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I 


THE 



No 62.425 


TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


TIMES 




9,500 places SS 

to be axed at 


^ „ .. ... 


polytechnics 


Polytechnic directors were Grants Committee’s decL m 
horrified yesterday when they to cut numbers to maintain 
saw details of proposed cuts in quality, 
student numbers, which will The advisory body claims 
lead to the closure of courses that there is a shortfall in 
nnd whole departments, be- government funding for poly- 
ginning in the academic year technics and universities in 
1987-88. 1987-88 of £23 million be- 

Thc proposed cuts in poly- cause of a failure to provide 
technics and colleges mean for inflation, and that is why 


■find whole departments, be- 
ginning in the academic year 
1987-88. 


By Lucy Hodges. Education Correspondent 

were Grants Committee’s decL >n The proposed cuts will be 
i they to cut numbers to maintain fought vigorously. Sunderland 
utsin quality. Polytechnic is angry to be 

i will The advisoiy body claims losing its civil engineering 
lurses that there is a shortfall in department which has 150 
>. be- eovemmem funding for DQlv- students. “This is a nonsense 


that 9.500 fewer students will 
win a place to study next year, 
which is a 7 per cent drop in 
student numbers. This will 
enable a saving of 3 percent to 
be made in spending. 

The axe is falling on the fine 


the cuts are needed. 

Engineering, science and 
business studies are to lose 
between 5 and 6 per cent of 
student places, and the hu- 
manities and social sciences 
will decline by 17 per cent The 


art department at Leeds Poly- only subjects to be spared are 


technic, where both Henry 
Moore and Barbara Hepwortb 
learnt their skills, as well as 
science and engineering. The 
civil engineering department 
at Sunderland Polytechnic is 
recommended for closure. 

The cuts result from a 
decision taken by the commit- 
tee of the National Advisory 
Body, which oversees spend- 
ing in the public sector of 
higher education, to trim stu- 
dent numbers to maintain 
standards. Until now the body 
has allowed more and more 
students to study for public 
sector degrees without any 
extra funding from the 
Government. 

It has thereby mopped up a 
lot of students who were 
foiling to get into university 
because of the University 


Tomorrow 


Albert’s 

bridge 



The story of two 
orphans and a 
Chicago con-man 
that tempted Albert 
Finnev back to the 
West End 

Fulham and 
after 

How the voters see 
the parties: a 
major Times survey 



expansion 


Diary 
Features 
bit Report 


16 t niimilin 
13-16 Weather 
24 Wilts 


teacher training ai 
agriculture. 

^ c *-. 


if V? 


decision,” Mr Peter Hart, its 
director, said. 

Leeds is destined to lose fine 
art. and expects also to have to- 
shut its town planning depart- 
ment. Mr Oirisloper Price, 
the former Labour MP and 
director of Leeds Polytechnic., 
said: “We will be talking to 
our local authority and local 
MPs and putting the greatest 
possible pressure on the Na- 
tional Advisory Body to 
rethink.” 

At Teesside Polytechnic, the 
design department, containing 
courses in industrial and inte- 
rior design, is proposed for' 
closure. “We are dumbfound- 


Frora David Bernstein 
Jerusalem 

Israel’s Labour Prime Min- 
ister, Mr Shimon Peres, decid- 
ed yesterday to dismiss the 
Likud Finance Minister, Mr 
Yitzhak Modai, placing Israel 
in the throes of one of its most 
serious crises since the forma- 
tion of the National Unity 
Government 18 months ago. 

Mr Modai had publidy 
critized Mr Peres and his 
economic policies in two news- 
paper mterriews last weekend. 

If Mr Peres does go ahead 
and dismiss Mr Modal, it will 
almo st certainly bring down 
the Government. The Likud 
leader, Mr Yitzhak Shamir, 
made it plain yesterday that 
any attempt by Mr Peres 
nallaterally to dismiss Mr 
Modai would be in open 
violation of the coalition 
agreement between their two 
parties. 

He made it equally plain 
that Likud had no intention of 
acquiescing in any snefa move. 

Moves were under way late 
yesterday to seek some sort of 
compromise that would leave 


ed by the apparent absence of. 
any logic in this.” Dr Michael, 

Longneld, its director, said. rnrt y. France Munster. A 


Newcastle upon Tyne Poly- 
technic was told it would lose 
its combined English and 
histoiy degree as well as its 
MA in the history of ideas, 
unique in the public sector. 

The advisory body commit- 
tee will make decisions in the 
autumn, and the Secretary of 
State for Education and Sci- 
ence will deliberate at the end 
of the year. 

Merger spraned, page 20 


i t -n. f ; V unique m uic puonc secior. 

) [ ' The advisory body commit- 

V-' V tee will make derisions in the 

— .. x autumn, and the Secretary of 

Kir\ -j. S7' ; r . State for Education and Sri- 

^050* ence will deliberate at the end 

fi.'iVu oflhe >' ear - 

itfiUva j, 1 -v \ l Merger spraned, page 20 


Policeman shot 
by IRA gunmen 

By Richard Ford 

An off-duty Ulster police- As Unionist politicians! 
man was shot and seriously clashed over attitudes towards' 


wounded in Londonderry by 
-the - • Provisional - IRA 
yesterday. 

The policeman was shot in 
the legs and neck by gunmen 


the intimidation, the Appren-; 
lice Boys outlined plans- for- 
another march in Portadown 
Although the organizers de- 
nied that the march, planned 


who ambushed his car as it for the spring bank holiday 
drove on the lower deck of the Monday, was “provocative" 
Ciaigavon Bridge in the city, or an^ exercise in “coat 
Last night his condition was trailing”, the authorities see it 


not as Finance Minister. A 
scheduled Cabinet meeting to 
discuss the crisis last night 
was postponed until Sunday 

The crisis erupted suddenly 
late on Sunday, after Mr Peres 
rejected Mr Modal's clarifica- 
tions of the remarks he had 
made in the two controversial 
interviews and called a late 
night meeting of his fellow 
Labour ministers to discuss 
the matter. 

Yesterday morning, be in- 
formed Mr Shamir that he 
intended dismissing Mr 
Modai who, in the interview, 
had challenged Mr Peres’s 
understanding of economics 
and had particularly incensed 
him by critizing his latest trip 
to the United States last week. 

There has been considerable 
tension between the two men 
recently, with Mr Modai open- 
ly critizing the rescue package 
for the Labour-controlled 
Hrstadrafs Knpat Hotim 
haalth-fhnd and Sole! Boaeh 
construction company which 
Mr Peres posted through tie 
Cabinet . 

Hie latest crisis recalls a 
sfanDar one last November, 

Continued on page 20, col 7 



Sinclair forced 
to sell patents 
to pay debts 

By Bill Johnstone, Technology Correspondent 


Sir Give Sinclair, who cre- 
ated the British home comput- 
er market and has supplied 
five million computers world- 
wide, has been forced to sell 
his design patents to pay debts 
and keep his company 
healthy. 

Amstrad the British hi-fi 
and electronics company yes- 
terday paid Sir Clive £5 mil- 


the Sinclair QL. which was 
launched nearly two years ago, 
is. likely to be discontinued 
after supplies are exhausted. 
Hie manufacture of ibe ma- 
chine has already ceased. 

Sir Clive Sinclair has denied 
that the Ainstrad deal was a 
rescue bid, although he was 
under pressure from his credi- 
tors to repay the remainder of 


lion for the exclusive right to , a £is million debt, about 
manufacture and sell his com- £7 million accumulated last 


Labour leader Neil Kinnock wears a Muslim cap, the topi, 
when v isiting the Bunnani Centre mosque in Fu lh a m , 
yesterday. Election report page 2 

Stronger sterling 
brings lower 
loan rates closer 

By Richard Thomson 

The prospect of a drop in for Distillers is due to end next 
interest rates within the next . week. Dealers said this was 
few weeks grew yesterday as a taking some of the froth out of 


rise in the price of oil helped 
sterling to strengthen against 
other leading currencies on 
world markets. 

City experts are predicting a 
cut of 0.5 per cent in bank base 
rates — 1 1.5 per cent in most 
cases naw^-Jh&5pring.or.fay. 
early summer fat the . latest, 
followed byTurther half-point 
reductions in due course. 


putexs throughout the world. 
The money is to be paid to 
creditors, who are owed about 
£7 million. 

Sir Give will still retain 
control of his company. Sin- 
clair Research, which designs 
the computers.. The deal 
marks the end of a year of 
unprecedented success by 
Amstrad. and one of financial 
stress for Sir Clive. 

Amstrad’s profits rose by 
122 per "cent to £20 million by 
June last year and appear set 
to grow even greater by the 
success of a word processor 
launchedin Britain last 
October. 

Sinclair Research, however, 
in spite of having 40 per cent 
of the British home computer 
market, accumlaleda £1 5 mil- 
lion . debt owed largely to 
Tbora-Emi, Timex and-AB 
Electronics, which make its 
productsand Barclays and 
Citicorp bank& 

Mr Alan Sugar, aged 39, 
chairman and founder of 
Amstrad. said Sinclair com- 
puters would still be made in 
Britain, although he empha- 
sized that British manufattur- 
; ers would have to remain 
* competive. Although Amstrad 
has a factory in Essex employ- 
ing about 300 people, many of 
its video recorders and com- 
puters are made in South 
Korea. Its hi-fi products are 
made largely in Essex! 

• The first computer to be 


year.-The deal will result in a 
number of redundancies 
among Sinclair Research's 100 
staff. 

■ Sir Give said the Ainstrad 
deal was one option available, 
and was one of a number of 
measures designed to reorga- 
nize his company. A new deal 
is to be struck with an 
undisclosed investor interest- 
ed in the telecommunications 
part of Sinclair Research. 
Another involves Sinclair’s 
ambitions in advanced 
microchip design, a project to 
be funded by Barclays Bank. 

Amstrad. however, bas not 
paid for the computers which 
Sinclair's manufacturers hold 
in stock. In the next few weeks 
it will need to negotiate a price 
for this stock and contracts for 
future manufacture. 

ft is Ihe third attempt in a 
year by Sir Give to beep his 
computer company healthy. 

Mr Robert Maxwell, the 
publisher, withdrew his June 
offer of. a £12 million rescue 
bid after advice from financial 
experts. A deal was struck 
shortly afterwards with Dix- 
ons to supply computers and 
fiat screen televisions, valued 
at £10 million. It was to give 
the ailing computer company 
much needed cash to pay 
creditors. 

The computer company ne- 
gotiated an extension of its 
credit last August and meth- 


thp «nck market and could: the nrst computer to De creau lasi August anu raciu- 

period of consolida- launched by the new partner- -ods of ikying ite debth 


cion in share prices j 

Sterling rose strongly j 
against the US dollar, putting 
on around half a cent from an 
opening ofll.449Q. before felt 
i»g 

the wake, of Sunday Vreafign- 
mem jo-Ae^Enropean Mono- 


ship is expected to be before 
Christmas for about £ 1 39. But 


before march of this year. 

End of an era, page 2 


auctions in. aue course. • jgjy gs^gxn. the pound was 

Despite that optimism the also strong>against the Westi 
sharp rise in share prices 00 German mark, rising by two' 
the Stock Exchange over lfie pfennigs to 3.4862, and 
last few weeks went into against ihe French franc, clos-i 
reverse yesterday with a fell of ing up from 10.9618 at 
20 points on the FT-30 share L LI 144. - 
index, which closed at 1,400.9. The pound’s strength was 
Dealers attributed the fell to helped by a_strike on Norwe- 
investors selling at a profit as gian North Sea oil fields, 
the new tax year got under which contributed to a boost 
way, and to the approaching 0 f$2 a barrel in the price of oil 
.end to the two largest takeover to above S 14. 
battles now befog fought out Sterling interest rates in the 
in the market. money markets reacted to the 

. The £2.8 billion bid for news of the currency's 
Imperial Group by United strength by weakening signifr- 




described 

stable. 


as an attempt to fuel still 
further tension in the Co 


The attack came in the wake Armagh town and within the 
of the seventh night of loyalist loyalist community after riot- 
intimidatory attacks on police i°8 when a similar march was 
homes and underlined the banned on Easter Monday. 


Royal Ulster Constabulary’s 
position in the middle of the 
community and under attack 
from both sides. 


Yesterday Sir John Her- 
mon. chief constable of the 
RUC. displayed weapons 
seized within the past few 


A total of 121 acts of days, defended his decision to 
intimidation against the po- recommend a ban of the 


lice have occurred since 
March 3. forcing 14 RUC 
officers to leave their homes. 
Following this continued 


parade ana justified me 
RUCs use of plastic bullets. 

Sir John accused para-mili- 
tary mafia-style organizations. 


violence, the unity among of living very well financially 
Northern Ireland's Unionist and otherwise, cloaking their 


panics frayed publicly yesier- 
da\ . 


criminality -with some sup- 
posed loyalty. 


1 There is £4.000 to be won in 
today's Times Portfolio daily 
competition as there was no 
winner yesterday. Portfolio 
list, page 29; how to play, 
information service, page 20. 

Portfolio Gold 

Portfolio is being relaunched 
next Monday. New Gold Port- 
folio cards are being distribut- 
ed through newsagents this 
week. Details of ihe new game 1 
will appear in The Times later 
this week. 

Killer trapped 

Police disguised as waiters at a 
Goa restaurant recaptured 
Charles Sobhraj, the killer 
who escaped on March 16 
from a Delhi jail after his 
guards were drugged Page 13 

Cancer drug 

Medical researchers involved 
in developing a new drug 
approved for use against ovar- 
ian cancer and small-cdl tu- 
mours of the lung gathered in 
London yesterday to mark the 
launch of the drug Page 3 


Britain's venture capital in- 
dustry is by fer the biggest in 
Europe. A Special Report 
explains how small businesses 
can raise finance for 


Scorn for Pretoria 
fingerprint plan 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 

A reported plan by the himself when he opened par- 
South African Government to liament in January to the 
fingerprint the entire popula- abolition of the pass book 
tion as part of a scheme for system 
standardizing identity docu- The new system of uniform 
ments has drawn criticism identity documents is said bv 
from all points on the political the Government to be a 
compass. ..... necessary part of this reform. 
Critics ray it will be absurd- Removing a discriminatory 



mg UP 

LUI44. 


German mark, rising by two' 
pfennigs to 3.4862, and 

?S m fJ hC S nCh lo'^8 C ' 0 - S - aSTa* Hwan 


Korea arrived for .a four-day 
visit to Britain, the first by a 


The pound’s strength wait 3 5 

helped by a_strike on Norwe- ***** 

cwth s*m nil fiMHc diplomatic relations. _ _ _ 


gian North Sea oil fields, 
which contributed to a boost 
of $2 a barrel in the price of oil 
to above $ 14. 

Sterling interest rates in the 
money markets reacted to the 


imperial Group by united 
Biscuits closes finally on Fri- 
day, and the struggle between 
Guinness and Argyll Group 


cantly, indicating a desire for 
for lower bank base rates. • 
Details, page 21 


US ‘not price dictator’ 


Shortly before he left Seoul 
he told The Times be hoped for 
a summ i t with President Kim 
H Sung of North Korea before 
the end of this year. He said be 
woald seek Britain's support 
for such a meeting. 

The President, accompanied 
by a delegation of 37 minis- 
ters, officials and industrial- 
ists, will disenss trade and the 
transfer of high technology to 
South Korea daring his stay in 


Britain. He is morions to 
reduce his country's depen- 
dence on dte United States and 
Japan. - 

He wfll have lunch with the 
Queen, hold talks with Mrs 
Margaret Thatcher and attend 
a dinner in his honour at 10 
Downing Street 

Although trade wflL top the 
agenda in his talks with Mrs 
Thatcher, the Prime Minister 
is expected to rage him to take 
farther steps towards granting 
full democratic rights in South 
Korea. 

President Chun, who is 
trying to introduce a cautious 
programme of political liberal- 

Coatinued on page 20, col 3 


Dhahran, Saudi Arabia 
(UPI) — Vice-President 
George Bush ended a visit to 
Saudi Arabia yesterday with a 
declaration that the United 
States wifi not dictate to Saudi 
Arabia or other countries what 
the price of oil should be. 

Mr Bush said be fonnd no 
real common ground during 
talks with King Fahd and 
senior Saudi officials for re* 
storing stability to a world 
market thrown into chaos by a 
plunge in prices caused in part 
by Saudi overproduction. 


“Certainly there wasn't any 
common solution found.” be 
said before leaving for Mana- 
ma, Bahrain, his third stop on 
a four-nation tour of the j 
Arabian peninsula. 

Mr Bush said it was 
“difficult” to blame the drop 
on increased Saudi produc- 
tion, but acknowledged dial 
the Saudis, as the world's 
largest producers, had a major 
role in influencing prices. 
However, it was not for the 
US to dictate oil prices to 
other countries. 


Greenpeace five inside A-test site 


ly expensive, as well as an. practice by the device of 
unnecessary invasion of the extending it to everyone is a 
individual citizen s privacy. familiar Pretoria tactic. 

At present, only blacks are “AH the Government 
fingerprinted when they are should be doing is replacing 
issued with the pass book they the (black) pass book with the 
are compelled to carry at all same identity document as is 
times and to produce when presently carried by whites.” 
asked to do so by a policeman, said Mrs Helen Suzman, the 
The pass book also contains spokesman on law and order 
details of every black's status for the liberal Progressive 
under the so-called “influx Federal Party (PFP). 
control” system, which pro- Draft legislation setting out 
hibiis any black without a the “orderly urbanization” 
special permit from being in a measures the Government in- 
prescribed white area for more lends to introduce to replace 
than 72 hours. the pass laws is exported to be 

President Botha committed tabled in the next few weeks. 


From Christopher Thomas 
Washington 

Five members of Green- 
peace are hiding in the forbid- 
den desert terrain of the 
Nevada nuclear test site in a 
symbolic, and certainly futile, 
attempt to stop the next US 
underground nuclear test 
The Department of Energy 


today, as widely expected, it by day in the nigged moun- 
insisted that the nuclear test- tainons terrain. They are car- 
ing programme would go tying protective clothing and 
ahead on schedule. respirators. Seven members 

-n,_ entered restricted areas on 

Thursday night and two have 


significant since it is expected 
to signal the end of the Soviet 
Union's eight-month morato- 
rium on nuclear testing. 


since left with video film. 

' Mr David Miller, director of 
public affairs for the Nevada- 


Green peace, which has set up operations, base, said: “We 


could barely conceal its con- a temporary headquarters in a P 31 ™** 


tempi for the protest yester- 
day. saying it would have “as 
much substance as the hot air 
balloon they tried to fly over 
the test she a few years ago”. 

Without confirming that the 
blast would be conducted 


botel, said its aim 
: President Reagan 


and all sensitive areas are well 
protected by armed guards 


to cancel the test so that foe ^ electronic sensors. 


superpowers could negotiate a 
permanent end lo future tests. 

The Greenpeace team are 
walking by night and biding 


“If they were to approach 
any of those areas they would 
be readily detected and 
arrested.” 


Hospital faults total £13m 


Pages 25-28 


Home News 2-S Leaders 17 
Oierscis 6-13 Letters 17 
\ppts 18 Obiraan 18 

\rtv 19 Parliament 70 

Births, deaths Male Room 18 
marriages 18 Science 18 
Business 21-29 Snow Reports 20 
Chess 5 Sport 37-40 


Court 18 Theatres, etc 39 

Crosswords 13.20 TV & Radio 39 


By Anthony Bevins, 
Political Correspondent 

The cost of repairing build- 
ing faults in foe new £4.28 
million cardiac block for Great 
Ormond Street Hospital for 
Sick Children, London, has 
risen to £13.24 million — with 
more than £3 million still to be 
spent during foe next 32 
months. 

The 56-bed block should 
have been completed in De- 
cember 1979 at an estimated 
cost of £3 million. 

It was eventually banded 
Over to the health authority in 
June 1980. but was taken out 
of service shortly afterwards 
when a concrete walkway col- 


lapsed and crashed to the 
ground. 

Consultant engineers re- 
ported a number of serious 
design and structural faults 
and recommended that about 
300 new piles were needed to 
strengthen foe nine-storey 
building. 

The original estimate for 
repairs was pot at £9,765,000, 
and work began in 1983. The 
latest estimate has been pro- 
vided to the Treasury by foe 
Department of Health and 
Social Security; £10.074,000 


further £84,000 has been set 
aside for “future years”. 

Writs were issued against 
13 plaintiffs, including 
Gnsdiit, Burden and Howitt, 
architects, ft T James and 
Partners, consulting engi- 
neers, and McLaughlin and 
Harvey Ltd, the main contrac- 
tors for the block, on 29 
March 1983 and foe action 
bas been set down fra bearing 
in foe High Court in October. 

The governors of foe hospi- 
tal were first authorised to go 
ahead with the project in 1972, 
when it was accepted that foe 


Carr faces a dilemma 
over Gooch dispute 

Mr Donald Carr, the secre- visit, that he does not regret 
lary of the Test and County ihe circumstances in which he 
Cricket Board, spent yesterday went to South Africa, and that 
morning with Mr Tony although he has no intention' 
Brown, the manager of foe of “seeking any similar oppor- 
England team, in Port of tunity to play cricket in South 
Spain, Trinidad, discussing Africa”, he will not undertake 


had been spent up to the end of need fra the block was vital 
last month. It is estimated that and mgent The target comple- 


£3.082.000 wfll be spent in the 
current financial year, and a 


tion date is thought to lave 
slipped beyond next August. 


Graham Gooch's reluctance 
to go to Antigua tomorrow. 

The England opening bats- 
men has said there are three 
points he wants to make to put 
the record straight over re- 
marks made by Mr Lester 
Bird, the Antiguan Foreign 
Minister, concerning Gooch's 
visit to South Africa fa 1982; 
that Mr Bird did not force an 
apology out of him for his 


never to go there again. 

If he is refused permission. 
Gooch has said he will not 
travel lb Antigua for this 
week's fifth Test match 
It is reported that Ian 
Botham is contemplating su- 
ing over sex and drugs allega- 
tions which have been made 
against him in various nation- 
al newspapere. 

Report, page 40 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


Troops face call-up as 
prison officers vote 
on industrial action 

Bv Peter Evans. Home Affairs Correspondent 


Contingency plans to use 
troops and open camps to 

hold the overspill from jails 
have been made by the Gov- 
ernment as prison officers 
prepare to ballot tomorrow on 
industrial action. 

Whether the Government 
would need to go that far 
depends on the vote and what 
action, if any. the Prison 
Officers' Association decides 
to lake. Much depends on 
today's Whitley Council meet- 
ing. * when officers will be 
looking, they say. for action to 
preserve the safety of mem- 
bers and humane regimes for 
prisoners. 

The way that budgetary 
controls are being implement- 
ed threatens disruption and 
chaos, officials repeated yes- 
terday — a warning first given 
in July. 

One of the severest actions 
officers could take would be 
the reduction of the prison 


population to the jails' official 
capacity 41.198. The present 
population is 46.637. The first 
clTect would be to fill police 
cells, which have a capacity of 
5.000 for such a purpose. 

POA officials yesterday re- 
fused to discuss options open 
to them but the choice will 
depend partly on the strength 
of the vote. 

Speaking of restrictions they 
say that already in two prisons 
Sunday working has been 
introduced on a Friday. 

But Home Office statistics 
show that between the fi m- 
cial years 1979-80 and 1*. 5- 
86 the budget for the service 
went up by 85 per cent 

The financial provision for 
1 9S6-S7 is £639 million, about 
8 per cent more than planned 
expenditure in 1985-86. Cur- 
rent public expenditure plans 
envisage spending on the ser- 
vice increasing to £700 million 
in 1988-89. 


Home Office figures show 
that some prison officers are 
earning £24.000 a year by 
working 30 hours or more 
overtime a week. A top gover- 
nor gets £25.000. Last year the 
highest known overtime earn- 
er was a hospital officer whose 
total salary reached £27,000. 

Officers average about 16.5 
hours a week on top of the 
basic 40 hours, and overtime 
makes up on average about 30 
per cent of a prison officer's 
earnings. The average pay of 
prison officers in 1985-86 was 
about £ 1 5.000 a year. 

More than £86 million will 
go on overtime in 1986-87 
compared with a budget of 
£81.6 million in 1985-86. But 
thanks to more staff and an 
increase in the basic rare there 
may be a reduction of half an 
hour's overtime throughout 
the service. But a POA official 
said yesterday the reduction 
was likely to be about two 
hours a man in 1986-87. 


Lords approve TV, 
with reservations 


Bv Sheila Beardall 


A House of Lords' select 
committee report has cautious- 
ly backed televising of the 
Lords although it slopped short 
of recommending a permanent 
arrangement. That decision, it 
said, should be left to the whole 
House. 

The introduction of cameras 
had been useful, the report 
concluded, but lighting arrange- 
menis were most un- 
satisfactory. Low-light and 
remote-con trolled cameras 
should be used in any perma- 
nent set-up. 

The broadcasting authorities 
said they wanted to continue 
broadcasts in spile of a fall-off 
in viewers since the Commons 
voted against allowing cameras 
in. They also wanted permis- 
sion to televise ministerial 
statements repeated in the 
Lords, but the report recom- 


mended keeping the present 
ban. 

The IBA is planning to fund 
an unedited service which 
could be used by commercial 
channels and the BBC to 
provide summaries starting this 
week. The offer was made after 
the committee made it cfear 
there was no public money 
available for the service. 

The (BA would run a regular 
late-night summary with the 
BBC putting out weekly 
summaries. 

The committee wanted the 
ban on still photographers in 
the Chamber continued in the 
absence of any strong argu- 
ments to the contrary. 

Report by the Select Committee 
ol' the House of Lords on 
Tdivningihe Proceedings of the 
House ’(Stationery Office; 
£9.10/. 


Turning sewage into 
water for drinking 

Water may be pumped inio 
reservoirs from an east Lon- 
don sewage works to meet 
increasing demand for water 
in the 1990s. the Thames 
Water Authority said yester- 
day. The plan is one or several 
being considered- 

Mr John Sexton. TWA'* 
water resources manager, said; 

"It is not unusual for people to 
drink dilute sewage, but it is 


always at the right level ol 
treatment." He explained that 
the Deephams sewage treat- 
ment works at Edmonton had 
been chosen as the first possi- 
ble candidate for a direct 
connection to a reservoir. 

Mr Sexton said it was 
incorrect to state that most 
London drinking water bad 
been through several people 
before reaching the consumer. 


Customs 
seek drug 
‘hotline’ 

By Stewart Teodler 
Crime Reporter 

Customs investigators yes- 
terday launched a national 
"hotline" confidential tele- 
phone scheme to persuade the 
public to pass on information 
about drug smuggling. 

A special leaflet has been 
prepared for distribution 
through Customs offices, Post 
Offices and other pnblic 
places. The leaflet warns peo- 
ple they should report: 

9 Boats transfering cargo at 
sea or any activity with boats 
in isolated places or at odd 
hours: 

9 Light aircraft at unofficial 
airfields especially where car- 
go is seen being handled: 

• Vehicles transfering loads 

in suspicions circumstances. 

Initiating the scheme, Mr 
Richard Lawrence, Customs 
Chief Investigations Officer, 
said: "We are concerned to 
prevent drugs from ever reach- 
ing Britain 

Mr Lawrence added: “We 
want anyone who notices sus- 
picious activity in ports or 
along the coast or at airports 
and airfields or inland clear- 
ance depots to ask themselves 
‘could it be drugs’? If the 
answer is yes or even maybe 
tell us about it as quickly as 
possible." 

Callers anywhere in the 
country should dial the opera- 
tor on 100 and then ask for 
Freefone Customs Drugs. 


Sinclair computer sale ends an era 


By Bill Johnstone 
Technology Correspondent 

Sir Give Sinclair yesterday 
sold the marketing and manu- 
facluring rights of his comput- 
ers to another British 
company. Amsirad. in a last 
ditch attempt to save hisailiog 
company. 

Although Sir Give dentes 
that the deal is a rescue bid. he 
was under pressure from his 
principal creditors to pay off 
the company's debts after an 
extension of credit granted last 
year. 

The Amstrad deal repre- 
sents the climax of nearly 15 
months of financial difficulty 
for Sir Give as he fought 
against ferocious price cutting 
and substantial competition 
in the computer market. 

It is seen as a sad irony that 
the man who created the 
British home computer mar- 
ket, and who was knighted for 
his technical innovation, 
should fall victim to the 
competition he encouraged. 

Renowned in the electron- 
ics industry for his imagina- 
tion and design skill. Sir Give 
struggled to overcome man- 
agement difficulties. 

A further irony is that his 
innovative products will now 
be sold by a company which 
has substantia] management 
talent yet spends relatively 
little on research and develop- 



Model 


Year Price e Mr Alan Green, Amstrad managing director, making a point as Sir Clive Sinclair looks on 


ZX80 

2X81 

Spectrum (18k) 
Spectrum (48k) 
Spectrum Plus 

OL (Ouantam 
Leap) 

Spectrum 128 


Jan 80 
Mar 81 
rrwj 82 
Apr 82 
Apr 82 
Oct 84 
Feb 85 
Jan 84 
Sep 85 
Feb 86 


£99.35 

£69.95 

£39.95 

£99.95 

£129.95 

£179.95 

£129.95 

399.00 

£199.95 

£179.99 


ment and imports most of its 
products from South Korea. 

In spite of its financial 
difficulties, the Sinclair com- 
puter group remains the mar- 
ket leader, commanding about 
40 per cent of the British home 
computer markeL 

Sir Give rose to promi- 
nence in the 1970s with the 
launch of a series of products, 
including digital watches, cal- 
culators and a small pocket 
television. His Cambridge- 
based company, Sinclair Radi- 
onics, which became Sinclair 
Research in 1980, was support- 
ed by the National Enterprise 


Board and the National Re- 
search Development Corpora- 
tion. later to become the 
British Technology Group. 

His first big success came m 
1980 with the ZX80, a comput- 
er priced at less than £100 and 
aimed at fulfilling his dream 
of a computer in every home. 
It was replaced 15 months 
later with the more powerful 
ZXS 1 . this time on sale for less 
than £70. 

By Christmas 1983, the 
home computer market was 
booming throughout the 
world and in Britain compa- 
nies such as Sinclair Research 
and Acorn, the makers of the 
BBC Microcomputer, were 
growing at a frightening rate. 

But they had trouble meet- 
ing the colossal demands for 
their products. Some retailers, 
caught short of supplies that 
Christmas, were determined 


not to make the same mistake 
twice. Over-ordering and 
more competition in the home 
computer market saw the rot 
set in, leaving many retailers 
over-stocked. By January 1985 
they were forced to join the 
manufacturers in dramatic 
price cuts. In the melee. 
Acorn was forced to stop 
trading when its shares fdl to 
28p. slashing more than £100 
million from the £136 million 
value placed on the company 
in autumn 1983 when it was 
floated on the unlisted securi- 
ties market (USM). 

By the end of the year it had 
been taken over by Olivetti, 
the Italian office automation 
company. The Acorn troubles 
had an immediate effect on Sir 
Give, who postponed plans to 
launch his company on the 
USM. 

By then, the City bad be- 


come extremely nervous 
about the computer business. 
Two years before Sir Clive had 
sold 10 per cent of his compa- 
ny for about £12 million, but 
the financial climate had 
changed. 

On a cold January day last 
year. Sir Clive unveiled nts C5 
electric tricycle, supposedly 
the forerunner of a series of 
cheap urban electric cars. But 
the public did not like it and 
by the end of summer produc- 
tion bad stopped with Hoo- 
ver, the manufacturer, owed 
about £1.5 million. 

Poor sales of the QL (Quan- 
tum Leap) computer, 
launched the previous year, 
and the flat screen television, 
released in September 1983, 
and the sluggish performance 
of other Sinclair products, also 
did not help waning 
confidence. 


Fulham pair fight for second place 


By Richard Evans 
Lobby Reporter 

The Fulham by-election de- 
scended into verbal warfare 
yesterday between the Alli- 
ance and Conservative candi- 
dates — over who will finish in 
third place. 

Whfle both Mr Roger 
Liddle and Mr Matthew 
Carrington are yet to formally 
admit they cannot win this 
Thursday's contest, the dally 
propaganda battle now looks 
aimed at gaining second spot 
behind Mr Nick Raynsford, 
the Labour candidate who 


holds a runaway lead in the 
polls. 

Cabinet ministers and Alli- 
ance chiefs know that second 
place would represent a credit- 
able performance, while third 
spot would be an electoral 
disaster. 

Mr Carrington, the Conser- 
vative candidate, delivered the 
first blow yesterday by daim- 
ing that the collapse of the 
SDP campaign in Fnlham left 
them fighting for third place. 

Mr Carrington complained 
about the SDP*s by-election 
techniques and pointed specif- 


ically to a newspaper produced 
by the party which he said 
deliberately looked like anoth- 
er id (he freesheet5 circulated 
in the constituency. 

In the latest leaflet to be 
pushed through the letter- 
boxes of Fulham's long-suffer- 
ing electors, Mr Carrington 
says: “If no newspaper will 
support yon. print your own — 
distribute it, but don't tell 
anyone it's from the SDP — 
pretend its independent and 
pretend that the SDP have a 
chance of winning." 

He says the SIM* are 


engaged in false claims to try 
to mislead die public. 

Mr Liddle hit back by 
plBiming that Mr Carrington 
was not only an invisible 
candidate but over the week- 
end bis campaign ^ become 
invisible as well. 

He produced the party's 
latest canvassing returns 
which showed Labour in the 
lead with 37 j 6 per cent. Alli- 
ance with 32.1 per cent and the 
Conservatives with 293 per 
cent. * _ _ 

General election. M Siri-cni «C1. 
18-204. A PoweB iLabL 13.415. □ 
Rendd JL/AUt. 7.194; ftHss J Cmnw 
lEcol. zrtl R Pearre iNfJ. 229; J 
Keats Und U. 102 C mat: 4.789. 


Dounreay 
nuclear * 
policy 
endorsed 

Energy produced from feta 
breeder nuclear reactors 
would be of strategic signifi- 
cance to Britain, generating so 
times more power than nor- 
ma! reactors and the energy 
equivalent of billions of loos 
of coal. 

That enthusiastic endorse- 
ment of British nuclear Belief 
was given by Mr David 
Morph iu head of the Atomic 
Encigy Division at the Dc. 
partment of Energy, when the 
Dounreay inquiry opened 
\csKftiay. 

Mr Morphii. the first wit- 
ness in what promises to be a 
long and technical argument 
over the siting of a European 
Demonstration Reprocessing 
Plant, made it clear (be Gov- 
ernment expected that any 
high-levef radioactive waste 
remaining from the reprocess- 
ing plant would be returned to 
the country of origin for 
disposal. 


~ i 

The public inquiry at Thurso 
is into proposals by the United 
kingdom Atomic Energy Au- 
thority and British Nuclear 
Fuels to buBd a p tooutam 
reprocessing plant “at 
Dounreay in Caithness. Op- 
posing are the islands' au- 
thorities in Orkney, She tland 
and the Western Isles, the 
Scottish fishermans’ Federa- 
tion, the Scottish National 
Party and a number of local 
environmental gnmps. The in- 
quiry Is expected to last sever- 
al months. 


He said the United Ring- . 
dom nuclear industry had 
unanimously, recommended 
that the atomic energy-author- 
ity and British Nuclear -Fuels 
should bid far the European 
Demonstration Plant 
The other partners, France. 
Italy. West- Germany and 
Belgium, still have to be 
convinced of the merits of 
siting the plant in Britain. 

Mr Morphit raid the 
Government’s nuclear policy 
was aimed towards acmevu 


nuclear power playing an im- 
portant and necessary 'tote 
against finite oil aadcoaL 
A government review of fast 
reactor policy had conducted 
they , would not be required . 
until in the early next century J 
which allowed more time for 
research, 

Mr Morphit agreed that 
trade in plutonium was ex- 
tremely sensitive and danger- 
ous and had to be protected 
carefully, but the Government 
believed this was possible. 

Asked if the Department of 
Energy expected that fast reac- 
tors would ever’ be financially 
viable before the next century. 
Mr Morphit said no one 
expected this, but the collabo- 
ration was to discover whether 
it could become viable. 


THE GUINNESS 
BID FC®. DISTILLERS. 
LATEST PRICES. 


Distillers 
share price 
worth 



Guinness 
best and final 
offer worth 




Fisurn based on ihe market price at J 30pm Mondav 


Screen can 
defeat 
radar 

By Rodney Cowton 
Defence Correspondent 
A top secret, lightweight 
material which can make 
ships and aircraft almost in- 
visible to enemy radar has 
been developed by scientists 
working for the British com- 
pany, Plessey. 

The material, named 
ADRAM. which stands for 
advanced radar absorbent ma- 
terial is claimed to be about 
one-third the weight of other 
materials used to defeat radar 
by reducing the "radar 
signature" of ships or aircraft 
by up to 95 per cent 
That provides protection 
against missiles which locate 
tbeir target by radar. Applied 
to cars it would make it more 
difficult for police radar speed 
traps to operate. 

ADRAM has been devel- 
oped by Plessey Microwave 
Materials at Towcester, 
Northamptonshire. Mr Nigel 
Bennett, marketing manager, 
said that about a dozen coun- 
tries were showing interest 
Plessey also announced that 
another of its companies, 
Plessey Avionics, based at 
Havant, had received an ini- 
tial order from the Royal Air 
Force for a device aimed at 
reducing the risk of aircraft 
being shot down by their own 
side. 

Military aircraft carry elec- 
tronic identification systems 
to prevent that happening, but 
now the RAF is to install at all 
its airfields in Britain and 
abroad a Plessey Automatic 
Launch Test facility, which 
will automatically check that 
an aircraft's identification 
equipment is functioning 
properly when it lakes off. 


Libyan 
case man 
is cleared 

A businessman was deared 
at the Central Criminal Court 
yesterday of plotting to smug- 
gle a Libyan farin g a drugs 
trial oat of Britain. 

A jury found Godfrey Shin- 
er. ased 48, of Laburnum 
Cottage, Napton-on-the-Hill 
Warwickshire, not guilty of 
conspiracy to pervert the 
coarse of justice by arranging 
for Muhammad Sbebli, be- 
lieved to be a distant relative of 
the Libyan leader.. Colonel 
Gaddafi, to flee from Britain in 
a private plane on August 2, 
1984. 

Another businessman, An- 
thony Gill pleaded guilty and 
is expected to be sentenced 
tomorrow. 

Sbebli. aged 43, was facing 
trial at Croydon Crown Court 
charged with possessing can- 
nabis and cocaine. 

On the day be was due to 
stand trial August 6. 1984, he 
had been in Tripoli for nearly 
a week, Mr Stephen Mitchell 
for the prosecution, said. 

It was said Shiner asked his 
co-defendant, Gill, to help 
with SheblTs escape. 

Gill aged 50, of Farnfield 
Road. Great Tey, Essex, ar- 
ranged the escape and flew 
with Shebli from Leaveseu 
airport Watford. 

Shiner admitted be knew 
Shebli and tint be was due for 
trial. Bat be denied having 
anything to do with the plot or 
making any suggestion to Gill. 

He said $7A>00 he trans- 
ferred from a Guernsey ac- 
count into GflTs bank at 
Braintree. Essex, was a "once 
and for all” payment for 
Shebti, who had been pester- 
ing him for money to pay his 
legal costs. 


The Guinness offer is unanimously recommended by the Board of Distillers. 

The closing date is April 18th at 3pm. 


GUINNESS PLC 


TT"' puMi-hmi bv M.r£Jn Gr-.ni.rU Si Co LhniiL-d anJ The Pri-i-h Linen Ban l LiJ «:in behafi ■* Gunnw • PLC The Director- M Guinntt. PLC are fhe pcrwin* 

•i-.pr.nM lc tor the mlonn.il ion c< -roamed in ihi~ -aivrrii^tnefir T.rrhe heM ol their l n-r» k-dc- and Mud <ha» nc ralvn atl rea-onable c.ite m entire tbai • uth ■> ihc t.i«i the miorm.-iri.-n 
_ _ i-W.tirmf lit du adtertoenrenr b hi A.-c»rdia» uiih ilx ia<r> The Dinner, oi Gum nr-- PLC accept re«ponr«bit.f.- according, 

IN n ‘ Gumnrv offer J. tfe-iula . <n n-oharr prae The above otter value ism Cuinnn, Otter, awimuty acceptance in lull bv all Diiillrr. shareholders ol die CoturmMe Preference SKnr 
tUrcnr-n and iheir teMiIrani pt" r.ir.i jlbnaiu-not ihe Guinno* GjnvemMe r rncTTTiff piurea. bawd on dte niciiV mar lei taken Inn The Stock LxcharKe Daih- OlTtctal bvon “lb April 
T*ie Oner eabie rake' account .V an cnimtaie bv U'uud Madmen- & Co. burned and Caimove & Co. i-I the value, bated vrt ’he relevant ordinary share price erf (be Conurobic 
r reference Snare, ot Guinness The value ol ihe Convertible Preference Share, of Cumnra arc rsumaied because *ev are nor prr-ccnrty ^m-red. 



Healey backs defence 
policy, Kinnock says 

By Richard Evans, Lobby Reporter 

scrap uaiiateraUy Polaris. 
Britain's independent nuclear 
deterrent, but the Labour 
leader said attention had not 
been paid to "detailed words 
or the meaning of the words". 

Earlier Mr Kinnock had 
shrugged off criticisms alleg- 
edly made against him by Mr 
Healey in an interview with 
La Stampa, the I talian 
newspaper. . 

Geoffrey Smith, page 5 


Mr Neil Kinnock insisted 
yesterday that he and Mr 
Denis Healey agreed over 
Labour's defence policy — 
including the decommission- 
ing of Polaris. 

He said critics who played 
up supposed differences be- 
tween himself and Labour's 
veteran foreign affairs spokes- 
man were “mischief makers”. 

Mr Healey has recently 
questioned Labour's pledge to 




Kinnock rejects 
Murdoch offer 

By Richard Evans, Lobby Reporter 

News International's at- Two policemen were taken 

to hospital and detained with 
serious head injuries. Two 
were discharged after treat- 
ment for minor injuries, and 
six were injured, but did not 
require treatment 
An eleventh policeman was 
treated for bead injuries after 
falling .* 

Twenty people were arrest- 
ed and 17 charged, mainly for 
public order offences. Scot- 
land Yard said they would 
at Thames 


tempt to settle the Wapping 
.dispute by offering print 
unions a fully operational 
newspaper and publishing 
plant was not adequate, Mr 
Neil Kinnock said yesterday. 

It would bear serious con- 
sideration only if it was part of 
a wider settlement package, 
the Labour leader said. 

Mr Kinnock, who was ques- 
tioned about the Wapping 
dispute at a Fulham by- 
eteciion press conference, ech- 


appear 


oed the view of print union Magistrates’ Court on April 15 
leaders that Mr Rupert and 22. 


Murdoch's offer of handing 
over the printing works at 
Gray’s Inn Road, where The 
Times and The Sunday Times 
were formerly produced, was 
“intriguing". 

He said: a My view is that 
his offer of the plant in Gray's 
Inn Road lode, stock and 
computer is not an adequate 
alternative to the resolution of 
the cause of the dispute which 
is the loss of employment 
without compensation for up- 
wards of 5,000 former em- 
ployees ofNews International. 


News International 
yesterday that in spite of 
Sunday’s demonstration, a 
full print of The Times am 
The Sun was achieved and 
distribution was carried out 
normally to all parts of the 
country. 

Leading artide, 

Player banned 

David Bishop, The Wales 
and Pontypool rugby player, 
ifora 


was banned from driving 
year arid fined £1 25 by Cardiff 
"It is not until these issues magistrates yesterday after he 
of work and of compensation admitted driving with excess 
are satisfactorily resolved that alcohol and foiling to comply 
there can be any real prospect with a traffic sign. 

of progress on the question of — - ■ ■ ■ 

tiie plant in Gray's Inn Road. 

"If it is part of a wider 
settlement package then it will, 
bear serious consideration. If 
it is the total package then it is 
very difficult to see how 
anybody could- progress on 
that basis. 

• Ten policemen were - in- 
jured, two seriously, in dashes 
with pickets outside the 
Wapping plant in east London 
on Sunday. There were clashes 
throughout the night after 
mounted police with shields 
were brought in to break up 
the demonstrators. . . 

About 5,000 demonstrators 
had marched to Wapping 
from a Trafalgar Square rally 
in support of 5,500 dismissed 
print workers. 


Austria Seta J29: -Bdqlutn B_ C’AJSv 
Canada 


■F.79: Can arm P« »£ 

Cry Bros TOcwnis: Denmark Dfcr 9.W 
Finland MJrtc 9 00; France Ft* 6W 
Germany DM cawaUar «** 

Greece Dr iaa Holland ci -V£»-Jre* 

republic 40 k iuiv l arootugw- 
bourn Lf 45; Madeira EK 1 TO; MaM 
56c: Morocco Dir IQ.OO: Norvray hr J 
9.00: Pakistan Rbs ]» PomwsLg* 1 
170: Snoaoore S3. SO. Spain pe*20<£ 
Sweden Skr 9.00: SwterWif.J; 
Francs 500. Tunisia Dtn BOOft USA.i 
■ fa tb- vnoiwlavia om 400. . 



IF VOL WANT 
TO G(T AHE.il). 
GET 

THE:^T TIMtS: 



You need to know 

WHO'S WHO 

1986 











I 


THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


HOME NEWS 


$ 


Leading role by British 
research groups in 
new anti-cancer drug 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


Leading medical research 
' groups from Britain have been 
instrumental in developing an 
a* anti-cancer drug, which was 
* " launched yesterday. 

The Committee on Safety of 
Medicines has approved the 
compound for the treatment 
of ovarian cancer and sraall- 
. cell tumours of the lung. 

There are 5,000 ovarian 
cancers that could be treated a 
/ year in Britain, and sraalLcell 
. tumours comprise more than 
20 per cent of the malignant 
lung conditions. 

The compound is carbo- 
platin. Its proprietary name is 
• Paraplaion. and it is being 
. produced by the Bristol-Myers 
. company. 

The research groups gath- 
crcd at a scientific meeting in 
r London yesterday to marls the 
, general launch of the com- 
• . pound. 

The meeting was called the 
. British Transition Confer- 
ence, because the fundamental 
chemistry and the clinical 
trials were conducted in Brii- 
' ain, through the Institute of 
. . Cancer Research, Sutton, 

; Surrey. 

Clinical trials are continu- 
ing against other tumours, 

; . including testicular, head and 
neck and uterine cancers. 

The new compound belongs 


to a group of substances based 
on platinum which will kill 
cells by attacking the DNA in 
the nucleus. Cisplatitu the first 
of the family of substances, 
raised hopes more than 15 
years ago about the prospects 
of effective chemotherapy for 
destroying tumours. 

But treatment with cisplatin 
had the problems which all 
attempts at chemotherapy to 
kill cells bad met before. 
Healthy cells were also dis- 
rupted, and the dose given was 
a trade-off between the effec- 
tiveness in destroying malig- 
nant cells and the severity of 
the side-effects. 

With cisplatin, in addition 
to nausea and vomiting, the 
drug could induce kidney 
damage, a loss of hearing and 
other damage of the nervous 
system. When low doses were 
used to minimize side-effects, 
the usefulness diminished 
sharply. But it is widely used. 

Professor Ken Harrap told 
yesterday's meeting: “Our pre- 
ciinical studies show Para- 
platin to be devoid of the side- 
effects of cisplatin." 

The explanation is believed 
to lie in the way the molecule 
of the new substance locks 
more firmly on to the DNA in 
the nucleus of cancer cells 
than other agents. This means 


lower doses are needed to kiD 
the cells, which have a higher 
sensitivity to the dreg than to 
other agents. 

Professor Harrap, head of 
biochemical pharmacology, at 
the Institute of Cancer Re- 
search, working with Dr Mike 
Cleare, from the Johnson 
Matthey Research Centre, at 
Reading, is screening possible 
relatives of cisplatin. During 
the past 10 years they have 
examined the activity of 25 
compounds with anti-cancer 
activity. 

The list was reduced to eight 
which went through extensive 
pharmacological trials before 
narrowing the field to caibo- 
platin. 

The lack of toxicity and the 
higher sensitivity of malignant 
cells to carboplatin were de- 
scribed by Dr Eve Wiltshaw, 
consultant medical oncologist 
at the Royal Marsden Hospi- 
tal. London, on treating ovari- 
an cancers. 

She says it cannot be substi- 
tuted for cisplatin in all cases. 
But it has shown no kidney 
damage, no instances of hear- 
ing loss or other report of 
impairment of the nervous 
system, and less nausea and 
vomiting. 



Prince Edward, aged 22, arriving at Bridgend Technical 
College yesterday, his first day of public engagements. 


<• Granada 
invests in 
satellite 

By David Hewson 
* " Arts Correspondent 

Granada has taken a 
20 per cent stake in an Ameri- 
can satellite television project 
for S3 million (£2.25 million) 
frith the hope of broadcasting 
its programmes throughout 
• America. 

It will buy a fifth Interest in 
USTV which is to operate two 
satellite transponders supply- 
‘ ing programmes to more than 
i : 700 US television stations. 

* Mr Alex Bernstein, the 
.’ Granada group chairman, 
said: “While the tele virion 
. . franchise remains -oar first 
priority, we are expanding oar 
. ‘ production capacity for world 
satellite markets and' at the 
; same time investing in Ee- 
rope and the USA." . 


Badger controls to be eased 


By John Young, Agriculture Correspondent 


The Government yesterday 
announced immediate 
changes in its badger control 
policy, after a critical report of 
its effectiveness in eli minating 
bovine tuberculosis. 

Mr Michael Jopling, Minis- 
ter of Agriculture, said that 
action against badgers would 
in future be considerably more 
limited and would be confined 
to farms or parts of farms 
where the tuberculosis out- 
break could be directly attrib- 
utable to badgers. 

The report, prepared for the 
ministry by an independent 
working group under Profes- 
sor George Dunnet, of Aber- 
deen University, concludes 
that the complete and perma- 
nent eradication of the disease 
in badgers, and hence in cattle, 
is unat tainab le. 

Hie objective of any policy 
therefore should be to limit 
the transmission by dealing 


with identifiable and avoid-, 
able risks, quickly and effec-' 
lively at a reasonable cost 

Professor Dunnet said yes- 
terday that he and his col- 
leagues believed that it was no 
longer sustainable to proceed 
with the policy of killing 
badgers indiscriminately in 
order to obtain a "dean ring" 
within which there was no 
infection. 

The report states that there 
is no evidence to suggest that 
the present strategy is a threat 
to the badger population as a 
whole, but there will obvious- 
ly be temporary effects on 
local populations. Infection in 
badgers is probably widdy, 
but sparsely and unevenly 
distributed. 

The option of ceasing any 
form of badger control was 
considered, given that the 
success of the present strategy 
was unconvincing. 


In time this might become 
the best policy to follow, but at 
present there could be no 
confidence that, if badger 
control ceased completely, 
there would not be an unac- 
ceptable increase in the num- 
ber of herd infections. 

The report is likely to cause 
controversy by suggesting that 
there is no scientific justifica- 
tion for continuing the prac- 
tice of releasing lactating 
female badgers, even where 
they are found to be infected. 

Lactating females may well 
transmit the disease to their 
cubs through their very close 
relationship, it says. 

Professor Dunnet said that 
it was very unfortunate that 
there had been distorted re- 
ports in the press, alleging that 
pressures had been put upon 
him and his colleagues.lt was 
absolutely untrue, he said. 


More TV 
on Tube to 
fight crime 

London Underground is to 
intensify its fight on crime 
with a £750,000 order for 
closed-circuit television on 37 
more of its stations. 

The Underground, which 
recently approved a 25 per 
cent increase in police man- 
power. is to take another 
initiative by inviting public 
views on passenger security 
and safety. 

The consultation exercise 
will be linked with the 
Government's own study of 
crime on the system. 

At present 71 of the 
Underground's 240 stations 
have closed-circuit television 
on the platforms, and another 
20 stations, in addition to the 
new order of 37, are to have it 
fitted. 


Computer 
drive to 
modeniize 
law courts 

By Frances Gibb 
Legal Affairs Correspondent 

' A plan for bringing comput- 
ers into civil criminal 

coots over the next decade to 
help administrators and assist 
lawyers and judges prepare 
cases and judgements has beat 
launched by the Lord 
Chancellor’s Department. 

Sir Duck Chilton, QC, per- 
manent secretary, said com- 
puters were essmtial because 
Of the “ gr ow i ng workload in 

the courts”. 

Computers me already be- 
ing used for monitoring cases 
in the Coot of Appears dvfl 

division, for record- keeping on 
judicial app ointmen t s and for 
an index of pe titi ons lodged in 
the companies' court 
During the next 10 years 
computers wfll be introduced 
to the criminal appeals office, 
the principal registry of the 
family division and in the 
running of ri»» aid 

scheme. 

Ways in which co mp ut er s 

more difficuft^to define pre- 
cisely, Sir Derek said. They 
could help to validate a case, 
perhaps, on the basis of 
precedent, possibly using a 
legal data retrieval system. 

Computer systems may he 
able to guide lawyers and 
laymen through the most com- 
plex legal procedures, he said. 

For comity courts, the de- 
partment plans to create a 
claims registry which wOl 
concentrate on keeping default 
summonses at large comp ute r 
installations. They will be 
linked to owi—i* in the 
courts. 

In crown courts, experimen- 
tal projects to computerize 
administration are taking 
place in Inner London ses- 
sions, Nottingham, Leicester 
and Derby. 

There are 15 other experi- 
ments m action, which are to 
be reproduced on a large scale 
in the county courts. 

A committee has been set up 
under Lord Justice NeOL in- 
cluding representatives from 
the Home Office, the Lord 
Chancellor’s Department and 
the legal profession, tomonitar 
developments. 

• Solicitors are installing 
computers in record numbers 
this year, according to a 
leading computer supplier. 
Sales in the first quarter of 
this year have ended with 
record orders estimated at 
£250,00Q,AIM, of Hull, 
reports. 


Inquest adjourned 
on tire death at 
Hampton Court 


By Robin Young 


The banqueting and recep- 
tion room of St James's Palace 
was temporarily transformed 
into a coroner's court yester- 
day when Lt-Col George 
McEwao, coroner of the 
Queen’s Household, opened 
the inquest on Lady Gale, who 
died in the fire at Hampton 
Court 

The hearing, held beneath 
oil painting s of historic bat- 
tles, lasted six minutes. The 
coroner heard that Lady Gale, 
a widow aged 76. was known 
to have been in her room the 
night before the fire and to 
have been missing afterwards. 

The body, with no recogniz- 
able mark or feature remain- 
ing. was on tbe floor of her 
badly damaged bedroom, near 
where her bed had been. The 
security system at Hampton 
Court meant no other person 
could have been in the room 
without the staffs knowledge. 

Dental tests had shown a 
strong similarity with Lady 
Gale's dental records, al- 
though further tests would be 
needed to demonstrate con- 


clusively that the body was 
hers. 

Del Chief Insp Carol Scard, 
who was in charge of inquiries 
at Hampton Court- said she 
was satisfied that no one else 
was involved in Lady Gale's 
death. 

The coroner said that he 
was fully satisfied that the 
body was that of Lady Gale, 
and that she had died as a 
result of carbon monoxide 
poisoning. He adjourned the 
inquest pending further police 
and fire authority inquiries, 
and authorized arrangements 
to be made for Lady Gale's 
funeral. 

This is the first inquest to 
have been held by the coroner 
of the Royal Household, 
whose jurisdiction covers roy- 
al palaces and parks, since 
1979 when a former nurse 
died of an overdose in Wind- 
sor Great Park. 

Hampton Court Palace was 
reopened to the public yester- 
day afternoon, a week after the 
fire which gutted upper rooms 
in the south wing. 


Dog costs 
his owner 
fines 

Thomas Sairnt, aged 46, a 
showman, yesterday admitted 
failing to dear up his pet 
Alsatian's rr» ss in the first 
case of its kind in Kent. 

The Government has desig- 
nated Rochester as a pilot area 
for trying out new regulations 
to outlaw dog fouling. 

Saunt and his family spent 
the winter on Strood fair- 
ground site. 

In a letter to the court he 
explained that his daughter, 
aged seven, let the dog off its 
chain at the site. He added 
that she must have forgptten 
to put it back on the chain and 
it followed her to schooL 

Medway magistrates fined 
Saunt £25 for letting his dog 
foul the path in Martins Road, 
Strood; £20 for letting it out 
without a collar, and £15 for 
each of three charges of letting 
a dog on to a road without a 
lead. . 

■ They also ordered him to 
pay £10 costs. . 


Husband 
cut car’s 
brake pipe 

A rejected husband who cirt 
the brake pipe of his rival's car 
after scratching the words 
“You Ye dead" across the 
paintwork has been given a 
suspended jail sentence. 

Cofin GdL, aged 30, a Brit- 
ish Airways engineer, was 
devastated by the loss of his 
wife, Shirley, to Mr David 
Thomas, a tax! driver, in late 
1984, Mr John Penry, for the 
defence, told Oxford Crown 
Court yesterday . 

He became extremely de- 
pressed and one night in 
February last year called at 
the bouse in Pitts Road, 
Slongh, where Mr Thomas 
lived with Mrs Gill, and 
ifamigwl the car. 

Next morning Mrs Gill 
tried to drive the car to her 
parents' tonne and found tbe 
brakes were not working. 

Gill told detectives: “I'm 
sorry. I've been like this since 
Shirley left.” 

He admitted damaging the 
car with intent to endanger life 
and was sentenced to a year's 
jaiL suspended for two years. 


Woman jockey found dead 


By Tim Jones 

Mrs Sue Horton, aged 43, a 
former point-to-poini champi- 
on. has been found dead in her 
car. 

Her body was discovered by 
her estranged husband, Mr 
David Horton, and their son, 
aged seven, on Saturday night. 
Beside her was her pet dog 
which also died in the car at 
her home in Littleton Drew, 
near Chippenham, Wiltshire. 

Mrs Horton, a flamboyant 
figure, had enjoyed hunting 
with Princess Anne and the 
Prince of Wales. Sbc liked last 
cars and had raced at Brands 
Hatch. 

She became nationally 
known in the 1970s when, as 
Sue Aston, she was the Cham- 
pion Ladies National Hum 
Jockey four limes in 
succession. 

In 1976. using the Sex 


A ■ 



Mrs Horton, who 
was four times champion 

Discrimination Act. she won 
her tong battle with the Jockey 
Club to become the first 
woman to be granted the right 


to compete on equal terms 
with men as a National Hunt 
jockey. 

Supt Ted Evans, of 
Chippenham police, said: 
“The son saw his mother in 
the car and thought she was 
sleeping. He went out for the 
afternoon with his father and 
returned later and they real- 
ized she was dead." 

He added: “Mr and Mrs 
Horton were separated and 
lived apart and Mr Horton 
had custody of the child. Mrs 
Horton was last heard of alive 
on Friday of last week. Her 
death is not suspicious." 

Mrs Horton, who had been 
previously married, suffered 
serious spine injuries in a bad 
fall in 1978. but returned a 
year later to continue on the 
point-to-point circuit. 

The coroner has been in- 
formed of her death. 


Hitches delay Royer launch 


By Clifford Webb 

Motoring Correspondent 

The launch of the new 
Rover executive saloon is 
being delayed for last-minute 
modifications resulting from 
almost daily track testing by 
Mr Harold Musgrove. chair- 
man and chief executive of 
Austin Rover. 

Staff at the company’s 
Gaydon proring ground, near 
Stratford upon Avon, report 
that he is at the wheel of pre- 
production models before 
many of them report for work 
in the morning and frequently 
stays on for night driving 
sessions. 

Senior colleagues are also 
taking part in an unprecedent- 
ed number of "ride and drive" 
exercises on the track and on 
public roads in the more 
remote parts of Britain. 

A source close to Mr 
Musgrove said: "He is abso- 
lutely determined that the new 
car will not suffer from the 
initial shortcomings of its 
predecessors. A lew more 
months or even weeks testing 
would have given them a 
much better start in life. 

"The problem is that in the 
last five years we have 
launched ah unprecedented 


number of entirely new mod- 
els which stretched our engi- 
neering resources to the limit 
Now that pressure has eased 
in time to concentrate more 
people and resources on the 
new Rover." 

Officially Austin Rover 
does not admit that the new 
car. which will be produced 
jointly with Honda Japan, is 
being delayed. A company 
spokesman said: ~Wc always 
aim for a target ’window’ of a 
few weeks rather than a specif- 
ic day. The actual launch date 
will almost certainly be fixed 
within the next 10 days." 

The most favoured date is 
mid-July. 

The new Rover is being seen 
within the company and 
Whitehall as the “make or 
break" crossroads for tbe loss- 
making state-controlled car 
maker. It is aimed squarely at 

■ ■ 


the most profitable sector of 
the market and carries Austin 
Rover's hopes of returning to 
the huge American market 
next year. 

It will be produced simulta- 
neously by Honda in Japan 
and Austin Rover at its Cow- 
ley plant, near Oxford, with a 
range of British and Japanese 
engines. 

Honda's own version called 
the Legend has been on sale in 
Japan for several months and 
is just reaching American 
showrooms. 

Senior and middle manag- 
ers from Austin Rover's head- 
quarters at Coventry are being 
forced to undertake one 
month’s "national service". 
That is their own description 
of secondment to Loogbridge 
and Cowley armed with ex- 
traordinary powers to tackle 
quality problems at source. 



Photograph: Car Magazmo 

The Rover 625, which is undergoing tbe most rigorous tests. 


Austin Rover in sales come-back 


New car registration figures 
for March issued last night 
show that Austin Rover sales 
are making a steady recovery 
from the battering they took in 
February when customer con- 
fidence was effected by the 
possibility of a Ford takeover. 

For the first time in three 
years increased showroom 
traffic last month provided the 
state-controlled company with 
a better first quarter than 


General Motors 

(Yauxhall/Opel). 

Austin Rover registered 
28536 cars in March giving it 
a 165 per cent share of the 
market compared with CM'S 
24,108 (14 per cent). From 
January to March it sold 
1,200 cars mote than the 
American group. Ford contin- 
ues to be the dear market 
leader with 44591 (26.1 per 
cent) in March- 

Figures released by the 


Society of Motor Manufactur- 
ers and Traders show that 
both Ford and GM increased 
the proportion of cars from 
their British factories at the 
expense of imports 
With total registrations of 
499,000 cars already this year, 
only 4,000 down on the same 
period last year, industry five- 
casters believe that 1986 year- 
end sales could match last 
year's record of 153 nufliou 


Call for 
housing in 
Green Belt 

By Christopher Warman 

Property Correspondent 

Green Belt land around 
London should be made avail- 
able for house building in an 
attempt to close the ever- 
widening gap between house 
prices in the North and South, 
according to the Halifax 
Building Society. 

But that is only a short-term 
answer to the problem, the 
Halifax says in its latest report 
on the housing market In the 
longer ran transferring gov- 
ernment departments and 
company headquarters to oth- 
er pans of the country might 
help to narrow the gBp. 

"Unfortunately economic, 
political and market trends all 
seem to be acting in the 
opposite direction at present" 

Considering the question of 
whether the country can af- 
ford the Green Belt area 
around London, the report 
comments: "The determining 
factor of house prices is the 
availability of houses com- 
pared to demand, hence it is 
only by reducing the relative 
shortage of houses in the 
South that the house price gap 
can be narrowed.” 

The survey by the Halifax 
shows that house prices in 
London increased by 19.5 per 
cent in the past year, and that 
the average detached home in 
the capital now costs 
£115,000. 

House prices generally are 
rising much fester than infla- 
tion, and in the past year the 
average UK house price has 
increased by 9.7 per cent to 
rearii £35,034. With mortgage 
demand surging ahead, prices 
are forecast to rise by about 10 
per cent this year. The Hali- 
fax, Britain’as biggest building 
society, alone completed £90 
million of mortgage loans on 
tbe day before the Easter 
holiday. 

But the increases hid an 
enormous regional difference: 
In the last quarter, house 
prices in greater London in- 
creased by nearly three times 
the national average. In all the 
northern and midland regions 
they rose by less than the 
national average figure of 1.5 
per cent. 

The figures show that in the 
first quarter of the year house 
prices increased by 4.1 per 
cent in Loudon, 3.7 per cent in 
East Angjia, 2.6 per cent in the 
South-east, 1.8 per cent in the 
South-west, and 1.3 percent in 
the North-west. 

All other regions showed 
rises of between 0.3 per cent 
and 0.8 per cent, apart from 
fells recorded in Wales (down 
1.1 per cent) and Scotland 
(down 1.8 percent). 


W hen you first handle a Patek Philippe, you 

become aware that this watch has the presence 
of an object of rare perfection 
We know the feeling well. We experience it every time 
a Patek Philippe leaves the hands of our craftsmen 
You can call it pride. For us it lasts a moment; for you, 
a lifetime. 

We made this watch for 
you - to be part of your 
life - simply because this 
is the way we've always 
made watches. 

And if we may draw a con- 
clusion from five genera- 
tions of experience, it will 
be this-, choose once but 
choose well. 

A Patek Philippe - 
because it’s for a lifetime. 



PATEK PHILIPPE 

GENEVE 

At exclusive Patek Philippe showroom 
15 New Bond Street London WJY 9PF 
TeL 01/493 8866 






& 



HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


* ** ** 


Spanish government 
may get Goya portrait 
before Christie’s sale 

Bv Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 




*f:r: 


sags 


Goya's portrait or the Mar- 
quesa de Santa Cruz, poten- 
tially the most expensive 
painting ever sold, may go to 
the Spanish government be- 
fore its scheduled auction at 
Christie's on Friday. 

The Spanish government 
has claimed that documents 
covering the painting's export 
from Spain are illegal and it is 
seeking a High Court declara- 
tion on their validity. 

An application by Christie's 
and the family trust of Lord 
Wim borne, principal owner of 
the painting, to stop the action 
on the grounds that it lies 
outside the jurisdiction of the 
English courts was dismissed 
two weeks ago. They are 
appealing against the decision. 

The purchase price has not 
been disclosed but the valua- 
tion on the Spanish export 
licence is given as 164.5 


million pesetas, or about 

£ 750 . 000 . 

The large painting of the 
marquess, wreathed in \ine 
leaves and lying on a day bed 
with a lyre in her hand, is 
listed as the final lot in 
Christie's main spring sale of 
Old Master paintings. 

Condition three of the sale 
catalogue warns potential buy- 
ers: “The seller w ill transfer to 
the buyer only such title as the 
seller may have in the lot The 
seller is Overseas Art Invest- 
ment Ltd. a company princi- 
pally owned by one of 1 ord 
Wimbome's family trusts id 
in which there are other 
minority interests. 

“Claims have been made by 
the government of Spain con- 
cerning the circumstances in 
which the painting left Spain 
and. in particular, they have 
alleged illegal export. 


Most men admit wrong 


A new crime survey shows 
that 8 Q per cent of men under 
35 admit to some criminal act, 
but the offences are minor. 

The NOP survey also shows 
that most believe in commu- 
nity service programmes for 
criminals rather than prison, 
and 70 per cent chose giving 


police more stop and search 
powers as their least-favoured 
option to improve policing. 

The survey discovered that 
the number of people who had 
been victims of crime was low. 
Two per hundred had suffered 
sexual assaults and one per 
hundred had been mugged. 


Christie's give no independent 

warranty." 

A further catalogue item 
relating to the sale states: “The 
respective rights and obliga- 
tions of the parlies in respect 
to the Conditions of Sale shall 
be governed and interpreted 
by English law and the buyer 
hereby submits to the non- 
exclusive jurisdiction of the 
English courts”. 

The world's richest muse- 
ums were expected to join in 
(he bidding for the portrait, 
which was expected to pass the 
previous auction record of 
£8.1 million. 

In the confused legal cir- 
cumstances. the probability of 
a museum coming forward 
which is prepared to risk 
millions on buying the paint- 
ing is considered slim. It 
would inherit the legal diffi- 
culties with the Spanish 
government 

Private collectors or dealers 
might be prepared to gamble a 
smaller price on their ability 
to solve the legal problems. 
But that would happen only if 
Lord Wimbome's family trust 
was prepared to accept a 
below-the- market price. 

The painting is on exhibi- 
tion this week in Christie's 
high-security viewing gallery 
in the West End, London. 
Sale room, page 18 



Detective Sergeant John Aflport, of Hammersmith, m 
training for the London Marathon on April 20 wearing au- 
thentic Bow Street Runner uniform 
(Photograph: JohnV 


Princess 
to open 
fertility 
clinic 

By Thomson Prentice 

Science Correspondent 

A new medical centre which 
aim$ to discover the cause of 
infertility in both men and 
women is being opened by the 
Princess of Wales today. 

The Princess is patron _ ol 
the Birthright charity, which 
has given a £500,000 grant to 
help hind the work of the unit, 
the Hams-Birtbright research 
centre for reproductive medi- 
cine, at the Jessop Hospital 
far Women in Sheffield. 

Couples who are unable to 
have children represent the 
biggest group, about 27 per- 
cent, of aO sufferers of infer- 
tility In Britain. 

Professor lan Cooke, the 
senior gynaecologist leading 
research at the unit, said 
yesterday: “We hope to be 
able to lower this sad statistic 
through our work in the next 
five years. 

The centre will offer more 
hope of conception particular- 
ly among older women who. 
Professor Cooke said, were 
invariably excluded from 
treatment at other units. 

“Many ia vitro fertilization 
clinics will pot even look at 
women over the age of 35 
because they believe the pros- 
pects for them are so poor." 

“However, we feel we can do 
something to help such wom- 
en, and even those over the age 
of 40." 

Spectrum, page 13 


A MICROWAVE WILL MAKE 
YOUR LIFE SIMPLER. 

ITS CHOOSING THE RIGHT ONE 

THATS DIFFICULT 





With so many different makes, modelsand 
sizes of microwave ovens on offer, how do you 
choose between them? 

If, like many people, you only want to de- 
frost frozen food or cook simple dishes like 
scrambled eggs, then you could be tempted to 
save money and go for a really basic model. 

But before you do so, consider Samsung. 

With the RE-670TC shown here, you can 
put a joint in the oven before you go to work. 

Then, at the correct time, the cooker will 
de-frost the meat, cook it and if necessary, keep 
it warm until you arrive home. Automatically. 

All this for around £240. A price thafs little 
more than some of the most basic microwaves. 

How come? Well, Samsung is one of the 
worlds largest manufacturers of microwave 
ovens. 


Yet surprisingly, we only make two sizes. 
Compact and large. Each coming in a basic or 
more sophisticated version. 

This means that by keeping the size of our 
range down, we can keep the quality high and 
the prices lower. 

So if you're in the market for a microwave 
oven, take a look at Samsung, 

We'll give you a real choice, not just a 
big one. . 




Peer ‘appalled at 
chaos’ on vessel 
in tall ships race 


There was “considerable 
chaos" aboard the sailing 
barque Marques not krogte- 
fore it sank with the loss of 19 
lives during the 1984 Tall 
Ships Race, a public inquiry 
was told yesterday. 

Lord Napier and Ettnck, 
who visited the ship in Bermu- 
da on the day before the start 
of the second le* of the race to 
Halifax. Nova Scotia, said: I 
was appalled at the general 
condition of what appeared to 
me to be, and I would go so far 
as to say, the unseawonh i ness 
of this vesseL" 

The 72-vear-oId. 8> ton, 
three-masted square rigger 
sank in 45 seconds on July 3 
1984. on the northern edge of 
the Bermuda Triangle after 
she was blown on her side in a 
sudden violent squall. Four 
Britons were among the dead 
and there were nine survivors. 

The public investigation 
into the sinking opened in 
Plymouth on October 14 last 
vear before Mr Richard Stone, 
QC, the Wreck Commission- 
er. and was adjourned eight 
weeks later. It resumed in 
London yesterday. 

Lord Napier, who was a 
guest of Lora Dunrossil. Gov- 
ernor of Bermuda, when they 
visited the Marques, said his 
impression was one of “quite 
considerable chaos" aboard 
the ship. 

He said the captain was 
surrounded by paperwork, 
and had told them be was 


trying to complete it but did 
noi understand some of the 
forms. 

Lord Napier said he gamed 
the impression that the well of 
the ship was wide open and 
that there were no proper 
hatches. He said he had told 
the Governor on disembark- 
ing: “My goodness me. 1 
would not wish to go to sea in 
thaL" Lord Dunrossil had 
commented in jest "No. I 
don't think we shall see her 
again." 

Lord Napier said he was 
instrumental in gelling a pub- 
lic inquiry into the sinking. He 
had raised the matter in the 
House of Lords after reading 
an article in The Sunday 
Times last summer by the 
mother of Ben Bryant, of 
Kentish Town, north-west 
London, who died in the 
disaster. 

The other Britons who died 
were Mr Peter Messer-Ben- 
netts. aged 20. of Wadebridge, 
Cornwall. Miss Gillian 
Shaughnessey. aged 24. ship's 
cook, of West Brampton, 
south-west London, and Mr 
Ian Brims, aged 48. a journal- 
ist and father of three who 
worked in Toronto. Canada, 
after moving from Hove. East 
Sussex. 

The Marques appeared in 
television series including The 
Onedin Line. The Voyage of 
Charles Darwin , and Poiaark. 
The inquiry’ continues today. 


PARLIAMENT APRIL 7 1986 


Britain failing to 
exploit sea fully 


HOUSE OF LORDS 

Britain was neglecting the re- 
sources of the sea. Lord Gregson 
(Lab) said when he opened a 
debate in the House of Lords on 
the report of the science and 
technology committee 
onmarine science and 
technology. 

The sea would become more 
and more important as a source 
of energy, food and raw materi- 
als. he said, yet knowledge of the 
sea and the sea bed was in- 
complete and sometimes 
nonexistent. 

It is unbelievable (be said) 
that our marine environment is 
probably less understood and 
less .well researched than, the 
new frontiers of space. 

The morale of researchers was 
suffering because of the lack of 
money. Then there was the 
extraordinary fragmentation 
and lack of coordination of the 
UK's effort in marine science 
and technology. 

Lord Nogjeot off Gnfldfbrd (C) 
said Government funding was 
low and set on a decreasing 
scale. It was already far short of 
an adequate level and much less 
than that of other maritime 
nations. 

We are missing opportunities 
(he went on) and will miss more 
both on our own shores and 
throughout the oceans of the 
world Unless we can mount a 
greater research effort and pro- 
vide bigger funds we shall 
simply fell out of the big league. 

Lord Kennel (SDP) said the 
House should set up a select 
committee on British maritime 
policy' as a whole. It was in the 
marine sector as a whole that 
this country, and this country 
alone, had suffered a cata- 
strophic economic decline over 
the past 10 or 15 years. 


Lord Carver (Ind) said the 
defence ministry's policy of 
running down research and 
development establishments in 
favour of farming out research 
and development to industry ! 
would not help. 

What was needed was an-' 
extension of contacts between; 
the Ministry of Defence R and 
D establishments and firms 
which were not primarily work- 
ing in the defence field. That ' 
would very much apply 10 ' 
marine science. 

It seemed to him a serious ' 
matter highlighted by this report 
that this country, so dependent 
on the sea in so many ways, and 
with so great maritime experi- 
ence. had no department of 
Government nor individual in 
Cabinet who felt responsible for 
watching over the maritime 
interest 

Lord McIntosh of Haringey, 
for the Opposition, said the first 
thing to be said about defence 
expenditure was that the share 
of the iota) budget as it could be 
analysed, which was the 
responsibility of the Ministry of 
Defence and its agencies was 
grossly excessive. It could not be 
right that so much of the total 
amount spent on marine science 
and technology should be the 
responsibility of the MoD. . 

The Earl of Swinton, replying to 
the debate for the Government, 
said the Government was at the 
moment actively involved in 
producing a response to the 
report, but with such a wide area 
covered and more than 60 
conclusions and recommenda- 
tions involved and a large; 
□umber of departments, the 
Government had not yet been . 
able to produce a response such 
as this report deserved, but 
would do so as soon as possible, 
certainly before the summer 
recess. 


Drink laws need 
urgent reform 


LICENSING 

The Home Secretary would 
want to consider carefully the 
implications before relaxing the 
licensing laws in England and 
Wales. Visconnt Davidson, the 
Government spokesman, said 
in replying to a debate in the 
House of Lords on the licensing 
laws. 

Lord Motloy (Lab) had said that 
the laws could be summed up as 
organized frustration. 

He believed the laws made 
Britain look silly. It would be 
impossible to change them for 
the worse unless there was 
prohibition. 

Viscount Montgomery of Ala- 
mein (Q. who initialed the 
debate, said there was urgent 
need for reform. The three mam. 
reasons were the special in- 
terests of restaurants, the bene- 
fits for tourism and the 
employment impact. 

The report on tire Scottish 
experience demonstrated that 
the limited reforms introduced 
there had been extremely effec- 
tive. 

Lady Madeod of Borre (C) 
said licensing laws which 
m at ch ed those abroad would 
do much for tourists who could 
not be expected to understand 
the existing system.. The 
Government ought to take the 
plunge and try new licensing 
hours as an experiment which 
could be withdrawn if 
unsuccessful. 

Viscount Falkland (SDP) said 
it had taken some time for the 
drinking habits -in Scotland to 
change following the 
introduction of new licensing 
hours and the same would 
happen in England and Wales, 
so it should be taken gradually. 
Lady Sharpies (O said she used 
to have a licensed restaurant 
where people eating could drink 
until 3 pm. Other customers 
could not understand this. She 
did not believe there would be 
an increase in alcohol consump- 




tion in pubs because she had 
seen at first hand that people 
drank only what they could 
afford and did not abuse the 
hours. 

Lord Harris of High. Crass, 
(Ind) said there was no longer 
any objective or logical justifica- 
tion for imposing restrictions 
and prohibitions on opening 
times for pubs, any more than 
for shops, cinemas, hotels or 
dubs. ... 

Lord Campbell of Croy <Q said 
that when be was Secretary of 
State for Scotland he -had ap- 
pointed the committee in 1971 : 
to review the licensing laws in 
Scotland, so he admitted to 
being responsible for negotiat- 
ing .the reform in there. 

Lady . Emrt-Bhgs, fen- the 
Opposition, saiatbe family of 
today would like to have a drink 
together. There should be more 
provision of non-alcoholic : 
drinks and something for chil- ' 
dren to do in a pub. . 

. If services and environment 
were changed to make it. pos- 
sible for foem to.be there, the 
presence of children would have • 
a highly beneficial effect on the ' 
amount of drinking. 

Viscount Davidson, replying for 
the Government, said they 
could not pretend that the 
problems associated with 
alcohol " misuse . were, 
insignificant. . 

There was some encouraging 
news from the Scottish report 
that the ebangebad led to more 
relaxed and more leisurely 
drinking. It would be wrong to 
suggest dial the increased levels . 
of drinking were directly 
attributable to the change in 
Scotland's licensittt hours, but. . 
equally one should not pretend 
that relaxing the licensing 
boors would always bring 
relaxed drinking. 

Overall the changes m 
licensing laws in Scotland had 
been popular. Surveys in 
England and Wales did not 
suggest widespread support for 
change. 






I 


^r. -- 


HOME NEWS 


iriL jl iiVLfcS 1 ULoi>nA rmuL o i>Qo 



The only surprising thing 
about Mr Denis Healey's 
comments on Mr Neil 
Kinnock's leadership is that 
he should hare made diem at 
all- He most surely have 
known that in speaking to Mr 
Arrigo Levi, the distingnisbed 
jofirnalist from La Stamps he 
was not giving his views to the 

Italian public alone. 

Bat what he said was accu- 
rate. Mb- Kinnock is politically 
intelligent He does have cour- 
age. But it is also true that be 
k<s never held any office in 
any government, that he there- 
fore lacks experience for the 
premiership, and that this lack 
con Id be critical in an election 
where the conntry is looking 
for strong leadership. 

It is only lair to Mr Kmnock 
to place equal emphasis on 
each of these three judgments. 
He is an intensely ambitions 
man with the understanding to 
appreciate that If he is ever to 
realize his goal of becoming 
prime minister be has to lead 
Labour back towards the 
mainstream of British politics. 
He has therefore deliberately 
* ' moderated most of the party's 
''principal policies, with the 
notable exception of defence. 

During the miners' strike he 
was inconsistent in his cour- 
age. But since then he has 
been admirably tough towards 
his extremists. Nobody could 
have asked for greater courage 
than he displayed in his 
attacks on successive days at 
the party conference last au- 
tumn on Militant and Mr 
Arthur ScaigOL Nor has his 
personal reputation for cour- 
age been diminished by the 
fiasco at the NEC over Mili- 
tant a fortnight ago. 


No experience a 
i double handicap 


If he becomes Prime Mins- 
ter, however, he will be the 
first person to do so without 
any ministerial experience 
since Ramsay MacDonald in 
1923. This will be a double 
handicap for him, ekctorally 
and in Downing Street should 
be get there. 

In some countries, the Unit- 
ed States being die most 
conspicuous example, the po- 
litical culture does not require 
a person to have held national 
office before being elected 
head of government. It is 
different in Britain. 

Unless a politician has held 
ministerial office the elector- 
ate here tends to feel dial he or 
she is untested. How can a 
person ran a government with- 
out knowing how the Cabinet 
system and the somewhat 
arcane processes of Whitehall 
actually work from the inside? 

Labour would probably not 
have won its landslide victory 
in 1945 if the country had not 
become accustomed to Labour 
politicians serving as minis- 
ters in Churchill's wartime 
coalition. The experience con- 
veyed an aura of political 
solidity. The Alliance now is 
eager to serve in some coali- 
tion whenever it gets the 
chance because that would be 
the best way to acquire weight 
in the eyes of the electorate. 


Broad themes but 
few details 


Mr Kinnock's danger is that 
he may appear a personally 
attractive lightweight He is 
less stndions in his paper work 
Han most political leaders. 
Consequently he is better at 
expounding the broad themes 
of policy than in determining 
the detains. 

As a general role that 
matters less in opposition than 
in office. Too much detail can 
be n positive disadvantage in 
opposition; ft is a hostage to 
criticism and can so easily be 
/ ! overtaken by events. Bat it is 
1 nonetheless important that a 
potential prime minister 
should appear to have a full 
grasp of the substance of 
policy- 

In office, a prime minister 
needs such a grasp if he is to 
be the dominating influence on 
his government. If Mr 
Kinnock becomes prime minis- 
ter, however, it is more likely 
that he will operate as chair- 
man of the beard rather than 
as managing director. He will 
be alive to political implica- 
tions and sensitive _ on the 
presentation of policy. Bnt 
others will provide the mam 
thrust on the substance. 

Already Mr Hattersley is 
exercising considerable influ- 
ence across the range of 
domestic policy: other shadow 
ministers have to check with 
him before making spending 
commitments. And if Mr 
Healey ever becomes foreign 
secretary he will exercise far 
more power in Labour coun- 
sels than he does now. 

The balance of experience 
and knowledge would make it 
inevitable that a Kinnock gov- 
ernment would operate more 
by collective leadership than 
has been the practice in this 
country for many years. 


£4 2m machines 
order to help 
Japanese grow 
food in water 

By John Yoang; Agriadtrae Correspondent 


A British com] 
announced a £42 million export 
order to supply Japan with 
machines to grow cheap grain 
and fodder. 

The machines employ a tech- 
nique known as hydropony, the 
cultivation of plants in water. 

Bui the significance of the 
new machines, developed by 
Landsaver, of Corby, North- 
amptonshire. is that they need 
only a fraction of the amount of 
water normally required. 

According to the manufactur- 
ers, the system uses only 2 per 
cent of the water required by 
boom sprinklers, wind) are 
widely wed m countries such as 
Saudi Arabia. 

The largest machine can 
produce up to one tonne of grass 
a day. and experiments have 
suggested a rice crop can be 
grown in nine days compared 
with 40 by conventional meth- 
ods. A further advantage is that 
the accelerated growth requires 
heat which in arid countries is 
freely available from the sun. 

Although Japan has a temper- 
ate climate, it is short of pasture 
and imports large quantities of 
feed for its 4,600,000 dairy 
cattle. 

The first two machines are 


due to arrive in Japan later tins 
month and should be in foil 
production by the time Mrs 
Thatcher leaves for next 
month's economic summit in 
Tokyo. 

Fifty-nine more will be deliv- 
ered by the end of the year, and 
thereafter about SO a month win 
be shipped in kit form. 

Mr Geoffrey Lusty, Land- 
saver’s managing director, said 
the Japanese told him they 
could not compete with the 
British on price or technology. 

Until recently there was a 
danger that the company might 
have to sell the new system to 
foreign interests because it 
lacked a financial backer. Then, 
Midland Gty Partnership, of 
Telford, agreed to provide fi- 
nance and marketing support 

Mr Michael Jophng. Minister 
of Agriculture, yesterday con- 
gratulated Landsaver on win- 
ning ‘This m^jor export order'’. 

He saidTJapan has the repu- 
tation of being a particularly 
difficult market to enter. This 
success shows what can be done 
by having a product the custom- 
er needs together with the 
energy, technology and enter- 
prise to back it up." 



Miss Diana Goodman (left) and Miss Elizabeth Blunt, the BBCs first women foreign corre- 
spondents, getting together in London before leaving for Bonn and Abidjan respectively. 


Rebel miners may 
boycott Labour 


Breakaway miners in Not- 
tinghamshire are looking at 
the possibility of withdrawing 
financial support from the 
Labour Party. 

The Creswell colliery 
branch, near Mansfield, has 
drawn up an appeal calling on 
other branches within the new 
Union of Democratic Mine- 
workers to boycott Labour. 

Mr Neil Greatrex, the union 
pensions officer, claimed yes- 
terday «h«r hundreds of min- 
ers in the Nottinghamshire 
coalfield were disillusioned 
with the Labour Party’s treat- 
ment of them. 

“We invited Neil Kinnock 
to speak at our national 
conference to be held in June. 
Kinnock sent a five-sentence 


letter back saying he would 
not attend the conference and 
no one from the Labour Party 
would attend in his place. 

“It is obviously a snub 
towards foe UDM and 
Creswell branch in particular 
are incensed by this. 

“They have put out an 
appeal to brandies suggesting 
that we withdraw support 
from foe Labour Party,” Mr 
Greatrex said. 

Each branch will discuss foe 
proposal and at the end of this 
month delegates will vote on 
foe matter. 

• Kinsley drift mine at 
Hemsworth, near Barnsley, a 
Yorkshire “super pit” which 
opened seven years ago at a 
cost of £30 million, is to dose. 


Inner city revival: 2 


Government doubts on urban development corporations 


The urban development 
corporation concept has work- 
ed successfully in London's 
docklands and has been 
adopted at Merseyside, but at 
present it seems unlikely that 
others will be formed. The 
Government is looking into 
the matter. 

Mr Kenneth Baker, Secre- 
tary of State for the Environ- 
ment, recently said be thought 
it might be difficult to estab- 
lish them in highly populated 
areas where the extent of 
dereliction was not great 

The New Towns chairmen, 
led by Lord Northfield, chair- 
man of Telford Development 


Corporation, have presented 
DoE ministers with a report 
recommending foe establish- 
ment of a central urban devel- 
opment corporation, based on 
the Government's willingness 
to channel funds into the area. 

A variation on the theme 
comes from The Phoenix Part- 
nership report commissioned 
by the National Council of 
Building Material Producers, 
which argues that to encour- 
age public-private partnership 
there should be a carrot; a 
wider availability of urban 
development aid grant-style 
and related tax exempt loans. 

Two initiatives come from 


In tire second of two articles, 
Christopher War-man, Proper- 
ty Correspondent, examines 
tire contribatiou by tire private 
sector towards the revival of 
the inner cities. 

the British Property Federa- 
tion, which is sending teams 
to deprived areas to advise 
owners of derelict land on the 
best way to bring it into use, 
and from tbe House-Builders 
Federation. 

Tbe HBF is determined to 
break through the rhetoric and 
good intentions to action, and 
has set up a commission 


charged with finding out foe 
real situation in foe inner 
cities, which is likley to look at 
12 specific areas; Newcastle 
upon Tyne or Middlesbrough, 
Sheffield or Leeds, Manches- 
ter or Salford, Leicester, Car- 
diff, Portsmouth, Luton and 
three in greater London. All- 
have problems, many differ- 
ent ones. It could be a tightly 
drawn Green Bell, decay but 
little open space, or just an 
unexplained failure to build 
houses in foe centre. 

In some cases where build- 
ing has taken place in badly 
decaying areas, it has foiled to 
bring foe neighbourhood up. 


and that means there is a 
difficulty with resales, values 
drop, building society repos- 
sessions increase, and no one 
is better off So foe HBF is 
trying to pick a way through 
the complexities, and while it 
claims to start with no precon- 
ceptions, Roger Humber. 
HBF director, says: “We be- 
lieve it will be a damned 
expensive business. It will 
require substantial sums of 
grant money, and we want, 
therefore, to make sure the 
Government is fully aware of ■ 
what can be done and what 
cannot be done." 

Cood tided 


Hungarian 
keeps 
chess lead 

By Harry Golombek 
Chess Correspondent 

Just past the half way stage 
of the Oakham School Inter- 
national Junior Tournament 
at Rutland, the Hungarian 
player, Csaba Horvath, aged 
17, leads with 4ft points from 
5 games. 

His fuU-point lead from foe 
previous round was dimin- 
ished yesterday when Neil 
McDonald, aged 19, of En- 
gland, won a nicely played 
knight ending against another 
English player, Kenneth Shov- 
el, to leave him with four 
points from five rounds. 

McDonald was recently 
placed first in the GLC Chess 
Challenge in London, where 
he attained his second leg of 
the international master title. 
AD he needs now is one more 
norm to be awarded foe title. 

Three other English players 
are right on his tail with 3ft 
points each after the fifth 
round; Hastings International 
Master Stuart Conquest, who 
recovered from his fourth 
round loss by beating foe 
Yugoslav player, Nikolic, An- 
gus Dunnington, who upset 
the lop seeded player in the 
tournament. Joseph Klinger, 
of Austria, and Graham wad- 
dington, who won against Luis 
Galego, of Portugal. 

The only other players with 
3ft points are: Scottish inter- 
national master Mark Condie, 
World Under- 16 Champion 
Eduardo Rojas, of Chile, and 
Poland's Robert Kuczynskl. 

Share option 
in local shop 

An unusual community su- 

? crmarket founded with a 
25.000 loan from the Greater 
London Enterprise Board, 
opened in Harefieid yesterday 
on foe site of a former Co-op 
store which closed in 1984. 

The Village Shop was in- 
spired by Mr Bill Leach, 
chairman of the local tenants' 
association, who enlisted the 
help a a retail consultant and a 
food wholesaler. Harefieid res- 
idents can buy shares in the 
shop for 25p. 

£500 fine over 
illegal sausage 

An unemployed 

Yorksbireman caught smug- 
gling German sausage meat at 
Southend airport. Essex, was 
fined £500 by magistrates at 
Southend yesterday. 

Wladyslaw Wowk. of East 
Crescent. East Deane. Rother- 
ham, claimed that relatives 
near Frankfurt had urged him 
to sneak home foe 13 kilos of 
bacon, salami and sausage. 

Channel ferry 
damaged 

Tbe British-based cargo fer- 
ry’, Viking Trader, was slightly 
damaged trying to force a log 
jam left by striking French 
seamen at Le Havre yesterday, 
a strike spokesman said. 

The Townsend-Thoresen 
ferry was trying to berth after 
arrival from Portsmouth, foe 
spokesman said. 

Royal stamp 

A stamp to marie the mar- 
riage of Prince Andrew and 
Miss Sarah Ferguson will be 
issued on July 1 5 for the royal 
event on July 23. foe Post 
Office said yesterday. The 
Queen has still to approve the 
design. 


Imperial Shareholders: 

The United Biscuits offer has the 
unanimous recommendation 
of your Board. 

You have only three days left 

to accept it! 




fi 


Please complete your white United Biscuits acceptance form and make sure you post it in 
time to be received by 3 ■ 00 pm this. Friday, 11th April 1986. 

If you are in any doubt how to complete the form, ring our Hdp Line on 0272 666961 and reverse 
the charges. 

And if you would like to hear your Chairman, Me Geoffrey Kent, explain why the Imperial Board 
unanimously recommend the UB offer; please ask the operator for Freefone Imperial Group. 



i«rrri — TTT 1 1 

■■i i i i | ' t* i t i 
HI I . l I •; J i I ; » 

11 ! I i U:-! l l.r 


Eik-T 






DAYS LEFT TO ACCEPT 1/S 
UB OFFER 


A • J • ~X • X ■ & ■ A 















: 6 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


Israeli bombs 
set Lebanon 
back to years 
before invasion 

From Robert Fisk, Sidnn 

‘Tell Arid Sharon there was and an official who said be 






not one casualty among us,” 
the Palestinian guerrilla 
shouted. But be was wrong. 

Ten-year-old Abdullah 
Khodor was wounded in the 
head when the Israelis 
bombed the little hill below 
Mieh Mieh. A 21-year-old 
woman was among the in- 
jured, and eight young men - 
officially described as civilians 
but quite possibly Palestinian 
gunmen — were an taken 
down to the Hamoud hospital 
before the smoke had cleared. 

Muhammad Paris had been 
eating his lunch on a nig 
beneath a tree when the first 
F16 jet fired a rocket into a 
house only 40ft from him. 
Abu Mazcn was asleep in the 
house when he heard a woman 
screaming and threw himself 
to safety in the cellar. 

The Israelis claimed later 
that they had attacked a 
Palestinian guerrilla base. The 
Palestinians standing amid 
the rubble on Mieh Mieh 
maintained that it had been a 
base but that they had evacu- 
ated the houses three mouths 
ago. 

It was a moot point. After 
the raid, the roadway was 
swarming with young gunmen 
who said openly they belonged 
to the Popular Front for the 
Liberation of Palestine. 

Indeed. Muhammad Fans 
was a member of the PFLP, 


belonged to the pro-Syrian 
“Palestine Salvation Front” 
and gave his name as Abu 
Chaleb told me that the 
Israelis had made six separate 
sorties against the houses on 
thehilL 

A 40-year-old woman with a 
lined, haggard face confirmed 
what be said. “I saw two 
planes at first . They turned 
round above me and then the 
house across the road blew 
up,” she said. 

The heaviness of the raid— 
other witnesses said that there 
were at least 10 Israeli aircraft 
involved — was a demonstra- 
tion of just bow seriously the 
Israelis now take the Palestin- 
ian military presence around 
Sidon. 

In the aftermath of the 
bombing it was all too appar- 
ent that pro-Syrian Palestin- 
ian guerrillas have re- 
established themselves above 
— although not inside — the 
city of Sidon. 

Tbe Israelis said that the 
Palestinians there had 
planned a recent raid against 
IsraeL True or not, an old 
pattern has been established of 
attacks by Palestinians and 
retaliatory air raids against 
them in southern Lebanon; 
which is exactly what hap- 
pened in the years before the 
Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 
1982. 



A Palestinian holding 


toman homing up shrapnel, evidence of an Israeli bombing raid yesterday on me of 
the camps near Sidon, claimed by Jerusalem to be a guerrilla training site. 


US certain of Libyan plot * 
to hit Americans abroad 

From Christopher Thomas, Washington 

Thf n pa pan Ariminktra tinn Libyan-connected attacks on waters of the Gulf of Snte two 

• - ■ « — 1 weeks ago. 

Mr Robert Oakley, director 
of the State Department's 
Office of Counter-Terrorism, 
raid the Administration began 
warning European govern- 
ments from last October and 

November that a big terrorism 
threat was on its way, # 

It is a key clement of the 
Administration's anti-terror- 
ism drive to draw the Europe" 
an aiii« into internationally 
co-ordinated action. It be- 
lieves the continued attacks in 
Europe are finally beginning 
to bring that about. 

“Out objective is to get 
Europe to work with us, to do 
more about this threat, wheth- 
er it be from Libya. Syria, Iran 
or elsewhere,” Mr Oakley 
said. 

He added that the attacks in 
Rome and Vienna fitted the 
pyHaffi pattern, as did the 


has dearly convinced an out- 
raged American public that 
Libya is behind the worldwide 
terrorist campaign against US 
targets abroad. 

A White House official said 
that the weekend bomb attack 
in West Berlin on La Belle 
discotheque fitted the Gadaffi 
pattern, although he was not 
yet prepared to apportion 
blame for it 

“There is obviously a mas- 
ter plan from Gadaffi to cause 
terrorist incidents worldwide, 
and particularly to attack 
Americans,” he added. 

After five years of mounting 
bitterness, tbe Administration 
has exhausted most diplomat- 
ic options. It is immensely 
frustrated that the economic 
sanctions, imposed on Janu- 
ary 7 in response to alleged 


the airports in Rome and 
Vienna, have proved ineffec- 
tive because of the refusal of 
West European governments 
to follow suit 

The US is now privately 
asking European governments 
to expel Libyan diplomats and 
suspected agents, although it 
does not expect much re- 
sponse. However, it regards 
the weekend French expulsion 
of two Libyan diplomats as an 
encouraging sign. 

There is considerable anger 
within the Administration 
that West Europe tends to 
dismiss the anti-Gadaffi cam- 
paign as an American obses- 
sion. The US noted with 
dismay the general lukewarm 
European reaction to the na- 
val and air attacks against 
Libyan targets in the disputed 


Mansur offer to police 


Tripoli, Lebanon (Reuter) — 
Mrs May Elias Mansur, aged 
31, whom Greek police would 
like to question over the 
bombing of a TWA Boeing 
said yesterday she would co- 
operate with Greek investiga- 
tors if they came to Lebanon. 

She denies any involvement 
in the bombing, which killed 


four people. 

Greek police have said they 
want to question Mrs Mansur, 
who travelled on the airliner, 
but on an earlier flight on 
Wednesday. Mrs Mansur, a 
former Lebanese guerrilla, 
says her militia would never 
have ordered her to bomb an 
airliner. 


latest atrocity in Berlin. “That 
does not mean we have co9p 
elusive evidence that can link 
it to Libya. Nevertheless, there 
have been a number of sur- 
veillances of American em- 
bassies by Libyans in a 
number of countries. The 
Libyans are beginning to come 
out in the open.” 

Letters, Page 17 


Army says guerrillas were hit 


Jerusalem — According to 
an Israeli Army spokesman, 
the targets bit belonged to Mr 
Yassir Arafat's Fatah and Mr 
George Habash's Popular 
Front for the Liberation of 
Palestine (David Bernstein 
writes). 


He said all the planes 
returned safely to base and 
reported accurate hits. 

Security sources here said 
the targets attacked included 
Fatah headquarters, a broad- 
casting station and several 
training bases. 


Students brave wrath of kidnappers 


From Robert Fisk 
Beirut 

“It’s not by kidnapping 
Professor Douglas that you’ll 
get Mrs Thatcher,” one of the 
banners — M. “Stop kidnap- 
ping our professors,” said 
another. 

More disturbing was the girl 
who held np a smaller placard 
in front of visitors to the 
American University in Bei- 
rut. “Who is next?” it asked. 

It was a brave enough little 
demonstration by the Leba- 
nese undergraduates who have 
lost two of their British teach- 


ers to the kidnappers of west 
Beirut. 

Professor John Douglas's 
colleagues from the English 
department were there, and so 
were a group of young men and 
women — many of them Mus- 
lims — wearing the badge of 
tbe Red Cross in protest at tiie 
recent abduction of three Red 
Cross workers. 

There has been no word of 
Professor Douglas or his 
friend ami colleague, Philip 
HadfieM, since their kidnap- 
ping last week 

The disappearance of the 


two Britons brought up to 406 
students to die steps of the 
university's West HaB yester- 
day in a symbolic “sit-in” to 
ripnwivt their return. 

As a girl undergraduate 
from the English department 
wrote on her own banner, 
“Even If we are powerless in 
terms of force, we stiO have the 
power of words — after aD, 
they cant kidnap n$ all, can 
they?” 

It did emerge yesterday that 
Professor Doqjhs had been 
in Mg home by two 
men a month before his kid- 


napping. His colleague* Pro- 
fessor Ptdfip Grant, an 
American, said that die assail- 
ants had been trying to find 
tbe whereabouts of a man 
whom they w r on gl y believed 
Professor Donglas knew. 

“He got scratches on his 
face and bruises on the bead,” 
Professor Grant said. “He 
contacted various political 
groups afterwards and there 
was a ‘dragnet* to find tbe two 
men. It seemed that it was 
some personal vendetta in 
which be was the innocent 
party; be didn't even know tbe 
man they wanted.” 


If you give us 




..well give you 

thismuc' 



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Shops join 
stoppage 
in Greece 

From Mario Modiano 
Athens 

Thousands of Greek work- 
ers, employees, shopkeepers 
and artisans staged a one-day 
strike in 30 Greek cities 
yesterday to protest against 
the Government's economic 
policy. 

The strike, sponsored by 
Communist unions and dissi- 
dent Socialists, but also by the 
more sedate merchants’ asso- 
ciations. led to the cancella- 
tion of all Olympic Airways 
flights and tbe dosing of 
banks, stores and workshops, 
while public transport was 
erratic and trains pulled to a 
halt 

Tbe workers were pressing 
for an end to the pay freeze 
and to state intervention in 
tbe labour unions. Shopkeep- 
ers and artisans were protest- 
ing against the penalties for 
tax evasion, while merchants 
want rental ceilings and an 
end to price control 

• STOCKHOLM: Sweden 
was heading into the first 
phase of a new bout of 
massive industrial action to- 
day as 18,000 white-collar 
workers in private industry 
strike in dispute of a wages 
claim (Christopher Mosey 
writes). 

• HELSINKI: The Swedish 
Prime Minister, Mr Ingvar 
Carisson, made the journey to 
Finland for an official visit 
yesterday by sea after the 
strike closed Helsinki airport. 


Contadora 
wants aid 
vote delay 

From John Carlin . 

Mexico City 

The Contadora Group has 
asked the US Congress to 
postpone the vote on Presi- 
dent Reagan's request for aid 
to Nicaraguan Contra rebels, 
in Older to give Central Amer- 
ica breathing space to sign a 
long-sought regional peace 
treaty. 

The foreign ministers of the 
Contadora Group — Mexico, 
Colombia, Venezuela and 
P anama — were concluding a 
meeting in Panama early yes- 
terday with their counterparts 
from Argentina, Brazil. Uru- 
guay, Peru and the five Cen- 
tral American countries. 

A two-month deadline was 
set for diplomatic efforts to 
agree on bunting solutions to 
the increasingly dangerous 
conflict in Central America. 

Three US Democratic con- 
gressmen. in Panama for the 
meeting, held private talks 
with the four Contadora for- 
eign ministers, at which the 
congressmen were asked “at 
the very least” to postpone the 
vote on the 'White House 
request for $100 million in aid 
to the Contras. 

The Contadora foreign min- 
isters said that any foreign 
support for rebel forces m 
Central America “under- 
mined the peace process in the 
region and could provoke the 
expansion of the violence and 
the war” 

The congressmen said that 
they would relay the post- 
ponement request to Wash- 
ington colleagues. 

If the Contadora request is 
granted, Mr Michael Baines 
(Democrat) said, “it win allow 
this group time to see if its 
peace initiative can succeed”. 

The US Congressmen said: 
“The four (Contadora) minis- 
ters were unanimous, strong 
and profound in declaring to 
us that United States aid to the 
Contras goes against the Cen- 
tral American peace effort.” 

The meeting of the 13 Latin 
American foreign ministers, 
due to end on Sunday, was 
extended until the early hours 
yesterday as discussions on 
signing a Central American 
peace treaty became bogged 
down. 


