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LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART STRATEGIC PLAN OCTOBER 2009 



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In 1997 the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) adopted a 
long-term strategic plan to stabilize the Museum and prepare it for 
a major expansion and endowment campaign. Since then we have 
made tremendous strides in advancing the vision presented in that 
plan. We continue to: 

IMPROVE THE QUALITY AND CARE OF OUR COLLECTION 

ATTRACT AND ENGAGE A BROADER AUDIENCE 

INCREASE OUR COMMITMENT TO EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND OVERALL SCHOLARSHIP 

PROMOTE THE CULTURAL VITALITY OF LOS ANGELES INTERNATIONALLY 

In 2004 the Board of Trustees adopted a comprehen- 
sive Master Plan that laid out a three-phased ap- 
proach to expanding and improving the LACMA 
campus. In 2008 the Museum opened Phase I of 
that plan, which included a 60,000 sq. ft. contempo- 
rary art building, underground parking, central en- 
trance and connecting concourse, a new central 
plant, and upgraded galleries throughout the east- 
ern portion of the campus. In addition to these cap- 
ital improvements, the Museum has made 
significant investments in building its collections 
with the placement of monumental sculptures by 
Chris Burden and Richard Serra, and the acquisi- 
tions of major collections of the art of the Pacific, 
Ancient Americas, Photography, and Costumes and 
Textiles. In 2010 Phase IIa, a 45,000 sq. ft. exhibition 
pavilion, is set to open and a monumental sculp- 
ture by Michael Heizer will be installed on the 
north side of the campus. 



This strategic plan carries forward the m 
of those great successes. Many initiatives represent 
refinements of our existing efforts, increasing their 
efficiency and alignment, and moving us to new lev- 
els of excellence. 



Importantly, while we've achieved these many mile- 
stones, the Museum has maintained a balanced 
budget, assuring potential donors to the campaign 
and national, traditional funders that the Museum 
is a good steward of its resources. Additionally, 
LACMA has managed a comprehensive public rela- 
tions plan that has raised the institution's prestige 
and international significance. 



In all of these areas, the strategy envisions a flexi- 
ble approach. We will pursue new initiatives delib- 
erately, particularly those requiring an investment 
of resources, using analysis and experimentation to 
ensure we achieve the desired outcomes. We will 
set goals and timelines that will ci 
intentions clearly to the various Board c( 
and staff that we work with to further develop 
these approaches. We will measure our success 
against performance metrics that align our vision 
for the institution with various methods and means 
of attaining our goals. 

The strategy resets priorities for the Museum's staff 
and volunteers, including the Trustees. In response, 
it is important to undertake a strategic review of 
governance and Board participation over the next 
few years as well as a review of staff structure and 
organizational hierarchies. Our goal will be to align 
expectations and efforts as we work together to 
transform LACMA. 






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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 



In a series of meetings conducted with Board members and staff from October 2008 
through May 2009 it was agreed that all of our efforts are focused on our commitment to: 



ACTIVATE LACMA'S COLLECTION, FACILITIES, AND PROGRAMS IN INNOVATIVE 
WAYS TO CREATE A CULTURAL TOWN SQUARE IN LOS ANGELES THAT EXPRESSES A 
TWENTY-FIRST-CENTURY WORLDVIEW OF EXCELLENCE IN ART AND PROVIDES A 
VARIED, ENJOYABLE, AND EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE FOR THE WIDEST 
POSSIBLE AUDIENCE. 



In late 2008 and early 2009 LACMA Trustee and executive leadership engaged in a series of 
discussions centered on LACMA's strategic potential. During those discussions the opinions 
of LACMA leadership coalesced around building the collections, building the facilities, and 
becoming the voice of authority in one or more high profile areas of art. There was agree- 
ment that focusing on the collection would catapult LACMA's reputation internationally 
and that increased visitorship and revenues would follow. 



In keeping with that unified view various committees of the Board of Trustees and Execu- 
tive Management staff will work together to position LACMA as a leader among its peers 
by developing specific goals, objectives, and tactics in the following areas that have 
emerged as institutional priorities over the past two years: 



1. IMPROVE THE QUALITY AND THE PRESENTATION OF LACMA'S COLLECTION 



Collecting preeminent examples of art from across cultures and history is cen- 
tral to LACMA's mission. Under the leadership of the Acquisitions Committee, 
LACMA's Director and curatorial staff have undertaken a thorough analysis of 
the collection, its standing by area in comparison to our peers, our priorities in 
building it, opportunities that exist in the short term, and several strategic 
areas where gift and acquisition goals should be set. In developing tactics to 
achieve this first goal, LACMA will need to develop networks that will increase 
gifts of art from inside and outside Southern California. Tactics for creative in- 
terpretation and presentation of the collection will also support LACMA's goal 
to distinguish itself from peer institutions, which in turn attracts audience. 



OBJECTIVE | Engage artists in interpreting, 

installing, and exhibiting collections 
and exhibitions, and in developing 
LACMA's galleries, related programs 
and facilities 



OBJECTIVE | Present an exhibition program that 
meets a variety of pre-established 



OBJECTIVE | Collect Masterpieces 

Develop a list of artworks owned by private collectors 
that should be sought out as donations or promised 
gifts. Work with curatorial staff to manage relation- 
ships with those collectors and secure the gifts. Con- 
tinue to work with individual and foundation donors 
to purchase rare "one-of-a-kind" artworks that add 
prestige, depth, or iconic images to LACMA's perma- 
nent collection. 



OBJECTIVE | Create "Best of "Collections 

Develop a war chest of funding ($5-$io million) that 
can be used to make opportunistic acquisitions in 
strategic collecting areas where small investments can 
yield a higher ranking in quality of collection among 
our collecting peers. Latin American Art, California De- 
sign, Korean Ceramics, and Costumes and Textiles are 
examples of collections where LACMA could lead the 



LACMA's exhibition program is balanced a< 






pie years. Programming 
ety of criteria including 
education, attracting vis 
tions, stimulating donati 
nities, and generating 



committed based on a vari- 
ntellectual contributions, 
, highlighting the collec- 
connecting with commu- 
le. Since no single 



exhibition can achieve all of these ends, this objectiv 
establishes the use of planning processes to ensure 
that the overall exhibition schedule achieves these 
varied goals. 



OBJECTIVE | Develop new strategic collecting ai 




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2. BUILD LACMA'S AUDIENCE 



OBJECTIVE | Expand ii 



ional recognition of 



LACMA as quality ai 

Identify LACMA as a trendsetter of past, current, and 
future activities, through a variety of means, including 
marketing and promotional programs, staff and 
trustee networking, and the establishment of an effi- 
cient onsite physical archive to document LACMA's 
rich history of regional and international exhibitions 
and programs. In addition, once implemented at 
LACMA West, LACMA's expanded research facilities, 
for Costume and Textiles, Photography and Works of 
Art on Paper, and the Rifkind Center for German Ex- 
pressionist Studies, will provide an added interface for 
both the scholarly community and the general public. 



OBJECTIVE | Engage, Educate, and 
Encourage Visitors 

The visitor experience lies at the heart of the Mu- 
seum's mission to connect people and art. When suc- 
cessful, visitors feel welcome, comfortable, engaged, 
informed, delighted, and eager to return. However, re- 
search indicates that we fall short of this goal because 
the physical plant is difficult to navigate and lacks ar- 
chitectural prestige. In response, this goal envisions a 
broad array of improvements, including large-scale 
outdoor art installations, interactive programs, and 
gallery installations and programming that increase 
engagement, accessibility and visual literacy. We will 
set goals for serving specific audiences (school chil- 
dren, Latino and Asian communities) and endeavor to 
make visitors feel more comfortable and communicate 
more effectively with them about what we offer. 
Through an audience-centered approach, LACMA will 
deepen visitors' connections with art, draw visitors 
into more of the Museum, increase attendance, and 
attract new audiences. 



OBJECTIVE | Set audience expansion and ri 

goals and specific plans for achieving 
those goals over the next five years 

Increasing and broadening the Museum's audiences 
are central to LACMA's mission and are important to 
the Museum's financial stability. These goals identify a 
number of opportunities to retain, increase, and 
broaden our audiences through strategic use of mar- 
keting communication, improved planning and coordi- 
nation, and use of targeted efforts to better serve 
specific audience segments (tourism, membership, 
donor groups). 

OBJECTIVE | Provide and promote worldwide 
access to LACMA's collection, 
scholarship, and programs 



Electronic communication is a defining aspect of 
today's museums. By exploiting the revolution in digi- 
tal technology, we can dramatically increase access to 
our collection. LACMA is particularly well positioned 
to pursue electronic opportunities, given its recent suc- 
cess with website improvements, Collections Online, 
handheld tours for PDAs and cell phones, and online 
publishing. This objective directs the Museum to use 
electronic means to better serve select audiences 
through layered information intended for visitors 
ranging from novices to scholars; to pursue new forms 
of publication; and to increase exposure to our 
collection. 



