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base rate falls 


>r hi 


The big four clearing banks 
cut the cost of borrowing for 
industry and consumers yes- 
terday with a surprise reduc- 
tion in their base lending rate. 
The reduction, it is. believed, 
will save industry £125 mfl- 
lion a year. - 

The pound remained strong 
on world currency markets 


. and there was increasing opti-. 
mism last night that a further 
fall in borrowing costs was 

* imminent, perhaps next week, 
j. National Westminster led 
[ the big bonks in cutting their 

base rates by half a percentage 
point to 1 1 pec cent in a swift 
reaction to at fail in general 
money market interest rates 
. : on Monday. Most experts had 
not expected a cm at least 
untilTomorrow. 

The nrove^ part of a round 
- of interest rate reductions in : 

' the world's leading .econo- 
mies, follows the weekend 
. realignment of currencies' in 
. the European , Monetary 
System. 

Sir James Geminson, presi- 
dent of the Confederation -of 
British Industry, commented 
on the speed of the 
Government's: reaction to the 
EMS changes," but : he' 
added“Our borrowing costs 
are still higher than those of 
our major competitors and we 
look forward id single-figure 
interest rates later tins year.** 

The rapid cut u> base rates 
was taken in the Gty as a sign 
that the authorities were deter- 
mined not to allow the pound 
to remain too strong! Analysts 
saw it as a reassuring indica- 
tion of the Government's 

* policy on exchange rates. . 


Optimism over lower inter- 
est rates did not prevent 
further weakness in the stock 
market where share prices fed 
back sharply in late tradin g 
. .undoing .small gains . in the 
morning.' 

■ The drop m . base rales wfi] 
not, however, mean an imme- 
diate reduction in mortgage 
rates, according to building 
societies. Mr John Bayltss, 
general manager of . Abbey 
National, the. second largest 
society, explained: “We dis- 
counted tins move when we 
cut our mortgage rales by 0.75 
per cent last month. We would 

need at least another one 
percentage point offbase rates 
before we were able to lower 
home-loan rates further.” 

One factor helping staling 
to remain firm . on world 
markets was the relatively 
steady, oil price. -The batch- 
mark North Sea Brent crude 
oil weakened only a few coats 
to around $14 a barrel for 
delivery in May. 

.Meanwhile, the dollar col- 
lapsed against most curren- 
cies, Jailing more, than five 
pfennigs to close . at 
DM2.3393. The pound rose 


BANK BASE RATE 


1985 :‘t986l 


2.5 cents against the dollar in 
London to close at $ l .4780. 

The dollar's weakness was 
attributed to an expected im- 
minent cut in the discount rate 
of its central bank, the Federal 
Reserve Board, of around half 
of one percentage point. 

.Dealers in London money 
markets also believed the 
dollar's weakness was due 
partly to reports from Wash- 
ington that finance ministers 
of the five largest industrial 
nations arc expected to agree 
to co-ordinate worldwide re- 
ductions in interest rates and 
to weaken the strengthening 
dollar. - 

Some dealers also claimed 
that the Bank of France, the 
central bank, was selling large 
amounts of dollars and buying 
marks to bolster the mark's 
position in the EMS. where ft 
had Mien to the bottom of its 
permitted trading range. 

Reductions are also antici- 
pated in Japanese . interest 
rates 

After the cut in base rates, 
the pound weakened against 
most European currencies, 
however, leaving its trade- 
weighted index, measured 
against a basket of currencies, 
unchanged from Monday at 
76.7. Sterling dropped five 
pfennigs against the mark to 
DM3.4548. 

On the stock market, prices 
rose initially after Monday's 
20-point fall on the FT 30- 
share index, but profit taking 
later in the day forced prices 
ftrrther down. The index 
dosed 15.1 points lower at 
1 ,385.8. 

Group of Five talks, page 21 


nd ? 

he J 

0n fi 
■P- i. 


v..- „ 


The wreckage of the helicopter which crashed killing six people near Banbury yesterday (Photograph: John Manning) 


Six die as 
helicopter 
crashes 
into hill 


Washington calls 
off underground 
nuclear blast test 


By Craig Setoa 


From Christopher Thomas, Washington 


The United States yesterday Both the White House and 
unexpectedly cancelled an un- die Slate Department insisted 


Union's eight-month unilater- with US-Soviet relations. Se- 
al moratorium on nuclear nior officials refused to offer 


testing 

The Department of Energy 


any explanation. 

Six members of the envi- 


refused to give an immediate ronmental group Greenpeace, 
explanation, but Adminisira- .Americans, were arrested 


hillside only 200 yards from 
booses at Swafdfffe, six miles 
from Banbnry, after narrowly 


by security guards in a heli- 
copter after entering the site 
illegally several days earlier. 


Tomorrow 


=>f nn 


‘Violent’ prisoner free 
after raid on hospital 


? ... 


m 



7 Z', ^ ByStewartTewlte; Crime Reporter 


Samuel Beckett, the 
playwright who 
made the absurd 
seem logical, is 
profiledby ■ 
Anthony Burgess . 


High society 
in oils 

James Fenton on John 
Singer Sargent, 
portrait painter 


h fi!;, 

* • r ■ 



Ari^extitemdy' dangennis';, veml 
high-security jni^er awmt- atten 
ingtrialifpr atttnipttt} murder Cam 
wason the tun last eight after of a 
beii^ (rod ljy a gang in a raid Affic 
on a west London hospital. non] 

- Alan Robert Knowlden, 1084 
aged 35, vitas freed by men Oi 
-axmad yrithiron bars, ammo- ■& ■-*. . 
ma and possiWy a shotgun 
shortly after dawn yesterday, f ” ' 
as he lay in a ward at St Mary’s 
HospitaL Paddington, where ; 
he was to ■receive surgery. ; 
Three prison officers were 
overpowered before Mr 
Knowlden . and his rescuers 
disappeared. V . 

As a watch on air and sea ■ 
sports be^i. Scotland Yard 
officers were 'expected to inter- 
view-the missing man’s wife, 
who visited him with two ■ 
others on Monday after he was ; 
brought from Wormwood M 

Scrubs prison for treatment on wi 

a fractured hose. v 

- The visit, in the presence of N 1 ? 
prison officers, was described 

by other patients in the ward mwl 
as long and loud. Officers were g* 3 
also investigating the 
prisoner’s move to hospital 


vembe^v charged witit the 
attempted murder, of Steven 
Gannon. The charge-aroseout 
of an incident al the Prince 
Alfred public house, Islington, 
north- London, in August 
1984. • ■ - 

On March 30 last, Mr 

bltf. 


The Dilot of a crashing unexpccicuiv tonccucu anun- me state ueparunent insisted 
helicopter which skimmed the demand nudear .‘f 1 , lhaI that any delay in the test had 
rooftops of an Oxfordshire H 1 " c &I&JSS connection the White 

vflbEe had straazkd at the l? 1 . 10 . 111 ® ® nd of ? e H °use meeting or. indeed, 

controls to avoid hitting Union s eight-month unilater- with US-Soviet relations. Se- 
hpnses before ft slammed into aI moratonum on nuclear nior officials refused to offer 
a field and burst into flames, lesuns - anv explanation, 

killing all six people oo board. The Department of Energy Six members of the cnvi- 

indodiog fonr children. refused to give an immediate ronmental group Greenpeace. 

Hie twin-engined French- explanation, but Adminisira- all .Americans, were arrested 
built Squirrel crashed into a lion sources attributed the in the early hours of yesterday 
hillside only 200 yards from delay to the weather. by security guards in a heli- 

booses at Swafctiffe, six miles News of the cancellation a ” er entedn 8 lhe ?ite 

from Banbnry, after narrowly came as Mr Mikhail ijlegnUy several days ea rlier. 
missing the 70ft high tower of Gorbachov, the Soviet leader Th 5*^ er lj^ n u U> *** VegaS 
the parish church. Villagers confirmed to President Rea- and cfaar ^ ecl wnh trespassing. 

said they had heard the gan that he was ready for a ■ — ■ ■■■■ 

helicopter's engines splntter summit in the US later this 

and cut out seconds before the year, although the two sides oUrtci turcat 
crash. continue to baggie about the Moscow (Renter) — Pmvda 

Among die dead were the da le said earlier that Washington's 

wife amt two sons of the ^ ^perpowers moved refusal to join Moscow's mora- 
heficopter’sownm; Mr Philip ctosertoa Yummit after a 75- t 9 n . n,n ®“ “^ T t * s ‘ s l . , S s 
Coasseus, a rauJo-milljoaaire, minule meelinB _ an hour B* vu, 8 the Soviet Union little 

2® was ^ n SZfZ* 00 longer than planned - be- choice but to resume them. 
*®*™J*®* TTm i helicopter was ^ president Reagan and 

owned by Mr Consseig scorn- An alo i y Dobrynin, the Greenpeace sard that anoih- 

pany, International Brok^ge oulgo j ng Soviet Ambassador er three members entered the 
► Virgiaia to Washington, which indud- huge site, most of which is 

ter, aprey, and was operaiea ^ discussions on .American unfenced, in a Jeep yesterday 
m tos behalf by McA&nne underground nuclear tests and and headed towards the area 
Hej icop ttra or Bayes, olher quesdons affecting su- of the planned explosion in 

Mrddtece*. perpowtr relations, tiic hope of creating a security 

A spokesman for Mc&Jp ice alert and thus causing a delay, 

sat “Abort 10 mfiea Sooth- Mr George Snultz, the Sec- ycsierdav’s developments 
west of Bnriwiy, tte pilot put retary of State annouiKed ^ plans ^ revealed 

rat a distress call savins he later that Mr Eduard „ ...hci.nii.i 


Mr Abut Kno widen, who 
was on the run last night 

Knbwlden was involved in an 
incident with a prison officer 
in which he received two (Hack 
eyes and a fractured nose. Mr 
Knowlden is believed to have 
claimed he was beaten up. 

He has received treatment 


and the arrangements for his _ ne "? s receivea treaunent 
guard. When a senior .detec- P n 1 son memcal staff and 
tive was asked yesterday if Mr a . consultanL On Monday it 


nuj 




The £4,000 prize in The Tunes 
Portfolio daily competition, 
double the usual amorait be- 
cause there was so whmer the 
previous day, was shared yes- 
terday by five readers, each 
receiving £800. They ar^Mr 
J. Sykes, of London SW15; 
Mr A.H. CordeL of Crawley, 
Sussex; Mr J. Farrell, of 
Glasgow; Mrs J. Newman, of 
Heme/ Hempstead, Herts; and 
Mrs G. Ecdes, of Ravenslone, 
Bucks. Portfolio fist, page 28; 
how to play, irforaiatiwi ser- 
vice, page 20; Portfolio re- 
launch, page 3. 


live was asked yesterday if Mr 
Knowlden had been given 
beer the night before he van- 
ished the policeman refused, to 
comment 

Mr Knowlden was commit- 
ted for trial by Clerked well 
Magistrates Court last No- 


was decided to move him to St 
Mary's for an operation on bis 
nose. The hospital was chosen 
because of the treatment it 
could offer. 

Mr Knowlden was put m a 
. Continued oh page 2, col 5 


said they had heard the 
helicopter's engines splntter 
and cat out seconds before the 
crash. 

Among tiie dead were the 
wife and two sous of the 
helicopter's owner, Mr Philip 
Cousseos, a multi-millionaire, 
who was in Germany on 
business. The helicopter was 
owned by Mr Conssess’s com- 
pany, International Brokage 
and Leasing, of Virginia Wa- 
ter, Surrey, and was operated 
on his behalf by McAipme 
Helicopters of Hayes, 
Middlesex. “ t. 

A spokesman for Mc$lpfee 
said: “Abort 10 mBes South- 
west of B an bury , the pilot pat 
oat n distress call saying he 
had eaghie failure. We lost 
contact shortly after that" 

The pilot was named last 
mght as Mr Jeremy Howe, 
aged 38, a father of three from 
Hampshire, who had worked 
for the company for three 
years and was formerly with 
the Army Air Corps. He was 
described as an experienced 
pilot with more than 4,000 
hoars flying time. 

He had taken off from 
Hayes and at Pangbonrae, 
Berkshire, bad picked up Mrs 
Val Cousseos, her sons Nigel, 
aged 16, and Stephen, aged 13, 
from Pangbourne, and two 
other children who were 
friends of the family, before 
flying north towards Alton 
Towers. Last night, the other 
children had not been named. 

Mr Coussens tanned of the 
tragedy by telephone yester- 
day and immediately tat to fly 
home. 

Department of Transport 
and Civil Aviation Authority 
crash investigators were yes- 
terday examining the burned 
out wreckage of the helicopter 
to find out the cause of its 
apparent engine failure and to 
discover if only one or both 
engines had faded. 

The accident happened at 
20.08 am yesterday morning 
Continued on page 20, col 8 


Soviet threat 


for a substantial expansion in 


j j _ _ p ■ . r a kAuaiuivn ■ ■ ■ 

aevardnad^, the So let For- ^ mcr jca's nudear production 
ran Mrnisw. wouM men fcdiitiK for the 1990 ,. 


Washington 


- , .. The Reaean Administration 

IDOn ; to . 1 r «,Vw w 3015 10 enlarge facilities that 

produce tritium, uranium and 


c . f A • 1 „ 1 1 . uiuuukL UUIUI1I. UI ail tun I aiiu 

prefer to be in June or July. plutonium. It wants to build 


Mr Shultz emphasized that advanced new laboratories to 
Mr Dobrynin, who has been study how nuclear explosions 


Ambassador for 24 years, did could be used for directed 
not present any preconditions energy weapons under Presi- 

C • Dntk <'irlae j & n •_ O . ' _ fN. 


for the summiL Both sides jent Reagan's Strategic De- 
wan ted to achieve significant fence Initiative. 


results and therefore wanted Both the Department of 


the meeting to be carefully Energy and the Pentagon's 


prepared. 


Defence Nuclear Agency want 


Yesterday's planned test in funds for laboratory experi- 
Nevada, codenamed “Mighty menis and underground tests 


Oak”, was to have tested the to explore new types of nucle- 
impact of a nuclear blast on ar warheads and missiles for 


nudear warheads. Scores of the next decade capable of 
Congressmen of both parties destroying hardened Soviet 


had urged the Administration missile silos. The biggest US 
to postpone it in the hope of nuclear weapons building pro- 
reaching an overall nuclear gyammed for 20 years is 


test ban treaty with the Soviet already under way. 


Union. 


Photograph, page 9 




CO \* 


Lonrho in 
attack on 
Whitehall 


Labour councillors face poll ban I / 

Rv lYavuf Waltpr finriol Pnlirr rnrrocnniulMit I r 'w' 


The auditor’s reports were 
delivered privately to town 
clerks, 1 but must by law be 


Bomb kills 10 


A car bomb which exploded 
near a Phalatigjsi Party otfire 
in Jounieh knled al least 10 


. By David Walker. Sorial Policy Correspondent 

The district auditor yester- The auditor's reports were dent Audit Commission, has 
day took steps which could delivered privately to town come under pressure from 
end in the. surcharge and clerks, 1 but must by law be Alliance MPs to disclose other 
cbsquafificarion of3G0 Labour made public. The movecomes financial losses 
councillors, including several a month before council elec- The district auditor’s find- 
parliamentary candidates and lions in the London boroughs ings could result in court 
some of the party's - best- and metropolitan districts action against Mrs Margaret 
known focal names. • Mr Sknuier has queried Hodge, leader of Islington, 

Mr Brian Skinner, auditor losses that occured when and Mr John Austin Walker, 
for the metropolitan districts, council cashflow was disrupt- Labour leader of Greenwich 


in jwuius.il _ 

people and marked resump- 
tion of the battle, for 


Lebanon's 

heartland 


Maronite 
Page 7 


Labour battle 


The Labour Party faces an 
uphill task in the two by- 
elections due after Fftiham, 
which goes tothepofistomOT- 
row. A special 7Jmes/MORl 
survey in all three constituen- 
cies looks behind the^ -poll 
figures . 


parliamentary candidates and 
some . of the party's ■ best- 
known focal names. • 

Mr Brian Skinner, auditor 
for the metropolitan districts, 
has found discrepancies in the 
1985-86 accounts of five Lon- 
don boroughs, Greenwich, 
Camden. Southwark, Hack- 
ney and Islington. All delayed 
setting, rales last’ spring, and 
mosT waited for up to-two 
months despite being-wanted 
of mounting tosses.' ' 


The district auditor’s find- 
ings could result in court 
action against Mrs Margaret 
Hodge, leader of Islington, 
and Mr John Austin Walker. 
Labour leader of. Greenwich 


/ earn a 1 /: f 

i sex . / 

J OeuyE I 

iff /? 1 ( *L 


ed. In Camden losses of and parliamentary candidate 
interest grew to £20.000 a day. forGravesham. 


The auditor’s action owes 
much to the High Court ruling 
Iasi month to surcharge and 
disqualify Labour members of 
Lambeth council 
- Mr Skinner, who is em- 
ployed by the quast-indepen- 


-The Audit _ Commission 
may, embarassingly. have to 
take action against one of its 
own members. Mr Roy Shaw, 
a Camden councillor. He may 
be held responsible for delay- 
ing the decision to set a rate. 


Ian Botham, the England 
cricketer, travelled to Antigua 
yesterday to see his wife 
Kathy, who flew out there from 
London. Tony Brown, the. 
England manager, arranged 
the reunion a day ahead of the 
main party's arrival from 
Trinidad to give the couple 
time to discuss newspaper 
allegations about sex and 
drugs concerning Botham. 


John Woodcock, pages 16, 40 


Lonrho. the international 
trading company, yesterday 
attacked the Government and 
KJeinwon Benson, the mer- 
chant bank, over an alleged 
“false offer document” in the 
takeover battle for House of 
Fraser won by the Ai-Fayed 
brothers of Egypt more than a 
year ago. 

Lonrho's chairman. Mr Ed- 
ward du Cann. said the Gov- 
ernment blocked the Lonrho 
bid but allowed “unknown 
foreigners” in after only a 
cursory glance at their 
credentials. 

He added; “Perhaps even 
more criticism should be lev- 
elled at those who misled the 
authoru'es by the warranties . 
they gave as to the financial 
standing of the purchasers.” 

A spokesman for Kleinwort 
Benson, which issued the offer 
document on behalf of the Al- 
Fayed brothers, declined to 
comment. Details, page 21 


Libyans admit 
56 died in 
Sirte skirmish 


Queen’s birthday present goes pop 


Home News 2-5 Uadet* 17 

Owmeas 7-W } J 

A ppts 26 Olunwy us 

ArtT 19 ft»y q 

Births, deaths, Pnpvt y 34J5 

namages 18 Sate Boon f 

SsEes* 21-28 Sdwce 18 

Chess 4 SnowRepoTO 20 

Coart *8 Sport 374g 

Dim « TV'*tad» » 

Features 14-16' Weather 20 


* * * 


. Beirut ~ The Libyan armed 
forces. commander has admit- 
ted thal 56 people died, 
“martyred”, he 5 aid,when US 
planes fired at a fishing boat 
and tugboat sent to rescue 
seamen in. the Golf of Sirte last 
month <Robm fisk writes). ■ 

A Cairo paper said Colonel 
Gadaffi had insisted that the 
confrontation had ended only 
temporarily. 

Berlin finktPfige 7 


By Alan Hamilton. 

The Queen Is to be greeted 
cm her 60th birthday in April, 
by children, flowers, and more 
than a touch of show business 
sdoruitiz’ 

An nooffidal conunltiee 
formed to mark the anniversa- 
ry on April 21 yesterday 
unveiled a pop record, per- 
formed by the Band of the 
Grenadier Guards and -chil- 
dren from St John’s College 
School, Cambridge, of a song * 
which 6,000 children will sing 
in tiie courtyard of Backing- 


ham Palace as tiie Queen 
listens from the balcony. 

With lyrics like “We saw 
your car. Hurrah! Hurrah! 
Arriving at tiie gate. We saw 
you wave your hand as you 
went through," and “Happy 
birthday Ma'am God bless 
you, With great work still to 
do. Think of April's voice and 
take heart, From hearts still 
new,” and a chirpy* brassy 
accompaniment, the organiz- 
ers hope the record will reach 
the top of the charts. 

At the Queen's request, 


profits are to be donated to the 
National Childrens' Charities 
Fund. 

The song was written by Mr 
Christopher Logue, the jour- 
nalist, and Mr Tony Macao- 
lay, a songwriter whose 
previous dienis have included 
Elvis Presley, Tom Jones and 
Johnny Mathis. 


The Mall will be closed for 
Vh hours os the afternoon of 
April 21 while the children 
walk to the Palace bearing 
120.000 daffodils. After they 
have serenaded the Queen, she 


will meet some of them in the 
forecourt. 

Mr Neville Labovitch. 
chairman of the organizing 
committee, said: “This cele- 
bration brings together three 
elements the Queen loves: 
children, flowers and music." 

Earlier In the day, the 
Queen will attend a family- 
thanksgiving service at St 
George's ChapeL Windsor, 
and in the evening she will 
attend a gala concert given in 
her honour at the Royal Opera 
House, Covent Garden. 


Challenge 
to Powell 
on Ulster 


By Anthony Bevins 
Political Correspondent 


Moscow (Renter) — Pmvda 
said earlier that Washington's 
refusal to join Moscow’s mora- 
torium on nuclear tests was 
giving the Soviet Union little 
choice hot to resume them. 


Greenpeace sa id that anoth- 
er three members entered the 
huge site, most of which is 
unfenced, in a Jeep yesterday 
and headed towards the area 
of the planned explosion in 
the hope of creating, -a security 


The Ulster crisis plunged 
the Commons into bitter tur- 
moil yesterday as Ulster 
Unionist MPs were accused of 
deliberately attempting to sub- 
vert democracy and an en- 
raged Mr Enoch Powell was 
challenged by Mr Tom King. 
Secretary of State for North- 
ern Ireland, to stand up and 
condemn anti-police violence. 

Earlier, the Prime Minister 
had told ihe House the Anglo- 
Irish accord could only bring 
peace and stability to Ulster 
with the goodwill and active 
co-operation of “decent men 
and women on both sides of 
the community." 

Mis Margaret Thatcher 
then cited the words of Burke. 
sayingTAll that is required for 
evil to triumph is that good 
men do nothing. Now is the 
time for good men to make 
their views known.” 

That challenge was later put 
directly to Mr Powell, the 
Official Unionist MP for 
South Down, who said the 
Government had been warned 
about the conseqences of the 
agreement with Dublin. 

Mr King said:“i hoped that 
he would have fell able to 
include in his remarks his 
condemnation of the violence 
being shown to the RUG" 
With Mr Powell shouting 
across the chamber - and the 
word “humbug” clearly heard 
in the hubbub — Mr King 
added: “I think it is very 
regret table indeed and I hope 
that he would feel able even 
now to say it, even in another 
place.” 

Bui Mr John Hume, the 
Social Democratic and La- 
bour MP for Foyle, told the 
House: “Those policemen in 
Northern Ireland, who are so 
clearly in difficult circum- 
stances. impartially upheld 
the rule of law in Northern 
Ireland last week. 

“They deserve not just the 

Continued on page 2. col 7 


From Peter Davenport 
Newcastle upon Tyne 

The Royal Navy’s latest 
warship was launched in se- 
cret yesterday to foil a ship- 
yard strike in an operation 
finalized over after-dinner 
brandy with senior Admiralty 
officers. 

At 3.45am. 12 hours earlier 
than scheduled, the type 22 
frigate. HMS Coventry, built 
to replace her destroyer name- 
sake sunk in the Falklands 
with a loss of 19 lives, was 
slipped into the River Tyne by 
a 100-strong management 
team from the Swan Hunter 
yard. 

The undercover plan had 
been drawn up by senior 
management who feared that 
a demonstration by some of 
the 2.000 workers who walked 
out on unofficial strike in a 
pay and conditions dispute 
would disrupt and delay the 
planned ceremony. 

They were determined to 
deliver the £100 million frig- 
ate on lime to further their 
claim for a £240 million 
Ministry of Defence order for 
two new vessels against their 
rivals Harland and Wolff in 
Belfast. 

The secret launch ceremo- 
ny. conducted in driving rain 
and gale force winds under 
special Hood lights in a desert- 
ed shipyard, took place shortly 
before a Cabinet committee 
met to discuss the order for 
the two auxiliary oil replenish- 
ment vessels. 


In the event, the economic 
committee postponed a deci- 
sion for at (cast another week 
because of deep divisions 
among ministers. 

After the launch Mr Alex 
Marsh, a managing director, 
said: “We had been worried 
that a small section of our 
workforce were not prepared 
to launch the ship and that 
there could be a 
demonstration. 

“It is not a question of it 
being one in the eye for the 
unions. We are not in the 
business of scoring points al 
the expense of the unions. We 
are in the business of building 
ships and delivering them on 
time.” 

Mr Marsh said that Swan 
Hunter was not going to be 
bullied by strikers. 

“Demonstrations don't help 
matters. 1 find it very sad that 
people should treat something 
as important as this without 
ihe respect it deserves. We 
hope the relatives of the 
people that died on the Cov- 
entry will not feel too 
disappointed. 

“I wish they could have 
seen the ship going into the 
water, but it was not possible 
in the circumstances. Our 
main commitment is to the 
customer.” 

The decision to go ahead 
with the secret launch was 


Continued on page 20, col 3 



To and from South Africa, SAA offer 
one-terminal simplicity at Heathrow 
Terminal 1. 

Connections with other airports 
throughout the UK, Ireland and Europe. 
More choice of non-stops to and from 
South Africa. 





SOUTH AFRICAN AIRWAYS 
—we me&e the cSfference 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 




Sir Keith signals move 
from education post 
as speculation grows 


Sir Keith Joseph, Secretary 
of State for Education and. 
Science, yesterday appeared to 
accept that his days at the 
department were numbered 
anergowing speculation that 
the Prune Minister was pre- 
paring to replace him. 

. During Commons ques- 
tions on education. Sir Keith 
spoke of “the department of 
which I am at present the 
ncad", and “the department of 
which 1 am at the moment the 
head". 

IJut Mr Giles Radies, the 
Opposition spokesman asked 
ror Sir Keith's resignation. 

He said: “As an honest man, 
will he accept that when the 
candidates for the succession 
so publicly and obviously 
submit their competitive job 
applications, and when he has 
dearly lost the confidence of 
pupils, teachers and local au- 
thorities, the time has come 
for him to stand down and let 
somebody else dear up the 
mess?" 

Sir Keith replied: “It is one 
of the by-products of the 
present tragic situation in 
schools that all parties in this 
House acknowledge that high- 
er standards from state educa- 
tion services are greatly to be 
desired for the benefit of all 
children and the benefit of the 
country. 


By Anthony Bevins, Political Correspondent 


“I am hopeful that out of 
that general recognition much 
good can come from the 
present miseries.” 

Sir Keith has responded 
angrily to a report in The 
Times yesterday about pro- 
posed cuts in polytechnic 
places. He suggests that the 
cuts either will not or do not 
have to happen. 

In a tetter, published in 
today's issue. Sir Keith makes 
clear his announce with the 
National Advisory Body for 
making proposals for cuts in 
student numbers based on a 
single, pessimistic guess about 
the likely level of funding in 
the academic year 1987-88. 

He says he has repeatedly 
asked the body, which advises 
him on public sector higher 
education, to plan for a num- 
ber of possibilities, but h has 
chosen not to do this. 

Sir Keith appears to suspect 
the NAB of “crying wolf' to 
wring more money' out of the 
Treasury. He says no deci- 
sions have been taken about 
levels of funding, or closure of 
polytechnic courses or de- 
partments. 

NAB officials, acting on 
instructions from its commit- 
tee. have estimated that 9,500 
student places will have to go 
next year because funding is 
£23 million below what is 
needed. 


They propose that science 
and engineering places should 
be cut by between S and 6 per 
cent, and the humanities and 
science by 17 per cent, to 
make an- overall cut of 7 per 
cent in student numbers. 

Confidential letters spelling 
out how that would affect each 
polytechnic and college were 
received on Monday. The 
proposals, which show, for 
example, departments of civil 
engineering and fine art hav- 
ing to close down, will now be 
subject to consultation. 

The committee will make 
its decisions in the autumn 
and these will be sent as 
recommendations to Sir 

Keith. 

The NAB has derided ii 
must safeguard the quality of 
its courses, and will therefore 
abandon its previous policy of 
taking more and more stu- 
dents for the same amount of 
money. 

Sir Keith implicity rejects 
this argument. He says that 
even if it is right about 
funding, it does not have to 
cut student numbers because 
its staff75tudent ratio is still 
below target. 

Polytechnic and college lec- 
turers received a 7.25 per cent 
pay increase last year on 
condition that they worked 
more efficiently. 

Parliament, page 4 


Bamford outlines 
Land Rover bid 

By Clifford Webb, Motoring Correspondent 

profitable and rapidly grow- 
ing. It was founded 40 years 
ago by his father and was a 
world leader. It was particular- 
ly strong in Europe and North 
America, where Land Rover 
marketing was weak. 

Last year, the Bamford. 
company JCB made a pre-tax 
profit of £2S million and, 
more important, has never 
shown a loss. It had an 
impressive 27.3 per cent re- 
turn on investment and had 
no borrowings. -All growth has 
been financed from profits. 
JCB had no plans to “make 


A team from J C Bamford, 
the North Staffordshire manu- 
facturer of construction ma- 
chinery, presented an outline 
proposal of a bid for Land 
Rover yesterday to Hill Samu- 
el, the BL advisers. The 
company will visit Land 
Rover's Solihull headquarters 
today. 

Mr Anthony Bamford. 
chairman and managing direc- 
tor. said that he was 
appoached by the Department 
of Trade and Industry more 
than six months ago to make a 
bid, but then the Government 
refused to separate Land 
Rover from the Ley land truck 
and bus operation. 

“We were not interested in 
the commercial vehicle side so 
we did not pursue the matter 
at that time. However, more 
recently the position changed 
and they are now ready to 
accept proposals for Land 
Rover Ltd.” 

Mr Bamford said that his 
privately owned Midlands- 
based company was highly 


a fast buck” by floating Land 
Rover on the Stock Exchange. 
It would become a privately 
owned family company 

He saw no problems in 
raising the purchase price or 
subsequent financing to devel- 
op new models. “With our 
financial strength we have 
very strong borrowing 
facilities." 

BL has set Tuesday as the 
deadline for proposals. 


Sales loss 
of £240m 
claimed 

Austin Rover tart sales of up 
to 40,000 cars worth £240 mil- 
lion at retail prices in the past 
three months because of dam- 
aging speculation about a 
takeover by Ford, it was 
claimed yesterday (our Motor- 
ing Correspondent writes). 

- Mr Mark Snowdon, Austin 
Rover's managing director of 
product development said 
that despite the threat to Ford 
being removed by the Govern- 
ment, his company was still 
suffering from the continued 
speculation about the future of 
other companies in die BL 
group. 

He said the latest upheaval 
came after a damaging “long, 
cold summer” last year when 
the BL Corporate Plan was 
awaiting approval by the 
Government 

Mr Snowdon also an- 
nounced that agreement had 
just been signed to use surplus 
capacity at the company's 
Longbridge plant to build 
4,000 Honda Ballades annual- 
ly for sale in Britain. 



Lord Whitelaw tries his hand at pi 


ja visit to die Institute of Indian Affairs while canvasring in theFul- 
lection yesterday (Photograph: Tim Bishop), 

Prescott offers Fulham jobs prospect 


By Richard Evans 
Lobby Reporter 

The prospect of 4,000 jobs 
being created in the Fulham 
area during the first two years 
of a Labour government was 
offered yesterday by Labour's 
employment spokesman, Mr 
John Prescott. 

But in the run-up to 
tomorrow's by-election he 
said that the jobs were almost 
certainly dependent on 
Labour's winning control of 
the local authority in next 
month's council elections and 
preparing a special package of 
job-creating measures in ad- 
vance of Mr Neil Kinnock’s 
becoming Prime Minister. 

Labour wants to create a 
million jobs nationwide with- 
in two years of gaining office 
and Mr Prescott emphasized 


the effect of allowing local 
authorities to spend £6 billion 
of capital receipts from coun- 
cil house sales, putting unem- 
ployed construction workers 
back to work and increasing 
the house building pro- 
gramme, which was now 2,000 
homes a week less than 
Labour's record. 

Unemployment in Fulham, 
which has been one of the 
main strands in the campaign 
of the Labour candidate, Mr 
Nick Raynsford, has increased 
from 4.5 per cent to about 13 
percent since 1979. 

. “What we say to the- local 
authorities is that Labour’s 
one million jobs will require 
them to put their packages 
together in a special invest- 
ment fund that we are now 


planning as a party” Mr 
Prescott said.- - 

The Conservative candi- 
date. Mr Matthew Carrington, 
returned to his familiar by- 
election lactic of attacking the 
extremists in the Labour Party 
and claimed that he would get 
more than 40 per cent of votes 
to give him victory. 

His canvassing returns, 
which be insists on’ keeping 
secret, unlike his two oppo- 
nents, put him “very well 
ahead”, with the SDP support 
collapsing &st,-he said to the 
surprise of by-election 
observers. 

. The Secretary of State for 
the Environment, Mr 
Kenneth Baker, joined the 
assault on Labour’s hard left 
by saying that Mr. Raynsford, 
a moderate Labour candidate. 


was “the smile on the. far* of 
the tiger”. 

Mr Kinnock could not deal 
with militancy inside the La- 
bour Party because it was too 
deeply entrenched, he said. 

For his attack, the SDP 
candidate, Mr Roger Little, 
pointed to the Tones' “fum- 
bling. and bumbling” cam- 
paign and said there was 
evidence of a slide In the 
Conservative vote, with 
“weak” Tory supporters going 
over to the Alliance in signifi- 
cant numbers^ 

• Ladbrokes has stopped tak- 
ing bets on Labour to win the 
Fulham by-election and now 
takes bets on who will be 
second. The odds are 8-1 1 the 
Tories and evens the Alliance. 


Miners’ 
case to be 
heard in 
January 

. By a Staff Reporter 

An action by the Receiver of 
the National Union of 
Mineworkere, seeking dam- 
ages awl costs against those 
responsible for putting 
£8.5 million of union assets 
outside. ;the - reach of 
sequestrators, should be tried m 
some , time next January, a 
High Court judge decided 
.yesterday- ‘ 

Mr Justice Warner had been 
asked by the Receiver, Mr 
Michael Arnold, for a date in 
October, but the judge said it 
was “unlikely" that justice 
would be done if the trial was 
that early. 

Mr Arthur ScugUL NUM 

president, Mr Mick McGahey, 

NUM vice-president and Mr 
Peter Heathfield, general sec- 
retary., who are being sued as 
former trustees of -the union, 
did not oppose an October 
trial., >£> 

Oppostion to an early trial 
came from several defendant 
banks, which allegedly trans- 
ferred union funds out of 
reach. 

Their counsel emphasized 
the complexity of the case and 
said it would be unrealistic to 
expea them to be ready for the 
trial, which is expected to last 
two months, in October, 

The receivership has recov- 
ered union, foods, transferred 
overseas. The claims -Were "for 
the difference between the 
funds recovered and the mon- 
ey that could bave been „ 
obtained if the funds had been **• 
properly inyested within Brit- 
ish jurisdiction. 


£3.5m campaign launched 
to promote job schemes 


- The Secretary of State for 
Employment, Lord Young of 
Graffham, yesterday launched 
a £3.5 million campaign to 
publicize government em- 
ployment schemes after re- 
search showed widespread 
ignorance of the programmes 
run by his department and the 
Manpower Services 
Commission. 

The essential element of the 
campaign is a 40-page booklet 
Action for Jobs that brings 
together for the fust ..tune 
information on more than 30 
schemes, ranging, from com- 
munity employment opportu- 
nities to training facilities and 
incentives, for starting and 
expanding small businesses. 

More than two million 
copies have been distributed 
to Post Offices, job centres 


By Gavin Bell 

and unemployment benefit 
offices throughout England, 
Scotland and Wales. Adver- 
tisements are planned in na- 
tional and about seventy 
regional evening newspaper, 
as well as on commercial radio 
stations. 

“We are reaching out to the 
unemployed and to the 
employed”. Lord Young told ‘ 
a press conference, “to those 
who have been out of work for 
a long time and have given up ' 
hope.- and to those who want * 
to employ them by establish-; 
ing ok expanding small 
businesses.” 

Loir. Young said that the 
aim of the campaign was not . 
to create jobs, but to show how 
to take advantage of govern- 
ment help and opportunities. 
There were 800,000 (daces to 


be filled- in - -the various 
schemes over the next year. 

“I have become increasingly 
conscious that people are left 
bewildered by the variety of 
opportunities available to 
them. They are confused by, 
or ignorant of the range of our 
activities. 

Mr Morgan Johnson, the 
managing director of an ad- 
vertising agency involved in 
the project, said research last 
July showed that more than 
half or those , interviewed 
could . not --name -a' .single 
government' employment 
scheme, while most employers 
felt tfie schemes were confus- 
ing in“hufober Sfid *pot Suffi- 
riently pubHcized. r 

Department, officials 1 said 
the booklet would be mailed 
to careers advisers 


x 'I™.,. , r , - 
■ « -... ■ ■ 



Austin Reed, the Authority on LOOKING THE PART 

Classic British tailoring in a nwy boartiroom check: : 

Two-piece suit m 'Cod Woof tor city corrrfbrt £160. 



LONOOfiMKIIMnONWBfl 


‘Violent’ prisoner 
at large 


Continued from page 1 
small room in a corner of an 
admissions ward on the third 
floor of the in-patients wing. 
He was the only patient on his 
own in a room. There were 
eight other patients in the 
open ward. 

According to police he was 
visited by his wife, a second 
woman and a man after he 
was admitted to the hospital. 
Yesterday. Det Superinten- 
dent Robert Andrews, in 
charge of investigating the 
escape, refused to comment 
on the identity of the other 
two visitors or what happened 
during the visit. 

Bui he described what he 
said was an “obviously 
planned” raid by three or four 
men dressed in dark boiler 
suits and ski masks yesterday 
morning. 

It was just after 6am and 
patients were still asleep. The 
raiders made their way to the 


ward where they attacked one 
guard outside and two sitting 
by Mr Knowlden’s bed. 

The attack was described by 
police as sudden and vicious. 
Oneguard was hit with an iron 
bar and another kicked in the 
head. Ammonia was sprayed 
by the raiders and one guard 
was saved from serious eye 
damage by swift medical at- 
tention after the attack. 

Asked if Mr Knowlden 
might have been forcibly tak- 
en, Mr Andrews said: “I don't 
think he went against his 
will". 

• A second prisoner also 
escaped yesterday in an un- 
connected incidenUCieron 
Pailett, aged 21, slipped away 
as his mother's coffin was 
being put in a grave in 
Plums lead cemetery, south 
London. He was serving a 
four-year sentence for griev- 
ous bodily harm and burglary. 


UDR man dies in 
booby-trap blast 

Republican terrorists killed 
a ofF-d 


an off-duty member of the 
security forces yesterday as a 
“loyalist” mob continued to 
bring terror by attacking the 
homes of off-duty officers- of 
the Royal Ulster Constabu- 
lary. 

Private W illiam Pollock, 
27, a member of the 
lster Defence Regiment, 
died after a booby-trap bomb 
exploded as he hitched a 
trailer to his car near 
Castlederg, Co Tyrone^ 
Private Pollock, who was 
married- six months ago; had 
-left the traflerovemight atthe 
side of the road giving the 
terrorists an opportunity to 

plouheir attack. ... 

The man's father^ who was 
in the car. when. the.. bomb 
exploded, was taken to hospi- 
tal with severe shock. The 
attack was designed to keep up 
pressure on the security forces 
and to inflame still further 
loyalist anger. Private Pollock 
is the 154th member of the 
regiment to be killed since its 
foundation. 

Early yesterday, loyalists 
attacked policemen's homes 
for the eighth consecutive day, 
though many Unionist politi- 
cians believe the attacks- are 
counter-productive. 


Instead of undermining the 
police force, they have 1 proba- 
bly reinforced its esprit de 
corps and have done enor- 
mous damage to - 'the 
Unionists' political campaign. 

Yesterday, Mr Peter Robin- 
son, deputy leader of the 
Democratic Unionist Party, 
said he would be prepared to 
talk among local community g 
groups to end the .violence 
against foe police and cool foe 
situation in loyalist areas. 

Tbe Rev Martin Smyth, 
-official- Unionist MP. for Bel- 
fast South , said hefooughttbe 
-onslaught -.was. . counterpro- 
ductive because the police bad 
not been cowed by attacks that 
had taken more than 200 fives 
during foe, troubles an&wQtfol 
.-nornowtMw easily. ••-?* ••• 

Early yesterday,- seven. jw- 
licemen and their families 
were attacked by mobs who 
fired bullets and hinted bricks 
and petrol bombs at homes in 
Bangor. Dungannon; Kilkeel, 
Belfast and Antrim. 

Since March 3 there have 
been 140 attacks on the police 
and 18 officers have been 
forced to flee their home® in a 
campaign that Sir John Her- 
mon, the Rue’s Chief Con- 
stable. says has been organized 
by “sinister elements”.- ... 


House Ulster uproar 


Continued from page 1 
support but the appreciation 
of the entire Northern Ireland 
community. Those loyalist 
members of this House who 
have consistently come in 
here to lecture foe rest of ns on 
law and order now stand 
finally exposed as to what they 
mean by law and order; they 
mean their law and their 
order. 

"Would tire Secretary of 
State agree with me that some 
honourable members of this 
House — if I can use foe 
adjective only' because I am 
supposed to use the adjective 
honourable — are in fact en- 
gaged in organizing violence 
and encouraging the violence 


against the police in Northern 
Ireland in an outright cam- 
paign against foe democratic 
process in order to create an 
atmosphere of fear in North- 
ern Ireland so that decent 
people will not speak up 
against it T 

He finally asked Mr King to 
agree that Mr Powell “has 
presented himself for most of 
this century in the House as 
foe upholder of foe sovereign- # 
ty of Parliament. But be 
abandoned that today, abject- 
ly, and in so doing abandoned 
the rule oflawT 

Mr King said some Union- 
ists had condemned violence, 
and others had felt unable to 
do so. Parliament, page 4 


Leak about debts a smear, MP says 


By sheila Gunn 
Political Staff 

Mrs G Wynne th Dtmwoody, 
Laboar MP for Crewe and 
Nantwfeh and a member of the 
party's national executive, 
claimed yesterday that she 
had been the victim of a 
political smear campaign after 
revelations about her debts. 

There was controversy and 
some sympathy ai Westmin- 
ster yesterday about foe leak 
of Mrs Dun woody’s unpaid 
House of Commons entering 
bills, which amount to more 
than £2.000. 

Labour whips have been 
asked by the Commons cater- 
ing subcommittee to 
her to settle foe Mils qi 
Mr Charles Irving, the chair- 
man, denied , that it was plan- 
ning to take legal action. 

"The matter is in the hands 
of the whips” be said. “It is 
tbeir responsibility to look 
after these matters. J have 
never known a case in which 
things were not settled In this 
way” 

Mr Irving said that he 
would be mounting an inquiry 
to trace the source of the leak. 
“I am very sorry that this 
whole thing seems to have 
attracted a mammoth amount 
of unnecessary attention. 

“I do not deny there is a debt 
but we do not discuss confiden- 


tial information between the 
refreshment department and 
its customers.” 

The City of London Corpo- 
ration is due to take Mrs 
Duuwoody to court next Tues- 
day to try to repossess her two- 
bedroom flat in foe Barbican 
because of rent arrears. 

However, Crewe and 
Nantwicb council has received 
a cheque for £1,117 to dear 
outstanding rates arrears on 
her home in ha- constituency, 
two weeks after a distress 
warrant was served. 

Mrs Dumroody , who said 
that she would not be seeing 
the whips about the unpaid 
catering bill because it would 
be settled later this w eek, said 
that a “malevolent’’ anony- 
mous phone caller was behind 
the revelations. 

As an MP she receives a 
salary of £17,702 a year, pins 
secretarial expenses. She also 
has a £4,000 annual retainer 
from her job as parliamentary 
adviser to the British Fur 
Trade Association, a post that 
angered many of her party 
colleagues. She was voted off 
the Shadow Cabinet last year. 

An association spokesman 
said yesterday: “We bare a 
contract with her which ex- 
pires in two or three years’ 
time. Then we mil consider 
the situation. There is no 


reason for ns to wish to lose 
hen she has been very helpful 
to us." 

Mrs Dumroody denied that 
her financial difficulties were 
caused by expenses at her 
large detached house in 
Crewe. 

“It was a massive invest- 
ment and it was an added 
complication”, she said. 

“I am the ideal MP for 
Crewe and Nantwicb because 
as a single woman trying to 
maintain not one but two 
homes I can understand tbe 
problems my constituents have 
better than most, and I have 
sever in a long life of politics 
had to mafc anonymous phone 
calls about my opponents and 
their private . peccadillos in 
business or in personal life.” 

Mr Ken Jones, a member of 
Crewe council and former 
chairman of the constituency 
Labour party, said that he was 
surprised at foe revelations 
but ho- personal finances were 
a private matter and no con- 
cern iff tbe constituency party. 

Mr David Hood, a Cheshire 
county councillor and Mrs 
Duawoody's. agent for 11 
years, said that he would not 
be surprised if she had been 
too generous for her own good. 
“She has got herself into a 
financial mess which Is a 
personal matter 


“She has had considerable 
expense m settingup her home 
in Crewe and has had to 
maintain her London -address 
also. That flat mint dost her 
about £1^000 a month. ! know 
that people have- offered to 
settle her debts, hot she is 
proud and independent and 
has refused offers of help,” be 


Mrs Duuwoody is the senior 
partner in a computer compa- 
ny, it was disclosed yesterday. 
She owns 99 of foe 100 shares 
in Dunwoody Com paters. • 
The other 1 per cent is 
owned by Mr Hood, an insur- 
ance executive. 

He said. yesterdgytL^rhere 
is do mystery about this 
company. Its purpose is to 
develop a . political -software 
program to make the fires of 
MP!s and other professional 
politicians easier. - 
“It will help MPs to keep a 
vast variety of things at their 
fingertips. We are hoping to 
use modern technology and 
communicatious to improve 
foe efficiency of MPs, rational 
Laboar parties and foe like. 

“So for it has not got off foe 
ground. Mrs Dub woody set up 
the company and I.am helping 
her. Hie £8,001 capital isthe 
value of foe computer equip- 
ment we are using .to .-develop 
the program: No one hashada 
penny out of it yet” 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1 986 


HOME NEWS 


prize in £43m takeover 


- The Our Price chain of 
record shops, which was a 
. driving force behind . lhe 
spread ■ of. cut-price, music 
stores in die raid- 1970s, yes- 
‘ terday became the latest prize 
■ in the round of high . street 
.mergers when it agreed ioJ-a 
£43 million bid from WH 
Smith,, the .newsagents. • ■ ■ 

The J 30 shops will continue 
to trade trader the Our Rice 
name and WH Smith is 
planning up to 40 new shops 
in the next year at a cdst of 
£3 minion, ' with particular 
emphasis on the Midlands 
and the North of England. 

The takeover will lift W H 
Smith's share of the re tail 
. market for records,, [ cassettes. 
compact discs and liitBB c vid- 
. eos.to about 1 8 per cent . . .’ 
The founders of Our Price, 
Mr Gary Nesbitt the chair- 
man, and Mr Michael Isaacs, 
the -deputy - chairman, will 
continue to manage the 

company. 

For Mr Nesbitt, the bid 
values his original £900 in- 
vestment at almost £6 million 
and vindicates what he now. 
calls his “pile 'em high and sell 
'em cheap" philosophy of iO 
years ago. 

Mr Nesbitt first thought of 
entering the music business in 
1 1971 after 'findipg .ft! difficult 


.. By Teresa Poole 
to buy cassettes for his car 

.stefoo^stem. : v ‘ - 
- While comimiing tO woik as 
. a'.; 'director . of 1 "Grand 
.M.etropolitan’s casino . opera-' 
sons joined’ ,in business 
■wither Isaacs and'set up the 
-fosLTape Revolution jshop in ! 
north' 1 London, -at a cost, of 
■£3,000, seifmg- pre-recorded 

' ca-wttpy 

By 1976, there were five 
London storesand die compa- 
ny was looking for a way to 
break into the record market 

Mr Richard Branson's first 
Viigin record store had 
opened in 1972 above a shoe 
shop in Oxford Street offering 
cheap records, and? exclusive 
importifrMr Nesbitt decided 
to concentrate on discounting 
the high safes volume records 
in the music charts. - 
..“We came. up with the 
concept of Our Price. Retail- 
ers were doing it with paint 
and with electrical goods but 
the music industry was behind 
the times. It just went like a 
snowball 

“Virgin was aimed more at 
the trendy, cult, student mar- 
ket, people who wouldn't have 
been seen dead walking down 
the road with a garish Our 
Price bag" he said. 

Price competition ' was 
fierce, with the high' sheet 
multiples, W H Shmh/Boots 



and Woo [worth, playing a. part 
in forcing down prices. By 
1979, Our Price had 10 shops 
and Mr Nesbitt decided to 
leave Grand Metropolitan and 
. work full time at OurTrict . . 
.. The next ’year, with 
• £1.25 million finance from 
Midland Bank, Our Prim 
. bought the 41 Harlequin 
record shops and an era of 
heady expansion began. A 
stock market flotation in 1984 
valued the company at 
£14 million and last year the 
company made profits of al- 
most £2 million. 

“The market is less price 
competitive now. What mat- 
tax today is certainly value, 
but also the environment, 
selection and" service," Mr 
Nesbitt said. 

Under W H Smith, Our 
Price will continue to concen- 
trate on smaller outlets. 

Other players in the market, 
particularly Virgin and HMV, 
have gone the other way over 
the past few years and invest- 
ed in music “megastores" 
which stock an enormous 
number of tides in record, 
cassette and compact disc 
form. 

According to the British 
Phonographic Industry, which 
represents the record compa- 
nies,, the days of “lunatic 
discounts" are over. 

. Mr Ian Duffell, managing 
director erf 1 HMV, said: “The 
difference between . retailers 
now is style more than any- 
thing. There is a certain 
loyalty because the image is 
right for the customer. It's 
very like fashion really." 

There are no plans to merge 
those businesses with Our 
Price or to reduce the music 
selling space within the W H 
Smith stores. 


‘castrated 

without consent’ 

By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 

Surgeons are castrating men bulletin's editor. Dr Richard 

Nicholson, said 


suffering from cancer without 
their informed consent as part 
of a medical trial that has httle 
or no scientific value, an 
ethical watchdog organization 
has claimed. • • 

; The .triaK sponsored Jjy tbe 
-MedicaL” Research- -Gpuncil, 
should, bejial ted at.ogtc&And 
the patients who hatre under- 
gone the operation should -be 
told exactly why .the smgery 
was performed, thc-Tostitute 
of Medical ■Ethics'-says -fri Tts 
bulletin published- this week. 

More than SB men have 
been castrated since the trial 
began last year. The patients 
are elderly men who , have 
developed cancer of !he : pros- 
tate gland, a condition diag- 
nosed in about 8,000 cases a 
year. Castration, technically 
known as orchiectomy, is one 
common form or treatment, 
but is not a cure.-. 

• • The : council; triaPs .main 
objective ' is to. : determine 
whether the operation is best 


it is not 
required that patients have to 
be told of the alternatives to 
castration, 

“What appears to be hap- 
pening, is |bat participating 
.surgeons are- -deciding -that 

My . from Social Class IV or 
V — are not capable of making 
up their own. .minds. . aboqt; 
-participation in the .aiaL and 
foal foe, surgeons should do it: 
for them.' > ’• ’ - 

"“Old men up and down the 
country are being castrated 
without their informed con- 
sent for the benefit of a trial 
sponsored by the Medical 
Research Council, that is of 
little, and possibly no, scientif- 
ic value." 

The ' Medical . Research 
Council issued a statement 
yesterday- saying : that . the ‘ 
claims in ' the 1ME bulletin 
were, unfounded- The opera- 
tion was accepted as the safest 


performed immediately after form of active treatment fora 
diagnosis' or whether it should patientwith advanced prostat- 
be deferred until serious ic cancer, it said. 


symptoms of the spread of the 
cancer have appeared. 

Immediate surgery is not 
known to improve survival 
and many specialists are un- 
certain about which is the best 
course of action. 


“If the patient objects to the 
operation be is allowed such 
alternative therapy as he may 
choose following further dis- 
cussion with his surgeon. If 
orchiectomy is undertaken it 
is carried out only after the 


But, according to the IME completion of a standard con- 
bulletin, ,the. trial is. .20 years sent form to operation." 


joo lair because of advances in 
treatment- of the "disease, ior 
eluding, .monthly drug injec- 
tions. which some research 
has shown to be as effective as 
the operation. 

In an attack on the trial, the 


It said foe . protocol for the 
trial had been screened and 
accepted by four separate 
committees of foe council all 
of which considered both- the 
scientific and ethical .basis of 
the study. 


Man jailed for helping 
Libyan escape justice 


A businessman was jailed 
for five years by the Central 
Criminal Court yesterday for 
helping a Libyan facing drug 
charges to escape the country. 

Andrew. 'Gill aged 49. hired 
a private aircraft to . fly Mr 
Muhammad- Shebli, aged 37, 
back to Tripoli before be could 
face trial. 

Mr Shebli. believed to be a 
relative of Colonel Gadaffi, 
vanished six days, before , he 
was due to appear at Croydon 
Crown Court in August 1984. 

Judge Michael Underhill 
QC. told Gilt “You made all 
the arrangements for the pro- 
curement of the aircraft and 


drew together the threads of 
the whole plot. • - 

Gill of Farmfield Road, 
Great Tey,. Colchester, Essex, 
had pleaded guilty to conspir- 
ing to pervert the course of 
justice. 

Gill was described as a 
“Waiter Milty tfiaracler" who 
became involved in. Libyan 
intrigues - 

Mr Philip Singer, for the 
defence, said that Gill had 
been “chillingly frank" about 
his activities. He expressed his 
great “shame and remorse" 
and the 17 months he had 
been, behind bars awaiting 
trial had been a “nightmare". 


Yacht man 
6 so 
to be alive’ 

A round-the-world yachts- 
man who was rescued after 
bailing out his smiting boat for 
eight days arrived home today 
saying: “I am just so lucky to 
be". 

Mr James Hatfield, aged 
29, t who fras had eight bout 
operations and was sailing 
^raund foe wtotid to raise matey 
for beart research at Papwoitfa 
Hospital Cauforidge, was res- 
gied byY. merchant vessel in 
35ft waves". J» the Strath 
Pacific 

" "“I couldn't have carried on 
for much longer but yon don't 
really know bow long you can 
keep going. When yon know it 
is aB there is between you and 
a long walk home you keep 
going. It is amazing what yon 
can do when yon are pushed," 
he said when he arrived at 
Heathrow airport. 

When his boat, British 
Herat, of Ipswich, started to 
take water, Mr Hatfield was 
283 days into his journey, 
about 2£00 mites from Cape 
Horn and about 2,000 miles 
from A nr Hand. 

He said he spent eight days 
roand the dock with no sleep, 
bailing out the boat with a 
hand pomp. He kept in touch 
with New Zealand amateur 
radio and they alerted a 
container ship to rescue him. 

Mr Hatfield, from Ipswich, 
believes that his journey 
raised about £80,000 and he 
said be would have another go 
if be can find the sponsorship 
moneys - • 


Manx censor 
bans play 

A play set in a Turkish bath 
involving female customers in 
nude scenes has been banned 
in the Isle of Man under a 
1916 Act of the Manx 
Parliament 

The ban on Nell Dunn's 
Steaming has started a politi- 
cal dispute m the .island, 
which also has a .Postcard 
Censoring Committee to con- 
trol postcard humour. 

Coleman wins 
adjournment 

A charge against the BBC 
sports commentator. David 
Coleman, of driving with too 
much alcohol was adjourned 
until. April 22 by magistrates 
at Beaconsfield, Buckingham- 
shire. yesterday. 


Action 



By Peter Evans, Heme Affairs Correspondent 


The Goveriiment is to seek 
agreements with other coun- 
tries to prevent organized 

crime fro® feeding off drag 
trafficking. ., 

The Home Secretary, Mr 
Douglas Hard, said yesterday 
that the aim was to build on 
the powers given fey theDnigs 
Trafficking Offences Bffinoir 
before Parliament The KB is 
intended to deprive traffickers 


Mr' flnrd said: 
that wj^/inferesteithe »ig 
traffickers, fe cwoey, ®« 
drugs; We atar.knpw that to a 
growing extent other fonns ■of 
organized crime feed ®* 
profits of drugs. 


■ that if they; are 
convicted of drug trafficking 
they will stand to lose their iU 
gotten gain*, combined with 
the prospect of long prison 
sentences, will act as a power- 
ful disincentive to getting In 1 , 
volved in this appalling trade. 

“Confiscation will also re- 
move' from the drugs world 
proceeds that could otherwise 
be used to finance further, 
hiper thugs deals.”; ! 

■ Jatematioasl co-operation 
was vital and tbe Government 
ruiended to buOd on tbe pow- 
ers which would fee’ given fey 
the ^ew Bill by .negotiating 
mutual enforcement agree- 
ments with other countries. 


Mr Hard, who was address- 
ing a conference in Wakefield 
on dings organized by foe 
Association of Chief Police 
Officers, said there was modi 
to be proad of in tbe work last 
year, a gains t drug trafficking. 
He beard success stories each 
week. But all the indicators 
showed drags misuse increas- 
ing at an alarming rate. 

“This week on foe steeets of 
south London yoo can pick up, 
wftb little difficulty, a gram of 
heroin for £80 — that Is' ’an 
average four days’ supply. . 
' “Supplies of all . drags are 
still plentiful and die sources 
of supply are still 
multiplying", be said. 


The Princess of Wales braving the cold as she arrived at 
Fuuinglcy for a torn- of South Yorkshire yesterday 


Residents of flats 
will get right to 
bny from landlord 

By Christopher Wa nna n. Property Correspondent 


Residents of privately 
owned mansion blocks of flats 
arc to be given important 
rights of tenure and ownership 
under proposals announced 
by foe Government yesterday. 

They come after the report 
last November of the Nugee 
committee, which recom- 
mended reforms to tackle the 
problems of management in 
such blocks, housing about 
500.000 people, particularly in 
London and the South-east. 

The Secretary of State for 
the Environment. Mr 
Kenneth Baker, said in fot 
Commons that the Govern- 
ment accepted the main rec- 
ommendations of the 
committee, chaired by Mr 
Edward Nugee. QC. and in 
two matters went further. 

The committee had said 
that residents should have the 
collective right of first refusal 
to buy the block where the 
landlord wished to dispose of 
his interest. The Government 
proposed foat the residents of 
blocks wholly or substantially 
occupied by long leaseholders 
should have foe right to 
purchase foe landlord's inter- 
est at market price if they 
saiisfed a court that the land- 
lord has persistently failed in 
his duties. 

In addition, the Govern- 
ment has added to the 
committee's recommenda- 
tions that more should be 


done to involve residents in 
the selection of managing 
agents by giving recognized 
residents' associations a right 
to require tile landlord to 
consult them about the ap- 
pointment of agents and to 
consult them thereafter. 

Mr Baker said foal it was 
dear from foe work of the 
committee, which was set up 
in 1984. that there were severe 
problems affecting the man- 
agement of many blocks of 
flats. 

Mr Baker, who said that 
legislation would be intro- 
duced as soon as possible, 
accepted foe committee's rec- 
ommendations for foe devel- 
opment of the procedure for 
appointing a receiver and 
manager tf a landlord or his 
agent neglected foe propen y 
or failed to carry out foe 
necessary work; a procedure to 
vary leases if there was an 
important defect in them: and 
tighter control over money 
paid into service chaige ac- 
counts and reserves. 

The Government has 
staffed on one of the main 
recommendations: to appoint 
assessors in the county court 
to deal quickly and cheaply 
with disputes on housing mat- 
ters. That is because it is one 
of tbe issues being considered 
in foe review of civil justice set 
up last year 


Lloyds to repay Playboy fraud funds 


The Playboy Guh. which 
allowed a young solicitor to 
gamble away more than 
£300,000 of clients* money, 
does not have to repay foe 
cash, a High Court judge ruled 
yesterday. 

Bui LLoyds Bank, whose 
manager “wilfully shut his 
eyes” to the fraud, is liable to 
repay an estimated £120,000 


to a London firm of solicitors, 
Lipkin Gorman which has 
made good foe losses to their 
• clients. 

Mr Justice AHiotl ruled that 
Playboy did not know that 
Norman Cass, aged 37, was 
using other people's money 
when he lost up to £400,000 at 
foe roulette wheel in its casino 
in Park Lane during a seven- 


month period in 1980. 

The Playboy, now owned by 
Knrpnale. a non-trading divi- 
sion of foe Pleas urama Group, 
and no longer operating as a 
casino, had denied liability. 
The judge ordered it to repay 
£3,735 after foe casino cashed 
a bank draft for Mr Cass. 

But Lipkin Gorman were 
also responsible for estimated 


£122,000 losses after October 
1 980 when they found that he 
had been unlawfully claiming 
expenses but was still allowed 
to draw on clients accounts. 

Lloyds, which denied liabil- 
ity, won its £5,000 counter- 
claim against the solicitors 
who had underwritten an 
overdraft facility for Mr Ca ss 
on his persona] account. 


Portfolio 
game to 
go gold in 
relaunch 

The Times Portfolio 
competition is to be re- 
launched next Monday, 
April 14, as The Times 
Portfolio Gold. 

