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No 62,421 





ME 



THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


l 


Bodies sucked from fuselage after explosion over Greece Pretoria Teachers 
fti* ,. ■__ lifts ban vote to 

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From Mario Modoro, Athens 
Three passengers on a TWA fore they board 
Boeing' 727 airliner, one a Rome”, 
child, were kilted over Greece In Rome it 
yesterday, when a mid-air only the lugs 
explosion ripped a large hole passengers- v$i 
in the fuselage and caused the flight there 
their bodiestobe sucked out. Earlier it ha 
Another child passenger was that the ex pit 
reported m issi n g curred between 

The bodies, were found on partment and 


fore they boarded the plane at 
Rome”. 

In Rome ir was said that 
only the luggage of the 10 
passengers -who had boarded 
the flight there was checked. 

Earner it had been stated 
that the explosion had oc- 
curred between the cargo com- 
partment and the passenger 






■ ■*V uuuim. Wk.iv IUIU1U till l^dj Ullwlll OUU Ulv 

the ground. Three other pas- area.lt caused a hole 6ft by3ft 
sengers were admitted to hos- wide oh - the fuselage 
pita! but their injuries were starboard, 
said not to be serious. Airline officials said that the 

The airtiner, carrying 114 plane would have disintegrat- 
passengers and a crew of ed if the e^losion had oc- 
seven, was on a r^ular flight curred while it was flying at its 
from Rome to Cairo via usual cruising altitude of 
Athens. Thirty minutes before 22,000 ft. 
landing lime, the pilot aterted The airliner, TWA flight 
Athens control tower that 847, was on the same route as 
there had been an explosion the plane of the samecompa- 
while the 727. was flying at ny which was hijacked by Shia 





mm 


V x <]•, ... J/- 1 . 




nuuv uu. r^r . vroo ujui^ ol uj muui rroo uijtxuniAi uj »mi« 

11,000 A above the city of gunmen in June last year after 
Argos, 87 mites south-west of taking off from Athens for 


here. 

The bodies of a man identi- 
fied as Alberto Stino, a Co- 
lombian, a woman and a 
child, both unidentified, were 
discovered near Argos airfield 
after a shepherd.toldthe police 
he had seen objects foiling 
from the. plane. A search for 
the possible fourth victim 
began. 

Mr Dennis Taylor, the 
TWA pilot, managed to land 
at Athens airport at 1235 
GMT. Seven passengers were 
taken to hospital but only 
three were detained for treat- 
ment One is an American, 
Mrs Myrtle Simpson from Los 
Angrfes. The other two are a 


Rome. It was then diverted to 
Algiers and one passenger, a 
US Navy diver, was killed by 
the hijackers. 

One woman passenger es- 
caped the blast because she left 
her seat' only minutes earlier 
to go to the lavatory. 7 Mrs 
Florentia Haniotalris, a 
Greek- American from Ohio 
travelling with her two small 
children, told Renters she had 
been sitting next to the spot 
where the explosion, 
happened. 

Site praised the seven-mem- 
ber crew and said they had 
comforted passengers during 
the emergency 

tehtfrag^Eyeryone grabbed 
their oxygen masks and the 




Vi- •* :; • ^ Mi®? . 

The hole ripped in the TWA airliner’s fuselage by the explosion and through which the passengers were socked 

Praise for ritv dim as nff Petrol se 


pilot who 
flew on 

By Michael Bally 
Transport Editor 


City shrugs off 
gloom as oil 
climbs past $10 


Flying and landing a Boeing By David Smith and Teresa Poole 

121 with^a 10 foot bole in its share prices and the pound trading in Nev 
side was a very good Pi^o f moved confidently upwards International Pe 
airmanship _ by the TWA shrussine off con- chanec in Londc 


8SSTSAlE.5t*V' SSSS and to have conduded the trip SiBeWidS 
tad bonatting next to die SfS^AeSid: without anyfurtber comphra- p^oints up at 1419.4. ThI 

Gtombiiul: Swg=r ,«te ^ng^.*e»«L tjors ^-y good 1 JoeM mre indoc 

was kilted. : ; MrJI^uL Sufoeriand, an pt^ofpiioting , Capi Clarke moved above ±e , 700 level, 

1 • -ji' - Amcrtean executive with, the sud test night . a 18.9 points 

A .Gr^ Fgnto M mjggf . Bank oF America m?Greece, i. The immediate problem af- on the daval 1702.9 
spokesman ^d safo ta beard a big noise and , ter the explosion would be ° SL of N^nh Sea oil 

^. .cfccompKssj™ «»M. of-: 


pilot, according to Captain 
Mike Clarke, president of the 
British Airline Pilots’ 
Association. 

“The sadness of the loss of 
life seems to have been con- 
tained in the initial seconds, 
and to have concluded the trip 
without any further complica- 
tions suggests a very good 
piece of puoting’VCapt Clarke 
sard test night 


Share prices and the pound trading in New York, the 
moved confidently upwards International Petroleum Ex- 
yesterday, shrugging off con- change in London was forced 


cem about the collapse in oil 
prices. 

The price of oil moved back 
above $10 a barrel, but the 
outlook remains uncertain. 

Share prices soared to 


for the first time to suspend 
dealings for a second 
successive day. 

The pound rose by half a 
cent to $1.4735 against a 
generally firm dollar, and also 


JLLOlb |J1 lUCJ *VUUIV%> , ” — ~ 

record levels, the Financial posted good gains against 
Times 30-share index closing other currencies, including a 


six pfennig rise to DM3.4877 
against the German mark. The 


moved above the 1700 level, sterling index rose 0.7 points 
showing a gain of 18.9 points to 76.5. 


cealed in the hand lugg age of a .'■* 
passenger” . .The.' ^spokesman , ^ 

only a cuisoiy. inspection be^ - , CbA®il n 






Tomorrow 


A child 
in danger 

When does a 
parent’s carelessness 
become neglect? 


Law Society 
finals 

Full winter 
examination results 


' Another pa^enger, - Mrs oxygen and go down to a 
bora Shintaku, a Japanese- height where passengers could 
American, sad:' “No one breathe normally. 

, Qmfimtt! on page 16, col 3 

with airflow and the aircraft s 
handling qualities in an unpre- 
dictable way. But a greater 
hazard would be loss of hy- 
draulic systems controlling 
flaps, slats and rudder, which 
would require emergency ac- 
tion by flight crew. 

Normally there are three 
separate systems and loss of 
one or two (clearly all three 
were not lost) would involve 
delay in activating controls. 

; It was apparently lucky that 
the explosive device was close 
to the side of the aircraft, 
which meant that much of the 
blast would go outwards. 


Loyalists attack 
homes of police 

From Richard Ford, Belfast 

The homes of police and implement politically-based 
Roman Catholic houses and decisions, 
chapels were attacked by hard- _ Later Sir John met foe 
line ‘ioyalists”yesierday, in Northern Ireland Police Au- 
an ominous development of foonty to give them a derail^ 
foe protests against the Anglo- account of events at the 
Irish asreement.. weekend. . , 

The attacks on police homes Mr J ames Atolyneaiw, Iead- 

is part of an insidious cam- er of foe 
paignto destroy foe morale of Party (OUP), y^erday^ 
a force which unionists allege manded an immediate end to 
t hefog used politically to “outrageousattacks onpobce- 
MfShe aereemenL men and then - families, to- 

^RoyalTE Constabu- “j£EK IB E 

fofoffied ^Tll officers woiddtej^^ to“aMrchy 
aral their families had been and ruin lflo ^ Jlst f, alIow ^ 
foreedto move-home because foer^lves to be used as not 

° f '^ l atSS n were discussed Events m Portadown, dnr- 
at . a meeting between foe 


gtt. 5k Md ’file officers, have infomtirf nianyPrmes- 
“S ctrinhn Hprmnn. Chief lams. There have been loud 
fVmsLbteGf foe RUC'Fedcr- protests at foe alleged indis- 
ft^rreDresentatives ex- criminate use of plastic bullets 

and in tave 

Sfteywere being used to ■ Contnawl on page t, cal 6 


on the day at 1 702.9. Despite the weakness of oil 

The price of North Sea oil prices in recent weeks, foe 
ralfied on news foal foe Amer- Bank of England stocked up 
ican Vice-President, Mr Britain’s gold and foreign 
George Bush, planned to dis- currency reserves last month. 

- «-!-*■* aT «La #kt1 T1 «a im/larlirmn nCA fix l*Pa 


cuss foe stabitization of the oil 
market when be arrives in 
Saudi Arabia on Saturday on 
foe first leg of a four-nation 
visit to foe Gulf. 


The underlying rise in re- 
serves, of $278 million (£189 
million), was foe biggest 
monthly increase since Janu- 
ary 1981. The actual rise was a 


He saidi’T think it is essen- much larger $2.94 billion, 
tial that we talk about stability mainly because of foe annual 


and that we not just have a 
continued free rail like a 
parachutist jumping out with- 
out a parachute.” 

But Mr Bush said he would 
not tell foe Saudis to cut 
production. 


revaluation of reserves. 

As a result. Britain’s re- 
serves stood at $18,750 mil- 
lion (£12,686 million) at the 
end of last month, their high- 
est level since March 1981 
The renewed rise in share 


Gains of up to $1.50 a barrel prices reflects foe belief that 
were reported for Brent, foe foe benefits of lower oil prices 
most widely traded North Sea more than outweigh any wor- 
cnide, but dealers said foe ries about the effects on foe 
market was very thin and US banking system, 
nervous. International bodies, in- 

As oil prices rebounded, eluding foe Paris-based Oraa- 
taking their lead from late nization for Economic Co- 
operation and Development 
and the International Mone^ 
lary Fund in Washington, 
believe that the fell in oil 
prices will bring about stron- 
ger world growth without 
inflation. 

The International Monetary 
Fund, in its World Economic 
Outlook, to be published next 
week, expects 3 per cent world 
growth this year. Its earlier 
forecast was for a 2.8 per cent 
expansion. 

For Britain, the London 
Business School expects foe 
oil price fell to be reflected in a 
lower rale of inflation next 
year, 2.5 per cent, than growth 
in output, forecast at 33 per 

Motorists begin to benefit cem* , ^ 

from oil price plunge Pressure for pact page 17 



Petrol set 
for further 
price fall 

By Teresa Poole 

Petrol prices are set to 
decline farther alter the recent 
slide in the oil price to $10 a 
barrel. 

OS companies yesterday re- 
ported a continuing downward 
trend, with one industry offi- 
cial describing the scene as a 
“controlled plummet”. 

The average price of a 
gallon of four-star is now 
I75p, but regional variations 
across the country mean a 
wide spread from below 160p 
to more than I80p. In some 
areas competition on foe 
forecourts has already eroded 
the 73p doty increase imposed 
in last month *5 budget. 

A spokesman for Esso said: 
“The trend in the past few 
days has been downwards. If 

Aberdeen fears 2 

Leading article 13 

the spot market price of $10 a 
barrel works its way through 
the system and the exchange 
rate remains stable, then we 
would expect to see com peti- 
tion increasing and petrol 
prices coming down.” 

The price could only drop 
according the Mobil, which 
this week lowered its reference 
price to match the 179.6p 
ffMvimmn set by Esso, BP, 
and ShelL 

The fall in the crude oil 
price is likely to bring renewed 
government pressure on the oil 
companies to pass on the 
benefits of cheaper oil to 
consumers. After the budget, 
both the Prime Minister and 
the Chancellor criticized the 
oil industry for passing on the 
full duty increase to the 
motorist 

The price of crude accounts 
for about 36p of the cost of a 
gallon of four-star, but any 
weakness in sterling can wipe 
out the impact of cheaper 
crude because oil is priced in 
dollars. 

Sterling has held its ground 
against the dollar in spite of 
the sharp decline of oil prices 
over the past four months 
which "tfans that cheaper oil 
is now working its way 
through the refinery system. 
Continued on page 2. col 8 


BL loss soars by 50% to £110m 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


From Michael Hornsby 
Soweto 

The wife of Nelson 
Mandela, the jailed leader of 
the outlawed African National 
Congress, yesterday returned 
to her home in Soweto after 
the government lifted all re- 
strictions on her movements 
for the first time in 10 years. 

A defiant Mrs Winnie 
Mandela told a crowd of 
newsmen, neighbours and 
well-wishers who crammed 
into her garden: ”1 am grateful 
to no one. it is my right to be at 
home, and it is not any 
particular step towards a 
change in the government's 
policy”. 

Mrs Mandela said it was 
quite obvious to her now that 
the government had never 
interned to release her hus- 
band from jail, it had merely 
given that impression “to 
hoodwink the world into be- 
lieving that (it) was moving 
towards some kind of a re- 
formist programme”. 

Mr Ismail Ayob. Mrs 
Mandela's lawyer, said he was 
told by the "state attorn ey- 
re presenting Mr Louis Le 
Grange, the Minister of Law 
and Order, that the govern- 
ment was no longer contesting 
Mrs Mandela's appeal against 
her "banning” order, which, 
among other things, prohibit- 
ed her from entering Soweto. 

“The effects of that is that 
she is unbanned but she 
remains silenced because of 
the ban on all meetings in the 
country and because she is still 
a listed' person,” Mr Ayob 
told The Times. 

Mrs Mandela has been sub- 
ject to banning orders of one 
kind or another almost contin- 
uously since 1962. in 1974 she 
was jailed for six months 

In May 1977, Mrs Mandela 
was banished to a black 
township near Brand fort, a 
small rural town in the Orange 
Free State. Last December, 
however, the government can- 
celled foe banishment and 
relaxed some of the other 
restrictions on her. 

Under foe modified ban, 
she was free to live in any 
black area outside foe Johan- 
nesburgand Roodepoort mag- 
isterial districts, which include 
Soweto. She was also permit- 
ted to attend social but not 
political gatherings, 

The state's decision to aban- 
don its case against Mrs 
Mandela appears to be a direct 
result of a ruling last month by 
the Appeal Court in Bloem- 
fontein which, in effect, re- 
quired foe Minister of Law 
and Order to give feller rea- 
sons for imposing banning 
orders. 

Meanwhile, Bishop Des- 
mond Tutu yesterday called 
on the international commu- 
nity to impose “punitive sanc- 
tions against this government 
to help us establish a new 
South Africa: non-rarial. dem- 
ocratic, participatory and 
just”. 


BL yesterday announced 
pretax losses for 1985 of 
£1 10.3 million, a 50 per cent 
increase on 1984 losses. But 
Land Rover, foe privatization 
candidate, saw its profits leap 
from £2 million to £lu 
million. 

BL's preliminary results 
show that the group's turnover 


was £3.415 million, up from 
1 984*5 £1955 million, with 
exports totalling £764 million, 

BL’s overall loss, after tax. 
interest and extraordinary 
hems, was £138 million. The 
1984 profit of £80.6 million 
was distorted by' foe proceeds 
from the sale of Jaguar. 

The state-controlled group s 


The edneation service »a.* > 
thrown into further charc i 
yesterday when the bigger 
teachers' union voted to con- - 
r inue to teach O level and CSE • 
courses this autumn in defi- > 
ance of the Government'! 
plans to introduce a new : 
examination for pupils aged - 
i6. ; 

The decision by delegates ol 1 
the National Union of Teach- 
ers at their annual conference 
in Blackpool was taken in 
secret session and in opposi- 
tion to the NUT leadership 
which argued that the move . 
noaid alienate parents at a - 
time when the unions needed , 
them. It might also place the . 
anion's members in breach of , 
contract. , 

Sir Keith Joseph. Secretary 
of State for Edneation and . 
Science, responded swiftly to . 
the decision. He said the new 
CCSE examination would still 
go ahead as planned in the 
interests of raising standards. 

Sir Keith said:“Teachers : 
have made much of their wish 1 
to win more sympathy from 
parents. Pupils who start their 
fourth year of education this 
autumn have the right tc be 
taught for the new exam. 
Teaching them for an exam 
which does not exist in the 
summer of 1988 will damage 
them during a vital period in 
their school careers.” 

The rebellion by NUT dele- 
gates comes after the decision 
by the second biggest teachers' 
union, the National Associa- 
tion of School masters/Union 
of Women Teachers, to coatin- 
ae to boycott the development 
work for the new examination. 
But foe NAS/UWT is com- 
mitted only to boycotting tbe 
preparation phase and not foe 
examination's introduction. 

The NUT’S motion pledges 
the union not only to continu- 
ing the boycott of preparation 
and training, but also to 
continue leaching existing syl- 
labuses until it is satisfied that 
the new examination is “ade- 
quately planned and funded”. 

In a brief public session in 
Blackpool, Mrs June Fisher, 
an NUT executive member, 
was booed when she comment- 
ed that Sir Keith would not 
defer the September introduc- 
tion of the GCSE. 

She said:“There are teach- 
ers genuinely concerned for 
the children who are going *o 
be facing the new syllabuses in 
the coming September term. 
Those colleagues do not want 
to see thejr children 
disadvantaged.” 

Mr Fred Jarvis, general 
secretary of foe NUT. said:“It 
demonstrates the strength of 
feeling of many of our mem- 
bers hi the schools.” 

The NUTs Leaders are to 
seek an urgent meeting with 
Sir Keith to urge a one year 
postponement and to ask for 
the extra £100 million which 
they say is needed for the 
introduction of the new exami- 
nation. 

School violence, page 2 


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Anewgui 
Rent Revi 
Lease Rei 
services 



The £4,000 prize in 
ve-sterday’s Tunes _Pi®tf@Ue 
rompetitiOB, dtmbte the osnal 
mount because there was no 
winner the previous daj jas 
stared by two readers, wPO 
HoBoway of Chandlers Ford, 

Hants, and Mr Derek 

Brighton, Sussex. PortiWm 
list page 22; *?«* J® 1 
information service, page 16 - 


H wyN w s jM 

Overseas 

APP® 

Arts , • iS 

Births, deaths, 

SS£*«-g 

oSwordslfttf 


Dutch round off small war in Scillies 


By Patricia Clough 


Mr Johkheer Rein 
Huydecoper, tta DHtch Am- 
bassador in London, will set 
out for foe Isles of Solly 

, *r. <wlar# neace after a 


Law Report 
Leaders *■* 

Lettered 

Sdeace 

Sport 

The**"*-, 1 !* 6 S 
TV£R*d*o 31 
Weather . w 


****** 


war which has been raging 
unnoticed for 335 years. 

The hostilities to 
wifl pot ai^beganmlttfi 
when the Dutch, tmgry at foe 
way foe Scniy pirates were 
phmderingttos^Mt^f 
East India route, serf 12men- 
of- war muter Admiral 
to quell foe pirates and re- 
trieve.foeir money- 


Tramp ordered foe island- 
ers, who were the last Royal- 
ists holding ont at tbe end of 
the Civil War, In surrender. 

They refused, whereupon he 

declared war. 

Before he could go any 
farther, up sailed foe English 

Parliamentary fleet under Ad- 
miral Blake, who said that he 
could sort ont the islanders 
■ without Dutch help. 

So it was that Tramp- de- 


parted without firing a shot. 

Peace was settled later be- 
tween England and The Neth- 
erlands. k t everyone forgot 
about the Scillies until the 
islands’ council noticed that 
their own particular war tad 
never formally ended. 

The Dutch Foreign Minis- 
try, searching through dusty 
documents, found that the 
islanders were right It is 
despatching foe Ambassador 
to foe is tends some time in the 
next few weeks, with a docu- 


ment stating that foe war is 
over. 

Mr Ray Duncan, chairman 
of foe islands council, said: 
“The Ambassador will be 
explaining to the council that 
although foe war between 
Holland and Britain ended 
after the signing of a peace 
treaty, foe position reganfing 
the Sallies is unclear. 

“The Dutch authorities are 
having a document prepared at 
tbe moment which will bring 
hostilities .to an end." 


operating loss of £39. 5 million 
for 1985 was a “significant 
reduction” from foe 1984 loss 
of £66.5 million, foe directors 
said. 

Land Rover was helped last 
vear by good results from 
Freight ’Rover, 

Letters, page 13 
Report, page 17 

Kidnap fears 
grow for 
two Britons 

Fears were growing yester- 
day that two British teachers 
missing in Beirut may have 
been kidnapped. The British 
Embassy 53id its efforts to 
locate them tad produced no 
dues. 

Mr Leigh Douglas, aged 34. 
a teacher at the American 
University of Beirut, and Mr 
Philip Padfield. aged 40, direc- 
tor of foe city’s International 
Language Centre, were last 
seen on Friday night leaving a 
public house 

Fears for Britons, page 5 



wz 


v ,4 




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1 


HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


County Hall 
‘to go to top 
bidder’ in 
massive deal 

By Hugh Clayton, Environment Correspondent 


w — ''Ml' - ! ''.v* &}. ; f/« V-v-." s-T*’"' 


IntfS 






WMm: 


The sale of County Hall, 
until last Tuesday the head- 
quarters of the Greater Lon- 
don Council, will be the 
biggest single property deal 
ever in Britain, the new owner 
of the building said yesterday. 

Sir Godfrey (Tag) Taylor, 
chairman of the London Re- 
siduary Body, which now 
owns County Hall, said: “It is 
a unique site worldwide.” 

.Although demolition “must 
be a possibility”, the famous 
frontage that faces the Houses 
of Parliament across West- 
minster Bridge was protected 
by listing as a historic 
building. 

Sir Godfrey said the aim 
was to secure a sale of the 
building as one unit, with its 
1.200 'rooms. 1.2 million 
square feet of usable space and 
live miles of mainly panelled 
corridors. There is also Ihe 
lofty council chamber with its 
. throne-like chairman's seaL 
. County Hall is the largest 
and most expensive of the 
8.000 properties all over the 
capital which Sir Godfrey's 
quango has inherited from the 
"GLC. Many GLC buildings 
have been transferred to bor- 
ough councils, but the Residu- 
ary Body is expected to sell 
. about 4.000. including many 
freeholds. 

The buildings include office 
. blocks and shops, and tracts of 
land sometimes bought years 
ago to allow widening of roads 
that were never were widened. 

. Some of the properties were 
inherited from Middlesex 
County Council when the 

- GLC was created 22 years ago. 

The freeholds include ibe 
award-winning shopping mail 
in old Covent Garden and the 
Shell centre near County Hall. 

The residuary quango has 

- become a substantial ratepay- 
er and will soon face a bill for 
well over £3 million from the 
Labour-led Lambeth Borough 
Counci' for rates on County 
Hall and the former GLC 
office blocks between it and 
York Road. 

Lambeth, as a council that 


has inherited planning powers 
from the GLC. will also have a 
say in deciding the late of 
County Hall next year. 

The building cannot be sold 
until a new headquarters bas 
been found for the Inner 
London Education Authority, 
which still occupies it 

Arts play on 
without GLC 

The arts will not suffer 
financially because of the 
abolition of the GLC and 
metropolitan councils, the 
Arts Council claimed yester- 
day (David Hewson writes). 
Extra funds ftom the council, 
local authorities and regional 
arts associations will meet the 
overall sum given to the arts 
by the abolished bodies Sir 
William Rees-Mogg. Arts 
Council chairman, said. 

But the effects will vary, 
with some parts of the North 
belter off (ban before and 
others, notably Merseyside, 
probably worse olf. 

In London the council has 
joined forces with the City of 
Westminster to secure 
£4.7 million to replace GLC 
grants for the National The- 
atre. the English National 
Opera, the London Festival 
Ballet and London Orchestras. 

The ENO. the National 
Theatre and the LFB will also 
receive 4 per cent increases in 
their general Arts Council 
grants. Mr Luke Rittner. the 
council's secretary general, 
said that the prospects lor arts 
funding after abolition were 
now much less bleak than they 
appeared a few months ago. 

The settlement, still under 
negotiation, should guarantee 
the future of companies which 
relied on the abolished bodies 
for their survival. According 
to the Arts Council these 
include the threatened 
Sadler's Wells and Almeida 
theatres. 

The new South Bank board, 
which will run the South Bank 
arts complex in London, is to 
receive £8.75 million. 




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The postcard view from County Hall, former home of the Greater London Council, across the Thames to Westminster (Photograph: Bill Warhurst) 




Hjaj* 



moves start over GLC cash 


By Our Environ meot 
Correspondent 

The quango left to wind up 
the business of the Greater 
London Council has called for 
legal advice about the destina- 
tion of the “absent millions" 
that were signed away by the 
council in its final hours. 

Sir Godfrey Taylor, chair- 
man of the London Residuary 
Body, said yesterday:“We are 
taking legal advice about the 
whole of the package. We 
would hope to have it by 
Monday.” 

At least £80 million is in- 
volved in the legal complica- 
tions that have interrupted its 
disbursement to the London 
boroughs and voluntary orga- 
nizations chosen by the GLC. 
There are two key legal points 
in dispute, and at least one is 
likely to be resolved when 
judgement on a GLC appeal is 
delivered by the Lords next 
week. 

The first point is whether 
the GLC. which no longer 
exists, had the power to 
allocate money for spending 
as it wished after it had been 
abolished. The second is 
whether the council had the 
power to allocate money to 
only some of the 32 London 
boroughs instead ofletting the 
residuary body pay it to all of 
them. 

A total of £7S million was 


paid with two cheques last 
week to Salman Develop- 
ments, a company formed to 
continue GLC housing reno- 
vation work in the boroughs. 

All of the contracts for 
which the money is destined 
were settled by the GLC in its 
final hours, and the job of 
Salman is to hand it out to the 
organizations chosen by the 
council. 


But Sat man has agreed for 
legal reasons to pay nothing 
for a month to allow time for 
legal challenges to the GLCs 
decision not to pay money to 
every borough. The money 

S id to Sat man includes about 
7 million which the GLC 
tried to band to the Inner 
London Education Authority 
until the payment was blocked 
in court It also indudes 





Mr Idris Pearce (left) and Sir Godfrey Taylor, who will de- 
cide the future of County Hall 


£16 million on which a court 
challenge by Conservative-led 
London boroughs was with- 
drawn last month. 

The fete of a further 
£25 million earmarked by the 
GLC to voluntary “umbrella” 
groups and not paid to Satman 
depends on the forthcoming 
Lords judgement At least 
£14 million more has been 
frozen by an injunction given 
in the GLCs final hours to 
Conservative-controlled 
Westminster City Council. 

In spite of the last-minute 
spending derisions of the 
GLC, London will escape the 
steep rate increases being im- 
posed in many of the shire 
authorities. But the rate bar- 
gains do not apply in areas 
where county councils were 
abolished on Monday. The 
latest figures from the Rating 
and Valuation Association 
show an average increase in 
England and Wales of 1 3 per- 
cent for the coming year 
compared with 8 per cent in 
1985. 

Inner London has scored a 
rate cut of 21.8 per cent, part- 
ly thanks to the impact of 
ratecapping. The average in- 
crease in the metropolitan 
districts, which used to be 
covered by the abolished La- 
bour-led county councils, will 
be 16 per cent. 


; 

COUNCIL 

% 

CakJerdale 

+37 

Cumbria 

+38 

Cambs 

+33 

Bucks 

+30 

Rochdale 

+30 

Kirklees 

+29 

Bradford 

+28 

Oxon 

+28 

Avon 

+28 

Laics 

+27 

Somerset 

+27 

Wilts 

+26 

Gateshead 

+25 

S. Glamorgan 

+24 

Rotherham 

+24 

Nth mb land 

+23 

Herts 

+22 

Lines 

+22 

Cornwall 

+20 

Sartdwell 

+20 

Devon 

+20 

Dorset 

+20 

EL Sussex 

+20 

Lot Wight 

+20 

Warks 

+20 

Sheffield 

+18 

Solihull 

+17 

Liverpool 

+15 

Birmingham 

Hampshire 

+15 

+1S 

Dyfed 

+15 

Powys 

+15 

Surrey 

Aberdeen 

+12 

+10 

Glasgow- 

+5 

Edinburgh 

+5 

Newcastle 

+2 

Lndn Sutton 

+2 

“ Brent 

0 

" Enfield 

0 

“City 

" Westminster 

0 

-1 

" Harrow 

-2 

" Kingston 

■3 

" Bromley 

-6 

“ Haringey 

-10 

" Hackney 

-11 

” Hammersmith 
" Kensington 

-15 

& Chelsea 

-28 

1 


Maxwell’s 
papers in 
production 

The dispute which stopped 
production of the Sunday 
Mail and Daily Record, 
Scotland's biggest selling daily 
newspaper, for three weeks, 
was settled yesterday. 

The l .000 workers who 
were dismissed at Mr Robert 
Maxwell's publishing plant at 
Andeiston Quay, Glasgow, 
were back at work last night. 

The deal reached between 
Mr Maxwell and leaders of 
Sogat ’82, the NGA and the 
NUJ, was accepted by the 
workforce in Glasgow. 

Month-long talks are to be 
held on the ftiture of the two 
newspapers. All workers who 
were dismissed will be rein- 
stated and there is a guarantee 
of no compulsory redundan- 
cies. Other key points in the 
agreement were acceptance of 
a nine-day fortnight instead of 
a four-day working week, with 
no more than 25 per cent 
redundancy in any one 
department. 

O Raymond Farrell, aged 30. 
a painter and decorator of 
Griuon House. Bethnal 
Green, was fined £40 by 
Thames magistrates yesterday 
after he admitted obstructing 
the highway near the News 
International plant in 
Wapping. east London. 


Tory plea 
for end to 
drink laws 

Abolition of the licensing 
laws, allowing advertising on 
the BBC and scrapping the 
licence fee, were among prom- 
ises called to be included in the 
next Conservative election 
manifesto by the Federation of 
Conservative Students yester- 
day. . 

The sale of the Post Office 
and privatization of coat, elec- 
tricity and rail were also 
among the package of mea- 
sures proposed in the 
federation's version of the 
Conservative Manifesto 1987. 
published on Ihe opening day 
of the annual conference at 
Scarborough. 

It calls for promises to bring 
inflation down to zero and 
income tax down to 20p; to 
reform the tax system with the 
purpose of introducing a single 
flat rale of income tax; to 
establish a personal retire- 
ment account into which tax- 
free funds can be paid towards 
private pensions: to raise VAT 
thresholds; to provide tax 
relief for private health care 
and to end the unequal tax 
treatment of women. 

H'r/Af People (Federation of 
Conservative Students. 32 
Smith Square. London SWIP 
3HH.J 


The oil price fall 


Aberdeen fears end of the North Sea booi 


wPhiOips 

ihl V s .UPP' -o 

Bleretock House 

IMPRESSIONIST & MODERN 
CONTINENTAL PAINTINGS 
Monday 23 June at 11 am and 
MODERN BRITISH PAINTINGS 
Tuesday 17 June at 11 am 



We are currently accepting pictures for inclusion in both 
these sales For further information, please contact ioachim 
Pissarro or Arda Kassabian ' Impressionist & Modern 
Continental Faintingsi or James la rr.es -Crook (Modem 
British Paintings) 

■ BIcrhoTO Slrcv* \wEon>{;iicri Lv-rdon IV I > u.AS Tel 

LONDON (TO NEW VOKC GENEVA BRUSSELS 


By Ronald Faux 

Four drilling rigs He idle in 
Aberdeen Bay marking the 
ominous calm that has fallen 
on the North Sea exploration 
programme. A drop in the 
price of crude oil has sent a 
detectable shudder through 
the oil capital of Europe. 

A0 the main oil companies 
have announced cuts in their 
drilling programmes amount- 
ing to many millions of dol- 
lars. Those are bound to work 
through the system and even- 
tually reduce the demand for 
the services Aberdeen has 
become expen at providing. 

The most optimistic feeling 
in the city is that oil prices will 
have picked up again before 
the end of the summer, so that 
the city might not feel any 
severe effects from lost trade 
or lower demand. 

One Aberdeen trader said: 
"The impact is being felt by 
the oil industry, not by us at 
the moment.” 

North Sea oil reaches its 
peak production this year with 
42 platforms off the east coast 
pumping oil ashore for a much 
lower return. Mr Jim Hender- 
son, principal development 
officer with Grampian region, 
said that nearly all the plat- 
forms were producing oil at $5 
(about £3.30) a barrel or 
below. 

The BP Forties field, the 
first in the North Sea. was 
producing for S 1.50 a barrel. 

“They will keep producing 
and as long as that happens a 



A.pf*q* cnca a 4‘ pitai par gaum 


strong service industry will be 
required,” he said. 

Although the future drilling 
programme had virtually col- 
lapsed - an event that could 
ultimately delay the develop- 
ment of maigmal fields - 36 
drilling rigs were still operat- 
ing in the North Sea, three 
more than last year, he added. 

“There have been minor 
cutbacks by the drilling com- 
panies onshore and the supply 
side that have cost about 500 
jobs, but there are about 
22.000 employed offshore and 
of those only 40 per cent live 
in the Grampian region. 

"As the oil prices firm up at 
a lower level I think the 
service companies might start 
making themselves leaner as 
the effect filters down to them. 

“It may be that fewer staff 
are replaced and operations 
rationalized, but it is hard to 
believe that the pressure for a 
higher oil price will not have 
an impact," he said. 

Grampian calculated before 
the drop in the oil price that 
the oil companies were plan- 
ning to invest £35 billion over 
the next 10 years in 34 North 


Sea fields, of which probably 1 
no more than 14 would have 
manned platforms. 

Unless there was some gov- 
ernment incentive to continue 
the programme, the fear was 
that many of those plans 
would be postponed. That 
would have an impact on the 
design, fabrication and light 
engineering services provided 
by the region. 

The shift from large produc- 
tion platforms to subsea or 
floating systems has cast a 
shadow over the fabrication 
yards in the north of Scotland 
where competition is severe 
and where demand could be 
affected by the lower oil price. 

The specialists are having to 


compete not only 'with one 
another but as the size of the 
structures diminishes, con- 
ventional shipbuilding yards 
throughout Britain are.abie to 
bid for work. 

w 

Local authority leaders in 
the north of Scotland said 
yesterday that they feared the 
cut in oil prices would mean 
less work for the fabrication 
yards in the Highlands, mak- 
ing a severe unemployment 
problem even worse. 

In Aberdeen, however, Mr 
Henderson was optimistic 
about the long-term future. 

Aberdeen and Grampian 
region host 150 foreign com- 
panies, 120 of them Ameri- 


cans, on the United Kingdom 
register. Some have grown to 
be bigger than their American 
parents and one has moved its 
world headquarters to Aber- 
deen. 

Although the high wages 
and inflationary effects of 
North Sea oil have kept other 
new industries out of the city, 
Aberdeen remains an impor- 
tant fishing port and retains a 
bedrock of sound traditional 
industries. 

Unemployment is less than 
8 per cent, industrial estates 
and new hotels have mush- 
roomed on the city outskirts, 
and Aberdeen airport is one of 
the busiest in Europe. 


Cheaper coal for power stations 


The sharp drop in oil prices 
has forced the coal board to cut 
the cost of its supplies to 
several power stations and to 
beppn negotiating new general 
pricing agreements with the 
Central Electricity Generating 
Board. 

However, the NCB said 
yesterday there was no evi- 
dence that its customers were 
switching from coal to cheaper 
oil and no immediate prospect 
of mounting stocks of unwant- 
ed coal. 

The CEGB, by for the coal 
board's biggest customer, con- 
finned that it had not used its 
capacity to switch fuel sup- 
plies and there had been no 


By Gavin Bell 

reduction In its purchases of 
coal. 

An NCB spokesman said 
the initial foil in oil prices id 
mid-February had resulted In 
local price adjustments, in 
agreement with the CEGB, 
affecting individual power 
stations. 

At about the same time the 
two boards began discussions 
on general pricing arrange- 
ments and it was hoped an 
agreement could be worked out 
soon, be said. 

“It is important to take 
account of the uncertainty id 
the oil market, but equally we 
should not be pushed or 
panicked into any imprudent 
action. The aim is to reach a 


sensible agreement, taking the 
longer view, in the interests of 
both our industries and of the 
consumers,” the spokesman 
said. 

The last general price in- 
crease, which took effect last 
November, was less than the 
rate of inflation for the. fifth 
consecutive year. The NCB 
could not assess bow its 
income would be affected, but 
so for H was stfll on coarse for 
its target of reaching break- 
even point by March 1988. 

The CEGB buys about two- 
thirds of NCB production, 
which is expected to be about 
90 million tonnes per annum 
during the next five years; 


Call for 
ban on 
violent 
students 

• From Lucy Hodges 

Education Correspondent 

Scarborough 

Children who commit seri- 
ous offences at school, and 
who abuse or assault teachers, 
should be expelled and put in „ 
an educational establishment < 
elsewhere, the conference of 
the second biggest teachers' 
union in Scarborough was told 
yesterday . 

In an emotional debate on 
violence in schools, directed 
specifically at the Poundswick 
High School affair in Man- 
chester, the National .Associa- 
tion of Schoolmasters/Union 

of Women Teachers voted 
unanimously to condemn lo- 
cal authorities who insist that 
abusive and violent pupils 
should return to the same 
school 

There were two standing 
ovations for IS NAS/UWT 
members from Manchester. A 
who have been refusing to 
teach errant pupils for the past 
six months. As a result they 
hare been sent home with no 
pay. 

Mr Michael Inman, the 
union's president announced 
afterwards that there would be 
a national rally in support of 
the Poundswick staff on May 
4 in Manchester. There will 
also be a rolling programme of 
lightning strike action in 
Manchester’s schools in the 
first half of next term. 

The teachers' salaries are 
being met by the union at a 
cost of£Z500 a week. 

Moving yesterday’s motion, 

Mr John Hughes, of Bexley, 
said: "You can hardly expect 
that a teacher who has been so 
abused should have any of 
those pupils in school again.” 
Referring to a survey of 
pupil violence carried out by 
his union last week, Mr 
Hughes said that verbal abuse 
and physical attacks era teach- 
ers were on the increase. 

A teacher from a boys' 
secondary school in South- 
ampton in the survey said that 
during the past 14 years he had 
been assaulted seven times. 

Miss Orris El wood, the 
union representative at 
Poundswick. said her mem- 
bers would "stick to their 
guns” because the issue was so 6 
fundamental to standards in 
education. 

A motion proposing that 
examinations should no long- 
er be exempt from industrial 
action was postponed for fur- 
ther debate today. It was 
moved yesterday by Mr .lan 
Draper, . from -Northampton- 
shire, who said that 10 out of 
13 NAS/UWT members had 
left the union at his school 
because of the recent Acas 
settlement 


Petrol set for 
further fall 
in pump price 

Continued from page 1 

leading to a steady foil in 
pump prices. 

Oil companies yesterday de- 
scribed the immediate situa- 
tion as very volatile and 
confused, and a spokesman for 
the 130 cut-price Jet garages 
said; “We are waiting to see 
what happens to the current 
situation while the level of 
stocks works its way through 
the system.” 

But across the industry 
expectations were for further 
price reductions. 

A survey of petrol prices by 
the Automobile Association 
yesterday showed that Britain 
has some of the cheapest 
petrol in Europe, with only 
West Germany, Luxembourg, 
and Yugoslavia significantly 
lower. 

Within the Britain, petrol 
costs varied from 159p in the 
West Country to 19Sp in the 
H ig hland s . The regional aver- 
ages for four-star were 171p in 
the West Country, 173p ia the 
North, I76p in the Midhinds, 
176L5p.m the South-east, and 
179.5p in ScothmdL - 


Sikhs battle for the temples 


Sikh extremism in Britain, 
which has dogged Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, the Foreign Secretary, 
during his present tour of 
India, is rooted in deep divi- 
sions over ihe issue of inde- 
pendence for their “home 
country"’- Khalistan. Its chief 
battleground is for the control 
of the Gurdwaras. the Sikh 
temples. 

Although Sir Geoffrey has 
made several significant con- 
cessions 10 Indian govern- 
ment concern, he has virtuallv 
ruled out the possibility of a 
new extradition treaty with 
India to deal with militant 
Sikh separatists. 

The divisions in the British 
Sikh community will re- 
emerge later this month in a 
High Court battle between 
moderates and extremists for 
control of one of the biggest 
temples in Britain. 

No one knows the exact 
number of Sikhs in Britain. 
The Office of Population and 
Census Surveys gives an esti- 
mated figure of 1 75.000. while 
the Indian High Commission 
estimates 210,000. Sikhs put 
the figure at about 200.000. 

Most arc concentrated in 
west London around Ealing, 
especially Southall, and in the 


By Richard Dowden 

Midlands in Birmingham. 
Coventry. Wolverhampton. 
Derby, and Leicester. 

The split within the com- 
munity opened up after the 
attack on the temple of Amrit- 
sar in 1 984 and the assassina- 
tion of Mrs Indira Gandhi 
later that year when some 
Sikhs danced in the streets of 
Britain to celebrate her death. 

There are about 2.000 tem- 
ples serving the Sikh commu- 
nity in Britain but only 60 of 
those are large enough to be 
politically significant. Thirty- 
two of those are said to be in 
ihe hands of the "extremists”, 
that is militantiy supporting 
an independent Khalistan. 

Since the Sikh community 
shares a common meal at the 
Gurdwaras after the Sunday 
religious service, to symbolize 
unity, any faction which con- 
trols the temple and its com- 
mon ftind has considerable 
influence in the community. 

In two weeks the High 
Court in London is to hear a 
case between the moderates 
and extremists over the Guru 
Singh Sabha temple in Have- 
lock Road. Southall one of 
the biggest in Britain, at 


present controlled by the 
extremists. 

Dr Jagjit Singh Chauhan. 
the most prominent of the 
Khalistan independence sup- 
porters in Britain, said yester- 
day that some of the previous 
Gurdwaras management com- 
mittee tried to suppress the 
opinion of the majority and 
were voted out. 

However, Mr P S Khabra. 
of the Indian Workers’ Associ- 
ation. said that there have 
never been any elections for 
management committees of 
the Gurdwaras in recent years 
but that many of them have 
been physically taken over by 
what he described as thuggish 
elements of the All India Sikh 
Students Federation. 

There have been serious 
clashes in Britain between the 
two groups and the many 
factions within them. Three 
moderate leaders have been 
shoL one killed, and the 
Indian government has been 
angered by the lack of action 
by the British Government 
against the extremists. 

But the British Government 
argues that it will not take 
action unless British law is 
broken. 


Loyalists in 
attacks on 
police homes 

Continued from page 1 
turned on the police in their 
homes where they are at their 
most vulnerable. 

A young police reservist 
recovering in hospital was 
described as “well” after being 
shot in the back in his home in 
North Belfast early yesterday. 
Loyalists also fired at police 
officers conducting a follow- 
up search. 

Shots were fired at the home 
of a reservist in 
Newtownabbey but no one 
was injured. In the Shankill 
Road area of Belfast, the son. 
aged five, of a reservist es- 
caped injury when loyalists 
hurled a petrol bomb through 
a bedroom window, causing 
extensive damage to the house 
which he had recently put up 
for sale. 

Another police officer's 
home near by was petrol 
bombed 

Mr Martin Gillespie, a 
neighbour of one of the offi- 
cers. said that the police were 
Protestants in RUC uniform, 
and os they had opened up on 
Protestants, loyalists had a 
right to retaliate. 

RUC challenge, page 12 



Clydesdale Bank PLC 


HOUSE 

MORTGAGE 

RATE 


Clydesdale Bank PLC 
announces that with effect from 
Thursday 3rd April 1986 it’s 
House Mortgage Rate is being 
reduced to 12.25% per annum. 






THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


HOME NEWS 


3 



‘ii >£1*^. V.* . ' . ir . i j .. ‘ 




after divorce far from 
adequate, report says 


ByFnnccsGil^l^AIlid^ 

m5?SS? l iSLS V ? t ? n ir I S r " M* 5 * Maraaret Southwell, cent ofcases; roughly the 
of the the research says every same figures as for divorcing 

so ran- iSfLvSSI? T* 31- ® 7 ’0® cbndren under 16 couples with no young chil- 

5U per cent of cases with mad- " . ko 


equate, if any, maintenance 
awarded for them and the 
former wives, according to a 
new survey of divorce 
settlements. 

It shows tbalcoDtrary to the 
principle that, the custodian 
it should remain in the 


divorce. 

In the survey, maintenance 
was ordered for the children in 
73 per cent of decided cases, 
and was more frequent where 
the children were under 10 
years old. Bui the sums award- 

. . : ed 1 were only -adequate to 

. ™e children, half cover their needs in 35 per- 

the children m more than 100 cent ofcases. ... ^ 


settlements had lo move out 
usually because the house -was 
sold. 

Awards for children, al- 
though frequent, were often 
inadequate to cover the costs 
of the children as determined 
by the National Foster Care 
Association, the survey, says. . 

It also shows that in spite of 
the belief dial former wives 
often receive over-generous 
maintenance awards, the 
sums ordered for wives with 
dependent children were un- 
likely to cover their expenses. 

The survey, published in 
the Solicitors' Journal, was 
conducted at Leeds Universi- 
ty on the basis of 105 settle- 
ments negotiated by solicitors 
locally for divorcing couples 
who owned their own homes. . 


Where the former wife had 
custody - which happens in 

87 per cent of divorces - 

mainte nance was ordered for 
berm 37 per cent of cases, the 
survey shows. Such mothers 
were no more likely to get an 
order for maintenance where 
the house was sold than if they 
stayed in the home. 

The sums ordered were 
unlikely to cover the former 
wives’ expenses. Few custodi- 
an mothers were fully com- 
pensated for the loss of or 
reduction in earning capacity 
resulting from their child care, 
duties, and most received no 
compensation at aJL 

The matrimonial home was 
sold in 32 per cent of cases, 
with one parent remaining in 
occupation in nearly 70 per- 


dren. 

The presence of children 
was therefore not a significant 
factor in the sale of the home. 

The separation of parents is 
a traumatic experience, the 
article says, and judicial prac- 
tice is supposed to allow the 
custodian parent to stay in the 
home with the children. Such 
practice does not apply in 
many cases, according to the 
findings. 

Custody was an important 
factor in deckling which party, 
should remain in the home, 
but the value of the borne was 
another factor. 

The higher the value, the 
more likely tie former hus- 
band was to remain, which 
conflicts with the principle 
that children’s need should be 
paramount, the article says. 

The survey was based on 
settlements mostly reached 
between June 1983 and June 
1984, before the new Matri- 
monial and Family Proceed- 
ings Act 1984 which says first 
consideration should be given 
to the welfare of children. 


BBC aims 
for world 
TV service 

By David Hewson 
Arts Correspondent 

The BBC is to attempt to set 
up a a television version of the 
World Service, producing one 
or two 30-minute news and 
current affairs programmes 
daily. 

The service would be of- 
fered to foreign broadcasters 
and carried on BBC 2. Televi- 
sion Centre and External Ser- 
vices have been considering a 
television version of the popu- 
lar foreign radio service for 
some time, and recently deliv- 
ered a working party report to 
Mr Alasdair Mflne, director 
generaL 

Mr Austen Karic, managing 
director of BBC external 
broadcasting, -said: “We. be- 
lieve that the BBC is mnquely 
placed to provide such - .; a 
service, given iti> uuiiyafled 
reputation worldwide together 
with the professional and; 
editorial skills available in 
both External Services and the 
television service. •' "• : “ “ 

“We also believe that a start 
has to be made if Britain is to 

remain in the forefront of 
international broa d c astin g." 

The project team is due to 
report in' August, and has yet 
to decide how the service 
would be distributed or broad- 
cast. The Independent Broad- 
casting Authority, advertised 
yesterday for contractors for 
three television services by 
direct broadcast satellite. The 
would-be franchise holders 
must apply before August 29. 

The winners are doe to be 
announced before the end of 
the year. The IBA hopes the 
services will be on the air by 
1990. The advertisements fol- 
low the failure of the BBC and 
I TV companies to launch a 
DBS venture. 


Crossroads 
actor banned 

Harry Nurmi, who plays an 
Australian barman in Cross- 
roads, the independent televi- 
sion soap opera, was fined 
£200 and banned from driving 
for 15 months by Marlbor- 
ough Street magistrates yester- 
day after be admitted driving 
while over the legal alcohol 
limit in Soho in February. 

Nurmi, aged 25, of Oakland 
Road, Moseley, Birmingham, 
was also fined £50 for jumping 
bail and given an absolute 
discharge for driving without 
a licence. He said after the 
hearing that the ban would not 
affect his part in Crossroads. 

Drivers saved 

Royal Automobile Club pa- 
trols rescued more than 
600,000 stranded dnyers be- 
tween last October and Febru- 
ary. 36,000 more than in me 
iod a year ago, om- 


Labour to control 
alcohol adverts 


. ByRichard Evans, Lobby Reporter 
. Alcohol and tobacco adver- 0 f alcohol am i medicines, 
tisemeots wifi free legal con- 
trols from 


a fixture Labour 
government, as wifi those that 
portray women in a 
“degrading” fashion. 

The charter for consumers, 
launched at a Fulham by- 
election press conference yes- 
terday, was immediately 
con donned by the advdtising 
industry as an unnecessary 
“puritans charter". 

The Labour document says 
that far too ' many 
advertisments give a false 
impression and carry little or 
no relevant information, with 
women portrayed too fre- 
quently in a degrading 
fashion. ■ • 

■' It therefore proposes a stat- 
utory codeof advertising prac- 
tice to ''replace', the; existing 
“inadequate" - setfregulatory 
^system. Thc code ^ould.re- 
quire advertisements to be 
^truthful and seek to discour- 
age. “the degrading , or sexist 
portrayal of women”. 

• 'Advertisements' 'deemed 
sexist would- include those 
where women were u»d al- 
though they were were not 
relevant to the product* 

- The Labour blueprint also 
proposes: 

• A ban on tobacco advertis- 
ing except where it is sold. 

• Strict control of advertising 


Corrective advertising — 
with advertisers having to pay 
for space of equal prominence 
to an original advertisement 
found lo be misleading. 

Mr David Harris, of the 
Advertising Association, said 
yesterday that the industry 
had taken steps to halt the 
irrelevant use of scantily clad 
women in advertisements. 
“Things are changing but 
advertisers have to keep a 
balance between not upsetting 
progressive, younger women 
and keeping faith with the 
older, traditional type of 
woman.” 

He predicted that if the 
Labour proposals come into 
force it would result in boring 
advertisments.' “I would imag- 
ine you would have nothing 
butproductshotsand women 
would hanefly appear- Adver- 
tisers might' be tempted just 
not to put women In adverts 
for risk, or ending up in court." 
. Miss Judie Lannon, of the J 
Walter Thompson adverising 
agency, said sexism was in the 
eye of the beholder and while 
feminist groups complained 
about the portrayal of women 
in the kitchen other women 
did not believe it was degrad- 
ing. Most people did not find 
existing advertisments offen- 
sive to women. 


Scepticism 
bii comet 
virus idea 

By Pearce Wright 
Science Editor • 

The theory that viruses from 
ma tte are a source of unex- 
plained epidemics of viral and 
bacterial Alnesses had a mixed 
reaction yesterday. 

The idea is proposed by two 
emin ent astronomers, Profes- 
sor Chandra Wickramasanghe 
and Sir Fred Hoyle, and an 
epidemiologist. Dr John Wat- 
kins. 

An noticeable aspect of the 
reaction to such a startling 
theory was the unusual reluc- 
tance of fellow astronomers to 
give an opinion for the record. 

But a lea«lS®g authority on 
the struc ture ®f virises, Dr 


at the National Institute for 
Medical Research, said: “I do 
not anyone knows 

enough to say ^equivocally 
what theorigm (of viruses) is.” 

There is a strong!y4ieH 
view that they mav:be 
dements that „ 
the break-up of cells. 

Dr SkeheJ fealieved “it was 
an unnecessary add itiona l pro- 
posal to make a jump mto 
space to took for an explana- 
tion for some bouts of illness 
that lacked a classic epideinio- 


Welsh job 
scheme ‘is 
success 9 

By Gavin Bell 

A scheme to reduce unem- 
ployment and increase partici- 
pation in sport in Wales has 
been a success in its first year, 
according to an independent 
study. 

The report on Operation 
Sport was published yester- 
day, only a few days after 
plans were announced for a 
similar ,- but larger, project in 
England. 

The Welsh venture, run by 
the Sports Council with the 
Manpower Services Commis- 
sion, and launched in March 
1984. provided 171 places for 
unemployed people to initiate 
and supervise sports sessions. 

Research by the Policy 
Studies Institute found that 59 
out of 226 people employed in 
the scheme during its first year 

had found other jobs. Mr 
Malcolm Riga, who produced 
the report, said: “It confirmed 
the view that if you have a job, 
it’s easier to get another one.” 

On Monday the British 
Sports Council approved a 
scheme called Action Sport to 
he run on similar lines in 
London, the South-west and 
Yorkshire and Humberside. 
About 400 people will be 
employed initially 


SySterK I logical explamtion . | employed initially* 

rlasgow aims at tourist market 

" ... . ^ ■ imet Dfivt vear to the Gt 


e is a sporting chance 
lasgow will be snHHig 
Bve tourist rite in the 
a the 1990s, Mr Aina 
mr, chairman or 
h Tourist Board, said 

iv 

vag a butterfly garden 
city, Mr Deveremu 
me to make a negative 
predicted that 


Glasgow’s international repn- 
frtiim has been concentrated 
more on industrial dereficti A 
the oty has cleared itself of 


nan ubuy _ . 

Tte tourist board thought 
Mr Deverenx was tmderimiug 

J .U IffliiuweHiMltfi 


Hd not not name 


but he saw nothing 
rt the prospect of tne 
Iling Paris, Rome or 

f&es art nor atone 
he dtfs gtorifr at- 
«s and although 


Domesday 
Book is 
bound 
to please 

By Alan Hamilton 

The Domesday Book, re- 
bound into five volumes in- 
stead of its original two, goes 
an display at the Public 
Record Office in Loudon for 
the summer from today as part 
of the celebrations to mark the 
900th anniversary of its 
compilation. 

Encased in a steel security 
cage at the Public Record 
Office branch at Kew, restor- 
ers and bookbinders have been 
working for several months 
replacing the previous bind- 
ing, applied in 1952, which has 
foiled to stand np to the 
attentions of scholars leafing 
through the sheepskin parch- 
ment pages. Every page has 
also bean photographed for 
the production of a fall-colour 
facsimile edition to go on sale 
soon at a cost of £L5©0. 

King William’s survey of his 
newly-conquered land is treat- 
ed with reverence by the 
Public Record Office, who 
took after it with greater care 
than in the days when its 
covers were food for worms in 
a below-stairs cupboard in tire 
chapter house at Westminster 
Abbey. 

Dr Geoffrey Martin, keeper 
of the public records, said at a 
preview iff the exhibition yes- 
terday: “There is no compara- 
ble record of such antiquity 
still in the beeping of the 
government which ordered it. 
It is as much a national 
monument as tire Tower of 
London.” 

Splitting Great Domesday, 
covering the majority of En- 
gland, and little Domesday, 
covering East Anglia, into live 
volumes was to make them 
easier to handle. Dr Martin 
explained. Bound into one 
volume. Great Doomsday is 
nearly nine inches thick. 

The exhibition, which por- 
trays life in eleventh-century 
England, also attempts to 
explain Domesday, essentially 



Edward Peters, aged II, from Sittingbonrne, Kent, with a 
page of the Domesday Book which traces his ancestry back 
to 1086 (Photograph: Tim Bishop). 


a survey rather than a full- 
scale census. Id keeping with 
latter-day bureaucratic prac- 
tice, all returns by the roving 
commissioners to the book's 
editors at Winchester had to 
be filled out in triplicate. 

It contains two million 
words, names 13,418 places, 
and values England at 
£73,000. It lists the country as 
having, among other classes of 
Saxon peasant, 109,230 vQ- 
leins, 28,235 slaves, 1,027 
priests. 16 beekeepers, and 
one female jester. It also 
records the Saxon equivalent 
of the Consumer Protection 
Act, in Chester. “Anyone who 
made bad beer was either put 
on the dong stool or paid four 


shillings the reeves." 

Widows who had unlawful 
sexual relations were punished 
with a fine of 100 shillings, 
although young girls commit- 
ting the same misdemeanour 
were let off more lightly. 
Breaches of planning regula- 
tions. such as building a fence 
too close to the road, also 
attracted a fine of 100 
shillings. 

Dr Martin hopes that the 
publicity over Domesday’s an- 
niversary will encourage origi- 
nal scholarly research into its 
compilation. “It is the work of 
one mind, but of several hands. 
We wonld like to know more of 
the various scribes who wrote 
it." 


Mother fears girl 
disappeared with 
person she knew 


il 


The mother of Sarah 
Harper, the missing school- 
girl. collapsed in grief after 
making an emotional appeal 
yesterday for the return of her 
daughter. 

Mrs Jackie Harper said: “If 
she is dead, at least she cannot 
be hurt any more. But we do 
hope she is alive." 

The gjri, aged 10. vanished 
from her home in Morley, 
West Yorkshire, last week 
after goi ng to a local shop for a 
loaf of bread and crisps. 

Mrs Harper, aged 26. was 


she would not. The last time 
she ran off and look the 
registration number of the car. 

“She would not go with 
someone she does not know. It 
is someone she knows, that is 
my feeling ... it is someone 
she knows. 

“I imagine someone from 
the area. 1 have always drilled 
it into her, if someone tries to 
take her, to scream and shout 
and kick and make as much 
noise as possible no matter 
what they offered." 

Mrs Harper sat between Det 


ere-. 

y ‘op- 
r n3 

s nd j n 
r ve to 

• ns ho 
i ey 
> ri- 

. cr 
i is , 


im 

m. 


iSv 

3 ) - fc 
ducting 
Briti: 
Kong 
i Ting 
*outh 


cradled in the arms of her Supi John Staimhorpe and her 
mother, Mrs Marlene Hopton, mother. 


-w 


Prop] 
if the 6 


aged 48. as she spoke publicly 
for the first time about her 
daughter's disappearance. She 
said Sarah would never have 
gone willingly with a stranger. 

After a press conference 
organized by the police. Mrs 
Harper buckled at the knees 
and had to be helped out by 
her mother and a member of 
the Salvation Army. 

In a shaky voice and clutch- 
ing a packet of paper tissues, 
Mrs Harper said: “She is one- 
third of my life. I just do not 
know what to say. I cannot 
remember a right lot to be 
honest. 1 just feel so guilty for 
sending her out, but she had 
been so many times." 

Mrs Harper said: “You just 
do not think. I just want her 
back. Even if she is dead, just 
pick up the telephone and tell 
us where the body is. 

“She would not go with 
someone strange, not willingly 


As she was helped from her 
seat. Mrs Harper turned back 
to reporters and said: “1 just 
want to thank everybody who 
have done everything. Please, 
whoever has got her, please 
bring her home." 

Mrs Harper is divorced 
from her daughter's father, 
Terry. She has another daugh- 
ter. Clare, aged nine, and a son 
David aged five. 

Hundreds of local people 
have helped police to scour 
the town, near Leeds, but no 
trace of Sarah has been found. 

Later. Mr Stainthorpe said 
he was now asking everyone in 
the Pee! Street area of Morley 
to try to recall where they were 
last Wednesday evening when 
the girl was abducted 
He said neighbours should 
write down or make a mental 
note of their movements for 
the police who would call to 
interview them. 


i ie tes id l.5( 

= r " hn list Ba. 
1 c ‘ a ! Mai? 


si ok 

sirs. 

** 

.£* 
-is 3? 

fs- 
a 


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entfon 
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MP acts on deaf mute 


An MP is hoping to change 
the taw after the jailing of a 
deaf mute last year. 

Mr Edward Leigh. Conser- 
vative MP for Gainsborough 
and Horn castle, plans to intro- 
duce a Bill under the 10- 
minute rule, amending the 
procedures for dealing with 
disabled people who are unfit 
to plead to charges. 


Glenn Pearson, aged 33, of 
Caistor. Lincolnshire, was 
jailed for a week and then 
moved to a menial hospital, 
where he spent two and a-half 
months, after appearing .at 
Lincoln Crown Court on a 
burglary charge. 

He was released after a 
campaign by local people. 


ft 


HARWICH 


HOOK OF HOLLAND 



TOU SAIL TO HOLLAND^ 
WE’LL GO DUTCH. 


host next year to the Garden 
Festival: an opera house and 
an immensely self-confident 
publicity campaign based on 
the slogan “Glasgow’s Miles 
Better”, which has stolen a 
much on its elegant ieigh- 
*- — the capital dty of] 


EcStirargh. 

Pnltodt park last MrDevereax’s forecast 
tiranoS raised an eyebrow or two 
3"»f. i^rtOQk arnona Edinburgh’s civic kad- 

eraTfe Lon! Provost,!* 
in John McKay, said that Glas- 
P^ta£. gpw had a bit to go in world 

,• w i-flst civ terms, although he adenoid- 

oty addicted to J Commerce, thought the claim I 
SS? pwpfe Mte* 1 a th ^lBll WMkl tepfctlSMimgh to 
. ■ . compete* 

matches. . • "ffee British Tourist Author- 

. Derertox’s predictions. 


Take two days off between now and 
June, and Sealink will take 50% off the 
cost of a return trip to Holland, 

Should you fancy a longer break of 
5 days, we'll give you an even larger 
discount, of up to 60%. 

The price, which starts at £58, in- 
cludes your cac two adults and two children. 

Once aboard, you'll hud Sealink 
ferries are the largest and most luxurious 
in operation across the North Sea. 

Something you'll appreciate as you 
ply between the bars, restaurants, cinemas 
and duty free supermarkets. 

For the more energetic, we 
recommend our discos, or should you 
fancy a flutter, the casinos. 


Whilst the less active can relax in the 
comfort of their own cabins. 

(These are available for a small extra 
re, as is the option of travelling first 


back again. Just remember to do it before 
the encl ofjune. 

We’d hate you to miss the boat 



When you arrive in Holland, you’ll 
find Amsterdam takes just over an hour 
by motorway. 

You can reach Brussels and its 
gastronomic delights in around two hours, 
while the Rhine Valley is also within 
comfortable smiting distance. 

Sealink have two crossings every day, 
in each direction. 

To take advantage of our generous 
offer, all we ask is that you sai 1 from 
Harwich to the Hook of Holland and 


[@551 


Send toHanvich-Hook i 
Fern,- Line, Sealink UK Limited, Parkesron 
Quay, Harwich. Essex CO 12 4SR. 

1 lolLnd & Beyond ’86 □ Hclio Holland '86 □ 
Mutomur Hofaibvs 86 D Mini-Breaks 86 D 


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WFRE FLEETS AHEAD. 




4 


HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


Mentally-ill 
children badly 
treated in some 
hospitals 


By Thomson Prentice 1 

Some disturbed children are 
wrongly detained in solitary' 
confinement in homes and 
others with serious psychiatric 
conditions are treated in adult 
hospital wards, according to a 
health service report pub- 
lished today. 

It says that some hospital 
units for adolescents are “little 
more than a repository for 
difficult patients". 

Teenagers suffering from 
mental illness, abnormal be- 
haviour and related problems 
have been subjected to physi- 
cal punishment and other 
. harsh measures and many 
become the victims of “buck 
passing" within the health and 
social sen ices. 

• The report, by the NHS 
Health Advisory Service, 
based on visits to health 
authorities last year, shows 
mutual suspicion aod lack of 
trust between health, social 
services and education depart- 
ments, where staff are often 
overworked and inadequately 
trained. 

It calls for wide-ranging 
changes in the care, treatment 
and management of such chil- 
dren. aged between 12 and 19. 

Adolescents requiring spe- 
cial care may suffer because 


Science Correspondent 

social workers with heavy 
caseloads give them low prior- 
ity. “Social workers should 
respect the rights of young 
people to be consulted in 
decisions about their future," 
the report says. 

“Infringement of individual 
liberty and legal rights , can 
easily occur in the pursuit of 
treatment and containment.” 

A "general national 
uncertainty" has led to low 
status being attached to many 
adolescent services. The in- 
vestigators found buildings ip 
poor repair, decoration “insti- 
tutional and shabby." equip- 
ment neglected and poor 
catering. 

Lack of privacy for visits 
and telephone calls and obser- 
vation without consent using 
two-way mirrors or video 
cameras, may all breach young 
people's rights, the report says. 

“Some disturbed adoles- 
cents find themselves placed 
in highly restrictive environ- 
ments. subjected at times to 
extremely rigorous forms of 
treatment.” 

Bridges Over Troubled R 'titers 
(NHS Health Advisory Service. 
Sutherland House, 29-37 Brigh- 
ton Road. Sutton, Surrey SM2 
SAN; £2.70). 


Problems with planning: 2 


Warehouse is an historic farmhouse’s neighbour 

. ... - • • * • in fell aiOT Mr 


One of the annerriug features 
of the town and country plan- 
ning system is the way it can 
creep op, unnoticed. Some- 
times, as Hugh Clayton, Envi- 
ronment Correspondent, 
reports in the second of three 
articles, nothing can be done 
about it. 


A photograph of Comer 
Farm shows a grassy lane and 
a rustic signpost with a great 
elm overshadowing every- 
thing else. The elm has long 
since disappeared, not 
through disease, but to make 
room for the bypasses and 
suburbs that now encircle the 
house. 

“It seems a hell of a sight, 
too easy for developers to get 
their own way," Mr John Wall 
said as he contemplated the 
scene which has replaced that 
in the 50-year-old photograph. 
The house is now isolated, a 
relic of the rural history of 
Hem el Hempstead where Mr 
Wall’s 500-year-old home is 
one of the oldest buildings. 

Mr WalL who lives in the 
house with his mother and 
Yobbo the cat, is bewildered 
by what the planning system is 
doing io his home. 

“I was at home with flu one 
afternoon and I heard an 
unusual noise," he explained. 
“There were these guys level- 
ling the ground on. 1 saw a 
chap at the end of the lane 
with a tape and another with a 
clipboard. 

“He said a fill! planning 
application had gone in a 
month before." 



ii .. I— ll— mmm 

Mr John Wall and heavy traffic passing his 500-year-old farmhouse (Photograph: Tim Bishop) 


When Mr Wall learnt what 
had been applied for he regis- 
tered an immediate objection, 
which was eventually over- 
ruled. The result of that 
rejection now looms behind 
his home. The old lane where 
he saw the tape and the 
clipboard 18 months ago has 
been turned into a wide 
approach road with its kerb 


about 15 feet from his watt. At 
the end of the new road a 
warehouse tbe size of a large 
hangar is being built 

The warehouse is to be the 
main distribution centre in 
southern England for consum- 
er goods that will have to be 
fetched and carried by con- 
voys of lorries. 

Mr Wall had hoped to have 


a wight limit placed on tbe 
lorries or a new approach road 
built along tbe edge of a sports 
field, near-by, away from his 
home. 

As a maintenance engineer 
on a low income he has no 
experience of. planning law 
and too little money to begin a 
case against his council, but be 
believes he has a good case 



makes a world of difference 



USA 

St Francis Place, a 4KJ unit rental apartment project fcy Taylor 
Wodremr of San Frandsco Inc no* under construction in downlcwn San 
Francisco Only JO minutes walk from the liiuncul dotrkt. and including retail, 
restaurant and office laci lilies Partners Thi Lincoln property Company. 


There is no easy road to success. Frank Taylor 
began in 1921, building his first pair of houses in 
Blackpool. 

A modest beginning which grew into what is 
now regarded as one of the finest worldwide con- 
struction, engineering and development companies. 

Working in all five continents. 

Taylor Woodrow are actively promoting 
the very best of modem technology, 
encouraging our expertise to develop 




its full potential, through free enterprise and teamwork. 

The success of this philosophy is amply demon- 
strated by the range and variety of projects, both 
large and small, in which Taylor Woodrow team 
workers are currently involved. 

The kind of teamwork that builds worldwide 
reputations. If you need help with a UK 
project, please contact Ted Page on 
01-575 4354 and for overseas, contact 
Bob Tippins on 01-997 6641. 


TAYLOR WOODROW 

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l the warehouse because 

oTthe effect of past vibration 
from vehicles that used the old 
lane. The new lorries will be 
larger and closer to his home. 

He walked round to the 
back where brick infilling has 
replaced the original wattle 
and daub between the oak 
struts and beams. 

“The wall here has started 


to fell out," Mr Wall said. “I 
am told it would all cost about 
ten grand to put right." 

He is afraid that the house 
win fell apart When the lorries 
start their deliveries to the 
new warehouse later in the 
year. "It has absolutely no 
foundations at all it is built 
on oak beams supported by a 
thm layer of rubble." 

As the house is officially 
listed as a Grade Two building 
of historic interest, Mr Wall 
called in English Heritage, the 
quango which looks after the 
listing of such buildings on 
behalf of ministers. 

The buildings are supposed 
to be protected against disrup- 
tion and damage, but there is 
no widespread agreement 
about the impact of vibration 
from p assi n g vehicles. 

“I am afraid there is not a 
lot we can do with an isolated 
listed building that is not of 
national importance," English 
Heritage said. 

Mr Wall said he then took 
legal advice, and was told that 
for a case to succeed he would 
probably have to wait for his 
home to collapse before he 
sued. 

“We are sitting here mind- 
ing our own business, and this 
comes along," Mr Wall said. 

“I don't want publicity, but 
I feel that things like this 
shonld not happen to 
anybody." 

Tomorrow. When pile-drivers 
arrive. 


Airlines cut cost 
of flights to US 

By Michael BaOy, Transport Editor 

Cuts of more than £70 are £100 which was to have been 
being offered in the cost of offered on normal eastbound 
flights across the Atlantic Atlantic feres, was abandoned 
during the next two months, yesterday after the British and 
in the wake of sliding oil US aviation bodies had re- 
prices. fused to authorize iL 

British Airways and British British Airways has been 
Caledonian are each offering a told by the Chinese govem- 
£288 “late saver" return to ment to slop carrying passen- 
New York, compared with a gets between Hong Kong and 
normal economy return of Peking, after giving permis- 
£362, and similar discounts sion to Cathay Pacific to 
are being offered by airlines in operate the route. BA will 
the United States until the end continue to operate its weekly 
of May. London-Hong Kong-Peking 

The £288 fere is £70 less service but without local pas- 
than the cheapest fere this sengers between the latter 
time last year. British Caledo- cities, 
nian said yesterday that weak- • Highland ; Express, which 
er oil prices, available plans to operate cheap flights 
capacity, and a strong pound from Scotland to North Amer- 
madethfeanattiactiyetimeto tea, announced yesterday that 
visit theJJS. VI I- - it' was postponing its launch 
The cuMnice airlines, Vir- date until next spring, 
gin Atlantic and People Ex- Mr Randolph Helds, its 
press, are offering returns of chairman^ said: “Both the US 
£258 (same-day booking) and arid Canadian markets show a 
! £266 respectively. steepdrop in bookings for this 

A further discount of about coating summer. * 


Teacher to 
retire over 
beating 

A teacher who was severely 
reprimanded for slapping a 
I pupil on a school holiday trip 
| is leaving the profession early 
because he claims his position 
has been made intolerable. 

Mr Ken Dorringion, aged 
59, a geography master, is to 
leave Ferndale Comprehen- 
sive School, Mid Glamorgan, 
in - July, five years before 
onnal retirement age. 

He Tnad e his decision 
known yesterday after it was 
disclosed that Mid Glamorgan 
Education Authority had 
made a £700 oulrof-coun 
award to a former pupil, 
! Jeffrey Davies, now aged 15, 

I after the incident during a 
visit to Majorca two years ago. 

The complaint was backed 
by the Society of Teachers 
Opposed to Physical 
Punishment. 

The boy claimed he was bit 
[about 15 times when mistak- 
[ enly thought to be misbehav- 
ing. But Mr Dorrington of 
Tonypandy, Mid Glamorgan, 
claimed he slapped tbe teen- 
ager fewer blows and twice 
apologized. 


Man went 
berserk in 
aircraft 

Passengers panicked when 
a man went berserk on board 
an aircraft flying between 
Manchester and Glasgow and 
tried to open the emergency 
exit and a rear door, a court 
was told on Tuesday. 

The man was subdued after 
a straggle with his police 
escort who had allowed him 
free of handcuffs to go to the 
lavatory. 

At Paisley Sheriff Court, 
John GaUacher, aged 36, ad- 
mitted acting recklessly and 
endangering an aircraft and 
passengers. He also admitted 
assaulting a policeman, an air 
hostess and a passenger. 

He was jailed for three 
months and fined £500. 

The court was told that 
GaUacher, who was a drug- 
taker, had been taken into 
custody after being found un- 
conscious by the roadside 
between Chester and his 
mother's home in Wallasey. 

1 He was being taken to 
Glasgow to lace a charge at 
Kilmarnock Sheriff Court 
when the incident occurred. 


British poultry leads 
rise in food exports 

By John Young y Agriculture Correspondent 

France, worth £517 million 
(up by 9 per cent); the United 
States, £496 million (up 
10 per cent); the Benelux 
countries, £427 million (down 
4 per cent) and West Germa- 
ny. £342 million- (up 23 per 
cent). 

• Frozen chickens from 
France, Denmark and West 
Germany have been found to 
fen short' of EEC regulations, 
according to the British Chick- 
en Information 

Servicc.lndependent tests 
showed substantial evidence 
of bruising and broken limbs 
in products reputed to be 
Grade A, and giblet packs 
contained lumps of fiat. 


British food and drink ex- 
last year were worth 
.1 billion, according to cus- 
toms and excise figures collat- 
ed by Food from Britain, the 
tarketing organization. 

Sales abroad rose by 9 per 
cent, discounting a drop in 
cereal exports because of the 
exceptionally poor harvest, 
Mr Brian Law, Food -from 
Britain's chief executive said. 

The fastest growing catego- 
ries were poultry (up by 40 per 
cent), beer (17 per cent), 
cakes, biscuits and confection- 
per cent), and smoked 
[fish (15 per cent). Tbe most 
important markets were 


Robber filmed again 

A man shown robbing a 
building society office in Shef- 
field on Cnmewatch on BBC ! 
last week has struck again at a 
building society near by. 

The man, who says be has a 
gun m bis plasuc bag, was 
filmed again b> a video cam- 


era on tus latest raid, on 
Tuesday. 

The police have released 
photographs, but be was wear- 
ing a mask. 

The robber is bebeved to 
have taken more than £9,000 
in six robbenes in Yorkshire. 











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THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 



found 


One of the world's most 
sought-after briefcases, the vo- 
luminous black bag with the 
gold initials R C which be- 
longed to the late Roberto 
Calvt, has reappeared here in 
the possession of a right-win g 
parliamentarian. 

The briefcase was last , 
known to have been taken by 
Calvi - on the eve of the 
spectacular collapse of his 
Banco Ambrosian o when be 
fled to London in June 1981 
A few days later his body was 
found hanging under Black- 
friars Bridge. 

But the famed briefcase, 
said at the dine to be bulging 
with secrets, with safe deposit 
keys and material usable for 
blackmail was nowhere to be 
found. 

Its contents were considered 
likely to throw light on wheth- 
er Calvi committed suicide or 
was murdered- It was also 
thought to contain documents 
dealing with his association 
with Michele Sindona. the 
other famous It alian bankrupt 

uilinrA L". ■ . 


Rome 

prison here on March 20 is 
ascribed to cyanide pn igrmin g. 

Senator Giorgio Pisano, of 
the right-wing Italian Social 
Movement, sard on Tuesday 
night that he had bought the 
briefcase from two unidenti- 
fied persons for 50 miffion lire 
(£21000). He allowed if to be 
~show n on television before 
mriutu' it over - to the 
investigators. 

Its' contents were emptied 
under the camera&;.They con- 
sisted of 23 keys, two Nicara- 
guan ' diplomatic passports, 
apparently for the use of Calvi 
and bis wife, a certificate of 
guarantee for a diamond, a 
postcard, of Milan Cathedral 


Three men who accompa- 
nied Calvi on his flight to 
London took part in the 
television programme. Signor 
Flavio Carbone and his assis- 
tant, Signor Emilio PeUicani, 
with Signor Silvano Vittor, 
described as a retired smug- 
gler, arranged Calvfs escape 
by way ofTriesle, Yugoslavia 
and Austria. 


some femfly photographs and 
some lettea,' three of which 


were addressed to prelates at 
the Vatican. 


Two of them, addressed to 
Cardinal Retro Palazzmi, are 
said to contain Chlyfs last 
pleas for help. The cardinal is 
head of the Sacred Congrega- 
tion, which deals with the 


whose death in a high-security ; can onizati on of saints. 


Signor Carbone confirmed 
that the briefcase was Calvi's 
and that the dead banker had 
it with him throughout their 
journey and during his stay in 
London. 

Senator Pisano takes a dif- 
ferent view. He has followed 
Calvi's career in detail because 
he was a member of the 
commission of inquiry into 
the Masonic lodge known as 
P2, to which both Calvi and 
Sindona belonged. 

“I think it never got to 
London,” be said. “It never 
went further than Yugoslavia 
and Austria. And someone 
probably took some things out 
ofiL” 



Calvfs briefcase (left) and Mousignor Paul Marcinkos (topi bead of the Vatican hank to which Calvi (below ) went for help. 


Zimbabwe 
customs 
men freed 


From Jan Raafh 
Harare 

Two senior customs officers- 
were freed on the orders of the 
Supreme Court here yesterday 
after 41 days of custody that 
courts have consistently re- 
jected as fllegaL 
On only one other occasion 
in Zimbabwe's six year history 
has the judiciary seen orders 
for the release of political 
prisoners implemented- •• 

Mr Kenneth Harper, aged 
43, the Controller of Customs 
and Excise, and . Mr John 
Austin, aged 36. the Chief 
Customs Investigation Offi- 
cer, were held first in deten- 
tion under state of emergency 
laws, and then on .remand 
under Zimbabwe's criminal 
code on allegations they had 
“spied” for South Africa. : .‘ 
Affidavits and statements 
in the courts in the numerous 
hearings have stated that- the 
two were seized from their 
homes on. February 22soJely 
on- tire wishes ofj Mr 
IjEnunersoh ; jau^og^^fhe. 

. Minister of State for National 
Security. - J: ~: 

Lawyers ■ rigwesanting- the 
- two men have waged the most 
vigorous, qppcsmon^^^J.iir 
courtSM-heEc -.-^gainst 
Zimbabwe's Jaws of detention J 
without trial Homan rights 
organisations charge that the 
broad scope of the laws are 
often abused by regular police 
and the Central Intelligence 
Organisation. 


Most black pupils 
return to school 


From Ray Kennedy, Johannesburg 

numbers of black end and said this was making 
h difficult to communicate the 


Howe to 
visit the 
Khyber 


From Michael Hainlyn 
‘Islamabad ■ 


Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretory, flew into 
Islamabad last night and said 
bis main purpose in beii^fiere: 
was “to stand at Pakistan's 
north-west frontier and affirm 
once again Britain’s support of 
the Pakistan position m the' 
face of the Soviet occupation 
of Afghanistan”. 

Sir Geoffrey wifi in fect go 
to tiie Khyber Pass and at 
Michni Point gaze down into 
Afghanistan tomorrow. 

He mil visit a refugee camp 
and meet Professor 
Burhan addin Rabbani, the 
leader of the fu n da m e n ta l ist 
Jamaai-i-lslami group of 
Mujahidin rebels. 

the professor, chairs: the 
seven-party alliance of moder- 
ate and fundamentalist resis- 
tance groups. ... . . ■ 

In his meetup today with 
Pakistan's Foreign Minister, 
Sahabzada Yaqub Khan, Sir 
Geoffrey will also be anxious 
to find out Pakistan's position 
on the round of talks with the 
special representative of the 
UN deputy Secretary-General, 
Seiior Diego Cordovez, who is 
shuttling between Kabul Is- 
lamabad and New York in an 
effort to get peace negotiations 


going again- . _ j 

Seiior Cordovez is reported 
as having obtained a timetable 
for withdrawal of Soviet 
the stumbling 


troops, but — . 

block now is over the principle 


-of sirauftaneity,. 


Diplomat set 
free after 
hostage ordeal 

OltaTO-TheVjceCon^ 
at the Bahamas High Com- 


mission here. 

Rahming. aged 33, was re- 
leased unharmed yesterday 
after being held hostage over- 
night by a gunman ■ 

Her captor, armed with a 
collection of vreapoiw, bar- 
gained with police .for ’ 
release of a convict and for an 
unused Ottawa fine station to 
be turned over ra the aeMy- 
ft was not immediately 
known if bis demands were 
met • 


Large 

pupils returned to school yes- 
terday after the derision taken 
at a conference of the National 
Education Crisis Committee, 
in Natal at the weekend to call 
an indefinite halt to class 
boycotts. 

Some obser v ers, however, 
felt it was; still too early to 
forecast whether, attendance 
would be maintained. In some 
parts of the country, particu- 
larly in the Cape Town area, 
the back-to-school turnout 
was low. 

The best school turnout was 
reported in townships in the 
Durban area where the confer- 
ence was held. Principals and 
teachers said .classes; were 
almost full .f: 

In the Western Cape, how- 
ever, Mr Piet Scbcepers, local 
director of the Department of 
Education, admitted the turn- 
out was below, expectations. 
Teachers Warned the response 


derision taken at the Durban 
. conference. 

- In Alexandra township out- 

- side Johannesburg, where 28 
people were killed in dashes 
■with police last month, sec- 

. ondary school pupils returned 
to classes, but said they would 
refuse tuition until their de- 
tained colleagues were freed. 

The stayaway continued at 
Vostooius on the East Rand, 
where -a funeral of a suspected 
African ' National Congress 
guerrilla Idfied by police last 
week is to be held today. But 
elsewhere in the area, teachers 
Isaid there was a good turnout 
and remarked on the absence 
of police and army patrols in 
the townships.' 

Normal attendance was also 
reported in Pretoria’s 
Mamelodi and Soshanguve 
townships where 13 schools 


on meetings held at the week- - before Easter. , 


were closed by the authorities 


Nasa confirms finding 
shuttle rocket booster 


A 


From Mobsni Afi, Washhiffiw 


piece of wreckage 
m -the Atlantic ; a 
is part- of the 
shuttle Challenger’s right solid 
fuel rocket booster, the main 
suspect in the explosion which . 
killed the crew-of seven Just 
after takeoff on January 20, a 
Nasa spokesman said. 

This was the first confirma- 
tion that the naval salvage 
team had recovered-a key part 
of the right booster rocket 
The spokesman-said the 8751b 
fragment contained part of the 
joint . suspected in the explo- 
sion but ft came; from the 
oppositerside of the area where 
flames • were. seed. toon after 
blast-off. ’ 


.The salvageleam is unlikely 
to recover tiie actual point of 
rupture because it is believed 
it was destroyed by the 6,000 
degree flames. 


• OTTAWA: An improperiy 
secured cord caused an air- 
launched US anise missile to 
crash at the start of a test ran 
in Canada’s Arctic in mid- 
February, Canadian and US 
investigators have concluded 
(John Best writes). 

The cord was supposed to 
pul] the tarpaulin cover off the 
missile as it was released from 
-a B52 bomber. However, the 
cover stayed on, denying oxy- 
gen to tyhe missile motors. 


Protest at 
carrier 
near Rock 


By Nicholas Ashford 
Diplomatic Cbrrespoodent 

Britain protested formally 
to Spain yesterday about an 
incident in which Spain's only 
aircraft carrier violated the 
territorial waters of Gibraltar. 

But British officials are 
playing down the seriousness 
of the incident to prevent it 
souring relations between 
London and Madrid on the 
eve of King Juan Carlos's state 
visit this month. 

The incident took place on 
the night of March 20-21. 
British officials said that the 
16.000-tonne Dedaio, flagship 
of the Spanish Navy, entered 
Gibraltar’s waters without no- 
tification or permission and 
launched two helicopters into 
Gibraltar's airspace. 

This is considered particu- 
larly dangerous in view of the 
carrier's proximity to Gibral- 
tar airport, though minor 
incursions are not unusal 
The violation occurred in 
AJgeriras Bay. west of Gibral- 
tar. The Dedaio crossed the 
“median line” marking the 
divide between Gibraltar and 
Spanish waters west of Europa 
Point, at the southern tip of 
the peninsula, then sailed 
north-east towards Gibraltar 
airport before turning back 
into Spanish waters north of 
the end of the runway. . 

At one stage it was said to be 
just a mile from the runway. 

British officials yesterday 
dismissed- as fanciful reports: 
that Spanish Navy “rebels” 
had sailed the ship deliberate- 
ly into Gibraltar’s waters m 
order to wreck the royal visit. 

Britain is seeking a full 
explanation from Madrid. 

I MADRID: The Spanish 
Government has immediately 
rejected Britain's protest, 
which was handed over to the 
Foreign Ministry here yester- 
day (Richard Wigg writes). 

The feet that King Juan 
Carlos is soon to make the first 
Spanish stale visit to Britain 
for more than 80 yeare ex- 
plains why the protest was 
made only at senior official 
level, and not by the British 
Ambassador. Lord Nicholas 
Gordon Lennox. 


Berlin’s ruling party admits 
hiring extremists for polls 


Herr Heinrich Lnmmer, the 
Christian Democrat deputy 
mayor of West Berlin, has 
admitted giving money from 
party foods to right-wing 
extremists. 

It is alleged that in return 
the extremists, among other 
jobs for Herr Lnmmer and his 
party, pasted material over 
Social Democrat posters in an 
election campaign. 

Christian Democrat politi- 
cians in Bonn are hoping that 
this is the most serious activity 
for which tiie money was used. 
They will then be able to pass 
H all off as the usual mischie- 
vous behaviour expected at 
election times. 

Since Chancellor Kohl is 
being investigated for alleged 
false testimony — to do with 
money — his party is extreme- 
ly worried about being thought 
of as the party of corruption. 

West Berlin is already re- 
garded by most West Germans 
as an inherently corrupt city. 
In the 30 years in which the 


From F rank Johnson 
Bonn 

Social Democrats tended to 
win elections in the city — 
providing the governing may- 
or, the district mayors and a 
majority on toe Senate (city 
council) — numerous politi- 
cians and party officials were 
forced to resign for accepting 
bribes, either for themselves 
or for party foods. 

The Christian Democrats 
came to power in the city at tbe 
turn of tbe decade, promising 
to cleanse it of sneb activities. 
Bat many of their officials 
have been indicted for taking 
bribes, or accused of similar 
offences. These include the 
youthful mayor, Herr 
Eberhard Diepgen, although 
the accusations against him 
have not been proved. 

Last year tiie Hamburg 
weekly Die Zext published a 
huge list of West Berlin 
officials under investigation. 
The scandals were about mon- 


ey, power and sex (the tolera- 
tion of illegal brothels). 

All that was lacking was 
neo-Nazism. This has now 
been supplied by Herr 
Lnmmer. He gave money to 
tbe “Action Community of 
June 17” - June 17, 1953, 
being the date of the East 
Berlin uprising against the 
Conun nnists. 

Herr Lnmmer says the mon- 
ey came from Christian Demo- 
crat funds and was intended to 
stop a right-wing party from 
contesting a local election and 
thus splitting the conservative 
vote. 

It is a measure of the tone of 
West Berlin pnblic life that he 
seems to see this admission as 
a defence. Herr Lmnmer's 
critics, some of whom are in 
his own party and in its ally 
the Free Democratic Party, 
think that the explanation 
could be more sinister. They 
say be has always been at- 
tracted to the radical right- 


Flu and age profit 
France’s pariahs 


From Diana Geddes, Fans 


By a quirk of feic, the first 
session of the eighth National 
Assembly of the Fifth French 
Republic was opened yester- 
day with a member of the 
extreme-right National Front 
— the pariah- of the new 
Parliament — occupying the 
Presidents chair. 

M Marcel Dassault, aged 
94, founder of the aerospace 
company of the same name, 
who. as the oldest member, 
was to have taken up his right 
to preside over the opening 
session and to give the inaugu- 
ral speech, sent a message at 
the last moment to say that he 
was still suffering from “a bad 
'flu” and would be unable to 
attend. 

His place was, therefore, 
taken by the next oldest 
member, M Edouard Fred- 
trio-Dupont, aged 83, former 
affiliated member of the 
Gauilisl RPR parliamentary 


group and now one of the 35 
National Front deputies who 
have entered Parliament for 
the first time, and whose 
attitude to the new right-wing 
government constitutes one of 
the .many "unknowns” 

M Frederic- Dupont, who 
read out M Dassault's speech 
to a packed House, inoluding 
M Jacques Chirac, the new 
Prime Minister, remained in 
the President's chair until the 
election of the new President 
of the Assembly, M Jacques 
Chaban-Delmas. aged 71. for- 
mer Gauflist Prime Minister 
The session was off to a 
rowdy start when a National 
Front deputy sprang to his feel 
to protest against tbe presence 
of 10 deputies whose election 
was still being contested, while 
the Communists and other 
deputies tried to drown him in 
a barrage of abuse and banging 
of desk lids. 


EEC calls 
for urgent 
cash talks 


Brussels — The EEC Com- 
mission called yesterday for 
urgent talks with the Council 
of Ministers and tbe European 
Parliament after issuing a 
warning that the Comm unity 
is running oat of cash for 
social and regional spending 
(Richard Owen writes). 

Mr Henning Christopher- 
sen. the budget commissioner, 
said that supplementary bud- 
gets were also needed because 
of the decline of the dollar. 

A supplementary budget 
would guarantee the payment 
this year of Britain's budget 
rebate of about £300 million. 

Mr Grigoris Varfis, com- 
missioner for structural funds, 
said tbe social fund would run 
out in October and the region- 
al fond in November because 
the Council and Parliament 
had failed to respect the 
balance between commit- 
ments and appropriations. 


Zhivkov 


calls for 


i 



ll 


Sofia (Reuter) - Mr Todor 
Zhivkov, the veteran Bulgari- 
an leader, opened a congress 
ofhis ruling Communist Party 
here yesterday with a call for a 
new style of management to 
bring advanced technolog)' to 
the Balkan stale’s economy. 

Echoing the seff-critical ap- 
proach adopted at Iasi 
month's Soviet part)' congress 
in Moscow. Mr Zhivkov 
blamed managers for covering 
up weaknesses and failures, 
and attacked a rising tide of 
absenteeism, lack of order and 
indiscipline. 


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Bangui deaths 
rise to 35 


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J- ^ ention 


Paris (AP) — Four people 
injured when a French Jaguar 
fighter jo; crashed into a 
school house in Bangui, capi- 
tal of the Centra] African 
Republic, have died in a 
French hospitaL 
They bring to 35 the num- 
ber of people killed in the 
accident on March 27. 


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Wrong Caine 


Rouen (AFP) — Reports 
that British actor Michael 
Caine and his sister had .been 
involved in a car crash here 
Frida.v were based on mistak- 
en identity by local police, 
thev said here. 


Bush tour 


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Vice-President George Bush 
begins a four-nation tour of 
the Middle East with the Iran- 
Iraq war a key issue on his 
agenda. 

Golf heli pad, page9 

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Turks proles^ 

Rome — Mr Musa Celebi 
and MrOmcr Bagci. the Turks 
acquitted on Saturday on 
charges of having conspired to 
murder the Pope, have pro- 
tested about haring to remain 
here without means of support 
until their appeals are heard. 

Sihanouk ill 

Peking (Reuter) — Prince 
Norodom Sihanouk, head of 
the anti-Vietnamese Kam- 
puchean guerrilla coalition, 
has serious health problems 
including high cholesterol and 
kidney trouble, according to 
his doctor. ... 


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Airport fine 


. Honiara (Reuter) — - The 
former Prime Minister of the 
Solomon Islands, Mr Solo- 
mon Mamaloni, has been 
fined £142 for disorderly con- 
duct. including carrying a 
lighted cigarette near ah air- 
craft being refuelled, at the 
country's international afrpon 


Baton theft 


Prague (AP) — Police are 
searching for the thief who 
stole the baton of the famous 
Czech composer Smetana 
from Prague museum. 


Honest Bill 


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Montreal (AP) — Honesty 
paid for Mr William Murphy, 
unemployed and on welfare, 
when he returned a lost lottery 
ticket worth the equivalent of 
more than $5 million and was 
given more than $ 850,000 as a 
reward. 


Fears grow for Britons as French quit Lebanon 

Silence on missing teachers 


By Omr Foreign Staff 


Beirut — Efforts to find two for 13 years. They dined 
British teachers missing in together on Friday night and 
Beirut produced no clues yes- went to Back Street for a 
today, increasing fears that . nightcap. “They left about 
they may have been kid- midnight” a friend said, “and 


Dennis Hill an English feaefr- 
ican University, 


napped. 

A British Embassy spokes- 
man said . contact had been 
made Twilit various parties” 
to determine whether they 
have been abducted, but “we 
have nothing solid so fer”. 

Mr Leigh Dougas, aged 34, 
a political Science teacher at 
the American University of 
Beirut, and Mr Philip 

padfidd, aged 40, director of 
Beirut's International : Lan- 
guage Centre, were last seen 
on Friday at the Back Street, 
one of the few public houses 
sun functioning in the city's 
Muslim sector. 