3. ENLARGE AND IMPROVE THE LACMA CAMPUS 



k. DEVELOP A STABLE AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL 
AND ORGANIZATIONAL PLAN 



OBJECTIVE | Complete the Master Plan 

The three-phase Master Plan for LACMA's Transforma- 
tion Campaign, approved by the Trustees, will advance 
our mission and benefit the Museum in a variety of 
ways including, but not limited to: larger and im- 
proved space for displaying art, state-of-the-art conser- 
vation and collection storage facilities, improved 
circulation and amenities for visitors, expanded learn- 
ing facilities, increased attendance, and increased fi- 
nancial support. This objective calls for the completion 
of Phase II, as well as the completion of planning for 
Phase III and the corresponding capital campaign re- 
quired to support the construction and operation of 
the expanded facility. 

OBJECTIVE | Develop a Strategic Real Estate Plan 

This objective analyzes and identifies real estate devel- 
opment opportunities for the Museum in the future 
and develops a funding plan that provides fie; 
taking advantage of those opportunities. It establishes 
policies to look at joint venture developments for 
Spaulding Avenue and Ogden Drive properties and sup- 
ports and maximizes opportunities associated with the 
subway extension down Wilshire Boulevard; it sets pa- 
rameters for making short-term improvements to 
those properties, and identifies other properties along 
Wilshire that should be acquired by the Museum. 



OBJECTIVE | Pursue fundraising required by 

LACMA's Transformation Campaign 
and develop plans to increase annual 
revenues by $5 million over the next 
five years 

This objective identifies opportunities to improve fi- 
nancial management; establishes policies to reduce the 
disruptive effects of the Museum's volatile revenue 
streams; completes the comprehensive campaign for 
Phase II that increases annual fundraising, encourages 
gifts that are unrestricted or provide budget relief; and 
crafts a plan for fundraising for Phase III of the cam- 
paign. At the behest of the Finance Committee, the 
Museum must craft a plan to increase revenue by $5 
million in five years from a variety of sources, includ- 
ing fundraising and membership, and must raise S150 
million to complete Phase II fundraising. 

OBJECTIVE I Reorganize the Museum's manage 
ment, support, programmatic, and 
curatorial functions to better plan and 
implement strategic objectives 



Create training and performance reward programs 
that encourage all staff to adopt an audience-aware, re- 
sults-oriented, experimental attitude and realign the 
organization to support these strategies. 



OBJECTIVE I Adopt initiatives that will help LACMA 
decrease its impact or 



The Museum is sensitive to the impact its operation 
has on the environment today and in the future. We 
have recently adopted initiatives that will help us use 
less energy and promote green thinking among our 
employees and visitors. Our aim is to recycle, reuse, 
and reduce in all of our activities and to design and op- 
erate our facilities with an aim toward reducing our 
impact or 



MEASURING SUCCESS 

1. COLLECTION GROWTH AND IMPROVEMENT PRIORITIES OVER THE NEXT FIVE YEARS 



Rank of LACMA collections compared with other major 
Efforts to build in strategic areas would bring LACMA's rank 



e competitive level nationally. 















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2. AUDIENCE FINANCIAL & ORGANIZATIONAL STABILITY GROWTH GOALS 



Tourism Share 



Overall Attendance 


Ticket Buyers 


2009 850,000 


2009 182,0 


2010 925,000 


2010 195,0 


1,200,000 


300,0 


2013 1,4 °°' 000 


2013 450, c 



I Admission Revenue 



Public Programs 
Attendance 



Shift in LA. Visitor Demographic 



I Children & Families 



Membership Revenue 



$8,075,0( 



County Funding 



School and Teacher 
Attendance 



Operating Budget 

2009 $57,311, 

2010 $53,518 

2011 $58,500 

2012 $59,0 

2013 $59,0 



Stretch Goal W^M 

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PURPOSE OF THE STRATEGIC PLAN 

This plan was created in order to move LACMA for- 
ward with renewed vision over the next seven years by 
establishing the Museum's priorities, setting clear 
goals, and delineating a plan of action for achieving 
these goals. 

Although the plan addresses all major areas of activity 
for the Museum, it is by no means comprehensive. Ac- 
tivities that will be unaffected by the strategy, but that 
e, are not included in the plan. 



HOW THIS PLAN WAS CREATED 

Development of this strategic plan began in April 2006 
with the appointment of Michael Govan as the Museum's 
Wallis Annenberg Director and the transformation of 
Board of Trustee leadership that followed. 

In June 2006, Michael and Melody Kanschat, the Mu- 
seum's President, laid out a three-phase Master Plan 
for physical expansion to the Board of Trustees. The 
plan was endorsed, and development of a more com- 
prehensive Phase II budget and schedule ensued, 
which was presented and accepted by the Board at 
subsequent meetings. 



In the spring of 2008, the Museum commissioned Hall 
and Partners to undertake an audience awareness 
study (post-BCAM opening) and compare those find- 
ings to a benchmark study that was conducted in 2005. 
In the summer of 2008, McKinsey & Company under- 
took a management study of the Museum's operations. 
The findings of both of these studies, as well as a col- 
lection analysis and ranking, were presented to the 
Board of Trustees in October 2008 (see appendix). In 
December 2008 and March 2009, Michael and Melody 
presented the Board and staff with key goals gathered 
from previous discussions, the principals of LACMA' s 
Transformation, and five-year growth goals by audi- 
ence segment (see appendix). 



Throughout this process extensive input was provided 
by the Trustees through Executive Committee, Finance 
Committee, and Acquisitions Committee meetings and 
general Board meetings. Executive-level Museum staff 
has also been integral in the development of this plan. 
In addition to ongoing operations and planning meet- 
ings more than twenty members of the management 
team participated in meetings conducted with McKin- 
sey representatives. 

At the end of this process, the Board of Trustees Chair- 
man called for the formation of an ad-hoc Strategic 
Planning Committee charged with monitoring 
LACMA's progress in reaching its strategic goals, objec- 
tives, and initiatives, and to work with staff to imple- 
ment tactical plans to achieve those goals. 



In May 2007, Michael presented the Executive Commit- 
tee of the Board with a strategic planning framework 
that laid out long-term thinking and specific short- 
term goals. Those goals were further refined and 
adopted by the Executive Committee later that month 
and were once again refined and adopted in March of 
2008 (see appendix). The goals were used as the basis 
for evaluating the performance of both Michael 
and Melody. 



STRUCTURE OF THE PLAN 



The strategic plan is organized around four key goals, 
each of which are supported by a set of initiatives and 
objectives. Each initiative, in turn, is supported by de- 
tailed action plans developed by staff. Each action plan 
includes steps required to achieve the initiative, tim- 
ing, and responsibility. Many of these action steps are 
already underway, some are still in planning, and each 
is being integrated into staff perfo 



This document contains an explanation of the strategic 
goals and initiatives, including a summary of the action 
steps supporting them. Action step documents will be 
kept by staff assigned with responsibility for carrying 
out the plan. At the October Board meeting, Michael 
and Melody will report on where the Museum stands 
against the various timelines and initiatives undertaken 
as a part of this plan. 




STRATEGIC PLAN 

STRATEGIC GOALS 

The four strategic goals are listed below. Goals under Collections and Audience 
represent the heart of how we fulfill our mission, while those under Facilities 
and Financial/Organizational provide support critical to achieving our 
mission objectives. 

Goals and Key Objectives 





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1. Continue to improve the quality and presentation 
of the collection 

2. Provide and promote web access to the collection 
and programs 

3. Schedule an exhibition program that meets a 
variety of objectives 












4. Engage, educate, and encourage visitors 

5. Retain and expand audiences by understanding 
their needs 

6. Set specific growth goals in target areas 








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7. Enlarge and improve the physical plant 

8. Develop a strategic real estate plan 




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9. Pursue fundraising required to complete Phase II 

fiscal stability 

10. Adopt an audience-aware, results-oriented, 
experimental attitude, and realign the organization 
and talent pool to support these strategies 

11. Implement various green initiatives to reduce the 
Museum's impact on the environment 



Each of these goals and key objectives and their 
supporting initiatives are discussed in detail in thi 
remainder of this document. 