The current blue Port- 
folio cards will be re- 
placed by Portfolio Gold 
cards, which will be avail- 
able to Times readers 
from their newsagents 
during this week. 

The new daily prize 
will be doubled to £4,000 
and the weekly prize will 
be £8,000. 



Details of the new game 
and how it will be played 
will appear in The Times 
ibis week. 

The attraction of the 
new Portfolio Gold is 
expected to increase the 
demand for copies of The 
Times: it will be wise to 
make sure your copy is 
ordered at your 
newsagent 

Readers experiencing 
any difficulty in obtaining 
a Portfolio Gold card 
should send an s. a. e. to: 
Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

P O Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

EBI 6AJ. 


Falklands aid 

The Government is to pro- 
vide £3.1 million for an im- 
proved water supply in Port 
Stanley. Mr Timothy Raison. 
Minister for Overseas Devel- 
opment. said yesterday during 
a visit to foe Falklands. 



Now there’s only, one place to 
save if you’re going overseas. 


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news which will help you get more from 
your building society savings. 

Nowall investors who are not ordi- 
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And wnat better way to enjoy this 
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our money can build up safely and you’I 


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As the major provider of mortgages in 
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your hard earned cash in a new home 

Life abroad seems so much better 
when you know the moneys coming in 
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I ] . To: Halifax Building Society, (Ref, MJP) Freepost. Trinity Road Halifax HXi 2BR. 1 1 

I am interested in investing with the Halifax while I am abroad Please send me your Actionpack with 
further details. (Please tick appropriate box) 

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HALIFAX. THE WORLP^NOI 


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A HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 




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PARLIAMENT APRIL 8 1986 


Violence against RUC 




Exam to go ahead 


Thatcher 


attacks 
on police 


ULSTER 


Attacks on the police in 
Northern Ireland were con- 
demned during Commons ques- 
tions by Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher." the Prime Minister, 
who expressed her determina- 
tion to continue with the Anglo- 
Irish agreement and urged ail 
decent Unionists to condemn 
such actions and do their best to 
ensure they did not reenr- 
She had been asked by Mr 
William Benton (Milton 
Keynes. Cl: In *iew of the recent 
appalling events in Protestant 
Loyalist L ister, has not the lime 
come when we should consider 
»cry carefully the expenditure of 
money and lues tn keep Ulster 
in the United Kingdom? 

Mrs Thatcher: 1 share his view 
about the recent appalling 
events in Ulster when the police 
have been attacked in a terrible 
way which all of us would utterly 
condemn, i think we must carry 
on with the Anglo-Irish accord 
and do our best to try 1° restore 
some peace and stability to the 
Province and really must call on 
all decent Unionists utterly to 
condemn this kind of activity 
and do their best to see no more 
occurs. 

Mr Neil Kinnock. Leader of the 
Opposition, said he completely 
endorsed the Prime Minister's 
words and hoped that the mes- 
sage went nut to all pans of the 
community in Northern Ireland 
Mr Tnny Baldry l Banbury. Cl: 
Does she agree that this House 
will not countenance intimida- 
tion from the Loyalist commu- 
nity in Northern Ireland any 
mure than it will countenance it 
from the IRA? Does it not He ill 
in the mouth of any person who 
attacks anyone who wears the 
Queen's cap badge to cal! him- 
self a Loyalist? 

Mrs Thatcher: I agree. Terror- 
ism and violence must be con- 
demned equally, no matter what 
quarter in Northern Ireland it 
comes from. I am sure the police 
will uphold their duty totally 
impartially and will not be 
intimidated by terrorism. 

Sir Eldon Griffiths fBury Sf 
Edmonds. C). parliamentary ad- 
viser to the Police Federarioiu 
Long before Portadown when we 
were debating the Northern 
Ireland agreement I asked in 
this House that in the event that 
the police had tn give protection 
tn (heir families (hat protection 
would be prnv ided. 

Since ministers promised it 
and it did not materialise until 
the petrol bombers struck does 
she not understand why there is 
among the rank and file of the 
Rl'C a great measure of 
disspiritment? 

Mrs Thatcher: I understand 
«hat he is saying but 1 know he 
will agree we have great admira- 
tion for the RUC for the totally 
impartial way in which they 
carry out their duties. The 
Secretary of Slate (Mr Tom 
King) will lake every action he 
possibly can if they require it to 
see they are given protection. 


King calls on all Unionists to 
speak out against violence 


TERRORISM 


Mr Tom King. Secretary ofSiaic 
tor Northern Ireland, repeatedly 
called on all political leaders in 
Northern Ireland, including 
some Westminster MPs. to con- 
demn the present v iolence 
against members of the Royal 
Ulster Constabulary and their 
families. When he criticized Mr 
Enoch Powell for not including 
a condemnation in his question. 
Mr Powell shouted: Everyone 
knows. 

Mr King made a statement on 
the safety of RUC members and 
their families in which he said 
there had been 13S attacks on 
off-dutv members of the RUC 
and RUC reserve, their homes 
and (amities in the past month. 
He condemned the attacks as 
cowardly and disgraceful. 

He said that the Chief Con- 
stable of Nonhem Ireland, with 
the full support of the police 
authority and of the Supennten- 
dents Association and the Police 
Federation, had put in hand 
arrangements to provide quick 
and effective assistance to police 
officers and families subject to 
attack or other forms of 
intimidation. 

Extra patrols were being 
mounted in vulnerable areas 
and steps had been taken to 
provide suitable alternative 
accommodation for those un- 
fortunate enough to have to 
move from their homes. The 
police were also making strenu- 
ous etTons to bring those 
responsible for this criminal 
bcliav iour to justice. A consid- 
erable number had been charged 
with serious offences associated 
with it. 

Mr Peter Archer, chief Oppo- 
sition spokesman on Northern 
Ireland, who had asked for the 
statement, said that the violence 
was deplorable, from whatever 
political sector it was con- 
demned by the vast majority of 
right-thinking people in the 
Unionist tradition. Those poli- 
ticians who had not dissociated 
themselves from the violence 
should make clear where they 
stood. 

Violence appeared to stem 
from those in a particular 
political position who had ex- 
pected the police to administer 
the law in a discriminating way 
and their respect for law had 
evaporated when they had 
discovered that they, too, were 
to be subject to the law. 

Those who warned that plas- 
tic bullets were a dangerous 
method of crowd control had 
been shown to be right by the 
injuries to Kcilh White recently. 
He asked for consideration of a 
Labour suggestion that there 
should be a special scheme of 
compensation for police and 
others whose jobs involved 
special risk. 

Mr King: I am in no doubt that 
the overwhelming majority of 
people in the Province, regard- 
less of iheir views about the 
Anglo-Irish Agreement, are ap- 
palled by the attacks on the 
police. 

It is regrettable that some 
political leaders . some of whom 


sit in this House, have not felt 
able to condemn, without 
qualification, these attacks. One 
of the nastiest aspects is the 

sectarian attacks which the 
House will deplore. 

He knew of one oflicer who 
had been attacked and had been 
reported on the radio as saying 
that the effect would be, not to 
undermine morale, but to make 
the RUC stick together more 
closely as a family against 
terorrism. as they had for |7 
years, and that they would not 
stop now- because the terrorism 
came from a different quarter. 

He understood the problems 
and difficulties of plastic bullets 
but w as not prepared to see the 
police defenceless against that 
sort of violence, although he 
regretted the sort of injuries 
which had been caused to Mr 
White even though he had been 
taking pan in an illegal march. 
Sir John Biggs-Darisou (Epping 
ForesL Ck Was it not forecast 
from these benches that the 



Rees: RUC are there 
for one reason 


result of the agreement would be 
to place this splendid force, 
whose families are suffering so 
erievously. between two ores? 


In the light of experience, would 
ic Prime Minister si 


not the Prime Minister seek to 
talk to the Taioscach and say 
that in view of the threat to the 
security of the whole island of 
Ireland, there should be a 
change, of policy? (Cheers and 
protests). 

Mr King: I hope he is not 
condoning the violence and I 
am sure that he would wish to be 
associated with the condemna- 
tion that the RUC should be 
placed in that sort of situation. 
Many people who have the 
strongest feelings and who wish 
to argue about it and to see an 
alternative approach, would not 
dream of condoning violence 
and I trust that we respect that 
approoach and not the other, 
which espouses violence. 

We have made clear that we 
are willing to talk with the 
Unionist leaders. I have re- 
ceived letters from Mr 
Molyneaux and Mr Paisley 
expressing certain points and 
concerns and we shall be 
responding soon. 

Mr Enoch Powell (South Down, 
OflTUL*): Does Mr King remem- 
ber that he and the Prime 
Minister were told in advance of 
the disastrous consequences 
which would inevitably ensue if 
they went ahead and made this 
agrecmcnL What shall be done 


to the evil counsellors to whom 
ihey listened instead? (Conser- 
vative protests). 

Mr King: I am. of course, well 
aware of his feelings about this 
agreement, but I hoped be 
would feel able to include in his 
remarks his condemnation of 
the violence shown to the RUC. 
It is regrettable and 1 hope he 
will feel able to. even now. 

Mr Powelh Everyone knows. 

Sir Eldon Griffiths (Bury St 
Edmunds. Ck Why do certain 
elected Unionist MPs approve 
the use of baton rounds when 
they are directed at Sinn Fein 
mobs but object to them when 
they are used against Loyalist 
mobs? 

Would he explain to the 
House and the men and women 
of the RUC how it is that 
protection specifically asked for 
and specifically promised was 
not forthcoming until after tbe 
petrol bombers had struck? 

Mr King: It is for tbe Unionist 
MPs or whoever he has in mind 
to respond to his first point, but 
I have noted the comments 
made elsewhere on that matter. 

On the second point, he is 
referring to the Under- 
secretary's reply that if re- 
sources and help were needed 
and asked for they would be 
given. It is precisely what we are 
doing at the request of the Chief 
Constable. 

Mr Merfyn Rees (Leeds, South 
and Morley, Lab): Where the 
situation is getting worse every 
day. where the politicians do not 
count and where, whatever the 
reason, they dare not put their 
heads above the political para- 
pet. would he ask the Prime 
Minister to go on television and 
talk to the people of Northern 
Ireland as Prime Minister and 
leader of the Conservative and 
Unionist Party, explaining that 
the people over there can have 
any views they like about the 
Anglo-Irish Agreement, a politi- 
cal agreement, but the RUC 
have become a British police 
force that is there for one reason 

- to uphold the laws on violence 

- and that is what they are doing? 
Mr King: The Prime Minister 
will have noted his comments. 
During his and other MPs’ 
terms of office as Northern 
Ireland Secretary more than 200 
members of the RL>C have laid 
down their lives in defence of 
the Province against terrorism 
and they are entitled to the 
support of everybody in (he 
Province and in the United 
Kingdom. 

If the politicians do not count 
any more it is perhaps because it 
has not yet been possible to get 
discussions going. This is a 
political matter which needs to 
be discussed by politicians and 
not tackled by men of violence. 
That is why it is so important 
that we get early discussions. 

Mr Ian Gow (Eastbourne, CY. 
On these benches those who 
support and those who oppose 
the Anglo-Irish Agreement join 
with him in condemning totally 
attacks on members of the 
RUC. But for the agreement the 
statement he has made today 
would not have been made. 

Mr King: I am grateful for his 
dear, unequivocal support for 


the condemnation of the acts of 
violence. I hope that in tbe last 
sentence he did not imply that 
in any way violence could be 
justified against the RUC. They 
are seeking impartially to up- 
hold the law ana it is in the vital 


interest of every person in tbe 
“ they are able to 


Province (hat 
continue to discharge that 
function. 

Mr Stephen Ross (Isle of Wight. 
Lk We hope he will continue to 


seejhe agreement through to its 
)my 


fulfilment. It is the only sane 
way forward in Northern Ire- 
land. Is protected accommoda- 
tion being made available to the 
RUC at this time, so that they 
can move in with their families 
if they so wish? 

Mr King said he would rather 
not go- into details about the 
arrangements 

Me Boy Mason (Barnsley Cen- 
tral, Labk Much of this violence 
must weigh heavily on the 
shoulders of the Unionist lead- 
ers. Firm leadership should be 
given to stop this mass intimida- 
tion. It is about lime that the 
Unionist leaders spoke out. 

Mr King: I hope his message will 
be beard by others who will 
recognize the responsibility that 
they clearly have. 

Mr Ivor SUnbrook (Orpington, 
Ck Every responsible person 
condemns violence, but when 
the Government decided to sign 
(he agreement was any assess- 
ment made as to tbe scale and 
violence of the likely reaction 
among the majority population 
of Northern Ireland? If so. is- he 
really surprised at what has 
happened? If noL why not? 

Mr King: I am sure he does not 
seek to imply that violence 
could be justified. 1 hope 1 will 
get his support on the need for 
talks now to take place. I hope 
we can get discussions going so 
that we can find a sensible and 
law-abiding way to resolve these 
difficulties. 

Mr John Home (Foyle. SDLP) 
said that loyalist MPs who 
consistently lectured about law 
and order now stood exposed: 
they meant their law and order. 

Some honourable members — 
he used the word "honourable' 
only because he was obliged to 
do so — were engaged in 
organizing and encouraging vi- 
olence in an outrighi campaign 
against the democratic process 
so that decent people would not 
speak against it. 

Mr Powell, who had pre- 
sented himself for most of this 
century as an upholder of 
sovereignty, had abandoned 
that today and so had aban- 
doned the rule of law. 

Mr King said some MPs had 
stood up bravely and con- 
demned violence against the 
RUC despite risks to them- 
selves. Others had not felt able 
to do so. He would not com- 
ment on the point about the 
organization of violence. 

Mr Robert Madennan (Caith- 
ness and Sutherland, SDP) said 
that politicians who were seek- 
ing to present the RUC as a 
force supporting a political 
agreement with which those 
politicians did not agree were 
uttering a false calumny against 
the force. 


Minister rejects 
pleas to delay 
new examination 


EDUCATION 


There could not be a national 
education syllabus in this coun- 
try determined by (he annual 
conference of - tbe National 
Union of Teachers. Mr Chris- 
topher Patten. Minister of Stale 
for Education and Science, said 
in reply to Commons questions 
about the introduction of ibe 
General Certificate of Second- 
ary Education examination. 

The programme of prepara- 
tion for the GCSE was thorough 


and of high quality, he claimed. 
Never betoi 


. _ . . _ Pore had so much been 
done to prepare all teachers for 
examination reform. 

Mr Michael Sbersby (Uxbridge. 
C) asked: Can he assure 
headteachers that given the 
additional training and re- 
sources made available there is 
the necessary time available for 
proper planning by teachers, 
including the agreed syllabus, 
bearing m mind that parents of 


third year. pupils in my constit- 


uency will have to make a 
choice of subjects very shortly? 
Mr Patten: I would like to give 
that assurance. I know of the 
concern -about the syllabus. 
There is no reason why proper 
choices should not be made on 
the basis of available informa- 
tion. including national criteria 
and ibe draft, syllabus which 
have been in schools for some 
months. 

Mr Alan Beith (Berwick-upon- 
Tweed, L) said ' few teachers 
would recognize the state of 
preparedness. Most parents at 
this stage would rather nor 
apportion blame. They were 
more more concerned about 
ensuring that their children were 
adequately prepared for the 
examination. 

Postponement had to be 
much more seriously considered 
than hitherto. 

Mr Patten: Postponement 
would lead to the very chaos its 
supporters seem to fear. That is 
overwhelmingly the case. Most 
fair-minded heads and teachers 
would accept that there has been 
more preparation for this 
change than there was for the 
introduction of GCE 'O' levels, 
the CSE or the raising of the 
school leaving age. 

Mr Hany Greenway (Ealing 
North, Ck The Secretary of 
State told the Select Committee 
on Education this morning that 
teachers' disruption made the 
introduction of the GCSE less 
assured. 


Mr Patten know that not only 
ional 


teachers, but also the natio 
federation of parent-teacher 
associations, many local 
authorities and two out of the 
five examining groups had ex- 
pressed strong reservations 
about, the new course going 
ahead as planned? - 

Was Mr Patten seriously tell- 
ing MPs that, without a lot more 
resources and more adequate 
preparation, it was really fair to 
next year's fourth year pupils, to 
start work on the new exam 


Mr Patten said he saw no reason 


why e’veij- teacher should not] 


have had perfectly adequate 
training by tbe end of next term. 
No GCE syllabus had been set 
for 1988 and. in any case, much 
of the machinery needed bad 
already been dismantled. 


•A document published in 


Timer today containing; instnzc-l 
school gov-J 


lions for secondary 
emors from a left-wing group in j 
St Helens was compulsory read- 1 
ing for anyone who .wanted io| 
know bow the extreme lef 
worked, Mrs Thatcher. 

Prime Minister, said 
She was replying to 
Robert Atkins (South RibWe, Of 
who raised the issue and said the! 
document aimed to destabilize. | 
damage and destroy the 
relationship of headteachers 
with governors and children 
within schools. The document 
was circulating m the North 
West of England. 


Bill on latent 


damage intact 


HOUSE OF LORDS 


Polytechnic cutbacks denied 


COMMONS 


The report on the front page of 
The Times about a decided cut in 
polytechnic places was rubbish. 
Sir Keith Joseph. Secretary of 
Slate for Education and Science, 
said to Conservative cheers dur- 
ing questions in the Commons. 
Dr Keith Hampton (Leeds 
North West. C) asked if Sir 
Keith would initiate a move to 
end binary provision in higher 
education which led to overlap- 
ping and do plication. 

Many of us (he said) find It 
strange that polytechnics have 
increased the proportion of 
young people going to them for 
education, yet they are haring to 
face massive cuts in places. 

Sir Keith added that there was 
no need to reorganize the 
Department of Education and 
Science in the light of any 
decision about binary or non- 
binary provision in higher 
education. 

Later Mrs Renee Short 
(Wolverhampton North East, 
Lab) said: One of the major 
criticisms of the DES is that 
resources on teaching and re- 


search in science are inadequate. 
It is nonsense that we should 
now in industrial areas of the 
country be closing science 
departments in polytechnics. 

What is he going to do about 
that? Should we not have a 
Minister for Science? 

Mr George Walden. Under Sec- 
retary of State for Education and 
Science: The Secretary of State 
described earlier the so-called 
cuts in polytechnics as rnbbish. I 
do not think 1 can do berter than 
that. It would be wrong for her to 
lend her name to what is a 
campaign of alarmism about so- 
called cuts in polytechnics. 

[ am the chairman of the 
National Advisory Body which 
has made no such recommenda- 
tions for such cuts. Neither has 
the Secretary of State. 

He will be considering in the 
normal way at the end of this 
year in the present round tbe 
amount of money available for 
expenditure in the public sector 
on higher education. 

Sir Anthony Grant (Sooth West 
Cambridgeshire, Ck In Cam- 
bridge there are very definite 
signs of a brain drain on this 
issue which could be resolved by 
a relatively small sum of money. 


Would he and his colleagues 
fight the Treasury on this one a 
lot more vigorously in the future 
than they have in the past? 

Mr Walden: He makes a point 
to which we are devoting consid- 
erable attention. We are await- 
ing a report from tbe Royal 
Society on the position over tbe 
brain drain and we will also 
listen very - carefully to the 
representations by the Save 
British Science campaign which 
includes a lot of very distin- 
guished men and women. 


•Later, Mr Neil Kinnock, Lead- 
er of the Opposition, raised the 
issue in exchanges with the 
Prime Minister, to whom he 
dec lea red: When oar country's 
future depends so obviously and 
heavily on technology and trade, 
where woold be the sense, 
efficiency or justice in making 
further cats in polytechnic de- 
gree courses in civil engineering, 
sciences and modern languages? 

Would that not be a desertion 
of the national interest and a 
further action by a yob 
Government? 

Mrs Thatcher: The number of 
places in polytechnics in 1986- 
87 will be 172,000 - an increase 


of 43 percent over the number in 
1979. They remained static un- 
der the Labour Government. 

Regarding more scientific 
courses in universities and poly- 
technics, this Government has 
found an extra £43 million, in 
conjunction with industry, to get 
the courses industry requires. 
Industry has contributed an- 
other £24 million towards these 
courses. 

Mr Kinnock: If the situation is 
as she describes, why does her 
own national advisory board and 
the committee of directors of 
polytechnics say they cannot 
make any further cuts without a 
diminution of quality of pro- 
vision in all of the fields she 
mentions? 

Will she heed the words of her 
own Green Paper on higher 
education last year which 
acknowledged if present trends 
continue we shall fall further 
behind our competitors in the 
engineering and technological 
subjects? 

Mrs Thatcher: I saw Mr 
Kinnock in his place when I 
heard my colleague, the chair- 
man of the national advisory 
board, utterly repudiate that 
report. 


Opposition 
fails to delay 
dockyard Bill 


The report stage of the Dock- 
yard Services Bill, which pri- 
vatizes the dockyards at 
Devonport and Rosyth, was 
delayed when Labour and Alli- 
ance MPs protested that im- 
portant documents vital to the 
debate were made available loo 
late for proper consideration. 

They forced a division on the 
exclusion of “si rangers" which 
was rejected by 259 votes to 1 10 
- majority, 149. A further di- 
vision on a motion to adjourn 
the debate was rejected by 239 
votes to 169 - Government 
majority. 70. 

Mr Norman Lunont, Minister 
of Slate for Defence. Procure- 
ment. said latest costings 
showed the annual surplus to 
the Exchequer, arising from the 
effects of implementing the Bill 
would be £21 million over each - 
of the first 10 years of commer- 
cial management. After that, il 
was expected to be £28 million 

An Opposition proposal 
requiring the Government to set 
out savings and losses was 
rejected by 224 votes to 170 — 
Government majority. 54. 


A proposal to amend the Latent 
Damage Bill would cause mas- 
sive uncertainty to the construc- 
tion industry, a peer warned the 
House of Lords during the 
committee stage of the Bill. 

The Bill, based on a report of 
the Law Reform Committee, 
amends the law of limitation of 
actions in negligence cases 
involving latent damage other 
than personal injury. 

Lord SOkin of Dulwich (Lab) 
moved an amendment, sub- 
sequently withdrawn, to give 
courts the discretion to extend 


the 15 years lonj^stop period 


specified in the 

He said there had been gen- 
eral agreement that a person 
who suffered damage through 
another person's wrong ought 
not to be prevented from 
obtaining compensation simply 
as a result of the lapse of time, 
particularly in circumstances in 
which be might be unaware of 
his rights. 

The best way to give effect to 


that was to provide the coon 
with a limited degree of dis- 
cretion, similar to that in per- 
sonal injury cases. . ■ „ " 

Lord Denning (Imt), supporting 
tbe proposal, said they were 
dealing with latent damage, for 
example, bad foundations. The 
damage might not appear until 
25 years afterwards. The 15 
years provided ftt tbe Bill ought 
to be extended in special cases. 
Judicial discretion would be 
wise in such cases. 

Lord Howie of Troon (Lab), 
referring to the effect on the 
construction industry, said il 
would result in massive un- 
certainty and place an unreason- 
able burden on the industry. 
Lord Scarnum (Ihd). chairman 
of the committee which pro- 
duced tbe report, said the 
committee considered that tbe 


value of the long slop provision 
’* there 


would be lost if mere was a 

K " iai discretion to extend it. 

Hailsbam of St Mu)b- 
bone. the Lord Chancellor, said 
the amendment woold destroy 
the balance of tbe report 
The committee - stage was 
concluded. 


Figures being checked 


TENDERS 


The Prime Minister congratu- 
lated the management of the 
Swan Hunter shipyard on their 
strenuous and successful efforts' 
to see that the frigate HMS 
Coventry was launched on time, 
when replying to Mr Richard 
Holt (Langbaurgh. C) 


With reference to the order 
for two naval advaince oil 
replenish mem vessels (AORs) 
being sought by bath Swan 
Hunter and Harland and Wolff 
Mrs Thatcher said: Further 
inquiries are being made to 
ensure the figures about com- 
petition are rair because that is 
vital to both shipyards. 


Bank of Scotland 
Base Rate 


Bank of Scotland 
announces that , 
with effect from 
9th April, 1986 
its Base Rate will be 
decreased from 
11.50% per annum 
to 1 1.00% per annum 




A FRIEND FOR T IFF. 


Sale room 


Vasari’s notes add to drawing’s value 


By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent 


Giorgio Vasari had made 
notes for his great book on 
Italian Renaissance painters 
on the back of a drawing 
which Christie's had for sale 
yesterday and the back con- 
tributed as much as the front 
to securing £32.400 (estimate 
£25,000 to £30.000) for il from 
Ars Libri of Boston. 

The little arched drawing, 
201 mm high, depicts a crowd- 
ed scene in a pillared h all. At 
the time it wrote the catalogue 
Christie's identified the scene 
as a celebration of the artistic 
or literary achievements of 
Florence; by yesterday it had 
changed horses to “The Trial 
of St Catherine”. 


• The back, however, was 
easier to identify, ft is a 
chronological chart of tbe 
dates that artists died. There 
arc Tuscan and north Italian 
artists listed. Vasari's Lives of 
the Most Excellent Architects. 
Painters and Sculptors was 
first published in 1550. 

The highest price in the sale. 
£41.040. was paid for a draw- 
ing that had come into 
Christie's as an unidentified 
work of little value. It is an 
oval oil sketch on paper laid 
down on canvas depicting the 
marriage celebrations of a 
patrician couple attended by 
courtiers and musicians. 

Christie’s had recognized 


the hand of Nicolo dell’ Abate, 
a Modenese painter who 
worked on the decoration of 
the Chateau de Fontainebleau 
in the 1 550s and is considered 
one of the founders of the 
Fontainebleau school. 

Treating its own identifica- 
tion with due caution. 
Christie's had published a pre- 
sale estimate of only £5.000 to 
£8.000. It was bought by 
Colnaghi’s, the Bond Street 
dealers. 

A red and white chalk 
drawing of the head of a boy 
by Tiepolo, a slight drawing of 
great charm, also secured 
£41.040 (estimate £15.000t to 
£25.000). 


The sale totalled £321.834 
with 6 per cent left unsold. 

Sotheby's monthly Conduit 
Street sale on Monday night of 
modestly priced pictures and 
furnishings suitable for pri- 
vate homes secured a total of| 
£149.330 with 23 per cent 
unsold. 


More than 1 ,000 people had 
i Sunday and 


viewed the sale on Sunday and 
it required two sale rooms to 
accommodate hopeful bidders 
on the nighL 

Private purchases among 
the paintings included a 
watercolour of All Saints 
Church, Ramsholt, Suffolk, by 
Henry Gilder at £220 (esti- 
mate £250 to £350). 


Librarian for Bodleian 


Mr David G. Vaisey. Keep- 
er of Western Manuscripts at 
the Bodleian Library, Oxford, 
has been appointed the new 
Bod ley's Librarian. He suc- 
ceeds Mr John Jolliffe, who 
died in March last year, 

Mr Vaisey. aged 51. who 
read history at Exeter College, 
where he is now a professorial 
fellow, went to the Bodleian in 
1959 as a trainee archivisL He 



then spent three years with 
Staffordshire County Council, 
returning to the Bodleian in 
1 963 as a graduate assistant 

In 1 966 he was made Depu- 
ty Keeper of Oxford Universi- 
ty Archives, and Keeper of 
Western Manuscripts in 1976. 

Mr Julian Roberts. Keeper 
of Printed Books, who had 
been acting librarian, becomes 
deputy librarian. 


Tory candidate chosen 


Mr Neil Balfour, a former 
Euro-MP, will stand for the 
Conservatives in the Rydale 
by-election in North 
Yorkshire. 


Mr Balfour, aged 41. is a 
merchant banker, who lives 
near Ripon. North Yorkshire. 
The by-election is expected on 
May 8. 

Mrs Elizabeth Shields, a 
teacher, second in the 1983 


general election, will again 
fight the seat for the Liberals. 

The by-election is caused by 
the death last month of Mr 
John Spence. 

Cenwai Ptecixm: j Snenr* m 
5J.311 Mrs E Shields. i'UlT.170. P 
Bloom iLinx 5.816. C mali 16.142. 

• Mr Michael Latham, aged 
43. Tory MP for Rutland and 
Melton, said yesterday that he 
had changed his mind and 
would not retire from Parlia- 
ment at the next election. 


Hungarian 
held to 
chess draw 


By Barry Gotombek 
ChessCorrespondent 


The Hungarian player 
Csaba Horvath, aged 17, re- 
tained his lead in round six of j 
the Oakham School Interna- 
tional Junior Tournament 
Leicestershire, yesterday by 
drawing a well-fought game 
with Neil McDonald. 

The draw gave McDonald, I 
aged 19, ot England. 4£' 
points. If he gets 1% points 
from the last three rounds he 
will acquire his International 
Master title^ 

The Polish player, Robert 
Kuczynski, is the only other 
player with- 4ft points. 

Stuart Conquest, James 
Howell and Angus 
Dunnington. all. of England, 
have 4 points, as do M 
Condie. of Scotland, V Anand. 
of India, and Eduardo Rojas, 
of Chile. 

The English International 
Woman's Master, Susan 
Walker,, drew her round six 


game with Luis Galego, of 
Portugal, to 


give her 3 points. 


Walker needs only l'/j 
points from the remaining 
three games to secure her 
Woman’s International 
Grand Master norm. 



COMMENTARY 






Will he give an assurance that 
despite that problem teachers 
already planning for this im- 
portam educational reform 
should go abend wh a tever hap- . 
pens so that parents may be 
quite certain that their 
children's education is weU 
looked after? 

Mr Patten: We shall press 
ahead. I hope that in all the 
teachers' associations and 
unions wiser counsels will pre- 
vail than some of the things that 
were said las week. 

Mr David Made! (Bedfordshire 
South West, Q asked if the 
Government was ready to deal 
with disruption of curricula in 
September. 

Mr Patten said that if some 
teachers* unions did wfaat they, 
were saying Iasi wee k th ey 
would do. it raised far greater 
questions than introduction of 
the GCSE. 

Mr Giles Rad Ice, chief Oppo- 
sition spokesman on education, 
said Labour shared the 
Government's support for the 
new examination. However, did 




Geoffrey Smith 




When it was first known 
that there was to he a by- 
election in Fnfluut aiy initial 
reaction was that this weald be 
a good opportunity for the 
Alliance. 

Here was a seat which had 
for years jSfflf to Labour, 

! which the Conservatives had 
won ju 1979 and 1983, but 
which they would obviously 
have the greatest difficulty ja 
bolding In a iaid-tenn by- 
election. Just the kind of 
chance that the Affiance need- 
ed, so it scented, to come 
thro ugh tire, middle. 

Bet the more the constituen- 
cy has been subjected to 
scrutiny the more it has be- 
come evident that there, is a 
missing factor. 

Most reports from Fulham 
have • drawn attention to its 
social polarization these days; 
more than most places nom rt 
is divided quite clearly be- 
tween the fairly rich Bad the 
fairiypoor. That means tint, 
the quintessential AUisoce 
voter is thin an tbe ground is .■ 
Fulham. 

That, I believe, sure Than 
the nature of the campaign, 
explains why Labour is so 
widely expected to win tomor- 
row. I do not say that in 
criticism of the Labour candi- 
date. Mr Nkk Ra y ns f ordpyho 
has appeared to be the most 
assured of the contenders. 

But. Mr Roger UdtOe has 
fought a vigorous campaign for 
the Alliance and Mr Matthew 
Carrington, the Cons e rvative , 
has seemed more at his ease hi 
direct contact with the voters 
than at tus morning press, 
conferences, when be "has 
sometimes appeared inhibited 
by the more senior party 
figures who have come to help 
him. 


A surprise if 
Alliance won 


No candidate has been 
chewed up this time in the way 
that so often happens at by- 
elections. ..... - 

f doubt, however, "if it has 
ever been- possible for the 
Conservatives to win this con- 
test, despite Mr Carrington'S 
bravado yesterday .in claiming , 
that tbem can vsssjnc- returns* 
showed him ahead. It wwfil 
also be surprising now if the 
Alliance were to grab the seat. 

There are a number of 
voters who ate considering 
switching to the Alliance. That 
is evident on the doorstep. Bat 
for enough of them to do so 
there would surely have to be a 
greater sense of momentum, 
which is hard to generate in a 
constituency with few typical 

Alliance voters. 

The concept of a typical 
Alliance voter is a relatively 
new one. It used to be thought 
that support for the Sooal 
Democrats and liberals was . 
spread so thinly .not only 
geographically but across the 
social classes that they would 
always have difficulty hi con- 
centrating their votes snffi- 
dentiy to win many seats. 

But now it is dear that it is 
the sodoiogkaily semi-de- 
tached who are particularly 
likely to vote for the Alliance. ! 
am tempted to say the subur- 
ban semi-detached because it 
is in. the suburbs that one: is ; 
most likely to find those who 
are upwardly mobile, and who 
are neither moneyed, nor think ■- 
of themselves as members of 
the working class. 


High expectations 
without the pay 


These are the people who 
are worried about their mort- 
gages and rail fores, who are 
especially disturbed by condi- 
tions'-' is state schools but 
cannot afford private ones and 
who fear that the health '* 
service is - being run.: down 
without being able 'to" pay 'for? 
private medicine. They .have 
higher expectations without 
being able to pay for thou: 
personally. 

Such people do not. howev- 
er, live only in the suburbs. 
The. Brecon and Radnor by^ 
election showed that there are 
many of them iu raral areas. 
Middle-rank managers and 
professional people, stirring to 
make it, are quite mnaeross m 
Britain these days. 

But there are not many-of 
the* upwardly mobile in Fat: 
ham. Most people- there seem' 
either to have arrived or not to 
be on the move.. _■ 

The Fulham result will 
therefore tell ns only a limited 
amount about the state -of 
British politics today. If La- 
boor gains its expected victory 
that s bound to be good for 
party morale and for Mr 
Khmock's personal aathority. 

But to get a fuller picture we 
shall have to wait for the other / 
two by-elections that are pend- 
ing in West Derbyshire and in 
Rydale, and then to assess all 
three results together. A single 
snapshot from Fulham cannot 
Diamine the wholescebe: 

By-election survey, page 16 


4 




















0KS 

revive 


British Rail plans40-aaswer 
A^iis critics., with a new genera- 
: v - *» on - of high speed cross- 

• 'i ,f :. country ' trams on "routes. 

'■ » largely abandoned since the 

. '■ ‘ '*** war. -- 

< The “Super-Sprinter” train 
will offer inier-rity-type ser- 
vices in the late !980s and 
.. ’ ’ i-n.' ! *- 1990s between towns such as 

' l " “ „ Bristol and Salisbury, Liver- 
!l ^ pool and Scarborough, Cardiff 

1 and Brighton, Cambridge and 

Manchester, Chester and 
Grantham, ' Leominster and 
"• • \*- s York.' ="■ • • • ' 

Routes suri as ’ those in . 
r recent years have had slow, 

stopping.seryTces.-or.ndne ar" 
- ■» v f f ?j sll; British Rail plans to revive 
them with a type of train not 
', "V used before on British Rail 

•• _ routes. 

"'•f V.. ' ^ “The Super-Sprinter wiB 
' • provide the speed and comfort 

' of inter-city at much lower 

cost", Mr John Edmonds.' 

. ; " '* head of British RaiPs jprovin- 

'7' V cial services, said in Shrews- 

• bury yesterday. 

: **s‘"-.S r ' t “They will enable us to 
: ** connect towns and dues away;. 

, f ^ from London which are now' 
.uneconomic, and bring: us 
; , . back into cross-country travel 

. r s? in a big way. v - 


?y Michael Baily, Transport Editor 


Representing ■ more "than 
half British Rail's- route net-' 
work, ■ stations and subsidy — 
now more than £500 million a 
year — the “provincial sector 
has been looked on as the lame 
duck of the railways, with 
closure or bus substitution as 
the likely fate of many routes. 

Bin, according to Mr Ed- 
; moods, there are no present 
plans for substitutingboses for 
trains and improvements had 
been made possible by annual 
savings of £100 million since 
1983 as a result . of smaller. 

■ more" advanced trains, auto- 
made levd crossings, radio 
.signalling and unmanned 
-stations. i -.1 > 

Other, major developments 
in the next 12 months include: 

• Eastern Region: New tirae- 
tables in May in the North- 
east and 50 new trains 
replacing 84 o|d ones. 

• Western Region: Continued 
development - of the South 
Wales valley lines and the 
introduction, of new trams. 

• Midland Region; New time- 
tables with faster trains from 
- Wales to' the Midlands. 

• Scotrail: Electrification -Of 
the Glasgow-Ayr route ■ in 
September , and '.its /extension 
to Largs next. year. 


Woman I Bomb case 


jockey 

inquest 

By a Staff Reporter 

An inquest into the death of 
Britain's first woman flat rac- 
er, Mrs; Sue. Horton, opened 
yesterday after she was - found, 
dead in her car. . 

Her husband. Mr David- 
Hortpii. aged .48.: of Winter- 
bourne Bassett, near Swindon, 
Wiltshire, gave evidence of 
identification to Mr John 
Elgar, the Wiltshire Coronet, 
at a brief hearing in Devizes. ■ 

- The inquest was adjourned 
until April 17. 

Mr Horton' found his wife, 
aged 43, in the garage of her. 
bungalow home at 
Honeystone.- -Littleton; Drew, 
Wiltshire, on Saturday when 
he retumed'ifromia-flayjopL 
with their son David. The 
couple were separated; - j 


men start 
jail fast 

Two men accused in con- 
nection with the {darning of a 
bomb at Chelsea Barracks, 
south-west London, last No- 
; veraber have started a hunger 
strike In Wcroi wood - Scrubs 
ijrisoiL. - V?- . .. . i. 

' ‘ Peter plxjughlni arid Pat- 
■ .rick Mri jjnghlan; -both aged 
26, from ' Londonderry^ 
stopped eating on Friday. 
They are taking liquid They 
are protesting at being isolated 
from other prisoners and say 
they are locked in their cells 
for 23 hours a day. 

They, are awaiting trial at 
the Central Criminal Court 
accused of conspiring with- 
rcfihqjns to cause aa. explosion, 
“likely to eadOTg^r. Jfe M. 
cauSe serious injury to 
; property”. - - .. . - v . 

■* •. - -vjr :n i;. «.*< 


Directors cUuld get jail 
for accounts in Welsh 


Five company directors 
could face prison sentences 
because of their refusal to 
submit accounts in the English 
"language to Companies House 
in Cardiff. 


Notice of dissolution has 
been posted in -the London 


By Tim Jones 

directors ' Mr Dafydd Williams, gener- 
sentences -. al secretary of Plaid. Cymru, 
jfusal to said “It cannot be right for a , 
e English public organization based , in 
es House the capital city, of Wales to 
discriminate in this way 
lion has against' a Welsh company. 7 
- London ■ “This high-handed colonial 


Gazette : against * -• Sain- - attitude underlines: .the heed 
(Recordiau) Cys, the Gwyn- for a' hewTWelsb Language 
edd-based company which Acl" 


specializes -in - producing 
Welsh language pop and bal- 
lad records. 


: Mr Dafydd Iwan, chairman 
of Sain, is also vice-president 
of Plaid Cymru and his 


IflU IWlA/iM-. ut 1 UUM VJIIUU ouw 

But it is likely that inch via- records advocating indepen- 
ual High Court summonses dence and passive resistance 


will be issued against the 
directors who could then face 
big fines or terms of 
imprisonment. 

Sain; founded in 1972. has 
consistently refused to comply 


sell thousands of copies. 

Mr Owen Huws, one of the 
directors, said yesterday: “We 
have no intention of comply- 
ing with the AcL It seems that 
we are allowed to- use our 


with the Companies Act ■ language on an everyday basis, 
which stales that, although but for anything important we 
companies' trading in Wales ' are forced to use English.” 

1 <s«wv^iin«c in WpI ch • - Unucp nt/1 IKa 


• can submit accounts in Welsh 
they must be accompanied by ; 
an English- language 
translation. " 

Welsh Nationalist MPS in- 
tend to raise the matter in the 
Commons. 


- Companies House said the. 
case' was the first of its kind. 
“We shall- explain the law to 
the directors and hope they 
comply. We are seeking com- 
pliance and not retribution," 
he said. 




of Scotland pic 

Ra se Rate 

The Royal Bank of Scotland 
ann o un ces that with effect 
from dose of business 
on 8 April 1986 
its Base Rate for advances 
will be reduced from iV6% 
to 11% per annum. 


IriL WCUlNE^L/A* Af KI l 9 1*60 


HGmEjnEwS 



Five women barristers were sworn in as Queen's Counsel by the Lord Chancellor at the House of Lords yesterday. They are. from left: Miss Anita 
' Mary Ryan, Miss Mary Howarth Arden, Mrs Janet Hilary Smith, Mrs Rosalyn Higgins and Mrs Barbara Jean Lyon Mills. 

Beatle gift ‘belongs to son’ Barrister scores 


A Red Indian head-dress 
given by John Lennon to his 
son Julian about ten years ago 
was still rightfully the property 
of the Lennon family, a court 
ruled yesterday. 

Magistrates at Warrington, 
Cheshire, derided that the 6ft 
head-dress should be returned 
to Julian Lennon, aged 23. 


Police Property Acl magis- 
trates were asked 10 decide on 
ownership. Mrs Lennon al- 
leged that it had been stolen 
from her former home in 
Ruthin. North Wales, in 1978. 

The court was told that in 
1978 Mrs Buckley was pre- 
sented with the head-dress by 
her former husband. Jeremiah 


Mrs Cynthia Lennon, former McGarry. who said that he 
wife of John, and Mrs Lynn had been given it by Mrs 


Buckley, of Fieldfare Gose, 
Oakwobd, Warrington., had 
contested ownership. 


Lennon 


offer of £4.500 from a collec- 
tor of Beatles memorabilia in 
America. He wanted proof 
that it bad belonged to the late 
John Lennon, so Mr Buckley 
contacted Mis Lennon. 

The next day Mrs Lennon i 
complained that the head- 
dress had been stolen. The 
police took possession of the 
head-dress. 

Mrs Lennon told the court 
that it was only when Mr 


legal hat trick 

By Frances Gibb, Legal Affairs Correspondent 


Recently Mrs Buckley, and _ Buckley phoned to inquire 
her husband Gary, decided to about ns authenticity that she 


In a civil action under the . offer it for sale and received an realized it was missing. 


A barrister yesterday com- 
pleted a hat trick when he 
became a Queen's Counsel at 
the Bar of England and Wales. 
Mr Richard Ferguson is ai- 
ready SC — senior counsel — 
at the Bar of the Republic of 
Ireland and QC at the North- 
ern Ireland Bar and is believed 
to be the only barrister to take 
silk at all three bars. 

Mr Fergnson. who moved to 


London three years ago from 
Northern Ireland and works at 
the criminal bar. was at the 
centre of controversy last year 
when he was not included 
among the list of QCs appoint- 
ed that year. 

Colleagues in Northern Ire- 
land were angry at his omis- 
sion from the list and said it 
‘was a snub to the Northern 
Ireland Bar and judiciary. 


Hampton 
Court fire 
inquiry 
is set up 

The Secretary of State for 
the Environment. Mr 
Kenneth Baker, has sei up an 
inquiry after the fire at Hamp- 
ton Court Palace on Easter 
Monday. 

The inquiry - by Sir John 
Gamck. a former Civil Ser- 
vant - is 10 look ai how the 
department's emergency re- 
sponse arrangements worked 
and what lessons might be 
learnt for the future. Mr Baker 
said in a Commons written 
reply. 

He said that Sir John would 
pay particular attention to 
maintenance, fire precautions, 
and the action taken when the 
fire was discovered. 

Before retiring from the 
Civil Service in 1981. Sir John 
was for three years Permanent 
Secretary at the Department 
of the Environment 

Minky set for 
life of luxury 

Minky the cat has been 
guaranteed a life of luxury 
after his owner. Mrs Mary 
Rossi, left him £10.000 in her 
will. 

Mrs Rossi, of The Drive. 
Goidcrs Green, north-west 
London, who died last Octo- 
ber. also left £2.000 to the 
RSPCA. Her estate was val- 
ued at £222.844 gross. 
£219.556 net. 


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IViL, J 1 ?OU 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Injured shoppers buried in rubble of Lebanon supermarket after explosion 


as car 


From Robert Fisk* Beirut 





_,"P5 brutal struggle between • day" suspected that Hobeika 
P™: fP 41 anu-Synan Quistian and ihe Syrians - were behind 
militias for control of the the bombing in. Jounieh. 
Maromie heartland of Leha- ■ ' The inhabitants of Jounieh, 
non erupted again yesterday which is .13 mites north of 
when a car loaded with 1651b Beirut, have generally been 
ot explosives blew up 50 yards spared the slaughter visited 
m>m a Phalangist Party office upon most other -communities 
in the port of Jounieh, killing •• in Lebanon in the past ten 
at least 10 people and -wound^ years.. It. is also the centre of 
ing another 1 10.-..‘ .■ one pf- the Phalangast Party’s 

As usual; most of (he dead' strongest units in Lebanon, 
^o played no role in the controlled by $amir Geagea, 
Lebanese war many, of them theVpro-Israeli ..Christian mili- 
were civilian' .bank workers, .lia -co m mande^X who over- 
whose charred bodies were threw HdbeikaVrule-almost 
dragged from their offices in three months ago. 
the main square of the' flour- Coincidentally, Druze and ■ 
ishing Christian - city. Red Sunni Muslim gunmen in the 
Cross workers found dozens Chouf Hills south of Beirut 
of wounded shoppers, buried - yesterday, managed to outdo 
in the nibble of a supermarket the bloodshed at Jounieh in a 
There had been no warning vicious political dispute wfth- 
of the explosion, although car in Mr Jumblatfs Progressive 
bombings in east Beirut have Socialist Party, 
become _ commonplace since' - Sunnis ‘and Druze in the 
Phalangist militia leaders -r- - region both belong to the PSP, 
silently supported by Presi- but Sunni villagers of Bsaba 
den t Ami n Gemayel — refused had for 1 5 dayis'been objecting 
to accept a Syrian peace plan to^he political control exer- 
for the country, and evicted cised oyer them by the. Druze 
the main pro-Syrian Christian of (fa rigigftfaiinngvil tegs' of 
commander, Elie HobeifcfcO MasraaiChouf. . . 
from the capital in a series of ;’ ' Aftertwo Druze were assas- 
savage street battles Ttfvsinaieti oh Monday night, 
January. . Druze gunmen yesterday 

Hobeika — whose previous stormed into Bsaba and mur- 
exploits are widely believed to . dered 12 people, most of them 
include the massacre of bun- members of the Sunni Akoum 



Contadora talks 
break up with 
recriminations 

From John Carlin, Mexico City 


Despite a widespread con- 
viction that the dangers are 
increasing of a regional war in 
Central America, peace talks 
in Panama have broken up 
amid recriminations and deep 
divisions between those in the 
US camp and the one country 
outside it, Nicaragua. 

The foreign ministers of the 
eight most powerful Latin 
.American nations were unable 
to persuade their counterparts 
from conflict-torn Central 
America to sign a regional 
peace treaty - a goal sought 
for more than three years by 
the Contadora group. 

The representatives of the 
US allies of El Salvador, 
Honduras and Costa Rica said 
the intransigence of left-wing 
Nicaragua was the only obsta- 
cle to an agreement 

Father Miguel D'Escoto, the 
Nicaraguan Foreign Minister, 
said it would be wrong to 
conclude that Contadora had 
failed. But he insisted his 
country could not commit 
itself to any peace treaty while 


Washington continued to arm 
Contra rebels. 

“We will not sign anything, 
we wonT hand in one rifle, we 
will not disarm while Ihe US 
abundance and shameless as- 
sistance to the counter-revolu- 
tionaries persists." Father 
D'Escoto said. 

It had been hoped a joint 
statement would be issued at 
the end of the meeting by all 
13 nations, but the Central 
Americans could not agree on 
a common draft. This left the 
Contadora group of Mexico. 
Colombia. Venezuela and 
Panama, and its so-called 
support group of Argentina, 
Brazil, Peru and Uruguay, to 
pen yet another expression of 
alarm at the threats besetting 
Centra! America and to warn 
against an increase in foreign 
support for rebel forces in the 
region. 

A June 6 deadline was set by 
the two pressure groups for the 
signing of a treaty. However, 
such a deadline has been set 
before, been forgotten and 
talks have been resumed. 


Honduras denies plea 
for Washington arms 


The crater caused by the car bomb blast in Jounieh which killed at least 10 people. 


dreds of Palestinians in the 
Sabra and Chatfla camps in 
1982 — usually languishes in 
his home village in the moun- 
tains above Zahle. but was 


family. - - 

On the edge of the Israeli 
occupation zone in southern 
Lebanon, a suicide bomber 
yesterday drove his car into a 


yesterday holding a series of checkpoint manned by mem- 
talks in Damascus with Walid - bers of Israel's proxy South 
Jumblatt, the Druze leader/ Lebanon Army militia in the 
and Nabib Bern, the head of village of Kawkaba, wounding 


the Shia Muslim Amal three of them and three -civil- 
movement. ians. according to Beirut radio 

Syria's enthusiastic support reports, 
for him — and its hatred of the The driver, whose identity 

Phalangisls — has not wavered was not known, died in the 
since the January fighting. It explosion, the first suicide 
was therefore not surprising bombing attack in the south 
that many Christians yester- this year. 


Cabinet crisis 
deferred by 
Israeli parties 

Jerusalem — Israel's Cabi- 
net crisis went on to the back- 
burner yesterday as the 
tension shifted to the opening 
of the Labour Party conven- 
tion here last night (David 
Bernstein writes). 

Nevertheless, the crisis was 
expected to dominate the 
convention which, even be- 
fore the crisis erupted, had 
been expected to devote con- 
siderable lime to mounting 
demands for a reappraisal of 
the party's rotation agreement 
with Likud. 

Both Labour and the Likud 
have agreed to take the edge 
off the crisis by deferring the. 
showdown between the La- 
bour Prime Minister, _ Mr 
Shimon Peres, and his Likud 
Finance Minister; Mr Yitzhak 
Modai, until Sunday's weekly 
Cabinet meeting 


Howe warned 
of N Korean 
military threat 

The Foreign Minister of 
South Korea, Mr Lee Won j 
Kyung, is thought to have 
warned Sir Geoffrey Howe, 
the Foreign Secretary, of his 
cduntry’sfears over a military 
threat posed by North Korea. 
(Our Diplomatic Staff write). 

Mr Lee is accompanying 
President Chun Doo Hwan on 
the first visit by a South 
Korean bead of state to Eu- 
rope: 

Yesterday the President had 
lunch with the Queen at 
Windsor and last night was 
having dinner at 10 Downing 
StrebL At yesterday’s meeting 
between Sir Geoffrey and Mr 
Lee there is thought to have 
been a general discussion 
about the situation iri Korea. 
South. Korea is concerned at 
the build-up of North Korean 
forces close to the border. 


Waldheim 
war file 
revealed 

From Frank Johnson 
Vienna 

A courier from the Austrian 
Mission to the United Nations 
was yesterday flying here with 
a file, held by the UN for 
nearly 40 years, which covers 
Dr Kurt Waldheim’s service 
in the Balkans during the 
Second World War. 

Herr Rudolf Kirchschlager, . 
whom Dr Waldheim is cam- ; 
paigning to succeed in the 
presidential election of May 4, 
has announced that he will 
rule on whether it implicates 
Dr Waldheim in war crimes. 

The file is part of an 
immense collection of docu- 
ments gathered by the Allies; ' 

Some of them formed part 
of the prosecution case for war 
crimes. But that does not 
mean every name in them 
denotes a war criminal. 


Chilean doctors in 
budget cuts strike 

From Lake Sagans, Santiago 

Chilean doctors began a inadequate resources, and put 
two-day strike yesterday to on & show as if nothing 
demand the resignation of the unusual were happening,” 
Health Minister, Dr Winston said Dr Haydee Lopez, the 
Chinchon, the repeal of new general secretary of the Col- 
health legislation and the rein- lege of Physicians, 
state ment of Dr Ricardo “We are more and more 
vacarezza, president of their aware that we cannot expect 
Santiago union branch, sacked solutions to our demands 
for his role in a December without a democratic change 
work stoppage. j n our country," he said. 

The doctors are especially Meanwhile, the national com- 
upset by conditions in clinics mittee of bishops has pub- 
and hospitals where budgets lished a statement calling for 
have been severely reduced, in “serious revision" of the 1980 
line with the Government's constitution adopted by the 
philosophy that education and military regime, 
social services should pay for It is the first time they have 
themselves. - directly criticized the regime’s 

“The question is whether f° r a gradual return to a 
it’s Jess ethical to stop work to “protected" democracy. They 
demand Chileans' right to also predicted that this year 

would be “a time of difficult 
and painful confrontations”. 


health, or to go to hospitals 
and offices where there are 


Tegucigalpa (UPI) - Presi- 
dent Jose Azcona Hoyo of 
Honduras said his govern- 
ment did not ask Washington 
for S20 million (about £13.5 
million) in military aid to fend 
off an alleged Nicaraguan 
Army invasion on its bolder. 

President Reagan, citing the 
seriousness of aggression from 
a “communist dictatorship," 
sent S20 million in emergency 
military aid to Senor Azcona 
saying the money was request- 
ed to repel the attack. 

“The Government of Presi- 
dent Jose Azcona Hoyo did 
not request military aid from 
the US Government as has 
been much speculated in the 
national and international 
press." a presidential palace 
statement said. “It is com- 
pletely false.” 

it said the only request 
made to Washington was “for 
the use of air transport to 
rapidly move Honduran 
troops to the sectors where the 
Sandinista Popular Army 
crossed over”. 

The announcement of an 
“invasion" of Honduras by 
troops from leftist-ruled Nica- 
ragua came from Washington 
on March 24. The incursion of 
some 1,500 Nicaraguan troops 
across the poorly marked bor- 


der in pursuit of US-backed 
Contra rebels came on the eve 
of a Senate vole on President 
Reagan's $1 00 million aid 
package for the rebels. 

A day later, the Govern- 
ment of Honduras, a staunch 
US ally, which at first vigor- 
ously denied the reports, said 
the Sandinista had “crossed 
into” western Olancho prov- 
ince. Shortly thereafter, Senor 
Azcona left for a Caribbean 
beach holiday. 

There was much conjecture 
among foreign diplomats that 
Washington exaggerated the 
Nicaraguan bonder raid to try 
to sway the Senate to vote in 
favor of Reagan's Contra aid 
proposal. 

Also in the presidential 
statement, Senor Azcona de- 
nounced statements by Presi- 
dent Daqiel Ortega, of 
Nicaragua, who said Sandinis- 
ta troops did not violate the 
border but rather entered a 
“no-man’s land” where Con- 
tra rebels have bases. 

“On the Honduran-Nicara- 
guan border, there does not 
exist nor can there exist a so- 
called ‘no-man’s land’ because 
the border was clearly marked 
for perpetuity by the Spanish 
King on December 23, 1906,” 
the statement said. 


US tells allies of Libya link with Berlin attack 


From Christopher Thomas 
Washington 

The United States has pri- 
vately instructed embassies in 
Western Europe to tell its 
allies that it has hard evidence 
linking Libya with Saturday's 
bomb atrocity in a West Berlin 
discotheque. 

It hopes, through qaiet dip- 
lomatic means, to use the 
evidence to coax Europe to- 
wards co-ordinated action 
against Colonel GadaffTs 
regime. 


American officials believe 
that there are tentative signs 
that Western Europe is finally 
responding to efforts to broad- 
en die dispute with Libya 
beyond its US-Libya 
dimension. 

A senior official, without 
giving details, said investiga- 
tors had gathered evidence 
showing that Libyan agents 
had operated through die Lib- 
yan People's Bureau, or em- 
bassy, in East Berlin. It is not 
clear if the US has linked 
other foreigners with the blast 


Details will be given privately 
to the US allies. 

The Reagan Administration 
is upset that news of the 
evidence, much of which ap- 
parently came from intercept- 
ed Libyan messages, was 
revealed in an American tele- 
vision interview given in Bonn 
by Mr Richard Burt, the US 
Ambassador to West Ger- 
many. It is wary of being seen 
pressurizing its allies too 
much in public to act against 
Libya. 

Mr Burt said there was 


"very dear evidence” of Liby- 
an involvement, adding that 
during the week before the 
explosion the US had told the 
Soviet Union and East Germa- 
ny that “we were concerned 
about the possibility of an 
attack coming from the Libyan 
People's Bureau”. 

The US believes that if 
West Germany does move 
against Libya, ft might provide 
the incentive for other West- 
ern European governments to 
follow suit. 


• BONN: The US has asked 
West Germany to impose eco- 
nomic and political sanctions 
on Libya after claiming Liby- 
an involvement in the disco- 
theque bomb attack, in which 
two people died (A Correspon- 
dent writes). 

News agency reports here, 
quoting West German govern- 
ment sources said Washing- 
ton had presented 
documentary evidence to Bonn 
alleging Libyan involvement in 
the blast. 


Phosphor 
burns 
treated in 
Kabul 

Islamabad (Reuter) - Ka- 
bul hospitals arc treating 
many cases of phosphorus 
burns, suggesting Soviet and 
Afghan forces are using the 
searing chemical as a weapon 
in Afghanistan, Western dip- 
lomats said. 

Reports from the Afghan 
capital show that one man has 
died of bums, possibly from a 
phosphorus bomb. Such burns 
had not been previously re- 
ported from Afghanistan. 

Economist 

defects 

Bonn (Reuter) - A leading 
East German economist has 
defected to West Germany 
after an official trip to Austria, 
Bonn government sources 
said. 

They named him as Mr 
Harry Maier. aged 52, from 
the East German Academy of 
Sciences in East Berlin. 

Curbs eased 

Bonn (Reuter) — East Ger- 
many is easing restrictions on 
West-bound travellers in a 
move that could be lied to 
plans by the Communist lead- 
er. Mr Erich Honecker, to pay 
a long-awaited visit to West 
Germany later this year. 

Crossing crash 

Berlin (API - A freight train 
rammed into a commuter bus 
on an East German railway 
crossing in thick fog near 
Lauchhammer. killing eight 
bus passengers. 

Queen’s job 

Copenhagen (Reuter) - 
Queen Margreihe of Denmark 
has started work as a costume 
designer fora television version 
of a Hans Christian Andersen 

slOTy. 

Pink protest 

Barcelona (Reuter) — Cata- 
lan radicals sprayed pink paint 
on the US Navy frigate 
Capodanno here. 

Pacific peril 

Manila (Reuter) — A French- 
owned luxury yacht was hi- 
jacked by pirates off the 
southern 'Philippines and its 
crew of four set adrift in a 
rubber raft They were later 
picked up. 

Super speedy 

Washington (Reuter) - US 
firms have won contracts worth 
$89.5 million (£60 million) for 
research into an aircraft that 
would fly in space and take two 
hours mom New York to 
Tokyo. 

Muldoon up 

Wellington (Reuter) — The 
former New Zealand Prime 
Minister, Sir Robert Muldoon. 
has been rehabilitated by his 
National Party, now in opposi- 
tion, with promotion to foreign 
affairs spokesman. 

Olga’s return 

Moscow (Reuter) — Svetlana 
Alliluyeva. Stalin's daughter 
who defected to the West and 
then came back to the Soviet 
Union, has confirmed that her 
daughter Olga would be return- 
ing to school in England soon. 


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RIL 9 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


-V. if . < 


j_. , •■■• r-i 

'• '■■■■ • >A : 



I, 


Pnzzle of link to Civil War incident 

vanish right Union deal 

uspected of 22 

itchinp nlot bullfights 




.« »t^Vvi4]t-v ■ 
tvA' 1 


at 


Pretoria reins in 
whites who fan 
flames of race war 

Fran Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Spam's principal jutefli- 
gence agency, run by the 
arart fores. is investigating 
anegea efforts by extreme 
ngnt-wmgers to incite plotting 
against the Socialist Govern- 
ment in connection with the 
fiftieth, anniversary in July of 
the outbreak of the Civil War. 

Defence Ministry sources 
yesterday confirmed a report 
on the .. investigation , in. 
Cambio J6, the Madrid news 
weekly, though 1 ;thcy den ied' 
the incidents had reached 
coup plot proportions. ; 

. “AJJ that has be«i revealed 
is how easy it is to' mint 
clandestine propaganda sheets 
and then send them to some of 
the military,” a Ministry 
spokesman said. 

According to Cambio 16* 
agents of the Centre for De- 
fence Intelligence have been 
investigating two former offi- 
cers serving prison sentences, 
who took part in extreme 
right-wing- coup attempts in 
1981 mid 1982,’ as -possible 
authors of thesfaeeuu V ’ ' 

These claimed that theSt*- 
daiists are engaged in a canK 
paign coindding ’wnb 7 the 
fiftieth ancvecsaiy Tto ehmi- 
nate the last remains, of the 


..Franco.’ legacy and retnm 
Spain to the spirit of April 
; 1931”. This was when Spain 
became a republic after the 
abdication of King Alfonso 
XIH, the .present King's 
grandfather. 

The sheets also claimed that 
-■ the Government is secretly 
negotiating the independence 
of Spain’s Basque region with 
ETA, the Basque separatist 
organization. . 

: The ' magazine stud five 
different messages had. been 
'detected," beginning last 
• ' Christmas; They were sent to 
generals, admirals and other 
service chiefs, especially in the 
Madrid. Seville, Valencia and 
. Valladolid: military regions. 
They were all signed with the 
pseudonym “Toe Director”, 

. 'recalling the procedure Gener- 
al Mola, one of the conspira- 
tors with General Franco, 

. used, in bis "secret 
instructions” to the- rebels 
before the . 1936 uprising 
; againstihe republic. ’ 

Others Suspected, the week- 
> fy added^ induded- a senior 
' oflRper' , wkh the. Brimete 
. arm o ur ed divigon.ouiside the 1 


From Richard Wigg 
Madrid 

Spaing Fiesta Nadosal our 
gp ahead this season thanks to 
a decision by the haflfighters' 
union to stipend fts threat- 
ened strike over pensions. 

