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TIMES 



WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


f 

7 ' . i« ■' 


* - 




BV’ Amanda Ha^y ntiww ^ ^ Staff 

Women will have the right rrfre«65h»:abreadiofthe and the Government believes 


ti> continue working until tbe- 
same age as men- under Gov*, 
eroment plans for equality of 
retirement age announced yes- 
terday by the Department of 
Employment. 

The Sex Di scriioinatio n Bill 
is to be amended; following a 
recent European .: Court of" 
Justice ruling, to outlaw the 
compulsory retirement of 
women; at 60L 

. It will be made unlawfol for 
a woman -to be dismissed on 
the grounds of agewhen a man 
of the same age and compara- 
ble circumstances would not ■ 

As a result, employers 
wqtdd have to change policies 
under which women hate to 
retire at an earlier age than 
men. 

A spokeswoman for the 
Equal Opportunities Commis- 
sion said: “While we welcome ' 
it as far as it goes, it does not 
go far enough, because under 
these proposals employers are 
still free' to retain, policies 
under whkhmenand women 
qualify for pensions at difier- 
ent ages and that is not equal 
retirement for ' men and 
women.” 

“They talk about adegree of 
choice bot we would like to see 
fiiU equality of choice:” 

The Government plans,' 
outlined in a consultative 
document entitledSex .Dis- 
crimination and Retirement, 
would give women working in 
the private sector foe ; right 
won by female puhiic employ- 


dnect i ves to -force, women to 
retire at 6Q n was a victory for 
Miss Helen Marshall, aged 67, 
a dietician who worked for the 
Southampton and Sooth West 
Hampshire Health Authority, 
who was forced to retire at 62. 

The verdict does hot affect 
the payment of state retire- 
ment pemoions at -different 
a«s for men and women, 
which is allowed by European 
law, and the proposed changes 
: announced, do not require 
errrp loyers to provide access to 
retirement benefits, including 
occupational pensions, at the 
same age, 

Nor would it oblige them to 
change policies muter which 
women cookl volunteer to 
retire and take a pension at an 
earlier age. than men. . 

However, compulsory re- 
tirement ages would have to 
be equal mid. women would be 
able to claim unfeirdi^znissal 
up to ihe sune age as men, a 
r^nsome women how lose at 

Gommentingoit-ihe change, 
Mr Ian--- lang , Parliamentary 
Under Secretary af.State far 
Employment, who has special 

t^^^s^^Thisjs < a^tep 
towards the concept of- a 
decade of retirement with 
greater individual: choice 
which; has long been the 
Government policy*” • 

“ft is right that women who 


ees to the same.TWirCT^Ptg tiEP.^ -wfokfoffv hn exercising ihedr 
as men at the.European conrt .". sltiBs and contributing to the 


in February. 

The ruling; lhai where men 


economy should be able to do 
so on the same, terms as men. 


Tomorrow 


Reach for 
the sHr a: 



How Norman Foster 
built the world’s . 
most expensive 
skyscraper in 
Hong Kong r 

Powered 

Islam 

Robert Fisk on the 
fundamentalist . 
upheaval mBeirut . 





There is £4,000 to be wa in 
today's Times Portfolio com- 
petition because there was bo 
winner yesterday. ' Portfolio 

list page 20; how -to plsy, 

information service, page 16. 


Moscow still 
wants summit 

The Soviet Union wants a full 
summit with .President Rea- 
gan this year as well as the 
emergency meeting on nuclear 
test bans which the White 
House has rejected P»ge 5 

Boycott vote 

The National Association of 
Schoolmasters/Union of 
Women Teachers voted at-its 
annual conference in Scarbor- 
ough yesterday to ^boycott 
training - courses for UJ® 
planned General Certificate of 
Secondary Education. 


French quit 

France’s decision to with draw 
its military observers from 
Beirut marks a shift away 
from its support for Prudent 
Gcm&yel - Page 16 

On This Day 

On April 2, 1924, Adolf Hitier 
was convicted of attempting 
to lead a Nationalist revoft 
from a Munich beer hail, but 
served only one yggrofa fivfr 
year sentence- ** 


Hone New. 

Omstis S-9 

AWJts 14 

Aib 15 

Busted* 17*22 

Owl 14 

tinimrislllti 
Dlajy 12 


Law Report 


n 

13 

Lertm g 
PWSWW 
Satan g 

iea** 2 ! 

Weather » 


*** fe * * 


‘ -Umrai& to 

jected r^ JPtto^Mtiusltfs province would be discussed. 


ofieraF farther - taHc£ pn the' 
Anglo-Irish agreement, bring- 
ing the prospect , of escalating 
street disorder and loyalist 
protests in Northern Ireland. ; 

The leaders .of "the two 
Unionist parties- have rephed 
to a letter fronTMrs Margaret 
Thatcher, saying ibal it does 
not provide the basis for a 
further fruitfitimoBting. ' 

However; although the- fet- 
ter; expected to be -rest to 
Downing Street at the end of 
the .week, offers no immediate 
project of earfy talks between 
toe Government mid Union- 
ists, it does not shut the door 
onfoture communication. 

Mrs Thatcher wrote to 
Unionists last month robustly 
defending the agreement, ana 
while refusing to suspend its 
operations as a precondition 
for talks to begin, offered to 
approachlbe working of it in a 
“sensitive way”. • ■ 

The stalemate between the 
Unionists- and Government 
hinges on their demand that 
she suspend the agreement for 
a round table ^inference to 
begin at which efforts to reach 
agreement on a form of de- 


News that the -Unionist 
leadership had turned down 
Mrs Thatcher's offer, of talks 
came as Mr Tom King urged 
Unionists to resume talks 
without precondition in the 
wake of loyalist rioting in 
Portadown, which he de- 
scribed as “ludicrous mindless 
thuggery." 

Mr King warned the Union- 
ist leadership that unless talk- 
ing began it would leave the 
field open to skinheads, hooli- 
gans and subversive elements 
aiming, at causing maximum 
mayhem and damage their 
Cause On the iwainbrnd- 

The danger is that with little 
occurring on the political 
front, hardliners wfll plot vio- 
lence and trouble during the 
summer’s marching, season 
which began ominously at the 
weekend. 

Last night, the RUC issued 
figures showing the scale of 
attempts by loyalists to intimi- 
date the police. There were 32 
attacks, on members of the 
RUC outride the main area of 

Continued on page 2, col 8 


Heathrow 
opens new 
terminal 

By Michael BaUy ! 

Transport Editor 

Heathrow’s massive new 
Terminal 4 was officially 
opened by tbe Prince and 
Princess, of Wales yesterday 
before starting passenger busi- 
ness on April 12. 

The £200 miffip n terminal 
has taken four ydffs to build 
and* will raise capacity at 
Heathrow, already the worias 
leading international airport, 
from 30 million to 38 million 

passer©ersayear. , 

Because of Prince Charles 
injured finger, the Princess 
bad to hold the ribbon while 
he cut it with scissors held in 
his uninjured right hand. 

The newtenmnal will house 
all British Airways* inter- 
continental .flights including 

those to Paris and Amster- 
dam, plus European services 

of KLM, NLM and Air Malta. 

While the huge 650-metre 
long terminal ' will set ^ 


be easier to reach by both road 
and Underground than the 
airport’s older terminals, it 
win also have traffic proo- 
iems- BA’s Interline t passen^ 
ms will have to shuttle across 
from Terminal I 
and air traffic controll^ wfl; 
have to contend for the firs 
time at Heathrow with aircraft 

taxi-ing across a runway m use 
for fgfag-off or-bndinfr - 


Canadian 
Club goes 
British 

Allied-Lyons, tbe Tetley tea 
to Double Diamond food and 
drinks group, is buying the 
Canadian company, Hiram 
Walker Spirits, one of the 
world’s biggest -distillers, for 
C$2.6 billion (£1.27 billion). 

Hiram Walker has more 
than 100 famous brand 
names, including Ca nad i an 
Club whisky, BaBantine’s 
Scotch, Coorvoisier cognac 
and Kahlua and Tia. Maria 
liqueurs. It also has a 25 per 
cent stake in Drambuie. 
Allied to pay £l-27bn, page 17 


r:vxs>\- *Sk- ?. 


EEC's-. eqtral treatment 'that tbe new statutory protect 

; in Tnrr^ nmn w i «a . j- _• _ . 


Pons are a desirable extension 
of equal opportunity.” 

The Government {dans to 
- make the amendments when 
the Sex Dj«imni«inn RiH, 
now in. the House of Lords, 
enters foe Commons, which 
could be as early as May, 
which.means it could become 
law within 18 months. 

While the Government rec- 
ognizes that employers wQl 
need time to adjust to tire new 
requirements, until tbe 
amendm ents come into force 
the possibility remains of the 
Government being in breach 
of its European Community 
obligations, and employees of 
state authorities will continue 
to enjoy greater protection by 
virtue of the judgement than 
their colleagues in the' private 
sector. 

It therefore plans to “strike 
a balance” and bring tbe 
change* into effect within 12 
months of the Bill receiving 
Royal Assentl 

A spokesman for the Con- 
federation of British Industry 
welcomed thedecisioD saying: 
“This is consistent with equal- 
ity of opportunity and with 
the CBPs aim of encouraging 
flexible retirement." 

And spokesman for the 
Royal College of Nursing wel- 
comed tbe announcement be- 
cause many female nurses 
would warn to stay on until 
they were 65, or perhaps for 
just a few months over the age 
of 60 to maximize foeir pen- 
sion rights. 



Sir Geoffrey, in 
where he hud a 


, at a ermunonity centre in Chauhatna. near Agra, 
don stone on which he was named as “The Hon’aMe Sir Geoferely”. 


New Delhi 
Sikh deal 
ruled out 

Ffom Michael Hamlyu 
Delhi 

Sw Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretory, last night 
vhtuallly ruled oat the possibil- 
ity of negotiating a new extra- 
dition treaty with India to deal 
with the problem of Sikh 
extremist separatists operat- 
ing in. Britain. 

He also declined to consider 
the possibility of proscribing 
the Sikh terrorist -organiza- 
tions, saying “it bastfCb&B 
found to be. toefoci"; 
odfdealh^wifolrishterrodsm. 

Sir' Geoffrey tidd a "press 
conference at the end of his 
two-day visit to the Indian 
capital that to negotiate a new 
treaty _ would be time- 

inns Hmin g. 

In additloo, white he had 
“no doctrinal or ideoIogteaF 
objection to a new treaty he 
saw no point in providing the 
“belt” of a new treaty when 
they already bad the “braces” 
of the Fugitive Offenders Act, 
which governs extradition be- 
tween Britain and members of 
the Commonwealth. 

“I am prepared to strength- 
en the braces,” Sir Geoffrey 
said, “to refurbish them, to 
add extra buttons.. But I 
cannot see the necessity for an 
extradition treaty.” 

He announced the appoint- 
ment of a special representa- 
tive to provide a link with 
Delhi on the Sikh issue. He 
nominated Mr Timothy Ren- 
ton, Minister of State at the 
Foreign Office, to fulfil this 
task, and invited the Indians to 
nominate their own_ special 
representative to liaise with 

him. 

Sir Geoffrey made tbe point 
a number oftfmes that Britain* 
was “rigorously devoted to 
stamping out terrorism”. 

He spent 35 minotes yester- 
day with Mr Rofiv Gandhi, the 
Prime Minister, and said their 
talks were “extremely friendly 
and quite useful”. 

Tourist trail, page 9 


Search for £80m 
‘spent’ by GLC 
before abolition 

By Hngh Clayton, Environment Correspondent 


A hurried search begat 
yesterday to round up between 
£80 million and £100 million 
of Greater London Council 
money, after a photocopy of 
two cheques for £33 million 
and £45 million was found in 
an office vacated by a commit- 
tee chairman. 

The cheques were made out 
to Salman Dexctojjmenls, a 
company set up by foe council 
in its final two years with the 
help of tbe Saturn Manage- 
ment group. Mr John 
Crockford, who was comptrol- 
ler of finance with the GLC 
until the moment of abolition, 
is a director of Satman. 

Sir Godfrey Taylor, chair- 
man of the London Residuary 
Body, said before his first 
official meeting in County 
Hall yesterday that be would 
want to know on what legal 
grounds the money had been 
paid out “We understand that 
approximately £100 million 
was signed away last Wednes- 
day and Thursday morning,” 
he said. “If there is any doubt 
about that we will claw it 
back.” 

The fete of the GLCs final 
cash holdings will take much 
unravelling because it is en- 
tangled in complex legal argu- 
ments. The council was 
embroiled to its last hours in a 
complicated court case 
brought by Conservative-led 
borough councils, which com- 
plained that tbe GLC should 
not be allowed to allocate 
money for spending after its 
abolition. 

The new residuary body is 
supposed to take charge of any 
GLC money left after aboli- 
tion. Sir Godfrey said that if 
£100 million was shared 
among the 32 London bor- 
oughs, it would trigger off 

S yraent to them of a further 
2 million in block grant 
from the Government. 


The court case has not 
reached a final judgement in 
the House of Lords, even 
though the GLC no longer 
exists. 

The money undoubtedly 
exists in a variety of compli- 
cated forms, which the expir- 
ing GLC did its best to protea 
against legal challenge. Much 


Photographs 
In the regions 


16 

16 


of the money has been frozen 
by a Court of Appeal judge- 
ment reversing a High Court 
decision that it could be spent 
after abolition. 

Much of the money paid to 
Satman for bousing renova- 
tions in some London bor- 
oughs. is being held for 28 
days before being released for 
spending. “One should be 
careful before signing any sum 
of money away while that 
ruling is being discussed in the 
House of Lords," Sir Godfrey' 
said. 

There is no question of 
money being misappropri- 
ated. but Sir Godfrey agreed 
that the GLC might have tried 
to dear out its coffers before 
his organization could reach 
them. 

One project for which GLC 
money has been earmarked 
was vetoed just before aboli- 
tion, the Department of the 
Environment disclosed yester- 
day. That was the conversion 
of’ the Round House into a 
centre for black culture at a 
cost of almost £7 million. 

• London should have its 
own directly-elected regional 
authority with more power 
and responsibility than the 
GLC according to a proposal 
yesterday by the joint Liberal- 
SDP Alliance Commission on 
Constitutional Reform 


Tin crisis stops Cornish mining 


One of the Cornish tin 
producers struggling to sur- 
vive in the wake of the tin 
crisis announced yesterday 
that mining would, be sus- 
pended 'from Monday and 
that most of its 358 employees 
would be laid off in the next 
two weeks 

Geevor Tin Mines, based at 
Pendeen, near Land’s End, 
claims that male unemploy- 


mem in the area would rise to 
more than 50 per cent if the 
mine closed. 

And the deputy chai rm a n , 
Mr Kenneth Gilbert, said the 
mine would be forced to close 
unless the Government pro- 
vided a £15 million assistance 
package to finance further 
investment. 

The Government was ac- 
cused last week by an afl-party 


Commons committee of in- 
competence in felling to help 
to prevent the tin crisis. It 
appealed for government fi- 
nancial aid for the Cornish tin 
industry and added: “If it 
waits for the tin price to settle 
before taking action there will 
be no tin industry left in 
Cornwall.” 

The tin price has halved 
since October 


Hampton Court work ‘to take years’ 


By Alan Hamil ton 

The full extent of the dam- 
age done by Monday’s fire at 
Hampton Court JPalace 
emerged yesterday as experts 
predicted restoration costs of 
many motions of pounds, aid 
Buckingham Palace an- 
nounced that the Ere de- 
stroyed works of art rained at 
£135,000. 

The wont damage was in- 
flicted on tbe King’s Audience 
Chamber, part cl King Wd- 
figm ATs state rooms halt by 
Sir Christopher Wrent The 
chamber contained some of the 
finest pictures in the royal 
collection, jBdHdmg * number 
gf ftnifan Renaissance works, 
but most w»e saved. 


H 


Tbe sum for tbe art works 
will be reclaimed from insur- 
ance, but the brildiiig itself, 
tike all Government property, 
is uninsured and the cost of 
restoration wfll be borne by 
the taxpayer.The work fa ex- 
pected to take several years. 

Sr Oliver Mflter, S ur veyo r 
of the Queen’s Ptame&,' paid 
tribute yesterday to the 
Palace’s own 11-man volun- 
teer salvage corps, who carried 
more than .250 pahitbgs to 
safety as the Bre raged above. 

Although modi damage had 
been done, toe toss was msig- 
mffcant compared with what 
could have happened. Sir Oli- 
ver sanL 

Only one pain ti ng, a land- 


's 

r* 


scape by JDankerts valued at 
£10,060, has been tost Seven 
others, redacting (me of the 
best known in the collection. 
The Embarkation of Henry 
Vm for foe Field of the Cloth 


Royal homes 


11 


of Gold by an nnknown six- 
teenth-center artist, were 
damaged, mainly by miter. 

The other damaged pictures 
are: The Qneen of Bohemia by 
Hontborst; The Archduchess 
Isabella by Pourbus; Crossing 
the Rhine by Wydq The 
Madonna and Child after 
Parmigiaaio; The Battle of the 
Spars . and The Famfiy of 
Henry Vm. " 


Sir Oliver and the team of 
four restorers hare been work- 
ing since Monday morning to 
save toe damaged pictnres by 
emergency drying. Tbe Em- 
barkatioa began to blister and 
its paint was in danger of 
moving, but Sir Oliver said he 

hoped all the damaged works 
could be repaired, although it 
could take two years. 

The biggest individual 
losses were an eighteen th- 
centnry table valued at 
£60,000, and the audience 
chamber’s rock crystal chan- 
delier worth £50,008. An eigh- 
teenth-century canopy and two 
vase stands were also de- 
stroyed, and several vases. 

Continued as pap* 2, col 3 


< § > 


North Sea oil 
under $10 
for first time 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 


The price of North Sea oil 
fell below $10 a barrel for toe 
first time ever yesterday. 
Dealers expea a further drop 
in tbe price, to a level which 
could threaten the viability of 
some of Britain’s offshore 
oilfields. 

The renewed weakness of 
oil prices provides an early 
threat to the Chancellor’s tax 
projections. If prices remain at 
present levels, oil revenues 
will be £2 billion short of 
planned levels in 1986-87. 

Yesterday, cargoes of Brent 
crude on for immediate deliv- 
ery were traded at just above 
$10 a barrel. Contracts for 
delivery in 15 days changed 
hands at $9.70 a barrel, while 
oil for delivery in toe summer 
was offered at just over $9 a 

barrel. 

Dealers said that there was 
evidence of some Japanese 
buying of Brent crude, for 
delivery next month, at $9.76 
a barrel. But most buyers were 
holding off in the expectation 
of a further slide in prices. 

Tbe weakness of oil prices, 
reflecting a build-up of pres- 
sures over the Easter weekend, 
when most European markets 
were dosed, caused problems 
yesterday. Trading on the 
International Petroleum Ex- 
change in London was sus- 
pended for 30 minutes as 
prices tumbled. 

The latest fell should mean 
that toe Budget rise in petrol 
prices will be quickly reversed. 
Prices rose by 7.5p a gallon as 
a result of toe Chancellor's 
increase in excise duties on 
petrol: the fell in refiners’ costs 
resulting from the latest dip in 
prices should allow toe oil 
companies to put down prices 
again quickly. 

The drop is the result of a 
combination of wanner 
weather and disarray within 
the Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries. Yester- 
day, Dr Mana Said a! Oiaiba, 
tbe oil minister of the United 
Arab Emirates, gave a warning 
that prices could drop to $5 a 


barrel unless there is agree* 
ment to Limit production. 

The next Opec ministerial 
meeting, in Geneva on April 
1 5, is not expected to come up 
with new initiatives to pat 
pressure on non-Opec coun- 
tries lo cut output Because of 
this, dealers see no early end 
to the slide in prices. 

Although the drop in prices 
— io toe same level in real 
terms as before the first world 
oil crisis in 1 973 — is generally 
welcome to the Western in- 
dustrialized countries, there 
are fears that further weakness 
could trigger off severe finan- 
cial problems. 

Baziks in the United States, 
in particular, who are heavily 
exposed both to the domestic 
energy sector and to loans to 
oil producing countries, are 

The pound improved from 
early lows yesterday and the 
dollar slipped in very quiet 
trading, 

The pound also dosed above 
the worst level against the 
mark. Sterling managed to 
remain relatively steady de- 
spite oil fears as it is still 
underpinned by the level of 
British interest rates, 

considered highly vulnerable 
in present circumstances. For 
this reason, the foreign ex- 
change markets have been 
concerned about the effects on 
toe dollar of the latest collapse 
in prices. 

As a result the pound held 
up much better than might 
have been expected. It lost 
only 1.38 cents to $1.4685 
against toe dollar, and two 
pfennigs to DM3.43 12 against 
toe West German marie. The 
sterling index fell 0.5 lo 75.8. 

Share prices were strong 
again, shrugging off any fears 
about lower oil prices and 
focusing on improved pros- 
pects for the non-oil part of 
the economy. The Financial 
Times 30-share index climbed 
back through tbe 1,400 level, 
rising 12.2 points to 1402^. 

Kenneth Fleet, page 17 


Britons held on drugs 
charges in Australia 


Three south Londoners 
were yesterday being held by 
Customs officers in Australia 
after a joint inquiry by British 
and Australian investigators 
into an alleged cocaine smug- 
gling ring stretching from 
Sooth America through Brit- 
ain to Sydney . 

Tbe three are reported to 
have been charged by the 
Australian authorities with 
smuggling 4.7 kilos of cocaine 
worth £23 million winch was 
seized during toe operation. 
They are said to come from the 
Lewisham area and to be aged 
between 45 and 49. 

On Monday at Uxbridge 
magistrates court Anthony 
Terrook aged 58, a driver from 


Comthfll Road, Lewisham, 
was given bail on two sureties 
each of £20,000 charged under 
toe Misuse of Drags Act with 
assisting in snuggling 4.75 
kilos of cocaine into Australia. 

Mr Terroui appeared with 
three Essex men charged un- 
der the Customs and Excise 
Act with smuggling 23 kilos of 
cocaine into Britain last year. 
All three were remanded in 
custody. 

They are Michael Mescal, 
aged 31, a trader, of Merlin 
Gardens, Romford; David 
Mescal, aged 24, bis brother, 
of Manser Road, Rain ham, a 
carpenter, and Alan Tomlin, 
aged 32, of Furness Way, 
Hornchurch, unemployed. 



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► 


HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 


Second biggest teacher 
union to boycott 
training for GCSE 


' By Lacy Hodges, Education Correspondent 

The conference of the sec- instructed not to take part in lion of the enormous work- 


ond biggest teachers’ union 
voted unanimously yesterday 
to boycott the development of 
the new General Certific ate of 
Secondary Education (GCSE) 
examination for pupils aged 
16, unless certain conditions 
are met 

Speaker after speaker at the 
annnni conference in Scarbor- 
ough of the National Associa- 
tion of Schoolmastere/Union 
of Women Teachers, which 
has a membership of 127,000, 
said that there would be chaos 
in tiie autumn when the 
examination courses are due 
to begin, if the Government 
insisted on introducing it this 
year. Teachers did not yet 
have the new syllabuses or text 
books. 

Afterwards Mr Fired Smith- 
ies, the union’s general secre- 
tary, said that he believed Sir 
Keith Joseph, Secretary of 
State for Education and Sci- 
ence, would bow to pressure 
and postpone introducing the 
examination. 

“I don’t believe Sir Keith 
wants to be responsible for the 
introduction of an unsuccess- 
ful exam. I also believe there 
will be increasing pressure 
from local authorities for Sir 
Keith to bow to the in- 
evitable.’’ 

He aid that the boycott 
meant his members would be 


the two-day training course at 
the end of the summer term. 

A move to toughen the 
motion so as to boycott the 
introduction of the new ex- 
amination in September, as 
well as its development stage, 
was defeated. 

The motion passed declared 
that before the union would 
participate in the new exami- 
nation, the timetable for its 
introduction would have to be 
extended; adequate resources 
would have to be supplie d for 
training, employing extra 
teachers and buying books 
and equipment; and appropri- 
ate examination fees would 
have to be negotiated. 

Moving the motion, Mr 
Graham Terrell, an executive 
member, said: “We should 
make sure that we don’t just 
get the GCSE, but that we get 
it right The real risk befog 
taken is that ft is the children 
who will be the guinea pigs. 
Their results will depend on a 
school’s readiness for the 
exam.” 

The GCSE, which replaces 
O levels and the Certific ate o f 

Secondary Education (CSE), 
made good educational sense 
and was the best educational 
decision for a very long time. 
But ft was being introduced 
too fast and with no appreda- 


NUT merger call 
to second union 


The National Union of 
Teachers voted yesterday to 
seek a merger with the second 
biggest teachers’ union, the 
National Association of 
Schoolmasters/Union of 
Women Teachers. 

The move received over- 
whelming support from dele- 
gates to the largest teachers’ 
union’s antmai conference in 
Blackpool 

However the move is un- 
likely to come into effect 
Even the TUC has had little 
success in bringing the two 
unions together and the NUT, 
which has 216,000 members, 
publicly blames the 
NAS/UWT, which has 
127,000, for last year’s pay 
settlement. The NUT would 
have Eked to go on striking far 
more money. 

Mr Nigel de Grucfay, deputy 
general secretary of the 


‘Women^only’ rejected 


A move to increase the 
number of women on the 
executive of the National 
Union of Teachers, 72 per 
cent of whose membership is 
female, was rejected yesterday 
at fee conference. 

Mrs Barbara Lloyd, one of 
the nine women on the NUTs 
41-member executive, de- 
scribed the proposal for five 
new women-only seats as “to- 
kenism at its worst”. It vwU 
create “second-class executive 
members". 

The resotatiou, which also 
called for positive discrimina- 
tion for women teachers look- 
ing for promotion, was 


defeated on a show of hands. 

Mexyie Davies, from South- 
wark, pot forward a resolution 
that the union be committed to 
a campaig n a gainst —™i 
harassment in schools. 


She told (he conference: 
“Sexism is apparent in oar 
schools in a curriculum which 
does not acknowledge even the 
existence of women in history 
as Scientists, iMthMu friffw, 
authors and playwrights-" 

Debate on the resolution, 
which also proposed setting op 
homosexual teacher confer- 
ences, was adjourned withost a 
vote. 


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load on teachers. 

Mr Terrell said later that a 
growing number of examina- 
tion boards, zed uding London 
Regional East Midlands, 
Yorkshire, Humberside and 
the East An glian, supported a 
move to postpone die change. 

Mr Les Moores, of Woking, 
told conference that he feared 
“a fudged issue". He said: 
“The executive should give us 
dear instructions that we are 
to go on strike for the two days 
of training. That way we -will 
be protected. 

Mr Terrell said that the 
executive needed flexibility in 
case the campaign agains t the 
development of toe GCSE 
failed. 

This brought a fierce re- 
sponse from Mrs Susan Rog- 
ersTof Sheffield: "The 
association must not accept 
the concept that the GCSE will 
come in September", she said. 
Claiming that teachers would 
not receive their syllabuses 
until then, she added: "You 
will be faced with a new class 
and reading the syllabus as 
you go along." 

• Teachers belonging to the 
NAS/UWT are to refuse to 
teach handicapped children 
where resources are inade- 
quate to meet the require- 
ments of legislation, tire 
conference deckled. 


NAS/UWT, said: “Unless ra- 
tionality breaks out among 
leaders of foe NUT, there is no 
point in talking about a 
merger." 

Supporters of a merger con- 
tended that a single, TUG 
affiliated union with a 
combined membership of 
843,000 would have greater 
strength in talks-The unity 
motion was carried on a show 
of hands after a debate in 
which NUT leaders did not 
take part, although foe union’s 
executive supported the 
resolution. 

During tiie teachers’ strike, 
the two unions co-operated 
extensively at grassroots level 
but their leaders became bit- 
terly alienated after 
foeNAS/UWT general secre- 
tary, Mr Fred Smithies, joined 
the four smaller unions to 
outvote the NUT : - 


Schools 

scheme 

attacked 


By George Hill 
Conservative Party plans 
for Whitehall-controlled inner 
city “Crown” schools were 
criticized yesterday as a “half- 
baked solution” from foe pasL 
Mr Giles Radice, Labour 
spokesman on education, de- 
scribed the scheme as “yet 
another educational solution 
from the past”. Mr Michael 
Hancock, his SDP counter- 
part called it “a half-baked 
scheme designed to win short- 
term votes by tinkering with 
the problem”. 

Mr Radice, MP for Durham 
North, said: “It is quite clear 
that such schools will be 
selective and because of that 
will do absolutely nothing to 
raise standards 
“Its advocates call it 
‘ButleriSrn Of "the 1980s’. In 
doing so they acknowledge 


that this is yet another educa- 


tional solution from foe past’ 
Mr Hancock, MP for Ports- 
mouth South, said the English 
education system was rotten 
and needed not tinkering but a 
complete overhaul 
“It is foe apathy of Sir Keith 
Joseph and other ministers 
that have got the schools into 
this mess, while local educa- 
tional authorities have fought 
gallantly against huge political 
odds to provide a decent 
service,” he said. 

The proposal which could 
be tart of the Conservative 
election manifesto, would re- 
move schools in the inner city 
areas from local authority 
control 

Leading article, page 13 


CT 5W* ~ ~ ’ - *• •• • - 





Cmtfamed foam page ! 

riots Jft Pemdown, rwinding 
nine attacks on their homes. 


injured; J48 /p testic baM c* ; 
wee fired aodthere^wsre" T4 
attempts - to intimidate foe 


civilians. _ _ 

. The manner , m winch use 4 
police withstood " violent at- “- 
ta*£ foomJayaSsts has cons *1 
finned, the chief constable's 
that the force he - 
relied upon to do .fts?dmy, 
while -tire firing. - of plasti c .4 
bolters at loyalist rioters has ™- 
j HjjifcitttfrH ftanPmOT who are n 
blaming 4k* ‘ RUC. . far " 


A young boy with a toy gen seems to be playing guard to a Junior Orange lodge parade hi Lome, Co Antrim, yesterday. 

Man in the flews 


The hating m 
Kfbaowedby^JOrafoc vio- 
lence,. 



By Richard Font 
One area is in no doubt 
about his position and that of 
the 12,767 police officers be 
leads. As “loyalists” increase 
attacks on the —rarity forces 
and attempt to break foe 
predominantly Protestant 
Royal Ulster Constabulary, its 
chief constable, Sir John Her- 
mon, remains supremely confi- 
dent that the divided 
co nmtnihy of Northern Ire- 
land can rely on his officers to 
enforce foe law. 

Indeed at an RUC facti o n 
shortly after foe sfgnfag of the 
Anglo-Irish agreement he 
sought to reassure Ids audi- 
ence. Sir John produced his 
new uniform, saying It meant 
he was staying in his job hi 
spite of a record manlier of 
calls for his resignation. 

His unifo rm was tailored in 
traditional dark pea doth. 
The message was dear; foe 
ifbrm and its distinctive cap 
badge would not change and 


he would raania chief coaster 
Me. 

It is 

ditef 

smeefoe trouble* began would 
have remained to. mart his. 
seventh year in perhaps foe 
most arduous police post sa the 
United Kingdom mikss he was 
convinced that in foe long term' 
the agreement could bring 
benefits in the fight against 
terrorism. 

He knew that inevitable 
aaionist o p position to foe deal 
would face his men and man- . 
en,' 9ft per. cent of whom are 
with a big test of; 


The 


traditional 
will test the 
particularly if loyalists an 
intrat on coBtronthig foe secu- 
rity forces on the streets and m 
mere sinister ways by attempt- 
ing to intimidate tt*. in their 
in largely Protestant 


Boot in foe Protestant 


r Lame, Co An- 
trim, Sir John, who fa 57, 
joined the RUC so 1950 after a 
brief period studying accoun- 
tancy and qnfckly came face to 
face with tenrmjaut. He gained 
his first promotion to Margeant 
when he replaced a non killed 
during foe IRA’s 1956-1962 

cum iffl jfri ■ 

His efimb to the top has 
been assisted by good intellect 
and managerial skflb arid 
judicious lack. Sir John has 
been a key figure since the 
early 1970s' iri reshaping the' 
RUC ami security poficy . 
which led in 1#?6 to 
“Ulsterizatkm”, in which po- 
lice took over more dnties from 
tiie Army. Becomtag ' chief 
constable in 1980, Sfr John 
arrived with a re pu t atio n for 
prufesrionaflsra, toughness, 
nou-rectariamsm and a bdirf 
in strict discipline. He afao has 
foe typically Ulster trait of 
being stifoborn and blunt to a 
point which has not always 


. attacks oa the. .. 

Roman Csthrmcs jn Lxspym* - 
Oj'Antrim. aDd attacks riaifce 
homes of po&oe .officers 'in 
Portatibwtiv Craigavcn*,.-. 

- imp and Newtown Abbey. " : 
Two fo&te werc .ifrea. at a 
vehicle - amtannihf tittSkfed-*; ' 
men after the RUC chaseda" 

emcM* aad > car frwlvtd in foe stoti hftlot - 
At. Bmesmmte nflicMs^and a paBceman’s hontein Largao^; 
lamisteis have d esp a ire d ui- ■- wc n» r»t»w l - 


radearedlutoto _ 
has' landed him M 


him,, but Sir. John’s position 
has ben strefahened by Ws 
feaatehdidrhiM^ctf and tiie 
feck of an ohvfous succemw. 

His tough approach has 
brought f”*”*** wMfafa foe 
lower ranks and be has a deep 1 
contempt bordering on disdain 
for umay of foie prov mce*s ? 
pelftkius, snqiectmg t hey 
are more extreme flan Ins 
peopfe. In private beexndre 
considerable charm, has good 
relations with let 
from both sides and : 
at times displays a 
deuce bordering on arrogance, 
teBs jokes against hlnse£ Be 
and Lady Heraum, who have 
t wo g r o w n ap duMwn, Kvem a 
Oat at the fortresarffim RUC 
headquarters, hat they refine 
to becoree prisoners, eqjoyihg 
a varied social Bfia. - . 


■rt.- , 


early _yabenK9i 
•Tii New*tnra-1%bhe^.7fiwr.-« 
shots were fired at the honte of 
a police reservist 
In Belfast, there wefe pemd 

bomb attacks on businesses 
near foe dty. : cemre, buses 
were -knocked,' schools dam-. 

car.ofDrJpe 



-and labour Party 
member w^iadtodj omn% : > 
his home id south Be&st. ■ >:* : . ,/ 
Meanwhite, tiiree men in* ' . 
jured daring the rioting anj lri ^ 
foe Royal Victoria hospital. u 
with, serious iqjmies. A mas -*> 
aged. 2D firm Lurgm is d* ^ 
scribed as very seriously ifl. - »f- 
Yesterday, thousands of Ju- 
nior. " Orangemen paraded .; - 
through Lame for their tradi-. , 
nonai aster paraffc-It passed 
offwifoomdistuibance. . : - 


Labour pledge on 
help for elderly 


By Ridiard Evans, Lobby Reporter 


A new package of benefits 
for pensioners was unveiled 
by foe Labour Party yesterday 
in the run-up to next week’s 
Fulham by-decium. 

The " 10-pomt programme, 
which includes new pledges 
tor the elderly, is sure to lead 
to debate with , foe Govem- 
iiriien£oYerifd jj£ 

--- Launching pac^fe 

while campaigning in Fafoam, 
Mr Michael Meacher, Labour 
social services spokesman, 
said ft would include an 
increased death grant to at 
least £200 and a new winter 
premium of £5 a week for ail 
pensioners mi supplementary 
benefit and to one million 
widows and pensioners living 
on the poverty line. 

Hie package would also 
contain a nationwide, off- 
peak, half-fare travel system; 
an immediate rise in basic 
State pensions of £5 a week for 
single people and £8 for 
pensioner couples, and reten- 
tion of foe sure earnings- 


related pension scheme 
(Serps). 

A 3 per cent annual increase 
in National Health "Service 
spending- to help to look after 
thegrovhng number ofeKferty, 
more money for community 
services such as home^hdp 
and meals-on-wheels, and an 
vuu ei aicd Ghris&nasfooims otp 
'£40 wpukThlsSISi ffi!fclu<3§L 
r ~- Mr^Meacher TSaid tbar brt 
Labour's first ofoifice.'a 
single pensioner would receive 
the equivalent of one-third of 
average earnings per week, 
and a couple almost half 
average earnings 

% retaining Serps, a single 
person’s pension would be 
equivalent to 43 per oent of 
average earnings by 1998, and 
that ofamanied couple to 5 7 
per cent of average earnings. 

Mr Meacher said the 
programme wouM be financed 
from the £3,500 million which 
would be recouped from the 
top 5 percent of salary earners 
who nave benefited from Con- 
servative tax concessions. 


The Hampton Court fire 


Restoration ‘to take years 9 


Continued from page 1 
mirrors, candle stands and 
items of gilded wood furniture 
were damaged. 

Art experts wifi shortly 
begin sifting t hr ough the pile 
of nibble that now litters foe 
floor of the chamber in foe 
hope of recovering parts of the 
damaged items. 

Architects from the Proper- 
ty Services Agency, which 
maintains the palace, were 
yesterday assessing the struc- 
tural da mage. Mr Michael 
Fishlock ®f the agency said 
that the first priority would be 
to place a temporary cover, 
over the damaged area where 
the roof had collapsed before 
carrying out a detailed exami- 
nation of the damage. 


Officials of the agency said 
that it was too soon to know In 
detail what work would he 
required. 

Mr Ian Gray, the palace 
superintendent, said that parts 
of it, but not the damaged area, 
would be reopened to the 
public “within a few days" 

The fire began in a private 
grace and favour flat in Foun- 
tain Court at the centre (ft the 
palace, and spread to the state 
apartments on the floor 
beneath. 

Mr Gray denied suggestions 
that there had been concern 
far some time over foe ability 
of Lady Gale, who died.m foe 
fixe, to took after "herself on 
her own in the fiat. 

“Lady Gale had had two 


strokes, but doctors said she 
was & enough to live on her 
own. You cannot impose on the 
t en ants too much," Mr Gray 
said. 

He added that Palace offi- 
cials no evidence to sug- 
gest that the fire had been 
started by lighted candles. 

The fire was first noticed by 
smoke detectors which 
sounded an alarm in the 
Palace security office, shortly 
after 5 JO am on Monday. 

Sprinklers are not fitted in 
tiie state apartments because 
of the damage they would 
inflict on works of art 7 - 

Mr Gray said that firemen 
had arrived within five min- 
utes of being called, and be 


Rare call to 
duty for 
royal coroner 

the body 


The inquest on 
after the 

Court fire means a rare 
duty for the Queen's House- 
hold Coroner. 


This is the first time lieu- 
tenaut-Colonel George 
McEwan has held such an 
mqoest since be was appointed 
to the century-old post in 
December 1983- 
Tbe last death to fell to the 
Household Coroner came in 
1978 when a maid in St 
James's Palace took a drug 
overdose. 


The Hampton Court body, 
still not formally identified bid 
believed to be that of Lady 
Gale, aged 75, comes under 
the provisions of a law dating 
from 1887. Col McEwan 1ms 
to be called In when a body 
“which has suffered death by 
violent or immediately 
inexplicable means" is found 
in any of foe Queen’s palaces 

in Fftigfamd- 


Public purse to foot 
Hampton Court bill 

By Richard Dowden 


Hampton CourUike all roy- 
al palaces and government 
buddings, was not insured 
commercially. -The rebuilding 
wSbepaid for out of the 
public purse 

It appears to be accepted 
wisdom in Whitehall that foe 
premiums involved in insur- 
ing Buckingham Palace, the 
Tower of London, the Houses 
of Parliament and similar 
buildings would be greater 
than tiie occasional bill for a 
disaster such as happened at 
Hampton Court. 

However the Department of 
foe Environment said yester- 
day that commercial compa- 
nies were never approached 
for estimates latest that view, 

“The Government bears its 
own responsibility " the de- 
partment said yesterday. “In- 
surance is carried fry the 
Treasury. It is not likely to go 
bust and has a good source o( 
funds in the public.” 


Norwich Union, the insur- 
ance company, said however 
that cathedrals and National 
Trust properties are insured 
commercially so foe premi- 
ums are not prohibitive. . _ 

“ No doubt they would be 
significantly big premiums, 
and in foe end there has to be a 
judgement whether the claims 
outweigh the premiums, but I 
would have thought that the 
Government ought to bring 
these properties to the market 
to get estimates,” its spokes- 
man added. 

Fears that insurance compa- 
nies would impose fire precau- 
tions which might spoil foe 
buildings* beauty are not 
-borne o in- by the experience of 
the National Trust. -It is 
regarded as expeat by the 
insurance companies and 
takes fire precautions on its 
1 1,000 properties in consulta- 
tion with local fire 
departments. 


Libyan 
pilot ban 
stays 


Police have railed off their 
investigation into three Libyan 
student pitots .at Oxford 
Airport. 

But foe priucfpaL af ffce 
flying school--Mr Cefia 
Bfeckwftfi, 

Hying imposed -our foe traine e ] : 
Libyan pilots would continue ' 

inspitcof thepoliceiieciSioiL 

“We shall just leave foot as 

gesture oabt-lSof foe trainr 
ino schooT for foe benefit of foe 
public, to show we are net 
totally dim faring foe whole 


Investigations into Haim? 
that trainee pflets at the 
airport were wflflng to fotm 
suicide squads against Ameri- 
can targets began on Friday 
and invol ved Special Branch 
officers: 

Yesterday,' Mr -Peter. 
Wlnship, assistant chief boor 
stride (operatic ;) for Thames 
Valley police, said foe inqui- 
ries had ended: “There is no 
further police action tint ap- 
pears appropriate 1 at this 
stage”, he said. 

Eleven Libyans are training; 
at Oxford Airport ‘Three sue 
pilots and eight are ; taking 
engineering courses. 

Mr Beckwith said the train- 
ing school demanded foe high- 
est standards of pereonri and 


3f. 







iJ.T.’-Kns 


newspaper: 


•!? 




_ . By Ramdd Fhax 

Glasgow City Councfl ycs- __ _ . _ _ 

terday ordered Mr Robert (ration, foe principle oCafivt* 
Maxwell publisher of foe day waiting week, which Mr ” * 
Daily Record and- Sunday Maxwdlhasbeoiftisfttii^on. 
Mao, -to remove the .barbed- lastnigto* was understood > 
wire winch has ^peared :dri£ jocmalis&.at - 
>arouni£ 4 )mts,'v o & frta and. Sunday. - 

AfiBedr m:.fonnfca7 


[ Quay, and nrad&a-; 
rimflar^HdreAubesamefoine-. 
foeNews btebrnritoti 9 


k|e MaacwriMo -•«• 

:“Evray-4p-r 




-where The Sun xs. 

‘ Gla^ow _ , 

rw-nt said ike fences 
"broke regtdatipns. ' “ferijed 
wire and other encroacfanaenfs 
which have been put. up will 
all have to comedown. It is up 
to each proprietor to applyfe 
pkuning perotisribn far such • pers already worked a 
measures." . • week. 

‘ Fianmng; inspectors in Glas^ Mr Maxwdfs. dedsfa Ao 
gow were drawingopalisi last dismiss all ibe woricocs at 
night ofpropertiesand factory Anderston. Quay- brought 


pressnre to hft 
biftwe^are.stidang. . . : 
Passaig ^s-resriur 
tion does not change a great ,' •- 
deal; it is what vrehaveriways r': 
said we woe wilting to.da” • <•: 

He said thri 25 percent of ■' 
the joimiatists on the i 


premises ra foe dfty where; 
similar defences: have ap- 
peared in the past few months. 

It followed; a day of intense 
activity by the- injectors at 
premises. throughout the oty 
where security fences have 
been put up. - 

On foe eve at the deadline 
set by Mr Maxwell fin his 
Scottish workforce ‘to apply 
fix- their jobs back with foe 
two new companies he has set 
up, tire National Union, ^of - 
Jomalists chapel at the Daily 
Record voted to accept, 


more mutest in y 

today. Mr S£Qars, ex«m- ■*> 
tive member of . foe 5cqttish 
National Party, chaflehgftd Mr ; 
Maxwefi to oomerto Scotland 
and argue his casenm puMic. 

He railed for a Department .rt 
of Trade and Industry investi-.^,/ 
gation into the donne . The 1^ * 


r«u 


. v. 
■.-a' 


Lonrho preparing new 
offer for Land Rover 


ByaifiordWebb 

The Lonrho group is prepar- 
a new offer for Land Rover 
receiving more informa- 
tion from the BL board. 

The offer will be submitted 
before the April 15 deadline 
the board set last week for 
Lonrho and the rival Land 

Rover management buyout .fejorxfaion as casb-fk>w and 
team to confirm or renew their ZTZTZZZ 


short time in Which lb 
our offer, it most 
good enough to qualify ns to 
go into .foe second, round.. ; - . 
. “That only began tost 
Thursday - the day freforctlre 
Easter holidays — when we 
were givenaccess to such vital 


offers. 

The management - team,' 
which is beaded by Mr David - 
Andrews, a BL director, said 
yesterday that it was “quite 
happy" with its original offer 
made bn February 24 and 
would not be changing it • 

A senior member of thier 
Lonrho board said: “In the 
first round we were provided 
with the absolute minimum o i ■ 
informatio n anri refused fecit., 
ities to inspect the factory. - 
“Despite these very consid- 
erable obstacles and the very 


other track records.' 

The management offer has 
been seen up. to now as the 
drar favourite. Last, ni g frt , 
however, indratry , sources 
said Lonhro was a very arong 
chailenger. Its biggest advan- 
tage. was . its . financial 
“muscle”. . - 
• Land Rover is well placed 
to win a Swiss army order for 
6,000 vehicles worth : more 
than £60 mflliou, with possi- 
ble further mders later (Alan 
McGregor ’ writes from 
Geneva). .. . -i •: 


BR chief to stay on 


By our Transport Editoa' 

Sir Bob Reid, chairman of - businessman the 'Government 
British Rail is to continue for was looking for at the time of 


a further three years from next 
year, it was disclosed 
yesterday. 

Sir Robert, aged 65, was 
appointed in 1984 and it was 
thought unlikely that he 
would take a second term. 

But m two-andrfi-quarter 


years he has achieved remark- . .months. 


his appointment; but he has 
done die job just as . . Mr 
Nicholas Ridley; the monetar- 
ist Secretary- of State for 
Transport, wished. With no. 
obvious successor, -the likeli- 
hood. of Sir Bob Continuing 
has grown steadily in recent 


able success in bringing rail- 
way finances under control 
and accepting tough 
from the Government. 

A lifelongjrailwayman, he is 
far from being the outside- 


His second term will see a 
consolidation of his ambi- 
tions, foe splitting of BR into 
separate business sector^ and 
electrification from London to 
Edinburgh. 




..j» 


*>*r 


By Patricia Ck»^i > 
■ i A Fhfldand ' Itfawit mtey ■ « 
shows that 945 per cent of tire f 
itiandets want to remain Brit- . - . 
ish, and only (X3 per Cxm% l -„ 
equivalent to three 






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party is to send. l^Mfi^post- 
catds. oae fa each ' Mirror 
Group employee dismissed, to 
Mr MajttowL They have been 
rigned by people in Glasgow 
prou^ag^agrinst tiie loss hi- 
■ foe pw^ gewspaperaU .. ^ ■ 




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want the^Aigeothte- fo ' 

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over. 


disdosed : 





Aigea tgi e invralpn; foe ipr;^~ . 

. vey of foe L033 voters to . 

commissioncdjby UreUintCd; . 
Kingdom ; Falkland ' Islands' 
Association from Marplan. - 
Only 5^2 pear ocot. fa w m red V 
.sdhmons to.foe totopdsv ^ I;. 

fixture. : .* 

In afl 920 b 





s u r v e y; Tire resufes were "•*** 
vetted by foe ’ Efeotoral Re- 
form Society. .. .. v:. 

In toms of actual numbers;. . 
foe survey showed ^ 

fralklamfors ; wriited^ BEptirii^i i ^ 
soverei gn t y, 15 wanted iftd ’pf-irs 
pendtDCc, -d.- • 

lease-back a gre e m e n t, force a 
United - Nations trosteestep 
and three Argentine 
dgnty. EtevcnBioposed scane 
other- sdriott and 10 chose 


, « Of 









two solutions; 

Mr Eric Ogden^tiairman of 


fMvS 


can doubt anymore that wfa 
the Falkiandem want is .to.-be' 
Britifoandtocontimreto be 


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HOME NEWS 


2 : 


Professional men most 

to cite adultery 



as 



Divorce statistics seem to 
. show a class distinction be- 
tween what are considered 
- -acceptable grounds for ending 
. a marriage, a survey , has 
'* shown.:;;. 

• The survey of the reasons 
for divorce in England and 
Wales shows a “distinct sodal 
class gradient” in the propor- 
tion of divorce decrees which 
are awarded to wives. 

Women married to men in 
professional occupations are 
’ least- lilcely to seek divorce, 
especially on grounds of un- 
reasonable behaviour, com- 
pared with those whose 
husbands have an unskilled 
jofc 

But professional men cited 
adultery by their wives as 
grounds for divorce in the 
majority of then- cases -46 per 
cent - while only one wife in 
: four married to a professional 
alleged tus adultery. 

“Adultery is cited relatively 
more often among couples in 
the higher soda! classes than 
in the manual occupation 
social classes,” Mr John 
Haskey, a statistician at the 
Office of Population Censuses 
and Surveys in London, says 
in Ms report. 

“Conversely, unreasonable 


By Thomson Prentice J 

behaviour is proved relatively 
■ more frequently among cou- 
' {ties in the lower social classes 
- than in Social Passes land JL 
. “This pattern accords with 
me popular view, of tbe typical 
kinds of marital misfaehav ifmr . 
in tbe higher and -lower social 
classes, hut the evidence may 
reflect different social dass. 
Bttiiude&'a$'-io':'wbai- consti- 
tutes ah 'acceptable' offence 
onwhicb to petition.” 

He adds that social attitudes 
to divorce have changed . “The 
. stigma which used to . be 
attached to divorce has dimin- 
ished considerably. 

“Today divorce can be ob- 
tained. on the. 'feet. of the 
couple’s separation, whereas 
50 ~ years . ago it was only 
posable by proving one 
partner’s adultery." . : 

During the past three de- 
cades, he points out, the 
divorce rate has increased six- 
fold. 

Teenage girls, who married 
white pregnant, and their hus- 
bands have “particularly high 
divorce rates m the early years 
of marriage”. • 

The survey also showed that 
a higher proportion of women 
who are granted a divorce 
remarry than do their hus- 


bands. Among couples where 
the husband obtained the 
decree, more husbands than 
wives remarry. 

. It also found that couples in 
their thirties are in the most 
dangoous age group for di- 
vorce because of adultery. 

Women who obtain decrees 
because of their husbands’ 
adultery are most Gkeiy to be 
in then* early thirties, and 
older than their husbands, and 
are just as prone to being 
deserted. 

However, men who seek a 
divorce because of their wives' 
extra-marital affairs are most 
likely to be in their late 
thirties, and five or'mdre years 
older than their partners. 

Couples where adultery or 
unreasonable behaviour has 
been proved, are tbe most 
likely to have dependent chil- 
dren, and to have married at 
younger than average ages, the 
survey shows. 

Marriage partners with no 
children are more than twice 
as likely 10 part by mutual 
consent after two years’ sepa- 
ration as couples with 
children. - - 

The full report will be 
published in V 0 U 8 , No.2 of 
the Journal of Biosodal 
Science. 


Warning 
► to hostels 
on alcohol 

The tradition of youth hos- 
tels m England and Wales as 
heahhy, safe refuges for young 
travellers is in danger 01 being 
eroded, it was claimed yester- 
day. . .1 ; .• : 

. Action on Alcohol Abase 
condemned , a motion to be 
considered by a Youth Hostels 
Association council confer- 
ence on Saturday, allowing 
wine and beer to be served 
with, meals to people aged- 18 
and over -and on special 
occasions at the YHA**~260 
hostels. _ . 

Mr Don Steele, AAA dzrec- 
v tor, said in London; “lire 
YHA, which stands in the best 
tradition of British provision 
for the health and well-being 
of young people, will become 
just another licensed hoteL” . . 

The AAA was framed three 
years ago at a conference of 
medical royal colleges. Mr 1 
Andrew Chmnedc, ihe YHA’s 
chief executive, said yester- 
day : “In no way ane/ : pur 
hostels going to become'drink- 
ing dens.” A trial ^scheme, 
allowing beer and wnre with 
meals to people aged IS and 
over was introduced two years 
ago in three hostels -in the 
West Country and the Peak 
District There was up evi- 
dence of alcohol abuse.- 


Firm set 
to defy 
the Queeh 

By Gavin BeH 

An Essex company is set to 
incur royal - displeasure by 
printing half a million colour, 
transfers for T-shirts to com- 
memorate the wedding of 
Prince Andrew and Miss Sa- 
rah Ferguson in July. 

Imagine Transfers, ofBrain- 
tree, will bean producing the 
heart-shaped transfers today, 
depicting the royal cqupkr 
with the legend 

v “congratulations”, in response 

to trade demand from Europe 
and the Commonwealth. 

Lord Airlie, Lord Chamber- 
lain, started a controversy last 
week by announcing that royal 
portraits and emblems should 
not be reproduced on clothing 
other than head scarves. 

Venables plea 

Terry Venables, aged 43, the 
manager of Barcelona football 
dub, is petitioning fra- di- 
vorce, according to. a state- 
ment issued by his wife's 
solicitors yesterday. 


Girl told 
to ‘avoid 
strangers’ 

the father of Sarah Harper, 
tbe missing schoolgirl, said 
yesterday sie had beat told 
not to talk tostrangers. 

. Mr Terry Harper, aged 30, 
a dustman, said: “I was always 
telling her not to go in cars 
with anyone she dM not know. 
She used to say: T won't'. 

“As time has gone on 1 have 
to think something terrible 
has happened.*! 

Mr Harper, of- Bothwefl, 
near Leeds, who is divorced 
from Sarah's mother. Mis 
Jackie Harper, said: “Whoev- 
er is responsible, I plead with 
! tom to ring the police even if 
it's bad news.” 

' Sarah, aged 10, went miss- 
ing last Wednesday oh a short 
shopping hip nearher home in 
Modey, near Leeds. 

. Defectives yestfeday ap- : 
pealed to anyone who finds a 
pair of Clark's sne 11 brown 
shoes, as -worn by the nrissing 
girl, to get' m touch wftfc the 
police. - T ‘ 


Air routes 
in line for 
fares fight 

A cut-price air feres contest 
may be on tbe way, according 
to the International Air Trans- 
port Association. 

It said yesterday that Amer- 
ican airlines are making more 
seats available on . Atlantic 
routes than the market can 
cope with 

In addition tbe number of 
tourists from the . United 
States has been felling. 

The association's headquar- 
ters at Geneva reported Mr 
Gunter Eser, its director gen- 
eral as saying that more than 
750,000 seats had been cross- 
ing the Atlantic empty each 
month this winter. Mr Mi- 
chael Spicer; Britain's avia- 
tion minister, said last month 
that in tire present round of 
talks with tbe United States 
about renewing agreements on , 
l imiting tbe number of airline 
seats, Britain thought it was 
“essential” .to prevent over- 
capacity. . . .. 


University sets up an 
animal welfare chair 


By John Young 
Agriculture Correspondent 
The appointment of the 
world's first ‘professor of ani- 
mal welfare was heralded 
yesterday as an attempt to 
replace emotion and prejudice 
with scientific research. . 

Dr Donald Broom, reader 
in pure and; applied zoology at 
. Reading University, will take 
up his post at Cambridge in 
September. He immediately 
made h dear that he did not 
visualize himself as a “moral 
watchdog ” 1 but as someone in 
a position to advise on tbe 
situation “from the animals’ 
point of view.” 

“Animal rights are not the 
same as animal welfare,” he 
said. “A rabbit in a cage 
responds to its environmental 
conditions, irrespective of 
whether it is being kept for 
h uman food, for laboratory 
use.orasapet 
“A wild rabbit responds 10 
being shot at. whether the 


person shooting views the 
rabbit as a food source, as a 
pest or as an object of sport. 

“People will continue to 
keep animals for various pur- 
poses, so we have an obliga- 
tion to ensure that their 
welfere is as good as possible, 
and is never below certain 
standards." 

The chair is being funded by 
the Animal Welfare Founda- 
tion, established in 1983 by 
the British Veterinary Associ- 
ation. The foundation's chair- 
man. Mr Neal King, said the 
appointment established ani- 
mal welfere. as a discipline in 
its own right and was the first 
step towards a centre of 
excellence. 

Dr Broom would be in a 
position to offer unbiased and 
genuine, scientifically based, 
opinions on ail welfere 
matters.He will concentrate 
initially on animals kept on 
forms and in zoos. 


L.Ulg Juvri 

School heating award 

■rt from Femdale Lower Con 


The parents of a teenager, 
who claimed a teacher at- 
tacked their son during a 
school trip to Majorca two 
years ago, have received a 
£700 out-of-court settlement 
from Mid Glamorgan counaL 
The Society of Teachers 
Opposed to Physical Punish- 
ment said that after pupils 


from Femdale • Lower Com- 
prehensive. Rhondda, were 
seen up after “lights out" a 
teacher entered a bedroom 
where Jeffrey Davies, aged 1 5, 
ofTylorstown, was sleeping. 

A photograph four days 
later showed “severe bruising 
across his shoulders and 
back.” 


Portrait of a top executive 


The average chief executive 


auc, aged Si married with 
ro or more children, and has 
spoasflritity for 5,656 em- 
loyees. He spends 52 nights a 
ar away fro» hum* on 
isiaess, and arrives at the 
Kce well before 8-20 a* 
dess he is taking one of Jus 
l days' annual leave, almost 
•rtaimy abroad. 

This portrait emerges fimn 


By Robin Young 
office and drive themselves to 
work. They are health-can- 
srious and set aside tome for 
relaxation and sport (nsaally 

r ttt, »emite, or walfeisi). Only 
per eat jog. Their most 
popular pastimes are wnac. 


Many felt that there was 
much to be done to improve 


UHIIW ~ — ... - 

Wed by PA consulting 
the international man- 


ers, who surveyed 256 
companies from The Times 

Top 1800. . 

It also dfeeovwed flat Brit- 
ish company chiefs are mine 

likely to hare attended jt 

pr ram mar school than a.pBHK 

school and wffl have aehfcwd 
their first dfoectorship withm 
15 yean Of.prtfeswwa? hfe, 
unless they were foHowmgm 
fathers 1 footsteps, in wb** 
case progress wwrfd bare been 
even quicker. .. . 

Most chief executives 

choose to lire in tbe cs®s*to_y 
within 35 minutes of drew; 


iUUbUiuft w— 

They are, the co nsultan ts 
deduce, increasingly interna- 
tional in outlook (more tom 

■ half have spent more ton 
three ?nd a half years working 

■ abroad), but more amreroed 
with people than Pr^tNrar- 
ly 70 percent listed “peofk 
pyacenis” such as co romaro ca- 

motivation and «tedwn. 

of managers as their most 
important ■ respon sibilities. 
Only just over a quarter otto 
-profit, fiuandal perfrassnee 

aBd retmu to sh«reho»a^ 

. More than half said toy 
had instituted formal process- 
es to encourage tooratioii to 
their companies. Nearly one- 
fifth use a desk-top terminal 
owtfhird a car 
nearly two-fifths a dyt atjag 
machine. Yet, in 
■their personal prodnctjvjy 

eitiy, 2 per cent mentooued the 

ssseof computers. 


ytll iuuca ivwweww - § — 

manufacturing if Britain was 
to become competitive agam. 
Nearly half called for better 
education and more profes- 
sfoeal training, and there was 
strong criticism of the public 
school system that two-fifths 
of them bad experienced. 
Two-fifths of to resimn- 
dents could remember particu- 
lar incidents which they felt 
had provided them with ot- 
dal lessons in leadership. 
Almost all were moments®! 
intense conflict, such is faring 
bankruptcy, strikes, ream- 


takeovers. 

But one man remembered a 
teenage cricket triumph, an- 
other his first sight of J*Pf- 

nese consensus-style 
management, and a third men- 
tioned his first risitto_^ 
shop-floor. It was the first 
time the workers had ever seen 
thpfcr manuring director. 



Royal opening for £200m terminal 


By Michael Baily 
Transport Editor 

The Prince and Princess of 
Wales formally opened the 
new Terminal 4 yesterday, to 
consolidate Heathrow's posi- 
tion as the world’s top interna- 
tional airport 

Costing £200 utiBiou to 
build over four years, T4 wffl 
raise Heathrow traffic from 
30 miOSon to 38 millioa pas- 
sengers a year, and should 
provide a substantia] boost to 
British Airways, its main user. 

In a wry comment on the 
size of to new ter mina l, to 
Prince said that he and his 
wife seemed to have walked 
miles, and suggested that to 
long vistas in modern airport 
terminals were perhaps de- 
signed to ensure that to 
passenger fell asleep as soon 
as he boarded to aircraft 

Before opening the terminal 
to Prince and Princess inau- 
gurated to London Under- 
ground's new £23 millioa 
extension to to Piccadilly 
Tine, taking airport passen- 
gers on a loop beneath to 
airport, first to to new 
Heathrow Terminal 4 station, 
then to Heathrow Terminal 1, 
2 and 3, formerly Heathrow 
Central 

Thw Prince's injured finger 
led to the royal couple per- 
forming a double act in open- 
ing to new Underground 
station, with the Princess 
bidding the ribbon while to 
Prince snipped it with scissors 
in his uninjured right hand. 

Infertile couple joined more 
rtnm 800 guests for lunch in 
the departure lounge of T4, 
which is more than two-thirds 
of a mile long and probably to 
world's most spadora airport 
terminal 

Hundreds of staff were on 
duty manning their normal 
positions in an attempt to 
create an fifesfam of a normal 
day at to newest terminal of 
to world’s busiest interna- 
tional airport. 

All to shops were manned 
amt many of to British Air- 
ways and KLM check-in desks 
were staffed. Bank, catering, 
and bar staff were on duty. 
British Airways had even 
parked a Boeing 747 and a 
Cbncorde dose to their normal 



Situated on the perimeter of 
to airport, T4 enjoys to 
advantage of better road con- 
nections to London, with a 
separate exit from tbe M25 
that avoids the frequent jams 
in to tunnel to Terminals 12 
and 3. 

But aircraft for T4 will need 
to cross a runway, which could 
cause queues. 

About two-thirds of T4s 
eight mini on passengers a 
year will be on long-haul 
ni g hts , relieving pressure on 
the cramped T3, which is to be 
modernized at a cost of more 
than £70 million. 

In performing to opening 
ceremony, to Prince and 
Princess were continuing a 
Royal tradition started by to 
Queen when she opened to 
central passenger terminal 31 
years ago. 

Sir Norman Payne, Chair- 
man of the British Airports 
Authority, said that Britain 
still enjoyed supremacy in 
international aviation, but 
Paris, Amsterdam, Frankfurt 
and New York were all invest- 
ing heavily. 

“There is a long-term un- 
derlying growth in aviation”. 
Sir Norman said, “but we have 
to run faster to hold on to our 
lead. Terminal 4 will play an 
important part in that” 



The Prince of Wales using his “good” hand to cut the ribbon 
when opening Terminal 4 at Heathrow airport yesterday. 


Duke puts 
plan to 
aid sports 
sponsors 

The Duke of Edinburgh has 
repeated his call for a counsel- 
ling service to be set up to help 
prospective sponsors of sport- 
ing events. 

He also wants a subcommit- 
tee 10 oversee “parliamentary 
and Whitehall liaison in order 
that the real achievements of 
sports sponsorship can be put 
across". 

The Duke was outlining a 
12-point plan u> make life 
easier for companies wishing 
to be involved in sports 
sponsorship, in his capacity as 
president of the Institute of 
Sports Sponsorship, which 
was formed five months ago 
and has already trebled its 
membership. 

He said; “The sponsorship 
of sport has been transformed 
in the Iasi 10 years. It is vital 
that this large and growing 
financial investment is put to 
best use for the benefit of both 
sport and the sponsoring com- 
pany. The issue will play an 
increasingly important role in 
this area. 

“1 firmly believe that com- 
mercial companies have a 
great deal more to offer than 
simply money, and I hope that 
their professional expertise 
will be extended, through the 
institute, to governing bodies 
to improve efficiency, extend 
the sport's appeal and estab- 
lish long-term and rewarding 
partnerships between sport 
and commerce.” 

Fan punched 
a policeman 

A football supporter who 
punched a policeman as he 
was being arrested for trying to 
prevent another fan’s arrest 
was sent to a detention centre 
for three weeks at Marylebone 
Magistrates’ Court yesterday. 

Luke Tait, aged 19, of 
Manor Road, Twickenham, 
Middlesex, a first offender, 
was arrested during a match at 
Loft us Road, west London, in 
; February. 


London. SW7 l BY). 



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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


Drugs ‘rival tobacco 
as threat to discipline’ 
in growing jails crisis 

By Peter Evans, Home Affairs Correspondent 


The planning muddle: 1 


Rubbish dump legacy of a l ong 


Drugs have become as im- 
portant as tobacco as an illicit 
currency in jail, according to 
Wandsworth Prison's board of 
visitors. 

As a result discipline and 
control are undermined, the 
board says inits report for 
1 985. Trafficking in the prison 
is serious. 

Wandsworth's report is only 
one sign of the growing prison 
crisis, which has almost 
brought officers to the point of 
industrial action, one of the 
most difficult situations the 
Home Office has to face. 

The threat by the Prison 
Officers' Association comes as 
the jail population in England 
and Wales has climbed to 
47.123. the highest figure this 
year, increasing already unac- 
ceptable overcrowding 

The latest figure for people 
held in police cells, acknowl- 
edged to be unsuitable for the 
purpose, is 39, all in the South- 
east. 

A circular by Mr David 
Evans, general secretary of the 
Prison Officers' Association, 
tells of the battle it says it has 
fought to protect essential 
services. These are regarded 
by prison staff as necessary to 
the effective running of the 
establishment 

They include the mainte- 


nance of proper levels of 
security and control, visits 
and association between pris- 
oners out of their ceils at set 
hours and workshops. 

Staff say that a budget cut 
last year meant a reduction of 
about !■£ hours a week in the 
work done by each officer. 

This year, there is, they 
daim, a further reduction of 
about three hours a week. 
Although excessive overtime 
has been a recurring issue in 
prisons, the argument against 
cutting hours generally is that 
life for prisoners and staff 
becomes more restrictive, 
with increased tension as a 
result. 

The association says new 
cuts to essential tasks are 
being proposed by the man- 
agement to remain within 
budget. There are, it adds, 
cases where governors are 
rejecting established agree- 
ments as the basis for negotia- 
tion, and are making up their 
rules as they go along. 

The prison officers are seek- 
ing a meeting of the Home 
Office prison department's 
Whitley council- It is expected 
to take place next Tuesday. 
The council is a forum for the 
discussion by management 
and staff representatives of 
conditions. If the meeting is 


unsuccessful, there will be a 
ballot of members calling for 
industrial action. 

The action will seek to 
protect manning levels. Mr 
Evans says in his circular, 
protect staff and inmate safe- 
ty, and ensure prison regimes 
remain humane. 

Prison officers say a bigger 
squeeze on cash limits could 
so restrict life in prisons that 
the individual safety of staff 
and prisoners would be 
threatened. 

Mr Douglas Hurd. Home 
Secretary, announced on 
March 25 that 54 prison 
workshops would close. A 
further 31 would remain open 
provided improved perfor- ; 
mance could be sustained. 

Six hundred inmates would 
be sent to other workshops, 
other jobs in prison or to 
educational or other training 
courses. 

The closure of workshops at 
Holloway Prison, London, the 
under use of sports facilities 
and cancellation of education 
classes was yesterday criti- 
cized by the National Associa- 
tion for the Care and 
Resettlement of Offenders. 
Prisoners were having to 
spend much too long in their 
cells. Miss Vivien Stem, 
Nacro’s director, said. 


Ministers want to loosen con- 
trols In the planning system 
because they act as “a brake 
on enterprise and an job- 
creating”. But a® Hugh Clay- 
ton, Environment Correspon- 
dent, reports, there are those 
for whom the system is quite 
loose enough already- 

The garden at Stock Fans 
House slopes gently towards a 
bell of trees. The scene is set in 
leafy countryside in one of the 
more comfortable outer 
reaches of London’s 
commulerland. It is classed 
officially as an area of out- 
standing natural beauty. 

It is wise not to try to 
sample the beauty just beyond 
the end of the garden too 
closely. People can remember 
when the land behind the 
house was typical flat Surrey 
scrubland where village chil- 
dren played. 

Today the same space is 
ringed by strands of barbed 
wire as a quarry is blasted and 
dug to a depth of 1 00ft and a 
width of about 700ft 
Mr Christopher Monk, who 
owns the house, does not want 
a deep quarry at the end of his 
garden, especially one at 
which only strands of wire 
keep wandering children at 
bay. He wants a rubbish dump 
even less, but that is what the 
immense hole is supposed to 
become once its potential as a 
quarry has been exhausted. 

Mr Monk has won wide 
support from local people who 
have turned themselves into a 



Mr Christopher Monk and his wife at the bathed wire fence surrounding the qmnry workings (Photograph: Peter Trievnor). 


protest group called the 
Stockstone Quarry Action 
Working Committee, or 


brought to fife in a completely licence of 1952, to let the 
different way”, Mr Monk finished quarry be a dumping 


Sqawc for short 
The recent rapid expansion 
of the quarry has been based 
on a planning permission 
issued in 1952 by a coancfl 
that was abolished more than 
10 years ago. “It is perfectly 
ridiculous that a licence grant- 
ed in 1952 should be suddenly 


complained. 

The licence said that when 
the quarry had been fully 
worked it would have to be 
filled in or have its surfac e 
covered, with “materials 
agreed to be suitable for plant 
growth”. 

Surrey County Council has 
agreed, on the basis of that 




becomes 



cer 






covers 


it’s 



There's no easy way to gain a commission in the 
Territorial Army, whatever walk of life you come from. 

You have to earn it. And, because we expect our 
Officers to take their place alongside Officers in the Regular 
Army, you have to leam it. _ j ^ 

The first step. 

The Territorial Army is expanding, and 
are looking for more Officers. But of course, before you Jj 
become an Officer, you have to join the Territorial Army! 
and start training hard with the rest of those who currently! 
make up one third of Her Majesty's Armed Forces on land! 



0W 


Assessment. 

During your basic training well decide whether you 
have the potential to become a Territorial Army Officer. 
Then, and only then, well arrange for you to spend 



.about. 


a fortnight at a place you may have heard 
It's called the Royal Military Academy 
Sandhurst. And, realistically you can expect 
to have been with us for some two years ^ 
before you get through thegates.though^fc 
some manage it after just one. 


\bur time at Sandhurst. 

-You'll leam a great deal there, 
from weaponry, drill and map reading, 
to tactics and fieldcraft. From night 
exercises and obstacle crossing, to 
command techniques. (You 11 soon find out 

decide to give you your commission. 

Time commitment. 

All this means giving up ^^some of 
your spare time. At least eight weekends a 



though once you’ve experienced 
the unique challenge of ‘ 

TA, and begun to under- 
stand the full importance 
of its role, the chances are 
you will want to put in 
more time. 


We’re ready and waiting 
to hear from you. 

You'll probably want 

to ask a lot more questions than we have room to answer 
jk here. Questions about pay discipline, employers’ atti- 
W tudes, or how we’d use any specialist skills you may have. 
|Sg|g^^ And, indeed, what you’ll get out of it. 

pick up the phone, with 
pen and paper handy and make a free 
call anytime on 0800 555 555. |bj| 
Or send off this coupon today. 

^ Were ready and waiting to hear 

T heTbritorial Army] 

Dept. T IF). Bristol BS1 3 Y X. Please send me | 


Address. 


Educational Qualifications.— 


-Age 


year plus a fortnight camp and some week- 
day evenings is the basic requirement. 





Z- 

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-WS ~C.\ v 


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I 


ground for London’s rubbish, 
i Many urban councils suffer 
■ from a lack of deep boles in 
which to dump rubbish. They 
have to look far beyond their 
own boundaries for suitable 
dumping grounds. 

Stockstone quarry looks 
ideal with its direct road 
access less than 50 miles from 

BBC to go 
private on 
catering 

By David Hewsou 
Arte Correspondent 

The BBC is to privatize its 
catering services, savins 
£2 nriUion-a-year with the loss 
of 588 jobs. 

The proposal is the latest 
step in a reorganization pro- 
gramme designed to switch 
funds from administration to 

■bh mwwBib ' • 

The rhaafwg, when com- 
plete, are likely to lead to a 
total loss of 2^)00 staff jobs in 
engineering, security and ad- 
ministration. The BBC hopes 
that the changes will help to 
pay for more sew programmes 
and the start of daytime 
television in the antunm. 

. BBC executives want to 
-prove that the corporation Is 
now ran as a “lightship” and 
defeat critics who want to. see ; 
advertising on its broadcasts. 

Most of the corporation’s 
London catering anils will be 
pat. in the .hands' of private , 
contractors next month. 

: Of the posts lost m the 
catering reorganization, 108 
are already unfilled and a 
farther 51 will be lost through 
.retirement Private caterers at 
Television Centre, Broadcast- 
ing House and Lime Grove, 
are expected to employ some 
of the present staffl 
In November, the corpora- 
tion announced the loss of 558 
posts, mainly in engfneermg, 
releasing £15.6 million for 
programme production. Two 
months later a further 625 jobs 
in engineering and support 
services were cut to save j 
£7.5 million. 

The BRCs commercial arm : 
has signed a three year agree- I 
ment with EMI records for the i 
manufacture ami distribution I 
of the corporation’s records. i 


Loudon, except that many 
local people fern the endless 
rumble of heavy lorries. 

The dumping pfcm is op- 
posed by many parish coun- 
cils, but their collective wrath 
is not enough to overrule the 
county authority. 

Sqawc is therefore about to 
tabs the case to the High 
Court . Tomorrow: 

The teenting warehouse. 

Osprey is 
back in 
fixed nest 

By Ronald Fans 

An osprey has returned to 
the nesting site at Loch Garten 
■in the Hi ghlands. This sure 
sign of spring was doubly 
^welcomed by the Royal Soci- 
ety for the Protection of Birds, 
which feared that the ospreys 
might not return after vandals 
lent the lop 20 feet off foe 50ft 
Ipinc tree where osp reys have 
nested for the past 27 years. 

The site is now protected by 
alarms and a 24-hour watch by 
■ volunteers. 

. Mr John Hunt, reserves 
manager for the Royal Society 
for the Protection of Birds in 
Scotland, said yesterday that a 
female osprey, which had laid 
' eggs for the past five years at 
the , loch, had settled at the 
-nest,..- • -a 

j- -The birds are sensitive to 
’severe changes at the nest site. 
When vandals tried to cut 
, down the tree, severing two of 
the main brandies, the society 
feared that the ospreys would 
reject the repaired tree, which 
has bolted on brandies and a 
■nest refurbished on a plat- 
form. Mr Hunt said the female 
had flown from Africa, where 
she had wintered, on Monday. 
She had landed on the nest, 
and accepted it immediately. * 
But the next few weeks will be 
a crucial time for a male to 
appear. Unfortunately the 
male last year flew into a wire 
and was killed.” 

More than one million peo- 
ple have visited the loch site 
since it was opened. There are 
30 pairs of ospreys in the 
Scottish Highlands. The popu- 
lation built up from near- 
extinction in 1914 when the 
birds were persecuted and 
preyed upon by egg-collectors 


Drug addicts are given 
priority for housing 


Edinburgh District Council 
voted yesterday to give priori- 
ty on the city's housing wait- 
ing list to drug addicts who 
were reforaring. 

Mr Nigel Griffiths, the 
housing committee chairman, 
said that only about a dozen 
cases would be involved. 

The decision was con- 
demned by the Conservative 
opposition. Mr Paul Martin, 
the party’s leader, said that the 
menace of drags might be 
introduced into parts of the 
city where it was not a 
problem. 

Housing priority would be 
given to any drug addicts who 
claimed to be attempting to 
give up their addiction. The 


Conservatives believed that 
the drug problem was most 
successfully handled by volun- 
tary organizations, supported 
by the council. 

They would ask every 
tenants' association to get in 
touch with their local council- 
lor if they had any fears about 
the scheme. 

“Those people who have 
been on the waiting Gst for 
many years will be appalled to 
find they have been jumped 
oyer in this way.” MrMartin 
said. .. . . 

.. The ruling Labour group 
said they were merely putting 
in writing what had been 
agreed all-party procedure for 
the past 18 months. ' ; . 




Nine stranded Scots launch 
as sailing ship charter on 
runs aground dole reform 


as sailing ship 
runs aground 

Nine people were branded 
early yesterday after a 60- 
tonne sail training ship, the 
Robert Gordon, ran aground 
off the Kent coast. 

A Sheemess lifeboat stood 
by for more than six hours 
waiting for high tide to free the 
70ft vessel, which had wedgsd 
itself on a sand bank. 

The sailing ship was then 
towed into Queen borough, on 
the Isle of Sheppey. The crew 
was shaken but unhurt. 

Mr Robin Castle, the life- 
boat cox, said that four people, 
including two cadets aged 13 
and 14, were ferried to land. 
The rest of the crew stayed On 
board the vessel. 

At Torquay, Devon, a Sovi- 
et freighter, the Enkholot, 
towed two American women 
to safety after their yacht was 
dismasted in heavy seas early 
yesterday. 


Scottish churchmen, trade 
unionists and councillors 
claimed yesterday that govern- 
ment plans to reform social 
security will put more people 
at risk' and have (ailed to 

of poverty in Britain. 

They launched a seven-page 
charter, c itliuiag their own 
proposals for reform - includ- 
ing the dial illation, so far as 
possible, rf means - to 

be seat to toe Prime Minister 
and the Secretary of State for 
Social Services. More than 
100 organizations have signed 
the charter, launched at the 
offices of the Scottish Trades 
Union Congress.The docu- 
ment claims that there is 
plenty of evidence tint the 
wealthy gate far' more from 
present ^equalities In the 
system than those in receipt of 
benefits. 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 






- 

Kn 

fixed, 


> arei 

r 


-v ‘ ’ :• 

-+> ■■ 

i : *•' . 


survivors and the w __ 

t*» terrain was thought Gketv 
^potongtherescaBe wA. 

Se^l Goss workers said, 
wradcage was found over a a*- 
i mSn rndia&, appearing to 30 b- 
^aantmte the reports of-yrit- 
j.^iiwses- th*t the plane 
^ exploded, or caught fire, be- 
fore crashing. 

One Mexfeana me chanic 
has'. suggested there lMfr** 

havebeen a bomb in the plane, 

v.,-. but so far there seem to be few 
&r real du* as to foe reason for 
■ „ the disaster, m which 22 
chUdreo under the age of 22 
, were fcflW 

All that is known for certain 
from the pilot's last radio 
coBummicatioo is that the 
" plane began to lose attitude 

- some 10 minutes before the 
r.‘ crash. Early yesterday rescue 

workers were still searching 
. for the plane's black box. 

Mexicans officials m»m the 
, pilot had 35,000 hoars flying 
- time behind him and the plane, 

— bought in 1981, was oneof foe 
newest in a fleet of 39 Boeing 
727s. 

Mexico's National Union of 
Aviation Workers has rfaimil 


Rescue workers recovering a body from the mountainside wreckage of the cradled Mexican Boeing while (right) another worker clambers over the tangled remains of part, of the jet. 

c^MI Russia insists it still wants Democrats 

The ration says Mexican* 11 il Clf 

maintenance has long been a A ' 11 0 j til JAM 

5S2: full summit with Reagan stingers 

ribns tedutical {wolilems. „ ^ . vaKaIci 


• Foreigners killed: At least 
20 foreigner* were believed to 
have been on board the aircraft 
(Renter reports). Among them 
were eight members of a 
French family and a senior 
Swedish diplomat in Mexico, 
Mrs Keratin Enaerfalt, with 
her two sons and a steter. 


From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


The Kremlin yesterday de- 
clared it was still seeking a fall 


But despite the new state- 
ment on Kremlin intentions. 


1986 summit with President there has still been no indica- 
Reagan, in addition to the tion here that any progress has 
emergency meeting on nuclear been made in breaking the 
test bans proposed by Mr deadlock between the Soviet 


Rome lifts silence 
ban on theologian 


Gorbachov last Saturday and 
turned down by the White 
House. 

Mr Georgy Kornienko, the 


Union and the US in fixing a 
date for Mr Gorbachov's visit 
to Washington. 

Mr Kornienko stressed that 


From Peter Nichols, Home 


The Vatican confirmed yes- 
terday that it has withdrawn 
its ban imposing silence on 


Father Leonardo BoC tho talks. 


pealed his objections last 
month to a group of Brazilian 
bishops summoned b ere for 


Mr Georgy Kornienko, the Mr Kornienko stressed that 
influential First Deputy For- the Soviet Union would not 
eign Minister, told reporters: agree to any date until the 
“Mikhail Gorbachov did not white House guaranteed that 
mean that this meeting, if it concrete agreements on arms 
took place, would supplant the control could be expected to 
summit meeting which had emerge from the second sum- 
been agreed upo n in Geneva mil meeting, 
and which would be a visit by “We should be sure of the 
Mr Gorbachov to Wash- constructive outcome of the 


of a US visit by the Soviet 
leader. This disclosure fol- 
lowed reports that senior US 
officials had this week warned 
that time was running out for 
arranging such a summit at a 
convenient time before the 
end of the year. 

Mr Kornienko’s remarks, 
combined with his scathing 
attacks on recent American 
foreign policy moves which he 
variously dismissed as “arro- 
gant, . . . defiant . . . and 
provocative", have convinced 
Western observers that the 
chances of a summit in the 
near future are fading fast. 

The latest Soviet declara- 
tions were made at a televised 


eminent Brazilian theologian 
and leading exponent of liber- 
ation theology. 

A Vatican spokesman also 
said the Holy See would issue 
on Saturday a major docu- 
ment on liberation theology to 
help guide local churches in 
their struggle to promote so- 
cial justice and human rights.. 

liberation theology was de- 
veloped mainly, m Latin 
America; as ;a Christian reacx 


Some of the bishops were 
believed to have asked the 
Pope to free Father Boff from 
the obligation of silence. 

In October, 1984, Father 
Boff was ordered to Rome by 
the Sacred Congregation for 
the ppctrine.of the Faith to 
answer charges :of putting 
forward “dangerous" doc- 
trines m-ifo- latest book. 
Church Charisma arid Power. 
The following May the Vati- 


ington.” meeting, and then as for as a lions were made at a televised 

The clarification followed date is concerned, any date news conference attended by 
widespread suggestions in the can be agreeable," be said, more than 400 journalists and 
West that the surprise offer of “We do not believe it is seen as a direct snub to Mr 
an emergency meeting in a feasible to set a date and not to George Shultz, the US Secre- 
European capital had been know what would become of it tary of State, who called for a 
designed by Moscow to extri- later on." quick return to private 


European capital had been know what would become of it tary of State, who called for a 
designed by Moscow to extri- later on." quick return to private 

cate itself from the increasing- Mr Kornienko also dis- diplomacy, 

ly elusive second summit dosed yesterday that no diplo- Mr Kornienko flatly reject- 

commitment made in Geneva made contacts of any kind bad ed the US demand that Mos- 
last November. been made for the organizing cow abandon Mr Gorbachov’s 


• tion to the- mica's massive, -ran made a known, that Father 
social problems. It has" been . ; Boff had been instructed to 
. criticized by Rome J niainly -stop publishing his raewi and 
- because. of its alleged J xmtow^ ‘-not speak in pttbtia ' • 

.. ings from Mant 1 r. - ; The tengjfl. of foe‘ Imposed 
The Pope - himself- ; lfos> kflenco was- officially left un- 
shown he distrusts elements in. . specified bill was understood 
_ liberation theology and re- - to have been a, year. . 


Secret meeting defies Pretoria 

White students say ANC is 
essential to peaee deal 


Acquitted I Knesset 

Bulgarian budget 

goes home pact fury 

2^ Piet** Nictate ErwaDavid Bernstein 

Rome - Jerusalem ■ 

A Rome court yesterday The Knesset has approved a 

removed the last obstacle to 30-2 billion shekel (£15 bik 
the departure from Italy of Mr lion) budget for the new fiscal 
Sergei Antonov, the Bulgarian year that started yesterday, 
airime official acquitted for jj, e and vote on 

lade of evidence on Sat urday Monday was dismissed bj 
of conspiracy to murder the Opposition spokesmen as for* 
, POP 6 - ‘ ■ _ , deal, after a prior agreement 

But ^ sa ? ne c 00 ?* among the coalition parties tc 

that two Turks acquitted on support the budget despite 
the same charge should stay reservations by both Labom 
here because the prosecution and Likud ministers, 
has .appealed against their, the deal was reached after a 

uft Ih.lv joct warning by the Prime Minis- 
£? ter, Mr Shimon Peres - who 

a L?!L Monday and was present no- 

aurnwt, he left ona tberfor the debate nor for the 

flight as tosown airime had no vote __ that foihjre to approve 
fh^it out of Rome until late in ^ ^ March 

theweek. ... , . 31 deadline would bring down 

The prosecuticmhad.^ted ^ Government . 

JjT Omer The Opposition waived its 

Mr AnttSS? right to debate its reservations 
Bago-^But m Mr Antonovs ^ budget ^ 

^ approved by a simple show of 

before Mr Peres’s deadline 

lal because of insufficient 0bservers doubt, however, 


. V Bjr Our Foreign Staff . 

A meeting between South national executive committee 
African students and mem- members, Mr Mac Maharaj 
bets of the banned African and Mr James Stuart, and 
National Congress ended yes- included representatives of its 
terday with a joint comm uni- Youth League, 
qufr which said the talks had Mr Maharaj' said that, as a 
been held in the belief that result of the meeting, the ANC 
there- could “no solution to now recognized Nusas as 
South Africa’s problems with- “part of the democratic forces 
out the participation of the fo our country". 


From David Bernstein - 
Jerusalem . 

The Knesset has approved a 
302 billion shekel (£15 bil- 
lion) budget for the new fiscal 
year that started yesterday. 

The debate and vote on 
Monday was dismissed by 
Opposition spokesmen as far- 
cical. after a prior agreement 
among the coalition parties to 
support the budget despite 
reservations by both Labour 
and Likud minisiers. 

The deal was reached after a 
warning by the Prime Minis- 
ter, Mr Shimon Peres — who 
left for the US earlier on 
Monday and was present nei- 
ther for the debate nor for the 
vote — that failure to approve 
the budget before the March 
31 deadline would bring down 
the Government 

The Opposition waived its 
right to debate its reservations 
about the budget which was 
approved by a simple show of 
hands with two hours to spare 


ANC". 

The talks were the latest in a 
series of contacts in Zimba- 


Mr Barry said that “possibly 
for the first time ... we have 
got a full picture of what the 


a secret venue in Harare, the 
Zambabwean capital, with se- 
nior officials of the ANC. 

The Nusas delegation was 
led by its president, Mr 
Brendan- Barry, while the 
ANC team was headed by two 


main English-speaking uni- 
versities as well as by Nusas 
members at Stellenbosch, the 
oldest Afrikaans university. 

Other groups which have 
held talks with the ANC in 
recent months include white 
businessmen, leaders of the 
opposition Progressive Feder- 
al Party, black churchmen, 
trade unionists and teachers. 

Such public contacts with 
the ANC would have been 
inconceivable as little as a year 
ago, and reflect the growing 
acceptance by whites (and 
previously politically cautious 
blacks) of the organization’s 
crucial role in the political 


bwe and Zambia between the ANC positions are and what it hi*** l ink* as a war 

ANC and various South Afri- hopes to achieve". 

can groups, both black and He declined to speculate on 

white which began in Septem- whether the Nusas group J5SS«iLSi?2JllS 
ber and have gathered mo- would face “recriminations" SJJJSS 

S^^dLlS^^ Sic?* ^ 10 ^ SSS.iole in !hf£litical 

^Eight members of the _Na- Nusas is open to students o f de . ba ^ ?° u1 ? 
tional Union of South African all races, but most of its In October the Government 
Students held three days of members are white II sup- confiscated the passports of a 
talks over the Easter weeked at ports many of the political group of students from Stel- 
a secret venue in Harare, the aims of the ANC (though not lenbosch who wanted to meet 
Zambabwean capital, with se- its use of violence) and of its the ANC in Zambia, though 
nior officials of the ANC. ally, the United Democratic they were able to circumvent 
The Nusas delegation was From. this obstacle later, 

led by its president, Mr The decision to meet the Since then Pretoria has 
Brendan : Barry, white the ANC was approved by more made surprisingly little effort 
ANC team was headed by two than 8,000 students at the four to stop such contacts. 


lenbosch who wanted to meet 
the ANC in Zambia, though 
they were able to circumvent 
this obstacle later. 

Since then Pretoria has 
made surprisingly little effort 
to stop such contacts. 


Gallows likely for arcade bomber 

From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 

A black youth was found R_ N. Leon, finds that there witness, identified only as Mr 


lal because of insufficient 
evidence. - 

Under Italian law, however. 
There remained the theoretical 
possibility of an appeal until 
April 28, so hisdeparture frean 
the country required a special 
court ruling before an exit visa 
could be granted. 

Mr Antonov was arrested m 
November, 1982. ‘ 


that it will be implemented 
easily or that it will be 
restricted to the figure that 
was approved. 

Members of both parties 
have reserved the right -to 
continue challenging several 
i tems on the revenue ride of 
the budget. 


guilty yesterday of murdering 
five whites who died in a 
bomb explosion at a beach- 
front shopping centre in 
I Amanzimtoti, south of Dur- 
ban, in December. 

The Supreme Court, sitting 
i in the resort of Scottburgh, a 


were extenuating circum- X. who said he had acted as 
stances, Zondo seems certain Zondo’s accomplice. Accord- 
to go to the gaUows, as the ing to Mr X, Zondo told him 
death penalty is mandatory the bombing was to avenge the 


for murder. 


deaths of nine people, most of 


In evidence Zondo admit- them members of the oui- 
ted planting the bomb — a Jawed African National Con- 
limpet mine left in a rubbish gress, kilted in a raid on 
bin — but said he bad not Lesotho by South African 


few miles to the south of bin — but said he bad not Lesotho by 
Amanzimloti, also found An- intended to kill anyone. He commandos, 
drew Zondo, aged 19, guilty of said it was aimed at a South Zondo alk 
attempting to murder other African Airways office in the regret to Mi 
members of the public who arcade. after the bon; 


attempting to murder other 
members of the public who 
were in the shopping centre at 
thetixne. 

Unless the judge, Mr Justice 


Zondo allegedly expressed 
cret to Mr X immediately 


t to Mr X immediately 
the bombing that he had 


The judge said the court had succeeded only in killing four 
accepted as having “the ring of people— a fifth person died in 
truth" the evidence of a state hospital later. 


Gadaffi demands war reparations from Britain 


From Robert Fisk 

Tripoli, Libya 


In the unmediate 
of his confrontation wflli tte 

Americans, Colonel Gadaffi 


BBS uruiuuv*““ » ■ - » *»■ . . 

demand substantial fimaiciai 

and Germany for dama» and 
laities inflicted on 
during and after the Second 

World War. 

Brochures 

Libyan Govermneaft Stud** 
C««taTnpofi^Pj^ 


daring a speech ha Triptli on 
Friday ni^t He. singled out 
the Italians as bring chiefly 
responsible for Libyan suffer- 
ing in die first half of this 
because of their km$ 




zarion of the 
MossofinTS repression of Lib- 

yaBgnemlfoapwhwcfflte 


foe authorities here; cost the 
fives of 2WHA IlbyflHS, 5JW7 


group of colonialists — foe 
Axis <- to another, the British. 

Britain's evacuation of foe 
RAF base at El Aden 16 years 
ago has therefore been repre- 
sented as the final end of 

mb h www h ahnnt. s'a? 


coarse, by that well-known 
revolutionary, ' Colonel 
Mmumnar Gadaffi. 

The Italians take foe view 
that they have already fblfified 
their obligations by paying ant 
1 th. milKoo Libyan (finals in 


mops In ffie desert 
Benghazi, and oan 


rfwaomjwre«ra 3 tionary Lfoyan Govenunent m 
lt rS* wiB pat 1956 . About five years ago, the 

cS for Italian Government also 
110 forwarded to Colonel GadafiTs 


I^^Warho^-. 


sqnare n sues m-V*. 


reparations, reiete SSS 
contention that foe Eqddh 
Army liherated foe comtoy 
from the Itafoms and foe 
Germans. Te!e«stei pro- 
rnammes broadcast u» Tripoli 


CWonri Gadaffi 

raised foe reparations jasue 


S^the Eiriifo regime Second World War 
ed foe country mops of Italian Ar my 
t&uts gad the minefields together with an 
ttetisfcm pro- offer to send Itolian borfj 
dwri-in Tripoli disposal W to dm vast 
» portrayed foe which once 

W^inUbyaas formed (he Axh 
nMierhDiB one Acaffdmg to the_ Itahan 


Second World Warm woya^ 
foe transfer of power f ooe 


Embassy here - which says 
foe Libyans are also claiming 
reparations for form animals 
killed in aerial bombings be- 
tween 1941 and 1942 - foe 
offer was nev«r accepted. 

'TLa P m Zt i rK an TUh _ 


oli says he has received no 
dating from foe Libyans al- 
though foe Egyptians raised 
similar Issues with foe British 
Government several years ago 
and obtained photocopies of 
Montgomery's Eighth Army 
froetmie maps to guide sap- 
pers working on foe minefields 
of El Alamein. 

The Libyan argument has 
been pot in a straight-forward 
manner by the Staines Centre 
which says Libyans are still 
suffering *in consequence of a 
war that was fought on their 
land between people who were 
strangers to it and who - after 
baring struggled against each 
ether for a tong time — left 


Libya, became reconciled and 
have become friends'". 

The formerly befligerent na- 
tions, foe centre says, “left in 
Libya tire ‘souvenir* of forir 
enmity, and this continues to 


Colonel Gadaffi notwith- 
standing, Libya’s long war 
against foe Italian occupiers is 
still a matter of great national 
pride among Libyans 
Fading old photographs in 
foe starmy-ririted Museum 
of Islamic Heritage hi Tripoli 
show the bodies of Italian 
troops who had been stripped 
naked with arms staked out in 
foe desert sun to die of thirst in 
the 1920s guerrilla war. Other 
pictures which appear in the 
recent brochures demanding 
reparations, depict Libyan 
peasants bring executed by the 
Italians at a mass hanging in 
Tripoli. 

Spectrum, page 10 


practice of announcing diplo- ! 
matic initiatives, such as the 
proposed European summit, I 
in advance — a gambit which ' 
has caused recent irritation in 
Washington. “It is up to us to 
decide what questions should 
be made public through diplo- 
matic channels, or otherwise." 

The Kremlin official re- 
vealed that the US had been 
informed of the contents of 
Mr Gorbachov’s 20-minute 
speech on Saturday only after 
it had been broadcast live. 
“The whole world was told 
our decision, and after we 
informed the US." he said. 

Headline-grabbing propos- 
als designed to portray the 
Soviet Union as the more 
ardent pursuer of peace and 
disarmament have become 
the hallmark of Mr Gorb- 
achov’s aggressive diplomatic 
style. Soviet sources say they 
wifi continue because they are 
deemed effective at influenc- 
ing public opinion. 