GOAL 1: IMPROVE THE QUALITY AND THE PRESENTATION OF THE COLLECTION 

Background and Rationale 

Collecting preeminent examples of art from across cultures and history is cen- 
tral to LACMA's mission. The Museum emphasizes quality over quantity in mak- 
ing acquisitions and in setting priorities when adding artworks to the collection 
that help increase LACMA's ranking in a particular area. Under the direction of 
the Acquisitions Committee, key collecting areas have been identified and plans 
are underway either to raise funds to purchase works in those areas or to ac- 
quire works through gifts and strengthened donor relations. The Museum must 
remain flexible and able to act quickly as opportunities arise to dramatically 
change the character and quality of the collection. 



LACMA must also organize and display its collections and exhibitions from a 
twenty-first-century point of view that features comparison and contrast. Inno- 
vative installation strategies are key to making LACMA's collection more acces- 
sible and are covered in each of the goals laid out in this plan. LACMA is 
committed to working with artists, architects, and other creative professionals 
to collaborate and experiment in reaching our varied audiences. 



Exhibitions are a powerful tool for bringing art and people together, and are 
central to our mission to expose our audiences to the finest examples of art 
across all cultures and from all historic periods. LACMA must present a multi- 
year exhibition program that demonstrates that breadth and depth through a 
contemporary and forward-thinking lens. 



Strategic Initiatives 



tion for donors to give collections and indi- 
vidual works of art 

The Acquisitions Committee and the Development De- 
partment will develop detailed plans for cultivating, 
stewarding, and acknowledging donors of gifts of art 
and funds for art acquisitions. Specific steps will in- 
clude training for curatorial staff, celebrating recent 
acquisitions in more varied and creative ways, and fur- 
ther development of collecting groups within the Mu- 
seum Councils. 




1.2 | Focus acquisitions and collection growth in 
key areas developed by analysis of market 
opportunity, lacunae in LACMA's existing 
collection, and building on existing strength 

Under the direction of the Acquisitions Committee, a 
comprehensive assessment of the Museum's acquisi- 
tion priorities by department was undertaken. The as- 
sessment included identifying lacunae in our existing 
collection, gathering information about trends in col- 
lecting internationally, compiling lists of donors and 
their collections not yet committed to other institu- 
tions, and in identifying purchase opportunities and 
values that are available in today's art marketplace. 






Manage human and financial r« 
strategically to align with institutional and 
departmental collecting strategies 




This initiative will result in a fundamental refocusing 
of Curatorial Division activities to address and balance 
six institutional objectives: 

• Cultivate collectors 

• Emphasize quality over quantity 

• Place priority on acquiring art where the market 

is favorable 

• Use strategic deaccessioning to strengthen the 

• Break down departmental structure and encourage 

cross-department collaboration 
Support innovative project-driven programs and 
invite increased curatorial input and direction 
in public programs, special events, and 
membership ai 



1.4 | Improve the display, care, and scholarship 
surrounding the collection 

The management and care of the collection are central 
to the Museum's mission, as is research to better un- 
derstand the collection and sharing that research with 
the wider public. In recent years, the Museum has 
made substantial progress in increasing the effective- 
ness and efficiency of conservation and collections 
management. The strategy builds upon this success, 

ng further opportunities to streamline efforts, 
improve storage areas and collection access, and en- 
sure that priorities in conservation and research are 
aligned with the institution's broader goals. These ef- 
forts will enable steady progress in conservation and 
research, even with an increase in demand. 



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1.5 | Ensure that curatorial and conservation 
installation priorities reflect the goals of 
the Museum 

Phases I and II of the Transformation Campaign pro- 
vide the opportunity for curatorial and conservation 
staff to work with artists and architects to install col- 
lections and exhibitions in fresh ways that encourage 
new audiences and provide accessibility to all visitors. 
Use of natural light, experimentation with design and 
interpretive materials, adjacencies to classroom activi- 
ties, and minimal changes to gallery designs between 
exhibitions are among the efforts underway. This ini- 
tiative will identify and prioritize these efforts. 



1.7 | Ensure that the exhibition schedule reflects a 
list of multi-year objectives 

Proposed exhibitions should be evaluated based on the 
intellectual contribution being made to the field; edu- 
cation opportunities; the ability to connect with visi- 
tors; the incorporation of LACMA's permanent 
collection; the possibility of stimulating future dona- 
tions; and ability to generate revenue. Since no one ex- 
hibition can achieve all of these ends, this initiative 
establishes a systematic method for evaluatin 
ual exhibition proposals and the overall exhibition 
schedule to ensure these objectives are met. 



Establish loan and installation design 
policies and procedures that utilize 
>t effectively 



Loaning artwork involves a significant investment by 
the Museum, including the time of conservation and 
curatorial staff. This initiative will ensure that loans 
provide strategic value to the Museum and are used to 
further its reputation as a leader among its peers. 

The museum should display works of art to achieve 
aesthetically appropriate presentation, challenge field- 
wide restrictions regarding light, humidity, and tem- 
perature requirements, while addressing security and 
long-term preservation risks. 



In line with our Audience Goal, i 
enable the Museum to plan appropriately for new dis- 
plays resulting from Phases I and II of the Transforma- 
tion Campaign. It calls for research into new security 
formats, staff education, and new paradigms for dis- 
playing works. 



1.8 | Balance the schedule across each fiscal year 
to ensure intellectual and educational 
impact, income, expense, and attendance 

Analysis conducted during the strategy review con- 
firmed that exhibitions with high attendance generate 
substantial financial contributions, making it fiscally 
possible to present other types of important exhibi- 
tions which may have lower projected attendance. Re- 
search and analysis also led to the development of 
tools to more accurately predict exhibition attendance, 
revenue, and cost. The Exhibition Strategy team will 
make use of such tools to help plan an exhibition 
schedule that has intellectual and educational impact 
while meeting financial objectives. Ticketing, market- 
ing, sponsorship, and messaging plans will be in- 
formed by the decisions made by the Exhibition 
Strategy team. 



Experiment with innovative exhibition 
concepts throughout the Museum buildings 
and grounds 



In an effort to stimulate innovation, 
fines steps intended to generate an increase in curatorial 
proposals, as well as nontraditional sources including 
artists, external colleagues, educators, and potential 



Formally 



w and analyze exhibition 



The exhibition staff will evaluate the cost and benefit 
of touring exhibitions based on the collection. Poten- 
tial benefits include increased public access to the col- 
lection, institutional visibility, cultivation of collectors, 
and financial contributions. However, these benefits 
must be weighed against direct and indirect costs, in- 
cluding staff hours. 



itive calls for the Exhibition Strategy team to 
determine how well exhibitions meet their objectives. 
The evaluation process will begin shortly after exhibi- 
tions open in order to allow "mid-course" corrections. 
The findings will be used to improve the selection and 
effectiveness of future exhibitions 




GOAL 2: BUILD AUDIENCE 



Background and Rationale 



The visitor experience lies at the heart of the Museum's mission to connect 
people and art. When successful, visitors feel welcome, comfortable, engaged, 
informed, delighted, and eager to return. LACMA can enhance visitor apprecia- 
tion, encourage visitors to explore more of the collection, increase attendance, 
and engage new audiences. In the crowded "entertainment" landscape of Los 
Angeles, the Museum competes for visitors' amongst a diverse array of choices: 
from the well-financed marketing of films and popular culture, to the outdoor 
activities available year-round in Southern California, to major theme parks 
and beaches. Through expanded outreach to diverse audiences, from school- 
children to the taste-making influencers of the entertainment industry, LACMA 
seeks to increase visitorship to rival and ultimately surpass that of the Getty, 
whose iconic architecture and location continue to make it the first choice 
among museum-going tourists. Additionally, by exploiting the revolution in 
digital technology, LACMA will dramatically increase access to its collection. 
The internet, in particular, can enhance the visitor experience by extending 
visits beyond the Museum walls, attract more visitors to our Museum, support 
the scholarly community, and reach worldwide audiences. 



Strategic Initiatives 



Install, interpret, and program galleries 
to create new experiences, deepen engage 
ment, heighten aesthetic appreciation, and 
;e visual literacy 



The Museum will use the experience of other institu- 
tions as well as our own visitor research and evalua- 
tion to achieve the ends identified in this initiative. A 
range of potential changes to both docent-led and self- 
directed learning will be explored, including new 
training and methodologies rolled out among the vol- 
unteer docents, PDA and cell phone tours, electronic 
signage, paper-based guides, drop-in activities or classes 
adjacent to gallery spaces, and computer kiosks. Based 
on well-tested theories about how people learn, experi- 
ential and interactive approaches will figure promi- 
nently in these efforts. 