Mr Douglas, of Stalham. 
Norfolk, has lived in Beirut 
for eight years and Mr 
Padfidd, of Bkteford,Ttevon, 


no one has seen them since.” 

On Saturday and Sunday, 
Easter well-wishers left mes- 
sages at their respective apart- 
ments, bnt they went 
unanswered. The manage- 
ment of Mr Padfiekfs centre, 
known as the Rasbideen 
school reported his disap- 
pearance on Sunday. The 
alarm was sounded when Mr 
Douglas foiled to show up at 
classes on Tuesday. 

None of the militias con- 
trolling west Beirut has hinted 
what could have happened to 
the teachere, and no under- 
ground organization has yet 
claimed any abductions. 

At least six other Britons 
were kidnapped in west Beirut 
last year. One of them, Mr 


er at the American 
was found shot dead on May 
29. Four others, including two 
women, were released by their 
captors. 

Mr Alec Collett, aged 64, a 
writer working with the Unit- 
ed Nations, is still being held 
hostage. 

The father of Mr Padfield, 


said yesterday his son would 
, deliberated 


not deliberately put his life in 
peril as a member of a 
“dangerous dining dub”. One 
report claimed that be and Mr 
Douglas had gone to a night- 
dub m the Muslim sector for a 
“dangerous night out”. 

Mr Ralph Padfield, a retired 
fanner, said at his home in 
Bideford that his son was a 
“quiet lad” who knew exactly 
where to go safely and where 
not to go in Beirut. 



Paris insists there is 
no change in policy 

From Diana Geddes, Paris ' 


Mr Leigh Douglas and Mr Philip Padfield, who were last 
seen in Beirut on Friday night and are feared kidnapped, 
month. “This is a double Wow waiting for news ofWift.J*We 


and has hit me pretty hand, but 
what can one do?” Mr 
Padfield senior said. 


He had returned to England 
funeral last 


for his mother's 


The family of Mr Douglas 
in Norfolk yesterday were 


are extremely anxious,” his 
retired father. Mr Edgar Doug- 
las, said. “I have to think he 
was probably kidnapped be- 
cause he wasn't the type to just 
disappear 


Hidden dangers for Britons in streets of Beirut 


Robert Fisk 


Middle 


No Britos could ever say he 
did hot know die dangers of 
thing Is Beirut Two years age 
the British Embassy advised 
its citizens to leave Lebanon 
unless they had “pressing 
reasons* to stay- . -v 

“Those chaps who know the 


nmes here wfll obrionsly hang 

— ~ David Mfers, then 


ou,' Snr 

British Ambassador, com- 
mented equably. “Bn* others 
really should think of going. 

With the disappearance of 
two British fecterers .from 
Beirut this week, Britam’snew 
Ambassador. Sir John Gray, 
is likely to make the point a 
little more strongly. - 

There were, after aU smae 
mm precedents; the latinap- 
g„g 0 r two Uritisli'bnsmess- 


men last year— released after 
two weeks as captives of aShia 
Muslim groep — and die 
murder of a British university 
lecturer who any have been 
resisting a kidnap when he 
was shot ina car park. 

And there was Aiec Collett, 
the freelance writer with the 
United Nations who was ab- 
ducted a year ago and is in the 
hands of Aba Natal's extras- 
Zst Palestinian group. 

Those who “know the 
ropes” - or thought they did 
until Tuesday — are a mixed 
bo g Some are British women 
who married Lebanese citizens 
and feel more at home in 
Hamra Street than they would 
hi tbe Edgware Road. 

One sseh hdy lives in my 
own block of flats in Beirut, a 

jnfchUe-aged woman with .a 
fongh Yorkshire accent who 


stays 

when 

comes 


assiduously mdoors 
the peighhonrhood 
under shellfire, but 


cat ami dog in the street. 

A few British men who 
married Lebanese women have 
not been home for years; one 
died in the fierce street fight- 
ing of February 1984, his body 
found later by British Embas- 
sy officials amid die rabble of 
hisBat 

Yet because Americans and 
French dfeens were the prin- 
cipal targets for Lebanese 
kidnappers, die few Britons 
left in the city felt somehow 
hnmane from abduction. 

When US and Fran* forces 
took action against Muslim 
militias riming the mkri iw of 

the multinational force to Bei- 
rat Britain's 100-strong con- 
tingent never fired a shot in 


angdr. So there is bo one with a 
score to settle against the 
British from that dark period 
of Lebanese history. 

But Britain could not escape 
an entanglement with Leba- 
non. Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher's derision to meet 
West Bank Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization supporters 
is London last year — a 
rendezvous that never took 
place — angered anti-Arafat 
Palestinian groups in Lebanon 
and Syria, 

Far more serious in its 
implications was the convic- 
tion and imprisonment of 
those members of Aba NidaTs 
group who tried to assassinate 
the Israeli Ambassador to 
London, Mr Shtomo Argo?, in 
1982. Mr Collett is now being 
held in Sidon as a hostage far 
their release, a condition 


which the Foreign Office has 
refused to contemplate. 

Appeals by Sir John for Mr 
Collett's release have been met 
only by warnings from his 
captors that his health is in 
danger and ehat Britain should 
send 10 kidney dialysis ma- 
chines to hospitals in sonthera 
Lebanon, one of which would 
be nsed to treat him. 


Tbe most disturbing ele- 
ment of his abduction was that 
his original kidnappers — led 
by a gnomon who referred to 
himself as “Captain Black" — 
appeared to have put him “cm 
sale” to other groups, passing 
him on to Abu NidaTs faction 
only after negotiations with 
other militias which might 
have had an interest in bolding 
a Westerner. No Briton can be 
immune from this. 


From Diana Geddes, 

France’s decision to with- 
draw its 45 observers from 
Beirut “in no way signifies a 
change in French policy in 
Lebanon”. M Alain Juppe, the 
government spokesman, said 
after yesterday's Cabinet 
meeting. 

“The withdrawal is the re- 
sult of an objective establish- 
ment of tbe fects: Our 
observers are no longer able to 
accomplish their mission, 
namely to ensure the respect 
of the ceasefire between the 
various Lebanese factions,” 
he said, adding that the “dif- 
ferent parties concerned” had 
expressed the wish that the 
observers should leave. 

The close relationship be- 
tween France and Lebanon 
dates back to i860 when 
France was made responsible 
for re-establishing order in 
Lebanon after the massacre of 
22,000 Christians by the 
Druze. 

In 1920, Lebanon was made 
a French mandated territory 
and was governed by France 
until independence in 1943. 

The last French troops were 
evacuated in 1946, but a 
“special relationship** be- 
tween the two countries 
continued. 

1978: 700 French troops re- 
turn to Lebanon as part of the 
4,000-slrong United Nations 
Interim Force in Lebanon 
(Unifil); 1,400 French soldiers 
are still serving with Unifil in 
the south of the country. 

April 15, 1981 Two French 
diplomats killed. 

May 24. 1982: French Embas- 
sy attacked with a car bomb — 

10 dead. 21 injured. 

August 18, 1982: 800 French 
soldiers sent to Beirut as part 
of the multinational force to 
supervise the withdrawal of 


25.000 supporters of the PLO 
leader. Yassir Arafat. Mission 
ends September 1 3. 1 982. 
September 24, 1982: New 
multinational security force, 
totalling 3.300 men. sent to 
Beirut after the Sabra and 
Chatila massacres, including 
J , J 00 French soldiers. 

October 23, 1983: 58 French 
paratroops and 241 US Ma- 
rines killed in separate suicide 
car bomb attacks. 

November 17, 1983: French 
planes bomb Shia Muslim 
training camp near Baalbek 

March 31, 1984: Last mem- 
bers of French contingent of 
the multinational force leave 
Beirut a month after the 
evacuation of the American 
troops. Total French losses 
over preceding 18 months: 88 
dead. 

March 1984: French observer 
mission sent to Beirut at_the 
request of President Gemayel 
to oversee ceasefire. 

March 22. 1985: Two French 
diplomats. Marcel Carton and 
Marcel Fontaine, kidnapped 
by Shia Muslim extremists in 
Beiruti still being held. 

May 21 1985: Two more 
French hostages. Michel Seu- 
raL a sociologist and Jcan- 
Paul Kauffmann, a journalist, 
seized. Seurat's “execution” 
was subsequently announced 
by the Islamic Jihad on March 
10, I9S6; Kauffmann still 
being held. 

March 14, 1986: Four-man 
French television crew seized 
in Beirut; still being held 
hostage. 

March 13, 1986: Seventh 
member of French observer 
mission killed in an ambush 

April I, 1986: Decision to 
withdraw remaining 45 mem- 
bers of observer mission. 


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unanimously recommend the United Biscuits offer. 

Sir Hector Laing, Chairman of UB, will tell you why the agreed 
partnership between UB and Imperial makes such profitable sense 
both immediately and for the future. 

Please ask the operator for Freefone Imperial Group. 

The final closing date for the UB offer is Friday, 11th April 1986, 


I II 1 M HI tJ | I I 

U 4ii Finn ill J 


The directors of Imperial Group pic (including those who have delegated detailed supervision of this advertisement) have taken all reasonable care to ensure that the 

facts stated and opinions expressed herein are fair and accurate. The directors accept responsibility accordingly. 




> 1 ^ 








Long a military bastion and 
symbol of the Salvadorean 


from Jolni Carlin, Apepa, El Salvador 


np by the Army, pm into 
helicopter* and deposited in a 


enerrilbK’ r^T, ana aeposneti m a 

““P w tbetown of 
Apopa, nnder the shadow of 
the now eerily vacant volcano. 
voKaim, has fallen mto gov- Fbrthesofoers. itwas 13th 


vaL7E feL i^“ apa thenowcerilvvacamvmcaiio. 

ga Y _ Fhr the so&ers, it was 13th 

s ****• °* ]1 previous 
SSfftefS?.?® &V had tried and 


PreaA^iw;rtr*V” 3 £? tc occasions jney naa tned and 
mjSnrVqS^ 16 office fitted to evacuate the volcano, 
m June 1984, , both a jumping-ofF point tw 

JiKt 15 miles north of the 


Simultaneously, soldiers, a 
total of -5,000, would make 
their way up the volcano in a 
long-planned attack code- 
named “Operation Phoenix", 
co-ordinated by American 
military advisers and the 


Army High Command. 
iM to evacuate tte volcano, “We were 14 days under- 

rth a jumping-off point for ground. The planes syerc drop- 
ping so many bombs we 
; couldn't .get out, not even 
' once, to fetch food or water." 
Senora Tomasa Perez, aged 
24, mother of four bloated 
little children, said. 

■ Sefiora Perez, who said the 
Army set fire to her home, is 
one of more than 1,000 people 
who m recent weeks have been 
tacks, on the capital .and swelling what has become 
gistk^ centre in the heart of known as the CaJle Real 
Salvador for the marauding (Royal Road) refugee camp 
nds of the FMLN. near Apopa. 

Thmnatmni i. j Two American nuns nin the 


£®PJtal, San Salvador, 
Guazapa volcano is a natural 
fortress full of caves and deep 
ravines, an irritant to the 
Army and constant reminder 
until very recently, that it can 
never drop hs guard against 
the 6,000 guerrillas of the left- 
wmg Farabiindo Marti Na- 
Liberation Front 

(rMLN). 

After a siege which lasted 
six years.— as long as the dvfl 
war itself — the American- 
supplied air power of the 
Salvadorean military finally 
proved too.- much for the 
bomb-blasted guerrillas. 

They fled north last month, 
to the mountains of 
Chaiatcnango province, as 
their sunken-cheeked camp- 
followers — mainl y under- 



attacks, .on the capital -.and 



UN urged 
to open 
files on 
Waldheim 


From Zoriana Pysariwsky op- j 
New York nd, 


Jewish organizations and ^ j£i 
New York legislators have t(i 
called on the United Nations ho 
to open secret files which they * J » 
claim hold the key to unravel- au ‘j n . n f 
ling the full story about Dr^T 
Kurt Waldheim, the former 1 ™ kong 
UN Secretary-General, who is * T ‘ n 8 
accused of concealing his Nazi *° uUl 

!»«- Li, , 


Hie request came as new t fthe6 
evidence was released by the ^ id 1 5f 
World Jewish Congress pur- hn Mst bL 

oortirur 10 show lhal he narlic- „ ■ 


porting to show that he panic- a 
ipated in operations against 
Yugoslav partisans in West ^ 
Bosnia and the resistance ? 


- is d 
ia’s21 


movement in Greece, indud- \ emion 
ing Mr George Papandreoa. 5 nc e c- 
ihe former Greek Prime Min- W 


.bands of the FMLN. 

Throughout January and 


Mexico 


US pledge to return ‘millions’ 


uai Srffi&SSLS? camp. Which held 5^200 

of B Salvador’s 500,000 refb- 
basest to December and is now 


-hugest in Central America, 
famed helicopter bullets and 
dropped hundreds- of thou- 
sands of pounds of bombs on 
the volcano. 


For days at a time the 
guerrillas and their supporters 


J i diai ujcir supporters 

nounsheed children, their took, refuge in dark undfir- 
mothers and sturdy grandpar- ground bomb shelters carved 

HT 1 TC ^ VftlAra !■ ti>in ■ * J a _ 


. / ftivuitt* wiiiu auenaa ui 

ents were literally rounded out of the mountainside. 


both haven and jail to more 
than 1,000 ragged guerrilla 
sympathizers. 

“We're safe from the bombs 
here," a 50-year-old father of 
six said, “and they feed us 
weH But we're also prisoners. 
If we try and get back to 
Guazapa the Army has told us 
we'll be killed.” 


gets 
its man 


Manila recovers titles to 


the former Greek Prime Min- jw jta 
istcr and father of Mr Andreas 2r is. 
Papandreou, the present ^ . 
prime minister. 

There is pressure on the a 
Reagan Administration for [ 0 
members of Congress to deter- at 


mine whether Dr Waldheim „ -n ior 

.i u i i j r n- "■ 


3 Kenyans 
jailed for 
‘sedition’ 


Civil servants’ dispute 
paralyses Helsinki 


From Offi B rinat, H dririn 


Nairobi — Three Kenyans 
were jailed here yestoday 
after admitting charges of 
possessing seditious publica- 
tions — anti-government leaf- 
lets (Charles Harrison writes). 

Two others were impris- 
oned last week on charges that 
they knew that a -group -.of 
Kenyans were producing sedi- 
tious publications, but failed 
to inform the authorities. 

A lecturer,. Joseph Manje, 
and an accountant GepOray 
Maina, were jailed yesterday 
for five years and a fanner* 
Peter Kihara, was given a" 
four-year sentence. 

All three were said to have 1 
been found' in possession of 
seditious leaflets earlier this 
year. The contents of the 
leaflets were not revealed and 
the alleged authors were not 
identified in court . 


Rail and air traffic in the 
Helsinki area were paralysed 
yesterday when civil servants 
and state employees began the 
first phase'ofa pay strike.' 
.-Flights were diverted to 
Tnrku and Tampere, both 
about 100 miles away, and 
passengers were taken to and 
fro by bos. Trains stopped 
outside the capital and mail 
deliveries as well as pensions 
and other post office pay- 
. ments were affected. 

For the first time-in F innish 
historylhle President's office is 
>on- strike, and . President 
-■Koivisto and his -wife have 
had to move from: foe official 
painca to government guest 
roomsina Jeading hold. 

Only 15,000 union mem- 
bers me on strike, but on April 
16. the stoppagewiB become 
nationaL it is quite possible 
that the. strike will be pro- 


longed, be The civil servants 
are demanding a rise of about 
6 per cent, plus £1 00 a month. 


• STOCKHOLM; • Sweden 
yesterday moved closer to an 
industrial confrontation likely 
to bring private industry to a 
standstill (Christopher Mosey 
writes). 

The Federation of Salaried 
Employees in Industry and 
Services (PTK) announced a 
strike of 50,000 while-collar 
workers for next Wednesday 
in response to a lockout of 
300,000 men by the Swedish 
Employers’ Confederation. 

PTK is seeking a pay in- 
crease dated from January I. 


• Pilots* threat: The Swed- 
ish air force may lose a fifth of 
its 500 pilots, who afe, threat- 
ening to resign by^Bfceember 
because of low pay (Reuter 
reports). 


Mexico City — The most 
wanted man in Mexico, Gener- 
al Arturo Durazn, the captod's 
former police chiefs arrived 
here yesterday after US au- 
thorities ordered his deporta- 
tion from a Los Angeles jail to 
face charges of extortion, ille- 
gal possession of weapons and 
probably murder (John Carfm 
writes). 

General Dmrazo. police chief 
from 1976 to 1982, was cap- 
tured by the FBI in Pnerto 
Rico two years ago and held in 
the US pending an extradition 
request from Mexico, which 
was granted on Tuesday. 

A symbol of the corruption 
of the six-year administration 
of former President Jose Lo- 
pez Portillo, his childhood 
friend ami toe man who ap- 
pointed him police chief, be 
retired in 1982, colosaliy rich. 

He has been accused of 
ordering several murders, 
heading a drag ring with 
international links and extort- 
ing Wiillinnc of pounds. 

With Mexicans thirsty for 
revenge, every detail of his 
extradition case in Los Ange- 
les provoked headlines. 
General Dvazo has often said 
he feared for his life bn return 
to Mexico. He arrived before 
dawn from Santiago yesterday 
and was transferred to a 
maximum security prison in 
the Mexican capital pending a 
court appearance. 


Marcos Philippines land 


should be barred from enter- 
ing the US. 


His (lie is one of 40,000 on u _ 919. 


The head of the commission 
investigating the hidden 
wealth of former President 
Marcos of the Philippines 
returned home yesterday with 
property titles valued at $25 
million (about £17 million), 
alleged to have been secretly 
acquired by Mr Marcos. 

Mr Jovito Salonga, chair- 
man of the Commission on 
Good Government, said the 
titles covered more than 
18,500 acres of land in the 
Philippines. 

During his 19-day trip, he 
said, US officials assured him 
that the Manila Government 
would be able to recover “in a 
few months" hundreds of 
millions of dollars in Marcos- 
controlled real estate. 

“A good portion of the ill- 
gotten wealth will surely be 
recovered," said Mr Salonga, 
who earlier estimated that the 
persona] fortune of Mr Mar- 
cos and his wife, Imelda, could 
reach $10 billion. 

The five-member commis- 
sion was set up by President 
Aquino. 

Mr Salonga, a former sena- 
tor once jailed by Mr Marcos, 
said the commission hoped to 
learn the extent of the deposed 
president's financial empire 
with the help of 2,300 pages of 
documenjs^e took with him 


From Keith Dalton, Manila 


war criminals, suspects and 


when he fled to Hawaii. US On a separate mission. Mr 


witnesses compiled by the UN ... x pul 

Vi-sr- lu. A nt 


authorities provided Mr Pedro Yap. another commis- 
Salonga with copies of the sion member, discussed with 


War Crimes Commission be- J 
tween 1943 and 1948. "■ 


documents last month. 


Swiss authorities 


In a letter to Senor Javier 1C 
’erez de Cuellar, the UN rv ^ 


The 19 land titles, covering steps” to recover assets held 
properties in Manila and pro- by Mr Marcos in six Swiss 


Secretary-General four Jew- ,f r Reute 


vinriaJ areas, were handed to bank accounts. 


Mr Ramon Diaz, another Mr Salonga said commis- 


commission member, by Mr sion inquiries in the US. 
Jose Campos, a former busi- Canada and Switzerland ex- 


ness associate of Mr Marcos, posed “what can only be 

Mr Campos fled to Canada described as the unprecedent- 


before the revolt and last week ed plunder of an entire 
surrendered the titles to Mr nation". 


Diaz in Vancouver. He admit- The commission has told 


ted he was Mr Marcos's “from right visiting Japanese parlia- 
man" and had set up four roentarians that Mr Marcos is 


ish organizations asked that n bur 
the UN files on Dr Waldheim _ font 
be made public and that he be n t an 
stripped of all LIN honours. £ fran< 
Only three flies have been 
made public by the UN: Adolf e »» 
Eichmann's. which was given it tl 
to Israel, and those on Josef '& rule 
Mengele and Klaus Barbie. ;t auon. 
requested by the US. l, use i 


dummy property companies also suspected of having sys- 
for the former president's land tematically syphoned off $500 


holdings. 



Mr Salonga: confident of 


million in official Japanese aid 
during his 20 years in power. 

Mr Diaz said the cost of 
projects under the Japan 
Overseas Economic Co-opera- 
tion Fund were believed to 
have been inflated by as much 
as 20 per cent to cover a 
commission paid to Mr 
Marcos. 

Meanwhile, thousands of 
Filipinos employed at five 
American military installa- 
tions yesterday returned to 
work after a 12-day strike. 
Several thousand defiant 
worker*, however, have reject- 
ed the new wage agreement 
and are continuing to barri- 


35 held after 
‘anarchist’ 


riot in Athens 


Athens — Greek police ar- 
rested 35 youths yesterday 
affer left-wing extremists riot- 
ed in central Athens, hurling 
fire bombs at police guarding 
the Socialist party headquar- 
ters (Mario Modiano writes). 

About 300 youths, de- 
scribed by police as anarchists, 
said they were protesting 


against the shooting of a 
comrade during a police raid 


recovering. millions - .-.--cade Subic Bay naval base. 


comrade during a police raid 
on a derelict house. 

They set fire to a polio; van. 
bombed and gutted a bank, 
and smashed shop windows. 



When the anti-eoinmimist witch- 
hunts were at their height in the .late 
1950’s, one man had the courage to 
stand up to Senator McCarthy. , 

His T'amp was Ed Murrow and he 
was the most influential broadcaster 
of his generation. - , . 


‘Murrow? a new television drama 
from TVS, directed by Jack Gold and 
featuring Daniel Travanti, vividly 
recreates his careen 

Prom the radio broadcasts that 
brought hometo his countrymen what 
Londoners were suffering in the blitz 


to the TV programme that helped And watch because it is another 
change the course ofAmerican history, fine production fix>m Television South, 
Watch ‘Murrow; this evening at a company whose networked 
9.30pm on Channel 4 ^ programmes are 

will see for yourself how tele- also making tele- 1 11 j 

vision history was made. vision history. A name to watch out for. 

‘MURROW 9.30pm, TONIGHT ON CHANNEL 4. 









THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


LA CREME DE LACE 



We talk and you listen, no. 
You talk and we listen, yes. 


W'W-T? 


Item 



PERSONAL 

ASSISTANT 

£12K + Car 

The Body Shop, renowned for its range of 
naturally based skin and hair care prepara- 
tions, is seeking a top flight PjA to the 
Managing Director. 

The position requires exceptional 
organisational and communication skills, the 
ability to assess priorities, and progress di- 
verse projects simultaneously and speedily to 
fruition. 

The successful candidate mil be aged 30-4 0, 
well-educated and presented with an excel- 
lent command of the English language and 
experience of staff supervision. 

The position would suit an ex-secretary who. 
having worked closely at Board level for 
some years, has already undertaken one ju- 
nior management or supervisory role. 

Written applications only, with full CV, to 
Veronica Potts, Body Shop InL Pic.. Domin- 
ion Way, Rustington, W. Sussex, BN 16 3LR. 


AREA EXECUTIVE 

Salary circa £14,000 
+ company car 
+ profit share scheme 

Ability to completely supervise sales and staff of 
eight existing branches of privately owned em- 
ployment agpncy. Excellent all round experience 
in a supervisory or management position essen- 
tial. All replies dealt with in strictest confidence. 
Reply to BOX E82 


FASHION CONSULTANCY 
KENSINGTON 

Are tooking fora secrelary/PA lo work in exrit- 
jftg.and growing business.' Skills required *re 
shorthand 90wp m.. ~\ypli£: ;5$&pm, ' gq^'.tete- 
phone manner, bookkeeping, knowledge or 
design helpful although not. essential. Position 
involves general office management and for the 
right candidate an -opportunity to.be involved in., 
design presentation wort; Good personality, «$*:• 
thnstastic and well presented, age 25 plus, salary * 
negotiable. 

Tel: 01-584 9321 


ADMINISTRATOR 

IT yon are educated to "A" level standard. ha™ a sound secre- 
larval or admmtatraUv* bxkvwml and art looking for an 
excrane orttr challenge. we nave the lota lor you Bcrganran 
tnKMnc. a taurine romnuKrtsed informalton company eased 
in the CRV ot London h looking r or an admuustraior who will 
deurtoe and run a mm inMnt and Minmar erogramme. dnl 
with sales pma g ecbi on a day lo nay basis and become In- 
volved in an aspecn of our dynamic marketing schedule. 


Please telephone for application form or send 
CV to Carol Lake. Bergamon Jnfoline Lid, 12 
Vandey Street, London EC2A 2DE 
Tet 01-377 4646. 


SECRETARY/WP 

OPERATOR 

Required to support the commercial sec- 
tion of young property practice. 
Experience an advantage, but keeness to 
team also important. The position in- 
cludes client contact and phone work. 
Excellent salary. 

SHAW ASSOCIATES 
01-631 4050 


WFRE HERE TO LISTEN TO YOU 
NOT TO OURSELVES 


At lost a recruitment consult- 
ancy that will listen to you. 
We're new and very differ- 
ent. Tell us your ideas for 
your career - you'll find us 
truthful, forthright and posi- 
tive. Telephone Suzanne 
Gnavett on 01-734 7394 



SECRETARY TO 

INTERNATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT, 
PERSONNEL 

S. W. LONDON £9,500 + 

An outstanding opportunity dealing with overseas 
personnel for a really "switched on” secretary. Must 
be strong on humour, initiative, style, shorthand, 
typing and word processing. This is a busy job and 
you need to be bright efficient and fit. Knowledge of 
a foreign language would be a plus, but not essential. 
Telephone: 01 788 7272 extn. 2123/2678 for 
an interview. 


Travelling blues? 

Fed up with commuting? 

We urgently need Senior Secretaries for our reg- 
ister of local vacancies. Circa £8,000 - £12,000 
per annum. 

IFyou would like your C.V. to be put forward to 
. 500 local companies this month please send this 
^direct -to Carofc Wisby. . 

' Senior Secretarial Division - • 

Seekers Employment Services 
26 The Broadway 

Wimbledon SW19 

Tel: 546 4424 ;. 


TRAVELLING 

SECRETARY/PA 

Top level Executive Secretary/PA to work on an 
International basis with periods away, frequent- 
ly extending up to 4 weeks. Candidates should 
be organised, adaptable and energetic with excel- 
lent skills ( 120/601 and education to at least ‘A’ 
level standard. No languages are required but a 
good sense of humour, charm, and impeccable 
grooming are essentiaL Top remuneration to 
someone who is prepared to work hard. Age 25- 
30. 

Telephone 01-243 0631/01-373 2456 


WORK FOR A REAL 
HUMAN BEING? 

The hard working, energetic and enigmatic M.D. 
of his own property company needs a P.A. He 
runs his friendly and expanding offices with to- 
tal involvement and is looking for someone to 
care for him as he cares for his staff. Working 
from a secluded office in Kensington W8, there 
are general secretarial duties and a lot of ‘out 
and about' work. 

Preferred non-smoker and driver aged 30-45 
with suitable experience. Please write with CV 
and current salary to BOX E80 


i OBeoSatj /VSSA&ADVWreWG 

f / Advertising £11/000 - Young 

/ / / energetic PX needed for the 

/ / / M.D. of this established agency 

/ / where a team spirit is the key to 

/ / success. Previous adverttetaw expert- 

/ ence useful. 80/65 AutSo 25-32 years. 

/ PJL £8,500 - Account executive in top 
PA consultancy requires young and com- 
mitted secretary. A 1/1 position with Lots of 
scope and involvement. 50 typing A level +. 

Video £8/500 - Friendly production company wiB 
give involvement and responsfibity to a secretary 
ffi their new Marketing Dept A very exciting situ- 
ation. 80/50 W.P. 20+ years. 

Exhibitions £8,000 - Working in a 1/1 role within 
a smaO team you win tse organising the advertis- 
ing and promotions side of a major trade fair. 
Some French/Oerman useful 80/60. 

Marketing £6£Q0 - Lively cottage leaver required 
tor this young and highly professional marketing 
company in their modem offices. 80/55. 


491 8775 

Recniirmerrt Consult cmfc 


SECRETARY/PA 

ENGLISH/SPANISH 

First language English with Spanish Just as good. 
Excellent typing skills required, acme shorthand. 
Small attractive office, varied dunes. Good tele- 
phone personality. No experience necessary. We 
will train for word-processor. 

Write with enclosed CV to: 

Talon, 60 Ebury Street, London SWIW 9QD. 


TEMP PA/SECRETARY 

Mature shorthand secretary with flair for admin required 
by shlpMne company for approx 5 months from mW-May 
Excellent conditions in superbly located modern office. W 
P and Irtex eroerrenw an advantage, competence and reU- 
abuuy essential. 

Please write enclosing CV to: 

Stolt-Nietsen UK Ltd, 

New Bond Street House, 

1-5 New Bond Street, 

London, W1Y 9PE. 


BILINGUAL SECRETARY 

International Freight Forwarders, situated Heathrow re- 
quire secretary lor Managing Director and Financial 
Controller. Fluent French. Busy, responsible position with 
varied dimes. Salary negotubie. 

Mease apply to wittw w*»> C.V. to Mr Marc OBMir, 

M m H tw fmarika LM, Unit 10. Hwl ce r s. fl ee t h row 
Estate, The Parkway, Cranked, WMiwrt. 


THEATRICAL 
SECRETARY 
£9 ~£tlK 

Our client. a web known 
Theatrical Producer is 
looking for a Secretary 
with previous experience 
in the theatre to work 
with his small team in 
beautiful West End 
offices. 

This is an extr e m el y inter- 
esting job. although not; 
overly pressurised and 
would suit someone with 
a mature personality and 
unflappable nature. 

Age 25-40. Skills 100/60. 

WEST END OFFICE 
629 9686 




RESEARCH 

DEPT. 


Bn&r and ea O m tm tK person 
required try mall prafiepoan 
F in an ci al Ccitsutaney. Expov 
ence not essential as turning 
ntta Goodaaadardof edora- 
uon and interest m fipns 
cMpuaL 

Salary c 16.000. 

King Mrs Drew. 

01-429 5917 
(No agesKtes) 


3SNcw0'U3dS-JW, LnndontCi’W -t -..n 
rrt01-5aS3SS8 cr Ol-BOa 
■T(7!oNa. Cl 


OpporttmBy«dxt»tomovBfetoabroad«rm*nag«iwntfimeaoo 

wftWn thfci fast-moving atnrirownm* 

Om SECRETARY/AOMiNlSTRAUVE 
ASSISTANT __ 

qjTY £13,0(Kh£t6/)OOI 

LONDON BRANCH OF A MAJOR US. fNVESTliENT. BAWC 

We invite applications far this challenging and damamfing position from yustariaa. 
aged 25 - 35 , with a university degree, who are competent to work as m ce m&nm 
Secretary and to assist m the running of the Hdtriiwtralive ftmehonet a rapitly wxpamang 
London franch. TtesporaftiBttea are widely drawn and wainchxle. i n add i tion k>W3ri^ 
with, and for, the Director of Administration, the day-to- day o ffice management, 
recruiting personnel acriedufing and providing assistance to retting oymseas iftsttot s. 
A positive, wea-terianeed personality and the abftty to deal adtotfly with eyams « t hey 
occur, to set priorities, and operate accurate^ under pressure a i mportant 
negotiable £ 13 £ 0 D-£ 1 6,000 + non-contributory pension, free We assurance. fWwBUPK- 
Apphcanons. in strict conflctence. under reference SAA654/n, a the Manages Owciotr 




EXECUTIVE SECRETARY/PA . 

Required for Depsty Chairman of PahUc Ltd Camgattj 

The company’s main area of operation is manance and insurance trader- 
writing and the successful candidate is likely to have an extensive working 
knowledge of the London insurance market, particularly with reg a rd to 
North American non marine business. 

First class shorthand and word processing skills essentiaL Age 28-K Excel* 
lent salary and employee benefits. 

Please telephone Jill Oakley <m 01-623 4600 

Coo aeenctefl 



SECRETARY/PA 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Enthusiastic, energetic and intelligent 
secretary/personal assistant badly needed by 
young, growing and very busy P.R. consultan- 
cy. You will work on a variety of accounts; 
travel, publishing, computers - but to one per- 
son. 

If you’re looking for an interesting job, with 
career development prospects, have good sec- 
retarial skills and like working hard, phone 
Brigid Rodeo on: 

01-222 0933 

Salary negotiable. 


SECRETARY/PA 

Required for Joint Managing Director of com- 
pany specialising in overseas projects in the 
Ceramics Industry. 

High standard of general education required 
along with fust date, secretarial skills and ma- 
ture personality. 

Pleasant, industrious environment 
Excellent salary and benefits. 

CVs to: 

Salgo Engineering (Inteririln) Ltd 
13/17 Long Lane 
London 
EC1A 9PN. 


AMERICAN 

LAWYERS 

St. James’s 

Audio secretary for partner. 
Ideal job for a bright young 
lady who is well presented. 
Previous legal experience not 
essential. Approx £9,000. 
Write with C.V. to: 

Mrs. C. CoIIfe, 

Third Floor* . v. - 
11, Waterloo Place, 
London, SW1Y 4AU. : 

. ... 


Country Pr op ert y 


'Philli p Ashle Y* 


ESTATE AGENTS 


AVENUE ROAD 
SL Johns Wbod NWS 

\ magnificent detached house 
wflh landscaped gardens. 
House arranged on 4 
Bedroom Bats. FREEHOLD 
pnoeonappl. 

SOLE AGENTS 

PtMUCO 

Large Victorian 3 bedroom. 2 
bain maisonette with private 
terrace, utility ire. and guest 
ctoak room. Marble ana 
Mahogany Entrance. Pat 
Free***! £785.000. 

SOLE AGENTS 


PORTUGAL HOLIDAYS 

ESTORIL- CASCAIS 
Beautifully set vflas and 
apartments with gardens arai 
poois, tor Rent or Sate. Book 
now for tax years paces. 

SOLE AGENTS 


HANOVER GATE MANa 



2l-Z2Gfosvreoi Stum 
Lona»W7X9FE 
Tefeohon# 01-6099226 
Tata 264419 BTFG 


c Phillip 
Ashley ~ 

Wishes you a Happy 
Easter. We are open 


day over the 

bedrooms. 1/2 rocep. plus Holklau 

pnvale garden nouoay. 


Freehold share. £155.000. 


SUES, RENTALS. MORTGAGES, 
SMKVS.WIBWnDES«. 

DEWJJB>*Brt*«VES. 


Country Property 


*S?S?RJ!5f?^£S^ to 


next to Regents Park. 
£200.000. including lux. 
contents. 


REGENTS PARK 

A selection of one and two 
bedroom flats with Park views. 
Long and short leases 
avaakte. £60.000 UP. 


CASTELLA1N ROAD 

A set back 2/3 Bed garden 
floor flat wiBi private garden 
plus appr. 3 acres comfTHjn^ 
gardens. Long tease. £99,850. 


PRINCE ALBERT 

A brighi 2 Bedroom apartment 
£140.000. 


MAID A VALE 

Newly decorated ground flewr 
3 Bed. 2 Bath apartmem m a 
large mansion block. 

£f 19.950. Long tease. 


WIMPOLE STREET 
2 Bed, 2 Bath apartment in 
ttxs excellent location. 

Long lease. £150.000. 


BOURNEMOUTH. Modern PENT 
HOISI MaBnirK-»nl >wwv 
urw bay A I of WnM a r*c 
nm. tun Inw?. hi!. 5 

tKUrrm J. ikferqrfttf /«>r S 

rjr* Suprrt) .nfler t£ 2 SCW 
Blatw Horv- Aocnnet Ru rmey 
A Punwv T« 0202 
761221 21912 


vunraoo duxsct. him 
■ mra ttyie Me dMe-gar 
G.F CH 2 tkolhf non. M ainH 
\ el oar niurdt Nr In «h. 
p art. banks, rbry. local ihoov. 
pnud £72.500 QUO. B'moulh 
12 mim R«mu> UtunedL oma>. 
0202 824507 

RLE OF WIOHT. Uhp IOOi Cm- 
rury r am home in Maiid 
rural wmalkai Miing a acres. 
OOck) outhuliainqs plus ««para(e 
hWJtew. Main house rui 4 
bedrooms 4 reception rooms, 
ele Bumnlou has 2 bedrooms. 

I Pull He Unis WATSON. BILL A 
PORTER >0985) 520844 

mncaARTOMsinte, 
o—wne i Close to MT4. MR. 
M9 4 Bedroomrd dfMcMd 
bungalow in eMtuUv* estate, 
integral Qiiae etc Many atktt- 
uonm iNhjrcs. Ollns n«r 
£68.000. Tel: 02367 24156 

i unet NR CRANTHAM Comerl. 

I ed former roach nouse FCH. 
3 5 beds. 2 Dutti > acre 
£95 000 Vin- F. lanes I04T«| 
60909 

UNCS MB CRANTHAM unique 
former school house. J 4 ret 
S 6 hods. 5 huh. d Me MV. 
Grade n usied. £99^00. view 
r.lnnm 1 0*761 60909. 

LWCS NR CRANTHAM Grade n 
tided house G acres, nan. 
roreoL 5 beds. 3 baths, swim- 
mi i*9 POOLCI os.ooo. View 
FJnnes *04761 60909. 

U"tt w CRANTHAM Immacu- 
■alely lauuurd del house. 3 
beds. 3 r crews. 2 oath, dblevgp. 

walled qdn CR6 <500 View 
F runes >0«7o> OOW 

UNCS NR CRANTHAM bKftvld. 

ual done lector ptrrurroauo 
'uunirs stde Scooe lor renesa- 
non *■ acre 1.45.000 view 
Flnnes >IM76> 60909 

LINOS NR STAMFORD imm« 
apoomu-d 5 »sr Mem ronane 
FCH ronsienanl tor Ai 
CS9 750 Vk-1. f Innes >Oa7oi 
60909 

UNCS NR CRANTHAM Maqnrii- 

renl -oo yr Ota rotla9e ) 

rereps.S oed«. 2 (uins dbleu«>. 

rcH. obm tJt jt £92.500 t m> 

F Innes -0476. 6o arm 


NR BOSTON UNCS BumialoiM vl 
in Mround, ut nearts' 3 aerev 5 
IM',. 2 n*Ui. FCH. OOle >mc. 
rs 5.000. Mew r.Umn >04 n,t 
60909. 


M.13MIN. Charming lira 
nedroorned matched Couage. 

Two fine reception v»m» inqie 

nodks and exposed beams. 
Modern rufly fitted kitchen. 
About Hi acre lawra. £69.500. 
0980 620648 


NR. MLTCM, Emfiantlftq matched 
cottage in sought after Hamp- 
shire t'lUage within easy access 
of London and south Coni 
Price. £120.000 Anpty: Wetlar 
CdOar. 0420 82601. 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


CWF STEAD. RENT. FurMriied 
17th Oncury perloa house « 
Bedrooms <2 douuei. 2 bath- 
rooms. down sta irs cloakroom, 
dining room, swing room, 
study, large fully fined kitchen. 
Uliliar room, large playroom. 
Wailed garden. Central neanng. 
30 minutes train front Central 
London, easy reach Oahvtck. 
Heathrow airports Ava* lame 
(Tom May-lU £600 per monUi 
CWI: 0732-4S20B2 before 9 
a.m. and after 6 pan. 


NKNT, D ee r e an ' ■ enchanting 
unan Ceorgian Noose lo let nr 
Tunprtdge Weds. Sum foreign 
ouriooMts. Term agreed ac- 
cording lo length of let 
Soectarutar view from houe 
and gardens AvallaMe Immedt- 
aieu Tel: OI Z36 1462. 


OALLOWAV COAST to let 2 wN 
roniamed flaN in lute A IMed 
Country house overlooking the 
sea. CH. Garage. Telephone 
Long tenet offered. Details 
*rom CC Grieve A Co. i% 
K!g? str” 1 - Douglas, 

klrkrudbiigmshlre OC7 :D8 
Tet Castle Dougsas <OS56i 2964. 


NEW HOMES 


USAS COWL 6 m<*N from 
Sherbornp. SO Indlsidua] prop- 
ernes a barn conversion in a 
oeOqhllully urauue selling. 
Lamp penis, archways, cobbles 
etc 5 A 4 bedrmd houses <i 
bungakws COS 950 lo 
£6? 600, Clients may Choose 
I ilctieti 6 bauiroom Imingv All 
amrmiim in nearby 
Tomphromhe Vatareiie Build 
ers 102581 820414. 





ADMIN/PA 

£10,000 

INTERNATIONAL FINANCE 
COMPANY MAYFAIR 

Otrr charming Group Financial Controller needs 
a secretary /assistant 

Requirements are experience within fin a nci a l 
environment, administrative ability, excellent 
secretarial skills, friendly disposition anti a sense 
of humour. 

For further details please call: 

Irene Woods 
01-493 5518 


ADMIN/PA 

ENegotiable + benefits 
INTERNATIONAL FINANCE 
COMPANY MAYFAIR 

Our young corporate council requires a polished, 
professional admin secretary 10 assist him in the 
running of the legal deparment. 

Excellent secretarial skills and legal experience 
are essential together with a confident and 
friendly personality. 

For further details please calk 

Irene Woods 
01 493 5518 


FASHION CONSULTANCY 


Lia: w JTciitJi 


Are looking-for a secretary/PA to work in excit- 
ing and growing business- Skiffs required an 
shorthand 90wpm, typing SOwpm, good tele- 
phone manner, bookkeeping, knowledge of 
design helpful although not wacnriaL Position 
involves general office man a gem ent and for the 
right candidates opportunity to be mvohned in 
derign presentation work. Good personality, en- 
thusiastic and wen presented, age 25 plus, salary 
negotiable. •, ; ; 

. . Tab 01-SS4 9321 


BUSY ARCHITECT/DIRECTOR 

Of an cxna n tftna deals n company tvganUy rtcMrea a 
brtghL enihoatattc PA/sccntesy- bim sttoa and varied 
work, normal secretarial skm) and wp aaaenttaL Car drtw 
«r. Salary ncnottebte. 

Ptease write wtoi cv to; 

MacMn JDestgra UL 
« Avenue Studfas. 

Sydney Close. London SW3 6HW. • 


■"s™, KMtmau Watarfrom 

naairom £89.980. cats cartro. 
Banmy. a boat. Oat on. Can 
l«i* Martin - 109731 977983 
ThuMiupi to Monday lOJKtan 
lo SJ Onrn or Jmm Otan - 
<02791 49S0DI. 

soMmrr hr bath unoty 
!»W- ,"«!* rwungs. 40 n 
L/rm. In i* acre* + v largr 
new dcUchM Sludm. suaMr 
JtietLooo Tel; 
0761-233399 or 239390 
■Aril CM- OmvbM WWuffl 
«nn miUhouw, a aeugntrui 
dwetang* »hte hy MO IBaern. 
TOO yoa mu stream. Slew 
Bonds, athbfe. amstr occommo- 
ouon inehidlne lam 
MiMm workshop. OOert 

around £i3OlO0o each or as a 

whole .07611 39197. 

60MOBCT. Croscemhe, Nr 
W HU Atnrthie del tgr rot- 
W9T. 9«wr iXBUMn. 4» Snh. 2 
bailw one en wlir Fun CH. 3 
Rer. KUrti. BteOy Miarhed barn 
lull PJ> Grannese. AmgH 
aarautt. garde n s angrotr Vm 
amt. F H C7BJS00 0749 3995 


PROPERTY TO LET 

COUNTRY 


*t***T. Pe»r«"t aei enchanting 
small Oroiglan house to lei nr 
Tunbridge Wells. SuH ioream 
diMomais. Terms agreed x- 
rording to tengui ot m. 
Sbectaeuur' vtew from houw 

BM gardens. Avauatue immetb- 

atoty- TeL Ol 339 1432. 


ADVERTISING 
CONTINUED ON 
PAGE 23 

















































r. -J* 


SJ'Ji ^k--’. 


THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1 986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Tanked Lebanese loyalties herald bloodiest battles 



■ 

- • 

1 - , ■* 
•• - _ 

. . ' *** wC 
■ »- . *^s 

** -rx * 

•; 


• •' -^ap 




! *' * “ «« 


" ■* 




.. r* 1 

• V. 

■ M -VJ IP* 

” 'a— 
.-iS I* 11 —. 


«« «« 


key to fundamentalist strife 


pieDnizearere^rnj 
In the past few 


nffiftnrecentfy bought in Vfeo- 
njU^tave bees dispensed 
Jbeallj jp the street veterans. 

a™* Hamra. Eves 
W afifi JumWatt’s aomml mjK. 
tjuy parade of old T ; S4 tanks 
*rwgh the rained streets of 
was - called off in case 
Beirut 
ret aboot (t, 

^pthd knows, or thinks he 
knonis; wlmt is coming: the 
most savage street battles in 
years between the Drnze, with 
their communist 'and ■ SsranJ 
Muslim allies, and the Shia 
Mrahm forces 'represented by 
Nabih Berri's AmaJ 
movement 

In reality the - conflict will 
represent a much more sinister 
and c ritical straggle as Syria . 
mges its most secular militia 
allies in west Beirut to tear 
mto the forces of the powerful 
Hezbollah, which has not only 
eclipsed the decfinmg AmaJ 
hot now' Bolds sway, over much 
of the city^s /MncBm. sector, 
mocking even Syria's attempts 
to .imp ose its wfll on the- 
country. . . ••'• .• 

So grave has the crisis 
become that President Assad 
of Syria Is said to have raised 
it personall y vrit h the Soviet 
leadership daring a visit to 
Moscow he reportedly made, 
last Thursday. 


B ri g adi e r General Ghari 
Kaaaan; the. head of Syrian 
-miufaiy intelligence, has re- 
peatedly visited the Shift refi- 
gons leaders of west Besot in 
the past three months to try to 
persuade them to stop sop- 
Porting the HezboHah. - 
His warts are sot taken 
lightly. After 1 remonstrating 
wkh die equally recalcitrant 
Sanni - extremist leader* 


V Oti, one. efd»she&h> closest 
aides was britally nmrdered. 
Few of the shefl^V followers 
dooht that flie Syrians killed 
him. - 

Hezbollah key to 
unfbldirig drama 

To the West, and to many 
A rab g rates, the Hezbollah is a 
frig ht e ning phenomenon, mi 
extreme pro-Iranian move- 
ment that is imposing Islamic 
tew to large areas of Lebanon, 
kidnapping westerners* stag- 
ing suicide attacks on- Israeli 
occu p a ti on troops and execst- 
iug “agents'* in BehmL . 

The organizations that exist 
■wi th i n it -r Jstemic Jihad, for. .' 
example, which holds at lost 
foar Americans god ' seven. 
Frenchmen captive —_are in- 
variably described by western 
news agencies as secretive or 
shadowy. There is some troth 
in these descriptions: bst the 
real story of the HezboHah, its 
disputes with rival poops in 
Lebanon, the growth of its 


Ban stifles I US threat 


meeting on 
free media 

From Christopher FoHett 
■’ Copenhagen^ • . . 

A. dispute bver.restrictioiis 
on !pres'«ovpg preceded 
the opening^ ia Ctipenfiagen 
yesterday ofa meeting on the 
flow of information sponsored 
by the United Nations and 
Unesco. 

At an introductory press 
briefing before the second 
international . round ttibie 
meeting on a new world 
information and communica- 
tions Order, Mr DDeep 
Padgaonkar, the hidiaB-born 
Director of the Division of' 
Free 

Communications ar UrteSCO- 
in PanVderoaade d - timt - j oug-- 
nalists Tforveiiiig" tbeTuuTei-' 1 
ence. recei ve'^clearaiicr' 
permission from participants 
before quoting front-, their 
speeches or papers* a. V.w S Jjj 

Correspondents, ^ who. saw 
this move asa^Wafabt <reKtfe»' 
tio'n on ' their press freedom, 
were' told that such a proce- 
dure was necessary to ensure 
correct coverage of the. meet- 
ing and engender a freer 
debate among participants. . 

Topping the agenda is an 
assessment of the internation- 
al flow of information. , 

Proposals are also On the 
table to redress the imbalance 
(between East and - West, 
North and South, and .the 
Third 'Woridand the Industri- 
al democracies)', on;, media 
freedom, wprid -cOrnmunkar 
lion developments an dT access 
to, and participation in, com- 
munication globally. : ' 

The final report is to be 
submitted to the UN General 
Assembly at the end of the 
Copenhagen session. 


alarms 

Portugal 

FromMarthadelaCal 

Portuguese.;. exporters and 
government officials are wor- 
, jjed; ty. President* Reagan’s 
threats to ' restrict imports 
from EEC countries . on the 
grounds that the recent entry 
of Portugal and Spain win cost 
the US SI billion a year in lost 
agricultural exports, particu- 
larly cereal, soya beans and 
cooking oils. 

The Secretary of State for 
European Integration, Senhor 
Vftor Martins, said Portugal 
iwas concerned that the US 
might , restrict basic PDrtn- 
guese exports such as teine and 

to sucft restne- 
-iionv -but would prefer to 
negotiate^itiirougfc tbfe EEC,, 
anti would: support, every ef- 
•foftTy the EEC ^ fipach an 
agreement--' r' « — ma jw v 

- $33"Wil-~ 

lion worth of wine and spirits 
to the US each year, and 
exports of textiles have been 
increasing*, so; rapidly that 
American manufoctiirers'have 
become atenned. ' 

On the other hatxLPortugal 
has been buying most of its 
cereals and cooldng oils from 
the US, although the hi^i 
value of the dollar has caused 
the amount to be cut back ! 
from $700 mfllion 1 worth of 
-wheat,- soya beans and other ! 
food products m 1 984 to $428 j 
miflionJast ^ar:i' •<’ ; 

Under .the: ^EEC agreement, 
Portugal m ust buy at feast 1 5 J 
per cent of its cereal from foe 
Community for a transition 
period of five years. 

The US Administration 
says this is a violation of the 
GATT treaty. 


Scandal of $lm awards 






ul 


TT 

ihl 


— .« 

IT 


1 

cx . 


From Christopher Thomas, Washington 


President Reagan ptaas to 
introduce legislation. to control 
runaway damages awards by 
American juries. 1 . 

Doctors m paroanar are 
being soed at record rates by 
patients wlto can become in- 
stantly rich because ofn minor 
medical error. The average 
medical malpractice awar ds by 
mries last year fen ffie first 
time topped $1 million 
(£667,000). • • 

Th« le^sbtwn propose 
signifi ouit changes m liability 
insurance coverage, P™* 8 
mduding cleariy defined lim- 
its on the awards juries can 
make.. Contingency lawyers 
who often become weafthy 
overnight by taking a percent- 
age of damages awards may 
have their fees fimfted- ^ 

White House officials Be- 
lieve that some.of the steam 
may be token ****** 
“damages mdustry dneetew- 
ySTfind such case* le» 

lucrative. 

The madness that seems to 
have gripped so 
damages cases «« demon- 
strated graphk^^fj^ 
when a jary m 
awarded more than $1 mfflmo 
toa woman who blamedabody 


soui for the toss of her psychic 
powers. - • 

:' Judith Hairaes had daimed 
that as a resufrof the scan she 
suffered - severe. : headaches 
when she- tried to ose her 
psychic powers. . . 

Insurance cover is now ran- 
available ter. many areas ra 
America -bemuse of fears by 
insurance companies of 
swingeing jmy awards. -Ice 
risks .and .fairgrounds have 

dosed aO over the country 
because they can no longer 
afford cover.. 

Man y. states have already 
made it more, difficult for 
victims to recover large finan- 
cial judgments, bat the White 
House says that it wants 
federal action to avert a crisis 
to the insurance industry 
- The legislation will propose 
that damages may be Po orer 
time and wiH change tews to 
provide a-more reaiistk as- 
sessment of responsibility m 

riaims. - 

A report prepared by Prea- 
deh t Reagan's Domestic Poli- 
cy Council said ttat a 
“veritable explosion m the 
definition of liability had led to 
a crisis that called for reform. 


Haiti police chief held 

Rio * ajto <AB T 

Colonel Afoot asylum on Fcbnianr 25. 

{° T ™ r ^^pSSSi-Prince, Golonel Pierre, aged55. to 
Ham capital, been accused of torture and 

has been mmtier by political prisoner? 

pending ^ ^ formerdictotOT; 

He amved on govW^ 11 ®^ Jean-Claude Duyafier, . -fled 
orders wi* fos fiaiti- The two couittricatave 


(X: 






Centre-stage players in Lebanon's unfolding tragedy: President Assad of Syria, Mr Nabih 
Beni, the Sitia Amal leader, and Ayatollah Khomeini of Iran. 


power and Iranian funding, 
provide an essential Insight 
into the drama bow unfolding. 

Hezbollah's roots are 
twined not Only around the 
foundations of the Iranian 
revohitioa but the growth of 
the Iraqi opposition Daawa 
party. Lebanese writers now 
trace its origins to a meeting in 
the Iraqi city of Najaf m 1969 
where the idea of a Skta 
revolution in Lebanon was 
first advanced. A number of 
Sfaia leaders and clergymen 
who attended have since her 
.come household names in 
Lebanon and In the files of 
western intelligence agencies. 
The discussions took place at 
the home of Muhammad Bakr 
Sadr.au Iranian ayatollah and 
dose friend of Ayatollah 
Khomeini. 

Sitting beside Muhammad 
ffaitr was the Iranian imam, 
Moussa Sadr, already well 
known as a teacher among the 
rural poor east of the Lebanese 


a Shia cleric who now lives in 
the Lebanese town of 
Baasyribelu Muhammad Bakr 
told Moussa Sadr to return to 
Tyre and to found groups for 
Islamic indoctrination. Two 
other Shia figures, Muham- 
mad Hussein Fadlallah and 
Mehdl Shamseddin, were sent 
to Lebanon to establish coir 
leges In Beirut 
Moussa Sadr, who now led a 
Lebanese **Sbia Higher 
Council* was, in his way, a 
constitutionalist, demanding 
equality for Lebanon's grow- 
ing Shia population within the 
existing structure of a Chris- 
tian-dominated government. 
The influence of the Daawa, 
which opposed Christian gov- 
ernment for Muslims, was 
curbed only when Sadr found- 
ed the “Lebanese Resistance 
Brigades'*, whose Arabic 
name produced the acronym 
Amal 

Sadr disappeared in Libya 


in 1978 — almost certainly 
murdered after a dispute with 
Colonel Gadaffi — but in the 
following year his “higher 
coundr, taking advantage of 
Kbomeinfs triumphant revo- 
lution, sent a delegation to 
Tehran led by Shamseddin. 
While the Iranian leader ap- 
parently evinced tittle enthusi- 
asm for Sadr’s “return’' — the 
fiction being maintained that 
be was missing rather than 
dead — Khomeini did insist 
that the Daawa should merge 
with Amal. 

Amal became the 
only Shia voice 

The Lebanese magazine ash- 
Shiraa, which has carried a 
learned analysis of 
Hezbollah’s origins, believes 
that by so doing, Khomeini 
was trying to bring all Shia 
groups under his own control. 
Amal thus became the only 


Shia representative movement 
in Lebanon, its voice projected 
in Iran b> hs Tehran represen- 
tative. Sheikh Ibrahim al- 
Amine. 

Bet at the height of Israel’s 
invasion of Lebanon In 1982, 
AmaJ's secular, westernized 
leader, Beni, agreed to join a 
Lebanese •'government of na- 
tional salvation** which was 
obliged to negotiate with the 
Americans for an Israeli 
withdraw aL 

In Iran, al-Amine de- 
nounced Bern while Berri's 
deputy. Hussein Monssawi, 
left Beirut to found a rival 
Amal movement in 
Baasyrlbek. Their followers 
borrowed the name used the 
previous year by those Irani- 
ans opposed to Abolhassan 
Ban E-Sadr’s presidency in 
Tehran — Hezbollah, the Par- 
ty of God. 

It was they whom the CIA 
believed were behind the 
bombing of the US marine 
base in Beirut in October 1983 
and whom Washington also 
suspects are holding most of 
the western hostages kid- 
napped in Lebanon. 

Since 1982, Iran has ceased 
to deal with Amal — which is 
why Mr Bern has recently 
been ineffective in securing the 
hostages' release: Bern's 
“takeover" of Hezbollah's hi- 
jacking of the TWA jet test 
year marked the end of any 
hope of Amal-lranian recon- 
ciliation. AI-Amine is now the 
spiritual leader of the 
Hezbollah in Beirut 


Ex-leaders 
unite to 
confront 
Khomeini 

By Hazhir Telmourian 

With talk in Tehran of a 
new offensive against Iraq 
north of the city of Basra. 
Iran's internal opposition - 
still clinging to a precarious 
existence — has merged to 
form an umbrella organiza- 
tion to facilitate its "struggle 
against despotism". 

The Alliance for the De- 
fence of Liberty and the 
Sovereignty of the Iranian 
Nation is composed of the 
Freedom Movement led by 
the Islamic republic's first 
prime minister. Dr Mehdi 
Bazargan. and senior figures 
from the old National Front 
ihc former liberal opposition 
grouping whose deputy leader. 
Dr Shahpour Bakhtiar. 
formed the Iasi government 
before the revolution of Feb- 
ruary 1979. 

The National Front repre- 
sentatives in the new organi- 
zation include Mr Ali 
Ardatan. a former economy 
minister, and Dr Assadollah 
Mobashery. a former minister 
of justice in Dr Bazargan's 
Cabinet. The alliance's hard- 
hitting. nine-page opening 
statement a copy of which has 
reached Europe, incurred 
Ayatollah Khomeini's wrath. 

In a recent speech, referring 
to alliance opposition to the 
war with Iraq, he said: "Such 
Muslims are worse than 
infidels." 


Iran hits 
tankers 
from Gulf 
helipad 

Bahrain (Reuter) — Iran is 
using an oil platform in the 
middle of the Gulf as a base 
from which helicopters attack 
tankers, shipping industry, 
sources said yesterday. 

Helicopters arc believed to 
have attacked at least 14 ships 
this year from the platform, 
known as Rostam Island, in 
the centre of an oilfield about 
65 miles from the Iranian 
mainland and close to ship- 
ping lanes for Arab Gulf ports. 
Since it started using Rostam 
late last year, the focus of 
Iran's attacks has moved east- 
wards in the Gulf. 

Previous strikes centred on 
an area of shallows known as 
the Shah AJlum shoal, closer 
to Qatar’s northern tip. Most 
were carried out by F4 Phan- 
toms based on Lavan Island, 
just off the Iranian mainland. 

The sources said the captain 
or the Panamanian tanker. 
Stelios. reported that a heli- 
copter. which fired a rocket at 
his ship last Sunday, took off 
from the Rostam helipad. 

Iran is short of jets and use- 
of helicopters in these attack*" 
frees fixed-wing aircraft to 
support its ground offensive^, 
further north. * 

• NICOSIA: Iran said yester- 
day that its navy had inter-* 
ceptcd a cargo ship near the 
Strait of Hormuz and taken it 
to a southern port because it, 
suspected the ship was carry- 
ing goods for Iraq (AP, 
reports). 


ere 

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10 


SPECTRUM 


Ambitions of a loyal all-rounder 


V ' 


ITHE TIMESI 


PROFILE 


SIR GEOFFREY HOWE 


T he Foreign Secretary has 
been heard to claim that 
the nearest he ever came 
to sporting attainment 
was “runner-up to the best loser” 
in an army boxing context. 
Roughly the same level of achieve- 
ment met his aspirations for the 
Conservative Party leadership in 
19 75, when he collected a few 
handfuls of votes in the second- 
ballot contest in which Margaret 
Thatcher defeated Willie White- 

law. 

Now, however. Geoffrey Howe 
scores high in the who-next con- 
versations enjoyed by any political 
party that has bad the same leader 
for more than a decade.“Howe if 
it's quick. Hurd if it's slow” sums 
up much political discussion 
about the succession, after both 
Michael Heseltine and Leon 
firittan had retired hurt from the 
Cabinet arena. 

Douglas Hurd is, in fact, less 
than four years younger than Sir 
Geoffrey, who will be 60 this year. 
But Hurd, newly sprung to promi- 
nence as Home Secretary, appears 
to belong to the younger genera- 
tion of Tory politicians. 

This is partly because Howe 
has. by now. notched up more top 
departmental offices than any 
other Cabinet member. As the life- 
histories of two other former 
Chancellors, Denis Healey and 
Roy Jenkins, all too clearly dem- 
onstrate, proven experience never 
provides a secure platform for a 
jump at party leadership. And not 
even the greatest of Howe’s admir- 
ers would argue that he was a 
political performer of the bril- 
liance of either Healey or Jenkins 
at their best. But dogged persis- 
tence, steadiness under political 
fire and sheer Ukeability are 
qua) i tites strong enough to make it 
worth having another try. should 
the opportunity arise in time. 
Howe's political career has pro- 
gressed continuously, if not steadi- 
ly. From a modest middle-class 
Welsh background, be distin- 
guished himself by winning an 
exhibition to Winchester. Once on 
that track, he moved naturally to 
Cambridge, to the Bar, and to the 
usual profusion of committees 
that make up the 'curriculum vitae 


of tbe aspiring politician. Two 
contests in a “hopeless” Welsh 
seat were followed by two years as 
member for Bebington. between 
J964 and 1966. Back in Parlia- 
ment by 1970, as Solicitor-Gener- 
al for Edward Heath, he was 
credited with responsibility for the 
ill-fated i97| industrial Relations 
Act, an albatross that hung round 
his neck for some time. 

Five years' apprenticeship shad- 
owing Healey, then Chancellor, 
led to that post in Mrs Thatcher's 
Government. Immediately, he ran 
into trouble again. Big Tory pay 
promises to public sector unions, 
combined with an over-amibitous 
first Budget and an optimistic 
monetary policy 1 , quickly ran gov- 
ernment economic policy into the 
sand. Typically, Howe hung on, 
and recovered. 


T he 1981 Budget was criti- 
cal It was tough and 
unpopular, but in retro- 
spect was the turning 
point of Sir Geoffrey’s career. 
Under his Chancellorship, the 
Conservatives were re-elected 
against a background of record 
unemployment, but with output 
rising and inflation low. 

The comparison with Hurd is 
instructive in another way. The 
Home Secretary stands for the 
“wet" image of the Conservative 
party, the Foreign Secretary for 
the “dry"; but both do so in a 
subdued fashion. 

Some would say, indeed, that 
Geoffrey Howe's lack of attack 
was his greatest political defect. 
The comment by his old oppo- 
nent. Healey, that being attacked 
by Howe was like being savaged 
by a dead sheep has stuck in 
political memories. Sir Geoffrey is 
a thinker, but he is not an orator; 
loo often, political journalists 
have been alerted to the prospect 
of an epoch-making speech by 
Howe, only to search in vain for a 
headline note. 

Vet his words are worth listen- 
ing to, for they come from 
somewhere close to the heart of 
the Conservative party. Even 
though Sir Geoffrey's lime at the 
Treasury epitomized the change in 
economic policy associated with 



IBIOGRAPHYI 


1926: Born December 20 at Port 
Tatoot, Glamorgan. Educated 
at winchester College and 


Trinity HaH, Cambridge 
*5-8: Lk - 


1945-8: Lieutenant in Royal Sig- 
nals. Chairman Cambridge 
University - Conservative 
. Association 

1952: Called to the Bar, Middle 
Temple 

1953: Married Bspeth Rosamund 
Morton Shand 

1955: Chairman Bow Group. 
Contested Aberavon and 
again in 1959 

1964-6: Elected MP for 

Bebington 

1965: Opposition front bench 
spokesman on labour and 
social services. Queen's. 
Counsel 

1970: Elected MP far Reigate 
(subsequently Surrey East}. 
Appointed Soficitor-Genera! 
by Edward Heath, and sub- 
sequently knighted. 


1972: Minister for Trade and 
Consumer Affairs. Privy 
Councilor. 

1974: Opposition front bench 
spokesman on social 
services. 


1975: Stands lor Tory leadership 
. Mrs Thatcher wins. Ap- 
pointed "Shadow 

ChanceBor” by Mrs Thatcher. 

1979: ChanceBor of the Ex- 
chequer. First Budget raises 
VAT to 15 per amt and cuts 
basic rate of income tax to 30 
percent 

1981: Third Budget cuts public 
borrowing 

1983: Fifth and last Budget 
precedes general election by 
cutting income tax. After elec- 
tion, moves to become For- 
eign Secretary _ A 

1984: Clinches deal with Chinese m 
Government on the future of 
Hong Kong 



;/ , • r 
! r ■-•V. 


i V- 




Howe the opportunity to demon- 
strate the skills he most enjoys. As 
Chancellor — again, in marked 
contrast to Nigel Lawson — he 
revelled in -the globe-trotting that 
went with the job. As Foreign 


Secretary, he enjoys displaying the 
expertise of a former Chancellor, 


particularly in the internecine 
financial warfare that character- 
izes most meetings of the Europe- 
an council of foreign ministers — 
of which he will take on the 
chairmanship in the second half of 
this year. Nine years on the 
international circuit of finance 
and foreign ministers has given 
him a useful even friendly ac- 
quaintance with most of his kind. 


is taken seriously in international 
affairs. 

With (he greater confidence 
engendered by this experi e nce, his 
public performances are improv- 
ing. allowing his natural good 
humour to show through. He has 
always tried to take pains over his 
televirion appearances, remem- 
bering such details as the need to 
wear the right kind of spectacles. 

if tbe political lottery never 
gives Howe a second chance at 
party leadership, be is equipped to 
move gracefully into the next 
generation of respected, even 
loved, elder statesmen. For that at 
least, he has reason to thank Mrs 
Thatcher. 


* 


Thatcherism, his image never 
acquired the hard sheen of the far 
righL 

Perhaps this is because the 
House of Commons retains con- 
siderable fondness for Sir Geof- 
frey, an advantage his more 
aggressive successor cannot count 
on. Perhaps it is because his wife, 
Elspeih. rounds the image by 
voicing more forthright views of 
her own than any other cabinet 

K ier, particularly those stimu- 
by her time as vice-chairman 
of the Equal Opportunities 
Commission. • • 


Some say that Elspeth Howe is 
her husband’s most determinal 
backer for the leadership; others 
that she is his greatest asset She 
remains, however, remarkably 
free of the fo/ie de grandeur which 
tempts Foreign Secretaries’ wives 
The Howes' down-to-earth ap- 
proach has survived despite the 
fad that the trappings of the job 
can be compared only to the 
Prime Minister’s. The Foreign 
Office is grand enough, if gloomy. 
The Foreign Secretary’s London 
residence, just off The Mali, is 
brighter, though it still reeks of 


officialdom. But the jewel in the 
Foreign Secretary's crown is a 
relatively new acquisition; Che ve- 
iling, the exquisite bequest to the 
nation by the Earl of Stanhope, 
now established as the Foreign 
Secretary’s country residence. 

Perhaps, however, Howe's soft- 
right image is the product of his 
transfer to a job where the petty 
divisions of British politics are 
singularly unimportant, and 
where — in the negotiations over 
the future of Hong Kong — ibe • 
secured his most obvious success. 
The Foreign Office has given 


When Howe first arrived, after 
the 1983 election, the Foreign 
Office was mouldering m the long 
shadow thrown by its failure to 
anticipate the Falklands War. To 
begin with, Howe was seen as too 
much bis mistress's puppet; Mrs 
Thatcher's instinctive urge to be 
her own Foreign Secretary, as well 
as her own Chancellor, seemed to 
leave Howe as a mere bag-carrier. 
Early events — the Grenada 
debacle, and still worse the embar- 
rassingly mishandled business of 
trade union membership at 
GCHQ in Cheltenham — did little 
to encourage Howe's party to 
believe things would go better if he 
did seize the reins of the Foreign 
Office. 

Hong Kong changed that If the 
Foreign Secretary still cannot 


conm on getting bis. way with the 
•Prime Minister, his fraedomuof 
manoeuvre has increased, and he 


S ome unkindry say this is 
because he constitutes no 
threat; tut it is worth 
remembering that is tbe 
1975 contest he got no fewer votes 
than James Prior, seen as too big a 
threat ever to be given a top job. 

Howe shares tbe Prime Mini- 
steps ability to go foriong periods 
with little sleep, a simple fserthat 
may explain much in their politi- 
cal partnership. He displays, at tbe 
same time, a greater capacity for 
enjoying himself. 

It is typical erf the Howes, in 
India this week, to take time to 
snap each other outside the Taj 
Mahal. And even if Howe is not 
built on exactly the same elegant 
lines as Rajiv Gandhi, one must 
hope that the family album will 
include some of him in that pretty 
vellow turban. ■ 


Sarah Hogg 




: r !••**'-. ;■ 
- • r • .• 



TIMETABLE 


l978;Bank ecmrrossfons ' 

- feasibility studies to . 
consider options for the 
redevelopment of 1 
Queen's Road Central 
1979: June: Seven firms of 
architects, induefing Foster 
Associates, invited to 
submit proposals for a new 
headquarters bidding 
November Foster 
Associates appointed 
architect 

198fh February: Foster 
Associates confirmed 
October John jLok/VVirnpey 
Joint Venture appointed as 
management cont racto r 

1981: June: 1935 building 
doses its doors tor the last 
time - 
July. Management 
contractor's appointment 
confirmed 


SPECIFICATION 


Coot: 250Qmfl»on {HK95.QOO 
: £5J)00 per 


to the 


1982: Fe 
of the final: 

Bank 

July: Site preparation work 
commences 


Sun-scraper Norman Foster's first sketch for his son-scoop (left), beaming light into the centre of the bank, and how his 
office masterpiece dominates the old and modern buildings along Hong Kong’s crowded shoreline 


Banking’s jewel in the crown 


The world’s most expensive 
new office building will be 
formally opened in the world's 
foremost capitalist city on 
Monday night when Sir Ed- 
ward Youde, Governor of 
Hong Kong, performs the 
ceremony at the £500 million 
headquarters of the Hongkong 
Bank. 

Its creator is the British 
architect and Royal Gold 
Medallist Norman Foster, 
whose design is a masterpiece 
of engineering and co-ordina- 
tion of more than 100 sub- 


Rising above Hong Kong’s business centre 
is the world’s most innovative bank. 


a symbol of the colony’s faith in the future 


contractors and suppliers 
from 80 countries around the 
globe. The skyscraper, which 
at less than 600ft high is small 
by American standards, is also 
the most advanced in terras of 
office accommodation. It in- 
corporates more than 1.800 
miles of electronic and com- 
munications cabling and a 



CONFERENCE 


GUERNSEY 


Manyof trie best known names in Britain— and on the 
Continent have held meetings in Guernsey. 

Top executive meetings; Incentive groups; conf eren ces 
for over 1,000 delegates; Guernsey can provideafffre 
facilities in a unique atmos ph ere that's British but abroad. 

For fun mformatkmon meetings At Guernsey p/ess e con ta ct 


flexibility of usable space 
which should ensure its lon- 
gevity despite the rapid evolu- 
tion of banking technology. 

Located at the heart of 
Hong Kong's bui^eoning busi- 
ness district facing mainland 
Kowloon, the building occu- 
pies the site used by the bank 
since the middle of the last 
century. The 1935 building 
demolished to make way for 
its successor was. in its day, 
the tallest and most sophisti- 
cated building in Asia. 

Similarly. Foster's design 
eschews the conventional con- 
crete frame and glass cunain 
walls which characterize Hong 
Kong, like every other devel- 
oped city. Instead he has 
devised a revolutionary struc- 


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ture which marks the most 
dramatic advance since tbe 
steel-framed “cathedrals of 
commerce" were built in New 
York and Chicago 100 years 
ago. 

The building is being seen 
as a symbol of the almost 
unbridled optimism that ex- 
ists about the future of the 
colony when it is handed over 
to Communist China in 11 
years' time. It sits happily 
amid the conspicuous wealth 
and work ethic of its sur- 
roundings. a jewel of industri- 
al design and precision 
engineering writ large, and 
also a potent corporate sym- 
bol now featured on the bank’s 
own HKS10G notes. 

Its structure has been com- 
pared with that of the pagoda 
in its elegant and obvious use 
of materials. This allows it to 
seem almost transparent at 
night when its interior is tit up 
against the sky. Eight masts of 
tubular steel cany suspended 
steel misses which support the 
floors. 

Lateral movement is re- 
strained against typhoon con- 
ditions by “flying braces'* both 
inside and out. doing away 
with the traditional central 
core which usually houses the 
lifts and services. These are 
located at the ends of the 
building: 139 prefabricated 
modules were shipped over 
from Japan, fitted out with 
toilets, mirrors and even soap 
dishes before they left the 
factory. 

Foster believes that escala- 
tors are a much more civilized 
way to travel vertically than 
lifts: so within the three zones 
of offices there are 62 escala- 



1983: February: First 
structural steelwork 
positioned 

1984: October Practical 
ileiton of structural 


1985: April: internal sun- 

scoop reflector completed 

May: Topping out 
ceremony to celebrate the 
practical completion of the 
cladding and curtain waSIng 

June: Lions moved from 
Statue Square back to 1 
Queen’s Road Central 


July: First phase 
completion and occupation 
commences November. 
Second and final phase 
completion 


1988: April 7: Sir Edward 
Youde, Governor of Hong 
“■ 3, formally opens the 


million); approx! 
sq metre 

Occupation: Phased from 
July 1 1985. more than 
3.500 people 

Completion: November 1985 
Height: 586.6ft (178 An) 
above Des Voeux Road 
Basement depth: 61.7ft 
0&8m) 

Storeys: 52; 47 above 
ground, 4 below ground 
and ground plaza level 
Occupied floors: 42 

Gross area: 1.07 miBton sq ft 
(99,200 sq m) . 

Net Area: 760,000 sq ft 
(70.400 sqm) 

of atrium: 170ft 
i); 10 storeys _ 

Internal transport: 82 
escalators. 23 passenger 
Wts, 4 goods mts and T 
catering lift 

Structural steelwork: 27,400 
tonnes 

Aluminium cladding: 3,500 
tonnes 

Glass: 345,000 sq ft (32,000 
sqm) 

Service modules: 139 
Electrical and 
communications cabOng: 
1364 miles (3,000 km) 

Cfient Hongkong and 
Shanghai Banking . . 
Corporation 

Architect Foster Associates 
Crvfl and structural 
engineers: Ove Ai-up & 
Partners 

Mechanical and e lec t ric al 
engineers: J Roger Preston 


Quantity surveyors: Lawett 4 
Bailey with Northcroft 
Neighbour and Nicholson 


Project co- or d ina t o r : BJ 
Mead & Co 

John! C ° rtraCten 


4r 


Scene steeler die architect's dream becomes reality 


tors as well as 23 passenger 
lifts. 


The public enter the build- 
ing via obliquely-placed esca- 
lators positioned with the help 
of a Chinese geomancer. From 
there they arrive in the cathe- 
dral-sized atrium of the bank- 
ing hall 170ft and 10 storeys 
high. Atrium lighting is en- 
hanced by a ‘sun-scoop’ which 
reflects sunlight from the out- 
side walls. The scoop itself is 
hung on the face of the 
building, a computer-con- 
trolled array of mirrors which 
respond to the solar calendar. 


Local people, used to a diet 
of Dallas-siyle commercial ar- 
chitecture, would have pre- 


ferred something more 
colourful than the building's 
sleek grey visage fronting foe 
only large public open space at 
the heart of the island. The 
same can be said for its 
interior, where the only colour 
is provided by some of the 
furniture selected by the bank 
against the architect's advice. 

Its air of ascetism is perhaps 
its one fault, but something 
which might be corrected in 
time as its owners and occu- 
pants get used to it Mean- 
while its place is assured in the 
architectural history books as 
one of the masterpieces of the 
20ih century. 


Charles Knevitt 


CONOSE CROSSWORD NO 915 


ACROSS 

8 Imperceptible (13) 

9 As well (3) 

10 Know again (9) 

11 Eucbarist plate (5) 
13 Lack of care (7) 

16 Use up (7) 

19 Emaciated |5) - 
22 Sentence cut (9) 

24 Baby bed (3) 

25 Rotting process (13) 


DOWN 

1 At highest point (6) 

2 Skilful (6) 

3 Alienate (8) 

4 Minister's assistant (6) 

5 Difficulty (4) 

6 Favour (6) 

7 Earnest request (6) 

12 Grow old (3] 

14 Enormous (8) 

15 Defraud (3) 



-> ,. v 


V 7 -V- 


16 Ridicule (6) 

17 Volcanic rock (6) 

18 inlmcunerffi) 


20 Roguish chad (6) 

21 Limb spasms (6) 
23 Certain amount (4) 


SOLUTION TO NO 914 


££* 13PW 1 *t6&J«H^ l,n?pe 8Eeri “«s 9Traas- 


DOWN: 1 Fade 2 Contrived 3 Drees 4 Cirri < n™ x 















THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


11 


H 


BOOKS 




HugoVickers 


THE ULTIMATE 
FAMILY 


Mtaaet Joseph, £12.95 


J&n Pearson b the amhp r of 
M sdsmnbte book on In 
2*™”* *“* W extremely 

gssftUJsr&i 

fore eoe approaches him with 
«“fiitewe and expectation. 
Curiously, be describes this 
Jook as “the most exacting 
book of in; career**. In the 
worst sdMehnasterty way I 
^ feared 1 shonld have to fell 
him OH this work, haranyt I 
have s eldom seen snch a well- 
written and informative book 
dogged by so many siBy 
bowlers. Many are trivial; hot 
some are bad. White castigat- 
- tag Harold MacmllSnfar 
appointing a surprising man-. 
ber of. his wife's relations to 
positions of government, Mr 
Pearson adds, *aitd his broth- 
er-in-law Lord Cobbold to the 
Governorship of the Bank of 
EaglanL^Lady Dorothy's sis- 
ter did I ndeed marry a 
Cob bold, but not that pturtiah 
lar worthy peer. The early 
£ part of . the book b farther 
weakened by too many sweep- 
ing and dismissive generafiza- 
tioas. 

Bat do mt be pit oQ 
became gradually the author 
gets into his stride, takes 
as on a most interesting aerial 
tour of. the current toyrf scene. 
His inaccuracies are more 
. than redeemed by hb inspired 
cameo descriptions of the 
. modern royals — Lord Snow- 
don “a male . Cinderella with a 
labyrinthine nature**; the 
Prince of Wales's erstwhile 
virginity “the most speculative 
of princely possessions'*; and 
many, many more. The thane 
of his book b the development 
of oar monarchy from the 
cloistered days of Palace se- 
crecy to the fun television 
glamour of today. And on this, 
and (be characters portrayed, 
he b very sound indeed. 



S ftu! Henchman, . Valentine 
Beals. Barberina Rookwood, 
Sir Dixon and Lady Tiptoft - 
they sound like characters 
an Anthony Powell noveL Oh, 
Utey are characters from an Anthony 
Powell novel, his first fulMeogth 
novel since he finished A Dance to the 
Music of Time. Well, what is it that 
“axes me think twice before,' reading 
a novel in which people have names 
like Valentine Beals?, An apprehen- 
sion, I suppose, that if the name 
sounds confected the character itself . 
will turn oat to he a confection. 

Beals is a popular, novelist, of 
international renown, the author' of 
spicy historical romances such as The 
Wizard on the Heath, Nell o' the 
. Chartists and Lancelots Love Feast. 
His origins are' in advertising, and his 
attitude to his audience and his craft 
is ‘ dearly intended to be level- 
headedly - co mme r cial. Hb is the 
seeing eye of the . noveL Hb is the 
mind that shapes the stray into a 
fable. In befit looks very muc h as if 
Valentine Beals is a figure in db gpise, 
Mr Powell him«irif moving Se a 
king incognita among hb subjects. ■ 
They talk in. a very odd way, these 
oddly named characters whom Mr 
Powell has assembled for a cruise 
around Britain. Here, is- how Saul 
Henchman effects' an introduction: 

“ This is my assistant. Miss 
Rookwood She isnamed Barberina. 
Being nearer to her age than I am. 1 
. expect you mU call her. Barberina, 
and she address you as Robin. Just 
as crystallisation of surnames was 
one of the steps in human civilisa- 
tion, their relinquishment gradually 
increases as we revert to savagery. 1 ’ 

They talk, that is to say, inelegant- 
ly- And they know it. Here is another . 
angle speech from Henchman: 

"Apart from my drink, I lack one 
other standby — my crutches. Will 
one of you oblige me even farther by 


in and the cripple 


James Fenton on Anthony Powell’s 
first major novel for ten years 


admirable vehicles for speedy move- 
ment. but can if necessary be 
toyed as weapons of defence or 
ice. You laugh? I can assure you 
1 have used them more than once in 
the latter capacity, may well do so 
again. One of you get my crutches, 
then come back here and have a 
drink with me. as a small recogni- 
tion of your kindness. H 
They talk inelegantly and at great 


THE FISHER KING 

By Anthony Powell 

- HeinemannJ.9.95 


length. The ponderous style is by no 
means inadvertent. It has many 
admirers. Bui I have to say I find u 
hard to face. 

Henchman is a renowned photog- 
rapher, war-wounded and impotent, 
with a sleazy past but redeemed by 
the company of Barberina 
Rookwood. She u 8 talented young 
dancer, a virgin who gave up her art 
and the prospect of sexual fulfilment 


getting them from the Bar, where 
they fell to the ground? / have 
developed quite an affection for my 
crutches over the years. We qU have 
mr crutches inpnefbrm, or another, 
although, not everyone ..heeds, the 
kind 1 use! Thai. sounds rather, like 
the beginning of one cf those long 
sermons 1 found so wearisome as a 
boy. Much as I. disliked therm 1 have 
always recognised the effect they had 
on my style, an over-omateness. too 
noticeable a tendency towards bibli- 
cal language. Let me hasten to add 
—'again rather in the manner of a 
sermon! — that in my own case 
crutches are by far the least of the 
disadvantages under which 1 labour. 
On the contrary, they are not only 



in order to devote herself to the 
crippled Henchman- He is the Fisher 
King of the title. It is Beal's fantasy to 
interpret his existence in the light of 
the Arthurian legend, and it is Mr 
Powell's purpose to arrange around 
this central couple a design of 
thematic variations on the subject of 
sickness and health, ugliness and 
beauty, impotence and sexuality, age 
and youth. 

The device of sending the assem- 
bled characters on a cruise to Orkney 
by way of Hadrian's Wail has a 
symbolic purpose (symbols are al- 
ways jumping out at you in this book 
— a character called Mr Jack turns out 
to be here as a lower-middle-class 
Don Juan). We are travelling to “the 
frontiers of Thule: the edge of the 
known world; man's permitted limits; 
a green-barriered check-point, be- 
yond which the fearful cataract of 
torrential seas cascades) down into 
chaos. And it is generally true that the 
intentions of the book, thematically, 
are easier to recognise than are the 
characters who embody these inten- 
tions. 

I f I think of Henchman as a 
photographer, and try to 
recognise in him characteristics 
that might remind me of other 
photographers I might have read 
about or met. I fed that I’m missing 
some point. But, if I think of him as 
The Artist, things fan immediately 
into place. If I look for the tell-tale 
details of the cruise, imagining exact- 
ly what kind of cruise it was, what sort 
of people the other passengers were, 
and so forth, I feel frustrated. But, if I 
think of it as Our Journey Through 
Life, it becomes unproblematic, if I 
ask myself what kind of girl gets given 
the name Barberina. I can't guess. But 
when we are told that there is a poem 
by Musset called Chanson de 
Barberina , all becomes clear. 
Barberina b so-called in order that 
this poem may be significantly de- 
ployed in the denouement 
So it is a work more alive in its in- 
tention than its execution. Of course 
it b not a realistic noveL and it may 
be thought that I am merely com- 
plaining that the work does not 
belong to a category to which 1 
mistakenly assigned in advance of 
reading it But tins is not so. If you 
compare it with another novel-fable, 
say with Fincher Martin, it b imme- 
diately dear that the only way to 
reach Golding's intentions is through 
their execution. With The Fisher 
King you have to find a way around 
the execution in order to get there. 
The symbolism is not firmly rooted 
in vividly presented fact 


. ■<r. 





.. :<t 


.a~V ' 

: * ’ 


; Patrick White,, appears it 
Memoirs of Many m One a ot 
only as “editor" of the genai?' 

.He rambfingsof Alex Xeno- 
phon Demujian Gray/ but as 
one of the characters, often 
. \ ' - cafled id by'tfie figure’s 

I. rather bossy, haras^daughr; 
1 ”* ter to rescue her mother from 
demented excursionsifito the 
realities of contemporary Aus- 
tralia. Fantastical accounts of 
these forays are interspersed 
in the chimerical jungle of the 
old lady's memories — some 
perhaps factual, others the 
work of a tempestuous imagi- 
nation. As well as referring to 
the cosmopolitan origins and 
alliances that her name sug- 
gests, Alex relives her experi- 
ences, as two quite different 
nuns, mid as a touring actress 
bringing culture to the out- 
bade The intention of the 
novel seems to be one of grim, 
comedy and even grimmer 
farce. It is presumably ah 
imaginative essay into the 
effects of physical and mental 
degeneration in .old ag& The 
ironic implications of the 
epilogue are very mu ch in 
keeping with the saturnine 
humour of the . novel as a 
whole. 

Jumbo is also set in Austra- 
lia. Potential readers should 


Nuns in the outback, reds in the bed 


■:<*- • r-:-' 


FICTION 




.*>■ - 
•*— i-* 


MEMOIRS OFMAfrY 
IN ONE : 

By Patrick White 

• ' Cape. £8.95 ■ - 

--JUMBO- 

By Gabrietle Lord 

The Bodley Head, £8.95 

ABIDING CITY . . 

By. Lanrence Halley - . 

The Bodley Head, £9.95 •. 

. - FREE A GENTS . 
By Max Apple 
Faber. 


not be put off fay the insensi- 
tive jacket design. It is an 
unsensatioriaL perceptive, of- 
ten painful study of two 
women whose lives intersect 
at! certain important mo- 
ments. One is a taut school- 
teacher tormented by the 
memory of the illegitimate 


bdiy gni she gave up to 
adoption. 16 years, ago. The 
other is a 16-year-old. gentle 
and weB-intentioned but with- - 
out any special skills, who is 
desperately trying to find a 
job. General retrenchment, 
callous attitudes on the part of . 
prospective employers; and 
her difficult relationship with 
her father convince the girl 
that she is a failure, in spite of 
the fact that she is-much loved 
by the children with whom she 
baby-sits. Increasingly de- 
pressed, she begins to dwell on 
human ‘ cruelty and misery. 
The teacher receives a note 
signed “Jumbo”, which is a 
muted cry for help, and which 
she loses; It b fallowed, later, 
by two more disturbing letters 
without aii address. It. would 
be of no service to reveal more 
of this delicately organized, 
com passionate, and moving 
noveL' 

Laurence Halley's novel 
foresees a time when Pope and 
Archbishop celebrate Mass in 
the same ceremony at Canter- 
bury. Events at the cathedral 
on the momentous occasion 
are intercut in a retrospective 


account of the life of Gareth 
Benton, in charge of protocol 
at Church House. 

■ The son of an eminent, 
autocratic surgeon who ex- 
pects success, Benton at his 
public school, at Cambridge, 
and .in bis Foreign Office 
career delivers iL Cold, selfish, 
supercilious, surpassingly am- 
bitious — friendship is not 
important to him, nor are 
relations with women. When 
he does many the daughter of 
an admiral, whom he treats 
with abominable froideur 
from the day of their wedding, 
it is for the sake of appear- 
ances. In the icy wilderness of 
their life together, the woman 
finds other sources of solace. 
But eventually a lonely and 
desperate tour of duty in 
Moscow, surrounded by-bugs, 
hidden cameras, and ubiqui- 
tous surveillance becomes too 
much for her, and she leaves 

him. 

Soon after, a pretty, sexually 
vibrant music-student comes 
to work, during her vacation, 
at his house, where a relation 
of hers is already a servant 
Benton embarks on an aban- 


doned love affair, which cul- 
minates in them tumbling 
about in the open air naked 
under the eyes of the K.G.B. 
The misdemeanour may seem 
trivial in the light of our 
cynical * mores: but the 
author’s understanding of dip- 
lomatic procedures lends 
credibility to the assumption 
that it is enough to compro- 
mise Bemon, and bring about 
bis downfall at the F.O. 

Fortuitously be is offered 
the protocol position at 
Church House, As he comes 
to terms with his sense of 
doubt and failure, be emerges 
slowly as a sadder, more 
sympathetic figure. The cli- 
max of the noveL in the 
cathedral, is inevitable, 
though achieved with _ well- 
judged suspense. It is an 
intelligent, unfailingly inter- 
esting, well written piece of 
fiction, with well-drawn char- 
acters who develop and 
change within the framework 
of a cleverly constructed plot 

Free Agents is an excellent, 
entertaining collection of sto- 
ries - very American, indeli- 
bly Jewish, so that many 


references and allusions, 
which no doubt enhance the 
author's keen sense of irony, 
will mean little to European 
readeis. Some of the tales 
appear to be autobiographical, 
in that Max Apple and his two 
children appear in them; but 
even these have a surreal 
fantastic quality that gives 
them an extra dimension. 
Some, notably “Bridging”, 
“The Four Apples”, “Pizza 
Time", and the brilliant title 
story “Free Agents”, are as 
moving as they are witty. The 
satirical bite is seldom cruel 
and underlaid with a mood of 
sadness and grief as a relative- 
ly young father is left to bring 
up two small lively, bright 
children. Jogging, dietary inhi- 
bitions, and the world of 
Disney offer weB-hit targets — 
the opening story is an arid 
fictionalization of the concep- 
tion of Disneyland. Since 
Walt's older brother was 
called Roy and was a mild 
partner in the enterprise, the 
Will of the title is presumably 
Walt's entrepreneurial alter 
ego, which seems to fit with 
his ruthless flair. Altogether 
Mr Apple has created a varied, 
often delightful array of char- 
acters, among whom one of 
the most pleasing is himself 




A hair-raisi 

Basil Boothroyd 





- p 
.. i • 



, # 


f t 


Innocence in the matter of 
sexual idiosyncrasies has been 
eroded of late. People can get 
up to anything. What the 
revered critic James A gate got 
up to. between his torrential 
outpourings of words, was, 
one might say, nobody’s busi- 
ness. Dr. Harding's good book 
makes no high point of these 
hair-raising larks, but he is air 
industrious qua trier for truth, 
and a biography would be 
unfaithful without than. 

It strikes me as admirably 
faithful, and has its own 
entertainment as well as its 
subject’s. A dry approach, a 
sharp eye far flluminatmg 
anecdote, snippets and utbrts 
of wit from names as global as 
Coward and as obscure as. 
Agate's succession of house- 
boy acolytes. These vastly 
wide and disparate gleanings 
he marshals into a seantiess 
whole. 

Agate was a man to ' 
other men feel midgets. He 
worked at that, butmany aaev 
would have towered: *5 “V 
arrogant theatrical pundit, a 
weKrrf quite alarming ; over- 
coats, a monument ot sen- 
admiration and a prodigal 
spender of money he batin 
got He could hardly see a 
house, a horse or g ear witajjj 
buying it and today, a 
fairy years since he di«L the 
Inland Revenue are stiff sere 
ing the trickles of his surviving 
royalties. - 

Besotted with the th^trete 

had many m ■ 

mies, too. since -he ■ *\ 

spoke, and. wrote, his iwi 

Seymour Hicks, a TO 

posed him for the 
Chib, that largely .theatrical 


AGATE 
A Biography 
By James Hardii 

Methuen. £12.95 



James Agate a man to make 

other men fed midgets 

enclave. Enemies blackballed 

him. ' . - . ■ , . 

Stage stones can be hard 
going. Few of these ate: One 
diary entry recalled how 
Beerhohm Tree's wife Helen, 
performing at a charity matt- 
hee, “advanced toa gold chair, 
and swathed in heliotrope 
aille. said . smilingly. T want 
you all 4o=Jnwgiiie -fm. a 
plumber’s mate."*- * ; ’ • 
The reader is taken, made 
the head. . A tortuous price to. 


be. Behind .the granite confi- 
- deoce, a warren of fears and 
superstitions. Touch every 
other railing, avoid the flag- 
stone cracks. In .ships he 
stayed well - clear of the side. 

Though no sleepwalker, he 
dreaded sleepwalking out of 
, .his ..window and killing 
himself 

. . By medical rights he should 
: . have killed himself by his 
lifestyle, its sheer toll of eating 
.and drinking and working, the 
reluctance ever to go to bed. 
,Ai 68, two years before his 
. death in 1947. now over- 
weight dropsical and wheez- 
. mg with asthma and cigars, he 
• still had the vigour far a last 
infatuation* the object of his 
affections a clean-cut Ameri- 
can GI who, backhome, show- 
ered: him with as many and 
. regular food parcels as -his 
creditors did writs., 

•' .: There were kindnesses. He 
would use bis influence to 
push young literary aspirants 
in whom he discerned some- 
thing worth poshing. But his 
selfseeking ambition domi- 
nated alL ' 

. One act of betrayal towards 
Alan (“Jock”) Deni for fifteen 
years his friend, secretary, 
often “ghost”, reads as 
shockingly* if in a different 
way; as any of the private 
. murk. 