Leading article, page 13 

Poll hope 
for heir 
of Mahdi 

From GUI Lusk 
Khartoum 

Sudan went to the polls 
yesterday in the conn try’s first 
free elections for 18 years. The 
results, to be announced from 
April 16 onwards, will deter- 
mine the form of the civilian 
government to take over from 
the techtiocratic/military 
councils that have run the 
country in the year following 
President Nimeiry’s over- 
throw in a popular uprising. 

Election forecasts consis- 
tently put the National Umma 
Party, led by a former Prime 
Minister, Mr Sadiq al-Mahdi, 
in the lead to form a coalition 
that is expected to include the 
country's other traditional 
party, the Democratic Union- 
ist Party (DUP). 

Mr al-Mahdi, great-grand- 
son of the Mahdi who headed 
Sudan's first modem stale and 
defeated General Gordon in 
1885. has led a campaign 
focusing on repealing Presi- 
dent Nimeiry’s pseudo-Islam- 
iclaws 

The issues have provided 
common ground for most 
leading parties, fueDing hopes 
of a workable coalition. In an 
attempt to defeat the Islamic 
Front leader, Dr Hassan Abd- 
ullah al-Turabi. a former 
Nimeiry minister, six parties 
have agreed to ask supporters 
to vote for a single candidate. 


Stingers 
for rebels 

From Christopher Thomas 
Washington 

Leading Democrats in the 
US Congress are worried by 
President Reagan’s decision to 
send Stinger shoulder-fired 
missiles to rebels in Angola 
and Afghanistan under covert 
aid programmes. 

Mr Lee HamiRon, chairman 
of the House intelligence com- 
mittee, called for an end to 
covert assistance to the insur- 
gents so that an open aid 
policy could be considered by 
the entire Congress. 

The United States is known 
to have given Afghan rebels 
hundreds of millions of dollars 
of weapons, including Soviet- 
made portable missiles bought 
from international arms deal- 
ers and friendly governments. 

The Washington Post 
quoted senior Administration 
officials at the weekend as 


Sindona 
cyanide 
was in 
coffee 

Milan (Reuter) - Forensic 
experts confirmwt here that 
the cyanide which killed the 
Sicilian financier, Michele 
Sindona, was in a cup ot 
breakfast coffee he drank in 
jail. 

But it was still not known 
whether he committed suicide 
or was murdered, the deputy 
public prosecutor. Signor 
Giovanni Simoni. said. 

Sindona died, aged 65, on 
March 21 iwo days after 
swallowing the cyanide in his 
cell in a top-security prison in 
northern Italy and four days 
after being sentenced to life 
imprisonment for ordering a 
contract murder. 

Professor Antonio Fomari. 
one of the scientists who 
1 briefed Signor Simoni, said: 
“Now we know for certain 
that the plastic cup containing 
j the coffee drunk by Sindona 
had traces of poison. But we 
do not know how the cyanide 
got into the cup.” 

‘Rocky’ shock 
for Soviet girl 

Los Angeles (UPH — The 
Soviet schoolgirl, Katerina 
Lycheva, believes that Presi- 
dent Reagan will help to ban 
nuclear weapons. But she says 
that the United States has 
sbown her an image of Rus- 
sians created by films like 
Rocky 1 1’ which is so horrible 
that even she was scared of the 
Soviet characters. 

“There was not a word that 
was true in that film.” Katya 
said through an interpreter at 
a news conference during her 
peace visit here. “Even the 
faces of the Soviet people were 
not the way they really are. 
Soviet people have friendly, 
open faces." 

Dark at noon 

Anchorage, Alaska (AFP) - 
The Alaskan volcano Augus- 
tine. which began erupting last 
week, blocked out the sun at 
Homer about 60 miles from 
here yesterday, forcing the 
town council to keep street- 
lights on during the day. 


saying that Stingers had been hunts on dunng the day. 
sent to rebels in both Afghani- . 11 

stan and Angola during the JLXiiSll lOll Up 


previous week. 

Although the State Depart- 
ment issued its standard refus- 
al to comment publicly about 
intelligence matters, congres- 
sional sources confirmed that 
foe intelligence committees of 
the House and the Senate had 
been informed privately of the 
President’s decision. 

Mr Reagan has authority to 
initiate covert programmes, 
but is required to notify the 
intelligence committees, which 
can then indicate approval or 
disapproval through confiden- 
tial channels. 

Stinger missiles, made by 
General Dynamics, are rela- 
tively easy to operate and are 
for more accurate and sophis- 
ticated than foe Russian-made 


Maputo (A P) - Five more 
people have died as a result of 
Sunday's crash of a Mozambi- 
can Air Force Antonov plane, 
raising the number killed to 
49. Three Russians were 
among the dead. 

Short term 

Washington (AP) — More 
than half the convicted mur- 
derers released from stale 
prisons in the United States in 
1983 spent less than seven 
years behind bars, a govern- 
ment study reported. 

Ferry deaths 

Dhaka — At least 38 people 
were killed when a ferry 


ncaren wan sne Kiissiait-nraue carrying about 250 passengers 

Vallee better 

five miles Los Angeles (Reuter) - 

Mr Hamilton has proposed Rud ? VaIIcc - a E ed 85, the 
introducing a Bill that would actor-singer, has shown a 
require aid to foe Angolan marked improvement after 
rebels to be open. Covert aid surgery «o remove a cancerous 
limits discussion to foe intelii- growth from his throat. He 
grace committees in had been in intensive care for 

secret sessions. two weeks. 

“I do not think it is wise to r a f a l iutrtTi 
proceed on these highly con- r<4UU JUHip 
troversfol foreign policy ded- Taipei (UPIl - A 21-year- 
sfons without foe support of o)d lovelorn woman who 
Congress," he said in a state- jumped from the 12th floor in 
menL ^This is not a covert a suicide attempt but hit and 
actior in the ordinary under- killed a food vendor was 
sta n din g of the term. This is indicted for manslaughter by 
... . negligence. 

“That is foe question: 

Should the United States enter If VPrvhflflV fftllf 
into support of one side of foe ^ J UUU J uul 
war in Angola? It is a for cry Zurich (Reuter) — The 
from the sort of situation number of strikes in Switzer- 


Los Angeles (Reuter) — 
Rudy Vallee, aged 85, the 
actor-singer, has shown a 
marked improvement after 
surgery to remove a cancerous 
growth from his throat. He 
had been in intensive care for 
two weeks. 

Fatal jump 

Taipei (UPIl - A 21-year- 
old lovelorn woman who 
jumped from the 12th floor in 
a suicide attempt but hit and 
killed a food vendor was 
indicted for manslaughter by 
negligence. 


Congress had in mind when it 
set up the procedure for han- 
dling covert operations." 


land rose by 50 per cent last 
year. There were three, com- 
pared with two in 1984. 


I BA 


INDEPENDENT 

BROADCASTING 

AUTHORITY 


Appointment 
of Contractors for 
UK DBS 

Following the bringing into force of Sections 37-41 of the 
Cable and Broadcasting Act 1984, the Independent Broadcasting 
Authority is empowered to provide Direct Broadcasting by 
Satellite (DBS) television and teletext services for the whole 
of the United Kingdom under the terms of the Cable and 
Broadcasting Act 1984 and the Broadcasting Act 1981. 

The IBA invites applications for contracts to provide DBS 
services. The closing date is noon on 29th August. The intention 
of the IBA is to award contracts by the end of 1986. 

Programme contract specifications may be obtained on 
written request to the Secretary to the Independent Broadcasting 
Authority, 70 Brompton Road, London, SW3 1EY. 

Bryan Rook, Secretary to the Authority. 

2nd April 1986. 


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AIRCRAFT MANUFACTURER 


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CONTENDi 



opposed to the Mercedes 200’s 46.1 5. something, to do with the 
Sash’s 16 valve engine compared to the Merc's 8. valves, we suspect 
Plus the Merc costs £500 more than the Saab, and an extra 
£1,000 more to achieve the same specification level 


l ~«t>y<wg*'9 wta Brc 88y»MT... 


F O R'"3- S^SBuSIBS 


YOUR £12, 











Spacious Saloon . 

This category provided a real turn-up for the books The 
Audi 100 famous for its roominess, came in with a highly respectable 
EPA figure of 115.4. 

Amazingly it was edged out by the shortest car in the class - 
the Saab 9000/ with a cavernous interior measured at 126. 

(For the technically minded, the EPA figure is a measurement 
by laser of the total area within a car, developed in the States.) 


Most Aerodynamic Saloon. 

Of all the executive saloons, the Renault 25 range takes top 
honours with drag coefficient figures between 0.28 and 0.33t 

Yet for the customer with up to £12,000 to spend there’s a 
surprise in store. 

The Saab 9000i achieves better average fuel economy, with 
a drag coefficient figure of 0.34) than the comparable Renault 25GTX* 

Best Appointed Saloon . 

MOTOR (Nov 16 85) got quite carried away at this 
particular point: 





Most Comfortable Saloon 

This was an extremely close run affair. MOTOR summed 
it up thus: 

Ride comfort . . . The 9000’s superb suspension control is 
every bit as good as that of the Mercedes, the standard setter in this 
class.'* A highly honourable draw! 

However, take into account Saab’s legendary skill at de- 
signing seats, and the 9000i is almost unbeatable at carrying up to 
5 people in comfort 

Most Fuel Efficient Saloon . 

Saab and Mercedes feature strongly once again. 

However, at a steady 56 mph, the 9000i achieves 47.9 mpg # 


-V V - 




■■ v*' * ■ , • '• -V: 


The Saab 9000 has a definite air of quality, easily in the. 
class of BMW) and is furnished better than its principal German rivals i* 

High praise indeed from such a respected journal. 

Best Use of Ergonomics. 

Here the competition for the Saab 9000/’ is particularly, 
stiff- the Saab Viggen - the jet aircraft on which the 9000/s cdnira/s, 
instruments and dashboard layout are based. 

But there again, file Viggen is outside your price bracket 
by roughly £7,000.000. 

The Saab 9000i for £11,995. For more information and/or 
a test drive contact Saab on (0272) 217177. 











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f; MD REAR S£Ar B£lTS - TAX and vat. butexcl udes 

C'U£ <3.9 MPG. CONSTANT Sfi MPH 47.9 MPG. CONSTANT 75 MPH 353 MPG. EXPORT ENQUIRIES (Of) 409 0990 












THF. TIMES WFDNF.Sr>AY APRIL 2 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


2 : 


US. complains of unfair trading 



war 


of words over 
quotas heats up 


A heated war . of words 
between the United States and 
the EEC over trade broke out 
yesterday with Mr Willy de 
Gercq, the EEC Commission- 
er for external relations, accus- 
ing President Reagan of 
unfriendly and needlesriy ag- 
gressive action. 

Mr de Otattt's angry state- 
ment. came after a - warning 
from the White House that it 
would impose fresh quotas 
and restrictions on agricultur- 
al imports from . Western Eu- 
rope because the enlaigcd 
Community of Twelve was 
discriminating against the 
United States. 

The Americans complain 
that the EEC lias imposed 
unfair restrictions on the im- 
porting of American cereals 
and oilseeds into Spain and 
Portugal, which joined the 
EEC three months ago. 

Europe and America are 
already embroiled in a grow- 
ing trade war over pasta, citrus 
fruits and steel products. EEC 
officials yesterday regretted 
the rising tone of hostility 
between Brussels and Wash- 
ington and said that “personal 


From Richard Owen, Brussels 

contact* between the two 
sides was being lost in a tide of 
rhetoric. ..." 

, .. Mr de Gtecq, currently on a 
visit to New Zealand, issued a 
.statement saying Mr Reagan's 
action was difficult to under- 
stood since America would 
derive considerable 
from EEC enlargement, both 
politically and in' terms of 
trade. The entry of Spain and 
Portugal would reinforce the 
Western : affiance, Mr de 
Clercqsaid. . . 

Last month Spain voted to 
stay in Nato ui a national 
referendum,, despite strong 
anti-Americanism in Spain, 
with many vpters persuaded 
‘ that there was a logical Hnfc 
between Spain's membership - 
of Nato and its entry to the 
EEC 

Mr de Oeroq said the EEC 
had shown its willingness to 
negotiate through Gatt, the 
General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade. But America's 
“confrontational approach” 
could lead to open commer- 
ce] conflict. •' 

He said the EEC had always 
scrupulously observed its Gatt 


commitments, and new Iberi- 
an farm import rules under 
which Siain and Portugal boy 
from their EEC partners were 
in accordance- with transition- 
al accession arrangements. 

Unilateral action by Wash- 
ington would be an unjustified 
breach of Gatt, and the EEC 
could not accept such a fla- 
grant violation of world free 
trade rales, the Commissioner 
said. 

The American retaliatory 
quotas would bar $1 billion 
(£667 million) of EEC imports 
from getting into the US. They 
do not take effect, however, 
for a month, giving the two 
sides time to negotiate a 
compromise. But Washington 
also objects to new EEC meat 
inspection regulations which 
would hit American meat 
exports to Europe by approxi- 
mately S 1 25 million. 

The EEC argues that all 
such measures are offset by 

S ciential improved access to 
pain and Portugal for Ameri- 
can industrial goods as Iberian 
industrial tariffs drop from 15 
per cent to the EEC average of 
only 5 per cent 


Aquino keeps eight Marcos generals 


From Keith Dalton 
ManQa 

President Corazon Aquino 
yesterday approved the retire- 
ment of 26 generals and 19 
colonels in the biggest mass 
retirement of scow military 
officers in Philippine history. 

The State-run Philippine 
News Agency, however, said 
Ate Aquino agreed to extern! 
for six months the terms of 
eight generak, indadigg three 
service chiefs, and three colo- 
nels os the recommendation of 
General Ftdd Ramon, the 
armed fanes chief 

The extensions violate her 
campaign pledge to remove 
bran command all officers who 
have completed 10 years' ser- 
vice ts alknr the promotion of 
junior officers, caught in a 
backlog created by the de- 
posed President, Mr FenE- 
oand Marcos, who doing Ms 
20-year rale extended for 
years the service of favoured 


Meanwhile, US and Filipi- 
no negotiators have agreed to 
end an 11-day-old strike at US 
military bases in the Philip- 
pines. A seven-point package 
was yesterday being taken to 
the 22JOOO moon members 
and, if approved, barricades 
outside the bases wonld be 
lifted and work wonld resume 
today. 

The longest strike ever at 
American facilities centred 
around Washington's refusal 
to agree to workers* demands 
for severance pay on resigna- 
tion. The compromse agree- 
ment provides optional 
retirement rules, a $100 (about 
£67) "signing boons” and 
1001b of rice every three 



Two members of the New People's Army show off their weapons just after getting married 

if the communist rebels 50 miles north-east of Manna. 


In 


at a temporary camp of 
return, US officials 


agreed not to retaliate against 
Filipino picketers who had 
blockaded movement in and 
out of the bases. 

• MADRID: Spain would be 
willing to consider reversing 


its initial refusal to grant 
political asylum to Mr Marcos 
if President Aquino requested 
it (Richard Wjgg writes). 

Foreign Ministry sources 
indicated yesterday that the 
future of the former dictator 


lay in the outcome of a visit to 
ManQa by Seftor Francisco 
Fernindez Ordddez. Spain's 
Foreign Minister, and the first 
representative of an EEC 
country to visit the new 
regime. 


Time runs 
out for 
fugitives 
in Spain 

From Richard Wigg 
Madrid 

Spain’s controversial aliens 
law, which Madrid could use 
to expel “undesirable” Britons 
wanted by Scotland Yard, 
came into force yesterday, 
eight montits after being 
promulgated. 

It had to be postponed three 
limes because of bureaucratic 
delays due to insufficient per- 
sonnel, and expulsion orders 
issued in a dozen cases against 
suspected Britons, often 
months ago, appeared still 
bogged down. 

Senor Jose Barrionuevo, the 
Interior Minister, yesterday 
began a visit to Spain’s en- 
claves on the North African 
coast, where the attempted 
application of the aliens law 
has caused the biggest bead- 
aches. There have been distur- 
bances in Melilia, where only 
7,000 local Muslims among an 
estimated 27,000 population 
have S panish nationality. 

So for only 40,000 foreign- 
ers have registered as the law 
esquires. In one important 
Mediterranean coast region, 
foreigners anxious to be on the 
right side of the law were told 
by the police that no registra- 
tion forms had arrived. 

The Spanish Ombudsman 
has taken up some of the new 
law's provisions before the 
Constitutional Court 


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Bulgaria responds 
to Soviet critics 

By RogerBoyes, East Europe Correspondent 


Bulgaria today convenes a 
Communist Party Congress 
that will try to answer some of 
the Soviet Union's sharp com- 
plaints about the way that 
Sofia is running the economy. 


long e x per ie nce m the state 
and parly administration, he 
is a strong candidate for the 
succession to the leadership. 
But the men who are really on 
the rise are in the Gorbachov 


la/uu m mjv vwwvujj • uiw uju aiw mi urn, 

It follows a.radical shake-up generation or. even younger, 
of the state administration, . Mr Georgi Atanasov, the 
the shifting of the Prime new Prune Minister, is S3. He 


Minister, the sacking of sever- 
al of his colleagues, and the 
abolition of five important 
economic ministries. 

Eastern Europe is holding 
its five-ytariy Communist 
congresses in the wake of the 
Soviet session which charted 
Mr Gorbachov's economic 
and political course and belda 
barrage of criticism of . the 
Brezhnev era. .• 

The Bulgarian leader; Mr 
Todor Zhivkov, was ranked as 
the closest fnendintheSoyiet 
bloc of Leonid Brezhnev and 
has been ^artkaila^ 


has a strong scientific back- 
ground and is thus wefl 
equipped to ran the “scientific 
and technical revolution" in 
the Bulgarian economy. This 
is the phrase used throughout 
the bloc for the new pro- 
grammes of modernizing the 
economy, narrowing the tech- 
nological gap between East 
and .West, and malting East 
-European products more com- 
petitive with those produced 
in the Wes|L^^ - 

ive- M 

of tMr. States Comnuttee 7 ^ 


xpressed wifo^usurf <»B-^ SckBee^ aiid' -Ttt*nM6fejr; as 
Sour by the SbV5etjtyfib«»?* Minister, 

lor to Sofia, about the quality/ and hewilTbe iif Charge of the 

fBulgarian goods exported to hroad firid of “innovaiion” • 

. — — 1 ~ — The reshuffle, and this 

week’s empress, reveaT above 
all a sensitivity to the needs of 
Moscow. . 


the Soviet Unioo and the time 
pent by formers on their 
arivate plots. 

A recent reshuffle was sup- 
posed to head off further 
xiticism. Above afl, it was 
designed to show that the 
main fault of the Bulgarians 
was in the implementation of 
xonomic policies — for which 
the Goverment is responsible 
- and not in the overall 
programme as defined by the 
party leadership. . 

Although Mr Zhivkov is 74 
and evidently tired, it -seems' 
unlikely that he win step down 
it the congress: some Western 

analysts suggest that he will do 

so at a plenary session of the 
Central Committee at the end 
of the year. 

The changes, late last 
month, gave some does as to 
the emerging leadership gen- 
nation. 

Mr Grisha Fffipov has been 
shifted from the premiership 
to the Central Committee 
Secretariat. Al 66, and with 


The Soviet Union, which 
supplies almost ail of the 
energy needs of Bulgaria, has 
been unhappy for some years 
about the quality of goods it 
gets in return. Those areas 
most under attack — mechani- 
cal engineering, the chemical 
industry, energy, communica- 
tions and metallurgy — have 
found their ministries simply 
abolished. It is not altogether 
dear what structure wili re- 
place them. • 

: The trend throughout the 
Soviet bloc, taring the tune 
from Moscow, is to make the 
Communist Party into a more 
effective control organ of the 
goverment. That means mak- 
ing a dear separation between 
party and goverment, but the 
real leadership stars of the 
future are men who can 
master both party and govern- 
ment work. 


[jfia’s victims listed 

w Amnesty sad it had 


ssty Interactional has 
oes of more than 100 
Tories allegedly , killed 
Bulgarian secu rity a a- 
s daring a campaign to 
mate take Slavnames, 
can rights organization 

i a report pubfeh^ 

(Oar Foreign Staff 

• were said tfl haw dfed 

protesting peacefully 
the campaign, others 
violent res- 


* were also reported 
pofice and troops, 
ere said- to hare - bees 
ifier swromuhng- a 

■ Dm*er2Mfc4; 
ythefom-moflth-fe^ 


Amnesty sad it had re- 

ceived many reports of etimie 

Turks bring released from 
may afire accepting 
new names for themselves or 
thrir families, and of people 
being resettled forcibly away 
from their home areas. 

It ms stiff not completely 
dear wby the authorities had 
moved against a minority esti- 
mated at no more than 10 per 
cent of a total Bulgarian 
popob 

higher birth rate titan the 
majority Slara. 

(Bulgaria: Imprisonment of Ein- 
mc Turks. Amnesty L 
natio nal. 5 Roberts Pi^cc, 
LcSdSfEClRm £2.50- post 
free.) 


as 


A 

the 

hit 


Cabinet offers 
resignation to 

help Uruguay 

Montevideo (AW - The 11 
members of the Cabm*°f; 
fered to resign to allow Presi- 
dent Sanguinctti to put into 
effecia jdan to reactivate the 
economy and strengthen the 
new democracy m Uruguay. 

The action came after news 
that agreement had been 
readied between political 

groups on a three-year plan to 
Svive . the ^ economy and 
streamline administration. 

The Cabinet members sent 
a note to Sehor San|uinem 
raying they wouldab^dmi 

thefrposts to give dj***®®’ 
dent “freedom of action to 

resolve political questions . 



OF INDIFF 



•T 1 

I. HoW mariy In the United Kingdom are an old person 

- £. ZS * ‘ □! in 30D I in 13 □ I in f0 □ I in7 


- - . w- 

-i ■ • " — Sa! 




livingafone?^ 

.. i . . i a- .- rt- 


■ -rjt < 


2. How many old people have no living relatives? 

□ 50,000 □ 100,000 □ 300,000 □ 500,000 

3. How many old people have no regular visitors? 

□ 200,000 □ 450,000 □ 750,000 □ 1,000,000 

4. How many old people cannot get in and out of bed unaided? 

□ 20,000 □ 34,000 □ 70,000 □ 189,000 □ 500,000 

5. How many old people died in their homes from the cold in 1985? 

□ 200 □ 571 □ 1,000 □ 10,512 □ 100,000 

6. Britain has 1.1 million dwellings statutorily defined as unfit for 

human habitation. How many are inhabited by old people? 

□ 50,000 □ 150,000 □ 250,000 □ 350,000 □ 500,000 

7. How oldwas: _ . 

a) Winston Churchill when he first became Prime Minister? 

b) Michelangelo when he started work on the Sistine Chapel? 


8. How many centenarians received congratulatory telegrams from 
the Queen a) in 1965? b) in 1985? 


9. How many old people depend upon Supplementary Benefit? 

□ 'A million □ I million □ 2 million □ 3 million □ 4 million □ 5 million 


10. What are we doing about it? 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 ; — 

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Not only does United Biscuits offer significant and immediate 
benefits, it offers over 17% more income than Hanson’s “best” bid. 

The very last date for acceptance of the United Biscuits’ offer 
is Friday, 11th April 1986. There can be no extension.* 

United Imperial 

THE LONGER YOU LOOK AT IT, THE MORE IT MAKES SENSE. 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1936 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


9 2: 


Hindu-Sikh fighting flares 





as 



tries to stem violence 


• (Reuter, AP) - The 
Governor of the violence- 
racked Punjab suae was re- 
place^ yestedityb^ a veteran 
. polituaui as the central Gov* 
etfrment tried to restore order, 
v. Sources in the Punjab capi- 
tefrof Chandigarh said Mr 
Shinkar Days] Stanna^ in 
office only three months^ was 
replaced by Mr Sidarih 
Shankar Ray, a lawyer, former 
MP 'and . Chief Minister of 
West ’Bengal from 1972 to 
1977. 

Mr Ray, aged 65, ha< not 
been actively involved in 
politics during the 1980s. 

Meanwhile, police shot 
dead two Sikh extremists in 
Punjab, and a general strike 
began in Delhi to protest at 
terrorist killings in tire north- 
era state. 

The two men were killed in 
a gunfight with police near 
Harike Pattan village, about 
30 miles south of the Sikh holy 
city of Amritsar, state authori- 
ties said. 

Hindu-Sikh violence flared 
in nearby Batala when a 
curfew was relaxed to allow 
people to buy provisions. 

Police said Sikh militants 
threw stones at Hindu-owned 
shops and houses during a 


demonstration against the 
beating, of a Sikh youth. 
Paramiiitaiytroops moved in 
&nd the curfew was imposed 
again. .... 

The Sikhs dispersed after 
police said they would Ale 
assault charges against three 
Hindus' who; beat the Sikh 
youth. But about -400 Hindu 
women defied the curfew and 
staged a sit-in outside - the 
police station to cfemanri die 
three be released 

Batala has been under cur- 
lew for more than two weeks, 
last week security forces 
broke a five-day siege - of 
Batala by Sikh villagers, who 
blockaded roads and cut off 
food. and m>nr to the Hindu- 
dominated industrial town. 

In Delhi yesterday thou- 
sands of people heeded a call 
by opposition parties and 
moderate Sikh groups fin- a 
strike to protest at the violence 
in Punjab. 

Main markets,, wholesale 
trading centres arid the stock 
exchange were closed, and 
there was less traffic, although 
public transport was not 
affected. 

The replacement of the 
Punjab governor yesterday 
was the second time in three 


Sir Geoffrey hits 
the tourist trail 


From Michael Hamtyn, Agra 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the off a village 
Foreign Secretary, came face 
to face yesterday with two 
widely different aspects of 
India: the magnificence of the 
Taj Mahal slimI the poverty of 
a village of UatMchables. - 

Before embarking on a se- 
ries of meetings in Delhi, 
i Delating a call on Mr Rafiv 
Gandhi, the Prime Munster, 

Sir Geoffrey flew in his RAF 
VC10 120 miles soath "ofthe 
capital to tire Mogul city 1 of- 
Agra for a little sightseeing. 

There he posed like any 
tourist for his wife’s camera in 
front of tire white marble 
nunsoleiin) built for Emperor 
Shah Jehan's favourite wife, 

Mmntaz. 

Occasionally some tourists 
feel let down by the Tai- bat'. 

Hat the Howes. “Like Chartres 
cathedral, it lives Hp to 
expectations,” Sr Geoffrey 
told me as we sheltered under 
a mango tree from the rising 

morning heat and sipped soft/.,-. . _ _ 

drinks. “The scale, which yon J 1 !? 

don't appreciate from the pto- ******** 

and tire 


a village development 
scheme. 

Chanhatna bad been 
cleaned up for the occasion, 
and lime had been spread at 
the side of tite roads to kifl tire 
smells. - 

Sir Geoffrey was shown a 
new concrete house built for an 
Untouchable family with a 
6.000 rupee (£350) teen. • ••-. 

While he was being shown 
.the.: freshly whitewashed 
houses; a group of Untouch- 
able women — they are on the 
lowest rung of aD in Indian 
society and are generally re- 
ferred to as Harijmu, or 
People of God, the name given 
them by Mahatma Gandhi — 
peeped from the rooftops, their 
foces shrouded hi their sans as 
they watched the menfolk 
pursue the visitors with trum- 
pet and -dram* 

Sir ^wffirey was asked to: 
lay a" 

soon-to^bmlt 
centra The stone dedarerittaft 


tographs, and the texture 
make it better than yon 
expect." 

Lady Howe caused a mo- 
ment of panic among the 
assembled officials when she 
realized she had abandoned 
her handbag while she took 
her hnsband’s photograph, 
and a minion was dispatched 
to retrieve it It was returned to 
her, something cffilikely to 
happen to other tourists in 
similar rircmnstances. 

*T fad to give the nun who 
found it a kiss," said tire tarty 
official who brought it tack to 
her, dangling it from a limp 
wrist - , 

After a speedy trip round 
the mansotemn, the Foreign 
Secretary was driven eight 
miles into the Uttar Pradesh 
conntrytide to the village of 
Ctantatna, where the state 
government proudly showed 


Sir Geoferely" 

A yellow tnrban was put on 
bis head and a tilak, or 
welcome mark of tnnneric and 
a red powder called kmm-kmm, 
was placed on his forehead. 
Pandit Jodbar, tire village 
Brahmin priest invoked bless- 
ings on “Sir Cederdy" and 
the stone. 

“It is a groat honour fa- 
me. . ~T :S*d Sir Geoffrey, 
before the pandiL interrupted 
him again with another round 
of In toning, The pandit was 
hushed by state officials, and 
Sir Geoffrey continued, his 
tartan nodding. 

Then the Foreign Secretary, 
the British High Commission- 
er, and a 15-car convoy of 
dignitaries drove away in a 
huge doad of dust, which 
settled slowly on the new 
whitewash in the 
shimmer. 


DeLorean 
ranch goes 
to lawyer 

From Ivor Davis ■ ■ 


toward Weitzraan, a 
>eles lawyer, ba* bfr 
ie owner of the S2-5 
£1.7 million) estate of 
t, Mr John DeLorean. 
Lawrence Irving ap- 
be transfer of th'e.San . 
roperty as parr . of the 
legal fees for Mr 
sn’ssuccessfiil 1984 
of Mr DeLorean on 
i charges of trafficking 
million of cocaine, 
rving ruled that tire 
e reasonable, 
feitzman is also de- 
the designer of the 
Bade DeLorean sports 
•barges of defrauding 
orean Motor Compaq 
lore of $18 million. 
Moving the transfer of 
ere ranch home of Mr 
m and his former 
ristina. Judge Irving 
Hr Weitzman had 
off the legal miracte of 
^iry" in winning ac- 
Mr DeLorean. 


LA plague 
of deadly 
new heroin 

Los Angeles - A cheap, tat 
often deadly form of heroin is 
being smuggled over the Mod- 
can border- into the United 
States, according to Los Ange- 
les police (Ivor Davis writes). 

Narcotics investigators say 
foe illegal drug, known as 
“lar" or “black tar’’ because of 
its colour and texture, has 
tripled the number of heroin 
orerdose deaths in Los Ange- 
les in the past few years. 
Heroin-related emergencies 
jumped from 1,833 in 1984 to 
2^78 last year. 

They " say that the tar is 
processed from opium poppy 
crops by formers in northern 
Mexican states and smuggled 
into the US, mostly by illegal 
aliens and migrant workers. 

It is readuy available in 
some 27 US states and espe- 
cially in Mexican-Amencan 
communities. What makes the 
spread ofthe often-iethsti drug 
so alarming is its cheapness. A 
chip the size of a - ®? tchs «35 
head costs from $20 to 530 
(about £13 to £20) and pro- 
vides up to eight doses. 


Briefcase’ firms shut 


cr) - China 
0 firms set up 
imunist Party 
tion of reguia- 
rid officials to 

i aily reported 


- 

i of a nanonr 
on corrup- 
ofoer ecoo- 

s companies" 


were set up to take.advamage 
of^cJsttto cootrol ovw 

the- economy. It was said foe 
Sfldren of several leading 
officials were Involved. 

The newspaper Qtatedan 
official announcement as say- 
ing state and party agencies 
SL permitted to run laun- 
shops., bath 

£sand other sennas 

lona as they were P url ^y^ r 
of their employees. 


days that a top official in the 
state had beto moved. On 
Saturday the Chief Minister, 
MrSurjit Singh Barn ala, an- 
nounced the replace meal of 
the state's police chief, by foe 
country's most . respected 
iawenforcer, Mr Julius 
Ribeiro, former police chief of 
Bombay. . . 

The violence threatened the 
stability of Mr Baroala's mod- 
erate Sikh-dominated govern- 
ment and has put pressure on 
him and the Prime Minister, 
Mr Rajiv Gandhi, to restore 
order to the prosperous state. 

At feast 104 people were 
killed last momh in Punjab in 
sectarian violence involving 
the minority Hindu commu- 
nity, prompting the central 
Government to flood foe state 
with police reinforcements. 

• Anti-terror expert Mr Ray, 
the new governor, bad experi- 
ence in dealing with left-wing 
terrorists, the Naxahies, when 
he was Chief Minister of West 
Bengal (Kuldip Nay ar writes). 

His predecessor, Mr Dayal, 

. has been given foe governor- 
ship of Maharashtra, a bigger 
state, though it is clear he has 
been removed for not being 
effective. 


Rebels say 
they killed 
two Soviet 
advisers 

Bangkok (AFP) - Khmer 
Rouge guerrillas yesterday 
claimed to have killed two 
Soviet advisers, 72 Vietnam- 
ese soldiers and wounded a 
further 115 Vietnamese in an 
attack on a Cambodian town. 

The rebel radio station, in a 
report monitored here, said 
foot the attack was launched 
on Friday against 
Batlamtang, the largest town 
in western Cambodia, about 
180 miles north-west of 
Phnom Penh and 45 miles 
from the Thai border. 

One prisoner was taken, 
according to the Peking- 
backed Conunmist faction of 
the tripartite Cambodian re- 
sistance movement The report 
indicated that it was one of the 

biggest offensives yet claimed 
by the Khmer Rouge. 

The guerrillas said they 
attacked Vietnamese camps 
defending the town, destroying 
military' equipment, including 
three tanks. 

Khmer Roage radio also 
reported attacks on the town of 
Maang in the south-west of 
the conn try and a Vietnamese 
army base in the eastern 
province of Kompong Cham. 
Rebels also claimed to have 
killed 52 Vietnamese and 
wounded 47 last week in an 
attack on a Vietnamese mili- 
tary convoy in the central 
province of Kompong 
Chhnang. 



§!. 


Weinberger gives 
security pledge 
to South Koreans 

From Our Own Correspondent, Seoul 



US Air Force A10 Thunderbolts fly over South Korea during 
ittint military exercises between the two countries. 


Mr Caspar Weinberger, the 
US Defence Secretory, yester- 
day said foe security of South 
Korea was pivotal to the peace 
and stability of north -east 
Asia. 

Arriving at Seoul's Kimpo 
airport for foe eighteenth an- 
nual Korean-American Secu- 
rity Consultative Meeting, he 
said communist North Korea 
had reorganized its forces "to 
move them closer to the 
demilitarized zone and has 
obtained more sophisticated 
equipment from the Soviet 
Union". 

The Defence Secretary, who 
will visit the demilitarized 
zone, said the relationship 
between the US and South 
Korea was "constantly chang- 
ing and maturing, as is the 
threat we face from the North. 

"The security of Korea is 
pivotal to the peace and 
stability of north-east Asia, 
and that in turn is vital to the 
security of foe United States." 

He said he understood 
South Korea was increasingly 
concerned about a threat from 
the North during the run-up to 
foe 1988 Olympic Games in 
Seoul. 

“1 know that the security of 
those events is of major 
concern to your Government 
during foe 1986-88 period." 
he said to his host. Mr Lee Ki 


Baek. the South Korean De- 
fence Minister. 

“1 want to assure you that 
we will do ail we can to assist 
you in ensuring their safety”. 

It is believed the Koreans 
will request better early warn- 
ing systems from Mr Weinber- 
ger and will raise the ticklish 
subject of the more than 80 
Hughes 500 anti-tank helicop- 
ters illegally exported to the 
North by a Californian firm 
last year. 

Meanwhile, the US House 
of Representatives sub-com- 
mittee on Asian and Parific 
affairs is preparing for a scries 
of hearings on South Korea 
later this month. 

Mr Stephen Solarz, chair- 
man of the sub-comminee 
which revealed many aspects 
of President Marcos's corrup- 
tion and hidden wealth, both 
prior to his downfall and since 
his escape to Honolulu, said 
he saw the Korean situation as 
the natural next focus for his 
committee. 

“We'll be looking at the 
extent to which Korea could 
become the next Philippines, 
the potential for instability, 
the extent to which foe United 
States should get involved in 
tbe drive for democracy and 
whether or not we should 
encourage direct election of 
foe President.” Mr Solarz 
said. 


TESTYO 




(Answers to page seven) 

1. One household in seven in the UK is an old person living alone. 

Help the Aged funds day centres throughout the country. For many old people, day centres are their 
only chance of companionship. 

2. Nearly half a million old people have no living relatives. 

Hgp' the Aged is aiming to place one minibus every week with voluntary groups. For no less than 
2$bb0 old pepplelwho already use tiiis service every week, it is a vital link with the community. 

3. One million old people have no regular visitors. 

Help the Aged’s Lifeline Appeal has already placed nearly 1,000 emergency alarm systems in the homes 
of old people who are vulnerable and at risk. 

4. 189,000 old people cannot get in and out of bed unaided. 695,000 
can’t cope with stairs. 757,000 can’t bath or shower without help. 
1,056,000 can’t walk unassisted. 

Help the Aged is funding day hospitals where old people can recover their independence and 
confidence, after illness or injury. 

5. Last year, 571 old people died in their homes from hypothermia. 
This year, the figure will be much higher. 

Besides campaigning for better heating subsidies and better pensions, the day centres we support 
provide warmth and a hot meal, for some old people their only regular hot meal. 

6. 500,000 dwellings - nearly half of our most appalling housing - is 
inhabited by old people; who are least able to cope. 

Help the Aged is campaigning for better housing provision for old people, both in the public and private 
sectors, because old people aren’t “them", they’re one in five of us. 

7. Winston Churchill was 64 when he became Prime Minister. 
Michelangelo was 71 when he started work on the Sistine Chapel. 

A reminder that being 60+ can be the beginning, not the end of a lifetime’s achievements. 

8. In 1965, 448 centenarians received a congratulatory telegram from 
the Queen. In 1985, the figure was 1,819. 

Between 1981 and 2001, the number of people aged over 75 will increase from 3.1 million to 4.1 
million. More and more of us are going to live to be old. Yet what is in store for us if we let things ride? 

9. Nearly two million old people depend upon supplementary benefit. 

Put another way; that’s one in five pensioners. 

1 0. These facts paint a grim picture of what it can mean to be old in Britain today. Help the Aged is dedicated 
to improving this situation by campaigning for better pensions and heating allowances. Funding • 

Day Centres, Day Hospitals and Hospices. Providing emergency alarm systems and y | 
minibuses. To find out more about our work, or if you would like to make a donation, 
please write to: John Mayo OBE, Director-General, Help the Aged, Freepost, 

St. James’s V&lk, London ECIB IBD. 



25TH ANNIVERSARY APPEAL 

PATRON: HRH The Princess of Wales. 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


SPECTRUM 






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* * 


A British delegation of 1 6 political activists 
joined some 700 foreigners — including 
Louis Farrakhan, the US black separatist — 
at a recent ‘anti-imperialist’ seminar in 
Tripoli. Paul Barker, who attended a similar 
conference, slipped away from the arena 
and discovered an outpost of the revolution 






Goingto conferences with Colonel 
Gadaffi isn't all beer and skittles. 
It's more tike a permanent diet of 
passionfruit juke. 

The British group, from Brixlon 
and elsewhere, may not have 
learnt to love Libya all that well 
during their widely-reported con- 
ference. Certainly not if my own 
experience at a similar shindig is 
anything to go by- 1 was never so 
glad to get out of a country in ray 
fifeT Waiting for the colonel, and 
ending np under arrest, wasn't 
much fun. 

The invitation turned op one 
day, without forewarning, in the 
office post Would I, as editor of 
New Society, tike to be a guest of 
the revolutionary government at a 
conference against racism and 
Zionism? 

This was when the diatribes 
against Israeli racism had just got 
into full flow at such talking shops 
as the United Nations. The invita- 
tion put me on the spot 1 fell very 
• unsympathetic towards the line 
being put about by Arab diplo- 
mats. On top of that, some nasty 
anti-Semitism, disguised as anti- 
Zionism, was beginning to surface 

— from the Left — in British 
university student unions. 1 didn't 
want to find myself used to 
endorse all this. 1 didn t endorse it 
anyway. 

But I was conscious that all the 
reporting of the Arab case came 
from sources who were, at that 
time, almost unequivocally hos- 
tile. Wasn't it better to give the 
other side a chance to put their 
own case in their own voice? 

My balancing act stopped when 
I got a guest-list and it showed, 
among others. Maxi me Rodinson 

— the distinguished French anti- 
Zionist and himself a Jew. If he 
can go, I thought then I can. I rang 


the People’s Bureau to accept The 
bureau — then in Kensington — 
hadn't yet started shooting people 
in the street It was simply the 
most chaotic office I’d come 
across. Democracy at work, no 
doubt 

Rodinson never did come to-tbe 
conference, but iher£ was a rea- 
sonable sprinkling of 


“respectable” guests, including 
various English academics and 


various English academics and 
journalists. So 1 felt some justifica- 
tion by solidarity. 

We were put up in Tripoli’s best 
hotel, and the passionfruit juice 
began. As a good Muslim state, 
Libya was “dry”. It also seemed to 
have exported all its chefs. We had 
passionfruit juice and Iamb stew 
all day every day. This is, notori- 
ously, not the best way to woo 
journalists, or even academics. 

The conference was in a vast 
super-cinema. We sat there, day in 
and day out, while Arab speaker 
after Arab speaker got on to the 
stage and delivered high-flown 


assaults against Israel. There was 
no break, no counter-arguments, 
no points from the floor. It might 
have been unwise to argue back, 
even if you could, given the storm 
of fraternal applause that greeted 
every rhetorical flourish. 

Along with Israel, the speakers 
linked South Africa and Iran (this 
was before the Shah fell) into one 
huge anti-Arab conspiracy. It was 
all' the doing of the CIA and the 
Jews of Johannesburg, in un- 
Koranic alliance. 

We shook our heads about all 
this, over the lamb stew and 
passionfruit juice — and wailed for 
Gadaffi. Every day he was sup- 
posed to be coming to address us. 
Every day, the epiphany was 
postponed And the unsuccessful 
brainwashing went on. 

I decided I would get something 
enjoyable out of coming to Libya, 
even if I wasn't getting anything 
useful. Further down the coast lay 
the big Roman site of Leptis 
Magna — an imperial port now 
dried up and in ruins. I would play 
hookey from the super-cinema 
and go there. I found the only hire 
car in Tripoli and finally, on the 
last morning of the conference, set 
off. Gadaffi was still expected 
hourly, so the only other confer- 
ence-goer I could tempt to come 
with me was a young researcher 
from St Antony's College, Oxford. 
Under blazing sun and over 
heavily ratted roads, we bounced 
off towards Leptis. 

At the gateway to the site, an 
attendant sleepily sold me a 
guidebook to the ruins, written ia 
a sort of English. The frontispiece 
was tom out, but you could work 
out that it had been a photograph 
of King Idris — the ruler the 
British left behind them after their 
brief post-war mandate. Gadaffi 
had overturned Idris's regime, but 
had kept the guidebooks. Frugal 

thinking . 

Leptis was the most impressive 
classical ruin I had seen. Columns 
and friezes were scattered over the 
dry land, with the Mediterranean 
as blue as a postcard in the 
background. 

But it was - very hot Time, 
really, for a mid-afternoon siesta. 
My colleague decided to call it a 
day in the shade ofa thorn-bush to 
have a daze. This culture-vulture 
strode on, guidebook in hand, 
determined to see the dwindled 
wadi where the old Roman port 
had been. 

As I came down the hill towards 
it, I saw why the harbour was now 
useless. There was a sand bar 
across the street On the other side 
stood a small temple — all as the 
map in the guidebook showed. I 
decided to walk over the sand bar 
to look at it before going back. 

The temple seemed to be shored 
up with breeze-block, I noticed as 



ar ' 


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1 ' 


I got nearer. Really, I thought, 
these archaeologists are vandals: 
they should be more careful with 
their restoration work. But every- 
thing became clearer when I 
stepped off the sand bar on to the 
other shore. A man came out from 
the temple with an automatic rifle 
in what looked like British army- 
issue uniform. He pointed at me 
and shouted what 1 immediately 
translated as “Halt." 

I halted. Another soldier came 
out from the temple buckling on 
his British-style belt. This was the 
sergeant. Both he and sentry 
seemed very cross — and not just 
because I'd interrupted their sies- 
ta. They took my guidebook. 

Because it was so hot, I thought 
I'd rather stand in the shade of the 
temple. But the rifle waved omi- 
nously when I tried to budge. 
Eventually I negotiated the move 
with the sergeant in sign language. 

He left me under guard and 
went back into the temple. I heard 
him on the field telephone. In due 
course, the captain drove up. He 
had a few words of English. They 
had now found my companion 
and were guarding him by the 
thorn-bush. 

Back to the field telephone, and 
at last another pick-up truck. A 
sleepy surgeon had been roused 
from his siesta. He spoke English 
and was friendly, but wary. I said 
we were guests of the government 
at the Tripoli conference. He said 
that, fortunately, the captain had 
read about the conference in the 


newspaper and was impressed. It 
was a good thing we had no 
cameras, and no guns; otherwise 
there would be no alternative to 
arrest. We were in a military zone. 
We had to have a strong story to 
persuade them to let us go. I 
convinced them I had got the map 
at the front office. It was too old to 
show the military zone, and no, I 
hadn't seen the notice further up 
the wadi. I over-explained my 
feeling for classical ruins. Eventu- 
ally the captain looked convinced 
and took to the telephone. 

We were shepherded back to the 
gateway to my Volkswagen, and 
we set off back to Tripoli I drove 
as fast as I could — though the road 
was full of tomato lorries, deliver- 
ing loads to the canning factories. I 
hoped we wouldn't be missed. 

I parked behind the super- 
cinema. U was the end of the 
afternoon. There was a gaggle of 
delegates and officials in the lobby 
as we went in. Gadaffi was 
coming! We hadn't even lost out 
on this. He followed us into the 
lobby — a film star of the 
revolution. He was bright and slim 
in a safari suit He was like the 
lead in The Desert Song. The 
fraternal delegates clustered round 
him like autograph-hunters. Libya 
had money to spend, after all on 
all kinds ofactivities. Perhaps now 
was the time to catch Gadaffi’s 
ear. 

But he broke away, plunged up 
the aisle - and then stopped short 
of the stage. He sat down in the 


As a good democrat, the 
colonel was only waiting 
to be sure he was wanted. 
He was, they assured him 


‘There was no 
break, no points 
from the floor. 
It might have 
been unwise to 
answer back* 


front row of the stall! The 
welcoming. party on the. platform 
were visibly flustered. But as a 
good democrat, die colonel was 
only waiting to be sure he was 
wanted. He was, they assured Him. 
No move. They assured him again 
— and this time he climbed the ' 
steps, took the microphone, and 
spoke. 

The speech was the mixture as 
before — though less verbose — • 
and it embodied Gadaffi’s vision, 
of peace. A peace without Israel. 
Iran, the CIA, South Africa, 
international capitalism: all got 
featured hilling once more. 

'• The’ colonel went even more 
rapidly than he'd come. Down the 
aisle and out to the official 
limousine. His fans crowded 
round for a last farewell. 


We English delegates mean- 
while had realized that the feet 
that we had got only an. outward- 
bound ticket might be no mere 
.formality. We had had to ask after 
return tickets every evening — 
following the lamb and 
passionfruit juice — from the 
small surly officials. (One of the 
odd things about Libyans, I no- 
ticed, was that they were a very 
agreeable people — until they got 
into a uniform.) We began to 
worry whether we'd ever be 
allowed to leave. 

We got the tickets at the very 
last miniitp. At the ramshackle, 
overcrowded airport, the same 
palaver of Third World official- 
dom continued. We might be a 
party of government guests, butall 
the minutiae ■ of visa-checking, 
ticket-checking and the rest would 
still, be done as, .slowly -and 
insufferably as . possible. It was 
. boiling hot There was, of course, 
no bar. 

The plane, when we got on it, 
was British Caledonian. We fefl up 
the steps in our_hgste to leave 
Libyan sofl. It was a delight to see 
the homely stewardesses in those 
silly tartan outfits — uniforms not 
taken seriously. There was a huge 
feeling of relief No more brain- 
washing, no more Libyan officials; 
and in my case, no more Libyan 
arrests; 

The drinking began. Most.of the 
men who Were on the plane with 
us were from the oiffidds out in 
the desert The. man next to me 


was from Ulster. He was doing a 
stint to earn enough money to get 
out of Northern Ireland because 
he thought be wouldn't be able to 
sell his house in the Belfast 
suburbs for very much. He was 
scathing about Libyan petty offi- 
cialdom in the desert too. 

It struck me (hat the atmo- 
sphere in the plane reminded me 
of something. Especially with 
those tartan stewardesses, and the 
drink, it was just like a football 
coach (old-style). There was. an 
overwhelming air of friendliness 
and escape. 

No conference, we agreed 
among ourselves, could have been 
more counter-productive. No 
one's mind had been swung 
towards the Arab line on Zionism 
as racism. And then there was all 
that obvious conspiracy- theory 
about Iran, the CIA, and. South 
Africa!. But at feast I'd. been Lb 
Libyvand heard the case I'd gone 
to bear. And I'd seen Leptis. 

The only thing is that as time 
passed, and the Shah fefl, and 
Israel’s policies on the West Bank 
hardened, and the Lebanon inva- 
sion was launched, I began to 
realize that, as a matter of feet, 
.much of what those Arab delegates 
had been saying — in their 
unacceptably doctrinaire and rhe- 
torical way — was right 

QTimM Ntwapapora, 1®*#. 


? >! 


ibai 


Paid Barker was Editor of New 
Society Jrom 1968 until this year. 


A watchful eye on the neighbourhood 


CONCISE CROSSWORD (No 9 14) 


How far should untrained people be allowed 
to go in defence of their communities? 
Peter Evans and Alan Franks examine the 
growth of urban vigilante groups and 
their often uneasy relations with the police 


I f the British remain true to 
their reputation and con- 
tinue to follow the Ameri- 
can precedent, it will not be 
long before we have our own 
Bernhardt Goetz - the 38- 
year-old New Yorker who 
achieved fleeting status as a 
national hero after shooting 
four would-be muggers on the 
city's subway 1 8 months ago. 

In England, even though the 
very word vigilante remains 
effectively outlawed by a po- 
lice force fearfUl of having its 
powers undermined by un- 
trained and partisan elements 


of society, there is growing 
evidence of the spread of 


evidence of the spread of 
informal militias patrolling 
inner city streets to protect the 
property and personal safety 
of ethnic minorities. 

Their actions are not re- 
stricted to the deterrence of 
racist crime, in the Birming- 
ham suburb of Moseley, for 
example, residents have taken 
to the streets to drive away a 
plague of prostitutes and kerb 
crawlers. Mr Sean Wheatley, 
chairman of the North 
Moseley Action Group, is 
adamant that the function of 
his members is pre-emptive 
rather than retaliatory. 

It is a community beset by 
problems of schoolgirls “on 
the game". Part of the trouble 
is that some prostitutes in the 
nearby suburb of Balsall 
Heath allegedly dress in 
school uniform to attract the 
“kinky" end of the market, 
with the result that bona fide 
schoolgirls, some of whom are 
no more than 11 years old, 
find themselves at risk. 

One girt, Nahide Emin, now 
aged 16, claims it was five 
years ago that she was first 


accosted by a kerb crawler. 
“Men in suits and posh cars 
have approached me more 
often than common men in 
old can", she says." 

Some members of the ac- 
tion group have been attacked 
while on duty, apparently by 
men arriving to protect the 
prostitutes. On one occasion 
Mr Wheatley needed hospital 
treatment after his eye had 
been blackened and his glasses 
broken by one such assailant. 
“We realized when we em- 
barked on this that it was 
fraught with a certain amount 
of danger", he admits. “We 
were interfering with a trade 
that involved a lot of money." 



assistant commissioner Mi- 
chael Richards, who is in 
charge of the force for the area 
that includes Waltham Forest. 

“If they have formed an. 
organization to look after the 
aged and the sick who might 
be victims of attacks, that falls 
within the concept of Neigh- 
bourhood Watch. I would be 
against vigilantes." 

Neighbourhood Watch is 
the name given by the police 
to a programme of surveil- 
lance. under the guidance of 
the police and in which the 
citizens become the force's 
auxiliary eyes and ears. This 
has proved so popular that 
there are now 3,770 watches in 
London's Metropolitan Police 


In America, vigUantism is a 
well established fed. It was 
first reflected, and then fu- 
elled, by films like the Death 
Wish series and Star Cham- 
ber. It has also acquired a . 
measure of unashamed glam- 
our with freelance groups like, 
the self-christened Magnifi- 
cent 13, who managed to 
restore law and order to the 
"Muggers’ Express," the 
Number 4 IRT train between 
Brooklyn and the Bronx. 


ACROSS 
1. Fertile (6) 

4 Cocktail titbit (6) 

7 Sand mound f4) 

5 Weirdness (8) 

9 Pass on (8) 

13 High spirits (3) 

■16 Listening in (13) . 
17 Craze (3) . \ . 

19 Timetable (8> 

24 Underground ceme- 
tery (8) 

25 Counterfoil (4) 

26 Purplish-red (6J 

27 Say again (6) 


zmaiaia awa 

£!■■■■■■ 

QBBUHHMH 




mim ajMimmmm 

m m m m m m 


area alone. If anything is 
guaranteed to raise the hackles 


On patrol: the Pakistan Welfare Society in east London 


of a police spokesman, it is to 
confuse vigilantes with Neiah- 


T bere is now a breed of 
vigilante not content 
merely to inform on the 
offender but jtfepared to dis- 
pense ready justice on the 
spot. Yet the forces against 
which they are ranged are huge 
indeed. Last year one prosti- 
tute admitted to earning 
£35.000 a year. 

When The Times accompa- 
nied the Moseley group on 
night patrol 35 residents 
turned out. Earlier in the 
evening members had moved 
two prostitutes on and by the 
time we made our tour the 
streets were almost deserted. 
Mr Wheatley cited this as 
proof of the group's effective- 
ness. A few years ago. he 
maintained, his vigilantes had 
logged 1,700 kerb crawlers 
between the hours of 9 and 
11.30pm. 

Police forces complain that 
patrols can hamper their work 
— in the words of local 
superintendent David Blagg: 


“There is fittle point in offi- 
cers being there because their 
observations are impeded". 
On the other hancl the very 
existence of a critical and 
often highly vocal, band of 
neighbours raises the public 
profile of the offences in 
question. 

In April last year a special 
police squad in Balsall Heath 
and Moseley was increased 
from eight men to 16 and 
police reckon that since then 
the number of prostitutes 
soliciting in the area has 
dropped from 1 00 to 50. At 
the same time, the number of 
arrests has inevitably risen: 
167 in January' alone com- 
pared with one seventh that 
figure 12 months previously. 
The police point out that 
although such statistics may 
give the impression of greater 
lawlessness, they are in fact 
proof of belter surveillance. 

In Walthamstow, east Lon- 
don, pan of the community 
faces a sterner menace — racial 
violence. The soberly-named 
Pakistan Welfare Society, es- 
sentially another vigilante 
group, estimates that there 


have been 28 attacks on 
immigrant homes in the Wal- 
thamstow and Leyton areas 
since 1979. 


A n the attacks follow a 
common pattern — in- 
cendiary devices put 
through the fetter box. The 
worst occurred in 1981 when 
four people died in a blaze. 


Dr Zafar Malik, president of 
the society, which can muster 
up to 100 volunteers on any 
given evening, insists it is 
composed of mature, family 
people whose intention is 
never to take the law into their 
own hands. “Their presence is 
a deterrent. A patrol once 
came across a couple of skin- 
heads attacking an elderly 
Asian lady with racialist 
taunts. The patrol told them to 
behave and thev withdrew". 


That however, begs the 
question of what might have 
happened had the skinheads 
not withdrawn. “1 don't object 
to groups being formed pro- 
vided they understand the 
guidelines within which they 
should work", says deputy 


confuse vigilantes with Neigh- 
bourhood Watches. 

Yet there are creatures who 
occupy the middle ground 
between the two. For example, 
the 24 amateur crime-busters 
who in January were paid a 
total of £167,0C >0 by the Man- 
power Services Commission 
to clean up the vandal-ridden 
villages of Poulton and 
Femhead in Cheshire. Even 
though their role was limited 
to keepi ng their eyes open and 
reporting anything suspicious, 
it was hard to refute the 
definition of vigilantes as they 
donned their second-hand po- 
lice uniforms and zoomed off 
on their night beat in radio- 
equipped Metros. 

On that occasion it was not 
the police who objected but 
the Labour MP for Walsall 
George Bruce. “An appalling 
development" was his verdict. 
“People are taking the law into 
their own hands without the 
benefit of the training given to 
police.” The objections go 
beyond the mere charge of 
amateurishness, for as these 
groups become more numer- 
ous there is a growing feeling 
that society should not allow 
itself lo be policed on the 
cheap. 


S uch a thing has yet to 
happen here but we are 
getting there by degrees. 
Three years ago a former bus 
driver opened a one-man se- 
curin' business in the small 
Norfolk market town of 
Walton, charging High Street 
premises £3.65 for a regular 
inspection of their premises in 
the wake of a spate of burglar- 
ies. In that case, however, he 
won not only the approval but 
the blessing of the seriously 
overstretched police force. 

The town of Ellesmere Port 
has a 74-strong patrol with a 
fleet of seven cars. Based at the 
Royal British Legion Training 
Centre and also funded by the 
MSG it provides work for a 
number of the young, long- 
term unemployed of the town, 
at a wage of about £16 for an 
eight-hour shift They patrol 
the schools, municipal build- 
ings, halls and community 
centres of Ellesmere Port and 
neighbouring Neston, often 
giving police an early warning 
of anything suspicious. 

Joe Clowes, who manages 
the centre, is as sensitive as 
Scotland Yard is about the 
“vigilante" tag. “They have 
no powers", he empha- 
sizes. “No more than the ordi- 
nary citizen. The patrol 
members tend to be at least 19 
years old, but in the main they 
are older than that You see, if 
you were to send out ‘virgins*, 
there would always be the 


DOWN 

1 Lose colour (4) 

2- Engineered (9) 

3 Remains (5) 

4 Wispy douds (5) 

5 Cdumbos ship (4) 

6 Out of date (5) 

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12 Typewritten (S) 


y r , l 

° 


13 Sequin (9) 20 How (5) 

14 Bouncing stick f4) 21 Glowing coal <5)- 

15 Distinct identity (4) 22 Den (4) 

■18 Use (5) 23 Adjoin (4) 


SOLUTION TO No 91 3 
ACROSS: 1 Amoral 5 Pope 8 Hefty: 9 Extreme 11 TmBgm 13 

a'SFftSS, ,7D " ® Asrabte aY “"” “ 

DOW* 2 Mufti 3 Ray 4 Liechtenstein 5 Data 6 Pretext 7 
WhnSundarj'^lO 121bex 14 Mere 16 Periwig 19 




■■Cr- 




JAGUAR 


Don* miss this week's five 16-page 
supplement on a famous name that conjures 
up speed, glamour and luxury. 

A FREE SUPPLEMENT THIS WEEK 


danger that they could actual- 
ly attract trouble." 




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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


11 


WEDNESDAY PAGE 


Our relationship 


HosDrMwstflr 

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Jeaji. Wyatt is 
one of me many 



Who are now 
learning how to 
live with their 
elderly parents. 
Sally Brompton 
reports 


arrng for an ageing moth- 
er or father when yon 
have a family of. your 
S own is the ultimate test 
' ofwhtft is possibly the 
ppst . complicated of human rela- 
tionships: -• : 

Indeed, taking in a widowed and 
often ailing parent is frequently the 
biggest and hardest decision in 
many coupled named lives. And 
it can be as much of a problem for 

owntoss olf independence and the 
inevitable role reversal. . 

When married women give up 
work to care for disabled parents, 
■the European Commission be- 
lieves they should get an invalid 
care allowance, as married men 
already do. But the commission's 
-decision merely highlights one 
aspert of the problem. 

- "Money can buy a respite but it 
can't ease a difficult relationship”, 
says Jill Pitkeathley, newly-ap- 
pointed director of the National 
Council foF Carers and their Elder- 
ly Dependants. 

- "Most 'married couples who 

deride to care for an ageing parent 
have no idea of the kindofstresses 
it is going to pot on their own 
relationship. • • . ' ; • 

“Apart from die sheer" physical 
and practical irtrain. there is also 
the emotional 'strain of having to 
look after , your qticnjfous and 
demanding mother as wefl- as 
keeping a good relationship going 


with your husband and maybe ypnr 
teenage children. The c o mpe ti tion 
for carers* time is tremendous.” 

The main difficulty confronting 
the children ofthe elderly is that 
acceptable alternatives to looking 
after them themselves are few and 
expensive. Most people are relao- 
tam to institutionalize parents and, 
in fact, only S per cent of Britain's 
elderlyare cumsrtly in institutions. 

Granny Bats can offer a satisfac- 
tory solution to those who can 
afford than; Sheltered housing is 
also growing popular — both pri- 
vate and local authority funded — 

- providing the -privacy of individ- 
ual apartments with shared com- 
munal facilities, alarm systems and 
resident wardens. 

Barra tt, whose 11 retirement 
developments ofifer one and two- 
bedroom apartments ranging in 
price from £26,000 to £70,000, say 
they are selling weO. 

.Jill Pitkeathley bdieves that the 
Govenunent should put considera- 
bly more moneyinto caring for the 
elderly in the community. “We 
need more district nurses, more 
voluntary , services and more re- 
spite care where dependants can be 
taken into a hospital or community 
ward for a fortnight to give the 
carer a rest from them”, she says. 

Even so, she admits that for 
every one disastrous case, “you can 
find eight or nine successes”. 

Dare Pryor always vowed that 
whatever happened she would 
-never live with her daughter, Jean. 
When she was forced to do so six 
■ years ago. following the death of 
her son with whom -die- lived, it 
caused tramnas all round. 

“1 hadn’t wanted her to come 
and she didn’t want to be here and 
initially it was a bijg battle”, admits 
Jtfan WyatL “It tbokus bom quite a 
while to accept it” 

- Now. 88 and suffering from 
Parkinson's disease, . Clare Pryor, 
widowed , as the result of World 
: War!; can do nothing for herself 
and meeds 24-hour care. For the 
past six years her "daughter, mar- 
ried-to Jolui a United Refonned 
Church -minister has deVoted her- 
sdf to 'providipgthat care *Td • 
- j aheadygiven up my job as a school 
secretary”, says Jean, who has four . 


grown-up children, “I had no high- 
powered career to sacrifice. Now 
this is my job. I'm a carer. I get a 
£20-a^week attendance allowance. 
This is my life.” 

To begin with, however, it was 
not so clear-cut Jean had many 
outride interests — “I was out most 
ofthe time”, she recalls, “and when 
mother came it was a completely 
different lifo. She kept saying 
‘you’re keeping men prisoner* and 
I wanted to say *you're keeping me 
a prisoner’.” 

: For the first nine months, Jean 
never left the bouse apart from a 
swift weekly visit to the local 
supermarket Money was not a 
problem because, as well as the 
proceeds from her house, her 
mother had her widow's pension 
and her son's pension. “It took me 
a long time to understand that I 
could spend my mother’s money 
on nursing”, says Jean. 

S he now pays an agency 
nurse to come in every 
evening to put her mother 
to bed, the district nurse 
gets her up and washes her 
'every morning, the NHS’s inconti- 
nence service delivers and collects 
“disposable everythings” once a 
- week and Jean allows herself the 
occasional afternoon off 
“Our relationship has turned 
round. Pm the boss in this house. 
Sometimes my mother calls me 
‘Mum’” 

. .When. Andrew White’s mother 
moved in with him, his wife Pat 
and their three children aged 22, 
nine and seven, it was inevitable 
that dashes would occur. 

Kay While was — and still is — 
an active, outspoken and indepen- 
dent widow with a strong mind of 
her own and a Victorian outlook 
on fife. Pal, now 42, is an easy- 
going modern-minded mother, de- 
termined not to be overpowered in 
her own home. 

That was eight years ago. Today 
the family agrees that, despite the 
initial problems, things have more 
or.iess worked out” 

Kay White, now 80, hasher own 
flat in the Dublin bungalow from ; 
which Andrew runs his egg packag- 
. ing and distributing business. She 



Full bouse; John Wyatt with his wife Jean (right) and her mother Clare Pryor 


eats all her meals mfo the family 
but insists that she does not 
interfere in their lives. “But what 
she calls interfering and what we 
call interfering are two different 
things”, says Andrew ruefully. 

Tc begin with there were what 
Pat describes as “the usual prob- 
lems - little things that turn into 
big things”. She found herself 
continually having to keep the 
peace between her mother-in-law 
and her children. Things are better 
now." 

Pat also got used to her mother- 
in-law telling her bow things 
should be done. “I'm not the sort of 
person who jumps up after a meal 
and washes the dishas imm- 
ediately”, says Pat “She is.” 

She finds it harder to accept the 
way Kay fusses over Andrew — 
especially after be and Pat have 
had a row. Andrew agrees. “She 
still treats me very much like a little 
boy and it gets on my nerves.” Pat 
finds that she and her mother-in- 
law get on better when Andrew is 
away. 

: Unable to leave Kay alone in the 
house, Pat and Andrew last year 
took separate holidays — Pat in 
Spain with her sister, Andrew in 
London with his son. “There’s a 
definite strain attached to her 
living with us”, says PaL “You’re 
very conscious of the fact that she 
is there all the time. We didn't 
really think about the reality of it 
beforehand and if we had I don't 
think we would have gone ahead.” 

It was Keith Ramsbotiom's idea 
to invite his father-in-law, Wilfred 


Janes, to live with him and his 
wife, Anne. “I don't think I would 
have dared to suggest it myself”, 
Anne admits. “It isn’t easy to do if 
it’s your parent." 

Her mother had died six months 
earlier and it was obvious to Keith 
and Anne, both in their early 50s, 
that her father would not be able to 
cope on his own despite being in 
reasonably good health; his Park- 
inson's disease, arthritis and cata- 
racts are all mild. 

Their own house was not large 
enough to allow them all sufficient 
independence, so they changed it 
for a tbree-bedroomed bungalow 
near Stratford-upon-Avon with a 
four-car garage which they convert- 
ed into a self-contained fiat for less 
.than £20,000. 

“1 think we are very very lucky", 
agrees Anne, whose husband runs 
his own small printing business. “It 


works well because father can be 
separate without being isolated. 
And he's very good if we have any 
expenses — he always insists on 
.paying his share." 

N ow 87, Wilfred spends 
bis days pottering 
around his new home 
with its own patio. He 
prepares his own break- 
fast and lunch, operates his own 
washing machine and grows toma- 
toes and runner beans. 

_ His daughter does his shopping 
and takes him a cooked meal every 
evening and on Sundays he joins- 
Anne and Keith, who have two 
married children, for lunch. 


An an only daughter, Elsie Evans 
was delighted when her husband 
Ronald first suggested that her 
mother, who is now almost 93, 
should move closer to them after 
she was widowed five years ago. 

After four years sharing their 
four-bedroomed house in Winch- 
more Hill, north London, neither 
Elsie nor Ronald would c laim that 
it has been anything other than a 
disaster. 

“The worst thing is the lack of 
freedom”, says Elsie, who is 65. 
“She hates us going out and always 
wants to know what time we'll be 
hack. It's just like being a child 


“We can't go and stay with our 
friends because we can't leave her 
alone. Every time we go away we 
have to put ha in an old people’s 
home which costs more than £200 
a week.” 

The fact that Ronald is due to 
retire from his job as a chartered 
quantity surveyor later this year 
worries them both. “I don’t know 
what will happen then”, Elsie says 

. “It’s a question of loyalties”, 
says Ronald. “To me she’s a 
mother-in-law but to Elsie she's a 
mother and sometimes I feel 
they’re like two peas in a pod. It 
would be all right if she would hang 
about in her own room but you 
can't expect her to do that and 
everywhere l go I trip over her. 

“we’ve got to get the NHS to 
help us to gin some facility ar- 
ranged to get her out of the house. 
Otherwise I could be dead before 
she is.” ' 


TALKBACK 


No hard 
graft 


From Mrs Kathy Ridges, 

Vale Road. Battle, 

East Sussex 

Your series “Like mother, 
like (laugher” (Spectrum, 
March 25) brings to mind 
some curious twists. To be 
fail, the women's liberation 
movement, when it -was go- 
ing, always claimed that 
women’s liberation was 
men’s liberation too. The 
daydream of Ms Alice Scott, 
“I had this really romantic 
picture of me silting in a big 
garden and my husband com- 
ing home from work ..." may 
Fall upon liberated male ears; 
he might suggest she does the 
grafting while he sits in the 
garden. 

From Maureen Green. 
Rosendale Road. Dulwich, 
London SE2! 

Bel Mooney's repetition of 
the alarmist and inaccurate 
notion that- “poor mothers 
mean violent and disruptive 
boy children” is unfortunate. 
Research backs folk wisdom 
in suggesting h is poor fathers 
who impede the growth to- 
wards social cooperation of 
their sons. 

The decline of the father 
role which 1 outlined in 
Goodbye Father (Routiedge) 
has produced a situation 
where just under two million 
children live in -one-parent 
families and many more in 
families where father is only a 
material asset. The problem 
is self-perpetuating: the poor- 
ly fathered have difficulty in 
working out what a father is 
for when they come to the 
experience themselves. 

From R. Le Grove, 

Manor Gardens, 

■ Saxmundham. Suffolk 
Sheila lady Bernard and 
Mary C Smith are both too 
.sweeping in their criticisms of 
Patricia Clough's “Love Be- 
igins at 60” (Friday Page. 
March 7). If there isa spark of 
love which can lie kept alive 
:by genuine effort, fair 
■enough, but supposing true 
ilove was absent from the 
start? 

> Couples who stay together 
(in a wasteland of existence to 
see their offspring safely into 
-adulthood have already 
shown many years of unself- 
ish fortitude and courage. 
Why. condemn them if, when 
their responsibilities are at 
last at an, end, they try to 
snatch what little happiness 
might yet remain to them? . 


Royal homes for the favoured few 


Inside Britain’s 
palaces^ a small, 
privileged group ' 
of tenants are 
living rent-free 
by royal consent . 

Jidda) in the depths of 
tritaw’s royal palaces, up tire 
tack stairs where (he public 
lever go, are a total of 128 
dghly desirable residences 
ree of rent and with views that 
re, to say the least, privileged, 
'bey range from 35-room 
alace wings to two-roomed 
partments, and they are high- 
f sought after, bat they will 
ot be (band on any estate 
gent's books. 

Grace and favour r esi dence s 
re what the name implies; 
rho lives in them is the 
edshm of the Queen, and she 
an nominate whoever die 
lushes as tenants. Those fa- 
oared with the royal grace 
an count themselves extreme- 
f fortunate. 

There are 27 flats at Hamp- 

E>n Court, 20 in St James's 
•alace, )3 at Kensington Pol- 
ice, a s nreti number at Buck- 
ogham palace and Windsor 
Castle, and the rest scattered 
hrongbout the country; in- 
Indasag one hi the New Town 
f Edinburgh riven to the 
taeen by toe city eoaadi at 
be time of her Coronation.. 
The greatest concentration 
f top-fine grace and favour* 
■■ ices is in Kensington 



Repairs carried 1 
out with 
public funds 


One of Hampton Court’s 27 grace and favour apartments (left) and the wing damaged by fire on Monday 


es. Princess 
Duke and 
ncester and 

ess Michael 

argest is a 
iies’s Palace 
louse, occo-* 


pied by Lord Kitchener daring 
the First World War, and by 
the Duke of Windsor, both as. 

prince of Wales and for most 
of his brief reign as Edward 
VEQ. It is now the London 
home' of toe Dnke and Duch- 
ess of Kent, who at weekends 
can escape to their other grace 
end favour home, Annrer Hall 
on the . royal estate at 

gUfflfyinglum. 

Demand for residences is 


the coming months a home will 
have to be found for the 
married Prince Andrew, who 


currently lives with his parent* 
in Bu ck ingham Palace. And 
Prince Edward and the 
princes William and Harry 
vriflafi be looting for homes in 
due coarse. ■ 

Most grace tod favour resi- 
dences, however, are much 
more modest and are not 
occupied by the Queen's im- 
mediate family. Tenants are 
generally retired or sometimes 
still active members of tire, 
royal household or, as in the 
case of tire Hi-fated flat at 
Hampton Court; retired senior 
officers from tire services. 
There are several splendid 


residences for admirals withfai 
Wren's Royal Naval College 
at Greenwich. 

Among toe dusters of grace 
and fanmr residences, those at 
Hampton Court are something 
of a special case. Traditional- 
ly, they have been occupied by 
retired officers or then* widows 
rather than personal friends of 
: the Queen; since 1972 no new 
tenants have been taken in at 
Hampton Court and those 
remaining are all elderly. Un- 
usually, a number of the 
Hampton Court flats lie 
empty. 


There has long been disqtu- 
et aboHt the suitability of such 
accommodation for die very 
elderly, and a recent study of 
the problem has even raised 
toe possibility of toe Hampton 
Court apartments being let 
comtnerrially. 

Although a daily house- 
keeper looks after the grace 
and favour residents, there is a 
growing feeling that such occu- 
pants would be much better off 
in accommodation tailor-made 
for the elderly. And living in 
them is not necessarily as 
cheap as it appears for those 
on a pension; although they 


five rent-free, they stSO have to 
pay for electricity and heating 
at normal rates. 

Grace and favour flats have 
often been put at the disposal 
of the royal family's more 
distant relations, a great many 
of whom seem to have.suflered 
upheaval and dispossession in 
their own lands. The Duke of 
Edinburgh's mother. Princess 
Alice of Batteabevg, b a n i s hed 
with her husband from Greece 
in 1922, took holy orders and 
lived most of her old age as a 
virtual red use in a flat in 
Buckingham Palace, where 
she died in 1969, an almost 
forgotten figure. 

It is reasonable to assume 
that prospective tenants hare 
to convince the Queen that 
they have nowhere else to lire, 
or are in reduced dream- 
stances. Having won the royal 
favour they can expect to 
occupy the apartment for toe 
rest of their Gres. There is no 
rent, and as they are generally 
parts of royal palaces, which 
are historic monuments, es- 
sential repairs are carried out 
with public foods from the 
Department of the 
Environment's Property Ser- 
vices Agency. In a typical year 
the agency win spend a boot £5 
million on maintenance of the 
royal palaces, considerably 
more if major works are to be 
carried out 

Care of the apartment's 
interior and any redecoration 
is normally the responsibility 
of the occupant, but Bucking- 
ham Palace points out dis- 
creetly that each tenancy is an 
individual, private agreement 
between tenant and monarch. 

Alan Hamilton 


Victoria Wine Of j 

The Month 



1984 

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MARRIOTT 


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HOT ELS* RESORTS 


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12 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Batting for 
Britain 

Fearing, I suspect, a diplomatic 
incident. Trade and Industry Min- 
ister Geoffrey Panic and the 
British High Commissioner in 
Barbados, Sr Giles Bullard, have 
become involved in the Graham 
Gooch apartheid controversy. 
Gooch is threatening to pull out of 
the fifth Test in Antigua later this 
month unless Lester Bird, the 
island’s deputy leader, withdraws 
the allegation that Gooch was 
“contemptuous of the Caribbean 
public” by captaining a rebel 
England party to South Africa in 
1982. The present tour came near 
to collapse last week when Gooch 
threatened to issue a statement 
denouncing Bird. His team mates 
tried fruitlessly to appease him. 
Diplomacy beckoned, and a com- 
promise was concocted at a dinner 
hosted by Sir Giles and attended 
by Peter May, chairman of selec- 
tors, and the visiting Pattie. They 
agreed that May should carry back 
to Lord’s a private letter from 
Gooch; it was duly presented 
yesterday to the Test and County 
Cricket Board chairman, Raman 
Subba Row. Although the con- 
tents are confidential, I under- 
stand Gooch attacks Bird and asks 
to be excused from playing in 
Antigua. Whether this will lead to 
a rapprochement 1 know not; but 
it’s a lot more exciting than 
England’s cricket 

Riding high 

Now that the General Motors deal 
is off, the Land Rover-sponsored 
Captain Mark Phillips will be 
saved the embarrassment of pass- 
ing round a begging bowl at the 
Badminton horse trials next week. 
A BL spokesman told me that, the 
awful prospect of Phillips riding 
under the colours of the Stars and 
Stripes having receded, a new 
contract had been signed to cover 
the next two years* equestrian 
events. 

• Extract from the Hungarian 
visa application form: “Name . . . 
First name . . . Maiden name . . . 
Occupation . . . For important in- 
formation see backside.’' 

Exclusive 

“It has been my ambition”, writes 
Donald Flory, “since I started the 
St George's Church, Cambridge, 
parish newspaper 23 years ago. to 
have a mention in the Times 
Diary.” At last, he says, he has a 
scoop. During a meeting of the St 
George's Over-60s Cub the other 
day. Prince Edward popped in 
unannounced to compere an im-‘ 
prom pi u song and dance act “As 
well as showing bis dramatic and 
singing talents, he drew the Cub's 
raffle” before the pensioners sat 
do wn to tea. 

BARRY FANTON1 



‘It's taken 100 years, comrade, but 
we're finally caught up* 


Self-help 


Liberals in Liverpool are spitting 
blood over a stall that has ap- 
peared on successive Saturdays in 
the city centre appealing for 
donations to help Labour coun- 
cillors take their case against 
surcharge to the House of Lords. 
Permission for the stall was 
granted by the licensing com- 
mittee's chairman and deputy — 
who face surcharge and legal fees 
already standing at more than 
£6,000 each. Richard Pine, deputy 
leader of the Liberal opposition, 
complains: “This appears a bla- 
tant breach of the rule that you 
should not vote on a matter in 
which you have a pecuniary 
interest." Roy Swainson, for the 
city solicitor, says that declaring 
an interest is a matter Tor individ- 
ual members but decisions can be 
challenged by other councillors. 
They certainly will be. 

Not so free 

Boyd Black, the Democratic 
Rights for Northern Ireland can- 
didate. has been accused of caus- 
ing great "embarrassment" to the 
Labour-affiliated Fabian Society, 
of which he is a prominent 
member, by standing in the Ful- 
ham by-election. Black, who is 
fighting on the ticket of freedom 
for citizens to vote for the three 
main UK parties, was told in 
writing by the Fabians’ general 
secretary. John Willman: “This 
would debar you from member- 
ship of the Labour Party if you 
lived on the mainland, and thus 
you could no longer be a full 
member of the Society.” Willman 
tells me rules are rules. Black, who 
firmly believes Labour would 
have much to gain by recognizing 
Northern Ireland, said: “This is 
blatant hypocrisy, as was shown 
when Kinnock visited the Belfast 
shipyards recently. He told work- 
ers he was there to show that there 
were no no-go areas in Northern 
Ireland. The mob hurled stones, 
and Kinnock had to be escorted 
out by the police.” PHS 


When the jury should be out 


The City of London’s reputation 
for financial integrity has been 
seriously damaged by recent scan- 
dals. There is widespread public 
suspicion of more cases of fraud 
ly in g ptutiscu vewed or transported. 
A popular conception is gaining 
ground that the greater the fraud 
and the richer its perpetrator, the 
more likely he is to escape justice. 
Urgent remedies are needed. 

The government has promised 
them. The Financial Services Bill, 
designed to regulate City dealing 
practices, is only a beginning. 
More changes are in the offing. 
The report of the Fraud Trials 
Committte under the chairman- 
ship of Lord Roskill, published 
earlier this year, made numerous 
sensible recommendations for re- 
form of the system of investiga- 
tion, prosecution and trial of 
complex fraud cases. The govern- 
ment is committed to implement- 
ing many of these in the 
forthcoming Criminal Justice BilL 

It still has to make up its mind, 
however, on Lord RoskUI’s single 
most controversial recommenda- 
tion. His committee accepted that 
trial by jury should continue for 
the great majority of fraud cases. 
But in a few cases the evidence is 
so complex and the alleged dis- 
honesty so deeply buried that even 
a trained business mind cannot 


A legal expert nrges the government 
to embrace the Roskill proposal on trial 
by tribunal of complex fraud cases 


easily encompass the case. 

Here, the committee said, there 
should no longer be trial by jury. 
Instead the case should be tried by 
a special fraud trials tribunal, 
consisting of a judge and two lay 
members with business skills and 
experience of complex trans- 
actions. An application for a 
particular case to be heard by the 
tribunal would be made to a High 
Court judge, and there would be a 
right of appeaL 

Only fraud cases foiling within 
certain guidelines would be eli- 
gible for this mode of trial. These 
would be those involving a series 
of inter-related transactions, usu- 
ally in a market offering highly 
specialized services, or in areas of 
high finance involving manipula- 
tion of the ownership of compa- 
nies, for example. 

The Roskill report points out 
that the complexity of such cases 
lies in the fact that markets or 
areas of business operate accord- 
ing to concepts which bear no 
obvious similarity to anything in 
the general experience of most 


members of the public, and are 
governed by rules and conducted 
in a language learned only after 
prolonged study by participants. 

The primary reason for this 
proposal is that a jury bearing a 
complex fraud case is highly 
unlikely to understand U. Roskill 
com missioned research which 
confirmed the common sense of 
this. The upshot is a real risk of a 
miscarriage of justice. Bewildered 
jurors may acquit a defendant 
becau se they have not understood 
the evidence or, worse, they may 
convict him because they have 
misunderstood it or have simply 
applied the “no smoke without 
fire” maxim. 

The requirement ofjury trial for 
this type of case also acts as a 
disincentive to prosecution. Ros- 
kill found that the difficulties of 
explaining the fuQ complexities of 
some cases to a jury was some- 
times a major contributory factor 
in deckling not to proceed with a 
prosecution, or in deciding to opt 
for less serious charges than the 
facts warranted. In this way the 


continued existence of a jury trial 
for particularly complicated fraud 
cases may actually assist wrong- 
doers to defeat justice. 

The fraud trials tribunal would 
bring defendants one benefit not 
at present available. Jury verdicts 
are inscrutable — we do not know 
the process by which jurors reach 
their verdicts. There can be no 
appeal against jury verdicts, ex- 
cept on the grounds of misdirec- 
tion by the judge. The tribunal 
would give reasons for its judg- 
ment; the defendant would know 
why it had decided in the way it 
had and so would be better placed 
to appeaL should the reasoning be 
defective or unsatisfactory. 

Some people will say the 
substitution of tribunals for juries 
is the thin end of the wedge. Not 
so. There are special factors which 
operate in this narrow sphere of 
the criminal law which have no 
parallel elsewhere and make trial 
by jury a particularly unsuitable 
method of determining guilt-. 

Some fraud cases are simply too 
difficult for ordinary people to 
understand. The government 
should muster its courage and 
include this reform in the Crim- 
inal Justice BilL 


The author is a practising barrister. 


Nicholas Ashford on Hong Kong reservations about political reform 

Don’t rock the sampan 


Although it is still 1 1 years before 
Hong Kong is returned to China, 
Peking is increasingly making its 
presence felt among the territory's 
5. 5 million people. Increasingly 
Hong Kong businessmen are turn- 
ing their eyes towards China’s 
huge and still largely untapped 
market which they hope will keep 
Hong Kong booming long after 
the Union Jack is lowered. 

In public, most claim to be 
lookiog forward to July I 1997. 
when Hong Kong becomes a 
special administrative region of 
China; privately, many are acquir- 
ing Canadian passports and stash- 
ing funk money overseas in case 
the transfer goes wrong. 

The general feeling is that China 
is on an irreversible path of 
economic reform which will sur- 
vive the death of the octogenarian 
Deng Xiaoping and that Peking 
intends Hong Kong to play a 
central role in the country's eco- 
nomic modernization pro- 
gramme. “China wants Hong 
Kong to remain a bastion of 
capitalism”, is a common refrain. 

Some of the territory's Chinese- 
language newspapers have already 
begun bowing in the breezes 
emanating from Peking. No direct 
pressure has been applied, but the 
more prominent newspapers often 
refer to the need to . “accom- 
modate” Peking's points of view 
and to be “responsible” in any 
criticism they make of China. 

It is left to the English-language 
press, notably the Far East Eco- 
nomic Review,’, to play the role of 
watchdog during the snail’s-pace 
talks between the Chinese and the 
British on implementation of the 
1984 agreement on the transfer of 
sovereignty. Much of its criticism 
is directed at Britain which is 
accused, often unfairly, of being 
insufficiently resolute in the de- 
fence of Hong Kong’s interests. 

Many of Hong Kong’s ap- 
pointed or indirectly elected 
political leaders have also begun 
subtly to shift their ground Last 
/ear many of them were pressing 
or political reforms which would 
have involved a substantial num- 
ber of seats in the advisory 
Legislative Council being filled by 
direct elections by the 1.35 mil- 
lion registered voters. 

China was apprehensive and 
said so publicly when two senior 
officials warned of the “mis- 
fortune” and “chaos" that politi- 
cal reforms might bring. These 
warning shots have slowed at- 
tempts to introduce democracy in 
a colony which has been run as a 
benevolent dictatorship for the 
past 140 years. 


Although political reform is still 
considered desirable so that a 
democratically based political sys- 
tem can be set up to prepare for 
Hong Kong’s promised “auton- 
omy", it is now widely accepted 
that the pace of change must be 
slow, controlled and, above aU, 
acceptable to Peking. 

The perceived need to secure 
China's approval for whatever 
changes are made is under- 
standable. “After all”, Lydia 
Dunn, the senior unofficial mem- 
ber of the Legislative CounriL 
remarked, “we are only being 
granted autonomy, not indep- 
endence." After 1997 Hong Kong 
will not be able to flout Peking's 
authority any more than it can 
London's now. 

What really matters is whether 
China will stick to its side of the 
bargain with. Britain that Hong 
Kong will retain “a high degree of 
autonomy” after 1997 and will 
maintain its existing economic 
system and way of life for at least 
the next 50 years. 

Most Hong Kong people believe 
it will, purely for reasons of 
pragmatic self-interest. China sees 
Hong Kong as its gateway to the 
world and needs its deep-water 
port and huge container fociiiues 
to import the machinery necessary 
for its economic development and 
to export to a growing list of 
customers. It also needs Hong 
Kong's banking and commercial 
expertise. On both counts, Shang- 
hai cannot even begin to compete. 

“China wants to inherit a place 
that is booming, not an empty 
shell”, observed Wong Po-yan. a 
prominent businessman and one 
of 33 Hong Kong residents sitting 
on the Chinese-appointed 
committee drawing up the basic 
law. which wifi serve as a mini- 
constitution. 

Even relatively radical mem- 
bers of the Legislative Council — 
such as Martin Lee and Szeto 
Wah, head of the teachers union, 
who have been pressing for foster 
political reform — accept that 
China's undertaking to maintain 
Hong Kong's “prosperity and 
stability” means preserving its 
capitalist system. 

But China also intends to 
inherit the island's highly cen- 
tralized system of government in 
which all power is vested in the 
governor (who will be superseded 
by a Pelting-appointed chief exec- 
utive). It does not want to assume 
responsibility for a territory riven 
by feuding political pparties whose 
budget has been burdened with a 
costly welfare programme in- 



Pfllar of capitalism — 
important for many 
than fledging democracy 

tended to satisfy the demands of a 
newly enfranchised electorate. 

Seen from Peking, the merits of 
colonialism for outweigh those of 
social democracy. It was therefore 
not altogether surprising that 
some Chinese leaders regarded 
Britain's attempts to unpick 140 
years of colonial rule by introduc- 
ing a degree of political reform as 
part of an underhand plot to 
maintain British influence. It does 
not seem to have occurred to them 
that Britain was responding to a 
desire by Hong Kong people to 
have a say in determining their 
future relationship with Peking. 

The warnings by the two Chi- 
nese officials about political 
change caused a frisson of 
nervousness throughout the col- 
ony and led to a sharp drop in 
share prices. Peking's concern has 
been allayed for the time being but 
the question of political reform 
will require delicate handling over 
the next few years if new ernes of 
confidence are to be avoided. 

The 1984 joint declaration was 
deliberately vague about the struc- 
ture of future government in Hong 
Kong. However, a government 
white paper in November of that 
year promised to develop a System 
of “representative government at 
the central level which is more 
directly accountable to the people 


of Hong Kong” and held out the 
prospect of direct elections to the 
56-seat Legislative Council. 

A government review of the 
political reform process is to take 
place next year and is likely to 
recommend that some members 
of the Legislative Council be 
directly elected. How many will 
depend on the number which 
Hong Kong's political and busi- 
ness establishment believes the 
Chinese will accept — most likely, 
only a few. 

It is hoped that the reforms 
recommended by the review will 
dovetail with the first draft of the 
basic law, due to be published in 
1988. Continuing contacts be- 
tween British and Chinese of- 
ficials, together with the existence 
of a “consultative committee” of 
Hong Kong residents, should en- 
sure that this convergence is 
achieved. 

If it is, then a major obstacle will 
have been overcome, and it is 
likely that the final version of the 
taw in 1990 will be broadly 
acceptable to the people of Hong 
Kong as well as the British 
authorities. “But if there is not a 
covergence between the two”, 
Maria Tam, a British-trained law- 
yer and member of the Legislative 
Council, warned, “alarm bells will 
\ ring and people will leave.” 

The belief that “convergence is 
vitaF* and can be achieved only 
with China’s consent has pro- 
duced an air of extreme caution 
among political leaders. Most talk 
constantly of the need for 
“evolution”, “gradual change” 
and “maintaining balance”. They 
recoil at the idea of one-man-one- 
vote or the establishment of 
political parties, which they fear 
could lead to a Communist versus 
Nationalist Chinese confrontation 
which the Communists would be 
bound to win. “We have no 
tradition of adversarial politics in 
Hong Kong. We believe in consen- 
sus politics,” Miss Tam said 

Many people, believing that 
little can be achieved through 
political reform, have reverted to 
what Hong Kong does best - 
making money. “I am more 
worried by our politicians than I 
am by Peking,” Ronald LL chair- 
man of the Stock Exchange, 
remarked “If we can accept that 
China wants to keep Hong Kong 
prosperous, and recognize the 
limits of what is politically pos- 
sible, then we can remain the 
foremost capitalist city in the 
world. That’s what really 
matters.” 

The author is Diplomatic 
Correspondent o/The Times. 


Last summer the government 
promised a review of public 
support for university and college 
students. Il was postponed Then 
it went ahead in secret. Now the 
review is not to be published Its 
main proposal - a mixed gram 
and loan scheme — has been re- 
jected as politically unpalatable. 

Instead, student grants are to go 
on shrinking. The 2 per cent 
increase in 1986/87 is weU below 
official estimates of inflation. This 
will further reduce the real value 
of grants, which has fallen by 14 
per cent since 1979. Students will 
also have their eligibility for 
welfare benefits cut as a result of 
the government's proposed social 
security changes. 

Despite the opposition to stu- 
dent loans, that in fact is what we 
already have - albeit, as George 
Walden, the junior minister 
responsible for higher education, 
has admitted via the back door. 
Grants are cut, so more students 
are forced to apply for overdrafts. 
But. Walden says, these are noth- 
ing to do with the government. 
They are private transactions 
between banks and customers and 
it is up to students and their 
families to make sure they can be 
fulfilled. 

The choice therefore lies be- 
tween loans that are haphazard 
(and open only to families who 
can convince bank managers they 
are a good risk) and a properly 
regulated student loan programme 
open to all. In the United States. 
Canada. West Germany. Sweden. 
Japan and Hong Kong students 
can borrow, either from commer- 
cial hanks — as in the US — or a 
state loan agency — as in Swe- 
den — with ine benefit of a gov- 
ernment guarantee and at subsid- 
ized rates of interest' in Germany 


Maureen Woodhall contrasts British grants 
with the long-term financing abroad 

Try banking on 
student loans 


they are interest-free. Loans are 
repayable over 10 years in the US 
and 20 years in Sweden and 
Germany. 

Because of the long repayment 
period and subsidized interest, 
none of the loan schemes is self- 
financing. But after allowing for 
interest subsidies and admin- 
istrative expenses repayments en- 
sure that the cost to public funds is 
substantially lower than that of a 
pure grant scheme which Britain, 
noiionally, still has. 

At the current rate ofinterest — 
which for American students is 8 
per cent on guaranteed student 
loans (GSL) and 4 J per cent for 
Swedish students — graduates will 
eventually repay between a half 
and iwo-thiras of the present 
value of the original amount. This 
means that loans result in a long- 
term saving of public funds or. 
alternatively, enable many more 
students to receive support for a 
given outlay. In Sweden, for 
example, part-time students are 
eligible for loans: in Britain most 
part-time students get nothing. 

Critics of student loans, particu- 
larly the National Union of Stu- 
dents, argue that working-class 
students would be discouraged 
from higher education if they 
faced a long period of debt. But in 


Sweden students from low-income 
families are not deterred. They 
know that if they are unemployed 
or their earnings fall below a 
minimum level they can postpone 
repayment, as 8 per cent of loan 
graduates did in 1984-85. 

A loans scheme need not deter 
women, who might fear that 
repayments would be a sort of 
negative dowry if they married. In 
Sweden, women can postpone 
repayments if they are not work- 
ing. In cases of serious illness or 
disability, loans are written oft 

When loans were first in- 
troduced in the US, sceptics 
doubted whether students would 
be willing to borrow to finance 
tuition fees and living expenses. 
But in 1984-85 more than four 
million students financed their 
higher education through loans, 
borrowing a total of S8.5 billion. 

Most students borrow through 
the GSL programme. This op- 
erates through commercial banks, 
backed by state guarantee agencies 
and federal government interest 
subsidies. Students from low- 
income families can borrow at 5 
percent. There is an unsubsidized 
but centrally organized loans 
scheme for higher-income fam- 
ilies. The idea of self-help is 
central to the American higher 


education system and in 1984-85 
52 per cent of all financial aid to 
students was in the form of loans, 
with work-study opportunities 
providing 4 per cent. 

Despite the increasing popular- 
ity of student loans abroad there is 
still strong resistance in Britain. 
Student leans are one educational 
subject on which Labour and the 
government appear to be agreed. 
One reason is that they do not 
offer any hope of quick savings. A 
long repayment period and sub- 
sidized interest means that 
substantial savings would be slow 
to materialize — probably at least 
10 years. However, in its review of 
social security the Government 
has shown its concern over long- 
term as well as short-term costs. 
The same view should be taken 
here. 

The NUS questions whether 
there would be any savings, 
arguing that loans would be 
expensive to administer, with a 
high likelihood of default In the 
US, however, the National 
Commission on Student Financial 
Assistance, which reviewed the 
GSL programme in 1983, found 
that loans are far more cost- 
effective than grants, because 
every dollar spent by the federal 
government generates at least two 
dollars of financial aid to students. 
Default rates on GLS loans are no 
higher than on many other fed- 
erally-insured loan programmes. 

A combination of loans and 
grants would be fairer than the 
present British system. This trans- 
fers income from taxpayers who 
have not had the benefit of higher 
education to those who are likely 
to enjoy bigher-ihan-average earn- 
ings after they graduate. 

The author is a lecturer at London 
University's Institute of Education. 


Danny Finkelstein 

Beating off the 
backlash 


Norman Tebbit is not a consensus 
politician. Ignoring the pleas of 
more restrained colleagues, he 
considers the framing and delivery 
of gnatuituous insults to be an 
intellectual challenge. He has not. 
as a result, won a great deal of 
affection from members on the 
Opposition benches and he cannot 
look to those benches to provide 
him with much support should he 

ever need it. „ 

Clare Short, Labour MP for 
Birmingham Ladywood, is an 
exception, however. She has re- 
cently introduced a bill into the 
House Commons which would 
ban the printing of “page three 
girls” in the tabloid press. She 
would no more publicly announce 
admiration for Norman Tebbit 
than Denis Healey would pri- 
vately for Neil Kinnock. Never- 
theless her bill is entirely in the 
spirit of Tebbit’s recent lecture. 