Its grievances, however, 
have not been resolved. Anx- 
ious about their earn mgs for 
the coming season, the boil- 
fighters and their teams ac- 
cepted a promise from 
government negotiators to 
solve pension problems. 

It is die teams of Picadors 
and Batttferiileros, who are 
recruited by the bullfighters 
and do not earn big money, 
who are most worried. 

The government, faced with 
a deficit of more than £540 
mSlioa in die country's social 
security system, wants to in- 
corporate the bullfighters' spe- 
cial pension scheme Into die 
national insurance plan. 

It and the bullfighters’ 
unkm have now given them- 
selves until the end of die year 
to compromise. 

Under the previous scheme 
dating from die Franco era, 
bullfighters only had to con- 
tribute for 10 years in order to 
qualify for a pension. The 
government now wants a 35- 
year contribution. 




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Members of the interna^onal anti-nuclear organization Greenpeace, flying their flag on the 
Nevada desert test she in the United States at the weekend. Six members of the group, 
which wanted to prevent a test yesterday, were arrested on the range on Monday. 


[ South Africa's ruling Na- 
tional Party (NP) has served 
warning that white right-wing 
extremists who take “the law 
into their own hands” are 
playing into the bands of 
revolutionaries by fanning the 
flames of a full-scale racial 
conflict which whites would 
not survive. 

The warning, the most open 
official expression of concern 
to date about the activities of 
right-wing groups, is con- 
tained in a front-page article in 
the latest issue of Nationalist, 
the NFs official newspaper. 

The article referred to a 
number of recent incidents in 
which whites have cruised the 
streets in cars taking pot shots 
at black pedestrians, or made 
unprovoked assaults on 
blacks. It also criticized the 
activities of extreme right- 
wing political parties and 
organizations. 

Such behaviour, the paper 
said, served the aim of left- 
wing revolutionaries who 
"want while fears to turn to 
rage so that peaceful co- 
existence and co-operation be- 
tween South Africa's 
population groups becomes 
impossible”. 

Emotions had to be calmed, 
and people had to understand 


what the Government was 
doing, (he paper went on. This 
was why a federal congress of 
the NP was to be held in 
Durban on August 12 and 13. 
Meanwhile, the chairman of 
the Broederbond, Professor J 
P de Lange, yesterday denied 
reports that the semi-secret 
society of the Afrikaner elite 
was seeking talks with the 
outlawed African National 
Congress (ANC). 

M A third party did ask us 
whether we would be interest- 
ed. and we said we were not 
interested”. Professor de 
Lange told The Times. ”Wc 
regard the ANC as a terrorist 
organization, and it is not true 
that we have put out any 
feelers”. 

An official in the ANCTs 
information department in 
Lusaka, the Zambian capital, 
said that the ANC had also 
been approached by an un- 
named third party, and asked 
what its reaction would be if 
the Broederbond requested 
talks. 

"Our answer was that we do 
not deal with intermediaries, 
but that if the Broederbond 
approached us directly with 
such a request, the National 
Executive would consider it”, 
Mr Tom Sebina, the assistant 
information officer, said. 


-wing civilians. 


Nato secrets charge 


Athens — A young Greek 
naval lieutenant who is being 
court-martiaUed in Piraeus on 
charges of espionage, was 
alleged by prosecution -wi^ . 
nessesyerieitbyjolmvegrvien 
Nato weapons system secrets; 
to the Soviet Union (Manila 
Modianowrites).- 
Lieutenant VaSsilis- 
Sereptsios, aged 35. \ffas arrest- ;■ 
ed last summer on infonriat 
tion supplied by Mr Sergei 
Bnkhan, a Soviet diplomat in ; 
Athens who defected to the 
United States in May last year. 
He was later identified as die 
deputy director of the Soviet 

UN seizes 
chance 
in Chad 

By a Staff Reporter 

Eighteen years of dvfl war 
and 14 years of contmums 
drought have left Chad, the 
poorest country in the world, 
ravaged. But last year that 
cyde was broken with rains 
and this year th e coun try has 
’ not requested emergency aid. 
Umoef has seized die win- 
dow of opportunity and is tn 
posh ahead with a $100 mil- 
lion WWWWO) development 
programme which ft hopes wtfl 

take Chad and 15 other aura- 
tries in Africa out of their 
downward spiraL 
The programme for Chad 
wfll cost an estimated $38 
million. It indudes a vaccina- 
tion programme for children 
under four years. Already a 
10-day vaccination campaign 
in Ndjamena has been her- 
alded a great success by the 
Unkrf representative ta Chad, 
Mr Ulf Kristoffersson. He 
sp irf in London yesterday that 
around 70 per cent of 
j> Nl Jjamw M 1 *! diiijff 1 * had torn . 

covered, which would save 
about 1,500 from death or 
crippling disease. 


military intelligence (GRU) in 
Greece. \ 

General George Politis, 
. chief of the Greek central 

- intelligence service (KYP), 
who interrogated Mr Bokhan 

- m Washington, said that Mr 
Soepisios had been, passing 
jnteftigeuce to the . Russians 
for eight years. • T 

. Lieutenant-Colonel Dimi- 
tris Karatzanis afKYP, anoth- 
er witness, told the court that 
the defendant had given his 
Soviet contacts Nato’s secret 
manuals for the Harpoon 
missile as weO as the anti- 
aircraft Sea Sparrow system. 

Museveni 
to fight 
corruption 

Ftom Charted Harrison 
' Nairobi 

President Museveni, of 
Uganda, is launching a major 
operation against widespread 
'corruption in government and 
semi-government services 
, which has existed for many 
years as a result of the 
economic breakdown which 
began when General Idi Amin 
took power in 1971. 

' It was announced in Kam- 
pala that a commission of 
inquiry would soon be set np 
to look into the activities of 
ministers and heads of state- 
-owned bodies. 

In response to what the 
government said was a public 
outcry, the commission will 
investigate financial scandals 
and abuse of office. Members 
of the public will be invited to 
give evidence. 

General Museveni has been 
bitterly critical of the way 
corruption, which roadbed 
alarming levels under General 
Amin in the 1970s, had been 
allowed to continue underJbe 
rule of General Milton Obote, 
who was ousted last July by a 
section of his own Army. 


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BASE 

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Clydesdale Bank PLC 
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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1 986 




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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


11 


Nakasone seeks better 
J apanese life-style and 
more spending power 


The Aptoese- -prime Minis^ 
wr, Mr Yasuhiro Nakasone, 
nas announced measures 
aimed at putting more spend- 
ing money in the pockets of 
his hard-working citizens and 
perking up their life-style. 

His pregramme is designed 
to try to buy the country's way 
° ut ,ts trade problems with 
the West by spending more at 
home on the good , things of 
life, such as better housing and 
cheaper imported bee? He 
hopes to divert some of the 
country's energies from the 
export drive. 

“I hope that each one of my 
fellow Japanese people will 
pause and reflect upon yout 
own life-style and will give 
some thought to achieving an 
enhanced pattern of 
consumption,” he said. 

“In the background of these 
large (trade! surpluses lie eco- 
nomic structural factors seen 
in the Japanese economy such 
as being export-oriented. 
Therefore, we should make a 
switchover in our traditional 
way of thinking and tackle 
structural adjustment of the. 
Japanese economy,' thereby 
transforming it into an inter- 
nationally harmonious one. 

"It is impossible for Japan 
alone to continue to be- an 
island of solitary prosperity. 


From David Walts, Tokyo 
with a large current account 
Imbalance; depending on ex- 
ports. It is no exaggeration to 
say that our success in achiev- 
ing the transformation will -be 
essential in determining 
Japan's future .... 

"I intend to endeavour to 
deploy the vitality of the 
Japanese- economy further to 
improve the quality of the 
nation's living standard.” In a 
message to the rest of the 
world, he said: "Japan is now 
at an historic turning point in 
its relations with the interna- 
tional economic community. 
Our continued large current 
account imbalance is a matter 
of serious concern not only for 
the management of our own 
economy but also for the 
harmonious development of 
the world economy.” 

But, tike so many similar 
pronouncements in the past — 
including a report issued on 
Monday from a committee 
chaired by Mr Hamo 
Maekawa, the former head of 
the Bank of Japan — the new 
announcement is long on 
generalizations and short on 
specifics.- Nor is it easy to see 
how some of the . proposals 
would actually lead to real 
change, especially as these 
"comprehensive ..economic 
measures” are for the short 


term rather than the medium 
to long term of the Maekawa 
Report 

In one case at least the latest 
economic .package actually 
contradicts suggestions made 
by Mr Maekawa’ s experts. 
They proposed that Japan's 
uneconomic coal industry be 
allowed to die. Yesterday's 
statement approves the con- 
tinuation of government pay- 
ments to mining industries in 
difficulty. 

The new measures were 
approved by a meeting of the 
Ministerial Conference for. 
Economic Measures yester- 
day, which was also given the 
Maekawa Report The meet- 
ing did not accept the report, 
but there will be some unspec- 
ified follow-up measures. 

The key points centre on 
passing on to the public some 
of the benefits of the greater 
purchasing power of the yen 
through cheaper oil and gas; 
bringing forward public works 
projects by signing contracts 
in the first half of the year; 
promoting housing construc- 
tion tv making housing loans 
cheaper and opening up more 
areas for development. Sup- 
port prices for beef pork and 
butter are to be reduced. 

Kenneth Fleet, page 21 


Bangkok 
bomb hits 
US-Thai 
meeting 

From Neil Kelly 


English lesson on the train 


9? 


A bomb exploded last night 
in the car park of the Era wan 
Hotel SO minutes before Mr 
Caspar Weinberger, the US 
Defence Secretary, was due to 
dine there with the Thai Prime 
Minister, General Prem. 

Three bystanders were in- 
jured but there was little 
damage. The dinner was 
moved to another hotel 

General Narong 

Mahanond, the Thai police 
chief, said hedid not not know 
who was responsible and that 
nobody had claimed 
responsibility. 

He said measures for die 
Prime Minister's security had 
been stepped up immediately 
after the bomb went oft 
Rumours of a move against 
the government swept through 
Bangkok quickly but they 
appear to have little 
substance. 

Observers believe the explo- 
sion may have been a protest 
against some American poli- 
cies towards Thailand. 

Before Mr Weinberger ar- 
rived in Bangkok on Monday 
night unidentified political ac- 
tivists had threatened to stage 
demonstrations during his vis- 
it against new American trad- 
ing laws which threaten 
Thailand's traditional rice ex- 
ports- 



Stephanie Ri 
express 


ogez, an English teacher, and her businessmen pnpils meet on a. Lille- Paris 
for a language lesson under a scheme organized by the French railways. 


MEPs dc 
battle 
over hoim 
of EEC 

From Richard Owen 
Brussels 

The row over whether t 
European Parliament shot 
move from Strasbourg to Bn 
sets was stepped up yesterd 
when a mulri-party group 
Euro-MPs moved to oppe 
action in the European Coi 
of Justice by tfae Fren 
Government, which wants t 
Parliament to stay in Fraud 

Many MEPs want the 2 
sembly moved to Bnisse 
where the Commission a> 
Council of Ministers meet, 
be at the centre of power and 
concentrate EEC institntio 
in the "capital of Europe”. 

The Parliament, which is 
hugely' consultative body b 
has control over part of t 
EEC budget, at present hoi- 
ks debates in Strasbourg ai 
committee meetings in Bru 
sels, with the secretariat ba» 
in Lnxembourg. MEPs. the 
staff and tons of documen 
have to be moved between tl 
three points. 

The Parliament voted by 
slim majority' in October 
authorize building a new pa 
liamentary chamber 
Brussels. 

Mr Peter Price, Conserv 
five MEP for London Sout! 
East, and foor other MEI 
argue that it is "imperative f. 
the Parliament to assert ful 
its powers". 


Cardinal to meet 
Jaruzelski before 
the Pope’s visit 

From Roger Bayes, Warsaw 

Cardinal Jozef Giemp, the monitoring sermons up and 


Primate of Poland, is pfauuring 
a summit meeting with Gener- 
al Jaruzelski, the Polish dead- 
er, in the next few weeks to 
discuss tender Church-state" 
relations before the Pope 
makes a pilgrimage to his 
homeland. 

At a rare press conference 
on Monday evening, ostensi- 
bly called to introduce .the 
cardinal's impending trip to 
France, the primate found 
himself replying to a detailed, 
official attack on the political 


down, the country. 

fiewrotealr 

• Apriest speaking in the 
northern poat OTSsaetin do- 
ctoring: "Co mpmniSM is aho a 
collective madness — , in the 
name of Satan it murdered 
people -and set np 
crematoriums”. 

• A, priest in the Silesian 
of Wroclaw preached that 
co m mnmsm and Nazism were 
without a fixture because they 
rejected God. Only religions 


sins of the Polish priesthoods r . ... coul d sha ke off, the, chains and- 
In an article recently written. U-. '•* 


under his customary 
onym. Mr Jerzy Urba£~ilife ; 
goverment spokesman,- sot 1 -., 
veyed and attacked several 
dozen sermons deUveredfirmn 
Polish pulpits. Among other 
things, he said, the sermons 
equated communists with Na- 
zis and accused the police of 
murder. 

The article was thefirst 
major attack on radical priests 
for several months and is 
being regarded as a flexing of 
the muscles before the detailed 
negotiations begin on the 
Pope’s trip, doe next year, ‘ ■ 

The cardinal stressed; “It 
was not a good article even, 
from the point of view of the 
Polish authorities, as this 
story mentions the names and 
addresses of priests who so for 
have been unknown”- He said 
phrases had been taken oat of 
context 

The chinch, be said, was 
also under fire at va rious 
closed communist meetings 
but "of course we have no way 
of recording such statements” 

- a jibe at secret police 
monitoring of chord) services 

— "but we know they exist and 
don’t intend to use them to 
prove there is hostility against 
the church”. 

Mr Urban’s artide showed 
that the authorities had been 




Stnirisfaw Maftowsld, recent- 
ly tn Id . his-coagregatioar 
"There. are three systems of 
threat to human life fin the 
world — communism, Nazism 
and the destruction of. newly- 
conceived lives (abortion)”. 

• One bishop said: "Atheists 
. usually .grow up to be thieves 
awTmurderers r ~ 

Other derks in Mr Urban's 
Urogfist accused the police of 
beating sp children and of 
spreading terror. One sermon 
-be’ quoted called on police 
agent* hidden In Church con- 
. gregarious to "abandon this 
work, join us . . . swindlers 
don't pniy. They . plot with 
Safonandifoslipeoirie into the 

mm -m 

The authorities, after s lull 
of several months, now dearly 
want-Co reactivate the issue of 
outspoken- priests. Church in- 
formants. say the quotations 
' given by Mr Urban were 
sometimes taken out of 
context 

The Church leadership, 
however, appears to be re- 
sponding to some degree to 
official criticism; it has recent- 
ly transferred two popular 
priests from worker parishes 
to the countryside, where their 
political influence is less 
noticeable. 

H off UK 


trip over snub 


From Our Own Correspondent, Warsaw 

the West after the declaration 
of martial law in 1 98 1. 

But the Polish Goverment 
openly expressed its irritation 
when the then Minister of 
State for Foreign Affairs, Mr 
Malcolm Rilkind, visited the 
grave of the murdered Solidar- 
fhanlafn. Father Jctzv 


rsaw yesterday accused 
n of discriminating 
t the Polish Goverment 
ling out a meeting be- 
Mrs Margaret Thatcher 
* Polish Foreign Minis- 
r Marian OrzBChowskL 

Jerzy Urban, the 
men! spokesman, con- 
1 that an April trip to 
m had been planned by 

Tzechowski but that it 

een postponed because 
w felt he would not get 
propriate reception, 
bout actually menuon- 
? name of Mis Thatcher, 
okesman made it dear 
he Poles felt they tad 
snubbed. Poland, M r 
i said, wanted a " part- 
;e dialogue" with Bnt- 
iut during preparatory 

he British side tad trted 

iscriminaie against Po- 
nd denigrate the impor- 
of the visit”. 

Geoffrey Howe, the 
p Secretary, visited 
w last April and met 
-al Jaruzelski, then 
Minister, and so the 
made clear yesterdey , 
:x pected an equivalent. 

1 are very much for foe. 
ipment of relations with 
Britain.” Mr Urban told 
1 reporters, “but on foe 
>f mutual reciprocity . 
md has been suaddJy 
itself out of foe dipfo- 
isolation. imposed by. 


ity chaplain. Father Jerzy 
Popieluszko. Sir Geoffrey, like 
Mr Rifkind, also met Solidari- 
ty advisers. 

The Warsaw Goverment, 
feeling that the tide was now 
flowing its way again, attached 
great importance to high-level 
meetings in London. 

.By contrast, Mr 
Oraecbowski is receiving top- 
flight treatment in Bonn. He 
has met. President Richard 
von Weizsacker and Chancel- 
lor Helmut Kohl as weB as his 
counterpart, Herr Hans- 
Pietrich Genscber. 

The discussion appears to 
be mainly about East-West 
relations with emphasis on 
achieving a new level of 
political and economic 
contacts. 

.. Herr Erich Honecker, foe 
East German leader, is expect- 
ed to visit- Bonn soon after the 
East German Communist Par- 
ty congress, which begins on. 
ApriF 1 7. There is speculation 
in Soviet Woe capitals that Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov, the Sovi- 
et leader, may attend foe East 
Berlin congress, giving sup- 
port to Heir HonecJcer's Bonn 
trip.- - 



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'MzktA 



Scandinavia’s labour 


crisis 


120,000 out of work as 
Norway is plunged 
into industrial chaos 


fc . Norway - was plunged into 
industrial chaos yesterday as a 
series of nationwide lock-outs 
put about 120,000 people - 
more than 10 per cent of the 
employed population — out of 
work. 

In a year_of unprecedented 
labour unrest throughout 
Scandinavia, the Norwegian 
dispute was said to be the 
most serious here since 1931, 
when 7.5 million working 
days were lost Employers 
took the action late on Mon- 
day, n ight after last-minute 
arbitration organized by the 
Federation of Trade Unions’ 
failed. 

^ The five industries afifected 

“ are iron and metal,, buildine 
and construction, hotel and 
restaurant trades, textiles, and 
electro-chemicals. The 
lockedout unions in those 
industries join 15,000 oil and 
gas workers whose lock-out at 
the weekend stopped all pro- 
duction in the North Sea, 

Several of Norway's largest 
industrial concerns have al- 
ready closed completely, a 
protracted dispute could halt 
the entire aluminium 
industry. 

Bewildered hotel residents 
were asked to leave their, 
rooms as about a quarter of 
the nation's hotels locked their 
doors. Hotels unaffected by 
the dispute were fillin g up 
rapidly. 



■ -■ » \ -*• •> >*.; 


From Tony Samstag, Oslo 

Several newspapers were 
unable to publish. including 
the' leading quality daily 
A fieri poster^ which is forced to 
postpone its laiirkh of a 32- 
page tabloid supplement on 
Saturday. . The. ■ postponed 
weekend edition was to be a 
first step towards Sunday 
publication, which printing 
unions have prevented here 
since 1919. 

Negotiations have foun- 

Presfd ent Kotvisto of Finland 
returned to his ofBdal resi- 
dence yesterday after a civil 
service strike had foreed-ium 
te; stay at a garenuaent guest 
house rnh by a private hotel 
(OUiKivinen writes from Hel- 
sinki). The President’s palace 
was excluded from the strike 
after the state., employees* 
anion lost sympathy when 
President Koivisto drove him- 
self to the guest house became 
his chauffeur was orilring. 

dered over a complicated 
package deal involving rela- 
tively higher wage rises for 
low-paid workers, a shorter 
working week and a govern- 
ment nmirof 5 per. cent for 
.overall pay increases, Under- 
lyii« the;coa£Bct however, is. 
? succession of . economic set- 
backs tied" to this year's col- 
lapse in oil prices, which has 
taken the coalition Conserva- 
tive Government by surprise. 


Mr Kaare Willoch, the 
Prime Minister, says there is 
unlikely to be any government 
intervention in the dispute. 
On televirion on Monday 
night he described the dispute 
as a tragedy, coming at a time 
when Norway needed as much 
revenue as it could earn. 

The Finance Minister, Mr 
Rolf Presihus, has predicted a 
slump in the economy, a 
warning he combined with the 
announcement that Norway is 
to enter international credit 
markets this year, its first 
foreign borrowing since 1990. 
• STOCKHOLM: With mas- 
sive industrial action post- 
poned at the last minute 
yesterday, the so-called Swed- 
ish model of highly central- 
ized wage bargaining, coupled 
with a state-run arbitration 
system, breathes what many 
observers see as its last gasp 
(Christopher Mosey writes). 

The employers and the 
unions' organization agreed to 
the 4$-hour postponement 
only 90 minutes before 1 8,000 
key white-collar workers in 
private industry were due to 
strike. - 

if the dispute is not settled, 
most private industry will 
come to a halt on Friday as 
employers are set to respond 
with a lock-out of 300,000 
workers and the onions call 
out another 30,000. 


Bangladesh opposition split 


Divisions in opposition par- 
ties campaigning for.demoda- . 
cy in Bangladesh became final 
as the ruling military Govern-' 
mem yesterday ended scrutiny , 
of more than Z1 00 nomina- 
tion papers filed for parita-: 
mentary polls on May 7. * _ 

A last hope for a united 
movement was dashed as 
Begum Khaleda Zia, .chief ofa 
seven-party alliance which has 
boycotted the polls, attacked 
opposition leader Sheikh 
Hasina Wazed for inking part 
in the elections under martial 
law. 

Sheikh Wazed. whose - 15- . 
party alliance eartfortled,; 4 ; 


From Ahmed Fazt, Dhaka 

joint civil agitation with- Be- 
gum Zia, is running .in' four 
constituencies. 

\ ;jrThey forged rene- 

gades oirt-tb share power with 
the military : rulers^* Begum. 
Zia foid~ ai least' 50.000 stipr 
porters at a noisy rally in the 
south-eastern port city of 
Chittagong oh Monday 
marred by clashes in which 50 
people were hurt. . 

She repeated her demands 
for withdrawal before the 
elections of martial law, the 
release of political prisoners 
and press freedom. Her accu- 
sations rvofatth^ang^TTC^? 


sponse from Sheikh Wazed 
and her Awami League, which 
has candidates in all 300 
constituencies 
“Those, who are boycotting 
the polls are for anarchy,” 
Sheikh Wazed. who has also 
come under fire from dissi- 
dent groups in the 15-party 
alliance, said at a meeting on 
Monday. 

• Students scared: Thirty-five 
Iranian students in Bangla- 
desh have refused to return to 
Iran and have asked the 
Dhaka office of the L7N High 
Commissioner for Refugees to 
arrange asylum for them in 
Australia and Canada. 


THE TIMES WED 


Benazir 
upsets 
her best 
friends 

From Michael Hamlyn 
Karachi 

When Miss Benazir Bhutto, 
the acting president of the 
Pakistan People's Party, re- 
turns here from exile in Lon- 
don this week, she will find the 
party founded by her father, 
Mr Zolfzkar AS Bhutto, the 
hanged Prime Minister, in 
deep disarray. 

The party which was her 
father's vehicle to power and 
the creation of him and his 
friends — who included some 
of the chief feudal landlords of 
bis home province of Sind - is 
on the point of splitting in 
three. 

Only skilled diplomatic ma- 
noeuvring on hex part will be 
able to prevent the split, and 
many are asking whether she 
has sufficient experience and 
tact to achieve it. 

The problem arises mainly 
from the autocratic way in 
which she has tried to ran the 
party while in exile and the 
idiosyncratic appointments 
she has made to key posts. 

In particular, she is resented 
for having bypassed estab- 
lished party figures who were 
her father's colleagues- Her 
appointments for instance of 
Mr Jehangir Badr as the 
Punjab secretary, and of Mr 
Shall Muhammnddi as secre- 
tary of the Sind party, have 
caused deep offence. 

They are regarded by party 
stalwarts as having no experi- 
ence and do credentials to 
occupy such key posts. The 
fact they were no minated in- 
stead of elected is also 
resented. 

The most senior of the party 
chief tain* affected by her atti- 
tude has been Mr Chilian 
Mustafa Jalot, president of 
the Sind party, former chief 
minister of the state and a 
former federal minister. 

While Miss Bhutto was 
under house arrest or in exile, 
Mr Jatoi, one of the state's 
largest- landowners, spent 
much time in prison as leader 
of the Movement for the 
Restoration of Democracy. He 
came to London recently to 
take part in a meeting of the 
central committee of the party 
and also to make his protests 
known to Miss Bhutto. 

“I am not happy,” he toM 
me in his bouse in a smart 
Karachi suburb. “I have given 
25 years of my youth to this 



AY APRIL 9 1986 


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Before leaving London. Miss Benazir Bhutto tells newsmen 
she hopes to bring down ihe Pakistan Government. 

party and to the family. 1 have no heed. ”i was not listened 


given my sweat and my blood 
and I have given my finances 
and my youth to this party. I 
have declined the highest of- 
fices in the country. 

”1 feel the party belongs to 
me and I belong to the party, 
and i will make every effort to 
stay with in the party. But I 
reserve my right to have my 
principles. 

“I will fight for fundamental 
principles, for consultation on 
major issues, like foreign poli- 
cy, like strategy within the 
country, like appointments,” 
be said. 

Mr Jatoi and his followers, 
who are by no means inconsid- 
erable, are particularly angry . 
over the appointments, which 
they feel have passed over- 
people of real merit. 

”Tbere should be elections 
at all levels.” he insists, ”bnt if 
yon have to have nominations, 
at least you should nominate 
those who have sacrificed, 
those who have had lashes, 
those who have suffered in 
jails for a number of years. We 
cant bypass them.” 

But Miss Bhutto paid him 


no heed. ”i was not listened 
to,” he said. Though perhaps 
Mr Jatoi inwardly regrets that 
be did not accept the Prime 
Minister's job when it was 
offered to him last year by 
President Zia, he still main- 
tains he is loyal to the leader- 
ship of Miss Bhutto and will 
accept that she is (he prime 
ministerial candidate for the 
party. 

But if he breaks away he 
could weaken the party consid- 
erably. He would leave trium- 
phant that wing of (he party- 
led by Makbdoom Khalia 
Quddin. the younger son of the 
Sind religious leader and he- 
reditary safttt, the Pir of Hala. 

The party is already weak- 
ened by the departure of two 
other former ministerial col- 
leagues of the late Mr Bhutto, 
Mr Mumtaz Ali Bhutto, his 
cousin, and Mr Kafeez 
Ptrzada. the creator of (he 
Bhutto Constitution of 1973. 

They were expelled recently 
when in frustration they set up 
a movement for the establish- 
ment of a Pakistan confedera- 
tion, the Sind, Baloch. Pushtu 
Front. 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


Greek steel chief 
assassinated 
in Athens street 

From Mario Modiano, Athens 

A leading Greek industrial- cembcr 1975 by murdering Mr 
isi was yesterday shot and Richard Welch, the American 
killed in a busy central Athens Central Intelligence Agency 
street in the tenth political station chief in Athens, securi- 
assassi nation since 1975 to be tv authorities have not been 
claimed by the mysterious able to find a clue that would 
terrorist organization “17 lead to the arrest of a single 
No* ember**. member of " 1 7 November'*. 

Mr Dimitris Angelopoulos. The organization's victims 
aged 79. the founder and have included two American 
chairman of Haly vourgiki. the officials, four Greek police 
main steel works in south officers and one Greek news- 
Grcece. was murdered as he paper publisher, as well as 
walked from his Kolonaki fiat some of their drivers. Almost 
to his city office. ail the killings were carried out 

Witnesses said he was shot with the same .45 calibre 
five limes in ihe abdomen and pistol. 

chest by a young man wearing Last November the organi- 
a raincoat and waiting on the zation claimed responsibility 
pavement. They said the man for bombing a police bus, 
pulled a pistol from a travel killing one policeman, 
bag. fired it at the industrialist. To such a group of extreme 

then ran across the street to a left-wingers. Mr Angelo- 
waiting motorcycle driven by poulos. known here as the 
an accomplice. The two es- grandfather of the Greek steel 
raped in the dense morning industry, would represent the 
traffic. typical Greek capitalist even 

Mr Angelopouios. who died though his family's beginnings 
shortly afterwards in hospital, were modest and involved a 
was known to have walked the small concern selling nails and 
same route every day. Busi- wire, 
ness associates said he. like Mr Angelopoulos went into 
several other Greek industrial- steel proper in the early 1930s 
isis. had received death and after the war he was able 
threats but chose to ignore to set up Halyvourgiki with 
them. the help of the Marshal] Plan. 

Mr Thanasis Tsouras. the Todav the steel mill has a 
Greek Minister of State for workforce of 1.400 and ranks 
Public Order, said a 13-page twelfth in the country 
proclamation claiming re- The industrialist had diver- 
sponsibility for the killing sified 10 years ago by buying 
from the “17 November revo- ihe Alfpha steel works in 
lutionary organization** was Newport. South Wales, as well 
found near ihe murder scene, as a mill in Switzerland when? 

Since the group inaugurated he also acquired some banking 
its terrorist activities in Dc- interests. 


Aquino accepts first 
foreign bank loan 

From Keith Dalton, Manila 


Six weeks after taking pow- 
er. President Corazon Aquino 
vesterday accepted the first 
foreign loan for her Govern- 
ment. reminding Filipinos 
that “while they are now 
politically free they remain 
shackled by the economic 
legacy" of former President 
Marcos. 

The “reckless borrowing 
and profligate spending” of 
the Marcos regime had 
plunged the Philippines into 
iis worst economic crisis since 
the Second World War. Mrs 
Aquino said at a foundation- 
laying ceremony at the head- 
quarters of the 32-nation 


Asian Development Bank. 

She thanked the bank for 
lending her Govemmem $100 
million (£67.5 million) 

Military officials, .mean- 
while. reported that r tasked 
men yesterday murdeed the 
former governor of Tarlac, 
President Aquino's home 
province, who was dismissed 
last week. 

Mr Said Federico Pcralpa. 
aged 58. a member of Mr 
Marcos's political party, was 
asleep in his house in San 
Manuel Town, when he was 
stabbed. His wife. Victoria, 
was wounded in the scuffle. 


_■ «iy.\ ■■p/.T. ■ 

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EAST MIDLANDS 1986 








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14 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 


SPECTRUM 


Finney 

bubbles 

back 


Albert Finney's considerable energy has 
been harnessed by an American play that 
brings him back to the West End tonight 


A lbert Finney is loping 
around the bar of die 
Apollo Theatre in 
Shaftesbury Avenue like 
a racehorse kept too long under 
starter's orders. “Forgive me if I 
stand up and walk about", he says. 
“It’s all this energy." 

There is indeed plenty of energy 
here — a barrel-chested Charlie 
Bubbles a quarter of a century on, 
now finding himself in the pivotal 
role of a traumatic American 
drama making the transition from 
Hampstead Theatre to the West 
End. He opens tonight in Orphans, 
a three-hander written by Lyle 
Kessler and first produced in 
Chicago and New York by the 
Steppenwolf Theatre Company. 

“1 fee] like a two- year-old 
again", says Finney, who is think- 
rag in equine rather than human 
terms. “No. 1 feel like an English 
musician who's gone to New 
Orleans and put his head inside a 
jazz club and has heard this 
fantastic Dixieland music coming 
from the stage. And I’ve fallen in 
love with it. It's no: that I was 
jaded before, I just didn't know 
what I was going to do." 

At least in terms of bis immedi- 
ate future. Finney has found the 
answer. For the next 12 weeks he 
will be playing the role of Harold, 
a Chicago con-man kidnapped by 
a young crook in an old house in 
north Philadelphia, and who, 
rather like the interloper in a 
Pinter play, envelopes the menage 
with his paternalistic impulses. 


The question has to be asked: 
what was an actor of Finney's 
magnitude doing in a nice little 
theatre like Hampstead, without, 
at that stage, the guarantee of a 
West End transfer? “The point 
about Hampstead", he says, “ is 
that it's a little like being on the 
road. I don’t mean to be rude 
when I say that it was the right 
size. It had the same capacity as 
the Steppenwolf Theatre in Chica- 
go and the West Side Arts in New 
York to which it transferred." 

As a company, Steppenwolf is 
noted for die sheer energy with 
which it invests its productions. 
When it acquired Albert Finney 
for the part of Harold in Orphans 
it was compounding the endemic 
tension of its approach with the 
essentially English acting style of 
Finney himself. 

Apart from The Biko Inquest 
and Sergeant Musgrave's Dance . 
Finney has not been on the stage 
for seven years, but working on 
films in England and the United 
States, “i have been on what you 
might call a sabbatical for 20 
months, unsure what to do next. 
That is often the case in a fallow 
spelL You wonder what on earth it 
is going to be that is going to 
engage you next. 

“I own some thoroughbred 
racehorses in New- York state. Not 
long ago I was staying in Long 
Island with some friends, where 
there are two racetracks. And 
Michael Medwin. who's head of 
Memorial Productions, rang me 


jehnHaym 



Kidnapped: Albert Finney as a Chicago con man — Sine of those special the a tric al experiences’ 


up and said there was a part which 
he thought might suit me. Now, as 
fate would have it, I was going to 
Manhattan in the next few days, 
and I went and saw the play, and 
by the interval I had decided that I 
wanted to be involved with these 
people. . . it was like hearing a 
different kind of jazz, played by 
different musicians." 

Seeing Finney perform on the 
play's last night at Hampstead, 
one was struck by the spectacle of 
an actor of this stature making the 
journey, albeit a hazardous one, 
back to the roots of his trade, and 


exposing himself to an entirely 
new set of influences. 

"But for me". Finney recalls, "it 
was something that enabled me to 
regain my sea-legs, having been off 
the stage for so long. In some ways 
I was rather tense. You see. as well 
as being in the play, as well as 
fitting into the style, I had much to 
answer for. because I was respon- 
sible for bringing it over here, and 
I hadn't realized how tense it 
would make me feeL That anxiety, 
which is quite deep, but which is 
covered over by the demands of 
doing a show, slowly starts to 


‘It was something that enabled 
me to regain my sea legs’ 


emerge, and it wasn't until the end 
of the third week that 1 found 1 
could feel at all relaxed." 

Even after 30 years in the 
business, Finney remains an ob- 
sessive actor, living and breathing 
the material of the moment. "In a 
way, this was a godsend for roe, 
because Jeff Fahey, who plays the 
pan of the elder orphan, was new 
to the cast the same as I was. So it 
was a terrific help to see the 
director Gary Sinise work with 
him. . . how he could instill into 
him that intensity of feeling." 

One strange thing about 


Finney's re-emergence on the 
London stage is that it should bein 
an American rote — admittedly 
one for which he has done long 
hours of homework. But be does 
not share the sense of surprise. 

. "When I was doing Luther, I 
used to go to monasteries and sit 1 
with the brothers, just to see what 
it was like, all those men sitting 
and eating -with each other. For 
this one, well. I remember all the - 
dead-end kids in the films with 
Bogart, and that tradition of 
gangsters with people like Cagney 
and Tracey. I also had a tape made 
for me by someone from 
Steppenwolf with four Chicagoans 
talking, and I listened to it over 
and over again. 

"And of course I’ve been living 
in New York, so I bear them 
talking, every time I take a cab to 
work. I have ray ear as an actor. 
Actually I think I once blew a film 
deal in LA because a guy who ran 
the studio tod an intrusive S 
sound -is that it? -and 1 lis- 
tened to him absolutely fascinat- 
ed, and suddenly found mysdf 
saying to him ‘sbimply 
shmashing’, just because I'd been 
watching his mouth move, and 
imitating it to myself 1 couldn't 
help if 

“But. you see, my generation of 
kids, we used to imitate all the 
movie stars. If there was a Jolson 
movie in town, then we'd do 
Jolson, if it was Bogey, we'd do 
Bogey, and so on." 

Orphans is a draining theatrical 
experience, for the cast no less 
than the audience, and Finney 
would have it no other way. It 
chronicles a sea-change of domes- 
tic responsibilities between, a 
street criminal elder brother and 
the sibling whom he has kept, in 
every sense, in the dark, in order 
to enhance his own sense of 
indispensibility in the absence of a 
bona fide parent. All this is called 
into question by the advent of a 
“kidnap victim" eager to impart 
his own street-wisdom even- 
tondedly to both boys. 

"I don't argue that this is the be- 
all and end-all", Finney says, "but 
1 do say that it's one of those 
special theatrical experiences you 
get every once in a while: You 
want every job to be like this, and 
to fire you in a particular way. 1*11 - 
tell you wity I believed it impor- 
tant for Steppenwolf to bring the 


show over more or less in the form 
in which it was done in America. 
Go back to West SideStory. When 
that arrived, it was a revelation to 
English dancers to see a US dance 
company doing the things it did 
for the four months prior to its 
replacement If the English danc- 
ers hadn’t seen -ft, they- wouldaT 
have known what the Americans 
were talking about" ' . 

When he. tries to analyse rite 


director of Orphans, Finney goes 
back to 1959, when he- was 
understudying Olivier in Cqriola- 
nus. "After having done four or 
five performances in the part I 
became aware of the feet that a 
great actor can take a role with a 
wide range, and make it even 
wider. Olivier himself tod laid 
down a very dear blueprint, and 
so it was hot the easiest thing to 
understudy. If there tod been two 
comparative graphs,' mine would 
have been wobbling around on the 
equator, but Olivier’s would have 
consisted of great sweeps up and 
down to both the poles. I believe 
that Gary Sinise is doing an 
Olivier on the directorial level, 
pushing his actors to the very, 
extremes of emotion." 

T hese days Finney the nag- 
fancier may no longer be 
the champing yearling he 
once was on his first 
cultish furlongs of the Fifties, but 
he remains decidedly sprightly, 
eager for new courses. He traces 
his love of horses back to boyhood 
in Salford, where his father and 
grandfather before him . ran a 
bookmaker’s. The filing about 
racing is that it's adrenalin-pro- 
during and you don't have to 
make an effort yourself It's thrill- 
ing without your having to *put 
out’ as they say. . . 

"In middle-age in' this business 
you can get fuddy-duddy. I've 
always feh that with the so-called 
new wave, people say: 
‘everything’s going to change'. 
And then it gets written off as a 
movement, the idea of a- spear- 
head cultural assault, and then 
after that the actors go their own 
way and it aU settles dowit I just 
believe in.work in progress. It’s a 
life. Oneof the things l love is that 
I don't know what TIL be doing in 
six months time. I have this sense 
of loyalty to a piece of work.” 

Alan Franks 




£ 


'OSt. 


i«r- 

\i J&: 


Trouble brewing 


The cost of the coffee in your 
cup is going up. Droughts, 
wars, earthquakes and assort- 
ed disasters natural and 
manmade have pushed up 
world coffee prices to their 
highest levels for a decade. 
Supermarket prices have risen 
twice this year already, and 
more increases are on the way. 

The increases reflect a virtu- 
al doubling of world raw or 
green coffee prices. In January 
1995 coffee fetched about 136 
cents a pound. By January this 
year it was 198 cents, and 
futures prices - the amoant 
traders expect to pay in three 
months time - are 250 cents. 

So what is happening ? The 
answer is a graphic example of 
the chain linking a raw materi- 
al with the final consumer and 
the first link is the coffee tree, 
of which there are two main 
types - arabica and robust*. 


The finest and most expen- 
sive coffees are often arabicas, 
which are mainly used for 
roasted and ground beans. 
Robostas are turned into in- 
stant coffee. But all coffees are 
grown between the tropics of 
Cancer and Capricorn in areas 
of high rainfall. They need 
slopes for drainage, plenty of 
sun to ripen the fruit (which 
develops Into the familiar 
bean), and steady warmth 
between 25 and 30 degrees 
centigrade. 

Sodden changes in tempera- 
ture can wreak havoc. Most of 
the coffee-growing regions of 
Brazil suffered drought during 
the critical early months of the 
flowering and pollination 
which produces the coffee 
berries, and the damage has 
been spectacular. Produc- 
tion — some 30 million bags 
in 1984/5 — may be as low as 


16 million this year. That has 
combined with wars in Uganda 
and Angola, and earthquakes 
and floods in Latin America, 
to disrupt the. balance between 
supply and demand on the 
world market. There is also 
the fear is that a frost in the 
middle of the year - the 
southern hemisphere winter - 
could inflict more damage. 

In theory, limits to coffee 
prices are set by the Interna- 
tional Coffee Organization, 
which has 75 exporting and 
importing members. Bat the 
recent rise has been so explo- 
sive that it burst through the 
ICO's ceiling of 150 cents a 
pound. Attempts to control the 
price have been suspended. 
Only when the industry is 
confident of a good Brazilian 
crop again wOl prices falL 

Michael Prest 


TIMES GUERNSEY FISHERMAN'S SWEATER 


P revious offers for Times 
Guernsey knitwear have proved 
very popular: both men and women 
appreciate the warmth, comfort and 
easy style it provides. 

T ihis classic Fisherman's Sweater is 
an attractive addition to our 
Guernsey range. As with our 
previous offers it is a high-quality 
garment specially made for Tunes 
readers in Guernsey of 100°o pure 
new wool. This Fisherman's Sweater 
features a traditional style — deep 
ribbing on neck and cuffs, with 
patterning around the drop shoulders 
and the hem. It is available in a choice 
of 3 colours — Navy, Oatmeal or 
Red. Tough and practical, it makes 
for ideal outdoor wear, yet is smart 
enough to wear on any kind of 
occasion. 

This classic sw cater will be a welcome 
addition to anv wardrobe. 


PRICE — £34.95 

Please note that if you prefer ft* near 
Otis garment ioose you should 
purchase a size larger than normal. 

The Times Guernsey Fisherman's 
Sweater Offer 
Bourne Road. BexJev, 

Kent DA5 1BL. 

Tri: Cray find (0322) 533 16 
for eiu|iri ries only. 



A II prices are inclusive of post and packing. 
Please allow up to 21 days for delivery. 

If you are not satisfied the Times will 
refund your money without question. This 
offer can only he despatched to addresses 
in the I K. 


THE TIMES 


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Resisting the corporate raiders 


Stephen Aris concludes his series 
on takeovers with a look at a 
family firm where management and 
workers united to fight off a bid 


In the early 1970s Victor 
Watson, chairman of the 
printing and games company 
John Waddmgton, created 
something of a stir by round- 
ing up half a dozen tycoons 
and sitting them down at 
Brown’s Hotel to play Monop- 
oly, his company’s best known 
product. The contest was won 
by the late Sir John Cohen of 
Tesco. thanks to some useful 
advice from Watson himself. 

A few years later Watson 
was playing Monopoly in 
earnest: and this time it was 
not Mayfair and Park Lane 
that were at stake but Wad- 
dington itself. Worse, 
Watson's adversary - Robert 
Maxwell of the British Print- 
ing Corporation, Mirror 
Group and Oxford United — 
occupied roost of the best 
spaces on the board. 

For a long period in 1983 
and again in 1984 it looked as 
if Waddington, an old-estab- 
lished family company based 
in Leeds, would go the way of 
the 15.909 British firms that 
have been swallowed up by 
bigger fish since 1963. at a cost 
to tire buyers of £92 billion. 

In the event the raider was 
beaten off and the business 
transformed. Waddington to- 
day is a much leaner, fitter and 
more profitable company than 
it was when Robert Maxwell 
came knocking on the door. 
And though many of the 
changes were initiated before 
the takeover battle. Watson 
says that there is no doubt that 
(he company has benefited 
from die experience, unpleas- 
ant and nerve-wracking 
though it was. 

"One effect was that it 
pushed us centre stage with 
fire spotlight firmly on us", he 
says. “We are still quite a 
small company but these days 
we are in a different league. 
City analysts come to visit us 
and we are discussed and 
talked about." 

The other tangible by-prod- 
uct is financial In two years, 
as Maxwell struggled for con- 
trol. the company's shares 
rose fourfold: a £10 million 

company in early 1983 be- 
came a £40 million one by the 
end of 1984. When it was all 
over Waddington used its 
new-found financial muscle to 
make a couple of friendly 
takeovers of its own. Last 
December it acquired an 
American plastics company. 



like that sort of thihg’Y Wat- 
son says. -But it was only at the 
eleventh ' hour, when WafSdn 
and Perry gained the support 
of iKtf NStwich Union; winch 
held nearly per -cent of the 
cdoipany.'that victory seemed 
even likely. • ■ 

Even then the company 
would not have escaped tod 
not die bard-won fruits of the 
previous two years of rational- 
ization and reorganization al- 
ready started to show through. 
When Maxwell made his fust 
bid, the company's perfor- 
mance was dreadful; profits of 
only £162JX)0 on a turnover 
of £43 million. 




,*■*.*». 


Playing for real: Victor Watson and Robert Maxwell, who did not pass go 


Additional reporting by 
Jeremy Warner and William 
Kaw 


Comet Products, and a British 
firm making self-adhesive la- 
bels. fora total of £7.4 million. 

Although the other benefits 
of the battle are not so easily 
measured, they are real Victor 
Watson and his managing 
director. David Perry, who 
together orchestrated the anti- 
Maxwell campaign, are con- 
vinced that the company 
would never have pulled 
through tod not the workforce 
united behind them to keep 

There is no doubt 
that the company 
has benefited 


the company independent. 

There was never any ques- 
tion of Watson's own determi- 
nation. “People accused me oi 
being too emotionally com- 
mitted, and 1 am", he says. 
There have been Watsons in 
charge for three generations 
and the chairman's first task 
was to transmit his enlhuri- 
asm to a workforce that had 
already suffered heavy redun- 
dancies and to a management 
that had been comprehensive- 
ly reshuffled. 

Watson's style is direct and 
personal. His humour is dry 
and self-deprecating. And al- 
though he had been busy 
wielding the hatchet himself 


he had little difficulty in 
casting Robert Maxwell as the 
bogeyman. 

Maxwell first gave notice of 
his intentions in a telephone 
call to Watson at 7.30 on the 
morning of May 17, 1983. He 
said that he was coming to 
save the company, that every- 
body should work together, 
and that he intended to make 
Watson vice-chairman of his 
master company, BPCC. Wat- 
son, who was already fighting 
off another takeover bid from 
a local firm called Norton 
Opax. told Maxwell to get lost 
Two hours later the formal bid 
arrived. Maxwell was offering 
240p per share, which valued 
the company at around £12 
million, slightly better than 
the Norton Opax bid. 

The next step was to assem- 
ble all the shop stewards and 
other- representatives in the 
canteen and to make an 
unashamed appeal for loyalty 
and solidarity. .As a former 
Maxwell employee. David 
Perry, the managing director 
and former England rugby 
international, voiced his lack 
of enthusiasm, and was sup- 
ported by a union official who 
had also once worked for a 
company taken over by 
MaxwelL 

The meeting had the desired 
result. Over the next 18 
months, so Watson says, the 
loyalty of the workforce never 


wavered. "We have our store 
of militants, but throughout 
the bid we never heard a word 
from them. Everybody was 
determined to fight off 
MaxwdL” 

Persuading the institutions 
to stand firm was, however, a 
more testing business. In or- 
der not to antagonize them the 
company fought a low-key 
campaign and desisted from 
public mud-slinging. ' "Re- 
spectable shareholders don’t 


Everybody was 
. determined to 
fight off Maxwell 


But management had an ace 
up its sleeve. It knew that in 
the next year the profits would 
be at least £2.5 million. The 
problem was whether the 
company would be given time 
to show what it could -do. 
David Perry says: "All along 
we were trying desperately to 
persuade the shareholders that 
their faith in us. was justified; 
that in the end we would 
deliver". 

The outcome for the com- 
pany was a happy one. It 
handsomely bettered its profit 
forecast and Maxwell retired 
with a bloody nose. But h was, 
as the Duke of Wellington 
said, “a damned close-run 
thing". The episode has left 
Victor Watson with his confi- 
dence and enthusiasm unim- 
paired but with strong views 
about corporate raiders. 

“They are not interested in 
rebuilding companies", he 
says. “They are opportunists 
. in for the main chance," 


Tomorrow: Burgess on Beckett 

Anthony Burgess profiles Samuel Beckett, the enigmatic 
playwright, who celebrates his 80th birthday this week 


CONCISE CROSSWORD (No 920) 


ACROSS 

1 Sturdy (6) 

4 Superficial (6) 

7 Bow (4) 

8 Cosmos (8) 

9 Destruction remains 

m 

13 Drag behind (3) 

14 Unostentatious (1 3) 
17 Dried grass (3) 

19 Merciless (8)- 

24 Movabkness(B) 

25 Chinesedqg(4) . 

26 Mean (6) 

27 Strong drink (6) 

DOWN 

1 Engrossed (4) 

2 Life story (9) 

3 Tree stem (5) 

4 Toss (5) 

5 Ship's company (4) 

6 Lariat (5) 

10 Inexpensive (5) 

11 Attentive (5) 

12 Exact (3) 



13 Bride's bundle (9) 

14 Sensible (4) 

15 Quieten (4) 

18 Decorate (S) 


26 Trojan epic (J) 

21 Pastoral musk: (5) 

22 DudBu&e(4) 

23 Change direction (4) 


SOLUTION TO No 9 19 . 

ACROSS: 1 Scenic 5 Cosy 8 Icing 9 Unsound 11 Debility 13 
Awe 15 Accomremems 17 Mead 18 Vertebra 21 R emnant w 
Guile ~23 Odds -24 Regard ^ . . 

^ " 7 Wfod. 

lAuiuu n mm iDL nmmwt ■«■ 

22 Gag 


DOWN: 2 Climb 3 Nag 4 Counterfeiter 5 Cost tSoupcoo 
jgjimcr^ tCPrecaakcr 12 Loud 14 Emit 16 Crammed 19 




* ? 


i 



i 




• — * 1 '— - ' 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 ! 986 


* * * 


15 


WEDNESDAY PAGE 


- / 



Progress brings its own dilemma for the childless, Thomson Prentice writes 

test tube maybe... 



i* 


The bright clusters :'qf snapshots 
pinned to the memity '.board in a 
London cJinic ar? a constant remind- 
er that at least some dreams come 
of a new-boni 
baby tells its. .ownj story, of a 
successftiinght against infertility. 

More than anything else in her life,: 
Tessa Horton wants to add to that 
collection: But she is 38 now and after 
five years of disappointment, she 
knows the odds are against her. 

Neither she nor her husband 
Michael will surrender their dream 
while the doctors continue to 
offerthera . even.' a slender hope. “1 
tend, to live from one appointment to 
the hext'Vshe'says, after traveffing 40' 
miles from. her. Surrey home to see a 
specialist in ihe clinic al. Hammer- 
smith HospifiaL - ”... 

- . For the H prions, ?md an estimated ’■ 
.one. million other couples in Britain 
striving to overcome .childlessness, 
doctors, can resort to a remarkable 
and increasing number of treatments. 

Advances in the "use of 
drugs .surgical techniques and in vitro 
fertilization, mean that babies are 
now being born to couples who until 
quite -recently would have been 
described as hopeless cases. 

Failure to ovulate may be responsi- 
ble for between 20and 30 per cent of 
an infertility, but it is one of the most 
successful areas for treatment with 
drugs. ' •“ ~ ; 

Menstrual cycles are controlled by. 
the pituitary - and- "hypothalamus - 
glands- m the brain. Ovulation de- 
pends on the complex interplay of the 
pituitary "hormone FSH (foliide- 
stimulating hormone) and the . hor- 
mone oestrogen in the ovaiy. . 

Unless this delicate relationship is- 
precisely balanced, a women is 
unlikely to ovulate and thus cannot 
conceive. 

The drug clomiphene is an anti- 
oestrogen that has been used for 
many years and is highly successful in 
inducing ovulation by causing a rise 
m the production of FSH and LH 
(luteinizing hormone), another im- 
pbnant pitttilary chemicat *-• 

- Other ferfility drugs are based on. 
the gonadotrophin hormones which 

Side effects range 
from 
to innltip] 


PMAYOvfttt 



act directly and with great effective- 
ness on the ovary. Recent refine- 
ments. have led to the use of small 
.pumps, placed underfoe skin, which 
i relea^regulaied.jMsKtrfhonnones 
^intg : tbe_v pleat's ., ^bloodstream 
throughout the meoknial cycle. 

- Successful as fertility drugs are, - 
_ there are iijeviiaWy side-cffects. D»~ 

: pending on the_ drug,'jii£ dosage%i|cLf- 
the patient, these - may range from 
miscarriage, to multiple births offonr 
or more babies. '1 

For some women, the risk of 
having too many babies is preferable, 
to the prospect of having none. 
Doctors are continuing to research 
means of reducing that risk, and 
today foe birth of more than twins as 
a result of fertility drugs is considered 
unusual. 

There have been advances, too, in 
surgery to repair blocked ot damaged 
fallopian .tubes. Conventional surgery 
has been almost completely, replaced 
by microsurgery. Using .a microscope 
and foe finest electrical instruments,, 
the surgeon can reverse sterilizations, 
and unblock or repair the damaged 
areas. 

Such surgery has been successful in 
up to three out of four cases, but even 
so the overall live birth rate resulting 
from it has been as low as about 13 
per cent. 

However, some surgeons are now 
applying lasers to tubal surgery. Mr 


Simon Wood, a consultant 
gynaecologist at the Royal Devon and 
Exeter Hospital, has achieved a 33 
per cent live birth cate in a small 
number of patients by nsing a laser. 

He. performs foe operation, known 
as it salpingostomy, guiding a laser 
beam with . a microscope, to remove 
, blockages at the outer aids of foe 
- fallopian tubes.“There is no tissue 
damage caused - by foe laser and 
_ therefore less chance of foe hlnckay 
recurring”, be.says. 

Following foe operation, one pa- 
tient, Mrs Shona Ankers, 25, of 
Exeter, succeeded in becoming preg- 
nant and earlier this month gave birth 
to -a son. She and her husband 
Stephen. 27, agreed to foe srngery as 
an alternative to pairing m vitro 
fertilization. . 

Unfortunately, 'neither drugs nor 
surgery-areas- effective in treating 
.in women 

-patients. 'Most male disorders are 
-'entirely TintreaiabJe, although 50me 
^encouraging progress has been made 
-irnthe last few ye&v,, : : ~ . 'V. .. 

- Sirigeiy can be successfal m revers- 
ing vasectomies, but fully restored 
fertility may result in less than half 
. foe cases. Researchers in the United 
Slates have found that deterioration 
of foe testicles can occur in otherwise 
healthy men following a vasectomy. 

This new finding, reported last 
November, follows other research 
indicating that the body's immune 
. system produces as anti-sperm anti- 
body following vasectomy. . . 

AboutJO per cent , of infertile men 
■arebeftevedto produce antibodies to 
ih&r own . .sperm;' -but, tre atm e nt to 
counteract this condition has been 
developed at foe Chelsea Hospital for 
Women and St Bartholomew's Hospi- 
tal, London, and elsewhere. 

■ A success rate of 33 per cent in 
pregnancies has been achieved so far. 

Semes of drugs are available to try 
to increase sperm production and 
improve spam quality, but in the 
opinion of one leading specialist, 
none of them has shown any signifi- 
cant advantage. 


For many infertile men and wom- 
en, foe well-publicized developments 
in in vitro fertilisation appear to offer 
the greatest hope. But just what are 
their chances of having a test-tube 
baby? 

Since foe birth of Louise Brown in 
Oldham in 1978, more than 2,000 
test-tube babies have been bom 
around foe world. Last year, foe first 
frozen embryo baby was bom in 
Australia. 

Last month, Britain's first frozen 
embryo baby, Gregory Jackson, was 
bom to his 34 year old mother and 
her schoolteacher husband, as a result 
of in vitro fertilization treatment at 
the Bourn Hall dink, near Cam- 
bridge, of IVF pioneers Dr Robert 
Edwards and Mr Patrick Step toe. 

In Britain, America and Australia, 
many hundreds of embryos are now 
stored in liquid nitrogen tanks at 200 
degrees C below- zero. ^They “are the 
potential children of infertile conples 
who have undergone IVF treatment. “ 

Some embryos produced -through 1 * 
IVF have been donated - to other 
childless couples. The freezing and 
storage of sperm .has also been 
successfully developed. Last Novem- 
ber, Australian scientists announced 
they were foe first team to successful- 
ly freeze and thaw human ova, which 
can subsequently be fertilized in- 
vitro. 

But despite foe extraordinary ad- 
vances, IVF treatment is still much 
more likely to fail than succeed. Only 
about 15 per cent of patients produce 
babies as a result, although research 
has shown foal women’s expectations 
are up tio three times higher. 

“Test-tube baby treatment should 
be seen as foe last resort, usually 
appropriate only when all else has 
railed”, says Mr Robert Winston, 
director of infertility clinic and IVF 
programme at Hammersmith 
Hospital. 

“It is one of the least successful of 
all fertility treatments and has taken 
attention away from other treatments 
which are usually far more likely to be 
of help.” 


That view is challenged by Dr 
Edwards and Mr Steptoe at Bourn 
HalL “We don’t believe IVF should 
be seen as a last resort h has a very 
important place in the treatment of 
infertility and deserves more recogni- 
tion as such” Dr Edwards says. 

Professional rivalry is intense 
among IVF specialists and it is 
common to hear criticisms of one 
unit’s work by scientists in another. 

Edwards and Steptoe have been 
especially critical of foe practice by 
some clinics of replacing three or 
more fertilized eggs in the mother's 
womb to increase the chances of a live 
birth. 

They believe that this practice 
reduces foe chances of all the embry- 
os surviving to maturity, endangers 
the health of the mother, and may 
result in a multiple birth of premature 
babies. 

And the impact on a childless 
couple of becoming the parents of up 
to four infants may be extremely 
stressful, they say. Last October, a 
retired an historian, Mr Tony del 
Renzio, aged 70, found himself in 
such a situation. His wife Doris, 38. 
gave birth to two girts and two boys 
after IVF treatment at Hammersmith 
HospitaL 

“I must admit we would have been 
happier if we had been able to have 
just one baby”, Mr del Renzio says. 
“But we were warned about foe risk 
of a multiple birth, and we took that 
risk, willingly." 

The babies were the third set of 
quads to be bom following IVF at 
Hammersmith in the last four years. 
Many more single births there have 
also resulted from the treatment 

Mr Winston, the clinic’s director, 
agrees that multiple births should be 
avoided, but argues that until tech- 
niques are improved through re- 
search, it is reasonable to offer 
patients foe maximum chance of a 
baby with foe least number of 
attempts. 

Such techniques are likely to be 
much more successful within foe next 
few years as new research yields its 
potential 

At Edinburgh University’s repro- 

Research on human 
embryos has raised the 
fiercest controversy 


ductive endocrinology department. 
Professor David Baird is trying to 
develop tests to identify which fertil- 
ized human eggs are healthy, and 
which are abnormal They hope to be 
able to exclude abnormal **pre- 
embryos” from IVF treatment, im- 
planting in foe mother only those 
which they judge to be most likely to 
mature and survive through 
pregnancy. 

Undoubtedly the skills of special- 
ists such as Professor Baird will lead 
to better treatment and benefits to 
other forms of infertility. Much de- 
pends, however, on research, and it is 
research on human embryos which 
has aroused the fiercest controversy. 

The recommendation from the 
Warnock committee that restricted 
research should be permitted under 
foe regulations ofa statutory licensing 
authority has failed to impress many 
opponents. 

Mr Enoch PoweU has been unsuc- 
cessful in seeking legislation to ban 
such research, but many MPs have 
similar views and foe next episode in 
the parliamentary campaign has al- 
ready begun with the publication on 
January 24 of a private member’s Bill 
very similar to Mr Powell's. 

Rival factions in politics and foe 
medical profession have formed their 
own pressure groups to try to sway 
public opinion. 



Arianna Stassinopoulos: lead role in a designer wedding 

Arianna, social rocket 


Ken “Kick” Start indepen- 
dent TV producer, is pitching 
an idea for a prime time soap 
opera to network executive 
Rushing Yardage in the Polo 
Lounge of foe Beverly Hills 
Hotel 

“I see it as a Joan Collins or 
Anjelica Huston vehicle - two 
more Mario”, says Start “It's 
about this superwoman. 
Young. Beautiful. A genius. 
She is from Italy. Or Greece. 
Let's make it Greece. 

“She is sent to England to be 
educated. Oxford or what’s 
that other place? Cambridge. 
Make it Cambridge. She is foe 
brightest star of her genera- 
tion. She meets all foe Right- 
People. They love her. She has 
affairs with some of the Right 
People. She dumps them. 

“She writes. She pontifi- 
cates. Books, TV. magazines, 
newspapers. But is she happy? 

“She goes to New York. 
Conquest, conquest all foe 
way. Glitterati. Literati. She 
meets foe Right People. They 
love her. She has affairs with 
foe Right People. She dumps 
them. Is she happy? 

“Then she has this wild 
romance with foe heir to a 
gigantic Texas oil fortune. 
Figure we can end the first 
season with foe climactic 
event - a glittering society 
wedding with New York’s 
elite donating kidneys to be 
invited. 

“The working title is 
Arianna.” 

T he story of Arianna 
Stassinopoulos - the 
“rise and rise” as one 
New York magazine has 
called her thoroughbred stride 
in a social steeplechase - may 
never be foe subject of a prime 
time soap opera but all foe 
ingredients are there: beauty, 
genius, conflict, passion and, 
now, enormous wealth. 