Guerrillas 
hanged in 
Zimbabwe*. 

Harare — Two guerrillas 
were hanged, after being sen- 
tenced to death for tbe murder 
of six foreign tourists, two . of 
them Britons, in western Zim- 
babwe in 1982 (Jan Raath 
writes). 

Gilbert Sitshda Ngwenya, 
aged 44, and Austin Mpofu, 
aged 27, were part of a gang 
which in July, 1982 abducted 
the six tourists 35 miles north 
of Bulawayo. 

The kidnapping and subse- 
quent kilting of the tourists 
was one of tbe most contro- 
versial acts in Zimbabwe's 
nearly five-year-old war be- 
tween security forces and 
guerrillas claiming allegiance 
to the Zapu party of Mr£ 
Joshua Nkomo. 

Winning novel 

Paris (Reuter) — The French 
novelist. Marguerite Duras. 
who two years ago won 
France’s top literary prize, the 
Prix Goncourt. has won tbe 
literary world's richest prize, 
the $50,000 Ritz Paris Hem- 
ingway Award for her novel 
L’Amant. 

Kangaroo toll 

Sydney (Reuter) — Up to six 
million kangaroos, more than 
the legal quota, were slaugh- 
tered in Australia last year, the 
Fund for Animals claimed, 
but government wildlife offi- 
cials demanded proof ; ± 

Docks blast 

Hamburg (AP) — Two 
workers died in an explosion 
on the 55.000-ton West Ger- 
man cargo ship Fanny in a 
dockyard here. 

Croc haul 

Bangkok (UPI) — Thieves 
have stolen 149 young croco- 
diles. measuring 2ft to 3t long 
and worth some £13,000, from 
the world's biggest crocodile 
form at Saraut Prakan. 

Time to rape 

Peking (Reuter) — Rich 
Chinese peasants are turning 1 4 . 
to crime, especially rape, to " 
beat boredom spawned of 
leisure, according to an official 
newspaper, the Tianjin Daily 
News. 


Devaluation of the franc 


French union outcry muted 


Except for predictable criti- 
cism from tbe Socialists, tbe 
Government's decision to al- 
low a devaluation of die franc, 
with its accompanying pack- 
age of economic measares, has 
been fairly well received here. 

Even the expected outcry 
from the moons over the 
Government's plans to freeze 
the wages of the 5.4 arilfion 
public sector workers has so 
far been muted, largely as a 
result of a hint yesterday that 
the Government may at least 
allow individual wages to rise 
in line with inflation. 

M Andris Giauque, general 
secretary for (he pubic sector 
of the Force Onvritre, one of 
the three biggest unions, said 
after two hours of talks with M 
Hervf de Charette, Minster 
for the Civil Service: “Con- 
trary to what I have beard, 
there is no wage freeze”. 

The minister had not ex- 
cluded die possibility of talks' 
with the onions on negotiating 
a safeguard danse, to ensure 
that real wages were main- 
tained hi case prices rose 
higher than expected. 

However, the Finance Min- 
ister, M Edouard Balladar, 
has only talked of allowing the 
total public sector wage MB to 
rise in line with inflation, 
meaning a cut in real terms in 
indiriduls’ wages. In the 
private sector, employers will 
be left free to negotiate their 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 
own wage i n c r eases with the 

mnimw- 

Ssnday*s devalntation of the 
franc was the fourth in less 
ttmn five years. The last time 
was in March 1983, when the 
franc was devalued by 8 per 
cent against the Deutsche- 
marfc, bringing the total loss to 
value of dm franc against the 



M Edouard BaOadur, the 
French Finance Minister 
West German currency to 233 
per cent within 18 months. 

Since then, however, the 
differential in French and 
German inflation rates has 
opened np a new 12 per cent 
gap in prices in the two 
coontrieg, making it harder for 
French products, to remain 
compe titi ve in. fhe German 
market. - V' 

France's trade deficit with 


its number one trading partner 
has remained stubbornly at 8 
billion francs (£2J5 billion) 
over the past three years. 

The previous Socialist 
Government's policies of eco- 
nomic rigour, coopted with the 
recent benefits from the lower ■ 
cost of oil and the fall in the 
dollar, had brought down 
France's inflation rate to 0.6 
per cent over the past six 
months, tbe same as in 
Germany. 

However, the higher cost of 
imports following devaluation 

and the new relaxation of price 

controls are expected to in- 
crease inflationary pressures 
in France and re-open the 
Price gap. 

In the industrial sector, 
where 90 per cent of prices 
were already freed, almost all 
remaining controls are to be 
lifted, as are tiueequrters of 
the controls in commerce. 

Freud tourists will be 
pleased fay - the decision to 
increase the limit on the 
amoimt of cash each person 
may take on holiday out of the 
country, from 5,000 francs to 
12,000 francs. They will also 
be allowed to triple the maxi- 
mum amount that may be 
drawn on credit cards abroad 
from 2,000 francs to feOOO 
francs. 

In addition, it will be possi- 
ble to use credit cards withont 

j*sfri«ioo-in France to settle 


fcr. 

/ • 

r 


< 




C 


% 








8 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


Glimpse 

into 

Soviet 

space 

Moscow — Soviet space 
chiefs gave Western reporters 
a rare glimpse of their normal- 
ly out-of-bounds mission con- 
trol yesterday, and staged a 
news conference at which two 
orbiting cosmonauts denied 
that their programme was 
military in nature (a Corre- 
spondent writes). 

Police cars escorted two 
Foreign Ministry buses carry- 
ing a large group of reporters 
to the Space Centre in Kali- 
ningrad. outside Moscow. It 
reflected Moscow's increasing 
confidence in its space pro- 
gramme since the launching of 
the new Mir space station on 
February 20. 

Several dozen controllers 
sat at video screens while 
television monitors tracked 
both Mir and the older Salyul- 
7 station, launched in April 
1982. 

The cosmonauts. Leonid 
Kizim and Vladimir 
Solovyov, appearing on a 
large television screen, took a 
camera through the Mir sta- 
tion. which they boarded last 
month, and showed a 
recreation area with rowing 
and cycling machines. The 
station, which Soviet space 
directors describe as the heart 
of the world's first permanent- 
ly-manned complex in space, 
has one cabin per cosmonaut 



A Peruvian villager. Senor Eusebio Qmjas, 
explaining how he lost almost everything he 
owned when his community was partially 
destroyed in Saturday's earthquake, which left 
eight dead. 35 injured and hundreds homeless. 
At least 11 villages were badly hit in the 
earthquake, which measured 5.8 on the Richter 
scale and had its epicentre near the southern 


city of Cuzco. Rescue workers yesterday 
appealed for help to airlift supplies to the 
remote mountain villages and said they were 
desperately short of supplies. There were only 
80 tents to house the estimated 600 homeless 
in the region, they said. Meanwhile, experts 
were checking damage to Spanish colonial 
buildings dating back to the 16th century. 


President Chun talks to ‘The Times^ 

Summit hope on divided Korea 


From David Watts 
Seoul 

President Chun Doo Hwan 
of South Korea hopes that 
there will be a summit meet- 
ing with his North Korean 
counterpart. President Kim II 
Sung, before the aid of the 
year. 

“1 am convinced that a 
summit conference between 
the parties directly involved is 
the best way to solve the 
urgent issues inherent in a 
divided country and to pre- 
vent miscalculations or mi$- 
judgmenls that could lead to 
war,” be said. 

“In the belief that a renewed 
war in Korea would not only 
be a catastrophe for the Kore- 
an people but could escalate 
into a global conflict, I have 
been steadfastly see k i n g, with 
maximum patience and good 
faith, a South-North dialogue 
to neutralize in advance the 
aggressive intentions of North 
Korea.” 

The President was answer- 
ing in writing questions sub- 
mitted by The Times last 
week. The answers were made 
available only after the Presi- 
dent left for London at the 
weekend. He answered six of 
the 12 questions submitted, 
avoiding some of those on 
domestic politics. 

In his answers he urged 
Britain to co-operate in creat- 
ing an environment condu- 
cive not only to the North- 
South summit but to the 


admission of both countries to 
the United Nations. 

“Further, I want to empha- 
size that our European friends 
should be very careful about 
promoting relations with 
North Korea, bec au s e such 
moves could lead North Ko- 
rea into misinterpreting the 
whole situation.” 

• TERRORISM THREAT: 
The President said that his 
European tour brought with it 
the same risks of terrorist 


frontation for the more than 
40 years since the nation was 

divided. _. 

“Earlier this year Norm 
Korea unilaterally broke on 
the inter-Korean dialogue, te; 
ing as a pretext Team Sprnt 
exercises, die annual Korea- 
US joint defensive manoeu- 
vres. At die same time they are 
heightening tension by drasti- 
cally expanding their offensive 

military capabilities whfle si- 
multaneously strengthening 


Demand for ministers to quit 

ister, Mr Sofan “J 

tjhe Information Munster “*■ 


Seoal (Renter) — The South 
Korean Opposition yesterday 
demanded in Parliament the 
dismissal offonr Cabinet min- 
isters for trying to suppress a 
campaign for election reforms. 

The opposition New Korea 
Democratic Party and the 
Korea National Party said 
their motion sought the dis- 
missal of dm Interior Minis- 
ter, Mr Chong Suk Mo, the 
Justice Minister, Mr Kim 
Seung Ky, the Education Mm- 


_ _ „ ... Mr 

Lee Won Hong. . ^ 

The move was expected to 
be defeated by the ruling 
Democratic Justice Party. _ 

• Riot charges: Sixteen of the 

141 anti-government demon- 
strators arrested In Taegu 
rioting on Saturday have been 
charged with mmnthnrized as- 
sembly and demonstr ations, 
the Yonhap news agency re- 
ported (AP reports). 


attack as were with him at 
home, 

“The Rangoon bombing 
atrocity once more taught the 
world that die Communists in 
North Korea are indeed will- 
ing to cany out their threats 
anywhere in the world, not 
only along the demilitarized 
zone cutting across the Kore- 
an peninsula which has been 
characterized by military con- 



THE DIFFERENCE 
IT MAKES TO YOUR 
MONTHLY INCOME 


Investment 

Average monthly income 

i Investment 

Average monthly income 

| Investment 

Average monthly income 

£ 2,000 

£ 20 

! £ 11,000 

£110 

I £ 20,000 

£200 

£ 3,000 

£ 30 

! £ 12,000 

£120 

£ 25,000 

i 1 

£250 

£ 4,000 

£ 40 

£ 13,000 

£130 

i £ 30,000 

£300 

£ 5,000 

£ 50 ! 

S £ 14,000 

£140 

i £ 35,000 

£350 

£ 6,000 

£ 60 

£ 15,000 

£150 

£ 40,000 

£400 

£ 7,000 

£ 70 

£ 16,000 

£160 

£ 45,000 

£450 

£ 8,000 

£ 80 

£ 17,000 

£170 i 

£ 50,000 

£500 

£ 9,000 

£ 90 

£ 18,000 

£180 ! 

i 

You can hold any amount from £2,000 up 
to £50,000 in multiples of£l,000.Each 

£ 10,000 

£100 

£ 19,000 

£190 j 

£1,000 of Income Bonds produces an 
average of £10 a month - £120 a year. 


As you can see, an investment in National Savings 
Income Bonds can make a lot of difference to your income. 
Currendy you 11 get 12% pa interest on your Income Bonds. 
You’ll get it paid monthly. And you’ll get it in full, because we 
don’t deduct tax. 

Enjo y life With A Monthly Income. The interest is 
sent direct to your home or your bank on the 5 th of each month. 

It means some extra money coming in regularly to help 
pay the bills or simply to spend enjoying life. 

Your Savin g s Are Never Touched Your capital is 
completely safe - die cash you put in is the cash you’ll get back. 
The rate paid may change from time to time, to keep it 
competitive. 


Interest is calculated on a day-to-day basis and is subject 
to tax if you are a taxpayer 

Getting Your Money Out. You need give only 3 months’! 
notice to have any Bond repaid. And there will be no loss of | 
interest if you’ve held your Bond for ayear or more. (For details 
of repayment, see paragraph 6 of the prospectus below.) 

Invest here and now. You can be sure your investment 
will always provide a worthwhile income - month in, month 
out. All you have to do is complete the coupon and send it 
with your cheque (payable to ‘National Savings?) to NSIB, 
Bonds and Stock Offrce,Blackpool,Lancs.FY3 9YEOraskfor 
an application form at your Post Office. It’s probably the most 
enjoyable investment you’ll ever make. 


NATIONAL SAVINGS INCOME BONDS 



APPLICATION FOR NATIONAL SAVINGS INCOME BOND 

To NSIB, Bonds and Stock Office, Blackpool, Lancs FY3 9YP 

104407 

iMte accepi trie terms of the Prospectus 
and apply for a Bond to the value of- £ 




ED 




,000 


Initial minimum of £2.000 
and multiples of £1.000 
to a maximum of £50.000 


Swtame(s) 


Full Christian nameis) or <orename<s) 


MrrMrVMiss 


Jddresi 

iirdudmq postcode* 


Day Month 'fear 


Nam* of Truy 
<it apptaabtei 


Date of Birth 
(essential >f under 7) 


NAME AND ADOBE'S j fO* DESPATCH OF INVESTMENT CERTIFICATE (Hteicfil hvnabovo 
Nam* 


DIVIDENDS TO BE F'Aip py CREDIT TO - -H nyi fr.ptljt „ : s*l Sp>-mgi Bart o> -..tr^rbani.atcia-jni -Kir** 
nameardadtWsiiOiiytv.ricJi.KiencJ^varr^it-snrjuidCpt **-ni 


Bor* 4:ri'n-3 Codi iWn" «■> lrv-rgnr 
tvjndar-K. oiyou C\V rh*am- 


Ada«*- 


a .. Mime* ii 


Signal 


. Cwt4 . 


PROSPECTUS 1 0ctober 1984 

i IneD-e.l 3 « *,i« ■f’g-. r, auhtoe itupIV LO-Jv orrtmunm ,.y rV, Mojt-J y i 
T"VM«» W unt-l twin* -<11 eacyV'.a par. for IWOR.I idtring-. to.ame 

Bonds 

? In* Bonds ..e lOoiemp : ■-e.mnv 'in Nji. /n^l,>iiviA,i 1968 

Toe* *•* ■'< ir— rtfi.jiM (Uq.vvr jn<j je -Aifiyei.i to o*. 

m IP r Ndt'OTWI S S.VM to 'he tent baif ul 

’>• i V5 , a'*jiiH'V;ae3it J, .Jt>‘rThtp'i«.'uaio'^d n'«*eOo>'it»'EloniS\«iibi' 
J >* iv- Loam, hma 

PURCHASE 

3 1 :odfnir^ u i*«.r,iiaip 0 i.;^v.^;i LliJK'i 4>j£|c'#*J rrw»t>» 

pu;<. "-•« <o» 1 1 0iK 1 1* a ir^it ?■ ioji vj- Ri/i»'i i" lull must tie made at iti. 
timfc.'l jpphiaiiae to-daie y D a .>a>,'a.ilct an p<yi>os.t[>>ft?4iM->':<lre> «ipr 
-Irv tfmnpnur arJO M .- 0 R <M f e d 400 IKal<on:onn al ttw Enn.J, jnd jlo..V Oll.fc. 

BU ksed O' V..O >10 m pia-e ■r, in* Dior >0. <Ji -in >Otr.ih 

3 2 On ■ranStrient -.ettiti.jtv tMK^mt-da'eotpui-.Oavr rail be >ViuM*i respect 

ct •fi'Oat»'^ia>' 

HOLDING LIMITS 

•J 1 Of (**■*.«, TTta*. h..m — 'rxc* . a lO^tlv *'!*’ •*>»» oit*e> p^v^. i«-. than 

U CO.' <x TK*r '0.1T ijCC'o'ev'W-. & »»3o.iW< I-^Oi-»nriJrt anH 

r Ll IX.*" ">jvvd^ l"4IMmMI<4”>iari(ii Aatnwmaie 6orU'. OUIJ o, j oeuon 

u-. t«usi'->* *ni ■ "31 um r-TkvaO'. Hie maiirtrfii nflith Ot |o hoW ait. i 
o~PS.ru* rn ,v>n 3o^*. o».*d m nml ,cur.| tlVr pemoied 

nvi.ar.ao ol a Dfithu yi-pt'vjnjl nonjaig 

— 3 Hi"- ItJun nay vjr, lrv -laiaman and nmrwii 0 .]*anq kmrs and the 

muian.jni T.iyrf pui-.riaieiipm i«? lol'O'Luoon^ .irflooi. f- Mp'aiUi *>iutMq 

•v.ii 'jh drr mewMoec-'ianiioveO iw i BondhoHei imnwdiaieiy 

oei..*e i«v- iMiain>n ai ->) a Bond 'nen hew nan 

INTEREST 

“> 1 |ni*..-rti *-jJi t/r LJKiajWO V t oa, 10 dai (Mv>''on is, ol oxohasea* a 
■ail 1>-I«'-T*ned :o- li»d'Jviirt keiiMy ranTI 

;•? c-.- pu^en- nr day ol n»di mrinth Th, Dm. lea ol 

tva.-nq-. <nj, oatrtren .'<■» -'u« •np’-r-' i tmrvrw . efv. t o' Bond 

/.•: n-nio, w*«5i >, ««*'. lu'tn'OQOwiirooi pta-mav/iar. mer44(nne>ej 
Wv kananng It*- ro*s ra ihal 

S 3 n ra. 'KVermrnj toe Scan o a-. •, l ^-oxliirsiiram-.t 

loir [tv r. a..,* .-.vr, pjc ,n * hip*,, i ;.i irv d.xxj umsr* Mr^p^r, 5 i 

«t tvoiM*, t.n l >-im in. wn i •; cv u-cam^m -nt-^e .1 -nerva on ineBpru and r*ji 
■f-riiz <-nori:-n-i-n / '“bradd-— Mnin, .Jim jbe'«j*ou atiha.av’ol 
'iso.rr. nr j>aa> >ea- 6 i *r n.n->( E»-«s.-jOI, Ir tfopanmtertrg 

tvr.nnnj i-om a<iq nyfl.. are* ih. i«uv"an oolf- nv.mjunr ol mat a*e>Ov 
«,«! tyaerLst.rS ''-j™ 

S « m, t'" J!-*a . mj> irr.mt*fr. rc tur*. "V- tr.»a*i*a 'ii.ai-mg-.njv* 

OOK , 

;• s "s- !-*-i,v^ may i*tt i—e in ww m m, .niM^h. at .me diirt cm mo. n 

n’t—'J -Jir-1 V jr *n j. jpmj holding IW!«S 

^-T v, -v r jiol-. fi rv -i^-at'oo *r,i ct7,- V- ,,4 acp*v i o u 

».vi'-o t i-io-e j *i,i->' •*» 9 ynco->. 3 -t o^i to mii> -ids* ait-o 

L'-«*.i!tl i.-ri .iBuniT <*r<j'V«-n3 r — v: ir* r ^*r*r- arunra undm -vaKi T-?arv ol 

na-i nJ! I « im-a. tn-pa-j.nio j'^i.:n.a'^.-»,j-,8 d m .v:oyn»ts-ru«,olSii' 

mu tj 

5 7 ir.]*.»**j on*Snnd*4t- CJ-? .wtrrs. . 1 0 -flu-n .j" nhn. nmf* 1 1 , Our q r, vj&w.I 
ifi ir*--.oma; Ua -anj nvi-J t>- ** H.J.J r. *, 'irjn o' C’.yrtr mioc id Itfc Ink rod 
IViW^ 


REPAYMENT 

6 1 A Bordhol*' may obwai iquynent ol a Bond at p* b^txe redempnonupen 
greng 3 aferrUr manors' noo-.e Th» Bond wi» «*n avenesr « [he Mituv rate 
h«m rhe dae ol (nacnase up to ihe repayment dan* nrhoerepaymoe Ms on at 
atror tr* bm anwyenary ol twchase Whete the repayment date UBS defcte the 
mi *r*wter»»Y O' puawse t** Bond *4 e»n mteiesl ai halt the Treesisy uietam 
it» am ol piactwte up to ihewpavnw dale 

6 5 ntv. eanappka>xitoir?oa*arianiij(aBoodri made alter dvdeath of ihesrte 
« vsiesuvnang legrfleted hoidn no iMd pmod ol nMKersieqwrcd andtheBood 
«4i wm m«i * tr» lr«B«y rate from the date of puthae 141 to the dated 
repa^ncm. woedvt o> nor repayment oum before the fnra anrwets«t of die 
pmindie 

6 3 any appkutnn f« repayment of a Bond mat Denude m wrung to the Bonds 

and Skjc* Ofae B laMxx* and aoxmpaned by the ceitAeMe the 

pitod al KmeK9**n by theBcmdhciaer m* oecakubMd hamhedattomirtadi 
tier applojtun ii nscened «r die fiords and Sud Otoe 

64 Application may be made ta repayment ol part of a Bond *1 an molt of 
1 1.000 <y a mumpteol that sum pKMiedthgithe iwiamg of Bsvxb remanng after 
Irt pat i<pay«ner« rwa •>* la* wattwi the n*nmum nntdmg bne anposed by 

paragta^iAlasweiedlicimBnietatiane^idapmagtaphAJibepitKethopsuti- 
oatapiacfO'mA-iogivtoitiepanrepflrdasrodwholeBand itieiemanngbatance 

mo oaae the same date al ptathaseand toesamemtereB dans mam^UM* 
to to* 09011 Bond «omedi«ely pro* to repattnem 

BAYMENTS 

7 iraoest <rti oepa*aole*ea toa NaKnalSaamgtBinLottXhe banlraccauaar 
bv massed vuanarrt sent by poo Cap-tai w4 oe tepayabte deea to a NaMnd 
iwmo, Bart account Or by crowed euoant sem by post 

MINORS 

8 ABondlwfdb»am«ioii*'derthe^ealieieny*aiii ethe* vaietyotnaodyerdh 
am atne* pL-san. not be replete wept ««»> ihe consent ol the Daeam d 
Sirny, 

TRANSFER 

9 &ono, ) viinoibei»n*»abfe«»i«>i'»»htiie , :onv!moftheaiecBiiofSa**igs 
Vamlet ol a Bond at pan ol a Bond «4 only be aHowed m an dtnowe at £UM0 at 
mult**! ol mat wm -md «*4 n*:a be aHcmed J the oottng at the Dwntaoi or 
t.ami..ee aad thetrtiy beouBrde ihehntdmqirots apmd by paid aphA 1 as 
ww d Iran tane tobrne under pa r agraph 4 2 fiwD»e,to»Of 4a*ingsw*rK»ma*y 
grve -:..msent r> ihe case ol to eumpie devotuuon ot Bonds on the death at a 
r**Je> but net to any propooed transte, rwtKti a by may ol sate a hr any 
••onsafctawo 

NOTICE 

Id rv.-iieavev«y4^wan*not.predi»rediinderparagr^iri43.54S5orllafthe 
pt-j--o-.ua. *1 rnr. inretor. Ettnough and Bdlast Cannes or many other manner 
ir.*-jch mry ma* 1 ii H noree rs (ywen otherwme »han m the Cannes * wdl as soon as 
* 'etujnaoh pcsvtfe tficeafier be rw.cmSwS m them 

GUARANTEED LIFE OF BONDS 

n Exr Bond n»y be herd fora giutdtXMdntui period olio yean bom thefra 
•nivmi iri, after ihe date ot puctuw Thetealtec mieren mu contour to be 

Pmatye iro.* ihe rerrm ol the pinontus rnt ihe ledemphan of the Bona The 
Bono «m hvrt &xmd M par eehe* ar iheendo* meg rjarareeed aMBtiMdarat 
utiy inlerea dateitmeafter. meah.. case upon the giving of sumorahriuKv by 
it,' bn.nut* ThcDaMP o< 5fiy*4twtww Bgftiolder betore led e nspn aL 
at the LrJ re- oaed ao*ew hr hrw Boodhrtdasg rntormndhun at the d«e ol ihe 
redempien natd«d by the Tieasuv 


military collaboration with 
the Soviet Union.’* 

• THE PHILIPPINES: 
Asked if there were any les- 
sons to be drawn from the 
overthrow of President Mar- 
cos in the Philippines, the 
President said he did not want 
to comment in depth on 
domestic political affairs in 
other coon tries. 

. “However, if I have to 
divulge some of my thinking 
about recent events in the 
Philippines, what has hap- 
pened in that country gives us 
yet another object lesson that 
the prevention of a protracted 
one-man rule is the foremost 
precondition for malting de- 
mocracy firmly rooted in a 
developing country. 

“I think the crux of all the 
problems of the Marcos re- 
gime was die 21-year rule by 
one person ...” 

• DEMOCRATIC EPOCH: 
Asked ho w he would like to be 
remembered by Koreans after 
he leaves office in 1988. the 
President said: “Above all. I 
think 1 have been called by 
history to set the first-ever 
example in the 40-year consti- 
tutional history of the Repub- 
lic of Korea of a peaceful 
transition of power, thereby 
opening a new epoch of demo- 
cratic development in this 
land. 

“The majority of the Kore- 
an people believe that only by 
successfully accomplishing 
that historic task will it be 
possible for democracy to 


send deep roots into the 
Korean wit Accordingly. 
when 1 transfer the reins of 
government to my successor 
m 19SS upon completing mv 
term of office. 1 ibink ! will be 
remembered by the Korean 
people as the first Korean 
chief executive to have the 
courage and wisdom to do 

^TRADITIONAL TIES: 
Commenting on his visit to 
Britain, the President said he 
rook great pleasure in the 
opportunity to express, “via 
such an historic and presti- 
gious paper as The Times, the 
special fading* of friendship 
that the Korean people have 
towards Great Britain”. 

Recalling the shedduig ot 
British Wood during the Kore- 
an war. he said his visit to 
London - the first of its kind 
bv a Korean President in 1G0 
years of diplomatic relations — 
was intended to propel the two 
countries* traditional ties into 
a second century- of dramati- 
cally increased practical co- 
operation. 

• THE CONSTITUTION: 
In wtaai appeared to be a 
comment oa the Opposition's 
present campaign for revision 
of the constitution. President 
Chun addedi^Over the past 40 
years the Korean constitution 
has been amended no less 
than eight times. 

“Experiments were made 
with various forms of govern- 
ment and elections - ranging 
from direct presidential ejec- 
tions to indirect presidential 
elections and from a Cabinet 
system to a presidential sys- 
tem. And yet no single peace- 
ful change of government has 
taken place because of the 
greed of those in power for 
unlimited power: 

“Therefore I believe that the 
most important and most 
urgent political task at this 
juncture is to observe the 
constitution and effect a 
peaceful transition of power as 
prescribed by the constitution. 
I am thus determined to exert 
utmost patience and seek 
maximum compromise to ac- 
complish that task, no matter 
how difficult it may he... 

“If only we can prevent war 
on tire Korean peninsula until 
1988 and can thus maintain 
the stability and the momen- 
tum for development needed 
successfully to stage the 1988 
Seoul Olympics and the 
scheduled peaceful transfer of 
power — tire two all-important 
national lasts now on hand — 
I believe we wifi have laid an 
unshakeabie foundation for 
building a unified and pros- 
perous Korea.” 


Unique chance to 
expand exports 


David Watts reports from 
Seoul on the prospects for 
South Korea's exports. 

A cn&fition of three factors 
gives the Sooth Korean econo- 
my a unique opportunity to 
compete against the Japanese 
this year and to expand world 
exports. 

The fell in the price of 
imported oil, on which Korea 
is heavily dependent, the ap- 
preciation of die value of the 
yen fay- some 40 per cent 
against die won and lower 
interest rates are combining to 
jpve the country the dunce of 
a lifetime. - 

“If yon can’t compete 
against the Japanese in these 
arcnmstaoces, yen’ll never 
compete,” said a Korean econ- 
omist He also sees the chance 
of Korea wiping ont its $900 
million <£570 million) current 
account deficit of last year. For 
every dollar drop hi the 
of oil, Korea saves 
nriDioa (£126 million), so a 
$10 fell could eliminate It 

The stronger yea is malting 
even the hugest Japanese 
corporations' inch less com- 
petitive, especially im the all- 
important North American 
market, clearing the way for 
Korean makers of cam, televi- 
sions, stereos and video tope 
recorders to move into the 
lower end of the market and 
gradually move np. 


price 

$200 


are generally considered as 
good as their cheaper Japa- 
nese counterparts, particularly 
at the moment when price 
competition is so keen. The 
price advantage is expected to 
comti particularly in the less 
developed parts of the world 
where the video boom is now in 
full swing. 

But Korean maanfectareis 
are at the mercy of Japanese 
parts makers, who sell fttm 
the more complex elements of 
video recorders and can there- 
fore ultimately regulate the 
amount they prodnee. 

lamer interest rates, too, 
help a country which is ri- 
valled only by the problem 
debtors of Latin America in 
the size of its foreign debt, 
with $46.7 bfflion (£29.5 bO- 
Ihm) owing. Korea, however, 
does not share Latin American 
difficulties in making pay- 
meats. 

Alongside the dock at 
Ulsaii, an hour’s Right south- 
east of Seoul, raws of red and 
white Hyundai Pony and Ex- 
cel cars are waiting for ship- 
ment as part of Korea's latest 
and most spectacular export 
success. 

At less than $5,000 


its foreign debt. 

Conclud ed 


More overseas news. Pages II and 13 




(£3,165), tire Excel is the 
cheapest car on the American 
market. In its first month in 
the showrooms, Hyundai sold 
more than 10,000 and plans to 
sell 10 times that number by 
tire end of the year. 

Sales do not seem to have 
been affected by a recall of 
more than 2.000 cars suspect- 
ed of having brake fenlts. 
Hyundai said that only three 
cars were found to have had a 
split pin incorrectly inserted 
on the brake pedaL 

Hyundai cars made a simi- 
lar debut in Canada last year, 
and there are already plans for 
two plants there. That, and the 
feet that Korea is an importer 
of Canadian raw materials, 
has led to quick acceptance for 
Hyimdai at a time when such 
market “targeting” has be- 
come so controversial, the 
company believes. 

A few notes further down 
the coast, Hyimdai shipyards, 
the world's leading shipbuild- 
ers in 1984, face less rosy 


S KOREA 

Part2 


prospects. Between now and 
the end of 1987 the yard will 
deliver 48 vessels tort, as 
things stand, there are few 
prospects beyond that Ship 
repair is still doing brisk 


Work levels are still much 
higher than in comparable 
Japanese yards, tort Hyundai 
believes there will be no real 
pick-up in the world market 
until there is increased ship- 
breaking to take up some of 
the slack. 

If sfrip fariMrng and shipping 
to general are slow far the 
Koreans, then they are equally 
concerned about construction. 
Since the oil boom years of the 
1970s, Koreans have won 
maqy Middle East construc- 
tion contracts. Now , that busi- 
ness has slowed dramatically. 

Uaempteymem and pres- 
sure for increased wages, de- 
spite low inflation levels, are 
fansing increased labour pu- 
rest to the point where some 
more moderate figures in the 
Government are saying there 
mast be an easing of rigid 
government control of wage 
levels. 

The Government is not like- 
ly to be very receptive. Over 
the next two years the country 
most not only break the bor- 


^ i 


$ 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1 QS* 



OVERSEAS NEWS 


JJ 


jer 

tells Aquino 

of economic 
aid priorities 


from Keith Dalton, Manila 

^oSSSSS£^S£ 

Ed by angry anti-American 
protesters, yesterday met Pre®. 
idem Corazon Aquino and 
promised that American eco- 
nomic aid for her new Gov- 
ernment would get priority 
over military assistance. 


ratehr the Defence Minister, 
Mr Juan Ponce Enrile,and the 
armed forces chief General 
Fidel Ramos — the two men 
who led the 77-hour military 
revolt - and later in front of 
his hotel and the US Embassy. 

The protesters demanded 
the dismantling of American 


, Rca 8 an later Mr Weinberger said that 

President Marcos fled into 
exile m Hawaii on February 
25 after an almost bloodless. 

Civilian-backed military 
revolt. 

Shouting “Go home, go 
home”, about 100 demonstra- 
tors surrounded, kicked and 
pummeled Mr Weinberger’s 
van in an eight-car convoy as 
he left the presidential palace 
after a 45-minute meeting 
with Mrs Aquino. 

He has been dogged by 
small but vocal groups of 
demonstrators since 50 chant- 
ing and placard-waving pro- 
testers met him at Manila 
airport on Sunday night, the 
third stop on a six-nation 
Pacific tour. 

Other demonstrations were 
held outside military head- 
quarters when he met sepa- 


expectcd to be a top agenda 
item in his talks with . Mrs 
Aquino — was not raised. 

“The bases agreement is Lot 
an issue. It's already been 
taken care of" he saicC appar- 
ently referring to the current 
bases agreement which Mrs 
Aquino has vowed to respect 
until it expires in 1991. 

After that, Mrs Aquino has 
said, she is keeping her 
“options” open. 

Filipino officials, however, 
said the future of the bases was 
raised in Mr Weinberger’s 
earlier discussions with Mr 
Enrile and General Ramos. 

Both have said they favour 
retention of the bases, for 
which Washington pays Ma- 
nila $900 million (£600 mil- 
lion) under a five-year agree- 
ment which comes up for 
review in 1989. 


Santiago’s dirty war dramatized 

Actor relives past 
after son vanishes 

From take Sagans, Santiago 
Out on the streets, demon- napped one morning at 8.30 in 


straiors commemorate the 
brutal murders of three oppo- 
sition leaders a year ago. Bui 
here, in a small Chilean 
theatre, everything is dark, 
expectant. 

As the curtain rises, the 
strains of a Mahler symphony 
begin to stir the nerves. Then, 
on stage, come the intermina- 
ble queues typical of a busy 
airport, and an elderly man 
standing at a news stall. 

The older man, who is a 
teacher, recognizes a former 
student, but at first the student 
pretends not to know him. 
Then, accosted by two other 
men. he talks nervously with 
the old music teacher. 

A stewardess suddenly pulls 
the old man to one side. The 
two men pounce, punch and 
drag the student away. The old 
man watches in consternation. 

This is the opening scene of 
What’s in the Air, a new play 
which tells the story of the 
elderly music teacher who 
becomes enmeshed In the 
dirty war conducted by Chile’s 
secret police. 

Roberto Parada, one of 
Chile’s oldest and best-loved 
actors, is the elderly school- 
teacher. He explains why this 
is one of the hardest roles he 
has ever had to play: 

“The old man forgets his 


front of his children's school 
and then found dead near the 
airport. 

After 13 years of military 
rule, the story has become ail 
too familiar to some Chileans. 

Production of this play has 
not been easy. During rehears- 
als, the author and co-direc- 
tors received constant riaath 
threats. 

“We want to present the 
facts to the audience to avoid 
forgetting these awful crimes. 
My boy disappeared exactly 
one year ago, and nobody has 
been charged,” said Senor 
Parada. 

In the play, friends and 
family try to convince the old 
teacher that nothing has hap- 
pened. The police produce a 
signed writ, guaranteeing it 
Everyone the old man comes 
into contact with is arrested. 
Several are brutally raped or 
murdered. 

The old man becomes con- 
fused. Only the music of 
Mahler reminds him of what 
he really saw. 

Finally, the musk teacher 
wakes up from a deep sleep. 
Alone. In prison. He must 
choose between voluntary am- 
nesia and freedom or remem- 
bering and feeing an uncertain 
future. 

“At the end of the play , I say 


travel plans and dedicates the I saw the kidnapping of this 

rest of his life to finding out 

what happened to this yo 
man. Finally, the kidnap! 
young man is found dead.” 

His voice grows quieter. 

“Thai’s the case of my son, 

Jose Manuel He was kid- 


young man and swear I'll 
never forget it. And FU pro- 
claim the truth, whatever the 
consequences,” Senor Parada 
says. “Those are the same 
words I always say about my 
son/ 



Chile: 

icardo and 
)se Weibel 
vfavarrete 

Caroline Moorebead 
» a ad Ricardo Weibel 
rate are brothers — one a 
iter, the other a driver — 
iisappeared” in the imd- 

^afonnerleadj^inan- 

■ the Conns Bnust Youtn 
ration, a"®** 1 ,?? 

cm March 29, 1976. His 
tnd children were with 

into, a Communist Par- 
nber, was taken from ms 
by five beavfly-anned 
in November 7, 1975, 
■d by his wife and aunt 
men were in their mid- 



Ricardo Weibel: driver who 
“disappeared”. 

Nothing was known of their 
late until 1984, when a former 
member of the Chilean Air 
Force said in a sworn state- 
ment to the Supreme Court, 


in a detention centre ran by the 
Security Forces. He befieved 


He sain that^ he believed 
they bad been killed, victims 
of a special group formed 
illegally after the 1973 conp to 
elimina te known government 
opponents. 

The authorities, however, 
'continue to deny. that the two 
brothers were arrested 


Hong Kong to 
step up police 
arms training 

Hong Kong - The Royall 
Hong Kong Police are step- 
ping up arms training because 
of an increasing number of 
armed robberies involving 
jewellery shops and banks 
(David ftona via writes). 

Robbers yesterday grabbed 
almost 030,000 worth of 
watches and gold ornaments 
from one shop. Police have 
orders to shoot, but there are 
clear restraints on gun battles 
in such crowded streets. 

Daylight hold-ups have be- 
come a regular occurrence, 
and police want weapons with 
more stopping power. 



Eastern bloc leaders tackle 
grammar of Gorbachovese 

By Roger Boyes. East Europe Correspondent 


Nuns joining a demonstration in Manila against the visit of die US Secretary of Defence, 
Mr Caspar Weinberger, who (right) later arrived in Bangkok for a three-day stay. 

Thai doubts on US munition dump 

From Neil Kelly 
Bangkok 

Mr Caspar Weinberger, the 
US Defence Secretary', arrived 
here last night for discussions 
with the Thai Government on 
a controversial proposal to 
establish a reserve of war 
munitions on Thai territory. 

Some Thai politicians, mili- 


tary men and academics fear 
that it might lead to the setting 
up of new American bases. 

Thailand does not want a 
recurrence of the studeni-led 
protests which forced closure 
of American bases in Thailand 
in 1975. General Ham Lee- 
nanond. deputy leader of the 
Democrat Party, has con- 


demned the stockpile. which 
he said would create tensions 
m South-East .Asia. 

Mr Weinberger will be seek- 
ing agreement with General 
Prem Tinsulanonda. the Thai 
Prime Minister, on cost con- 
trol and location of the re- 
serve. which will be maint- 
ain munition and spares. 


The Communist leader- 
ships of East Europe are 
undergoing intensive training 
in the new language ot 
Gorbachovese. 

The Bulgarian Commu- 
nists. who ended their five- 
j early party congress last 
week, showed that they are 
more proficient than the 
Czechoslovaks in the idiom of 
change, but the more active 
verbs (overhaul, intensify, 
modernize i arc still giving 
them trouble. 

One-third of the Bulgarian 
| Central Committee has been 
i changed by the congress but 
there were no shifts in the 
Politburo and no major reju- 
> enation of personnel. 
Two-thirds of the new Cen- 
, iral Committee arc well over 
. A! Hie age of 50. and while that is 
;j! loosely known as the 
4j "Gorbacho\ generation” they 
are for the most pan loyal 
party activists who have 
worked their way through the 
provincial Communist hier- 
archy. 

Their loyalty is to the old 
order, to the decades of rule by 
74-year-old party leader. Mr 
Todor Zhivkov. 

Mr Zhivkov addressed the 
2.260 delegates in fluent, if 
accented. Gorbachovese. He 
called for greater efficiency 
and an end to bureaucratic red 
tape, for a drive against party 
corruption, and new efforts to 
haul Bulgaria into the comput- 
er age. 

Workers — or at least Com- 


munist cells in the factories - 
should have a greater say in 
management, but there should 
also be stricter labour disci- 
pline. This was the tone set by 
Mr Mikhail Gorbachov, the 
Soviet leader, at his party 
congress in Moscow in 
February. 

The diagnosis of the 
Bulgarians’ economic pros- 
pects was also similar in style 
to that made in Moscow. 
Many of Bulgaria's past cco- 

Reating denied 

Warsaw (AP) - A prison 
official yesterday denied re- 
ports that a Solidarity leader, 
Mr Wladysiaw Frasyniuk. 
was beaten by prison guards in 
bis cell on Illarch 26, but 
acknowledged that be had 
been placed in solitary 
confinement. 

nomic methods, said the party 
leader, had “exhausted their 
capacities”, slowing down the 
economy. "As a party and as a 
country we are faced with new 
realities, s profound change is 
necessary” 

But it seems unlikely that 
Gorbachovese will translate 
very smooothly into Bulgari- 
an. Despite the phrases, the 
Bulgarian leadership is not all 
that unhappy with itself. Bul- 
garian reforms have brought 
the country from a fairly low- 
level peasant economy to a 
relatively successful ’mixed 
economy, exporting electron- 
ics as well as strawberry jam. 


The Gorbachov approach is 
designed to shake a superpow- 
er into gear for the 2 1st 
century: but in Sofia there is 
no sense of future shock. The 
system has worked, is falter- 
ing. but with a bit of stream- 
lining will recover. 

The pressure for change 
comes mainly in the field of 
Bulgarian-Soviet relations. 
Moscow has publicly com- 
plained about the quality of 
Bulgarian exports to the Sovi- 
et Union (supposed to pay 
back the heavy supply of 
Soviet oil and gas) and is 
irritated about the Bulgarian 
workers slipping away from 
their jobs to till, at great profit, 
their private allotments. 

Mr Zhivkov has now prom- 
ised that "Bulgarian-Soviei 
co-opera lion is entering a 
qualitatively new stage”. 

This remains to be seen. 
Certainly before the party 
congress Mr Zhivkov autho- 
rized the abolition of several 
economic ministries — me- 
chanical engineering, chemi- 
cal industry, communications, 
energy and metallurgy — 
which have been touched by- 
Soviet criticism. 

Instead, there is to be a new 
super-ministry which, under 
5 1 -year-old Mr Ognan Doy- 
nov. will try to introduce the 
fabled streamlining. 

The value of the congress is 
that it crystallized the future 
succession to Mr Zhivkov. 

Leading article, page 17 



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The Japanese are highly impressed by the hard-working people and the pride taken in 
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Perhaps the made-to-measure financial packages and the wide choice 
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THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 4986 






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The Offer 

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INCOME 
(per 100 Imperial 
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£21-90 

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Based on market prices at 3.30pm on Monday, 7th April 1986. 




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THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL g 1986 


SPECTRUM/OVERSEAS NEWS 


13 


SPECTRUM 1 


■^gthope do today’s advanced medical techniques offer the childless? Thomson Prentice launches 


Time is running out for Sarah 

flame of fflb has 
^ died within her 10 

• hmes in foe Iasi eight years, bm 

Now in her mid-thirties, she is 

Britain** a ? i,lion women in 
Bmain who share with their 
husbands a constant dream - and 

lnferdhly has been described as 
a lifetime spent in limbo, grieving 
not for a child that died, but for 
one foat could not be born. The 
victims of childlessness - a terra of 

fina hty - fed their loss 
is foe harder one to bear. 

Tell a woman who wants a baby 
foai she can never have it and she 
is devastated by foe denial of 
nature s gift. Tell a man he cannot 

»rnf*? th ?’l.. and ^ feds he has 
WfaQed both his wife and himself, 
barah Browne and her husband 
^ S H! 1 “Jidiy together, despite 
her 10 miscarriages and seven 
operations. Others are less strong, 
trading they cannot remain uni- 
fied without a child. 

Sufferers are punished 
again and again by the 
^^ue^assingnfttme^ 

“Individuals who during their 
younger years have seen their 
nnure selves not only as husbands 
or wives, but as parents, have to 
I make a tremendous psychological 
adjustment to foeir infertility" 
ays psychiatrist Dr Ctecilia 
Brebner. “They fees not only foe 
loss of self as the kind of person 
they would have become, bm foe 
loss of the imaginary femily, and 
with it foe kind of life they would 
have led." 

TheWorid Health Organization 
has decreed that every couple has 
foe right to establish a femily. 
Unfortunately there is no om- 
budsman. no tribunal, no court of 
appeal, for those who discover 
that foe right has been withheld, 
whether by nature, accident or 
misguided design. 

Accurate estimates are hard to 
obtain, but many doctors agree 
that at least one couple in every 10 
is infertile. The number of cases 
seems to be increasing, partly 
because of a trend among many - ' 
couples to delay trying to start a 
femily until later .in marriage, 
when they are bound to be less 
fertile. 

It may take many empty years 


¥» 


Living in limbo. 


a two-part series 


before many couples even realize 
■foe .problem exists. Some never 
acknowledge foe truth; afraid or 
unable to admit “failure” to 
foenudves. to foeir own parents, 
workmates and friends. "When 
are you going to have a “baby?", 
however innocently adr^, fc foe 
question they dread . - 

More than in most other medi- 
cal conditions, foe sufferers are 
punished again and again by the 
ouel passing of time; even after 
they have sought help] The “same 
ume next year syndrome of clinic 
waning rooms is t’ *ir Jot, for 
whatever foe medical. oWem, its 
resolution is likely to come de- 
moralizingly slowly - if ft comes at 
ail. 

. -| eri my Hunt, a counsdlor for the 
infertility clinic at London’s Ham- 
mersmith Hospital, one of 
Britain's leading units, is full of 
sympathy. “People can. feel . 
they’ve lost control of foeir lives, 
when they have to depend on 
medical skill in order to have a 
child. Angry feelings are very 
normal in the circumstances.” 

Their only hope lies with the 
gynaecologists, andrologists, urol- 
ogists. endocrinologists and others 
who specialize in treating infertil- 
ity, including foe growing number 
of experts in in vitro fertilization — * 
foe so-called “test-tube baby” 
doctors. 

All are dedicated to helping 
couples create and complete their 
families, but for all fodr skills they 
can offer only hope, not promises. 
They themselves often suffer 
stress and. depression brought on 
by trying -fo beat foe odds on 
behalf or their patients. 

However sophisticated the 
.treatment, however accomplished 
the surgeon or specialist, perhaps 
only one couple in three will be 
rewarded with a baby. 



for life 


Ydubts 





The campaign against embryo 
research and many other aspects 
of is vitro fertilization has been 
gathering strength since the birth 
of Louise Broun, the world's first 
test-tube baby, in 1978. 

Parliamentary opposition has 
been spearheaded by Mr Enoch 
Powell foe Official Ulster Union- 
ist MP for South Down. His 
private member’s Bill which 
failed in foe House of Commons 
lost summer, has been resurrected 
virtually intact and presented 
again by Mr Kenneth Hargreaves. 
Conservative MP for Hyndburn. 

They have the support of such 
influential “pro-life" groaps as foe 
Order of Christian Unity, whose 
founder members include Sir John 
PeeL, a former gynaecologist to foe 
Queen. 

Professor Ian Donald, a pioneer 
of ultrasound diagnostics, now 
retired, has warned that IYF is 
opening the door to “concentration 
camp types of abuse", sHch as 
hybrid experiments, sex discrimi- 
nation in which the embryos of 
boys would be preferred to girls, 
and attempts to grow human 
beings outside the womb. 

Leading practitioners of IVF 
such as Mr Patrick Steptoe and Dr 
Robert Edwards at Bourn Hall in 
Cambridge, and Mr Robert Win- 
ston at Hammersmith Hospital in 
London, reject such lurid scenari- 
os. They argue that it is unethical 
not to carry out research which 


will lead not only to better 
treatment of infertility but also to 
foe detection and prevention of 
many terrible forms of congenital 
disease.They do, however, favour 
legislation to define the limits of 
what is acceptable. 

Detailed proposals for such laws 
were put forward by the Warnock 
committee in its report published 
in 1984. They included; 

0 Research on human embryos 
should be permitted only under 
licence, and only in the first 14 
days after fertilization. 

• The freezing and sroring of 
“spare" embryos should be accept 
ble fur as long as 10 years. 

0 It should be a criminal offence 
to place a human embryo In the 
uterus of another species for 
gestation, or to buy or sell such 
embryos. 

0 No embryo used for research 
should be transferred to a woman. 

_ However, these recommenda- 
tions did not receive the 
comm i nee’s unanimous support. 
Seven of its members dissented, 
three of whom said that embryos 
should not be used for experi- 
ments. One summed up foeir view 
thus; “Because embryos hare the 
potential to become human per- 
sons. neither the relief of infertility 
ncr tbe advance of knowledge 
justifies (heir deliberate 
destruction." 


Today, in up to almost half tbe 
cases, it is discovered to be foe 
man who is infertile. He may be 
more psychologically shattered 
than his wife, and find his 
condition much more difficult to 


What are these obstacles? What 
can be done to overcome them? 
What are the chances of success, 
and how fer can science go - or be 
allowed to go - to improve those 
odds? 

“At one-time, if a couple were 
childless, there was very little they 
could do ”, Maty Wamock says in 
A Question of Lye. her book on the 
Wamock report on human fertil- 
ization and embryology. 
r “Generally, foe cause of infertil- 
ity was thought to be something in 
foe; woman which ™h«» her 
childless; rarely was it thought 
there might be something wrong 
with foe man." 


accept 

“Chi! 


“Childless women can usually 
receive consolation from their 
girlfriends”, one specialist says, 
“but few men even want to discuss 
their problem. Even if they did, 
few other men are able to listen 
and be sympathetic." 

Medical help for women and 
men is now available through 
surgery, drug treatment, or one or 
more forms of in vitro fertiliza- 
tion. from within foe National 
Health Service, and from private 
clinics. 

The most common cause of 
infertility in women, found in 
about 30 per cent of cases, is 
damage or disease in foe fallopian 
tubes, foe delicate conduits that 


At least one couple in 
ten is infertile, and tbe 
nnmber is increasing 

cany foe ripe egg from the ovary 
to foe meeting place for egg and 
sperm. 

Conception cannot occur if the 
tubes are so blocked, scarred or 
infected that they sabotage foe 
movement of egg or sperm. Such 
infections may set in after sexual 
activity, or following pelvic sur- 
gery, appendicitis, miscarriage, 
abortion or foe birth of a previous 
child. Even after an infection has 
been cleared, foe tubes may be left 
too damaged to function properly. 

In some cases, when the egg is 
fertilized, it does not move down 
into foe womb as it should, but 
remains there, leading to ectopic 
pregnancy. 


.As many as half the women who 
suffer an ectopic pregnancy will 
never conceive again. The egg 
swells and ma> burst through the 
fallopian tube, thus not only 
destroying one pregnancy but 
endangering foe prospect of an- 
other. It can even endanger foe 
woman's life. 

Failure to ovulate, or foe inabil- 
ity to ovulate efficiently, is a 
second major cause of infertility, 
again representing about 30 per 
cent of cases. Ovulation depends 
on foe complex interplay of the 
pituitary gland in the brain and 
hormones in the ovaries, whose 
delicate balance can be disturbed 
by a wide range of physical and 
psychological factors, 'some of 
which are still not fully 
understood. 

Other causes of infertility in 
women include endometriosis, in 
which deposits of the lining of foe 


uterus form outside the womb: 
tuberculosis of the womb: scarring 
or other abnormalities of foe 
womb: hostile mucus in foe cervix 
which destroys sperm; and other 
abnormalities of foe cervix. 

Identifying the cause is a diffi- 
cult and time-devouring process, 
more so than many women ex- 
pect. It involves a series of 
consultations, examinations and 
tests that may be long and painful, 
and intervals of w eeks or months 
while individual conditions are 
observed. Most distressing for 
some women, the only diagnosis 
their specialists can finally offer is 
"unexplained infertility’’.' 

Among infertile men. foe main 
problems are low sperm produc- 
tion. defective sperm which mav 
be foe wrong size or shape, and 
sperm with impaired mobility 
which are unable to move freelv 
after ejaculation. 


But even more so than among 
women, many of the causes of 
infertility in men are unknown or 
inexplicable. 

However, progress in treating 
infertile couples has significantly 
quickened in the last decade and 
many previously umreatabie con- 
ditions are now within the skills of 
specialists. Research in Britain 
and throughout the world is 
providing important clues, if not 
answers: new techniques are con- 
stantly being tried. 

The result is that for many 
thousands of childless couples, the 
dream of a baby is now more likely 
to be fulfilled. 

C TOMORROW ) 

Advances in treatment: 
the test-tube dilemma 


Tables turned on most wanted man 



India’s Houdini 


By Michael Haralyn 
South Asia Correspondent 

The Houdini spell so coolly 
cast by foe alleged “bikini 
killer", Charles Sobhraj, one 
of Asia's most wanted crimi- 
g nals, has been broken. 

Police posing as waiters 
recaptured foe international 
fugitive on his 42nd birthday 
in a careftJJy-pfennned trap 
set at a Goa restaurant during 
a wedding party on Sunday 
night, Bombay police dis- 
closed yesterday. 

Sobhraj, who is wanted in at 
least seven countries for rob- 
beries and murders, mainly 
involving Western tourists, 
was seized at the O Coqueiro 
(Coconut Tree) restaurant 
with Mr David Richard Hall, 
a British national, aged 28, 
who is suspected of master- 
minding the escape from a 
Delhi prison three weeks ago. 

» The escape had all the 
elements of Sobhraj’s re- 
nowned cooL cunning and 
deadly charm. He strolled to 
freedom on March 16, with six 
other prisoners, past sleeping 
guards who had been drugged 
with spiked sweets. 

The breakout, from one of 
India's most overcrowded 
•maximum security prisons, 
caused an uproar. 

But the midnight swoop by 
Bombay police officers, dis- 
guised as waiters in sarongs, at 
foe seafood restaurant in an 
old Portuguese villa off the 
road about six miles from the 
Goa capital Panaji. caught foe 
fugitive completely by 
surprise. 


imk 



Police officers patiently 
served Sobhraj and. Mr Hall 
drinks for more than an hour 
as wedding guests enjoyed the 
celebrations. 

“ Sobhraj was enjoying his 
drink when we nabbed him,” 
foe Maharashtra state police 
chief, Mr S S Jog, said later. 

Apparently Sobhraj and Mr 
Hall had been trying- to tele- 
phone people in Beirut. 

Sobhraj, bom Gurmukh 
Sobhraj, a French citizen, is 
alleged to have committed a 
series of murders and robber- 
ies, mainly m Thailand; Nepal 
and India, preying on young 
travellers on the hippie frail in 
foe sixties and early seventies; 

Since he was arrested in 


Delhi in 1976, Charles Sahib, 
as he came to be known in 
Tihar jail Delhi's maximum 
security prison, has gradually 
been acquitted of each serious 
charge against him, and was 
expecting extradition to Bang- 
kok, where more murder 
charges await him. 

He boasts a string of master- 

ny Sf ^ V '\Sn^ t from Afghan 
rJiains in Kabul a few years 
later and from guards taking 
him to the maximum security 
prison on Aegina island by the 
Greek authorities. 

The latest escape bore his 
trade marks. One Sunday 
early last month a car with two 
accomplices drew up to the 


entrance of the jail and, in the 
first of many irregularities that 
day, foe)' and foe car were 
allowed inside. 

Prisoners were making an 
early celebration of Sobhraj’s 
birthday, and foe men brought 
bunches of grapes, plates of 
fruit custard and white milk- 
based sweets, called burfi or 
snow. 

AH the guards near by were 
invited to join in foe birthday 
celebrations and eagerly 
tucked into foe sweets. 

Half an hour later, foe 
guards, foe warden and foe 
assistant superintendent woke 
up to find that all seven of 
their prisoners had disap- 
peared in foe waiting car. 


Passport firms cash in 
on Hong Kong’s fears 

From David Bona via, Hong Kong 


s are springing up 
I Kong offering to 
j on how to certain 
lassport and to 
- Interests before 
■ of sovereignty 
to China in 1997. 
ling degrees of 
these consul- 
ting a need which 

elt increasingly 
residents, whefo- 
se extraction or 
ities. Most Euro- 
Americans 


legal system and foil cultural 
and religious freedoms fer SO 
years after 1997. 

Most woeld-be Chinese em- 
igrants would like tO jO to foe 
United States, Britain, Cana- 
da, Western Europe Australia 
or New Zealand, but all of 
fli fgp require long waits with 
no guarantee of success. Some 
Third World countries will 
grant citizenship in a few 
months, but the sophisticated 
people of Hong Kong tend to 


i, material of 
Oil the fear of 

hat China may 

with sincerity 
hkh have been 
>ag Kong under 
ensent between 
rhina. This is 
araotee a capi- 
a British-style 


The Hong Kong British 
passport I dd by the majority 
of people is less nsefal than, a 
UK passport and is to he 
replaced by a new travd 
document of dubious useful- 
ness. And the latter wifi 
eventually, be replaced with a 
Chinese passport for the 
bearer's children if theyare 
eltunc Chinese. 


Doe reshuffles jobs 
in Liberia Cabinet 


Monrovia (AFP) - Presi- 
dent Samuel Doe has reshuf- 
fled bis Cabinet for foe first 
time since becoming civilian 
head of state in January, 
putting a former bead of foe 
Economic Community of 
West African States in charge 
of foe country's economy and 
swapping several t other 
portfolios. 

The shuffle, gave the Fi- 
nance Ministry to Mr Robert 
Truman, former director of 
ECOWAS, a regional econom- 
ic body grouping 16 states. He 
takes over from Mr Alvin 
Jones, who replaced Mr 
George Boley as Minister of 
State for Presidential Affairs. 

Mr Boley, who has twice 
served in foe presidential 
affairs portfolio, was appoint- 
ed to Posts and Telecommuni- 
cations. a job he has also held 
twice in foe past six years. . 

Mr John Bestman was ap- 
pointed Governor of foe Cen- 


tral Bank and replaced at his 
former post of midget director 
by Liberia’s Ambassador to 
Belgium and tbe European 
Community. Mr J. Rudolph 
Johnson. Mr Thomas Hanson 
moves from the Central Bank 
to head foe Liberia Produce 
Marketing Corporation. 

Other changes involving 
state-run enterprises included 
moving Mr Philip Davis, 
chairman of the National 
Investment Commission, to 
managing director of the Libe- 
ria Petroleum Refining Com- 
pany, and foe former Posts 
and Telecommunications 
Minister, Mr Diaries Roberts, 
replacing Mr Moses Washing- 
ton as director-general .of foe 
Liberia Broadcasting System. 

Mr Francis Horton, vice- 
chairman of foe ruling Na- 
tional Democratic Party,, was 
appointed chairman of foe 
National Investment 
Commission. 


Appeal by 
Lange for 
help in 
Paris row 

From Richard Long 
Wellington 

Mr David Lange, the Prime 
Minister of New Zealand, 
yesterday called for Western 
backing in the dispute with 
France over the sinking last 
year of the Greenpeace vessel. 
Rainbow Warrior. 

He said all Western nations 
should oppose state- backed 
terrorism and consequently 
reject France’s demands for 
the release of Dominique 
Prieor and Alain M start, the 
two secret service agents jailed 
for IQ years for foeir part in 
the sabotage of the protest 
ship and the death of a crew 


Mr Lange said his approach 
to M Jacques Chirac, the 
French Prime Minister, for a 
meeting had been rejected 
unless New Zealand met foe 
French precondition of freeing 
tbe agents. 

Attacking tbe French trade 
threats against New Zealand, 
which had already had an 
impact, Mr Lange said: “We 
are not a prostitute client state. 
We are a people. We have a 
right to make a living in a 
world where free trade ought 
to be in the ascendancy'-” 

Mr Lange said be under- 
stood that France bad ap- 
proached Mr Pierre Trudeau, 
the former Canadian Prime 
Minister, to see if he vronld 
arbitrate between Paris and 
Wellington over the SNZ2I 
million (about £8 million) 
which Wellington is seeking in 
compensation. 

Mr Trudeau had rejected 
the approach, but New Zea- 
land hoped be would reconsid- 
er, or that someone else would 
take on the role. Mr Lange 
indicated that the United 
States should be among foe 
Western nations willing to 
back Wellington's case. 

“In the end somebody out 
there will recognize that when 
yon appear to condone what 
has happened In New Zealand 
whHe demanding outrage at 
say, what has happened in 
Libya, yon have fo come to a 
day of reckoning.” . 

# Shotgtm killing: A man nidi 
a shotgun killed a police 
hostage yesterday nears lodge 
where foe visiting Prime Min- 
ister of Singapore, Mr Lee 
Koan Yew, was staying. Tbe 
gunman had earlier held up a 
store, crashed a car seized 
from two old ladies and fled in 
a police car (Renter reports). 

Another police man was 
wounded hi the incident, which 
the New Zealand Government 
said was not linked to Mr 
Lee's visit. 


Japan braced for economic 
to cut back trade surplus 


From Our Own Correspondent, Tokyo 


A plan for an "historical" 
reform of foe Japanese econo- 
my to reduce its perennial 
trade surpluses has been pre- 
sented to the Prime Minister, 
Mr Yasuhiro Nakasone. 

The new guidelines for foe 
restructuring of foe economy 
were drawn up by a special 
panel headed by Mr Haruo 
Maekawa. a former governor 
of foe Bank of Japan, and 
composed of leading figures 
from finance and industry. 

Mr Nakasone. who appoint- 
ed foe panel, accepted most of 
its recommendations yester- 
day. Most of the recommen- 
dations are expected to figure 
in a government package of 
measures to stimulate the 
domestic economy to be an- 
nounced later this week. 

"The time has come for 
Japan to make an historical 
transformation in its tradi- 
tional policies on economic 


management and foe nation's 
lifestyle," the report safe, 
adding; "There can be no 
further development for Japan 
without this transformation.’* 

Japan is urged to move 
from export-lea growth to 
growth led by domestic de- 
mand in what foe report calls 
"basic transformations in the 
nation's trade and industrial 
structure". This transforma- 
tion should be undertaken 
with the national objective of 
steadily reducing the Japanese 
trade surplus- 

One of the most controver- 
sial elements of a report 
certain to stimulate consider- 
able debate is a recommenda- 
tion that the Government 
should tax private savings. 
Foreign governments have 
long argued that Japan's sav- 
ings rate - one of foe highest 
in the world — discourages foe 
Japanese from spending like 


people do in the West. Savings 
of up to I million yen are at 
present tax-free. 

Other main recommenda- 
tions of foe report arc: reform 
of housing policy and encour- 
agement of housing redevel- 
opment through tax and other 
measures. 

The report said it was 
imperative that Japan recog- 
nize (hat continued big cur- 
rent account imbalances cre- 
ated a critical situation not 
only for the management of 
the Japanese economy but 
also for the harmonious devel- 
opment of foe world economy 
as a whole. 

As has previously been the 
case. Mr Maekawa was unwill- 
ing to give any kind of a 
monetary estimate of the ef- 
fect of the recommendations if 
they were adopted. 

Business News, page 23 


Berlin Ministers quit 
in fresh CDU scandal 


West Berlin (Reuter) — 
Chancellor Kohl's Christian 
Democrats (CDU). already 
rocked by corruption scan- 
dals. suffered new shocks yes- 
terday when three ministers in 
foe West Berlin Government 
resigned over a separate bribes 
affair. 

The CDU Interior Minister. 
Herr Heinrich Lummer. the 
Building Construction Minis- 
ter, Herr Klaus Franke. and 
foe Minister for the Environ- 
ment, Hen Horst Vetter, re- 
signed after weeks of pressure 
from foe opposition Serial 
Democrats (SPD) and foeir 
own party ranks. All deny 
impropriety. 

The widening scandal has 
resulted in corruption charges 
against eight people here. 

They include a former CDU 
building official accused of 
taking up to DM1 million 
(£285.000) in bribes for plan- 
ning favours. Another 29 peo- 
ple, including an architect, 
businessmen, former officials 
and a brothel owner, are in 
investigative custody. 

The resignation of Herr 
Lummer. a leading figure in 
West Berlin’s CDU-led Gov- 
ernment since it took office in 
1981 pledging to abolish cor- 
ruption. was a blow to Mayor 
Eberhard Diepgen and to 
Chancellor Kohl’s parly in 
Bonn. 

With 10 months to go 
before national elections, the 
CDU in West Germany is 
already suffering from a scan- 
dal over unofficial donations 
to party funds. Chancellor 
Kohl is alleged to have misled 


an official committee investi- 
gation into corruption 
charges. 

Herr Diepgen has admitted 
taking thousands or marks 
from building contractor Herr 
Kurt Franke, already charged 
with bribery. 

He says he accepted the 
money as a party donation 
before he took office. 

Last week Herr Lummer. 
renowned for his hardline 
attitudes on immigration and 
security, admitted that he paid 
DM2 7 000 to an extreme right- 
wing group to stop them 
campaigning against the CDU 
in an election. He said the 
action had been endorsed by 
the party. 

Herr Lummer. aged 53. had 
also become a political liabil- 
ity because of his acquaint- 
ance with a car dealer now 
being investigated on charges 
of attempted bribery over a 
property deal. 

Herr Franke's position had 
been undermined by a maga- 
zine report that said investiga- 
tors had found Dm800.000 of 
"unexplained origin” in his 
private bank accounts. 

He denied foat the money 
had been paid to him as 
bribes. 

The CDLTs coalition part- 
ners. foe Free Democrats, 
have made it clear they do not 
intend to leave foe govern- 
ment over the scandal. 

Parly sources said the FDP 
Environmental Senator Horst 
Verier, who has admitted 
taking a Dm 10,000 party do- 
nation from Here Franke. is 
under pressure to resign. 


Eastwood set 
to become 
Carmel mayor 



Hie latest poll taken in the 
tiny Californian oceanside 
town of Carmel indicates that 
voters of the tourist communi- 
ty will indeed make the day for 
the neophyte politician Clint 
Eastwood and elect him mayor 
at today's election (Ivor Davis 
writes from I»s Angeles). 

Eastwood, above., will prob- 
ably get at least 61 per cent of 
foe vote — and foe poll was 
takes even before one oppo- 
nent. Mr Paul Laub, pulled 
out of tbe four-person race ar.d 
threw bis support behind bim. 

That makes Eastwood a 
virtual certainty to to“ e foe job 
from foe incumbent, Mrs 
Charlotte Townsend, who is 
n>rn«ini> fn eivc up. 




14 


THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


SPECTRUM 2 


Takeover: a me 



in three acts 


As the stakes in the mergers’ boom rise ever 
higher, the tactics employed in boardroom 
battles are becoming much harder-edged. In 
the second part of his series, Stephen Aris 
examines the Takeover Panel, the referee 
called in when the going gets rough 


Only a quarter of a mile separates 
S.G. Warburg's modem building 
overlooking London Bridge and 
the Stock Exchange skyscraper 
that overshadows the Bank of 
England. But for John Walker- 
Howanh the journey involved 
more than a five-minute walk. 

As a senior member of 
Warburg’s corporate finance team 
Walker- Ho want was a highly 
active and weU -rewarded player in 
the great takeover game. Now. as 
director-general of the City’s 
Takeover Panel, which is housed 
on the 20th floor of the Stock 
Exchange building, he sits in 
judgement on his former col- 
leagues and rivals. Overnight, one 
of the team's star strikers had 
become the referee. 

When it was set up 18 years ago 
the Takeover Panel was a distinct- 
ly modest, not to say amateur, 
affair. ft made up its own rules and 
issued gentle rebukes to those 
members of the City fraternity 
whose behaviour was considered 
to be offside. The firsr edition of 
the Takeover Code, which lays 
down how takeovers should be 
conducted, was a volume of no 
more than a dozen pages. 

Today, the pace is not so gentle. 
The code runs to almost 1 00 pages 
and hardly a week passes without 
Walker-Kcwanb and his team of 
half a dozen executives being in 
the thick of the battle. And as the 
games played by the merchant 
bankers have got rougher, so the 
judgements handed down by the 
panel have necessarily become 
sharper. 

■'Everybody involved knows the 

rules inside out”, says Walker- 
Howarth. “Bui with so much at 
stake people will take a kick at 
them if they think they can 
possibly get away wiih iL” 

Last month, for example. Mor- 
gan GrenfelL which is acting for 
United Biscuits in its proposed 
merger with the Imperial Group, 
had its attention drawn by the 
Bank of England to the rule that 
prohibits bidders committing 


more than 25 per cent of their 
capital 10 acquiring shares in the 
target company. It is a useful way 
of shutting out a rival bidder (in 
this case Hanson Trust) but if 
things went wrong, it would, so the 
Bank felt, expose United Biscuits 
and its shareholders to a risk. 

What worries the Panel far 
more, however, is the broad from 
on which takeover battles are now 
being fought They are not so 
much a hand-to-hand fight be- 
tween two well-matched teams of 
merchant bankers but a wide- 
ranging contest involving bankers, 
advertising agencies, the Press and 
what Walker-Howanh describes 
as “the demi-monde" of public 
relations. “We all know what goes 
on: a journalist is taken out to 
dinner by a PR guy and fed inside 
information. It shouldn't happen, 
but it does. That's life and there is 
nothing we can do about iL” 

The Panel is also concerned 
about the advertising blitz which 
has become such a feature of the 
takeover scene. It has already told 
Imperial that it is not happy with 
three of its press broadsides. Bui 
although the Panel does its best to 
check every advertisement the 
process is not, as Walker-Howanh 
admits, foolproof. “Sometimes we 
don't know- it's wrong until the 
other side objects: by which time, 
you couid argue, the damage has 
already been done." 

In short many now maintain, 
the Panel is being taken for a ride, 
thus putting the entire system of 
self-regulation in jeopardy. “It’s 
no good shutting the door alter the 
horse has bolted”, says Nicholas 
Jones, a director of Schroder 
Wagg. one of the City's leading 
merchant banks. “The regulatory 
framework is too weak. The time 
has come for legislation." 

In criticizing the Panel. Jones is 
perhaps being a little ungrateful. It 
was. after all. thanks to the Panel 
that Schraders won a famous 
victory at the end ofl35t year. The 
episode is described by Nicholas 
Jones in the current issue of 



Acquisitions Monthly. It is worth 
looking at in a little detail as it 
illustrates many of the features of 
the modem takeover. 

The drama, which formally 
began on March 18 last year, can 
be divided into three acts and five 
scenes. 

DRAMATIS PERSONAE 

• Scottish and Newcastle Brewer- 
ies — the aggressor, one of the Big 
Eight of Britain’s brewers. Profits 
£62.5 million. 

• Matthew Brown — the intended 
victim, based in Blackburn and 
strong in the north-west, with some 
530 pubs. Brands: Slalom lager 
and Old Peculier bitter. Projits: 
£3.2 million. 

• Morgan Grenfell — merchant 
bank advisers to S & N, one of the 
City's most successful and feared 
takeover specialists. Known as an 
attacker. 


J. 


Henry Schroder Wagg — 


merchant bank advisers to Mat- 
thew Brown. Emerging from bad 
patch and keen to restore its 
reputation. 


• Large supporting cast of lobby- 
ists. MPs. lawyers, advertising 
men and PR advisers. 

PROLOGUE 

January 1985: S & N go into the 
market and begin buying Matthew 
Brown shares. Acquire 4.9 percent 
at prices between 262p and 284p 
per share. 

ACT ONE 

Scene One: The Dawn Raid 
Swoop by 5 & N”s brokers who 
attempt to buy 10 per cent stake at 
3S4p. Schraders counter-attacks 
by mounting its own buying 
operation. Price rises to 400p. 
Dawn raiders repulsed. 

Scene Two: The Formal Offers 
March IS: S & N makes first 
formal offer. Rejected as being 
“most unwelcome and wholly 
unacceptable”. 

Following second dawn raid, 
S & N makes second formal offer 
at 440p. Stake now up to 13 per 
cenL Whitbread increases stake in 
Matthew Brown from 5 per cent to 
nearly 9 per cent. 


ACT TWO 
The Phoney War 

The act opens with one of a 
defender's favourite gambits — an 
appeal to the Monopolies Com- 
mission. Enter local MPs Jack 
Straw and Dale CampbeH-Savours 
waving order papers. Enter em- 
ployees with drays and delivery 
vans festooned with “Keep Mat- 
thew Brawn independent” ban- 
ners. Traffic jams at Stock 
Exchange and Houses of Parlia- 
ment. Public relations firm re- 
cruits Russell Harty. Lobbyists go 
to work at House of Commons. 
Loud noises offstage from the 
Campaign for Real Ale. Rallies., 
petitions and other special effects. 

As reference to the Monopolies 
Commission becomes more cer- 
tain. share price sags. S & N stake 
rises to 14.9 per cent, just below 
point where full cash alternative is 
mandatory. Six-month lull while 
bid referred to Monopolies 
Commission. 

ACT THREE 

Scene One: The Gloves Are Off 
November 12: The Monopolies 


Commission gives S & N the 
green light, ruling that the bid is 
not against the public interesL 
Spirits sink at Schraders and rise 
at Morgan Grenfell, who move in 
for what is hoped will be knock- 
out blow. Ante is upped again with 
arrival of third and final offer of 
560p in shares and 540p in cash, 
valuing company at £122 million. 
Company has doubled in value in 
nine months. Morgan's attempt to 
stampede shareholders by an- 
nouncing dosing date for accep- 
tances as December 11 with no 
extensions — something the bank 
is later to bitterly regret. Matthew 
Brown's chairman, Patrick 
Townsend, puts on brave front, 
describing latest bid as “totally 
unacceptable” and commercial 
arguments as “poppycock”. But 
bankers very worried that small 
shareholders would be tempted by 
the cash. 

Scene Two: Backs To The Wall 
Schraders go all out to woo the 
small shareholder. Public rela- 
tions firm sends a personal mes- 
sage on cassette from ■ tie 
chairman to all shareholders. 


Opinions of locals in a Matthew 
Brawn pub in Preston canvassed. 
Advertising campaign in local 
papers in areas where small share- 
holders Itve.Insaiutsonal share- 
holders wheeled in to sec . 
chairman. Both companies pub- 
lish rosv profit forecasts, but 
neither sk!e willing to leave any- 
thing to chance- Brokers for both 
sides wade in to pick up as many 
shares as possible. S & M's stake 
rises to 26 per eenL Matthew 
Brown and friends have 23 per 
cent. Balance up for grabs. 

Scene Three: Time. 

Gentlemen, Please 

The deadline for final acceptances 
is set for 3.30pm. December II. 
The arguments have been made, 
the shareholders bombarded, the 
Press has taken sides: **S &. N 
looks set to wm” is the general 
view. Everything depends on the 
final hours. At lunchtimes* 
Schraders makes its final throw. ’ 
picking up 160.000 shares. But as 
3.30 approaches it is dear to 
every body it will be dose. 

The deadline has already passed 
when Morgan Grenfell tries to 
change the rules. At 4pm, half an 
hour after the expiry of the 
deadline. Schraders receives a 
phone call from the Takeover 
tend idling it that Morgan is 
claiming 47 per cent and is 
extending the offer to 5pm. 

Schraders immediately cries 
“fool” and appeals to the Panel. 
During this meeting Schraders 
learns to its horror that Morgan 
has indeed succeeded in capturing 
.over 50 per cent and that the final 
purchase had been made at 
4.55pm, only five minutes before 
the “new” deadline. 

.An almighty row then ensues. 

. Initially the Panel's staff lakes 
Morgan's side. but . Schraders in- 
sists on a foil hearing fed by 
chairman Sir Jasper Hoi lorn, for- 
mer deputy governor of the Bank 
of England On the folk) wing day, 
the initial decision in Morgan's 
favour, is reversed, to general 
rejoicing in the Matthew Brown 
camp. 

Throughout the north-west that 
evening. Slalom lager and Okl 
Peculier bitter are in strong 
demand. .. 

Additional reporting 6y Jeremy 
Warner and VMliom Kay * 

( TOMORROW ) 

The serious game 
of Monopoly 


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Mindful tli.it share prices can van daily, we are publishing a bulletin showing the value 
of our ofTer Ibr Imperial. The \ alue we've quoted is based on our best possible offer. 

The ne\t closing dale of our offer is \pril 1 1 at 5 pm. 

IMPERIAL SHARE PRICE: 




HANSON BID WORTH: 




HANSON BID HIGHER BY: 



Future* based mi ihemarki-i pnr>-.dl Vitlpiii'in M-uuld'. 


H ANSON TRUST 



lb nifrnOnrVisA' 4rf*nr tVH^.udrrKjirnWmn JrrJ .»*»P****r I w— xw *w n wn«»l iw ■ t"|M 


With a big takeover 
battle looming, rows 
in the EEC and fears 
about diet, why has 
the sugar business 
turned so m? 

S ugar has been Mamed for 
the slave trade and 
Queen Elizabeth Ts bad 
teeth. For centuries it has been 
at the centre of political and 
nutritional debate. 

Refilled sugar b frequently 
attacked as a health risk by 
the “brown rice brigade*'. Yet 
ft b not only free from 
additives and artificial fla- 
vouring, but if European and 
American consumption 
dropped dramatically, a host 
of Third World countries 
would be economically stran- 
gled — something with which 
those same health Seeds 
would hate to be associated. 

Even the scientists and nu- 
tritionists cannot agree. Pro- 
fessor John Yudkin, emeritus 
professor of nutrition at Lon- 
don University, b convinced 
that it b an important contrib- 
utor to coronary thrombosis, 
diabetes and obesity. Bnt Vin- 
cent Marks, professor of clini- 
cal biochemistry at Snrrey 
University, insists: “State- 
ments that sugar b a primary 
or indeed even a contributory 
cause of coronary heart dis- 
ease are not only false and 
misleading, bnt frankly misch- 
ievous”. 

Britain absorbs 2350,000 
tonnes of sugar a year, some- 
thing like 841b per head of 
population. The market b 
roughly divided between sugar 
beet — grown in Britain and 
refined and distributed by 
British Sugar, now involved a 
a takeover battle — and sugar 
cane, imported, refined and 
distributed by Tate & Lyle. 

If Britain's European part- 
ners had had their way, there 
would have been no imported 
sugar at all and the Third 
World or — in sugar jargon — 
the African, Caribbean and 
Pacific countries (ACP), 
would have gone to the wall 
alongside Tate & Lyle. 

There is little difference 
between sugar obtained from 
beet or cane. Beet grows 
beneath the ground in temper- 
ate climates and cane above 
ground in tropical countries. 
White sugar is not an artifi- 
cially doctored hybrid of “the 
real thing”, but pare sucrose. 
“Raw brown sugar” is the stuff 
which arrives at, say, Tate and 
Lyle before it is refined: no one 

who works there would readily 
agree to eat or drink iL 

“Natural unrefined brown 


WORLD SUGAR GROWING AREAS 



sugar”, op the other hand, is 
sugar which has been handled 
from source in the knowledge 
that it will not be refined and 
which contains traces of such 
metals as iron, chromium and 
zinc, thought to be beneficial. 
White sngar made into brown 
by the addition of molasses is, 
usually, brown-coloured white 
sugar. 

The EEC pays a fixed price 
for raw sngar of £370 a too — 
four times the world price. 
Michael S hereby, director 
general of Britain's Sugar 
Bureau, firmly denies that this 
amounts to a farming subsidy. 

T he fixed price is only 
paid, be Insists, for sug- 
ar needed for the home 
market — the so-called quotas 
A and B — and only sugar 
exported as sarplHs is sold at 
the artificially depressed 
world price. “Without this 
guaranteed price, growers in 
Britain and foe ACP countries 
would have no basis on which 
to invest in modern mach- 
inery”, be says. 

But foe EEC also “damps” 
about foor-and-a-half million 
tons of sugar a year on to the 
export market. It is not diffi- 
cult to understand the anguish 
of Caribbean governments, 
who discovered last month 
that European sngar was being 
imported into their own conn- 
tries at a fraction of foe price 
that it cost to produce. 

Grateful as foe ACP coun- 
tries might he for a guaranteed 
share of the international quo- 
ta market, the bulk of their 
trade Is still on foe open world 
market At the moment, then- 
growers are losing up to £300 
on every ton they produce. 


“As a major export indus- 
try, sngar as we know it fa 
dead”, Mr George Chambers, 
prime minister of Trinidad, 
said recently. The same de- 
cline, differing only in degree, 
exists in every otter tropical 
region whose climate suits 
only sugar cane. 

Even on the neatly divided 
home front the battle cries are 
sounding. British Sngar, 
which bad its quota share 
reduced in foe 1970s after a 
succession of poor harvests^ is 
lobbying hard for a return to 
foe lion's portion. At the same 
time, its owners. S. and W. 


Berisfbrd, are openly threaten- 
ing to sell their sugar interests. 
When they do. a British 
Leyland-utyie battle seems in- 
evitable with the Italian sugar 
giant, FemzzzL 

That prospect terrifies Tate 
& Lyle. With Ferrnzzi embroi- 
ling about 30 per cent of the 
entire European market, ft 
conld squeeze them oat of the 
sngar business altogether. 

William Greaves 

Sugar is the subject af 
O’Donnell Investigates The 
Food Business on BBC2 to- 
night at 7.30pm. 


CONCISE CROSSWORD (No 919) 


ACROSS 

1 With pretty view (6) 
5 Snug (4) 

8 Cake coating (5) 

9 Unreliable (7) 

11 Infirmity (8) 

13 N Israel Crusades 
port (4) 

15 Tnppings<l3) 

17 Haney wine (4) 

18 Spines^meutftl) 

21 Left-over (7) 

22 CraftinessfS) 

23 Chances (4) 

24 Esteem (6) 

DOWN 

2 Ascend (5) 

3 Scold (3) 

4 Forger (1 3} 

5 Charge (4) 

6 Taste (7) 

7 Luge sailing ship 

10 CocrurierUOj 



12 Noisy (4) 

14 Give off (4) 
M Packed (7) 


19 Pipe wood (S) 

20 Scots girl (4) 
22 Joke (3) 




SOLUTION TO N0918 

J™** I0Es>allop 1. 

Neigh 23 S^wpo?M Layer 18 Conserve 21 GnocetaZZ 

Sne N 7 Ne<3e > "' 12 liSlnal 3 w1m?lore 4 _ 5 Nail 6 * 

Rainy 20Scup ” implore 15 Staggs 26 Tether 19 
























FASHION by Suzy Menkes 








The beachwear scene, dominated in recent years 
by bright colours and the barest of essentials, is 
plunging back in tim e to the more modest 
underwear styles of the Fifties and Sixties 


-•5.v 

:• V.- 
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\ 


v \*: 5 - • - 

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oonin 


* 






T he: Maries- anid. 

Spencer saleslady 
was trimnphant 
“It. just goes to 
prove”, she/ said, 
“that women only 
want the bottom half of a 
bikini”. 

It did indeed. There in 
Brent Cross on a fle ering 
spring day, hung the drooping, 
abandoned cups of the M & S 
bikini sets. The policy of 
allowing customers to buy 
what they want gives a whole 
new meaning to the idea ofa 
one-piece swimsuit. 

The beachwear revolution 
that is now lapping the shores 
of wholesome high street 
stores is also affecting high 
fashion. For as the mass 
marker gets holiday packing 
( down to the briefest of bnefe, 

■ designers come up with ever 
more fantastic creations to 
lure us bade into the 
swimwear. ■ . . 

Just when you thought it 
was safe to try the high-cut 
swimsuits and bikim pants, 
the leading designers are try- 
ing the opposite angle and 
drawing the fabric down our 
thighs. The kmg^egged swim- 
suit, cut like a 1930s regulation 
swimsuit — but in today s 
featherlight man-made fabrics 
— is a novelty. So are the 
simple swimsuits that rely for 
their impact on geometric cut- 
outs across the body. „ 
There is a whiff of the 1960s 
about a lot of these sharp 
angles, and especially in the 
key-hole cut-outs that are 
mostly to show off a bronzed 
back, but appear also at the 
midriff. The T-back is another 
strong shape for swimsuits 
that are meant to have a hre 
out of the water. 

Italian designer Gianni 
Versace, one of the -artistic 
creators of fashion swimsuits, 
has a distinct Sixties feel to ms 
graphic black _ swimwear, 
which comes with a micro 
mini-skirt as the ultimate 

cover-up. . . , . 

The most dramatic design 
treatment is given to the 
bikini in order to revitalize it 
as a two-piece. Those twin 
triangles or fabric tied at , the 
sides with a thong are now 
being replaced by 
shapes a bold. V of &bne 
sliced up to the waist at the 

ssssssSF 

saver - a frill of oveMlart 

The despised bra top a dso 

changing- The halter top has 
giveaway to the bandeau that 





£?*?■■*. • > . 









WM 






^ < ■ ! . t* ■£ *3? 

s?v. >»■. >y\£ 








V '".’•Jar 











*• '?■, : r AWWf. 

' • * ■* 







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\k 



We think Big 
gBeoutiW- 

Are you size 1 8-24? 

TlKJiwhyaoiWivlforoc^rt^^ 

BSOBSBiBS 


Super ■QKsfr*® 3 • 


r.SM» 


is getting much deeper and 
becoming more of a sunWP 
and less just for the beach. 

The inspiration for both 
halves of the bikini seems to 
■come from early underwear, 
with the tops looking some- 
thing tike the bras that fat 
postcard women wore on the 
beach. These bold bikinis are 
Unlikely to be -worn by the 
. deckchair brigade, for they are 
coming in from foe high 
fashion names and at top-ot- 
the-market prices. 

Norma Kamallfoe Amen- 
can designer whose swimsuits 
seif at Browns, has taken the 
shapes of old-fashioned cor- 
sets and reformed them , in 
lightweight fabrics for quite a 
different effect Her. styles are 
saucy and much-copied. 

Liza Brace, is another de- 
signer who makes waves on 
die beach with her sexy swim- 
suits, strapped, banded and 
cut-out to give you a suntan 
surprise. Such costumes are 
not meant for sunbathing, 
except rolled to the hips. They 
art far parading on the water- 
front or wearing as fashion s 
. new buzangarment .‘‘the 
body", under a sarong skirt or 
narrow trousers. /' _ 


When I talked to Princess 
Stephanie of Monaco about 
her own swim wear collection 
(on sale at Harrods) she was 
adamant that she is designing 
clothes, not swimwear. She 
proved foe point by wearing 
one of her glamorous niched 
swimsuits under an evening 
skin to a gala dinner. 


P erhaps because foe 
classy swimsuits 
take you from day 
to night, sparkle, 
subtle glitter and 
shiny fabrics are 
now favourites. So are solid 
colours, with a lot of black, lit 
up with white or vivid day-glo 
trims. Stripes, spots and 
graphic patterns are now more 
popular pure gentler flowers. 
The only high fashion floral 
prints are the black outlined, 
stylized psychedelic blooms 
that come from foe 1960s. _ 
The choice between swim- 
ming high or swimming low 
lies with your body and in 
your wallet Because foe long- 
legged panties are high fash- 
ion, they are mostly more 
expensive than foe very brief 
swimsuits with high-cut less. 
That shape is now the stan- 
dard in the chain stores. It 


flatters and lengthens good 
legs but is cruel to heavy 
thighs and seats. 

For those who swim seri- 
ously. for exercise or for fun, 
there is an excellent selection 
of swimsuits; featherlight, 

streamlined, and from the 
athletics experts like Speedo. 
The shapes are uncomplicated 
but foe suits broken up with 
geometric flags of colour or by 
racing stripes. Straps are get- 
ting broader, sometimes cut 
like a wrestler’s vest at foe 
hack. 



Main picture. Bathing BeHe: 
flesh pink lycra bikini with 
bandeau top and ruched pants, 
by Lhria. £29.95 from Fenwick. 
Wt and Newcastle. Soft straw 
hat, £19.50, The Hat Shop, 
WC2. 


For holidays, accessorizing 
your swimsuit is part of its 
fashion treatment In keeping 
with foe sleek, shiny image of 
foe current beachwear, foe 
favourite fabrics are latex or 
plastic for bold hoop earrings 
or cheap and cheery sandals. 
.Heavy metal is also high 
fashion with hip-line chain 
belts that weigh more than foe 
briefs. 

Are there any real signs that 


foe wave of topless snnbathing 
is receding? It took a sexual 


is receding? It took a sexual 
revolution to make us burn 
our flesh as well as our bras. It 

will need a counter-revolution 
to persuade anyone that mod- 
esty is a must for foe beach. 


Top left Deep Plunge: Gianni 
Versace’s shiny black lycra 
bustier bikini, EEC from Gianni 
Versace, 35 Brook Street W1 
and 92 Brompton Road, SW1. 
Above left Stretch and 
swim; keyhole cut-outs on 
striped crinkle Lycra swimsuit 
by Liza Bruce, £60 from 
Harrods, SW1; LiUywhites, Wt; 
Prelude, Newcastle upon Tyne; 

Hattan, Brighton. 

Above rightSixties Geometry: 
black lycra one-piece with 


cross back straps, £7.99 by 
Club Azure from C4A 


branches. 


Left Pop-Art strapless lycra 
print swimsuit £62 by Kafka 


from Liberty, Regent Street, 
Wl. 


Chain and rubber jewellery 
from Prism at Hyper Hyper, 
W8. 


Hair by Wendy Sadd for 
Simon Rattan. 

Make-up by 
Jane Goddard. 


Photographs by 
DAVID ANTHONY 


FASHION PEOPLE 


Falling 
into line 


Who fa foe designer who has 
pot Her Majesty shoulder-to- 
sboolder-pad with her daogb- 

ier-in-U»? The buttercup 
yellow coal that has changed 
the royal silhouette was de- 
signed by Ken Fleetwood at 
Hardy Amies, who. with his 
usual discretion, Hill not enter 
into discuss bos about how 
resistance was overcome. The 
Princess of Wales who has, 
even more discreedy, become a 
diem of Hardy Amies, might 
just have had something to do 
with this palace revolution. 

But will Princess Diana be 
foe guiding star in choosing 
foe wedding dress for her 
friend Sarah Ferguson? Logic 
might suggest that Miss Fer- 
guson will choose made-to- 


f * 

9 




order clothes from Diana's 
young couturiers, Bruce 
Oldfield and Victor Edelstein 
and the willowy Catherine 
Walker. But foe engagement 
outfit came from a newcomer. 
.Alistair Blair. Blair’s Person 
Friday is Susannah Constan- 
tine, dose friend of Lord 
Linley and of his sister Lady 
Sarah, who first introduced 
Sarah to Diana. In the fashion 
world, foe scissors are out 



• I claim total responsibility for Ralph Lauren's lyrical 
campaign in praise of older men. i knew that Ralph had 
liked the men's fashion pictures 1 took at Kempton Park 
last autumn, showing a distinguished grandfather figure 
(left) with his Lauren-clad “grandson". Ralph took my idea 
to the Bahamas the next month. The result are the 
evocative pictures of a Wasp family on a country weekend 
that you will And in the glossy magazines. His version has 
the elderly gentleman (right) a spectator at polo rather than 
horse-racing. But after all, polo is Lauren's signature. 


Japanese 

twists 


1 


A throng of black clad fashion 
groupies descended like crows 
on Sloan e Street last week to 
celebrate foe opening of Yohji 
Yamamoto's new shop (writes 
Rebecca Tyrrell The party 
and foe shop came courtesy of 
fashion king Joseph Ettedgni. 
Yohji himself pat in an early 
appearance, hot fled before the 
throng swooped. 

Joseph has given over his 
Norman Foster, early 80s hi- 
tech store to Yohji who has 
now given the decor a Japa- 
nese twist But it was Cham- 
pagne; not said, that flowed 
and foe only sign of oriental 
cuisine was the seaweed green 
of the batik print sarongs. 

The groupies were fresh 
from viewing the new collec- 
tion in Paris and foe talk was 
of Yohji's clever cutting, 
though no one was yet wearing 
the new palette of bright 
colours promised next season. 



The spring collection hung 
on shiny industrial rails 
around our heads and was 
photographed in moody black 
and white for a glossy bro- 
chure. Matelot T-shirts are 
worn with kittle French girl’s 
sailor dresses. Mandarin tu- 
nics in lightweight man-made 
fabrics like rayon and nylon 
are mixed with cotton skirts 
with mis-matched buttons. 


GUCCI 

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The card will enable you to purchase items from the 
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We will regularly advise our card holders of our new 
collections and events. 


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1 






16 


THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 


Hot seat 
for Snow 

News flash from Independent 
Television News; Jon Snow is 
returning from Washington to 
become ITN’s political editor. 
Snow, cousin of Newsniekt pre- 
senter Peter and onetime nance of 
Anna Ford, has won plaudits for 
his cerebral and sometimes caustic 
reports on the Reagpn years. He 
makes little secret of his leftish 


of the coal strike, for example, be 
put his name to an appeal for ««h 
to aid striking miners 1 families, 
alongside radical journalists such 
as Mary Holland and Paul Foot 
Current political editor CHyn Ma- 
thias— whose wife is an SDP 
activist — is being moved side- 
ways to mastermind UN’s cover- 
age of the House of Lords, which 
began a new run last night. Tim 
Ewart after a successful spell in 
Poland, is being rewarded with the 
Washington job. Meanwhile, dip- 
lomatic editor Michael Brunson, 
himself a former White House 
watcher, is reportedly nursing his 
own bruised ambitions for the 
Commons job. 


Mmm 


Weary rail passengers were 
revitalized yesterday by an 
amendment to the old slogan 
"Send Botha Home" on a bridge 
at Heme Hill, south London. 
Someone had scrawled a supple- 
mentary “m" on the name. 

Words worth 

In a perfect world everyone would 
read the Times Diary. For the 
moment, teachers Anna and 
Philip Dunlop are grateful that 
John Bolton, managing director of 
Swan Hellenic Cruises, does. He 
spluttered over his cornflakes 
yesterday when he read how the 
Dunlops had tied in a Spectator 
competition with another compet- 
itor who, in a draw, was given the 
first prize: a Swan Hellenic art 
treasure tour. The Dunlops won 
the second prize,' a complete 
OED — which, as I reported yes- 
terday, they already had. Within 
minutes Bolton was making 
arrangements for the couple to 
choose any available Swan Hel- 
lenic cruise this year, a bauble 
worth more than £3,000. The 
OED wiD now go to a runner-up. 

Moving house 

Although it has not yet been 
announced, Tom King's personal 
adviser in Northern Ireland, Rich- 
ard Ehnnan, is to quit. His 
decision comes only weeks after 
Nigel Lawson lost two of his 
advisers, Howard Davies and 
Rodney Lord. Lawson's loss pales 
into insignificance beside the ex- 
odus endured by the unpopular 
John Stanley, the Armed Forces 
Minister, who has lost about a 
dozen senior officials in his time.- 
Ehnnan, who accompanied King 
in his move from Employment, is 
leaving amicably. Yesterday he 
told me: "It isn't known but I'm 
going to run the family business.” 
Property and mail order, if you 
want to know. 

Sacre bleu 

France was very smug when it 
persuaded Oxford and Cambridge 
to stage a boat race every August at 
Manddieu. Now it thinks it has 
done even better: for this year's 
event it has also secured crack 
teams from Yale and New York's 
Cornell university. 


BARRY FANTONI 



‘I just wish they'd leave Ian 
alone so be can get 
on not playing (Ticket* 

MoD rocker 

After further eml 
ern merit backdowns over 
all George Younger needs is for 
one of his Ministry of Defence 
Staff to end up leading a national 
trade union. Ann Downey, a 
GCHQ clerical officer who refused 
to take the government's hush 
money, is this month standing for 
the “Broad Left *82” in the 
elections to the national executive 
of the civil servants union, the 
CPSA. What's more, I understand, 
ha* emotive circumstances make 
it odds-on that she will succeed. 

Know-alls 

Sturdily independent, the people 
of Sark — not to mention great 
tittle-tattlers. The 500 people of 
the island have just voted in their 
semi-autonomous local parlia- 
ment not to undergo a quinquen- 
nial census. By law, householders 
are required to complete an eight- 
page form used to establish trends 
in immigration, education, hous- 
ing and employment. But the 
islanders - Sarioans. Sarides? - 
say there is no point since every- 
one on the four square mile island 
knows everything about everyone 
else. Big sister Guernsey knows 
better than to argue. PHS 


The European criticism of the 
recent US naval action against 
Libya was part of an established 
pattern. However seemingly jus- 
tified the use of American power 
might be, the reaction of its Nato 
allies is the same: we have become 
accustomed to speaking about the 
United States as dangerons, 
aggressive and unstable. 

Although such criticism is usu- 
ally over US foreign policy, it 
draws upon broader and older 
criticisms of American society as 
being violent, chaotic, crime-rid- 
den and irrational. America is 
portrayed as a wealthy neurotic, 
dangerous at home and abroad. 

Many of the critics, both here 
and in America, call themselves 
liberals. But what underlies them 
is a non-Communist repudiation 
of liberal democratic capitalism 
and its values. Hie liberal tra- 
dition developed in 19th century 
England. At its heart was an 
optimistic belief in progress, in the 
supremacy of the individual, in 
the economic and moral benefi- 
cence of capitalism, and in lim- 
ited. constitutional government. 
This liberal capitalism developed 
still more My in the United 
States because of its lack of a 
feudal tradition, and the absence 
of what R.H. Tawney called “the 
lingering aroma of the aristocratic 
legend”. 

In this century, however, Eu- 
rope has reacted against its own 
early liberalism. That reaction, 
which is the fundamental source 
of its anti- Americanism, takes two 
broad forms. 

Fust, there is European distaste 
for America's democratic culture. 
Take, for example, post-war West 
Germany, which has become the 
most Americanized of America's 
West European allies, Andrei 
Markovits of Boston University 
points out that America and tire 
Americans have normally been 
popular with the German public, 
but not with the German literati: 
conservative and radical thinkers 
alike, he says, regard American 
“civilization” as “overly materi- 
alistic, vulgar, uncouth, in- 
strumental and mass-orientated.” 

As an antithesis to this, Euro- 
pean peace movement propa- 
ganda is laced with nostalgic 
appeals to pastoral ideals and to 
older, gentler, rural values. All of 
this is skilfully counterpoised 
against the image of a rapacious 
commercial, transatlantic super- 
power, out to destroy peaceful 
Europe. “Culture” has become a 
political weapon. 

The second source of anti- 
Americanism is the traditionalist 
rejection of social equality. An- 
thony Crosland used to argue from 


Stephen Haseler traces the sources of 
the latest bout of anti-Americanism 

US and us: the 
new rift in 
British politics 



the left that in American, as 
compared to European, society, 
“class distinctions are less perva- 
sive and less hereditary, social 
attitudes are less class-conscious, 
the atmosphere more natural and 
unrestrained, the social ladder as a 
whole much shorter, and social 
envy and resentment less -in 
sum, social equality is much 
greater”. 

Crosland exposed the elitist 
nature of the anti-Americanism 


evinced by both conservatives and 
socialists -outside the United 
States. Conservative elitism de- 
rived from an attachment to social 
hierarchy, and to a political order 
that would entrench that hierar- 
chy; socialist elitism derived from 
the view that the state, or the 
party, knows best. 

This began to chang e in the late 
1 950s as post-war affluence began 
to stimulate social modernization 
throughout Europe. Some social 


convergence between the US and 
Western Europe seemed 
possible.Subsequent economic 
problems, however, polarized the 
politics and societies of Western 
Europe, dispersing the pro-Ameri- 
can pro-Atlantirist tendencies at 
tire centre. 

There is an identifiable duster 
of British institutions and interest 
groups — the BBC, the Ted Heath 
wing of the Conservative Party, 
the Church of England, the Civil 
Service — which share certain 
characteristics; all of them leading 
to anti-Americanism. They put 
forward a liberal face while har- 
bouring nativist. reactionary or 
socialist sentiments. They recruit 
many of their personnel from 
privileged backgrounds (particu- 
larly public schools) and tend, 
consequently, to resent free mar- 
ket, democratic and egalitarian 
forces, which many see as threat- 
ening their very existence. They 
are world players, used to being 
taken seriously from Bombay to 
New York but no longer necessar- 
ily admired or even particularly 
noticed. Anti-Americanism pro- 
vides an outlet for their resent- 
ments and frustrations. 

Attitudes to tire United States 
could soon define a new political 
divide in Britain. Mrs Thatcher’s 
obvious self-identification with 
aspects of American, culture has 
forced the issuer The questions 
which she seems to be posing to 
the British people are of ultimate 
importance: do we wish, finally, to 
rejoin the modem world of the 
open societies, and are we pre- 
pared to take the risks? 

On the other side stand the 
political representatives of the 
forces opposed to modernization: 
the majority of the Labour Party, 
who still see themselves as 
representing the proletariat cre- 
ated by 19th nineteenth century 
industrialism; certain sections of 
the Alliance parties who, for all 
their progressive talk, represent 
the interests and inclinations of a 
narrow, provincial stratum of 
English upper-class society (best 
typified by the growing green 
movement in the Liberal Party, 
with its anti-nuclear, anti-tech- 
nological impulse); the left wing of 
the Conservative Party, with the 
most to lose — in terms of inher- 
ited wealth and privilege — should 
our society actually be opened up. 

It is a formidable coalition with 
counterparts in other Western 
countries. How the US deals with 
the challenge wfll be a fun- 
damental test of its superpower 
status; and how its friends and 
allies respond to anti-Ameri- 
canism in their own communities 
will be a test of their maturity. 


The affair ; of the education 
authority of the Borough of St 
Helens do not normally provide 
my nightly reading or my daylight 
thoughts. But I have recently 
received a document, its origin 
plainly one of the extreme left- 
wing groups operating in the area, 
and foe authenticity of which has 
been respectably vouched for, 
which concerns the business of the 
said authority, and which is so 
remarkable, and so portentous in 
its implications, that I must needs 
concern myself with it. Those who 
are tempted not to read further, on 
the ground that St Helens is a far- 
off country of which we know 
nothing, should resist temptation: 
it is very nnlikdy indeed that what 
1 am to relate is confined to the 
area in question. 

The leaders of the organization 
which has drawn up the document 
have circulated it to all their 
members among the governors of 
schools in the area; it has long 
been an aim of the extreme left to 
capture control of as many such 
bodies as possible, and the work of 
infiltration has already gone for. In 
the paper 1 have, the governors 
who belong to the organization are 
given instructions as to how they 
should best conduct themselves in 
furthering their revolutionary 
aims; I have to say that the 
methods advocated would tom 
any school that foil under their 
control into something hardly 
distinguishable from a concentra- 
tion camp. 

The programme of action is 
divided into six sections: Gov- 
ernors' Meetings, The Head, 
Teaching Stan. Non-teaching 
Staff Pupils and Parents. 1 shall 
take them in order. 

Under “Governors' Meetings”, 
members are instructed as follows 
(I have been necessarily selective, 
for the whole document, which 
contains 87 separate items, would 
lake most of this page, but I assure 
you that the tenor throughout is 
the same): 

When in the majority — ensure 
Chair and Vice are members 
and continually pre ss to a vote. 
When in a minority — interpose 
frequently on points of order, 
etc. and prevent a vote. Always 
meet as a group prior to the 
Governors' Meeting, decide 
points to be raised and who 
raises them; lbe aim is to act as 
one while seeming to act in- 
dividually. Use “filibustering” 
on important matters until non- 
members are exasperated, then 
produce the proposals you want 
at the end of the meeting. 
Constantly refer to “The 
Governors” in respect of pre- 
vious meetings, although an 
individual has put forward 


Bernard Levin: the way we live now 

Reading, 
writing and 
revolution 


points. Always have unfinished 
business when meetings end — 
requiring further (extra) meet- 
ings. Increase numbers of 
meetings ... if non-members 
find attendance difficult, so 
much the better. Prolong meetr 
mgs by prevaricating, “seeking 
aaiificauon”, “niggling**, and 
in sist on being beard oul Pick 
awkward times for meetings 
. . . Seek to annoy non-mem- 
bers. Always raise pre-planned 
“unexpected” points. Seek to 
discredit the clerk — question 
accuracy, put in a member to 
clerk. 