Tebbit’s theme was, as one 
might perhaps expect, simple. The 
social reforms and liberalization 
of the 1 960s has led in breakdowns 
in authority, in family life, and in 
respect for the law. The recent 
spate of violent crime is not an 
expression of anger at s ocial^ 
deprivation or an outbreak of 
inexplicable evil; it is the fault of 
Roy Jenkins, whose tenure at the 
Home Office, Tebbit argued, ush- 
ered in the “permissive society” 
which increased social insecurity, 
lack of discipline and, therefore, 
violence and crime. 

Clare Short agrees with an 
important part of this analysis. As 
a committed fe minis t she believes 
that degrading pictures of half- 
naked women in national news- 
papers encourage sexual attacks 
on women. “Less permissiveness” 
would mean less crime. 

Ms Short is not alone in 
accepting this central tenet of 
Tebbrfs argument and her bill is 
not the -only assault on “per- 
missiveness” to have immediately 
followed or preceded Tebbit’s 
lecture. There has been Graham 
Bright’s bill to censor “video 
nasties”, die rise of Victoria 
Gillick, Enoch Powell's bill on 
unborn children and Winston 
Churchill's Obscene Publications 
Bill. In addition Douglas Hurd, 
the Home Secretary, has acted to 
increase prison sentences, presum- 
ably believing that for the past two 
decades we have been “soft” on 
criminals. 

More recently there has also 
been a great deal of condemna- 
tion, especially from such MPs as 
Teddy Taylor and Nicholas 
Faitbairn, of a jury for acquitting a 
man of murder when, it was later 
revealed, he had previously 
admitted two counts of rape. 

Hie defenders of social reform 
and of the permissive society do 
not take these moves particularly 
seriously. Calls for capital punish- 
ment, corporal punishment and 
for more censorship, demandsfor 
stiller sentences, to make divorce 
more difficult and abortions il- 
legaL are dismissed as the ravings 
of aging Conservative MPs in 
seaside constituencies. 

There was a time, however, 
when those who challenged the 
economic consensus of the 1950s 


and 19605 were dismisse d in 
precisely the same way. Only a 
decade later the position was very 
different. The journal of the 
Institute of .Economic Affaire 
could justifiably proclaim that 
“we’re all libertarians now”. 

AH the ingredients that contrib- 
uted to the success of the eco- 
nomic counter-revolution are 

present to assist a social backlash. 



Clare Short and Norman TeWat: 

unlikely allies in a ~ *■ 

crusade against penmssfreBess 

As with economic affoirs in the 
1970s there is a widespread 
perception of crisis, with rising 
crime rates and lurid . accounts of 
sexual violence in every daily 
newspaper. And_ as with 1970s 
economics there is a great deal of 
public support for a backlash, with 
widespread favour for greater 
authority, suffer sentences and 

tougher discipline. 

Similarly, as with economic 
af&ira in the 19705, there is no 
clearly articulated alternative to 
the policies of the backlash, with 
man y, like Germaine Greer, who 
strongly supported the reforms of 4.. 
the 1960s. now deeply anxious 
about their consequences. 

Social liberals should dearly 
recognize the ' potential for a 
backlash and should begin to 
mount a defence. There is no 
conclusive evidence lin k i n g “per- 
missiveness” to crime and much 
evidence that repression is not the 
answer. Social liberalism does not 
imply approval of aO the ways in 
which liberty is used. It implies, 
rather, a desire not to live in a 
society in which Norman Tebbit 
and Teddy Taylor are the arbiters 
of literary and artistic merit and 
Nicholas Fairbaim is the guardian 
of public morality. 

Giving more women positions 
of authority, promoting greater 
neighbourliness and supporting ■ 
the more sober press are for better • 
answers than banning newspapers. 

A free and tolerant society which 
respects the law and the police is 
for more likely to reduce crime 
than arbitrary sentences and un- 
fair trials. 

At a time of confusion and fear 
people will always look for solu- 
tions that provide apparent cer- 
tainty and security. Social liberals 
must ensure that these solutions 
are found in a free and progressive 
society and not in the policies of 
censorship and reaction. If such 
answers are not found, perhaps in 
a decade from now the magazines 
will 1« proclaiming; “We’re all 
authoritarian now ” 

The author is Alliance prospective 
parliamentary cand idate for Brent 
East. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

On top of the 
world only 


I first met Hamish McBarber at a 
No 52 bus stop in Notting HT1L He 
is the only real explorer I have 
ever come across, though of 
course I didn't know that to begin 
with; at first, he was just the other 
person in the queue. Well, after 
the first day or two at the bus stop 
we got talking, as the British tend 
to do, even though there was no 
mutual acquaintance there to 
introduce us. and he asked me 
where I was going. 

"High St Kensington,” I said. “I 
have to buy a new pair of shoes.” 

Silence fell for an hour or more, 
until I got the very strong feeling 
that he wanted me to ask him 
where he was going. How does one 
get these feelings? I don’t know. 
Perhaps it’s the silent camaraderie 
that builds up over long periods. 
Perhaps it was the way he held up 
a notice in front of my face saying: 
“Why don’t you ask me where I’m 
off to?". 

“So, where are you off to?” I 
asked casually. 

“The North Pole,” he said. 

“The 52 bus doesn’t go to the 
North Pole." 

“Ah’m changing at Victoria." 
Silence fell again. 1 had never 
met anyone before who was going 
to the North Pole, though I once 
knew someone who was off to 
Glasgow, which is in that general 
direction, and I didn’t know the 
correct response. Eventually I 
responded in the only way I knew. 

“I don’t know the correct 
response to that." 

“You say: ‘Who's sponsoring 
your wee trip*?” 

I thought' about it. Night felL 
The sky over Notting Hill turned 
pink with flaming doner kebabs, 
dark blue with late police cars and 
yellow with free taxis. By and by 
dawn came, and I said: 

“So. who’s sponsoring your wee 
trip, then?” 

“The GLC," he said. “They’ve 
given me £400.000 as a parting 
present in order to get to the North 
Pole, as long as 1 stick to public 
transport." 

The sun came up. 1 could hear 
architects getting up in nearby 
houses, groaning at the prospect of 
having to plan attic conversions 
instead of the National Gallery 
extension they so dearly wanted to 


design. I could "hear Radio 3 in 
every breakfast room. I said; 

“You can’t get to the North Pole 
on public transport.” 

“That’s what you think, laddie. 
That’s what they said when I 
agreed to trace the source of the 
Nile using only public transport.” * 

“And did you find it?” 

“Aye. In the heart of Cairo.” 

More silence felL I thought 
about Sir Richard Burton. I 
thought about Dr Livingstone. I 
thought about Ken Livingstone. 

Ken Livingstone, I presume: Yes, 

I am Ken Livingstone, and here is 
£400,000 to spend as you like. 
Thank you, Ken, because I am a 
minority group, being the only 
Glaswegian trying to reach the 
North Pole by public transport A 
great shadow came out of the 
dawn. It was a 52 bus. 

“High Street Ken,” I said. 

“North Pole, single” said 
Hamish. 

“We don’t go to the North 
Pole,” said the conductor. “You’ll 
have to change at Victoria. I'm 
sure you can find a train to the 
North Pole there. If not, take the 
tube to King's Cross. 70p, please.” 

“Here in by briefcase,” said 
Hamish McBarber; '“is a cheque 
signed personally by Ken Living- 
stone for £400,000. A ticket for the 
North Pole, if you don’t mind, 
laddie.” 

“We don’t do through tickets,” 
said the conductor. “And even if 
we did, l couldn't take a cheque. 

Not even with a bank card.” 

“All right.” said Hamish. “I'll 
just have a ticket to Victoria. Bat I 
insist on paying £20 for it.” 

As he counted out the notes to 
die amazed conductor, he con- 
fided to me that getting through 
£400,000 was not easy, especially 
when restricted to public trans- 
port, though he seemed to be 
enjoying the work. When I got off 
the bus, he wrote his address on a 
fiver and gave it to me. 

“Keep in touch, laddie. And do 
one thing for me; every time you , 
go through High Street Ken, think 
of the man it was named after. The 
great Ken Livingstone.” 

He kissed his cheque for 
£400,000 and was borne off to- 
wards the North Pole on the 52 
bus. Via Victoria. 



: 



13 


London HI 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 






tl i. ' ^ 
***«!!» . 1 . 


TteSoyieL leader’s invitation 
to President Rcqgan to meet 
him in Europe — anywhere, 
anytime •». to talk about a 

nudear test ban shook! be seen 

for what n is: a play for the 
P: vote and a tactic to 

IF - ttiday tire; scheduled spper- 
^ .jpower sapunit But ii also 
. ^suggests a measure ofdespera- 
iT r >two in Moscow about how to 
■ ; ; - ' deal; va*h IVesiaeitt Regan’s 
> foreign policy. That may be 
k Why the Soviet people have 
fr not been. told, about the 
.^prompt American refection of 
n foejdea.and why the Soviet 
fbreigrr ministry has now de- 
nied wanting to dday the 
Washington summit 

This is not to say that Mr 
Gorbachov's initiative was not 
cleverly, timed. It was. The 
American President was on 
holiday. So were the Europe- - 
arts, except for those taking 
-pvt in the traditional Easter 
disarmament matches. The ' 
Soviet leader's message was ; 
calculated to- bypass govern- 
ments ana appeal to what 
Moscow regarcls as potential 
afoesintte pursuftof disarma- 
ment the people of Europe. 

In recent .years, however, 
Moscow has had reason to be 
wary of the people of Europe. ’ 
They have elected - govern-- 
ments in favour of siting US 
cruise and Pershing * missiles 
on their territory, despite dire 
warnings from - Moscow of 
what would happen if they did. 
Worse, the people of Spain 
have actually voted to remain - 
in Mato in dear defiance of 
Moscow's advice to puO out. 
So why does Mr Gorbachov 
calculate that Europe will react 
differently on this occasion? . 

Partly, it is because of the - 
undoubted 1 appeal of a com- 
prehensive nuclear test ban. . 
What dearer expression of a 
country’s peace-loving nature 
could there be than this? It 
casts anyone; including Presi- 
dent Reagan who rejects the- 
proposal and Mrs Thatcher* 


i* kin*; 


> f if:' 


V'.fV 

• i * a 


who makes the unimpeachable 
point that nuclear weapons 
cannot be unin vented, in the 
■ role of uncharitable pessimist 
* Partly, though, ft is because the ■ 
Soviet Union is running out of 
odicr ideas and time for 
combating, what seems from 
: Moscow^ to : be .Prudent 
Reagan's growing • inter- . 
: national dout 

When Mr Gorbachov an- 
nounced his unilateral mora- 
torium bn nuclear tests, the 
Soviet Union had completed 
tests of its newest missiles. It 
was a gesture that cost-little; 
Washington, on the other 
hand, as President Reagan and 
his advisers have been keen to 
point out, was * still in the 
. middle of a series of tests. To 
caD a. halt, would have been 
-expensive, politically and in 
research.. .terms. The Ameri- 
cans, disregarding short-term 
propaganda considerations, 
said no. 

Any" advantage to the Rus- 
: sians could only be temporary. 
Eventually, the Russians will 
want to start a new series of 
tests. But they are hoist by 
their own petard: to start 
testing again would mean 
.forfeiting the propaganda 
advan&ge their moratorium 
gave, then in the fiist place.: 
The only . alternative would be;' 
to negotiate a test bah -agree-' 
ment with the Ame ricans — 
and fast ■ 

Moreover, the effect of Mr 
Gorbachov’s new offer — 
whatever the Soviet Foreign 
Ministry is now saying— is to 
blur the issue of a superpower, 
summit in Washington later in 
the year. For if President 
Reagan had agreed to come to - 


both the te rms Mid the. timing : 
-of -a--' Washington -samiwtj, 
would have been altered ; And" 
the Soviet leader baa good 
reasons for wantingto do both. 

. Talks about anns control, 
and especially about the uto- 
pian idea of a test ban treaty. 


have always been more accept- 
able to the Soviet leadership 
than talks about the whole 
gamut of bilateral and inter- 
national issues: among them 
human rights. Since the Kd- 
. sinki agreement was signed 10 
-years -ago, the Soviet Union 
has repeatedly tried to have 
security ; issues and human 
rights discussed at separate 
forums to. prevent the two 
being linked too closely in 
Western minds. 

It is also becoming apparent 
that the Soviet leader — or his 
military and foreign policy 
establishment — may be hav- 
ing second thoughts about the 
timing and the venue of the 
summit he agreed to in 
November. Mr Gorbachov 
emerged from the Geneva 
. summit with very little to 
show for his pains: above all, 
no US concessions on the 
Strategic Defence Initiative. 
An .agreement to meet next in 
Washington may now look in 
Moscow like a concession to 
the Americans which it would 
have been wiser not to make. 
Can the Soviet leader afford to 
go to Washington with no 
prospect of an arms control 
agreement of any kind in 
prospect, and President Rea- 
gan riding high after his Lib- 
yan venture? 

.- .- As Moscow's foreign policy 
line looks increasingly unclear, 
the Soviet side may be con- 
cerned that June, or even 
September, may be too soon to 
talk generally with the Ameri- 
cans. - What better, from 
Moscow's point of view, than 
indefinite postponement of a 
Washington summit, in favour 
of test ten talks among friend- 
lier natives in Europe? 

...It. is to the credit of 
Wa&ingfon’a steel nerves that 
-:it-iustst5bn following the letter 
of the agreements reached at 
last November’s summit It is 
a' measure of the uncertainty 
still prevailing in Moscow that 
Mr Gorbachov cannot do 
likewise. 


Education pofacy-making has 
become a display of think-tonk - 
~ squibs. The; Ideas v range ; 
through: -."vouchers, v- 

. “privatization”,', City mOney, : . 

■■ and this weektiielat^LGown; 
schools. Some of them dazzle. 
Each has its attractions; Most 
speak more directly to the. 
concerns of parents , than the 
speechifying that Has gone on 
at the National Union of 
Teachers’ conference this 
Easter. Each is worth study — 
and experimental im- 
plementation _at the. level, 
where it counts, the leyd of 
local communities. 

But while the new ideas are 
welcome evidence of fresh 
thought about old problems, 
some seem. tike p ana c e a s for 
problems of -under-achieve- 
ment and organization that by .. 
their very nature will hot be 
ameliorated quickly. Mean- 
Mule, what ought to be square 
in the educational radical’s 
sight — a better connexion 

- between schooling and -the ■ 

' economic life of late twentieth ; 

century Britain — slips out of . 
focus. 

Crown schools have an in- 
triguing ring, . The idea is a 
hybrid. Its elements are nostal- 
gia for the direct grant schools' 
and a half-assimilated notion 
of the success in American 
urban areas " of “magnet 
schools” . ft harks back, 
perhaps unconsciously, to the 
. work of Professor AJL Halsey 
(no Tory but on occasion a 
radical thinker about school. : 

- organization) on educational 
priority areas. 

Aa exciting picture can be 
drawn (for the manifesto?), it 
features wefi-disciplined inner 
city schools malting minimal 
concessions to the poverty ot 
their environment, offering to 
the children of the dues the 
same kind of secondary edura- 
tion so desired by the middle 
and upper classes.; Such - 
schools could be vehicles r at 
advancement for , the dis- 


Job for JobCentres 


advantaged, white and'fton- 
L whjte,i^viding;aaavenue to " 
' academic qaalifieatkras — a 
reawakdfingof "tbe Tidtels "Of 
The fouhders .carn&ries ago. of 
^he:“ptfolic aajadftr. f ; .. 

; And there the dream bumps 
into reality. Educational 
enhancement is being at- 
tempted by, for example, the 
. Inner London Education 
Authority . J . with ’ its 
“Hargreaves” initiative; . But 
the predilections of some of its 
Labour members and the anti- 
achievement ethos of-some of 
its teachers are not the only 
reasons why-such schemes of 
planting orchids in gardens of 
weed are unlikely to have 
dramatic results. The con- 
ditions of inner urban life do 
not easily, bend to classroom 
improvements. . . 

Crown schools would likely 
be selective; they would have 
to be if they were going to offer 
examination courses different 
.front the comprehensives that 
surround them. But selective 
on what basis: aptitud e, pr o* 
-fidency at. tests, • parental 
enthusiasm?' They would at- 
tract the better fomilies: They 
would become a means for 
reorganizing education, in a 
way that maverick mimsters- 
such as Mr Bob Dunn talk 
about but which timid Cabi- 
nets has shown no willingness 
to sanction. . 

Who. is to pay for their 
enhanced curriculum, good 
teachers, laboratories and 
freshly . painted classrooms? 
The fact is, uncomfortable 

though it. is to both teacher 
unions and to Department al 
Education and Science min- 
isters, that spending per head 

in secondary education has 
risen in the past six years of 
alleged educational austerity. 
It has risen and yet there are 
well-attested complaints about 
books and buildings. There is, 

m other words* much that is 
wrong with , the administration 
of education. The culprit is not 


the' DBS singularly nor the 
locatauthorities in the plural 
bnt the relationship bmween 
them, .. " 

- - Nearly all the ^ glistening 
policy ideas thrown in the air 
recently, have written on them 
the end of that pat formula 
used since the Second World 
War to describe British educa- 
tion — a national system 
locally administered. The exis- 
tence of Crown schools would 
upset town hall planning. They 
would require the DEStogrow 
an' executive ann. ft would-be 
only a matter of time before 
••the central government 
stepped in to administer the 
entirety of the system. But of 
course there is in existence 
already an executive arm of 
the central government run- 
ning, more or less, a large 
component of public educa- 
tion: the Manpower Services 
Commission. 

The Crown schools would 
be neo-grammar schools 
pursuing an ac a demic ciuricn- 
-lum, more or less like the 
.public schools. They would 
not offer preparation for work 
and training in vocational 
s kills. They would, in short, 
miss the target 

For the problem of British 
secondary schools is not 
primarily, a failure to serve 
middle class children and to 
stretch and stimulate the well 
motivated from good homes— 
important though deficiencies 
: are in these departments. The 
failure is at the other end of the 
. scale. It is devising a system 
" which maintains the interest ot 
the 30 to 40 per cent who at 
present sit for no recognized 
examination, who ■ give up 
mentally before the fourth 
form, who have consistently 
been neglected since the 1944 
Act Reform in this area is not 
glamorous. But the educa- 
tional revolution is needed 
here as much as, if not more 
than, at die other end of the 
scale of ability and motiva- 
tion. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Plans to dismantle Herstmonceux 


From Mr Ray Hurst 
Si r, Your leader.-The way to tootc 
jobs" (March 20), refers to foe 
“revolution” in . the role at 
JobCentres resulting from the 
Government’s decision to expana 
counselling facilities for the \ot>Sr 
term unemployed. You fell to 
mention that in 1983 the Govern- 
ment, in accepting the recom- 
mendations of Sir Derek Rayneir^s 
report on the M SCs empJoy^rat 

seizes, abolished counting 

facilities for the uneimriOi'ed m 
JobCentres. ^eiudtag .the 
Commission’s occupation guid- 
ance units. - 

This was done as a cost-cutting 
exercise tet . tte . dec^ ■ rise 
reflected cwtamnunu^al V 
at that time that counsefong me 


unemployed was " ’‘social 
engineering”, totally alien to the 
“stand on your own' feet” philos- 
ophy, ... 

Associated with the 
Goveramenfs attnude in 1983 to 
counselling service in JobCentres 
was its decision to abolish The 
requirements of unemployed per- 
sons aged over 18 to register for 
employment This derision, again 
taken for cost-cutting, reasons, 
placed this country in bread! of 
International Labour 

Ofganisationand European social 
conventions which require mem- 
ber countries to raster the un- 
employed for employment These 
conventions statetharthis should 
fee done to evaluate tirerr capacity 
for . employment or vocational 
training or re-training; 

- The Government should 


remtroduce'foe reqoiremem a fall 
unemployed people ued 18 aud 
over receiving benefits to also 
register regularly for emptoyment 
at JobCentres and careers offices. 
This has always applied in respect 
of young people under 18 years of 
age and cannot be dissociated 
from the success of the local 


young people into the Yout 
Training Scheme. 

Only in this way can continuous 
counselling of all the unemployed 
be maintained, ;Why should this 
important revival facility be with- 
held by JobCenires . until a person 
has been unemployed for a year? 
Yours faithfully; - 
RAY HURST.. 

39 Corporation Road, 

Redsar, Cleveland. 


From Or Victor Chtbe 
Sir, It seems extraordinary that 
only the Treasury now stands in 
the way of the Department of 
Education and Science and its 
plan to dismantle the Royal 
Greenwich Observatory (Pearce 
Wright’s report, March zl). Have 
not the Government and the head 
of State some concern for the 
future role of our national obser- 
vatory? Or are we to understand 
that rf the Ministry of Defence 
were to choose to dose down the 
Meteorological Office in order to 
save* few pounds, then the nation 
would disclaim any interest in the 
weather? 

Should these questions seem 
frivolous. Sir, my point is a serious 
one nonetheless. There are obvi- 
ously more things in heaven amt 
earth than meet the eyes of a few 
Civil Servants in the Department 
ofEcfucatkm and Science. Yet it is 
these "experts” apparently who 
have persuaded the new ehaimiar) 
of the Science and Engineering 
Research Council, who is no 
a s t ro nomer, into believing it is not 
important to predict what is 
happening in the sky. 

It seems doubly extramdinary 
therefore that the planned dis- 
persal to Scotland should involve 
terminating the prediction ser- 
vices which constitute the only 
sound reason for having a national 


observatory at an. And it seems 
triply extraordinary that all this 
should be done in the year, nay the 
week almost, of the very comet 
that gave our national observatory 
its supreme international status in 
the first place. Such insensitivity 
indicates a lack of appreciation 
not only of the celestial sphere but 
of English history as weLL 

One should of course remember 
that it is only two decades since 
the Govemrocrn removed our 
national observatory out of the 
ambit of the Ministry of Defence 
where it had essentially been for 
three hundred years. Now, on the 
advice of mere Civil Servants and 
a few blinkered academics, who do 
not know its purpose, the Govern- 
ment seeks to dispose of our 
national observatory altogether. 

Does the Government really 
believe we understand our celes- 
tial environment so well that we 
need have no concern over what is 
_ to happen during the next 
• years, say? Or is the Govern- 
ment placing its faith in Ameri- 
cans as usual, and quietly selling 
off the family silver? 

Yours faithfully, 

VICTOR CLUBE, 

University of Oxford, 

Department of Astrophysics, 
Smith Paris Road, 

Oxford. 

March 25. 


US and the Contras 

From Mr David Hoile 
Sic. John Carlin’s article, “Will 
Congress bail out the Contras?” 
(March 18), was both contradic- 
tory and misleading. In it be 
dismisses the US view that the 
Nicaraguan people are “in a 
ferment” 

Somoza’s overthrow in 1979, 
amid wide-scale dissatisfaction, 
was achieved with 5,000 rebels 
under arms: there are now 21.000 
Nicaraguans under arms. Surely 
four times as many anti-govern- 
ment guerillas and twice as many 
civilian refugees now than at the 
height of the Somoza era indicates 
a considerable degree of dis- 
content? 

John Carlin’s dismissal of oppo- 
sition to the Sandinistas as being 
‘The embittered middle class” 
ignores the fact that the Contra 
movement is composed 
overwhelmingly of peasants and 
workers: be also neglects to men-' 
tioo the Misldto, Sumo and Creole 
ethnic communities whose at- 
tempted collectivisation, displace- 
ment and slaughter led to their 
taking up. arms against the Ma- 
nagua regime. 


It would also be a mistake to 
attribute the massive Sandinista 
defence spending to the Contra 
activities. Both the Managua re- 
rime and John Carlin’s article 
imply a very minimal threat 
indeed from the democratic 
guerillas. Why then the huge war 
footing, including 200 tanks? As 
anyone who has seen northern 
Nicaragua knows armour is use- 
less in the counter-insurgency role 
in the country. The only possible 
answer is that the Sandinista 
militarisation is designed for a 
more conventional application in 
a region where none of her 
neighbours have an armoured 
capacity. 

It is very high time indeed that 
this Conservative Government 
showed as much of an interest in 
central America as the United 
States and also offered tangible 
military assistance to the demo- 
cratic resistance m Nicaragua. 

Yours sinceriey, 

DAVID HOILE, 

Senior Vice-Chairman, 

Federation of Conservative Stu- 
dents, 

32 Smith Square, SWJ. 

March 18. 


The ‘workers*. 

From Mr F. W.D. Jackson 
Sir, I do not know why Dr Daig 
(March 24) should think that 
terms like “work giver” and “work 
accepter” are any less divisive 
than “manager” and “worker". 
Presumably a “work giver", hav- 
ing cleared all his papers off his 
desk, can go away to do some bard 
labour on the golf course, while 
the “work accepter" meekly gets 
on with the job allotted to him! 
The term “manager" is entirely 
functional, and the term “ wor k e r ” 
is hallowed by tradition and 
certainly am offensive. 

If we have to copy the conti- 
nentals, let us imitate their work 
methods rather than their jargon. 
If the relationship between 
management and work-force is 
good, rt does not matter how the 
individuals describe their func- 
tions. If it is bad, no changes in 
title will improve it 

When the Red Army was raised, 
the old Russian military ranks 
were avoided in favour of such 
functional terms as “Co mrade 
Battalion Commander”. When 
the Russians had their backs to the 
wall, fighting the Nazis, the old 
ranks and their insignia were 
revived and have been kept ever 
since. . 

Yours faithfully. 

DAVID JACKSON. 

8 Woodlands Road, 

Surbiton, 

Surrey. 

March 24. 


Trial by jnry 

From Mr R. E. H. Bailey 
Sir, Your level-headed leader in 
today's Times concludes by saying 
that “public faith in the delivery of 
justice must be buoyed. . ." and I 
wholeheartedly agree. I venture to 
suggest, as a rider to that, that 
public awareness of the definition 
of justice should also be given a 
boost. 

It is at present the tendency 
among some newspapers, some 
more respectable than others, to 
pre-empt the outcome of a crim- 
inal trial and to express horror and 
outrage if a jury, some of whom 
may be among the readers of those 
newspapers, fail, having heard all 
the evidence, to find some wretch 
guilty, usually of rape. 

Quite apart tom the fact that a 
jury are in a far better position to 
reach a finding at the end of a trial 
than are those who have only read 
the juicy bits in a newspaper, it is 
monstrous that any newspaper 
should seek to criticize jurors for 
doing tbeir duty. 

What such journals demand is 
not justice, but blood, and they 
seem not to mind very much 
whose the blood is. 

I am. Sir. your obedient servant, 
ROBIN H. BAILEY, 

Gweal Dryra, 

Higher Drym, 

Praze, 

Camborne, 

Cornwall. 

March 14. 


Stripping of grain 

From Dr Lynnette J. Peel 
Sir. Your report (March 24) 
“Stripping off ears of corn to cut 
costs", suggests that this method 
of grain harvesting has not been 
developed successnilly in foe past 
In fact, the “stripper”, using this 
principle, was developed in South 
Australia is 1843. 

A stripper was essentially a large 
boot on wheels with a comb 
mounted in the front and a 
revolving beater mounted at the 
back of the comb, so that as the 
stripper was pulled through the 
wheal by a horse foe ripe beads of 
gram were drawn back through the 
comb and knocked off by the 
beater into the box. The mixture 
of chaff and grain in foe box was 
then taken to a small stationary 
winnower and winnowed by hand. 

In the mid-lSSOs foe winnow- 
ing and stripping operations were 
incorporated into one machine, 
the McKay stripper-harvester, and 
this machine was used throughout 
the Austrahan wheat regions; by 
1914 some 10,000 had been 
exported to the Argentine. 

Yours faithfully, 

LYNNETTE J. PEEL, 

49 Oakiands, 

Hamilton Road, 

Reading, 

March 24* 

From MrJ. P. Toomey 
Sir, The idea of grain stripping 
discovered by the National In- 
" stitute of Agricultural Pn g i nw inp 
(Science Report, March 24) is in 
feet a very okS one: In Book I of 
foe Georgies Virgil describes foe 
process, using the verb nringere. 


(cp the Greek root word for 
squeeze or strangle) which sug- 
gests holding the grain-bead tight 
and stripping the ears off; so he 
talks of “stripping foe barley from 
the brittle stalk." The standing 
straw was then burnt. 

As your reports suggests, the 
method is less labour-intensive 
than others, cutting out one stage 
of the process of harvesting. 
Whether VjigiL with his adher- 
ence to the work ethic, wholly 
approved of this aspect is another 
matter. 

Yours faithfully, 

J. P. TOOMEY, 

253 Chester Road North, 
Kidderminster, 

Worcestershire. 


Continuing grip 
of apartheid 

From Dr Julian Cobbing 
Sir, In reply to Mr Woodrow 
Wyatt’s claim (“Give Botha 
enough time to bury apartheid". 
March 1) that “foe policy of 
apartheid is officially and actuaHy 
dead", this is certainly not the case 
in Grahamsiown. foe town in the 
Eastern Cape in which I live. 
Neither arc we one of the “pockets 
of segregation left after so many 
years”. 

Blacks are still forced to live in 
residentiafly segregated areas 
throughout “white South Africa" 
and are clearly destined to remain 
that way partly for foe purposes of 
military control. The organisation 
to which 1 belong, the Grahams- 
town Committee of Democrats, 
has had its meetings banned since 
last July because we publicly 
called for the end of apartheid. 

Mr Wyatt has misunderstood 
what apartheid is. Apartheid is foe 
black “homelands" - separate, 
huge reserves, turned into pseudo- 
states ruled over by Mack collabo- 
rators, the creation of which this 
century has involved allocating 87 
per cent of land in South Africa to 
just over 10 per cent of whites and 
13 per cent to nearly 80 percent of 
blacks, a land division which, 
makes Ian Smith’s Rhodesia ap- 
pear extravagantly generous. 

This division was imposed by 
force against foe will of foe 
voteless majority of blacks and 
they will never accept it P. W. 
Botha is fully committed to 
maintaining and defending this 
grand apartheid, bat calculatedly 
seeks to confuse foreign visitors by 
speaking of reforms within the 
white pseudo-state. 

The African National Congress 
(which Mr Wyatt forgot to say has 
been banned since I960), and 
other organisations such as the 
United Democratic From and the 
Azanian Peoples Organisation, are 
fighting to destroy grand apartheid 
and replace it with a single, unified 
democratic slate. That it will 
require a comprehensive struc- 
tural revolution is a tautology. 

The longer the indefensible is 
defended by foe Army the more 
likely it is that the solutions will be 
extreme, and vice-versa. I am 
afraid that Mr Wyatt has been foe 
victim of a very big lie indeed. 
Yours faithfully, 

JULIAN COBBING. 

15 George Street, 

Graham stown. 

South Africa. 

March 20. 

The Savery case 

From Mr Denis E. Meehan 
Sir. It used to be commonly held 
that one of the main purposes of. 
education was to nurture in 
individuals the capacity for in- 
dependent thought. 

Now (March 21) the Director of 
Education for the County of Avon 
disabuses us of this silly notion: a 
teacher whose published opinions 
are “extreme and provocative" to 
his colleagues (but not, appar- 
ently, extreme and provocactive 
enough to be actionable at law) is 
to be hauled before a disciplinary 
tribunal. 

Mr Savory's co-educators have 
to be protected from opinions 
contrary to their own. it seems, 
they cannot hold their own in 
rational debate, or agree to differ 
when differing opinions prove 
irreconcilable. Let’s burn a few 
books. 

Yours faithfully, 

DENIS E. MEEHAN, 

194 Merton Road, SW18. 

March 22. 


Sirte recalled 

From Mr David W. Pugh 
Sir, Your editorial today (March 
26) is headed “The Battle of 
Sirte.” To some who served in the 
Royal Navy in foe last war the real 
battle of Sirte was fought on 
Passion Sunday, March 22, 1942 
when foe whole of the Italian Fleet 
comprising all tbeir battleships, 
8in and 6in cruisers plus destroy- 
ers. intercepted a Malta convoy 
passing from Alexandria to Malta. 

Admiral Philip Vian, 
commanding the 15th Cruiser 
Squadron of four 5'Ain light 
cruisers, retired behind a dense 
smoke-screen, firing on radar 
bearings which the Italians did not 
possess, and put that mighty force 
to flight. There was a howling gale 
blowing, but it was a day to 
remember for ever. 

Yours faithfully, 

DAVID W.PUGH 
(Ex-Surgeon IieutenanLRNVR), 
38 Sion HtlL 
Bath. 

Avon. 

March 26. 


Deaths from cold 

From DrJ. H. B. Beal 
Sir, Longstanding, regular readers 
of The Times death announce- 
ments will have noticed that, for at 
least the last 60 years, spells of 
very cold weather have been 
rapidly followed by increased 
numbers of elderly deaths re- 
corded. 

It is unlikely that any of those 
whose executors put notices in 
The Times died from hypother- 
mia doe to lack of means to pay 
heating biDs. 

This suggests that there are 
other mechanisms automatically 
causing deaths of foe elderly in 
cold weather. Changes of govern- 
ment have not had any obvious 
effect on this phenomenon. 

Yours faithfully, 

JACK BEAL, 

61 Cadogan Square, SWt. 


Slow biit sore 

From Mr W. C R. Whalley 
Sir, Our tortoise emerged today, 
two weeks later than last year. He 
lives, free range, in our small 
walled garden. I captured him in 
centra] Syria in 1950, ami he has 
lived with us ever since. 

Usually be appears at the same 
time as the dandelions, to which 
he is partial. Later, lettuce and 
strawberries are his favourites. I 
attribute his success io the fact 
that his home in Syria at an 
elevation of 1 ,600ft can be bitterly 
cold in winter. 

Anyway, 35 years in foe open in 
Berkshire seems a pretty good 
record. 

Yours etc, 

W.CR. WHALLEY, 

105 High Street, 

Hungerford, 

Berkshire. 

March 23. 



APRIL 2 1924 

Antagonism between the Bavarian 
state government and the central 
government in Berlin led Hitler to 
believe that his National Socialist 
Party could take over Germany. 
With what he thought was the 
Support of the Bavarian premier 
and the head of the Bavarian 
army, and the encouragement of 
Ludendorff. he launched his coup 
from the Beer Hall in Munich on 
November 8, 1923. It quickly 
proved aborthv when, on the 
following day, the police fired on 
Hitler’s supporters. Hitler served 
only one year of his sentence, and 
that in comparative comfort. 


MUNICH TREASON 

TRIAL. 


FARCICAL SENTENCES. 


GENERAL LUDEN DORFF 
ACQUITTED. 

(From Our Correspondent.) 

MUNICH, April L 
Subdued cheers greeted General 
Ludendorff and his associates as 
they swaggered into the Court this 
morning to hear judgement passed 
on them for the part they played in 
the Nationalist revolt in Munich 
on November 8 and 9 last year. 
With the exception of Herr HitieT 
and Dr. Weber all were in full 
uniform and wearing numerous 
decorations. Previously, in the 
streets leading to the Army School 
General Ludendorff had received 
an enthusiastic welcome as his car 
drove slowly through the large 
crowds that had assembled in spite 
of the numerous police edicts 
forbidding all public 
demonstrations. 

The verdict was slowly read by 
Dr. Neidhardt, the President of the 
Court:— Five years’ imprisonment 
in a fortress and a fine of 200 marks 
(£10) and costs for Herr Hitler. Dr. 
Weber. Herr von Pohner, and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Kriebel, who 
were found guilty of high treason— 
the crowded Court shuddered with 
indigna tion— one year and three 
months' imprisonment in a for- 
tress and a fine of 100 marks and 
costa for Lieutenant BrOckner, 
Captain Rfihm, Herr Frick, Lieu- 
tenant Wagner, and Lieutenant 
Pemel (General LudendorfPa step- 
son), who were found guilty of 
abetting high treason; Excellency 
Ludendorff acquitted, but ordered 
to pay certain costs. 

The President watted for the 
excitement and sympathetic mur- 
murs to subside and then contin- 
uetfc— “Hitter, Pbhner, Weber and 
Kriebel must serve six months and 
will then be released on their own 
recognizances, the remainder of 
the sentence being suspended. 
Briickner and the others will be set 
free at once, also on suspended 
sentence and on their own 
recognizances.” 

Munich is chuckling over the 
verdict, which is regarded as an 
excellent joke for All Fools’ Day. 
The verdict was arrived at by a 
vote of four to one, the Court 
consisting of three judges and two 
laymen. The President afterwards 
read a long statement setting forth 
the legal grounds on which the 
Court had based its decision. In 
view of the actual verdict, it was 
rather difficult to take his state- 
ment seriously in spite of the use of 
such phrases as filotjustitio pereat 
mundus. 

At the conclusion of the 
President’s statement. General Lu- 
deneforff indignantly declared that 
it was a scandal and a disgrace that 
he should be acquitted and his 
gallant comrades condemned. The 
public rose to jeer at the Court or to 
shout, “Hail HitterT or “Hail 
Ludendorff!" The President looked 
surprised and grave. He evidently 
felt that he had done nothing to 
merit this hostile demonstration. 
Had he not on several occasions 
during the long trial said that the 
Court was not a theatre? But the 
performance was obviously fin- 
ished, and the public swarmed out 
into the corridors to greet foe 
heroes as they walked away. 

From a window Herr Hitter 
smilingly bowed his acknowledge- 
ments to the crowd outside, who 
already knew the verdict and 
apparently appreciated the joke. 
The streets were again densely 
crowded to welcome General Lu- 
dendorff on his way home. One or 
two women were crushed and 
several other casualties occurred 
owing to a charge by mounted 
police armed with rubber-covered 
steel truncheons who evidently did 
not realize that it was April 1, and 
were acting on the orders they had 
received to disperse the crowd at 
any cost But in an hour or so 
conditions in the city were abso- 
lutely normal. 

The trial has at any rate proved 
that to plot against the Constitu- 
tion of the Raich is not considered 
a serious crime in Bavaria. Possi- 
bly the only people who do not 
share the general satisfaction at 
foe verdict are the relatives of foe 
18 men who tost their lives under 
the leadership of Hen Hitter and 
General Ludendorff in the 
Odeonsplatz on November 9. 


Return of Eros 

From Mr Frank T. Smith 
Sir. 1 understood from reading 
H.V. Morton's In Search of Lon- 
don that foe original intention of 
the sculptor Gilbert was to per- 
petrate a pun by positioning Eros 
so that his arrow was discharged in 
foe direction of Shaftesbury Ave- 
nue. 

This was not done, and I had 
hoped that when Eros was re- 
turned io Piccadilly Circus he 
would be seen to have “buried his 
shaft" in foe correct direcuon. 
However, sadly, he now has sped 
foe bolt to Lower Regent Street. 
Yours faithfully, 

FRANK T. SMITH. 

St Paul’s Manse, , 

6 Park Avenue, 

Dunfermline. 

Fife. 

March 25. 


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THE TiMES WBDNJbSDAY APRIL 2 1986 



COURT AND 
SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


WINDSOR CASTLE 

April 1: The Duke of £dlnbui£h 

this morning reopened (he 

Guildhall at Windsor after its 

refurbishment. 

His Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the Mayor of the 
Royal Borough of Windsor and 
Maidenhead (Councillor 
R.Shaw). 

Mr Brian McGrath was in 
attendance. 

The Queen was represented 
by Air Chief Marshal Sir 
Thomas Kennedy (Air Aide-de 
Camp) at the Funeral of Air 
Chief Marshal Sir Walter Mer- 
ton (formerly Air Aide-de- 
Camp) which was held in the 
Church of St Mary and St 
Nicholas. Wilton, Wiltshire this 
afternoon. 


Lady Abel Smith has suc- 
ceeded the Hon Mary Morrison 
as Lady in Waiting to The 
Queen. 

CLARENCE HOUSE 
April I; Mrs Patrick Campbell- 
Preson has succeeded Ruth. 
Lady Fermov as Lady in Wait- 
ing to Queen Elizabeth The 
Queen Mother. 


Austrian Embassy, 18 Belgrave 
Square, SW1. 

Mrs George West and Mr 
David Roycroft were in 
attendance. 


KENSINGTON PALACE 
April 1: The Prince and Princess 
of Wales today opened the 
Terminal 4 extensions of the 
London Underground System 
and subsequently toured and 
opened Terminal 4 Heathrow 
Airport 

Miss Anne Beckwith -Smith 
and Mr David Roycroft were in 
attendance. 

Their Royal Highnesses this 
evening attended a 
dinner/dance given by His Ex- 
cellency the Austrian Ambas- 
sador and Mrs Thomas at the 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr CD. Coveriey 
and Miss S.E. Jones 
The engagement is announced 
between Give, only son of Mr 
and Mrs D.A. Coveriey, of 
Newport Pagnell. Buckingham- 
shire. and Susan Elizabeth, elder 
daughter of Mr and Mrs D.W. 
Jones. of Lavendon, 
Buckinghamshire. 

Mr W.R_ Cox 
and Miss C-F. Regnart 
The engagement is announced 
between Wakely Richard, youn- 
gest son of Mr and Mrs John 
Cox. of Stafford Park. 
Puddle town. Dorset, and Caro- 
line Frances, elder daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Julian Regnart. of 
Tarrant Gunville, Dorset. 

Mr S.G. Crichton 
and Miss A.M.V. Ford 
The engagement is announced 
between Scott Gordon, only son 
of the late Squadron Leader 
Gordon Crichton, of The 
Haymarkel, London, and the 
late Mrs J. McGoldrick, of 
Essex, and Alicia, only daughter 
of the late Mr Christopher Ford, 
of Lincolnshire, and of Mrs 
Brian Inwood, and stepdaughter 
of Mr Brian In wood, of Dolphin 
Square, London, SW1. 

Dr GJL Duncan 
and Miss VAA1. Salisbury 
The engagement is announced 
between George, elder son of Dr 
and Mrs A.M. Duncan, of 
Loughborough, and Vivienne, 
elder daughter of the late Major 
Dennis Salisbury and of Mrs M. 
Salisbury, of Guildford. 

Mr S.D. Fowler 
and Miss AE Heal 
The engagement is announced 
between Stuart, son of Mr and 
Mrs I.D. Fowler, of Tilehurst, 
Berkshire, and Anne, daughter 
of Mr and Mrs J.W. Heal, of 
Great Shelford, 

Cambridgeshire. 

Mr AJ. Gallacher 
and Miss D-A- Bickmore 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, only son of Mr 
and Mis C. Galiacber, of 
Seven oaks. Kent, and DanielL 


Mr J.P.Q. Harwood 
and Miss G.O. Aenlle 
The engagement is announced 
between Piers, only son of Mr 
and Mrs S.E. Harwood, of 
Fitzhead. Somerset, and Giselle 
OEnone. daughter of the late Mr 
Gervasio Aenlle and of Mrs 
OEnone Aenlle. of Montevideo. 
Uruguay. 


Mr PJk. Hildreth 
and Dr VA. Gaold 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs C.L. Hildreth, of 
Stevenage. Hertfordshire, and 
Victoria, younger daughter of 
Mr and Mrs W.5. GauJd, of 
Wimbledon, London. 


Mr C.D. Hutchins 
and Miss J.M. Fisher 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, son of 
Group Captain P. Hutchins and 
the late Mrs Hutchins, of 
Beaconsfield. Buckinghamshire, 
and Judy, daughter of Dr and 
Mrs Hugh Fisher, of Perth, 
Australia. 


Mr A.A. Keith 
and Miss CS. Cowdrey 
The engagement is announced 
between Alistair, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs Donald Keith, of 
Pontefract. Yorkshire, and 
Carolyn, only daughter of Mr 
M.C. Cowdrey, CBE, and Mrs 
M.C. Cowdrey, of Limpsfield. 
Surrey. 


Mr P.N.C. Walker 
and Miss SJLHepborn 
The engagement is announced 
between Patrick, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs P.M. Walker, of 
East Harpiree. near Bristol, and 
Sara, youngest daughter of the 
late Mr J.M. Hepbuni. of 
Bishopsteignton, Devon, and of 
Mrs J.M. Hepburn, of Fentiman 
Road, London. 


Mr D.G. Lindlev 
and Miss H.K. Constable 
The engagement is announced 
between David Graham, eider 
son of Mr and Mrs Raymond 
Lindley, of Spalding, Lincoln- 
shire. and Helen Katrine, 
daughter of Group Captain and 
Mrs John Constable, of Bramp- 
ton, Cambridgeshire. 


Mr J. Walter 
and Miss D J. Parker 
The engagement is announced 
between John, only son of the 
late Mr John Walter, of Lugano, 
Switzerland, and of Mrs Vladi- 
mir DaskalofT. of Palma, Ma- 
llorca. and Davina, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Charles 
Parker, of The White House, 
Nuffield, Oxfordshire. 


only daughter, of Lieutenant- 
Colonel and Mrs Jesse O. 
Bickmore, of Broad Marston, 
Worcestershire. 


Mr CJ.D. MacColl 
and Miss J.E- Goslett 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, son of Mr 
and Mrs D.F. MacColL of 
Rowhook, Sussex, and Juliet, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J.H. 
Goslett, of Beaconsfield, 
Buckinghamshire. 


Mr 5. Warrington 
and Miss C.C. Holbrook 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, son of Mr and 
Mrs K_B. Warrington, of Peter- 
borough. Cambridgeshire, and 
Catherine Charlotte, elder 
daughter of Dr and Mrs K-A.J 
Holbrook, of Cotiingbara, 
Yorkshire. 


Science report 


US pointer to treatment of Aids 


By Bill Johnstone, Technology Correspondent 


A discovery which points the 
way to a treatment for ac- 
quired immune deficiency 
syndrome (Aids)has been 
made by an American medi- 
cal research team. 

Their findings are still 
tentative; hot they suggest a 
reason why the infection is so 
destructive. The deadly Aids 
virus may cause i mm une sys- 
tem cells to destroy them- 
selves, according to a Yale 
researcher. 

The discovery has been 
disclosed by Dr Nancy Rud- 
dle, associate professor of 
epidemiology and public 
health at Yale University 
School of Medicine, whose 
research team has been 
studying the disease. 

Dr Raddle told a seminar 
sponsored by the American 


Cancer Society at Daytona 
Beach, Florida, that the Aids 
virus may cause immune sys- 
tem cells to produce a deadly 
protein called lymphotoxin, 
which kills them. 

The virus destroys the T- 
cells of the body's immune 
system, leaving the victim 
defenceless against a variety 
of fatal diseases. 

Dr Ruddle said that T-ceDs 
normally produce some 
lymphotoxin to help to kill 
germs, bat that the Aids vines 
may make one type of T-ceU, 
designated T4, produce un- 
usually high amounts of the 
protein. 

The virus-induced 
lymphotoxin apparently can- 
not be absorbed by the T4 
cells and kills its maker or a 
neighbouring T-celL 


Researchers were looking 
for evidence of lymphotoxin 
in the blood of people with i 
Aids. Dr Rnddie added that if j 
the theory were true, some 
type of treatment that deals . 
with lymphotoxin production 
might be able to control Aids 
in infected people, although h 
would not be a cure, because 
the virus would remain 
present 


One possiblity being inves- 
tigated, she said, is 
cyclosporin, which has been 
fonnd to inhibit lymphotoxin 
production in laboratory 
tests. 


More than 1&5G0 people 
have contracted Aids in the 
United States, and more than 
half of them have died. 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS and H NEMOBUH 
4 a Km + 15% VAT 

(minimum 3 tines) 


Announce nls. authcntkaUd by ihe 
name and permanent address of the 
sender, may be sent Kk 


CROSS on 2ist March at toe John 
RadcUffe Hospital. Oxford, to Jose- 
phine inee Landlord ) and Nicholas, a 
daughter. Poppy Ptiltomena. a staler 
for Chloe and Sophie. 

DAWSON - On Sunday 90th March at 
Hospital de la Tour. Geneva, to Sere- 
na inee Fran kiln p and Paul, a 
daughter. (Alice Moffat Amageri. 


THE TIMES 
PO BOX 434 
Virginia Street 
London El 


EDELSIM1N - On 29th March In Lon- 
don to Yasuko (nee Okada) and 
Ma rtin, a son. Benjamin Tomotane. 
FTTZ GERALD To Sarah i nee Dykes' & 
Peter on 27ib March a girl. 


or letcptioncd (b> telephone subs- 
cibcn only) to @9-48) 3824 


An IK) ii ner men 15 can be received by 
telephone between 9 .00am and 
5. 30pm Monday to Friday, on Satur- 
day between Q OOazn and 12 noon. 
W1-WI 4088 Daly) For publication the 
following day phone by 1.30pm. 


COLOB - on 29th March, to Anne (nee 
□evtnet and James, a son. Edward 
Christian James, a brother for 
Sacha. 

GRAY - On March 28. to Stephanie 
I nee Thomton-Dewtnrst) and Philip, 
a daughter. Charlotte. 


TESTER - On March 27Ui to Jtwane 
and Kevin, a son Mikael David 
Antony. 

THOMPSON on March 27 to Charlotte 
i Nee Firm 'and Simon a son fEctward 
John Gower i. 

TURNER - On 31st March, to Jane and 
Roger, a daughter. Gillian: a sister 
for Joanna and Francis. 

WARBURTGN On March 28th at 
Wythenshawe Hospital. Cheshire to 
Heather and tan a beautiful daughter 
Amy. 

WILSON on March 28th In Barnstable 
Devon, lo Lane and John, a daugh- 
ter Katie, sister for Suzanna and 
Richard. 


DEATHS 


FOfmtCOWKI MMHM6E5, HIDHUSS 
etc on Court and Social Pace £8 a (m 
+ 15% VAT. 


HOLMS - On March 26. to Alexandra 
inee Blekerdtkei and Robin, a son 
Timothy, a brother for Edward. 

HOWARD. On March 2-tth at Liver- 
pool Maternity hospital, to Clare <nee 
Jordan) and Robert, a son James 
Philip. 


Court and Social P»gc 
announcements can not be accepted 
by telephone. Enquiries la D1-8Z2 
9951 l after lOJOam). or send lo 1. 

Paongtoa Stmt, tMta El. 


HUGHES - On 24th March 1986. m 
Sian inee Peanam and Nicholas, a 
daughter. Emily Meryl. 

HUSTLER On 31sl March at Mount 
Ahcmia. to uz <Nee Hugnes- 
Onslowi and John, a son. 


AGGETT on Good Friday, peacefully 
alter a long illness. Hilary Mary 
Aggett FSA of Cutty Rivel. Somer- 
set. dear wife. motru-r and 
grandmother. Family requiem on 
Friday. April 4. a memorial service 
will be announced Utter. By her re- 
guest, no flowers, but donations if 
desired, lo St. Margarets Somerset 
Hosts ce. Hook House. Taunton TAi 
IBT. 


..wiw I ran. I shall arme: wtmnl 
■at in uniwu, iih LORD mall 
be a bgni unto me. 

MH-atl T. a 


BIRTHS 


JOHNSON to Susan inee Butt) and Bri- 
an on 24th March 1986 at Wycombe 
General Hospital, a son Alexander 
Willia m, a brother for Clare. 

KEMBLE - On 28th March, to Sarah 
■ nee Hoitini and Brian, a son. Henry 
Edward, a brother for Alex and 
Thomas. 


BASSETT - Jack Stanley, beloved hus- 
band of Lilian and father oi Margaret 
and John, on 27 March 1986. al 
Walton Hospital after a tong illness, 
borne with courage and selflessness. 
Cremation al 12.30 pm on Friday 4 
April 1986 at Randalls Park. 
Leatherhead. Family flowers only. 
Donations if desired to the Friends of 
Walton Hospital. Walton Hospital. 
Rodney Road. Wauon-on Thames 
Surrey. 


tCDDOCS - On 27 March at Rochford 
Hospital, lo Christine inee Mac Lean) 
and ChrtsioDlier. a son. Alexander 
Thomas. 


BUTCHER On 31st March 1986 in 
Dorcholcr lo Sharon uiec Grouser A 
Michael a son Joseph Christy Leo. 


KENNEDY - To Joanna on March 25m 
a daughter. Eleanor Frances. 

LECCE- On March 23rd. to Beth inee 
Bayne i and Fraser, a son Andrew 
lain Fraser, a brother for Beniamin. 

MOAT . ^ March 26th. lo Maggie 
mee Ashpiteli and Graham, a son. 
Guv Edward, a brother for Anna. 


CHRISTIE On March 23rd 1986. at 
Elgin, lo Paste and Tomas, a daugh- 
ter Georgina. 


GUIMES-ROSS - To Gillian (ode 
Wade! and Jonathan, on 24Ui 
March, a daughter. Tantsin Jessica. 


CRANSTON. To Helen and Kevm a 
daughter. Rebecca Charlotte, on 
March 26th >986. 


NEVER on March 26th. ai Curkfteid 
Hospital, to Laurence and Nick, a son 
(Samueli. A brother for Hanna 
MCXABfiV . Or March 27th at home 
m Liverpool, lo Dorothy and Wil- 
liam. a son Thomas Edward 
Pi deshm . a brother for Alice. 
ROBERTSON - On 30 March at St 
Thomas’ Hospital. London. lo Jac- 
queline. wrfe of Charles Man waring 
Robertson, a daughter. 


BEATTIE on Friday. 28th March at 
Oueemberrv lodge. Royal Mile. Ed- 
inburgh. Professor William Beattie 
CBE of 7 South GUbtand Road. Edin- 
burgh. EH 10. dear husband of ine 
late Agnes Wood. Dear lather of 
Anne. Jean, and the late Alice. 
grandfather of Ehseand Uv. Funeral 
service al Morton Hall crematorium. 
Main Chapel. Eduiburgn on Wednes- 
day. 2nd April at 12.00 pm. No 
flowers by request bid donations in 
lieu to ‘Friends of Queensaerry 
House Hospital and Lodge'. 


CAMERON on March 31st at King Ed- 
ward >11 Hospital, London i Staler 
Agnes-) peacefully after devoted and 
compassionate care Irene Maud 'Nee 
Ferguson i wife of Sir James Camer- 
on and mother o< Sheila- Hamtsh and 
Jennifer. Funeral private. 



JeJi 




I 


**- lift*. - , 4- 



T 




Prince Michael of Kent, Presi- 
dent of the Institute of the 
Motor Industry, will visit Aston 
Martin Lagonda Limited at 
Newport Pagnell on April 9 and 
laLer will attend a dinner of the 
Board of Grand Stewards at 
Merchant Taylors’ HalL 


A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Thomas Bennett Langton 
will be held at St Mary’s Church, 
Henley-on-Thames. Oxford- 
shire. at 3.30 pm on Friday, 
April 4. 1986. 

The Action Ball will be held at 
the Savoy Hotel on April 10 in 
aid of Guide Dogs for the Blind. 
For further details, telephone 
01-381 9034. 


Mr J.B. limes 
and Miss JA. Stephenson 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan, younger son 
of Lieutenant-Colonel and Mrs 
W.A.D. Innes, of The Old 
Manse of Marnocb, Banffshire, 
and Jane, daughter of Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel J.D. Stephenson, of 
Cefn Pare. Brecon, and the late 
Mrs Stephenson. 


Mr A.B. Stobart 
and Miss LS. Gladstone 
The engagement is announced 
between Anthony, younger son 
of the late Mr and Mrs H.G. 
Stobart. of Brompton-by- 
Sawdon. Yorkshire, and Susan, 
elder daughter of the late 
LieuienantKTolonel R.M. Glad- 
stone. of Grosmom, Yorkshire, 
and of Mrs EM. Gladstone, of 
Helmdon. Brackley, 

Northamptonshire. 



On guard 
against 
the old 
cliches 


By Philip Howard 


Frank Bnmo, the European heavyweight champion, dogging 
the first sod yesterday for a new hydrotherapy unit to help 
disabled and injured children in the East Esd of London. 
The unit, for which £227,000 has to be raised, will be part of 
the physiotherapy department of die London Hospital in 
Tower Hamlets (Photograph: Chris Harris). 


Birthdays today 


Mr C.W.L. Bevan. 66; Sir Jack 
Brabham, 60; Professor A.C. 
DomhorsL. 71; Mr Leslie Farrer- 
Brow n. 82; Miss Catherine Gas- 
kin. 57; Major-General Sir 
Stuart G reeves, 89; Sir Alec 
Guinness. 72; Sir Ian Hunter, 
67; Miss Penelope Keith, 46; Sir 
Peter Lazarus. 60; Sir Peter 
Middleton, 52; Sir Robert 
Munro. 79: Sir Hugh Overion. 
63: Major-General C.J. 
Popham. 59; Mr M.G. Rizzello, 
60; Sir Denis Rookc, 62; Mr 
Denis Tuoby. 49. 


Appointments 


Latest appointments indude: 
Mr Michael Vartmwi Conser- 
vative MP for Rutland and 
Mellon, to be chairman of the 
executive committee of the 
Anglo-lsrad Association in 
succession to Lady Byers. 



mg men. 

We should therefore be on 
our guard against the old 
clich 6 and the modern schol- 
ars who tell os that the Greek 
tragedians wrote their plays to 
prove that suffering is always 
punishment for hubris; and to 
warn us to avoid it. Life is 
more complex than that And 
the Greeks saw more deeply 
than that 


Bridge win for 
London couple 

N. and C. Tompkins of London 
won the Swiss pairs champion- 
ship final of the Guardian Easter 
International Tournament, 
which ended at the Park Lane 
Hotel, London, on Monday 
night. 

Leading scores: 1. N and C TantpWm 


ExMMUona: Elizabeth Devine (The i 
GranvSM. Sarah F ounce (Sevenoaka 
County Primary). 

Music awards 

Music stfKUaraMw: David Billing 


(SolefleW). Anthony Zeroa-Falcoa 
(Sevenoaks). Madeleine Amos 


■Newstead Wood). Anna Kioto , 
(T un bri dg e Wells Grammar School). 
Susanna Hodder-wmiaras iWaRham- i 
stow Hall). Annabel Me Euan 
(Walthamstow Hall). Francois Man 
CSevanoalB). 

Music Exhibition: Kather in e Wynne 
ISevenoaks). 

Specialist awards 

International Baccalaureate Ex- 
hibitions: Pauline Pulktnnen (SI 


Church news 


(London) 102 vp; 2. Mrs H Farmer 
and Mrs A Grzeatak (Surrey) 99wL 
S Preston (Hampshire, We qf wight) 
and Mrs K. Preddy (London) 98 vp: 4. 
Mrs M P Pottage (Hampshire, bte or 
Wight) and J Y Pottage (Sussex). 96 
vp: 6. Dr B K Ctwah (Surrey) and M J 
Ladbrook (Middlesex) 95 ypt 6. RC 
Belcher and Mis D Wade (Surrey) 92 
vp. 


Julian's. Portugal), Nigel SUrk 
CSevwtoaksL NKau Watson (Croydon 
HWU. 

The Worshipful Compa n y of Pine 
Makers and Tobacco Blenders for All- 
Round Achievement: CbarttySroodtey 
(St Bede's). 


Appointments 

Church. of Scodtod 
The Rev Trevor Hunt lo Evie with 

Firth with Rental). 

The Rev Alexander H Green Co 
caasoow. South . carntyne. _ . 

The Rev James SA Cowan to 
CackeiuK and Port Sctan. OkL 
The Rev p Douglas v/Hson from 
Errol wh)i KBsslndle and Rate lo 
Aberdeen. St CtfurahaV Bridge of 


Mariey Me Creative Technology. 
David Tra dewell (Skippers HU1 


The Rev David L wtttfit mm 
Hawick. Old with TevMtiead to 
Stornoway. SI' CotumMu 


The Rev John McLeod from Ltvtng- 
on. Si Fours lo Resoua and 


Manor). 

Grand Metnxxdflaii Art; Scott Mitch- 
ell (Hotmewood House). 


stan. Si FauTS to Resoua 
urauhan. 


Scottish 


’attenmakers 


The following have been elected 
officers of the Pattenmakers’ 
Company for the ensuing year 
Master. Mr Anthony Eskenzi; 
Upper Warden, Mr WJLF. 
Chamberlain; Renter Warden, 
Mr A.D. Miller, Warden to the 
Trade, Mr R.P. Shepherd. 


Mary Hare 
Grammar School 


Episcopal 

K.V. Fagan 


Church 


The Rev K.V. Fagan. R 
Campbeltown. Argyll, to be a 
Si John's Cathedra). Oban. 


Rector oT I 
a canon of 


The board of governors of Mary 
Hare Grammar School for the 
Deaf has elected Mr LG. Tucker 
to the post of principal in 
succession to Mr K. Pearce, who 
will retire on August 31, 1987. 


. The Rev P.WG. BwweC has 
resigned Ms ap po i n t m e n t as Rector of 
Si Leonard's. Lasswade. and ja 
Mary's. Dalkeith. Edinburgh, on his 
appointment as Christian stewardship 
adviser In the dtocese of Bradford. 


Church in Wales 

The Rev Donald Keith Pope. Vicar of j 
Pou ly pool, to be Vicar of the newly ! 
grouped parish of Grosmont and 


grouped parish of 
SkenfrUh and Liar 
with Li a nflUr Chape 


and ^^UMy atMck Ungoed 


University news 

Oxford 



Births, Deaths and In Memoriam 


CAMPBELL • On Thursday 27th 
March at Haresione Nursing Home. 
Catertiam. peacefully after a long ill- 
ness bravely borne. Lucy, beloved 
Wife of Maior General Peter Camp- 
bell. loving mother of Murray and 
Colin, mother-in-law to Suzannati. 
and grandmother to Duncan. Private 
cremation al Beckenham crematori- 
um. on Friday 4th April. Ftowen 
please 10 J * R h'Uhck. 112 High 
street. West Wickham. Mail, or if 
preferred, donations to the Marie Cu- 
rie Foundation. 


CHAMBERLAYNE Barbara of Hobday 
House. Harlpury. Gloucester, dear 
wrfe of Jack Chambertayne. on 
Easier Sunday. Private cremation, 
memorial service on Thursday April 
lOtn at 2 30 ai Ashleworth Church. 
Donations In lieu of flowers may be 
given for The Gtoucestershlre Asso- 
ctabon For The Disabled. 
Community House. IG College 
Green. Gloucester. 


de COURCY -IRELAND - On March 28. 
aged 91. Gerald Blakeney de Ootaxar- 
1 reland LVO.. M.C.. Lt. Col. late of 
the worceshlre Regiment, loved fa- 
ther, grandfather and great- 
grandfather. Cremation private. 
Donations if desired to Guide Dogs 
tor the Blind. 

DRYSDALE John Alexander. Peace- 
fully. on Good Friday- Beloved 
husband of Dorothy, father of Mary 
and Robin and grandfather of Rory. 
Amanda. Alexander, and Henry. Pri- 
vate Funeral. Memorial Service on 
Friday April 26th at St Mary's 
Church. Dedham at 12 noon. 


HARDMAN - Elizabeth Marie (Biddy), 
peacefully at Mareton-tn-Marsh Hos- 
pital on Saturday March 29th 1986. 
wrfe of the late George Hardman and 
dearly loved mother of PMUppa. 
John and Adrian. Fimerai at St 
John's Church. Charrlnglon. 
Warwickshire. 


CLARK. On March 29th peacefully at 
home. Kenneth Allan. Beloved hus- 
band or Palsy, much loved lather 
and grandfather. Service of Thanks- 
grang al St Andrews. Cor bridge. 12 
noon. Friday April 4th. No flowers, 
donations if desired to Care. 
K lb worth. Leicester 


CASE on March 27th 1986 peaceftrf&r 
m hospital John aged 73 years of 
MAiford Avenue. Exeter. 26 years 
school master Exeter school. Past 
Captain RTR and past. Secretary 
Devon and Cornwall RTR Old Qnn- 
rades Association. Beloved h u sband 
of Averts, father of Josephine and 
Glnny (deceased) and a much loved 
grandfalha- Funeral sairice SI 
Leonards Church. Exeter. Friday 
April 4th. 10.00 am followed by Cre- 
mation Family flowers only 


COLLETT- On Manrh 29th 1986. Olga 
Kathleen. O.B.E.. of 5 Dolphin Ct.. 
Weymouth, peacefully in her B7ui 
year. Rcqirfum Mass al the Coven! of 
Mercy. w>ke Road. Weymouth, on 
Monday Apnl 7th at 10.16 am. Fam- 
ily flowers only, but donations if 
desired to Save The Children Fund 
■ LMunon Desk) 17 Grove Lane. 
Camberwell. London SE5 8RD Ed 
a inn ps to Slock ting & Son. 22 
Cresenl Street. Weymouth iOSOB 
78S9I5). 


CRAVES - On 29 March 1986. peace- 
fully al home after a long illness 
borne with great courage Helen, be- 
loved wife of the tale Brian wniiara 
Craves, mother of Judith. Rodney 
and Cynthia, and grandmother of 
MeUssa. Julian. Amanda. Lucinda 
and Adrian Regutum Mass at St 
Christophers Churni. Tabor Gar 
dens. Cheam. Surrey on Friday 4 
April, al noon, followed by crema 
uon al the South London 
Crematorium. Mitcham, al 1 IS pm 
Family flowers only but donations 
may be sent to the Imperial Cancer 
Research All enauirtes to W A True 
lave and Son Ud Sutton Surrey Ol 
642 8211 


CHOMMELIN - On March 28. sudden 
IV In hosoilal. Emily Mona Mary 
beloved wife of Uie late Henry Arden 
Crommefirt. lot mg mother of Pameta 
Jordan and the late Geoffrey 
Crommehn. loving grandmother and 
greal -grandmother Enquiries lo L E 
perry. Tethury, 52295 


CUTHSERT on ZOih March 1986 Nor 
nuii Ctiihben. MiUbum. T ur n berry 
Avrshire Beloved husband of AUw 
and dearest father of Norma Funer 
ai senice took place al Kirk Oswald 
Pansh Church. Ayrshire on 24ih 
March 1986 


GREY - Suddenly bui peacefully on 
March 30th Harold Hylton Grey 
brother of Connie and the late Sybil 
and Neville Service al Newcastle 
upon Tyne Crematorium on 
Thursday April 3rd at 10 30 am 
Famitv flowers only Donations if de 
sired lo British Heart Foundation 
393 West gate Road Newcastle 
GfUFFTTHS On Easter Sunday al 
Monoulti House Lymraglon Gee 
Irudc Winifred beloved wife of the 
late Frank and murti loved mother of 
Kathleen iKay) Ronald and HlUary 
grandmother and grealorandmoUier 
Servicr al Bournemouth Cfematon 
um at 1 19 Friday 4th AprU No 
(lowers please 


HAWKINS - CM 29th March. In the 
Churchill Hospital. Oxford, after a 
long tflaess. Kathleen Octavte. dearly 
loved sister of Joan. Funeral service 
al Oxford crematorium on Friday 
4ih April al 2.15 pm. Oonattons if 
desired for the National Trust, c/o 
JAM Humphrls. Albert Street 
Ba nbury 

NEAGERTY - On Saturday March 
2910. very peacefully al her home in 
Hermanns. Smith Africa. Mary Ola 
Murdoch, aged 87. beloved wife of 
John and mother of Maureen. Pat- 
rick and James. 

HODDER— WILLIAMS - on 31st March 
1986. Felicuy (nee Btagden). wife of 
Paul Hodder-Wuuams and mother of 
Susan. Mark. Richard and Mary 
Anna. Suddenly at home. Funeral 
service at Exford. Saturday 5th April 
al 2 30 p m Family flowers only 
Donations If desired to SI Mary Mag- 
dalene, Exford, c/o Reverend John 
Atkin. The Rectory. Exford. 
Ml nohead. Somerset 

BOTHAM Suddenly on Marti 29m. 
Henry aged eleven veers, beloved 
younger son of Martin and Erica Fu- 
neral al ad Samis. Dnnlcstone. Burs 
St Edmunds on Monday April 7th 
at 230 pro 

HUGHES On April 1st Alexander Ian 
Hughes OJ-Odr RNR DjS-C R 0) 
aged 71 years, after a short Illness 
Dearly loved father of Gordon Les 
ley and Cay Cremation at Mid 
W a rrickaJin e Crematorium at lO 30 
am Friday April 4th Flowers la the 
John Taylor Funeral Service Learn 
nation Spa or dooabens to 
Wruilaker Ward Warrick Hospital 

JOLLY Catnerme Mary aged 22 oa 
March 27m iragfeauy as toe result of 
an Avalanche Much loved daughter 
or Koran and the late pinup Jolly of 
tne Grange h'esgrave and aster of 
Pamck Timothy Margaret Richard 
and Hug n R I P 

JONES - On 31 March 1986 al Hen 
ford Mr Trevor Jones Chartered 
Accountant sadly missed by family 
friends and colleagues 

KEKMRCK - On March 30th Gladys E. 
M Kefcwirk aged 88 years beloved 
wife of toe late Leslie O Kekwick 
and mother of Roy Moyna and Alan 


OBITUARY 

DR WILLIAM BEATTIE 

Expansion of the National 
Library of Scotland 


Does God punish os for our 
sins? Or does He stomp on ns 
merely for fim? _ In other 
words, are Lbe gods just, and of 
our pleasant vices make in- 
struments to plague us? Or, on 
the other band, as flies to 
wanton boys, are we to the 
gods; do they kill us for their 
sport? 

That we can ask such semi- 
nal questions in The Times 
today is a sign that April has 
arrived, and Jongen folk lo go 
on conference. At the joint 
meeting of the Classical Asso- 
ciations of Scotland and En- 
gland at Glasgow University 
last night, Mr Alex Garvie of 
Glagsow University discussed 
the roots of our morality in 
western civilization. 

The ancient Greeks held 
two different notions about 
the gods. The first was the 
moralistic view that the gods 
punish human misbehaviour, 
in particular hubris. 

The second was the amoral 
theology, that the gods resent, 
and cut down to size, mortals 
who become too prosperous. 
Mr Garvie traced the parallel 
growth of both notions in the 
earlier poets from Homer to 
Pindar. 

The optimist said that if yon 
were good, and made juicy 
sacrifices, and took care not to 
commit such blasphemy as 
urinating while standing up 
and facing the sun, with a bit 
ofluck you might be all right. 
The pessimist recognized that 
because he was human, things 
were going to turn out scaly 
anyhow. 

In his thoughtful paper, Mr 
Garvie discussed the even 
older fundamental Greek idea 
that no man can remain happy 
and prospero us all his life: The 
most for which one can hope 
is a mixture of good and evil: 
the principle of alternation. 
No thinking man can suppose 
that the exclamation of hu- 
man suffering is a simple 
black and white matter. And 
those old Greeks were think- 


Dr William Beattie, CBE, 
who died tin March 28, aged 
82, was Librarian of the 
National Library of Scotland 
from 1953 to 1970, and the 
institution to which be devot- 
ed practically the whole of his 
working life owed much to his 
determined administration. 

Bom in Jedburgh - the local 
connection giving him a na- 
tive interest in Sir Waiter 
Scott and in the Border bal- 
lads on which be was taler to 
write - he proceeded from the 
local grammar school to 
George Watson’s College, £d- 
in burgh, and thence to Edin- 


burgh University. 
He was for four 


MACLMJRM on 281b March suddm 
U al 65 Cornwall Dardens SW7 
Olga inee Pa)unei widow of toe late 
George Maclaurln 


He was for four years an 
Assistant Librarian in Edin- 
burgh University Library be- 
fore moving to the newly- 
founded National Library of 
Scotland, where he became 
Keeper of Printed Books in 
1931. 

The 40 years he spent in the 
service of the National Li- 
brary saw rapid developments 
in its slock, its staff and its 
reputation; and above all its 
move from cramped quarters 
in the historic premises of the 
Advocates' Library to the 
spacious, but in the event not 
large enough, new building on 
Geoige IV Bridge, Edinburgh. 

The new building, planned 
and started in the 1930s, 
delayed by the Second World 
War and opened only in 1936, 
was a matter of great pride to 
Beattie, who felt that the 
prolonged administrative ef- 
fort to secure the appropriate 
housing of the literary trea- 
sures of the Scottish nation 
was worthwhile, and that a 
building comfortable and at- 
tractive to readers and visitors 
{and to benefactors also) had 
been achieved. 

Beattie's own printed schol- 
arly output was relatively 
small His principal interest, 
the history of early Scottish 
printing, was deployed in 
various papers and in his 


lacsmule of the earliest of all 
The Chepmem and \fyliar 
Prims (1950), but be never 
com pie led the systematic 
study of the subject be was so 
well qualified to write. 

His LyeU lectures at Oxford 
UniverMty in 1964-65. still [ft 
unpublished, dealt with the 
history of the Advocates' Li- 
brary, particularly as a major 
centre of Scottish cultural life 
in the eighteenth century, a 
period he knew well, serving 
as an active member of the 
advisory committee of ihe 
Yale Boswell editions. 

Beattie was also a learned 
incunabulist (the library’s col- 
lections developed si gnifi ca nt- 
ly during his keepersnip). and 
several papers on the subject, 
were contributed to the Trans- 
actions of the Edinburgh Bib- 
iiographical Society, an 
organisation whose revival in 
the 1 930s was very largely due - 
to his successful efforts as*' 
honorary secretary and editor. 

He was President of the 
(London) Bibliographical So- 
ciety between 1975 and 1977. 

Beattie, who held honorary 
doctorates from St Andrews 
and Trinity College, Dublin, 
was made a titular professor 
by Edinburgh University in 
1967 and soon after his retire- 
ment from the National Li- 
brary he became the first 
Director of the university’s 
Institute for Advanced Studies 
in the Humanities, where his 
-wide-ranging interests . and 
quiet hospitality were placed 
at the service of many visiting 4 ; 
scholars. He was created a 
CBE in 1963. 

.In 1932 be married Agnes 
Wood, who died in 1979 after 
many years of ill health, and is 
survi ved by two of their three 
daughters. The marriage ofhis 
eldest daughter to a Norwe- 
gian reinforced fiis interest in 
Scandinavian life and litera- 
ture, and in 1977 he received 
the St Olafs medal, an honour 
that gave him special pleasure. 


MISS EDITH DUMAS 


Miss Edith Ditmas, who has 
died aged 90, was a pioneer in 
modern documentation and 
communications during a 
long career with the Associa- 
tion of Special Libraries and 
Information Bureaux, now the 
Association for Information 
Management . 

Edith Maigaret Robertson 
. Ditmas was appointed general 
secretary (and later first direc- 
tor) of the association in 1933 
and was uniquely fitted for the 
task. The organisation had 
already published its Directo- 
ry, and its new general secre- 
tary, with her accurate and 
wide-ranging' -perception, 
• quickly recognised the poten- 
tial for modern documenta- 
tion of the emerging 
technology of microfilm and 
tape-recording. 

Throughout the Second 
World War, though twice 
bombed out of her London 
home, she kept the association 
alive and growing, even using 
her own money when fundi 
dried up. After her retirement. 


she continued to edit the 
Journal of Documentation un- 
til 1962. In 1967 Chatham 
House published her Index to 
the Survey of. and Documenta- 
tion on International Affairs. * , 

By then Miss Ditmas was 
concentrating on her first and 
abiding love: historical re- 
search into legend, and in 
particular the legends of King 
Arthur. ■ 

Her books, Gareth of Ork- 
ney and Tristran and Iseuh in 
Cornwall, and her many schol- 
arly papers and articles, based 
on meticulous research and 
evaluation of both (rid- and 
new theory, were of deceptive- 
ly simple elegance. 

Her interest led to the 
publication of two booklets on 
the Glastonbury legends, an- 
other on Drake’s Drum, and a 
history of the village of Ben- 
son in Oxfordshire, completed 
when she was 87. 

She donated her library, A 

papers and research material ** 

to the National Library -of 
Wales. 


MR JOHN MANN 


Mr John Mann, CBE, who 
died on March 5 at the age of 
75, had a distinguished career 
in business and public service. 


Educated at Bristol Gram- 
mar School and Merton Col- 
lege, Oxford, where he read 
Honour Moderations and 
Greats, he joined Unilever as 
a management trainee and 
rose to be a member of the 
board. His career was mainly 
in marketing, advertising and 
personnel training. 

During the Second World 
War he spent six years in the 
Royal Artillery and the Spe- 
cial Operations Executive, 
where he was concerned with 


the organisation of resistance 
in Norway. 

After retirement from 
Unilever he was bu$y in 
various forms of public ser- 
vice. He was a member of Ihe 


Council of Loughborough 
University which, only a few 


days before his death, invited 
him to receive an honorary 
degree of Doctor of Letters. 

He was Chairman of the 
Food, Drink ami Tobacco 
Training Board, Chairman of 
the Governors of Ashridge 
Management College (and 
then a life vice-president), a 
Fellow of the Royal Society of 
Aits and Companion of the 
British Institute of Manage- 
ment. 


■ORCAN - On March 29th, after a 
sudden and short tuneas. Hugh 
Thomas Morgan or 56 Uandemhs 
Avenue. Cyncoed. Cardiff, beloved 
husband husband of toe late Irene, 
devoted father of Hugh Marsden. 
and father- in- law of Amanda, dearly 
loved grandfather of Richard, zoe 
and Charles. Funeral on Friday April 
4 Ul Eggutnes to Jams Summers. 
Roath Court. Cardiff, telephone 0222 
484606. 


MO SS - On March 27th. peacefully In 
Sussex. Dorothy (Dot) wife of late LL 
COL Harry (Hattie) de Vera Mo»0n- 
dton Army) and loving mother of 
Dolores and Peter, and much loved 
g ra ndmother Cremation at East- 
bourne at 2.30 pm. on Tuesday 8 
AprtL 

MUM Richard George, peacefully on 
Good Friday after a long Hbtess. be- 
loved husband of Cteety. loving 
father and vandfather 

NAYLOR on Easter Sunday, peaceful- 
ly. Dorothy Isabel Duming Naylor, 
beloved wife of toe lale Thomas 
Humphrey Naylor, and Hearty loved 
mother of Christopher. Murray 
Carolyn, and Mary Anne: and step 
mother of Peter Cremation private 
Service of Thanksgiving followed by 


W ARMAN - On the 28th March 1 986. 
Helena, of Gtenferness Avenue. 
Bournemouth, during convalescence 
az Donster. Beloved mother of Joan, 
and a much loved grandmother and 
great grandmother. Funeral service 
will take Place al the Bournemouth 
Crematorium. 11.46 am. on Friday 
April 4th- Family flowers only 
Please. Donations If desired:, to toe 
R.N.L.L c/o Hawkes 4. Sons. 
Dunster. Somerset. Telephone 
821235. 


WATKINS mi 3 1st March 1986 sud- 
denly but peacefully wdh Ms family 
m AMnger. Surrey. Norman Ainslte 
Watkins of Easton-tn-Gordano. Bris- 
tol- Much loved husband of Yvonne. 
Knmg father of Vhrtan. grandfather 
of Sarah and Sophie, and devoted 
brother of Sonny Family Service - 
has been held In AMnger A Memori- 
al Service is to be arranged m Bristol, 
which win be announced later 


totermeni al Le&itoo Parish 
Church. Welsh pooL at 2 45 pm Frl 
day lllb April Family Cowers 
only 

RATON On Thursday March 271b 
sudden Uy Ctecfl (Charles) Scott Pa 
(on of Walstngham Notfolk. son of 
late David ana Ma d e le in e Pawn of 
Hampstead loved by John and Mot 
he David and CaroUne Reoutem 
Mass Thursday Aura 3rd. a 30m 
Church of the Annunciation 
WaMnghara Family dowers only 
Donabous if desired lo Charity of 
o wn choic e 

SANBFOHD Margaret Alice Mary 
Peacefully on 24th March to ber 
88to year Loving and loved nanny 
to Jme generations Requtera Mam 
2 30pm Friday 4tn April at Naza 
rent House HaramereRrito 
Eagutrlcs and Dowers to J F Fletcher 
Telephone Ol 603 3811 

BCORGIE -On Easter day peacefully 
Menyn Nelson Srorgie QBE aged 
70 years a dearly loved brother and 
Unde Family funeral wtto memorial 
service lo be arranged 

TEMB>1£ on March 28to peacefully 
wuiiam Temple of Black Charles 
LnOemver Sevenoaks Kent Dearly 
loved husband of Florence and much 
loved ranter grandfather and great 
orancfame- Funeral private no 
flowers but donations tf desired lo 
toe Barristers Benevolent Asaocta 
non Grays Inn 8 South Sonar? 
London WC l 


Kathleen EDlnor 0 Cay) on 
Good Friday March 28th after m- 
»». beloved mother and friend of 
Ann and John, aid devoted stsur to 
Jack She win be remembered wim 
Rwy, M fra" Camay and friends. 

at Guildford on Friday 
ACM) at II 30am Flowers may 
O e sent to J Monk & Sons. 3 Attilleiy 
terrace Guildford Id 62780 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


A 8KM0MAL SOVICC tor Peter 
RayressOBE dsc bro win 
he held at St James's Piccadilly 

iS? 5 s w o!*S ““‘” oay 


HWFifr I - a Thanksglvtng Service 
(hr the life of Mas Ivy Freehiii wiH 
be held on Saturday April '19th al 
2 30pm al Camden School Dor Guts 
Sandan Roan NWS Enauirtes Joan 
Mills Mogadnir 832732 


IN MEMORIAM 
- PRTVATE 


KENYON - a memorial service of 
fbanksgiitng for the bf» and work of 
Nancy uutev Kenyon win be held at 
toe Parish Church Bury Lanca 
store on Wednesday Aprfl ifith at 
12 noon 




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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1 986 

THE ARTS 


Television 


drama at 
its most 
genuine 

Standing Up for Joe (BBC1) 
was the story of a five-year-okl 
, boy w hose cerebral palsy bad 
■. apparently coolned him to a 
halHife without hope. “AH we 
: had been offered**, his fatter. 
. said, “were condolences and 
sympathy." But these were not 

enough. Joseph's parents did 
not trust the platitudes of their 
doctors, and decided to move 
to Budapest, where a treat* 
tnenr known as ^conductive 
education" has been estate 
fished at the Peto Institute. 

They. did this in the face of 
established opinion which 
\ counsels patients and discour- 
ages optimism' in such' cases; 
bat low expectations breed low 
rewards. As Thomas Chatter- 
ton is supposed to have said, 
..“God has. sent his creatures 
into the world with arms long 
enough to reach anything n 
they choose to be at the trouble 
to seek it". And so the 
Horsleys rented a small flat 
and waited to see if. Joseph 
would be accepted at the 
Institute. As a record of 
courage and determination it 
was quite extraordinary; as a 
celebration of parental care 
and tenderness it had a power 
that defied analysis, 

. At the Institute were the 
spastic children once diag- 
nosed as “incurable”, Jittfe 
bandies of humanity generally 
left in the baJf-tightof institu- 
tions — a light in which no one 
can see, or care for, then- 
potential. But here “70 per 
cent of the children leave the 
Institute to lead normal fives"; 
and last night's documentary 
became not only an account of 
one family's attempt to give 
new life to their child bat also 
a celebration of human 
potential 

It was an extraordinary fifan 
and not less so because ^of its 
modest and quite unsensatiou- 
al production, even though -it 
showed children JhezaQy tak- 
ing their first steps — steps 
which would otherwise have 
been denied them. This was 
real human drama, in no 
sentimental or artificial -sense. 

And Joseph himself began 
to improve — “He seems",- his 
mother said, “to fie comm&oot 
ofa tong sleep. "And the other 
children sang “Joe is standing 
upright like a candle?. It was 
astonishing, but eve»;gs one 
watched there also caiaeiffce 
necessary and insistent: ques? 
lions: Why cannot -the same 
treatment be available here far 
spastic children? Why are 
they consigned to lives without 
hope when there b hope to be 
found elsewhere? 

Peter Ackroyd 


I Ari^epaonciiid^ (right), 

| whose adaptation of Klaus 
i Mann’s Mephisto opens at 
the Barbican tomorrow, is a 
theatrical legend for her 
piercing vision and radical 
individuality: Irving Wardle 
met her at her home base 
on the outskirts of Paris for 
this exclusive interview 








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An artist s 
response to 
guilt and 


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I firat met Ariane Mnoochkine in 1971 
during toe ran of her production of 
E / 789 at the Roundhouse — the one and 
only appearance of her troupe, Le 
Theatre du Solcil in this country. It 
was also the first and greatest exercise 
we have seen in .promenade perfor- 
mance, and an explosion of. revolu- 
. tionaiy hope. that, brought down the 
curiam on toe age of euphoria: 1789 
and 1968 were both wrapped up in its 
slogan, “La Revolution dost s'an&er d 
: la perfection da bonheui**. 

My only doubt was over her 
decision to cast Gracchus Babeuf as 
her principal spokesman for liberty 
and happiness, .given Babeuf s post- 
revolutionary decree advocating for- 
ced labour and perpetual slavery for 
dass . enemies, as quoted in Herzen's 
Memoirs. 1 drew this passage to 
Mnouchkine's attention. “Who was 
this Herzen?" . she asked. I said, he 
edited The Belt and was a prime force 
. in -international agitation -the - 
Tsarist government “Aha", she said, 
i “but . was he a friend of Marx?" So 
• much for Herzen. 

Last week I met her again; this time 
at her base in the Cartoucherie de 
Vincennes, toe old cartridge depot on 
toe' outskirts of. Baris where the 
presence of three other theatres and a 
riding stables do little to dispel toe air 
, of blighted desolation peculiar to 
abandoned nrilitaiy installations. She 
look me over ber theatre, showing off 
the set far the current production of - 
; Hefene Cixous’s HislQire terrible mais 
iaadterit.de Norodom Sihanouk, roi 
deCambodgeAtwasbeaxidfaL But my 
memory- went toack: to tte. jugglers, 
fire-eaters and jubilant crowds or 17&9 
at the right of hundreds upon'hun- 
-dreds of Mank-feced Cambodia n dolls 
all round the stage and auditorium, 
mute witnesses. to the atrocities of the 
Khmer Rouge and Pol Pot —assuredly 
a ftieiid of Marx; 

i Between these productions, toe 
| company has evolved through coHec- 


.sfe-V 

-. v - . ■ V -- - 


tiveworkto Molifere and Shakespeare, 
and — most immediately — Mnoucb- 
bine's adaptation of Klaus Mann's 
Mephisto. which reaches toe Barbican 
tomorrow in toe not-too-distaut wake 
of Gordon McDougali's 1981 Oxford- 
Roundhouse production and toe 
Istvan Szabo film. 

- Something dearly has changed in 
toe 15 years between Babeuf and 
Sianouk, but pressing Mnouchkine for 
details is a delicate matter as she is apt 
to turn on a bright smile and say “I 
don't want to talk about that". One of 
the things she did not want to talk 
about was the film, beyond remarking 
that its ending contradicted that of the 
novel. Of ber own adaptation she says: 
“I found h in a bookshop and thought 
it an extraordinary story. I didn't even 
know anything about Gustav Gruend- 
gens [the model for Mann's Nazi- 
coUaborator protagonist]. I just 
wanted to tefi the story about the 
responsibility of being an artist; and 
what guiltiness is, and complicity. The 
story isn't entirely relevant to demo- 
cratic countries. You should not 
compare what's not comparable: and 
Nazi Germany is not comparable to 
France; with all France's defects. But 
what happened is still part of our 
history, and it is very English of you to 
ask why we should choose a German 
subject 

“We turned to one-author texts 
because we’d gone as far as we could 
with collective work in L'Age d'or 
[J975J. My job is to put- the -focus 
aHereit should be, and is thaijuece I 
couldn't because thecompany weieso . 
eager, to display what they'd created. 
The limit in cdBectivity is toe lack of 
poetry in the text — so h has to be ev- 
erywhere else instead. In the beginning 
I accepted that. But ndw poetry is my 
priority; and if there is poetry in the 
text it gives birth to toe poetry of 
bodies and gestures. The collective 
piece I liked most was 1793 — the 
sequel to 1789. It only played at toe 




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Cartoucherie, but it was structured to 
be more contradictory and painful; 
more true. We began to grow up. 

“We turned to Shakespeare because 
he is a school; and it's natural to go 
back to school after a certain length of 
time. For us, his content is more 
legendary than political: his way of 
presenting events gives us a model 
from which historical theatre also 
becomes a possibility for us. But that 
has nothing to do with Sihanouk, 
nothing legendary about his story, it's 
a terrible reality." 

During the four years of their 
Shakespeare phase ( 1 98 1 -84) the com- 
pany were continuously in work. Now, 
with the change of government and 
toe departure of the arts minister Jack 
H an g jwbo doubled their subsidy of 
two million francs in 1981), there is a 
shadow over their future; and, when 
Sihanouk completes its tour of toe 
summer arts festivals, they will have 
to disband for four months to “pay 
debts instead of paying ourselves". 
There is strong pressure on Muoucb- 
kine to increase the company's output: 
“We resist it and do dungs when we 
want to do them. We are not Civil 
Service actors, and 1 am still a 
radical" 

- I say I no longer know what that 
word means. “I do", she replies, and 
defines it as an attachment to toe 
principles she set out with — “equal 
salaries for all: moral equality at work; 
company meetings to decide on 
Pinitiadve de Vequipe. \ profound re- 
spect for toe public; and respect for the 
money we are given, which is not to be 
wasted «n anything we don't' believe 
in." 

- About 12 of toe original company 
are still with her. She still takes on 
inexperienced applicants, partly on 
toe strength of their readiness to do 
manual work. (1 could believe this, as 
our interview took place to an 
incessant background of hammering 
and electric drilling.) “Some people", 



she says, “have left to form their own 
troupes. They start along the same 
lines as our the atr e, but they change 
very quicldy. I'm not saying that all 
they do is bad, but they're less 
stubborn than I am.” 

This statement abruptly brings us 
back to Mephisto and to Mnouch- 
kine's film Af alien? (shown on French 
television in 1976-77 to an estimated 
audience of two million): two studies 
of an actor-manager at once under ■ 
pressure from an autocratic regime 
while himself ruling the lives ot his 
own theatrical community. 1 remind 
her of a debate in 1972. and her reply 
to a heckler who said that what 
happens before a play reaches toe 
public has nothing to do with toe 
spectators: “It is as much your concern 
to know how a play has been done as it 
is to know whether or not toe sugar 
you drink in your coffee has been 
produced by slavery". 

That is still her belief, she says: toe 
conditions in which something is 
created leave an indelible imprint on 
toe finished product “But il’s harder 
to hold on to that belief now because 
the moral environment is so different 
Everyone would have said the same 
thing at that lime. Now everyone saw 
what toe heckler said; not least the left- 
wing newspapers. The company is still 
searching for ways of working together 
in toe greatest possible harmony. But 
there are times when I feel an 
anachronism." 

Does the Theatre du Soleil still play 
in strike-bound factories and other 
working-class locations? An expres- 
sion close io bitterness crosses her 
lace. “We would like to go to such 
places if we are desired. If, one day, the 
workers said 'We would really like you 
to come’ we would go. But T m not 
going to say ‘Please let us play for you’ 
because I know it’s useless. They have 
changed too. If they want the theatre, 
they can make the effort to come to 
it.” 



Nostalgia and a taste for the 
home-grown are not the least 
qualities of the Viennale, as 
David Robinson reports 

Remembering 
the ‘old empire’ 

Endearing knockabout sarreafism with the 
pqfarinad^ofXis^Rtoo 


Forty years om Jack Lemmon (left) and 
Marcello Mastrohmni in Mecdtenmi 



The annual Viennale, - Aus- 
tria's only international film 
festival, has two aspects. It 
offers, mostly for the local 
audience, a reprise of the best 
of the rest of the festivals, with 
toe familiar a nn ual tounng 
repertory - this year inevita- 
bly including Claude Lanz- 
raann’s epic documentary of 
the holocaust, Sho&h,. LdS 
Puenzo's Oscar-winning The 
Official Story, from Argentina, 
and the Soviet successes of 
1985. Elem Klimov's Co and 
See and Eldar Sbengelaia’s 
The Blue Mountains. As inev- 
itably Britain was represented 
by Letter to Brezhnev and My 
Beautiful Laundrette , which 
continue to seduce the public 
everywhere, whatever toe lan- 
guage of the subtitles. 

More significant however is 
the panorama, which ©e 
Viennale seems to oner al- 
most unconsciously, of films 
from the countries, of. the 
former empire - Hungary, 
Italy and Austria herself. The 
Hungarian selection reflected 
a current artistic slump: the 


best was Peter Gardos’s in- 
triguing d£but feature, The 
Philadelphia Attraction (seen 
at the London Festival), which 
describes a young circus 
performer’s obsessive efforts 
to extort from an old artist toe 
secret of his greatest act Livia 
Gyarmatby's A Bit of 
You ...A Bit of. Me is a 
changing and unpretentious 
situation comedy about par- 
ents frilling out over the 
upbringing of their teenag e 
daughter.. Istvan Goal's Or- 
pheus and Eurydice however 
proved a deeply misguided 
effort to film Gluck in natural 
locations. 

The Austrian cinema, re- 
membering perhaps whai a 
high proportion of Holly- 
wood's finest artists were mi- 
grants from the old empire, is 
currently making determined 
efforts towards renaissance; 

Last year saw the inauguration 
of a national festival m Weis: 
and there are ambitiou s pro - 
motional' schemes for forth- 
coming international festivals. 

The Viennale itself tends to 


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provide showings for those 
home-grown films with less 
apparent commercial poten- 
tial. This year these included 
Albert Qnendter's valuable 
documentary portrait of Ko- 
koschka, Erinnerung, and a 
couple of laggard avant-garde 
efforts. Michael Pilz’s Noah 
Delta EL an Ausmo-Hungarian 
co-production, Combines 
flashy btiages with empty 
hocus-pocus — in marked 
contrast to toe director’s pre- 
vious film Himmel und Erde, 
a sober five-hour documenta- 
ry on life in an Austrian 
village. Tone Fisk's Kati- 
jabato is more endearing 
knockabout nonsense, in 
which toe director’s own fam- 
ily wrestle with a surreal worid 
of papier nrichb objects. 

Outside toe festival, toe 
major local hit, breaking 
bouse records with a mainly 
teenage audience, is Niki 
list's Mailers Bare, a jolly, 
bawdy, nonsensical musical 
parody of the Forties private- 
eye genre. A poker-feed 
young comic actor, Christian 
Schmidt, plays Muller, who 
sometimes calls himself Sam 
Spade and has a Maltese 
falcon on the desk of toe 
sloppy office which is the 
Mecca -for dinky and some- 
times dead femmes fataJes. 
The story makes tittle sense, 
but moves fast, with a muitier 
or a song whenever it begins to 
flag. The eclectici sm o f toe 

music -* veering from hard 
rock to Thirties operetta to 
Eurovision vacuity — demon- 
strates bow good-natured and 
unde man ding the teenage au- 
dience can be so long as 
o retaine d concentration is not 
required. 


A first film by Wolfram 
Paulus, Heiden tocher {Hide- 
out) has won a certain critical 
prestige and was the Austrian 
entry at toe Berlin Festival last 
month. Selfconsciously “aes- 
thetic", magnificently filmed 
in blade and white, it is a 
sombre and somewhat con- 
fused story set in toe winter of 
1942, about a woman strug- 
gling to hide her deserter 
husband amid the tensions of 
an isolated village disrupted 
by the presence of PoWs and 
Gestapo. While Echo Park 
(currently showing in Lon- 
don) and Midlers Bum boost 
industry morale with box- 
office results. Heideniocher is 
reassurance that Austria can 
still produce old-style quality 
film. 