On Saturday, 300 Right 
People will gather at foe 
Romanesque-style St 
Bartholomew's church in 
Manhattan for her ostenta- 
tious wedding to Michael 
Huffington. foe bright, hand- 
some 38-year-old heir to a 
Texas oil and gas fortune 
conservatively estimated at 
$300 million. As a social event 
it may rival foe forthcoming 
wedding of Caroline Kennedy. 

Bishop Edwin Moore, Epis- 
copal Bishop of New York, 
will officiate at a ceremony 
written by Arianna and com- 
bining Protestant and Greek 
traditions to the background 
strains of Haydn and 
Telleman. 



Diploma and. 
Certificate Courses 

WinkfieW Place erffere carter 
courees for girt* from the age 
of 17 in Cordon Bleu Cookery 
or Secretarial Skill*, There 
ore 3-term Diploma Courses 
or the 12-week Cookery . 
Certificate Course. Each 
cookery syllabus is 
supervised by the Cordon 

Bleu Cookery School of 
London. Th* Diploma " 
Courses also include 
dressmaking, ftodstry *™ - 

typtng- 

Student* may foe rwidentlal - 
or dally. Entry is in Sept. Jan 
and also AprilMay tor 

Certificate Course. Winkfidd 
is a beautiful Georgian house 
near Windsor. 2S rmles from 
London. There is a tennis 
eourt, outdoor heated 
swimming pod and 
extensive gardens. 

Classes ere email to ensure 
individual attention. 

Students leave Widdiew 
.with the foundation for a 
"career anywhere in the 
world. For a prospectus or 
interview pteasoeontad: 

BMOAKK ; 


One day my chintz will come 


^ Recently there was a 
# two-day exhibition for 

the funri&hing trade at 

Kensington Exhibition 
^ Centre. It was called 
“Better Buy British” and was 
held to persuade people to do 
just fh«* 

Britain designs and prints 
some of the most beautiful 
fabrics in the world. The 
ranges of glazed chintz — now 
enjoying an nnprecedeated re- 
vival both here and in Ameri- 
ca — are particularly .mouth- 
watering./ 

"..':And. : many of hs wraU 
indeed like to bnyBritish. The 
big problem comes whoa yen 
actually try to do so. A 
personal story fllnstrates how 
very difficult it can be to get 
the British fabric yon want 
Juuqfog np at yoar wmdews or 
(covering your chairs. . - ' 



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PersoralshopperawrieomeMpud^ to Saturday {a 00 a i m. t»6^0pjn- 


FIRST 

PERSON 


Last November, needing 
new curtains for the firing 
room, I fell In love with a 
glazed c hint z m liberty’s East 
India range. The local shop 
measured up and estimated, 
and I duly ordered. At first I 
was told tin fabric was oat of 
stock but would be in by die 
end of December. My hopes af 
retting tiie curtains up for 
Christinas were d ash e d, but 
nevermind.. 

At foe beginning of April, 
I'm still waiting. The materia! 
has not yet arrived in foe shop. 
To add insalt to Injury, I am 
informed that there will be a 
price rise when foe fabric is 
eventually delivered. 

In foe meantime, another 
room needed curtains. I found 
Just the stuff, again a glazed 
chintz — yes, Fra a convert, 
too — in foe Cofefax and 
Fowler range. The shop rather 
shamefacedly rang to say 
there was a 10 -week wait for 
this particular design and that 
I amid expect it to arrive 
around the end of May. 

A neighbour, also doing ap 
her house, told me she had to 
wait four months for some 
curtains for a bedroom. She 
too had ordered British fabric. 

Was al! this just bad luck, 
an mhappy coincidence, or is 
there something less than 100 
per cast efficientabotrt the 
British furnishing industry? 

It seems it is the latter. In 
fact, my neighboar and lean 
count ourselves among the 
fortunate ones-. Delays of six 
months, apparently, are not 
uncommon, and- some people 
are now having to waft tip to 


two and a half years for certain 
special designs. Such is the 
demand that our fabrics indus- 
try, ran on distinctly cottage- 
like fines, simply cannot cope. 

Henry Greenfield of Cole- 
fax and Fowler told me: “Ev- 
erybody wants glazed chintz. 
Business has don bled in the 
past two years and foe ma- 
chinery and staffing levels are 
irouip«|nnt» to deal with the 
new demand.” With three- 
and-a-half million people un- 
employed, one is tempted to 
ask, why don't they take more 
people on and get more 
machinery? 

“Just lately”, Mr Great- 

field continued, “there has 
been an obsolete glut of or- 
ders. We, like most fabric 
firms, have to rely on a few 
email fabric printers, who 
quickly fin np with work. We 
all have to wait our tom.” 

AUsoh Richards buying di- 
rector of Habitat, confessed 
that she ft often in despair 
abort the British famishing 
industry. She said: “On the 
whoie, British manufaftnrers 
are absolutely terrible, really 
am a teuri sh. 

“Once they quote a 
time, yoa find they rarefy i 
to ft The casual system does 
horrify us, but we’ve just had 
to get nsed to ft. These delivery 
dates are a problem through- 
out the whole home famishing 
industry in fob country. Man- 
ufacturers may quote March 1, 
but often May 1 will do. It’s 
got to the point where yon are 
actually surprised if it does 
come on time. 

“At Habitat we like to buy 
British, bat so often we have to 
order from abroad. We have a 
ridicatons ritnatioa in this 
country where there are 
five vat (a form of 
printers left, and we have to go 


t/0 ^lAPA<M - THAT'S THE YM3 
you CM EXPECT ■DELIVERS... 



to whichever firm is behaving 
itself at the time. 

“It’s true there is now a 
huge demand, but so many 
British fonts are firing in the 
past In the days when retail- 
ers could carry a tot of stock, it 
didn’t matter so modi, but 
most like to offer a large 
selection and so they can now 
only have samples in the shop. 

“Asa large high street chain 
we have slightly more mnsde 
bat, even so, we have to waft a 
long time. Unlike foreign 
firms, British companies don't 
appear to want to expand and 
grow, Thor attitude seems to 
be that if they've got enough 
work and a fall order book, 
why should they worry abort 
getting more orders? You've 
got me on my bobby horse 


now”, she added apeioetically. 

liberty, on the other hand, 
were distinctly huffy over any 
snggestkm that there coold be 
something wrong with the 
British famishing trade. Their 
official spokesman said: “We 
have 189 designs, and at any 
one time, 90 per cert wfl] be 
available. There have been 
some technical difficulties 
with a particular design (the 
one 1 ordered, naturally) and 
twice we’ve had to reject 
batches. We are still trying to 
get it right. 

Perhaps I'm being 
particularly impatient, 
hot it seems to me that 
fom- months is an awful- 
ly long time to wait 


5 


Wealth marries 
fame this weekend 
in a soap opera 
setting, reports 
Peter Fearon 

The guest list is apparently 
an abstract of Who 's Who and 
The Forties 400 although few 
names have surfaced. The 
matron of honor is Ann Getty, 
wife of Gordon Getty, argu- 
ably the world's richest indi- 
vidual She is also Arianna’s 
patron and surrogate mother, 
the woman who has helped 
guide her over many a social 
obstacle. 

The attendants, to be clad in 
creations of designer Paul- 
Louis Orrier. will be Lucky 
Roosevelt, chief of protocol at 
the White House: Barbara 
Wallers, the ABC interviewer 
who has gained more celebrity 
than the celebrities she inter- 
views: Terry Huffington, the 
groom's sister: and Agapi 
Stassinopoulos, Arianna's 
sister. 

Guests include Princess Mi- 
chael of Kent, publisher Lord 
Weidenfeld, Henry and Nancy 
Kissinger and Mrs Alfred 
Bloomingdale, widow of the 
department store millionaire. 

The night before the wed- 
ding there will be a cosy 
dinner for 100 at New York's 
Asia Society and there will be 
what a member of Arianna’s 
staff calls “a small reception” 
for the 300 wedding guests at 
New York’s palatial Metro- 
politan Club. 

The wedding is the climax 
ofa glittering career as a single 
woman in American society 
and doubtless the start of a 
hectic one as a hostess. Her 
publishers may be forgiven for 
wondering what it will do for 
her writing career - the manu- 
script of her Picasso biography 
is reportedly nearly two years 
late.. 

Arianna came to the United 
States in 1981 to promote her 
biography of Maria Callas: 
subsequently, it was alleged 
that an already published 
work on Callas had been 
plundered for the biography 
and there was litigation and an 
out-of-court settlement 

Arianna remained, as 
Americans say. “unfazed”. 
Her entree into American 
society comprised a letter to 
Lucky Roosevelt and a series 
of introductions from, among 
others. Lord Weidenfeld and 
Lord Bernstein. 


She was befriended by Bar- 
bara Walters and began filling 
index files with Right People 
telephone numbers, many of 
them gleaned at events to 
which she was invited by Ann 
Getty. She followed up the 
social leads assiduously, 
helped by a small staff of 
personal aides. 

Her arrival as a celebrity 
came with a lengthv. colourful 
profile in Sew York magazine. 
She was pictured gliding about 
New York harbour in an open 
speedboat not a hair out of 
place: working in her study, 
greeting guests: even balanc- 
ing grapes on her head. 

“When she goes to the 
ballet”, the magazine report- 
ed. “she is hailed and cheek 
kissed by so many people it 
seems the performance will 
have to be delayed.” 

I t also noted, prophetically, 
her “desire to get into 
society and find a wealthy 
husband”. Arianna has never 
confirmed that this was in- 
deed her desire, but she has 
certainly succeeded in finding 
one. 

She moved to Los Angeles, 
apparently bent on conquer- 
ing the west coast as thorough- 
ly as she has New York and 
Washington. 

In September last year she 
met Michael Huffington at the 
San Francisco Symphony - 
introduced by the ubiquitous 
Mrs Getty. Huffington shuns 
publicity even as Arianna 
craves it. The Houston Post 
library department reveals it 
has “just one iddy biddy clip” 
on him referring to bis nomi- 
nation as Assistant Secretary 
for Commerce in 1984. He 
withdrew. 

It is apparently on his 
insistence that as little infor- 
mation as possible is being 
revealed about his wedding 
and that is also one of the 
reasons why Arianna is not 
giving interviews prior to her 
nuptials. 

Huffington graduated from 
Stanford University with a BA 
in economics and a BSc in 
engineering and, reflecting the 
fact that oil millionaires do 
most of their prospecting on 
Wall Street, went on to Har- 
vard Business School for an 
MBA. He is a senior executive 
in his father's company. 

It is not a biography to set 
pulses racing among Dallas 
scriptwriters, but it has the 
aura of money and status. 
Arianna can supply enough of 
the rest to keep the show in the 
ratings long after the opening 
night. 


Liz Hodgkinson 


Could I get 
up your stairs 
as easily? 


install a stannan Access wheelchair staftHft 


And let people confined to wheetchaks 

gel lq your stairs unassisted— under 
thoir own push button control You 
open up many mote of yourfadffiesto 
handicapped people who tael (rear and 
more effective. 

Completely sate and easy to use. 
Noralip wheelchair platform. Sett- 
locking bantam. Passenger dops and 
stans it at w*. 

quick AtacoMvenmfT 
TO INSTALL 

Normaly no attentions needed, ms to 
rail alongside wall. 


StanrahcannsteA in a day - no mess. 
No noticeable noise. Motor butt into 
platform. Rims off easting power 
euprtr- 

Platform folds back, leaving slabs free. 
The inetroenswe aofetwn to access 
problems In public or mim nar a af 
butfngs. Ask Stennah tor details. 

FREE demonstrations. 

Send on the crayon tor free ootowr 
broenure and demonstration at an 
enstngtoGauan. 



Please rick 

Please send me your brodim tel about 
Suntan's Access wheeieharstwfifL 

Ptease conect me about a free demonstration □ 

Name - — 

Position.-.— ........ - 

Or gansaio n - - 

Address - - — 

Phone - - — 

Nowptoaee post -no stamp needed' to 0eot61S7 SOnnah lifts. FREEPOST. 

Andover. Hampshire SPfO 3BB. Phone f0264) 643H . tZ« hrsj 


SSI- 

. of 
a 
rit- 
:rO- 
eld. 
*aw 
the 
the 
lies 
ica- 
ull- 
ack 

iiin 

ean 

met 

tish 

ir>. 

Mr 

to 

of 

*ide 

•ign 

and 
irly 
h a 
the 

Mr 
ath 
nre 
Mr 
of 
fur- 
d 2 
nd- 
iDO- 



1 


16 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 


Labour: how real the revival? 


Fulham opens a series of key 
by-elections tomorrow. 
George Brock reports on the signals 
coming from the constituencies 


If. as an the polls suggest. Labour wins 
tomorrow's by-election in Fulham, the 
result win be rapidly projected into 
numbers of seats to be won and lost ax 
the next general election. This post-result 
ritual has always been an inexact science 
because of the distortions caused by the 
special conditions of a by-election; three- 
party politics makes these predictions 
even more unreliable. With more choices 
available to the floating voter, the exact 
way in which those decisions are made is 
of unprecedented importance. 

Fulham is only the first of three by- 
elections due this spring. The other two, 
in West Derbyshire and Ryedale, look 
likely to be held alongside the council 
elections of May 8. Will these very 
different seats confirm or confound the 
predictions made after Fulham? A large 
enough margin of victory will make an 
outright Labour victory next time seem 
closer. The three lines on the opinion 
poll graphs are bunched tightly together 
at the moment, just as they were in early 
1982 before the Falkland* war pulled 
them violently apart. The key issue now 
is how many Conservative defectors 
there will be and whether they will go to 
Labour or the Alliance. 

All three by-elections will reveal not 
only fresh clues about where the votes 
are going but also why. The Times 
commissioned Market & Opinion Re- 
search International (MORQ to conduct 
six in-depth discussion groups among 
voters in these constituencies who are 
thinking of changing their allegiance. 
What are the underlying issues, we 
wanted to know, that wilt move votes? 

There are two current interpretations 
of Labour's performance in the opinion 
polls. One holds that with a number of 
temporary problems behind it. the party 
is steadily reasserting its natural claim to 
be. tbe only opposition to the Tories. 
With Michael Foot replaced by Neil 
Kinnock, the anti-Militani purge under 
way and party organization revamped, 
this theory goes. Labour can boldly go for 
an outright majority, profiling from the 
unpopularity of Thatcherism. The Alli- 
ance may take votes from the Tories but 
it will do little damage in the Labour 
heartlands of the north and the rides. 

The counter-argument to this bolds 
that these successes are mostly on the 
surface. Kinnock may be likeable, ac- 
cording to the voters, but he is untried 
and thought likely to be ineffectual. 
Dislodging Militant, if possible at all, 
will be a long and unpleasant business. 
Party reorganization amounts to updat- 
ing the party's marketing operation in 
Older to provide a more effective 
disguise for ideological disunity. Accord- 
ing to La Stampa, Denis Healey appar- 


ently agrees with some of this 
interpretation. The extent to which 
voters lean towards either of these 
feelings about Labour will help deter- 
mine the division of the spoils — the 
votes leaving the Tories. With voters 
continuing volatile and unpredictable, 
there is much still to play for. 

The opinion polls of the last six 
months show Labour's vote holding 
generally steady, with most of the 
movement between the Conservatives 
and the Alliance. The strongest and 
dearest impression left by our groups 
was of the continuing appeal of the 
centre ground. What political scientists 
call “negative" voting (choosing against 
something disliked rather than for 
something liked) seems to dominate, as 
it mainly did in the 1983 ejection. 

A travelling stable lad in Ryedale 
voiced the creed of the negative, discon- 
tented mid-term voter who could end up 
anywhere on the political spectrum. 
“Mrs Thatcher is not far off being a 
dictator. Kinnock is the lesser of two 
evils. I suppose. She's going too far and 
he's not going far enough ... I might 
vote Liberal this time.” 


Short-sighted and 
signs of slipping 


it was central to Mrs Thatcher's 
electoral appeal that she did not look or 
sound like a stereotyped Conservative, 
and thus attracted an unsual number of 
working): lass votes. Both in these groups 
and in discussion groups commissioned 
by The Times last autumn on the 
influence of the “Thatcher Factor", it 
was clear that her most individual 
characteristics and achievements were 
fading in the public memory. Nobody 
appeared influenced — to the extent that 
it might affect the way they vote — by a 
Falk lands factor. Her leadership during 
the Falklands conflict is spoken of as an 
episode that is now history. 

Nobody mentioned the Prime .Minis-., 
ter in connection with any kind of 
overall economic vision for Britain. 
Asked to write down descriptive words 
for each of the party leaders more than 
one used the expression “short-righted". 
Brian, a marble mason living in Fulham 
and undecided about his vote this week; 
“I think her sternness has stopped us 
slipping further and further down, but I 
think she's come to a point now, I don't 
know whether she can improve it. Maybe 
she might start to slip down." 

The Westland affair may not have 
affected the government's standing in the 



polls, but it has coloured views of what 
goes on in the Cabinet room. “Margaret 
Thatcher had such a lot of good ideas 

when she was starting She's gone 

over the top. She's right regardless of 
what her ministers say." (Sandy, self- 
employed cleaner, Matlock). A Ryedale 
group was asked how they would 
describe the Thatcher era to their 
grandchildren: “Dominated chaos 

steady erosion of the things that 

matter, health, education, the elderly and 
jobs ... law of the jungle . . . selling off 
_assets ._. ^_sbe just had faith .in ourselves 
and in her country." In the weariness of 
some voices talking about her is the 
sense that she has become a politician 
like all the others. 

But Mrs Thatcher is not the issue she 
was; not every defecting Conservative is 
fleeing from her; her party's problems are 
more general. The Tories are noticeably 
more and more associated with sectional 
interest, the defence of money and class. 
References to huge City salaries were 
frequent; a Fulham housewife who had 
voted Tory in 1983, conflating innuendo 
abour shady goings, on over Westland 


and financial scandals, described Con- 
servative politicians as “corrupt”. Sue, a 
clerical officer in Fulham remembered 
the quotation on the steps of Downing 
Street in 1979: “Mrs Thatcher quotes 
from St Francis of Assisi when she’s 
saying we’ll bring harmony. Its more like 
‘to those who have shall be given, to 
those who have not shall be taken away." 

Alan, a Youth Training Scheme 
supervisor in Matlock, observed that - 
when his groups, of youngsters discussed 
politics, there were mysteriously few 
Labour voices. “Next yearfs-voters” were-, 
all planning to vote either Conservative _ 
or Liberal. Behind the frequent; and 
traditional, voters' complaints about the 
“extremism" of politicians on the fur- 
thest right and left seems to lie a large 
measure of acceptance of much early 
Thatcher rhetoric and change, but with 
significant exceptions which have be- 
come increasingly important as the 
second term has unfolded. How far 
floating voters travel back across the 
political spectrum — whether they stop 
in the centre or cross all the way back to 
Labour— seems to be' determined by 


what issues have brought them to part 
company with Mrs Thatcher, for whom 
they voted in 1979 and 1983. 

Mrs Thatcher’s changes, particularly 
privatization, have made those leaning 
towards the Alliance create a new 
informal definition of what should 
remain in communal hands. Few people 
made much of the plan to. privatize 
British Gas, but several picked out -the 
water ' privatization plans for special - 
condemnation (“you can’t make money 
on the essential services"). The same ' 
people, -who win probably, have, had few 
strong feelings about some privatization 
and approved some .measure of econo m-' 
ic stimulation, feel increasingly strongly 
about health service' cuts, and perhaps 
strongest of all about education. In the 
Fulham middle-class group, Jerry was 
defending the forcing of technological 
change on the labour force in order that 
Britain should remain competitive. Yes, 
said Sue, but look what she’s doing to. the 
universities: “there won’t be anybody to 
get near the new technology,” - 

A trickle back in ; 
both directions 

In these respects, the middle-class' and 
middle-ground voters we talked to in all 
three constituencies fit the pattern which 
some recent research has shown to be the 
profile of the natural Alliance constitu- 
ency. Its heartland seems to consist of 
people with economic views to the right 
of the Labour party, in tune with some, if 
not all of Mrs Thatcher’s economic 
reforms but with views oir social, foreign 
and defence affairs well to the left of the ' 
Conservative positions. But these groups 
cast doubt on how far these instincts 
have been fused into anything which' 
could.be called a set of slogansjet alone 
a philosophy. - ' 1 . 

Tie overwhelming impression left by 
the floaters of the centre was of people 
holding a set of strong views about what 
they wanted to avoid rather than the 
society they wanted to create. Not only 
will some gravitate back to Labour, but a 
proportion will, in the end, stay with the 
Conservatives. 

But some of the same seemed to apply 
to socialism as well. Those people 
drifting back to traditional Labour 
loyalties after taking -temporary refuge 
with the Alliance said they were doingsa . 
without necessarily being convinced that 
the new- Kinnock ‘crusade against .Mili- ' 
-tarn win succeed, although all wanted 
' Militants expelled. - ; ' ; “ ' - ' 

: The overall picture of Kinnock — 
sincere but weak and inexperienced — 
suggests that the major issue he will 
confront at an election is a variant of the 
problem which underlay much of 
Labour’s difficulty in 1983. Do the 
voters believe that Labour can. achieve 
the promises of the manifesto? 

This question is at the heart of the 
politics of unemployment doubts about 
whether Labour could affect the figures 

• -U. — I .... TT. ., 


was a major hindrance to them in 1983. 

Nick, a young unemployed man in 
Ryedale^If I could have voted last tune, 
it would have . been a case of ranie 
meanie miney mo. I still don t - feel i 
know enough about the main parties to 
know, so Td do it just the same way 
unless someone came to me and told me 
about politics. Obviously jobs are the 
mai n thing as far as someone like me 15 
concerned. I suppose that if any party ■ 
can do something about that'tt.would be . 

. Labour " But . for . each, Nick .there are 
several, voicesacknowledging either that 
new technology makes high unemploy- 
ment likfely for good or that Britain paid 

' itself uncompetitive wages for. wo long. 

That leaves the two principal issues 
otherwise mentioned most frequently as 
reasons for voting against the Conserve 
fives as perceived cuts in health and 
education. On these two fronts, the 
Alliance seem as well placed to gam as 
Labour the natural constituencies for 
party are both consumers of the 
services and the Alliance has not suffered 
, from much division or-vagueness on the 
subject Unemployment remains a po- 
tential mover of a great many votes. -but 
not until Labour overcomes the credibfl- 
' Tty gap more decisively than it has so .far 
' or until the figures take a dramatic turn ejf) 
for better or worse. . ' " 

. The Alliance advantage here is that 
middle-class consumers of health ser- 
vices and education facilities may be 
more likely to be more sensitive and 
active over changes than their working- 
class counterparts; but they are less likely 
to have unemployed people id their 
families. 

Labour faces a difficult tactical and 
strategic dilemma. One of the most 
tempting ways for the party to seek an 
. Overall majority is to consolidate itshold 
on its traditional centres of strength, in 
the north. If its vote rises a little above 
last time .and, in addition, tfae~ Alliance 
makes heavy inroads into the Tory- vote 
in the south, Labourcould win with a rd- .. 

atively low proportion of die vote. Its 
results in the south could safely .ignored. 

But this would shrink Labour’s base 
into only a section of the counuy and 
would run contrary to its ambition to 
remain a national force — an aim en- 
shrined in the target list of marginals all 
over the country prepared by the shadow 
cabinet election strategist, Robin Cook. 

Last year a close adviser to Neil 
Kinnock remarked that, whatever polls 
and politicians said in the meanwhile 
and in public. Labours essential, task at 
the next'J.efectfon was _fo remain.. a 
' national .'political force. Ryfedale, and 
; West Derbyshire — although they , will 
how be wooed to Vme tactically for the 

- Alliance' - are' test cases: in the fast 20 
-years (during which both constituencies 
have changed their borders), the Labour 
vote has halved in West Derbyshire and 
been quartered in Ryedale. Labour’s A, 
problems, whatever the polls say, remain 
that great 

MOn conducted ttac. UdmcixM group tOt- 
Cumflons m the three by-election OdRStnuendea of 
Fulham- Derbyshire Weal and Ryedale. Each grow 
contained between atx and etahl ' participants 
recruited on thebaatoof shifting poltticafailogiante. 

- -The survey technique wan oualnauw rsuhermin 

quantitative. - - - . 

■ ■* a 


siss 


v-> 


V* 

i ,;-i 


After Fulham, 


*i - . •- - 


Even in die most private and 
fearful of Tory vocabularies the 
word defeat does not crop op when 
the constituencies of West Derby- 
shire and Ryedale In North York- 
shire come under scrutiny, as they 
are now In the run-up to their 
respective by-elections. 

Both, on the face of it, are safe, 
solid and blamelessly rural, and 
long the preserve of two great 
parliamentary families. Until 
shortly before the Second World 
War West Derbyshire was fre- 
quently represented by the Mar- 
quess of Hartington, son and heir 
of the leading load aristocrat, the 
Duke of Devonshire. The first — 
and last — time the voters rebelled 
was to return one Charlie White as 
a Common W'calther in 1944 and 
as a Labour candidate the follow- 
ing year. 

Since then an unbroken line of 
Tories has commuted to West- 
minster from this spectacularly 
beautiful area of the Derbyshire 
Peaks which, in the last boundary' 
redistribution, acquired Belprr. 
repre s ented for 25 years by Harold 
Wilson's deputy , George Brown. 

Despite this acquisition Labour 
could still attract only 17.1 per 
cent of the vote at the 1983 general 
election compared with the 


Liberals' 27.1 per cent (14370), 
and the Conservatives’ 55.9 per 
cent (29,695). 

While the Ryedale by-election Is 
occasioned by the death of the 
MP, John Spence, West Derby- 
shire is vacant because Matthew 
Pams, the young Tory incumbent 
since 1979, is leaving to take first 
the Chiltern Hundreds, which is 
standard practise for a resigning 
MP, and then the Walden Mil- 
lions. which is not. His salary for 
fronting the influential Weekend 
World on Sundays is rumoured to 
be some six times that of an MP. 

His successor designate, Patrick 
McLonghlin, is quite as un- 
expected as the Peak District 
scenery — a lifelong Conservative 
supporter and, as a former under- 
ground mine worker at Littleton 
Colliery near Cannock, a member 
of the NUM. Contrary to popular 
opinion, the 27-year-old Mc- 
Lough lin argues, miners generally 
are right-wing. “They might vote 
Labour, bat yon ask them what 
they think on issues like defence, 
disarmament, law and order and 
immigration, and yon will find that 
the replies will be a world away 
from Labour policy. They are 
Tories really, it's just that they 
don't realize it." 





Many of McLoughlin*s constit-' 
oents re main uncertain how they 
will vote. Although he should have 
no trouble mastering a handsosme 
majority there is dissaflection 
among most age groups, with a 
distinct possibility that the Alli- 
ance candidate will pick up votes 
both from traditional Conservative 
as well as Labour supporters. 

Hazel, wife of a funeral director, 
says: "Tm undecided, but a few 
things have shaken me. I don't 
think the whole troth was told 
about the Westland business, for 
example. I don’t agree with every- 
thing Mrs Thaldier does, but at 
least she’s not guilty of giving in." 

While West Derbyshire is all 
hills and jagged clefts, Ryedale 
has its share of fla Hands, tra- 
versed at leisure by the broad 
ribbon of the River Derwent, 
which meanders between sedate 
stone market towns like Mai ton 
and Nortou-For many years 
Ryedale was held by the Tnrton 
family, the last parliamentary 
scion of which sat for 29 years 
from 1945 to 1979. Labour's 1983 
showing here was even more 
dismal than in West Derbyshire, 
with only 103 per cent of the vole 
(5.816) against the Liberals' 303 
per cent (17,170) and the 


Conservatives' 59.2 per cent 
(33312). 

One crucial factor here is Mrs 
Elizabeth Shfels, the strong Lib- 
eral-Alliance candidate well 
known as a local councillor. She, 
more than the party itself, is 
proving a powerful magnet for the 
undecided. In die words of Jose, a 
middle-aged housewife: *Tve al- 
ways voted Conservative but for 
the by-election, it will be the 
Alliance for me — partly because 
of the candidate. I remember going 
to a a meeting at a school where 
die was speaking. The former 



MP, John Spoke, was there as 
welL He was very disrespectful to 
her and said he wouldn't sit on the 
same platform. I think all the sixth 
form at that school will be voting 
Alliance." 

There is a perceptible shift to 
the centre among the yomg of the 
constituency, many of them first- 
time voters. 

In terms of sheer acreage, tire 
local government - district of 
Ryedale is the largest in E ng land, 
and the new parliamentary constit- 
uency takes in almost the whole of 
that district while also stretching 
westwards to Easingwold in the 
Vale of York and eastwards to 
Filey on the Scarborough coast - 
a distance of about 50 ofles. Like 
West Derbyshire it claims some of 
the finest scenery in Engfandjif 
yon like that sort of thing), taking 
in a swathe of the brooding and 
treeless North York Moors. Again 
like West Derbyshire, it has to 
make an accommodation between 
tire not always compatible in- 
terests of tourism and agriculture. 

In Ryedale housing . owner- 
occupation is 10 per cent higher 


occupation is 10 per cent higher 
than the national average at 653 
per cent, while and unemployment, 
at 4.7 per cent, is little more than 


M'ite national 
culture, manufacturing and cater- 
ing account between them for the 
lion's share of the jobs, with the 
first running at 10 per cent of the 
labour force, five times higher than 
the national average. 

This whole great rump of central 
Yorkshire b a scene of small but 
gathering change. Farming and its 
related manakorii^ industries 
may still hold sway, what with the 
bacon .and ' sausage factories at 
Norton and die Westiers hot dog 
plant at' Amocberby, but there- is 
also a growing influx, abetted by 
the district and county councils, of 
new industrial estates and high- 
tech operations, notably at 
Malton, Pickering and Clifton. 
And at Swinton Grange there is 
already a company called Spectra 
Tek making computerized equip- 
ment far the monitoring of flow 
gauges. Many of tire new firms are 
oflsboots of larger and more 
entrenched ones, such as SEngsby 
Engnreering at KMsymooonnde. 

Where Ryedale has to s q u ar e 
tire rival demands of tractor and 
trekker. West J>erbysfaire’s auth- 
orities have their ©wn set of pitfalls 
among die extractive industries, 
much of whose activity is canned 
on within tire boundaries of the 


BJnwtfbn. V 
ULabi 9.060. 


Alan Franks 


■r 


• j 
■ \ 




National Part Once, at lead- 
mining area, the northern sector of 
the constituency now produces 
limestone, fiuospar and barytes for 
tire construction, chemical and oO 
industries. With a highly moti- 
vated environmental fobtey both 
nationally and locally,' all par- 
liamentary candidates can expect 
a stem boot of questioning on tins v* 
dear conflict of interests. The not w 
entirely vacnous joke gofaig around 
the-cotsstituency’s second largest 
.town of Matiodk at . present- nuts 
that the successful campaigner 
will be the one whose Legsbest 
bear the strain of . the" streets' 
uncompromising gradients. . 

The other centres of national 
repute and local pride are 
Ashbourne, Bakewell and 
Hartington — one for its water, one 
for its puddings and one for its 
Stilton. Ail three enjoy more 
recognition than the Tory miner 
who ' would represent their in- 
terests; but all that could change in 
tire next few weeks. 

Last election 

«c> sasia swa.da._Mrs 


! i 


. t 

•_ f 

: i 


Bodley loses 
its head 

Devastating news for the Bodley Head: 
although it has not yet been announced, 
the publisher of such giants as Graham 
Greene. Muriel Spark, .Alexander Sol- 
zhenitsyn and William Trevor — which 
was dire to celebrate its centenary next 
July — is to merge with ns bigger 
brother, Jonathan Cape. Yesterday a 
distressed spokesman at Bodley Head 
saidthe merger had been caused because 
of “financial reasons" necessitating re- 
dundancies in both companies, but 
stressed that the house would retain its 
imprint - “Our authors would not con- 
template anything else". Chairman Max 
Reinhardt has agreed to merge virtually 
every department within the company- 
production. publicity, rights and copy- 
right editing. The news comes only 
weeks after I announced the takeover of 
Lord Forte's publishing empire. 
Sidgwick and Jackson, by Macmillan. 

Extra, extra-dition 

The embarrassing muddle surrounding 
theabortive arrest of IRA suspect Evelyn 
Gfenholmes becomes instantly compre- 
hensible on reading the latest Home 
Office law book, written for the guidance 
of local magistrates. It contains 41 
“substantive errors" and a lengthy 
addendum correcting these in the Orel 
prim run of 40.000. The book. The 
Sentence of the Court, is circulated to ail 
26.000 magi si rates and is selling like hot 
cakes to bench and judiciary. "The prooi 
errors are indeed unfortunate,’ said a 
Home Office spokesman. 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 


their new digs. The Northern Ireland 
authorities have offered them married 
quarters inside the secure-perimeter 
Army's Palace Barracks, four miles from 
Belfast. Previous occupants have been 
notorious terrorist supergrasses, given 

BARRY FANTONI 


safe accommodation before being 
shipped abroad with new identities. 
They include IRA defectors Christopher 
Black and Robert Lean — who quickly 
repented of his decision and escaped 
back to West Belfast in his RUC 
minder's car - and Protestant Ulster 
Volunteer Force murderer Joe Bennett. 
Sweet dreams, folks. 


QED 


Grassroots 


Refugee Royal Ulster Constabulary fam- 
ilies, bombed out of their homes in the 
wave of loyalist attacks, should not 
inquire loo closely about the history of 



‘Very hush-hush. He’s inventing a 
comparer that refls him how many 
more duff ideas there are' 


Enoch Powell is in fine form in an 
interview just published in the Federa- 
tion or Conservatives Students rag, ,\ew 
Agendo. Q: You have been labelled 
“anti-American." Do you accept the 
label? A: Most people are. The only- 
change is that it has become a term of 
abuse. Q: Why in particular are you anti- 
American? A: Well. I just don't like 
America, or .Americans. It is like saying 
you like sugar in your tea. De gustibus 
non est disputandum. 

Back burner 

A TV advertisement starring Clive 
James standing next to a Yorkshire 
pudding, from which a Yorkshire 
terrier's head protrudes, has been banned 
by the IBA on grounds of taste. The ad 
was intended to promote the Observer. 
for which James is a columnist, and 
carried the words "Instead of Yorkshire 
pudding, do something different." The 
ISA tell me it feared it would prove 
distasteful ro all the Barbara 
Woodhouses. The Observer duly pro- 
duced a tasteful substitute; but disaster 
struck again; LWT decided to ban it, 
saying James cannot appear in a com- 
mercial on the same night as his new 
Saturday chat show. As a result, the 
Observer has had to shelve its £230,000 
James promotion. All embarrassing for 
Roger Harrison, who is both chief 
executive of the Observer and an LWT 
director. 

PHS 


John Woodcock 


Self-inflicted wounds 


Port of Spain 

In the past two or three weeks West 
Indian newspapers have frequently car- 
ried photographs of former England 
batsmen out here for the endket 
Yesterday it was the rubicund face of 
Colin Milbum that decorated the back 
page of the Trinidad Guardian. The 
captions are much the same. This time it 
was: “Could Milbum's smile mean that 
he feels he could handle the West Indian 
bowline better than England’s current 
crop of batsmen are doing?" 

It so happens that Milbum might well 
have done so. As a fearless hooker and 
cutter of the ball be might even have 
enjoyed the challenge, and I can think of 
few batsmen of whom that could be said. 

To put it more evocatively, bow would 
the great Australian Don Bradman have 
coped? With an average in test cricket of 
99.94. he was the most prodigious run- 
making machine the game has known. 
The other day he presented to an 
Adelaide museum the placard from a 
London evening paper of the 1930s 
which carried the two words “HFS 
OUT". That was the extent to which he 
dominated every match in which be 
played. 

In 1932-33, in an attempt to subjugate 
Bradman, England devised body-tine 
bowling, a ruthless method of attack 
aimed more at the batsman than the 
stumps. The result? Bradman’s average 
was cut from 139 - when the two sides 
had met in 1930 - to a mere 56, And 
body-line was undoubtedly less remorse- 
less than the present West Indian attack. 
Let there be no mistake about it at 
Kingston. Jamaica, in the first Test 
match of this tour, {flayed on a badly 


wa: 


prepared pitch, no batsman, in tbe 
■world — in this or any . other age — could 
have expected to escape from facing the 
four West Indian fast bowlers with Ins 
nerve unaffected* despite all the armour 
worn today. 

There is talk of arranging for this tune 
next year a short series of matches 
between the West Indies and the Rest of 
the World. If one snag in tbe way of it is 
the crowded international programme, 
another would almost certainly be the 
reluctance of many leading batsmen to 
subject themselves unnecessarily to a 
battering from Marshall, Patterson and 
tbe rest. West Indies would start as 
favourites to win, at any rate on the type 
of pitches which put such a premium on 
various fast bowling and with Rafferty's 
rules applied as to what is allowed in the 
ly of short-pitched bowling. . 

It should be clear from this that David 
Gower’s side has faced a formidable and 
at times dangerous task. I saw recently 
that Jeff Dujon, tbe West Indian wicket- 
keeper, was critical of the methods being 
used by England’s batsmen. He thought 
they should take a leaf out erf New 
Zealander Jeremy Coney’s book by 
"getting into line". In theory, of course, 
Dujon is right, but the fact remains that 
Coney ended his only series in the West 
Indies with a badly broken arm. Later 
this year England go to Australia where 
their technical sborteominK.wil! be less 
ruthlessly exposed. They wfll find cricket 
rather fun again, and the shattered noses, 
fractured thumbs and disintegration of 
.this tour win have had time to mead. 

I shall enjoy that; but only' if the 
lessons of tbe last few depressing weeks 
have been absorbed. There may be no 


a deq ua t e way of preparing in advance for 
a tour of the West Indies, because the 
.game that is to be played fa played 
nowhere else. Indoor nets are ' not 
enough, nor physical jerks. At the same 
time, in many respects the England side 
has brought the troubles upon itself. 
Their practising has been hopelessly 
inadequate and their training nothing 
like as hard as their opponents’, and for 
tiiat hfa no good blaming, as they do, the 
facilities. Much more imagination could 
and should have been shown in making 
die best of what has been available, or 
finding something better. Geoff Boycott 
did it when he was here for a couple of 
-months. 

This is something like the 30th tour I 
: have reported in the past 36 years, and 
never, have l seen such, a lack of.whal.the 
modern player so prides himself on 
.possessing - professionalism. That Tim 
Robinson can lie for hbursin the baking 
sun by the hotel swimming pool on the 
eve of a test match, his energy 
sapped by the minute, fa beyond 
comprehension. Why was he not work- 
ing on the obvious batting flaw which 
has been hfa undoing? That Gower could 
go sailing when England were losing their 
opening match, or that Neil Foster could 
bring himself to saunter off for golf and 
others could go to the beach, instead of 
when they had done nothing for several 
days after the loss of the third test match, 
fa lamentable. 

It has seemed ax limes as though 
<fasciphne~and firm leadership are con- 
. side red to be of no account In fact they 
were never more needed: At the same 
time, I think even Bradman would have 
struggled for runs. - 




« 



i 





f hv: ,, • : 


<kf y?^ J 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


* A 


-- 7 ? 

i iu? 


1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN T elephone: 01-481 4100 

LAND OF SMILES 


■Mr Yasuhiro Nakasone, .promotion agencies have 
Japan s prime mimster y is artxr switched to import promotion. 
ious to please - or at least defence .spending is. being 
appease - his free worTd trading stepped up, the financial sy£ 
partners. 'Nothing .could be " tem liberal ised. - Japanese 
r ^ or ® emoarrassing than for companieshavebuilt factories 
the host nation io find next, abroad where they used to 


month's economic summit in 
Tokyo dominated by: more 
querulous . European and 
North American threats over 
Japan's still-rising ■ trade sur- 
plus. He would much prefer 
some mutual back-dapping 
over inflation, felling interest 
rates and currency adjust- 
ments, to prepare the ground 
for worthy sentiments on 
financial help for- the Third 


export. Yet still Japan has 
conquered . more export mar- 
kets while manufactured im- 
ports have felled to flood in, 
leaving the Europeans and 
Americans more frustrated. 
The report of the special 
committee of establishment 
figures under former Bank of 
Japan governor -Mr Haruo 
Maekawa, -now. issued for 


7u{r : uic uiim maximum public relations ef- - 
stems ^ 

(YimMiiui iimH/i'c lamaet ^ sve proposals so far to sub- 


second largest economybe- 
comes the world's largest cred- 
itor nation. The United States 
and Western Europe wfll not 
easily be satisfied however. 
The. most important con- 
dition for reducing Japan's 
surpluses and its dependence 
on export growth has been put 
in place by the 30 per cent rise 
of the yen against the dollar. 
But the effects will not show 
through in Japan's trade fig- 
ures nearly : fast enough to 
satisfy -its- 1 critics. Improving 
. terms of trade and Ming 
import costs will boost the 
immediate surplus. : In any 
case, Europe and North Amer- 
ica have become convinced 
that Japan's competitive suc- 
cess stems ultimately from 
fundamental but somehow un- 
fair features of its economic 
structure that must be changed 
to overcome political -strains 
on trade. •' 

In response, Mr ' Nakasone 
' has produced a series of pack- 


ings would be deeply unpopu- 
lar. The more positive changes 
are in any .case likely to come 
about as a result of yen 
revaluation. Bat they will take 
time: A recent long-term fore- 
cast, anticipating the change of 
tack, concluded that japan 
would reach trade balance by 
around 199S. 

Even then, Europeans may 
be disappointed at the lack of 
growth of manufactured ex- 
ports to Japan, unless there is a 
sudden mass conversion to 
learning the Japanese lan- 
guage. Demands for Japan to 
quantify targets for manufac- 
tured imports may well con- 
tinue to go : unanswered. They 
could be met in the short rim 
.. . , only by increased state inter- 

stit ute consumption for vention and public spending, 
exports as the engine of the it may be no bad thmg ) 
economy, even if few of its however, for some of the 
details are .new. They seek to . demands of Japan’s summit 
stimulate home demand by partners to be left unsatisfied. 
gover nment spending, by The call for Japan to fall in 
removing controls on housing step with the mature econo- 
and construction , and above mies of Europe and North 
all by encouraging Japanese America owes more to the 
people to .saye less, work less imbalance between Japan's 
and spend, more, particula r ly . 'economic strength and its 
onimppri^ Vi- . ... ..political weakness than to 

The unportahte of this re- . sense, 
port lies more in its reception JapaD ^ succeeded to ex- 

ccss by sticking to the Vic- j 

relabonS-For it jpves the back- torian virtues of Samuel 
mg for Mr Nakasone or his its citizens ab- 

suwessor to push through . s^ted a hundred years ago, 
pohaes tiiat run counter to tte but which have been cast aside 
values of hard work and thnft ^ Europe in favour of 
mstiDed in . Japanese society consuming on credit at rising 
since the Meyi revolution. The interest rates at the expense of 
message is as bizarre to the investment and employment 
average Japanese as it would to . these are just the virtues 
Bntons used to quite different in poor countries if 


In response, Mr ’ Nakasone - exhortations.- . - " V they are to devdop. If Japan 

has produced aserieserf pack- Some V feaftires are dearly: should adopt Western ways, 
ages; that have yet to deliver. .; moreVjpractical than' 1 othoi. there are plenty of others 
Official non-tariff barriers Increased spending on housing adopting the Japanese way to 
have followed formal tariffs- and public works is overdue, discomfit the successors of the 
into the. dustbin. .Export '.Taxing returns on small say- summiteers in Tokyo. 


CUTS WITHOUT JUDGEMENT 


History repeats. In 1981, the 
University Grants Committee 
did what it does well, making 
resource judgements based on 
academic criteria : vw& faint 
reference to politicians* (and 
taxpayers*) priorities. It deliv- 
ered to the government jt 
reduction in rtfal spending, 
primarily by dum- 

ber of student places. It so 
happened drat the way it made 
cuts also made a good deal of 
nonsense of ministers’ brave 
talk of a switch from social 
studies and humanities into 
applied science and technol- 
ogy. Now the nonsense looks 
to have happened again. 

This time the National Ad- 
visory Body on Local. Author- 
ity Highai Education* a body 
.parallel-' in function tor the 
UGC has delivered cutS; in 
spending fcy~ cutting places. 
And where 1 is . education to 
cease? Wolverhampton Poly- 
technic is to eliminate en- 
gineering: so much for Black 
Country economic regenera- 
tion. Design education is to 
end at-Teeskfe Polytechnic. 
Civil engineering is to go at 
Sunderland. 

Of course no single, degree 
should be sacrosanct Of 
course there must- be some 


academic logic behind the 
NAB’s decisions. What dis- 
mays is, first and foremost, the 
necessity of substantial reduc- 
. ; lions ioplacesatali .Demand 
* for places mhighereftucatidii 
remains high. To cut places 
. strikes at opportunity, Worse 
" there appears to Be na&hem% 
:?.«4hfcr bySregioo dr by subject, 
^connecting areas; of tuition to 
economic prospect dr- (with 
reference to demises in fine art) 
theculture of the nation. 

- In the nature of the game 
some of these cuts have been 
selected for maximum public 
impact. Mr Christopher Price, 
director ofLeeds Polytechnic, 
wfll naturally make much of 
- proposalsto close the depart- 
ment' such- sculptors as 

Hemy Moore " and , 'Barbara 
Jiepworjh m itspedigree. And 
there wilL be many who will 
wonder how the government 
, can countenance the closure of 
social services training courses 
when it has accepted a spate of 
recent recommendations for 
-enhancement of training in 
such specialties as child care 
and the prevention of abase. 

The response to all this is 
not bland protestation against 
any and all . reductions in 
public, . outlays . on higher 


education. On the ooatraiy it is 
to take issue with the assump- 
tions regularly made by the 
National Advisory Body as by 
. I tthc University Grants 
' Committee (and regularly ac- 
cepted by the government) 
that it is student numbers that 
' must bear the brunt of spend- 
ink constraint. ^ 

The UGC and now NAB 
have been allowed to assert 
that there is an irreducible 
minimum cost per student. 
The arithmetic is simple. Unit 
costs cannot be reduced, so to 
deliver a Treasury-ordered ag- 
gregate, across-the-board cuts 
in places must follow. An 
alternative higher education 
policy would have examined 
much more criticaDly the “unit 
of resource” argument. That 
would have ted to questioning 
some deeply-entrenched 
assumptions: about 

academics’ use of their time, 
and the balance of research 
and teaching. 

They would have been hard 
questions, but asking them 
could have prevented the 
astonishing sight of a nation 
that relies for well-being on the 
qualities of its people cutting 
the provision for intellectual 
and practical attainment 


The Cabinet committee 
responsible for allocating the 
£240 million contract on two 
auxiliary oil vessels, for which 
both Swan Hunter of Tyneside 
and Harland and Wolff of 
Belfast have submitted 
tenders, yesterday postponed a 
decision on the matter. Min- 
isters are now expected to take 
a further two weeks to make 
their choice. - ■ ■ * 

• ' It is a prudent; delay. Swan 
Hunter's coup .in the. eariy - 
hours of yesterday morning,, in 
which the company’s exec- 
utives themselves launched 
the frigate Coventry, therejy 
beating a strike and meeting 
the Navy's deadline, had cre- 
ated an "atmosphere in which 
the proper commercial 
comparisons seemed unr 
seasonably, cold... It., evoked 
both nostalgia for the escape of 
HMS Amethyst along the 
Yangtse and Tftatchenie 
admiration' for the dash" and 
spirit of the new entrepreneurs .' 
of privatization. • 

If. the government proved , 
capable of rising, above these 
appeals to its sensibilities (and, 
perhaps more important, to 
the sensibilities of its support- 
ers), the political significance 
of both shipyards couJd hardly 
escape it Both are in areas of 
distressingly high unemploy--, 
mem.- Bui as the Chairman or- • 
Swan Hunter pointed out in a>. 
letter to this newspaper, tin- ' 
.employment on Tyneside, is . ... 
now- higher, than - in. BeUastr ? 
And whereas sympathy for toe. - 
unemployed of the North-East 
is undiluted, the seemingly:- 


eridtess crisis in Ulster, cur- 
rently dramatized by the at- 
tacks on the RUC, has eroded 
public support for measures to 
alleviate economic problems 
there. The name of De Lorean 
reminds us that there has, after 
all, been a plethora of such 
measures in the last few years. 
If it were simply a choice 
between assisting Tyneside or 
Belfast, - popular - sympathy 
would lean “in . favour Of 
^Tyneside," 

But,' as the managements of 
both; shipyards concede, 
.awarding a defense contract 
should not be a matter of 
charity: It should aim at 
obtaining the best product at 
the . cheapest price. That 
means, in practice, a system of 
competitive tendering 
namely, choosing the com- 
. pany which puis in the lowest 
. tender while ft also meets the 
- specifications laid down by the 
'Ministry of Defense.^ ‘ 

In this instance, Harland ; 
-and Wolff has put jn what is at 
face value the lowest tender. 
r ' Swan Hunter advances several 
arguments — some substantial, 

• some less so - to urge its 
rejection nonetheless. 

The company asserts, for 
instance, that . the . Ministry 
should rely on companies like 
itself with .a recent, 
•proventradt record in naval 
. shipbuilding. But there would 
: be little; point iif competitive 
tendering ’if", the. traditional . 

■ suppliers j.^ere' automatically 
‘ chosen. New. entrants into the 

■ market deserve, an." Q ve ti 
chance. - 


Swan Hunter also argues 
that its expectation of gaining 
this contract was induded in 
the terms on which the present 
management arranged its buy- 
out But that claim treats the 
contract as a disguised subsidy 

— which is utterly inconsistent 
with Swan Hunter’s main 
argument that Harland and 
Wolffs tender benefits from 
the general subsidy of £37 

- million it has received over the 

last'll months. 

- Swan Hunter concedes that 
a team of independent accoun- 
tants has certified that their 
rivaTs tender price has been 
sealed off from this general 
subsidy. It goes on to make the 
point, however, that the 
nationalised shipyard will in- 
evitably call upon the taxpayer 
to meet its losses if the project 
overruns. There is, in short, an 
implicit subsidy in any tender 
from a nationalised industry. 

. That argument is not with- 
out merit It is, indeed, the 
main argument for privatiza- 
tion. For as long as national- 
ized industries are until us, 
however, the government can- 
not automatically reject their 
tendering for particular con- 
tracts on the general grounds 
that they might overrun. 

What it can — and in this 
case should — do is satisfy 
itself that the company can 
"perform the- contract success- 
fully by a; rigorous and open 
investigation and set real pen- 
alties for non-fulfilment Hav- 
ing done that, ft should award 
the contract on plain commer- 
cial grounds. 


How proposed poly axe will fall 

From the Secretary' of State for number of student places needs to 
Education and Science be reduced even ifN'AB’s assump- 

Sir, Todav’s front page report tion about public funding proves 


From the Secretary of State for 
Education and Science 
Sir. Today's front page report 
about cuts in places for students at 
polytechnics proposed by the Na- 
tional Advisory Body (NAB) gave 
an incomplete account of the 
position and will cause an un- 
necessary degree of alarm among 
students and their parents. 

Your Education Correspondent 
wrote that “the cuts result from a 
decision taken by the committee 
of the NAB”. No such decisions 
have been taken. At this stage the 
corn mince, which is chaired by 
ray ministerial colleague, Mr 
George Walden, MP, and whose 
majority membership is repre- 
sentative of local authorities, has 
done no more than make a single 
guess about the likely level of 
public funding in 1987-88. De- 
cisions on the level of funding will 
not be taken by the Government 
until later this year. 

Nevertheless, on the basis of its 
single guess, the NAB committee 
has instructed its staff to make 
proposals keeping the number of 
student places within a total that 
would involve no fall in resources 
per student. The NAB will not 
advise me until much later this 
year whether the number of places 
should be reduced and if so how 
this might be done by institution 
and by subject Decisions on these 
matters are for the Secretary of 
State and nor the NAB. 

There are three points I must 
make about the approach fa- 
voured by the local authority 
members of the NAB committee. 
First, 1 have repeatedly suggested 
to the NAB that it should not plan 
on the basis ofa single assumption 
about support from public funds. 
Of course I acknowledge the 
consequent difficulty in planning, 
but it is no more than common 
sense in such circumstances for 
any organisation, public or pri- 
vate, to consider a number of 
pasribUities. This NAB has chosen 
not to do. 

Secondly, there is room for 
substantial difference of view on 
whether and to what extent the 

Shipyard duel 

From Admiral Sir Anthony Griffin 
Sir, Anyone who has the country's 
maritime interests at heart must 
feel dismayed at the prospect of 
either Harland and Wolff or Swan 
Hunter being severely damaged, 
or even destroyed, by the handling 
of a defence contract for two 
auxiliary oil replenishment vessels 
(AORsk 

Both companies are major na- 
tional assets and the rigid adher- 
ence to current defence contract 
policy coukl cost the country not 
only one or two highly talented 
design teams and workforces in 
this area, but also the basis for any 
future competition. 

Musical excellence 

From Mr Peter Heyworth 
Sir. In his admirable piece (April 
1) on the astonishing odium 
incurred by the Royal Academy of 
Music for its plan to establish itself 
as “a centre of excellence", Ber- 
nard Levin has understated his 
case. 

The plan to set up a salaried 
orchestra in London, such as 
whose standards might stand 
comparison with those in Chicago,' 
Vienna, Berlin, etc, did not 
founder because the money was 
not available. It came to nothing 
because the Arts Council coukl 
not persuade any of the four 
London orchestras to accept it 

The fuss about the RAM is a 
further example of our current 

Hours not theirs 

From Mr Basil Boothroyd 
Sir, I have just been told" by British 
Telecom’s speaking clock that at 
the third stroke the time “from 
Accural” will be 6.SS precisely. 
This seems to be new and awful 
and 1 don’t want to know that 
everything from cricket to sym- 
phony concerts is now a commer- 
cial bandwagon, though I see that 
we’re stuck with that if we want 
any sport or music. But time 
belongs to us all. 

It is not for watchmakers to cry 
their wares at us six times a 
minute day and night. It doesn't 

Bristol intolerance 9 

From Dr Peter W. Thomas 
Sir, As yon observed in your 
leader of March 28. it is indeed 
disturbing that “the Association of 
University Teachers has been so 
slow to comment publicly on the 
Vincent case". Disturbing, but not 
surprising, I fear. 

For the AUT is simply not (I say 
it sadly as a member of oyer 20 
years" standing) what once it was 
— a decent, dull, reticent, respon- 
sible. sound professional body 
through and through. 
Politicisation by activists, aspiring 
downward to trade unionism and 
exploiting legitimate concerns on 
the way, has taken its tolL 
Today the message from HQ is 
nor “tong live John Vincent" but 
“welcome to Wapping"! Those 
three little words are, of course, 
not the AUTs; but by sending to 
each of its members a propaganda 
leaflet of that title published by 
Sogat, NGA, AUEW and NUJ, it 
has publicly endorsed and re- 
iterated them. 

Our secretariat albeit by proxy, 
plainly wishes us, in insistent 
capiials. to "boycott" The News oj 
the World, The Sunday Times , 
The Times, and. of course. The 
Sun , with Professor Vincent and 
his columns to boot 

It is not that the AUT has 
nothing to say, simply that it is 
content to let Sogat’s slogans 
speak for it That in the aftermath 
of the vicious attempts to silence 
the professor in his lecture theatre, 
is in all conscience a disgrace to 
the profession. 


correct. The polytechnics and 
colleges have done a magnificent 
job in the 1980s. They now 
provide for 27 per cent more 
students than in 1979 and are 
more cost-effective than ever be- 
fore - the number of students per 
academic member of staff (S5R) 
has risen from 8.2 to 10.8. 

There is evidence that young 
people and their parents increas- 
ingly recognise that the poly- 
technics offer high quality 
vocational courses, especially in 
business studies and engineering. 
However on the NAB’s own 
reckoning there is still room for 
the polytechnics and other local 
authority colleges to take more 
students overall without increas- 
ing the number of staff (NAB’s 
target SSR is 12.0:1 y 

Thirdly, the polytechnic and 
college lecturers were awarded last 
year a 125 per cent pay increase 
by the local authorities. This 
increase was well above the level 
of inflation and was awarded on 
the understanding that the 
lecturers* union would discuss 
changes in working practice that 
could lead to significant efficiency 
gains. I do not see how the NAB 
committee, which is largely repre- 
sentative of the employers of these 
staff, can so readily ignore the 
contribution which is to be ex- 
pected from these discussions. 

I regret that you. Sir, should 
have published a one-sided report. 
It does no service to the poly- 
technics and other colleges who 
had been so successful in taking 
large numbers of additional stu- 
dents and in showing enterprise in 
developing courses and activities 
of other kinds which are of service 
to the economy. 

Yours sincerely, 

KEITH JOSEPH. 

Department of Education and 
Science, 

Elizabeth House, 

York Road. SE1. 

April 8. 

Since a total of six AORs is 
planned, surely it would be in the 
national long-term interest if some 
sensible flexibility was adopted. 
For example, contracts could be 
awarded to one company for ships 
1 and 3 and to the other for ships 2 
and 4. Subsequent orders for the 
remaining two ships could be held 
in abeyance until the competitive 
performance of each company had 
been proved 
Yours faithfully, 

A. T. F. GRIFFIN, Chairman, 

The British Maritime League, 
Moat Cottage, 

The Drive, 

Bosham, 

West Sussex. 

dedication to mediocrity and “fair 
shares for ail". Japan lives on its 
industrial excellence, the German 
standard of living is based in pan 
on the excellence of German cars. 
The French not only produce 
excellent perfumes and wine, but 
even have the effrontery to take 
pride in such products. 

How, I wonder, are SO million 
people to be maintained at a 
standard of life which we have 
come to regard as God-given, on a 
small island that is dedicated to 
mediocrity? The state of our car 
exports offers one answer to that 
question; the condition of our 
inner cities another. 

Yours truly, 

PETER HEYWORTH, 

32 Bryanston Square, Wl. 

come from anybody. Some say 
there's no such thing. Time, as we 
call it, stands still, and we people 
just whiz past Let Accurist mind 
their own business. Though I 
suppose they're doing that, damn 
their self-promoting mainsprings, 
quartz and chips. And damn 
British Telecom too, while I'm at 
it. 

Yours sincerely, 

BASIL BOOTHROYD. 

PCelers, 

Church Street, 

Cuckfietd, 

Sussex, 

April 4. 

Bui there is more, and worse, to 
follow. The self— same number of 
our Bulletin that brought the 
Wapping leaflet to our desks 
vehemently reprimands the Sec- 
retary of Stale for Education as a 
man who in his thinking about 
tenure “ignores the question of 
academic freedom". 

Effrontery is, in the circum- 
stances, the only word for that line 
of argument Nor is it very bright 
just when events at Bristol reveal 
at a stroke that tenure is itself no 
guarantee of academic freedom of 
speech. All the tenure in the world 
will be worthless if academics, of 
all people, permit “agit-prop" to 
become the order of the day. 

Happily there is still, as: you 
imply, an abundance of good old- 
fashioned academic tolerance and 
disinterestedness in our univer- 
sities — witness the failure of the 
recent strike ballot to command 
more than 38 per cent support 
among AUT members. That, 
naturally, was interpreted as a 
mandate for "action" - another 
reminder that it is simply no 
longer safe to assume that the 
AUT speaks in good faith for the 
majority of its members, let alone 
the profession as a whole. That 
silence which disturbed you has. i 
conclude, spoken volumes. 

Yours faithfully, 

PETER W. THOMAS, 

University College, Cardiff, 
Department of English. 

PO Box 78. 

Cardiff. 

South Glamorgan. 

March 28. 


UK concern on 
ADR tax effects 

From the Chairman of Imperial 
Chemical Industries and others 
Sir. Over the past three weeks 
since the Budget, you have pub- 
lished a number of relevant re- 
ports on the concern felt in the 
City and by industry at the 
Chancellor’s intention to levy a 
tax of S per cent oo the creation of 
new American depositary receipts 
(ADRs) and similar securities. 

We write now. as Parliament 
reassembles, to confirm the valid- 
ity' of your reporting, certainly as 
far as our own companies are 
concerned: indeed we have ample 
evidence that our concerns and 
objects arc shared by numerous 
other major British industrial 
companies and by the financial 
communities on both sides of the 
Atlantic and elsewhere. 

It now appears that the tax is 
being levied not to raise revenue 
(there is general agreement that 
payments will be negligible) but 
with the aim of bringing “lost" 
stock exchange business back to 
London by ensuring that all trade 
in British equities takes place here. 
If this is true then the legislation is 
essentially nationalist and protec- 
tionist. the very reverse of the 
policy needed if London is to 
prosper as a major financial 
centre, post “big bang". 

Without detracting from the 
importance of this argument 
against the Chancellor's proposal, 
we summarise below a number of 
our personal concerns at the way 
in which the tax is likely to impact 
on British industry. 

1. For reasons which have already 
been well rehearsed in your col- 
umns, the effect of the tax will be 
to close to British companies the 
large foreign investment markets 
to which they have increasingly 
looked for financial support in 
recent years. 

1 The purchase of ADRs and 
similar securities in British 
companies by foreign nationals 
constitutes overseas investment in 
the UK. Under the new legislation 
this process will reverse with 
adverse economic consequences 
for industry and for the country. 

It is an illusion to believe that 
any significant increase in volume 
of foreign investment will be made 
directly through the London mar- 
ket; there are several technical 
factors which will prevent this 
happening. 

3. The direct use of equity by 
British companies making foreign 
acquisitions will involve payment 
of the tax, making it more difficult 
for our industry to develop new 
markets for its products. 

4. In foreign markets, especially in 
the USA, investors are frequently 
customers. Loss of liquidity in the 
ADR market will make exporting 
more difficult for many major 
British companies as a result of 
their reduced credibility and 
visibility. 