• Under “The Head” we have 
these orders: 

Constantly question statements 
matte by the Head. Imply 
concealment of informatiou. 
Seek to isolate Head . . . Ring 
up and question Head on any 
and all matters. Suggest unrest 
among parents, teachers, stu- 
dents. Imply low morals . . . 
Prevent Head .from pursuing a 
line of argument. Discover 
whether Head has been in- 
volved in litigation — seize 
opportunity to mention this. 
Hint at financial advantage for 
Head in retaining Sixth Form. 
Objectives: to keep Head off 
balance, undermine confid- 
ence . . . make staff parents 
and students suspicious of 
Head's motives and create ten- 
sion in and around Head. 

• The next section concerns the 

Teaching Staff 

Infiltrate staff room. Hint at 
unfairness, awkwardness. lack 
of communication of Hod, of 
some Governors, of LEA. Ques- 
tion morals. Always support 
grievance procedure, whatever 
the grievance. Concentrate to 
begin with on teachers of 
Humanities, Social Studies. Re- 
ligious Instruction. Political 
Studies. Avoid being asked to 
address staff as a whole. Seek to 
join splinter groups. Hint at 
unfairness in Head's promotion 
policy. Attend all functions — 
avoid being escorted by Head. 
Ignore Physical Education, Mu- 
sic, Classics. Insist on interview- 
ing candidates for vacant posts 
. . . ook for foreign travel es- 
pecially South America, Eastern 


Europe . . . Note that teachers 
trained in the late Sixties are 
often suitable. 

• Next, attention is turned to the 
Non-teaching Steffi 

Discover Union affiliation . . . 
Visit them, offer to cany 
complaints — Inquire after 
grievances — promise action. 
Get caretaker to Governors' 
meetings. 

• After that, the Students: 

Offer to pass “grumbles” to 
Head, to teachers. Offer lit- 
erature (they do not mean what 
you and 1 think of as literature), 
especially to senior students, 
offer to put school in tench 
with . _ . useful organisations. 

• Finally, the Parents: 

Always bring up parents* com- 
plaints at Governors' Meetings 
... say “some parents” even if 
only one. Infiltrate PTA comm- 
ittee. Keep up questioning of 
Head's authority ...Offer to 
accompany parents to interview 
with Head: insist on seeing 
Head: imply difficulty for par- 
ent alone. Always take ride of 
parents and students in cases of 
corporal punishment, suspen- 
sion from school etc. Encourage 
parents to write to Governors 
with complaints. Question whe- 
ther Head should attend PTA 
meetings. 

The document ends with a curious 
rubric, printed in capitals, and sc 
presumably of particular signifi- 
cance, which reads REMEMBER: 
FOUR YEARS IS NOT LONG. 
Whether this refers to a target the 
organizers have set themselves — 
say to rontrol the schools of St 
Helens in that time -or to a 
significant date (perhaps the next 
election of governors) is not dear, 
at least to the uninitiated. Bat it 
directly reinforces, in its mysteri- 
ous and sinister urgency, the 
warning that the whole catalogue 
of instructions ought to provide 
for the St Helens Educatio n 
Authority, for the area's parents 
and teachers (and pupils for that 
matter), for the teachers' unions, 
for the Department of Education 
and indeed for the entire country. 


or at least the 99.86 per cent or so 
who, from whatever political 
standpoint, do not want to see 
Britain's educational system ei- 
ther destroyed altogether or 
turned into an instrument de- 
signed to further the revolutionary 
aims of a band of im pfarahlft 
foules who aim for a state that 
would turn us all into helots. 

Many of the techniques that 
these fanatics are instructed to use 
wiD be familiar to any job who has 
ever belonged to an organization 
in which there are even a very few 
of them; I was myself inevitably 
reminded of the affairs of the 
London Freelance Branch of the 
NUJ, in the days when I and 
others were trying to prise open 
the grip upon it of a handful 
(perhaps 50 out of some 3,000) of 
varioos brands of communist and 
Trotskyite. But even those who 
have had direct experience of their 
aims and methods are often 
inclined (largely to excuse them- 
selves from the trouble of resist- 
ing ) to minimize the danger. 

I think that is a mistake, and a 
potentially disastrous one. Look 
again at the very first sentence in 
the first section of this Devil's 
Catechism: “When in the major- 
ity .. .” You may say that that 
sort of language is customary 
among these bullfrog folk, many 
of whom are convinced, and say, 
that the Revolution is going to 
arrive next Wednesday (or, when 
it foils to materialize on the due 
date, the Tuesday following). 

But remember that this docu- 
ment was never openly published; 
it was designed to remain in the 
hands to which it was directed. 
The recipients would know well 
whether their group of school 
governors contained only a couple 
of members or enough to carry the 
day; there would be no point or 
gain, indeed much risk of disillu- 
sion, for the rank and file to be 
told that they were for more 
powerful than they knew them- 
selves to be. And I repeat that 
there is no reason to suppose that 
any area of the country is wholly 
immune to this kind of infiltration 
and corruption of the educational 
process. Perhaps aD those in- 
volved in the process, and in 
particular parents, teachers and 
governors, should take a -moment 
to ponder the implications of this 
extraordinarily detailed battle 
plan for the conquest and ruin of 
education. For whatever the final 
slogan on the paper may mean, I 
think we can all agree with it: four 
years is not long. 

6 


Bill Boaks cheerfully acknowl- 
edged the general view of him as a 
crank and a loony. “I don't mind.” 
he used to say, “as long as I make 
people think. The trouble is. I'm 
years before my time.” 

He was certainly not years 
before the problems which he 
battled against so indefefigably, 
only in public concern about 
them — even public awareness 
that they in feci existed. Take each 
facet of his crusading banner 
Democratic Monarchist Public 
Safety White Resident. (He would 
have added more but was limited 
to five words on the ballot forms). 

Democratic? The words “fellow 
traveller” figured frequently in 
Boalu's conversation. He was 
aware years ago that our institu- . 
tions of democratic government 
must be vigorously defended 
against the tactics of the extreme 
left notably illustrated in Bernard 
Levin's piece above — to infiltrate 


The joker we failed 
to take seriously 


any and every organization that 
could help them to power. 

Monarchist? Not an unthinking, 
uncritical devotee of all things 
royal but seeing the role of the 
monarch in the British constitu- 
tion as our last defence against 
tyranny which, be feared, might 
one day need to be invoked. (That 
did not stop him from trying to 
bring private prosecutions for 
alleged dangerous driving against, 
among others. Prince Philip and 
Princess Anne). 

Public Safety. Who can now 
doubt that Britain would be 
cleaner, safer, less ugly, more 
socially cohesive if the political 


parties had abandoned then- 
philosophy of giving the electorate 
anything that brings in votes and 
taken action in the 1950s to 
prevent the untrammelled 
proliferation of the motor car? 

White Resident? Would we not 
have avoided intolerable social 
tensions, accompanied by rioting 
and an unprecedented level of 
crime, had politicians from Attlee 
onward not flinched and imposed 
controls earlier on the entry of 
non-white Commonwealth im- 
migrants? 

In the first of his 30 by-election 
campaigns, in 1951, Boaks ad- 
vocated the then revolutionary 




\ l>*I 


1 

1 ..... 

* H 

■ 


policies of equal pay for women, 
the sale of council houses and 
subsidized apprenticeships. All 
have come about, the latter albeit 
under the Youth Training 
Scheme. 

With his placard-festooned bi- 
cycle. his woolly hat and some of 
his more hare-brained schemes — 
such as turning the garden of his 
house in Sueatham into a civil 
defence helicopter port — Boaks 
could hardly avoid being regarded 
as a joker. In feet, had he made it 
to Westminster, be would have 
proved a formidable politician, 
farsighted, logical - if not always 
lucid — the enemy of cant, hypoc- 
risy and selfiseddng ambition. 
May another eccentric of his 
stature come along to do battle 
with the political establishment 
and the nation's failure to think. 

Laurie Weston 

Obitnary, page 18. 


I 


Roger Scrnton 

When charity 
goes astray 



The preamble to the Charitable 
Uses Act of 1601 gives no defi- 
nition of charity. Nevertheless, in 
the cases that it mentions, and in 
lbe subsequent history of die 
common law, four broad areas 
have been defined as charitable; 
religion, education, the -relief of 
poverty, and other proposes bene- 
ficial to tike community. Those 
categories must be understood not 
abstractly but in the light ofa long 
history of cases through which the 
courts have tried to offer a 
consensual idea of public benefit 
• Two firm principles have 
emerged from the judicial reason- 
ing. The first is that charities 
should not merely • serve the 
private interests of the donor. 
They should not, for example, be 
designed as a reward to employ- 
ees, or as a family endowment 
Secondly, charities should not be 
political in intention, even if they 
are sometimes political in effect 

The consequences of this sec- 
ond principle have been profound 
chanties are exempt from tax- 
ation, and to exdude political 
organizations from this privilege 
is drastically to curtail their 
power. There seems to be little 
agreement however, as to the 
reason for the exclusion. Lawyers 
and jurisprudents have written as 
though it were an historical ac- 
cident a quirk of the common 
law, subsequently enshrined in 
fiscal thinking^ and now lending a 
permanent colour to our politics. 

In feet there are good reasons 
for the exclusion of political 
activity from the field of charity. 
Politics is never better than a 
means to an end, while education, 
worship and the relief of suffering 
are ends in themselves. In these 
latter activities man is at rest 
doing what he knows to be 
intrinsically worthwhile. In the 
experience of. worship, learning 

and IrinrfnwBt are endiir iiwH OUT 

first ideas of peace. Politics, by 
contrast is directed always to a 
farther goal. It has no intrinsic 
value, but must look for its 
justification in barely foreseeable 
consequences. Politics is a para- 
digm of restlessness — an experi- 
ence ini which man is always 
seeking, never finding, and always 
in conflict with his kind. 

The exclusion , of politics from 
the privileges granted to charity 
can be seen, therefore, as part of 
the de-politicization of society. It 
expresses an important motive of 
the English law, which is the 
generation and protection of civil 
society as an entity independent of 
the state. The law of charity 
encourages those activities in 
which we are at peace* the value of 
which is unquestioned by those 
engaged in them. At tire same time 
it refuses to encourage politics, in 
which our conflicts axe height- 
ened, and where value is never 
more than instrumental. 

Moreover, through charitable 
endowment, churches, schools, 
colleges and relief organizations 
are maintained outside the control 
of the state. The existence of these 
institutions constitutes a severe 
limitation on the scope and the 
authority of political power. 
Through their fiscal privileges 
such institutions are able to defy 
the attempts to control our lives 


and to mobilize our actions. 
Totalitarian states, therefore, usu- 
ally forbid gifts to charity. For 
such states are the enemies of civil 
society, and seek rather to control i 
the thought and activity of the y 
citizen than to permit his nature to 
flourish according to its own 
. intrinsic purposes. 

Ourde-politidzedlaw of charity 

is an important component of a 
free social order. Everyone should 
therefore view with alarm the 
increasing defiance of the law by 
established charities. Many of 
these are turning themselves into 
left-wing campaigning organiza- 
tions, wn fle the Charity Commis- 
sioners - whose role is to uphold 
and to advertise the law — neither 
take action against them nor 
notice the feutt. 

Consider, for example, the 
intensive campaign mounted by 
Oxfem, Christian Aid and asso-fe 
dated bodies in support of the 
Marxist government of Nicaragua. 
This campaign has produced a 
flood of literature, and even 
advertisements on the- Under- 
ground, inviting ns to “pray that 
Nicaragua be left in peace” (the 
last two words being no more than 
an afterthought). It may be the 
case, as these charities claim, that 
the Sandinistas are texting the 
people of Nicaragua towards 
p ear*, justice and a Christian 
polity; it may also be the case, as 
Nicaraguans like Humberto Belli 
have forcefully argued, that they 
are leading the people towards 
Marxist enslavement beneath a 
mantle of deliberate deception. 
(See Bellf s Breaking Faith, pub- 
lished by the Pueblo Institute). 

But is it the role of charities to 
enter this debate, or to spend 
considerable sums, as Oxfem 
does, on propaganda indistin- 
guishable in language and content 
from issued by the Sandinis- 
tas and their left-wing allies? A 
particularly disturbing example is 
Oxfem's campaigning booklet 
Nicaragua — The Threat of a 
Good Example? by Dianna Mel- 
rose. This carefully arranged pas- 
tiche of opinions,, facts and 
images, backed by a reading list of 
exclusively left-wing omaterial, 
invites us to campaign in support 
of the new socialist order in 
Nicaragua, to put appropriate 
press ur e on the British govern- 
ment and the European Economic 
Community, to follow various 
paths towards sabotaging US for- 
eign policy. To use Qx&m's good 
nameto win credibility for acause 

that is immensel y controversial 

and in all probability counter to 
Britain’s long-term interests is a 
species of deception comparable 
-to that ^practised daily I? -tire 
Sandinistas-Are weto believe that 
Oxfem, too, is another- ihdnto, 
another mask for dictatorial 
power? 

The Charity Commissioners 
have been many times alerted to 
Oxfem’s propaganda on behalf of 
“Third World socialism” by those 
on whom it is bestowed. Yet they 
have per sis tently refused to take 
action. Perhaps the time has come 
for those who give money to such 
charities to reflect again as to 
whether it is either honestly raised 
or wisely used. . 

The author is editor of the Salis- 
bury Review. • 


moreover — Miles Kington 

How’s the Gulf 
handicap? 


Just how well do you keep up with 
the news? Could you point to- the 
Gulf of Sirte on a map of the 
workf? And if you did, would you 
be surprised if your index finger 
was attacked by a Libyan rocket? 
Was that maybe what happened to 
Prince Charles? 

Here are some more searching 
questions based on world news as 
reported during the past 10 days. 

1. The Greater London Council 

manage d tn stash away mfllinns of 
pounds during its last lew days in a 
secret Swiss bank account, as 
indeed did ex-Presideut Marcos of 
the Philippines. Accidentally, 
these two accounts have become 
confused, so that last week more 
than £40 million was given to gay 
theatre groups and lesbian criches 
in Manila. True or false? 

2. Which of the following has been 
going on the longest? (a) The Iran- 
haq war. (b) The teachers’ dis- 
pute. (c) The Test series against 
the West Indies, (d) The Sduies — 
Netherlands War. 

3. Although Hampton Court Pal- 
ace is a very old buildirig, it is 
uninsured. Although it is highly 
inflammable, there are no sprink- 
lers anywhere in the rooms. And 
although it is full of works of art, 
there are little old laches living 
than who are in the habit of 
having a late-night drink by naked 
candle-light When the place goes 
up in flames, are you (a) surprised; 
(b) surprised it didn’t happen 
years ago; (c) surmised, because 
you thought things like that only 

ipened at the V & A? 

4 . Two weds ago, nobody had 
heard of the Guuof Sirte. But can 
you show on a map where the Bay 
of Pigs was? And die Gulf of 
Tonkin? And can you explain the 
mysterious compulsion of the 
Americans to explore other 
nations* maritime recesses? 

5. What was the cause of the 
accident that made HMS Illus- 
trious suddenly turn back to port 
last week? (a) The injury to Prince 
Charles's finger, (b) A bomb ’ 
concealed In the hand luggage of ° 
an Arab passenger, (c) A btfkold- 




£ 

-sa* 


admiral sitting up late at night for 
a last drink, by candle-light. ^ 

6. Which well-known institution ** 
celebrated its fifth birthday last 
week? (a) The Soda] Democratic 
Party, (b) Labour’s campaign to 
oust the Militant Tendency, (c) 

The Iran-Iraq war. (d) The Test 
series against the West Indies. 

7. Who is the criminal most 
wanted for extradition on -Scot- 
land Yard’s list? (a) Colonel 
Gadaffi. (b) Evelyn Gtenhoddle. 

(c) Ian Botham. 

8. During the week Prince Charles 
and Princess Diana opened a huge 
new building at Heathrow, Lon- 
don. Whai is the building frn? (a) 

To provide room to flog even 
more duty-free cigarettes and 
whisky, (b) To provide premises r 
out rathe weather where the police 

can practise their anti-riot proce- 
dures. (c) To provide net practice 
for replacements being flown out 
to join the England cricket team in 
the West Indies. ' - 

9. In which aewspaper.did this 
headline appear “Prince Charles's 
Body Rqaaed by His Finger”? 

10. Which is the correct way . to 
spell the name of the Libyan 
leader? (a) Gadaffi. (b) Qaddafy. 

(c) Qnaflaffhi (d) Q’haddafhi. (e) 
Cholmonddey. 

11. Which was recently voted in a A 
national poll as the most boring " 
sporting fixture of modem times? 

(a) The Oxford v Cambridge Boat 
Race, (b) The Labour v Militant 
Vote Race, (c) Talks about talks 
about summit talks. . . 

12. And which was recently voted 
Most Injured Organ of the Year? 

(a) Prince ChanesY finger, (b) 

Mike Gatling’s Nose: (c) Steven 
Spielberg’s ego. 

13. Why are the Austrians worried 
about Dr Kun Waldheim? (a) 

Because he may have been a NazL -j£- 

(b) Because he may not have been ^ 
a Nazi, (c) Because he may- have 

tried jto sneak millions of pounds 
UN to a secret -Swiss 
(d) Because he may have 
taed to bomb Hampton Court 
during the -wtit 











THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


* * * g* 


17 



1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


* » 

‘ \- 


i t ."4 

tit 


o: 


,-qr 

V H ► 


A VERY DANGEROUS ERROR 


: Well before the launch of Mr 
• Eddy Shah's new paper, well 
before the move of The Times 
and the other News Inter- 
national titles to London’s 
docklands, well before the 
time when the proposed 
launch of a new newspaper 
was as familiar an event as it is 
today, the complaint could be 
heard that the products of 
fleet Street took an unreason- 
able interest in their own 
affairs. A small industrial dis- 
pute in Ludgate Circus, it was 
argued, received immediate 
coverage for which a crippling 
strike in the North Etist of 
England might wait months. 
Were traders really as in- 
terested in the Bracken House 
machine minders’ wrangle, it 
was asked, as were those 
journalists who daily brought 
each detail lovingly to their 
attention? 

Those who found the na- 
tional press unappealingly self- 
regarding in the past may find 
the present still harder to bear. 
Scarcely a newspaper edition 
goes by without a story about a 
newspaper in it But whereas 
in the past such stories were 
mostly not of the greatest 
moment and it barely 
mattered — except to the most 
fastidious — whether the words 
were motivated by self-im- 
portance, self-flagellation, sin- 
cere concern for free speech or 
somewhat less than sincere 
attempts to lame the com- 
petition, the situation today is 
markedly different 

The publishers of The Times 
are involved in one of the 
biggest, most violent .and 
hence genuinely newsworthy 
industrial disputes that has 
taken place in central London 
since foe war. More than five 
thousand print workers have 
lived up to their past reputa- 
tion for irrational strike action 
and encountered the present 
reality of lost jobs. They and 
their supporters are engaged in 
a destructive struggle — using 
weapons that would not dis- 
grace a Chicago prison riot.. At 
the moment it is mainly self- 
destructive action. But as the 
rest of Fleet Street follows 
News Internationa 'down foe 
road of commercfel reason, 
there is no saying where the 
destructive forces will frill 
and with what results. 

One thing, however, should 
be absolutely clear. What is 
happening at Wapping - the 
aims, ambitions, methods and 
motives of all sides in the 
conflict - is of no small 


importance to newspapers and 
- their readers. Its course and 
outcome will have more im- 
pact on foe political life of this 
country than, say, the Fulham 
by-election. It should not be 
for us to say so but its coverage 
requires the very best in 
rectitude and impartiality that 
a free press can offer. The very 
freedom of that press is being 
dragged to the stake. - 

At the end oflast week News 
International attempted to fol- 
low its free .offer U 'he unions 
of its former prinn .g plant at 
Gray’s Inn Road with a short 
newspaper advertising cam- 
paign that set out foe 
company's case. Mr Robert 
Maxwell's papers look foe 
advertisement So did those 
owned by Associated News- 
papers So did Mr Shah's 
Today. But, strangely. The 
Guardian and The Financial 
■ Times wanted indemnities 
against consequent legal ac- 
tion. The Sunday Telegraph 
and Observer found no space 
to spare. Most openly and 
cynically of all, the editor of 
the Daily Telegraph said that 
he wanted to give no' help to 
his principal commercial com- 
petition. 

The reaction to this curious 
set of events was still more 
curious. Here was a newspaper 
story of some significance, a 
part of a bigger story of very 
great significance. Did The 
Guardian, which had three 
stories broadly critical of the 
News Internationa! position, 
carry any mention of foe 
missing advertisements. Did 
foe Telegraph thaw its readers’ 
attention to its generous 
protection of their minds from 
the rude blandishments of 
Wapping? They did not The 
Financial Times ran three 
different Wapping stories. Did 
any mention foe advertise- 
ment row? No. 

Now, in normal circum- 
stances, it ill behoves a news- 
paper to criticise the editorial 
judgements of its rivals. We all 
operate in foe same market 
place. Over time our readers 
will' see u$ . for what we are, 
judge us actifrdihgiy and buy 
us or not as. they win. But it 
also behoves all who love 
newspapers — their virtues, 
their faults, their . candours, 
their conspiracies, their di- 
verse contribution to the pub- 
lic life of this country — to take 
a straightforward journalistic 
look at foe motives in this 
case. 


News International’s otter 
to the unions of its Gray's Inn 
Road printing plant in settle- 
ment of the dispute over 
Wapping opens foe possibility 
of new jobs in new papers, 
some of which — possibly all of 
which — could be sympathetic 
to the Labour Party. The 
Labour movement says that it 
wants jobs. It says it wants a 
friendlier national daily. Is any 
part of the movementacting as 
though it actually wanted to 
achieve those aims? 

Certainly Mr Robert Max- 
well is not. Perhaps this should 
cause nobody any surprise. 
But foe sight of two almost 
identical editorials in his Sun- 
day Mirror and Sunday Peo- 
ple , both attacking a scheme 
which might have bought his 
papers some pro-Labour com- 
petition. puts a question mark, 
at least, over his motives. 

. What about Mr Kinnock 
and his employment spokes- 
man. Mr Prescott, who said he 
would not exchange property 
for principle? They both 
clearly want jobs for 
printworkers. But they want 
old jobs that no longer exisL 
They do not want the risk of 
new jobs. As for a Labour 
paper, why spoil a nice dream 
by trying to make it work? 

On all sides of the Left — 
from the prim union leaders to 
foe leader of the Labour Party 
— foe methods and motives 
betray a de pres singly familiar 
mixture of cynicism and 
brutality. The result is an 
unguided weapon of great 
potential power and utterly 
unpredictable application. 

There are some in the 
newspaper industry who are 
still afraid of their unions. This 
alone ought to speak more 
than any advertisement in 
favour of the cause that News 
International is fighting. Sadly, 
however, the fact of fear is 
often foe best kept secret And 
it is bard not to have some 
sympathy for those who are 
afraid. 

There are others who con- 
tinue to play the game of 
hopingthat foe bomb will fell 
on their competitors not on 
themselves. Some editors be- 
lieve that they have a hiding 
place. There is no hiding place. 
There is plenty of precedent 
for foe view that all is fair in 
love, war and Fleet Street But 
in 1986 it is a simple, very 
dangerous error. 


TINKERING IS NOT ENOUGH 


■ Public confidence in foe 
condition pf education in Brit- 
ain is hardly bolstered by foe 
manner in which its problems 
are now being publicly dis- 
cussed by members of the 
Government Mrs Thatcher 
has made it clear that she now 
regards education as a political 
priority and she is right 
Permanent damage is being 
done to children, whose 
schooldays come only once, 
and public concern is likely to 
cost the government votes. But 
what is to be done about it? 
The Prime Minister will play 
the key role in determining 

that , , . ' 

Sir Keith Joseph has been 
under attack for his lack of 
success in ha ndl ing foe 
teachers' dispute which now 
threatens not only daily life 
and learning in schools, but 
also teaching for the new 
GCSE examination. (The 
teachers' unions abuse of their 
power by using the new 
examination as a weapon 
against foe Secretary of State 
is, of course, reprehensible.) 
Sir . Keith also carries the 
ultimate public responsibility 
for the inadequate financial 
provision from whit* so many 
schools are suffering, even 
though this reflects more the 
foe way in which local govern- 
ment resources are deployed 
than the general level or cen- 
tral financing.- _ 

The latest educational prob- 
lem for the government ts 
presented by yesterdays pro- 
posals of the National Ad- 
visory Body for cutting £000 
audoit Places at Mgdnu 
in 1987/88, and the killing off 
of entire departments, evenm 
engineering, which 
seems to meet foe needs of the 
■time for more vocational 
■training rather than jess. 

The schools, however, 
present foe main cbaneng&. 

and a radically new ap^ch 

is needed. Who « w miMte iL 
Sir Keith Joseph is j*t?nng 
from foe House of Commons 

at foe end of tins Parliament 
2fd U has been commonly 
accepted in Westminster^ 
he is likely to leave his 
department (if not foo govern- 


ment, where he might remain 
without a portfolio) this au- 
tumn, when Mrs Thatcher is 
expected to have her final 
reshuffle of this administra- 
tion. If that is so, we shall have 
an awkward period of time 
between now and the autumn 
in which it is bard to see how 
new approaches can 1% at- 
tempted. 

: In this uncertain situation 
the adherents of various min- 
isters, if not foe ministers 
themselves, seem to be putting 
in their tentative claims for 
succesion to the hot seat at the 
Department of Education and 
Science in either the “wet”, 
^*dry” or “new broom” in- 
terest, and it is- certainly 
arguable that if Sir Keith is 
going, there would be benefit 
in malting foe change sooner 
rather than later. 

But Mrs Thatcher has now 
gone out of her way to express 

-her “total support” for Sir 
Keith, and her admiration for 
what he has done to raise 
educational standards which 
might even be taken to in- 
dicate that there will be no 
change before the election 
itself Sir Keith has, indeed, 
done some valuable work, not 
least on foe curriculum, but 
the -question is whether he is 
foe right person to take educa- 
tion forward from here. What 
is surely not in doubt is that 
foe uncertainty is damaging, 
and Mrs Thatcher ought to 
find a way of ending it. 

Meanwhile, even as foe 
prime Minister makes it dear 
that she is still interested in foe 
idea of foe education voucher 
under a new name (education 
credit). Sir Keith’s Minister of 
State, Mr.ChrisPatten (speak- 
ing from foe heartland of the 
Education. Department which 
killed the idea off last time 
round) has discussed vouchers 
with some scepticism in foe 
House of Commons, and has 
floated foe idea of a network of 
Crown schools which would be 
set-up. and directly funded, by 
foe DES, by-passing local 
aufooritifes. . . 

On the face of it, fo'e scheme 
has some attractions as a 
means of setting standards to 


which local authority schools 
would live up. It would make 
good acute deficiencies in 
academic education in some 
places; but academic potential 
would not necessarily be their 
criterion of selection. Else- 
where they might be addressed 
to deficiencies of training. 

But in other respects the 
idea carries implications 
which one would expect Sir 
Keith, as an opponent of 
centralisation, to distrust, even 
though he has now said that he 
authorised its scrutiny. For 
one thing, though the Crown 
schools might look like- an 
echo of the old direct grant 
schools, they would not have 
foe independence or local 
resources which enabled so 
many of foe direct grant 
schools to survive indepen- 
dently when government 
money was withdrawn. The 
Government should also ask 
itself, looking at the Health 
Service, what reason its experi- 
ence gives it for thinking that 
funning education 

bureaucratically from foe cen- 
tre is better than running it 
bureaucratically by local 
authorities. Education is too 
important to be left to local 
politicians and new ways must 
be found; but handing it to 
Whitehall officials appears a 
dubious answer. 

The Government should 
remember the store set by 
Conservatives in foe 1960s and 
1970s on local resistance to 
central educational fashion 
and the stampede into 
comprehensives, and ask 
whether it wishes to give this 
weapon to a future Labour 
administration. It should ask. 
most of alL what foe scheme 
would do for foe many chil- 
dren who would still be left out 
of it in local authority schools 

The. Government is showing 
every sign of thinking on ns 
feet as it runs to keep up with 
events moving too fak for il It 
is not the best way of new 
thinking, and Mrs Thatcher 
should find some way of 
convincing foe pubbe that the 
Government knows where it is 
going. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Europe’s view 
on Arab terror 

From Mr Peter Foster 
Sir. The encounter between the 
US Sixth Reel and Colonel 
Gadafil’s Soviei-made missiles 
has highlighted once again the 
disagreement between Wes era 
Europe and America about how to 
deal with Arab or Muslim fanati- 
cism. 

The European view reminds 
one of the “progressive” educa- 
tional psychology which emerged 
from the “silly sixties”: do noi try 
to discipline the naughty child or 
you will turn him into a dangerous 
criminal: in any case, society in 
general and his parents in particu- 
lar are really to blame. 

EEC govern ments are express- 
ing concern about the Americans' 
sharp response io Colonel 
GadaffTs missile attacks, having 
earlier rejected Washington's lead 
in applying economic sanctions 
against the maverick Libyan dic- 
tator. on the ground that Arab 
terrorism is rooted in Western 
failure to give effective support to 
the cause of the fanatical and 
intransigent Palestinians, which 
“moderate" Arab leaders dare not 
appear to “betray”. 

Until recently "it was possible to 
bolster such Arabophile senti- 
ments with considerations of real- 
politik : the dependence ofWestem 
Europe on a powerful Middle 
East-based oil cartel and the need 
to deny Soviet propaganda an easy 
route into the bleeding hearts and 
confused minds of the Arab and 
Muslim world; but surely no 
longer. 

Politically, economically and 
ideologically the .Arabs are riven 
by dissensions engendered by 
competitive greed, mutual sus- 
picion and sectional fanaticism. 
We no more need collectively to 
fear their blackmail or take seri- 
ously their ritual tantrums: pro- 
vided we avoid exposing our 
individual selves to murder or 
kidnapping, steer dear of notori- 
ous centres of banditry and keep a 
tight grip on airline security. 

Nor should we heed the hypo- 
critical rhetoric of the Soviet 
authorities, who for six years have 
demonstrated in Afghanistan, and 
recently on a smaller scale in 
Beirut, their utter ruthlessness in 
dealing with Muslim 
“extremists”. 

Yours f aith fully , 

PETER FOSTER, 

Rew Cottage, 

Abinger Common. 

Near Dorking, 

Surrey. 

March 27. 


Weakness at A level 

From Dr L. Velecky 
Sir, When the A levels and the 
International Baccalaureate are 
compared (letter from Miss 
A-DreydeL, March 24) the contrast 
between them is not just between 
the mere “depth plus breadth” of 
the latter. What matters even 
more for the education of the 
person is that the A-level system 
makes no attempt at exploring the 
relationships between and among 
the subjects studied or how they fit 
into the students' general cultural 
background; nor does it encourage 
them to consider critically how 
they come to know. 

The International Baccalaureate 
does attempt to do these things 
through its obligatory course in 
“Theory of knowledge". 

Yours faithfully, 

LUBOR VELECKY, 

Moderator for Theory 
of KnowIedge,InternationaI 
Baccalaureate Office, 

Route des MoriUons IS, 

CH— 1218 Grand— Saconnex, 
Geneva, 

Switzerland. 

March 25. 


Alliance and hunting 

From Mr John Cartwright. MP for 
Woolwich (Social Democratic 
Party) 

Sir, You recently reported a claim 
by ihe Conservative MP. Sir 
Hector Monro, that Alliance MPs 
would “certainly” support legisla- 
tion to outlaw hare coursing, fox 
hunting and stag hunting. 

May I make it perfectly clear 
that there is no formal Alliance 
policy on these questions? In- 
dividual Liberal and SDP mem- 
bers of Parliament have their own 
opinions, often strongly hekL, on 
the subject of field sports. On this, 
as on other issues no party whip is 
applied and individuals are free to 
follow their own conscience. 

It is therefore quite impossible 
to predict how .Alliance MPs 
would vote on these issues in foe 
next Parliament. 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN CARTWRIGHT. 

House of Commons. 

April 4. 


Damage at V & A 

From Mr 4 R A Hobson 
Sir. The accident at the Victoria 
and Albert (report. March 241 
prompts the question whether 
public money is being well spent 
on museums’ buying objects they 
have no room to display, iheir 
acquisition onh adding to the 
clutter in perilous and antiquated 
storerooms. 

When a ladder cannot be 
erected without the risk of smash- 
ing an AJgardi bust into smith- 
ereens. will the champions of 
London’s prior claim to every 
notable work of an justify further 
acquisitions on the grounds that 
they are needed to fill the gaps 
thus created'’ 

I taaxe the honour to be Sir. your 
obedient servant, 

ANTHONY HOBSON 
Brooks’s. 

Si James’s Street. SV* 1 
Apn! I 


Thoughts on passing of the GLC 


From Mr Robert Mitchell 
Sir. As the GLC ended in a burst of 
fireworks. I walked out of County 
Hall wfth relief ihac. after 22 years 
as a Conscn ati\c member. I w as 
free from us burdensome de- 
mands. But 1 sighed for London 
which will only gradually appre- 
ciate its loss, for the GLC dealt 
wnh strategic issues. 

I remembered some of the great 
London initiatives. The green belt 
was purchased, assembled and 
fiercely defended. Thai defence is 
already wavering. Co vent Garden. 
Si Katherine's Dock. Cry stal Pal- 
ace National Sports Centre and 
the South Bank complex are 
unique achievements. 

Regional parks like Burgess 
(Southwark.). Mile End (Tower 
Hamlets! and in the Lea 2 nd 
Colne Valleys - these are only 
possible in disadvantaged areas by 
spreading the cost London— wide. 
Free travel passes and seaside 
homes have enriched Ihe lives of 
many pensioners as the Taxi- 
Card has for the disabled. 

The Thames Barrier has sav ed a 
geologically sinking London from 
certain flooding. The giant incin- 
erator in north London and the 
hygienical! y sealed barges have 
made London's waste disposal 
uniquely efficient. Some grams to 
voluntary bodies were certainly 
eccentric but the majority went 10 
worthwhile causes and many of 
both types arc now- in danger. 

The Greater London Enterprise 
Board bad only limited success 
but did advance new ideas. With- 
out a London-wide authority, 
these and many more initiatives 
would never have happened. Now 
there will be no more. To carry out 
such enterprises requires a vision 
beyond borough boundaries and 
the use of all London’s resources — 
impossible with boroughs so bit- 
terly politically divided. 

Almost all GLC members 
would have welcomed reform. But 
they consider abolition disastrous 
for London. 

Prophecy is dangerous but I feel 
sure we’ll be back. 

Yours sincerely, 

ROBERT MITCHELL, 
Hatchwood House, 

Nursery Road, 

Lough ton, Essex. 


Frt-m Pn-fesi.il George J-vscs and 
Mr Tom frj.irs 

Sir. London's governance will, as 
vour L-ditonal of March 2$ $ug- 
g-.-sts. continue to occupy poli- 
ticians during ihe next few years. 
It is almost certain that a future 
government will set up a new 
London— wide- authority, once the 
dust has settled on the present 
reorganisation. 

An endunng basis for a new 
London— wide authoriiv already 
exists. The Inner London Educa- 
tion Authority covers an area 
within which the vast majority of 
people consider themselves 
"Londoners" and is the same area 
as the old London County Coun- 
cil. The ILEA will be fully elected 
for ihe first time on May 8. 

This core-city area is similar m 
population, though somewhat big- 
ger in territory, to the City of 
Paris. .A single tier of local 
government covering some 2': 
million people in the capital 
would have 3 population big 
enough for the administration of 
the more local services. 

The common interests of the 
mosr far-flung parts of the new 
authority, for example Bow and 
ruiham. are considerably greater 
than the common interests of 
people living at the opposite ends 
of some of our large, artificial, 
counties. 

Outer London could become a 
series of similar single— tier all- 
purpose authorities, as some of 
them once were. Problems of rate 
equalisation would be removed 
with the merging of the small, 
inner London boroughs into the 
new authority. 

The abolition of the GLC has 
given an opportunity to consider 
the case for an effective London- 
wide authority. The quality of the 
economic and social life of the 
capital is important not just for 
Londoners but also for ihe rest of 
Britain. 

Yours failbfullv. 

GEORGE JONES. 

TONY TRAVERS (North East 
London Polytechnic). 

The London School of Economics 
and Political Science. 

Houghton Street. WC2. 

March 29. 


Bristol intolerance 9 

From Ms P. A. Mulligan 
Sir, Your leader writer today 
(Good Friday) should have read 
Bernard Levin on the opposite 
page, where he drew attention to 
the dangers of the current popular- 
ity for judging people without tor 
even before) a considered judge- 
ment of the facts. 

You state with approval that the 
Bristol University authorities in- 
tend to take punitive measures 
against such students as took part 
in ihe alleged disruption of Profes- 
sor Vincent's tenures. 

The facts are that IS students 
(out of an estimated total of 200 
involved in the demonstrations) 
have been notified by the univer- 
sity of its intention to institute 
disciplinary proceedings against 
them. None of them has as yet 
been informed of the detailed 
nature of the charges or of the 
evidence which supports them. 

No doubt Professor Vincent's 
articles in The Sun are more 
“breezy" and “populist" ihan 
those he writes in your newspaper, 
but to suggest that the complaint 
of sexism is based solely on the 


proximity of his articles to photo- 
graphs of naked women is special 
pleading of the worst kind. 

Because you cannot find an 
equally facetious way to dismiss 
the other complaint against 
Professor V incent - that of racism 
- you omit il altogether, in the 
hope your readers will be unaware 
of the" facts. 

You also make the outrageous 
statement that Professor Vincent 
is being “punished” for expressing 
an opinion. The only people in 
danger of being punished for 
expressing an opinion are 18 
students in a demonstration in 
protest against Professor Vincent’s 
“breezy" and “populist" articles 
in The Sun being given spurious, 
intellectual authority by the addi- 
tion of the statement that he is a 
Professor of Modern History at 
Bristol Lfoiversiiy. 

I understand that this statement 
has been removed from his more 
recent articles. Could it be that the 
students were making a fair point? 
Yours faithfully. 

PATRICIA MULLIGAN. 

2 Daylesford Avenue 
Putney. SW ! 5. 

March 28. 


Ordination of women 

From The General Secretary of 
The Church Union 
Sir. The Church’ of England 
claims, as emphasised by the 
Bishop of London (March 27). 
that ihe ministry she shares with 
the majority of Christendom is of 
divine institution. As such, il 
cannot be changed (apropos .Arti- 
cle XXXIV) by a decision of a 
provincial synod. 

The ministry referred to in the 
Ordinal attached to the Book of 
Common Prayer is a threefold 
one: bishops, priests, and deacons. 
The words “appointed - . -by thy 
divine providence" occur specifi- 
cally and emphatically in the 
Collect Prayer for the “Ordering of 
Deacons" - as well as elsewhere. 
Holy Order is one sacrament in 
three forms. 

Whilst the creation of a woman 
bishop in America dearly has 


greaier theological and practical 
Implications, if within the next 
few weeks Parliament approves 
the “Ordination of Women (sic) 
(Deacons) Measure" the principle 
will have been conceded here. 

It is significant that great 
emphasis is being made at the 
present time by the Episcopal 
Church in the LISA, that she is in 
possession of “the historic three- 
fold ministry". A female bishop is. 
they maintain, the logical develop- 
ment of the decision allowing 
women into Holy Orders as 
deacons, made in 1 470: a sequence 
they claim the Church of England 
is about to follow. 

Yours sincerely. 

PETER GELDARD, 

General Secretary. 

The Church Union. 

Faith House. 

7 T ufton Street. SW ) . 

March 27. 


Job for JobCentres 

From the Chief Executive. Man- 
power Services Commission 
(Employment Division I 

Sir, In his letter published on 
March 27 Angus Hamon reported 
some problems in recruiting a 
clerical worker through Brixton 
JobCentrc. 

The JobCenire is in fact highly 
effective in helping both employ- 
ers and jobseekers. It takes about 
3.900 vacancies a year and places 
about 3.800 people tn jobs at 
around £53 per placing. When I 
visited it recently 1 found a highly 
motivated siafF delivering a good 
service 10 ihe public I am sure 
therefore that by now ihe manager 


will have been in touch with Mr - 
Hamon about his problems. 

JobCentres already gi\c un- 
employed people valuable help 
through their normal placing ser- 
vice. The Manpower Services 
Commission shares Mr Hamon's 
concern that more should be done. 

Following the Budget we shall 
have around 2.000 extra siaff 
chiefly in JobCentres specifically 
to help long term unemployed 
people under the new Restart 
programme. So happily we shall 
be doing a great deal more. 

Yours faithfully. 

S. LOVEMAN* Chief Executive. 
Manpower Services Commission 
(Employment Division). 

MoorfooL 

Sheffield. South Yorkshire 


Tax on ‘paper’ gains 

from MrJ L Perks 
Sir. Your correspondent. S. E. 
Scammell (March 24L put 1 ! rather 
mildlv when he said that, a 
previous Conservative Chancellor 
expressed “strong views'* about 
Capital Gains Tax, on paper gains. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe is on record 
over successive years as having 
said that 11 was "intolerable" and 
“iniquitous” that “tax should fall 
on what are no more than paper 
gains" 

Then tn I9S2 he announced 
proposals which continued the 
taxing of paper gams brought 
about by the most inflationary 
decade m the nation's histon 


Last year the present Chancellor 
said "the present indexation pro- 
usion unfairly discriminates 
against (hose who acquired their 
assets prior to 1982" and. 
having recognised the unfairness, 
allowed it to remain 

His fine words, that the “injus- 
tice would be remedied" by allow- 
ing inflationary gams after ! 982 to 
be disregarded, butter no parsnips 
S ours irulv 
J L PERRS. 

Heath RocL 
Beacon Lane 
Hcswall . 
w trial 
Mersexxidc 
March 2S 



APRILS 1852 

The /.-/'»• •-.•i/rj padd/e steamer 
Birkenhead 1 . a, a troopship which 
left Cur* for tne Cape of Good 
Hope "ft January 7, 1852. carrying 
■Wi men. 55 women and children 
and lb 11 crew. She ormedat Cape 

Tun n and >>n February 25 left far 
P.>r: Elisabeth. The next dir.' she 
ttruik o n/ck in False Bay about 
V# miles {mm Cape Town. Of the 
tit!*' firf.p'e then on board 193 uvre 
-need including all the uomcn and 
children. A tablet with the names 
of tn( loxt. r ev'.raing the "hemic 
r.ir„**qr.r\ and unbrnken 
dr. i ipl/ne " <i a, placed in Chelsea 
H\.'p:‘.a> h-. t- mmand id Queen 
l'i». 'n-ifl. F’ede’-k k Vr'iUicm JV. 
k.r.c ‘.f pray jo. impressed by the 
hennm. urdered : hv account to be 
read io cl cr. regiment- 


LOSS of the TROOPSHIP 
BIRKENHEAD. 

The following despatches and 
endu:urc-s were yesterday received 
by the Board of Admiralty from 
Cftmmidore Wyvitl. containing the 
painfully- interesting details con- 
nected with ihe lo&* of this ill-fated 
£ learner, li appears that ihe loial 
number of lives which have been 
1 ms; i in this uccasiun amuums 
io 4.18;— 

STATEMENT OF CAPTAIN 

WRIGHT. 9 1 st REGIMENT. 

•■SirnMn'-: Bay. March 1. 

“About * p.m. of the 25th of 
February Her Majesty's ship Bir- 
kenhead sailed from Simon's Bay 
• •n her passage to Algoa Bay. to 
land the draughts of the I2lh. 91 si 
and 7-Jih. and then u.< proceed to 
ihe B'Jtiakf t<> land the remainder 
of ihe draughts— viz.. 12th Lancers. 
2d. 4 Id. 7“d. 45th, 6th, and 60th 
Rifles. About half-pas; 10 1 was on 
deck, and the officer on watch, 
Mr.. Speer, observed to me that be 
had passed the light, at the same 
time pointing out to me a light on 
the port *;de «.f the vessel: I made 
ihe remark at foe time. 'Surely that 
is not Cape Agulhas light, for if so 
the Cipe must have moved nearer 
the Cape < meaning Cape Point) 
than it wa« when I was here five 
years a ~o.‘ From the appearance of 
foe light I was satisfied that it was 
!rom a light house, and not from a 
fire on foe hiJis. many of which 
were burning, and therefore 1 
concluded that another lighthouse 
had been built since I was here in 
1647. 1 then went to bed. About 2 
o'clock a.m. on Thursday I was 
awoke by a severe shock, and on 
getting up found that foe vessel 
had struck. 1 came up on deck and 
found ihe commander, Mr. 
Salmond, and Mr. Davis, second 
master, on the poop. 1 was standing 
alongside them. The commander 
asked Mr. Davis, how the light was 
hearing when he last saw it? Mr. 
Davis replied by naming some 
puinE of the cumpass. When the 
commander turned away Mr. Davis 
remarked to me that it was odd 
where that light was. and he gave 
me distinctly to understand that he 
alluded to a lighthouse light, and 
nm a fire on the hills. I have now 
every reason to suppose that the 
light which was seen was a fire 
lighted of dry wood on Cape 
Mudge. to act as a signal fire to the 
fishing boats which go out from 
that point. I saw the light for a long 
time myself, and certainly consid- 
ered it a lighthouse light, as 1 have 
before stated. After the vessel 
struck the commander remained 
un the poop, and gave his orders to 
Major Seii.m and myself. The 
utmost order was observed by all 
on board, and until the vessel 
totally disappeared there was not a 
cry or murmur from soldiers or 
sailors. It struck me as being one of, 
the most perfect instances of what 
discipline can effect, and almost 
led me tu believe that not a man on 
board knew the vessel was likely to 
go down. About ten minutes after 
the vessel struck the commander 
sent me to Mr. Brodie. who was on 
the bridge, to know what assis 
tance he required to get foe 
paddlebnx-btxus ouu he told me to 
get 30 men put on Ui each tackle, so 
as to get the boats off. 1 did so, and 
then went to the commander on 
the poop so see if he had any more 
orders: he told me to get 20 men 
more to the chain pumps. I 
directed Lieutenant Girardot, 43d, 
to do this, and it was done. Almost 
immediately the vessel’s bow 
snapped off, the bow part going up 
in the air towards the foremast: the 
funnel fell over lo starboard at the 
same lime, almost carrying away 
the paddle-box and boat; on the 
starboard side, foe other paddle- 
box was being canted over just at 
this time, and Mr. Brodie disap- 
peared from the bridge, having 
been knocked over somehow or 
another. 

■'■Just before the vessel broke at 
the hows the commander had 
ordered the horses to be pushed 
overbuard, and directed Mr. Rich- 
ards to get into the cutter to receive 
the women and children. All this 
was done with foe utmost regulari- 
ty, and the boats stood off about 
lOd yards from the ship: the 
commander also ordered out the 
large boat in the centre of the ship, 
but if ci mid not he moved, as tne 
ship was breaking up at the bows . . 


MJJes cheaper 

From Mr O HV.WuW 
Sir. Last week J travelled on State- 
owned British Rail from London's 
Victoria Station io Gaiwick. a 
distance of 2f> 1 ? miles. The cost of 
rm one-way second class ticket 
was £4 20. or 1 5 85p per mile 

Virgin Atlantic, ihe epitome ot 
pm ale enterprise, is offering re- 
turn flights front London to New : 
)ork, a round-top distance of 
0.^12 miles at £258. or 3 7 3p per 
mile 

Wh> is it that there is no plan to 
privatise ihe radwavs. or is H lhat 
there 1 are no Americans silh 
enough to make us an offer 0 
\ ours (kitfifuJfy 
O ViDOLCOTT 
2ft Kingston Road 
Oxford 
April ' 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


WINDSOR CASTLE 
April 7: The Queen and The 

Duke of Edinburgh this evening 
visited Royal Air Force Brize 
Norton. 

Having been received by the 
Station Commander (Group 
Captain Peter Beer) and the 
President of the Mess Commit- 
tee (Wing Commander L. Mar- 
shall). Her Majesty, with His 
Royal Highness, honoured the 
Station Commander with her 
presence at dinner in the 
Officers’ Mess. 

Lady Abel Smith and Major 
Hugh Lindsay were m 
attendance. 

The Duke of Edinburgh. 
Trustee of Si George's House, 
this morning attended a Council 
Meeting at St George's House. 
Windsor. 

The Pnnoe Andrew arrived at 
Heathrow Airport. London, this 
morning from the Bahamas. 

The Prince Edward. Chair- 
man of The Duke of 
Edinburgh’s Award 30th 
Anniversary Tribute, visited 
South Wales toda> and carried 
out engagements in connection 
with The Duke of Edinburgh's 
Award Scheme and in the 
evening attended a dinner given 


bv the Lord Mavor of Cardiff at 
the City Hall. 

His Royal Highness, attended 
b> Wing Commander Adam 
Wise, travelled in an aircraft of 
The Queen's Flight. 

By command of The Queen, 
the Viscount Davidson (Lord in 
Waiting) was present at 
Heathrow Airport. London, this 
morning upon the arrival ofThe 
President of the Republic of 
Korea and Mrs Chun Doo 
Hwan and welcomed Their 
Excellencies on behalf of Her 
Majesty. 


YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES’S PALACE 
April 7: The Duchess of Kent. 
Patron, this evening z trended a 
Gala Performance of the musi- 
cal Time in aid of the National 
Society for Cancer Relief at the 
Dominion Theatre. 

Miss Sarah Partridge was in 
attendance. 


A memorial service for Sir 
Anthony Rawlinson will be held 
in Westminster Abbey at noon 
todav_ 


A funeral service for Sir William 
Fell owes will be held at 
Flucham Church. King's Lynn, 
at noon tomorrow. April 9. 'The 
memorial service for Lady 
Fellow es. planned for April 10. 
has been cancelled. 


Birthdays today Charily film 


Mr W.A. Acton. 82; Mr Alfie 
Bass. 65; Mr Hywel Bennett. 42: 
Sir Cynl BlacL 84: Major H.J. 
Brew is. bb: the Hon Alick 
Buchanan Smith. MP. 54; Sir 
James Cameron. 8 1 : General Sir 
Anthony Famr-Hockiey. 62; Sir 
John Hicks. 82; Sir Neil 
Lawson. 7$: Air Commandant 
Dame Alice Lowrey. 81: Mrs 
Mary Moore. 56: Mr Eric Por- 
ter. 5S: Sir John Reiss. 77; Mr 
lan Smith. 67; Professor Mau- 
rice Stacey. 79: Miss Dorothy 
Tulin. 55. 


The Prince and Princess of 
Wales will attend a charity 
premiere in London on May 29 
of Z-wiiV Jane, a British film 
about Lady Jane Grey, who was 
proclaimed Queen of England in- 
1553 and was deposed and 
beheaded after reigning for 14 
days. 


London 

KING'S COLLEGE LONDON 

The following have been elected 
fellows of the college: 

Professor Bernard Ashmote. Professor 
Jane! Margaret Salefy. Professor 
Leslie Hough. Canon Die Jam es. 
Professor harry Cuthbert LHnJilon 
Derek Mendes da Costa. Sir Hush 
Rons!. MP. 

QUEEN MARY COLLEGE 

In its twenty-first year the 
faculty of laws has appointed 
three new professors all 
non-UGC funded: 


Dinner 


Latest wills 


Mrs Elizabeth Maud Gordon, of 
Brackley. Northamptonshire, 
lert estate valued at £1.130.621 
net. 


Pathclob Limited 
The Directors of Pathclub Lim- 
ited gave a dinner on Sunday at 
Clandgc's hotel. The guest of 
honour was Mr Arthur Morris. 
The other auests were: 

Mis Judith Morris. Sir Leonard and 
Lady Huron. Mr and Mrs w j Lunch. 
Mr and Mi' Hubert Doogart. Mr and 
Mrs Tpd Dexter. Mr and Mrs Ronald 
Gerard Mr and Mrs Clive Radley. Mr 
•md Mrs Geoffrey Simon and Mr 
Raphael Oianoqly. 


Science renort 


By Pearce Wright Science Editor 


Comparing the average 
person's head to a grapefruit 
may not be flattering, but there 
is a similarity, and a medical 
research team’has exploited it in 
the development of a new 
method for looking inside the 
body. as well as into other 
objects. 

Applied potential tomog- 
raphy. or APT. is the latest of 
many advances in medical imag- 
ing in the past 20 years, beyond 
the X-ray do* eloped at the turn 
of the century, and yields a 
different type of information 
from the others. 

The APT technique depends 
on giving a person a tiny but 
imperceptible electric shock- It 
works because some parts of the 
body are pood conductors of 
electricity anc others are not. 
Currents applied through the 
skin will affect nerves and 
stimulate movement, because 
the brain and mu«cle tissues are 
In effect bio-electronic circuits. 

In exT^rimental work the 
grapefruit substituted for the 
head because it had the same 
characteristics of electrical 
resistivity. 

When a drop of pure water 
was injected imn one of the 
segments of the frail, the APT 
equipment showed exactly 
where it was. 

The same devices can show 
where there Ls water in the longs, 
what is happening in the chest 
between deep breathing, how a 
tumour cells are reacting to 
treatment from chemotherapy or 
radiation and other instant 
physiological effects. 

The procedure is described hy 
Professor B H Brown, from the 
department of medical physics 
and clinical engineering at Royal 
Hallamshire Hospital. Shef- 
field. in the latest issue of 
Physics Bulletin, a monthly peri- 
odical of the Institute of Physics. 

Accidental shocks from the 
mains electricity can travel 
along a nerve muscle. If it is 
regulating the heart, the inter- 
ference can cause regular pnmp- 


uie of the blood to stop, bringing 
death in minutes. There is, 
however, an optimum frequency, 
at 50 Hz l hertz or cycles), with 
which to stimulate the body, and 
which also happens to be the 
mains electricity frequency. 

However the body is relatively 
insensitive to high frequency 
currents. Professor Brown says 
that at freqnencies above 40 kHz 
(40.000 or 40 kilo-hertz ), there 
is no risk of interfering with the 
heart nerves and muscles with 
tiny s^nals used to probe the 
body. 

The scientists measure the 
different patterns of electrical 
resistance across a section of the 
body from a ring or electrodes 
placed on the surface of the skin. 
Withont cheap microcomputers 
to analyse the patterns, the 
technical and computational 
problems would have been com- 
plicated to work ont for this idea 
to be of practical value. 

The progress in electronic 
analysis has made the process a 
cheap technology compared with 
other forms of image-malting. 

Recent medical technology 
has produced four immense 
strides. The X-ray scanner pro- 
duces “slice" images across the 
body instead of the traditional 
transmission pictures 
perpendicular to the beam. 
Ultrasound scans form images 
by echo-sounding. 

Gamma cameras compose 
their pictures from (be distribu- 
tion in tissues and organs of 
substances administered to pa- 
tients that have been labelled 
with radioactive tracer. 

Nuclear magnetic resonance; 
NMR. detects tiny magnetic 
differences between the mol- 
ecules which make np various 
tissues to arrive at pictures of 
the brain.heart and blood 
vessels. 

Bui there are still things that 
doctors cannot see in the body, 
and APT is another idea for 
showing some of tbem. 

'‘'Physics Bulletin : Vol 37 No 3 
March 1986 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES. 
DEATHS and in MEMORIAL 
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FORTHCOMING MARRIAGES. WEDMH6S 

vie nn l"i)urt and Social Page ffi a On 


Court and Social Page 
announcements can nni bv accepted 
h> iclL-phone Enquiries IP - B 1-822 
3953 I alter (■). JOaml. or send lo 1. 

P mi B ln n Stmt. London El. 


BIRTHS 


ATKINSON On 28th March ai the Roy- 
al Hampshire County Hooilal- 
Xv'inchMIcr. In Ruin and Keith. a 
daughter. Emily cure, a sister for 
Lucy 

BAILEY on 3rd April al the West Lon- 
don Hospital to Carol inee Jcnklnsi 
and Muhad a daughter. Sarah-Janc 
Victoria, a Mstor for Jonathan 
BANO on 27Ui March al Queen 
Charlotte's Hospital lo Andrew and 
Elizabeth inw Sheeny), a son. Chris- 
topher Patrick Mich#.-). 


BARWHW - On 4lh April to Julian and 
P.illie. a daughter Zoe. 

BOLUS on 4ih April 1986 lo Salty and 
Hugo a daughter. Pouy. 

BRUMVELS on April 6th 1986 lo All- 
son i nee Bacon i and Peter, a 
daughter i Alexandra Caroline) 

BURTON on JOth March lo Peter and 
Karen, a son James Alexander. 

DARBY - al The Portland Hospital. 
London, on Sunday 6Ui April 1986. 
lo Elizabeth Ann iFoxv> inee Foxonj 
and Kcilh. a son. Harry. 

EDEN On March 2nd. lo NtckJd inee 
Royer i and Robb al the John Rad- 
cinre Hospital. a daughter. 
Annabel le. a sister for Emma. 

ELLEFSEH On April 4lh. at 
CTowborough Hospital, to Carole 
rnee £1 muck' and Peter, a daughter 
Beatrice Jennifer Emily, a sister for 
Benedict 

ELLERBY on (Mn April 1986 hi 
lw HWn Hire Moorrai 
and John, a J^inhii-r Dna Hek 
en. a seder Mr Nicholas 

HOCtUN on 1st April 1986 lo Lesley 
■nee Williams) and Graham, a son 
Ben Laurence 

KENNEDY on 3rd April 1986 to Char- 
lotte inee Styles! and Gerard a 
daughter Rebecca Frances, a sister 
for Emma. 

LLOYD-DAVIES On April 3rd 1986 U> 
Lisa and Bob. a beautiful daughter 
Popov. 

LOCKING on 4lh April to Gillian and 
□avid a son Alexander Michael 
Robert. 

MAULiNSON on April 5th in Poole. 
Dorwi. lo Karen and Christopher, a 
daughter. Chare. Catherine. 

■SARTOS on Sunday .April 6th 1986 al 
The Portland Hospital. Great Port- 
land Street. London Wl. To Wendy 
■nee Mulder) and Hector a daughter 
Edwina Laetilia 

PEARSON on March 15th to Sarah 
■nee Rarnptom and Nicholas, a 
daughter. Rosemary Sophia Lavmla- 

PUWT on April 4U1 to NrcKv me* 
Lillie worn and George a daughter 
Annabel. 

PRITCHARD on April 3rd lo Krryga 
inee TorteeW) and Michael a daugh- 
ter. Oils la Anne Maria 

RILEY On Stti April at St Teresa s Hos- 
pital. Wimbledon to Julia and Mark a 
son. Edward. 



I Herchel Smith Professor of 
Intellectual Property and head 
of the intellectual property law 
unit; Professor Gerald Dworkin, 
former dean of the faculty of law 
at Southampton University. He 
will succeed Professor J.C 
Lahore. 

Denning Professor of Compar- 
ative Law: Dr Basil Markesinis. 
fellow of Trinity College. Cam- 
bridge. This is the first chair to 
bear the name of Lord Denning, 
former Master of the Rolls. 


Appointments 


Latest appointments include; 
Mr Konrad Hermann Theodor 
Schumann. QC. to be a Justice 
of the High Court, assigned to 
the Queen's Bench Division. 

Mr Roger Hunt to be a circuit 
judge on the North-eastern 
circuit. 

General Sir Hugh Beach, War- 
den of St George's House, 
Windsor Castle, to be Director 
of the Council for Arms Control 
from October 1, 1986, in succes- 
sion to Mr Peter Foster, former 
British Ambassador to the Ger- 
man Democratic Republic. 










General Sir Hngh Beach 


Sir Neville Leigh, aged 63, 
former Clerk of the Privy Coun- 
cil. to be a public member of the 
Press Council in succession to 
Mrs B.M. Anderson, who has 
resigned for personal reasons. 


Mr Michael Gordon Fester, of 
Oswaldkirk, and Mr Humphrey 
Talbot Thornton- Berry, of 
Lev-bum. North Yorkshire, to be 
Deputy Lieutenants for the 
County of North Yorkshire. 


Mr Peter UdelL head of the 
BBC s Central European Ser- 
vice. to be Controller, European 
Services, responsible for BBC 
external services broadcasts in 
15 languages. 


Mr David Bernard Lloyd to be 
secretary of the Royal College of 
Physicians of London in succes- 
sion to Mr G.M.G. Tibbs, who 
retires in November. 


Father John Guest headmaster 
of St Hugh’s College, Tollerton, 
to be president of the Catholic 
Marriage Advisory Council. 


ROBINSON - on JUi April to Fiona ntee 
Johnston j and Charles. a ton Alexan- 
der Rupert, a brother tor Hugh. 

ROSS on the 5th April at Kingston 
Hopsila] lo Angela inee Biueni and 
Derek, a son (Geoffrey Paul) a broth- 
er tor Joanna. 

ROY on 4th April 1986 lo Sandy and 
Valene. a son James Campbell. 

RYAN on Aunt am in Barking Hospi- 
tal. Hubert (Pan Ryan LDS After a 
short Illness Requiem Mass al St 
Mary Elhelburga Barking. Friday 
April 11th al 11 am followed by in- 
terment al RiPHeside Cemetery. 

SAWBMDSE on 3rd April al Oueen 
Mary's. Roehampton to Angela inee 
Wain and Edward a son Jack WH- 
liam H ugo. 

STOB8S on April 5Ui to Frances inee 
Richards) and John, a daugmer. 
Emily Catherine. 

van ZWANENBERG - on 5th April. In 
Durham, lo Stella and NigeL a son. 
Beniamin John. 

WEARNE on March 26th to Nigel And 
Sarah a daughter. Cecily, a slsier lor 
Ham . Jack and Archie. 

WLDINC on April dth to Caroline (nee 
Wordsworth) and Peter, a son. 
Michael 

VERSURCII on April 6th al The John 
Radcllilc Hospital to Vanessa ihtee 
hJrfc 1 and BabOy a second son. 


Sale room 


OBITUARY 

T TF IJT-CDR bill soaks 


Bids go for bean cake Patron of lost causes 

•— * r mi.rnnimandcr 


By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 


University news 

St Andrews 

Professor Chris Cullen, pre- 
viously principal clinical 
psychologist with Salford 
Health Authority and honorary 
research fellow with the Hester 
Adrian Research Centre at Man- 
chester University, has been 
appointed to a new chair ol 
learning difficulties, funded by 
the Scottish Society for the 
Mentally Handicapped. 
Glasgow 

Promotions to senior lecturer 


marriages 


OYSO^TTCKELLd" April 5th 1 986 al 
Si. Mary's Church. The Boltons. 
London John Ntgcl Dyson lo Janet 
Mary Tickell. 

Mr D P WaofeAHu J Mc M ti The 

marriage took place on Saturday Slh 
°* Ad I 11 of Mr Douglas Philip WooH. 
son of Mr and Mrs Alexander Wooir 
or Kingston House . Hmqnisbndqp. 
London, and Mbs Jill McManners. 
daugmer cl Mr and Mrs Thomas 
McManners ol Sell* House. Hexham. 
Northumberland. 

WATSONiBUHM AN on Saturday 51 h 
4pnl 1986 al Hignfirid Church. 
Sauihamplon. the marriage Iihii, 
place Dei ween Mr Kent) lan Watson 
son of Mr and Mrs of D C Watson of 
MnhUcsboroimh and Dr Tara Eliza 
beih Burman. dauttfiier of Profexxnr 
and Mrs J.T eurman of Btackneath. 
London. 


An irregular oral lump of silver about 3in Ions 
and weighing 152g was sold for S4I.00U 
(£27.300> at a weekend coin auction in 
Singapore where the pre-sale estimate of its 
value had been only $500 to $600. 

The auction, mainly devoted to Far Eastern 
corns, had been mounted jointly by Spinks of 
London and Taisei of Japan. The block of 
silver was of a type used ss a form of carrency 
in barter deals in Japan in the 1590s. 

It is known as a ko-chogin in Japanese or 
“old bean cake block", and very few have 
survived. Japanese characters are stamped 
onto it. 

Reproduction pieces were made at the torn of 
the century for sale to tourists and the 
cataloguers in London had believed that they 
were dealing with one of those, relatively 
worthless pieces. It was catalogued guardedly 
as -believed c. 1593- 

Bidders, however, had poured into Singa- 
pore from Japan — a special package tour had 
been organized for the sale — and they took the 
view that the block was a genuine sarvivaJ from 
the sixteenth century. 

It had come to Spinks with a group of 
Japanese coins from die legendary Birgial 
Brand collection, formed in America in the 
early years of this century. The silver Mock 


was bought by tire Tokyo branch of TaiseL 

The same dealers, part of the commercial 
empire that helped organize the sale, account- 
ed for the other top prices in die auction. They 
paid $16,500 (estimate $16,000 to $19,000) or 
£11,000 for a pattern Chinese dollar of 1897 
struck in gold. The dyes for this sUva coin 
were made for the Honan province of Imperial 
China by the Birmingham Mint and have been 
used to strike a one-off example in gold. 

It was the first time that Spinks had 
attempted an auction in Singapore. Since it was 
within easy reads of Japan by air, the 
Japanese coins in particular fetched a good 
deal more than they would have done in 
London, and the sale totalled £373,000 with 
about 12 per cent left unsold. 


Lieutenant-Commander 

Bill Soaks. DSC, who died on 
April 4, aged 81, was a tireless 
campaigner at the hustings 
who provided a good deal of 
eniertainmenl at election time 
over a period of 30 years. 

Beaks exemplified that loo- 
ny individualism which the 
British people like: 
indeed it appears to find 
essential to the maintenance 
of its interest in what it is 
otherwise prone to regard as 
the tedium of political 





At Phillips yesterday private collectors 
turned ont in force tor an auction of Victoria 


watercolours and made for a very strong 
market. Fairy pictures are very 1 popular and a. 
late example with tiny fairy figures escorting 
themselves in an bower of mid flowers by 
Eleanor Fortescue-Brickdale (1871 to 1945) 
sold for £7,700 (estimate £3,000 to £5.000). It 
Is titled “Before the Coming of the Sinful 
Queen” and sold to Julian HartnoU, the 
London dealer. 


Forthcoming marriages 


Sir John Lubbock Chair of 
Banking Law. Dr Ross Cran- 
ston. reader in law and associate 
dean of the faculty of law at ihe 
Australian National University 
in Canberra. The chair is fi- 
nanced by a substantial capital 
endowmeni from the banking 
community. 


Mr J J-L Andrew 
and Miss J.L. Small 
The engagement is announced 
between James Houston, youn- 
ger son of Mr A.H. Andrew, of 
Byways. Hertford, and the late 
Mrs Andrew, and Jane Louise, 
younger daughter of Colonel 
and Mrs J.I.M. Smail, of Ber- 
wick-upon-T weed, 
Northumberland. 

Mr A.F. Arson tt 
and Miss N. Hughes 
The engagement is announced 
between Alan, second son of Mr 
and Mrs N.D. Arscon. of Croy- 
don, Surrey, and Nicola, youn- 
gest daughter of Mr and Mrs D. 
Hughes, of Reigaie. Surrey. 

Mr A.C.G. CartmeU 
and Miss CM. Potter 
The engagement is announced 
between Anthony, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs M.G. CartmeU. of 
Hest Bank. Lancashire, and 
Caroline, second daughter of the 
late Lieutenant-Colonel BJ. 
Potter and of Mrs B J. Potter, of 
Wallington. Surrey. 

Mr P.AjC. Cavendish 
and Miss L Olivier 
The engagement is announced 
between Piers, younger son of 
Lieutenant Commander 
Greville Cavendish. tretd). 
of Abaco. The Bahamas, and 
Mrs Hazel Cavendish, of 
Ashmouni House. South Stoke, 
Oxfordshire, and Louise, elder 
daughter of the late Gerard 
Dacres (Dickie) Olivier and Mrs 
Hester St John-lves. of Chain 
House, Mod bury. South Devon. 


Mr R.C.T. Holden and 
Miss P.M. Mordaunt-Crook 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard Charles 
Thomas, elder son of Mr and 
Mrs R.A.C. Holden, of Chelten- 
ham. Gloucestershire, and Pa- 
tricia Mary, younger daughter of 
Mr and Mrs D. Mordaunt- 
Crook. of L'Etang-la-Viile, 
France. 


Mr E-W. Stephenson 
and Miss JJB. Awdry 
The engagement is announced 
between Wilfrid, second son of 
Canon and Mrs R.O. Stephen- 
son, of Ash. Somerset and 
Johanna, eldest daughter of Mr 
Philip N. Awdry. FRCS, and 
Mrs Awdry, of Headington. 
Oxford. 


Mr A.M.G. McBride 
and Miss OJ. Morrow 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael, eldest son of 
Mr and Mrs N McBride, of 
Meadow Way, Crawfordsbum, 
and Deborah, only daughter of 
Mr and Mrs D. Morcow, of 
Bcechfield, RalhgaeL Bangor. 


Mr P. Monk 
and Miss J.L. Tnrvey 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul, eldest son of 
Michael and Mary Monk, of St 
Leonards-on-Sea. East Sussex, 
and iacaranda. youngest daugh- 
ter of Peter and Margaret 
Turvey, of Brixion and 
Rhodesia. 


Mr A J. Turner 
and Miss K.G. Kingdon 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew John, only son 
of Mr and Mrs Philip Turner, of 
Malt on, Yorkshire, and Kath- 
erine Gay nor. only daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Roger Kingdon. of 
Egglcsclitfe. Stockton on Tees, 
Cleveland. 


Mr E.C Neil son 
and Miss J.E. Watt 
The engagement is announced 
between Ewan, only son of Mr 
and Mrs H.R. Neilson, of 
Brimpton. Berkshire, and Joyce, 
younger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
F. Watt, of Fraserburgh, 
Aberdeenshire. 


Mr J.P. Vanderstegen-Drake 
and Miss C.S. Gunn 
The engagement is announced 
between John Peter, elder son of 
Mr and Mrs S.R.F. 
Vanderstegen-Drake. of The 
Old Tannery. Ecchinsweli, 
Newbury, and Charlotte 
Susannah, younger daughter of 
Mr and Mrs H.B.S. Gunn, of 
Quarry Close, Winscombe, 
Avon. 


Mr C.M5. Clowes 
and Miss R. Morton 
The engagement is announced 
between George, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs Archibald Clowes, of 
Ashland*. Billesdon. Leicester- 
shire, and Romans, only daugh- 
ter of Judge and Mrs Ala stair 
Morton, of S3 Eaton Terrace, 
London. 


Captain TJLA. Cook, HA, 
aad Miss LP. Ford 
The engagement is announced 
between Timothy, youngest son 
of Mr and Mis A.T. Cook, - of 
Manningtree. Essex, and 
Kimian. daughter of Mr and 
Mrs B.C.P. Ford, of Mijas. 
Malaga, Spain. 


Mr J.P. OTfelloran 
and Miss S J. Vaughan Jones 
The engagement is announced 
between Julian Paul youngest 
son of the late Mr Patrick 
O'Halloran and of Mrs 
O'Halloran. of Reading. Berk- 
shire, and Sarah Jane, daughter 
of Dr and Mrs Ronald Vaughan 
Jones, of Woiplesdon, Surrey. 


Mr J. WaddQove 
and Miss GA1. Davey 
The engagement is announced 
between Justin, youngest son of 
Mr and MrsG.G Waddiiove, of 
Reigaie, and Georgina May, 
only daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Vyvyan Davey, of Ash lead. 
Surrey. 


activity. 

And although in tats numer- 
ous attempts he never came 
remotely near capturing a 
parliamentary seat, hss cam- 
paigns frequently, secured 
more column inches in the 

& than those of more 
ly endorsed contendere 
■on the fists. 

In a dozen elections, tn 
which he contested 30 odd 
scats - multiple candidatures 
were a feature of his electoral 
style - Books lost his deposit 
with unfailing regularity. 

But thanks to the low 
financial penalty inflicted by 
the law on this species of 
political lapse, his losses 
amounted to only a few 
thousand pounds in his career. 

He campaigned on behalf of 
a variety Of causes. The most 
comprehensive of his labels 
was the Land. Sea and Air 
Democratic Monarchist. Pub- 
lic Safety. White Resident and 
Women’s Party banner under 
which he went into action al 
Crosby in 1981. . 

William George Boaks 
came to political life after a 
distinguished 30-year career in 
the Royal Navy. He had seen 
service at Dunkirk and had a 
destroyer sunk under him. 

Later he was in the battle- 
ship Rodney when die was 
ordered in lo try to sink the 
Bismarck by gunfire after air 
attacks had crippled the Ger- 
man warship. 

Boaks' s first electoral cam- 
paign was at Walthamstow 
East in 1951. The title of his 
one-man party. ADMIRAL, 
appeared to reflect his naval 
antecedents. In fact it stood 
for Association of Democratic 
Monarchists Representing All 
Women. He became a familiar 
sight at both by*electians and 
general elections, first for his 
campaign vehicle. Josephine, 
an elderly Vauxhall 12 saloon 
painted with zebra stripes, and 
subsequently for the 
armoured bicycle from which 
he photographed errant mo- 
torists to underpin the public 
safety element of his- 
campaigns. 




M 


But his zeal did not stop 
with elections. Convinced of 
the peril of Richmond, lying 
under the flight path into 
Heathrow, he was strong for 
the re-siting of London Air- 
port at Maplin. Selsey or even 
Bodmin Moor. The citizens offp 
Sheffield, on the other hand, 
he felt were deprived of an 
airpon and he planned one for 
them on platforms floating in 
a local lake. 


A litigious man - he. had 
attempted to bring private 
actions seainst Earl Attlee and 
the Duke or Edinburgh at 
different times - Boaks was 
also frequently in trouble with 
the law himself for the vigour 
with which he prosecuted his 
campaign against the 
motorist. 

.As the years went by; his 
own brand of individualism 
came under increasing pres- 
sure from other forms of 
eccentricity which burgeoned 
especially in the more carefree 
atmosphere of the 1960s, and 
Dog Lover, Humanitarian, 
Christian Anti-Pom and New 
Britain candidates challenged 
him strongly for the wooden 
spoon. 

Thus, at Crosby in 198L.it 
was T. F.Tang (Cambridge 
University Raving Loony So- 
ciety) and not W. G. Boaks 
who bogged that fringe lime- 
light and drew forth solemn 
protest from the leader col- 
umns of The Times. 

Glasgow Hi Ahead (March, 
1982) baid fair to be his 
swansong with the electorate 
dismissing him with a deriso- 
ry five votes. Yet he returned 
to the fray at Peckham with 
102 votes in October of that 
year, and only injury in No- 
vember, 1.981 from one of the 
motorcycles he had always 
stigmatised, put a more per- 
manent end to a dogged 
political career. 


Mr L-J. Fearer 
and Miss LJ. Stapleton 
The engagement is announced 
between Lance, only son of Mr 
and Mrs J.L. Feaver, of Lower 
Dean, Cambridgeshire, and 
Lynn, youngest daughter of Mr 
and Mrs M.H. Stapleton, of 
Durham City, Co Durham. 


Mr D.C. Hamm 
and Miss V. Duncan 
The engagement is announced 
between David Christopher, 
only son of Mr and Mrs ELT. 
Ramm, of Wyndham Road, 
Walkford, Dorset, and Vanessa, 
elder daughter of Mrs P. Dun- 
can. -of Nether Warden. 
Hexham. Northumberland, and 
Major I.S. Duncan, of 
Roscwonh Avenue. Gosfonh, 
Newcastle upon Tyne. 


Mr L.A. Webb 
and Miss CJ. Shad bolt 
The engagement is announced 
between Lennox, son of Tony 
and Silena Webb, of 
Sanderstead. Surrey, and Clem- 
ency. younger daughter of Mi- 
chael and Frances Shadboh, of 
Kenley, Surrey. 


PROF CHARLES ROSS 


Mr D-H. Williams 
and Miss SJVL Emslie 
The engagement is announced 
between Douglas Harry, youn- 
ger son of Mr and Mrs Dennis 
Williams, of Troon, Ayrshire, 
and Susan Margaret, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Wil- 
liam Emslie, of Aberdeen. 


Mr R.M. Finney 
and Miss AJL Hart 
The engagement is announced 
between Richard, third son of 
Mr and Mrs PJ. Finney, of 
Heaton, Bradford, and Amanda, 
eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs 
D.H. Hart, of Guise! ey. Leeds. 


Mr TJuD. Rfce 
and Miss TA. Meisel 
The engagement is announced 
between Tim, elder son of the 
late Mr Edward Rice and Mrs 
Catherine Rice, and stepson of 
Mrs Eileen Rice, of Putney, 
SW15. and Tracie. daughter of 
the late Mr and Mrs William 
Meisel, of Pennsylvania, United 
Stales. 


Marriages 

Mr C.HX. Graham 
and Miss FJJL Patou 
The marriage took place quietly 
in Edinburgh, on Thursday, 
April 3. 1986. of Mr Colin 
Graham, of The Coach House, 
Gosford. Longniddry, and Miss 
Fiona (Noni) Raton, of 29 
Dunrobin Place, Edinburgh. 


Dr W.T. Green 
and Miss S.A. Donton 
The engagement is announced 
between William Thomas, el- 
dest son of Dr and Mrs W. 
Green, of Pokfulam. Hong 
Kong, and Sarah, daughter of Dr 
and Mrs A.K.N. Dun ton, of 
Great Abshoi Farm, Titchfield, 
Hampshire. 


Dr D J. Shepherd 
and Miss S.L. Jackson 
The engagement is announced 
between David James, eldest 
son of Dr and Mrs AJ.H. 
Shepherd, of New Malden, Sur- 
rey, and Sarah Lindsay, daugh- 
ter of the Very Rev Brandon D. 
and Mrs Jackkra, of Bradford 


Mr DJMJI. Rooney 
and Mis M.E. Franklin 
The marriage took place quietly 
on April 7 at St Mary’s. Cadogan 
Street, of Mr Denis Hall Rooney 
to Mrs Muriel Franklin. 


Professor Charles Ross, 
who was found stabbed to 
death at his home in Bristol on 
April 3, was a distinguished 
medieval historian who made 
a major contribution to our 
knowledge of fifteenth century 
England in general and the 
Yorkist dynasty in particular. 

Charles Derek Ross, who 
was 62, was bom in Wake- 
field, and after attending 
Queen Elizabeth’s Grammar 
SchooL he went up to Oxford 
to read history in 1942. His 
college was Brasenose but as it 
was at that time occupied by 
the Army, his undergraduate 
studies were carried out in 
Christ Church- 

After taking his degree, he 
began post-graduate work for 
the DPhil, choosing as bis 
subject the Yorkshire baron- 
age in the fifteenth century. 
His supervisor was K. B. 
McFariane, whose work was 
then transforming historical 


Among his many contribu- 
tions to historical studies, 
perhaps the most important 
were his scholarly and detailed 
Edward IV (1974) and his 
perceptive biography Richard 
HI (1981). In addition, he 
edited the Cartulary of St 
Mark's Hospital Bristol 
(1959)and two volumes of the 
Cartulary of Cirencester Ab- 
bey (1964). 

His editorial work showed 
meticulous concern for detail 
This was also evident in his 
biographical studies which 
combined sharp analysis with 
fluent narrative in a way 
which gave pleasure to both 
professional and general 
readers. 




Mr A. Scott 

and Miss H.B. VTUiers 

The marriage took place on 

April 5, 1986. at ukombe, 

Kent, between Mr Alastair Scott 

and Miss Henrietta Villi ers. 


Mr CJ*. Hickson 
and Miss V J*. George 
The engagement is announced 
berween Cyril Paul younger son 
of Mr and Mrs C.W. Hickson, of 
Southport, Merseyside, and 
Vanessa Pamela, youngest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs E.T. 
George, of Rayleigh. Essex. 


Mr N.C. Stasden 
and Miss AJ. Page 
The engagement is announced 
between Nicholas, son of Mr 
A.C.L Sian den. of Tunbridge 
Wells, Kenu and Amanda, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs F.B.M. 
Page. of Ravensbead, 
Nottingham. 


Mr H.W. Wiggin 
and Mrs D. Anstey . 

The marriage took place on 
Wednesday, March 19. between 
Mr Harry Wiggjn and Mre 
Diana Anstey and a service of 
prayer and dedication took 
place the following day at 
Rep ion parish church. 


eval England. 

In 1947 Charles Ross was 
appointed assistant lecturer in 
the University of Bristol 
which was developing its me- 
dieval studies under the lead- 
ership of Professor David 
Douglas. He spent the whole 
of his academic career in 
Bristol and in due course was 
given a personal chair. 

In 1 982 he decided to accept 
early retirement but continual 
to work as a research professor 
and had recently signed a 
contract to wnte another 
book. 


Charles Ross was an amus- 
ing and stimulating lecturer 
and an inspiring teacher who 
communicated his great en- 
thusiasm to a Large number of 
students, some of whom later 
distinguished themselves in 
academic life. A festschrift in 
his honour, edited by Profes- 
sor Ralph A. Griffiths and Mr 
James Sherborne, is nearing 
completion. 


His death has come as a 
profound shock .to his col- 
leagues, to his former students 
and to scholars in many parts 
of the world who have benefit- 
led over a period of nearly 40 
years from his scholarship, his 
wisdom and his enthusiasm. 
He had a great sense of 
humour as well as a sharp wit, 
and he had a fund of good 
stories. 


BAINES on Maundy Thursday Susan 
M*nei TaJboi Baines ag**l 91 . Requi- 
em mass at S( Josephs' Hosoilal. 
Burlington Lane. London \*4 on 
23rd April ai 10 30. followed by a 
service of committal al Moruake Cre- 
matorium. Flowers to Sl Josephs' 
Hospital 

BAKER - on 5ih April, at home tn lde 
Hill. The Rev. Cannr C.A. (PETER i. 
beloved nusoano wt veronica, greatly 
loved fattier ot Anm-iny and Angela 
and dear grandtatner of Da-Kt and 
Andrew Much mved by all wtio 
knew him Funeral Ttiankiwnv mg 
Eerv(Ce 31 Chnsi Oiurrn. Fanned 
Road. Becsennam cn Monday Apol 
tain, a) 2.30 pm. fufiu-v-o uy bunai 
al Si. Man's tee Hu. Family ftr.-.- 
ers only please cans ic 9«im) in 
ChrtSI Oiurrn Bevkenham Budding 
Fund. SI. George ■ and iU. Saviour's. 
Battersea and CPAS “More man 
conquerors tnrougn Him wno loved 


dm GUIMGAMD - on the *1)1 April 
1986. suddenly at home. Bay Tree 
Collage. The Hill. Cranbrook. Kent 
Paul Emile aged 76 years, much 
loved hu&baraf of Doreen and loving 
father of Anthony. Genevieve 
(Greenwood 1 and Basil. A dear and 
loving papa Reouiem Mass at St 
Theodores Cathode Church. 
Cranorook. Thursday 10th April, at 
2.30 p.m followed by Interment in 
Cranbrook Cemetery. Family flow- 
ers only. 


BEVTS on 5ui April in Ealing Hospital. 
Judith, wife of Nicholas and momer 
of Timomy and Johanna, after a 
long illness. F uncrai to 00 announced 
later. 


BURTON - on ath April 1086. Geoffrey 
Cecil, aged 76 years, after a long HI- 
ness most braveiv borne: loving 
husband of Kitty, devoied fatner of 
David and Amanda and grandfather 
lo Clare. Feuaty and Jennifer. Fu- 
neral Service al Eastbourne 
Crematorium, on Thursday 10 m 
April, at 4 pm. Family flowers ontv. 
no Fellers please. 


CHURCH ER - on dth April I9S6. Nan- 
cy Thursfield. aned 86 years: widow 
of Dr Duncan GUlara Chunrher Fu- 
neral Sen ice al Eastbourne 
Crematorium, on Monday April 
1-Hh. at 11.30 am. No (lowers or tel- 
lers please. 


DCUTCH - on April 3rd. after a short 
Illness, aged sa years. Alice Bngid. 
sister of Frank Dunn of New York, a 
gitlcd teacher and a loyal friend. Fu- 
neral on Thursday April jgth at 
1 45pm at Putney Vale Cemetary. 
Flowers lo Earner and Son. 246 Up- 
per Richmond ru. swis. 


FALCON on April Slh 1986. Violet ' 
(BinzuM. beloved wtfe of Keith. In 
tragic circumsranres as a result of a 
fire at Hliiway Withypoot. Crema- 
tion private. 

FELL OWES on April 6th at Queen 
dux ,r— m Homvii. Kings Lynn. Billy, 
iM.r.Hft Hirttwind m jane and mum ' 
aim or^nmai/wr F uner- i 
ai la r-non Wrr.i.ed .j gin April at 
Ficrrwxn Oxin n All wen nve. |Vo 
ten*- v 01 iii.w'YS pjtvrse. pul com 
liuiis 11 u Mini ip Hume Hoxpd.e 
Suooori. po Moithe fta. nani. 

Kiihis U>nn The rm-Rnjndl service 
tur La.1v Feilowe* manned lor lOUi 
Aon! iLdd been cancelled. 

fltBSON On Easier Sunday al home 
atier a Lorw nine's nom wun gr-ai 
courage. Elizabeth juce<>n ijw 
B io—ievis) beloved sut 01 Robert, 
mother of Aiasfajr. Caroline and Jon 
air.an and grandmother of Etndti and 
Thomas. Service ai SI Andrews. 
Fernng. It. 30am April 14lh. Flow- 
ers 10 P A. Tourle. Church Lane. 
Fernng. or donations if desired ic 
Rovai Society for Mentally Handi- 
capped Children. 123 Golden Lane. 
London EC1. 

HALL M.M.. William Henry, beloved 
husband of Fay and father of Stmt. 
Howard and Martin. On Sunday 
March Wli. suddenly al home.. 
Wyecrofl Court. BakewelL Demy- 
wure. Church service Wednesday 
9th April ] 1 .30 am. followed by pn- 
tale cremation. Family flowers onlv 
Donations to the Royal British Legion 
Betwvoteni Fund 

HOOtHUE on ath April 1986 peace- 
tuny at her home in Guernsey. C I. 
Henrietta Hood -Dye. widow of Cot. 
William Hood-Dye RAMC and dear 
smw of Florence Hinton Private 
Cremation. 


JOSEPH Edward diaries, peacefully 
tn hts steep at home. 3rd AprtL aged 
70: dearly loved brother, unde and 
great unde. 

LUUtoET Lady Dorothy Clare OBE. on 
Monday 7th April aged 90. Dearly 
loved wife of the late Mamr General 
Sir Claude Uardef and much loved 
mother of John, mother-in-law of 
Pauline. Grandmother of Adam and 
Edward and s ten-mother of Bill. Cre- 
mation at Chichester Crematorium 
Thursday 10th April at 3 pm. Flow- 
ers 10 Edward While. 5 ' South 
Pallani. Chichester 


MARTIN. Derrick John S.D.. SUL 
F.R.C.S- (Edin.l aged 84. Suddenly 
on April 5U) at hts home. Comb 
House. Lawgtiau. Suffolk. Beloved 
husband of Marione. and dearly 
loved lather of Joy. Rae. Roger.. and 
Chmaupner sons and daughters In 
law. Laima grandfather to all his 
grandchildren and great grandcWJ- 
dren Funwvj wmue al Lawsaall 
Church on Tnurvvay 1 OB 1 April at 
3 30 pm. loiioweq uy Diiermenl In 
me enurthyarfl. Family flowers only 
tee.-w*. bui 11 desired, donations to 
Oierseav Mission .formerly China In- 
land Mission l. t oA. L ThurtoW & 
son. 1 HMD street, brwonn. Suffolk. 
Tel. Paxenhant 30227. 

MASON Gama) on dih April after 
a devastating iiims?. couragtousty 
borne Rusnan' veronica Mason 113. 
aytso 26 years of 162 Crewe Road. 
Aisager. Stake-on- Trent. The mast 
loved wife of Robert John Mason and 
beloved daugmer of Anne and 
FVrvrt Service and inurtrwm in 
Odd Rode Church at 3 OO pm on 
W cant-day. Enautnes Joseph Ed- 
wards A Sons. Aisager 2097. 

MORLAND - on 3rd April, peacefully 
in St. Pflert twsn'ai. CfH'rney. 
Nigel Mori and. auixur. criminologist 
ano co-lounger Crime writers Aj»o- 
nauon: beloved fatner nr Terence 
Edward. Funeral ai Woking jH. 
Jonn s Crematorium 2 pm April 
tom Flowers 10 above, or donations 
to Cincer Research. 

K ARSON 011 April 3rd al The SI 
Raphael's Nursing home. Bromley, 
peacefully In hw T7Bi year. Alfred 
loving nusband of Uie late May Caro- 
line and much loved father of Father 
Paddy iSheernessi. Donations If de- 
sired to CAFOD. 


“AGIUEWN OSX - on April 3rd 1986. 
peacefully at tus home, after only a 
short dlness. Raymond, much loved 
husband of Mona, father of Heather. 
Jennifer and Anthony, ^andfather 
of Jane. Luke. Thomas. Edward and 
Jesse. Memorial Service on Friday 
llth April. 2.16 pm. al Kingston 
tinned Reformed Church, followed 
hy private cremation. Family flowers 
only. Donations, if desired, to 
ILN.LIi 

PHILLIPS John, of Bry aialu ti Court. . 
WL formerly of the Automobile As- 
sodauon. peacefully tm 4th April. 
Gosforth. NewcastteDpon-Tyne. 
widower of Jeanne and previously 
Gladys and beloved father of Barba- 
ra CarNai&h and Elizabeth Pike. 
Fune^ at AH Saints Church. 
GosfOrth. Friday nth April ai 12 

iKSlPST"* may sent to J 
BarttgeH* sons lid. Westgafe Road. 

SKHMBHHE - On 2nd Aprs 1986 at 
the John Raddiffe HospfiaL Oxford, 
m her 93rd year. Dorothy 
Sfcrimsturc (Toots) of sl 
F ndeswttfrt Farmhouse. North Ox- 
ford. late of Speen. Newbury. 
Berkshire, mother of Sally and NevIL 
Funeral service at St. Bantabas 
Church. Jencho. Oxford on Friday 
llth April at SL30 pri. Floral tributes 
to Oiurch. 

SCHRODER on April 6th peacefully al 
Behops Hearn. Engteneid Green. He- 
lene Dorothee Eveline Emma In her 
90Ui year. Sadly missed by her fam- 
ily and friends. Funeral service 
Friday April llth 2pm at The Royal 
Chapel Windsor Great Park. Flowers 
10 F. Harmon and son Funeral Di- 
rectors. 40 Harvest Rd. Englefiehi 
G reen, Surrey. 

SC ORER on 3rd April 1986 at Ham- 
mersmith Hospital. London 
Catherine Susan (Cash) aged 38 of 
177 Holland Rd. London NWlo. Fu- 
neral 10.50 am Friday, llth April 
198b at Colliers Green Crematori- 
um Family and close friends only 
Followed by celebration of Cash's life 
at 1230 pm. llth April 1986 al 
County Han. London SE1. an 
friends welcome. No flower*. Dona- 
tions please to Cash Scorer. Civil 
Liberties Trust, c/o Michael Stef err 
Stefert Sedtey & Williams. 3 Dym 
Buildings. Hoibom. London ECl. 


a H 5 HHLL on Aw11 sm - "Hie Mon. 

SS? 90 J! ean - 01 Thlf M,u 

i™ 8 *- fj* 1 * 0 "' Suffolk: wtfe of the 
HttHenn, Gerard Walter 

/£!Ei^ W !S2L. rooth * r °* Geraldine 
,and 3 raucf ) loved 

Aped urn 

“ **-30 am. Flowers nhrrrr in F R 

ft™? 2A *• • wh "* 

a«reet. woodbndge. Suffolk. 

CHARI ES STRUNG ot Cadet. 

5U« AprtJbe. 
01 Ann aiKl dear 
FaXher netope Sadler. Marion 

Laepgm d Franos. Funeral private. 
«W«wial service to be announced 

***® n 5 l 6th Ami 1986 peace- 

!c2? . Ma,or General Eric 

? s *, Bln Cametiotdam 
(aCOtush Rifles). Aqed 81 Related 

“Joanna. Angus and Edmund, and 

Stee^ U « r m F uneral Ser- . 
St Marw Church. Hurih 
^attorn oa Frl- 
B«wtIiteni l e U J Jonaaons 10 Army 

TSSTriniK. 4 . Mouni 


««*wr of sarn. 
Sg^-Moswaf 00 Friday 
Funeral at the Car- 
Kensington Church 
fSL 2 "" on Wednesday 9 m 

•" Ramsey Isle 
rasonc fSKr t . Sunon OBE. TD. 

I ^? CF Ser. 

1 , L ? 2avre Church on Friday 

/ anuJ F flowers 
MmmtcHo^uh t dca,r M 10 Royal 

S {!£"“■ Raiewcoun 
U Simdoi«l?2berfTO l ^?# •" K#m ' 

of the late 

mooter much loved 

Uon. oranomoflicr. Gretna- 

vice m vmLmT Memorial wr- 

3 30pm SuSay P Churchl 


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Tahiti’s 


mystic 

charms 


The title of the new series into 
loner Eye (Channel 4) sug- 
gests a certain comforting if 
rather vague my s tic ism; and so 
wbat better place to start it 
than Tahiti, where the roll of 

the surf is matched only by the 

thunder of the gods. That 
island has attracted many 
artists and scientists hi search 
of "truth” and for the purposes 

of this documentary it has 
drawn Nicholas Humphrey, 
an academic psychologist, in 
pursuit of a theory. 

The title of the first pro- 
gramme, Imagined Worlds* 
testified to Dr Humphrey's 
faith in a strange, process of 
which Tahiti has been the 
principaT beneficiary nr virrim- 
The island has become the 
repository of other people's 
fant asi e s or assumptions — 
like some enchanted land- 
scape (previously only seen in 
old Star Trek adrenimes), it 
changes shape to coincide with 
the preconceptions of its visi- 
tors. Ronssean eves invented it 
before it was discovered; Dar- 
win explained the coral islands 
before he had seen any evi- 
dence for them; Gauguin imag- 
ined its geography under the 
harden, it seems, of some 
artistic imperative. 

It is not a new theory — it is 
practically the standard expla- 
nation of creativity, and was 
certainly being promulgated 
by Oscar WDde in the 1888s. 
As a theory, of course, it has 
the advantages of simplicity 
and wide applicability, bat the 
fact that it is familiar and (by 

now) obvious may have been 
responsible for the amount of 
time spent showing Dr Hum- 
phrey In various attractiv e 
close-ops. 

Once he had reiterated his 
central point in a variety Of 
ways, there was nothing else 
left to say. Certainly this first 
episode seemed merely an 
excuse for some pretty pic* 
tores; Tahiti has mice again 
been miraculously trans- 
formed. this time into a back- 
drop for a televirion series. 


Peter Ackroyd 



Galleries 


Unparalleled grasp of texture 


£ In Tandenu The 
:/ • Painter-Sculptor in 
v\ : the Twentieth 
v Century 

v';:- Whitechapel 


every effort but, despite the im- 
proved security and reconditioned 
ideal exhibition space, failed to 
acquire the desired works. Owners 
are becoming increasingly reluc- 
tant to lend. 


■ : Julian SchnabeTs paintings assault 
the very act of tainting. Georg 
Baselitz has in recent years sunk 
into formula painting. Yet these 
- two emerge as the most exciting 
contemporary painier-scuiptors in 
■ a thought-provoking exhibition at 
the Whitechapel until May 25. 
Degas, Picasso, Matisse. Kirchuer 
, - . ' and Boccioni immediately con- 
vince die viator how important 
sculpture has been to painters since 
the beginning of the century, but 
after this initial onslaught by the 
early modern masters most of the 
gallery space is devoted to living 
artists. 


The many omissions do not spoil 
the exhibition. They help engender 
the rare feeling that the organizers 
do not wish to instruct their 
audience, but rather provoke 
thought by the interplay between 
the exhibits. A case could be argued 
that both Picasso and Degas were 
better sculptors than painters, but 
it would be a wasted effort as these 
great artists so obviously needed to 
explore both media folly to express 
their an. Matisse is shown using his 
sculpture to develop his painting. 
In Sculpture and Persian I'ase. 
1908 the original plaster cast for 
Reclining Nude. 1907 (also in the 
exhibition) plays a dominant role 
in the still life. 


Rough strokes creating smooth, 
op fjring forms in Kirdbiter's 
Dancer with Necklace 


Four hopping works by Degas 
greet the visitor on entering Die 
upper galleries: four versions of 
Dancer Looking at the Sole of her 
Right Foot provide proof of 
Degas’s endless search for perfect 
form. The brutal display of some of 
his most private, thematic work is 
vaguely comicaL The blank wall 
behind provides no relief; there is 
no expected pastel The opposite 
wall is vacant too. The lone 
representative of Picasso's oeuvre 
stands in front, an 85-centimeire 
high bronze Head of a Woman. 
The lack of a painting by either of 
these artists was not intentional 
The director of the gallery made 


Right from the beginning, the 
organizers demonstrate that they 
are not just concerned with 
ceaseless repetition of the same 
image in different media. Kirch- 
ner’s Nude Combing her Hair. 
1913 may have benefited from 
Dancer with Necklace, 1910 but, 
apart from the sharp cutting-edge 
profile of the bod) 1 , they share little 
in their impact. As a sculptor in 
wood Kirchner's understanding of 
texture is unparalleled. The rough 
strokes slice into her to create a 
patchwork of smooth, enticing 
forms. In Dancer with Necklace 
this is most obvious in the way he 
has chopped the very ends of her 
bosoms to reveal iw-o oval-like 


rings in a simple piece of country 
furniture. 

Baselitz's Red Man. 1984/5 
stands like a totem-pole a: the end 
of the first gallery. Though the eye 
has been guided through a course 
of Jasper Johnses, Twomblys. Fcn- 
lanas and Giacomettis, the link 
with Kirchner appears to be obvi- 
ous. The malproportioned giant 
crudely hewn from a tree-trunk 
must surely owe its origins to the 
•■primitive** work the artist ad- 
mires and collects. However, de- 
spite the feci that the piece is 
figurative and unmistakably simi- 
lar to an object of tribal worship, 
the artist disclaims any cuiiic or 
iconographic significance for his 
sculpture. Indeed, by painting over 
the form he has created and by 
diffusing the eye-comae: with the 
piece by sheer height, he is trying :o 
reduce the effect of the sculpture to 
pure gut-reaction. 

De Kooning's twisting, contort- 
ed, volcanic bronzes echo his 
paintings but seem tame in com- 
parison with the Baselines. The 
gallery's no man's land, the small 
interconnecting room, quickly of- 
fers consolation with a comparison 
of some faded Dubuffets and a 
bold, free-standing Lichtenstein 
Cup and Saucer. At the end of the 
room is an altar arrangement of 
Miro's Drop of Water on Pink 
Snow and two ceramic sculptures. 
Gauguin may not have krai in- 
cluded in the first room, but Bird 
on a Tree-trunk is undoubtedly 
intended to reeaJI his influence and 
indeed the life that inspired so 
many- of this century's painter/ 
sculptors. 


The lower gallery does not 
maintain the tension of the exhibi- 
tion. An Ellsworth Kelly pairing 
open strongly, but one whole side 
of !he room falls away with some 
facile Jennifer Bardens and Alex 
Katzcs. Looking across Gcmcnte's 
penned-in. senseless army of day- 
figures. Schnabel's Balzac fights 
heroically to gain his artistic birth. 
The controversial American artist 
has here found a subject to suit his 
romantic temperament. Balsac's 
ambitious plans to portray the 
whole of French society in a novel 
of 50 volumes would appeal to 
Schnabel, as would Rodin's 
endeavours to ensure that his 
sculpture of the same title was 
recognized as his greatest master- 
piece. 




The top half of the sculpture 
looks like the piece-mould for 
Rodin's famous rendering TTie 
writer is sull contained like an 
Egyptian mummy within his piece- 
mould by heavy clasps. Only half 
of this has been revealed by an 
apparently arduous attack on the 
outer waste-mould. It looks like a 
cocoon reluctantly yielding its 
creation. Then, in a typically 
defiant action. Schnabel plants a 
branch in the French writer’s bead, 
to produce an effect as outrageous 
as Landseer's Monarch of the Glen. 
Perhaps Schnabel, like Picasso and 
Matisse, should keep a plaster-cast 
of Michelangelo's Dying Slave in 
his studio, its spirit hangs over the 
exhibition as its unfinished nature 
poses the ultimate challenge to the 
artist. 


\j • 4 / 

■imrv * 


'''V j*' & 



Alistair Hicks 


Baselitz trying to reduce the 
effect of sculpture tn pure gut- 
reaction in Red Man 


Concerts 

Philhanrionia/ 

Moti 

Festival Hall/ 
Radio 3 


The central and most conven- 
tionally programmed of Rio- 
cardo Muti’s three spring 
concerts with the Philhar- 
monia shone the - spotlight 
directly, on performing style 
itself And, with Haydn and 
Dvorak. at their most confi- 
dently festive, it was an eve- 
ning of effervescent spirit and 
debonair self-assurance. 

There was little pomp but 
plenty of spry crraimstance in 


the opening of Haydn's "Ma- 
ria Theresa” Symphony: slen- 
der brass playing, the body of 
strings treated at times as a 
single solo line, as Muti's most 
elegantly groomed first move- 
ment barely touched ‘ the 
ground. The Minuet, indeed, 
may have been just not earthy 
enough for some tastes: Mud 
emphasized here the dignity of 
the single beat rather than the 
activity of the three, sustain- 
ing rather than blowing away 
the balm of the Adagio. 


through its development, 
Muti let the Scherzo creep up 
as it were behind its back. A 
tinkle of the triangle, and the 
dance of counterpoint and 
woodwind repartee was on its 
way. Muti's greatest cunning, 
though, was to make the 
symphony seem both more 
felicitous and more kaleido- 
scopic than it really is. by 
creating a sense of confident 
instrumental metamorphosis 
within his sweeping direction 
of the work's dr ama. 


breadth and bravado which 
would normally be reserved 
for the Romantic greats. At 
times it was a little overheated 
for the orchestra's more tem- 
perate accompaniment and, in 
its more elaborate passages, in 
danger of boiling over. A 
daring performance, though, 
heady with enjoyment and 
unusually imaginative in its 
original cadenzas. 


of producing a heart-warming 
performance of Schumann's 
Krcisleriano. The fingers may 
not quite have the instinctive 
accuracy of old. but the tech- 
nique is generally excellently- 
preserved. and Fischer's glori- 
ous romantic spirit remains 
indubitable. 


Hilary Finch 


Perhaps he already had 
Dvorak on his mind. For one 
of the most beguiling mo- 
ments of his Fifth Symphony 
was Dvorak’s transition from 
the second to the third move- 
ment By keeping (he con 
moto of the andante tingling 


There was plenty of swag- 
ger, too, in Yo Yo Ma’s central 
performance of Haydn's D 
major Cello Concerto. From 
the descending chromatics of 
the first movement to the 
whooping double start of the 
last, he played it with a 


Annie Fischer 

Elizabeth Hall 


In this Indian summer of her 
career the Hungarian pianist 
Annie Fischer is still capable 


What has always been com- 
pletely instinctive, one sus- 
penses her sense of rubato. It 
is not so much a graded ebb 
and flow as an impulsive, 
almost jerky process that in- 
fuses the music with unusual 
nuances and an infectious 
vivacity. That liveliness was 
evident, too. as she skipped 
lightly through the dotted- 
rhythm counterpoints that 
permeate the piece, while her 
declamation of the b ig<hord- 


cd themes had an unforced 
nobility. 