At the other end of the scale, 
the hit of the Viennese adults- 
only cinemas is the latest of 
many (usually clandestine) ad- 
aptations of the most famous 
pornographic novel in the 
German language, Felix Sal- 
ten’s Josefine Metzenbacfcer. 
Though the film is never likely 
to figure in toe Viennale, or to 
hit British screens, it is cur- 
rently relevant since a cele- 
brated adaptation of another 
famous Salten book, Walt 
Disney’s Bambi, has just been 
reissued in this country. Tbe 
two works arc closely related: 
while Bambi, written in 1923, 
describes the infant deer’s 
adventures in quest of experi- 
ence and maturity, Josefme 
Mutzenbacher relates toe ex- 
actly parallel journey of dis- 
covery of a 1 2-year-old girl 
through the sexual forests of 
post-imperial Vienna. 

Reflecting toe ^neral trend 
of Italian production, three 


Italian exhibits in the Vien- 
nale were comedies. A sequel 
to Mario Monicdli's elastic 
crime comedy I solid ignoti 
( Big Deal on Madonna Street) 
might seem at this stage a 
melancholy idea of fun. The 
new film, directed by 
Amanzio Todini, is called I 
solid ignoti — vent'anni 
dopo; but the “twenty years 
after is an understatement, 
since toe original was made in 
1 958 and the actors — 
Marcello Mastroianni, Vit- 
torio Gassman and Tiberio 
Murgia - look every bit of 27 
years older. The comedy is 
slight and the melancholy no 
doubt intentional: Mastro- 
ianni comes out of gaol to find 
that the quality of life in the 
city is not what it was; 
Gassman as toe old master- 
crook has a stroke in mid- 
heist Mastroianni and nost- 
algia are also the components 
ofMaceberoni, a mild comedy 
which has Jack Lemmon as a 
man returning to Italy forty 
years after his Gl adventures 
there. 

The most engaging of this 
group of Italian comedies was 
Non d rests die piangere 
[Nothing to do but Cry), co- 
dirccted by and featuring two 
variety comics who have indi- 
vidually made their way into 
films and now successfully 
team together. Roberto Beg- 
nini is a manic, knowing 
Tuscan; Massimo Troisi a 
handsome but daft and diffi- 
dent Neapolitan lad. Taking a 
short cut in toe country while 
driving their car, they land 
inexplicably in the year 1492. 

After the first shocks, toey 
make toe best of things, 
contemplate toe desirability of 


introducing toe water closet, 
and give Leonardo a hint or 
two about the steam locomo- 
tive. Realizing tbe significance 
of the date, they embark on a 
mission to save toe world by 
preventing Columbus from 
discovering America. Alas, the 
history books have the dale 
wrong; when they reach toe 
coast, Columbus has already 
set sail and toe damage is 
done. There is a primitive 
grace about the film that . 
seems to derive from centuries ! 
of Neapolitan popular theatre. 
The comedians are charming, 
delight in funny costumes and 
rude jokes, and are disarming- 
ly unembarrassed to stop pro- 
ceedings for static sessions of 
cross-talk of toe “Ob-no-it- 
isn’t" variety. 


Concerts 

Return of irony 


^dssasss 


“Boulez is back!" screamed 
the New York Philharmonic's 
announcements. Well, he was 
back, briefly, and with a 
vengeance. Still, it all seemed 
rather tasteless, this un- 
abashed hype from some of 
toe very people who had all 
but run the orchestra's music 
director out of town on a rail 
not a decade ago. Perhaps, one 
thought. Zubin Mehta's lack- 
lustre tenure has finally given 
New Yorkers a just apprecia- 
tion of his predecessor and. if 
so, it might prove to be this 
music director's most lasting 
and significant accomplish- 
ment Thus, toe final stop cm 
Pierre Boulez's American tour 
with his Ensemble Inter- 
Contemporain, which had 
taken him to Los Angeles, San 
Francisco. Chicago, and Bos- 
ton. held the added interest of 
high irony. 

Much of the baggage Boulez 
brought with him — which 
included the latest version of 
Ripons, performed in the 
Columbia University gymna- 
sium. and a fascinating pro- 
gramme of Donatoni. HoeUer, 
Caner and Ligeti, all stunning- 
ly rendered by toe ensemble — 
lias already been heard in 
London and on the Continent 
The festival also featured Phil- 
harmonic performances of 
other Boulez works: Rituel, in 
a subscription series under 
Mehta, and Improvisations 
sur Mallarme, in the conclud- 
ing series with Boulez. 

Perhaps it is too much to 
.expect Philharmonic subscrip- 
tion audiences to warm even 
now to Boulez the composer 
and. sure enough, the reaction 
to these works was just like the 
okl days. Held in their seats by 
the prospect of Mozart in the 
second half of Mehta's pro- 
gramme, they squirmed 


Pope/Rendall 

Wigmore Hall 

David RendaJl. currently a 
dashing Matteo in Covent 
Garden's Arabella, found him- 
self on Sunday with Faust, 
Rodolfo, Nemorino and Alf- 
redo on his hands as welL 
Arthur Davies, suddenly tak- 
en i!L was unable to take part 
in an evening of operatic 
extracts with Cathryn Pope: 
and, despite the disappoint- 
ment, it was good have an 
unexpected chance to hear 
Rendall in concert. 

Singing a “Questa o quella", 
a “Nessun donna", even “Che 
gelida tnanina” out of context 
can be daunting for even a 
Domingo. It is a close and 
caked encounter: not a sniff of 
grease-paint for stimulus, not 
a moment's distraction for the 
audience. Rendall, with con- 
siderable elan and volume, 
enjoyed them as party pieces, 
and in tbe circumstances it 
was perhaps greedy to expect 
more. There did come a point, 
though, when one longed for a 
moment of unpredictability, 
and tbe quickening detail of 
individual response. 

RendalTs alertness and 
quick musical intelligence 


Gioacchino Rossini’s 

SEMIRAMIDE 

Concert performances 

Conductor 

Henry Lewis 

Cast includes 

Jane Anderson, Marilyn Horne, 
Samuel Ramey, Chris Merritt, 
G Wynne Howell 

April 9, 12, 15 at 6.30pm 

Access/Visa/Diners Club 

Reservations: 01-240 1066/19U 

A Ltndtm framat n»fci / Opera Fniinl £ 
ipMiCrcd lr. HiiltJM- x HMimgt pL 


through Rituel, and many 
booled the composer lustily at 
its close. Improvisations, in 
contrast, was the second half 
of Boulez's own programme. 
At the last concert of the 
series, perhaps 20 per cent of 
toe paunns bad defected at the 
interval, and as many fled 
noisily after each of the first 
two movements; the remain- 
ing 40 per cent cheered loudly 
ax the dose. 

A final touch of irony was 
so doubt lost on most of toe 
Philharmonic faithful, who. 
not having ventured to toe 
Columbia gym (where toe 
crowd was predominantly 
young), cannot have known 
how approachable much of 
Boulez's writing has become: 
toe subscribers had to endure 
the more forbidding (though 
hardly unrewarding) earlier 
works. 

As for Boulez the conduc- 
tor, toe audience response was 
mostly polite, and the Phil- 
harmonic's playing was suffi- 
ciently disciplined and dis- 
tinguished (except for those 
accursed boras) to recall toe 
glories of toe former director's 
tenure ( 1 97 1 -77 )l Not, certain- 
ly, that he conducted every- 
thing well in those days; but 
what he did well he did 
superbly, and his programme 
here — with Stravinsky's Song 
of the Nightingale and Deb- 
ussy's Jeux — played admira- 
bly to his strengths. 

So the provocateur's touted 
first return caught the atten- 
tion, if not always the fancy, of 
New York listeners, and — to 
use one of his favourite words 
— he doubtless found the 
response “interesting". 

James R. 
Oestreich 


Gabrieli Qaartet 
Wigmore Hall 

String quartets and solo vio- 
linists rarely work together. 
Perhaps toe touch of “artistic 
temperament" traditionally 
associated with toe great quar- 
tet leader is also liable to 
render him psychologically 
incapable of playing second 
fiddle while someone else 
steals his glorious flight 
through toe leger-lines. But 
Kenneth Sillito is clearly a 
leader of uncommon generos- 
ity, for here the Gabrieli 
Quartet cooperated happily 
with both the Dutch violinist 
Emmy Veriiey and toe Ameri- 
can pianist William Nabore, 
allowing us to savour one of 
the neglected glories of toe late 
Romantic chamber repertoire, 
Chausson’s Concerto. 

The piece oozes with the 
liebesrod sort of passion fa- 
voured in the 1 880s. grafted (a 
little uneasily at times) on to 
the French suite tradition to 
which its title alludes. Wagner 
is toe influence behind toe 
exhausting obsession with 
modulations (about two every 
bar in toe opening move- 
ment), and a Frandrian cyclic 
form is also applied rather 
earnestly, but Chausson’s rav- 
ishing textures and bis sweep- 


ing melodies owe nothing to 
anybody else. 

From the first striding 
theme, declaimed in charac- 
teristically rich-timbred oc- 
taves by the quartet, then 
more tremulously echoed on 
Miss Verhey's G string, these 
performers seemed to hit ex- 
actly the right idiom. The two 
central movements were par- 
ticularly well characterized. In 
the lilting, insidiously catchy 
Sicilienne one could admire 
the rapport between soloist 
and leader, or the violist Ian 
Jewel, as toey duelled elo- 
quently over Nabore's suit- 
ably opulent arpeggios. The 
work’s most purple patch, 
however, undoubtedly comes 
at the passacaglia’s climax in 
the Grave movement, and this 
was properly raw and thrilling 

Tbe performance's only 
faults were ones of over- 
exuberance. and this was true 
also of a notably gutsy, if 
occasionally inelegant ac- 
count of Schubert’s Rondo in 
A for violin and quartet 
(better known in its less, 
authentic orchestral version), 
where Miss Verhey was rightly 
dominant A terse and dra- 
matic reading of Beethoven's 
Op 95 Quanet provided a 
good contrast to the other two, 
essentially lyrical, works. 

Richard Morrison 


handled nicely, though, the 
stage-managing of his duets 
with Cathryn Pope: Traviata's 
“Brindisi" begged an encore, 
and toe parting embrace of 
Bohimds “O soave fenriulla” 
floated away elegantly back- 
slags. Less helpml in scene- 
setting was the accompanying 
of Paul Wynne Griffiths, too 
much the supportive repe- 
titeur-pianist too little the 
imaginative orefaestrator. 

As Cathryn Pope’s recent 
London roles have shown, her 
silver soprano, shifting mercu- 
riafly from toe demure to toe 
vivacious, is particularly at 
home in tbe French repertoire. 
Her Manon Gavotte was quite 
the most stylish part of toe 
evening. In be! canto, though, 
toe voice still has to concen- 
trate loo hard to leave much 
room for expressive manipu- 
lation , with the result that toe 
brilliance of a Gilda, Elvira or 
Norina is dimmed. And, for 
all its strength, the top of the 
voice, lacking in focus, needs 
urgent and wise direction. 

Hilary Finch 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


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THURSDAY 
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16 


THF TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986_ 




A tone figure patrolling tbe empty corridors of power, while a walker in Jubilee Gardens picks his way throqgh debris left by rerdlers (Photographs: John Voos) 


Thousands of empty beer 
tins littering tbe south bank of 
the Thames marked the end 
yesterday of the largest local 
authority in the world (Hugh 
Clayton writes). 

Workmen clambered over 
County Hall, headquarters on- 
til midnight on Monday of the 
Greater London Council, re- 
moving banners and other 
reminders of 22 years of 
municipal administration. 

For the past three years the 
banners have taunted Conser- 
vative parliamentarians across 
the Thames at Westminster. 
Sir Godfrey Taylor, chairman 
of the London residuary body, 
the new owners, said: •‘This 
lovely building shonld not be 
festoooned with advertising." 

It will be a year at least 
before County Hall, with its 
1,000 rooms and five mOes of 
corridors, is ready to be sold. 


First day of the new regime 


The first day after the 
disbanding of the County 
Council got off to a shakey 
start in the West Midlands 
yesterday when staff from the 
residuary body found they 
could not operate the 
telephones. 

The staff took over at the 
West Midlands County Hall 
where the County Council had 
a computerized telephone 
system. 

There were no switchboard 
operators - only security staff 
- and no one could work out 
which new executive was on 
what number. 

The situation was less mud- 
dled in Yorkshire where well- 
drilled telephone operators 
quickly adopted their new 
roles. 

“Residuary body" they said 


to callers - that was when 
callers could find a phone 
number to ring. There was 
total silence from the Barnsley 
headquarters of South York- 
shire and also in nearby 
Wakefield, centre of the for- 
mer West Yorkshire 
authority. 

In other centres yesterday 
the action was under way for 
the residuary bodies whose 
(ask is to temporarily take 
over the local government 
services provided for 18 mil- 
lion people. 

In Greater Manchester, Mr 
Peter Quick, the new chief 
executive and former county 
legal officer, was doing the 
rounds accompanied by Mr 
Peter Hadfield, tbe quango 
chairman and newly-retired 
chairman and manag ing direc-' 


tor of the brewery Bass North 
West 

In Tyneside in the north 
east, Mr Peter Smith, the 
former county treasurer now 
running the new Tyne and 
Wear residuary body, was at 
first confronted by a pile of 
post and papers 6 feet high. 

One of the first problems 
feeing the chairman of the 
Merseyside residuary body 
was what to do with two Ford 
Granada cars 

“I should imagine they will 
be sold eventually," Mr Wil- 
liam Baldwin, former legal 
officer, said. 

• Before its abolition on 
Monday night. West Mid- 
lands County Council made a 
final £ 1.5 million gift to at- 
tract the 1 992 Olympic Games 
to Bir mingham. 


Comets 6 a source of viruses’ 


Editor 

New pictures of Halley's 
comet, takes by one of the 
world’s most powerful tele- 
scopes on Monday night, con- 
firm a theory that rinses and 
bacteria originate in outer 
space. 

Tbe daim was made yester- 
day by two eminent astrono- 
mers, Professor Chandra 
Wickramasingbe and Sir Red 
Hoyle, based on a study of tbe 
first infra-red pictures of the 
Halley’s comet obtained by the 
154-inch Anglo- Australian 
Telescope, at Siding Spring, 
New South Wales. 

For more than 10 years, the 
two astronomers have pnrsned 
the idea that comets carry 
firing organisms to Earth, 
prtmdmg the source of viruses 


and bacteria that have caused 
unexplained epidemics rang- 
ing from fnflnwraw tO wtlOOp- 
ing cough and animal diseases. 

The astronomers say that 
confirmation of their theory 
comes in a preliminary report 
flashed around the world to 
major observatories and uni- 
versities via a special astrono- 
my intelligence network. 

The observations of the 
infra-red radiation were 
planned after the encounter 
three weeks ago between the 
European Giotto spacecraft 
and the comet, when it was 
discovered that the widens 
was velvet Mack to colour and 
Oat it might consisted carbon- 
like material, overturning the 
widely held view that comets 
are mainly ky snowballs en- 


Astronomers at Siding 
Spring who analyzed the infra- 
red “fingerprint" of Halley^ 
comet found that tbe same 
patterns can be reproduced to 
laboratory exp erim e n ts. 

According to Professor 
Wicbramasnighe, “the infra- 
red analyses are identical to 
those obtained in the 
laboratory", when particles of 
organic material, which are 
the bttfiding blocks tf bacteria 
and viruses, are subjected to 
the type of conditions which 
surround the comet. 

Details, of the laboratory 
experiments which coincide 
with tiie new findings are 
published today in Vtrases 
from Space, written by the two 
astronomers in association 
with Dr John Watkins, an 
epidemiologist- 


France to 
withdraw 
observers 
in Beirut 

From Diana Guides 
Paris 

The new right-wing French 
Government is withdrawing 
its remaining 45 military ob- 
servers from strife-torn Beirut 
within the next few days l -~ 
because they are “no longer 
able to carry out their mission 
property". * 

Tbe decision to withdraw 
marks a shift in the French 
position of supporting the 
Government of President 
GeraayeL 

It has been sees by some as 
also marking the beginning of 
what could become a total 
disengagement of France from 
Lebanon, even though there 
has been no talk of withdraw- 
ing the 1,400 French soldiers 
in Unifil, the United Nations 
peace-keeping force, in the 
south of the country. 

The decision was said to^ s 
have followed the death of the 
seventh observer in an am- 
bush at the mission's Beirut 
headquarters on March 12, 
four days before the victory of 
the right in the French elec- 
tions and one week before the 
formation of the new Govern- 
ment under M Jacques Chirac 
But M Chirac has been 
credited with the decision, 
which fits in with his ex- 
pressed view that France 
should take as few risks as 
possible in Lebanon. 

Although the kidnappers 
have never mentioned the 
withdrawal of the observers as , > 
one of their specific kidnap " 
demands, both the Shia Mus- 
lims and the Syrians, who are 
thought to be close to them, 
have repeatedly .called on 
France to stop “interfering" in 
Lebanese affairs. 

• BEIRUT: France's decision 
to withdraw its 45 military 
observers from here gives 
Lebanon's Christian and Mus- 
lim militias new free-firing 
zones (Our Correspondent 
writes). 

The move has raised well- 
founded fears that the 1 1 -year- 
old civil war may take a turn 
for the worse , as the French 
represented the last token of 
international commitment to 
help the Lebanese solve the x 
conflict, which by conserva- <•* 
trve estimates las already 
daimed about 100,000 lives. 




THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today's events 


Roy al engagements 

Queen Elizabeth The Queen 
Mother opens the headquarters 
of the British Sporting Art 
Trust, National Horse Racing 
Museum, Newmarket. 12.15. 

The Prince of Wales opens 
British Aerospace's new Space 
Engineering building. filton. 
Bristol. 10. 10; and then visits 
the Freeland Buildings Project 
of the Zenzele Self Build Hous- 
ing Association. Eastville. Bris- 
tol. 2.15: later, accompanied by 
The Princess of Wales, he 
attends the London Welsh 
Rugby Football Club centenary 
dinner, the Grosvenor House, 
Park Lane. Wl. 7.20. 

New exhibitions 

Antidotes to Madness? work 
by Richard Hamilton, Nam 
June Paik. Ree Morton, Hannah 
Collins and Piotr Sobietalski; 
Riverside Studios. Crisp Rd, 
W6: Tues to Sun 12 to 8 (ends 
April 27). 

Decorative batiks by Elly 


Beckett; Tbe Talent Store Gal- 
lery. 11 Eccleston St SW I ; Mon 
to Fri 9.30 to 5.30 (ends 25 
April). 

Exhibitions in progress 
Blowing in tbe Wind: works 
in textiles, plastics and ceramics 
by five young artists: Lanscapes 
in glass, by Wendy Ramshaw; A 
glass interior by Christine 
Kirby: Scent bottles by Liz 
McClure; and fashion jewellery 
in glass by Slim Barren: Aspects. 
3/5 Whitfield St, Wl; Moo to 
Fri 10 to 7, Sat 10 to 5 (ends 
April 26) 

The Archives of Dorset; Dor- 
set County Museum. Dor- 
chester. Mon to Sal 10 to 5 (ends 
April 26). 

Fifties’ Printed Textiles: Wal- 
sall Museum and An Gallery. 
Lichfield St Mon to Fri 10 to 6. 
Sat 10 to 4.45 (ends April 12). 

The Prim in Germany 1880- 
1933; York City Art Gallery. 
Exhibition Sq: Mon to Sat 10 to 
5, Sun 2.30 to 5 (ends May 4). 

Last chance to see 

Landscapes in charcoal by 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,009 

T 


ii 


■ 

7 - ’■ 



■ 




ACROSS 

1 One way of finishing top in 
languages? (6-6). 

8 Relieved from sentry-go? 
Thai’s unusual (3-4). 

9 Affecting the nose of Nor- 
man Bishop — and ours per- 
haps (7). 

11 Weapon to apply knock-out 
to contain brief general 
disturbance (4-3) 

12 Many a march organized 
with foreign money (7). 

13 Head's name in marble (5). 

14 Caught adding a bit on (7,2). 

16 Sort of site meant for a cafe 

(9). 

19 In dramatic action they may 
be far from spineless (5). 

21 Relationship with amiable 
radical (7). 

23 Fool fault is hard in the old 
local lingo (7). 

24 Among the others, the 
Prophet's son-in-law is a 
practical type (7). 

25 Rake cash in — standard 
procedure (7). 

26 No fair reward for such a 
one (5-7). 

DOWN 

1 Team for a Jacobite rebel- 
lion (7). 

2 Ornament of the Board 
branching out (7). 

3 How to escape scoring a 
duck (3.3.3). 


4 Outstanding — arrogant too 
(SL 

5 Lion and partner spotted in 
the forest (7). 

6 Do those reassembled be- 
come calmed? (7). 

7 Criminal demolition con- 
tractor ( 12). 

10 Pinkerton gjii noticed by 
the eagle-eyed (5-7). 

15 Rash use of the technical 
term (9). 

17 Beat Jack with a trumpet- 
blast (7). 

18 Wells brought him down to 
earth (7). 

19 Unethical — animal noise 
arising in bed (7). 

20 Long term issue includes 
capital return (7). 

22 Let down beside the road? 
(5). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17.008 




Concise Crossword page 10 


Luke Ralphs: Niccol Ontre, 
Brewery Court, Cirencester, 10 
to 4. 

Music 

Concert by the London 
Smfonietta with Gyorgy Pauk 
(violin); Queen Elizabeth Hall, 
EC1, 7.45. 

Children's concert (suitable 
ofr ages 7-13) with Lucie 
Skeaping and Jeremy Barlow; 
Purcell Room. South Bank, 3. 

Jazz recital by the Jenako 
Five. Foyer, 12.30; Concert by 
the London Philharmonic Or- 
chestra. 7.30; Royal Festival 
Hall. South Bank, SEI. 

Concert by the Guaroeri Trio; 
Barbican Hall, EC2. I. 

Concert by Hampshire 
County Youth Orchestra. Salis- 
bury Cathedral. 7.45. 

Recital by Mary Mee (so- 
prano) and John Mee (organ); St 
Olave's, Hart St, EC3, 1.05. 
Talks, lectures, films 

Techniques The develop- 
ment of oil painting, by David 
Bom ford; The National Gallery, 
Trafalgar Sq, WC2. I. 

Op and Kinetic Art, by Ste- 
phen Barm, 1; Any Warhol and 
His Clan and Jim Dine, 2.30; 
Tate Gallery. Millbank. 

Heartbeat of a Volcano and 
Succession on Lava (films); The 
Geological Museum, Exhibition 
Rd, SW7, 2 JO. 

I have a dream— by Michael 
Lyons; Friends House. Euston 
Rd, NWI. 7 JO. 

General 

Teenage painting and draw- 
ing: murals with Brian Dawn 
(ages 12 to 16); Poetic puppets 
(make and play) with Barbara 
Davis (ages 7 to Ilk Sculpture 
and Clay: modelling with Zora 
Bjelogrtic (ages 8 to 12): Pottery 
with Valerie Taylor (ages 7 to 
10); Printing with Ray Gale 
(ages 9 to 14); Camden Arts 
Centre. Arkwright Road. NW3, 
10 to 3. 

Magic lantern demonstration 
(ages 4 to 11); The Bethnal 
Green Museum of Childhood, 
Cambrdige Heath Road. E2, 12. 

Fan making workshop; Mu- 
seum of London, London Wail. 
EC2. 1 1 to l and 2 to 4. 

International Model Railway 
exhibtion: Royal Horticultural 
Society Halls. SW1, today and 
tomorrow 10 to 8 (ends 
tomorrow). 


Endangered reptiles 


A booklet. The Conservation 
of Endangered Amphibians and 
Reptiles , published by the Na- 
ture Conservancy CounriL is 
available from Interpretive Ser- 
vices Brandi. (Dept BP). NCC, 
North minster House. Peter- 
borough, PEI IUA, post free 
<50pL 


The pound 


AustraBaS 
Aastna Scfi 
Belgium ft 
Canada S 
Denmark Kr 
Finland Mkk 
France Fr 
German? Dm 
Gre ece Dr 
Hong Kang S 
Ireland Pt 
luh Lira 
Japan Ven 
he&Mftanda GJd 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
South Africa Rd 
Spam Pta 
Sweden Kr 
Switzerland Ft 
USAS 

Yugoslavia Dm- 


Sank 

■a: 

2445 
7340 
2.128 
13.14 
8.04 
10.30 
3.S55 
231 JM 
11.75 
1.18 
241540 
274.00 
199 
11.10 
22825 
4.10 
222.50 
11-23 
297 
1-532 
54000 


Bank 

Sens 

2-01 

2U5 

6080 

2-028 

12.44 

7-59 

10-35 

1375 

211 no 
113 s 
1.12 
2295-00 
260-00 
3-80 
1035 

218.25 

3-30 

210-50 

1038 

232 

1.«62 

49030 


Retail Price index: 381.1 

London: The FT Index dosed up 122 et 

1402.2. 


Books — hardback 


The Deputy Literary Editor's selection at In tere sti ng books pubtsftied this 

“*• • ■ — — — > - - - 

ttunca Mas: The National Co mm i ssi on on Disappeared People (Faber. 
£14.95) 

French Fascism, Hie Hrat Wave, 1 924-33, by Robert Soucy (Yale. E2Z50) 
Bwana Stokesi and Ms African Conquests, by Nicholas Ha nnan (Cape; 
£12.95) 

The Camp David Accords, by Mohamed IbraMm Kamel (KP1, £25) 

Joining (he Club, A History of Jens end Vale, by Dan. A-Oon (Yale, £30) 
Memoirs of a Thinking RatSsh, by Peter Medawar (Oxford. £12 JO) 
Studies in Past-tanprosskuisin, tw John Rewaid (Thames & Hudson, £25) 
The Idea of England, by Russell Chamberlain (Thames & Hudson, £935) 
A Short History of MM) Literature, by Seamus Deane (Hutchinso n , £15) 
Beatrix Potter's Journal, abridged by GtanCtoaBaro(VBdng, £10.95) 

NS 


TV top ten 


National top tan Mevklon mUMM in 
die week endng 23 Mard) 88; 


cThe Body in the library 


EastEnders (Tue/ 

EastEndarsf 
Our John 1< 

Nine O Ctock News (MM) 1240m 
DaBas 12.15m 
wogan (Fri) 12.00m 
MissMwpfcT 
11.85m 
8 OED 11.40m 

8 That's Life 11.40m 

10 Hancock's Hail Hour 11.15m 

rrv 

1 C o ro na tio n Street (Mon) Granada 
17.85m 

2 Coronation Street (Wed) Granada 
1630m 

3 Won You were Here (Mon/Wed) 
Thames 1530m 

4 AutWtoderoetiafiFtot Central 1255m 

5 C r os sr oad s (Toe) Central 122Sm 

6 Reunion at FeWaorouah ITV 1320m 

7 Al At No20 Thames 1210m 
7 Boon Central 13.10m 

9 Errsnerdale Farm (Tue) Yorkshire 
1U0m 

10 Crossroads (Wed) Central 1240m 


BBC 2 

1 Grange HM 7.10m 
1 Forty Minutes 7.10m 

3 Joan Rwers: Can We Talc 695m 

4 MASH 5.15m 

5 Sher gar 435m 

6 Think lt_ Do It 4. 45m 
6 Star Tre* 4.45m 

B Now - Something Else 4.40m 
9 Horizon (Mon/Sat) 4.15ffl 
10 My Favtxms Wife 4.10m 


Channel 4 

1 Breoksid8(Tue/Sat)6A5m 

2 Brookskte (Mon/Sal) 8.85m 

3 Treasure Hunt 620m 

4 Prospects 4.00m 

5 Counrtdown (Wed) 3.45m 

6 Countdown (Thu) 3. 


. j) 3.10m 
7 I CXjgM to be in Pictures 3.05m 
7 Cheers 305m 

9 Countdown (Fri) 230m 

10 Countdown (Mon) 2S5ra 

Bre rtfret te t wr isl a s The average 


who viewed lor at least three retires); 

BBC* Brsatt/ast Tima: Mon to Fri 
1.6m (73m) 

TV -am: Good Momng Britain Mon to Fri 
2.6m 1103m) Sal 3.1m (73m) 

Sun 1.3m 

Broadc a sters' Autflenca R eseai ch Board. 


Roads 


London and South-east A23: 
Roadworks at tbe junction of 
Bruton Rd and Acre Lane. Ml: 
Southbound lane closures 
approaching junction 6 (A405 
Interchange), 10 JO am to 4 JO 
pm. The Midlands: Ml: 
Contraflow on northbound 
carriageway between junctions 
15 and J6 (Northampton and 
Davemry). A5: Repairs between 
Shrewsbury and Gobowen. 
A446: Reconstruction of north- 
bound carriageway near the 
A446 Coleshill bypass 
interchange. 

Wales and West A3& North- 
bound carriageway dosed at 
South Brent; contraflow on 
southbound. AS: Major road- 
works in Regent St, UangoOen," 
Clwyd. A47& Roadworks S of 
Builth Wells; temporary lights. 

The North: A1 (M): 
Contraflow near Blyih round- 
about, Yorkshire. M63: Major 
widening scheme between junc- 
tions ) and 3, Barton Bridge. 

Scotland: A9: Roadworks be- 
tween Larbert Cross and North 
Broomage; lane closures be- 
tween Dunblane and Ducbburn. 
Edinburgh: Width restriction in 
both directions in Leith St; 
delays. A93: Single line traffic in 
North Deeside Rd, Banchory. 

Informs tian supplied by AA 


Anniversaries 


Births: Hans Christian 
Andersen. Odense, Denmark, 
1805; William Holman Hunt, 
Pre-Raphaelite. London. 1827; 
Emile Zola, Paris, 1840. 

Deaths: Sir James Clarke 
Ross, Polar explorer. A 1 . 
Buckinghamshire, 1862; 
aid Cobden, politician, London. 
1865; CS. Forester, novelist, 
creator of Hornblowcr, Fuller- 
ton, California. 1966: Georges 
Pompidou, president of France 
1969-74. Paris. 1974. 


Snow reports 


Depth Conditions Weather 

(cm) 

L U 

AUSTRIA 

St Anton 50 280 

Superb snow and sun 

FRANCE 

La PJagne 75 250 

Lower slopes now soft 

Les Arcs 140 200 

Excellent skiing conditions 

Megeve 30 120 

Skiing good above 1800m 

ITALY 

Counnayeur 110 250 

High winds dose top lift 

SWITZERLAND 

Andermart 35 180 

Good skiing above 2000m 

Les Dtabwreis 40 100 

New snow on hard base 

In me above reports, supplied by representatives of the Ski Club of Grea 

Britain, L refers to lower slopes and U to upper, and art to artiliclaL 


Piste 

Off 

Phae 

Runs to 
resort 

(5pm) 

“C 

soft 

fail- 

poor 

fine 

6 

good 

heavy 

good 

cloud 

5 

good 

varied 

good 

fine 

-2 

(air 

heavy 

worn 

doud 

S 

fair 

heavy 

fair 

fine 

s 

good 

poor 

fair 

fine 

8 

good 

poor 

soft 

fine 

10 


Weather 
forecast 

A cool showery N or NW 
airstream will cover the 
British Isles. 


6 am to midnig ht 


London, SE, central S, E, central 

N, HE England, East Angfia. Mid- 

lands, Borden, Erfinburph, Dun- 
dee, Aberdeen, Centra) Highlands, 
Moray Firth: Fog patches early; 

sunny intervals and showers, some 
heavy with hal. sleet or snow. 

perhaps thunder, dying out in the 

evening; wind variable, mainly W. 
or moderate; max temp 9C 

Channel (stands, SW, NW &v- 

gtend, Wales, Lake District, Isle of 

Man, SW. NW, NE Scotland, Glas- 

gow, ArgyB, Orkney, Shetland, 
Northern Ireland: Rather cloudy, 

showers, heavy and prolonged at 

times with has, sleet and snow, 

tps thunder; wind W or NW, 

or moderate; max temp 9C 

Outlook for tomorro w and Friday: 
Sumy or dear intervals and show- 
ers, locaBy heavy on tomorrow ; 
rather cow with night frosts. 




%m 




* 


635 am 


SutSotK 
7.35 pro 


a Moon rises: Moan outs 
4.19 am 11.09 am 

Naw moorr Aprs 9. 


Lightmg-up time 



High Tides 


, London 80S pm to 032 am . 

Bristol 8.15pm to 6.12 am 
EdMnngh 622 pm to 6 j09 am 
Manctwntsr 8.16 pm to 838 am 

Pananca 835 pm to 635 am 


b-btue toor. bc-fatae i 

cloudy: o-ovrrcaat f-t _ 

haB: mM-row: min: tnww; m- 
Biunderflornu Mhowere. 

Arrows mow wind mrzcikm. wind 
reeed Crept!) drded. Temperature 
centtgraae. 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

LfiadooHBiUge 

KA. 1 

63 

333 

53 

Abartaen 

7.43 

33 

832 

24 

jtewsM 

1233 

103 

13T- 

92 


5.13 

33 

fl.11 

29 

Canfiff 

1238 

S3 

1.16 

93 

Deuonpoft 




42 

Dewar 

H'/J 

63 

542 

53 

rreaorah 

1131 

43 



l*¥aenniii 

UreJali 

nwwMfl 

624 

5.48 

43 

3.4 

734 

6.19 

43 

32 

^hred 

437 

1236 

4.6 530 
63 1233 

4.4 

63 

Kraccmb* 



1216 

63 

Le«t 

9.02 

43 

935 

43 

Uraqxral 

5.17 

73 

6.05 

7.4 

Lowestoft 

348 

22 

3-58 

20 

Maigate 

537 

43 

639 

33 

Wfanf Haven 

1201 

5.7 1242 

52 

SCW 

Oban 

11.41 

5 A 

12.12 

23 

Penance 

11.17 

42 1134 

43 

Potflanu 

1213 

13 1230 

13 

PertnmuuBi - 

532 

39 

6.32 

27 

Shonbam - 

534 

5.1 

538 

49 

j, mi 

535 

. 33 . 634 

33 

Swansea 

1234 

- 7.7 1242 

73 

Tare 

mu 

43 1139 

42 

WTtoB-on-Nze 

547 

27 

6.16 

23 




Ud a m ganraq dlnmtran l n»4 . ? 80 H . 


Around Britain 


Yesterday 


Temperatures at midday yesterday: c. 
doucti I, ten r, rain; a, sun 

C F C F 

f 846 Quires ey 8 948 
a 948 Miemee a a 948 
c 745 Jersey f 846 

* 846 London r 948 

CaxBf 1 846 ITncbstar r 843 

Edtobargb I 848 Newcastle f 846 

— h 846 msdsway I 745, 


Our address 


(H to rmaflo n tor Inctoion in The Times 
intormason service ahoUd be sent ter. 

Tbe Information Servtca EtStor, ms. 
The TVn8S. 1 Virginia Streak London, El 
SXN. 



Moedxy-Sstnnlay r ecord your deny 
Portfolio total. 

Add these together to amiWiw 
your weekly Portfolio total. 

tr your total matmr* me jxmaabed 
weekly dividend figure yon have woo 
ouDlom or a share of the prize nuney 
MM for IMS week, and must claim 
your prtzB asmarurted i below. 

ISTSSTsSn mrere > w!oa"n a &3 


you card wtm you 


lull 

The Time* 

between Uw 

No responsibility can be aoceMed 
for failure to contact the dam otnee 
far any reason within me stated 
hours. 

The above instructions me ap- 
plicable. to both daOy and weekly 

dividend claims. 

•Some Times Portfolio cards include 
minor mtsprtaks in Die tnatrucoons on 
the reverse side. These cards are not 
inralklaled. 

•The wordtne of Rules 2 and 3 has 
been expanded from earner versions 
for danneauon burposes. The Game 
ttseU ts not affected and win continue 
us belayed m exactly Use same way 




ersj Limited of l Virginia Street. 

London El 9XN Wednesday. April 2. 


NEWSPAPERS 

Printed t£> London Post 


1986 RMfcSered 
t Office. 


Sun Rain 
In in 

EAST COAST 

1j6 £1 
4 A 24 
24 .17 
X 

43 J» 
Mamie X M 

SOUTHCOAST 

68 43 
5J M 
68 43 
42 48 
5.1 37 
UttetaBlB 5J5 .41 
BmrearR 33 40 
4.5' J37 
53 -37 
63 -33 
72 24 
72 21 

7.7 32 

Weymouth 53 38 
Enaoufli 63 .04 
Teigoreoatb &0 31 
Torquay 63 30 
" " 83 37 

93 33 
63 41 

5.7 34 

WEsrr “ 
ScOyMae 83 47 
S3 30 


Max 
C F 

7 45 

7 45 

8 46 

9 48 
11 52 

10 50 
9 48 
8 48 

7 45 

8 48 

9 48 
9 48 
9 48 
9 48 

11 52 

10 50 

11 52 
9 48 
9 48 

9 48 
9 48 

10 50 

10 50 

11 52 
10 50 

10 so 


DlA 

Showers 

Bright 

S h ow ers 
Stas pm 

Thun pro 
Thun pm 
HaBpro 
Thun pro 
HaV pro 


Tenby 

CotoynBay 


SunRtfn Max 
hre In C F 
41 .14 8 46 Sunam 


5.1 .T7 7 .45 Ha* 
23 36 6 43 Stoat 



ENGLAND AND WALES 

53 .02 10 50 Ttompm 

63 .09 8 46 HaB 

71 38 
. , 93 36 

Ang to a a y ' 61 33 

B"pool Airpl X 
Manrhaamr 23 31 5 41 Stoat 

NnCttogbsei 43 36 6 43 Showers 

N’cfHt-Tyne U .U 6 43 Snow 

CaiMe 43 . 18 7 45 Bright 


8 46 Ha* am 

8 46 Hall am 

9 48 She am 


Has pm c*««ra 

SUSP's 3 

Qfesgour 93 - 

Tire* 83 - 

Stomway 93 - 

Ltxwki 35 32 

I £2* Wick WJ 31 

ST 9 Wnloes 5.6 .02 

Sunoy - 03 


7 45 Snow 
7 45 Sunny 
10 50 Sgmqr 
7 45 Sunny 
7 45 Sunny 

6 43 Shrsam 

7 45 Sunny 

7 45 Ghraam 

8 46 Snow 




11 i ^55*555* 7.7 - 9 48 Bright 

NORTHERN B ' 
email 

Three are Monday's figraas 


NORTHERN IRELAND 

B— il 24 .18 6 48 HMpm 


Abroad 




MODAY: c. cloud; d. drizzle: t, fair. to. tog: r. rain: e. sure sn. anow; t thunder. 


Atocdo s 
AtoreM th 
Atoordria 1 
Algiers a 
AmNn c 
8 
S 


Sracetre s 


C F 
16 «1 

19 66 C W tfi 

16 64 Corfu 
23 73 Drdrihi 

6 43 Ikfamk 

20 68 Faro 

20 68 Florence* 

- - Fraa fcfra t. 

17 63 RmcM 

- - Geneva 
17 63 GtonM* 
6 43 HefaWM 

- - KongK 

14 57 Inuabrok 

8 48 MaW 
11 52 Jeddah 
10 50 Jafogi 
" KeredS 




2 36 Naples* 
c 18 64 NDaM 
8 13 55 N York 
-8 14 57 Me* . 
8 30 88 (fata 


SiSKfi* 

a 16 61 
9 19 66 
I 7 45 

18 64 




f 26 79 TaeSar 

f 18 61 TslAviv 
s 31 88 Tetradfe _ 
- - - Tokyo 
8- 19 86 Toronto 
f 4 39 Tunis 
1 10 50 Vatancia 
s 21 70 VenCwr 
f 21 70 Venire 
1 10 50 Vienna 
8 -2 28 Warsaw 
8 19 66 Wasbtou 

8 33 91 Warngto* 

I 27 81 Zorich 



* denotes Monday's figures are latest aveteMe 


s 11 82 





















F 


.* v 



WEDNESDAY APRTT. 21986 


THE %$8lte TIMES 








‘ ^ 


STOCK MARKET 

FT 30 Share 
1402.2 (+1Z2) 

FT-SE 100 
1684.0 (+15.25 

Wm (Datastre 
118.20 (+0.64) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 
1.4685 (-0.0135) 

W German mark 
3.4231 (-0.0307) 

Trade-weighted 

75.8 (-0.5; 




Friendly in 
£6m deal 


Friendly Hotels is to buy 
five hotels from the Virani 
Group for a cash and shares 
offer totalling £5.89 million. 

Friendly intends raising 
£4.15 million in a rights issue 
of new convertible preference 
shares, of which £2.65 million 
will be used for . the cash 
element of the purchase. The 
rest of the price is made up of 
303,030 Friendly Hotels ordi- 
nary shares and £2.83 million 
of new preference shares. 

The deal, if approved by 
shareholders, will giveFriend- 
ly a total of seven medium- 
price hotels, including the 
Central Hotel, Glasgow, for- 
merly owned by British Rafl. 

Friendly has agreed to pay 
£1.75 million rent on the lease 
of the Ecclestbn Hotel, Lon- 
don, pan of the Virani 
package. 

Friendly’s shares have been 
suspended at the company’s 
request to allow the hew 
shares to be listed and for 
shareholders to approve the 
acquisition. Trading is likely 
to be resumed on April 29. 


Atlantic joy 

Atlantic Computers, the 
computer leasing company, 
.lifted profits from £10.5 mil- 
lion to £17.1 million before' 
tax in the year to last Decem- 
ber. Turnover was up from 
£96. 1 million to £1 83 million 
and the final dividend is I.7Sp 
against 1.1 3p. 

Tempos, page 19 


Brammer up 


Brammer, the bearingsdiss- 
tributor, lifted . pretax profits 
from £10.2 miUkm to £13.6 
million in the year to Decem- 
ber 31. Tuntoyerwasnp from 
£86.5 mflUon to £101 
and the firtft dividend is to 
(5.25p). Tempos, page 19 


. By Alison Eadie 

Alfied-Lyons, the British 
brewing and foodgroup whose 
brands include Double Dia- 
. mctndbeer and.Tetley.tea, has 
reached agreement with Hi- 
ram Walker Resources, the 
Canadian conglomerate, to 
buy Hiram’s spirits and wines 
division -for Can$2.6 Mon 
(£1.27 billion). 

Hiram Walker Spirits is one 
of the largest, distillers in the 
■ world and has more than 100 
proprietary brands, including 
Canadian ’ Club whisky, 
Bailantin&’s Scotch, 
Courvoisier cognac and 
Kahlua and Tia Maria li- 
queurs. 

The purchase, if successful- ' 
ly completed, will increase 
Allied's size by around 40 per 
cent. Although Alfied’s chair- 
man, Sir .Derrick Holders 
Brown, said them, was nothing 
defensive in tfremove, it will 
have the effect of making 
Allied a much” more difficult 
target for the Australian brew- 
ing group Elders DGL 

Elders £1.7 billion bid for 
Allied lapsed in December, . 
when it was referred to the 


to pay £1 .27bn for 
’s Hiram Walker 



Sir Derrick: defence 
not the motive 

Monopolies and Mergers 
Commisssion, but Elders had 
said itwasstiH interested in re- 
bidding' if it gained clearance. 

' Sir Derrick said yesterday 
that Allied did not need, size 
for. protection. “We are pear-, 
feedy capable of fighting off 
Elders or anyone else on the 
strength . of our own 
performance”, he said, and 
added that he doubted if 
Elders would now bid again. 

. ..The Hiram deal was 
wrapped up in 10 days and 


1 approached the Canadi- 
an company after learning that 
it was on the receiving end of 
an unwelcome partial offer 
from Gulf Canada. Gulf has 
offered Can532 a share to tiy 
to increase its stake in Hiram 
Walker to 49 per cent 

Allied said yesterday its 
agreement to buy the drinks 
division should not be affect- 
ed by Gulfs offer. Hiram's 
shares had anyway risen 
above the offer price to 
Can$35 on the Canadian stock 
market. 

The agreement is subject to 
Allied's shareholders' approv- 
al and clearance by the Office 
of Fair Trading and govern- 
ment departments in Canada 
and the United States. Allied, 
which controls about 15 per 
cent of the British Scotch 
market, largely through its 
Teachers brand, said the com- 
bined share of the British 
market would still be under 25 
per cent — Hiram only has 
about 4 per cent. 

Ball an tine’s, however, is the 
world’s fourth largest selling 
Scotch and is the market 


leader in Germany. Italy, the 
Netherlands, Greece and Swit- 
zerland. Allied and Hiram 
combined would have about 
17 per cent of the world 
whisky market 

Hiram Walker Spirits made 
operating profits of CanS282 
million on turnover of 
CanS 1.52 billion in the year to 
August 31. 1985. Profits in- 
creased by only 1.4 per cent 
over 1984 due to flatness of 
demand in the US, which 
accounted for 56 per cent of 
Hiram's sales. 

Allied has not detailed yet 
how it intends to pay for its 
purchase, but a mixture of 
debt and equity is expected to 
be used. Allied's gearing at the 
end of 1985-86 was 25 per 
cent, giving the company 
scope to raise its borrowings 
significantly. The company 
also said that whatever meth- 
od of financing was used, there 
would be no earnings dilution. 

Allied said the combination 
of the two wines and spirits 
divisions would give much 
greater muscle in the market 
place with stronger distribu- 
tion. 


Chase Manhattan millions 


enter UK home loans war 


By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


the 


Debt transfer 


Century Factors, Close. 
Brothers’ debt factoring sub- 
sidiary, has taken on most of 
the debt portfolio of Brown 
Shipley Factors. The value of 
the debts transferred is more 
than £4 million, and payment 
for the transfer, in rash, will 
equal their book value, subject 
to certain provisional 
retentions. 


Bid referred 


The Department of Trade 
and Industry has confirmed 
that the proposed acquisition 
by Cope Allman of Firth 
Cleveland Strip will be 
referrred to the Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission, on 
the grounds that the proposal 
raises issues of competition in 
the market for hardened and 
tempered steel strip. 


Shops project 

Capital and Counties is 


tion for an £85 million shop- 
ping complex at Watford. The 
other partners in the proposed 
development are Watford 
Borough Council and the Sun 
Alliance Insurance group. 


Hanson deal 


The merger agreement un- 
der which SCM, the American 
company, became a subsid- 
iary of Hanson Trust has been 
approved by SCM sharehold- 
ers. Those who did not lender 
their shares before the offer 
closed will receive S75ashare. 


Chase Manhattan, 
American hank, is i 
hundreds of millions 
pounds to the fiercely compet- 
itive home loans market in 
Britain over the next year, it 
announced yesterday. 

Chase is p lanning to offer 
the full range of home loans, 
including repayment and en- 
dowment mortgages as well as 
pension home loans and re- 
mortgages. The business will 
be conducted through a net- 
work of life assurance offices 
and brokers, since Chase has 
no retail network in Britain. 
The bank would not say 
exactly how much it planned 
to tend initially — a spokes- 
man said it would be whatever 

the mar ker ttommriwl. 

The bank said that its move 
Into mortgages was pait of its 
overall, international, con sinn- 
er banking strategy, which was 
one qf the mam areas of 


development 

The emphasis will be on fast 
service, it said, with a turn- 
around time of 48 hours 
between an application and 
the initial mortgage offer. The 
bank already offers mortgages 
in the United States, the Far 


buyers, but most choose to do 
so through existing British 
institutions with established 
retail outlets. The banks have 
then simply to provide the 
finance. 


East, Europe ami Australia, 
lase follows other US 


. rimy 

banks into the British home 
loans business, most notably 
.Ctitarik and Chemical Bank 
which entered the market over 
a year ago. Last year Citibank 
lent £270 million in home 
loans. 

Last month the British 
clearing banks reaffirmed 
their commitment to mort- 
gage lending by announcing 
aggressive new packages de- 
signed to.win a larger share of 


Chase is offering an initial 
mortgage rate for repayment 
and endowment loans of 1 225 
per cent It is willing to 
consider 100 per cent loans on 
amounts up to £50,000, sink- 
ing to 80 per cent on amounts 
above £200,000. The bank is 
willing to lend up to £500,000 
in a single loan. 


die market from the building 
nnber of 


societies. A large number 
foreign hank* are also now 
keen to lend to British home 


Meanwhile, Hill Samuel, 
the merchant bank, is setting 
up a new licensed deposit- 
taker, to be called Hill Samuel 
Personal Finance, which will 
operate its expanding mort- 
gage lending. The new opera- 
tion will initially lend around 
£50 million in the first two 
years. _ . 


Companies 
‘face 33% 
rate rises 9 


By Derek Harris 
Industrial Editor 


New legal 
challenge 
by Argyll 


By Jeremy Warner 
- Business Correspondent 

Mr James Gulliver’s Argyll 
supermarkets group yesterday 
began a newlegal challenge to 
the agreed £2-5 bdtiontake^ 
over bid by Guinness for 
Distillers, dauning'that it ran 
counter to European Econom- 
ic Community law. 

Argyll, which has made a 
rival £25 billion bid for 
Distillers, said it bad been 
advised by the Dean of the 
Faculty of Advocates in Scot- 
land, Mr David Prosser, that 


the proposed merger was pro- 
>f the 


hibited by Article 86 o; 
Treaty of Rome. Proceedin 
are to begin today in tl 
Edinburgh Court of Session. 

Article 86 deals with abuses 
of a dominant market position 
within the Common Market 
Guinness and Distillers have 
already satisfied British gov- 
ernment concern about the 
effects of the merger on com- 
petition in the drinks market 
by promising to sell off a 
number of whisky brands, but 
they may still be at fault under 
EEC law. 


h is open to an^any third 


party which may be harmed 
by a breach of EEC law to 
apply either through the Brit- 
ish courts or the European 
Commission for relief 
Argyll said it was beginning 
proceedings in Scotland _ 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


SjSSSs 13l4Mt-&9S> 

K£dow._. 15745.871-113*8} 


Commerzbank 
Brussels: 
General — 


Part® CAC 

Zurich: 

SKA General — 


„ 21 05.9 (+204) 

.549.891+4653 
35*4 (Same) 

509.40 (same) 


GOLD 


London FteJnSF 
AM £333.70 pm-$333.10 . 


75- 


224.25) 

SSjf&WH** 


MAIN PRICE changes 


FUSES; 

Thorn EMI — — — 

PUtangton — 



J Mam - — ■ 

Glynwed 

Emess Ugbbng — - 
Vaux Brew — 

Ud Biscuits — — ■ 

Uid Newspapers 


- 470p 
... 373>1+«W 



ESK| 

350P (+20p) 


Bund . 
Burton 
GusA 


. 655p L 
. 342p 1+14 


pSSand^W, 1 

RedattandC 82Jp+]|B 

tG Gas — - ?i9P ItSR 


1Q22p. 


AB Ports. 
TricentroJ 


Christies ln« 
Sun Life 



Lcjn and Edinburgh — 

Cable and W 735p (h 




CURRENCIES 


London: • 

£: SI .4685 
CDM3.4ZTI 
E SwFr£fl577 

E FFrl 0.5181 
£ Yen261.1Q 
£jndsx:75.8 


New York: - 
£$1.4685 
$: Dfca3310 _ 
S: Index 11 83 


ECU £0636027 

SORSn/a 


INTEREST RATES 


Londwt ■ 


buying raw 


US: 

Prune Bate 







shows 

17% rise in profits 

By Judith Hartley, Commercial Property Correspondent 


Slough Estates, the property 
company with a heavy 
weighting in the industrial 
sector, has turned in pretax 
profits of £39.51 million for 
the year ended December 31, 
1985 — a 17.6 per cent 
improvement on £33.59 mil- 
lion for the previous year. 

A revaluation of the £774 
million portfolio shows a pal- 
try 1.5 per cent increase in 
folly diluted net asset value, to 
2d2p, below market 
expectations. 

Slough's net asset value has 
been hit by £23 million cur- 
rency losses . And the compa- 
ny says the internal valuation 
of the Britidi and Ca n a di a n 
properties was carried out last 
September when the industri- 
al rriaiket was more uncertain 
than it is now. 


The figures have been 
helped by the acquisition of 
the Helmlace portfolio last 
year from Wimpey Property 
Holdings at a discount of 
about 2! per cent, for £15 
million. That gives Slough an 
office development in the City 
and valuable land in Berkshire 
and Basingstoke, Hampshire 
— all buoyant sectors of the 
property market. 

Tire company intends to 
restructure its finances to take 
advantage of felling interest 
rates. 

Slough made a net profit of 
£1.1 million from the sale of 
its Stock Conversion stake last 
year; turnover, rental income 
and sates fell to £95.66 million 
from £95.81 million. The 
dividend will be 3.3p malting 
5.5p for the year. 


STC makes £26m sale 


By Lawrence Lever 

STC, the troubled telecom- 
munications and computer 
group, is continuing its 
rationalisation with the sale of 
Computer Field Maintenance 
— a computer maintenance 
company — to the Granada 
Group for £26 million in 
casfoThe sale follows STCs 
£10 million sate of its 
Telebank TV rental business 
to Granada and job cuts of 
8,000 last year. 

CFM,the market leader in 


third party computer 
maintance, made pretax prof- 
its of £L5 million last year on 
a turnover of £12.5 million. 
Net assets at the end of 1985 
were £3.2 million and it has 
450 employees. 

G ranada, which already has 
a specialist third party 
maintanance business called 
Microcare, said that CFM 
'would operate as an autono- 
mous unit without job 
losses. 


Rate increases of up to 33 
per cent are hitting businesses 
outside the Greater London 
area, according to a survey by 
the Association of British 
Chambers of Commerce. 

The association called for a 
ceiling on rates increases and 
more consultation by local 
authorities with business rate- 
payers. It said the latest rate 
rises imposed more burdens 
on businesses at a time when 
the fell in oil prices had 
opened a window of opportu- 
nity for British industry to 
improve its output, exports 
and thus employment 

The association told Mr 
Kenneth Baker, Secretary of 
State for the Environment, in 
a letter. “If a business cannot 
put up its' prices to meet rate 
increases — and this in present 
circumstances is both undesir- 
able and difficult — it must 
either cut back investment 
plans or sacrifice new or 
existing jobs”. 

The survey, out yesterday , 
showed there were swingeing 
increases outside the London 
area, the capital having bene- 
fited from the rate support 
grant the association said. 

Out of 50 rate increases 
tracked for important indus- 
trial areas outside London, 14 
bad rises of more than 20 per 
cent 18 were up between 15 
and 20 per cent 11 were 
between 10 and 25 per cent 
and only seven had rises under 
10 per cent 

New business rate pound- 
ages, including county pre- 
cepts, were in 19 instances 
over 250p in the pound and 1 8 
were between 200p and 250p 
in the pound. 

Among those areas with rate 
rises of more than a quarter 
are: Bradford. Calderdale, 
Kirklees, Wakefield and Roth- 
erham in the Yorkshire and 
Humberside area; Bolton and 
Blackpool in the North-west; 
Derby in the East Midlands; 
Cambridge in East Anglia; 
and, in the south, Aylesbury 
Vale with two other Bucking- 
hamshire districts. Many 
county council precepts show 
big rises. 

The association said rate 
capping could not be relied on 
to protea business ratepayers, 
h had been applied only to a 
limited number of local au- 
thorities, mostly in inner Lon- 
don. The association called for 
a business rates ceiling to be 
introduced as a fixed thresh- 
old above the rate of inflation. 


Oil fall ‘will hit Eastern bloc’s 
growth and export earnings’ 


By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 


The sharp fell In world oil 
prices has produced signifi- 
cant changes in prospects for 
the European economies, ac- 
cording to the United Nations 
Economic Commission for 
Europe. ' 

But while the effect is an 
almost unequivocal boons far 
Western Europe, the Eastern 
bloc countries will suffer a loss 
of export earnings and tower 
growth in output 
The UN's Economic Survey 


is the only major study and 
forecasts for both Eastern and 
Western Europe. The survey’s 
roodosfotts for Western Eu- 
rope - are in fine with the 
recently published forecasts. 

Growth in the European 
Community should be around 
3_5 per cent this year, and the 
sharp drop in ofl jokes has 


of the EEC into a non- 
JjjQatkmary situation, the re- 


port says- 

The governments of. West- 


ern Europe in these circum- 
stances coaid take steps to 
further improve growth, al- 
though the strong growth al- 
ready in prospect should result 
in lower levels of unempLoy- 
ment, the report says. 

The centrally planned econ- 
omies of Eastern Europe and 
the Soviet Union suffered a 
growth setback hist year, with 
economic performance below 
that set oat in annual plan 
targets. Unfike in Western 
Europe, foe drop in world oil 
prices does not improve the 
short-term growth prospects 

The five-year plans iff the 
Eastern European economies 
of Bidgarta, Czechoslovakia, 
the German Democratic Re- 
public, Hungary, Poland and 
Romania, enrisage average 
annual growth of 46 per cent 
during 1986-98, compared 
with am outturn of Z2 per cent 
in 1981-85. 

For tiie Soviet Union, 
growth of 354.1 per cent a 
year is planned, compared 


with growth of 3.2 per cent 
annually in 198145. 

But the sharp fen in oil 
prices will hit the Eastern 
bloc's hard currency earnings 
in the West, the report says. In 
1985. the Soviet Union earned 
about $12 billion from oil sales 
to the market economies. 

Oil exports account for 
around 60 per cent of total 
Soviet exports to the Western 
industrialized countries. Hard 
currency earnings on oil could 
be halved by the sharp drop in 
■prices. 

The result, according to the 
report, is that lower oil prices 
mean new economic uncertain- 
ty for the centrally planned 
economies. And, while growth 
hi die economies of Eastern 
Europe may not fall for short 
of that in die West, ft will be 
below the projections of state 
planners. 

The gross external debt of 
Eastern Europe and the Soviet 
Union totalled S96 billion at 
die mid of last year. 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


N Sea oil nightmare 
still has to sink in 


Not even the most pessimistic of 
oilmen in his blackest hour seriously 
believed that the oil price would fail 
below S10 a barrel. Curiously, not 
many seem to believe it even now, 
despite the evidence of the market. 
Brent futures for June dipped to 
$9.80 over the holiday weekend, and 
there can be no assurances that this 
represents the bottom. 

The sinking oil price seems to be 
regarded as a temporary aberration 
by most of the producing companies 
that have reported results in the last 
few weeks. There is a touching faith 
that the Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries will come to the 
rescue with production controls. 

There is still a chance that Opec 
may be able to agree on a strategy to 
stabilize prices. But most of the very 
considerable ground the oil price has 
already lost to competitive forces can 
be regarded as lost irretrievably. 

In the short term, while supply so 
decisively exceeds demand, there 
seems to be nothing to stop the oil 
price from falling further. Even at 
today's very low prices, the amount 
of production being cut is derisory. 

There is now a very real possibility 
that the oil price will become more 
volatile, while remaining below $15 a 
barrel On present trends, an average 
for 1 986 as a whole of as little as $ 12 a 
barrel could be on the cards. Good 
news for the consumer, but a disaster 
for the North Sea companies. 

.Asset values are hit on two fronts. 
Not only do they fall as the oil price 
fails, but many deposits cease to be 
economically recoverable and have 
to be removed from the asset value 
calculation altogether. In these 
circumstances, much of the asset 
backing for share prices melts away. 

To give discounted present values 
of estimated revenues from proven 
and probable reserves based on year- 
end prices as Tricentrol did at the 
time of the preliminary results is 
standard American practice. But a 
fall in oil prices of the magnitude seen 
since the year end renders the 


exercise irrelevant. In fairness, 
Tricentrol shows the efffect of an $18 
oil price, which is its estimate of 1986 
prices. But by the the time of the 
announcement, the price of Brent 
had fallen to $12.50 and it would 
have been interesting to see the 
impact of this on the discounted cash 
flows. 

In the face of dwindling cash flows, 
the oil independents' first priority is 
to survive. Sovereign omitted what 
would have been its first dividend 
payment. Tricentrol cut its dividend 
to a token lp, when arguably it 
should have passed it altogether. 
Everywhere, exploration is being 
pared back to the bare minimum, and 
developments are being shelved. 

Of the larger independents, only 
Enterprise Oil has still to report its 
1985 results and is due to do so to- 
morrow. With its strong balance 
sheet and rising production profile, it 
is unlikely to cut its final dividend. 
Depending on the level of explora- 
tion write-offs, net income for the 
year to December 1985 is expected to 
be up slightly on 1984 at some £63 
million. 

But even Enterprise, whose oil 
output is expected to be up by 9 per 
cent next year, must feel uncomfort- 
able at the prospect of oil at below 
$15 per barrel. If it stays at these 
levels, a cut in the 1986 dividend may 
be inevitable. 

In the event of a prolonged period 
of low oil prices, many of the North 
Sea production companies will fail to 
stay the course. Ironically, the two 
companies most likely to survive on 
their own merits. Enterprise and 
BriioiJ, are protected from takeover 
anyway by the Government’s 
“golden shares’*. 

Tricentrol is not so fortunate, and 
Trafalgar House is already sniffing at 
the prey. It announced a 5 per cent 
holding in Tricentrol yesterday, caus- 
ing the shares to leap 1 Op to 80p. This 
may be the opening salvo in the 
biggest shakeout yet seen in the North 
Sea oil industry. 


Belt-tightening at Opec 


Whatever the impact of felling oil 
prices on British government rev- 
enues, it pales in comparison with the 
damage wrought to the national 
finances of the Organization for 
Petroleum Exporting Countries. An 


of Opec’s struggle 
deficit. 


to contain its 


analysis by Graham Bishop and Paul 
of Salomon Brothers dem- 


Mlotok 

onstrates the direct effect on Opec’s 
ability to finance growing current 
account deficits, which they now see 
as the key constraint 
It seems clear - according to their 
analysis - that Opec as a group cannot 
finance a current account deficit 
much in excess of $10 billion a year. 
Even Saudi Arabia, the authors point 
out was by 1984 running a current 
account deficit of $24 billion, or 22 
per cent of national income - equiva- 
lent to an $800 billion deficit for the 
United States. Opec’s huge deficit on 
services is not easy to cut consisting 
as it does largely of interest payments 
and remittances to foreign workers. 
So imports will have to bear the brunt 


Taking $15 a barrel as the average 
price for oil this. year, the authors 
calculate that Opec would have to cut 
its combined imports from $105 
billion last year to $45 billion this in 
order to keep its current account 
deficit down to $10 billion. 

Taking a $10 per barrel oil price as 
the average for 1986, the cut is even 
more dramatic: down to only $19 
billion this year. In later years, this 
analysis suggests, imports could rise 
again a little, as demand for oil 
increases in response to lower prices. 

But the savage nature of the cuts re- 
quired this year is further illustrated 
by expressing imports as a percentage 
of 1973 levels. Last year, Opec 
imported more that two and a half 
times as much as it did in 1 973; with 
an average oil price of only $10, it 
could afford to import a mere 39 per 
cent of its 1973 level of imports. 


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Name — - — - ■ — — — ' 


I 


Position - — 
Address ™ 


.Company . 


I 


HEWLETT 


Pbstcode . 


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pD*0 2TI. 

, MUM PACKARD Telephone no. " ~ - * 



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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 



Nam e 

Position 

Company, 

Address_ 


Postcode. 


JTel No. 


Toshiba infonnafion Svweins(lJK) L/d . International House, Windmill Road, 
5unbury-on-Thames, Middlesex TW 16 7HR-Tei: 0932 785666. 


COMMODITIES 


Share prices tamed mixed on farther cat in interest rates. 
Monday after reaching record The Dow Jones Indus trial 
levels earlier in the day. average closed down 3.11 
Trading was subdoed after the points at 1,818.61, after last 
holiday, desite hopes of a Thursday's record. 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 



Mar 

Mai 


Mar 

Mar 


Mar 

Mar 


31 

27 


31 

27 


31 

57 

AMR 

S7'4 

sm 

Exxon Gorp 

fifi 

56'A 

Pttsar 

fiO'i 

60% 

ASA 

3S’4 

37S 

FedDptSta 

7B’» 

78% 


30% 

29% 

Allied Signa 

51*4 

51* 

Frsstone 

25** 

25 *B 

PnuipMrs 

117% 

118** 

AtedSira 

/b's 

7b a 

PstChrcsgo 

K% 


PWipaPtn 

9% 

10*. 

At&sGhtmns 

5*9 

5'4 

FstmtBncp 

Fat PonnC 

64H, 

64% 

Polaroid 

64% 

6 S’* 

Alcoa 

42>a 

43V, 

9'* 

9% 

PPGlnd 

64% 

$4% 

Amaxinc 

iy« 

IS’* 

Ford 

82'4 

63'-i 

Prea-Gmbl 

73% 

74’# 

Am'rda Hs 

19'# 


FTWoctiva 

43>» 


PbSESQ 

37 'e 

373* 

Am Brands 

B4 

64'/, 

GAFCorp 

70% 

77 

Raytheon 

63% 

63/, 

Am Brocas 
Am Can 

Tb 

n ^i% 

GTECorp 

53»a 

n/a 

53 

79 

RCA Cap 
RymdsMet 

63% 

49% 

62'i 

49 

Am Cynm'd 
AmEiPwr 

68', 

28 

70V, 

277, 

Gen Dymca 
GanEfeanc 

is 

78% 

85% 

78 

Rocxwefl Int 
Royal Dutch 

47% 

72 

47** 

73% 

Am Express 

68S 

68% 

Gan Inst 

18% 

19K 

XTt 

37'* 

Am Home 

7S:e 

79ii 

Gen Mils 

74% 

75% 


60% 

59% 

Am Hospital 

n/a 

n/a 

Gen Motors 

BS% 

B8J» 

SFESopac 

37% 

39 Vi 

Am Motors 

4\ 

44< 

GnPbUtny 

(94, 

19'* 

5CM 

75 

74% 

AmSfnrd 

45 

48 

Genesco 


4 

Sctilberger 

31 ! * 

32% 

AmTeieph 

22'# 

22'-; 

Georgia Pac 

32% 

Scon Paper 

60’s 

60 

Amoco 


S9\ 

GHlete 

87'. 

87% 

Seecram 

52% 

52 

Aimco Steel 

It'S 

10> 

Goodrich 

45 

47 


4«¥-. 

50% 

Asarco 

2Sh 

224* 

Goodyear 

3Sh 

35% 

Shell Trans 

4S!i 

46% 

Ashland Oil 

51>* 

554# 

27^* 

27'i 


5*’* 

52** 

Ai Richfield 

51*i 

52 *# 


52 

53% 


91 

90% 

Avon Prods 

33 

33 V, 

Gt Ati&Tac 

24'g 

24 

Sony 

Sth Cal Ed 

21% 

21 ’» 

BkrsTstNY 

473, 

47* 

GThnd 

36'* 

37% 

31% 

31'* 

Bankamar 

16'* 

16* 

GrumanCor 

S7H 

27 

Sperry Coro 
SldOilOtvo 

51% 

511. 

Bkol Baton 


T7'\ 

Gulf 8 West 

58% 

59% 

44 li 

44'# 

Bank of NY 

65'/, 

04»» 

Hama HJ. 

39% 

39% 

Starting Dra 
Stevens Jf* 

46 

44 j b 

BaalraeRde 

49W 

49h 

Hercules 

48% 

<7V 

35% 

38% 

Beth Sum 

IIP, 

20% 

HTett-Pkrd 

44 

43S 

Sun Comp 

49 

48 s . 

Booing n/a 

BseCaacde S6'» 

57 '4 
57* 

Honeywel 

1C Ind* 

71% 

4S>* 

71% 

46% 

Taledyne 

Tenneco 

341 

36% 

342% 

38 s # 

Brden 

6 1%, 

61% 

ingwooB 
mfend Steel 

66 Vi 

66% 


30 

30% 

Bg Werner 
Srist Myers 

30-V, 

30K 

26% 

27% 

Texas ECor 

33 r > 

33% 

/b’r 

75% 

IBM 

151% 

149% 

Takes Inal 

118% 

122 

BP 

33b 

33% 

IntHarvtr 



Texas Utis 

33* 

33’a 

BuiTton Ind 

39 'i 

39% 

INCO 

IS 3 * 

Textron 

64% 

64% 

BuriKHiNtn 

75'* 

77 J » 

mt Paper 
bit Tel Tel 

61% 

6l 7 * 

TravireCor 

Sb'R 

58». 

Burroughs 

CmptooiSp 

66 Y. 

BSh i 

47'* 

47 s * 

TRW Inc 

102% 

101 

56 

55% 


547, 

54% 

UAL Inc 

58% 

57 s * 

Can Pacific 

14K 

14 3 # 

Jhnsn&Jtm 

573* 

57 Vi 

UnHeverNV 

157% 

159% 

CaferpUjer 

53«- 

53 

Kaoer Alum 

TP* 

23 

On Carbide 

21% 

22K 

Cetarrese 

196/, 

138 


n-s 

28H 

UnPacCcr 

54 '4 

54% 

Cemraisw 

3V* 

31% 

KmbTyOrfc 

86 

66 

Uid Brands 

?4% 

24 s * 

Champion 

29'a 

26% 

KMart 

44% 

43% 

USSdsel 

22% 

22 's 

CnawMen 

46b 

4S 7 # 

Kroger 

LT . V.Corp 

47% 

48X 

Utt Techno! 

53 r w 

53% 

Ohm 8k NY 

M'* 

55% 

e% 

B’e 

Unocal 

19’# 

20% 

Chevron 

36’/, 

37%! 

Litton 

84% 

n/a 

Jim Walter 

S7»a 

50% 

Chrysler 

44 

62% 

Lockheed 

58 

n/a 

Wmsr LmM 

SS% 

57 

Citicorp 

Clark efftap 

Kb« 

»’* 

53'.; 

23 

Lucky Sirs 
Man H'nver 

267, 

55’* 

n £% 

Wefts Forgo 
Wstgtise a 

67% 

64% 

87% 

31 s * 

Coca Cola 

105 '4 

106 

MamnlleCp 

8'* 

e 

Waveroser 

38 s ! 

37% 


37 X 

33 


37% 

36% 

Whirlpool 

67% 

67/, 

CBS 

147 

147 

Manna Mid 

52% 

5114 

Woohwcnh 

76 

76V4 

Ctmbla Gas 

3B*t 

38% 

Mri Marietta 

43% 

43% 

Xerox Corp 

67’* 

66 

Cmb'tn Eng 
Comwttn Ed 

35 ? * 

35'* 

Masco 

57'. 

68% 

Zon*3i 

2b 

24 s # 

3SU 

34% 

McDonnell 

ff(% 

86% 




Cons Edls 

45»* 

42% 

Mead 

48'* 

49% 




Cn Net Gas 

S1»* 

51 >* 

Merck 

174% 

169 

CANADIAN PRICF3 

Cons Power 

13’* 

13% 

Minsta Mng 

105% 

icb 3 * 




Cntri Data 

24i* 

23’, 

Mobil Oil 

28 ie 

29 

Abittji 

?4% 

25 

Coming Gl 

75%, 

74% 

Monsamo 

62% 

63 1 * 

Aten Alum 

44'# 

n/a 

CPC bra 

tfl°« 

63 "a 

Morgan J.P. 

78% 

78'# 

AfgomaSfl 

BeSTsle 

18Ji 

18*« 

Crane 

47 

47% 

Motorola 

443* 

44% 

■s 

n/a 

Cm Zeller 

46'H 

4trS 

NCRCorp 

43% 

42’. 

CanP30fic 

n/a 

DartS Krott 

51 K 

51’, 

NLMdstrs 

14% 

14% 

Commco 

12% 


Deere 

34K 

34 V; 

NatCtetfrfl 

43K 

44 J , 

Con Batfirst 

27-Vr 

n/a 

Delta Air 

44:1 

44% 

Nat Med Era 

24% 

24% 

Gulf CM 

■Sn 


Detroit Ed 

irt'.i 

1fl% 

Net&mcnat 

13% 

13>i 

HXr/SdCan 

26 

Digital Eq 

157!-. 

I5e<, 

Norfolk Sth 

«i% 

SS 

HdsnBMin 

29% 

30 

D% 

DowChem 

37 'i 

37.% 

IWBancrp 

-IS. 

38?* 

Imasco 

34 

33% 

M". 

53% 

Ocaant Pet 

24 k, 

24% 

Im aerial 01 
InFhpe 



Dresser Ind 

1» 

IIP* 

Ogden 

ObiCorp 

31’* 

32% 

41V; 

40% 

Duke Power 

4141 

41J. 

4?%t 

42% 

Mass-Ferg 

259 

254 

Du Pom 

7BW 

75 

Owens-ID 

711# 

71.% 

RyiT/ustco 

315. 


Eastern Air 

flv, 

Bh 

Pac Gas El 

22 s * 

22% 

Seagram 

73 

1, 

Eatm Kodak 

«?'/, 

63% 

Pan Am 

7 1 . 

7% 

Sjwi Co 

26-'# 

Eaton Cora 
Emerson B 

75 

74% 

PennevJ.C. 

88% 

68% 

Thmsn N A' 

78 

27 

91»b 

91% 

PannzoU 

57-» 

58% 

Wlkrrfiram 

37% 

n/a 

Evans Prod 

m 

n/a 

Pap*sco 

8S’4 

83 7 * 

WCT 

13 4 * 

nza_ 


• £» ft>. ■ M c E* MMMWL t B*. K Mam dw*d 


■S3IB. P Suck jp«t I Tiacod i UnQuabd. 


• JAMES DICKIE & COM- 
PANY: A final dividend of 
0.75p (0.5p). making a total of 
1 J5p (O.Sp) is payable for the 
year to October 31. 1985. With 
figures in £000, turnover was 
5,167 (4.261). pretax profit 51 
and attributable profit 69 (36). 
Earnings a per share were 3.72p 
(1.95 m. 


O LAURENCE GOULD & 
COMPANY: A final dividend 
of 2.2p is payable, making 3.6p 
(3.3p> tor the year to December 
31, 1985. With figures in £C00,i 
turnover was 6.255 (5.S65 ad- 
justed) and trading profit 411 
(37SJ after staff profit sharing 
scheme 73 i42». Earnings per 
share were 13.32p. 


igtr* 

NY«K 1.4820-1.4725 
Momrew Z.03TZ-Z0*B3 
Am? dam3.B56J-3.87l 4 
Brussels 69.88-70.17 
C'phaen 1L57S6.12.647S 
DUOfm 1.1287-1.1329 
Franklin 3.41 7341 4335 
Lisbon 220.47-223.00 
Madrid 214 55-215.06 
kUanU Z32ZBB-2335.0* 
Osu 10.6448-10.6884 
Pahs 10.4680-10.5430 
St'khlm 10.6448-10.7986 
Tokyo 281.16-28188 
Vienna 23.96-24.06 
Zurich 2JS688884S 


Apt* 1 

1 >1680-1.4690 

2.6J 19-2.0463 

38068-3.8714 

6997-70.17 
12.6194-12.6487 
(.1319-1 1320 

3.4289-3-4335 

221.38-223.00 

214.62-214.91 
2330-51 -3335.04 

10.6738-10.6884 

10.5145-10.5363 
10.7B1 0-1 0.7986 
281.26-261.06 
24.02-24.06 
28594-28636 


1 month 

060-057 ptpm 

fl.23-0.12prem 

2%-2prem 

2fxem-9ffls 

5-3«prem 


2K-2pfwn 

1854100 * 

15-55dts 

B-12dls 

%-IVJti 

MUdb 

itt-ttprem 

IK-lMprem 

13-1i%prem 

2-1% pram 


3 months 
l.45-V42pram 
054-a38pnsm 
SV5%prem 

18- I6pram 

ns-iO'-wam 

77-JftJdjs 

5H-5Viprwn 

400-1 170015 

B5-i80dis 

19- 27dis 
4h-6>rids 
3V5J4do 
154-lE 
4^-av 
35 V.. . 
5V4!4pnmi 


Staffing index compared with 1978 waa down at 7S8 (day's rung# 7SJS-75JI). 

Rates suppled by Bwtiays Sank HOF« and ExteL Uoyds Bank Wamafiona! 


’M&NEy-^MA 


Base Rates % 

Cfearmg Bjnka US 
Finance House 13V, 

Discount Market Loans ■% 

OveTrxgM Hah: 12'<, Low 10 
week Iftsd: 1 1% 

Treasury BBs (Discount %] 

Buying Seflmg 

2mnifi 11 '/. 2 mnifi llVu 
3mnih 10 ,3 >« 3 mnth 10" ■■ 

Prime Bank Btts (Discount %) 

1 mniti u’ J j:-ll , '» 2 mmti ii : u.ii>n 
3mmri tCP*n-io% 6mntti 51 'w- 9 -''k 

Trade BAs | Discount %) 

ImnDi 12 'j i 3 mirth 77 7 '« 
3mnth 11 ”m 6 ninth TO-^jr 

Interbank {%) 

Overnight open 12% dose 10% 

(weak IZ-TIS 6mnin 10VT0K 
imntti 11’Vllli 9mnth lOVIOli 
3 ninth 1?'w-1l*i B 12 nth lOJv-10 
Local Authority Deposits I'M 
2 days ll'.i 7 days 1154 

1 irmtti n% 3 mnth 1154 

6mmh IDS 12 mm 10 

Local Authority Bunds (%) 
imnth 12:4-12 2rnntn 12-1 1 >4 
3mntti 11 %-llft Smntti m-UA 
Smntti 11-10'/. l2mth iO'/,-1D54 
Sterling CDs (%) 

1114-11 4 


1 ninth 
6mnth 1054-10% 
Dollar CDs (%l 
1 mnth 7.35-725 
E ninth 7.10-7 JB 


3 mnth 11 '4-1154 
12mth 9'».«-9'5, e 


3 moth 720-7.15 
IZmtti 7.10-7.05 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 7%-7'n 
3 mirth Pi^T'u 
Deuts c hm a rk 
7 days 4"'ir4*n 
3 mnth 4*i*r4 T * 
French Franc 
7 days 19-17 
3 mnth 13-1214 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 3V,-3% 

3 mnth 4>.»4'>i# 
Van 

7 days 5M-SK 
3 mnth S'»,*-5'i# 


cat 
1 mnth 
fimnth 
cel 

1 ninth 
6 mnth 
call 
1 mnth 
6 mnth 
call 

1 mnth 
6 mnth 
cal 
i mntti 
6 mnth 


7% -64. 
7V75S 
7K-7 

5- i 

4".«-S*n 
4® I fir-4' .4 
B!*-8'-S 
16-155* 
10-9*. 

24,-1 54 
45*4 
3H.-./U,, 

6- 5 

5'w4<*.# 


GOLD 


Odd 5328. 00-329.00 
Krugerrand' (per comt: 

S 330.00-331.50 (£224.75-226. 
Sovereigns' (new): 

S .91 -00-02. OOK55.OB-55.7S ) 
•Excludes VAT 


ECGD 


Fixed Rate Sterling Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average reference rate lor 
interest period February 5 1986 to 
Martin 4 1986 inclusive: 12-654 per 
cent. 


Three Month Staring Open 

Sep 56 — 9 Q. 7 B 

Dec 86 - 91 .05 

Mar 67 91.11 

Previous day's total open interest 15988 
Three Month Eurodollar 


Jun 86 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

US Treasury Bond 
Jun 86 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 — 


Short Gat 

Jun 66 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 — 


9306 

93.10 

93.02 

92.69 

102-24 

102-16 

HIT 


101-40 

N/T 

Nff 


9^ 

Low 

Own 

Eat Vol 

9034 

90.42 

1996 

90.66 

30.78 

9887 

228 

91.09 

30.01 

91.09 

83 

91.17 

91.11 

91.17 

85 

Previous day's total 
99.15 93-06 

open Mterast 16914 
93.11 2730 

93.20 

93.10 

93.16 

1003 

93.07 

93.02 

93.06 

160 

92.93 

92 87 

92-94 

115 


Previous! 


104-16 

102-24 

104-03 

0532 

103-21 

102-16 

103-21 

25 



102-24 

0 

Previous day's Mai open interest 897 

101-60 

101-37 

101-65 

378 


Long Gilt 

Jun 86 127-17 

Sep 86 128-00 

Dec 86 ... _ 127-30 

Mar ST 127-25 


Previous day's oraf open Interest 9855 


FT-5E 100 

Jun 86 

Sep 86 ....... 


171.60 

N/T 


120-16 127 

128-00 127-27 

127-30 127-30 

127-26 127-26 

Previous 
173.90 171 


12845 7898 

128-28 19 

128-26 80 
12*22 16 
_ interest 1447 
17390 191 

176.40 0 


The pound improved from 
early lows yesterday and the 
dollar slipped in very quiet 
trading, although sterling re- 
mained weaker on the over- 
night level against the dollar. 
The pound also dosed above 
the worst level against the 
mark. Sterling managed to 
remain relatively steady de- 
spite oil fears as it is still 
underpinned by the level of 
British interest rates, acmrd- 
ing to observers. 


Ireland 
Singapore 
Maftywa — 

Australia 

Canaria 

Sweden 

Norway .... 


1.2970-1.3000 

2.17S5-2.17B5 

2.6020-2.6030 


- 0.72200.7230 
.» 1.3920-1.3330 
. 7 3400-7.3450 
72650-7^700 


Denmark &S925-&5975 

West Germany - 23300-23310 

Switzerland 13466-1.9465 

Netherlands 2.62S5-2.6280 

Ranee 7.1500-7.1550 

Japan 177.75-17735 

1583.0-1585.0 
. 47.6247.67 




Hong Kong . 
Portugal-- 
Spem 
Austria 


7.8116-7 31 25 
150.50-15230 
146.15-14635 
1038-16.40 


OTHER STERLING RATES 

Argentina austral* 1.1724-1.1747 

Australis doftar 20325-23368 

Bahrain dinar , 03505-03545 

Brazil cruzado * 20.18-2030 

Cyprus pound 0.7520-0.7620 

Finland marka 7.6270-7.6670 


Greece tfaanma . 


21050-21230 


Hong Kong dollar 114865-11.4981 

India rupee 16.09-1839 




KuwatfdmarKD . 
Malays ladolsr „ 

Mexico peso. 


0.42404 
33238-33278 I 
^■680-730 


New Zealand doBar 2.7031 -2.7150 

SawS Arabia riyal — _ 5.3235-53635 

Smgapore dollar 3.1990-33028 

South Afnca rend 3.1320-3.1476 

U AEdMuun 53535-53836 


LONDON OOaUOOffY 
EXCHANGE 

Soyabean meat, coffee and 
cocoa ln£ par tonne; 
Oss-oil end sugar In US! 
friufi t o nw a. 

ff W Mum socles report 


&=r: 

COFFEE 

- 


July 

Sept 

Nov 


Jon—, 
March . 


May — 

Vat 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
Unofficial prices 
Offtctt Turnover figures 

Pries tnt par metric toms 
SHverm pence par trey «mee 

RudeH WriM i CaLkL report 

COPPER HKW GRADE 

Cash 974-975 

Three months 


Vol 

Z/Dt 

STANDARD CATHODES - 

Cash 

970-072 

Three Months 



Vol 


TM 





LEM 

. 250-251 

Three Months 
WM 


12511 

Tone 

„ Bursty Steady 


2Mt STANDARD 

Cash — 

Three Months 

Vest. 


407412 


Tone — — 

ZINC HIGH GRADE 

Cash 1 442-443 

Three Months — 45434543 

Voi 2850 

Tone Barely Swariy 

SSLVERLMOE 

Cash 3393-34(3 

Three Months 349-351 

Vol NH 

Tone MM 


SILVER SMALL. 

Cash — 33933413 

Three Vtomha 345<J51 

Vol (W 

Tons — — Us 


SEAT AND LIVESTOCK 
C O M MISSIO N 
Average tram* pricosst 

reurea aoaBvmarimMon 

Spiit 

GEeCstOe. 9t3fip per kg lw 


Sheep 252-140 pw *5 ast 
cwl+1130 

GBs^S. 7541 p per Wgtw 

•aaWstes: ; 

IPOS, up 114%, 8VB. 


Cuttio nos. flown 16-7%, svb. 
9936p(+1.®SJ 
no*, down 43%. sve. 
24736p(+iaoq 
nas- up 8.4 *V. sve. 
price, 7832p(+2.41J 


LONDON GRAM FWURE5 
Zpartorme . . 


Month 

May 

M,. 

sept 

Nov 

Jan 

March 

Volume: 

Wheat. 


Close Close 
11855 116.10 

12035 

10055 99.00 

10335 10230 

10530 10556 

109.85 10830 

T58 


75 

MEAT FUTURES 
wmuac 


1023 
1023 
1010 
102-8 
1023 
1073 
1103 
1113 
10SJ3 
1023 
Vot B 


LONDON MEAT FUnflSS 
EXCHANGE 
Be«f Cohcsct 

. P-{*£**3 ^ 

M*«h open^ Orae, 

iMfl 194.0 2130 

URCjTod unq (ad 


jtfy 

Aiig- 

Sep* 


tjai m 

unqtod ifeo 
unq tad unq ted 
una ttd unq led 
Vpl-0 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 
£ per tonne 

Moms 0 p» Goes 
April 1063 104.40 

tV 12460 124.70 

Nov S3.6C 8330 

F«0 8950 9130 

Aprt 10830 10370 

VoL 1670 


OVXftwJgM Futon* Ltd 


T^S^LCI 


Gtase 
7550 

Jut 86 7193710.0 7103 

OCt 86 8173-815.0 8133 

JS« 67 83533300 835.0- 

«(J 

Ju>87 — ■ 8125 

0387 89L0 

Jan 88 9103 

SP0C73E5 
VcT 211 lots 


TAMGER REPORT 

Apr 86 % 

May 88 - 7 BQ 379 Q 3 7*73 . 

Jun 36 78037803 7603 d 1 

Sep 88 9875 

Dec 86 — 9655 

Mars? 9983 

Vot 72 lea 
opemmarestss 

Spot raricet CDomenwiy: 

Tsnkgr index: 

8895 flown 263 
Max: 
down 15 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


14S 
182 
230 

320 

C f k s w Hons a*S 

z. 

>w a g* > Sw m oofl 

kwCui 27* 

Japan Aaaaw 58 

IS* DWMRM 228 

Ion UaKMR Sao 8> - 
Lon TOW 87 

ManAqntt t£> 

Morfa VU 

Murray fexxana U3 

Umray toe 103 

Murray Smas 278 

Mans* Wean 3BB 

Naw court 433 

Now Oaaan 00 32 

187 

me 83 575 

M 

AfcncSac 3zr 

Sm Aasata 87 

NOai Amar 335 

OuMCIl 177 

Paufie AaaaB 72 

Do Wnn 87 

hreorei Aaaaa 37 

Raeburn 3M 

RMar & Mate 184 

Rtvar Pton 232 

nobaoo 288 

Romeo 206 

Romney - 293 

FtonMo 03 

Si MOM 133 

Senna 342 

Scot awicw 303 

Scot Eflsram in 

Sen V 503 

5c« r« 287 

Scot Mare 'A' 413 

Second nflanea B60 

Bae » BcMand 1SB 


• +3 

• +2 


AS ZB Si A 
14.5 43 3&J0 

40 as ma 
33 13D8J 
51 22 033 

2a aa .. 
63 M 
V _ 

133' 43 222 

8J* 1-4 BOa 

ts ft™ 

SO 3S273 

ritU 53 313 
340 1.8 mz 
7.7n 5.0 283 
7,1b 44 343 
33TI 14 .. 
rojffl 27 ea a 
204 47 30.0 
OS 1.7 SU 

5.7 10 384 
42B 73 203 
(.1 04 .. 

43 15 31.1 
fl.? 10 77.8 

7.7 £3 812 

44 25 613 

13 14 88.7 

03 05 I! 

15.0 33403 

u urn 

12.1 45 232 


• 4-1 7.1 24 482 

• -4T 41 XS 453 

40 85 25800 

• *3 9.7b 32 <34 

•+1 23 23 685 

*3 10.7b 21 GLO 

4-1 83 24 517 

.. 253 8.12IJ.7 

• *6 2Mn 17318 

42 83b 42894 


tag is 


22ft 202 


101 BO 


M3 113 


He 140 


lift SO'j 


174 OS 


184 135 


305 ZP 


35B 300 


ttj J57V 


HI 112 


93 73 


2T7 


2te 181 


330 


79 

mtasir S' 
to cay o * in, akn2o 
TRtKfSQw W 
23 Nani rm 2M 
m No*i Ammea 27 
tg PacWoBaMn . 133 

gffg -& 

T tnogu or to n 298 
TtawSacMd Crease 
Tmna Otam MB 
Trew .188 

tfeMMMc' 93 

U8 DabaOM*- 

aasr *" § 

WMadsant Bwrgy SO 


• « 

+« 

+1 

*9 

-4 

4-} 

42 

• -42 

• 40 

-»• 


«4« 


12b 25 434 
05 15 .. 

3.1 35 293 

95b 47 318 
tt«) £7 321 
107 50 274 

23b 27 422 
14 03 .. 

51 32 408 
25 £2 81.7 
Ub 85 892 
75 45237 . . 

115 45 354 

AS 4547.1 W 
35. 2f 913 
147 Hft 33 
05 35 470 
22b 43 421 

22 24 495 

23 35404 
41 20 722 
an 4.1 345 


RNANC1AL TRUSTS 


700 530 

S i 35*. 
> 91 
49 21 

159 133 
18 13S 

17»i 12S 

158 131 
102 90 

247 187 
90 63 

680.375 
32, 77 
102 86 
1S'i9B0 
188 183 
440 320 
860 MO 
3*9 204 
00 78 

tte'isS 


Atom 




Arum 


£47 

»0-i 

21 

147 

WIN 

£«* 

IW 

at 

222 


+10 

♦1 

• *2h 


*i 

•+i 


Atadl 

Goode 

Itonda i 


IW 


» « 


■CM 
MAI 
MAO 

UkuM Hoqm 
Paote bar Ha 
- Do Wanann 
6mMi aramare 


E14’. 

MS 

440 

too 

3M 

98 

23*9 

M3 


••a 

• 4-10 


*a*i 


255 2A 195 

14 25 324 
.. a .. S6J 
85 41 195 
.833 >3124' 
813 45125 
5.4 13384 
4.0 43 117 
50 27 M3 

35 U 163 

sr-8i9 

2(4- 27 20 
183 85 84 

05 05825 

<C> 45 225 


COPIER WILL 


In our book a copier that’s always out of order, 
is definitely out of order. 

Which is why you will find our range more 
reliable than most. 

Our paper paths are short and straight. So 
our copiers have an appetite for work, 
not paper. And our liquid crystal 


display is one feature other copiers have had to copy. 

It can stop operator errors turning into 
problems by giving you all the information you need 
to keep in control. 

So if you want to start seeing less of your copier 
| mechanic, we suggest you see more of 








liifc i iM£S WEDNESDAY APRIL i m6 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY* 


19 


2 : 


• • .* 

*?«. v 


C 


TEMPUS 



3 




its 






Doing business with IBM can 
be a mixed Messing. Atlantic 
Computers, which yesterday 
announced profits of £17.1 
.million before tax. up from 
£10.3 million, has clearly 
benefited from -the cormeo- 
tton in the past. Over half of 
tet year's profit came from 
IBM-related business, specifi- 
cally the supply of IBM 

.computer systems on long 
leases. - 

The other side of the coin is 
. that Atlantic can hardly tail 
to be .hfc by- the expected 
slowdown in IBM business in 
the second and third quarters 
of this year. It is confident, 
however, of a recovery to- 
wards the end of the year. 

Atlantic claims that' the 
effect of the current round of 

IBM price CUtS is mar ginal 
but in the long term they 
must tend to make customers 
increasingly reluctant to take 
up long leases from Atlantic 
when . there is a likelihood 
that by the end of the lease 
prices on the open : market 
will have fallen significantly. 

This means that progress in 
the future could he slower. 
This year will not have the . 
benefit of 12 orders for large 
computer systems, based -on 
the new IBM Sierra proces- 
sor, as did last year. There 
will, however, be growth 
overseas following die start of 
an American operation and 
an increased contribution 
from .the newly acquired 
British distributor to Digital 
Equipment Corporation.' In 
addition, the company, hopes 
to make two or three 
acquisitions. 

Increasing diver s i fi c ati on 
makes Atlantic less reliant on 
IBM and reduces the propor- 
tion of profits coming from 
the company's residual inter- 
ests in leased computers. last 
year this fell dramatically 
from 60 per cent to 12 per 
cent after provisions, bin. 
next year the proportion 
should rise again to about 25 
per cent 

The general trend, howev- 
er, is towards better quality 
earnings. With that in mind a 
multiple of just seven tones 
earnings, assuming profits of 
£23 million m 1986. with the 
shares at 295ft looks fair. 

McKeduue Bros/ 
Newman Tonks 



The gloves are off attest in 
the takeover bidV.zby 
McKechme Brothers for the 
Newman Tonks Gronp.bTbe 
offer closes oh Sunday. . A 
public row about. 'Newman 
Tonks’s American turnover : 


was followed last week by 
claims 'and counterclaims 
about McKechhie’s first-half 
profits. -. 

l ‘B ut, white the temperature 
■ has risen, Newman Tonks 
shares have stock at around 
1 39p, 1 lp below the value of 
the shares-jrfus-cash offer and 
comfortably above the I34p 
cash alternative. 

At this- level Newman 
Tonks is seeking to assure 
" shareholders that the increase 
in the share price— it was 98p 
■. before the first offer — repre- 
sents* genuine rerating. In an 
unusual move, the joint bro- 
kers to foe company. Fi eld i n g 
Newson-Smitb and Albert E 
Sharp, havewrfaen to share- 
hokters, claiming that the 
share price should not fen if 
the bid foils. There are also 
confident mutterings about 
the ease — and profit — with 
which McKeduue could un- 
load its 15 per cent stake. 

On foe forecast 25 per cent 
increase in pretax profits for 
the year to October, Newman 
Tonks issdling on 11.6 times 
prospective - earnings.. After 
an no inspiring, dividend 
record over the past few years 
• — albeit partly because New- 
man Tonks never cut its 
payout during the difficult 
early 80s— shareholders have 
been promised a 30 per cent 
increase, which means a yidd 
of more than 7 percent With 
the full benefits of last year’s 
Cartwright acquisition stiff to 
come, 1987 profits of around 
£lf) million wonid push the 
p/e below 10 l 

On the question of indus- 
trial logic, the two companies 
have adopted different strate- 
gies over the past few years. 
While Newman. Tonks has 
shifted its business away 
from semi-finished goods and 
into higher margin branded 
products, McKechnic has 
concentrated on high volume 
plastics, metals and com- 
modities where price is all 
important At the time of the 
first offer Newman Tonks 
had become a forgotten 
.slock, and McKedmie identi- 
fied a potentially cheap way 
to expand info related value- 
added areas.; 

The bid kfoks set to foil, 
and rightly so at this price, 
but it served its prime pur- ... 
pose for McKechme — de- 
flecting ‘ the Williams 
Holdings; bid:. For Newman 
Tonks the higher profile in / 
foe City over tire past week 
has won .tire compaxtyoew 
friends. • * 

it only remains for" : 
McKechnie shareholdm to.r 
-wouder whether it was sensi- 
•bte foblbdclhe wnffamsTHtf 


by giving the go-ahead for a 
takeover offer which never 
seemed to get off the ground. 