2.2 | Enhance LACMA's web presence to expand 
access to the collection and market our 
programs to the public 

LACMA has plans in place to redesign its website to 
allow easier user-directed access to information. Dy- 
namic search, easy access to a streamlined program, 

■d backend support of shopping cart . 
and access to scholarly research and online courses/ 
curricula are among the goals of the redesigned site. 
Use of blogs, social media sites, search engine opti- 
mization, and email/text/cell phone applications to 
deliver LACMA's message is also a priority among 
departments such as Communications, Development, 
Education, and Public Programs. 













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2.3 | Expand our definition of publications to 

include not only traditional printed books 
but all forms of electronic publication, in 
order to maximize access and efficiency 



The Museum seeks to become the first encyclopedic 
museum to adopt online publishing as the norm, 
thereby reducing printing costs and overhead associ- 
ated with publishing scholarly research. A traditional 
printed book program or print-on-demand program 
will be developed for each special exhibition that is 
supported with solid trade potential. Continue to ac- 
cess the permanent collection in an expanded online 
format with highly searchable, citable, and appropri- 
ately tiered levels of information for both a scholarly 
and more general audiences and to establish both an 
onsite archive and a virtual archive to document 
LACMA's rich history of regional a 
hibitions and p 



2.4 | Encourage the broad use of LACMA images 

for educational purposes and pursue market- 
supported licensing opportunities more 
vigorously 

This initiative aims to increase the number of images 
licensed by the Museum through pooled and commer- 
cial database management entities. It encourages de- 
veloping products and souvenirs that can be supported 
in the trade, and it sets a goal to change the way insti- 
tutions deal with each other in granting license to re- 
produce images. 



2.5 | Coordinate public programs and member 

ship events across the Museum so that every 
event is developed collaboratively and 
aligned to serve the Museum's efforts to 
build audiences, engage diverse audiences 
with works of art, and create unique and 
high-quality experiences 



d timing of activities will be coordi- 
nated to ensure a coherent and diverse schedule that i 
artist-centered and supported with clear revenue- or 
audience-building goals. Steps toward this coordina- 
tion have been taken with the formation of a public 
programs team that includes curatorial, education, 
marketing, and membership staff. Invitee lists will be 
strategically selected to mix audiences and further 
LACMA's reputation for high-quality programming. 
Curatorial staff will be challenged to conceive of pro- 
gramming and collaborate in producing 
of their performance objectives. 






This initiative will build upon existing efforts to im- 
prove customer service museum-wide. This involves 
setting clear standards for service while providing 
front-line staff and volunteers with training and sup- 
port. Several mechanisms will ensure continual im- 
provement, including evaluating staff and volunteer 
service, requiring staff and volunteers to participate in 
visitor observations, deploying secret shoppers, and 
evaluating the visitor experience over time. 




i 



2.7 | Ensure physical facilities ai 
user-friendly 



welcoming and 



3r surveys and historical data clarify the 
challenges visitors face in finding their way around the 
Museum. At best, these navigational challenges cause 
visitors to restrict their visits to familiar areas. At worst, 
visitors lose significant time and become frustrated. In 
response, this initiative aims to improve entrances, in- 
formation centers, way-finding, and Museum ameni- 
ties in an effort to ensure visitors feel comfortable 
and oriented. 




While placing the highest priority on visitor experi- 
ences inside the Museum, the strategic plan also calls 
for investigating opportunities to enhance pre- and 
post-visit experiences, particularly through use of 
the web. 



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2.9 | Offer public programming that creates new 2.10 | Invest in audience research to understand 
experiences, deepens engagement, increases and improve our audience-development 
understanding, and is aligned with audience- efforts 
development strategies 

Research into our current and potential audiences has 
Programs such as films, concerts, lectures, art classes, increased over recent years. While this research has 
Friday Night Jazz, Latin Jazz Saturdays, and Family Day been critical in sharpening our efforts, ongoing re- 
programs play critical roles in deepening the connec- search is required to further build upon and broaden 
tion core audiences have with the Museum, bringing our audiences and improve their experience, 
in new audiences, and fulfilling our commitment to 
our community. The strategy calls for continued efforts 
in these areas, but with a clearer sense of how these 
programs support institutional priorities. It also calls 
for the development of a business plan to expand pro- 
grams and set specific audience target goals in each 



I I Retain and build our core audiences, 

increase penetration in Los Angeles region, 
develop and grow tourist visitation 



LACMA must continue to add opportunities to increase 
visitation, while improving the experience of current 
core audiences, particularly with regard to members 
and local repeat visitors, as these groups account for 
85% of LACMA's attendance. Understanding these groups 
is also critical to ensure that efforts made to engage 
new audiences do not detract from the experience of 

Substantial member research is already underway, re- 
1 a variety of steps designed to increase mem- 
ber attendance and retention, such as expanding 
e-mail connectivity. Other steps include research into 
converting visitors to members, targeted mail 
rected at Los Angeles tourists, and testing of low-cost 
street marketing techniques across the Southland. 



2.13 I Coordinate strategies for audience develop- 
ment across the whole organization 

Audience development involves a wide range of activi- 
ties that combine to attract and serve our public audi- 
ences. These activities include marketing communication, 
corporate sponsorship, public relations, pricing, mar- 
ket research, and the design and delivery of our offer- 
ings. Because many different departments play a role 
in audience development, this initiative calls for the use 
of periodic audience development plans to set priori- 
ties and align efforts. These plans will address all offer- 
ings, including permanent gallery installations, 

is, and programs. Plans will specify how each 
offering will be marketed and priced, what audiences 
will be targeted, what investments will be required, and 
what results are expected. Audience-development plans 
will include steps to advance the diversity ir 



I Engage in strategic advertising and 



LACMA currently offers a variety of programming that 
attracts nontraditional Museum visitors. These offer- 
ings include festival-like events, special programs and 
lectures, film festivals, and exhibitions. This initiative 
calls on the Museum to continue attracting wide audi- 
ences while at the same time building deeper relation- 
ships with Latino, Korean, and African American 
audiences. 



Research and analysis have revealed opportunities to 
increase awareness of the Museum's offerings. This ini- 
tiative establishes strategic guidelines for marketing 
communications that will broaden our reach while im- 
proving our cost effectiveness. As examples, these 
guidelines call for high levels of advertising for exhibi- 
tions with broad appeal, while recommending effec- 
tive but relatively low-cost communication vehicles 
(such as e-mail) to promote offerings that appeal to 
narrower audiences. This initiative also calls for the de- 
velopment of a brand positioning to generate public 
interest and excitement around the improved visitor 
experience and the Master Site Plan. 



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GOAL 3: ENLARGE AND IMPROVE THE PHYSICAL PLANT 



Background and Rationale 



The Master Site Plan will advance 01 
variety of ways, including: 



n and benefit the Museum h 



• Increased gallery space with logically organized 

collections spread across the LACMA campus 

• Improved and expanded collection storage facilities 

• Clear circulation for visitors 

• Expanded learning facilities 

• Monumental sculpture | iconic art features that brand LACMA 

• Enhanced green space 

• Increased attendance 

• Increased financial support and gifts of art 

Strategic Initiatives 



3.1 | Complete Phase II of the Transformation 
Campaign 



Plans are in place to complete construction of Phase II 
by 2011 and begin programming all facilities on the 
east and west side of the campus. 



3.2 | Complete planning for Phase III of the 
Transformation Campaign 

The Museum will prepare for subsequent phases of the 
Master Site Plan over the next few years. This will en- 
tail finalizing design work and approvals for replacing 
facilities on the east side of the campus, integrating a 
subway stop into the LACMA West program, complet- 
ing financial projections and planning, and developing 
a timeline and campaign plan. 



3.3 | Develop a Strategic Real Estate Plan 

The Museum will evaluate properties in the immediate 
area along Wilshire Boulevard and Sixth Street that 
could be assembled, acquired and held for future 
LACMA development. Additionally, the MTA's needs 
for Subway to the Sea construction and lay-down areas 
will be assessed and properties may be assembled to 
take advantage of that need. The Museum will also es- 
tablish a plan with benchmarks for the development 
of Spaulding Avenue and 6006 Wilshire that contem- 
plates co-developer relationships, mixed-use opportu- 
nities, like uses, and museum mergers, and sets 
benchmark pricing and policies that could lead future 
Trustees in managing LACMA's real estate holdings. 



GOAL k: DEVELOP A STABLE AND SUSTAINABLE FINANCIAL AND 
ORGANIZATIONAL PLAN 

Background and Rationale 

Ongoing fundraising will be critical to sustain and improve the Museum's pro- 
grams and facilities, including those envisioned by the Transformation Cam- 
paign. Managing the heavy debt load associated with Phase I and Phase II 
requires that fundraising be completed on a strict timeline to ensure debt 
covenants are met and that sufficient earnings from investments exist to pay 
annual debt service. 