By keeping the dynamic 
range comparatively restricted 
and the rhetorical gestures 
similarly intimate. Fischer en- 
sured that this music's salon 
conventions were never trans- 
gressed. Instead she gave. ad- 
mirably dear voice ro the 
maze of “hidden themes" 
lying in the middle textures of 
Schumann's piano writing. In 
this context the numerous 
repeat markings formed an 
essential part of her thinking, 
for it was often only on second 
hearing that some inner signif- 
icance was made explicit. 

Fischer was less assured in 
Beethoven’s Sonata quasi una 
fantasia, which was dogged by 
minor fluffs, not so much in 
the finale's florid passagework 


as in the scherzo's quicksilver 
leaps up the keyboard. Ii was a 
tribute to her tenacity that she 
refused lo accommodate them 
at a more sedate tempo. 

The physically gruelling oc- 
tave passages of Liszt's B 
minor Sonata also had their 
hits and misses, and some 
heavv pedalling did sound 
desperate!;, remedial ai times. 
Yet the passionate sensibility 
of Fischer's playing compelled 
admiration. The fugal section, 
in particular, was rattled off 
with great panache - an 
invigorating emphasis on each 
entry's upbeat triplets generat- 
ing a cumulative excitement • 


and many of the quiet pas- 


_ :s were delivered with a 
deliciously shimmering touch. 


Richard Morrison 


Larry Fuller (below), director and principal choreographer of 
Time, which opens at the Dominion tomorrow, is well used to 
the sharp end of show business: interview by Sheridan Morley 


In line for a little levitation 


For a man who had, on the 
morning we met, just lost his 
first three previews at the 
Dominion because of a little 
local difficulty with the set 
(shades of Mutiny\ ibt direc- 
tor and priori pal choreogra- 
pher of Dave dark’s new 
Time musical was looking 
remarkably resilient and still 
prepared for opening night 
tomorrow. 


“All I asked", says Larry 
which 


Fuller, “was for a set wl 
could turn into a galaxy, an 
auditorium which could be- 
come a planetarium and three 
characters who could spend 
most of their time on stage 
levitating. After Time John 
Napier is goinjg to have to go 
back to designing black boxes: 
there’s just nowhere else for 
him to go in spectaculars." 

As brats a man who started 
his choreographic career by 
putting Barbra Streisand into 
the London premtere of Fun- 
nv Girl all of twenty years ago, 
Mr Fuller, who is now 48, s 
accustomed to living at the 
sharp end of showbusiness. 
Many years ago be went to Los 

Angeles and Las Vegas as one 
of the Jack Cole Dancers: Mr 
Cole was the father of jazz 
dancing, and a formative in- 
fluence on both Bob Fosse and 
Michael Bennett 

“Cole was really the start of 
a whole new era in show 
dancing, and I was lucky 
enough to be with him when - 
he was still dancing himself at 
Vegas; but by now I knew I 
wanted to choreograph and 
direct shows myself because 

? 'ou can’t go on being a dancer 
brever, and the last show in 
which I actually appealed was 



“Sweeping 
up aH the 
top prizes 
for 

musicals’’ 



Tei:01 836 8106 


M 

theatre royal, 
drury lane 


Funny Girl where I was the 
dance captain and an assistant 
to Carol Haney. Then she 
sadly died, and I was asked to. 
take over the choreography for 
London. When we started that 
show on Broadway, Streisand 
was a kid with only one 
Broadway appearance and one 
record to her name; she was 
never really trained as an 
actress or a dancerbut she 
moved wonderfully, and by 
the lime we got to London she 
had learnt just about every- 
thing." ‘ ... 

Choreographing Funny Girt 
in London led Mr Fuller into 
directing ir as well for summer 
seasons all over America: “I 
found at last what 1 really 
wanted to do, which was 
direct actors as well as danc- 
ers. In the late 1 960s there was 
still a lot of summer theatre 
work along the East Coast and 
I would do maybe halfa dozen 
shows a summer, spending the 
winters dancing in television 
spectaculars to keep the mon- 
ey coming in. Then . I choreo- 
graphed a couple of Broadway 
flops and. that more or less 
took care of the 1960s. 

' “But then. in 1970 T- was 
asked to choreograph West 
Side Story in Vienna and in 
Nuremberg, and .1 started a 
whole European decade of my 
life what I found was that, afl 
over Germany' .especially, 
there were opera-houses that 
had only ever got as far as 
operetta but. now wanted to 
stage Broadway shows for the 
fira time. Their problem was 
that nobody on tne staff knew 
how to do a Broadway show, 
so I went from opera-house to 
opera-house having a wonder- 
flu time with hugs casts and 
amazing budgets. 

" "By the time I got back to 
Broadway it was deep into the 
recession and there was literal- 
ly no work around, so. I 
returned to Vienna and Mu- 
nich and it was while I was in 
Vienna, doing a show at the , 
Theater an der Wien, that 1 
met up wrtfi Hal Prince who 
had come over.ta.do A Link 
Sight Music. 9 ' 

that meeting ted to the 


next decade of Fuller's life 
“Hal asked me to do a Vienna 
production of Candide, and 
that ' led to the movie of A 
Little Sight Music and then 
On the Twentieth Century and 
Evita and Sweeney Todd and 
Merrily We Roll Along and A 
Dolts Life and Silver Lake, all 
of which 1 choreographed for 
Hal in New York and most of 
which we also (fid in London." 
After a while however Fuller 
felt that be wanted to get back 
to being his own director, even 
though his first show away 
from Prince was rather las 
than triumphant: 

"I was asked to do Marilyn 
in London, and when I got the 
script it was just a bunch of 
lyrics around which we had to 
create a book. The material 
was good to mediocre, but a 
lot of shows get by on inven- 
tive staging and one big star- 
turn, both of which I thought 
we had. Critics -disagreed. 
Thai’s the way it goes some- 
times. You just have to get on 
to the next show." 

Except that there wasn't 
one: "Far the first time in my 
life, I was out of work for a 
year after Marilyn. But during 
the rehearsals I had met Dave 
Clark over here, and he asked 
me to look at a space fantasy 
with a message about nuclear 
warfare which he was putting 
together for London. There 
was a strong rock score, and I 
got more and more intrigued 
by the staging possibilities — 
so here we now are, five weeks 
into rehearsal.” 

With a budget that is now 
said to be so far over a million 
pounds that nobody mentions 
it Time has Cliff Richard as 
the mtergalactic rock star and, 
on screen, an appearance by 
Laurence Olivien 

“That was difficult, because 
Dave had to film the Olivier 
sequences before I arrived in 
England; so I’ve had to get 
actors on stage to work with 
what we've got on film of Sir 
Laurence. But I like a techni- 
cal challenge, and FVe luckily 
been able to share the choreog- 
raphy with Arlene Phillips so 
that we have built up rival 
teams of dancers rather like 
the Jets and the Sharks of 
West Side, rehearsing them in 
quite different ways. It’s of 
course a myth that America 
has a monopoly of good 
dancers; we just have more of 
them because we are a larger 
nation, and ironically one of 
\he problems here now is that, 
because there are more hit 
musicals around than ever 
before, good dancers' are in 
very short supply. I just hope 
lhat we’re a hit, and Chess is a 
hit, and the Phantom is a hit if 
so, at least Broadway will have 
some imports to look forward 
to. It doesn’t have much rise 
at present." 


Theatre 

Execution of 
Justice 

Virginia, New York 


Ideologically, the timing of the 
5 of Execu- 


Broadway opening 
lion of Justice was uncanny. 
Emily Mann's docu-drama 
about the 1978 assassination 
of San Francisco's liberal may- 
or and the first politician who 
openly represented the city’s 
homosexual community, and 
the trial of the conservative 
politician who shot them, 
appeared m a city wracked by 
contention and scandaL The 
play opened in the same week 
that a gay rights bill passed 
one more hurdle in its 1 5-year 
struggle towards becoming 
New York City law, and on 
the very night thata disgraced 
political leader succeeded in 
his second suicide attempt 

Theatrically, the timing of 
this somewhat flawed but 
ultimately engrossing and 
moving play, which boasts no 
stars but one of the finest large 
casts of American actors I 
have seen, is likely to be dire. 
Broadway audiences have 
grown indifferent to serious 
dramas, the most lauded of 
which seldom run a full year. 
Execution of Justice, which 
has already had a life in seven 
regional theatre productions, 
and has been considerably 
improved since the version I 
saw ax the Actors Theatre of 
Louisville m 1984, braves 
formidable Broadway odds. 

In addition to the excellent 
company of 23 actors — most 
of whom play several roles - 
and imaginative and generally 
well-modulated direction by 
the author, the production has 
Broadway size and polish. 
Ming Cho Lee's set of a bright 
blue floor with a red squared 
centre, overhung by a cube on 
which slides and film footage 
are frequently run in tandem 
with or counterpoint to the 
stage action, is banked by 
television cameras, tights and 
upstage seats (sold the day of 
performance for 510} for audi- 
ence members who represent 
the San Francisco courtroom 
onlookers. 

For much ofthe first act, the 
sheer volume of information 
conveyed in staged scenes and 
monologues and on film is so 
dense that it is difficult to sort 
it out even when one already 
knows the story. The whats, 



The People Show 

Almeida 


Inquisition: Gerry Bamman and Lisabeth Bartlett i 
an outstanding cast in Execution of Justice 


runs while the stage and aisles 
fill with candle-bearing actors. 

Using only the fans and 
actual words spoken by the 
participants in and commen- 
tators on the events, Emily 
Mann as both playwright ana 
director lays out the issues and 
personalities with scrupulous 
fairness. It might have been 
more dramatically satisfying if 
she had used the case to craft 
her own variation with an 
immediate emotional focus — 
like a Crucible, a Winslow Boy 
or an Accidental Death of an 
Anarchist — but she lives 
dangerously and, artistically at 
least survives. 

By the play's rad, when we 
know of the verdict the riots 


and recriminations that fol- 
lowed, and the last act of the 
killer, whether we conclude 
that the events represent an 
execution of justice is perhaps 
less important than that we 
have seen and felt how com- 
plex they were. 


Because it causes us to 
experience an intellectual and 
emotional journey from the 
multitudinous points of view 
of the people who took it 
Execution of Justice makes it 
difficult for the attentive to 
look at much less join, the 
battles around us armed solely 
with our own prejudices. 


Holly Hill 


"This is Art", announces the 
compere Mark Long in the 
course of a rambling prologue. 
“Art is always ambiguous. Or 
is it just an excuse for 
laziness?” 

This, the ninety-first “enter- 
tainment" conceived and per- 
formed by The People Show 
in its 20-year history, is cer- 
tainly not An, nor yet anti- 
Art. Neither is Mr Long’s 
introduction genuinely dis- 
arming: it is fake-disarming. 
By inviting us to deprecate the 
company’s artistic aspirations, 
be implies the opposite, that 
what follows is to be raken 
seriously. He cannot have it 
both ways. In fact, he cannot 
have it at all. This show is an 
unambiguous nullity. 

Here we find the pristine 
mother! ode of 1960s preten- 
tiousness defiantly preserved 
in an almost hermetic time- 
warp- The People Show’s only 
advance seems to lie in the 
acquisition of dumb gadgetry. 
Behind tawdry plush curtains 
stands their major plaything, 
an electrically driven round- 
about affording the facility of 
three minimally decorated 
sets, the whole machine 
flanked and backed by comi- 
gaied iron walls. 

The male “protagonist" 
(Chahine Yavroyan) is dis- 
charged from prison where he 
has been sentenced for an 
unspecified offence, pals up 
with the female "protagonist” 
(Collette Walker) in a pub and 
decamps to a tatty hotel in 
Brighton; later, he happens 
upon an Excalibur-like sword 
rising from a grave. Through- 
out his journeying he becomes 
ever more laden with props: a 
large soft toy dog, a goldfish 
bowl, two plastic mackerel, a 
“No Credit" sign. 

Most of this is accompanied 
by a pre-recorded soundtrack 
of “atmospheric" effects and 
of music such as Ennio 


Morricone’s theme from The 
Good. The Bad and The Ugly 
and the first four bars of "I 
Heard It Through the Grape- 
vine" which, played over and 
over like a stuck record, 
precipitates a ritual, bored 
dance routine. 


Further music is purveyed 
by the players themselves: 
Jeremy Swift on piano and 
violin. George Kahn on saxo- 
phone. and Miss Walker sings 
“Blue Moon", "Stormy Wea- 
ther" and “Summertime”. Mr 
Long favours us with several 
soporific monologues which 
appear lo owe their inspira- 
tion to Vivian Stanshafl. How 
strange it is that when there 
are no rules apart from the 
axiom of self-indulgence — 
when, in other words, any- 
thing can happen - nothing 
like enough ever does happen. 


Martin Cropper 



“IS PAVED WITH 
GOLD. I EXPECT 
IT WILL BE STILL 
RUNNING WHEN 
THE NEXT 
OLYMPICS GET 
UNDERWAY” 

Da 9 y Mirror 

TeLOl 836 8106 


THEATRE ROYAL 
.DRURY LANE^ 


wheres and whys settle by the 

em 


second act, which delivers 
emotional blow after Wow. 
One of the most gnuesomely 
funny scenes I have ever 
beheld is the real courtroom 
testimony of five psychiatrists 
twisting concepts to defend 
the assassin. One suggests, 
complacently. “If you look at 
the gun as a transitional 
object . . ”. This is soon fol- 


lowed by a stirring sequence in 
which film of ih 


of the spontaneous 
candlelight procession of 
mourning for the slain men by 
thousands of San Franciscans 


CHRISTIE’S WEEK IN VIEW 


A selection front our 18 sales in London this week. 


Important En glish Furniture: Thursday, 10 April at 
ILOOajn., Ring Street: An exciting sale with furniture ro 
suit all tastes. Of particular interest from the Harewood 
Charitable Trust are the only surviving pair of George HI 
silvered mirr ors by Thomas Chippendale expected to realise 
in excess of £50,000. From other sources there are a set of 11 
Regency mahogany tub chairs, which include a pair of 
armchairs. They realised 56 gns when offered at Christie's in 
1937. A price in the region of £15,000 to £20,000 is 
expected. 

Motoring Art and Literature: Thursday, 10 April at 
2D0 pm.. South Kensington: Among intriguing items on 
offer is a picture by Terence Cuneo of 1962 illustrating Sir 
Henry Sea graved exciting Members? Banking at Brooklands 
in the Sedbeam 300 H.P.. which could sell for as much as 
£2,000. The strong racing flavour in this sale is illustrated 
by four pictures of the French Grand Prix, which could 


fetch £2,000 each. The sale also includes many mascots 
and memorabilia of years gone by in racing. 


Important Old Master Pictures: Friday, 2i April at 
1L0O a.m. f King Street: An impressive sale including the 
Marquesa dc Santa Cruz by Goya. Other major lots are 
The Adoration of the Magi by Mattia Preti; The Madonna 
and Child with Saints Helen and Francis bv Amico 
Aspertmi; from the collection of Sir Francis Dashwood 
comes The Sacrifice of Noah after the Flood hy Giovanni 
Martin elli and from a collector on the Continent an oil of 
Bacchus and Ceres by Hans von Aachen. 


Viewing: King Street: Weekdays 9 ajn.-4.45 p.m. 
Enquiries: (01) 839 9060 . 0E[7?v. 

4 

South Kensington: Mondays 9 aaxW pan. 

Hies day to Friday 9 ajn.-4.45 p.m. 

Enquiries: (01] 581 761 1 



Christie's have 25 offices throughout the UK. If you would like ro know the name of your nearest representative please 
telephone Caroline TYeffgame on (01] 588 4424. 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1 986 


Teacher unions! Oriental smiles in a downpour 


merger 
move spurned 

By Lucy Hodges, Education Correspondent 


*«*» **#■**■•* * _ 

-V^ I-V* A • .53PW' v 

w ^ *.*« •**- - 
* <* . .. "»K>^ 


A formal approach for the 
two biggest teaching unions to 
unite was made yesterday by 
Mr Fred Jams, general secre- 
tary of the National Union of 
Teachers, which has ’16.000 
members. 

He wrote to his opposite 
number in the National Asso- 
ciation of 

Sehoolmasiers-Union of 
Women Teachers. Mr Fred 
Smithies, asking for a consid- 
ered response to the call for 
talks on a merger made by the 
NUT s annua! conference Iasi 
week. 

As expected, the move met 
with a rebuff. Mr Smithies 
said he had not received the 
letter but he believed it was a 
propaganda exercise. 

■'This is presented as a 
serious mailer,” he said. "If 
Mr Jarvis is serious, one 
would have thought he would 
have ensured i was privy to 
the contents of the letter 
before issuing it to ihe 
newspapers." 

Mr Smithies said he could 
not take the NUT seriously. 
"Everything they do these 
days is contrived to secure 
publicity and I can only 
conclude that they are feeling 
increasincK insecure." 


Mr Jarvis said the unions 
should unite to campaign for 
higher teachers' pay and im- 
proved state education. “We 
face the same anti-teacher, 
anti-public education Govern- 
ment. The policy of our 
combined strengths — to battle 
for the future of the service 
and teaching profession — 
ought to be a major object- 
i\e." 

The split between the two 
unions goes very' deep because 
they were divided O'er tactics 
in the vear-lone pay dispute. 
The NAS/UWT and four 
smaller unions settled the 
dispute against the wishes of 
the NUT which wanted to 
cairy on the strikes. 

The divisions are still fun- 
damental. The NAS/UWT is 
prepared to negotiate on a new 
teachers' contract to secure a 
big pay rise for the profession 
whereas the NUT is noL It 
wants the big pay rise without 
any change in working prac- 
tices. 

it is significant that the 
NUT executive opposed the 
conference resolution on a 
merger last week. Mr Smithies 
said the NAS/UWT had been 
besieged by a campaign of 
vilification from the NUT. 


MP’s rates paid after 
visit from bailiffs 


A rate demand for more 
than one thousand pounds has 
been paid after Crewe bailiffs 
threatened to seize furniture 
and other assets belonging to 
Mrs Gwyneth Dun woody. La- 
bour MP for Crewe and 
Nantwich. at her London flat, 
it was revealed yesterday. 

Mr Frank Wood, director of 
Crewe and Nantwich Central 
Services, said the bailiffs re- 
ceived a cheque for £1.11 7 last 
Thursday. 

They went to Mrs 
Dunwoody's Barbican flat two 
weeks ago after a distress 
warrant was issued for rate 
arrears on the MP's Crewe 
home. 

"It was a third-party cheque 


By a Staff Reporter 

or more which has been endorsed and 
tundshas payable to her." Mr W'ood 
e bailiffs said. 

furniture Mrs Dunwoody. who was 
>neinc to overdue in paying her 1985-86 
jody. La- rates, had been treated in the 
-we* and same manner as any other 
idon Hat. ratepayer, 
day. The MP, who is 55 and a 

i rector of member of Labour's national 
i Central executive, has been threatened 
lililTs re- with legal action by the ail- 
1.1 17 last party House of Commons 
catering committee over near- 
o Mrs ly £2.000 she owes in oul- 
n flat two standing restaurant bills, 
distress She refused to comment 
for rate yesterday about her financial 
s Crewe affairs at the redbrick house in 
Manor Avenue. Crewe, where 
y cheque she lives. 



mi tl 

od o 


Today's events 


Royal engagements 

Queen Elizabeth The Queen 
Mother visits the HMS Ark 
Royal at sea. II. 40. 

The Princess of Wales visits 
the Spinal Injuries llnit at 
Lodge Moor Hospital. 
Redmires RdL Sheffield. 11.25: 
later, as Patron of Birthright, she 
opens the Centre for Reproduc- 
tive Medicine at the Jcssop 
Hospital for Women. 
Lea vy grave Rd. Sheffield. 
1 2.55: and attends a luncheon in 
aid of -he Sheffield Branch of 
Birthright at Cullers Hall. 
Church St. Sheffield. 1.50. 

Princess Anne visits HMS 
Amazon at sea. 10.50; and later 
aitends a performance of My 
Fair Lady to celebrate the 
reopening of the Everyman 
Theatre. Cheltenham. 7.20. 


Prince Michael of Kent. Presi- 
dent of the Institute of the 
Motor Industry, presents the 
Casirol Gold Medal of the 
Institute of the Motor Industry 
for 1985 at The Connaught 
Rooms. WC2. 1 1.30. 

New exhibitions 

Watercolours of the Carib- 
bean by Poul Webb; Francis 
Kyle Gallery. 9 Maddox St Wl: 
Mon to Fri 10 to 6. Sat 1 1 to 5 
(ends May 8). 

Painting and Sculpture by 
Nick Collins and Tim 
Hamsson: Showroom Gallery. 
44 Bonner Rd, E2: Mon to Sun 
10 to 6 tends April 17). 

The View From Above; 125 
Years of aerial photography; 
Collins Gallery. Strathclyde 
University. 22 Richmond 
Street. Glasgow; Mon to Fri 10 
to 5. Sat 1 2 to 4 (ends 29 April). 

Pen and Ink Drawings by Bob 
Ross: Clotwonhy House Arts 



The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,014 



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ACROSS 

1 Tattered rags, some flimsy 
material (8). 

9 Like a friend entering car- 
riage in a race (8). 

10 Some memorable picture 
(4). 

11 Ditched airman could be 
rescued thus unexpectedly 
15.2.3.4). 

13 New models rarely appear- 
ing (6). 

14 Retreating soldiers manoeu- 
vre under cover — he gives 
the orders f8). 

15 Speculator accepts money 
for making a declaration (7). 

16 Arrangement to admit us 
into the sportsrground (7). 

20 Not entirely enthusiastic 
about crack horse-drawn 
carriage 1 8). 

22 Shocked expressions of sur- 
prise in a touring car (6). 

23 Stay untied, though the 
other gang breaks up (4.8). 

25 Husband of Miss St. Clare 
in I 1 * (4j. 

26 Fruit with coverings might 
be called bananas (3-5). 

27 Trying to give directions to 
a gnome (8). 

DOWN 

2 Not worried about pages I 
put on the other side (8). 

3 Alternative course of action 
Herts, town follows after 
some time (6.6). 


4 Frank's mother taking scrip- 
tures to Sultanate (3-2-3). 

5 Draws a thief (7). 

6 Piece — of the cloth (6). 

7 The man Seth replaced — a 
girl married him (4). 

8 Wire lifting border obstruc- 
tion (8). 

12 Dashing young man. second 
among a number wanting to 
fight (12). 

15 Furious, refer to article (8). 

17 Masters the conversion of 
hectares (8). 

18 Hairy refuge belonging to 
international organization 

(5) . 

19 Turn longue back (7). 

21 Nothing in a trick to excite 

( 6 ) . 

24 Money the school raised (4). 
Solution to Puzzle No 17.013 


|Z3- O-'ffl - B m -B- . a -M 

S3 S3 H E . m ra K -JB 
MHffllEil g ■ i- ffl&a wagg 
a . m ; • m 

££££=331131 


Chun flies 


a- 

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HT . 0 153 S E I3rBl 
13 S- G W -;IH- H 




CONCISE CROSSWORD PAGE 14 




Third bid 
expected 
for Land 
Rover 

By Clifford Webb 
Motoring Correspondent ^ 

A last-minute bod for BL's 
Land Rover company was Iasi 
night being considered by 1 C 
Bamford, the Staffordshire- 
based manufacturer of con- 
struction and earth-moving 
machinery. 

BL said that it had received 
an approach ' from Baznford 
but emphasized that it was 
“only at a preliminary stage". 
The existing contenders for 
ownership are a Land Rover 
management buy-out team 
and Mr Tony Rowlands' 
Lonrbo Group. 

BL has set a deadline of 
April IS for proposals to be 
submitted. Last night a BL i 
spokesman said that after the j 
‘deadline it might decide to | 
hold further talks with pro- 
spective purchasers before rec- 
ommending either a sale or 
the retention ofLand Rover in 
BL ownership. 

If the latter course is adopt- 
ed the intention will almost 
certainly be to secure a public 
flotation on the Stock Ex- 
change in about IS months. 

J C Bamford. with a turn- 
over of £200 xnillkm last year 
and a workforce of only 1,500, 
exports 70 per cent of its pro- 
duction. Its famous Back Hoe 
loader is virtually unrivalled. 

Mr Anthony Bamford, the 
chflhrn pn and son of the 
company founder Mr Joe 
Bamford. is a prominent 
sponsor of motor racing. He 
will hold a press conference in 
London today. 


Matadors, 
threaten 
to down 
capes 


fm 

■ i .si-: 


Frost Richard Wub 
! Madrid 77; 

| Spain's baDfighters VKfesgt 
1 to stage a rational Strike foa 
mKhright yesterday over 
penstoa right s after a fifetine 
fathering. 

EErreath-hoar talks were 
being held between the Na- 
tional Federation of Bsffigfa. 
ers and Ministry of Labour 
and Seda] Security officials to 
get round the basic problem 

that the Government no longer 

intends to giro 

special terms for their aki age. 

Stumbling Weeks were a 
new 35-year minimum require- 
ment of paying soda! security 
contributions, instead of the 30 
years accepted by tbe.baB- 
Bgbters, and the new fonanfa 
to calculate the pension w 
earnings daring the brirefefat 
years of a bu llfighter 's career. 

This has beat indignantly^ 
rejected bj? the. baUfigliters 7 
because earnings drag, fee 
fast years are usually down, 
corresponding to a physical 
decline reflected fa fewer 
contracts. 

Just like the demands for 
better medical facilities after 
the dramatic death of 
“Ps^mni", gored fa the ring 
in September 1984, the pen- 
aons dispute represeats a 
subtle change of attitude in a 
dangerous profession. /•• 

The strike would come just, 
before a major bnllfightiig 
event at the begmnfagof the 
season, next Friday's famous 
Seville fair. Tickets were soM 
oat a month age. 


Israeli Cabinet crisis 


Continued from pagel 
when Mr Peres tried to dis- 
miss the Likud's fiery Trade 
Minister, Mr Ariel Sharon, 
also for critizing him in public. 

On that occasion, Mr Peres 
was persuaded to climb down, 
settling for a public apology 
from Mr Shawn. He made it 
dear then, however, that a 
repeat of such attacks by any 
minister would result fa insne- 
dinie dismissal. 

\ The Cabinet crisis fa certain 
•to dominate the proceedings at 
the Labour Party convention, 
which opens today. The future 
of the rotation agreemeitt with 
Xiknd, under which Mr 


Shamir Is due to take over is 
Prime Minister from : Mr 
Foes' this autumn, was/ even 
before the present crisis, ex- 
pected to be an important issue 
of the conference. 

Mr Peres had dismissed any 
suggestion that be might re- 
nege on the agreement, which 
had made his present uncom- 
promising stand on Mr Modai 
puzzling to many observers 
who fed he might have sought 
a more cempdfiBg and 
dectoraBy constrnctiro .— rea- 
son to bringdown the Govern- 
ment before be is doe to hand 
over to Mr Shamir. 

Israeli raids, page 6 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Centre. Randal stown Rd. An- 
trim: Mon to Fri 9.30 to 5, Sat 10 
to I (ends April 26). 

Watercolours by Denis 
Booth: The Stonegate Gallery. 
52a Stonegate. York; Tues to Sat 
10.30 to 5 (ends April 26). 

Light Fantastic, works by 
Derek Clarkson. David Morris. 
Barry Guppy. Barry Cullen. 
Peter Collingwood and Frances 
Alcock: Yew Tree Gallety. The 
Square. EHastone. Ashbourne; 
Tues to Sun il to 5.30 (ends 
May 18). 

Last chance to see 
When Gentlemen Vied with 
Peacocks. ‘The Cult of the 
Ornamental Waistcoat’: Gallery 
of Antique Costume and Tex- 
tiles. 2 Church Su NWS; 10 to 

5.30. dosed good friday and 
easier monday 

Music 

Concert by the City of Lon- 
don Sinfoma; Barbican Hall. 
EC2. 7.45. 

Lawyers* Music Concert; St 
Mary's Church. Bryans ton Sq. 
WI. 7 JO. 

Concert by the Chilingirian 
Siring Quartet; Bishopsgate 
Hall. EC2. 1.05. 

Organ recital by Catherine 
Ennis: St Lawrence Jewry, 
Guildhall Yard. EC2. 1. 

Recital of recorder music by 
Helen Rees: St Vedast. Foster 
Lane, EC2. 1. 10. 

Concert of Baroque music by 
Aldeburgh Music Club: 
Aldebnrgh Cinema, Suffolk. 

7.30. 

Concert by the New Chamber 
Ensemble of Wales; St David's 
Hall, Cardiff. I. 

Concert by the 1APS Band: 
The Assembly Rooms. Derby. 3. 

Jazz by the Lennie Best 
Quartet; South Hill Park, 
BraclcnelL Berkshire. 8. 

Concert by the Guameri Trio; 
Newcastle City Hall, I. 

Piano concert by Thomas 
McIntosh: De La Wqtt Pavilion. 
Bex hi 1 1-un-Sea. 3. 

Organ recital by Dr Gillian 
Weir: Leeds Town Hall. 1.05. 

Talks, lectures and films 
Furniture for Exhibitions in 
the 19th Century by Geoffrey 
Opie: Victoria & Albert Mu- 
seum. SW7. 11.30. 

Graham Sutherland: The Mir- 
ror and the Mirage, video: 
10.30: The Independent Group 
and Early British Pop by Gra- 
ham Whiiham; l: Christo - 
Running Fence, film; The Tate 
Gallery. Millbank. SWl. 2.30. 

The Birds of Shetland by 
Dave Hassell: Oak Farm Li- 
brary. Long Lane. Hillingdon. 

8.30. 

Flood. Fire and Death - 
Montague Close in the Middle 
Ages by Graham Dawson: John 
Harvard Library Hall. Borough 
High Sl SEI. 7. 

Myths and Traps for Parents 
by Dr Herbert Barrie: Si 
Teresa's Hospital. 12 The 
Downs. Wimbledon. SW20. 8. 

Science and the Police by 
Chief Superintendent John 
Hulben: Highgate Literary & 
Scientific Institution. II South 
Grove. N6. 8.15. 

Somerset Maugham: The 
British Library. Great Russell 
St. WCl. II. 

Henry Moore: The Sculptor; 

1.30. 3. The Makiritare. growing 
crops and making bread among 
Amazonian Indians or Ven- 
ezuela: Museum of Mankind. 6 
Burlington Gardens. Wl. 2 and 

3.30. 

Swallows and Swifts b> Joyce 
Pope: Natural History Museum. 
Cromwell Rd. SW7. 3. 

The Story of Aeneas by Colin 
Wiggins: The National GaJlerv. 
Trafalgar Sq. WC2. I. 


Hard of hearing 



Anniversaries 


Births: Jobs Loudon, 
horticuIturalisL Cambuslang, 
Lanarkshire. 1783; Harvey 
Cashing, surgeon, Cleveland, 
Ohio. 1869. 

Deaths: £1 Greco, Toledo, 
Spain, 1614; Eric Axel Karl- 
feldL poet. Nobel laureate. 1931 
'(posthumous), Stockholm, 
1931; Vaslav Nijinsky, ballet 
dancer and choreographer. Lon- 
don. 1950: Pablo Picasso, 
Mougins. France, 1973. 


Which benefit 


There are many people who 
lose benefit because they do not 
know they are entitled to it. The 
Department of Health and So- 
cial Security has a booklet 
Which Benefit with information 
about 60 cash benefits and on 

how and when to claim. . 

To obtain a copy of H *irt Bmrlit 
can In al your local Social Security 
pffcf or wrllplo the DHSS Lea nets 
Unit. PO Bax 2i. Stan more. Middle- 
sex. 


Roads 


London and the South East: 
A 13: Flyover closed and di- 
versions at Movers Lane. Bark- 
ing. M3: S bound carriageway 
dosed between junctions 8 and 
9 (Popham and Winchester). 

The Midlands: M6: 
Contraflow between junctions 
16 and 15, nr Stoke on Trent 
Ml: Contraflow between junc- 
tions 15 and 16 nr 
Roth ers thorpe service area. 
M5(k Lane closures in both 
directions between junctions 2 
and 3. Bury Court and Jays 
Green in Worcestershire and 
Gloucestershire. 

Wales and the West: MS: 
Gloucestershire, lane closures in 
both directions between junc- 
tion 8 (M50) and junction 9 
(Tewkesbury) and contraflow 
on S bound carriageway. A470: 
South Glamorgan, outside lane 
closed in both carriageways for 
several weeks between M4 
(junction 32) and Cardiff. A38: 
One lane dosed N bound on 
Ashburton to Plymouth Rd, 
Devon. 

The North: Al: Diversion at 
Catterick because of bridge re- 
pairs. M63: Widening work at 
Barton Bridge, Cheshire, SW of 
Manchester, avoid area. M6: 
Lancashire, various restrictions 
between junctions 31 and 32. 
contraflow and S bound traffic 
joining the M6 from the M55 
and the A6. 

Scotland: M9: Both carriage- 
ways closed on the Craigpath to 
Keir interchange, Stirling. A77: 
Various lane closures nr 
Eastwood Toll on the Glasgow 
to Ayr rd. Strathclyde, delays 
possible. Perth: High St closed 
between S Methven St and Mill 
Wynd. 

Information supplied by the AA 


The pound 




Yugoslavia Dnr 550-00 51000 

Rams lor SrcaK denomination bank notes 
onty as supphed by Barclays Bar* PLC. 
Ditierent rales apply to travellers' 
Cheques and other torsion currency 
busmess. 

Retail Price Index: 381.1 

London: The FT Index dosed dorm 20 SS 

MOM 


P anr aH o - bow to ptay 
Monday-Saturday record your dally 
Portfolio total. 

Add thee together to determine 
your weekly Portfolio total. 

If your total matches the putdislted 
weekly dividend figure you have won 
outright or a share of the prize money 
staled for that week, and must claim 
your prize as instructed below. 

How to stake _ 

TeWgfNMM TIM That* Portfolio «Mm 
lino 0254-53272 betwoon two am and 

No ctabns can be aoooptad outride these 

You must have your card with you 
when you tetephone. 

If you are unable to telephone 
someone rtse run claim on yonr Behalf 
but they must have your card and can 
The Times Portfolio claims line 
between the stipulated times. 

No responsibility can be accepted 
for failure k> contact the claims office 
for any reason within the slated 
hours. 

The above Instructions are ap- 
plicable to both dally and weekly 
dividend claims. 

•Some time* Portfolio cards include 
minor mlsprinw In the instructions on 
the reverse side. These cards are not 
Ln vaBdal ed. 

•The wording of Rules 2 and 3 has 


Itself Is not affected and win continue 
to be played In exact ly the same way 
as before. 


Weather I NOON 

forecast 

An anticyclone will per- 
sist to the N of the British 
Isles. A depression ova* 
northern France with its 
associated frontal trough 
over southern England 
will be slow moving. 


6 am to midnight 

London, Centra) S, SW England, 

Midlands, S Wales: Mainly cloudy, 
occasional rain or drizzle, hill fog 
patche s ; wind NE moderate or 
fresh; max temp 0C (46F). 

SE England, East Anglia: Mainly noon i 

cloudy, occasional rain or drizzle, 

patchy hill and coastal fog; wind NE 
moderate or fresh; max temp 7C 
(45 F). „ £ 

E, NW, Centra) N England, N Jg6 — 

Wales: Mainly cloudy, occasional . 

rain with sleet or snow over hIBs 
slowly dying out hfll fog patches; 
wind NE fresh or strong; max temp 
5CJ41F). 

Channel Islands: Mainly doudy, c 

occasional rain; wind NE moderate § 

or fresh: max temp 10C (50FL 

Lake District Me of Man, NE •/ 

England, Borden, SW Scotland, N <gQs4e 

Ireland: Occasional rain with sleet 
or snow over hiUs at first becoming ^ 
mainly dry with bright or dear a 

intervals later; wind NE fresh or / 5) 

strong: max temp 6F (43 F). 

Edinburgh, Dundee, Aberdeen, 

Glasgow, Central Highlands, Mo- 

ray Rrttu Sunny intervals, scattered 
showers some with hafl or snow; b-Mue ate 
wmd NE fresh or strong; max temp 

7C (45 F). Unindem 

NE Scotland, Orkney, Shetland: ajxows a 
Mainly dry with sunny intervals; 

wind NE l igh t or moderate: max 

temp 8C (46FL 

Argyll, NW Scotland: Sunny inter- 
vals. isolated showers of snow or 

hail; wind NE fresh; max temp 8C 
(46F). 

Outlook for tomorrow and Thurs- EAST CO * 
day: Bright weather with sunny sewbow 
intervals and showers over -Scot- 
land, N Ireland and parts of N 
England wifi spread slowly S during etaexon 
Wednesday, replacing tne mainly Mangta 
doudy weather with occasional rain SOUTHCO 
or drizzle. On Thursday aU districts 
will have sunny intervals and show- 
ers. 


HOMY Nnm b abown fn. maftouHOKBWwM 


^ w * v * w-v v-v m 

l.U’ivl?; m wm~T\ 

SI 




High Tides 


fe5 ) ISL Bky: sky and cloud; c- 

djatn o-oyercatt Mbg: d-drizde: h- 
ha fl: , nH nMc rridn: mwm; m 
(bundcrsMcni: patKwcn. 

Arrows Show wind direction, wind 
speed (mull) dueled- Temperature 


TODAY AM 

London Bridge 2.16 
Mwfdoan- 152 

Avoomouth 7.48 

BattMt 1133 

Oman 732 

DowMpan 6-29 

Dover 11.47 

Fotandti SJ5S 

Gtnoow 120 

Karwicb . 12.9 

HoMmod 10.49 

H otf 7.00 

Hrecamtw 633 

LflOl 309 

Uwpoal 11.49 

Lowrctott 10.19 

Msrgote 1223 

HtfoRMtavor 6.47 

He w^noy S39. 

Oban 634 

Ponzoncn E26 

Purttand 732 

Portsmouth 1157 

Shorot uM H 11.49 

So uBumip ion 1131 
Smmaaa 638 

Tmo . 4.19 

Wman-on-Nw 
Tide nwasnrad ki.met 


KT FM NT 
69 244 73 
4j0. L52 46 
123 607 123 
33 11.64 3.1 
113 732 113 

5.4 630 53 
63 1134 6.4 

52 020 -6J 

43 132 4,7 

68 1242 .40 

5.5 11.14 53 

69 636 .73 

83 - 631 67 

53 3.19 54 

aa 

231035 24 
49 MB M 
63 7.05 68 

69 5.66 66 

3 .9 M2 37 
53 546 54 
21 606 29 

44 ’ -. 

69 - - 

43 11.54 46 
93 7.17 93 
5.1 432 53 

-1236 41 


Around Britain 


SunmsM: Sw Sots: 
621 dm 7.45 pm 


630 am 7.02 pm 
New moon tomorrow 

Ughting-np time 

London 615 pm to 549 am 
Bristol 835 pm to 539 am 
Edbibnrgh 835pm to 534 am 
Manchsatar 836 pm to 534 am 
Penzance 635 pm to 6.12 am 


Yesterday 


Sun Ren 
hrs in 

EAST COAST 
SeartWRi 53 92 

93 91 

33 - 

Low rt p f l 

Clacton 33 - 

Mangle - 94 

soirm COAST 

19 .14 
ao .07 
47 94 
66 .11 
73 - 

67 - 

64 92 
63 - 

73 - 

„ ^ 8.1 91 

Boumendh 43 - 

23 - 

63 91 
Woywmg h 63 - 

T al ip iw uuib 63 - 

ssa, “ - 

Rwwi 103 .01 
J«ey 7.0 97 

13 

S caybde o 9.1 - 

Nw w r 94 - 


SimRam Max 
hre Jn C " F, ■ . . ■ , 
a triB M M b e 94 95 6 43 Btiwy ■ 

Tenby 61 97 7 45 jtnnri 

Cdwyn Bay 53-96 ' 6 43 sunny L 
Momcambe 83 - 7 45 hri .... 

Dongtao 61 - 7 45 Sumy 


had 

showem 

showers 

bright 

showers 

sunny ' 

sunny 

showers 


ENGLAND AND WALES - 
London 0.7 .03 6 

(Theoi AJrpf 2.7 92 7 
Bristol (OM) 43 91 7 
Gnnfltf (CH9. 73 98 7 
A ntfea o y - 93. - 7 

B'poot Airpt 6.8 - 8 

Mancfaestor 5.1 ■ - 7 

Noutatfian 45 - 6 

rrcfl-u-Tyne 109 .11 - e 
CariWe 10.6 91 7 

SCOTLAND 

Brirrtmwnatr S3 93 6 

PiMMcfc 103-8 
-Gtaogaw 94-8 
Time .63-9 
Stom owa y. 99 7 

Lerwick 49 92 7 
Wck 27 96 6 

KMass 53 95 8 
Ahenioen 53 - 8 

St Andrews 93 92 6 

EdMb ur gh 63 95 6 

NORTNBIN RELAND 
Ballast 83 91 9 


6 43. showers 

7 45 snow 
7 45 snow 
7 46.SWW 

7 45 suny ^ 

8 46 hMT 

7 45 showers 
6 43 Bhowars 

6 43 lak 

7 45 sh ow o re 

6 43 snow- J 

8 46. showers • 
8 46 sunny 

9 .48 simry * 

7 45 sunny . 

7 . 45 tngw 
6 43 hm . . 

8 46 sunny .- 

8 48 bright 

6 43 sunny ; - 
6 43 hai 

9 48 eumy 


| g « ero1aj*x U • 

ounenpy s uyuira 


Snow reports 


Depth 

(cm) 

L U Piste 

AUSTRIA 

St Anton 50 380 Mr 

Good skiing above 2000 metres 
FRANCE 

Flaine 95 200 good 

Slush on lower slopes • 

Tignes 176 290 good 

Good cover on all slopes 
ValThorens 110 200 good 

Lifts closed by high winds 
SWITZERLAND 

Vertwr 30 230 oood 


Conditions 

Off 

Piste 


Runs to 
resort 


Weather 
(5pm) _ 


heavy poor 

heavy fair 
heavy good 
varied good 

varied fair 


«aiiw lair nrie ; 

worn patches on tower slopes 


hES^SZ?? jestemay: c. 

1, fair r. rain; s, sun. 

C F c F 

5*“ J S41 Guernsey sl 236 

gnnplmu sl 238 hw mw c 541 

n£S KM ‘ i 151 « 337 

***** a 337 Uwdnti r 337 

gyW* . r 439 Mtochster r 439 

SftobMg h f 6«3 M a t sat is r 439 

Slasoow c 541 Rtoklaway I 643 

Parliament today 

Commons (2.30): Dockyard 
Services Bill, re mainin g stages. 

Lords (2.30k Latent Damage 
Bill, committee. Lothian Region 
(Edinburgh Western Relief 
Road) Order Confirmation Bifl, 
second reading. 

4£S NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 
Prtnien by London Post (Prini- 
CIS! Limited of 1 Virginia Street. 
London El 9XN TueMay. April 8. 

i^ 6 Po5 e ® ed 38 a npwsaM * r 31 


Abroad 


^V: c, cioul: d. drizzle; t Mr % «)(F r. radm s. sun; m. mow. t thundK 


C F 

f 17 63 Cologne 
I 26 77 epfaagn 
c 21 70 Gorki 
f 21 70 Dublin 
o 6 43 OubniBk 
a 25. 77 Fm 


C F r. 

8 13 55 
f 5 41 

S 28 77 MeHs. 

C 5 41 Mefe'ae C 17 
b 23 73 Mexico C 
» MS? Mend* c 28 


t 25 77 Florence C 22 72 Wen 
1 2? 84 Ftamktat s 14 57 MontreaT 




B Aires* 

Cato 

Cape To 

Cbienca 

Chicago' 

Ch’chrch* 


* 12 54 Fdnctwl 
Geneve 

s 28 79 GtoraRar 
d 6 43 HetolnM 
f 21 70 HongK 
r 7 45 kna ib ek 
r 4 39 Istanbul 
f 6-46 Jeddah 
c 7 45 
1 24 75 


t 17 S3 Moscow 
C 7 45 Munich 
f 15 59 Natobi 

C 21 70 NDaU 
s 20 68 N Yoric* 
8 14 57 Wee 
S SI 88 Oslo 
I 25 77 Paris 
S 38100 Psktag 


6 2S 77 L Potass S 19 66 Perth 


th 24 75 Lisbon 
C 21 70 Locarno 


s 10 50 
r 7 45 


c 15 59 UflMObg I 10 50 
c 12 54 L Angels* c 16 61 Wyatt 
s 16 81 Madrid c 7 45 RtodaJ 


c 25 77 
r 12 54 
r 2 36 
c 4 39 

S 21 70 

r 19 66 Tbngfer 

tans Tei aS# 

s 32 90 
r 5 41 Ti — 
c 15 59 Toronto- 
a 5 41 Twbb 
x 8 46 Valencia 
S 20 86 Vie w 
s 29 84 VtaifiS 
a IB 81 Vienna 
f 5 4t Warsaw 
S 24 75 Wnstfton* 
f 24 75 Wetogtn* 
C 28 82 Zurich 


’denotes Sunday's Agues ere latest avaftabla 


C f 

* s-a 

f 21 70 
dr 23 73 
c 14 57 

8 25 77 
S 12 54 . 
t 3i re 
S 2 36 
I 12 84 
CIS 64 
» 14 57 

S 23 73 
c'19 66 
s II 52 
MS S8 
9 Zi 72 
l 12 54 ; 

9 IS 12 

S 16 64 
C21 70 
c 8 46 
c tt g 
b « M 
f 14 57 













FT 30 Share 
1400.9 (-20U)) 

FT-SE100 
1888.5 (~21 .2) 

USM (Oatastream) 
119.35 (+057) 


US Dollar . 

■ 1 :452s (+0.0035) 

. W German mark 

x 3.4802 (+0.0178) 


**£'?*!* -i 

'* -is ;j«fc : 

iU"*- 

. ' ' b v 


Hope of interest rate cuts Odd hostility from 

°Ppf interest rates rise yesterday by over half a against too much optimism most other currencies, some- | |1 P J J3 Tl| M Cl T* /g Cl TT1 

it be cat soon rose farther cent from SI. 4490 to SI -4355 lyqMise of doubt about how lhing which is beginning w ''■•-fV kJ L'C'V.i-2. WJ.C'V-i. vi- wCl'XXl. 

^raav as stemnz strenath- at »» «<u» *rv- M ; n .i — JL 


)inet criv 


trade-weighted 

^ r ;^; 76.7 (+0.3) 

Steel price 
warning - 

The. Present .wave of 
' -. / **■* &, potectionism wi thin the world 

• -v- ’ ? steel market was attacked last 

- . s r~ * /^Fright in New York by Mr Bob 
-“-.C . 1- ’ Scodey, the chairman of the 
'■■■ • \~*i u ^ British Steel Corporation. 

' •■"■••j,., ' ^'4 l Protectionism, he said, 

. : * would depress steel prices 
v :■;* below the level necessary for 
"■ -•sl the industry worldwide to be 
_ . - 7 financially viable in the long 

i^v ^ term. . - 

,, / The accelerated growth 'of: 

;; ‘ the Third World steel indus- 
often state-aided in both 
its capital development and in 
^ its export pricing ■- arrange- 

' ■ J ment s. bad led to an unwel- 

‘ c .• come growth in 

J protectionism, he told the 
“ r ,. -I'* 1 : Fifth In ifimati nnal Steel Con- 
- s - gress, 

— ’ ** “ He said: “Thus while world 

■ * steel demand and production 

f 1 H At a*!-! have retnained static over the 
*•‘*'1 tf| decade from 1974 the devel- 
oping countries' share of 
■ .’? world consumption has risen 
~"’ s ' from 4 per cent to 10 per 
cenL" 

■,^;=c Glynwed jump 

' • • Glynwed International has 

reported a 34 percent increase 
.• - ./~L: in pretax profit to £35.6 
raison for the year to Decem- 
r- v? ber. Turnover was reduced 
t.- from £514 million to £464 

. , , _™ i ' million. The dividend was 

increased from 925p to KUp. 

• i : -4^ Tempn*|mge23 

Rugby fall 

s; +- Rugby Portland' Cement’s 

*2 pretax profit for the year, to 
December 1985 fell by 22 per 
cent to £21.8 mil R on, from 
£27.8' million in 1984: Turn- 

— over was up by 26 per cent to 

f*!* £252 million. The final di\i> 

- -«» dend is 3-5 p, making^6.4p for 
the year. , '■ 

y - Tempus, pag^ 23 

7'""" Pentland joy 

• . Pentland Industries, which 

-rA owns 41 per cent of the 
Reebok sports shoe company, 
\ T saw pretax profits more than 
. triple from £129 million to 
* £40.2 million in 1985. Turi> 

H over increased from £115 

\ .million to £246. miHion aqd 
" ' i . ? the dividend payout was up 
» from 0.867p to l-5p. 

— - Tempos, page 23 

Deals halted 

Good Relations, the quoted 
public relations group, susp 
.. , ended dealing iu its shares 

.. 1 ' yesterday pending a merger 

• with Valin Pollen Tutemaxion- 
al. the larger financial commu- 

- . - nications group. 

'■r~ Woolles writ 

The Woolworth board has 
.1 issued a writ agsdnst Mr 

Stanley Kalms, chairman of 
■rr k claiming imurious 

T - ■*" • “ falsehood over Mr Kalms’s 

■ - • roprted statement that “there 

^ is not a retailerin the whole 

. outfit.” 

Zi Shops park 

“ - Mountleigh Group pro- 

. poses to develop Yorkshire’s 
first retail and leisure park on 
a new public transport mler- 
. change at Pudsey, near Leeds. 

It wiu include up to 500,000 sq 
• ! ft of shopping, a railway 
•- v "* station, multi-screen cinema, 

^ hotel and sports fecilities. 


Hopes that interest rates 
might be cut soon rose further 
yesterday as sterling strength- 
ened against all,, leading cur- 
rencies and domestic interest 
rates weakened --following the 
realignment of the European 
Monetary. System ax the 
weekend. - 

' Bui the risipg pound did not 
stop. a sharp slide in diare 
prices oh the Stock Exchange 

wde^pread^p^t^^^*^ 
htvestork After the re -nt 
sharp rise in the stock market 
the FT-30 share index yester- 
day closed '20 points down at 
1,400.9. _ ' 

The spike by Norwegian oil 
production workers in the 


rise yesterday by over half a 
cent from SI. 4490 to SI. 4555 
at one stage. The gain was 
.reduced by the dose when 
sterfing fell back to $1.4515. 
The pound’s trade-weighted 
index, measured against a 
basket of currencies, ended up 
0.4 points at 76.8. 

At the same time the money 
market began to signal its 
desire for tower bank base 
rales with awakening in most 
interest rates. The three- 
month interbank rate dropped 
furthest, falling ¥ie of a point 
(o around ll per.cenL 

City experts believe that a 
cut in bank base rates of 0.5 
per cent is increasingly likely 
in the the next few weeks. 


against too much optimism 
because of doubt about how 
the authorities view the 
present situation. 

Money supply and bank 
lending figures due out tomor- 
row could show a large rise in 
sterling Mi putting pressure 
on the Government to keep 
interest rates high. There is 
also uncertainty over the out- 
come of the meeting of the 
Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries on April 
16 which will try again to 
settle the problem of oil 
production quotas. 

The finance ministers of the 
Group of Five leading indus- 
trial countries meet today and 
are expected to discuss the 
.strength of the dollar against 


Oil rises $2 as Norwegian 
strike cuts out lm barrels 

By David Young, Energy Correspondent 

The fragility of the world oS to bow our action would affect is a sign that it is willing to 
arket was underlined yester- world oil prices.” help restore the present world 


market was underlined yester- 
day ’ when prices rose by 
almost $2 a barrel in response 
to a strike in the Norwegian 
sector of the North Sea, called 
by a pastry cook. • • 

The dispute immediately 
removed a miH ion barrels a 
day from the. world’s present 
output, almost enough to 
bring supply and demand 
bade into line. . . 

The spot market price for 
Britain’s North Sea Brent 
Blend rose from $1220 a 
barrel to -$14.10, less than a 
week after falling below, the 
$10 mark. .. 

The pastry cook who is 
leading the strike, Mr Oddleiv 
Toennsen, said yesterday: “I 
bad not given modi thought 


The Norwegian government 
fears that the dispute could 
last for several .weeks, while in 
the Arab Gulf states the oil 
ministers hope that it wilL 

A long hah to Norwegian 
production would immediate- 
ly. ease the pressure on the 
Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries to agree 
to drastic cuts in itscurrent 
output quotas, allowing its 
scheduled meeting in Geneva 
next Tuesday to agree to a 
limited trimming of output, 
without having a serious effect 
on the carters foreign earnings 
as prices move back upwards. 

It is now felt wi thin Opec 
that the refusal of tire Norwe- 
gian government to intervene 


help restore the present world 
supply-demand imbalance by 
accepting an interuption to 
supplies. 

Norwegian labour laws 
mean that in a dispute — the 
caterers are demanding a 28 
per cent wage rise to bring 
them in line with other oil 
production workers — an arbi- 
trator is appointed when strike 
is threatened. 

Although Norway produces 
900,000 barrels a day com- 
pared with Britain's 27 mil- 
lion most of it is exported and 
Norway now accounts for 
more than 5 per cent of world 
oil export trade while produc- 
ing less than 1 per cent of total 
outpuL 


Imps challenges Hanson 
over value of loan stock 


on Hanson Trust's shares al 
1 83p and UB’s at 263p. 

Imps valued UB’s bid at 
365p and Hanson’s at 365.9p. 


■ Martin Taylor.a Hanson 


: By Alisou Eadk 
A row over the value of 
Hanson Trust’s convertible 
loan stock erupted last night 
jiist four days before the final 
dosing .dale of- .the body' 
contested bid for Impend 
Group. . . - . 

Imperial . Group look , its 
complaint^..: which /Hansom - 
Trust dismissed as - totally; 
without validity, to the Take--; 
over Band.' 

■' '-Meanwhile -Lord Hanson, 
the chairman of Hanson 
Trust, was buying Inms shares 

in thc market, takingbis stake T , -i-t,. “ a .° a«fP«u me oasis umu 

dSZJSSS^ th “ weeL 

has acceptances of about. 2D Imperial said that Hanson's ro Sparison ^f^nvmible 
per cent .... . existing 8 percent convertible ^ 

Imperial Group said that, loan stock and 5J5 per cent. SfeiSire sh™ 
according to its broker convertible preference shares . 

Cazenove and de Zbete & •: were trading at well below Impaia! claims that the 
Bevan, Hanson’s *T)est bid” their theraretic values. undei performance of Han- 

was overvalued because die .Taking Imperial's valuation son s ousting convertible ts- 
theoretic valuation of its 10 of Hanson’s 10 per cent sues is because of the market s 
per cent convertible stock was _ convertible, the difference be- rear of he ,n 8 flooded with a 
not supported by the market tween United Biscuits’ bid convertible issue potentially 
valuation of existing Hanson and Hanson’s bid had nar- 4te times as big as the largest 
convertible i ssues. rowed to 0-9p last night, based existing convertible issue- 

Bid support ebbs I Granada move 


most other currencies, some- 
thing which is beginning to 
cause concern. 

After the 6 percent devalua- 
tion of the franc against ihe 
mark on Sunday, trading in 
European currency markets 
was subdued. Despite active 
selling of francs by the Bank of 
France in support of the mark, 
the French currency traded at 
the lop of iis new range all day. 
at 318.75 francs per 100 
marks, while the West Ger- 
man currency fell to the flow 
of its EMS trading range. 

The pound showed its 
strength against European cur- 
rencies by rising about two 
pfennigs against the mark to 
finish the day at 3.4862 up 
from 3.4624. 

US may 
unveil 
new plan 

From Bailey Morris, 
Washington 

Mr James Baker, the US 
Treasury Secretary, has stated 
firmly, on the eve of a meeting 
of world finance ministers, 
that he remained committed 
to the current system of 
floating exchange rates but 
was seeking important 
changes. 

Mr Baker's comment, in 
televised and personal inter- 
views. foelled speculation that 
the United States will soon 
unveil a new proposal requir- 
ing the most powerful indus- 
trialized nations to coordinate 
interest rates, exchange rates, 
and perhaps trade policies in a 
more formal way. 

The final ITS proposal is not 
expected until the May 4 
economic summit of world 
leaders in Tokyo but the seeds 
will be sown at this week's 
Interim Committee of the 
International Monetary Fund 
meeting of finance ministers 
in Washington, officials 
indicated. 

At the same time, officials 


According to Hanson’s valua- said the United States and 
lion its best offer is worth European Nations would put 


pressure on Japan to add more 
stimulus to its economy to 


Trust director, said Imperial generate greater growth than 
was just trying to mislead and the current estimated rale of 3 
confuse die market at this late per cent. 


, . , ..... , T , He also objected to the 

Imperial said that Hanson s comparison of convertible 
isin^ 8 percent amveruWe /oan ^ convertible 

80 per cent . preference shares. 


existing 8 percent convertible 
Joan stock and 5J5 per cent 
convertible preference shares 
were trading at well below 
their theraretic values. 


Imperial claims that the 
underperformance of Han- 


Taking Imperial's valuation son’s existing convertible is- 
of Hanson’s 10 per cent sues is b«ause of the maricet’s 
convertible, the difference be- fear of being flooded with a 


By Jeremy Warner, Business Correspondent 


Support for' the Argyll 
Group’s £27 billion bid Tor 
Distillers, the Scotch whisky 
group* is showing further signs 
of weakening. 

Argyll admitted yesterday 
that more Distillers’ share- 
holders have withdrawn, earli- 
er acceptances of its bitterly- 
opposed takeover, attempt 
Acceptances amount to 281 
per cent of /Distillers’ shares 
against the 197 per cent 
announced on March 27, and 


shareholders after their 
board’s advice to baric a rival 
£2.7 billion bid from 
Guinness. 

Argyll believes that it still 
has considerable support 
among institutional- share- 
holders, and they are unlikely 
to make up their minds until 
much nearer the final dosing 
date for the takeover battle 

Guinness gloated over the 
declining acceptance level, 
saying it showed that “Argyll’s 


st ^- t , . The prospect of a formal- 

He said the method of jzed system has touched off a 
valuing Hansons convertible scramble among industrial- 
had been established for more j ze d nations over which will 
titan two months and Imperial be included in the exclusive 
had accepted the basis until c i u b which sets policy. 

***“ Week< Rumours circulated among 

also objected to the ministers attending the four- 
rison of convertible day meeting in Washington 
lock with convertible that Italy had threatened to 
nee shares. arrive uninvited at today’s 

meeting of the Group of Five 
cte TvUil Mte lo sots iispoini that 
vicVioo^mvra-ri iwVic. 11 should be a member. 

Saul .ftffS&S ■ 

heine flooded with a demanded entry to the group 

**»■“ 10 

es as big as the largest seven MUons ‘ 

>, convertible issue— Meanwhile, the group of ten 

* nations, which includes the 

seven plus Switzerland, Bel- 
marfa move Sweden ami the Nether- 

Uiaua , mU T ^ lands { for eleven in a:i » claims 
tada. the leisure g roup, dial it is the proper body to 
ire a 20 per cent interest coordinate the world's eco- 
[Y, which will supply nom j c policies. Mr Onno 
nines to mere than 700 Rudding. the Netherlands Fi- 
on stations in the Unit- nance Minister and H the G- 
ites by satellite. The io chairman, is expected to 
ny said it was expand- continue the campaign when 
oduction capacity for the group meets again today to 
satellite markets. discuss economic reforms. 


Granada, the leisure group, 
is to take a 20 per cent interest 
in USTV, which will supply 
programmes to more than 700 
television stations in the Unit- 
ed States by satellite. The 
company said it was expand- 
ing production capacity for 
world satellite markets. 


£35m Queens issue 


the3.19percenta weekbriore bid is going' backwards. 


that 

Argyll should have reported 
tbe lower acceptance level last 
week but bad to be told by tbe 
Takeover Panel to publish the 
figures.. ■ 

■ The withdrawals have come 
almost entirely from small 


MARKET SUMMARY 



FALLS: 

Amstred 

Vaux Op. — 

Batlnd 

Rsckttts — 


478p - 

— 4«p j-: 

.-376p - 
BBOp -1 


CURRENCIES 


London: 
£$1.4525 - 
£ DM3.4802 
£SwFr29311 
£ FBI t . 0753 
£ Yent® JO 
Etnfloc76.7 


New York: . 
£$14525 : 

£ DM2.3960 
$; Index: 121 J 

ECU Cl .6124 
SOR £0-779619 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


Hattersley 


132p(+8p) 


144p_t+8p 


INTEREST RATES 


own bid, on tbe other hand, 
had safar received an accep- 
tance level of 9 per cent. 

Argyll controls more than 
1725 per cent of Distillers 
shares, counting stock market 

g urchases. The .figure for 
luimtess is 19.5 percent 

Dividend 

passed 

By Our City Staff 

Blackwood Hodge has de- 
cided not to resume dividend 
payments yet, despite “serious 
consideration," although a 
dividend later this year is still 
possible: 

The company, which sells 
heavy equipmenUast paid a 
dividend in 1982 
.. Blackwood says the delay is 
the result of a redaction in 
shareholders funds, the unsat- 
isfactory debt-to-equity ratio 
and the need to conserve 
working capital. . 

Il was announcing turnover 
for last year of £198 million, 
down from £2 1 6.99 million. 
Operating profit was up from 
£10.82 million to £13.17 mil- 
lion and pretax profit from 
£204 miHion to £7.16 million. 

The company says the mar- 
kets it serves have shown little 
or no growth over the last few 
years and the present level of 
demand should be seen as 
normal rather than as the 
bottom of the trade cycle. > 

. Totel : borrowing during 
1985 fefl by £172 million 


Queens Moat Houses, the 
fast-growing hotel chain, is 
placing a £35 million deben- 
ture issue, secured on some of 
its properties, in order to 
reschedule its finance and 
leave the way dear for possi- 
ble further acquisitions, writes 
Judith Huntley. 

Charterhouse Japhet, the 
finance bouse, is to subscribe 
for tbe issue, which will have a 


redemption yield of 1026 per 
cent Gearing is now 45 per 
cent. 

Queens Moat Houses has 
increased its pretax profits for 
the year ended December 31 
by 65 percent to £10.5 million 
in line with some brokers’ 
forecasts. 

The final dividend of 
0.835p brings the year’s total 
to 1.6p compared with I.33p 


Bestwood joins 
Gentlemen battle 


Merger mania has penetrat- 
ed as far as the leafy lanes 
around Letcbwonh, Hertford- 
shire. where the Country 
Gentlemen's Association has 
its headquarters. The associa- 
tion — it has about 27,000 
members - is the subject of 
two bids. 

This sudden interest must 
come as a suprise to most 
CGA shareholders, whose pri- 
mary interest in the company 
probably has more to do with 
tbe wine dub and ladies' day 
than with the value of their 
shares on the market 
■ But, with one offer docu- 
ment already on their desks 
and another due put next 
Monday, they will shortly 
have to leave aside their copy 
of Ihe Country magazine in 
favour of more critical read- 
ing. This should not be too 
painful as their shares are now 
worth £925 each against £4.80 
last sear. 

If shareholders want to 
blame someone for disrupting 
their calm lives they need go 
no further than the Tanlaw 


senlemenL Lord Tanlaw was a 
director of the CGA until 
recently, and it was his trust 
which saved the company's 
independence two years ago. 
when it was last under siege. 

Atlanta Investment Trust, 
which was run by Mr Tony 
Cole, then made a tender offer 
for 29.9 per cent of CGA. The 
trust stepped in. snapping up 
27 per cent of the shares. 

Ironically, the trust is now 
supporting Mr Cole, who has 
come back with a full offer by 
Bestwood, his quoted vehicle. 
Bestwood is offering two 
shares, or one share plus 350p 
in cash, for each CGA share. 
The higher offer values the 
association at £6.7 million. 

The board of CGA. howev- 
er. is recommending a cash 
offer from Fredericks Place 
Group, formerly Hill 
Woolgar. and this values the 
company at £6.5 million. 

Fredericks Place is a small 
issuing house which recently 
acquired Spencer Thornton, a 
stockbroker. There is a paper 
offer as well. 


It is being suggested in banking 
circles that the annual results recently 
produced by Standard Chartered 
Bank v. ere at least partly intended as 
window-dressing, showing off the 
bank's wares to potential bidders. If 
so. Standard's hostile reaction to the 
Lloyds Bank approach seems odd. 
the more so since Standard has. if 
anything, more to gain from the deal. 
The Standard board has the opportu- 
nity to give its considered opinion on 
the offer after it meets today. 

Ever since the frustrated attempt 
by the chairman. Lord Barber, to 
grasp Royal Bank of Scotland with 
the blessing of the Bank of England in 
1981, Standard has yearned for a 
British retail base but’ has singularly 
failed to find one. It has held talks 
with building societies but these 
never looked like producing much . A 
full takeover of a society was impos- 
sible and looks like remaining so in 
practice when the new building 
societies legislation goes through. A 
link with Lloyds would bring a high 
quality retail base and a management 
which produces a high return on 
assets, one thing Standard is not 
renowned for doing. 

The market was less convinced last 
week of the benefits for Lloyds. But 
on reflection the attractions of going 
aggressively for more international 
business rather than getting heavily 
involved on the relatively risky 
securities side now seem more ob- 
vious. However, the deal will be 
worthwhile for Lloyds only if it can 
achieve rationalizations sufficient to 
improve Standard's return on assets, 
such as merging overlapping activ- 
ities of the two banks and cutting out 
less profitable operations. 

Standard’s objection so far is not to 
Lloyds itself as a partner but to the 
implication that Lloyds is mounti ng a 
takeover. Standard would like a 
merger — which leaves the way open 
for semantic fudging by both sides in 
any negotiations which follow. What 
Standard has in mind is something 
like Royal Bank of Scotland's 
arrangement with Williams & Glyn’s, 
where the two banks worked together 
for several years before the full 
“merger". In the meantime. 
Standard's leisurely pace in reacting 
publicly to the offer seems designed 
to force Lloyds to raise it offer from 
750p - Standard shares are now 
above 860p and Lloyds could prob- 
ably afford up 850p with little 
dilution. It also gives time for rival 
bidders to throw their hats into the 
ring. 

There is little doubt in the stock 
market that there will be a rival, 
although by now almost every lead- 
ing international bank has been 
mentioned as a possibility. This looks 
like an ideal opportunity for a foreign 
institution to get its hands on a 
British bank, albeit one with little 
retail involvement in the Britain. 

The Bank of England regards the 
situation as quite different from the 
debacle over Royal Bank of Scotland 
five years ago and would almost 
certainly countenance an auction for 


Standard. It is. indeed . an opportu- 
nity for the central bank to appear 
flexible and open-minded over for- 
eign ownership of a British bank 
without actually giving away an 
institution which is in any way 
central to the domestic British bank- 
ing sysiem. 

Rituals and realities 

The realignment of currencies within 
the European Monetary System 
should pave the way for general 
interest rate cuts. The actual process, 
however, could pose some problems 
for the Chancellor and the Bank of 
England because British monetary 
policy is now perceived in the 
markets to hang on the single thread 
of the relation between base rates and 
sterling. 

The London three-month inter- 
bank rate ?el! to 11 per cent middle 
yesterday, enough to set off a swift if 
modest cut in bank base raies.ihough 
the one-month rate most closely 
monitored by Barclays is still only on 
the margin. Nothing is likely to 
happen before tomorrow when wc 
have the riiua) monthly monetary 
figures. Under the latest twist of 
policy, these do not in themselves 
mean much to the markets. The main 
interest is whether bank lending and 
£M3 rise more or less than the most 
informed City estimates, roughly 
£1.8 billion and 1 percent. If there are 
no nasty surprises, only nervous 
authorities would be likely to delay a 
half point rate cut 

The authorities, however, may w'ell 
be nervous in advance of yet another 
meeting of Opec where the Saudis are 
as likely to let the rest of the world 
sweat over the oil price as bend to 
patch up an Opec-or.ly deal. The 
pound has held up remarkably well to 
the oil price cut with confident home 
propaganda emphasizing its positive 
aspects. Indeed, if yesterday's sterling 
strength were to continue/ the Trea- 
sury might feel an interest rate cut 
was desirable to stop the sterling 
index edging up from yesterday's 76.7 
to nearer 78 . which must be around 
the ceiling for the Treasury's present 
informal and undeclared target range. 

The trouble is that while sterling is 
at present healthy, it is also vulner- 
able. Yesterday's early boost came 
from 5 he unwinding of speculative 
mark positions in the wake of the 
realignment. The dealers will now be 
looking for the next currency play 
since stability is anathema to them. 

Oil prices are not the only shadow 
over the pound. The Government 
may be happy about our apparently 
modest inflation rate, but it is not 
good internationally. 

It is important, therefore, that the 
Bank of England should not 
encourage the markets to rate sterling 
as a safe sell against the dollar. Thai 
could gain momentum. Hence the 
Treasury may prefer to resist base 
rate cuts (certainly of more than half 
a point) until other countries with 
leading currencies pave the way. 


More than just a 
Stockbroker 


A PART OF 


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&Cmickshank Holdings Ltd 


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FINANCE AND TND1 JSTRY 


THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


■■*:*■*■* 


.WALL STREET'. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES. 


COMMODITIES 


New Vork (Reuter) — Wall 
Street stocks continued their 
slide yesterday which pro- 
pelled them to a record loss 
last »eek. 

Sell programmes, weaker 
bonds and oil prices again 
weakened the markets, traders 
said. 

A strike by the Norwegian 
North Sea oil workers farther 
boosted the price of crude. 


The Dow Jones industrial 
average was down five points 
to 1.735 at one stage, extend- 
ing the record 82-50 decline of 
last week's five sessions. 

Declining shares led ad- 
vancing issues by two-to-one 
on volume of 13.7 million. 

Beatrice Co. led the actives, 
unchanged al 49 to. Trading 
was heavy at 1.9 million 
shares. Ford was down one to 
I48to. 


Apr 


53*; 

36 


AMR 
ASA 
Allied &qnal Si 
AlbecStH 36 
Allis Cbfflrs 
Alcoa 
Amai Inc 
Am rda Hs 
Am Brands 
Am Broca st n/a 
Am Can 7t V. 
Am Cinm d 
Am El Pwr 
Am Express 64 
Am Home 74 
Am Hospiai n/a 
Am Motors 
AmSt'nrd 
Am Teiepn 
Amoco 


S'. 
41 '4 
14 
20 
■3- 


64'..- 
26. - 


42*4 
21 'a 
59- + 


Arm co Sled 1Q'» 


20-! 

46 

S3' 


Asa tco 
Asniand OH 
At Richl«« ^ 

Aucra Proos 33'. 

BVrs T-St NY 
Banka mer 
Sk oi Bston 
Bank oi NY 
Beatrce Fds 49^ 
Betti Steel 18 
Boeing 


15 3 « 

74 

62 


54 


Bse Cased? 5J'.- 


57-. 

7 O’- 
33'- 


Brden 
Eg Warner 
Ernst Myers 
BP 

Ekjn Km Ind 37* 
Bon ion Ntn 69'* 
Burrouons 
Cmpoeti So 
Can Pacific 
Carerpiller 
Ceianese 
Central SW 

Champion 

Chase Man 44": 
ChmBkNr SQi 
Chevron 
Chrysler 
Citicorp 
Dark Eqmp 
Coca Cola 
Colgate 
CBS 
C'lmOia Gas 38 
CmD it Eng 35'. 
CorriwIthE'd 33- 
Cons Edrs 42 
Cn Nal Gas 48'.- 
Cons Power 13 » 
Our) Daia 23 N 

Coming Gl 
CPC Inn 
Crane 
Cm Zeller 


63' 
52 i 
13** 
4&N 
192': 
30". 
25'. 


37'.; 
40 
58'; 
2 Vi 
100 
38'. 
136 


7J J * 

61’. 

44 

44 


Pan A Kraft 48 


32'* 

43'. 

18 

154» 

36'. 

47', 

ia j 


Deere 
Delia Air 
Oecoit Ed 
Di^'Eal Eq 
Disney 

DowChem 
Dresser Ind 
Duke Power 40 -' j 

Du Pont 71 ’. 

Eastern Adt 8-'. 

Estm Kodak 
Eaton Com 72 

Emerson B 88’. 

Evans Prod n/a 


r 


Apr 

4 

r 

54’. 

Exxon Coro 

55 ,B 

55'* 

37 '» 

Fed Dpt sis 

72- e 

75-> 

50’. 

Fires' one 

24 '5 

24'a 

38V 

FstChicaqo 

30'i 

31 

5 

Fst IniBncp 

61 '*7 


42 

Fsi Perm C 

8'„ 

■rfifl 

14’- 

Ford 

80 'A 

91 

19 M 

FT Wachva 

44 

44=y 

76’- 

GAFCorp 

64 '.i 

67*a 

n/a 

GTE Corp 

51*i 

SHI- 

72 r 

Gen Corp 

73’a 

74~ 

68'.. 

Gen Dy mes 

85 

881: 


Gen Electric 

73* 

75'i 

66 J . 

Gen Inst 

18’i 

Ifl’v 

77 

Gen MiDs 

71 

73 

n/a 

4' . 

Gen Motors 

80 

80'+ 

Gn Pb lit ny 

19S 

19=u 

44 

Genesco 

S’. 

2'e 

22 

Georgia Pae 

30 « 

31 

59'k 

Giflaie 

8Z T * 

84'-. 

10 i 


40'-l 

42 v; 

21 

49 

Goodyear 
Gouic Me 

33*1 

25V 

34'a 

25V. 

S2 4 . 

Grace 

49 

50 

33'. 

Gl AH S Tac 

23'.- 

36'. 

23' r 

45 

Gr'hnd 

36’.- 

15* 

GrumanCor 

27 *x 

28'-. 

75’. 

Gult&Wesi 

57 « 

58'k 

62 • 

Hemz H.J. 

37iy 

39N, 

49': 

Hercules 

42 

44’a 

Iff-- 

H'leR-PKrd 

40 J » 

42’r 

53 J i 
55 S. 

Honeywell 
tC mas 

71V. 

43 

72 - 
44'. 

59!: 

ingereoli 

62'. 

64'-: 

29'- 

irusnd Steel 

23'. 

23 X 

72'; 

IBM 

143-I 

149-'# 

33’: 

Int Harvtr 

n/a 

n/a 

38 - 

INCO 

15‘* 

15 « 

70 ' 

Im Paper 

ys’. 

6tP; 

63 - 

Int Tel Tel 

44'a 

4515 

54'. 

Irving Bank 

55 j 

55 '8 

13 s " 

Jhnsn & jnn 

54 

55- . 


Kaiser Akim 

21 

21 =k 

194 

Ken McGee 

2 P- 

2ff> 

31-a 

Kmb ly Ckk 

83 r 

85'a 

27 ’x 

K Mari 

45’: 

4frV< 

45 

sr. 

Kroger 

L.T V. Corp 

46 

8'. 

46^. 

37’. 

Litton 

82 -6 

82': 

43’* 

Lockheed 

bbs 

55 *i 

59'. 

Lucky Sirs 

W* 

28 

22-- 

Man H nver 

51 U 

52'V 

101'- 

ManmHeCp 

7»i 

T; 

36 

Mapco 

37 

37'n 

139'. 

Marine Mid 

52 

52 

35 » 

Mn Manetta 

41 ’x 

42'. 

35'. 


54’; 

55!; 

34'. 

McDortneD 

B7 

87'; 

42’: 

Mead 


48 

49 

Merck 

164'i 

170": 

1J J . 

MmsuMng 

100 

100 

23 

Mobil OH 

29'-: 

29 

74 ■* 

Monsanto 

58-'. 

60', 

63'. 

Morgan J.P. 

74 n 

74*. 

44'. 

Motorola 


41*. 

45 > 

NCR Corp 

4ia e 

41 

49 , 

NLinostrs 

14 '.a 

14 

33 

Nat Distlrs 

4 

43* 

44 

Nat Med Ent 

24 'j 

24 

17*. 

Nat Smcrxll 

12>i 

13'a 

1»‘.. 

NoriiA Sth 

m 

93 

37 

NWBancip 

3b''» 

36 'a 

49'i 

OcodrlPei 

2b 1 -. 

24 

is 1 ; 

Ogden 

30 > 

29*8 

41 

OftnCorp 

3tFs 

40’t 

73 

OvreriS-a 

66’. 

68K 

S': 

Par Gas B 

21 J i 

22’r 

60s 

Pan Am 

6'* 

7’a 

71 

Penney JC. 

66’i 

68 

89 

Pennzai 

5b'» 

55 'a 

n/a 

Pepisco 

82 V. 

64 'x 


Apr Apr 

4 3 


Pfizer 
PneipsDge 
Pfnhp Mrs 
Pn*ips Pet 
Polaroid 
PPG ind 
ProrGmW 
POSE &.G 
Raytheon 
RCA Carp 
Rynlds Met 
Rockwell Int 
Rovai Dutch 
Saleways 
Sara Lee 
SFESopac 
SCM 

Schltrerger 
Scott Paper 
Seagram 
Sears Rack 
Snell Trans 
Srogar 
Smthkm Bk 
Sony 

StnCaiEd 
SpenvCorp 
SrdOilOrno 
Sterling Drg 
Siemens JP 
Sun Comp 
Tele dyne 
Termeco 
Texaco 
Texas E Cor 
Texas Inst 
Texas litis 
Textron 
Travlrs Cor 
TRW Inc 
UAL Inc 
Unilever NV 
UnCartnde 
UnPacCor 
Uld Brands 
US Stew 
Urd Techno! 
Unocal 
Jen Walter 
WmerLmOt 
Wells Fargo 
WstghssEI 

Weyerft ser 
Wtwtpool 
Woolwonti 
Xerox Corp 
Zenith 


56» 

28H 

111 

10'i 

S9N. 

GO’. 

73N> 

36": 

58*. 

63* 

471k 

44’e 

71 

36> 

59> 

35'.. 

58::- 
52 U 
4G*B 
46 
51fii 
90 
2Vb 
29 
51*. 
45 
42’a 
34U 
44'-y 
335*3 
37 
29’.- 
3Z* 
119 
33'1 
60'/: 
54 >« 
96'0 
53^ 
157*1 
2m. 

52 
23'i 
21 '" 
511: 
21 As 
51 Vi 
52% 

an 

53 V 
36 
64iv 
73 V 
64 
23<; 


S8*v 

zr* 

110% 

9’i 
62V 
63K 
73 
37 
GOV 
63% 
49'4 
45V 
71 V 
36% 
61V 
35V 
n/a 
31% 
58 V 

"p 
.*>* 
51 U 
90 
21V 
30 
52% 
44V 
43', 
34% 
45% 
339% 
37 
29*. 
32V 
119 
33V 
62*1 
55 

100V 

55 

158% 

20V 

52% 

23 

2t'a 

52V 

20 % 

S3 

53V 

67V 

55 

37V 

57'.. 

75V 

65'.: 

24V 


CANADIAN PRICES 


Abmbi 
Aicn Alum 
AKjoma SU n/a 
Tele n/a 
Can Pacific n/a 
Commco n/a 
ConBathrst n/a 
Gull CM n/a 
Hkr/Sid Can n/a 
Hdsn B Min *n/ 
Imasco n/a 
imperial Oil n/a 
In Pipe n/a 
Mass-Ferg n/a 
Ryf Trustee n/a 
n/a 
n/a 

n/a 

Wikr Hiram n/a 


n/a 

n/a 


WCT 


n/a 


"STTei cEiarrsnrtOa E k nRwnSii ihiwSsm piSSTilni fwauSBr 


m 


23V 

45 
18V 
n/a 
18V 

m 

27 

% 

29V 

34fc 

46 
43*J 

260 

30V 

75V 

27 

28V 

35V 

13V 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Market rates 
day's range 
Apra7 

NY«R 1.4505-1 4575 
Montreal 2.0082-2.0210 

Ams'damS 9134-3.9546 

Brussels 7098-71 -GO 
Cphgen 128419-12.9029 
Dublin 1.1435-1.1587 
Franklurt3.4768-15037 
UStaa 21637-231.27 

Maond 22006-221.58 

MftanM 2377.30-2411.00 

Oslo 10.770M0.786O 
Pans 11.0070-11.1750 
St'khim 104959-10-9297 
Tokyo 263.04-265.94 
lAemta 2443-24 J3 
Zurich 25096-2-3320 


Mutu rates 


inrij 7 

1AK0-14530 

2.0038-2.0117 

35204-352S3 

7098-71 .13 
12 B561-1 25795 

I. 1435-1.1445 

3.4828-3.4874 

219.40-229 73 

22006-220^5 

2381. 47-23 J8 
10.7784-10.7980 

II. 0806-110984 

109077-105287 

26554-2K54 

2443-24.47 

25278-2.9320 


1 month 

050-0.47prem 

0.16-0 07prem 

21.-1 *:prsm 

SMprwn 

SK-S^grein 

6-2SO® 

2'A-iVprem 

150-410d» 

204509 

2prem-1 Idh 

ivy-2r%ds 

3%-2prem 

Hi pram-par 

1*4-1 Vprem 

14 ‘12’ifrm 

2-VAfxem 


3 months 

1.35-130 

0.58-0 42pram 

5K-5H 

«K50 

1334-1115 

13-480B 

5H-514 

395-1175 

85-206 

3-20 

5<-7'4 

10H-7K 

2-V 

4K-2H 

36S-32N 

5H-454 


Both sterling and the dollar 

advanced yesterday after the 

weekend realignment of Euro- 
pean Monetary System cur- 
rencies. The pound closed 35 
points better against the dollar 

at 1.4525. having touched 
1-4575 at one time. 


Staling Index compared with 1975 mm up at 7B.7 (day 1 ! range 76.7-783). 

Rotes atvpGedhy Barclay* Bank HOFEX and ExUL uoyda Bank kWa t naMo n l 


MONEY MARKETS AND GOLD 


BaaeRate9% 

Cleanng Banks 1 1 Vr 
Finance House 12K 
Dtecoum Marirel Loans % 

Overnight Hwle 11 *4 Low 7 
Week fixed-Tl!':/'* 

Treasury Bids (Dtscount %) 

Buying Setting 

2 mmfi 10 ,!, i* Zmnm UK's/ 

3mnth 10"n. 3mmh 10H 

Prime Bank BHta (Dtscount *4) 

1 mnth Ili-II’.H 3mnth I0''ie-I0r'w 
3mnth IVviOVi 6 mnth 9 l: ur9U 

Trade BBs (Discount %> 

1mnthHVi 2 mnth 1 1’m 

3 mnth ll’v 6irenh 10'm 

interbank (%) 

Ovemigm. open 1114 dose 8 
1 week 11%-llli 6mntn tO'u-iIPi* 

1 mntti 11 '*m-I1 , u 9mntn lO’ix-iO’m 

3 mnth 11-10!: I2mlh 1014-10 

Local Authority Deposits (%) 

2 days 1 1 w /days 1f4 

1 mnth ll'.'i 3 mnth 1054 
8 mnth lO'.V 12 mtn 95% 

Local Authority Bondi (%) 
n 1214-12 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


Dollar 

7 days 7 
3 mnth 7».*-T , .« 
Deutschmark 
7 days A’wa’m 
3 mnm 4*i.-4 : m 
French Franc 
7 days fiJi-8 
3 mnth 8-7% 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 3-2% 

3 mnth 4'i&-3' s i* 
Yen 

7 days firPn 
3 mim 5* i s— 5 1 •* 


call 
1 mnth 
8 mnth 
cafl 

1 mnth 
6 mnth 
call 
f mnth 
6 mnth 
cafl 
1 mnth 
6 mnth 
can 
1 mnth 
6 mnth 


TO-6K 

7'i6-7 J i« 

714-7 

5- 4 

4»ifr4 r m 
45* -4*4 
914-614 
8 K-fl 
7!'.-7S 
214-114 
4 l ie-3 ,6 ie 
4~3'A 

6- 5 

5*-»-5 J ia 

5-414 


OTHER STERLING RATES 

Argentina ausuar 

















|r ^ 








1^680-1^690 

22070-2J2080 


Ireland 

ass*/ - 2.6900-2.6930 

AustraHa 0.7175-0.718S 

Canada 1-3830-1^840 

Sweden 7^150-7^200 

Norway 7.4200-7.4250 

Denmark 864504.8500 


West Germany 

Switzerland 

Netherlands 

France 


GOLD 


1 mnm 

3 mnth IIAk-nH 

9 mntti 11-10% 

Starting CDs (44) 
l mnth m*-i1K 
6 mnth 1014-1054 
Do8arCDsf%) 

1 mmh 735-720 
6 mnth 7.00-696 


2 mnth 12-11 14 
6 mmh 11 ■4-11:4 
12mth 10V.-1054 

3 mmh 1054-1014 
12 mth 

3 mnth 7.00495 
12 mth 7.00695 


GoteS338.50-339.a0 

Knagerrand'giercon): 

S 3^00341 90 (£234.00-235.00) 
Sovereigns* (newt 
S 81 .0041290 (£55.75-5590 ) 
•Excludes WAT 


HurrriComm) . 

Hong Kong 

Ponugal 

SpalnT 

Austria 


2.4025-2- 4035 

20130-2.0145 

Z 7060-2-7075 

7.6500-7.6550 

162-20-18290 

16420-18460 
_ 4902-4907 

79120-7.8140 

15500-158.00 

151.40-151.70 

1879-1693 


LONDON COMMODITY 
EXCHANGE 


SUGAR 

(Haw) 

FOB 

May.,. 


2089-08.0 

Aug 208.0-079 

Oct 2088080 

Dec 2100060 

Mar 215.0-130 

May 21&0-1Z0 

VW 3731 


COCOA 

May 

July — 

K? — 

Dee — 
Mar — 
May 

Ji ' 


tt: 


1366-65 
1399-83 
„ 1421 -a 

1461-60 

1495-92 

1520-18 

1539-35 
__5220 


2275-71 
" U20 


COFFEE 
Miy 

sSt 2375-72 

nST 2420-19 

Jan 2460-50 

Mar._ 2495-50 

May 3500-2460 

VQl: 56® 


SOYABEAN 

April 

June 

Aug 

Oa 

Dec 


Feb 

«: 


_ 1349-339 
_ 129.7-29.6 

126.0-25.6 

— 1264-26.0 
_ 1289-28.0 

130.0-299 

1319909 
224 


Gas oh. 


Jiete . 


166.0-65.25 

14425-00 

13490-00 


JUy 13290-00 

Aim 13395-3290 

S«oj 1 37.00-36.00 

13990-36.00 

NOV 142.00-36.00 

Dec 143.00-3690 

Vt* 5253 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
OffkadtbnwMr^m 
Price in £ per metric t om* 
38tf#r in pence per trey o unce 

Rmtofl Won ICaUH. report 

COPPER WCWSMDE^. 

cash ; aeaiwaoi 

Three months ~~~ 

Vat - .6900 

Tone — Steady 

STANDARD CATHODES 

Casn 978-980 

Three Months 

VQt W 

Tone .. — — 


TIM 

Cash 

Three Months . . 

vol 

Tone 


.Suspended 


LEAD 

Cash - 251*257 

Three Months — 2829-2639 

Vol 1300 

Tone Steady 

ZINC STANDARD 

Cash 410-115 

Three Months 

Vol Na 

Tans ■■ — Mb 


ZINC HIGH GRADE 
Cash 445-446 


Three Months 45&{M56 lS 

Vol 400 

Tone Steady/Quet 

SILVER LARGE 

Cash 3S1-382 

Three Months 3719-372L0 

VU - 10 

Tone Stsadfer/OiM! 


SILVER SHALL 

Cash 

Three Months .„ 
Vol 


361-382 


Tote . 


A u a n s a ut 

Ca«m J9S-J9B 

Three MomfB 

va 16CC 

Torres SBMtffcCatet 

NICKEL i 

cSJlT- 2734-2706 

Three Months , 283923*0 

Vgl 738 

Tone Esser 


BSATAKDUVESTOCX 
- rnuutKsa a 

Average tatrioc k pace* t 

teumeoxattwsm a t k s agn 

April? 

GBt Ca»te. 96.66ppe? k^iw 
D7JI 


U WO ONllCArWTWE^ 


a 

cw(«21XRi 

Gangs. 76.46? per kg tw 

England andWtee* 
Cameras. up 115 6"&, aue 
pree. 9899si-t.381 
Sheep nos. uc 7C9 V. ssa. 
ai=e.2S?.CTtf+2012} 

Pigncs. upS&3‘%. BE- 
pnee. 76.44g{*) 76) 


Carte nos down 101 V.aw 
pnee. 97. 46a -*-2. 18} 

Sheep nos. up Z7 v are. 
once. ISZOM+Zl 74) 

Pxj nos. \xs275 avs. 

pnee. SI 67p(+0-l9j 

LONDON GRAIN FUTURE8 
Epertonna 



Wheel 

Barter 

Womb 

Cose 

Oose 


117.90 

>1485 

JUV 

Sefpt 

119-50 


IC0 15 

93-40 


103.05 

T0I.7D 


10833 

104.95 

March 

Volume- 

109 JO 

10700 

Wheat — 


. ,.... 48] 

Barley — 

— 



INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


ECGD 


Fixed Rare Sterling Export Finance 

Scheme IV Average refarence rate lor 

interest period March 5. 1986 to 
April 1. 1986 tnduswe: 11.677 per 
cent 


•LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Month Staring Open Mgh 

Jim 88 9u35 90.45 

Sep 86 90.82 91.04 

Dec 86 91.08 91.22 

Mat 87 91.14 9193 

Previous day's total open mtaracr ikvk 
T hree Monte Emdoilar 

JunS6 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

US Treasury Bond 

Jun 86 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

Stoii Git ™~ 


Low 
9091 
90.82 
91.08 
91 13 


Ctosa 

Eat Vol 

90.44 

2718 

91 04 

719 

9126 

284 

9133 

95 


Sep86i 
Dec 86. 


GM 


Jim 

Sep 86 

Dec 86. 

Mar 87 


FT-SE 100 

Jun 36 

Sep 86 


93.11 


rest 19079 
1999 

93.10 

93.15 93.09 93.16 

953 

93.02 

9308 93.02 93.06 

48 

92-86 

92-89 92.36 92.88 

15 

99-24 

PTBvtous Gay's total open interest 5908 
9901 99-05 99-24 7434 

99-02 

99-02 98-18 99-00 

4 

N IT 

98-15 

0 

101-24 

_ Previous clay 's total open interest 1166 

101-31 101-20 101-29 

261 


101-49 

0 

N/r 


0 

12002 

„„ Previous day s total open Interest 10430 
126-18 125-25 126-16 6407 

HE 

126-25 

0 

N/r 

126-23 

0 

N/T 

12S-19 

0 

171.50 

fwrious day's (Mai open interest 1616 
171.80 17020 170.25 400 

N/T 

172.50 

0 


1906 

Ugh Low Company 


Gross 
or* yu 

Pficv ca ge panes % p/E 


IIS 9« 

703 m 

149 131 

356 268 

171 149 
170 108 

Ӥ SB 

203 159 

62-i S3 

53 31 

448 384 

sa ® 
J? - 00 

139 108 
143 110 
348 3V4 
I5S 134 

968 420 

516 503 

204 176 

1»7 JOB 

150 119 

370 284 

152 136 
91 75 

131 110 
142 119 
UP BS 
<68 142 

270 237 

337 287 
120 95 

558 480 

185 145 

340 284 

110', 84': 

132 109 

638 480 
14S 123 

147 t23 

162 143 

38? 322 

90'.- 68 
KB 92 
164 no 
154 138 


MH 
Wfcanca 
Aflwr Trust 
Am Amar Sac 
Ashcxam 

Attarnc ASSOC 

Bums 

Barry 
Br Assets 
ar Emm Sec 
Bran bn 
Bnarar 

SS£LS 8ney 

MJnOTJTW 

Oascent Jaoan 
Darbv Inc 
Do Cap 
Drsvron Cons 
Drayton Far ES3I 
Drayton Japan 

Drayton Premtt 
Dunum Lon 
£dm Amar Asset 

EUnOurgn 

Eiacirc Gan 
Engtar W 
Enghsli Scot 
Enghsn NY 


113 • .. 

755 B-S 

105 B-1 

352 m-2 

171 • . 

113 -2 

118 

196 -4 

60'r 

48 -a 

448 
97 
97 
760 
180 
139 
137 
348 
1S2 


1-1 


-2 
• -2 


3.1S 

296 

44 

BA 

44 

OB 

asp 

1A 

2.7 

0l7 

20.90 

31 

336 

30.8a 

05 

12.0 

143 

15 


27 418 
39 30. T 
30 37J 
2.5 554 

28 541 

07 .. 
3 4 43E 

08 .. 
45 338 
18 658 
4.7 278 
32 45.1 
34 418 
39 333 
0.3 .. 
86 188 

4 A 343 
1.1 


F 6 c Aa-anoe 

F 6 C PacrUc 

FmBv 

Fan Seal Amor 

firm un Gan 
Ftomng Amencan 
F lutwg Ow 
Remarg Erutram 
Bjciaig Far bust 
Flaming Radgtag 
Flanm Japan 
Renting Mercantile 

Flaming Overseas 

Fleming Teen 
Fleming Uravemd 
For Cd 
GBC Ceprtsl 
GT Jinan 
General Funds 


567 

-5 

14 

02 .. 


512 


182 

38 390 


204 

+2 

77 

38 380 


114 

•-> 

09 

1 ' 1 '■ K 




4 6b 

32 480 


388 


5JSb 

f ' I ’ ■ 



-2 

60 



91 

• .. 

20 

22 540 


129 

9-2 

30 

26 51 E 


142 

* +* 

20 

14 783 


10B 


25 

2*599 


163 

-2 

18b 

I TT '■ 

BrjJ 

m 

•+5 

110 

4.4 310 


334 

•-a 

143 

40 321 


SB 


8.7 

as 62 


S3S 

0-6 

az 

1.5 67. 7 

r * 

182 

-1 



165 

340 

• .. 

12.9b 

as 4i 6 

KI 


106 

132 

619 

141 

143 

IS? 

385 

87 

IDS 

181 

1S4 


-7 

• -1V 

• -3 


18 1 A .. 

38 2.7 51P 

5.7 D9 . . 
5.1 36 38.4 

39 ZJ 47.4 

33 2.1 868 

7.1b 19 479 
21 24 588 

200 \z " 

29 19 802 


1968 

IfcjH Una Company 


tar YU 

Pncn Ca ge pence Th 


P/E 


312 275 
130 115 
366 291 
147 !Z7 
1B2 136 
231 W 
324 244 

3*5 230 

190 158 

294 283 
OB 5*0 
275 244 
58 45 

233 18B 

70 56 

71 65 
128 132 
197 181 
158 126 


General Cons 
Gtaagoer Stock 
Oom 

Gmatt Aflame 

Gownt Onamal 

Gomel Swargy 
Giaentner 
Grwriam Kousa 
Hannas 

Hill IP) 

kweet-er Success 
tnv Cap 
JHXBi Assets 

Law Ueoemwa 
Lon Marcnam See 
Lai Thar 


307 

• -0 

159 - 

52 270 

127 

■ -I 

30 

20 510 

381 

-5 

140 

40346 

Ml 

-3 

*0 

26 439 

178 

-1 

33 

10 672 

227 

-2 

51 

22 845 

322 

-2 

2* 

65 .. 

3*5 


83 


188 

-1 

6.1 

30 434 

294 

*2 

136 

47 301 

802 

-3 

82 

14897 

273 

» . 

80 

24 770 

55 

-1 

0.1 

02 .. 

229 

•-2 

9D 

30 270 

8 


32 

52 159 

65 

-V 

81* 

94 220 

121 

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aib 



242 207 

215 f>1 
302 287 
13V IV: 
138 116 
348 297 
307 373 
113 » 

508 402 
268 2<S 
420 390 


Monks 

Murray Income 
Murray M 
Murray SmaB 
Murray Venture 
New Cent 
New Daneo Oil 

928 _ 
NwUrrog Inc 83 
New Tovyp 
not Affiumc Sac 

Hm Sea Aesats 

mm Amar 

Ouwadi 
Psdfcc Assars 
Do Wnxs 
Personal Aesats 
RaeCunt 
Fkvar 8 Merc 
Rm> Pisa 
RcDaco 

Boanoo 
Domnay 
ftannw 
St A n drew s 
Scamn 
Sera Airman 
Scot Eesiem 
Scat Mgs 

Scoi Nai 

Scat Merc 'A' 


THE .TIMES, UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


EM Oder Cnng YM 


1220 

1290* 

+08 

930 

940 

MS* 

+02 

495 

1732 

185 7 

-18 

522 

1535 

1534 

-2-0 

2.4! 

404 

434 

+07 

288 

992 

106 0 

-IS 

125 

639 

642* 

+04 

157 

680 

72.7* 

-01 

243 

840 

896* 

-03 

187 

1421 

151 9 

-19 

260 

647 

692 



51 4 

982* 

-Of 

157 

131 2 

141 0* 

-12 

1 09 

555 

604 

-04 

043 

197.0 

209 6 

-20 

3.40 

580 

622 

-10 

I61 


ABBEY UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
M ►Kueertnprs: Ra. Bourne mourn 0 m 8 8W. 
0345 ':r3n iLmmei 
J.1 & FnH 
rkai* in; Gcian- 
lviro-.ee Btmo 

xme-i^jn 

Part< 

»iws & Emm 
Cap.?i Menenw 
Ccrnn a Ene-gv 
Eurcosan Cental 
General 
jeejn 

UK Grawoi me 

Do 4<su"» 

US cmen^vg Co’S 
Eamtas progress 
MjnerrstAcc 

AUJEP DUNBAR UMT TRUSTS 

Alkec Durcar C^me 5WBXKKI SN1 I EL 
0793 6T03M & 0793 28791 
Fi-ft Trusi 

Grwtn s mcome 

Ca?ai Trust 
Baancoa 
rwcum Trust 
Amenv^r. hveeme 
hign income Tsi 
EAurv irrcone 
rtgn Vy« 
ucw: Secs Tnjsr 
imemeucnji 
J-io-in Fund 
Pa-lhc Trust 

xmet 5oa Sirs 
Secs 0! Ann Tsi 
aw A..WI ueiue 

G*r Gn>wi 
Smaller Co’s 
2na Smaller Co's 
Recnrery Tuea 
Mm Mm A Cmcry 
0 seas Eemmgs 


Tecnndocy Tu 

inc^ne E>s 


2314 

246 4* 

-1 4 

310 

138 7 

147 7* 

-10 

307 

2394 

255.0* 

-26 

206 

37*3 

398 6 

-37 

30? 

554 1 

600 7 

-76 

202 

308 

328 

-04 

4 >2 

2542 

2707* 

+07 

460 

1373 

1461 

+01 

4 71 

145 7 

1552 

+10 

534 

300 

310* 

-02 

920 

74 4 

792 

-10 

1 12 

648 

903 

-03 

001 

1413 

1605 

-02 

1 19 

661 

69 3* 

-OB 

1 IB 

202 7 

2U9 

-10 

064 

231 5 

2485 

-06 

306 

380 

401* 

+02 

262 

1150 

122 5 

-04 

267 

1516 

1615* 

-01 

248 

81 B 

87 1 c 

-04 

2-15 

825 

882 

-10 

224 

1931 

205 5 

-22 

288 

900 

95 9e 

-22 

094 

127 8 

1350 

+1.1 

524 

2184 

2315* 


278 

325 7 

3452* 

-4.7 

139 


«emgt 

fciemptSmaSer Cp a 
USA Ei end Trusi 
ARBimiNOT SECURITIES 
131. Finstxxy Payamem. London EC2A 1*Y 


Fi 

e 

01-63 9876 01-280 8040/ 1/2,3 


Capital G'jwth Inc 

592 

633 

-07 187 

pc 

h 


662 

708 

-08 167 

d 

Easrern 4 Inti 

1110 

1107* 

+05 097 

to 

M 

DO 6». vnnawM 

594 

63 5* 

*02 097 


Finance 6 Property 

59.9 

640 

+02 203 



510 

536 

+02 812 

dt 



83 H 

882 

+00 B 12 

w 


75 6 

BOB 

+01 4-B4 

e\ 


1751 

1870 

+02 «04 

SI 

r+rei Tw« Mcome 
Oa Accum 

74 4 

79 5* 

+00 768 

te 

C 

ei 

1928 

205.9* 

+07 788 

ion Accum 

700 

754 

-09 246 

w 

bo S'> Wxirdrwl 

870 

71 6 

-09 246 


Managed Fix'd 
Preference income 
Do Accum 


57 5 
279 

684 


60 E 
29 BU 
suse 


Snaiior Cos 4cnim 136 9 14fl4 


vrortd Penny V<ue 96 102 

Porfloao Tsi uk 79 7 82 6 
Pcrttoho Tsi Jaoan 799 KEB 
ParrtDfco TSI LS 72 1 747 

Pontoec Tu Europe 9? 6 101 1 
Portota Tsi HK 37 7 398 

BAIUJE GIFFORD 

3 Glenwvas Sr ErMjmdi EH3 6YY 
031^25 2561 (Dealeil 031-226 6066) 


1083 
. 1083 
-06 137 
1 16 
-08 155 
-OI 010 
-0 I 1.06 
+02 010 
+04 010 


Ml E+ 1221 

405.0 4231 


120 

Jaoan E+ 1431 

305 7 3203 


029 

UA E> (JT| 

ri£0 229 5 


156 

Pill Pyrtj lira 

368 8 3862 



P Sid Pars UK 

1612 169 6 



BG Anwnca 

164 2 174 7 

-12 053 

SO Energy 

114 0 121 3 

-02 

ise 

BG Mcome Gnmh 

194 3 206.8* 

+1 4 

498 

BG Japan 

137 7 1465 

-13 000 

BG TecMrotogv 

163 0 173 5 

-07 

193 


Bid Otter cnng YM 


Inn Recorary 
Smaaer Cos 

Uk Grcwm 
Etna [nc 
G4t 

me t Growrn 
Nai iVgn me 
Prel Snares 
Commodnv 
Fmaneai Sacs 
Gold S Gen 
m: Leisure 
Prep Snares 
dim, Energy 

ivprjd Teen 

Amur Growtn 
Amar inccme 
Amer Smaaer Co s 
Aust Growtn 
Eure Smaaer 
Far Em 
H ong hong PH 

hr# Grown 
Jaw" Part 
Jaoan SmaUar 
Exemgr 

Exam« Marker 
BROWN SWIET 


1084 1156* 
137 0 1461* 
401 428 

61 i 65 2 
27 7 262 
205 7 219 4c 
201.0 21* 40 

19 2 20 9* 
128 6 135 0 
454 484 
18.1 195 
163 174 

602 642U 
393 41fl 
4T 9 44.7 

96.7 1B31* 
500 619* 

25.0 267 

717 76 SU 
137 146 

38 6 412 

22.7 242 

339 362c 
549 586 
131 14 0 

84 6 886 
64 7 67 7 


-09 256 

-fl4 133 

-0.1 1 .69 
+02 657 
♦01 729 
+!.6 4.06 
+09 455 
. 9.70 

-05 2.56 
-02 218 
349 
-02 052 
-OB 1.15 
*02 177 
-04 054 
•15 326 
-04 534 
-04 052 
-03 151 
-01 024 
+05 109 
+07 274 
-02 162 
+02 . . 