What of the words? They 
were good. Between 1921 and 
. 1946 1 always keeping a tally} 
he wrote seven million. His 
nine Ego diaries, if still on 
library shelves, would repay 
anoiher-dip. And if the Public 
Lending Right Act extends to 
literary executors, there could 
. be another little something for 
the patient taxman. 


Patricia Highsmilh has set her 
novel in New York’s Green- 
wich Village, which was possi- 
bly a mistake. She seems, 
surprisingly, to be not totally 
at ease in the milieu, and as a 
result her characters, toa are 
nOt as confidently described as 
we have come to expect from 
her. This is especially true of 
Elsie, who is not so much the 
central character as the cata- 
lyst and the object of some 
very Highsmilh ian sexual 
obsessions. 

Elsie, a 20-year old small- 
town girl is a trusting, impul- 
sive. freewheeling creature 
having a good lime in the big 
city. Ralph, middle-aged and 
alone (apart from a dog called 
Cod), conceives a fanatical 
and unwelcome mission to 
protea her from what be sees 
as the corruption and evil of 
the society in which she 
moves. She is befriended by 
Jack, an illustrator, and his 
wife Natalia. They too are 
drawn into her emotional 
web. 

High smith’s extraordinary 
ability to draw menace and 
tension out of the most every- 
day events has not deserted 
her, and her portrayal of 
Ralph's developing obsession 
is as chilling and credible as 
anything she has done. But the 
interplay between the four 
principals is less convincing, 
and when the cathartic art of 
violence occurs, its effect is 
both less macabre and less 
plausible than Highsmith’s 
norm. By her own impossibly 
high standards. Found in the 
Streets .though eminently 
readable and often gripping, is 
a slight disappointment. 

• Safely to the Grave Jjy 
Margaret Yorke [Hutchinson 
££. 95 J.Yobbo psychopath 
seeks revenge on women who 


Small pie 
from the 
Big Apple 


CRIME 


Marcel Berlins 

FOUND IN THE 

STREET 

By Patricia Higbsmith 
Heinemann. 19.95 


reported him for dangerous 
driving. Yorke’s portrait of 
growing resentment leading to 
inevitable violence is frighten- 
ingly convincing: An altogeth- 
er superior psychothriller. 

• Pretty Maids all in a Row 
by Amhea Fraser ( Collins 
£7. 95). The typical sleepy En- 
glish village, complete with a 
murderer at large and a rapist 
who forces his victims to 
recite nursery rhymes. A good 
old-fashioned read on a thor- 
oughly modern theme. 

• Into the Valley of Death, 

Evelyn Hervey [Weidenfeld .. 
S’icolsan £8.95 L The re- 
sourceful Miss Unwin. Vic- 
torian governess with a 
penchant for detection, is 
summoned to save an inno- 
cent country publican from 
imminent gallows. Convinc- 
ing. unhurried manners and 
dialogue of the period, topped 
with a satisfying plot and 
splendid surprises en route. 
Incidentally, what is the pur- 
pose of a nom-de-piume if, 
your real, name (which hap-‘ 
pens to be H R F Keating) is 


plastered in big letters on the 
front cover? 

• At Night all Wolves are 
Grey, by Gunnar Staalesen 
(i Quartet . £8.95 ) Set in Bergen, 
written in Norwegian, 
Staalesen 's novel has an 
unmistakeable whiff of Ross 
Macdonald's California. Vaig 
Veum is in the best traditions 
of sleuthery. The dense plot 
combines interesting glimpses 
of the seamier side of non- 
fjord Norway with wartime 
treachery and a thirty year old 
fatal mystery fire. 

• “A” is for Alibi by Sue 
Grafton [Macmillan 
£".95).Sparky cynical Califor- 
nian female private eye Kin- 
sey Milhone in promising 
debuu hired by convinced, 
now paroled, wife to seek real 
killer of her nasty husband 
eight years ago. Twisty plot 
well-handled. 

• Moon drop (o Murder, by 
John Buxton Hilton [Collins. 
£7. 95). Retired Superintendent 
Kenworthy not altogether at 
ease in the south or France, 
following dying colonel's last 
trip and unearthing long-kept 
secrets of wartime Resistance 
and betrayaL 


FOYLES ART 
GALLERY 

LACE 

AN OPEN BOOK 
AN EXHIBITION BY 

PAT EARNSHAW 

(Author of The 
Identification of Lace*) 
10-6 daily until April 9 

J13-M9 Charing Cross Road 
• London. WC2 


Making the 
caged bird sing 


To her countrymen Indira 
Gandhi was an enigma. 
Whether they loved or hated 
her. few could claim to have 
understood the woman. Her 
opponents saw her as the 


frigid, calculating Amazon of 
Indian politics. Her support- 
ers as the mother figure, 
“Indiramma”, the saviour. 
Many others simply as “that 
bloody woman”. But these 
were all images of the politi- 
cian. What was she really like? 
What made her laugh and cry? 
Happy and despondent? What 
made her tick? 

The purpose of publishing 
Mrs Gandhi's letters is pre- 
sumably to provide answers to 
these questions. Indira Gan- 
dhi certainly had her own. 
Writing of herself she asks 
“Are most people not just a 
split personality but several 
personalities? I feel I am and 1 
have learned to make all the 
separate personalities quite 
friendly with each other. But I 
still don’t know how to 
present them to the world. 
Different people see different 
raesf” 

By her own description Mrs 
Gandhi was a multi-sided 
person. Yet the woman that 
emerges from these letters is 
relatively one-dimensional. 
The overpowering impression 
is of a gentle, sensitive soul 
trapped within her own life, a 
prisoner of fate and circum- 
stance. “I have felt like a bird 
in a too-small cage.” Sur- 
rounded by people she could 
not communicate with — 
“There isn't one single person 
to whom one can talk or ask 
advice” — she was prone to fits 
of depression and despair. Her 
father’s political contacts who 
she found “dreary" forced her 
to value her privacy . and 
anonymity. Yet, “privacy”, 
she lamented, “is not possible 
for me even in the remotest 
comer of this sub-continent. I 
have had people presenting 
their cards and their problems 
even at the foot of the Kolahoi 
glacier ( 1 6,000ft high)!” 

Thrust into politics her 
success look its toll on her 
marriage. “1 have been and 
am deeply unhappy in my 
domestic life... Feroze (her 
husband) has always resented 
my very existence, but since I 
have become President (of the 
Congress Party) he exudes 
such hostility ibaut seems to 
poison the air... I am sorry to 
have missed the most wonder- 
ful thing in life having a 
complete and perfect relation- 
ship with another human 
being.-” 

Yet. politics did not sooth 
the caged spiriL The tempes- 
tuous quest to find her real self 
continued. “I just don’t know 
where I am. The body is there 
— grinning, talking, but it's 
just a shell The real me is 
non-existent.” 

Tired and drained of spirit, 
Indira Gandhi planned her 
escape. It was the closing days 
of her father’s reign, her sons 
were studying in England, and 
for the first time the cage was 
opening and the bird could 
fed free. She planned to move 
to London: “I want another 
life. It may not work out I 


Karan Thapar 

INDIRA GANDHI 
Letters to a Friend 
1950-1984 

By Dorothy Norman 

Weidenfeld A Nicotson. L 10.95 


may not like ii or be good at iL 
But at least it deserves a trial.” 

It was not to be. Instead, she 
became India's prime minister 
and the prison's walls closed 
in. Despite her anxieties and 
premonitions, a greater power 
was driving her on. “Ever 
since 1 was a small girl, there 
seemed to be some force 
driving me on — as if there 
were a debt to pay.” 

The Indira of these letters is 
thus a tormented heroine. Her 
life seems grey and melan- 
choly. The heavy dull weight 
of endurance, resignation, ac- 
ceptance descends over the 
book. Even her fasdnation for 
travel, her delight in receiving 
books and records, her curios- 
ity for new ideas offer little 
respite from the gathering 
storm. 

What is missing from these 
letter is the laughter, the 
mischief, the gaiety that was 
also Indira Gandhi. The other 
personalities are really not 
discemable at all. Perhaps Mrs 
Gandhi did not communicate 
them in her letters. Or. per- 
haps, Dorothy Norman chose 
to supress them. Yet, those 
who did know Indira Gandhi 
remember them as clearly as 
they do the haunted lady of 
Indian politics. They still 
chortle over the memory of 
the treasure bums she orga- 
nized in the 1960s far her 
son's friends' parties, where 
the challenges included pur- 
loining fishbones from fash- 
ionable restaurants. They 
fondly recall the zest and 
vigour of her humour as well 
as the delicate, slightly self- 
deprecaung nature of her 
jokes. They say her enthusi- 
asms were boundless, yet 
earthy, and her loyalties fierce 
but forgiving Where are these 
other Mrs Gandhis? 

All Dorothy Norman can 
offer in their place is turgid 
detail of political agitations, of 
Asian Games, and, most of all, 
oTpedestrian plans to meet on 
routjne foreign visits. The 
letters don’t even offer any 
insight into Indian politics. 
When they resume after a four 
year lapse during the 
“emergency” they offer no 
explanation for the interreg- 
num. “I do not want to enter 
into controversy”, Mrs Gan- 
dhi asserts. “The past is over, 
let it lie.” 

What these letters amount 
to is unrivalled proof of a 
unique friendship which 
spanned three and a half 
decades. Through them and 
also otherwise Dorothy Nor- 
man must have got to know 
the real and complete Indira 
Gandhi as well as anyone 
outside the immediate family. 
What a pity then that Miss 
Norman did not choose to 
write a profile instead. 


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THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Lambeth 

squawk 

After Red Ted Knight and his 29 
Lambeth sidekicks disappeared in 
a puff of smoke last night, the 
dominant Tory group is today 
preparing a counter-attack to pre- 
vent a triumvirate of remaining 
J Labour councillors assuming the 

• mantle of power. In a final gesture 
I of defiance to the government, the 

debarred councillors shifted all 

• powers to the three — the new 
. mayor. Kingsley Smith, his dep- 
uty, Lynda Bellos, and Labour 
moderate Janet Boston — allow- 
ing the Tories no say in affairs, 
despite their 26 seats to Labour's 
four. Tory leader Mary Leigh said:. 

• “We will either take 1 the matter to 
;court immediately or call another 

• council meeting to reverse this 
; gross manipulation of the standing 
•orders.” Should the Tories take 
control after the council elections 

■ in May, Miss Leigh promises they 
: will take a close look at some of 
the officers. Among those under 
the microscope will be AJ 
Hanagao. chief public relations 
"officer who ran the £700,000 anti- 
-govemment campaign over rate- 
capping. and Phil Sealy, principal 
■race relations officer. 

:Mod cons 

-Is Sir Clive Sinclair feeling the 
.pinch since the collapse of his CS 
company? His four-bedroom 
Chelsea home has just come on 
-the market at an asking price of 
£995,000. Among the gadgets 
Sinclair is leaving behind are sets 
of electronically operated window 
Iblinds, automatically irrigated 

■ plant tubs, a high-tech kitchen and 
;a back-up generator. Home 
-computers, alas, are not included. 

;Macsim 

-Lord Stockton has lost none of his 
"grasp of the nuances of the 
political scene. After Leon 
Brittan's replacement by Paul 
Channon as Trade and Industry 
Secretary, he was overheard 
"observing to his London club: “I 
see we now have more Etonians 
ithan Estonians in the Cabinet.” 

:Woe upon woe 

■ Will the V & A's troubles never 
;end? I hear that immediately after 

■ the flooding caused by a burst pipe 
a scaffolding plank broke the 
skylight of an upstairs gallery, 
scattering glass throughout the 
room. A few hours later a gust of 
wind shattered two glass doors. 
Voluntary contributions will be 
-accepted even more . .gratefully 
‘than before. 


BARRY FANTONU 



Thank goodness he didn't injure 
himself cutting the ribbon' 

Distaff rules 

".Hammersmith and Fulham Coun- 
cil workers have issued a charier 
pledging that women managers 
will: “Be honest °nd open with 
everyone . . . refus to subscribe 
to the conflici t wy for the 
operation of this Authority . . . 
departmentalism, secrecy and 
point-scoring are out, co-opera- 
-tion is in . . . question and chal- 
lenge situations where aggressive 
and paranoid behaviourisallowed 
'to dominate . . What is more it 
comes up with a bill of rights: 
“The right to be treated with 
respect: the right to make mis- 
takes; the right to choose not to 
assert yourself the right to ask for 
what you want: the right to say No 
without feeling guilty.” This 
-masterpiece is the product of an 
open meeting held this year. 


Matcho 


■Mick McGahey. the NUM*s 
chain-smoking vice-president, ob- 
viously has as scant regard for the 
TUC leadership as he does his 
own health. At a TUC committee 
meeting recently, McGahey. who 
suffers from chronic chest prob- 
lems. wheezed: “It's a sign of the 
times — ashtrays, like leadership, 
are in short supply at Congress 
'House these days.” 

Oscar for hire 

Sound recordist Peter Handsford, 
whose work on Out of Africa 
landed Britain one of its handfril 
of Oscars, tells me be has not 
worked on a feature film since 
finishing the Streep-Redfond epic 
more than a year ago. Even when 
director Sydney Pollack recom- 
mended him to John Mackenzie, 
who was about to start filming 
Frederick Forsyth's Fourth Proto- 
col. Mackenzie chose someone 
else. “1 quite understand.” says 
Handsford. who adds that it is a 
fallacy to think work pours in just 
because you win an Oscar. Union 
restrictions prevent technicians 
from working in most countries 
abroad and few films are being 
made in Britain. So what has he 
been doing? “Oh. a couple of 
television documentaries and a 
record of train sounds.” _ 

PUS 


Teachers in England must be 
puzzled by the way that Scottish 
ministers can “find” the money to 
finance their colleagues' IS per 
cent pay deaL Ratepayers south of 
the border were similarly sur- 
prised at the ease with which £38 
million was “found” last spring in 
rale relief for Scots. To the 
Treasury at least the answer is 
simple, and disturbing. 

Public expenditure last year was 
£2.210 per head in Scotland and 
£1.927 in Wales against £1,761 in 
England. In most of the big 
spending programmes — roads, 
hospitals, schools and housing — 
spending in Scotland is an average 
30 per cent higher than in Eng- 
land. Housing takes 78 per cent 
more, education 36 per cent more, 
health 26 per cent more. 

Why does Scotland do so well ? 
The answer is neither English 
generosity nor Scottish ministerial 
advocacy but a Treasury mecha- 
nism, the “territorial block 
formula”, applied to each territory 
(Scotland, Wales and Northern 
Ireland) since 1980. Under this 
curious system public spending in 
each country is determined not 
according to need but by 
mathematical formulae giving 
Scotland 10/85, Wales 5/85 and 
Northern Ireland 2.75 per cent of 
the English total. 

The results five years on are 
startling. Security costs make 
comparison difficult for Northern 
Ireland. But in Scotland and 
Wales, there is now over-pro- 
vision amounting to well over 


Give England 
a fair deal 
for a change 

by Michael Fallon 


£l billion a year which could not 
be justified under normal public 
spending rules. The territorial 
block formula is the cause of the 
trouble. 

For a start, the formula appears 
to apply automatically.- If addi- 
tional provision, for example, on 
roads or libraries, is decided for 
England, the Scottish and Welsh 
blocks benefit accordingly — whe- 
ther or not new roads or libraries 
are actually required in Scotland 
and Wales. Worse still, the respec- 
tive Secretaries of State can hap- 
pily switch funds from one block 
to another; thus money theoreti- 
cally allocated for Scottish prisons 
can end up being spent on Scottish 
hospitals instead. 

Does this matter? Z think it 
does. First, overall control of 
public spending is threatened by a 
system that builds in over-pro- 
vision each year. As the govern- 
ment struggles to hold expenditure 


broadly flat, each year's public 
spending bargaining round will 
become increasingly difficult; un- 
justified spending will make' it 
even more so. 

Secondly, England suffers. In 
particular, the -formula 1 discrimi- 
. nates against the less pr os p e ro us 
English reraqns. Without any re- 
gional analysis "of public spending, 
the difference is hard to quantify. 
But regions such' "as -foe North 
West and North East, with struc- 
tural and social problems similar 
to those of Scotland, lose out 
directly in per capita terms to their 
neighbours across the border. 

Thirdly, there is little reason to 
exempt either Scotland or Wales 
from the current pressures on 
public spending. When other pro- 
grammes are being restrained or 
cut back, it would be unfair not to 
took to Scotland and Wales for 
some contribution. Nor can Scot- 
land in particular be regarded any 


longer as one of Britain's poorer 
regions: measured on GDP per 
capita it ranks third, after only die 
South East; and .East Anglia. 
Indeed, suspending. the formula in 
some areas (such as council hous- 
ing) might compel Scottish Office 
ministers to pursue eves more, 
vigorously the policies that have 
extended ownership is England. 

Finally, unless the entire terri- 
torial node formula system is 
recast, both the over-provision 
and discrimination trill increase. 
The longer that action is post- 
poned, the more difficult it trill be 
politically for the Treasury to 
reassert us control over Scottish 
Office spending. And as die 
discrimination against the English 
regions becomes more severe, the 
government will face further pres- 
sure for devolution and separate 
.development agencies from hard- 
pressed areas like such as .the 
North East, "the North West and 
the South West'. 

A review of both the mech- 
anism and its effects is therefore 
long overdue. The arrival of funds 
approved fry the US Congress will 
in any case complicate Northern 
Ireland spending. Separate studies 
ought now to be put in band to 
determine real need in each 
territory and to equalize Whitehall 
subvention towards the main 
programme areas. Fending then- 
conclusions the working of the 
formula should be sus p ended on 
all block programmes. 

The author is Conservative MPfar 
Darlington. 


Richard Ford examines the strains imposed by Portadown 


Loyal or 
loyalist? 
The great 
RUC 
challenge 

Belfast 

Last weekend, as Northern 
Ireland's traditional marching sea- 
son began, men of the Royal 
Ulster Constabulary were hoping 
that the parades would not herald 
the onset of a turbulent summer. 
But on Sunday they faced vicious 
rioting after a loyalist Apprentice 
Boys' parade was banned in 
Portadown. a town that has been 
described as the “Vatican of 
Orangeism”. 

Afterwards, the gun shots that 
blasted the window of a police 
reservist's home in north Belfast 
and the petrol bomb attacks on the 
homes of two officers in the 
Shankhill Road showed what 
loyalists mean when they scream 
at the RUC, “Your day of 
reckoning in coming”. 

• Policing loyalist protests against 
tKe Anglo-Irish "Hillsborough 
agreement while at the same time 
combating IRA terrorism is the 
stiffest test the RUC has .faced* in 
its- history. Many of its members 
may have" private, doubts about 
Hillsborough, but in public they 
display contempt, in unprintable 
language, for the loyalists who 
bombard them with paving 
stones, bricks and bottles. 

The violence is venomous. 
Policemen have had 30 pieces of 
silver hurled at them. There has 
been talk of “bits in plastic bags", 
a reference to the method used to 
collect the bodies of victims of 
terrorist activity. Some RUC men 
have been reminded that the 
crowds on the street know exactly 
where they live. 

But the rioting in Portadown 
last Sunday had its origins not 
only in the loyalist opposition to 
the Anglo-Irish agreement but also 
in memories of last year’s march- 
ing season. In 1985 there were 
1,897 loyalist marches and 223 
republican. There was also a long- 
run n i ng controversy over 
“provocative" marches through 
certain Roman Catholic areas 



Belfast, December 1985: RUC men retreat from a loyalist demonstration of protest 
against the Hillsborough agreement — a foretaste of this week's violence 

which the authorities deliberately Irishmen. It has also mfeant that The police have, in effect, . been 
brought tp a head, to the dismay of the once ‘steady stream df soldiers’ asked to agree to be used as tools 

hardline loyalists. Although only coffinsnrturningfotbe mainland in enforcing the agreement Ad/i 

has- almost ceas^'effectiwify illicit tape recording of two-offi— | 
tiewrallZmg'tiie cers being cheered when they 

movement in Britain". ~ : expressed opposition 


two loyalist parades were banned 
and l3 re-routed, . the suspicion 
that Dublin's hand was behind the 
action enraged Unionists and led 
to rioting and intimidatiqn of 
police officers. 

This year the Orange institu- 
tions threatened to defy any 
attempt by the RUC to alter 
traditional routes, believing that 
the police were acting at the behest 
of the southern authorities. Sir 
John Hermon, Chief Constable of 
the RUC. has denied this, and 
suggests that an independent tri- 
bunal should deride on re-routing. 
He has also criticized parade 
organizers for insisting on march- 
ing through areas where, because 
of population shifts, they are no 
longer welcome. 

It is not only the steadfastness of 


Police primacy has also resulted 
in a huge expansion in the size of 
tin? RUC; which 'nOw^has^S? ; 
fuU-tinie officer^ and i rfcSerffe of 1 
4,508. Despite the ".‘dangers, r ft . 
remains one ofthe more attractive 
employment prospects, especially 
for Protestants, in a country where 
the opportunities for steady, well- 
paid work have diminished. An 
RUC constable can earn up to 
£ 1 2,033 a year, with an inspector's 
pay rising to £14,991, plus rent 
and special duty allowances. But 
the very desirability of serving in 
the RUC has brought its own 
problems. With so many young 
and educated constables in the 
force, there may well be a frustrat- 


nities in the fhture. 
But, above all. 


it fa r: the 


the RUC-in policing the loyalist - jag Jack .of promotion opportu- 
population that will be tested this "* 

summer but also the policy' Of 
“police primacy". This is the 
policy, introduced in 1976, which 
gave the RUC responsibility for 
enforcing law and order, with the 
army being used only in support. 

Putting police in the front line 
of the battle against terrorism has 
had two effects. It has meant that 
Irishmen are increasingly killing 


to it was 
leaked to a politician- Two Union- 
ist. party, leaders subsequently, 
ptoc^^^ad^jrtisemert JfPgcaL 
newspapers suggesting mat the 
role Of the police '"under the. 
agreement was contrary to their 
oathofaflegiance. 

Clearly this is designed to 
unsettle the force. None the less, 
only one officer is believed to have 
resigned because of the agreement 
and an esprit de corps has grown 
up within the ranks of the RUC 
which even the para-militaries 
privately admit will be almost 
impossible to shatter. 

Although there may be private 
doubts about how far the police 
can be pushed — and their efforts 
during the loyalist, day of action 
raised questions about its willing-, 
ness to confront such" protesters — ' 


Hillsborough agreement that pro- - Sir John Hermon is in no doubt 
J ' tfiatthey will remain -firm and do 

their duty within the law. He is 
equally sure that despite the 
difficulties ahead there will be no 
shortage of potential recruits — 
people he describes as “extraor- 
dinary men doing an extraor- 
dinary job". 


vides the sternest lest ftxr the 
RUC. Ninety per cent of its men 
are Protestant and live in 
predominantly loyalist areas. In- 
evitably, persona] hostility and 
concern surrounds an agreement 
which gives Dublin a consultative 
role in the affairs of the North. 


Johannes fang 

The possibility of a deal between 
South Africa’s biggest while tribe, 
the Afrikaners, and its biggest 
black group, the Zulus, has hov- 
ered for years on the horizon of the 
country's political landscape. 
Hitherto, however, it has always 
evaporated on closer examination. 

Today, at a conference in Dur- 
ban, the mirage may at last 
become tangible. The purpose of 
the conference is to discuss the 
details of a merger between the 
while and black-ruled parts of 
Natal with a view to forming a 
single multi-racial policy. 

Three years ago, when the idea 
was first suggested by an all-race 
commission set up by Chief 
Gatsha Buthelezi, the chief min- 
ister of the KwaZulu tribal 
“homeland”, the Pretoria govern- 
ment rejected it our of hand. But 
after 19 months of political unrest 
and violence, and under growing 
international pressure. President 
Botha has had to rethink his 
position. Representatives of bis 
ruling National Party are to attend 
the Durban “indaba” as observers 
“in a spirit of goodwill and as 
further evidence of our commit- 
ment to negotiation” 

If the scheme gets off the 
ground, it could turn Natal into a 
largely autonomous entity, with a 
predominantly black government 
and no apartheid laws, whose 
relationship with Pretoria would 
be similar to that between, say, 
California and the federal admin- 
istration in Washington. That goal 
is still some way off. The first 
phase — on which Buthelezi and 
Radclyffe Cad man, who heads the 
white Natal Provincial Admin- 
istration, have already agreed, but 
which has not yet been accepted 
by Pretoria - envisages the set- 
ting up of a “Joint Executive 
Authority” (JEA). This body 
would still be accountable to 
separate black and white admin- 
istrative and legislative structures. 

The KwaZulu cabinet and the 


Michael Hornsby previews a meeting that 
could change the face of South Africa 

Talking about 
tolerance 


Natal Provincial Council, its 
white counterpart, would be 
equally represented on the JEA, 
the chairmanship of which would 
rotate between Buthelezi and 
Cadman. Pretoria seems likely to 
agree to this stage of the proposal, 
even though it has still to be 
explained now Natal’s large In- 
dian community would be accom- 
modated within this system. 

Much more far-reaching is the 
second phase, which envisages the 
creation of a joint legislative body 
in which, presumably, blacks — 
given their numerical predomi- 
nance — would be in the majority, 
whatever constitutional safe- 
guards might be devised for 
minority groups. The precedent 
this would set is much harder for 
Pretoria to swallow. 

There can be no doubt that a 
unified Natal, which possesses in 
Durban the biggest industrial 
complex outside the Johannes- 
burg-Pretoria region, would pro- 
vide a more credible power base 
for Buthelezi than the more than 
40 impoverished and mainly rural 
fragments of territory scattered 
throughout the province that 
collectively constitute KwaZulu. 

The threat is recognized by 
radical black opposition groups 
such as the United Democratic 
Front and its affiliate in the 
province, the Natal Indian Con- 
gress, which have turned .down 
invitations to attend the con- 
ference. The outlawed African 


National Congress has denounced 
it as “a divisive gathering" de- 
signed “to fragment our already 
bantustanised country”. 

The Durban initiative is re- 
garded with no less suspicion by 
the extreme right-wing Conser- 
vative and Herstigte Nasionale 
white parties, which have also 
declined to attend. Right-wing 
members of the Natal Provincial 
Council have formed a group 
called Action White Natal to 
oppose the project 

Natal has always been (he odd 
man out of South Africa's four 
provinces. Physically, with its 
green rolling bills, sugar planta- 
tions (on which - Indians were 
imported to work in the 19th 
century) and sub- tropical coast- 
line, it is strikingly different from 
the vast empty spaces of semi-arid 




m 

./INDIAN 
^cjcOCEAN 1 
k Pietermaritzburg : : d 

"^KWAZULU 


grassland that occupy most of the 
interior plateau. The provincial 
capital, Pietermaritzburg, is 
named after two early Boer 
voortrekkers. Ret Relief and Gert » 
Maritz, but the Boer Republic of 
Natalia lasted only four years 
before it came under British rule 
in 1843. Natal’s white population, 
which in mid- 1983 numbered 
586,018, is almost entirely En- 
glish-speaking, and voted heavily 
against severing links with the 
British Crown in I960. Natal's 
other inhabitants consist of 
5,232,135 blacks, overwhelmingly 
Zulus, 706,691 Indians and 95,479 
of the mixed-race people defined 
as coloureds. They constitute 21.2 
per cent of South Africa’s popula- 
tion, but are crammed into only 
7.7 per cent of its land area. 

The density of the population, 
particularly in the vast urban 
sprawl of Durban, has created a 
racial jigsaw of immense complex- 
ity which has always made non- 
sense of the neat boundaries 
drawn on apartheid maps by the 
social engineers in Pretoria. By 
attending the Durban “indaba”; 
Botha's government, is at last 
coming to terras with that reality. 

With no significant white politi- 
cal. following at .risk in Natal, 
Pretoria arguably has nothing to 
lose by using the province as a 
laboratory for constitutional ex- 
periment One of the more 
enlightened cabinet ministers re- 
cently conceded that spuming the 
“Natal option" when it was first 
proposed was one of the most 
serious mistakes the government 
had made. 

Three years ago a positive 
response by Pretoria would have 
been seen as a generous con- 
cession from a position of 
strength — today as a volte-face 
under pressure. Radical black 
opposition will also be stronger, 
increasing the danger of open war- 
bet ween Buthelezi's conservative 
Inkatha movement and the UDF, 
together with the ANC 


Ronald Butt 



The idea of loyalty to a political 
'party moves Michael Foot to a 
Sad of intellectual ecstasy. To 
h»m, loyalty means more than the 
obligation of a politician who 
dissents from his party on particu- 
lar issues to remain loyal so long 
as he subscribes to its basic aims; 
he seems to believe, rather, that- a 
politician should never go into 
opposition against his party how- 
ever much it ceases to represent 
the rhfng s for which he joined it. 

His latest book of essays* (most 
of them already published else- 
where) is both a hymn in praise of 
such loyalists and an anathema 
(qualified in some favoured cases, 
such as Lloyd George) upon those 
he sees as traitors. If they desert 
their party ii must be because they 
have their eye “fixed on the main 
chance” — which is the way he 
sees David Owen. 

With pained incomprehension. 
Foot observes that simply to 
mention party politics can unloose 
“floods of hypocrisy and absurd* 
ity” and he asks how to explain the 
“populist sophistry” Ity which 
party politics are dismissed as a 
“dirty game”. He rightly observes 
that for three centuries party 
politics has provided the distinc- 
tive flavour vitality of British 

freedom. But with astonishing 
sleight of logic, he goes on to ask 
rhetorically: “Without the loyal- 
ists, even the ultraloyalists; how 
would the parties survive?” As 
though the survival of party 
politics as a system depended on 
the ability of “loyalists” to keep 
the existing parties in being. 

On that analysis, the old Liberal 
Party should never have split and 
declined, making way for Labour. 
Nor should the Tories have split 
Over the Cam Laws. The truth is 
that parties wax and wane, some 
dying, some altering their shape, 
according to changing needs. To 
an honest mind, all political 
loyalty must be ultimately con- 
ditional: a politician can stay with 
a party through a certain amount 
of disagreement on subsidiary 
questions but* when he . can no 
longer subscribe to its basieprin- 
ripies it is time to go. 

, Foot also feds anger towards 
those social democratic politicians 
such as Hugh GaitskeU (though he 
at least is accorded the virtues of 
courage and honesty) who, instead 
of deserting, stay and seek to guide 
Labour “into alien channels” - in 
other words away from Foot’s 
immutable fundamentalism. 

Another target is Tony Benn, 
the boai-rocker of the left. Foot’s 
account of Benn’s transformation 
after 1979 from a moderate into 
the extremist who used the party 
conference to. downgrade the po-V 
sftions oftiie ftarfiamenttry party— 
and of the leader are essays in 
insider observation which a mod- 
erate could hardly better. • * ..." 

- Foot sees Berm's woWem as 
*5ridre ptychor^iaTyticar " than 
political” and his SreiKOTOUS at- 
tack on Berm fortunung against 
the government, of "which both 
had been members, accurately 
describes Benn’s techniques of 
exploiting the caucus 7 though 
that was nothing new within the 
Labour Party. But Foot’s rage 
against Benn for refusing to 
compromise over his party- 
democracy socialism exposes the 
dilemma of all politicians who 
wish to work within the par- 
liamentary system but also want a 
new social and political order 


whose logic is a party democracy 
which is immicable to parliament 
Writing of Benn’s discovery of 
Marxism after 1979. Foot ob- 
serves “Marxism is a thrilling 
creed, and one which can open our 
eyes and ears to the excitement 
and glory of working-class 
history.” He finds it as bard as 
ever to see any enemies on the left. 

More than once he pays his own 
tribute to Marx and even to the 
prophet's disciples who’ wrought 
the Russian Revolution. He' at- 
tacks what' Ire calls . ihe .“bastard 
Marxism or Trotskyism” which 
spreads the doctrine dim. since all 
rep halist • governments are by 
definition repressive, any form of 
resistance is legitimate. But he 
continues; “Neither Karl Marx 
nor Leon Trotsky, we must hastily 
add, ever said anything quite so 
demonstrably and dangerously 
foolish." But did not Marx argue 
that it would be necessary .to 
repeat 1793, the . apex year of; 
revolution? Did not Trotsky ad- 
vocate permanent revolution and 
bis colleague Lenin openly pro- 
claim tin s red terror as the way to 
woridng-dass freedom? - 

Since Foot fa a parliamentarian 
he would have none ofafl this. Bra 
like many on the legitimate left he 
has been happy torise in his party 
by playing with fixe; he condemns 
the blatant Trotskyists buz says 
nothing about the hidden Lenin- 
ists who are more frightening 
because more efficient. Indeed, 
even his attitude to the Leninists 
of Moscow is significantly re- 
vealed in the final words of his 
essay on Churchill where he 
condemns the “post-war - panic 
about ihe Soviet Union which be 
himself (Churchill) had done so 
much to inflame.” 

Foot's thinking is of interest 
because he embodies the paradox 
at the heart ofthe Labour Patty 
from which Owen and friends had 
to get away because ho satisfactory 
resolution, was possible. * 

His attack on Owen, who 
decided to “kick away the ladder 
which had lifted him to eminencer 
fa personal and bitter. It does not 
even scruple to imply comparison 
with Oswald Mosley’s departure 
from Labour — somewhat to Mos- 
ley’s advantage since he at least 
(Foot observes) had reason to be 
impatient . with Labour's 
“pusillanimity” over unemploy- 
ment. But only a few years later, 
says Foot pointedly, Mosley’s 
reckless ambition was unmasked. 

Yet the only “fact” that Foot 
can marshal against Owen is that 
he published a book which he had 
already prepared while in the 
.Labour fterry to describe what he 
>tbought socialism should mean, 
making a pp ropriate changes from 
“socialism 1 *' to “social .dem- 
ocracy”. But rfthai -does .-that 
signify .other than that Owen had 
decided to caff , the same tfjiijg.Tty 
another name since his old party 
would have none of it? Are Roy 
Jenkins and the rest of the SDP 
traitors too? 

Since Foot's kind of socialism 
always has more sentiment than 
charity we should not be shocked. 
We should rather welcome the 
reminder of how ill-fitted Labour 
still is to govern, and how right the 
Social Democrats were to make 
honest men and women of them- 
selves by leaving it 
* Loyalists and Loners (Collins, 
£15f 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 



We interrupt this page to bring you 
a British Telecom announcement 
Hello. Have you got one of those 
new phones where yon don’t dial, 
you simply press buttons? Better 
still, have you got one of those 
really new phones wbereyou don't 
even press buttons, you just use 
the memory to get the number for 
you? Fun, isn't it? And yet so 
simple. 

But you’ve probably noticed 
one rather odd thing: however 
quickly yon press the. buttons, it 
still takes as long as ever for the 
number at the other end to ring. So 
after you’ve done your button- 
work, you have to wait for 20 or 30 
seconds while nothing happens. 
And that takes time: about 20 or 
30 seconds, in fact 

We'd be the first to admit that 
this can be annoying especially if 
at the end of all those seconds you 
get a wrong number or a high- 
pitched whining noise. None ofns 
likes sitting placidly for 20 or 30 
seconds when we could be doing 
something better. So that's why, 
instead of speeding up the dialling 
system, we've produced a little 
booklet called You Could Be 
Doing Something Better.' 

Yes, we'ye actually dreamed up 
a whole host of ideas for ways to 
fin in that time to your advantage! 
But don’t take our word for ft — 
listen to some of today’s people 
who are using that wait in their 
own particular way. 

Sir Boris Trelfarth, top aril 
servant: “I am learning Spanish. 
While I am waiting for a number 
to ring I find 1 can learn several 
words ata time — and believe me, 
with the number of phone calk 1 
have to make, that's a lot of 
vocabulary! The only snag is that 
when the number finally rings and 
is answered, f tend to start talking 
in Spanish. Mucho comjpo, no?” 
Ken Sprigged, best-selling thriller 
writen “1 usually spend the Hmi» 
killing off another character in my 
newnoveL” 

Jastm Caatefoape, Young Stock- 
broker of the Yean “The speed I 
work at, I simply cant afford to 


packed 


wait for 20 or 30 seconds doing 
nothing. While 1 am waiting for 
the number to ring, I make 
another, phone calL” 

Wilson Corona, Formula 1 racing 
driver: “Most Grand Prix cars are 
now equipped with phones, so 
during a race 1 often can up my 
low drivers to annoy them. Some- 
times I pretend ft’s a wrong 
number, or perhaps I arid trie 
their 1 driving — they hate. *h»H 
When I'm waiting for the number 
to tin g I fflce to wave the receiver 
at the driver next to me and shout: 
‘It’s for you!' We need more 
humour in motor racing.” 

These are just some of the many 
ideas contained in our new book- 
let, akmg with knitting playing the 

E yoga and Look-Like- 
ter-Staflone exercises. But 
3 Corona's comments bring 
us to a very serious subject 
telephoning w hile driving a car. 
More and more of us have a phone 
in our -car; which can lead to 
dangerous driving and accidents, 
and that can only hring British 
Telecom into disrepute. So for 
heaven's sake, try to obey the 
following simple . rules about 
phoning 'n' driving.' 

• Dial only at a red fight. ' . .. . 

• Never answer die phone oil a 
hairpin bend. 

• Do not feed the phone cord 
through the steering wheeL . 

• Do not gestiqolate in a French, 
least of all Italian, manner. 

• Turn off your car stereo "while 
phoning • 

• Never use two phones at the 
same time: 

• Leave your phone concealed 
while your car is parked. Other- 
vase the car may be vandalized by 
passers-by, and there fa nothing 
worse than coming back to find a 
car full of empty cider bottles and 
graffiti reading “Rita, Lovely 
Model — 246 8091”. . 

• If you are involved in a fatal " 
crash w hile phoning do replace 
the receiver - before going' un- 
cposrious.OthcrmseyourcallwiH 
be way expensive. 

A British Telecom announcement . 



>le 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


j^^^Sfaee^London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 

WHAT OIL CRISIS? 


Getting Land Rovers on the road 


When the world was told in the 
seventies - by the Club of 
Rome, President Cartels 
Commission on global prob- 
lems and assorted doom sayers 

— that jtfce energy crisis was a 
permanent feature of our lives, 
it occurred to few people that 
the crisis in question might 
one day consist of falling oil 
prios-and a world glut. Had 
they been so informed, they 
would have wondered in what 
sense these developments con- 
stituted a crisis rather th^ a 
benefit 

It is understandable that the 
finance ministers of oil- 
t producing countries should 
1 speak in crisis terms. They are 
watching their revenues and 
investment projects shrink 
hourly. But when the United 
States Vice-President George 
Bush compares free-falling oil 
prices to a .parachutist mjnpp 
his parachute, the economics 
of oil plenty evidently need 
Spelling out. 

- What is happening today is 
the reversal of the two oil 
shocks of the seventies. Since 
they produced world inflation, 
severe recession and a transfer 
of wealth to a small number of 
oil-producing countries, 
reversing them would seem to 
be in the general interest 
Which is, indeed, the case: 
Lower oO prices will 'mean 
lower industrial costs, higher 
world economic growth, and 
less inflationary pressure. It is 
a shot of adrenalin for the 
world economy. 

.There are^ of course, Josers. 
But except for a few cases of 
countries and companies 
whose income : is derived 
overwhelmingly from oil even 
losers regain on the round- 
abouts some of what they lose 
on the swings. - " 

Mexico is an interesting 
example. It is an oil-producing 
country which planned large 
investment projects on great 
oil expectations. It' now faces 
huge debt repayment probfcins 


(which, nonetheless, the inter- 
national banking community 
has so far managed to juggle 
successfully.) ' " 

Yet the Mexican economy is 
mom diversified than the 
economies of Gulf : producers. 
It can therefore hope to enjby 
some ofFsetting benefits. from 
the falling dollar,.- lower .in- 
terest rales and more rapid 
growth of the American econ- 
omy next-door. • . 

The Gulf producers, on the 
other' hand, can react to declin- 
ing oil revenues by cutting 
back on civil investment 
projects which are ambitious 
rather than strictly necessary. 
They may dislike that — but 
doubtless Pharaoh disliked 
cutting down on pyramids in 
lean years. ' 

. That leaves a few countries 
— of which Nigeria is the most 
obvious example — which 
combine' little industrial 
diversification, collapsing oil 
revenues and , major, state- 
financed capital projects. 
Their plight is real, bat self- 
inflicted. Though world finan- 
cial institutions will doubtless 
provide short-term adjust- 
ment assistance, it must be on 
the understanding that long- 
term retrenchment is unavoid- 
able. 

Both Mexico and Nigeria 
will, of course, pose a problem 
for those American banks. 
Their loan security has sud- 
denly shrunk. Nonetheless, the 
long-advertised debt crisis, fa 
unlikely to explode.' Most 
developing:;' countries, with 
outstanding debts arejrot oil 
producers. They benefit from 
the oil price collapse. "■ 

And onetittlemoticed bene- 
fit of cheap oil is that Iran and- 
Iraq will fold the smews of war 
Increasingly expensive. 

lit Britain, oil and oil-related 
industries account for six per- 
cent of gross national product 
Unless tails wag dogs, the 
depressed outlook for that six 
percent fa more than offset by 
the boost that 4ower energy - 
... : t." 


prices will give to the other 94 
percent 

- That would be so if the UK 
economy were a closed unit It 
.is doubly true of a trading 
economy which benefits from 
■increased economic activity m 
. foe world economy in which 
about two-thirds of trade is 
carried on between OECD 
countries. 

Only two real losers spoil foe 
outlook for Britain — compa- 
nies with heavy investment in 
marginal North Sea oilfields, 
where foe cost of production 
now outweighs the revenue, 
and the Treasury. The compa- 
nies have little choice but to 
accommodate to foe new eco- 
nomic reality by writing down 
their assets, cutting dividends, 
and curbing their plans for 
exploration, talk. That is what 
risk capital is all about. 

But foe Treasury, though 
facing a major revenue loss, 
has some room for manoeu- 
vre. There will be an un- 
qjiantiftable, offsetting 
revenue increase from the 
higher profits of non-oil 
companies. Until this year, 
moreover, the Treasury had 
underestimated North Sea ofl 
revenues with suspicious 
consistency. And finally the 
British government is running 
one of the lowest deficits in the 
industrialised world. 

It is this relatively prudent 
fiscal stance which helps to 
explain why the Pound and the 
^Stock Market have both per- 
formed steadily in the face of 
an^pRprice fall which forecast- 
ago would have 
expected to be accompanied 
by chaotic trading in both. It 
would be a bold forecaster now 
who would predict that, de- 
spite the expected revenue , 
loss, the Chancellor will not i 
find it politically possible to 
cut taxes next year. 

. And there is one tittle-, 
noticed domestic benefit of the J 
oil price fall. Governments' 
need never fear Arthur Scaigin 
again..-." 




Thegovemmentis decision to 
allow women to .retire ar foe r 
same age as men'js^y^ccme 
recognition of 

lale twentiefo centujy BritaiiL' 
The only cause for regret is 
that such an eminently sen- 
sible decision was not . of the 
government's own making but 
had to be forced on it by foe 
European Court 

Britain has one of the high- 
est proportions of working 
women in Europe. That 
proportion is increasing and 
there is every sign that it will 
continue to do so, npt so much^ 
because women have re work ' 
out of economic, necessity 
(thoughmany do), bufbecause^ 
they want to. The arguments^ 
for work in general — that it- 
endows foe worker with a 
sense of dignity and purpose, 
and gives companionship and 
diversion — are no less valid 
for women than they are for 
men. This point is sometimes 
drowned in the volume of 
complaints (not from men 
alone) to foe effect that women 
have increasingly been enter- 
ing jobs traditionally regarded 
as male preserves. 

At the same time, the ratio- 
nale behind the old arrange-, 
mem, which provided for a 
five-year gap between retire- 
ment ages on the grounds that 
women were on average five 
years younger than their hus- 


bands, is out of date. It is also 
contradicted by the fact that 
women,- .®,- forthin as elser 


tendfo'iye Jonathan men. If 
fofa' fact ; were taken ' to its 
loj^calcondusiQiy the existing 
differential in retirement ages 
would have to be reversed. 

. . The reluctance of any . Brit- 
ish government hitherto. La- 
bour or Conservative, to go 
even half way towards 
recognizing these, realities' de- 
rives largely from .foe es- 
timated cost. Current 
. calculations suggest that retire-, 
meni would have to he fixed at' 
. just over 64 if foen ahd women 
'were to retire andcollect their 
. pensions a t foe samp tune with 
no extra cost to Ufa Exchequer: 
It is presumably bn the baas of 
these figures that the govern-, 
menf has chosen to allow 
women to retire later, while 
leaving the five-year differen- 
tial in pensionable ages un- 
changed. 

This compromise decision is' 
bound to lead to objections. 
Some will be from men, of all 
ages, concerned that their tra- 
ditional advantages to employ- 
ers — among .them the extra 
years they work: towards their 
pensions -r- - will be- eroded 
further than foey. already have 
been by equal rights legisla- 
tion. Others will be from 
women looking forward to 


their earlier retireme n t as a 
: retease from drudgery, who 
\ vdll spp foe derisiqft as a first 
. Steptoforai'ds alajer retirement 
•• nfr women across' the 
' .board.! Yet others wilt be from 
. those — of both sexes — who 
hoped for equality in foe 
pensionable age. This last is 
the only valid objection. 

If women want equal status 
at work, and there is every sign 
that they do, then retirement, 
like everything else, must be 
on equal terms. But this does 
not preclude a degree of 
' flexibility. For everyone, man 
or woman, who is able and 
, willing to work past foe age of 
60, there are offiers for whom 
■ retirement cannot come soon 
' enough. Some have wearied of 
their jobs, others are in failing 
health, others without 
paid employment would wel- 
come the chance to exchange 
their unemployed status for 
that of pensioner. 

It is for this reason that the 
government's decision to ak 
low women to continue work- 
. mg until 65 can only be a first 
stage. The discriminatory pro- 
vision which allows women to 
collect their state pension at 
60, while men have to wait 
another five years, must be 
phased out and replaced by a 
flexible retirement age ap- 
plicable to men and women 
alike. That fa foe next bar- 
ricade. 


the falklands future 


Senor Javier Perez dc 
Cuellar, Secretary-General of 
the United Nations is due in 
Buenos Aires today for talks 
with the Argentine govern- 
ment - which is expected to 
press its case for negotiations 
with Britain over sovereignty 
of foe- Falkland Islands. But 
neither is likely to work out a 
formula which vffl settle mat 
vexed issue, Four years after 
Argentine forces invaded foe 
Islands, 94.5 per cent of the 
people who live there have just 
said that they '*an t to stay 

British. . . 

The results of foe unofficial 
referendum whichwascarned 
out for the UK Falkland 
Islands Committee, have, 
hardly come as a surprise, it 
would have hsd more value 
had.it allowed foe islanders a 
second option. Assuming foat 

their first choice was contmu- 

mg British sovereignty, 

would be their second ? Would 
it be some leaseback arrange- 
ment? Or administration un- 
der the trusteeship of the 
United Nations? 
chok Ss these were 
rejected and it is easy ^ 


understand why they were not 
presented: in any other way. 
But to do so would have made 
the exercise more worthwhile. 

-As it is the results only 
underline the difficulty of the 
British position. In the Falk- 
lands there is a majority ntiiose 
commitment to the Crown is 
absolute. Any alternative 
would be. carried, through 
against the’7 wishes - of ■ foe 
people who live there. ■ - 
..There are ; . wider issues 
affecting Britain and its 56m 
people. But four years is a 
short time in international 
politics - especially after a war 
in which so many died: Such 
arguments are for tomorrow 
not today - and the Argentine 
government must understand 
foat this fa so. ' 

The difficulty ' President 
Alfonsin has over accepting 
foe long-standing British in- 
vitation to normalise relations 
on related issues, suggests foat 
he .understands .it only too 
well Argentina has never ao- 
cepteti foe. British-^ffer -to 
repatriate its -war idead or to 
allow Bext-of-knvtp visit their 
Falklands graves.. H is unwill- 
•' t . 


ing to discuss the reopening of 
air links with this country - or 
to allow British goods to be 
imported. 

It has not even taken advan- 
tage of the announcement by. 
Whitehall last Summer that 
Argentine imports would once 
more be permitted io enter 
Britain. Argentine exports to 
this country totalled £2 m 
worth last year - slightly up on 
the £150,000 or so of the 
previous two or three years but 
hardly to be compared with 
the £12Sm which they were 
earning before the war 

Whatever President 
Alfonsin does, it would prob- 
ably not alter very radically the 
findings of this latest 
‘referendum*'. But a renewal 
of diplomatic and commercial 
contact between foe two coun- 
tries would do more than 
merely bring economic bene- 
fits. The time for sovereignty 
to be written into the agenda 
foe Anglo-Argentine negotia- 
tions may not be yet-But if it is 
ever going to dawn it is more 
likely to do soin a climate of 
better relations. 


From AfrR. M. H. Duncan 
Sir, As a director of a multi- 
national company's subsidiary in 
Nigeria I control a small fleet of 
vehicles, including a dozen whh 
four-wheel drive, and have always 
had the greatest admiration for the 
design concept of Land Rover and 
Range Rover. However, the de- 
sign detail and quality control in 
manufacture is very poor. . 

I purchased one of tie first 
Range Rovers exported to Ma- 
lawi. Within weeks, a number of 
faults developed, showing that the 
detail design was inadequate for 
prolonged use on poor roads. 
These faults were common to all 

Range Rovers in Malawi at that 
time. 

In Nigeria, my company ini- 
tially purchased Land Rovers. 
However, in 1982, we started 
buying Nissan Patrols because 
they were more reliable, more 
comfortable and cheaper. Due to 
import restrictions we were forced 
bade to Land Rovers last year. 

Of the five Land Rovers pur- 
chased (all the new 1 10 series) two 
are off the road permanently, doe 
to assembly faults and a complete 
lack of spares. We purchased a 
Range Rover three months ago 
which was delivered with a host of 
assembly faults and has developed 
even more. Although these ve- 
hicles were assembled in Nigeria 
by Leyiand Nigeria Limited, we 
have i>kn purchased large num- 
bers of Peugeot cars and light 
trucks which are extremely reli- 
able. 

Land Rover and Range Rover 
are in dire need of new manage- 
ment to improve their design and 
quality controL The alternative is 
to see them lose, totally, their 
already diminishing market Share 
to the aggressive and efficient 
Japanese. In that contest is it 
worth the debate as to who owns 
the companies? 

Yours faithfully, 

RICHARD DUNCAN, 

PO Box 413, 

Zaria, 

Nigeria. 

March 23. 

From Mr Nod Falconer 

Sir, The situation at Leyiand 

Signals to the East 

From Sir John Lawrence 
Sr, 1 am glad to see from Mary 
Dejevsky’s article on the BBCs 
Russian services (March 27) that 
lively argument about the purpose 
and scope of these valuable broad- 
casts continues. But may the 
argument borne once more to the 
•conclusion -that ihe purpose of the 
service is' “to provide truthful 
information to people who would 
Otherwise go without” and that 
this service,- being one of the best 
investments HMG have made in 
the last 40 years, should continue 
to be financed by a Foreign Office 
grant 

The argument pies on forever, 
and quite rfaht too, but the right 
conclusion is what it has always 
been. More than 40 years ago, I 
was European Intelligence Officer 
and later European Services 
Organiser for the BBC In the days 
of the phoney war we used to pet 
letters protesting against the quiet, 
objective and (as some thought) 
dull tone of the BBCs news. 

Why couldn't we be like the 

‘Degree days 9 

From Professor Thomas A. 
Markus 

Sir, Recent.debates about donate 
and beating allowances have high- 
lighted the irrationality of the 
present system. The Department 
of Geography at Lancaster 
University (March 5) rightly 
points out that ail the data for 
rational allocation of fuel sub- 
sidies are readily available. 

But Kenneth Hutchison's retro- 
grade proposal (March 5) to re- 
introduce “degree days”, in place 
of this year’s attempts by DHSS 
staff to guess subjectively the 
j severity of the weather, would put 
tire clock back to an almost 
j equally unsatisfactory earlier sys- 
tem. “Degree days” assume that 
[climatic severity is only deter- 
mined by temperature. But a 
much better “climatic severity 
index” (CSI) is now available - 
; developed by this depart m ent 
with Scottish Development 
Department funding. 

The C$1 additionally takes into 
account sunshine avanahtiity and 
wind, which significa ntly affect 
fuel consumption. The CSI shows 


Price of petrol 

From Mr. John Tearle 
Sir, Having disposed of a majority 
holding in British Petroleum, in 
the interests of a wider share* 
owning democracy, it ill behoves 
the Government to lecture the oil 
companies on their obligations to 
the public interest 

Any enlightened company 
director when considering pricing 
policy will take into account the 
interests of his shareholders, his 
employees and his customers, as 
weH as those of the wider public; 
am] tire Chancellor must not 
complain if the directors of BP, in 
reacting to his Budget, choose to 
give greatest weight to the interests 
of tire shareholders who elected 
them. 

The Prime Minister urges all of 
us, as customers, to shop around 
for petrol Has she forgotten that, 
thanks to ho-, we are all sharehold- 
ers now, and may actually benefit 
from higher prices at the pump? 
Yours truly, 

JOHN TEARLE, 

Paihade, 

Frithsden Copse, 

Berifoamsted, 

Hampshire. 

March 22. 

I 


Vehicles is desperate and requires 
urgent action. That at Land Rover 
is noL There is time for a proper 
privatization, that very many 
employees and shareholders and 
plain British citizens would wel- 
come. This must be attempted, if 
LR is not essential to the disposal 
OfLV. 

There is no case whatsoever for 
panic-selling LR to the corporate 
executive who beads the failed LV 
— and who absents himself from 
his desk at this critical point in its 
history! - and to four managers, 
and nobody else from the firm. 

This is not an employee take- 
over that might deserve favoured 
treatment; indeed such treatment 
would appear to constitute an 
“abuse of the minority” that could 
be blocked legally. 

Yours sincerely, 

NOEL FALCONER, 

223 Brarahall Moor Lane, 

Hazel Grove, 

Stockport, 

Cheshire. 

March 26. 

Attitudes to US 

From Mr Kenneth J. Moss 
Sir, Surely Messrs Sheehy, Dur- 
ham and Walters (March 28) 
misunderstand the source of the 
general unease about increasing 
US investment in the UK. Few 
people doubt tire advantages they 
point out; few people have un- 
friendly feelings towards the 
United Slates. 

Nevertheless, it cannot be wise 
for any country to allow another 
one to have too large an interest in 
its economy. To do so is to open 
the door to pressures that may not 
always be welcome, as the invest- 
ing country seeks — reasonably 
enough — to protea its owq 
interests. 

Indeed, the friendlier the invest- 
ing country, the harder it may be 
to resist such pressure. The wise 
man avoids becoming too much 
beholden to his friend. 

Yours faithfully, 

KENNETH J. MOSS, 

8 Gilman Road, 

Norwich, 

Norfolk. 

March 28. 


Americans and put more pep into 
it? But when the real war started 
the calm tone and unswerving 
objectivity of the BBC brought a 
rich and lasting reward. Never 
mind if Radio Free Europe and 
the Voice of America are winning 
more of the youthful listeners at 
tire present time. 

’ .Let ..us .be content with our 
present estimated fourteen million 
listeners in the Soviet Union and 
our by now legendary reputation 
as the only completely reliable 
source of news. 

I have only one suggestion to 
make We ought not to broadcast 
in Russian alone but also in other 
major languages of the Soviet 
Union. Tire Government would 
have to increase its grant to tire 
BBC but the sums involved are 
not large and the returns in 
goodwill would be enormous if 
past experience is anything to go 
on. 

Yours faithfully, 

JOHN LAWRENCE, 

24 & Leonard's Terrace, SW3. 
March 27. 

that regional variations are even 
larger than those indicated by 
“degree days”. If Kew is given an 
index of 100, on “degree days” 
EskdaJemuir is 130 and Lerwick 
145. But using CSI they become 
163 and 169 respectively. In other 
words, a Highlands house uses 69 
per cent more fuel a year to 
maintain identical conditions to 
those in an identical bouse in 
London. 

But any system which bases 
severe weather allowances on the 
average weather in a region - 
whether assessed subjectively, by 
“degree days” or by CSI - is totally 
absurd and unjust Thus a London 
claimant receives extra money for 
weather which is “average” in 
Aberdeen, where it attracts no 
extra over a basic, uniform, na- 
tional rate which assumes that 
climate does not affect one's fuel 
bill! 

Yours sincerely, 

THOMAS A. MARKUS, 
University of Strathclyde, 
Department of Architecture and 
Building Science, 

131 Ronenrow, 

Glasgow. 

March 23. 


The ‘workers’ 

From Mr D. H. Hackel 
Sir, I disagree with Dr Doig 
(March 24). There is nothing 
emotive or divisive about the 
term employers and employees. It 
is. as it should be impersonal, and 
its usage is dear and accepted. 

The “secret” of German eco- 
nomic success is not to be sought 
in semantics. The German 
Arbeilgeber, with a little help from 
the State, invested. Welfare for the 
Arbeit nehmer. with a little push 
from the State, followed. 

Yours faithfully, 

D. H. HACKEL, 

7 Raby Place, 

Bath, 

Avon. 

From Margaret Marchioness of 
Aberdeen 

Sir, Many years ago my husband 
was chairman of a steel works in 
Sheffield. He had no difficulty in 
finding the right word to include 
managers and workers — he 
always said “we”. 

Yours faithfully, 

MARGARET ABERDEEN 
Sycamore Cottage , 

Forest Row, 

Sussex. 


Ignoble effects 
of noble art 

From Dr Helen C. Grant 
Sir. Your second leader in the 
issue of March 25 isa good deed in 
a naughty world. Cerebral damage 
is caused by boxing because 
causing cerebral damage is the aim 
of the game. Your proposal to 
limit the sport to the age of 
consent is to be applauded as a 
first step in limiting the amount of 
cerebral damage. 

t note with dismay, however, 
that the British Boxing Board of 
Control has succeeded in seducing 
you with their propaganda about 
the “medical precautions” they 
have introduced. 

“Propaganda”? Yes, propa- 
ganda. because the Board is aware 
that they will find nothing in 
active professional boxers. That is 
why they carry out these “medical 
precautions” ’ amid much pub- 
licity. The beginnings of damage 
to the brain can only be detected 
when a boxer dies unexpectedly 
early and his brain is carefully 
examined under the microscope 
(which is what I will be doing to 
Sieve Watts’s brain). 

To quote yourself. Sir, “re- 
pealed blows to the head. . . 
produce cumulative and irrevers- 
ible brain damage.” Quite; and 
some years will elapse before the 
millions of destroyed nerve cells 
are replaced by scar tissue. Only 
then will the shrivelled brain be 
demonstrated by “investigations.” 
Then it is too lale: the victim is 
doomed. 

Now. after another well-publi- 
cized death due to boxing trauma, 
we hear the ritual lamentations 
about some sports being dan- 
gerous. Boxing is not just a 
dangerous sport To quote you. 
Sir, once more: “causing hurt and 
injury to an opponent is the very 
aim of the sport” 

Furthermore, this aim is cere- 
bral injury so that madness is the 
result For each of the 300-odd 
dramatic boxing deaths recorded 
world-wide since the last war there 
are unrecorded numbers of punch- 
drunk dements who creep away 
into mental institutions. The out- 
side world only gets to know about 
the occasional famous one. 

Yours faithfully, 

H. C. GRANT, 

10 Antrim Grove, NW3. 

March 26. 

From Mr R. A. B. Gowlland 
Sir, There is much in your leader 
on boxing with which any fair- 
minded supporter of the sport 
must agrees However, most of 
•your strictures . apply, to . pro- 
fessional boxing: amateur boxing, 
as enjoyed in many - voluntary 
youth dubs throughout the coun- 
try, is very different in both 
purpose and effect . . . 

.In apiateur boxing, the objec- 
tive is' not tohurt the other man. It 
is to .score points. The one who 
does not get hit is the one who 
wins, and it is for this reason that 
the sport is known as “the noble 
art of self defence.” 

Most people who have worked 
in youth dubs will testify to the 
benefits of amateur boxing. It 
keeps the boys off the streets and 
provides an outlet in training and 
competition for their natural 
aggression. It teaches them 

sportsmanship' sdf discipline- 
pride in fitness, the joy of 
comradeship and a great deal of 
courage. 

It is my experience that those 
boys who have been involved in 
amateur boxing at a youth dub are 
the ones who support the dubs in 
later life, giving back of their time, 
energy and money to those clubs 
which supported and helped them 
when they were young. Are we to 
throw away these significant 
advantages which arise through 
amateur boxing because of the 
small risks, voluntarily accepted 
by those taking part, in the 
professional game? 

Yours faithfully, 

ROBIN GOWLLAND, 

87 Jermyn Street, SW1, 

March 27. 


Ordination of women 

From the Headmaster of Notting- 
ham High School 
Sir, As an historian I was once 
amused to find that a member of 
Charles II's Parliament had ex- 
pressed the wish that Englishmen 
would “always worship in the way 
that Christ ordained”, meaning by 
this that they would use the Prayer 
Book of 1 662! As a member of the 
Anglican Communion I am less 
amused to find the Bishop of 
London perpetrating a similar 
absurdity. 

Bishop Graham, in his letter of 
March 27. challenges the right of 
the Anglican Church to consecrate 
a woman bishop on the grounds 
that Article XXXIV allows change 
only to riles ordained by man’s 
authority. Am I wrong in thinking 
that the rites of ordination at 
present used by the Church of 
England derive from Acts of 
Parliament of 1559 and 1662 and 
that they include significant dif- 
ferences from those used in earlier 
centuries? 

If this is the case am I to 
conclude that the Almighty 
changed his mind about the 
constitution of our Church in the 
sixteenth and seventeenth centu- 
ries, and that he did this not once 
but several times? 

I have no doubt that God 
ordained that there should be a 
ministry but I believe he left it io 
his people to decide what form 
that ministry should take and to 
make changes when this became 
appropriate. 

Yours faithfully, ■ 

DENNIS WITCOMBE. 
Nottingham High School, 
Wzverley Mount, 

Nottingham. 

March 28. 


ON THIS DAY 


APRILS 1964 

.4 short extract from the last of | 
three long articles on the 
Conservative Party (April 1, B, 3). 

Their appearance created 
something of a sensation in 
political - ana social - circles, and 
they elicited a vttluminous and 
varied correspondence from 
readers. There was considerable 
speculation as to the identity of “A 
Conservative". At Hie Times his 
name um, indeed still is, a secret, 
for only one person knew it, the 
then Editor, to whom anonymity 
was, and still is, sacrosanct 


m search of 
a pattern— 3 


The Field Where the 
Biggest Failures Lie 

By A Conservative 

The Conservative Party must 
therefore stand pat on the distinc- 
tion between the areas where 
economic criteria apply and where 
therefore the principles of capital-' 
ism must reign, and the areas 
where other criteria than economic 
are accepted. Plain though this 
touchstone is, and vital to the 
party's coherence and {pod con- 
science, it is extraordinary how 
haphazardly and ua -analytically 
Conservatives have applied it. It 
chmiM prmhlf them to take full 
account of the common purposes of 
society and of the charitable 
impulses — in the widest sense of 
the term — of society and zta 
members. These are purposes and' 
impulses which the Conservative- 
Party, in opposition alike to utfii-' 
♦nri»nc i to laisser-faire liberals, and 
to individualists, baa always assert- 
ed and championed. The right of 
the state to act and to interfere on 
these grounds is one of the basic 
tenets of Conservatism. 

POVERTY 

The relief of poverty in cash or 
kind, money or bread, is the 
plainest object of the charitable 
impulse in individuak or societies. 
We are no longer accustomed in 
Britain to the use of such naked 
terminology - in other countries, 
even the United States, it is still 
permissible officially to mention 
poverty — but the concept affords 
the most convenient starting point 
for discussion. Fortunately it is 
unnecessary to define poverty, 
except to say two things about its 
meaning in this context. First, it is 
the condition of a relatively small 
minority — the idea of poverty, as 
applied to a substantial proportion 
or even the majority of a communi- 
ty, is something quite different 
Secondly, the “poverty tine”, wher- 
ever on» chooses to draw it moves 
upwardsas the standards of life of 
the large majority rise. Harsh 
though the judgment may seem, it 
is'in the'rdi^pf poverty that the 
biggest failures of Conservative 
policy in the past 12 years lie. 
Consequently it is there that some 
of the largest changes are called for. 

Relief of poverty in kind, the 
wayfarer's dole at the monastery 
gate, belongs to a primitive society. 
In the modern world only cash is 
tolerable, for more reasons than 
one; it enables the adequacy of the 
benefit — the standard of living 
assumed — to be clerly seen and 
measured; it gives the recipient 
freedom and dignity, the power 
within limits to choose the compo- 
sition of his living standard and 
not have it dictated for him by the 
donor; and as a consequence, it 
gears in with the general mecha- 
nism of production to ensure that 
the demands of consumers general- 
ly, including the poor, are efficient- 
ly satisfied. The Conservatives set 
out boldly 12 years ago by commut- 
ing the food subsidies for selective 
cash benefits, and they have done 
several useful oddments since, like 
abolishing the tobacco concession 
and resisting all manner of ease- 
ments in Irind for “the old-age 
pensioner". But from the big 
challenges, pensions and housing, 
they have run away. 

THE BOLD ACT 

The Beveridge social security sys- 
tem of uniform benefits for all, 
inadequate in poverty but increas- 
ingly superfluous for others, as 
savings, personal and institutional, 
continue to grow, has been main- 
tained and edged upwards just 
behind the national assistance 
standard (if rent is included), 
which remains the actual guaran- 
tee against poverty. Instead of 
meeting the challenge, successive 
Conservative governments, amid 
the growing restiveness of their 
supporters,' have not only kept 

Beveridge intact but put on top of 
it a “graduated scheme”, which will 
presently become unworkable as 
more and more stand to gain by 
contracting out Now they find 
themselves confronted by the La- 
bour Party's bid to nationalize 
private saving for security by a 
comprehensive scheme of “half- 
pay on retirement". The time has 
never seemed right for the bold act 
of stepping off the escalator and 
finding a way back to the purpose 
of guaranteeing, wherever neces- 
sary, a cash income generously 
adequate for the basic needs at 
current prices. ... 

Elision course 

From Mr Leslie Fielding 
Sir. The elided English of some of 
today's newsreaders takes a lot o? 
swallowing. The Pry-Mister, the 
Chance-a-Chcqucr and the Brisfr 
Gum surely deserve fuller men- 
tion. Is Co-Stree the coal industry 
or the Coldstream Guards? 

If normal diction is not rapidly 
restored, we shall be even less uif 
stood by our Ewer-peer partners. 
(I write as what might be called a 
Loyal sizn of the Nye-King df 
Gray-Brii-Nor-Nisle.) i 

Yours seer4y, 

LESLIE FIELDING, 
RuedeiaLOl 200, 

B- 1049 Brussels, 

Belgium. 


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COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

WINDSOR CASTLE 
April 2: The Queen was repre- 
sented by Sir Paul Scoon (Gov- 
ernor General or Grenada) at 
the Requiem Mass for Sir Leo 
de Gale (formerly Governor 
General of Grenada) which was 
Held in the Cathedral of the 
Immaculate Conception, Si 
George's this afternoon. 
BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
April 2: The Princess Anne. Mrs 
Marie Phillips. Immediate Past 
Master of the Worshipful Com- 
pany of Ferriers. this afternoon 
attended a Meeting of the 
Adjudicators of the Further 
Education Awards for 1986 at 
the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, Belgrave Square, Lon- 
don SW1 

CLARENCE HOUSE 
April 2: Queen ELizabeth The 
Queen Mother this morning 
opened the British Sporting Art 
!> Trust Gallery at the National 
<•* Horse Raring Museum. New- 
'j markeL Her Majesty travelled 
■ - in an Aircraft of The Queen's 
Flight. 

Lady Angela Oswald and Sir 
■- Martin Gilliat were in 
*'„• attendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
April 2: The Prince of Wales 
arrived at Bristol Parkway Sta- 


tion in the Royal Train this 

morning. 

His Royal Highness opened 
British Aerospace's new Space 
Engineering Building at Filton. 
Bristol and received a briefing 
on the interception of Halley's 
Comet by the Spacecraft Giotto. 

The Prince of Wales sub- 
sequently visited the Freeland 
Buildings Project of the Zenzele 
Self Build Housing Association 
Ltd at Eastvilte. Bristol. 

His Royal Highness later 
travelled to Royal Air Force 
Northolt in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Brian 
Anderson was in attendance. 

The Prince of Wales, Patron, 
the London Welsh Rugby Foot- 
ball Club, accompanied bv The 
Princess of Wales, this evening 
attended the Centenary Dinner 
at the Grosvenor House Hotel. 
London Wl. 

Mrs George West and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Brian 
Anderson were in attendance. 


Prince Michael of Kent, Presi- 
dent of the Institute of the 
Motor Industry, will present the 
institute's Castrol Gold Medal 
for 1985 at the Connaught 
Rooms on April 8. 

Prince Michael of Kent will 
attend a meeting of the trustees 
of the National Motor Museum 
at Beaulieu on April 18. 


A recount for ancient polls 


Public opinion polls and other 
forms of computerized head- 
counting and number games 
are the bread and marg of 
modern politics. 

At the joint meeting of the 
Classical Associations of Scot- 
land and England in Glasgow 
yesterday. Dr M H Hansen of 
Copenhagen University ap- 
plied the new techniques to the 
politics of 24 centuries ago, 
and reached some revolution- 
ary conclusions. 

It is now possible to calcu- 
late scientifically the demog- 
raphy of the ancient world, 
correcting the miscalculations 
and old errors of unscientific 
authorities. 

Dr Hansen demonstrated 
that the population of male 
citizens of Athens in the time 
of Demosthenes was more 


By Philip Howard 

than 30 , 000 , rather than 
21,000. There were 500,000 
slaves. 

Those statistics have impor- 
tant consequences for the poli- 
tics and history of the period, 
and sophisticated techn iques 
can now be applied to rewrit- 
ing much ancient history. 

Politicians, like the earth, 
are flattened at the polls, but 
polls conducted across the 
millennia are an exciting new 
form of HI animation for old 
politics. 

Professor Stephen Clark of 
Liverpool University gave a 
revivalist account of the un- 
fashionable notion of philoso- 
phy as a consolation. Some 
modern analytic philosophy 
may seem to those outside the 
game like crossword puzzles: a 
trivial pursuit for an idle hour. 


Professor Clark argued that 
the models and even the myths 
of sscb moralizing philoso- 
phers as Boethius, Marcas 
Amelias, and Epictetus are 
still valid in our new world of 
scientism. 

The consolation of philoso- 
phy is still the consolation of 
those who respond to God's 
call to wake np from a dream 
and see the world as it really 
is. 

“What are we here for?” is 
still a philosophical, not a 
meaningless, question to be 
committed to the flames. 

Dr Adrian Gratwkk of St 
Andrews University dis- 
coursed lucidly of die texture 
of early Latin verse; and 
declaimed some of the rousing 
old rhythms that are the 
bedrock of western poetry. 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 
Mr Justice Tucker to be a 
Presiding Judge on the Midland 
and Oxford Circuit in place of 
the late Mr Justice Skinner. 

Mr Justice OgnaU, aged 52, to 
be a member of the Judicial 
Studies Board and chairman of 
iis criminal subcommittee in 
succession to the late Mr Justice 
Tudor Price. 

Lady LJoyd, wife of Sir Anthony 
Llovit and Dr Martin Richards 
to Be members of the council of 
the Tavistock Institute of Medi- 
cal Psychology. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Mr C.T. Bun bury 
and Miss A.C. Green 
The engagement is announced 
between Charles Thomas, youn- 
ger son of the late Sir William 
Bunbury, Bt, and Pamela Lady 
Bunbury. of Hollesley. Suffolk, 
and Amanda Carol, younger 
daughter of Mr and the Hon Mrs 
John Green, of Chelsea Park 
Gardens. London, SW3. 

Mr R.W. Cook 
and Miss C.M. Toovey 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs B.WJ. Cook, of 
Stretlington. Sussex, and Cath- 
erine, younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs J. A. Toovey, of 
Funtington. Sussex. 

Mr GJ. Gas kart h 
and Miss J£. Hutchings 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, son of Mr 
and Mrs Robert F. Gaskarth. of 
Inhington. Cumbria, and Jane, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs John A. 
Hutchings, of St Albans, 
Hertfordshire. 

Mr TJ. Millington-Drake 
and Miss LR. Carlin 
The engagement is announced 
between Tristan James, elder 
son of the late Mr James 
Millington-Drake and of Mrs 
Millington-Drake, and Kathleen 
Regina, daughter of the late Mr 
Leonard Carlin and of Mrs 
Carlin, of Iowa, United Slates. 


Mr A. Gershfield 
and Miss US. Jacobson 
The engagement is announced 
between Aaron, younger son of 
Mr and Mrs Ivor Gershfield. 
and Laura Susanne, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Ronald M. 
Jacobson, all of London. 

Mr P.G.F. Hanratty 
and Miss P.L. Roberts 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter, youngest son of 
Dr and Mrs J.F. Hanratty. of 
Westminster, and Paula. daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs J.F. Roberts, 
of Kidderminster. 

Worcestershire. 

Mr MJ. Leeson 
and Miss H.E. Moore 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael, son of Mrs B. 
Leeson and the late Mr S.C. 
Leeson. of Eastcote. Middlesex, 
and Helen, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs P.K. Moore, of Putney 
Heath. London. 

Mr G.M.B. Mailer-Howat 
and Miss MJ. Nelson 
The engagement is announced 
between Gavin Mailer-Howat, 
Argyll and Sutherland High- 
landers. younger son of Lieuten- 
ant-Colonel and Mrs G.M.M. 
Mailer-Howat of Monks Park, 
Wad hurst Sussex, and Melissa, 
eldest daughter of Commander 
P.G. Nelson, of Oslo. Norway, 
and Mrs E. Si V. Troubridge. of 
Blackheath. London. SE3. 


Mr R.H.C. Phillips 
and Miss J A. Carton 
The engagement is announced 
between Henry, elder son of the 
late Michael Phillips and of Mrs 
M.H.C. Phillips, of Lavant, 
West Sussex, and Jacqueline, 
elder daughter of Colonel and 
Mrs Conrad Carton, of London. 

Mr P. Ritchie 
and Miss S.E. Dyson 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter, youngest son of 
Mr and Mrs James W. Ritchie, 
of Lockeridge Down, Marl- 
borough. and Sara Elizabeth, 
only daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Edward Dyson, of Spring Place, 
Had low, KenL 

Jonkhcer D.A.Van Lennep 
and Miss N.M JL Shaw 
The engagement is announced 
between Dirk, elder son of the 
late Jonkheer F.A.D. Van 
Lennep and Mme Van Lennep, 
of Lincolnshire, and Nicola, 
younger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
J.R.H. Shaw, of Johannesburg, 
South Africa. 

Mr T.G. Watkin 
and Miss MJ. Hamlin 
The engagement is announced 
between Thomas Glyn, son of 
Mr and Mrs T.G. Watkins, of 
Cwmparc, Glamorgan, and 
Marv Jane, daughter of Mr W. 
Hamlin, of Cardiff; and the late, 
Mrs W. Hamlin. 


Marriages 


Viscount Camrose 
and Princess Joan Aly Khan 
The marriage has taken place 
quietly abroad between Vis- 
count Camrose and Princess 
Joan Aly Khan. 

Surgeon Lieutenant Commander 
C.F. Swinboe, RN, 
and Miss J.S. Young 
The marriage took place on 
Tuesday, April 1, in Fareham. 
Hampshire, between Surgeon 
Lieutenant Commander Crispin 
Swinboe and Miss Josephine 
Young. 

Mr CJ. Fayers 
and Miss SX. Ward 
The marriage took place quietly 
on March 26. 1986, in London, 
between Mr Christopher James 
Fayers, son of the Rev Douglas 
and Mrs Fayers, and Miss Sarah 
Elizabeth Ward, younger daugh- 
ter of Mrs Mary Ward and the 
late Mr George Ward. 

Mr R. HnD 
and Miss SuP. Hands 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday. March 22, at St John's 
Church. Belmont. Surrey, be- 
tween Mr Robert Hull son of 
Mr and Mrs N. HulL of 
Narberth, Dyfed, and Miss Sally 
Hands, younger daughter of the 
late Mr Thomas Hands and of 
Mrs Hands, of Cheam. Surrey. 
Brigadier D.W. McConne! 
and MissJLM. Allison 
The marriage took place on 
April 2, in Edinburgh, of Briga- 
dier David McConnel, 
Towerbum, Denholm, and Miss 
Rosemary Allison, Meadows 
House. Edinburgh. 


Latest wills 

Dowager Viscountess Davidson. 
Baroness Northchuirh. of Black 
Notley, Essex, left estate valued 
at £224,918. 

Mr Israel PoIIecoff, of Bangor, 
Gwynedd, left £1,196,761 net. 
Mr Eric Conrad Peters, of 
Ambers ham. West Sussex, the 
only British amateur tennis 
player to beat the prewar Ameri- . 
can champion, W.T. Tflden. left 
£159.547 neL. 


Science report 


Soviet plan for Martian space probe 


By a Special Correspondent 


As scientists tiuongfaoat the 
world continue to analyse and 
evaluate the huge volume of 
data gathered from last month's 
encounters with Halley's 
Comet, plans are well under 
way in Moscow for another 
space spectacular, code-named 
Project P hobos. 

Like the Vega probes, the 
new Russian spacecraft will be 
used for an international under- 
taking. with the collaboration 
of the European space agency. 

But this time the target oil! 
be Mars. According to Dr Yuri 
Zaitsev of the Soviet Space 
Research Institute, two un- 
manned probes will be launched 
from the Baikonur cosmodrome 
in July 1988 and, it is hoped, 
will reach (heir destination at 
the beginning of 1989. 

II is not intended that they 
should land on the red planet 
Instead, they will sail past its 
two natural satellites, Pbobos 
and Deimos, photograph them 
and Mars itself, and sub- 


sequently. laud an instrument 
module on Pbobos. The main 
purpose of the project will be to 
explore the Martian iono- 
sphere, its magnetic fields and 
what lies beneath the planet's 
surface. 

In preparatory work for the 
design of Project Phobos, So- 
viet scientists examined the 
Earth's ionosphere, a region 
above the stratosphere, ft forms 
a layer about 40 to 500 miles 
above sea level, which reflects 
radiowaves, making long-range 
communications over the Earth 
possible. 

The region was explored 
some time ago by a Soviet 
probe. Intercosmos 19. with the 
type of instruments that will be 
included on the interplanetary 
mission. 

Project Phobos will try to 
determine the distribution and 
density of electrons in the 
Martian ionosphere by probing 
it with radio signals from an 
orbiting spacecraft For the 
very first time, it should be 


possible not only to unravel 
some secrets of that ionosphere 
bnt also to gather data about 
the Martian magnetic field. 

This is important, because 
the solar wind (a continuous 
flow of atomic particles stream- 
ing out of t be snn in ail 
directions) affects different 
planets in different ways. The 
Earth's magnetic Geld stops the 
solar wind from reaching ns by 
deflecting its path at a distance 
of about 60,000 kilometres 
away. 

A detailed study of informa- 
tion from previous Soviet- 
probes has led scientists to 
conclude that Mars has a very 
weak magnetic field, estimated 
to be tens of thousands of times 
weaker than that of Earth. 
Wlut is far from dear is 
whether that is enough to 
screen Mars from the solar 
wind. 

If it is suffidendy powerful to 
do that, the upper layers of the 
Martian ionosphere must be 
similar to those of the Earth's. 


On the other hand, if that 
ionosphere is similar to that of 
Venus (which virtually has no 
magnetic field) it would mean 
that its magnetic field is too 
weak to interfere with the solar 
wind. 

Present a s tro n omical think- 
ing links the emergence of 
planetary magnetic fields with 
the inner structure of the planet 
concerned. The argument goes 
that any planet with its own 
magnetic field mast have a 
liquid nucleus and revolve at an 
appreciable rate. 

Yet, there is a drawback to 
that theory: if Venus has no 
magnetic field because it ro- 
tates too slowly, why has Mars 
only a very weak magnetic field, 
although it revolves at roughly 
the same rate as the Earth, 
which has a very strong one? 

If Project Phobos is success- 
ful that should be one of the 
questions shout Mars to be 
answered before the end of the 
decade. 


Dinners 

London Welsh Rngby Football 
Club 

The Prince and Princess of 
Wales were present at the Lon- 
don Welsh Rugby Football Club 
centenary dinner held last night 
at Grosvenor House. Mr Victor 
Watkins presided and others 
present indudh 

The Dueness or 


it included: 

_ ucness or Norft 

Lady CbaWoni. Mr Neil Khinoric. MP. 


folk. Lord and 


and Mrs Klnnock. Mr Richard Tracey. 
MP. and Mrs Tracey. Brigadier and 
Mrs Dennis Stuituewonh. Mr and Mrs 
Aftm Thomas. Mr and Mrs Mldtei 
Dtiaiwoke. Mr cuw Morgan, and Mr 
and Mrs Dudley Wood. 

Mis J. Whitfield 
Mr and Mis John Whitfield 
gave a dinner at County Halt 
Kingston upon Thames, last 
night to mark the installation of 
Mr David Cotes as High Sheriff 
of Surrey for 1986/87. The 
guests included: 

The Lord lieutenant of Sow and 
Lady Mammon Of Oaii L Mrs CCHes. 
me Chairman of Surrey County 
CouncU and Mrs Macfartene. and 
lodges of ttte South East Ctrcutt and 
UMdr ladies. 


Birthdays today 

Mr Anthony Wedgwood Berm, 
MP, 61; Mr Jeffery Bowman, 51; 
Mr Marion Brando, 62; Canon 
AD. Caesar, 62; Mr Dennis 
Farr, 57; Sir Alistair Frames 57; 
the Duke of Grafton, 67; Herr 
Helmut Kohl, 56; Mr Jonathan 
Lynn, 43; Vice-Admiral Sir Alan 
McNicoll,.78; His Honour J.C. 
Maude. QC, 85; Lord Justice 
Nourse, 54; Mr James 
Phemister, 93; Sir John Ricks, 
76; Sir Godfrey Style, 71; Mr 
F.H. Tate, 73; Lieutenant-Colo- 
nel Sir John Thomson, 78; 
Professor Kathleen Tifiotson, 
80; Sir John WaUey, 80. 


Sir Hnw Wheldon 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Sir Huw Wheldon, former 
Managing Director of BBC Tele- 
vision, will be held in West- 
minster Abbey at noon on 
Wednesday. May 7, 1986. Those 
wishing to attend are invited to 
apply for tickets uk The Re- 
ceiver General, Room 7, . 20 
Dean's Yard, Westminster Ab- 
bey..- London. SW1P 3PA, 
enclosing a stamped addressed 
envelope, by Wednesday. April 
23. Tickets will be posted oh 
Wednesday, April 30. All are _ 
welcome. . 


University of Sussex 
Society 

The University of Sussex Soci- 
ety is orga n izi n g a series of 
schools of studies-based reunion 
dinners in April and May, 1986, 
to mark the university’s silver 
jubilee. Former students and 
staff may obtain more details of 
the dinners from Mr Andrew 
Panting, Sussex University. 
Palmer, Brighton, BN I 9RH. 
(Telephone 0273-678888). 


Fettes College 

As a result of the recent 
examinations the following 
scholarships bare been awarded 
for 1986: 

Chenevtx-TTench Memorial Scholar- 
ship And Crawford Musk Scholarship: 
AJasdair Kennedy (Fettes Junior 
Schoon. 

Joannides Scholarship: Emily Taylor 
(Pack wood Haugh. Shrewsbury). 
ruOai-ton Conn Scholarship: Am 

Hepburn (St Mary's School. Metros*). 
Mitchell Watson Scholarship and 
muNc scholarship: Clare McGodbrey 
(Fettes Junior School). 

Minor scholarship: Timothy Butler 
(CaroUftrtd. Edinburgh). 

Services scholarship; Duncan Wilson 
(A honour House). 

Todd Scholarship: Jeremy KUpatricfc 
(Ballymena Academy.*. 

Musk scholarship: Timothy Clyde 
fFeues Junior School) 


OBITUARY 


ERIK BRUHN 

Virtuoso ballet dancer of individual style 


Erik Bruhn, the most per- 
fect male dancer of his genera- 
tion, died on April I in 
Toronto, aged 57. An interna- 
tional ballet star of the first 
rank, he was idolized in his 
'native Denmark and in Amer- 
ica where he spent most of his 
career. His performances in 
'Britain were sadly few but 
unforgettable. 

Bruhn ’s real name was 
Belton Evers. He was bom on 
October 3, 1928. in Copenha- 
gen. the son of an engineer 
who left home when the boy 
was five. (Much later they met 
and became good friends.) 

Brought up in an all-female 
home, the boy became silent 
and introspective, and a doc- 
tor advised dancing classes as 
a remedy. 

Beginning at a private 
school, he took to this new 
activity with success, entered 
the Royal Theatre School at 
the age of nine and joined the 
Royal Danish Ballet eight 
years later, being confirmed as 
a permanent member of the 
company in 1947. His first big 
role, as Adonis in Harald 
Lander’s Thorvaldsen, re- 
vealed his exceptional beauty 
of person and of dancing. 

At once (on the recommen- 
dation of a slightly older 
dan cer, Poul Goan, who had 
already pursued the same 
course) he took leave of 
absence to gain quicker expe- 
rience by dancing with the 
small Metropolitan Ballet in 
Britain. On returning to Den- 
mark, Bruhn was cast by 
Massine to dance both the 
hussar and the dandy at 
alternative performances of 
his revival - of Le Beau 
Danube. 

Soon afterwards he ap- 
peared for the first time in one 
of Denmark's greatest classic 
ballets, as James in La 
Sylphide, but his attempt to 

nd a personal interpretation 
did not at that time find 
favour. 

He enjoyed a great success 
creating the virtuoso leading 
role in a new, more difficult 
version of Etudes by Harakl 
Lander, and at the other 
extreme revealed the 
stagecraft and presence to 
make a notable impression as 
Junker Ove in Bournonville's 
A Folk Tale, which at that 
time was played entirely as a 



mimed role, not dancing a 
single step all evening. 

Other roles by Balanchine 
and by several Danish chore- 
ographers soon followed, and 
in 1953 Bruhn first tried bis 
hand at choreography with 
Concertette. to music by Mor- 
ton Gould. When the Royal 
Danish Ballet made its British 
d£but at Covent Garden that 
same year, Bruhn's dancing in 
La Sylphide on the opening 
night was acclaimed as a 
triumph of technique and 
style. 

Although American Ballet 
Theatre remained Bruhn's 
chief affiliation, he danced 
increasingly with other com- 
panies. He was for a time a 
member of New York City 
Ballet, toured with the 
Harkness Ballet and Ruth 
Page’s company, began a con- 
t in lung association with the 
National Ballet of Canada, 
and in 1962 danced with the 
Royal Ballet at Co vent Gar- 
den. At that time Rudolf 
Nureyev had recently arrived 
in the West and, on the 
strength of an amateur film of 
Bruhn's dancing, eagerly 
sought him ouL 

Bruhn was the male dancer 
whom Nureyev admired 
above any other, and their 
friendship greatly influenced 
both men, helping Nureyev to 
adjust to a new environment 
and stimulating Bruhn to 
renewed enthusiasm. 

A colleague in Russia had 
described Bruhn as “cokT, to 
which Nureyev responded: 
“Yes, so cola that it burns 
you". 

In some roles Bruhn did 
indeed show an Apollonian 
perfection remote from ordi- 
nary mortals, but that was 


achieved at the price of driv- 
ing himself hard to make 
every' single performance bet- 
ter than the one before. 

He began to suffer from a 
mysterious series of pains, and 
in 1972 his malady forced him 
to give up dancing altogether^ 

Although tire pains were 
eventually diagnosed as a 
stomach ulcer and treated 
operatively, Bruhn was by 
then in his mid-40s and never 
tried to' return to the more 
demanding roles of classical 
balleL 

However, during his conva- 
lescence he acted with great 
success in a Danish produc- 
tion of Rashomon and he 
returned to the ballet in 
January 1975 when his danc- 
ing of an extract from Miss 
Julie was one of the most 
eagerly awaited and applaud- 
ed items on a star-studded gala 
celebrating American . Bails* 
Theatre's 35th anniversary. * 

He became for a while 
director of the ballet at the 
Rome Opera House and more 
recently artistic director of the 
National Ballet of Canada. 

Tte chief contribution of 
iiis later years was as a 
producer of the classic ballets. 
His readings, especially of 
Swan Lake with Rothbart 
changed to a malevolent wom- 
an, were sometimes contro- 
versial but never without a 
core of logic* He nevertheless 
retained a profound respect 
for the old style and was the 
author (in collaboration with 
the dance historian Lillian i 
Moore) of a distinguished 
textbook, Boumonvme and 
Ballet Technique, published in 
1961. 

It is as a dancer of rare 
quality that be will be chiefly 
remembered, a virtuoso who 
pushed his youthful facility to 
the limits of technical and 
stylistic .perfection, who 
sought always to put his 
awesome command of classi- 
cal ballet io the most expres- 
sive use. 

\ By his achievements and 
example he pushed forward 
the boundaries of his art and 
influenced an entire genera- 
tion of other men whose 
careers will be his monument 

For his services to Danish 
ballet and its world-wide repiK 1 
union, he was created a 
Knight of the Dannebrog in 
1963. 


SIR HAROLD HARDING 


Sir Harold Handing, FEng, a 
past president of the Institu- 
tion of Civil Engineers, who-- 
“acted as a consultant to the 
Channel Tunnel Study Group 
in the 1960s, died, on March 
27, aged 86. 

A man of prodigious stami- 
na and energy, he was in- 
volved in some 400 
assignments including exten- 
sive new work on the London 
Underground system and a 
long spell during the Second 
World War repairing bomb 
damage to deep sewers and 


tunnels, chiefly in the East 
End of London. 

Harold John Boyer Harding 
was born on January 6, J900, 
and educated at Christ's Hos- 
pital before studying engineer- 
ing at the City and Guilds 
College, South Kensington, 
where he gained a BScfEng) in ‘ 
1922. 

He then joined John 
Mowlem and Company, 
where he was to spend the 
main part of his career. As 
assistant engineer, his experi- 
ence began with the Euston to 
Camden Town Underground 
extension (1922-24) and con- 
tinued with a London County 
Council stormwater pumping 


station in bad ground on the 
IsleofDogs. 

Then came the construction 
of escalators at Charing Cross 
.station, coinciding with three 
years in charge of all below- 
ground work on Piccadilly 
Circus station escalators and 
booking haft, one of his most 
enjoyable assignments. 

Harding, with his dry sense 
of humour, enjoyed telling 
stories against himself and one 
of his favourites was how he 
and a colleague emerged coal- 
ed in slime into Piccadilly 
after surveying a sewer and 
look a bath in an engineers' 
shed in the middle of the 
Circus, cl aiming to be the only 
people to appear nude under 
the gaze of Eros at five o'clock 
on a summer afternoon. 

Besides his repair work 
throughout the Second World 
War, he acted as adviser to the 
Royal Engineers bomb dispos- 
al units on shoring up excava- 
tions and built concrete petrol 
barges and concrete monoliths 
for the Normandy invasion. 

' The failure of the Cbingford 
reservoir in east London in 
1937 gave new impetus to the 
study of soil mechanics, with 
which, as a specialist in tun- 
nelling and heavy founda- 


tions, Harding was closely 
involved. He was a joint 
consultant 'to the Channel 
Tumid Study Group from 
1958 until 1970 and helped to 
organize two million pounds' 
worth of work involving 75 
borings at sea and 800 mites of 
geophysical work. 

Harding became a member 
of the council of the Institu- 
tion ofCivil Engineers in 1949 
and was elected president in 
1963. He was a governor of *• 
Westminster Technical CoL ~ 
lege, Northampton Engineer- 
ing College and, for 20 years, a 
governor of Imperial College, 
London University. From 
1966-67 he was a member of 
the Aberfan Disaster Tribu- 
nal He was created a knight in 
1968. 

He was made an honorary 
DSc by the City University in 
1970 and six years later was 
elected a founder fellow of the 
Fellowship of Engineering. He 
was founder chaurman of the 
British Tunnelling Society and 
was a fellow of both the City 
and Guilds of London Insti- 
tute and the Institution of 
Civil Engineers. 