Brammer 

Brammer shareholders de- 
serve to be rewarded for their 
loyalty.: Last simmer they 
rejected a 420p-a-share cash 
oner from Buirrl, only to see 
their shares fell to 280p. Since 
then they have climbed fairly 
steadily but at yesterday’s 
price of 373p there is still 
some way to go. 

While the figures for 1985 
confirm that the company 
has made steady progress, 
foot give no grounds for an 
early bounce in the share 
price. Profits were up from 
£1(X2 million to £1 3.6 million 
before tax. That compares 
with a forecast, made as part 
of the bid defence, for £12 
million for the original group 
plus an annual contribution 
of £4 million before financing 
costs from Energy Services *. 
Electronics. 

' ESE was included for only 
six months so the outcome 
was roughly in line with the 
forecasts It would have been 
better if ESE had not suffered 
from the general electronics 
malaise towards the end of 
the year. 

White 1986 will have tire 
benefit of a 12-month contri- 
bution' from ESE, albeit of 
possibly less than £4 million, 
it w01 suffer from the sale of 
two companies to Readicut 
for £6.1 million. These con- 
tributed £1.44 million above 
the line last year and £2.4 
million below the litre by way 
of a profit on disposal 
The company says that 
there is plenty of scope for 
improvement within the ex- 
isting businesses. It is looking 
for improvement from foe 
traditional bearings distribu- 
tion busmess and from foe 
newer electronics compo- 
nents operation. For the mo- 
ment . acquisitions have 
second priorty although, with 
net debt of only £4 million, 
there islitdem the way of a fi- 
nancial rn ratrain t 

Shareholders might like to 
be reassured about ESE*s 
contribution before more 
shares are issued fin* an 
acquisition. It accounts for 29 
per cent of the equity, but it is 
probably contributing rather 
less in foe way of profits and 
earnings. Until it is seen to be 
doing belter than ibis share- 
holders will continue to ques- 
tion their collective wisdom 
in i effectively rej ecting 
BunzPs bid in fevour of the 
acquisition of ESE. . 


: . i 7* • STAFFORDSHIRE 

V* ;;jPOTTERIES (HOLDINGS* 
■ • ■' Interim dividend lJ3p (lp). 
; With figures in . £000, pretax 
profit for the six mouths to 
. .-a: October 31 was 678 (651). 

■ * . Earnings per share basic 7.7p 
(6.3), fuDy diluted 5.4p{4J5). 


.‘L* 


.A 

. -5 


-- ft 



"T ENis^Yrfbechanxoan, MrT 
IrM.Bissrt.Tjsaid.xhai foe collar 


'iT in prices was likely to lead to 
v ..n decrease in- 1986 revenues and 
v would. result in cuts In esptora- 
C tion' programmes, skiwing the 

* discovery rate of reserves. 

Z?9 ELECTROLUX: The bid to 

acquire White Cons was con- 
.ditiooal'on lhe owners of at least . 
million shares accepting the 
% offer by March 28. The owners 
' of 10.9 million shares had by 
T Man* 26 accepted the offer, 
~ which ensured its success. . 

UN IDA RE: Allied Irish 
-T Investment Bank is placing 
-> 6.28 1 million Unidare ordinary 
^ shares (66 per cent) at 175p a 
*-V share with Dublin institutional 

* * investors. Alcan has disposed of 

its entire stake. ; 

-•MARTIN CURRIE PA- 
' 71C1E1C TRUST: The directors 
: - have recommended a dividend 
of 0.45p net per share for the 
period ended February 28. Divi- 
dend reflects foe high, level of 
interest on cash deposits await- 
ing investment during foe ear- 
lier part of the period, which can 
' be regarded as exceptional This 
year's dividend does not neo- 

* essarily reflect the level of fiitrne 
Z- payments. Pretax profit 

,£127,987. Earnings, per share 

• CONSOLIDATED GOLD 
;=• FIELDS:'. Agreement has been 

ir foe i 





4 signed for foe issue fry GWjd 
Finance BV ofSwFri65 
' million 5-1/8 per cent bonds 
! 1996 under foe guarantee 01 
•^Consolidated Gold Fields at 
2* 1 09-1/4 per cert. . 

■'* • FIFE iNDMARs The chair- 
man. Mr G A H Hepburn, saw 
t“foal although foe products fo- 
vision had a stow start, ne 
^expected efltetr «T 
lotion to show m foe seamohah. 

The marine market showed no 
listen of improvement in torwro- 
*>able futpre, but modest 
improvement could be expected 
frmn. ironmongery. PTOspect^m 


COMPANY NEWS 


foe components division looted 
encouraging. ■ 

• RAMUS HOLDINGS In- 
terim dividend 1.5p (same) 
With figures, in £000, profit 
before tax-. for. half year to 
January 6 was 78 (108). Profit 
after tax i 33 (109). Earnings per 

• FrIsjbSaKE FOODS: : 
Company -has acquired Prior 
-Fwm -Fbods ■ for in- initial 

. consideration of £700,000 with 
an additional consideration of 
up to £1 £120.00 0. 

• LEX SERVICE: Company 
has sold business and certain 
assets- and liabilities of Lex 
Systemtine, its cootrart distribu- 
tion- business, to Lex Wilkinson, 
a subsidiary of Federal Express 
Corporation, for about £3.6 
million rash. Company retains 
ownership of the trade* debtors, 
which amount to “about £1.6 
miflion and wiff be collected by. 
Lex Wilkinson on its b ehalf. 

• desoutter brothers 
(HOLDINGS): Dividend 4.8p 
(4.3), making 73p (6-46). With 

-figures- in. £000, trading profit 
before tax for 1985 was 4,706 
(4v543X tax 732 (1.597) indad- 
ma credit from deferred rax 
nSrve 1,004 (463). Profit after 
tax 3,974 (Z946). Bunings per 
share 32. Mp (24.08). The 
chairman is confident the com- 
pany will make further progress 
in 1986. 

• THE COUNTRY 

GENTLEMEN'S ASSOCI T 
ATION: The boards , of Fred- 
ericks Place Group and the 
OGA say that terms have been 
agreed for an offer to be made 
for CGA The offervfflbe made 
on behalf of a new holding 
company,; Fredericks Place 
Holdings,- which wiB mate 
ashnultaneous offer tor FPG- 
TheCGA board unanimously 
recommends the cash 
alternative. 

• DOMINION INTER- 
NATIONAL GROUP:The 
company has . purchased foe 

outstanding 25 per cent of foe 

issued share capital of Guardian 
Property Management not dr 
ready owned for about £i-& 

• RELIANT MOTOR: BMjp- 
dustries has been unsuccesrful 
inraising foe finance teqn 116 ® 10 


complete foe ^reemeut with 
Reliant Motor to acquire the 
manufacturing rights for the 
Scimitar GTE/OTRC for 
£500,000. The company is 
considering alternative pro- 
posals for the disposal of the 
rights.: 

• RUGBY PORTLAND CE- 
MEND.Gockburn Cement final 
dividend 5.75c (5-25) for 1985. 
Frames in fOOOs. Trading sur- 
plus.. 15,401 (13,403X less in- 
terest 871 (820), dept 
3,679 (3.792). tax 4,537 

• COMMON BR — . - 

Year to June 30, 1985, no 
dividend (same), figures in 
£000. Pretax loss 26,274 
(20,082). Loss per share 4lgp 
(28 lp). . . 

• GOAL PETROLEUM: 
Tbecompany is to acquire Third 
Triton Petroleum whose prin- 
cipal asset is a 0-5 per cent 
interest in the Claymore oil 
field. 

• CITY. & ■ FOREIGN 
INVESTMENT: Harvard 
Securities intends to make an 
offer to acquire all of the 
ordinary shares " it does not 
already own. 

• CCA GALLERIES: With fig- 
ures in £000, turnover rose to 
3.551 (2,948), gross profit to 
1,972 (1,595) and pretax profit 
was up 29.7 percent to 432 (33). 
Earnings per share were 7.1p 

• EMBSS LIGHTING: A divi- 
dend of 3Jp ma king 5.5p, 
payable , on May 24, has been 
declared for the year ending 
December 31. With figures in 
£000, turnover rose to 30,679 
(22,160) and profit after tax u> 
X018 . (1.406). Earnings per 

share were up to 14J3p (i 1 .4pV 

• GLAND FIELD LAW- 
RENCE: Turnover for 1985 
(comparisons amended and fig- 
ures in £000) was down to 
10579 (19.364). Pretax profit 
was 25 (251 loss). Earnings per 
Share beforeextraordinary items 
wereO-3pO&tossL 

• ROTAFLEX: A final divi- 
dend of 3.6p mala 
for 1985 has been — 

With figures in £000. turnover 
was up to 50,056 (41,'”'' 

aridgross profit to 21, 

(17.748X Pretax profit rose to 
3,182 (2,757) 


BASE 

lending 

RATES 


ABN — 

Adam & Company 
BCC1- 


Citibank Savingst — 
ConsoTidafed Crds.- 
Commertiaf T«^— 
CcHjperathe Bank— 
C. Hoara & Co— 

L Loyds Bank 

Nat Westiratister ~~ 
Royti Baft of Scotland 

TSB 

CMank NA 


_12»% 
tllB* 

1134% 

11tt% 

.ii»% 


f MuMff hietee. 


Investor fuels bid talk 


fnm Oar Corespondent, 
New Yoii 


Mr Alan Ckffe, a Loralon- 
tesed investor, has raised his 
stake in a US pharrnacetm- 
calcompany, fuelling specula- 
tion that itmay be a potential 
takeover taraet 

Rorar, a Pennsylvania con- 
cern thalhas acquired 
Revlon's prescription dn^5 

bSness from 

has been the sul»ect of t^ce- 
over speculation 
°MrTto«smdhehadrai^ 

his sake in J 3 t ^T 

cent from 9 percent and that 
he had formed a partnership 
with a dissident Rorer share* 
bolder from Flonda. 


Mr Eugene Dooner, a 
nvalof foe Rorer manage- 
ment, is said to hold 2per cent 

Mr Clore bas a reputation 
for seeing a company's value 
before others do and revesting 
in Stocks just before a takeover 
bid is launched. He bought 
heavily into Revlon just be- 
fore the Pantry Ride takeover 
last year. 

Mr Gore said m his filing 
with the Securities mid Ex- 
change Commission that two 
of his companies. Nerval and 
Manor Inc of Panama, and 

NMlPartners of Geneva, both 

owned the shares in Rorer. 


Financial 
services 
gear up 
for PEPs 

By Richard Thomson 
Banking Correspondent 

Then are signs that some 
financial services companies 
in the City are already gearing 
op to offer Personal Equity 
Plans, outlined in the Budget, 
as soon as the scheme comes 
into operation in January 
1987. 

The PEP scheme has been 
widely criticized as offering 
insufficient tax incentives to 
attract investors and has pro- 
voked scepticism from finan- 
cial services companies which 
doubt drey can offer schemes 
on a profitable basis. 

Details of the scheme have 
yet to be worked oat by foe 
Government, bat so far the 
plan is to offer capital gains 
and investment tax relief on 
investm e n ts within a PEP. 

Fidelity International, foe 
imit trust and in vestment man- 
agement group, however, has 
already outlined plans for the 
possible shape of a PEP. 

Mr Alan A i n sw orth, Fideli- 
ty hrt»rMftomir 8 marketing 
director, said yesterday: “We 
before we can ran schemes on 
our computer system, which 
already exists to sen-fee our 
Other waimympnt 

activities, and make money on 
PEPS. 

“We are working on the 
assumption that unit and in- 
vestment trusts will be extend- 
ed as vehicles for PEPs. What 
the Government is aiming for 
is direct eqmty investment by 
indiridBals with the intermedi- 
ation of investment vehicles.*' 
Mr Ainsworth said the 
scheme would work on a 
pooled basis, rather fike unit 
trust s , and thus benefit from 
cheaper bulk purchases. “We 
would receive "wrtiiy contri- 
butions and pool them. 

“We would then immed- 
iately invest the money in a 
range of stocks which would go 
into each investor’s PEP on a 
pro rata basis.** Each plan 
would probably have around 
30 blue chip stocks in it — 
slightly fewer than in a trust 
but enough to spread foe risk. 

“Our research suggests that 
people would like actively 
managed discretionary 
portfolios,** Mr A i ns w orth 
said. “The anasal manage- 
ment charge is likely to be less 
than foe 1 per cent traditional- 
ly charged on unit trusts, bat it 
is hard to say exactly bow 
mach less at this stage. It 
depends what other services 
are iaduded, such as regular 
portftdie valuations/* 

These would also be a Curly 
low mrainnnn investment. 

He added that PEPs were 
likely to become popular, not 
because of the tax benefits bat 
because they wonkl give foe 
investment industry a market- 
foens la selling to the 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Shares climb back over 1 ,400 ,i ^ 


After a sluggish start share 
prices began to climb again 
yesterday, with the FT 30- 
share index going back above 
1400. 

The index rose by 112 
points to close at 14022 and 
the FT-SE index of 100 shares 
gained 15.2 at 1684.0. 

The backlog of weekend 
press comment kept specula- 
tive investors busy. Trading, 
however, was fitiriy light, 
many dealers apparently ex* 
tending their holiday break. 

Gilts advanced a full point, 
both at the longer end and in 
index-linked stocks, as the US 
long bond went higher amid 
hopes of a further cut in the 
federal reserve discount rate. 

Leaders gained as much as 
10p. Exceptionally, Thorn 
EMI increased 20p to 51 9p as 
the company offered a stake in 
its Inmos subsidiary to Japa- 
nese concern Matsushita. 

British Telecom, on the day 
the shares went fully paid, 
added 5p to 266p. Vickers put 
on 10p to 493p; Bine Circle 


went ahead 8p to 671p and 
Boots 8p to 274p. Beet ham, 
after press comment, was 5p 
higher at 366p. 

Affied-Lyons, on acquisi- 
tion news, fell 7p to 3 Ip. 

Speculative favourite of the 


day was Pflkington, a regular 
subject of bid gossip, up 25p to 
470p. 

Building shares showed 
some good advances, with 
Amec up 3p to 267p ahead of 
results tomorrow. SGB, on 




EQUITIES 

Abbott M V (IfiOpl 225 
Ashley (L) (135p) 220 +10 

BPP ddp) 190 

Brookmount (I60p) 182 

Chart FL (86p) 93 

Chancery Secs (63p) 78 

Conv 8% A 2000 ESI’s+l* 
Cranswick M (95p) 105 

Dialene (I28p) 190 

Ferguson (J) (10p) 31 : 2 +*2 

Gold Gm Trot (165p) 188 

Grarryte Surface (56p) 80 +2 
Inoco (55p) 39 -3 

JS Pathology (I80p) 276 

Jarvis Porter (105p) 133 +3 

Klearlold (1l8p) 113-2 

Lexicon (115p) 

Macro 4 (105p) 140 

Mari vale M (I15p) 144 

Norank Sys (90p) 105 +3 

Realty Useful (330p) 338 -3 


SAC Inti (lOOp) 

SPP (125p) 
Templeton (2l5p) 
Sigmex (i0lp) 
Snowdon & B (97p) 
Spice (80p) 

Tech Comp (130p) 
s (180p) 


139 
155-2 
228 -2 
81 +1 
118 
96 
204 

Underwoods (I80p) 183 -2 

Wellcome (120p) 230 410 

W York Hosp (90p) 78 

Wtckes (I40p) 170-1 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

Cullens rfP 
Hartwells N/P 
NMW Comp F/P 
Porter chad F/P 
Safeway UK 
Wates F/P 
Westland F/P 
(Issue price in brackets). 


70 

a* 

103 
£49 +1 
153 +1 
83 


press comment, put on 30p to 
372p. 

Engineering shares firmed 
ahead of their dividend sea- 
son. Smiths Industries, which 
declarer its interim on April 9, 
was up 6p to 325p and 
Glvnwed, with results next 
Monday, was up 1 7p to 379p. 

Stores were in demand. 
Among the better rises were 
Burton ahead 14p to 342p, 
Combined English 5p to 265p 
and Gus A up 35p to I022p. 

On the bid front, Imperial 
Group gained 4p to 348p. 
Argyll pul on 7p to 348p; lhe 
company yesterday started a 
court action aimed at blocking 
the Guinness bid for 
Distillers. 

The Express deal helped 
United Newspapers to a 32p 
rise at 355p. 

Oils were dull as the price of 
erode fell below $10 a barrel. 
BP was down 3p to 555p. 

Among companies report- 
ing. Emess Lighting advanced 
26p to 320p. after announcing 
profits up 5 1 per cent 


Competition shake-up call 
for consulting engineers 


By Derek Harris 
Industrial Editor 

Consulting engineers serv- 
ing the construction industry 
should change their rules to 
promote greater competition 
and freer advertising. Sir Gor- 
don Borne, Director General 
of Fair Trading, has urged. 

His challenge to the Associ- 
ation of Consulting Engineers, 
one of the leading professional 
bodies, has come in a wide- 
ranging report on the advertis- 
ing and charging rules of 
professions serving the con- 
struction industry. The profes- 
sions include architects, 
quantity surveyors and profes- 
sional engineers. 

After an investigation by 
the Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission there was agree- 
ment that there should be 
more competition, although 
some professions still have 
recommended fee scales in- 
stead of the old mandatory 
ones. Advertising is freer but 
still suffers from some restric- 
tions in some cases. 

The ACE which has about 
1,200 individual members 
from 600 consulting engineer 
practices, was told in Sir 
Gordon's report that it should 
change one of its roles of 
professional conduct to re- 
move a potentially restrictive 
effect on its members’ ability 
to compete on fee scales. 
Another role “significanfly 
restricts” ACE members’ free- 
dom to advertise, according to 
the report 

Sir Gordon, in recommend- 
ing to government ministers 
that they should look first to 
professional bodies to act. 



Sir Gordon Borne: may 
take further action 
gave a warning that if the 
professions did not make 
changes he would consider 
taking further action under the 
Fair Trading Act 

He wants all the profession- 
al bodies involved with con- 
struction work to remove all 
remaining restrictions on ad- 
vertising because although he 
had found more freedom to 
advertise, some restrictions 
still remained, particularly on 
which media could be used. 

There is some evidence 
from the construction indus- 
try that small or occasional 
users of professional services 
tend not to get such good 
terms on fees as more power- 
ful groups. Sir Gordon urged 
the professional bodies to 
publicize services and terms to 
small users. 

But overall the survey sug- 
gests there is a considerable 
degree of competition among 
the professional services on 
offer to the construction in- 
dustry. Users were generally 


satisfied about their ability to 
negotiate acceptable fees al- 
though the OFT found this 
unsurprising, given the rela- 
tive power of most of the 
client groups involved. 

Recommended fee scales 
put out by the Royal Institute 
of British Architects and the 
ACE did not appear to be 
acting as mandatory' scales, 
said the report But it added: 
“Even recommended fee 
scales can have a restrictive 
effect on competition”. 

Sir Gordon nevertheless 
said he did not feel justified in 
recommending that such fee 
scales should be abolished nor 
in referring the fee scales for a 
Monopolies Commission 
investigation. 

But he added: “This would 
be a possibility in the future if 
there should be grounds for 
believing that recommended 
fee scales were being more 
widely adhered to than ap- 
pears to be the case at present. 
This could arise if the demand 
for lhe services of these profes- 
sions should increase as a 
result of a sustained upturn in 
economic activity in 
construction”. 

The ACE has subsequently 
pointed out that the OFT 
acknowledged that the govern- 
ment experiment of making 
fee levels a primary selection 
factor was too recent for the 
effects to be fully apparent. 
Some disadvantages had not 
been brought out. like the 
effects on safety of reducing 
consultancy input to the mini- 
mum and on consultancies' 
ability to earn abroad by 
bringing in “adversarial 
relationships” in Britain. 


Positive evide 
recovery shows t 



1985 Result 

There was an increased pre-tax 
profit of £4L4m (1984: £lL2m). 

The underlying increase in general 
insurance written premiums of 
24% was almost entirely due to 
much higher prices on existing 
business. 

Life operations 
The increase in Royal Life’s pre- 
tax profits was again substantial - 
up over 22% to £26.4m. 

Long-term business potential has 
been further enhanced by the 
purchase of Lloyd’s Life, shortly to 
be re-named Royal Heritage Life 
Assurance Ltd. 

Net worth 

The net worth of the company 
increased to over£L9 billion 
inclusive of the balance sheet value 
of the existing business ofRoyal 
Life and Lloyd’s Life of £320m; the \ 
directors consider the ‘going /u \ 
concern’ value of these -O 
companies to be at 
least £60Qm. 


880p 

A 



^ A 

r 






T 














2Mp 




-J 







1376 1377 1978 1979 I» 1981 1982 1983 l*M 1985 

Dividend 

flMni 

£lSm 



1376 1377 1378 1973 19*0 1981 1982 1983 19M 1985 




Dividend 

The recommended final dividend 
is 16.55p per share, making a total 
for the year of 25.75p. The increase 
over 1984 of 8.4% recognises the 
greater freedom the prospect of 
improving profits gives us and 
remains in line with our long stand- 
ing policy of regularly increasing 
dividends. 

Prospects 

With some two thirds of our 
worldwide general premium 
income coming from commercial 
insurance classes we are well 
placed to take advantage of the 
sharply improving trading 
conditions in these classes and to 
build upon the achievements of 
the past year 


H 


Royal insurance 


Please send me a copy of the Report & Accounts 
for the year ending December 31st, 1985. 

Name 

Address 


To: The Secretary, Royal Insurance pic, Group I 

. Head Office, I Corahiil, London EC3V3QR. 

L- 

, " ■ V - . - 

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Tisch may 
hold key 
to CBS 

From Our Correspondent 
New York 

The takeover saga at CBS 
took another twist when the 
$3.74 billion cash bid by Mr 
Marvin Davis was rejected by 
lhe board, but experts say that 
ihe next move may be made 
by an unlikely suitor. 

Mr Lawrence Tisch, chair- 
man of the Loews Corpora- 
tion. is the biggest CBS 
shareholder, with a 12.3 per 
cent stake. Wall Street ana- 
lysts say Mr Tisch holds all the 
cards so he may be the only 
person who knows how the 
saga will end. 

Mr Tisch was brought into 
the CBS fold after Mr Ted 
Turner’s abortive bid for the 
company in October. Elected 
to the board, be sided with Mr 
William PaJey, the CBS 
founder, who owns 8.3 per 
'cent of the stock, but many 
analysis suspect that his loyal- 
ties may not lie with Mr Pfoey 
if a high bid comes. 

Mr Davis, whose bid was 
rejected last Tuesday, is said 
to be keen to re-enter the 
entertainment field since his 
sale of 20ih Centuiy Fox to 
Mr Rupert Murdoch last year. 
But, while the oil billionaire’s 
bid for CBS was low, industry 
analysis expect him to raise it 
within the next few weeks. 

CBS says that it wants to 
stay independent, and some 
experts believe that response 
will discourage new bids. If 
Mr Davis makes a higher offer 
and the board rejects it, some 
shareholders may sue the CBS 
board for breach of fiduciary 
duty. 


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FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


27* 217 Or TWaoenr WO P 288 
iiS re Bkhr Bowl Kara 112 




Equities rally 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began yesterday. Dealings end April i 1. §Contango day April 14. Settlement day, April 2L 

^Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 


DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+46 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


FINANCE AND LAND 


241 .. 15 0J .. 

MS -1 115 75 8.1 

450 0+M 27-B 81 12 

ITS *4 

ao>« •->! i7.i oasis 

238 87 24 278 

28 48 

27 41 18 48)21 

228 • .. 104 46 32.4 

ISO -2 81 34 314 

1B2 +2 88 48 278 

48 -1 

848 0 .. BOO 187 .. 


FOODS 


150 

+4 

41 

17 111 

21V 


35 

111 .. 

848 

+5 

11.1 

32148 

350 

0+10 

83 

13147 

104 

0-1 

45 

44 315 

539 

0+12 

M3 

21 MLB 

280 

0 .. 

148 

S3 74 

127* 

+V 


.. 222 

335 

0*3 

111 

35 95 

183 


47 

43 105 

105 

0 !! 

39 

29125 

149 

0-3 

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23175 

94 


74 

t3sbj 

74 

1179 

Sii 

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84 

27127 
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181 


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206 

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HU 

40114 

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0-1 

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41 112 

li 

r-6 

BJ 

34 295 

183 

+2 

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280 

0+7 

HM 

42X12 

283 

0 .. 

S3 

11 20.1 

aa 

-ID 

114 

15275 

215 

0+a 

44 

25149 

281 

+15 

8IB 

13 141 


♦it 

45 

95 89 

552 

0-8 

84 

1.7 22b 

2Bfl 

+8 

85 

24 212 

no 

0 .. 

11 

15 141 

95 


45 

45 885 

BIB 

*6 

17.1 

18 194 

890 


147 

25140 

110 

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75 

48147 

IB* 


1.7 

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1250 


85 

44 144 

71V 

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28145 

270 

+4 

104 

35143 

170 

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134 

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64 

43133 

219 

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813 

+3 

174 

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398 

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83 

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162 


41 

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162 


m . 


688 

+5 

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49 03 

885 

♦: T 

74 

25 255 

293 

0+3 

124 

42185 

258 

+11 

128b 43128 

19* 


85 

84 <43 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


418 328 Brand Uat 415 847 130 81 188 

270 209 Kennedy Breetaa 254 *4 2.1 08 13.1 

379 312 LwtwNw 379 40 181 42178 

47S *47 Lon PWh HOMB 473 43 M3 40 205 

TOO BflV Mown CnarloM 83 -1 20 22 148 

IQS 07 Pmoa Of W HoMa 98 21 81 WJ 

rev 59V Duma Miw 77 22b 2821.4 

4« 375 Savoy Hour* 'K 403 88 08 104 

81 SB Start 81 • IJ 21 200 

208 148 Truadrouae Forte 185 • 78 40 188 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


211 

0+4 

10.1 

45 187 

23* 

0+2 

95 

4.1 241 

re 


82 

4311.1 

821 


141 

40 347 

100 

•~T 

45 

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11.1 

40 145 

276 

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18 215 

1*5 


87 

67 104 

372 

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41 

+1 


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27 


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1.1 135 

381 


248 

7S 11.7 

78 

+1 


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275 


114 


353 

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187 

4J 171 

BO 

0+* 

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298 

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+13 

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215 

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78 

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385 

• +? 

to* 

37 <39 

*80 

0+2 

116 

25 200 

201 

+7 

125 

80 105 

19v 



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640 


245h 45 118 

300 

+ 1 

102 

24 127 

197 

-3 

100 

5.1 129 

1W 

+2 

25 

15 248 

33* 




59 

0-1 

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180 


267 

139 48 

24 

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1»8 

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ii| 

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27 



ZS 

0*« 

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106 

0 +6 

75 

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130 

0 . . 

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+7 

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♦40 


19 359 

34V 

0 .. 

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31(1 

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95 

11 148 

190 





♦3* 

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1613 


85 

43 147 

162 




208 

0-2 

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15 109 





303 

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08 20 1 

2*0 

•7 

48 

22 129 

3*5 


171 

5 0 M9 

275 

+9" 

92 

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BV 




350 

♦20 

iis 

39 129 

£22. 

♦ 1 



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ias*ii4 . . 

375 

♦2 

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4 8 19.1 

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45119 

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are 

♦10 

95 

47 1*5 

128 


35 

30 901 

786 

0+2 

105 

38 112 

308 

♦ 8 




♦4 


231*1 

1«r 




*3 





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♦1 



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74 135 

203 


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198 

♦e 

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70V 

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0-3 



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2* 



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330 


17 9d 44 79 

63 

+1 



37 


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11 0 

18V 






31 


BS 

*'• 

46 

05 10.9 

63 



00 88 

an 

+10 

167 

40 522 



38 

4 1 155 

570 

♦5 



326 

+ 13 

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+ 1 



18V 

♦5 

85 

33 305 

125 

♦3 

107 

45 95 

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35 0* 

138 

+8 

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COTOamrt 

Cam swonara 

Cook IW 
Coauan 
Cope MM 
Cogwin 

Cowtneir Pope 
Cowan Da ftoot 
Own Mduaaon 
Crown Houaa 
Cunraha 3V% 
DSC 

dpcs 

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DM* NW 
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28 28 
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523-388 
350 348 
05 32 

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487 415 
303 208 

2 o-i tev 

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115 92 

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340 188 
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88 72 Do* 


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162 

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487 « 

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7.1 83 1 13 
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103 S3 83 
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12.1 55 21.1 

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84 8.1 143 
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5.1 43 543 
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73 44 114 
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284 0-3 

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23a 88 72 
02 33 133 

1.7 2.1 ZU 

85 03 144 
1&> 3.4 107 

42 17 183 

43 23143 

33 32 15.1 

17 1.1 383 
13 1.1 373 

34 25 283 

23 00 153 

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tZB 0.1 8.7 
173 2.1 214 
a 3a 83143 
114 *.7 0.1 

73 83 104 
224 43 IBS 

BUB 23 212 
04 1.1 233 

84 10 253 

57 27 133 

28 3.1 122 
87 33 183 

42 3.4 123 
7.0 83 ai 

85 53 83 

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233 52 12.7 
183 43 123 

32 22 37.7 
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83 138 83 
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123 84 03 
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142 74 7.7 
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43 13113 
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02 48 77 
40 43 10.1 
41b S3 180 
23 27 182 


m T Ma r na ao T4lna 

S3 § jaggs 

W 124 Dampon Da* 
MV 0V Tranwood 
K 58 THaba 
123 78 Trip** 

2f0 W Twnara Nawai 


353 m UKO 

'rev rev iS SS S F 

JB-g'lBf"** 

483 293 Vfcfcara 
■m ins wanrpicoMaa 

105 141 VMM 
177 137 VttMai 
148 121 Wffl. 

MS tm AMI ttraartaa 

SO? IsS Wagmjy^,, 

™ 340 8SS5% H4M 

kH 5 

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110 85 WaaOknO 
ire 78 WM 
270 210 HMnan Ham 
104 88 VWwaaoa 
2M 177 Wflecr ug 

S 144 iMtai (Janaaj 
903 mmwp 
160 133 UMaOp 
BM 42B vttitNvv^tolM 


87 23 12.1 
103 33 133 
83 82143 
43b 32343 

II 481 
43 27 US 
43 12 .. 

11.1 &7-M3 

13 17 .. 
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107 33 133 
41a 33 04 


108 58 CNM Cap* 
88 8« CMW _ 

M M Grwrwr nw t 
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aaa 280 sum N Aaa 
5B 28 Goal Pa! n 
ICO 45 ft Wliai ara Haa 
370 3J71 1C Gw 
XV 4V KC 00 
54 39 noco __ 

29 10 NCA Mag 

243 115 LASMO 
m 2io ObUnte _ 
48 25 New London OB 
143 IK Panama 
34 25V MMr 

WM ST- 

lon 133 S rtHtBOT 
17 47 8o*m w 

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153 -70 THUMB W 
280 150 THKMi £utBper 
218 155 UMnar 


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EKMI 426 VR/nliJy fbiutm 

a s E0£r 

81 43V WnAmi 8 Rbt 


s 


| 

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41 91 Bormnek 

148 V 1 Z 7 Mhgw 

1(3 K RnhyUam 


X&BSfU S 
^ ^ SSW JB 

ass 133 patataon Zodb » 

260 <90 Do 'A' 233 

183 128 Poly Pear 180 

M 39 Soafll 26 

sea 670 swoon* ore 

142 «i Toxar Kaaotay W 

ire 153 YUaCaso MO 


-1 89 83 45' 

*17 988 83 KL5 

+HJ 253 83 17.4 

14 88 113 
0+2 17.1 87 134 

42 83 73 
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•4 83 97 73 

• *» 73 63 23 


PAPER, PRINTING. ADVERT G 


79V 66V 

14fi 12 
929 754 


720 £20 SUB/ 
927 771 Sun L 
STS 380 Trad. 



LEISURE 


M4 98 Bar a an ■* ss 

158 128 Sooaay 6 Kwrtai is® 

196 98 Draw WaMr 135 

83 34 C»W 61 

213 195 Cwyaafc 2ii 

488 4ii nrat Lalaaaa 468 

82V 54 ORA 84 

81 85 Hantmar Snda 71 

128 93 HwbwrnnvM IK 

191 94 fen trtaura 118 

103 88 JutaW N HUoa 80 

175 195 Ueomnaar 7 150 

991 271 WaaBaama 345 

988 338 HaalyUatM 338 

a* « nwy twrara 58 

I5M2X S 

S3 81 Towa rami i WMpm 91 

174 13BV Zanara 174 


103 102 72 
.. a .. 102 

73 S3 114 
14b 27 133 
m 33137 
WJ 24 187 
.. .. 853 

.. .. 484 

83 SO (LO 
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30 33 123 
73 53 100 

107 SI 183 
16.1 43 .. 
.. 0 .. U 
83 3317.1 
34 -SJi .. 
870112 93 
SI 33<43 


12 24 183 

83 37 133 


PROPERTY 


40 27 Mam 
75 71 ABM Lon 
DO 70 MW 
06 454 Blur (CH) 

12 « » BMgnna 
2 H 218 fS» 5 rt« 

640 440 Brertord 
ITU 144 Hr und 
168 139 Bifacfcn 
48 38 CaM(M 8 S 0 M 

290 218 Cap I Coumaa 
MS 200 CMMPlcp 

m its Ombowkw 

475 420 Oaaiartwa 
WS 3 TSS GALA 
165 136 CfeNfee NcM8a 
218 173 Court 
20 14V CooMN Sana 

137 80 Camay t New 
188 117" Comsr V 
220 ITS Cvnkm 
625 47 Q Ofls^n 
250 190 Sana Da* 
id A Damn 
<85 188 BabdM 8 AOancy 
120 no Eabaaa Got 
153 140 EMM nop 

re 83 &M>ofUada 

08 43 V Aw Orta 

291 170 ftnanra 

181 146 Gr PDntml 

^ sassep 

495 436 H aaam ncn 

4SS 425 Do 'A* 

193 MO Uanoaer 
2 S 3 233 HmMr 
&m 479 Hajiamaiii 

300 27 D tllly 

tsg >188 Jataan 
215 273 Lafew Prop 
« 54 UndfeMaura 

382 276 Land SaonUaa 
7 S 3 430 Lpa ■ Efifcl TB 
22 * 147 DbPAp 
28 fl 718 Lon 4 Pro* Shop 
171 186 LOB snap nop 
303 2 B 8 Lytnon 
380 275 MEPC 


Manamay 
118 W5 IftXaySacs 
98 S3 M at ifi raft 
144 125 HMrt Mawa 
73 bo Martanmh 
277 173 MarWr E* 

760 810 IfeMWgh 
480 984 MCMiMM 
98 82 MOCMOW (ASH 
20 18 Mfeacual 
75 73 NMcSwaflpi 
83 43 FMaWa 

276 255 Paadaty 
1M 178 nop 6 Hot 
107 Prop Hugo 
122 108 PtooSeorty 
9V r. Raglan 
5 to 320 n»a»*8n 

srnSm^ 

aw 153 sranual 
07 7B Scot MM 
175 142 EkunEnam 
418 280 S«hMk 

S & Mp^on 
SS S »Ua 

2*5 TSS TbmatfPferfE 
138 95 UK Land 

570 525 UdRaW - 
010 875 Wamar 
495 475 wandort 
a. 17>| Waeb uoaf 
MO 142 VmqtfctMWY 


40 «+2V 02 80825 

76 .. zn 2.7 170 

78 0+3 95 95 155 

825 0-6 18-0 2915.1 

114 .. AS 59 79 

250 42 18.1 85 185 

540 .. U5 25 227 

178 +1 25 25 181 

134 41 75 49 23.7 

41 

228 0+1 85 35 20J 

240 0+8 25 1.1 .. 

17« • . . 85 *2 155 

448 15.7 85 84 J 

SID -M 28.7b 22 120 

149 -9 9SI 05XL4 

201 +3 BS 25 25.1 

rev .. .. a .. ai 

MO .. 23 15855 

<88 • .. 80 3S 55 

220 .. 85 20 945 

825 • .. 185 25 121 

215 48 

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118 -3 26 21 17.4 

150 • 121 21 121 

05 +1 SS 52115 

87 +1 .. .. 78 

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178 .. 100 17 769 

25* 21b 12 885 

eia* •+* .. .. .. 

45S .. 121 26 329 

489 .. 121 27 322 

mi .. 45 24 325 

235 *2 148 AO 89 

835 . , 127 29 *09 

285 0+6 73 27 323 

186 29 15885 

303 0-2 IDS 35 <45 

82 0+1 tJ 27 35 2 

319 +1 121 28 273 

700 *35 95 1.4 322 

2M +10 13 45 .. 

2*3 63 27 215 

15S • .. 75b 45127 

295 .. 35 28 37.1 

343 +8 160 45 223 

122 

113 • .. 45 45185 

58 • 219 55 255 

144 23 25145 

BB -3 09b 15 2*5 

277 +2 45a 1.8 275 

730 lain 1.4 225 

49B 0+10 84 15102 


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07 32 715 
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SHIPPING 


501 37* MaocBrnna soi 
« M? Sr. CuHMa w i'a m i 333 is 14 208 

“ »J 361 ai U7SS 

94 « AparU m a rt 88 4.7 85 83 

» ,S » **- “ 

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JM <* RmcfenannwmD 88 +S 7A 8.1 201 

680 360 Itairtrt SpoB 370 .. 1 22 35 903 


+87 125 22 .. 

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MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 



187 138 AE 
1*1 78 Apt 

141 70V Am 

237 113 Art 
38 24V B31 


ffl, 

Arts pnducte 


ISSna | 

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371 

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iHntrad (fend sS 


-7.1 35 127 
7.1 54 as 
22 15104, 
21a 05 284 
15 35.175 

Js 34154 
295 35 IU 
83 8S 18.1 

II If is 

-. .. 82 
43 15 285 

73 2fl .. 
45 21 35 
253 85 .. 
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.. 485 
33 *5115 

ita S3 94 

8J 85 73 

3 44 883 
MZM 
W.1 41 Z1S 

73 as 7.S 
1SJ 23129 
U 49 145 
24 7 J 113 

95 B0 .. 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


a 290 m 368 0 .. 95 25 135 

*M jWBOQdi IBS -8 121 BJ 49 

» M Hartrthn S3 218 94 73 

inn 16* Urrmn HmaA aos -2 M UiB| 

-E E i**«w 8* apw - re 0.. 44 44225 

!S 5 E _ W* -2 02 83 85 

JS 212 SVOTfl 8 Firtfr 13a 0+2 114 &5 S3 

288 188 SrjSo 283 +18 84 23 315 


TEXTILES 


ai 43 122 

W 02 129 




NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 




W" 


386 346 hdmM 
482 *04 M thanaan 


... 33 3313.7 

+8 8.1 25 140 

+8 M3 47 184 
.. 323 JL3 2&S 

0 ii.i. Dm 

0 . . u.i as 194 

.*¥ 2DS i53S 
iS S5" 

-- 145 23 127 

-V 14B 1,* .. 

04 15225 

-a aj 49 155 

0-4 214 U U 

+39 229 85135 


»0 MS tSSS^S, 

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s iS 

^i£ b SSU. 
SSiS SS5T* 

ar w 

’IS 1 ss£ 


S1ST- 

77V 64 LisMr 

s a S 9 ™ 

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* res 8*dw 

ii&HL 


1 A ■» 


M5 23M5 
8.1 4B0L1 

B3n 45 40 

B 8.1 115 
8.1 7J 
7.1 93195 

75 25 143 
BJ 93 .. 
75 23127 
2Jb 15115 
89 33 175 

■ a jB >p 

114b 21 113 
45 85 49 
37 223 34 
83 84 82 
75 41 87 
.. b .. 375 
39 25 140 
43 32115 
74 45108 
04 05238 
79 85 194 
93 79 112 
.. a .. 43 

83 85 45 

25 85 9.1 
75b 85 8.1 
28*123 183 
44 27 139 
93 85 85 
35 43 M3 
75 42113 

43 25124 
S7b 49105 
85 32132 


TOBACCOS 


*11 308 Bat 
ass 238 InuW 
iB 7 127 flBSmm V 


*03 0 .. 175 *5 85 

9*9 0+8 17.1 49 129 

160 +0 9.7 31 32 


128 107 AN0OI 
30 9 Aran Enaryy 


591 818 Or PfeMhrwn 
12 7 Bnrfuea 


210 l« 8PM 

357 2» Bunnaft 


888 0-2 440 47 84 

7 -1 . . a . . 

345 ,, 34* 7.7 125 

17i 0-4 143 109 45 

347 +1 184 44 121 


• Ex dMdand ■ Ex al b Forecast dMdend * MBrtn 
payment p&saad * Pnca m suspension g DMdand and 
p« excmoBB specialpamnntk pnHiWBBrflgurasH 
Forecast samingG o Ex omer r Ex rMts b Ex scrip or 
Btnre spat t Tax-baa .. No signfflcant data. 




































































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


21 


2: 






..../iWrtvV'V ' 











: . •• • : . •; :'-■■■■ '* >■ 5 : : • i y. 

: v";; S ?• ' : : v • . "•• 




DiKrume- 
form i»rt of lhl ‘ 


H-uf-Awe"^ 11 Acceptance 




•*•’• , v j-' •:.'•• • " •..., ’••• >y > 1 . 

■■:.■■ •■#*%• ’ •'. ^ :••>:•’•. :xs 

~ •.'■*: ! -^V •' ' ■■' 


TOACC 1 


affiS!,'v»aS^4A?«Oo;BEW^ ' : . :■ 

! . ■' ’•*:***£;■*•. v:j :? ' ."' » ^4- • •■*■„*■ -i A ;•' .v '■■*■■■■.'■■■■ ' ... ' 

•;'> •.*. . ; ;'; ., \ .•' ■ ' . ■ 

• • ■: . ••• 

• .' sfc • .*..; ■■■• -• • •"• ■ - "" 







17-5% greater than that from the highest Hanson offer. 

We, the Imperial Board, urgently and unanimously 
f^r nrbr Hend you to reject the unwelcome Hanson bio and 
■ r accept the United Biscuits’ offer without delay 

The TJB Offer: 

Is fair and reasonable and represents an 
11 — ^ a — i -c — Imperial shareholders. 



•Delivers a gross income of £24*68 for every 
100 Imperial shares: 17*5% better than mat 
from the Hanson alternative with the highest 

capital value. 

•Gives you a valuable investment in a major 

feist-growing consumer business. 

There will be no more offers — from either United 
Biscuits or Hanson Trust. 

So please complete your white UB acceptance form 

immediately. 

United Biscuits’ forms must be received by 3*00 pm 

_ 11th* Anril 1986. This is the final closmg date 



This is your last opportunity to help crea te a great 
consumer 



company - United Imperial - 
and benefit from its highly 




The bases on 


which 




1 i 


1 


are 
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22 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY/LAW 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1 986 


1985 FINAL RESULTS 


Swire Pacific Limited 

RESULTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED 31ST DECEMBER 1985 

The profit for 1985 before the extraordinary item was HK$1 ,225.9 million, representing an increase of 28.4% 
as compared with HKS954.4 million in 1984, as adjusted. In addition, in 1985 there was an extraordinary profit 
of HKS59.1 million (1984: nil). The audited consolidated results were: 


Year ended 31st December 
1985 1984 

HKSm HKSm 


Turnover 


13£9Z2 


11,996.8 


Operating profit 

2,0300 

1,930.9 

Interest charges — net 

3606 

384.8 

Net operating profit 

1,663.4 

1,546.1 

Share of profits less losses of associated companies 

609 

58.9 

Profit before taxation 

1,7523 

1,605.0 

Taxation 

2104 

294.9 

Profit after taxation 

1,5309 

1,310.1 

Minority interests 

311.0 

355.7 

Profit for the year before extraordinary item 

1,2209 

954.4 

Extraordinary hem 

59.1 

— 

Profit attributable lo shareholders 

1,2800 

954.4 

Earnings per share: 'A' shares 

2322B 

2408RP 

•B' shares 

5049 

49.49 

Dividends per share: ‘A’ shares — interim 

44.09 

39.0C 

— final, recommended 

97.09 

87.0C 


141 JOB 

126.0C 

*B’ shares — interim 

089 

7.89 

— final, recommended 

1949 

17.4C 


9ft 9? 

25.2C 

Net assets per share: ‘A' shares 

HKS14.44 

HKS10.80 

‘B’ shares 

HKS 2.89 

HKS 216 


T he profit far 1985 before the extraordinary item increased by 28.4% 
and additionally there was an extraordinary profrt of HKS59.1 million 
<1984: nil). During 1985. the Group changed its method of 
accounting for finance leases, which if now capitalises in line with 
generally accepted international practice: as a result of this change, the 
comparative figures tor 1984 have been adjusted and the attributable 
profit for that year, previously recorded at HKS1 .048.8 million, is now 
shown at HKS954.4 million. 

Cathay Pacific Airways Limited reported higher profits from operations 
but, without me benefit of substantial capital profits, the total profit for 
1985 was somewhat lower. Hong Kong Aircraft Englneenng Company 
Limited's attributable profit increased by 29.5%. Swire Properties 
Limited's profit was sharply higher reflecting higher sales prices at 
Tattoo Shing and profits on sale ol investment properties. Offshore 
services activities recorded reduced profits, and tosses were incurred in 
shipping and dockyard activities. There was a furtner substantial 
improvement in the Operating profit of the industries division during 
1985. A slight decline in profitability was recorded by the trading division 
in difficult manat conditions. 

Final dividends. The directors of Swire Pacific Limited will recommend 
to shareholders at Ihe annual general meeting on 
29th May 1966 the Daymen! ol final dividends ol 97 0eH984- B70c) per 
■A* share and i9.4« (1984: 17 4« per 'B' snare payable on 2nd June 1986 
to shareholders on the register ot members on 25in April 1986, ihe 3nare 
registers will be closed from 14th Apnl 1986 to 25th April 1986. bom 
dates inclusive. 

Once again, the final dividends will be satisfied by the issue of scrip to 
each class ol shareholder, with the option being given to shareholders to 
elect to receive cash in lieu ol scnp in respect of p an or all of such 
dividends. Full details ot ine scnp dividend procedures will oe sei out in 
a circular letter which, together with (he forms o< election fo> (he 
payment of cash dividends, will be sent ro shareholders on 5tn May 1988. 
Capitalisation (bonus) issue. The directors will recommend a 


capitalisation issue of two new "A' shares for each 'A' share h etd 
and two new ‘S' shares for each ~B' share held on 25th Apri l 196 6. The 
new shares will rank pari passu with the existing shares, except that 
they will not quality for the final dividends to be pad in respect of 1985. 
Investment properties and net assets per share, tn accordance with the 
policy of the Group, the annual valuation at open market value of 
Investment properties was carried out at 31st December 1965 by 
independent valuers. As a consequence of the 1985 valuation there has 
been an increase of HKS864.4 million in th e valu ation resenes of the 
Group, as compared with a reduction of HKS270.0 million at the end of 
1984 Taking into account both ihe retained earnings in 1986 and the 
increase in the valuation o< investment properties, the net asset values 
ot the shares of Swire Pacific Limited at 31st December 1986 were 
HKS14 44 per 'A' share and HKS2.89 per *B‘ share which come 
respectively witn HKS1Q.80 and HKS2.16 at 31st December ir 
Prospects. Cathay Pacific Airways expects an improvement in profits 
dunng 1986. on the basis that the present generally favourable market 
conditions subsist The improved climate within the Hong Kong property 
marvel snoutd continue and Swire Properties again expects improved 
resuns in 1986 although the greater proportion ol its profits will arise 
within the second half ol the year due to the timing of completion of 
properties under development industries division is looking lor further 
growth in 1986 and the trading division's prospects are also good. The 
business environmeni in which me snipping, ottsnore services and 
dockyard division operates is expected lo remain depressed. 

I consider that, on balance, general business conditions are Hkaiy to 
remain favourable and that the prospects for the Swire Pacific Group as 
a whole lor 1986 are good. 

The Annual Report for 1985 will be sent to shareholders on 5th May 1986. 


Hong Kong, 26lh March 1968 


H.M.P. Mites 

Chairman 


I 


Swire Pacific Limited 

The Swire Group 

Swire House, Hong Kong. 


Latest prices: 

At last some help for the hard pressed Imperial shareholder. 

Mindful that share prices can vary daily, we are publishing a bulletin 
showing the value of each of the offers for your company. 

In order to be perfectly fair, the values we’ve quoted are based on the 
best possible offers. 


IMPERIAL SHARE PRICE: 



HANSON BID WORTH: 




HANSON BID BETTER BY: 



Pteim-M l)>iM‘ii <111 flii- nicirki'l |«ri«-f->.-n l.to]im<>n Tiu-nUit. 


H 


N S O N 


TRUST 


C O \ T I M I N C. CJ It C) \\ T 11 FROM B \ S I C K l S I \ K S S E S . 

The «flhin of Hainan 1Vu»t% «lfc» deprad un ih 'tan* prti-r Ttw atniw iiflrr ulm* is hrihM Ihw\ tlr.liufi and id^acreuninf niwuruiPbi 

Hu-n- UuM-u Lid oritM- talur nf l Ik IW r»n»miMr liufl slurhnf Hdiurni TYu.il 


(COMMODITIES REVIEW) 

London exchange 
adopts new look 


London's campaign to reas- 
sert its prominence as an 
international commodity trad- 
ing centre took a decisive step 
forward yesterday with the 
introduction of a new legal and 
a dminis trative structure for 
the London Commodity Ex- 
change. 

AU the former members of 
the cocoa, coffee and sugar 
terminal market associations 
have become shareholders in 
the new company, the London 
Commodity Exchange (1986) 
E tmhad, which, it is hoped, 
will speak for soft commodity 
futures trading in London with 
one voice. 

The only exception is the 
International Petroleum Ex- 
change, which, because It had 
no assets, coaid not convert 
them into shares in the new 
LCE. Bat 33 of the 35 EPE 
members are also members of 
the LCE. The IPE board has 
voted to move to Commodity 
Qnay, the £5 million new home 
for the LCE which is doe to be 
occupied on the Tuesday after 
Easter next year. 

The reorganization has been 
completed only six months 
since Mr Saxon Tate, the 
LCE's executive chairman, put 
up his original proposals. He 
said: u Our first priority most 
be the welfare of existing 
business". Promotion of exist- 
ing contracts is to be favoured 
over the invention of new ones. 

The second priority, Mr 
Tate said, most be to improve 
volume. The LCE hopes to 
exploit its rale changes and 
the provisions of the FinanJcal 
Services Bill — expected to 
become law in the summer — 1» 
bring in locals (indmdnal floor 


traders operating on their own 
account) and to encourage 
private investors in commodity 

futures. 

Mr Tate commented: “We 
have got to get that volume 
curve going op again. We've 
got to get existing owners and 
customers saying, ‘These peo- 
ple have grasped the nettle, 
they're improving the dimate 
for doing business in 
London'." 

To set up the new LCE, the 
assets of the terminal market 
associations were divided 
equally between their mem- 
bers. Those divided assets 
were then converted into LCE 
shares at the rate of £1 for £1 
Of the more than 50 firms wfco 
are members of the new LCE, 
around a dozen are noticeably 
bigger shareholders than the 
rest, chiefly because they were 
members of all the markets. 

When the LCE does torn its 
attention to new contracts, the 
focus is likely to be on traded 
options on existing contracts. 
But the exchange is anxious to 
avoid the mistake of inade- 
quate education abort aid 
marketing of new contracts* 

Mr Tate said that in the 
past “we didn't put enoogh 
preparation into education, 
into the market, into ensuring 
that there were market makers 
on the floor". 

For the moment, however, 
the LCE's budget is mtiifcely to 
be much bigger than before. 
Mr Tate said: “We're not 

awning (0 do anything wfld Hilf 

year". But in the longer run 
the LCE will consider jointly 
promoting with other London 
exchanges the City as a com- 
modity futures trading centre. 

MichaelPrest 


Notice to Members 
and Depositors 

WITH EFFECT FROM 1st APRIL 1986, THE FOLLOWING 
INTEREST RATES WILL APPLY TO INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS:- 


PsU-Up Shires 


Shares Ptas 

beta* t 

abovD £ 


JLTJTi Id Pmshre 


Fuft 


5.00% equivalent to 1U5V 


BJ0% equvataot to -11.69V 


6.35% eqtonlent to 11.76%' 
8.75% eqwdent to 1232V 


11.75% pro 


1050% gross 


tw urns of sramr nun « ui aura types of sccouht mu be names 
BY 1 % area* teams post seras 2.7 jud a wan wu. k hebqceo by 

TWHEHE INTEREST ON BONUS SNARES IS FAD OTHER THAN ANNUALLY. THE RATES 
QUOTED SHOULD BE REDUCED BY 025%. 

’GROSS EQUIVALENT TD INCOME TAX PAYERS WITH BASE RATE MC0ME TAX (AT THE 
RATE AFPUCABLE FROM O&MJK) RAD. 

ColchsteiyrO 

Building Society i 


This«l.rni>rmrni i* publiOini hi \M A -hhi* ijmilnS .nd J llirin 'vhmdrtr W*** 4 I In Ijmiiml mtehtiriV lUnsun Hni»l PIS' Thrllin-rtoniif Huuon THU4 PUT arribr pmon>l 

mfioiarfiWBrlbr nrfonNUoiimUunlmnittallvrflBMirM. ImFr-Ik-I .rfihrir kivmlM*.- dud tn-ljH ih.iuui.krn.il rmwHMMr inn* I*. •nsjrr Ihai Mirh t-IhrnM-j ihrinToniubiinraaluimlinl 
UlnMliritivnirfll u in jmirtjnrr *uh I tv Urti. Ttv Unvnan nt Usman Trus PLC Kttp mpansibilil, MCrvnhafiy 



TO PLACE 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 
PLEASE TELEPHONE 

01-481 4000 

USE YOUR ACCESS OR VISA CARDS 


Coi 

our rate tor 
endowment' 
mortgages. 



CHELTENHAM 

Goldloan 


11 - 75 

12 - 6 


The Cheltenham Goldloan rate for 
endowment or pension linked mortgages 
is currently 11.75% typical APR 12.6%. 
Compare that with the rates offered by 
other leading building societies and 
banks and you’ll see just how 
competitive Cheltenham Goldloan is. 

Loans are available for mortgages 
of £30,000 or more, including 
remortgage arrangements. Naturally 
security will be required for the loan and 
the rate may vary. 

For full written details simply 
complete and return the FREEPOST 
coupon or, if it's more convenient, call 
into your nearest C&G branch. 


To Cheltenham & Gloucester Building Society, 

FREEPOST. Cheltenham, Gloucestershire GLdO 1BR. 

Please send me full written details on Cheltenham Goldloan. 


Name 


GKTI 


Address , 


Postcode 



Over 160 branches throughout the UK. See\fellow Pages. 


Law Report April 2 1986 


Tax relief comes 
before set-off 


CbHard (Inspector of Taxes) t 
Mining & Industrial Hol d in g s 
Ltd 

Before Mr Justice Walton . 
(Judgment given March 14] 

For the purposes of comput- 
ing liability to corporation tax, 
credit for double taxation, relief 
was to be allowed before any set- 
off for advanced corporation tax 
(ACT) was made. The Crown’s 
case that the ACT set-off should 
be «nad* first produced a mon- 
strously unjust result that was 
not supported by the statutory 
provisions . . 

Mr Justice Walton so held in 
rfjgmip grn g the Crown's appeal 
from the determination of a 
single special commissioner 
allowing a claim by. toe taxpayer 
company. Mining & Industrial 
Holdings Ltd, for foil relief by 
way of credit for foreign tax for 
its accounting period to June 
198a 

The taxpayer company, a 
subsdiary of Consolidated Gold 
fields pfc, carried on the busi- 
ness of a mining finance home 
in the United Kingdom. For the 
1980 accounting period it 
claimed relief under section 
497(1) of the _ income and 
Corporation Taxes Act 1970 
from double taxation by way of 
credit fix- foreign withholding 
tax and foreign underlying tax in 
respect of dividends it had 
received from overseas compa- 
nies. 

Its profits fix- the period 
consisted of income not subject 
to double tax and non-control 
and control dividends subject to 
foreign tax. It bad paid ACT by 
reference to dividends of £22 
million that it had paid during 
the accounting penod. It ap- 
pealed to the conunissionets 
against the refusal of the tax 
inspector to allow in full it claim 
forrdieC. 

Mr Stephen -©liver; OC and 
j Mir Alan Moses for the Crown; 
Mr Andrew Park, QC, for the 
taxpayer company. 

MR JUSTICE WALTON 
said that the case concerned the 
inier-retanonship of double tax- 
ation relief (DTR) and ad- 
vanced corporation tax. 

DTR arose under Part 18 of 
the 1970 Act and was to be a 
credit against tax payable in the 
United Kingdom. The pro- 
visions in section SOI enforced 
the idea that a company would 
compute its corporation tax 
habihty in respect of its charge- 
able income and then reduce* 
that . amount of tax by the 
amount of the credit. 

However limits and restric- 
tions were placed on DTR, for 
example, section SOS restricted 
it to an effective rate of 32 per 
cent - being the rate of corpora- 
tion tax at the time: 

ACT was introduced by sec- 


tion 84 of the Finance Act 1972 
where a company, made a 
“qualifying distribution". Sec- 
tion 83 provided for ACT to be 
set off against a company’s 
corporation tax liability on us 
income. 

Thus the taxpayer company 
had a further sum to be set 
against its liability to corpora- 
tioa tax — that was against its 
. liability for the balance after toe 
deduction of its DTR. 

But the Crown contended that 
that was not the order of events 
and DTR was only available 
after ACT had been taken into 
account and taken into account 

in a particular way. 

The result, bearing in mind 
the relevant DTR limits, was an 
increase in- tax payable of 
£254,137. ACT. said the Crown, 
bad to be spread rateatoy across 
the different sorts oT the tax- 
payer company’s income. 

But if the Crown was right the 
result would be that because the 
taxpayer company had paid a 
dividend during the year it had 
thereby become liable to pay 
£234,137 more in tax than if it 
bad not done so. U nless driven 
to it by the language ef the Act, 
such a monstrously unjust 
conclusion should not be 
readied 

How did the Crown reach 
such a conclusion? It was not an 
arbitrary whim: it thought that it 
had, a peg on which to hang such 
a conclusion in section 100(6) of 
the 1972 Acl 

That provisions, it was said, 
placed the taxpayer empany 
under a mandatory duty to 
allocate its ACT to such or its 
income as it thought fit 

Mr Park contended that sec- 
tion KXX6) was not mandatory 
but merely gave the taxpayer 
company a power of allocation 
and having chosen not to ex- 
ercise that power the ACT was, 
in accordance with section 85(1) 
to be put against the totality of 
its Handily to corporation tax 
thereby reducing the amount 
payable to niL 

Did section KXX6) impose 
such a duty on the taxpayer 
company? There was no due as 
to what precisely that provision 
was getting aL 

But it would be astonishing 
that the matter should have 
been cast in the way that it had 
been if the intention was that a 
company be forced to exercise a 
power that could only benefit 
toe Revenue and not itself. 

Section SOI of the 1970 Act 
and section 8S(l)ofthe-l972 Act 
made it dear in what order DTR 
end ACT were to be brought 
into account. Those dearly 
stated provisions were not to be 
set aside as a result of section 
HXX6). 

The appeal was dismissed. 

Solicitors: Solicitor of Inland 
Revenue; Fresh fields. 


Sentencing dishonest 
baggage handlers 


_ ud Other* - 
ition of a sentence of 
three years' imprisonment 
should be toe starting parai 
when sentencing for persistent 
pilfering committed by baggage 
handlers at airports. The im- 
position of more severe or 
lighter punishment than that 
should be considered with re- 
gard to the particular cmnnn- 
stances in each case and to any 
particular mitigation there 
it be. . v.. 
rd Justice; Watkins so 
stated, when ; sitting with Mr 
Justice McNeill and Mr Justice 
Otton-on March 24 the Court of 
Appealallowed appeals against 
sentences of imprisonment 
ranging from three to four years 
imposed on 13 men who had 
pleaded guilty on January IO, 
1986 in Aylesbury Crown Court 
(Judge Vemey) to specimen 
counts of then or attempted 
itbeft at Heathrow Airport. In 
each case toe sentence of 
imprisonment was reduced to 
two and a half years. 

LORD JUSTICE WATKINS 
said that it was beyond doubt 
that immediate terms t>f- 
im prison mem were proper. 

R v Barrick ((1985) 81 


GApp R 78) [in which guide- 
fines were given on sentencing 
is breach of trust cases] was not 
fully applicable to the present 
case. It was right, therefore, to 
a tte mp t to assist others who 
might have to sentence dis- 
honest handlers. 

For persistent pilfering of the 
kind committed by these appel- 
lants three years* imprisonment 
was toe starting point. 

Their Lordships found it 
impassible to distinguish be- 
tween these appellants as the 
sentencing judge had done. A 
team leader was not more 
seriously at fault than a baggage 
-handler he had no authority 
over toe handler. 

The oi 

respect of an; 
foci that they I 

.That . might have helped to 
reduce their sentence from three 
years to two but for the feet that 
without the installation of police 
video cameras it was unlikely 
that their conceded dishonesty 
would have been uncovered. 

The amount of reduction they 
could expect therefore was wa- 
tered down, and in each case a 
sentence of two and a half years 
would be substituted. 



Compensation order 
guidelines 


Regina r Scott 

Considerations to be borne in 
mind when making compensa- 
tion orders were set out by toe 
-Court of Appeal (Criminal Di- 
vision) (Lend Justice Watkins, 
Mr Justice McNeill and Mr 
justice Orton), cm March 18 in 
-allowing an appeal by Roger 
; Scon against a compensation 
order imposed on him on 
J August 19. 1981 to Gloucester 
Crown Court (Judge Hutton) for 
.offences of obtaining propert y 
by deception. 

LORD JUSTICE WATKINS 
said that toe court bad 
endeavoured, as toe authorities 
showed, to impress upon judges 
that compensation orders, 
should, not be made without 
careful inquiry by the court into 
toe defendant's ability to pay. 

Once toe court was satisfied 
about his ability, if .ft .were 
minded to give him time topay. 


that period should not be 
excessive. 

A compensation order should 
be precise, to its. terms, for 
example, as to the dates of first 
and last instalments. Thai 
ought, by now, to be absolutely 
dear m the minds of judges. 

If toe court embarked on 
consideration of the manner of 
payment, it should bear in mind 
. that toe court which would have 
to deal with enforcement and 
. the consequences of non- 
compliance with the order was a 
magistrates’ 'court. 

Accordingly, unless at the 
crown court- the dreum stances 
were such that it was realistic for 
an order to be made to be paid 
in. instalments, then the court 
should content itself with 
merely making an order for' 
compensation, thus allowing the 
ordinary consequences to fol- 
low, that is, leaving it to toe 
mag i s trates to deaf with the 
process of enforcement on non- 
compliance. 


Function of the court 
welfare departments 


Scott t Sort 

The court welfare 
department's function in con- 
tested custody hearings was to 
assist toe court by investigating 
the drenmsiances of the dxild or 
children concerned and the 
important figures to their lives 
so as to provide the court with, 
factual information on which to 
make a decision. 

The Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice Dillon and Lord Justice 
Woolf) so stated on March 25 in 
toe course of dismissin g an 
appeal. 

LORD JUSTICE DILLON 


said that toe particular court 
welfare dep a r m em had mi*. 
conceived its function as solely 
to endeavour to produce a 
conciliation b etw e en the parties 
and if that could not be achieved 
then H was for the judge to 
decide the case. 

It was desirable that there 
should be successful concili- 
ation bat that was not the only 
service the d ep a rtm e n t pro- 
vided. Although' it was for the' 
judge to make the decision, the 
court welfare department’s 
iw rommen dationB could be of 
great betp to the judge and their 
mvestigprions we re of great 
importance. 




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at feast 30 years of age 

wvaai yean expo-tenet ax senior executive fcveL 
Tte renmnerutkai packa^ will be attractive and win include the normal 


OFFICE 

MA NAGE R (ESS) 
BOOKKEEPER TO 
£14,000 

International Trading Co in Wi is 
seeking an exceptional person to 
ftilfl! the role of Office Manager- 
ess) /PA/Sec. ; The successful 
candidate , will have experience ini 
the above skills together with a' 
knowledge of bookkeeping to trial 
balance, good S/H & typing and 
must be dedicated to their career, A 
mature, energetic approach cou- 
pled with enthusiasm and a positive 
personality are essential require- 
ments. It is not envisaged that any 
one tinder 28 years will possess the 
experience necessary for this posi- 
tion 

FLAIR RECRUITMENT 
01-938 2222 




MUSIC PUBLISHING 

CBS Songs International is seeking an experi- 
enced S/H Secretary to work for their Business 
Affaire Manager, dealing with International 
publishing contracts and agreementv 

The swxessfhl candidate win be a sdfmotivat- 
ed, weU-organised-nidh'idual who . in addition 
to the norma! secretariat duties will already be 
coping with aiaige volume of word-processing. 
Legal experience although not essential would _ 
be an advantage. "V .' ;* * ~ ‘ ' "J * 

We are offering a salary of £8, 800 per ammm 

wri lif i ffitt which wfll jnriiiite (faarnwt on 

records and free .c on ceit tickets. 

Interested applicants should write 
with CV to: Maureen Heneghan, 
CBS Records, 17-19 Soho Square, 
London Wl. ... 



H f.ua c mm 
(UCMriMlC, 
■ MX 

*1-07-3711 


SECRETARY 

fOfcJcr appfaow to wei- 


Wi m i nii MB u Planning GOO- 
QtWanaa wH Ouitfl td 

Snvqo Heavy respocat- 
bifity to befo dy na mic 
F»wb in tin nd office 
dating with <*" »; *« 

Interne job fowtameaL 
Salary 0.ZSO pa. + boras. 

Wrfto 

Howard Sharp A 


01 phono Senior Partner 
Eveotogg, fcwffia 
454042. 


OFFICE SERVICES 
ADMINISTRATOR 


CBUhawr ia WC1 weeks a 
•ecreory in nbd 20k to take 
toponsSnSiy tbr chy to day 
office and boating arricea. 
-Tie duties are wide ranging 
and invcdriuj. e*. manage- 
ment of e eapny flu. 
tnperviwaa at ctooffcar. so- 
cial Jbn e ti o ns . p i m hatin g, 
bad*, tog. etc. Ideal opportu- 
nity for a capable *A* level 
see* teary to develop 


TOP CLASS SfeCRETARY - 
SOUGHT BY LEADING PR . 
CONSULTANCY - ? . 

We need an mtdfigent, (filQent and entlrasxaAc 
secratary (21 yean or over). Excellent secretarial 
skills ana no fear of tots or typing (on-aW P) are 
essential, as is a minimum of 2 years work expe- 
rience. 

A wdl presented perfectionist whose 
oiggitigtional ability is equal to yoor dedicati o n 
should fit the balL : 

In retain .we can. offer yon exceflent woricn«. 
conditions, a frieodly, busy atmosphere, beauti- 
ful surroundings and' the enjoyment of Working 
as part of a team: -_»n r 

If the above botii fits and appeals, phase write, 
with a fuD GV. to: 

NteMa Kflkeaaqr, 

iliuitur One Pl ant Yard, 


London SW1P 3MR. 


PA SECRETARY \ 
FOR ARCHITECTS 

SmaH/busy practice 
Regent Park area, re- 
quires secretary with 
broad experience and 
skffis of 100/6a 

Age group 25/35, sala- 
ry range 0,000 neg 
depending qualifica- 
tions. 

01-722 Mil 


AMERICAN 

LAWYERS 

St James’s 

Audio secretary for partner. 
Ideal job for a bright young 
lady who is well presented. 
Previous legal experience not 
essential. Approx £9,000. 
Write with CV. to: 

Mrs. C. Collis, 

Third Floor, 

1L Waterloo Place, 

London, SW1Y 4AU. 

(NO AGENOES PLEASE) 


inWCl. Excellent coMmuofflon staBs. an 
ability to thrive under 
shorthand/audio typing skflls are aU 
mmireBMOts. An excellent negotiable sabiy is 


pima contact*- IWsa.Katffi 
01*242 0999 «t 222 


PORTUGAL 

S&Bys 


' RECEPTIONIST/ SECWETARY 
FOR DESIGN STUPI O 

SSKSSKSSSS 

wsssVKswi ssar - 

pjpmwiv un A g*»«* 



ADMMSTRATOft 



COMMONWEALTH 

JEWISH COUNCIL 

Needs organising sec- 
retary /administrator 


plications to: Tne 
Executive Director. 
Commonwealth Jew- 
ish Council. 25 
Victoria StreeL Lon- 
don SW1H0EX 


PROPERTY CO, 
SW7 

TMs is more DMA an aS 
nce fob but requires 
Initiative- Yeung am 
friendly team need an 
enttuefastic. MgM See- 
Mary to take <m a 
variety of wort. Good 
secretariat MUa nrete- 
sary and driving been 
combined with sense of 
humour an vm. __ 


MEDICAL 

SECRETARY 

To wiridok sues Con- 
sultant to run busy 
practice. Most be experi- 
enced. c o mp etent, with 
shorthand /audio skills 
and good telephone 
manner. Salary negotte- 
bta. T cKp no n* 01-*37 
4838/39 «■ SST 4905. 




Prestigious International Marketing Consultancy 
offers a unique opportunity for training mio a 
career in marketing. As secretary to one of the 
Executives you wdl iso be responsible for some 


^v.W - m'4 


W * w J‘ 


MARKETING EXECUTIVE s £9,500 

of the clients on the compan ,'s impressi-.e c : :em 
list The position v.iii sent a br *h: 2r.z toober who 
is able to weri: as part of 3 fusts 

and is keen to leant St ills oG'SC ts-rsrf-ftoirs 

Tft£ CT» 

OT-4999T75 

city v c : r ■ ■ FiNesse ■ 

'mwnnmLiB 


.A Wt&totA 

nv/// ^ 


DRIVE AND CONFIDENCE 

£ 10,000 

H you sra ready (or a positive raw career move 
you must dumonatrat a your varsatffity in han> 
tffing Tatephoo* Sales situations with a natural 
Hair and enthu s i a sm to guarantee success. Fua 
training given to a candictaie (20's. 30'!) who has 
a sound office background with an abOty to type 
and spell accurately. High financial rewards ana 
generous benefits are yours tor the picking! 

Call 588 3081 1 


MANAGING DIRECTOR'S 
SECRETARY 

£l(LS00pa + benefits 

We are a very successful company m the Lef- 
stae industry operating inns and pubs mainly in 
London and the Home Counties. We are cur- 
rency seeking a secretary for our Managing 
Director at our central London Head Office. 

To succeed you win be they type of person who 
enjoys a chaBenge - have worked at senior 
executive level and possess a flexible ap- 
proach. Aged 25+, you wfll have excellent S/H 
& typing and a good telephone manner. WP 
experience would be useful. Benefits indude 
BUPA. contributory pension scheme, LVs and 
22 days holiday. 

For further inf or m a tion and to arrange an in- 
terview please call Personnel on 01-630 1691. 


SECRETARIAL ASSISTANT 

Six month appointment 
through mid September 

Sdf motivated, flexible and enthusiastic pers on 
required to provide secretarial services to the 
Director of Programmes responsible for a wide 
range of stody/navd activities in London. 
Ability to wok in busy surroundings essential. 
Good shorthand and typing skills (100/60) 
required. Word processing experience an 
advantage or instruction will be given. Salary at 
the rate of E&JOOQ p^ free hutches are provided. 
Candidates should contact Charlotte Redfem to 
arrange a suitable time for interview ac 

The American Institute for Foreign Study, 
37 Queens Gate, 

London SW7 SHE. 
Telephone: ObSSl 2733. . 


EXPERIENCED SECRETARY 

Needed Immediately * 

Wc are the small London office of a large Japanese 
chemical company. We are looking fora person aged 
over25 who is we0 spoken, presentable, has a pleasant 
personality and appropriate professional feapenence in 
miming an office. Good typing is e s s e nt ia l and 
knowledge of word processing would be an advantage. 
The mana&R ait frequently away mi b u si n e s a, and 
need someone on whom they can rdy. 

An ap prop ria te salary will be paid to the right 
applicant. 

Please write with fiiD CV ta 
MrHUn 
Genoa! Manager 
Asain Chemical Industry Co Ltd 
54 Grosvenor Street 
Loudon Wl 


FRENCH 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 
IN MAYFAIR 

Managing Director of small fast moving consul- 
tancy requires a superb Secretary/P A. The work 
is demanding but varied and exciting. Top level 
professional skills are vital but also important is 
enthusiasm and team spirit Good appearance 
and dress seme, attractive telephone manner, 
lively iniefligcnce and sense of humour are all 
essentiaL 

£9,000 pa upwards plus benefits. 

Please telephone: 

Frances Coleman on 01-439 0875 


CHELSEA 
ESTATE AGENTS 

Young enthusiastic secretary urgently required 
for busy and fim rentals department Good 
S/H and typing essentiaL 

£8,000 pa 

Ring Catherine AM 
Ayfosfonf A Co 02-351-2383 


STOCKBROflUMG 


An opportnui. 


ly for someone (eufy 2W *bo to* ihiaily had tome experience 
ia 1 finanrnl e nv irem art to develop a oner in the City. Yon 
need to be abb to operate eqaaUy wefl in Englitit and French, 
and » have dental typing Aa cmraven personality and a w 
of bamonr would be appreciated. 

MULTILINGUAL SERVICES 
ffe u uiimea l Cousuftauts 
22 Charfcic Cross Read 
London WC2H OHR 
01-836 3794/5 


ASDIA&Al 


f / / Advertising £11.000 - Yeung 

/ / energetic PA needed for the 
/ / MJ3. o» the established agency 

/ where a team spirit is me key to 

/ success. Previous advertising expen- 

f once useful. 80/65 A udo 25-32 years. 

PA £8,500 - Account executive in top 
P.R. consultancy requires young and com- 
mitted secretary. A 1/T position with lots of 
scope and involvement. SO typing A level +. 

Video £8,500 - Friendly production company will 
give mvofvemenr and nBsponsitxJty to a secretary 
m their new Marketing Dept- A very exerting situ- 
ation. 80/50 W.P. 2d+ years. * 

Exhibitions E&000 - Working m a 1/1 rob wtthin 
a smafl team you witi be organising the advertis- 
ing and promotions side ot a major trade fair. 
Soma French/German useful. 80/60. 

M arketi ng £B£00 - Lively coflege leaver required 
for this young and highly professional marketing 
company in the* modem offices. 80/55. 


6298775 

Recruitment Consolrenh 


PA/SECRETARY to MD 
EC2 £7 ,500-29,000 aae 

Absorbing position for a well educated person 
aged 23+ to deal with advertising and the many 
varied situations which arise within this special- 
ist Recruitment Consultancy Group. 

This is a challenging position which will require 
a flexible approach to the variety- of work and 
where common sense and initiative will be well 
rewarded. Good audio typing essentiaL 

Please ring 01-828 6004 
Accountancy Personnel 
1 Glen House 
Stag Place 
Victoria SW1 


PA/SECRETARY 
FOR ADVERTISING AGENCY 

IN THE SULTANATE OF 
OMAN 

We are looking for an articulate, accurate, 
hardworking and quick person to join a newly 
established advertising agency in MuscaL 

We are part of a large Omani trading group 
and in addition to good tax free salary and 
benefits can offer you the opportunity to 
build a career according to your skills, experi- 
ence, drive and initiative in a professionally 
run and rapidly expanding business. 

Please send a short handwritten letter to Paul 
M. Griffin, SABCO Advertising, PO Box 
6779, Ruwi, Sultanate of Oman. 


SECRETARY/PA RICHMOND 

The Managing Director of a busy sales office of 
an Austrian company requires a very capable 
secretary with varied skills. Candidates should 
possess good oiganistaional abilities together 
with a nigh degree of self motivation. Basic 
bookeepiDB and the ability to speak German 
would be distinctly advantageous. Experience of 
working with computers and WP would also be 
usefbL Salary and benefits for this responsible 
position are negotiable. Applications from suit- 
ably experienced candidates accompanied by a 
full CV arc invited. 

Please rcptyux 

The Nfonagmg Director. 

Chemie unz UK Ltd, 

12 The Green, Richmond 
Surrey TW9 IPX. 


AUDIO SECRETARY 

for full partner. 25+ used to working under pres- 
sure. Shorthand and previous exp with 
surveyors an advantage but not essentiaL Deal- 
ing with developments and confidential work. 4 
weeks hols, dress allowance, LVs. Salary aae. 

Apply in writing ta 

Mrs BtihrOk 

STRUTT 6 PARKER, 

13 HiB Street, 

London, WJX SDL. 

(No Agencies) 


SECRETARY FDR ACCOUNTS 
PERSONNEL 
£6^00+ 

A State Oil Agency of a Middle East country requires 
an efficient junior secretary for its London office to 
work in the Accounts/Persoonel section. In addition to 
secretarial «fcttK *0* level accounts would be a definale 
advantage. Excellent shorthand as well as use of IBM 
word processor knowledge required. The successful 
candidate should be diplomatic and discreet and be 
able to communicate at all levels. Please ring Personnel 
Officer on 01-235 7060 and send CV particulars to 
General Petroleum and Mineral Services (Cl) Ltd. 15 
Knigbtsbrid^, London SWIX 7LY. 


EVENT ORGANISERS 
£7,500 neg 

Assistant/secretary for Director of expanding 
party plaiming/ promotions consultancy. Ability 
to bdp co-ordinate events and give sec back-up. 
Shouls be highly presentable, bright, well-spo- 
ken, ‘A’ levels. WP, 90/50. Basic book-keeping 
experience required. Age 19-23. Ring Caroline 
581 5351 


EXECUTIVE ACTION LIMITED 

Arc you a wB qui&led. wofl spoken, wafl presented 
Secretary 'PA 9 

A Career CouraeULns Agency situated in luxurious Offices 
in toe West End ot London mutrm shorthand Secretary 
/PA for Managing Director. Must have word processing 
experience and a very accurate shorthand A typing. The 
position win involve much client contact and requires an 
organised personable Secretary to oeal with a very Mgn 
went load. Salary circa £10.000 

Please phone Fiona Packer lor details on 01-651-1 UOer 
send your CV to Executive Action Limited- 57 Queen asm 
S treet London WIM 9TB 


The 

HatianJob 

Sepufl patera 
r rial and Sana pmetem e 
desidara lavorara 
nefleocaanre msndo del 
mexato cat capnab. quess 
pOOToneie imenssera 
Una date rmgbon Merchant 
Banks A m eneaneoate City 
cenauna persona 
tiranacacoe tavOft «xr» 
asstaarte person aie peri 
capo del Qrupao chos< 
oecupadefl'ltaba Hlavoto 

e esnemamenje vano b 
nchieda grand capacte 
Oigaruzzaruee 
concscenzd oete Coy. O 
sera da lenera delta 
conispcmdenza. pane date 
quaSe dr caranerc 
esranamerte 
oonwensaie Ancneses 
iavoramono-siecen 
ncompensanesio 
Crenamente com vtm nolle 
operasoni Usalanoed 
Cl 0-13.000 paj rmti i Boncf ic i 
oHenidateMnca. 
Tdephono 01-439 64 77 . 


• MucBLtin 

NASM-cmr 


IIBBI DRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

EUROPEAN FLAIR 

E9.00D 

Use yoor German and 
Frt*>cti on a aav-io-day 
bas<s wM you become 
completely nvohed vein tne 
Eutoaean ottos, wastfig 
w<n Cbents V person and ; 
over me pnone. as weS as a 
tot amount tV wtrwen and 
oral transubon As nvs tS B 
ca>ee< posmon. your 
reSPOnSOMKS Wd DO 
detemnned 0 y now we« you 

I utAse your adamstranve 
siuis and rntoove. Vten 
pood t>pmg c sit 

PATTI ROSS oa 
221 5072. 

T fei^aig^ ajafe 


LEGAL AUDIO SEC 
£9.800+ 

Senior Partner level, all 
Conveyancing. Will train 
Wang WP. EC1 
Solicitors. 

LEGAL AUDIO SEC 
£9,800+ 

DomBStic/Corranerci2l 
Conveyancing. Partner 
leveL Wl Solicitors. 

831-7622 

CLAYMAN 

LEGAL 

300 High Holbom 


PA/SECRETARY 
BELGRAVIA 
ART GALLERY 

Efficient and hard 
working person re- 
quired to run busy 
office. Good secretari- 
al skills, cheerful i 
manner and sense of 
humour. Start £9000 
pa. 

01-235 4526 


TEMPORARIES WTTH 
M ULTIMATE 
- WHERE ARE YOU? 

SuUerty MMmae stalls ae m 
great denand. wtothei you wart 
id woA m tne West End 01 the 
City vein oi yrthoui seu et aia i 
sUis «e iwe the nghea rates 
and exenmg assgnmeffls 
AES.0ta«ii act) cnwattis 
more man rrekorae, we need you 
ton 

174 Nm Bond Stmt. Wl. 


MEDICAL 

SECRETARY 

Physician & Sur- 
geon require 

experienced medical 
secretary/practice 
administrator for 
Harley StreeL 

Salary 
£7,500 aae 

Tel: 01-935 7505 


CREATIVE PA's 
Salaries £9,500+ 

Advertising and Market- 
ing Companies need top 
fUghi pa's aged 25/30 
with good education, 
shorthand /typing skills 
and presentation, excel- 
lent prospects to further 
career, 

Phonos 01-831 4978 


SEC/PA - INTL. 
CONSULTANTS 

cJE 12,000 + 

Unxjue opportunity to ion smal 
but fast expandng bin ot inter- 
national bmnesc and 
mvsstment considtanis ai 
Green Park as PA/SEC lo the 
MD Some knowfeOTe d Itaten. 
(lexMty, oMiy 10 wort nde- 
pendentiy and omanee day 10 
day nwing of otfee, WP wpe- 
nence end s cheerful 
dspasdion essonbal. Salary 
neg CET2.000 phis bows 
pfeBM nog O’ 451 2475 


IURKETWS • WT SALES 
05HIE6 

PA/ac 2S+ 100/50 tv Uro Bard 
OfKW dt pnmrent Co. ECi. A 
iMiy M wad posnsn. ms 1 
good aganoer. merit/ wxtxv a- 
moBBen 5 warts nob Rune 734 
37aorC7B476, i33MndSB«A 
(RtoCuiSI. 

MILLER 

MCN1SH 


PA/TOP PU6HT Sett Stoner lor 
aotr etioror ol ovsv otlicr aaa 

Enirwenuer^ noroe alain 
AOttity (a l«se at all M* 
Highly orgointed ond motivated 

ptr^nslili with warm FMendly 
nature suns jzo-tfO nnp 
Ilona) Bjlary. ApedV Miss F 
Howard- Mh> Jinn ftcenred 
Agency Telepnone Ql 8ZS- 
2063 


Golden Hello 

c.£ 16 k pkge 

T7«s ExacufiwB Director has been toviud m 
Jt*» the main Boaitl ol a poweriul financial 
congtomerate, totmed when Ms firm ol 
Stockbrokers joined with other eminent 
institutions. 

He wW reward a wall-presented PA of 
appropriate catty*, experience and abiily with a 


wiD expect s^xficant City expense possibly 
gained in Corporate Finance. 

This varied career role offers: extensive Client 
oontact (at ffie most senior level), scope to 
develop adm insliat ive systems, laison wdh staff 
throughout the Company and total responsihiity 
torco-oramaung meetings and providing teat. 
accurate secretarial skins \ 100/60). 

This is a Golden Hello suited to an ambitious 
perfectionist aged mid 80s currently earning 
c£t 0 k - who can work to exacting standards. 

Benefits include: mortqage. foai. paid 
overtime, bonus. BUPA. season ticket loan, 
subsidised restauranL 

Please telephone: 01-439 6477. 


( MacBlain'- . 

\ NASH-CITY / 


ho s, . 
ev J — r*. 
-j. ductinf 
> r :- Brili: 

er :n K ®ng 
is 171 ■ 1 Ting 
a \ 5!e iomh 

IS 

- SI pcopf 
w if the 6 
ie -es id 1.S 
r “ in !.'si B; 
c ~ 2 I Malr 
« ok 

51 rs. • is d 
* a la's 21 
1 % ention 
^ yc ncc c 
* 1 - 2 ttandii 
•s ? is. 


THE NATIONAL TRUSTe t 

requires L ri3 quaIi 

Secretary to The Secretary " n- »■ ■« 

Experienced secretary with first class skills, is al Su: 
required to work for busy Head of Department ‘j’ 919 . 
at the Trust's Head Office in London. Outgoing) " 32-paj 
personality and good telephone manner essen-j . x pu 
tiaL Salary range £7,500 pa. to £8,900 p^. - ^ . A pi 
Please write, enclosing a CV, to 

Margaret Harris r j; pp«> 

Personnel Officer 1 lC * 

The Nattonal Trust - ;V ^euie 

36 Qumui Anne’s Gate l n bur 

London 5W2H 9A5 > - fum 


SECRETARY TO MD 

As one of Londons Leading Catering Compa- 
ny we are looking for a highly compttent 
Secretary to provide full support for the 
Managing Director and Senior Executives 
within a small office. You should have wp 
experience & above all be flexible enjoy 
working under pressure in a team environ- 
ment & have an excellent telephone manner 
& sence of humour. 

Salary Circa £9.000. 

Apply in writing with CV to Kit Cuthbert 

CATERING & ALLIED 
SERVICES 

22 Chiswick Ngh Road London W4 ITE 


SECRETARY/PERSONAL 

ASSISTANT | 

£9,0Q0pa neg l 

This small but prestigious Management Consol- | 
tancy requires sec/PA 26+ to look after the E 
office and four delightful gentlemen. Must be l 
neat, well dressed and have a good sense of J 
humour whilst being efficient at shorthand and j 
typing and using own initiative. Phone or write j 
to Annie Price at: » 

Lewis Briggs International ? 

Suite 15 \ 

19a. Cavendish Square | 

London WiM 9 AD | 

Telephone 01 491 3057 } 


HEADMASTERS SECRETARY 
REQUIRED 

immediately for well known Independent Co-Ed u- 
catlonal Day School. Accommodation for single 
person available. Knowledge of accounts essential. 
Interesting, responsible post for someone possess- 
ing initiative and a sense of humour. Applications 
in writing giving fun details and two references to: 

The Headmaster 
Mostyn House School 
Parkgate 
South Wlrral 
Cheshire. L64 6SG 


KNIGHTSBRIDGE 

£10,000 + 

Two experienced Legal Audio 
Secretaries required to work for two 
busy partners in this small' friendly 
expanding firm of Solicitors with inter- 
national practice in modem offices 
with all the latest equipment Top sala- 
ries and bonuses. • 

Telephone 01-235 0222 

Rrf ST. 




TW 


c£ 11,000 


We are an expanding Recruitment Consultancy 
with an active presence in the highly competi- 
tive Permanant Placement Market 

Ideally, you will be experienced in this field and 
really enjoy a demanding and hectic environ- 
ment which is extremely rewarding in terms of 
bonus earnings and career progression. 

Sally Hall 

Office Systems Consultancy 
US Shaftesbury Avenue 
London WC2 


Churchill Clinic 

Medical Secretary 
/Nurse 

Needad for tNs private hospital now St. Thomas' to help n*i *o 
now Out-prams Department of 6 rooms and Mpteticaied 
support services. Secretarial and nuramg experience »» 
essential and tin post involves the o r ga nis a t i on Ot. and nursng 
responabrtnes lor. consulting rooms end a minor operations 
theatre. A good salary, benefits, and a pleasant anvranmera are 
ottered won tin post. 

Further derate and application tom tram 01-828 5633 €rt- 209 



WEST END ADVERTISING AGENCY 
SECRETARY/ PA 

The Managing Pinroor of ihh fat growing tpttc y reqnitcs a 
superb Seartary/PA. Previous capencncc in an agency oata- 
uaL Salary negotiable ixt 

Ether Paul Lte' 

Telephone Cfaftotr tVmlry m 0>-631 ^8S 




























LACR 



BERKELEY SQUARE C £12,000 

A senior partner of ihissmall but exclusive firm 
of executive search consultants needs a fast 
thinking and well educated PA/Secretary with 
a good sense of humour. As well as providinga 
first class secretarial back up to him you will 
also be responsible Tor assisting with the 
smooth runnmgoftheonice.Rustyshonhand, 

audio and Wfi Age 22-30. 

VICTORIA C £11,000 

This exclusive and fast moving financial 
company needsafirst class young secretary for 
their Managing Director. Speeds 90/60 + 
audio. Age 23-28. 

MAGAZINE, WI TO £9,000 

A newly -appointed Director of this prestigious 
magazine group is looking for a bright 
Secreiary/RA. to help organise her busy 

schedule. The successful applicant will be well- 

presented, enthusiastic and a bom organiser. 
Age 25ish. Speeds 100/70. 

COBBOLD AND DAVIS 
RECRUITMENT LTD. 

35 Braton Place W10M93 7789 


Judy Farquharson Limited 

4/ New Bond Street. London. W1Y 9HA. 
01-4938824 

COLLEGE LEAVERS 


ill 


Bright young secretary for exhibition 
organisers. Confident presentable with 
good shorthand and typing. Languages an 
advantage. 

Knightsbridge advertising agency need en- 
thusiastic college leaver with good speeds 
(90/60) to join team. Lots of involvement 
Rights/ Assistant for publishers with scope 
to progress. Good shorthand/typing. 
Mayfair estate agents need fively secretary 
with good skills. 

TEMPORARY APPOINTMENTS 

We are always keen to interview candidates 
with excellent secretarial skfls tar varied 
temporary assignments in the West End. 

RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


CREATIVE & MEDIA 

DESKM IWp wwh —hito i qw la £8,000 

WJBUSHWGc Etfoorfal and rights opttriag to £7,500 
nMUC RELATION* Prm idaom aod 
he w otnug pfcona to £8,000 

ADVERTISING: honor ogport u ai l ,. dm taar Harta £8.000 
Afl tba en* ports and good r faartfc wil ml/a typing. 


gyjtpTE??i 





r4FiWf?il: 





AMBITIOUS 


cfinounE m 

HI - TECH £9,500 + benefits 

This weft known comupter company need a Svely. 
efficient secretary bo jom the sales team at one of 
thar London Offices. Lots of admi nistra tion, 
telephone contact with, clients and m oot i n g s to 
arrange. SkjSs 80/55. audio and WP experience. 

FASHION £9,000 

This large fashion group are looking for a well 
groomed secretary to assist one of their Director's. 
Lots of confidential work, basing with other 
departments and travel arrangements. No short- 
hand, typing 60 wpm. auefco aid WP experience. 
Perks include substantial discounts on clothes and 
accessories. 

please telephone: 01-499 8070 

L 46 Old Bond Street London W.l. 

CAROLINE KMG SECRETARIAL APPOMTIIBnS 


CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS 
c£1 2,000 

Exciting qpportirity tor an IntBflganL. artiaiatB person to work 
lor the Deputy Chaaman of a htaWy successful. rapxSy 
exporting company. Re sp or stt Xflttes Include Bason with hgn 
level executives and major political figures, hamffng 
presentations social fimctnns and PA. activities In addKtan to 
general PA duties are] personnel matters. Skits of 100/60 
wpm, smart presentation. 'A' levels and experience in ties Raid 
essential Age 27-33. 

434 4512 

Crone Corkill 

Recruitment Consultants 

99 Regent Street 


MARCH INTO APRIL 

with 

OUR TEMPORARY TEAM 

£6.20p.h. 

Our busy team of professional tamporary secretaries are always In demand, and it 
has established an excellent reputation over the years, 
tf you are a first dass, senior level secretary with speeds of 100/80, 2 years Director 
level experience In central London, and proficient wool processing skfls. we can 
otter you an Interesting variety of temporary aecretaria! assignments and the best 
rates in London. 

Our skSed temps are aft paid the same rates and are frequently offered too 
opport u nity of temping into a permanent position. 

If you would flee to tamp at the level you deserve and be positively appreciated, 

please telephone for an appointment or a tactsheet 

01-434 4512 (West End) 01-588 3535 


Crone Corkill 

Recruttment Consultants 


PERSONNEL 


We are cwrentiy handling several 
excellent positions at both 
secretarial and executive level hi 
Personnel. Some offer skilled 
secretaries an opportunity to make 
a bat move into this raid: one 
position (salary c£1 4,000) needs a 
graduate with proven personnel 
experience. 



MEDIA 

£7,500 - £10,000 

We have a wide variety of 
opportunities for secretaries who 
would Bra to work in the tallowing 
areas: 

Cable TV, Publshmg, Pubfic 
Relations, Exhibitions. 

In most cases, you wfl need at 
least 12 months experience plus 
good shorthand and typing skHs. 

‘“SfeS. 

rS^isiiil 


OFFICE MANAGER/PA £13,000 

Set up new offices tor this American Company ot 
Architects based near West End where your exedte nt 
ORGANISING and secretarial skfls dong with WP 
experience to necessary. 

CREME DE LA CREME PA £9,000 NEG 

This to an excellent opening for a HaxHe 




withm the largest sports car company m the l/K, where 
your high level of initiative end motivation talents wlf be 
appreciated. . 

MATURE EXEC SEC £10,250 

TWs to a senior position for a mature Secretary age pretf 
35-i- who enjoys organising a dema n efing but chanrwra 
Senior Director who delegates. Shorthand and WP 
experience is necessary. 

01-623 4688 


w 


. cittreckuitmentI 
CONSULTANTS 

5c Hcir.diiti, 

Lc"d:r: £CSA 7D1 


BEAUTY + STYLE 
£8,500 

K you are keen to team about cos- 
metics and mar ket in g then here is 
an opportunity to join this exclusive 
cosmetics and fragrance house. As 


er, you erifl need to t» ww t 
organised, en ergetic arid flee re- 
sponsibility. The company 
atmosphere is glamorous and 
friendly. 90/BO Skas need«A .\ 

. 03WS51 JtiZQbE 


CITY BANKING;' 
£9,000 

Join this dynamic merchant bank as 
secretary to a senior' manager in 
corporate finance. A Rvely, fastmov- 
- ing env iro nment where yur sotmd 
secretarial skfls arid abfttyto think 


to think 


and act quckhr and effectively will 
be valued! T<fo/60 Skfls and 18 
moftite secretarial experience are 

n .murttlal -r - 

8S8w1I^k.,; % _ >Z ■ i"*. , 


ElizabethHunt 

iifi.iM te<n4rnent'G3n5ijfcantSrt»» 


. fianasRvu 


Secretary/PA £15-£20,000 
WI Business & Social 


Our cflenL an International business man, requms an 
executeo PA/Secrecwy wSh exce O an t sh/typ state to 
handle Ms busmans and private atfairs In the UK. 
Working fro m a am al b ut presagte us offica to WI an 
ta/lw own ■■leave, co-onfinamg he many Intannte - 
social, home. tamrfy. busnass and fine arts. 

The right canrfidate wH be aged 30-40, hawi previous 
chief exacuiMi experience, an intere s t In iha aria, tlw 
presence to balsa Mh people at teltevate and ba a good 
organiser. Salary £15-E2ft000 aae. 

Please send det te ed caifcitai wltee fo 


9CII 


jm CflOSTHWUTE RtOTURMENI UD 
21 BEMKHM 1 PLACE. LJDMXMSW3UfQ 
THEPHM 01-581 29772947 



PART TIME 

SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST 

for Wl dental surgery. Some typing and boofceeping. 
Use of computer keyboard. Hours and salary by 
arr angement. 