LACMA receives more than 33% of its annual operating budget from the County 
of Los Angeles. While recent efforts to increase the contract amount with the 
county have been successful, it is clear LACMA must develop stronger audience- 
driven revenue streams, increase the size of its endowment, and develop more 
multi-year sponsorship opportunities. It is important that the Museum main- 
tain its high standards and solid reputation for fiscal responsibility. 

The Museum's volatile revenue streams serve to complicate its financial man- 
agement. Short-term volatility is driven primarily by the dramatic impact of ex- 
hibitions on attendance-related revenue. Revenues are also affected by long-term 
economic cycles. While some smoothing of revenues may be achieved through 
careful exhibition planning and by ensuring that the Museum is less exhibi- 
tion-dependent over time, the Museum's revenue will continue to fluctuate. 

In 2009 goals were set by the LACMA Finance Committee to establish a five-year 
plan that ensures a $5 million cushion between expenses and revenues. A multi- 
disciplined staff team will be working on the plan to develop yearly goals and 
look at program reductions and revenue enhancements. 

This goal also calls for several organizational changes, first to the organiza- 
tion's structure, staffing, and processes. Goals must be aligned across the insti- 
tution, down to the individual level. Culturally, the organization must become 
less cautious and more innovative. Early retirement, staff-wide reorganization, 
growth, and downsizing in some areas will take shape through targeted plan- 
ning across the next several years. 



Strategic Initiatives 



Successfully complete the comprehen 
campaign for Phase II 



Plan for future fundraising beyond the 
campaign for Phase II 



Efforts are underway to complete the "quiet phase" of 
the Transformation Campaign during 2010 and the 
public phase by 2011. In addition, plans are in place to 
build and strengthen annual fundraising by enhancing 
individual and institutional connections to the Museum. 



The Museum will determine capital and endowment 
needs beyond Phase II, undertake a feasibility study to 
assess donor capacity and Board support, and develop 
a campaign plan for subsequent phases of construction 
and associated endowment requirements. 



4.2 I Develop plans to sustain and increase annual 
fundraising programs and encourage gifts 
that are either unrestricted or provide 
budget relief with future financial flexibility 

The Museum will continue to analyze costs and bene- 
fits of its volunteer and development programs and 
continue to shift resources toward major gifts pro- 
grams. (Annual fundraising includes the Director's and 
President's Circles, corporate sponsorships, and gen- 
eral membership.) 



Establish policies that address our volatile 



This initiative recommends the study of a series of 
policies that would reduce the disruptive effects of 
short-term revenue fluctuations. This initiative also 
recommends measures for managing expenses in an- 
ticipation of revenue fluctuations. 



Continue efforts to analyze financial 
contributions by activity area, and use thi: 
information to inform annual planning 



The Museum will develop programs to encourage 
executive cohesion among the Board of Trustees and 
Executive Staff to facilitate and support Trustee 
fundraising efforts in the community. Efficient briefing 
materials and support will be provided to Trustees to 
build confidence in completing Transformation Phase 
II and annual fundraising. 



Understanding which activities generate a net finan- 
cial contribution, and which require a subsidy, will 
allow the Museum to make informed decisions about 
how best to fulfill its mission while maintaining finan- 
cial stability. 



Explore partnerships with outside restaurant, 
hotel, and residence developers and retail 
organizations that contribute to the visitor 
experience, build upon LACMA's brand, and 
maximize the ongoing financial contribution 
of the enterprises to LACMA's operating 



Business partners will be sought and business plans 
will be developed for the Museum shops and restau- 
rants to maximize their direct financial contribution 
while also considering their impact on the visitor 
experience and attendance. 



| Institute planning and evaluation procedures 
that link institutional goals to those of divi- 
s, departments, and individuals 



This critical initiative will be realized through an an- 
nual planning process that begins with institutional 
goal-setting affecting divisions, departments, staff, and 
volunteers. Progress will be measured through em- 
ployee evaluations and a performance matrix that will 
reflect employees' participation in and leadership of 
cross-departmental projects. Providing clear objectives 
and support for staff efforts are fundamental to en- 
courage energy and creativity. 



4.8 | Adopt green initiatives 

The Museum is sensitive to the impact its operation 
has on the environment today and in the future. We 
have recently adopted initiatives that will help us use 
less energy and promote green thinking among our 
employees and visitors. Our aim is to recycle, reuse, 
and reduce in all of ot 



Determine organizational changes required 
to address the Strategic Plan and Master 
Site Plan 



These changes may relate to structure, assignment of 
responsibilities, cross-functional teams, processes, 
and/or training. It is also important that management 
determine a level and variety of staffing that is sensi- 
tive to priorities and changing conditions. 



4.11 | Align volunteer activity with the Museum's 
mission and strategic objectives 

Volunteer programs provide tremendous value to 
LACMA and offer a variety of rewarding experiences. 

a rive calls for a comprehensive audit of volun- 
teer programs and the strengthening of the representa- 
tive Docent, Museum Service, and Art Museum Councils 



the Museum's evolving needs. 




4.12 | Encourage and reward employee Innovation 

This initiative supports a cultural shift toward greater 
innovation and experimentation in pursuit of our 
strategic goals. It calls for communicating these expec- 
tations to managers and their staff, and adding criteria 
for participation in cross-disciplinary or intra-depart- 
mental initiatives, building each into the annual re- 
view process while rewarding examples of successful 
innovation and disseminating these examples through- 
out the organization. 



4.13 | Keep staff and volunteers informed 



Improving communication among staff and volunteers 
increases their effectiveness. This initiative identifies 
steps to meet this challenge, including redesigned all- 
staff meetings, informal forums, use of the web and e- 
mail, and holding department heads and managers 
more accountable for sharing information with staff. 





MISSION STATEMENT ADOPTED BY 
THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 1997 
TO SERVE THE PUBLIC THROUGH THE 
COLLECTION, CONSERVATION, EXHIBI- 
TION, AND INTERPRETATION OF SIG- 
NIFICANT WORKS OF ART FROM A 
BROAD RANGE OF CULTURES AND 
HISTORICAL PERIODS, AND THROUGH 
THE TRANSLATION OF THESE 
COLLECTIONS INTO MEANINGFUL 
EDUCATIONAL, AESTHETIC, INTELLEC- 
TUAL, AND CULTURAL EXPERIENCES 
FOR THE WIDEST ARRAY OF AUDIENCES. 



STATEMENT OF PURPOSE ADOPTED BY 
BOARD OF TRUSTEE 2009 THE BOARD 
OF TRUSTEES OF THE LOS ANGELES 
COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART IS COMMIT- 
TED TO ACTIVATING LACMA'S COLLEC- 
TION, FACILITIES, AND PROGRAMS IN 
INNOVATIVE WAYS THAT WILL SET THE 
INSTITUTION APART FROM ITS PEERS. 
WE STRIVE TO CREATE A CULTURAL 
TOWN SQUARE IN LOS ANGELES THAT 
EXPRESSES A TWENTY-FIRST-CEN- 
TURY WORLDVIEW OF CULTURAL AND 
ARTISTIC ACHIEVEMENT AND PRO- 
VIDES A VARIED, ENJOYABLE, AND 
EDUCATIONAL ART EXPERIENCE FOR 
THE WIDEST POSSIBLE AUDIENCE. 



SUMMARY OF FINDINGS 



OVERALL AWARENESS OF LACMA IS STABLE 
ACROSS LA COUNTY, WITH THREE IN FOUR 
RECOGNIZING THE DESTINATION BY NAME. 

Within this, LACMA has become more top- 
of-mind, with significantly more LA resi- 
dents able to recall it when asked to name 
which museums come to mind. 



THUS FAR, BCAM'S IMPACT ON OVERALL LACMA 
AWARENESS HAS BEEN LIMITED, AS ONLY 11% 
OF LA COUNTY RESIDENTS HAVE HEARD OF IT. 

The majority of those who've heard of 
BCAM also know of LACMA, suggesting 
BCAM has primarily reached LACMA's pre- 
existing audience. 

However, not all BCAM-aware residents 
regularly visit LACMA, indicating that news 
of BCAM has extended outside the scope of 
those who may have simply noticed it 
while visiting LACMA. 

Those aware of BCAM tend to skew 
younger and lower income, potentially a re- 
sult of the appeal of contemporary exhibits 
to this demographic. 



LACMA VISITATION HAS SOFTENED SINCE 2005, 
THIS CHANGE DRIVEN BY LESS FREQUENT 
VISITATION AMONG NON-CAUCASIANS. 

Yearly visitation among Hispanics is stable, 
potentially as relevant cultural exhibits 
have sustained their interest over the past 
year (e.g. Dali, the Arts in Latin America). 