The introduction of the tax will 
thus provide both a financial and a 
commercial advantage to the for- 
eign competitors of British in- 
dustry. We believe that the 
arguments against the legislation 
are overwhelming and, insofar as 
the matter is non-party, ask for the 
support of all members of Par- 
liament to persuade the Chan- 
cellor to withdraw iL 
Yours faithfully. 

J. HARVEY-JONES. Chairman, 
imperial Chemical Industries. 

R. I. J. AGNEW, Chairman, 
Consolidated Gold Fields, 

P. G. BOSONNET, 

Deputy Chairman, 

BOC Group, 

ADRIAN CADBURY, 

Chairman, 

Cadbury Schweppes, 

J. L. EGAN. Chairman, 

Jaguar Cars, 

P, GJROLAMI, Chairman. 

Glaxo Holdings, 

HANSON, Chairman. 

Hanson Trust. 

CHRISTOPHER HOGG. 
Chairman. 

Reuters Holdings. 

P. HOLMES, Chairman, 

Shell Transport and Trading 
Company, 

GEORGEJEFFERSON, 

Chairman, 

British Telecommunications, 

A. I. LENTON. Chairman, 

Bowater Industries. 

c/o Imperial Chemical House, 

Millbank, SW1. 

April 7. 

Changes at ITN 

From the Editor ofJTN 
Sir. Flash it may be fDiary, April 
8>. but news it is not. No decision 
whatever has been taken about 
what job Jon Snow will be invited 
to do when he is succeeded in 
Washington by Tim Ewan. 

Yours sincerely. 

DAVID NICHOLAS Editor. 
Independent Television News, 

ITN House. 

48 Wells Street. W). 

April 8. 

Back to school 

From Dr Bill Holmes 
Sir, Teachers accuse the public of 
unfairly equating school vacations 
wife their personal holidays, a 
cbaige they deny. Do not the 
profession now have an opportu- 
nity to prove their assertion by 
undertaking that necessary train- 
ing for any new examination will 
be done outside term time? 

They might be able to reclaim 
some of the public's respect, steal a 
march on the Government, and 
demonstrate the consistency of 
that particular argument. 

Yours faithfully. 

BILL HOLMES, 

4 Rushcliffe Avenue. 

Radcliffe on Trent, 

Nottingham. 

April 4. 


ON THIS DAY 


APRIL 9 1906 

Africa m the 19th and early 20th 
centuries utts a field (or 
exploitation by the European 
powers. Morocco had come under 
the influence of Frann?, a 
situation accepted by Britain in 
return for France's non- 
intervention in Egypt A third 
party, Germany, felt mat it should 
have an interest in Morocco and 
arranged for a conference io be 
held to discuss that country's 
government and economy. It 
opened in January, 1906 and 
closed with France's “ special 
position " being recognised. 
Germany's hopes of any gains 
came to naught. Our Special 
Correspondent was Sir Donald 
Mackenzie Wallace. 


CLOSE OF THE MOROCCO 
CONFERENCE. 

AGREEMENT SIGNED. 
fFROM OUR SPECIAL 
CORRESPONDENT) 
ALGEORAS, APRIL 7. 

At last the interminable Confer- 
ence is at an end, and sincere 
mutual congratulation is now the 
order of the day. At II o'clock this 
morning the delegates met as usual 
in the red hall of the municipal 
buildings, and for the first time a 
few favoured outsiders, including 
the Governor of Gibraltar, had the 
honour of being present. At a long 
table covered with red cloth in- 
stead of the diplomatic green sal 
the 25 representatives of 13 Pow- 
ers. including four Moors clad in 
spotless white garments and head- 
ed by the venerable Mahomed el 
Torres, who. though a Moroccan 
official and comparatively poor, 
enjoys a well-earned reputation for 
unimpeachable honesty . . . 

After a few introductory remarks 
by the president and other custom- 
ary formalities the Acte General 
embodying the results of the 
Conference was read by one of the 
Spanish secretaries. It is a long 
printed document covering 22 folio 
pages, and is divided into seven 
chapters, which contain, not a 
scheme of general reforms for the 
decrepit Moroccan Empire, as is 
often erroneously supposed, but 
merely some modest proposals for 
the development of European com- 
merce at eight open seaports. My 
apprehension as to its containing 
typographical errors prove to be 
not unfounded. One of these 
raising a fine for smuggling from 
2,000 pesetas (£57) to 5.000 pese- 
tas (£142) was considered so 
serious that an erratum had to be 
inserted in manuscript at the end 
of the document, the trivial mis- 
takes in spelling being left uncor- 
rected. Tracts of haste are likewise 
visible in style, and altogether it is 
not a document of which diploma- 
tists of the old school would be 
proud. The only things which 
remind one of the old school are the 
traditional consecrated formulas 
such as the opening M Au nom de 
Dieu tout puissant.” For its defects 
I hasten to add that the secretaries 
are not to blame. The cause, as 
already explained in previous tele- 
grams, is to be sought in the 
irrepressible impatience of the 
delegates to escape from their 
Moorish captivity and spend at 
least a portion of Holy Week in the 
bosom of their families . . . 

Thus ended the memorable Con- 
ference. and. notwithstanding 
many hours of impatience and 
anxiety, it seems, on the whole, to 
have left agreeable impressions, for 
at the moment of departure every 
one present appeared anxious to 
secure a tangible little souvenir of 
it by appropriating, with the 
President's gracious permission, a 
penholder, blotter, calendar or 
some such thing of trivial value 
which had been used during the 
deliberations. What was consid- 
ered the first prize was an ordinary 
paper calendar bearing the date 
Sarurday. the 7th of April, 1908, on 
which all the delegates kindly 
inscribed their signatures 

Now a very few words regarding 
the results of the Conference. In 
my telegram of April 1, at the 
moment when an agreement on the 
main points had been attained. I 
transmitted the first impressions 
of the delegates and promised to 
transmit in a few days their more 
matured views when the results 
had been carefully examined and 
probed. I am now in a position to 
state that between first impres- 
sions and matured views there is 
very little difference. My appre- 
hensions that the unconcealed joy 
of the delegates at the prospect of a 
speedy release from their long 
Moorish captivity might have 
made them a little too optimistic 
have happily not been realized. 
They still think that, considering 
all the circumstances of the case, 
no one has much reason to 
complain — 

So far. therefore, as the Moroc- 
can question in the narrower sense 
is concerned the Conference has 
been a decided success, though we 
cannot help feeling that the ma- 
chinery employed to attain the 
object in view has been somewhat 
our »f proportion to the require- 
ments of the situation. In diploma- 
cy. as in ordinary life, the 
employment of a steam-hammer 
fur cracking a walnut implies a 
lamentable waste of energy. 

If the whole truth must be told, 
his Shereetian Majesty has been 
unceremoniously used as a pawn on 
the European chessboard. This has 
been latterly more and more dearly 
recognized here -■ . 

Return of Eros 

From Mr L. M. Cornwall 
Sir. Surely Eros would not po- 
sition himself firmly on the 
ground, let alone lightly on a 
pedestal, to aim his arrow. The 
god of love would be in free fall, 
his limbs not subject to such 
restraints, and ii seems to me that 
the statue represents this concep- 
tion admirably. 

Yours truly, 

L.M. CORNWALL 
4 High Street, 

Dunblane, 

Perthshire. 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


Forthcoming marriages 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

WINDSOR CASTLE 
April 8: The President or the 
Republic of Korea and Mrs 
Chun Doo Hwan visited The 
Queen and The Duke of Edin- 
burgh at Windsor Castle and 
remained to luncheon. 

His Excellency the Axtibnn- 
- sador of the Republic of Korea 
and Mrs Kim and Mr and Mis 
John Sprecktey had the honour 
of being invited, 

The Queen invested The 
President of the Repbulic of 
Korea with the Insignia of a 
Knight Grand Cross or the Most 
Distinguished Order of St Mi- 
chael and St Georae. 

The Duke of Edinburgh, 

Trustee, dm evening attended a 
meeting of the Prince Philip 
Trust Fund Trustees at the 
Guildhall. Windsor. 

His Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by Her Majesty's Lord- 
Lieu tenant for the Royal 
County of Berkshire (Colonel 
the Hon Gordon Palmer) and 
the Mayor of the Royal Borough 
of Windsor and Maidenhead 
(Councillor R Shaw). 

By command of The Queen. 
Lieutenant-General Sir John 
Richards (Marshal of the Dip- 
lomatic Corps) this morning 
called upon His Excellency Mr 
Saleh Abdulla Muthana and 
Mrs Muthana at 57 Cromwell 
Road. SW7 in order to bid 
farewell to His Excellency upon 
relinquishing his appointment 
as Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary from the 
People's Democratic Republic 
of Yemen to the Court of St 
James's. 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
April 8: The Princess Anne. Mrs 
Mark Phillips, visited HMS 
Amazon at sea today and was 
received on board by the Cap- 
tain (Commander JEK Ellis, 
RN1. 

Her Royal Highness, attended 
by Mrs Malcolm Wallace, trav- 


Marriage 


Mr R.P. Macnamara 
and Miss M.C. Asquith 
The marriage took place yes- 
terday at St Lawrence Jewry- 
next-GuildhaU of Mr Rory 
Patrick Macnamara. elder son 
of Mr and Mrs Carroll 
Macnamara. of Inverchamm 
House, Ardgay, Ross-shire. and 
Miss Mary Clare Asquith, 
daughter or the late Hon Paul 
Asquith and of Mrs James 
Bayley, of Wittersham, KenL 


died in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight. 

The Princess Aime. Mrs Mark 
Phillips, and Captain Mark 
Phillips. Patron of the 
Gloucestershire Everyman The- 
atre Company, this evening 
attended a performance of My 
Fair Lady to celebrate the re- 
opening of the Everyman The- 
atre. Cheltenham. 

Her Royal Highness and Cap- 
tain Mark Phillips were received 
upon arrival by Her Majesty’s 
Lord-Lieutenant for Gloucester- 
shire (Colonel Martin Gibbs). 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
April 8: The Princess of Wales 
this morning visited the Spinal 
Injuries Unit at Lodge Moor 
Hospital. Redmires Road, 
Sheffield. 

Afterwards Her Royal High- 
ness, Patron. Birthright, opened 
the Centre for Reproductive 
Medicine at the Jessop Hospital 
for Women, Leavygrave Rood. 
Sheffield. 

The Princess of Wales sub- 
sequently attended a luncheon 
in aid of the Sheffield Branch of 
Birthright at Cutlers' Hall, 
Church Street. Sheffield. 

Her Royal Highness, attended 
bv Mis ’ George West and 
Lieutenant-Commander Rich- 
ard Aylard. RN. travelled in an 
aircraft of The Queen's Flight. 

CLARENCE HOUSE 
April 8: Queen Elizabeth The 
Queen Mother today sailed in 
HMS Ark Royal from Ports- 
mouth Harbour, and watched 
the embarkation of the Ship's 
Air Group. 

Her Majesty travelled in an 
Aircraft of The Queen's Flight. 

The Lady Grimihorpe, Sir 
Aiasiair Aird and Captain 
James Lowther-Pinkenoa were 
in attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
April 8: The Duke of Kent. 
Colonel-in-Chief of the Royal 
Regiment of Fusiliers, today 
received Major General David 
Woodfod on relinquishing the 
appointment as Colonel of the 
Regiment. 

The Rev Basil Watson 
officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her brother, Mr 
Jonathan Asquith, was attended 
by Oliver Broiherstone, James 
Palmer, Kitty Harvie. Miss 
Rachel Bayley and Miss Emily 
Asquith. Mr Philip Sykes was 
best man. 

A reception was held at 
Fishmongers' Hall and the 
honeymoon will be spent 
abroad. 


Science report 

Sheep clones that give 
promise for farmers 

By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 

Experimental work on dotting eggs and fused with the mdertfl- 
mammali has opened the way in ized cells, 
farm mg for the large-scale An acco unt of the manipnla- 
breedinR of domestic herds or tioa hi a paper in Akront from Dr 
ctooes-Tbe method could also be SM WOlasden reports details of 
of help for zootomsts engaged u u* first trial, in which four ewes 
conservation of midlife at nsk of were impregnated with the fused 
extraction. _ _ cells. Three of the four implants 

Studies at the Institute of placed healthy lambs. 

£5£?™ y £! M« iKgurofa. brouko 

Agriculture and Food Research P 1 ** ^ **• P«s«ni breeding 
Council, and involved the birth se ?5° B * 

of cross-breeds of sheep. The techniqnes i of cell fusion , 

The embryo of a Suffolk which were used first in the 
cross-bred sheep - eight ceils cloning of frogs, bare proved 
that had been placed in cold valuable for laboratory studies 
storage five veais previously - of the. development embryos in 
was taken from a deep freeze, several non-mammalian species. 
The next step was to take Some work on small animals , 
unfertilized eggs from Welsh mainly mice, has explored the 
Mountain v Chev iot ewes, which factors which can disrupt the 
had been injected with the development of normal embryos, 
hormone human chorionic making use of cell fusion tech- 
gonadotropin, for stimulating tuque. This, however, is believed 
ovulation. to be the first result of cloning 

The nucleus, which contains work with large animals, 
the chromosomes, was then •\atart. Vol 320, p63-65. 
extracted from the fertilized 1986 


Royal 

Horticultural 
Society 
Spring Show 

By Alan Toogood 
Horticulture 
Correspondent 

The Royal Horticultural 
Society's spring flower show 
includes not only impressive 
displays of daffodils, camellias 
and other seasonal plants, but 
also several important 
competitions. 

In the daffodil competition 
Mrs Hylda Oxton, of Col- 
chester. Essex, has gained the 
Simmon ds medal for the best 
bloom: the deep yellow and 
orange "Irish Light . 

The camellia show is not very 
well supported. A leading prize- 
winner is G Mount, of East 
Preston, Sussex, who is showing 
mainly popular C. wiltiamsii 
varieties, i Deluding "St Ewe", 
'‘Donation” and "Mary 
Christian". 

In the ornamental plant com- 
petition. R N Stephenson 
Clarke, of Borde Hill, Sussex, 
has fared well, and his exhibits 
include the beautiful shell-pink 
Rhododendron "Anne Clarke" 
and the deep yd low Rhodo- 
dendron bunnanicum (grown 
under glass). 

W a Brown, of Beckenham, 
Kent, has gained the Chinn 
stone lantern in the Japan 
Society of London's bonsai 
(dwarfed trees) competition. His 
exhibits include Ilex crenauu a 
small -leaved holly, not often 
seen as a bonsai specimen. 

The Alpine Garden Society’s 
main spring show is in the Old . 
Hall at Westminster. The main 
award winners are: Mis C 
Brightman, of Sheffield, the 
Fairer medal for best plant in 
show (the white anemone-like 
Call ian them um anemonoides); 
Mrs K N Dryden, of 
Sawbridgeworth, Hertfordshire, 
the Mooney cup and the AGS 
medal; Mrs J Hulrae. of 
Woking. Surrey, the Williams 
and Glyns Bank trophy and the 
Anna Griffith memorial trophy, 
A Edwards, of Dorking. Surrey, 
the Tomlinson tankard; C 
Lilley, of Worksop, Not- 
tinghamshire. the Henry Ham- 
mer cup; and Dr L J Bacon.of 
Winchester. Hampshire, the 
Dawson trophy. 

The following plants have 
received the award of meric 
Salix araentea, silvery catkins, 
shown by Dr J A Smart, of 
Barnstaple, Devon; Tulipa 
neustnievae, yellow flowers, 
shown by the director. Royal 
Botanic Gardens, Kew; and 
Primula 'Johanna*, pink flow- 
ers. exhibited by Jim Jermyn, of 
Edrom Nurseries, Coldingham. 
Berwickshire. 

Gold medals have been 
awarded to the following: 
Bumcoose and South Down 
Nurseries, of Redruth. Corn- 
walL showing shrubs: Southfield 
Nurseries, of Grimsby, - South 
Humberside, cacti and 
succulents; Edrom Nurseries, of 
Coktingham, Berwickshire, al- 
pines; Royal Botanic Gardens. 
Kew. alpines; and Potierton and 
Martin, of Netxteton, Lincoln- 
shire, dwarf plants. 

The show, at Westminster, is 
open today from 1 0 am to 5 pm. 

Birthdays today 

Mr Severiano Ballesteros. 29; 
Mr Justice Simon Brown. 49; Sir 
Brian Cubbon. 58: Vice-Ad- 
miral Sir John Cuthbert. 84: Mr 
Paul de Hevesy. 103; Mr Antal 
Dorati. 80; the Most Rev 
Domenico Enrici. 77; Lord Fitt. 
60; Senator J. William Ful- 
bnghL 81; Miss Hannah Gor- 
don. 45; Rear-Admiral Sir 
Alexander Gordon Lennox, 75; 
Sir Robert Helpmann. 77; Dr 
G J. Hills. 60; Mr Tom Jackson. 

6 1 : Mr Alan Knott 40; Mr Tom 
Lehrer. 58: Mr Prter Moores. 
54; Mr Vincent O’Brien. 69; Sir > 
Michael Pal User. 64; Mr Mi- 
chael Somare. CH, 50; Professor 
D.M. Walker. QC. 66: Sir 
Richard Young. 72. 


Mr AX Kendal) 

and Miss FJJL MatbesM 


and Miss FJJL Matbeson Mr W- M reray . 

The engagement is announced and Mbs VJYL David 

sra ftfanssa s sanr- sssi 

ajssSSSS 

-SjEtetfaSSTB ftJiffESftSffS 


the Hon Mrs Fergus 
of Hedenham Old 
Norfolk. 


Rectory. 


M J. Kenny, of London. 

Mr D.A. Henderson-WiUiiuns 
and Mbs KJE. Peddley 
■The engagement is- announced 
between David, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs J.- Henderson-Wil- 
liams, of Chapmans Walk, 
Leigh-on-Sea, Essex, and Karen, 


Mr N.CJL Macpherson The engagement is- : 

and Miss GX-F. Mountain . between David, eldest 
The engagement is announced and Mrs J.- Hend 
between Nigel Charles Blake, Dams. of Chapma 
only son of Mr and Mrs Ian Lciglwm-Sea, Essex, «... 
Macpherson. of The Old HalL daughter of Mr and Mrs j.B. 
Bio field. Norwich, Norfolk, and Peddley. of 1 Audtey Cottage, - 
Georgina Lily Fleur, only. Windhsham, -Surrey: 
daughter ofSir Denis and Lady '■ 

Mountain, of Shawford Park. ZStcrM 
■KarWinctaner. Hampshire. 


of Audley Cottage,- 


and Miss S.C Diyaljee 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael, s6n of Mr and 
Mrs D.J. . Kelly, of 
H umbers tone. Leicester, and 


Mr JS. Baldwin M n n j Keliv n f 

and Miss C. Durdant-Hr^uaby HumbersioniL LeSi^, and 
TTie engagement is announced Sonia, younger daughter of Mr 
l TS lJoh u n ' e,tl BM n w and Mrs H. Diyaijee, of New 
^nColSw^iSuS, Amaeriam.Gujaa. 


and Clare, elder daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Nigel Durdant- 
Hollamby, of Seven oaks, Kent. 

Mr J.S.P. Brown 
and Miss C J.T. Healy 
The engagement is announced 
between Stephen, elder son of 
Dr J.K. Brown and the late Mrs 
Brown, of Harbome, Bir- 
mingham. and Clare, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J.F. 
Healy, of St Leonards-oo-Sea, 
Sussex. 

Mr TJVL Cradock-Watsoa 
and Miss M.H.A.G. 
Spottiswoode 

The engagement is announced 
between Tom. only son of Dr 
and Mrs John Cradock- Watson, 
of Hale. Cheshire, and Miranda, 


Painswick Lodge, Gloucester- 
shire, and Virginia, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Patrick David, of 
Sandhurst, Gloucestershire. 

Mr I_MJ. Kisietewski Dunbar 
and MU* A.G.M. Prsdal 
The engagement is announced 
between Luke, elder son of the 
late M Jdzef Kisidewski and 
Mrae.E. Kisidewska Dunbar, 
Bnd'Anne,-daughter of the late 
Dr Henri Pradal and-- Mme 
! Pradat bfParis. 


MrIVLR. Pollard - 
and Mrs J. Christopher 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs W.D. Pollard, of 
Bmgjey, West Yorkshire, and 
Jane.' daughter of Mr and Mrs 
J-A. Christopher, of Sunderland. 
Tyne and Wear. 


Mr J.R. O'Connor Tyne and Wear, 

and Miss GS.F. Sutherland 

The engagement is announced 

between Jeremy, son of . Major Mr DJJi.Wdster 

and Mrs P. O'Connor, of Cray- and Min AJ. PeD 

don. Surrey, and Chiara, daugb- The engagement is announced 

ter of Mr and Mis E. Sutherland, between David, son of Mr and 


of Chipstead, Surrey. 


Mrs AJ.B. Webster, of Frizley 
Old Hall,- Bradford, and 
Amanda, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs , K. Fell, of Bradford. 


Mr JJ). Knox • Amanda, daughter i 

ud Miss C. Mejia de Veter ' ■ Mrs K. PelL of 
The engagement is announced Yorkshire 
between John Dillwyn, eldest 
sou of Oliver and Patricia Knox, m 

of Linden Gardens, London. Mflm flPP 
and Camila. daughter of ® 

Mercedes Mejia de Velez, of Mr GAG. Nonfood 
New York. and Mrs P. Pescod 

Mr G. McGork The marriage look place re- 
am! Miss KA. Heslop cenUy. in Hove, between Mr 

The engagement is announced Gordon Norwood, eldest son of 
between Gerard, youngest son ^ Mr and Mrs T. Alan 


or Hale. Cheshire, and Miranda, between Gerard, youngest son mm mrmaa wits i. Atan 
younger daughter of Mr David of Mr and Mrs J- McGurk, of Norwood, of Leamington Spa, 
Spottiswoode. of Ham. Rich- Redcar, Cleveland, and Ruth, 2 nd Mrs Phyllis Pescod, eider 


mond. and Mrs Angela 
Spottiswoode, of Si Mawes, 
Cornwall. 


youngest daughter of Mr and daughter of Die late Mr and Mrs 
Mrs J.A.B. Heslop, of Cheam, J-E. Barrett, of KmghUbndge, 
•• London. 


Surrey. 


Memorial services 


Sir Anthony Rawlinson 
The Lord Mayor of West- 
minster was present at a me- 
morial service for Sir Anthony 
Rawlinson held yesterday in 
Westminster Abbey. The Right 
Rev Edward Knapp-Fisher 
officiated, assisted by Canon 
Trevor Beeson. Mr John 
Rawlinson. son. read the lesson 
and Mr Richard Rawlinson. 
son, read from ‘On the High 
Hills' by Geoffrey Wimhrop 
Young. 

Sir Robert Armstrong also 
representing Christ Church, Ox- 
ford, gave an address. Canon 
P.W. Miller, also representing 
the Bishop and Diocese ot 
Derby, was robed and in the 
sacrarium. The Lord Privy Seal 
and Mrs Biffen. the Secretary of 
State for the Home Department 
and the Secretary of State for 
Trade and Industry and Mrs 
Channon attended. Others 




(MonUorCocnvenyi. Mr X J Feme and 
Mr D wiles (cooper* and Lynram 
Associates). Mr B Meaden (Bnaon 
Enterprises) and Mrs Meaden. Mr Cuy 
ruber (Landor AsncMet). Mr K J 
MUnertNadonal Hama Loans}. Profes- 
sor NT E Odell. Lieutenant -OoloneJ H R 
A SJnrather. M- L G Wadeson 
(reoresonCno Die secret a ry -peneraL 
Central Synod of tne enuren o i 
England). ~Mr C WIDlans U Henry 
setiroder Wagg end Company). Mr A 
C Ttnwer nvowee, snil andKeellng). 
Mr F W awards (Humphreys and 
Glasgow). Dr Wallace Hauwa lOvto> 
unteBmaneniuty tn Public Ammo. 
Mr RTBWiw (Drtvm -Jonas). Mrs C 
MUM -fctoatrmsn. Oxfontshlre Heamt 
. Authority x Mr Ward Jones fOamlrig 
Board (or Great BrUainK Mr j Dennis 
_Ann*trortg {Yorkshire Ramblers’ 
IjOU^Tmt-G P MacDonald (Jonas. 
jBoj,(hsvtt and Pogue. Surrey and 


Moreek Dr john Haromenon. MiDor c 
•-JSSmour (re pr ese n ting ueumam- 
■ OnM . Commanding. Granadiar 
Mr d Hickey and Mr A 

Mr A M 

W BatusMa Mr AM Bwey. Mr J 

tue^och. mt. E PtMadL tfr p q 

Cazalet. Mr C E CodSTmt R C M 
Cooper. MT J Camus. Mrs J caneton. 
Mr j I DMty. rwsaor and Mrs M 
FOber. Dr P I Freenon. Mr R Grey. 
Mr w anraeo. Mr P L cregoon. Mr 
and Mrs J HGaRmtfth. Mr S OoR. Mr 
A D Owyther. Mr D Heaton. Mrs M E 
l ledley -MiBer. Dr K P JaoL Mr H H 
Ueser, Mr said Mre P Ledger. Mr N F 
Ladsome. Mr R A Uoyd Jones. Mr A 
O MnaW. Mr R MountflekL Mr P 
' MotmUMd. Mlsr A Moeller. Mr T 
RoMnaan. Mr N Rotooo, Mr J s 
Sadler. Mr D ScjiotgT. Mr M Scholar. 
Mr and Mre C H Tidtonv. Mr A R 


«r. Mr A -Trir 
Mr .E Vlmar. JM 


n. Mr j B. 
m P Ward. 
an. MF. J.K 


Genera) Sir James . 
MarahaU-CoranraU 
A service of thank^iviug for the 
:hfe of^ tCJteeriafSu' JanuesrMar- 
shaD-CornwalJ was bdd ^oa 
Monday in the Chapel of the 
Royal Hospital. Chelsea. The 
Ven Peter Maliett officiated, 
assisted by the Rpv Denys 
Bartlett. General Sir Martin 
Farndale ■ read from Pilgrim’s 
Progress by John Bunyan and 
Rear-Admiral Sir Edmond Ir- 
ving gave an address. Among 


l .Viscount de 
f- Bw Hon Chrts- 

djord. HoDendexu- 
Hxw,.G«teral Str' 


'ebwSm HOwud-VVw. ■ Liealepant- 
Gencnu Sir Peter Vincent- Mator- 
Gcnni Sir NM Tapp. Motor- 
General Str Peter GtBeu. LKatenaot- 
General Sir Jotnr dusipie. Sir VtvUh 
Fuchs. 8r Seymour Eaertaa. Sir 
Uuma and Udv KIrwan. Cotooel 
ar Douglas DoddS-ParKer (Special 
Forces Oub). Str George Btehoo 
(president. Raw. Georgrnphtad.Soo- 
•ty) and Lady Bishop with Professor 
Eric Brown: Mdor bom) the Hon Mrs 
Fergus Matheson. 


The Princess oT Wales has 
appointed (wo more ladies-in- 
waiting to help her with her 
many engagements, Bucking- 
ham Palace has announced. 

They are Mrs Max Pike 
(above), aged 38, daughter of 
Major-General Lord Michael 
FhzaJan-Howard, who far 10 
years until 1981 was Marshal of 
the Diplomatic Corps, and Miss 
Alexandra Loyd, aged . 24, 
daughter of Mr Julian Loyd, the 
Queen's land agent at San- 
dringham. Norfolk. 


Dittners . 

Pharmaceutical Society V . 
of Great Britain 
Dr Geoffrey Booth. President of 
the Pharmaceutical Society of 
Great Britain, presided at a 
dinner held last night at 1 
Lambeth High Street, SE1. Sir 
Brian Bailey. Chairman of the 
Health Education CountiL also 

WHh. Mr Pswr Hoiwdt. Dr Join 


Tylers' 1 and ' Bricklayers* 
Co mp any 

The Lord Mayor and Lady 
Mayoress, accompanied ty the 
Sheriffs and their ladies, at- 
tended a ladies* dinner given by 
the Tylers’ and Bricklayers' 
Company at -Carpenters' Hall 
last night. Mr JBF Mathews, 
Master, and Mrs Mathews, re- 
ceived the guests. The speakers 
were the Lord Mayor, the 
Master, Mr PR Harris and Mr D 
Mason-Jones. 


HKTHS, MJUnOAEES, 
DEATHS mi M MEMQRAM 
» ■ few + 15\ VAT 

(minimum 3 ImcM 

Mtnoumnu. junbawcaLxl h> «he 
name jnd pernunnu of I he 

fcmfcr. bu> he sent lu 

THE TIMES 
P0 BOX 484 
VirgMa Straat 
London El 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


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BIRTHS 


tAtmCM On rrfartun- CTh 1486 in 
CalUarnta. In Sua mre WMtOrel 
wo# of Stnrtwn Rttw BarbWrt. a son. 
Trnun John. 

MUHCri - WnA CUtebHIi. •»«" on 
March 30th. a dauflMre lor Liannf 
mre rnfhi and BatTV Grand daugls 
trr for wsnm Oms. Lona. Jaca in 
Nrw Ireland 

BUftmUfittSOn 6th April in sventy. 
ALBtraUL to Judr and Tun. a dpogh 
Ur KatMftne Margaret A vaitr lor 
WimaM. 

■OUT . on «nt March at Fairf Krtd Con 
rral Hoepuat Bun 1 , to Eit 'ore 
Twure and Alniair a daugMcr Ha- 
re) Mirum 

■tnrr . On April *Ut in London, to 
Oiarhn and \onesu. a daNhlrr 
fCfitma) 

CUVE On April 5Ui. to Jaw am An- 
drew. a «m iJohm. 

DOtttiC -On April 3td X9B6.I0MW*" 
lure Johmoft-FwutBani and Prtrr. a 
dau^titof. OUvu. a uster for Henri' 
and Jftnlnu. 

KSPMEZ Onaih AmH mfibin Pans 
■u Odup mre Humphrey i and AWn 
Dreirrr. a daughm*. Soptw Alice. 

DRAPER - on 7th Apni. m Cnnuo- 

pfter and Manil a, a son Fergus. 


DUNCAM On March 77ih at W>camiM a 
OtmtjI HospiUi lo PhvUra ince Preli 
and mec. a dauqtner Joanna 
rronm. a stsler for Tom. 

GREEN - On MU April, lo Kale and 
Oaiid. a son iDonumr Jam« 
Mi II team a brother (or Clemency. 

OKU On AptU l« IQRfc lo Dun and 
Joian. a son FrreMrtcJk. brother lor 
James and AWiene 

HOGG - To Angm and Carole ipfe 
Mafthewyi on 2nd April 1486. a 
daughter. lAlrinn Jennifer r born 
well 6 Spruce Crescent- RAF 
FUmingm. Donrauer. DK9. South 
Yorkshire. 

JARMAN on 6th April I486, to Jane 
•See Eiirati and Robert ai St Thomas 
Hosnlal. London, a son wuuam 
Crane Edward, a brother for 
Thomas 

KAUFELER On March 28th at SI 
George's Tooting to Jin mee Edge* 
and Robert, a daughter. Isabelle 
Judith 

KENNEDY - On 4th April, at St. 
Teresa's HosHtal. Wimbledon, lo 
Farida and Ken. a son. Alexander 
Matthew, and brother to Patrick. 

KITSCH - On 7Ui of April 1986 at 
Ft red am Fields Hospital Plymouth 
to James and MmeL lore de LasMi 
a tan. Robert Redtert Bulier. a 
hr other fo r Joan and Philip. 

UTTUTDM on April Ath 148b to LMy 
and Antony a ton. Aiasiair. brother 
for Katrina 

MITCHELL - On April 3rd at South- 
amoton. toMarvihreLewKnluuand 
Brian Miuhetl. a son. Leo Brian. 

FAL CRAVE - On 3rd April al Kingston 
Hnswui to jiu mre Selnun-Siiinhi 
and Jm». a son. Alexandre James. 

ROSEN. On March 51st oi Widfrath. 
FUG. lo Petra mre Edwantai and 
Briam a dauqhfer Patrtaa Helen 

Mm - To Susan uire FanaMi and 
Roger, a daughter Beatrice an dm 
April a SHier for Robert. 

STANLEY - on March 30th. 1986. to 
EUdie and Mrhatas. a daughter. 
Georgina EttraOrth. a stster for 
Loutse 

TETLOW - On 1st April to Rot and 
Christopher, a daughter rranees 
Jane 

THORNCHOPTOn January |7thai ST 
Lukes Hospital. Guildford to Jacque- 
line mee Honuiioni and Brian a 
daughter. Koty Taman, a seder for 
Abigail 

WRAGC On April 4 to Frmu mre La- 
tte' and Christopher, a daughter. 


DEATHS 


AMBLER - On April 7lh. IW6, to 
pome Hospital, alter nrurh illiwss. 
Antonia ageo B5. widow of LI. Col 
M J A muter ami mother of A vornw 
King Funeral Friday tint April 2.15 
pm or Bouroreiiouih cmnaionum. 
Flowers may be teni to Dene Scott, 
portman Lodge ruanrai Home. 
Boarnrenoum. 


■ERET. On April 5th 1986 peacefully. 
Frederick William Beney, aged 102 
span. Recently Using at East 
Gnmteod. formerly Wall on on 
Thames. Brioved husband of Uie late 

Irene Constance, and dearly loied la- 
ther. tamer -In-Jaw and grandfathn- 
Mrenonal scry ice al S. John the Dt- 
\ine. Fdbrtdgr. East GnmUMd. 
Monday April 14ih at 12 15 pm. 
Flowers to the church. Enquiries to 
R MedhursL Hanfteu 2S3. 

KKKET-CUUtK PracefuOy at Edhv 
burgh. on 6Ch April I486. Doctor 
Patrick Allan Bennett -Clark iagcd 
45i of Eton Terrace Service at 
Warrtslon Crematonuni. Clotster 
Chapel on ThreydaV 10th April, at 
2 45 pm to wmch ail friends are 
united 

SUCKE In Aprs soddeidy by a tragic 
acndenl Andrew Harvey aged 39 Of i 
CXwtsea. Befosed son of Frederick ! 
and the late Irene, orally mourned j 
and sadly missed by his brother cave I 
andtustaindy.andby tus wide circle ! 
of relations and friends Funeral ser- 
itce at Surrey and Sussex 
Crenuiorium. Worth, on Friday 
April 1 1 at IS 30pm Family flowers 
only Donations. If desired to the Coi- 
c Hester Satnanuns c o Ehtuut 
Funeral Services. 89 High Street. 
Croydon. Tel 0L«88 5S5S. 

■URflELD On April 6 peacefully at 
Ravdon Nursing Home. Irene Vera 
aged 91 years. Formerly Boxled. Col- 
chester Losing wife of Ihe late Cant 
CH Burfirld. York and Laneasier 
Regt. Service Boxted Church on 
April 11 at 12 noon fortowrd by pri- 
vate interment at Cow den. Kent. 
Flow-m to Singleton A Hastings Fu- 
neral Service. 21 Berners Street. 
Ipswich. 

DARLEY - on Tuesday 8th Aprfl. 
i486. Geoffrey Wardle. peacefully at 
home. Barmoon. Hutton-ie-Hoie Fu- 
neral at SL BatoiDh'sranirrh. Bovull 
on Friday UUi April at 11 30 am 
fnUowed by totermenl at 
Butt er e r am be 

FENTON Martha Findlay Louden (nee 
Darting! widow of Robert Fenton for 
mrrfy of Dunfermline. Scotland. 
Suddenly on Thursday 3rd April at 
Tunbridge Wells. Sadly mwsea by an 
her family. Funeral arrangements by 
Hurkmous. Tutondre weds. 

FINNI4 On April 5th peacefully In lus 
4eep. David Genl awd 62 Enquines 
lo WHhani Weller A son Ltd.- 
Wortlung 213828. 

FOX - Peacefully ai home on 6tn April. 
Helen, dear wife ot Miht ay. mother 
and gr j pomothre Funeral 12 noon, 
Monday lath April al SI Mary The 
Virgm. Church sum. Caine, will 
■shtre Family ttnwerv only. 
OnnailoM IT desired may be vent to 
Dorothy Hour Fowoohon. 16? 
BMOftoieid Rood. Both 8A2 3AT En 
gwiM to Wool ion a. bon. Came 

81228 a 


FRAMFTON Or 4th Aprfl 1986. peace- 
fully. In Lreoon. Vyvyan WMinhy. 
lormrety of Singapore, aged 85, hus- 
band of the laie Dons and father of 
Peter and Sally A Memorial Service 
will be held later, details lo be 
announced. 

HOUR Geoffrey aged 78 on 4th April 
at Ms home In Spam. Beloved hus- 
band of Maiorie. father of Patricia. 
Belinda and Simon, and formerly of 
Abbotte HaD. Great wtgborougb. Es- i 
se*. Crrmauon privale. Date of 
Memorial Service In England will be ; 
announced later. 

KERYOll on April 6th 1486 at home. I 
Peter Booth try. much loved husband 
of Barbara and father of Frantn. 
Room and Ian. Cremation 
privateJOnuly flowers only. Dona- 
bom. if desired, lo Cancer Research 
or Cancer Relief. 

LENNOX 6(h April 1986 Janes Crtfg 
QBE pasted Secretary of Anriedt Or- 
der of Foresters Friendly Society. 
Funeral Service at St MaryieOone 
crematorium. East End Road. Finch- 
lev. 10 am Friday uui April. 
Donatioas K desired to Brampton 
HosMloL League of Friends. 

LEONARD A. J W. S iGerryl on 7tt| I 
April after months of pMn most i 
bravely borne. Funeral Woking Cre- . 
nutorium Al hH desire no flowers, 
and family ottty. 

MAHON - Ftorence May agM 83. 
peacefully m hospital In Leeds on 6th 
April, betoved and loving mother of 
Mary- 

MALLOY on 3 4 86 Muriel, dearest 
wile, mother, daughter, stsler and 
friend Donaum tn memory may be 
sent low Gemmas Hospice. 329 Har- 
rogate Rd. Leeds 17. Enqxdiis to 
Bowers Funeral Directors 0423 
77Q2S8. 

MANLEY, on 214 March 1986. Frank 
Horace. M.BE.. MVSc.. 
M R.C.V.S . D.V.M. tzurlchi. aged 
85. peacrfully at Ids home m Red- 
lands. California, bekned husband of 
Megan, father of Joan and BIO. 
grandfather of Sian. Margaret and 
John, great grandfather of Nick, 
well travelled. Ainu, the Middle 
East and finally the Far west 

■AXWEU. - Oil 31S March, in Mid- 
renoerg south Africa. Theodora 
Mary, widow of the late Viet Admi- 
ral. the non sir Denis Maxwell 
K CB. C-B E. 

MEARA ■ On Stti ArelL Gwvnne. aged 
80. dearly bekned husband, of Wini- 
fred and father of Richard and 
David. Funeral Service at 
Brcakspcar Crematorium. RuNUp. 
on Friday inn April ar 1205 pm. 
Family ftowenonly . but donananstf 
desired to the Munster. Si Andrew's 
Churm. Bndle Road. EosKOto. 
Mtnoiesex. 


MOLBttEY - on 7th ApriL 1986. H 
TIM Western tnflrmary. GbagoW. C 
Rkhcy Mouraey of "Rougrauiowe-. 
Dalbeattie; dear brother of Sheila. 
Michael and Coitn. Funeral id 
MosonhlD crematortum by Ayr on 
Thursday lOtti April at 12 noon. No 
Bowers please. 

OTTON Henry Albert peoceftdly at 
Leamington Spa on 3 IS March aged 
87 years. Dear hustMaad of Leah and 
beloved father of Philip. 

PULLAN - On the 3rd April 1986. 
Tactta Mary, of Anemoen. Beading 
IO w.. widow of John PuUaa. FU- 
nera at Bradtog Church al3 30 p.m. 
Friday ilth AprB. Flowers or dona- 
Hone to R.S.R.B. c/o Downer a 
White. 43 Sasdows . Road. Lake.. 
Smdowim, i.O W- - ■ 

RAYBDtlLD on April Sth pncdtffly In 
Sevenoaks. Barbara Raybmdd. Dear- 
ly tavnt Wife of Gordon, mother of 
Rohm and Felicity and grandmother 
to Alexander. Olivia snd Julia. Fu- 
neral service Sumbldoe Church 
Tuesday April ifitn at z^onm. fol- 
lowed by private cremation. Flowers 
to Hodges and Co. 37 Quakes Hall 
Lane. Severnaia. KenL 

ROONEY DFC RFC On Thursday 3rd 
April Gerard Octavius, aged 96. 
peacefully at Stroud House Putney, a 
very much loved brother. Unde and 
great unde. Formerly of the UnHed 
Nations . Geneva and New York. Re- 
quiem Mas at Wednesday lfith 
April. 1) 30am at St John's Church. 
St John's Avenue, POtrcy. Family 
flowers only. Donations H wished m 
the RAF Benevolent Fund.., 

RYAN on April 4th in Bating Host- 

• lal. Hubert 1 PM) Ryan LDS. After a 
short tttoeah R e o u lem Mass .at St 
Mary Cthriburga Barvmg. Friday 
April lllh to 11 am followed by to- 
fennenl at MpfBnide Cemetery. 

SAS Paid. On 5tti ApriL peacefully at 
home, aged 79. dearly beloved hus- 
band of Fit. Sadly nUtoed Service M 
west Chape). Golders Green Crema- 
torium. iQun. Thursday lOth ApriL 
Howes to E.B Ashton A Company. 
96 Fulham Road. Chelsea sws. 


SOMER on April 5th 1986 suddenly at 
Camerimry. Francis Edward Some 
FRCYS.. DVSM, aged 86 years fate 
of Bromley and Worcester Betoven 

father of Kenneth and ShriU and de- 
voted grandfather and great, 
srandfaUier. Funeral 'details to be 
Announced later. 

STRANG - on' April SUi 1986.' In The 
Royal Berhsiure. Hospital. Heading. 
David, dear father of Peter. Fwterai 

on April t im. 4 pm, onfeadlng Ore- 
matommi No nowm. donations if 
dewM for Gidde Dogs for me Blind, 
folly Court. Barktum Road, 
wofcingtoun. . 


TAYLOR. On 4th Aprfl. NobeL widow 
of Geoffrey Thyior. peacefully in 
hospital after a short mnesa. Funeral 
servtre-MBL PeterUi BvtonL War- 
1 wteksMre. on Fridaar-Zlth April at 3 
pm. Ftowvrs may breent to w.G. 
Ralhbones. 30 Clarendan Avenue. 
Leandmuon Spa. 

THOMPSON on Aprfl 2nd. Anne Ehzp- 
beth. peacefully at rest. Beloved 
Mother of Anya. PtriHppa and 
KCster. Funeral al Alt Saints Church. 
Ascot No flowers by request Dona- 
tions to British Heart Foundation. 
Please check tone with Lines. Ban- 
nister. Ascot 20266. 

WALSH - On Monday 7lh ApriL peace- 
fully at home in Oxford, wnuam 
Henry. fRiChanU Wtosh. FBA FRFE. 
Emeritus Pr n feiaor of Edinburgh 
University and Fellow Emeritus of 
Merton College. Oxford. Dearly 
loved husband of Trixie, father of 
Catharine. Steuben and Poly and 
gr an dfather of Cob it.- Anthea. Ed- 
ward. IsabeOe. Amu and Thomas. 
Funeral service St Cross Church 
Hoiywefi. Oxford at 12 noon. 14th 
ApriL tottowed by Commttiai at Ox- 
fold Crematorium. Memorial Service 
to be announced later. 

WEDDELL on April 6 O 1 at Brendan. 
Hflda Madeline aged 96 late of Uctien 
Abbas. Funeral service al lichen 
Abbas Parish Church tomorrow 
Thursday April 10 th at 3.15 pm. 
Family flowers only, donations if de- 
sired to Save The Children Fund c/o 
John Steel and Son. Chesll House, 
winchester. 

WISE On 31st March 1986 May 
Georgina mfe Can) peacefully in 
Poole Hospital m her 74tn year. Be- 
lated wife of nearly 49 years to 
Arthur Francis Wise, mother of Jon. 
Chrainpher and Robert, grandmoth- 
er of AUBon. pamna. Andrew and 
OavM- Bewaifuf memories of a lire 
full of love and labour for her lowed 

. CMS. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 

MA W HPOE - A Memorial Service for 
Dav id Henry Maeindoe win be held 
at Eton College Chapel al 2.46pm an 
Friday 9th May. 

ROSE. A Service of Thanlsglvtng fOr 
the life and work of E. Michael Row 
CM.G.. win be held at Sl Lukes 
Church. Sydney SL Chctaea at man 
on Monday April 2JsL 


IN MEMORIAM - WAR 

JACKSON. To toe. dear memory of 
Geoffrey LatattTomi Jackson ■ Cap-‘ 
tain • The WOe Brigade. Killed tn 
Action near Arte on Aoril 9th 1917. 
aged. S3. - 

IN MlSfOWAM • 

- PRIVATE- 

rLBYWttNCTWf CSJ_ CJJL Born 4th 
Jafjr 1904. DM SM April 13M. 


OBITUARY 
CEfiMSTOPHEK LLO 
Historian of the sea 


Professor Christopher 
Lloyd, -ihe author and distin- 
guished naval historian whose 
many handsomely .produced 
and well-illustrated -volumes 
brought vividly to the modem 
reader the seafarer’s life of 
centuries past, has died ai the 
age of 79. 

He was one of ibose.uncooi- 
' nfon people who was able .to 
combine research with lively 
presentation, and many gener- 
ations of naval officers owe 
much of their nautical knowl- 
edge to his teaching. 

Charles Christopher Lloyd 
was born on September 2, 
1906, in Bangalore, India, and 
was educated at Marlborough 
and Lincoln College, Oxford, 
taking a first in history. 

He moved to Canada to 
lecture at Bishop's University, 
Quebec, from 1930 to 1934, 
returning to the Royal Naval 
College, Dartmouth, where he 
remained until 1945. 

He was then appointed a 
lecturer at the Royal Naval 
College, Greenwich, a post he 
held until 1966. He was also a 
professor of history at the 
college from 1962-66. 

Lloyd took an active part in 
the affairs of the Navy 
Records Society - for which he 
edited two volumes of the 
papers of Lord Keith - and of 
the 'Society for Nautical 
Research. 

After holding various of- 
fices in the latter society, be 
took over the editorship, at 
short notice, -of the journal. 
The Manner's Mirror, after 
the sudden death, in 1971, of 
Captain T. D. Manning. 

Lloyd's general works are 
excellent examples of how a 
great deal of expert knowledge 
can be expressed in a way 
which is easy to read without 
losing either the historical 
accuracy or the romantic over- 


tones conjured up by a life at 

The Navy and the Slave 
Trade (1949). in which there is 
little to criticize and much to 
admire, describes the Royal 
Navy’s part in the suppression 
of the African slave tirade.. As 
with his other works, Lloyd s 
mastery of his feet* tjom 
political and naval, were ad-g* 
mirable and drive home his 
‘ argument with- logic.' and 
precision. 

In The British Seaman 
(1968) the author deserts his 
mariners to concentrate in 
detail on their conditions - 
discipline, pay and promo- 
tion, desertion. It was an 
important book that opened a 
new view into . the navy's 
social history. His Atlas of 
Maritime History ( 1 976), with 
its ingenious, dear and infor- 
mative coloured maps, is. a 
fine example of the better sort 
of coffee-table book. • 

' Lloyd’s' more specialist 
work indudes Medicine and. 

■ the Navv: 1 200- J 900 (1961 P 7 
written in collaboration with 
Jack L S. Coulter. 

This third volume, covering 
the hundred years from’1714- 
1815, was a welcome and 
worthy successor 10 the two 
previous volumes : so ably 
produced by the late Surgeon 
Commander John ReeviL 

The book reveals many 

recorded ofthe medicalof^ 
cers at this time, notably one 
Dr McKinnel who ..drank: a 
wineglass frill qf black vomit 
from a man dying of. yellow 
fever to prove to the crew that 
this was hot a contagious^ 
disease. The whole work made 
an important contribution not 
only to the history of medicine 
but to that of the Royal Navy 
as well. 

Lloyd married Katherine 
Brenda Sturge in 1938 and had 
a son and a daughter. 


HIS HONOUR GERAINT REES 


His Honour Geraint Rees, 
who was in turn conspicuous- 
ly successful as a metropolitan 
magistrate and as a circuit 
judge, died on Maundy Thurs- 
day, aged 78. 

He heard the preGniiiiary 
hearings of the cases against 
the Richardson and Kray 
gangs when there were efforts 
to inierfer with witnesses and 
to disrupt the proceedings and 
it whs due laigely to Rees's 
representations that the Crim- 
inal Justice Act of. 1972, 
designed, to prevent sudj’in- 
.imndaijofl, was passed. 

^ Rjchartf Geraint Rees was 
•fibrii off May 5, 1907, and 
spent his boyhood in Aberyst- 
f-wyth and m -Cardiff as a 
- ioeiiibtt bf a*. pious noncon- 
formist family. As a student, 
Rees had that passion. 'for 
intellectual excellence which 
is typical of the clever Welsh 
boy from a humble home, and 
his academic achievements 
were outstanding. 

At the University College of 
Wales he took his LLB with 
first class honours, followed 
this.witli a double first in the 
law. tripos at Cambridge^and 
finally won a certificate of 
honour at the loner Temple. 

Rees was called to the Bar in 
1932, and began lo practise on 
the South Wales circuit. If he 
did not forge ahead as quickly 
as might hive been expected 
of one of his intellectual 
calibre and academic bril- 
liance, he was making good 
progress when war broke out 
in 1939. 

He joined the Army at once, 
and remained in the forces for 
the duration of hostilities. He 
was commissioned in the 
Welsh Guards, reached the 
rank of lieutenant-colonel 
was mentioned in despatches, 
and awarded the United States . 
Bronze Star. 

After demobilization, Rees 
resumed his professional ca- 
reer, and acquired a good 
practice; mainly in North 
Wales and Cheshire. The time 
came when be had to decide 
between applying for Silk or 
for a judicial appointment. 

He chose the latter course, 
and became a metropolitan 
magistrate m 1956. He im me- 
dia lelx showed himself to .be... 
admirably suited to the 
position. 

His legal learning was exten- 
sive. but he carried it lightly. 
He was quick, courteous, fair- 
! minded and shrewd. He could 


be stern when he had to deal 
with: hardened, and dexer- 
. mined criminal^' but towards 
the inadequate and, the nn- 
. lucky, (who. constitute- a' high 
proportion of those who enter 
the dock in the magistrates' 
courts) he was invariably sym- 
pathetic and compassionate. 

After Rees had sat for five& 
years at Old Street, the Chief 
Magistrate invited him .to 
move to Bow Street Here he 
heard many exuaditipn cases 
(in which that court has an 
exclusive jurisdiction). l^His 
sound legal knowl^ge^ and 
qukknessfo gj^ijjg^uov- 
el an decomplex points, were 
invaluable, and he became an 
.^agJsnowledgxLexpea -in. -this 


. There were occasions^ on 
which his judgments' were 
reversed by the Divisional 
Court, and then vindicated by 
a unanimous decision of the 
House of Lords. 

His most exacting, and 
thankless task involved the 
preliminary hearing of the 
cases concerning the Richard- 
son and Kray gangs. _ ” 

Determined efforts, .were 
made to terrify witnesses and 
to" disrupt - The - proceedings; 
owing to a defect in the law, 
the only weapons available 
against these tactics were per- 
sonality and bluff and with 
the help of them he succeeded 
in avoiding the threatened 
breakdown into chaos. 

It was largely due to his 
representations that the law 
was later changed (Criminal 
Justice Act, 1972) in a way 
which made it extremely un- 
likely that there would, ever be 
a recurrence of this large-scale 
and premeditated disorder. 

When- the changes in the 


administration ofthe criminal & 
courts, which followed- the v 
Beeching Report, were imple- 
mented, Rees- became one of 
the first batch of circuit judges 
who began operations at the 
beginning of 1972. 

He had seen nothing of jury 
trials for 13 years, but he was 
very adaptable, and he proved 
to be as effective in the crown 
court as he had been for so 
long in the magistrates’ courts. 

He retired in 1981. 

His courtesy_remained all 
pervading, and his patience 
immense. His feeling for 
words meant that his 
summings-up were always lu- 
cid and never duU. : 

Rees was twice married. ft 4 


THE RIGHT REV H.FJDAVIS 


Monsignor Henry Francis 
Davis, DD, who has died, 
aged 83. was a theologian of 
international standing and an 
authority on the life and 
writings of Newman. 

He was ordained a priest for 
the Archdiocese of Birming- 
ham in 1928 and, for the next 
28 years, his main preoccupa-. 
lion was the training of stu- 
dents for . the. priesthood at 
Oscott College, Birmingham, 
where he was vice-rector. Dur- 
ing these years be was also a . 
lecturer in theology at Bir- 
mingham University. 

In the latter years of the 
Second World War he was 
instrumental in the War Of- 
ficer arranging to have German 
prisoners of war who were 
students for the priesthood 10 
be brought together in a camp 
at Colchester, Here, he direct- 
ed their studies and, on their 
return to Germany, they were 
ordained on his 
recommendation. 

More than 70 of these 
priests, many of them now 
bishops, recently invito] Da- 
vis to Germany to celebrate 


the fortieth anniversary of 
their ordination. 

_ His reputation as a theolo- 
gian was recognized by the 
Holy See and Pope Pius XII 
invited him to Rome to 
discuss the dogmatic implica- 
tions of the doctrine of the 
Assumption, whichresulted in 
^ declaration of November • 

-.He was a committed -ecu- 
memst even' 30 years before 
Vatican II. 

In 1958 Davis left Oscott to 
become parish priest, of St 
Gregory the Great, Bearwood, 
near Birmingham, where he 
served for 20 years. He was 
appointed to the parish of 
Eynsham, near Oxford, in 
1978, retiring last year. 

Davis never owned a can 
his bicycle took him every- 
whCTe. even to Rome. His 
intellectual and academic at- 1 -ft 

SSIS 1 ®- n{ ? er inierferred " 
witfr the simplicity -of his life 

S-Sb?*! IWw hi « life 

Jfwas held ifi the Bgfiest 

as a scholar a£da 
devout priest 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1 986 

THE ARTS 




Television Riccardo Muti (right), in London for three Philharmonia concerts, 
ur’ k j talks to John Higgins about his first season as La Scala’s music 

VV IvKcU director and the theatre’s new recording contract with EMI 

Homecoming for a new era 

deatmved. w* MtiUaf W' 


“"wanna muiion oranges were 
destroyed. We also got rid of 
. ffe t housand tons of canii- 
“owws. And over-produced 
wheat by seven million tons. In 
' O'Donnell Investigates ike 
Food Business (BBC2) these 
figures were delivered in tons 
' « appropriate outrage. 

Not only does this country, 
and the European Economic 
Community, over-produce 
food, it also subsidises the 
over-production undo: the 
Common Agriculture Policy. 
Thus, although we have a 
sugar- surplus of four million 
tons a year, we also have sugar 
subsidies running at £1 mflfion 
a day. 

Dr Michael ODonadl cal- 
led these figures obscene and 
criminal, which indeed they 
'are. However, he was not 
•mcerned that this abundance 
old exist while half the rest 
*e world starves, but that 


On December 7, the immovable 
opening date of the Scala season, 
Riccardo Muti conducts his first 
opera as music director of the 
Milan house. The work is 
Sabucco. and it has been very 
carefully chosen. 

It was Verdi's first major 
success at La Scala and with it 
came the start of a new era for 
him. Muti has of course had his 
own Milan successes already, 
not the least of which was the 
Emani a few seasons back which 
be rescued from a wretched 
production and turned into a 
triumph. But he does anticipate 
a new era both for himself and 
the theatre. Tm not arriving 
carrying an aura about me that 
everything will alter, la a way 
I’m. coming home. But there will 
be changes." 

One of these is a new reiation- 


fcatal shortcomings of the 01 ? nc ? J®" 10 ?- 

itionalBriteh diet are ship between EMI and La Scala 

End as a result of the “ no “ nced 
i subsidies for ■nricultere. the three-year spomorship, with 
. argument was tlat fet and “ 35°?®? f"? 

■gar arecbeap and heavily of ^ <*»>• I^ys Stale oil 
romoted, while poultry, cere- comjtfiiy, there will bea senes of 
v and polymsatBrated fits recordings with Scala forces, 
ceire no subsidies and are some made live (asm the case of 
terefore more expensive than Emani) and others in the studio, 
r should be. The fast of these isLaforz&dei 

he programme was part oT desxino . with fteni. Domingo 
BC ftmpip . and and Zancanaro. This will be in 

ligaments were pa ssio na te the studio. Verdi's Requiem is to 
convincing. One or two be recorded in the place where it 
trial facts were over- had its first performance, the 
ied: Dr O'Donnell did not Church of San Marco, Milan, 
as the resalts of EEC The next opera is likely to be 
ddies on the diets of other Verdi again: 7 vespri sicilianL 


tey should be. 
The pTourami 


The programme was part oT 
BBC health campaign and j 
arguments were passionate 
' convincing. One or two 
ferial facts were over- 
ted: Dr O'Donnell did not 
ess the resalts of EEC 
jsidics on the diets of other 
ations in the Community; no- 
id be point out that the 
subsidized healthy foods 
•ere still very much cheaper in 
Britain than those which fann- 
ers were paid to produce. 

Marco Polo (Channel 4) is* 
another big-canvas epic pro-1 
dneed by Vincenzo Label]*. It 
is marginally more exciting 
than AD. It looks more attrac- 
tive and covers ground less 

familiar than that of the Bible 

stories. However, Marco Polo 
shares some of AD ' s faults — 
the dialogue is exerntiating, 
the characterization is vesti- 
gial and the mdkmge of British 
and American accents spoken 
by prominent dtizens of Ven- 
ice is irritating. 

Later episodes of this story 
were shot on location in China 
but, if the exterior scenes were 
worthwhile, the inner land- 
scape was miserably poor. 
Young Marco was portrayed 
as a pretty youth obsessed 
with his absent father; whatev- 
er qualities the great 13th- 
century explorer may have had 
to make his 1 7-year journey to 
the unknown East successful 
were not indicated. 


At a time when many record 
companies, despite the success 
of CD, are cutting back on opera 


this represents a major commit- 
ment by EMI and ENI over the 
next few years. But Muti also 
sees it as a means of re- 
establishing the past. "I want to 
get back to the days when 
Karajan, Serafin, De Sabata and 
others were making great record- 
ings with La Scala. Also in the 
theatre I want to create a team 
around me of young musicians 
in the way that Toscanini had at 
his side votto, Gui and — yes, 
again — Serafin." 

Nabucco wifi not be on the 
ENI sponsorship list for the 
basic reason that Muti has 
recorded it already and the CD 
version is due out from EMI 
later this summer. However it is 
likely to provide opportunity in 
plenty for patriotic display on 
December 7. “Yes, that side is 
well known enough: Jerusalem 
versus Babylon representing Ita- 
ly against the Austrians. But it 
can be taken too for. A couple of 
yean ago there was a move to 
establish the chorus “Va pen- 
sion” as our national anthem. 
But had anyone really looked at 
the score? It begins sotto voce 
and when it is all over the High 
Priest Zaccaria refers to it as “the 
lamentation of timorous 
women". What sort of anthem is 
that? ----- 

“No, what I like about 
Nabucco is its fire — it's a storm, 
it’s a tempest. Emani is more 
refined, the characters are menu 
deeply analyzed, with the excep- 
tion of Abigaile, the first great 
soprano role that Verdi created. 
There is the prototype of Lady 


Macbeth, the female who is a 
combination of bene e male" 

Dimitrova is the Abigaile and 
Bruson sings the title role. The 
producer is Roberto di Simone, 
who like Muti was boro in 
Naples. Coincidence? Muti chor- 
tles: “Roberto is so Neapolitan 
that by comparison I might have 
been bom in Scandinavia." 

Mutf s commitments with La 
Scala, together with his music 
directorship of the Philadelphia 
Orchestra, mean that his appear- 
ances at foreign opera houses, 
which are not exactly thick on 
the ground already, are going to 
become even rarer in the future. 
One though could well be an 
Emani at Covent Garden to- 
wards the end of the decade. Is 
this a peace-offering in return for 
his rejection of the post of 
musical director of the London 
house? 

“No. It is an opera which 
Govern Garden have asked me 
to conduct and which hasn't 
been heard in that house for half 
a century. I have always regarded 
Covent Garden as a serious 
house and I do so stilL But I need 
Italy. If I had said ‘Yes' to 
Covent Garden then I would 
have been forced to uproot to 
London and that would not have 
ban in my nature. In Milan I am 
two hours on the autostrada 
from my home in Ravenna. 

“La Scala has come, 1 hope, at 
the right time in my career. In 
1968 [when Muti was still under 
30]4 was director of the Maggio 
Musicak in Florence. We had 
the chance to chase works that 


were out of the ordinary or 
perhaps only just coming back 
into fashion. Now, twenty years 
later, or almost, at the Sola I 
think there is a townee to 
est abli sh a true Verdi style just as 
there is now a new Rossini style, 
to move the orchestra a step 
forward, to create a cadre of 
young Italian stagers." 

And also possibly to create 
that rarity at La Scala, a Mozart 
styl& Muti plans a new Don 
Giovanni, directed by Giorgio 
Strehler and with Thomas Allen 
in the title role, for 1987 and then 
has scheduled a month in which 
the three Da Ponte operas will be 
seen in repertory. 