He married, m 1927, Sophie X 
Helen Blair and they had two 
sons and one daughter. 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


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BIRTHS 


ANDREWS on March 29ih to Helen 
i net Brooks) .and Giles, a son 
Edward 

BALLINGER - A son. Charles William 
Boyd. Io Caroline mee WUson i and 
Brian, bom 1st April ai BMH 
Rinirtn 

BLAND on 22 March. Io Julie and 
Charles a daughter. Daisy Prudence 
Hamel. 

COCKBURN on 2a March la Rulft «nee 
Belli and Charles TWINS: Christ o- 
pher (Kilt and Charlotte 

COCKLE on April 1st 1986 to Louise 
mee Siekebsi and Ranald, a son 
James, a brother lor Hannah-Loune. 

DAWSON • On 22nd March 1986. at 
Vairiey, Hampshire. Io Susan 'nee 
Mavnei and Edward, a daughter. 
Caroline Elizabeth Marie, a sister for 
Aubrey. 


GARDNER • On March 261b to Penelo- 
pe ut« CMorosi and Piers. In 
Strasbourg- a son. Nicholas Benia- 
min. a brother for Alexander. 

‘JONES - To Michael and Ann mee 
E venden i on 1st April, a son, Richard 
Charles Evenpen. a brother for Han- 
nah and Philippa. 

KAYE - On 1st April at the Royal 
Hampshire County Hospital, Win- 
chester. to Came mfe Fullertont and 
Johnny, a son (James Sebastian 
Wigram). 

KYRKE -SMITH - On 29th March to 
Sharon and Anthony a son. Peter Jo- 
seph. a brother for Edward and 
Christopher. 

LUMSDEN - On March 25Ut to Jane 
mee Carroll) and James, a daughter. 
Camilla Louise, a sister for Rebecca 
and Ranald. 

MAY - On 29th March at Portland 
Hospital io Rema Marla May inee 
Retailing) wife of John Watson, a 
son. 

WATSON - James Anion Flnbar con- 
gratulates hr* parents Rema Marta 
and John on hte arrival on 29Ui 
March at the Portland Hospital. 

MELGUHD on Friday. 28th March to 
Diana and Timothy, a son. Lome, a 
brouter for Francis. 

FIRMEKT Timothy and Pa we are 
pleased to announce the birth of their 
daughter. Sara Anne, on 3 March 
1986 and Portland Hospital in 
London. 

PAJAC - On 2?nd March 1986 Io Su- 
san and Etk. a son Charles Louis 
William, brother for Zoe. 

PARSONS on March 29lh at Wes Lon- 
don to Alison mee Hamvllon Jones) 
and Charles, a son Andrew. 

RAVTOSCROFT On March 25Ui at SI 
Richard's Chichester to Siobhan and 
Rapnael. a daughter Scarlett. 

RAMfLINSON - On 29th March 1986. 
at Princess Margaret Hospital. Swin- 
don. Io Penelope mee Lens) and 
John, a son. Anthony si John 
Lawrence. 

ROOK - On March 29th at Royal 
Shrewsbury Hospital to George and 
Jane mee Bedsoni. a boy. William. 

SEEBOHM - To LualhaU and Frederic 
a son. Benjamin, on 29th March. 

SHEPHARD - On 31SI of March 1986 
to Annie and Colin, a daughter. 
Klrsty Anne. 

TEALE on 2nd April io Alison 'Nee 
wynni and Jeremy a daughter Sally 
Jo 


DEATHS 





BfRT - On 300i March. Phyllis Edith 
BUI MBE.. formerly Assistant Secre- 
tary of the Parliamentary Labour 
Party, dearest s»ler of Dora Mum- 
ford. Funeral service at St Paul's 
Church. Wilton Place. KrUghlsbrldge. 
London SWi. on Monday 7Bi ApiU 
at II am. Followed by CTemabon at 
Putney vale. Floral tributes to J H 
Kenyon Lid.. 49 Marloes Road W8. 
by 10 am on the day of the funeraL 
please. 

BLACK - On March 27 at Nufffefd 
Lodge. Shepherds Kill. Highgate. 
Lieutenant Colonel William run 
Black M.B.E.. h a. iret'di. member 
oi me council of the Ex -Service Fel- 
lowship Centres iE.F. C.I. following 
Invaluable service as Aomin tstralor 
for 10 years. Devoted husband of Ms 
late wife Mary. Funeral service at St 
Michael's Church. Higngaie. Friday 
April d at li am. Flowers to 
Leverlon A Sons Ltd . 212 Eversholl 
Street NWi. or donations to the 
EFC.. 6 Lower Grosvenor Place. 
London SWI. 

BLASEBY - Cedi Albert, a! home, 
peacefully, on 27th March. 

BRAITHWATTE ■ on Tuesday 1st 
April, aged 76 years. Margaret Mary 
Braithwaite 'Margaret Mastermani. 
formerly Director of the Cambridge 
Language Research Unit, formerly 
vice President of Lucy Cavendish 
College, wife of Professor R B 
Braithwaite. or 11 Millington Road. 
Cambridge. 

BRYANS on March 29th Peacefully in 
Alton General Hospital Frances An- 
nette Brvars aged 8a years. Beloved 
Aunl ai Joy. Ann. John and families. 
Funeral on Friday April uie atn at 
All Saints Church Alton 11 30am. 
roltcwM by Cremation al Aldershot 
12 30pm. Flowers and matures lo 
Kemp at Stevens Funeral Directors 
93 High SL Alton 83177. 

CALLENDER - MaMe. on Good Fri- 
day suddenly al home in Rye. dearly 
loved sister of Alnter and Sheila and 
of Jnwcc her late twin. Private cre- 
mation on Monday 7Bi April al 
Hastings Family flowers only, dona- 
tions it desired to Rye Church may be 
sent to the Rectory. Rye. East Sussex. 

CAREY - On March 29th. the day be- 
fore her 89th birthday, tvy FeHda 
Caw. daughter of the unnj Baron 
Raglan and widow of Raymond 
Marwood Elton Carey, al St Luke's 
Nursing Home. Scodtem. Lincoln. 




COLLMGMAM on SAth March In West- 
minster Hospital. Hugh Ayre 
Chaplin. MA (CANTAB) PHD. aged 
38. son of Hilary ChapUn. (formerly 
Couinghami. and (he late Norman, 
stepson of Leslie Chap tin and brother 
of AnUiea Larsen. Funeral at St 
Few* Church. Near Truro. Corn- 
wall at 2.30 pm on Friday 4th April. 
Family flowers only but donations If 
desired to Friends of Wesunutsier 
HospfUf. c. o Howard Burrows. 
Penelewey. Feock. Truro. Cornwall 
TR3 6QY 

DAVIS - On Maundy Thursday 27th 
March in Birmingham. Monsignor 
Henry France D.D. MA- Protonota- 
ry Apostolic. Regulum Mass al St 
Chad's Cathedral on 7th April, at 
11.30 am. followed by burial ad 
Oscott College Reaulescat In pace. 

DEEYES -On March 21. 1986. brave- 
ly, as be had lived. Richard Oldham 
Deeves. Crossways. Gerrards Cross. 
Beloved son of the tale Thomas and 
Lilian, brother of Nancy and loved 
by a tetpon of friends. The runeral 
has taken place. If wished, donations 
to a favourite charity. 

DON1ACH on April IsL at SobeH 
House. Oxford. Thea Ursula (nee 
Pilichowsiai. aged 7& after a long 
Illness borne with great courage. An 
arusl and a teacher. Much loved wife 
of Naky, mooter of Iona and Ruth 
and grandmother of Maya. Sonia. 
Miriam. Owen and CaUa. 

ELUS on March 27th peacefully at 
home. Reverend Joseph Uotuti BA 
London, aged 86. Beloved father of 
Elizabeth. Service at Fonthfll. 
Gifford. 2.30 pm April 3rd. 

FAtRCLOUCH - On March 29th 1986. 
Laurence, aged 9* years, of MWtUe- 
lon-ort-Sea. Sussex, brother of Dora 
and Eileen, formerly of Lewanam. 
Worthing, and BeaconsfleM. Crema- 
tion private. 

FORD Air Vice Marshall Howard Ford 
CB CBE AFC iretlred). affectionately 
known as Bunny Good Friday, aged 
BO No flowers. Donations URAF 
Benevoleni Fund. 67 Portland Place. 
London Wl. 

FHEETH H. Andrew. Funeral service 
at 1 OOpm on Monday 7th April at St 
Michael's Church. Elmwood Road. 
Chiswick. London W4. Enaulrles and 
flower* lo Frederick Payne. 468 
Huh Road. London W4. Tel 01-994 
0056 Donations to Artists General 
Benevoleni Fund. 

CRIFFTOWOWS ■ Angela, peacefully 
In Madras on March 27tli 1986. Fu- 
neral look place in Madras on March 
Z9th. Beloved wtfe of John and 
daughter of Pamela. Memorial ser- 
vice m London lo be announced. 

f 


GUBBMS - Edith Abide Mabel On 26 
March al her home BksDow. Bocks, 
widow of Valentine. FZS. "1 am In 
eternity now". Funeral service 11 
an. Friday 4 April af Bfedtow Parish 
Church. No flowers by request 

HALL - On March 28th 1906 In hospl- 
laL Robert Montague OJLE. Wing 
Commander RAJ 1 . iRM) of Potty 
House. Market Haiborough. Adored 
friend of Julia. Late iom Managing 
Director of Joseph Cheaney A Sons 
Ltd. Past member of the Air Cadet 
Council and pad President 1980 & 
1981 Leicestershire and Rutland 
Gotf union. Funeral service at Mar- 
ket Haiboroogh Parish Church on 
Monday April 7th at 2^50 pjn. fol- 
lowed by interment. No flowers at 
Ms own reauest. Donations please for 
Ttte Welfare Fund. No. 1084 Squad- 
ron (Marker Harborough) Air 
Training Corns to Mr F.O Kemp, is 
Halford Road. Kibworth. 
Beaucham p L£8 OHN. 

HERBERT on 29th March, peacefully 
at Richmond. Manue. beloved wife of 
Cyril. Funeral Sendee at Hickey's 
ChapeL Sheen Road. Ric hm ond, on 
Tuesday 8th April ai 9 30 am and 
thereafter to Morttake Cranatoriura. 

HUBERT on Good Friday, ray sud- 
denly and peacefully at Mi home. 
Donald, much-loved brother of 
Muriel and Alan, and dear friend of 
Tom. Funeral Service at st 
Leonard's Church. Apethorpe al 2 
pm on Tuesday 8th April followed by 
private cremation. Family flow er s 
only to the Co-op Chapel Of Rest. SI 
Georges SireeL Stamford. Donations 
if desired to the Rotary Ctob of Peter- 
borough C/o Mr David Ptltham. 107 
Athe rton Avenue. Peterborough. 
PE3 6UJ for dlslributlon to charities 
supported by them. 

HNH on March 27 rh 1986 af East- 
bourne John English aged SS years 
very dearly loved husband Wynne, 
father of Robert. Helen and Kay. 
grandfather of Jacqueline and Ste- 
ven. Lynda and Darren. Chairman 
and Managing Director of Viking Pa- 
per company Ltd. viking Paper 
Services Lid. William c. Hamilton 
Ltd and High. Lithe and Burrell 
fH.LB.) Ltd. He win be greatly 
missed by us aQ. All enquiries to 
Haine a Son Ltd. 19 South Street 
Eastbourne. Sussex. 

HOLMES ■ on 29th March 1986. as 
the result of a tragic accident Louise 
Philippa, aged 23 years of 10 
Thondey Road. Fedxsiowe. Suffolk, 
much loved daughter of Michael and 
Jean and dear sister of Susan and 
Nicola. Funeral service al Trimtey St 
Mary Church on Saturday Sth April 
at 12 noon. Other flowers or K pre- 
ferred dona flora for ttte Live Akl 
Appeal may be sent to Farthing Fu- 
neral Service. 126 High Road West. 
Felixstowe. Suffolk. 


wrCMSON ’ On 1st April 1966. 
James Seller, dearly loved husband 
of Kathleen, and father of Christine 
and Fiona. Funeral private at Ms 
own request No letters, ptease. Fam- 
ily Rowfn only. 

JAMESON - On March 3 1st peaceful- 
ly. Dorothy babel tide Jacobs), aged 
93. wife of the late Herbert MeUor. 
loved and loving stepmother of Da- 
vid. Denys and Ann (deceased), 
mother-in-law. grandmother and 
great-grandmother, cremation al 
Gaiders Green crematorium, small 
chapeL at 3.40 pm on Monday April 
7. No flowers. Donations If desired (o 
the Handmaids of Mary. SB Holland 
Park. London Wl 1. or lo a charity of 
own choice 

LEWS - On 20th March 1906. Enid 
Anita Lewis, peacefully In Arundel. 

LLOYD - On March 31. whfle on holi- 
day In Gloucealerahhe. Charles 
Christopher Lloyd aged 79. of Lion's 
Wood. Lion's Green. Healhfidd. Be- 
loved husband of Brenda, and father 
of Joanna and John. Funeral service 
al All Saints aiurch. Waldron, on 
Tuesday Btti April at 3 pm. Family 
flowers only, or donations If wished 
In Royal National Life Boat tnstUn- 
Oon, c/oR Jarvis. Funeral Directors. 
High Street. Crons-in-nand. 
Heautfleld. East Sussex. Memorial- 
Sende e la be announced later- 

LLOYD - Sylvia Constance on Easter 
Day. peacefully. Much loved Aunt lo 
many. Private O hi nati on. Family 
flowers only. A memorial service 
will ne announced laler. 

PATEY on 28th Aprs iXMceftflly at 
Stradbroke Suffolk. Kathleen wife of 
Jack and mother or Christopher and 
John. Funeral Service ai tnswtch 
Crematorium on Monday April 7th 
at 2:30 pm. Service of thanksgiving 
win be raw later at Str a dbrok e Par- 
tdi Ch urch. 

PRITCHARD - On 27Ui March al UtUe- 
ton. Flanchfonl Road. Relgate Heath, 
after a long utness bravely borne, 
teobei Mary Winifred (atfedkmately 
known as "Wynne"), aged 93 years, 
formerly of 18 Harlow Court. 
Rripaie. widow of Captain Laurence 
Pnlchard C.BJE. Cremation on Fri- 
day 4th April at I1.4B am at Surrey 
and Sussex crematorium near 
Crawley. No flowers, no tetters by 
reouesL but donations If desired hi 
the Royal Aeronautical Society (En- 
dowment Fund). 4 Hand turn Place. 
London Wl. 

WEES - On 27 March 1986. 
Richard Geraint Rees, beloved nus- 
bandof Peggy and much wved father 
or Victoria and Oep-iMlwr of (Mm 
and FeUdly. Funeral at SI James’ 

■ Church. Worbridge. on Friday 4th 
April «X 10 am. Enqufrtes to F w. 
CWt» and On- Ud- lei 0933 42820. 
Thanksgiving service to fie an- 
nounced later. 


ROBMSOH - On April 1st. M M Glad- 
ys. late of Wood Lane. Highgate. 
peacefully al her mice's home at 
Sunbury-on-Thama. 

RUSSELL - On Monday March 3 1 st at 
St Barthotamew Hospital after a 
short Ulness. Hanoi Russefl. late of 
Eleven Acre Rise. Laughton, aged 66 
swan, dearly loved w»e of Peter and 
. mother of Bob end devoted .grand- 
mother of Omar. Funeral at the 
Liberal Jewish Cemetery. Pound 
Lane. Wfllesden. North-West Thames 
on 8 April at 2JO pm. Flowers, if 
desired to the cemetery please. 

SCHOFIELD - on March 3LsL at 
Ramlcy House Nursing Home, near 
LynUngton; formerly of Botdre. 
Ehsabeth Mary (Betty), aged 74. Fu- 
neral Sendee at Bournemouth 
Crematorium, on Tuesday April Sot. 
at 12-30 nm. No letters and no flow- 
ers please, but donatkm may be sent 
to World Wildlife Fund, c/o Dia- 
mond A Son FIX 9-11 Lower 
Buddand Road. Lymington- Tel: 
(0690) 72060. 

SHANNON on April UL peacefully in 
haspItaL Ian. A.T. or Halesworm. 
Suffolk for over 62 years, dear hus- 
band of AurioL a loved and tovtng 
feiher and grandfather. Funeral ser- 
vice Geideston Omrch. Wednesday 
April 9th al 11 am followed by pri- 
vate cremation. FamUy flowers only. 
Donattons If desired for Dr Graham's 
Homes. KaUmpoog. India. Cheques 
payable please to Harvey Bros. Fu- 
neral Directors. Kirby Cane. Bungay. 
SUFFOLK. 

SLADE • On March 27th. Gerald Gori 
don. aged 86. Commander RJ4. 
i retd) last surviving Son of Henry 
Adolphus wane Slade. Cremation 
private. 

WALTON on March 26th 1986 peace- 
fully John Hugh Walton, aged 96 
years. Native of Bishop Auckland.. 
■County Durham. Formerly of Park 
Avenue Eastbourne. Beloved son of 
william and Annie Waltm). and be- 
loved brother of the late Maude and 
Mabel Walton. He was a member of 
the Seventh Gurkha Rifles and was 
Imperial Agricultural Bacteriologist. 
Pusa India. Funeral Service at East- 
bourne Cranmorium on Friday «th 
April at 1.30pm. No flowers by 
reouesL 

hmii on Easter Sunday 30lh March 
1986 Professor Beatrice White, alter 
an Illness most courageouly taught. 
The Funeral Sendee wfll take place 
al Haoxham Oemetary on Monday 
7th April at 2pm. Flowers may be 
sent to Halne & Son Ltd. 19 South 
Street Eastbourne. Sussex, or if pre- 
ferred donations to Help the Aged, st 

James's Walk. London EC 1 R QBE. 


WBXIAMS on March 29th Etoabetti 
(Emily May) nee Lartw CBE. of 
Bridge Farm. Great BardftekL Essex, 
formerly principal of White Lands 
College. London. Funeral sendee al 
St Ippoiyts Parish Church near 
Hitching. Herts, on Saturday. AMI 
BUi at 11.00 am. AD enquiries lo W 
Austin A Sou. 0438 316623. 

WILSON - joan Maty, dear mother of 
Tim and Jonathan, peacefully on 
Easter Sunday. Reqcdum Mass tot SL 
Norton's Church. Spalding. Lincoln- 
shire. an Monday 7th of April. 

. Flowers, strictly tar thedeco ra tton of 
the church by Sunday 6Ut April, lo 
Uie Presbytery. 

TOOL - Or March 31st 1986. peaceful- 
ty at home. Henry, aged 73. very 
dearly loved husband of Joan, feiher 
of Nicholas and brother or Elizabeth, 
schoolmaster at AllbaOows. 
Rousdon. 1946-1972. The funeral 
service wfll take Mace at Membury 
Parish Church, near Administer. 
Devon, on Monday 7th April af SJO 
pm. followed by interment fit the 
chwdtyanL Family flowers only, 
please. Bed donations if desired Io 
Maicoita Fargent Cancer Fund far 
Children, c/o J F aarfce & Son. 
MaryknolL Lyme Street. Axmtnster. 

IN MEMORIAM 
- PRIVATE 

CARVER A Memorial Service tar the 
late Rev Basil Carver, T.D.. M.A.. 
will be twid at the Church of die Holy 
Trinity. Stoane Street London. SWL * 
on Wednesday 23ru April at 13 
noon. 


Zimbabwe. 3rd of April 1980. In lov- 
ing memory- Ann. Louise and 
M ervyw. 

CRICK -in memory of E liza b et h Crick. 
O.B.E— April 2nd 1886 - March 
1972. Human, being and nurse be- 
yond compare. Beloved wife of the 
late Arthur Crick of the Dell.. Maid- 
stone. Always lovingly remembered 
fa y Ui etr daughter. Monica. 

NANGUE - Oemeocy remembered 
with love on the seventh anniversary 
of her death. George. Amte.' JUdet 

STURSE - A service of thankgtving tar 
the life of Conwyn Sturge MC. will 
be beU at St Michael's Charch. 
ComhliL EC 3- on Ttiaraday April V- 
24th. M midday. - 


SILVER 

ANNIVERSARIES 


TVNNKUFFE- WAUKSUY On April 
3rd 1961 at Samw-In-Furnas. 
Derek to Judith. Now at BKfcerioa. 
Mallas. Cheshire. 





THE ARTS 


The worldwide success of A Dance to the Music of Time has 
'made Anthony Powell such a target for photographers that his 
growing fascination has led him to return the compliment, 
making one such central to his new novel, The Fisher King, 
published today: interview by Nicholas Shakespeare 


Phoayaph o< Anlh u ny Powfl By PWr Ttlmmor 


powers 


Since 1945 some 30 m31kia There is a cab-driver in Seattle who it the profession of his central’ The .social interconnections between a 
•people the majorfty.tiviIiaB$ .'keeps a complete set of A Dance to the character in The Fisher King, his first • small group of downwardly mobile 
— nave died fat more than 100 Music qf Time on Hsdashboaid. He is .novel for three years and his sccODdsmice characters form the heart of any Powell 
wars. Heard on the radio, read: not emulated by the; man "driving me ■- completing Dance in 1975. noveL “Other writers have an enonnous- 

or newspaper, ♦hfo . rftom Westbary Station to fhe rtygnp y- Powell, who as a young publisher ly dear view about their writing. I’ve 
statistic becomes imgraspably whojotestiphehasread four of Anthony worked on Cecal Beaton's first hook, sets never managed to do that After 80, how 

PowdTs novels but stuck at A Question his tale oh board a enrisearound Britain, one does it, howitstarts,wfay onedoesrt, 
of Upbringing. “You wanted to -know Told by a familiarly detached narrator- remain totally obscure. I have to see 
wimt wascomiagne^,hesayK turning a popular noveHsi called Beals — it something in a haze in order to write 
into the drive ofa house as classical as its follows Beals's application of Arthurian about rt.“ He puts his hands behind his 


The social interconnections between a 
small group of downwardly mobile 
characters form the heart of any Powell 
noveL “Other writers have an enormous- 
ly dear view about their writing. I’ve 


be swept under a great carpet 
of conscience. When it is 
brought subvert rely to life on 

screen, as it was ha the first of 

David Mumro's two documen- 
taries, the viewer finds himself 
falling through floors ami 
ceilings in oatraga ami im- 
potence. 

The Four Horsemen (Cen- 
tral) dealt Qnflinchingly and 
unsentimentaUy with how the 
boardroom tensions between 
America and Russia are visit- 
ed on the Third World and 
■ tra n sla te d too civilian casual- 
ties. Stepping anaj from the 
*. vulturine ' shadow 'of John 
FUger, . with whom - he has 
made fflms on Cambodia and 
* Vietnam, Mon visited every- 
where from Eritrea, where 
behind the vefl of 'famine 
Africa's longest war is now 
-conducted with Soviet napalm, 
to Vietnam, where children 
tending their cows step on 
some of the three minion 
■mexploded bombs, to £1 Sal- 
vador, where America is re- 
peating her south-east Asian 
mistakes and sins. 

At ground level expertly 
filmed by Ivan Strasburg and 
Geny Pinches, certain images 
were made to smoulder in the 
mind like white phosphorus. 
In Beirut, the cry tfim framed 
two-year-old girl rose over the 
eyeless-sockets of bombed-out 
fiats. At* school in Vietnam* 
terrible mutants played with 
toys, their mutations theresoK 
of Agent Orange. (One ounce 
is enough to Idfi London's 
population; the Americans 
dropped 240 lbs on Vietnam, 
destroying 50 per cent of Us 
forests.) In Eritrea, a burnt 
woman had skin like a plane- 
tree. Again and again Monro 
was able to make ns ask the. 
question: What on earth are 
we doing to ourselves, anrffor 
what? 

Q.ED (BBC!) dealt with 
people playingwftb foe ina 
much loopfer way'.’ To conquer 
certain fears, a groop of 
' Londoners - enfraoteif tfcem- 
( selves to a - gashing hypno- 
therapist. He ■made-- (hem 
repeat phrases banal as 
rair phobiad' fapreg an rtion 
for a firewaBt. “freaBy dig to 
walk tfanngh.fire* Intoned a 
man who looked Hke a hairy* 
skulL “Fire is fuu far my feet.’' 
Urged to imagine the hot coals 
as “coolwet grass", tbegroup 
chanted this phrase mindless- 
ly— as if they had smoked the 
substance rather than walked 
on it . . 

Scientists who pulled up 
their trouser-legs and partici- 
pated argued this -was not * 
victory of mind ever matter bat 
a feat within anyone’s power. 
Forcing everyone mto tne rote 
of either-UBbetievor or zombie, 
each party lost in its respective 

jargon, Stqriien flosefe pro- 
gramme w« watdmHe fir the 
same reasons that it - was 
meretricious. r 

A walk on a cold stretch rtf 
water would probably have 
benefited the lot of them. 

Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


• The Gambler ; by Peter 
Brewis, Bob Goody and Mel 
Smith, is to be presented at 
Hampstead Theatre for six 
weeks from April 15 (with 
previews, from. April-. 10). It 
was first produced, by Hamp- 
stead Theatre m 198ft when it 
played at the Bull. and Gate. - 


into the driveofa house as classical as its 
owner, “Sm oothing hap pened." No, 
what -.he really enjoys reading -are 
PqweLts titerary reviews: . 

• ; “How frightfully funny”, says the 


auumr, wiinoui snrnmg . ne nes on an 
elegant Empire sofa, his- Iras .stretched 
out, his hands stroking a rufBed Cornish 
cat and his eyes straying, unfocused, to a 


■ ■■ ■ wjwa JUajiiUL. UlfUM' iTTiH i m q ^ — w — v w m 

wall furnished with 13 green voUnnra of be useful or not." TTwugh wdl veiled m 
Burke’s Complete Peerage. • *** matenal, be has rehed on his 

dentist to supply him with details of 
tisGgaxmnatt and disease, and his wife 
who. used to work as a feshion 

journrtstoaihcEvemngStandani-on 
almewas waiving to Jmow who j^ ^ ch2racten ^ 0nW dns$ ^ A 

Qfsomces provided him^hh the 
Mprelandand Mrs Erdhagh. And earfe of ^ Tl ^er King, the knight 

time, as he restrains Trefawney the cut tn-hanh. wp s e from 


from . eating the', tea biscuits, Powell v-_ _ gjj. 
parries the - questions with., polite but - • “p V e oftm 
impish exasperation. ■ edmeofthel 

“They think you just take a real person - Hsber King’, 
and recoid them as in a photograph- It’s by the way e 
fike the art exhibitions ofmy youth when fixjm myth, 1 
people looked at the model in the back to Ronu 
paintings wanting only to know who rile famous fascii 
was, who she Imdstopt with. They don’t gy. fTIlexpe 
.realize even, thie lowest novelist invents, on your pedi 
In fact he probably finds it easier" - telephone.) “ 

•* To this . room*: attempting a truthful and listen for 
record of their own* have also come “a history. Peop 
terrific stream" of photographers and s aying how 5 
cameramen, fusing the lights, dis turbing . extreme revei 
the furniture, upsettingihe wadring day. the fluidity of 


lows Beals's application rtf Arthurian about it" He puts his hands behind his 
legend to some Mow passengers; mote- neck and gazes again towards the 
Wy a hideously maime d photographer Complete Peerage. “My job is to try and 
and his companion, abcaatiful virgin. present a view or what human beings arc 
“Since I960, when I developed a like to me.” 
fijghtiul dislike of airports, I’ve been on doing so he has no idea erf - his 

an awfiil tot of cruises - but the thing audience. “But I'm staggered who they 
about writing a novel is you do simply turn out to be. One man who runs a 
nevmtaow whete anything is going to home for deprived Blacks in New York 
usefid ornot." Though wdtt veraed m wrote to say bow greatly they enjoyed 
raw material, be has rehed on his having Aznce read to them. I had several 
mst to supply him with details of letters from a chap in a penitentiary in 
ngurement and disease, and his wife Virginia, though I slightly when 

who. used to work as a feshion a^ed me to touch with his 

raahaanthe£ww»j£SMndtorf-on girifiield in CSucago.” Currently being 
v the characters should dress- A translated into Furnish - and part of 
dteyofsQmces provided him with the curricula in Egypt and Italy - Dance is 
:nd of the Fisher King, the knight ^ being adapted for television. “I 
imed m banto whose castle rose from . would regard myself as a classical 
renfidds, . writer”, he continues. “I write about how 

Tve often met people whoVe remind- , peopje behave.” Which is how he 


ed me of the legend and felt * 011 , he is the 
Fisher King*. I'm continually fascinated 
by the way everything has come down 
from myth, how we can see ourselves 
back to Roman times.” It is allied to the 
famous fascination he feds for genealo- 
gy. (“Til expect you to have brushed up 
mi your pedigree”, be had said on the 
telephone.) Tm pr ep ar ed to sit down 
and listen for hours to someone's family 
history. People get into a complete rage 
saying how snobbish this is. It is the 
extreme reverse. If you look bade you see 
the fluidity of families. This is very much 


All this activity and questioning has soft-pedalled .by people who want to 


madePowetf so interested in thepdsitioi) 
of the modern photograpber that he has 


appear grand and suppress their less. 

toccessfidtoKestas-” 


Danish Paintings 

1880-1920 

Bray Street Gallery - 



. . . « • • • ~ \ r*i n ; • 

tr^^iirapiw •• • -2 

nrriTY^ iiitmuni # 4 


g»^i ■ wV, iiw in 

v‘‘ i H 


■<-. ■ 


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; vf> • ■ :• ; : 

J 1 * 1 , 'fli n 

: * •. tl, . 



■ *i mi'- W i lA 1 ^' r 

1 • If ; . -XM > 

wry anwijjaiiay nniu Apu 
20. - • 

If ... . .. i 

M 

What we are tallow about is 

< • . V . •. « 1 % 

-> +4 **. 

basically paiiiting of the Sym- 

• . x 


were many difEtrem ways of. 

approadlingSyrnbolisin prao- 

txsed in Scandinavia at the 
time - so much so that it . HamumkoLmh 
becomes an atmosptere rather . .. 
thap a- cfeariy distinginshaMe inmg, hidden into 
style. In -Deimiairl^^ ^ior . iiir there b no esca 
stance, there were the group of Hammershoi, with 
painters centred on Skagen, jortnctniesastireo\ 
Kroyer in particular, who with Figure and 
specialized in rendering the meerish Woman J 
ekgam melancholy of a blue Letter at Comoaug] 
summer dusk along the beach- and several smaller 
es, and there were the ly impressive pfetur 
intimists grouped around Street, is the real t 
Hammershoi, a great master the othds pate refle 
internationally recognized as - The , Co nn au ghi 
such ait the time but only now show ventures also 
regaining that positiem in non- and Norway, to take 
Danish estimation. ■ trimseif most femoi 

These latter figure strikiz^y characteristic of Sea 
in both shows Hammershofs Symbolists, and se 
brother-inTaw listed and his fine and refetively 
lifelong friend Holsoe both lan d scap is ts . Part ia 
painted tranquil interiors with . sing are Gottfried 

..- vL TnVa . Unrilitfm 7 JO 


explains a prize awarded last year by the 
IngersoD Foundation “for upholding 
Jndeo-Christian standards and the 10 
commandments”. 

Lady Violet enters with a tea-tray. She 
has just been described as “shonk” in a 
Dutch magazine and has no idea what it 
means. “Did you ask if he uses a 
typewriter?", she enquires sweetly. Spot- 
ting the gingerbread, Trelawney arches 
his back on Anthony Powell's lap. 
“Darting”, he says, “there's going to be a 
raid.” • 

• The Fisher King is reviewed by James 
Fenton on page 11. 


Theatre 

Three Sisters 

Bloomsbury 

Dead authors wrote for then- 
own time and foreign authors 
write for their own people. 
The subtler a playwright the 
easier for other audiences to 
miss his point A nice silver 
samovar seems, to us, a very 
decent present , to give a 20- 
year-old Russian girt. Rus- 
sians, apparently, know that 
this- is a gift- fit only for 
matrons and widows. 

" Chekhov makes a character 
remark three times, but appar- 
ently apropos of nothing, that 
Balzac was married in Berd- 
ifcfagv. But Russians, it is said, 
regard this place as the pits, a 


Concert 

KPO/Gibson 

Festival Hall 

The GLC has gone from the 
South Bank, and with it, or so 
it seemed on Tuesday night, 
the last vestiges of civilized 
concert-giving. The reward fin- 
being subjected to dnmsy and 
churlish security searches, and 


View drowpi iloonvay to a music room beyornt byWhefo h^ng subjected to dumsy and 
Hamra^^Mlyitow regatoing his jntera a t ional states SuSsh security searches, and 

iiimg, hidden intensity, ^ but wh^capft^jwtthat 

there b no escaping thai with a subdued glow of blues 
Htonmershoi, with sudr ma- and greens, and Axel TOr- 

jramctnresasflteovalitoerfor neman’s Figures in a Land- Soum Bmk a 

MthFiguTe and the Ver- scape under a churmj^, Tdiaiko^ky Bomm mdJhh 
meerish Woman Reading a apocalyptic sky which mdt- ^Overmre of imusu^ tefo- 
Letter at Ctoxmaught Brown, cates something of why he zs ^\ AIexan “^Vv > *2 1 
and several smaller but equal- should have been a friend of 
ly impressive pictures at Bury Nolde. Sigge Jernmark’s Sum- 
Street, is the realthing, with mer Evening in the Ardiipela- 
the others pate reflections. go is also fascinating, com- 
The , Coimmight Brown billing a composition remi- 
show ventures also to Sweden niscent of Friedncfa . with ££ 

and Norway, to take in Munch colours looking sideways to 
himself; most famous but least theFauves. 
characteristic of Scandinavian g,^h diverse comparisons 

Symbolists, and several very inSrate rfSouS- 

navian SySbS's variety, !Ster » aSSS 

w; .JU rMhehi livkt. Stock- opment, pointed lie repeated 


much of Ha mm erstoi’s hun>- life’s -2 Northern Light, Stock- striking, and^ suggests that this thi> mMimv 

^ . . " - - | summer’s show will be a real SSofa selecting rar/and a 


- W BE N.? 


W H'E R E ? - 


F O R W H O M ? 


BOW? -WBZN?-- :WBY?- W U E R ET y * 

•AU These atomapend m 

a ymrotty OP gXCMlN AXED MANIBQMWS • CHRISTOPHER DE HAMEL 

Tte fi«t general inm>ducuTO W dfc. ' fh P/l /71/T/ 

Here, in this smaningiy aiustmri book, u&nmnpa pteviou^only jf LiA'LLA'l. 

available to the speridisr it now revealed. : or ..... '« 

J80 , 071481 125 


alien but 
world. 


— 1 entry in a moment s silence or 

I to an tied cate the besinnins of 

John RusseH \ one phrase in the ending of 
another. 

Not surprisingly, the second 


or MKt root* 


this was the best possible angnr for foe forfocomin&B 
ne musicany this is a smnptuons&ast; bwk a tabl. 

gad^Aiam,Fnum&Tim*i- • 

"The casting is as pleasurable as BCaitinfc^mastery. 5 

TamSaddU,Tht.Gwmhm 


radiant Arabella in this country 

Hihryi^eft, ThtTbna 


Cast induces: 

1 ucis Popp./Bcrnd \X-'e:kl. Marie MeLaugnli 
.David Reridall , Helga.Dernesdi, Walter Berr 
Conductor Bernard Haitink. 

Arrii -Hr B.-j o at .vH-'i/in. 

Reservations 01*240 1086/1911 

Access/ Visa /Diners <Oub. 


Halritii 

tie now 




Rock 

MathQde Santing 

ICA ; 

Returning to the ICA with & 
five-piece cafe jazz band in- 
stead of a tape recorder to 
back her up. Mathilde Santing 
played a rather nervous first 
show of a^hoit run that lasts 
until Saturday' Although her' 
talent has been recognized for 
some years in her native 
Netherlands, it is only since 
the release last year of her 
album. -Water Unde .the 
Bridge that she has begun to 
make, inroads in Britain. 

But she is not an impatient 
woman, as the purposeful 
serenity of her performance 
showed. The band were mar- 
vellous; sympathetic, stylish 
and creative, they wove care- 
fid idiosyncratic patterns in a 
manner that recalls Tom 
Waits's angular mode of ar- 
ranging. The combination of 
Sebastian Koolhoven's violin 
and Simon Planting’s doable 
tiass often created a mood of 
chamber .music melancholy, 
while the two; percussionists 
Set, lip sprightly cross-rhythms. 





Russian Wigan. The author’s 
implication being, one may 
presume, that even in the 
dreariest spot (my apologies to 
readers in Wigan) happiness 
may blossom: a message lost 
on the three daughters of 
General Prazorov, longing to 
leave their provincial dump 

and return tO pa radical 

Moscow. 

English directors have to 
make these points by other 
means. Which is why we are 
never likely to meet definitive 
productions of plays such as 
this. We can at best find 
"approximations, some -mag- 
nificent, others less so. The 
man y nuances that do come 
across in translation can be 
variously handled- and even;' 
in Mike Aifieds's touring pro- 
duction, at very considerable 

len gth 


movement of Dvorak’s “New 
World” Symphony was the 
most distinguished. When the 
woodwind soloists, encour- 
aged by the cor anglais lead, 
were given their head, a new 
liveliness of ensemble playing 
liberated the score. The 
concertante string postlude 
was a rare memorable mo- 
ment in a performance which 
coasted along with little dis- 
tinction other than its brusque 
dimaxes which included some 


The Bloomsbury stage is of 
considerable width and the 
cast sit at the sides between 
their appearances. For the first 
three acts they emerge out of 
the Harimfgs on to the elegant 
set (designed by Paul Dart) 
where the black furniture 
leads us to expect some eve- 
ning of scarcely relieved mel- 
ancholy. But the director 
knows his author better than 
that, and throughout the eve- 
ning encourages his cast to 
show us the laughable folly of 
these philosophizing soldiers 
and mismatched partners. A 
ripple of laughter greets 
Vershinin's, “My wife has 
tatfn poison again” — and 
why not? Seldom has his or 
the Baron's chatter sounded 
more fatuous than here. 

Another strength of the 
production is the counter- 


notably coarse brass playing. 

At the centre of the evening 
stood Rachmaninov’s Second 
Piano Concerto. Michael Roll 
was to have been the soloist 
but, as he had an accident at 
the weekend, Howard Shelley, 
the composer’s worthy En- 
glish champion, stepped in at 
the last moment Mr Shelley's 
Rachmaninov is worthy not 
only in its scholarship bat also 
in its sturdy, no-nonsense 
clarity. Never mind that his 


pointing of what goes on 
downstage with the back- 
ground comments, offstage 
music and a stove-pipe roar- 
ing like an avalanche. A 
musical top gives us a mo- 
ment as fleetingly beautiful as 
the more celebrated breaking 
string in The Cherry Orchard. 

If the sorrows of HoDy 
Wilson. Leslee Udwin and 
Chloe Salman do not manag e 
to touch us, there is a convinc- 
ing doctor from Philip Voss, 
poltroonery rooted in self- 
disgust, and a companion- 
piece .in evil from Christian 
Burgess’s tormented Solyony. 
Burnt three and a half hours it 
is a long journey to the fetal 
pistol-shot among the birch 
trees. 

Jeremy Kingston 


octaves tended only to acceler- 
ate, rather than to broaden, or 
that his fortissimi existed for 
the sake of volume rather than 
depth of resonance. Shelley 
did, after aft have to urge on 
the orchestra somewhat stren- 
uously: the style and sensitiv- 
ity he brought to the 
performance was, given the 
circumstances, more than 
adequa te . 


Hilary Finch 


THE TIMES LEISURE SUIT OFFER 


Michael Vatcher shaking, 
striking or even whirling an 
intriguing variety of objects. 

Santing, her blonde hair 
cropped tight to the draft 
destined to comment between 
songs, bat sang with such 
grace and charm that the 
warmth of her personality 
shone through regardless. Her 
voice, with its cod jazzy 
range, has drawn comparison 
with that of Sade. But the 
■ Dutch chanteuse’s approach is 
much less taflored to the 
homogenized requirement of 
a mass market, and bears 
more relation to the personal 
vision of a performer like 
Janice Ian. “One day as a Hon 
is worth a lifetime as a 
mouse”, she sang over a 
cheerful calypso, expressing 
the kind of sentiment that 
Sade might find a little uncooL 

Along with much fresh ma- 
terial woe favourites such as 
“I Most Have Done Some- 
thing Good", “Why Try to 
Change Me Now?" and a 
glorious arrangement of Gene 
Pitney’s “Town Without 
Pity”. She has long had the wit 
and talent; with her band in 
tow she is a delight 

David Sinclair 



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THE TIMES 





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Kent, DAS IBL Tel: Cnryford 53316 for enquiries 


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16 


THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


New US 
mobs 

rivalling 

Mafia 


From Christopher Thomas 
Washington 

Organized crime in America, 
though still dominated by the 
Mafia, is being transformed by 
particularly vicious new breeds 
of prison gangs, ethnic criminal 
societies, and at least four 
powerful motor cyde groups 
with chapters in Europe and 

Austr alia. 

The phenomenon is de- 
scribed in the report of Presi- 
dent Reagan's Commission on 
Organised Crime, which was 
set up in July 1983. It warns 
that the US must broaden its 
crime-fighting perspectives be- 
yond the Mafia and realize that 
the problem is much more 
pervasive. 

The report says that the 
newest development is the 
creation of self-peipetuating 
gangs in US prisons, with at 
least five groups meeting “the 
criteria of an organized crime 
group”. They are named as the 
Mexican Mafia, La Nucstra 
Familia, the Aryan Brother- 
hood. the Black Guerilla Fam- 
ily. and the Texas Syndicate. 

“All five operated in more 
than one stale." the report says. 
“In all five, either murder or 
the drawing of blood are pre- 
requisites for membership.” 

Ethnic groups are also flour- 
ishing. including the Triads, 
Japanese “Yakuza” groups. 
Vietnamese gangs, Cuban crim- 
inal cartels. Colombian cocaine 
rings, remnants of old Irish 
gangs and even new Russian 
groups. The first Russian ele- 
ment was noted in 1975. 

“There will be little lasting 
benefit in disabling La Cosa 
Nostra if other groups success- 
fully claim its franchises" the 
Commission says. 

The study estimates that 
organized crime reduces the 
gross national product by SI 8.2 
billion a year and reduces the 
annual income of every Ameri- 
can by S77. Total income from 
organized crime in I9S6 is 
estimated between $46 billion 
and $65 billion. 

The Commission calls fix- 
new efforts to deal with lawyers 
who co-operate with criminals, 
to include undercover tech- 
niques. including electronic 
surveillance. 


Today's events 



Letter from Delhi 


Small begi nnin gs: A silkworm moth that has hatched ont of its cocoon- (Photograph: Smresh Karadia) 

Evolution of a 
silk royal 
wedding dress 


One silkworm cocoon yields 
np to a mile of thread, but tens 
of thousands of cocoons such 
as the one above will be needed 
for Miss Sarah Ferguson's 
wedding dress when she mar- 
ries Prince Andrew in July. 

The cocoons, formed when 
the worm weaves the thread 
around its body to enter its 
pnpal stage before taming into 
a moth, are being harvested at 
Lnilingstone Silk Farm, 
Sherborne, Dorset. 

Lnilingstone is famed for pro- 
ducing thread for royal gar- 
ments, including the wedding 
dresses of the Queen, Princess 
of Wales and Princess Marga- 
ret 


Three killed as blast 
rocks jet in mid-air 


Continued from page 1 
thought it was a bomb until we 
got off the plane. It just 
sounded like a hissing, real 
strong. I thought they can't 
have done any maintenance 
work.” 

TWA staff in Athens com- 
plained to reporters that it had 
taken half an bour to get 
ambulances to the airport and 
an airport doctor said he had 
been inadequately briefed.”! 
had no idea what to expect 1 
was simply asked to bring one 
ambulance,” Dr George 
Micholitzis told Reuters. 

© Libyans shocked: The offi- 
cial from the Libyan 
“secretariat” of information 


appeared genuinely shocked 
(Robert Fisk writes from Trip- 
oli). “Was anyone killed?” be 
asked. When I told him that 
three people had been hurled 
from the jet he put his hand to 
his forehead and said: “Jesus 
Christ” 

Other reactions were less 
sympathetic. At the Libyan 
news agency Jana, an official 
said he knew no more than he 
had read on news agency 
reports. “Why should we be 
involved?” he asked. “It’s not 
our jet Claiming that we are 
responsible for anything that 
happens anywhere in the 
world is a very dangerous 
analysis. • 


Four accused of being 
Militants win reprieve 


Four Young Socialists, 
threatened with expulsion by a 
local Labour party for sup- 
porting Militant Tendency, 
won a reprieve in the High 
Couri in London yesterday. 

After a 75-minute private 
hearing, Mr Justice Evans 
granted temporary injunc- 
tions to John Hoare, Alison 
McDonald, Martin Bens and 
John Waddingham, prevent- 
ing Mansfield (Notts) constit- 
uency Labotir party from 
taking any further steps to 
expel them. 

The constituency party's 
general management commit- 
tee was to meet today to rule 
on expulsion recommends- 


. THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Royal engagements 

The Prince of Wales visits the 
Isles of Stilly and inaugurates 
the mains electricity supply for 
the off-islands. St Martin's Is- 
land, II. 

Princess Anne attends the 
premiere of the film Absolute 
Beginners. Leicester Sq Theatre, 
7.55. 

Princess Alice. Duchess of 
Gloucester, visits the Royal 
Army Veterinary Corps training 
centre. Mdlon Mowbray. 12.30: 
and later opens Age Concern's 
Gloucester House. Melton 
Mowbray, 3. 

Prince Michael of Kent at- 


tends a reception to launch an 
appeal by the Paviors’ Company 
for the Road Makers exhibition. 
Amberley Chalk Pits Museum, 
Cullers HalL EC4. 12. 

New exhibitions 
Paintings from Venice by 
Sophie WalbeolTe-Wilson: Ste- 
phen Bartley Gallery, 62 Old 
Church St- SW3: Tues to Fri II 
to 6. Sat 10 to 5 (ends April 24). 

Domesday: The Book; Public 
Record Office. Chancery Lane. 
WC2; Mon to Sat 10 to 6 (ends 
September 30). 

Lawrence Preece: new paint- 
ings and related drawings; 
Red fern Gallery. 20 Cork St 
Wl: Mon to Fri 10 to 5.30, Sat 
10 to 12.30 (ends May 7). 


The Times Crossword Pnzzle No 17,010 



ACROSS 

1 Dedication not so much in 
evidence in a crooner (8) 

5 Edison's 99% perspiratory 
condition (6). 

10 Where Hawke rated some- 
how as a rebel (8.3.4). 

11 Acquire a letter from Lucian 
to a lady (7). 

12 Old capital hostile to sur-. 
prise announcement by the 
Scots (7). 

13 Wheeler's find, perhaps, 
preserves animals (8). 

15 Some arc curious enough to 
come round again t5). 

18 County town once said to 
produce material for caulk- 
ing (5). 

20 Make a lot of noise about 
engineers going round a but- 
ter factory (8). 

23 Quell leaders of revolt en- 
dangering the fourth estate 
(7i. 

25 They are on the wicket, and 
may be popping (7). 

26 Digger’s noted way of carry- 
ing the swag (8.7). 

27 Reprimand for the class (6). 

28 Business deficit a pound? 
Hardly to be described thus 
18). 

DOWN 

1 Dispatch article supporting 
ambassador in reurement 
(61. 

2 Foxhole to act as part of the 
defence (9). 

3 Tom's sayings about the old 
river? 17). 

4 Dash up to see detailed 
tender (5). 


6 Choose a sound member of 
Uncle Sam’s college? (7) 

7 Observed one employed in 
gardening, say. in America 
(5). 

8 “Go. for they call you. . 

from the hill" (M.Aroold) 

( 8 ). 

9 Non-committal stance, up- 
right on horseback (8). 

14 Forgiveness makes former 
copper squeal (S). 

16 His scaly members about 
right for a state of transi- 
tion? (9 >. 

17 Bishop lakes gold to oars- 
man — not the owner (8). 

19 One with an exalted calling 
in Islam? (7). 

21 Virtuoso from Miss West’s 
centre in Detroit 1 7). 

22 Mount an attack on a south- 
ern ship (6). 

24 Look among part of the 
audience for a guide (5). 

25 Had no future as a literary 
sketch (5). 

Solatium to Puzzle No 17,009 



Concise Crossword page 10 


The Wally Cose: photographs 
by Hugh Carroll and John 
Gifmoun (ends April 26). 

The Architecture of Adolf 
Loos; Third Eye Centre. 350 
SaucHiehall Su Glasgow; Tues to 
Sat 10 to 5.30. Sun 2 to 5.30 
(ends April 271. 

Ceramic sculptures by Sten 
Lykke Madsen (ends April 14); 
Linocuts by Hans Oldau Kxull 
(ends May 3 Y. MacRobert Arts 
Centre Gallery, Stirling Univer- 
sity: Mon to Sat 11 to S. Sun 2 to 

Last chance to see 

Works by Geoffrey Bawa; 
Royal Institute of British Archi- 
tects, Portland Place, Wl, 9 to 
5.30. 

Uford Photographic Awards: 
National Centre of Photog- 
raphy. The Octagon. Milsom St. 
Bath. 10 to 5.30. 

British Trees: photographs by 
Alan Fairhurst and Eric 
Soothilh Towneley Hall An 
Gallery. Burnley, 10 to 5.30. 
Music 

Concert by the Parke En- 
semble: work by Ravel. Debussy 
and Mozart: St Manin-in-the- 
Fields, Trafalgar 

Recital 

tel; St James 
dilly. Wl. 1.10. 

Recital by the Della Sax 
Quarter. Riverside Studios. 
Crisp Rd, W6. 8.30. 

Concert by the Halle Or- 
chestra: Manchester Free Trade 
Hall. 7.30. 

Concert by the Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra: Colston 
Hall. Bristol 7.30. 

Concert by the Royal Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra; Royal 
Concert Hall. Theatre Sq. Not- 
tingham. 7.30. 

Talks lectures, films 

Understanding fossils, by 
Joyce Pope: Natural History- 
Museum. Cromwell Rd. SW7. 3. 

Resistance and rebellion in 
eighteenth century Metz: 
Women. Jews and the royal 
courts of law. by Prof Frances 
Mahno: University Women's 
Glib. 2 Audley Sq. Wl. 6.30. 

Aerobic- The Amazing Flying 
Ring, by Mr Alan Adler. The 
Royal Aeronautical Society. 4 
Hamilton Place. Wl. 6. 

Francis Bacon by Richard 
Humphry s, 1: Forty years of 
modern Art 1945-198*5. 6.30: 
Tate Gallery. Millbank. SWl. 

Myths and Legends: the por- 
trait as creator of myth, by Colin 
Wiggins: The National Gallery. 
Trafalgar Sq. WC2. 1. 

General 

Teenage painting and draw- 
ing: murals with Brian Dawn 
(ages 12 to 16): Poetic puppets 
(make and play) with Barbara 
Davis (ages 7 to II): Sculpture 
and Gay modelling with Zora 
Bjelogrlic (ages 8 to 12); Pottery 
with Valerie Taylor (ages 7 to 
10k Printing with Ray Gale 
(ages 9 to 14): Camden Arts 
Centre. Arkwright Rd- NW3. 10 
to 3. 

Different ways of making 
finger puppets; The Bethnal 
Green Museum of Childhood. 
Cambridge Heath Rd. E2. 2.30. 

The Scottish Antiques Fair; 
Roxhurghe Hotel. Charlotte Sq. 
Edinburgh, today and tomorrow 
II to 9. Sat 1 1 to 5 (ends April 
5). 

Sunday Times National Stu- 
dent Drama Festival; Taliesin 
Arts Centre. University College. 
Singleton Park. Swansea: for 
details tel: <0792) 296883 (ends 
April 10). 

Buucrfiics: making butterfly 
kites: Royal Albert Memorial 
Museum. Queen St, Exeter, 10 
to 12.30. 


Books — paperback 


The Deputy Literary Editor's selection of interesting books published this 

laifinfr 

FICTION 

No Bed tor Bacon, by Caryl Brahms & S J.Simon-fHogarth, E3 .95) 

Andrea Lee, by Sanaa PhaSps (Faber, £2.95) 

They Don't Dance Much, by James Ross (Harrap, £5.96} 

The Carnivorous Lamb, by Agustin Gomez-Arcos (CMP. £455) 

Ende, A Diary of the Thud world War, by Antotv Andraas Guha (Corgi, 
£2.95) 

NON-FICTION 

Four Stwfies fat Loyalty, by Christ op her Sykes (Century. £5-&>) 

Home Sweet Home, My Canadian Album, by Mordecai Richter (Triad, 
£235) 


A United Kingdom, by David Owen (Penguin. £2.95) 
Tuscany, An Anthology, edited by Laura Raison (Enury, 
The Inner Eye, by Nicholas Humphrey (Faber, £435) 


£6.95) 


NS 


Roads 


London and South-east: 
A308: Road width reduced 
westbound on Fulham Rd at the 
junction with Elm Park Gardens 
and Evelyn Gardens. A10: 
Southbound carriageway dosed; 
contraflow northbound, Herts. 

The Midlands: Ml: 

Contraflow between junctions 
15 and 16 (Northampton and 
Daventryk junction 16 dosed. 
A41: Roadworks on Bir- 

mingham to Warwick road at 
Hatton. A446: Reconstruction 
work on Coleshill bypass, N of 
the M6/M42 interchange. 

Wales and West: M5: North- 
bound carriageway closed be- 
tween junctions 15 and 16 (M4 
and Tbombury): contraflow on 
southbound. A470: Roadworks 
at Coryton; outside lane dosed 
in both directions. 

The North: M6: Contraflow 
between junction 31 and 32 
(Preston and M55 interchange). 
A49: Roadworks at Tarporfry. 
Scotland: A 77: Various lane 
closures between Eastwood Toll 
and Malletsheugh. A8: Lane 
closures westbound between the 
junctions with A72S at 
Shawhead and M8 at 
Baillieslon. M90: Lane closures 
on both carriageways at Perth 
between junctions 10 and II. 

Information supplied by AA 


The pound 


Bank 

Bank 

AustnritoS 

mm 

Sets 

2315 

Austria Sch 

25.20 

2430 

Belgium Ft 

7460 

7030 

CwesriaS 

2.128 

2323 

Denmark Kr 

1335 

1235 

Finland *Skk 

6.10 

735 

France Fr 

1135 

1030 

Germany Dm 

330 

342 

Greece Or 

23230 

21230 

HongKongS 

11.78 

1138 

Ireland PI 

1.192 

1.132 

Italy Lira 

244500 

232530 

Japan Yen 

27530 

26130 

NelheriJids Gld 

434 

335 

Nonray Xr 

11.15 

1030 

Portugal Esc 

23030 

22030 

Soufli Africa Rd 

4.10 

330 

Spain Pta 

22530 

21330 

SwedmKr 

11-30 

10.75 

Switzerland Fr 

330 

235 

USAS 

1332 

1462 

Yugoslavia Dor 

54030 

49030 

Retafi Price Index: 381.1 


London: The FT Inbox closed us 172 at 

14194 




Best wines 


In a blind tasting of 34 Rioja 
Reservas. an expert panel chose 
two wines as outstanding: 

Vina Ardanza 1976 Keser 
Sainsbury's Vintage Selection, 
Sainsbury, £4.25;V!na Landano 
1975 Reserva, Bodegas Law, 
Sberston Wine Company, 
.Sherston, Malmesbury, wilts, 
£4.32. 

Gose behind and good value 
for money were: 

Domecq Domain 1980 
Reserva, Safeway, Peter Domi- 
nic. Victoria Wine, Thresher, 
Cooper & Roberts, Gateway. 
Oddbins. £3.25 - £3.4W?erro 
Anon 1976 Reserva, Bodegas 
CHarra, Oddbins, Cooper & 
Roberts, Waitrose, £3-25. 
Source: Decanter. 


Sentencing guide 


A new edition of The Sentence 
of the Court, a handbook for 
courts on the treatment of 
offenders, has beenpublished by 
the Home Office. Toe booklet is 
intended to provide judges and 
magistrates with a concise guide 
to the semening powers avail- 
able to them under the present 
law. and the basic principles 
applicable to their use. The 
Sentence of the Court is avail- 
able at HMSO book shops or 
can by ordered from HMSO 
Publications Centre. PO Box 
276, London, SW8 5DT; tel: 01- 
622 3316 (£3.50). 


Anniversaries 


Births: George Herbert poet 
Montgomery Castle. Wales, 
1593; Washington Irving, 
writer. New York, 1 783; James 
Hertzog, Prime Minister of 
South Africa, 1924-39. Welling- 
ton. Cape Colony, 1866. 

Deaths: John Napier, in- 
ventor of logarithms, 
Merchision Castle, Edinburgh. 
1617; Bartotocne Murillo, Se- 
ville, 1682; Johannes Brahms, 
Vienna. 1897; Richard ETOyle 
Carte, impresario. London, 
1901; Kurt Weill, .composer. 
New York. 1950. 


Snow reports 


Depth 

l r> u 

FRANCE 

Bains 110 320 

Good snow on upper slopes 
Morzme 70 230 

Good above 1800m 
ValThorerts 175 200 

Slush art lower slopes 
SWITZERLAND 
C Montana 00 160 

Fair spring conditions 
'Davos 60 170 

More new snow has (alien 
Verbier 35 240 


Piste 

good 

good 

good 

(air 

good 

good 


Powder on north facing slopes 
Wenger 20 90 fair 

Slush on lower slopes 

Zermatt 65 185 good 

Slush on lower slopes 


Conditions 
Off Runs to 
Pate resort 

varied fair 

crust good 

varied good 

heavy fair 
powder fair 
varied fair 


Weather 

(5pm) 


sun 

cloud 

fine 

fine 

fine 

fine 


spring dosed fine 
heavy fair fine 


°C 

11 

8 

5 

12 

4 

8 

7 

8 



Sun Risas: Sun Sot*: 

032 am 7.37 pm 

Moon rises: Moon sets: 
4.58 am 1230 pm 
New moon: April 9. 


lighting-up time 


London 837 pm to 600 am 
Bristol &16jan to 6.10 am 
EdUbugb &24 pm to 607 m 
Manchester 8.17 pm to 6.08 am 
Penzance 837 pm to &23 am 


Yesterday 


Temperatures 
Cloud; I. tain r. 

Belfast f 
» 
I 
f 
c 
I 
f 


Bristol 
Canfiff 

r ii i | 

EUHlUUfGR 

Glasgow 


at midday yesterday: c. 
rafts, sun. 

CF C F 

846 Guernsey f 646 
846 memem f 745 
341 Jersey s 646 
745 London c 948 
643 ITnchster f 745 
745 Ne wc as t le c 643 
846 RTMsmy c 643 



P or tt gria - how to play 

you, daty 


your weeuy Portfolio touuT^te 

| u 

■h have won 


M or a slur* of theorize money 
for Dial week, anormni claim 
prize aa instructed below. . 


M 


you must have your ts 
when you t el e p ho ne. 

IT you are unable i 
Someone else can claim or 
MM mg/ must have your 

Th? Times Portfotto 

between the sttsulaMd times. 

, No responsibility can be acce pt ed 
for I allure io contact the claims ofnee 
for any reasoa within the stated 
hours. 

The above instructions are mp- 

■Some Times Portfolla cards Include 
miner misprints In the Inatradfons on 
the reverse aide. These cards ars not 
Invalidated. 

•The wording of Rules 2 and 5 has 

h “ «•»-- — * -writer versions 

res. The Game 
d will continue 
the same way 


to^ed in 


era Limned or i 
the Post Office. 


unday. i 





exam cheats 


tions made by its executive 
committee. 

The constituency party was 
not present or represented at 
yesterday’s bearing, and the 
injunctions will remain in 
force until a full hearing. 

- Miss McDonald, for the 
group, said they had brought 
the proceedings “with 
reluctance” because they 
feared they would not get a fair 
bearing today. 

She said: “We had argued 
all along that there was no 
constitutional basis for the 
expulsions. This is a witch- 1 
hunt because of our political 
ideas.” 


Though Mr 

the Indian Prime Minister, is 
sot getting quite the adula- 
tory press he was epjoying a 
few months ago, the one part 
ofhis image that has not been 
impugned is his reputation as 
“Mr Clean”. 

No one, politician nor 
journalist, has so for found 
the merest tittle of gossip to 
tie him to any unethical 
conduct -though you may be 
sure -it is not for want of 
trying. Mr Gandhi, indeed, 
appears to have set himself 
the Herculean task of clean- 
ing up corruption in Indian 
public life, a task in compari- 
son to which cleaning the 
Augean stables would appear 
a little light housework. 

His startling speech to the 

centenary meeting of his 

Congressfl) Party has sec the 
tone. He said of the leaders of 
his own parly; “Their life- 
style, their thinking — or lack 
of it — their sdfeggrandize- 
ment, their corrupt ways, 
their linkages with tire vested 
interests in society, and ibeir 
sanctimonious posturing are 
wholly incompatible with 
work among tire people.” 

And he has proved that be 
meant what he sakL 

When Mr A.R. Antulay, 
then Chief .Minister of the 
western state ofMaharashtra, 
was named by a judge as 
.having im pr oper l y extracted 
money from cement con- 
tracts for one or two political 
trust funds, he was compelled 
to resign and was proceeded 
against in court, though the 
case now rests with the 
Supreme CburL Thai was 
during Mrs Indira Gandhi's 
time, when ' Mr Gandhi was 
but his mother’s adviser. 

But now one of Mr 
Antulay’s successors has been 
compelled to resign tv Mr 
Gandhi after being named in 
the same courtroom. While 
Mr Antulay collected money, 
Mr Shivajirao Nilangekar 
collected degrees for himself 
and his family. 

Last November Mr 
Nilangekar's daughter, 
Chapdrakala, a poor student, 
lode the obstetrics and 
ptaecology exam for the 
mrth time. According to the 
original marks, of the 16 
practical and theoretical, pa- 
pers, tiie passed four and 


- marginally foiled 12. By re- 
computing the results the 
examiner had her marginally 
failing four theoretical papers 
.and two practical tests. Then 
he changed the balance of the 
scores so that tire practical 
outweighed tire theory, and 
finally so for lowered the 

standards ibat an astonishing 


72 per cent of the candidates 
passed including Chandra- 
kala r hut excluding another 
MD candidate wholater chal- 
lenged the whole process and 
brought it into tire open. 

Education , is one way for 
the poor or lower middle 
class Indians to escape the 
dreadful grinding poverty of 
tireir surroundings. - 

This explains why tire stan- 
dard of ch e a tin g or of using 
undue influence on examin- 
ers is so high. In 1981 tire son 
of a senior professor in Bihar 
secured 96 per cent in the 
subject of the department of 
which his father was head. 
Not much surprising in that 
perhaps, except that for his 
entire slay at tire university 
the boy never secured than 30 
per cent in any subject 

At Patna Univeraty T also 
in Bihar, the Chief Minister's 
daughter also in 198 L. ob- 
tained a first and a second 
dass honours in economics, 
but only after the examiners 
bad been changed. 

fn 1982 a former Kerala 
minister was accused of fid- 
dling his daughter’s examina- 
tion results - also ra the 
medical exams, in 1984, four 
MBA students at the Anna 
Maiai University in Tamil 
Nadu were found to have 
been awarded degrees be- 
cause the father of one of 
them was a senior professor. 

Last year people who had 
already graduated were found 
impersonating students at the 
exams in Nagpur. 

Mr Nilangekar protests 
that no one has proved that 
he brought any influence to 
bear on the examiner, but a 
number of other unusual 
educational events have since 
come to light. His son, Mr 
Shared Pam, for example, 
was admitted to the general 
surgery course by a highly 
fovourable interpretation of 
the rules. 

Michael Hamlyn 


Weather 

forecast 

A slack trough of low 
pressure will be slow mov- 
ing over SE areas. A ridge 
of high pressure will de- 
velop to the NW of 
Britain. 

6 am to midnight 

London, central S, antral N, 
Mkttands, Channel Wands: Sunny 
intervals and rain or stoat showers, 
heavy In places: wtnd N moderate; 
max temp IOC (50F). 

SE, E, IE England, East Andre 
Rather cloudy with rain or sleet 
showers, heavy at limes: wind NE 
moderate; max temp 8C(46F). 

SW. NW England, Wales. Lake 
District: Sunny intervals aid scat- 
tered showers; wind N moderate; 
max temp 11C 152FL 
. tote of Mart, SW BcoBmd, Glas- 
gow, ArayK: Sunny periods and 
scattered showers; wmd N mod- 
erate max temp 10C (50F). .T 
Borders, Edtabnrah, Dundee, 
Aberdeen, Central Highlands. Mo- 
ray Firth, NE, NW Scotland, North- 
ern Ireland: Rather cloudy, ' 
occasional showers of rain, sleet or 
snow, wind N moderate or fresh; 
max temp 9C(48F). 

Orkney, Shetland: Rather cloudy, 
scattered showers of rain or snow; 
wind N fresh; max temp 7C (45FL 
Outlook for tomorrow and Sat- 
urday: Sumy intervals and show- 
ers, by Saturday the showers wH 
mostly have died out in the W and N. 




High Tides 


TODAY AM 

London Bridge 9.09 
- ' 9.08 

Z13 
634 

Cardiff X£S 

Comport 1236 

Dow 6.33 

Faknootta 1206 

Glasgow 7.21 

H ar we l l 7.10 

HoMead 6.04 

HuB 134 

1.01 
1026 
6.46 
634 
7.18 

MMHnw 135 
Newquay 1225 

Oban 220 


MMue sky: be -Mae sky and cloud: C- 
doudy: o-overcask l-feg: d-drtan*: h- 
Sa* tmot-rnlsfc r-rota: wnow; Uv- 
nunKtefsMrm: oehowera. 

Arrows show wind direction, wind 
speed onpto circled. Temperature 
centigrade. 


137 

Portsmouth 659 

Sbore ham 635 

So u t ham pton 832 

Swansea 132 

Tom 1138 

WRon-on-Nza 7.07 
TUa acMMWd In 


HT PM 

60 939 
33 1028 
93 2)57 
23 7.43 
93 2.42 
44.1.43 
53 731 

43 1.13 

4.1 830 
33 748 

44 7.18 
53 230 
09 137 
44 1T37 
74 7.45 

2.1 5.17 
43 749 

53 2.19 

54 1.19 
23 333 

1.00 
14 235 
33 8-15 
4.8 744 
27 7.47 
73 231 

4.1 

33 742 


metres: 


Around Britain 


Sui Rain 

hra (n 

EAST COAST 
Srartmro 83 . . - 
BridHngtun .83 32 
Owner - JJ6 


"■BP ”*-■ 

SOtlm COAST 

83 38 
103 31 
113 - 

103 .16 
103 - 

93 - 

10.6 31 
83 .03 

113 - 

10.7 - 
93 .12 

103 - 

103 - 

108 - 

103 31 

104 31 

gaa, ?8i : 

Fm aa wca 104 32 
Jmaay S4 .02 

SKEW 01 «■ 

ScflyMoa 103 31 
N e w quay 103 .01 


Max 
C F 

10.50. 
10 50 
9 48 

10 50 

10 50 

11 52 
10 50 

9 48 

8 46 

10 50 
W 50 

11 52 
10 50 

10 50 

9 48 

11 52 

12 54 

10 50 
9-48: 

11 62 

11 52 

12 54 

10 GO 

11 52 
11 52 
11 52 

11 52 

12 54 


Bright 


Sumy 

Sonny 

Stoat 

Sumy 

Sunny 

Sumy 

Stoat 

Sumy 

Showers 

Sumy 

Shrairers 

Sunny 

Ha* pm 

Sunny 

Sumy 

Sramy 

Sunny 

Sunny 

Sunny 

Sumy 

Sunny 

Swny 

Sunny 

Sum 

Sunny 


Sun Rain Max 
hre in C F 

83 33 8 48 

Tenby 7.7 31 10 50 

CotorynBay 2.8 .19 8 46 

'' 10.6 .18 8 48 

103 37 10 50 


ENGLAI0 AND WALES 
London - .01 11 52 

S ham AIq* 54 34 10 50 

Bristol (Ctrl) 83 .01 9 48 

Carttl (CM) 93 31 9 48 

Angtoaey 83 .10 9 49 

B’pool Alrpt 73 33 8 48 

Ma n ch e s ter 33 .13 0 32 

Nottingham 7.6 37 9 48 

rfcd-n-Tyne 103 - 11 52 

Caritoto 73 .03 9 48 

SCOTLAND 


gaagwr 

Tfcno 


Wk* ■ 
Kbtttes 


83 34 
73 31 
73 -L- 
93-32 
33 .02 
9.4 JJ4 

73 31 
90 - 

73 - 


SL Arnhem 

NORTHERN tRELAND 
84 32 


10 50 
9 48 
10,50 
9 48' 
9 48 
8 46 
10 60 
10 60 
10 50 


Sumy 

Sunny 

Hrtpm 

Sunny 

Sunny 

Shoem 

Showers 

SUriOy 

Sunny 

Sumy 

Sunny 

Shownra 

HaB pm 

gamy 

cvxmra 

Hal 

Sunny 

Sunny 

Stomy 

Stows ra 

Sunny 

Sunny 


7.6 32 11 52 Shawm 
9 48 Shawm 


Thee* m ‘fijesday'a figure* 


Abroad 



Chicago* 

Ct?c& 


:i fsss? 

1SE- 



* ttenotaa Tuesday’s figures are 


S 19 08 Sabfawg 
a 19 66 S Pwahr 
a 26 79 S Frisco* 
a 23 73 Santiago 
1 28 79 Soota^ 

1 18 61 Statfpor 
a 23 73 

I 8 43 STraabYg 
c 9 48 Sydney 
f 26 79 Tangier. 

S 21 70 Tal Aviv 
a 31 88 Tenerife 
B 19 66 Tokyo 
a 18 61 Tomato* 

1 B 46 Tori* 
f 10 50 Vataneto* 
f 18 64 VaoctW 
1 21 70 Venice ' 
s 11 52 Vteona 
8 O 32 «nm 
S 22 72 Wi ahW 
a 38 97 WarngH* 
a 27 81 Zurich 
avaflattfs 


C 
a 17 
1.14 
c 25 
e 13 


lY: e, doud: d, drtxzft l, fair Ig, log; r, raft a, sun; an. snow; t, ttumjac. 

C F C . F 

1 10 50 Ma j o rca . . . 

C 7 45 Manga* 
a 2D ra55a 
C B 43 Mrtrtne 
a 19 68 Mexico C 
r 14 57 
9 16 84 
a 10 50 
1 17 53 

1 11 52 

f 16 61 NakoM 
c 2 36 Naples 
C 16 84 NdaH 
a 13 58 H YoriT 
» 17 63 Wee 

a 80 agCMo 

a 22 72 Paris 



a 17 
> 30 
c 2 
c-. 9 
a 27 
I 17 

r 16 
I 20 
a 16 
a 20 
a 24 
a 17 

3 8 

I 17 

4 12 
f 7 
a 20 
l 17 
a 11 


63 

B6 

35 

48 

91 

63 

61 

68 

61 

88 

75 

83 

48 

68 

54 

45 

79 

83 

52 


r>n, j 


HT 

5.7 

34 

9.4 

23 

as 

43 

5.1 
83 
39 

3.1 

44 
5-7 
63 

4.6 
72 
23 
33 
53 

5.1 
Z7 
43 
12 

2.7 
49 
33 
63 

3 2 






THURSDAY APR ri . * j cjgfl 


THE 



TIMES 


17 


, -7 , ■ ’ 

; 

- V :' , y 

- A 


: *< 
. -v. > 

t " I* 

’■ V:4' 




. ~ 1 *.. "*. 

«: ••. .■ , ^:i 



FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


STOCK market 

FT 30 Share 
1419.4 (+172) 

FT-SE 100 
1702.9 (+18.9) 

USM (Datastream) 
118.62 (+Q.42) 

THEPOUtiP 


US Dollar 
1*735 (+0.0050)' 

W German marie 
3.4885 (+0:0654) 

Trade-weighted 

76:5 (+0:7) 


> _ 


*7 







/ 

/; 






• P .T f 

l 1 •=* 

c • 




.... ;*f- 




Sugar cash 
resignation 

A boardroom dash rambled 

the payrae^oi J a^ra?jSo 

million extraor dinar y divi- 
dend |o S & W Berisfoid, the 
sugar refiner's parent 
company. 

"Mr Nigel Robson, a non- 
executive director, .resi gned 
after a board meeting of 
British Sugar agreed to pay 
Bensfbid_ the: money.. The 
payment is part of a posable 
sale by Bensford of B ritish 
Sugar to Ferruzzi, .the Italian 
foods amT agricultural prod- 
ucts group. 

Imps accuses 
Hanson 

The imperial Group and 
United Biscuits yesterday 
complained to lire Takeover 
Panel about a Hanson Trust 
advertisement which com- 
pared Hanson's offer with the 
Imperial share price and 
which appeared yesterday. 

The advertisement in The 
Times also incorrectly iocor- 
porated the wrong wording, 
saying that eacbof the offers 
.was. being shown. The panel 
accepted that The . Times ad- 
vertisement was an error ^by 
the advertisiiig agency, Lowe 
Howard-Sping, and to taking 
no action on it. 

GRE retreat 

Guardian Royal Exchange, 
thecompositeinsunaice.com- 
pany, made pretax profits, of 
£3.5-mHlidrfin )985again5t 
£923 million. .The' dividend is 
raised by 10.6 per cent te 
28.75p. Tempos, page 19 

Christies foil 

Christies :&uernaboaaETe- 
ftarivoyerr 

iberl®? 

, on, 1984 to . 

; profit fell 24pef cesat to023 
million. Earmngs'. pra share 
were 14.83pand the. dividend 
was unchanged at;. -£5p 
net. Tempos, page 19 

Bunzl payout 

Bunzl turnover sfijpped 8 per 
cent to £788 milhon for the 
year 10 December 31 but 
pretax profit rose; to £42.7 
million, up 34 per Cent-Tbc 
dividend was raised by 2^Sp to 
l Op net. Tempos, page 19 

BHP sues 

Broken Hiff Propriettoy and 
its directors- have issued sppa-: 
rate write concerning foe exer- 
cise of vpUng'Jigbt for shares 
the company has bought in 
Beil Resources and alfega&ons 

raadebyBelL . 

Sketchley buy 

Acceptances for . the 
Sketchley offer for Breakmate 
have been received for 3.61 
million Breakmate shares, 
representing 98.5 per cent 

No referral 

The following. ^ proposed 
mergers will not be .referred to 
the Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission: Ladbroie 

Group and Home Charm 
Group, Chicago Pacific Cor- 
poration and the Hoover Co, 
and TAC Construction Mate- 
rials and Etemrt Budding 
Products. 

Auditors’ plea 

Auditors are asking the 
Government to put a- limit on 
negligence damages. The 
Chartered Association of Cer- 
tified Accountants is seeking 
legislation to restrict' liability 
to 10 times the fee. 



at BL leap 
.3 million 


BC-thestate-conirofiedmo-' 
tor company whose Land - 
Rover subsidiary remains sT 
the ; centre- . .of ■ ' the 
; Government's latest privati- 
zation controversy, yes terday 
, disclosed pretax losses for tea 

year of £n0J minion, a 50 

per cem increase on the £733 * 
milhon loss in 1984. 

The apparent 'woreenmg. 
was caused mainly by the sale 
of Jaguar in August . 1984, 
which . removed that' 
company's profit-malting ac- 
tivities from; ifee BL group. 

. .The directors, led by Sir 
Austin Bide, the - chairma n, 
said; however, that the operat- 
ing loss of £393 - million 
represented, “a significant 
reduction" on the comparable' 
1984 loss of£66.5 million. 


By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


. .Austin’. Rover, the volume 
care business; cut back its 
losses from £26 million in 
• 1984 to..£6 million last year, 
withits world sales recovering 
strongly to 479.500, a rise of 
14 per cent ’ . 

’ '■ Land Rover Group, which 
includes the successful Freight 
Rover operation — maker of 
the Sbeipayan - increased its • 
operating profit to £10 million 
against £2 minimi in 1984. 

Ley land Group, the truck 
and bus business; suffered a 
loss of £52 million against a 
deficit of £61 million tn 1984. 
BL said Leyland Trucks’ 
much improved financial per- 
formance was offset by sharp- 
ly increased losses at Leyland 
Bus. ' ; 

TlL's total - loss for 1985, . 


after tax. interest and extraor- 
dinary items, was £138 mil- 
lion. compared with a profit of 
£80-6 million in 1984. The 
latter figure was distorted, 
however, by the impact of the 
£167- million of profit 
achieved from the sale of 
Jaguar: 

The board said: “Despite a 
further intensification of com- 
petitive conditions in all mar- 
kets in which BL companies 
operate, on a comparable 
basis overall progress was 
achieved in production, sales 
and financial performance**. 

Turnover for the year was 
£3.415 minion of which ex- 
ports accounted for £764 mil- 
lion. a 28 per cent rise on 
1984. Excluding Jaguar’s over- 
seas sales, BL's 1984 exports 


were worth £598 million. Sales 
revenue m Britain was £2,353 
million 

BL's 1985 preliminary re- 
sults show that Austin Rover 
safes rose by 27 per cent in 
Eqrope to 105,000 units, the 
best performance since 1979. 

Output was up 23 per cent 
to 479,000 units, with 99.95 
per cent of wortcing time free 
of disputes, an industrial rela- 
tions record for BL 

Uni pan, the BL parts and 
components company, made a 
much reduced profit of £6 
million (£14 million). 

Land Rover-Ley land, in- 
cluding the bus operation, was 
hit by dedining profitability in 
international operations and 
its operating loss was £41 
million. 


UK reserves show biggest 
increase for five years 


• By Ztevlti Smiffi Economics 

“ : Correspondent . 

■'Britain's official gold and 
foreign currency reserves re- 
corded their biggest rise for 
more .than five years last 
month, reflecting the pound's 
strength in the face of weak oQ 
prices. .... 

The . re s e r ves rose by an 
underlying $278 mMon(£189 
million), in MtodL the biggest 
monthly increase since Janu- 
ary, 1981. The actual rise last 
month was much Unger, be- 
cause of the annual revalua- 
tion of the reserves. - 

• -The reserves^ total led 
$18,750 million (£12*686 mil- 
lion) actfieend'of March, the 
highest since" March.- 1982. 
This compared with: $15,810 
million at the end ofFebruary. 

- The .overall increase in the 
reserves was $2*940 million. 
Of this, : $2,505 million was 
because of the annual revalua- 
tion, and $435 million because 
of. tlte - monthly . increase, be- 
fore Rowing for capital accru- . 
ah and repaymentsr' ' 4 , 

. The rise in foe- reserves, 
which 1 was much bigger than 
City economists . expected. 



pound's strength, particularly 
after the March 18 Budget, to 
boost the reserves. 

The pound reached a 2Vi- 
year high of $13190 last 
. month, and its -average value 
also rose The sterling index 
began the month at 72.5 and 
ended it 5 per cent higher at 
763. 


It is official policy not to 
comment on intervention in 
the foreign exchange markets. 
However, Treasury sources 
pointed out that the reserves 
fell sharply in the final three 
months of last year (by $941 
million) when the pound was 
weak, and have risen by $52 2 
million in the first three 
months of this year. 

A healthy level of reserves 
could be important during the 
run-up to the next General 
Election, when support for 
sterling may be the only 
acceptable alternative to a 
politically' damaging raising of 
interest rates. . . 


Bank lending slows 


The pace of bank tending 
bar slowed markedly, accord- 
ing to the . latest quarterly 
analysis of advances from the 
Bank of England- Total lend- 
ing, rose 2 per cent, or 22L97 
biuiofl, in foe three months to 
mid-February. 

- After seasonal adjustment; 
the rise was £3J6UBeo,£L6 
bOficmtess than in the pteri- 
ons. three months. The slow- 
down io the pace of tending, 
together with lower-dmu-e*- 1 
prefod pobfic- sector hemm- 


ing, has reduced the rate of 
increase of broad money. 

The figures show why the 
bonks have been adopting a 
more aggressive approach to 
mortgage leading. La the No- 
vember- Febraary period, 
mortgage kudfag by foe banks 
increased by £640 mfllioa, less 
than faatf foe rise in the 
prerions two quarters. 

Around half foe rise la 
lending in the amst recent 
flwe -ao it fc peri o d was to the 
financial sector. 











pressure 



Horn Bailey Mortis / ' 
Washington ‘ 

The Reagan Admmistration 
is. reasressing its ’policies to 
decide whether it should put 
messore on Saudi Arabia and 
Britain to reach an oil produc- 
tion agrecyncnL " . -f 

The Administratioii is int-. 
der severe pditicaT pressure 
fiton GS oiTproiftiring states, . 
but official^ are divided oyer 
wfieiher tite barrafiil events of ; 
^foe :-oDI jmce. : coHagse: are 
■"begiimiiig to outwent, the 
-good effects measured by 
more optimistic world eco- 
nomic growth projections. . 

The officials decided to 
publicize their concern on the 
eve of Vice-President . Geoige 
Bash's visit to Saudi Arabia 
which begins today. 



Fic^Presxdent Baslu will 
press for price stability. 

Mr Bush said on Tuesday 
that although be is not going 
to Saudi Arabia on a “price- 
setting mission", he does in- 
tend, to press for more price 
stability. 


Administration officials 
have said that stability is 
unlikely unless the Saudis and 
the Opec nations are able to 
settle their differences with 
Britain. 

Studies indicate that as the 
price for oil paid by US 
refiners drops from $15 to $10 
a band, losses in the big 
energy-producing stales could 
cancel gains made elsewhere 
Four of the biggest oil- 
producing states suffering re- 
cessions - Texas. Louisiana, 
Oklahoma and Alaska - ac- 
count for 10 per cent of total 
US employment and 11 per 
cent of total retail sales. ' 
Since December, when 
erode oil was priced at about 
$26 a barrel, the credit 
rankings of large Texas banks 
have dropped sharply. 


Enterprise to slash exploration 


Enterprise Oil, foe former 
oil production arm of "the 
British Gas. Corporation, yes- 
today .anzfoiznCed a 40 per 
cent cut’ in : its- expi- 
ration;-’ programme _ this 
.yearbecause pf the. falHrrlhe 
price of oiL’ . - ■ . 

In announcing the resorts of . 
its first full year of operations' 
since privatization in mid-. 

1984, the company forecast 
for 1986 “a mock. reduced 
level of activity and profits 
"from which Enterprise is not 

immune”. - 

For the year to December 

1985, Enterprise said oil pro- 


By Carol Ferguson 

duction in the North' Sea was 
more than 35,000 bands a. 
day -from seven fields, an 
increase of 9 per cent on last 
.year.' .. 

A lower sterling oil price 
meant that turnover, was un- 
changed at £266 million. Ex- 
ploration write-offs were £32.8 
million, nearly double the 
1984 . leveL Despite higher 
interest income, pretax profit 
was down by 20 per cent to 
£111 motion. 

The company made several 
acquisitions, of which. Saxon 
Oil is the most important 
Saxon's Miller field is-ooe of 


tbe largest undeveloped Brit- 
ish offshore oil fields. . 

These acquisitions have in- 
creased the exploration , area 
and six further oil and gas 
discoveries which could be 
devdoped over the next 10 
years. 

However, if the oQ price 
remains under $18 a band for' 
a long lime; the commercial 
viability of many undevel- 
oped fields will be in doubt. 

Nevertheless, Enterprise 
was confident that its financial 
resilience would enable it to 
continue foe development of 
the business in the short term. 


Guinness 
Peat to 
buy broker 

By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

Guinness Peat, the invest- 
ment management and mer- 
chant banking group, 
announced yesterday that it 
had reached an advanced 
stage in negotiations to ac- 
quire 100 per cent of Hender- 
son Crosthwaite, the 
stockbroker. 

The size of the deal was not 
disclosed but the move would 
add a medium-sized broking 
capacity in both private and 
institutional business. 

Tbe private diem business 
of Henderson Crosthwaite will 
be fitted in with the personal 
finance services offered by 
Guinness Mahon, the mer- 
chant banking arm of 
Guinness Peat. The institu- 
tional business will be com- 
bined with White & 
Cbeesman, the jobber which is 
wholly owned by Guinness 
Peat, to create the core of 
Guinness Mahon Securities. 

Mr Alasiair Morton, the 
Guinness Peal chief executive, 
saidi’The private client busi- 
ness will be a valuable addi- 
tion to foe retail financial 
services we are building up 
within the group. On the 
securities side we are not 
aiming to compete with the 
big US securities houses after 
big bang but offer a more 
specialised service in certain 
siocks." 

The acquisition of Hender- 
son Crosthwaite, which han- 
dles around £900 million of 
clients’ funds, will be complet- 
ed during the summer. Tbe 
talks to purchase tbe stockbro- 
ker started after the failure of 
Guiness Peal's bid for Britan- 
nia Arrow. 


Ocean plan to 
diversify 
after ship sales 

By Clare Dobie 
Ocean Transport & Trad- 
ing, tbe shipping company 
with growing industrial on- 
shore activities, yesterday an- 
nounced an increase in profits 
from £30.1 million to £31.9 
million before tax in the year 
to December 31- 
Associates, including Over- 
seas Containers, increased 
their contribution to £26.8 
million from £19.4 mition. 
There was a £5.6 million loss 
on the sale of ships, against a 
£5.8 million profit in 1984. 

- Last year Ocean Transport 
sold three bulk carriers, there- 
by withdrawing from bulk 
shipping, and it has disposed 
of three surplus liners. 

The company now plans to 
expand the industrial side, 
having already acquired sever- 
al small businesses in coal 
distribution. 

The final dividend is 3.95p 
making 6.5p for the year 
against S.Sp in 1984. The 
shares were unchanged at 
J97p. 


market summary 


STOCK MARKETS 


177838 f-11 -26) 


...w 




, !• * 
*■,-*** 




NewYocfc 
Dow Jones. 

Nrfricei Dow — 15555.51 +190-36) 

r. AO 11380 (+.&3| 

-2107.T(+13) 
582.17 


Commerzbank 
Brussels 
General — 
Paris: CAC 
Zuiiete 

SKA General - 


509.40 (same) 


■fr GOLD 


'' £ London ft**: ' 

. AM $935.50 PȣSro.50 

, close $335.25-335-75 (E2Z7.5Q- 

226.00) 

■ PJ SAumio 

iuartten Roys! 

SunAltencQ-™— JtjP +230 
HanteonsCros — .-Sgtoj+ioto 
Alexandra WorKwear .iml* 

Execptex 113p(+aWJ 

FALLS _ ' 

Christies mu gaHaS 

totwest 

Geevor 

, Z-r . ■ *'; INTEREST RATES 

; '• ¥, London: 

■ fv* ■\-r. BankBesa»ifc 11B . 

tT- sr 0 ™ 

PtimeRataB 

**.* ■ -Zfl Federal Funds 7% _ - 

% s ; 

. <*' * . - ■ Z- ” . . ■ — 

CURRENCIES 

• 8B»-- 

£ gwFil9146 t Index: 119-9 ^ •. 

.■l-SSSf ■ 

|l!S 9*76* SDR 01777320, 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RSES: 

CooKson _ 
PHTomkmS — 
WUHamsHldgs 
Brit Dredging 
Vickers ~ — 
VQinst — =■ 

-Amstrad 
vaux --- — 
ttana-Chamn 
GusA 
Stylo 

CoMtodds 
j Foster 

Rsons— 

Hedattand Co — 



Whitehall steels itself for 
Cornish tinmen’s appeal 


Cornwall's tin mines, which 
fece closure after foe cmfepse 
of foe world tin price, are 
appealing to the Government 
for financial help to -stem 
heavy lossei and are consider- 
ing legal action against the 
London Metal Exchange for 
alleged loss of revenue. . 

But yesterday Whitehall 
.-sources said foal foe mines 
stood fittie chance ofobtaming 
revenue subsidies, although 
capital assistance for econom- 
ic projects might be possible. 

Mr Kenneth Gilbert, man- 
aging director of Geevor. ac- 
cused the Department of 
Trade and Imhstry of using 
foe lack of a formal applica- 
tion by hts company for capital 
amjstuice ns an excuse for 
j^uslbg^ ^to consider Isbort- 
ierm pradaetion spfestofes. 

Carbon . Consolidated, -foe 
subsidiary of Rio linto-Zinc 
which - controls . foe* Wheal 


By Michael Prest, Ffoandal Correspondent 

Jane and Smith Crafty mines, 
is toeing more than £1 million 
a month. 

Virtually no tin is being sold 
in the very depressed market, 
so production is being stock- 
piled. The loss is calculated on 
foe interest cost of carrying 
the stock and on revenue 


aimoanced on Tues- 
day that its monthly tosses are 
nxnningat £350,000 and that it 
‘ win have to lay-off aB its 380 
workers at the cud of this 
week. Canton employs about 
1,000 people. 

Tin is fetching between 
£3,000 amd £4,000 a tonne, 
half its price last October; 

Mr GQbert said that the 
company to completing an 
application for about £16 mil- 
lion of Regional Selective As- 
sistance over live years, along 
with another £4 million of 
working capital. 


It wants £1 million to con- 
tinue production over tbe three 
months Geevor believes tire 
Department of Trade and 
Industry wfll take to process 
foe application, which is due to 
be sent on Friday. 

Carnon is seeking rather 
more and has already held 
several rounds of dtoatssfobs 
with foe department 

Ironically, production this 
year to at a record average of 
94 tonnes of tin in concentrate 
a month, compared with 74 
tonnes in 1985. 

Cornish sources recognize, 
however, that they will have 
difficulty convincing White- 
hall that their mines can be 
economic. 

Canton's average produc- 
tion cost is £7,006 a tonne, and 
Geevor's is more than £8,000. 
Continued capital investment 
could reduce Canton’s costs to 
nearer £6,000 a tonne. 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


Sir Gordon hits out 
over competition 


The spate of takeover bids has not left 
competition policy in disarray. Far 
from it At least, that was last night's 


controversial message from Sir Gor- 
don Borne. Director-General of Fair 
Trading, who took advantage of the 
Finance Houses* Association annual 
dinner to argue that competition 
policy was now clearer on three 
counts. 

Sir Gordon began with a swipe at 
Alex Fletcher, the former minister 
who now advises Argyll in its bid for 
Distillers. When Sir Gordon decided 
not to refer for Monopolies and 
Mergers Commission investigation 
the second Guinness bid for Distill- 
ers, after the proposal to divest some 
of foe Distillers whisky brands, Mr 
Fletcher said that a wedge was being 
driven through foe Government's 
competition policy. Sir Gordon said 
last night: “He speaks with foe 
authority of ministerial experience, 
but I think he has allowed his 
judgment to be clouded by his current 
attachment as a consultant to 
ArgylL" 

Sir Gordon recalled the Tebbit 
dictum that foe primary ground for 
merger referral is concern over 
reduction in market competition. But 
primary does not mean exclusive, he 
pointed oul Hence, he said, the 
Elders’ bid for AUied-Lyons was 
referred because of concern at the 
high leverage. He looks to the 
commission's report, due in foe 
summer, to provide helpful guidance 
on the issue to everybody, including 


Sir Gordon himself — whichever way 
the report goes. 

It is clear, said Sir Gordon, that 
when only one of two rival bids 
demands investigation it will be 
referred and not the other, even 
though that limits the choice for the 
target company's shareholders. Well, 
that is at least fair warning. 

Sir Gordon maintained that his 
referrals of foe original United 
Biscuits' bid for Imperial and 
Guinness's first Distillers approach 
were entirely consistent with foe 
Tebbit dictum. It was equally clear, 
he said, that a referred bidder should 
be able lo revise proposals in order to 
eliminate the competition problem. 

In those two instances foe bidders 
satisfied the commission that the 
original plans had been abandoned 
and foe references were set aside. Sir 
Gordon said: “In both cases a 
binding agreement was reached to 
dispose ofparts of the business to be 
acquired and to ensure that the 
merger would not give rise to very 
high market shares. This seems to me 
to vindicate competition policy, not 
to undermine it." 

Sir Gordon added: “I think it is 
quite wrong to suggest that recent 
events have somehow left existing 
policy and procedures in a state of 
chaos." But he allowed that foe 
Government review of competition 
and mergers policy, due to be 
announced shortly, should thor- 
oughly examine both existing policy 
and procedures. 


No flotation in sight at 3i 


Plans to Boat Investors In Industry 
on the stock market have been 
shelved indefinitely after several 
meetings of foe venture capital 
group's eight main shareholders — a 
decision revealed in foe prospectus 
for a £100 million 3i loan issue. 