Telephone 
01-935 3438 
Mr Trewin. 


PR SECRETARY 

Superb opportunity tor a Secretary to Join a busy Covert 
Garden PH agency! Working within Consuner DMamn 
(specaksrtg m rood) each day Is varied end traeresttog. 
Ap pfl ca nt s educate d to fiteve l standard with some w ork 
experience. Should have Inioatiw. good communications and 
accurate typing state (s/h not essential). or ga n wan onH afitay 
retd entiustasta Salary nego ti ate 

nag Afieoo (Mm on 01-SH 2843 


1ST JOB 



Susan Beck 

i-ieCR-JlTMEST 0‘ 5S4 6?42 


RECEPTIONIST 


TO £8,000 

A successM PR Company 
with beautiful offices n 
Central London needs a 
first dass receptiomst to 
tan thenr reception Nan. 
With two others you vmft 
greet cherts, took after a 
Monarch switchboard and 
attend to varied reception 
(kibes. - 

Bernadette 
of Bond St. 

feULEMdiBBraMim 

flHtatZH 



NG 

With Languages 
£8,500 

Multinational Company, 
cuknary requsttes, otters 
rare opportunity lor 
experienced Secretary 
23/26 woti good French 
and rusty German to work 
at Director level hi this 
exciting situation. 

Witn your good short- 
hand, typing stalls, phone 
Monka: 

01-831 0666 


SALES SEC 
£9J)00 

■OMM UK coot 






wa^nrtd to m matura and 


■w testvon ndusvy or 
piMc rarmons. Typng a 


! HUMPHRIES « 
ZZ1 5071 


MEET YOUR 
MATCH 

£11,000 + M/G 

One of the besMcnown and 

leading UK banks roqures 
a dkgant secretary to assist 
one of its brightest young 
stare. Liaising si Director 
level and above, you wifl 
become involved in 
con fi dent ia l deW. Incfadlng 

Personnel Remuneration 
and Mormabon on the 
bank's standing. 

Age 25-36. you wM be reed 
to working at a fast pace, 
ba adnxt on tha phone, and 
have exoeitont 


Word processing 

experience is desirette, 
and good secretarial state 
essential (100/80). 

CUY OFRCE 
726 8491 


FINE. ARTS / £9,000 

We arelooking for a capable secretary 
to help run a small fund raising 
department and organise social 
events. Age c23. 90/60. French useful 

ADVERTISING £9,500 

Our efient, a well know advertising 
agency, are expanding and need an 
excellent secretary for their No. 1 
Accounts Director. Lovely 
atmosphere. Advertising experience 
useful. Age c22. 80/60. . 


The MDofsi Informal 
market research 
company requires a 
bri gh t enthusiastic 'PA, 
who wll also take 
responsibility lor office 
admtnksirarion. ...And 
personnel. 

-Your wll-bo IriviDlved in 
overseeing ; ‘.Office 
services. haindBng 
secretarial recrutmertt 
as weft- as minuting 
Board Mae Sn gs. aid 
preparing reports :and 


m 




TM. International LM 
Secmanal 
Recrutomt 
HHansCrescortSWl 




CfiKOUflE KIRQ 

TEMPS! TEMPS! TEMPS! 

We LR^ntfy need to recrutt experienced and 
adaptable staff to compfement our busy, 
experienced team. If you have excellent 
skfls - especially word processing, please 
telephone Brenda Stewart on 

01-4998070 


TEMPING WITH 
A DIFFERENCE 

Why take jest any tem- 
porary secretarial |0b 
when Wi could work n 
TLLEVSON. films. 
ADVERTISING. PUBLIC 
RELATIONS OR PUB- 
LISHING? we have lots 
ot vacancies and after 
exitoStent rates - and 
what's more we pay you 
n the same week! 

Why not call us today 
ore 

01-499 6566 
or 01-493 8383 




niRI-.CTORS’ 

SH:KbT.\Rii:s 

r--- ^ 


01-629 9323 


PERSONNEL 

MONEY MARKET 

£104100 

Travel u America at least 
once a year whan you act 
as PA to ma Director of 
die brokerage. Vou may 
be mooed to oeSver tne 
odd certificate to New 
York and must be able to 
heeg calm m tne hec&c 
dealing room atmosphere. 
Your shorthand and 
twang state wW be uateed 
as wefl as your Aar for 
organisation. 

CaS LYNN LA IT TODAY 
ON 227 5072. 



TEMP IN THE CITY 

If you have good shorthand, audio, copy 
typing or word processing skills we’d very 
much Rke you to join our City temporary 
division. We handle a variety of interesting 
short and long term assignments for many 
famous name clients and now would tike 
to increase our applicant register. To dis- 
cuss your requirements and availability 
please telephone Fiona. 

. 0L2® 3551 Elizabeth Hunt 0L240353 

— ag.ABMifipwi.a-i. ^ 




i.V> yia-nkirir 

fl “ 1 Tj'pMT 1 




ii- f »•»% t 

JR- 

sa 












































4 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 




INCENTIVE TRAVEL 

C^**" 3 * Satoy a*. Plea* write JSh 



J®MttTAmr 
c ^MO m. 


£2E£ 

iff" ** 

^«82<«t5SrtffiS57 

ABmarte 

01-409 0040 - 




sries 


solicitors pa/sechetary - 

WCl 

Senior fitigatfon 
firsa requites 
trathne skills. 


in yo ung e xpanding 
— retary with adininis- 
around £9,500. 




ESTATE AGENTS 


Busy South Ken Office requires keen, young, 
**“spoken sec with excellent office stalls (no 
ShomMnd, but wonl processor experience). 
Good salary. 

GabvM U-3704711. 


Hampton & Sons 



ap i Bnu w.w 
*■ A bMmW oner lonse in tfatta ancfa% tonor de- 


sEsli 


m, 4 tartar tuadt tabs, 2 man 


psSHS® masts 

w» w wImIm mmTkvu sun ntM*noi™ fu 


WCi 

cunuB w 


. 4aBn0MirtiH«ataianai4BRtaBs. 

Mtajupas Smwbo fractal non tay J fata bta- 


6 Arlington Street London SW1A1RB 


01-4938222 


KOBSTEB REISES, 
VEST SUSSEX 

Nwmi Ita* ? rata. <63 B nfa. 


SnoMW «*» jaw cafc KssKag, 

^etaoran b&mmkZ 



III 


:i.Mv 
^ >2 


*«e ? 

•• • • .-■• te-i. 

J . ; :> /• ■ •*•'.- 


PERSONNEL 

EXECUTIVE PA 
nSUSHMG 

rajas 



rtfllM M 08 *-"" f “ 
Ujfatajoy praam, taro 

EaaUPfUCEM 

834 m 



RECRWTMENT CONSULTANTS 

One ol tte top 10 M Agendas is 
DflertaQ 2 manetBui oepominl- 
Ubs bi ttnr Media Dept for 2 


totaak Mb Us taunting io- 
States c. E&500 ml t 

MnMkral Ad Agency «M*to*2 
jumi seartartes torn Inge at an- 
ew and danu » walk In Mr 
mqr but extremely busy Cbm 
Hradtag Dm Mm kw poo J 

ss.-ssr "■ K 

FU— « n a i4 e« ta ita»Jtab. 


mynt 


MA.- 
"4*-. * 


■VI* - 


■ ft" • 


** • * » 


. : - •»#* T 

--••.15. 


•« 

i - «• 


"i-SVl***.. 

•ia:e -a* 
' .-it 


wta luxury IMS aM Mm 
rrocn £200 - £ 1.000 w. DM 
Burgos ■ EMM •Aaeaw SBt B13& 
■Uumnn. luxury swvind Itals 
Monde Aaxt/BayavUtr. CISO 
K» £400 PW, 01 794 0104. Oil 
446 7742 W 0636020303X0. 


KMaHTSSSUDOE QXto/IMKaai 
naHabte- now. JUOO-UOOO pw 
i 01-601 0130. 

— MR m. UL____ _ 
M/MWU aprtRMM. Terrace. 
Cngs Co' let only. 
£l7Spw.Teb 724 8897. 

HA MWHI <■«. Peg— « ttu 
Ul Mk. with porterage. note MS. 
Inge. 9*p HU. all martyoea. £200 
pw me. 402 2606- 
MD m dMi'mw nH. recto 
2S* a 20*. 2 beds. M kta + bam. 
C+C. 0— CM. 12 MM +. £210 
pw. x me DBM— 482 2277 
Hmn.4 bad del hM. 2 b— M. 3 
rec. corn pw 4- many mmi 
P ippa. waned Rentals. Ol 78S 
6222. 

sroDamant m mu Mietdftd 
2 -dM bed flat oiooktog O* 
square. Avan now. lone ML 
£200 —. Banana— 361 T767 
MM. InmmeuMMl bad flat talma 
tot of Ctopnacn CM Town. 

Tuny nntatied. cioo yw co M( 

only. Morgan OUtaTCo 74m. 

SST MU The number to raoe— ■ 

ber wnen seeking best rental 

nropraUes tn central and pekoe 

mBO/£2jOOOyw. 


bed oa» wHi tenaca. muv ftan. 

4 Mbs nwaM. £390 pan. 

Co. ltd enty. 229-1060. 

W14L 1 bed Oat wBh W dwIl In 
Bnnd new — ivndcn. 3 mini 
tube. Choice ot 4. £120 pw. Co 
M only 937 9683. 

COtntAU bedML DbDM. nr BMe. 
£36 pw. om— ail areas 01-627 
2610 


EWGAPP 


CUUWW SOOTH S»Wt2 
Gloss tube snd anwrabes 
hail 1/2 bed flat m conver- 
sion. T/2 reap, bath + 
shower attt*etL modem ft 
Ut/cbier + washcr/dr^r. 
Pi-note gdn. Avad now. Co let 
pref. Em pw. 

We require proposes in Cen- 
ii A Sooth & West London 
areas for waiting a pp tams. 



W* targe fsmfly 

house m good rmnouial am. 

tmmoculaieiy daco c — ed ami 

fura— ia g . ides) for enunm- 

tng. 3 bedims. 2 bain ms. 2 

recap ms, larer — in ul 

study/KodM. Garden. Co. 
lease. 1 yr T.' WfiOtw. 
AROUND TOWN Ol -229 9966. 


auYFAHt tall hoc self cone tarn 
flat 1 large oednn cuaune bam- 
room. lens. kBchen fuHy 
coutooed. £200 pw. short Ms 
629 2646 IU. 


'•ST Nq£^tir~ dWanb. 
execuUves ung 6 mart MO be 
aB arms. Unfriend & Co. 48. 
Albemarle SI W I . Ol 499 6334. 


UiMfWy funuJ ied a*—— 
.ftamcn 837-7360. 


NOVTKUI WALK SW7. 3 
mins Hanods. 4 mins Nude 
Park. Luxurious wen lundshM 
A equipped Oar. Z rec. 2 note 
bedfms. fed. tan. bam a oks. 
Outer a -Huey. All uuoinit is- 
ounces. Cd TV. gas CH. 
□replace, phone. Company tat. 
1 year from Id APML No 
agents. 3896466. 

RAKER Cr/MMDtn PARK 
m central a—m 
moderntownnouse with goe in 
outat maws. 2 beds. 2 baths. dM 
reep. Avail now for long cn tat. 
unfurntabed wtm carpets- cut 
lal» A AH machines. £198 pw. 
BuctaiUM 3S1 7767 

CWEUHEA Ctanxdap newly dec i 
dtlt bed flat for careful tenanl. 
£118 PW TW 532 9710 


^ElE^ 

IV Graves 

MAYFAIR, W1 
Sdcctan nl Wyittnued tnurt 
on umbos, sauted m own 
resricnm tartan psi <tl (koy 
usw Sq. These audnuMs ire 
5 d n « neWy ratarbota) b«k 


oraugta na gnes and a mybM 
nutysMl tM M Ur 
comeO na knuy samurd ml 
■UM OMlOl Ul «n« na» 
m Hdwa Untv based 

sr-“ 



< u— i CAM meamo seek 

tux ftvs/hdiam w lo £300 
pw. Usual tea req- PhUlpa 
K*y A Lewis. South of me Park. 
Cnttaea office. 01-362 8111 or 
North of me Park. Regent's 
Park office. 01-722 3136. 

LET TOUR H IO WBTY wRh 
greater flrxi bMIt y Oman hut 

fund lure for short or long term 


Rita Mr MMhael Norbiay. 

John strand Contracts Ud. Tel 

Ol 485 8616. 


home. comMetety l ef u rtamed- 
6 beds. 3 baths efutc. Unfur- 
ntaticd with cundM. carpets 
and an machines. Long tat CSOO 
pw. Buchanans 381-7767 
CMHW1CIU 2 bMtflat. washer, 
chfld okay. £120 pw. Others 
627 2&lO HomttocMara 
HOLLAND RARK ROOSC. 3 beds. 
2 Mbs. garden, oidet street. 
New rrfurtx£62Sow.937 0681. 
KENSINGTON! sre audio Lv.. 
ptatL Dhooe. £70 aw. Others 
too. 629 2610 Homeinramra 


A nses to real fen mural Lon- 
don. Samuel & Co 736 5000. 
MAVnUH dbte studio, nr. lube. 
XI IO pw.Othm N>o. Ol- 627 
2610 HontcMcaiara 
MATTAK/HTDE PARK. Long / 
short lets. Best one—. W. T. P. 
935 9512. 

MOM WMISC. IO mm CXWWt. 
Fufly equipped- C/M. CO. let. 
£230 pw. Tel: Rode 482 3400. 
MW 2 bedraaned naL no bills, 
rung. £80 pw. others loo. Ol- 
627 2610 HoraelacalOM 
HMUCtL Oegui rweapL dbf 
bettras. sol bedrm. in CH. 
ON T.V. £120 p.w. 834 9723. 

F WHOIt HU. caMam dn g tote- 
riar deagned 2 bed tiaL Use 
OOtt. £270 pw. 606 9842 J.T. 


SOUTH KBtSMGTtW SW7 V 
Modem newly dec and 
fum Rat m good 
conwraoa 1 race p. 2 
dMe/twm bed fm*. i tsth 
rm. 1 stwmr rm. H «t 
£310 pw. 01-225 1972. 
NORTH KSCDlfiTOW HUO 
Superb newty cammed 
ground floor Itai n nmaG' 
mate Oder ttvoughouL 3 
bed mis. 2 (ntfstm. (1 an 
sons}. 22ft raoep. If tat. 
£375 pw 01-727 7227. 

HAMPSTEAD INO 
ExceSore UMFURN rased 
floor Rat ai sMlurb 
order. Brand 
now carpets and curtains. 
Spu level recap. 3 bed 
run. 2 bath rms (1 en 
state) U.S tM* wt £4pO 
pw. 01-722 7101. 


EROMFTDN PARK CRESCfflT SW6 
Excellent sefecticn of one ancT 
two bedrm. flats in extremely 
good p/b development with use 
of sports complex and parking. 
Available now for 6/12 months. 
Company let only. 216Q-E250 
per week. 

Kensington Office 01-937 7244 


Wide range ol quality furnished 
arc) uniurfesnea property 
• Full Management Service 



* LegaiSTar-Advce 

Personalised Service ttuougn 
7 computer hnhed oflices 


1 5- 


RIVERSIDE, GARNET ST, El . 

Attractive two bedroon 
Maisonette in newly refurbished 
purpose built block. Communa 
gardens. Perldng space. Ufl 
Porterage. ExceBent Security 
Available 6 months phis. £13! 
per week- 
Hyde Park Office: 01-262 5860 - 


1 


:ro 

ir. - 

op 

na..." 



Baigets 


WANTS) 


Vhim awkCBta Irani nUh 

none wgour ngnt feann n 
He pom t ana a * Wont m and 
mm LondaP 
fleRous 
EtareHaioB 

81-724 3168. 


STUi SEARCHING? 

We bwe tte ftattH tv you! 

Rental Accommoctawo acress 

tag Nanon. 37 vaictics 
ttaudiuM Sreal Brttn. Wte 
aryfesK, ftais BEDsrfS. 
amm a stoma, ow is 

g enwnence Woridonie. 
tales. Mis. ft PBS our 

S< *H0ME10CATCRS 

RENTAL ACCOM. PUBLISHERS 
01 720 2028 
OR CALL YOUR LOCAL OFFICE 
OPEN 7 DAYS 


AROUND TOWN 

120 Holland Park Ave 

Wit 

Campden MO gdns W8 
reagntatcanl views from thta 
lovely penthouse maison- 
ette. 3 b edroom*. 2 
Bathrooms, reception. B Idl 
with breakfast bar. Dmtaig 
area. Terrace. CO. LeL 1 yr 
+ X350pw. 

229 9966. 


CLOSE 7D WER AND KAMI lo 

Juer Sr. Battersea. Oiamine 3 
dble bed family Muc Cic dec. 
enter. FuDytwn. Avail now lor 
M monrhs. Co Enumsa* tel 
only. £280 pw. 01-387 1476/- 
fitoe Ref Gar 


GOING 

OVERSEAS? 

WE HAVE WAITMj 
COMR ft NY TENANTS ■ 
WANTING TO RENT 
YOUR HOME M 
CENTRAL LMOON 

Buchanans 

Liflagl Ui m p atm 

01-3517767 



=if^ 

STaMffla 

I Par Watt £ | 

B HWSCflS GEHX I 

S-eal uaura Iwm 

rancT 

ue 

2 OM G&ycian nose 

otsunat 

290 

4- be: own feotSfe 

PMlICfl SW! 

290 

2 -fwc na 

1TO 

EAST RMCmEY 


New 2 MU tea 

« 



ROBERT BRUCE 

GREYCOAT GARDENS SW1 
Rat on 4tn floor avadeole 
for sftorr las. SdOng room, 
good «8 kixhen. double 
bedroom. bathroom. 
AvaHaote tor 1-3 raomns. 
E22£pw. 

WLLGATE STUBS! WS 
Ctermmg house oorsst- 
ng ol 2 double beorooms. 
boot wnn oatnooms en- 
sure, recapfton room and 
kitcnen/dmer. Av^ilamo 
tor 1 yew. E350pw 

ST. JAMES HOUSE 
13 KENSINGTON SO. 
01-337 3664. 


BO. ORA VIA. New ruzury 

w-niced Oil BroinUid an 
noun. Urge roof garden I 
tMd.Mtnnq room. dmiiHl room, 
lot. Oalh. TV. wrreo £270. Tel' 
233 0260 5891697 


• pLEltlNG?? 

■ > -r‘- 

i our : 

'.^'■^pecialist f. : 

;XJEC>R(;B -KNIGHT 

’ > Tt>J f cnlnf Lj.'rnC 

i:1 55-157. KTiiphisbridgi- 
,'i^Sr" j.l;«i3on : SVV1 v- 

S v :Tei:589'fl53# 


DRAYTON GARDENS SHU 

Siureous nm - good lor rTUT. 
taming a ores. 2 astro. 
rku> r. 3 re ceps, kn , Break. 
£630 pw 


Cmlrajay tocated rial 2 Wh, 
1 bani. I recep. kn, break. 
£260 pw 

QRR— EWING 
ASSOCIATES 
01 581 8025 


KNIGHTSBR1DGE 

5 irtes Harrods/Hyde Park. 
Charm dig bouse m oust sheet. 
crmpMtiv rdabahed md 
7.3 rpcep. 3/4 beds. 3 bate, 
pkc WC. Bosch Kiichen. Gas 
CH. Utdin/hmsoMl I year 
Compjny lei E600 pw uxei 

01-584 5799 


PUTMEY1 no bllta brdsu. 1 1- 
phone, nr robe. £3Uow. Other 
6Z7 2610 Honwtoolon 
REGStrn PAHK ' Portland Race. 
Magnu lux relurb 2 bed rial All 
mad eons. C2t>apw. 935 9056. 
VKTORUU betbir only feiL Lr. 
phone £39pw. Others loo. 01- 
627 2610 Homeiocaiors 
W2. Share lux mews cottage Dbl 
rm. Suu prof ad t/wgge-£32& 
pent. 220 4522. 

WEST EMM Ewe style I bed- 
room hat. r v. Mdno. £90 pw. 
01 627 2610 Homeiocaiors 

CHELSCA FLAT, Off Cheyne 
walk 2 Beth. 2 oaths. 2 rceepr. 
new rcfuniX 228 pw. 957 9681 
SW5 Lirktiry I double bedroom 
rial Filled Mtehen Ail rea 
chine* ewe la lube £150 pw. 
Co tel only Tel: 673 JTi 2 6.30- 
8 30 pm. 


11 
li 

ISv 

Douglas, I^ons & Lyons' * 3 |g| 

Due to a tremendous increase in the demand, cr |Jp ^ong 
for trath furnished and unfurnished proper!) j is 
in Central London, we urgently require good; izj 
quality florc and houses to let to awaiting 
aunpanies. 



• 01 - 2357933 - 


UPFRIEND 

ST. JOHNS WOOD. Mgtll SQK W 
pmshgous sk Cose Hegwh h 3 
[Mdims. 7 hubs. atM imp. Ur U if | 
nudi £300 
SLOANE sa UU turn of m vmn 
msbae t*. Z beams, nee Keep. 
mod U & bxtam. mo CH E2S0 
HiGHOATE 2 bed am moo oik 
Attnanehr tam KU. age. gm. Cttsel 
uk ET35 

01-499 S334 


SPECIALISTS are 

currcndy seeking good duality 
rental accommodation in 
central London lor waluna 
com pany tenants 01-937 9681 

CHEUUCA in brand new redec- 
orated 2 bed nal in rasman^Ae 
Chrlsn Square. Great *o cation, 
long cn tat. £260 pw. Buchan- 
ans 561 7767 

REGENTS PARK. Prince Albert 
HQ Lux Period Fum Carden 
FLu wnn gtny 2-3 beds 
Lono Let £210 PW. Td 01 722 
4070 

KENT 'SURREY HORP O L 

Drulchrd hocar.4 beds CM. 
fully equipped mo d ernised 
Idlrhrn. Garage .garden, ivsy 
commutlim. £460 con. Refer 
enrei required 0752 965255. 

BATTERSEA SW1L- hteSty rant 
rial, bedrm. rec rm. k & b. Avail 
powrorCoki £96 pw. Samuel 
A Oo 736 6000. 

(KLSKAVtA CHELSEA 

KMGKTSaniDCC flam /houses 
available now £ 100 - 1.000 gw 
Burgess 01 681 6136. 

DTK PARK W2. UMone t 
bed -studM amrlmenl. Terrace. 
Gcungr Co let only 
£t7Spw.TH: 724 8897. 

-JUKE tor I year 3 
tar .-(lax. SWt. SW3. 
SWT. W8. NWS or N6. On let. 
£200 pw max. Ol 3BTl490m. 

AM EECtl.I.rHT SELECT10M Of 
flats- houses, bedsits. London 
Apartments- Ol 244 7363 

SW1 Very attractive unfurnished 
house newly decorated. 4 beds. 
2 ballm. 3 r*rp> large kn. all 
machines, roof terrace grd Co 
lei X*2S PH> Te*. Ol 838-OOCO 


PLAZA ESTATE 


m. 
ilc 
is 
2SL 

■** 

“ >es 
r -nn 
c- a 

^ 5k 

St 


i Ting 

south 


FLOOD STREET SW3 

Beaurfui Jno dpex Rat ttaOBOM 
•wnsned mqi nm J Md*. 

Bums ante iscep. Mao kx £3 
Dm 

HOLLYWOOD MEWS SW1, 

Anracb/e owners own hor 
aeadaole to up to 6 months. 2 dt- IS iS 


n. 

:e 3 

■nj 


bens. 2 hams it an uoai .. 

stuoy. Ead kit. ggt From 050 pJ 
DANVERS STREET SW3- 
Tiaooonate tonatad lower gnd 
rial Statute to aaananog Dr 
bed. ben. 2 recaps, nx Long i 

1200 pw. 

01-581 7646 


it 


i 9S- 


peopJ 
jflhe6 
id l.5( 
list 
Malr 

• is d 
ia's 21 
ention 
nee c- 
nandu 
ts. 


S ts 


CLAPHAM 2 Bedrm flat nr h 
CH W. rerepL £120 pw. ( 
era 627 2610 Honieiocaton 
HOLLAND PARK HOU8C- 3 ba 
2 baths, garden, quiet Sr 

New rrlurb£62Spw 937 96 
KEMsaeeroM */< uuoio. - 
parking £76 pw Omereiooc 
2610 Nomekjcator* 

■AIM VAU3 2 bedrm gan 
na). Pm Memo £104 pw C 
en 627 2610 HotmAocafon 

MARIA VALE Gontf 2 bed 
GCH. nr tube 3-6 mills 
pw 0532 433144. Dr. Hole 


1C a 

>r \rj 

r- 

T1 „ 
r- 


■s. 


•j- J 


lv 


quali 
». toe 
»ing tl 
al Su> 
919. 
3--pai 
x pul 
. Api 


s 3 “ fer 


Dbte bedsit, c — - r 
kiictien. £40 pw Others ,, 

627 2610 HomeMCUon. 11 

Ptroenf’. Dele bedrm garden ■ Tl _ 
phone. £9S pw Others uto- _ _ 
2610 HomefocHors. v . 

K6EKTS PARK- Portland PI ? 
Mbgmf lux refurb 2 bed flat. 1 
mod cons. £28Sow 93G 9C q 

ROLAND aOHl 8W7 charain If -~ 
bed ftai. Newly re-dec £130 L 
Key cock & Cn 01 384 686 n it 

SW 2 Brora flat, peta aM > 'f S 

dren ok. TV. £86 pw 0(1 , 

627 2610 Hdmehmars. •• 


;t 


WEST EMU Dbte bedrm rial 
tube, recepl. £90 pw Others — i 
627 2610 HomelOCMUirs 


.^emc 
n bur 
func 
e ar 
frani 

er 

ru hi 
aiion- 
jse i 


bedrm hoi 
wuhrr. snarers ok, £150 i 
Olhere 627 2610 Hronefocai- 


AUDIO SECRETARY 
BUSY SURVEYORS OFFICE 

In West End Accurate typing essential 50/60 
wptiu WP experience (will cross tram). 
Send C.V. tinder rtf CWD/5: 

BERNARD THORPE 
& PARTNERS 

19/24 Saint George Street, 

Hanover Sfne, 

London, WlA OPT. 

{No Agencies) 


SUPER SECRETARIES 




A.-IC 




.7 .» • 

r 

.. - • .'r 

jt e 3 
; C- 
... r. 

■-i 


OIL 


£7,2504- 


A State Oil Agency . of a Middle East Country 
requires an efficient secretary in its London of- 
fice to wort in a busy research section, fix 
addition to general secretarial skills, applicants 
must be able to use a Wf„ (preferably IBM). 
Good shorthand as wdl as interest in world 
affairs will be a definite asset. 

The right candidate has a good opportunity for 
personal development and future prospects. 
Please ring Personnel Officer on 01-235 7060 
and send CV particulars to General Petroleum 
and Mineral Services (C3) Ltd. 15 
Knighstbridge. London SW1X 7LY. 






• ' 1 

it ;> j^". 


59300 


small active coroner- 
dal Estate Agency to 
west t is seekfno a 
young ctreerful and 
Uutobly secretary to 
took after the two Di- 
rectors. Pour weeks 
holiday 

REFERENCE D-B 

TELEPHONE 

01-491-2700 


busy 

ESTATE A®W1* 



Caona Hc«K PwyJaom 
5466 LOW 
State State, tog*" SWt. 

Tefi 01-730 8752 



& 


a , 


I MGRtakte M 

SSraS m'VSSS&t 

Dolarfif 

Ml ie -worti In 

Ptauta ^ **r „ TSSSt 
SeSfesaura Ttawt -^-SOQ 

m CfrBOO BA. Ptetaf writ e, qt - 

Shwi cy. m wnggiaga 

?sr»ssr»s»® K 

SWIH 9A&- 


■as -von a iw ii w ffS 

SSSSaa SSSiTeSv 22 * 

MteMr gnat 








e mu* 

SB ST Uteppawmi e 
piwMI U«B8taaa01439 

3 M?n£vM 6 Pameand 


AMBITIOUS 

ACCOUNTS 

ASSISTANT 

Young Or* or second ten- 
ter wtth ’A’ tevm MM* 
tywngttletfly *» of 

Ctaftertd Accountants l»- 

.in mvemtoe 
hy Tower 
(own s wtp u ntpg 

pogio. A nauty good on- 

poctunay to progre* ■ w* 

wU leech yuo. Good 
salary. - 

•tai tin tantaaml 
ealUUITIL 


MILL HULL aeacd Oomanarte- 
votved antenteHoteMbr tava 


pa w wort at Dtrertar tat—L 

Ahtoteswrowtoblnaltaran^ 

<ng anrtroutetet 
f mfflpiw to get (Wiy In. 
volvrt. Good orgac ta dotal 
stcHH rr— * *»* tor #* vary 


tetuic ao/sa Age 2»- »aaH«y 

£3.000 rtau ta te AppnWbwmte* 

CROC Ooott 01-499 9175. 


gnHR MKHim ntaL a 

organ taJ tataanf., mWJ oy 

lo iatfiztewty avokdsMeioipL 
£7^oo^eoo. 
uftnt. htfi a ig f i of MCTngw 


CDBtORttni on Ul® ®W*N 88® All 

wnte with CV leMr raawiB* 

wS5rt -_ Bern; Br o» R Wy M 
3 SL 

SWlAlEO 


cotaLmenreyoo 

In a mffion 

. id/recpnoiiM DOMUon la the 

swiotHor ore b¥ toimnueo. 


voiot CMRIML saflOO phte a*- 

^£ZT-J?5XJ?2S£ 


Arrange 



4^08676 er Hff* 599 

4377. Duke St Itoc OMB. 

Sff “5S5ii5S 

£10000+ MrU tom* * 

Ml tevota- Sukt funoca apfj 
Sb sonwe 0l-A3° 7066 


RECEPTIONIST/SWITCHBOARD 

OPERATOR 

Of the Highest Calibre as 
Deputy for our Reception Team 
The ideal candidate will show an understanding 
of the importance of a good receptionist by be- 
ing perfectly presented, well spoken, intelligent, 
friendly and efficient. 

If you have at least a year’s experience, would 
find working from 8.00 am to 4.15 pm conve- 
nient and would be happy in a busy and 
professional but friendly atmosphere, please 
-write' with * fall CV. to: - 
MtlHidu KMwiBy, 

Number Oh Deans Yard, 


London, SW1P 3NR. 


SECRETARY 

Pnqperty Company Director seeks well spoken 
secretary to work in exquisite offices in WU 
shorthand not essential but must be sdfsuffi- 
cient as will be required to work alone. Hours 
10.00 a.m. to 430 p-m, -age -25-45. Salary 
£8^)00. 

01-723 2042 


BOH MHtl to CJRJOOa Ofta- 

uste 301- Ewn 


A rapoastoW pnsHten with lots 

of cocnoe raa i ft n md tn- 

votvement. Impccrabte 

p r ti miaoon. wart teenrdft aac 

teettta ran ft abOty to oraanta. 



porttmay with 4 _ _ 

company Ibr a wtel eeHad 

ratary wtm Hkce in men pcopte 

and itannte a varied wortaae nr 

admin cootMned with aoraa are- 

ra tonal Min- Nc shorthand. 

Ctrca SBjQOOl Ptwnp B83- >034. 

MeredUb Boon RecroRatenc 


PAKTHaHaaeiObano-raaeaH. 

br* perwnaaateU hv ctarretna 

partnar In p ratetee •nviran- 


m t/cr audio app retta—e. m 

WP exp PYef. Superb tarts and 


NMy on 01-630 7066 


TOUNQ AMHmrWII oecrManr 

wBunp to kero aU awad 

work HI tots bow pereonna! de- 

gtetnwnL Execttent appornnmr 

for a 2nd lobber to trstn on WP. 

telex, eoreno te r etc a» wefl na 

using the uaunl Menunal 

skills. (EH n« neck Aged 19+. 

Salary Caooa CM Km 01- 

828 6793 KlngHand Personnel 




VtSHQT*. I8+- era i 

683-1034. m rta n ii 


ft CammerdeL Law Dcpto, IT 
you waul a man tavolvad. to- 
«■ 

i an 01 -623 S7 k 


PA TO HD £1 to eogw 

S^ te tob IHM PA^wllti rata r 

HMHECL > PieK men 

uStaMtuod on 01-49 5034 

lor fnrtttr ' * 


mho 

Young, busy company inSWi 

need a amr-aarwr for u»eft- p» 

-fOfiMi at w inwaL vou wi 

h—wie ygmf own particular 

prduoa and Have a varied 

wnrtloaa. FUB srcrelortaJ iWB. 

20*. Om £9.000, 683-1054 
Meredith Scon Recraumcni. 


; tn work tn a 


protect* deaertnent of large 08 
cn In Victoria. Lot* of admin ft 
reg an taa tta n neceat a to ■» w«u 
n Minty to wort on own 
toUtalve. Aee 20 * Salary 
£8000 + perks Cab tarn Ol- 

B28 6792 KUnpHand PCfsonnte 

«M»/M«KnnrtarSfer- 

wi n ters Estate Agents. You will 

he working lor two cttaniifng 

directors m am active offices to 

Bond Street, “file DOttMon to var- 

ied and toterestmg Saury 
LBjOOO. Tdentane mm YUung 

on 01-493 0642- No Agnate* 


S9JQOO 

8ac/PA.SH otefuL amM Uvefy 

Marketing Team. Lot* of diont 

Ballon and admta snppon. Ex- 

ceneM prOMecH to drweton ban 

a more marketing role. 493 

8676 or after 7pm. 099 4377. 
Duke Si Rec Cons. 


U2AN HO SUO HTHAHP InL 

Co. ~ - 


i Sec /PA. TVMng 

66* Audio. IBM/WP will X 


RECRCTAHY/I 

Property wi. £6600. No re- 
MtMton ns nested, lute 60 



Us* Co. Fantastic wenme 
atmuphere. officas and pcm. 

Can Sophie on 01-630 7066 

Klneteand Pert Cons. 

KtrnnKT £LSM Lota of 
Miami and notthmiy for SU- 
PER MTEMOR DESIGN CO. 
Typmg and acrtal ptwne 

mamtur essential. Lonta of- 

fices. JttysBf Career* CStoane 
So) Ud. 01-730 5148. 




perks. Coona Mew on 01-650 
7066 Ktngteand Pen OOPS 
noMOTIOM Exc Goflcge leaver 

or 2nd lobber wUhS/M for to- 

HreshiHi posRkm a iwfr Oo 

wttb lovely offices ft exc wu. 

CHI Sophie on 01-630 7066 

KJngsund Pars cons, 
renim LEAVER l9Bh for 

now oftoiore baaUng coftawtn 

in imnirkM wi offices. Mar- 

mSous apponunlty lor 
r well cduceM told pro 

_ with goad MW and 

? knowledge WP. C- ct.ooo 

toes. 01580 


OIL COMPANY, GREEN PARK 
SEEKS 
SECRETARY 

lor one year contract ufeflsl ibe pennanenl job bolder is on 
maternity leave. Candidates must have a minimum of 3 yean 
office experience, SO wpm typinx. no s/h. u provide seomarial 
back-up and adrakmiralire support to a snaU. busy office. Ibe 
a pp to m duuld possess sound orgudsalioaal skilh. be able to 
wort under pressure witft mtnimai supervision and 
communicate with staff at aB levels. 

Salary 44A STL 

Please apply in writing with fan CV to; 

J. Hataan. ftr aa ro l D t p sibiwto . Stawg.7B WccadiBy. Lo n do n 
W1V9HH, Tcfc M-4W MIS, to anive no law Ikon fHdaj, II 
ApriL 1986. 


SENIOR SECRETARY 
£9,000 

Required for Financial Reporting Manager at 
the headquarters of an Internationa] Computer 
Company based in Hounslow. You will be 26-35 
yrs with shorthand. WP and preferably audio. 

PtoaM call 01-570 8555 cart 212. 

(NO AGENCIES) 


NMe (Mtate secretary /PA. 

Tremcndous fim/v«W c«n- 
pmatra for tmaeiHi salary . Tci 
Mm Hnwtelf on 01351 7641. 

ICOc£7.ooouvc- 

■Mioty tvptai 


for wp nnsaton. 66 wpm. Can 

Mr ThompuM cur 01-828 5792 

Kingteand Pmwad 


Estate Agenw. young Mrrtcal 

aoteatanL APMy to wrttino lo 

ChappHons. 77 nayef HmpbbI 

“ - _ - SW3. 


Q1IJX8F LEA VOfeS to £7.000. 

sun your career in book poo- 

Hsiang, eaiubttum. m ag ann * 

puMhhlna or managerneni can- 

suRancv. We tava totemtmg 

vacancies to Itoese Balds wMdi 

will ofTer you exccttenl exp and 

the opportunity k> puke a pos»- 

ttv» DoterffeuHoa. Typing at 

EOwptn Is a neg u iremr nl for an 

of thne poaroom and some also 

require ahorUtamL To hear 

more about ta n a vacancies and 

to get aB Ibe support you need 

as you start your carter, tar- 

phone: Synergy. the 

recruBnmu BanBanor Ol- 
637 9633/9. 


C 7. SOO. A pTOfcvuoMi and eg 
Bfiteneed recapOonM la needed 
for im* wtol known company. 
You win answer a busy switch- 
board and raiw «Um and 
TV persaBaHtia. The atmo- 
sphere M Btemuy and taorota 
and you will work higefner 
wHti two other recepuonlits. 
Excellent benefits manor 900 
Lv-s per day. ClOO Brooming 
allowance and a June salary re- 
view. Age 2330. Please 
telephone G$ 240 3861 (Ctcyior 
Ol 240 3631 (Weal Endi. Btza- 
Mh Hunt Reex u mneni 
ConudtanGL 

HI THE NEWS £9/000. The atrno- 
sphere In mts Covad Garden 
baaed pOMKRy mtuuMn is 
»arn sotifted aed bapoy. as aec- 
refary to mree executtves you 
wtu need M teate two yean ex 
pentnee koo good 
KMMttnmi Bbtuy. There 
are iota or aeadnan and work- 
shops to organise Iran 
lmrttottoK to bnxtno-M and 

speakere. 90/GS tedDs. Pteose 

tetomoneOl 2403601 (CHyior 

01 240 9691 (We* End). EUia- 
-beth 



which eould lead lo develop. 
mem Into *n rdllcrhd role. 
Careytog out an OMM nenage- 


the PuhttAtno Dr 

rector, you wtH be aue to make 

a positive cohirftutjnn through 

your initiative and cbmantstn. 

TVptng at fifiwpn req'd. Sh an 

amel. Smw. the reenntmeH 

consuitoncv 01-637 9633/9. 

SH fiCC/ BOOKKEEPER for tbit 

coEC3. Computerised system. 

increasing mvotvement ft re- 
toOMMMy. ElOOtXJ Mg. 
Wawhoate Rec On oi-aQ4 


FASHION 

CIOJX30. The ctuef execuUve at 

(MB wed established c ompan y 

sMUng exclusive British fashion 

overseas mvetx extenwvety. Me 

needs a sophuncated senior lev- 

H secretary lo run Ids office 

effeettvety. you wB be very 

much at the cadre of the action 

and have every ooparniaHy to 

dewlap a tun PA rale 100/66 

suits. Age 30*. Please- tele- 

phone Ol 240 3661 iCsty) or Ol 
240 3631 (Wesl End). Etaabeth 

Hunt RMTUUmrnl Coosultanis- 

KCBCTMri M PCRSONML 

£f£0OO. As seowary m *ne 

personnel director of these es- 

tablished commodity raters 
you win need w be dmreeL 

tactful and asarnlMUy a people 

person- Excrflerw secretarial ex- 

perience ojmttmte wfdi good 
orgudsauonal tedda and knowl- 

edge « the nuance world are a 
mute. 100/60 sktlls. Me 30-40. 

Pteaoe tetephone 01 240 3661 

cGdy) or Ol 240 3631 (Wort 

Emu. o c c a ne m Hun necrua- 


BAMKHM SECRETARY £9.600. 
As secretary lo a vice preakten! 
of this Urge and Dnarigwus 
American mveshnent tank you 
will be unwed m aU aspects of 
me p rope rty side of me bank. 
He is a pood organiser and wiu 
give vou every opportunity lo 
develop • respoiwatee rote. 
100. 66 tedfls and WP experi- 
ence needed. Please taephone 
01 240 3661 iCUy) or Ol 240 
3631 fWeri End). Ettzabefh 
Hud Pecndtmenl canunanu. 

HAIHUM £8.760 + excritenl 
perks This large mternanooal 
bank reqnere a secretory to as- 
sist two dynamic ha n kers 

Some expe ri ence of working In 
altar a ttaandai or legal envi- 
ron rood necessary You will 

en toy torn of rileni cxmtocL 
organiteiig meetings and UK 
travel umerones. working 
knowledge of French plus skills 
of IOO 60 essential. Please letr- 
phone Carmine King Appfs on 
Ol 499 0070. 

cur mxu n oKts T casoo 
This presugmus US invest. 
ment bank need a profesteonal 
and experienced reorpOonltf for 
inrir rwntkr suite. Van win 
greet visitors and be rrspontebt* 
lor the smooth running of the 
reception are*. You should be 
well groomed, efficient and per. 
tenable. Age 307sh. Phase 
telephone of 240 3651 fCIBrior 
Ol 340 3631 (West Emu. Eno< 
befit Hunt Recruumeite 


CAST FMCHUCY CE9.000. TMa 
small company which provuea 
various eogtneering servicn lo 
nurd World countries h e»- 
pamHng and now requires 
additional help, working main- 
ly tor nw shipping executive 
you Win be (eam spfrited wkh 
eacelleni skins U20/70) and 
have a Itvety. ennauing mind! 
Please tetephone Oi 240 3561 
lOty) or 01 240 3631 iW« 
GtaJL Einabetn Hunt Recruu 
men! 



A1MIOR SH sec for fabric* Sates 
Manager WI . Liaise with taenia 
ft new accounts. Progressive ir- 
vofvenwAL £7003. Woomous* 

Bee COW, 01-404 4646. 


COLLEGE LEAVERS 

Don! late 3 joti - unless you are mare ol Hie range ol opportunities 
open lo you. afleiter m toe topsHWvy new htetnatiural an) Mn- 
chan banhmg maitiet n toe Cdy. o the mote tratStional and 'gtamou' 
jobs in PR. pubkstung. teteveion and atansnfl n Die West End. 

Each of on consultants tea several yeare peraonnd manaflemenl 
omence and so has BM hand bnttdge and the etpemse in 
admse you on current satay levels and possiWe career paths. 

Mala a positive step by caSog effiet office now. 

City 577 8600 UfestEnd 4397001 


Secretaries Plus 

The Secretarial Consultarns 


r 


IBM OR WANG 
£9 - £9,500+ 

Wa noad a brtghl Wnfy SH 
Secretary «dh »-p. • good 
swte to assnt a supa 
Marketing Dractor n a 
prestigious West End VIP 
Group. Larnuagat wfl bo 
wy usefaf as mem b 
constant feateon witfi Eirope 
and also New York. 
Excedem career opportunity. 
Phase itog CaaBodato 
oo 01-485 40TL 


UOJJOO * perks, nm large 
SMpglng Co btecq In Ita City 


lo aa*tte ltatr young and cner- 
geoc Group thrector. You win 
be responsible Mr keeping the 
office running smoothly, ar 
ranging complex travel 
Itineraries and Uaung at »ntar 
level wtm clients and bourno* 
conlam. Skilh 100.. 60 and WP 
expemnee. Iriephane OI 490 
9070. Caroline King Anns. 
ADvnrmtMQ uto Shonhandno 
£84)00. Tm* leading agency H 

seeking a young PA lo become 

Involved tn dealing with a var- 

ied range of household name 
consumer Kmunu. w«iun a 

fast moving envirannienL you 

win be Itivolvrd in an earning 

hmettoo ana win be able lo 

make a real coatnbmum. Typ- 

ing al sowsm * a mho ability. 
Synergy, the recruftmeot oon- 

suiuocy. 01-657 9633.9. 
MMZMG BUT EMCA1BMO 
young mrecior. wt . seem cool 


enn WP iwUI erwo’ 

Audio. Seme of humour. Good 

education and capacity to keep 

the snow on the roadl A work 

hard. May hard enstroroen! fi- 

nancing various enterprises. 
Total parndpaUon Inclu d in g 

socialite Tig CX9.&XH- bonus * 

mage pens. Joyce Gutness 01- 

689 8907 Rrc Com 
COULCOE LEAVER worth 
£7.500 If very well educated 
and reasonably numerwe. 
What* mare lids export orient- 

ed company al Regents Park 
win give you great promotion 

opportunities to progre s s from 

cteriOU and accounts wort lo a 

Management Executive pou- 
non. il you can type » much 

the better. Tetephone Joan Tree 

Recruitment iRee Con*) OI -579 

3616 

BET WTO MMMKTM1MM 

£6.600 Young display compa- 

ny oilers terrific opooriunuv to 
a lively milgolTig 2nd lehtar 

who will lake charge o * Ihetr 

*Me* MSmlntteralUB. WtePh to te. 

trier work and client liaison . 

Lei your style and good lyMgo 

touts earn you an introdu c tion 

with this company Pnone Ol 

831 0006 Drake Personnel 

ABV. 

CU Hy P BD ICE 0MUMWER5 • 

tlOOocV Career minded PA 

late Wi* to handle own corre- 

spondence + aamln. and co- 
orduuie marteung and gel 

involved with the conferences 

for MD or busy Co in SW1 Ex- 

crl trial SH. typing tecBs + 
numeracy raroual. 

700! Secrriano Plus (The Sec- 

retarial CorouHants) 

PTHUW TOUHS WI Commer- 
cial Solicllor in Mctdy 
etslnmrenurlal Co need* strong 
minded PA Sec. 2S 3GtSii with 

audio to organise Mm w sup- 

portive role. WHI train on WP. 
Some legal erpertere* to under 

gland aH aspects of OOgauon 

and maior fuunaag orMecto 

C.S.ICDOO* review. Joyce 
Guinns Oi *69 8807 Rec Con*. 
SECRET AKEft fOK MM- 
TfCTS AHO OO KIKBS. 
Permanent ft temporary dost 
tMBK AM5A 6PMUUU RcC. 
Con* 01 734 0532 
fTJUMM/ENCUSH spk senior 

PA- English SH £13.000 Lar 

guage SUIT agy 456 8922. 




COLLEGE 
LEAVER 
IN PR to £7,280 

TWs friarefly and rapidly 
expanding Mayfair 
company seeks an 
outgoing and co n fid ent 
junior secretary to work 
lor a busy account 
executive. Accurate 

typing and confident tele- 
phone manner important 
when dealing wMi the 
rneefia and journalists. 
Aged 1B+. 

Bernadette 
of Bond St. 

Hecnalmefll Consultants 
.No ii WutarlaFtmtO] 

FASHION c£73CO Do you enloy 
arranging ex ta Bin om . mreung 
r uetns and uteng your inma- 
uve? TM* (amovs Msttkn house 
needs a nrtgW. wed groomed 
secretory wuh some experie nc e 
lo mu ttalr promotions team. 
Good audio typing ISO wpmt. 
age >a years P lease leteghooe 
Caroline Ulna A pots on Ol 499 
0070 

■ UUUH THW CAftgOO a—- This 
hiuui but expandino nurtiM re- 
search co. In WI need 4 young 
secretory . college leaver wim 
lot* of infnaave and enenususm 
lo help set uo the office * wp 
systems, advertising agencies * 
co-ordmaie the admin. 60 wpm 
typing + WP. audio pre f erred. 
Telephone 01 499 9070. Garo- 
nne King APPtL 

XHCa * GOOD BENEFITS Fate 
enthususne sec reord by small 
mnully Beta a n company, var- 
ied duties for busy young 
managerial team. lOCA In- 
vohetnenl esscnUal Rusty 
■ 'hand 60 typing- French an 
atari homed, tearl available. 
Age 20 u>26. Pteose tetephone 
Bridget on : 01-222 6024 uw 
agencies!. 

P BOPMTT PA to £ 10.000 * nc 
beoefiis Sian a career rorabm- 
ing property and a personnri- 
ortentoled note. This leading 
property ro b seeking a PA to 
assisi a ctarmng Partner who 
h responsmte for nafr and far 
premises nunagemenl. Skills 
lOO.OOwpm * audio ability. 
Synergy- me recnnimenl oon- 
suilancv. 01-637 9563/9. 

ECONOMIC BESCAHCH 

OrganisaUon close lo Fleet 
Street are Looking for a wefl- 
prescnied Rccegoonku 'TyplH 
from 20 years. You wiu be 

greeting VI p%, answering ms 

ononr rails and organising 

appointments Salary c 
£&500 Call Tina Cratter 930 
6733. centarom Suff Agency. 

ML £8.000 + bonus. With sump- 
luous ofUres in Qwii Park mis 
Cm oamanir need you lo torn 
Uieir team of dynamic young 
evecullia. You will arrange 
ana attend an annual oil trade 
exhibition and enjoy ttaunt 
client ton tari Please Meghan* 
Caroline King AKKs on Oi 49 9 
8070. 

WOMPLEX Wp op c£9.000 For 
lusurious WI solicitors tag of 
System 7 or 8 Age zo-zo Excel 
tern enoY mto the legal AeM 
Cali Bill Oh 01-828 6792 

Klnasland Legal 

GERMAN SPK Secretaires! We 
are rurremty romauno fl ecre. 
tones wifh German, for a 
number of vacancm in and 
around London Salaries 
£7.000 10 £12X100. For lurther 
rmormauon call. Mmov Emp 
AW. "The Language Special- 
MSI. Tel Ol 6S6 1487. 

RECEPTiOMIST/TEL A literate 
dm. for £4oane si property co. 
Age i8+. £7000 Call Fiona «1 
377 ae>O0 SocTviarim Hu* (77» 
Secreunal Coctsunanlsi 


CITY OF LONDON { 

Si Barbican Centre 

The Barbican Centre provides London with a 
major complex of Theatres, Concert Hall, Cine-’ 
mas. Art Gallery, Public Library and 
Conference and Exhibition facilities. 

The Director wishes to make the following 
appointment 

Administrative 

Assistant 

In the Conference 
Marketing Department 

An Assistant is required to provide secretarial 
and administrative services to the Conference 
Director. Applicants should be accustomed to 
working at a senior level with good shorthand 
and typing. Experience in the conference in- 
dustry would be an advantage. 

Hours 9.15am - 5.00pm. 20 days hofiday phis 
5 discretionary leave. Corporation of London’s 
normal sickness benefits. There is a contribu- 
tory pension scheme md season ticket loan. 
Salary C 7146 - £8763 p.a. inclusive. 

Please apply m writing enclosing your Curricu- 
lum Vitae, by 14 April 1986 to the Director, 
Barbican Centre (Personnel Section) Silk 
Sveet, London EC2Y 8DS. 

This post is subject to LMGSC ring fence pro- 
cedure. With their agreement it is now being 
offered on an unrestricted basis. Applications 
are particularly invited from employees of the 
GLC and MCC’s. 


ter) 
iappe 
d bv 
se t 
•f h, 
indir 


- Tf 
We 
Netl 
nc: 
i cor 


Uti 

*hei 

ndu 

iftir 

lh 

filii 


r) 

isci 

fere 

izer 

ffii 


£10.000 1 

PA ■iecreaty lo deveion ltatr 
rote taststmg tta Financial Di- 
rector of a maior group tn ECS. 
Snuti «uaouk office*. 
SubUiUSril lunch * bonuses. 
C*ll 439 7001 IWcD End} or 
377 9600 icfO-l Sewlarlrs Plus 
(Tta Secretarial CcmSudlantSI 

PART TIME TO./MCC/TVF In 
SW1. hectic imcrnalional Co. 
heeds wtng shut wonder per 
von for busy Herald for 
overload and Cheetah Trie*, 
organise courier*, reservanons 
etc. CXb OOO for 25 hour week 
and fringe bens Joyce Outness 
01-689 B807 Rec Cons. 

PCRSOHALmr FLJUW 17/18 
years with exrettent pree e nt a- 
Oon and now offered superb 
opoonunity to win Advertising 
Bureau handling press Uaknn 
throughout ita U K. wuh your 
good grade* and lymna sktos 
phone Monika on 01-631 0666 
Drake Personnel Agy 

KMT ART required to look af- 
ter ececuUves tn Financial 
Service*. Croup In Wed End. 
Hours 10 - 4 . more if necessary. 
Pleasant telephone manner, ac- 
curate audio typing suite and 

aptitude for Item nec essar y. 
Contort Cnnstopner Buckley Ol 
434 4683 no agencies please. 

COLLKQC LEAVE* wuh brigtal 
personality and 90* shorthand 
to co-onUnair earn and nM 
Sale* Manager of unmarkei 
indite co in WI. £7000. CaB 
439 7001 iWeal End) or 377 
8600 iCttyi S e e rs l an e* Phi* 
(The Secretarial ConsuUantsl 

FA UCHCTAirr Cd 
typing/ appearance tor auend- 
ing press funritons. exhtbUMn* 
and sorting with 
vipvmebnifes to Die area of 
ronMrvMKin. £9600*. Lan- 
guages met ui Link Language 
Appotnhneols 846 9743. 

Nl M MOTH KEN LM*r 
PA 'Sec 22i*ii wnn roxnaabie 
snonnand/ typmg. pgnx proof 
outlook and prepared for fatal 
Involvement to mis tactic 
young P» scene. C. LB.BOO * 
maf praipecfa. Jovte GuiltoH 
01-589 8807 Bee Omc. 

FUSUMtHG • PA.'Wcrefary to 
Chief Ewcume of ctasUcal note 
mninp ro in wi. Empnasn on 
PA funettpn bul shorthand typ- 
ing skills needed. Call 439 7001 
iWnl End) or 377 8600 iCRy] 
Secretaries Plus (The Secretari- 
al Consultants! 

WP/SEOKTARML ASSISTANT 

e CSAOO Super Cliy Co mum 
young person wnn gn IBM Db- 
play Writer exp to «aul PA ft 
Partner. Varied work, happy 
alnuKdtare ft good projects 
60* Wpm pref CaB Nacky Ol 
630 7066 Kioouand Pets Cons 


f 


NO RUSH HOURSI 
c £9,000 

Would you Bke to avoid 
rush hour? If so, this 
small private Investment 

Trust based in Wi needs 

a secretary to assist the 

Chairman's PA and a 

Director working from 

70 JO - 6.30. 

This is a busy but non- 
pressurtsed Job and 
requires someone with 
discretion and 

confidentiaJily to handle 

prestigious clients, liaise 

internationally and assist 

with typing, WP (Wang) 

and tetephone work. 
Beautiful offices. French 
an advantge. Stans 
60/60 + WP experience. 
Age 25-35. 

West End Office 
629 9686 




OEHUW Hj-L fH O UA L secretary 
lor Prmtacni of noiri chain. 
Good tetephone 

nunner /appearance. Exreflent 
suite 90 s& for ms interesting 
and saned position. Unk Lan- 
guage Appt* 046 9743. 

LEOAL TRAINBie for audio sec 
by city BoUrttors. A level educ ft 
calm approach lo deal wuh 
bo*»H tactic workload. Social 
dub and gym. ca.7so. 
Woodhouw Bee Cons 01-404 
4646 

3FAMSM HUNHIfAL (CC 

£11. BOO Uncludtng bonuW Cuy 
Merrtun! Bank dealing sum 
BraalL Mexico ana ante SWBs 
80-60 EngHsh moitar tongue. 
Ape 20 - 30. 430 1&&I/2S63 
Didcte Sttnoum Ann 

•MATMS' hi Ita etty. Speak and 
type French 8 wee* aaEtanment 
signing 7ui April ExceOrit! 
rates Tetephone inlernahonal 
Secretaries 'Bee Com) 01-191 
7100 


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to 

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hand 
b ice 

rit in 

(ir 15 
~ uy 

Ir. 

n«S 





j4 

rt 3 , 


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Ti*-;' 


-.-j ■ 

.y. 


Over 1-4 nulfioii of the 
most affluent people in the 
country read the classified 
cdhrams of The Times. The 
foflowing categories appear 
regularly eveary week, and 
se gciieraHy accompanied 
byidenmt editorial articles. 

Use the coupon (right), 
and find rad hew easy, East 
and ecoeontical it is to adver- 
tiser The Times Classified 


MONDAY EduottfatK Univer- WEDNESDAY La Creme <fe b 


sUy Appojnimems. Prep. & Public 
School Appointments. Educational 
Coursis^habishipsAFtikMships. 
La Crime dr bi Crsk: 
TUESDAY CoMpatar Rtriuns: 
a comprehensive guide to the 
computer market 
Lefial AppatoOneiHs: Soli chars. 
Commercial Lawyers. Legal 
OfTicers, Private A Public practice. 
Ugai La Oi«; a new classifica- 
tion Ibr top legal secretaries. 


Crfeme: Scaeoria l/PA appomiments 
Over £7500. General secieurial. 
Property: Resideniial. Commercial. 
Town* Country. Overseas. Ren uk. 

THURSDAY General Appotet- 
bmbPr ChfefExocuiives.Mariagffig 
Dircctore. Directots, Sales and 
Mariceung Execuli vcsaitd O' veise&S 
Appointments. Including a new 
classification entitled finweM aod 
Acwaouhcy AppaiwiiHtits. 


THE WORLD FAMOUS PERSONAL COLUMN APPEARS EVERY DAY. 
ANNOUNCEMENTS GAN APPEAR WITHIN 24 HOURS. 


FREDA) Meters A complete car 
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26 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


LONDON PROPERTIES 


OVER 

jSSSERvj. 


A development by Berkley House PIC 

ROBERTS COURT 

43-49 Barkston Gardens 
Kensington, London SW5 

A major reconstruction of four fine 
houses to provide 33 splendid new flats - 

LEASES 125 YEARS FOR SALE: — 

Available tbits 

Ifco Bedroom Flats from £167,500 
Three Bedroom Flats from £230.000 
Three Bedroom Rsnthouses from £295,000 
Lift ■ Resident Porter- Gas Central Heating - High quality (pushes • Balconies. 

terraces or patios to many flats -Access to beautiful gardens. 
SUPERB SHOW FLATS (01-244 8253) OPEN TODAY £ DAILY 11 am-7 pm 
Joint Satbng Aaias 

WAJELLIS 

ITS Brampton Rood 
London SWj IHP 
kfes 23461 WAE 



01-581 7654 


15? Funan Road SWiO 0M99 8425 
31 nenwwaon H^I Sewt W9 0*403 t*21 
W*. .2939*5 F3A/OG 


A1 


HBtSUiCTOIt CHURCH STREET. PH. 

VtfT toght ad mau 1 bad lot n tta hra txrod pteoute. 
HM w pattnal meats HU WM| hwh gaga Canpten 
W Gonens. Bi teat lean E71000 

OUHWGME TERRACE. SW7 

.JlMItarstMttaAincMt 

wmajs ad many Una pmod (etas oaks tw tm Ural puO- 
j-wnt 

995 feu hast E7i950 

UUWROAE GROVE. W11 

An npoamUe naaiMM 2 bedneo pnM float ltd m 
Ito peMOt ttac* ">nn mnttsiO at HM Pant Canon- 
mi qgmais ad £* am oamgi 
85 W lciS4 £82580 

MOLE 6AR08IS. WE 

A sapoD vent bn9>l and s*m» 2 tmtnxm gorien Rd n Has 
PMVOM luff ttatt on eu um oi CanodBi Ha Emm 
□ moon m tcass at 3 xm of mum adonae the 
a moM lav. 

56 w* last £87500 



NeU 


WVBMESS TBffiACE. MB 
WrmwMii ram i 
dijiuo 2hd#oB*fl 


LMM SABDOtS. W2 

menm Hunt a ms oaust i 

RM tor n Of botou <* Here Hfl Good He moms 41 




gvdan «mdi ■ Ued to Uwa mm* tararcua. 

125 yea toe m to» ougomy. £*&S0Q 

KENSWSTtM MGR STREET . MR 
A meat* raoMoorf 9* * 7U to® p Mkv nujoaftr to 

'SXSteSZ 

Sua| Kcepfeon man today Id anca. My total 

r last man 


OT r 221 2000 iO ,-i 


Best terms 
for 

mortgages 

If you need finance fora new home, 
a second home, school fees, or for home 
improvements, there’s no reason for you to 
think that our excellent reputation means 
high costs. 

On the contrary'. You’ll find our terms 
extremely competitive with anything on 
offer in the High Street. And we’ll consider 
advances from £30,000 upwards, for 
primary mortgages, and £5,000 upwards 
for secondary mortgages. 

Our service is countrywide. 

If you'd like to know more, call us on 
01-486 8305 any day of the week. 9 

-"IjftVurtls 

ESTATE OFFICES 

MORTGAGE SERVICES 

Well do the homework. 


Residential and Commercial Mortgages 
Re-mortgages. Second Homes and School Fees 
*9am-#poi weekdays- 10J*Oam-2.30piu 
Saturdays and Sundays 


T» Harmds Estate Office?. FREEPOST. 

Lncfrin SW3 1YZ. 

Please send niedeiails/if y»ur Muryjnge Serva es. 

Name 

Address 


“1 


. Pr«tcude. 


I 

I Wurk Tel. N.i - 1 

| Home Tel. T. LJ 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


RIVERSIDE 
HOUSES AT 
CHISWICK 
CHOICE OF 3 
TOWN HOUSES 

Spodota accommodation of 
3/4 bedroom*. Direct nvw 
screes with 3 acrea of private 
grounds leading to Thames 
with private jetty and moor- 
ng facilities. Only 15 T^iiTfr, 
from Harnxfa end 
Heathrow. Possibly the last 
opportunity to acquire a 
Inge bouse beside the river. 
From £170400. 

Contact 

01-996 2964 or 
994 8276 or 
994 8336. 


N PURPOSE BUILT wvll man- 
M(d Katranoion Mock, dal in 
«i-rtww rendition 4 na. 2 re- 
(«plMn. 2 Mil*. Ksnalt WC. 
Upv* UKnm ini dlnlna area, 
urorrl ornate ulr. £360.000 
Rina Ol 84k 4221. evenings 01 
M7 3368. 


RIVERSIDE 
HOUSES AT 
CHISWICK 
CHOICE OF 3 
TOWN HOUSES 

Spacious accommodation 
of 3. 4 bedrooms. Direct 
river access with 3 acres of 
private grounds leading to 
Thames with private Jetty 
and mooring faculties. 
Only 16 mins, from 
Harrods and Heathrow. 
Possibly the last opportuni- 
ty to acquire a large house 
beside the river. From 
£170.000. 

Contact 

01 995 2964 or 
994 8276 or 
994 8335. 


MKERSTRDCrWMOmaiW 

401 door flaL 3 mins Repents 
Part-« beat. Ipe rerep. 
kK.- diner. bath Un. Scope lor 
ffnprevcmenl 116 yr* he 
Cl 66.000 P*rtcrs724 44S5. 


LB 


•MORTAGE MEWS' 


"NON-STATUS” LOANS AT 12% 

Residential up to 7S% of purchase price or valuation 
which ever is tower, up to £250.000 maximum 
(MJ.RAS. fuSy operational up to £30,000 
regardless of size of loan) 

RE-MORTGAGES ALSO FROM 12% 
PLUS 

other "Non Status" loans at competitive 'mterestf 
rates on both residential and commericsl propert 
unlimited funds. Initial underwriting of the facility to 
completed by this company. 

Please reply without delay to 
LB (LHc art Peastees) Ltd 
m/» EsMNHaa Bred LredM 5*7 7B 
SI -581 2S1T 




| Douglas 6? Gordon 

ELM PARK ROAD, CHELSEA, SW3 

large BeauShAy decorated flat on two floors. vMh private 
strast anbw aa and magpdflreni 70* south-tadng g a rden. 
Double bring room, dnbig reom. fufly equipped Utcnaa ttwaa 
beds, three baths, etcekroom. uhity mom. plenty of 
cupboards. 

Lease 66 yean £385400 to Include carpets and curtains. 
To view this weeke nd cal 01-581 8943 

01-730 8411 


^Wlnkwofth=\ 

* MORTGAGES ^ 

TERMS NOW AVAILABLE 


3Vz tmies income or 2^ times joint mcome 
100% mortgages op to £100,000 
No evidence of income required for loans 
up to £150,000 for qualifying Applicants 
MIRAS facility available over £30.000 

Ring 01-235 0691 

for full Information 




Winkworth 
Financial Services 
25a Motcomb Street 
London SWl 

Open unto 8 p.m. today 


CRAWFORDS 

T6 Old Brompum Rd. 
London sw 7 
RKHSafOTOM SW7 
Charm(n9 19iT vfudfo. 
lul«baUi. low outqaloei- 90 
yrv C45.WI.Rrf A 669. 

MDtSMQTDN SW7 
Uatu «ad wom iwr sru n 

lludko 041 wlUl own 

mMraacv. i45yn.C54.Ka 
RET ABli. 

KCUSaWTON W10 

Brtohl t tadoos 2nd rtw 
19n studio, kh* baUi In (rev 
lined road. cti.96 tn 
£49.500 Rrf MIO 

WNnnaiR 

3 superb fully fumMwd p b 
studio Oats, ch, Ufl. porrer 
konfl leases. 

£46.950 '54 .950. REf M24. 

unw«a W2 

deuptuhil 4tt (Mar 2 
bpdroomed nai ch un. 122 
yrs £79.960. Ref PZ4J. 

MH 

Selection of newty converted 
hais. ct» epts. 0*9- 99 yrs 
lease gmd a t bed. rec. ml 
£ 69.500 2 beds, ret QdD 
£71.000. 2nd fl 3 beds, rec 
£62.500. Rrf W98-600. 
W12 

Luw3dnar end of terrace 
house with vac pass of 
1st '2nd n flat roratsUne of 3 
beds. rec. bam. wc. larqe 
storaoe area. Cnd n Hal let at 
£700 M red. £99.950. Rrf 
P568. 


01-584 3334 


ST JOHNS WOOD. 

LARGE. SLtNNY. 1ST 
FLOOR 

VICTORIAN CONVERSION. 
Quiet location In tree lined 
sired. EnnUfnt condition. 
Mod facilities. Fully luted 
kllclten. 5 bedrooms. 2 baUi- 
rooms. Coramunual Harden 
£(60.000. Td Ol 831 8563 
ofllce or 01 794 5296 home. 


MORTGAGES 

100% to £150X00 » 12.17% 
95% to £300,000 fr i2J>3% 
90% to £B 0J00 #12.00% 

96% (O Cl 00.000 1200% 

CARRINGTONS 
STH KENSINGTON SW7 SES 
01 225 2377. NIGEL FERRIS 
PoreRon iret Snted low cost 


FLEXIBLE- 


W12 

EDWARDIAN 
TERRACED HOUSE 

ORMHUL FCATUns 

3 bedrooms, reception, 
bathroom, idlchen. fUning 
room. pane. Gas CH. 

£73,950. 

01-407 7272 x416 
Eves 01-743 6951 




SUTHERLAND AVDOJK W9 

Raned ground floor flat. Newts 
mm ertod 2 beds with larqe re- 
ceooon room, fully nned 
auchen and bathroom Steps 
down to larve West- lacing oar- 
den. GCH. 99 year lease. 
£86.500. TH. 244 8072 or 
0920 3387. 


4 


INSURANCE 






s 


% 


% 


\ 


\ 

PERSONAL 
LOAN , 


MORTGAGE 


* BRIDGING a ? 
— LOAN ^ 


HOME 

IMPROVEMENT 

LOAN 

.« ,» 

8 

f * 

// 


««EB 


BUDGET 

ACCOUNT 


QHO S VKWOH SQUAftZ Wt lofO 
rarely available an kiRWM 
period house encreUenUy located 

In a very prestigious Quiet 

•beet. Twlxt Park Lane and 
Crovsnor Snare. Offering ex- 
reilem family accorrendalton 
wUb very eiegani drawing 
room i22-4Hxi9fu dining room, 
klidienefle. 4-S bedrooms. 3 
bails. 1 oi suite. Guest cloak 
room, vilrtien. large paved gar- 
den. ctL In need of uprtaJXno. 32 
years n i ifi inrhluarlrl 

£366.000. Asm Properties. 
486 5741 Sole Agents. 


MUM VALK WJ Large 3 bed- 
room ground floor ftal set back 
off road Fully n nx lei i kwd to 
incfude luxury fitted Boarti 
kitchen with mm U ancer . 3 erv 
suiie bainrooms. Large brk^tt 
recegdon with gas log One. 
Small garden /podo. Large 
ceuers parking for 2 cars. 62 
year lease. £170.000. Tet Ol- 
209 0005 eves A w/ands. 


tSUNOTON ML. Charming newly 
ChoR mews hoe In rxuuslve 
laiMbcaped seaing. Close to An- 
gel lube A an amenities. 
Carefully planned to ma stndre 
sure A superbly ftaWfied the 
•reorannuon offers 2 beds, 
bam. recep. Boscfi ktL gar ch. 
lawn gdn. run NHBC guaran- 
lee. £1 1 0.000 f .hid. Phone 389 
6603 eve 6 W.'B CD 


HENDON NW4. Drfacbed house 
in premier road. Spacious ugm 
rooms. 4 beds 13 dbli Bath. Sep 
WC. Lounge D-rtxxn. Large 
hall. Crown. sep WC 
Kildmer Cge. Large gdn. 
r, hold- Plans for extension. Of- 
fers above 012.950. Phone Ol 
203 2333 anytime 


ATTRACTIVE DOCKLAND Wa- 
terfront Secluded m o d e m 2/3 
bed terraced bouse, gar den a nd 
mooring. Reception tT-ST x 
15 *-. sep guesl doakrm. fitted 
kitchen Parting. Gas CH. 
£170.000 TH. 01-516 3461 


■ LOB — MW T wet I bed. 1 
recepi flat wtui large kit/diner 
In small P'b block. Reoiares to- 
tal modem tsation. 99 yr ha. 
£66000 FrarJt Aa,r» A Co 

3d7-OU77. 


FULHAM SWC, Superb modern 2 
bed flaL knehen. bathroom, low 
outgoings. Very good dec order. 
G.CJH. 122 sear lease 
£6880 O Tel: 01 386 7826 1 to- 
day and rveiL 


LITTLE VENICE W8 FBm produc- 
ers pad. 2 <XMe bed. good recto. 
with evd clews. Good order. 
Share F 'hid. £129.750 
Normandy Ests. Ol 629 3248. 


RANDOLPH AVC. W». 2nd fir. 2 
me bedrra. Re fined ward- 
robes. bright soaocos recap. 
GCH. 1 min lobe. 123 yr Ise. 
£78.000. Tel. 01-637 2611 day 


RUUDA VALE, 2 bed foHy fur- 
nkshed flat. P B Work. 46 year 
lease, un porterage Exd 
eond £75.006 Ol 289 6326. 


LARGEST LIST of psews houses. 
Lu«H Brand 01*02 3275. 


PROVE PARK CscepffanaJ. beau 
(dully modernised and 
decorated 3 bed house nr Ch»- 
Wtck House Grounds. 2 recep ts 
wtui fireplaces. Luxury kit and 
very large bamreoni with 
laruZZL New gas CH. wiring 
and deep piled carpets. Ready to 
mtnr mio . Drllghuul 80 ' gdn. 
Cge . £130.000 mid. view to- 
day 01-9968094 

•CHS WELL HILL. Spaa IKE ele- 
gant Edwardian corner 
resid e nce Good decorative or- 
der 6 bedrooms. 2 receptions. I 
breakfast room, kitchen, ham 
room. 2 WC«. GCH. shed A 
workshop, large garden, room 
lor 3 garages. Coropietety lur- 
rttshed. Freehold £206006 
01-444 9422. 

m PURPOSE 8UR.T kWiiun 
aged Kensington Mock, flat In 
rarellepl condition 4 beds. 2 re- 
ception. 2 bains seperate WC. 
Large kitchen and dfmno area, 
urgent private sale. £260.00 
Bing Ol 84t 4221. evenings Ol 
937 336B. 


CLOSE TBSIV WOOAH. Ikbut 
4 COte bed period tae with 
many superb ortg f eatum Rec. 
dtnmg rm. 18 ' Hi. bathrm. sep 
wc. sgac snwr. SO' gdn. 
£175.000 TowncTio.ce 731 

4*48. 

PULHAM. PARSONS OREDt 

SW6. New reiurb lux gr flaL 2 
bed i u uin i FF Kit Baihr. L’UIity 
rm. DOT gl. All secunues. SW F 
gan. Min waikshops rest 
Tube-Bus I14V 125 year lease. 
£79.000. TH 731 1663. 

WDKMMORE HILL M2L In prel 
ly tree Imed crescent 4 Beds, 
study, baui. dining rm. elk rm. 
UL mu rm. draw rm leading 
Into drUSIMfiil conservatory, 
gge. 200‘ gdn. £245.000. Ol- 
■300 3168. T 

DORSET HOUSE NWS. Tap <9Bu 
nr flu In nop bis. Chw Baker 
Si Bed. recep. kit k 1 3 yrs. 
£69.950. Abo 2 bed (tab Irpm 
£99.950. SHAW Ol 486 7326 


oc style del townhse. 5 beds. 3 
baths, sauna, gge. Pado gdn 
BeauUfUOy finished th iuu ga- 
out. £185.000 Viewing on 
Saturday Ham nn 4pm. 0480 
860166 ID. 

HI AMQEli. Otorgn. Cam tae. 4 
Ige b/r. dHe reccpt Jge 
Widm/ptoTin. Bfgd'gOoor » 
pguoA SSft SAW gdn. I bthrm 
1 elks. GCH OTfari around 
£176000 ono. for drfans or 
view 01 389 4687 
EAUND CMUCN WS large de-’ 
tamed house. lO beds, a 
recegdOTB. separate Rab Ideal 
b&b or development C776.O00. 
Acre Estates 01-993 7373. 
EATON PLACE SWl VaR lmmod 
high cellbiged tower ground 
flat Recep. 2 bed. 2 bam. v. 
small POIto. £156006 TrCOt 
741 8330 or 229 1999 office. 
STAMFORD BROOK. Exceptional 
rood & value. 5 bed end Of Mr. 
Thru Inge, utsity. fit ktt -brk. 
bain, sth frng gdn. £87.960 
WhUman (toner 996 3333. 

ST MMNS WOOD Beautlfid 2 
bedroomed nai wwi garage in 
ouiH rood. tong kerne. 
£126000 01 289 4272 home. 
01 233 661S office. 

FULHAM - MVrfy tpactout 3 bed 
fUL rec nn. superb HL lux 
bthrm. cbe la South Port. Lse 
92 yrt. £76000 Ol 370 02S6 
» you ARE LOOMNQ lor a 
duality flat fei central Loreto o. 
we have a wide selection avail- 
able. TH Parkers: 01 724 4456 
LUMNUDUS 2 bed penthouse flat 
In Hyde Park So. £155.000. 01- 
637 8181 AbM Properties. 

■iiiPiHHnr man. 2 tea. 

Flat newly renovated. £89.966 
Tel: Ol 749 5104. 



Three houses 
in a Pilgrim 
Father’s house 

■ Groton Place, Groton. Suffolk, is a 
Grade II listed manor house of early 
Tudor origin with later additions 
including a Georgian tagade and entrance 
haH. Its most famous occupant was 
John Winthrop, one of the Pilgrim 
Fathers. Winthrop was one of the 
founding fathers of New England, the first 
governor of the Massachusetts colony 
and founder of the city of Boston. 

The main house Is now being 
converted to form three houses, the first 
of which is the Old Guildhall wing, the 


. .» v*v» /’ \ie? ' * V , . : ; 

- .*» — l i . *• V-.'- - • .... > 

■; r :-u ..-v f ■■.V-al-Ix 

y v- .V . . • - r-r - — -.e kcC&ra 



expose. 

is symmetrical, wrtb gables oa each side. Sesaal 

plasterwork and panelling dati^ from awijW ^feelVUi-ceotiiry 

trance was made on frie smith front soonafter 1^)0 whM tiM toie -o-js. 

formal gardens wo* swept away, and the house has been keptwext^l^ 

tioa. The accommodation includes a reception Sands’ in 37 

principal suites, seven farther bedrooms and a onide 

acres of formal gardens and parkland. Knight Frank & 
price approaching £1 milKnn And the house comes on to the market tomorrow 


timbering and studwork, it has two 
reception rooms and four bedrooms, 
and half an acre of walled garden. 

S worriers of Sudbury, Suffolk, is 
asking £96,500. The next phase will see 
the conversion of two bams and a 
Victorian stable block to make a total of 
six properties in this Interesting 
development. 

B Keiren Guinness, a tanning 
member of the famous famfly, is sefing 
hie London home in Holland Parte. 

The house, in Hotiand Park Road, is on 
two floors and has a gaHerfad 
recaption room, a (feting room and two 
or three b e droo ms . RusseS Simpson 
is asking £550,000 for the house, which 
was originaffy an artist’s studio. 

Gatehouse grandeur 

■ The Gatehouse at Goodrich, 
Herefordshire, was built between 1828 
and 1831 and is considered one of the 
most important 1 9th-century buildings in 
the county. The former Goodrich Court 
and gatehouse were designed by Edward 
Blore, the latter based on toe Boriette 
at Aachen in the Rhineland. Goodrich 
Court was demolished shorty after the 
last war. The Gatehouse has since been 
renovated and enlarged, using local 
stone to blend in with toe original. Its 
accommodation is well maintained, 
and the property, four miles from Ross- 
on-Wye. is for sale at £95,000 through 
Bernard Thorpe and Partners (0432 
276202). 


B The Ghosts public house at 
Pluddey, near Ashford, Kent is looking 
for a new licensee who cart cope with 
the bumps in the night and the strange 
atmosphere In one of the bedrooms 
in what is reputed to be a haunted 
village. K is a tree house, though not 
apparently ghost-free, and Cobbs’ 
Maidstone office is asking £120,000. 


A sporting deal 


The 


of the fiat season and the 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 



Valley view 


B Dry Hifl House. Crockerton. near 
Warminster, Wiltshire, was formed from 
two farmworkers’ cottages on the 
edge of toe Longieat estate. It now has 
five bedrooms and two reception 
rooms, and stands in two acres on high 

S ound above toe Upper Wyfye Valley. 

arsons' Warminster office is asking 
£140,000. 


opening 
pect of 

Saturday are timely reminders of the 
importance of sporting estates and stud 
farms in the property market And later 
this mouth perhaps the best known Irish 
estate and stud farm comes on to the 
market 

The Mount Juliet estate in Co Kilken- 
ny, covering more than 1,600 acres, was 
the seat of the Earls of Carrick for 250 
years and has been in the family of the 
present owner. Major Victor 
McCalmont, for most of this century. He 
is now selling reluctantly after unsuccess- 
ful efforts fo find a way to keep it in the 
family. And although no price is being 
given, it is understood that it could be 
worth about £4.5 million. 

Its two stud farms, BaUylmch and 
Norelands, are renowned in Irish blood- 
stock circles, and cover 466 acres of 
paddocks, ail railed and watered. There 
are also 538 acres of farmland and 347 
acres of woodland, and the estate 
provides the home of the Kilkenny 
Foxhounds. 

Mount Juliet House is a late 18th- 
century mansion, built mainly of stone, 
which has five or six reception rooms, 
three bedroom suites and at least eight 
other bedrooms, with about 30 acres of 
grounds running down to the river Note. 
The house contains a collection of 
furniture and paintings of great value, 
most of which would be available to a 
buyer. 

Founded as a public stud early this 
century. Ballylinch rose to prominence 
and remains known as one of the great 
breeding centres of Irish bloodstock, 
largely on the reputation of The 
Teirarch, one of the famous names in 


racing history, who is buried at 
Baflylinch. 

The estate also has pheasant shooting 
- an average bag of 200 birds a day for 
the 12 days of sbooung - and salmon 
and trout fishing. There is likely to be 
considerable interest in this fine estate, 
which is for sale through Christopher 
Stephenson International is association 
with Knight Frank & Rutiey. 

Mr Stephenson, whose firm specializes 
in property connected with toe racing 
industry, says in his review of the 1985 
season that it was a year when most of 
the stud forms coming on to the market 
foiled to selL This was largely because 
many vendors overpriced their property 
hoping that an “Arab buyer would 
appear from the sands of the desert 1 ’ and 
pay up to half above the market price. 

But the Arabs are not major buyers 
now because those in the sport have 
enough land, because the foil in oil prices 
has affected their disposable income and 
because most Middle East buyers sue 
now shrewd businessmen who wall not 
pay over the market price. 

Mr Stephenson says the main demand 
for stud land today is in the Newmarket 
and west Berkshire areas, where wdl 
railed stud paddocks on the right land - 
rhaik, for example — would fetch double 
the agricultural value. Elsewhere they 
might fetch little more than agricultural 
lan d in the area, although it costs about 
double to produce good stud land. 

He concludes that, provided vendors 
price their properties reasonably, there is 
good demand, and that 1986 could be 
better than 1985. 

Christopher Wannaa 

Properl y Correspondent 


inxta rad poos d mrt y nM . Stot- 
m J tad. Z HA [data Scce 

MUM*"-*"*. 



Shook 3 tad c Ura Haiti tr 
rent. Mfcd U/frM*. Mfea. tto 
aa 6* ct ton, ang Mm man; 


£190 

+ VAT and 
disbursements 

is oar chatfe for freehold 
property ales or purobnet 
irre spectiv e of price. 

STEPHENS 

Solicitors 

72 Edae Street 
Kiugsfu n-U fxn>-77ianies 
01-546 4442 

For fnD written details ring 
ns now 

OPEN SATURDAYS 
AND SUNDAYS 


SupFftrfy rrfurtASMrf 4 b*d 
*mil dHorfnml Victorian roJ- 

8MKT rmmovM and 

decorated to the tuflhcM stan- 
dard £150.000 


In nraUent location Hadoos 
garden nat of character. 16ft 
rereo. ML 2 Bed. bath and 
(OBwnrHTy. £72.960 

wmausoN parr 

In irre luted avenue dove to 
lube, character 2 bed oardea 
flat £59.950. 

JONHSTGH A PYCRAFT 

01-948 9446 


BATTERSEA 


Mid. terr a ced Victorian 
house. 5 bedrooms. 2 recep- 
tions. tow kitrhm/dmin? 
room. 30ft rear burden. 
GCH. many octoinal leatnres. 

£130.000 

TH 01-228 7939 


WANDSWORTH 

er than average 4 bed Victorian 
haute ui conservation area 
Open, airy layout, double recep- 
tion Midi msrole fireplace 
Corned. Mory- dining room, 
targe known. 3 db*e b e drooms 
+ a large studio 4ih bedroom, 
large cHlar. 65" garden. GCH. 
£159.960 Freehold Tet Ol 
767 4892 iMfcOl 788 B8!9<WI. 


4TH Cavor 
Compart r storey Oct hse m 200 
ft grounds. Bull l recently lo 
bioh slandd. d beds. 2 intercom 
recro. 2 rnsutte baths, wort 
shoo FHD Offers region 
£236000 852 5523 /32B 1838 


WANOMFORTH COMMON. Larg- 
er than aid vict Me. 5 mtrrt 
Common. Hugh due recep. 3 
dble beds. 2 baths. ULVtaSt 
rm. util rm. cun wc. cellar, 
adn. new roof a ono leafs, geti. 
£117.000 352 7580 today. 

622 2590 w day . - 


DAfHfES VILLAGE Large 2 Bed 
maisonette Legtil studio lounge, 
a I rose study. Ml A tmih. gen. 
£72.500 01 878 5391. 


DURAND GARDENS, Stocks, ell 
1 oed flat on square. CH. filled 
wardrobes. Mir hen atari, gar- 
den £41.000 TH 582 8278 


liruxcrably brevnled 
lux on roe built to neabasi sun 
daros 4 years ago * beds 2 
Baths «l en stole) creep wsih 
dining area, study m brk. uni 
liy rm. dtue gge Off st rtm 
■secluded SO' gdn £256.000 
i It. Harren A Co 7 BB tbsj. 

ST. JAMES'S DRIVE SWI7. 
Large 4 stoned (amity hoisc 
Enormous garden. Garage IC-3 
yards Wandsworth Common 
Honan RaasfltuHr condition 
£215.000 lor quirk sate 
Phone ■ 05481 560011 or oi- 
672 0727 

SW8- Soanou, sunny smii level l 
bed (Lai. Earn arre-r. Citv W 
end. £41.500 AMdfNMiry Es- 
tates 3dl 6677 


CULPHAM. DedgbUol Urge fam- 
ily. house. 4. bedrooms. 2 
bathrooms. 2/3 reception 
rooms. CH. Much sought after 
residential street close lo 
CCapfura Common. £136000. 
Tel Ol 2Z3 4495. 

EAST SHEEN }W1L Sonveihlng 
special Ground fir flat. 4 Beds. 
3 rectos, usual offices, t. 40090 
ft Oarage, secluded grounds. 
cured acre** lo Common ana 
pork. £186000 Freehold. Tel: 
222 9111/ 878 7226 tEvesI 

ARMOUUR HOUSE HUNTBfS 
Search and relocation special 
Ms for residential properties In 
South and West loadon and 
Surrey / Sussex borders. Ring 
01-223 0660. 

TQRSLEYS SWl 8. Ovarmlng 
modernised cottage hi excellent 
Rd. 2 dole beds. Ige tal, bfasl 
rm. recep. both. 30 n west toe- 
ing gar d e n £82.500. 
Ken woods: Ol 223 2282. 

BATTERSEA. Elegant 3 bed 
house with dMe recep A ige 
kit -bfasl rm. luily mod. 
£96.000. Ahboisbury E stat es 
381 6677. 

CLAFHAM JCT. two 1 bed flats. 
M»n walk of Station VM with 
Ige receo £50 000. Mod with 
gdn. CrfLOQO. View today. 01 
871 0173 9T 01-350 2722. 

CLAPHAM COMMON IL9K 
Much sought after superb, 
immoc. large 1st fl 2 bed flaL 
CH. curtains, carpels A cooLer 

1 PCI £72.500. TH 01 228 3820. 

5MT9 BeoofUuUy modem tsed. Ige 

2 bed gdn flat Attractive decor. 
Kit diner. Recepi rm. Bath rm. 
CH v close lubes £56.00 O. 
L-H. Ol 928 2406. I 

SW18 FAMOONABLE sludto OaL 
Low mainienance. musl be 
seen. Sep tor . bath. Orel 
£32.500 Tel; Ol 677 6981. 

LLI1. Victorian semi 3 beds. 2 
receps . sep rtoak. »c h, own 
drive. £106,003. 01663 2930. 


CHELSEA & 
KENSINGTON 


Douglas &Gardoa 

CHaSEA 8W10 
Die emmst tsiNf house et CbetMl 1 
HU/ Large twep. Wehen 4 florf- 
t ctms. 2 Bamtooms. Ckhml CH. 
CHW. 

Uh S3 yon 
Pries £157.505 

01-730 8411 


HOLLAND PARK 

Wll 

2 needy convened flats in 
lux new development over- 
looking gardens. 2 beds 
plus study /bed 3- large 
rrcep. 2 bates. -Uh floor lift 
and Ground floor 2 beds, 
large recep. bath. 125 year 
/fiscs, lux kit carpets 
£129.950. priced for quick 
sale 

NELSON HEARN 
01-937 3811. 


ST. STEPHENS HEWS, W2 
Fabulous mews house on 3 
noon. Z/3 OaiSs bed rooms . 
1;2 UnjE recepnors. btchen, 
bathroom, snower loom and 
cloakroom Garage. Gas eh. 

£124,509 ffaki 
ANTHONY HILL & CO. 

01-229 0072 


MOCUFFE SQ SWIfL litmuc 
l 2 bed nat overtooKOTg 
Peoctitlc So . Lime Boll-m,. 
Camprun, rec mi. on dining 
rm. i nii-orai kic 2 bed, vrud» 
ample -iwaoe cn Long Is* 
Low outgoing* £!26X»a IBM 
A Lewis. £04 8377. 

EXCEPTIONAL ? bed flat. Stw- 
miB areftmmedanon Carocfs. 
mruini tilled Kitchen Huge 
oadrn L’rgenl dale. A89.SCV 
Tet OI 6C«2 3245. 


KENTON COURT.Kenungton 
Wt* Eurcmely Krf- ueauttful 3 
te-dmt flat on 2nd nr of ih» itn 
prcs«iv«- pb oiorV ctove lo 
Holland Park A bm*fUs irem 
Ine or snapping A transport fa- 
rill lies ufl hen High Si Enl lull, 
rnc rm. dm area. 3 bed. hath. 
M*p rlkrrn. rtl. chw. ;t hr por- 
ter £145 000 Rv:d 3 Lews 

2J4 8377 

KCNSINCTON COURT WAN- 
SIOMS NL Lae 3 txsl re*. Mi A 
3 halhs. pb flat Interior de- 
w-jimI Eac enr proiimn Low 
nutoomos Jusi ndur-sl In 
£135.000. Reed A Lf«is 244 
63f7 


ASNBUSI PLACE SWT. Lge split 
level 2 bed. 2 rec. hi l /bam. 2nd 
fir coiv nai. Access to pnvole 
gdns. New 99 yr He OV*H Of- 
fers in excess of £116^500. 
Reed A UWb 244 8377- 
PMLBEACM SONS SWB. Newfy 
mod 2 bed lsi fir bale OaL Rcc. 
dtning area, kit, hath, gas ch. 
Lse 99 yrs. C79XXJO. Reed A 
Lewis 244 8377. 


HAMPSTEAD A 
HIGHGATE 


HAMPSTEAD SON SIBDRB 
wniiRaj} WAY NW11 

An extremely attractive cot 
tag* style property comprising 


idtcheo /bepakfa 


batorooni/wc. FWad carpets. 
Cos CH. SW facing gardens. 
£140 000 SOLE AGENTS 

CYKL LEONARD A CO 
01 408 2222. 


Wtoly presented 2nd 
convened flat in pramiar Km- 
Hon. 3 bedrooms. 2 baths, 
lounge, tor Chen /brk Id room, 
lame south west facing terrace. 
OSP. gae CH. 84 yrs. S37S.OCO 
Druce A Co. 431-1122 


F fT ZJ OWR AVE. NWX BngM 

oenlhse. 2 pass/ 3 bedims. 
Kit dPd. tec. com. Mi. OCK 
for qtnrk sale £72.600. Ol 794 
1046 no agents. 


SEMI DCTACMn 4 bedim hooee 
Immaculate cond. FuB GCH. 
Iff garden. Integral gge. dedr- 

able N6 area. £169.960 TetOl 
485 7701 


RICHMOND & 
KINGSTON 


Adi to River, close 
■own centre and rfaiton. Turn 
of Ccm deiached 3bed house. 2 
Ige creeps, sunny ktL bathrm. 
ctkrm. gdn Full gas CM. taste- 
lolly refUrb. £87.600 F/h. H: 
546 0815, O 948 8303. 


MW. cut-de sac off Green. 60 
yds fownoth. Mon victatUn 
cot!**. 2 beds, garden. 

£89.000. 01-940 4727 

day.- eves. 


BERKSHIRE 


COONMAM NR MAlOCWfEAO. 

Character cottage Meal ror 
coonlry. garden lovers End ter- 
race of 4 only Rural location. 3 
beds. 2 baths. 2 receps. Ige 
kitchen, utility room. CH. Lge 
pal to. gardens, om buntings, 
approx v, acre mot Ctim 
£105.000 Tel: 06286 26144. 


XCtti CEWTURT THATCHES CM- 

toge. Grade 2 listed. Wilts 
border 5 mBes M*. t hour Lon- 
don. Orta Beams. Ingtenook etc. 
3 dbfc bras, lint ham. 2 Receps. 
shower rm. Cos G M. Ige gdn. 
workshop. Offers nc £83000 
Telep none: 0672*010. 


IHOHV AILED RURAL PQ6ITION 

in t'l acres. Mid way Windsor 
and Reading Cnorarier cnalet 
and s c annexe Scope for 
improvement reptocvment lex- 
bulng 2200 sq.fll Auction 21st 
May 1986 l unless sow* 

Tufnetlxnd Partners. BlnfleM 
Estate Office <03*41 54368 
EXCEPTIONAL BET RECENCY 
house.Sunmngdale. Rural as- 
pect. I a acre gdn a Beds. 
£1 33.000 0990 3B9bO. 

NEAR 8KACHME1L lovely period 
rentage 2 largr beds, luxury 
kllcnen and bath 2 pottos + 
Odn. £82.000 0344 484604. 
RANCBOURNC vm 4 bed semi, 
nr village centre. Sm A R. 
Thames 08 ’ open Plan I tv rm. 
20' Hi £68.000 07357 3896 


BUCKS 


BURNHAM 
BEECHES 
FAMILY HOUSE 

Fvnhxti Conran. Attractive 
rortera sett lew! house mpn- 
va'e road Lowiqe. ^tut^ mom. 
song room. 4 dWa bedrooms. 
Krtchci/tUst room 2 bath- 
rjoms. t en sate, shorn room 
jts uafety rm. GCH h kit wfH 
srocUB sou at taang ganfcn. 
Dm garage. 

FSEsraii) C135JB5 

Tel: 02814 2356 


STOW BASBL ConVn. nr in 14. 
Ml. HoIL 2 roc. WL4 d.'bed. 2 
baths. GCH. Barn Annex. 
D-’gge. tnc. gdn. £96000. 
G hftl n gM b <09081 616936. - . 


BOLTON KEYNES fim. Ml ton. 
suprfh Victorian m Mwtt 
owerlosfdng woodland. 6 bib 
3 receps. lovely 9dn £196-000. 
Brown A Merry 0908 663231: 


DEVON & CORNWALL 


CORNWALL 

Retire to recently complet- 
ed 1 and 3 beds and 
penthouse ap artments. 
Finished lo an exceedingly 
high standard with spec- 
tacular views over 
Newquay bartXKr and 
coast. ReKtfent Secretary 
provides comprehensive 
security and dervlces. 
Ftmn£3ZL500to££&000. 
For further dettrils:. 

The Ospruy 
Company 
0637 671051 


TCMBtHwn ranara 

US Ml COTTAGE 
* rob uiniim a tm n rtc 
CNMMRD 

2S acres. MMond. Sbeam. 
Ourixatwgi. A qmo tar 


AUCTION 17U APRIL 


Lii-Swim i , 

Bock Itano, OrM. (tzn) 


THATCHED 

COTTAGES 

COUNTRY 

HOUSES 

LET US HELP YOU 
FIND ONE IN SOUTH 
WEST ENGLAND. 
PLEASE CAUL; 
MR COHN ON 
03637-215 


TORBAY /DARTMOOR Luxury 2 
and 3 bed apartment In noMfuf- 
ty leswia d country aunrion 
awn £49.600X86.0X1 

-Menage ProperOrt. toeach 
, House. Chofsey. Ovon 0X10 
SUN. TW 10491) 661699. 


DEVON. One Tlw1bn/M& link. 
-A bed conage for comotete 'res- 
toration with 6K acres. iGuHto 
£40.0001 Further HVr acres in 
2 lots with River frontage A 
ftaMbfr Auction 30th April. Re- 
ply suns 19 Oampton Sl. 
Tiverton 10884) 256331. J/lOft 


LONDON PROreRTY 


WAPPING 

Georgian House in private garden 
square overlooking River. 