Muti has been broadening his 
own repertory at a rapid rate. 
Scriabin on paper appears to be 
the new passion: the First Sym- 
phony with the Philadelphia is 
out on EMI this month (EL 27 
0270 1) and the Third Sympho- 
ny was given with the Phil- 
harmonia last night But Muti 
claims that this devotion goes 
back to his student days in 
Vienna when he bought on 
impulse the scores of all the 
Scriabin symphonies in a music 
shop. There remains thongh one 
key opera which does not come 
into the conversation. OteUo is 
waiting in the wings, but there is 
no mention of Falstqff. 

"Falstaff! There are two major 
works which scare me. The 
Missa Solemnis is one and 
Falstcffis the other. Falstcffis a 
mo untain, as for as I am 
c o ncerned, with its peak way np 
in the clouds. Tutto nel mondoe 
buria.' How do you do it?” 




Celia Brayfield 

Concerts 

RPO/Dorati 
Festival Hall 


Joe Metia: marvellonsly embodying the image 
of a Zionist trapped on the wrong side 


Theatre 

Intellect 

against 

material 

survival 

Flight 

The Other Place, 
Stratford. _ 


David Lair's title offers a one- 
word encapsulation of Jewish 
history: the Exodus, die dias- 
pora and the migrations of his 
own characters being suc- 
cessive chapters in the history 
of a race in constant flight 


One oddity of the piece, almost ruined by his father’s 
which spans SO years in the crooked bookkeeping. In the 
lives of the wandering Lev- final section we move on to 
ines, is that it nowhere ac- the 1970s, by which time the 
knowledges the existence of prosperous Levines are nerv- 
tbe state of IsraeL The play ing themselves for another 


opens and ends with a Pass- 
over dinner, and in 1980 as in 
1930 it presents the Jews as a 


flight, and having stormy 
scenes with their son, a splen- 
did physical specimen desper- 


homeless people perpetually ate to desert from the army 
journeying towards a destina- and escape the country. 


don Wien their dray will m, l*. amdoiBly puoues 
entL his Janus-faced themes of 

Even without this strange imefiect versus material sur- 
o mission, the play seems curi- vival and the operation of die 
ously detached from the out- family as a haven or a cage: so 
side world which allegedly is tenaciously, in foot, that his 
giving the characters such a people have very little life of 
hard time. You have to con- their own. Each of them is 
suit the programme to discov- -equipped with a particular 


er where and when -events are 
taking place — a necessary 
procedure, as it opens -in 
Rhodesia ' in foe 1950s then 
zips back 20 years to Lithua- 
nia before winding up in 
Mugabe's Zimbabwe: Apart 
from the appearance of two 


cessive chapters in the history inehrthe xune countr^ PPen_ tuaL There nunQH1 ous 
of a race in constant flight. ^ * the same country. violent rows and physical 

— ■ ■ i ■ " ' | The *wain aim of the piece is tussles, but there is not much 

aga in , virtually unacoompa- to examine three strands of in the way of revealing human 
nied, there was her strangely Jewish tradition through the contact Early in the play Mrs 
distanced “Cantico de la story of one fondly. Chrono- Levine (Dinah Stabb) pounces 
esposa” again ter frolicsome logically, it begins with their on her son for stealing bis- 


They are at once airlessly 
removed from life outside and 
presented at long range as 
specimens of their inheri- 


One theory about Antal 
Dorati's career on the podium 


This ebullient performance 
of Beethoven’s Fourth Sym- 
phony supported such a hy- 
pothesis. The hard graft was 
plain for all to hear an 
excellently controlled slow in- 
troduction bursting like a dam 
Antal into the allegro; similarly mag- 
tdium isterial supervision of the 


In the Piano Concerto No 5, 
too, there was a similar exu- 
berance, though here it was 
offset winningly by Radu 
Lupu’s command of a multi- 
tude of subtly differentiated 
keyboard colours. The epic 
proportions of the “Emperor" 


di s t an ced “Cantico de la story of one family. Chrono- 
esposa”, again ter frolicsome logically, it begins with their 
“EstanimFTWwMftlla, Sto Afii^ere are four 
too, and all the sad irony of them — two sisters and their 
caught within the caprice of husbands - but only three 
the “Seguidilla murciana" as passes. The devout Isaac and 


is that, as he steps into his tricky exposed entries herald- 
ninth decade, his public perso- ing the recapitulation: the 
na. and therefore his interpre- violins in the finale rowdr to 
tation of Beethoven, is enunciate every semiquaver; 
becoming noticeably mell- the careful balancing of lan- 
o«er. Another says that be has guidly beautiful woodwind so- 
always had the capacity for los in the Adagio against the 
genial music-making, but that turbulent accompaniments. 


were played down, yet there well as the most soulful, 
was plenty of drama about, penetrating “Ai-ee"s of pain 


especially at the slow move- in “Polo", 
mem’s close. Conductor and . .. . __ 

soloist conspired to lull the RZJSJSSfiJSSfiSff 
senses with barely audible Rqzar, ° sgraaouspertoniung 


delights, so that Lupu’s sud- 
den sweep into a finale that 


presence: the poise of the 
slight, sari-dad figure is ex- 


story of one family. Chrono- Levine (Dinah Stabb) pounces 
logically, it begins with their on her son for ste alin g bis- 
flight to Africa. There are four She then welcomes his 
ofthem — two sisters and their ffrlfriend, inviting her to eat 
husbands — but only three anything she likes while carry- 
passes. The devout Isaac and the biscuit -tin back to the 
his wife and sister Lily make cupboard. This tiny, well- 
their escape, leaving Lily's prepared comic episode tells 
communist-leader husband y° u more about her and holds 
behind. the attention in a way that the 

^ . shouting matches and tirades 

The 1950s show the ortho- on Jewish identity do not. 


his martinei-like rehearsal 
style in mid-life created an 
abrasive atmosphere which 


Yet beyond and above this 
was a huge, robust joviality. It 


led to performances that were *ras 111081 obvious in 


the opposite of relaxed. 

Perhaps the truth is that 
ev en in jubilant or lightweight 
works Dorati has never com- 


bust! ing first movement and 
in the symphony's final bus: 
the sudden modi seriousness 
solemnly undertaken, and 


promised his demands for focn the joke's punchline ar- 
rhythmic precision, lean tex- riving in a massive, throaty 


lures and unsettling dynamic 
jolts, and that this technical 
rigour is easily mistaken for a 
severe interpretation. 


downward roar from cellos 
and basses. But it was preva- 
lent in less overt forms 
everywhere. 


danadfikea Vten^TwSre tended in ttefonplerore she 

even managed to restore foe 

surprise element to this most ^ 

ftmonioftrundons. _ gfabeitan m33£ 

Richard JVlOrTlSOn She held lightly m foe palm of 

her hand flic charm, senti- 
ment and naive evocation of 

Rozario/Troop 

Purcell Room imagination, it seemed, the 

orchestral voices behind the 

Manoris of Fund, Roz- ^ 

r- . -■ t piano accompanying oi ner 


dox Isaac coming into conflict 
with his go-ahead son Mike, 


With foe aid of many a long, 


who sets up a jeweller’s shop unfilled pause, Howard Dav- 
and makes his pile, and is ies’s production rum to over 


Rozario/Troop 

Purcell Room imagination, it seemed, the 

orchestral voices behind the 

Memories of Patricia Roz- ^ 

7^SSSSFX. SustandaSra 

day night, as she turned again The evening was not witb- 
to three songs by the Spanish out its moments of anxiety, 
composer and two mcores For some time now it has been 
from his Qualm madrigales. worrying to watch the weaken- 


Lloyds Bank 

re t\ Jr u"w 


day night, as she turned again 
to three songs by the Spanish 
composer mid two encores 
from his Qualm madrigales. 

It was a most pleasant 
sensation of dtja mil For one 
of foe most distinctive de- 
lights Of Rosario's rin g in g is 
foe way in which she plays on 


Dance 

The Sons of 
Horus 

Covent Garden 


Injuries and Alness prevented 
some of the expected cast- 
changes at Covent Garden on 
Monday, but caused otters 
which had not been foreseen. 

The Sons Of Horus had a 


ing of the muscle at the top of complete new quartet in foe 
the voice, as if through lack of title roles, and David Bintley's 


the gently shifting timbres of Schubert in particular, bowev- 
her soprano as on a wind er musically sung, suffered 


strong exercise, and with it foe 
inevitable hints of unease in 
integration. Her Mozart and 
Schubert in particular, howev- 
er musically sung, suffered 


instrument; and foe elision of from shaky support: not 
Latin languages in general and nerves alone. I think. 
Rodrigo's music in particular 

glory in such treatment. Once Hilary rlDCIl 


choreography proved strongly ^Birthd^ri^i^s 

^ re P ert0f y but only 56 
1,5^ R c ^- P™**; performances at Covent Gar- 
ably, showed a oimbination of den - 1 suppose I must have 

br ® seen most of them), one has 


Collier with gentle authority 
in foe main duet and matchi ng 
ter grave seriousness of man- 
ner in bis brief solo. Bruce 
Sansom's light, fluent style 
looked at home in foe first of 
the solos: and Phillip Broom- 
bead brought a live athleti- 
cism to the last solo, even 
though not matching Ashley 
Page’s fierceness as the jackal- 
headed deity. 

I find that the ballet contin- 
ues to reveal further wealth of 
detail, both in Bintley’s con- 
cept and staging and in Peter 
McGowan's richly-textured 
score. With a ballet as familiar 
as Birthday Offering (30 years 
in the repertory but only 36 
performances at Covent Gar- 


movement that entirely suited 
the role of the ape-headed god. 
Jonathan Cope also proved 
notable, partnering Lesley 


Lloyds Bank Pic has reduced 
its Base Rate from 11.5 per cent to 
11 per cent p.a. with effect from 
Tuesday, 8 April 1986. 

All tiacilitttt. [including reyulared consumer credit 
agreements! with a rate of' interest linked to Lloyd* 
Bank Base Rate will be varied accordingly 

The change in Ba.se Rate will also be applied from 
the same dare by rite United Kingdom branch of: 
The National Bank of New Zealand Limited, 


iJBank 


A THOaOl'CiHBRED AMONGST BISKS. 
Uffl 4- built JH.*. 1 tfinbJiJ Mivvi EC -V* -BS 


cf'D 


T onight 7 JO ^ *T ^ 

and continuing 


^ Labor's 
sparkling oparatta 


less expectation of new in- 
sights. yet they can come 
serendipitoiuly. 

An example at this perfor- 
mance was Ravenna Tucker’s 
taking over the sixth solo: one 
of the company’s smaller 
dancers in a role made for one 
of foe tallest (Beryl Grey), yet 


EILEEN 


London CoVMtiflV 
S». Merww tana, tandon WC2 
Bo» Office 01 -S363IA1 
Crodi Carts 01-34Q S3U 


Cost includes V fcil ai la M Uf wn, Sian Qpie, 
Uriajr Garrett, Adriaq Martin, IrfeShUUnf 


Standby 

£6.50 

from 

6.45pm 




The Royal Opera 


!& fGWCt *LO Oi ??S 62f 


Rossini's 


II barbiere di Siviglia 

CINOQUm cO AN N MURRAY DOMENICO TRIMARCSI DAVID KENDALL ROBERT LLOYD 
Conductor ALBERTO ZEDDA Tickets from £7.50 April 14, 18, 25, 26 at 730pra 

Reservations: 01- 240 1066/1911 (Access/Visa/Diners Club) 


three hours and yields some of 
the most forced and unnatural 
acting I can recall at this 
address. Joe Mefia lightens the 
patriarchal Isaac with some 
nifty dancing and high-speed 
card-playing, mvt marvel- 
lously embodies the humiliat- 
ed image .of a Zionist trapped 
on foe wrong side. ‘.Nicholas 
Woodeson and G illian Barge 
play with a rage and energy 
which at least do full justice to 
foe play’s axgume&L 

Irving Wardle 


Obsession and" a few ’personal 
attributes which they flash- in 
sequence like revolving bea- 
cons. . 


Relatively 

Speaking 

Greenwich. 


- ,4 - : i ' v 
«P.i ■ A . 


Two sets, four, scenes, fonr 

unimpeachably middle-class 

characters, a plot- which runs 
on low-octane embarrass- 
ment you know where you are 
with Alan Ayckbourn. Reiar 
lively Speaking, his first major 
West End success, here enjoys 
its first major revival. Alan 
Strachan’s worthy production 
stays in period (summer 
1965), which gives the eye an 
unexpected shock of recogni- 
tion in foe fust-scene set of a 
London bed-sit It all looks so 
mid-1980s, so taste-freak 
revivalist 

These intimations of mo- 
dernity are handsomely 
crushed by the expositional 
dialogue between the two 
young lovers, Greg and Ginny 
- of an age, though years apart 
in experience— whose month- 
old relationship is overshad- 
owed by 0100/5 former lover, 

so assured in technique, so 
smoothly exact in the many 
turning steps, that it looked 
exactly right 

- Perhaps similarly coura- 
geous casting might benefit 
other solos, which at present 
vary too much fin comfort in 
then’ standard of execution, 


a much older man. She leaves 
to spend the day with her 
parents. Greg, having secured 
foe address erf her destination, 
folio wes in hot pursuit 

“Good DaySunshine" gives 
* plan* to “In an Fn glkh Coun- 
try •• Garden” as foe ~ stage 
revolves and we find ourselves 
in - yes, a back garden in 
BucIul, where a childless mid- 
dle-aged couple, Philip and 
Sheila, indulge in politely 
stilted bickering after Sunday 
breakfesL He has been candid- 
ly unfehhful to her she in 
compensation has invented 
ter own lover. 

Enter young Greg to Sheila, 
■ alone, whom he takes lo be 
GnmyVin6$er Charmingly 
^ tentative, he. quite forgets to 

aHph courtesy, she quite for- 
-iets to dsk hrih who he might 
be. Philip inevitably takes' him 
to be ter lover. Philip (of 
course) is Grimy's former 
lover and when she herself 
arrives by a later train die 
piece turns into a slow waltz of 
readjustment with characters 
talking of themselves in the 
hypothetical, ironic third per- 
son and with the safety valve 
of eccentricity called upon 
whenever complete revelation 
threatens- 

Gwen Watford is perfectly 
cast as Sheila, and Michael 
Aldridge's Philip has a nice 
line in pop-eyed . consterna-. 
tion. Fehcty Dean as foe 
pneumatic Ginny and Mi- 
chael Simians as the obtuse 
Greg work better when in the 
company of the old troopers. 

Martin Cropper 

’with Fiona Chadwick the best 
and Maria Almeida especially 
promising. But almost nobody 
wears Andrfc Levasseur’s or- 
nate costumes with chic: sure- 
ly their ornamentation and 
colour should appeal to 
today’s young dancers? 

John Permal 



ALBERT FINNEY 

KEVIN ANDERSON JEFF FAHEY 



LYLE KESSLER 

DIRECTED BY 

GARY SINISE 


“You musfsee Orphans” 

“A feast of fine acting . . . 
a mesmerising evening” 

Guardian 




APOLLO SHAFTESBURY AVE 

tuc ATDC LONDON W1 

InCAIKC TEL: 437 2663,434 3598 









THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 


No evidence to 
proceed with 


JMB charges 


Bv Stewart Tendler. Crime Reporter 


Police officers investigating 
the affairs of Johnson Matthey 
Bankers and its collapse an- 
nounced jesierday that the 
Director of Public Prosecu- 
tions has decided that there 
was no evidence to justify 
charges on four allegations 
made by Mr Brian Sedgemcre. 
the Labour MP for Hackney 
South, on the JMB affair. 

The announcement came 
from the City of London 
police, whose fraud squad 
officers began an investigation 
of JMB last summer. They 
announced late last year that 
they had found evidence of 
fraud involving JMB. 

The statement yesterday re- 
fers to allegations made by Mr 
Sedgemcre involving Mr 
Mahmoud Sipra and Mr Mi- 
chael Hepker. chairman of 
Sumrie Gothes. 

The statement said that the 
police had made a report to 
the DPP following allegations 
made to the Chancellor of the 
Exchequer by Mr Scdgemore. 


The first said that JMB and 
the Bank of England agreed to 
release a chaise on I Chester 
Terrace. Regents Park, after 
payment by Mr Sipra of 
£(>5.000 when the value of the 
property would have justified 
payments of a higher sum. 

The second allegation sug- 
gested that Bank of England 
officials acted with impropri- 
ety before and after their 
takeover of JMB in relation to 
the movement of funds on the 
accounts of Mr Sipra. 

The third allegation suggest- 
ed there were attempts by 
JMB and the Bank of England 
to show JMB as a secured 
creditor of Ardmore Film 
Studios and thereby obtain 
fraudulent preference in the 
liquidation of the company. 

The fourth allegation 
claimed that a £1 Bank of 
England note was illegally 
photographed by Mr Hepker 
in support of3n alleged option 
agreement to buy Ravensburv 
Investments. 


Motion attacks agents 
at Lloyd’s on funds 


By Anthony Bevins. Politico] Correspondent 


The leading directors of one 
of the most prominent groups 
of Lloyd's insurance syndi- 
cates. Bellew, Parry and 
Raven, were last night accused 
in a parliamentary motion of 
diverting funds from syndicate 
names or members into a trust 
fund set up for their children. 

Mr Brian Sedgeraore. the 
La boor MP for Hackney- 
South and Shoreditch, 
claimed in a Commons motion 
last night that the Lloyd's 
anthorities should charge the 
directors of BPR “with a 
breach of fiduciary duty, not- 
withstanding the declaration 
of Arthur Granan-Bellew that 
if Lloyd's brings down Bellew. 
Parry and Raven, he » ill bring 
down Lloyd's." 


In another motion Mr 
Sedge mo re says that it was 
appalling “that Lloyd's, hav- 
ing found the directors of 
Brooks and Dooley guilty of a 


breach of fiduciary duty to 
their names, has not charged 
Messrs Bellew. Parry and 
Raven with aiding and abet- 
ting them in channeling funds 
to a Bermuda company. 
Fidentia. to tbe detriment of 
those names." 

The motion on BPR claims 
“that solicitors James 
Pearraan and Richard 
Pearman of Conyers. Dill and 
Pearman were and are prime 
movers in both the Brooks and 
Dooley case, where Lloyd's 
have fonnd them guilty and 
imposed absurdly low sen- 
tences for not cooperating in 
their enquiries and in the 
Bellew Parry and Raven case." 

It alleged that in the BPR 
case profits “from monies 
which were invested in off- 
shore reinsurance in Bermuda 
which should have gone to tbe 
names, go via a trust fimd to 
the children of the Bellew, 
Parry and Raven families". 




Today's events 


Royal engagements 
Princess Anne ai lends ihe 
Royal Philharmonic Orchestra's 
SOih Birthday Concert for Mae- 
stro Antal Doran a» the Royal 
Festival Hall. South Bank. SEl. 


The Duchess of Kent visits 
the Joint Air Force 
Reconaissance and Intelligence 
Centre. RAF Brampton. 
Cambridgeshire. 1 1 : later, as 
Patron, attends a Gala Evening 
in aid of the Stars Organisation 
for Spastics and the National 
Society for Cancer Relief at the 
Theatre Royal. WC2. 7.30. 

Pnnce Michael of Kent. Presi- 
dent of the Institute of the 
Motor Industry, visits Aston 
Martin Lagonda Ltd. Newport 
Pagnall. 10; and later attends a 
dinner of the Board of Grand 
Stewards at Merchant Taylors 
Hall. EC2. M5. 


New exhibitions 
Falls the Shadow: Recent 
British and European Art. the 
Hayward Gallery. South Bank. 
SEl: Mon to Wed 10 to 8. Thurs 
to Sat 10 to 6. Sun 12 to 6 (ends 
June 15) 

Works by Mary Fedden. New 
Grafton Gallery. 49 Church Rd, 
Barnes. SW 1 3; Tues to Sat 10 to* 
5.30. (ends May 3} 

New Faces at the Warwick: 
works by Joanna Stockhatn. 
Daniel Male. Iona Campbell- 
Gray. Gerard Morris. John 
Meadows. John G Evans, Ben 
Hartley and Sunil Patel: War- 
wick Arts Trust. 33 Warwick Sq. 
SW I : Wed to Sun 1 0 to 6 (closed 
Mon. Tues and May 3. 4 and 5) 
(ends May II) 

Music 

1 8th Century Music by Sweet 
Harmony. Home House. 20 
Portman Sq. W|. 7.30. 

Concert by the Forest Choir. 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,015 



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Lady Stanford naming the frigate with Mr Marsh after management had removed timbers beneath the ship (right). 


Frigate launched in secret to foil strike 


Continued from page 1 


taken at 9pm on Monday 
although senior yard manage- 
ment had been on details 
throughout the day. 

The senior Admiralty guests 
invited to the ceremony. Ad- 
miral Sir Peier Stanford, Com- 
mand in Chief Naval Home 
Command, his wife Lady 
Stanford., the ship sponsor, 
and Vice Admiral Sir Derek 
ReffeJl, Controller of the 
Navy, were told of the change 
of plan at a dinner given by 
Swan Hunter management a 
local hotel. 


another hotel the 100 mem- 
bers of management had been 
assembled and were briefed on 
the launch. 


They were asked if they 
wanted to attend as agreed. At 


At 3.45am. in an otherwise 
deserted shipyard. Lady Stan- 
ford performed the ceremony, 
pulling a lever which sent a 
bottle of champagne crashing 
against the bows of the frigate. 
“It was very dark, very wet 
very cold and very windy but 
also very exciting I was not 
told 1 had to be there. 1 was 
kindly asked if I would like to 
be there. I said yes not only as 
the sponsor but on behalf of 
the next of kin. It was a very 
moving moment," she said. 

Lady Stanford and the other 


guests were equipped with 
oilskins, boots and large um- 
brellas. The official naming 
ceremony for the frigate took 
place later yesterday and was 
attended by relatives of the 19 
men who died when the 
previous Coventry was sunk. 

The stoppage by the 2,000 
workers at the yard was in 
defiance of national union 
instructions. They had been 
told to work normally to allow 
talks with the company 
tomorrow. 


The men had intended to 
return to work yesterday but 
were suspended by the compa- 
ny. They have rejected offers 
of rises for skilled men from 


£135 per week to £153 per 
week rising to £160 next year. 

Several hundred workers 
demonstrated ax the yard gates 
yesterday. They are to meet on 
Friday. " 

Mr Paul Stockdale, Secre- 
tary of the local Confederation 
of Ship Building and Engi- 
neering Unions said: “This 
management expects us to be 
tbe worse paid warship yard in 
the country and we are not 
going to apologize for any 
action we have taken. 


relations are going to get 
worse, feelings wiU harden. I 
just hope someone can see 
common sense soon." 

The new Coventry, weigh- 
ing 4, 100 tons, will be armed 
with Exocets and Sea Wolf 
missiles and carry two Lynx 
helicopters.it have a com pie- 
men; of 300 officers and men. 


“We are very disappointed 
that the management carried 
work traditionally done by 
manual workers. Industrial 


The anti-submarine frigate 
will be fined out at Swan 
Hunter's Neptune , shipyard 
alongside her sister ship. HMS 
Sheffield, be .ready to 
handover to the Royal Navy 
eariy in 1987. 


Leading article, page 17 | ho&kssT 


j Omtuned front page Z . 

I when low dwd, .ttfcf and 

i pcwiiteJrtdriEzfe.iwdevfcJ^ 

1 ity poor. 

Alter (he crash shocked 
villagers rushed across a (mid- 
dy field, bat tbe creasKot 

eared helicopter was already 
burning fiercely - and it was*, 
bettered that all m hoard bad 
died instantly- Two bodies 
were thrown from tiw wreck- 
age. bet others were burned 
btteod recognition. 

Sir Duncan Jack, «f 
Brakefands Farm, Swaktiffe, 
who owns. the land on which 
the helicopter crashed, rushed 
to the scene wfcea he heard the 
explosion- 

Mr Jack, who fHes his own 
helicopter, said: “1 think (he 
pilot w.ts trying to clear the 
village. 1 think he was aWoody 

brave boy. . — 

think he knew that, he 
was in trouble audreipd tp jg* 
otw the village to a field. If be*, 
had tried to I and in the ySUagt” 
Cod knows bow many peojjtfe 
could bare been kflkd ff it tod 
gone wrong. 

**t think be was trying to get 
lo a fiekl, but he dropped like a 
brick." 

Mr Hugh Smith, a plumber 
who fires in tbe village, was 
working on the roof of ibe 
Swatctiffe Park School witea 
the accident happened! 

He said: “It was an awful 
experience that wTHSe with nw 
to tbe day I dre-T -heard the 
sound of the heUcopter conmig 
low over due nwres of -the 
houses in tbe afiage* Suddenly 
the engine started to splatter £ 
and 1 heard it cat onLl lookers 
up and saw it starting to hdL 

“The engine came back to 
life for a few seconds and then 
ent out again and it crashed iu 
the field. I ran as fast as my 
legs would carry me, tot the 
helicopter was fa. a qfapkd 
heap and on tiro- 1 managed lo 
get dose to fr aud I cooW see 
•three men, a girt and another 
.woman. - - " 

•• “Two /Of (he men had fataa 
thrown into the field .bat. they 
were obHonsly 'dead. 7fate*t 
was terrible mid I cb&ld svkU 
bodies burning, it was appall- 
ing. There was nownyicotid 
get any of them out. I cnuld see 
the young girl insidt, tot l just 
had to watch it harm It was * 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


ACROSS 

1 Destructive people train to 
break up exhibition (13). 

9 Such braggadocio made 
Livy groan (^0. 

10 Rejected »ork includes 
spicy picture (5). 

1! Lair for animal about (o 
leave cage in Belgium (5). 

12 Fine article about king, pos- 
sibly written by Boito (4i. 

13 In the same book Bashan’s 
king relumed to the desert 
(4). 

15 Evergreen only found in a 
Latin country (7). 

17 Records of actors' appear- 
ances (7). 

18 Railway supporter comes by 
tube (7). 

20 Revolutionary device for 
receiving cables at sea (7). 

21 Source of heat acceptable in 
church (4t. 

22 Blue feathers (4). 

23 Poet's claim to be at all 
limes a Muslim ruler (5). 

26 Sound attempt — total three 

(51. 

27 Means of evasion employed 
by archers «4). 

28 linderworld aspect or the 
Mary Celeste crew (13i. 

DOWN 

1 Papal appointee literary 
hacks recommend ? ($.$)■ 

2 Hawthorn blossom's pro- 
nounced suitable for animal 
feed (5). 


3 Omitting to genuflect, per- 
haps. before start of Litany? 


haps, before start of Litany? 

(10). 

4 A month in class upset hard 
workers (7). 

5 A US city sage appears.no 
matter ho» (7). 

6 Soldiers in denim picking 
off foes (4). 

7 Student goes into assembly 
— one s Lining a new term 

<9L 

8 Castaway spotted birds on 
erratic course (8.6). 

14 Progress more, say, as one 
in toco parentis ( 10). 

16 Sinister young woman's kid- 
napped slave (9). 

19 First to hold sway, before 
she Tell? (7). 

20 Excuse prisoner already 
committed f7). 

24 The Spanish boy in “The 
Lady of the Lake"? (5). 

25 Inequalities not even Soc- 
rates initially recognized (4). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17.014 


Queen Elizabeth Hall, South- 
Bank. 7.45. 

Harpsichord recital by Naomi 
Da vidov. Purcell Room, South 
Bank. 7.30. 

Concert by the Royal Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra and Brigh- 
ton Festival Chorus. Royal 
Festival Hall. South Bank. 7.30 

Recital by the Vanessa 
Latache Trio, Royal Festival 
Hall Foyer, South Bank. 1130. ■ 

Concert by (he Dresden Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra. Royal 
Festival Hall, South Bank. SEl. 
7.30. 

Recital by Nicholas Clapton 
(counter-tenor) and Leta 
Henderson (piano), the Purcell 
Room. South Bank. 7.30. 

Concert by Peter FrankI and 
Tamas Vasary (piano). Barbican 
Hall. EC2. I 

Concert by the Orchestra of St 
John's Smith Square Orchestra, 
St John's, Smith Square, SWI. 
7.30. 

Serenade Concert, Si Luke's 
Leisure Centre, Central St. ECl, 

7.3a 

Concert by the Sinfonia 
Chorus; Newcastle City HalL 
7.45. 

Concert by Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra, 
Guildhall. Portsmouth. 7.30. 

Concert by the Halle Or- 
chestra. Manchester Free Trade 
HalL 7.30. 

Concert by the Scottish Na- 
tional Orchestra; Caird HalL 
Dundee, 7.30. 

Cello recital by Nicholas 
Priestly; Haworth .Art Gallery, 
Accrington. 7 JO. 

Talks, lectures and 
films 

Flora and Fauna Preservation 
Society talk by Ton Langron. 
Crouch Hill Recreation Society, 
Hillrise Rd. NI9 7.30. 

Painting the Warmth of the 
Sun: Si Ives Painters. 10.30; 
British Pop in the 1960s; David 
Hockney and R B Kitaj. 1: The 
Tate Gallery. Millbank. SWI. C 
Chinese jade by Gillian Darby. 

1 1 JO: The Great Houses of 
Virginia by Sarah Bowles: Vic- 
toria & Albert Museum, SW7, 
1.15. 

Techniques of drawing by 
Colin Wiggins, The National 
Gallery. Trafalgar Sq. WC2. I: 

1986 - The UN Year of Peace 
by Myriel Davies. Charing 
Cross Hotel. Strand. WC2. 6-30. 


Books — hardback 


bM Deputy Uterary Bfiofs settettorr 
of totsres&ng books pubflsned trus weak. 

Samuel Backs! : The Campime Drs- 
utto Wooes (FabsrflZJO) 

A Matom View, ibs Mute of Imftsn 
Cricket by MB* Bon (Aiim & Unwin, 

mss) 

Longman Synonym Dictionary 
(Lonpran. £1495) 

The Shew Oufaie to British Af che aology 


by Jacquetta Hawfcea (Michael 
£14351 


4J9S) 

Fool Play, Drag Abuse In Sports by 


Tom Oonotvx & Ned Johnson {BtiCkweB, 
£12.50) 

The History of the CaaabyaMa by. 
Obvar Rackham (Dent £18.95) 

At tee Dawn of Tyramy by E8 Sagan 
(Facer. £1430} 

The Kaeand Falof tbe BritWi Navy by 
Ricnara Humus (Macdonald. Cl 0.B51 
The Oxford Book of Legal Anecdotes 
adaad by Mtcnaei Gdben (OUP. £12S0) 

If I Had a Hamm er. TheHandywo«mm*s 
Glade to OPT SwvmL by Pamela Donald 
(WodenfeW 4 Nictsson, £635) 


Weather 

forecast 


The rather cold north- 
easterly airflow wiH con- 
tinue to affect the 
country. 


mtemy ■ i ■ ■uirrW~rr : i~» j 
~1 

'■Mil yj.vfra -arr . v i 


6am to midnight 


TV top ten 


Roads 


National top fen television programmes in 
the week ending March 30: 


London and Soudi-eiiefc A3: London - 
bound camageway rsduced K7 one lane N 


BBC 1 

1 EastanderefTuas/Sun)21.40m 

2 Eastondaia (Thu/Sun) 20.70m 

3 The 1986 GoWan Egg Awards 
1660m 

4 Cnmewatch UK 14,60m 

5 Dear John 13.85m 

6 Wogan (Fn) 13.65m 

7 A Question of Sport 13.40m 

8 Darias 1285m 


bound camageway reduced to one lane n 
of A244 (Copsem Lane mtarenangrt 
Contraflow at London Bridge with two 


Contraflow a< London Bridge with two 
lanes lor N-bouncf ana one tor 5- bound 
traffic; use other onages to avoid oeteys. 


MM 



Roadworks m Fishery Rd, Hemal Hemp- 
stead. N of A4t London Rd. 


stead. N of Ml London Rd. 

Midlands: M6: Con Ira flow in M-boUnd 
camaoeway between luncnons 16 ana 15, 
nr Stoke on Trent; soutnbound entry sup 




'ilii l'ii' Mi'i 


9 Antiques Roadshow 1 2.1 5m 
10 Only Foote and Horses 12.10m 


road dosed at junction 16 ( Smfca N). MS 
N and S- bound entry s*p roafla closed at 


Function 5 ( Hereford/ Worcs). A34: 
Roaaworks on Stone Rd, Hanford, aflect- 
mg N and S-txxmd traffic. 

Wales and West: MS: Inside lane ctosed 
on bom carriageways between mnenons 8 
and 9 ( M5 and Tewkesbury). Contraflow 
on S -bound carriageway between junc- 
tions 15 and !6fM4 mtotenanga and 
RUon). A377:Ternparary bam n Bonhay 
Rd. Extnw. A5/AS3& Roadworks n 


M.rV'V' 


1 Coronation Street (Mon) Granada 
17.90m 

2 Coronation Street (Wed) Granada 
17.45m 

3 Wan You Were Here (Mon/Wed) 
Thames 15.90m 

4 Spitting Image Central 14.2m 

5 Spmk ling Cyorada ITV 13.90m 

6 Aut WtemrMhen PetCentral 13.60m 

7 Boon Central t3.40m 

8 Emmeroale Farm (Tub) Yorkshsa 
1320m 








Regent St. Uangoflen. Cfwyd. 
North: MS: Bnh csmuMW 


North: M& Both cam a g aways enected 
between junctions 32 and 33. Comratow 
between lunceons 3i and 32; single -lane 


Outtook for tomorrow raid Friday: 
Cloudy, with ram n S at first and over 
Sconana law. otherwise sunny nervals 
and showers. 


ony tor traffic joining S-bound carriage- 
way tram M55 and A6. M63: Road 
vndenmg between ^ncoona 1 ana 3 
(Barton Bridge) M61: instea tana closures 
in both daechons a Walton Summit, 
junction M6WM6 (Blacow BndgeV 
Scodanct betoys on A96 Great North- 
ern Rd at Anoarson Dnvo, Aoerdeen. 
Delays at Wmdygatss bypass on A915. 


9 Crossroads (Tue) Central 13 10m 
10 This Is Your Lite Thames 1380m 


BBC 2 

1 Joan Rivera: Can W0 Talk? 7.95m 

2 MASH 5.65m 


Sun Fuses: Sun Set*: 
819 am 7.47 om 




HT: 

322 

T3 

228 

41 

8^1 

ttr 


38 

826 

128 

mf 1 

54 

12.18 

w 

•6J0 

52 

2.09 

4Z 

1^0 

49 

11.44 

53 

729 

75 

mrm 

80 

351 

55 

1229 

93 

1042 

a* 

125 » 

48 

738 

58 

62B 

68 

7D4, 

38 

B33 



3 Hard Travelling 4.85m 

4 Victoria Wood As Seen On TV 4.80m 

5 B^ha Light of the Silvery Moon 

6 Trapeze 4^5m 

7 Now ■ Sometnmg Bse 4 3D 


Delays at Wmdygates bypass on A915. 
M74/A74: Lane and carriageway closures 
nr BlKkwooa Lssmagow and Atmgton. 


liM»iItQi|tMlliiW 


The pound 


8 Horraor (Mon/Sm)4.15 

9 Pot Blat* 1 B6(Thu)4.15m 
10 Star Trek 4.10m 


Channel 4 

1 BrooksKJe (Mon/Sat) 8.00m 

2 BVooksae ffuerSat) 670m 

3 Cheere 5.40m 

4 Prospects 4.75m 

5 

6 Countdown (Mon) 3.55m 
7. Countdown (Tue) 3.55m 

8 4 What It's Worth 3.05m 

9 Dead Man Don ! wear Plaid 3.00m 
10 Countdown (Thu) 2£Sm 


General 

Drama with Stephanie Free- 
man (ages 7 to 10 k Children *sd 
painting : Seaside holiday with 
Ray Gale (ages 7 to 9); Hands 
and Feet Plaster-casting with 
Barbara Davis (ages 8 to 12 k 
P ottery with Valerie Taylor 
(ages II to 16): Making dolls' 
houses with Hanne Yales (ages 8 
to 1 4): Camden .Arts Centre. 
Arkwright Rd. NW3. 10 to 3. 


Breakf as t te l e visi on ; The average 
weekly figures tor aucflences at peak 
times (wffli figures m parenthesis 
showing the reaai - me number of people 
who vteweo tor at least three mteutest 
BBCI: Breakfast Time. Mon to Fr> 
1 An (9.1m) 



Fit* 1)1 fill »>1?iKTFl 


at imdday yesterday c. 
ram: s, sun. 

C F C F 

541 Guemey 

c 

643 

337 toveroesa 

1 

745 

541 Jersey 

c 

745 

541 London 

d 

541 

439 HTncMter 

r 

439 

643 Newcastle 

c 

541 i 

846 Rtoldsway 

r 

439 


Worthing 


Yugoslavia Dnr 


TV-am: Good Morning Britain Mon to Fn 
ZBm (12.4ml Sat 3.0lfin (6 7m) 

Sun 1 4m (14.4m) 


Broadcasters AucSence Research Board 


Rates tor small denonMiatnn bank notes 
only as suppsed by Barclays Bank PLC 
Remit Price Mmc 38 J 1 
London: The FT Index dosed down 
12.8 at 1388 1 


Parliament today 


Anniversaries 


I swowmoran n & - .si 
;-ET3 - r kjraBBrarwr 
i4LJB4 - (W OH D Nl 
!*? • aWkJgtiaa g TCT 
.5" _ .!? H W !5! W S’ 

■.■flSQMssaraa 
rr t? its h r b 
{S'Aiufj a« a B i-a h t 

5 ta ■ i-i n ca tr 

»i^J5CT^53 

a ? El h fa n is 

1 sfW 1 ' 

a-'B 1 . ••jsf 


CONOSE CROSSWORD, ftige 14 


Births: Isambard kingdom 
Brunei, civil and mechanical 
engineer. Portsmouth. 1806. 
Charles Baudelaire, poet. Pans. 
1821: Leon Blum. Premier of 
France 1936-37. Pans, 1872. 
Paul Robeson. Pnncetown. New 
Jersey. 1898: Hugh Gaitskell. 
leader of the Labour Party. 
1955-63. London. 1906 
Deaths: Edward IV. reigned 
1461-70. 1471-83. London. 

1483: Francois Rabelais, wnter. 
Paris. 1553; Francis bran. 
Viscount St Albans. Lord Chan- 
cellor. London. 1 626, Dante 
Gabriel Rossetti, painter poet 
and a founder of the Pre- 
Raphauiitc Brotherhood 
Birch i ngton-on-Sea. Kent 1882 



Sun Rain 

Max 

nra 

m 

C 

F 

5.3 

92 

4 

39 

9.8 

91 

7 

45 

39 


7 

45 

39 

_ 

6 

43 


.04 

6 

43 

T 




1.0 

14 

7 

45 

39 

.07 

8 

46 

47 

94 

7 

45 

68 

11 

7 45 

79 


.8 

46 

87 


B 

46 

GA 

.02 

8 

46 

69 


6 

46 

72 


8 

46 

81 

91 

7 

45 

4.3 


6 

46 

28 


6 

46 

69 

01 

7 

45 

6.3 


7 

45 

62 


7 

45 

62 


7 

46 

92 


8 

46 

09 

01 

7 

45 

70 

07 

8 

46 

88 

13 

9 

48 



ilV/ 


i* JHj 










Snow reports 


Heavy poor fine 


Depth ContSnons Weather 

(cm) Off Runs to (5pm) 

L U Prate Piste resort 0 

AUSTRIA 

St Anton 30 340 fair heavy poc 

Good skimg tor tone of year 

FRANCE 

Lai. acne ISO 220 good waned fair 

Wa rm weather soft pistes 
SWITZERLAND 

Vertver £5 220 good varied fair 

Mont Fort dosed 




C F 
r 13 55 
f 22 72 
9 22 72 
r 10 50 
c 6 41 
e 25 77 
a 28 82 
I 20 64 
* 12 54 


S 26 79 
c . 7 45 
f 21 70 
f 5 41 
ig 5 41 
C 8 48 
C * 46 
8 34 75 


In the above reports supplied by representatives of the So Club of Great 
Britain L refers to lower slopes ana U to upper and art to artificial 




» 26 
* 20 58 
C 14 67 


f toc tg 1 


C F 

e 

10 SO 

f 

8 46 

6 2* 75 

c 

5 41 

a 23 73 

f 

11 52 

C 22 72 

s 

13 SS 

0 

IS 58 

c 

18 55 

1 

15 59 

c 22 72 
B 20 88 

G 

20 88 

9 

32 90 

r- 

SB 5 S 

1 

19 66 

c 

8 46 

r 

11.52 

S 

14 57 

» 

16 01 


C- F 
C IS 99 
G 15 SB 

s 21 ro 

C 19 68 
s 23 73 
c 28 »9 
18 55 
d ’ 45 
c -4 39 
l 21 70 
.» 20 79 
t 24 ’S 
8 33 91 
8 V* 63 
14 57 
*--8 48 
c’< 5 
a- a "» 
g. 23 ra 
s 21 ■•0 

*■ 6 41 
* 22 
s a* 

f’JP 


mi 


























TIMES 



* : • .. 2*v: ."• • V; .-Tic ■■. vV* -- • * ^ ■.■•?'_«> •-? • : 


r A 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 

1388.1 (-12.8) 

FT-SE 100 
1675.7 (-12.8) . 

U$M (Datastream) 
119.84 (*0.4% 

THE ROUND ; 


US Dollar 

1.4730(+ 0.0205) 

W Germanmarfc 

3.4424 (-0.0378) 

Trade-weighted 

76.7 (same) 


j* _ « _ 

i Guinness 

- ‘favoured’ 

^ More than 3,20Q‘ sniall 
shareholders in Distillers -out 

i, ^ of 7;256 contacted in a survey 
* v> by Kleinwort Benson, 'the 

>”» whisky group’s merchant 
t bank, are bacldag the £ 2.8 
billion" bid by f Guinness- 
•■i Only .195 favoured the rival 
£2.7 billion offer from Argyll 
Distillers denied dial the 
' > research was intended to- put 

6 - pressure on small sharehold- 

i • era to accept the agreed deaL - 
J-v Argyll said it was uncon- 
cerned "toy. the findings of the 
survey. 

v. ... . ■ 

^ Kwikrise , . 

_ Kwik-Frt ' . (Tyres' . & Ex- 
, . * - . hausis) Holdings tifted'profits 
'* from £4~23: mfllidn to £6.63 

j. , 0 million in theyear to February 

. 28. Turnover rose from £61 3. 
'7 DtiHion to £83.8 million and 
“ ; the final dividend is up from 
. .7 Q.94p to Lip. . 

• f . Tempos, page 23 - 

; 5 Gains at Next 

Next has announced tum- 
■... over, for the six months to 
March. 31, 1986, up. 20 per 
.. . cent to £854 million. . Prmx 
, profit was £1 3.6 million com- 
_ 7.. pared with;,£9.6 mflBbn- last 
t ; year. The.mterim dividend is 
1.3p against Ip last year. 

Tempas. page 23 

Trust launch 

Laing & , Cruickshank is 
bringing River and Mercantile 
Geared: CapitSL and Jncoirie,; 

- ■ — Trust 1999 to the market via 
T an offer for sale of 35 milfioh 

preferred capital shares and 

■ 14' mfljjon^ordinary -income" 
shares,' : vahihQT it ‘ at -.’£14 

} million. , The applicaubw fist 

7 opens at; 10 anMomcwTow. 

J Ramada’s third 

/ : Ramada, the world's third. 
^ largest hotel chain, is planning- 
>, its third English property with 
• the £9 million con version of a 
Manchester office block into a 
205-bedroom hotel. Comple- 
tion is due next summer. 

Special payout 

^ . West’s Group International r 
, - has declared a spedai urterim 
11 dividend of 2 Jp, lobepaid o n. 
7 April 24, after the takeover, 
offer for West by Tilbury : 
Group becoming’ 

unconditional. 

Newman fall 

Newman Industries has de- 
clared a final dividend of Q.5p 
with pretax profits down from 
£5.1 million in 1984 to £3.1 
million last year. . . 

Expametdeal 

Expatnet International has 
paid £1.16 million in cash for. 
Hoseworth, the Aylesbury- 
based manufacturer of fire- 
alarm and security systems. 

£50m issue 

Enterprise Oil is to issue £50 

■ million of 10 per cent bonds 
due in 1 993 at par through an 
international syndicate man- 
aged by ' J Henry Schroder 
Wagg. The issue will be used 
to .fund capital expenditure 
oh its existing operations. 



y Teady to agree cut in 
world interest rates’ 


■ -rFi'hance ministers of the 
Group of five nations pre- 
. pared ; to’ meet in a closely- 
' guarded session .yesterday as 
speculation, grew in financial 
markets that they would agree 
to another coordinated cut in 
world interest rates. 

Market' analysis said there 
was. ample room for the 
United States and Japan to cut 
their discount rates; following 
the base rate cuts in Britain, to 
stimulate their economies and 
relieve pressure on Latin 
. American debtor nations, par- 
ticularly oil . exporters suffer- 
ing -from' ihec energy price' 
collapsei T 

= v - Tfe teafigunren't of curren- 
cies in the European Monetary 
System sh'oujd also spur rate 
reductions. 

'Speculation' over the GS 
session grew even as World 
Bank officials confirmed that 
the bank planned to accelerate 
its lending, rate by nearly 90 
per cent by 1990 because of 
the dismal prospects for 
growth in Third World 
countries. 

US treasury officials, main- 
taining a wall of secrecy 
around the G5- meeting, re- 


From Bailey Morris, Washington 


fused to acknowledge that it 
was being held and advised 
journalists not to expect any 
dramatic statements, from the 
four-day -meeting of world 
finance ministers in 
Washington. 

Privately, officials noted 
that even though Japan left 
the door open to further 
interest rate cuts in the eco- 
nomic package it unveiled 
yesterday, it did not take the 
step and has urged the United 
States to prevent additional 


sharp reductions in the dollar 
against the yen. 

Meanwhile, in his outgoing 
report to ihetwice-yeariyjoint 
meeting of the bank and the 
Internationa! Monetary Fund, 
Mr A W Tom Oauscn. the 
president of the World Bank, 
planned to recommend sharp- 
ly higher lending levels rising 
to $21.5 billion annually to 
generate more growth in de- 
pressed Third World 
economies. 

Mr Clausen, who is to be 


Base rates cut to 11% 


The big banks yesterday cut 
their base lending rates by half 
a percentage point The tim- 
ing, so soon after tbe drop in 
money market rates on Mon- 
day, took many by surprise. 

The banks lowered their 
base rates to 11 percent and as 
interest _ rates weakened in 
other industrial countries, 
base rates might fall a further 
half a percentage point next 
week. 

The prospect of a cut in the 
US Federal Reserve discount 


rate encouraged a dollar col- 
lapse. It opened against ster- 
ling at 1.4730 in London after 
dosing on Monday at Si. 45 17 
and closed at 1.4780 against 
the pound, and at DM2 3393, 
down more than five pfennigs. 

Sterling’s trade-weighted 
index remained unchanged at 
76.7. 

Sterling weakened against, 
most European currencies, 
however, dropping five pfen- 
nigs to DM3.4548. 


succeeded this summer by the 
former New Vork Congress- 
man Barber Conable. warned 
in bis still unpublished report 
that Third World nations will 
not be able to resume growth 
without a much larger infu- 
sion of capital from rich 
nations, officials confirmed. 

He planned to tell the 
ministers from 153 nations 
that a capital increase of $53 
billion will be required to 
support the grcaier lending 
levels envisioned under the 
new five-year plan. 

The United States, which 
has balked in the past at 
proposals for a capital in- 
crease, has promised to sup- 
port one but not until after the 
mid-term elections in Con- 
gress and possibly, not at this 
high level, officials said. 

Mr Clausen’s report esti- 
mates that the banks’ loan 
programme will now range 
from $40 billion to $50 billion 
for I9S6-88, up from the $45 
billion peak estimated in 
Seoul, South Korea when Mr 
James Baker, the US Treasury 
Secretary, unveiled his debt 
initiative. 


Standard board united Whitehall 
against Lloyds offer attached 

By Richard Thomson, banking Correspondent DV 1 v OlirilO 


- Standard Chartered Bank 
yesterday issued an uncom- 
promising rejection of the bid 
proposals made by Lloyds 
Bank last week and said that it 
would not be looking for an 
alternative bidder. 

' Despite the rebuff Lloyds 
said it would be launching a 
formal bid bytbe end of the 
week; 

Standard said that a board. 
; meeting yesterday had unani- 
mously decided that Lloyds’ 
proposals were not in the 
interests of its shareholders, 
staff or customers. 

The chairman. Lord Barber, 
has informed the chair man of 
Lloyds," Sir* Jeremy Morse, 
>lhatdisaissionsabout an offer 
for Standard “would not be 
.fruitful”. 


Diamond 
.prices 
rise 7.5% 

* By Michael Prest 

A steady finning of the 
diamond market id recent 
months was declared official 
yesterday when the Central 
Selling Organization, the mar- 
keting 1 arnr of the “South 
African mining. conaTo De 
■ Beers, abDounad "an average 
increase ~of73, per cenrin the 
price of rough gem stones. 

The increases; which will 
take .'effect from , the sight or 
CSO sale in London qd May 6 . 
are tbe first since April 1983. 
Jt is stressed that the latest 
increase excludes industrial 
diamonds and that prices of 
different grades of gemstones 
will go up by different 
amounts. 

City, analysts pointed but 
that last year De Beers’ South 
African profits had benefited 
greatly from the collapse of the 
rand against the: c _doHar,_in 
which diamond prices are' 
denominated. . But the. rand 
has began - to .’'recover, so 
higher diamondprices should 
help to main tain De Beers' 
profits.-. 

Trade sources said the mar- 
ket for. geftn diamonds had 
been strengthening since the 
middle of last year. Sales are 
buoyant in the US, the world's 
biggest diamond market, de- 
spite the depreciation of the 
dollar against most currencies. 
Germany and Japan have also 
- been strong markets. 


Mr David Horne, a director 
of Lloyds Merchant Bank, 
said: “We are surprised and 
disappointed by Standard’s 
attitude but we are not going 
away just because they do not 
like our approach. 

^Since talks now look 
doubtful we will be launching 
a foil bid, probably aL750p per 
share which we believe is a fair 
price” Standard's share price 
yesterday stood at 879p. 

Mr Michael McWilliam, 
Standard's group managing 
director, said: “We believe we 
have a good business and we 
do not want a merger with 
anyone. We are beginning to 
show an improvement in the 
size and quality of our earn- 
ings and we do not want to 
share the benefits with anyone 


He added: “We may need 
some time to deliver the 
goods. We clearly have some 
persuading to do in the stock 
market over our ability to 
improve our performance.” 

He said that Standard had 
received no other bid ap- 
proaches but had received 
expressions of support from 
overseas institutions, though 
none from Britain. 

Mr McWilliam said: “We 
are not seeking a white knight 
but it is dear that we would 
have support if we were forced 
to mount a defence 
He said that the bank still 
wanted a retail base in the 
United Kingdom and contin- 
ued to believe a link with a 
building society would suit it 
best 


Granada forecasts 
37% nrofits rise 


attacked 
by Lonrho 

By Richard Lander 
Lonhro, the international 
trading company headed by 
Mr Roland “Tiny" Rowland, 
yesterday launched a bitter 
attack against the Govern- 
ment and Kleinwort Benson, 
the merchant bank, over the 
House of Fraser affair, more 
than a year after it lost the 
battle for tbe store group to the 
Al-Fayed brothers of E^pt 
Addressing a packed annual 
general meeting at the Grosve- 
nor House Hotel, Lonrho’s 
chairman. Mr Edward du 
Cann. lambasted the Govern- 
ment for blocking a Lonhro 
bid for so long while allowing 
“unknown foreigners” to buy 
the group after just a cursory- 
glance at their credentials. 

He added: perhaps even 
moreTcritirism should Belev-' 
elled at those- who misled the 
authorlies by the warranties 
they gave as to the financial 
standing of the purchasers and 


By Cliff Feltham 


Granada, the television and 
leisure group, yesterday fore- 
cast a “profit breakthrough" 
this year as it continued to 
pour scorn on the Rank 
Organization's frustrated £750 
million takeover bid. 

Mr Alex Bernstein, Gra- 
nada's chairman, said half- 
year profits were set to rise by 
37 peri cent to £38.5 million, 
with a similar increase expect- 
ed for the foil year, implying 
an outcome of £88 million. On 
ihe stock market, the shares 
greeted tire news with a 12 p 
jump to 296p. 

Mr Bernstein told share- 
holders at ihe reconvened 


annual meeting in London 
that Rank's bid — which has 
been put on ice following its 
veto by the Independent 
Broadcariing Authority — had 
been misconceived. 

He said: “They were after 
our substantiai cash flow and 
businesses ''ring a greater 
potential than theirs.” 

But Rank's chief executive, 
Mr Michael Gifford, who 
attended the meeting, said 
afterwards: “We have not 
given up. It still makes sense 
to put the two groups together. 
We are considering whether to 
make a fresh approach to the 
IBA.” 


New setback for TSB 

By Our City Staff 

The date for floating.' the September, but the appeal 


Trustee Savings Bank oif the 
stock market was ~ again 
thrown into -doubt yesterday. 

Mr James Ross, a Scottish 
depositor., said he would ap- 


coiild delay it until next year. 

Mr Ross claims a flotation 
would be illegal because h 
would deprive depositors of 
ownership rights but the Gov- 


peal to the House of Lords eminent which is handling 
after his claim that the TSB is the flotation, says no one owns 


beneficially owned by its de- 
positors was rejected by the 
Edinburgh Inner Court last 
month. 

The move prolongs the legal 
wrangle that has postponed 
the flotation. 

After the Scottish court's 
decision, the TSB had hoped 
for aflotation in August or 


the bank. 

Mr Ross said the a peal 
would be subject to ihe result 
of a similar case between 
English depositors and the 
TSB in the English High 
Court. 

TSB said yesterday it would 
not pay for an appeal by 
depositors to the Lords. 


niTJ. i flfwir 


document. 

“1 have no doubt that this is 
a matter of which more will be 
heard. In the end theiruih will 
out and so it should.” 

A spokesman for Kleinwort 
Benson, which issued the offer 
document on behalf of the Al- 
Fayed brothers, declined to 
comment on Mr du Cann's 
remarks. 

Lonhro itself is currently at 
the centre of mounting bid 
speculation following strong 
US buying which has lifted 
the share price to almost £3 
from a low of I47p last year. 

However. Mr Rowland, the 
chief executive and managing 
director, told reporters after 
the meeting that any bid under 
£5 would not succeed “and I 
wouldn't sell at £5”. Lonrho's i 
shares closed 8 p down y ester- i 
day, at 29 Ip. ! 

Mr Rowland said he could ! 
not estimate how much of the I 
estimated 20 per cent of 
Lonhro shares held in the 
United States were in hostile 
hands. 

On the possible purchase of 
Land Rover and Range 
Rover, which the Govern- 
ment has put up for sale, Mr 
Spicer said the company had 
been given until next Tuesday 
to come up with firm 
proposals. 

Mr du Cann announced a 1- 
for -10 scrip issue. 

He also announced a further 
S 100 million (£68 million); 
convertible loan stock issue 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


A ha’p’orth that will 
decide Imps’ future 


The moment of decision for Im- 
perial shareholders has arrived with 
United Biscuits’ offer closing on 
Friday. 

The battle continues to rage about 
whose offer is highest and by how- 
many pence, with last-minute di- 
versions by Imps over what is the real 
value of Hanson Trust convertible 
serving only to obscure the real 
issues. For the record, Hanson's best 
bid stood at 367p per Imperial share 
last night (or 359. Ip. according to 
!mps/UB) and UB*s stood at 360. 9p. 

Add in the higher income UB is 
offering and there is barely a 
ha’p'orth in iL Sadly, that ha’p'orth 
will make the difference for some 
fund managers desperate to boost 
short-term performance. 

But the real issue, as this column 
has said before, is where the brightest 
future lies for Imperial. Institutions 
are going to have to be shareholders 
in whichever grouping emerges as the 
victor, so they should be thinking 
long-term. 

The arguments are all well re- 
hearsed. They boil down to the desire 
of UB’s Sir Hector Laing to create a 
global food group to compete with 
the American majors, using tobacco 
cash-flow to finance it. United Im- 
perial would certainly be smaller than 
the biggest American combined to- 
bacco and food groups, but it would 
be bigger than Heinz, Quaker and 
Kellog. 

Lord Hanson, chairman of Hanson 
Trust, scoffs at Sir Hectors grand 
plan and says global food businesses 
do not work (Tell that to McDonalds 
or Coca Cola). United Biscuits’ 
ambition to feed the third world may 
sound somewhat far fetched, but its 
digestive biscuits are already the 
nubmber one brand in Hong Kong. 

Lord Hanson's plan is to correct 
. the decline in Imperial's cigarette 
market share, down from 66~3 per 
cent in 1975 to 42.1 per cent in 19S5, 
and bring its 5.000 pubs into the 
twentieth century. He does not 
intend, he says, ’ to close any of 
Imperial’s businesses, but will take 
the usual Hanson hard look at the 
acquired company. 

Imperial shareholders have to de- 
cide between different concepts, both 
of which have merit, and different 
managements, both of which have 
strong records. Then there is the 
financial dimension. 

Hanson' has.. suggested that UB's 
share price will fell heavily if it wins 
Imperial. But on fundamental 
grounds — a prospective p/e ratio of 
12 1 /; — it is at the right price. Add in 
bid speculation, now largely in 
abeyance, and it should be much 
higher. 

Dilution in 1986, assuming £290 
million pretax profits from Imps and 
£120 million from UB, would be 1.4 
per cent before conversion and before 
estimated minimum £20 million 
savings. Analysts estimate that by 
1988 United Imperial could be 


to 


CHOICE OF 


gaining an annual £75 million to £80 
million in integration benefits, which 
would far outweigh dilution of £47 
million. 

Hanson would undoubtedly reap 
quick financial rewards if it were to 
win Imps, but doubts about its ability 
to keep on the treadmill of high 
growth persist. 

LiB’s offer has the most potential. 
Imperial shareholders should accept 
it now. 

Promise falls short 

After the vision of the Maekawa 
Report on the Japanese economy, 
published on Monday, came the 
reality, in Prime Minister Nakasonc's 
economic package yesterday. 

The package is rather like one of 
Nigel Lawson's Budgets, busy rather 
than substantial. Many such packages 
would be needed to produce the 
“historical transformation” of the 
Japanese economy from its tra- 
ditional export base urged by the 
committee under the former gov- 
ernor of the Bank of Japan. Huruo 
Maekawa. 

There is a personal sector tax cut, 
said to be worth 1,000 billion yen 
(£3.7 billion), in the form of letting 
the Japanese consumer benefit from 
lower world oil prices and the yen's 
rise. Electricity and gas prices are to 
be allowed to fall in line with the drop 
in the local currency cost of crude oil. 

A more traditional tax cut is ruled 
out by Japan's debtisl obsession with 
reducing reliance on long-term 
bonds. The Maruyu tax relief on 
small savings, which if removed 
could boost consumption, is left 
untouched. 

The package is described in Tokyo 
as “pump-priming”, although this is 
mainly achieved by bringing forward 
planned public sector investment, 
and hitting existing public works 
targets for the fiscal year 1 986. 

The Nakasone package has ad- 
opted some of the Maekawa Report's 
proposals, notably in housing and 
construction. Limits on the height of 
office buildings in Tokyo, tradition- 
ally held to be there because of the 
area’s susceptibility to earthquakes, 
are to be relaxed. 

In an interview with foreign 
journalists, Masaya Miyoshi. senior 
managing director of the Keidanren, 
Japan's CBI, said that employers 
would resist any government attempt 
to limit working hours, to set off the 
proposed leisure revolution. A long- 
term reduction, however, should 
come about naturally, he said. 

Prime Minister Nakasone travels 
to the United States in the next few 
days, armed with his package and the 
Maekawa Report. He has to convince 
President Reagan, and more im- 
portantly Congress, that Japan is 
taking action on the trade surplus to 
avoid an uncomfortable world eco- 
nomic summit in Tokyo in early 
May. 



sun 





MARKET SUMMARY 




New York 

Dow Jones — ~ 
Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow 1 

Hong Kong: 

Hang Seng 

Amsterdam: Gen 
Sydney: AO — ~ 
FrankftHt 

Commerzbank — 

Brussels: 

General ... — — r — 

Paris CAC 

Zurich: 

SKA General 



. 1751 . 681 + 16 . 17 ) 

15014.06 (-47 32) 

■22TSSK3 

114a3(-04) 

„ 2192.0 (+ 26 ^) 

„ 623.30 (-39-59) 

367.1 (-5.0) . ... . _ 

I Woohrarth — 

524.70 (same) 


Salomon Brothers breaks 
the UK mortgage mould 

By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 
Salomon Brothers, the Am- such as Royal Insurance and ness on packaging and trading 


erican securities house, yester- 
day, announced an innovation 
in the British mortgage market 
which will increase the already 
intense competition to lend to 
homebuyers. 

It will, for the first time, 
enable British mortgages-tb be 


Sun Alliance. 

. Insurance brokers and other 
intermediaries will be used as 
the company's business 
expands. 

The company will then 
package the mortgages iir 
pools of about £100 million 


NswYoric 
C$1.4730 
&DM&3370 
$: Index: 119.7 

ECU £1.6009 
SDR £0.769439 



packaged into securities to be - into securities with a floating 
sold fo' international invest- interest' rate set every three 


ors. 

And the move could herald 
tbe introduction of a full 
secondary market in mortgage 
securities in Britain, similar to 
that which already exists in 
the US. 

The Mortgage Corporation. 
a subsidiary of Salomon, will 
offer home loans from today. 
It plans to lend about £500 
million in the first year and 
£750 million or more in the 
second year. : 

Mortgage Corporation will 
market ns loans through prii^ 
advertising and by; selling 
through insurance companies 


months. 