The document stresses that no 
decision has yet been taken on either 
a listing or on foe disposal by any of 
foe 3i shareholders including foe 
Bank of England and foe main 
clearing banks, of their holdings. 
However, foe shareholders have 
“agreed in principle that in the 
interests of preserving 3i Group’s 
special role and character, overall 
control should be retained for the 
foreseeable future within foe present 
shareholding group.” 

Reading between the lines, that 
means there will fee no listing this 
year or next and that it is highly 
improbable there will be any change 
in the shareholding structure. 

The idea of flotation was initiated 
by Midland when it was strapped for 
cash and casting around for disposals. 
Its 1 8 per cent shareholding in 3L, the 
world's largest single source of ven- 
ture capital, was an obvious target 

Today Midland's need is not so 
urgent and with no one to drive the 
proposal through, it was perhaps 


inevitable that talks about a listing 
should have got bogged down. 

The last published accounts 
showed that risk capital investments 
financed out of borrowings had 
grown to £20.4 million. Accounts for 
the year lo the end of last month will 
show that this figure has almost 
doubled and with the continuing 
growth in the activities of 3i Ventures 
and the trend towards ever larger and 
more ambitious management 
buyouts — 3i is responsible for about 
half Britain's management buyouts — 
there is bound to be considerable 
growth again this year. 

Though 3i is still nowhere near its 
borrowing limits, the upshot is that at 
some stage soon either 3i's present 
shareholders are going to have to 
provide new capital or they are going 
to have to make it possible for others 
to do so. 

On this latter count they have done 
themselves few favours by failing to 
agree on whether foe long-term 
nature of 3i's business would be 
better reflected if its accounts were 
prepared on the basis on an invest- 
ment company. Such a status would 
cany certain tax advantages as well as 
allowing 3i to revalue on an annual 
basis its considerable portfolio of 
unquoted investments. 


AMEC 

The worldwide 
construction group 



Tear ended 

Year ended 


31 December 

31 December 


1985 

1584 


£ million 

£ million 

Tontover 

251.0 

686.-7 

Profit before tax 

85.5 

27.1 

Profit after tax 

16.0 

I9.S 

Earnings per share 

24£p 

29.6p 

Dividends per share 

11. Op 

lLOp 

The final dividend of 7p will be paid on 1 July 1986 


The Chairman, Mr j W H Morgan F Eng, reports: 

"Main core businesses performed 
satisfactorily . . . areas of unacceptable 
performance dealt with . . . healthy cash 
position maintained . . . management 
strengthened . . . now set fair to resume 
steady progress and improvement ” 


AMEC - Areas of Operation □ Building □ Cnnl engineering G 
MecftaaiceJ engineering □ Mining □ Mechanical and electrical services 
□ Project and construction management □ Offshore engineering “ 
Manufacturing □ Quality assurance C Design □ Property development 

AMEC p.Lc., Sandiway House. Northwich. Cheshire, CW8 2YA 
Telephone: (0606) 8838B5. Telex: 669708- 


11 

J xk 
! gist 


arv 


T-V. 
ducting 
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south 


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FINANCE AND INDUSTRY THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 i 986 


WALL STREET 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


COMMODITIES 


New York(AP-Dow Jones) - 
The Dow Jones industrial 
average slipped to 1,784.12 
shortly after opening yester- 
day, down 5.99 on Toesday. 

The transportation average 
was down 7.48 to SW5J57 and 
the utilities average slipped 
0.87 to 190.4. The 65 stocks 
average was down 6.00 to 
700.17. 

Tuesday's trading saw 621 


Apr Marl 

1 31 


issues advancing, 1,105 declin- 
ing, and 350 anchangOd. 

Volume totalled 

167390,000 shares on Toes- 
day compared with the previ- 
ous dose of 134,440,000. 

The American Stock Ex- 
change volume totalled 
14,090380 shares on Tuesday 
compared with the previous 
dose of 13J>87,495. 




>CMH 1 



X”j I 



1 

1 1 - : 1 1 - - • 


\jyrr. I 






Apr Mar 

1 31 


Apr Mar 

1 31 






UMoONGOMIOWTY 

EXCHANGE 

Soyabean iniaal, coffee omL 
cocoa to £ per Hnne: 
CtaHoa retd Buoar HUES 
par Hem. 

O W-Jovnem end Co report 


W»Y 

^ 

200-1890 

199*990 

Doc 

March — 

May 

vot 

SeH j 


MONEY MARKET S AND GOLD 

jj^j5|222i3ESi222 


Base Rates % 

Clearing Banks 11 % 

Finance House 12% 

Discount Maricut Loan* % 
Ovemgnt Hnti: 12'A Low 10 
weex mat): 11 % 

Treasury BiBs (discount 
Buying Sertmg 

2 mntn 1114 2mmti i 


3 mntn IQ' 3 # 


2 mntfi 11 * 1 ? 
3 mntn 10" m 


Prana Bank BBa mtscount W 
1 mntn 11 ,1 »>11 ,l w2mnth f1'a»-1t s ti 
3 mntn 1 (K*rr- 1 0 -4 6 mntn IP’afOTn 

Trade Brito (Dtecoun %) 

1 mntn 12'ai 2 mntn 

3 mntn 11 '*n 6 ninth 10 s ** 

brtotnwik (%) 

Overrate open 12 K dose 10% 

1 weak 12-11% fimnOi 10%-10% 

1 mntn 11 n is-11k 9 mntn 1D%-10% 

3 rnntti irw-11»w I2mth 10%-ID 

Local Authority Deposit* i%) 

2 days 11% /days 11% 

1 moth 11% 3mntti UK 

8 mntn 10% 12mth 10 

Local Authority Bonds f%) 

1 mmh 12%-12 2iraith 12-11% 
3mnth 11«-1I% 8 mmh 11%-11% 

9 mmh 11-10% 12 mm 1Q%-10% 



■12SJZ54XI 
1 10-75-60 
■ 107 . 5 O-OO 
1O7.0(HJeJ25 
■1100-107.5 
■114.0-100 


1105-100 

1220-100 

.1253-100 

.4500 


LOKDON METAL OWHANfiE 

UDofSctsI prices 
. oiflctal Turnover flgurn 
Price tn Cpar tMtrto few* 

BatefH(MtK»pweoy«w» 
R«tottWcB*CaUtL report 

COPPER HIGH CfflADE 
Cash -— B7M7S 

Three montns — ^ = 5 ; 

vet - .2700 

Tow _ : aeady/Out* 

STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash __ 970972 

Three Months — 

J2 

Tone K “ 

LEAD 

Cash — ®Wgi 

Three Month* 2 »259 

VOI -1250 

Tone. Bora* Steady 

ZMC STANOAHD 

Cash - 407-412 

Three Months . — 

VW' — ^ Jg 
Tone «fe 

ZINC HIGH GRADE 

Cash j - -- 442-443 

Three Month* — «4G^WO 

Vol 2850 

Tone Barely Steady 

Three Months 349-351 

firaB 

338*3410 

Thee Months 349-3S1 

VOI ; ■■ No 

Tone _ — • — Hie 

ai 1 nilt BUM 

Cash ___. 8013B^ 

Three Morrihs K»-827 

Vo) -1700 

Tone Easer 


Caah ' — I gW - g” 

isptsseiiiaiiisii'wVMkria 

April 1 

OB: CaWe.980Sp perks'* 


LONDON 

potato nrums 

£ per tome 

JSJ* 

12*00 13470 ■ 

NW 8300 030 

££ 89 SO 8130 . 

/Eg 10M0 108.70 
^ Wot tfiW - 


BMPEX 

(LULL ReigM Putraee Ud .• ■ 

HMVLow Gtasew.* 
AprBB TteOJSAO 75fcft . 

mm mo-7i«.Q noo . 

da 86 81 7.0-81 5JJ 813* 

Jan B7 33SJW30B B38tt 

Apr 87 «1f 

Jut 87 ' — 8123 

GCtfl? OBI* ; 

Jen 88 — -9110. 

Spot 7325 IT • 

Vot 211 lot* - 


Sub 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


Stetflng CDs (96) 
1 mnth 11%-11% 
6 mmh 10%-IOK 
Dour CDs (%| 

1 mnth 7.35-7.3 
8 mntti 7.10-7*5 


3 mnth 11%-11% 
12 mth B’Vis-B 131 ^ 

3 mmh 720-7.15 
12mth 7.10-7.05 


Fixed Rate Sterling Export nuance 
Scheme IV Average reference rate tor 
merest period Fetxumy 5 1986 to 
March 4 1988 inefesfea: 12554 per 
cent 


T LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES - 1 


Three Month Btettag Open 

Jun88 90-38 

Sep 88 9078 

Dec 86 91-05 

Mar 87 91.11 

Previous daYs total open Wares* 15988 

CANADIAN PRICES | Ei ^°Z r _ 93.06 

SflDSS 8310 

Dec 86 8302 

Mar 87 . — 92*9 

US Treasury Bond 

Jim 88 !K"?S 

Sep 86 102-18 

□sc 88 HT 



junse ioi-40 

B«= K 


Mob Lew 

9043 9034 

90.60 9078 

91.09 90*1 

91.17 91-11 

Previous day> to 
93.15 93*8 

9320 93.10 

93*7 93*2 

B293 92*7 

Previous Gey's 1 
104-18 102-24 

109*1 102*16 


does EstVol 
9042 1998 

90*7 22B 

91*9 83 

91-17 as 

1 open Interest 1891 4 
93.11 2730 

99.18 1003 

83.06 180 

92*4 115 

■asrar 

10321 25 

102*4 0 


Long GUI 

Jun88 

Sep 88 

Dec 86 — 

Mar 87 

FT-SE1Q0 
Jun 66 — 
Sep 86 


127-17 

12800 

127-30 

127-26 


Previous dgre HU open Merest I 
1 101-37 101-65 37B 


Previous dovl tttsi cpenWorw riM a 
128-16 127-11 128-15 7898 

120*0 127-27 12828 19 

127-30 127-30 128*6 BO 

127-28 127-26 128-22 16 

Previous days total open merest 1447 
173*0 171*0 173*0 191 



3,8,HK&.- s, 

05 96 TO £?T Lon DM 12 

MB IBS TTtndAtton 197 
22S SO* TO N W US The 
KB 90 TH Norm Aretes V 
tSS-IU-TR htmc Bw 153 
MB 140 TO Prop«jy «* 

1M »i 35 Twi' to 

174 139 TR TrtMMM 
1*4 13S Tunp WBsr M4 

305 237 TX iU iWin » 
358 300 Vtm> S Scared Cap *® 
193 157*1 DH Oe— U C MS 
1*1 113 TMxn s •• MB 
S3 T9 « 

205 217 USDVtNfleM 2W 


1.7V 23 4W. 
04 t * 
kl U8U. 
&8b 47 330. 
5*b 27 CS. 
107 U 274 
ZSO 2-7 «2‘ 
1.4 09 ‘.l ■ 
U 3*4BB< 
25 U«7‘ 
Mb M 390 > 
7 B *5 327, 
It* *J3 J}Bj», 

95 U«^< 
U U3BB< 
147 1U KB. 
93 IB OB . 
22b 42 
22 3.4 *85 
33 3S4B4: 
*2 20732. 

137b 4,1313; 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


THE TIMES UNIT. TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


Bd One Cmg VW 


an osar Ceng YU 




ms Rreovwy '06.7 na|e *i | J fflJ 
Snam Cos 134.7 1417s *08 1-38 

Si^aMih 385 415 40* 155 

SmST S' 84 1 -0-3 6-99 

ST 27.7 392 *0.2 7-29 

me 4 Grown. 201.1 2i4S +08 416 
MilMilnc 197.1 21020 +05 454 

Pw9wn 192 205* .. 9.70 

1200 1365 -10 

Fwevaai Sees 45 1 481 +0-3 220 

SSlto 179 193 -0.6 352 

STu«i»e 167 17 0 *02 051 

Proo Swe 503 8330 +1.0 1.18 

Un> Envoy 365 *1.1 -05 1JB 

Anna rSf «5 *53 +05 0.B3 

Oowth 99 4 loeoe *15 317 

m.ihw maxnfl . 584 62M -+5-J Sjl 

«in«r arassr Co'l as 272 *03 051 

AuM On*. 705 7520 +1.7 1 B* 

a as sa « 

SI Si ^ii8 

japan Pnri 537 6SL6 +2.1 . ■ 

Jaoan Smtfer 133 141 +01.. 

Esampt SI 8 M.7 +13 3P 

Ewow Ua"wt 6*7 67.7 4.14 

emMiiswLEY 

0 - 1 7. Parryncunt R*L HaywxnM HMh 

0*44 450144 

RnwoU 121.7 MMe 2-« 

Gro-m Aocum 1937 20S3e .. - • 

Da wxnw 1245 134 3* .. 179 

Nan incams 620 66 7* .. 525 

moom * , « o* _i,'a 

Man PonfSH Inc 630 078 -00 428 

Do ACC 105 7 113JS -l.fl ■ - 

rwx^i Amencan «' JjJ •• 

Own 65B 70.6 . 030 

Bwowry 37 G 40.4 331 

Tacnrcfcgy 1372 1475 a60 

oSrwm f 313 310 250 

BUCtUHASIZR MAHAOSIEirT 

Hi# Snch Enmangs London EC2P 2 IT 

Oi 5ffl 2BB8 

CUrerUMMt 2 1 ?® HS 

Do Accurn M 3267 3«62 370 

bnmeFund^ 1005 1050 «« 

Oo Actum P) 1726 1816 ... 4 40 

mr me i2i 120.7 i26 ie +t B 1 84 

DDMcun (2) 1505 166.70 +23 154 

Smaap- me (51 HO *3 1110 -0 IQ ?J*Z 

Da Accum 15] £1101 11.72 -Oil 202 

CSRJMPMAM40EHB 
125. W Horexn. London WCIV SPY 

01- 242 1148 

CS 7SVU1 Fond 725 77.1 +2.1 028 

CANNON FUND MMWGP M... „ 

1 Chnt* Way. VramOHy. HA0 0MB 
Ol-Sffi H7fl 

SEE S3SL8 4 45JS 

Fe Erer i«l5 ito '• *2-5 0.— 

MOrWAmWICWI 142J 151.8* +17 OJi 

CAPELMMCtoMANAOEllWT 

100 0« Bmad St London ECJN 1BQ 
Ot-821 OOH 

Cam) 131 3538 3784* -08 1.71 

2B1 0 30060 +05 443 

Monti Ainancvn P) 2743 2836# +15 134 

CATER ALU9I . 


R«L HaywanM Hrettl 

121.7 isaae 
1937 20830 
1249 13*30 
620 66 70 
755 8120 
630 078 -I 
105 7 1118 -1 

601 8*7 
85 8 70.8 
37 6 4a* 

1372 1475 
313 330 


♦18 280 
+06 138 
*OA 105 
+03 800 
+02 729 
+00 *16 
+00 4.64 
.. 8.70 
-10 253 
+03 220 
-06 352 
+02 051 
+1.0 1.18 
-05 100 
+00 OB3 
+1S 317 
+07 511 
+03 051 
+1.7 154 

+02 are 

+15 1*4 


w4«, 


Ednum pmcui 

Han income Taut 

gSs FteH m 
Ts Of Hi Trusts 
Spam Sts Rust 
Ntn Amsr Trust 
Fv Easnm Him 


8U Oftar Ctao YU 


75.8 B05C +1 0 MB 
710 777 +13 502 

554 »* +12 800 

650 032e +1* 238 
7*0 79* +1* 237 

580 B2J *13 1.77 
688 734 +2.1 076 


Chng YU 


Chng YU 


BU Oflar Qsig YU 


C0UTY1LAW 

St Georgs Hre Corparadon 8L Oovtwy CV1 

19D 

0203 5 8 8281 

UK GrawdLAcuiai 1489 1583c +1.7 &3& 
Do team 1909 U9 l2e +1S 335 
HM me Accum 2308 2538a +25 '45* 
DO incams 1954 2078c +25 *54 
Gtaxiftota Accwn- * 103J 106 7# +05 2*8 
Da team • • B8 3 szam +05 2.88 
Mn Amar Tit Accum 139.0 1478c +44-013 
Fir Essi TSt Accum 1254 1334c +05 037 
Ewo Tjr Acorn MOD MA5e +3* 002 
Gsnarsl Trust 2322 2*800 +47 274 

F5CuMimm oa «KT 

1. LSuiWica Pommy HO. Lonaoa EC4H OBA 

01-623 4680 


2792 2070 
32*0 3*32 


1 . torn mkam St EG*N 7AU 
01 «3 6314 

G» Trust 1082 1155 +1.11026 

CENTRAL eOARD OF FINANCE OF 
CHURCH OF EMO 
77 Lonaoi was EC 2 1 DB 
01-588 1815 

inv Fund 389 15 • 4*3 

Fond tni 1396 .. 102 * 

DtOOW 1KL0 . .. 1250 

CHARireS OFFICIAL tNVESTMEHT FUND 
77, UKUon WsS. London EC2N IDB 
01-586 1615 

means »'« • 

Accum £100088 

CLERICAL HEDtCAL LMrr TRUST 

managers 

mm- Pum. Brow BS2 OJH 
0272 277719 

Oansral Fqaty 38 1 406 +03 370 

mpiteorm *’0 *37e +01 440 

&S* pSd im G*1 30 1 re 1 +0.4 320 

maw tawac 235 Bl Z-JJ 

Amw Grown, 248 255 +00 1 ®5 

jaosn Grr+ni 250 21 6 + 1 1 090 

EumoBOn G«t>wM 230 255 +05 2-00 

GnTFnM MB 250 27 0 +05 950 

COUNTY SAME UW7THU|re 
161 Oapvn. Laraan EC 2 V BEU 
01-726 1909 

Cam) Accum 2«6 2T72 +22 IB* 

Cum, Trus 02 440 +Q8 560 

IlSteOte 157 3 167 3 ..621 

Cranow 1*8 9 158 4 +0 7 234 

G* SKsraqv »3 570 . 158 

Giawm mws u nsnt 2824 3004 +33 251 

mura 8 Grown, *03 42M +03 445 

Japanem & Pacte 13,0 1+U +30 in 

NO, «W Gmwm 1061 1,3 B +19 109 


Smoa COS 
Guc* me tu 


106 1 1,7 a 
106* 1121 
1335 2058 
549 584# 


crown umr trust semnees 
Crown -MM wanrm Gu2l IXW 
0*862 5033 

)«gn means TruU 230 0 2*6 00 
Grown, Irusr 223 9 2395 

Amanesn Trust 128 5 137 4 

EFMUtMT TRUST StANAaBRS 
4. www Ooicsm. Eomourgh 
031 226 3482 

Anwnan Fund 70 9 750 

Cam Luna 90S 968 

Grown, A inc Fund 1325 141.7 


►Up, D*i Fond 
imsmsaanai Fuml 

oaaouicas Funo 


1058 1112 
182.5 1913 
205 219# 


Snwr jap Co ■ Fnd 28 4 303 


Tono Fund 

(Ell Im, ia 

FEjiI jaoan 131 
(Eil Caohc i4) 


130 2 139 3 
i*30 1*7 re 
06E 89 4 
2,95 2266# 


<L *1 Vww Jap , 4 | 1625 'S ’ 8 • Oig 

EiMiM 2*6 283 + 0.3 380 

EAOLE STAR Ijwrr rauST MAMAOERS 
bam «V«a Cwmwi OKwowe GlS 3 7 LQ 
02*2 52,311 

ua Bswra» me 69* 7*0 +08 2 70 

Do acewn, SO* MO *08 2.70 

U» O^wn, Accum 1 | i 79 S +1 • 1 S 7 

rj* r*g» »mc 828810 +05 5 lK 

N Amancr, Accum 85.8 ?l 3 0 +,8 1*3 

Far Fjw — mccut 7, * 17 +25 064 

Europwan Accum 898 7*5 *10 1 11 

U* tSi 4 FT me 563 Ml + 0.5 BM 

Do Accum 563 801 +0 5 B32 

EWHIRANCF FUND HOINAOCMBIT LTO 
Aomn Centra, ruuajpn nouSS. 28. KVSWH 
Poaa Fwmons Rmi JLfl 


eautTABLE gwre aonbustration 

35. Faunam Si. M S tX te — 

061-238 5685 


fi*¥l 


rac 


Da Accum 
Buo Gdi tae 
Do Aoasn 
SmsOWOOlM 
Da Aon 


127* 1383 
1080 1109 
13*5 1320 
1028 1080 
1086 1183’ 


HURRAY JOHNSmCUKT TRUST 

■MNinaiBir 

183 HOP* sum. tmvtrn 02 UHr • .. 

041 221 92G2 

AmdM, T131 1307#' +1.8 328 

S v:. .KH3 23B.T +50.375 

gaKCM 2D4.t 217.8 +1-3 009 

MTKMAUWWnmtNVnTnEM; ; 
HANAOQIS" .... 

43 Qracmtetetta^BaP.aNH - .. % % 

01-823 42t»E*r2» •*-’ - 

Hn UK ■£■■■’■ ~5P5-T. 2180 . +10 200 

Do tteum 32B8 3400 +3,1 200 

NPKhSSs -6882 5S0e-+«M J0O 

. Do Accum 8SU 680M +U8 130 

nit rret rnr • sr.f - • 71 .* + 2 * 030 

Do DW 870 710 +23 ti-sa 

nawnrsn nrr 583 620 : + 1 * 1.70 

- DO DW 570 810 +U 130 






Do ACCMI 
Am On sSuOre 
IU Accor 
Aun t Gsn no 
Do Aoaan 


"0"^ u S"!L. « ^ w, 

PO Bos A. Nomtd, HRT WO 
0603 822200 

Ann That 21108 1201* +0.10 007 
SrR* 1210 128 2» +80 107 


ra iS U B KH MH TRUST MANAOBH yr 

08. Cwnre SWC London KiN 8AE 
dretogi 01 - 8 W 3S86W7fflWO 
Wsnw tgr w flres Bt OJA 1«* * 

team** (tarit *1* 658 - 


JSpHI OaMI 
Sre pre n Cmm 
UK Om8i 
Pacte Qnwti 


IMA 1430 +83 OJB 

610 680 -03 300 

79.1 8*0 +08 AAO 

333 36-1* OJO 

810 88.1 +10 .. 
870 820 +03 230 

530 57.4 +07 000 

433 4*4 +10 0.10 

3018 R.7S -M *S 

51.1 64 A* +03 230 
B2A KM +00 200 


KM UNIT TRUST It 
11 . DsMnsnre Sq. 
01-423 4273 
Equcy Exanpt 
Do Accan 
UK Manor FMtuni 
Do Accum 
japan Fmonwncs 
Do Accum 
US Spacas Fsamra 
Do Accum 
Goto * PraeoM Mi 
Do Accum 
us Spscw me 
Do Accon 
Bacpren Part Inc 
Oo Acorn 


00+ 


London BC2M 4YR 

39«0 4110# 
*900 snou 
» 87 5 720e 
00 74.1 • 
108A H1A 
1087 1130 
I 874 71.8 
870 7ZA 
I 403 *80* 
41.0 *50* 

57 1 609 

607 647 
7Z5 77.1* 

720 770* 


Grown, urns 7*0 7BL2 

Gar t Read Int 1120 118 1U 
Hmn mcomo Unto 106* H50U 
Hn, VlH G4I tint 55 7 57.7 

rmi Growm UmtS 1118 1207 

N Amatcen Lma 689 739 

Far £au unre 778 628 

SnaMr Cos Fund 860 70.* 


MENCAPUWT TRUST 

Uncom Mao. 282, Roaford M. E7 

01-284 55*4 

Monoas 1360 u&* 

meuav RIND MUNAOSIS LTD 
33 XmgwvlMm St EC+fl 9A5 
01^80 2880 
Amor Own 

Oo Accum 
Amer mcomo 

Da Accum 
Eumioan Grower 
Oo Accum 
s™a 
Do Accum 
On 4 Food 
Oo accum 



51 






^ Tfa- 'gT ^.| 












m+\ 11 










mm 

mm 






aSSPP 

■2J 


jipycgjJ 



c- 



I:,#. n <i ■ 

fKr - j 1 


**' 1 

■ti- 1 1 

ll IF-, 



+20 1j47 
+14-100 
+10 100 


+00 902 
+00 902 


+1.7 1.49 
+17 102 


A 


m 


33 Cay Rd. London. I 
01-638 «m 
Anar Teeti a Ban 
Poole 

Sac teoma Fnd 
Stmcwl StarexM* 
IndQrawa , 
Aawncan Maiota 
anWCtrs _ 
Japtm Teat 8 Ban 
vatmre ow) Moan 1 
Exempt 

UKOanaa* ' ' 

Baa Grow*, 

Euro mean 


1077 1150 
148.7 188.1* 
1720 1840 
207.1 2210 

28.1 270 
724 770 
360 8BA* 
B40 890 
580 62.1 

*080 58100 
327 360 

20.1 21.1 

300 320 


+32 000 
+60 0.10 
+10 40Q 
+40 2a5 
+03 30D 
+1.8 130 
+00 3.50 
+4.0 010 
+00 807 
.. 200 
-00 298 
-Cl 

+00 .. 


SMON 4 COATES 

1. bonoen Ws* BUc*. London EC2M Sf T 
01-588 38** 643ST 

SpacMEHam 50.1 S3A *. IAS 

STANDARD LIFE 

a^Oaoy a St . Edat mtf l BI2 2XZ 

(neons (mas 25*6 2772* +20 208 

Do Accum Unas 286.1 3037* *Z2 208 

STEWART. IVORY UNtnMJST 
MANAGERS 

46. Grantee Sr Edtaoutfi - 

031-226 3271 

Amencan Rind 2288 23*3 +51 212 

DoAccva 2513 2878 +57 212 

DdWMMM . 1820' 1720 402 212 

AlWttaren Fund 1220 1300 +29 090 


Do *ceum 
Bctwgt Fund 
So Accon 
E oo tia e i Fwid 
Do Accum 
Jag*, Fund 




1230.131.9 
5892 BOB0* 
78*7 sure 
2570 2738 
27*6 20*3 
258.1 2740# 
269.4 2780# 
1872 1880 


SUN ALLIANCE 

ores 1 fSS ^ •*" 

EouHy Tn*t Ace 3802 *2** 

H Am Trust Acc S14 82.1 
re Gael Trust Acc 950 *87 


TS8 UNIT TRUSTS 
PO Bom * Kaana naa. Anfcm 
026* 62108 Oeaangs028*8 
Anwnan Inc Tl*0 ' 

Do *ceum 121.7 

Earn means Inc 107.1 
DO Aeon, 1252 

Genm urar IK 1600 
□a Accum 2815 : 

Gw 4 Fnsamc 9£2 

Do Acam 880 

Incana 2172 

Accum 3335 

Pacte te 1334 

Oo Accum 13*7 

m te 297 2 

Do Accon 86*0 

g aeoao Oow tac 80.8 
Do Accum 8*7 

Natural Raa *58 

Da Accun 460 


+51 212 
+57 212 
+50 312 
+29 090 
+20 000 
+«9 *07 
+120 *07 
+40 090 
+40 000 
+03 038 
+04 00* 


+50 196 
+10 1.00 
+10 077 


jtent*. SP10 IPO 

M.4 +27 005 

795 +20 095 

MO# +1.7 SM 
S32# +20 5 U 
raa *22 201 
7*2 +26 201 

S*4 +OI 791 
39.6 +0.1 701 

n I +27 407 
3*0 +40 407 

ti9 +28 an 
4*4 +20 006 

180 +80 1 83 

B80 +10.1 1.83 

MO* +10 108 
HIM +1.1 1.56 
4*2# 401 228 
480# 228 


4UM+ 


xl 


• House. Cwaneusa Rd. Aytaatwy eucha 
Scl 

Amir Or* - - - - 74.10 78 70-- +083 044 

Autumn 180 20.1 +0.1 0.10 

Ca tv cda y tos 702 -o* 201 

Envoy 310 3*5 -0.1 1 82 

Eaafi 1270 13*0 +10 207. 































*5 "ifia* • 


'T* 



I,— 






A ni£ iiMJca iriui^auAi nr ml j ouu 


in trvi >\_.jb» ,1^ M'uootui 




V*, 


s 

^ & 
• • 1 4 :> 


‘Jte. 4* , 



Guardian Royal Exchange’s 
shares, in an apparently per- 
verse reaction to the news of 
the slump in 1985 pretax 
profits to a pahiy £3.5 million 
from £92.2 million in 1984, 
rained 24p to 875p yesterday 
Gaiv a month atat CSn 




. .a. 







. y a month aga City 
analysts had been forecasting 
^xable profits of £30 million 
to £38 million. 

* .The flock market, howev- 
er, drew comfort from the 
fact that GRE has completed 
the most ■ extensive spring 
clean in its history, which 
should pave the way for 
future advance. 

^-British reserves have been 
strengthened by £19 million 
ft> cope whh asbestosis and 
ether long tail claims, some 
riOf which relate to 30-year-old 
^ policies. A special reserve for 
1 discontinued professional in- 
demnity business cost £40.6 
million and a below-foe-Kne 
Charge of £5 5 ' million was 
[cmade for .potential claims 
from continuing • inde mni ty 
business. GRE stopped Writ- 
ing indemnity business early 
test year, but some of its 
contracts last unto early 
.1288.. 

..-Claims against accountants 
lit North America produced 
the worst of the damage. 
Even rate rises of 1 ,000 per 
cent would not have tempted 
GRE to keep writing inoem- 
yiity business. 

i With no further special 
reserves anticipated in 1986, 
the outlook is relatively en- 
couraging. GRE, as one of 
Britain's largest private mo- 
tor insurers, admits it has lost 
some market share after rate 
.rises of 26 per cent since 
Lpeamber 1984, but the 
[•cEainis frequency appears to 
be levelling ouL 

^ British household insur- 
ce is also thought tb . be. 
equately rated now and; 
"early indications are that 
March gales have not been as 
bad as feared. On a world- 
wide basis, Australia, Canada 
and West Germany are all 
{Showing encouraging signs, 
rafter worsening losses in 
1985. 

Expectations of taxable, 
profits this year are being 1 
marked up to more than £100 
million. The shares stiB have 
st long way to go to recover 
from their underp e r for mance 
against the other composites - 
over the past .year, but a 10.6 . 
per cent dividend increase, : 
giving an aboveravera^yield ; 
Pf 4.6 per cent, shotuoJielp 
•foe recovery on its way.V'r ■* ? 

Qiristieslnt'^ 


Christies Internationa the 
fine an auctioneer, signalled 
at the half-year stage that the 
1985 result would not be as 


good, as 1984 and this has 
proved to be the case. - 
' The company, endured- a 
fair amount of adverse pub- 
licity in connection with the 
resignation,, of Mr David 
Bathurst in the middle of last 
year and than can be little 
doubt that . the' revelations 
about, imaginary sales of a 
Gauguin and a Van Gogh in 
New York have affected 
Christies' standing in the USL 
Consequently, its ability to 
.generate business in its sec- 
ond biggest market hasbecn 
impaired,... 

Of course, 1984 was an 
exceptional year remembered 
in particular for tbe sale oT71 
Old Master drawings from 
. the Chatsworth Collection. 
Despite the absence of any- 
thing on this scale in 1985, 
Christies. . managed to raise 
turnover by 1 percent to £64 
million. Costs inevitably 

- were much higher and pretax 
profit was down by nearly 25 
pw. cent to just over £12 
million. ■ • • 

* During I985,the,company 
has been busy consolidating 
its property portfolio- It com- 
pleted the extension to its 
office and storage accommo- 
dation in New York in May, 
while in London, it pur- 
chased foe head lease of its 
headquarters in St James's. 

The increase in fixed tangi- 
ble assets of £11 million 
shown in December 1985 was 
financed internally. Cash re- 
serves fell in the same period 
by nearly £13 million from 

- £32 million to £19 milli on. 

For the current year, Chris- 
ties is confident that Its 
problems in foe US market 
are behind it and it is 
competing vigorously for 
business with its old rival 
Sotheby’s. . . . • . 

Auctioneering practices in' 
New.York are. being reviewed 
bry the Department of Con- 
sumer Affairs. In London, 
Christies, in common with 
other auction houses and 
professional associations* is 
co-operating in disclosing a 
rode of conduct with the 
authorities. • 

The company can be as- 
sured of continuing to attract 
the full glare of publicity, 
beginning with foe rate of the 
Goya portrait of the Marque- 
ss de Santa Quz next week 
bn . Friday; . . ? •" 

.! y The.le«al dispute. wftb foe . 
Spanish authorities o ver how 
ihepainting'was tatafdfit qf 
Spain could nimble on for 
another two "years. > 

as -for as . Christies ras, con- 1 
cetned, the -.seller . has:! dear 
title , to foe picture, and foe 

satewffl go ahead.' . 

. Also, bepnmng April 28, 
there wit] bea five-day sale of 
the recently recovered nrid- 
lgfo century china from foe 


reign of Qianlong. The 
160.000 items of ware were 
on board a Dutch ship which 
sank on its homeward jour- 
ney and they are expected to 
fetch up to £3 million. 

Tbe company's capital 
spendir^ programme is now 
behind ' it and it can look 
forward to generating sub- 
stantial amounts of cash of up 
to £10 milion annually. This 
makes this year's decision not 
to increase foe dividend look 
mean. And the accumulating 
cash balances can only make 
Christies look ever more 
attractive to a predator. 

Bunzl 

Mr James White sounds like 
a happy man. Five years ago 
Bunzl where he is managing 
director, was valued at just 
SI million. Yesterday it was 
worth 30 times that with foe 
shares at 658p, unchanged on 
the day. 

The results for 1985, an- 
nounced yesterday, provide 
reassurance about foe short 
-term at least. Profits were up 
from £27.6 million to £42.7 
million before tax but that 
was after a one-off profit of 
£14 mfifian made by selling 
dollars forward at tbe start of 
foe year. .Without that 
gain, the increase would have 
been 41 percent. 

Tbe figures included a £! 
million contribution from ac- 
quisitions made last year, the 
most important being United 
Parcels, which joined the 
group in November. In a full 
year, it might contribute £10 
million before interest, which 
together with contributions 
from Stewart Plastics and 
Monmouth Paper of New 
Jersey, both acquired last 
year, should help, to keep' the 
momentum going this year. 

Further acquisitions are 
under consideration, arid the 
company says it can afford to 
Spend more £35 miHi an with- 
out issuing more paper. But. 
the emphasis now will be on 
organic growth. Much de- 
pends on the American econ- 
omy but- the underlying 
prospects are good for foe 
distribution division, supply- 
ing disposals to restaurants 
and other, users in America 
and fine paper in Britain, 
which is lately to remain foe 
largest part of. the group. 
Even the old cigarette filter 
business isriomg well .V/. 

' This jyw "should^ see a , 
similar profits increase, to last 
even without foeu-cuiTency 
-rain. For. foe. medium term, 
however^ investors art ,im- 
tikefy to find; phase; two as 
exciting as phase one. The 
shares are trading on 17 times 
prospective earnings which 
suggests there could now be 
some profit taking. 


Isro’s new 
chief is 
used 

to change 

By Lawrence Lever 

Change is no stranger to Mr 
Jonathan Agnew, foe newly 
appointed chief executive of 
foe International Securities 
Regulatory Organization 
(Isro). 

“I tike change, foal fa a fair 
criticism of me", he says. It fa 
not that his career is Uttered 
with dozens of different jobs; 
jost that having made a suc- 
cess of his job he has tended to 
move on to other things. 

He did however have a false 
start of sorts. After leaving 
Cambridge University he 
spent a year working for The 
EowMifar, before deciding 
it»ar jouruaiisui was not for 
him and he went to the World 
Bmiik where he became a staff 
assistant in tbe projects de- 
partment, erataJ&sg proposed 
leading deals. 

In 1967 Mr Agnew moved to 
HBI Sunset's corporate fi- 
nance department, ending up 
as a director for the last two 
years be was there. He left in 
1973 for Morgan Stanley 
where he was a managing 
director from 1977 to 1982. 

Four years ago he struck out 
on his own as a consultant 
advising institutions on likely 
developments following the 
abolition of fixed 
commissi ons. 

So how wiD be approach the 
prospect of becoming an em- 
ployee again, albeit a highly 
paid one, as foe job of Isro 
chief executive was advertised 
with a benchmark salary of 
£70,000. 

Mr Agnew perceives his role 
as “representing the position 
of the international securities 
industry to tbe authorities and 
persuading the industry to fit 
into foe proposed regulatory 
framework". 

“There will need to be 
changes in the way that busi- 
ness is done, tat it is vital that 
these do not impair the growth 
of tbe international securities 
business", he says. 

“After all this business had 
grown up in an unregulated 
area and without any major 
scandals." 

The areas that Isro, and 
therefore Mr Agnew, are most 
likely to be concerned with are 
the Eurobond market, the 
international equities business 
which now takes place hugely 
off foe Stock Exchange, 
through Mode trading between 
the major players. 

.- 'In addifion^ there hisro's 
edationshqi : mth the -Stock 
Exchange. “Relations with the 
Stock Exchange die now-very 
friendly”, Mr Agnew say*. . 

. But they lave not always 
been so and it will take all us 
negotiating skills if the rela- 
tionship between the two bod- 
ies is to evolve into a 
harmonious, nod permanent, 
one. 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Buoyant shares break record 


Initial uncertainty did not 
last long on stock markets, 
and by the end of the day 
prices had broken through to 
new records. The FT 30-share 
index closed up 17.2 at 1419.4 
and the FT-SE 100 was 18.9 
higher at 1702.9. 

The overnight slide on Wall 
Street prompted foe cautious 
opening, but a firm pound, 
and an encouraging outlook 
for inflation as oil prices 
tumble, soon brought inves- 
tors back in force. 

Equitie 
ing, food 
were in favour. Among leaders 
meeting strong support were 
Vickers, 20p up at 513p on 
compensation hopes, and 
Courtanlds 14p higher at 31 3p 
in response to investment 
buying. 

In contrast, pits were out of 
favour in foe wake of 
yesterday’s decline in the US 
bond market. Falls stretched 
to a pound in places. 

Oils staged a strong rally 


after early weakness. The 
movement of futures prices 
back over $ 1 0 a barrel provid- 
ed sufficient impetus for ma- 
jors such as Shell - up 12p to 
768p - to reverse initial 
losses. 

Some good trading results 


spurred demand for many 
secondary issues, notably As- 
sociated British Ports up 4Sp 
at 609p in response to bumper 
results. Earnings up 23 per 
cent lifted Blockleys 15p at 
930p. while trebled profits 
gave a 20p fillip to Execntex at 


RECENT JSSUES 


lurtics in foe stores, build- 
ing, food and electrical sectors 


EQUITIES 

Abbott M V (I80p) 228 +3 

Asniey (LJ (I35pj 221 +1 
BPP (I60p) 190 

Brook mount (I60p) 182 

Chart FL (86p) 93 

Chancery Secs (63p) 77 -1 

Conv 9% A 2000 £30 -1 'a 

Cranswick M (95p) 105 

Dialene (I28p) 185-5 

Ferguson (J) (I0p) 31*3 

Gold Gm Trot (165 p) 186 

Granyte Surface (56p) 80 

Inoco (55p) 38 -1 

JS Pathology (IBGp) 278 -<-2 
Jarvis Porter (105p) 133 

Klearfold (ll8p) 110-3 

Macro 4 (105p) 140 

Motivate M {11Sp) 141 -3 

Norank Sys (90p) 105 

Realty Useful (330p) 338 -2 


SAC tntl (lOOp) 

SPP (125p) 
Templeton (215p) 
Sigmex (101 p) 
Snowdon & B (97p) 
Spice (80p) 

Tech Comp (T30p) 
i {18 Op) 


139 
156+1 
228 
81 
118 
96 

204 

Underwoods (I80p) 183 

Wellcome (i20p) 229 -i 

W York Hosp (90p) 78 

Wickes (140p) 170 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

Cullens F/P 
Greycoat N/P 
Hartwells N/P 
NMW Comp F/P 
Porter chad F/P 
Safeway UK 
Wales F/P 
Westland F/P 


70 

36 

34 

£340 
104 +1 
£49 
156+3 
83 


(Issue price in brackets). 


1 13p- 

Among builders, acquisi- 
tion news put 58p on Williams 
Holdings at 67 Ip. Cookson 
followed the market trend 1 7p 
higher at 540p. 

The clearance of the 
Ladbroke bid hoisted Home 
Charm I2p at 372p, while 
recent comment enabled Stylo 
to climb lSpat271p. 

Banks recovered from US 
debt worries, although Na- 
tional Westminster still 
showed a lOp fall at 91 5p. 
Insurances helped by some 
satisfactory tiding results 
made headway. Sun Alliance 
put on 23p at 71 Ip. 

There were many shares 
catching the gambler's eye. T 
Curie rose Sp at 185p for this 
reason, while in brewers Vaux 
was up 15p at 465p. The stake 
change on Tuesday helped 
Oxford Instruments to a 15p 
rise at 493p. 

Elsewhere, satisfactory trad- 
ing news put 6p on AG 
Stanley at 89p. 


Fairey sold for £22 million 


Williams Holdings, the East- 
growing diversified engineer- 
ing group, is buying foe 
world's leading military bridg- 
ing company, Fairey Engi- 
neering, from Pearson for £22 
million. 

Excluding the Soviet bloc, 
Fairey supplies 90 per cent of 
foe world's dry gap military 
bridging and 10 per cent of the 
wet gap bridging. Its 31 -metre 
medium girder bridge out be 
built by 24 soldiers in one 
hour and can support a 60- 
tonne tank. The company also 
has interests in nuclear and 
general engineering, including 


• DELANEY GROUP* Mr R 
Delaney, tbe chairman, said that 
in the first two months of this 
year the order book is 21 per 
cent higher than at same time 
last year. 

• TO WN CENTRE SECURI- 
TIES: An interim dividend of 
0.4p (same) is payable for tbe six 
months to December 31, 1985. 
With figures in £000, gross 
rental and investment income 
amounted to 3,334 (2,833), 
group revenue before interest 
charges 2,542 (2,091), property 
dealing profits 268 (nil), pretax 
profit 1,428 ( 1 , 1 02) and attribut- 
able profit 851 (601). Earnings 
per share were 0.94p (0.66p) 

• INOCO: No dividend win be 
paid for the period from April 3 
1985 to December 31, 1985. 
Turnover for the period was 
£419,777, profit before excep- 
tional items and tax 
wax£38396. Exceptional items 
were a foreign exchange loss of 
£51,094, revaluation of US oil 
and gas properties £1,184,425. 
Loss before tax £1,197,123, tax 
Credit £37,51 1. Loss attributable 
to shareholders £1,159,612 and 
Joss per share 5. 1 Op. 

MOUN& A final dividend 
of 5.7p, mkg 7.9p (same) is 


By Teresa Poole 
robotics and nuclear waste 
containers. 

A £150 million bid by 
Williams for McKechnie 
Brothers in February was 
blocked when McKechnie 
shareholders supported their 
company's bid for Newman 
Tonks. Mr Brian 
McGowan.managing director 
of Williams, said; “We started 
on the Fairey deal the day 
after McKechnie turned us 
down." 

The Western market in 
military bridging between now 
and 1989 is estimated at £275 
million. In 1985 Fairey made 


COMPANY NEWS 


payable far 1 985. With figures in 
£ mil lions, group sales totalled 
1 16.3 (133.5), trading profit 8.3 
(S.8), made up of tohacco 
machinery 6.4 (4.9) and corru- 
gated board machinery 1 .9 (0.9). 
Pretax profit was 8.1 (6.0). 
Earnings per share were 19.2p 
(8.2p). Dividend payable on 
May 29. 

• CAPITAL & COUNTIES: A 
planning application is being 
submitted for a Ing new shop- 
ping complex in Watford town 
centre. The partners in foe £85 
million development are Wat- 
ford Borough Council, foe Sun 
Alliance insurance group and 
Capital & Counties. The project 
will be built in two phases and it 
is hoped to make a start on the 
site next year. 

• ARCOLECTR1C HOLD- 
INGS: A final dividend of 
0.47p. making CL72p (D.65p) is 
payable for the year to Decem- 
ber 31, 1985. with figures in 
£000. turnover was 6.247 
(5.922) and pretax profit 283 
(227). Earnings per share were 
3.07p (3,13p)_ Despite fierce 
market competition, sales went 
up by 6,9 per cent with tbe 
upward trend continuing into 
the first quarter of this year. 


pretax profits of £10.1 million 
on turnover of £h l. 2 milllion. 
but this year profits are ex- 
pected to fall to about £4 
million because of market 
fluctuations. Net assets, in- 
cluding £7 million of cash, will 
be £19.5 million at foe time of 
completion, which is expected 
on April 24. 

Williams is financing the 
Fairey deal, which needs 
shareholders' approval, 
through a vendor placing of 
3.7 million shares at 590p. 
Wjiliams' share price jumped 
40p to 653p on news of the 
acquisition. 


• ASPEN COMMUNICA- 
TIONS: A final dividend of 
1.8p. making 2.8p for the year is 
payable for foe year to Decem- 
ber 31, 1985. With figures in 
£000. turnover was 8.092 
(6.894) and pretax profit 1.1606 
(634). 

• UNITED COMPUTER 
AND TECHNOLOGY 
HOLDINGS/PARK PLACE: 
By Tuesday of this week. 389 
UCAT holdings accepted the 
ord offer in respect of 2. J 1 9,701 
UCAT shares (approx 84.7 per 
cent). Another 127 accepted the 
cash alternative in respect of 
25.292 UCAT shares (approx 
1.0 per cent). Some 254 UCAT 
warrant holders accepted in 
respect of 34.944 UCAT war- 
rants, (approx 14.1 per cent) 
while 159 UCAT warrant hold- 
ers indicated their wish to 
exercise their rights to subscribe 
for one UCAT share in respect 
of each of the 89,245 warrants 
they hold (aprox 35.9 per cem) 
and then accept the ord offer. 
The offers became uncondi- 
tional in all respects on March 
18. The ord offer and the 
warrant offer will remain open 
for acceptances until further 
notice. The cash alternative has 
closed. 


Hong Kong 
goes 

high-tech 

From David Bona via 
Hong Kong 

Trading on Hong Kong's 
new space age slock exchange 
made a bearish start yesterday 
as leading stocks traded lower 
than before the Easter holiday. 

The sluggish launch for the 
computerized, unified ex- 
change was attributed to cau- 
tion on the part of brokers, 
who wanted to see how the 
high-technology exchange 
would work in practice. 

The territory’s four ex- 
changes have been brought 
into a 24.000- sq-ft hall with 
800 computer consoles. 

Mr Robert Li, chairman of 
the new exchange, said the 
system would present **a bet- 
ter image” to investors from 
abroad, and would make the 
local share market "more 
internationaL” 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN 

Adam & Company 

8CC1 — 

Citibank Savronst 

Consolidated Crtis 

Continental Trust — 
Co-operative Bank — 
C. Hoare & Co 


Lloyds Bank....- — 
Nat Westminster — 
Royal Bank o( Scotland. 

TSB 

Citibank NA 


-i 

— 1114% 

~11H% 

.~12*%. 

_12%% 

„1lv»% 

-1.134% 

,_11W% 

-11te% 

~11H% 

_11»% 


t Mortgage Base Rare. 


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irrninrriTT‘- ‘ l T1|-T‘-* > ~-~— *—**~ , **‘* 1 **^ *"*“****" ,tt "^ l * n< " *- TVOiplH«rtriW*kpiiwlrt*ii/Midl>rtlrf (having Mm MI iraMmaMr iwrUmun Uuuarfc bWrravr] H»rlnftiftnailroro«uirio«in 
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,-14 



At last some help forthe hard pressed Imperial shareholder. 

Mindful that share prices can vary daily, we are publishing a bulletin 
showing the value of each of the offers foryour company. 

In order to be perfectly fail; the values we’ve quoted are based on the 

best possible offers. 

The next closing date of our offer is April 1 1 at 3 pm. 


HANSON BID WORTH: 




UNITED BISCUITS BID WORTH: 



7 p 


HANSON BID BETTER BY: 




C (> N TI N 


\ N S Q N 

• ri.NG GROWTH FR O M B V SIC 


T TV U S T 


\ G G R O W1H r itU M ihmu B.f S I N E S S E S. 

i L II -"V f - 1 * ' - 1 - 1 «h^<rfTwvaht«ai»toKawa>oTVu»r>St»wnndComfrtiMcS»ori>eh-ai<>n 

ssKSSfassc^^ 


Sun Life; 

Onward 
and upward 


Results from Stm Life 
Assurance Society pic far tbeycar 
ended 3lst December 1985. 

Salient Points: 

• Total premium income rose by 
£18 million to £434 million. 

Group funds now total £3.75 biUion. 
The proprietors’ share of profits 
rose by a record £L5 million to 
£13.4 million, 23% up on 1984. 

A record ^115 million was 
distributed to policy (raiders as 
bonuses. 


Results 

1985 

1984 

Proprietors’ share of profits . 


£m 

Sun Life Assurance Society pic 

1U 

9.3 

Sun Life Pensions Management Ltd 

1.7 

U 

Sun Life Unit Assurance Ltd 

0.8 

0.4 

Funding development of Sun Life 



Trust Management Ltd 

(0.4) 

~ 


13.4 

10.9 

Proprietors' investment income 

1.7 

1.7 


15.1 

12.6 

Expenses 

0.2 

0.1 

Employees’ Profit Sharing Scheme 

0.6 

05 

Taxation 

02 

03 

Proprietors'profit for year after tax 

14.1 

11.7 

Balance brought forward 

7.4 

73 


2U 

19.0 

Dividends: paid 

5.5 

4.6 

declared for payment 

8.4 

7.0 

Balance carried forward 

7.6 

7.4 


• The final dividend of 14.40p per 
share makes an annual total of23.74p 
- an increase of 20% on 1984. 

Fora copy of the 1985 Report 
and Accounts of one of Britain’s most 
consistently successful life and 
pensions offices, please contact: 

Sun Life Assurance Society pfc,on 
Factline, 0 1-606 77SS, 
or write to: 

107 Cheapside, 

London EC2V6DU 



A major force in British Life for over 175 years 


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20 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


Further 

encouraging 

progress.” 

W N. Menzies-Wilson, Chairman * 

am Steady improvement in Cory MM 
MM Excellent year for OCL MM 
V Dividend up 18% MT 



1985 

£m 

1984 

£m 


Turnover 

76&9 

7793 


Trading profit 

18.8 

16.2 


Profit before tax 
and ship sales 

37.5 

24.3 


Profit attributable to 
stockholders 

16.4 

14.1 


Earnings per stock unit 

I7.5p 

16.8p 


Dividend per stock unit 

6.5p 

5.5p 



I The Ocean Annual Report will be available I 
on 28th April. To receive a cnp^ please com- 
plete this coupon and return it to: 

The Secretary Ocean Transport & Trading pic 
India Buildings. Water Sl, Liverpool L2 ORB. 


Name- 


Address. 


OcenN 


I 
I 

I We can handle it. . 

I 



OCEAN TRANSPORT & TRADING pic. INDIA BUILDINGS. WATER STREET. LIVERPOOL L20RB 



SUN ALLIANCE 

INSURANCE GROUP 

RESULTS FOR 1985 

The group results for 1985, subject to audit, are as follows:- 


Premium Income 
General Insurance 
Long-term Insurance . 




General insurance underwriting loss 

Long-term insurance profits 

Investment and other income 




GROUP PROFIT BEFORE TAXATION 
Taxation 




GROUP PROFIT AFTER TAXATION 
Minority interests 


GROUP NET PROFIT FOR YEAR 

Adjustment to exclude net loss incurred by Phoenix 
prior to acquisition 


PROFIT ATTRIBUTABLE TO SHAREHOLDERS 
DIVIDEND - 


RETAINED PROFITS TRANSFER 

EARNINGS PER SHARE 

DIVIDEND PER SHARE 


1985 

Cm 

1,7783 

5763 

2355.1 


{183.4} 

20.9 
200-2 

37.7 
28 

34.9 
7 2 

27.7 


27.7 

343 

16-8 ) 

143p 

173p 


1984 

£m 

1.606.7 
505.1 

2.111.8 


(198.7) 

18.4 
227.9 

47.6 
4J 

433 

63 

37.0 
4.0 

41.0 

30.6 

10.4 


20.8p 

15.5p 


TERRITORIAL ANALYSIS OF GENERAL INSURANCE RESULTS 

1985 


I9W 




Under* 


Under- 


Premium 

writing 

Premium 

writing 


Income 

result 

income 

result 


£tn 

£tn 

£m 

£m 

United Kingdom & Ireland — 

817,9 

(69.9) 

669.3 

(83.2) 

Europe - 

199.1 

(303) 

184.5 

(1131 

U.S. A. inote 11 

180.2 

(183) 

272.1 

(35.0) 


923 

(173) 

105.1 

(16.2) 

Australia (note 2) — - 

663 

(16.7) 

53.6 

(6.7) 

Other overseas areas - 

1203 

(11.7) 

141.0 

(17.0) 

Reinsurance - 

29.2 

(143) 

36.9 

(22.01 

Marine and Aviation (worldwide) - 

1533 

(3.7) 

144.2 

(7.11 


1,6593 

(183.4) 

1,606.7 

(198.7) 

Reinsurance from Chubb Corporation 

119.0 

— 

— 

— 


1,7783 

(183 A) 

1.606.7 

(198.7) 


Noies - 1 J l The U-S.A. figures for J984 include the Phoenn's Continental pool business which was tenn mated on 1.I.19S5. 

)2i The !98!> results for Australia include the business of Phoenix Prudential (formerly an associated company! 
became a wholly owned subsidiary with effect from t.l .1985. 


»hicfa 


GENERAL INSURANCE UNDERWRITING RESUITS 
The premium income for (he year included a premium of 
£UQm receivable under an excess of loss reinsurance agreement 
with Chubb Corporation relating to anticipated Future claims in 
respect of. discontinued U.S. medical malpractice business. This 
reinsurance, wnh a fixed limit ot liability, was a non-recurring 
facility afforded to Chubb because of the Group's dose association. 
Excluding tins re in s u rance premium, general business premium 
income increased by 3-3'h in sterling terms. The underlying 
premium growth, after allowing for currency fluctuations and 
changes in the business portfolio was I9-3V 

At Home, the household results were badly affected by the 
severe weather at the be gi nning a i the year and further advene 
weather claims in December. Better results were achieved in 
commercial property classes, reflecting a reduction in the number 
of large fife (oases, but substantial underwriting losses were suffered 
in both (he commercial and private motor accounts. 

In Europe, the deterioration was mainly aUribnuMe to sharply 
increased underwriting losses in Holland and unfavourable motor 
experience in Denmark. 

In the U.S.A. most commercial lines arc beginning to benefit 
from the improving market conditions but liability results remain 
unsatisfactory. The underwriting fos does not include the Group's 
additional claims provisions in respect of its own discontinued 
medical malpractice busines which have been met a transfer 
from retained profits. 

In Canada, the result suffered from an increase in large jj io pc rt y 
claims and continuing poor ex p erience in t he , a utomobile acsonnL 
The increased underwriting loss in Australia was partly due to 
weather losses in Brisbane at the beginning of the year and in 


addition there was a significant increase in the incidence of serious 
fires. 

Elsewhere, a few territories showed improvement but results 
generally remained unsatisfactory. 

The rundown of the Group's reinsurance business has continued 
but has necessitated some further strengthening in reserves. 
LONG-TERM INSURANCE 

Long-term insurance results were satisfactory, with particularly 
T achieved in the individual pensions market in the U-K. 
proga e ss was also made in most overseas territories. The 
transfer to shareholders increased by 13% compared with I9&4. 
INVESTMENT INCOME 

In sterling terns investment income showed a decrease of 
12.4% but after allowing for the financing costs of the Phoenix 
acquisition, changes in the Group structure and currency fluctua- 
tions. the undertying growth was 13-OV 
SHAREHOLDERS' FUNDS 

The costs of integrating Phoenix's general business, estimated 
at £33. Im. have been dealt with through revaluation reserve. After 
providing for these costs and other reserve adjustments the Group's 
net assets at 3lst D ec ember, lift? amounted to £l-^!bm. The 
solvency margin was 74%. or 79% if the reinsurance premium from 
Chubb is excluded. 

DIVIDEND 

The Directors have resolved to declare a the Annual General 
Meeting on 21st May. 19R6 a total dividend for 13H5 of IT.ip per 
share. An interim dividend of 5."?5p per share was paid on btb 
January. 1%6 and the final dividend of 1 1 /op per share will be paid 
on 7th July next. 

Jk* °btw riawwiif is a summary of the years results. The full audited Report and Accounts will tv posted to shareholders on 25th 
April I9d6and delivered to the Registrar of Companies after the Annual General Meeting, 

2Apnl /*WL 


SUM ALLIANCE AND LONDON INSURANCE pic 


.51 


C COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ) 


Tarmac in £30m 



By Judith Huntley 

Tarmac Properties, part of 
Tarmac, the construction 
company based in the Mid- 
lands, has ambitious develop- 
ment plans. 

It is taking the brave step of 
investing £30 million in a 
200,000 sq ft office develop- 
ment in Brighton next to the 
Pavilion built for the Prince 
Regent in the eighteenth cen- 
tury. But there is nothing 
eighteenth century about the 
building planned by Tarmac 
Properties. 

An application goes to the 
planners this week. Brighton 
Council would gain an icerink 
and a big increase in car 
parking from the scheme. 

Tarmac Properties is hop- 
ing for rents of £1030 a sq ft 
on the development by the 
time it is completed in about 
three years. The company has 
just let a small amount of 
in the town at £830 a sq 


Tarmac Properties must be 
hoping for another American 
Express, whose British head- 


quarters is in Brighton, to take 
its new building or that an 
owner-occupier in the finan- 
cial services field appears. 

The company is exploring 
ways of financing the Brighton 
project with Morgan Grenfell 

Laurie. It may raise seven to 
10-year money and then sell 
equity stakes in the completed 
and let development Syndica- 
tion is definitely in the 
company's mind. . 

Its joint venture with Lon- 
don & Edinburgh Trust the 
fast growing property compa- 
ny, at Waterside Park in 
Bracknell, Berkshire, has tak- 
en' a step nearer with the 
granting of planning permis- 
sion for the 300,000 sq ft 
scheme. 

Tarmac Properties, which 
says its pretax profits equal 
those of LET, its partner, is 
aiming for rents of £12 a sq ft 
at Waterside. 

Mr Steve Reeves, head of 
Tarmac Properties, says that 
be would have been sceptical 
about achieving rents at that, 
level a year ago but lettings in 


the neighbourhood and 
growth seen so for have con- 
vinced him that £12 a sq ft is 
obtainable. 

Hewlett Packard, the Amer- 
ican computer company set a 
.record rent for campus office 
space at Waterside by paying 
£10 a sq ft for 105,000 sq ft of 
space developed by LET on 
land bought from _ Tarmac. 
That was the beginningof the 
relationship between the .two 
which led to the establishment 
of the joint company 10 devel- 
op .the next 15 acre phase at 
Bracknell in a £50 mill ion 
partnership, 

Hewlett Packard, mean- 
while; has just bought 25 acres 
of land only half a mile from 
Waterside, making it the larg- 
est owner-occupier purchase 
in the area. , . 

Tarmac Properties has an- 
other large scheme under rts 
belt at GrrdifT where it [dans 
to develop a £30 million retell, 
housing, leisure and office 
scheme with the help of a £10 
million urban development 
grant 


Its central London office 
development next to Charing 
Cross Station, funded by Scot- 
tish Amicable, was taken by 
British Aerospace at a rent of 
£22 a sq ft, a figure which 
could have been higher bad 
the covenant not been so 
good. 

But the company has re- ^ 
cently backed away from two 
potential schemes. It had 
planned to _ bny the 
Technicolour site, close to 
London's Heathrow. Airport 
and the Wilkinson Sword site 
at Fdy^ Hampshire. 

Tarmac Properties' future 
looks likely to stay within the 
parent company to which it 
contributes a mere 23 per cent 
of overall profits but a very 

visble profile. 

Sir Eric Pountain, the chair- 
man of Tarmac, is not willing 
to hive off his property arm 
despite the speculation of 
some and desire of others it% 
see it floated as a separate 
company on the stock market. 


Guardian Royal Exchange Group 

Results for 1985 


Subject to audit the results of the Guardian Royal Exchange Group for the year aided 


31st December 1985 are as follows: 

Investment Income 

Less Interest Payable 

Und e rw ri t in g Results 
Short-tom insurance business 
Long-term insurance business 

Profit before loss on discontinued international 
professional indemnity business, taxation and 
extraordinary item . 

Loss on discontinued international professional 
indemnity business . 

• - Profit before taxation and extraordinary item 


1985 

£zn 

193.6 

14.3 

179-3 


1984 

£m 

202.7 
16.0 

186.7 


taxation 

minority interests 

(Loss)/profit after taxation and before 
extraordinary item 

Extraordinary item — contingency claims provision in 
respect of discontinued international professional 
indemnity business 

(Loss)/profit transferred to retained profits 
Earning s per ordinary share (after taxation and before 
extr a ordinary item) 

Stetementof retained profits 


In terim ' \ 9.00p per share 

Proposed Final 19.75p per share 
Tbtal 28.75p per share (1984: 26.0p) 


Contingency reinsurance fund profit 

Profits less losses (Hi investments sold less taxation 

Retained profits 31st December 


liPS 



(135.2) 

(94.5) 

44 JL 

922 

SIS 5311 

— 

3.5 

92J2 

15.0 


349 

2.3 


3.0 

17.3 

37.9 

(13£) 

54.3 

(55.0) 


(68.8) 

543 

(8.7)p 

34.5p 

-■■373 a 

345.5 

Brit *.-.4. 

54.3 

',‘^1 


399.8 

s EM 


13.4 

iKTCl 


27.5 


45.6 
259.3 

1.6 

61.7 
322.6 


40.9 


358.9 

.1 

14.7 

373.7 


Results by Territories (before taxation) 

1985 

Net, ’ Underwriting. Investment 
Premhms - Bewlt Income 


1984 

Net-. Un de rwri ting fovesoneqt 
PreminmB Remit - Income- 



£m . 

£m . 

. ton. 

L £m 

: £m 

£m 

Australia 

80.3 

(9*9) 

14.3 

123.4 

Xi - 

: 16.7 

Canada 

100.0 

(16.6) 

12.2 . 

107.6 

(1L5) 

36.0 

Germany 

197.0 

(9.6) 

22 & 

178.6 

(7.0) 

2LQ 

Republic of Ireland 

35.7 

2.6 

5.2 

249 

(L6) 

'4.5 

South Africa 

34.5 

(2.0) 

4.0 

431 

(2.1) 

5.0 

U.K 

459.7 

(66.9) 

70.9 

388.0 

(45.5) 

698 

USA 

173.6 

(20.2) 

15.4 

166.7 

(19.1) 

16.5 

Miscellaneous 

205.9 

(31.7)* 

34.5 

2063 

(25.6) 

37.2 


1*286.7 

(154.3) 

1703 

L238.6 

OU.2) 

186.7 


The territorial results are stated after reinsurance 
protection from group companies including protection 


‘Miscellaneous’ underwriting result includes tins 

reinsiirancemrespectoftiteteEritoriessliowii 

opposite: 

* Eudadmg loss on discontinued international professorial 
indemnity business. 


Australia 
Canada 
South Africa 
USA. 
Others 



Exchange Rates 
1985 

Australia 2 112 

Canada 2.02 


1984 
L40 

L53 Rep. of 


1985 1984 

3.54 3.66 

L16 117 


South Africa 
USA 


1985 

3.73 

L45 


1984 

230 

1.16 


The Chairman’s Statement last year referred to the 
adverse effect of professional negligence claims, 
particularly those written in London an an international 
basts involving leading accountancy firms. This class of 
business has been discontinued but large numbers of 
claims have continued to be notified at earlier years of 
account and estimates on many existing claims have been 
substantially increased. This has been shown as a separate 
item of £40. 6m under loss on discontinued business: In 
some cases the contract provides however that we must 
continue to offer cover to existing clients for up to three 
years during the run-off period- Tb provide for any losses 
which may occur under this future commitment we have 
thought it prudent to make provision of a further £5$m 
this year as an extraordinary item. The long ta3 nature of 
this business makes ft difficult to estimate with accuracy, 
particularly in predicting the future of American legal 
practice, but we believe we have established a realistic 
estimate on the bass of current information. 7bx relief will 
be dealt with as losses emerge and accardingy no deferred 
tax benefit has been assumed; the amount of tax relief on 
the contingency daims provision is estimated to be 
approximately £l9m. 

The short-term business underwriting results for the 
year were impacted severely by daims in the first half of 
1985 from neural disasters in Australasia, a cyclone 
affecting Canada and the US A and heavier than usual 
weather related daims in the UK., Germany 
and France. The short-term business 
underwriting results far the second half of 
1985 however have shown a significant 
improvement over the underwriting 
results far the first six months of the year 

and in part reflect the corrective action 
which has been taken. 



The underlying investment income growth was 7%%. 

The profits from our long-term business have made a 
useful cootribution to the results. 

The effect of exchange rate movements has been to 
decrease net p remi u ms by £ 165.7m, investment income by 
£ 2L 3 m and the short-term underwriting loss by £28-0m. 

During the yean and in connection with the 
redasafication of our short-term business, home fo reign 
business repeated previously within our UJC results is now 
reported as part of the Miscellaneous result Comparative 
figures for 1984 have been adjusted accordingly. ... 

Dividend - 

The fi nanc i al strength of the Company hag, 
permitted the progressive dividend po&cy' to be maintained 
and accordingly the Directors recommend the payment of 
a final dividaid which, with theinterim dividend paid in 
January 1986, will constitute an increase of 10.6% 
compared with the dividend paid to shareholders in respect 
of the year 1984 

If approved at the Annual General Meeting to be 
held on 28th May 1986 a payment at the rate of 19.75p per 
share (gross equivalent 27.82p) in respect of the final 
dividend will be made an 2nd July 1986 to holders of 
Ordinary shares whose names appear on the register at 
3pjn- on 30th May 1986 making, with the interim payment 
in January last, a total of 28.75p (1984: 26.0p) 
per share (gross equivalent 40.67p; 1984: 

* 37J4p). . 

The mditetlAniaai Report end Atramssteilf be partttlai 
duvehoUentmlstMaylSSSenddetueredaihsequeiUlyto 
the Bxguawnf Campania. - 


3LS 


An insurance Service worldwide 




3 






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K 


THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY/LAW 


21 


* 


COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 



•In ipinstfMioiinl portfolios 
; toveJalkBto2percentby 
J^fMsyw,f*efiisL 

-*•' faU recorded by Hfllier ■' 
V ‘V ft . - ftta. the cfaartered sBT- 

o... veyo^siBce Its records began 
"" ■ ^,n 1982. 


•'JK 


' of flhUJron of industrial 
„ propertyshows tint Dot 
only K»sB0H4accHiie prodac- 

' ingiwqpefly ffiqpgtetf from 

3.1 per cent ofportfcB«$ fe 
-~’-1984 < fatrf that the voM reft* - 
' * iff factories is bow twice that 
. - in warehouses. 


▼aloe of institutional portfo- 
' lios. Aid the rate rises to $ 
per cent when measured as a 
proportion of overall 
floorspace. 

In contrast to the cries 
for higher quality space, Mr 
bn FteMM^iadiistml 
partner ofHillier Parker, 
comments; “Indnstry COD’ 


preferring sfightfy older 
bntcfaeaperHnUs iuA accegt- 
m&titemcOmtieiKe of 


'y 



up i 




(k befieftbattiie industrial 
property market is impror- 
-i< ; slightly. Bm the great di- 
ide between north, and 
south remains. Voids are 
M twice as high in the north 
, as. the soath despite rednc- 
^ trass in both areas itrer 
last year's tereL 
The lowest void ntes oc- 
^curred in buildings under . 

^Osq ft or o»er 20,000 : 
sq ft with middle-sized 
premises stdTeringihe . " 

2 most. Hlllier Parker says that 
25 per cent of the institn- 
tiens it surveyed bod no smaO 
Z properties even &ongh. , t 
- these hare the lowest voids. , 
10-y ear-old bnQdin^had 
fewer voids than wmfcm ones. 
If the retd rate is defined 
lZ as imoocnpied property. It - 
I- rises to 5.2 per cent of the 


poor car braiSm? and 

access," 

• JNippon TetegrophA 
Telephonels paying £83,000 a 
yearfor2,4§#sqftof 

space inWates Cky of Lon- 
don Properties' and Phoe- 
nix Assurance's' City Tower 


Street in the Square MBs. 

- The Japanese company 
has taken a 10-year lease on 
the offices. Balxr Harris * 
Saunders was the! 


Ratley acting for Nippon. 

The developers of the 
Ht ran dsd lfa ft Warehouse ini 
the City of London are .■ 
likely to whr approval ftom - 
the corporation's pbmieis 
for a scheme to bdld 23 © s §§@ 
sq ft of offices there. Bot 
theQty is insisting that only 

200,600 sq ft should be al- 
lowed aboveground, and Oat 
: 11,626 sq ft 


- of retailing goes back on the 
site. 

There is a 92-ft height 
restriction above gromtd, er- 

clodiag the proposed atri- 

mn. Outline consent for the 
scheme caaU be gNai to- 
day, tearing the Mailed de- 
sign to be worked out. 

• Capital & Counties 
plans to develop a 509,000-sq- 
ft shopping scheme in the 
■ emtre of Watford, Hertford- 
shire. The company has . 

- submitted » ' pbrnittg applii^. 

' thm to Watford Borough - 
Council, which is a partner m 
the ventare with Capital St 
Counties ami die Son Alliance 
Insurance Group. 

The sew centre involves 
relocating and expanding the 
John Lew&ftu-tnership 
department store, extending 
Marks and Spc&cer and 
British Home Stores, adding a 
total of-27ty000 sq ft of re- 
tail space. 

The £85 millio n scheme, 
which covers a 10-acre site at 
Watford, will Knk with the 
existing Charter Place shop- 


Watford Council and the Gen- 
eral Accident Insurance 
Company. ‘ 

...Phase <me of the new- - 
centre will be completed by 
the end of 1989. Capital & 
Counties is to project manage 
the development The let- 
ting agents are Healey & Bak- 
er and Molynesx Rose. 


The property industry's at- 
tempts to set up a market 
trading units in individual 
commercial properties contin- 
ue apace, but there are still 
many doubts about the idea. 

Heretics in l he industry 
may ask whether there is a 
need for unitization at all. The 
developers and chartered sur- 
veyors see it as a way of 
bringing liquidity to a market 
in which the number of poten- 
tial purchasers for large and 
expensive schemes is 

sh rinkin g. • 

But a number Of developers 
with City of London office 
blocks have " been ingenious 
enough to find ways of financ- 
ing their completed develop- 
ments without recourse to an 
untried new market, which 
needs legal changes before it 
can come into being. Flailing 
interest rates will help devel- 
opers in their search for new 
forms of financing. 

Debenture issues, for exam- 
ple. become an attractive form 
of funding as interest rales fell, 
and the method has already 
been tried by Rosehaugh at its 
1 Finsbury Avenue develop- 
ment on the City fringes. 

Selling securities in com- 
mercial property debt is an- 
other avenue being explored 
by the financial conglomer- 
ates, particularly those from 
the United States, where there 
is an established secondary 
market 

But accepting that there is a 
need for unitization, there are 
still many unanswered ques- 



Speyhawlc, the property company, has sold the freehold of its 
joint development at 71/77 Leaden hall Street and Mitre Street 
in the City of London for £20 miltioa. The offices have been 
bought by the Swiss Reinsurance Group which will use the 
building as its London headquarters. Spey hawk developed the 
scheme with the Johnston Group, a Storey builder. The 
property company will project manage the scheme. Swiss 
Reinsurance is to sell Spey hawk its former City offices at 1G8 
Cannon Street for £1 1 million for the 22,000 sq ft freehold build- 
ing, Speyhawk is to redevelop the site which formerly belonged 
to MEPC. Sincl a ir Goldsmith and Mellersh & Harding are the 
letting age nts for Cannon Street. 


tions. Scrimgeour Vickers, the 
stockbroker, has joined the 
heretics by asking whether 
such a market .would eyeaJbe 
profitable. 

If the problems of initial 
valuation, the trading of units 
at a discount and the manage- 


ment of buildings are re- 
solved. there remains the 
uncertainly over the volume 
of trading. 

Scrimgeour Vickers doubts 
whether there will be enough 
trading to produce profits for 
the market makers. 


Law Report April 3 1986 


Appellant need 
not attend 
if represented 




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Ktl.FRS MOt DINGS PIC 
\ \ \ I 1 A I REPORT l rf 5 


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You've seen how welt we 



on screen 


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now read the hard copy 


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Whatever your involvement with the world of finance, 

■ you’re probably femiliar with the range of services that has 
made Reuters the world’s leading provider of screen-based - 

information. - " ‘"V '- 1 .. A 
Now we are offering rrwe ^ges of-racts anafigures - 
the ones cbhtaned in thel985 Annual Report & Accounts. : 
Group revenue, for example, increased by 31.4% to 

£434.1 million.. , 

Profit after tax was £54.9 million - up. 29.5% on last 

yea ^ arn j n gs per ordinary share increased by 25.7% to 

132 pence. . , „ , 

The Annual Report contains an overview.of Reuters 

business in 1985. Money market products continued to fuel 

most of our growth, but new. products and services .were 

introduced at record. ratesand the.pnK|^.ibr ^ look just ; 

as bright - 


Make sure you get your copy of the hard facts about 
Reuters 1985 performance. Complete and return the coupon 
bekw or call the Corporate Relations Department on 01-250 1122. 

• _ The above figures are taken from the 1985 audited financial statements of 

ffeuters Holdings PLC. . 


Fdr your copy of the Annual Report please post this coupon to: 
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• •• 


Regina v Croydon Crown 
Court, Ex parte Claire 
Before Lord Justice Croom- 
Johnson and Mr Justice Mann 
[JudgmenL given March 19] 

A defendant who was repre- 
sented by counsel on his appeal 
to a crown court against convic- 
tion was entitled not to lx 
present at the hearing. 

The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court so held allowing 
an application for judicial re- 
view by way of certiorari and 
mandamus to quash the de- 
cision of Croydon Crown Court 
(Judge McHaie and Justices) 
refusing the application by 
counsel for the defendant that 
the hearing be beard in the 
defendant's absence, and direct- 
ing the crown court to hear the 
defendant's appeal. 

The defendant Errol Clair 
had been charged and convicted 
with two other defendants, who 
were present at the appeal and 
whose appeals were allowed. 

Mr Edward Rees for the 
defendant: Mr Clive Anderson 
for the prosecutor. 

LORD JUSTICE CROOM- 
JOHNSON said thai it was 
quite. obvious that if the crown 
court had heard the defendant's 
appeal, it would have been 
allowed 'as were the appeals by 
the two other defendants. 

His Lordship agreed with the 
submissions of counsel for the 
defendant that under section 122 
of the Magistrates Court Act 
1980, the defendant if repre- 
sented by counsel, was in fact 
deemed to be present, and thus 
an application to the court to 
hear the appeal in the 
defendant's absence was un- 
necessary and was merely made 


out of courtesy to the court. 

ft was quite clear that the 
defendant could appear by 
counsel if he wished but there 
was no strong obligation to be 
present himself. 

His Lordship referred to sec- 
tion 79i 3) of the Supreme Court 
Act 1981 which dealt with the 
customary practice and proce- 
dure with respect to appeals to 

.the crown. court and to section 
9(6) of the Courts Act 197] which 
transferred the appellate juris- 
diction of quarter sessions to the 
crown court and did not affect 
the customary practice and 
procedure on appeals, on which 
the defendant relied, and he 
concluded that there was no 
obligation on the defendant to 
be present if he had good reason. 

His Lordship added that there 
was no question that the with- 
drawal of (he appeal would 
ordinarily be regarded as being 
tantamount to an abandon- 
mcnL 

The questions arose whether 
the abandonment was a nullity 
and whether what happened was 
capable in those quite excep- 
tional circumstances of being a 
nullity. 

It did not matter Whether it 
was an abandonment by mis- 
take. it was something which 
should not be held, to prevent 
the defendant's appeal after the 
crown court wrongly refused to 
hear it. 

It would be unjust if the 
detendam were to be left with a 
conviction against his name 
which ought not to be there. 

Mr Justice Mann agreed. 

Solicitors: B. M. Bimberg & 
Co; Solicitor, Metropolitan 
Police. 


Industrial injury in 
_ removing danger 


McGovern v British Steel 
Corporation 

Before Sir John Donaldson, 
Master of the Rolls, Lord Justice 
Neill and Lord Justice Ralph 
Gibson 

[Judgment given March 21] 

An accident in which a work- 
man injured his back while 
attempting to move a displaced 
toe-board which was obstructing 
a walkway at his workplace was 
caused by a breach of regulation 
30 of the Construction (Working 
Places) Regulations (SI 1 966 No 
.94) (which required gangways to 
be kept free from unnecessary, 
obstructions) andr waS alsp a', 
'"^lief 'of the., lurid against 


Those events might involve 
the intervention Of some human 
action; it would then be nec- 
essary to examine whether the 
intervention was a natural and 
probable consequence of the 
breach and. if so. whether the 
conduct of the intervener was 
such as to break the chain of 
causation. 

The onus of proving the 
causal connection rested on the 
plaintiff: it was not sufficient to 
prove that there was a breach of 
duly which might have caused 
his injury. The question of 
causation was to be decided by 
applying common sense to the 
particular tects. 


’ourt of- Appeal (Lord 


fu-was essential to take, ac- 
Mmni of the fra that the 
gangway ’was 20 metres above 


was (he feet that the 


ine) soihChtisfa en'dism issi run an of molten t metal 


an 

appeal* fc^ibe ^Brrti sh Steel 

Corporation against a finding by 
Mr .Justice Glidewell on Feb- 
ruary 19, 1985 that they were 
liable to the plaintiff. John 
Patrick McGovern, with an 
order for assessment of 
damages. 

Mr John Deby, QC and Mr 
Michael J. Taylor for the British 
Steel Corporation; Mr Graeme 
Williams. QC and Mr G Barry 
Stewart for the plaintiff. 

Lord Justice Ralph Gibson 
delivered a judgment in favour 
of allowing the appeal. 

LORD JUSTICE NEILL said 
that the “bu^fpr” lest provided 
a useful starting-point bat was 


Ariyone who found an obstruc- 
tion on the gangway sufficient to 
cause someone to trip would be 
• very likely to remove iL 

The argument that the inter- 
vention by itself broke the chain 
of causation was unacceptable 
on the fern. 

In the particular circum- 
stances there was a sufficient 
link between the obstruction 
and the injury to lead to the 
conclusion that the injury was 
caused by the breach. 

The regulation was directed to 
safeguard workmen from (he 
risks of unnecessary obstruc- 
tions on gangways. By attempt- 
ing immediately and reasonably 
id remove it the plaintiff had not 


SrSdSS? mterion by . 

which to determine liability. Uon ? f . ***? - r c 8“! au 9 ns - 
It was lust necessary -to 
identify the relevant breach of 
statutory duty and the injury 
which was allegedly caused by it. 

The next step was to trace the 
events which formed the links 
between the breach and the 
injury. 


the regulations. The 
- appeal should be dismissed. 

The Master of the Rolls 
delivered a concurring 
judgment. 

Solicitors: Turner Kenneth 
Brown for Jacksons Monk & 
Rowe. Middlesbrough; 
Goodswens, Middlesbrough. 


Erasure of program 
is criminal act 


Cox w Riley 

Justices who found that a 
defendant had deliberately 
erased a computer program 
from the plastic circuit card of a 
computerised saw so as to 
render the saw inoperable, had 
properly found the defendant 
guilty of criminal damage under 
section 1(1) of the Criminal 
Damage Act 1971, the Queen's 
Bench Divisional Court (Lord 
Justice Stephen Brown and Mr 
Justice McCullough) held on 
March IZ dismissing an appeal 
by case stated. 

LORD JUSTICE STEPHEN 
BROWN said that counsel for 
the defendant had submitted 


rbat (he programme was noi 
tangible within section 10(1) of 
the Act and that erasing it did 
not amount to damage. 

The charge in question alleged 
deliberate damage to the plastic 
circuit card by the removal of 
the program. 

The defendant’s action in 
erasing the program rendered 
the saw inoperable and necessi- 
tated time, labour and expense 
in restoring the relevant pro- 
gram on the circuit card. 

The argument that the 
defendant's action did not 
amount to damage to property 
within the meaning of the 1971 
Act was untenable. 


Financial aid provision 
is retrospective 


Chetarotr vCbefannr - 

The provisions of section 12 
of the Matrimonial and Family 
Proceedings Act 1984 were " 
retrospective and the court had 
jarismetiem thereunder to enter- . 
tain an application for leave to 
apply for financial relief by a 
former wife against the former 
husband notwi lit landing that 
the marriage between the parties 
bad been dissolved overseas 


before September 16. 1955, the 
date that the 1 984 Act came into 
force. 

Mr Justice Sheldon so held in 
the Family Division on March 
26 when granting leave to the 
applicant to apply for financial 
relief from her former husband 
who had been granted a decree 
of divorce in Lebanon on April 
16, 1985, the validity of which 
would be recognised in England 
and Wales. 


September sittings 


HOLDINGS PLC 


Practice Direction 

Exercising his powers under 
Order 64. rule 2(1) of the Rules 
of the Supreme Court, and with 
the concurrence of the Lord 
Chancellor, Sir John Donald- 
son, Master of the Rolls, di- 
rected on March 18, that die 
Court ofAppeal(Civi) Division) 
should, sil d unrig the month- of. 
September in 1986 arid. in fiiuup. 
.years until further, notice; 

THE MASTER OF THE 


ROLLS said that the sittings 
were necessary for the purpose 
of hearing appeals and applica- 
tions during the vacation. • 
Details of the number of 
courts sitting in September 
would be published each year, 
normally before Easter, and 
were as follows for 1986: 

September ] _ 5, one two^udge 
court; Sept 8- 12; one two-judge 
court and one three-judge court; 
Sept IS - 26, three three-judge 
courts. 


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Resufts of The Law Society winter bdufittrion will be 
po^sbed tomorrow. * 


. — r ’ 











FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


From your portfolio card check VOur 
eight share price movements. Add them 
up to give you your overall totaL Check 
this against the daily dividend figure 
published on this page. If il matches you 
have won outright or a share of the total 
daily prize money stated- If you are a 
winner Follow the daim procedure on the 
bach of your card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 


Shares outpace gilts 

ACCOUNT DAYS' D eali ngs began April 1. Dealings end April 1 1. §Coniango day April 14. Settlement day, April 21. 
ACLOUN i da id. ta^ains are permitted on two previous business days. 


0 ThMNmM«UM 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£ 2,000 

Claims required for 
+35 points 

Claimants should rise 0254*53272 




Victor Product* 


Secant) Sere 


Sandhurst 


mi 


Uauhanu 


Wbilccrofi 


BUILDING AND ROADS 


LoveH fYll 


Countryside 


Ibstocl iohiuen 


Rubens Adlanf 


Tarmac 


Blue Circle 


Bmdon & Cloud Hill 


INDUSTRIALS L-R 


Peidei-Haiierslcy 


RFD 


Redfeant Glass 


EEaagia 


1*571 Lear Conewy 


U 33 Sman Si aui 
627 <19 Sund Chan 

816 613 unen 
b^» 43'. was Fargo 
330 220 wairusT 


S< *1 tJO 11 «3 

619 • >3 438 70 73 

HI SU UK4 

£»** -■» 

290 • . . 1.1 U 10* 


BREWERIES 


336 248 
63? BSD 
49 38 

128 88 
SCO 373 
177 l<7 
SCO 405 
490 410 

828 640 
680 488 
20* 165 

230 183 
328 275 
475 405 

68 89 
ITS 188 
285 173 
101 77 

2*9 217 
2*8 1S3 
232 163 
37% 30 % 
465 »3 
313 223 
315 Z28 

231 188 
505 410 
285 195 


MaMten 306 

Baa* 832 

D a w— an a8 

BodOngxma 12S 

Broon fMannaw) 500 
BOnar (H PI 174 

BdlBMOM Brew 535 

dark (Maimawi 470 

Dvrarem |i A) 820 

Dmtret 670 

Creanal wnoar W1 

Greane Mg 218 

Giavau 328 

Hawn > Ha ac m 47S 

t-grema Doc 84 

twnrmraon Qua 172 

Msh Qua 278 

UarsKn Thompson 101 

Mortand 2*9 

SA Bwret 211 

See! S He* 232 

E3P* 

Vu» 408 

Wteoraad 'A' 306 

DO B 303 

wnoraad an 245 

W iT rrana n 8 0 501 

Young A’ 280 


+8 116 
♦2 21.0 
+a i.i 

1-1 4fl 
.. 201 
1*2 7.0 

M3 
» 107 

188 
.. 22,9 n 

>1 7 a 

*9 73 

1 .. 10J 


*8 ion 
*1'. 41.1 
♦IS IU 
-a 102 
+3 102 

*3 09 

.. 122 
24 


BUILDING AND ROADS 


Cjmhndpc Eire 


June* Slr'Kid 


Thun. EMI 


C Time. Nc+npipere Ltd. Daily Total 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £20.000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 


BRITISH FUNDS 


SHORTS (Under 
98'. 97 T.aaa 3% 1 
99>. 99 Em* 10 As i 
100’. 99'. T.aa* i?V i 
995 97% T.aaf 8' A. 1 
98'> 94 - E.<* 9'.-. 1 

102.100-.Em* 14% 1 

IE*- 100 • EnO> 13 %V 1 
lOO i 93% Treat CIO .V 
35'. 92> Den 2--* 1 
100*. 97 . 8*01 10— . 1 
97 . W- Funa 6.-V 1 
100% 96- Trnaa lOv i 
93‘. 90% Treat 3V ' 
100'. 99-. Treat 12% ■ 
97% S2 j 4 Treat 7'.% l 
101V 96'; Em* 10 •% l 
100': 9*% Treat CV-V 1 
90’. 88-: Trens J*. 1 
99% 93’* T.aas 9 i% i 
104 '« 93'. Treat li i% l 
107V 95’.- Treat 10iV i 
10l J i 93': E»«n 10% 1 

109 9< - Em* 1Q-*V ' 
80V 76 • Eacn ? .-• i 

10*- 94 E«* 11% i 

89% 8*i Tress 5% 1 
1(B'; 9<-. Em* n% 1 
101 '. 92'. Treat C9 % ' 
87 B2‘. Treat 3% ' 

111'jlBJ'. Treat 13% ' 

110 : 101. Em* 12 .%' 
03% 79% T.aaa 3% 
97-. 89 . Tims 8 -% « 
103% 0?% Treat 10% 1 


Years) 

90% .. 

99* 

roo .. 
99’. .. 
90* .. 

102 • .. 
U*?% .. 

IDO*. .. 
98’. ■ .. 
100% .. 
97-. • . 
100% .. 

i03*4la% 
97% -% 
lOl-j -■» 

r :: 

99%e-'a 
104% 
l0?’i -% 
lOl't 

106%*-% 

100%B-'I 

86 % 

111 % -% 
110’. -% 
03% O .. 

97* 

103 •-% 


10 

10 

180 

100 

W0 a*-2 
2.0 79 
10 34J2 
84 190 
00 


.. 100 


07 MB 


10 38 1 

81 

20 182 

8*n 86 245 

10 

00 .. 


80 182 


07 283 

80 

43 160 

40 

20 180 

70 

19 287 

10 

10 890 

40 

79 220 

70 

84 287 

60 

10 19* 

20 

18 250 



30 

10 (50 

07 

10 172 

60 

80 188 

U 

85 81 

30 

87 12* 

17 

1 1 188 

10 

08 .. 

1C 7 

40 108 

7.1 

61 292 

170 

00 76 

1*a 00 197 

M0 


40 

1.1 29* 

20 

48 81 

. . • 


*09 7.1 42.1 

01 

00 .. 

81 

85 80 

193 

87 130 

70 

70 161 

1.1 

40 58 

20 

0* 257 


5* 80 

575 

30 .. 

70 

solo* 

70 

80 72 

60 

81 170 

81 

2* 191 


.. 150 

40 

28 110 

71 

30 90 


39 188 

87 

88 161 

00 

f* 68 


.. 70 

90 

80 120 

OB 

00 320 


81 40 

172 121 
188 198 
218'. 181 '. 
40 32 

487 615 
303 208 
23% 15% 
80 48 

220 178 
118 92 
10% 715 
250 171 
240 188 
293 168 

19% ta 

371 28 9 
68 83 

110 98 

118 93 
•3% 57% 
78 25 
M 81 
88 73 


yi ^ , 





la 


FINANCE AND LAND 


248 228 AtogwcMi 
184 144 Aoan Hume 
510 300 AreoW^aa 
173 no Bartaay Tach 
26 20% Ca-W* 

243 194 Candawr 

28 18 c anwa — i 

27': 17 EOtxC) 6 Gsi 
2S3 183 HaiM 
1B5 183 May 4 Sana 
1 83 151 l4qMW 
46 39 ns mm Loan* 

49 40 DO0V 


341 18 07 .. 

148 *1 110 78 01 

480 «+10 275 88 76 

173 *3 

£20% • .. 17.1 08 009 

238 • .. 57 2* 378 

20 .. .. 
27% 4% 1 J 47 125 

223 e-5 10.4 47 31 • 

100 61 8*31* 

MS +t <J 48 27.7 

45 

£<9 *1 n 1U .. 


FOODS 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


48 36% 

190 160 
393 291 
241 1B0 
133 106 
111 76% 


FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 

IQS’. 99 Treat ll'.S '991 '09% -% 

92% 04'.' FunrJ 5%V 1987-91 92% 

109% 98 . Em* »>% '991 108%4-J. 

If7% no Treat !?-.% 1992 ”0% -% 

106% 91 .Treat 10% 1992 105% -% 

107% 95'. Treat CW -% >992 IQ TV*-'. 
115% ICC- Em* ij .% 1992 114 • ->* 

l?rtlB7-E<en 13 ■% 1992 120* 

1Q6 94% Treat 10V 1993 MB'* -% 

118'. 103% Treat 12 •% 1993 U6 -'l 

90% T9'.P^« 6% 1993 09% 9- % 

125% Ill-Treat 13'.% 1993 124 J -% 

130 . IDS - Treat ia- •% 1994 129% 

124% "0 E»cn i; A, 1994 12^-*-% 

119% 97vE.cn 13 -V 1994 110% -% 

101% 8T. Treat B-% i9»4 WO'i -% 

ll7% iOO% Treat 17V '995 110% -A 

77% 60- Gat JV 1990-95 7?%#-% 

107’. 9l-E.cn 10 -S 1995 HP % -% 

123*- KB’- Treat 17-.V 1995 122% -% 

13D-.n2-.Trea* MV 1996 130. -% 

102 07 Treat 9V 1992-96 101% 

140’- 122 : Tins 15-.V 1986 139%*-% 

120 lil*E»<* 13--V 1996 127% -% 

83% 7« % Rome* 3V 1998 03 -% 

128* 11O Treat 13 .% '997 127% 

n0% 93% Em* 10 -V 1987 109 1 - • 

700 79 ■ Treat 0-V 1997 99% -% 

1<8% 122'- Em* i$V 1997 139.-*-% 

87 7 9* Treat 1995-00 88% *-V 

M»% 08-7 Em* 9-.V i960 105% -% 

145’: 126 . Tint 15 .'V 1998 145 

122 105 -E.cn i?V 1990 121 -1 

105 -- 08% Treat 9-V 1999 'WS -% 

124% 103% Em* 12%V 1999 123% -1 

, lij% 98% Tiaas 10--V 1999 111% -% 

110% Su- Cure 10 -v 1999 W: -'1 

131% 1 11% Treat 13V 2000 130% -1 

OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 

UJ9% 91%T'*as 10V 

106 89* Con* 9*V 

31% 25 -Care 9%> 

102% 9fr*- C*yv 9V 

135 -H7 .Treat MS 
109v 94-. Core lOV 

122 ; lor. E.cn 15V 

100 90 T.ms« 9*.% 

110-.- 93 ■ T>tM 10V 
135 . 1 18% Tiaat 1>%V 
121% 104 Treat 11--V 
TUP- 9»% Treat 10V 
59% 48% Puna 3 V 
106% 90% Core 9 -V 
J07-. 90. Core 9- V 
115% 9<. Em* 10 V 
132% ur» Treat 12 
94% 79% Treat 0V 
125% 104% Treat 11 'A 
iai 115% Treat 13’ V 
71% 57'iTieat 5-v 
92% 76"* Treat 7-.V 
133% 113: Em* 12V 

UNDATED 

45% 3B-.0an«cb «V 44% -% 

40% 3<% Wa In 3' V *0% -% 

51 % 44. Core J jV ST. -% 

34% 29'. Treat 3V 34 

28% 2<\ ConK»£ 2 )V 29 - « 

29 24-.Tiatt 2".V 28 'i -% 


»KTO K/V Baarer 

*Mac Cam 
*re-5 nan. 
micro. Cnaocai 
gm 

Bare* D4I50 
g^Bo m 
Orel © '•’it 
B» Banrol 
Canraig (W| 
Coffin 
Cram Brat 
0s » 

Ct»i ihoreeai 
Creda 
Do DM 

Qfct 6 Ei wvd 


Hoton 
Hoaorei 0*450 
nno Ow« *«J 


Yoretnra Oan 


-A 400 
«2 3 J 

•5 80 

*5 m 

57 

-2*. 700 
1-2 103 

I -2 to 
5il 

42 93 

80 

-1 00 

4l’i 07 

*1 100 


103 

47 

»2 33 


-2 11 1 
I *1 43 


335 

230 

190 

145 

105 

99 

1B0 

140 

ISO 

73 

76 

54 

187 

142 

183 

100 

210 

180 

205 

14V 

275 

234 

293 

225 

189 

131 

316 

ZSi 

263 

226 

800 

7GB 

215 

170 

270 

181 

06 

75 

567 

489 

290 

220 

no 

85 

95 

50 

615 

506 

70S 

486 

113 

93 

190 

150 

257 

215 

82’: 

1 66'; 

292 

250 

170 

152 

137 

127 

224 

157 

523 

300 

<08 

3*4 

•58 

• 22 

190 

164 

8*3 

520 

370 

105 

298 

216 

258 

210 

159 

138 


4 f 2.7 19-1 
20 111 .. 
11 1 S3 103 
gO 23 170 
40 4.4 31 0 
1&J ii i80 
140 50 74 

.. .. 210 
12.1 20 9-5 

9.7 S3 10 5 
30 20 120 
5-7 50 177 
74 70 203 

tO 27 187 
84 43193 

10 40 100 
103 30 114 
MU 41 113 


S3 40 120 

20 80 71 

40 40 183 
83 1.7 140 

110 83 160 

2 1 83 344 

80 53 >10 

120 80 100 
23 40 290 
400 40 180 
11.1 83 102 

375 10 .. 