3 Reception Rooms, 3 Bedrooms, etc. al! in 
excellent order. Patio garden, oftsueet parking 
and mooring rights. Walking distance of the 
City. Freehold £425,000. 

Phone 01-480 6666 today to view. 


WIMBLEDON 

Cork HO - One of to maa- 

nmcenl caecum* deuchod 

bouses. Newiy devrkwed by 

McAiptaa Master bed with 

enotiile bath. S further beds 

and bafjL Butt In ward- 

PUnnedL- 


stuped ihrtag/dlntng room 

wtm splendid through nm- 

bie flraptsce. Oweiau Z7Yt x 

21 OR. Study. Poggenpcta 

mchesL Utility roam. 17 fl 

CatHDy /breakfast roan. 
OBOUf parage RC. Secnrtty 
system, views. £310.000 

Telephone 01-686 4013 


ESCAPE! 


3 bunding plats an 1 acre. 
Far sale toehold 


PANG BOURNE 
THAMES. 


ON 


40 I 


07367 6149 9ato-6pm daily. 


CONVEYANCING 

Mdtafe Warn A Co 

Offer you scrrice'tt reason- 
able talcs. 

Wby not phone Gavin Wil- 
son or Sandra KrywaJd 

01-24? 3100 

fcr • quowisn or job pnp- 


. , — End Tgiwnhousa 4 

bed pr mooring Hh factng nr MS 
mmiUStnlBa(te» 
£169.000 NHBC StahMt 60280 


WESTMINSTER 

FnBy mottenaed larec stu- 
d»o flat m p/h. Separate 
kitchen A nous mom. 
Leasehold SO ya 
remaining. 

£42^500. 

Td n-sn 26W 


ST JOHNS WOOD 
FnUy famished Injury fiat nr. 
tube 2 double beds. i*4 
ba*s. folly eqttiped German 
lcitcbm, bige double recep- 
bon. parking, poner, cokwr 
T.V. Ca La. £350 pw. ut 
me t OL and H.+ C crater, 
end rates. 

Tel; 01-348 5747. 


r ijj N A M SUNL Sunny Itmtwtd 
property an South Path. «xc dr- 
d?: » » recep . 3 Beds. 
baihroOTtL Ctkna. 20 ft 
kNehen/dfnbtg rrn. touch win- 
dow. . onto large bnmac u toto 
wraet £36 Oj 0OO open Id offer. 
Tot Ol 731 SBBAT^ - • 


2 bed Bat a 

magnfflcenfvfewfcflifcfiAt __ 

. 1 a cre tena wn a gem. gge 
*79.000 TW 01-997 6191 

E AU NQ WS Luxury Edwardian 
■matte house. Large through 
fldUr mted oik 
totchen/breakraK roam, cruay. . 
Cloakroom. 3 bedrooms, fitted 
wardrobes, luxury bathroom, 
garden, psno and ports. 
£89.600 01497 2724 



Theyteall 
under one roof 
at NatWest. 


So if you’re looking for a mortgage, 
bndging loan, insurance cover, a personal 
loan or a budget account, why not step into 
your local NatWest for written details or write to: 
,^Trf L r S M ^ a S er ’ Nali ona I Westminster 
™Eci^ ng De P« men '- FREEPOST i 

cVNatVYest 




27 




H r . - 


: dishoti 
handler* 


- -sri > it 
! i I J f 


5 . > 

! i V 


h 

rf 


f- 


.«*;• 






THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


OVERSEAS PROPERTY 




can 


, up 

the trade 
in Spain 

By Diana Wildman 

Britons are buying about 25,000 Spanish 
properties a year, accounting for half the 
total sales to foreigners. With Spam now 
a full member of the Common Marfa*, 
the campaign under way in the European 
Parliament, ted bytheJEoro MP, Edward 
McMillan-Scott, to set up a comtnisaon 
to stamp out fraudulent sales ofMedher- 
ranean holiday homes, will be welcomed 
by both potential purchasers and bona 
fide agents alike. 

The growth of what Mr McMillan- 
Scott refers to as "backstairs companies” 
who sell either properties they do not 
own or ‘‘offirfan r * homes winch they 
never intend building, might be stamped 
out if only buyers would seek legal advice - 
on their proposed purchase. 

Michael Soul, a City of London 
solicitor, whose practice specializes in 
Anglo-Spanish law, makes the point that 
UK agents selling a British home rarely 
expect to collect payments on behalf of 
the vendor. 

Bnyers can go out to 
judge for themselves 

Mr Soul says "Here, if they do, agents 
are required under the Estate Agents Act 
of 1979 to hold this on a separate clients’ 
account. The Office of Fair Trading can 
even prohibit agents from continuing to 
practise if they mil to comply with the re- 
quirements of the Act. 

"However, as yet the Estate Agents Act 
has no application where the deposit is 
paid in respect of overseas property. So 
unless the agents can produce a notarized 
power of attorney from the developer in 
Spain they cannot give a valid receipt on 
.his behalf . . 

“So far. Spanish entry into the EEC 
has had no impact on the activities of 
estate agents who. sell S panish property 
to citizens of. other Community 
countries." 

All reputable agents and developers 
can arrange inspection trips for holiday- 
home buyers, who can then judge for 
themselves whether the facilities and 
properties are of an expected standard. 

Anyone visiting the La Manga Club, 
the 1,400-acre leisure estate in Murcia, a 
90-minute drive due south of Alicante 
airport, could not fail to be impressed' 
both by the standard of the -gwrting 



in the stnn The Los Altos development it La Manga Club near Alicante 
— Spain comprises small dusters of villas in Andalnsfrn style with pri- 

> of the owners 


yate swimming pools, gardens and terraces, all for the exclusive nse 

£77,000 for two bedrooms to £101,000 
fora four-bedroom villa. 

Flexible timeshare has now arrived at 


facilities and the sheer variety of sport to 
choose from. 

Owned and run by European Ferries 
pic, this very British estate has two 
championship 18 -hole golf courses, one 
of which has bested the Spanish Open 
five times, with a large clubhouse 
attached to the four-star Las Mimosas 
Hotel set in the heart of La Manga. 

' The redesigned Racquets Club, run 
under the auspices of David Lloyd now 

boasts 17 tennis courts, a mix of hard, «_ - . . _ . . ... _ . _ 

day and^rass. Two squash courts, a The Costa del Sol is snll a magnet for the 
bowling green and croquet lawn are due neb international pumper, with L» 
to be-added soon. There is a riding Tenazas de fas Lom^ del Marbdla Club 
centre, watereports such as windsurfing a dawc ^xample. Set tn the foothills 
sailing and water-skiing and, oniquem %**** P ? erla “** *** MarbelIa 
Southern Europe, a cricket pitch, com- apartment 


La Manga with weeks costing between 
£2,450 during low season in a two- 
bedroom villa, to £5.950 for a three- 
bedroom unit in high season. Weeks 
bought can be taken any time within the 
designated season. 

Details: La Manga Cub, 62 Brompton 
Road, London SW3 1BW (01-225 041 1.) 


pfete with pavilion. 

La Manga's residential development 
concept shows how effectively a tradi- 
tional white-washed, rough-roof pueblo- 
style development ban be incorporated 
into today's environment and look as if 
the buildings have been there for ever. 

' In essence, this is achievedby creating 
email alCmnlainwl villages ygftarfr f, 
seemingly at random, throughout the 
estate. Plans are for 16, with phased 
completion during the next four years. 

Currently for safe is a selection of one-, 
two- and three-bedroom villas in Los 
Mofinos, an Andalusian-style village 
being built, on a hillstde overlooking the 
golf courses. This pueblo will consist of 
150 homes, some with roof terraces, all 
- with balconies or gardens, with the focal 
point being the swimming pool area. 

The 4$ housesin phase one are due for 
completion in August, and prices range 
from £55,000 for a one-bedroom to 
£85,000 for a three-bedroom home. 

- Phase one of Los Altos village is sold 
and occupied, and ofthe64inphasetwo, 
a„ few are still available, priced from 


block, the first of two to be completed. 


Marble flooring Is 
laid throughout 


boasts vast terracing equal in size to the 
imposing inside accommodation. 

The specifications are high and in- 
clude marble flooring throughout, in- 
cluding the terraces. Facilities include 
central heating, air conditioning, fully 
fitted kitchens, a swimming pool, gar- 
dens and underground garaging. There is 
a foil manag ement and rental service, 
plus 24-hour porterage. 

. Out of the 52 apartments in the first 
block, 19 are now for sale through 
Chestertons Residential and hs.Marbella 
associates. Panorama de Espana. Prices 
range from £65,000 for one and two 
bedrooms, from £ 120,000 for three 
bedrooms and from £316,000 for a four-; 
bedroom penthouse with 166 square If 
metres of terracing. 

Details: Chesiertons Residential 1 J 6 
Kensington High Street, London W 8 
7RW (01-937 7244). 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


■ HUNTING GAIE HOMES QfiOBtN 

I D Safes tee, Enfield 
4 bed luscyiy detached names frem 

I £M0,mU 

B Cwwor Glebe, Cumnor 

2 bed housesr— pnccs awaited. 3 S 4_ 
a bed houses from 159,500 to 175,95(1 Q 

J X! Sandy Ltne, NorfhwOOd 

5 bed luxury deudwd homes 
I from £275fiOQ to ootyxtt— two 
V remaining only Q 
a D Hems Reach, Wefayn Carden 

2bed hones from £43/9S0. Q 

1 3 bed hones — p rices awaited. 

D 

2&3bed homes from K1950-£S) # 9S0.Q 


UUNnNC GAZE HOME SOUTISH 


I 


‘ 3 &4 bed detached houses 

■ EqgSO to OMfiO O.0 ^ 

3 & 4 

I bed daached houses available soon. 

■ Prices from around £4^500 to 
_ **» oral n 

I houses. Pticesfrom £3*500 to £80/HlX3 
H The Roystoi&lhncsaead ns 

I 1,2*3 bed horoesfiomwotflid 
*£31,500 to £44,950. Cl 

I d CaraSneCoaitStFezdtBi 

1 Sc 2 bed apartments and 2 & 3 bed 
homes from 



Street. fUdm, Hen SG4 9BL at rttchin 3XM. 
Hun&gCzre Hornes Southern, Buddand HfiUMV 
* Oaremom lan*Esh^Suaqria70SDL 
■fcL Isher GB41S. 

Homemakers, Chautw Horae, GBcfeo Voao, 
Haywant. Heath. Sussex, RH16 IBB. 
KUraardt Heath* “ 


— — I 

Stes shortly to be commenced ■ 

HUNTING GATE HOMES SOUTfStN 

]H Soufmalec Jk Hof&BQ. Wbt 
Suscx 

Range of 1-4 bed houses tenace* and 

m detached. Available summer TS8& 

prices awaited. 

HUNQNG GATE HOMES CHURN 
IB hScfcelby House, Ealing 

1 bed flais—prices awaited. 

B Enfield 

Town houses and 4 bed detached 
homes— prices awaited. 

IE Watford 

Studio apartments anal fi 2 bed 
maisonettes— prices awaited. 

^OCSMASCRS UEVB6PMENIS 

& Woodbury PaA. Ermnudi 
3 bed bungalows, 4/5 bed detadied 
houses. Prices from S£30i. U 
B Hieh VieM( Eveter 
4/5 bed detached luxury homes from 
£81,500 □ 

D Coodea Mount Mount Goodeoy 

3 bed bungdows. 4/S ted detached 
houses. Pnces from £89,950. LJ 
BMaresfidA East Steer 
3 bed bungalows. 4/5 bed aetacted 
houses. Pnoes from £B9,500 to 
SXSJXO.Q 


I 

I 

I 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

I 

I 

I 

I 

1 


•Trices coned at — ^ 

S^Gate 


Hunting 




SMITH-WOOLLEY 


UHCOUtSK3R£ 

HIBHHHJJS FARM, EtfEDOH, SLEAFORD 



Most xnan pan stn* termoouse 
3 recepoon rooms. 2 tffcas. tatehen. S bedrooms, 
dressing mom. to hro o m. 

Seooodsy 4 brto owed hence. Cottage (bather avrta&ie) 
Bren Sere 


;amo 

hnade Grade 3. Exsendng (dig about CSS 

roe bale bt rmvAis mm as a 
ob n cure* 

Ftdf 0eta«e from: 27/28 Sndge SkoeL CanOndge. C82 1LU 
Tet (0223) £2SG6 


sstsr* 



MARINE COURT. ST. LEONARDS-ON-SEA 


Studio Flat from £14.950 
7T'~~~ 2 mom FU& from £16^300 
3 room Fba from £38,000 
1 , 4 room Flan from £57,000 

......V.tPorten; LA, Eon jpboae, 

Sccvity. etc 


HEREFORDSHIRE. 
WORCS. A SHROP 


4 BEMOOMED MOD DCT 
HS£ 

VERT USEFUL EX FORGE 

buojwg 

IDEAL FOR LOOSE BOXES ETC 
IVtosarstoe bi 5 Atm. 
ovoen/b Uflt Corro lu> tnefl 
woen Keep heb enerrma bwrng 
room, tammofn and &o*tx room 
FREBfOLO £1353X30 OFFERS. 

TH 090567 226 ANYTIME 


NT 

Pmhort ranaty nouw nf «» 
imrlioo In Hn')M portion 
wtui ineomparaur rural nr« 
Frontage lo River Avon im i i 
aon ol grounds. 7 beds. A re- 
ception rooms. 2 boon. CM. 
dole garage, swimming pool. 
Price guide 3260-000 Freehold. 
Contact Banks A Slivers. A6 
foregale iiikL Worcester. Id 
10*061 23a£6. 

DCUGtfTFUL Halt Umbered ler- 
rared cottage circa IdnCwim 
charming vinage in oeauliful 
Her rtontslm countryside. 
Swing duitng room 17* s SO' 
with ooen nre. luicnen. bath- 
room * 2 double bedrooma. 
rsa.OQO freehold Tel. 023687 
6«2 

NR TEMBUMT WELLS. Soactoiv 
3 bedroom period collage, limy 
moderrused Bath » sep shwr 
Ku with au adottances. I acres 
* grazing rights. Secluded. 2 
miles from marvel town. 
£60 000 F .H. 0664 810706 

MALVERN HRXS 3 bed flat mo 
garden i. with magmnranl 
views lo Hack Mountains. MS. 
MSO 12 miles, gas CH. 98 yrs 
lease, good order throughout. 
£33.600. 068*3 60330. 


YORKSHIRE 


HEUBUT N. Vdrtt Moon Nat 
Ram Snacttms None ouui per»- 
oo no w. CM. 4 bdiu 1 double 3 
angles). Ctoaelo all ammemoes. 
Parking, tdedl lor holiday or 
York commuter £60 000. Tel 
090* 421966 evenings 


C'M.'VPLIN 


7 Upper Grosveaor Street, Mayfair, London W1 
TeL 01-493 5421 

NR. ORSETT, ESSEX. £275.0011. A tope modatued tmdy mac. 
stnounOa] by fannond, with abna 3S sees. 4 n ananw tooms. hmd 
bRMii and idrtty. < bedrooms. 2 battnooms. Dote g ton*. camM 
hubng. gngng. 8am. 3 (inter ooouttngs. 1 aot paddock and 2 
loose botes. 

FRYERHM&. ESSEX. £219500. A tame lodge houss m a sum- 
ta* sauig. W«1 yd ova t» arm. 3 recepten rooms. 3 Maroons, 
aon! fuui gc*sr Suit at bedroom and ftHteoom, second bathroom 
GfCH. douDie garage «<ti stuko ova. neaed SMurnwg pool and loo 
cabm/gaiiKs room. 

TEDD1NGTDK. HBOLESEX. Ottos arote £180000. A damng 
Thanes ode imn bouse vnrh hie ms across tes to ne fiver. 
EiefoM and OcapavWY suaemus 3-oaBoomo a cawsnodanon n a 
Qebgrtlid setrog. win moomg avadaoie to rem. 

WUYSatRY, BBUCSMRE. E175J00. A spa»s dote honied 
Edwarttan house von gvoens ol ovs 1 acre and fisnsig on tne Rwa 
Cane 3 itcepsmit rooms. S nearoiHns, GFCH. in need of sane rtemal 
modemaon. Heatnrow 6 mags. M2S mommy 2 mdes. 

NIL HUMGSHURST. SUSSEX. £T65J0fl. An excepwnrfv spa- 
ens tansy Douse, tnrfl n me iOSOs. wsti about 3 goes. 2 
■MKonnKbng (eseobon rooms, tape stuov. breadasr room, launen. S 
beauams. oaitvoom. Dodse garage, garaen m paddock, m a pleasant 
run! p os ti fl fl- 

ML WTCHJN. HERTS. A beautfrty modem sed period (nose, dating 
tram 17Ui camsy. wai many attractive features m a duel adage semng. 
Drawing room «nb mgamook, dnng room. Mted knawa 4 txdrooms. 
bathroom and showa room. Modem sobo luei cJu double garage. Ad m 
anmatose decorative orda. a about <* acre. £180.000. 

and at ShenTield, Essex. Teh Brentwood 
(0277) 211467. 


GENERAL 


WEEK LOVOkS only. At last, 
small or urg* houses, bulli lo 
onrer In tradtlional style. VD 
Uge or stoBfU isolation m the 
beauftfUf Southern 

Momumu Prooi £38000 in- 
ciustve. R obert CMiUbb. 2 
Market Short. Saffron WaUen. 
107991 22641 



CK OF EUROPEAN PROPER 


i 

& 

The greatest ever show under one roof of apartments, vilias and land for sale in France, Italy, Switzerland, Portugal, 
Spain and Mallorca - with prices ranging from £19,000 to over £500,000. 

Expert advice wB be on hard from Chestertons Overseas 1 senior personnel, Iheir associated offices and devetopere from each country. 

THK DORCHESTER HOTEL 22 nd- 23 id APRIL 

Show open Tuesday and Wednesday 10am - 8.30pm 



THE 1986 EUROPEAN PROPERTY SHOW 
IS ORGANISED BY 

CHESTERTONS 

W/. — BRSrnENTIAL OVERSEAS w 


TiXmn sa t p ccnmnsaWHBblebyphonBoraiittesho*/. 


-RESIDENTIAL OVERSEAS- 

116 Kensmgion High Street 
London W87RW Telephone 01-937 7244 


OVERSEAS PROPHTTY 


VILLARS - SWITZERLAND 


Imaaine an fmjnn rofiMnrt, jnd lO mHin tatfaMI GcatW . J . SUMlliik£ . . . Slriin g 

. ffurrog swinraring. . .golf „ . . booe-rkbag. . ■ saperb r ewa arapte & shops. 

Intcnianooal schoote . . .-aH set m wooded slopes with stunning toottaiaiD view. 

' All this -and mote- you wffl find at VILLARS -8 historic village mth 
a sophisticated yet friendly atmosphere. 


LE BRISTOL 

New bfertmeot opportunity fa Swiss itert 
Exodtent mcome potexmal 



Meet the Swta derdepen at THE BfAY FAIR QOTEL, LONDON, Wl , 
10am-8p« lOtiu Utfa and 12th April 
HILARY SCOTT LTD For d e t ai ls a nd appomtmegt: . fcrnTrt 

422 Upper KkhBModBiMd West, vlSwl 

ES t25^6 ZtS&h 

MM TdnSSCZUCESECH 

Tefca. 927828 — - 


EXHIBITION 

Of YRiAS AW IPMTtnTS OB Ttt COSTA BIANCA 

Sunday ®fr April 12-8 pzn - 
the pothouse hotel road. 

pgNTTWVTSf. CARDIFF. 

& THE ANGEL HOTEL- WGH STREET, 

KinWFORP , SURREY. 

Tavneistai 01-549 425J 

t0mar Mu-6l7«-r77Lou^ 


. Ttnuort vm» 

nr sale- » 

South Tate. * 

lanni/dliiM rm. aoen Man 
khOKn. M uw t r rtn with MM 
+ MM. Sue l»a» U3t views to 
Ok mb in most luxurious new 

bte *v» rimrewneg a 
milnr up the coast tram Pteya 


alter wtth garara. nano aiuf 
i own banana tree. The dewtfop- 
nunl boas* an ote . g* 
1 flundm. cwtronwro noai. morn 
centre, lenma court. wawaMr 
tsgoon. Omt*. teMB.* 
. bars. Fixed te «te entr 

£51.000 s ecur es. Tofc 

CumbanouU (OHdt72S07l 


FRANCE 


UNMET. S rmtw tem 


rtw. 

Lane stoat butt hoow un Wj 
acres of tovdy Wwtes . CH. 98 
modem 
£80.000 ono. 

211179. 


RUM OOOI 


cae tvaaot vttjm 
anneal ' v * a% 0001 

beaches, i 

a*. Miconf. odn. Ot-7* l '** 5 

cas rOBAT i bed agL _flteuy 
■ ufcFF l-SOO.OOa Bt ITOlU. 
■» «im 1 villa wftn 

ES 


S 'gzs&rsm&z 

IVSOPS TA'SSt 

SttoooFta rite?”' 

zesstm* s 

SToSS'aSSSf^SSiu 


CHANNEL ISLES 


SANK 6 bteJwteWVte*. no 
■Mrs. t*M W S»m 2*3* * 

0626 220038 


SPAIN 


*namw ptwagwB 
HaSted Strain 4 


MB (UttU V 04 ™“ 


11 

ffl{B912J«T77 


■tetwv-i ■jarirs s 

ml Hrff serract 
SSmm mew. Nr PW 

S5£Tfi«X00a Ot-«r 9656 

g teuj calamompa. aw* 

■^STbuSo vte contemns * 

dry. BOICMnr * WT. “rb- 

ttndscaoe-Ban-s/PooJ- CSWOO 

lor quxh »««- «B*uu o: 449 

7910 or rwrw Ol S« 9*70- 

COSTA ®0*»APA- 

hjh, rurn aOL . W 

EXJ tfWdteSea. ■»•*«« 

.tet- pnw 

|Sh."SS5o: Ot 646 SI06. 

If ■«» » Banns ttte 

nr rrh utetiurorm gm» 

nucuntndly furo Mid own 

teMA SSri'tertSSar 


COSTA 8LAKCA modern Wa» 3 
nedf tnrracr mkunM Pbrt 
ooun beach OOSOOBI area 
Tel 0272 332683. 


CANARY ISLANDS 


MUrtU 8 OOLF a COUHTVV 

CUiB«bam Ternertte Apwt- 
bkm « vats* from ««.*o 
- Our approach * only ten mrro 
ireni me Mrpori te we ouiof - 
W nedott acttUwte. teen- 
i#tm *frhowh ridiflHW count 
and much moro Tfi gf ro-i 01 
938 2616 or 021-643 7025. 



SOUTH TENERIFE 

On abtefj tamiM gnu 

in -a ootef Kami of La 

OteWft Ural fax tour h oWim . 

m n wiura mb our renxd ta- 

^Kk«iten> taenHjuywio 

fiSofilK (xuriuseprire. rnrnr 
ptew hr death ur 

MM* dc kv Cora 
3tCMDKtai 


Tet urn HIS 



PES1 PE NCIAL 

' Your Harbour... 

PUERTO ESTEPONA RESIDENTIAL 

Luxury apartments by Yacht Marine, prime 
position. 25 minutes from Gib. 

1, 2. & 3 bedrooms (between 100 and 289 m 2 ). 
AU with large terraces, white marble floors and 
fireplace, directly overlooking the sea. 

- Parking places. 

- Swimming pool & beautiful gardens. 

- Very interesting prices. 

- Payments over 10 years. 

- Already buitL 

ASERVISA 

IN THE FIFTH LARGEST GROUP 
OF SPANISH COMPANIES. 
(Marbelta-Malaga) Head Office, Serrano, 23. MADRID -1. 
For inspection flights brochures and further details, 
call: UK Agent 

HOME & ABROAD LTD 
01-969 1133 


BALEAKICS 


VILLA Majorca. « wu rao w 
wnti bathrooms. Imdrate 

EE Sfeo.,8^.72-^: 

Majorca: rt»0&4?l-) £70522. 


MAJORCA 2 te apL ground ta. 
furnHMd Conumnal moL 
own garden and ooiag* row * 
data water yacm mooring. 
£ 18 X 00 t/H. Trii Swttory 
(0787) 310712 <m*J. 


VZSXT7MC MEJKWCA 
Then couan Buubcda Ltd r«r a 
Jrtecaou ol properw* uvwwi- 
aul (stand. Tel 01-937 2824 


ITALY 


ace LUX 1 ST vma lO years 
ow. I*> to* wrtro. all mam 
services- £ 240000 . 07663758 . 


PORTUGAL 


VALE DO LORD, The Algarve. 
Luxury vtftas Rk- «aM in Me 

. wed -known mart. 3/4 tea- 
rooms wtti pool. From 

£85.000 0372-66466. 

MjCMVE BnOdfng PfHs. Con- 
xniclwra- F a vaiuuaaa. V1U» 
teorti- OSPl. 0778 34449 9. 
aUJMVI WANTED. Ljnl & V» 

im wwun 10 tada tens « 
Cwoem. TH 0494 33962.. 

Cootined «a page 39 


Country Pr oper ty 


SIBLEY PARES & PARTNERS 

SEVEMOAKS, KENT 
ST MARY PLATT 

2 RECEJVTLY COMPLETED DETACHED 
HOUSES OF CHARACTER UPON PLOTS OF 
APPROX y* ACRE ENJOYING SPLENDID 
SECLUDED YET NOT ISOLATED RURAL 
SURROUNDINGS 

An exaflaot te tfiscemng sgte ca ta m newporat a tf flatugbam m 
enluiKa Bk te pra p onkmetl aetanmoteon. 

Local unemtas. mapi centres aod raconng road conwawatains are 

^ ^Cffc35 1 D00 AND £250000 FREEHOLD 

Fufl p man 

Site office 9732 8859G2 


Keith 
Cardale 
Groves 




tat irj 

kranaote 3rfl flow fla sa n 
rntfage ti pjpoa Qu i n ptoev 
nans. Einy wae ftrao- 
on l. E/ teL reap mom . 

tut ma oHr tadroi. insaoom. 

qJSLf. m 

Unkanutea 3 faeaooned 6th 
fim Uiav uestpous non- 
uwt HdcL FJf* tte U am 
Prop ww«s r/ teH, reran 
loom. Iffl J i r fl. 2 0b4 Wdrooms, 
1 sup; Dtdronm. 2 Wts (1 an 
natal. f«7Spn. Nag. 




THE PERIOO 


The only monxidy naoonal 
ealalosue et Oid and His- 
tone Homes tor salt. April 
issue out now. 


BALDO*CS COMPANY 

CMftw. GU24 RHQ. 

OMtB-TttS/CUa 


HANTSJXWSET, A 

1 D.W. 


SOWUEY - NEAR 
LYMINBTON 

A wry speoa) 8 k tcrioomeii 
country noose, occupymg an 
ixmvaUcd pesbon Mh its omi 

e foreshore between 
jhm and Bariieu. The 
prooeny possesses scope te 
further modenuteOA. Three 
bemoaned staff bungalow. 
Numerous useful MbnfiSngs. 
Matured ml sheared 
goads. 

Auction safe - mid May, 1888. 
Pros Bade: £250,000/ 
£300.000 Freehold. 

JacksoB & Jackstrt. 
The House oa the Quay. 
Lymfflgtni. Hanpshke. 
TofefAun (6539) 7582S 


CIDER WITH 

ROSIE VALLEY 

Self -contained rial wtffl 
splendid views in hbtonc 
mtu. S beds. 2 bathrooms, 
tuny BBed uteheiL targe 
suung room, large study. 
mghl storage heattoB- 
partdng soart- With or 
without B acre wood. 

With wood: £85.000. 
W/O wood: £75,000. 
0452-81388!. 


SANDBANKS 

Soberfe 2/3 MraanM 2nd 
flour nai wim direct (reach 
and haroour frontage. Umn- 
wruaM awmuc news 
from lounge, dtning room 
ono orarosm. M ai Kfn iully 
fined kiiawfL Bathroom and 
2 nd wnur wc Garage and 
parking lor 2 ran. 74 yaafb 
lease £89300 

•SZ 787450 or (056 7S337. 


SLE OF wssr 
tats win CVrtMS 

Wga m d» te son ibh 
DOB K8 MS BJTTMS 
la. Y w wo u m 

DaL 3 Bras. 2 Recap, tt acre 

ibqwbs irawMbmam 

PARLA CJJTTAfiC 
la. Come 

Dec 1 VaOL. 2 Racao. K tom 
r mourns rakroramnt 
PAW COTTAGE 


Dai a Baos. 2 Racep. Garage, 
Lvga Garden 



VERB Ml & POSTS 
estate wan* re 
TNMSUflr re»r 

Tet (0333) 761234 


B6BSTEB XETKS, 
VEST S6SSEX 



ms mats ten te 

aatf pad Sopbb smes d Wbl 

anted, ndssda n ra urtra d. In « 


jSSISESEb 


Bkrttte «te tew nru m 

■ TtltV«S US. Take 2EH1 ■ 


WALES 


» dote 4 bed mod 
bungalow nuty furnished wrih 
adloinfng flat. ** acre overlook- 
ing Gower. Pretty vukage tw 
mB LBMU. Dyted. £ 00 . 000 . 
Detail* '06641 773286 level l 


CLWYta. 13 mHei CMser. Do- 
nnctive Edwardian 4 
bedroomed country nouse of 
gmi character. Including wood 
panelled rooms and two kitctv 
erti. etc Matiued gardens, 
garages. siablH. workshop* and 
PBOOOCM. m au 2<h Mm. Pan- 
orarmr views. £90000 
Tefepnone. 02^^8657. 


WOOOED 

VISTAS. 


Unusual Weydrtdgc lux con- 

version 2 nedjmk Exposed 
beam*. Spurious lounge. Bal- 
cony terrace- Panorama. 

97S YR LEASE £88.960 

TEL 0932 41149. 


IfHC 


SOUTH wo w 

WTOni AL SCPERATE 

COTTAOC 

10 Acres, viable olorv. Poten- 

tial for conversion or siufl 
ouMnev wnhlfl to mins 
DIUey a, Botuui Abbey- *tHR 

Harrogate. Leeds & Brad- 

ford. Ow w 4 eerta. 2 
reception*. ETC 
£160.000 BEST on EB 
TEL 0636 63790 


BATH 

AWARD-WINNING 
NORTHANGER COURT 

RENOWNED FOR QIMLTTY u»J now foully co mpIcirrL oar omqnr CUV 
ccbbc te have an km imeuxd a Hr Bed huufy dcvtsopmcai by 
IBr~Whal Home - awards W l«S. 

SwprrM) oiMlat hter ike Riwi Avon, the tors nude qahtv iB rwiy 
homi of desn Md necvboo. Fetuira aktaor Mv-fmrd wld wood 
Litchcn. Unary taihiuMns wdB inguaw iihagud Araum floonna Tbe 
macniftmn mdlov. sknc NnUdas ■> in fafanlol ba dsqpro co «v 

yards pro-id mi drtehifnl uifroundmes. w4N»u tbf Ontlyrf of 
— — T ihrm. Viewins o cunnul to aa VtXBcauoii of *e qudny we 

^ PRICES: 285M0-Q4SJM0 

Brochure from: 

LTTHODOMOS LTD 

Sdcs Office. I Nontnnger Couft. Crowe Sum. Bdb BA2 bPf. 

Ttt BuafOZZS) MM87 ar BOMB 


EAST ANGLIA 


WATBRFBOMT WO«*«E 4 ■ 5 

Berta. 3 ballta. 2 3 leeepttom. 
(uKony. ftioortrefl. WW- 
Views to wooes and flefcte nt 
N orwich £92000- Tel: OBU 
738405 


Modernised rtv- 
ersroe rotUge. 2 Bedrooms, 
garden, rune to amenities. 
£36.000 Tet Woodbnage 7376 
6un- eves. 


CAST AN6UAN colour pronefTy 
HUXMemrei David Bedfords 
nrmg naur now available 
Send for tree copy to. 15 
Guild Ivin sheet Bury Si. Ed- 
munds l«64. 2822.6840. 
Lines Ml KMmuil Excellent 

Ine lb village ucaBMi. 4 bed. 2 
bath. FCH. ome gge. ^ acre. 
£75.000 ono. view F tunes 
1 0476) 60909 


WILTSHIRE 


i M4 ijiBV 17th Century 
tnaicned ronage ovenoowng 
farmland. Beam*. inglenoofcB. 
onguiai bread oven. 3 beds, 
Odn L7&000. 01-660 5767 ex 
*464 


Period me in 
unique aluanon overtnoung 
river & Cathedral few yd» jf 
City centre. 4,5 teas. bath. 3 
ren. ml * acre A arrow «r 
space. Needs miprovenienl 
Auction late APrU WoOUev A 
warns Salisbury 10722)2171 1. 

MATTOH Lumw bungalow /ft 
Coroervafion visage. 5 bedrms. 
suiMoungr. CCH a large gon. 
PdOdUtaon inwroiy service 
from Wwtbury £95.000. To 
view lei. 0380 830446. 

S HUES EAST OT BATH. Dear- 
able 3 bed def cottage, gge. gdn. 
£7&fl00. fh. Tet. 0025 706603. 


OXFORDSHIRE 


■nouciroN stomet «s «u« 

Oxford. 4 mttrs Smsaeri Lina 
nguay appomied detached 
(bakH style proaerty quletty uc 

Hi Vi acre detaghlful s*n»» 
Otoe MMdtnon Park- 2/3 
rerruL german fined ktT bfwri 
rm. uditty room, shower and 
r*erv. 3.4 bods. 2 110 baths it 
ra> suite) On CH. oouMe stat- 
ing. double garage Offers 
Around £177.500. Murray A 
Co: IQ8641 240331 Open loCfty 
llara-dpra. 


SOUTH OXFW0SNHE, East 
hggbourne DidcOl sianon 2 DUE 
(Paodington 40 mmst ACrac- 
ove 200 yr ok) rouge In lovely 
vHta9e * 8Me teds, large 
rooms, beams mrourarout Ga- 
rage- PdA prerty »u*s. 

Views of Beeiaiure Downs 
£ 82.000 for urtmrdude sale. 
Tel: 0235 812421 


NAMOMUM M40 lO im, 

Cbanmng cons del gone barn. 

2 bads MoermBro 10 lugn stan- 

dard Boom !r* -v fi nd £87 500. 

Phene 1086732) 8664 or 107341 

697167. 

BTLLK CMAHACm CotawMd 

cott, Ler gdn Many faaiuroa. 

Curee £66.000 Tet Burton 

KW 382) 2015. Ol 251 6596. 

exrofta tnunac 2 ucd period cot- 

tage 2 rams wai ring road. Dr 
Fowler 0635 39533 office 
hours for details 


LAND FOR SALE 


BWU TMrtlAWgwgi Surrey 
turners Full planning Fur Page 
house Sobsuniiai offers Lmiifd 

for (his unique opgcfemfty. 

(0262) 63494. 


GLUTTONS 


Near Canterbury, Kent 

An ■■Dprnsdw Country House, dating from the tad 19ik Century, with line feat urea and 
■iirariivr Garden. Had, 3 Recrpiion Roodta. Kitcben/Bnauaai Room. Playroom, 
QaaLroom/ Utility Room. First Floor with S Bedrooms, Drewing Boom 4 Bathroom, 
Serond Floor with Kitehenetie A 3 further Bcdwoma. Cange A (hithuildinp. Weil 
storked Gardm with mdl Paddock, lo all almoai 2Vt Acres. Price Guide £300,000. 

Canterbury Office Td: (0227 ) 451441 

Baihwick Hill, Bath 

SuJptantial Virwrian House Cna 1850 Is noronline design enjoying niperh views o*er 
(he Giy. HalL Study, Drawing Room. Dhuv Boom. Stidny; Room, kitchen. Play r oom. 5 
Bedrooms, 2 Bathroom, Of Ear. Double Gnp. CH. Aiuaetivc Garden. Offer* around 
£ I ¥ 0 . 000 . 

Bath Office Td: 10225) 695 II 

West Penaard, Near Glastonbury, Somerset 

Hilllieid School & milea. Main line Suiion 7 tniW 
An eseeptianil Vielorian Family House in b fine Village aellrag dose to the Parish Oturch. 
Reception Hail. Drawing Into, Dining Room, kitchen/ Break tail Rnb> Cloalwoom, 
Playroom. Garden Room. Utility Room. Cellar. 5 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms. »"» 

Rsbrp of OulhuUdimts rnriudoig double Garage. Stable Bloch. Tmnat Court. Beauutol 
mature Garden* & Grounds of appru 2 V* Aries- OfTeni In shed in the Bcgioe ol £185,000. 
Veil* Office Tel: (0746) 78012 


127 Mount Street, Maythir, London WIY 5HA,Tdephonc0M994I55 
Ahoae Lomfan — TO unsna er. Ktenpon. Qefan. AnuiJd, Barti.Csnfcftxifv. EtWx»j)i. 
Hanrypte, Otfoid. Wdb. Bjhran. Du ha. K'uwaii, Shariah 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


PERSONAL 


eomortan dm ihoms/ms 

10 Europe. USA amort **£■»- 

Uon* Dtptomal TW«! 01-730 

2201 ABTA LATA ATOU 


LOWEST AIK FA** 

BoelunqfMra Travel- AST A. 

01-636 6*22. 


ah ctasaficd driven semen is 
can be accepted by telephone 
leuvpi Announcement). The 
dmfline n S.OOjwn 2 days prior 
IO publication |K 5.00pm Mon- 
day Tor Wednesday L Should 
yOu »rih to x*d an advernw- 
mcni in wnime please include 
vpur davnmc phone number. 
CUSTOMER SERVICES DE- 
PARTMENT. ir you have any 
queries c-r problems relating to j 
your advertisement oner it has 
appealed, please contact our 
Customer Services Department 
by telephone on 01-481 3008 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


iyJimamsBBftgM 


Long Pain 


Plant, a deeatnm Cr A/ip « nrar. 
A kgatytokdpxftntkrptiurr. 


THE ARTHRITIS AMD RHEUMATISM 
COUNCIL FOR RESEARCH 

<1 Eagle Street. London WC1K4AR 


WORK FIRST PLAY 
LATER IN THE U.S. 


Aie pu I KjW nine <x '.inOrfi 
ova iflyis a Mr ' 1 '4 CSHif Auvrea 
needs you w 9 *«fc k rucr awns 
jils and cans m an iaeun Swn»- 
Camp Beo?Ws metoe Free retun 

Bqm her D» lpoetel money and up 

Id 6 raefc bee we Wide non to 


Camp America, 
Dept TT27 
37, Queens Gate, 
London SW7 
or can 01-581 2378 


PLEASE KELT T tv National Be~ 
ncvolrnt Fund (or the Aped lo 
provide ’(efts' machines for the 
relief of pain in renal liana like 
arthrUH £60 buys a machine 
DonatMcis please la the vo 
CO uni Tony PantJy. Oulrman 
Is’&FA 35. Newport SI. London. 
EC2 M1NH 

GERMAN LADY lookina for Iwo 
famttks tn same area lo tale 
sons jyrd 14 16 for 5 weefcs 
summer Holidays in wctvuw 
Cnqltsn boys milled lo Black 
Forest Coniaet. R Smue. 
Bratunsslr lb. D-TSeo Buehl 



BIRTHDAYS 


CEMTENAMAM. MOSS Can. 
stance Marta inee Thorpe' ot 
Horsham lAunl Nell lo the fam- 
ily! Born 2nd April. 1686. at 
Long talon 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


WALLER/ HACKING. Mamed on 
April 2nd I “3o at SI Pauls. 
KnlghtsBrtdge George Stanley, 
to Elizabeth >Peg) Marlene 
with love Tessa. Mark and 
Irvin and limiin. 


SERVICES 


FRUMDSHIP, Love or Marriage 

All dvs. areas. Dateline. Dept 
10161 23 AMMon Road. Lon 
don we Tel- Ot 938 1011 
MAM1ACE 8 ADVICE Bureau 
Katharine Allen m foreign Of 
fleet personal Interviews. 7 
sadlry PI. Wl. 01-499 2556 


HEART to HEART. Todays way 
of meeting Confidential intro- 
ductions throughout UK for 
Companionship. Friendship. 
Marriage Heart lo Heart. 32 
London Rd. Twickenham. 
Middx 01-892 2051. 

MARRIAGE 8 ADVICE Bureau 
Katharine Allen lev Foreign Of- 
fice! personal Interviews. 7 
SJdley PI. Wl. 01-499 2656 
iSMBl 

CALIBRE CVS profesdonany 
wniten and produced 
CunVulum viiae documenia. 
Details: 01680 2959. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


TAX LAWYER planning advice, 
returns complefed. speedy effi- 
cient amice. Bnndlcy 
Associates Obi 799 8S34 

(24tmi 


FOR SALE 


* 200 PIANOS * 

★ FOR SALE * 

OR 

HIRE FROM £16 PM 

WITH OPTION TO PURCHASE 

MARKSON PIANOS. 

Albany Street. NWl. 

Tel: 01-935 8682. 

Artmrry place. SEta. 

Tel: 01-854 4517. 



LOWERY Limned edlbon prints 
(or sale. DcfUH Mr Hanson. Tel 
0926725146 lEvsi 
TOPAZ CRYSTAL. I 772 qmv 
Medium /deep blue. Certificate 
Tel. Derek Brough O! 328 7261 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


WANTED 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


USA JOBURC mOH AtBtratM 
New Zealand. Genuine dh cou nl 
facet OTC. 01-802 3236. 


BENTLEY &C9 

now urgently require to psrdiase 

DIAMONDS AN D DIAMOND JEWH1KY 

jyp—wHato murt. «Hiw UnlnttltlwlB miliLl. - 

65 New Bond Street. W l. Telephone 01-629 0651 


SphiL 


HHBUDM Deoenftue team 
wanted for prtvaie companies. 
Tup price* paid, at 228 0423. 


Buy *War Medals 

mdutbng Orders A DeeaeiHona 
Spink t Son Limited 
5-7 KincSurrt. ■«. |am».V». 

L.ind.mSWlY6QS 

_ Tel; u I- 991 7jWX<"t huurv * 

r \ / n 


LARGE WARDROBES A Mirrors. 
Desks Bookcase efc A Pre 1940 
furnllure. Tel' 01-686 0148 or 
01-228 2716 day or nighl. 

OLYNDEBOURNE TICKETS 
wanted Top men paid . Tel Ot 
828 0778. 


NON-SECRET ARLYL 


ASSISTANT 
TO OFFICE MANAGER 

Expanding 60 strong architects office in South 
Kensington needs an assistant to the Office 
Manager. Duties include some typing, some fig- 
ure work and general administration. 

Write with CV to Elizabeth Leigh-Breese at 
Michael Haskoll Associates. 7 Cromwell Place, 
London SW7 2JN. 

Telephone 01-581 8535 


SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissair's 

Super Apex. 

London to Zurich or 
Geneva daily on con- 
venient afternoon 
flights. 

And daily morning 
flights London to Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days 
before departure. 

Slay in Switzerland at 
least until the Sunday 
after arrival. 

Similar savings also 
from Manchester and 
Birmingham direct to 
Switzerland. 

Book ings and full con- 
ditions from travel 
agents or 01-4379583. 


CHEAP FUCH7* Worldwide. 

Hay market 01-930 1366. 


SWITZERLAND Scheduled n*rt» 
01-724 2388 ABTA ATOL 


PH IARLE LICENSED A Sanded 
low cast flight e vp eft a. NY. LA. 
Sydney. Singapore. Bangkok. 
Rio. Santiago. Luna. Narou. 

Jo'burg. Ob Europe. Freedom 
Holiday* 01-741 4888 ATOL 
432 LATA AJTO 
AIRFARE RECUUSIS Sydney 
o w £396 rm £648. Auckland 
o w £420 rtu C774 Jotnirg 
o w £264 rm £470 Loe Ange- 
■exo-w £177 rtn £338. London 
Fhahl Centra 01370 6532. 
LATIN AMERICA- Law CO* 
Flight* eg Rio £495. Ucna 
£475 rtn Also SmaB Group 
Hobday Journey*. JLA Ot -747- 


LOW FARES WORLDWBC - 

USA. S. America. Mid and Far 
EaaL S Africa Trayvale. 08 
Margaret Street. Wl. Ol GOO 
2928 iv tsa Accepted] 


ROUND WORLD ETASocun. ChA 
fr £1699. nr*t ft £2038. Syd- 
ney rr £899 rtn. Gofumbas. 
Cutter* Gardens. 10 Dnenon 
Souaie. EC2 Ol 929 4281. 
DISCOUNTS I Nr Economy uek- 

(h. TTy tn 


9100. 

LOW COST FUGHTS. MM Euro- 


Ol 402 4262/0082 ABTA 
61004 ATOL I960 


RECCPTMMttT/TELEPNOMIST 

i2030‘ for expanding Gounei- 
ie* Compani tn luxurious new 
MfKc* in Holland Park Busy 
pen Lara Switchboard ■ similar 
loHcraMi and overload cow 
typing when necessary >48 
wpm). Salary lo £9.000 tele 
phone Mary Bottoms 
Recruitment 01-734 5771. 


FLATSHARE 


CAwmnocg and couhtauld 

educated witter on all and an- 
luues 40*. regulres cheap 
room in aiurt house flaf any- 
where in Greater London. 486 
3307. 


SHEPHERDS GUSH W12- Share 
wnih 2 prof females Ige newly 
decora I nd hse C h Own bed 
and bath Close lubes. £60 p.w. 
inti F 25 plus TrILorna Work 
9-S. 6-10. Ol 740 8040. 


CLAPHAM PARK/SW2. Prof, 
h* S For loveii room and 
shower in lux family house LNe 
of kilchen Excellent for Irani 
port. £40 pw. Tel 01 274 2995. 
EARLSF1CLDSW1S. 3rd and aih 
wanted lo share beautifully re 
lurotshed Victorian house. 
£37 SO pw each. TcL Ol 870 
0908 or 0932 68202. 

ST JOHNS WOOD Comlortabfe 
bed -sailing man in lady's flat 
Available unmrdiaieiy for prof 
male Near shops 6 transport 
t50 pw Ol 289 9466 
OTT 10 MH. 3rd Prof M/F lo 
share lux hse V Ige O. R ♦ all 
mad cons ♦ cleaning lady. £45 
pw inrt. 981-5757 after 7 pm 
CLAPHAM COMMON. Prof F 25 

* fo shr 2 bedim flat. O r. nr 
lube. £216 66 lock Tel 01-629 
1434 ex 29 

FLATMATES Selective Sharing. 
Well rslab Introductory servlne. 
Ptse let for appl 01-589 5491. 
31 3 aroropwn Road. SW3 
MARTLEBONC Prof person own 
room, rleoantly dec. CH CHW 
£46 per week exd. Long let 
Only Ref emenflal 402-6322. 
NWl 1. Furntsned single room for 
pros F. Shared kilchen and 
bathroom. CH. hoi water. £41 
pw inri oepowr. Tef. 4555751. 
PUTNEY Room 10 lei in luxury 
house. Share K 8 B. £30 pw 
Incl. Tel 995-1441 Extn 4636 
1 day 1 788-6846 level 
SWl 2- Prof f. N/S for own sun- 
ny room. TV. m large lux 
family lee 5 mins walk 
lubc/BR £40 DW. 01-678 1482 
SW17. Female f23ei wanted 10 
snare pretty house with 1 other 
£38 pw Tel 767 7711 day. 947 
0542 eves 

RATSWATER. Share Heasenl flat 
wtth 1 other O ' r. £70 P.w. O! - 
321 7304 after 6 p.m. 
CLAPHAM Opp Common 3rd lo 
share flat. O R £160 pm pxcl 

* dep 720 7954 after 6 00pm 
FINCHLEY MS. Ctrl N/8 lo share 

mod hse O/H. £130 pent ail 
Ire Avail unified Ol 346 4166 
FULHAM F 22* lo share room in 
attractive flat £40.38 pw excL 
Tel; 351 2777 afler 7 30 pm 
ISUMCTON, prof person M F. 
28* share house O. R. £36 pw 
esc! Tel. Ol 837 2939. 

PROF F 25 seeks accommodation. 
wiUHn '--hr WotmliNMr. <Day> 
212 6780 

SW17. Prof M. 28 +. O/R. close 
10 lube- £160 pm nil. Tel: 
416-1254 afler 6.30 pm. 

SWl 7 girt wanted 10 share breefy 
house with t other £40 pw Tef 
767 771 1 day. 947 0642 eves. 
TULSE NBA AREA C R In 
house. CH. garden. £36 pw 
rxcl. 833 2648 afler IO am 
TWICKENHAM. N S. F lo share 
3 bed hse with Prof M. 36. Bills 
Inc £40 pw TN; 898-5796. 

W. HENSMCTON Pi Of ra.f for 
super o. r In flat nr lube. £46 
pw ex Cl Tel' 01-381-5398 
WL2 Prof F n * 10 shore lux flat 
o. r nr lube £5dpw lnc. 01-438 
4627 idayi 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 



■n ibe Wesi End of 
London. If >ou are also 
maiurc and ambitious, 
with a uste for some- 
thing differenL please 
nnp 

David Connell 
on 01-493 2844. 


Redundant 
Executives & 
Managers 
Contact 
01-242 2420 


Bookkeeper admfntttralor re- 
oulred Wrsl End Shirt 
manufacturers. Experience es- 
sential Tel. 01 734 2993 


Bom AMD KAUJMANN Serial 
number: 14132 Overstrung, 
underdainprr. £790 Ol SSQ 
2136. 




PIANO 

London's leading spenalltt In 
new and restored ptano* for ihe 
br-nl genuine vMIHia avail- 
able. 30« HlghyaHe Rd. lkW6. 
Ot-267 7671 Free catalogue 
PIANOS: HUUK A SONS. New 
and necoodilioned. Ouabiy a) 
reavonMe prices 326 Brigmon 
Rd . 5 Croydon. Ol «4M 35X3 
CHALLEN ONANO. 4n 6ut* Inv 
maculate I ov-ly tone. £2.200 
Felixstowe- 10394. 1 27 1 896. 
RACK UPRIGHT 128102. Model 
B5. 1977 Chipendale Style 4* 
New £2-000 OSO 0620 24691 


FREE U5T of country vacancies 
al salaries from L7.0O0 la 
£25 000 Chamber* & Panners 
01-606 9371 


LEGAL LA CREME 


SHORT LETS 


FULHAM. 3 niths Prof m f for 
o r in lux house. Roof lenace 
* close 10 tube. £70 o.w. me. 
Tel S81 5785 


LUXURY SERVICED Apartments 
near SKranc Sauare A-iMon- 
worth Ltd Ol sni 3000 iT> 
LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, 
central London from £32S pw. 
Ring Town Hse Apts 573 3433 
OUEEMSWAY W2 3 bed (urn lux 
£600 pw Short Let Phone 437. 
2443 dav or 0923-720630 eve 
SERVICED APARTMENTS in 
Kensington Col TV 24hr xwbd. 
tlx Cotlinonam Apis 373 6306 
ST JAMES SW1. Luxury 2 Bed 
fully fumlHKd serviced apt nr 
park. 01 373 6306 iT» 

WI4 LUXURY small double room 
and sharing nouse. Nr lube. 
UOpwlnd. Tel. Ol 388 13*3 


COVENT GDN 
£ 10 , 000 + 


3 Partner Practice needs 
audio Sec - PA (or Senior 
Partner. 25 - 36 wWi 
minimum of 2 years 
Litigation Conveyancing 
experience and ability to 

cope under pr»vnrrc exretv 
Hal WP and SH useful 


T«t 01-379 7083 

■No Agmcm- 


GENERAL 


GOLF GYI Llmlled Edition AD 
Wnnr ronscrliDle A Rrg. Low 
Mileage ljogo only t lady 
owner immaculaie condinon. 
£7.200 ana. Tel 0243 774311 
MORGAN 4 4. 4 veal. -S3 V Peg. 
Alum body. W W. Learner ml 
Yellow. Many extras 8.000 re. 
£9.000 ono Wantage roxon. 
Q23S7 4321 101 67423 Oil 





RESEARCH 

DEPT. 

JUNIOR 

Bright and cttibusiasic pemoti 


♦FUCHTS FUCKTS FUGHIS* 

★ ★SAVE ££Ts+* 

★ ★TOURIST CLASS* ★ 
★★CLUB CLASS** 

★ ★1ST CLASS** 


* SYOttV 

* PBITH 

* H08M1 

* JCTBURS 


* HELBOURNE * 

* BHSSMC * 

* ARtXX * 

* s ARC* * 


I* MIOaMO * PVffLtikGTOk * I 


reqiuied bv small prpfesKml 
Firancul Lorauiuncy. Etpen- 
rocr not essential as training 
given. Good standard of educa- 
tion and 1 merest tn figures 
essential. 

Salary c £6000. 

Ring Mrs Drew; 

OI-blN y>!7 
(No agenoesl 


* PUT * 

9 BAN3W* * 

* SMMPORE * 

* DUBAI 9 

* MO EAST * 

* LUSAKA * 

* TORONTO * 


* L AXCaiS * 


* *FT MOflTSBY * 

* * TDkYO * 

* * MANILA * 

* 9- BAfflAM * 

* • NABOB * 

* * HARMS * 

* * VWiCOUVEfl « 

* * MUM * 


Worldwide rr— yeM tarn. 
Rjchmona TTOvcL t Drike 81 
RKfunaml ABTA 01-940 4073. 
SPAMI, anev uOM 
Flights from rood UK airports. 
Many Me sperif* oftax. FaMor 
Ol 471 0047 ATOL 1640 
TUNISIA For If— pCTtoef holiday 
wansusoy days & carefree ml 
M eal Swing -Summer .TanMoa 
Travel. 01-573 4411. 

IMA. N.-York £189 Miami £198 
la £299 rm Abo OKBpm 
schedule m on maMr US carri- 
ers. 01-684 7371 ABTA 
ALICANTE. Fora. Malaga eV 
Dunood Travel ATOL >783. 
01-581 4841. H6f»sm 68841 
AI W8RT. N2 . Sm Africa. USA 
Hong Kong. Beal Fares: 01-493 
7775 ABTA. 

SYD/MEL £618 Perth £548 All 
motor earners to AUS/NZ. OX- 
584 7371. ABTA 
TURKEY. FtMN only lo 
Daiaman. Dm. 13. 20 May. 
From £169. 01-892 2819. AM. 
SOUTH AFRICA Jo'burg fr £466. 
01-684 7571 ABTA. 


9 CNVKAM * *S FRANCISCO * 
4* SOUTH UBKA ** 

* US* * USA * USA *USA * 


CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 


TEMPTING TIMES 


SUNWOftLD TRAVEL 
lEtt'd l«04) 

W South St Epiotn . S u rr e y 
CQJTJTi ’TSt|aj.aynii»/ 

41 WJ/M4SV MP*7 
Telex 24667 

ALL FLIGHTS BONDED 


CAMELEON TURXBM CHAR- 
TERS (real yourseff to an erode 
sNHng holiday aboard our En- 
durance 40 Two week* from 
£440 head iplus farm! includes 
half board, windsurfer esc. De- 
tails: 0590-74684 or 0886- 
62193. 


YOUNG SRAMMTFS wflft seere- 
lartal skills for temnorary work 
In unlvcnlllas. chanties and 
other non-co m niertlal 

organuauons. Please ring Pros- 
pect Temps ifiifl Agency) Ol- 
629 1331. 


AUSTRALIA 
FAR EAST 


Jll,. Al, ll 


Office Overload pay lop rales. 
hnlad.iv pav hank holiday pay. 
•Hie WP iraimiig * \ uainlng 
• ourves Join us now lor Uamed 
bootings Sets Audios, w Ps. 
Tvptsiv. 5 Bds Phone Frances 
Cares on 229 924a lAgyi. 


The lowest cost Rights 

Ea roc beck Travel 
01-542 4013 
01-543 4227 

Estab 1970 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


NEW LONDON THAI Restaurant 
opening mid June requires full 
and part time staff. Must be flu- 
ent In Thai language and 
experienced In all aspects of 
Thai rood, service. Salaries 
high and negotiable The fol- 
lowing positions are available; 
Head Chris. 2nd Chefs. Preo 
Chefs. Head waiter . ess's. 
waUer. ess's. Bar staff. Cash- 
iers etc. Reply in Thai or 
EnghSfi please with references 
and CV lo BOX EET The Tunes. 
Virginia Street. London. Cl 
900 



SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


NCW UW HUES NOUBMK 


PARTY MCREDKNTS require 
junior cook to help in their ca- 
lerlnu Kitchens in Battersea. 
Opportunity to learn and gain 
experience in catering £5.000 
p a Telephone Luanda on 720 

0904. 


Atpdm E400 DubM £370 

eisstoun £100 Iswrtxi Ft 80 

Lagos 040 jnh E44C 

Mamovu £400 Karachi £280 

Amman £260 Kul/Sw £445 

Bangto* CEO KimS E3S0 

Bom.: 08 £335 HYort £235 

Cora £240 5en4 £750 

GoknHM £430 Syd/Md £655 

Damascus £270 Tokyo £570 

SXTUMO TOWEL LTD 
2 OSMAN STTHT. UMMR Wl 
T* B1-439 3S21/KH7 


COLLECTORS CARS 


£270 Tokyo 

OHO TOWa LTD 


MOtCRDTA 1—1 330 T-L silver 
grey 'red leather interior. Auto- 
matic. air conditioning. Tax and 
MOT until July. 30.000 miles. 
Electric windows. Oomptefehr 
overhauled gearbox 6 mths 
guarantee Highly timed engine 
fay Mercedes spcdalMs. Profes- 
sio natty re-sprayed. Power 
Heel ing - whtte original steering 
wheel. £3.950 Tel; 723 7191 
1 day): 733 4720 (even). 


JAGUAR & DAIMLER 


JAGUAR SOVREMK. 1988 CBJ. 
Dark way wtth li^il grey Ulteri- 
or. Cruise control /trip meter. 
16.000 mile*. £15.260. TeL 
Gran thank 04 76) 76313. 




280 SE. 

September 85. C re^tmion. 
automatic. 1800 miles. CTav 
sk white. Woe velour, brand 
new with lots of extras in- 
duding air condihoaioe. 755 
etecuonie siereo 

casscitc/ radio. Owner going 
abroad. 

£17.956 for *uick nk. 

81-643 5748. 


LOWEST FARES 

Pam £69 Cairo £206 
Milan £88 Jhurg £348 
Athens £109 H Kong £496 
Con Zut £79 LA SF £346 
F.iro £89 N York £276 
Vienna 029 SydMel £699 
Delhi £346 TAvlv £189 


SUN & SAND 

21. 1 nil. SL Load— ’ 


01-439 2100/7 34 6668 

MAJOR C/CAROS AtXXPfLU 



730 E (124) 1986- Red. ESR Al- 
loys. Siereo. A 1x0 Elec 

windows. eK Personal no 8675 
m £16.600 Tel. 0902 24119 


380 SE A REG. 18.000 miles. !m 
macuiaie Many extras 
£17.460. Tel: Ol 500 2433. 


DARTA1R 


f-f Yorli * , ‘i’evre ^*9 

-C-, Ang £I>5 't Noifco: £1:29 


Borcoo*. C33 < ? 
A-jcfc ' £7SC £c:cr/o ;C2^ 


130 J«rmyn Sr.-eef, SWl 

939 7 Ui Acciss 


GREEK EASTER 


CxndkSf proccsamo aram a 
day bxrtoar. Barbegsed fauab 
-ashed dm wtth Grata* 
wfae. BeutiM Cower BDed 
valleys & snow-capped mom- 
tarns <ft Cratas hosptahiy 
with * wans proud frfcnOj 
peofde. This b mo Ode. 
came 4 share ix wtth ns. b on 
beodside ribs A Madias. 
Spocttd oHpc 
dm 22/4 ft 28/4 
From El 75 pp 

Tat 01-994 440/5228 




The Real 
Corfu... 


LONDON 


SUM edits - the 14 E. coast: 
miles of bieathtakmgly 
beautiful cppmUsg leriwied 

villM. Idyl lie Iwcnw sod 
moptc al boy*. U you appeeciale 
wonderful views o( Abanion 
mounlmnx. long and k»ry 
attemoonx. refadngon your 
terrace, twu wm lng m blue. 


tarpoll uled wafer, eventng 
wattii along thyme scented 

ottve groves - [hen our Corfu 
Is fra you. 

Swy In the grew c om f o rt of 
some oi the rno« sought after 
viUaa In the HedHermnean. all 
with maid, some with cook. 
They range from the ultimate 


SOMERSET & AVON 


hi luxury to charming couagas. 
Hake 1 986 the year you got 


Hake 1 986 the year you got 
the villa nghL oak far our 
clegem brochure, including 
Crete and Pbeos 


abta atol CV Travel (KMT) 
utw Corfu Department 
.irVLtf 43 Chaval Place 


GENERAL 



43 Chaval Place 
Loudon SW7 1ER 
01-581 0851 
(5890132 - 24 hi 
brochure serried 


GREECE FROM £129 
SPRING OFFERS 

Ink 2*fcs 
KOS/MOCES 9/4 £129 £158 
KOS/HHOOES 16/4 £149 £179 
TOLOtt 11/4 EM8 £179 
CTETE 8,15/4 £159 £189 

PRICES INCLUDE 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


A/TAXES $ INSE 
TDBSWAY mXJDAYS 
fDCXHANSWORTH, HERTS 
(8323) 778344 
NORTHERN OFRCE: 
(0422) 75999 
ABTA ATOL 1107 ARO 


SURVEILLANCE 

MONITORING 

aad coountrr sorvei Dance 
c qui pm ca l for bub the ama- 
leur A professoiiaL Ring or 
write for price hst 

RUBY ELECTRONICS LID 
716 Lea Bridgt Rd 
Loadoo E18 6AW 
61 558 4226 * 


COMMERCIAL 

PROPERTY 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


END. Ind ul ge yom-Mtf.- you 
deserve tt. A weekend In Ven- 
ice. Florence, or Rome Cot 
wen. drink wett. shop wed and 
forget about Entt*rxrs drorera- 
»ng waa&Mr. Or combine 8 city 
weekatd wnh a week tty the 
sea. Free brochure from Mage 
of Italy. Dew ST. 47 Shepherds 
Bush Green. W12 BP . S THs Ol 
749 7449 (24 bra service) 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE. Vlita 
Holidays of d t M tncBon for the 
very few. Tel: 01-491 0800. 73 
SL James* Street. SWl. 


200,000 PEOPLE 
PASS OUR 
PROPERTY DAILY! 

Showrooms 
Supermarket 
Auction Rooms 
2700 sq. feet 
In Golden MHe 
Of Lake District 
Wifl develop 
Exendabie 
am &40-S.15 
pm 7.30-9.00 

TEL: 022 988 745 
FOR SALE 



SELF-CATERING SPAIN 



For coptmciriaVrexideanal dr- 
v tiu p um i wtthin4 mile rath os 
of Martdc Arch. Good loratioa. 


F/H or Lease 75 yn at kast 
Stnokl be smxonBy sound 
wiih qualified surveyors cerirfi- 


WILLINC TO PAY 

£500,000 CASH 

for the nabl bmlding 
NO AGENTS PLEASE 
Reply Zo 01-262 4687 O 

10jw 



AVABJkBNJTT 
CHALET HOUDAYS IN 
THE TOP RESORTS 


01-584 


DISTRIBUTORS 
A AGENTS 



PUBLIC NOTICES 


CONVOCATION ' 

The Annual Meeting of Convoca- 
tion win be field on Sal urday 19 
April. 1908 b» Ihe Union Society 
Debating Chamber. Pemberton 
BufhUog. Palacr Orron. Durham, 
of If. 30 am. 


J.C.F- Hayward 
Registrar and Secretary 


AGENDUM 

Annual Report bar vireOianccf- 
lor and Warden. 

Uhhrantty Office. 

OH GMre Han. 

OH DveL 



UNIVERSITY APPOINTMENTS 


Career Power 


Take off\\ith the Midland Bank Studentship Scheme 


Throe nigh A level grades or equivalent in 
1907 wnhcersonai qualities lomdich.coukl 
fluaiil v you lor a sponsored Dlace at University and 
launch you on a loo Slight management career m 
banking and finance 

How the schemes work. Each year a limited 
number o! siudents are selected lor sponsorshio 
commencing wnh one year 3 accelerated training 
■n me Bank on full cay Then, they go 10 
Loughborough University 10 read lor a BSc 
Honours Degree m Banking and Finance - or. rf 
they see Ikw future on I he International side ot 
bank mg to The Ciky university m London 10 read 
for a BSc Honours Degree in Banking and 
Inter national Finance Jn addition to the normal 
education authority grant for me tnree years of 
University study, students receive a further grant 
from rhe Sank and undertake vacation work in ihe 
summer on lu-J oar 

Alter University graduates return for further 
irammg at Midland Bank, with a view to reaching 


responsible appointments in their mid-twenties 
ana prospects of a first -class career leading to »op 
positions within the Midland Bank Group 

How to apply. First, you should be expecting 
good grades m ai least 3 A levels (excluding 
General Studies) or an eauivarent qua lit nation 
and should already have some better than average 
O levels (including Mathematics and English 

Language), 'fou should be resident in the u K . taking 
your examinations in 1987 and within the normal age 
range ol >7-19 Applications can be made at any 
time up to rt»e closing dafe of 3 1 October 1986 

Both schemes are ooen to exceptional young 
men and women of good character and personality 
-out students taking examinations in 1966 are 
not eligible 

Have a word with your Careers Teacher or 
Careers Officer and then get things moving bv 
contactmg The Manager Graduate Recruitment. 
Midland Bank pic. Courtwood House 
Silver Street Head. Sheffield SI 3RD. 


SPORT 


OTMS *K» BJWWUHS Vn«er 

a, Vat metre- enuea iz/* , 
£139. I9i4 £129 htdudtnp 
staWMT coach- at west 0373 - j 
864811 . 

SKI JCT FLIGHT* Geneva. 
ZiMli. Muutcn. «c rriKJrt 
tranafer from £69. SM W 
10373)864811 ABTA. 

SX) DA VO*. AvaltabHKy 20 Mr 
• 20 Apr. Tailor -made. TeL 
0225 889698. 


‘u \ 


RUGBY UNION 


nwnron muse. 200 unic 
roams £65ow mroaf taara 
Apply 172 New Kern Rood. 
London. B»- 4YT. T«t Ol 703 
4175- 


Rutherford added 
to Lions squad 
after Bowen injury 




1# L 

fl.il 


I’ 1 '' . V 


# % s » 

JSil M 

hV’V'- 


ttii f 

i'* ,al 


By David Hands, Rng&y Correspondent 

John Ruihcrford. ScoUaad’s last 
stand-off half in .37 imer- 


• h I f J 

* : 4.( U - 

/ nar 


rm o oa. ExnUcnl food and 
comfort tn vurwrii Georatan xyie 

country CH. me baked rows. 
Cloned cream UtasMJIA * 
a £13-80. Tel 0398 4203. 


British Lions squad, which wifl two tnes 10 ^OOC. 


— ML CISSpw. a bod 

fun ODt- Mtn 6 rath Co lex 
oily. Also sefccifan avattonie in 
Si Johns wood 4 w Horao 
mu. A.CJLE. 686 8811. 


contribute to the tniemaiioral Lazowsld left the fidd in the 
Board centenary matches at last five minutes, hut the injury . 
Cardiff and Twickenham this was not diagosed unul the ^ 
month. Rutherford, a Lion in following day when Wasps were 
New Zealand in 1983. replaces touring in Liverpool The un- 
Bleddvn Bowen, the Welsh cen- luckj- centre — who missed 
lie who has a hip injury and will Wasps' win in the Middlesex 
not nlav attain this season. Sevens at die end of last season 


not play again this season. 


It is a well deserved honour because of a pulled bare string — 
for Rutherford, aged 30. who wifl miss the remainder of die 


i or icuurcriuiu. -I— j .. — — ~ 

has contributed so much to season and ibe po»bxlity of a 
Scottish successes since he was visit to Italy with EnglancTs a 


first cai-_ — — ------ 

been by tar the roost consistent Wasps select their side tomor- 
player 'in his position from all row . but Scottish and Leicester, 
four home countries during die wbo play Bath in the other semi- 


apped in 1979. He has team in May. 
iy tar the roost consistent Wasps selec 


four home countries during die wbo play Bath in the other semi- 
1980s. his latest appearance for final, have already nominated 


his country being in the 33-18 their teams. Bonhwick comes in 
win over Romania in Bucharest at prop for the Scottish in the 

• > J . 1 tl.raH.ffk !ra 


last weekend. 


cominued absence through in- 


Ruiherford may have to wait jury of Fraser .an dis their only 
to learn of his selection how- change from the side that beat 


ever. He is a member of the Gloucester. 


Scottish Co-Opli mists squad 
which flew out on Monday to 


Leicester will be without 
Underwood, their England wing 


Wlltt.ll lit XT VUI UN .w , T _ 

appear in the Caft Pacific Hong who is playing .for the RAP. his 
Kong Bank sevens this week- place goes to the experienced 


end. a squad which includes five Williams and they are otherwise 
of his colleagues from the at frill strength- Rwrb aids. their 


Ui uia lvi » v*i* — -y- -r--w Q • . 

current national squad. .Scon England No 8. has recovered 
Hastings. Finlay CaJder. John from an arm tiyury urtiwi 


Jeffrey. Roger Baird, and Gary 
Callander are all in Hong Kong 


prevented him touring Wales 
with the dub or appearing for 


along with Eric Paxton. Andrew the Barbarians over Easter. 


Ker . and Bob Hoganh, bringing 
Kelso's representation in the 
Co-Optimists squad to six. 

Like the Irish Wolfhounds, 
the only other side competing 
from this comer of the world, it 
will be the Co-Optimists’ third 


France have chosen a side 
that beat England in the Five 
Nations Championship last 
month to play against Romania 
at Lille on April 12 in the 
Federation Internationale 
Rugby Amateurt F7RA) 


will UC Lilt tirvpuiiugw O .' . , . , . - 

visit In 1980 they reached the Championship. It is an indtca- 
final where they lost to Fiji, but tion of the respect in wmefa they 
six of this month’s squad ap- hold Romania that they have 


31 A UI 11119 » — t— — — -f — — — . * . 

peared in last season’s final chosen not to experiment, for 
under the banner of Public instance ai lock where ligst 


X.JUCI un Liauuu WL AUITOV j IT T^if 

School Wanderers. losing in the remains, or at stand-off naif 
final 24-10 to Australia- where La pone keeps his place. 

Wasps will be without (gS: 

jzowski. their iniemational otaiarara^^SroL e Ba nn pvt 


Lozowski. their iniemational 


Special Cup semi-final against B artHziPf 
London Scottish on Saturday. 

He broke his leg just below the FHqat (Banna), j 

knee during the final quarter of ErtanttAganj, J-LJoM^nw» 


Speculation grows 
over rebel tour 


Sydney (AP) — A number of 
Kuog Australian rugby, union 
players could join a rebel inter- 
national team to tour South 
Africa later this month, accord- 
ing to growing speculation here. 
Australian officials have denied 
any knowledge of such a tour, 
“and that is the official line, but 
it is believed at least a couple of 
Australians will join the tour.” 
said Brian Mossop, a rugby 
union writer for The Telegraph 
newspaper. 

i The Australian newspaper re- 
i ported yesterday that an II- 
' match, six-week trip would 
begin on -April 23 after inter- 
national matches: . at Twick- 
enham and Cardiff Anns Park 
celebrating, the centenary of the 
the International Rugby Board. 

The report said that the 
composite team, to include 
players from New Zealand, 
France. Britain and Australia, 
would play four Test matches 
against the Springboks. It added 
that the South African Rugby 
Board (SARB) bad organized 
the tour following the dis- 
appointment of New Zealand 
cancelling a tour last year be- 
cause of apartheid — South 


Africa's policy of racial separa- 
tion. Several New Zealand play- 
ers who were due to make that 
tour , would, be in the inter- 
national team, the report said. 

South Africa, starved of inter- 
national rugby since England 
made a tour in 1 984, has denied 
any knowledge of a tour since 
weekend j reports in New Zea- 
land that eighL Kiwi Test players 
were to take part 

Australian rugby sources, who 
did not wish to be identified, 
said leading Australian can- 
didates included Roger Gould. 
Michael Lynagh and Andrew 
Slack. But Australians going -on 
the lour could expect to.be met 
with the disapproval of their 
government which does not 
favour sporting links with South 
Africa. 

There has been no official 
rugby contact between the two 
nations since 1971 but some 
Australian officials are known 
to favour a resumption of 
matches. Individuals, including 
Gould, Glen EUa and David 
Campese last year, have, how- 
ever. made private trips to play 
rugby union in South Africa. 


King supports Games claim 


Liliehammer bidding 
for winter Olympics 


The Norwegian town of 
liUebanuner, about 100 miles 
north of Oslo, is putting out the 
stops in an effort to sell itself as 
host to the 1992 WiaferOtym* 
pic Games. With a population of 
22,000, Liliehammer is one ot 
the most popular tourist destina- 
tions in Norway, although rel- 
atively unknown outside the 
country. For tire. Olympics, Its 
aheady-excellent winter sports 
faettities would be augmented to 
the tune of two new Ice halls, an 
Olympic hotel, a new skating 
rink at the central Stanrpesiefta 
complex and a new skiing 
stadium for 30,000 spectators at 
nearby JorekstadL 
Li He hammer's 450-page 
application to the International 
Olympic Comm i ttee (IOC) car- 
ries the royal seal of approval in 
the form of a letter from King 
Olav V, still a dedicated skier at 
the age of 82, offering to staud as 
patron for the winter games. 
Although conserv a tioni st s have 
expressed concern at the Impact 
the Olympics amid have oo the 
town's well p re s erv ed old world 
charm, local businessmen have 
little doubt that, commercially at 
least acceptance of their offer by 
the IOC would be the best thing 


to have happened to them since 
the invention of snow. 

Elsewhere in Norway, there 
have been a few raised eyebrows 
at the aggressiveness of the 
campaign. Mugs, T-shirts, bpd 
badges, car stickers asd tire like 
.are in wide circulation, boosting 
the attractions of the town. The 
application documents are to be 
seat to the 91 IOC members and 
aB 161 national Olympic 
committees, while more than 
7,000 shorter versions hare also 
been pubfisbed with a series of 
promotional videos. . 

Logistically, the town should 
be able to cope. There are 40,000 
car parking spaces with easy 
access from Oslo via tire E6 and 
a new bridge over Lake Mjoesa. 
A new airport between 
Lille hammer and Hamar to tire 
sooth supplements a. rail and 
road network already capable of 
carrying 65,600 passengers ev- 
ery three hoars. 


All ceremonies would be held 
at Stampesletta; ice hockey in 
Hamar and-Gjoerik; the men's 
downhill at KvitijeH and tire 
women’s dowahill at HafreOL. 


Tony Samstag 


mss ttsm 




Midland Bank Group 














lu ll ' ll 




jt fl yy, y: , 












U- 





mm 









































































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


SPORT 


29 


:t 




RACING: ST ATE OF AINTREE GOING WILL PLAY MAJOR PART IN DECIDING FATE OF EXPECTED £25M OF WAGERS ON GRAND NATIONAL 

9 




% 


David Chapman, the 
Still ington (Yorkshire) trainer 
will always be remembered for 
his association wizl} (be prolif- 
ic Sly, Soba, who wop so 
many good- Prizes for him, 
notably the Stewards' Cup at 
Goodwood. Soba rose from a 
humble beginning to ©a 
the best in the land and it is 
the ability to improve horses 
out of all recognition and win 
race after race with them that 
has characterized Chapman’s 
career. 

Sprinters have been 
- Ch a pm an’s forte, but he does 
not confirm himself to speed 
■ horses and this afternoon at 
Hamilton Park he can take the 
feature race; the Lang’s Su- 
preme Scotch Whisky Trophy 
Handicap with the improving 
Jane's Brave Bey, who is 
napped tofoUow up a recent 
success at Catierick. - 

When scoring in an appren- 
tices race over seven furlongs 
at the Yorkshire course last 
week, Jane's Brave Boy looked 
the sort who would win again 
quickly before the handicap- 
per took his measure. He was 
always going well and once he 
took the lead two furlongs 
from home he never looked in 


its nearest pursuer, 2*h 
lengths behind, wag John Gjfl- 
pin, who takes him on 
today on identical terms. John 
Gilpin kept on well in the 
Catierick race, but there is no 
logical reason to suggest t hat 

he shooM reverse the pfarings. 

Indeed, more danger to my 
selection may come from the 
maiden Hinckley Lane, from 
Mick Eastetby*s in form sta- 
ble. Hinckley Lane looked like 
an improving animal when he 
finished fourth to Formatime 
at Doncaster, having failed to 
reach a ptace in his three 
attempts last year. 

Another attractive bet at the 
Scottish course could be 
SmmaieBe, in the Glengoyne 
Malt Whisky Quakh Handi- 
cap. Trained at Ayr by John 
Wilson, Sonnenefle ram well in 
most of her races last season,, 
notably when second to the 
recent Doncaster winner, 
Rove, at Edinburg#' an her 
. final outing. -There is a New- 
marfcet whisper for Mark 
Tompkins’s My Derya, hut. 
Sonnenelle’s form looks much 
sounder. • , 


s’s - Should 
course nn, 

ed, though, because his colt 
SftnmH, should take the 
opening Banana Rum Maiden 
States at the expense of 
another Newmarket challeng- 
er, . Lost . Opportunity. Mr 
KewmilLwbo was trained fay 
Martin Pipe .last season, 
caught the eye an his flrai 
outing in 1985 when be fin- 
ished strongly to take sixth 
place behind Possedyno at 
Newmarket. 

Sir Mark Prescott, another 
Newmarket framer, fa as an 
excellent record at Hamilton, 
having saddled 23 winners 
from 92 runners in the last five 
years - an average of 25 per 
eenL It cook! be seen as 
significant, therefore, that he 
is sending just ' one horse. 
Regal Capistrano, to the 
course today. 

-However, Regal Capistrano 
proved an extremely disap- 
pointing animal last season, 
reding on several occasions to 
take advantage of what looked 
like favourable opportunities. 
Xl may pay to take a chance, 
therefore,. with Sonny One 
Shine; who had only ope run 
on the Flat last year, but who 
showed smart form over hur- 
dles this winter; 'winning at 
Kelso, Ayr and Sandown. 

The National Hunt meeting 
at Fbqtwett Patk offers quanti- 
ty rather than quality, but 
there are some -promising 
animals contesting; . the 
Amberiey Novices* Hurdle. 
Two of these. Heart Of Stone 
and Musical Mystery, have 
rim Wfaind inherit m repent 
weeks, the -former finishing 
three-lengths second to John 
Jehkiitt’scakatFtattweB two 
weeks ago, arid Musical Mys- 
tery occupying fourth place 
-behind- him at lingfiekl four 
days earifcr, 

Howevov.both may firilto 
hold S*a Ones; who haa been 
rather outofhis depth in two 
competitive races -on his most 
recent outings, but whose 
form previously bares the 
closest inspection. Following 
an easy victory at Fontwcn in 
January, San Carlos chased 
jfopm My Pomimoq -in a 
good-dass race p ver the same 
course and -a reproduction <*f 


By Michael Seely 

Grand National fever began 
togrip the radng world yester- 
day as foe counfoown to the 
world’s most exciting steeple- 
chase began with the pufajka- 
don of the four-day acceptors. 
Josh Giffond. second as a 
jockey on Honey End to 
Foraavon in 1967 and trainer 
. of the 1981 winner, Aldanid, 
is this year responsible for the 
heavilybacted Door Latch. 

- “I start to get the jitters 
when I pull out onto the M6," 
said the hardened 44-year old 
professional, u Ii*s a marvel- 
ions meeting and a fantastic 
race. I feel the same as a 
trainer as I did as a jockey and 
I hope it will never cfaangft. 
There's nothing else to touch 
it/* 

"Victory for Door Latch’s 
owner, the 91 -year-old Jim 
Jod, would beta keeping with 
the fairy-tale results so often 
associated with the big race. 
Bui the trainer gave a cool 
assessment of the prospects of 
his eight- year-old winner of 
Ascot’s SGB Chase. “I fended 
. Aldamti a lot when he won 
and even more when he feO ai 
the first the following season. - 
Door Latch is a class horse 
and he’s got a hefl of a chance. 
I'd like to have waited for 
.another year, but then he 
would have had 1 1st 1 21b. He 
acts in heavy going, but in 
view of his inexperience I 
certainly don’t want it to be 
worse than good to soft.” 

The final state of Aintree’s 
notoriously quick-drying turf 
is going to prove vital not only 
to trainers and jockeys but 
also to - the destination of 
£25m of punters’ money, 
more then is wagered on the 
Derby. 

^Yesterday’s report from the 
Liverpool ' manager, - John 
Botch, was as follows: “We 
have had no serious rain since 
Friday. . The going is nearly 
good on the ran down to 
Bechers. It's softer on the far 
side of the track and good to 
soft in the home straight It's a 
fine day and the forecast for 
the rest of the week is for dry 
weather.” 

Tim Forster is hoping for 
heavy going as the nation's 
most pessimistic trainer seeks 
to equal Fred RimelTs post- 
war record of four National: 
winners. “The softer for Last 
Suspect the better, thought it’s 
not so important for Port 
Askaig. I don’t think I can 
possibly win another National 
and there's no pressure on me 
at aD. After ap, the horse has 
already done it” 

. Hywd Davies, last year’s 
winning jockey, was more 
forthcoming than his appar- 


key to fairytale 



Hallo Dandy, the 1984 Grand National winner who has bees well backed to repeat that success 

Snugfit will start favourite.” 


Today’s course specialists 


HAMILTON 

TRAINERS: M Proscott. Swferan tarn 
92 runrara, 2SMi B Hartttg.tt Team 
nmfv -8 


66. 22.7%; Mre G BM0B* 

S>QgraiRC«*»wBw>nnw»»BWi3p , m2 


coarse and a reproduction <A ently laid-back employer. “It*s 
that form should- be good -asking a Jot r knqw, but Last 
enough to Jandjixm today’s Susped- couldn't be better and 
^ : -jic's wonboiITEs races this 

-season. I hope to use the same 
.tactics as last -year, hunting 
“ around on the outside and 
then trying to bring him with a 
fete run.” 

Last year 'West Tip started 
joint favourite with Grease- 
paint and cost the punters a 
fortune when felting with 


. FONTWELt 

7RABR3»SWboOrn^19wtomfro»n 
94 nraaro.2tt21k M»N SnMh. 23 l tom 
125. 184* J0HiDPl.S8from.t29. 180*. 


Richard Donwoody when go- 
ing easily in the lead at 
Bechers Brook on the final 
circuit. Once again a flood of 
money has forced the nine- 
year-old’s price down from 16- 
1 to 9-1 after his recent 
Newbury victory. 

Yesterday West Tip did his 
final serious gallop at 
Droitwich. “He went two 
miles with Von Trappe and I 
can tell you he's no slouch,” 
said Michael Oliver.the train- 
er. “The horse has come right 
for the race Ihave trained him 
for. The only bad race he’s ran 
this season was in the Welsh 
National, but that was my 
fault for running Him in heavy 
going. But he’ll be perfectly 
alright in ordinary soft 
ground.” : 

With 60 still standing their - 
ground at yesterday’s declara- 
tion stage, 20 will have, to be 
withdrawn overnight as 40 is 
the ma«m»nn number al- 
lowed to lake part. Although 
Essex is automatic top weight 
with 12st the Czechoslovak 
horse does not count for 
handicapping purposes and 
the weights of the remainder 
have therefore been raised 31b. 
Cotbiere will have to carry 
list 715 as the best Aintree. 
peforiner since Red Rum 
seeks to improve on fau record 
of* win and two thirds. 

“Logic says thata horse who. 
won with: 1 1st 41b as an eight- 
year-old -can’t win again with 
list 71b as a 12-year-said 
Jenny Pitman, “but like the 
rest of my team he’s in 
tremendous shape. He’s sure 
to be running on the death, 
particularly if the going is 


testing, but I'll be surprised if 
he can win. I just can't forgive 
Captain Mordaunt for handi- 
capping his courage.” 

Mr Snugfit, last year’s run- 
ner- up will be suited by every 
drop of rain that fells and is 
most professionals' choice for 
this year’s marathon. With 
lOstTIb to shoulder, Mick 
Easterby’s nine-year- old pos- 
sesses the strongest possible 
credentials. 

The indomitable Phil Tuck, 
the man, who has twice been 
“jocked oft” Burrough Hill 
Lad, firmly believes that his 
chance may have come. “The 
National's the world's greatest 
race and it’s my life’s ambition 
to win it. Everything went 
right last year, but Last Sus- 
pect put his act together and 
we just got caught. 

“ If we can survive the first 


circuit and get the waifs and 
strays and bad jumpers out of 
the way. Til be able to sit down 
and ride a race. If the going is 
fest, we may get a bit left 
behind at first, so HI have to 
sit and suffer. But Mr Snugfit 
stays so well that he’s bound to 
be fighting out the finish.” 

West Tip and Mr Snugfit 
are joint favourites at 9-1 with 
Ladbrokes. “There has been 
tremendous interest this year 
with so many fancied runner,” 
said the firm's representative, 
Mike Dillon, “you've got 
three previous winners in Last 
Suspect, Hallo Dandy and 
Corbiere all reported fit and 
fancied. And Greasepaint's 
another popular old stager. 
And then you’ve got interest- 
ing newcomers tike Door 
Latch, The Tsarevich and 
Knock Hill. It’s a toss up 
whether West Tip or Mr 


Like all his family, Peter 
Walwyn has a love of racing 
very deeply in his bones. On 
Saturday, the Lambourn 
trainer is taking a busload of 
40 friends to Aintree for the 
fourth successive year. “The 
National is part of our heri- 
tage. The moment I arrive at 
the course I walk out onto the 
track and start to shake with 
anticipation. It's the same at 
Epsom when 1 go out onto the 
Downs before the Derby. 
These are events that every- 
one should experience at first 
hand at least once in their 
lives.” 

Tens of thousands on the 
track and tens of millions of 
viewers will be sharing 
Walwyn's excitement when 
the starter presses the handle 
at 3:20 on Saturday. 


National declarations and betting 


Essex (Mr J ChaloapkaX 
Corbiere (B de Haan), 
Drumlargan (T J Ryan), 
KilkUowes (K Morgan), Last 
Suspect (H Davies), Door Latch 
(R RoweX Acarine (R StrougeX 
West Tip (R DtnnroodyX 
Greasepaint (T Carmody), 
BatfhianfTTa Lad (-X Hallo 
Dandy (N DoogbtyX Mr Songfit 
(P TncfcX TVe Trarericb (J 
WMteX Lantern Lodge (A 
MMBnsX Tracy’s Special (Steve 
KnightX Broomy Bank (P 
Sea damoreX Classified (-) Gayle 

Forgett^LaiofaVAnoSer’ Duke 

(P pte^™ (S ShenroodX 
Tacroy (A StringerX Imperial 
Black (R CrankX Rnpertiao(C 


Charles-JooesX Sommelier (T J 
TaafTeX Yoong Driver (C 
Grant), Monanore (T Morgan), 
Dodie (-) Knock Hill (M 
DwyerX Ballymilao (C Haw- 
kins) Fethard Friend (PBartonX 
Late Night Extra (-X Master 
Tercel (-X St Alezan (-X Port 
Askaig (G McCoortX Little 
Polveir (C Brown), 
DonUeoagain (— XTen Cherries 
(—X Northern Bay (Philip 
Hobbs), Mount Oliver (—X 
King Spruce (Mrs J CarrierX 
Man too Castle (— ) Ron To Me 
<—), Insnre (M Flynn), 
Ona promise (—X Brinkwaler 
(Mr D Pitcher), Succeeded (-X 
Colonel Christy (—X Immigrate 
(-X Master Nibble (-X Sunlit 
River (—X Sea Splash (M Bren- 


nan), Pea-Cock-Ade (—X Kat- 
mandu (-X Mr Baker (-X 
Lnmpaxita <— X Charles Duke (— 
X Segahsn Dam (—), Newstead 
(-X Jubilee King <_). 

LATEST BETTING: 
Ladbrokes: 9-1 Mr Snugfit, 
West Tip, 10-1 Doer Latch, 14-1 
Hallo Dandy, 16-1 Corbiere, 
Greasepaint, Last Suspect. The 
Tsarevich, 20-1 Broomy Bank, 
Knock Hill 25-1 Monanore, 
Northern Bay, Plundering. 

Tote: B-1 Mr Snugfit, West Tip, 
Jl-J Door Latch, 14-1 Hallo 
Dandy, Last Suspect, 16-1 
Corbiere. Greasepaint, 20-1 
Knock HHL, 22-1 The Tsarevich, 
Broomy Bank, 25-1 Plundering, 
28-1 Monanore, Northern Bay. 


HAMILTON PARK 


Going: toft < 

Draw:5f-6f,mkMoto h ^n tn pl»>rsbo»t 


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3 

4 

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11 
12 
13 


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4- LOST 

000-0 ' MASTER MUSIC 

o- MOVWQpar- 

MO- MRKEWKi, 

ON. VAN Dean* (4 Jam) 


2.15 BANANA RUM MAIDEN STAKES 0-Y-Os 08*1* 40*9 (8 
nmaora) 

.z’SES 


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- 


4-5 Lost Opportunity, 7-2 Mr Kaw*. ®-1 NPffwu R to* W mmr AMto, 12-1 
Vsi Der Pup, itfl ethers. 

2.45 BROMKTA RUM HANDICAP (3-Y-O: C1,1» 1» 10 (4) 
i Bans. pAROUWLimo^ffjA^aBonandgjVMjiMn ~ ® 1 



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6 0*2001- BRAVE AND -- 

8 00000-0 euaAH mi fT 

9 490000- 8BJ9UtDCfWBW«0 


ft-ll Bmve And-BoU. 94 Carauni Rocket 7*1 Bagant SW IM Beam. 


Hamilton selections 

By Mandarin 

“i 15 Mr KewmilL 2.45 Brave And' Bold. 3.15 JANE’S BRAVE 
BOY (nap).. 3.45 Minizen Lady. 4.15 SonnepeUe. 4,45 Somiy One 
Shine. . 

By Our Newnaaritet Correspopdeot 

2.15 Mr KewmilL Z45 Brave And Bold. 3.45 Vkhy-VaL A15 My 

Derya. 4.45 R^al Capistrano. 

By Michael Seely 

2.45 Began! B UL 3,15 HINCKLEY LANE (napX 

3.15 LANGS SUffiEKS SCOTCH WWSJ0T TROPHY HANDICAP 

(£2,194; 1m 4fl yd) (ID - — -■T^.inr iW 




S 4R9M MV) 

9 020-000 BAMDORD1 

w 

11 
13 


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1 10001-1 JMgBgWWy 


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Foutwell selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Shuttfecock Star. 2J0 Hiz. 3.0 Cumrew. 330 Creson. 4.0 San 
Carlos. 4.30 Graiguenamanagh. 

Michael Seely’s selection: 3.0 Yeoman Broker. 


330 CALEDONIAN STUDRAIL HANDICAP CHASE (£2311: 2m 2f 
110 yd) (8) 

4 C213-P0 MANSION MARAIBIER (M Brnkh) F R Hadgw 10-11-7 MMi Q Armtage (ti 

5 24U24P CRESUN fBHJ Bolanfl S Woo*nan MM 

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4.0 AMBERLEY NOVICE HURDUE (4-Y-O: E696: 2m 2f)(8) 

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■2 00131 kW0gK^lScm8)l£iJF%wn5-11-8. 

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7-4 Musical Mystery, 5-2 Heart Of Stone, 5-1 VIsiuJb. M San Cartas. 10-1 Bronzo 
Effigy, 12-1 Mariners Bea. *4-1 others. 

430 ROBERT GORE MEMORIAL CHALLENGE CUP HANDICAP 
CHASE (£2399: 3m 21 110yd) (11) 

3 MKPP DONT TOUCH 

6 11W3-P DRPBVEB “ 

7 342342 LAURENCE 

8 000432 STAR 

11 0WB1P QRAK 

12 124V2 OOLDEN HORNET 

13 PMP04 KMQKT OF LOVE i 

14 14PPM MONKTON RKJ. 



Rain could 
rule out 
Irish hardy 
annual 

From Onr Irish 
CorresptHideac, Dublin 

Greasepaint, who has played a 
starring role in each of the last 
three runnings of the Aintree 
Grand National, finishing in the 
first four every time even if 
outright success has always 
evaded him, will be declared for 
Saturday’s renewal, but Dermoi 
Weld, the trainer, warned yes- 
terday: “If the ground looks like 
being very soft 1 would have to 
consider him a doubtful 
staner”. 

Weld added: “As he gets older 
he seems less and less able to 
handle soft going". It would be a 
big disappointment if Grease- 
paint could not take his chance 
as he has been specifically 
trained for this one race all 
season and is in superb order 
having come through a testing 
preparation. 

Given good ground. Weld 
believes that he is now well 
enough handicapped to win and 
be points out how well he 
performed under !2st in 
Ireland’s biggest summer 
steeplechase, the Galway Plate, 
Iasi August. 

There will be other defections 
from the list of Irish .Aintree 
possibles in consequence of 
tough races in Monday's Jame- 
son Irish Grand National at 
Fairy house. However. Pat 
Hughes, uainer of the surprise 
winner. Insure, said yesterday 
that the horse was none the 
worse for his exertions and may 
well take his chance at Aintree, 
with Michael Flynn, the win- 
ning jockey on Monday, again 
having the ride. 

Marcolo and Mister Dono- 
van. neither of whom completed 
the course behind Insure, are 
now certain non-starters and 
Arthur Moore, who withdrew 
the Irish National fourth. The 
Ellier. at the four-day stage, 
confirmed that he will have no 
runners at all at Liverpool this 
week. 

His stable jockey, Tom 
Taafie, will however still have a 
ride in the Seagram promotion, 
having been booked by the 
English trainer. Robin Gow, for 
the outsider. Sommelier. 

Excursion, one of the Irish 
entries singled out by Dermot 
Weld as a likely danger to all- 
comers, is now not certain to 
take pan. His owner-rider, Mrs 
Rosemary Stewart, is having 
second thoughts after Excursion 
was beaten into second place 
behind Olympian Princess at 
Fairyhouse on Sunday, and may 
now keep the horse fresh for the 
Guinness Chase at 
Punchestown later in April. 

For Auction, the winner of the 
1982 Champion Hurdle, suf- 
fered a feta! fell in yesterday's 
Power Gold Cup ai Fairyhouse. 
The race went to Bartres, who 
was twice hampered by fellers 
when finishing unplaced in the 
Arklc Trophy Chase at Chelten- 
ham. 

This race was run at a 
cracking gallop taking into ac- 
count the heavy ground as First 
Noel quickly built up a 20- 
length lead and was still clear 
but starting to tire at the third 
last fence. Early in the straight. 
Boro Quarter, carrying the 
Dawn Run colours of Mrs 
Channian HilL moved into the 
lead with flattering ease, but 
Bartres, on whom Tom Morgan 
had hugged the inside rail 
throughout the last mile, came 
through to win going away. 