The securities, will be mar- 
keted through Salomon's in- 
ternational securities dealing 
network to investors in the 
US, Japan and Europe. 


mortgages as securities. 

Mr Freedberg said that Sal- 
omon had an advantage in 
starting the business in Britain 
because of its involvement in 
the large and active secondary 
market in mortgage-backed 
securities .in the US. 

He emphasized' that -Salo- 
mon would continue to- ad- 
minister the mortgages and set 
the mortgage rates for borrow- 
ers after the loans had been 
packaged and sold. 

Mortgage Corporation’s 
loans will all be on a low-cost 


Mr Hugh Freedberg, the endowment basis at a current 
chief executive of Mortgage rate of 1 1.75 per cent - up to 
Corporation, said: “We be- 0.5 per cent below the rate 
lieve there will be strong being charged by other 
demand from international lenders, 
investors for long-term ster- Mr Freedberg said no an- 
ting mortgage backed, securi-. rangement fees would be 
ties which have the reputation * charged and responses 10 
of being very high quality mortgage applications would 
risks." be made on the same day. 

this is the first lime that a The minimum loan size will 
company has based Hs bust- be £16.000 . - 


TO LISBON 


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FREE VIDEO. 


In the interest of shareholders, Guinness Brewing World- 
wide have recendy produced a short documentary which shows 
how we operate overseas. 

Available free in VHS, Betamax, V2000 or U-Matic, this 
15 minute tape will help you gain a fuller understanding of 
Guinness’ ideas in action. 

This video tape is offered only to Distillers and Guinness 


shareholders. If you are such a shareholder to obtain your, copy 
simply phone the 24 hour number above (for Scodand ring 
041 332 3333) and ask for “Guinness Video!’ 

"fou will be asked for your name, address and the type 
of tape you require and confirmation that you are a Distillers 
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GUINNESS PLC 


This advertisement is published by Morgan Grentdl Co Limited and The BrinVh Linen Bank Ltd on bchah of Guinness PLC- The Directors of Guinness PLC are the persons responsible for the information contained in this advertise menc. To the best c* 
their knowledge and belief (having taken all reasonable care to ensure that such is the easel the information contained in this advertisement is in accordance with the facts. The Directors of Guinness PLC accepr responsibility accordingly. 











THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


23 


After four years of expiosrve 
growth at the Next retailing 
chain, George Davies, its 
cjief executive, is still full of 
ideas for expansion. His out- 
standing record of profits 
growth was continued with 
yesterday's interim an- 
Pretax profit 
of £13.7 million for the six 
months to March 31, 41 per 
cent up on last year. 

Next is the bouncing baby 
which bounced all over its 
parent, the uninspiring Hep- 
worth group, so much that 
the family name was 
changed. 

. ■ Next began as a specialist 
retailer of women’s apparel, 
whence it has moved into 
men's fashion wear and home 
furnishings. Shoes, accesso- 
ries and cosmetics are*becon>. 
mg increasingly available in 
Next stores. In the ^autumn, 
lingerie will be added to the 
range of goods offeredand, in 
18 months' time, children's 
wear. 

_ Next dabbled m acquisi- 
tion when it took over the 
Lord John chain: It is also 
reliably reported to have 
considered buying the House 
of Fraser chain, excluding 
Harrods, a move which 
would have taken it into:tbe 
big league of retailers at a 
stroke and changed the face 
of many city high streets: It . 
has now principally decided . 
to grow organically, although 
the temptations to make an 
acquisition remain. - 

Club 24, Next's credit card 
company, contributes about 
25 per cent of pretax profit * 
and lends stability to retailing 
earnings, which can be very 
volatile. Financially, • - the 
company is extremely strong. 
Gearing is close to 7 per cent 
and cash flow more than 
adequate: Its rating in the low 
20s discounts quite a bit of 
future growth. 


and Lucas Industries, to foe 
more highly-rated; stores 
sector. - 

• _ JCwik-Fit says this designa- 
tion would more accurately 
reflect . the retailing nature of 
its business. 

. Whatever die sector, Kwik- 
Fit now -has. a growth tag. 
Profits jumped from £4.23 
million to £6.63 million be- 
fore tax last year-arid there 
should be good progress again 
this year.-. . 

Though 33 depots 
were opened the company 
saw little of the benefit as 22 
of them started in the last two 
months of the year. Kwik-Fit 
expects to open another 30 
this year. 

Exhausts account for 46 
percent of turnover, tyres for 
35 percent and other prod- 
ucts, including radiators, ac- 
count for the resL 
. The latter group is bedorh- 
;ing Increasingly important as 
the company introduces a 
broader range of products. 

, For the longer term, it has 
plans to open up to 100 Car 
Care centres offering a com- 
plete car service. 

While the cost of new 
depots should be covered by 
cash flow from trading, the 
Car Care project could re- 
quire special funding, given 
gearing of 57 per cent That 
could be why the company is 
.planning to sell its property 
portfolio, which has a book 
value ofirt million. Confir- 
mation of these property 
disposals should remove 
rears of a rights issue. • 

' ' The shares art' trading on a!’ 
modest -multiple of 11 times 
prospective earnings assum- 
ing profits of£8.5 million and 
a slightly higher tax charge. 

- They should continue to 
perform well and should be 
.particularly . attractive to car 
owners as they can make use 
of the 10 per cent discount 
available to holders of 100 
shares. 

Two and a half million Dn /o « __ i - ' i n:t 
motorists wifi.; take their- tar - HI ol 3 IHl3 r u Ull 

to be mend&fal a KwfUt-Fit — .Jr f — : j 

outlet this year. That ‘com- BPV biggest investment is 
fares widvlimllioir B^t year its 55.5 per cent share in the 
and~ million "the year: Standard Oil Company, for-^ 
before. nierty Sohio. In the financial 

Increasing popularity is year just ended, its interest in 
driving both profits and the Standard Oil contributed 50 
share price forward, at a per cent of its net income of 
tremendous rate. .. £1.6 billion before extraordi- 

Shares w Kwik-Fft (Tyres nary charges. 

& Exhausts) have come np ... Despite the considerable 
from a 12-month low of 55p expansion of Standard Offs 
to a high of 99p, where they downstream capacity thro- 

hase of ' 


The fall in the oil price is of 
concern to BP. therefore, but 
it is a particular worry in the 
case of Alaskan oil with its 
high cost of operation. 

Extraction costs have fallen 
recently because Alaskan 
severance taxes are calculated 
at 1 5 per cent ofthe well-head 
value, which has fallen. De- 
spite this, they: are still esti- 
mated to be $4.25 per barrel. 

Moving the oil across Alas- 
ka via the Alyeska pipeline 
costs another $4.50 a barrel. 
Between them. Standard Oil 
and BP own 50 per cent ofthe 
pipeline, so the tariff is partly 
a transfer charge. However, 
the operating cost of the line 
and interest on capital 
amount to about SL60. 

The rest of the journey 
from Valdez to the refining 
centres in the Gulf of Mexico 
and the East Coast of Ameri- 
ca costs another $3 or so 
giving a built-up marginal 
cost to the refiner of nearly $9 
per barrel. 

North Slope crude is heavi- 
er and higher in sulphur, so 
its spot value is approximate- 
ly 25 cents a barrel lower than 
West Texas Intermediate, the 
most frequently quoted US 
crude. The current spot price 
of Alaskan crude is therefore 
about $12 after recent rises. 

At a delivered cost of 
nearly $9, Alaskan crude was 
barely profitable when the 
spot price was $10 and even 
though the price has risen to 
$12, the price is still volatile 
and profitability remains 
vulnerable. 

Even if the price feD to a 
level where there was no 
profit to be made on Alaskan 
oil, it is unlikely that the 
Prudhoe Bay field would be 
closed altogether because of 
die considerable costs associ- 
ated with shutting it down 
and restarting it when the 
price recovered. For this to 
happen, there would need to 
be a prolonged decline to 
between $7 and $8 per band. 

■y Most of Standard Oifs 
output is disposed of directly 
or via exchanges into its own 
refineries at prices of $14 in 
the Gulfand $13 in the East 
Coast Consequently, prod- 
uction profits are being 
subsidised by the refining and 
marketing operations, but 
this will not go on 
indefinitely. 

If the price remains low, 
competition will gradually 
. - . . » „ erode product prices, reduo 

were trading yesterday. ngh the purchase 9 f Gulfs mg total profitability. 

They could soon receive a refining and marketing prop?'.-;- . \£ven allowing for th&fape-'.L 
further boost if the company erties; the company was still o'" lag wfaTleprbduct prices catch I 
succeeds in its attempt to dependent on oil production up with the lower oil prices, 
switch its listing from the in Alaska for more than 85 the outlook for Standard OiTs 
automotive components sec- • per cent of its pretax profit and hence BP'S profits is not 
tor, where it lies alongside from integrated oil opera- - bright unless oil prices stabi- 
manufacturers siich as GKN lions last yew. lize at higher levels 


Kwik-Fit 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 



Gilts Mazed away again 
yesterday as the clearing banks 
chopped half a point from 
their base rates. Gains 
stretched to about two points 
as dealers looked forward to 
another small reduction soon. 

Bui equities failed to hold 
an initial strong advance and 
another! wave of profit-taking 
during the afternoon had 
prices looking mixed. 

The FT 30-share index 
slipped by 12.8 points to 
1 388. 1 . while the FT-SE index 
fell by a similar number of 
points, to 1675.7. 

Internationals suffered the 
most as the pound continued 
to remain strong against a 
weakening dollar. 

Glaxo were among the 
worst hit, at 975p, .down 25 p, 
ahead of next Tuesday's half- 
timer, while I Cl lost I3p to 
91 6p on persistent talk of a bid 
for Beedtam. which finished 
2p better at 408p after actively 
trading between. extremes of 
4] 5p and 399p. 

Hawker, reporting later this 
month, gave up 8p to S71p 
and Vickers took, heed of 
“take profits" advice, down 
20pto 518p. 

Stores were good at first, but 


boosted as equities dip 


also succumbed to selling 
pressure bier in the session. 
Woobvorth. at 875p. gave back 
30p of its recent rise which 
followed last week's bid from 
Dixons Group. 

Burton ar 316p and Com- 
bined English. 228p. were 
others to lose about I5p. In 
contrast Onr Price was hoist- 
ed 73p ro 648p following an 
agreed bid from W H Smith, 
24p down at 330p. 

Some house builders bene- 
fited from the prospects of 
cheaper mortgages, with 
Wimpey 4p better at I64p. 

Estate agents were wanted 
for a similar reason, with 
Connells another 18p higher 


EQUITIES 


fieop; 

I35p) 


223 -2 
210-3 
186 
188 +5 
90-3 

Chancery Secs (63p) 75 

10 £KP B+1 r a 
105 +2 
165 +5 
29 '2 -2 
1 ) 188 

>) 80 
38-1 


Abbott M V 

bppTi&p) 

Brookmount (160p) 
Chart FL (86p) 
mcery Sets 
Conv 9%-A 2000 
Cranswick M (95p) 
Dialene (128p) 
Ferguson (J) (10p) 
Gold Gm Trot (1* 
Granyte Surface (! 
inoco (55p) 


at 23 1 p ahead of next Friday's 
results. Mann & Co improved 
15p to 305 p in sympathy. 

Engineers attracted selec- 
tive support mainly on bid 
hopes. Pegler-Hattersley were 
to the fore again at 462p. up 
20p. Weir Group climbed I Op 
to !43p on suggestions of an 
imminent approach from ei- 
ther F H Tomkins or GEC. 

Talk of a big acquisition 
lopped I7p from Williams 
Holdings at 663p and Laird 
Group were another weak spot 
at 301 p. down 22p after recent 
results. TI Group remained in 
favour ai 553p. up 14p. the 
Evered stake remaining a 
stimulant. 


RECENT ISSUES 


JS Pathology (160p) 281 

Jarvis Porter (105p) 133 +3 

Ktearfold (11 Bp) 118 -4-3 

Lexicon (115p) 

Macro 4 (I05p) 136+2 

Merivale M (ll5p) 147 +2 

Norank Sys (90p) 108 

Really Useful (330p) 330 +2 

SAC Inti (IQOp) 139 

SPP (125p) 155 

Templeton (21 5p) 218 

Stgmex (101 p) 78 

Snowdon & B (97p) 120 +1 

Spice (80p) 98 

Tech Comp (130p) 202 


Recovery hopes lifted John- 
son & Firth Broun at 43'^p. up 
4p. while Glynwed at 3S0p. up 
5p. continual to benefit from 
the good results announced on 
Monday. 

News of a defence contract 
boosted CAP Group I5p to 
243p. Amstrad were hoisted 
26p to 500p on further consid- 
eration of the Sinclair deal. 

Granada jumped Spio292p 
asthe chairman forecast a 37 
per cent increase in pretax 
profit. Kwik Fit added 4p to 
lOOp after a 57 per cent 
earnings improvemenL 

Scottish TV rose 21 p 10 
325p on Monday's results. 
Recent comment was rcspon- 


Underwoods (180p) 183-1 

Wellcome (I20p) 209 -4 

W York Hosp (90p) 75 -3 

Wickes (I40p) 171 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

Cullens F/P 275 

Greycoat N/P 40 -2 

Hartwells N/P 

NMW Comp F/P 330 

Porter chad F/P 114 +8 

Safeway UK £49 +1 

Wales F/P 150 

Westland F/P 80-3 

(Issue price in brackets). 


sible for another 40p advance 
in Bernard Matthews at 745p. 
Bejam. benefiting from the 
current unseasonal weather 
which is making fresh vegeta- 
bles scarce, improved 8p to 
I55p. 

Pentland put on 30p to 540p 
on the Reebok figures. British 
Syphon at I36p returned from 
suspension down 5p on the 
agreed merger terms with 
Marshall's Universal, 3p bet- 
ter at S5p. 

A 95 percent profit increase 
lifted Loudon & Continental 
Advertising 14p to !85p. 
Cheerful statements also sup- 
ported Ash & Lacy at 387p, 
Bod> cote 258p. Arenson 45p. 
Metsec 9Qp and Beanford 
J3lp up 2p to 1 3p. 

Dwek Group, with figures 
due. was suspended at 77p. 
down 1 Ip. while a 40 per cent 
setback chopped 4p from 
Newman industries at 28p. 
Next gave up 6p to 2S8p in 
spile of profits well up 10 
expectations but in mail or- 
ders Grattan was firm in ex- 
rights form at 452p. up 12p. 

Continuous Stationery ad- 
vanced I3p to 45p on news of 
a important stake change. 


Factory jobs drop 
by 40% in decade 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 
The decline in manufactur- and Manchester, the number 


mg industries over the last 
decade has been confirmed 
and' highlighted in the latest 
'analysis ofthe Government's 
1981 census, which shows that 
in some major cities employ- 
ment in manufacturing has 
dropped by more than 40 per 
cenL 

The report says that while 
the’ foil in the number of 
people with jobs was about 4 
per cent between 1971 and 
1981, the drop in manufactur- 
ing was nearly 24 per cent, 
representing a loss of 1.9 
mrUkrajohs. 

In agriculture, forestry and 
fishing, the foil was 19 per 
cent, bat this represented only 
10a.000jobs. 

Employment rose in. every 
region in distribution and 
insustries and also in 
other fields, including local 
and central government finan- 
cial and business services, 
entertainment, recreation and 
personal services. 

In London, Birmingham, 


employed in manufacturing 
fell by 40 per cent, while there 
were increase in the rural 
districts. 

The census records a decline 
in the numbers of salesmen in 
the 10 years and of male 
economists, statisticians, sys- 
tems analysts and computer 
programmers, although the 
number of women in these 
jobs almost doubled. 

In 1981, about 10 percent of 
the economically active men 
and 7 per cent of the women 
were looking for work - a 
combined rate of 9 per cent - 
while IS per cent of teenagers 
were jobless. The report stress- 
es that while there has been a 
big rise in unemployment 
since 1981, the general pat- 
terns of areas and social 
differentials still prevail. 

Census Guide 3 - Britain's 
workforce. Office of Popula- 
tion Censuses and Surveys, St 
Catherine's House, 10, 
Kingswav, London WC2B 
6JP. Price £3. 


NBN 



Base Rate 

Reduces by 0.5% to 11% per annum 
effect from 9th April 1986. 


with 


Deposit Account 

Interest on Deposit Accounts reduces 
by 0.5% to 5.25% net p.a. with effect 
from 9th April 1986. For those customers 
who receive interest gross, the rate reduces 
to 7.02% p.a. 


IWKcHand Bank 

Midland Bank pic, 27 Poultry, London EC2P 2BX 






Notice of Annual 



Notice is hereby given that the Annua] General Meeting of Aktiebolaget 
SKF will be held at SKF Kristin edal, Byfogdegatan 4, GSteborg, Sweden, 
at 3.30 p.m. on Tuesday, 29 April, 1986. 

Agenda 

Ordinary general meeting business will be transacted in accordance with 
Swedish law and the Articles of Association. „ 

Other business is a Board proposal that Article 4 of the Company’s Articles 
of Association be altered to set the lowest authorised share capital limit 
at 1,350,000,000 Swedish kronor and tbe highest authorised limit at 

5.400.000. 000 kronor; and that an amendment to Article 6 be made to 
limit the number of authorised ‘A’ and ‘B’ shares to a maximum of 

108.000. 000 respectively. 

AGM acceptance of the Board’s dividend proposal for 1985 would, in 
accordance with the Company’s Articles, also require the conversion of all 
'C shares to l B’ shares. In the event of saiddividends being declared, a 
Board resolution t&invalidate theregulations governing ‘C shares by 
changing Article 6 will be put to the meeting. 

The AGM is further to consider authorising the Board to decide - no 
later than the following Annual General Meeting - on a convertible bond 
issue in foreign currency not exceeding 650,000,000 Swedish kronor: 

The issue - to the exclusion of shareholders' preference rights- would 
be aimed at the international money market, with the bonds being 
convertible to non-restricted/B’ shares.. 

In conclusion, a matter raised by a shareholder concerning South Africa 
will also be taken up. 

Notice of attendance 

For the right to participate in the meeting, shareholders must notify the 
Board, at the Company's address in Goteborg, before noon on Thursday 
24 April, preferably in writing, of their intention to attend, giving details 
of name, address, telephone and sharehokiingrThey must also be 

recorded in the shareholders’ register kept 1^ the Securities Register . 

Centre (VPC ABfS-171 18 SoInaHy ftitfay 18 April-' - - - 
Shareholders with holdings registered in banks or other authorized 
depositaries must temporarily re-register these in their own name by 
Friday 18 April to be able to participate in the Annual General Meeting. 

Payment of dividends . 

The Board reeommends-thal shareholders with holdings m the VPC AB 
records on 6 May be entitled to receive dividendsfor 1985. Subject to the 
Board’s proposal being accepted by the Annual General Meeting, it is 
expected that the Securities Register Centre will send out notice of 
payment to recorded shareholders and listed depositaries on 14 May. 

Proxy forms are available from . 

AB SKF, S -435 50 GotEboig, Sweden 1 ". 

'TeV+ 4 fr- 31 - 37275 S'& 37 i 000 ’ v ^ • 


Battle for 
wine sales 
hots up 

By Derek Harris 
■ Industrial Editor 

The wine market, already 
worth more than £3.2 billion, 
is expected to keep growing as 
the battle between supermar- 
kets and specialist outlets 
enters a new phase. 

Table wines account for 
two-thirds of tbe sales witb 
stronger wines sudi as ver- 
mouth and port taking up the 
remainder. 

Among factors fuelling die 
struggle are changed consumer 
patterns creating tbe wine 
consumption] boom and tech- 
nological developments which 
have raised the quality and 
lowered the cost of produc- 
tion, according to a financial 
study* by Jordan Surveys. 


the standards of the food 
industry, are another foetpr. 
Over foe past two decades, 


wine consumption, per head of 
those aged 15 and over has 
trebled to 1 1.4 litres a year, the 
survey points out. Wine in 
1 984 accounted for 22.3 per 
cent of consumer expenditure 
on drink and was almost equal 
to spending on spirits. 

Grocery chains, after ag- 
gressive marketing, have now 
seized 48.3 per cent of foe 
wine market with specialist 
outlets like wine merchants 
accounting for 47.8 per cent. 
Outlets like hotels and restau- 
rants are responsible for the 
remainder of sales. 

The market analysis, which 
was prepared by the Catering 
Management and Applied 
Economics Department of 
Oxford Polytechnic, said 
shifts In leisure patterns and 
lifestyles would tend to favour 
wine consumption. 

■ .The foil in real terms of foe 
value of excise duties -and the 
escape from any increase in 
foe 'Budget was likely to 

maintain the 

.The take-home market in 
alcoholic drinks is dominated 
by J. Salisbury and Tesco 
Stores whose combined sales 
amount 10 £500 million. 
Buube specialist outlets are 
jhting back, foe survey said. 
Both Bass and Whitbread 
among 'foe big brewers have 
increased their stake in off- 
licences while brewery-owned 
chains like Allied-Lyons' Vic- 
toria Wine and . Grand 
Metropolitan's Peter Dominic 
have upgraded their 
marketing 

Financial analysis showed 
International Distillers and 
Vintners (part of Grand Met- 
ropolitan) to have' had the 
highest turnover and best pre-j 
tax profits in 1984. . 

* Britain’s Wine Industry. 
Jordan and Sons',' Jordan 
House, Brunswck Place, Lon- 
don NL 6EE £125. 


THEGUIN> 

JESS 

BID FOR DISTI 

LLERS. 

LATEST PRICEa 

Distillers 

share price r"\\J 
worth ^ 

'8 p 

Guinness 

best and final / ^ 

| offer worth i — ^ 

;7 p 

Guinness 1 

higher by ■ ^ 

9 p 

Ficurc- Ki-tJ .>n ihf m.irtii pru,- ,ii ' 

The Guinness offer is unanimously recommended by the Board of Distillers. 

The closing date is April 18th at 3 pm. 

GUINNESS FLC 


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retpoGtlhlr lor the trrt.rrrrutu't .MTtUlIwJ in ihu aiilt-l tiHfnirflt T* the K-l .|| (bur kn.-» leJ^e hi tn I »h.i' ir^ i.ilen all rej..,m.>rk v .,«• r.-vn-uie <h ■> -u/h I. the '"J-e* '■»!■ Tnui'.vn 

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rrrteTen.v Sharis «i Thi • ,>■ ihe Cwi'cmHr Pri'IcrcrHr Sbaiv- ,•! Ciuinrit^ art c-nnwinJ rcvMU-? inei ei.-i pc™ nilr J 









W MLL- O l mzc I 


New York (Renter) — Wall 
Street prices jumped sharply 
higher at the start of trading 
yesterday on reports of an 
imminent US discount rate 
change, according to traders. 

The reports fanned enthusi- 
asm already evident on Mon- 
day when 'shares recovered 
from sharp losses at the end of 
the day. 

Shares on Monday were 
also affected by the Norwegian 


Aar Aar 

7 4 


North Sea oil workers' strike 
which boosted crude oil prices. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average gained 13 points to 
1.748 in early trading yester- 
day. The average had retreat- 
ed most of last week and 
through midsession on Mon- 
day, its recovery amonntiag to 
more than 100 points. 

Advancing shares led de- 
clining issues by a margin of 
seven- to- two 


Anr Aar 
7 4 


AUR 53V 

ASA 37'.. 

Allied Signal 51 '« 
AJitca 5riV 37'. 
AIM Chlmrs S' 
Akxya AO . 

Amm Inc 1 4 « 
An; r Jj Hs 2<V.. 

Am Brands 74'? 
An Eli .least n.'a 
An Can 70 
ArnCvnrnO 63’* 
An El Pv.t 26V 
Am Express 63 » 
Am Heme 76 
Am Hospital n/a 
Am Motors A 1 . 

AmSnta 42". 
Am Tetepit 21 ’. 
Amoco 59*« 
Armce Steel 9’» 
Asaico 19V 
Ashland Oil 4S-* 
A: fiirnheid 54 
Avon Pracs 32'. 
BktSTEtNf 44 
Bankamer i6’i 
Eko' Bstcn 72 
Bank oi NY 61 V 
Beamre Fes 49*. 
Bern Steel 17V 
Boeing 54'. 

B;e Cascoe 55'« 
Eraan 57 

Bg Warner 2?'.- 
B:rsl Myers 70 V 
BP 33 : « 

Buri'ron Ind 37 , 
Burl tan Ntn 70S 
Bun one ns 64 -a 
Cmpoeii Sp 53'. 
Can Pacific 13 ; » 
Caterpillar 49 
Ce'anese 192'. 
Central SW 30* 
Champion 25'* 
Chase Man 43‘- 
CnmBkNV 50*. 

Chevron 37'-. 
Cnr\5i0f 39 'i 
Cmccm 5 Pm 
C lark Eomp 21'. 
CocaCtNa 93'. 
Cauaie 38- 
CS5 137'. 

C Infra Sas 29 
C”tnErj 35 
Comwitfi Ed 33 V 
ConsEdLS 4t‘j 
CnNaeGas 45'. 
Cons Power :3'« 
Cntrl Daia C3'« 
Coming Gl “3- ; 
CPC Inil 60' : 
Crane 44'. 

Cm Zelter 43\ 
Dan&krait 49'. 
Deere 32'. 

De'ta Air 42‘* 
Eetron Ed 17V 
D'aitaiEu i59v ' 
Disrev 36 
Dr* Chen 47 , 
0-es wring 15 - 
Cuke Power 39-'. 
DuPont 72. 
EasremAir 6’» 
Es'.m hocak 56 - 
Eaten Coro 72'. 
rerson EJ 87'.- 


20 
73> 

64'. 

26'-. 

64*. 

74 
n/a 
4'.- 
J2*. 

21 r 

59'.- 

IQ’n 

29'j , 

45 V G 
53 V G 

33 V Gt Art A Tac 23' 
44*. G 
15*e G 
74 G 



i». ( ; «<■ iti/ioc ■« hii«: ■ aim: « -a: a kn> .su* BSiatrtt 1 * I T'aree tUiCJBec 



USTraseuiyBond Previous day’s total open interest 61! 

Jui 86 100-10 101-23 100-10 101-18 9660 

Sep 86 99-24 100-20 99-20 100-25 34 

Dec 86 N/T HfT 0 

Short en Previous day's tout open interest 10 

Jun 86 ... 101-60 1D2-15 1014SO 102-15 638 

Sep 86 N/T 102-3S 0 

Dec 86 N/T 0 

Long GHt Previous day's total open merest 1 0787 

Jun 86 127-10 128-18 127-10 1284* 11303 

Sep 86 128-02 129-21 1284» 128-14 72 

Doc 86 128-01 128-01 128471 128-12 8 

Mar 87 1Z7-29 127-29 1Z7-29 1284* 8 

ft-SE 100 Previous day's total open interest 1 879 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 






















































To be sure your acceptance of the UB offer arrives in time, you must 
post it today It has to be received by 3 00 pm this Friday 11th April 1986.* 

If you are in any doubt how to complete the form, ring our Help 
Line on 0272 666961and reverse the charges. 

^ 






0=1 S =5'.K _:«a £ » 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 


Agency to 
seek PCW 


By Alison Eadie 

AUA3. the agency appoint- 
ed by Lloyd's insurance mar- 
ket to close the loss-making 
PCW syndicates, has request- 
ed a meeting with Mr Peter 
Cameron-Webb. the former 
managing director of the PCW 
agency, to try to find out what 
action he would have taken if 
he had remained in chaise. 

Sir Ian Morrow, chairman 
of AlfAl wrote this week to 
names on former PCW syndi- 
cates: “It has been suggested 
that the losses which affect 
some of the syndicates under 
our management would not 
have occurred if the original 
PCW management had 
remained. 

“We can find no evidence 
whatsoever to substantiate 
such a view, but in order to 


Reporting record profits. 
London & Edinburgh Trust. 

| the Knightsbridge property 
I development group, is lifting 
its final dividend for 1985 
from 3.75p to 4,3p, raising the 
total from 6.25p to 7.5 d. The 
board plans a one-for-five 
: scrip issue and intends to 
i maintain the dividend on the 
enlarged capita] for 1986. 

Last year, turnover more 
than doubled to £72.05 mil- 
lion. against £33.3$ million. 
Pretax profits climbed from 
£5,11 million to a best-ever 
£9.2 million. In the interim 
report last October, the board 
predicted ‘‘significantly 
higher" pretax profits for the 
year. Operating profit rose 
from £4.36 million to £7.3 
million, while rental income 
increased from £1.1 million to 
£1.44 million. The trust's 
share of related companies* 
profits jumped from £1 18.000 
to £337.000 and net interest 
receivable was £ 1 1 3.000. com- 
pared with £471,000 payable 
Iasi lime. 

• WYNDHAM GROUP: The 
group is to buy a freehold site 


Peak profits 
from London 
& Edinburgh 


COMPANY' NEWS 


investigate h I have wrillen lo ^ho“* SP cS d cS 
Mr Cameron-Wtbb in the f rom r j Grcairex for £260,000 
United Slates to enquire ,-,51. 


whether he would agree to 
meet me. 

Mr Cameron-Webb is al- 
leged to have misappropriated 
£6.5 million of syndicate 
funds for his own benefit. He 
agreed last weekend to pay 
backSI.5 million (£1 million). 

The letter also said that the 
syndicates’ accounts at De- 
cembers!. t«S5. would not be 
ready until the end of June, j 
The accounts arc expected to I 
show a much higher loss than 
Lhe £130 million shown last 
year. 

Sir Ian believes that propos- 
als for a market settlement' 
could be made in the next few 
weeks. He said that potential 
defendants against legal action 
by PCW names exp«t names 
to contribute “a significant 
amount" to the settlement. 


from R J Grcairex for £260,000 
cash. 

• ARENSON GROUP: In- 
terim dividend 0.4p (nil) for the 
six months to Feb: 2, 1986. 
Turnover £6.94 million (£7.38 
million!. Pretax profit £236.000 
(£60.000). Earnings per share 2p 

(0.26p). 

• LONDON AND CONTI- 
NENTAL ADVERTISING: 
Total dividend for 1985 2.25p 
1 1.6p). Turnover £28.65 million 
(£17.64 million). Pretax profit 
£3.51 million (£1.8 million). 
Earnings per share 9.33p 
(6.27p>. The board reports that 
the current year has started welL 

• METSEC: Final dividend of 
l.3p for 1985. If the ordinary 
shares had been dealt in on the 
USM for the whole year, the 
board would have recom- 
mended a dividend of 2.46p. 
Turnover £14.88 million (£12.4 
million). Pretax profit £1.38 
million (£658.000). Eamings per 
share 6.6Sp (3p). 


• RILEY LEISURE: No divi- 
dend for 1 985 (0.7p). Turnover 
£25.76 million (£22.57 million). 
Pretax profit £751.000 (loss 
£1.22 million). Eamings per 
share l.8p (loss 9.6p>. 

• MEMORY COMPUTER: 
For the six months to December 
31. 1985 (six months 10 Septem- 
ber 30. 1984). with figures in Ir 
£000. turnover was 3.578 
(2.131), pretax profit 58 (loss 
1204) and tax 20 ( 1 8). Eamings 
per share were 0.04p (loss 

35. 8p). 

Profits at Johnston Gimp, the 
Surrey dvQ and mechanical 
engineer, staged a partial recov- 
ery last year. Before tax. they 
improved from £4.46 million to 
£5.54 million - but they are still 
below 1983*s £5.9 million. Turn- 
over expanded from £58-37 mil- 
lion to £62.09 million. Tbe final 
dividend is going up from 5p to 
5.25p. making 7-5p (7p). Earn- 
ings per share slipped (0 30.98 p 
(31.26p). but the net asset value 
climbed to 273p (257p). 

• CLYDE PETROLEUM: The 
chairman. Dr Colin Phipps, said 
that 1986 would probably see an 


• COMBINED ENGLISH 
STORES GROUP: The com- 
pany has bought 50 per cent of 
Paige Group, the 246-branch 
women’s wear retailer, for £2.3 
million. Great Universal Stores 
retains a 50 per cent interest in 
Paige and will keep the freehold 
and longer leasehold interests in 
properties it leases to Paige. The 
board of Paige will comprise Mr 
Murray Gordon (who will be 
chairman). Mr David Roxburgh 
and Mr Pai Hammond -Turner 
from Combined English, and 
Mr Erie Barnes, Mr Walter 
Wolfe and Mr Walter Kelly 
from Great Universal Com- 
bined English will have full 
management responsibilities for 
the business. 

• THE FLEMING JAPA- 
NESE INVESTMENT 
TRUST: The net asset value per 
ordinary share for the six 
months to January 3J, 1986* 
was 652.2p (606.6p). Invest- 
ment income, in £1 franked 
dividends I05.S2I (106.(17). 
un franked dividends 443.698 
(266.493). un franked interest 
171.384 (392.287). deposit in- 
terest 266.384 (208.255), lend- 
ing fees 7.441 (6.064). making 


that 1 986 r^uld probably reean 
acceleration in rationalization 

and restructuring of oil sector at ^ , 7? ! V?,™! 055 *** 

home ande overseas. The com- share were 3.14p (,.94p). 
pany could not be immune to • GODFREY DAVIS (HOLD- 

r. - * 1 I J 1 . TLa L nr 


this. nor should it 
be. 

• TR ENERGY: With figures in 
£000. income from fixed asset 
investments for the six months 
to December 3). 1985. 777 
(S7J). investment dealing losses 
157 (36). pretax loss 24 (profit 
17) and tax nil (5.6). Loss per 
share was O.lOp (earnings per 
share O.OSpX. 



Thisodiemsertent a usual in compliancy with the requirements of the Council of The Stock Exchange 

SEAT-PLUS GROUP PLC 

(Incorporated m England under the Companies Acts 1948 to 1981 Registered No. 1071698) 


AUTHORISED 

£425,000 


SHARE CAPITAL 

ISSUED AND FULLY PAID 
in Ordinary Shares of 5p each £358,333 


Application has been made to the Council of The Stock Exchange for the whole of the 
issued share capital of Stax-Plus Group PLC formerly dealt in on the Unlisted Securities 
Market to be admi tted to the Official List 

Particulars relating to the Company are available in the Extel Statistical Service and copies 
of the listing particulars may be obtained during normal office hours on any weekday 
(Saturdays and Bank Holidays excepted ; for 14 days from the date of this notice from 
Srai-PJus Group PLC. Stat-Plus House, i 1 Greenlea Park, Prince George's Road, Collier's 
Wood, London SW19 2PU and from Laurence, Prust & Co., 7-11 Moorgate, London 
EC2R 6 AH, and for the two business days following the date of this notice from ' 
Company Announcements Office. The Stock Exchange. London EC2. 

LAURENCE, PRUST & CO. 
BasiIdonHouse,7-ll Moorgate 
9 th April 1986 London EC2R 6 AH 


INGS): The company has 
bought Shepherds Grove Park. 
Stanton. Suffolk, from AB1 Park 
Developments for £825.000. the 
consideration being for the busi- 
ness of the park home residen- 
tial estate: tbe freehold of the 
park, which is licensed for 191 
homes, and £27,000 of plant and 
machinery. 

• DAVIDSON PEARCE. 
GROUP: The company has 
acquired the remaining 70 per 
cent of the issued share capital 
of Bay Tree that it did not 
already own. 

• FRIENDLY HOTELS: 
Final 0.7p. making 0.7p (7pX 
Results for year to December 
28. Figures in £000. Group 
profit 114 (9 J) after all charges. 
Earnings per share 22.4p (16.6). 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 

ABN 12.50% 

Adam & Company 11.50% 

BCC1 11.50% 

Citibank Savirmst 11.95% 

Consolidated Crds — 11.00% 

Continental Trust 11.50% 

Co-operative Bank- 11.50% 

C. Hoare & Co 11.50% 

LLoyds Bark 11.00% 

Nat Westminster 11.00% 

Royal-Bank oi Scotland 11.00% 

TSB _ 11.00% 

Citibank NA 11.50% 


f Mortgage Base Rate. 


• LEE INTERNATIONAL: 
21.676 applications for 
42,074.600 shares were received 
from the genera] public and 397 
applications for (.494.150 
shares were received from the 
group's employees. After allot- 
ting in full the shares applied for 
by employees on preferential 
application forms, 15,168,050 
shares are available for the 

S ral public, to be allotted as 
ws; between 100 and 300 
shares applied for, allocation in 
full; 300400 applied for, 300 
allotted; 500-700 applied for, 
400 allotted; 800-1.100 applied 
for. 500 allotted: 1. 200-2,000 
applied for. 600 allotted', up to 
2,500 applied for, 800 allotted: 
3,000-18,000 applied for, about 
33 per cent allotted; 1 9,000- 
.22,000 applied for, 6,000 allot- 
-ted; 25,000 and over, about 25 
'percent aborted. 

• AC CARS: Acceptances of tbe 
offer by Mr William Wes* for 

the share capital of the company 
has been received for 1,262,587 

ordinary shares (63. t per cent), 
for which irrevocable undertak- 
ings had been given before the 
oiler was announced. 

ISC Defence and Space Groap, a 
US offshoot of London-based 
International Signal & Control, 
is to buy Electro Magnetic 
Processes of Chatsworth. 
California. The price is S3 -5 
milli on cash (£24 million), with 
two instalments, payable io cash 
in_ 1987 . and 1988, JoUowing 
certification of EMP"s accounts 
and based on EMP’s profits 
after tax. This additional consid- 
eration will represent some 6.7 
times tbe average profit after tax 
for tbe two years to 1987. Last 
year, EMP's sales were S8.9 1 
million and pretax profits were 
$1.9 million. Its net assets at tbe ; 
year-end were about $4j4 i 
minion. 


• KLEINWORT BENSON 
STERLING ASSET FUND: 
For the period October I 1985 to 
March 3). Dividend 4.9p mak- 
ing 4.9p (5. Ip). Gross revenue 
£28.617 (£37.189), net revenue 
£3.044 (£5,056), nav per 
participating share £19.90 xd 
(£18.00.1/2 xd). 

• AVON RUBBER: Tbe com-, 
pany has acquired of Galt GlAss 
Laminates and Galt Glass 
Laminates (Overseas), 

• FLOYD OIL PARTICIPA- 

TIONS: Results for six months 
to December 31. No div. With 
figures in £000, turnover was 
1.830 (2.29]}. cost of sales: 
royalties 153 (250), operating 
costs 428 (365). depletion U33 
(762). gross profit 116 (915). 
admin expenses 191 (97). 

amortization of exploration 
expenditure 261 (91). other 
income 225 (70k operating loss 
112 (pft 796), interest expense 
69(136). loss before tax 180 -- . 

• BEATSON CLARK: The' 
chairman. Mr David Clark, said 
that Brookhill Moultings would 
shortly commission first phase 
of new factory to accommodate 
expansion of flexible plastic 
tube business. In Australia 
foundations were laid for fur- 
ther expansion. New opportu- 
'nities were expected in Holland 
for Pont Packaging. However, 
improved performance would 
'to some extent be offset by 
consolidation of an expected 
trading loss from Beatson Plas- 
tics in its first year of operation. 


Bryan Cowgill elected 
to board of SelecTV 


SelecTV: Mr Bryan 
Cowgill, deputy chairman oi 
Minor Group Newspapers, 
has been elected to the board. 
Mr Cowgill has more than 30 
years’ experience in television 
broadcasting, setting up BBC 
television sports coverage as 
head of sport in the 1960s and 
later becoming controller of 
BBC1 in tbe 1970s. 

The Phoenix Timber 
Group: Mr David H Darke 
has been appointed group 
managing director. 

Stonegate Farmers: Mr Paul 
Parsons has been made chair- 
man and managing director. 

Allied International Design- 
ers: Mr John Salisse joins the 
board as a non-exccutive 
director. 

Balmoral Group: Mr Mark 
Patterson has become a 
director. 

The Declan Kelly Group: 
Mr Harry B Caswell becomes 
land_direcior. 

Brown Shipley Insurance 
Group Management: Mr R N 
Amos, chairman, Mr D C 
McIntosh, deputy chairman, 
Lord Farnham, Mr A C D 
Ingle by-Mackenzie, Mr F H 
Brandenburg, Mr A W Mans- 
field have all been appointed 
to the board. 

Brown Shipley Insurance 
Services: Mr M J Rnsby has 
been made a director. Mr C 
Barker is the new deputy 
managing director of -Brown 
Shipley Insurance Brokers M 
& I. Mr G Ford is now deputy 
managing director and Air D 
Pressey is a director of Brown 
Shipley Insurance Brokers 
(UK). 

A) wen Hough Johnson 
(Holdings): Mr A S Fox has 
been appointed a director and 
Mr D J Moss has been made a 
director of Alwen Hough 
Johnson. 

Bradstock, Blunt & Thomp- 
son (LAP): Mr Terry C Monk 
has been named as managing 
director. Mr Geoffrey Smith is 
now deputy chairman. 

Reed Plastic Packaging: Mr 
D J Cooksey, has become 
managing director, 
j • Whessoe Haden Offshore: 
Mr M W Hippie, chairman. 
Mr W F Edwards, Mr F 
Mtddtemiss and Mr J D Pool 
have been appointed to tbe 
board of directors. 

Killick Martin & Co: Mr 
John Webb and Mr Ron 
Paterson join the board. 

S & W Berisford: Mr John 
R SeJater has become a non- 
executive director. 

Biwater. Mr Stuart NnttaO 
joins the corporate board. 


Ttu> .rfi-nr-uirm i, paiMi.hni In \ M. Bulwtiitd & Ijmurd ind J. Itrtin Srtmrirr « u< & f n liimfMl «n b-tuif nf Hanvn TrvM WjT- Thf rmwtnrs nf Han vm Trmi Pl.C «r- ihr prrwm 

n^ift^MrfiirliarinfiimuiH'n-i-iiliiiinliiiThKdittrt'isrtn-iil T»lln U^l. 4 ltwirtii.»lrdE'HnilMirrilmiiwwk»inHmiwnnJW-i jn T..rmur-ih*l'Urhi,itw<Trw|ibriiYhcT 7 W!rrniru|ilmnrdia 
lhl»rfl»»nr»m.nl !■ in-1-T.mianrr mill Ihr Ini* Thi liirrrliirtiiflUiiMillTrvoPl I d-irflrr-^i.n.ilxIHi.iiT.inlind'. 




Mindful that share prices can vary daily; we are publishing a bulletin showing the value 
ofourofTerfor imperial. The value we’ve quoted is based on our best possible offer. 

The next closing date of our offer is April 1 1 at 3 pm. 



On and after 8th April, 1986 
Standard Chartered Bank's Base Rate 
for lending is being decreased from 
11.50*/* to 11.00% 


Deposit Rates are 

Grass Interest 

Net interest 

7 days’ notice 

7.50% 

5.61% 

21 days' notice 

8.25% 

6.17% 


Interest paid half-yearly 


Standard Chartered Bank 

Head Office 38 Bishopsgate, London EC2N 4DE 
TeL 01-280 7500 Telex 885951 






Mr Neil Kerr, who has been 
appointed assistant man a gin g 
director of Boddingfuns" Brew- 
eries of Manchester. 



Mr J M Letherbarrow, the 
new managing director of Tri- 
.nmph Adler (UK). 

Sabre Securities: Mr Bryan 
Hawkins has been made a 
non-executive director. 


Schlumberger Measure- 
ment and. Control (UK): Mr 
Alan Plumpren has become s 
director. 

Oayform Properties: Mr 
Robert Ware has been ap- 
pointed a director. 

Harper-Smith. Bennett: Mr 
Say Whittaker. Mr Ntfntaa 
Murray and Mr Roger "Brown -. 
have been made partaers’ 9 
' Rapra Technology: Dr Mai* 
colm Hail has joined the 
board. 

Securicor. Mr H C Coxal) 
has been promoted to vice- 
chairman of Securicor Air 
Couriers. He is succeeded as 
managing director by Mr J 
Wild. 

SatchweU Control Systems: 

Mr Christopher Smyth has 
been made managing director. 

Ward White Group: Mr 
Peter George Arber has joined 
the main board. Mr Stephen 
Etheridge is promoted from 
sales director to_ managing 
director of John White Foot^ 
wear in succession to Mr? 

A *Ltindori & Edfnburjfc Trust: 

Mr John H Com *u(d Mr 
Keith J Rawlings have been 
appointed to the board. 

Ward White Group: Mr 
Peter George Arber has joined 
the main board. 

Sabre Securities Ud: Mr 
Bryan Hawkins has been 
made a non-executiva 
director- • • 


Hill Samuel 

Base Rate 

With effect from the close of 
business on 9th April, 1986, Hill 
Samuel's Base Hate for lending will 
be decreased from 
11.5% to 11.0% per annum. 

DEMAND DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS 

Depositors not liable to deduction 
for basic rate tax 
7.02% per annum gross. 
Depositors liable to deduction 
for basic rate tax 
5.25% per annum net 
7.39% per annum gross equivalent 
Interest to be paid quarterly and 
rates are subject to variation. 


Hill Samuel & Ox Limited 

100 Wfood Street, London EC2P 2AI. 
Telephone: 01-628 80H. 


JBl National 
Westminster 
mw Bank PLC 


* 


NatWest announces that 
with effect from 
Tuesday, 8th April, 1986, 
its Base Rate 
is decreased from 
11.50% to 11.00% per annum. 

All facilities (including regulated consumer credit 
agreements) with a rate of interest linke d to 
NatWest Base Rate will be varied accordingly. 

41 Lothbury London EC2P 2BP 



I nuiikrl |irn »■•..»! Viti|iui"li Tui‘Hja\. 


HANSON TRUST 

7 1 if v .iiiii". i ill I.iiimiii ’) pn%! V ili'pi'tii) mi 11 ^ '•hii ri* |irii - v Tlw iib' nr t*lTr r i alii*’ i* hir I lanwii I ni -I - .■’Ini n* -ind ( rii ililr Sji n-k Kiri linn und 

lakrs ,ii itin hi i ir .in '->l intiiir lit ) liitirr ( imril ) jil. <>l thr ^alii' 1 iifilii* ll'*» run* rrn bli - i* ini *lm - k *«I I IdilMiii Tm-I. 

Tin* \ aim - nf Jh«* • .mil vrllbl* 1 Murk i-- < , slimal<’d bn ju il » <11 uni » hr h>1rd m (hi 1 1*» mi i J (hr i <lTr r bn «»nti 1 1 a u n, <• n d i In •ii,il. 


With effect from the 
close of business on 
Tuesday, 8th April, 1986, 
and until further notice 
TSB Base Rate 
is decreased from 
11.5% p.a. to 11.0% p.a. 

All facilities (including regulated consumer credit 
agreements) with a rate of interest linked to 
TSB Base Rate will be varied accordingly 

Trustee Savings Banks 
Central Board, 

PO Box 33, 25 Milk Street, 
London EC2V8LU. 


Coutts & Co. announce that their 
Base Rate is reduced from 
1 1 .50% to 11.00% per annum with effect 
from the 8th April, 1986 
until further notice. 

AH ^ facilities Imdodinjj regulated consumer credit agreements) 
with a rare (inked „ Couos Base Rare wfll be varied accordingly 

The Deposit Rates on monies subject ■ 
to seven days notice of withdrawal 
are as follows:- 

7.25% per annum Gross* 

5.25% per annum Net (the Gross Equivalent 
of which is 7 -39% per annum, to 
a basic rate tax payer). 

Rates are subject to variation and 
interest i$ paid half-yearly in 
June and December. 

‘Not Oidinanlv available w are.OK. . .. 

• W Strand, London, WC2R OQS 


















:HK ru* 



Based on market prices at 3.30pm on Tuesday, 8th April 1986. 




United Imperial 


; u r WA , ,,r riF I OFFER 'DEPENDS ON' fTS SHARE 'PRICE THE ABOVE OFFER VALUE IS FOR UBS ORDINARY SHARE ALTERNATIVE AND TAKES ACCOUNT OF AN ESTATE t's POWE s. FiTMAM AND WOOD MACKENZIE & CO LIMITED. BROKERS TO UB OF THE VALUE OF Thf NPv up 
, Ht VALUt ur UDO W ^ -'CONVERTIBLE PREFERRED SHARES THE VALUE C'F-TKE CONVERTIBLE PREFERRED SHARES IS ESTIMATED BECAUSE THE* W-lL OMIT EE LISTED IN THE EVENT OF THE OFFER BECOMING UNCONDITIONAL 1 ut 

- • - ' rT^' ' ' 7 " •UNLESS. THE OFFER HAS BECOME UNCONDITIONAL AS TO ACCEPTANCES 











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28 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


THE safife TIMES 



.From your portfolio card check your 
eight sham price movements. Add mem 
10 give you vour overall lotaL Check 
this against the daitv dividend figure 

K Wished on this page. If H matches you. 

ye won outright or a share of the total 
dailv prize monev stated. If you are A 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
hack of vour card. You must always have 
your card available when claiming. 


No. 


Conpaoj 


INDUSTRIALS A-D 


Davy 


Cbvipn Son 


Bespak 


Babcock 


Avrdure Meal 


Dcniend Siampuig 


Blue .Arrow 


Bwdum 


Brown & Tame 


Amuon 


BUILDING AND ROADS 


Gal Ilford 


Crmnn-BoodMoix 


Monk 1 ' I 


Mr Alpine l Allred) 


fonder Grp 


Lilte* 1FJC1 


Wimpcy (Gcmgrr 


Warrrayion (T) 


Ifolock Johiuen 


FinUn Gp 


ELECTRICALS 


Jorurs Stroud 


Bowihorw 


B1 rc 


Dale Elrci 


Audio Fidelity 


RoulVv 


Quea Auionuiiiin 


Duwdmg Jt Mills 


MK Ekci 


Phicnm 


FOODS 


Low (Wmi 


Lotell (GFI 


BJ&.V1I Foods 


Stiltneri (Omni 


HilWnun HkJgs 


Cad hury -Sch wvppn 


Momvon IW) 


Assoc Fisheries 


Nihn Foods 


J8 

il 

40 

© Times N*wspsp<rs Ltd. DsOy Timd 


Samslmry 1J1 


Tour 


gun w 
km 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £20.000 in 
Saturday's newspaper. 


■*u 


Weekly 

iau< 


BRITISH FUNDS 


bn Gross 
omy Rea 
Pnes Qi'bo y«%- pq% 


SHORTS (Under Ftve 
as a? 


Tims 3% IBM 
__ Emu 1988 

tOO'« 88', Tree* 12% IMS 
N't ST*. Treas ( A ISM-88 

•on m'iEkk 2 'i% isae 

ttC'.ICO-.Excn 14% 1989 


Years) 

09 


nim'.Eioi i3_'.% >«i 


aa'»Twnaou%i987 
9S*» SZ'.Eufi 2'.-% 1987 
101 97%Excn 10';% 1987 
87% 3T»runc 6%% 1BBS07 
100% 96% Trot* 10% 1987 
0* BO'.Tmw 3% 1987 
103% 97'. Trias 12% 1987 
97% 97'. mas 7’«% f 9BS4H 
U2% 98‘iEsdi 10 :% 1988 
101 ■**. Trias C9V% 1988 
90% 86% Trane 3% 1978-88 
100% D%niBI B'i% 1988 
top* 93% Tree* ll'i% 1989 
T03’i OS'iTraaa 10';% 1989 
t02% 93'iEncn 10% 1889 
709% 9*’.E reft 70«% I9B9 
81% 78% Eatfi ?'-% 1990 
108% W Exen 11% 1909 
80% 84% Trees S% 1986-89 
586% 94'« E*cn 11% 1990 
101% 82% Trass C9':% 1989 
88% 82% Trial 3% 1989 
Ha^lOS 1 . Trias 13% 1990 
llf% tor VExdi TZ'/% 1990 
8*% 7W1 Troas 3% 1990 
97't 89 . Tress B'-% 1387-90 
104 32% Tress 10% 1990 


100 

00% +% 
98% »% 
lOZ'-to+'s 
1®% + '* 
100': *% 
95% *•% 
100 > +% 
97', *% 
100-1 +'. 
94 *% 

103%*+% 
97% 

'02% +V 
101% *% 
90% 4-% 
100% 

105% +% 
103% +-. 

ioe% *i 

'Q0".-4>+5*/ 

ar« •% 
10&+ .1 
90'.*+% 
106% *1 
101% *1 
88. W. 
112'r .1% 
m% *r% 
8**-*+% 
97% 

104 *1 


30 
10 s 
110 
85 
76 
137 
119 
102 
26 
104 
87 
99 
32 
116 
7.9 
102 


XJ 

94 
109 
101 

95 
04 
31 

104 

55 

103 

94 

34 
116 
JI2 

35 
84 
86 


FIVE TO FIFTEEN YEARS 

HO*. 99 Tress 11%% 1991 
02% tU'iFur* 5%% 1987-91 
109% 98 '» Excft 11% 1991 
117', 103 Tress 12%% 1992 


*1% 


106'> It'iTma 10% I99Z 
108% 98% 1 " 


110% 

92'. ♦ '.• 

ns 1 .**!*, 

117 V *1% 
106 -.1% 
IM'ito+1% 
US'. •»% 


12T. .1% 
108% +1% 


1% 


110 
90 
125'. 

131 
12*' 

IM'i 
102 

117% +1% 
77%*,J. 
108% *1% 
12* «>1 % 
131*, *1 


• 1% 
»1>. 
+1% 
.1% 


, Trias Cl O A. 1992 

115% 100% Escn 12%% 1992 
191% 182': Each 13'.% 1992 
108% 94% Treat 10% 1993 
119 HOVTrssa 12* A 1993 
90% 79'. Fun** 8% 1933 
125% IIISTreas 13V'. 1993 
131 103% Tram 14*:% IBM 
I34’a 1 10% E*0i 12 % IBM 
120% 97%Ewh I3'.% 1994 
103 88% Trass 9% T994 

117% 100% Tress 12% 1995 
77% 88% Gal 3% 1990-95 
108% 91% Each 10'.% 1995 
124 IDS'. Tram 12’rt. 1995 
131', 112't Tress 14% 1996 
102'* 07 Trass 9% 1992-96 UB - *1* 
IW, 122% Tress 15%% 1096 140*.- *2 

128% lll’.EttB !3'i% 1S98 
83'r 74% RotW 3% 1996 
129". 110 Trass 13’.% 1997 
110% 93*1 Em" I0‘:% 1997 
100% 79% Tress B%% 1997 
140%122'tEvrcn 15% 1997 

87 73>. Treas 6%% 1996-38 

106% B9'> E*di 9%% 1998 
148%12S% Trass 15 % 1996 
122 105%Eun 12% 1990 

HB% B8'« Trass 9 .% 1999 
iw% icoiEre* ir.% 1999 
112% 96% Trass 10':% 1999 
110", 9*’: Core 10.% 1999 
131 '.111% Trass 13% I0G0 


138% **8% 
83 . *% 


129 
110% 

100 % 

140% 

87 

106*. 

146*. *2 
122 *1 • 
105% *r. 


♦ 1% 


1% 


124 

n2% 
110*; 
131 . 


— r* 


108 
6 2 
101 
109 
94 
9.7 
106 
11 1 

94 

105 
67 

109 
11 l 
108 
10 4 

BB 
10 2 
38 
9.4 
103 
10 6 

8 B 
109 
103 
38 
103 

95 
87 

10 7 
78 

92 

106 

9 B 
90 
99 
94 

93 
9-9 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 


109% 91% Treas 
108% 89% Core 
31% 25% Core 
109% 96% Core 
135% 117% Treat 
110 94% Crew 
122*. 103% Even 
100% 90 Tress 
liO'i 93% Tress 


i®% 

IDS'. 

30'. 

102 % 

135% 

110 


1(7% 2001 
9%% 2001 
9% * 2000 
9\ 2000 
14% 1999-01 
10% 2002 
12% 1999-02 122 
9%% 2002 108 % 

... 10% 2003 HO ; 

136% 118% Trass 13%% 2000-03 136 . 
131% 104 Tran 11'.-% 2001-04 121% 
110% »4% Trass 10% 2004 110% 

88% 48% Fund 3 ;% 199944 
*H5% 90% Con* 9 .-% 2i<0* 

107% 90% Core 9.% 2005 
119% 94'aExcn '0',% 2005 
132’. 112% Trias 12-.% 200345 132% 
94% 79% Trass 8% 2002 « 94% 

125% I04V Tress 17%% 20CJ47 125% 
141% 11 5% Trass 13,% 200*46 141'. 
71% ST i Treas S.% 2008-12 71 * 

92% 76% Trass 7’.% 2012-15 92% 
134%113'iEscn 12% 2013-17 1M% 


•1% 

‘2 


59'. 
106'. 
107 . 
US . 


• 1% 
*2 
.1% 


91 

90 
292 

68 

104 

91 
96 

90 

91 
10 0 
44 

90 
59 
• 9 
89 

91 
05 
85 

94 

96 


77 


UNDATED 

45% 38'. Consols 4% 
40% 3>'.W Ln 3 7% 
61% 44'. Con* 3' .-% 
34% 29'. Tress 3% 
29% 24% Content 3 V% 
29% 24'* Trisa Z->% 


51% 

34% 

29% 

29% 


89 

86 

68 

86 

65 

85 


INDEX- LINKED 


171% 114% -mss A 2% 1388 
105 88% Treas M. 2% 1900 

1I5%108'. Trans L 2% 1998 
«a% 95% Trass U':% 2001 
101% 93% Trass H2'j% 2003 
103% 98% Trasa 1L 2% 2006 
«7r 92%Traa» IL2'.% 2009 
104% 97 TraaaKJi%20M 
BBS rn Treat JU ',% 2013 
95% 87% Treas IL2 ,% 2016 
94% OB ', Trass IL2':% 2020 


121 % 

105 

115% 

102 % 

101 % 

103% 

99% 

104* 


2 I 
2-2 
24 
30 
30 
27 

30 

31 
30 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


350 193 
81 85 

291 208 
13% 8% 
480 358 
9% 8 
380 230 


BUS Nw* t 


590 *29 
485 410 
838 423 
57 38 

33% 34% 
*?. 33% 
SI 32 

73 48 
1B7-, B0\- 
2E2%317% 
713 148 
389 249 

90 86 
376 110 
31 20 

•30 333 

74 64 
438 318 
108 138 
930 56S 
677 4J9 

40 32 
953 678 
562 41T 
371 708 
93S 5T2 
”1 80 
448 312 
80 6] 
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16- 13. 
380 260 

16% !!% 


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Bar* Lounv hre* 
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B an* O* Sceiwna 
Baroays 

Brown Showy 
Cere Man 
CatBM 

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CommiMaaiw 
Oaunena Ban* 
Fan Nat Franco 
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Maroon 
Maroun Vacs 
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ProwMm 
Baa Bros 
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31 141 
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36 4 0£2D9 


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-% 30? 22 IS 7 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Shares turn mixed 


ACCOUNT DAYS- Dealings began April 1 . Dealings end Friday. §Conlango day April 14 . Settlement day, April 21 . 
§Forward bairns are permitted on two previous business days. 


1986 

High Law Compare- 


Gross 
a~ via 
Pnee Cltge ponos % 


M 33 Smsh Si AuOyn 
889 419 Srard CwM 
818 613 Ureon 
60% 43% '.wis Fsiao 
3£0 220 WmnuH 


54 

B74 

B13 

£58% 

300 


1.0' 1.9 4.9 
1-3 4J9 50103 

. 529 55 8)9 

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*10 7 1 2.4 igj) 


336 2 IB 
B40 620 
•9 38 
133 85 

500 375 

IT? 14? 
560 405 
490 410 
KW MO 

no 480 

ZB4 Ifi5 
230 133 
351 275 
480 405 
B8 59 
179 158 

285 173 

167 7? 

2*9 217 
2*8 153 
234 163 

37% Jff. 
540 353 
313 233 
315 226 
251 168 
505 410 
265 195 


Med- Lyons 


298 

MS 

Bxmrean 49 

Boncswis 128 

Grown iMaWww) *85 
B u*na> |H PI 173 
Bu'-onwooO Brew 558 
Ca<* iManhewl 480 
Ou-entsn (J 41 825 

CnsnBsiS 698 

CVuanJi W»fwvr 1 6S 

Greens lOng 213 

GwnniM 346 

HarOvs B Hansens 480 
Hignmnd IM 82 

imwoonsan Osa 173 
bisn Dns 285 

Mareton Thomnen 107 
Morland 2*4 

&A Brawanaa 203 
Sea 8 New 228 

Suoram oy. 

Vann 485 

WHtaiMd "A* 296 

Do 'B 303 

WMbreM m* 2*3 
WanrtimDtn & D 4S3 
Young '4 255 


-4 118 

-10 210 


39 174 

ZS 17.1 
22 27 


• -2 

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3.8 '55 

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4 1 178 

-2 

70 

41 138 

<-3 

1*0 

2 6 131 


10.7 

32 19.4 


186 

20 240 

-9 

220i 

88 140 

S 

79 

48 13 2 



34 15 1 

-2 

108 

30 131 


241 

28 

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3 4 15 8 

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58 

30 11.0 


50 

21 

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91 

27 185 
3 7 13 5 


100 

4 4 155 

-% 

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-3 100 


102 

99 

122 

04 


33 107 

34 151 
34 15 4 
4.1 35 6 
25 iflO 

3-7 70 i 


BUILDING AND ROADS 


262 21 fi 
297 213 
60 52 

153 125 
485 331 
377 284 
160 114 


AMTOMn Const: 
AmK 


Atrwcoas 
BPS tnoustnas 
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2T 23 


162 128 
65 


260 

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52 

149 

475 

374 

148 

2S 

173 


63 65 
960 875 
706 531 
270 235 
93 Tj 


Bagganege f 
Barren Dev. 