03a .20 .. 
40 00 383 
170 0.1 112 


T8A 03 80 
S3 53 100 
*20 43 133 

93 «2 it 
93 43 12* 

184 30 110 
00 4.1 14* 

73 2! 220 
7* 70 13* 
7.1 80 110 

7.0 7.0 82 
20 20 287 
.. ..371 

B 83 210 
73 190 


143 43 82 
100 53 S3 
90 31 172 
23 7 0 150 

80 50 110 

29 ** 100 
130 *0 .. 
*87 43 140 
8.0 03 .. 
40 23 200 

01 80 110 
71 01 .. 

40 1.7 240 

40 30 181 

S 50 18* 
2* 233 
1 4 40 80 

1* 41307 

7 1 93214 
50 7.1 187 

70 12 283 

10 20 .. 
5.4 *5 90 

00 10 73 

87 40463 

10 51110 
110 60 1S3 
4.1 00 

64 73 17.1 

171 40 143 

100 a* 00 

50 63 85 

21 10 10.7 

43b 20 20 I 
140 1* 280 

130 87 213 
29 84 80 
180 30160 
80 6SH.1 
10.1 IB 220 
03 7* 81 
20 33 M.1 
120 53 10* 

88n 40109 
120 72123 
22 00 375 

7. 70 40 130 

57* 81 W0 
800 40 .. 
83 7* .. 
70 401B0 
121 60 21.1 
17.4 29 183 
27 21 90 
64 63 14.1 
103 81 186 
81 38 570 
39 50 83 
283 

.. ■ .. 317 
64 5 J 184 
88 43188 

40 4.1 110 
990 At .. 
107 30103 
66 63224 


10 03481 
80 30163 

293 851ft 
87 04223 
.. 210 
104 30 161 
60 4.7 76 
100 • 66 Til 
29 103 90 
1.7 40264 
TT4 40120 
20b 10210 
214- 74 242 
187 70 62 
7.1 46 820 


CINEMAS AND TV 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


<23 320 franc) mr <23 1 -8 UO 81142 

770 200 Kannao* frCOWa 202 -8 21 0B >55 

3S8 3'2 LM®T*a 388 *9 18 1 * I 183 

477 447 Lon Pvt WN 477 *4 14j 30 20.7 

100 Mown Own* 83% *1 20 21 140 

105 67 Pram O' WHOM 99 41 21 2J17 0 

79 58% Quaare Meal 79 >2 Z2VUKI 

*05 375 San* MM 'A' «1 -3 88 00 19 7 

01 56 Swat *0 •-! 17 21190 

309 146 Tnoraai Fore IBS • . . 70 40 193 


225 176 Anp* TV *■ 
43 27 Grempun 

2*0 176 KTV H/V 
350 263 LWT HOT 
276 >88 Sot TV *' 
J10 153 TVS N/V 
43 31 T 8W 


129 59 153 
24 80 3 0 

TI4 55 95 
213 87 128 
12.7 40 112 

114 86 99 

26 82 115 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


INDEX-LINKED 

119. 'ia%Ttaa5 il 7V 
K0 * 90 : Treat «. ?v 
l'J . '00% Treat IL 7V 
99 - * • Treat IU -% 
98 : 93% Trent 43 V 
101 "■ 9t '.Treat il Jv 
90 - 9!VT»e**li3 v 
K>i 1 97 Treat il 2 V 
85 : 79% Treat IU % 
92v 87% Tiaas lU V 
90% 88 : Trent IU <*> 


1988 119-a 

'990 103. 

1996 113% 

MO' 99 

M«a 96% 

2006 icn-i 

2009 90% 

21>l »DI . 

2013 85'. 

2016 92- 

2020 80** I 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


9% s 
260 230 
->69 304 
590 *29 
480 410 
638 423 
57 36 

32% 2C. 
42% 33% 
51 32 

73 *6 

»07 % 80*: 
262% 217 : 
216 152 
389 2*9 
89 66 

248 160 
31 20 

430 333 
7* 6* 

438 319 
98 138 
B3D VA 
677 439 
*0 32 

838 878 
559 417 
306 208 
955 672 
IU so 
*36 3>2 
80 83 

s-*- 191 102 

16% 13- 
3*5 2SO 
ll-a 


1 


S3 mm , nvl 

65 »n*oa*nar (Mgwvl 

08 *ut f«i« Z 

0% Bmawnei 

Be Ban. CH »~MX5 
S Ban. Leun- »>l» 
90 Ba«- im. u« 

0* Ban* £* Suinano 
29 BaKVrt 
10 B'rren Mm 
S3 Carer Mai 
36 Cams 
«*-. cnata Marerenwi 
33% Crocor: 

32 O-a 

*6 Core Sare «*w t 
80% Cfflre.r»*» 

'17 . Dvuitcna Bare 
52 mu tinanca 
*9 C«”M w 

66 Gureren. Paul 

00 Haren 

20 Dt iM3f 

03 h* Wm«> 

0a » ». 6^-1941 
>8 IlMDOtal 

38 0-9 4 ?%■%■. 
65 twin t mwton 

39 l> -ret 
32 Manvm 

78 M^e.ire Sact 
17 M-Swid 
08 Hal Bute Bk 
^2 A* Wretl 
SO Okhwi 
il2 *•. -umi| 

83 Rua B>nc 
02 Vi*ti**d >41 H*J 
13 - Acw Bre ry, Cl" 
SO f v O’ Scot 

!• - Sewootre 


90 30 . . 

.. 303 
150 53 . . 


E8 

2*0 • .. 
*57 -3 

552 w-12 

475 *5 

638 

« • - 
E30% a -I 
E*r, •-% 
50 

69 s -I 

£9*'. -1% 

2247 -I 

216 .6 


9’S e-w 

£' >J *3 


160 67 113 

180B 30 11 I 
28 8 4 8 ?g 

132 28 205 
413 45 15 5 
28 4 9 156 

139 *5 . 
208 .5 

13 269> 

3* 52 108 

60 01 
OT 49 .. 
*0 13 131 

IB 9 4 9 22 6 

2 7 30 I* J 

5 5 4 4 >8 I 

957 J52S6 

1>0 4-2 10 f 

174 * i re 
118 62 2 8 
25 7 31 1.9 
300 * 6 >0 

2 3 SI 1*6 
229 26 131 
36 * 7 0 280 

*03 44 74 

5M J92*3 
>86 * 3 126 

18 26208 

6 5 5 0 15.7 

13 i.-w Q too 
33 7 ‘%2J 15 9 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


ELECTRICALS 


lip 

■80 

*8 Emn 

2« 








■il 

*onea Lflfn&flure 

80 



S3 




300 

2Ub 

Crenc 

204 


53 

46 

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S3 



140 

*w>0 Sue 





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3*3 






„ J 

444 

3.-H 

BwWW 

471 

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73i 

178 

AM 

ZB 

19* 

Ml 

101 

95 

AW 

33 1 

0*3 

4 PI 

101 

22* 

80 

172 

AW 

AO 

298 

aj7 

AM. 

ISO 

403 

'30 

250 

Aik 

AOC 

e7 

32 

Ara 

30 

23 

*m 

301 

355 

a* r 

0T 

62 

AS« 

3C6 

255 

»ta 

395 

363 

Ats 

60 

. P% 

Aur 

JO 

265 

Art 

69 

G7 

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2® 

130 

aa. 

*50 

363 

BE" 

82 

67 

a E- 

380 

077% | 

aa 

an 

355 ' 

BTT 

222 

163 

Bat 

26% Mb. 

3a* 

580 

*20 

Bat 

303 

216 

Bat 

200 

122 

Bar 

174 

<13 

aw 

*95 

180 

Bar 

56 

40 

Bw 

195 

180 

Be' 

32 

» 

Bai 

198 

138 

Bm 

118 

M 

Bm 

180 

318 

Bm 

29 

19 

Pa 

Bn' 

233 

132 

are 

H5 

65 

Sre 

!» 

100 

Bn 

33? 

f* 

9— 

469 

JiQ 

Bn 

35 

26 

fen— 

335 

260 

Bat 

205 

i«0 

Em 

•120 

»s 

&= 

'33 

. 8* . 

B-T 

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1«S 

t.b 



’•a 

Bw 

229 

203 

Bre 

92 

3S 


336 

’B9 

Bax 

262 

i5> 

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Bn 

353 

285 

285 

220 

Bo* 

10 

6: 

Bn 

3» 

258 

So 

»- ie% i 

30 

>23 

71 

Bre 

383 

JQ 

Bre 

06 

fS 


*3 

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Bre 

4* 

35 

9* 

178 

iiO 

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1JD 

>•5 

B> 

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158 

B> 

115 

91 

B- 

36-1 

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3*9 

296 

b-n 

6* 

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23 


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THE 


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TIMES 


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*•< i r. s-> - 


GENERAL APPO 




April 3 , 1986 5 U 


S, N . 

- «. > " 
~ r. 


R eading through previ- 
ous articles on this 
page it was- surprising 
to find how rarely the 
word enterprise was 
mentioned. Yet this is the core of 
Britain's problems today and the 
key to its solution. Achievement, • 
results and success are ^ product^ 
of mixing skills and motivation •••■ 
with experience, a mixture where • • 
me key el ement in tite.packagcis. 
the word enterprise, used in its"' 
broadest sense. If the enterprise 
element is right, the other ele- • 
meats will woric well together. . - 
There is no shortage of .enter- ' 
prise in Britain today. Unfiwtu- ' 
nately, much of it is channelled in 
unconstnictive directions — into 
crime, rioting, city scandals a nd 
lax evasion. 

Britain not only needs more 
enterprise. It needs to ensure that 
this enterprise'is used positively in 
the interests of society as a whole. 
Fostering enterprise is not just 
valuable in itself, ft gives people 
more control over their live^ -it 
encourages self-sufficiency ft 
makes people- less slaves to their: 
organizations. It also provides : th&':' 
freedom to make life in<f wriric' : 
more satisfying. ' - V • 

1 But perhaps even more impbr-- 
taut, it is enterprise and entrepre- - 
nenrial effort that create the new 


* — -. a « '• 

- - * 1 

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* : ' ' 

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ideas, new companies and new 
jobs. It is the main employment 
growth sector. It is- the key to the 
level of prosperity and job 
satisfaction. 

4 One ’reason for so many nega- 
tive side effects of enterprise in 
Britain is that our institutions and 
organizations are so traditional. . 
Theyspend;so much time looking 
back into the precedents of history 
and -.pandering 'to or appeasing 
vested , interests. Our .educational ‘ 
system has been geared to produc- 
ing bureaucrats and -academics, 
not- self-sufficient enterprising in- 
dividuals. Most enterprise 
emerges. despite the system, not 
because ofit. 

: That is the magnitude of the 
challenge. What is the answer? To 
start with there will be little or no 
real progress if this whole issue is 
seen in party political terms. 

Historically, enterprise educa- 
tion has fended to be concerned 
with small busness,-but the basic 
skills are much wider. They 
indude such characteristics as the 
ability to have ideas, do things . 
differently, take initiatives, be a. 
selfstarter —get thiqgs done; 

; So what can be done? Here it is . 
important to. recognize that some 
things are happening. Change is 
-taking place in many - areas and 
this progress needs to be recog- 


Enterprise is the 
vital factor that is 
so often forgotten 
in the search for the 
key to prosperity, 
says Bruce Lloyd 


S ffgSl Ip 
Ji m 

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V 


niKd, encouraged and built on. 

However, the education system 
needs further injections of enter- 
prise from top to bottom. It seems 
relatively easy to have crash 
programmes for new computer 
skills, but giving enterprise a 
higher priority seems much more 
difficult. Recently mini-enterprise 
schemes have been started. This 
kind of project should be second 
nature to all business schools, 
enterprise agencies and education- 
al establishments throughout the 
country. - The end product of 
schooling should be not only the 
life skills to equip youngsters to 
look for a job, but the even more 
important ability to create your 
own work and earn a living. The 


latter is very different. The energy 
and enterprise is there, if only it 
can be encouraged and harnessed 
to good effect. 

The same basic issues arise in 
the polytechnics, universities and 
other institutes of higher educa- 
tion, again recognizing that some 
things have changed in the past 
decade — science parks and new 
enterprise programmes — but links 
with industry and commerce are 
not close enough. The new gradu- 
ate enterprise programmes are still 
the exception, rather than the rule. 

Things are changing in the 
business schools and management 
centres. Many more MBAs are 
getting involved in running their 
own companies, or moving into 


the venture capita! industry- But 
still the small firm sector is viewed 
with suspicion by many academ- 
ics. Venture .creation courses are 
active links with the small busi- 
ness sector but are still exceptions 
rather than the rule. Perhaps the 
MBA needs to change its emphasis 
from administration to enterprise, 
but awarding MBEs could cause 
confusion with the other award. 

Overall government expendi- 
ture on training has increased 
enormously during the past five 
xears to an annual figure of more 
than £1 billion. Ye: the Youth 
Training Scheme is still dominat- 
ed by a "skill" rather than 
enterprise approach. It is begin- 
ning to change, and perhaps the 
two-year course will help, but it is 
hard' not to feel that attitudes and 
priorities in this area still leave 
much to be desired. 

Contrast the Manpower Ser- 
vices Commission budget with the 
few hundred pounds budget of the 
Education Enterprise Network, 
who are desperately trying to 
effect change in teaching attitudes 
and methods. 

The adult-education industry 
has a vast network of hobby- 
courses — Britain must be the 
most sophisticated hobby society 
in the world — and this can be an 
invaluable base for income earn- 


ing. enterprise growth. Yet, very 
little attention is given to how 
these activities can be used to help 
people earn a living. 

I n this whole area the media, 
whether television or news- 
papers. have much to con- 
tribute. Again, there has 
been some change in the 
past decade. But the Open Univer- 
sity and Open Tech are both still 
dominated by the tradition of 
academic teaching, rather than an 
enterprise approach to learning 
With a few commendable excep- 
tions, newspapers are generally 
more preoccupied with bingo than 
constructive enterprising activi- 
ties. Television is preoccupied 
with panel games. 

In another area what efforts are 
being put into injecting construc- 
tive enterprise-orientated training 
programmes into our prisons? The 
latest results of the prison work 
programme indicated a shambles, 
if not a scandal. Yet the prisons 
probably hold one of the largest 
concentrations of entrepreneurial 
talent in the country! 

In some parts of the country 
there are Livewire Twinning pro- 
grammes. or Job mate schemes, 
but these successful ideas should 
be applied much more widely and 
much more quickly, if the real 


needs of society and the individual 
are to work together. 

The idea of job clubs started 
recently by the MSC is a com- 
mendable initiative, but both job 
centres and the MSC itself tend to 
be over-focused on traditional 
approaches in the way they oper- 
ate. with emphasis on skills and 
employment rather than 
enterprise. 

Much has also changed in the 
City and the financial world in the 
past few years — the Business 
Expansion Scheme, the growth of 
the OTC and the USM. the 
expansion of the venture capital 
industry, the explosion in manage- 
ment buyouts, the loan guarantee 
scheme, the growth of small 
business centres, workshops and 
cooperatives, as well as the priva- 
tization programme. 

Britain did have its first Enter- 
prise week in May 1985, but it is a 
pity that this year is Industry Year, 
not Enterprise Year. If enterprise 
can be put into industry then there 
is a chance of solving its other 
problems. Industry Year needs to 
have enterprise at its core. If 
enterprise is not encouraged and 
developed constructively there 
will be little cause for optimism. 

Bruce Lloyd is chairman of the 
Business Graduates Association 


Appointment* Phone: 01-481 4481 


Appointments Phone: 01-481 4481 


" 1 ••• 






Original solutions for business in London 






V 1 

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British businesses are changing fast Nowhere are the 
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if you can provide technical solutions to business problems 
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THE WORLDS SECOND L AfiGEST 
COMPUTER COMPANY 




|l « 
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t ere Al 

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Fire Service Inspectorate — Fire Prevention (London) 

Hie Inspectorate monitors the way in which fireaudiorides perform tbeir 

fancrions mider fire services and foe precautions legislation, advises the 

Seosory of State bo Gre serviwnwtteregeiierallyi and participattsiii official 
■ enquarks. 

%u will IteprinwrilyconcOTied with foe inspection of fire prevention 
■.vrark nndeiSten by Joed authority fire brigades, and for providing them 
vwi'th a consuhariwand advisory service on Bre prevention problems 
'foci tiding- the implantation of foe fire Preraatiom Act 1971and its 
e : nnM ,KK mewd or ocaiDied bv the Crown. Taste is 


involvement as a member of technical committees and m the 
preparation of technical memoranda. You must hare wide local authority 
udfermed fire service experience in rhe UK at senior IctcI with abfliry to 
work effectively with senior management m central and fool government 
You most have attended a long courre on^Iiispectmg Officer and- 
Advanced Fire Prevention courses at die Fire Service College. 

Some travelling in England and Wales, and exceptionally elsewhere, will be 

SALARY: as Inspector Grade II £21,185-123,480. 

h-rt further details and an-applkation form (to be returned by 24 April 1986) 
r , 0 Civil Service Commission, Alencon Link. Basingstoke, 

^r.in ]JB, or telephone Basingstoke (0256) 468551 (answering service 
- - ’ - - operates outride office bouts). 

Please quote ref: G/6847- 

The GvilServjceis aa eqnal oppoitnnlty 


OFFICE 


PC 





Recruitment Speiiiilists 




SALES PROFESSIONALS 
IBM PERSONAL COMPUTER 

LONDON • SOUTH EAST BIRMINGHAM 
BRISTOL ■ MANCHESTER ■ EAST ANGLIA 

The IBMPC Maik^Hacerontinueatoo^tihfimostesritingfiiture 
for DP Sales Professionals. Our clients, the cream of the PC Industry, 
have opportunities for PROFESSIONAL SALES MEN & WOMEN 
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develop a career within a rapidly expanding, dynamic, profitable, 
secure but demanding and dtailenging'company is paramount 


Our clients are the 'Blue Chips’ of the PC Industry. If you are a 
*Bhie Chip’ of the DP sales profession, these are some of the 
opportunities we can talk about: 

BRANCH MANAGERS: OTEto£40K 


MAJOR ACCOUNT SALES 

MEN & WOMEN OTEto£30K 


SALES EXECUTIVES: OTEto£30K 


RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANTS: (to succeed with us) OTE to £30K 


PLUS: TELE SALES (Surrey), PC ENGINEERS (London), 
CUSTOMER SUPPORT (London & Surrey). 


For an informal discussion please ring Nigel Wood on 
. . . . _ 01-530 7988. or write to 


■ POBesoufceiitd.; Moriey'HquYefiiil^ 

Tel: 01-580 .7 ?8'5 (24 brfj J S 



us; N u mber : One': 

ite'ei ; n u mberc-r men and 
k ^?Hvor':(an ! to ibecorii e: - L-rp} d. r : a a ■ : V ' ■ ; 

I SSENIORSALES EXECUTIVES 

■ re xper fenced jofcfc la! s- in th em : 

Ihe p t<>5UCCC^rd ' 

l i n'atro aaJ con ipa ^ o ti ; ? h c-t-i ( d fc^e v e r s 

con su m e 6 ! es At v i th y ou ./j 

iooe^t^gasongel^ 
^J^pntqr^Bcad^.;- v a 


















GENERAL APPO 



FINANCIAL CONSULTANCY 

A GROWTH AREA OF THE MOMENT 
AND OF THE FUTURE - DON’T MISS OUT! 




FPS (Management) Ltd is a leading firm of financial consultants and because of phenomenal expansion in 1 986 is 
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The right individuals (aged 234- and based in London) will be energetic and intelligent, highly motivated, 
hardworking and able to absorb new ideas quickly. 

Full training will be provided 

Remuneration expected to be in excess of £15,000, and lead to management in the first year. 

This is a superb opportunity to develop your own business and career path in a growing company and in an ex- 
citing industry. 

For further details phone the Recruitment Manager on 01-240 9058. 




TECHNICAL 

SUPPORT 

SPECIALIST 


Your systems expertise 
can move you ahead at Canaan 


Canaan Computer offers chaBenges tew ethers can. We’re at the cut- 
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with IBM 
BAL (As- 
language skills 

(FOCUS, RAMIS, NOMAD, etc.). \bu should be an independent 
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An Equal Opportunity Employer 



CANAAN 





City of London 

Common Crver and 
Ser jeant-at-Arms 


Applications are invited for ihe Office of COMMON CRYER AND 
SERJEANT-AT-ARMS. Candidates should be between 45 and 55 years of age. 
have administrative and ceremonial experience, preferably a University 
decree or similar hicher educational qualifications and knowledge of one or 
more fureien lanquunes. Service background with staff (raining would be an 
advantage. 


The duties are administrative and secretarial, and also entail: attendance 
upon the Lord Mayor bearing the Mace on Ceremonial occasions: 
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The salary will he within the scale of £14.904 per annum rising by four annual 
increments to £16.344 inclusive. 


The successful candidate will be required to take up the appointment in 
January 1987. 


This post is subject to the LMGSC ring fence procedure: with their agreement 
it is being offered on an unrestricted basis. Applications are invited from 
anyone with appropriate qualifications and experience but priority will be 
given to ex-employees of the G.L.C. or the M.C.C s. 


Application form, particulars and details of duties may be obtained from the 
Town Clerk. Corporation of London. P-O. Box 270. Guildhall. London. EC2P 
2EJ. Telephone Ol-Wlh 3030 Extension 2431 or 2432. and should be returned to 
him by 9th May. 1986. 


/f 




A role for a mature physician — probably now a Medical Director 
or Head of Clinical Research/Medical .Affairs — whose self- 
confidence, qualifications and impeccable history will generate 
peer-group confidence as 


Medical Director 


Pharmaceuticals 


£ negotiable 


The responsibilities in this post are to manage all medical aspects of 
the organisation's academic, media, professional, research and 
regulatory relationships, and to provide first class advisory and 
information services for colleagues, prescribes and others. 


Candidates who are 4 5 -phis, working in industry or government 
and earning c £35/40,000 are likely to be interested in this 
demanding assignment. Base: south east. 


Please write in complete confidence to Roger Stephens, who is 
advising, or telephone him for a private initial discussion. 

Ref. 8606. 


Roger Stephens 

& Associates 



Management Search • Selection • Development 
1-3 Park Street, Old Hatfield, Hertfordshire AL9 5 AT. 
Telephone: 07072 75361 


„ Sales 
Manager 


Attractive Salary plus car. 

AA Gnw I M nttemi Ltd., bon* of the world's 
leading irenufartiMU of high qudhy w h— ifa , 
hatfag a record of mcckM growth, and a M£dy 
prograttbe laanomant torn, «nd now wbhas to 
raenrit a Saks Maugar for Hs UK oparatioo band 
at Hi Brooborautfi baajqtartars. 


Ri|«ttlnBtttte M anure Wnstor. the soccwa- 
hd •ppHcwtwBba expected to Ind and Motivate 
s su omw M s tew fa r ce aodoidwiwgngtaflt 

lagwitgauMMa, 


i attar mb or Unfa, prefwaWy of 
graduate afibre, most p oma ce exceptional 
fra* raniil k Mg Map— I aaftfihi if 
. ref ractory industry or efcaaiy ra tel ed fl ald i . 


An attrecUre retey pretev. tedodtag a compny 
or la of fnad, tngrthar whh I mai t oii reMaict to 
thkwypiaareBi mb of North Wait England. 


■ - -*-« -- « — ■ iltil ■ firf! 

vppvy m vmc&BSt coTHjoe rK» r ynog na 
of CV tadudtag cur re n t salary to: 

tftr. LB. Hahn 



AJP.Gran Refractories InL, 

JL n — 4 frunti " - ■ - » 

iaxx noao oomn, DnxiiDonnp, 
WM L624S& 



RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 

• 35 INii-w Broad Street, London EGSfVt 1 r>JH 
.. Tel: 01-588 35B8 or O'l • S8B 3576 
/ Telex t\Ja- 8 B’73'7^ Ffi»x Mo. OT-&3S 32 T S 


Scope to advance in 



PROJECT MANAGER- 


1 " C. • rf"- '-re* a-* 




- : -■ ,vu-: n cc "Cl jemukiss** -vi i 


cmr 


MAJOR INTERNATIONALBANK 

For this appointment we require candidates of graduate calibre, aged 

devetopnSTan intentelSna corporate environment with manegemem responsittiittes. meaHy. .. 
theSSdng sector but applicants wan pmven experience in the Peagn Pi after large 

accounting suites using structured methodology and fourth generalwnBrigu^waten ^^ A^^^g^'P* 
and other leading mainframes, operating systems and applications software is neces^ : Repcrt^^M.r.af^^^TO 
successful candidate will be responsible for all aspects of the management of untat ' 

instaflaiiOT of a new. sophisiiratedaccountinglfoformation system. Technic^ ei^lenw is essen^p^^e^Wyop^^ 

pressure artoestaMsh a high level of user conffoencewito the mininTum erf 

- £30,000. mortgage facilrty, pension, life assurance, family medical cover and assistance with relocation expenses. Applications n 
strict confidence under reference PMN4406/TT to the Managing Grector: CJA. 


Prospects exist to advance In Senior Group or Divistoftal Marketing Management 



WEST END • ....... . £18,000- £22,000 + CAR 

A UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY IN A MAJOR, EXPANDING INTERNATIONAL HOTELS AND CATER ING GROUP 

For this new appointment, we seek cancfidates of graduate calibre, aged 27-35. with a background in the ma»kx^^°tfjn-c-g-or 

consumer services with successful organisations in these fields noted for their maiksting methods. The must metode « 

as a Brand Manager or eqigvaJent, accountable for aH aspects ol the marketing function, including profit responsfoaty. wrtn adcmiorai 

sales eiqjerienca advantageous. Reporting to the Group Marking Executive, the successful candidate will spearhead the retaincn 

and major development of an existing charge card operation sending all divisions of tfas diverse Group andtageted at ffrthfoe . 
corporate dient and the general public. Essential qualities are an enquiring, analytical mnd, cxjnwnuntcabon stalls, commercial flair 
and the abi&ty to achieve results. Initial salary negotiable Cl 8 , 000 - £22.000. car, contrfoutoiy pension, fife assurance, freearoy 
BUPA and assistance with relocation. Applications in strict confidence under reference GMM4407/TT to the Managing Director CJA. 


A demanding, interesting arid autonomous appointment 


IOD 


agtAKCH LIAISON OFFICER 


LONDON 

f - ‘ 


+ CAR < 


; ; '. J' T ' ; -i. ’sX- rS'.-JT. ,?W 5 I 

- v j ; INSTITUTEOFOIReCTQaar 

On behalf of our cflents. we rnvfte appfcaivnsforlhis^ F*Sttibri4nDirr‘^ A#r*vs^9^^^36-45. who have fast 

hand knowledge of. and sympathy with, the interests of leaders in thebuaness comrtfohfty.iwhe Comprise the membership ctf the 
KID. The Branch Liaison Officer, as the fink between the fnstftute 's headquarters and its & branches (UK and oyetseas ), wfl atte nd 
branch meetings and give guidance on a wide range of poficy issues and administrative matters, such as finance,^ anangements for 
speakers, committee elections etc. An additkxiai irrqxjrtant aspect will be the channelling of Ihe lOD’s Poficies to its membership aid, 
in turn, conveying their views to the KID'S officials and departeients. irr^xjitantpetsonalaltriauteswMin diJde commercia l 
awareness, the abflity to get on with people in an advisory and problem-solving capacity, combtnad with stamina and sefcriottvSHon. 
Initial salary negotiable £t 6.000-C20.000 + car. non-contributory pension with free life assurance, free medical insurance. 
Applications, in strict confidence, under reference BLO4409nT, to the Managing Director. CJA. 


35 m BROAD STRfft, UBTOI EC2M 1«. TaEPHOJt 01-588 3588 or 01-588 3576. TBEt 887374. BUC 01-6389216. 


0f£AKtSAn08S RBRIRM ASStSttMCE M RffiRWTMBIT nfiASETOBME; 01-6281539, 


0 


A Dynamic Manager fortnnr: ^ [ 
London Women’s Screening timt: 


U-. r \ 


c.£16,000 + benefits 


Bl/PA Metficaf Centre is ihe leading 
wue in health s cre e nin g and 
preventive metfirine with 14 Merfical 
Centres operating successfully around 
the UK. 


For the expanding Women's Screening 
Unit siUiaLed near King's Cross, we're 
looking for a Manager with the 
commercial awareness to take over the 
day-to-day running of its operabons. 
This new post wffl demand, on the one 
hand, an administrator capable of 
onanianga variety of services and 
supervising a 32 strong 
mukHfiadpKned team and. on the 
other, a strong 'ideas' person (o 
develop and promote the unit to ensure 
its profitability whilst main taming the 
very highest standards. 

Ideally in your JUs. you 11 have already 
demonstrated a talent for management 
and first-rate communication skills in a 
o»mmer rial environment- not 


necessarily in health care, although 
this would naturally be an advantage. 
Certainly a commitment to the 
concepts of private and preventive 
medicine is essentiaL Thisisan 
excellent opportunity with genuine 
prospects in a progressive, successful 
and expanding company which is always 
receptive to new ideas. A benefits 
package inducting non-contributory 
pension, mortgage-subsidy and. of 

course, bee B UFA wDbr offered. . 

Do you have the blend of skills In meet ' ■ 
(his challenge? Lei uskrewrby wnflng. 
with full CV tic Kate Youll perstmnel 
Manager. BUPA Medk'af Centre. / 
Battle Bridge H<tuse. Jim Grays Inn 
Road. London WCiXbbll. 
Tet01-JU7ij4«. 



BUPA 

Medical Centre 


CURATORIAL OFFICER 

GRADE E/F 


The Royal Armouries is looking &x ■ 
qualified and experienc e d person to loir the 
research soft of die Natioaal Museum ol 
Anns snd Armouc 

The person appointed wiO asset die research, 
cataloguing, paWicaoons sod exhibitions, 
answer enquiries, and help m the large study 

coflecnocs. 

Applicants should normally have a degree, 
preferably with first or second class honoors 
in History or History of An, an equivalent 
or higher qualification, but exceptional candi- 
dates having extensive practical experience 
in the field of ants and armour wiO also be 
considered- A working knowledge of at least 
one modern foreign language h essentnL 


Salary Grade E £8452 to £1 1.2G5 pa 
G rade F C6.J03 to C8.9I7 pj. 

In addition there is a London Weighting 
Allowance ol Cl_Vri pj.. Suiting salary 
according to qualifications and experience. 
Further dei ads and dpphcalusn form can he 
obtained from Aim S.J. tX’Uscn. 
ftrwmd Stilisn, Royal Armouries, 

HM TovtrafLouLm. EC3M -MB, 
or uhphw: at-M63S8Eti 352. 

Please ref. Tl CR. 

Closing date for receipt of applications is 
Friday 2nd May 198b. 

The Royal Armouries is an Equal 
Opportunity Employee 


ROYAL ARMOURIES 


THf NUHiN'UMl'SKI MpF 
ARMS AND AKMUl' R 


- ' 1 .dUO-lCy '.i", ' ! ‘ . r • 3 >fT O- jZ.’.'.i 

s -r\3 ar 


ij> as 



If you're set on having 
a better-paid, more stim- 
ubting, more challenging 
career, tften recent events 
at the Sun Affiance Croup are 
certain to rank as the hottest 
news youll read in today's paper. 

What you might not be aware of is the 
fact that Sun Alliance lias joined forces with 
Phoenix Assurance Group and Property Growth 
Assurance to form one of the most powerful 
financial organisations in Great Britain today. 

Sun Alhance investment and Life Services, 
one nl' the Groups vital national sales teams, 
are offering excellent opportunities to people 
who'd like to succeed in the UK's fastest- 
growine and most dynamic industry. 

If you join us as one of our direct sales con- 
sultants, youll be brained to give people valuable 
advice on liow our plans can help them. And 
you’ll benefit from a career which promises 


‘ news hasi^ketf <^yoo w^Be^ only 
one who wants to head for ihe Sun.- v- r - 



Contact Derek Forbes an Ol-680 OGO&’ y’ 

- 'r “„ 7 “" r’“ M k* . Or write to him at Sun Alliance Investment 

unlinuted tarnmus potential first rate promotion and Life Services, LeeoUausefffirfv Street- 
prospects and lifelong security. Croydon CR9 I LU. 



Are you earning £20,000 - £100,000 p.a. and 
seeking a new job? 

Connaught has probably helped more execu- 
tives to find new appointments through its suc- 
cessful executive marketing programme than 
any other organisation. 

Contact us for a free confidential fee assess- 
ment meeting. If you are currently abroad, ask 
for our Expat Executive Services. 

Telephone: 01-734 3879 (24 hours) 



tight 


32 Savte Row, London, W1 
i The Executive Job Search Professionals 


TTVE lor old ess 
frvnhl sMpptno nitminn la 
r« ct rnainb- the Crmlvr Lon- 
don JIM Could MUI vouny 
ponon wtsMna K, Hart furtNcr 
a win tartw SaLarv and 
eomm accord ko aw and ns. 
tt'llfeimon Braiiwn Limited. 
JJO 2X4 Lon? Lane. Lccxton 
SCI 4QE 01J03 «MS_ _ 


lua MMb 
MtetMarcMiMraliLUL 
XC-'t. f dl. partial, ar 


«Hh C.V. ami Mabd m^SSrt. 
cm la BOX AI3 - 


SAUS CUC. 

BankingitiarkMlna Ooc*. 

around. Fluent German and, or 

Swcdffii. Eincmiv irnri 
C2SDG0 sul Blrnltrtm A«y Dt 
495 9993 


BCU Clous very unseiuatue 

inim lady ID help run a vrrv 
■HirreKful drtlcalcwn tn Ful- 
Ham. Please pfiorw Mr king Ol 
7fc> 4000 


L 



Sfifl ow wj smt 

‘ SwA I 3 


Investment & Life Servic^' T ^ 1 ik 

THE CAREER BUILDER': 

A member at U*? Sun Abnce llnmp. 





WANTED ■ 
SALES MANAGERS 


Can you recruiL train and motivate? I can and' 
I earn oyer £8.000 per month. If you. dan, 
phone 01-938 Z056. v 


S. 

-L. 


Dynamic m b '.."I r 

FOHTNEW COSMETICS 
AND 

or i 

"WfkeL An «xtrenH3tuacUE6»* KmunenMaB 








-V 


V 


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*'■***** 




V 




I “ .>• K 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 



RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 

35 New Broad Strait, London ECEM 1NH 
TaiiCn-SBB 3SBSorOl-58S 3576 
Toiox No. 00*737*1 Fax Mo. 01-G3B 9016 




-rf-TTV'-n ; >»..< 'i rl'-.n.WlV 


liBSI* 


TRAIMING OPPORTUNITIES WITH AN 
OVERVIEW OF INDUSTRY 


•• *-* r'y -This i*an csramjNiTY n'vom with modern electronic techniques and 

■ S.Lr ~BQ UtEME HTAtS AX- THE SAME TIME WEWIU. OFFER TOU TRAINING WHICH SHOULD LEAD 
...... ... TO CORPORATE MEMBERSHIP CF THE 1N5TI rUTION OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERS. 

... TrakEAREajwiENTLy'opPOT^ 

COMMUNICATIONS ENGINEERING 

- - The Radio Regulatory Division, London puce a key role in regulating 

. THE USE OF THE RADIO FREQUENCY SPECTRUM WTTHIN THE UK. IT ALSO HAS A MAJOR 
NKSOnATINO' HOLE TO ENSURE THAT THE INTEKffiTS OF THE UK ARE SAFEGUARDED 

... curing International discussions. 

As PART OF THE PROFESSIONAL ENGlNEQdNG STAFF, YOU WILL HELP TO PROVIDE 
TKHlOCAL AOT) ENGlNEERIN6 SUPPORT needed TO FORM AND IMPLEMENT POLICY; 

•/ • j. j ASSCT WITH SraCTTRi^ ENGINEEIUJffi 51OTOTT; PBOWIOT TECHNICAL EICPERTIffi IN THE 
--•* '•'••• USE ©FALL KIND50F RADIO SYSTEMS. YfcfU WILL CARRY OUT LABOBAIORY AND FIELD 
. . / ‘ v : : WORK TD ACQUIRE INFORMATT0N ON ALL ASPECTS OF R/UMOCX3MMUNICATTONS. 

^ ; : 'T; OBTAIN IN 1986, A GOOD HONOURS DEGREE IN PHYSICS 

OR ELBCTW£Ak/fcLECTroNK/(XMMU^^ 

- • ■■ EnGKEEIUNG CODNOT-’sDffiT 2 EXAMINATION M APPROPRIATE 5U8JBCTS OR HAVE 

higher A ctEPimE-QUALincArm 


- EVALUATION ENGINEERING 

r ’ -THENAro^V^^ andMeasure Laboratory is »wrtly to move 
-. * \J '• : TO B^FWX'ED OCILmES ATTHE BlAnONAL PHYSICAL LABORATORY TeDDINGTON. THE 
>■ Laboratory carries Outstaiutory evaluation and approval of the design of 

: . ' .• « ; Alf-NEW OB. MODIFIED WEIGHING OR-MEASUUNG EQUIPMENT RANGING FROM DFMOnON 

-TI^'-WHGHIW TO 0MPUTHHXTNTROLLED FUEL DISPENSING SYSTEMS. 

. Y3U WlLLBEimOLVe) WITH THE MANURVCTUEER FROM THE DEVELOPMENT 
_•* y. StAGEP^WtftDSiiOBiSSUftE'^tSACClSU^BEUABILrrY AND FREEDOM FROM 

: rtttUWJLENT USE OF EQClPtCNrTHE work PROVIDE A HIGH ENGINEERING INTEREST 

;' T ' JtN^VlNGTHE LATECTTO J iNOtOCT KSTRUMENWU3N FTEUX 

‘ :*T • f ; ; ' itoU|flJST««?E, OR 08IMN W'1986, ATWOD HONOURS DECTS IN ELECTRICAL 
OS tL^ri^TtENGiNCni»fc o4habe passed the EngkeeringCoijncil!s Burr 2 

:■ J ; ^ '■ ' 

r * '• --\Sfl£AS^lE8aKF£aQ65ttoK^^ £1365 Inner L oNiX3NVteGHTiNG)Aax»DMG 




TRW pUCE (WER THE NEXT 3 YEARS - W. ADDITION TO NORMAL ANNUAL MY INCREASES- 

.‘V'T : JRog fURTHerottaiisand An application form fro be returned by 25 April 
: | 986) wramtot^ Alencon Lnac, Basingstoke, Hants 

^4G2J 1 JBTqr telephone Basingstoke (0256) 468551 (answering service operates 

csirsii^oHTCEH^^ 

Y p " i TYte CIVIL $ervk£ i5AN EQUALOPPOTTUNTTY employer 


□ERMTTMENT OF 

TRADE SlINDOSM 


The pioneers of endowmentTnortgages urgent 
need ntore inspectors to ibint^^ 


siucces§^jl 1 apfficante will have some knowledge 
dthe mortgage market and ^teothe ability to develop 
mortgage bustoessalongskierour new portfolio d 
saving and per^ plans: ■ : • 

aJhe flwrti - 

; VVbriang with the *Ptus fectore? we build into, our 
pbfiqfes, the Tewards inciude a basic salary 




mortage scheme; ‘ 

1 Itthafs a diaHeftge that appeals, to you dial 100 


[filpiiiiipi 


THE living landscape 
TRUST 
DDfECTOlt . 




A weR ustabS sh wl. tatv* 
n^onal ofoanssttoa is 
sufang an a d dttonat &- 
Bcutnc. 25-32 yuan to 
m— Han and de velop te 
exist in o busi n ess amongst 
pratesskmal flWBttOBS 
m Europe. Apcficams. 
pfetetaWy graduXes. 
snoukt have good wortong 
' k nowledg e of other 
French or German: be sx- 
cgOent com nagii c ato re; be 
aUe lo Sank, starring on 
thrar feet mi enjoy a de- 
manding market lead 
organi sa tion- 25% or the 
time wri be spent in Eu- 
rope. There wiB be a fri 
fanrisisation programme. 

Contact Sesflreyfladi oa 


01-437 1014 




& Associates 
RecnBUmt Consokanei 
DORqpa Sheet Loatoa Wl 


WHICH CAREER 
SUITS BEST? 

Pralauioiiii Gaidsaea and 
AstMimentlorJflaaiH. 

IMImift— I.CWI 
Tiinrr *Tarttr rr>w 

nXdMriUMMlMciWK- 
• CAREER ANALYSIS 
HOmHulin 



MAYFAIR 

soucrroRs 







Chief Electrical Engineer 

Hospitals 

c£25,000 + car + accommodation 

Saudi Arabia 

For one of Ibc top Saudi architectural and ensnevrinu 
coosultaac employing over 25U proTesbionaTb. Joh involves 

the supervision of lik:d^ricalenpaieeriri£.Mdcofa25^ . 
bod hospiiaL Minimum BScqualrfKation ahd vtA years’ 
experience of hospital electrical desien and consihiciion. 
This is a two year contract, with paid "Diehls forieavceverv 
six months. 

5»end hill c* to: Paul Rowland. PER International. 

4th Floor. Rex House. 4-12 Regent Street. 

London SW1Y4PP. 


Production Services 
Manager 

c£15,0<Hr Hants 

My dirod is hnolved in the manufacture of a range of 
specialised products in ihc automotive liehi engineering 
Mid. You will have overall responsibility fnr pr< iduciiorT 
planning, material control ana the imptixncmatjon oraneu 
oosnputerised production control svBicni. Other 
rcsponsibitiiieswSl involve the purchasne. di^nhution. 
stoics and iranspon functions. Ideally aaSd 3ti-iUviiiha -; 
dcgiec/HNO mechanical engineering or bussn css studies,- . 
experienced in die use of computerised production control ■" 
systems in an engineering/ manufacturing environ mem. 


omiliar with small batch production ar.dv >u must tv j Ne 
to communicate well at ail levds. An excellent rewards 
package reflects this position s importance. 

Send nil] cv to: Michael Brissenden, PER. 20 The Butts 
Centre, Reading RGt 7QB. 


Works Manager 

c£ 16,000+ bonus West Midlands 

This Lsan ideal appon unity to conmbute to the 
development of a small, highly successful boll and nul 
manufucturer. Ri-piirlme inllie Managing Dirc-ctor. vnu 
will take full control or tficiruorio operdtiorr. Aged ]UW5 
with a mechanical engineering degreCi HNC. you must have 
ihc ability to moiiv-jiL- and lead the workforce! Relocation 
assistance wilt be paid if appropriate. 

Send lull cv to: Jane Rothert, PER, 150 Corporation 
Street. Birmingham B4 6 TB. 


Works Manager/ 
Designate Director 

c£ 15,000+ benefits Northern Home Counties 

Manufacturer of mechanical components and precision 
repetition turned pans seeks Works Manager Director 
Designate. 'Hands on’ experience in light engineering 
environment plus know ledge of mulri^spindle automatics 
considered essential. Competitive salary to £ 15,(11.10 + 
benefits is offered. 

Phone: Lvnne Watertaotise, PER Luton on 
(058214)7562. 


Sales Manager 

£12,000 + car Kent based 

Ambitious, business orientated with a number of years all 
round saks/marketing experience, looking for an 
opponunity that offers excellent earnings potential ? A small 

subsidiary of a wd) established German company seeks a 
Saks Manager to spearhead ihe sales and markeiin c n f 
their comprehensive range of optical components and 
scientific ciectro-opti cal instmmemarion throughout the 
UK.^ The sales poten dalis vast due to hs wide and diverse 
industrial applications. Aged 3fw 5 you will be □ self- . . 


Maidstone. Kent 


Assistant Accountant 

c£10,000 Essex 

Our client isa UK subsidiary of a major international croup 
manufacturing and marketing qualitv engineered products 
for worldwide distribution. They now wish tn reeruil an 
Assistant Accountant with significant experience in a 
manufacturing environment to complete their financial 


iTv i. (TJTn RT 1 1 AV« . 1 IV 


be resporisibierorthe budgeting and costing sy stems for 
mamitacTu ring operations. Part-qualified ACMA. essential 
with familiarity of computerised <.ystejn$.The eoi^any is. 
cunenfy going riuougna period of expansion: Difa isan-- 
exceUem oppommiiy for you to make a majo 
totheipanagpnentofihe division, and to 
future devd 


Mechanical Engineers 

(£15,000 Surrey 

Sought by muliinarionaL Aged 2S-35, with steam turbine/ 
turbo experience gained m marine engineering, petrochcm 
to handle intcmaunnal client enquiries from conception to 
nrripi isaJ. Training in Germany -US A 

Phone: CTiariotte Rafferty, PER Chisn ick on 
(01)995 2424. 


Management Accountant 

£ 1 5,000 + benefits Northfleet, Kent 

One of the most successful retail display groups in Britain 
enjoy a turnover in excess of £20 miuiorc They seek a 
Management Accountant to produce monthly accounts 
and annual management acci>unting analyses! whilst 
maintaining responsibility for the company's computer 
development programme. Candidates Rt If be in their late 
2( I'S. recently qualified ACM A or ACCA with experience 
allied to consumer goods. The ability to work on own 
.initiative and communicate financial information to staff at 
all levds is essential. Salary plus profit related bonus/ 
Contributory pension scheme and BUPA arc offered with 
relocation expenses where appropriate 
Send RiBcv'to: Javne EJdridge, PER, 5 London Road, 



Management Accountant 

c£ 10,000+ benefits Mid Kent 

A superb opportunity exists fora young accountant ic 
develop a career with an expanding subsidiary of a major 
international group. Reporting to the Commercial 
Manager the incumbent will produce management 
accounts to a short timetable and prepare budgets andyear 
end accounts. You will also be responsible for devdopmg 
the existing conuxuerised accounts svstem. Candidates will 
be part quau&etf ACCA. ACM A. with experience gained 
in a manufacturing environmenL The ability to interpret 
financial information to non- financial staff is essential. 
Salary and benefits are offered with relocation expenses 
where appropriate. 

Send &iucv to: Jayne Eldridga* PER, 5 London Road, 
Maidstone, Kent ME 1 6 8 HR. 


Automatic Control 
Engineers - Applications 

Tyneside/Manchester/Essex 

Procter & Gam We \ straps, detergents and personal care 
products arc household names, including Arid. Fairy 
Liquid. Camay and Crest They wish to reeruil graduate 
level engineers toapply commercially available hardware 
and software paekagesto the conirolof the company's 
manufaciurinc processes. The successful candidates will 
identify pnqccs>es and areas for devdopmem and be 
tesporcxib^Jc^ Drainingeroducnon staff in new operating 
wtrtbofls andicchnpH^ Applicants aged fromcady 20 s 
locarly 3* ft will beat least "graduate le^3 in^ ejteeuoniCr,. 
engineering or a related discipline. Two to three yea rs 
experience an advantage. High IcvdpommunicaikHi skills 
and general management ahaity essential. Excelleni salary 
and Benefus package. Definite prospects for career . 
dcviinpnacnumd proeresMuct - i .■ / ’ '* ► 

For further information and application form pleaSOphone: 
Jill Mcl ntyne or SurahneTopfaani at PER Newcastle on ; 
(0622)618418. 

i-i Z? •* PROCTER & GAMBLE LIMITED 


General Manager 

Attractive salary + company car 

London based 

The UK subsidiary of a leading uivmimcntational croup of 
companiCsSpeci Jisi/igininsirumcnlabon.coni roTsvsLems 
and assouat e d sc niccssciAs icr strengthen and develop its 
UK market. Can you demonstrate to our client the ability to 
spearhead the company's marketing th rust in UK and 
b u rope? Rcponing d i rcctfy to the MD the target markets 
are murine, offshore and prciccss industries. Substantial 
track record in the fidd. sales of proven control systems 



JOBHUNTERS 

For* tree job humioR mAtmulion jmcL andneekh dclaitsoa 
tbe ravruiimrai nwrlei bIbcv bortudineow 450 oe« jobs 
-phoiKietalau lull 200 0200 or write io 
PER. (TP) Fluwflliam House. 2-4 FiuwiHiamGaie.Shri&etilSI 4JH. 
h»aOp&tMHmsmllli\e n m p nsi li ‘t pii B nli i m %Mrrin%ilrdtrtmil)ertim»rtMd’^iilie(a. 




association 


RETIRED EXECiniVES 

We oiigenily need to rccnril a force of volunteers 
with a senior executive background for both fimd- 
raiong committee wort st county level and other 
promotional lasts as part of our Silver Jubilee 
ramp mm- We are particularly seeking volunteers 
In the -areas of Buocs. Berks, Cambridge, North 
Herts and Leicester, West Midlands and the West 
Country. 

The: men and women we are seeking will have 
worked at senior level in industry, the professions, 
commerce or in government service. They will 
have an outgoing personality, enormous enthttSF 
asm and. well developed communication skills. 

Whilst The work is voluntary, involving about two 
days a week, all normal expenses will be 
natnbused. The real reward will be the enormous 
personal satisfaction ^bringing to fruition a vital 
part of -the charity's objective. 

Ptease wriie to Ian Adams, Help ihe Aged, St 
James' Walk, London ECIR OBE. 

^ available ^ CV would be most belpfoL Local 

imerviest vrifl be arranged, al which work options 

wffl be “fuBy explained. ^ 


RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANTS 

Central London fnegotiable 

Accountancy Personnel is the market 
leader in the Specialist Recruitment of 
Accountants and their staff at all levels in 
commerce, industry and public practice. 
Committed to sustained growth, we oiler 
sound training leading rapidly into an 
exceptionally progressive career structure 
with all promotion from within, providing 
stimulating and rewarding responsibilities. 

To join one of our successful professional 
teams you should be 21-28, self confident, 
educated to degree level and ideally have- 
accountancy or commercial experience^ 

Contact Richard Wallace on; 

01-834 0489 
Accountancy Personnel 
6 Glen House, 

Stag Place 
London SWJE 5AA. 


STRATEGIC SERVICE 
MANAGEMENT 
CONSULTANTS 

A leading international company, specialising in 
corporate development for service businesses, 
wishes to expand its London office. We offer 
exciting opportuniites io Consultants with a 
.proven track record, drive and enthusiasm. 
Salary will be highly corapetitative and linked to. 
performance. 

To learn more, please write, enclosing a CV to: 
Denis Boyle 

The Service Management Group Ltd 
Amen House 
2S Dover Sum 
London W1X 3RA 
Telephone ^1-629 1419 


CAYMAN ISLANDS 

.... _ MAPLES AND CALDER 

We areiooTdng for. a solicitor to become associated 
with our wed established and rapidly expanding 
international practice. 

We anticipate that the successful applicant wtu 
have a first class honours degree from a 
recognised university and a minimum of two years 
poet -qualification experience with leading City 
firm. The position is demanding. It will involve 
advising on all aspects of corporate, commercial 
and related legal matters and may also involve 
advising in relation to private trusts. 

The starting salary win be negotiable. A minimum 
Of pounds 37.600 per annum may be expected and 
thereafter substantial annual reviews based on 
performance- Prospects are excellent. 

There are no personal taxes in the Cayman islands 
and living conditions are very attractive. 

All applications should be tn writing wnh a curric- 
ulum vitae and passport sized photgraph addressed 
■ to Anthony Travers. Maples and Calder. P.O. Box 
309. Grand Cayman. Cayman Islands. British 
West indies- Interviews .will be 1 held -in- London: 


THE CITY UNIVERSITY ' 

MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT CENTRE 

-The above Centre, which is located m the New Bartwan 
complex, runs a ftourtening post-experience programme 
ot short courses lor business personnel. A new Develop- 
ment is tne setting up or a professional trawng 
programme tor the Stock Exchange lonowing the &g 
Bang'. 

The IS a new and exettmg opportunity tor anyone interest- 
ed in being involved m London's capita! market by 
managing the training programme of City protesetonaB. 

PROGRAMME CO-ORDINATOR 

£9,366 to £10,779 per annum inclusive 

An energetic, oroansed self-starter is needed to set up 
and coordinate the aormnstranon o» me nsufly agreed 
Stofik Exenange ProtBssxJftfii Tram mg programme. 

The gimraggft* candidate win be a vital member of die 
management^ team, taking responsiMitY tor an aoministra> . 
1 tire arrangementS-Of the programme and should combine 
sound Jdmirtsttattve wAth good interpersonal skd&? - -. 
' Benefit induce season ticket loan scheme, generous 
taftettv enwiemant andexceoent spong and rscreanonai 
.Tsjj&tes. For further iniormaMn please write to Ms Jane. 
Canwoh, Pereonnel Recrurtnient AsststatA.' The Cite Unk 
. versrty. "Nor t hampton Square. London. EC1V OHB, or 
teiephom 01-250 1107 -(24 hour ansaphone service). 
Closing date lor receipt o( apptcatrOOS; 17 April 1986. 


ISl is a protessional corauliancy srecalisirg in - 
the areas o( inier personal skills development, 
oettormanee appraisal and assess mem ol f 
managemem paennal. Our denis include leading 

organisations m computing, banking, retail, 
manulaaurmg. aerospace and local government. 

Due io expanding demand ior our services we have 2 
vacancy lor an additional 


Consultant in 
Human Resources 


. The successful candidate will be responsible lot 
suppomng denis in ihe design and implementation 
of assessment centres and performance appraisal 
systems. There will also be an involvement in 
presenting ISL's established mier-personal skills 
programmes and related assignments. 

Applicants should have perceptiveness and sensitivity 
lo organisai tonal cultures and me dynamics ol 
change end strong interpersonal presentation and 
training skills, imitative, energy and a pioiessionai 
approach are essential. A postgraduate degree m 
wher business studies or organisational psychology 
and eligibility for membership of the BPS or IPM g 
desirable. Pietened age range s laie 20's lo laie 30's. 
An attractive salary and bonus package s available 


Candidates should forward 
.CVs, relating experience 
to ttje position, to Roger 
Prior, Managing Director. 
(Meracfire Skills Limited, 
50a Bed Street, Heoiey on 

Thames, OxOfl,BB32BS. 



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HORIZONS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 

A guide to career I IvAftsJk 
development 


Wfi Sr AfXXW INTAKE* 




<1 


THE BIG PC BANG 


Reading between the lines 


Recently I found myself discussing the 
recruitment process with a friend of 
several years' standing. It was when we 
reached the topic of job advertisements 
that be recalled an incident from his 
early career as a technical college 
lecturer. 

One day his Head of Department 
took him aside and drew his attention to 
a vacancy notice in the Times Educa- 
tional Supplement* for a more senior 
post in his discipline in that very 
college. 

-I’ve seen it," my friend replied. “In 
fact, I was going to ask whether you 
thought I should apply for it.” 

“Go ahead, my boy,” said the other. 
“It's yours." 


Understanding some job 
advertisements can 
often be a complex 
matter. R.AJones 
looks at some of the 
ways to inteipret 
recruitment ads 


{ am sure that most job-humere can 
cite instances from their own experience 
where a job vacancy was as good as 
filled before it was even advertised. But 
it is no earthly use railing about the 
injustice of this practice if you happen 
to be a disappointed outside candidate. 


— or even contracting — be prepared for 
disappointment. For here you are likely 
to be up against candidates from within 
the firm, and this will lessen your 
chances. 


The fact of the matter is that some 
organisations — particularly public sec- 
tor ones — publicise their vacancies as a 
matter of course. And while their 
selection procedures may be' carried out 
impeccably, it is a trait of human nature 
to prefer the devil you know to the one 
you don't A candidate from inside the 
institution therefore has a head start 
over his rivals for the vacancy, and in 
the case of my colleague it would have 
taken nothing less than a Nobel prize- 
winner to pip him to that post 
All is fair, it seems, in love, war and 
the job market and the only way to 
come out on top is to perfect your job 
finding strategy. This starts not with 
your letter of application or your 
encounter with the selection board, but 


Vacancies in an 
expanding field 


with the identification of a suitable 
vacancy and understanding what the 
advertisement really means. In other 
words, you have to learn to read 
between the lines. 

When you see a senior post adver- 
tised, do you ever wonder why it is up 
for grabs? Is this, in fact, a genuine 
vacancy open to all comers, or is there 
some internal candidate waiting in the 
wings eager for promotion? 

Short of enlisting the services of a 
private investigator there is no sure way 
of finding out. But you can hazard a few 
guesses, some of which might prove 
correct. 

If the vacancy occurs in an expanding 
organisation or field, for example, then 
you need have no qualms about 
applying for it The likelihood is that the 
firm needs extra staff to assist in its 
development and there are none of 
sufficient calibre within the tanks of the 


Recruitment advertising can be quite 
a cosily business, so many firms — 
particularly small ones — do not 
advertise unless they need to. Perhaps I 
am somewhat gullible — a victim of 
excessive media manipulation — but I 
am inclined to feel lhai the larger the ad 
the more genuine it is. 

The same goes for vacancies handled 
by recruitment agencies. A sensible firm 
does not spend perhaps thousands of 
pounds on commissions to outside 
consultants if the next incumbent of the 
post works in an office just along the 
corridor. 

Outside consultants generally have a 
more objective idea of a particular post 
than the firm itself, and this can work in 
the applicant's favour. The description 
of the job will be factual and reliable, 
since they are in the business of 
communicating their clients' require- 
ments effectively in order to attract 
suitable applicants. 

If the vacancy notice emanates from 
the company itself, you may need to 
scrutinise the wording with care. The 
firm which considers itself to be “well- 
established” and offers “an exceptional 
opportunity to the right person” could 
well have seen better days and be 
looking for someone who will not rock 
the already leaking boat. 

At the other end of the scale the 
"young, dynamic hi-tech company” is 
in need of "an experienced accountant" 
could well be headed by a group of 
unworldly boffins who have got them- 
selves into an unholy financial mess. 


back on the dole within a matter of 
months. 

To change the subject slightly, have 
you ever had the experience of being 
turned down for a post and then seen it 
re-advertised? Infuriating, isn't it? But 
instead of cursing the people who 
rejected you, why not pen a brief letter 
to them indicating that your services are 
still available? 

The vacancy, after all. could have 
resurfaced for any number of reasons. 
The appointee might have let the. 
organisation down at the last moment 
It may have been decided to revise the 
terms of reference of the job. Or perhaps 
some hapless junior clerk put all the 
applicants' CVs through the shredder by 
mistake! Everything is possible — even 
in the best regulated personnel offices. 

The recurrent advertisement could 
signify a number of things. A company 
may, for example, advertise even if it 
has no vacancies in prospect the reason 
being that it likes to test the market for 
personnel in certain fields. If someone 
exceptional turns up, then they might 
well create a position for him or her, but 
otherwise they are under no compulsion 
to make an appointment 

On the other hand such an ad could 
mean that the organisation has difficul- 
ty in recruiting or retaining staff, in 
which case further investigation is 
called for. Are they simply bad employ- 
ers — poor pay, uncongenial working 
conditions — or is there a shortage of 
skilled personnel in that particular area? 

Or perhaps the selectors fed that their 
first trawl has not brought in sufficient 


You are a leading financial institution which reaves foe impact 
P ersonal Computers are about 10 make on ike rtniKtil teOQt 
and hm) have doubtless fra ad Urn die line opera are fcw- 
You need proven practical skill* in all aspects of PC's. 
Networking and Comm u motions together with buaness 
knowledge and management ability. 

You are looking for m ambitious and innovative pnyecl leader 
jo put your company at the forefront of the imminent PC 
revolution and arc pre par ed 10 invest generously in research and 
offer as aimprrfinay remuneration package. 

ConiDBoiaiioi -mU be to our ntousl advantage 
Reply to BOX NO CSfi 


FINANCIAL AND 
ACCOUNTANCY 


HOLDING & MANAGEMENT LIMITED 

j njulre a 

COMPANY SECRETARY/ACCOUNTANT 


we aaretnWer manage tame btodts or Oats rranoa 1 office 

m KoiMootan where « employ about a doMn staff. The 
numreineid t» far someone to manage Ifte accounts depart- 
ment oversee the day-today running of be office and look 
after all Company Secre ta r ia l mailers. The wccneaM candi- 
date wfl stso be utadUe for completing be task of 
nansotertstng be accounting and management information 
ayurana. which the Company is presently e ng aged tn. 


The Meet ca ndi ta ie «riD mi Chartered Secretary with an 
a nm u mtn g background and ex per i e nc e of mmtKftrr compoter 
systems. However, a candidate who to Nitty qmttfled « who 
has sMIdeul relevant e x perience may afeo be suitable. 


Salary is negotiable to $ 14 , 000 . 


Patrick Cox FCA 
Holding & Management Ltd 
Thackeray House 
Gilbert Road 
London SE 11 4NL 


by esnaiNHng enannvd accoun- 
tants tn hford area. Send C. V. to 
Nensen ft Co. £43 cranbraok 


‘ PUBLIC 
APPOINTMENTS 


GRADUATES 63/** t£7JM 
Train as Chartered accoub- 
uob with a high motile 20 
partner firm In London. Excel- 
lent training In prmUgtoue new 
office- Full rtudy —bre r for 
am&tnosB graduates won • 
good academic record. Rtag Ka- 
ren Fond at Harrtwon and 
watts on 01-620 4463. tAgyt- 


When appointment is 
a foregone conclusion 


To either confirm or refute your 
guesswork you need to get hold of past 
reports and any other literature relating 
to the firm to which you are applying. 
Not only will you find out if your 
prospective employers are financially 
viable, but you should be able to learn 
something of the organisation's man- 
agement style. 


development and there are none of fc . ; This is an important point. There is 
sufficient cafibrewirhin the ranks ofthe yno point in joining an -outfit where 
organisation. ' £ ■. ... be a square peg in a round hole. If 

On the other-hand, ift^company Or- -"-you and the firm turn out to be tO-suited 
institution is exp^riencin^^TO *gr$»lh. : r tbeach other, you could find yourself 


applicants of the calibre they hoped for, 
so they are having another attempt at ! 
recruitment. 

By this stage you may be starting to 
regard every job notice you see with the 
profouodest mistrust, but do not let I 
your heightened perception, deter you I 
from applying for as many jobs as you 

ran. 

By all means scrutinise each -ad with 
care, but do not admit defeat before you 
even start your application. The outsid- 
er is not always on the outside lane, and 
there are firms around who are bold 
enough to favour new blood rather than 
recruit from within. 

Even if you find out that a certain 
appointment is a foregone conclusion, 
there is no reason why you should not 
apply. In this way you get your foot in 
the door, as it were, for the vacancy 
created when Joe Bloggs moves into the 
post you aspired to. 

If you were to express an interest in 
Joe's old job. you would certainly be 
given credit .for inj$tive and 
ingenuity. ..and you might even get it.i 
Job-hunting requires, both flair -and; 
cunning, and there is no-betier irainihgj 
in these techniques than' scanning 
job columns and reading-berweeii' the; 
lines, - • 


Kingston & Esher Health Authority 

UNIT 
GENERAL 
MANAGER 
(ACUTE UNIT) 


The Authority which serves a population 
of 180.000 needs to appoint a General Man- 
ager to take personal responsibility for the 
management and development of services 

a a . . t r . t r: 


for the Acute Unit, comprising Kingston 
and Tofworth Hospitals. The Unit has a 


budget of £20.561m and staff of 1,500 WTE. 

'Hie District will be undertaking major 
peritice developments and changes in rite 
next few' years and will have to manage 
these within reducing revenue cash limits.. 
The Unit General Manager will therefore 
need to demonstrate skills in management 
of change and leadership qualities in a com- 
plex multi-disciplinary environment. 

Hie appointment will be for a fixed term 
of 3 years, renewable by agreement 

Saury will be at least £20.545 per annum 
plus London Weighting Allowance. 

For informal Hisraiminn, please contact Dr 
B W Meade, District General Manager on 
01-390 1111 (ext 265). 

Information package and application 
form from District Feisonnel Officer. 17 


Upper Brighton Road, Surbiton, Surrey. 
Tfefc01-390 1111 (ext 234). 


T& 01-390 1111 (ext 234). . .. 

Closing date fogreoript of applications: 25 
April 1986: ■ 


GENERAL 


SUPER SEGREIAR1ES 


APPOINTMENTS 



ARE YOU IN 
TUNE WITH YOUR 
SELLING CAREER? 


If the answer is no, then get 
in tune by harmonizing with 
one of the United Kingdom’s 
largest, fastest moving and 
most dynamic retailers of 
advanced and sophisticated 
office equipment. 


Our client wishes to hear 
from experienced 
KEYBOARD SALES 
SPECIALISTS. Aged 25 - 
35 years, you must be 
experienced in selling 
specialist keyboard 
computers or advanced 
office equipment You must 
be enthusiastic, articulate, 
professional and have the 
drive and ambition to 
succeed in this highly 
competitive market 


In return for these qualities, our client offers a competitive 
salary, high commission structure and other large 
company benefits. 

If you would like to tune into the 90’s in your selling career, 
then write enclosing a full C. V. to: 

John E. Holm wood, Agency Manager, 

JRA Advertising, I ■— * * 

Sun Life House, ■ 1 

3-5 Charlotte Street, 

Manchester, Ml 4HB. A .g. ^ gIgJ!^!g.. 



HUMAN RESOURCES 


ICA Hob* Onset La* North. GauSont fthdtfc, UBS OH. 
C c nWfcrt Afpbcart Response & Etstfuztan 


MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTANT 
Location: SUSSEX c£14,000 (La. 


A young, recently quaSSed management 
accountant with e xp erience of computeri se d 
financial modeSng in an FJAGXx environment is 
needed by an organsaOon that is recognised as the 
leader in ks fiete. 


You wa probably be in jar ntidtwenOei with 
sound m anagement a ccount i ng experience, which 
must include budgeting, financial planning and 
variance analysis. You wfl be expected to 
contribute positively to the preparation and 
estabtishment of budgets and operating plans, and 
it is essential that you are able to evaluate In terms 
of finance and profitably, the consequence of 
marketing strategy, product d e v e lop m ent and new 
product Launches. 

Renowned lor its career de v elo p ment philosophy, 
the company's benefits match the high cdbre of 
staff employed. 

Raft! 3/6011 


GS3BSQ 


EXPERIENCED MEDICAL SECRETARY 

Required for busy Wimpoie Street Ortho- 
paedic Surgical Practice- Starting salary 
£9,500 with review and benefits. 


ALSO PART TIME 
MEDICAL SECRETARY 


required for this Practice. Audio Typing & 
some reception work. Approximately 3 
days per week. Good salary by 
arrangements. 

Telephone 01-935-2349 


ROYAL HOUSEHOLD 


The Lord Chamberlains' Office at SL James's Mace 
requires a secretary under die age of 24 with fU£i stan- . 
dam of typewriting and shorthand. 


Salary Starting between £6.466 and £7.179 depending 
on age and rising by annual t n eremene to CASTT6 Un- 
dudes London Weighting). The post is penstonaMe and 
offers 22 days paid houoay p-a. Free lunch. Parting 
available. 


Please apply la writing, enebabg C V tos- 


Tfce Secretary 
Lord Chamberlaias’ Office 
SL James’s Palace 
Loadoa SW1 


MEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL 
EXECUTIVE OFFICES 
£7,668 - £10,282 pa, inch LW 


Fottowtng a series of Internal promotions the Medical 
Research Council is seeking to recruit a small number of 
Executive Officer-; to work at Che Headquarter's office 
near Regents Park Awriicatiom are Invited from endn- 
otes or from candidate, with 2 ‘A* levels. Students 
expecting to graduate uus summer may also apply. 


Conditions include 22 days annual leave plus 10** days 
public and privilege leave, contributory pension scheme 
wtth pay supplement, flexible working hours and season 
ticket loan. 


Write to Mrs B. Price, 20 Park Crescent, London 
WiN 4AL. for farther details and an application 
form, quoting reference P1O02/I81. 


Closing dale for receipt of completed application 
forms is 21 April IV86. 




IMPERIAL 

COLLEGE 


TEMPING WITH 
A DIFFERENCE 


Why take just any tem- 
porey secretarial job 
when you ctxdd work n 
TELEVISION. FILMS, 
ADVERTISING. PUBLIC 
relations on pub- 
lishing? We have lots 

ol vacancies and otter 
excellent rates - aid 
wrist’s mere we pay you 
in trie same week! 

Why not cafi us today 
on: 


01-499 6566 
or 01-493 8383 


(Ushmitj of Loadofl) 

SOUTH 

KENSINGTON 


JAPANESE 


SCHOOL 

Near Newmarket re- 
quires an experienced 
full time chef, ability to 
cook Japanese meals for 
Ihe students essential. 

Apply in writing 
with C.V. to: 



MMPTMIX COOK to ran kitch- 
en In French Catalan village. 
June to S eptember. Uv» in. 
Phone after 6 pm 01-871 2609. 


COOK 

Ea husa sac and che erful p erson 
■mured to cook lor sman Met 
resam m hcSacd Part. For- 
mat caenng rrarang not 


necessary, but some cooung ex- 
perience essmaJ. To <mrt 5 day 
reek. l 0 - 6 cm ndudmj seme 
treeksafs. sitin_UJ$X> pa. 
Rra Rota on 7Z7-Z777 tear 
1030. 


COOK 

WANTED 


. -. .latir-s | : 


to help run business 
on small Berkshire 
farm. Car driver 
essential. 

Teh 0734 744369 



College leaver/Junior 
Secretary required for 
busy modern Depart- 
mental Office In 
Mechanical Engineer- 
ing Department 
Cheerful personality 
and ability to work 
with students and aca- 




FINANCIAL SERVICES 

LONDON 

Salaries to £ 28 K plus car 


Touche Ross & Co, one of the world's largest and rr^t progressive 

.firrrBOfClwtsredAccourtarit5.ise3c^^eii^5ign^^n!S«»9>« 

the demand for it’s Audit and speoatet Audit Services. 

Exerting career opportunities exist in:- 

— CORPORATE FINANCE 
— FORENSIC INVESTIGATIONS 

BANKING AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 

: — AUDIT MANAGEMENT 

Applicants should be C^erecLAccountants. aged up to 35. with 
relevant experience in public practice, in -financial .. 1 

institutions or in the corporate finance department of a large 
corporation. ■ 

Career prospects for ambitious candidates with partnership 
potential are excellent 

Write or phone now to Raymond Hurley tar more information at- 


6 Ibuche Ross 


The Business Partners 

Touche Ross & Co, ■., - 

Hill House. 1 Little New Street, London EC4A3TR. 
Telephone: 01-353 801 1 


Ten 


01-6251266 


01-623 1266 


Banking Appointments 


We are seeking ambitious, self motivated graduate ACA’s, aged 25-32 yeas for 
vacancies withnraerrfBnt and international city based banks fix tile foBowing areas , 


Senior Accounting/ 
Financial Control 


£20-£37,000 


UK & International 

Corporate Tax £30-£35,O0O 

(Creative financial skiBs a prerequisite). 

Aatiit - wieg£2#-£35 1 

(M^b^expwience essential). 

For the above 3^ vacancies contact Bryan Sates or Brian Gooch. 


v.neg£20-£35,0QO 


Operations Managers. . £2O-£35,O0O 

Jonathan Wren is currently handing a number of senior operational positions on 
behalf of its major cSents. We woid See to hear from candidates with extensive 
relevant experience, preferably gained with London based international banks, 
ideally covering foreign exchange, accounts, loans, etc. 

Contact David WS&ams or Anne Griggs. 


Senior Credit Analyst £18-£25,000 

Successful international bank requires a highly experienced, banker with a 
comprehensive knowledge of credit qppra&ai. Age range28-35 years. ^ The appointee 
wi be requffed to reorganise an active depaitmentof six &iaiysfs. 

Junior Credit Analyst £10-£15,000 

A large european bar* seeks an experienced Craft Analyst with experience gained 
within a banting-erwironment Ideally aged between 2f-25-yeBfS/ the successful 


are s leading firm of Chartered Accou n tants, and are currently 
expandingourlax Consultancy team. We are looking for an innovative, 
conunexrially-aiinded VAT Consultant who would be responsible for 
assignments ran g in g from large intern a tional companies to small 
businesses, frequently llairiagar senior managemeoi levcL 
Assignments will indude planning, g en er al advisory work and 
negotiating with Customs & Excise. The position will also include 
offensi ve liaison with other national and international offices of the 
firm. 


The successful candidate is likely to have a degree and/or professional 
qualification; a detailed te chni ca l knowledge ofYAT procedures^ well 
as a general understanding of other tares and co uqjui e is . 

A competitive salary together with managerial benefits, is offered. 
Applicants should apply for as application form or send their 
Curriculum Vitaedirect tcc 


Miss E. O'Hare, Baso n nel Manages, Spicer and Begfer. Friary Court, 
65 Cxuixiied friars, London EC3N2NP (01-480. 7766 ext 2294). 


CITY CAREERS! 


London SH'7 2BX. 


MANAGEMENT CONSULTANT 
to £30,000 + car EC 4 

If you are a qualified, graduate accoun- 
tant (26-33), a notable achiever with an 
aptitude for systems development, 
then management consultancy affords 
you the chance to extend your skills 
within an entrepreneurial environment. 
Ref: 5W0031 


JKJtMMEK HHMKML CONTflOIS 
c25t000 + Benefits EC2 

An krtemationai merchant bank seeks 
a graduate ACA (aged 28-32) with bank 
experience to assist with the develop- 
ment of new systems .to anticipation of 
deregulation. A prestigious opportunity 
offering career... progression. Refc- 
PSW0015. - . - . . : 


CORPORATE FINANCE 
to £ 20,000 + Bank Benefits 


VtSCQ AM AUDtO VISUAL dtvi 
stem of raofolv nmndim 
avfrtev. nouns an exptrt- 
«md wonay to work vntn 
Boa no Director and Producer* 
liidy amnhur. Wn« tedo 
VIMnd OD Ot 242 0545. 


An ideal commencing point for a gradu- 
ate ACA to start a career in Merchant 
Banking, working in a high profile, in- 
ternationally prominent organisation in 
Eurobond issues. Ref. RS0018. 


tfo mdrrd for W«J End p roperty 
company OwHert taiary will 
be paid to Kw sucnMUI. wee 
pnvnlMl ammn. Ptoae con- 
tact Mias Wlkunason . C1-93& 
8906. 


BUDGET ANALYST - - 

to. £18^00 . ECl 

A Head. Office role, providing a wide 
range of corporate planning and . bud- 
geting tasks. A recently qualified 
accountant will gain s valuable over- 
view of tiiis highly diversified 
international . trading group. Ref: 
RS0032. 


CITY FINANCIAL 
FUTURES COMPANY 


requires trainees » partKtwnc m a three month tradUn course, 
to Include 91IB. Hock?-. US bonds and cwrcnctea. NO prevfou, 
relevant ermerteiiM necossanlir required, but xiaOSng requires a 
nnfxmtl and stxiQtuwd character with a seta t of Humour 
who can thrive under w^ainrd pressure in order m cover 
CWMS d Charge WOl he made for tnc course Please safo CVs tq 
BOJl EfiT. The Times. PO Box 48d. Virginia SL. London El. 

il 


CI 6 . 6 OC v Incnaty Wi Prao- 
erty Co. reeks bredii young ik. 
C*r nerkr m p rawiB Can 
Kate 8il 7372. Ktngstand Pm 


UfomoUl ec h for 
CEO 'CFO of fast growing di- 
vermtrted group. The too 
requires reaaonaMe nentnu 
iMB but more nuporsnup 
drive and tnllLaUve. Com Bed 
live votary, send C.V. 10 Tower 
MarUtme Group Umneo. SI 
Piccadilly. London. WI V 9HF. 



STUDENT AU PAIR/ HOUSEKEEPER 

Student required for two hours IMttf housekeeping dally 
and 10 prepare a dinner party approxltnalrty once a week. 
Musi be excellent cook and highly r ap o nsiMe as the em- 
ployer. a Merchant Bank Director, a away for much or the 
lime. German speaking (German /Swiss/ Austrian i pre- 
ferred. Own Room in luxury Knls&tsbrMge house and 
spending money to be agreed. Must be expecting to stay la 
London for at least 3 months. 

Please call Ms Linda Butcher on 01-634 3093. 


SWCMSH 5PCAKPW 

PA Secretary. To £13400 P Jl 

nun- national City Co. Typed 
mum* Mease ta CamefoUr 
Agy. 66 Ren uon Street. Lon- 
don WC1B 4NA. 

AUDIO SEC rusty sherlhorel for 
charm mo company lawyer. No 
legal rxo. nccenary. Superb of- 
ncm cca. Cio.ooo pa «- bonua. 

Bene Dig Agy oi-oOd 
PmaMMC SECS - Cood radge 
at opetungi now m £7.000 • 
£7 000 range. Covcm Carden 
Bureau. 1 lO Fleel SL EC4.iN 
TMPt ^ 


□ 


Managenrent Personnel 


10fiBAtoySatera.LinlniEC2A1AD 
fetaphwOI 2585041 (out of boars 01 80927831 


DVUtDICU Secretary rr- 
aurrd to kda a new recutenttal 
properly hnnlmtel droorl- 
mein In ati csUHhhcd Cstalr 
Avon. Ttw wcepduL appH- 

ciM will be uuMvanve ana 

efficlnit and nave an aMUty to 
deal with Oienta and Their prao- 
nrtln m a Drofraional manner. 
Preference will Be men to an- 
pUnoie aged Pelween 2230 
yean who hold a current driv- 
ing licence and live in Central 
London. Tel. 01-251 S&a* r^J 


DOMESTIC & 
CATERING 

SITUATIONS WANTED 


W0ffU» LABSC5T Au IWr Bu- 
reau oners M, iwip. Drrna or 
live in sat. uk « overseas au 
Pair Agency LW. 07 Ragofo SL 
London, mssg teas 


VERSATILE BBUm ouanfled cook 
with conwfmWr managertoi 
experience rewmea day-tPH 
lab running wine bar. 
organtunq city lunches or simi- 
lar position In Central London, 
write or ring Belinda Clarke 96 
Dray colt Place, SW3. Ten 
5827 OT 0948 360368. 


CORnOR nuu. (Pm Lrtgti) and 
LCDfc wine diploma. Wide 
experience country house, di- 
rector* (hiring room. Seeks 
stmllv post home or aoraed. 
PuMk: SCHOOL Single. Good 
n w gi Td .0489 676500 

QlaysL <E» 6 > OflBT 210411. . 


TAILOR 

Ren u tma to qo and work 

in Japan. Pleare apply tn 
writing ire -. 

Haa mc.Mirir, 
gfi Bit ttefe * toad. SkA 
Td 01-581-2298 




a- -W 

'A 1 ' 

- .rP 



































fi***. 1 ‘i 'y T.g ' .. ■ - 

j ■• s,Lr> . 


THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


of control syHems ““H™* &&>sn, supply and roamlraauce 

To compfement our Sales* Tfeara. *t« n^M^appoinl additional . 

SYSTEM SALES PROFESSIONALS 

Environmental Controls & Building Management Systems 

LONDON 

forachiSim sS« 2£“?5 “**"* maicbes our Cfempany^ 

ihoriiics and End U*ere7or^^ Contmctore, Public Au- 

prcv conftoJ systems and/or air conditioning systems, as well as 
applicants, who ai^SSf oflhff st,ccess ^ 

Ccm^^s e ^^ Tl1 ** exceIlent “d « dictated by the successful applicant^ motivation and the 

3fe a prestif^axnpanycar. BUPA, free 

Please write with foil details toc- 

The Personnel Officer 
Saater Automation Limited 
165 Bath Road 
SLOUCH 
Berks SL1 IAA 



PRODUCERS 

(NEWS) 

Radio Devon 
Based Exeter & 
Plymouth 
£9,916- £14,024** 


To join the newsroom team working primarily on the preparation and 
prtxkitabxi of the statkxfsnevwotr^ and current affa^pfogram- 
mes, ifKaudingfiewseacfing, Interviewing and reporting. Snadtition, 
you may produce feature programmes and take part an announcing 
duties. Joumafistlc experience at sub-edtor or reporter level, 
good microphone voice and cunent driving licence, essential. 

The Plymouth vacancy includes general programming as well 
as joumafem. Ybti wffl be resportsfcle for originating and 
undertaking coverage in an area witti a population of 300,000 
from lhe office which provides news and general programming to 
Radio Comwaflaswefl as Devon.’ 

Based Exeter (Ret 9542/D 

Based Plymouth . (Ref. 9543/D 


PROGRAMME 

SUBEDITORS 

£8^77- £1t385* 


REPORTERS 

Radio Cumbria .. . 
Radio Devon 
Radio Newcastle . 
RacBoNorfo* 

.. RadloOxford 


We are looMng for tempcvary and permanent sub editors to work 
CTy jiTF* withki our busy pro gr amme sectk>n, based in central London. 

[XMlO 'MIMICS Programme sub edrtors supervise the compilation, preparation 

“*■*“■*■ and presentation of the programme pages for eitherTV or Racfio, 

which involves dose Bnks with programme output and Production 
Departments. 

This is a demanding area requiring dose attention to detal as 
;:weiastheabflitytDwofXtodeadiiT>es. 

Appbants should have a good education -at least to A' level 
standard— jaswBU as relevant professional journalistic 
: experience as a sU> edttor or similar, and must be prepared to 
work on ashffi basis.- (Ref. 9531 /D 

Areyouayoung, ambftkxjs reporter with at least three years' 
joumafistip experience? It so, these BBC Local Radio stations 
have vacancies that msw Merest you The work is primarily 
. reporting, interviewing, bdletin writing and newsreadmg. Good 
‘ mfcrophone voice ami current driving Icence essential. 

. : - Salaries: £8,528 - £10,581 ‘ 

Radio Cumbria (based Whitehaven) . . . (Ref. 9521 /T) 

Radio Devon (based Exeter) (Ref. 9541 /T) 

(This vacancy may Initially be on a 12 month contract) 

Radio Newcastle •• (Ref. 9520/D 

Radio Norfolk (based Norwich) (Ref. 9510/D 

Radto Oxford ■ (Ref.95Q2/li 


(Ref. 9521 /T) 
(Ref. 9541/T) 


- T^aaow*rKseofC589p-a.““Pfa»aftowanceof CS71 p^. 

Wears an equal 

opportuhip*^^ 

' . , . 1 :w.ow.dnl 


StrategicBusiness Planning 

II International Legal Practice 1 
%- London 

I c.£17,000 + Benefits || 


TTiis leading practice provides a 
comprehensive domestic and 
international legal ser vice to commerce, 
industiy and financial institutions. They 
now wish to appoint a Business Analyst, 
to develop and co-ordinate the strategic 
business plan for the firm. 

Reporting to the Director of 

Administration, the key tasks of this 

challenging post will be; to act as the 
day to day; project leader in developing 
the plan, to provide business data and 
analysis relevanttothe firm'sbusiness 
and the evolving plan, and undertake 
regular internal surveys to assess the 
firm’sneeds. ' : 

Fbr this post we seek a graduate, 
probably economics based, aged 26- 
32, who has gained similar experience • 
of developing a total plan, within a 

corporate or professional environment 


Candidates with MBAs and relevant 
experience will be viewed favourably by 
the client 

■ As a leading practice, considerable 
relevance is placed on the professional 
approach adopted by its staff. 

This is an important position, that is 
seen as key to ensuring the continued 
successful growth of the firm; 
from which the post holder may 
themselves expect future career 
advancement 

Candidates should write enclosing a 
fun CVarid quoting reference MCS/ 1002 

to Michael Madgwick 
Executive Selection Division 
Price Wafreifiouse 
Management Consultants 
Southwark Towers 
32 London Bridge Street • 

London SEL9SY 


Price Waterhouse 




w mpM Munurr rewired 

■fa/Mal Mnly run MM On 
M of Ml*. SMIMI 
Stay teSowneer. Ptcne IB* 
0688 20 ** 

0963 70733. 

T4UWB, Mt WOW*« 

Um nM PNW ***" . 
Mom* 

Ourfcla HI OJ-891 »3> 


!2*2fSi«to iwawn* WS 

TMMOE «BW«» “*v**JX 
TUTO R 

s-s a*s%jgS£ 
IfWMflar 1 


trainee broker 

CITY 

ApptoB B «r 

.Tte »***“ wfa , * " a -- 
twai a+. of WI 

afBtemx. 

sijrftiS-Sis 


CPLLEOC 

aniAA tmiier**" 


T *^5 

. 0U83 7Mi 


Redundant 
Executives & 
Managers 
■ Contact 
01-242 2420 


M. 1 MtinMV Mil* Job 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 

. EVRSVIHlIKSDAl' 

CHIEF EXECUTIVES ■ MANAGING DIRECTORS 
■DIRECT0RS1SALES& MARKETING EXECUTIVES 
■OVERSEAS APPOINTMENTS 
■financial&accountancy 
A wide range irf mana^nKTH appoiniflKnisa^X'ais 
iwryThuniby 

THURSDAY 
MAKE SURE YOU GET 
YOUR COPY OF 


There are many companies in the office furniture industry' but there is 
only one undisputed leader. Our client is just that. The world's major 
manufacturer with more than twice 

ENVIRONMENTAL 

OTTTTTPTh 1 QVQTT7A /T Q 

I # 1 * f 1 IK jI 1 . * j I • j I full servicedeaier in one of the three choicest 

A ^ - 1 " ^ 1 J l V territories in the UX- the City. Wesi End 

A T TH ri and the West of London -you will represent our client to 

ZA I M rPL _ Tr ^_l 5 0 signific^l companies drawn from most industrial and 

1 M l \ f 1 1 H I X xJLti VV UI1Q u commerical sectors. Not only will you sell but you will 


& KEgBY m> 

EXECUTIVE SEARCH 4 SELECTION 


also advise on the most effective ultiJisation of our 
1 rr client 's sophisticated concept of office envi ronments. 

iw • • • Immediate rewards are exci ling, and longer term 

^ prospects simply oulsland ing. From day one you '1 1 enjoy a 

high, negotiable base salary and a commission scheme that will produce a 
realistic OTE of £25,000 p a — for the high achievers well into the £30. 000 's 
is quite possible. And with career opportunities being limited only by your 
own ambition, drive and ability; this adds up to an offer that is totally 
compatible with our clients pre-eminent position in the industry. 
Experience in the office furnishing field would obviously be a distinct plus 
but a solid record of sales achievement is the key' criteria. If you have this 
call us now. -* n t ■ 

...be part or it! 

We want to tell you more about our client s success story and the part 
in it for y'ou so telephone Keith Sunderland during normal office hours. 

If y’ou prefer send us your CV and we'll mail you a fact pack by return. 

Moxon Dolphin & Kerbv Ltd.. 178-202 Great Portland Street. 

London WIN STB. Tel: 01-631 4411. 


! MANAGEMENT 
; OPPORTUNITY 

As anOMCMr* epaa a m*- 
Mdufe (22+) »tn an a ngla 
ranted nd unatfad in ttw 
o*n Mm V you «oM an me 
opgorttNQr Dora mcr E2D,000 
pvinnfli mflaarn stares in a 
i wnwi UB gmv. 

Pleaw eat 
Mr. S. Scall on 
01*439 8431 


SALES 

ASSISTANT 

Qgabfc afcs taaoatu. 
21 6. required forexdosve 
Wes End cogntry dodrag 
* 0 pb Pleaseal peranaJity. 
some auxnence would be 
usefiiL 

Please M i p fca n 
Mha Cax aa 
01*499 4411 


THE CITY UNIVERSITY 

MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT CENTRE 
COURSE DEVELOPMENT MANAGER 
. £&336 to £10,779 .par narar imfosive 

The Mwagement Development Centre.- wNch b locaMt In 
the new Bartucan complex, runs a ftourisrnng past-experi- 
ence programme o< short roursas tor busB>ess axecutives 
and senior personnel. 

As part of im Integra! team, we now require a self motivat- 
ed Course DewaiopiTient Msiager to expend the range ot 
cowses currently BVHJtatse. 

RasDonsUDties w« include developing new cotrae pro- 
posals, parocularly in the growng area of in-house 
courses, and mantaining strict financial and stock con- 
trols. The ideal esnduere wfl be aged 25+. preferably 
educated to degree level m commerce cr business stud- 
ies. Experience of training would be an adventage. 
Benefits indude season ticket ban scheme, generous 
hefiday e n titlement and oxcofcm t sports and recreanonal 
taettmes- For further information please writs to Ms Jane 
Cameron. Personnel Recruitment Assistant The City Uni- 
versity. Northampton Square, London EC1V OHB. or 
telephone 01-250 1107, (24 hour ensaphone service). 
Closing data tor receip t of appB catb ns: 17th April 1988. 


ST. JOHN’S WINCHESTER CHARITY; 

Applications are invited for the position of 
Secretary to this aadeot almshouse charity. The 
function of the Secretary is the general manage- 
ment of the charity. The successful candidate will 
be an experienced administrator with an interest 
in the welfare of the elderly and preferably with a 


ARE YOU DOING THE JOB YOU 
WANT TO... OR HAVE TO? 


Many of us are so involved with the jobs weYe doing and 
the responsibilities we have that we seldom stop to wonder 
whether we are making full use of our potential. 

We are wortdng because we have to — we have 
mortgages to pay families to support rates gas, electricity 
and melist goes on, These are not so much excuses as 
facts of life. 

Another fact is that most of us have a nagging doubt 
that we could be doing better but we just don't know what 
to do about it 

Chusid Lander has changed afl that 


We are a group of specialist career consultants whose 

sole function is to guide executives and professional 
people and help diem achieve their individual objectives. 

We guarantee that we will commit our time and effort 
until you are satisfied that your career objectives have 
been realised. 

Fbr thirty years we have been striving for the best 
Nowjt'syourtum! 

Telephone us to arrange a confidential personal 
assessment without obligation, or write to 
The Administrator RefA/tyi 35/37 Fitzroy Street, 
London W1P 5AF — enclosing a brief career summary. 

LONDON 01-5806771 MANCHESTER 061-2280089 

BIRMINGHAM 021-6438102 NOTTINGHAM 094937911 
BRISTOL 027222367 GLASGOW 041-3321502 

BELFAST 0232621824 

® CHUSID LANDER 


professional qualification. 
Salary in the region of £! 


in the region of £19,000 p-a. according to 
nee. There is a non-«mtributoiy pension 


Please write before 11th April 1986 for job descrip- 
tion and application form to: 

The Secre t a r y, 

St. John’s Winchester Charity, 

1 St. John's North, 

The Bro a dwa y , 

Winchester, 

Ha mpshire, S023 9BD. 


BRITISH VETERINARY 
ASSOCIATION 

COMMITTEE SECRETARIES 

This busy professional association, representing 
UK veterinary surgeons, seeks enthusiastic and 
bard working staff to service its policy commit- 
tees. Our idol candidates are graduates with the 
ability to manage the afiairs of the committees, 
to distilt complex discussions into dear records, 
to prepare committee papers and handle corre- 
spondence. Typing skills helpful but not 
essential. 