♦15 355 
.. 4.14 


9- 1". Banymoiort 

Ha. Haywards HMtn 


0444 458144 





Fmeneiai 

1238 

1329* 

-05 

212 

Growm Accum 

197 9 

2128* 

+08 


Do Mcome 

126 7 

1363* 

+05 

i’?9 

Hign Inccxns 

647 

695* 

+0.6 

60S 

Mean* 

756 

813* 

-01 

504 

Man Pijrtfnao me 

644 

690 

-02 

408 

Do Acc 

1060 

1161 

-00 


NOrtn Amencen 

6(75 

651 

-Ofi 

700 

Onem 

660 

715 

-01 

000 

Haarvery 

386 

414 

+00 

331 

Tecnnciagv 

142 2 

1530c 

-00 

060 

German 

320 

3*0 

+03 

200 


8UCKMASTEH MANAGEMENT 
The Slock Exchange London EC2P 2JT 
01-666 2868 


General Inc (4) 
Do Accum (41 
Income Fund (3) 
Do Accum 131 
Wine (21 
Do Accum (2) 
Smalfcr int iSi 
D o Accum (5j 


215 7 2265 
338 7 356 7 
103 0 r085c 
1770 IS6J2 
120 7 126 1 
1598 1667 
£1071 11.38 
E1UI 1201 


280 

250 

4 41 
4 41 
164 
1E4 
258 
2B9 


CS FUND MANAGERS 

125. rtgh HObore. London WCtV 6PY 

91-242 1148 


C5 Japan Fund 


694 714 -0.9 02S 


CANNON FWB MANAGERS 

01 VMm0W ' ^ WB 


176 

Gmvtn 
Income 
Far E«n 
Norn American 


Teas 3093 
333 4 35«7 
1629 172 M 
1402 1492* 


+3 0 279 
*13 394 
-22 044 
-15 072 


BALTIC TRUST MANAGE R5 

25 '26 aim mane Street London WlA «AD 

01-491 0295 

Amencar 49 9 514 -0 6 082 

Auslfahan 19 6 210 -0 3 278 

Japan 8 General 82 I . B7 9 -0 1 0 19 

n*jn Income 4j. 9 49 T +0 6 728 

InlemitKnal Tr u w 73 9 79 1 -1 2 I 10 

Income Gin Til 50 T 536 +0 3 3 90 

■Sns 6 Fi.M cn 67 7 T23rn -1 0 566 

GIOWI Markers 36 7 3S3N -02 ISO 

Specs* SrtuatKWS 45 7 469 -02 139 

BARCLAYS UMCOm 
Ihtcom House. 252. Romtcra Ra E7 
01-534 5544 


America 

84 6 

902 

-1 7 

231 

AuS Accum 

1*02 

149 1 

-13 

1 77 

Do meow 

100 T 

106 4 

-10 

1.77 

Carnal 

719 

764 

-1 1 

288 

Ewn O' TruSJ 

■135 6 

4633 

-35 

366 

Extra incoma 

738 

ras* 

+07 

5 19 

Fnanojj 

2368 

251 9 

-09 

295 

500 

261 2 

277 8* 

-1 4 

307 

General 

141 1 

1501* 

-16 

292 

G4I 4 Fned MC 

554 

580* 

+03 

935 

Japan fi Gen inc 

130 4 

138 7* 

-04 

0.44 

Do Acc 

1318 

140 2* 

-00 

0.44 

Growth Accum 

182 5 

194 1* 

-23 

241 

Mcomo Trust 

3366 

3580 

-29 

344 

Leisure Trust 

81 1 

880 

-08 

101 

Soaoa Srtuawms 

1*0 T 

149 0 

-10 

239 

flee ever. 

1876 

199 4 

-1 4 

250 

Trusrea Fund 

1108 

1170 

-1 7 

284 

Uiw T«ji Accum 

509 

941 

-03 

079 

Do Income 

506 

538 

-00 

079 

Mmdwioe Trust 

140 5 

1494 

-17 

1.14 

- B Tsj in. Fund Ace 

3307 

351 7 

-28 

315 

DC- Inc 

2169 

230 7 

-18 

315 


BAR INO FUND MANAGERS 

PO Bpi 156. Seckennam. Kent BR3 ■ 

01-866 9002 


- 

Australia 

57.1 

610 

-00 000 


Eastern 

*64 

51 7* 

+08 030 

• 

ferny mcuns 

55 7 

589 

+08 580 

■ 

Euiaoe 

1056 

1123 

-or 090 


Growth 6 Me 

646 

68 4* 

-05 230 

( 

Japan soeoal 

B2t 

878 

-04 030 

Japan Surmse 

759 

81 1* 

-03 030 

J 

First Euroaa 

.950 

idi a 

080 

1 

Frrci Japan 

673 

719 

-04 030 

c 

F*v N Amer 

499 

510 

-09 180 

i 

Fes SmaflH Cos 

633 

eaxic 

-02 270 


BARRatOTON MANAGEMENT 

59. Gresham St London EC2P 205 
01-606 4*33 
Planned mv 

EunDiun Inc 

Do xccum 
General me 
Dc. Accum 
a» Yield ire: 

Do Accum 

Yield me 

— Accum 
Japan income 
Do Accum 
N Amancan Inc 
Do Accum 
Pnahc inccme 
Oc Accum 
Smvr Co* me 
Ou Accum 




1191 

1269 


1 87 

838 

879 

+05 

125 

1026 

1070 

+06 

100 

1000 

1698 

♦1 0 

296 

2168 

2299 

+ 1 4 

296 

ii8 r 

121 a* 

+07 

9*0 

185 4 

191 2 

♦ 10 

9*0 

8*0 

91 8* 

+13 

580 

1698 

180 7 

+20 

560 

1950 

2059 

-12 

02* 

195 8 

206 6 

-12 

004 

467 

*98 

-10 

096 

S* 1 

576 

-1 1 

096 

108 7 

11* 5c 

-06 

05? 

122 4 

1268 

-0? 

007 

750 

770 


207 

856 

91 1 


207. 


mnimunii ihhi 

74-78 mnsounr PavtKrom Lonopi ECSA I JO 

0Ng6 27T7J >aakng0r^3fl 0478/8 MoneyGuiee 


Grown M 


57 9 508 +05 042 


CAPEL (JAMES) HJINAGEHENT 
too Old Broad Sl London EC2N 1BO 
Or-621 0011 

Cap«U(3) 364 6 m0« +0.1 1.66 

Vccme m 2903 3105* *0.1 426 

rjorrn American (3) 286 6 ZB7J* -4 0 137 
CATER ALLEN 

r^Kxvi & K4N 7AU 

G« Trust 1074 1143 +0510.47 

CENTRAL BOARD OF FHANCE OF 
CHURCH OF ENG 
77 London WM EC2 1DB 
Dr-588 1815 

Inv Fund 414 05 . 4 17 

Fned int 149 75 .. 955 

Depou 1000 . 1200 

CHARITIES OFFICIAL WVESTMENT FUND 
77. London was. London EC2N IDS 
01-568 1615 

income 375 7 • ..4 74 

Accum CIO 7266 .. .. 


CLERICAL MEDICAL UMT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Narrow Plan Brow BS2 CUM 
0272 277719 

General Eouxv 387 «13 
Eautv High Income *23 *5M 
Gm S Fixed Mr Gar 29.6 31 B 
m-Jer Secunms 243 258 
Amer Grewdi 24 7 26 3 

Japan Growth 255 27 2 

European Growth 23.9 255 

GXi A Faed me 25 1 258 

COUNTY BAMK UMT TRUSTS _ 
161. Cneapvoe. London EC7V 6BJ 
0I-7TB 1599 
Cepnai Accum 
Energ y Trust 
Em income 
Fmaneui 
GJt Strategy 

Growm investment 
Income A Growth 
Japanese & Paoflc 
Mm Amar Growm 
me Recovery 
Smaaer Coe 
GKXMI Inc Tar 


-03 2.60 
•01 430 
+03 320 
*03 240 
-0 4 190 
-03 090 
+01 200 
+03 850 


+05 180 
554 
—07 505 
+09 239 
+03 156 
-1.7 246 
-01 135 
-06 041 
-15 162 
-0.1 286 
-05 235 
+01 588 


267 7 2847 
43 3 460 
1623 1726 
152 0 1617 
555 57 6 
288 2 306.5 
412 *38 
124 8 IJ27 
10*0 1108 
1083 IISI 
195 5 207.9 
55 7 593* 

CROWN IWT TRUST SERVICES 
Crown House, wound GU21 1XW 
0*882 5033 

than Income Trust 2380 254 5a 
Growth Trust 227 4 2432 

American Trust 127 1 1358 

EFM UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
a MetvOa Crosem. Edmburgn 
031-226 3492 

Amert cit Fund 893 74 1 

Capita Fund 917 96.1 

Growm 8 Me Fund 13* 7 mi 
Hxyi Dm Fima tor 3 ri4B 
IrwroaMral Fund 180.1 1927 
Resources Fund 20 6 2200 

SmAr J 30 Co 5 End 26 7 30 7 

Tokyo Fund 122 8 131 3 

iEjc) Amer IZl 143 0 147 ?• 

I Er) Japan (31 89 6 927 

IE»I Pacihe (41 220 6 228 M 

■Ex) SmaAer Jap (4| 187 0 173 * 

EuroTund 24.3 260 

EAOLE STAR UNIT TRUST IMNAGER9 
Bam Road cnenerwom. Gkhicasier GL53 7LQ 
0242 52t3H 

-0 7 266 
-0 7 266 
-08 153 
-01 5 12 
-OB 1*6 
-03 069 
-0 5 r IS 
+03 640 
+03 8*0 

ENDURANCE FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 
Admin Centre. Huaqpn House. 26. Western 
p-sed Romford RM1 •3LB 

070566966 

endurance ira* no 6 337 

EpUTTjOBLE UNITS A0MM5TRAT10N 
35 Fountain Si. Mancnmtr 
061-236 5683 


+28 503 
-17 256 
-05 074 


. 239 
. 173 
.. a 16 
.. 588 
. 1 17 
.. 204 

019 
. . 203 
. 026 
.. 179 
. 010 
. 366 


UK Balanced Inc 

706 

753 

Do accun 

70S 

753 

UK Growm Accum 

765 

91 6 

UK ikgn Me Inc 

64 1 

68* 

N Amyif can Accum 

635 

67 7 

Far Eastern Accum 

681 

T2.S 

European Accum 

Ur' Unit fi FI Inc 

690 

558 

736 

595 

Do Accum 

558 

585 


Bti Oiler Oxvj YU 


EquSatji# Pelican 
Hxm krone Trust 
(Xt a Fixed Mr 
Tsi oi m* Trusts 
Speaal Site Trust 
Ntn Amer Trust 
For Eastern Trust 


752 BOO* 
74 7 795 

55.1 58 7 

64 B 68.0 
761 810 
585 805 
66.4 707 


-l 0 3 l# 
+07 *91 
+0 3 810 
-05 190 
+0* 232 
-09 1.64 
+01 0.78 


EQUITY B LAW 
Si George Hue Corporation St Coventry CV1 
ISO 

0203 553231 

UK aowth ACCUe 1502 159.7c 
Do Income 1321 1405c 

Hanw K Accum 241 0 2569c 
Do Income 1972 208.7c 

GUtx/Ffeed Accum 1026 lOBO 
Do krone 87.8 924 

NRlAmerTSf Accun 1360 1445c 
Far East Tsi Accum 121 J 1290c 
Euro Tat Accum 1394 1482R 
Gtreral Trust 2325 2474* 


-15 3.14 
-i 3 ai4 
-15 444 
-12 4.44 
+0.7 267 
+0.6 257 
-I 7 0.17 
-U 041 
-05 090 
■27 271 


F A C UNIT MANAGEMENT 
1. Laurence ftxitnoy hh London EC4R DBA 
01-623 4880 
American Fund 
Captal Fund 
income Fund 
Far Eastern FrMd 
Ortraoaa krone 
Fned inroren 
Natural Res Fix'd 
Eurooean income 


FS MVESTMENT MANAGERS 
190. Wut George 3t Gbigow G2 
041-332 3132 


737 

789 

-10 

024 

1049 

112-1* 

-t.1 

043 

803 

8S.M 

-02 

406 

849 

890 

-02 

037 

060 

709 

-0.4 

387 

01.4 

637 

+00 

aoo 

440 

473 

-0.7 

4.12 

67.1 

719 

-09 

243 


Batancea Gth Me 
Do Accum 
krone Gin Inc 
Do Accum 
Service Go a me 
Do (tecum 


4056 *35.7* 
415.7 4422* 
404 435 
414 44 0 
431 455 
434 452 


F1DBJTY INTERNATIONAL 
Rarer Wek. Torttadge. TW9 IDY 
0732 382222 

American 08.7 1055 

Amer Eouty krone 325 34 B 
Amer Specol Sra 
Far East Me 
OH A Fixed M 
Growth C mcome 
Japan Special Sts 
Japan Trusi 


Managed int Tsr 
Max krone EcMy 
Professicnai Glh 
Scum Earn Asa Tst 
Special s« 


ST5 555 
297 316 
309 322* 
899 1075 
321 342 

99.7 108.1 
126 2 1345* 

71 1 751 

34.7 370 
232 259 

151.0 1625 


SPA 

+96 220 
+ 10.1 .. 
+02 550 
+02 

+13 190 
+15 .. 


-29 056 
-04 4.75 
-09 0J6 
-05 436 
.. 382 
-09 425 

-04 ’! 
-12 025 
-0.1 522 
-0.4 218 
+10 059 
+05 096 


FLEMING (HOBERTT 

B. Crosby Sq. London EC3A SAN 

01-636 5858 


American Exempt 
Japan Exempt 
Am Property Tsr 
Properly Trust 


E36B3 3861* 
£332 * 3*29 
510795 0 


1.87 

12 ? 

7.75 

6.10 


FRAAHJWGTOW UMT MAN A G EMEN T 
3 London VYal BMgs. London WaB. London 
EC2M 5NO 
01-628 5IB1 

Amar 3 Gan Me 229 4 2445 -1.6 053 

Do Accum 23* 0 2482 -1 9 053 

Amar Tisnamd Inc 2162 230.0 -3.9 1.14 

Dd Accun 2229 237 0 -4 I 1 14 

Cants) Tw me 1!W£ 2026* -15 290 

Do Accum 2294 24*0* -15 290 

Com- S Gat Me 89 6 9S2 -02 623 

Do Accun 1172 1245 . . 623 

Extra Me Tn Me 1546 1844 -10 *41 

Da Accum 1644 17*5 -l 0 4*1 

Mcome Trust 1152 1224 -05 421 

Do Accum 119* 1270 -06 *21 

Ml Growth Fd bid 157 4 167 4C -10 0.00 

Do Accum 1746 1852c -20 060 

Japan a Gan kic 69 4 73 6* -KUDOS 

DO Actum 700 74 4* +02 00B 

MontlYy Krona Fd 73 6 784* . 4.82 

Recovery 13*2 1428 -1 T 1.77 

Do Accum 1452 154 4 -10 1.77 

Euroasan Me 514 546 -02 0 9* 

Do Accum 514 54 6 -02 094 

FRIENDS PROVIDENT MANAGERS 
Pmiwm End. Dmung. Surrey 
0306 885055 

FP EpudV DdR 2045 2170 -25 259 

Do Accum 337 7 3584 -42 ZJ» 

FP Fixed HU DBt 117 6 1251 +08 5.74 

Do Accum 130 9 1382 +09 574 

Stewarosntp Dor 185 1 1752 -1.7 2.10 

DO Accun 169.7 180.1 -16 2.10 

FUNOS IN COURT 

PuBkc Trustee. Kmgsway. WC2 

01-405 4300 

Carnal 3525 364 6* .. 263 

Grooo Me ISOS 15*2 .. 752 

High YM) 2155 2206 .. 569 

GT UMT MANAIteRS 

8«h Floor a. Onoima Sa. London EC2M 4YJ 
01-283 2S7S Deafeng 01-62S 9*31 
UK Can Fne Me 
Do accum 
inccm e Fund 
Pension Exompf 
knemAnonol 
US 6 General 
Tech 6 Growth 
J »an a General 
Far East 6 Gan 
Eurooean Fund 
Germany Fuvj 


-07 230 
-10 230 
♦06 650 
-16 200 
-15 1.00 
-10 1.40 
-04 100 
-ID OJ* 
100 
-1 1 0 70 

-09 IjGO 


995 1065 
141 9 151 B* 

608 665* 

160 3 167 9 
1*4 9 155 0* 

57 I 61.1 
648 691* 

1759 1862* 

75 7 81 0 

373 7 238 0* 

63 7 692 

GARTUORE FUND MANAGERS 
2. o' Mary **e. London EC3A 88P 
01423 1212 Dealing 01-623 5786 Deakng 01 -823 

Amencar Trusi 
Australian Trusi 
Bmsti Tsi Accun 
Do tksr 

Ccromowy Snare 
Euro Dean Trust 
Ertri tncoms Trust 
Far Eastern Trust 
Fixed interest Fund 
Gar Trust 
oral Fund Accum 
Do Oar 

Beta Share Trust 
Hedged American 
H>gn Mcome Trust 

HongAong Trust 
Income Futd 
MRirance Agendas 
Japan Trust 
Managed Examot 
O* a Energy Trust 
Soeo+i Sts Trust 
UK Suer Z s Roc T« 

GOVE1T (JOHN) UNfT MANA GE MENT 
■Mrrctiestsr hml 77. Lanoon Ws*. London EC2N 
»DA 


900 

970 

-1 I 

000 

198 

21 le 

-03 

041 

550 

599 

-10 

239 

479 

513 

-10 

239 

56 S 

609 

+04 

IM 

469 

503* 

-02 

007 

493 

528 

-02 

007 

1107 

1180 

-OI 

0.10 

269 

2&0c 

+01 

909 

27.7 

28 8* 

♦at 

656 

1558 

1658 

+01 

023 

1486 

158 0 

+0.1 

023 

121 

126 

-01 

229 

293 

303 

-0.7 

a ia 

1304 

1450 

-10 

531 

25 1 

289* 

+10 

1.05 

730 

782 


332 

£44 64 

4829 

-o’ IS 

199 

1185 

1261 

-13 

aoo 

2870 

2782* 

-06 

205 

29.1 

31.1 

+01 

133 

871 

933 

-OS 

004 

l 832 

677 

-04 

1.73 


01-588 5620 





lira Growih 

754 

808 

-10 

172 

American Growth 

828 

869 

-09 

108 

American tec 

077 

7230 

-ID 

589 

Eurooean Growth 

189.0 

202.1 

+03 

022 

Gam fi Miner aw 

420 

*49 

+02 

189 

Japan Growth 

128 2 

137 1 

-13 

020 

Pacific Income 

831 

678 


428 

uk gmooi oops 

829 

831 

-07 

204 


ORE UNIT MANAGERS 
Row 1 Etehargo. EC3P SDN 
01-688 5803 


Bri Oftor Chng Yk) 


Grk & Fned im 
Growth Eojrty 
GuaroM 

N American 

PaoAc 

Property snare 
Smner ComoiraM 
European Trusi 


1235 128 a 
2115 2250 

299 1 3099 
1376 1486c 

1822 1939c 

2433 2589 
2105 2240c 
2176 231.8 


-03 894 
+0.1 201 
-3.1 297 
-25 203 
+1.6 037 
-27 158 
+08 1.60 
-0.4 OB9 


DURNESS MAHON UMT TRUST 
MANAGERS 
PO Box 442 32 St MeryM-H*. London EC3P 
3AJ. 

01-623 8333 
Ugh Income 542 582c . . B33 

N Amer Trust 1156 1220* -22 079 

Recovery 165.7 1976c -02 251 

G* Trust 412 42.7 +02 852 

S> Vmcein Me 825 851 +02 552 

St Vincent US Gth 749 780 -08 075 

Temple Bar Sm Cos 1624 1713 . . 327 

Temple Bar USM 3412 3685 .. 245 

NAWROS BANK UNrrTRUST MANAGERS 
Prarrner UT Aomn. 5 RaytBKM Ra. Brerawaad 
Essex 

0277 217915 


nmtro, snw Co s 1223 1301 


Hapres N Amer 
Hampioi Jau a F E 

Hempros Scanjvn 

Hempros European 

Hempros Canetui 

Hampros Emm Me 

Harapros Hgn me 

Hampros Res Assts 


-04 199 
-06 093 
-01 045 
+03 100 
-08 097 
+0.1 157 
+06 443 
+08 5.78 
-06 267 


66.7 719 
9*9 I0l6c 
72 7 773 
883 950* 

478 506 
83 6 889 
565 604* 

581 618 

HBteERSONAOMMVIRATKM 
PrwrttrUT At>iw i e elteflun 5 HeyWoh RdL HuOon 
Bretxwood Esse* 

0277-217238 
Special Sas Me 
_De Accum 
Recovery Trust 
Caw* Growm Me 
Dd Accum 
Moome Assets 

FManoai Trust 


1307 1386* 
184.0 198 9* 
902 1051 
58.7 525* 
675 72 2* 
1123 120.7* 
144 8 154.7 
Income & Growth Me 1459 1565 


Do Accun 
High krone Trust 
Extra Mcome 
SmUar Cos Dnr 
Praia G* 

GUI Trust 

Frxoq Interest Trust 
Goto Healthcare 

Global Teen 
GoU 


Globa Rnsounaro 
Worldwide 15) 

Aiatraean 
Euopeen 
Euro SmaOar Coe 
Jaoan Trust 
Japan Spacrai Sts 
PacAc SnuHf Cos 

Snsapora A Matey 

North American 
Amer smalar Cos 
Am* Recovery TSI 

kkgn income Exempt 124 7 1313* 

Ernaker Coe Exempi 1185 124.7 

Etm Exempi 106.1 1139* 

Japan Exempt (S) 119.4 1257 

N Am* 85 7 902 

Gttw Tech ex rt) 0E 0 905 

Pacrte Exempt (5) 1416 1496 


2803 3014 

176.7 1591 
1579 1683* 
966 106.6 
476 506* 
464 492 
548 564* 
872 712 
1067 1152 
462 «81 
1816 1726* 
692 734 
3603 3793 
656 704* 
2Z13 237.8c 
767 846 

T289 1350 
1308 1381 
582 61.7* 
228 242 
137 9 1476 
527 56* c 
1176 1258 


-17 093 
-24 063 
-01 231 
-09 129 
-10 129 
-O* 335 
+02 243 
+01 261 
+01 261 
-OI 462 
-OI 450 
-0.1 526 
+01 322 
.. 9.11 
-03 937 
-13 OJH 
-OB 022 
-04 092 
-12 001 
-0.1 338 
.. 117 
-09 064 
♦06 0.42 
-02 033 
-14 0.18 
-0.4 OOl 
+01 099 
+01 318 
-21 050 
-0.7 OOl 
-1.1 068 
+04 *61 
-12 161 
+0.1 167 
-06 039 
-12 1 15 
-06 015 
+36 231 


HRJ, SAMUEL UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
*5. Seocn SL EC2P 2LX 

01-628 8011 


Bnbsh Trust Units 

CepK* Trust Lnts 

outer Trust tints 
Etraean Trust 
Far East Trust 

FnancvY Trust 
Get Fned In Me 
Do Grown 
Ikgh Y+id Trusi 
Mcome Tnm 


japan Teen Tst 
Natural Resoutes 
Seamy Trust 

Smeler Cos 
Special Sis 


5493 5844 

1004 1069 

1797 1912 
1139 1212 
1047 111.4 
363 4 3857* 
218 310 
442 489 
63.7 678 
BZ2 875 
1114 1188 

335 346 
320 34.1* 
184 3 1961* 
83.6 89.0* 

955 101.7* 


-96 289 
-1 0 272 
-29 295 
-os oar 

+05 2.14 
+55 244 
-02 9A1 
-02 7 35 
+0* 60S 
+05 4*7 
-1 A 257 
-02 043 
-01 245 
-63 292 
-0.6 155 
-15 241 


FUND MANAGERS 

-Queen Ames Gan. London SW1H 9AS 


32 

01-222 1000 
« Bm « cr«5 1306 138 4 
IS* Hqn mcome 539 568* 

[S' Security Ok 55 9 S8.9re 

Hwee m ioni Tn Fnd 662 6B.7 

KLEMWORT BENSON 

20. Fenaxircti SL London ECS 

01-623 8000 


-1.9 1 70 
.. moo 

+0.3 260 
-0.4 360 


692 
70.7 
21 1 * 
— . 266 
1286 1385 

208.1 220 0 

972 1036 
101 7 1076 
785 832* 

78 B S35« 
146 2 156.4* 

190 8 2042* 

293 314 
482 518 
42 2 446* 
425 45.1 


653 

B6J 

19.9 

251 


-0.1 111 
-01 .. 
-0.1 270 

-a i . 

+04 509 
♦05 .. 
-06 155 
-OB . . 
-05 .. 
-05 . 
+0.1 266 
♦0.1 .. 

.. 0B4 
+ 0.1 
.. 0.74 


494 

081 


Anwr Growth Inc 
Dd Accun 
Fund Mi Tsi Inc 
Da Accum 
H«n Yield Me 
— Accum 
Mr Recovery inc 
Do Accun 

r Growth Mg 
Accum 

s™ser Cos inc 
Da Accun 
UK Eo Growm Inc 
Oc Accun 
Worfnmte Test he 
Do Accun 

L 6 C UNIT TRUST MANAGEKNT 
ETO'.'SPP- CoDOtrt Are. EC2R 7BE 
Oi-SM 2800 

Mcome Fund 420 8 4294 

mtemmrera! a Gen 237 7 2425 

16GAL fl GENERAL UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

5 R * ymgh R 
0277 234HB3* 

Ecury Dotmomn 280.1 SS96re -34 204 
Dd Accun 4379 4683* -52 204 

Do bream 81.6 859 +03 465 

Euinen 5*1 886 +ai 121 

Fir Eastern 789 843 .. 047 

Get Treat 805 852* +05 550 

Ml Manned 706 755 -13 121 

Nnurairtea 51* 556* +21328 

N American Trust 735 7B6 -1.4 £52 

UK Soeoal Sds 622 665 -13 211 

LLOVOG BANK UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
Regrenani Dot. Gorerg-BrSeo. Worming, w 
EvUk 
0444 *501** 

Bauncee 

Do Accum 
Energy Md 
Do Accun 
Extra Income 
Do Accum 
German Gm inc 
Do Accum 
Income 
Do Acpvm 
Mil Tech 
Do Accum 
Japan Growtfi 
Do Accun 
N Amer a Gen 
_Dd Accum 
Pac4m Basm 
Do Accun 


1869 199 8 
3292 3526 
46 8 50 0 
516 551 
1588 1899 
2806 3001 
59 7 63 So 
54.7 83 8 
271 1 299 9c 
526.1 562.6 
178 5 188 7 

184 1 1969 
626 683* 
622 685* 
987 r(l$5 

1062 1135 
■038 109 9 
107 4 1148 


5matar Cos A Rec *820 1346 


-E4 391 
-42 381 
*02 332 
+02 333 
+ 10 *68 
♦ I 7 408 
-02 005 
-02 005 
-1 0 4 15 
-1 7 4 15 
+03 043 
+08 0*3 
+09 002 
+06 002 
-S3 097 
-38 09? 
+03 034 
+04 0.M 
+06 1.73 


Bet Oiler Chng YM 


.. Do Accum 2025 21&B 

WtXMwBB Growth 1761 1B83 

Dd Accun 2465 2635 

LLOYDS LffE UNIT TRUST 
20. Qttm Sl London B3A544X 
01-820 0311 

Out 1222 1300 

'Accum 1702 181 t 

GO Trust 545 57.4 

Do Accum 583 8IA 

High Mcome Orel 906 95 8* 

Do Accun 1035 1102* 

US Grown 537 572* 

Do Accun 54.1 575* 


"SW 


+07 1.73 
-18 13* 
-25 132 


-13 135 
+19 1.45 
-33 435 
+4L5 435 
-04 4.43 
-05 4. *3 
-1.6 1.15 
-15 1.15 


LONDON a MANCHESTBt 
WMsiede Park. Exeter EXS IDS 
0392 52155 

General Trust 443 476 -83 330 

Mcome Trust 3ft 2 385* -04 5.60 

mumaaonaJ Trust 302 323 -04 100 

MAQBeCURrtlES 
three Oum. Tower hsi EC3R 660 
01-626 4588 


Am** Gen Inc 
Do Accun 
Arrjtr Recovery 
Do Accun 
Am smeler Cos 
Do Accun 
Aust a Gen Me 
Dq Accun 
Comm a Gen Inc 
Do Accum 
CcDtpounl Growth 
Comrerawi Growth 3263 3473 
Do Me 1827 16S.7 

Orotund Fund Inc 4193 448.0 
Do Accun E1212 1285 
European 8 General 179.7 1905 
Do Accun 
Extra Yiaa Me 
DO Accun 


-17 148 
-43 148 
-23 033 
-11 033 
-04 025 
-03 025 
-06 093 
-07 083 
+07 238 
+06 208 
+03 237 
+22 254 
+3.7 392 
+73 431 
+021 4.41 
+12 038 
2148 2203 +14 039 

2212 2345* +53 528 
475.B 5044 +107 626 

1031 1103* +1.1 210 
1253 144.1 


2300 2332 
2550 2704 
2457 2923 
2684 2850 
613 655 
625 657 
754 803 
321 374 
1557 167.7 
204.4 2137 
4194 4456 


For Eastern Me 
Da Accun 
Fund Of Mv Me 237.7 2523 

DO At* 368 4 391.6 

General Moome 6253 6833 

DO ACCUM £1109 1356 

oat 6 Fixed Ml 832 654 

Do Accun 94.4 98.1 

Gold Mcome 39.7 425 

Do Accun 413 45.1 

Moxne Inc 3207 343.1 

Accum 0503 908.6 

[ntl Grown Inc 7274 7733 

Do Accum 21160 1242 

Me Me Inc 574 505* 

Japan A Gen tie 60 33 6428 

Do Accun 6434 6664 

Japan Smaiter Ace 742 75 JO 

MWNnd a Gen Inc 3554 5887c 

Do Accum Cl 3 62 1444 
RoOmry Fund me 355 6 3733 
Do Accun 4553 483.1 

Second Gen kc 5884 7297 

Do Accun 
Smeler Cos Me 
Dq Accum 
Trustee Fmd Me 
Da Accun 
Chanpond me (3) 

Do Accum (3) 

Chsrftard MC (2) 

Da Accum 




+1.4 2.10 
-0.4 247 
-06 247 
+43 336 
+009 338 
-OB 077 
-19 8.77 
.. 234 
.. 234 
+42 4.73 
+112 4.73 
+09 204 
+O01 204 
.. 5.12 
-34 004 
-69 001 
-74 003 
+78 396 
+0.10 396 
+59 274 
+74 274 
+05 348 
+001 3.48 
+01 262 
*09 262 
+0.7 4.03 
+0.01 493 
.. 1042 
.. 1(1.42 
.. 550 
.. 550 
+159 4.10 
.. 012 
.. 812 


m«3 1423 
6233 6733 
87351051* 

4805 4927c 
£1300 13.81 
) 119.1 

3822 

3794 5832 

878 1 8879 
(I) 4732 4945 
S3 

459.0 

WteUNfT TRUST MANACZRS 
11. Dmronatnre So. London EC2M 4YR 
01-623 4273 

Etompt 4088 4269* -09 298 

Accun 5174 54®a« -S.0 233 

UK Mttihet Futures 701 74.7* -0 3 1.82 

Do Again 72 1 780* -09 192 

Japan Pertxmwiee 1063 1»33 -03 0 13 

tta Accun 106 8 1117 -03 0.13 

U5Speael Features 683 720 -05 070 

„SS 889 735 -04 0.70 

Goto a Preoous Mat 4i 9 4*8* +os 195 

DQ Accum *31 *60® +09 196 

US Special Me 56 7 626 +02 *96 

Do Accum K 3 66.5 +02 406 

Eucywen Part Me 744 781* -05 1.13 

Do Accum 745 782* -09 1.13 

IOA UWT TRUST MANAOEMEWT 

m-lOO Sanding Rd. Maxtsnne. Kent ME14 1W 

0622 674751 

Ganerat 34.5 365 -OS 205 

KW S« , ™WnN 495 525* -09 1.00 

»>MUM 25.1 266 +0.1 077 

fR4 Mcome 39.9 422 -03 4.73 

NLA European 285 303 -0.1 092 

HAMJUFE MANAGEMENT 

***■ aB ™“ a * "" 


TO 


Growth unts 
GM a Fixed W 
►Hjn tneoma Units 
" v YUM gm ura 

Grtwnh Unis 
N Amonmn Units 
Fur East Units 
SmSer Coe Find 


77.9 828 
1150 iigo* 
1123 1183* 
565 589 
114.7 1219c 
£84 739 
79 8 84 8 
689 731 


-. 244 
.. 844 
.. 648 
.. OSS 
.. 041 
.. 058 
.. 030 
.. 161 


■ENCAPUMT TRUST 

Unworn Hse. 252 Romtore U 67 

01-234 S544 _ 

Mencap * 1389 M55 -09 393 

MERCU1Y FUND MAHAOBtS LTD 
33. KmcWBarr SL EC*P BAS 

01 -280 tea 

Aiw Growth 
Da Accun 
Amer Mcome 
Do Accun 
Euocean Growth 
Do Accun 


972 1014 
1005 1079 
40 0 52.1* 

514 549* 

1158 1211 

T1H9 1284 

Gansu 254 7 2709* 

DU Accun 414.4 44QM 

OH a Farad 909 012 

DO Accun S3® B8B 

801 653* 

881 937* 

2117 2282 

Dd Accum 2025 2782 

J«£m 1242 1321 

_Do Accum 127.0 1351 

Racovery 1052 2078c 

_ Do Accum 2065 219 6c 

Exempt Det 237 0 24*5 

Ex tenet Accun 3625 373 7 

JWDLANOBAlnS GROUP IRRT TRUST 

gkMwdOd IHse, E**r SL HestL Shafltetd 81 3RD 


Do Accun 


-0.7 097 
-0.7 097 
-03 4.60 
-05 480 
-0.* 191 
-04 191 
-15 198 
-25 198 
*1.0 747 
+1.1 747 
+0.7 407 
+09 407 

££8B 
• : 3Si 
=B!iJ 

.. 246 

. . 246 


0742 78S4S 

Caocal Income 
Do Accun 
Commodn* a Gen 
G» Accum 
Extra Hon Me 
Do Accum 
GM t Frxeo Me 
Do Accun 
Hren neia 
Do Acaan 
Moome 
Do Accum 
Japan a Pacific 
Do Accum 
n Amman inc 
Do Accun 
Euro Qtn Me 
Od Accum 
SmMdr Cos Inc 
Do Accum 


809 855 
1089 115 4 
1119 I1M 
154 8 166.1 
58 7 SLH 
67 4 71 
560 S84* 
69 7 KL7* 
154 3 1646 

256.1 2732 
1734 (8*9 
9824 9019 

2164 230. BW 
2269 2420* 

107.1 1142 
197 3 1359 
1S09 114,0 
1361 1368 
10*5 111.7 
110.7 11&1 


-OB 2 V* 
-1 1 114 
-08 357 
-19 427 
.. 7.64 
.. 794 
+0.3 901 
+06 901 
+03 591 
+05 591 
-15 350 
+2J 3 SO 
-0.7 020 
-05 090 
-I* 109 
-16 MB 
+02 1.17 
+09 1 17 
-09 227 
-04 227 


Bid Offer Chng YM 


MURRAY JOHNSTONE UNIT TRUST 


163. Hope Sheet- Oasgow G2 2UH 
041 221 8252 


Amencan 
European 
Smeser Cos 


1105 TI79 -11 3*5 

2216 2365 -05 074 

2075 2215 +04 198 


NATIONAL PROtNDEMT RNESTHBfT 
MANAGERS 

48. Gracechurth St EC3P 3HH 
01-623 4200 Ext 299 
NPI UK 
Do Accun 
NPi Ovunees 


Do Accun 
Far East ACC' 
Do Det 
American ACC 
Do Dot 


2095 2227 -11 250 

3345 3559 -09 290 

5295 5635* -04 T.10 
6481 8874* -102 1.10 
-847-889- 41.7 030 
647 689 -06 030 

580 61 8 -09 190 

576 619 -09 170 


NORWICH UNION 
PO Box 4. Norwich NR1 3NG 
0603 622200 
Group That £12.10 T274* -094 377 
M9 Trusr mi 128.4* >14 152 


OPPENHEMElt TRUST KANAGaOSir 
65. Canaan Strom. London EC4N 5AE 
dsakngs 01-238 388S/B/7/8/9/0 
kne me ilo ns l Growth ISO 1416 
Inccme 8 Growth 01.8 65.9 


Specal Sas 755 85.1 

Amman Growth 337 35 5* 

Jteten Growth 495 525 

European Growm 576 615 

UK Growth 5*1 579 

Padfic Growth *27 45.7 

High Income SOS 325* 

Practical Moome 517 5*5* 

Do Accum 927 807* 

PEARL TRUST 

251 High Hcmom. WCIV 7EB 
H 0441 


01-405 
Growdi Fund Me 
Op Accum 
Mcome Fund 
HI Equity Me 
Do Accum 
UM Trust Me 
Do Accum 


895 955c 
1317 1417C 
1199 1276c 
1213 130.1 
1213 1301 
1Z8.7 1369 
2203 2344 


-17 050 
-10 390 
-01 440 
-03 070 
-07 . . 

4ISS 
+01 010 
.. 540 
-03 230 
-05 190 


-04 238 
-Ofi 238 
-20 353 
-10 158 
-10 158 
-05 2.11 
-19 3.11 


PERPETUAL UNIT TRUST 


PROunC UNIT TRUSTS 
22lamo^». Londue EC2 

M W i Misi nai 
High Mcome 
Conn a GR 
Far Eastern 
North American 
5*3 


Extra Moome 


1066 114 6* 
1815 1925 
894 105.4* 
1*05 151 1* 
1375 147.1* 
206 8 2193 
1135 1227 
834 884* 


-07 138 
+19 * 00 
+08 585 
-44 078 

-OI no 

+1.7 146 
+03 041 
-0.1 452 


PRUDENTIAL UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
51-®. Mart HA. Hera Essex. Cl 2DL 
01-478 3377 
Hoftom EquRy 4074 *334* -49 106 
European 78.1 84.1 -0.1 056 

Htttqm Comms 52» B62 -05 294 

Hoftatn Hub Inc 66.7 709* +02 510 

Hcfttom Irw 884 949 -08 074 

Jnwese 74.3 7 dm +Ot 095 

N Amcncjui 651 724 -09 157 

HOQtam Spec sta 644 685 -02 225 

Hotoom UK Growm 839 e92* -0.6 178 

Hotjom Gvt Trust 1799 1879* +0.1 8.15 

QULTER MANAGEMENT COMRAHT 
31-« Qroslum SL London EC2V 7LH 
01-800 4177 

Oiudrara General 4334 401.1* +155 254 
Ouausra Mcome 2395 2552 +7.1 5.02 
Quadrant M8 Fd 371 1 390.7 -03 1 12 
Quadrant Recavary 2513 2655* +05 3.78 


St Swahna Lana. London EG4P adu 
- 01-280 5458 
NC America Inc 


Do Accun' 

NC Energy Res 
NC Income 
NC japan 
NC Smalar Cm 


2757 2825 
288.1 3150 
1367 1449 
812 88 0 
1559 1845 
133.7 1412* 


-4.1 198 
-47 193 
-07 290 
+07 355 

■^as 003 

-0* 2.1B 
-09 036 
.. 857 


NCSmCrEwOpCb'S 1600 169.1 

NC Exempt Gtt £1319 1369c 

NC Amer fkop til ST 1210 

NC Property 1725 1829* 

ROWAN UNTT TRUST 

33 Kxrg w*em Street Lonaui ec*h 9AS 
01-638 6678 


American ut 
Sacuntwe ai 
H«0h Yield (5) 
Marta (3) 
Ftnea merest 
Hgn kwrect 
Far East Cl 


2185 2225 
6760 astu 
1609 1835 
3699 3779 
1759 176®® 
1270 1210*1 
1765 1800 


.. 108 
.. 256 
+59 549 
101 
-05 142 
-391150 
.. 028 




ROYAL UFE FUND MANAGEMENT 
New Hal Place. Lwenpoci 159 3HS 
051-227 *422 

Trust 6*4 685 -OB £45 

. JSt . 055 707 -06 120 

Tjser 27.e 292 +0.1 0i)O 

Trust 312 337 -05 143 

PacAc Basin Tat 315 339 -02 0.62 

ROYAL LONDON tMT TRUST MANAGERS 
~ ' 1 London House, Colchesttr COi IRA 
576115 

American Growth 839 882 -15 056 

am Accun 1B04 2016 -04 291 

« Mcuns 500 61.1* +02 845 

High I ncome 795 B49* +03 493 

Mcama a Growth 100 * 1069 -0.1 422 
Japan Qrnwtb 674 722c -07 098 

Special sss 1015 1082* +05 143 

SAVE A PROSPER 

Z8. Wastsrn Rd, Romtort Rail 3LB 
_6B-73. Quaen St Edrta 
IHuidart) 071048986 Or 
Amer In: a Grew* -57.4 729 

Cacllal Units 902 1050 


CommadMy 

Energy Mds 

Euuoean Grtmh 
Exenypr Me Bnd 
_ DP MU 1*3) 
Dgeoraaon 
Fmanaai Secs 
O* 6 Ft me 
Hign Ftotum urea 
Fkgn Y«H Units 
mooree urns 
M yoat n ie nt Trust 
mramawnrai 
Japan Growth 

issiar rc - 

STaITW 

Srxjtbtte 

SoaDhom 

Scpivmds 


311 -57 

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594 Q 15 
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(Ofi) 2nd Tuesday of inu nm. 





























THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


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C TEMPUS ) 


Glynwed cuts gearing 
as profits rise 34% 


Having reduced Glynwed 
IniemationaTs debt/equity 
ratio from 67.7 per cent five 
years ago to 13. 5 per cent at 
the end of last December, it is 
with some justification that 
the chief executive, Gareth 
Davies, asserts: “No one can 
say that debt is now a 
problem for Glynwed”. 

Nor can anyone complain 
about last year's profit perfor- 
mance, announced yesterday, 
alihough it is to be expected 
that the traditional engineer- 
ing and metal-forming busi- 
nesses will do well when the 
rest of the British economy is 
buoyant. So it was no surprise 
when Glynwed reported an 
excellent performance for the 
year to December 1985. Pre- 
tax profit was £35.6 million, a 
34 per cent increase on 1984 
and slightly ahead of market 
expectations. 

Of the £9.1 million rise in 
pretax profit in 1985. £5.1 
million came from a reduc- 
tion in interest charges. The 
remaining £4 million was due 
to improved profits from all 
areas except the United 
States. 

Operating profit from the 
consumer and building prod- 
ucts division rose 20 per cent 
to £9.5 million. Elimination 
of losses from the closure of 
Vogue Bathrooms helped 
these results. 

The group's other two 
main profit earners, steels, 
and tubes and fittings, both 
had good years, showing 
increases of nearly I S per cent 
to £12.1 million and £11.4 
million respectively. The 
cash flow from the steels 
division is vital to the group, 
while tubes and fittings bene- 
fited from the group's strate- 
gy of vertical integration of 
the manufacturers and 
distributors. 

The engineering division 
remains disappointing de- 
spite its improvement from 
£1.7 million to £17 million. 
When compared with a sales 
volume of £68 million, such 
meagre returns are clearly 
unsatisfactory. 

The group has set itself 
some fairly demanding tar- 
gets for performance. The 
primary measure is earnings 
per share, where it is looking 
for a 20 per cent improve- 
ment annually. 

This year much of the spin 
is expected to come from 
plastics, and especially from 
efficiencies arising out of the 
Philmac acquisition. This 


nujitjuau wau iuuh/i r*u 

enable the group to develop ; 
global strategy for a vertical!’ 


Australian distributor will 

_ia 

i vertically 
integrated speciality plastic 
pipe systems business. 

If achieved, the 20 per cent 
rise in earnings per share 
suggests that Glynwed wfll 
report at least 33p per share 
for 1986, implying a prospec- 
tive multiple of 13 at the 


purchase, earnings are head- 
ing for 60p in 1986, which 
puts the group on a prospec- 
tive rating of just eight. This 
is hardly demanding, but the 
shares may pause for breath 
in anticipation of a large 
acquisition. 

Rugby Portland 


_ Cement 


not necessarily a de 
rating in an inflated market 

Pentland Ind. 

PentlancTs earnings are as 
fleet of foot as its Reebok 
associate's sports shoes, *nd 
in 1985 rose from 10.7(. to 
35.3p. The phenomenal suc- 
cess of Reebok itself has 
continued unabated, but the 
results of the other businesses 
are also up to speed. 

The reduction in the 
Reebok stake from 55 to 41 
per cent has muddied the 
waters at the pretax line but 
at the net attributable level 
but before the £3.9 million 
extraordinary profit from the 
Reebok share sale, progress is 
clear. Reebok's net contribu- 
tion surged from £2.9 million 
to £12.5 million while the 
other interests — from general 
trading to luggage and clothes 
and more shoes — almost 
exactly doubled to £3.9 mil- 
lion. 

The Reebok stake is worth 
about 393p of the current 
500p share price, which 
dropped 3 Op in a weak mar- 
ket That means a p/e of 14.6 
for Reebok and 12.7 for the 
rest of the group. Cash and 
quoted investments stood at 
£14 million at the end of the 
year and are worth some 30p 
a share. 

Reebok has already fore- 
cast quintupled net income 
for the first quarter of this 
year, and the newly-launched 
basketball shoes have won 
more than S100 million in 
forward orders. 

It would be too much to 
hope for another Reebok but 
Holmes Air, the US electrical 
appliances importer and dis- 
tributor, doubled turnover 
last year and is expected to do 
so again in 1986. 

With Pentland capitalized 
at £233 million, compared 
with less than £10 million at 
the beginning of 1984, the 
chairman. Stephen Rubin, 
says be is now looking for a 
“major acquisition.” 

Even without a substantial 


Rugby Portland Cement's re- 
cent acquisitions may not 
have helped profits yet but 
they have already boosted the 
share price. In the past six 
months the shares have 
jumped by 40 per cent from 
1 30p to 180p yesterday. 

Rugby acquired John Carr, 
a joinery company, for £65 
million last year and the year 
before it bought Addison, an 
American budding materials 
distributor. 

It is keen to expand further 
in related fields but before its 
next purchase Rugby may 
well sell the five-star 
Parmelia Hotel in Australia, 
which could command £15 
million or so. This would 
help reduce borrowings. 

The figures for 1985, pub- 
lished yesterday, reflect the 
changes in Rugby's structure. 
Whereas British cement ac- 
counted for 60 per cent of its 
trading profits m 1984, it was 
responsible for less than half 
of last year's total. And with a 
full-year of John Carr the 
proportion should be even 
less this year. 

This should help profits 
recover from last year when 
they fell from £27.9 million to 
£21.8 million before tax. 
Most of the downturn took 
place in the first half when 
Rugby lost market share to 
the other British cement pro- 
ducers. The second half re- 
covery was hampered by 
exchange rate movements 
which cost £4 million over 
the whole year and a third 
round of rationalization 

John Carr contributed 
£3.74 million to trading prof- 
its. leaving its net profit at 
about£2 million in its first six 
months. 

Despite the sharp fall in 
profits and an increased share 
capital, earnings per share 
were down only slightly last 
year, thanks to an unusually 
low tax charge. Even though 
the charge is likely to be 
higher this year the shares 
look attractive on a prospec- 
tive multiple of less than 13 . 


Winter holidays may cost more 
as jet fuel prices remain high 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


Next winter's package holi- 
days. including skiing breaks, 
are likely to rise in price 
because of increases in hotel 
charges and air control admin- 
istration costs. 

Unless oil companies cut jet 
fuel prices in line with declin- 
ing oil prices, the increases 
will be especially steep, ac- 
cording to the Tour Operators 
Study Group, the umbrella 
organization for Britain's 
leading package tour 
operators. 

With benchmark prices of 
next winter's holidays due to 
be struck shortly, a dispute has 
arisen after the TOSG put 
pressure on the oil companies 
to cut costs of aviation fiiel to 
the airlines which could then 
set scat prices lower to the tour 
operators. 

International Leisure 
Group's Mr Sidney Perez, the 
TOSG chairman, said: “We 
have made repeated represen- 
tations to the oil companies 
for lower jet fuel prices. So far 
we have been fobbed off with 
all sons of reasons and ex- 
cuses. While the oil companies 
have always been swift to pass 


on increases they are reluctant 
to pass on savings." 

The cost of aviation fuel in 
Britain still stands at the July 
1985 level despite a 60 per 
cent drop in the price of crude 
oil. TOSG says. This is unfair 
to holidaymakers while mo- 
torists are seeing prices at the 
pumps come down, it says 
There have been aviation fuel 
price changes since last July, 
but recent reductions have 
merely cancelled out autumn 
increases, according to the 
TOSG. 

Some fuel suppliers abroad 
used by British airlines to pick, 
up fuel while overseas are 
beginning to reduce prices, 
said Mr Perez who added: “It 
means there is a chance we 
shall get something back." 

If reduced jet fuel costs can 
be agreed it could offset at 
least of the other increases 
coming through. These are 
still being quantified in detail 
but some overseas hoteliers 
have been looking to price 
increases of between a tenth 
and a fifth at local currency 
level while administration 


costs of a new system of air 
control in Europe has added 
between £2 and £3 a seat for 
flights to countries like Spain- 
and PortugaL 

Mr Perez added: “Unless 
there is a substantial reduction 
in jet fuel prices next winter's 
holidays will cost more than. 
they need to.” 

• Enterprise, part of British 
Airways holidays operations, 
is cutting prices on 35,000 
package holidays throughout 
the coming summer season. 
About 10,000 offer reductions 
of up to £25 on holidays in the 
summer 1986 Enterprise bro- 
chure. but the rest are special 
reductions usually featured by 
operators in the early part of 
the booking season. 

As a result Enterprise high 
season prices on these lower- 
price holidays start at £1 66 for 
14 nights in Costa Blanca 
apartments in Spain. A family 
of three could go away in 
August to a four-star hotel in 
Tangier for £500, says Enter- 
prise. But the key stipulation 
is that choice of resort and 
hotel is left to Enterprise. 


Schroders 
favourite 
for water 
contract 

By Jeremy Warner, 
Baseless Correspondent 

Four City banks have been 
shortlisted by the Govern- 
ment for the job of advising on 
privatization of the water 
industry. 

The successful candidate is 
expected to be named shortly. 

The four are Samuel Monta- 
gu, Standard Chartered, 
Schroders and S G Warburg. 

The favourite to win what 
could amount to one of the 
biggest and most lucrative of 
the Government's privatiza- 
tion contracts, is Schroders. It 
undertook a feasibility study 
for the Government on deoa- 



Roy Watts: leading advocate 
of water privatization 

tionalizing the industry last 
summer. 

The Government is prepar- 
ing to privatize at least five of 
the 10 regional water authori- 
ties in England and Wales 
before the next election to 
raise a total of up to £5 billion. 

The five thought most ap- 
propriate for a stock market 
flotation are Thames,' whose 
chairman Mr Roy Watts has 
been one of the foremost 
advocates of privatization, 
Sevem-Trent, Southern, An- 
glian and Northumbrian. The 
Department of the 
Environment's water director- 
ate has been reorganized to 
help speed through the 
privatizations 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Prices tumble on 
profit taking 




Share prices suffered a bout 
of profit-taking as small inves- 
tors sold shares in the new 
financial year, thus avoiding 
capita] gains tax penalties. The 
FT 30 snare index tumbled 20 
points to 1400.9 while the 
FT-SE share index fell 21.2 
points to 1688.5. 

The underlying mood .how- 
ever, was still one of optimism 
illustrated by numerous good 
features prompted, by week- 
end press comments, takeover 
speculation and cheerful com- 
oanv statements. 

Wall Street's doll , perfor- 
mance last Friday caused a 
dull opening and prices subse- 
quently slipped back quite 
quickly during the morning 
with jobbers inundated with 
small selling orders. 

Once these bargains had 
been completed, shares stead- 
ied out and after a quiet 
afternoon finish ed above the 
worst Those sectors which 
have shown the strongest 
gains recently were among the 
worse hit. 

Stores, foods, buildings and 
properties often recorded 
losses into double figures. 
Among the leaders fells ranged 
between 5p and 15p but 
clearing banks tumbled 
around 20p, not helped by the 
news that the Texas Savings 
Group had closed in America. 

However, there was aggres- 
sive buying of Standard Char- 
tered at 867p up 62p as deatera 
looked for a counter to last 
Friday’s surprise offer from 
Lloyds, I8p -lower- at 599p. 
Midland was also su p p ort e d at 
567p, up 10p, while among 
merchants Hambros jumped 
27p to 265p also on bid hopes. 

Perennial takeover 
favourite Beecfaam Group ad- 
vanced 2 Op to 406p although 
some analysts are suggesting 
that the company may launch 
a major acquisition of its own. 

In generally drab electricals, 
STC stood out with an 8p rise 
to 144p hoping for a rescue 


bid. Stores succumbed to prof- 
it t akin g with Dixons 8p down 
at 398p on further consider- 
ation of their offer for Wool- 
worth, unchanged at 905p. 
Combined English slipped 5p 
to 248p on the Paige Group 
deal with GUS. Next, report- 
ing first hatf profits today, 
hardened 2p to 294p. Dealers 
are looking for profits of 
around £13 million up from 
£9.6 million last tune. 

In cements, Rugby lost 7 ftp 
to I79ftp after a 22 per cent 
profits set back. Good results 
and a 25 per cent scrip issue 
lifted Glynwed 3p to 38C 
Amstrad gave up lOp to 471 
on the Sinclair acquisition. 

Pegler Hatters! ey, ad- 
vanced another 36p to 438p 
on persistent demand. TI 
Group found favour at 539p, 
up I4p, while Richardsons 
Westgarth, at 54p up 5p and 
Wellman 31ftp up 3ftp were 
both better after comment 

Press “tips" accounted for 
gains ofbetweeu5p and 10 pin 
Crystallite at 223p, Forward 
Technology 53p, Bernard 
Matthews 705p, Lew St Bonar 
460p, Peters Stores 66p, 
Grampian 273p, Hestair 1 52p, 
Bromsgrave Castings 85p, 


Executex 132p and Loriin 
Electrical I80p. 

Profit-taking, docked 22p 
from Redritt's at S60p and 
ISp from BAT Industries az 
376p. The absenceofbid news 
left Vans Group 40p down at 
495p but in motor distributors 
Jessups was wanted at 105pup 
9p. Good Relations was sus- 
pended at 176p, up 8p, on the 
announcement of merger talks 
with Vafin Polka, l Op easier 
at 205 pl 

Standard Fireworks, which 
received an approach last 
week, added 5p to 145p. 
Connells Estates, with results 
due next Friday, put on 8p to 
213p. Blackwood Hodge hard- 
ened 2ftp to 60p after results 
and Wilson (Connolly) 
dim bed 15p to 428p following 
a 28 per cent profits improve- 
ment and 100 per cent scrip 
proposals. 

Profit— taking cut 14p from 
Magnet Southerns at 1 74p but 
Abbey attracted speculative 
interest at 132p, up 8p. 
Andfotronic did well at 13p, 
up 2’Ap, and hopes of an asset 
injection lifted Snnletgh 3Vip 
to 31 ftp. 


RECENT ISSUES 


EQUITIES 

Abbott M V 

£» (135p,; - 
Brookmount (160p) 
Chart FL (86p) 
Chancery Secs (63p) 
Conv 9% A 2000 
Cranswtck M (95p) 
Dialene (128p) 
Ferguson (J) (1 
Gold Gm Trot 
Granyte Surface 
Inoco (55p) 

JS Pathology (160p) 
Jarvis Porter (105p) 
Klearfoid (1i8p) 
Lexicon (I15p) 

Macro 4 (I05p) 
Motivate M (lisp) 
Norank Sys (90p) 
Really Useful (330p) 


225 ^5 
213-4 
186 
183 
93 
75-2 
£29 +*a 
103-2 
180 
31 '2 
188-7 
80 
37-1 
281 +1 
130-6 
115^3 

134-2 

145-1 

108 

328 


SAC Inti (lOOp) 
SPP (125p) 


139 
155 
218-5 
78-3 
(37 P) . Ilf 

QO 

Tech Comp (I30p) 202 

Underwoods (180p) 184 -1 

WeHcome (120p) 213-6 

W York Hosp (90p) 78 

Wickes (140p) 171 -1 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

Cullens F/P 


Greycoat N/P 
Hartwells N/P 
NMW Comp F/P 
Porter chad F/P 
Safeway UK 
Wates F/P 
Westland F/P 


275 

42-10 

3, 

330 -20 
106+2 
£48 
150-5 
83 


(Issue price in brackets). 


Salaries of 
machine 
engineers 
up 28.5% 

The median salary of nearly 
64,000 foil raembere of the 
Institution of Mechanical En- 
gineers (IMecbE) has risen 
28.5 per cent in die last three 
years to £1 7,000 a year. While 
33 per rent still earn less than 
£10,000 a year 16.9 per cent 
earn £25,000 or more. 

The median salary is less 
titan that of chemical engi- 
neers (£19.500) and electrical 
engineers (£18,400) but out- 
distances the civil engineers 
(£15,300), according to com- 
parisons with findings of the 
Institutions of Chemical Engi- 
neers, Electrical Engineers and 
Civil Engineers. 

So few women are mechani- 
cal engineers that the survey 
could draw no meaningful 
conclusion about differences 
in salary compared with men, 
but 35 women engineers in the 
public sector had a median 
salary of only £9^00 and 80 in 
the private sector a median of 
£9,900. 

Those are the main findings 
of the latest IMechE salaries 
survey*, the first since 1983. It 
covered institution members 
living in the United Kingdom 
and the Irish Republic but not 
those based elsewhere abroad. 
Full corporate members in- 
clude fellows and there are 
also associate and graduate 
members whose median sala- 
ry level is £10,000. 

If allowance is made for the 
effects of inflation, median 
salaries between 1979 and 
1986 have risen 15.7 per cent 
in real terms for full IMechE 
members aged between 40 and 
44, the survey shows. Other 
members have seen median 
salaries increase 13.7 per cent 
in real terms for those aged 
between 30 and 34. 

* Mechanical Engineers Sal- 
ary Survey 19S&. £25 from 
Manager, Professional Ser- 
vices, The Institution of Me- 
chanical Engineers. 1 Birdcage 
Walk, London SW1H 9JJ. 


Japanese urged to take life 
easy and help the economy 


Japan needs a complete 
transformation of its economy 
— away from the traditional 
export-oriented model — to 
deal with its massive trade 
surplus, according to a report 
submitted to the Prime Minis- 
ter, Mr Yasuhiro Nakasone, 
yesterday. 

For several years Japan has 
been attempting, a without 
much success, to divert criti- 
cism from the surplus, mainl y 
through a series of measures to 
open up the economy to 
imports. 

Instead, the report, pre- 
pared by a committee under 
the chairmanship of a former 
Governor of the Bank of 
Japan, Mr Haruo Maekawa, 
says that a medium-term strat- 
egy should be implemented 
with the goal not set in terms 
of inflation, or unemploy- 
ment, but the removal of 
Japan's current account 
imbalance. 

Mr Nakasone will announce 
today the first of a series of 
measures based on recom- 
mendations of the report, 
which be commissioned last 
October. 

If fully implemented, the 
Maekawa Report will have 
far-reaching implications, be- 
yond the reduction of trade 
surpluses. It suggests that the 
Japanese people, having 
worked aggressively to con- 
quer world markets, should 
now ease back and enjoy their 
prosperity. 

“The time has come to 
make a historical transforma- 
tion in its traditional policies 
on economic management 
and the nation's lifestyle” it 
says, and gives a warning that 
“tiwrecan be no further 


Fran David Smith, Tokyo 

development for Japan with- 
out this transformation”. 

The difficulty is that this 
may be achievable only 
through the acquisition of 
what many economists regard 
as Western bad habits. 

A revitalization of the do-* 
mestic construction sector is 
proposed as part of the shift 
from an export-based to a 
domestically-biased economy. 
New government financial in- 
centives to housebuilders are 
proposed, alongside expan- 
sion of the Japanese equiva- 
lent of mortgage tax relief 
However, restrictions on 
building should also be re- 
laxed to keep land prices 
down. 

In addition, local authori- 
ties should be given more 
funds and more freedom for 
infrastructure work. 

More general private con- 
sumption, the report says, 
should be fostered through tax 
cuts and what amounts to a 
leisure revolution. Japanese 
companies should to provide 
longer paid holidays and the 
average working week should 
be reduced to European and 
American levels. 

Abolition of the preferential 
tax treatment on small sav- 
ings, the “maruyu", is 
recommended. 

The Maekawa Report goes 
on to propose an end to 
subsidies which keep uncom- 
petitive industries like 
coalmining, aluminium and 
shipbuilding in business, 
when cheaper products are 
available on world markets. 

A general boost to imports 
ofboth agricultural and manu- 
factured products is envisaged 


through unproved market ac- 
cess, including improvements 
in the distribution system and 
reinforcement of the Office of 
the Trade and Investment 
Ombudsman. 

The vision, set out is one of 
increased internationalization 
of the Japanese ec o nomy, 
including the financial mar- 
kets, coupled with a slower 
pace of export growth. It is 
more far reaching in its impli- 
cations than previous Japa- 
nese market-opening efforts, 
even though when taken in 
total those represent consider- 
able progress. 

Foreign observers are, how- 
ever, entitled to be slightly 
suspicious of plans which 
appear just before the impor- 
tant Work) Economic Summit 
in Tokyo early next month. 
United States protectionist 
threats are as real with a lower 
dollar as they were when it was 
at its highest level of last year. 

Even if the recommenda- 
tions are accepted by Mr 
Nakasone there is no guaran- 
tee that he will be Prime 
Minister loog enough to -see 
them through, with elections 
due soon after the summit. 

Even then, the report looks 
cautious in some important 
areas. The tax cuts, it is made 
dear, have to be within a 
framework of the planned 
reduction in Japan's borrow- 
ing requirement Under this 
plan the bond-financed defi- 
cits will be zero by fiscal 1990. 

The report also limits any 
further current account ad- 
justment that may be achieved 
through the exchange' rate. 
Monetary policy, it says, 
should be left with the aim of 
stabilizing the yen's value. 


COMPANY NEWS 


• AMEC: Results for year to 
December 31. Div 7p (7p), mkg 
lip (ilp). With figs in £ 
millions, turnover was 751 
(686.7), pretax pft 25.5 (27.1). 
tax 9.5 (7.6), minorities nil (dbt 
0.4), exlraord dbt 3.3 (cdt 0.5). 
Earnings per share 24.8p 
(29.6p). 

• MORE O'FERRALL: Final 
3p, making 4p (3). Results for 
1985. Figures in £000. Pretax 
profit 2,812 (2218J, tax 1080 
(1,004). Earnings per share 6»7p 
(5.8tlmprovemeni in second 
half of last year continued in 
opening months of 1986.' 

• MY DART: Final dividend 
0.675p, mkg lp (0.75p) for 1985. 
With figs in £000, turnover was 
24,770 (21,596), trading profit 
922 (312X exceptional charges 
116 (11), pretax profit 806 (301), 
tax 260 (7cdt), extraord dbt 68 
(225), attrib 478 (83). Earnings 
per share 2.85p (1.6p). Pretax 


More 
news, page 


profit -packaging 834 (952), 
sporting and leisure equipment 
255 (51), pyrotechnic products 
192 (304 loss), interest 475 
(398). 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


a 

ABU. 


_1lH% 
—11%% 

Citibank Savings! 

Consolidated Crds TIH% 

Continental Trust 


Adam & Company. 
BCC1 


__.m% 

— 11M% 

Royal Baft of ScrtSand 11 h% 

TSB 1114% 

Citibank NA 11H% 


Co-operative Bank. 
C. Hoare & Co — 

Lloyds Balk — 

Nat Westiranster. 


t .Mortgage Bale Rate 


HONG KONG OFFICE 


Turner Kenneth Brown are pleased to 
a nn ounce that on 10th April 1986 they are 
opening an office in Hong Kong at: 

19th Floor; 

Worldwide House, 

19 Des Voeux Road Central 

Tel: 010 852 5-8 10508 1 

Fax: 010 852 5-8101295 Groups 2 & 3 

Telex; 80468 HKTKB HX 

John G. G. Williams is the Partner in charge. 


TURNER 


KENNETH 


BROWN 


v: 




fir 




More O'Ferrall PLC 


1985 Results— Record Second Half 


$ 
S 


PROFIT BEFORE TAX 


1st Half 

.cm 


1985 

1984 

DIVIDEND 

per Ordinary Share 

376 

1*205 

. . Interim 

2*36 

*013 

2,812 
• zzto 

1985 

I.Op 

' 3a 


1984 

1-Op 



EARNINGS 




per Ordinary Share 

1st Half 

2nd Half 




1985 1.0p ./ ■y/B.Tp 

1984 3^p...; : ;:: ; '--'2L5p ;: 

The ab«v« statement Is a lummary of year's tmaucOtaUtvaolts, 







24 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY/LAW 


THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


16 


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( COMMODITIES REVIEW ) 


LME chiefs struggle to win the peace 


Trading volume on the 


ling vol 
London Metal Exchange may 
still be half its level before the 
tin crisis, but the verbal 
volume has risen □ times, 
where n represents a big 
number. The exchange has 
now fragmented into a thou- 
sand sub-committees, each 

charged with pronouncing on 
an arcane if crucial aspen of 
the LME*s cloudy future. 

li is an outbreak of soul- 
searching most uncharacteris- 
tic of a marketplace until 
recently so confident in its 
conservatism. The issue, 
moreover, is not merely the 
fiiture of the LME. 

In so far as a healthy metals 
market is important for com- 
modities trading in London 
and for the City generally, 
much more is at stake. For 
that reason if for no other the 
LMFs transition into the 
modem age is being keenly 
followed by the shadowy but 
potent ■■authorities". 

The process is akin to that 
just completed by the London 
Commodity Exchange. For 
the LME, however, the timing 
bas been exceptionally diffi- 
cult. After emerging bloody 
but unbowed from the great 
tin war. it must win the peace 
in a world which changed 
almost beyond recognition 
while the combatants were 
preoccupiede. 

Still, it does not matter now 
whether the navel gazing was 
delaved by the tin crisis, as the 
LME claims. Perhaps the tin 
debacle was a blessing in 


disguise, although one can 
understand why some mem- 
bers may feel otherwise. What 
matters is successful adapta- 
tion to a strange universe of 
regulators, new laws and hov- 
ering overseas competitors. 

The parallel with the LCE 
breaks down in other places, 
too. LCE membership was 
stable while Mr Savon Tate's 
reforming pen raced across the 
pages. But these days there are 
empty scats in the LME ring, 
mute testimony to the casual- 
ties of the tin war — MMC. 
Rayner. Holco arc but the first 
names inscribed upon the 
doleful role. How many and 
what kind of members to have 
is only one of the many 
decisions facing ihe exchange. 

In the LCE*s case, however, 
decisions w ere the order of the 
dav. Mr Tate was brought in 
with the explicit intention of 
shaking the place up. Had he 
not done so he would have 
failed in his mission. But there 
is no comparable deus r.v 
machina at the LME Indeed, 
an important question is 
whether the old guard can 
reform itself, always a tricky 
insitutional manoeuvre. 

I think it can. The LME 
board and committee do not 
like what is happening to 
them. Mr Jacques Lion, the 
chairman of the board, partic- 
ularly appears in the best sense 
to be a man from another, 
more honourable age. The 
LMETs clubby, essentially 
trusting character has the great 



Mr Saxon Tate: A 
reforming pen 

virtue of informaJily.That in- 
formality has its drawbacks — 
not all rule interpretations 
have met whith general appro- 
bation — yet it is far removed 
from the less desirable traits of 
the bureuacracies who are the 
City’s new guardians. 

So the LME has accepted, if 
not embraced, the urgent need 
for change. True, a little 
nudging from the Securities 
and Investments Board has 
accelerated the process, and it 
certainly helps when someone 
else draws up the agenda. 

Throughout there runs a 
common theme: should the 
changes be simply the mini- 
mum necessary to satisy the 
SIB. or should the exchange 
seize the time to make exten- 
sive reforms? 

In fact the logic of what the 
LME is doing points in only 
one direction. It is probably 
impossible to separate the 


SIB’s criteria for qualification 
as a recognised investment 
exchange - price transparen- 
cy. proper price reporting, a 
ciearing house, etc - from the 
wider question of what sort of 
contract the LM E should trade 
and the minute by minute 
rules under which they arc 
traded. 

Thus a paper written by Mr 
Michael Metcalfe, a director 
of Holco. argues that the LME 
should enter the modern age 
in one mighty bound by- 
abolishing its treasured 
“prompt date" contract. This 
curious animal, for the unini- 
tiated. is the came! of futures 
trading. If a camel is a horse 
designed by a committee, then 
the prompt date contract simi- 
larly is an attempt to combine 
all virtues, in this case of a 
physical contract and a futures 
contract (as we now under- 
stand it). 

Mr Metcalfe, who was men- 
tioned in dispatches for his 
conduct in the tin war. advo- 
cates splitting the prompt date 
contract into its constituent 
pans of separate physical and 
futures contracts which would 
be traded as different markets. 
The former would be a princi- 
pals contract — as the prompt 
date contract is at the moment 
- because the chief users 
would be “the trade" (mining 
companies, merchants, indus- 
trial fabricators and the like). 
As such, it would probably fall 
outside most of the provisions 
of the looming Investor Pro- 
tection Act. 


The futures contract, how- 
ever. is exactly what the 
legislators have in mind. It 
will be a futures contract 
under Mr Metcalfe's plan like 
anv other, with specified set- 
tlement months instead of the 
60-odd prompt dates, a clear- 
ing house (presumably the 
International Commodities 
Gearing House with whom 
the LME hopes to complete 
arrangements by the early 
autumn), margin pools and 
the whole works. 

Trade hedges will cover 
themselves on the futures 
market-There is much to rec- 
ommend this arrangement. It 
will bring the LME into line 
with markets around the 
world, albeit at the cost of 
sacrificing the eccentricities 
greatly beloved of members. 

1 would add my nickel's 
worth. One of the (numerable 
sub-committees is investigat- 
ing the feasibility of formal 
■traded options. An informal 
options market is already a 
significant part of the business 
done between LME members. 
An options markets could 
stand alongside the physical 
and futures contracts as the 
first leg of a re-vamped LME. 

Options are all the rage and 
other markets and could be- 
come equally so on the LME. 
But I daresay that the volume 
of words will swell handsome- 
ly before so radical a decision 
is taken to swell the volume of 
business. 

Michael Prest 


APPOINTMENTS. 


D E & J Levy: Mr Martyn 
Calder has joined as a partner. 

Bear Brand Hosiery: Mr 
Alan Cotton has been made 
chairman. 

Carless. Cape! & Leonard: 
Mr K J Wiseman is appointed 
managing director of Carless 
Solvents, succeeding Mr K 
Turner, who remains chair- 
man. Mr A Morgan joins the 
board of Carless Petroleum. 

Hawtal Whiting Holdings: 
Mr Kenneth Sinclair has 
joined the board as finance 
director. 

W S Atkins Group Consul- 
tants: Mr Mick Duckett. Mr 
Richard Jarvis and Mr Brian 
Patterson have been appoint- 
ed to the board. 


Bemrose Transfer Prints: 
Mr John Myott has been 
named commercial director. 

American Express: Mr 
Christopher Rodrigues has 
been made managing director, 
travel and travel management 
services. 

Beneficial Trust and Sav- 
ings: Mr Martin J Leadbetter 
has become operations 
director. 

Charterhouse Japhet: Mr 
John F Aslbury and Mr 
Michael R B Gatenby have 
been named joint managing 
directors. Mr Paul C Button. 
Mr Edward D Glover. Mr 
Michael R Hargreaves and 
Miss Jeanne E Short have 
been made directors. 


Advertising 
up 22% at 
Scottish TV 

Scottish Television report- 
ed that advertising revenue 
has been strong this year with 
the first quarter showing a 22 
per cent increase over the 
comparable period for 1985. 

The company was announc- 
ing pretax profits of £4.34 
million for last year cpmpared 
with £3.69 million in 1984. 
Final dividend is 8. Ip making 
a total of )0.5p, up from 8.8p. 

The chairman. Sir Camp- 
bell Fraser, said last year saw a 
13.5 per cent increase in net 
advertising revenue. 


a HA LAMA: The company has 
completed the purchase of the 
issued share capital of Noigan.- 
B us in ess will be absorbed into 
Hanovia. a subsidiary. The 
consideration of £285.000 will 
be satisfied by the issue of 
■ 117.207 ordinary shares, cred- 
ited as fully paid. There is 
provision for a further payment 
of up to £ 1 00.000. depending on 
sales of Norgan products. 

O WILSON (CONNOLLY) 
HOLDINGS: Final 2.85p. mak- 
ing 4p (3). One-for-one scrip 
issue proposed. Figures is £000. 
Profit before tax 20,287 
(15.835). tax 8.421 (6,698). 
Earnings per share 26.9p (20.7T. 
Chairman looks forward to 
reporting further progress. 


• NORANK SYSTEMS: The 
chairman. Mr A L R Morton, 
says that company is experienc- 
ing buoyant trading conditions. 
He anticipates substantial 
growth in 1986. 

• GASKELL BROADLOOM: 
Final 3.5p (same). Results for 
1985. Figures in £000. Pretax 
profits 1.133 (1,204). Earnings 
per share 14p(15.4). 

• MACFARLANE GROUP 
(CLANSMAN): Dividend 
].S7p (1.237). making Z482p 
(2.157 adjusted). Figures in 
£000. Profit before tax for year 
to December 31, 4,022 (3.011). 
Earnings per share before 
extraordinary items 7.805p 
(6.375 adjusted). 


Share "prices are on page 29 



John Can; astro: 





252 


200 


163 




• •• 

V 


Commenting on the results the Chairman, 
Maurice Jenkins, said: 

1985 proved to be a very difficult year 
made worse by the fall of both the US dollar and 
even more significandy the Australian dollar. 
The 1985 profit before taxation would have been 
some £4,000,000 higher at the 19S4 exchange 
rates. 

The UK. cement divisions sales recovered 
during the second half of the year with modest 
~ growth beingachieved in the 

final quarter. However, the 
recovery in trading profits 
was affected by a further 
manpower reduction pro- 
gramme, which cost some 
0,750,000. 

John Carr (Doncaster) 
PL.Cs first contribution, a 


14 'S 


Wr 








165 

TURNGVER£m!44 

dollars were some 5% higher. P - ; \ 

The mutually beneficial tax ' ^ 

profiles of John Carr and the par- 
ent company resulted in a lower 
than normal tax charge for 1985. 

There will also be a modest 
benefit in 19Sd 

All members of the Group ^ 
started the current year well, but the 
extensive snow and low’ temperatures 
reduced “wet" construction activity in 
the U.K. during February. Given stable 
currencies and a full years contribution from 
1985s major acquisition, John Carr, a strong 
recovery is expected. 


61 *2 S3 3-1 S3 
THE LAST 
5 YEARS 


The Directors recommend an 
increased final dividend on the 25p 
Ordinary Shares of 3.5p (33p) - which 
together with the interim dividend of 
2.9p (2.9p)- makes &4p (6.2p) for the 
year. The proposed filial dividend, if 
approved.will be payableon lstjuly 1986 
to Shareholders on the register at the 
close of business on 2nd May 1986 



[ =£ 

trading profit of £3,741,000, was a record half 
year, Rom limited continued with its recovery. 

Overseas, Cockbura Cement Limited had 
a good year with its 
trading profits 14% 
higher in its local 
currency, despite a 
reduction in land sale 
profits to £445,000. 

In America, the Addison Corporations 

performance was affected 
by the acquisition of the 
new’ branches, which in- 
creased its size by some 
65%. The related cement 
companies’ results in US. 




Results in Brief 

1985 
£ million 

1934 
£ million 

Turnover 

2522 

200.0 

Profit on ordinary 
activities before taxation 

21.8 

27.S 

Earnings 

18.0 

17.4 

Dividends 

9.1 

75 

Earnings per share 

13.7p 

14.5p 

Dividends per share 

6.4p 

6.2p 

Exchange rates used: 

AS = £1 

212 

1.40 

USS = £1 

1.45 

1.16 


THE RUGBY 
PORTLAND 
CEMENT P.L.C. 


It is our policy to continue to expand the 
Group's activities with a view to developin g 
further as a widely based buildin g materials 
com pan y; one of whose ma jor product areas 
will remain cement. 


a copy of the 1985 Report and Accounts 
I containing the full review by the Chairman, 

■ ( which is due to be posted on 9th May 1986), 
I pic ase sen d the coupon to: The Secretary, The 

I Rugby Portland Cement EL.G,Ciown House, 

■ Rugby CV212DT 

Name 

, Address 


Postcode. 



Law Report April 8, 1986 


Employer obliged to pay 
stated amount despite error 
in architect’s certificate 


& 


Lnbenbam Fidelities and In- 
vestment Co Ltd v South 
Pembrokeshire District Coun- 
cil and Another 
Before Lord Justice May. Lord 
Justice Slade and Lord Justice 
Neill 

[Judgment given March 4] 

Where in a building contract 
it was agreed that the employer's 
architect would issue interim 
certificates slating the amount 
due to the contractor from the 
employer and that the con- 
tractor would be entitled to 
payment therefor within a speci- 
fied period, the employer was 
bound to pay the amount stated 
in the certificate, even though 
that amount was wrong and the 
certificate contained patent or 
latent errors. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
in a reserved judgment, d ismi ss-- 
ing appeals by the plaintiff. 
Lubenham Fidelities and 
Investment Co Lid. the succes- 
sor of a firm of contractors 
employed by the first defendant, 
the South Pembrokeshire Dis- 
trict Council, from a decision of 
Judge Newey. QC. sitting as an 
Official Referee on May 26, 

1 983. in a dispute, arising out of 
two contracts on the S tanda rd 
Form of Building Contract, 
1963 edition (July 1975 re- 
vision) Local Authorities' Edi- 
tion (With Quantities) between 
the plaintiff and the council and 
the second defendant. Wigley 
Fox Partnership, the council's 
architect. 

Mr Simon Goldbfatt. QC and 
Mr Edwin Glasgow for the 
plaintiff: Mr Stephen Desch. QC 
and Mr David Tucker for the 
council; Mr John . Dyson. QC 
and Mr Robert Gaitskefi for the 
architect 

LORD JUSTICE MAY, 
delivering the judgment of the 
court said that the architect had 
issued interim certificates in the 
usual RIBA form for the value 
of the work done at a particular 
date, less certain deductions 
which it was now accepted by all 
parties should not have been 
made. 

The plaintiff had demanded 
payment for the full value of the 
work done, but the council had 
refused to pay more than the 
amount certified. The plaintiff 
had issued notices under the 
contracts to. determine them and 
'had suspended work; the coun- 
cil had taken that as repudiation 
and had issued notices to deter- 
mine under the contracts. 

A procedural point had arisen 
as to whether the plaintiff could 
appeal on issues of fact. 

That was governed by Order 
58. rule 4 of the Rules of the 
Supreme Court. It was dear 


from Moody v Ellis {(1983) 25 
BLR 39.46) that where an issue 
of fact was relevant u> J 
defendant's lability for alleged 
professional negligence, then an 
appeal would lie on that issue of 
feci* 

Since negligence was not 
actionable per se. where a claim 
was in tort the issue might well 
be whether damage was provea 
to have been caused by that 
negligence, as Lord Juarce Law- 
ton had said in Hubert C Eeuch 
Lid v Norman Crosstcy & Part- 
ners < unreported, December I.- - 
1984). If the claim were in 
contract, different consid- 
erations might arise. 

On the true construction ot 
the contract, the issuing of an 
interim certificate was a con- 
dition precedent to the 
plaintiffs right to be paid, and it 
was entitled to be paid onlj as 
much as was staled by the 
certificate. _ , 

That gave effect to the dear 
contractual intention that the 
contractor should carry out the 
works under the supervision ot 
ihe architect, whose instructions 
each side were bound to follow, 
subject to their right to go to 
arbitration (in this case before 
completion). .. . . 

The value attributed to th e 
constituent parts by the archi- 
tect in his certificate could never 
be more than approximate:, it 
depended upon his expert opin- 
ion as as the person to whom the 
parties had chosen to entrust 
that function. Any error could 
be remedied by adjustments in 
subsequent certificates. 

There was no sufficient rea- 
son for differentiating between 
certificates containing patent 
errors and those containing 
latent errors. In default of 
arbitration or a new, adjusted 
certificate, the contracts gave 
the plaintiff no right to sue for 
the higher sum. 

If that were not the proper 
construction of clause 30 of the 
contract, the express power to 
open interim certificates on an 
arbitration while the cont ract 
was still executory, conferred by 
clause 35(2). would be 
purposeless. . . 

The plaintiff had argued that 
even if clause 30 were to be 
construed in that way. it could 
rely upon the decision in 
Panamena Europea Navigation 
(Campania Umltada) v Fred- 
erick Levland & Co Ltd ((1943) 
76 LI LR 113, CA; [1947] AC 
428, HL). 

In the circumstances that 
submission could not be made 
good. The facts of Panamena 
were very different from those 
here. The ratio of that decision 
had been that a party could lake 


advantage of the non-tulfilmcm 
of a condition precedent where 
it had hindered performance 
and that there was an implied 

term that the employer would 
c m re el its agent when it disco v- ^ 
ercd that be was not fulfilling his 
duties under the contract. 

Here die council had done no 
more than acquiesce in the 
architect's erroneous cer- 
tificates. That did not suffice to 
expose it to liability to pa v sums 
higher than those specified in 
the certificates in accordance 
with Panamena principles. Gil- 
bert- 4sh i Northern) Ltd v Mod- 
ern Engineering (Bristol) Ltd 
ijl974] AC 689) was of no 
assistance in this context. 

Moreover, in this case the 
very wide arbitration clause 
made the implication of an 
further term unnecessary; there 
had been no arbitration clause 
in Panamena. - 

There was no g eneral rule of 
jaw that, apart from the terms of 
contract, a contractor was^ 


the contract, a — — 

entitled to suspend work upon 
the employer fefling to pay any 
sums due, and Gdbert-Adi did 
not support the existence of 
such a rule. There was no k&l 
basis on which toe suspension of 
work could be justified here. 

It was not the case that an 
architect, in issuing- an interim 
certificate under such a comma, 
could never in any circum- 
stances expose himself to a 
claim in rort for interference 
with the contractor's contractual 
rights. - . 

He could become so liable if 
for example, in effecting a clause 
30 valuation, he deliberately 
misapplied the clause's pro- 
visions with the intention of -j 
depriving the contractor of the - 
larger sums to which he would 
otherwise be entitled^ 

The plaintiff trad submitted 
that this was such a case. 
.Although the mere feet that the 
architect mighLhave been acting 
in good faith with the motive of 
serving the coundfs best in- 
terests. or ihe mere ignorance of 
die unlawfulness of his actions 
could by themselves afford no 
defence to a p ers on who knew 
all the facts, the architect bad 
not be shown to have had the 
intention necessary to constitute 
actionable inter f ere n ce with the 
plaintiffs contractual rights. 

Even viewed objectively, this 
had been straightforward pro- 
fessional negligence r - far from 
living to interfere with the 
performance of the contracts, he 
had been doing his incompetent , 
best. * • 

Solicitors: Geoffrey Hill & 
Co. Leicester. Sharpe Pritchard 
4r OH. 


& Co foe Mr — 
Pembroke: Ince & Co. 


James. 


Prejudicial conduct can affect 
member’s " rtlh * c 



In re a.Company (No 00477 
of 1986) 

Before Mr Justice Hoffmann 
[Judgment given March 21] 

The application of section 459 
of the Companies Act 1985, 
relating to conduct unfairly 
prejudicial to a member of a 
company, was not necessarily 
limited to his strict legal rights 
but could include wider eq- 
uitable considerations. 

Thus the interests of a mem- 
ber who had ventured bis capital 
in a small private company 
might include the legitimate 
expectation that he would con- 
tinue to be employed as a 
director, so that his dismissal 
would be unfairly prejudicial to 
his interests as a director. 

Mr Justice Hoffmann so held 
in the Chancery Division, refus- 
ing to strike out the petition of 
Mr and Mrs S under section 459 
against the respondent company 
O pic, controlled by Mr A and 
Mr B. and giving leave for the 
petition to be amended. 

Mr Richard Slowe for the 
petitioners: Mr Jonathan. Crow 
for the respondent company. 

MR JUSTICE HOFFMANN 
said the respondents applied to 
strike out the petition as an 
abuse of process, contending 
that even as re-amended, it 
would still be demurrable. The 
allegations in the amended draft 
were in substance a claim for 
damages for deceit and breach 
of contract. 

It was alleged that in April 
1985 it was represented to the 
petitioners that if they would 
sell their shares in A Ltd to O 
pic. that company would invest 
substantial funds . which it held 
on deposit, in developing A 
Ltd's business; that the petition- 
ers would continue as directors 
of A Ltd. Mr S as managing 
director that Mr S would come 
on to the board ofO pic and that 
the association between the 
petitioners and the individual 
respondents would be one of 
“partnership”. 

In reliance on those 
representations the petitioners 
sold their shares in A Ltd for an 
allotment of shares In O pic. 


treated as having a value of 
£ 100 . 000 . 

It was alleged that the 
representations, were false and 
fraudulent, in that O pfc had no 
funds for investment; that A Ltd 
was used to supply goods and 
services to another associated 
company known to be insol- 
vent. with the result that the 
company had a bad debt of 
£26,000, its assets had been 
sold, and H was no longer a 
going concern. 

The whole transaction was 
said to be a fraudulent scheme 
to strip A Ltd of its assets m an 
attempt to support the other 
company. 

It was further said that Mr S 
had been wrongly deprived of 
his managing directorship, and 
asked to resign from the board 
of O pic. The petitioners were 
said to have lost both the 
director's salary and the pros- 
pect of dividends , since the O 
pic shares were worthless. 

The petitioners sought an 
order for the purchase of their 
shares in O pic at a price 
equivalent to the value of their 
A Lid shares at the date of their 
sale in July 1985. 

The principal ground for the 
stoiking-oui application was that 
the matters complained of 
would constitute wrongs done to 
the petitioners, as defrauded 
vendors ofthe A Ltd shares or as 
a wrongfully dismissed em- 
ployee , and not matters “un- 
fairly prejudicial” to them as 
members of O pic under section 
459. 

His Lordship accepted that 
proposition in principle, but 
said that its application had to 
lake into account that, the 
interests of a member were not 
necessarily limited to his stria 
legal rights, since use of the word 
“unfairly” in section 459 en- 
abled the court to have regard to 
wider equitable considerations. 

The interests of a member 
who had ventured his capital in 
the business of a small private 
company might include the 
legitimate expectation that he 
would continue to be employed 


iOgfa 

relief 


under section 459. 
Solicitors: Reid Minty & C« 
* Foreman Laws, Hitchin: • • / 


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as a director, so that, his dis- 
missal would be unfairly preju- . 
didst to his . interests as a 
member. 

was argued that O pk was 
not a small private company, 
mid that Mr ffs rights, if any, to 
be employed as managing direc- 
tor or A Ltd. rested solely in 
contract and had nothing to do 
with his interests asa member of 
Opk. 

But, while there was force in 
that submission, his Lordship, ^ 
with some hesitation, concluded 
that the parts of the petition . 
based on prejudice to. Mr S"s 
position as managing director of 
A Ltd were not so plainly 
demurrable that they should be 
struck out. ■ 

The petition alleged that tire 
relationship between the pe- 
titioners and the individual 
respondents was to bea partner- 
ship relationship, in which the 
petitioners should take pan by 
conducting the business of A 
Ltd as a subsidiary, mid that 
although there ' was no restric- 
tion of the transfer .of shares in 
O pic in practice they were 
u n saleable 

The other ground of conh 
plaint was that the respondents’ 
conduct bad adversely affected 
the value of the petitknrers’ ^ 
shares in 0 pic 

It was argued that the real 
complaint was that those shares 
were valueless from the s tart. 
and that the petitioners had 
been induced to part with then- 
shares in A" Ltd_:by fraudulent 
misrepresentation, which could 
nm affect the value of the diaas 
m O pic. . . . -■ . 

Again- there was' force' in that 
contention but the facts alleged 
might bear on “unfairness 
under section 459. and bis 
Lordship would therefore not 
strike them out. 

However, if the petitioners 
went ahead with the re-amended 
petition they might well find 
themselves left without- a 'rem- 
edy. even if they suoceded ra 

fkawi tn 



4 






* 

' er ^ 


uc: canal? 
i table risk 




>* it 


5’1 r> ; 




- - Ronald Cohen: Looking 
for quality 

conjured up by the combined 
efforts of the entrepreneurs 
and the venture capital teams 
that have backed, them. 

RonaldCohen, chairman- of 
the BVCA, reflects for .a 
mordent on the successes. The 
once-struggling newcomers 
backed by venture capilal 
groups are progressively se- 
curing that seal of success, a 
public flotation. The names 
tumble out rather like * roll of 
honour. 

There is DPCE, a computer 
hardware maintenance com- 
pany which five years ago 
started with an equity capital 
of £350,000 and is now worth 
£65 million altogether, includ- 
ing £50 million of equity. It 
has produced about 400 "jobs. 

Isotron, which like DPCE 
has a full Stock Exchange 
quote, is not big in the Job 
stakes because h has exploited 
a British-based gamma radia- 
rion technology for steriliza- 
tion, particularly of medical 
equipment. But the - original 
investors have seen the value 
of their stake mnbiptied by 


THE 



TIMES 


April 8, 1986 


FOCUS 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON 

VENTURE CAPITAL/1 


high-risk business 
at grew to £300m G 


Michael Davtfeon 


P 


lap 


IE 


One indication of die matura- 
tion of Britain's venture ~caph 
tal industry is that it tesds.to 
be concerned with its feults - 
and problems rather 
successes. Apart from future 
growth prospects, the quality 
of managers to track the 
companies is probably- the, 

. biggest worry-' now. 

Vet ri looks as if the 
member companies . of the 
- British Venture Capital Asso- 
ciation — only pan of the 
industry — probably staked 
up-and-coming British cbm-~ 
ponies to' the tuoe of more 
than £300 miUion last year ~ 
almost a rise of a third bn the 
year before. •• 

That is admittedly a slow- 
down in what has been : pell- 
mell growth in this decade; 
1984 was 40 per cent up on 
1983, which shows the ex- 
traordinary rate of develop- 
ment in a market worth less 
than £20 million just before 
the stan of the present decade. 

Up to the end of last year 
1,500 companies had been 
backed by BVCA members, it 
is estimated. The total for the 
whole industry could well be 
2,000. Five hunched compa- 
nies Teceived BVCA support 
in 1984 and last year the 
fortunes of 700 more were 
potentially changed by injec- 
tions of cash. Assistance also 
came from the -hands on*' 
venture capital companies 
which get deeply involved : 
with their proteges, injections , 
of expertise and advice. 

How many jobs all this has 
created can only be guessed at 
The BVCA has finally got 
round to starting- a study on 
this. Some venture capital 
groups say thenr growing com- 
panies, will soon employ 100 
or more. If that -was anything 
like an average, it means 
150.000 new jobs have: been 


aboul'lOG times, the company 
. - now being worth £35 nulfion. 

The . venture capital group 
involved with DPCE and 
Isotron is Thompson Clive 
and Partners, whose- Colin 
Clive is deputy chairman of 
the BVCA and its chainnan- 
■ elect.-. 

Of DPCE, he recalls: “That 
was ' a risk and we were 
worried. Some 85 per cent of 
its business relied on one big 
user of mainframes, who 
might easily have pulled out” 

Macro 4, producing IBM- 
compatible systems software, 
is one of 40 high-technology 
companies' in which the Ad- 
vent venture capital organiza- 
tion is involved. 

Another success has been 
the Garfunkds restaurant 
chain, backed by Atnngworth. 
Our Price, the audio and . 

fXhe crucial 
thing is 
the quality 
of the 

investment 9 

records sales chain, was 
backed by Midland Bank Eq- 
uity, part of Midland Bank. 

. Among the companies set 
up with the help of venture 
capital, there are now 20 with 
foil Stock Exchange quotes 
and 47 on the unlisted securi- 
ties market (USM), the more 
Junior’' market, according to 
venture Economics, the lead- 
ing source of information on 
die industry. 

About half of these success- 
ful flotations were backed by 
Investors in Industry (£), the 
biggest provider of venture 
capital in Britain. It was set up 
by the Bank of England and 
the main banks. . 

Mr Cohen said: ^Mercifolly 
we have not yet had any big 
disasters.'* - V 

•- Yet in the nature of this 
high risk end of the business a 
fow disasters ■ ought to be 
expected. There have been, 
some failures, especially in 
high technology areas, and not 
all projected entries to the 
USM have so fer come off 

Mr Cohen said: “The mea- 
sure is not so much how for 
additional cash goes into hew 
and growing companies — foe 
crucial thing is lhe quality of 
investments made. 

• ‘ “And there -is the other 
factor, in high technology 
companies the degree of man- 
agement skills available does 
not match the pace of develop- 
ment of the industry. It is fort- 
moving, there are great 
fluctuations — it is a great 
challenge without* doubt** 

. It ted him to a drive in the 
past. 22 months to bring in 
more managers .and experi- 
enced executives into growmg 
companies. The problem is 
pereirating those with the 
dolls, now usually with big 
companies and yet aware of 

financial and family c laims to 

throw in their lot with what 
might seem high risk and even 
questionable ventures. 

The BVCA is now research- 
ing this problem - ty sending 
out questionnaires to typical 
managers of big company 
divisions. Mr Cohen said: “To 
an extent the problem is a lack 
of perception of what new 
ventures can. oSTer. 1 also 
believe many of them are just 
too cautions. After all, we look 
for 10 times returns on what 
we invest m five.yeais.** 

• It is the - quality of a 
company's management that 
professional venture capital 
investors look for, he empha- 
sized. “If there is no strong 
management team you will 


not invest because at the end 
of the day it is all about 
people. A Jot of the projects we 
have turned down were not 
because of their nature but 
because the teams have not 
been heavyweight enough to 
give us a reasonable shot at 
building up the business.” 

Bnt be is quick to point out 
that venture capital has gone 
into start-ups and early stage 
businesses to the extent of 
about 39 per cent of all 
resources injected. 

It does seem curious that 
the appeal of new ventures 
does not attract more manage 
ers with the expertise to propel 
more to success. The number 
of cash and on-paper million- 
aires created by the USM 
since it started just over five 
years ago has now reached 
467, according to the latest 
analysis by Touche Ross, the 
accountants. 

On the road to this sort of 
success there are a number of 
sources to be tapped for those 
searching for venture capital 
help. There are now more than 
120 venture capital funds, 
compared with 20 in 1979. 
Britain is now probably devot- 
ing a larger percentage of its 
gross domestic prbduct to 
venture capital than the Unit- 
ed States. 

A recent European study 
showed that about seven bil- 
lion ecu (European Currency 
Units) of venture capital were 
available in the EEC, of which 
well over a half had its source 
in the UK. 

Cohn Clive is optimistic 
about the future of the venture 
capital industry in Britain and 
that it will go. on creating 
companies and jobs to the 
benefit of the UK economy. 

He bdieves the Govern- 
ment should look more closely 
at the double taxation for 




Col&iCfireOiiMic 
about the future 

capital gams the industry still 
faces, imKine the situation in 
France where there is no such 
taxation of venture capital 
and in the US where the 
burden foils only once. 

Susan Lloyd, of Venture 
Economics, believes that one 
of the main weaknesses of the 
British venture capital indus- 
try is the lack of bigger 
industrial and commercial 
companies willing to involve 
themselves in venture capital 
projects either directly or by 
hiving off a subsidiary activi- 
ty. But some companies are 
doing this, including Ferranti 
and Thorn EMI and Italian- 
based Olivetti with its already 
extensive UK interests. 

The key question still lacing 
the venture capital industry in 
Britain is whether the big City 
institutions can be convinced 
that ample returns can be 
expected overall from such 
investment Otherwise the 
flow of this crucial cash back- 
ing might well seriously ebb. 

Derek Harris 

Industrial Editor 


Business Finance: Finding it 


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COMPANIES 


B9& 


The equity gap is noi quite the 
chasm it was, In 197} the 
Bolton committee, in the first 
real investigation of small 
businesses, noted that difficul- 
ties in raising finance started 
around and below £250.000 
which at today's prices is 
about £1 million. 

Now the problem area is at 
about £150,000, and particu- 
larly below £50,000. so the gap 
has to some extent been 
closed. 

The point is made in the 
recent report 1 * on external 
capital for small firms by the 
National Economic Develop- 
ment Council's committee on 
finance for industry. It found a 
substantial increase in equity- 
linked finance for businesses 
that needed £ i 00.000 or more. 
In 1984, for instance, there 
was a 35 per cent increase over 
the year before in equity and 
loans provided by venture 
capilal companies. These in- 
cluded Business Expansion 
Scheme approved funds, for 
companies that needed back- 
ing of between £100.000 and 
£1 million. 

But the Neddy survey found 
a much less dramatic impact 
at the bottom range of busi- 
ness needs. Of the companies 
which benefited under the 
BES, 70 per cent were raising 
capital of less than £100.000, 
but that still represented only 
I4percentofthe£i05 million 
provided by the scheme in 
total in 1983-84. 

investors in Industry I3i) 
provided rather more than 
twice the BES in this belcw- 


£1 00.000 sector, amounting to 
£28 million in the Neddy year 
of study. 

So 3’i remains the biggest 
provider for the little man, its 
own analyses showing that last 
year it made investments of 
£38 million in 174 start-up 
companies with more than 
100 of the investments in the 
£100,000 to £150,000 range. 
One trend emerging is that 
start-ups need more cash than 
in the past few years which is 
tending to move up the 
“floor - ’ for funding. 

Dr Neil Cross, assistant 
general manager at 3i. whose 
key responsibility is the small 
and medium-size businesses, 
maintains there is no equity 
gap if a business is viable and 
has prospects. The point he is 
making is one of horses for 
courses. When 3i backs a start 
up it is looking for a 59 to 60 
per cent return in five years. 
Thai son of growth is not 
usually going to come from 
the typical one-person 
proprietorial business which, 
even if successful, is going to 
make only a small profit 
margin. 

The Cross criteria for a 
viable proposition is: “if you 
believe in the people, the 
market and the product, and if 
the business plan hangs to- 
gether. so that it all looks as if 
it will work.” He added: “If all 
this is right then there is no 
equity gap.” In such circum- 
stances.' initial funding may 
well be below £100.000. 

Essentially, this same point 
Continued on page 26 • 


HOW WOULD A REQUEST 


iUi 


GO 





PPiP 


Ask most bank managers for a loan 
of £2 Vz million and their reaction 
may well be one of, shall we say, mild 
surprise. 

There is one bank, however; where 
local branch managers are happy to take 
such requests in their stride. 

Barclays, you see, have tapped the 
resources of Barclays Development 
Capital Limited. 

Which means our branch 
managers are able to offer companies 
loans of up to £2 ] A million. 

Unlike most financing schemes, 
a Basis Loan - as it’s called - does not 
involve selling off a substantial chunk 
of equity. 

Nor would there be any question 
of appointing external directors to the 
board. 

Naturally Barclays will want 
to assure themselves that the business 
concerned is likely to prosper 

And they will almost certainly 
wish to know what the finance is 
needed for 


It might be required for expansion, 
perhaps, for a management buyout or 
tor buying back shares. 

But at all times you'll be able to 
discuss matters with your local bank 
manager. 

Basis Loans are usually granted for 
sums between jf250,000 and 
£2,500,000. 

And while repayment arrange- 
ments are negotiable, we are happy 
to consider a repayment period of up 
to 10 years. 

For more details contact Clive 
McLintock at PO Box 1 88, Ebbgate 
House, 2 Swan Lane, London EC4R 
3TS on 01-623 4321. 

Or, of course, just get in touch with 
your Barclays bank manager. 

Even if you’re after a cool £2 x h 
million, you can be sure he'll keep both 
feet firmly on the ground. 






BARCLAYS DEVELOPMENT 
CAPITAL LIMITED 





THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


VENTURE CAPITAL/2 



i S 
\ / 


The tricky business of buying 
your shares over the counter 


Share buying, even in today's 
bull market, can be risky. 
Purchasing shares in “blue 
chip - ’ companies on the main 
market or in businesses traded 
on the junior market, the 
Unlisted Securities Market 
(USM). needs to be done in 
the knowledge that what goes 
up can come down. But 
perhaps the one area where the 
downside risk is the greatest is 
on the O'er the Counter 
Market 

Since its development a few 
years ago the OTC has played 
a small but useful role in 
helping small firms raise fi- 
nance for expansion. Certain- 
ly. no one wants to kill it off. 
But the fragmented nature of 
the market." its lack ofliquid- 
ity. and the impression among 
the investing public that it is 
poorly regulated, have stunted 
its growth and attention has 
been focussed more often on 
its more glamorous and now 
verv successfiil elder brother, 
the USM. 

Entry to the OTC markets 
are made either through share 
placings by a market maker 
with iis clients at a fixed price 
- in some cases underwritten 
by institutions - or by offers 
for sale. 

The funds raised by the 
OTC have risen from just £7 


million in 1982 to around £65- facing the OTC market, 
million last year. But there are Baynard Securities, which 
signs that this could be tailing trades in 10 UK companies, 
off and the OTC could be endeavours to steer clear of 
enicring a period of limbo stan-up situations — com pa- 
while iis future position in the nies with no trading record 
capital raising markets comes seeking to raise cash to pro- 
under review. mote an idea or project. 

Another factor is that the “We like to have had some 
sponsors of the issues, keenly relationship with the company 
aware of criticism in the past first and then insist on closelv 
of companies which have not monitoring the financial 
lived up to some of iheir progress of the business. But 
rather frolhv expectations, are there is a degree of nsk. The 
becoming more fussy about companies coming to us do 
whom thev chose to bring to not have 20 or 30 year trading 
the market. records. By the very nature of 

Mr Ted Awty of the accoun- the market they are new and 
tarns Peat Marwick, which considering the OTC is^a very 
have been closely associated big step for them, say 
with the development of the Baynard. 
market, makes the point: “The One of the leading market 
indications are that OTC mar- makers, which is itself traded 
ket makers are finding it more on the OTC. Harvard has 
difficult to identify sound brought to the market com pa- 
companies. They are con- nies like Hard Rock Cafe, 
scious of the image surround- Park Hall Leisure, and For 
ing some of them of being Eyes. . „ 

perhaps a little indiscreet over Harvard admit it gets cold 
iheir choice of companies in feet" over new companies and 
the past" is usually looking for a one 

That is as good a way of year trading record at the very 
«avins that the city has a long least. “And if it isn’t making 


saying that the city has a long 
memory and does not forget 
the experience of bad compa- 
nies foisted on an unsuspect- 
ing public 

The quality of the compa- 
nies remains the key issue 


profits in the current year we 
like to see a forecast for the 
year ahead,” says Steve 
Aquilina. 

Harvard usually seeks to 
raise at least £250,000 and will 


quote two way prices in the 
stock, avoiding a situation 
where a particular buyer is 
matched against a seller, one 
of the criticisms levelled at the 
restricted dealing facility on 
the OTC 

At the last count there were 
around 200 companies whose 
shares are traded on the 
market, through 12 main mar- 
ket makers.Patrick Harrex of 
accountants Spicer and Pegler 
says that the city siiti remains 
suspicious of the OTC. 