At Fairyhouse this afternoon. 
Bonalma. who finished sixth to 
See You Then in the Champion 
Hurdle, running as well as could 
be exprined for a 33-1 outsider, 
looks a worthy top weight in the 
Hium Handicap Hurdle, an- 
other Cheltenham runner. Atti- 
tude Adjuster, looks set to 
extend his winning run in the 
Coolmore Joseph O’Reilly Me- 
morial Ctip. Attitude Adjuster 
was ridden by Ted Walsh to 
victory in the Christies 
Foxhunters Chase, but as Walsh 
has now given up riding over 
fences, Enda Bofger will depu- 
tize here. 

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9-4 Otar Gazette, 3-1 Laurence Rambler. 4-1 GfatguanvnanBgh. 6-1 QoUan 

Hornet B-1 Dr Pepper. 10-1 oMffi. 

POINT-TO-POINT 

Sheppard equals women’s record 

By Brian Beel 


With her win on Baratick at the 
E^ex Farmers' meeting on 
Monday Josephine Sheppard 
equalled Pat Tollu’s record of 
171 winners by a woman rider 
in pointto-pomi5- Hs" w other, 
David Turner, who took over 
the mantle of leading mate nder 
four years ago from Major Guy 
CunanL by-passed the meeting 
for Fakenham but was un- 
successful in the two hunter 

chases. 

Mike Felton kepi one ahead 
in this , year's contest for the 
■leading nder with two wins, on 
Reynard’s Bow and Lot hi an 
General, at the Old Berks, 
which n mftfiarf Peter Greensll’s 
double on Boonabarooand Run 
Token at the North Shropshire. 

Gillian Minio bad her second 
win in- three days on Foolish 
Hero at the Tynedale meeting 


much to the surprise of most. 
On Saturday she had been 
considered lucky to get the 
verdict, but on Monday most 
onlookers thought she bad been 
clearly beaten by a neck by 
UpesL 

CMDDNtGFOLD ft LECONFEU ft 
COWDRAY: WBC COrtiDMi. Adt WhiS- 
ttrg Jim. Ras: Kltan Jbn. Latte: WBSajn- 
son. Opvtt: Vufctw*. Mdre TuBnw. 
ESSbT FARMERS: Hont Trust To Luefc. 
Adt Atyfl Vfl#oy. L u iftow Bratich. Ocroft 
Great iWd Boy. Rest: Geoeral WMon. 
•hta k Tonmqr's Treasure, UAt U: 

rcKSsROW:kfcntMDOrtrtM.Opett 
R«w Goaf?. laAc Scat Maine. A4 
Mac Sararese. ftk Coin S*Jan. 
NCWTH C0TSWDLD: Hunt Borter Mark. 
A« Caber fmb. Ladtoe: Bngetfa iffiiM. 
Opaa: Paddy's Pert. Reft AnsscencL 
luic ChaxwxTt 

NORTH StROPSHBE Hunt Sfflte HB. 
Adr Pofi*rl«town. Opaa Boerabaroo. 
1 a maa- Brohan Ceunuy. Rett t Rut 
T oken. Real ft Soarw SEk. Mdn fc Mitt 
FMtfL Mr lb Tours Lad 
OLD BERKS: Hunt Raytunf a Bow. *4 


Master Ben. Open: Game Trust. Lertev 
Zar^etf. Mat Moody Brook Attr Lo- 
ttunGenareL 

SOUTH NOTTS: Hnt Morgan's Trea- 
swe. Art: Bettis Bey. “ 

Urte*: Sweet Diana. Rest 
Mdn: Wages Of Sin. 

ffiMmrtteSMRE; Hunt Hnnl FSrtaboa 
Mdn t Tenrlfie. Mdn It Kerozuno. Open: 

LatBee: Premon'a Lest. 
Langton. A4 Yettow 

SwSmMU£ M: MMcxSc lad. Real: 
CM Apptotack. Laota Sodrtv Kmg. 
Fa naa ro. Saucy Knight Opaa Bless em 
WL ware Smart Pint. 

TALTBONT: Hunt Ddrrty DoBy. Adf 
Team. LertK Roml Iftssu. Open: Fond 
Pnca Mdn: SongBcw. Rest Liza RxkJ. 
TAUNTON VALE: Hfti I: Hayna Moor. 
Mdn It cnamragne Bar. A# Faxborougn 
Lad. Open: Pmce K Hbo u me- 
Senbar. Rest: Marthoias. Hwt Rose Ol 
Bradford. 

TYNEftAli Adt Navtaatiorel AkL Beat 
SkxM. Ladies: Fbobi Hera Open: 
Winning BneL Mrti fc Gurnewm. IMi It 
HaHo Owrita. HredARw Mufsj. 

VME AND CRAVEN: Hunt: Lady Shot. 
Rest Ron OtlMfe LadtoK 

ArtartCo. 


Dermot Weld: soft ground 

warning on Greasepaint 

Haydon Jones 
doubles up 

Derek Haydon Jones, the 
Pontypridd trainer, got off the 
mark for the season at Warwick 
yesterday with a 20-1 double 
through Record Wing and 
Chepsiowed and had starting 
stalls been used for all races it 
might have been a treble. Be- 
cause of the difficulty of moving 
the stalls in the soft ground, the 
two races over a mile and the 
seven furlong event were started 
by flag. 

Haydon Jones' apprentice 
Dewi Williams, on the 5-1 
favourite Lemelasor, was 
experiencing a flag start for the 
first time in ihe 'Arc' Weekend 
Handicap and the amount of 
ground lost by the combination 
at the start was a lot more than 
the two lengths and a neck by 
which the mare was beaten into 
third place behind De Rigeur. 

This did not detract from De 
Riguer's performance under lop 
weight and an enierprizing ride 
by Willie Canon, who picked 
the best ground aD the way 
round on the outside to hit the 
front more than a furlong from 
home. It was the Lester Piggott- 
trained Vague Melody who 
pipped young Williams’ mount 
for second place. 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


FOOTBALL: WARD FIGHTS TO SHAKE OFF INJURY FOR FOREST CLASH AS LINEKER DOUBT WORRIES CHAMPIONS EVERTON 


The ace in the 


West Ham 


Hearts 
are no 


pack chases a 
full house 


longer 


lonely 


Mark Ward, who has played 
a key role in West Ham 
United's championship chal- 
lenge this season, is fighting to 
keep h is ever-present record at 
Nottingham Forest tonight. 

Ward, signed from Oldham 
for f 250. 000 in August, has 
worn the number seven shin 
in ail 41 of West Ham's 
League and Cup games so far. 
But a shoulder injury, re- 
ceived during Monday's 2-1 
home victory over Totten- 
ham. is threatening to end that 
ran. 

The forward was substitut- 
ed after falling heavily and. at 
first West Ham feared a 
serious injury. Ward was tak- 
en to hospital for an X-rayed 
but their assistant manager. 
Mick McGiven. said yester- 
day: “Thankfully, there are no 
broken bones. The shoulder is 
still swollen and painful but it 
is too early to say whether he 
will be fit Knowing Mark, he 
will play if he possibly can: he 
hates to miss anything and has 
certainly not ruled himself 
out" 


The Everton manager, 
Howard Kendall, said yester- 
day: “Gary wilt have two days 
of complete rest and then we 
will assess the extent of the 
injury on Thursday. It is too 
early to talk about his chances 
of making Saturday's FA Cup 
semi-final against Sheffield 
Wednesday." 


The hamstring strain is not 
Lineker’s only problem. He 
has been playing with a nig- 
gling groin injury and has not 
trained properly for some 
lime. 


The Brighton captain, Dan- 
ny Wilson, will be out of 
action for two weeks after 
tearing a hamstring in the 
second division home defeat 
by Portsmouth on Monday. 
Wilson, who missed the last 
four matches of last season 
with a shoulder injury, is 


Brighton's joint second top 


scorer with 15 goals from 
senior appearances. 


West Ham also have a 
doubt about their former En- 
gland midfielder, Alan Dev- 
onshire. who has a slight thigh 
strain and faces a late fitness 
test. But Alvin Martin, the 
captain, returns to the squad 
after serving a iwo-malch ban. 

The manager, John Lyall, is 
refusing to speculate on his 
side's championship chances. 
“If other people are talking 
about us winning the title that 
is up to them." he said, “but it 
is all hypothetical. After tak- 
ing six points from the Easter 
matches against Chelsea and 
Spurs anything we get at 
Forest could be looked upon 
as a bonus, but we will be 
trying to win. 

“After the Forest match we 
have three consecutive home 
games, so that is something to 
look forward to." 


The defender Gary O'Reilly 
also damaged a hamstring 
against Portsmouth and 
misses tonight's match with 
Oldham. Also missing will be 
Steve Jacobs, who needed 
stitches in a facial injury 
received at Crystal Palace on 
Saturday. 

Brighton may draft in teen- 
age defender Darren New- 
man. an untried substitute on 
two occasions this season, and 
the former Barnet full back, 
Graham Pearce, is likely to 
return, despite suffering from 
concussion in a recent reserve 
match. 


Injuries could yet decide 
whether West Ham lift their 
Erst championship. So far 
they have had few problems, 
but with 1 1 League games to 
play, every knock will take on 
new significance. 

Everton. by comparison, 
have been plagued with inju- 
ries. Their latest worry con- 
cerns Gary Lineker, the 
country's leading goalscorer, 
who damaging a hamstring 
during Monday's 0-0 draw at 
Manchester United. 


Carlisle United's top scorer, 
John Haipin. who has sparked 
their remarkable climb off the 
foot of the second division, 
has been ruled out for the rest 
of the season. An X-ray con- 
firmed that Hajpin had bro- 
ken his leg in Monday's' 
victory at Middlesbrough. 


The Liverpool defender. 
La wren son, may be able to 
play in Saturday's FA Cup 
semi-final against Southamp- 
ton. He has been told he can 
resume training, having 
missed two matches with an 
ankle injury. It could mean 
that the Liverpool player- 
manager. Kenny Dalglish, has 
a full-strength squad because 
his only other injury worry. 
Walsh, is making good 
progress after an ankle 
problem. 


When yesterday's heroes 
become lyrical aboet the foot- 
ballers of today there eaa no 
longer be doubts that there is a 
special quality aboet Heart of 
Midlothian. 

Although the old Edinburgh 
dub have played 27 successive 
games without defeat, are 
entrenched at the top of the 
Scottish premier division and 
play at Hampden on Saturday 
in die semi-final of the Scot- 
tish Cap, if is only recently 
that the seal of approval has 
been awarded. 

So long had Hearts been 
bathed in despair, floundering 
in the first division, burdened 
by debt, the morale of players 
non-existent, that few believed 
the resurgence was anything 
but a flash in the Tynecastte 
pan. 

Even Walter Kidd, their 
redoubtable captain, had to 
pinch hims elf to ensure that he 
was not living out a fairy-tale. 
After all, be is the sole 
survivor from the doleful days 
of the 1970s and it was 
difficult for him to believe that 
the transformation was not a 
midwinter's dream. 

An old boys' reunion at the 
dab featured as guests of 
honour some of the players 
who had won the champion- 
ship in 1960. That side are 
still talked about reverently in 
Edinburgh. They took the title 
in style, winning 23 matches, 
drawing eight, losing three, 
conceding 51 goals but scoring 
twice that n am her. 

And when players of the 
stature of the graceful Gordon 
Smith, the venomous sharp- 
shooter Jimmy Murray and 
the lion-hearted John 
Camming joined in acclaiming 
the team built by a new 
"terrible trio” of Mercer, 
MacDonald and Jardine, even 
wondering if their own side 
could have beaten the present 
warriors. Hearts realized that 
they had arrived. 

It Is not really surprising 
that Hearts have recovered 
their pride. Historic champi- 
ons of Scottish football before 
the tarn of the century, they 
are too famous a club, too 
steeped in the tradition of 
entrancing football to have 
lingered for ever on the mourn- 
ful fringes of the game. 



Barcelona aiming 


to make up 
for past failures 


The awkward hurdle of 1FK 
Goteborg, of Sweden, stands in 

the way of- Barcelona's first 

appearance in a European Cup 
final for 25 years, while the 
Belgian team Andertechr. mak- 
ing their thirteenth attempt on 
the cup, take -on Stead Bu- 
charest, the army team from 
Romania. 

Of the four teams contesting 
the semi-finals, the first legs of 
which are being played tonight, 
Barcelona must be the 
favourites to win the trophy. 
But, remarkably,' the Spanish 
dub, reputedly the richest in the 
world, have never won Europe's 
premier tournament and have 
reached the final once only — in 
1961, when they lost to 
PortugaTs Benfica. 

Now, after defeating last 
year’s champions Juventus. of 
Italy, in the quarter-finals, Terry 
Venables* team look to have 


of the final Despite a mediocre 
record in the tournament, they 
have vast experience in Europe, 
having appeared in six previous 
finals, winning the Cup 
Winners' Cup twice (1976, 
1978) and the UEFA Cuponce 
(1983). 

For a dub which has become 
one of the most powerful in 
football, Anderiecnt’s begin- 
nings were bumble. Their first 
three European Cop appear- 
ances aided in misery. In 1956 
ibey were crushed 10-4 by Voids 
Lcbogo. now known as MTK 
Budapest. The following season 
they were thrashed 12-0 by 
Manchester United and in 1960 
they lost 7-2 to Rangers. 

It will be interesting to see 
whether their newfy*ppoimed 
Dutch manager, Arie- Haan. 
dispels then- “Jekyli and Hyde 
image which so often sees them 
transformed from a delightful. 


their best chance yet of claiming attacking team m Brussels into a 


the trophy they covet above all 
others. 

Barcelona have won the Fairs 


fear-ridden, defensive side away 
from home. 


Clip (now the UEFA Cup) three 
times and the Cup Winners’ 


Held to a 3-3. draw by Bruges 

squander- 


4hs 4 ^' :r - 

vr • ***»-»• 


Heart of oak: Jardine, the playing half of the New Firm 


Romance stalks 
mahogany halls 


Just like Auld times 


Bertie Auld, one of Scottish 
football's most irrepressible 
characters, relumed lo the game 
yesterday 3fter a break of almost 
two years. He started his second 
spell’ as manager of Partick 
Thistle, the dub he left to join 
Hibernian more than five years 
ago. 

The former Celtic favourite, 
who was subsequently dis- 
missed by Hibernian and then 
later by his next dub. Hamilton, 
looked forward to the challenge 
of keeping Thistle in the first 
division, following the dismissal 
of Benny Rooney. It is a tall 
order with the Glasgow club 
third from the Fool of the table 
but Auld. as ever, is undaunted 
by the prospect 

“I've never grown disillu- 
sioned with football,” he said on 
his first day in charge. “This 
game is full of ups and downs 
and I’ve had my share of 
knocks. But football owes me 


nothing and I am just glad to 
have this chance to pul some- 
thing back. 

"It's great to be at Firtiill 
again, because this is home to 
me. I missed the involvement 
badly over the last two years but 
I always knew 1 would be back. I 
am a confident character. 1 have 
faith in my ability and 1 know I 
can do the job." 

Partick have seven games in 
which to escape relegation and 
Auld is preparing to tackle the 
problem with his own brand of 
infectious enthusiasm. “1 hope 
those games will turn out to be 
the magnificent seven.” he said. 
“If l can raise the players' spirits 
again we can still get out of 
trouble and whatever happens 1 
will give it my best shot.” 

Auld. aged 48, a member of 
the Celtic side who won the 
European Cup in 1 967, is asking 
the assistant manager. Mike 
Jackson, to stay with the dub. 


What is remarkable is the 
way in which the transforma- 
tion has been achieved. As 
their name. Heart of Midlothi- 
an, derived from Sr Waiter 
Scott, suggests, there has al- 
ways been a whiff of romance 
about the dab. Their style has 
been a compoud of the crafts- 
man, portrayed in the sweet 
design of the Walkers, Youngs 
and Wardhaoghs, and the 
knight errant, the broad- 
swords strappmgly wielded by 
the Mackays and Battles. 

But there was also apparent 
in the mahogany halls of 
Tynecastie hints of Edinburgh 
stuffiness and it is ironic that 
it was the dynamic, modern 
flair of a businessman once 
dismissed as a brash property 
developer that tamed the doz- 
ing giant of the capital into 
Scotland’s most successful 
dnb of the season. 

Wallace Mercer revels in 
his reputation as a showman 
and has cultivated an image of 
astute self-publicist never 
short of a hundred words. It is 


said of him that if yon have an 
hour to spare yon can have a 
frre-nunnte talk with Mr 
Mercer. 

While he is regarded in 
staider circles as brazenly 
outspoken with “too gnid a 
conceit of himself* he will go 
down in football history as the 
first of the country's new breed 
of enlightened entrepreneurs 
and is idolized by Hearts 
supporters as a man who 
perforated a mirade at 
Tynecastie. 

Once a Rangers enthusiast, 
this self-made businessman 
bought himse lf into the ailing 
Hearts four years ago, created 
a climate in which enthusiastic 
youngsters conld thrive and 
feel elated playing for the dnb, 
and, most important appoint- 
ed a young management team 
of two Ibrox favourites, Alex 
MacDonald and Sandy 
Jardine. 

While Mercer has generat- 
ed a new spirit at the dub, with 
a firebrand style of leadership, 
ruffling many feathers in his 
attempt to change the face of 
Scottish football, he docs not 
interfere with his managers, 
whose methods contrast vivid- 
ly with that of the 
Government. 

MacDonald, the man in 
charge, and Jardine, his assis- 
tant as well as the most 
influential player in the team, 
go about their business with 
qniet authority and agree so 
amicably that they seem des- 
tined to become a partnership 
even more accomplished than 
that of Clough and Taylor. 

The eminently sensible style 
of Hearts is the product of the 
managers' differing playing 
ways: the combative, ever- 
helpful attitude of MacDon- 
ald, the more refined, hyper- 
intelligent quality of Jardine, 
who has appeared in more 
than 1,000 senior matches and 
shows no sign of flagging. 

How good are Hearts? 
Theqoestion is asked anxious- 
ly in every dressing-room in 


Scotland. While it is sadly 
obvious that there has been a 
decline n the form of the 
leading teams in the premier 
division, Hearts deserve a 
much more enthusiastic de- 
scription than that of 
“workmanlike **. They are 
fnlfrr committed, put teamwork 
first and if they are not yet 
recognized as being of the 
vintage of imaginative sides of 
the CoBB-Banld-WaRfhaiigb 
era they are potent and matur- 
ing quickly. 

MacDonald and Jardine re- 
tain the lowest of profiles. 
“There is no magic formula,** 
they say. “it is mostly hard 
work and getting the players to 
believe in themselves." 


Wise old hens and 
the spring chicks 


Yet by securing players such 
as Clark from Rangers and 
Cokpihoun from Celtic the 
managers reveal part of their 
secret. They seek players who 

are well grounded in the 

methods of highest profession- 
alism which the Old Firm 
retain even if their playing 
prowess is less virile these 
days and who are desperately 
eager to show their former 
employers that they should not 
have ben transferred. 

Add to these transfers 
youngsters such as Lereine, 
Robertson and Mackay and it 
is realized that the Hearts 
bloid is the oldest but still the 
best in football, the perfect 
anion of the wise old hen and 
the vigom- of youth. 

Heart of Midlothian are 
firm favevhes for the champi- 
onship and there is only one 
ckrod on their horizon: the fear 
that big offers seem certain to 
be made for their rising stars. 
But Mr Mercer is adamant 
that his players are not for 
sale. “Indeed," be says, “we 
are intent on adding to our 
staff." _ 

Hugh Taylor 


the Cup 
Cup twice. But, despite heavy 
investment in stars such as 
Johan Cruyff and Johan 
Neeskens of The Netherlands 
and Argentina's Diego 
Maradona, success in the Euro- 
pean Cup has so far eluded 
them. 

Victory tonight could weO 
depend on the wayward genius 
of the West German midfield 
player, Bernd Schuster. 
Schuster, recently stripped of 
the captaincy by Venables, has 
been in dispute with the dub 
and is expected to leave Barce- 
lona this summer. But he is fit 
again after being sidelined for 
two months with a knee injury. 
The bad news for the Spaniards, 
however, is the absence of Steve 
Archibald, the Scottish inter- 
national striker, who palled a 
muscle after scoring the vital 
goal in Turin which ended 
Juventus's challenge. Ramon 
Caldere, who plays in midfield, 
is also ruled out through 
suspension. 

Despite Saturday’s defeat by 
Real Sodedad and the loss of 
this year’s league title to arch- 
rivals Real Madrid, Venables is 
cautiously optimistic about his 
team’s chances of reaching the 
final in Seville on May 7. But be 
knows that Goteborg, spear- 
headed by their experienced 
forward, Nilsson, are dangerous 
opponents. The Swedes ousted 
Scottish champions, Aberde en , 
in the quarter-finals and have 
produced their fair share of 
shocks against Hiclrnpiichnit 
opposition in the past. 

In 1982 they won die UEFA 
Cup. becoming the only Swed- 
ish team to lift a European 
trophy, knocking out Valencia 
and Kaiserslautern on the way 
and beating Hamburg 4-0 on 
aggregate in the finaL Their 
manager. Guilder Beqgtsson. 
however, is not optimistic and 
rates his team’s. _ chances of 
reaching the frnal at about 30 
pa -cent.- TWe are as weU 
prepared as^t Swedish side can 
be before the season has started, 
but Barcelona are a very good 
team and it will be difficult.for 
us to win," be said 

Anderiecht, who took part in 
the first European Cup in 1956, 
have finally come within reach 


at the weekend after sq 
ing &2-0 lead, the Belgian league 
leaders should be at foil 
strength, with the exception of 
their injured international goal- 
keeper. Monaron. 

No Romanian . side has 
reached a European final, but 
the Belgians would do welt not 
to underestimate Bucharest. 


If Anderiecht, shaky under 
pressure; display aayindeewon 
in defence they could weu be 
punished by Steau's central 
striker Piturca — who is power- 
ful with his bead and was scorer 
of the the quarter-final winner 
against Finland's Kuusysi Lahti. 

Bucharest's own defence is 
built on international experi- 
ence which begins with goal- 
keeper, Dncadam, while the 
midfield is masterminded by 
Botoiti, capped a ' record 83 
times for his country. ' 

Those who still believe in the 
sports book of fairytales will Ik 
hoping West Germany’s Bayer 
Uenftngea overcome Attetico 
Madrid and qualify for the Cup 
Winners' Cup final in Lyons on 
May 2. Bayer made the quarter- 
final headlines when they oyer- 
turned a 5-1 half-time deficit in 
their second-leg home tie 
against Dynamo Dresden by 
scoring six goals in the space of 
30 TTifniiri-c after the interval. 
The heroics, however, have 
failed to intrigue the Madrid 
public and Atfefico have taken 
out advertisements in the Span- 
ish pres urging their supporters 
to torn up. 

The winners of the Bayer- 
Atletico tie will probably meet 
Dynamo Kiev in the finaL The 
Uknuuans. who wflj compete in 
the Champions' Cop next si 
son, thrashed Rapid Vienna, last 
year's runners-up, 9-2 in the last 
round and their seven full 
internationals, should have too 
much all-round drill for their 
visitors Dadda Prague. 

The UEFA Cup will stage the 
most glamorous tie of the night 
when Milan 

meet Real Madrid in the San 
Siro stadium- where ticket sales 
have hit an Italian record 
exceeding £750,000. The other 
semi-final paixs Cologne, beaten 
in each of their six past semi- 
finals in Europe; at home to the 
Belgian side, Waregem. 


Ryan becomes 


new manager 


Schuster plans 
fresh start 


Barry Fry has resigned as 
manager of Maidstone ” 


United. 

the struggling Gob League side, 
and John Ryan, the club's 
coach, has taken over as team 
manager. Fry is also 
Maidstone's general manager 
and he will continue in that 
position until the end of the 
season. 

Formerly the manager of 


Dftsseldorf (AP) — Bernd 
Schuster has indicated he may 
return to West Germany’s na- 
tional team after the World Cup 
finals in Mexico. ' 

Franz Beckenbauer, the team 
r, said: “Bernd told me 


Barnet Fry joined Maidstone in 
her 1984. 1 


December 1984. But the dub 
have struggled this season and 
are fifth from bottom of the 
Gob Le ag u e- Ryan, a former 
Maidstone player, was pre- 
viously manager of Cambridge 
United. 


off through injury. But he 
indicated be may be ready for a 
fresh start in the national team 
after Mexico.” . 


• COLOGNE: Thomas Allots, 
the West German international. 
is to join his elder br oth er , 
Klaus, at Cologne. 


BADMINTON 


Scots get 
no time 
in which to 
recover 


From Richard Eaton 
Uppsala 


England look like a team that 
might after all make a spirited 
defence of their European tide* 
after begin rung with a 5-0 win 
over Scotland here yesterday. 
About the most anxious mo- 
ment for them was when the 
court buckled after the thud 
contest and much .taping and 
tidying had to be done. 

This was eloquent of English 
efficiency. Scotland are one of 
several smaller nations whose 
badminton is improving 
steadily and only rarely are they 
fryati-w easily these days. This 
was one of them. Perhaps the 
champions have put ail toe 
troublesome politics behind 
them. 


The most surprising of the 
wins was that in which Billy 
Gilliland and Dan Travels, thcr 
1983 All-Engbnd finalists and 
still Scotland's pride and joy, 
went down rather tamely by 15- 
13, 1 5-9 to Nigel Tier and Andy 
Goode. Apart from a spell when 
they came from 8-14 to 13-14 in 
the first game, the Scots never 
caught fire. For them it was an 
unusual damp squib. Six weeks 
ago G illiland and Travers were 
worthy winners against England 
in the Thomas Cup. 


Later Allan GunpbeO, the 
Scottish manager, said that be 
would be having words with the 
European Badminton Union 
(EBUJafter his team were re- 
quired to go back on court 
within 10 minutes oflbeir defeat 
by England. Although they over- 
came west Germany 3-2, they 
saw Gilliland go down with 
cramp and unexpectedly lose 
the mixed doubles: 


“That could have cost us the 
match", Campbell said angrily. 
“The players cant recover m so 
short a time as that Gilliland 
was forced to eat because he felt 
weak and, because he ate, the 
blood went to his stomach. Not 
only that — we had to pick an 
altered team against England 
knowing we would have to play 
again very soon afterwards. 
Thai, particularly against En- 
gland, is something we bate to 
do." 


As British representative -of 
the Players.' Associaton, 
Gillilan d is likely to take lip with 
the working party of the Inter- 
national Badminton Federation ,■ 
(IBF> the complaints of the two * 
Welshmen. Phil Sutton and 
Chris Rees, aboet the event’s 
new split formal. 

“2 feel strongly about it," be 
said- “Unless you come from 
the top seven countries you 


have to play many- more 

unfair 


matches, which Is unfair on a 
number of good players. For 


them automatic placing in the 
dole unie: 


last 32 is impossible unless they 
seeded." 


The EBlTs idea was basically 
sensible; to create a system less 


wasteful in time and money. 

: should 


Gilliland’s is that there 

be more exceptions to the new 
system. “I think quite a few- 
other players will feel the same 
say,” he said. 


The gap between the strong 
and the weak is. however, 
narrowing. This was illustrated 
by the 5-0 win for England's 
rivals, Denmark, against the 
Soviet Union, in which the 
favourites nearly last two of the 
contests. Svetlana BeKasova led 
5-1 -in the 'game against 
Charlotte flattens and, in the 
mixed doubles with Vladimir 
Shmakov. had two match points 
against Steen Fladberg, a former 
world finalist, and Gitte 
Paulsen. ' 


The admission of badminton 
to the Olympics is already 
having an effect As Erland 
Cops, the six times former Afi- 
Engfand champion from Den- 
mark, recently 

said: “The Russians are 
coming." 


REAL TENNIS 


Consistency is 
the key as 
Lovell reigns 

. By William Stephens 


Alan Lovell retained the ama- 
teur championship at Lord's on 
Monday. He beat Julian Snow, 
the under-24 champion, 4-6, 6- 
1 , 6-2. 1-6, 6-4 in one of the best 
finals for many years, where the 
premium was on fitness. Lovell, 
aged 32, absorbed sustained 
pressure from his 21-year-old 
opponent and still retained 
consistent control. 

Snow grasped the militative 
in the first set and revelled in the 
fast pace. He leaned on the ball, 
applying severe cut with no 
margin for error and Lovell 
performed exciting retrievals, 
particularly off the tambour. 

Snow's resolution wavered as 
Lovell probed his retrieving 
capacity with fine sliced back- 
hands in the second and third 
sets. Snow recovered by attack- 
ing the ball on ibe front foot, 
cutting the ball away to take the 
fourth seL 

Lovell seized a 4-0 lead in the 
final set but Snow levelled and 
led at 30-15 and 4-4. However, 
in the tantalizingly close finale, 
Lovell remained cool and 
precise. 

0 The George Wimpey world 
tournament of singles and dou- 
bles began at Leamington and 
Morton Morrell yesterday. The 
most notable professionals 
competing are Chris Ronaidson, 
the world champion, Lachlan 
Dcuchar. his deputy at Hamp- 
ton Court, Colin Lumley, for- 
merly at Holyport. Graham 
Hyland, the former US Open, 
and Jonathan Howell 
(Bordeaux!. 


Well heeled 


Sue Devoy. the women's 
world squash champion, has 
signed a “lucrative” three-year 
contract with the shoe and 
leisure wear company, Hi-tec. 


TENNIS 


Lendl out for three weeks after injury 


New York (Reuter) — The 
defending champion Ivan 
Lendl, of Czechoslovakia, will 
be forced to miss next week’s 
WCT finals in Dallas because of 
a suspected chipped bone on his 
right kneecap. 

“1 think it will keep him out 
for a minimum of two to three 
weeks.” said Jerry Solomon, 
Lendl's agent. Lendl, aged 26. is 
scheduled to have the knee X- 
rayed today, Solomon said. 

Lendl, the world’s top player, 
said be had aggravated the 
injury in beating Scon Davis of 
the United States in the semi- 
finals of the Chicago grand pm 
tournament on Saturday. He 
suffered his first loss of the year 
on Sunday when Boris Becker, 
of West Germany, beat him in 
the final to end a 29-match 
winning sequence. Before that 
defeat. Lendl had won tour- 
naments in Milan and Fort 
Myers. Florida. 

According to Solomon, the 
injury has been bothering Lendl 
for some time. “He knew it had 
been there for a long time. He 
can now attend to the knee and 
rest it,” he said. 

Lendl is not scheduled to 
return to action after the Dallas 
tournament until the first week 


of May, when he defends his 
title a’t the Tournament of 
Champions in Forest Hill, New 
York. 


NEW YORK (UP!) - Jimmy 
Connors announced on Monday 
that he has waived his right to 


appeal and is accepting a 10- 
I S20.C 


week suspension and $20,000 
fine imposed by the Men's 
International Professionasl Ten- 
nis Council (M1PTO last week. 

Connors's suspension began 
on Monday and will end on 
Sunday. June 8. He will be 
ineligible to participate in any 
MIPTC-sanctioned or rec- 
ognized event, including the 
French Open championships, 
which begin in Paris on June 2, 
the first lime a player has been 
barred from one of the four 
Grand Slam events. 


The suspension and fine stem 
from Connors's refusal to com- 
plete his semi-final match 
against Ivan Lendl at the Lipton 
International Players 
Championships in Boca Raton. 
Florida, on February 21. During 
that match. Connors was de- 
faulted after delaying the fifth 
set of the match following a 
dispute with the chair umpire. 

At that time. Connors was 


also lined $5,000 by the MI PTC 
for “failure to complete a 
match." 

Ivan Blumbeig. Connors's 
attorney, said the player would 
return to the Grand Prix circuit 
at the Stella Artois Grass Court 
Championshios in London, 
which begin on June 9. 
Blum berg added that Connors 
would also play a number of 
special events in the United 
States, Japan and Europe during 
the 10-day suspension. 

“While (his incident never 
should have happened. I must 
live with the results of my 
actions.” Connors said in 
announcing his decision. “Al- 
though I believe the chair 
umpire had allowed the match 
to get out of hand through 
improper and inconsistent 
application of the rules. I have 
decided, after consulting with 
my attorneys, not to appeal the 
suspension in order to avoid any 
possibility of missing Wimble- 
don or the U.S. Open." 

“Because of other reasons. I 
had seriously been considering 
not playing the French Open 
this year anyway. Connors 
added. 

Blumberg said Connors 


would have appealed the sanc- 
tions if they had been handed 
down at a different time of the 
year, “but it’s simply not worth 
the risk of missing the two most 
important events of the year, 
and his schedule is such that the 
hardship of the penalties is 
extremely minimal.’* 


• SCOTTSDALE 


flJPJ} — John McEnroe and 
Martina Navratilova have 
agreed to compete in the Butch 
Walts and Friends tennis ex- 
hibition later this month. Walts 
announced on Monday that the 
two stars would play in his 
fourth annual benefit for 
research on April 26 and 27. 


McEnroe wifi play in the 


charity event despite the fact he 
ak from 


is laking a break from the Grand 
Prix circuit. Walts said. He said 
there was no problem with the 
ATP, the men's player union, 
because the Scottsdale event is a 
benefit 


McEnroe is to play Tim 
Mayotte, ranked ninth m the 
world. on April 26, 
andNavratilova. ranked No.I in 
the world, will play Stephanie 
Rebe on April 27. 


FOR THE RECORD 


BASKETBALL 


HOCKEY 


MOTOR RACING 


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TENNIS 


ORIENTEERING 


FOOTBALL 


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FESTIVALS: Jersey: Mr CraoaiMS 1. 

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1; Hflvam 1. ere CM* 5. Kings Cosege a 


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Boys Beme 2 Loading Mta 1 . Neuctf- 

KL28pta:2, Graa*oppw,Z7; 3. Young Boys. 


Cemondge 3. Ov's 2. Hudto 2. Becxenftani O. 

Hwuntft - 


Caesarians g. lOrgs CdBega 1; 

"" toft! Mere 


Crastys 1. Bracknafl 1 L o ee ato t L 

Gariesm Reaaaeon 1. Vic Bates 6. 


SNOOKER 


26. 


Buigsyans 1. Bdhrgoati 2. ScatoMS 5. 
StidDiry 2 Lomes wn Town 2. icenana Z. 


PRESTON: FhMim noiM laoletaloml 

rti e iryi c n aWp quaHjiffaff Third maid; P 
■tender (Con) m P Fagsi (London) IO-7; J 


MARCO ISLAND. H o n do - Wame We tau>- 

ne m ent of dMeylae: Ah meed ; U 

Luwswm (Sm) bt A HobtK (GB) 6-4, 7.R M 

Masker (Nethl bt A Obit (OB) 6-0. 7-6 P 

MMFKto(Bqz)M H DatMramt&rral&O, 6* 

j tempeon (Am) bt S Hack iBul) 6-3. 6-1; S 

Ceccftrt WBK Kjrtwon (See) S-i rat 


ST MAXIM'S Ol 886 I A45. Spe- 
cial CC NO. 3796433. Ev»8a 
Turs ZM. Set 5.0 and a.O. 


THE MOUSETRAP 


AVON 

IOTB9J 29S«3 or TfcAeOaaeter 
Ol 579 5433. ROYAL SNAKE - 


I OeHjf 750. sat 1.30. 

7JO. witere TMe (25 Movj. 

Also new l e e . Theatre hi The 

Two NeMe Mean C2A AoriO. 

C«ery Mee In Ms H —e US 

Miyi For sMdd md/Dkairr 

Urals end hotel stop over ring 

107891 67252 


The very beet of mumt c o te 


wn moms at rotrr 


See Crderton Theatre 


■ See Wh Behan Theatre ■ 

A MONTH or SUMMITS 
See PuchM Thea t re 

feMIM THEATRE, 

THEATRE 


entry. 


VAUBCVKU.WC2. Bok Office 
and CC 01-835 9987/6645. PH 
can (cc so bm 01200 730 a 
Eves 7.3a Wed Mats ajso. sh 

BJO it 8.15. 


MUtROA WARBEH 

in 


”A PUT TO SEND TRE ST RO fS 


REVIVAL- 


VICTORIA PALACE Ol 534 131T. 
Eves 7.30. Mac SM 2.48 

MICHAEL CRAWFORD 


in BARNUM 


MUST END APRIL 26TH 

A me OOO SEATS 4VMUW 


Box Office opens «n-9pn. (Stm- 
day Tefl CC Bhgs only Ilent-TMiU. 


WYNDHASrS 836 3028 OC 379 

6646/579 6*33. Crve 836 

5962. Eves Gm. SM 5 A 8 JO. 

Wed mats 3. 

CAFE PUCCINI 

A maJCM May hy ROBIN RAY. 

Based on the Me A nMc at 


""LEWIS F1ANDER PLAYS 
PUCCINI WITH STYLE 

AND ELAN-Std. 
"NtCHQLA McAUUFTE 
MARVELLOUS MOMENTS OF 

THEATRICAL AND MUSCAL 

_ . TRUTH" D-TeL 

Itbalnhl 


_ TJUM 
“MUCH CHARM. WARMTH 
AND MUSICAL 

APPEAL -JXTM. 


SW1.' 


01-930 

7765/889 *435 CC 01-379 

6065/6433 741 9999 Gte Ol- 
836 3962. MOB-Fn ELOO, Wed MM 
300- Sats 6-00 A 830 

TtKATRE OP C 04 4 SPY CO 
TW ACTBM IS A SHEER JOT" 


PATSKU KATES 

■W 4 I I MURPHY 
•ATKICIA ROOTLEDCI 
MTST ROWLANDS 


WHEN WE ARE 
MARRIED 

By XB. Priestley 
Dtreded by RonMd Eyrev 

-YOU WHA NOT PMD A STORE 
PLEASURABLE EVCfHHO ART- 


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T O U H B VK 928 6363 TheMr 


wed a sm Mats 3Mn. 

TOUHB WB HIM— 9286365 


BOWH. TB SM- Eves 8pm. 


Property 


KENT 


RECJOEMMML c ha rmlnp Orw- 

gian tone semt-detached house. 

excluthe area. DnMr tounffe. 

3 bedrooms. G.CJf.. garden, ga- 

rage. EkcOM co n ditio n Quick 
sale. £92.000. View Mdaw. Tel: 
650 9311. 


Luxurious A saadous upper Qr 


sefl IndorkHBl . 

stde on edge of wwoB village- 

3 miles FTveMan A M2. Lon- 

don t hr 6 Dover h nr. 
BeacMl uny restored retaining 

otHj I (replaces, mouldings A 

sash window*. LOe mu. 

drawing /dhungim. rated 

Ui. brkrm. master U e dim wsii 

en suite tacmi/SRwr/wc. 2 

other dole bedims. 2 nd 
bath.'slrwr /mc en. alarm sys- 

tem 6 3 ggn. Sth wM aaea 
Lovely shared formal gdns at 

IS acres with lenots court t» 

swimmin g po ol. L»e 144 yn. 

. £98/300. 0798 534441 ITL 


tuny 1 

reeentlam. tngtenonk. 


ESSEX 


STOCK. Lhcnuof Ol. 30 ndns, 
easy access MSB/Ml 1 . Luc 6- 
lactag 1M hoar arartmeM In 
con vened M ansion House. 2 
beds. 2 bum. 2oR * 200 draw- 
ing room * din area, tux ktt 
utility mv 0(91. 81. entry 
phono, tmmar 4 acre ton anop 
grads. 120 yr lease. £97.000- 
01-928 1276 Or 0277 841281. 


EAST OF ENGLAND 


HJMT HOUSE On 


tape. S W Norfolk. Red ega. 6 
beds, watted gon. £67.000- 
TcfcOS66 500128. 


GLOUCESTER 


TETBUKf . A rare opportunity 10 
purchase 0 fmy restored de- 
tached straw college to the heart 
of Tefbury. 4 bMrooras. 3 ba«t- 
. rooms, pan CM. waBed garden, 
double parage etc. £ 11 5000 
Tel; Tettnny 82342 (Office 
hours) or NaUsworUi 4036. 


-TEMHAM. Beaoufulty sttu- 


style nsMenoc. 3 rec. fitted 
Mt/OHc. 4 beds (2 en-oooel hot 
bath + studio OaL C Ov odes. 
Offers la excess of .£106400. 
0242 684073. 


SUSSEX 





If- 

tf". 


-• . a* 

5- 


rT' . 






■VP 

VY 





1 ' how Late. BeauOM 
tkoahd Boar AM. (orartoaMna 

the drn»i Large hedway. large 

lounge- a be dr ooms, bdhraon. 

Kited kHefaen. ndly decorated. 

COMO r parking soara. 6 ndns 

mb (Tarawa (root 


Id Iff 


day ff«42R6 4» 


C-J- * 




iv ' it. 


i i . - 

: c <u 


IA, . 

Vy- 


TUMOTON, WEST SfiSfiC 

■OUMOV on edge of VMape adja- 

cent to PMwarth Par*. Slone 
NdR stBtam suuatne for con ver- 




. 4 bedrooms. 5 bathrooms. 2 re- 

centton rooms. kHchen. double - 

garage. Partly wailed, widen 

a bo u t Y, acre iMatn nrvtces 

•vadaMe. AUCTION 30m April 




Aucttoasrs: King A Chsa e i nin e. 
Lombard Stmt P M wotdi 
70307981 42011. 

AltOV 



O'. 


\ : •, * 
\v. 


nt Wew. £ 28.000 For dutch 

sOe. TeL 0273 728276 


«... 


1 . 


SCOTLAND 


■A TO T . Large waaetegtaH hse 

1 hr Aberdeen. S beds f 1 era IS 

to t Pen OCH £63(000. T* 

am 724289 


’ ’ 












31 





--V?~ •- V: 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


’s television and radio programmes 



and Peter Davalle 


BBC 1 


Wtt CMfex . 

WO freaktaatTbmwtti Frank 


.’at 8*5, 745, 
7-55, 845 andW^* 

- mkxtol news and traffic- 
atMATJ^y, T^7 and 
847) nation^ and 

wwSsnsr 7 - 00 ’ 

fasWon hints. Financial 
advice firoh AKson Mitchefl 
(phone W 811 1086) 

940 Roland Rafs Easter 
Ett rava g im a starts this 
' morning with 940 Laaato- 
thawomterdoq p ersuade s 


1040 


« runaway child to go 
homeuMSWhydotft 

jsusss^*^ 

constructive? 10.15 ■ 
Jnekanory Handles takS 
by Brian Cat*. ifc3p. 
Pfawchool with Sarah 
Long and Stuart BracUay. 

Ohwtw presented by 
P&rveen Mirza, Surindor 
Koebar, Shahuen Nawab 
and Ghazaka Anfiri with 
singer Shahnaz 
RanmatuHah (nan all" 
tamaia programme hosted 


11.15 Ctefox 
1240 Wows with Richard 
Whitmore and Sue 
Carpenter. 1245 
Regional news and 
weather. - . 

1-00 Pebble H» atom with 
Magnus Magnusson, Paul 
CoaandJOMpMna 
Buchan on royal matters in 
.the year of the Queen's 
sixtieth birthday, in the 
studio® Journalist Don 
CooBcan and Royal 


Cross sings Us theme 
song from the film Arthur. 

1.45 BagpunM. 240 
Ceefax.7 


345 Up Our Street Simon end 


■ U 


■the Witch (r) 4.10 « 

HoethcPf the Cat (04.15 
JackenoryThqra fflrdtetts 


--i 


die story of Mra 
Pepperpot 44S Cttaite 
Brown - Easter Beagle (rt 
445 Jotai Craven’s 
Newsrotmd 

5.0Q The December Rose . 
Fourth episode of Ueon 
Garfield's thriller serial. 
What Is significant about 
Colonel Brodsky's watch? 
545 Fkrff Hants CartoonTime . 
starring Buga Bunny and 
PorKyPw. - . 

6.00 News w$i Nichole . 
Wftchetl and Frances 
Covwtfate. Weather. 

845 Regional magazine* 1 
740 A 3ong forEuropeTarry 
- Wogan hosts the British 
finals m the thirtieth year 
of the Eurovision Song 
Contest Eight hopeful 
contestants fine up before 
11 juries around tM 
country. (Simultaneous 
broadcast on Radio 2) 

840 Dallas Miss EHle is not ... 
pleased when SuefBen'a 
mother (Martha Sooty 
arrives to interfere- ■ 

845 Points of View Bartjr Took 
foams at the mouth oven. 

■ views op^aapSiThtt 

, DaBayty and-'S. & 


9.00 News with Jdhn+iumphrys 
. andAndrewHarvey; -^ 

• : Regtonatnew# ana ' 

• ■ ■ weathers 

940 OEJXMind over matter 
volunteers from the paMc 
paidtoiofna • 
psychological experiment 
they walked over 5- metres 
of coals burning at 400 
degrees C, to see ff they 
could conquer their own 
fear. Hugh Brpmfley, - 
martial artist and 

firewafter claims anyone - 
• can do tt Many of the- \r. 
pertb^amshada it; .-•■ 
profess tens! Interest they. 

weredoctors and- 
psypWatristMCeefta) . 
10.10 aurt anigh t Steve Rider 
introduces soccer from 
• three European club 
competitions and looks 
ahead to the FA Cup semi- 
finals on Saturday. 

Richard Pitman previews 
the Grand National - 
runners and tafirs to ... .- 
trainer Josh Gifford. Also 
preparations for the ,. 
Fourth Test In Trinidad. 
11-40 Weather 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good 

■.'"..maontBdbjrl.... 

\«itf AhrMraFfiosJ 





Sport# 6u35 and 744, 
Cartoon m 744. Vkteo 

awsr 

PfesentedbyTimroy 
Swiet with pay 


1TV/LONDON 


945 Thames Nwraheacffinaa 
fb&jwed by Once Ubon a 
Tkoes w. Map Neanderthal 
imn in cartooo sertea (r). 

*445 Jenene^e ' 

•" taSEmtf The 
Concert Stages of Europe 
mother smuggles to put 
her son on fie concert 
1035 The A5 


Arcade Beifa baa shown a 
profit with her g®in the 
arcade, makes a date and 
becomes manager of the 
tr 


and Andy 

Ruffat introduce the BMX 
Tkfers.1145 Cartoon Haw 
1140 About Biltafec Against the 
Odds. Suzanne 

Is an artist 


New 


. - .giving j .. . .. 

. encouragement and . 
painting advfcfrfo 
psychiatric pattenteta a 
- nogpitaliwy Newcastle. 
1240 Woechops cartoon about 
a dmosatffrt. 12.10 Our 
Backyard The ' 

Gramyrtegsupto 
Laura tr 
1240 Talking 
series of six 
launched by Anna 
Raeburn taming to Michael 
AspeL 

1,00 News at One. 140 

Thames News. 140 The 
; Champion* underwater 
drama with assassination 
agpmptfd-- ■- 

240 On the fftarittdThe food 
amme from Susan 


and Trevor Hyatt 
with market reports and 
QpotcCare«ne 
340 Gama 
of hands In the 
Covent Garden workshops 
of a fashion house where 
the autumn and winter 
coBection has met with 
flttte pubic enthusiasm, 
but there's a big deal 
afoot 345 Thamea newa 
haadfines. 340 Sons and 
Australian 
Wayne has 
'.’s father's 
Wmrtffity,- i- - 
-*M Moscbdpathbdindsaiir 
* ■ cartoon; ftritWamesfli* 

cat (fiscorera a lonete bee. 
- 440 The WaM Game 
Weatherman 4m Bacon 

• whs the chSdrap from 
WHtemAustio Junior 
-Bchoofc la# of the series, 
M&The A* (r) (Oracle) 

• MSCoonecbonaVVords, 
pictures and numbers , 
game with Sue Robbies 

5J45 Neva. BJHUtames .. 
^.HamtWS.HelpI *. 
coramwWy.wttMiw U*# 
■- , ^Government - j ;j>: 

435 CrosairotateDe^eidfltves 
Mo^iflHPae^end ffiQBta^ 

■ ; - v^ecafisan amtanwye' - , 
l#TMtkTBWtlftrpmra: 
ihoiigbtforlhehiisbtindQr 
'wfe who has had to keep 
. tbe«g?eczet . 

740 CtaonattouBtraft Susan 
i Bqriqta celebrates her 
twertyBrat(Oracle). 

840 Minder. Broken Arrow'll 
Bob Hope can do it tor r 
aM, I cando it for darts' 

thteto Arthur (Geora 

Cote) with Ws eye on the 


940 


Muhroxm the human i 
and economic dteasfofbf 
. wandespbadOyeaisof. 

- woridpeace more titan a 
hundred other wars have 
brokenout; many 
thousands m tfia in war. 
1040 News et Ten followed by 
Thamea news headfinas 
1040 FBm: 48 Hows (1982). • 
Nick Notts plays a whits 
officer opposite Eddte 

tsc 

m manhunt 
-12.15' Web! Thoughte- 




•DAV1D QOLDBLATT IN 
BLACK AND WWTE (Channel 4. 
8 .00pm)tecteveriy fitted 
because tt Is about this 


photographer's 
taperapoanofa 
i mat is riven by 


monochrome 

8 outh Africa that to riven by 
conflict between men with 
(Afferent colour sWns.ffls 


tend to be in black end white. 
tM, although he expresses them 
■' with the qunt strength of an 


more than any newsreel 
footage or reporter's 
despatches. Goidbiatt's 
photowaphs encapsulate the 
despair tfi South Africa's 
Hacks at specific moments in 
thek'-dafly fives, in wA out of 
their homes^omatimpa aware of 
hfe camera and at other times 
Militia cMkEITie Few Honemeo, . notJurt as actdely, GokWatt 
ITVgjiOpm . captures what he cafis the 


CHOICE 


physical confidence of the whtteB 
and the threat erf danger in 
thek presence, though perhaps 
he reads too much Into the 
tace of the security police officer 
briefly gfimftesd in the back 
seat of Itis car as it passes a fine 
of Macks. 

•OREAMS^ECRETS, 
BEAUTIFUL UES, a deeply 

Fe^^iv^ad»^7^Wpm)ls 
an anatomy of decephon.the 
dteorierttathg effects of 
which are shown to be equally 
devastating whether 
practised on ourselves or others. 
Ferossson's drama about 
three townies -wife, second 
husband, and young 
daughter- looking tar a country 


mysocaDy 

orms the basic plot by 
finding pargflete with the if 

days icst "when the Gregorian 
calendar replaced the 
JuflaaAt ihe more mundane 
level, the play alerts grown- 
ups to the danger of being too 
grown-up within earshot of 
the children. 
•Adotescencsandits 
problems, only tangentially the 
theme of Robert Ferguson's 
radio play, rs the be and end an of 
Truffaut's masterly Hm THE 
400 BLOWS (Channel 4, 
10.00pm), the first in a short 
season of movies made by this 
sorely-missed director. Even 
if you did not know that ThgtQQ 
Wows was autobiographical, 
l suspect you would have 
guessed as much by the 
depth of feeling it expresses. 

Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


940 (*nif I 

1240 Open UntanRyi Start up 

your own Businma Advice 

gn researching the market 
. . . end developing a sates 
strategy. 1245 Resource 
Utilisation wasted 
.. materials cost our Industry 
" mBBons. 140 Narkettag In 
Action Can the National 
" TYust do anything to save 
morecoasnbe? 

1145 Wtndmflt Chris Serie 

delves further Into the 
archives of the BBC; today 
his theme is movement 
2.45 FtioKTeetPflot (1938)" the 
second Clark GaMe movie 
this week, again with 
Spencer Tracy; here our 
hero loves Ms aeroplane 
and the girt he meets in a 
wheatftetd, as the result of 
a forced tending, in equal 
measures. 

440 ThePaper Chase Hght 
American drama about a 
of tew students. 


reactions to Ms paper, but 
teoteng forward to seeing 
Kathy, wtwnKingsfteld 
-arrives unexpectedly. . 

540 Hews with subtitles. 

... Weather 

545 Bridge Club Jeremy Hint 
and Jeremy James teach 
the r uribno nts end Improve 

640 K¥beEo^(lW 
Bigamy as the result of a 
dwdhood trauma is the 
fitame of another Robert 
Mtchummovte also 


Brian Abeme. Flashbacks 
reveal (he background to 
fin crucial intervention of 
a stranger at a society 


74O~0fuft Tttsand Bumftie- 
- < - heMQavjd Bellamy 

introduces the programme 

- fiwt shows you how to 
make a wikwe garden to 
attract kestrels and other 
unusual vistoreff) 

545 T, Dan Snath, convicted 
for cammtion in 1 974. is 
now 70. He used to be 
known as 'Newcesfia's 
. tHctafor’. Today he talks 
for the first time about the 
■ events Ai the Newcastle 
area attire time of the 

• Pouison affair, attem 

• - to )uBt% w!iat he eBd . 
i v r eteas<n why. Ws ewdence 

- r ~ 4& mmpbrtarfend 

~ -dWten^dbyPauTFodt’ 
•‘■'Tjxti f terri s 'ra Greenwich. 

•’ Qerek'Serfioirl Muir 
* ' Hunter, QC and others. • 

940 M*A"S-H'Q Cutter ' 
decides there must be a 
moratorium on relations 
with the opposite sax until 
the unfort una te Edwin a 
has found contentment A 

. straw poa amongst the 

likely males etera 
Hawkeye to make Edwtna 
hmpy and release the rest 
ofme tefles from their 
vow of abstinence (rt' 

-B25* That Uncertain Faewq ; 

. final pwtpf the ajteptafiofi 

. otKingsteyAmiss novel, 
John Lawfe (Denis 
Lawson) escaped from the 
- finstrtight party dressed as 
a Wewi woman, but stB 
feels guflty about his 
extramarital attraction to 
Lj^jteyad by Sheila Gish- 

1045 w 

Tusa, Peter Snow. Donald 
MaeConnlck and CHIvia 
O'Leary. Also Ian Smith 
and Jerafi Murray with a 
round-up of news. 

1140 Weather 


CHANNEL 4 


240 mm: Rood fo Morocco 
(1842)* A classic "road" 
movie, starring Kng 

Crosby and Bob Mope as 
oonmen sh ip wrecked In 
North Africa. Crosby sefls 
Hope into slavery to pay 
for thek (firmer. Thera Is 
much parody of Arabian 
Nights; Anthony Quinn 
pfays a wricked shaikh and 
Dorothy Lamour Is 
Princess Shafenar. 

440 A Phis 4 Mavis Nicholson 
talks to 3 woman at the 
top cri thek fields as 
international business 
consultant, depute general 
secretary of TASS and 
Oraptaln of Cfiare College. 

440 Countdown Richard 
WfiKatoy chars the third 
round hi the 
Championship of 
Champions of weeds and 
numbers 

540 AScm Vera, the Torch 
American sit-com In the 
dawn-town (finer. Vera is 
in trouble for having pets 
In her apartment than 
feels severe guilt for her 
revenge fantasies. 

540 TchouTchou Dutch 

animation using building < 
bricks. 

640 The C hristia n s : The 
Godless State? Bamber 
Gascoigne’s final 
programme in this 
documentary series 
examines the Christian 
Church in Italy, in the 
Soviet Union, where the 
Russian Orthodox Church 
still flourishes in spite of 
banning and in Poland 
where congregations are 
larger than tn 
• establishment Christian 

740 Channel# News. 7.50 
Comment Today's political 
comment is by Sr Russefl 
Johnston, leader of the 
Scottish Liberal Party. 
Weather 

840 David Goldblatt: In Btack 
and White Goidbiatt has 
photographed South 
Africans for 30 years, 
“touching a nerve of 
sensfoifity and influencing 
our p erception of 
. ouraetees and our workf* 
in the words of writer 

• Nadine Gortibner. (An 

_ . exhibition of his - . .. 

_ .photographs, is attire 

' . Photographers Gallery in 

V London.) Janet Suzman 

• narrates the pregramme in 
which Gokfotatt speaks of 
his feelings, (see Choice) 

940 Prospects Freddie pians 
to turn the Isle of Dogs 
into a replica of Venice; 
meanwhie he is using the 
land as a car park, where 
Mick wS wash cars. Mona 
types envelopes on fire 
mailing Bst of apomo mag 

1040 FRac Double BH of 

Truffaut TOms; Les Outers 

CentCoups(1959r 
Truffaut's almost 
autobtograpMcBl account 
of Parisian chikfliood. This 
ften launched Jean-Plena 
Leaud as Antoine Dorns) 

(the character he plaved in 
several later flkns] 


misunderstood in a rough 
area of Paris (see Choice). 

1140 LesABstons (1957)* The 
second Truffaut film is a 
short about five 
schoolboys, mischief 
malting one adptescent 
summer. 

12.10 Closedown 


C Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. VHF fitsreo 
vartQtions at end at Rado 4. 

5L55 Shipping 840 News Briefing, 
Weather fi.10 Fanning 


640 Today, inci 640, 740, 

840 News &4S Business 
News 845, 745 Weather 
740, 840 News 745. 

845 Sport 7.45 Thought for 
the Day 

843 Star Smashers of the 
Galaxy Rangers. Read 
by Keny Shale (3)<s) 857 
Weather; Travel 

940 News 

945 Midweek. Midweek from 
New York. With Libby 
Putvbs 

1040 News: Gardeners’ 

Question Time. 

Listeners' questions 
1040 Morning Story: A 

Question of Judgment by 
Mark Bourne. Reader 
Robert Rietty 

10.45 Dslfy Service (new Every 
Mornira. page HBKs) 

1140 News; Travel: The Rise 
and Fan of County Hafl. 
Christabel King finds out 
about the traditions that 
win be lost now that the GLC 
is abolished 

11.48 Enquire Within. Nefl 
Landor and spedafists 
answer ttstenars' queries 
1240 News; Prophets, 

Charlatans and Little 
Gurus. Ray Gosling on 
Homer Lane, 


1247 Lord of Misrule. The 

battle tor the lordship of 
a Welsh valley in the mid- 
18th century (8) 1255 
Weather; Travel 
140 The World At One: News 
140 The Archers. 145 
Shipping 

240 News; Woman's Hour. 
Includes an Interview 
with the comedian Ben Elton 
340 News; The Afternoon 
I OU. by John 
Cowsl!. With 
Christian Redska and 
Barbara Peirson (s) 

847 Time for Verse. Kevin 
Crossley-Hofland 
present more poems 
Inspired by pictures In 
the Tata GaBary (7) The Art 
of Seeing 
440 News 

445 My Life TJH Now. Mary 
Sweeny, talks to David 
Wade about what life was 
like in Liverpool In the 
early 30s (r). 

4A5 Kaleidoscope Extra: A 

Dream in Three 
Dimensions. Richard Cork 


visits Menkton House 
which contains a unique 
collection ot surrealistic 
decor 

540 PM: News magazine. 

540 Shipping 545 
Weather 

640 News 

640 Rim Star. Alexander 
Walker cm Jack Lemmon 

7.00 News 

745 The Archers 

740 Fireside Tabes. Stones 
about the Fans. Phil 
Smith visits a pub in 
Norwich. 

7.45 Brainwaves. Margaret 
Percy presents the 
education magazine. 
Calculators in the 
Classroom. 

8.15 Tales from Paradise. 

June Knox-Mawar with 
stories ot the British who 
went to the South Pacific 
as ad min i s tr ato rs (2) Flying 
the Flag (s) 

940 Thuty-Mmuta Theatre. 
Steve and Eddie by 
Johnnie Quarren. with Jake 
Wood and Jack 
McNlchofl (sVrt 

940 Adventure. This week: 
Underwater Treasure- 
hunting 

9.45 KaiekMSCope.Includes 
comment on The Fisher 
King, by Anthony Powell; II 
Candelalo at The Pit and 
Alan Blythe on new 
recordings of works by 
Vivaldi and Beethoven 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: A 
Prefect Spy written and 
read by John ie Carre (1 3) 
1049 weather 

18.30 The World Tonight 

11.15 The Financial Work! 

Tonight 

1140 Soundings. Bernard 
Jackson asks 

theologians and scientists if 
they believe we are living 
in the shadow of the 


12.00 News; Weather 1243 
Shipping 

VHF (available m England and 
S. Wales only) as above except 
545-6408*1 Weather; Travel 
945-1040 Cat's Whiskers with 


ining Comer (s) 
540-545 PM (continued). 

C "Radio 3 

Afl programmes on medium wave- 
645 Weather. 740 News 
745 Morning 

ConcertDvorak 
(Scherzo capricdoso). Bliss ■ 
(Kenilworth ballet suite). 
CPE Bach (Harpsichord 


Concerto in D minor, 
Wq 23: LeonhardL soloist). 
Debus (Dance 
Rhapsody). 84Q News 
645 Concert (contd): LtilO (La 
RoidYs overture), 

Sibelius (Serenade In D. Op 
59 No 1 with Belkin, 
violin), Holst (Fugal 
Concerto, with 
BennetLflute and 
Graeme, oboe), Verdi 

.940 News 


K 509; and Divertimento m B 
uat, K 287 (Vienna 

Mozart Ensemble) 

1040 Robert Mayer Concert 
City of London 
Smkmiatta; Janet HUion 
(clarinet). Falla (Three- 
cornered hat), Weber (last 
movement ot Clarinet 
Concerto No 2), Warlock 
(Pavana). Lutnslawsk) 

(Dance Preludes), Faure 
(Pavane). Mendelssohn 
(third movement ttaBan 
symphony) 

11.10 Academia Wind Quintet 
of Prague: Dusek (Partita 
In F). Retcha (Wind Quintet in 
F), Kretci (Wind Quintet) 
1145 Ayres for the Theatre: 
played by the Pzriey of 
Instruments. Works by 
’William Corbett and 
Purcell 

12.25 Tchaikovsky: Peter 

Donohoe (piano). Sonata 
No 2. OP 37- 140 
145 Count 


140 News 
1954 

recordings 

140 Mabnee Musicals: Ulster 
Orchestra (under Cofman 
Pearcal, with Michael 
McGutfin (piano)Busonl 

(Lustspie! overture), Bax 
(Oliver Twist suite 
extracts). Bgar (Contrasts: 
Gavotte), Ireland (The 
Towing Path). Debts 
(Summer Evening). 

Howells (Walton's Toys and 
Ralph' 8 Pavane). 
Shostakovich (Hamlet. Op 

240 Paganini: JawKlacquee 
Kamorow( violin). Axrthea 
Gifford (guitar). Sonatas and 
three duets 
345 Netherlands Wind 
Ensemble: Mozart 
(Dwertimemo in B flat K 
240). Strauss (Symphony 
No 2ftor Wind instruments) 
440 Choral Evensong: from St 
Mary-at-HHI Church. 

London. With the Wren 
Singers. 445 News 
540 Midweek Choice; 

Butterworth (Shropshire 
Lad. rhapsody), Handel ( 

Suite No 5: Landowska, 
harpsichord). Janacek 
(String Quartet No 1), 
Rachmaninov (Piano 
Concerto No 3: with 
Bo let piano). Arne 
(Shakespeare settings), 
Stsmdate Bennett 

(Symphony in G minor) 

740 Debut: Angela 

Hewfttfplano). Brahms 
(Variations on theme by 
Schumann, Op 9): 

Scherzo in E flat minor. Op 4 
740 Dreams, Secrets, 

Beautiful Lies: play by 
Robert Ferguson.With Diana 
Quick. Charles Kay, 

Emma Glasner 
8.45 Danish 

Fantasies: Staphen 
Bermetfidarinet), Joyce 
RiddeU(plano). Gada 
(Fantasy Pieces, Op 43), 
Winding (Fantasy Pieces, 

Op 19) 

9.1S Music ot Bght Decades: 
London Skrronietta, with 
Pauk(violln).Part 1. 
Abrahamsen(Marchen- 
brfdar). Lutostawski (Chain 2: 


./conducta) 

9.45 Six Continents: Foreign 
radio broadcasts, 
monitored by the BBC 
1045 Conosrtlparttwo): Brian 
Femeyhough (Carcert 
dinvenzkxte ■). Schoenberg 
(Chamber Symphony No 
1 ) 

1140 Manchester Cttember 
Mutac: BBC 
PMharmonle (under 
Kies), with KweUa 
(soprano). Bach (Cantata No 
HE), and Suite No 4 in D 
major, BWV 1069 
1147 New*. 1240 Closedown 

C Radio 2 ) 

On medium wavs. For VHF. see 
Radiol. 

News on the hour (except 
7.00pm, 940). Headlines 540am, 


Desks at 145pm. 242. 342. 44% 
545, 642, 645 (ml only), 945. 
440am Colin Berry (s) 840 Ray 
Moore is) 845 Ken Bruce (a) 1O30 
Jimmy Young (s) 145pm Vince 
Hdl (a) 240 (Soria Hunrtford (s) 
(phone-m) 340 Music Al The 
way (s) 440 Paul Jones (a) 640 
John Dunn (s) 740 A Song for 
Europe with terry Wooan who 

introduces the competition 
which decides which one of the 
eight finalists wtt! represent the 
UK at the Eurovision Song Contest 
tn Bergen, Norway, on 3 May (a 
simultaneous broadcast wttn 
BBC1) 840 Yer Roots Are 
Stovmg (Mike Han*^{^8.45 Big 

1040 It's A Funny Business. 

Mke Craig invites us to remember 
Eric Morecambe 1040 Hubert 
Grew says Thanks (re the Memory 
11 AtTBrian Matthew present 
Round Mkbtigtt (stereo from 
midnight) 1.00am Chariea Nova 
presents NightrldB (s) 3.00-440 A 
Utile Night Music (s). 

C Radio 1 ) 

6JXtem Adrian John 740 Mike 
Read 940 Simon Bates 1240pm 


Partridge) 545 Bruno Brookes bid 
at 840 the new Top 30 atoum 
chart 740 Janice Long 1040-1240 
John Peel (s). VHF RADIOS 1 A 
2 440am As Radio 2 1040 As 
Radiol 

WORLD SERVICE 

GJOO Newscssk U0 Maridan 740 Nma 
749 Twwuy-Four Hours 7JU Dovelop- 
ment ‘86 BJXD Mama 849 RefiecdonslLlB 
Ctossca) Hecord Review 840 Transatian- 
be Quiz 940 Newt 949 Review of the 
Bmisn Press S.15 The World Today 840 
Financial Nows 940 Look Ahead 945 
Ftanoers and Swann M4D News 1041 
Omnbus 1140 News 1149 Naws About 
Bntarn IT. 15 Ortana 1146 A Latlar (ram 
Wales 1140 Uerktan 1940 Radio Naws- 
reel 12.15 Natm Notebook 1225 Ttw 
Farmvig World 1245 Sports Roundup 
140 Nows 149 Twenty-fW Hours 140 
Oevetopmant *86 240 Outlook 245 Ra- 
port on RaMgkxi&OO Radio NwnnalftlB 
Byways olHtstory 240 Two Cheers lor 
Iteefi 440 News 448 Commen tar y 4.15 
: Roek Salad 545 Sports Romteo 745 
Good Books 840 News 849 TwentyAwr 
Moure 840 Assignment 840 News 201 
Network UK 215 I n tern a tional Saocar 
“Special 1840 News 1240 The World 
.Today 1045 A Letter (ram Wales 1238 
•FlnanbU News 1240 Reflections 1245 
Sports Roundup 1148 News 1148 Com- 
mentary 11.15 Good Books 1140 Tap 
Twenty 1240 News 1249 News About 
Bntarn 12.15 Radio Newsreel 1248 Two 
Cheers for March 140 News 141 Outlook 
140 Waveguide 140 Book Choice 145 
Master Ctetets 240 Now* 249 Review of 
tee British Press 2.16 Network UK 240 
Asston i Mnt 200 Nans 215 The World 
Today 445 Financial News 455 PeOec- 
.bons 540 Kltorid News 549 Twenty-Four 
Hours 545 The Wortd Today JUi ttewe In 
9MT. 


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RRC1 WALES 545pt»4u00 

warn Today. K45pm-740 
Juice. Il40pre-I145 News of 
Walas. SCOTLAND Catch- 

word 645pm-74P Ropvfing Scot- 
land. NORTHERN lRELAND&4Spm-5AQ 
Today's Spent 2%»840 Inside 
Ulster. 84tatW'T40 Charles In Charge. 
1140pm-1145 Northern Ireland 
News and weather, ENGLANO 245pm- 
740 Regional news magazines. 

CHANNEL falSf &sy* 

Street 1230-1IL3SCartooa 


1 Young Dot 

Btocktwteare. 64044S Channel Re- 
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As London e*- 

225am Sesame 


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1240-1.10 Cleggs Peopie.140 News. 
140 Job SpU. 145-200 Fhn: The 
Magnet*. “ 

545 BloC 


i BtockOustere, I 
and Scottend Today. U.15SR Late Cad, 
Ooeadown. 


P«kwlck Papers. 124flpa9-i40 
Gienroe. 120 News. 1^240 Hartta 
Hail 640445 News. t215en 
Quedown. 


■ REGIONAL TELEVISION. VARJATiONS 


HTV WALES y_»iy west 
except 

225an>'l 045 Plckwa* Papers. 
640pn-845 Mates at Sk. 

TSUI As London except 225am 

Sesame Street 1025-1045 Foo 
Cbormy Pncaea. 215545 Btock- 
bustars. 840445 About Anglia. 12.15am 
In ConvereaMn, Ctosadowm. 

BORDER 

1040-1045 Cartoon. I240pm-140 
Pomartol a Legend- 1JM News. 140- 
240 Low Boot 230-400 Young 
Doctors- 840*845 Lookareund. 12.1Sam 
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GR A MPI A N 

940 Sesame stratt. 1040- 

i Cartoon. 1240pm-140At Homo. 

140 News. 140-240 Country Prec- 
we. 215-545 Bteckbusters. 640445 
North Ton^nt 12.15am News. 
Ctosedown. 

PFNTRAI As London except 
I IWt " 225am Runaway te- 
tand. 250 Groovy GhouKao. 1040- 
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Thing 

1045 


1240pm-1 40 SomotiivigtaTi 
sue. 140 News. 140-240 


Scarecrow 


and Mrs Kng. 640 Crossroads. 

545-740 News. 12.15am dosadown. 

GR ENADA 

an FoW Tates. 945 u«le Rascals. 

1040 Stuggte Benaete the Sea. 1225- 
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£.S®Co«my Practice. 245-240 Home 
Cookery. 5.15 Gus Honeybun. 540- 
MS Crossroads. 840 Today South West 
840-7 J» Amoabaa to Zabras. 

1215am Postscript, Closedown. 

T1/C As London except 945am 
ASS Outlook. 228 Sesame Street 

1040-1045 Cartoon. T230nm-1.(M 

.140 Neva. 


JuCB Goes on I 


140 


n HoNtey. ' 

Off the Rack. 200-24- Moutetrap. 

340-440 Voung Doctors. 215-245 

BtocWjustms. 5402Xi Coast to 
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imiAKS 5.250 
Cartoon. 1045-1045 Jacksons. 
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1045 Arts and Crans si West Africa. 
1240KH-1.00 AfWtess Ageing. 140 Gra- 
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The B You Right 1219am 
Closedown. 


Starts: 140pm Countdown. 
xiGE 140 Aitoftaeunlon. 148 


PWabatam. 215 btianoL 200 The 
Chrtstians. 440 A PIUS4. 440 tWorfd Of 
Animation. 445 Uytr Uoffion. 250 
Deri Peg. 200 BSdowcar. 540 Cartoon 
CamSTOtiO Braaksfcta. 230 
Concwest 740 Newyddton Sqite. 740 
DrannoMhy FWr. 240 Y Byd ar 
Bedwar. 945 rarre Tha Wsatonary, 1040 
Secret Dianes of thaFXm Canaan. 
tZIOaraCtosadown. 

YORKSHIRE ^g"^ 

kws Funmes. 250 Man and Janny. 
1210-1045 Tananawks. l2»Mt-140 
Calendar Umcntinw Live. 140 News. 
140-240 Faioon Crest 042285 Calen- 
dar. 121SemArt BtakayatRocmte 
Scott's 1245 Ctosedown. 

ulster ft aaqs^Ht 

1045 Cartoon. 1240pm-140 Sea ki 
Their Blood. 140 LuncWnteL 140-245 
Country Practice. 230-440 Look 
Who's Taking 215-545 Connections 
■640446 Good Evening Uteter. 

1210am Closedown. 

TYNtTEIS«i SESiroft 


230-1140 Flm: WMU^tour Stem. 
1240pm-l40 A Woman's Place. 14Qpca 
News. 145 Wnerethe Jobs Are. 
140-240 Country Practice. E40-64S 
Northern Lite. 1215am Happy Eater, 
Ctosedown. 



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WEDNESDAY APRIL 2 1986 


THE TIMES 


SPORT 




land need 







From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Port of Spam 


Within a day or wo of the 
England manager, Tony 
Brown, saying that for the rest 
of the tour all practices would 
be compulsory, yesterday's 
was again made optional. Of 
the 17 players seven attended. 
Those who sunbathed or 
hopped across to Tobago or 
lay in wait for the scarlet ibis 
have it on their minds. I am 
sure, that Monday's defeat in 
the last of the one-day interna- 
tionals was England's fifth in 
succession, an unprecented 
sequence over all the years. 

How this arose about 
yesterday's practice was that 
after Monday's match Gower 
asked whether anyone would 
like to join him for a knock 
yesterday morning. In the 
event. Ellison. Gatling. Slack. 
Smith. Thomas and Willey 
did so. Had Brown felt strong- 
ly enough that there should be 
no scrimshankers he could, in 
theory, have told everyone to 
turn up: he has the authority 
to intervene in cricketing mat- 
ters as a last resort, though 
that is a right which a manager 
very rarely exercises. 

Last Friday, when Gower 
made England's first practice 
optional after the loss, three 
days earlier, of the third Test 
in Barbados. Brown thought it 
was a wrong decision, for 
psychological as well as 
cricketing reasons. We mostly 
did. Yesterday I felt the same, 
but the manager, having taken 
everything into account, did 
not. In his view this was not 
an optional practice, the day 
having originally been left 
free, but a voluntary' one. If 
the difference is semantic, it 
was the explanation given. 

Though it may seem from 
this as though he is. Brown is 
not in fact a vacillating type. 
He bore in mind yesterday not 
that England have had only 
one full day's cricket in the last 
nine, but that there is a full- 
scale practice today and for 
the players who matter most a 
busy time lies ahead with a 
possible 10 -day's Test cricket 
in the next 14. Like Gower, he 
thoughl no good would come 
of a hard workout yesterday. I 
would have seen one more as a 


sharp reminder, and everyone 
would still have been free for 
the scarlet ibis and quite 
enough lime by the pool. 

Concerning this question of 
priorities, the touring con- 
tracts of the two managers 
could well define more sharply 
where their respective author- 
ity begins and ends. Willis’s, 
although he is the coach, 
allows him no say. so he 
believes, in who should go to 
practice and who should not 
“It's entirely up to the captain 
to deride who does whaL and 
when they do it; he's in sole 
charge of the cricket,” says 
Willis. Ideally, of course, all 
three would work in close 
conjunction, but because 
Brown and Willis are not as 
compatible as they might be. 
that has not always happened 
here. 

England an? playing so 
poorly at the moment that 
they could just have arrived in 
West Indies. Instead, only the 
last two Tests remain. There 
was nothing to be frightened 
of on Monday, the pitch being 
slow and the West Indian 
bowlers pitching the ball well 
up. The batsmen, it is true, 
have very little confidence 
left, because of what they h 2 ve 
been through, but the side 
should still be making much 
more of themselves than they 
are. 

It was disappointing to 
score only 165 for nine in 48 
overs, but in the conditions it 
was noi contemptible. West 
Indies bowled and fielded 
very well, and it was an 
awkward pitch on which to 
force the pace, certainly for the 
ordinary mortal. Gooch could 
have done it. but he was soon 
out. Lamb, a bustler, spent 13 
overs making 16. Robinson, 
who played the longest in- 
nings. found it slow going. 
What has not improved at all 
on the tour, and it showed, is 
England's running between 
the wickets. They seem quite 
unaware of what they are 
missing though they have had 
two months in which to learn 
from the West Indians. 

Simply by taking a fast first 
run to third man on Monday. 


Richards and Haynes put 
Emburey under sufficient 
pressure to force a slight 
misfield and so open the way 
for a safe second. England 
would have been much less 
likely to bother. Few. unfortu- 
nately. see the short single, 
and Lamb, who does, looks in 
vain for partners to respond to 
him, unless he is batting with 
Gower. 

Except that Botham is a bod 
clown and Lamb is not a 
Wardle or a Barrington, there 
was no harm in their larking 
about on the boundary. En- 
gland had played misguidedly 
at times and badly at others. 
They do, I think, lack disci- 
pline: but no one with much 
knowledge of cricket would 
have seen Botham's accep- 
tance of a tot of rum from 
someone in the crowd as the 
reason for England's defeat. 
Hendren used to do the same, 
though he, I fancy, would have 
practised yesterday, had he 
ever found himself as a mem- 
ber of an England side in this 
one's present plight They 
ought all to have practised, 
whether ordered to or not 

Scoreboard 


ENGLAND 

*G A Gooch c Richards 


V > .... ■ 

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R T Robinson b Marshal 

10 

55 

•Ol Gower b Waist . _. __ 

20 

16 

t T Botham e Harper b Gamer — 

29 

tP Dowmon c GraenMae 

bMamiuf 

12 

RM BRsonb Garner _ 

5 


2 


. 0 

Extras (bl. Ib4, w2.nb3) 

Total (9 wkts. 47 wars) 

N A Foster <8d not bat 

10 

— 165 




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FALL OF WICKETS: 1-15. 2-48. 3-6& 4- 
126. 5-138. 6-154, 7-161. 8-165.9-165. 
BOWLING: Marshal 90-37-4; Gamer 9-1- 
22-3: Hoidhn 9-1-32-0: WBfch 10-0-25-2: 
Harpar 10-0-44-0. 


WEST DOES 

CG GfBOn^na b Foster 0 

0 L Kaynas not uttf — 77 

R B Richardson e Gooch t> Emburey . 31 

*1 V A Hichams not out 50 

Extra* qb 7, w 1) 8 

Total (for 2 wMs. 38-2 ovars) — 166 
H AGomoa, tf>jOujon.R AHarpar. MO 
Marshal. M A Hokfrg, J Gamer and C A 
Walsh dd not beL 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-0, 2-75. 

BOWLING: Foster 6-1-27-1, Stem 7-0- 
30-0. Botham 5-0-24-0. Edmonds 10-1- 
38-0. Emburey 102-31-1. Gower 0.20-9- 
0. 

Umpires.' C CwRtMrbal^i and S 
Mohammed. 


/.!• . • . . -mj- '■ ■- V' ■■ r '■ 


— ir\ .-r r ?r. : • •• . r • ,i.w , 

Never mind the width of the rinlc, feel the quality of the Siting: Susan Jackson full of joy mconfined at Richmond 


FOOTBALL: CHAMPIONSHIP ASPIRATIONS FADE FOR MANCHESTER UNITED 

First division race cut to three runners 


MOTOR RALLYING 


The field of potential En- 
glish champions has been 
reduced to three. Liverpool. 
Everton and West Ham Unit- 
ed, who will strengthen their 
claim if they win their third 
fixture in five days tonight at 
Nottingham Forest, are the 
only clubs that can realistical- 
ly expect to collect the most 
significant prize of the season. 

Chelsea, who dropped out 
of the race dramatically over 
Easter, and Arsenal who with- 
drew more gently, could 
scarcely have been considered 
genuine contenders over such 


a lengthy and demanding 
course anyway. But Manches- 
ter United, the other challeng- 
ers to pull up over the 
weekend, were once several 
laps ahead and odds on to win. 

The turning point took 
place on November 9 at 12 
minutes past three. It was 
then, against Sheffield 
Wednesday at Hillsborough, 
that Biyan Robson sustained a 
leg injury. Later that after- 
noon United's opening se- 
quence of 15 first division 
games without defeat had 


Preserve the value 
of yoor income 
or watch 

your capital grow. 

Its all too easy to get caught in the 
money trap. 

Either your income suffers or your 
capital dwindles. 

Hill Samuel together with the 
Nottingham Building Socierv could have 

C c 1 • 

the answer you're looking lor. 

It's called the Hill Samuel Monthly 

J 

Income Scheme, which combines 
the security ol a Building Society with 
the growth potential of Unit Trusts. 

If you have £6,000 or more to invest, 
complete and post the coupon, and we’ll 
tell you more. 


T<> Wiilip Kim-.. Iliil Nimiifl V-n io* limited. Mi lower. 

12 I* \ildnc«inifai L’hiviliin. L'K ,( *iHi; 

MjLi- j l< >c.tl ■ iuiM>- ■ -ill ii»li \ i m I inL L ini-: 1.1 14 a 5!'l-l*l 1 24 hour mtikc 
irn. lulling itt-il. rd. t. 

] wi mli I liLi- in know Finn.- .il» nn i hi- Hill Mmurl M rniliK Incomi Vh*. m-. 


By Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 

ing ended, and so, effectively, had Sport 
es- iheir title ambitions. Evert 

ng- Although one individual w - 
the should not be held responsible TV 
Tal for the success or failure of a 
in. team, particularly one full of x u P' 
>ok established internationals £ U E ' 
12 from six different nations, * 
vas Robson is considered an es- ' 
»ld seatiaJ and irreplaceable lead- 
gh, er of his country and his club. £~ K 1 , 
d a Bobby Robson. England's 
er- manager, described him as 
se- “unique”. 

on He added that his namesake 

tad is a more complete player than Alt 
■aj-the gifted Platini, of Juventus and i 
| and France who was twice City c 
voted the European Football- back 
er of the Year. But Robson's conic 
appearances for United have maim 
been limited by injuries to atBir 
only 23 of their 48 games. He shoul 
was unable to complete three more 
of those. perfoi 

Robson's contribution has 
been undeniable. Under his “It 
leadership. United lost only poimi 
four matches. Those defeats again* 
were at Hillsborough, at West enoug 
Ham, when he also limped off remer 
with an ankle injury, at South- every 
ampton, which happened to just 
be bis first game back, and at chant] 
home in a meaningless Screen displa 


Sports Super Cup tie against 
Everton. 

Without him. United went 
out to Liverpool in the Milk 
Cup. to West Ham in the FA 
Cup and succumbed to rela- 
tively mediocre opposition in 
the Canon League such as 
Leicester City and Queens 
Park Rangers. Crucially, over 
the last fortnight, they have 
dropped nine points and lie 
five behind their Merseyside 
rivals. 

Although Robson returned, 
and scored, at Birmingham 
City on Saturday, he has come 
back too late to lift them into 
contention. Typically, he re- 
mains defiant. “We were poor 
at Birmingham.” he says. “We 
should have pushed them 
more but the level of our 
performance against Everton 
gives us reason for hope.” 

“It was obviously disap- 
pointing not to get a goal 
against them but we did 
enough to edge it We have to 
remember to play like that 
every time we go out and not 
just against the League 
champions.” Yet his own 
display in the 0-0 draw was 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


Fulham s 
lifeline 

Fulham Rugby League club 
seem likely to survive, at least 
for this season (Keith Macklin 
writes). Shareholders and 
creditors decided at a meeting 
yesterday morning not to go 
ahead with the planned 
liquidation. 

Instead, an announcement 
was expected late last night 
staring that a new owner had 
come forward and that the 
club’s fixtures for the season 
would be completed. 

Fulham folded three weeks 
ago when the owner. Roy 
Close, declared that losses 
amounting to thousands of 
pounds each week could no 
longer be bome. 

The avenger 

Marco Island. Florida (Reu- 
ter) — Marcella Mesker. ofThe 
Netherlands, overcame 
.Annabel Croft, of Britain. 6-0. 
7-6 in the first round of the 
Tournament of Champions 
here yesterday, gaining re- 
venge for a resounding defeat 
at the hands of the Briton the 
previous time they met. 

First victory 

Ferla. Sicily (AP) — 
Francesco Cesarini. of Italy, 
won the Pan tali ca trophy road 



Larkins: injury 

cycling race here for his first 
professional victory. 

Larkins doubt 

Northamptonshire's former 
England batsman, Wayne 
Larkins, may miss the start of 
the season because of a foot- 
ball injury. Larkins, who was 
playing for the United Coun- 
ties League side. Buckingham, 
damaged his right ankle in a 
clash with the opposition's 
goalkeeper. Larkins has his 
benefit this season. 

Clean sweep 

Toronto (UPI) — Sweden 
and Scotland remained the 
only undefeated teams after 
the opening day of competi- 
tion at the Silver Broom world 
curling championships here. 


significantly less forceful and 
less powerful than usual. 

Robson maintains that his 
shoulder is “100 per cent 
better than it was at the 
corresponding stage when I 
last dislocated it”. He will 
continue to protect it in a 
harness until the end of the 
season but the damage, as far 
as United are concerned, 
would seem already to have \ 
been done. 

Their current strike force 
embraces one forward, Dav- 
enport, who has yet to settle in 
and another, Hughes, who is : 
on his way out Before it was 
known that he had signed for 
Barcelona, Hughes was list- 
less. Now he performs for the 
audience as though he were 
already on show in the Nou 
Camp. 

Ron Atkinson, United’S 
manager, predictably also be- 
lieves that “the championship 
is far from over”. But his 
attack is disjointed, one of his 
central defenders. Higgins, has 
a broken hand and his leading 
inspiration is playing with a 
limb that has twice been 
displaced. Only those within 
the club would claim that their 
challenge is not totterip& if 
-not already collapsed. 


Top junior 

Florence, Italy (AP) —Javier 
Sanchez, of Spain, won an 
international junior tennis 
event here after bearing 
Eugenio Rossi, of Italy. 6-4, 6- 
0 in the final Benina Fuico, of 
Argentina, beat Martina 
Gh'ezzi, of Italy, 6-2, 6-1 in the 
women's final 

Drug-net call 

Athletes caught taking drugs 
should be banned from com- 
petition for life without any 
chance of reinstatement, ac- 
cording to the former Austra- 
lian long-distance runner. Ron 
Clarke. “Random drug testing 
is useless unless the person 
found guilty is disqualified for 
life.*’ Clarke said. He retired 
after the 1970 Commonwealth 
Games. “There should be no 
second chance.” 

Backing boost 

Sealink British Ferries are 
to continue their sponsorship 
of cycling by backing the 1986 
women's and junior road race 
series. The first event in the 
women's series is the Cental 
District two-day race at 
Tilton, near Leicester, on 
April 19-20. The six-race ju- 
nior series starts with the Peak 
Forest race ax Buxton on April 
13. 


Toyota finding it 
tough at the top 


Nairobi (AP) — The Toyota 
team fought off mechanical 
problems, fast-closing rivals 
and the rigours of a 12-bour, 
non-stop drive to bold on to 
the first three places going into 
yesterday's final stages of the 
Safari Rally. 

Bjorn Waldegaard, of Swe- 
den, managed to maintain his 
overnight lead, pulling his 
Ceiica TC into the Eldoret 
rest-stop at noon, having 
amassed 248 penalty points. 
Lars-Eric Torph, his compa- 
triot and team-mate, was sec- 
ond on276 and West German 
Erwin Weber, of West Germa- 
ny, third on 31 1. 

The defending champion 
Juha Kankfcunen. of Finland, 
took advantage of the me- 
chanical problems suffered by 
the Toyotas to reduce what 
had been a commanding lead 
by the Japanese care. He was 
fourth in his Peugeot 205 on 
316, while die Finnish driver 

Markku Alen, in a Lancia, was 
fifth with 328. 

The tough, 1,022-mile cir- 


cuit through western Kenya 
brought about the retirements 
of six of the 25 drivers who 
began the gnieUing,.tbird and 
final leg in Nairobi 

Waldegaard was one driver 
to suffer when a broken right 
rear hub cost him more than 
30 minutes. Weber lost second 
place when his rear axle broke 
and penalty points piled up as 
be waited for mechanics 
aboard a helicopter to bring a 
new axle. 

STANDINGS: 1, B Wafcteqaairi 
(Swa, Toyota Cetfca TC), 24g pen- 
alties; 2, L- E Torph (Swa. Toyota 
Ceiica TCI. 276 1 5, E Weber (WG, 
Toyota Ceiica), 31 1 ; 4. J Kankkunen 
(Rn, Peugeot 205). 316; 5-M Alen 
(Ha Lancia), 328; 6, M Kirkland 
(Kenya. Subaru), 388; 7. F Tmdo 
(Kenya. Subaru), 426; 8, S Mehta , 
(Kenya, Peugeot 205). 427; 9, J ! 
Heifer (Kenya, Lancial 448; 10, G 
CrWoos (Kenya, Lancia), 483, 

Spectator killed i 

The Kenya Safari was maned I 
yesterday by an accident in 
which a spectator was killed 
when a Volkswagen' Gol£ 
driven by Kenneth Eriksson, of 
Sweden, ploughed off the road 
with a broken st e eri ng rod. 


First Welsh winner 


David Uewdlin, a 25-year- 
old farmer, was the first Welsh 
driver to win Ireland's top rally, 
the Rothmans Circuit of Ire- 
land. when be came to tire 
Belfast finish of the five-day 
event just under nine minutes 
ahead of Russell Brookes, from 
the Midlands, yesterday. 

Llewellin was driving the MG 
Metro 6R4, Austin Rover’s 
rallying super car. and broke a 
seven-year domination of the 
Easter classic by Vauxhall-OpeL 
However, it is even longer since 
the British company claimed a 
circuit victory — Paddy Hopkirk 
took the last of bis five wins in a 
Mini Cooper'S* in 1967. 

The group, a production car 
category, was led from start to 
finish by Fentii Amlckola, for- 


mer circuit winne r, in his 
VauxbaD Astra GTE. The Finn 
finished the 1,500 mile event in 
a creditable fifth place, healing 
some much faster machines. 

This win elevates Llewellin 
imo the lead of the Shell Oils 
KAC Open Rally Championr 
ship, as well as giving him and 
the MG Metro 6R4 their first 
international Tally, victory. 

Faun, positions ' .. _ 

Llawe fci and P Short (fag Me nu 6B4L7ftr 
B3n«i 06sac2. R Brookaa and M Broad 
(Opal Manta 400L & 02.05: 3, A McHaie 
and C FnraB (Opal Manta MOL *134>1£. 
M Loral and P Davis (Fort RS200L 
&1G23A P AHteta and R McNwtmm 
(V auxhafl Astra GTE), &4&S7; 6. S 
DavtonandM Aftfetson (Moan 240RS). 
&35-31 J. F FannsH and T CaflanaritOMt 




Nicholson _ 

H Ha* and I Baasant (Sun b e am Tljl 
9:14.03: 10. E Coton and F Samoa 
(Psugeot 206 071)9:1 7.14. 


Britain 

cramps 

world’s 

style 


Caution was a. priority for 
the maid's skating champi- 
ons, mcfttdmg Debt Thomas, 
Brian Boitaao and all the top 
R us sians, when They took the 
ice at last night’s Richmond 
gala and displayed the prow- 
ess that won them titles and 
medals at Geneva last week. 

Unlike most ice rinks 
abroad, that at Richmond is 
not the standard 60 metres by 
30 metres (approximately 
196ft 8hrhy 58ft 4fa) bat is 
200ft by 81ft- Take-offs for 
jumps heed to be shortened, 
programmes adjusted and 

dance steps omitted here and 
there to avoid impact with the & 
barriers. The_ 17-foot differ* 
ence in width Is perflons. 

Richmond, for decades the 
home of British skatin& can 
be forgiven- its shape, BoiU 
long before the switch to 
metre standards and at a time 
when most of the world ap- 
peared red in school atlases, 
its pecnlarities can be tolerat- 
ed. Indeed, its quaintness can 
be a retieL 

What cannot be ftwgrmi, 
however, is that aS other ice 
rinks In Britain, including 
those recently tarilt ami under 
constractian, are not of the 
size expected by international 
skaters. ; * 

That at Sloogh, opening 
shortly, » 56 metres by 26 
metres. Sdr too, wfU be die 
rinks nearing completion at 
Chelmsford and Cardiff. Pro- 
posed rinks at Greenwich, 
Basingstoke and Norwich wiD 
also be nndersazed, it is 
understood. 

Notone of the rinks opened 
over the last three or fber 
years — namely at Lee Valley, 
London, Oxford, Gillingham, 
Swindon, Tefford and Peter- 
borough — could provide the 
kedhnenskmsmi which inter- 
national championships coaU 
he held. Huy would even be 
nssnitaUe as (mining rinks 
for a world championship. • 

The size is criticaL It is like $ 
taking a foot off each side of a 
tennis court, two yards off a 
raring pool or shrinking a 
snooker table by three inches 
aB round. Slough . Owned 
opted for their 5fr metres fay 
26 metres rink because of 
costs. Apparently it meant a 
.difference between £3.5 mfl- 
■lioK for the -smaller size and 
£5 -piffioB for the foller size, 
seconding to Jimmy Young, 
!who wiD be its director. 

; Young, a. trainer. of the 
former - British ice-dance 
champions, Karen Barber and 
. Nicky Slater, hopes - to ton 
Slough into a national ice- 
dance centre but knows only 
too well that top couples mast 
: train on foil-size rinks. Ten 
days before Geneva he had to 
move from Richmond to' 
Oberstdorf in West Germany 
with the Japanese champions 
whom he- is coaching. No 
.British rink ms np to the 
mark. - 

- Bernard Ford, a former 
world ice-dance champion and 
Canada ’s national 
said; M A foil-size rink would 
cost £5 million. So what? 
Slough is virtually pouring 
£33 million down foe drain." 

When I asked Alex 
McGowan, trainer of Dehi 
Thomas, the world figure- 
skating champion, why so 
many British coaches like 
Mmseif worked abroad, . he 
replied: “Whenever T asked 
other tramers that question y 
here in Geneva they invari- 
ably came op with the same 
answer: ‘lack of a 60 by 30- 
metre rink’.” 


Economy size 
for Britons 


John Scott, the skating 
liaison officer of the Sports 
Council, who -provides pro- 
spective developers with an 
“ice pack” of information, 
explained: “Once you go over 
56 metres by 26 -.metres it 
involves a different s tr uctur e. 
There is a geometric progres- 
sion which shoots Bp the 
price.” 

Unfortunately the sport's 
governing bodies still recog- 
nize a range of sires for 
international competitions 
(though not championships) 
— namely 56 to 60 by ?6 to 30 
metres for figure skating, and 
np to a 61-metre length for ice 
hockey. “Given foe option, 
ecowomy-consckws councils, 
who mainly wish to provide 
social f aci li ti e s, choose -the 
smaBer size,” Scott safaL . 

Is there any hope of Britain 


TENNIS 

Tax relief considered 

By Rex Bellamy, Tennis Correspondent 


Wimbledon may consider 
paying players' hotel bills after 
this year's championships. 
Any payment (a flat rate of 
£65 a day has been touted on 
behalf of the players) would 
offset the fact that from next 
year prize money will be 
taxable at source. 

Such a system already ap- 
plies to the French champion- 
ships, for the same reason. 
Ronald Bookman, the deputy 
executive director of the Asso- 


ciation of Tennis Profession- 
als, said yesterday: “This is 
nothing more than a thoug ht 
at this stage. But there has 
been discussion of some pro- 
vision to help players with the 
cost of a two-week tourna- 
ment in a big city. 

“Some players are not mak- 
ing a great deal of money on 
the circuit and during as two- 
week period, a lot of thenLwill 
not be able to make their 
expenses.” 


foe redevelopment of Alexan- 
dra Palace in Loudon, though 
still at the “feasibility study” 
stage, involves an ice area. 

It Is to be hoped that the 
National Skating Association 
wifi nse ail their powers of 
persuasion to provide British 
skaters and coaches wfth the 
type of rink they desperately 
need. 

Michael Coleman 


*/ 

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