Lack of popular exhibition (Tut, Van 
Gogh, Impressionism) cited as possible rea- 
son for decline. 

DESPITE A DECLINE IN VISITATION SINCE 2005, 
LACMA CITED AS MOST ATTENDED OVER PEER 
INSTITUTIONS (GETTY, MOCA, HAMMER, NORTON 
SIMON, HUNTINGTON). 

HOWEVER, THE GETTY'S PROGRESSION OVER 
THE PAST FEW YEARS MAKES IT A MORE 
FORMIDABLE COMPETITOR. 

The Getty experienced significant growth in 
Awareness, and is now at parity with 
LACMA. It appears to have an added advan- 
tage in that it is top-of-mind not only as a 
museum, but also as a cultural and educa- 
tional center. 

The Getty's growth in visitations stems 
mostly from Infrequent and Non LACMA 
Visitors, suggesting it may have stronger 
appeal among the atypical museum-goer. 

LA RESIDENTS LACK CLARITY ON LACMA'S 
LOCATION. OF THOSE WHO HAVE HEARD OF IT, 
ONLY A THIRD CAN CORRECTLY ARTICULATE 
WHERE IT IS. 



GREATER OPPORTUNITY EXISTS TO UTILIZE 
CONTEMPORARY ART PROGRAMS TO DRIVE 
LACMA AWARENESS, PARTICULARLY BY 
TOUTING EXHIBITS THAT MAY HAVE SPECIFIC 
APPEAL TO UNIQUE DEMOGRAPHIC GROUPS. 



LACMA MUST COMMUNICATE ITS LOCATION 
CLEARLY IN MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS, 
AS TWO THIRDS OF LA COUNTY RESIDENTS 
CAN'T CORRECTLY IDENTIFY ITS LOCATION. 



GIVEN STABILITY IN AWARENESS HAS NOT 
TRANSLATED INTO GREATER VISITATION, LACMA 
MUST FIND WAYS TO GENERATE GREATER 
INTEREST AMONG CURRENT AND POTENTIAL 
VISITORS. 



For some infrequent visitors, distance may 
be somewhat of a greater barrier to visita- 
tion, suggesting that LACMA's proposition 
must be that much stronger to coerce these 
visitors to make the trip. 




LACMA FACES STRONGER COMPETITION FROM 
THE GETTY, GIVEN SIGNIFICANT GAINS FOR THE 
GETTY AIDED AND UNAIDED AWARENESS OVER 
THE PAST THREE YEARS. 

LACMA must provide a unique and com- 
pelling point of differentiation from the 
Getty, potentially via dual strategies: first 
persuading regular museum-goers that it 
offers something better or different from 
the Getty; second by convincing Non-fre- 
quent museum goers to consider LACMA as 
a leisure destination (above the movies, the 
beach, etc.), and also as a museum that is 
more relevant or worth visiting over others. 



LACMA VISITATION 



IN TARGET OUT OF TARGET 

ZIP CODES ZIP CODES 



18% 17 ./ o 18% 



AFRICAN 
AMERICAN 



ASIAN- HISPANIC 

AMERICAN/OTHER 



REASONS FOR NOT VISITING LACMA 



REGULAR VISITORS INFREQUENT VISITORS NON-VISITORS 




I AM NOT AWARE OF THE CURRENT EXHIBITS 



NOT EASY TO PARK AND ENTER 



IT'S INCONVENIENTLY LOCATED 



ITS TOO DIFFICULT TO VISIT WITH CHILDREN 



■S TOO EXPENSIVE 



THE EXHIBITIONS AT LACMA ARE NOT THAT GREAT 



OT THAT INTERESTED IN MUSEUMS IN GENERAL 



THE PERMANENT COLLECTION AT LACMA 



I DONT FEEL WELCOME AT LACMA 



m 



OTHER ACTIVITIES SURVEYED CLAIM THEY CHOOSE INSTEAD OF VISITING LACMA 



TO A PARK OR BEACH 

TO SEE LIVE MUSIC 

TO THE MOVIES 

TO A THEME PARK 



I INFREQUENT 



DEMOGRAPHICS 









ULI1UCK 

MALE 


37% 


36% 


40% 








FEMALE 


63% 


64% 


60% 






AGE 






18-25 


17% 


13% 


17% 






26-30 


8% 


7% 


12% 






31-35 


9% 


^^m 










36-40 


7% 


12% 


11% 








41-50 


21% 


23% 


17% 








51-60 


17% 


15% 


10% 








OVER 60 


21% 


21% 


19% 






ETHNICITY 






WHITE/CAUCASIAN/EUROPEAN AMERICAN 


41% 


49% 


33% 


■ 




AFRICAN-AMERICAN/AFRICAN DESCENT/BLACK 


11% 


10% 


11% 






HISPANIC/CHICANO/LATINO 


36% 


31% 


46% 






ASIAN/PACIFIC ISLANDER/ASIAN AMERICAN 


5% 


5% 


5% 






AMERICAN INDIAN/NATIVE AMERICAN 


2% 


2% 


1% 








OTHER 


4% 


2% 


3% 







DEMOGRAPHICS 
















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HOUSEHOLD INCOME 






LESS THAN $30,000 


14% 


15% 


32% 


S30,000-S34,000 


6% 


6% 


7% 


$35,000-$44,000 


5% 


5% 


7% 




$45,000-354,000 


7% 


4% 


7% 






$55,000-$64,000 


6% 


5% 


6% 




$65,000-$74,000 


6% 


7% 


5% 




$75,000-399,000 


14% 


13% 


6% 




SI 00,000-3149,000 


14% 


14% 


7% 


3150,000-3200,000 


6% 


9% 


3% 


OVER $200,000 


6% 


6% 


3% 


■ 


REFUSED/DON'T KNOW 


17% 


16% 


15% 


EMPLOYMENT 






EMPLOYED FULL-TIME 


44% 


44% 


39% 


EMPLOYED PART-TIME 


10% 


7% 


9% 


SELF-EMPLOYED, WORK FROM HOME 


6% 


8% 


4% 


SELF-EMPLOYED, WORK AWAY FROM HOME 


3% 


3% 


4% 




HOMEMAKER 


9% 


12% 


15% 


UNEMPLOYED 


20% 


20% 


21% 


STUDENT 


8% 


6% 


6% 


REFUSED 


1% 


2% 


MARITAL STATUS 






SINGLE (NOT LIVING WITH A PARTNER) 


32% 


27% 


29% 


MARRIED/LIVING WITH A PARTNER 


53% 


59% 


54% 


WIDOWED/DIVORCED/SEPARATED 


15% 


14% 


16% 




REFUSED 


1% 


1% 


1% 



















HOUSEHOLD SIZE 


1 


17% 


12% 


14% 




^^■1 


27% 


26% 


21% 




3 


18% 


23% 
23% 


18% 
24% 




5 OR MORE 


19% 


16% 


23% 




NUMBER OF PEOPLE UNDER 18 IN HOUSEHOLD 


NONE 


45% 


50% 


40% 




^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^Bl 


23% 


23% 


19% 




2 


18% 


19% 


22% 




^■1 


9% 


6% 


11% 




* 


3% 


1% 


6% 




5 OR MORE 


3% 


1% 


2% 




EDUCATION 


ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 


2% 


4% 


12% 




HIGH SCHOOL 


16% 


19% 


28% 




SOME COLLEGE 


22% 


29% 


28% 




UNDERGRADUATE COLLEGE DEGREE 


31% 


23% 


17% 




SOME POST GRADUATE 


8% 


6% 


2% 




POST GRADUATE DEGREE 


21% 


17% 


10% 




^^mmmmmm^^^^^^^^ refused 


1% 


1% 


2% 




OWN OR RENT YOUR HOME 


OWN 


58% 


63% 


49% 




RENT 


40% 


36% 


48% 




REFUSED 


3% 


2% 


3% 





SUMMARY OF FINDINGS 



LACMA SPENDS LESS ON ITS TOTAL ANNUAL 
OPERATING EXPENSES THAN ITS PEERS 



LACMA EMPLOYEES FEWER STAFF THAN 
ITS PEERS 



Over the last 5 years LACMA's annual oper- 
ating budget has averaged $47.5 million, 
while peer institutions (Boston, Chicago, 
Philadelphia) has averaged $55 million. 

On a dollar spent per square foot man- 
aged basis LACMA spends $69/sq. ft. against 
a peer average of $123/sq ft. 

LACMA's mix of spending (% toward cu- 
ratorial, administration, facilities, exhibi- 
tions, fundraising) is in line with its peers. 