However, all this could 
change. When the new Securi- 
ties and Investments Board 
gets its power to oversee 
dealings in securities, dealers 
will need to be members of a 
recognised statutory regula- 
tory organisation. 

At present the OTC dealers 
come under the general um- 
brella of the National Associa- 
tion of Security Dealers and 
Investment Managers 
(Nasdim). But the likelihood 
is that the Stock Exchange 
itself will create a third tier 
market place to which the 
present OTC members could 
seek membership. This sort of 
stamp of approval would go a 
long way to giving the OTC 
the added status it needs. 

Cliff Feltham 




A hard world: Steve Aqeflina of Harvard. The Hard Rock Cafe was one of his fora's less risky OTC dienfcs 
















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As any schoolchild will tell you, there are 
one hundred pennies to the pound. 

We at the SDA beg to differ 
According to our calculations, onepound equals 
five hundred pence. 

Let us explain. 

When the SDA was established in 1975, it was 
seen by some as being the poor relation ot the private 
financial secret 

Time and our track record over the years have 
proved the doubters wrong 

In fact, our record is such that when we put 
money into a project, it encourages our friends in the 
private sector to follow suit 

T:i the point where every pound we invest brings 
in just over four times that amount from private sources. 
Last year we invested £9 million. 

Abu don't need a calculator to work out how 
much this ended up being worth to Scotland. 

Who benefited from this injection of capital? 
To date, over 900 firms have found their 
association with the SDA not so much useful as invaluable 
Here are just three of our success stories 

N lAKBJG MONEY GROW ON TREES. 

An .American entrepreneur by the name of 
John Godfrey read an SDA feasibility study on the Scottish 
timber industry. 

.Among other things, the report highlighted a 
significant opportunity: the manufacture of a new type 
of wood product known as Orientated Structural 
Board or OSB. 

We won’t go into the nitty gritty of OSB 
production. Suffice it to say that OSB is a very acceptable 
substitute for plywood 

The difference being that OSB can be made 
from much smaller logs than plywood. Just the land oflogs 
that Scotland has in abundance 

As luck would have it, Mr Godfrey had already 
set up an OSB mill in Maine, USA 

So, without further ado, he contacted the SDA 
with a view to establishing a similar plant in Scotland 

.After investigating the idea we were delighted 
to help. We invested £750,000 of the £12-5 million 
required most of which came from tire private sector: 


The new plant is now successfully producing 
OSB and is on course to employ 90 people. 

But thatk not alL It has helped Britain^ balance 
of payments, since in the past almost lOWo of plywood 
used in the UK was imported 

GROW, B.AEYGRQ. 

To all appearances, Babygro had everything 
going for them. 

A reputation for quality babywear so strong that 
their name was virtually a generic term for such clothing. 

A dominant position in the UK babywear 
market, with a 14% slice of the £66 million cake. 

And modem, well -equipped factories. 

Why then, had they been experiencing 
substantial losses? 

To find out, we offered the help of our 
Corporate Services Division. 

Following their investigations, a review was pro- 
duced which forecast a £l million loss if no action was taken. 

Not unnaturally Babygro's bankers decided it 
was time to solve the problem. 

With help from specialist textile and general 
consultants, the company was bought from its American 
owners, a new management team installed, and risk capital 
raised from the SDA and two like-minded partners from 
the private sector 

How successful has the cure been? 

Well, from a projected loss of £1 million, 
Babygro have recovered profitability and now have a 
programme of continuing developments. 

The company, it seems, is growing as fast as 
its customers. 

WHO SAYSTHERE'S NO MONEY IN BIOTECHNOLOGY? 

Right now; only a handful of companies in the 
world are making money’ out of biotechnology. 

So when Livingston- based Cruachem asked 
us for finance to manufacture a new’ range of chemicals 
aimed at that particular sector; we were even more 
cautious than usual 

We went through their plans with a fine tooth- 
comb, before we were finally convinced. 

And then not only did we back them, we per- 
suaded our private sector partners to do likewise. 


Has our investment paid off? 

Well, Cruachem now have a US subsidiary 
distrib uting and selling the ch em i ca ls they make in 
Livingston. They have customers from Scandinavia to 
Australia and Asia. 

And they are all set to manufacture the very 
latest ‘gene machines! 

NOW THAT WEVE HELPED THEM, 
HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 

As we’ve demonstrated, the SDA has been able 
to help a range of companies from new ventures to more 
mature companies requiring development fmaru-y. 

Wj'ie confident we can help you too; we can 
certainly advise you. 

A1 though you may wefl ask why a publicly 
owned operation should be any better qualified than the 
private sector 

To such questions, we give the following answers. 

Firstly we have to be seen to try harder 

To this end we will spend time and money 
thoroughly appraising an idea and talking in depth to the 
people involved. 

(Once we have done our homework, however 
we are remarkably fast at making a decision, and 
implementing it.) 

Secondly, being first and foremast a develop- 
ment agency we are prepared to accept a higher risk to get 
a desirable project off the ground 

Thirdly we will do more to help you than any 
conventional backer because we have a vested interest in 
the success of businesses in Scotland 

And finally having operated on both sides of 
the investment fence, our staff have contacts both in and 
out of the private sector 

We therefore have the flexibility to combine 
the best that private and public have to offer 

All these policies, as we've seen, have been 
extremely valuable to Scotland j^. 

Perhaps the time is right to find 
out just what they could be worth to you. 

Investment Division Dewefopment 

120 BoihweU Street Glasgow G2 7JE Telephone 041 248 2700. 



yA^ 


A brighter futore 
for the little man 


Con tiaiied from page 25 

is made by Colin Clive, depu- 
ty chairman of the British 
Venture Capital Association, 
whose members are not noted 
for looking at investments 
below £250.000. Mr Give 
said: “It is not the amount the 
venture capital company puts 
in. it is what comes out the 


to 3 per cent before. Guaran- 
tees that were being issued at 
330 a month dropped to less 
than 50. 

In the Budget the Chancel- 
lor changed all that The 
banks' risk exposure has re- 
mained the same but the 
premium has been halved to 
2 J per cent. On a total loan 
that means a business feces a 


other end. What venture capi- premia, of 1.75 per cent 
tal companies wtll not do is So the LGS could soon he 
put £5,000 into a Chinese thawing a few more planks 
laundry in a village. again across the equity gap for 

The smallest investment his ^ rea ||y small businesses, 
own company. Thompson banks are trinised the 

Clive and Partners, was m- .scheme has been given a three- . 
.valued in was £5,000 in ],fe enabling them to a. 

equity, but the company in properly and to get their w 
question bad a unique piece of marketing into its smS. Na- 
technology to exploit _ and tional Westminster and 
subsequently made profits of Barclays, for Instance, are 
£1 million on a turnover of optimistic^ about-. LGS 
£10 million. . growth white-looking - to. a 

Mr Clive admitted there .'gradual build up- They ma in- 
here varying views among that failure rates should 
venture capital compass a 1*5* rngiring 


about. .sma/I-scafe invest- lhat 4^ d^ajing-witfi^fee 
wn.-TOMlf sebetoe havebeCn tearim«1dl 
£20,000 myested could roake the rime. Barclays ndroas its 


sense provided therejw^ big fefluitratebasbeen<kwno5 
growth in prospect But others percent ” " . r 
might feel this was too small a Vrbere are taher "attnitpis 
deal, hesaid. going on fo dose the equity 

So where ran the small \STV*e«ra» the London 
owner-nin business turn for ' fjnterprise >^iey (LEntA) 
help? After all, although a ^ Rank Xerox - 


* Neddy found 
a much less 


bottom range of 
business needs ? 


these days. 


accommodation 


young business 
a betterchaac^ 
of survival^ 


- Single investors and local- Burnside Lodge- of Whitley 
ized groups as opposed to ^y.Theproj^isexpe^Eedto' 
nationai funds can often un- create 32 full /and .-parwune,’ 
der the Business Expansion jobs. Burnside; - run by^ a 
Scheme help the owner busi- ‘ :-I.. 

ness of this kind. Small busi- .«. 7L- ~. v 

nesses have on the other hand 

been notorious for a disindi- L r , All |* T , flnilfiMi 
nation to release a stake of Equity llfldOlg. 
equity in their “baby”. But it • -■■■■ . . : 

has been one of the achieve- often pivec 
mems of the BES that it has ~ ■? Vi - 

persuaded more entrepreneurs . 

10 do this, according to Peat yOUUg 0USIDCS5: *- 
Marwick Mitchell, the ac- . v ! .v; 

“ 0 U uS mS““- ” -a better chancy 

Equity fending instead of V : *' : 

too heavy a reliance on bank OI SUTVlVal *-^..- 
financing often gives a young ; _ ‘-V-L’ L- 

business a better chance of -i ' A.-A? • ' 

survival during the crucial 

early days. . husband and wife paitna&ip, 

It is nevertheless the banks has operated ihree^nanTfars- 
which — credit from suppliers ing homes for the elderfy and 
apart — are still the biggest the new fending vrill enable 
source of financing for small them to move to other aECom- 
businesses and especially can modarion which will double 
help the one-person project, the number in care. 
Undoubtedly, _ the Near to completion is ftrad- 
ooi^ronient s Loan Guaran- ing of a high-technology busi- 
tee Scheme has played a key ness in the region. Others are 
role there. In four-and-a-half in the pipeline, 
years to November 1 985 LGS Clearing banks are -looking 

/ ! Iake 5 c ^' S0 O u ^ usmess more closely at smaller invesi- 
with over £536 million. All raents. An example is Nation- 

BSnnn^ ^ below al Westminster Bank's 
,004.1. , Growth Options subsidiary 
In m id- 1984 the LGS terms with loans between £25,000 
were tightened up due to and £200.000 over ten years 
losses springing from a failure with options for a minority 
, " l lhree - The slake. Sir Philip Harris, head 
amoumof a bank loan guaran- of Harris Queensway, has also 
Government established a £1 million fend 
Per. «m to aimed at closing the equity 
70 per cent thus exposing the gap. 
banks to more risk. But wfaat 

really hit the scheme was the * External Capital Jar Small 
raising of the premium ro be Errmsr National Economic 
paid by borrowers: 5 per cent development Council — front 
(over, and above the going XEDO Books, Millbank Tow- 
interest rate) on the guaran- London SVPI 4QX;£350 
teed part of the loan compared rjtl 




retativeh- humdrum enter- pension fand to provide in- 

pnse JRJSZ vestments of £5a000 or less 

potential growth, that could forsmall^nterprisesfrofnaTL 

. million fund set aside.by the & 

. ' pension fund. Tyne and Wrar ' . ’ 

it Neddy found Enterprise Trust (Entrust) iri ..- 
the North Bast also joined toe - . 

a mach less ~ lts of , Ws - lwjll 
dramatic Impact at 

MnAn : been able to single dot 20 . 
bottom range OI enterprises as possible candl- . 

. dates and two offers are now 

bUSineSS needs " under discussion. '-OncAijfc* ' 

vdves a fibre-opties vertture : 
in West London and anottera 
- business speckiizin^ m .lhe . 

- develop. A single fish and chip promotion of mventioris 3 hh 1 
shop rai^it turn into a chain ideas. 
once a husband and wife team Entrust has had one ifrvest- 
get the bang of it. That would ment arranged" under v.ihe 
start producing a few more of scheme: Some £50,000 -Jias • 
the jobs of which small busi- been injected into a £250*000 « 
ness is largely the provider financing of larger iau£smg r '- ^ 


husband and wife parnwrtship, 
has operated ihree^naDitrins- 
ing homes for the eklerfy^nd 
the new fending will enable 
them to move to othtfasrom* 
modarion which will double 
the number in rare. 

Near 10 complctionisfend- 
ing of a high-technology busi- 
ness in the region. Otherc are 
in the pijxline. 

Clearing banks are -looking 
more closely at smaller invest- 
ments. An example is Nation- 
al Westminster Bank's 
Growth Options subsidiary 
with loans between £25.000 
and £200.000 over ten years 
with options for a minority 
stake. Sir Philip. Hams, head 
of Harris Queensway, has also 
established a £1 million fend 
aimed at closing the equity 
gap. 

* External Capital Jar Small 
//>wur National Economic 
development Council - front 
A EDO Books, Afillbank Tow- 
er. London SWl 4QX;£330 

DH 





A 




Arthurfoung Services 
to\fenture Capitalists. 

Wfe’ie boking for people 
who’ll take a long hard look 

at businesses. 


VENTURE CAPITAL/3 


Budget boost for the BES 


The business expansion scheme, intro- 
duced mq 983,, by the then Chancellor, 
Sf Geoffrey- ‘Howe, :was given an 
experimental life of four years. It has 

•now been’exiendeiifindefiiuteJy%:NiBd 

Lawson, Who announced the extension 


nue arid covered jmmarily the fiist year 
oftheBES's existence. 

Among the conclusions reached by 
PMM were: more than 94 percent of the 
-finance invested by individuals would 
not have been invested in die particular 


An estimated £50 million had already 
been raised on property development 
companies before the end of the 1984-5 
tax year. This - was almost twice the 
amount of finance that the companies 
forming the subject of the detailed 


* TO Ihjrt ■ JM _ un ww ww iim * w lurwwu IU U1W ytLl L i y U im 1U1IIIIUQ uiv vi — 

« ntmiui s Budget, describing the companies by. those individuals. This analysis in the PMM report raised 

" scnmne at the same time as “an : does not mean that the finance would Moreover, the report was finished by 
outstanding.success”." - • not have come from other sources and in October 31. 1985. — 4Vi months before it 

■ This glowmjj picture, however, con-, 
ceais the manifold-ways in which the/ 

• Kbeme was being abused nmfli this year’s 

Bud|et proposals sought toput it bade on : 

, the nghttrack. . • 

* The BES was actually the successor to 
the business startup , scheme (BSS), 
introduced by the Govemmentxn 1981. 

Both schemes aimed to stim ulate invest- 

i jpent in unquoted companies operating • 

^ m high-risk fields through giving, inves- 
S tors lax relief on their investments up to 
t certain specified limits. 

^ The terms of The BSS. whidi applied 

* only, to new companies,, proved too 
restrictive, so it was replaced by the 

* broader BES in, 1983,- which did not 
;• require that invesibr companies be start-. 

" ups. Broadly speakings -any company 

carrying on a “qualifying trade", which 
was not already quoted on the stock 
jg. market or the USM, would be aWe to 
; raise BES finance, 

r Oh the face of- it, the Inland Revenue 

* -- statistics for the money invested in BES - 
l projects for the. first two years of the 
V scheme’s existence, are impressive. In 
J year, one, according to the statistics, a 
5- total of £105 millioii was raised under 
' the BES by ■688 companies- Iq year two — 

- the 1984-85 tax year -- the provisional 

estimates from the Inland Revenue sbbw 
715 companies raising £136 ariffi oh. . . 

At the same time a detailed report on 
the scheme, prepared by accountants 
. Peat- Marwick Mitchell and published on 
Budget day, was referred to by the 
Chancellor as supporting his view of the 
scheme's success. The PMM report bad ' 
been commissioned by the Inland Reve* 


other forms. It simply rnmny that 
without the BES almost all of those 
investing would not have done so. 

Four thousand jobs were 
“attributable" to the BES. This does not 
mean that the scheme created 4,000 new 
jobs; in feet the PMM report says that 
only 870 new jobs were created. The 
balance of the 4,000 were jobs which bad 
been “saved". 

... .. Scheme had been 
-widely abused 

Classifying the nature of the invest- 
ment, the report said that only 14 per 
cent ofthe finance raised went to “higher 
risk companies". As against this 27. per 
cent went to medium-ride companies 
and 59 percent into low-risk ventures. 

. This last conclusion is particularly 
enlightening in that it shows that even in 
the early days of the scheme most BES fi- 
nance was hot going to the kind of 
. companies that the BES was set up for. 
Moreover yon have to bear in mind that 
the PMM report.ddibenuely ignored the 
notorious farming companies which 
raised money in the 1983-4 tax year 

The condushms of the PMM report 
and the “outstanding success" claim of 
the chancellor would have looked very 
different had the farming companies not 
been selectively ignored. 

The reality was that the scheme bad 
been brazenly and widely abused for a 
longtime before the ink had dried on the 
PMM report and for a long time after it 
was finished but before it was published. 


was published. This proved very conve- 
nient for a government that wanted to 
present the BES as “an outstanding 
success" because the report on which this 
conclusion was based, would not tackle 
in any detail the plethora of safe asset- 
backed tax shelters that had by that time 
characterized the BES. 

Hotels, retirement homes, nursing 
homes, pubs — in feet any opportunity to 
wrap the BES structure around freehold 
or long-leasehold property was exploited. 
Four companies alone in a matter of 
weeks before the Budget, raised almost as 
much money as the en tire ; 120 compa- 
nies included in the PMM report. 

Two of these were pub ventures, , one 
was a retail stores scheme, and the final 
one was Saim Hotels, a Johnson Fry 
hotel venture which raised £6.5 million 
in three weeks. 

Perhaps the most telling remark comes 
from Alan Comber. “If you plough 
through 1984-5 all you will get is the 
conclusion that we've got a lot of asset- 
backed schemes," he said. “We all know 
that the scheme was not meeting its 
objectives at alL" Mr Comber, inciden- 
tally, is the partner at PMM primarily 
responsible for the Peat report. 

One must hope that the new measures 
introduced will put the scheme back on 
the right track. The most significant 
provision in the Budget is the power to 
amend the definition of a qualifying 
trade by a statutory instrument 

This should mean that brazen abuses 
of the BES can be nipped in the bud 
before they have chance to flower. 

Lawrence Lever 


■There are more than 125 
sources of venture and devel- 
opment capital listed in a 
just out from Stay 
lyward. It also lists 30 of the 
bigger Business Expansion 
Scheme (BES) foods. 

Most of the venture capital 
sources are In. the private 
sector but there are some 
public ones. . " 

An example analysed in the 
latest Venture . Capital Re- 
port** is the Thames world 
nautical theme park for 
Greenwich. This is planned by 
a group of entrepreneurs 
which has an offer of grants 
totalling £200.000 from the 
ETB and the Greenwich local 
authority. 

Grants are also available 
from the EEC sources. 

There are six fecal enter- 


prise boards in England, three 
. In the North West and others 
in West Yorkshire, the West 
Midlands and Greater Lon- 
don. . 

Other- regional sources in- 
clude the Scottish and Welsh 
development ~ agencies, the 
Highlands and Islands Devel- 
opment Board and the Council 
for Small Industries in Rural 
Areas (CoSIRA). 

^Sources of Venture and De- 
velopment Capital in the Unit- 
ed Kingdom 1986: free from 
Stov Havward, 8 Baker Street 
London W1M IDA, (01) 486 
5888. 

** Venture Capital Report Feb- 
ruary 1986:' VCR, Refuge 
Building, 20 Baldwin Street. 
Bristol BS1 1SE: by subscrip- 
tion, (0272) 272250. : 

DH 


SOURCES OF FUNDS TO SMALLER BUSINESSES (£*000) 
Amounts invested per company in the liK 


Source 

Year 

Usual range' 
min max 

Total 

p/a 

Total 

outstanding 

USM 

84 

600 

3,200 

262,000 

730,000 

ore 

83-84 

240 

3,200 

39,000 

n/a 

BES: direct 

83-84 

5 

150 

66.000 

n/a 

BES: app. fend 

83-84 

50 

500 

39,000 

n/a 

578,000 

Venture capital 2 

84 

250 

750 

228,000 

3i 

84-85 

10 

500 

270,000 

1,142,000 

LGS 

84 

1 

75 

75.000 

350.000 3 

Bank king 

84 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 20,000,0003 

Local enterprise 
boards 

85 

100* 

750 

18,000* 

35.000 6 


'To cover 80% of financings, te, ignoring 10% extremes 
3 Figures include BES approved funds 
3 Estimate 

* Figures are for West Mdtands En te r pr i se Board. Other boards tend to 
lend at lower levels 
6 First fill year for some of LEBS 


.Source: Bank of England 




We’ll be 
right 
with you 

Chari-rir th..- world i> not <?a>y. 

Tint's why we work ver\ ci- ■><?!> 
•.vir' 1 a!l our clients and v.r pr< •vide' 
much more support than just 
i nance. 

In amounts from -£-5.000 to 
more than £2M «.ve have already 
n&l pi -d ovt -r 2C4 1 cor: ipa : lie by 
proGding each one with a strong 
equit\ base. The comma: lies we 
back are engaged in many different 
activities but they all have one 
* common quality: purposeful 
management . 

We !-ave the kind of sharp-end 
business exqe ner:ce and expertise 
to understand your problems and 
talk your language. 

So. if you brink you could 
benefit from our involvement and 
' you can demonstrate a highly 
motivated and imaginative 
approach to management, take 
the initiative today. 

. Contact: 

David Hutchings - 01-636 SS61. 
Or write to 

Midland Bank Equity Group. 

47 Cannon Street. 

London ECdMoSQ. 


MIDLAND BANK EQUITY GROUP 

Taking an interest in business. 


Inside your company there may be a thriving 

business struggling to get out 

You may well feel you could bring this about 
if only you were able to control your own destiny 
and carry through your best .ideas. 

Whatever the reasons, you and your 
colleagues may feel the right solution is a manage- 
ment buy-out . . 

If you have the drive and ambition we have 

the expertise and experience to help you 
overcome the many complex problems that will 
inevitably arise. k. ,. . G .. . 

Price Waterhouse specialists will be with 


you from the moment you decide to investigate 
tiie feasibility of a buy-out 

They will provide independent and 
cenfidential guidance - from assisting you in neg- 
otiating the most appropriate financial package to 
advising you on the most tax effective structure 
and, ultimately, helping you run a successful 
independent business. 

For further information call Tom Wilson or 
Chris Rees on 01-407 8989. 


Price Tfhterhouse 




Our Venture Capital team is expanding. 

If you’re a commercially-minded Chartered Accountant with 
the ability to recognise a good business when you see one, wed 
like to hear from you 

Wed particularly like to hear from accountants who ve had a 
spell in industry 

The team offers the Venture Capital investor all the usual 
range of services (such as business plan reviews and tax advice) 
but also some further ones not so commonly available 

We will prepare a rapid overview of a company to see if it 
represents a good risk. 

We can also undertake an in-depth study of particular 
aspects of a company which are of interest to the investor. 

We will subsequently review investments to identify 
problems and suggest solutions. 

In due course we can also help to realise an investment 

If all this appeals to you, write to. or phone Nick Pasricha on 

01 - 831 7130 . 

As were used to working quickly we expect to hear from 
you soon. 


Arthur YounS 


Telephone-. 01 

Accountants, Auditors 
Tax Advisors Management Consultants 




I nc- A livico 1 UCOUft I Artuxro tyoo 


16 VENTURE CAPITAL/4 


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“If the main purpose of the Unlisted 
Securities Market was to encourage 
new companies to come to the Stock 
Exchange, it must be counted a 
considerable success.” 

That is the verdict of stockbro- 
kers Phillips and Drew in their latest 
analysis of the rapidly maturing 
junior market and there are few 
people in the Square Mile who 
would disagree. 

The USM has in a little over five 
years since its tentative launch 
turned into a valuable capital 

raising feature of the City of 
London. At the last count a total of 
443 companies had joined the 
USM. Of these. 22 had been 
promoted to a full listing. 29 had 
been subject to takeovers, eight 
underwent reorganization, and nine 
had been suspended or cancelled for 
solvency reasons. 


From a tentative launch to 


a major source of capital 


The statistics bear out the 
market's remarkable growth. In 
1 982 £ 1 1 7 million was raised on the 
market rising to £344 million last 
year while the value of the compa- 
nies quoted had gone up in this time 
from just over £1.2 billion to almost 
£3.5 billion. 

From just 23 companies which 
somewhat nervously joined the 
market when it began in November 
1980 the numbers more than tre- 
bled the following year and last year 
reached 101. This year close on 
another 100 firms are expected to 
acquire USM status before the year 
isouL 

The USM was set up to stimulate 
the flow of new companies to the 
stock market. The authorities had 
become concerned at the dearth of 
new quoted companies and wanted 
to encourage the small 
entrepreneur. 


The Stock Exchange had felt that 
one of the main obstacles prevent- 
ing companies from coming for- 
ward for a full listing was the very 
high entry standard required, both 
in providing and publicising infor- 
mation and in making available 
sufficient shares to create a fair 
market. 

As a result it took the innovative 
step of relaxing the entry rules so 
that new firms were only required to 
produce a three year profit record 
instead of five years for the main 
market. And the owners of the 
business only had to sell to the 
public no more than 10 per cent of 
the equity compared with 25 per 
cent in the case of a full listing. 

For the authorities, laying out the 
welcome mat like this coincided in 
the headlong surge of the bull 
market. 

In the early days the market 
attracted a large number of high 
technology related companies, and 
oil and gas exploration companies. 
Now. however, the market acts as a 
cross-section of commercial life — 
with a range of companies drawn 
from brewing, property, finance, oil. 
leisure, printing, advertising, con- 
struction. retailing, and electricals. 

Firms like Bisgood. Bishop, the 
only stockjobber to make a market 
in all the companies on the USM. 
were fearful at one stage that a 
shake-out among the high technol- 
ogy companies could have dealt a 


hammerblow to the market's 
prospects. 

The biggest setback was caused by 
the near collapse of Acom Comput- 
ers, once the USM’s biggest compa- 
ny valued at £217 million. When 
dealings were halted with its shares 
at a lowly 28p, they had been down 
to 23p at one stage, pending a rescue 
by the Italian firm Olivetti. Acorn 
was worth just over £30 million. 
The boom or bust nature of many 
companies like Acorn exposed the 
dangers of single-produce business- 
es. But Acorn, now less dependent 
on the vicious home computer 
market, looks a lot happier and the 
electronics sector of the USM has 
staged a considerable recovery. 

The cycle through which the 
L>SM has gone, from oil and high 


financial public relations concern to 
forge a new business with sales of 
£60 million, a diem listing indnd- 
ing 800 of the top 1,000 companies 
— and a full Stock Exchange listing. 

The broadly-based USM also 
provided a launch pad for the full 
marker to companies like Spring 
Ram Corporation, the Yorkshire 
based bathroom products group, 
and McCarthy and Stone, builders 
of sheltered housing for the elderly. 

Spring Ram Corporation was 
worth just £ 1 1 million when it came 
to the USM in April 1983 and is 
now valued at around £80 million. 
Spring Ram started by manufactur- 
ing acrylic baths, later taking on a 
ceramic bathroom division, and 
then kitchen sinks and units. 


Prospects of growth 
by acquisition 


technology, has now taken it into 
the so-called “people” businesses — 
attracting public relations and ad- 
vertising firms. 

Addison Page, one of the largest 
communications groups in the 


country, was created at the begin- 
of i 


One of the reasons companies 
give for coming to the USM is to 
improve the prospects of growth by 
acquisition, although some critics 
say that fewer companies than 
expected have made use of their 
□ew status to expand in this way. 
.Another concern, never far away, is 
that the USM may suffer badly in a 
bear market. Some stockbrokers 
believe that while this may have 
been the case a couple of years ago it 
is now much less likely. 


stock. They arc much more likely to 
provide support for the market and 
sit out any period of weakness. 

In the meantime the USM has 
found supporters in the United 
States who say it provides a much 
cheaper and quicker method of 
obtaining a listing than at home. A 
US firm wanting to raise £3 milli on 
could expect to pay £300,000 for a 
listing that might take four months 
in London. In the US it could take 
three months longer and be 
£200.000 more expensive. 

But this does not mean the entry 
requirements are below standard. A 
few years ago some of the main 
sponsors to the market were con- 
cerned at the quality of some of the 
newcomers to the market. But 
today, with many of the best known 
banks, brokers, and accountants 
lending their names to the issues the 
quality of the candidates has im- 
proved considerably. However, as 
with any stock market issue, a 
degree of risk remains. 

Phillips and Drew, official bro- 
kers to 33 USM companies, says 
“investors both institutional and 
private have proved willing to 
support the shares of USM compa- 
nies even to the point in a few cases 
where observers feared that compa- 
nies would be unable to justify then- 
ratings by their results and thus 
cause general disillusion with the 
new market. However, this danger 
has receded with the very widening 
choice of USM companies to invest 


ning ot 1985 out of the merger of 
two USM companies, Addison 
Communications and Michael Page 
Partnership. It has just merged with 
the fully-quoted Chetwyn Streets 


They point out that the tightness 
of the market in the shares — itself 
something which probably needs to 
be tackled — will deter the big 
institutions from unloading their 


in, and the growing liquidity in the 
ated by 


market is demonstrated by the 
.rising volumes of dealings.” From 
turnover in USM securities of £282 
million in its first year, last year saw 
a peak of £1.7 billion. ... 

CF 


We’re always 

ON THE LOOK OUT FOR 
RISING STARS. 




It takes a special kind of person to push out 
the frontiers of technology beyond today’s state 
of the art. 

It takes belief in one’s own ability and ideas. 
It takes product knowledge and marketing skill 


And, yes, it takes guts to be a potential rising star: 

We understand. And we’ll do our best 
to provide a helping hand. 

Last year alone we put over £20 million 
into almost 100 high-technology companies. 

While some of our earliest stars moved 
through to a public share listing. 

Like Oxford Instruments with a full Stock 
Exchange Listing after 16 years’ association 


Or like LSI Logic after just two years, 
OTC listing in New York. 

If, like them, you’re a rising star in 


venture capital why not contact us? 
ve provided more of it for more 
than anyone else in the universe. 

The creative use of money 




aaiM3 



INVESTORS IN INDUSTRY GROUP pic. 91 WATERLOO RD, LONDON SE1 8XP. TEL: 01-928 7822. 




Dramatic nse f iiK 
in buy-outs j 



There are more than 100 
providers of venture capital in 
Britain and nearly all of these 
have at least one management 
buy-out in their portfolio. 
Management buy-outs are 
judged to be at the lower end 
of the risk spectrum and a 
vital part of any well-balanced 
general venture capital fund. 

Over the last five years both 
the number and size of man- 
agement buy-outs have grown 
enormously. According to the 
UK Venture Capital Journal. 
112 manag ement buy-out in- 
vestments were completed in 
the first 10 months of the last 
year compared with just 60 in 
1981. And these figures ex- 
clude 3i, the largest manage- 
ment buy-out specialist in 
Britain accounting for perhaps 
as many as a half of the 
investments made in this 
field. 

By value, the growth has 
been even more dramatic 
rising from deals worth £84 
milli on in 1981 to £343 mil- 
lion in the first 10 months of 
1985. Charles Gonszor of 
Citicorp Venture Capital, 
reckons that total will double 
in 1986. 

“Before last year h was 
uncommon to see a manage- 
ment buy-out deal worth more 
than £10 million,” he says. 

“Last year, however, there 
were a number in the £30 
million plus range including. 
Haden at £57.5 million, 5L 
Regis at £52 million, 
Mallison-Denny at £90 mil- 
lion, and Mardon Packaging 
at £273 million. 

“We expect to see a number 
of even larger deals this year 
both because of increased 
awareness of management 
buy-out opportunities and be- 
cause of the growing number 
of international conglomer- 
ates wishing to divest them- 
selves of their peripheral 
businesses. This is particularly 
the case with large American 
corporations some of whose 
unwanted European interests 
are very large indeed,” Mr 
Gonszor says. 

There is some debate about 
whether management buy- 
outs are really venture capital 
or just fixed interest invest- 
ments with an equity kick, 
back. Nearly all buy-outs are 
of established businesses with 
recognized markets and a 
considerable number tend to 
be in mature cash generating 
industries with a kiw level of 
anticipated development and 


start-up. Richard Gawthoroe. 
chief executive of Frutcc and 
Pro venture, believes strongly 
tha t management buy-out 
companies should get suppari 

from the investor group in 
oidcr to deal with the host of 

additional management prob- 
lems they will encounter once, 
the parent is lost . 

**This normally involves d-. 
tber staff from one of the 
investors going on.ifre board 
of the company or else the 
appointment of an outsider or 
outsiders to the board as non- 
executive directors. 

Equity participation m 
management buy-outs is often 
limited fo a small number of 
senior managers or directors 
who put their own money and 
reputations at risk. There is an 
inherent danger in this, ac- 
cording to Mr Gawihorne, 
since if the buy-out is success-' 
fill and large capital gains are 
made, it can cause jealousy 
and poor motivation lower 
down the management scale. 

“This problem bas occurred 
in the recent purchases of 
stockbrokers where the part- 
ners have sold out for large 
cadi sums and the next tier 
down, on whom, firms often 
depend, have got liute or 
nothing. 

Most of the examples iff 
employee buy-outs have been 
privatizations where' the 
Government's aim of wider 




i 

*■ t 


4 


Y 





if 


: a" 






Charles Gonszar: Even . 
fangs deals this year 

share ownership has provided 
as added incentive. The first 



was die National Freight Cot- 
es folic 


I 


capital expenditure, 

Derek Sach, a director of 3i, 


points oat that the techniques 
involved in appraising a man- 
agement buy-out are exactly 
the same as fiv any venture 
capital situation though one 
positive advantage is that the 
management team wiH have a 
track record which can be 
inspected. 

“You can never be sure a 
business, however wdl devel- 
oped, will work after being 
separated from its parent,” Mr 
Sach says.. One in seven 
'management buy-outs foil and 
though this compares well 
with start-ups where the fail- 
ure rate is one in three, the risk 
reward is still high compared 
with listed equities. 

Management buy-out com- 
panies tend to be treated by 
venture capital funds in much 
the same way as a traditional 


potation. This was followed 
by Vimulic and more recent- 
ly by the Swan Hunter and 
Vickers shipbuilding yards. 

Most, or these, employee 
buy-outs have worked well 
though .obvious problems 
have emer g ed when redun- 
dancies among workers who 
are abb shareholders become 
necessary. 

Typically, venture capital 
institutions look for four main 
features in a management 
buy-out company: 

■ Strong cash generation. 

■ Low working: capital 


requirements. ; . 

■ Low capital expenditure 


reomremenis. • • 

■ High asset backing.' 

■ A company possessing all 
these characteristics would be 
an ideal candidate for a man- 
agement buy-out allowing a 
rapid unwinding of . the debt 
finance in the buy-out and. a 
consequent high level of re- 
turn for the equity investors. . 

Jeremy Wanier 

Business Correspondent . 




ENTREPRENEURS 


£ Millions available for investment in 
New and esiieigmg businesses in the ILK. 5 


If you run a company starved of cash* ace 
keen, enthusiastic and determined to • 
succeed against aU odds— 

You could qualify to join tire elite band of 
companies floated by 
Harvard Securities PLC 
on the Over-The-Counter market. 


CONTACT US NOW ON 01-928 3330 
Ask for Clive Lawrence or Marie Prit chard 



HARVARD 
SECURITIES PIC 


licensed Dealer in Securities 
HARVARD HOUSE; 42-44 DOtBEN STREET; LONDON SET 0UQ 

kagastR«cal«tU(anr— Suppacfliia%(iiorfM%BiaskiWbdO|L 




STARTUP OR YOUNG BUSINESS? 
EXPANDING INTERNATIONALLY? ; 
EUROPE? USA? JAPAN? 

Needing: 

CONTACTS? 

SUPPORT? 

FINANCE? 

Contact 

Baring BrothersNambrecht a Quist 


140 Pak Lane 
London W1 
Telephone 
(01)4080555 



54Ruedu Stand 
1204 Geneva 
Telephone 
(022)29231.40 





j-j . 



. ■ r 







a VA'-rsJ'-./JUlfctis - f- 


THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


FINANCE AND IN DUSTRY 


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BIB <13 Unon 
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STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Broad retreat 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began April 1. Dealings end April 11. §Contango day April 14. Settlement day. April 21. 
^Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 



© Times N«iwf*pef« United 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Qaims required for 
+44 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


Price Cn'oe pence % PIE 


34 . . t.« t a 4* 

|77 B+72 428 SO 103 

0*3 S2B 88 813 

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58 77 178 
117 23 203 
214 33 143 
7.0 45 134 
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CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


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43 27 Gnoman 

340 176 HTV fW 
350 263 -1WT HkJo. 

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218 153 TVSM/V ' 
43 31 T8W 


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40 .. 24 50 98 

205 B+3 114 58 95 

3*0 B+10 219 53 188 
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a» B+3 114 5-5 100 

41 .. -28 53118 


DRAPERY AND STORES 



29'. 24»,Coiaa»2.W< . 

29 24%'ftaM 2'f% 

INDEX-LINKED 

i2i iM’.Trw* &• ?> !*2 


BANKS discount HP 


135 ae i 

W* 67 t 
SB 79 I 
173 185 I 
. 18 13 1 
82 SI. I 
605 625 I 

S’E! 

45 « I 

3S5 605 < 
540 *26 I 
26B 145 • 
152 118 > 
355 305 , 
SO 62 ' 

SMS! 

91 . 73 ! 
995 610 1 
190 134 
274 194 
132 39 

132 W5 
133% 51 
168 183 
458 "310 
1TD 37 

74 54 
121 .88 
192 172 
455 312 
’M%83D 

10% 721 
302 196 
32 2S 
39 29 
337 240 
M3 102 
88 78 
96. 3( 

133 112 
ZEB 135 
830 900 
186 173 
261 166 . 
39T 2B9 ■■ 
185 190 
630 569 
150 112 
286 IBB 
353 315 
575 605 

6i as 
SB 56 
112 10D 
141 112 

ft 31 
330 220 
177 133 
3B 31 
ITS 180 
9B 72 
i«'»ioa 

362 234 
. 7Z 47 

90 » 
389 273 

42 27 

91 «13 

75 40 
73% STb 

106 180 
370 173 


132 

(Ml "A- £ 

Lea 15 


Dowttffi*n) *■ 
OAK Stapaon 'A' 

ow*W M 

D«c«* Grp 
DurBB 

9* 6 Goldstein 
Bm 0»T*taion) 
am 9m 

Ban 

Emta draftee 
fine Art Dev 
F ort (Me mo; 
Fraeilnetar 

Frearaana 


•-1 38 41 173 

+i aa as i5i 
-3 3.1 18343 

14*2342.8 

4 ’if ZA US 

V: S? IS^ 

.. 12.1 39 133 

+2 17.1 b 3316.1 

•-10 SS 48218 
• ... 6.7 4J 11.7 

14 18 208 

-9 43b 1.1 445 

-5 61 18 234 

+% 93 42 109 

-10 tao 292M 
54 39. 1T.1 
.. 48 1.7 291 

+17 23- 32 88 

-3 47 8.7 228 


BUS • 

DOW 

Hina taMwy 
wane Of Lnxm 
Hoau- 
Horne Charm 

Home Of Leroe# 

Jonaa fSnaaa) 
Lidas me 
LCP 

LacOwpar 

lSSSmOobw 

Marta 8 Spenear 
Mantes (AWH 
tarn Latture 
Uoae Bn 
MSS Ntaasgatt 
Hart 


SMEkaS 

Raao&sM 3» 

Do W 177 

BlUSUraC 32 
3BM(H) 1W 

Do W « 


- Dair 

Strata? |AQl 

semnouaa 

SltatCHM 


Tim Product 
URdMoodt 
wwBmup 
mn«n 


electricals 


318 1BD ABS as /• » 

490 180 mu .47* #-M 

«9 81 Apricot Compmr. « -I 

300 206 HBnacGbnM 290 -7 

53 46 MW SI .. 

90S mo Auto Sac ' £05 . +10 

fas So see ■■ 3« -a 

119 6* UR - 1« v 

484-379 BortBoip# *6* * 


60. 34443 

8--SH 

78 21 342 
' 13 11 2*8 
33 41149 
119 33 218 

7.'i iJ» zra 
23a 49153 
25 34 161 
24 133Z9 

113 33103 
B3n 29 149 
36a 13 
143 18 240 


114 29228 

16 03353 
21 23 72 

38 13 92 

..143 

21 19 121 

157 *5 K.T 
£4 29 79 

22 13 224 


1996 

Mgo Low Com pa ny 


Ita Ml 

Price Ch’ga panel % P/£ 


43 19113 
13 109 442 
19 29 79 
138 15 232 
106 38 199 

11 OS . . 

.. ..708 

21 67 lit 

48 15 3*8 

8.1 28 133 

94 88845 

19 05 .. 

15 3.1 107 

15 0.7 ZU 

29 O M8 
*9 29 129 

79 29 251 

19 15990 

46 21 224 
72 25 222 
65 29 16.6 
29 14 235 

28 17 168 

39 13158 

07 15 219 

58 39 139 
M2 27 73 
36 35 129 

12 1.1 129 

19 03 .. 


• .. 

W.7 

43 1X3 


7.1 

59 27.1 

-8 

173 

89 72 

-6 

144 

06 19A 

-a 

M3 

44106 

+6 

43 

1.1 289 

-6 

25 

43 67 

-15 

.. a 



49b 69 429 
2ln 03 .. 



1.1 

34 93 


193 

69 130 


76 



11 

69 67 

• +7 

2.0 

X4X5 

+1 


80 100 


575 

39 .. 




-2 

75 

42 16 

-6 

75 

XI 67 


66 

31 168 




• -3 

61 

24 167 

+1 


.. 125 


42 

23120 


7.1 

36 108 


314 

XB 129 


27 

38 1X1 


xa 

14 80 

*e 


.. 72 

+2 

65 

31 130 

• .. 

08 

05 312 

-2 

inn 

621*0 


25 

27 54 

-ib 

250 

50 160 


61 

25 103 


74 

08 22.1 


78 

28 233 

-5 

85 

30 125 

■4 

S3 

10 67 


61 

58 129 


68 

00 250 


114 

42 112 

+r 

SB 

42 215 


72 

25 135 

• .. 

99 

67 139 


FINANCE AND LAND 


Abtoge«*i 240 +2 19 03 .. 

mm Hmm irs 119 7.7 69 

dnmta^n 470 p-10 273 S3 73 

Bortlsy Tacb 173 -2 

CanaM 620 •-% 17.1 09 799 

Cardomr 2*3 • .. 27 23 384 

Ca a raem 20 .. B .. .. 

EqutfiOao 20 .. 13 69 11.7 

Hasan 2S3 B+28 104 4 0 37.7 

taylON 179 61 34 21.1 

Maerta 193 -1 28 48 27.7 


41 28184 
29 121 .. 

11.1 21 179 

20 23158 

4.6 45 307 

120 29 179 
M3 23 21 

.. .. 219 

121 13 25 

9.7 22 107 

39 29 125 

27 33 179 
73 83 229 
29 28 121 

84 48 184 
46 48 109 
108 49 144 

103 43 1*3 

27 25 228 
32 19 2*8 

148 23 219 

53 21 121 

114 14 2BJ 

44 22 179 
69 19 199 

<8 55 47 

84 1.7 229 
89 24 212 

21 13 121 

43 21 813 

17.1 28 198 
127 22 143 

73 78158 
13 19 127 

83 24 154 

28 27158 

104 33 144 
52 39 123 

54 40 138 
73 2218.1 

174 38 138 
64 1.7 284 
41 28 21.1 



914 59123 
74 Z9 269 
124 45 188 
138b 22 138 
88 54 198 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


433 328 OnmlMU *13 S -6 09 3.1 159 

236 206 Karmady ftooke* Z76 -7 21 08 M5 

391 312 Ladbreta 376 -5 121 43 173 

477 447 LOP PKk HOMS *77 M8 59 2QJ 

IX ae MOUK ChanoaB .96 -2 29 28 ia.7 

10S 67 Pita* Of W Ha»h 9* -4 21 22 159 

79 58% Ouaena Moat 79% -1% 29 b 28 219 

405 376 Savoy He* W *01 . . 38 09 1B7 

91 58 Stafoa 77 B-1 1.7 22 189 

200 148 TiumTnna Font 182 B-5 74 *3 189 


1.7 22 189 
74 «3 189 




INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


221 178 - 

238 194 . 

101 95 

331 2*3 
110 BO 
234 172 . 
298 207 , 
iso IX 
403 230 

47 32 

X 23 
351 355 
87 K 
305 255 
395 353 
77 37% 

313 265 
89 £ 

260 138 
450 363 
82 97 

386 277% 
tOB 355 

222 1B3 

26% 18% 

580 420 
308 216 


205 140 
>20 7B 
136% 84% 

173 105 

174 149 

11 

II 

22% 1EH 

If 

44 35 
119 110 
162 139 
195 Ttt 
M 166 
MS 97 
271 1H 
383 296 
60 9* 
81 15 

49 25 
160 158 
25 IB 
BZ 52 
303 200 
220 136 

83 S3 

79 56 
44 25% 

86 58 

400 253 
65 58 

39% 25% 
B 5% 
20 13 
74 45 

BE ES'i 

84 59 
250 143 

as 8B 

600 BIB 

3*3 290 
43 36 

216 132 
133 69 
440 360 
223 145 
20 % ur 


•+i 
+2 
+6 
a-% 
46 B-2 

1» -= . 

60 +2 
ZDO -6 
(99 -3 

79 +<% 

72 •‘3 


««6 

tta* Lew Company 


ok n a 

Pnca Cnga paoco % P/E 


SO 71 
32 28 
112 74 

570 356 
356 2tf 
6b 32 
75% 63% 
395 23J 
8i 40 
173 121 
186 159 
215% 181% 
40 32 

no 415 

30 sea 

21 % 15 % 
X 48 
220 178 
11$ 82 
ID 1 . 715 
250 171 
240 180 
2S3 168 
19% 18 
371 205 

98 B 
110 98 

118 35 

110% 57% 
83 25 

91 91 

as 72 


CaiwPop* 
Cmk Da Otrt 
Cram taOKtaoe 
Own Houm 


Dm 

Denea 6 Mai w 

DrrtM 5 Mmwnan 

STa Rea 


333 

98 B-2 

170 r -2 

MS -3 

Cl88% -S 

36 -1 

490 • .. 

£38 -7 

EZ1** -% 

» 

220 

98 B-1 

E9% 

Z25 -2 

228 B+3 

230 -15 

19% +% 

335 -10 

94 % -% 

108 • 

IX -8 

IDS +5% 

S3 +9 

65 B-5 

77 B-1 


U MIU 
U 7,8 81 
43 *5 193 
aa i6i5o 
119 31 153 
21 33 35a 

39 5 6 108 

123 38 108 
32 45 295 
686 45 139 
11 1 60 106 
375 2JJ .. 
07a 19 . 

45 09 356 

173 83 113 

S3 44 ! I 
134 51 7.0 

53 34 99 
420 42 13.1 

93 31 32 
9 3 4.1 129 
ID* 45 9 4 
09 41 184 

75 2 2 207 

74 75 135 
7.1 58 113 

78 76 75 

£8 25 268 
.. .428 

37 67 207 

37 74 787 


i72 es 
260 132 
283 263 
349 308 
2*3 203 
1*1 124 
20 9': 

85 58 

123 78 
225 86 

281 95 

125 75 
>5- 13'. 
67’. 58 . 
347 20 
540 299 
IX IN 
IK 125 
170% 137 
148 118 
165 128 
273 120 
2C2 156 

125 68 

1*1 161 
£73 340 
294 239 
IX 89 
31% M% 
110 55 

118 79 

280 210 
104 86 

845 177 
IBB 144 
690 339 
ISO 128 
EBB *26 
94 58 

44 28 

81 *3% 

09 82 

618 503 
175 135 


TlenrM T.L4ie 
lOKor 
TorrWrt (FHJ 
TraoiBw Hom 
Transcommanw 
Transport Da. 

TraXaCCO 

Tnefifi 

Tnp%» 

Tumor & Na ni 

UKO 

Un*0u8 

im*v«r 
(WWvar (WV> 
V4Mr 
Vues 

Vetor PraAiCCI 

Vntal 

VObswagan 

WSL 

wade Peoanas 

4Vacat 

Wagon tnd 


Vmaor (R War) 

IfcOJKW 

Wu 


WM (Janrea) 
M a m wttp 
HMS Go 
Wo»»eiey+aignei 

Wood 
Wood fSWi 
vjoatjoi ae 6 Rot 
Wyndnem Eng 
I’anaw 
Tormg IH1 


170 r 
2*0 -IB 
£71 B-4 

311 -12 

240 B-1 

m a-1 

19 i r -% 

B3 -a 

121 -2 

2i3 -e 
261 

107 -5 

E15% 

£85% *% 

236 

559 a-! 
110 s .. 
125 • .. 
8179% +5 

t20 

153 -1 

279 +5 

ies -l 

113 •— 1 

1B1 
273 
2*2 

IX +2 

31% +3% 

83 

115 

270 -10 

98 -2 

213 

144 -3 

5 BD »-6 
120 

578 -8 

7a 

84 

7a B-6 
62 

618 *5 

169 -7 


&3 22329 
35 1 J 339 

104 53 85 
96 40 |79 
as 4-7 RL4 
. . a .284 
Oie 01 .. 
29b £4 185 
71 3-3 B2 

7 1 2.7 12.1 

1A 15 238 
552 3 5 112 

67 29 119 
iae 35 165 
59 82 149 
4 30 96 21.7 

;; 42.7 
49 29 155 
43 16 . 
11.1 57 MS 

19 1J . 
51 27 273 

51 22X8 

107 37 198 
4.1 ai ii i 


INSURANCE 


Aooev Ida 
Aelw> 

Am Gan 
ESradMoex 
Bmanrvc 
Com unen 
Efiuny & Law 
PM 

Gan Aeertam 
GRE 

Haim C E 
Hrae Rotwson 
Legal 9 Gan 
SSton 6 Man 
Lon we m* 
Maran a MCLan 


-4 99 47 .. 

• -». IX 43 .. 

• 890 32 .. 

• +S 79 2*202 

• -5 426 4J ■ 

•-3 169 54 . . 

-8 98 .. 


31.4 34 23 2 
41.1/ «5 264 
314 47 102 
134 39 162 
SS.C 47 317 
341 49 349 
i£c 54 132 
20 31 . 
49 35 155 
£9 52 319 

JU 31.. 

37.1 39 639 

196 47 .. 
368 4.1 737 

157 41 179 

14 4 34 227 

86 19 303 

221 00 65.9 

339 39 . 

139 £4 208 

125 09 209 


109 9.1 81 
. a .. 202 
79 55122 
1 4b 2 a 144 
89 37 M2 
M7 £3 189 
.. .. 582 

.. .46.4 

63 59 69 
7.1b 31 86 
39 36 122 
7.9 53 109 
10.7 3 1 138 
18.1 49 . . 

. 0 .. 53 

66 83 169 

See 19 .. 

578106 96 

Si ia 155 


U 87121 
257 136 59 
U U .. 
107 89 UA 

58 56107 

18.1 49189 

.. f .. .. 

16 8.7 153 
159 82 113 

75 6.7 107 

8.1 4.7 7A 
86 28192 
56 19 352 
too 82 79 
85 21 189 

M2 75 85 

59 45 *9 

54 4.1 127 
99 53167 
5^ 49 139 

24 12 189 

.. .. 28.1 
1.7 05 208 
89 3* 127 

17.1 49 M4 
83 24 121 


.. UOflliO .. 
-18 172 52 M2 

1-1 32 37 126 

-1 21 84 122 



Conets Cuaf 68 

Gerauy BE 

Oanamaa u 

Enterprise 147 

Gerber Energy 32 

Gtotmi u Rk £00 

Gobi X 

Gi Western Art 82 

1C Gai 415 

ICC 04 

Inooo 37 

KCA OnOng 15 

LASMO M 6 

Do Unas 200 

MAS London Of 33 

Patrocon 1 S 6 

r Preneei 28 

Rents' 245 

noytt Oraar £48% 

Enel 758 

Mdm 155 

SorWdi 57 

TR Enarsy 17% 

TnowwrJ 75 

Ttrton Eumpn 147 

uwaav 189 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


BCrtllwidl 43 

Cimiggei 133 

Fnl«v 1 James) 9b 

Hemson CtOSbOO 36J 
Incncaea 383 

Jacks (Wmj 37 

Lcmto 2 9i 

Ocean Wtun 64 

Paterson Zecp 225 

Da A ZZ3 

Poor Pee* i» 

Sane Darby X 

Steel 8/« 575 

Toier Kematoy IM 

tub Cano IX 


♦2 

35 

X7 75 

-1 

57 

62 4X3 



. 368 

*3 

121 

82 XO 

+2 

l'« 


-7 

41 

68 .. 

+ZZ 

22.1 

53123 

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.? 

43 

28.7 .. 



118 47 

1 . . 

144. 

721 .. 


79 59 73 

-% .. .. 132 

-5 

226 48 .. 

I . 500 55 7.8 

-2 129 83 258 


*3 


.. 17 

-*'3 


.. 172 

+2 

71 

95 £7 



.. 200 


15.0 

60 59 


PAPER. PRINTING. ADVERTG 


59 43 

2*7 225 
43 31 

165 IX 
3t1 224 
261 XI 
178 143 
178 142 
673 470 
»5 720 
220 173 
160 lffl 
265 178 
308 189 
>69 MS 
463 360 
2S5 172 
*S0 375 
78 S3 
175 110 
230 188 
4)8 311 
235 >40 
135 X 
155 128 
28 19% 

SB X 
a>5 513 
9-7S0 
150 122 
ISO 124 

220 an 

50 *0 

750 565 
291 Z73 
420 320 


Aidcsm lirt 4* 

ASSOC Paper 232 

Auo 6 VKog 39 

Bemrns* 155 

Boasa Unnam 332 

8PCC 255 

Brummo 154 

Do RjV 152 

Sonzi 650 

Cemon Comm BCG 

Crmpman 21B 

Cnerwvrrd Streets IX 

Cmpper iJamasl 255 

Da-taon Paaree 173 

Eucaiyonn Pu« 415 

Perrsdon Ira] 253 

FteROainn 440 

Gaara Gross 63 

Good RaUbono 173 

Huraanmi 220 

Lone %-SM 395 

McCorauOdata 225 

Mora OTarraB TX 

Norton Om> 143 

OvWy A Mamar £28 

Olives Prater 31 

Si Nee Gp 770 

Sateen 8 Senera 970 

Do 53% Crw Prt 145 

Smurf* 1 Jett) 158 

uver wafcar 210 

wa ce aa 

Waodngton |J) 755 

Wnmou^i 283 

W 911 Gotais die 


19 86 169 
86 87 139 
. . 94 

19 12 57 

54 1.6 306 

171b 6.7 96 
79 45 309 

70 49 38.1 

M3 22 223 
86 1 0 29.7 

120 55 I HO 
3 0 29 184 
36 1 4 14 1 

118 4 0 10.7 
36 2 1 175 

109 £4 79 
109 43 170 
60 T.S 339 
43 89 63 
70 . .. 

6.7 39 81 

86 22 23.1 

51 36 22.4 

49 36 22.6 

S OD 86 146 

252 

129b 1.7 318 
209 21 185 

90 U .. 
47 39 .. 

8.7 46 115 

.. .. 115 

35.7 47145 
83 33 155 
45 1-1 386 


PROPERTY 


Abacs 
Afteo Lon 
Ape* 

eaazwfCH) 
a<«gra«B 
B4W. (p) 
Braotoid 
Br Land 
Broaon 

Cam (Ai 5 Sara 
Cun 6 Cawaes 
CarOiH Prop 
CcnboMncial 
cawstertwa 
C4LA 

Cbrke NKWteS 
Cormeds 
Control Sacs 
Courmy 6 New 

Cdteirv 'B' 


Estaws & Agency 165 

Estates Gen 115 

Estates Piop >50 

Erara Of Leeds X 

Fw* oaks 59 


Froomore 
Or Ptnem 
GreycOBt 
Hahood Gp 


»% 22 
325 251 
323 218 

IX IX 

71 42 

77 41 

34 25 

74 70 

86 64 

87 SI% 

33 23% 

216 179 
118 BO 
73 68% 

214 158 
170 13* 
460 326 
330 306 

X 84 
50% 32 

SB3 255 
150 121 
89 <3 
239 185 
103 78 

630 495 
« 52 
12 * 101 
83 66 

98 72 

94 m 

78 85 
BO S80 
720 525 
150 123 

62 61 
78% 61 
38 70 

191 1S3 

275 212 
113 88 
X 20% 
216 161 
144 82 
65 50 

283 196 
233 203 
888 247 
288 223 
9>5 525 
505 383 
20 11 
112 n 

442 332 
650 260 
M 775 
489 311 
83 51 
820 S90 
263 715 
288 238 
16* » 

75 58 
117 97 
174 in 
IX 129 
564 421 
200 115 

IX X 

900 605 
IX 118 
239 200 
091 648 
153 '32 
78 S7 
102 X 
475 345 
29 21 

ISO 1W 
B3 53 
55 18 

152 120 
260 155 
53 X 
W» 128 

146 124 
7% 3% 
IX 116 
IX X 


625 374 
396 301 
366 291 
34 X 
603 4» 
65 5*% 

12 % 8 
X 26 
210 180 
656 428 
105 X 
XQ 360 


Haatomere 635 

kwy 2B5 

Jarmyn 155 

Lamp Prop 303 

Land investors X 

Land SaaBfMs 311 

LOT s Erin Ter 725 

Do 6’.-% 236 

Lon S Pro* Shoe 238 
Lon Snap Prop 156 

Lynton 295 

MEPC 338 

Mcktetiwy IX 

McKay Secs H3 

UarkMMh S3 

MartuM Mom 145 

Martborougn 07 

Mtetor Esj 263 

Mowawgn 775 

Momvttw 515 

NhKMO* IAAJJ 96 

Miaamai £20 

New CavendW) 73 

Parkdam X 

PeacMy 271 

Pioo S Re* IK 

Prop HUgs 118 

Prop Saaony 123 

. Raglan 9% 

Ragrtan 500 

Ftasahaugn 580 

Rush I TOnvtana 276 
Sanui 206 

Scot M at ■ 

Skiugn Estates 165 

Sw^wwk 435 

Stand Secs 155 

Stock Conversion 60S 

Stocfeiey 78 

Town Cm 48 

Tranonl Park 215 

UK Land 726 

UU Real 565 

'Manor BTO 

Wrantonl 510 

Wet* Urn) 22 

west 8 Courtey 155 


SHIPPING 


Assoc B> Rons 607 -10 

Bi C o m mo n weaWi 378 -5 

Cwama M -6 

fitter (James) BO *2 

Ora* 520 

Jat3» UO am.. 

kimay Docks X 

Ocean Transport 200 -S 

P 6 O DU 538 B-7 

Runcanan fWMer) 93 

Tumcue Scon 370 -to 


B-6 02 04 703 

. . 29 2.7 ,73 

• . . 28 38 16.1 

• -13 169 29 149 

.. 6.0 II 7.7 

. . 15.1 59 16.7 

. . 119 29 22.7 

-1 20 22 17.9 

72 49 252 

• -a 89 38 209 

• .. 28 1.1 .. 
B-S B9 59 15.1 

-13 157 3.7 23 2 

0*t 25.7b 32 120 

90! 69 334 
+8 50 29 20B 

. . B . . 39 

-1 29 19 8*8 

• .. 5.0 29 58 

ei un.fi 

B-5 185 30 130 

t " a ” 39 
43 25740 
.. 35 3.1 17.* 

• .. 12.1 81121 

+1 50 S2119 

+1 . . . . 82 

• -1 10.1 52 122 

. . 109 57 259 

r -10 2ib 12 710 

■ -% 

. . 121 25 339 

121 29 328 
10 ZA 329 
-7 MO 5S 99 
127n 22 318 
•-S 7.7 2.7 323 

■ . 22 10X8 

•-a 10.0 23 163 

• • . 1.7 20219 

-2 121 28 269 

-S 90 19 334 
+8 93 28 .. 

-5 68 20 210 

• -1 70b 40 128 

86 28 37.1 
.. 159 4A 210 


19 £8 286 

180 7.8 149 

2D (U 221 

25.7 33 387 

21.4 *2 429 

0.7 22 71.0 

119 74 89 


143 24 190 
63 1.7 293 

6.1 19 773 
4.7 50 74 

170 24 248 

5.1 80X5 

. . . . 05 

.. ..18 
93 4.7 102 

220 *3 ISO 

7 1 7.8 270 

120 30 300 


+2 21 43 

+% SO BO. 

so ea 
-12 1S7 SS 
.. *0 Or 

+X 192 3 b 

-10 70 

•• JC2 

... BO no 

-6 127 K 

*■ 1S4jma 
-10 7.1 ‘ 


ijre' 

18B 
x 
, Z2B 
a 183 
6 398 
74 IX 
X 71 
118 86 
ISO 85 
« 43 
470 345 
473 354 
115 X 
233 170 
X 75 
210 153 
205 183 
296 IX 
126 254 
X 12 
221 IS 
H» 3*8 
106 116 
250 210 
496 360 
62 X 
8% 5% 
91 64 

IB 123 
IDS 81 




iri 

al 



5 

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p+ 




r*- 

Wi 

H* 

% 

-m 

m 


3*8 -10 

X -s 

74 B+3 

aa +10 

119 +4 

TOO -4 

115 -1 

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M7 • .. 

’2 • v 

11 s +2 

125 b-a 

szo a +10 

44 

238 -8 

118 +2 
463 +3 

S2B>. -a* 

254 B-d 

X 

330 -I 

203 -6 

zeo 

172 -2 

130 +1 

116 

1*6 *6 

60 

470 +9 

483 a -10 

115 * .. 
230 a -3 
83 B+1 

165 

20 * +2 

W • 

324 +14 

26 -a 

206 

538 • -14 

163 -a 

235 B+7 

450 • .. 

SS3 -1 

6 % ♦% 

a • .. 

t» 


7.7 50 IIS 
20 1.7 62-7 


29# 71 BO 
99 JO 146 
17 2.1 XI 
30 4.7 17 % 
T6.1 12 11 4 

49 36 1&6 
49 29 1X7 
38 3.1 154 
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Many of the top computer 
leasing companies are unhap- 
py. They are uneasy at the 
expansionist plans oflBM and 
fearful that "Big Blue" could 
be about to flex its muscles, 
thereby squeezing them out of 
ihe market. 

The fears were aired ai a 
meeting of the European 
Computer Lessors and Trad- 
ers Association in Vienna last 
week. Delegates were also 
updated an the formal action 
to be taken against IBM, 
which the association believes 
could be poised to abuse its 
monopoly position. 

The association, which rep- 
resents about 60 of the Euro- 
pean companies involved in 
computer leasing, has made a 
complaint to the West Ger- 
man trade authorities that the 
expansion of IBM in the 
computer-leasing market is a 
dangerous commercial threat 
and anti-competitive. 

The German complaint is 
expected to be the stalking 
horse of others made to the 
EEC. which has already exert- 
ed pressure on Lhe American 
computer giant. The EEC 
ensured that it got an under- 
taking from IBM that it be 
more oven in its plans for 
product launch, so allowing 
compatible product designers 
and software suppliers to be be 
able to effectively compeie in 
the European market. 

But the pressures of surviv- 
al in the computer market are 
equally intense and IBM is 
more than aware that market 
share must be maintained. 
The increasing activity in 
European leasing by IBM in 
recent years is part of that 
Strategy, but it is one destined 
to generate political conflict. 

The leasing market curious- 
ly had flourished because of a 
decision by IBM to sell its 
machines instead of renting. 
IBM. under pressure from the 
highly competitive computer 
market, needed cash for ex- 
pansion and investment in 
research and development. 

Tne company was having to 
compete in a world controlled 
by micro-electronics and 
moving at an unprecedented 


pace. Models could be outdat- 
ed overnight by the launch of a 
new product. 

That problem was acute in 
the late 1970s and early 1980s. 
It made the computer-leasing 
business unattractive then and 
IBM appeared prepared to 
surrender it to the 
independents. 

But the climate has changed 
yet again. IBM has dearly 
been concerned that a sub- 
stantial customer base with 
potential for buying new prod- 
uct is not directly under its 
control. The third-party leas- 
ing companies in some mar- 
kets could be an unnecessary 
obstacle. 

A comprehensive report on 
the computer-leasing market 
by Rowe «£ Pitman empha- 



By Bill Johnstone 

Technology 
Correspondent^ 


sizes the influential position of 
IBM and the delicate balance 
that has to be maintained if 
the independents are to 
flourish. 

The residual value of a 
computer — its commercial 
value after the life of the 
computer has expired - is one 
of the main features in suc- 
cessful computer leasing. The 
acquisition of cheap financing 
to fund the leasing projects is 
the other ingredient. The Eu- 
ropean computer lessors are 
worried that IBM would be in 
a position to unfairly influ- 
ence both. 

The company, more than 
any other, would know the 
timing of its new product 
launches and the influences 
they would have on the value 
of the secondhand product. 
The computer giant, because 
of the scale of its operation, 
could offer financing on terms 
which the smaller competitors 
— the computer leasing com- 
panies — could never match. 

The computer-leasing busi- 
ness has been so sensitively 
balanced that the slightest 


change in financing legislation 
can have dramatic effects. 
Banks and financial institu- 
tions have in the past taken 
advantage of such tax incen- 
tives and have been among 
the principal proponents of 
computer leasing. 

They would buy the ma- 
chines and lease them to 
customers through the leasing 
companies, in the process 
taking advantage of the tax 
benefits, then selling the ma- 
chines at the end of a lease to 
the companies or customers 
for a nominal sum. 

The continued expansion of 
the independent computer- 
leasing companies might de- 
pend on that patronage but 
one which may be less forth- 
coming if IBM's influence is 
uncomfortable. 

The big players such as 
Atlantic, Comcap, Dataserv 
and United will want the 
status quo maintained. 

The Rowe & Pitman study 
sums it up sucrintly. It says:” 
In the past five years, IBM has 
spent USS 28 billion on fixed 
assets and research and devel- 
opment; in the next five, this 
figure has been forecast to 
double. 

“It is this last factor that has 
driven the corporation to 
allow placements to be funded 
by outside finance. Given the 
high cost of the average instal- 
lation it is inevitable that the 
customer has looked for exter- 
nal finance, thus letting in the 
leasing companies. 

"Yet doubts remain. Suc- 
cess was built upon the back of 
a rental strategy and in losing 
control of the account base, 
IBM runs the risk of losing 
control of the customer. What 
if the leasing company's sales 
engineer recommends config- 
uring an IBM compatible 
system around a rival's pro- 
cessor or, more likely, recom- 
mends an array of non-IBM 
peripherals? IBM will lose the 
sale. 

“This is the core of the 
concern that IBM may be 
looking to reassert control 
over its marketplace". 

Hence the concern in 
Europe. 


9s$r? v t •\ v '• 



The Olivetti M2i launched earlier this year at Venice 

Laptops win 
IBM approval 


• ' 
WK ';fv- 






By Matthew May 

IBM has finally entered the 
market for battery powered 
laptop computers with the 
annoucement in the US of the 
IBM Convertible — a $2,000 
portable weighing 13 lb with a 
detachable liquid crystal dis- 
play screen and two 3Vhin. disc 
drives. 

IBM, which started the 
boom in desktop micros with 
its original PC, has been 
conspicously absent from this 
area which has so for consis- 
tently underperformed market 
researchers expectations. 

The new portable may 
well help in making the con- 
cept of such computers re- 
spectable, something the 
company has achieved when 
launching products into sever- 
al other areas 

- The possibility of having 
nearly all the functions of a 
desktop personal computer 
available in a small battery 
powered unit, have great ap- 
peal for some occupations — 
journalists and travelling 
salesmen are the most quoted 
examples. However, the con- 
cept has not caught the imagi- 
nation of more general 
computer users. 

Manufacturers are still hop- 
ing that the portable computer 
might catch on in the same 
way as the portable television 
—used more for space saving 
and moving around at one 
location than frantic typing in 
cars or trains. Most users 
of desktop computers still 


agree with the American jour- 
nalist who described portables 
as perfect for people who like 
to write standing up in tele- 
phone booths. The chief reser- 
vation is the liquid crystal 
display screen which is diffi- 
cult to read from an angle and 
in dim lighting conditions. A 
cheap and better alternative 
has still to be found. 

IBM's new computer, the 
first major personal computer 
announcement by the compa- 
ny for over one and half 
years, has an 80 character by 
25 line liquid crystal display. 

It runs off either a rechargable 
battery pack that lasts from 6 
to JO hours or a mams 
adapier.The memory size is 
256k expandable, to 512k and 
e ac h disc drive has the capaci- 
ty for 350 typed A4* 
pages. External three and a half * 
inch disc drives are to be made 
available for the IBM XT and 
AT. This wilt allow the discs 
used on the portable to be run 
on desktop machines back at 
base. 

It will be available in the US 
from ihe middle of May, but 
potential British customers 
will have to content them- 
selves with other companies 
portables for the time being, 
such as the writ regarded 
Olivetti M22 at £1600. IBM's 
British arm is not releasing 
any details on when the 
Convertible will be on sale in 
the UK or at what price. IBM 
has also announced a new 
version of the AT, which will 
run one third foster, and three# 
new models of the XT. 


Blow to videotext 
in America 


Trom Solange De Santis in 
Los Angeles 

The derision by two large US 
newspaper chains to pall out of 
videotex! — the sendiiq* of 
computer information to tele- 
vision sets via phone lines - is 
a serious blow for the Dedgfoig 
industry that has always foaod 
the Americas market hard 
going. A lack of demand from 
consumers was died by both 
Times Mirror Company and 
Knight Ridder for their puti- 
out. 

Knight-Ridder’s president, 
James Batten, sauL*!! is now 
dear that videotext is not 
likely to be a threat to either 
newspaper advertising or 
readership in the foreseeable 
future.” Neither company saw 
enough income from the 
videotext projects to justify 
ttheir existence. 

Analysts on Wall Street 
said Times Mirror sank more 
than $15 milUoa into its 
Gateway videotex subsidiary, 
while Kjajgfat Ridder had pot 
$50 million into its Viewtron 
service. The shutdowns woold 
have minimal impacts on the 
companies' finances, they 
added. 

Knight-Ridder and Times 
Mirror shared a fundamental 
fault in trying to offer too wide- 
ranging a service to too many 
people who did not really need 
it, analysts said. The high 
prices dareed were also a 
barrier to sales. 

Viewtron and Gateway of- 
fered a wide range of services 


— sews retrieval, electronic 
maO, hanking, shopping and 
ticket purchasing. But old 
habits are hard to break, and 
users found ; Uttle cause to 
eba^e the ways they had done 
things before. - 

Mr Batten said: “The 
American public is not yet 
ready to pay for Information 
off a screen, it's a matter of 
habit. You cotrid order fioweis 
from the system, but people pi 
would stiU pick up the phone." 

Also, people can get the 
same news and information for 
much less money and were not 
comfortable using ' a video 
screen for that purpose, die 
analysts said. 

Gary Ariea, editor of Inter- 
national Videotext Teletext 
News, based in Washington, 
said: “You're asking for a 
great leap of faith when you 
aso people to boy information 
on line for $30 to $40 that they 
can get from a newspaper for 
25 cents.” Using a TV set for 
infor mation retrieval clashed 
with regular television view- 
ing. he added. 

New direction coaid corned 
from three research projects 
currently under way in the 
home-information retrieval 
field. These involve a number 
of banking, computer, and 
communications companies. 
Triutex, for instance, is a 


Roebuck, and i&expect- 
ed to start hi late 15*87 or early 
1988. 


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By David Hewson 

®™Ming Wah Disneys may have 
to shun an school and Ha afl for 

MlSodi er an' Sta ^ iC ® 

SJ2p’“ 8 ***• 

rated cartoon progr ams becoming 
available for sraSrbrailKssand 
home computers. 

breed of animaiion 
PfQfiranis, best exemplified by 
Hayden $ Video works for the 
Macintosh, is not too distant from 
«ieear]y cartoonists in the way it 
wonts. All an im a t ors, even those 
who preceded Disney, were 
searching for ways to repficate 
information from frame to frame 
in order to cut down on the 
dnjdgery of producing a cartoon 

With 28-film frames a 
needed for conventional cartoons, 
the individual colouring of each, 
often with information which dres 
not change much, if at all,, is 
tiresome and expensive. 

Disney refined “cel” animation, 
which used celluloid as a d ra win g 
medium. Backgrounds could be 
painted on plain opaque stock and 
me moving parts on transparent 
film for changing from frame to 
frame. 

Later be pioneered other tech- 
niques such as multi-layered back- 
grounds that move at different 
rates and in different planes to 
heighten the illusion of depth on 
the screen. 

But the business of producing 
cartoons still remained complex 
and labour intensive, eventually 
deterring all but the most brave to 


video screen re- draws the cartoonist’s trade 


Spend years producing full-,, 
animation feature films fora ; 
world cinema market. 

VMeoworks win not create a 
new breed of home Disneys, but it 
is an intriguing pointer to the 
power of toda/s micros and the 
ingenious uses to which they may 
p ut Mainframe computers 
started to come to terms with film 
and 1 television graphics in the 
1970s and the results have been 
seen in films such as Star Wars, 
Tron and Star Trek II - The 
Wrath erf Khan. 

Now most television companies 
have expensive computers that 
can produce graphics for logos or 
to illustrate statistical data The 
BBC’s Nine O'Clock News is 
inordinately proud of its system, 
which generates the backgrounds 
for its use of still photographs and 
the fancy title sequence and 
occasionally makpg one wonder 
whether the programme editor is 
barking instructions down a mi- 
crophone or twiddling with a 
computer joystick. 

R udiment ary animation pro- 
grams for home micros have been 
arou nd for some time, but the 
arcade-game images they produce 
and their inability to handle 
complex screen movements have 
made there little mote than toys. 
An advanced animation prog ram 
needed a high-resolution screen on 
which every dot can be manipulat- 
ed at speed and a following among 
computer addicts eccentric 
enough to want to design it 
of the successor to Wordstar. ' 
Inevitably, then, the Macintosh 


Stephan Johnson 



was the first machine to acquire 
the facility to emulate Daffy Duck 
at home. The results are in 
monochrome, but h may be that 
the new Commodore Amiga, 
which has sophisticated colour 
graphics facilities, will attract 
computer cartoonists too. 

To begin, one draws a list of cast 
members within Videoworks or 
grabs characters from other graph- 
ics programs or the an library that 
comes with the disc. The storyline 
is then produced and sound 
effects, ranging from Mozart to a 
version of jazz Junk and a wolf 


whistle, synchronized with the 
action. The program’s sophistica- 
tion lies in its ability to mimic, 
and in some ways improve on, 
Disney's multi-layer techniques. 

Videoworks can move up to 24 
different objects across the screen 
at any one time, giving each a pre- 
ordained priority over the others. 
You can even re-draw objects and 
personalities as the cartoon is 
playing and automatically copy 
one of Warner Brothers’ favouriie 
tricks, turning up the volume 
when your character “moves” 
closer to the viewer. 


Once you are happy wiih the 
film you issue ihe command 
^Siage" and all of the computer 
instructions are cleared from the 
Mac screen for a performance 
which looks just like a black-and- 
white cartoon on a high-resolution 
TV screen. With a variable frame 
rate of between three and 60 
frames a second, the animation 
can be as smooth as anything seen 
in the cinema, with the crucial 
difference that you can stop and 
rewind a frame for re-drawing in a 
few seconds. 

Combining the live action of 


Dick Van Dyke and the cartoon 
penguins in Mary Poppins took 
Disney months of work. On the 
Macintosh you need need just a 
cheap TV camera and the neces- 
sary software to digitize black- 
and-white pictures and send them 
into the Videoworks environ- 
ment, where all manner of Monty 
Python mischief may be heaped 
on them. 

All of which is very nice, you 
may say, but what use is it all? 
Videoworks is priced at £92, 
which means that it is aimed at the 
leisure market. Any business user 
who wants to enliven his day with 
it may find his career curtailed if 
the boss discover? him animating 
the antics of Harry the Hamster 
one week from financial year end 
(although he could always avail 
himself of the latest piece of 
computer one-upmanship, a small 
progam that places one page of 
some fictitious accounts in memo- 
ry to be recalled with one key- 
stroke when a superior 
materializes). 

But the program could have 
some uses. Many film directors 
use comic-strip storyboards to 
develop the action of their work, a 
technique much-beloved of Ste- 
ven Spielberg, who likes to visual- 
ize all of his scenes before the 
camera crew gets to work. A small 
computer animation program 
would offer an advanced way of 
pre-directing a film from the 
keyboard. 

The cartoons which 
Video works produces are limited 
by the available memory of the 


computer, so even with the new 
one megabyte Mac Pius, they 
cannot run for more than a few 
minutes. Bui the program does 
have the ability to run several 
short films in succession, although 
there is a gap between the titles for 
one to be removed and the new 
one loaded. 

The program's manufacturers 
say this facility could be used to 
produce in-store advertising and 
point-of-sale material that will run 
all day without further attention. 
If they also produce a play-only 
version, cartoon advertisements 
could also be despatched to Mac 
users anywhere in the world, 
extolling a product's merits and 
giving Videoworks itself new fans. 

Another suggestion from Hay- 
den is that business executives 
brighten up boring grapbs and 
statistics by animating them and 
adding music. Though this may 
impress American managing di- 
rectors and bank managers, one 
cann help but feel that anyone 
trying the same trick on this side 
of the Atlantic may receive a 
distinctly chilly response for 
“playing” with his computer. 

Personally, I think the logical 
thing to do is to combine the lot 
with a cheap camera, a set of 
newspaper library still photo- 
graphs and a link to a commercial 
video recorder, then head off 
down Jeremy Isaacs' way in 
Charlotte Street, Wl. It could give 
Channel 4 the cheapest daily 
alternative to Spitting Image 
imaginable. 


i 


COMPUTER BRIEFING 


I 


New test 
for 

software 

■ The National Computing 
Centre is to “road test" 
accountancy software for 
micros under a contract with 
the Department of 
Employment Tito Depa rtmen t 
is worried about the 
problems smafi firms have with 
evaluating software 
packages and the job and 
financial losses that can 
result from making the wrong 
decision. 

The NCC, working with the 
Institute of Chartered 
Accountants and Customs 
and Excise, aims to be able to 
provide the small-business 
sector with impartial 
information. The service wtfl ; 
go live in the summer and may 
later be extended to other 
types of software. 

Free Prestel 

■ The electronic 
supermarket service. 
Supershop, which allows . 
people in parts of central : 
London to order groceries 
via Prestel sets, rs to give new 
customers a free three- 
month loan of the TV adapter 
needed to connect to 
Prestel and waive the £6.50 
subscription charge. 

John Cauicutt, chairman of 
Telecard, which runs the 
service said: "Many 
newcomers are reluctant to 
use Supershop because 
they are comftted to buying an 
adapter for their TV and a 
Prestel subscription without 
being able to try the service 
first Supershop subscribers 
.who number 600, key in 
their orders from home and 
those over £35 are 
delivered tree. Further 
information from 01-225 
1535. 

FBI operative 

■ Some time next month, 

FBI agents wW start receiving 
helpful tips from a highly 
trained operative known as Big 
cioyd. It is a computerized 

- aimed at sharpening 


mm 



■ Experienced operators 
of the co mpu ter keyboard 
above can produce typing 
speeds of 1 B0 to 200 woras, 
about the sp eed of a fast 
talker, say its Dutch designers 
Special Systems Industry. 
SyBables or words rather than 
individual characters are 
typed Mo the unit by 
depressing a combination 
of keys rattier tike playing a 
chord on the piano. Called 
Vetotypa,tbe keyboard is 
available either by itself at 
£1,250 or as a complete 
limit with monBor, 
r, word processor and a 
eek teaming course 
for £2£00Jt can also be 
hooked up to typesetting 
and telex machines. Rattier 
detafis: Veto quick W on 
01-5757070. 


com pute r s to mimic human 
thought processes. One wW 
be used to help the 
government investigate 
narcotics shipments, the 
second to anticipate the 
activities of suspected 
terrorists. 

Digital launch 

■ Digital Equipment wffl 
announce tommorrow a new 
mid-range minicomputer, 
the Vax 8500, which wffl 
replace the current 
11/785.R Is the sixth machine 


11/785.lt I 
in. me sari 


series launched over 


the range first started In 
1977. 

Modem China 

■ Chinese defence 
researchers have developed a 
system Inking 
microcomputers over long 
distances. The New China 
News Agency said the 
network, successfully 
tested last week, enables texts 
in Chinese to be 1 
transmitted over existing 
phone tines to a distance of 
1,550 miles from Peking, 
tevetoofna equipment for 


bureau’s ability to 
__velop Hie sort of cases 

where score® of agents are 
monitoring the activities of 
hundreds of suspects. . 

The FBI has asked 
Congress for $1 2 mifflon to 
make the first test of the 
computer's investigative 
powers and to finance two 
parallel artificial-int aIBgen ce 
systems, which program 


China's defence forces is one 
of the country’s much- 
pubBdzed "four 
modemizat^o^s ,, , along 
with agriculture, industry and 
science and technology. 

Official figures show that 
China, which built its first 
computer in 1959, last year 
produced 30,000 
microcomputers, 500 times 
more than hi 1980, when tins 
sector got off the ground. 


ONLINE AND THE NEW 
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In male the nghl drasons. getting ihe 'flht riormalion al the right 

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Chu fit ihe 2 600 compute databases scattered afl ower the wortd. 
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Theadvancedtochnotogy of the Atari 1040STFlsln For the ‘Buffs' amongst you, we have included our vital *£799 excl. VAT with mono monitor, E999exct. VAT vrith 

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Andat£799* —itcostsveryliWetodlscoverbowusefulit 
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Almost every office is now equipped with its ou-n 
micro or woni processor terminal, but the floppy disks 
they produce are not compatible with other computers, 
laser printers or typesetting systems. So this means that 
the exchange or publication of data still requires hours 
of re-keying li-jih the inevitable errors. 

Bur when you invest in an InterMedia Multi Media 
Converter you will be saving both lime and money. 

Copy supplied on disk, or even magnetic tape can be 
converted to the correct format for most computers, 
laser printers or typesetting systems in a fraction of the 
time it takes tore-key. The InterMedia MMC 3000' scan 
read over 5S5 formats on 8". 5 1 * 3 1 or 3" soft and hard 
sectored disks and most of (he popular dedicated word 

S uccessors. It can also currently write to over 345 
ormats giving over 201,300 read-write permutations. 

Quarterly software updates ensure that the 
InterMedia is constantly developed and the next issue 
will include the ability to read Sirius' Vic tor. Amstrad, 
Vector, the Commodore SOW series and Amicus. 

InterMedia Graphic Systems Ltd. internationally 
recognised as the leading company in media conversion, 
also offers a consultancy and bureau service from it's 
head office. 

/ Graphic Systems Limited 


HEAD OFFICE 

InterMedia Graphic Systems Limited 
Lewes Business Centre, Lewes, East Sussex 
England BN72PE. Tel: 0273478725 
Telex: 94O240 iCWEASY G). Quoting 1W1147D 


LOCAL OFFICES: 

London Sales Office 
Intermedia Graphic Systems Lid 
Southwark Street 
London England. SE1 0)F 
Tel. OI-Zol-OU: 


London Sales Office North America and Canada 

Intermedia Graphic Systems Lid U.S. Lynx 

Southwark Street 853 Broadway 

London England. SEI 0)F New fori 10003 

Tel. 01 -ZdMKI: U.S. A 

Tel: I 212673 3210 
Europe and Scandinavia 

Delta Systems BV Isvs Crafische Mascbmen AG 

Eperweg7250Sl HI Frife-AntuM -Straw 16 

Ibiibus W Sum Z). THarde Holland 7750 Konstanz. VV. Germany 
lei: 31 5255 33SS Tel: 4V 7531 540W 


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Tel: 33 1 6266767 


Sistemi Graf id 
Via Mafucti 12 
20158 Milan. Italy 
Tel: 30Z3760657 


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W6 73 Athens. Greece Box 43027 

Tel: 30 1 363 15o2 100 72 Stnckhohn. Sweden 

Tel:4bB?H2ttt) 

Far East and Australasia 

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viy.-CC* 






' ; NAME:Q&A 

OCCUPATION : INTELLIGENT SOFTWARE 
SPECIALIST SUBJECT: ENGLISH 


Q. Wat's so special about Qfcfl? 

A. II is a new trie ma na gement system with an InteHigent A ssistant 
capability. This means it can understand questions and mstnctnms 
put to it in plain English. 

Q. Comet How does the tsteSgent Assistant wst? 

A. By using its own built-in wwabulay ana me way you talk so it cat 
get smarter the more you use it. 

Q. Coned. Anything else? 

A. Yes. By being able to answer loSow-up questions and mate simple 
inferences so you don't have to exoiain everything. 

Q. Correct What mates Q&A tin quintessential manager - stool? 

A. Its sheer versatility and ease ot use combined with its incredible 
word processing power enabling it to wnte, edit merge and print at 
lightning speed. 

Q. Correct Who codd use MAT 

A. Anyone m business Of the professions who needs b keep records. 


fists and files of customers or employees, for instance, and could mate 
use of a word processor. 

Q. Correct tad is MA expensive? 

A. fio. At E25fl it's about nail me price of many ottienrea4inown 
products- so Q&A helps you manage your budget too. vM/ . 

Q. Correct 1»at is tta otter tag deal about 0&A?VV yv ''»^ r 
A. The special otter wnoeby you pra taraitigm 
your old “ummeUigenT Database ot Word > npg-tAl^*- 

processmg software and they vnB give you a 
^length Z56K memory board to increase your 
PC's power- ABSOttfTQT FREE. ^LA/Nl'* 

Beep... Beep... Been.. .Beep... Beep... Beep... 

Thank you Q&A At the end ot that round you have scored top marks 
for your understanding ot English and the speed ot your answers. 

II you have any more questions about Q&A please ask Paradigm or 
your nearest Paradigm dealer. 


Paradigm. 

Our experience is part of the package 
Paradigm, Southampton House, 192-206 York Road. London SWU 3SA. Tel: 01-228 5008 Telex: 8954575 
FREE from April 7th -The Q&A Customer Hot Line. Dial 0800-289202 



What will compatibility cost? 



Useful move | 

• We nse a small minicompot- , 
er and several old mfcrocora- j 
paters hi our laboratory for 
data handling- All the equip- ' 
mem could be integrated use- > 
folly. Is there any chance that <■ 
this could be done at reason- 5 
able cost? ) 

The higher-performance per- ^ 
sona] computers, such as the t 
IBM PC AT or its compatible * 
equivalent, may be useful r 
here. In some cases, the 
supporting boards which pro- J 
vide for capturing analogue 
data are now performing at > 
speeds that equal the power of f 
earlier minicomputers. ' 

la any instance where speed 
of data capture is important, it 
is now reasonable to look at 
systems built around the more 
capable models of personal 
computers. The boards which 
do the data capture seem to 
cost £1,000 to £2.000 and they 
commonly offer good software 
(at extra cost) for Unking with 
applications routines. 

The re-equipment of most 
industrial laboratories with 
new types of computer is 
generally justified by im- 
proved applications 
opportunities. r 


■ hedley voysey 

looks this week cu some qf system invented 

your problems, including fa - Mos £ of IBM’s 

how to integroie equip- y 0 rktown Heights research 
mem. has encouraging group. This really means that 
words for a struggling user vo(j fi „ in a 


your problems, including 
how to integroie equip- 
ment. has encouraging 
words for a struggling user 
and considers the issue of 
speed versus reliability. If 
you have a question about 
business and personal 
computing, write to 
Workshop, Computer Ho- 
rizons, The Times, Vir- 
ginia Street, London El 


WORKSHOP 



Wonder-struggle 

• Though trained to use 
Ashton Tate's DBase Q, I 


have sever become a cheerful 
“end-user'' and I straggle 
along foil of wonder that 
anything works. 

Should I give up or persist 
with this effort to appear a 
manager who can handle hi- 
tech? 

Help may be on the way. The 
cavalry column is only trying 
to relieve users of the IBM PC- 
type. however. The Paradox 
database building software 
from Ansa does seem to be 
making things easier for this 
dass of user who can spend 
£550. 

The Paradox software 
avoids most of the tedious 


example of your query' to the 
system. 

Jf you need good guidance 
on how to organize your tables 
then read Chris Date's book 
from Addison- Wesley called 
An Introduction to Database 
Systems. 

This may give you such an 
enthusiasm for doing these 
chores that you will be able to 
set up as an evaluator of 
database schemes. 

For £200 the TAS product 
from Newtons Laboratories is 
cheap enough to try as some- 
thing different from DBase 1L 

Personal worst? 

• Is it true that tester person*! 
computers are less reliable 
than those driven fay slower 
timing pulses? 

There should not be a signifi- 
cant drop in reliability when a 
commeridal product is re- 
leased that uses a higher 
clockspeed figure. 


For instance, the Motorola 
68020 is now routinely used at 
over 16 Megphetz speeds. 

This is a powerful processor 
in am form but really shows 
up well at these speeds *bich 
are wo to three times the 
figure used in most standard 

personal compiw 1 *- 

The extra performance can 
easily be used especially m 
graphics applications such as 
publishing. 

The processor most be 
matched by high quality mem- 
ory chips of course if it is to 
behave well in demanding 
applications. 

Talking costs 

• I want to use speech output 
in an app&catioa. Specialis ts 
have tendered for implement- 
ing my specification and they 
seem to thank speech output 
should justify a large increase 
in cost Should it? 

Speech output can be de- 
manding on their builders, 
which is why they are not 
common. 

Leading companies in the 
UK. however, would be able 
to spd! out in detail exactly 
where the extra costs woe 
incurred. 

This understanding is some- 
thing that you need anyway so 
that you-' can adapt your 
application if necessary. . 






A 


With most large computers look- 
ing like a cross between a refrig- 
erator and a storage heater, artists 
and photographers have an unenvi- 
able task in trying to produce 
interesting pictures for computer 
companies to advertise their wares. 

One company that has decided 


Artful sales 

pictures of compote’ equipment 
may not endow its sales literature 
with high visual merit is the 
Hoskyns Group. 

Working closely with a design 
consultancy computers have been 


s<q»idanted In Hoskyns latest set 
brochures by a range; of 1930*8 
images like the examples shown, 
above. They publicize the varied 
facilities of the company's distribu- 
tion management control systems 
amLsav Hoskyns, customers have 
responded well to the hew took. 






7-Z-: 


• - " .» 'it > 




diWl jriWta AlB M’ i m >| 





yi 









9 









rtr, 







1 tic. iiMfcS 1 UfcbUAY APRILS 1*86 


c °$t! * 



SttChW Johnson 




- S&M. I 


A data explosion set to 
send all systems down 






* - ** 
- . ‘’tt’ 


Out to reverse brain drain 







WMe the Government has 
busying dealing with Ameri- 
cans who want to boy the 
conn try’s helicopter and onto- 
motive industries, a section of 
the UK’s high-techno Igy busi- 
ness community is desperately 
trying to win hack some of 
those who have already sold 
out to stateside charms. 

Executive head-hunting or- 
ganizations in the UK and 
Europe are looking for home- 
sick British engineering -and 
management expatriates who 

might be willing to trade some 
of the Silicon Valley son-and- 
sarf lifestyle for a good mootb- 
fnl of Yorkshire padding and a 
decent glass of lager. 

Yon might wonder why Brit- 
ish industry is so keen to 
attract expatriates back to the 
country when there are so 
many people already here who 
are keen to take op executive . 
and engineering position* 
Many companies, however, 
seem to have the idea that 
people who have spent some 
time working in large Ameri- 
can firms will gain the kind of 
“attitude” which will help UK 
companies compete in the 
competitive high-technology 
market 

There's also a feeling that 
executives with strong US 


connections might also help in 
the frequent search for a way 
to seQ British computer prod- 
ucts in the American market- 
place — which has generally 
seen only limited success and 
some spectacular and expen- 
sive failures. . . . 

The fact titat US companies 
have spent money training and 
developing these British expa- 
triates also has a bearmg on 
the siteation.Tbe task of 


SCENE 


By Geof 
Wheelwright 

bringing out this reverse brain 
drain, however, is not an easy 
one. ■ 

One specialist in this field is 
London-based Ian Ashworth, 
who ms a head-hunting com- 
pany that is on the lookout for 
sach people. - 

He said: “For many, the 
decision is personal . rather 
than financial. Often their 
children have reached school 
age and there is a desire to 
see them educated in Britain.” 

He points out that few 


European companies can oiler 
salaries which match what top 
executives might be receiving 
in the US, but that they may 
be able to offer greater respon- 
sibilities and challenge. 

American companies are of- 
ten so large that real responsi- 
bility on major projects rests 
in only a few hands at the top 
of the organization — with a 
large layer of middle manage- 
ment to which such executives 
are often assigned.Mr 
Ashworth adds: “It is vital too 
that we make the best use of 
returning expatriates. The ex- 
perience they have gained in 
the US is too valuable to waste 
in a line-management 
position.'' 

-The ironic thing, however, is 
that it may well be US money 
that eventually attracts tech- 
nology specialists in die de- 
fence and research sectors of 

the nuriret. 

The prospect of US research 
money being tunneled into the 
UK via the “star wars” strate- 
gic defence initiative (SDI) 
suggests that a number of 
people who can provide top 
level US-UKliason and offer a 
Ugh degree of t*rf»«»ieal expe- 
rience will be much in demand. 


By William Jacot 
The technological advances in 
data storage techniques during 
the past IS years have been so 
great that computer users have 
been encouraged to consider 
lheir limits of storage as 
almost infinite. In the 1960s, 
before the explosion in capaci- 
ty of conventional disc units, 
data storage .was a major 
constraint in the design and 
operation of computer 
systems. 

Programming ingenuity was 
needed to make the best use of 
limited and expensive storage, 
both in the design of operating 
systems application soft- 
ware. Since those early days 
dramatic reductions in cost 
and exponential increases in 
capacity have freed designers 
of computer systems and pro- 
grammers from such 
constraints. 

More drives for the 
flood of new data 

But has the wheel turned? 
The requirements for data 
storage may well be approach- 
ing the point when they 
overtake the practical limit of 
the storage facilities available. 
The tortoise is catching the 
hare. 

Many large commercial or- 
ganizations estimate that the 
amount of business data that 
will have to be held on line is 
increasing and will continue to 
increase at up to 50 per cent 
compound a year. 

Such a rale of growth far 
outstrips the pace at which 
packing densities in direct 
storage devices) are rising, so 
that a flood of new data 
demands more and more 
drives. Apart from the cost of 
such storage many installs- 
.tions do not have the flora* 
space, especially in city cen- 
tres where the cost is high. 

Faced with such a problem. 





City 


COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 

Information 
Systems Analyst 


c£18K 




1 


mm 

■ 



We are a large City based firm of sofidtofs currently estabBah in g a fejfly 
computerised information and precedent system throughout the practice. 

We wish to appotnt an experienced systems analyst with a good educational 
tackground (to degree level). Suitable candidates are likely to have at least five 
years systems and programming experience indutfing project leadership in a 
database environment. ■ 

The post wiU involve working closely with solicitors in all departments 
engaged in the collation/ cross referencing of legal materials, and the 
development of other information service facilities. 

This is a senior position and we offer a competitive salary and excellent 
benefits. Please write, in confidence, with a full curriculum vitae to Janet Day, 
Personnel Manager, Allen & Ovety, 9 Cheapside, London EC2V 6AD. 


EN 


OVERY 



a company has the options of 
seeing if the existing devices 
can be used more efficiently; 
improving the usage of the 
data storage services, or 
changing to the more recent 
storage techniques such as 
optional discs. 

A major manufacturer's 
study among its own custom- 
ers is said to have revealed 
that 45-55 per cent of online 
capacity is. on average, likely 
to be either unallocated or 
allocated to data which are 
never accessed. Existing facili- 
ties may provide the addition- 
al space. 

Improvement in the usa ge 
of data storage surfaces may 
perhaps be obtained by enlisi- 
ing the help of optimizing 
alogorilhms which can be 
applied dynamically by file 
management software. But 
there is a penalty to pay that 
may lessen its attraction as a 
solution. In addition to the 
cost of acquiring and main- 
taining the software and of 
accommodating and running 
h, the user might suffer a 
partial loss of control over the 
data because of the extra layer 
of software inserted. 

Any advantage secured as a 
result of unproved methods 
may be no more than short 
term, becoming progressively 
less effective as the volumes of 
data continues to rise. 

By the same token, the loss 
of storage efficiency that may 
be expected to accompany 
growth of data volume could 
partly or wholly offset the 
annual fall of 1 5 to 20 per cent 
in the cost of expected data 
unit capacity. 

Impressive changes on the 
way include the use of thin 
film heads on disc drives that 
provide tighter packing than 
current heads can tolerate. 
Again further improvements 
will become possible by 
changing the direction of 
magnetization. 


Optical disc storage using 
digital techniques is heralded 
as the storage device of the 
future. WORM - write once, 
read many times — storage on 
optical discs is becoming 
widely available and is partic- 
ularly suitable for static 
archives. 

Looking over such a rapidly 
advancing horizon suggests 
that ultimately fixed solid 
state memory may replace all 
rotating and other moving 
forms of storage, so providing 
users with low access times in 
addition to compact reliable 
low-cost storage. 

So what decisions should 
our computer user take to 
avoid drowning beneath the 
rising tide of data? A balance 
needs to be struck between 
installing more of the equip- 
ment the user knows and i 
trusts and launching into new, j 

Impressive changes 
are on the way 

relatively untried products 
with little associated software 
in order to reap benefits of 
state-of-the-art technology. 

The impetus or opportunity 
for a data storage review may 
be provided by the demands 
of the Data Protection Act. 
Storage of data relevant to the 
Act needs access procedures 
so th3t applicants for informa- 
tion may be satisfied with the 
least possible disruption to 
both business and computer 
operations. 

A hard-nosed assessment 
may well reveal that business 
interests are best served by 
holding somewha t less data on 
line than suppliers or internal 
advisers suggest as “vital*'. 
Just for once the easy way out 
of a business enigma may be 
ihebest. 

William Jacot is a member of 
The Association of Profession- 
al Computer Consultants. 


A snip at $200 million 


Floating Point Systems based 
in Oregon says its new super- 
computer is more powerful 
than any machine available 
and could be used in the Star 
Wars defence system. 

Financial analysts and aca- 
demic researchers who attend- 


Arr you corakterina CON- 
TRACTING or LOOKING 
FOR YOUR NEXT ASSIGN- 
MENT?. H you have 
Botn m cf m INSURANCE 
or FINANCE, thro caU> 

BWMESS inm 
DESIGN LTD 

■i (01) ESI 4421 


ed the company's news 
conference agreed that the 
architecture of the T Series 
super-computers made them 
the most powerful available, 
but said the machines are so 
new it will be several years 
before they can be widely 
used. 

The smallest model in the 
series, can perform up to 128 
million “floating-point” oper- 
ations a second and costs less 
than $500,000. The largest 
configuration offers a peak 
speed of 262 billion floating- 
point operations a second. It 
would cost about $200 
million. 


IMPERIAL COLLEGE 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 
ENERGY AND POWER SYSTEMS GROUP 

SOFTWARE ENGINEER 

mMnri tar ■ m SERG-famtat prom on tic operwvul planning of 
paver systems. Tie succsssftf aptAcant wfl be respansOle tor msiag- 
ng the (poop’s MCflOVAX I. several meroeanputars ndufrng IBM PCs 
tod BBC Model Bs. and Inks to me Colleges ns* VAX B600 CA0/CAE 
madwe. The post nwfves the development of a range ot eommercaDy 
marketable inaracmis software packages snd the zssocara data bases 
m VAX-VUS and UMX enwoocarts. 

Apphonts shmdd hoU a wwsdy detree or egawiem testification and 
preferably have eqjenenea ot VMS or UWX and knowledge id Fortran 
and/or Pascal Fwnfcray Mh computer g ra phi cs an adnmage. 

The apposoma * toenedu. *tt obey n the range EA3S2 - fia792. 
■cuing London Ataaneo. Acpacatns. mdi the names aid adthesses 
of three referees, by Friday ktoy Wr 1886. to Dr M J Short. Den. Of 
Beard E n gn cenng. brpatrt Coaege. London SW7 2BT - Irani whom 
tarttar ntorraabon op be obomed on 01-589 5111 00. 5114. 


EDUCATIONAL 


Directorate of Education 
and Recreation 

We are seeking graduates with teaching 
and management experience at a senior 
level to fill! he following posts in the 
Directorate. Candidates must have 
proven leadership qualities, a record of 
achievement ana be able to contribute 
and stimulate a fresh approach and 
solutions to the changing demands and 
needs facing the Service. 

HEAD OF SCHOOLS 

DIVISION/ASSISTANT 

DIRECTOR 

Up to £22,776 p.a. * 

To manage and review the schools 
provision in the Authority. 

HEAD OF 
CURRICULUM 
DEVELOPMENT & 
MONITORING/ 
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 

Up to £22,375 p.a . * 

To manage and review curriculum 
development and monitoring in the 
Authonty's establishments. 

* Following the filling of these posts, 
responsibility for co-ordinating the work 
of the Directorate in the Director s 
absence will be allocated to one of five 
posts of Assistant Director. An additional 
payment of£1.0GG per annum is payable 
in this respect 

Application forms and further particulars 
available from the Director of Personnel 
and Administration. Royal Borough of 
Kingston upon Thames. Surrey I\F1 1EU. 
Tel: 01-546 2121 Ext 2215 lAn’swerphone) 
Closing Date: 25th April. 1966. 

ROYAL BOROUGH OF 
KINGSTON UPON THAMES 


COURSES 


LEARN IN LUXURY 

TheCemro Eaero Piemonte, one oflialy’s leading 
language training centres in partnership with the 
training division of the Olivetti group, have a few 
remaining placeson their residential language course 
this summer, between the 10th and 30th of August. 

Designed for the adult executive, the count employs a 
progressive teaching approach as used by one of the 
USA's Ivy-League Universities and includes quality 
accommodation in an historic 18th Century villa, set in 
the vineyards above Florence. 

For funher details of this remarkable course, comact:- 

The British Italian Language Centre 

134 Clerkenwell Road, 

London. EC1R5DL 

Telephone 01-278-0130/9 



FELLOWSHIPS 


POETS 

TV TrwJ for ik» A On [Mn 
Fnmy TrarrOfor Fritanlnp hu 
been evu&twtttd iu nrami wot 
pnru b» imwidinc ■ P»nt w mablt 
Ibt tHapwn Iu ponur up u> a \w M 
mriffwnantt riadi. (mH ud liw 

■mliw •>( (k«uv m Lb* I'anwl 

Slria TV Fdta.-ftup u* hr j— aid- 
rd n Iftfi. Kill hr vurih {JAMMU 

uniiDmoKh EUUX‘'I 
TV* owcimI m nmkmt cQphca 
tim nr in*iwd to kbit fr>r further 
panmiUn 10 the FrUwthv Jucfe*. 
Pi» 4 ‘nM, I'bnMupfcrr Rrk\ no bl-r 
Itao I ho IMh Ml*. ISM. Inqumr*. 
khuuld hr Mm lu 

cfo Whitman A In— 

II Waterloo Ware 
Uodoa SWIY 4AU 
TV FcCmhip u qpra to all auat i- 
W I"**, manllti uf fair. 
nau.motu>. n or nfewu bHttf 


UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL 

JUNIOR FlUOWSHIP M ENGLISH 
Apo'cAim » mvtfed a Jumw 
Feacu*sna< n Emjtcn rmUM Item 
Oaotiet la 1986 lor on* »*■ Can- 
(tows snoiwi law a icscaren 
mldesl n 5omr ara ul Enghtfi Ucr- 
aiuie ''cm iw Renasratict imreiK. 
Th*» as e>ofciH m wreue me* 
ow lesoaich. Du' may M nv<M to 
Bo a (—so annum 01 tuemq Ths 
uurv lor me Fw jtwrm ni w< or anlb- 
m in* mgt £8020 • (9000 par 
anam Fuju*' oaocu^s Wuld be 
tftWK'OJ horn ms Regstrai and Sec- 
irtar* umverai* o* wool. Serene 
Huu is Bristol BS8 1TH W «I»ni ap- 
phcarionc cftjin or son Dy ApN 
Jin 


LWfVTRSITY 

APPOINTMENTS 


UNIVERSITY OF 
EAST ANGLIA 


MAJOR COMPUTER OPPORTUNITIES 
SOFTWARE & SALES 


SYSTEMS ANALYST COY TO £16400 

tETRAM TO IBM 

Company; Web wanttred ire^pr IB M usar a Wn B w C*y o* Lawton uMng tho tatart 

tociaafeiay Ok bortt tacMcal and buBtoan soUtoos. . 