Progressive salary: £8.00W! 12,000, depending 
on ability and experience. 4 weeks holiday. 
Career details to-. 

Chief Executive, BVA 
7 Mansfield Sheet London WlM OAT 
(Telephone 01-636 6541) 


Windmill Plasties ^ 

A apdiy ttantaoing MkSdii maMm coma* *ah a Burner eseatng 
£5n reams wettgem and sdf noBoM paooto tor we wd tartom. 

BUYER/MATERIAL CONTROLLER 

Prereus enerima torid be an advantage to this maty crated ptrton. 
A say of mud Cl OK watf be nepndAe. 

SENIOR MOULD TECHNICIAN 

Aa magor muting Kbnan nqgM aft a least S ton npenexein 

tea tofecston Mouttg tasty. 

HeM* wfi be wed ft conduct trials and sarafan d «* toast at mb 
« mm » wnole stoNOfl on i tm. Stay «* to repuoft me 


oSSS uS* h»» 


TdPMS «*» 02*00 oaoT. 


£9^00 pa. pas wrefits nMng g nmoffy ear. 

Ptaase ante «A m to tts Jam Dertmsta. WadnB Phstia W. fit 
WMina noM . sarnmNDi-TtoDto. moe*. iwte 7DT. Tot suauy 
(0332) 789711. 

A ranter d ita Hetut Orem at C oaeams 


COVENT GARDEN GALLERY 

W« need a briWL capaM* mrsoa te ewe own 
afftce duties astf heS»«»a» ow OaUajy.Oaw typrepwen- 
naL 

PHaM.awty in wnnng. wsavcv. ur 

Robert Douwtna Prtcts & Maps Ltd 
4 Nanetn Street 
The Piazza 
Covert Oasnen 
London WCX 6QU 


EXPORT MARKETING PLANNER 

V & FFriedtand. an international market leader in 
domestic and industrial sound signaffing equip- 
ment, wishes to recruit an Export Marketing 
Planner who will be responsible to the Marketing 
Director for researching understanding and pre- 
- paring, business plans tor. the overseas .marketing 
of the Company's products which are weH estab- 
lished in many countries around the world. 

The Export Marketing Planner wffl also work wftft 
the International Sates Manager in his contact with 
overseas distributors and agents in carrying out 
the agreed plans. 

Candidates should ideally have had experience in 
an export marketing environment in a manufactur- 
ing company ana should speak French and 
German to a standard suitable for business con- 
versations. An education to University degree level 
would be desirable. 

Age around 30. Competitive salary and benefits, 
please write with brief details for an application 
form to Ref. JRB/EMP/T1. 

V & E FRIEDLAND LTD 
Reddish, Stockport, Cheshire, SK5 6BP 
A member of the MK Electric Group PLC 


SEVENOAKS, KENT 
Circa £6,250 p.a. 

A capable and well presented P.A. 
Secretary is required for an established 
building company in ^evenoaks, Kent. 
Impeccable telephone manner and 
excellent typing and shorthand required. 
The successful applicant will be 
responsible for certain minor 
administrative aspects including 
reception. Age 25 to 35. Good prospects. 

For appointment please telephone 
01-541 4217 
Eves/Weekends only 


DYNAMIC 
EXPERIENCED 
SALES PERSON 

Required to launch famous Italian 
men/women pret-a-porter line on 
British market from new agency in 
West End 

Excellent salary and benefits are 
the rewards for this challenging 
position 

Call 01-437 7969, eves 01-540 1231 


SPEAK WELL? 

START APRIL 7th or I4tb? 

Need £4-800 pw? If so telephone us today if you 
can work in our NW2 offices, are determined 
and reasonably educated and aged 23-55. Some 
people will make £16-20,000 by August There is 
no evening or weekend work and you don't need 
your own home phone or car. But you do need 
the above qualifications and we teach you how 
to make the above income. 

Tel: R. Tofbot or P. $weauey on 
01 450 9322. 


Pensions Acco u n ts 

m m . v . ^ -x » 

Mmamszntor 

Holbovn, London Up to £12^>00 

A moor lamadort anmaaan mdi offices tii tie Hokum Ana « me a> 
us ai awing for an Arams Aonmmnr at ion ms cnanteg ousore 
ojwmnera. 

Appeals, prime sqt aaga 2M5 sbodt Jaw a stmt aamara 
baftgraont id ta zMe n peso* bows b w Man. 

Please write to Mr. J J I Hawkins, 

17 Charterhouse St, London, EC1H 8RA 


InterExec is ffeorganisarionspecial' 
iang in the confidential promotion of 
Senior Executives. 

InterExec clients do not need to find 
vacancies or apply for appointments. 

InterExeds qualified specialist staff 
and access to over 100 unadvertised 
vacancies per week, enable newappoint- 
ments at senior levels to be achieved 
rapidly, effectively and confidentially. 

For a mutually exploratory meeting tekpbone: 

London ® 01-930 5041/8 

19 Cturmg Ciob Rod, WCl 

Birmingham ® 021-632 5648 

The Rcnrab, New Street. 

Bristol ® 0272 277315 

30 Baldwin Street. 

Edinburgh @ 031-226 5680 

47a George Scren. 

Leeds ® 0532 450243 

12 St. huh Street 

Manchester ® 061-236 8409 

FanUwr House, Faulkner Street C\& 

taterifregf J 

The oik wbo stands m 


RESIDENTIAL LETTINGS 

MANAGER/NEGOTIATORS 

Ow continued pwli and o b mou has luvlkd in mtAl key 
»aanci« fcf experienced personnel w our Rcpdemoi Leungs 
tiuHRCSL 

Wr are lootmg far dynamic, jdf mMiraied people lo jom onr team. 
H^i rewards will be paid far profit related suaeis. Plaae apply ia 
wnung wuh faD CV UK 

Ckrimfac Dnfa 

ITtliiqil tfaMi Axttittl 

m Cwnnaht SuSa 
Loadon to JAB 


fHESTERTONS 

K t: M ll K N T 1 XI — w 


NANNY AND CHILDRENS 
COMPANION REQUIRED 

taafluert art aflapBCW flri b nqww tn w a e anwinn md taniy 
for a »y aged 7 and a girl aged «. Ska rauo M mmraa nm. 
tori Sirred prow tntofltrte . 

arttowa aW ng a an M Oliaapon Biirt yastiomiiMatikBwmnB. 

Sue mot tea car dmar ad>sa> ama. 

Fust dsss nnwnaram <s meabte for B* no Wpari OB. 


. ere., 

" arj 

X ‘Oti'l 

p- oft., 
lo ■" ? 


< r 

5 s ru fo 
. st ation 
k L mb i 
2 l * 

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28) 


Mr 

IS 

_ 

is 

DSt 

a 

Jie 

ti 

for 

Jj 

:h- 

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to 

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nv 


he 

1 i 

mt 

Vi 

3SS 

ll 

nd 

£ 

k 

3. 

bit 

e 

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17, 



28 


THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


SPORT 


UI rlwvM tdoMIMCfllMlI 
can be meptod b» MleplHW 
(nwH AmmmtWWi TV 
deadline a S.U0pm 2 dm pnof 
io DoHkanoo lie 5.00pm Mon- 
day for WednodayL Should 
x» we* » nd an atfvnitse- 
mmi ta wnun% please lactmk 
your davitroc phone number. 

cuCT OnM imwamt. 

PASTMEHT. If yon haw any 
qoencs or pnNenn ehl » t lo 
>our AhnMcncm once n tun 
aoDcarat pkasc contact Pur 
Cuaomcr Services Department 
by tetepbone on 01-481 3006 


MARRIAGES 


Mr F F— CnnaHllw G 
B l i W— ■ The nurrw look 
peace on 31« March at Worm 
A one*. Turner* WB. or Mr sal- 
(Mor PonvOjrrta. von of Mr 
and Mrs F Pons-Osrrea of Ma- 
drid. Sulk and Man Genevieve 
Bumdpe. daughter or Mr and 
Mn NicnoUs Bumtfgr o* 
Crawley Downs Suw» Oom 
Bede MU orncialed Die 


BIRTHDAYS 


MCX Happy 18m uBbr tove A 
nmrMuUUora MAO. James 
A Tara 


GOLDEN 

anniversaries 


on April 

3rd 1930 31 ChiBtetiureti sun 
la. BUI lo Louise MAI. Now a I 
Hawthorn RMe. Wlndiar Mead. 

SldRMWUi. 


FLATSHARE 


CAMBRIDGE AMO COURT AULO 

educated wmer on an and an- 
IMun. Ml. reaulrei cheap 
room in aulet house (lal any. 
where in Greater London. «86 
3307. 


■URLEY/COULSDOM prof 25* 
io share Ipe N/9 C/H hse A 
Gdn. AU (aril M/L B/R 
VKtFLnd Br/GarwKk. Road 
M23/M25 ParMitt. 3 Time 
angle £180. Couple £390 pcm 
exd neg 01-660 8163. 

HUH COTTAGE Easy going 
pro* io snare sunny luxurious 3 
bed IUL close lo lube and ahop* 
m quirt read £320 0 c m Tel: 
01624 5567 after fiem or u>0»* 
01 637 5941 

IAIJUUM extroven home- n am ed 
person lo share undecwwed 
maHoneae. Gas CM. own room. 
£28 pw * HUS 672 436] ext 
415 <D> 673 6020 <£1 
MMM PARK/SWZ. Prof 
N S. For loveiy room and 
shower in lux family home usr 
or Wiichen. Excrttenl (or trans- 
port. £AO pw Tel Ol 274 2906. 
CARLSHELD SWIG. 3rd and 4th 
wanted to share oeauMuUy re- 
furbished Victorian house. 
£37.90 pw each. TeL Ol 870 
0908 or 0933 68302 
IT JOHNS WOOD Comfortable 
bed-silting room m lady's nai 
Available bnmedtaiefy tar prof 
male. Near shops A transport. 
£90 pw Ol 289 9466 
IATTTRSZA. prof m/f to ware 
lovely very spacious flrt with 
View over park £250 pent. Tel 
Ol 622 7674 after 6 Pm. 
XAPMAM COMMON. Prof F 26 
*■ to shr 2 bedim flat. O/r. nr 
tube. £216.66 MCI. Tel 01429 
1434 ex 29 


Sham house. Lor dMr roam. 
Small balcony Prof only. £66 
pw Tel' 238 5031 
tOUCH END.N5. Profm/fn/s 
o r snare attractive noiar and 
pin. £50 pw. Tel 348 5809 af- 
ter 8.00 pm. 


Miuped how 5 nans Manor 
House tube. £36 o.w 708 464S 
K 40 BOB 5908. 

UMCTOM- Own nan In large 
inared home CH. garden For 
grad/prof under 30 PtM ore- 
fertetf. £178 aft In. 226 4532. 


rwty dec flaL O.R- fully nfted 
U. 2 baths AD MDS UCt. £300 
cm. 388 4332 tdayl 
•GSTOM as nan WTOQK Prof 
28 + to sfunrcanf lira wiifi l 
OierF O/r Cal lover £160 pan 
. Phone 01-549 7731 fevM) 


2 sttUpe Rm*. Uraal kttdt- 
1. 18 nuns centre and aty 


• CH 

hort and taug let from £53 PW 
SC Tel Ol 202 2503. 

BE OF WALES Dime. Pref- 
er F. Own room Large flat 
I5PW toe. T0 935 7744/720 


FttTKEY Pro* H/F. 28s. Home 
-wMIs- pano. Chwe taAe/raU. 
Own room - £200 pcm tncl. 491 
3336 exl 211 Or *74 0369 
tW2 professional M/f. N/S. 
Room tn large muN a dn aai lam - 
tty none. Own bamraom. £200 
pcm. Ta 67 1 4196 
THAMES BARGE CbOsen. Two 
young professionals wasted tor 


_ DnaM 

snarl let own cabins. £40.00 
per week. Ta. 01-3526537 
Ml. Prof M. 25+. N/S. for mrtrt 
luxury gdn house. Mon m Fn 
tests only. CH. O. R. £40 pw 
CXd. 01-262 6308. 

WRITER /HWanan seeks roam <4 
wan use of kitchen m London. 
Flat or House Out« 
erate. Rtfl. Reply » BOX E75. 


r to share CH 
IMP. O/R. £160 pcm Exrt 
Trt.fll 381 3906 altar 630 pm. 


CMKWICK own roam in snared 
flak or river. £>68pcm. nut 
bills. Avail now. Ol 995 9882 


FRKRLEY N3» GUI N S to share 
mod use. O R. £130 pcm an 
Inc. Avan burned- Oi 346 4166 


FULHAM F 22s- to share ream to 
attractive flat. £40.38 pw excL 
Tel: 351 2777 after 7.30 pm 


_ . M/F. 

28* share house O* R £36 pw 
end. TeL ox 837 2939. 


WWAB / T M I H Prof F. n /1 
abare 3 bed flat. o/r. £35 pw 
nd. Tetashoor. 01-6860966 


ONSLOW SQUARE. Own room, 
tar f n/k 3 months. 68 pw In- 
clusive- Trt 689 7824. 


PU1KET. 1 Prof F. She lovely ftl 
Nr Heath. £220 pm exd. Ol 
409 3303 IW> 898 6773 (Ml 


W. KEMSINOTON Prof m l for 
sups' o<r m (M nr tube £46 
pw excL Tet 01-381-6398 


MB prof m/f n/g own room lit 
cosy ftal. CAop.w. exd. Tel Oi- 
602 6862. 


clubs 


: club 

and school HB-40 age growl 
TN: 01-373 1668. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


■ of WK- 
Ham. Duke of Normandy. 
Harold. King of Cngland. Sir 
Francis Drake. Sure out the Pi- 
rate. Napoleon Bonaparte. Lord 
Nelson Brunei. BtenoL Claud e 
Moneu Turner. OeMasy. Sir 
Wind on CnurcMU. Charles de 
Gaulle and especially Monsieur 
Thome de Gamond ace urgently 
invited to contact BOX E64 for 
deudi of a Submarine Family 
Relation on July 3rd. Pedigrees 
must be Woven 


doles on business lunching 
needed urgently tor 
immortalisation in prim I Au- 
thor of new book we l co m es 
Ideas Please Reply » BOX ET3 
KUOUML will Qlvr A. 
Oelbowne on* tune Major In Use 
inMDvmc* Corps or lus nrvl of 
kin. contact wiiuam Srurges A 
Co. soMrtlora trt Ol 222 1391 
ref: TF concerning a legacy 
WE WON THE AMERICAS CUM 
2 Aussie tnrts available lo crew 
your yacht. Con lari Margarrl 
Piero. 4i cnarione Si reel. 
Leichhardt. Sydney. 


WORK FIRST PLAY 
LATER IN THE ILS. 


Arm i leaov wx « suaem 
Over I8|i5<**qe’*sn Camp Arcenca 
needs jou kn 9 peas m Patti soar* 
sts md oahs «i an mean Sanaa 
Canp B w Hs nMe ohm 
M/t Fxebsrt oodci monev wd up 
to 6 peas bee dm wwe nap ta 


Camp America, 
DepL TT27 
37, Queens Gate, 
London SW7 
or cat 01-581 2378 


THE MIND 
CAN TAKE ONLY/ 
SO MUCH 


Mo kiiC aneivaorsmSamb 
ftSOOMf f*Jw««dns/OfMiOnln 
avery licking ciocy AUSe/vicamen 
risk iriemoi D>«cndmn in pence a 
soi Girke fte drone ouisehesn 
me weifoie of mese men ana 
«o men Wg unis' gc on nanng 
fftem M9niii9 nova tomB Prease 
Sena us a Dotwnon. o Conran) of 
rememiMt us with a legacy 


EX-SERVICES (MENIAL 
WElttRE SOCIETY 

I none lreBoxraey 
"tlULTd 0^5636333/ 



SERVICES 


HUMUBVi Low or Mamage 
AO pges. arete. IMOUie. Dent 
(0161 23 Abingdon Road. Lon- 
don WB Tfl Ol 938 LOU. 

rtND MEW FARTHERS OW 

Hedi Funer Introductions. 
BA.L 14 Brauchaiap PL SW3 
Ot 2676066 High tucresc rale. 
Men 4046 to demand. 
SELECT X™ MRDG evdiaKe in- 
troductions Mr me unattached . 
68 Maddox Street. London wi. 
Telephone 4S3-9937. 

FDD THU* ROOTS. Start (hr 
esettme quest lor your men 
tors. Send lor tn* Brochure and 
driak of easy monthly terms. 
Windsor Ancestry Res ea rch 
ITT III Mounlballcn Hour. 
Victoria St. Windsor. Berks. 
SL4 IMF. Tet : i07S3i B57IB1 
CAUSRE CV> BtoetenUy 
tv-mien and produced 
curriculum vitae documents. 
DrtadS 01-580 2959. 


WANTED 


Debenture seats 

wanted for prime comoaiucs. 
Top prices pud Ol 228 0423. 


LAST OFI'QRltlHITY lo Include 
buntings by Smvtoe in an Im- 
portant special exhUsiuon. 
Ulnae send detadi and ohoto- 
graons to Oscar A Peter 
Johoson Ltd. 27. Lowndev 
torrl. London swix 9HY 

EMTCRTAIMMG We need tanta 
elegant houses to Central Lon- 
don suitable for Receptions and 

Dowers. Ewouirtm wneeler 
BuskMP Events Ol -788 5363. 

CASH FOR «* and 
waiercoKHRS of animals and 
birds, esp dogs and cats. Rotor 
lo BOX E71 . 

LARGE WARDROBES A Mtnurs. 
Desks Bookcase etc A Pre 1940 
furniture. Tel: 01-665 0148 or 
01-228 2716 day or night. 

OLTHPEBOU RHE TKHETS 
wanted Top prtces paid . Td Ol 
828 0778 

WMBUDOM TICKETS remnred 
01 928 1775 


FOR SALE 


RESISTA 
CARPETS 
SPECIAL OFTERS 

Wkandcn CorfcoplaM Tiks. 


design natural only fS.OS per 
*q vd + VaT. Wool mu 


Berber carpets 4m gride 
Hessian hacked £4 J5 per sq 
yd + VAT. White stocks 1 ml 
2SS Nm Kings Rand. 
Pars bps GnoL Sff(. 

Tel: 01-731-2588 

Free tplnat • Epm fiOtag. 


CHESTERFIELDS 

MINT CONDITION 

Superb green leather Chet 
lerflekfc - three sealer with 
or wiihoui matching wing 
armchairs and slipper 
chaos. 

Telephone: 

01-439 4661 daytime 
01-866 2828 


AFfOL BARGAINS OH T Vs fr 

£49. Videos ft- £149. Tops T v. 
91 Lower Skane Street, swi 
01-7300933. 


BflfGHTS OF RETTUBO. Cnm- 
pleie lumMnng soxinee in Hie 
pertod style. Finest Quality rep- 
Hca furniture from our own 
workshop. £2 mutton stacks. 
NeftWbed 10491) 641115. 

Bournemouth iOZIC) 293580. 
Totohom 1039287) 7443. 

Berkeley. CIOS 1 04531 810962. 
■R iams OF MTT1EBP. rour 
poster beds and Georgian style 
b e d room furniture In Yew and 


showroom now open. The Butts 
Centre. Reading. Trt. <0734) 
587644 

CATS, STARLIGHT EXPRESS 
We nave (fckets for Ota* and all 
theatre and sports. TeL 631 
3719. 637 1715. AB tnalor 
credtl cards. 

THE TOMES 17SS-1SRG. Otoer 
nun aval.. Hand bound ready 
lor pndentauan also . 

-Sundays" £12 50 Remember 
f When. 01-688 6323. 

" 7" nan t»ii r Ruushed ny 
-nasaiwr- 1890. carved -lesto.- 
' Totally, magn li ico n i. Tet ■ Ol -. 
940 1162 or w/e 0572 870629 

OLD TOM FLAGSTONES, cob- 
ble sens etc. NWoowldr 
dettv fries. TeL 10380) 850039 
tWIItsi 

OLD TOM FAVRtO STOICS 

The highest duality and mod 
cumpfCrttve (n (he errantry. Tfl 
0625 633721. 

SEATFWDCRS Any event me Les 
Mb Govern Gdn. Starhghi Exp. 
Wimbledon, cayndebotmie. Ol 
828 1678 MOOT credM cards. 

PIANO. Medium- rtzvd upright 
id clam rontf. £386. Can ar- 
range delivery. 01-453 oiaa 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


GORS AMD NAI I W ARM Serial 
number 14132 Overstrung, 
underdamper. £730 01-660 
2136. 


THE PIANO 

London’s leading tpectoim In 
new and restored pianos for toe 
largest genuine seieciion avail- 
able. 30a Htgbgaie Rd. NW5. 
01-267 7671. Free catalogue. 
PIANOS: MAKE A SONS. New 
and reconditioned- Quality at 
reasonable prices. 326 Brighton 
Rd . S Croydon. 01-688 3613 


SHORT LETS 


PULKAAL 3 Bdte. Prof m/f ter 
o. r In tux. house Roof terra* 
♦ close to lute. £70 p.w. uic. 
Tel: 581 3786 


LUXURY SERVICES Apartments 
near Shane Square Astrton- 
worth Lid Ol 681 8008.07 
LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, 
central London Irom £325 pw. 
Ring Town Hse Apts 373 3433 
QUEENSWAT W2 3 bed turn lux 
£600 pw snort Lei Phone 437- 
2443 day or 0923-720630 eve 


tn 


h'ensnqlgn CM TV 24hr swbd. 
Ilk Colling ham APIS 373 6306. 
ST MINES SWt. Luxury 2 bed 
fully furnhlvd serviced apt nr 
park. O) 373 6306 m 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 




Td Aviv 

7/4 

. £99.08 

GUI 

9/4 

£129.00 

Malaga 

9/4 

£49.08 

Faro 

10/4 

£69 JM 

Teaerife 

18/4 

EiigjB 

Palma 

18/4 

£79 JO 


speeeWing 

01 486 9356 


BARGAM A 

USA- Canada. CaribbearvAlrlca. 
Far EasL Aisnu. Gtoorcrcd 
Ol 737 7IU 22I2 ABTA. 


COSTCUTYERS ON fHgMs.-hob 
io Europe- USA & nun destina- 
tions. Dlptomal Tf»d! 01-730 
2201. AMTA JATA ATDL. 


LOWEST Ata PAK5- 

Buridngnam Travel. ABTA. 
01-836 8622. 


WA JOPUM IIIMfC Ausmdla 
New Zealand Colton* dMcounl 
fares. OTC. 01-602 3236. 


CHEAP FLIGHTS Worldwide. 
Haynurkei 01-930 1366 


SWITZERLAND Scheduled fnghis 

Ol 724 2388 ABTA ATOL 


USA irom £9*. Major travel Ol 
485 9237 IATA 


IT" f»" » « «■ Unreded 

low ent ftluM experts. NY. LA. 
Sydney. Singapore. Bangkok. 
Rio. Santiago. Lima. Nairobi. 
JoTiurg. all Europe. Freedom 
Holidays 01-741 4686 ATOL 
432 IATA AJTO 
WORLD MrtDE FWrirt- 
Specialising to Ftrvl A Quo 
Class a Economy to Australia. 
Far East. S. Africa. USA. Lis- 
bon Faro « Geneva. Phone 
Travel Centre 01-666 7025 
ABTA 

AIRFARE SPE CI A LIS TS Sydney 
o w £395 rtn £645 Auckland 
e W £420 rtn £774 jo'burg 

0 w £264 rtn £470. Lm Ange- 
los o w£177rtn£33S. London 
Flight Centre Ol 370 6332. 

ALGARVE; Menorca. Tenerife, 
creek Islands. VIHaS Apts. Pen- 
swan Tavern*. Holidays/ 
Fitohls Brochures -bookings, 
venlura Holidays. Ta 06 1 534 
BOSS. 

■ENOGCA. T ENEM PE. Greek b- 
lamb. Algarve Villas Aots 
Pennons Tavertite Holidays ' 
FUgms. Brochures- bookmto- 
vemura Holidays. Tel 0742 
331100. 

LATIN AMERICA. Low COM 

nigh Is eg RIO £495. Lima 
£475 rtn. Abo SntaH Group 
Holidav journeys- JLA Ol -747- 
3108 

LOW FARES WORLOWRK - 

USA. S. America. Mid and Far 
Fast, s Africa. Trayvale. 48 
Mar gam Street. Wl. Ol 880 
2938 iv ) m Accepied) 
MARRAKECH. Traditional pal- 
ace m the heart of Marrakeeti 
Spactom Roof lerrae Two 
servants ilnn 4 to 6 pe rsons 
£500 per week. 0692 630770. 
HOUND WORLD £745 econ. Oub 
fr £1599- first fr £2035. Syd- 
ney ft £659 tin Col urn bus. 
Cutler* Gardens. 10 Devonshire 
Square. EC2 Ol 929 4251. 
DISCOUNTS 1M Economy tick- 
ets Tn> ua 

list TLIGHTKXWERS « -387 
9100. 

LOW COST FLIGHTS Most Euro- 
pean destinations. Vaiexander 

01 402 4262 0062 ABTA 
61004 ATOL 1960 

M1AML JAMAICA, MLVORK. 
Worldwide cheapest fare*. 
Richmond TraveL 1 Duk e SI 
RlCfl mood ABTA 01-940 4073. 
SPAM, PORTUGAL. GREECE. 
FUgms irom moa UK airpcwts 
Many lair special otters Fatdor 
Ol 471 0047 ATOL 1640 
TUNISIA For that perfect holiday 
with sunny days & carefree nb. 
Meal Spring Summer Tunisian 
Travel. 01-373 441*. 

TURKEY BEACH HOTEL. May 
Bargains from £166 Inc. H/B A 
nee waiersporis. Hoi Turkey. 
Ol 326 1005. 


USA. N. York £189 Miami £198 
LA £299 rtn Abo meanest 
schedule (11 on malor US cam- 
era. 01-884 7371 ABTA. 


USA, ri AHA »»n * 

LOWEST AIR FARES. Also 
dub and 1st Besltene Ol -390- 
1642. AIM 1400. 


AUCAHTE, Faro. Malaga etc. 
Dimood Travel ATOL 17B3. 
01-581 4641. Honlwmi 68541 


AUSSE. NJ.. Stl Africa. US- A. 
Hong Kong. Best Fates; 01-493 
7775 ABT4. 


SVD/MEL C61B Perth £546 AU 
malor earner* to AUS/NZ. 01- 
584 7371. ABTA 


Flight only to 

Dalaman Dm. 13. 20 May. 
From £169.01-8922619 Alof. 


SOUTH AFRICA Jo'burg lr £465. 
01-584 7371 ABTA. 


. : 'AUSTRALIA 
■ -- /Aft EAST 
WORLDWIDE 

Tlto'icrwepj cost flights 

Eurocheck Travel 
01-542 4613 
01-543 4227 

Estab 1970 


DISCOUNTED PARES 
angle rati 
Jo'burg 'Har £300 £465 

Nairobi £220 £325 

Cairo £130 £200 

Lagos £235 £335 

Det-Bom CM £340 

Bangkok £195 £330 

Douali £420 

Afro Asian Travel Lid 


162. 168 m ggii s i w.i. 

1Ui 01-4X7 8295/0/7/8 
AMEX. VISA- DINERS 


HEM UM F»B£S WflUDWE 

Ai»«10 E«0 Dutto 070 

FreeNOtt E«» wwbd I1B0 

Lofts f34C JfflUto £440 

Momiog £400 Knell £220 

Amman £260 Kvl/Sn £445 

£3W Kinrbt 5350 
Bom/Dea ECS k.Yoft WS 

Caro E!40 Seed £750 

CcWrilOQ £430 Svd/Md £B M 

thnai^ CTO £570 

SKTUWD TRAVEL LTO 
2 DBOUN STREET. LONDON Mt 
Tat BT-43S 352118807 
MUKBOU» 


UP UP & AWAY 


Nairobi JoUurr. Cain). Du- 
bai. IsianbuL Singapore. K.U 
Dcihi. Bangkok. Itetre Kong. 
Svdney. torope, A The 
Americas. Flamingo Travel 
3 New Quebec Sl MarWe 
Airb London W)H 7D D 

01-402 9217/18/19 

Open Saturday I QJX3-I3.00 


TRAILFINDERS 


Wortdwide low east ffigUs. 
Tke best - nd «8 cao pme i 
17HBO0 efiests stea 1970 

AROUND THE WORLD 
FROM £755 


SYDNE Y 

PERTH 

AUCKLAND 

BANGKOK 

SINGAPORE 

MIAMI /FLORIDA 

HONG KONG 

DELHI/BOMBAY 

COLOMBO 

TB- AVIV 

NAIROBI 

jot burg 

LIMA 

LOS ANGELES 
NEW YORK 
GENEVA 


Cm £841 
£380 £582 
£409 E743 
£198 £383 
£231 £462 
£208 £376 
£248 £496 
£250 £374 
£242 £424 
£109 EISB 
£231 £391 
£286 £470 
£253 £495 
£204 £388 
£1® £242 
£75 EM 


42-41 EARL'S COURT MUD, 
UNDO* M (El 


AKA MSB 


“BOOK SUNWORLD & BOOK SECURITY” 
★ ★HUGE FUGHT SAVINGS** 

Each chent booking with Sunworto Travel is instantly travel 
bonded tor £2.000. This travel urdemnity fee rt £5 is 
automatically added to each diems' confirmation. 


f&g 

Bns&tae 

Penh 

Hdtwrt 

TownsvGe 

Cams 

Pi MoresOr 
Hanna 

AiKkim 

Chnsiciiurch 


Wrtrgnn 

Dune&n 


Jo bur^ 


Cm Tam 

□iFttSI 

Pi Ef«bBh 
Lusaka 



Amman 

Mom 



tew York 

Lsaos 

IUI 

Dforyt 

Los Angeles 
San Frsnasa 



Dans 

SeycheUs 

W» 

St Louts 

Mirtimascaf 

Jeddah 

Wastaogtan 


Kuvral 

Mbaoueoue 

Bat 

Patoian 

Las Vegas 


Sxua 

Kansas 

Hong Kong 

Toronto 

PHoena 

Jakarta 

Montreal 

S»rt)iego 


Vancoirte 

Denver 

K uumur 

Cagarv 

Artanu 

Mania 

Scant* 

to He Janero 


HonehAt 

Stjenos Ares 


Houston 

Soutt America 

Atai OttJta 

Boston 

Barbados 

tovssase 

Cfipcago 

Si Luoa 


Deoirt 

Caribbean 


Harare Oeoot Caribbean 

SUNWORLD TRAVEL (est’d 1969) 


59, SOUTH STREET, EPSOM, SURREY 

(03727) 26057 /2SS30/2753S/27 160. '24832 /2S3 15 
Gonmont Lfeemed brokar*. CredR ttrm niM)* 
“Ovgr 220,000 c5en(s Moca IMS’* 

Tdn bg. 24(87 

STILiaDI CASUS LAPIDEM CAVAT 


RENTALS 



CLEVELAND SQUARE W2 

Overlooking Square Gardens. 3 
bedrooms, 3 bathrooms furnished 
Flat Large recaption and large 
Roof Terrace. Kitchen (an 
machines) Company Let £450 

per week. 

Hyde Park Office; 01-262 SOSO 


Wide range olausMytumished 
and unfurnished property 
» FuU Management Service. 


cassiffflff® 


• LegaWTax Advice. 

. Porsonaksee Service throt«ti 
7 computer to*ed ofleas. 


WNCffiSTER STREET SWI 
WtoO - - equipped, speraews 
Maisonette . - excellent for 
entertaining. Double and single 
bedrooms, 2 reception rooms. 
bathroom aid shower room, fitted 
kitchen. CH/chw. Available 
immediately 0/12 months. £230 
per week. 

Hraffeo Office; 01-834 9998 


SWEBY COWAN 


COVENT GARDEN, W.02 
kimacuUip 2 baton 2 twutvm 
Hat si brand new Lmay block. 
E«cefla<ily eramped totou ghtkiL 
irwai Company M £375 p w. 

INVERNESS TSm, W J2 

Ug m and spaems 2 bedim tot 
si period converaon wOh Nl mo- 
men is horn Hyde PoV Co lot 
£200 p.w 


Quraishi 

Constantine 


OWNERS WITH 
PROPERTY 
TO LET NOW? 

In Kensington, Cfrertaa. 
and mchmond. 


Fufl management 
service available. 


HOLLAND PARK. Charming 
and tower grod mahMiota. 

dbta recroUan. dto bMnn. 
Kitchen, b'loel ream. Batoim. 
cdsakrm. patio. Ol. Co tat £155 
pw. Trt.- 01229 8416 


HAMPSTKAD. to the hart M me 
village Suoert 3 beftrm rue 


WU, super lux 

newly rtnlec 3 bed ftaL 2 
reccps rf kit aU mach. bath. sep 
WC. «dn OSP Nr tube sin. Co 
lei C2D0PW Tel 992 6643 
NOOK ONSXN WC really spa- 
(loin 3 bedroom. 2 reception 
mansion flat. New decor. aU 
machines. L 009 ropany let 
£225 pw. Buchanans 351 77e7 

MEWS JtOUSC W2. 1 bedroom 
designer house to smart rebuild 
mews. AU mod cons & garage 
Long company Ut. £150 pw. 
Buchanans OI -351 7767 

KX Super lumpy not. 2nd Door. 
Pb block. Lift and porter. 2 
beds. rrt-p. bain. wc. Ml an ma- 
chines, ch. on si pfcg co la. 
£275 dw. A 9«1L Ol 458 437S. 
saarrs PARK. Prince Albert 
RD. Lux Period Furn Garden 
Ftal with garage 2 3 b ed*. 
Long lei. £210 PW. Tel 01 722 
4070. 

AMERICAN EXECUTIVES Seek 
lux nais/houses up 10 SB 00 
p.w. t v.w lees teq Phhbpa 
Kay 4 Lewis. South of toe park. 
Chelsea office. 01-362 Sill or 
North of the Park Regent - * 
Park office. 01-722 5135 

BCLSIZE PARK NW3 Immac 
furn studio flat, t rm. k * b ta 
prestige Mk View over gdn. UTL. 
porter. 1 mm tube < Not thew i 
Uner. shoot, busre ac. arab 
12Ul April co Wt. CUQpw. Tet 
624 3348/586 2663 


SWI dose Westminster Abbey, 
superb u> 1 M rum new 
block. Huoe reerp Lge ted. ex- 
ert lent kll bath. £ 2 S 0 pw. 
Cootes 01-828 8251. 


MCHGA1T BORDERS NB. Urm- 
ry double bed IUI. WrU ftan. Co 
let only £125 pw Medwxy t> 
lares. 01 348 779 a. 


house. newly — 

Duoughoto. 3 creeps. Obi bed. 
bain rm. dknn. Ml afl ma- 
chures. full CH. t»oo gdn * 
•err. £28Cpw. Tet Young 01 
331 0362 

quRABM COMBTMITWe offer 
duality ruroUtied unfurnished 
properties to KOritnglon. 
Chelsea. Fulham. Putney. 
Wimbledon. Richmond. From 
£100 pw Please ref wtlb yota 
reqiaremenls Ol 244 73S3. 


Charming weU dec fhd. 1 bed. 2 
roes KM. baih. Lge roof tair ft 
balcony Avail 6 mirths to I yr. 
£150 pw. SuUhrao Thomas 
731 3333. 

WIWJTION TOIL Superb da 
newly bum « beg 2 bath hse. 
Lux kM all appliances PTOff de- 
signed Inferior. Gpr ft Odra. 
Avail now. Co M. £350 pw. 
Sturgis ft Son 788 4561. 

AMUBCAN S HCI A U8 TS ate 
currenUy seeking good quality 

rental accnmmofLnion to 
central London for waiting 
company tenants Ol 937 9681. 

BATON SQUARE Attractive 2nd 
ft 3rd FI oat Mail mute! S bods 
2 baths? 2 reept kU. aU ma- 
chines £600 pw 6 mm *■ Tet- 
01-B2&0040 

— NfOHi HOAD Nl. Oom- 
Btetety raortMshed tamUy 
house. 4 Beds. 2 Bams 2 Rrcep. 
Excetlenl Idl. Lge gdn. £326 
pw. Trt: 730 6010. 

NEGKNTS PARK. Prince APtert 
RD lux Penan Film Garden 


Flal with garage 2<3 beds 
T2IO PW 


Long lef. £210 PW. Trt Ol 722 
4070 


GATWICK 

•NICE* 


EVERY THURSDAY . 
SATURDAY & SUNDAY! 

• From May 17 • 

FLIGHTS • HOTELS 

• FLYDRIVE 



LOWEST FARES 

Pate £69 Cue £206 
Mrtan £88 riwe £346 
A mens £109 H Kong £496 
Gen Zur £79 LA 8F £34g 
Faro £89 N York £276 
Vienna £129 Sy®W £699 
Delhi £345 TASK £169 


SUN & SAND 

9, Hate M, L ie tan Nt 

01-139 2100/73 4 6668 

MAJOR CiCABM ACCCPTTB 


DARTAI 




m 


MTct».-£249 isWc CSS9 

tovAro C3;f rMc^:-' .v339 
5y o.sey ii-'639-‘ Scrorcl C33‘v 
Amk C75C Tcrcrro C/4». 


WO Jermyrt Sireef. 5V\ r l 
' 83 V 4J r<xt 


GENERAL 


TAKE TONE OFF to Paris. Am- 
sterdam. Brioreb. Bruges 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague. Dublin. Rouen. Bou- 
logne ft Dieppe. Time Oft 2a. 
Chester Close. London. Swix 
79Q 01-236 8070 
SPfHMG M CTPM1L Special 
prices 1 ft 2 weekt lx«h ft 
anarts pan World Houdav* 01- 
734 2562. 


SELF-CATERING 


ISCHIA. Alderney Wands Ol 
836-0383 ABTA 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


BRITT AKV. Vendee. Dordogne 
coasMi and rural cott ages, most 
dales from £100 p w. 0225 335 
761 337 477. 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


GREECE FROM £129 
SPRING OFFERS 

Iwk 2»fts 
KOS 'RHODES 9l< £129 E1S9 
KOS'IWODES 16,4 EIO £1/9 
TOLON 11*4 £149 £179 

CRETE 8.15*4 EISS EIB9 
PRICES INCLUDE 
A/TAXES 13 INSE 
TIWSWAY HOLIDAYS 
RtCXMANSWORTH. HERTS 
(0923) 778344 
NORTHERN OFFICE: 
(0422) 75999 
ABTA ATOL 1107 AiTQ 


_ 9th 

ft loot Apn) I week £935 2 
wa-ers £145 tort Tet Strain* 
0705 862814 

senm m Corfu Ami May. 
specsal prrn in our attractive 
villas Ring Pan World Holidays 
Ot 734 2562 W day* 
RHODCS APRIL BAROAMS 1 wlf 
£149 2 whs £169 tort. Tef 

Siroma 0705 562814. 


01-6315313 


RESIDENTIAL 


with gge. Early riewtng ad- 
vised. £250 


pw pgg. Nathan 

Wilson ft Co. 794 1161. 


ft exerurtves urgency seek 
quality properties In afl central 
. wea London areas. For aftra- 
IKm Measr ring 01-938 3426. 


IWL A charming i bed fttfiy 
iurn nai dose lo tube. £ 120 pw. 
T. P M. Ol 446 2026. 


W2. Lux 2 bed ruxy rum oaf to 
pb block. £185 pw. T. P. M. 
446 2025. 


BARMS. Superb Iren tee ta aul 
el rd by Common 4 beds. 3 roc. 
super ut. bathrm. cart Mo- 
Gdn. CtJOO am tor 1/3 m 
(Not auroral Taylor dump Por- 
ta 741 1063. 


wflh- 

capital outlay Far 

ilium rtioir i r tw ai attradtvq 
prices. rag Mr Mtatetl 
Noroury. Jeon Strand Con- 
tracts Ud. Td 01-486 8616. 


newly brrtR 4 bed 2 bath hse. 
Lux kU all appliances. Proa de- 
signed utter-tar. Ope ft sML 
Avail now. Co let £350 pw. 
Sturos ft Sen 788 4561. 

5 


ft rmuntim Obl 2 roc. 2 dMr 
b e dim s. UL had. hath ft dh. 
Outat ft sunny. AU pomtote te- 
pMancca. CM TV. gas OL 


1 year from la AsrB. 
agent*. 5896466. 


QUESMSGATC SW 7 Bright and 

attractive up floor flat a few 
yards Lycee. short walk Ken- 
sington Gardens ft Hands 2 
doable beds. 2 baths, large re- 
ception. fUOy equMMd 
kirehen/dtoer. storeroom. Mi 
£346 pw met CH.CHW. Co teL 
Phone 01 493 4430 ft Ol .408 
987S evenings 
HAMPSTEAD. Superb .spacious 
luxury rtas. ChariTkng decor ft 
runrtsMngs. French windows ft 
balconies to ad roo ms . ~ pig 
lounge. 2 danMa im ireoms ^ a 
esdhruumf. Mb- ntted-mmy 
.kitchen.- Must be sescL J£i95 
P.W. Trt 722 2366. 

SOUTH BAMS ovaloofctng river 
Steer targe 3 bed $ 2 baths pan- 

house. 60 « tomato teKtaua 
roof terrace. £375 pw.- 01-831 
2692 trade 
SWI Very attractive te f br atate d 
house, newly decorated. 4 bed*. 
2 baths. 3 recpL targe HL Ml 
maefanes roof terrace pd. Co 
)eL £425 PW Tel: 01-B2BG040 


SELFCATERING ITALY 


Bf A MAGIC WEEK- 
END. indulge younOT . ! 
deserve ft A weekend fp Veo- 


weU. drink weO. shop wen aM 
forget about England's depress, 
log weather. Or combine a rity 
weekend with a week N the 
sea. Free brochure from Magic 
of Italy, ore* ST. 47 S tr uta thta 
Bush Orem. W12 BPS Tat 01 
749 7449 124 hra service) 


TOP LEVEL RESIDENTIAL 
LETTINGS NEGOTIATOR 

(Anticipated earnings £15.000+) 

BENHAM & REEVES 

NEW KENSINGTON OFFICE 
Phone: GS. ^wra^SV/l 01-435 44» - 



>1 


Keith 

farrinlp 
Groves 

sr.wi Ste McteSpaatr 

MM ■ nufl yn btak Ndo rtl 

oa«—JSMM i «rag« 

Mtftadw. Piw 

«oai team 4 tan bss nwm. i 
sag to teMsMMdr. 2 ItensL 

a 

1 



S/C gun DM. Lnfte. dbta bad. k 
ft b. CH. CHW. TV. All tad 
£150 pw. 58* 1438. 


to blit, with port e rage. Obtat 
Urge, sep ML aH machine*, r 

pw-tac. 402 2806. 

SW4. bmnaculaiz 1 bed Oat to the 
heart of Ctaswm OH Town. 
Fully finished fjoopwCoia 
arty. Morgan Gtte720 7481. 


ber when a ee k tag ban rental 


London arotu £1SO/£2£OQBW. 
ML i bad Oat with w jaadi. to 
brand new conversion, s mins 
tube. Choree of *. £120 pw. co 
M only 937 9683. 

FLAT, OfT Cheyne 
Walk. 2 beds. 2 baths. 2 racas. 
new refurh£22£pw. 937 9681. 
C HPHB Aftaantawg newly dre 1 
dbta bed flat tar careful tanteL 
£118 pw TW 352 9710 
CWUU 0bleL2 bad. 2 recepv 
poner.gdn. paratog. £ 2 is pw. 
CH ft HW tad. 01-361 6639. 
FLATVHOUm, short -tang lets. 


labrnatMul: 01 B44 7363. 
MOKATE' SpadooL sunny 3 
bedroom garden Oat N/S. 
£496 pera. 01-348 1348. 
HOLLAND PARK B0U5K. 3 beta. 
2 baths, garden, qutat straaL 
New-rafurbX62&pw.937 9681 .' 
LOVELY 4 bora baa on pkl pr 
swftmalaft. riOtog.* 7 t mata. 
Dthon SE9. 0273 728349. , 
MAYTAHt/HTDC MM. Long / 
street tett. Best Brices, w. T. p. 
936 9512- 

tm M FurnJL itaxBJdtS beiL2 
boBiOas OUrrf£ 22 ap.w. 
fans 482 2277 
FttTWnr data to EM 8U. MM 2 
dbt bed flat with garage. £120 
wactoy. Td 0980 70031. 



SBf 1 Bright A attrae. 2 ted fML 
£140 p.w. Co. Lei cany 
nai attorn 834 8000 


SW7 Cne m rol Rtf. epactew 5 
bed Oat/2 baths £900 pw. Ol- 
831 2692 trade. 


Wl BHHIL tax. fma RaL ceeen. 2, 

— <M beds. £228 p.w. Cl -727 

— 9919.'” 1 


f timry i CtabMe bedroom 
flat. Fined knetreet. Air sue 


Co la only- Yd: 


121 


AMOBCAH Bata nsnCAS 
goires luxury Rata and. hrw ega 
(TOtn £200 - £1.000 pw . Riog 
Boti na D A M Au di ran 6136 


■LSHAM BD *14. Lorrty gar- 
den nb 2 MdL- lee reoep/din. 
k and b. £200 pw. Go's onv. 
Barnard Marcos Ol 602 2428 


MU HOLIDAY* 05 AsrB By ah 
from Catwxk wtb hoM* or 
atas. From £129. LH1 past oirty 
£27. Good snow f Freedom 
Holidays Ol 741 4686 ATOL 
432. 


BUMP HOUMYS 6/4 By aft- 
front Gacwtcft wrtfc fretOs or 
apta. FYara C129. UR OHS only 
£27 Good Bam I Freedom 
Monday* Ot-741 458<£ ATOL . 



SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


COSTA DEL SOL. 

Sea from anartoWM to rent, 
steent 2/4. Uae of all htad fadl- 
iBes. Avail April. May. Augwat 
From £75 pw. 0762 352773. 

KAZAJtRON Utsooin resirttms. 
Spam villas AMs BP fd Gai 
Mureta i Nr La Mangel Ora c h 
Bay Hois 0432 270185 ATOL 
AfTT 1517. 


SPAIN 


PIAIO W CA Unusual property to 
hiUs. IB kms Palma. Furnished 
cnatel with 2 d 

living, dtolng no. kU 


shower rm. terraced also cara- 
van to te 2 £48000 Regfy to 
BOK A06. 

5ALOU. COSTA OOIIABA. 2 bed 
room fully furn apL targe 


avail. £35.000: Ol Mi SIPS. 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
The Cornell C unmuvdw fi s have 
prepared drafi Pastoral sc he mes 
providmg for declarations or re- 
dunaancy in nihil of the parish 
otrtftth of SI AU». MUUnra 
brougn. iVorfc oiocesM ana ns 
apptoprsatloa lo me tor worship 
by the Kingdom Ufe Trim: and to 
respect of the church of St An- 
drew Northover iBafh ft Wells 
Diocese), being one of toe two 
parish churches of the parish of 
nctiesier with Northover. , 
providing tor its rare and raainte- 
n ante by tbe Redundant 
Churches Fund. Copies of 
drali scheme may be dim 
Irons Use Osurrts Commlsatonera 
I Munank. London SW I P3JZ to 
whom any representauora should 
be sent withns .28 days of the pub-1 
iKabofi of (ms notice. 


MSS ROSE PHXLAMENA 
CETHHMOS DECEASED 
Any pergoo holding or having 
knowledge of a Win of Use late 
RO<e RMIamena Celhtogs. Hofei 
Lrtrum. 32 38 Lertsam Gardens. 
Kensington who died on Bth Au- 
gust. 1985 or having claims 
against the estate, ta requested to 
canuunnir s— rthi- 
Messra. James ft David W B. 
TO. W.S 
to The Square. 

Kerto. 

Rostourotsahlre. 

Scotwad. 

CHAR1TV COMMISSION 
Charily - Cathedral Ansemiies 
Fund - General Chari ry 


The Charily Cornmissioriers pro- 
pose lo make a Scheme lor tola 
charily wnuh will vary sis oo- 
lerts. Copies of the draft Scheme 
mav be obtained from itsem 
lief 306846- A 48 LSI al Sl 
Alban's House. 57-60 
Haymarket. London SWt S' 40X. 
Oevtirms and suggestions may 
be sent lo i hero „iihui one month 
from [ooav 


EVILL ft COLEMAN. 

PALL A EVILL who has been a 
Parfiwv- »n the firm since 1969. 
retired from the practice an inc 
25th March 1986 
ANTHONY JOSEPH NASH 
LEE. JAMES FAIRCLOL’CH and 
TERENCE LEE romuiuc m pan 
nershfp under the same style at 
i M L'pper Rtrfnnond noad. 
Putney London swia 2UO and 
al 1178 London Road. Noroury. 
London $W16 4DW_ 


MMOL Excellent toon and 
comfort In Mpeth Georgian syte 
country CH. Fresh naked rolls. 
Ooned cream. UcrsawL CLB ft 
8 £1360. Ta 0398 4203. 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


nuMraoortta. £68000. TO: Ol 
685 3408 


fUL 21ft ReC. 2 beds. 80ft Gar- 
den. COL £68000. Td 01-720 
0885 Eves. . 


STILL SEfifiCHING? 

We fame M -EMM tor 'fl*£ 
fkntol te oHO W to be a »» 
the KMVL 37 tancte 


ttroi M oat Great Bf tefL Wa 
carry HOUSES. HATS 


,ps tajftiTO c r W otabwfe 
FrnSes, angles. & pets our 
ripwiaftt y 

HOMaOCATORS 

RENTAL ACCOM. PU8U&SS 
01 720 2028 
OR CALL YOUR LOCAL OFFER 
OPEN 7 DAYS 


KENSINGTON PARK ML 

MAGKHCEKT LUXURY KEWLY 
MTEnOR DECORMED 4TH HJDOR 
RAT. 

In fwtpoa tonli Btock witb paw 
Ataaoeat mane 
. 2 nun -afk undcr- 
rijrert re City. EnoMt 

Lime recepuoo room. 

KUcbra entti all nartiinr*. dWc 
bedroom, tatamrei. Ideal to 
ta. £2» PW tac. Td 01. 3»i 

BU. 


pound i 

Ian. L 


KENSOMTQM WB large Canfly 


tannaruutay decorated and 
furntehctf. ktaai tor rniotaln- 
tag. 3 bedims. 2 both na*. 2 
recep rms- large eat m UL 
study /oudto. Gardrn. Co. 
Mara, i yr a. £45Qpw. 
AROUND TOWN 01-229 9966. 


HYDC PMHLtatortor designed 2 


tton with dining ba8 American 
kftanai. matMe Bathroom plus 
sen wc. flat wMti baicony in 
prestige Mode. AvaBaue now. 
Palace^ Properties. 486 B936. 


Newly 
3 bed 

9/e furnished 

t nta a wn eoe. garden. 2 tid ra «n>- 
dervoond. £97 gw. Td 0730 
893157 After ,6PM. 


LkT require properties m cortlM 
south and west xondo g arroa 
for wafilar apyuraaiaxn- 221 - 


SLOftlC ft VENUE SW2 9Bi floor 
pied a tarre with 


Steer views 

Studio flat with bath and Bny 
liftmen. £!OOow. incL cb/chw. 


SUPEBKM FLAT* ft HOUSES 
avail, ft read for dto tatn a fs . 
executives. Long ft short Mfs in 
ail areas. Unfriend ft Go. 48. 
Albanaite S WI . Ol -499 5334. 


VttVIBfO LOmoMT Atai Bates 
ft Co have a urge sdenion of 
flats and bouses ava ftabfe Mr 1 
we ek 4- from £150pw. 499 
1665. 


r£ itaJunaJEWalM. 
s.-. flora t jored . Ur/baih.' de- 


signer’ note. 1 Co bffl . Mm 
sTxidCrWf Cfl -748-9400. 


HUftifr fLIkFflMKfl Bud- 
.■Mntarey ago.- Slren-Mts. 
■ Ctoftal UMn_0143&-N12. 


QUALITY- FUKMSHEZ) Ftari and 
houses 10 reram aU areas. 
Hunters 01-837-7365 


WINTER SPORTS 


(Ml oppartunUy ta sM lap re- 
aarre at tow prices. Catered 
Chib/ chaiel holidays. 5 ftpeft- 
£229. 12 AprB -£178. 19 April - 
£109. Can Shi VaL on OteSCO 
4444 or 01-300 ao eo faanrex 
ABTA 66431 ATOL 1 162. 


SKI SKI SKI 
CHALET 
PARTIES 


S April from £199PP 
12 April from £149PP 




Ring now fix 

Afaih 
01-4991991 

M1A//E/I ABAftSSIlO 

073066561 mimiwuiia 


PROPSRTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


KOfT, Pen raw i * owhantlng 


i Georgian house la lei rr 

tadge W«l 


Tunbridge W«ts Sub foreign 


cantina ta length Of iPL 


- and gardens. Available Immedi- 
arety. Trt-. Ol 235 143E. 


FINANCIAL NOTICES 


it mm 


m 






-.'if 


* i 


i m »• i 

1 ' I i i IT 


I I 


i I 


i ; i ■ i r, ' 

rmmkii 


ROBECO N.V. 


Further to the igmoiMcemanl pnMshed mDie Ibras tad Tbe FtomcU 
Tmes an 27Bi March 1986 coa c e mr u the Cash Omdenc) pzyMde 8 April 
1988. the raw ot exchange tip the payment al Has 4wdend. on both 
Raimi NV. Ordray Shares ot Fts.10 (al Fk?S2) and Sub-Sharas 
fctpsAentD in Ore nano ol Nihonal Piranaai Bank (Noianees) EJnMBd (at 
BsJL2S2) 8 FtsJBTTt - El. 


UNITED KINGDOM RESIDENTS 


dtadend s BL75Z77133 per OftSnafy Stare of FB.10 {Ga«on 
l.ond k subpa to the hAmns deduetioac- 


15% Netotrimds^rn 

14% Unted KsigdoBi Ta 
Nri Papnert 


- S&11291570 per Share 

- EO. 10538799 pa Shoe 
• - SL534487B4 pa Share 

NON RESIDENTS OF THE LffffTH) KINGDOM 

Where 25% Wberimtf s Ta s a pE fca M e . the toBonins Heduchont apply. 

25% NOhertandS Ta • E0.1881SBB3 pa Shoe 

29% U.K. Ta on Kei 

omdend (When ApphaMe; - £0.16372777 pa Shoe 

Net Payment - £0.40085073 pa Share 


Dnndeml erM aw e et on die Sub-Shares be 
aw amouns. toss MJi comtrass f on on £0 


apne tmtti ol be 

per Sob-Store. 

Where 15% Hwwrimia Taisaptoable die frirdtarari areaterUneed 
KTOdom Residents, but rebel tram IMed Kingdom Ta a fenmedattv 
ohiarHJ prowled Bnl tbe app i opi ato Wand Revalue Affidavn Is todged 
ftsn Be cam. 


ADVERTISING 
ALSO ON 
PAGE 8 


r jkii, ^ La 


. motor rallying 

YValdegaard from 1 
start to finish 


• 43) 


Nairobi (Agencies) -Bf<yn 
Wa Me g aaid. the veteran Sweta, 
drove io a comfortable win m 
the Kenya Saferi raUv yestertfay, 
finishing almost 30 nun^ 
dear of tbe padc. He had led 
from the start. . . . 

It was WaldeganTs nurd 
victory in the African classic 
and be described ibcToyma 
Cetica TC he was drivin g as th e 
ideal car for the boulder-strewn 
mountain Hacks and swollen 
torrents that make the rally ?«* 
a gruelling test ofcaranddnver. 

Tins year's 4*20Wulomeire 
event was- 1^00 luliwtetns 
shorter than usual at the insis- 
tence of tbe International Motor 
Sports Federation, but 
Waldegaard said this had not 
made Tt any easier. “I think it 
was as tough as ever,*’ he said. 

_ WaWegeard, ihe only for- 


eigner to have won xhe jrai^y 


more than once, broke a - — __ 
hub on the final leg, forcing bun 
to drive more than 100 


kilometres with brakes ^on^otdy 


debut in a Toyota.. Torph said 
that it wss frastrarieg that 
Waldegaard had taken such aa 
early and decisive lead. 

Toe aggressive Toyota team 
raced ibeir TCs co first, second 
and fourth places. Only 16oTlhe 
69 cats that started the five-day 
endurance run, finished the 
event. 

Tbe 4J-ycar-okl Waktegwnl 
and his co-driver, Fred 
Gallagher, of Northern Ireland, 
finished with 306 penalty 
points. Martial AJen. of Fin- 
land. prevented Toyota from 
sweeping thr top three positions 
when be slipped- his Lancia 
Rallyc 037 into third place, 
finishing with 372- points. 

BHftL STftWDfGOc I.^WH^Start. 

OSk 

Lancia 0(801.551. 


three wheels. He was — - — 
home by his fellow Swede. Lus* 
Eric Torph. making bis Safari 


KANUFftCnStSeS" 




i. leva*. 2ft5. Wotaswagoa 1 .. 
14: 7. StfOaru. 13: 8. Criregn, ia 


The shining lights 
in the life of Reilly 


It was worrying at the time, 
Malcolm ReO^y 


bat Malcolm ReflJy can now 
look back with wry amusement 
to the ‘ occasion at Brisbane 
Airport when a pretty young 
woman was used as bait art 
attempt to sene him with a rivii 
writ for assault on aa Australian 
rtM fh. When tbe Great Britain 
party’s plane was about to take 
off, the intercom announcement 
asked for Mr Malcolm Redly to 
press his light button. Every 
light in the plane went oo as the 
British party pressed in naisoa. 
and the pretty yoaag lady gave 
op, ’ 

Malcolm Reilly, who pro- 
nounces his name Reely, was a 
22-year old roistering forward 
for Casdeford with a hair- 
trigger temper in those days. 
Now, at a more mature 38, he is 
the longest serving coach » 
Ru gb y. League, and has -lost, 
steered Castkford into the Chal- 
lenge Cop final for th& first tone 
since be played in a winning side 
for the dob at Wembley in 1970. 

After three heartbreaking 
semi-final defeats in four sea- 
sons, Reilly saw Iris side beat 
Oldham at Wigan to qinffijr for 
a joust at Wembley against 
either Hull Kingston Rovers or 
Leeds. It has been a knag wait 
since he first took over the 
ooadiiag reins at Whridon Road 
back in 1974, when he was still 
playing for the Australian dab, 
Manly-Waningah and_ taking 
holidays in his native 
CastiefanL 

r. That famous incident on the. 
1979 tour of Australasia is still 
vivid itt fiis-infitoL and there*was 
a prospect at one stage that be 
might have .to go to jap .after., 
geftmg - iavoived^hr what 3» 
-euphemistically: tail* “an 
- altercation* with.au Australian 
cos named Rymic r - • 

The Ansae called him a 
“Pommie. bastard” without the 
warm good humour, and smDe 
that Bonoally accompanies the 
phrase, and Reilly took violent 
exception to it. He had to appear 
in coart charged with assault, 
but the charge was dismissed, 
partly through the defence of 
extreme provocation and partly 
because RcCDy was due to play in 
an international match ag ai nst 
Australia. However, the braised 
and affronted Ryan tried to serve 
a crvO writ for damages for 
assault, using a pretty girl 
courier _'as bait, and Reilly 
ahnbstlell for tbe beckoning, eye 
and invitation beiore a red light 
shone in his mind,, and be 
boarded the plane at Brisbane 
Airport. Then followed the in- 
cident where the touring party. 


RUGBY 

MARY 

KsttiMactfn 



including journalises, 
their light buttons in 
when Malcolm’s 

/-al>y d„ 

He still bad to pay t humpin g 
comt costs, and all 26 players 
chipped 4 d to help pay them, yet 
another sign of tbe esprit de 
corps that motivates the best 
touring sides. Indeed, 1970 was 
the last year in which Great 
Britain won a scries in Austra- 
lia, It was an amaring year for 
Reilly, who played a feadfegiele 
m CastiefonTs 7-2 .win over 
Wigan at WemWey bcsfore going 
on Soar. On May 3he tetnrns to 
the famous station. hopag- to 
complete a' remarkable doable 
by coaririagjtis dnbto victory. 

It wfll be a resoeadhig rever- 
sal fortnne-for “Cas” if to 
does so. since the side has 
fioundered about in the bottom 
half of the first division trite, 
with an outside threat of relega- 
tion, Cas, always regarded as an 
attractive attadong team, have 
been prone to defensive lapses, 
making them vulnerable to otter 
attacking sides. However, h 
their cup games against Barrow, 
Wigan and Oldham it was cast 
iron defeace which carried them 
through. 

• -Reilly solved tbe problem 
pragmatically -In cup games 
there is no point in opening out 
antf g*vii*ff p«n!s away. J Good 
deTence wins enp ties, wiMjwt 
tighten^ iq» and took no ^sks, 
ana waited for try soaring 
opportunity fossae oar way. 
Wigan had nn -all-star- tea*, so 
wejost had to dose them down." 

Casdeford vril| be ao soft 
tooefa al WeaMey despite the 
inevitable tog Of underdogs. 
They bave proved that they can 
move the ball about with the 
best, but now they have proved 
that they can also tackle- Nri* 


ther Hull Kingston Rovers nor 
Leeds wffl underrate them. 


Cheese-lover proves 
a fly in the ointment 


By Cham! Voss Bark 


The corruption of the world 
has spread to Oy fishing. Shock, 
horror, hut it is true: There was a 
case last season at one of on 
better known trout lakes which 


rent a shiver through the fly 
would 


fishing community which 
be comparable -to a force 12 
earthquake oa the Rkhter scale. 
It was unbelievable but ft hap- 
pened: A day ticket angler was 
d i scovered putting cheese on Ms 
fly. 

**By God, sir!** said toe pur- 
pling fishery manager. “Ont you 

onf" A nf not Ew raora* fra* Ira 



go!” And out be went, bat he 
toned up again at another day 
ticket water — persistent fellow 
— with aa even trigger piece of 
Cheddar and a greater 
determination than ever to catch 
Us limit with his cheese Dy. 

Once again be was evicted and 
toe word went rotrad. Keep out 
so and so, address so and -so, car 
registration n timber and so oa. 
Bat — bow embarrassing to write 
all this — this was not alL 
Worse, if it could be worse, was 
to come. 

At another distinguished trout 
lake, which had a Dust of four 
fish, one-'.of the rads .was 
discovered on lea ringed- have — 
no, no, hnpossibfe,-but ft is true 
-no Jess than 12 troat in ' bis 
fishing bag, which means of 
course that he was a highly 
incompetent crook, probably a 
beginner, for toe bag was bug- 
1 — like a balloon. 

had. obviously not ben 


ln^Efc 


to 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


7 2D unlASk phttiid 

SOWMgto JgtoUfe fttfUra fplolon. 

Sutton Coldfield: .Stourbridge v 
Bro m s g row RoraranoaBwn driWara 
Dover Athletic v l ian as : Enth end 
Behadae v WMdfcm 


VAUXHALL-OPB. LEAGUE: ftul tf (S- 
vMok Epsom and E«raB v BBeneay; 
Slough v HtoWn; wonntng ir Ditancn. 
Rral (SwWaiK Grays Athtedc v Uxondga 
(7.4^c hmow * Waken amt Horsham. 
Second OteWon north: Barton Rows v 
Stevenage Boro; tring v Saffron Welderr 
Mahwtqn * wore (7^). .Second dbMo* 
south: EastHoumg v Southal 





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One man who certainly will 
have respect for Reilly and 
Castleford is Roger MRlward, 
the Rovers' coach. He and ReiDy 
belong, to the same Yorkshire 

tillage and are good mates. They 
are members of the, same work- 
ing men's dub at Kippax, be- 
tween Casdeford and Leeds. 
Malcolm would like Rovers to 
get. through to Wembley tonight 
so that, one way or another, they 
can have a celebratory drink 
together after Wembley. 


V f. 

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tntined to make use of the rid 
po achin g trick <tf potting' them 
down your waders. Anyway, be 
has now gone down on -toe 
blacklist which h bring com- 
piled by the Fishery 
Association to be. 

. from tone to time Co its i 

who are tbe owners at] . 

of virtually afl the m aj or pri- 
vately owned stillwater treat 
fisheries.. 

Fortunately, there an ant 
many crooks about, or at least 
not many taooks that we. knew 
about but a vixus secss to break 
out from time to tone. A maggst 
oa a Mallard and Claret to a 
considerable help to some res- 
ervoir fishermen to get their 
Hm it and .they seem to be 
careless enough to leave tbe 
empty bait tin .undre -the boat 
seat as evidence afterwards. ' 

. Very careless indeed. Given 
- half a chance they could be- weU 
into toe black market e c on omy , 
.as wen young lestovrir 
fishermen a few yens' back — 

and they may stifi be ddtog kfer 
alll kanw — who were cat ~*~* — 
their limit and n mv of* 
rainbows and. sriliu 
hotels as sea trout It paid 
theft tickets. 


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CEHTTUU. LEftQUE: Ffrrt gwtplowrOomy 
V UmrpoaL Socond AiWaK Grimsby v 
OWhsm; Nona Cower v -Don ca shr; 
Rotherham v Won Vata. 

FOOTBALL COM8INATXM: RM» v 

Swansea. 

OTHER SPORT ' : 

RUGBY LEAQU& SK Cut ClOteng 
Cup: Seal ini raplay: Loads * Rt h.Oi 
‘ 1 Leeds FCL^ League: Second fSvWoit 


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BAOWNTON: Carttwi 


Wor^qutty 


WoHno v Whytefeafe. AC Deles 

SnMMr SgCOrtd It 


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iSK&ghoup urnns counties 


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coamplonstrlps . (at Nott 1 ngli«a 
IMunM. " 

GOLF: I nrtim' t norlnr. Fin r^nroex (St 

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THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 

RACING: GOLD CUP RUNNER-UP SHOULD NOW BE AT PEAK FOR RETURN CLASH WITH DAWN RUN 


SPORT 


29 


Wayward Lad on course for revenge 


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By Mandarin 
(Michael Phillips) 

Tte spirit of National Htmt 
is embodied in today's 
Whitbread Gold Ljfod Chase 
..at Liverpool with Dawn Run 
ana Wayward Lad taking on 
one -another again just three 
weks after their epic race in 
the Tote Gold Cup at 
Cheltenham. 

Were this a Flat race, the 
. chances are that one of them 
would have ducked the issue 
lor fear of being beaten - 
sadly that has become one of 
the trends of 'the commercial 
climate in which that part of 
the sport basks these days. 

-In rapping Wayward Lad to 
beat Dawn Run this time and 
thus take his revenge on the 
great Irish mare, I am pmtmg 
my faith in the opinion of his 
jockey, Graham Bradley. Af- 
ter the Gold Cup, having p aid 
due tribute to Dawn Run, 
Bradley said that he would 
have won ifWayward Lad had 
been able to have a race 
Boxing Day. 

The Saturday before Chel- 
tenham, Bradley told me at 
Sandown that he thought 
Wayward Lad would run real- 
ly well but deep down, he felt 
•the Jack of a preparatory race 
..would find him.ouL Ami so it 
' proved. Ridden to perfection. 
Wayward Lad came to winhis 
race pnly.to faher in those last 
agonizing yards and succumb 
to Down Run's late counter- 
attack. 

Now, with a recent race 
under his belt, be should be at 
bis peak and I take him to cut 
Dawn Run down tosizeatthe 
end of a slightly shorter race 
on a course less demanding 
than Cheltenham. 

The mare will almost cer- 
tainly have to make all her 
own running again. That 
should suit Bradley down to 
the ground because he will 
want to siton her tail and wait 
as long as possible before he 
, tries to beat her for speed over 
and after the iasLThese were 
the' . tactics that' John 
.Francome used to sudi'effect 
on Wayward Lad on this very 
occasion 12 months ago and I 
think that they wfll prove 
successful again. 

For Very Promising, the 
gallant runner-up to Buck -. 
House in the Queen. Mother 
Champion Chase over two 


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Classified changes 
hands on eve of 
National meeting 


By Michael Seely 


Classified, fifth to last year's 
Grand National. win ran under 
new ownership at Aintree on 
Saturday. The 10-year-old was 
bought for an undisclosed sera in 
a private deal yesterday and will 
ran in the colours of the 
Cbetdey Park Stud. 

The deal was handled by 

David Minton, who acts as 
racing manager to the New- 
nurbet stud owners- He said: “It 
will be their first runner in the 
race. They jnst fancied the idea 
of a runner in the Grand 
National/* Minton added: “He’s 
a fresher horse than when he ran 
in the race last year and 
performed well at Cheltenham 
last time." The horse stays in 
training with Nicky Henderson 
at Lambotim and will be 
partnered by Steve Smith Ecdes 
on Saturday. 

Cbewkj Park, who stand 
Mask Bey and Tina's Pet at 
their stud, have horses in train- 
ing on the Flat with Michael 
Stoute, Luca Cmnani and John 
Winter. The sprinters, Primo 
Dominie and Prince Sabo, and 
the miter, Scottish Reel, are 
among the smart horses they 


have in training for this season. 

Discussing the chances of his 
Grand National pair yesterday, 
Henderson said: "They are very 
well bat I most emphasize that I 
need good ground for both 
horses. The Tsarevieh has a 
touch of class at the weights and 

I think his jumping is right ter 
the job." 

Whether Henderson wfll get 
the ground he remains to 
be sees as the going on the 
National coarse yesterday was 
good to soft ami the forecast for 
the next two days is occasional 
showers. The going on the 
Mildmay and hvdies coarse is 
good, acc or ding to Hugo Sevan, 
the assistaw clerk of the coarse. 

There was significant support 
hi the offices yesterday for two 
previous winners. Hallo Dandy 
and Last Suspect, with Hills 
reducing offers on both by two 
points to 16-1 and 14-1 respec- 
tively. Hills have West Tip as 
their dear favourite at 8-1 but 
Ladbrokes make Mr Snngfit 
their market leader at the same 
price following support for Mick 
Easterby's nine-year-old 
yesterday. 


Wayward Lad demonstrates the jmipiiig ability which has helped him to win the King George VI Chase three times 


mfles at Cheltenham, this will 
be his first attempt at a 
distance beyond throe mites. 
The only time he has run over 
three miles was at Ascot in 
February and that was incon- 
clusive as he broke a blood 
vessel that day. 

Those who think West Tip 
capable of winning Saturday’s 
Grand National will be look- 
ing to Beau Ranger to run 
respectably, even in this exalt- 
ed company. Recently Beau 
Ranger was runner-up to West 
Tip at Newbury. 

The meeting beans on a 
high note with the Whitbread 
Best-Scotch -Novices'-Hunfie, 
which features River Ceiriog, 
the- runaway winner' of the 
Waterford Crystal Supreme 
Novices’ Hurdle at Chelten- 
ham, and.Riva Rose. V 

I saw River Ceiriog in his 
bent in Lamboum on Tuesday 
evening and it was apparent 
thatrhe had taken bis Chelten- 
ham race rally iii^ bid I still 
doubt whether hecan give 41b 


to Riva Rose. River fceiriog’s 
perfo rm ance at Cheltenham 
took the breath away but the 
feet remains that, at Ascot in 
February, he was beaten three 
lengths by Riva Rose The 
latter was ridden that day by 
an inexperienced 71b daimer, 
who lost his irons jumping the 
last hurdle. . 

Also, by taking direct form 
lines through Teletrader, who 
was runner-up to Riva Rose at 
Ludlow and second to Canute 
Express at Chepstow; and 
Canute Express, who was. 
fourth to River Ceiriog at 
Cheltenham it is possible to 
argue, that there is little be- 
tween todays principals. So, 
flie 4Ib aflowance today looks 
crucial. 

■ “No matter how River 
Ceiriog feres, Nicky Hender- 
son, his trainer, and Steve 
Smith Eccles, his jockey, 
should not leave die trade 
unrewarded as they have an 
excellent chance of winning 
the. Whitbread Pale Ale 


Handicap Hurdle with 
Indamdody. Although he 
looks the epitome of a chaser, 
my selection is happier when 
he is hurdling He was certain- 
ly far from disgraced in his last 
race at Uttoxeter when failing 
to give 241b to Water Cannon, 
whose young rider managed to 
give his rivals the slip that day. 

Prebea Fur has been in the 
bade of my mind as a possible 
winner of the Whitebread 
Trophy (formerly the Topham 
Trophy) since he was success- 
ful over 2 % miles at Kelso in 
December and 2 Vi miles at 
Newcastle in January. 

Now, seeing the opposition 
on the day, his chance has 
come to the fore even though 
he has a bit more to carry than 
he would if the handicap were 
extended. The important 
thing to consider in tins race is 
that they will be jumping the 
Aintree fences proper and, like 
his trainer, Gordon Richards, 
I think that Preben Fur is 
equal to that daunting task. 


Macotiver, from the stable 
which sent out Smith's Man to 
win the race 12 months ago, 
looks the main danger. 

With Cross Master, Strands 
Of Gold, Stearsby and Fudge 
Deligbi all standing their 
ground, the Whitbred Best 
Mild Chase is virtually a 
replay of the Sun Alliance 
Chase at Cheltenham. Strands 
Of Gold meets Cross Master 
on 61b better terms for a head 
defeat and that should be 
decisive. 

Finally. I have a feeling that 
Hazy Sunset will come good 
at last in the Chester Handicap 
Chase over a distance that 
should. suit him ideally. At 
Sandown last time out be 
found the nippy Lefrak City 
just a shade too quick for him 
over only two miles. Never- 
theless. that was a good run 
and earlier in the season he 
won over today’s distance at 
Sandown before being nar- 
rowly beaten over the same 
trip at Kempton. 


William Crump keeps 
Mullion flag flying 

From Our Irish Racing Correspondent, Dublin 

second big-race winner or the 
week for his trainer, Dessie 
Hughes, who turned oat Barnes 
to take the Power Gold Cap the 
previous afternoon. 

Attitude Adjuster extended 
his winning sequence to three a 
the Coobaore Joseph O'Reilly 
Memorial Cop and was sent off 
at the generous price of even 
none}'. He beat a good field in 
the Christie's Foxhuniers Chase 
at Cheltenham and had only 
three opponents here bat was 
opposed from odds-on following 
the gamble on the newcomer. 
Over The Road. This was 
another instance, though, where 
the form book and not the 
betting money proved the more 
accorate guide to the outcome. 

Meanwhile, looking towards 
the future of Alntree, the course 
manager, John Hugfees, said in 
an interview on Irish television 
yesterday that they would not be 
looking for extra raring dates for 
Aintree for at least another fonr 
to five years. “There is still a lot 
of work to be done," he said. 


The colours of Mrs Jim 
MulEon are much better known 
in the Flat racing world than to 
jumping enthusiasts as the prod- 
ucts of her Ardenode stud in Co. 
Kildare have won classic races in 
Ireland, En gland and France. 
However, at Fairy boose yes- 
terday. one of the few hurdlers 
she has in training, William 
Crump, collared the front-run- 
ning Aranm to win the Huzzar 
Handicap Hurdle. 

For the greater part of the race 
Aranm threatened to turn it into 
a procession as he bowled along 
a uzeo lengths dear. But he 
made a bad wdatako at the 

second last flight and had 
nothing left when William 
Crump came to jump the last 
hurdle hurdle alongside him. 

William Cramp drew away 
from Aranm on the Flat but, in 
die final 100 yards. Tommy 
Morgan had to paD out all the 
stops as Sty Grin finishing 
fastest of all and came through 
on the rails to force a photo 
finish. William Cramp was the 




LIVERPOOL 


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baamia t o Qlyd a Cowt (11-W 20 ran. Chattanhan h'cap ch good to sod Mar 11. 
■mOKT OASStSjll^vmn hd (rum Dusartooig H 1-8) 9 ran. Ludtow an 4f h'cap ch soft 
MMV- .MACOIM* (10-1^ 2nd boatsn 81 to Northern Bm (10-1Q 12 raa 
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By Mandarin 
10 Riva Rose. 13$ WAYWARD LAD (; 
3.45 Preben. Fur. 4.20 Strands Of GokL-4.50 


2.0 Riva Rose. 3.10 Emo 


By Micbad Seely 
> Forever. 3.4S M 


Macdzvcr. 


3.10 WHITBREAD PALE ALE HANDICAP HURDLE (£5^24: 2m 5f 
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FORM: CR08G. MASTER (11-4) won hd tan . STRANDS OF GOLD (11-4) with 
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450 CHESTERS HANDICAP CHASE (£4,900: 2m 4f) (9) 

SB M2UM RFTY DOLLARS MORE (043) (ShiMi Al Aai Khatain) F T Wkrtar 

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99.90: £1.10, £1j60, £1.1G OF: £020 
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'38-1 


5-1 Laurence 


Haee|«£l3JB ■. 


Course specialists 

LIVERPOOL. 

TRAMEII&. F Walayn 9 wtanera from 27 
nmnare. 333%; P MuHna 4 from 18. 
SJMc M Ptoe 2 (rom 0. 2024A. 
JOCKEYS: R Beggar 3 winnera'lfom 7 
rktos.42LS%:Klu£5cm£fran1^2Qj^ 
Htevtes 3 irem I0.lifl%. 

HAMILTON 

Ut AW EH fc Mrs G R ev etey, 8 wknera 
(ram 37 rumen. 21 .8%; N THder 6 9rom 
32, 183%; S Norton 2t1nxn 133, 158%. 
JOCKEYS M HincSey 6 wfemra from 20 
rides. 30J)% R Cochrane 6 from 30. 
ZHtto Pai Eddery 6 trttoi 31. 103%. 

TAUNTON 

TRAMBtS R Holder 9 wtonurs bom 43 
nranra. 203% J Thome 17 from 111, 
153% M Pipe 23 (ram 177. 14.1% 
JOCKEYS CBrawn 14 Miners torn 90 
rides. 108% Peter Hobbs 5 from 32, 
fM% PBarion 6 ton 4ft 100% 

BUnkered first time 

HMSLTON: 4.15 AdhGi 


P^sMo-poiirt winners 

CR0 0 M E AND WEST WARMCKSHK: 
Hue Prnze Eugan. ResC SanftXfte Boy. 
lufraa. Maam CrascenL Opam St*%. 
Ato-Touchot Rat DMibRodHrick Arthcn*. 
Mvi K Karamsuo. 

DUMRUEO MRfc MBdtkWK A4 OUda 
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luff Raat Mye&Osic. MUSweetHlMK 
.MiH PEAK: Hwt Amy. Aro Keep vmt£ 
ladtow Cttto John. CteawAnaher Sknon. 
Heat P b I mm i Wtoort Itot JmMowi 
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BhylocS RsnaL Lauac uocMa 'Lmv. 
(meflurty Up Henry. Raat tub LMb Ban. 
Ittti RnslwtoMaai: OhABl. 


HAMILTON PARK 


Going: soft 

Drawr 51-61, middle to high numbers best 

115 AUdflNRAFTH APPRBfTICE HANDICAP 
(£695: 1m 3i) (10 runners) 


3.45 EBF CAMPSIE MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O; 
£680: 5Q (12) 

AREA CODE MnG RevetofM E Gnat (3) 2 

3 BANlELfXAZEH ICssI EM9-0 NCariMal 

GEOBRITOIIY D Mo(taH9-0 QIMfMd9 

2 LATERAL. J Bflfty M M Fry 7 


7 BM OKK<OdGHT(C-D)ABalayS4-7— LFonirag 

10 210- HUSiCAL WILL T faxhuret 4-9-3 H Taylor (^3 

11 2-11 BALOOWME J MuBufl 6-9-1 Sari — MRichaidaooB 

12 0M- SULTAN ZAMANJSWBHnSM 
14 OM 

17 OM 

18 038- 

19 B00-3 

20 Sfri 

21 000- 

9-4 Baigownie. 3.1 Daac Knight 5-1 Musical W3. 6-1 Star's 
DeBgia.8-1 MrUon, 12-1 SUtan Zaman. 14-1 athera. 


145 HOLYTOWN MAIDEN STAKES (£840: 1m If] 
0) 


1 

2 
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7 
9 
11 
12 
14 
17 
18- 
20 
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■MBBI LAD M Breabi 94- 
PANBOY TFaahumW 


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RURAL SC8ET Barron 74M2J 
SHERMMAN DChapmn 7-9-7 _ 
STARTS DEUGKT W Storey 49-7 
CHRSTIIAS HOLLY Mrs GReveW 

TAXWETTE A Dawson 499 

MRUON (C)F Cm 499 


ETMtarlO 

BMcOMHI 

ARoparS 

JQM5 

«Lf?KgI 

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MEffS MONEY JKetttewel&-11. BBeocro«11 

MUSICSTAR J KaUaml 9-11 RVkkm(7)3 

0 OUKK STICKS 0 Chapman 9-11 D Mchofa 12 

4 SEATON GIRL (BFJTBnron 8-11 SMWatar* 

9-4 Lateral. 3-1 Panhoy, 5-1 Bartel Blazer. 139 Seaton 
Gin. 9-1 MMzan Lad. 10-1 U-Btt Copy. 12-1 Area Coda. 16-1 
others. 


ACKA'S BOY D Mottatt 497 , 


09 GOLDEN BOV AW Jonas 49-7 - 
09 GRAM! CBLSRATKM (USA) W i 

009 POCOLOCO A0nlaon497_ 


- SKeU«ay3 
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ID 00- PMLLY ATHLETIC JKafflawWI 499 _ NComortoo2 

12 000- BAHTEL BUSHVUosI Bel 399 NCwWaB 

T4 343- PORCSiO (USA) 5 Norton 399 JLowbB 

speoaLji 


Hamilton selections 

v By Mandarin 

115 Baigownie. 145 Forceilo. 3.15 Martella. 3.45 
LateraL 4.15 Faline. 4.45 Via Satellite. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
115 Dick Knight. 4.15 Taranga. 


4.15 DECHUONT MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: £778: 
6f)(8) 

1 00- BAN7EL BAZAI D) Mss I Bafl 99 NCvMeS 

2 009 DEARHAM BRDQs D Molfaii 99 CDw«er7 

3 409 GLORIAMT M Ektoam 9-0 KDadayA 

6 0 PETB4CORE J Redtwn 99 SKtoghtleyS 

_ J Lom 1 


17 


0 PARSES! 


I Parties 399. 


P)1 


7 0- HAAS S Norton 99 

8 002- TARANGA MTompkira 99 R Cochrane 6 

9 ADHARI (BIB Hanbuty 8-1 1 GBaxWf 2 

10 3 FAUNE M Rands 9-11 Pad Eddery S 


11-10 FbrceBo, 3-1 PhGy Athletic. 6-1 Golden Boy. 9-1 
Grand OaMOTh o n . 10-1 Bamal Bushy. 12-1 Poco Loco, 14-1 
others. 


3.15 QUARRY SELLING HANDICAP (£681: 1m 
40yd) (6) 


1 409 SWSTCSOWN Trader 49-10 JH Brown IS 5 

2 004 GILLANB0NE B McMahon 4-99 JWfa(5)2 

3 009 JAL0MESWB8S499 Dltehota4 

4 009 MARTBXA M Brntan 499 KDariayB 

5 B00- CONBURJ Bony 399. “ “ 


6 400- BANIB. BOWLER 


139-11. 


X 


159 Faline, 9-4 Adhart, 7-2 Taranga, 5-1 GtortanL 12-1 
Raas, 141 aours. 


4.45 MDDLEWARD HANDICAP (£1,623: 6f) (10) 

1 100- MARY MAGURE(C9)D Chapman 9-109 DMcMb 9 

2 292 BAY BAZAAR MW Easremy 499 5 

5 004 BJQHEGA8 DAY (B) (D) B MclMnoi 499 

7 004 TRADE HIGH (p) I Vekars 79-13 SWabtoarB 

80119 BUBS BOV (C-D> Mm Q Rmkw 49-12- EGuesI (3)3 
9 004 PENT0FF |C9) D Ctwnm 49-10 S P Grifftha |5) 10 

11 019 YELLOW BEAR fC-D)J Rerhes 499 — . TPwfce»(7)4 

12 444 VIA SATELLITE R Sknpaan 49-5 SWltaarihl 

13 204 DLETWESCBsm 49-4 J Lowe 7 

PJJB1 


(7 404 SKAN0U8KA (D) J S WHsan 479 . 


. A Kacfcsy 2 


44 GUanbona, 59 MariBla, 3-1 Conersar. 15-2 Sweat 
Gemma. 141 BsrtM Bowler, 141 Jatoma. 


2-1 Bay Bazaar. 5-2 Wa SattoHe. 5 -1 Mary Magulra. 759 
■1 Yelow Bear. 141 Homagas Day. 141 Pentotf, 


Bubs Boy, 8 
141 others. 


TAUNTON 


Going: good to soft 

115 PfTUUNSTER NOVICE MffiDLE (£606: 2m 11) 
(17 runners) 

6 0BYRNH3 GROVE— D R GandoBo 7-119 R Ewnshaw 

7 PPOONTH.LAO IP Wattfe 5-11-3 K To«mand(7} 

0 OB2GARAROCK(NZ) DH~ 

14 434 PBJMW OC « PJHObta 6-11-3 


4.0 THURLOKIDN HANDICAP CHASE (£1 .903: 2m 
30 02) 

4 023/ PRETTY HOPEFUL R J Hodgra 11-11-7 C Brown 

8 0111 6nKENWW(&0)RC^Vr^a^ | 

10 UXV THE STIRRER P J Hobbs 14109- 

11 -FPC SPAMSH GODI4D} C L Popham 11-109— SMcNaR 

12 0438 SCOTS NOGGBIJL Spearmg 11-145. 


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. ^ 0 RGan&Uo 14141 R 
1B14re DUDE HOY (BNGAvMa 7-109. 

19 13P0 POMPOSnrRJSn«to4109 


15 0P32 BSIMUGGB)| 


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20 

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22 

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P0 DH DRUMS I G BUr 7-1412 

00 DT5WU MSS Bsyfcas 5-1412. 
40 LADY LEA B Stevens 41412 


P STRAIGHT MEllBSt P J Notts 7-1412 

0 CURA'S LAD DHJonaa 41411 

OPP FREMDLYNamsIRHawfcar 


HGotaraan 

TftSS? 

.JHDms 
- A CamG 
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41411 N0NR UN HE R 


Kennard 41411. 


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U2ZY LONGSTDCKMG Mre J WarmacoO 

410-6 D WOnmcoB (7) 

41 3M IRSS NEVER HYDE MC Pipe 4109 PffiehaKte 

42 OP REDGRAVE OEVI. K BHnp 4109— M0N9UNNB1 
34 Mbs New Hyde, 4-1 Lady Liza. 41 Sara Rock. 6-1 

RotoponneBB. 141 Dow. Shoapccato. 12-1 Qara'S Lao. 141 
athsts. 

150 CROWCOIffiE J&LL&K3 HAhffllCAP HURDLE 
(£528: 2m 11) (19) 

. 3 MOO PLOffiNDNOER JO Davies 4119 GH*avar(7) 

4 MOO CORVMABStonns 411-1 JHOavita 

5 OPOO TWHY BOY JPMh 4119 — ■ NOMtUNKER 

6 224 GOLD HUNTB1 R J Hodges 41 19 C Brown 

7 290 H1TYWAaiBGHk*s414l2 G Davies 

S0RP4 EASTFORM ® J FaHon 4109 — 

13 900 MARRCrU^a R Smsson 5-109 A Cam* 

14 0000 TOP PHYAL Mrs A finen410-5 S Eerie 


25 030P WSS ABWAH D D ScoO 7-KH). 

2-1 Sr Kanwtn 41 Scots Noager, 42 Been Mttgged. 41 
Hope Gap. 41 Doucemunt, 141 Qua Hot 12-1 others. 


Taunton selections 

By Mandarin 

115 Miss Never Hyde. 150 I van ter. 3-25 
Romulex. 4.0 Sir Kenwin. 4.35 Beniy Heath. 5.5 
Ring Lou. 


435 PfTUNSTER NOVICE HURDLE (£611: 2m If) 

(17) 

1 0010 ROYAL BAIZE (IQ (BF) J H Baker 

4lM3HrLHway(7) 

2 FO BSTTY HEATH U C Pipe 5-11-3 P RSdurte 

4 OP CLUGA GURM ft J Hodges 41 1-3 C 


POP OUROAV 


IS -PPf HAVERS MAD WG Morris 4144- 
17 892 RMNTER T N Batoy 4143 

20 04 3HARAZ0UR Mrs SRobwtt 4142. 

21 040 MAID FAST PRHadaar 4142 

22 0000 PBELYNPSmKiws S Other 4142. 


24 WPS JW BROWN HE 
26 POOP CLEVER ANOEl 

29 «P4 NEWTON PARK □ 

30 090 COPERMCOMCl 
34 044 ASTON BANK PJ 


- P Warner 
_ ft RomB 
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JI 


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Forsey 4141 CWterea 

VMe4l4l R" 

4141 P 

4141 Pater Hobba 


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■FM WU£RD HOUSE (NaDH Barons 

411-3 N0N9UNNER 

J Thome 4119 LBtoemfleMM 

PJHotta 411-3 Pater Hohhs 

18 POO WELSH SPY ®)JPSmei 5-11-3 — 

20 FIP0 FOUR SromMJCoi 411-2 VI 

22 P- DUSTY RUN R P Shepherd 41412- NtfC 
24 P GLOW'S SUPPER MRS E Ken«rd 41412 P 
30 000P STORMY KES1R8. L Waring 41412- 

32 OF WHITE PENNY (B) Min A Lmgwd ^ ^ 

33 00 BROAD WOOD Ur JWWnt 


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37 900 CAERFM&£DJUMto4141~ MnDTaakameana 
79 Aston Bank. 41 non Wonder. 41 GoU Hunter, 41 
CopenAco, Conans, 141 hrantar. 12-1 M a r mnea s a. 141 Matt 
Fast 141 Mhan. 

125 MTTFOWVSLADE HUNTER CHASE 
(Amateurs: £1,066: 3m if) (14) 

1 109 KCKY BLOB (D) J fWxAs 11-140 S Long (7) 

Z mi BAU.YEAH0N Mrs 8 Gordon 12-129 — 

3 V BARARDCN Mr* RFe« 14129- M«» S CmrtctaW (7) 

4 0P-P CBJ1C TUDOR J DHanhBtson 14129— — 

. 6 OOP- CiaijrilMMGQtHdy4139 TSWtbtn 

5 PF9 COO USw BOY J D Hartarwon 11-129 „ NOMr A 

9 ZB3- HU. EXPRESS JV Lane 4129 tol H Vfej n 

. 10 0W PETWOUC (USA) Mm A Dafte 4129 — 

. 11 24 roaW JEX Mrs JBeBtodape 4129 -■ 

12 UPTON R l Jones 11-129-—. MteaTI 

13 . 0Kro»LJUEMHuttintoon14119. HfesKI . 

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« m AO% P J HcOto 4119— LHarmy l 

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' 41 Bndan. 42 Ctem. 41 DUqr Btoh, 41 Romdax, HB 
Exorasa. ,141 Sotondtt Ace. 12-1. Phtan. 141 omen. 


» BUTTS BAY J A Ott 41411 
36 0 NNGS POLLY □ H Jones 41411 

41 P LAVAR J H COOdan 4-148 


41411 DWoa n ee o B 




CGray 

119 Royal Baze, 10430 Rotdavte Ud, 5-1 Four Sport. 4 
1 Buns Bey. 141 Kngs Foiy. 12-1 Ban Heath. 141 welsh 
Spy. 141 others. 


55 WEST MONKTON HANDICAP CHASE (£2,076: 
2m If) (IQ) 


1 0001 WARNER FOR LEISURE (B) D R Gftidt*0 

412-3(7*0 R Eamehav* 
7-11-5— wHAMytHt(7) 

411-10 (7«1 COW* 

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5 2201 ARRRAMRJ 
S 3113 RMG-LOU SO J A' 

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TEN BEARS mTujSias 141412 


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11 0QBP GRBM I M OodDaon 9-141Q 

13 WOO BLACK EARL I A Wanfla 4109 

18 0033 ROYAL CASINO J D Roberts 9-140. 

41 Rostra, 7-2 Warner For Lateura. 41 RkiflLixv41 
Royal Caam 41 Akram. 141 Ten Baara, 12-1 BmflEe.f41 
others. . . . . 


SQUASH RACKETS 

Cannons 
throw 
down the 
gauntlet 

By Colin McQniUan 

Cannons Oub. having won 
the fiercely contested American 
Express premier squash league 
on 3 couni back to games dif- 
ference. yesterday threw the 
competition back into the melt- 
ing pot by challenging Ardleigh 
Hall their leadership rivals 
throughout the second half of 
the season, to a match for the 
combined first and second 
prizes. 

Garry Oliver, manager of the 
fashionable London sports club, 
wants to meet the Ardleigh Hall 

team on the all-iran sparent 

Perspex showcoun at Wembley 
during this month's British 
Open Championships for a 
match purse of £4,500. 