In 2008 LACMA employed 533 staffers in- 
cluding security.landscape and custodial 
personnel vs. the average 714 staffers em- 
ployed by its peers. 

LACMA employs fewer staff per square 
foot managed than its peers with .68 ftes/sq 
ft against a peer average of .80 ftes/sq. ft. 



LACMA SPENDS SIGNIFICANTLY LESS THAN ITS 
PEERS ON MARKETING AND ADVERTISING 




LACMA'S MIX OF OPERATING EXPENSES IS 
IN-LINE WITH PEERS 



OPERATING EXPENSES 2007 



LACMA'S COST PER PARTICIPANT FOR 
EDUCATIONAL AND PUBLIC PROGRAMS IS 
SIMILAR TO PEERS FOR ADULTS AND LESS 
THAN AVERAGE FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES. 




LACMA spends $1.98 per adult on education 
and public programs vs. $ 2.36 per adult 
spent by peer institutions. 

LACMA spends $1.08 per participant on 
children and family programs vs. $ 2.72 per 
participant spent by peer insititutions. 




ATTENDANCE 

ACHIEVING PEER LEVEL ATTENDANCE 
WITH LOCALS AND TOURISTS WOULD 
TRANSLATE INTO ANNUAL VISITORSHIP 
OF2MILLION+FORLACMA 



I SPECIAL EXHIBITIONS PLAY AN IMPORTANT 

ROLE IN DRIVING ATTENDANCE FOR PEER 
I INSTITUTIONS AS WELL 



RESIDENT PENETRATION 
LOCAL VISITORS/RESIDENTS 
IN 15 Ml. DRIVING an1<) 



• Achieving peer-level local penetration would 
double visitors from 2004 base of 540,000 to 





% SPECIAL 




EXHIBITIONS 


MUSEUM 


ATTENDANCE 


Midwest 


10% 


Mid Atlantic 


50% 


South 


40% 


LACMA 


40% 



j si 




PP 



ist penetration in line with peer 
s would require adding ~500,000 visitors 
a year (from 2004 base of 260,000 to ~750,000) 




FINANCIAL OVERVIEW 

LACMA'S CONTRIBUTIONS FOR SPECIFIC 
PURPOSES HAVE STEADILY GROWN 
OVER THE PAST FEW YEARS 



LACMA SPENDS 6% OF CONTRIBUTED 
INCOME ON FUNDRAISING EXPENSES 
COMPARED TO THE PEER AVERAGE OF 7%. 




2005 2006 2007 2008E 
$25M S15M $79M $106M 



I YET NUMBER OF MEMBERS BY GIVING 
I CATAGORY HAVE BEEN ON THE DECLINE 



Students 

Active 

Patron 

Sponsor 

Presidents Circle+ 



2005 

1173 

67710 

10139 

618 

964 



2008 

550 
51794 
7920 
706 
978 



PEER INSTITUTIONS CAPITAL INVESTMENT 
METRIC: FOR EVERY $150 MILLION SPENT ON 
EXPANSION, ATTENDANCE IS INCREASED BY 
100,000 VISITORS 



PEERS HAVE STRUCTURED CAPITAL CAMPAIGNS 
WITH GREATER PERCENTAGES KEYED FOR 
ENDOWMENT GROWTH 



%0F 

CAMPAIGN 



MUSEUM 

Midwest 
Mid Atlantic 
South 
New York 
LACMA 



Growing the endowment to help cover in- 
creased operating expenses reduces the 
pressure to continue raising large amounts 
of operating donations 

Many peers have voiced the difficulty of 
predicting post opening attendance and giv- 
ing levels 



LACMA'S COLLECTION RANK BY AREA COMPARED TO "TOP OF FIELD" INSTITUTIONAL PEERS 
EGYPTIAN ART EUROPEAN ART 



Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

Brooklyn Museum of Art 

Penn Museum, University of Pennsylvania 

Hearst Museum of Anthropology, 

UC Berkeley 
Art Institute of Chicago 
LACMA 

Detroit Institute of Arts 
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 

ART OF THE MIDDLE EAST 

ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN ART 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Oriental Institute, University of Chicago 

Penn Museum, University of Pennsylvania 

Brooklyn Museum of Art 

LACMA 

Freer Gallery of Art / 

Arthur M. Sadder Gallery 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 
Cleveland Museum of Art 



GREEK AND ROMAN ART 



PAINTING 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

National Gallery of Art 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston /Art Institute 

of Chicago 
Cleveland Museum of Art 
Philadelphia Museum of Art 
Detroit Institute of Arts 
J. Paul Getty Museum 
Minneapolis Institute of Arts 
Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford 
LACMA 

Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco 
Nelsonfu\tldns Museum of Art 
Ringling Art Museum, Sarasota 
LACMA 

SCULPTURE 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

National Gallery of Art 

J. Paul Getty / Museum of Fine Arts, Boston / 

LACMA 

Detroit Institute of Arts 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Minneapolis Institute of Arts 



Metropolitan Museum of Art 
J. Paul Getty Museum 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 
Cleveland Museum of Art 
Walters Art Museum 
LACMA / Toledo Museum of Art / 

Nelson-Atkins Museum 
San Antonio Museum of Art 






CHINESE ART 



JAPANESE ART 



Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Cleveland Museum of Art 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sadder 

Gallery 

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City 

Art Institute of Chicago 

Asian Art Museum of San Francisco 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Minneapolis Institute of Arts 

Honolulu Academy of Arts 

LACMA 

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 



Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Cleveland Museum of Art 

Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sadder 

Gallery 

Art Institute of Chicago 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Seattle Art Museum 

LACMA 

Asian Art Museum, San Francisco 

Asia Society Museum, New York 

Brooklyn Museum of Art 

Minneapolis Institute of Art 




KOREAN ART 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

LACMA 

Brooklyn Museum of Art 

Asian Art Museum of San Francisco 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Cleveland Museum of Art 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Art Institute of Chicago 

Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, MA 

Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sadder 

Gallery 

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 



SOUTH ASIAN ART 

(TIBET, NEPAL) 

LACMA 

Cleveland Museum of Art 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond 

Rubin Museum of Art, New York 

Asia Society Museum, New York 

Asian Art Museum of San Francisco 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

Art Institute of Chicago 

Newark Museum 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Norton Simon Museum 

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 

(INDIA, PAKISTAN, SRI LANKA) 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Cleveland Museum of Art 

LACMA 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, Richmond 

Asia Society Museum, New York 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Art Institute of Chicago 

Asian Art Museum of San Francisco 

Brooklyn Museum of Art 

Freer Gallery of Art / 

Arthur M. Sackler Gallery 
Norton Simon Museum 
Denver Art Museum 



SOUTHEAST ASIAN ART 

(THAILAND, CAMBODIA, VIETNAM, INDONESIA, BURMA) 

Asian Art Museum of San Francisco 

Norton Simon Museum 

Cleveland Museum of Art 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

Asia Society Museum, New York 

Walters Art Museum, Baltimore 

LACMA 

Art Institute of Chicago 

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art 

Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth 

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 



ART OF THE MIDDLE EAST 

ISLAMIC ART 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Freer Gallery of Art / Arthur M. Sackler 

Gallery 

LACMA 

Cleveland Museum of Art 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

Harvard University Art Museums 

Art Institute of Chicago 

LACMAt 

Walters Art Gallery 

Brooklyn Museum of Art 

Detroit Institute of Arts 



PRINTS AND DRAWINGS 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

National Gallery of Art 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Art Institute of Chicago 

Cleveland Museum of Art 

J. Paul Getty Museum (drawings only) 

Baltimore Museum of Art 

Fogg Museum of Art, Harvard 

LACMA 

Minneapolis Institute of Arts 

Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco 

Yale University Art Gallery 

Detroit Institute of Arts 

Hammer Museum (Grunwald Center) 

LACMAt 




COSTUME AND TEXTILES 

COSTUME 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

LACMA 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Brooklyn Museum of Art 

LACMAt 

Museum at the Fashion Institute 

of Technology 
Kent State University Museum 
de Young 
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 

TEXTILES 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

Art Institute of Chicago 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

LACMA 

Cleveland Museum of Art 

Brooklyn Museum of Art 

Minneapolis Museum of Art 

Rhode Island School of Design 

de Young 

J. Paul Getty Museum 

National Gallery of Art 

Museum of Modern Art 



DECORATIVE ARTS AND DESIGN 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 
Art Institute of Chicago 
Cleveland Museum of Art 
Philadelphia Museum of Art 
Detroit Institute of Arts 
St. Louis Art Museum 
LACMA 

Toledo Museum of Art 
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 
Dallas Museum of Art 



20TH CENTURY DESIGN 

Museum of Modern Art 

Art Institute of Chicago 

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Minneapolis Institute of Arts 