Fmdmsvwm MM raNwatato tor too dowtopmam ol oNtaa BCCOunOng and ftancM 


SALES 


nsslu^ to ■ eonaaowWuBmMS amjrcmMt • ■ 


kiNcB prognannem catwrtiMiW wamraaoi 
aOvantagST homwar Mi erga^trawng wta ba preff^ 


GmanL Lastto^Maue^anda oppoABitty to hattwc ywr earear to an •rafe^mi^tang 

HK1VE TcThSII ' mMm ' SURREY UP T0 £15K + SUB 

RORTGASE AND 
FRSUFE COVER 

Coata«y:.Awtoeeaa MttoincMaafMcpgww p— >PtaCBdatoB talti8lr<Ma»reaape.BNNtoHaa 

toerewta waah 

SSS. TfWti fr* — * ******* I— r flatten dwwioaioo and gwxxatoi flnanoal auatowa. 

&£££* A Wrt mwonBmcW te COBOL 

opportunay to nbfeai toBMand joto a sntgressiM eoiipany wBi 
canttMM enar aArencamffl 


★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ 

SALES LONDON ta £20K BASE 

DATA CmnSS BRISTOL C3SK 07E 

CHOICE OF CAR 
GUARANTEE BUPA 

Coaqiany: EatabHad and aucoassM manrtactorer now bringing out a naw data oonanuolc*- 
Bona product to conMament tnetr wdsttng range of wtooly used ay atoma. 
ftatatoitiwpatoea oii' i ri i tiew are waOBdtoJolnadyiiBiiae and MgMyprofw M o na l Ware toaH 
an axclrtis now X2S baaed data comma predict. Ora poataon «■ cover London and tho South 
Ebm. tha other «a co«ar too West Courey. toned In Bristol 

fap artao c a : SucoaaaM can rtd a toa are mpactad to bn tayi ach to rere vwto an oac abai n aales 
record In too data conaowucations naatw ptaca. 

Genarat A nn l flc opp orenay lor ara b^ xa protosolo nali to (om on mp arning company «mooe 
Ndfe regarrtwd prcdHca are bachad by 18^9 nadarhoW auitjl warot Tha oa awi 
p o toaga oftarad to e b daa BUPA. chows of car and guawaa. 

REF: TA 1318 


fftri V a 

PROJECT LEADBtS/ SURffiY BASE . T16-25X 

duality CAR 

BOTSULTa " 2 X BONUS 

Company: Martrei taadar aupHytoglta oam relational itofttoaao and 4QL pnxtacta. Praatigiihn 
Siarev ftoose toTwtoon) ___ 


VAR SALES MANAGER 
NATIONAL ACCT EXECS 
32 BIT UMX BASED MICRO 


CAKB1S BASE 


£35400 PLUS OTE 
£20380 BASIC 
3 MONTH GUARANTEE 


SUiSSY BASE 


product range. Based in surd* tAw *» - — — 

s^»aM wtotonw awat mms a sound DP bachgmond to»| MftWar Mm 

^ r«TW«nPP0flT ' . UNfflOtt T0E15K 


Companf: MgNy reapoctod nd oatremafy aucoanM, <Ma BrilMi nmitadierBr has an totem». 
flonal r uputafai Co r omoltan ra watan toe n ac r oc w np u tor waih af ptaca. Dus to an bnpresawe 
pceto mo and outstanding da m en d. nddatonat aados pnhsscnas wo now reowred 
Pontoon: The amcuaaM eand tooto a «• be reaponstola tor too earn at toe company’s togMy 
accfefcned 32 Ut Unix baaed mlcreooHMar. dtoa communlctokaH and awnriwtBri peripherals 
Mo a variety of corp ore al accounts and eanicai martats. 

Btoertone* H nb a aBy a proven snd suooo s aU track record and sound lenowt o dg a of tola 
particular e rmUont ne nt la rewnfal in addtoon toe more senior cantodam ahouto be able to 
demon str ate their dtoty to grow a cc ounts , and a cra toto a. mahae a irihe l w For both p oeton na 
to w iie tf ga of toe Unbt operating system wotod be aovanttgaoua. 

Gonanfcfteooiptsed In oarer 30 cotaanea tar pmkang a ratable and coat sflecttw Urex based 
system, tote c om p a n y la oftanng a generous range of benatha batudbig atoaarabta on target 
aamfagt end a three month guarantee. 71)090 factors togetaer wtto cnaatondtag laetmeal baa- 
up mil* these racawd a a a urtqua opportunty to tartar tor career. 


MAJOR ACCOUNT 

^litoria^^m«toama.Attondon»dBtarandtM«^»areiRwomaoaiiMa MANAKR OA UMIKAL DTE S3 SJW 

gw^.trerraepwenra ^ » LI" BUSOffiSS S0RWAHE/ LOWOH + LONDON WHGKT1NI 

Offfl CENTK/SUPPOHT UMfflON . TO E15K mt& QUALITY CAJ 

HGH GUARJWTEJ 

SBRBR SgEfSSSVaBtt 

itaatoapa aad otoca amnaikn. 

KiSSSw SDdtorrtC0m5S553»«lrtbta«*»to“ tonca jkwhB be oothgas Ptattona: Saaaral am asalabto to sariotabcatlonalnctatSngWW and Cwaral London orterin 

liTrtTrani o mf ot ar PMl ^ ' Ml accaaa todbect ml and ttoeytua tote. Wortang from purpose but busnass centre 

ri^Sjon orexpecta aw ouMaWng «nd j w caiMdtoB iM to fc toaftto gifltfetf 10 offering oxcolaui dent itareunangs - partfctoariy condumre to writtog and namming goo 
fry the Sufnmra. ftomoaf padage nel ncnato aoCTafati TOiaada bueam. Accoud Umgars raB be mUng ta doaehr apacatead oaritaf areas eaatang feor 

Uon a tvoe mtoMneosL - . . R rf^J s outolfiad touts aid an axtrema^ lage ucar base. Uanagamant apport s emtoam as b to 

.usrwT/P MUW UlBIBIS CITY - £15*£17K tsebnea praftoet satos smxn. 

tpmici^ 1 ' Bp ewec a MlnUMcm or office automation bedlams cosareig any taedarara. Ftri oaten 

OVERSEAS lnA WP-^ - .^__ nWaWm nnwnuinntremaa atawfderalMi»» «« bo ghwn where requlrnd The «anb “energy, enteisfesm. caeddem. good track record 

areregutartyaia^hOTfautganuiMoa^pnapec ttrtnaa^ totenewnariMaretean 
astrefa finance Into aanagemart afaptod be noted and gran catU cc n eto eratav Recent ancessM cand 

tespeoab y to Mna^iroaMma^Bhinaii i . iei inr n n dHaatotosa tost iobavrarw- tat down, bored, tooteig fora chatonge or juai ready to nsw mow 

Pawiwn: atea. TUere Ml be aweneireua e ruantaa toto “The Jotf*. Tliey were aericus about ehongtog Jobs and dooig aumetoing about thd 

n CKSeSreniiiam. ap p l ica nts from Mum hnuses wtarat rong fi nanaal or Qen eret Several po ah ione are na fi efii e we tan towd that atandeida are t*ah and 

--SuTanm^* *«■ pntteitefc u*eM bve traaitoB a* be^ta wi K n«M»y. previous oanKWes have l»en eatamMy tepreased end keen to ten - toe company are *w 

m^ects tor tM bchMio ub ratn opportarfey to worie sath rfie laasl M f o etne ana enhr a tew are effarad iote - ~Ot*v toe beat wto do". H tots ta vaur atMude an 
gmarot company benelfta.VaiiiabB 

Con&dfanL 

r B J csrWMfto Ammo* «« ttese w» nav ctw nraadex pMse cotocf w el oa c«n«Mto. VA w ton ipaatas ■ sanaig mm mi ofc nm w* tetotag^ to mn to m <* 

Vloor, Empire House, 1 75 Kccadilly, London W1Z 9DB Telephonfa 01409 2844, 01439 8302 (24 horns). 


WEST & 
CENTRAL 

LONDON 


ofRfmsad BM me t d ra mas. 
t micro dMetaa nppdffing and 


BASE TO £16,000 
OTE £35JB0 
+ LONDON WBGKTING 
QUALITY CAR 
BUPA 

HGH GUARANTEE 


Company: FrcDatXy aia of cor torgato ml moto praugtow diems. Haring been astabtetiad tar 
t ort d ecadat covering awry coippuffrr generation ttaougfi ra a to fa neMainto. meros- 
deaktops and r*a^ ai e n m eUgn 

tatoonE Sawaref am avalaPto to sarioua bcattana tacbcing Weat and Canm London offering 
easy access todbeet ml and tuoe/tw tote. Wortang from purpose bu* busnass centres 
oftaring ta c tH a oi efiant n a na m dinga - parttraariy condtaare to art tog and mamtalnlng good 
busaiaak. Atmmf kingare rata be norictog to doaely apaoalaad earitaf areas wortung bom 
auaUed toads aid an axtrernafy tega ucar baaa. Management appal k aacsfient as b toa 
Mcfncai pr a/ poet sWas swoon. 

Eip eneno a. MtotfnaDO or office a u to ma ton bacfcpointa cosanng any taedaora Fid nteng 
tefi be given whore required. The words "energy. eMtasfesnt. co n fidence, good back record" 
are reguiariy spofcan fwra but gantoa career proepacta of movtog into new merkat oeas and 
Into management stioiid be noted and gnen caraU conelderatnn. RaoentaocassUoamk- 
daiaa to Bisb last iobasrarw-M down, bored, tooteig tor a chalanga or jute ready to now move 
toto "The Job". They were aericus about dwnglng Jobe and dooig aumedang about ttwb 
h a B iood. 

Qeneret Beve ra i potation s are mw i taii i ws tan, feuid that at a ndsrds are tvgh and 
previous oandtoatos lew been extsrrwty bupiureed snd keen to jom - tha c om pany am vsry 
s a kx aw a and ofiy a tow are offered jobs - ~Orty me beet wifi do . If fife b your attitude and 
MSB standards are atoar you lore comp to expect ptoase cal tar krtwr Wornawn and a 
conMerctt Owustooa REF: Tva nez 

b H Bn spebtois m asoakig Mta rretaote wodrag more red efcttg to non to MW- 



Evening numbers 
until 10pm:- 

0990 25639 
03727 22531 


KEBLE COLLEGE 
and 7 WE QUEEN’S 
COLLEGE OXFORD 
Official Fellowship and 
Tutorship at Kefale College 
and Associated Lecturership 
at the Queen s College m 
English Literature 
The Cofleges propose to 
appoint a suitably quab- 
fted candidatB to English 
literature (within the peri- 
od 1500-1900) tor five 
years from 1 October 
1986. Further particulars 
may be obtained from the 
Warden. (Cable Cottage, 
Oxford. OX1 3PG, to 
whom applications 
should be submitted not 
later than 17 May 1986. 


The Oueans Umvosoy ol Beftast 

COBDEN TRUST 
RESEARCH 
STUDENTSHIP 

For resaicn rmo mt opwreon at 
Itgemm fo* mv ureol « ipinara 
am nw pnneaan <t o«nan ngnb 

Apphcsms must hold a good 
honours dept-a r> law or other 
relevant <*&c**nS- "mh person 
acuameu wo Da requvva to 
carry out research vmnn me 
speohed heu anno reg star lor 
an aopropnai* posgraouate 
degree The atudenamp a 
tanaols tor one year tram Jidy 
1396 and is ranewaote lor a 
■ tamer one or two years Tho 
currant payment <9 ol me rate 
ror state studentships crm entry 
at E 2 .be per annum plus few. 
AptVicaocns. encrosmg a hi* 
cumcUum vsao ana me names 
and addresses ol two reterees 

snoukt be sent to- 
The Dean ot me FaoAy ol Law. 
The Oueen's unveruty 
ol Bellasi. 

BT7 INN 

from whom runner aetata may 
be conned. 

Oosng date 16m May 1966. 


ALL BOX 
NUMBER 
REPLIES 
SHOULD BE 
ADDRESSED 
TO: 

Box No 

C.O Times 
Newspapers. 
P.O. BOX 484 
Virginia Street 
LONDON 
El 9DD 


SCHOOL OF 

INFORMATION SYSTEMS 

CHAIR IN 

COMPUTING SCIENCE 

Applications arc invited for a 
nrwt> published Chau- tn 
Ccmpuung Science, tenable 
from I Sqjfcmhrr IflSb with- 
ru the School of Informauoa 
sv-sienu. This pouiion antes 
from addmonal UGC suppon 
to the Ufliveroty to rein Jana: 
leaching: on enpneenng and 
lecbnolog) programmes and. 
more pamcularl>. lo surtigib- 
en research in computing 
saencc and software engineer- 
ing Candidaies should haven 
proven record of coniritw 
uons to some mainstream 
aspect of these fields, in eitlMr 
an academic or an industrial 
contnl. The person appoint- 
ed will be eapecieo to 
spearhead research ai ibe fotr- 
from of infonnauoD 
icctinologi. focusing for in- 
stance on i be engineering of 
knowledge-based systems. Ap- 
pormmetn will he at an 
appropnaie point on ihc Pro- 
fessorial scab- £19010 - 

CI32SS. 

The School of Information 
Svstcms at UEA encompasses 
ibe academic disciplines of 
Accountanci. Compuluig Sci- 
ence and Electronic Systems 
Engineering. The principal ar- 
eas of research in Computing ' 
Science are ai present in 
data base and informaiion sys- 
tems. graphics and computer- I 
axled design, concurrency and 1 
distributed computing, declar- | 
alive languages and : 
ardnlecinres. and maihcmati- 
•al models and algorithms. 
Common intomls with the 
Accountancy sector include 
computerised modelling, sys- 
tems analysis methods and 
business information systems. 
There is also dose co-open* 
lion »ilb the EJcmoiucs 
sector in areas such as com* 
puicr architecture, iltc design 
of mmuproceMor-hased s>v 
terns and technsquesand tools 
for computer-aided engineer- 
ing. The School's research 
acirvilies incrcasinpjy involve 
industrial collaboration, sup- 
ported m pan through the 
Alvey and Espnt 
program ires- 

Appltoanons tfive copresL 
punc foil particuhrs ol age. 
qualifications and experience, 
toeeihcr u-iih the names, and 
addresses nf three persons lo 
whom reference nu> be made 
Should he lodged »iUi the 
Rceattar and Secretary. L'm- 
venitv of Anglo. 

Norwich. NR-» 7TJ I (telephone 
tMri Vilhl ctl 22llh) Iran 
whom further pamculais mat 
he obtained, not later than S 
May 1‘tSh. No forms of appb- 
catiiin are iswWd 












16 


34 


THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


n 


H 

fo 

New 
Tele* 
retur 
beco 
Snov 
senu 
Ann; 
hiso 
repo 
mak' 
polit 
of th 
put) 
to a 
alon 
as N 
Cun 
thiai 
acth 
way: 
age 
begs 
Ewa 
Pols 
Was 
lom 
him 
wat< 

own 

Con 

M 

Wez 
revi 
a me 
“Sei 
at 

Son 

mer 

W 

In a 
reac 
moi 
Phi! 
Job 
SW£ 
spit 
yest 
Dui 
con 
itor 
firs' 
tres 
the 
OE 
ten 
mil 
arr 
chc 
ien 
wo 
OE 

N 

.All 

am 

ad- 

arc 

det 

Ni 

ad 

Rc 

im 

od 

Jo 

M 

dc 

El- 

in 

lei 

to 

S° 

Pi 

w: 


Fr 

pe 

to 

M 

dc 

ev 

1C 

C* 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 



Commercial Solicitor and 
Conveyancing Legal Executive 


Racal Electronics PLC has a head office team of 
solicitors and banisters in Bracknell. Berkshire 
advising the Group subsidiaries in all areas of law. 
There are two vacancies to be filled:- 

1. A young Solicitor For our commercial law 
depanmem is required to work on commercial 
contracts of all opes, including joint ventures, 
technology transfers, intellectual property, 
company law and overseas law. E.E.C. competition 
and consumer law etc. 

2. Wt also require a suitably experienced Legal 
Executive with a sound knowledge of commercial 
conveyancing procedures to assist in handling a 
substantial volume of conveyancing associated 
with the Group's property holdings. The work will 
include both acquisitions and disposals ot 


commercial premises with a particular emphasis 
on leasing of sites required for the recendy 
launched cellular radio service provided by one of 
the companies within the Group. 

The successful applicants will be required to 
complete their work without use of outside firms of 
solicitors and should have the ability to liaise 
successfully with senior personnel within the Group. 

If you are interested in joining a friendly team 
working in modem offices and having a challenging 
post with a secure future please apply with full c.v. 
including present salary to:- 
Mr. A. J. Franklin, Personnel Executive, 

Group Personnel Services, 

Racal Group Services LtiL, 

Western Road, Bracknell, Berkshire RG12 1RG 


00300 



entertainment 

.35. At least 1 years qualified experience to abouL 
30 years old. 

Aj- Entertainm ent, media and c omimm ic aaop s 
law, particularly film and TV productions, 
sponsorship and financing, 
jf ftrip jdng ^nrerramment personalities on all 
a spyff of their pro fe ssoral fives. 

THE FIRM 

Anticipating our move to the Gty this June and as a result cf expansion, we wzsbro appoint personable yotmg 

lawyers of the highest calibre to our Entertainment and Litigation Departments, we are a 20 partne r 

also in the fields of company and co mm erc ia l law, commercial properry, nreanon ami pnvate chcnt wptk , ami 

offer excellent career prospects in a friendly, modem environme nt. If you wish to tirscres these 

pL-re» oil Toby Wilkinson on 01-405 6852 or apply quoting Ret TW210 to Reuter Suntan Lid, 26-28 Bealoro 

Row, London WC1R4HE. 


LmGATION 

* 25-30 years old with good academic record 

00(1 63CDCXlCOC6a 

* Broad based commercial litigation including 
employment and intellectual property law. 

•& Substantial diem contact and responsibility 
for own matters. 


REUTER SIMKIN 

• WINCHESTER 


LONDON 


LEEDS 


'RECRUITMENT & MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS. 


Rcwe & Mow are established solicitors 
who ha^e recently undergone substantial 
growth resulting in a move fo prestigious 
new offices in the Gty of London. 

We now require c young, ctMe solicitor 
to pm our expanding Commercial 
Property Deportment where he she will 
join c closely knit ream specialising in 


development and securities orientated 
wort. The person appointed will possess 
up to tv*c years qualified conveyancing 
experience and will be eager to meet 
this fresh challenge with a new and 
mn ovetive approach to traditional 
problems. 

An attractive salary is offered together 


with the normal benefits associated with 
a progressive firm. 

Please send a full CV to our Staff fartner 
Richard Bowles. 

Rowe & Maw 

20 Blackfriats Lane, London EC4V 9HD 

Rowe & Maw 


COMPETENT 

LOCUMS 

required Countrywide 
for Solicitors with 
staff emergencies 

01-248 1139 

Short and long term 
assignments for 
Litigation & 
Conveyancing. 

ASA LAW 

I noun ky SuttODfS 

6/7 LuCgaR HS EC4W 7ts 



LEGAL AID £38,295 


The present Director leaves at the 
end nf August ltiSfi. to take up an appoint- 
ment outside legal administration. He has 
been in charge of Legal .Aid for over ten 
years during a period nf considerable and 
progresshe change, culminating in a 
major scrutiny bv externa! consultants 
and the establishment of a new manage- 
ment structure which came into i>eing on 
the 1st January. 19S6. The immediate 
tasks of the Director include the implemen- 
tation of line management principles in 
the Area Offices, the development of strict 
financial management information and 
control systems, increased personnel and 
training services and a major review of 
computerisation. The Director also has a 
mle as a Depanmental Secretary of the 
Law Society. 

Legal .Aid is administered from a 
Head Office in London and operates 
through 15 Area Offices in England ar.d 
Wales together with Accounts and 
Computer & Communications 
Departments, also in London with a total 
staff of 1.400. The Legal Aid Service deals 
with over 300.000 applications for Legal 
Aid each year currently increasing at 


about 9"' per annum with a current 
annual cost of £520 million and 
administration costs exceeding £20 
million. I c operates under the general 
guidance of the Lord Chancellor. 

The successful applicant will be 
closely involved in the formation of 
policy. He/she will be a solicitor with broad 
legal experience. the will and ability to 
manage personally and effectively and to 
understand, direct and support the various 
senior staff functions. The post is the focal 
point for many interested and influential 
bodies and pressure groups and can 
attract high media attention requiring 
the Director to act as spokesman in the 
press, on radio and television. 

Conditions of service are linked to 
those of the Civil Service and include an 
annual salary review, index linked 
contributory pension scheme and 30 
working days leave. 

Please send details of education, 
career development, experience and date 
available to the Personnel Manager. 

Legal Aid. Legal .Aid Head Office. 

$-16 Great New Street. London EC34BN 
by che 9th May, 19S6. 



THE LAW SOCIETY 



Senior Assistant 
Solicitor 

LEICESTER up to £18, ’02 

Due ra promotion an ambitious Soliritorcf some 
3 years experience is required to joinabusy legal 
office providing a fully comprehensive legal 
service to Britisn Gas East Midlands. The work 
involved is extremely broad and includes 
common law, contracts, commercial, employ- 
ment litigation and conveyancing matters. 
The post involves management and staff 
supervision duties. 

Detailed written applications to Personnel 
Director. British Gas East Midlands, De Montfort 
Street Leicester, quoting Vacancy No. 12073 on 
both envelope 2 nd letter. 

An equal opportunities employer. 


British Gas 

East Midlands 



Decide 



Putting Criminal Advocacy into Action 


For the ambitious young lawyer, few 
opportunities present a broader or more 
challenging caseload in criminal advocacy* 
than the new Crown Prosecution Service. 

The Crown Prosecutors will review- 
charges brought by the police, dedde 
whether court proceedings are warranted 
and, if so, normally conduct the case for 
the prosecution. Your skill and judgment 
will be instrumental in ensuring that the 
Service successfully provides a consistent 
criminal justice system throughout England. 

Vacancies are currently available in the 
London area for Crown Prosecutors and 
Senior Crown Prosecutors. • • 

Salary*: 1 . under review; as Senior Crown 


Prosecutor &13.505-&1S.360; as Crown 
Prosecutor & 10.500-SI 3.000. The posts win 
attract London Weighting as follows: Inner 
S 1 365. Intermediate 5-765. Outer £545. 
Starting salary according to qualifications 
and experience. 

For further details and an application 
form ( to be returned by 2 May 1936) Write . 
to Gvil Service Commission, Ale neon Link, 
Basingstoke. Hants RG2 1 1 JB or telephone 
Basingstoke (0256 ) 468551 (answering 
service operates outside office hours). 
Please quote ref: G(3)942. 

The Ova Service Is an equal 
opportunity employer 



CROWN PROSE CUT/OX SEJIWCE 



THE BANKING OMBUDSMAN 

Citadel House. 5/11 Fetter Lane. 
London EC4A IBR 

Requires a 5EN10R LEGAL OFFICER to rank 
as No 2 in the legal staffing of this consumer 
service. 

Salary guide: £20.000+. dependant on experi- 
ence. 

The successful candidate will: 

- Be likely 10 be in the 30 - 50 age group and already 
earning over £ 1 5.000. 

- View the posi as a medium 10 long terra career 
appointment. 

- Be competent to take executive responsibility for 
the day to day legal work of the Office during 
temporary absences of the Ombudsman. 

Ideally he/she will already have substantial practising 
experience in retail banking law and practice-, but sub- 
stantial practice experience in another civil field related 
to our operational function might be acceptable if cou- 
pled with willingness to acquire banking law expertise 
rapidly and. in pan at least, in own time. 

Acute but sympathetic diagnostic skill in the legal anal- 
ysis of written complaints - often complex, and by non- 
lawyers - is indispensable. 

Applications in writing, with CV and marked 

•Ref OBO/SLO/IEJ' 10 the Banking Ombudsman as 

above. 

This is a separate vacancy from that recently ad- 
vertised for Legal Assistant. Applicants for that 
vacancy who have been notified that they would be 
reconsidered if a more senior vacancy arose need not 
submit a fresh application. 



TEACHER 


of 

37/41 Bedford Row, 
London VTC1R 4JH 
Telephone 242 3191 

REQUIRE 

TWO YOUNG SOLICITORS 

for their expanding Com- 
mercial Litigation and 
Company & Commercial 
Departments. 

Attractive salary and pros- 
pects for right applicants. 

Write with CV or telephone 
reference DT. 


Borough 
Solicitor 

£20,637-£22,845 
Plus Allowances -under review 


Applications are invited from Solicitors forthis 
post m the Council's Chief Officer Team. 

The successful applicant will be the Council s 
legal officer and will be responsible to the 
Chief Executive and Town Clerk for the work 
of the Legal Department which includes, legal 
services, local land charges, maintenance 
and control of statutory registers, properly 
records as well as other functions allocated to 
the Borough Solicitor by or on behalf of the 
Council. 

/yjplrcants will be expected to demonstrate 
significant local government and managerial 
experience at a high level in the legal 
profession, as well as the ability to work well 
whilst under sustained pressure. 

The successful applicant will be required to 
reside wirhin the Borough which extends over 
some 32.000 acres of Surrey with four main 
townships of Banstead. Reigate, Redhill and 
Horley and a population of approximately 
1 1 7.000. A generous relocation scheme is 
available. 

Further details and application form can be 
obtamed tram the Personnel Office. Town 
Hall. Reigaie. Surrey RH2 OSH. alternatively 
telephone Reigate 22560. (24 hour answering 
service). Applicants wishing to discuss the 
post are welcome to telephone the Chief 
Executive and Town Clerk. Mr C. T. Pollard, 
on Reigate 42477 Ext 132. 

Closing date 22nd April 1 986. 


Borough of 
Reigate & Banstead 




OTOR 


Housing Development 

The Woolwich is one of the leading Building Societies 
involved in housing development projects and to assist in 
this expanding area we wish to appoint an additional 
solicitor who will be dealing primarily with direct housing 
development work and specialised mortgage lending 
projects. 

The work includes negotiation and drafting of development 
agreements, building contracts, mortgage Mid estate 
conveyancing documentation. This position (which is based 
at Woolwich) is likely to appeal to those aged 25-35 with 
post qualification experience in the above areas. 

Enthusiasm and commitment for this challenging position 
are important as are a sound knowledge of real property law 
and a commercial approach. 

An attractive remuneration package is offered which 
includes: concessionary mortgage facilities, free BURA, 
contributory Pension Scheme and generous life cover. 
Relocation assistance will be given where appropriate. 
Applications with a full c.v: should be sent to: M. A. Plummer, 
Personnel Manager, Woolwich Equitable Building Society, 
Equitable House, Woolwich, London SE18 6AB. 

Applications are welcome from both men and women. 


M 


WOOLWICH 

I EQUITABLE BUILDING SOCIETY I 


WIGGIN AND CO 

A SPECIALIST PRACTICE IN THE COTSWOLDS 

w login and Corn apedoUU linn of Solicitor, wkh a strong totaraaflona! amo r t aste. 

Wf are seeking TWO soHdlon 

■ One fo ante! m the area of private client flnanctal planning: 

- One to SMH « the expanding area of conunny ana commercial work ondortoksn by the firm. 

The successful applicants wtB tw%c had reievani ekpedence. probaMy in the atjr. and wiu he 
looking 10 continue then- profcsnwul Ufe In a modem office ouok*? f codoo where the location 
has prosed to Be no ear to Uw spectollst nature of the rtm' mr.to. 

S ala r y at or above London rates. 

Apply in writing in the first instance to: 

T.W. Osborne, Wiggfn and Co, The Quadrangle, Imperial Square, 
Cheltenham, Gloucestershire GL50 1TX. Tet 0242 5191X1. 


Dept of Law and Administration 
The Legal Division of this large multi-racial London Borough in which the 
Counci land its 3a £f share a commitment to Equal Opportunities is looking for 
new staff to meet an increasing workkrad. ... 

Local Government experience is not a pre-requisite. 

ASSISTANT SOLICITORS 

(2) Ref A/412 

POl (8) 

Salary £11,850 - £12,885 p4L plus £1,138 LW. and 
Supplements. 


Two opportun t tes to join a 
varied legal workload of the 

but not necessarfiy 
j.' Housing, Traffic M 
related to Courts, Titeunals 



team of soflcAors who between teem handto the 
should haw soma ffigaitoo experience, 
. The posts wflf cover such areas as 
and Contracts and offer valuable experienced 
inquiries, afi tai a busy London Borough. 


SENIOR LEGAL ASSISTANTS 

(2) Ref A/414 

Sade 6 

Salary £8,979 to £9,591 pa plus £1,138 LW. and 
Supplements. 

Two experienced Legal Assistants are sought, one each in tee CONVEYANCING and 
COMMON LAW (evwytWng else) sections. Successful applicants wifi undertake the 
more complex work of these sections and have some supervisory resptesfitfty and 
should be Associates or Fbfiow of the Institute of Legal Executives or have 
compar ab le qualification. 

LEGAL ASSISTANTS 

(2) Ref A/376 

30310 ^ 

Salary £6,900 to £7,713 pa plus £1,138 LW. and 
Supplements. 

ss S MaH agaaa^aaMaaasfSi 

requires some experience of Btigabon and knowledge of 

TSyahSffh nJ 0 beAssoclat830f ft- 01 °f ! 


exp«1erx» of negation end knowledge cif court 
wig to be Associates of ft£X or stater qualification but tea is notessatial. 
however have a rranimum of 3 ‘O' levels or BTEC or other eqitivalent. 

J 05 1 < ^ 8c ^ F ao n s r f r° m ftePpreonnef DWison Rooro.t Brent Town 
Reference numbers must be quoted. 


London Borough of 

BRENTk 


SURREY MAGISTRATES’ 
COURTS COMMITTEE 

STAINES & S UNBURY DIVISION 

PRINCIPAL ASSISTANT 

AnfKaaiim arc milled from BanMcn. SoBcuori and odwr 
suitable gualuM persons wno are able to take an types of coot 
mIIIkku supentsion and undertake a wtde range of uaimia s no - 
lii c duller at sent or levels. 

Salary cu.Ul to £12 744 (nclinfve. 

Funner details and apptteatton forms from. 

Wesoale House 
81 Higti Street 
Eater 

Surrey KTIO 9RQ 

(Telephone Ester 6S484I 
Ooauig dale 2SUi April 1986. 

BH ATKINS 
CJerk io uw CmnnrtttaT 


MESSRS. WILLIAM CHARLES CROCKER 

Wish to appoint an assistant to one of iheir Commercial partners. A 
varied work load is involved for clients in the Lloyd's market, and 
outside the insurance field. 

A com petit ve salary is payable according to experience. Solicitors with 
up to 2 years qualified experience should apply with full CV to: 

R D HUDSON, 

NEW MERCURY HOUSE, 

81-82 FARRM6DON STR E ET. 

LONDON, EC4A 48T, 

or, for further details, p h o no 01 3S3 0311. 


Assistant 




There is a vacancy for an Assistant 
Legal Executive in the Medico- 
Legal Section of IQ’s Legal 
Department at its Millbank 
Headquarters. The work of the 
Section includes industrial dis ease 
litigation. The successful applicant 
will be required to assist the 
section's lawyers in this work. 
Candidates, who should be in their 
mid-twenties, will be Associates/ 
Members or Fellows of the 
Institute of Legal Executives and 


have good personal injury litigation' 
experience. 

An attractive salary and benefits 
will be offered. 

Please apply with full cv to: 

Mis Linda Kennedy, Personnel 
Officer, Imperial Chemical 

Industries PLC, 
Imperial Chemical - 
House, Millbank, 
London 
SW1P3JF. 

(Tel: 01-8344444). 












THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1 986 


r?t\ 






ERT\rv„ 

4 ix.* 


IN’ 


d.j;freeman&qq 

Solidtofc 

BUILDING AND PROPERTY UTK5ATI0N 

SSLnSi e S2? ndi,r 5 ^ sectjon of litigation department 

with a wide range of property-related disputes 
EKE bu'iding contract, design and planning claims. The 
fpJtowingtvw) new posts are available;- 

i ?J olfc ? or with at least fiveyears experience in substantial 
ouiidmg disputes, whether for employers, contractors, sub- 
contractors, professional advisers or insurers; 

Z a newly or recently qualified solicitor wishing to specialise 
m property-related litigation; though not necessarily having 
experience in this field. 

If you feel you are able to contribute in either of these areas 
arid would like to wort in a challenging but friendly 
environment, please write to Graham Ceadel with a full c.v. 

DJ. Freeman A Co., 43 Fetter Lane, London EC4A 1NA. 


ftedbrqe 

DIRECTORATE OF ADMINISTRATION 
AND LEGAL SERVICES 

SENIOR ASSISTANT 
SOLICITOR 

£13,578 to £14,718 (inclusive) 

This is a newly created Senior post responsible 
for the provision of professional advise on 
services to be transferred to the Borough on 
the abolition of the GLC. 

Specifically the areas of worn will be traffic 
management matters. Unitary Plans, waste 
r eg Nation and disposal, entertainments 
licensing, judicial services and grants to 
outside bodies. 

This Is a challenging opportunity for an able 
Softener to gain an insight into a wide variety of 
local authority activities. Applicants should 
have approximately three years post- 
quafification experience: a knowledge of one or 
more of the specific areas of responsibility 
would be an advantage. 

Application forms and further detaSs from 
Director of Administration and Legal Services, 
PO Box 2, Town HaD, High Road, Btord, Essex 
KS1 1DD (telephone 01-478 3020 extension 
168), to be returned by 25 April 1986. 


ig ten co procedu res; wit h 
farad cm an unrestricted 
anyone rath appropriate 



I C<>mpany/Commercial 
I Solicitors 

If you are a solicitor with up to 4 years' company/ 
commercial experience and good academic qualifications 
we would like to hear from you. 

Our consultants include solicitors and barristers. We 
believe you can derive invaluable benefits from their 
experience, both in the profession and in recruitment, by- 
discussing your career with them. ’ 

For further information please telephone Laurence 
Simons, Simon Anderson or Steven Grubb on 
01- 831-2000 (01-485 1345 evenings arid weekends) or 
write to The Legal Division, Michael Page Partnership 
(UK), 39-41 Parker Street, London WC2B 5LH. 
Strictest confidentiality assured. 


”71 


?! 






MiadftgeRatoerdig) 

International RecnimntraGttsdtaiits 

London Windsor Bristol ftnnfagbam Manchester Leeds Ghs^ Breads NewVbdi^rfaey 
Amemba-ofiheAiU^RifrPtCftvup 


nAbarro nathanson 

C0MPANYAND 




Wbaresedcu^ to rccruftadditional lawyers of outstanding 
ahility for our expanding Company and Corameiml Department 
Ah ewy, but varied, workload will encompass both public and 
priwue company work ns.wdl as general and mremational 
commerdal transactions. Opportunities to specialise within 
th«e Mis are awinlaWe 

Successful candidates will havea piacticalcoiiimeraalapproadi 
and an abilfty to relate to a wide rangeofoistitufional and 
- corporatedients. 

Nut kss than one year's relevant experience is essential. 

Salary aid prospects are excel lent 
Applications with lull CVs to John Rare FQS, 
Rfftnership Secretary Nabarro Nathanson, 76 Jertnyn Street, 
London SW1Y 6NR. 



Solicitor 

Abroad-ranging role with a 
Major UK Chemical Company 
London 

The Associated Oriel Company one of Britain^ most 


na c niatio r i a f organisation 

and now extending and dwetsilyirigiB aQivftie sfun^ 

We are now looking to appoint a So&torto join a small. 
quaSBed legal team within the Gonipany Secretary's. 
Department at our HeadOffice in Serkefey Square. London, 
fc'sannweaing broadly based rot inwIiicftyajnKybe - 
mvotved with ary aspect of the axnpan/sopaations. 

\bu should be a SofidtDr.protiabfy a^d 3040. with 
Pxppriwv-p both In private practice and man industrial/ 

mmrrterrialenwonrrieix wtfflto 

asoiir^gr^irfrarporateaffi^anduflntn^ 

Bqjerienafofinahtawapitfesiotd 

wndd be an advantage. _ „ 

Sabwwfllbenegbd^accDn^tDquafincaJoreara 
experienreandwfllbesupptemerxEdtyacDrnpanybenefiB . 

package Including pension scheme and BUBA. Relocation 
expenses will be available, if appficabte. 

Please write, endosfng a compreharoivecit, to 

Mis GJH. Smftfc Staff Rtcnritaunt Offiot 

The Associated Octet Company UmfteeLPO Box 17. 

EBeunert Port* South WfcwL w5 4HR 


Win ward Fearon & C Q 

We are a seven partner firm with a substantial commercial 
practice together with high quality private client work and 
require as a consequence of our expanding client base and 
workload the fbllowing:- 

BUILDING CONTRACT 

A 1-3 year qualifited solicitor 

GENERAL LITIGATION 

A 1-3 year qualified solicitor 

CONVEYANCING 

A newly qualified solicitor to assist in both domestic and 
commercial conveyancing. 

For aU the above posts a high level of academic ability is 
essential. 

Please reply together with curriculumn vitae toc- 

Roger Doulton 
Windward Fearon & Co 
35 Bow Street 
London WC2E 7AU 


Compliance Executive 

LEADING UK STOCKBROKER 

A leading UK stockbroker, now the subsidiary of a major 
international bank, wishes to appoints qualified barrister or 
solicitor to work in a key role in its Compliance function. 
Reporting to the Senior Director in charge of Compliance and 
staff matters, responsibilities will include: 

- interpreting legal aspects of regulatory matters; 

- establishing monitoring systems for front and back office 
areas; 

- advising the Executive Board on all legal questions; 

- assisting the Chief Executive. 

The firm is committed to the highest professional standards, 
it seeks a lawyer of outstanding energy and ability to address 
these vital tasks positively and creatively. Ideal age is 27 to 32. 
Compensation includes base salary, bonus and significant 
fringe benefits. Opportunities for further career develop- 
ments with the firm are excellent 

Please reply in confidence to Box 77968, 

St James's House, 4/7 Red Lion Court Fleet Street 
London EC4A3EB. 


PRIVATE CLIENT 
DEPARTMENT 

Famham, Surrey 

We are seeking a bright and ambitious 
young Solicitor to specialise in personal tax 
and financial planning, trusts and probate. 
The successful candidate will initially work 
closely with the firm's existing Tax Depart- 
ment but will be encouraged to develop the 
private client work on his or her own initiar 
tive. Prospects are excellent. 

Stevens & Bolton is a long-established 
but rapidly expanding and progressive firm 
with a wide range of high quality corporate 
and personal clients. Our Famham office is 
situated in a delightful country town about 
an hour from London and the sea. The post 
would ideally suit a Solicitor currently prac- 
tising in London who values both 
professional excellence and the qualify of 
life. 

Please write with full particulars to 
Roger Berner at 5 Castle Street, Famham, 
Surrey GU9 7HT. 


(UTTERING - MMfflllAliPTOIISHliBE 

a&TTEUHBSS • 

cv “ Richard Norfolk & Company 
Howemarfcot 
Kotfwfoc 
Ref W* . 


assist solicitor 

prospects. “ _ . 

■^».nl .4999274«tm«l— <■"«"»*> 


WMJKMEXaOUIH. Vouw Uta- 
■dcKV Private CMe nU. Cotnp/ 
Cram Soil e. awXD*. M*r- 
eatm Sam 01463 0068. 

jowl amp imT WOww i y*- 

enna . wen unman firm 
CULBOO wamx CaaMttrate 
0968 36103. 

cmLinHWim wHcttcr Dart 
Mutuums preferably adnriUM! 
2/3 yean cnooo Wesae* 
ConwttanU OW8 28188. 


CONVEVAMCBI for Exeter soOd- 
nr wartime without 
- snpervMon eiaooo Wcb cx 
CO miBastt 0956 26183. 


COMVETAI 
trrahfte 
. weseex. 

20183. 


cat Norm Wanes- 
aoHdtore £10400 
Oxeamawn 0906 


CMMBML ADVOCATE rammed 
ss/aa Weal London to Cl 1 JX» 
. Wnm OHWlMW 0*56 


LANE & PARTNERS 

COMPANY/COMMERCIAL SOLICITOR 

We have a vacancy for a recently qualified Solicitor 
(or somebody about to qualify) with a good academic 
record wishing to specialise in company/commercial 
work. The film has strong International connections 
and its clients include multi-nationals and quoted com 
anies as well as private companies, ensuring a broad 
range of interesting and demanding work. 

The position is likely to suit somebody who has had 
some exposure to company/commeicial work while in 
Articles with a large City firm. 

A good salary will be paid. 

Please apply in confidence to: 

THE OFFICE MANAGER. 

LANE & PARTNERS, 

46/47 BLOOMSBURY SQUARE, 

LONDON WC1A 2RU. 


BARLOW LYDE 
& GILBERT 

We are looking for young solicitors of high calibre to fill 
positions in two challenging areas of litigation. A good 
academic background is required, together with the 
ability to cope with a demanding but stimulating work- 
load. The work has an international context and there 
are opportunities for overseas travel. 

AVIATION AND SPACE LAW 

Applicants should have a keen interest in aviation and 
space law. A post-graduate degree or other 
qualification with an aerospace content would be an 
advantage, although not essential. This position offers 
o uniquely interesting career to a person of the right 
calibre- 

REINSURANCE 

Applicants must have the ability to deal with complex 
international cases. We do not necessarily expect prior 
experience in this field, but will be looking for a record 
of academic achievement followed by successful 
practical experience. 

We are housed in attractive modern offices and offer 
the rewards of a major City-based practice. The 
prospects for people of the right calibre are excellent. 

Please write with a full curriculum vitae to John Hartnett, 
Barlow Lyde & Gilbert, 1 Finsbury Avenue, London EC2M 2PJ. 




ManuLife 


The Manufacturers 
Life Insurance 
Group 


Please write or telephone 
«iih full career derails to: 

Monica Smith. 

Senior Personnel Officer, 
The Manufacturers Life 
Insurance Company. 
Mann Life House, 

Si George's Way, 
Stevenage. 

Hens SCI 1HP. 
Telephone: Stevenage 
(0436 J 356101. 


Senior Legal 

O pp* 

mcer 

c. £16,000 

We are seeking a qualified solicitor or barrister to join our small 
legal and technical dept, at our UK Chief Office in Stevenage. 

You will be responsible for advising the company on the 
implications of new legislation and drafting trusts, unit trust 
deeds, polities and other documents. You will also handle tax 
and legal enquiries from the public and the sales force and 
undertake varied assigned projects. 

In your early thirties you must have substantial experience of 
drafting and inteqxeting legislation, preferably in the insurance 
sector. 

Benefits package include low-oost contributory pension 
scheme, private medical insurance and. where appropriate, a 
subsidised mortgage. 





M^jor bonking group subsidiary, 
c. £13,500 + car + excellent benefits inc. mortgage subsidy 


Bristol. 


This new role heads a recently formed 
department of 11 staff controlling debt recovery 
activities related to commercial finance - specifically 
office equipment leasing. 

Departmental responsibility includes 
negotiating settlements prior to litigation, 
progressing County Court or High Court actions 
through to enforcement of judgment^ where 
appropriate. 

As well as significant management and 
administrative accountabilities, you will handle a 
personal case load - mainly 
complex, high value or 


defended actions. In addition, you nil! provide a 
divisional legal advisory role in areas such as 
documentation, new contracts, consumer credit and 
employment legislation and other statutory issues. 

This role will appeal to a qualified solicitor 
with good communications dulls, wishing to 
develop his/her commerdal and managerial 
experience within a dynamic environment. It 
provides an ideal opportunity to join a successful 
and growth orientated Division of a major banking 

fYfflMTV rtrsv «TJtr midi fall TA. In: 


LlavdsTknvmaker 


rinw «fflr Midi fall M. In: 

Jwc Ln»rs ftfMwnd Marucrr. 

LLniS. BomiiuLit Finance llmup, 

Orfxv EifUipniw f niKi LIKi.inn. 

Ftnaiwr Hrw. HO 'unite* ( mil . BfW<4 BM IQW, 


BRACHER SON 
& MISK1N 

KENT 

LitigaHon Department 

currently 4 Partners, 2 Assistant 
Solicitors and 3 Legal Executives, 
require 2 further Assistant Solicitors. 

The Deparbnerfs Work 
is wide ranging, embracing insurance, 
insolvency and other commercial 
work, agricultural law, planning, 
landlord and tenant and private client 
issues. Specialisation is encouraged. 

Qua tfi cations 

sought include a good degree and 
London training. 

Rewards 

are comparable with London. 
Candidates must be of partner calibre. 
Application 
with c.v. to:- 
D.G. Horner Esq., 

Bracher Son & Miskin, 

Star House, 

Pudding Lane, 

Maidstone. Kent. 

ME14 1LX. 


^SES South East Thames ESS 
ES Regional Health Authority S 

Legal Services Section 

Senior Principal 
Administrative Assistant 
- Scale 14 

£10,269 - £12,486 p.a. 

You win be a member of a team of Officers in 
the Section each with responsibility for 
providing legal services to a specified number 
of District Health Authorities in the Region. 
Duties will include responsibility for providing 
a service to Districts covering a wide range of 
general legal matters including Inquests, Com- 
mittees of Enquiry, Complaints, and certain 
Land and Premises matters, as well as giving 
assistance to Health Visitors and other Com- 
munity Health Service Staff involved in Care 
Proceedings and similar matters. You will also 
deal with requests from Solicitors for 
disclosure of medical records prior to the 
issue of proceedings, and with all non-medical 
legal action claims against his or her Districts. 
You will be responsible also lor giving talks to 
groups of National Health Service Staff on 
legal matters related to their duties. 
Application form and job description may be 
obtained from Regional Personnel Division, 
Thrift House, CoUIngton Avenue, BexhilVon- 
Sea, East Sussex. Telephone: (0424) 222555 
extension 3147. 

Closing date: 24th April 1986. Ref: 660. 


CROYDON 


A well-established expanding Arm of solici- 
tors Is looking for the foDowing:- 

1. Litigation solicitor: Our clients are 
seeking an ambitious solicitor of part- 
nership material, with a minimum of 
three years post-qualification experi- 
ence. aged under 30. 

The work Is varied but personal acci- 
dent experience would be an 
advantage. 

Salary tip to £15.000. plus company 
car after six months. 

2. Conveyancing solicitor: Our clients are 
seeking a newly qualified solicitor, 
aged mid 20s. The successful candi- 
date will be of high calibre who will 
enjoy a challenging and rewarding op- 
portunity. There are excellent future 
prospects. 

Salary £1 1,000. plus company car af- 
ter six months. 

Please write, with fnO CV, to Skewes 
Press Services, 49, Addiscorabe Road, 
East Croydon, Surrey, CRO 6SB. 


Buiterworths. the leading legal publishers, have 
a vacancy fora sub-editor in their Lexis Editori- 
al Department. Previous editorial experience is 
not necessary, but applicants should have 
sound legal knowledge, common sense, adapt- 
ability and the ability to work methodically and 
with accuracy. A law degree and/or legal profes- 


Suuling salary up to c£ 10,000. Terms and con- 
ditions in accordance with NUJ agreements. 

' Please wif e vna fan cv to:- 
ifcra nawa Gate. 

Bu Ba ww tt B Co (PuBBsbess) I*L, 


□□ Butterworths 










16 



Legal Appointments 

PENWTTH DISTRICT COUNCIL 
West Cornwall (Penzance) 

SOLICITOR 

Up to £1 1,604 

Wc seek a person wilh at least 2 years admitted 
experience. Duties mainly advocacy and com- 
mon law. ' 

Generous re-location package. 

Closing Dale - (Sth April i 986: Interviews - 2Sth 
April 1986. 

Application forms available from District 
Secretary, Council Offices, St. Clare, 
Penzance, Cornwall TR18 3QW (if phoning 
0736 62341 Ext. 166). 


THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 




FILM LAWYER 

Simon Oiswang & Co specialise in 
media and communications law. 
We need a totally operational 
Lawyer experienced in feature 
film and television production to 
work as a member of a highly 
skilled team. 

Please write to: 

Mark Devereux 
1 Great Cumberland Place 
London W1H 7AL. 


UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG 
CHAIR OF LAW 

flmLcznons aie minted tor a Cnar ol Law m Bk Department oi Law 
Carandtfes win any nerd ot legal interest ififerart to the teaching ol 
S» Decmmeni ire i meteor* to apply Cut tfw Umverarty exwos an 
applicant w nave conidercWa University experience and a record ol 
scnoiarsfoc He should also preferably have a nig her degree m law. 
Ccnsicetfion vnll also 0 * given 10 applications for appointment on 
secondment tram other Universities. Private practice on a bass 
arjreec with the University '3 permitted. 

Annual salary isuoerannuatjie) w* be within the professorial range 
and no! iess man HKSJ57.120 lapwro E30.52D: stertmg equvaJem 
as at March 2t. 1986) At nirreni rates, salaries tan will not exceed 
i7 ; r ul gross income Housing al a rental ot ot salary. 
cftiQff’R's education allowances] leave, and medical benefits are 
provided 

Further particulars and application forms may be obraned tram the 
Secretary General. Association ot Commonweaim Umversibes 
lApptsl 36 Gontofs Scuare. London WC1H OPF. or horn the 
Appointments Unit. Secretary's Otiice. Unreisny ot hong Kong. 
Hong Kong Closes ?i May 1936. 


OWEN WHITE 

Are looking for 

A LITIGATION SOLICITOR/ LEGAL EXECUTIVE 

with sufficient experience jo ran a busy Civil 
Litigation Department with emphasis on P.l. 
work at their Hounslow office. Competitive sala- 
ry. pension and a quality car. 

TEL: Mr. Weston 01-570 5471. 


LONDON 

WEST ENDiClTV 

Recently admitted Convey- 
ancing solicitors wrtfi up to 
lour years cost Qualification 
experience, reowred by our 
pras tic cus event practices 
to oeat with Commercial 
workload. £ Highly attractive. 

CTTY 

Progressive medium sized 
practice requires Company 
Commercial Solicitor with 
minimum two years related 
post qualification experi- 
ence. Varied quality 
workload, up to £ 25 . 000 . 

CENTRAL LONDON 
High calibre litigator with up 
X> live years post qualifica- 
tion experience required by 
ims progressive medium 
seed practice, to deal with 
Commercial workload. 
c £ 20.000 



anrDEN UliSJJior Solicitor. 
Drrgrrt.oir Purlin- ClS.MO* 
pxtiiD or^mij Meredith Scon 
oi sea oo is 

DERBY LmOATtOM SOOCtTOR 

m ll a criminal CIO COO Apply 
Morv Male Accord Pmonnel 
Oa>s 815500 

GENERAL PRACTICE wibcilor. 
9 -KXi prosper Is HW. town lirm 
Cl 3 OOO u i>wx GansuUants 
0*35 25183 

HANTS SURREY BTJER LiIhh- 
uon Sol. ao-alwod Prime* 
r £15.000 ♦ p-ship pros Mer 
rdilh Sr on Ol 583 0055 

LANCS TOWN firm Exurnmnl 
iromnjnfrr some commercial 
£10 000 Wwn Consul UP Is 
0955 25183 

LANDLORD AND TENANT leaol 

nmnne mural London 
LI 2.500 W esww Consultants 
C»35 25183. 

LEGAL AID mention snUcllor for 
Col M id lands lirm £10000 
coniaci Wowx Cemultants 
0*38 25S83 

LITIGATION SOUOTDR Crov- 
dan Old and criminal, busy 
drpormwnl Cii 500 Wrw* 
Con+allmts 0035 25183. 

LITIGATION SOUCtTOR same 
court work for Medway lirm 
salary £11 500 contort Knsn 
Consultants 0939 2SI&3. 

LITIGATION EXECUTIVE main 
■nornal. crime and rail Herts 
firm XI 0.000. roman Wessex 
Consul unis 0955 25183 

LITIGATION SOLICITOR with ad 
icc.irv Cast Sirm lirm 
Cl 3.000 Wessex Cunsulla tints 
0038 25183 

MATRIMONIAL SPECIALIST 
WITH mill work Dei on 
1 1 o oxi Apply Marv Male Ac- 
cord Personnel 0935 815506 

MATRIMONIAL speoalisl lor 
small Norm London solicitors 
Cl 2.000 Wessex Comulunts 
0935 25183. 


rruuie WeM London £10030 
W’ewex Consultants 09 35 
25183. 

MATURE LITIGATION solicitor 
35-95 for Hampshire nrm 
£12 500. contact Wessex Con- 
sultants 0935 25183 
MID DEVON General PracUlio- 
ner. manage branch office To 
£14.000 - earty P"xlup. Mer- 
edith SCOII 01-583 0055 
IEWLY- RECENTLY CuaWW. 
Oil* Numerous lacancies in 
Comm disciplines, c £13.000. 
Meredith Scon 01 583 0055 
PRIVATE CLIENT senator Com 
wall, well established nrm lo 
£12.000 Wessex Consul Lints 
09*5 25183 

PRIVATE CLIENT sotacllor QB of 
London ad ml Med 8a 85 
£13.000 Wessex Consultants 
0935 251 83 

PROBATE AND TRUST ie«a! ex 
crutue SW London £10.000 
Wessex Consultants 0935 ' 
25183. 


PROBATE TRUST and lax spr- 
culHl Weil Surrey firm 
815506 £12X00 Wessex Consul UnM 

SOMERSET SMALL TOWN SoltC- 25,R5 

liars need young general 

practice person. 84 85 86 lo PROPERTY LITIGATION special 
£IQ OOO Applv Mary Mate Ac tsi weal London £12.500 

cord Personnel 0935 815606 Wessex Coroullanls 0938 

ALL ROUNDER lomw ad milled 1 25183 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


CHARITY COMMISSION 
Charily The Borrowed Oergy 
Home. 

Tlve Charily Commissioner* 
propose lo make a Scheme for 
tills Chanty. Comes of the drall 
Scheme m»v be obtained from 
them i ref 251644 A 2> al SI Al- 
ban's House. 57-60 Haymarkel. 
London SWIY AON Objections 
and suwsnons may be sent Id 
them wittnn one monlh from 
today 


IN THE MATTER OF 
DALEHURST PROPERTIES 
LIMITED Bv order of me Hhpi 
Court of Justice dared me 4ffi day 
of March 1986 Mr Keilh DavW 
Goodman FCA of Leonard Curtis 
& Co. 30 Eastbourne Terrace. 
London W 2 6LF. has been ap- 
pointed Uuuidaiar of me above- 
named Company with 
Commlllee of imwcuon 

Doled l hr. 19111 nay of March 
1986 



SCOTTISH AMICABLE 
LIFE ASSURANCE SOCIETY 


NOTICE OF MEETING 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 
One Hundred and Sixtieth Annual 
General Meeting of the Members will be 
held in 150 Sl Vincent Street, Glasgow, 
G2 5NQ_on Wednesday, 23rd April, 1986 
at Noon. 

By Order of the Directors 

W. PROUDFOOT 

Chief General Manager and Actuary’ 

150 St Vincent Street, 

Glasgow, G2 5NQ. 

14th March, 1986. 



PERSONAL 


RENTALS 


£0 c Unified adimumcnls 
cm be accepted by telephone 
(except knnounccmcnis). The 
deadline is p.Oupm 2 days prior 
io publication fn? 5 00 pm Mon- 
day for Wednesday I. Should 
i«i »nh io tend an advert isc- 
nwm in uniing please include 
your da Mime phone number. 


PARTMENT. If you have any 
duenes or proMc ms relating lo 
vour adveniwmcni once il has 
appear vd. phrase contort our 
(. uMomcr Services Dcpanmcm 
by telephone on 01-461 3006 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


WANTED 


WIMBLEDON Drtmlire scats 
warned lor ornate companies. 
Top pnen paid. OI 228 0423. 



FOR SALE 


RES 1ST A 
CARPETS 
SPECIAL OFFERS 

Wiranders Corkoplasi 
Tries, design natural only 
£8.95 per sq yd + VAT. 
Wool mix Berber carpets 
Am wide Hessian backed 
£4.35 per so yd + VAT. 
While slocks lasL 
548 FuRiam Road. 
Parsons Green, SW6. 

Tel: 01-736 7551 

Free estimate ■ Expert Hume. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP 

London's Wading special bi In 
new- and restored pianos for the 
largest genuine selection avail- 
able 3oa Highgaie Rd. NWS. 
01 267 7671 Free catalogue. 
PIAItOBt M.LAME A BOMS. New 
and recondlltatied. Quality al 
reasonable prices 326 Brighton 
Rd . S.croydon 01*88 3613 
GROTRIMf-STEmWEC, 1927. 
6fi Grand. Excellent condition. 
£3.495 Tel 01 346 3336 
LARGE UPRIGHT. Refund Pine 
case. Delivery arranged £590 
Tel 724 2652 

CHALLEN GRAND. 4' 6" By 

Royal AppofnlmcnL Imniacu- 
loie £1.800 0394 271895. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


WE WON THE AMERICAS CUP! 
2 Auwir alris available lo crew 
your yacht. Contort Margaret 
Piercy. 41 Cnorton- Street. 
Leichhardt. Sydney. 


CALIFORNIA Software Product* 

of Slough ore dehghled lo an- 
nounce i heir new omvoL 
Baby 38. a smer for Baby 34 
and Baby 36. and a long dwarf- 
ed devefopmeiu system for 
System 38 RPG OI Lsers 


MIRACLES {■busMtl con be 
achieved by disabled people. 
They msi need a little help f 
Please support RehaMIHaUon & 
Medical Research Trust wub 
vour donation or legacy. PO 
Bax lO. Rodstock. Both BAS 
3VB 


Are deawd io ammee On mAs ol its 
imm flag Ok am * w 
ceres ft Bun's W awobnly Mg 
cotecitd on m» <bn 

CITY OF LOUDON 
II Septembe 1985 

njoi 

EXBOB8S £47 



BBC 

HORIZON 




about 

III P T P 

Now a your chance lo 
support research Into 


Oonauona lo 
Parkinsons' Disease 
Society 

36. Portland Place 
London SW1N 3DC. 

Tet 01-323 1174. 



Cancer 


Together we can beat iL 

We fund iivur one third of 
all ntwarv h inio the prvvun- 
lion and cure of cancer in 
ihi- UK 

Help us by vending a dtina- 
liOfl vr niakc a kgji y 10 

Cancer, 
Research 
Campaign 

’ i ui III >n HnvT- rrj' •: 

-.Lh-,11 n.B'4 1 1 >.ln1"ii!W IV ■>« 



SPECIAL OFFERS 
GREECE FROM £129 

ROSfRHODES 
16 4 I wk. ?wks £169 
TOUM 

18 4 1 wk £159 2whs£lB9 

CRETE 

26. 4 lwk £109 2wks£lB9 

CANARY IGLAHOS 


27. 4 I wk CI79. 2 «*W 1199 
S'C. B+fl. aepan Taxes + 
“isurance 

(0923)77120/278144 
TIM8WAY HOUM1S 
Rlekmanwartii. Herts 
ABTA ATDL lie 


DISCOUNTED FARES 


JoTHug Hor 

buirotM 

Cairo 

Logos 

Del Bom 

Bangkok 

Qouaia 

Afro Asian 


single return 
£300 £465 
£220 £325 

£130 £200 

£235 £336 

£230 £340 

£195 £330 
£420 

Travel Lid 



162 168 Regent 54 W.l. 
TELi 01-4X7 8255:6/7/8 
AMEX -VISA DINERS 



PILOT FLIGHTS 

For A Fair Deal 


01 631 0167 

Agents Aral 1893 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. Jo'Btug. Cairo. Du- 
bai. Istanbul. Singapore. K.L 
Delhi. Bangkok. Hoik Kong. 
Sydney. Europe. A The 
Americas. Flamingo Travel. 
3 New Quebec Sl Marble 
Arch London WIH 7DD. 
01-402 9217/18/19 
Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


COST Cl/TTERS ON flitfiK hoh 
lo Europe. ISA 6 most dcsUtid- 
lions Diplomat Travel: 01-7 30 
2201 ABTA 1ATA ATOL 


LOWEST An FARES. 

Bu> Hmham Travel ABTA 
Ol 836 8622. 


AIRFARE SPECIALISTS SydOCV 
o V. £305 nn £o45 AurtUand 
a «* £420 tin £774 Ja'burg 
o w C3s4 rtn £470. Los Ange- 
leso w £177 rui £336. London 
Flight Centro 01 370 6332 



DARTAIR 


Li'.~ 

-■ t'.i • •£:?» 

t> : - . J13 s 
i'iJ 

. ‘ IZ — y-> $•*-*•. 5>" ; 

cj.?7'-ie 'i.'tm 


USA JOBURG E1MKMPE Ausiralia 
New Zealand Genuine mviMnl 
fares DTC 01-602 3236. 


CHEAPEST rUOfTS W WJW - 
Benz Travel Tel Ol 385 6414 


CHEAP FLIGHTS WondtokM. 
Haymarkel 0l °30 1366 


SWITZERLAND S'* neduk-d fllghU 
Ol 734 238B ABTA ATOL 


USA from £99 Major travel OI 
485 9257 IATA 


TAORMINA « UPARt Sicily ■ 
Three very voeviol -pringume 
often 1 13 ntgnn. 17 so Apnf 
I ik I » HOTEL CAPO TAORMI- 
NA i Superior Ivl Clm> £445 
half board GATTOBAHDO 
PARK HOTEL. Lioan £239 B A 
B TWO CENTRES: Villa 

E‘pena. Taormvna 6 night* + 
GaKooardo Par* 7 nights £249 
BAB. All hotidJ>-s mcl 13 
mghn accommodauofi. return 
das lime Golw tek ilighb. oiTMrt 
faxes £ local ironsfen ferry. 
Sinhon Sun Lid <91 1 222 7452 
ABTA ATOL 1907 
AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
O W £395 rtn £645 Auckland 

0 w £420 nn £774. jaHiirg 
a - w £264 rtn £470. Los Am* 
lev c w £ 1 77 rfn £339 London 
Flight Centre 01 370 6332. 

GREEK ISLANDS Algarve. 
Menorca. Tenenfe vulas. A of 
Pennons Tavernas. Holidays 
Fltghlv Brocnurev •• unUM 

bo-ikinw Vemura Holidays. 
Trt 01-290 1355 
LATIN AMERICA. Low cm! 
rughrs eg. mo £J95 Lima 
£475 rtn Also Small Group 
Hof Idas Journeys JLA 01-747- 
3108 

LOW FARES WORLDWIDE - 

LSA. S America Mid and Far 
EM. 5 Africa Trayvoie. 48 
Margaret Street. Wi Ol 580 
2928 Ana Accepted! 
RELIABLE LICENSED A. Bonded 
Iom ml Hi am experts. Europe 
A Worldwide Freedom 
Hobdays 01-741 4686 ATOL 
432 IATA A [TO 
ROUND WORLD £795 mm. Club 
IT £1599. Jim fr £2035. Svd 
nry ir C659 rtn CoJumhus. 
Cullers Gardens IO Deicunlurr 
Saiiare. EC2 01 929 4251. 
DISCOUNTS isr Cctnams ack- 
ers Try us 

Iasi FUCHTBOOKERS OI 387 
9100. 

Ml AML 1AMAKA. N.YORK. 

Worldwide rhea pest lares 
Richmond TrasrL I Duke Si 
Rirhmond ABTA 01 -940 4073. 
SPAIN. PORTUGAL. GREECE. 
Flights from noil LK airpom. 
Many IMc special offers Fafdar 

01 471 0047 ATOL 1640 
TUNISIA Far mol perfect holiday 

wnh sunny days 6 carefree ms. 
Ideal Son no Summer Tunisian 
Travel 01-373 4411. 

TURKEY BEACH HOTEL. May 
Bargains from £155 me H BA 
tree waienports Hof Turkey. 
Ot 326 1005 

USA. K York £159 MURK £198 
LA £299 rin Also Cheapest 
schedule 111 an major cam 
erv. Ol 584 TJ71 ABTA. 

USA. CANADA A EUROPE. 
LOWEST AIR FARES. Ahfl 
Club and 1*1 Bestlare 01-394- 
1642 Abll 1400. 

ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga efc. 
Dimond Travel ATOL 1783. 
01 581 4641. Horsham 6854 L 
AUSSIE. K Z . Slh Africa, l JS.A. 
Hong Kong. Best Fares: 01-493 
7775 ABTA. 

SYD MEL C6IB Perth £345 An 
num tamers la ACS KZ OT 
584 7371. ABTA 
SOUTH AFRICA Ja'burg IT £465. 
Ol 584 7371 ABTA. 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


GENERAL 


TAKE 1MC OFT to Pans. Am- 
sterdam. tun n els. Brawl. 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne. TIN 
How Duoun. Rouen, bou 
lognr A Dieppe Tune Off 2a. 
Chester Chne. London. SWix 
7BQ. 01-238 8070 
ammo m emus, spmt 

price* 1*2 wreki howw * 
a ports. Pan worta Hobdays 01 
734 3562. 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARIC'S 


WANTED. JKAJmlSA- 5 bed vifla 
with own pool. From mid May 
lor unis I year for couple ino 
rhlktrenl Ol 993 3415. 

■weekends eves'. 


SELF-CATERING 
CANARY & MADEIRA 


LAHZAMOTC Modena Blands 
Ol -836-4383 ABTA. 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


FRENCH COUNTRY COTTAGES. 
Brittany Alps * Gen. 
with, wilhovd femes 01-602 
4826. 


WINTER SPORTS 


KENSINGTON CHRUCH STREET, W8 
Well located two bedroom Flat In 
heart of Kensington. 1 double 
bedrm., 1 single bedrm., 1 
bathrm., reception na, & fully fit. 
ted kitchen. Available now for 12 

months. £200 per week. Compa- 

ny let only. 

KHstaessn Office: 01-937 7244. 


• woe range of quaiuywman 
«nd unfurnished property 
• Fun Management Senna* 


aKStlKffi® 


• Legainbx Adwce 

. Persona^sed Service through 

7 compuw inked officsB 


PfflRJCG, son 

ExceSent smart naw cowson 

Magnifioert top «r. ccrawslpn 
Fiat 40 sq metrar recep/cSnwg 
nn 2 beds.. baS>.. i Kit 
ML itt yre. £500 per week 

incL maid sendees. 

ftafico Office: 01-83* 9958 




CHALETS 

Sumy slang *1 wig sno* wdh 
soumpBous food A *>« 
me I2in Aon! ham £129 
a>/cnatel inctusi-« 

0223-68526 
SKI BEACH VILLAS 
Dept T. 

8 Marked Passage. 
Cambridge 

ATOL 36 IB /STA MI5X 


HONES AND VAL DNSERC -12 

April £175 pp rtn roach. £235 
pprui air. 19 Apnl£l09pp rtn 
coach. inclusive catered 
chetci. club noHdays Excellent 
snow oondtuanv. Call Ski Vat 
Ml I Ol 905 4444 or Ol- 200 
6000 (24mgj. ABTA 56431 
ATOL 1162. 



JEAN WILLIAMS LTD 
01-949 2482 

S.W.11 Close Oaptwm 
South sin. newly turn & dec 
hse- 4 bed. 2 bstti. aa 
machines 5250 pw. 

LANGFORD GREW. SB 
Townhouse, ww dec & him 
3 bed. 3 recap, gas CH £165 
pw. 

GHISMOCX KM Smart 3 cad 
larrKy hse m conuemant 
location. £220 pw. 

COIEHEFBIE COURT. SW5. 
PiBsbgraua apartmom over- 
looking gdns. 3 bed. 2 bath-, 
taa format dbung rm. Ige hit 
Afl machines. M20 pw. 

THAMES DnTUIL Detached 
hse we* dec & fum. 2 Igs 
receps. 2 beds, gas CH. gge 
Ige gdn. £160 pw to me 
gaidner. 

TEDOINTON. Lux mersKb 
apartment with beauhtul 
views. 2 dbls beds, 1 shr rm 
an suite, 1 bath, gge. £150 
pw 

LAO BROKE SQUARE, WI. 
Bright & spacious 1 bod Bat 
Lge Ddcony. Wed man- 
tamed block wflh Ot £150 
pw. 


YORKSHIRE 


CENTRE OF KERMOTB York- 
shirr lovely oak beamed collage 
Seep 6 large medern kllrhen 
from £70pw EUrtby 0609 2568 
MOWH YORKS Moan near sea. 
secluded del cubage. 3 bed. Iin- 
efl. a 1.1 1 ladle srtfoter. Weens 
May 10 Oct Tel 0723 362682 


FLATS HARE 


*i\ IT’S ALL AT 
TFOtlLFINDERS 


More low-cost flights 
via mote routes 
to more destinations 
than any other agency 
PLUS 

• Fast, expert, high-tech 
service ■ Free worldwide 

hotels car hire pass 

• up to 60% discount* 

Open 9-6 Mon-Sal 
On-the-spot 

Immunisation, Insurance, 
Foreign Exchange, 
Map & Book Shop 


42-48 Earls Court Road 
London W8 GEJ 
Long-Haul 01-603 ISIS 
Europe/USA 01-937 5400 
lat/Busineaa 01-S3B 3444 


ISLANDS IN THE 
SUN 

Spring Breaks 

Cast. Cep'atoma. Coitu. ZanK. 
StoJBWL 

1 W* (row f iSri-P . 

2 Wta Iran £22$ep. 

Sonic FREE CMS pfacw. April 

IA.15J2L29 toy 53.12 
Win not treat ynral to a Mae M 
oi Swrev BcfigtDUl twVy «Lo 
A subs dose » gionooi onebs. 
For deWo Tni 
0403 59788 

Utoa I aland HoRdan 

ABTA IATA ATOL T4S2 



SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissair’s 
Super Apex. 

London to Zurich or 
Geneva daily on con- 
venieni afternoon 
llighis. 

And daily morning 
flights London to Basle 
(except Sundays*. 
Book and pay 14 days 
before departure. 

Slay in Sw itzerkind al 
leasi until the Sunday 
after arrival. 

Similar savings also 
from Manchester and 
Birmingham direct to 
Switzerland. 

Book ings and full con- 
ditions from travel 
agent 5 or 01-437 5573. 


SIMPLY CRETE 

GREEK EASTS! 

C mM nro mw w rand ■ guy 
ftatxu Uma nm 

■ton «i*i Qmn f~e The u na 
Date core i rtw » ■*> us m oar 
hodah v/hi & mdre 

SPECIAL OFrtR 

Ore 234 3 29/* 

FflOH rus m AM. 

TH; 81-994 4462/5226 


RHODES JVPWL BJUNUUNS 91h 
6 1 6th April 623 April. I week 
£145 Inc. Trt: Slramx 0705 
862814 

SF RINB M CORFU Aretl/Moy. 
fpedol brtces In our attractive 
villas. Ring Pan World Holidays 
OI 734 2562 W,d ays 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


INDULGE M A MAGIC WEEK- 
END. indulge yaursrtr . you 
Of ser ve it. A wertwnd In vau- 
lt*. norenc*. or Rom*. Eat 
well, drink wed. shop wen and 
forget oboat ElKOomrs depnso- 
tea weather. Or combine a city 
weekend with a woe* by the 
sea. Free b r o c hu re from Magic 
of Italy. Deni ST. 47 Shepherds 
Btrah Green. W12 BPS Trt. Ol 
749 7449 ■ 24 hr* aervtCol 

niBGAHY - VILLAS MALFIANO. 
A POOL peace 6 wine. Trt: 062 
OBI BOO everm»B«< weekends 

ADRIATIC. Haute sleeps 9. 4 
irtiko M from £190 pw. May 
10 September. Tel 05S2 832195 


SELF-CATERING MALTA 
& GOZO 


MALTA. Charming oM village 
house. Sips 6. private pool 
02606 2236. OI 326 0256 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


MAZARHON Unspoilt resort hi S. 
Spun VUloe Aims Sol Fn Gal 
Minria iNr La Manual Beach 
Bay Hals 0432 770183 ATOL 
ACT 1517. 

LLAFRANC, CoW Brava, rial 
near beach. Avail mast dates 
O'Carrod (02731 738869. 


SELF-CATERING 


ST JOHNS WOOD Comfortable 
bed-vjiting room In lady 1 * flat 
Available immediately for prof 
male Near shop* 6 transport. 
£50 pw Ol 289 9466 
WIMRELDOH PARK SWt*. 
Grad prof m f lo snare attrac- 
tive house with otm. O R. Nr 
lube. Short k« considered. £200 
prro loci Oi 637 4383 CDayi 
WOOD GREEN Prof females. 
Sture house. Own Room. 2 
puces available £130 ocm A 
£160 pem exa Mod cons. Tel: 

888-9194 (Evesl 

BALHAM 9W17 Prof, person 10 
short- flat wim one other Own 
room £35.00 p.w exclusive. 
Tef01-93S-1269 
FLATMATES Selective Shoring 
Well mtob iniroouclory service. 
Pise lei for oppt: 01-689 5491. 
313 Bromploa Road. SW3 
HEM Church SL 2 Prof Females 
lo share bedroom In Ip OL 
GCH. £150 pem each plus dtp. 
Tel after 3 pm 01937-8457 
PROF COUPLE to share room bi 
lux flat on Clapharn Oansmon 
with 2 persons. £37pa» p.w. 01 
720 9226 7. 

BAL H A M Comfortable spacious 
flat. DM. (Win bed. immoe. 
K&B. gch A Trt. Nr Tutte/BR 
£105 lot pw. 673 5442 
SW19 Professional M F 2Se 
share rial. Own dhle room. CM. 
Small garden. Close Tube. £ I BO 
pem ext. Refs 642 9076 eves. 
W. KENSINGTON Prof F. N.S lo 
share super lge new flat. £60 
rxd pw. Ml: 602 3904 eve B3l 
9861 day 

FIND-A-FLAT (Flat Sharing 
Agency' nomepwnerj. no fee. 
36 Kings Rd. SW3QI-5B4 8012 

FULHAM M 25V share noose 
with one other £200 p.cjn 
excL 381 6073 tAfler TtxmJ 


NIB. Nr Tube. Prof F N. S. O/R. 
Modern garden fUL £50 pw 
exn. 01 272 6631. 

SWll urside Common IF mare 
house O R. Pretty gdn. 180 
pem Ind. eves we Ol -22B 0579 

WB O'R for 3rd person. 25+ N/S 
InoideL spacious flat. ClBOncn 
me. Tel: 937 6239 offer 6 JO 


STILL SEARCHING? 

We nave Vie Berta lor you! 
Rental Am um r -a jan o a across 
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PLEASE RING 

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U1-S28 4599 












































































































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THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


SPORT 


37 


RACING: McCORMACK CAN WIN AYR RACE FOR THIRD TIME 


POINT-TO-POINT 


Quel Esprit on 


_ By Mandarin ... 

(Mfcbael Phillips) 

When he eventually retires 
^“McCoiimcK,' the 
Sparsholt trainer, . will have 
g>od reason to remember the: 
Hiltoouse Slakes at Ayr, re- 
sardless of whether he wins it 
^ain today with Quel Esprit 
For _il was this race, which 
helped to provide him with a. 
secure financial base in- the 
spring of 1982 when, by bis 
own a dmiss ion, he was 
badly. 

He had in his care a sbarp- 
lookrng colt by Tumble Wind, 
who had already begun to 
show above-average ability at 
home. So, with this knowl- 
.edge, McCormack staked his 
all oa a crack at this race in the 
nope that not many in Scot- 
land would know about the 
horse’s activities on the downs 
near Wantage. 

The colt was called Horace : 
and the happy end to the rare 
was that McCormack was able 
to average 6 - 1 . to. his money 
about a horse who was dcs- - 
lined to win bis next eight 
races, a record that included 
the Coventry Stakes at Royal 
Ascot, the July Stakes at 
Newmarket and the Gimcrack 
Stakes at York. 

Not surprisingly, Scottish 
bookmakers are now under- 
standably wary when-, they - 
spot one of McCormack’s 
runners at Ayr, so no one 
should expect tong odds about 
Quel Esprit winning the same 
race today, especially as the 
stable wonit fora second time 
12 months ago. with The* 
Hflcote Clntvwho started at 
only 6-4. 

However, in the belief that a 
short-priced winner is better 
than a long-priced loser. Quel 
Esprit is napped to follow his 
fluent four-lengths Doncaster 
win with a second success at 
the expense of Galfic Times, 
who caused a surprise at 
Newcastle on Easter Monday 
when be upset the odds on 
another unbeaten two-year- 
old, Blu era ede, who had al- 
ready scored at ' both 
Doncaster and Catterick. 
Clearly, Gallic . Times will be 
no pushover. . 

John Wilson, the local train- 
er, who most have had tire - 
thrill of a lifetime at Aintree 
on Saturday watching his first 


.-T™ <.-vjr«>vv Tel ?■* j 

* SrjgS&xfft a v.-. 



trail Llewellyn scoops 
treble chance to 
bustle up leaders 


By Brian Bed 


Mike Felton started well by 
winning on Reden ham at the 
Royal Artillery on Saturday, but 
that was the extent of bis success 
on an afternoon that was ex- 
pected to be something of a 
benefit for him. In the maiden, 
be was beaten by Anthony Tory 
on Ruby Flame and then things 
progressively deteriorated with 
a third, a fourth and a fell from 

his other three rides. 

The most impressive winner 
of the meeting was Dick Hill's 
Crazrman on his seasonal debuL 
Held op by a virus, he had been 
back m training for only a 
fortnight, but, nevertheless, un- 
der Robert Alner’s hard driving, 
he sprinted away from Hasty 
Storm. 

Jenny Pidgeon drew a blank 
her only 


when 


only mount here. 


Baiser Vote (above) at- 
tempts to emulate Ma 
Bkhe when she tackles 
the sevetHfonrioiig Prix 
Imprudence at Mafsons- 
Laffitte today (Our 
French Racing 

Correspondent writes). 
Ma Riche won this event 
for Coquette Head before 


^ on to land the 1,000 
rtrineas and her trainer 
hopes that Raiser Vote, 
the top-rated French two- 
year-old last season, will 
fellow her example. 

Raiser Vole won the 
Prix de la Salamandre 
narrowly from Regal 
State and Bold Arrange- 


ment on her final appear- 
ance of 1985. River 
Dancer, a runner today, 
was a close fourth then 
when in season. 

Rose Of The Sea was 
a good third to Embla in 
the Tattersalls Cheveley 
Park Stakes and could be 
a danger to alL 


Random Leg, found nothing 
when asked to challenge the alf 
ihe-way leader, Alison Dare, on 
Dawn Street. 

With Peter Green all foiling in 
the maiden and being beaten on 
Robson by Tanker in the open 
race, it was left to Run Token to 
provide him with his only 
winner in the hunt race at the 
Cliftoo-on-Tcme. 

At the South wold, Simon 
Andrews kept in contention by 
winning on Golden Casino, 
while at the Llugibby John 
Llewellyn seized the opportu- 
nity of narrowing the gap be- 
tween himself and the leaders by 
riding a treble for the second 
successive Saturday. The Welsh 
champion qualified Fixed Price, 
as expected, for the Audi final 
and also won on Taf and 
Raiocbhu. 

BLACKMORE AND SPARXFOfto VALE: 
Hum: Scottish Sound, ad* Royal Beau. 


National runner. Young Driv- 
er, excel himself to .finish 
second, is relying on Scottish 
FIio& who is a half brother to 
Rotberfiekl Greys, a good 
two-year-old of a couple of 
seasons bade. 

While Scottish Fling cer- 
tainly shaped like a future 
winner when be finished third 
at Hanuhbn first time out last 
week, T cannot envisage him 
beating Qud Esprit, who looks 
another bargain : buy- on 
McCormack's part at only 
10,000 guineas. 


Arguably, Wilson’s best 
chance today lies with his 
recent Hamilton winner 
SotmeneQe in the Smithstone 
Handicap. When she won she 
beat the favourite. My Derya, 
' by four lengths and, with Gay 
KelJeway rJatmmg 51b, she 
should just about manage to 
do it again. 

* Pap Tire Cork, who is 
trained for Steve Cauthen’s 
mother, Myra,' by Merrick 
Francis at Lambourn. is an- 
other who looks poised to 
justify the long journey from 


the south by winning the 
Auchans Maiden Stakes — not 
in the bands of Mrs Cauthen’s 
son. but ridden by Paul 
Eddery. 

Instead of riding his. 
mother's horse, the champion 
jockey will be at Nottingham, 
principally to partner Pearl 
Fisher for John Francome in 
the Oval Maiden Stakes. 

Blinkered first time 

AYR: 20 Treyvnon; 330 BamM Beau; 
4S0My Derm. 

NOTTmOiMtt 2.0 Take Effect; 3w30 The 
Dabbed 49 Better Beware, Gray Dragon; 
400 Delta Lima. 


Opmc Tawny Myth, late: Prnce 
Mflboume. Mdir No Politics. Rest The 
Cooler King. 

BRANHAM MOOR: Hunt Arctic Era. AcH: 
tOrkori. Ladtec Rosa Trout (Xwc 
Fnsk. Heat t Aberoy. Rest flb Tlpa IMk 
C onway Grow. 

CLIFTON-ON-TEHE: Hut: Cider's 
Nephew. Open: Tanker. Lath es : Royal 
Mteafla. A* Another OrbiL Mdn: Ceaihc. 
Hunt RunToken. 

EAST ESSEX: Kant Safcfedore. Ac$ Trust 
To Luck. Lades: River Saint. Open: 
Bars**. Rase Midsummer Gladness. 
Mdn I: Donte&as OK MdR Carts Choice. 
EAST KENT: Atifc Gay Rsh. Mdn Sir 
Jasper. Lad tos- Soaffy's Daughter. 
Boichecfc- PTOA: VafcnaLHunt: 
Town. 

(BBY: Hunt Taf. Bad: Young 
Gipsy. Ad): Hnd Price. Open: Ratachhu. 
LteS^Eggington. IMk Drarfi Choke. 
MORPETft Ad: Hummeftnoor. Reel fc 
varanica Cnns&a. Rest tt: Tumpy Lakes. 
Open N a vfa aU oi M l Aid. Lades: Catch 
That Mdi c Even Ogan. 

Cigar. Hint Farmhouse 


Mdn R: Royal 


Pippa Jones, aged 16. had her 
first ride at this meeting and 
won the ladies' open on 
Eggington. 

David Maciaggan qualified 
Hummrimoor for the Audi by 
winning at the Morpeth and 
Alistair Ulyet brought Another 
Simon home first in the 
corresponding event at Clifton- 

on-Teme. 

After her thrilling success at 
Aintree on Friday. Caroline 
Beasley was given a more sedate 
ride on Pemoic in the ladies' 
open at the West Shropshire. 
Lucy Crow took up the running 
on her ex-chaser. Brave Hussar, 
after the third fence and ted 
until the run-in where the horse 
hung left allowing Learn Lord to 
gel up and win by three pans of 
a length. 

TJrser by-passed the Land- 
Rover event won by Mr Frisk at 
the Bramham Moor to run a 
disappointing race in the 
Ni trace ladies' qualifier under 
Sue Easterby. Against (airly 
moderate opposition he foiled to 
find enough acceleration at the 
finish and was beaten three 
lengths by Rosa Trout. 

Saumress the winner of the 
restricted open at the North 
Cornwall is one horse who 
approves of the new course at 
Wade bridge. She has been there 
three times this season and won 
on each occasion for Jonathan 
Geake. 

At the Hejthrop meeting today 
(Chipping Norton. 10) Desert 
Fox may beat Paddy's Peril in 
the four-mile open and Brockie 
Law should win the lad ies' event 
for the third successive year. 

NORTH CORNWALL: Hoot Freda. Open: 
Never Deemed. Lukes: Seal Marine. 
Rest: Sauntress. ktSp Stout Answer. Hite: 
CefnSxfen. 

PEMBROKESHIRE: Hunt Bunky Star 
Open: Dosey Moses. Rase wool island. 
MB— Caesar's Bronze. A# The 
Cleaver. Mdn: Rad Diamond. 

ROYAL ARTILLERY: Hunt Redenham. 
Mdn: Ruby Flame. At$ Aleos. LadfeK 
Dawn Saw. Open: Crouton. Rest 
Another Piper. King's Troop: Waldron. 
SOUTHDOWN AND ER1DG& Hunt: Colo- 
nel Henry. Rest Gazo-Mwa. Ladles: El 
Padre. Open: Ho&om Head. Adfc The 
Hooiae. Mdn General Sandy. 
SOUTHWOUh Hunt: Cawkwel Duke At* 
Chebbie. Late Sweet Dana. Open: 
Golden Casmo. Rest Wadswick Lad. 
M*e Clock Tower. 

TIVERTON: Hunt: teotip. Adt O'er The 
Border. LadfeK Ottary News. Open 
Ericas General. PPOA: Woodland Boy 
MdtE Pembndoe. 

WEST SHROKHfllE: Hat Double De- 
cision. Ad): Al Borak. Open: Jimmy 
Thompson. La di e s: Learn Laid. Rest 
Chanels. Mdn fc Adage. Mdn lb Court 
Guest 


AYR 


Going: soft 

Draw: towiumben beat 

ZJ0 CASTLEHILL APPRENTICE HANDICAP (£1^97: 1m 21) (12 
raniiCHrs) 

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00000-3 MRlJONtlOxJltanfrFCT 4-7-11 - 


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— OWntefflf 

— JOJIanyS 

___PBwi»r 
^ -4<fer8 


11-4 Patchburn. 3-1 Tneyomon. S4S. Mr Lion. 64 Mm Chria, M Screes, 10-1 
jr. 12-1 GoWanFancy.14-1 others. 


Ayr selections 

By. Mandarin ' 

iO Patch bora. 2.30 Pop The Cork. 3JQ AuM Lang Syne. 3.30 
Planler. 4.0 QUEL ESPRIT (pap). 4 JO SonneneDe. 

By Oar Newmarket Correspondent : ' . 

4.30 My Derya. 

Micbad Seely’s selection: 2.0 Patchburg. 


2B0 AUCHANS MAIDEN STAKES (ESS85 1m) (jS) 


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3.0 COODHAM HANDICAP (£2,169: 1m 5f) (10) 

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Sea, 8-1 Marikm, 10-1 Wessex. 12-1 Dmoartss. 14-1 Hl^wn Gray, 1&-1 pOwra. 

3J0 LAMLASH SELLING STAKES (£888: M) |13> 


2 00009-3 CAERNARVON BOYPHH] 

3 32000-0 BARNES STAB tUC ntWMj 

5 400200- TtgCHALCEWHLprarap 
B 000844) WES8R EE BAY iHo cfacy Ptg IM 
7 •- fiwABaoameiDCnapnMniDi 


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ChsHcevmB, 10-1 VaWema 12-I Bantal Beau. 14-1 eilien 


wE— n 

liiotml 

Rwigio 

SPOdWtemMil 


4B HJUJWtlSE STAKES £959: SI) W 

1 31 

lOJSwtaon 


Evans Care Esprit IS-SGaSteltnas. 5-1 ScotttehFBno,1IM SwWCtirtwger. 


4M SMTTHST0NE HANDICAP (3-y-a £1^88:5!) (B) 


IT 120000- CAFEABLnYPOIW^ 

2 310110- WOW WOW WOW Ai 

3 43422-1 somamiEm 

4 000810- aoEcmocoji 

5 000004 PWBLECREMtggWi 

6 006003 «nfDKYAMWWP*Oi 



_ 97 H M eh erdeea g) 4 

CkCtali4ATWder94) — ran Ttakter m 5 
jSWfeonMl(7«<J« oay r ejfeimy»l 


i 006003 WT PtHTA <Bnmor> |« n Akyig) M TOWptaneT-t S ^ 

7-4 Sonnenalte. 5-2 My Derya. 4-1 Baactaix^pPBifls. .rag WtowWawWow 



Ayr results 

ioffe^j! amo i ga.MggTg 




ALSO RAN: 


-I K* ' 




- i^lOnowfeora 

biv\ of (wbmer or *»cond 
Smart £3.m -CSF: 283-55. Trleasfc 

«M.Wlmte54S5SOC.Nnt*t 
Bradshaw. 5 -f^Sij): i BaML^. 


Hot AProMe mJT also RMfc 

5-2 Wessex Kkigdom, - 11-4 Jarnwten 
(4BA.25-1 Ture'am Back Jad e CSB^ 8 r an. 
E2r |*L 71, a. Z54L M Tompfcne at 

ESBSa CSF: £2125. imfcl I ftBtte e c . 
430(68 1. aumiSKA fipramta, 

ALSO BAIfc5-r BMopnwftmbarm 
14-1 Mon^rL^Tidaywtw BWL Zp-1 
ToOvmore ffith). 7 iaiilta,4t 3, SLJ 
wgSfa fe:T0te 22J» EISOj El^B- 
Df; E3S0. £848. 1.h 18S75et 

-naoBDOb 222850. • 



gt Newmarket j 

m £m 

Sa29. 2mn SOhCtaeo. 

- GRANTrTON 


UWIWWI-MHBVn-- Xl-anw 

HWtfaker M marnitig. Tote.gSJa DR 
p on CSF: £1438. Inw WAfo BC. 


Coarse .spkialists 

AYR 

THWeB85M1WEi»M^8vri^ft«B 
19TUXWS.m3* 8MqrtBHL.14ftoniJA 
i7STfc;D Chapman. 12 from 12ft 10.0%. 
JOCKEYS: K Hodmon, 18 wYmera tom 

78 ritfes. ffiSTkofSchoas, 1 $ from T14, 

IsilfePBul BfOory, SfiOrt 82i 14^14 

NOTTINGHAM 

Tf WNEBO. C TWOW^ **inara torn » 
runoere, 233%,’ C Booth, B bom 27, 
1S5M: tt Thonaon Jones. 12 Un 86, 

jOCffiYS: Ptt Eddery. 19 wtenorafrom 
S7 rides at l9J9fc ffCBuMra & tan 
14a t7.tfc W R Swinbara IS, Wm IK. 
IT*. ■ . 

SEDGEFIELD ; - 
TRAtMStS: T BarraM wim>ei»tffonLj8 
nmnera, 303%:- F Storey. 

m£EDenpfim8h,a8bom 170.1W1L 
JOCKEYS: R Eamahnw, 11 vennws cw! 

58 ‘rides. 19%: C HmiotL 17 from HO,' 
1 M%{ C.aant.32 from 212; tt-1%- ■ 


iwhv a 


Nottingham results 

Oote good to aoR (fleet S mceab soft 

6*atS) 

20 (BQ .1. R0SC DtCKKS (R Lanpin. 
ll-l): 2 Top That (G Baxter. 10-lt; 3. 
P fewie n fP Rotinson, 10030 few). Also 
ran: 92 RMrakte Writer. 5-1 Royal Bnar 
m 8-1 MaMr, Staafe Hand (G«4 10*1 
Name The Gama. M-1 GoU Ductana 
20-1 Sng Gaho Sing, Sidy's 
i, 33-1 Rornatedar Tip. Norcool, k 
AmtedaaWty. 14 ran. «. hd, IXLnk. U 
HoMmdiaad at Upper Longdon. TWk 
844ft El M. ftoiaei ADR E723K 
CSF: El 13J53. Tric*Kt £41330. 

230(51) 1.SKYDREAM(KDariey. 114); 
2 Ai w a B e ll e (J VWtens. 7-1); 3. Donat 
Plan (M Birch, ISO fate. Afeo me 114 
Above The Salt (SIM, 8-1 Mali Link S0& 
16-1 Mata Duffer 14*). 20-1 Kakh'swm 
7 ran. Nft Daar-GtanSa. ML 2JU, 2L 1XL 
4L M Brittain at wanNL Totm 8200: 
El m£1 -70. Df: £4.70- CSF: £21 .46. Sold 
to A VerdtecNo tar 4^00 guteaas. 

20 Pm en 1, UIVE WALKS) IN <R 

n:2t - 


Moraa, 6-1): 2 Lwa (W R SwWxan. 94 

favk 2 tt feruu— (W Canon. 20-1); 4. 
PtawkkBe (J QUbm, S-1). ALSO RAN: 8-1 
BteebinSno. 10-1 Wastrey. Season’s De- 

ngM. Bateownfe, Cawana Bata (8th), 12-1 

Sailore Reward. 1&-1 Action Time, 
Gabnito Lad, UbrMs. 20-1 Wandering 

Water. North Star Sam, Mossbeny Fat. 

Coffee House (Stti). 17 ran. 1L 3L fiL 4L 1L 

W Holden at Naw m aika L Tote: £1290; 
£832 E1.12 SSM. £6.40. DR £20.72 
CSP: £2057. THcasb £2400)8. 

230 pm 50yd) 1, - 
Eddery. 54 favk 2. Moonsmdr (P 
Robbwoa 8-1); 3, Pom Bay fP Waldron. 
33-1). ALSO HAN: 94 ‘ — 


Soxoph (5iW. 38-1 

(4th). Simon' 


Pallinko 


ssms 

ion's Fantasy, 
avanOua. 8 ran. NR: Gotdm Bouma. Mr, 

10L3L2L1XLNCa8aghanatNewinBtot 

Tote: £1.60; £1.10, ^330. £820. DF: 
£1202 CSP. £254 

SJnraMI.SMEORUNDTfSCaulher. 
Ttf im 2 Marie GMaatofffRoteaan, 
7-1LaM y«tert 9 — nan t ai (Pat Eddery. 2- 
1). ALSO RAN: 7-2 Dawmna. 4 ran. 2L 8J. 

15L G Wramat Nawmartat Tote: £122 

DR£230T(SF:£a71. 


430 pm 2Q 1. GULPLAND (S CMte. 
25-1 b 2, Careen ® Cauthen. 4-1); 2 
Vagne Maioife (W R Swinbum, 74 tav). 
ALSO RAN? 100-30 Pliant. 10-1 
Bossonova Bw (6di). Gods Hope (5th). 
12-1 Sumr Trip. 14-1 Absurd, Oeerftokl 
Beach, Record! Red (4th), 25-1 CUddy. 
ManabeL Ooregous Princese. Stud 
Rebugft. RBss Motley. 15 ran. NR: Cart 

Bertrand. 41, 8L 4L 1W. 3L G Pritehard- 

Gordon at Newmarket Tote: £38242 

£107.50. £212 £132 OF: £20332 CSF: 
£12262 Tricatt £25422 

Ptecepot £3212 

Folkestone 

Qoteg: h eavy 

145 150 1 MBS SUNDAY SPORT (P 
Cook, fib 2 Royal RsbMajA McGtone. 
10-1 fc 2 Mreres GM (M Mtar. 74 teu). 

ALSO RAN: 94 Mister Cota (4thL 7-1 

WWsMng Wonder (5th). 12-1 Master 
Dnxnmer, MUdaySanto, 20-1 Telegraph 
Foiy. 33-1 Piminr Prince, MkrabOt 
Pwwanda BeSe fR^ 11 Ran. 8L U bd. 
etUKL-41. P Kstaw» at N ewm ar fc a L Tote: 
£5.40; E220Tra% £122 DR £15212 
CSRES54& 

215 pm 21) 1, TOPORt (P Cook. 15-1); 
2 Madam U RakL .114 lai^ 2 Qemtat 
(R Carter. 10-1), ALSO RAN: 5-1 Mr Murie 

Man, Pamela Heaney ffittrt. 5-1 BUris 

Winrte. 7-1 unit Tart. 12-1 Steflarijm 

14-1 CBEsoion. Greatest HRs; 1S-1 Tame 

Duchess (4tt2 25-1 Maidan adder. 
UOarty Wak 13 ran. NTt Oore. C7Q Boy. 

3L « «. 2L ShJxJ. S Wocxknan at 

ChfcftestoT- Tow: £11.0ft^£4£O. £1-72 

£242 DRE7232C8RES337.TFUCAST 

£45292 no bid. 

245Pm» 1. STRAIGHT THRCKXH (B 
Rouse, 13-8 mb 2 The Wooden Hat k) 
BrowiL 125b 2 VantasflclG Carter. SB- 
1L ALSO RAN: 152 A8 A Dream, Helen # 

Assure (5thL 7-1 Ptesston ■ Ptay, B-1 

Psridee Bar. 121 Keep Onoi (4tet 12-1 
‘ DniKinwr. 14-1 Retorm Princess 
33-1 Rc Vis. 11 ran. Nft Stent 

j«l 7L H, a a, nk. J Winter at 

NwmScsL Tote: £832 £ 1 . 10 . £1.10. 

£1820. DR tSJW. CSF. E1424. TR1CAST: 

£18252 

.IS (IB. 7f BMOMMSI 


MA Sttay O oooar 6025-1 CfeiWO. 1M 

N.<X| 


Qark. i2-1t 2 Artaaium 


* 


Butch 

M 


m-mu 12-1 L0t4 
14-1 The Bom, ZD- 

jortx.DMneTnav 

i5fto.mBK.*Lia,7uc 

tokinteam. Tote: £1832 £412 

2212 £422 BP. £2282 CSF: £10084 
Tricaat£156532 

248(61) 1. ANOTHBIMNea Wggto. 
20-1 L i Bate Tower (A Cote. 7-Zt 2 
Hokusan (G Maah. 4-U AL«> ^AN: S-2 

tev Music Machine m> u ~ z s E« r ** ,rt 

Lao (4fl2 5*1 Ruasej Wyer 5-1 Ugp 
Yeav 7 tan. Nft Visual identity, 
radartarious. 2W. a 1*4 - ft SLA Mom 
at Britiiton. Tote £1832 £422 £2.12 
DT: ££.72 CSP £8287. 

41 6 p m 4B1 , BRBE (M MBsr. 7-1); 2 

ran. fl. 71. a m 1HL R Bobs at 
NewmakaLTote: £7.72 £822 21-80. DR 
£252 CSF: £1219 - 
Ptacapocnotwco 


NOTTINGHAM 


Gomg; good to soft 
Draw: M-fif, high nu 


high numbers sSghtty favoured 

JL0 OLD TRAFFORD MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£921: 51) (11 runners) 

2 0 OtaHUClMCVnUarM MMbotfr 

HUSO ZHACX O te USH CTWder 8-0 MBbchS 

4 lAWNSWOQDLADRHoteiSteadM SPtetalO 

MASTBt POKEY MW Easterby 60 WCmk»2 

NOAUBBA K Wtfle 60 1 Kwh Wood (7) 9 

8 PBmww Wharton 90 WRyanTI 

33 TAME HTECT ORM BriBHn 90 KDadayS 

0 BOLD DFFBffiHCEW Wharton 61t 

0 FOUR LAFFSDliteie 611 JWsniiS 

0 H0MMBNG Hotter 611 GCadar^4 


3D KEADfNGLEY EBF STAKES (3-Y-O: £2,460: 6f) 
(5) 

2 016 UAAMflMH Thomson Jonw 66 A Hurray 3 

3 ®12- Keaton D Laing 61 WCaoonl 

4 060 YOUNG PUOGYRHoBnshead 61 SPerts2 

7 00 NORTHERN MELODY 0) (BRA Barter 


ANGS3 ARE BUJE M Ryan 67 


610PBhwnBeld4 
.. — P Robi nson 5 


74 Linam, 62 Kadron, 100-30 Young Puggy. 74 Angels 
Am BbnTNordiem Melody. 

3^0 TAVERN SELLING STAKES (3-Y-a £667: 1m 
2J)(8) ... - 


1 0*4 ANDREA'S PfflDE P Hastem 60 TWMtms5 

2 060 DW8 OEM P Rohan 90 Put Eddery 7 

4 006 GRAND RING D Laing 90 . 


5 006 SOLBir LAD B Surens 60 
7 006 HANNAH REED D Tucker 611. 


SUNNY OBRAiTARN Ttakfcr 611 


Thes3 


11-8 TWw Btect 94 Lawnaunod Lad, 61 Four Latfs.61 
Mr Pokay 8 Hontag h, 161 others. 


Nottingham selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Take Effect 2J0 Pearl Run. 3.0 Kedron. 3.30 
D'Or’s Gem. 4.0 Pearl Fisher. 4.30 Fair Atlanta. 

By Out Newmaxket Correspondent 
2.0 Homing In. 2.30 Pelham Line. 3.0 Angeh Are 
Bine. 330 Andrea's Pride. 4.0 Highest Peak. 4.30 
Barley BilL 

Michael Seely’s selection: 2.0 Lawnswood Lad. 


_ C ftuaer (51 3 
— RCartnr(5)4 
_ SWWtwortbS 

8 06 PLAnNM START Karsm 611 DSaray(7)2 

9 060 RAC9DRN RHAPSODY G Moore 611 _RPB0M1 

10 000 THE DABBER 03} Q Harman 611 GDuOkidt 

2-1 Sotom Lad. 61 Andrea’s Prida. 7-2 D’Or's Gem. 61 
H a nn a h Reed, 8-1 Racafotm Rhapsody. 161 others. 

4J) OVAL MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-G. C & G: £1^72: 
1m 2f)(14) 


06 


2J30 TRENT BRIDGE HANDICAP (£1^09: 2m 2t) 
(19) 

3 608 DON HUM D Morin 6610 GDaflMdB 

4 850 JACKDAW (USA) RHoSnshaad 699 SPttfeSII 

54006 DANONQ ADMWAL W1 K Moral 69-7. 8 PrShtel 17 

7 261 PEARL RWG Price 54-7 pex)_ GKtau(7)14 

9 «- AMETUCK J Robar» 6-9-6 G^toy13 

13 2 £- CORSTOH SPRttGSD Tucker 4-63 —10 

14 099 SHOT COPPBIiasNSintth 861- —19 

18 613 GMBEADESMHEastartw 6-610 (5ax) G Carter 15 

20 B4-0 AMBUNMra8Dauenmrf568 JWBBuniO 

21 0-&2 KMGtfTS IBR L LUmtomi 568 — W Woods (3) 6 

23 006 CHEKA (USAllBakftg 1665 PstEddary2 

» 016 LADY TUT TBB 665 

25 003/ PSJiAN LINE W Musscr 663 

W WS!>- BEAKER (USA) M Nutton 86 

26 460 RJENFORD J Old 167-13 

31 00/0 NO FLUKE F 

32 QM BOHIAMDOWNN 

33 006 KAY ASM C 000th 

34 006 MBHELE MY 0ELLE R Nichols 4-7-12 
114 Cameadas. 7-2 Peart Run, 92 Knight's Hair. 61 

Beaker, 61 Coreton Springs, 12-1 Dneteg Attaint. RtMtafard, 
161 otan. 