"The excitement of this 
league was incredible right up to 
ihc Iasi match of the final 
fixture.*' Oliver said. His players 
won 13 matches and lost live 
during the season, winning 55 
individual ties and losing 
35.“Ardleigh Hall finished with 
the same statistics and actually 
won two more games than us. 
but our games difference at 193 
won and 1 45 lost was better than 
theirs at 195 to 165." 

To cap it all. Cannons lost to 
the runners-up, who are based in 
Colchester, both home and 
away. ■'They were just unlucky 
that the rules call for games 
difference instead of games 
won." Oliver continued. “We 
are nol about to give up the 
Amex Trophy, but we can offer 
Ardleigh Hal] the chance of 
winning the big purse." 

Cannons defeated Edgbaston 
Priory 4-1 to make sure of the 
title, but were forced to wait 
anxiously for fifteen minutes 
before hearing from Ardleigh 
that Martin Bodimeade had lost 
narrowly to Geoff Williams in 
his team's vital match against 
Manchester Northern. A 
Bodimeade win would have 
taken the trophy to Essex by one 
poinL Defeat led to the unfortu- 
nate countback. 

The misfortunes of Ardleigh 
Hall do not end there. The club 
is facing a far worse fate than the 
team, with the owners, a local 
building consortium, threaten- 
ing to demolish the building and 
redevelop it as an old people's 
home unless a buyer with 


£250,000 appears by April 13. 

There is a plan for 100 club 
members to buy life member- 
ship at £3.000 each and thus 
remove Ardleigh Hall perma- 
nently from the commercial 
sector. The challenge from Can- 
nons, Oliver believes, might 
allow the premier league players 
to make their own contribution 
to that scheme. 

RESULTS 
4; 

Chapa) Aoanon 4. Redwood Lodge 
Nott i ngham 5 Dunnings MB 0; Squash 
Leicester 5. Armiey 0. Final Lea gue 
POaHoM: 1. Cannons 91 pts; 2. Armagh 
Hail B1: 3. Chapel Merton. 72; 4. 
NotSngham 69; 5, Squash Leicester, 69: 6. 
Manchester Northern. 67; 7. Edgnaston 
Priory, 60; & Oimnaigs Ml,- 59: 9,-Arnsey , 
40; 10. Redwood Lodge. 32. 


LV UUU A.IIWIIIW. 

RESULTS: Edgbaston Priory 1 Cannons 
l; Ardleigh Hal 3. Manchester Northern 2; 
Chapel AOarton 4. Redwood Lodge 1; 


CRICKET 

Cup winners 
to receive 
more money 

Half of ibis year's £4.000 
increased Benson and Hedges 
Cup prize money will go to the 
winners. The winning county in 
the final on July 12 - a week 
earlier than normal to avoid 


£9.500. an increase of £1.000. 

Each of the losing semi- 
final i sis and quarter- finalists 
will receive £250 and £125 more 
than last summer - £4.500 and 
£2.250. but the rest of the prize 
pool remains unchanged. The 
winners of the zonal matches 
will gel £725. in which the gold 
awards will be worth £125. 

In the quartcr-fmals the gold 
awards will be increased to 
£200, in the semi- finals 10 £275. 
and the final to £550. The 
£82.400 cash awards come out 
of the £422,000 sponsorship fee 
paid to the Test and Counzy 
Cricket Board by Benson ana 
Hedges. As agreed at the spring 
meeting of the TCCB last 
month, rain-affected matches 
will be decided by a five-a-side 
bowling competition. 

Easy win for 
Sri Lanka 

Kandy fReuter) — An un- 
beaten 68-run stand between 
Ranatunga and Gunisinghe 
helped Sri Lanka to an easy 
seven-wicket wifi over Bangla- 
desh and a place in the three- 
nation Asia Cup tournament 
final here yesterday. 

Sri Lanka, after restricting 
Bangladesh to 131 for eight in 45 
overs, replied with 132 for three 
in 31.3 overs, and will meet 
Pakistan in the final on Sunday. 
BANGLADESH 

Hassan tow b Raaamea 12 

Abeam e Mahanama b Ratrayato 
13 

AsrefHtta&neKirfuppub Ranatunga 10 

Umhazul Abddm ntt Oul — 40 

Shahaedur Rahman c Mendis b 

Ratnayeke — 25 

Rafiqul AtembAmatean 10 

Gofarn Chowdhurv not out 3 

Janangk Shah Badsha ran out 1 

Samw Ranman c Dais b Amatean 4 

Gotetn Nawsnar not out 3 

Extras (bl, U*. no2. *5) 10 

TdW for B wtaa. 45 overs) 131 

Haflzur Rahman (fed not bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-26. 2-29. 449. 4 

82. 4119, 4119. 7-120. 4126. 

BOWUNG;drWe(41-309:Amflle»i42- 

142: flanayate 41 -41 -2; Ranatunga 9-1- 

17-2; Anurawn 44239. 

SB LANKA 

D S B P Kuruppu c Samur b Nawtoiar 3 
R Mahanama cHafiaVbChowttuy 25 

A Gurusoighe ntt Out 44 

RLDtaacRaqubutHatttnbHoaMin 0 


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19 


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Extrasife 

Total(3wMs.3U4wens) 132 

L R D umku. a da Sflua. R j flamayakfl, 
ALFdaMaL K Amatean, R Anuraon (id 

not bat 

FALL OF WICKETS; 19, 393, 3-64. 
BOWLING: Nawsher 99-441; Sttntgr 3- 
0-159: Badsha 40-189; Ctnwdhury 8l4 
2-22-1; Hoaaam 40-22-1. 

Going home 

Sydney TAP) - Kepler 
Wessels, the Australian Test 
cricketer, has confirmed that he 
is returning to his native South 
Africa. WessclS). ased 28. said be 
will leave Australia next month 
to take up a public relations job 
with the University of Port 
Elizabeth. 


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FOOTBALL: EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIP DRAW HAS THE INGREDIENTS TO KEEP EVERYBODY HAPPY 


England game 
gives Irish 
joy and Turkish 
delight 


By Clive White 


There was happiness in the 
Nonhem Ireland camp when 
they were drawn to open their 
European championship chal- 
lenge with a home game 
against England when the 
dates were announced yester- 
day. But no doubt their joy 
was nothing compared to the 
Turkish delight (not to men- 
tion that of Yugoslavia) that 
the two home countries will 
not round off the group with a 
cosy get-together as they did in 
the recent World Cup 
qualifiers. 

It was in November at 
Wembley, amid foreign fears 
of collusion, that Northern 
Ireland scored the point they 
needed to qualify for the 
World Cup finals in Mexico 
this summer. Turkey, though 
they shared the same group 
then. too. had long since lost 
interest in that particular cli- 
max. but now they nurture 
fresh hopes. 

Yugoslavia, like Romania 
before them, are the more 
seriously threatened party and 
will have noted with relief that 
the English and Irish will be 
done with their domestic dis- 
putes by the third match of 
their five. 

David Bowen, secretary of 
the Nonhem Ireland FA. 
saidi^This draw could not be 
better for us. We wanted to 
sian with a home game 
against England." He added: 
“There were no objections 
from Turkey, who were un- 
happy about us ptaying En- 
gland in the last match of the 
World Cup qualifying 
tournament." 

Billy Bingham, their manag- 
er. was also satisfied with the 
order of fixtures, which dose 
with a game against Turkey at 
Windsor Park. **lt*s important 
to finish your group at home." 
he said. He was pleased, too. 
that the first match against 
England on October I 5 was a 
couple of months after the 
season bad begun. No team 
likes to play a qualifying game 
out of season when they may 


be rusty, and the Irish have 
had particular trouble in that 
respect over the years, most 
recently when losing to Fin- 
land at the start of their World 
Cup campaign. Bingham will 
be attempting to qualify for 
the first time for the final 
stages of a European champi- 
onship. this time to be played 
in West Germany in 1988. 

Bobby Robson, the England 
manager, was more optimistic 
than Bingham of arranging a 
friendly in September before 
their Windsor Park meeting. 
He. too, was satisfied with 
how Group Four unfolded, 
but countries invariably are at 
this stage. Time may prove 
that the order has not suited 
the Irish. England, who play 
their first game at Wembley 
on November 12 against Yu- 
goslavia. finish the group 
away against the same opposi- 
tion in November next year. 
Robson observed yesterday 
that he did not warn to go 
there still needing points to 
qualify. “We must try and 
clinch our place before then." 
he said. 

Should England have al- 
ready qualified by the tirae 
they visit eastern Europe it 
would not be difficult to 
imagine a scenario in which 
Yugoslavia's desire is greater 
than England's. The Yugo- 
slavs will still have a fixture 
left, away against Turkey on 
December 16 — significantly 
after the Irish have played 
their final game. 


Fixture dates 


.Turkey' 

1987 

APRIL 1: England v Northern 
Ireland 

APRIL 2ft Turkey v England: North- 
ern Ireland v Yugoslavia. 

0CT08ER 14: England v Turkey; 
Yugoslavs v Northern Ireland. 
NOVEMBER 11: Yugoslavia v En- 
gland: Northern Ireland v Turkey. 
DECEMBER 16: Turkey v 
Yugoslavia. 


Ardiles’s testimonial 
has to be postponed 


--Tottenham-. Hotspur have 
been ordered not to go ahead 
with their testimonial match for 
Ossie Ardiies against Rangers at 
While Han Lane on April 22. 
The problem is that the date is 
24 hours before the England- 
Scotland international at 
Wembley. 

The Tottenham secretary. Pe- 
ter Day. said yesterday: “Our 
police objected to the testimo- 
nial on the grounds that it would 
encourage Scottish supporters to 
come down early for the inter- 
national. We will still play 
Rangers in a testimonial for 
Ossie, but on a different dale." 


A Football Association . 
spokesman said: “It should be 
emphasized that, we and the 
Scottish Association have pre- 
viously allowed matches be-, 
tween English and Scottish dubs 
to take place, but it was felt that 
the close proximity of the game 
to the England-Scotland fixture 
and security considerations out- 
weighed other factors." 

• Derby County's third division 
promotion match against 
Gillingham at the Basehall 
Ground will be played next 
Monday, the Football League 
has decided. The mate fa has 
twice been postponed. 





Ml dividends subject to nsaeto} AH matches tar March 29th 


LITTLEWOODS 


POOLS. LIVERPOOL 



TREBLE CHANCE 

24PTS £1.406-80 

23PTS £29-25 

22V2PTS £6-20 

22PTS £3-05 

21VaPTS £1-05 

5 Dividends only-?** Rule 9 '0 

TnfainCtaBceiKvidesdstBMitsafVsP' 


4 DRAWS £2-45 


10 HOMES £2,232 50 

iPaidcn'^Hum^sj 


4AWAYS £20-25 


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Outjumping a Grasshopper Diego Maradona, under pressure from Raimondo Ponte, lets fly during 
Argentina's tour match against Zurich Grasshoppers on Tuesday evening. Argentina won 1-0. - 


Brazil win 
but fail 
to impress 


Burtenshaw’s Wednesday 


unhappy start 


Brazil 4 

Peru... — ......... — — 0 


B ra ril down to 10 men afier 
30 minutes following the dis- 
missal of Eder, their left winger, 
started their series of home 
World Cup warm-up matches 
with an easy but unconvincing 
4-0 victory over a rejuvenated 
Peru in Sao Luis. 


ouL 


Despite dominating titrougb- 
iL the Brazilians looked far 


1986 

OCTOBER 15: Northern Ireland v 


from impressive and committed 
similar errors to those that led to 
defeats against West Germany 
and Hungary on their recent 
brief European tour. 

Eder was sent off on the half 
hour for punching Peru's right- 
back Castro. Bui by then Brazil 
had opened their account 
through Casagrande, who 
scored in the twelfth minute 
from a cross by Socrates. Seven 
minutes into the second half 
Casagrande was on hand again, 
heading home Edson's cross 
from the right 

But it was only in the later 
stages that Brazil drove home 
their advantage- First Alemao 
scored from the penalty spot 
after Muller had been brought 
down from behind by IsusquL 
And then Careca, substituting 
for Casagrande, received a long 
ball from Alemao in the last 
minute and beat goalkeeper 
Valdettaro for Brazil's fourth 
goal. 

- BRAZIL: Victor; Edson, Oscar. Gatvao, j 
Branco (sub: OidaL Etzo. Falcso. Socratas 
Alemao). Gaucfto (sub: Muter). 
Caracal Eder. 

Castro. Reynoso. 
tsuSQul. Alcazar, Vasquez. Martrtez. 
Caban ilia (sub: Correa), Loyola. 
CabaSero.Torreafl)a. 

Referee: A CoeBn. Brazil. 

•Romania have cancelled two 
international matches against 
Mexico afier claiming air tickets 
for their squad had failed to 
arrive. The countries were due 
to play in Que retaro on April 6 
and in Torreon three days later 
as part of Mexico's warm-up 
programme for the World Cup 
finals which begin on May 31. 
Romania did not qualify for the 
finals. 

The Romanians informed the 
Mexican federation of their 
decision to withdraw by telex. 
But a spokesman for the Mexi- 
cans yesterday criticised the 
decision and said that tickets 
had been sent on time. The two 
countries are now attempting to 
rearrange the games for later this 
month. 


Steve Burtenshaw's unhappy 
stan as Arsenal's caretaker 
manager continued as his side 
were beaten for the second time ■ 
in 24 hours by Watford on 
Tuesday night. 

After going down 2-0 at 
Highbury on Easter Monday, 
Arsenal were defeated 3-0 by an 
injury-hit Watford side, whose 
goals came from Smiliie, Jacket! 
(penalty) and Allen. 4 

Southampton, who face Liver- 
pool in the FA Cup semi-finals 
on Saturday, did not give their 
confidence much of a boost by 
struggling to a l-i home draw 


against relegation -threatened 
Odd 

England centre half saved 


ford United. Wright, the 
halL s 
Southampton's blushes with the 
equalizer after Aldridge had 
given Oxford the lead with his 
28th goal of the season. 

West Bromwich Albion, the 
bottom dub. took another step 
towards the second division 
with their 3-0 defeat by Luton, 


who moved into sixth place in 
the table through goals by 
Newell, Harford (penalty) and 
HilL 

Wimbledon missed their 
chance of moving beck into 
third place in the second di- 
vision promotion race when 
they were held 1-1 at home by 
Crystal Palace. Fashanu. their 
new £125.000 signing from 
Mill wall, gave Wimbledon the 
lead with his first goal for the 
club but Palace equalized in the 
second half through Wright. 

HttD kept their flickering 
hopes alive with a 1-0 victory at 
their Humberside rivals, 
Grimsby, Flounders scoring the 
only goal. 

In the third division, Wigan 
consolidated their promotion 
push with a 1-1 draw at Bristol 
Rovers, but Hartlepool's 
chances of escaping from the 
fourth division virtually dis- 
appeared with their 1-0 home 
defeat by Scaathorpe. 


Tuesday's results 


RRST DIVISION: Luton Town 3. West 
BnxiMidi Aftmn ft So u t h ampton 1. 
Oxford Utt 1; Watford 3, Arsenal ft 


SECOND DIVISON: OknsOy 0. HuB 1; 
WMMdon 1. Crysal Palace 1. 


West German 
recall for 
Bayern veteran 


THno DIVISION: Bristol Roots 1 . Wigan 


1. 


FOURTH DtVMOfc Harttepool a Sa*v 
thorpe 1; Torquay 1, Exatw 2. 

SCOTTISH FSSST DIVISION: Forte Z 
Brechin 0 

SCOTTISH SECOND OVtSKte: Quean s 
Park Z Stirling Alteon ft St Johnstone i. 
bankO. 


Meactowbanjci 

VAUXHAJX-OPEL TEAQOE: AC Daks 
Cup: Saral-rinal. second leg: 
Famtwrough 1 L UxtHldge 2 (Uxbridge ran 
S^ftsmteifvWorctmJaorandtaaM 
1. Kmgstonrtm 0- First tfMakMC 
Borehamwood 3, Staines 5; Chesftam 2. 
Basildon 3. Second dMatei north: 


Cheahunt 2. Vauxhal Motors 1 : ICngsbtey 
Boro 1. Second awstei 


1. 

sonde 


Fotics t, Hungwford ft 


FrwxJy Hartow 0, Namsos (Norway) 6. 
FOOTBALL C0MBMAT10M: OPR 3, 


Portsmouth Z Poaipa n ad - Charlton v 
MRwaH. 


CENTRAL LEAGUE Rrat division: Usds 

1. Derby 1. Second dwteorc Bradford 0. 
Notts Corny 4; Wofrett iam pton 2. Port 
Vte 1. Post poned: Rotherham * Black- 
pool; Stoke v Tom. 

SMIRNOFF RUSH LEAGUE: Nawry Z 
Gtonavon ft Portadowm 0. Disatary 1; 
Colerane 3. Bangor 1: Artte 1. Lame 1. 
Postponed: Carrie* * BaHymena: LnMd 

2. CafmnvRe ft 


INTERNATIONAL MATCH: Grasshopper 


Zurich 0. Argentina f . 

BAHRAJtfc Gulf Cup: Kuwait Z Qatar 1. 


FRENCH CUP: Quarte-finals, 
Lons 0 1 


legs: Parts-Si Germain 2. Lons 0 (Pans-St 


German quality tor semWtaals): Bor- 
deaux 1. Tours 0 (Bordeaux quote** 


Romes 2. Auxarre 1 (set; Rennes t . 
SWISS LEAGUE: Baden 0. Young Boys 
Berne 2. 

WEST GERMAN LEAGUE: VFB Stuttgart 
1. Hamburg SVO. 


SQUAD: U Stein , 

i DonmuxJL K 
Mtrtcfy. T Bated 
ABrehm " 

K ARB- ^ 

Wkenmayer (Sntractt 
(aged) (rambu 



oart), K-H I 

IXSSL 

Maguh (t&nburgTw 

Mmhaeta (Bayern Mtaich). O Thou 

(Schafce), H GrtteW (Hamburg), D 


.. (Hamburg), 

Htiness (Bayern Munich), K-H 

Runmaaigge (kite Mian). 


TENNIS 


Banned Connors may 
play at Beckenham 


Jimmy Connors, who was 
fined £13.400 and banned from 
tennis for defaulting in a match 
in February, could be playing in 
the Beckenham tournament in 
June — seven days before his 
suspension expires. 


to compete at Beckenham then 1 
feel we are abiding by the rules. 

“Beckenham is not an 
MIPTC tournament and has no 
points towards the ra nk i n g s , and 
Connors appears to have a 


Connors received his ban 
from the Men's Internationa! 
Professional Tennis Council 
(MIPTC) two weeks ago for 
pulling out of a semi-final match 
with Ivan Lendl in the Lip ton 
International in Florida. 


genuine interest in participating 
at Beckenham.” 


As Connors has decided not 
to appeal, he has been ruled out 
of tournaments sanctioned by 
MIPTC until the stan of the 
Stella Artois grass court 


The Beckenham tournament 
will have a new title and new 
sponsors to mark its centenary 
this year. The event, which 
began nine years after Wimble- 
don. in 1886. is to be called 
'Direct Line Insurance Tennis at 
Beckenham* and will carry a 
prize fund of over £21.000. 


grJ 

championships at Queen’s Club 


on June 9-15. But according to 
John Stickland. chairman of the 


Beckenham tournament. Con- 
nors — who won the event in 
1978 — will be able to play at 
Beckenham because the lour- 
nament is not an MIPTC event. 

Stickland said: “The rule 
about his suspension was made 
quite clear. It is only MIPTC 
tournaments and Davis Cup 
matches. If the rules allow him 


The organisers have signed a 
three-year agreement with the 
motor insurance company, 
which is owned by the Royal 
Bank of Scotland. This year's 
event will include a number of 
previous men’s singles winners 
apart from Connors: Tim 
Mayotte (1985). Steve Denton 
(1983) and Kevin Curren (1981 
and 1982). Two other men’s 
champions - Peter Fleming 
(19791 and Vijay Amriiraj 
(1974) - are also expected to 
participate. 


FOR THE RECORD 

BASKETBALL 

FOOTBALL 

ISM 






BOXING 



BANGKOK: Ktefl’a Cup amaeeur tournament 
Ugfei ffywmi* 9 FUuapaka (naj « P 
Dteponhi (Nepal. xo 2nd rw. P HuSon 
(Thau h D da Gw p ng te IAum. ho 1st J 
Kamau (Kan) M M Pxma (Thai) ta 1st Lm 
Mine CM (Taiwan) W W Boocnsa /Uganda). 
ptS; P CraxaN (Thau M N Steranvuni 
lSm 9 )._r5c3«l.S Sncna»fThM tt Y Solo Uk>| 

P 

...... .. PH. S 

Stnyasen ffto^w S Utensor (USSR), pts: J 


TENNIS 


ATLANTA: WCT ctiRsnioniNpa (US ixtess 

sxstwa Rep nxnt J Gamer M BSftuftz «-6, 


lumoj. isc Jro. a 5ncna> fmw c 

pa. Rywa lgh t K TwAm 
wXjTOBwni (Pte). pts Bte 
Aflham {Thau te R ifakanan 


(Japi 


7-5. 6-*: T Gutfcson M M Anger 4-6. 7-fl. frl 
6 GtfMrt « R Acuna fCratgf fra. 8-3 T 
Mayotte ffl P Cash (Aus) 6-J. 6-3, A 
Cnesnofcov (USSPt M S Dm fra 7-6 K 
Cunwi tit R Knsfansn (InM) 7-6 
MARCO GLAND. RPtefraMVl T< 
mmol 
RWVHt 


GOLF 


Saunders calls 
circuit 
‘a disgrace’ 


Vivien Saunders, who pio- 
neered the formation of the 
European women's tour, yes- 
terday described this year’s 
WPOA circuit as “an utter 
disgrace.” Miss Saunders, a 
professional for 17 years, is 
incensed that only seven out of 
19 tournaments are being played 
on mainland Britain and she 
believes that -this will put the 
lour out of reach of many 
members. 

“Lots of the girls cannot 
afford to play,” said the former 
British Open champion. “It is 
an utter disgrace that it should 
cost them something like 
£10,000 for the privilege of 
playing. “Many girts have com- 

S lained to me, but are too 
igbtened to speak up them- 
selves. I intend putting these 
questions to the executive direc- 
tor, Colin Snape, at the annual 
meeting later this month.” 

Miss Saunders, a solicitor 
who helped form the tour in 
1979, plans playing four events 
this season: all of them m 
England. She said: “I will com- 
mute to three of them, but n will 
still cost me around £1.000. 
How can anyone expect these 
guts, many without sponsors, to 
travel around the Continent 0 
Much more emphasis should be 
applied to cultivating interest m 
the home market 


“As things stand, the original 
idea that young girts could turn 
professional ana play is being 
undermined by a Continental 
fixation More than half the 
total 1986 prize fond (£700.000) 
will be contested outside Brit- 
ain This does not indude die 
£60, 000-pl us British Open, 
whidi is under the control of the 
Ladies Golf Union 


More golf page 32 


Green’s choice 


f QwmociK Bnrt n*ra£ R R*gm TO 
Tte(tJS)44.64 > fr4 SKtemte 


e GaeuMA (USi M L Oobrsa lig 6-3, 6-3. Q 
ten ' ~ 


Sotatteif-UB- 


Samtxx (Ann H J Momma 
«n|AusiMM 


Thompson) 

6-2. 


_ W. 6>t J 

(BuflM 1-6 


Lucinda Greeii will nde 
Shannagh in next month's Bad- 
minton horse trials for the 
Whitbread championships The 
event, from April P-20 has 
auracted a lop field ; 


-'U*-*’ f 




J 


worry 
over Hodge 


Sheffield Wednesday, who 
contest an FA Cup semi-final 
against Everton at Villa Park on 
Saturday, have injury doubts 
about thefr goalkeeper and cap- 
tain, Martin Hodge. Hodge, who 
has not missed a match m three 
years, suffered a bade strain 
during training yesterday before 
be and his colleagues left for the 
national sports centre at 
i iiirehafi. Hodge win have treat- 
ment from the dub physiothera- 
pist, Alan Smith. 


Hodge, a former Everton 
player, sai±”I think I should be 
fit. if l were to miss this match it 
would fed (ike six years* hard 
work down the drain. The semi- 
final will be the highlight of my 
season and I'm determined not 
to miss it.” 


The reserve goalkeeper, 
Hesfoid, has been placed on 
standby. Smith, out for the last 
five games with a foot strain. 
Chapman (stomach vims) and 


Shelton (foot injury), should all 


be fit for 


semi-finaL 


Wednesday trained at Lilleshall 
in 1966 before they beat Chelsea 


in the semi-final at Villa Park. 


Frankfurt (AP) - Dieter 
Honess. West Germany's vet- 
eran forward, has been recalled 
by the national team for the first 
time in seven yean aod will lead 
their attack in next week’s 
World Cup warm-up - match, 
against Switzerland m Basle. 

Honess, the 33-year-old Bay- 
ern Munich Toward, has only 
two international caps to date. 
Both came in May 1979. when 
he scored three goals in victories 
over Ireland and Iceland. A 
lowering figure, he scores most 
of his goals with powerful 
headers. By resuming his 
partnership with his former club 
colleague. Karl-Heinz 
Rummenigge, now with Inter- 
Milan, Honess win, no doubt, 
be hoping to enhance his claims 
of being included in his 
country’s World Cup squad. 


Real Madrid’s 
new manager 


Madrid (Reuter> — The for- 
mer Dutch. , national manager, 
Leo Bccnhakker, - .will take 
charge of the- Spanish League 
champions. Real Madrid, 
according to Ramon Mendoza, 
president of the Spanish dub. 
The appointment was due to be 
announced yesterday in Milan, 
where • Real flayed 
Intern azionale in the UEFA 
Cup semi-finals. 


Cub sources said that Luta 
Moiowny, who replaced 
Amancio Amato as Real's man- 
ager last year, would return to 


bis former position as general 
rid have 


manager. Real Madrii 
already won die Spanish league 
championship. 


Becnhakfcer, aged 43, resigned 
as manager of the Netherlands 
last week, because his team bad 
foiled to qualify for the World 
Cup finals in Mexico. He pre- 
viously managed the Spanish 
dub. Real Zara g oza , from 1981 
to 1984. 


London Welsh put 
their big match 
before the sevens 


By David Hands, Kngby Correspondent 
London Welsh, whose cen- son because of dismissals in 


tenary dinner was last night and 
whose final birthday fixture will 
be the game against a distin- 
guished President's XV on April 
12, will miss next Wednesday's 
London floodlit sevens at 


in the 


Roehampton.^H^fid^' saving 


their box until . — - — 

are concentrating on concluding 
their hundredth year in-style. 

The sevens — which attracts 
die other nine Loudon merit 
table cfnhs together with Cam- 
bridge University, last years 
winners, Durham University 
and Esher — have found new 
spons o rs. This twelfth tour- 
nament wiB be held under the 
hannpy of Sturgis and Son — the 
London estate agents whose - 
principal, George Sturgis, was 
president of Rosslyn Park five 
years ?go , while his sod Martin 
is a vice-president of the dub. 

Cambridge’s first match for 
tbe Sturgis Trophy will be 
against Saracens while Durham 
— where Sutton Henderson, the 
Rosslyn Parte captain, was edu- 
cated— will meet Harlequins in 
their first outing. The final is 
scheduled for lO.lGpm.- The 
president's XV to play London 
Welsh win be captained by 
Fitzgerald, the Irish hooker and 
captain of the 1983 Lions. Tbe 
team is entirely composed, of 
internationals: five English, 
three Irish, one Scottidi. and six 
Welsh. Among the Welshmen 
will be Mark Ring, the Cardiff 
centre who suffered a knee 
iqjury so serious at the end of 
last season that it has kept him 
mit of first -class rugby for nearly 
a year. 


curred r 

first half of die season. , * 

Wasps, whose team for this *■ 
Saturday's John Player Special 
Cup semi-final against London 
Scottish wiH be chosen tonight, 
will be without three inter- 
nationals — Melville. Davies 
and Lozowski — who are afl 
injured. 

England Colts play Wales 
Youth at V/h aland on Saturday 
with a side showing two changes 
from that winch lost 16-0 to 
Italy in Rome last month. 
Davies (Leamington) comes in 
at hooker and Taylor (Barnet) at 
franker. Taylor also takes over 
-the captaincy front Glen, tbe 
Sudbury scrum halt 
The Welsh, who defeated 
itafv 25-16 and Welsh Colleges 
33-12, but lost to France 40-12, 
have brought in Lee Williams a -. 
on tbe left wing. Price at hooker 
and Stephen Williams at 
flanker, fix' a match which will 
be handled by Eom Doyle, the 
Irish international referee. 

WELSH YOUTH: R Jams (Cattcoft A 
OWN (Be dras). S Dniat (Uswte. A 

ttowtemte (AbycrfrfcL Catrtd (Mwxtn). E 
Pcfcs mxnbM. D Yams (Ateramnsn. 

S waterau (BMdwooa). ■ Piny 
A ARM ^CwfflUarari), H Wfrtete 



ptentette 



namtl H 


)qDLTftAL— a d — (W frwteB): 
(Barters Boas). C OmS 
torttou (Salai. G Amtnmg 
Rovers* K fifetmt (Wan 
SGNrt (Sudbury* A Yowir 


a Tartar (Barnet, captain), 3 





Belated chance for 
Welsh schools 


By David Hands 


This season has been sadly 
curtailed for die Welsh schools 
owing to disruption caused by 
the teaching dispute. But as for 
as representative matches are 
concerned, over the last months 
their administrators have 
salvaged a large part of the 
season which now begins with* 
18 Group Esso International 
against Scotland at Neath on 
Saturday. 

This match should have been* 
played in January but was 
postponed because of Welsh, 
difficulties in raising a side, a 
problem which also contributed 
loihe cancellation of yesterday’s' 
scheduled game against France. 
But.: several -trials have been, 
organised over the last three 
weeks and selection has been, 
assisted by tbe Inter-County 
competition for under- 1 7s and 
the feet that there are five 
survivors from last season's 18 
group to Zimbabwe. . 

Four of the quintet, including 


Andrew Booth, the captain and 
scrum half play against Scot- 
land. Thereafter wales play 


England at Otley on April 

UtaSH SCHOOLS: A Ftawmi 
R White (CynttaLC. 

WHtens Ptoair^ R I 
Staffletorttom (NsaSl). A I. _ . 

Gore. cBptenk I Bucket (Hoayweq. 

Mar{PDrthc3N% LFtey(TcnHwntlv). C 



(DoL 

tert O Rtertand (KflMnsUfrL 4 Furtny 
moon Bertwcht. A autegw (HgteJ- « 
ManKraM (GatoshMs): C Chateen 


£ Porter (Gtanahnond); M 
in {Earlstonl. K McKenzie 

asfnissf^^rKss 

(Fattest. P WWtoa (Mencftsmn Castle). H 
Martel (Mwtteatan Caste), K Octsmoo 


Correction 


ent reports __ 

tional schools . seven -a-side 
rugby tournament. City of Lon- 
don school was mentioned. This 
should have-been City of Lon- 
don Freeman’s SchooL 


ROWING 


Focus on Nottingham 


Fifteen hundred competitors 
and officials from more than 30 . 
countries are expected to take 
pan in what could be the biggest 
ever world towing champion- 
ships, at Nottingham from Au- 
gust 17 to 24 (Jim Railton 
writes): 

Princess Anne, president of 
the British Olympic Association 
and patron of the rowing - 
championships is among a num- 


ber of dignitaries planning to 
visit the event throughout the 
week. One visitor with more 
than a passing interest will be 
Juan Antonio Samaranch, the 
president of the International 
Olympic Committee. If Bir- 
mingham succeeds in. its bid to 
stage the Olympic Games, the 
Holme and PieTrepont course 
will be the venue for the 1988 
Olympic Regatta. 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


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7.30. Sal Mats 3.30 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 



31 


Edited by Jane Henderson 
and Peter Davalle 


i ■> 

•. *v- 

r . ' 


Vv 


■If 


- 1 " ' 

‘ : fj 


j' 


e-f.’ , . 

K r* 'J W, 


'• -r " l"U> 
W*«,_ . r> . 


hance! 

school 


BBC 1 


6.00 

tSO BfMktaram with Frank 
Bough and Sefiria Scott. 
Weather at 6.55, 7.25, . 
7.55, &25 and 8.55; 
regional news and traffic 
at bLS7, 7.27, 7-57 and ■ 
8J7; national and 
international news at 7JXL 
738, 8JW, &30and%oa 
Holiday ideas from Nigel 
Coorrths. Glynn Chrtsfen 
on cookery, Richard Smith 
on heatth haiptine (01 811 
1068). - 

&20 Roland Rat’s Enter 
Extravaganza Lassie to- 
the rescue' nain in a cliff .- . 
drama. %45 Why don't 
you — ? turn box off ' 

and create something. - 
' ' . m'TSJacJcamwy (rt. 1030 

Ptay School with Sneolagh 
Gitbey and Ben Thomas m 

to.50 Ceefsx ... ' 

12L30 Newt with Richard 
Whitmore and Moira 
- Stuart - news headlines ' 
with subtitles. 12£S 
Redone! news and. . 

Weather with Michael 
Fish. 

IDO Pebble MU at One Tony 
Britton and Sandra 
Dickinson, on tour 
together in The Sewn 
Year Itch Join Paul Cola, 
Josephine Buchan and 

Bob Langley. Dr Sherryfl 
KemaKraizer offers 
professional advice to 
parents on the frightening 
sublet of child abuse, and 
Hilary James advises on . 
dressmaking. 145 Hokey 
■ Cokey, o .* 

220 Racing from Aintree the 
big butfd-up to Saturday's 
Grand National starts . . 

. -today with the £35 

WhUveed Gold Label and 
&10 Whitbread Pale Ate . 
Hamficap, then switches 
to BBCZ32S Ceetax. 
SL52 Regional news. 

325 T.T.V. Afarm bells toR for 
Scragtag and his assistant 
Marcus Kimber with Jufiet 
Prague. 4.10 SuperTed 
and the Robbers (rt. 4.15 
Jackanoiy. 420 Ulysses 

4.55 New8round.5DSBkie 
Peter Simon Groom 
reports on Josie, the . 
collie, sniffing out loot for 
the Lend an Ear Appeal 
(Gaefax). 525 Tits . - 
FBntstonss (cartoon) 

6.00 News. - 

6.35 Loudon Plus : ' 

7.00 Top of the Pop*. ' 
presented by John Peel 
and Janice Long - ; 

720 EastEnders ATI runs Into 
trouble tryingloget more 
work as a minicab driver, 
and Sharon plans to find 
her perfect man. 

820 Tomorrow’s World 
examines the rote ot : 
technology mchUdbktfv. . 
and demonstrates a - 
robotic truck which 
navigates by laser. . 

820 AQueatlonofSpbrttfi*... 


i 

I ' ■ 


■V' V5 


• L 


sutnnSE 



by_. 

Beaumont and Emfyn 
■Hughes'. Guests Stew ~ 
DavIS. Dave Odticey. Hywej 
. , . Jjavfe&araiPaul waist? . 

- face the questions/ 

*■ St08 Nevm.wah^p^.isnpf^ 

- arte Ranees -w - -. '-n* 

CoveidaleJIeglonM (lews 
and weattrar - ■ ' ^ 

920 IWofceuponeMpmfoB - 
the story of four drinking ,• 
men. .. ... ' 

1020 Tl»e Rtehaid Wmbteby : .' 

Lecture In fhdustry. rear 
1 988, the Chakinantof the 
ICl Sir John Harvey- 
Jones, argues that we \ 
undervalue industry and \ 
workers in Britain; he 
challenges us to abandon 
okt attitudes and adapt to 
change in his lecture . 
entajad Does Industry - 
Matter? ' \ _ _ • 

1020 Can you AvoWCanaw? 
Dr-Mtebael O’Dormett - 

looks at earty warning 
■ skins, discusses - 
prevention of cancer am* 

- debates The need to know 
- - 0):-^' • - 

11.15 UIB Mghtin Concert -. 

Ricky Skaggs from . ■ 

: Kentucky with his band in 
traditionaiBluegrass;, 
music; Ehrfe Costeto joins 
Skaggs for Don t Get 
Above Your Raisin'. 
Introduced by Anne - 
Nightingale 
11.45 Weather- ••••• 


TV-AM 


6*15 Good Momlnd Britain * 
presented by Henry Kelly 
- and AruiekaRfca. News 
with Jayne Irving at C20L 
720. 720. 500,820 and 
820. Weather at 628, 

■ W8. 728,828 and82B. 
Sport at 625 Wid 724. 

at jm. Postbag at £35* 
94)0 Waeaday?* 



Japanese Mountain 
• Frenay- '--.V.-.-.- 

94SAnfmatedCtesslcaJu{^ 

• •' Verne' s-escape story ■ . 
1025 The Aft-Sectrfc -■ ■■■ 7 
"-if-” Amusonart Arcade BeBa 
andthabmdaredckng- 
well until the arrival of . - 
staging, dandna ■ - 
.. _ ^mtng StarBasa(r). 
tl2fr BMXBeat ' - 

1125 Cartoon. 11*30 About 
Brttten Looks at a North 
‘ ■ : ^forksWrevBagK Btttton . 
122Q Theftaggy Doislnthetoy 
.factory. 

12.10 PaddwLma Look cut MTs 
magic. 1220 The ' 
Sufivana Geoff plans his 
" . - future; ..-•-••• 

120 News at One. 125 
. Thames News. 

120 Hotel American drama • 

< series; British dijacimat 
. involved In a tragic drug: 
incident. 

225 Horm Cookery DUk Stic 
fry squid. 220 Daytime ttw 
. stories behind thenftvs. 

. - 820 O wn* Cowant Gerdau 
fashion workshop drama 
series; Pad and NkhobAy- 
. . .. iJUinchtheH-restaurarrt/ .' ; 
3-25 News Headlines- -. 

320 Sonswtd DttigMarr 
.. Wayne Morrell suffers a 
huniHation. 

420 Tbe Raggy Dotia vt tfw toy 
shop reject bin {r) 4>10 
James the Cab 4.15 
BasTs Joke Machine new 
series of Basil Brush and 
tha^ corny gags machine. 
420 
£45. 

*. . 

.v Mighty 

5.15 Thames Sport 
meets the 1966 
winning team to relive .. . 

• victory over West Germany- 
and antiefoate the 1986 . • 
World Cup. 5A5News 
& 06. Thames News. 1L25 Heipl 
: - Snowdon awartte for . 
transport or adaption of 
tbhefotite. 



625 Crossreads Rbytias a 
.vistthecouW do without' 
720 Emmerdaie Farm; fear 
invades the vaiage a6 an 
armed criminal o at large. 
720 .llwArTtreg The. White - :/ 
Ballot Hannibal plans to ■ 
r deantipacrime-rtddan 
. convnuiTfly in Wyoming ^r).. 

,820.The Brothers ^^McGregor 
Newsariesdfsitcomina 
-Merseyside secondhand 
' car tot with Paul Barber 

• - . - and Ph«k> Whitehurch as 

^-brothereanffatedy 
■ : ; traffic warden (Grade): ■ - 
•820 ^UfWd H tt^ieock-^ - ; ^ V 
■£■?■> presems.Newjsarfes'Df. 

- ” vstosptefipth^tereifrrefrrat ' 
w. ‘stvs Mbrtfo Sh6eri r as , ak’. ' 

■ ateohdfc actor tosteg work . 

id arnewcomer. v. . 

820 TVEyatovestigatestho ^ 

- . dedskmtolaunchthB. 

space shuttte.Challenger 
a*_V which WHed.ZDStronaute. 

Peter Predwgastasks the 
. NASA teanvlf they ignored 

■ vital wamngs. ....... 

1020 News atTen, Thames 

News. . - • 

1020-Kflfalc WM Street' . . 
Gunsflnger. Hugerobbery 
causes our bald hero to 
disguise himself as a ' -. 
Greek maSpoaSe. . 

1120 Six Centimes of Versa Sir 
~ John 
- Romantic . .... 

■ - - verse to theirwlf ^ 

• eighteenth century.Damo 


#As stories about races 

time go. the 40 Minutes 

COUNTDOWN 

TO TODAY (BBC 2. 920pm)ls 
notes nerva-ttogting as you 
wort) expect it to be because we 
aft know that EdtfieShah diet 
succeed In bringing out his new 
national tabloid on the 
projected launch day. March 4. 
Moreover (with apologies to 
Mites WngtonLyoj wifi 
understand why we, at 77te 
Times, vriB view Ruth Jackson's 
breathless account of the 
Shah initiative to beat the clock 
with only grudging 
admiration. We have come 
through traumatic days 

“ a weekend 
move to Wappmg that, in 
comparison, made toe laimchfng 
of raebyheem as leisurely as 
Dsuei J Traviurii as Ed Murrow. a game of crogueLBut even 
^ XSuuuMj ^y^Opra dattie-hsdened veterans of 



CHOICE 


thenBwspaperwarwfifffxlitin 
thek hearts to admire the 
unflappabStyofMrShahwhen 
tampers were snapping afl 
around him as the minutes ticked 
away and It began to look as 
if the rose-tinted spectacles that 
all members of the staff were 
given a aflow them a more 
optimistic view of their futira, 
would quickly be worn out 
through over-tee. 


•ah kinds of mate bastions 
are assaulted on behalf of the 
opposite eex in tonight's 
TtMEWATCH (BBC 2, 8.05).l am 
surprised that Pater France 
managed to survive as 
presenter.Men get the blame 
for using Lady Jane Gray as a 
pawn to thek power game. It 


was men who, intent on bringing 
the Great war to its bloody 
conclusion, rejected concerted 
action by 22W women aimed 
at stopping the slaughter without 
further ado. And it was those 
men who monopolized the world 
of fine arts in rmd-ntoeteenth 
century Britain wno caused Mary 
Eflen Best to pick up her 
brushes and palette in an act of 
quiet defiance and go off to 
paint those amazingly detailed 
scenes of domestic life that 
have recently delighted visitors 
to the Fine Art Society in 
London. She mastered the 
photographic an before 
anyone started to use a camera, 
and it is smaii wonder that 
social historians and art lovers 
now unite to praise her 

Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


920 C eet ax 

1220 Open Uolveretty Start up 
. . your own Business: 
advice from those who 
have started succssful 
smaB businesses. 

1255 Caefer 

32S . WbxfcnM Chris Serie down 

. . ^ in the archives again finds 
". romance between 

Pinky and 
_ „Ftpst Report 
end The Bt ' 
Adder.GuestCtaim 
Rayner is the expert. 

325 Racing from Atotree 

425 Tbe Paper Chase series 
- about American law 
studBnte. 

&2S N aw» wBh Subtitles and 


520 Requiem fora Ratiwey 1 

-* > Laat week the Swindon . 
workshops for the Great 
Wsstwn RNIway and fater 
. British RNi dosed down. 
Petar Brown went to 
Swindon before the 
closure was announced 
and returned later to find 
thettveauned workforce 
bftter a fter massive 
redundancies and 

jBoganfeatJocnatonetime 

. . . 14200 employees 
regarded theirs as a Job 
. for fife (first-shown on 
BBC West! 

620 Stn- Trak Leonard IMimoy 
asMrSfxxddri 
645 Discovering Bkds Tony 



7J0 BestofBranTherfourth 
• ' roundfeateras Lewis. 

- Me*yT^and,GUSaod - ' 

- _ -Leytetd Vehicles Bands 

and soloists JeffThmras, 
Paul Ffiby. David 
Reddyhou^i and Ian 
itickman. - 

725 WBd n owar . Heather. 
Mfchaef Jordan on a great 
flttte strvivor in man-made 
. landscapes - 
• whetherheathiand or 
gardens heather comes 
■ arioite own. (Ceetax)* 

8.05 Tsnswatch A Man s 
Wbrid. Three stories 
Uu strate toe way history 
has been written or re- 

- . - . written^ men. Lady Jane 



.JuS an Gtovar reads 
Wordsworth and Ian 
- Richardson reads the "' 

■ poem Christopher Smart 
wrotefbrhiadat; - ■' 
1220 Thaffs Hoaywoodkxsksat 
. mate chauvinistic - - 

: preference for blondes:. 
Joan Harlow, Alice Faye . 
- - and Marilyn. 

1225 Night Thoughts. 


friarfl^b|hted to the **: 

. ' pOwkSanfe; CMnngTheJ-irst 

.-.^YfextoWartwothousand- 
women hetiAcongressIn 
the Hasuh cSscusdng 
ktitiativesforpeece: Mary 
EBen,6est.was a footer of 
tnemu-nawBentn century 
- - confined by convention to 
domestic subjects and 
unatitnowtedged unffi this . 
decade. 

920 Keren Key Impressions of 
Edith Piafi Dame Edna 
Everagsand Mrs David ‘ 
Attenborough, song end 
dance with guest Bob 


: new 


920 40'HGrartns- the series - 
won the 1986 Bafte Award 
.. ■ forBestFactual Series. . 

. Countdowrvto Today 
looks at EtftfieShaf^i 
ttftej 


- and^ then the launch. 
(Ceefax) 

J10.10 Pot Black 86 The last 

quarter final Ray Reantoo 
and Dennis Taytor. 

Pi 025 NswaOtoM Mark Austin 
I reprats from Trinidad on 

the Fourth Test 
1125 Weather 


Channel 4 


220 RtorMcnOncte 
Tati's second ftn as 
Hutot was a reworking of 
Modem Times. The 
clumsy, affectionate Hutot 
on visits to his stuffy 
sister's family to their 
mechanised and orderiy 
surrounefings. takes up 
with hts lonely nephew. Off 
they go on sweet-eating 
binges 


620 


land 
ringpe 
commeitfaia. 

420 Countdown Richard 
Whiteteywflh the last 
preliminary round of the 
word and numbers game 
adjudicated by GDes 
Brandreth. 

520 AbbottendCosteloMeet 
the Keystone Kops 
(1954)*. Wild comedy set 
to silent movie era. Abbott 
and Costello, swindled by 
a conman, pursue him to 
Hollywood where they 
make good as stuntmen, 
and meet Mack Sen nett 
before a crazy chase 
sequence. 

Union Worid: last 

ramme in the series 
loofe at management buy- 
outs, in particular The - 
National Freight Company 
suocesfutly bought by 
management and 
workforce in 1982, 
presented by Julie Halt. 

720 News. 720 Comment 
Weather ‘ 

8J»0 Herrin Gave: Transit 

- -v Ostend. Famed in his 
- . Belgian retreat shortly 
before Ws death two years 

- ago, the souf-singer is 
caught In reflective mood. 

820 Club Mix second in the 
mainly black talent show 
series, hosted by Baz 
Bamlgboye and Smiley 
Culture, with souL blues, 
jazz, rap, reggae, poetry . 
politics and sports within a 
- dub atmosphere. 

920 What Now? is the question 
school leavers ask when 
they've done a YTS 
scheme and there's still no 
work. The six main - 
characters hi Phil 
Redmond s series are 
. tom Liverpool, 

> > *.?-• con f ront i ng the. problems 

- ofjjnemptoyment 
woteode, sexcaT 

and even death ( 

920 pBmrMurirbw Wartime 
Ed Murrow 




ast nightly on CBS 
from London to America, 


„ raids; clamber 

onto rooftops tor the 
blackout and crossing 
London in open cars. 

When he returned to the 
US after the war he was a 
pioneer joumalst 
speaking out against the 
McCarthy witcWxtots In 
his television series. 

1125 Voices Discussion of our 

economic future: a quarter 
of a century ago the 
American thinker Daniel 
Bed coined the phrase ’the 


_ . jht he debates with 
economist Emma 
Rothschild and German 
trade unionist Ulrich Briefs 
the new driving force of 
computer and information 
technology, the increasing 
importance of services 
over goods and the 
prospect of even greater 
unemployment 
1220 Closedown. 


C Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. VHF stereo at end of 
Radio 4. 

555am Shipping 8.00 News 



lyCs) 

620 Today, tod 620, 720, . 

620 News 645 Business 
News 655k 755 Weather 
720. 820 News 725. 

82S Sport 7.45 Thought tar 
the Day 

643 Star Smashers of the 
Galaxy Rangers read by 
Kerry Shale (4)(s) 857 
Weather Travel 

9.00 News 

925 The Natural History 
Programme. Nick Davies 
talks to Sandy Harcoun 
about the altitudes of 
African fanners to thdr 
tnUfie 

925 Fireside Tales. 

Unexpected stories from 
the Fens. Ptw Smrth visits a 
pub to Norwich (r) 

1020 News: Medicine Now. 

Geoff Watts on the 
health of medical care 
1020 Morning Story: Shopping 
with Mrs Riley by K.Ei 
Rowlands. Reader: Judy 
Bennett 

10.45 An Act Of Worship (s) 

1120 News: Travel: Tales from 
Paradise. June Knox- 
Mawer with stones of the 
British who went to the 
South Pacific as 
administrators (2) Flying 
the Rag (rks) 

11.4a Thought tor Food. Bob 
Symes in search of 
traditional European 
dishes -Today, the 
Cornish pastie 
1220 News: Prophets. 

Charlatans. Little 
Gurus, .and Peggy Duff(r) 
1227 Film Star. Alexander 
Walker outlines the 
screen career of Jack 
Lemmon (r) 1255 
Weather 

1.00 The World at One: News 

1.40 The Archers. 155 


220 News; Woman's Hour. 
Includes an item on the 
history of British towns as 
written In stone. 

320 News; The Afternoon 
Play. Twister by Ronald 
Frame, with Pippa Guard and 
Barry Morse. Drama, set 
to Hollywood, (s) 

420 News 


425 Bookshelf: Bards and 
Bucket oos. Christopher 
Frayung proves that the 
Great American Cowboy 
is still alive and well (s) 
425 Kaievtoscope Last 
rnght s edition, repeated. 
520 PM: News magazine 550 
Snipping 555 weather 
620 News: Financial Rer 


6.30 BramoJ Britain 1! 

7.00 News 

725 The Archers 
720 Any Answers? Listeners 
can air their v«ws on 
subjects raised m last 
week's Any Questions? 

7 M CeieOration of G.K. 

Chesren on by Michael 
Finch, with Hugh Burden (s) 
8.40 Miss Dorothea s Artificial 
Soprano. Roy Johnson 
tells the story of a famous 
Irish mamage is) 

9.00 Does he take Sugar? 
Magazme tor disabled 
listeners and their families 

920 The Archive Auction, with 
Gavin Campbell 
9.45 Kaietdoscope. Includes a 
review ot Anthony 
Powell's oook The Fisher 
King 

10.15 A Bock at Bedtime: A 
Perfect Spy written and 
reed by John le Carre (14) 
1029 Weather 

1020 The Worid Tonight With 
Tim Ltewefiyn 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1120 Soundings: John Got it 
RighL An examination of 
the evidence that John's 
Gospel is the most 
accurate record of the Me of 
Jesus 

1220 News. Weather 1223 
Shipping 

VHF (available m England and 
S. Wales only) as above except 
555-620am Weather; Travel 
925-1020 Cat s Whiskers with 
plays, songs and quizzes for 
young children. 155-2. 00pm For 
schools; Listening Comer (s) 
550-555 PM (continued). 

( Radio 3 ) 

On medium wave. VHF stereo 
variations at end of Radto 3 listings. 
655 Weather. 720 News 
725 Morning Concert 
Rossini (Wifiam Tel 
overtire), Delius (Dance for 
Harpsichord: Kipnis. 
harpsichord). Denzi (Quintet 
to Bflat, Op 56 No 1). 


Poulenc (Concerto in G 
minor for 

organ, bmpani.sthngs). 820 
News 

825 Concert (oontd): Mehui 
(La chasse du jeune 
Henri). Stenhammar (Two 
Sentimental Romances: 
with Teltefsan. violin). D'lndy 
(Symphony on a French 
mountain song .with Clccofini, 
piano). 9.00 News 
9.05 This Week's Composer: 
Mozart. March in D. 

K445: Divertimento In D, K 
334; played by Vienna 
Mozart Ensemble) 

1020 Robert Mayer Concert 
Royal Philhharmonic 
(under Cteobury), with 
Stephen hough, piano. 
Wagner (Mastersmgers 
prefaide), Liszt (Piano 
Concerto No 1). Ligeti 
(Atmospheres), 

Hindemith (Tumandot 

scherzo: March. 

Symphonic metamorphosis 
of themes by Carl Maria 
von Weber) 

11.15 Raff: Academy of st 
Maron-m-tbe-Fi 


sr 


teUa 

Octet in C major. Op 


11.40 Six Contlnems.'toratgn 
radiobroadcasts, 
monitored by the BBC 
1220 BSC Welsh SO (under 
Owain Arwel Hughes). 
Shostakovich (Symphony No 
10).. 120 News 

125 Schubert Hans 

LsgTBffpi&no). Sonata in 

125 The Barber of SevBe: 
Rossini’s two-act opera. 
Sung in ttaUan.With Rtoafdi 
ftitfe rota), Yachmi. 

Bacquier, Aler, Sutton, 
Barscha and Brodard. 

Valdes conducts the 
Lausanne Chamber 
Orchestra. Act one. Act two 
begins at 32S after an 
interval talk 

3-25 Cricket Fast day of the 
Fourth Test In Trinidad. 

Until 525 on medium wave 

620 Bandstend: Band of HM 
Royal Marines School of 
Music. Russell (A Ufa on the 
Ocean Wave). Knox (Sea 
Songs). Wiggins (Big Sky 
Country) 

720 A Paradise out of a 
Common Field: Victorian 
gardeners-Dr Joan Morgan 
cm Journals and 
Journeymen 

720 Halle Orchestra (under 
Loughran).Wkh Offi 
Mustonen (prano).Part one. 
Beethoven (Symphony 
No 1). Ravel (Piano 
Conceono to G major) 

025 Rose-cotoured Teacups: 

Anna Massey reads the 
short story by AS Byatt 

820 Concert (con td): 

Vaughan Williams 
(Symphony No 6) 

92S The Georgies: Vkgi's 


1020 

Welsh SO (under Foss). 
With Equals Brass. Foss 
(Salomon Rossi suite: 

Night Music for John 
Lennon) 

1055 Mozart Melos Quartet of 
Stuttgart Quartet to D 
minor. K 421 ; and Quintet to 
A major, K 581. with Juba 
Raysonxtorinet 
1157 News. 1220 Closedown 
VHF only; 4.10 British Youth 
Orchestras (GufidhaU Symphonic 
Wind Band). Works by Bernard 


Stevens (East end West overture). 
Milner (Concerto far T 
Wind Band). Copland 



Mainly for Pleasure (Jeremy 
Stopmann) 

C Radio 2 ) 

On medium wave. For VHF 
stereo, see Radio 1. 

News on the hour. Headlines 
520am, 620, 720, 820. Cricket 
Fourth Test. West lnd*s v 
England 81125941,222,322, 

422, 525, 622, 625 (mi only). 
8.02,3.02, 955, 11-02- 
4.00am Cofin Berry (st 820 Ray 
Moore (s) 825 Ken Bruce (s) 1020 
Jimmy Young me* food 
information from Tony De Angeii (s) 
1.05pm Vince HiD (s) 2.00 Gloria 
Hunmford (s) 320 Music Ail The 
Way md Racing from Liverpool: 

3.45 £12.000 The Whitbread 
Trophy Handicap Chase (2m 61 ) 
4.00 Paul Jones (s) 620 John Dunn 
(s) 8-00 warty Whyton 
introduces County Club, featuring 


Desk 

Roy 

Hudd with June Whitfield. Chris 
Emmett and the Huddhrars 
1020 Star Sou no Extra (Nick 
Jackson) 1120 Brian Matthew 
presents Round Midnight (stereo 
from midnight) 120am Charles 
Nove presents Nightride (s) 3-00- 
420 A Little Night Music (s). 

( Radio 1 ) 

On medium wave. Stereo on 
VHF. 

News on the half hour from 
620am until 920pm and at 1220 
rmdmghL 

6.00am Adrian John 720 Mike 
Read 9.30 Simon Bates 1220pm 
Newsoeat (Janet Trawm) 1225 
Gary Davies 320 Dave Lee Travis 
5.30 Newsbeat (Janet Trewin) 

525 Bruno Brookes 720 Janice 
Long 1020-1220 Andy 
Kershaw (S). VHF RADIOS 1 ft 2. 
420am As Radio 2 1020pm As 
Radio 1 12. 00-4. 00am As Radio 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 


(L 00 hewseask 6 J 0 Nature Notebook 
640 The Farming World 7.00 News 758 
Twenty-Four Hours 7-30 The Classic 
Albums 725 Network UK 8.00 News B28 
Refactions L15 International Soccer 
Special L30 Jom Peel LOO News 828 
Review ol tne British Press LIS The 
Wond Today L30 Financial News 820 
Look Ahead 925 Byways or Hstonr 1020 
News 1021 Kings ol Swing 1120 Newt 
11.09 News About Britain 11.15 New 
Ideas 1125 A Latter from England 1120 
Assignment 1220 Batto Newsreel 12.15 
Top Tweniy 1225 Spoils Roundup 1.00 
News 1 .M Twersy-Four Hours 120 
Network UK 125 Flanders end Swam 
220 News 221 Outlook 225 Jazz from 
Europe 320 Radio Newsreel 3.15 The 
Pleasure's Yours 420 News 428 Com- 
mentary 4.15 Assignment 525 Spons 
Roundup 7.45 Thar's Trad L00 NewwLOB 
Twenty-Four Hours L30 Business Mat- 
ure LOO News 921 Book Ctioce 925 In 


the Meanwne 9.15 A Jolty Good Show 

.... worn Today 1026 

A Lenar from England 1020 Fkiancwl 


1020 News 1029 The t 


News 1020 Reflections 1025 Spans 
Roundup 1120 News 1129 Commeniare 
11.15 Merchant Navy Programme 1120 
Nature Notebook 1120 The Farming 
World 1220 News 1228 News About 
Britain 12.15 Ratto Newsreel 1220 fcfcafc 
Now 120 News 121 Outkx* 120 
Flanders and Swann 125 Book Chocs 
ISO hi the Meemime 220 News 228 
Review of the British press 2.15 Training 
for Tomorrow 220 Music ol Richard 
Rodney Bennett LOO News 329 News 
About Britain LIB The World Today 445 
Financial News 455 Reflections 520 
News 520 Twenty-Four Hours 525 The 
world Today. AH times ki GKT. 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1053kHz/285m;10B9kHz/275m; Radio 2: G93kHz/^^nK90»H/^»m; Radi 

92.5; Radio 4: 200kHz 1500m: VHF -92-95; LBC: 1152kHz^61m; VHF 973; Capital: 1548kHz/l94m; VHF 95B; BBC Radio London 
1458kHz/206m: VHF 945; World Service MF 648kHz/463m. , ' 


OBril WALES225220pa 
HHSSi wales Todw L3S-720 
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LAM) I020em-1120 Dotsran 

Scotland. Regkxv 

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NORTHERN IRELAND 


LNW lu.uupiri MH MMI 

L35pm-720 Reportra Scot 
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L3S-720 The Fkntstonei 


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B2JM.OO Spotlight 112S-1 120 
Northern Ireland news and amatoer. B*- 
OLANO 1220noon-1Z20pm NORTH 
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Focus.62S-720pm Regional news 
magazms. 

CHANNEL 

1020-10-35 Cartoon 120 pm News 
1 20-220 Home Cookery 1 25-220 F«L 
con crest L30-420 Douney IJacaw 
5.1 91625 Biockbustere S2IF62S Chan- 
nel Reoort 72M20 TJ. Hooker 
1020 Puttng on the South 11.15 Sfac Con- 
tunes of Verse 1T.45 That's Hofly- 
wood 12.15am Untouchables 1.15 
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SCOTTISH 

Rs*de 320^20 VWuskers and J NM 
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News and Scotland Today 720 Take 
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1L35 Big Bird m China 620pavL35 
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120pm Newsl 20-220 The Baron 
S. 15-525 Gus Honeybun 520-5.45 


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600-820 Busman's Hobday 1022 - 
1120 Mapp and Lucia 12-00 Party With 
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toon 1 - 20 pm News 120 Home Cook- 
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500625 Coast to Coast 720420 TJ. 
Hooker 1020 Putimq on the South 
11.15 a* Centuries of Verse 11.46 That's 
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1025*1025 Jacksons 120pm News 
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1020 Foh) 11.00-1120 Dans 1220 
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120-220 Man m a Sudcase 320-420 

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120 pm News 515-545 Blockbusters 
620-625 North Tontoht 720 Ran- 
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1020-1120 Mapp and Uida 1220 
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CENTRAL 

land 920 GroowOhoulies 10.10- 10- 
35 Ghost of Thomas Kempa I 2 ^pm- 
1.00 Contact 120 News 120220 
Men in a Suitcase 516-545 Connections 
LOO Crossroads 625-720 News 
720420 Falcon Crest 1025CMRtf 
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1125 Jessie 1 1.10 Closedown. 


YORKSHIRE 

Groowa Gnoulies L&ONatt and Jen- 


ny 10.10-10-35 Tenahawks 1220pm- 
120 Calendar Umcbtime Live 120 
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>20*28 T J Hooker 1020-1 120 
HontcasUeJnC McCormnick 1220 
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GRANADA SfflgSo3i 

film: Satan Met a Lady 120pm Gra- 
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320-4.00 young_Dodore 515-546 
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62S Tins is Your Right 720 Cany <» 
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car 120 pm Countdown 1-45 
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420 « What It's Worth 460 Hannar 
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aa Ol 240.7200. Ore Bate* Ol 
930 6123. Flsn Wad. Eve* 
Sum. Sat Mata 420. 

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ORPHANS 


From 9 APrtl for 12 week 
Season only. 


ATOU.Q VtCTOlOA SS ttl 66 M^ 
CC 650 6262 Grp SalesWO 6ps| 
Eves 7-46 Mau n» * Sn 1£_ 

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ASTOBtA TNEATBS Box Oil 

CC * Oman 01*734 4287 
01-437 8772 

BEST MUSICAL 1985, 

The Tunes 

■LENNON 

■Ac d etitmowontwIlfeMi anHmc 
or Jorui Lennon. "THEY 
COtHJtfT HAVE BOW IT 


-a : w oNQPtruu.r_ «*« 
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H U T S SONOS - HE WOUW 
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ADAPT OH DYE 
TUe*. Wad. Thnrt al 9 mb m 6 
Sac 9 A I icm. AH aetttt £g. 


COMEDY THEATHE Boat office 
01-930 2678 Flnl CaU 244WUT 7 
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ACROSS FROM THE 
GARDEN OF ALLAH 

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Evre Mon-Fri ao sat 530 a sjo 


COTTfSLQC 928 2252 CC 
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cortuuii. Toni 7 JO. am A pro 
to la 12 FUTURISTS By Duaty 
Hashes- Tumor 7 30. 6 U WO 
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CaREHMHL 6 930 6216 QC 579 
66653796433741 9999. Croups 
i 3962. ere exxx Tim mal 
220. S al 820 A 850. 

•WTIM FAKE AT ITS BEST” 
- XX Man 
The Theatre of Comedy company 


jan mnr 


HELEN 0U 


RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

Written and ev ened by 
HAY 

Over 1200 
serfs. “SHOULD RUN FOR 
8 . Cxp Theatre r dinner /OHeihiu 
Brawde/sure or o«te £iT 2 & 


H0TLOES Ol 680,8846 BOX Of 
Bee Ol 636 8538/9 Or 01 680 
9562/3. Fird CaB 24Hr 7 Day CC 

856 ^SPSSig 0 61281 

TIME 


CUFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK STAR THE 
PORTRAYAL OF 'AKASH* BY 

LAURENCE 0UVIER 

Men-Fn 7 jo Tim Mai 2 JO Sat a 
A BJO. 


AT 7 JO 
onus WED * WK AT 7pm 

No Thun Mal uncO April ID 
LATECOMERS WRX NOT BE. 
ADMITTED UNTH. A SUITABLE 
, BREAK *J THE 

(OSRFOKMANCE. 


340 

8230 CC5T9 6066/6433. Eire 
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DManr LANE THEATRE ROYAL 

Ol 836 8108. 01-240 9066/7' 
Flee can 24 -hour 7-Aay cc M«b| 
240 7200 


4 2ND STREET 

A SHOW POR ALL THE PAMLV 
•anli 

BEST MUSICAL , 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

voted 

MUSICAL 

OUVKR AWARD 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

FLATS ft PLA TENS 
LONDON THEATRE OHnCS 
AWARD 

Evre 8.0 MON Wed 3to Stt SO A 
Croup Sales 930 612 3 

NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
JAN 1957 


DUCHESS 836 8243/ 240 9648 
Pint CaB CC 240 7200 
■24 hrs 7 drew CC 741 9999 CC 
379 6*L5 

Bob LarheyT new remedy. 

A MOfmi OF SUNDAYS 

»iJU«aTW WttTOO A 
WARMER AW) MURE 
WOMKHFUL PLACE- D.Mafl 
Starring 

GEORGE COLE ^ 

Eves B. Wed matt 3 . Sato 6 6 &30 
NOW B OOKIN G THROLKA1 TO 
SEPTEMBER 1986. 


DWOC OF YORKS 836 5122 CC 
B36 9837 -741 9999 Grp Satti 
930 6123 F Wtfa iar HT7BW 
CC 2«J 7200. Etrt 8.0. 

Tmi Mat 1 sat 5 A 8.30 

2nd YEAR OF THE 
AWARD WINNING 
COMEDY HTT 
STEPPING OUT ^ 

-TRIUMPH ON TAP- Or 9td 
HH Comedy by mefurd Hart* 
Directed by JuHaMrtfagto 
COMEDT OF THE YCAK 
Standard Oratna Award t wa 
-tAUOH YOODSCLF SOJ-T” _ 
T Out "Had the audience ycflffiS 
tor more" D Mbit -mim surely 
lUWWKMn.. CO NOW- D TO 


FORTUNE S CC 836 2238/9 741 

9999 nm on 24fr 7 day cc 

240 7206. Ew 8 trtf sal * » « 40 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Laurence Olivier Award 1984 

UP AND UNDER 

Bv John <W Mr 

“A WONDERFUL. ftU dWD T" 6 
Tliam •'SPLEfSHD- DTO 
-one of mefreoM and tees ree- 
tedtlrus etas you am ever ooina 


10 see. TSTAUiT 

. Obs “ A-JOV" £ Exp 

_ 2nd HILARIOUS YEAR 


> OI 836 4601. CC 

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. . ... 4371502 rim call 24 hr 
7 day CC 240 7200. Crt> Sato 
930 6125. £*r* 8 . Matt Wed 3. 
631 4 

Andrew Lloyd WfttwProoiii 


LEND ME A TENOR 

FENUMCLY FUNNY- FT 
-HILARIOCSLY OVER 
THE TOP-Odn 


OF THROAT PAOtS FROM 
LAUSWtC TOO MUCH- Todre 
**Aa ap-aiariiM rerfaa a« Ha Sre 
Ptome We're RrMeh - H raetly far 
eery toe fJ Times 
A Comedy liv Ken Lutfwig 
Career rd by David CUmarc. 


OR g DnWC H TWATRE OI-B58 
7786. Preview* E\p& 7.45 mal 
Sal 2 60 1 ope m April 7 ai 7 00; 


Wetterd. FeScBy - 

o-tbr In. AUUf 
Arc Ksoowrs. to-xttvelt 


HAMPSttAD 722; 9301 UMII 
Sai Eves asm. Sai Mai 4 30. 
ORFHAH9 by Lyto Kamtar. 
SOLD OUT - return may he 
Bvatuak <m re* 
femnp to to* .U* 
todlHtun Av. April 9 


tUYMMWET THEATRE ROYAL 

Box otto A re 01-930 9B3ZFUW 
CHI 24 hr 7 cav cc bkps 240 7200 

PETER O'TOOLE 

wtm 


DORA MIYAH 
MICHAEL DENISON 
MARWS SORDHI 
GEOFFREY KEEN 
DAVID HMD 

MOtKA USTEH 

PAUL ROGERS 
OBUII SHERIDAN 
DA VS WALLER 

and 

SUSAMHAH YORK 

THE APPLE CART 

By BERNARD SHAW 

Elf* 7.30 Mai Sal 230 


HER MMESTTS 930 4028 
930 6606 « Hotline 741 9999 
FttU Call 24 hour 7 day 
CC DOOUlW 240 7200 



P.T “The reredree, 

!■ Air eMW MaU an Sun. 
Ftps 7 JO Matt wed a Sai m iO 
LAST 2 WICKS 
MUSTEKB APRS. 12. 


LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373. 

. 437 2066. CC 734 8461. 

379 6433. 741 9999 FI r*t CSD 24 
Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200 
Crn Sates 930 6123 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

DMU CCT FROM BROADWAY 

GEORGE HEARN A DENIS 
QL'ILLEV 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

A LOVE STORY YOL'’LL LAUGH 
ABOUT FOR A LIFE TIME 
Previews from April 22 
nm NWrt May 7 

BOOK NOW FOR THE 
EVEJONQ OF YOUR UFE 


.... ... Ol 741 

2311. Now Previewing Eves 
7 *5 Opera Apni8al7pm. Suti 
Eves 7 45. Wed Matt Sal 
Matt 4 0. 

THE beaux 

STRATAGEM . 

LYRE STlKHOl From lO April 

ANGRY HOUSEWIVES 


LYRE TKATW Stunnhm 1 
Air Wl 01-437 3686 fT 01-434 
1050 CC 01-434 1650 01-734 
6166/7 Fir* Can 2 4 hou r 7 day 
re booktnd* 01-240 7200 
lEAN^KRRS SUN 

AUM0HT PHtUro 

SEOFFRCY AMANDA 

SUfOtnKX WAJKHO 

Md DtAKA COOPLAND In 

UMOtaLMIFS MUMCAL 


GIGI 


Ptreeird W John Dextre 
-Orrcted with tumuHous 
apptarae- Daily EXpree* 
Evot 7 JO Sail 50 A 8.15 
Wed Matt 30 
croup Sain 01-930 6123 
LAST S WEENS 


V 92B 22S2 CC 
iNauonal Theatre's prwenfum 

siarel Toni Tomor 7.46. Sat 
215ilou-pwmXfl 7 451* 
peris THE DUCHESS OT WALK 
by wenaer. Aoni 9 to to MRS 
WARREN'S PROFESSION mot 
LOVE FOR LOVE re primed D 
Irafleu ■ ■ 


MAYFABt S CC 639 3036 741 
9999. real CaB S Mir 7 day pc 
240 7200. Mon Thu 8 Frt-Sal 
5.40 A a. id 

RICHAR D TOD D .. 

one LAMER ANt tlinr ANDRE 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

The rut ihriUcr 6y Richard Harrd 
“The tire* thriller far yean" S 
Mu' "An unanattml winner- S 
Exp -A (rawer that achmes lie! 
SepsBBonM- Tiroes -The moil m- 
geiuoui mysiery » have repeared 
In 4 decade" D Mall 

6ih GR EAT YEAR 

OVER UN KRFWUWfCES 


MERMAID CC mo DOOkine feel 
01 2S6 5S68 Of 741 9999/379 
6433 cc iBLw Fee> 24 hr. 7 (tty 
240 7200. Grp 5*|rs Ol -930 6123. 
Ein B O. Fri A Sat 50 A BO. 
NTS AWARD- W IN N D 1B 
PRODUCTION 
oand Mamet s 

GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS 

dirccied hv Biu Bryden 

—IT IS BY FAR THE BEST 1NHM 
BHOWHtQM LONDON-SpecUlor 

istrono languaoe ■ may Mlendl 
Pre-Theatre Food a Dnnk 
CAR PARK next door 95p 
Other NT shows see National Th. 


KATIOMAL 7W47HZ Slh Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMPANY 

See SEPARATE OitR tES u 
OLIVIER/LYTTELTON/ 
corrasioe ExreUem c 
seats days of peris all theatres 
■men lO «■ RESTAURANT i928 
2033/ CHEAP. EASY CAR PAIL 
TOURS OP THE RUOJNNC <lnc 
Bat*suge> O. Wo 653 0880 
NT ALSO AT THE MTRMAW 


HEW LONDON Drury Lane WC2 
01^05 0072 CC 579 6433 Eves 
7 45 Tim- a Sai 3.00 A 7 4S. 

THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
fJJ. ELIOT MUSICAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO SOX OFFICE 
FOR RETURNS 

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THURSDAY APRIL 3 1986 


THE 


TIMES 


Uphill straggle: Kim Andersen, of Denmark, on his way to victory in the Pnris-Cainembert cycling race 


Canada’s 
French 
Kiss of 
death 

Don Green, chairman of the 
(’flimiiM Tne North syndi- 
cate, has called a halt to his 
group's America's Cop pro- 
gramme after they ran rat of 
foods last week. 

Green, who has donated 
S3m out of his own pocket, 
says that the syndicate, one of 
two challenging from Canada, 
needs a farther $5m to com- 
plete construction of a second 
boat and retorn to Perth for 
the challenge trials, and has 
given the team 30 days to 
garner support from corporate 
sponsors. 

The Canadian fending pro- 
gramme was not helped by the 
lack-lustre performance of the 
syndicate's first boat, True 
North at the recent 12-metre 
world championship —a prob- 
lem brightened falter by the 
resignation of the helmsman, 
Haas Fogh. 

The former Olympic gold 
medallist, who took over at the 
helm half-way through the 
world series, transforming the 
yacht's performance, left the 
team after they bad been 
beaten 7-0 by the Mark Pgjot- 
skippered French Kiss in a 
series of informal match races, 
complaining of a conflict over 
strategy between hunseif and 
his sluppe, Jeff Boyd. 

“What the boat lacks is 
speed. We need to make 
urgent changes to the hall bat 
instead of making the alter- 
ations here in Fremantle, it 
was decided to ship the boat 
bade to Nova Scotia. That 
means three valuable months 
when' we should be tuning ®p 
against other syndicates and it 
just won't work,” Fogh told me 
somewhat prophetically a few 
weeks ago. 


Another group facing delays 
is the American west coast 
syndicate repres enti ng the St 
Francis Yacht Oob headed by 
Tom BJackalier. Their new 
yacht, USA, designed by Gary 
Mall did not measure up as a 
12 metre when touched in 
February and work continues 
to rectify the design. ‘ 


cruel test 


land 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Port of Spain, Trinidad 


There beinjt no way of 
calling the scries off on" hu- 
manitarian grounds, the 
fourth Test match between 
England and West Indies, 
sponsored by Cable and Wire- 
less. starts here today. The rest 
day is not until Monday, and 
the odds must be against the 
game still being alive by then. 

The pitch at the Queen's 
Park Oval is normally at its 
best for batting at this time of 
year, and when Australia lost 
the first three tests of their Iasi 
scries against Australia, they 
then drew the fourth and won 
the fifth. But 1 am clutching at 
straws: for Australia turned 
the tables only because the 
pitches at Melbourne and 
Sydney were entirely unsuited 
to the West Indian fast 
bowlers. 

After giving his injured 
thumb a "long net yesterday 
morning. Gatling decided re- 
luctantly that it would be 
wrong for him to play. Even 
against the medium pace of 
Gooch and Slack it jarred 
painfully, and the pitch for 
today still looked menacingly 
grassy. In Gatting’s absence. 
Smith has been included in 
the England squad . in case it 
is decided to play an extra 
batsman at the expense of a 
bowler. Botham hangs on to 
his place, but not before there 
bad been some discussion as 
to whether he should. 

The West Indians, for their 
pan. show no signs of tiring of 
their supremacy, which is one 
of the reasons why. man for 
man. they are a good deal 
filter than England. Their 
determination to stay at the 
top is exemplified by Rich- 
ards. who trains as hard now 
as he ever did. None of his 
side would dare not follow his 
lead. Even at age of 34. he is 
their best all-round fielder 
with the strongest throw of 
any of them. 

By winning again and mak- 
ing it nine victories in a row 
against England. West Indies 


have a record sequence to play 
for. Thai is incentive enough, 
without Richards's ambition 
to be remembered for having 
been as successful a captain as 
Clive Lloyd There is also 
fierce competition to fill the 
fast bowling places in the West 
Indian side. To be in posses- 
sion of one of them is a sure 
way to a good life and a 
prosperous living, and 
Holding's will be vacant after 
next week's final Test match. 
Patterson knows already that 
life is tough at the top: in spite 
of having taken 1 5 wickets in 
only 70 overs in the first three 
Tests, he was left out of the 
one-day side on Monday. 

The crowd that day of 
nearly 22.000 was being seen 
in yesterday's Trinidad 
Guardian 35 having “demon- 

The squads 

WEST INDIES (from): ‘I V A Rich- 
ards. C G GreerwJge. D I Haynes, fl 
B Richardson, H A Gomes. tP J 
Duion. M D Marshall, R A Harper. M 
A Holding. J Gamer. B P Patterson, 
C A Walsh. 

ENGLAND (from): U I Gower. G A 
Gooch. R T Robinson. D M Smith. A 
J Lamb. P WlJley. I T Botham, P H 
Edmonds, J E Emburey. fP R 
Dowrrton, J G Thomas, R H Elfison. 

sinned their loyalty to the 
heroic West Indian team and 
their love of the game itself as 
much as their refusal to be 
swayed by rabble-rousers and 
people with a distorted vision 
of reality." 

For the moment, at any 
rate, the anti-apartheid dem- 
onstrators are a long way in 
arrears. But that was a one day 
game on Monday, with the 
one-day series still undecided. 
Interest in the Tests has been 
badly affected. I am afraid, by 
England's wretched form. 

A great many West Indians 
would like now' to see England 
win. or at least put up a better 
show, and it should be some 
encouragement that when we 
were here five years ago. 
Willey, Gooch and Gower all 


made hundreds in the last two 
Tests after England had lost 
the first two. What had not hit 
that side though, despite their 
evacuation from Guyana and 
Ken Barrington’s death, was 
the sense of submission that is 
lurking now. England's field- 
ing practice yesterday, with 
the catches being hit by Willis, 
would hardly have done for a 
village side, and certainly not 
for a prep school. 

If England do fail again, 
without making a fight of it, 
some heads will have to roll, 
one of which could be 
Botham's. In the series so far 
he has taken four wickets at S3 
runs apiece and averaged 13 
with the bat, and he goes into 
today's match, as he did the 
third’ Test, with his lifestyle 
being questioned, this time by 
his manager, or agent, or 
whatever he is. a ludicrous- 
looking figure whose arrival is 
imminenL 

Drugs are at the bottom of it 
again, which reminds me of a 
dig which Gower had at the 
pitch for today. Picking a leaf 
of one of several weeds show- 
ing in it yesterday, he asked 
me whether 1 thought i! was 
being grown for smoking. 
Morale may be pretty low, but 
they have not altogether lost 
their sense of humour. 

Tomlins signs 

Gloucestershire, who fin- 
ished third in last season's 
county championship, have 
signed the former Middlesex 
batsman Keith Tomlins, aged 
28. on a two-year contract 

Jarvis fit 

Paul Jarvis, Yorkshire's 
most successful bowler last 
summer, who had to return 
early from his winter contract 
in South Africa because of 
back trouble, reported fully fit 
when the club’s players re- 
sumed training for the new 
season at Headingley. 


• \ 


> 


GOLF: CONCENTRATION THE KEY TO WINNING A PLACE AT THE MASTERS 



for encouragement 


From Mitchell Platts, Greensboro, North Carolina 


The dogwoods arc bloom- 
ing at Forest Oaks, where the 
greater Greensboro Open 
stans today, as they are at 
Augusta, scene of the US 
Masters next week, bui trying 
to draw another similarity 
between the two events is like 
seeking a comparison between 
the university match and 
Henley. 

For the Greater Greensboro 
Open is an excuse for specta- 
tors to enjoy a monumental 
binge whereas the US Masters, 
of course, unfolds amidst a 


lavish tea-party atmosphere 
with the green-blazered mem- 
bers politely applauding the 
deeds of men like Jack 
NickJaus and Tom Watson. 

Nicklaus and Watson have 
long since decided that early 
practice at Augusta is prefera- 
ble to competing at Forest 
Oaks. It is hardly surprising as 
the Greater Greensboro Open 
is mostly referred to as the 
“Beer Can Open” with specta- 
tors competing with each oth- 
er to drink more Budweisers 
and Michclobs. 


Multiple Sclerosis is merciless. 

It's a Ji'jcjse that can strike anybody, anytime. 

And there's n« > cure. 

Yet. 

Every penny y* ai contribute to the Multiple 
5cler«:>sis n -eiety brings the cure that much closer. 

It ,i!m» brings -omc enmlort to the many 
thousands who suffer the misery of impaired speech, 
li iss i »f eyesight. inu»nti nonce and paralysis. 

The much publicised events uf the past twelve 
m« 'lulls have demonstrated just h> iw generous 
people can lx* w hen they believe in a cause. 

i »ur cause is very imp* 'riant. 

Plcu.se give os much as you can. 

Because the « 0 "ncr we find the answer the 
si * »ner we can ensure that the lives of those nearest to 
y iu are n< it t< >rn apart. 

If charity begins at 
home, imagine yours being 
torn apart 



L T., Th-.-Muhipk VIcTip.r- > , N 1 * F(irr»>N : 5 Mltr R. *,1. I <J\| * >N 11"'. j 
Ti.'fcpIHim.til T't.lO ■* ClpiJUnf-V. I 


MULTIPLE 
SCLEROSIS | 
We can find the cure only 
□ if we find the funds. | , 

hi* F(i-cf“ .'’MlirBi'JitlONI* >N .•Wft I 


Nick Faldo, however, does 
not have an invitation to the 
annual gathering of the elite 
down in Augusta. Georgia, so 
he is here to try and earn the 
last remaining Masters place 
which is reserved for the 
winner. 

For Faldo to succeed in this 
bier keller environment is 
asking a lot even though he 
has played well here in the 
past True, he was third in 
New Orleans two weeks ago. 
but his form in general over 
the last two years has lacked 
sparkle. 

With so much at stake it 
would hardly seem the opti- 
mum lime for Faldo's concen- 
tration to be examined, as the 
very merry fans rock in the 
aisles, but in some respects it 
might be exactly what he 
needs. 

“I like the course, it's more 
British than most in the 
States, but 1 wouldn't mind if 
it blew a little harder and 


rained," said Faldo. "I know 
what I have to do this week 
but if I don't make Augusta 
then I'm not going to let it get 
me down. 

“I've been working on the 
new swing now for 10 months 
and I’m convinced I’m getting 
there. My next step is to 
decide-what to do this year. If I 
don't win here and get into 
Augusta, then I'll go home for 
one week. My plan is to come 
back for three more tourna- 
ments, then make a decision 
on whether to play more here 
or in Europe." 

Faldo knows he must turn 
his career round now that 
Sandy Lyle has earned the 
lion's share of the ’fat' offers 
which come the way of British 
players. 

Lyle, perhaps, might have 
been better employed this 
week joining Ballesteros. 
NickJaus and Watson practis- 
ing at Augusta. 


EQUESTRIANISM 


Leng and the winding road 


The run-up to next month’s 
world three-day event cham- 
pionships is. in the words of 
Henrietta Knight, the. chair- 
man of the selectors, “the 
most difficult one ever" be- 
cause of Australia's stringent 
quarantine restrictions. 

But Virginia Leng, the 
reigning European three-day 
event champion, and three 
others of the seven bound for 
Australia have an additional 
worry. They are all competing 
at Badminton on a second 
horse in a fortnight's time, just 
five days before flying out to 
Australia. In Mrs Leng's case 
the second horse is the bril- 
liant Night Cap who finished 
third at Badminton last year. 

Mrs Leng has driven more 
than 1.000 mites in the 10 days 
since her world championship 
horse. Priceless, went into 
quarantine at Wylye, Wilt- 
shire. Night Cap is still based 
at her home in Gloucester- 
shire along with four other 
horses which need daily 


By Jenny MacArthnr 

schooling, so Mrs Leng is 
making the one and a quarter 
hour journey between home 
and Wylye, where the other 
riders are based, several limes 
a day. 

Night Cap has a final pre- 
Badminton outing at 
Brockenhurst this weekend, 
but Mrs Leng said yesterday 
that she was concerned that 
Priceless had taken part in 
only one event, Aldon, since 
winning the European cham- 
pionships last September. The 
length of quarantine for Aus- 
tralia (four weeks in Britain 
then two more on Torrens 
Island off Australia) and the 
cancellation ofCrookham, the 
first horse trials of the season, 
had severely curtailed her 
preparations. 

The other three riders pre- 
paring horses for Badminton 
— Ian Stark (Glenbumie and 
Sir Wattie), Lorna Clarke 
(Glentrool) and Anne-Marie 
Taylor (Jimney Cricket) — 
have their horses bated near 


Wylye so life for them has 
been a little less frenetic. 

Andy Griffiths, a London 
insurance broker, and the only 
one of the seven riders with a 
job outside horses, has been 
driving the 200 miles to work 
from Wylye every day to 
oversee his newly formed 
company, Petprotect Grif- 
fiths, who like Miss Taylor 
and Mandy Orchard is com- 
peting in his first champion- 
ships, will ride Hullabaloo in 
Australia, a nine-year-old who 
like Miss Orchard’s Venture 
Busby has had just one outing, 
a novice event Iasi month, 
since last year's European 
championships. 

Most of the riders, including 
Clarissa Strachan who is com- 
peting in her fifth official 
championships, are likely to 
take up the option of compet- 
ing in an event in Australia 
which takes place two days 
after quarantine ends. The 
horses will be flown out on 
April 20; 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


The light 
brigade 

England could wear an un- 
familiar sky blue strip in the 
World Cup finals in Mexico. 
The red change shirts worn by 
Bobby Moore and company 
when they won the Jules 
Rimet trophy in 1966 are 
considered too dark for the 
heat of Mexico. 

The blue shirt and shorts 
have been officially registered 
as England's second colours 
because they will keep players 
cooler in temperatures which 
are expected to exceed 90 
degrees Fahrenheit The kit 
manufacturers. Umbro. will 
use the synthetic material they 
experimented with last 
summer. 

Rule waived 

The International Skating 
Federation has waived the 
rule barring amateurs and 
professionals competing to- 
gether to allow the sport's top 
stars to help raise funds for 
Sports Aid. a joint venture 
between Bob Geldofs 'Band 
Aid' and UNICEF. 

Grand entry 

Riders from eight countries 
will be among the 60 entries in 
Lhe 3 1 si Wincanton Wheels 
international cycling grand 
prix at Beaconsfield" on 
Sunday. 



Brnndle: new car 

Car unveiled 

Britain's Martin Brundlc, 
will have a new car for the 
remainder of this year's For- 
mula One world champion- 
ship. Brundle and his French 
team-mate Philippe StriefT 
were at yesterday's Silverstone 
unveiling of the Data General 
Tyrrell Renault 015, which 
can reach a speed of 200mph 
and will be used for the first 
time in lhe Spanish Grand 
Prix at Jerez on April 13. 

Heavily backed 

Ireland's three-man golf team, 
led by a slimmer Christy 
O'Connor junior, start as clear 
favourites in the DunhiJI Cup 
qualifying tournament at Nimcs. 
France, today . O'Connor teed oft 
two stones lighter following a 
diet, “Hungry gofers make the 
best ones." he quipped. 


Don bows out 

Adelaide — Sir Donald 
Bradman. Australia's most 
famous cricketer, announced 
yesterday that he was severing 
his last official lies whh the 
game he has dominated as a 
player and administrator for 
the past 59 years. “The Don", 
aged 77. will retire at the end 
of June from his positions as 
trustee of the South Australian 
Cricket Association and mem- 
ber of its ground and finance 
committee. 

Rugby debate 

Two important submissions 
were being considered last night 
by the Rugby League manage- 
ment committee. A London- 
based consortium put forward 
proposals for the purchase of 
Fulham which would allow the 
second division club to continue 
ns fixtures this season. The 
move for a super league was also 
being discussed. 

England shine 

England's Under- 1 8 and Un- 
der- 16 teams struggled against 
Wales, then found their their 
touch against Scotland in the 
home countries’ schoolboys’ 
football tournament "at 
Coventry 

Masters final 

Gateshead will stage the final 
of the British Masters basketball 
tournament next Wednesday 


BADMINTON 


Clark is about to face 
her moment of truth 

From Richard Eaton, Uppsala, Sweden 


Gillian Clark, aiming to win 
the European doubles title 
with a different partner for the 
third successive year, knows 
her playing future may hinge 
on whai happens here over the 
next three days. 

Clark, aged 24, partnered by 
Gillian Gowers, opened the 
defence of her tide with an 
emphatic 15-2. 15-4 victory 
over Ireland's Elaine Doyle 
and Iceland's Kristin 
Knsijiansdottir But far more 
important than the results, or 
perhaps even retaining the 
title, will be lhe condition of 
the champion's knee at the 
end of the week 

The knee is now elaborately 
swathed in bandages after 
Clark’s third bad injury in 
three years The trouble first 
occurred in the English Masr 
ters tournament in 1983 re- 
lumed next yeann the l Tier 
Cup m Kuala Lumpur and 
recurred again in Taiwan in 
January 

Clark has now restricted the 
movemeni she ongmallv used 
to perform round-the-head 
shots — which caused the 
original accident — and is 
having to make a number of 
other adjustments in order to 
survive “In the last two 
months I have also had to 
alter the wav I lunge lor the 
shuttle “ she said “And I have 


to do all sorts of work and 
preparations before I can even 
begin the training other play- 
era take for granted.". 

She has been encouraged by 
a promise from Jake Downey, 
the England managor, that it 
she is movrhg satisfactorily 
-she will be included in the 
Uber Cup squad which leaves 
for Jakarta on April 16. It will 
be a great tribute to her if she 
makes the trip. 

Clark was not, however, 
risked in the side for the 
European team final against 
old rivals Denmark last night , 

Downey preferred Karen ■ 
Beckman and Sara Halsall 
but the other European dou- 
bles champion Martin Dew 
was included He arrived from 
C openhagen on Tuesday night 
and, partnered by Dipak Tai- 
lor opened in the individual 
event with a 15-1 15-2 win 
against the Hungarians. C sate 
Kiss and Gabor Petrov its 

Later the pair learned thev 
were on course for a contest 
with Jesper Helledie and Steen 
Rad berg, the former woria 
champions that is ItkeN to 
have a crucial bearing ot. 
whether E ngland can hang on 
to their title against Denmark 
in what would be the seventh 
meeting between the two ui 
eight finals 


Here in . Britain, the recent 
trial of strengt h competition to 
find a namber of Frank Bruno 
leokafikes to toT over -the 
powerful coffee grinder watch- 
es on. the two British 12- 
raetres, has led to two new 
crew members flying out to 
Perth to j’oin Harold 
Cudmore's squad. 

Sean Campbell, aged 30, 
from Arnold, Nottingham- 
shire, is a 6ft 3in 15% stones 
rower and is joined on the ? 
flight next week by Paul 
Rusheat, from Maidenhead, a 
23-year old, 6ft 2in rowing and 
rugby enthusiast, weighing 
more than 17 stones. 

Mark Higgins, the 6ft 9m 
power lifter and discos throw- 
er from Birmingham who tops 
the scales at 21 Mi stones and 
dwarfed all 2ft of the original 
contestants In both strength 
and stature, plans to join the 
team in June in time to work 
np on die second 12 metre, a 
79-ft David Holloa design 
now nearing completion at 
Hainble. 

Cadmore, who is doe to take 
the crew out for a first test sail 
on Crusader — the first of /j i 
Britain's two 12-metres — on 
Saturday said in Fremantle 
that he was confident that the 
indnsion of non-sailors in the 
team would pose no significant 
problems. This, however, was 
not the case with a similar 
experiment carried out recent- 
ly by the New Zealand syndi- 
cate. Their efforts -to sorer 
their country for musde-bonnd 
powerhouses came to nought 
when it was found all of them 
suffered from seasickness. 


Last week's -series of short 
races off Fremantle between 
the challengers for Anstralia's 
defence proved a success for 
Kevin Parry's Task Force 
syndicate. Kookaburra II, with 
Britain's Lawrie Smith acting 
as guest helmsman, scored 14 
wins against 12 gained by 
Alan Bond's world champion- 
ship w inning Australia HL 
Australia EL, the yacht that 
won the America's Cop is 
1983 won 10 of the races and 
South Australia gained eight 
victories. ; 

News this week that work 
has started on a fourth 12- 
raetre for Dennis Connor's 
Safi America syndicate set off 
a spate of announcements 
from elsewhere in the world. 

The New Zealanders have set 
a launch date of Jane 26 for 
their third boat, rhe American 
Eagle syndicate who launch 
their first boat on Saturday 
plan to build another \ alentijn 
design immediately and the 
Alan Bond and Kevin Parry 
Austafian syndicates are vying „ 
for tank-testing time at the w 
ship model basin m Ike 
Netherlands' to test the final 
lines for Australia I\ and 
Kookabmra 111 - 

Barry PickthaU