The Wolfsonian, Florida International 

University 
LACMA 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (American) 
Dallas Museum of Art 
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 
St. Louis Art Museum 



ARTS AND CRAFTS 

LACMA 

Art Institute of Chicago 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (American) 

Minneapolis Institute of Arts 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

The Wolfsonian, Florida International 

University 
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts 
St. Louis Art Museum 



CALIFORNIA MODERN 

LACMA 

Oakland Museum 

SFMoMA 



OCEANIC ART 




Metropolitan Museum of Art 
de Young (primarily New Guinea) 
Bishop Museum, Honolulu 
Fowler Museum, UCLA 
LACMA 

St. Louis Art Museum 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 
Detroit Institute of Arts 
Brooklyn Museum of Art 
Honolulu Academy of Arts 



LATIN AMERICAN ART 



AMERICAN ART 



ART OF THE ANCIENT AMERICAS 
Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC 
Metropolitan Museum of Art 
Denver Art Museum 
LACMA 

Dallas Art Museum 
Art Institute of Chicago 
Brooklyn Museum of Art 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 
St. Louis Art Museum 
de Young 

SPANISH COLONIAL 

Denver Art Museum 

Brooklyn Museum of Art 

LACMA 

Hispanic Society of America, New York 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

San Antonio Museum of Art 

Dallas Museum of Art 

MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY 
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 
Museum of Modern Art 
Coleccion Patricia Phelps de Cisneros 

(private) 
LACMA 

Blanton Museum, University of Texas at 
Austin 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 
Detroit Institute of Arts 



Metropolitan Museum of Art 

National Gallery of Art 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Art Institute of Chicago 

Brooklyn Museum of Art 

Cleveland Museum of Art 

Detroit Institute of Arts 

Smithsonian American Art Museum 

Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City 

Amon Carter Museum 

LACMA 

de Young 




AFRICAN ART 



MODERN ART "PRE WAR" 



Metropolitan Museum of Art 
National Museum of African Art, 

Smithsonian 
Fowler Museum, UCLA 
Detroit Institute of Arts 
New Orleans Museum of Art 
Brooklyn Museum of Art 
Penn Museum, University of Pennsylvania 
Seattle Art Museum 
Art Institute of Chicago 
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts 
Yale University Art Gallery 
University of Iowa Museum of Art 
The Menil Collection 
de Young 
LACMA 



Museum of Modern Art 

Guggenheim / 

Art Institute of Chicago / 
Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

National Gallery of Art 

LACMA 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

Cleveland Museum of Art 




CONTEMPORARY ART "POSTWAR- 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



Museum of Modern Art 

Guggenheim 

Museum of Contemporary Art 

Walker Art Center 

Art Institute of Chicago 

SFMoMA 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

National Gallery of Art 

LACMA 

Cleveland Museum of Art 

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 

CONTEMPORARY ART "1968 - PRESENT" 

Museum of Modern Art 

Guggenheim 

Walker Art Center 

Museum of Contemporary Art 

Art Institute of Chicago 

SFMoMA 

Dia 

National Gallery of Art 

LACMA 

Philadelphia Museum of Art 

Metropolitan Museum of Art 

Cleveland Museum of Art 

Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 



Metropolitan Museum of Art / 

J. Paul Getty Museum 
Museum of Modern Art 
Art Institute of Chicago 
SFMoMA 
LACMA 

Cleveland Museum of Art 
Philadelphia Museum of Art 
Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 
Museum of Fine Arts, Boston 
LACMAt 




BUILD THE COLLECTION 



BUILD FINANCIAL FOUNDATION 



IDENTIFY KEY COLLECTING AREAS 
Contemporary Art 
Latin American 
Korean 

California Design and Architecture 
Large scale outdoor sculpture 
Other 

IDENTIFY KEY COLLECTORS/COLLECTIONS AS 
PROSPECTS 

PULL TOGETHER $5-10 MILLION FUND THAT CAN BE 
USED TO ACQUIRE WORKS WHEN OPPORTUNITIES 
ARISE 



BUILD AUDIENCE 

INCREASE FREE ADMISSION OPPORTUNITIES 

DEVELOP WEB 2.0 APPLICATIONS AND ACCESS TO 
ON-LINE COLLECTIONS AND CONTENT 

IDENTIFY KEY AUDIENCES AND SET GOALS FOR 
INCREASING: 

School children 

Latinio and Asian visitors 

Tourists 

Members 

DEVELOP TARGET MARKETING PLAN 



INCREASE ANNUAL REVENUE BY $5 MILLION 

DECREASE ANNUAL EXPENSES BY $5 MILLION 

FINISH PHASE II OF TRANSFORMATION CAMPAIGN 
(TOTAL $250 MILLION) 

FINISH PHASE III TRANSFORMATION CAMPAIGN 
PLANNING 

INCREASE OPERATING ENDOWMENT 

INCREASE COUNTY OPERATING COMMITMENT 




BUILD/IMPROVE LACMA CAMPUS 



TOP PRIORITIES 



FINISH PHASE II CONSTRUCTION 
Resnick Pavilion 
LACMA West 
Outdoor sculpture and landscaping 

DEVELOP STRATEGIC REAL ESTATE PLAN 
Spaulding lot development 
6006 Wilshire property 
Identify other property acquisitions 

along Wilshire 
Subway to the sea integration 

into campus 

PLAN PHASE III CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS 



KEEP PHASE II MOMENTUM GOING 

Raise $150 million in additional pledges 
Start LACMAWest construction when 

$100 m in commitments are made 
Finish Heizer Rock and BP Grand 

Entrance Restaurant if LACMAWest 

construction is delayed 

PLAN FOR A DOWN ECONOMY 

Explore LACMAEast program shutdown 
and redeployment of program in 
BCAM and Resnick Pavilion 

Staff and program adjustments 




ATTENDANCE 

2006-2007 ATTENDANCE 
2007-2008 ATTENDANCE 
CURRENT ATTENDANCE 
FIVE YEAR GOAL 



SCHOOL AND TEACHER PROGRAMS 

SCHOOL TOUR ATTENDANCE 
OFF-SITE PROGRAMS 
TEACHER PROGRAMS 

CURRENT ATTENDANCE 
FIVE YEAR GOAL 



CHILDREN AND FAMILIES 



616,491 
825,241 
850,000 


CHILDREN FREE ADMISSION 

NEXGEN MEMBERS 

ANDELL FAMILY SUNDAYS AND CLASSES 


50,318 
96,105 
96,610 


1,400,000 


CURRENT ATTENDANCE 
FIVE YEAR GOAL 

SCHOLARS 


243,033 
350,000 


60,407 
70,521 
1,871 


COLLECTION STUDY CENTERS 
BALCH ART RESEARCH LIBRARY 
CONSERVATION CENTER 
PUBLICATIONS 


1,396 
3,435 
224 
50,000 



290,000 CURRENT SERVED 
1,000,000 FIVE YEAR GOAL 



TRAVELING EXHIBITIONS 



FY 07 
FY 08 

CURRENT YEAR 
NEXT YEAR ESTIMATE 
(5 SHOWS) 



55,000 
55,000 
22,500 
550,000 



FIVE YEAR GOAL (AVERAGE) 



p* ^?r \ ^ iH- 



ii r !<t j 



■ "^ic^orT 




FILM, MUSIC EVENTS 

FILM PROGRAMS 
MUSIC PROGRAMS 
GENERATION X&Y EVENTS 
EXHIBITION OPENINGS 
CORPORATE EVENTS 

CURRENT ATTENDANCE 
FIVE YEAR GOAL 



32,787 
68,636 
9,425 
22,916 



142,333 
300,000 



La#ligW 



CMA 



TICKET BUYERS 

NON-MEMBER ATTENDANCE 
SENIOR ATTENDANCE 
TALKS AND COURSES 

CURRENT NON MEMBER ATTENDANCE 
FIVE YEAR GOAL 



ONLINE AUDIENCES 

SESSIONS ON LACMA.ORG 
VIEWS OF LACMA BLOG 
DISTANCE LEARNING 

CURRENT SESSIONS 
FIVE YEAR GOAL 



185,000 
450,000 



3,065,671 
46,595 



3,113,491 
5,000,000 



CULMULATIVE CAMPAIGN GIFTS 



$310,403,665 5317,685,933 



$178,528,599 $183,378,599 



ill 



FY 2004 FY 2005 



CAMPAIGN GOAL $450 MILLION 

RAISED TO DATE: $317,685,933 

NEEDED TO CLOSE CAMPAIGN: $132,314,067 
NEEDED TO START LACMA WEST: $100,000,000 





V 



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