BETTER BEWARE (USA) I Baking 9-0 _ PM Eddery 0 
BLUSHBIG SPY M FSaihersian-Godey 96 — R Mis 13 

4 CROWHMNEB Stevens 60 H Carter (5) 12 

5 04-0 GREY DRAGON (B1WGM Turner 94 -TWMona 10 

6 006 HKHE5T PEAK Q Pnkhard-Gotdon 60 . GDuffietel 

7 0 MSTON BRONZE C Spares 60 NCateoamS 

8 OLE SONG R HoBnsheed 90 SPeri»4 

9 BBSH DOBIMA A Batoy 60 P Btcomfiald 9 

14 006 OUT OP STOCK M BtanNterd 90 W R Swttxan 3 

15 PEARL RSHBt (USA) J Francome 90 — S Cerfben 2 

18 PRMCE EATHE (USA) M Jarws 60 Tlveo6 

19 600 ROYAL BYTOV D Lane 9-0 JWBtansM 

20 6 SHARP TRCS W Musson 60 NWighamll 

21 SUPROE COMMAND M Leach 60 R Quest 7 

61 Psart Fisher. 61 Bkahing Spy. 61 Highest Peak. 132 

Out Ol Stock, 61 Utah Dtatnma. 161 Royal Bfigy, 


Dragon. Bettor Beware, 261 others . 


161 Grey 


130 LORDS HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £1,450: 1m 50yd) 
(14) 


MWghataS 
- M iBter 7 



: Yanflay 87-12 

MM NBydolt 7-7-12 
Booth 67-12 


1 026 BARLEY BULL Ctmni 67 R Quest 12 

2 03-0 AUCTION MAN RHoBrehead 68 S Perks 2 

4 162 atPROVTSE Ron Thompson 63 RPEBott9 

G 046 MABEL AUCEP Frigate 60 HMhrS 

8 fiS6 UNEX-PLAMED R Armstnma 90 V Smith (7) 8 

9 006 SPORTBIG SOVEREIGN (N3 H Jarvis 9-0 — T Ivbi3 

10 006 ARKW EXPRESS (USA) RAimstrong 90 GSextonl 

11 041- PHILOSOPHICAL WUuseon 613 HWIgfavnS 

12 064 CEROC J Bethel 611 

15 006 FAIR ATLANTA M Usher 61 


18 046 ARCTIC KBiCNNSon 66 

20 060 DELTA UNA (S) G KkXtersiey 8-4 . 
“ — amacho63 — 


21 006 F0USW000M Camacho 

22 016 HARE MU.P Rohan 61 

72 Bartoy BO. 61 Improvise. 62 

Atlanta. 7-1 Auction Man, 9-1 Arrow Express, (61 Coroc. 161 
others. 


M WlghmnS 

_ W Canon 11 
_ AMcGtenee 

J Raid 13 

. PRohtnsonlO 
NConnonon 14 
_ j Bteesdaie 7 
112 Fair 


SEDGEFIELD 


Going; good 

2-15 ROAD SHOW NOVICE HURDLE (£743: 2m) (18 
runners) 

2 3010 WALLSBE HARBOUR T Jeffay 611-10 MrYJaBtewm 

3 0002 R9UUNDER WYN M Bowkor 5-11-5 PTteCk 

G 00 CAUHJGIOva r 611-0 OHcfceownm 

7 P CAVALER CROSSETT E Caine 611-0. MrNJMeem 
9 DNX THE VIC WRmv 611-0 BStereyfo 

11 6 QUITELL Mrs S Wbd 611-0 HrOKknetap) 

14 P JASTTOMCAT E HesaMne 

15 86P MMHIYSUPROIO(USA)J MHchai 


6 /PUP HUNTEHHAC Ws J Jordan 11-11-7 Mbs A StekeO (7) 

7 PPP- JOHNNY ROY Mrs M Amstrww 1611-7 — 

9 00 LUMBBt QUAY A Uaaaggan 611-7 DMecteggert 

10 406 HBjQOIC LAD W Lamarque 11-11-7 __ TDSmith 
MUSTAPHAJ HeOms 611-7 P" 


TTBCHROHAT1C (C-IR P Needham 

14-11-7 8 Cuatagtmi 
WOOL MERCHANT R Park 1611-7 _ F Chandler 
OUNQE CLASSIC E Caine 16112 N 


18 401/ LOCH BRANDY Mrs J Nrren 6112. 


4-8 FMng Ace, 10630 Poetical Whip. 61. Mustapha. 61 
Mekxkc Lad. 161 ottwre. 


6112 D 


COrent 


18 0000 PERFECT SUM Denys Sndh 61 V0 , 

22 0 WORTHY KMQHT 8 McLean 6112 

24 PP0 NOTHMQKAPPBB} Mrs M Thoms 6160- CMten 

25 FB TRUGOD Lee6lffi-9 IteH Pmae g) 

27 0 HOME FRONT M Astern 4-1 D-B MPopper 

29 ODD POUSHKNGHTK Stone 4-160 ABmm 

30 » PROHBmON BOY RWoodhoeee 6168 JHente 

32 FOB SMART W BLACK GRetemte 4-168 JHanan 

34 TRIAL PERIOD ABM JHJotwson 6168 HHBm 

S P WARTOBL tOY BFtefchsr 4-168 P Ferre! ft 

11-4 Smart lu Bteck. 10020 Wetakto Hartxw. 61 
Ramakitter wyn. 61 Perfect Glen. 61 Potah Knight 

Z45 SPRING NOVICE CHASE (£1,233: 3m 600yd) 

(IQ) 

7 23PP CLQNSHARAGH A Maetaggen 16112 — 

8UF33 FWESira.BMcLSi6n2 :RI 

9 0P6 OO ON JOE J nchanteoo 16112 IB A 

11 0030 LEAN OUT R Pattens 6112 ...Dal 

12 34F0 NBMUSTRW Johnson 16112 _ Hr PJottaNXip) 

13 22P0 PRMCE SWEET GRtehenlB 6H2 DCoaUay 

17 MOO VULBUCKDMofteH61T2 K Titian 

19 0P98 TIMELESS RJGHTBMcLaan 61611. HWHtUNt®! 

20 POM WOLD SONG UreCCtak 161611 CPkMctt 

21 -PPP WOLD WALK Mrs CCtark 61611 — 

IMRneSfeel, 10630 Ctonsharagh, 4-1 Prinee Sweet 16 

2 Lean Ort 7-1 MenaKL 61 ThBetass ngfy, 161 others. 

3.15 STEEL PROFILE HANDICAP CHASE £1,571: 
2m4f)(9) 


Sedgefield selections ■ 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Smart Id Black. 2.45 Prince Sweep. 3.15 
Ivarop. 3.45 Flying Ace. 4.15 Chance In A 
Million. 4.45 Bidcerstaffe. 

Michael Seely's selection: 4.45 NEWMARKET 
SAUSAGE (nap). 


4.15 ROAD SHOW NOVICE HURDLE (£744: 2m) 
(18) 

2 0443 AUADtS T Barron 61 1-0 

3 P BAD LANGUAGE f -. F GOSOfi 5-1 1^3 _ O UeXrwrei 
B HADRMUTS HYTECH D lamb 6_112~ r . — —H 
9 2000 LEPtATDWR Whitaker 611-0 MrSWM afcer(7) 

10 8328 MAC CHARLEY P Courage 6112 A Stringer 

t2 NtaRAY LAD J Pa rian Sll fa-— ■ 

14 00 PRMCE IBSnERNKHCJ BeU 6112 Mr P Dmte (4) 

15 OUAliTT SQUARE RHsher 6112 — 

17 0(6 RITAS LOVE Denys Snath 5-11-0 

19 /P03 THETOSJ WG Reed 611-0 ~ — 

20 0834 riHAD TREBLE JH Johnson 611-0 — 

21 WOODLANDS WISH J Doyle 511-0. _« 

22 500 CELTIC RjOflA Mre M Thomas 6169- 

25 00 ARDOON PRMCE K Stone 6168- 


HrTReed 
. M Pepper 


CMarai 
i A Brant 


1 P2U3 _ _ 

21120 nilRtiSC'WOQllIiqGRiaieRte 

611-4P0TOannal (4) 

3 TUP SIMON SUNSMBE (B) (CO) D Yeoman 

61 W CHwktaa 

4 4128 HR BMCERJJeltelSOn 61611 SCtMttna 

6 206 HAPPY WORKS) M WEaMUtw 11-168 Pita* 

7 024- NUMBtATE(&D) ft Better 7-1M H Meagher 

9 2042 IVAC0P (D) Denys SnNh 7-165 C(£b0 

10 PP24 RATHCOLMANLASSnjH Johneon6104 MPepoer 

11 0000 LraALBVBURklm«Mon61(ML_ HHanoad 
61 Skawsby, 61 teseop, 61 Mr Baker, 162 Pittmose 

Wood. 7-1 Kumn Sunstme, 61 Happy waiter. 161 
Nufflora®. 161 odtffls. 

3.45 SEDGEFIELD HUNTER CHASE (Amafours: 
£690: 3m 600yd) (14) 

1 >12 PLY9KlAGE(C-0)(flP)ACalder 


26 2000 CHANCE BMULIJOND Hodgson 

4-iiw B stonf 

U GGMm CELEBRATKBiW Storey 61 MUeaF Storey 

28 000U MNCXLEY LANE U W BHtortw 4-168- PTUCk 

29 0284 JELLEAR (HQ R Woodhouse 6168 JHtate 

11-4 Chance tea MKon, 61 Amwfia, 61 1» PtefOr, 1M 

Jdtear, 61 Thetchu, 161 Hindkley Lane, 12-1 Triad Trouble 

4.45 ACROPOLA HANDICAP HURDLE (£1 423: 2m 

4f)06) 


1 2104 SECRET WALE (&OIJH Johnson 7-11-11 
4 4001 NEWMAHKET SAUSAGE 


.M«|7) 

li-8(7terfM Hammond 
M Bcwriby (7) 
™ SCheritcn 


:(C-O^SM Moore 


2 NU LING HAtL lire 

3 31 -F POLITICAL WHIP ff-WR Bra 

4 006 HABMSIGJHelBnslT-1M2 

5 BALLYDALY STAR J Wtafa 611-7. 


16167 Hae D CaMer(7) ? mw 

P Russel 7-12-2 DKtaaaBam 24 -m 

P ft Brader 612-2 TWefeadp) 28 -« 


5 2200 TBIAJOdOJSWIson 7-11-0. 

5 0133 TH0HBELL ARCH (D) fl ftey 7-1613 . 

7 03P* COLOMHIU. PADDY GHSenenfa 

11-1611N Density 

B SOM TABRIZ GOLD ffl)(P«JH Johroon 7-1611 JKmaen 

9 0231 UNGUARDED on F S Swray 6168 B Stony 

10 4003 MEOFDOUJSWStoray 7-167 OTNtom 

11 600 JtBWSTWS BABY ® £ Alston 7-1CH> — KDoofea 

12 BQ6 DBCABi BOY CTtaUte 6165, N Dwyer 

14 0000 GHDANGD F Teriw 7-163 MrAOrknw(7) 

15 M0 KCXEHSTAFFEtam MWEflKBTOy 5-162 _ PTuck 
ISIMPO CHBROT MANOm B UCLean 7-10-0— NOII-flUMER 

22 000U FAR CITY FGBteoa 6104) DHcKaoem(7) 

24 -pro CRESTA CROSSETT E Cana 610-0 DSteOt 

28 -403 PRMCE BUBBLY (8) M Arison 6160 M Pepper 


TftMd 


61 Secret Ftaeta, 61 Unouardod. 61 Coiouttul Paddy, 16 
2 Newmarket Sausage, 61 Tamajojo, 61 Thorfanfl Arch. 


RUGBY UNION 


Divisional concept 
under new attack 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 

The executive commiilcc of 
the Rugby Football Union will 
meet on Friday to discuss the 
laiesi proposals by their com- 


Thc divisional concept in 
England remains unacceptable 
for many administrators despite 
the enthusiasm for it oftcading 


coaches, selectors and players. A petitions sub-commiuee for a 


meeting in Torquay over the 
weekend stirred once again the 
division versus constituent 
body argument. 

A proposition came before the 
South West Division Commit' 
tcc. at the behest of Berkshire 
and seconded by Gloucester- 
shire. that only players who 
made themselves available for 
county football should be se- 
lected for divisional matches; 
the proposers gained support 
from Somerset and Dorset and 
Wiltshire but not from Corn- 
wall. Devon. Buckinghamshire 
and Oxfordshire. 

A tied vote indicates clearly 
how thin the ice is beneath ihe 
divisional championship: had 
the proposition been earned ii 
would have helped undermine a 
vast body of work by admin- 
istrators from the highest level 
down to establish a fresh 
competitive structure in the 
English game and would have 
left players even more confused 
than they are now about how 
individual and national in- 
tercsts are best served. 


revised club structure. It is likely 
that, beneath the existing na- 
tional merit tables A. B. and C. 
two new tables will be mooted 
on a North-South basis and 
beneath them, four divisional 
tables. Each division could then 
work out its own sub-structure 
according to its size and number 
of dubs. 

Such a proposal indicates how 
important the divisions are in 
terms of the future organization 
of the English game. The role of 
the constituent body is changing 
and while it still has an obvious 
place in the game, it should not 
be at the expense of the di- 
visional game. 

Vet still constituent bodies 
seek to influence that develop- 
ing area. 

At a time when the home 
countries arc struggling to stay 
in touch with playing standards 
in France and ihe Southern 
Hemisphere. 1 would not have 
thought there was room for 
argument that the face of the 
English game needs to be 
changed. 


Ulster’s mystery tour 


By George Ace 


With a bevy of internationals 
not available. Ulster's 22-man 
squad for their two-match tour 
of Italy next month makes for 
sunnge reading. Internationals 
R ingland, Carr. Matthews and 
McCall were not considered and 
only three members of the 
Ireland team which lost the final 
Five Nations Championship 
match against Scotland are in- 
cluded in the squad — Anderson, 
who will captain the team, 
Crossan and Morrow. 


The lour opens with a game 
against the Italian Barbarians in 
Milan on Saturday 

SQUAD: P Rainey (Ballymena). R Ander- 
son (London Insr.r. J Hewa (NIFC). I 
Moles (Ards). K Cmun (instoraans). I 
Brown (Malone). R Brady iBaflymenal. P 
Kennedy i London Insnj. J McDonald 
(Malone). J McCoy (Bangor). W Anderson 
(Dungannon, capt). J Rogers (Bangor). W 
Duncan (Metene). D Morrow (Bangor), D 
Crawford (Instoraans). C Morrison 
(ClYMSl. S Smith (Ballymena). P Millar 
(Ballymena), S Cowan (Malone). P Russell 
(lnsianians). C WWdnson (Malone). W 
HarUnson (Malone). 


BASKETBALL 


Wood finally proving 
a prediction wrong 


By Nicholas Marling 


For a man who was told by his 
predecessor that be would never 
win another game as coach of 
Birmingham Ballets, Colin 
Wood has not done a bad job. 
His current count is two cup 
finals, the second of which 
Birmingham will play at Gates- 
head tomorrow when the much- 
maligned British Masters 
tournament reaches its 
'conclusion. 

Had Birmingham heeded the 
advice of Art Ross, who was 
their coach before a severe chest 
infection forced him to return 
home to Florida two months 
ago. Wood, his assistant, would 
hive been the last man to take 
over the coaching. The- out- 
spoken American has probably 
priced himself out of any chance 
of returning, but contrary to his 
opinion. Birmingham do seem 
to have a worthy successor in 
the 37-year-old physical educa- 
tion teacher from Tam worth. 

Wood, who was in charge of 
the club last season when an- 
other American, Sieve Salvo, 
walked out three days before the 
start of the campaign, gained his 
most spectacular victory yet on 
Saturday when Bullets beat 
Team Polycell Kingston to gain 
unexpected revenge for their 
emphatic 1 7-point defeat in the 
final of the national champion- 
ship play-offs. 

Birmingham's 105-99 victory 
puts them in the final with 
Murray International Metals 
Edinburgh, the crack Scots. The 
two dubs have never met 
before. Shoulders, Hays and 
Donaldson were chiefly respon- 
sible for the eclipse of Kingston, 
now showing the fotigue of a 
long hard, albeit otherwise 
successful season. Kingston 


were helped neither by Clark 
missing so many free throws, 
nor by Davis lacking his usual 
energy under the baskets, nor by 
BonLragcr enduring a scoreless 
first half. 

The prospect of an all-English 
final disappeared within the first 
three minutes of the second half 
in Edinburgh on Sunday. Man- 
chester Giants. who had gone in 
at the interval trailing only by 
3&-37, conceded the next 11 
points, after which they were 
never in with a real chance. The 
handicap of being without Ken- 
nedy, who had injured a toe in 
Thursday’s quarter-final defeat 
of Falkirk, proved too much, 
well though Brookins. 
Pemberton and Peers played 
against the Alton Byrd-inspired 
home side, who finished the 85- 
70 winners. 

• Three of the four dubs who 
applied to join the second 
division of the National League 
next season, Rhondda. Elles- 
mere Port and Walsall, have 
been successful. The odd ones 
out arc Market Harborough. 
Rhondda will be Lhe first Welsh 
dub to compete in the league 
and their inclusion means that 
Dave Lawrence, brother of 
Bracknell's Renaldo. gets a be- 
lated chance to play at the higher 
level he deserves. 

•Colin Irish, of Portsmouth, 
and Colin McNish, of Kingston, 
are the surprise omissions from 
the England team who play .in 
the European championship 
qualifying round in Copenhagen 
from April 23 to 27. England 
meet Cyprus, Luxembourg, 
Austria and Denmark with only 
one team to qualify. 

TEAM: S Stiller. P Swnpson. K Tathem, J 
Moore. D Sews#. Dar Lloyd, A Baiogun, P 
Jwwracti. D Gartner, M Spari, 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


7J0 unless stated 

FOOTBALL 

First division 
Arsenal v Nottingham For 
Ipswich v Leicester (7.45) 

Shaft Wed v QPR 

West Ham Utd v South a mp t on 

Second division 

Barnsley v Sheffield Utd 
C Palace v Portsmouth (7.45) 
Fulham v CarfisJe 

Third division 

Bury v Cardiff 
Notts County v Walsall 
Pfymouth v Rotherham 
Wolves v Reading 

Fourth division 
Cambridge Utd v Halifax (7.45) 
Colchester v Orient 
Northampton v Exeter 
Peterborough v Stockport 
Swindon v Chester 
Torquay v Aldershot 
Wrexham v Southend 

Scottish premier division 

Dundee Utd v St Mirren 

Scottish first efivision 

AUoa v Montrose 
Brechin v Ayr 

Scottish second division 
Albion R v Stirling 
Meadowbank v Dunfermine 
SOLA LEAGUE: Runcorn v Wycomne; 
Stafford v Altrincham; weahlstono v 


CENTRAL LEAGUE FMOMafem Derby 
v Manchester Unnad; Ewenon v Sheffield 
United; Manchester Crty v Blackburn; 
StwHtetd Wednesday v Leeds. Second 
dnteion: Blackpool v Wolverhampton 
(7.0); Burnley v Stoke (7.0); Coventry v 
MiddlesDorouqh (7.0); OMnam v Roth- 
erham (7.0V. Port .Vale v Grimsby (7.0); 
Scunthorpe v Bradford: Sunderland tr 
Bolton p.30): York v Preston (7.0L 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Chelsea v 
Swansea (2.15k Crystal Palace v Luton 
12 . 0 ). 

NORTHERN PREMER LEAGUE CUP: 
Semi-final, second lag: Marine (1) v 
Bangor City (3). 

SMIRNOFF IRISH LEAGUE: BaUmena v 
Arts (6.30); CWtoranta yportedgvm (6.30); 


VAlfXHALL-OPEL LEAGUE: Premier *- 
wwxi: Bflencay v Croydon: Bishop's 
Storrtard v Sutton Utd; Carsturiton v 
Wonting: Famsborougn v Epsom & 
EMU; Hayes v Harrow: Kingstoraan v 
Bognor Reals; Wokngh&m v Barking; 
Windsor S Eton v Httcnm. Fast iMatoa: 
Boreham Wood v Bromley; Chesham v 
Maidenhead; Rays Ath v Hornchurch; 
Harlow v Leyfcxsone Start; Lewes v 
Leetherhsad; Layton Wingate v Uxbridge 
(745): Staines v Hampton: Tdbury v 
Avetey: Walton and H v fincNey. Saeond 
dmann north: fterikhamsud u Kingsbury; 
Hestumt v Roystoft Harefieid v Oahom 
St P: Haringey Borov Hertford: HeyMdge 
Swifts v Clapton (7.45): Wotuerton v 
Barton Rovers. Second dMsten south: 
Cam&artsy y Mat Pofce; Dotting v 
Bansaed abk Motesey v Southwick. 
somnau v Marlow; wnyieseale v 
PewrsfleM (7.45& WcWng v Newbury 

(7-45). 

MULTIPART LEAGUE: Horanch » Buxton. 
SOUTHERN L EAGUE: Prem ie r dntim 
Ayteabury v Bedworth; Crawley <r King's 
Lynn; Fofctttona v RS Southampton; 
Gosport v Ctteknsl&rd; WWenhaH v 


dteteloR Andover « Watenoorita; Ashford 
v Ernh and B; Corinthian v Hastings; 
Rutsfep v Burnham and H; Woodfonf v 


Dorchester. 


Crusaders v Lmfield (630): Drsufsrv 
Newry (6.30): Gfemoran « Camcfc (730); 
Lame v Coleraine (6 30). 

ESSEX SENIOR LEAGUE: Brentwood v 
Chelmsford City: Ford Litd v Eton Manor. 
COMBINED COUNTIES LEAGUE: Pre- 
mier dMatan: Chensey v Ash Utd; 
Gooamunq * Cranteuh (6.0); Hanley 
Wintney v Famham (6.0): Meratham v 
Hortev (6.0); Westfield v Cobnam (6.0L 
LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: Bedcton 
Utd v Pennant (6.0): Hanweil v Beacons- 
heW (80); Swanfoy v Danson (60). Senior 
divitMMt: Southwck Sports » Comthlan 

Casuals (6.01. 

GREAT MALE WESTERN LEAGUE: Pre- 
mier division: Bristol Manor Farm v 
Pacdton Rovers: Chert v MeUcskanu 
Ctevedon v Barnstaple: Shepfon Matiei v 
Dawton. First dhrohxt: BecKwoti Utd v 
Devizes; Heavnree v Ottary . St Mary: 
wetton Rovers v westt uxy U td. 

BUILD MG SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Hfston v Cotanesrer Utd; March Town Utd 
v Sud&ury: Newmarket v Thettom. Bo6 
dog Penieum Cups Hurd round: 
Stowmarfcet v FaSxstowe. 

NORTH WEST COUNTIES LEAGUE: First 
division: CStheroe v Forraby; Leek v 
Sialyondoe Cffltic. 

NENE GROUP UMTED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Premier (tension: Bracktey v 
Rothweti ; Hotoeacti v S And L Corby: Long 
Buckby v BaldocK: Northampton Spencer 
v Bourne. 

RUGBY UNION 

CLUB MATCHES: Birkenhead Park v 
Royal Navy; Birmingham v North a mpton: 
Exeter v Bristol (3.0): Maesteg v UaneSi 
(7 0). Neath v Crawsnay's XV (7.0). 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

SLALOM LASER CHAMPIONSHIP: Hu» 
KR v Si Helens. 

OTHER SPORT 
BOWLS: World indoor pa« Champon- 
shipsatBoimjmouth). 

GOLF; Lathes Midand foursames (at 
Northarranyisttre County GQ. 
raCKETk caesnon opm doi*a (at 

Queens CU>] t . c 

REAL TENNIS: George Wimpey world 
singles and dwxites loumament (at Leam- 
ington and Morten MoireS): George 
wimpey world OWMfls. 50s and 60& 
tournament (at Hatfield and Cambndge) 
SNOOKER: Benson and Hedges Inflh 
Masters tat Gods. Co KBdamJ. 

SPEBIWAY: World champaa hi p <X«My- 
ing (at Milton Keynes. PPOteL _ 

TENNIS.- Pnrtenhai British junior 
championships W WWO fedon): L TA 

Western Counties BMW tournament (at 
Bn&tai). - 


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»lr>. _ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


FOOTBALL 


Southampton facing a 
test of character 
after double setback 

had a lot of problems - the er, also feces a tough task to 
Sweden affair and being cast lift his team, beaten by 


t ? ul Cup by into the spotlight with En- Everton in the other FA Cup 

I 0 ® 11 ® centre gland as well as a broken jaw semi-final, for tonight's match 
Wright with a last season. But he’s shown against QPR at Hillsborough. 
* oni 85 l ™ eet Wes* great character and I'm sure he Ipswich have the key match 

Park ?°U he will come through this." in the relegation zone at 
WriLiSS 51 to 83111 ^° m But Nicholl admitted that Portman Road against Lefces- 
ngnts misfortune. _ the double blow of losing ter, who have been put in 

^°9 ks Wright and the semi-final to trouble by four defeats in five 

mjvZi* j S Liverpool could be too much games. Bobby Ferguson, the 

=«gjana world Cup squad to recover from in only three Ipswich manager, believes 
SSKSLvj Southampton days. He saidTThey were tonight's match and 
determination pill hitter blows and as much as I Satuniay’s game against Man- 
aii?^ dielnploMexiCOthls want tods to pull them- Chester City make this “the 
rw^xr-j. M , selves together, it will be most important week at the 

l^cnoll thp .South- difficulL But they are profes- dub for foe past three years", 
ampton manager, said: “In sionals and resuieut and I In foe second division, 
r perfonnances, hope to see them pick them- Crystal Palace can improve 
especially for England m Rus~ selves up off the floor." their slim promotion hopes at 
su, ne nas shown a great Nicholl has Danny Wallace, home to second-placed Ports- 
aroetite for foe game and we Kevin Bond and George Law- mouth tonight Portsmouth 
. m badly. That rence requiring treatment as were surprisingly beaten 3-2 at 
sSmttyI **** m extra 111X16 on Southampton turn their atten- home by Leeds on Saturday 
aararaay. tion to winning the points and no longer look the certaiu- 

w “ m bis required to avoid relation. ties leaders Norwich will be- 

the doctors wrong Howard Wilkinson, the come if they beat Sunderland 

and make it to Mexico. He has Sheffield Wednesday manag- at Carrow Roadiomorrow. 

The goals of Atkinson’s latest signing BjrrjtWOOtl 

Dreamer with his deserve 

feet on the ground I P* ace 

By George Oieaterton 

Old Carthusians 0 

Old Brentwoods 2 

Old Brentwoods, with a goal 
in each half, deserved their 
success at Charterhouse on Sat- 
urday in the Arthur Dunn Cup 
semi-final replay. 

In a match played under 
conditions of alternating sleet 
and sunshine. Brentwood had 
the better of the play in midfield 
and took the lead after IS 
minutes. Ellis, the Charterhouse 
captain, could only parry a hard 
shot from Lockhart, and Doran, 
the game's outstanding player, 
made no mistake from the 
rebound. 

iunu|H. ui aumiuj a uo|isv*ts ** . , For Charterhouse, Andrews I 

hunger for the goals which Daveiipon: romantic story did sterling work in defence and 
wold bring United the leagoe in riled him for a triad. Sub- Adomakoh, until be pulled a 
dsawpifflusfeip. sequently, they signed him- hamstring IS minutes from 

Garry Mrtfes and Alan Brazil, He rtkkly made an impact, time, looked fast and threaten- 

liodi very talented players, had a averaging just ora a goal eroy ing. But it was Brentwood who 
miserable time at Old Trafiord two games in first ifirisioa, a again got the breakthrough, foe 
prhlfe Joe Jordan and Frank remarkable ratio. As impressive second goal coming !0 minutes 
Stapleton also looked less for- as Us strike-rate, however, is his into the second half when 
aidable in United's colours than all-round ability. His sure tooch Needham pounced onto a loose 
hey had done at their previous and awareness of his colleagues ball and confidently placed it 
iabsjVs Jimmy Hill said, when jg as outstanding an ability as past Ellis, 
le was chairman of Coventry his speed and finding Despite exerting plenty of 

3ty. “Baying players is often Accordin g to bis former man- pressure. Charterhouse . only 
he way to make the balance- ager, Brian Clough, who does twice seriously threatened their 
sheet worse and the team wont not h««d oat paise lightly, opponents’ goal - once early in 
it dm same lime. Ifs like especially to forwards, “he poo- the second half when Pears 
mrgery. You’re catting a player sesses a superior in positioned well to keep out a 

» ff from his friends, hi* ad- renting with die ball to anybody powerful shot by Godby and 
dagoes, the dnb and the system i* w wen for many years. Whafs - then in foe late stages, when 
le has perhaps grown op ul.“ more, he has got two great feet Preston had to head dear off his 
That insight apparently does and brings otter people into play own line, 

tot appeal to Ron Atkinson. superMy." Comparing him with Old Brentwoods, who fast 

Davenport, his fattest purchase, war Mantuan and Kenny won the cup in 1973, meet Old 

vho had watched Birfles'sstmn- Dalglish for his range of ability, Chohnetdans in foe final on 
bling efforts atOM Traflord as a jnwtot rtn»t n»«n paH Saturday at Dulwich Hamlet 

supporter before joining him as ms a better fimsher than his ground, 
t player at Nottingham Forest, two predecessors at Forest - ° 

j ." ? t iT‘ElL L ..n w Sf dco 2J ,,i ^S ,,c ^ Sttc^(5£! , )f , SiSlS;S 

twots. Like unties, he entered If talent, enthusiasm and QckSjv, o Pennant. 

the profusions! game late and lereJ-bradedness are enough to 15222: *1 

he says that.il be am do at the cMn^d ^ P .TB.port 

momeast “is to play the way I did should come through his new s Doran. 

at Fore st; it t akes tone to buM challenge with flying adorns. BeftmwrD Smith (3t*ig). 

m understanding’'. However, Very dose to his supportive w- _ . _ a v«i« 

time is at a premium. family. Us feet are firmly on the JLiSltC HClOltlOIlS 

The move to ^ Manchester ground and be is unlikely to be . _ _ _ 

United, soon after be bad signed affected by either the pressures fnf rYl 01 $111(1 

a new three-year contract with or the adulation. 1 t llglAlI U 

Nottingham Forest, was the He still goes to watch his old Mike Newall, the Luton for- 
latest twist m the eventful career amatenr dub, CannneU Laird, wanL and Nigel Winterburn, the 
of the forward. Almost exactly whenever be can. His character Wimbledon full back, were late 
five years ago, Davenport, aged was Illustrated when he swept up additions to the England squad 
25, was rejected by Everton, with every available Cop Final ticket who flew to Pisa yesterday for 
whom be was on amateur forms, a t Notfeghain Forest to give to the UEFA Under-21 champion- 
■nd his chance of b ecoming a his former park football art- ship semi-final, first Ira against 
profossional footballer seemed leagues, Everton supporters to a Italy. They replaced Nick Pick- 
to nave gone. >et h» goal- man, wfe® their dub reached ering, of Coventry, who is 
sawing feats for CanuaeD Laird, Wembley. Now, however, be will injured, and Paul Rideout, of 
for whom he scored 200 m two hope to disappoint them by Bari. 

seasons, and his Sunday team, helping United deny Everton the •Everton and LiveipooUbe 
Queens Park, persuaded his League title. If he can do that, be FA Cup finalists, are to take 
brother to send a packet of may find a summer in Mexico a steps against southern ticket 
dippings to Nottingham Forest, fitting reward. touts to prevent them from 

jbo initially rejected him, bat , U«Ji making a profit at the fens’ 

hen thought better of it and rclcf Doll expense from next month's final 


*«e> oweveu mu owi uciug 

'by into foe spotlight with En- 
itre gland, as well as a broken jaw 
. a last season. But he’s shown 


Haif^T^rr ‘P 661 West great character and Tm sure he 

will come through this." 

83111 from But Nicholl admitted that 
iWsmBfortuifc the double blow of losing 

Alvin Maitm looks certain Wright and foe semi-final to 


4*1.- . ' V : OlIU Lilt. M.UU-UUOI UJ 

' £ acem *5 Liverpool could be too mucb 

S 0rid c5 u P sqaad 10 recover from in only three 

*»ys. He said-’^They were 
* ^termination ail! bitter blows and as much as I 


n .U O u ^v® 5 twefoer, it will be 
, JrJ 1115 Scholl thp South- difficulL But they are profes- 
SKKf, S l <2? 8 f!lr s:i,d: ** Ic sionals and resQient and I 

hope to see them pick foem- 
espeaaUy for England in Rus- selves up off the floor." 
sia, he has shown a gnat Nicholl has Danny Wallace, 
aroetite for foe game andwe Kevin Bond and Geoige La^ 
wfo miss him badly. That rence requiring treatment as 
^ m extra t* me on Southampton turn their anen- 
- 1 . u- tion to winning foe points 

. * J“st wish hkn well in his required to avoid relegation, 
bid to prove the doctors wrong Howard Wilkinson, the 
and make it to Mexico. He has Sheffield Wednesday manag- 

The goals of Atkinson’s latest signing 

Dreamer with his 
feet on the ground 


• . a ?.\ 


Most boys in the crowd at Old 
Traflord dream of one day 
leading Manchester United'S 
attack. For the vast majority k 
will remain a dream, but for 
Peter Davenport, recently trans- 
ferred from Nottingham Forest, 
bis boyhood fantasy has beea 
fulfilled. 

It is a romantic story for the 
player who as a youngster was 
thrilled by the right of Law, 

Best, and Chariton, but the 
reality makes his sftnatioa less 
than completely enviable. The 
responsibility of leading 
United's attack, which has 
fallen on his slim shoulders, has 
recently proved a heavy harden 
for home-produced players and 
expensive purchases alike in the 
attempt to satisfy a desperate __ 
hunger for the p™ 1 * which Davenport: romantic story 


would bring United the leagoe invited him for a trial. Sob- 
ebampionship. sequentiy, they signed fc™. 

Garry Birtles and Alaa Brazil, He jirickly made an impact, 
both very talented players, had a averaging just over a goal every 
miserable time at Old Traflord two games in first wririoo, a 
while Joe Jordan and Frank remarkable ratio. As impressive 
Stapleton also looked less for- as his strike-rate, however, is his 
readable in United's colours Hum all-road ability. His sure tooch 
they had done at four previous and awareness of his colleagues 
dubsjks Jimmy Hill said, when jj as outstanding an ability as 


he was chairman of Coveotry 
City: “Buying players is often 


his speed and finishing. 
A ccording to bis former l 


the way to make foe balance- ager, Brian Clough, who does 
sheet worse and the team worse baud out praise lightly, 


at the same time. Ifs like especially to forwards, “he poo- 
surgery. Yotfre catting aplayer sesses a superior talent in 


He has peruafS grown up m. more, he has git two great feet 

That aright apparently does and brings otter people into play 
not appeal to Ron Atkinson, superbly." Comparing him with 


Davenport, his latest purchase. 


Maanhm 


who had watched Bo-ties’* stum- Dalglish for his range of ability, 
bling efforts at OH Traflord as a Clough insisted that Davaiport 
supporter before joining him as was a better finisher thy his 
a player at Nottingham Forest, two predecessors at Forest - 
is only too aware of the prec- Woodcock and Frauds, 
edents. Like Bfrtks, he entered If talent, enthusiasm and 
foe professional game late and level-teadedness are enough to 
he says that all be can do at the command s uccess, Davenport 
moment “is to play the way I did should come through his new 
at Forest; it takes time to build challenge with flymg colours, 
op understanding”. However, Very eSase to his supportive 


time is at a premium. 


S c 

y. 


kis feet are firmly on the 


The move to Manchester ground ami be is unlikely to be 
United, soon after he had signed affected by either the pressures 
a new three-year contract with w the adulation. 

Nottingham Forest, was foe He stiU goes to watch his old 
latest twist m the eveotfrd career amatenr dub, CannneU Laird, 
of the forward. Almost exactly whenever be can. His character 
five years ago. Davenport, aged was illustrated when be swept up 
25, was rejected by Everton, with every available Cup Final ticket 
whom be was on amatenr forms, a t No t tin gham Forest to give to 


and his chance of becoming a 
processional footballer seemed 
to have gone. Yet his goai- 


his former park football col- 
leagues, Everton supporters to a 
man, wfe«q their dnb reached 


sawing feats Tor Canrarefl Laird, Wembley. Now, however, be wifi 
for whom he sowed 200 m two hope to disappoint them by 
seasons, and his Sunday team, helping United deny Everton the 
Queens Park, pmea&d his League title. If he can do that, be 
brother to send a packet of may find a summer in Mexico a 
dippings to Nottingham Forest, fitting reward, 
who initially rejected him, bat n . n n 

then thought better of it and r ClCf JSilli 


GOLF; WHERE THE BEST FIND THEMSELVES UP THE CREEK 


■ 0 


YACHTING 


-vr 




Paragon rises to a 0 
French challenge 



.* * * • ~ .7 • . V-i ■ .1 

V> ' S : * ,i -; v { 

*, ^'v ■ 

w;' ... 

* r/.C ‘ ^ 

. W ' ' 

”• , x • 


The sparfding performance of 
ParagOtt, the 60-fool British 
trimaran ridppered by Mike 
Whipp, in wmoing three of last 
weekend's four multi-hull grand 
prix races outright ax the La 
Trinito, France, is proving to be 
something of an embarrassment 
to French race organisers — who 

plan to stage a two-handed 
Transatlantic race from Rouen 
to New York next .month to 
rival Britain's own two-star race 
from Plymouth to Newport 
The French, who have billed 
their race as a contest between 
25 of foe fastest sailing boats in 
foe world, have attracted only 
12 entries to date despite the 


ByRanyPkkthaQ 

manceof 900,000 francs (about £90000) 
t British prize money on offer, while the 
by Mike British event boasts a 100- 
ee of last strong entry, 
lull grand The French must also now 
t the La face the feet that they may not 
ting to be ■ have the fastest mufti-hulls, for 
rassment despite intense lobbying at the 


weekend, Whipp and his crew^i 
David Alan Williams. havcF* 
decided instead to compem in 
the Royal Western Yacht Club 
event, sponsored for the first 
time by Cartsberg. Competing 
against them will te Tony 
BulUm ore's Apricot, and the 
catamaran British Airways I, 
skippered by Robin Knox- 
Johiiston. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


■*':-***■ - ;. 


Shooting for the stars and his American stripes: San 
before winning the Greater Greensboro Open In 


finds himself in a sandy spot 


Thackray’s good news 


Thirteenth looms large in 
tale of Masters disasters 


Bernhard Longer won the 
United States Musters a year 
ago in the manner of a genuine 
champion. Yet as he prepares to 
start bis defence at Augusta. 
Georgia tomorrow last year's 
event is still regarded by some 
obs e rve r s as foe one Curtis 
Strange lost. 

Strange took six at the 13tb 
bole in the final round only 
minutes after Longer had scored 
a Untie there. The American 
lost a two-stroke advantage and 
Longer went on to wm by two 
strokes. Strange sharing second 
place with Severiano 
Ballesteros. 

Strange stands accused of 
losing foe 1985 Masters because 
he took what to many was an 
unnecessary gamble at that' 
13th. The bole measures 465 
yards and it is a par five oa the 
Augusta National Golf Onb 
card even though It is 11 yards 
Short Of foe customary distan ce 
for such a rating at a British 
course. 

A rivulet meanders along the 
left side of foe fairway, .then 
t ur n s at right angi— across the 
front of the green. Known as 
Rae’s Creek, it might have been 
rechrfstened Curtis's Creek ex- 
cept Hut he is not the first 
player to become a casualty 
there in the Masters. 

Strange laced a second shot of 
208 yards. His crime, so to 
speak, is that he gambled en 
carrying the Creek rather than 
laying op. His 4-wood veered 
right, foe ball finished in the 
Creek and Strange took two to 
escape before needing two pntts. 

Tom Watson has won two US 
Masters. He is adamant that In 


gone for foe green. Ballesteros, 
who has won two US Masters, is 
equally adamant that Strange 
should have played safe. By 
coming np short of foe Creek he 
amid have still pitched on and 
been putting for a birdie which 
would have left him with his two- 
stroke lead- 

“If I was Acre again I would 
make the same decision — no 


tFnmTOTi 


question,” Strange said. 14 It 
wasn't the decision that har- 
dened me, it was the way I hit 
the shot." 

Strange will not be allowed to 
forget his catastrophic mis- 
fortune. Masters disasters are 
an integral part of the history of 
the tournament which was 
started in 1934 when the leg- 
endary Bobby Jones realized fads 
dream to play his own tour- 
nament on his own course. 

The 13fo hole has been die 
scene of many of these disasters. 
Mathematically, nobody can 
mmi* Tommy Nakgjpma, of 
Japan, who took 13 strokes 
there oa Friday, April 13, 1978. 

Ralph GaUahl mid his sights 
en victory in 1937 when he made 
two visits to Rae’s Creek, which 
weaves its way from left of the 
llfo green across foe front of foe 
12th and on to foe 13th. GnUahl 
took five at the 12th and she at 
the 13th, where he pot his 3-iroa 
approach in the Creek. 

Words can never 
dilute the pain 

Byron Nelson scored a birdie 
at foe 12 th and an eagle at foe 
13th, thereby gaining 
sixstrokes. Nelson won and 
GuldahJ was ranoer-up. Two 
years later Gridahl was com- 
pensated by' winning the 
Masters. 

In 1954 it was the torn of a 
lumberjack to be felled by the 
13th. Billy Joe Patton, who had 
qualified as a Walker Cap 
player, en foe last day holed in 
one at foe sixth and had birdies 


Patton was tied for the lead 
standing on foe 13fo hot he. Eke 
Strange, went for the green with 
a 4-wood. The ball dattered into 
the Creek, where Patton took 
seven, foot a six at the long 
15th. 

Jenes said at the time: "Billy 
Joe would almost certainly have 
won if he had restrained his 
enthusiasm at the par five." An 


eloquent way of offering 
commiserations to Fatten but 
words can never dilute the pain. 

At AigBSla many players 
have felt the agony of victory 
sliding away: Ben Hogan had a 
downhfll putt of Httte more than 
10 feet to win in 1946: be took 
three putts and lost to Homan 
Keiser. Ken Venturi led by fbnr 
strokes going into the last round 
in 1956 and nit aa 80 by taking 
three putts oa six occasions on 
foe treacherous g ree ns . He lost 
by one stroke to Jackie Barite. 

Arnold Palmer woo- the Mas- 
ters. in 1958, 1960, 1962 awl 
1964. He lost in 1961 when he 
required a par four at the last 
bole to beat Gary Player. 

Player benefited again in 
1978. The South African pro- 
duced an astonishing final mud 
of 64 to come from eight strokes 
behind. But Hubert Green 
missed from three feet on the 
last green to tie. The following 
year Ed Sneed took three putts 
at foe 16th, missed from Vh feet 
at the 17th and foiled from five 
feet at the 18th. He lost to Fuzzy 
ZoeUerina play-off. 

The hardest lorn of all was 
that of the amiable Roberto de 
Vicenza, of Argentina, in 1968. 
He took 65 strokes for Us last 
round but Tommy Aaron, who 
was marking his card, put 
Vicenzo down for a finer at the 
17th, where he had taken three. 
Vicenzo had signed his card and 
under the rales his score had to 
be changed to a 66. He missed a 
phfHjjfff fey one stroke and Bob 
Goalby became champion. 

“It was my own fault," 
Vicenzo said. “ Bob Goalby 


my brains.". 

Augusta National has a habit 
of doing tint to many goffers; 
but as tong as they accept defeat 
in the manner of Vknzo ha 1968 
and Strange last year there wfll 
never be any question of golf 
losing its enviable reputation of 
befog a game for gentlemen. 

Mitchell Platts 


The injury to Rick Thackray, 
the Wamngion winger, may not 
be as serious as was first 
thought. Thackray was carried 
off in the match against Dews- 
bury, which Wamngion won 
52-0, and it was feared that he 
had broken his leg. However, an 
initial examination has not 1 re- 
vealed a fracture and Thackray 
is to have a further examination 
today. 

The St Helens manager Alex 
Murphy, yesterday expressed 
tbe views of all managers and 


By Keitfa Macfclin 

Tiackray. coaches involved in a hectic 
may not fixture scramble during the next 
vas first two weeks. St Helens visit HuU 


Kingston Rovers tonight ani 
both have crowded programmes 
as they pursue a top four place in 
foe championship table. “It's 
ridiculous. My players are men- 
tally and physically exhausted.." 
Murphy said. 

Much the same can be said for 
Rovers, who need to win all 
their remaining fixtures to be 
sure of catching Halifax and 
retaining their championship. 


FOR THE RECORD 


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Roma veteran hits Juventus e ur°pean football results 


Francesco Graziani. the 33- 
year-old veteran international 
centre forward, gave Roma a 
vital win in the Olympic Sta- 
dium last weekend over 
Sampdoria, and dosed foe gap 
with Juventus, the champions, 
to a angle point. Graziani. a 
World Cup final player in 1932, 
had been out of the team for 
much of the season but has been 
in magnificent form of late. 

The present European trans- 
fer market is somewhat more 
complicated than it looks, h is 
bv no means sure, for one thing, 
that foe new star of Argentine 
football, Carlos Borghi. the 
Argeminos Juniors centre for- 
ward. will finish with Servette m 
Geneva next season, hibernat- 
ing till Sampdoria are able to 
bring him to Italy. 

Racing Club de Paris, once 
the opponents of Arsenal in 
Paris every Armistice Day, have 
won promotion back to the 
French first division, and are 
said to have topped the money 
which would have been paid by 
Servette. or Sampdoria. Borghi 
himself, a bibte-reading Mor- 
mon. sent off the other day in 
Paris, is confused, as well he 
might be. 


For Maxi me Bossis, foe gam- 
ble of joining Racing Club and 
dropping down this season to 
the second division has worked 
out wonderfully well. He has not 
lost his place on the French 
international team, he has had a 
fine season as captain of Racing 
Club, and he seems to have 
found a modus vivendi in the 
French international defence, 
where both he and Battiston 
wanted the role of libero. Now 
they seem content to be foe 
centre backs; though there is still 
a question mark against them 
when the high crosses whistle 
over. 

Racing Club are also in 
pursuit of Pierre Littbarski, of 
Cologne, the little West German 
international right winger, who 
is just recovering from an 
operation on his ankle. 
Littbarski won't give a decision, 
he said, until he is wholly 
recovered, which will probably 
be ai foe end of this month. 

Valdano. the Argentine inter- 
national forward striker who hit 
the bar against France in Paris 
and scored for Real Madrid in 
Milan against Internazionale a 
week later, could also be on his 


way to French football. Nantes 
and Monaco (who'd also like to 
sign Liam Brady from Inter and 
have bought Lerby from Bay- 
onne) are in contention for 
Valdano. who. at 30. cannot 
expect better than a one-year 
contract from Real. Nantes 
already have another member of 
the current Araentina team in 
the midfielder Bumichaga. 

Within France Philippe 
Vercruysse, a great success and a 
goalscorer on his international 
debut against Argentina, is leav- 
ing Lens, his only dub so for, for 
Bordeaux, where he is looking 
forward to playing beside Alain 
Giresse. 

The Spanish midfield is 
functioning p retty well. too. 
Spain will play no more gomes 
against other international 
teams till the World Cup finals. 
Splendid home wins over Rus- 
sia. Belgium and Poland have 
suddenly made them a fended 
team; but will they wQl produce 
such form so tor away from 
home? 



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THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


39 




s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Jane Henderson 
and Peter Davalle 


BBC 1 


8-00 Cwefax 
6J0 Breakfast Tin* with Frank 
Bough and Selina 

Weather at 6.55,7.25, 
7-SSt 8J25andS.65. Local 
news, weather and travel 
316^7,7.25,7.57,8^7. 
Sport al7JJ» and 8L20. 
Today’s papers at 857. 
Also Alan Titchmarsh on 


* > P,-, 




_ irjstian oncookerv. _ . 
9-20 Roland Rafs Easter 
prtravojjanza begins with 
Laaele riding a kayak ■ 

down the rapids W 9^t5 
Why don't you J? solve ' 

the mystery of the water- 

dafytng hankie mi5 
Simon and the Witch told 
by Nerys Hughes for 
Jackanory. mao Play 
School spring cleaning 
presented by Iain 
Luachfen.KUOCeafax 
1250 New* after Noon with 
Richard Whitmore and 
Frances Coverdale, news 
headlines with subtitles 
1255 Regional News and 
Weather 

150 Pebble MBS etOne first in 
a series about trair 


dren's traditional 
dance and musio. Actor 
Patrick Mower talks about 
his career, Including the 
part of a towjh detective in 
Target and Gerald 
Kaufman reviews new 
films 

1-45 Mop and Smjff a shaggy- 
haired sheep dog ana a 

tabby cat go to the circus 

(r) 2.00 Ceefax X52 


355 Pigeon Street Can I have 
my ban back? (r) 455 
Laurel and Hardy In the 
Teepee TV. 4.15 John 
Briggs first pert of a 23 
pan serial. Johny starts 
dreaming of rabbits (0 
4J0 Banana man in the 
Crown Jewel Caper. 455 
Think it. Do it Johny BaQ 
investigates the catering 
business and gives some 
recipes 

550 John Craven's 

NswsrouncL 556 Seerview 
second comedy In 6 part 
series. Dad's ideas on 
ecology don't coincide 
with young Sandy's — he 
wants to protect wildlife 
whereas bad wants to - 
give a fur coat to the wife 
(r) 555 RoH Harris 
Cartoon Tfaoe the Aussie 
singer and artist illustrates 
love with cfips from 
Pctpeye and Tom and 
Jerry. 

6.00 SixO’CIock News 
presented by Sue Lawiey 
and Nicholas WitchaB, 
followed by weather 655 
Regional news magazine 

750 Holiday introduced by CBff 
Micheimore. The Royal 
Scotsman was fuD on 
nearly every trip in 1985 of 
nostalgia-freaks In rose 
coloured spectacles being 
taken for a wonderful ride. 
Also Vienna for cuflure 
vultures 

750 EastEmtea: (Ceefax) Dan 
and Angie are away on 
hofiday and Wicksy and 
r mean to Improve the 
l margin of the Queen 
Tony finds a 
tran s formation i n hte flat 

850 One by One based on the 
Zoo Vot books; Sindy and 
Turner are sent to pick 
a whale for Ben Bishop , . 
(Ceefax) (r) 

&50 Points of vlawBany Took 
with viewers' letters and 
his own smart remarks; 

950 Nine O’clock News with 
Julia Somerville and 
Andrew Harvey 

950 The Kenny Everett 

Television Show Why was 
the celery In the offertory 
box? he asks (r) 

m00 Kami Vice new series of 
the Award-winning 
designer cop show. Singer 
Phil CoWns appears as 
Britishcon artist Phil 
(Ceefax) 

1050 FBm 86 Michael Paridnaon 

reviews A Room with a 
View and talks of Cflnt 
Eastwood running for 
mayor in Southern 
California today - wefl 
there Is a precedent, Mr 
President- 

1150 Golf -the One Ckib 

Challenge for the Epson 
Trophy 

12.10 Weather. 



tv-am 


6.15 Good Morning Britain with 
Anne Diamond and Nick 
Owen news at 650,750, 
750, UMT/U0' and 950. 
Weather at 658, 658, 

• - 758, 858 and 858. Sport 
at 655 and.754. Cartoon 
. -at 754. Pop video at 755. 


ITV/LCNDON 


955 Thames News headlines 
- followed by Nature of 
Things The Invte&te Reef 

and underwater wildlife. 
9S Cartoon Time Roger 
Jtentiet in two adventures. 
1050 to Sijrftf short drama. 

1055 The AH Electric 

Amusement Arcade; Mr 
Thomsett and Gran are 
anxious not to be left out 

1150 RrabaSMS^/Sms^ 
threaten the Hfe of Steve 
ZocBac(rt. 

11.25 Cartoon Tane. 

1150 About Britain The 

Guardians Two historic 
houses, KentweU Hall in 
Suffolk, and Knebworth 
House in Hertfordshire, 
and the problems their 
owne rs fac e paying to 

12.00 CcSdeshel^yNmr ' 
series for young children. 
Robin and Rosie five to a 
guesthouse beside ihe 
sea, and turn their hands 
to sleuthing when their 
baby sister cfisappears. 
12.10 Rainbow Three currant 
buns for four people, Rod, 
Jane and Freddy sing 
approriatety Sharing. 

1250 TneSuffivans Norm Baker 
prevents a potential 
deserter from quitting. 

150 News atone. 150 
ThanmsMews 
150 Fifty, Fifty two lady tecs 
tnvesttaate a kidnabDfna. 
250 Daytime SarahiGannw# 
cfiscussthe 
behind the news. 
3.00 University Coflege A new 
form sets individual 
members of an 
teams to heat 
rounds; Pembroke 
CoBege, Cambridge v St 
Catherine's Oxford. 355 
Thames news headlines. 
350 The Young Doctors The 
best man at the wedding is 
to be Graham Steele. 

450 Cockleshell Bay first S8en 
at noon. 4.10 James the 
Cat marked by the local 
bobby. 

450 Sooty first to the new 
series of Sooty tales with 
SpfkeMlBgan. 
has a grand scheme 
for vtflich Sweep must 
take singing lessons. 455 
Cartoon Tone Woody 
Woodpecker takes on the 
Army. 

455 Splash Supersteuth the 
bloodhound Sherlock on 

the trail of answers to the 

competition (lucky winner 

goes to San Francisco for 

a week), and Rve coverage 

of young viewers' stories. 
5.15 Connexions Teenage . 
word and numbers quiz 
with Sue Robbie S^S 
News 650 Humes News 
Reporting London Michael 
Barrett's news magazine. 
750 rBmnaidaie Fann Derek 
Warner has been arrested 
for Harry Mowlamls 
murder and Dofly is 
reteaved that Matt - 
Skifoeck fas now a free - 
man. tri the pub Joe 
Sugden andAlan Turner 

find themselves In a race 

for promotion. . 

750 Duty Free Two couples on 
holiday in Spain, blowing 

the redundancy money 
and playing with fire- 

850 j^^m^rivateeyeto 
Hawaii. 

950 Boon last episode In the 
present senes; Harry Is 
about to buy a new hotel. 
1050 News at Ten followed by 
Thames news head&nes. . 
1050 King’s FBght Lord Hill, 
Chairman of BA, talks 
about privatisation and his 
plans for the company 

(see Choice). 

1150 FB»e Backfire (1962) 

British B movie set in the 
cosmetics badness where 

an arsonist is engaged to 

solve solvency problems, 
with Alfred Burke, Zena 
Marshall and Paul. 
Almond.. 

1250 N^itThoaghts 



t,Ofl!TV 


•t watched John Swtoffekfs 
documentary KING'S FUGHT ( 
ITV, 1050pm) feeling as If I 
ware sitting on a pile of pins. It is 
not, in a word, a comfortable 
experience. What I 
conspicuously lacked was the 
rhino-hide that is displayed 
throughout the documentary 
. , I subject Lora 
iairman of British 
Airways who struck me as befog 
Impervious not only to 
pinpricks but to every mtssRe 
with the possible exception of 
a nuclear bomb.Cotainly, any 
interviewer who confronts 
him with a half-baked question Is 
asking for trouble, and we 
duly see a couple of them coming 
to grief m this no-hoids- 
barred anatomy of Lord King's 
twice- rebuffed attempt to 
privatize his airfine. Although we 
are denied a thunder-and- 
lightning confront a tion between 


CHOICE' 


Lord King and two of his 
knightly antagonists, Freddie 
Laker and Adam Thomson, of 
British Caledonian, we are toft in 
rw doubt whatsoever about 
hts attitude to the charges they 
fey at British Airways' front 
door with regard to deprivation of 
totar-alritoe competition and 
the nature of the book-keeping 
that, with Lord King in the BA 
cockpit changed a £1000 minion 
BA debt into a £200 million 
profit 

•MARCO POLO (Channel 
4.6.00pm) Is guilty of profligacy. 

It wastes one of America's 
best actresses^nne Bancroft, in 
a death-bed scene in the very 
first Optsode.lt is also gidty of 
the besetting crime that alt 
Italian-based spectaculars 
commit, and which is 


currently being perpetrated over 
on BBCl in AJJ.- Anno 

Domini: scripting of numbing 

banality. That sa>d. 1 must tell 
you that Marco Polo is. visually, a 
treat for sore eyes 
(photography by Pasqualino de 
Santis, settings by Luciano 
Rtccen). If you warn to know 
what Venice must have 
looked like in the 13th century, 
with Venetians moving about 
the Piazza San Marco in sifts 
and not in oils, then you need 
took no further 
•Radio choice:the BBC 
Philharmonic playing the 
Bruckner No 7 (Radio 
3,8.10pm). and a long-overdue 
analysis of regional radio, 
and how it works, in the new 13- 
J series called The Local 
r (Radio 4,4.05). 


part serie 
Network { 


Peter Davalle 


m 


BBC 2 


855 Open 

search of a 1 

9.00 Ceefax 

2.00 World Bowls Scotland v 
Ireland (grow} 2), England 
v Scotifflid (Group 1), and 
Wales v Ireland (group 3). 

555 News Summary with 
subtitles, weather. 

550 The Grim Run the final 
stageof a joruney 
recreating the Roman's 
, waterway routes from 
Selby to Ripon visa < 

miflin Yotfoa 

and finatiy by canoe 

650 Whistle Tesf Extra Bryan 
Ferry to a rare interview 
talks about his solo career 
and the former group 
Roxy Music which took 
the music world by storm 
in 1972. Known for his 
stylish appearance and 
the cleverness of Ws 
music he has just made a 


655 World Bowls Midland 
Bank World Indoor Pairs 
Championship. 

750 OTJorinMItovestigatestite 
Food Business: In the 
Community Interest? 
Michael O'Donnell claims 
that the Common 
Agriculture PoBcy has 
caused food mountains 
which in turn have caused 
overeating of the very 
foods we should cut down 
for health reasons. Britain 
for example has the 
highest rate of coronary 
heart (Ssease to the wdrid 
and yet we persistently eat 
foods connected with 
obesity, cancer and heart 
dsease. Meanwhile 41 
cauliflowers are destroyed 
every minute because 
we’ve grown too tinny of 
them. 

850 Harty goes to Monaco. 


Harty races round 

to Prix dr 


the Grand Prix circuit with 
Jackie Stewart, meets 
Princess Carofine at the 
Rose Bad, high point of 
the Monegasque season, 
and talks to Prince Rainier 
(rt 

850 top Gear hew series 
about news and views in 
motoring looks at attempts 
to teach care less drivers 
better habits to European 
Road Safety Year, and at 
the Japanese invasion, of 
1986. waRam Wootard 
tests the new Ford Escort 
and its anti-lock brake 
system and the team 
reports an crowd safety at 
rales after last month’s 
disaster in PortugaL 

950 I, Ctoudiiis Last episode: 
Claudius's thoughts turn 
to Rome's future, he 
devises a plan to destroy 
the Empire and bring 
about the return of tna 
Republic, protecting his 
son Brttannteus (r). 

9l 55 World Bowts John 
Ottoway and John Bed 

forEndandv Don Peoples 
and Kenny Wlffiams for 
Australia. 

1055 New a nigh t foBowed by 
weather 

1150 Work! Bowls Jim Brankin 
and Bily Montgomery far 
Ireland and Ray HSI and 
Jeff Wright for Wales, 
introduced by David Icke. 

1255 Open University Bronze 
casting; how was a 
Renaissance bronze 
made? (r). 

1255 Closedown. 


CHANNEL 4 


2.15 Their (jordeftfps’s House. 


coverage of the Rouse of 
Lords. 

250 Ulster Landscapes How 
the new technology is 

affecting Ulster's 
countryside. Many villages 
grew up around the water- 
driven mflte of the linen 
industry, until the 
Twenties, when the 
industry declined; 


taking over, although they 
are now foiling too (r). 

350 FBm: As you Desire Me* 
(1932) Greta Garbo as a 
young bride whose happy 
marriage is brutally 
sabotaged by enemy 
invasion. Erich von 
Stroheim as Salter. 

4-15 Countdown specially 
extended programme for 
two finalists, who face 
eight letters games, four 
numbers games and two 
conundrums. 

550 Bewitched Someone has 
concocted a love-potion 
for Samantha, the 
latterday witch, but the 
cocktail goes astray when 
Endora polishes it off. 
Shades of Midsummer 
Night's Dream. 

550 PamtafaBity- Decorating 
with a Difference. Jocasta 
tones’ new series about 
patot finishes starts 
tonight with a programme 
devoted to colour, ragging 
and stippling and a 
demonstration of colour 


650 Marco Polo first of a 
blockbuster new drama 
series about the thirteenth 
century Venetian traveller, 
inspired with curiosity 
about the Orient, who took 
three and a half years to 
cross Asa and then lived 
for 17 years to Peking as 
the guest of the Great 
Khan. 

750 Channel 4 News 750 
Comment by Geoffrey 
Heptonstall, the writer, 
followed by weather. 

8.00 Brookside Harry and 

Ralph prepare for their trip 
to Torquay wondering who 
Madge will bring to make 
up tne foursome; Heather 
comes back from Scotland 
with her boss, Keith 
Tench, but is happy to find 
Nicholas again. . 

850 4 What it's Worth Penny 
Junor with John 
Stoneborough and David 
Strafford talking tonight 
about the legalisation of 
irradiated foods and the 
Illegal importation which 
has already occurred 
(Orade). 

950 FRue Suffivan’s Travels 


(1 941)* classic comedy 
from Hollywood, to wt» 


which a 


Hollywood comedy 
cHrector (played by Joel 
McCrea) decides to j 
reafismhii 


go for 

reafism In a documentary 
about the destitute; 
disguised as a tramp he 
researches his movie. The 
film mixes realism, fantasy 
and social comment 
1045 The Tube repeat of 
Friday's show (the 
hundredth edition). C&ve 
James in the studo 
reviews the show and 
there's music from It’s 
Immaterial, Siouxsie and 
the Banshees and the 
video of Kate Bush (1), 
12.10 Their Lordships’s House 
from the House of Lord's 


1255 


( Radio 4 ) 

On tong wave. VHF stereo 
variations given at end. 

S.S5 Shipping 650 News Briefing; 
Weather 6.10 Fanreng 
655 Prayer js) 

650 Today, ind 650. 750, 

850 News 6.45 Business 
News 6-55, 755 Weather 
750, 850 News 750 
Letters 755, 855 Sport 7.45 
Thought for the Day 855 
Yesterday in Parliament 
843 Islands of Hope and 
Glory by Ronald Knox- 
Mawer. Reader Frank 
Duncan. 857 Weather; 

Travel 
9.00 News 

355 Tuesday CaU: 01 -560 
4411. Listeners can 
express their views, and 
question experts, dti a 
subject of current interest 
1050 News; From Our Own 
Correspondent Life and 


BC foreign 
correspondents 

1050 Momma Story; The 

Three Rosettes by Sam 

Houghton. Reader Neil 

Stacy 

1CL45 Daily Service (new Every 
Morning, page 71) (s) 

1150 News; Travel; Thirty- 
Minute Theatre. Parents' 
Evening by Diana Griffiths. 
With Heather Ben, Brian 
Murphy and Tessa Worstay 

1153 ihe Living World. Derek 
Jones m search of six 
species of our native 
amphitxans 

1250 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer programme. 

1257 Brain of Britain 1986. 
Nationwide general 
knowledge contest. First 
round; London. 1255' 
Weather 

150 The World At One: News 
140 The Archers. 155 
Shipping Forecast News; 
Woman s Hour. The 
impact of feminism on the 
study of literature. 

350 News; The Afternoon 
Play. The Storytellers, a 
senes of seven dramatized 
short stones (2) Angel, 
by John Robert King. Wrtfi 
June Barrie. Based on 
Chekhov short story (s) 

450 News 4.05 The Local 
Network (new series) 

Paul Hemey hosts an 
examination of an issue 


of the moment as n affects 

locations across tite 
British Isles, using the skats 
of the BBC Local Radio 
network 

4.30 Kaleidoscope. Another 
chance to hear last 
night's edition of the arts 
magazine. 

550 PM: News magazine. 

5.50 Shipping Forecast 
555 Weather 

6.00 News; Financial Report 
650 Jarvis's Frayn. A 
series of unguarded 
observations by Michael 
Frayn. Alt the roles ere 
played by Martin Jarvis. 

7.00 News 7.05 The Archers 

750 The Road To Jerusalem. 

Carole Rosen examines 
the reasons for the upsurge 
of religicus and political 
interest in the Holy Land 

850 Medicine Now. Geoff 
Watts on ttie health of 
medical care 

850 The Tuesday Feature; 
Andalusia - Land of 
Flamenco. Trader Faulkner 
traces the history of 
Falmenco which has its 
origins in the gipsy 
population of southern 
Spam. 

9.00 to Touch. For people with 
a visual handicap 

950 More Wrestling Than 
Dancing. David Moreau 
recollects attempts to come 
to grips with life (4) That 
Cat that Loves Dogs 

945 Kaleidoscope. 10.15 A 
Book At Bedtime: The 
Battle of Pollock's Crossing 
(21. Read by Keith 
Drmkel. 1059 Weather 
1050 The World Tonight 11.15 
The Financial World 
Tonight 11 50 Today to 
Parliament 1250 News; 
Weather. 1253 Shipping 
Forecast 
VHF (available in England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except: 555650am Weather: 
TraveL 1.55- 2.00 pm 
Listening Comer. 5505.55 
PM (continued). 11-30- 
12.10 Open University. 11.30 
Open Forum; Students' 
Magazine. 11.50 Science: 
Energy Accounting 


( Radio 3 ) 

On medium wave. VHF stereo 
variations at the end of Radio 3 
listings. 


65S» weather. 750 News 
755 Telemann (Overture in 
C). Faure (Barcarolle No 
• 12 m Eilat and BarcaroBe 
No 5; Crossley .piano). 

Bruch (Swedish Dances. Op 
63). Mendelssohn (War 
March of the Priests). 8.00 
News 

855 Concert (contd): Copland 
( El Salon Mexico). 

Haydn (Piano Too in C. H XiV 
Ci ), Debussy 1 La bone a 


Cl ), Debussy | 
rpujoux)-9.00 
This Week's C 


955 This Week's Composer 
Bartok. Violin Concerto 
No 1; Kyung-Wha chung and 
Chicago SO), Piano 
Concerto No 2 : Po/llni and 
Chicago SO) 

10.00 English Choral Music: 

BBC Singers. Pearsall 
songs including Lay a 
garland and Three Glees, 
and works by Samuel 
Arnold. John Hatton, 
Stanford! The biue bird). 
Elgar, and Seiber 

1050 Medici Stnng Quartet 
Haydn (Ouartei m G. Op 
76 No 1). Kodaly (Quartet No 
2 ) 

11.10 Scarlatti end Seixas: 

Virginia Black 

(harpsl chord fplays works 
including Seixes's 
Toccata in D minor and 
Sonata in A major, and 
Scarlatti's Sonata in C minor, 
Kk363 and in B minor, 

Kfc40B 

1145 Phyllis Tate: Fairey 

Engineering Works Band 
play Illustrations 

1250 BBC Welsh SO (under 
Lough ran). With John LiU 
(piano).Part 1 . Mozart (Magic 
Flute overture). Brahms 
(Pieno Concerto No 1). 150 
News 

155 Concert part two. 

Dvorak (Symphony No 6) 

155 Guitar Encores: Roberto 
Aussel plays Weiss's 
Suite XXV, and Giuliani's 
Grande Ouverture 

245 Chicago SO (under 
Staltin, Kubelik and 
Lemsdori). Respighi (Festa 
romane), Roy Harris 
(Symphony No 5). Martmu 
(Symphony No 4) 

255 Cncket Final morning s 
play in the Fourth Test. 

On medium wave until 555. 

550 Mainly for Pleasure: 
recorded music 
selection .presented by Brian 
Kay 

650 Viva I'amore: songs and 
dances from Italy m the 
14th century. The composers 
include Landini, 

Vincent us de Arimino, 

Andrea da Firenze and 
M agister Piero. Performed 
by Landini Consort 

7.00 Fine Arts Ensemble: 

John Joubert (Chamber 
Music). John Casken (Clarion 
Sea) 

750 BBC Philharmonic (under 
Bernhard Kiee).W!th 
Eifene Hannan (soprano). 
Boys of Manchester 
Grammar School. Parti. 

Berg (Three fragments 
from Wozzeck) 

750 Five Notes after a Visit 
Anne Devfln reads her 
own story 

8.10 Concert part two. 

Bruckner (Symphony No 


955 The Geor 


eorgics: Virgil’s 
poem.rsad by John 
Franklyn-Robblns (2). Trees 
and Vines 

1050 Jazz Today: Charles Fox 
presents Nouvelle 


Cuisine 

1150 VenehBn Baroque: 

Raglan Baroque Players, 
with ins: rumen taiists. Vivaldi 
(Concerto m G, Alla 
Rustica. RV 151). Albinoni 
(Concerto in G. Op 9 No 
6 lor two oboes) and 
Vivaldi 3 Concerto in G 
major lor two VKJlins. RV 156 
1155 Another World- South 
Indian music played by L 
Subramsnism (violin) and V 
Kanalakar Rao 
(mndangam). Rage 
Mohanam 

1157 News. 12.00 Closedown. 

VHF only:0pen University.From 
6.35 to 6.55am. Modem art 4-00 
Peter Bitheil (piano). Haydn 
(Sonata in G. H XVI Stand Brahms 
(Variations and Fugue on 
HandBl theme). 455 News 

C Radio 2 ) 

On medium wave. For VHF 
stereo, see Radio 1. 

News on me hour. Headlines 
550am, 6.30pm, 750 and 850. 
4.00am Colin Berry (S) 550 Ray 
Moore (s) 750 Derek Jameson (S) 
950 Ken Bruce (s) 1150 Jimmy 
Young (plus medic a! questions 
answered by Dr Mike Smith (s) 
1.05pm David Jacobs IS) 250 
Gloria Hunniford [sj 350 David 
Hamilton (s) 555 John Dunn (s) 

750 Bob Hotness 
presents... (new series] (s) 9.55 
Sports Desk 1050 The Law 
Game. Shaw Taylor. David 
Hamilton, Anna Carteret and 
Martin Janns 10.30 Dealing With 
Daniels Paul Darnels, witn 
Patrick Moore. Fem Britton and 
Tim Brooke-Taylor 11.00 Bnan 
Matthew presents Round Midnight 
1.00am Charias Nove (s) 3.00- 
4.00 A Little Night Music (5). 

( Radio 1 ) 

6.00am Adrian John 7.30 Mike 
Read 950 Simon Bates 12.3opm 
Newsbeat (Frank Partridge) 

12.45 Gary Davies 350 Steve 
Wright 5.30 News beat (Frank 
Partndge) 5.45 Bruno Brookes mcL 
at 650 a review of the Tcp 40 
singles chart 7.30 Janice Long 
1050-1250 John Peel (s) 


WORLD SERVICE 


6.00 NewsdesK 6-30 Counurpmt 750 
News 759 Twenty-Four Hours 750 
Behind me Credits 7.45 Network UK 850 
News 859 Reflections 9.15 Training lor 
Tomorrow 2850 Opera By Instalments 

9.00 News 9.15 The Wot Id Today 950 
Financial News 940 Look Ahead 9.45 
What's New 1050 News 1051 Discovery 
1150 News 1159 News About Britan 
11.15 Waveguide 1i_as Letter Irom Scot- 
land 1150 Sports tmemanonal 1250 
Ratio Newsreel 12.15 Albert Sammons 
12.45 Sports Roundup 150 News 1.09 
Twenty-Four Hours 150 Network UK 1.45 
Recording the Week 250 Outlook 2.45 
English Song 350 Radio Newsreel 115 A 
jotty Good Show 450 News 459 Com- 
mentary 4.15 Omnibus 5.45 Sports 
Roundup 745 Report on fle*gian 450 
News 859 Twenty Four Hours 850 
Oimbus 9.00 News 951 Ortana 9.10 
Book Choca 9.15 Concert Hall 1050 
News 1059 The World Today 1055 A 
Letter From Scotland 1050 Financial 
News 10.40 Reflections 10.45 Spoils 
Roundup 1150 News 11-09 Commentary 
11.15 The Classic Albums 1150 Albert 
Sammons 12.00 News 1259 News About 
Bnum 12.15 Radio Newsreel 1250 
OfliiHbus 150 News 151 Outlook 150 
Report on Religion 145 Country Style 

2.00 News 256 Review o( the British 
Press 2.15 Guitar Interlude 250 Pride and 
Prejudice 350 News 3.15 The World 
Today 445 Financial News 455 Reflec- 
tions 550 World News 559 Twenty-Four 
House 546 The World TooayJUl ttnea In 
GMT. 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1053kHz/285m;lOB9kHz/275m; Radio 2: 693kHz/433m; 909kH/433m; Radio 3: 1215kHz/247m: VHF -90- 
92J5; Radio 4: 200kHz 1500m: VHF -92-95; LBC: 1152kHz/261m; VHF 97.3; Capital: 1548kHz/194m: VHF 95.8; BBC Radio London 
1458kHz/20&n: VHF 943; World Service MF 648kHz/463m. 


WALES 5554LoljWida& Today 
655-750 Rmg Second BeM950- 
1050 Week hi Week Out 1050-1050 
Hideway 1050-11.40 God 11.40- 
12.10 Flm 88 with Michael Pnridnsoa 

Femuras ‘A Room withe View' star- 

ring Maggie Smith. Denholm BfioR and 
Habra Borttem Carter, and sane 
mayoral election m Southern CaNkxnta 
contested by Cfint Eastwood. 
I2.l0mt-I2.l5 News and Weather. 

SCOTLAND iasOnro-1150 Dctsman 

OS-7 50pm Reportna Scotland, regional 

news magaxma 1050-1050 The 
West Highland Way 1050-1 1.1 5 Mlerrt 
Vice 11.15-1145 Frim 86 1145-1150 

Weather. NORTHB1N IRELAND 555pm- 

540 Today s Sport 540-850 Inside 

LHster. Regional raws magazine 655- 

750 Charles m Charge 12.10am- 
12.15 News and weattxr. ENGLAND: 

EAST irMptn-1250 East on Two 
65Spm-750 Regxmal news magazine- 

CHANNEL ataa-SL^ 

1050-1055 Cartoon 11.00-1150 

RretMfl XL5 150pn News 150-250 

Cauttry Practice 5.15-545 Sons end 

Deughtera 950 Channel Report 650 

Oassic Themes 650-750 Cross- 
roads 1240am Closedown. 

TSW A* London except 9L25em 
JLSSL Sesame Street 1055-1055 Fpo 
Foo 1155-1150 Fireball XL5 
1250pm-150 WKRP in Qndratti 150 

News 150-250 Fifty Fifty 359-450 
Sons and Daughters 5.15 Gus Honeytiun 
550-545 Cttwsroeds 550 Today 

South West B5S Televiews 650 

EmmerdaJe Famt 750-750 People 

do the FUnnlest Thmgs 850-0.00 T J 

Hooker 1240sni Postscript, 

Qosedown. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


GRANADA 

an Fofc Tates 955 lea Skattig 10.15- 
1056 Lmie Resets 11JX} Cartoon 1 1 .OS- 
II 50 Matt and Jenny 150pm 
Granada Reports 1JB Scarecrow and 
Mrs King 255-250 Home Cookery 
350-U9 Sons and Daughters 650 Gra- 
nada Reports 650 This is Your Right 
855-750 Crossroads 1£40am 
Closedown. 

BORDER&g^*^ 

1050-1055 Cartoon 1150 The Rida 
1155-1150 Cartoon 150pm News 150- 
250 Fifty Fifty 350-450 Sons end 
Daughters 650 Looks round 655-750 
Crossroads 850450 Hotel 12.40am 
Closedown. 

1055-1055 Cartoon 1150-1150 
FabUous Funrues I250pm-150 Grade ns 
for AII1.S) News 150-250 The Bar- 
on 5.15-545 Emmerdaie Farm 550 About 
AngBa 555 Crossroads 7.00-750 
Moutfmap 1240mn Tuesday Topic, 
Closedown. 

HTVWESTg^ar^ 

955-1055 Sinbad Voyage 1150- 
1 1 55 WHd Wtorld of Annals 1 50pra 
News 150-250 The Baron 650 
Nows 555-750 Crossroads 850-950 
Mutder. She Wrote 1240em 
Closedown. 

Htv wales sas, 

955 Cartoon 650pm-65S Wales at 
Six. 


GRAMPIAN As London e*- 
otWHiriHn eepb 855em Fro 

Thmg 950 Sesame Street 1055- 
1035 Cartoon 1150-1150 Terrahawks 
1250pm- 150 Gardening Time 150 
News 150-250NewAvengars6-15-S45 
Emmerdaie Farm 650 Norm Tonight 
555 Crossroads 750-750 Shammy Dab 
850-950 Hotel 1240em News. 
Closedown. 

TVS ** London except 958am 
1 Sesame Street 1050-1055 Car- 
toon 1150-1150 Fireball XL5 
15&pm News 150-250 Couitry Practice 
5-15-545 Sons and Daughters 850 

Coast to Coast 555 Police 5 655-750 
Crossroads 1240am Company, 

Closedown. 

central 

rows of Robm Hood 1150 Home 
Cookery 1155 About Britan 1150-1250 
Blockbusters I250p»-150 Garden- 

ing Time 150 News 150-250 Afternoon 
Playhouse 6.00 Crossroads 655- 

7.00 News 1240am Closedown. 

S4C 15tora Countdown 150 Al- 
-■ Ice 250 Ftsfabatem 2.15 Interval 
256 Wednesday Club 155 Shaka- 
spesra Lnes 455 Bewftched 455 Hanner 
Awr Fawr 550 Car 54, Where Are 
You? 650 WtostonChurchOI- The Val- 
iant Years 650 DJI DFwyd 645 
Sue Siarad 7.00 NewyckBon Sanh 750 
Rygbi 8.40 Byd Y Crafftwr 9.15 
Aowyd 10.10 leau Ddoa A Heddlw 1040 
Well Bang 1155 Film: Frankenstein 

Meets The Wolf Man 12.45am 

Closedown. 


. 955am Sesame Street 
1055-10.35 Cartoon 1150 Sport Bil- 
ly 1150-1150 Cattoon 150pm Lunch- 
time 150-250 Han to Hart 130-450 
Horses tor Courses 5.00 Good Evening 
Ulster 655 Oary Dates 535-750 
Crossroads 850-950 Falcon Crest 
1240nmNews. Closedown 


icepr 955am 
Groovfp Ghoulies 950 Matt and Jen- 
ny 10.10-1055 Terranawks 11.00-1155 
Under me Mountavt 1250pm-150 
Calendar Luncntlme Live 150 News 150- 
250 Riptide 350-450 Coumry Prac- 
nce 500 Calendar 535-750 Crossroads 
12.40am Closedown 


TYNE TEES London «»• 

1 ' nc 1 cepe 95£am News 

950 Sesame Street 1050 Doug 
Henning Magic Speoeis 11. 20- 11 50 Car- 
toon l5opm News 150 Scarecrow 
Mrs Ktng 


and Mrs King 255-230 Home Cookery 
650 Northern Life 535-750 Cross- 
roads 850-9.00 Hotel 12.40am Lnmg 
Dust 1250 Closedown. 

SCOTTISH As London ex- 
OL4 J I I tan ^ 855am Sesame 


SItb« 1055-1055 Blue Knight 
1150-1155 Straggle Beneatn the Sea 
1250po-1.00 Gardening Tone 350- 
450 Sons and Dauontert 5.15-545 
Emtnardale Farm 650 News and 
Scotland Today 655 Crossroads 750- 
750 Take the High Road 850450 
Murder. She Wrote 1240am La» Cal. 
Closedown. 


VT 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


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OPERA & BALLET 


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pleasurable evemns 

WHERE IM LONDON - OR THE 
WORLD “S EvpriKv 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY APRIL 8 1986 


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SPORT 



ooch row 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent. Port of Spain, Trinidad 



Mr Donald Carr, secretary 
of the Test and County Crick- 
et Board tTCCBl. spent yes- 
terday morning here closeted 
with Tony Brown, manager of 
the England team, discussing 
Graham Gooch's reluctance 
to go to Antigua tomorrow. 
At different times they were 
joined by Gooch himself and 
David Gower, captain of the 
side. 

Gooch has an obsession he 
is determined to exorcize. 
There are three points he is 
wanting to make concerning 
Mr Lester Bird the Foreign 
Minister of Antigua. They are 
that Mr Bird did not force an 
apology out of him concern- 
ing his visit to South Africa in 
19S2: that he does not regret 
the circumstances in which he 
went to South Africa with the 
rebel side, as Mr Bird has 
said: and that although he has 
no intention of "seeking any 
similar opportunity to play 
crickeL in South Africa." this 
does not mean that he intends 
never to so there again, if. on 
these counts, he ~i$ refused 
permission to put the record 
straight, he is saving that he 
will not return to Antigua. 

Whether in the end his 
stand, based on obstinacy or 
principle according to how 
you look at iL will jeoparadize 
his Test future remains to be 
seen. To some extent the 
TCCB are themselves respon- 


sible Tor the dilemma, having 
put words into Gooch's 
mouLh last summer which he 
would rather not have spo- 
ken. They probably regret 
that now. as Gooch may * 'ell 
regret his decision to m :e 
the tour. 

Ian Botham, meanwhile, is 
having nothing to say about 
further allegations concerning 
his private habits, nor is Mr 
Brown other than to confirm 
that the TCCB will be looking 
into recent charges of drug 
taking. Already the Board 
must be wondering whether 
for the last four of five years 
they ha% e had the wool pulled 
over their eyes. In 1984. when 
they investigated charges of 
drug taking made against Bob 
Willis's side on their return 
from New Zealand and Paki- 
stan. my impression was that 
if the truth was bad they 
would rather not believe it. ' 

Being larger than life, 
Botham attracts strong feel- 
ings. both of aw e and outrage. 
Some of the things written 
about him on this tour have 
been enough to drive anyone 
to drugs. But the TCCB would 
be on dangerous ground if. 
now. they were to suspend 
him on the strength of a sieezy 
campaign. After their investi- 
gations' two years ago they 
stated that they had found 
"no evidence of any off-the- 
flcld behaviour which ad- 


Master steerer 


Colombo (Reuter) - A 
captain's innings of 68 by 
.laved Miandad sieea'd Paki- 
stan. to a ihrifiing four-wicket 
win over New Zealand and 
victory in a three-nation limit- 
ed overs cricket tournament 
yesterday. Set a target of 214 
in 42 overs. Pakistan scored 
217 for six to win with eight 
balls to spare in the final 
match of the competition. 
They were declared winners 
because of a higher run rate 
than New Zealand and hosts 
Sri Lanka after each side had 
won and lost a match. 

Miandad. captain in the 
absence of the injured Imran 
Khan. who has a leg muscle 
strain, played impeccably af- 
ter Macassar Nazar and 


Mohsin Khan. the openers, 
had both departed with only 
42 runs on the board. 
Miandad hit five fours and 
when he went, bowled by 
Martin Snedden. Pakistan 
were 173 for five and within 
sight of victory. 

Mansoor Elahi.the all- 
rounder. slammed rwo sixes 
off Snedden in the (39th over 
before being caught by Martin 
Crowe at backward square leg 
for 27 off the New Zealander's 
next over to leave Pakistan 
206 for six. 

SCORES: New Zealand; 214 tor S 
(M D Crowe 75. J J Crowe 42. Kamal 
4 for 47]. Pakistan: 217 for 6 (Javed 
Miandad 68. Salim Malik 32. 
Snedden 2 for 56.) Pakistan won by 
4 wickets. 


t ersely affected performances 
on the field.” On the present 
tour there have been, if 
anything, fewer grounds for 
suspicion. 

TTie Board's warnings con- 
cerning drug-taking have not 
gone unheeded. Other things 
have gone horribly wrong, 
some, certainly, through a 
want of discipline. After 
Saturday's heavy defeat there 
were few signs of contrition 
ftofn the captain, and the 
stage has been reached when 
excuses are being too readily 
sought. The team may indeed 
have drifted through the Ca-. 
ribbean: but I doubt whether 
behind the doors of the tour 
any widespread evidence 
could be found to concern a 
solicitor. 

There being word from 
Antigua of heavy rains - Mr 
Carr's plane was not able to 
land there on Sunday evening 
- the team have abandoned 
plans to proceed there today, 
24-hours earlier than sched- 
uled. Instead they will prac- 
tice here today, as they did 
yesterday. They are looking 
forward, all the same, to 
leaving Trinidad, to shake the 
dust of defeat out of their 
clothes. With no welcome 
from the Government, cer- 
tain restrictions imposed 
upon their movements and 
the aggravation of the anti- 
apartheid demonstrations, 
such as they have been, it is 
not a place they have grown to 
love. 

• Gus Logie, the Trinidad 
batsman, comes back into the 
West Indies squad for the 
fifth Test match which starts 
in Antigua on Friday, Logie, 
aged 25. replaces the Jamai- 
can fast bowler Courtney 
Walsh in the squad of 12. 

SQUAD: C G Green id ge, D L 
Haynes. R B Richardson, H A 
Gomes. *1 V A Richards. A L Lowe. 
|P J Dujon, R A Harper, M D 
Marshall, M A Holding, J Gamer, B 
P Patterson. 

Goodyear 

Warwickshire made a record 
profit of £89.01 5 last year, with 
income exceeding £1 million for 
the first time. The annual report 
reveals that the dub have spent 
£500.000 over the last two years 
in developing Edgbaston as a 
Test centre. 



it 


?■ 'r - ^ -\.j. .;•* \- v *y: . * ‘ •• ; . . - 


Floating on air: Kevin Correa takes off on bis way to beating bis fellow American Tim WHkison in fee final of the W CT championships in Atlanta 

Expert cooks waiting for hire 


Ken Fletcher and Frew Mc- 
Millan won a combined total 
of 22 doubles championships 
in grand slam tournaments, 
with such partners as Roy 
Emerson, John Kewcombe, 
Bob Hewitt. Margaret Court 
and Betty Stove. Both have 
homes in England and have 
reached ages at which their 
future lies in coaching, club 
management, or related roles. 
In ih"e first of two articles 
discussing what they did and 
what they learned. Rex Bella- 
my, our Tennis Correspon- 
dent explains the dilemma 
they pose for the Lawn Tennis 
.Association. 

How much are the upper 
crust of doubles champions 
worth as coaches, and how can 
they best be fitted into a 
nation's existing coaching pro- 
gramme? Those questions are 
currently under review by the 
Lawn Tennis Association, 
particularly by Paul Hutchins, 
head of the training develop- 
ment and Ian Peacock, execu- 
tive director. 

Two such former champi- 
ons are available: Ken Fletch- 
er (Australia) and Frew 
McMillan (South Africa). Re- 
nowned doubles specialists of 
the 1960s and 1970s, they are 
now in their 40s and want to 
pass on the wisdom acquired 
in more than a decade of life at 
the top. Their relevance to the 
LTA is that Fletcher is based 
at Slough and McMillan at 
Bristol. 


When it comes to benefiting 
from the proximity of so much 
expertise, the LTA has a two- 
part problem. Two former 
British Davis Cup players, 
Mark Cox and Richard Lewis, 
are already working with the 
LTA. Two more, Roger Tay- 
lor and Busier Mottram, are 
free to expand their coaching 
programme in Britain and 
would be especially effective, 
Hutchins considers, in work- 
ing with national players on 
an individual basis. Would 
more cooks spoil the broth, or 
improve it? 

The other half of the LTA 
problem is how much they 
could afford to pay Fletcher 
and McMillan (and how of- 
ten) without insulting Cox and 
Lewis. Taylor and Mottram. 
One-time international celeb- 
rities who move on from 
playing to coaching tend to 
ask £1,000 or more for a 
week’s work. Whether they 
should be accepted at their 
own valuation is an open 
question. Great players do not 
automatically make great 
coaches. 

“I am discussing with Ian 
Peacock the whole question of 
hiring international players," 
Hutchins says, “but I would 
like to get Mark, Richard, 
Roger and Buster involved 
before anybody else. I am 
renegotiating with Mark and 
Richard and I am also talking 
to Roger and Buster. I prefer 
someone we can get on a 


consistent basis. We already 
have a big coaching staff and 
there is a string of British 
players I would like to use 
more. There is no reason why 
I can't use Frew or ‘Retch’, 
but the finance needs to be 
settled.” 

Sweden importing 
foreign coaches 

The LTA will be in no 
position to assert that Fletcher 
and McMillan are too expen- 
sive until offers have been 
made to them — and rejected. 
The size of any such offers 
would presumably be condi- 
tioned by the terms agreed 
with Cox, Lewis, Taylor and 
Mottram. One possible role 
for Fletcher and McMillan 
could lie in week-long doubles 
“camps” at the Bisham Abbey 
national training centre, 
where they could complement 
the work of the regular coach- 
ing corps. Sweden provides a 
parallel by occasionally im- 
porting coaches. The conve- 
nient difference in the cases of 
Fletcher and McMillan is that 
there is no need for Britain to 
import them. For much of the 
year they live dawn the M4. 
And both, sc to speak, became 
English by marriage. 

Fletcher, aged 45, first went 
on tour in 1959. The company 
of such players as Emerson, 
Rod Laver and Neale Eraser 


was good for his tennis but 
bad for his Davis Cup pros- 
pects. In J964 the five leading 
Australian “amateurs” had a 
row with their national associ- 
ation. Fletcher later emigrated 
to Hong Kong (where he bad 
close family friends). Bob 
Hewitt to South Africa, and 
Martin Mulligan to Italy. 

From 1962 to 1968 Fletcher 
'did wdl in grand slam singles: 
one Australian finaL three 
Wimbledon quarter-finals; 
and two French quarter-finals. 
But it was in doubles that be 
left his mark. Fletcher shared 
the Wimbledon and French 
men’s championships and 
reached seven other grand 
slam finals In the mixed 
event he won 10 grand slam 
titles with Margaret Coon 

Fletcher retired after the 
1969 season and engaged in a 
variety of business, ventures 
before becoming manager of 
the three-court Slough Indoor 
Tennis Centre m September, 
1984. 

McMillan, aged 43, married 
a former show-jumper .and 
almost a decade ago they 
decided feat her home city,' 
Bristol was the best location 
for fee children’s education. 
Most of his income is still 
derived .from playing tourna- 
ments, nowadays on fee 35- 
and-over circuit He also 
broadcasts, appears as a guest 
celebrity at a variety of fime- 
tions, and conducts doubles 
“dinks” mainly in fee Unit- 


ed States. “There is a 
marker for ft”, he says, “but it 
means living in the Sates oral 
least spending more time 
here”. 

. From 1966 to 19&L McMil- 
lan shared 10 doublesriiles- 
five men’sand five mixed -in « 
grand slam champtaoslups 
and made six other appear- 
ances in mixed finals. Is . 
December, . 1966. he -joined . 
Hewitt for an unbeaten run of 
more than 50. matches. They ' . 
did not lose a set - and 
McMillan did not lose ' a' 
service game *-al Wimbledon 
in (967, when McMillan be- 
came fee first player beftn ut 
South Africa to-4hare fee 
men’s doubles Title. 

McMillan played Davis' 

Cup tennis from 1965 to 1978, 
winning his only ftra tingjtes 
matches and acctmmfating a 
22-5 record in doubles. Wife 
Hewftt. he played 16 Davis 
Cup doubles and lost :only 
one: coincidentally.: fear wqs 
in McMillan's adopted home 
city, Bristol, where Cox and 
Peter Curtis frustrated fee.. 
South African.pair in 1969.; ... 

- Their presence -in England 
may - be . something of an . 
embarrassment to fee LTA, 
but k is the kind of embarrass-- 
toent any - national associa-; 
dons should welcome. 

• Tomorrow - Fletcher and 
McMQhra discuss;, doubles, 
thepartners -of their peak ■=.- 
yetrs. and fee tenuis scene bin. 
Brib&a. ■ ■ ■- 


ATHLETICS: BRITISH ADMINISTRATION CRITICIZED FOR STANCE ON DRUGS 



testing gets under way 


By Pat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent 


The administration of 
Britain's athletes, some of 
whom, like Dale) - Thompson. 
Steve Cram. Sebastian Coe 
and Tessa Sanderson are 
among the most successful in 
ihe world, could soon find 
itself at loggerheads with the 
International Amateur Athlet- 


ic Federation (IAAF). the 
world governing body for the 
sport. Perhaps surprisingly to 
some people who see athletics 
currently moving rather prob- 
lematically from an amateur 
to a professional era. the issue 
is not money. It is drugs. 

When the British Amateur 



Athletic Board announced its 
random oul-of-season drug 
testing yesterday morning. Sir 
Arthur Gold, president of the 
European Athletic Associa- 
tion and Board member re- 
vealed that IAAF president Dr 
Primo Nebiolo had written to 
him criticizing his hard-line 
stance on drugs, “and saying 
that my attitude cannot be 
accepted in future. Presum- 
ably he’s trying to muzzle 
me”. 

Sir Arthur believes athletes 
found to have cheated by 
taking proscribed drugs 
should be banned for life. 
Current IAAF policy is to 
reinstate drug offenders after 
18 months. The most recent 
reinstatement, known to have 
angered British international 
afeletes. is feat of Martti 
Vainio, the Finn who, after a 
positive dope test, lost his 
Olympic silver medal which 
was awarded instead to Mike 
McLeod, of Great Britain. 


The further bannings of 
Ludmilla Andonova of Bul- 
garia, Zdenka Silhava of 
Czechoslovakia and fee re- 
cently-reinstated Tatyana 
Kazankina of the Soviet 
Union, all world record-hold- 
ers, is only an indication of the 
incidence of drug-taking 
among top international ath- 
letes. As Sir Arthur reiterated 
yesterday. “those delected in 
competition are either careless 
or ill advised.” It is widely 
known that competitive aid 
from drugs is maintained after 
the traces in the body can be 
detected. Hence fee instiga- 
tion by the BAAB of the 
random out-of-season testing. 

More than 90 per cent of 
Britain's current and potential 
international athletes have al- 
ready ‘volunteered’ to be 
placed on the random sam- 
pling register of athletes, with 
fee penalty for omission from 
the register being withdrawal 
from future selection. 


GOLF: BRITISH PLAYER SHOWS UNIQUE INGREDIENT IN US 

Lyle the master eyes Masters 


From Mitchell Platts, Augusta, Georgia 


; » 


Two years before he won 
the Open Championship some 
of Sandy Lyle's closest friends 
found it hard to take him 
seriously. The trouble was that 
Lyle accepted defeat wife such 
ease and grace that there 
seemed to be a dangerous 
chink in his competitive 
make-up. 

When he lost an 1 1-stroke 
lead in fee European Masters 
in 1983 and missed a 2‘A-foot 
pun to lose fee play-off to 
Nick Faldo he shrugged his 
shoulders and went for a beer. 
. Yet it is that almost unique 
ingredient as far as a golfer is 


13 under par, and a two-stroke 
win over Andy Bean. 

The glory and fee $90,000 
fust prize might have slipped 
from his grasp as early as the 
second hole, where he wiklly 
booked his drive 40 yards 
deep into fee wood. 

Lyle slightly pulled his es- 
cape attempt off fee intended 
line and the ball struck a 
photographer and stopped be- 


hind other trees. Lyle content- 
ed himself wife a quick “Oh, 
come on” and continued with- 
out losing his concentration or 
composure. 

The six feat Lyle took at the 
second was fee only blemish 
on his card. He holed' from 
five feet and 12 feet at the 
ninth and I Oth respectively, 
crucial putts as Bean had 
birdies at four boles in succes- 


sion from the eighth, and 
came to the last requiringapar 
four to win. 

Lyle did rather better than, 
that by confidently hohng' 
from 15 feet for a birdie and 
Bean was the first to congrats 
late him. The next logical step 
in Lyle’s rise to famets fortim 
to win fee United States--; 
Masters, which starts at Au- 
gusta tomorrow. 


Ray’s day ends on a high pitch 


Masters course profile, p38 


concerned which assisted Lyle 
to his latest triumph here in 
the United States. He gained 
his first official United States 
PGA tour win with a last 
round of 70 in fee Greater 
Greensboro Open for a win- 
ning aggregate of 275, which is 


David Ray, winner of fee 
Lowndes Lambert PGA un- 
der-25 championship two 
years ago, the last time ft was 
held, made long strides to- 
wards achieving fee same 
distinction at Simningdaie 
yesterday (John Hennessy 
writes). 

Undaunted by fee presence 
of Ronan Rafferty, an Irish 
World Cup player, Ray played 
the first of fee two rounds in 


67, three under par, to estab- 
lish a lead of four strokes over 
Mark Roe. Rafferty, the strong 
favourite in view of his pedi- 
gree, languished eight strokes, 
behind on 7S. 

Ray's day began, unpromis- 
ingly with a penalty drop at 
the first (494 yards), where his 
ball lodged knee-high in a 
bush and be was denied fee 
possible birdie, downwind, 
but only once did he surrender 


a stroke to par, when his 2- 
tron was an insufficient dub - 
for the 226-yard 15th. 

Otherwise he rose splendid- 
ly above appalling conditions 
pnd came home in a rock-solid . 
■finish. He made a good-mr : 
four against fee wind at fee 
demanding I6fe, booked a~5- 
iron from among the trees.fof . 
an improbable three ' ar the . 
17th and pitched to three feet . 
for his par at the last. V 


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TABLE TENNIS 

England in 
top form 

From a Special 
Correspondent 

England completed six vic- 
tories on the third day of the 
European Championships 
here in Prague yesterday, wife 
promotion back to category 
one al Ihe first attempt as- 
sured if they beat either Italy 
or Denmark this morning. 

While England's Desmond 
Douglas, the European No. 4, 
looks fresh and fit for the 
individual events to come — 
he easily beat Scottish No. 1, 
David Hannah. 21-12. 21-13 
- some of his main rivals 
were spilling blood to survive. 

The European No. 1, Jan- 
Ove Waldner. surprisingly 
beaten in straight games by 
Boris Rozenberg. had to extri- 
cate himself 22-20 in the final 
game against Andrei 
Mazunov before Sweden, the 
favourites for the team title, 
beat the Soviet Union 5-3. 

In contrast Tiber Klampar. 
the former European No. I. 
won two contests and led 19- 
16 in the final game of a third 
before losing to Patrick 
Birocheau. That gave France, 
the title-holders, a 5-3 win 
over Hungary, their 
predecessors. 




Sibson’s 
new foe 

Tony Sibson, the Common- 
wealth middleweight champi- 
on, has a new opponent for his 
contest al the Royalty The- 
atre, London, on April 16. 
Sibson will free Luis Rivera, a 
top-ranked .American from 
Miami. If he is successful 
Sibson has the prospect of 
meeting Roberto Duran, the 
former world welterweight 
champion, later this year. 
Sibson's original opponent. 
Alex Ramos, also from fee 
United States, pulled out after 
sustaining an injury in 
training 

Tie-breaker 

Kevin Cuiren. of the United 
States, beat his compatriot, 
Tim Wilkison. in the final of 
the WCT championships in 
Atlanta on Sunday. Curran, 
the fourth seed, won both sets 
on tie-breaks. 

Title retained 

Hilario Zapata, aged 27. of 
Panama, retained his World 
Boxing Association flyweight 
title when he beat Shuichi 
Hozumi. of Japan, on a unani- 
mous points decision over 1 5 
rounds in Nirasaki. Japan. 


SPORT. IN BRIEF'.;',;-'' 



fV - • 

Sibson: Rivera bout 

Wallace goes 

Rangers yesterday an- 
nounced feat Jock Wallace, 
their manager, has left them 
“by mutual agreement” and 
that they have entered into 
negotiations wife Sampdoria 
for the transfer of Graeme 
Souness. who is to be offered 
the post of player-manager. 

Lloyd wins 

Chris Lloyd played almost 
faultless tennis to beat Claudia 
Kohdc-Kilsch, of West Ger- 
many. and win fee Tourna- 
ment of Champions at Marcos 
Island. Florida, on Sunday. 


Wall too far 

Petat Wall, the former Liv- 
erpool player who is coach of 
the Los Angeles Lazers, has 
been fined £7.000 and sus- 
pended for four matches for 
incidents in a game against fee 
St Louis Steamers. He was 
fined for striking an official 
wife a missile, for instructing 
his players not to challenge 
their opponents and for com- 
municating wife them after 
being ejected from fee game. 

Cup referee 

Alan Robinson will referee 
fee FA Cup final between 
Liverpool and Everton at 
Wembley on May 10. Robin- 
son, aged 47. was in charge 
when fee two clubs met in fee 
1984 Milk Cup finaL which 
ended in a goalless draw, and 
fee replay at Maine Road, 
which Liverpool won 1-0. 

Cable bout 

Jimmy Cable, the former 
British and European light- 
middleweight champion, will 
meet Cliff Gilpin, of Wolver- 
hampton, at fee Royalty Tfte- 
atre, London, next 
Wednesday. Cable remains 
unbeaten in fee middleweight 
division and a win would put 
him in line for a meeting with 
Errol Christie. 


HOCKEY 


Point to ponder 


From Sydney Frisian 
Karachi 


Great Britain 

West Germany., 


Great Britain managed to 
hold West Germany to a draw 
in fee Champions Trophy 
tournament here yesterday, 
but two points did not leave 
them in a very happy position 
since fee Germans have 
earned five from as many 
games. 

As always. West Germany 
were made to fight for posses- 
sion by Britain^ tightly con- 
trolled defence. And the 
British attack had enough 
sharpness, when occasion de- 
manded, to' tax fee German 
defence along fee right flank 

Taylor was like a jack-in- 
the-box in fee British goal, 
rushing out at short comers to 
deny Fischer a dear shot at 
goal When the need arose be 
also had enough energy to 
dash to the top . of the circle 
and dispossess fee opposition. 
Martin had a superb game at 
right bade. 

. Twenty minutes Had passed 
and neither side had seized 
any of fee half-chances. But 
the Germans eventually took 
the lead in the 26th minute. 


Reck slamming in a 
shot after a centre from feel 
by Hilgers. - 

But. about a mmUtebeforr 
half-time; Britain were award- 
ed a penally stroke, the. result 
of Leman’s stick being hdd •- 
down in . front of goal. "by: ; 
Siawyk. Potter converted with ~ 
no hesitation to put BritaHiftir 
equal terms. . •..V-'V-.i 

Britain began fee second 
half by taking off McConnell, 
sending. Dufeie to left half and 
bringing on Imran Sherwanfat 
outside left „ ' : 

As the end 'drew near.-tbr- ; 
Germans threw everything 
into a concerted assault led by - 
Dopp who was twice stopped . 
in his tracks by Taylor. The 1 
last short comerof the maidL 
nearly produced a goaL/but , 
Dodds cleared off fee-fiat.- -• 
Australia, fee holders, .’beat 
India 3-0 to finish fee day-with . 
a. total of four points,, one 
behind West Germany. 

GREAT BRITAIN: I Taylor, S Martin. •" 
P Barter, J Pottsr, R DcxKfe.. Wr 
MeConnet (sub: I Shenwanl). . ° 
Batchelor fart: K Bhaura). fl L** 
man, S Ketiy, D Fsuftner, J Dutne- « 
WEST GERMANY: T Prank:. C ! 
Fischer, R Fastrich, M SJatfyb. N 
Metz, H Hurter {sub: H Dopp). f 
Schmktt-Oppel (sub: D BriMonann); 

V Hand. T Reck. S. Btochw, /.M 
Hflgers, ' 

Umpires: L Gfllet (France). B Prior 

(Australia).