BartaylBan] Constr 
Bdireay 

Beni on: Conaare 
Ben Bros 75 

BosUay* 980 

BMr Coo* 673 

BrewUn&Ctoud W* 2E7 
BnonouM DudMy BB 
Br Dredgmg 90 

B’cren 8 ikekym 2* 
Btowntee 67 

&Y8"1 III 

Buraen & HjRarn 21 
Cemtni-toaosiofls 112 


61 
116 
98 
10 9 


100 

54 


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286 
14 3 
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566 46? 
402 36 
156 124 


104 

9i 

87 

9! 

70 


84 

73 
SI 
78 
SB 
60 
88 80 
123 106 
3S1 254 
105 56 

158 56 
55 42 

224 140 

560 428 
194 130 
355 265 
407 396 
397 286 
105 78 

90 7t 
413 290 
196 126 
230 178 
193 161 
138 09 

435 304 
250 n 
77 33 

128 109 

444 306 

920 796 
213 163 
108 118 
110 87 

385 285 
650 4*0 
482 340 
170 ISO 
240 188 
191 133: 
37* 22B 

100 87 

81 70 
516 342 
576 473 
162 140 
308.328 

101 75 
175 ISO 
282 195 
288 246 

69 58 

204 174 

82 67 

55 41 

440 214 

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Cos 1341 
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Croucn iParetti 
Cm*. tGeonisi 
Douglas iRM) 
Erin 
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402 

144 

86 

75 

97 

78 

60 

62 

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LOWS 1 (YJI 
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Mi nacre 

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Pocrwis 
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Rereann 
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101 

178 
55 
310 
550 
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330 
402 
392 
100 
90 

413 

174 

218 

188 

114 

433 

253 

26 

H9 

406 

880 

211 

198 

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370 

636 

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170 

240 

179 
364 
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80 

486 

548 

158 

386 

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40 162 
56 11J 
02 60 
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2J8 135 
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7 0 40 5 

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65 75 
44 14 0 
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23 42 111 

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470 

52 

59 

70 

138 

175 

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194 

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6.0 a 0 16 1 

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57 

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13 164 
28 155 


48% 36% 
103 160 
393 251 
241 180 
1J6 UK 

111 78'; 
126 102 
188 H2 

85% 57% 
138 02 
285 3*5 

159 1*0 

142 112 
20 15 

163 127 
129 100 
216 172 
.298 215 

160 M3 
448 130 
101% 79 

10 734 
410 135 
113 102 
225 179 
B2 52 
176 135 
322 216 
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112 67 


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£48% 4.% 400 

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a sod Coaoes 

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198 

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375 -5 89 

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215 -2 61 

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130 *5 51 

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149 *3 68 

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3iB 250 
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380 TBS 
2S3 196 
155 122 
203 152 
51 2S 
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103 84 
105 89 

153 138 
373 303 
225 175 
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323 333 
201 124 
3*1 270 
433 JTo 
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250 150 
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65 59 

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290 24 V/ 
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530 383 
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195 170 
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210 170 
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360 225 
278 706 
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Ewcrronc Ramus 55 

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EuioOwnn 335 

Famaii Bare 205 

Farrar* I'M 

Fret Casw Bsc '67 

Fowsnl Tech 53 

GEC '« 

GrciEvenor 94 

UK &flrw 6 Control 30 
Jcnas SxrcuO 225 

Kooa iso 

use ReriCTrenon 26i 

Luges 179 

MK Else 333 

Mamoc 385 

Mem BS 60 

Micro Focus 230 

MuMone Bee 58 

Murrey Dad 52 

Nawmsn 28 

Stewmarti (Lire) 285 

NEJ 98 

Ocaoncs 28 

Orhya Instruments K» 

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15 890 
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25 322 
10 180 
14 236 
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44 103 
11 298 
42 95 


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190 

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VG i n a m met u g 437 
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42 112 
39 232 
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FINANCE AND LAND 


19 09 
119 7 7 
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17.1 99 
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29 49 


508 127 


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158 138 

2 * ai 

375 330 
366 236 
128 103 
607 52* 
275 240 
15% 11' 
335 230 
191 145 
105 98 
700 «48 
150 73 

79 54 

157 142 
183 160 
285 ISO 
246 149 
375 234 
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189 IS* 
315 2Sl 
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215 170 
320 181 

86 75 

567 499 
392 220 

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257 215 
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292 2S8 
178 152 
137 1?T 
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378 2* 
290 216 
269 218 

159 138 


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ASSOC fiSlMSM to* 

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Banks (Sklnay CJ 275 

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105 
118 

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Mormon IW! 198 

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433 338 
386 208 
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477 447 

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Kennedy Braohas 271 
Lad&roka 373 

Lon Par* Hereto 477 

Mremi Cnartrew 85 

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308% 

+8% 



171 

-1 

70 

44 110 

390 

♦50 

19 

08 839 

am 

88 

80 182 

112 




670 

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81 182 

in 

+2 

87 

04 210 

42% 

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.. 210 

325 

-5 

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104 

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52 100 

28 

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39 

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114 

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288 

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15.7 

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148 

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38% 22 LDH 
325 251 Lap 
323 216 Lead 
190 132 Lemon) 


31 

321 

301 

158 


-22 

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71 

42 

Lawtex 

81 

• .. 


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25 

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70 

IMM 

72 


56 

64 

Lairaal 

75 

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67 

33 

215 

53% 

23% 

179 

Lot MOTTO 

54% 

3B% 

211 

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121 

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121 

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80 2.1 268 
80 20 12.) 
64b 30 67 
3 5b 69 64 
30 40 67 
.. 212 
28 40 11,7 
80 40 60 
30 68 150 
10 62161 
142 67 140 


218 150 Lon M 
170 13* Longm mg 
403 328 LOW 8 Boner 
390 m ML Hdpa 
85 64 MS W 

50% 32 MV DM 

256 Mecwmys Ptwrm 350 

m 142 

(pan « 

• 192 

103 78 MagnXB too 

COO 495 M a nenenar amp 530 


218 **4 

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463 *40 

378 «-2 

79 -2 


74 »| r M 


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73 *3 

185 


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123 •+£ 

78 
98 
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85 *7 

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137 • +4 

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88 • .. 
95 -5 

188 

250 -4 

103 
28 
206 
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35 
260 


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125 101 Poifly 
83 06 Mating 
98 72 Manriea (Uniey) 

94 GO Do -A 
«5 as Mwanan Unw 
650 360 Martonar 
7=0 525 Meal Bax 
1» 128 Metd CknurM 

82 El Mtulru 

78% dr Mrcrwi Cotrs 
98 70 Mncrwii Same's 

191 163 Mofcns 
2?5 212 Morgan CrocmM 
113 99 Mou iRobvrtl 
30 20% Naepsend 

216 161 Nam Ml 
'44 9: Nawman Torecs 

65 SO Nooon 

3*0 '88 Nora oy 
233 203 Oflua Bact Mecti 215 
398 2*7 Partner' Km* -A' 398 

2E8 223 Pam Place 
915 S25 Pamsn JT 
505 383 Pearson 
20 11 Par* 

1 12 88 Paerems 

468 332 Pwgtor-Hansrauy 
550 280 Peranum hiq 
1* 775 Pnoto-Ma 
483 3 m Prtkmgkon 

83 51 Prasac Constr 

8M 5M Portals 
2G8 *15 Porter CRadBum 
28B 238 Powaa DuKryn 
IW as nwsiwicn Moos 
7b 58 Pmcnera Sarv 
128 97 RFD 

174 119 RHP 
130 >3 Rea TO* Mow 
577 4JI Ram Org 
200 lib Ransoms Sms 
138 98 RatcMb rQl Bretga) 103 

900 605 RacMI 8 Colman 857 
18O 118 Redfaem Gton iBO 
238 200 Raed Exocu&xe 238 
891 S49 Peed mi 
153 132 Ratyon 
75 57 Htnvd 

102 SO Radnor 

475 3*5 Rauaire 
29 21 nevmore 

too tig FbGenio 


-2 

+2 

-2 


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253 • 

980 

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112 • . 
482 *20 

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£11% 

488 *1 


59 2.7 220 

43 20 210 

130 £9 120 
11.1b 29 213 
0.7 00 11 3 
14 £9180 

130 3917.1 
30 20 182 

28 30 1S.1 

114 69 93 
40 47 9.4 
66 1.8 160 
4 3 88 7.8 
54 44 230 
23 3.1 9.1 
43 44 163 

43 40 |40 

20 34 21.0 

15.7a 20 21 8 
246 38 104 

98 70 16S 

30 45 119 
fit 92 07 

60 52 178 

113 «0 9 8 
121 48 146 

44 40 110 
0.1a 0.4 140 

IQO 40 .as 

10JD 73 116 
7.4 20 BIB 
120 *0 111 
11.4 63 13.0 
160 30 145 
98 30 214 


BOO 

261 

270 

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68 

128 

188 

130 

572 

190 


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102 

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56 19 Ricnwdsan im 55 

152 '3) Rorartson Res 130 

273 156 Ramson (Thomas) 273 

55 30 Roc* wara 46 

i«9 129 Ropnar 13a 

148 1=4 Do A' 12* 

7 J% Hgl*or<ni 7 

158 H6 Rgun 153 

130 96 RuMeS lAl 116 


*2 

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140 60 153 

. . . . 369 

90n 60 15 1 
21 4 40 13.7 
21 0.4 48 B 

70 (17 HB 
179 30 100 

40 4 9 144 

279 30 164 

10 06 .. 
21 7 80 1*5 
10 1/290 

54 7.9 79 

55 43 158 

61 38125 

38 20 . . 

2T4 37 203 

7 1 3.7 11 8 
06 35 3.7 

229 27 179 
29 10 107 

50 21 197 
27 5 3.T 150 

8 6 4.7 IM 

10 1.4 167 

57 5 8 15.7 

48 11328 

14B 50 110 

41 20 160 

1.4 1.7 69 

. • a .250 
31 20 186 

374 

.. .270 

90 89 79 

93 75 70 
09 

77 50 114 

20 17 627 


s-z 


□ 


38 17 

280 ?ia 
83 55 

78 49 
505 173 

129 103 
IT IM 
118 94 
164 137 

154 134 
164 134 

*0r 29 
HE 75 
153 129 
9=3 703 
47 A? 

155 IBO 
i-’a ea 
•63 388 

3' ■ 25% 
X2 >88 
» 30 
3=5 as 
225 163 
3*5 3*8 
i?8 i.m 

130 71 

118 W 
ISO 85 
63 43 

473 345 
473 31* 
MS 98 
Z33 170 
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205 183 
=98 '83 
0H 254 
38 1= 

221 '33 
555 343 
186 115 
2» 2rfl 
495 380 
S3 A3 
S'. 5>- 
91 64 

)«S J?J 

108 91 


a 33% 

Sara winey =6) 
SandHurst 80 

bowse Gordon (Jt 71 
Scape , 505 

Scon Gmeraism 1=5 

Scan Hamm s '« 
scon A Robertson 113 


to-3 

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Sacumy Sara 
Sanur Eng 
Snnon 
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Simtfi A Nac/ww 

sran wwmorai 
SnwBB no 
Spear (JW) 

5/w A Jackant 
Speax-Saroo 
Suns PonaiM 
Sag Funiiue 


152 


147 


137 

40% 

115 

123 

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£MV 

=53 

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310 

203 

200 

178 

129 

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20e 89 7t 

90 3 7 148 

17 It 231 

35 40 IBS 

161 02110 
43 94 174 

43 26 tar 

-3 36 32 150 

17 1 I 307 

16 11384 

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*1% 20 S.7 18.7 

32 20 77 

-3 120 100 7 8 

-10 17.5 1 9 229 

39a 89 is j 

'S 114 SO 06 

*1 79 60 108 

224 48 192 


Standard foanoras 145 


SUr Comp 
Swotor 
SMeeay 
Swflng Md 
SncMM 
s wneraa 
Smnat A Pra 
Sara 

Sow 

Saif Petjth c A 

Svcamgie 
St (tone 


TNT 

TSL TNpm* 
Tacs 

Tatiana Oran 
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two 


60 

473 

460 

(13 

230 

83 
163 
204 
2» 
332 

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548 
179 
=35 
490 
£50 
6 • 

84 
158 
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04 1 1 230 

64 £0 247 
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05 31 120 

6 7 3 8 142 
5.7b *4 131 
78 72 86 
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269 

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19 8 4 0 72.7 

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171 74 49 

96 10.4 07 

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129 80 99 
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THE ’SBfife TIMES 



Tidies N«wip*be» Ltaremi 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£ 2,000 

Gaims required for 
+36 points 

Qiprants shook! ring 0254-53272 


PIE 


1986 

rtO& Law CQBqyiy 


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Price Olga pww % •K 6 


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6.0 110 
66 11.4 
40 193 
1.7 14.7 
32 161 
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5-5 110 
39 168 
— 50 286 
&Bb 41 135 
111 B0 10.6 
375 20 

07a 18 
40 SB 390 
179 61 112 


14 3 ro 82 
U10 180 34 180 


*3 18 120 

90 1 9 229 


• *2 
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4 0 4 8 104 

6 (0 35 (67 
=9 27 163 


172 BB 
Xt 132 
283 203 
349 308 
243-200 


Thomson TrtJna 
Tangos 
Tornwu (FHI 
TraLugar house 
Traw co n m ar tf 
TranSBoO Dev 


170 
245 
287 
90S 
240 
19 1 “ 9*1 


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53 

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164 

SE 

68 


20 

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19% 


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58 

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80 


1J3 

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120 

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261 

95 

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248 

-13 

125 

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13- 

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107 

£15% 


67% 

56' 

Lkwarar jwij 

£55% 


347 

n 2 

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238 


5*0 

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51B 

-20 

130 

108 

View Praducu 

110 

■ . 

195 

125 

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127 

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10 

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373 120 
203 156 
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>88 144 


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270 . . 

100 ■ +2 


67 26 110 

168 38 1*0 

68 621*8 
400 65 229 


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49 10 

11.1 32 M0 

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81- 22 368 
167 17 138 , 
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INSURANCE 


44 


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114 

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409 

303 


37* 

-5 

259 

89 

171 

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18 

43 

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391 

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293 

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171 

58 

131 

84 

51 

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87 

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190 

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80 

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70 

280 


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128 

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70 

30 

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50 

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36 





580 

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220 

40 

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135 

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170 

183 

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89 

60 

69 


228 199 
26% 72 

=8-. a 

sm 223 
917 007 

318 228 
301 238 
350 213 
934 761 
922 720 
709 643 
3*8 267 
839 602 
897 8)7 
350 281 
74% 55% 

285 as 
309 223 
l*V 12 
9(9 754 
450 388 
9Z2 788 
420 3*5 
424 3<B 
445 4BS 
752 520 
977 772 
675 360 


Abbs? Lika 
Ala* 6 Alex 
Am Gan 
Bradskodr 
Bmanrac 
Com (Mm 
Eauny A Law 
FAI 

Gan AcoOe n t 
ORE 

Heath C E 
Hogg Rdtonson 
Legal A Gen 
London i Man - 

Id* Lhu Iny ' 
Mann 4 McLen 
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PWS 


soar ■ 

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380 

187 

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139 

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4.1 730 

40 T74 
84 227 
10 303 
10 850 
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43 31 ,Aun 6 W&»g 

MS . 189 * 

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178. 1« Bmnmng 
171 .142 Ob R?V 
828-476 Bund 
910 720 Carson Cora® 
220 '.173 "CMontoto 
180 120. OMwyao 9CTSM 
2B9 178 'Cropom ijaraas) 
308 is3 -oST:, .. 
186-1*5 nasafeop Puma 
*83 360 Eucalvsrtoa Pub 
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(75 no Good Srtaomt 
230 188 Hurnnw - 
418 311 Low H-S-C-C 
236 i*o McCorauMtoa 
135 B3 Mora OFand 


255 172 
*50 375 
78 53 


1S5 128 
28 19V 


38 28 
315 513 SrMsGp 


fSSmar 


LEISURE 


9S750 
150 122 


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Cb 63V Co* Prf 144 


47 

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34 

173 

232 


88 

81 

139 

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300 

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1200 

17376 

970 


200 

01 

180 


144 98 Bari WA' 


158 129 
148 98 
SB 34 
228 106 
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82% 52 
Bi 85 
128 93 

1Z1 94 

103 60 

175 135 
39) 378 
388 326 
6* 54 

228 195 
960 280 
53 51 

183 128% 


110 


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Bran Wafer i*3 


Canaan 
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GRA 82 

l i e manger Broora - Tt 
Horooo Travel - 194 

fed Lsnura - — 115 

JuBvra i hob 78 

Uaonata 1 155 
Piaasmunra 350 

RaaBy Useful 330 

Rday LMM 59 


*13 
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• -I 
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to-rZ 
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Saga Hetaap. 198 

Samualsoii Go 848 


Tot umn a m fwaper SB 
179 


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to *2 

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100 9.1 6.1 
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73 68 120 

"Ub 20 140 
8 a 30 140 
167 . .20.187 . 

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60 51 50 
7.1b 82 80 
30 15 110 
• 70 - 61 163 
167 11 130 
18 I 40 118 
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60 13 168 
14b 10 .. 
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61 14 162 


i60 )2* smvra Mara 
220 200 Usiwwuwr 

50 40 Wace 

760 565 WMtognn (J) 


29) .873 

■ 420 320 W gw 


160 

210 -• 
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760 
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410 - 


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60 63 
41 20 


97 40110 

113 

36 7 4 8147 

98 U 155 
-45 U350 


f 




PROPBTTY' 


53 27- «M£0 

75- 71 



178 MA ' Br Land 
170 -138 Brndon 


48 35 Clto^Um 


MINING 


13% 8% Ang Hum CDil 
10% 743 Ana ten 
ST, 38 Am Odd 
86 33 AAIT 


40 28% ArgkMUd 


or> 

040 

£*8 

ESS 


-•« 

-3 


41 26 

IM 130 Ayer Hearn 
425 3'0 Btymora - ' 
ISO 100 fraermn 
21% 15 V BUftrts 
358 258 CHA 
88 68 Carr Boyd 
S3* 439 Cons OMdBsMr 
rat 314 Qe Berm • 

200 123 OeotoraM 
9% 0% Do o mtont a si 
13V 9% Dnatomei 
7% 4V Dmtnn 
255 150 E Daggaa 
694 360 Baoderanu 
160 129 B Oro 
195 115 Babmg 
390 2(8 ERaMGoM 
4-« 2% E Rend Pkp 
B 7'. FS Cons 
2)3 123 FS Dev 
re m Geewor Tin 
8% fl% Ganoel 
10 6 Gen MIMig 

10% 7 GF0A 
478 388 GM KakgoOrff 
83 35 Goeeng 

375 255 Groonfa 
148 103 Harman Anas 
8V 6% H armony 
350 223 wm 

81 61 Johnraaa 
12-i 8% Kbrens 
8% *% Wool 
ISO 106 Lotoka 
13% 9-r Uwncn • 

410 256 Lorama 
157 ns m 
28 18 Mtoion Mntag 

123 74 Manevato 

23 14% Mat ab E«tan 

14 8 Mrangura 

9 5% Mrtkfla WiM 

655 555 MMorao 
5% a Hew WHS 
1*2 100 Nth Bohan m 

50 33% (Mi Ktograa 

280 210 Hotwgao 
22% 18% Orange Fran 
128 90 Paretoig Tin 
280 229 fo«J WaMand 
25 18% Rare) Mrties ud 
4*5 SO Hand Mknai Prop 
69 16 HanaMnraa i 

298 233 Rensoi 
791 511 RTZ 
7% *’• Rusnnbum 
10 -j 7% » Hawna 
(68 105 SA Land 
31 20% SouthMM 

556 4ff SMomaai 
no ao Swgm-Bem- — 
9-1 B Tara 
130 75 Tronon 
569 350 liras! 

58% *1% Vast Raa<a 
64* 3(6 Vtoverspoat 
i05 65 Vbinorasin 
90 SB Vogels 
13% 10% Wanfcie Caben - 
5*5 378 VMBvora 
310 175 Wwnero Arm 
29% zo% Wenam Deep 

W6 149 Western Ifeang 
265 IM nwesi Ranq Cana 
1*0 RM Wn Beak 
17% io% wrenen 
58 38 VM Mgal 

(6% 11% Zbnaw Capper 
68 44 Zandpan 


£31 

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s 

IU 


474 


5 *J0 67 
446 97 

271 48 

1*2 44 
142 40 

470. 316- 
79.0 210 
260 220 
262 104 




Ell' 
£5-i 
2*0 
431 
180 
175 
338 
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180 
52 
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379 
48 . 
283 
103 
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• -10 - 350 7.4 1J0. 

■ ..♦■10 • iso as 
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" ’ - 126 100 

to 


230 2lB Cap*'-. 

245 200 carrM Prop 
IM 170 Cemowndal 
475 415 CbesMrflMd 
853 780- CALA 
165 T36 CUrfeto Nckdlt 
235 173 Comets - 
20 u % Control Sacs 
(37 99 Courary a Naur 
178 1J7 corny ■S' 

DaM Dair 
"30 ". e% Dtraa r .-J*. it 
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120 ixa BujwnsT^pr ' .- «5 
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Mr 83 Evans Of Leeds— 
ei .-.*3% Fra oaks . 

20i 170 Fro gm ora 
188 .148 .Or fta S a wd- 

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80 33 111 
WJ 80 
280 80 


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• T— 


CREME DE LA CREME 


gwtor Secretaries* first one-day course on 
Management Thinking for Secretaries’ last 
month was designed to make secretaries more 
aware of the management function and their 
own role within it. 

Some typical comments by PAs and secre- 

^ “■J** ‘ A *** professional and 
wo«J J while day . Tht course confirmed 1 was 

thinking along the right iW. 


1 became much more aware of time 
management and the art of delegation'. 

The course'wlll be repeated on April 30 
and June 10. The fee of £175 + £26.25 VAT 
indudes morning coffee, lunch and 
afternoon tea. 

To make sure of a place on either of these 
dates ring Elizabeth Moon today 
on 01-499 0092. 

from the moment X was 


4 My luck changed, Fiona, from the moment ± 

introduced to Senior Secretaries .9 


WEST END 


\\\ 

■1'j 




SeniorW 

Secretaries 


G H T S B R 


BRUSSELS 




£12,000 

negotiable 

Our client needs an 
excellent and thoroughly 
reliable PA to work from 
his own home helping 
with his property 
development business. 
YOU wilt be working 

entirely on your own for 
part of the time, so must 
be a self-starter and very 
weu organised. Your 
responsibilities will 
indude personal and 
confidential matters in 
addition to his business 
affairs. Skids 100/60. Age 
35-45. 

Telephone: 01-499 0092 

Senior®? 

Secretaries 


PA IN STOCKBROKING 

£12,500 + Mortgage Subsidy 

Are you an outgoing, career-mi ncted pa seeking a challenge? If 
SO, our client a high-powered American Chief Executive of a 
major stockbroking firm in EC2 would like to meet you. This 
position requires initiative, motivation and a willingness to take 
responsibility Your knowledge of the 
City and talent for building a rapport 

with events will be invaluable. Skills of finl 

100/60. Age 24-35. vTVIUUi W 

Tdephon« oi4»* leu Secretaries 


COLLEGE LEAVER 
£7,000 - £8,000 West End 

A prestigious china and glass group needs a bright young secre- 
tary for their London sales office. Working for the Sales Manager 


A prestigious china and glass group needs a bright young secre- 
tary for their London sales office. Working for the Sales Manager 
(and assisting the Sales Director one day e week) you will enjoy 
variety of contact, on the telephone and in the showroom, with 
international Clients and visiting group mmmm 

executives. For such a position excel- r» - 

Senior® 

Telephone: 01-499 0092 060^(31108 


DIRECTORS’ 

P.A. 

Based in EC4, this position 
requires a tough-minded 
secretary who nas solid 
experience in personnel. 
The successful candidate 
w* be responsible to the 
managing and financial 
directors and win assist m 
creating and administering 
the personnel department in 
a young company employ- 
ing circa 200 personnel 
You win be aged 30-40 
years, wilt have fast 
shorthand and typing and 
some wp. experience, to 
return you win be paid a 
handsome salary, have a 
bonus to December and 4 
weeks' hoMay per year. 

Telephones 01-606 1611 

SeniorW 

Secretaries 

■MM tr-vr^r- ■■Mia 


TAKE ON 
A CHALLENGE 

A rare chance exists for a 
young, bright and fivefy 
PA. with the energy and 
motivation to move into a 
new and stimulating area 
ot a firm of investment 
brokers. You w ffl be 
thoroughly involved from 
the start and your poise 
and confidence wfll be 
fufly utilised in the , 
successful establishment 
of this new venture. Skills 
of 80/60 with w.p. exper- 
ience. Age 20+ . Salary c. 
£9.500 plus excaRent 
banking package. 
Telephone: 01-606 1611 


Senior SP 
Secretaries 


PROMOTIONS SECRETARY 

_ . c £9,000 

Organise and administer the affairs of a tough young 
management team of 3, responsible for the Group's 
spo nsors hip an d promotion activities, in the entertainment 
industry, nationwide. A post for a talented and organised 
administrator, aged 24-30. with good secretarial state C10O6C0 
and an extrovert personality. 

PERSONNEL 

c £9,500 

To a ssist a newly appointed Personnel Manager in the 
restructuring, and computerisation of the Company's 
personnel records, staff appraisals, salary reviews, norms 
sdhemes etc. for approx. 850 staff. Previous personnel 
experience in these areas is as isThe confidence to 

interview internal and eternal operatives and deputise 
generally in the managers absence. 


In the first instance 
contact Paid Saunders on 
one of these telephone 
numbers or alternatively 
send your C.V. to him at 

this aHriww' 





01-6369891/6373096 
40GreallMaalSr UnduaUnifiMH 



SECRETARY/PA 

London W1 £9,000+ 

A leading Management Consultancy reu u ires a 
Secretary /PA to look after the modest require- 
ments of the two Partners, run a small office and 
be capable of working alone during frequent 
abscence of Partners. 

You win form part of a close# kntt enthusiastic 
team, dealing with many leaders of business. In- 
dustry and government, and servicing some of 
Europe's . largest pubHc and private 
organisations. 

Age 28 - 46. good secret a rial suns {shorthand 
not essential), with a sound education, ideally to 
degree standard. An attractive earnings package 
win be negotiated with a mbnfmnm base of. 
£9,000. free funcites and superb' woitcfng envi- 
ronment i n c l udi n g your owh office. 

Ptease reply to Box Number A32 with CV. 


AMBITIOUS CAREER MINDED 
PA/SEC (30+) 

£ 10,000 

International Co. requires a well organised dedi- 
cated secretary to keep their Director's and 
general office in order. Yon will be responsible 
lor aJl office administration, will be dealing with 
top international clients and will be required to 
become totally involved ui the business develop- 
ment In return you are offered a highly 
interesting and stimulating career with excellent 
future prospects. Please apply to Gaye Neville 
on GJ-486 6717. 

Alfred Markes Recruitment Consultants 


LEGAL - ST. JAMES’S 

We are 0 medium sized aad friendly firm of sctirilors aid 
amenity have vacancies for an experienced Conveyancing Sec- 
retary io work for a young sofichor and a venule Houma 
Sccmarv (WP Exp. preferred) who can handle a wide variety of 
work. We are offering attractive negotiable salaries. &.T.L. LVt, 
and twice yearly salary reviews together with presage offices id 
ibc hem of Si. Jamefs. 

Please Contact; 

Hu A. Ctay 

AoAant Brown Martin A Nich o lson 
2 Duka Street, St. Jaaes'c, 

. .. London SW1Y. 6BJL . 

Teh 01-930 2366. 


SECRETARY 
CLASSICAL MUSIC 

poiyGrsm Classics, r e sponsible for the marketing 
and promotion of Deutsche Grammophon and 
Phillips recorded product is seeking a qualified 
and experienced Secretary. 

Applicants, aged 2l+. must have excellent skffls. 
S/H 90+ . T.56+. an excellent telephone manner, 
good social skills and the ability to work In an 
organised manner whilst under pressure. 

To apply- Please send a detailed CV to Vero nica 
Spicer. Personnel Officer. PotyGramCJassks. 15 
Saint George Street London WIR 9DE. or tele- 
phone 01-499 8686. ext 381/476 for an 
. application form. 

(No Agencies) 


VERSATILE 

SECRETARY / ADMINISTRATOR 
TO £9,500 + BONUS 

ui.-rtMnd aaenev close to Tower Bridge H looking 

s~3ȣ^jesvs!x5 

and ahle to me your own 

initiative. 

we expect poumed MaJWff >- - MUtggMw * 


saeifija mmmmm 


by us an. 

_ „u lane Tmer Ml 01-231 7275 OT Wild a tXVtf C. V. 

^^jS?w«S^nd Partners Lte^-22 Mew 
JgJSAwS. MM-Swet London. SE1 288. 


WORK FOR A REAL 
HUMAN BEING? 

The hard working enei^ and enigmatic M.R 
of his own property company needs a PA. He 
njns his friendly and expanding offices with lo- 
S involvement and is looking for M.to 
are for him as he cans for h» saS. Wmkn« 
Sim a secluded office m 
are general secretarial dunes and a lot of out 
and .about* work. . _ . 

Preferred non-smoker and driver aged 30-45 
wiLh suitable experien^. ^wntu «tth CV 
and currmu salary to BOX Ew_-_ 



M Rmb. 124 M— nn St VI 

RIGHT AT.THE TOP 


;i ft 


c£12,000 

This Leading Agency 
requires the best PA sec 
that we can find for the 
top man. Pre se nt a tion, 
voice, skffle. .and' the 
social paces aka must 
for this very involving 
and stretching rale. 

PERFECT 

TYPE-CASTING 

£11,000 

Are you a poflshed. 
capable . PA/sec 25+ 
with good aueflo and WP 
skits, than this tot 
Executive Search Co 
needs you Superb 
offices and excellent 
benefits for the person 
with a persuasive 
telephone manner -and 
docretion who wiahes to 
be totally utifised. 


[n»MuiWTT*i 


(£10,500 

tot house requires a 
Sales Services Co- 
ordinator 25+ for the 

toiletries division. 

Relevant ret&a exp and a 
knowledge of computers 
desirable together with 
an OND quaEficatiort 
This is a superb 
o pp ortunity to develop 
into a m ar keting role. 

01-935 8235 


ASSISTANT 

SECRETARY 

required to undertake 
varied secretarial and 
general duties in the ok 
fice of the Dean of a 
Medical School 

specialising in Heart and 
Lung diseases. 

Applicants should be self 
motivated, have compe- 
tent shorthand and audio 
typing skills and eqjqy 
personal contact with 
staff, students and pa* 
lienis. Word processing 
experience an advantage. 
Salary up to £8,092. 

Applications from non- 
smokers should be sent 
to the Secretary, 
Cardiothoracic Institute, 
Bromplon Hospital, 
Fulham Road, London 
SW3 6HP. 

fTet 352 5121 Ext 4166/ 


ESTATE 

AGENTS 

SECRETARY 

Busy Fulham and 

Kensington estate 
agents need an 
unflappable, outgoing 
secretary with Word 
Processor knowledge 
and good typing skills. 
Must be able to cope 
with a full workload 
and look after our, 
clients. Salary in me 
region- of £8.500 p.a. 

, Please ring:, 

RSchanl RawBngs 
Winkworfh 
OX-731 3388 

(NO AGENCIES) 


KINGSWAY TEMPORARY 
STAFF CONSULTANTS 

We're one of London's leading temporary staff supply companies and 
we've literally got work coming out of our ears. 

Our list of clients includes some of the country's leading employers, all of 
whom recognise the benefit of using Kingsway's top calibre temporary 
staff. 

So for regular, well paid assignments call your nearest Kingsway office ac 

Kingsway I Kingsway il 

1 Kingsway Duke Street House 

WC2 . 415/417 Oxford Street W1 

Tel: 836 9272 Tel: 629 9863 

URGENTLY LOOKING TO FILL THIS WEEK> 

KINGSWAY I KINGSWAY II 

IBM 5520 Operator. 6 weeks Wordstar Secretary with S/H to 

assignment in American Bank work for Mayfair Property 

IBM 8100. using S/H secretarial Com P an >- 

skills for a Merchant Bank in the Wang Operators with S/H always 

City needed for immediate work. 

Zeros 860 Secretary, no S/H to S/H Secretaries with 90wpm 
start immediately, for 4 weeks. shorthand and accurate typing. 


KINGSWAY 

Temporary Staff Consultants 



Stockbroker’s 

Assistant 

Dean Witter Reynolds Inc. is a leading American stockbroking and investment 
company, based in iheGty We now have a vacancy for a Stockbroker's Assistant 
Worktog for one stockbroker, you will start with basic secretarial duties as you 
learn about our business. \bu will be encouraged to take the New York Stock 
Exchange examinations and your role will develop as you do. Eventually you 
should be able to assist the broker in creating business. 

As our clients are the most important part of our business, you should be smart 
and hauegood social and telephone skills. You should also be accurate, reliable and 
numerate, with good organizational abilities. No previous experience is required 
but you should be educated to at least A Level standard. 

We are ofl ering a competitive salary with Life of 75p a day. staff restaurant free 
BURA cover; 4 weeks holiday and season ticket loan. 

Please write, enclosing your curriculum vitaeand a short letter stating your 
present salary and telling us why you are interested in the post to: 

Mrs. Elizabeth Bell. Personnel Dep a rtme nt . Dean Witter Reynolds. 

56 Leadenhall Street, London EC3A2BH. 

No agencies. 

DEAN WITTER REYNOLDS INC. 


TRANSLATOR 

English/German 

Frankfort DM Neg. 

Our dient, a leading German bank, requires a translator to be based in 
their head office in Frankfurt. As pan of a team of translators, the can dilate 
would be required to translate documents of a banking, economic or EDP 
nature between English and German. 

Educated to degree level in either German or Economics, the ideal 
candidate should have English mother tongue with a perfect knowledge of 
German and posses relevant experience gained either as a translator or within 
a banking environment 

Please send a detailed Curriculum Vitae, stating salary expectations, to 
Alison McGuigan. Jonathan Wren International Ltd, 170 Bishops gate, 
London EC2M 4LX. Teh (01) 623 1266. 


^ Jonathan Wren 
. International Ltd 

- i flanking Consultants 



MD's Secretary 

Property Development N.W. London 

The Managing Director of John Laing Development Limited 
requires an experienced Senior Secretary to become totally 
involved m the busy, fast moving world of property development 

Probably aged 35+, with sound secretarial skills (including short- 
hand and audio) and previous experience at senior level, you should 
be a good organiser and have the necessary confidence and 
maturity to cope with a challenging and demanding role. The ability 
to establish priorities and to work to deadlines are essential. 

An attractive salary will be offered together with excellent benefits 
which include 5 weeks annual holiday, pension and life assurance 
schemes, subsidised restaurant, sports and social dub facilities. 

Please apply to: 

Mrs M A Staines. Personnel Officer, 

John Laing pic. Page Street, Mifl Hill, London NW7 2ER. 

Tel: 01-959 363$ 


LAI NO 



NATIONAL NEWSPAPER GROUP FLEET STREET 
VIP NEW EXECUTIVE PA APPOINTMENTS CHAIRMAN’S OFFICE 

The very hub of the newspaper world. Exciting, varied admin orientated 
and charanor building, 

PA Sec to MD £1 1.000+ PA Sec Executive office to £10.500 

Junior Sec 18-20 to £8.500 Exec Receptionist with typing c£8.500 
AH PA positions require good communication and admin skills with 
excellent SH/typing and some WP experience. 

Please call or send CV to Sue SackwikL 01 734 8466. 

Stockton Associates, 29 Glasshouse Street, wi. Appointed rec cons. 



SENIOR PA/Secretary 

IPEC is a test-growing firm of petroleum engineering consultants with an international 
reputation and client base. We require a highly educated Senior Secretary to work for the 
Managing Director in our Hanover Square office.This is one of the two senior administrative 
positions in IPEC and you will have extensive interaction with the Board of Directors. 

Career advancement can be rapid for the person who can build on their present experience to 
take on responsibilities of a more general management and business nature. This will require 
contact with our clients and Interest in developing more general business skills, particularly in 
the support of marketing activities. 

To carry out your responsibilities, you will need to employ excellent all round secretarial 
skills, including shorthand and word processing. However, this will only establish your basic 
credentials. The right applicant will be able to demonstrate both flair and ambition lor taking the 
initiative in handling and sorting out complex business problems as a key member of the 
company's management. Competence in other European languages would be an advantage 
but will not be the determining factor. 

Applicants under 25 are unlikely to have the required experience for this position which 
obviously offers an excellent salary and benefits package. Please wnte enclosing CV with lull 
details of experience, present salary package and availability to: 

Mrs S.Y. Sutton 

International Petroleum Engineering Consultants Limited. 

18 Hanover Square, LONDON WIR 9DA 

■ m H JM INTERNATIONAL _______________ 

RE— PETROLEUM 

= = ' CONSULTANTS LIMITED — — — ' ' ==*& ■ 


eiiLooo 

Sumt) oppotruniy has ansen for 
a loo Sac/PA to tot la the 
dtarmmg ItetMuig Dtectm 0> 
tne famous Fman ca l Seims 
Gioiid. You'd te emerencaa. an- 
ttusasne & amcuaie wtti a fftn 
lor affirm & "doing wtii 
people'. 

CITY; 01-4812345 

WEST END= 01-938 2188 


eio^oo 

Spmg mo acnoni Expanding 
young Finance Co seeks someone 
wno on step up mo new posi- 
tion You'll be 100/60. nmrate, 
Mdi rntmrvr mo ataiy to cope 
inter pressure. Beautfui new nt- 
hces. Promotion prospects. 

OTY: 01-481 2345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 


UI INI' 


SEC TO MD 
ci(M>oo 

MgNy prebpou5 mi chan or- 
dures a smart Exec Sec with a 
least 2 yrs experience a Dncw 
level. Latse well ctais on a Paly 
lasts. Develop ahnostrane 
slots to me Ml a a posffion ma 
promises great merest variety 
aid raaienge. 

CITY: 01-481 2345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 

attatt 


atbatt 


Martent) Co-ottkiaiv requres 
Aonwi Asastan to Iwip promote 
mer new produo nnge n the UK 
maria. American City computer 
Co needs a hqh-energy. fast- 
paced person «*h setae ill 
humour to hmi me* team Com- 
puter background a pkx Get 
nvotved n resesen. road shots, 
some lypmg. 

CITY: 01 4812345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 


w 1 

GRADUATES 

C1IMXM 

Two snan graduates reared to 
share seoetinal Owes and wo it 
as pan ol a warn « inatux com- 
pany based m EC2 Good 
seaetanal skids ol 904-/60+ a 
must Very vaned pb - no two 
days an (he samri Lively oeraoa- 
tidy- Good PrOGoects. 

CITY: 01 481 2345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 

DESIGN 

£10.500 

Young, tasl-mowng Hew De- 
sign Co seeks a dynamic 
Seeetary to get involved « me 
running o) me* Purcnasng sec- 
um. Good SH /Tying sioits 
warned nm Iter lor affiiMistution 
and oroansanw are me two key 
reounmems Cbere kason. travel 
arrangements, people contad. 
good inospeds. 

CITY: 01 481 2345 
WEST END: 01- 938 2188 

P 1 iJm l || 

aUratt 



£9,000 

An expenenco S/H Sec at re- 
am! it* I International) Faslmn 
house to provide full PA back up 
to Group MD. You# be presem- 
atte. triable Mh Ms ri 
peraonafety. They otter a good 
salsy padaqe including BUPA 
ant ffiscoum on domes 

CITY: 01-4812345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 


oppoarnwmr 

CtLSOO* 

Superb opnartundy for a bright 
2nd lObber (t yr i eip) Mth ex- 
cefcro SH /Typmg data to Kxn 
tt*s piy mve s tmeni Co. Varied S 
murosing position mvotwig 
Adrian & Sec modi 4 Daman 
level Encurma Stria Mortgage 
laetty. paid travel LV's S 5 whs 
Iwls 

CTTY- 01-481 2345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 


afcbatt aftatt 


SECRETARY/ADMINISTRATOR 


FRANKLIN MINT LIMITED b the British subsidiary of a 
tnuht-naiiona! direct marketing company dealing in a wide 
variety of an objects and collectibles - from porcelain and 
crystal to fine books and prints. 

Wc an: looking for an experienced Secretary io provide 
secretarial support to our Concept. Development and re- 
search team. The position calls for a confident and 
enthusiastic person with a flair for organ kaium. capable of 
working independently in an international environment. 
Good communication skills are essential in a position which 
will be responsible for maintaining dose liaison between 
researchers and artists and our parent company in the 
VSJl 

Our pleasant, modern offices, with flee car parking facili- 
ties. are situated between Bromley and Catford (S.tLo). As 
wdl as a salary of (£8.500. we oner substantial Company 
benefits, including free membership of BL’PA. life assur- 
ance and natt-oaniribuiwy pension. 

Phrase write wtth fttfl dtfaib of ro w ir and qnaBfl- 
TftiOW fo> 

MrsJfl. GHford, Pt r s on ml Manager, 
Franklin Mint Limited, 138 Bromley Road, 
LONDON SE6 2XG. 


BANKING 


FRENCH 


French speaking PA/Secretary wtth floorless English, 
good English shorthand and word processing /penamal 
axnputer experience, required by City merchant bank. We 
are looking Ifor someone over 26 . wtih experience at senior 
level, flexible, confident and wishing to use their own 
ini halve. You win be working for a French Executive Dt- 
tector In a busy office where some overtime (paid) Should 
be expected. Up to £104300. + Benefits. 

GERMAN: 

German Speaking P.A. /Secretary <26-251 wtth English and 
German shorthand, to assist General Manager of mer- 
chani banking arm of old established German bank. Varied 
duties, from organising meetings and travel, to looking 
after visnors. plus normal correspondence aod bateau ac- 
tivities. The post would sui! someone matme. calm and 
flexible with good experience at senior level. Around 
£1S.OOO * benefits. 

MULTILINGUAL 

S 




PRIVATE SECRETARY/ 
PERSONAL ASSISTANT 

Someone with experience and 
initiative needed to run busy 
private office covering many 
varied interests. Located close 
to Sloane Square. Flexible 
hours. Negotiable salary. 5 
hours/day, 5 days/week. 

Call 01-730 9305 


Recruttmem consultants 
22 Channg Cross Road. London WC2H OHR 

01 836 3794/5 


FAST GROWING 
ADVERTISING AGENCY 
COVENT GARDEN 

Two secretaries: salaries from £8.500++ 

Usual secretarial skills apply, including sense of 
humour and sense of fun to cope with hectic 
workload. 

Would welcome C.V. and recent photograph. 

Send io: 

Diana Kelly, 

41/44 Great Queen Street, 

London WC2B 5 AY. 

POSITIVELY NO AGENCIES 


COVENT GARDEN 

£12,000 

Experienced senior audio fetal secretary for partner m modem 
Olliers overlooking Piazza. WP experience -mrt thonband an 
advantage. 

Td Nicholas Squire 01 379 7083 

£10,000 

Experienced audio fepJ secretary for partner tkaliOgmcomffKf- 
na! hugauon. Age 13+ . 

TeL David Herbert 01 379 7083. 


TRILINGUAL PA £11,000 

COVENT GARDEN 

Small well established Financial Consultancy 
needs mature and capable PA/Sec. All round 
involvement with company PR, dient liaison, 
administration, organisation. Fluent French 
and Spanish plus excellent SH /Typing. Age 30- 
40. 

YOUNG PR SECRETARY 

For successful West End Company. Needs 
good SH/Typing. ability to work under pres- 
sure, scope to gel involved and work as team. 
Age c23. Salary eJS.OOO 

TEMPORARY 

APPOINTMENTS 

We are always keen to interview candidates 
with excellent secretarial skills for varied tem- 
porary assignments in the West End. 


Bi Lingual 
Secretary/PA 

Swedish/English 

The Swiss Associate of a UK-based international 
bank is setting-up new offices to the West End and 
now requires a capable Secretary/PA * t+Ungual 
Swedish/English - io work at Director level. 

As this position involves a great deal of private client 
contact, you win need to have plenty of initiative and 
fleribfty as well as exceBeni secretarial skills, ideally 
you wfll have gained experience within a banking or 
financial environment. 

If you are looking for a chaflengtog role. Offering a 
competitive salary and a very attractive banking 
benefits package, telephone for an application form 
and further details to: Vhrion Karam. on 01-236 6090 
Ext 483. 2-6 Cannon Street. London EC4M 6XX. 



















THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AP 




TWeek* Tweaks* Tweeks* 4 WEEKS holiday pay per year PLUS. 

Bank Holiday pay, free word processor training, sick pay scheme and an excellent 

choice of interesting assignments. ['brook street 


Executive Secretary 


Central London 


circa £11,400 + substantial paid overtime 


Arthur Andcn«?n & G v i» jn irveni.iiionil firm rifaccounums 
employing * >me 2s,i>.KJ people vMirldv.-i.ie, 

'K'e are seeking to recruit a senior PA to wi <rk for ihe M.uuging 
Director of the Furvipean T.ix Practice who is resp"nsible lor 
ovemli quality control of sen ice and the direction and 
development ol’iax practices m Eun «pe. the Middle East and 
Africa. 

Based in London. you will heexpwied to provide jn 
exceptional service which refleas iheseni* >rity of the 
Managing Director. Tins w ill mv olve the co-ordination of 
policies. procedures and information in ihe areas f ir which he 
has responsibilities', as w ell as jetinga- 3 1 Mi>on puini for 
visiting partners fin. mi overseas As the Managing Director 
travels extensn elvvou nuw. in addition, ensure the -mixnh 
running of the office in his jbsence. 


Successful candidates will he aged 26+ , educated to "A" level 
standard and have skilLs of 1 uOwpm shorthand and tiSwpm 
audio. Proven experienceatasenior level in a large 
ppjfessii nul orcummerrial organisation Is essential, as are 
your presentation and communication skills. 

The position is demanding, with overt imej regular feature, 
hut in rerum for your commitment we can offer you j 
challenging career. 

If y ou are interested, please send a detai led c.v. t enclosing a 
daytime telephone numberno: . 

Mr>M. Hennessv, A IJ - 1 ‘LIT TO 

Recruiting Officer. Ad YIN 1 It U 1\ 

^“ss nsco - Andersen 

London WC2R2PS. && 

CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS 



CAREER 


DE S I G N 


L I M I T E I.) 


It's the little things that go into planning careers 
• that make all the difference. 

Like a little time, a little thought, and a little trouble. 

Diane Hilton heads our Secretarial Division. She will take time to 
discover exactly what a secretary wants from a career so that when 
the right opening comes along, she knows exactly who is right for it 
and why. If you are an executive secretary or a college leaver and 
are looking fora career rather than just another job, 

TALK TO CAREER DESIGNTODAY. 

Karin Pamaby heads ourTetnporary Division. She offers you not 
only top rates, holiday pay and incentives but also the opportunity 
to use your skills and expertise within your choice of envi ronment 
If you are a PA secretary wiih shorthand, audio or WP skills, a 
receptionist/telephonist ora bright graduate clerk/administrator 
currently available, 

TALK TO CARE E R DESIGN TODAY. 

Judy Adams heads our Media Division. She takes the trouble to 
evaluate each graduate's potential in the media marketplace and 
utilises her extensive contacts to offer you the widest choice in 
the media field. If you are of graduate calibre, have good 
communication skills and a positive desire to succeed, 
TALK TO CAREER DESIGN TODAY. 

Why not come and talk lo us first? You've nothing to Jose but your 
old job, and nothing to gain except an exciting new career. 


1 GROVE LAND COURT. BOW LANE. LONDON EC4M 9EH 
TELEPHONE: 01 -489 0889 


~ ~ " ’ ■ - 


Wfe are a 700 staff firm of Chartered Accountants, employing 
80 operators on 2 Wang VS 65 and 1 CHS 140 word processing 
systems. System expansion now requires reinforcement of 
operator support and training functions. 

Wang W.P. Co-ordinator 

a, 4,000 

Responsible for strategic mailers, setting training and 
house- keeping standards, and monitoring system performance. 
The co-ordinator must be capable of planning, organising and 
controlling but not above participation in routine training and 
trouble-shooting mauers. 

MLP. 

Ct, £"ST3 s 55©0 

Responsible for a combination of operator training in basic 
and advanced functions One! uding house-keeping procedures 
for section supervisors], technical advice and 'hotline' operator 
support on a shared basis with another administrator. 

Candidates for both appointments must have had relevant 
VS and 0IS experience. Conditions include 4 wks' holiday, 
bonus, pension/life assurance. Salaries reviewed July 1986 or 
after 3 mihs' service. 

Please apply in wniing including details of relevant expenence 
and existing salary 10 Marian Florence, Personnel Officer, 
5 toy Hayward, 8 Baker Street, London W1M IDA. 



rnember'of MorwaUj ffHorwatn: rciterrvitiooa W p ^ ' 


GRADUATE MULTBUNGUAL 
EXECUTIVE 

Salary negotiable + Car 

Required for the Chairman's office of a London (Fulham) based 
compact international company with subsidiaries in France, Germany 
and Switzerland. The company, a leader in its field, is developing 
rapidly and is part of a well known international group. 

The candidate, who will complement an existing team of two, will have 
language qualifications and will be fluent in French and German and 
possibly have some knowledge of Spanish or Italian. Must possess 
good shorthand and typing, a full driving license, have an outgoing 
personality and smart appearance. 

The position mil suit an ambitious young person 25-30, who is 
prepared to travel in Western Europe, frequently at short notice, and 
willing to work overseas for penods of up to two weeks at a time. 
Salary negotiable, BUPA and other benefits plus car provided. 

Send full O' to: 

Michelle Field, Scried Group Ltd., 

24 Parsons Green Lane, London SW6 4HT. 


ISSEHICOL 


W1/SW1 


SECRETARY 


£9^00 pol 


International Management consultancy seeks an 
experienced, mature Secretary/Admin person 
for a very busy and interesting rale. You should 
be a fast, acurale typist, skilled with WP equip- 
ment (we use WANG) enjoy hard work and like 
a tough but happy boss. You should also be 
skilled in the use of dictation equipment Loca- 
tion: St James's Street SW 1 . 

Please telephone:- 

Martin Lawless on Teh 01-629 8070 
or send a c.v. to him at 
Slade Consulting 
Group (UK) Ltd, 

Metro House, 

S 8 St James's Street 
London SW1A 1 LD. 


OPPORTUNITY TO WORK WITH A 
BEAUTIFUL PRODUCT IN OUR 


[•lv j 


Josiah Wedgwood & Sons Limited require a Sates Secretary with 
responsibility lo the Sales Manager and working closely with site 
Sates Team. 

4 weeks holiday and tuff discount Salary negotiable. 

Please contact Miss Jan Tapp on: 4 &j 5I8(. 

Wedgwood 

Josiah Wedgwood & Sons Ltd 
32-44 Wigmore Street 
London W1H0HU 


BI LINGUAL SECRETARY 
ITALIAN 

Audio secretary with good written and spoken 
Italian required to work for International Law 
Firm WC2. Legal experience preferred. 

Salary £8,500. 

Please telephone Carole Kettner 01-242 2919 


BOND STREET ART GALLERY 

Requires responsible secretary. Good shorthand 
and typing essential. Pleasant working condi- 
tions. Salary to £10,000 depending on 
experience. 

Telephone 01-491 7408 ext 49 


BUSY ARCHITECT/DIRECTOR 

Of an expanding design company urgently rea uJres a 
bright. enUiusiaiic PA secretary Interesting and sailed 
work, normal secretarial Odlts and wp essential. Car dm 
er. Salary negotiable. 

Please write with CV to: 

Machln Designs Lid. 

A Aim ue studios. 

Sydney Close. London 5W3 6HW. 


ENTHUSTIC SECRETARY REQUIRED 

To join the team selling houses in busy Kensing- 
ton Estate Agents. Help take instructions, 
arrange appointments etc efficient typing & 
moderate shorthand. 

RING SUSIE ON 01-727 6663 


ESTATE AGENTS 

Busy South Ken Office requires keen, young, 
well’ spoken sec with excellent office skills (no 
shorthand, but word processor experience). 
Good salary'. 

Cad Denise Gabriel 01-370-45781. 


GRADUATE SECRETARY 

Senior Partner in Conwraie Finance Department of Lawrence 
Graham seeks »dl presented gradual* or equiialeni Secretary, 
mid Xti far inKnsuag work with PA. content and high level 
client contact. Salary negotiable. 

Aptritesdon a Mktuei Kkfaudsaa. 

Lawrence Graham. 

50/51 Rnssell Sqm- »CI. Tek M7 0651. 


RECEPTIONIST/TELEPHONIST 

required for Yves Saint Laurem Nlenswear UK 
Ltd. Musi be fully experienced on Viceroy 
switch board. Excellent working conditions and 
top salary paid for right applicanL 

Please apply: Mrs E J Lewis. 01 637 9S9i. 


typist/adminstrator 

FOR EXPANDING 
IBM RECRUITMENT AGENCY 

You win be 30- . pvrftap* wlUi "A" Icvrts bid mar. munruimy 
naw> good MMKS typing lWlb imbnmum 50 w&cnt Tr .i. b n w4> b. 

w HP. The abth-y lo work as parr o* a Iran and unbr 
orewir* h mwuu. so you can erject a sal ary and enmnnoRS 
rommemuraw witn your wcreJanai twentnee. 

Contact jum Boynlon on 01-409 amis 
H alrren Ltd. 18 James Street. London WJM shm 


Financial Controller/ 
Personal Accountant 

c. £20,000 

Our client is the Chairman of ah international group 
. with interests in the Middle East, Europe and the United 
1 States. 

- He is in the process of establishing his operational base 

in London, where he is seeking an adaptable and 
enthusiastic personto deal exclusively with areas of his 
personal financial activities. 

These are by no means confined to London and the 
appointee can expect a reasonable amount of travel, 
particularly to the South of France. 

Skills in office procedures and general accountancy are 
required with some emphasis on audit An accounting 
qualification is essential and familiarity with computer usage 
is desirable. Candidates are likely to be in the age range 25 to 
30 years. Salary level is about £20,000. 

Resumes should be' sent to theconsultants advising on-.. 
this appointment at the address below. All replies will be 
treated in the strictest confidence. . . - 

The Welbeck Group Limited, Panton House, 

25 Hay market, London SW1Y4EN. 

The WeJbeck Group 
Limited j 

ASSISTANT 
TO THE CHAIRMAN 

CITY OFFICE EXCELLENT SALARY 

Alexander Howden Ltd are a rapidly expanding compa- 
ny within the Alexander Howden Group. Due to internal 
reorganisation a vacancy has arisen for a Personal 
Assistant/Secretary to the Chairman. 

You will ideally be aged 30+ and, in addition to proven 
experience at this ievef, have the desire and ambition to 
be a key member of a successful team. The ability, to 
work under pressure whilst retaining a sense of hu? 
mour is a pre-requisite; as is^previbcis experience 1 on a 
• -word processor.-: Cross training "■ ’ onto v r ari ■_ IBM 
Displaywriter "will be provided.. . v ‘ 5 

If you have excellent skills, previous city experience 
and are committed to being successful then please 
.write with full career history to:- ~ 

Mrs Wendy Garrett, Alexander Howden Group, 

8 Devonshire Square, LONDON EC2M 4PL 


Alexander 
Howden Group ie 


SENIOR GROUP SECRETARY 

CITY £10,000 AGE: 22+ 

We are a national firm of Chartered Accountants looking for a well- 
spoken and well -presented Group Secretary to provide secretarial and 
administrative support to a team of Senior Managers in our busy 
Audit Department You will have had experience working at senior 
level, with a good academic background and last and accurate audio 
typing. You will have proven organisational skills and be able to 
communicate with people at all levels. Word processing framing will 
be given. Non-smoker preferred. 

We offer attractive working conditions in modern, offices, 2 minutes 
from Liverpool Street Station. Hours 9.15 - 515. Benefits indude 21 
days holiday, 30p LVs per day, pension scheme and STL. 
Applications, with foil cv, to Kim West, 246 Bishopsgate, London 
EC2M 4PB or telephone 01-377 1000 for further details. 

(No aganctee) 


SPRING FEVER 

on 

OUR TEMPORARY TEAM 
£6.20p.h. 

Our busy team of professional temporary secretaries are always in demand, and It 
has established an excellent reputation over the years. 

If you are a first class, senior level secretary with speeds of 100/60. 2 years Director 
(eve! experience in central London, and proficient word processing skills. we can 
offer you an Interesting variety of temporary secretarial assignm en t s and the best 
rates In London. 

Our skated tamps are afl paid the same rates and are frequently offered the 
opportunity of temping into a permanent position. 

if you would like to tamp at the level you deserve and be positively appreciated, 

p*ease telephone tor an appointment or a tactsheet 

01-434 4512 (West End) 01-588 3535 (City) 


Crone Corkill 

Recruitment Consultants 


SECRETARY/ 

ADMINISTRATOR 

ctfl.500 SW1 

A smoD expanding firm of recrulfmenr 
consul ranrs seek ro appoint an experienced 
and comperenrsecrerary whowtH rake 
charge of ihe office odminisirarion. Assisted 
by r wo staff rheirdunes wi# cover a wide 
range of Tasks induding WP basic 
bookkeeping and advertising. Applicants 
should have good secretarial skills (.nosh) as 
well as a sense of responsibility and initiative. 
Apply in wniing. 

ANTONY DUNLOp 

BR 9 16 ERMYN STREET lOfSONSWfYdHP 
Ifs M TED 01-09 6171 -& PICCADILLY 








01-734 0911 


ARE YOU a "PEOPLE PERSON" 

SECRETARY/PA 

£9/500 

Senior Secretary reporting to the Vico President 

Stearns Catalytic is an international Engineering 
Design and Construction Company with several 
international offices. The Vice President in Lon- 
don is responsible for the technical direction and 
administration of activities through Britain, Eu- 
rope and the Middle East, involving a staff- of 
about 100 . 

Your responsibilities wifi include a wide range of 
secretarial and administrative duties. Previous ex- 
perience in an engineering environment is not 
necessary. 

Applicants should be aged 25+ with shorthand/ 
typing of 100/60 and word processing experience. 
You should have a mature and friendly personality 
but most important of all is a flexible attitude and 
sense of humour. 

In addition to the above salary we can offer an 
attractive benefits package which includes free pri- 
vate medical insurance, season ticket loan scheme 
and 4 weeks holiday. 

Find out .more by telephoning Christine .Gilson, 
Personnel Officer, Stearne Catalytic International 
Ltd.. 48 Leicester Square. London WC2H 7LZ. 

01.839 4377,. 

{No Agencies pteose) 


MEDIA- FINANCE ■ ADVERTISING ■ SALES ■ PERSONNEL 

2 - ‘ ’ S 

g Pa To MD £11,500 J 

• M otpmhbrePA it nquirrd to atmt th* MD of this hune — 
3 and /vnfvuxa Bant. H* u yauiyf. eery bnjiht 

? and obcmvdj tuemmfaL Thin u a true PA rote requiring < 
v cvmmtlmeni and talent. SUBm: 120/60 Age: Ci 


Venture 


£ 10,000 . 


ui og ^tm/aes-i 

Thurmart dynamic and eery qka venture capital etmpa- r. Z W 

ny nbetdr an mxuyiant Tfiey ijfer the rhancr far REAL ? 

incatiemnit in lAr MOST internting and creatine a.vrt r" 

in 'dir City.' No 'N/Nl 'SkitL: EicrOmt typing Afir SO-W 2 

Television -• £o,oojo i ^QDv 

Admin AttttiiSet in fart mlrUectiml mfirarurumL People < ■ ' t 

ore hardouriinx bal aery fneadh and hmx'o guud team *- 


Admin AuuxtjSet in fart mlrUMiat miinmnnU. People < 
are hardouriimt bal aery fneadh and hmx'o pmd team 
invokiement in roper aftieca in- the Wist Rad. SIttib: Et 
cetleat typing Ape: 3V-2B. z - 

.7! *■ 


Design 


£ 8,000 


rj A Vest End firm, nf O nignrn and aitkiuda requires a 2 
~ secretary , rta shorthand with I >T years’ uf pervious usark- 
‘ ing rxpc n va c t. It is a friendly company- where you wiR ‘ 
^ work at dl levels including souse administration datum. ^ 
g Skids: Oood typing Ago: IS IS, . 2 

3 hazell stAtqn j 

z 8 Golden Square, London, \YL . -5 

g ' . ... /Tel:0l-4.3?,602L .... ^ 

MEDIA- TES.W’CE • ADN’ERTISEVG ■ SALES • PERSONNEL 


CONSUMER P.R. ...£8,500 

Our clients, an expandmg P R agency hi Covent 
Garden, are looking for sieverd young secretaries to 
assist their account groups. The jobs are demanding 
Bnd invtaving and require a high level of commitment 
and a flakier organising. You wffl attend press con- 
ferences arid take notes during regular client 
meetings. We are looking for people with 'A' level 
education, aged cJ20 who wffl fit into a young and 
busy atmosphere. 50/60- T. 

BANKING c£1 0,500 

-A weti known and pres i tgfbus intamationaf bank U 
looking for a FA/Secretary for me of its top' Direc- 
tors. 'An excefierrt presentation is required for regular 
ctient meetings as.weU as a dedicated and profes- 
sional working method. 90/60. Aga cJ2A. 


EM ftemafirind Ltd 
Soman* 
nscnxmarit 
50 Hans Crescent SWl 


^m) 


Individual caeer 
advice fur 
seoata nesand; 
personal assetads 


PROFESSIONAL SEC/PA 

Young 'mother figure’ required for. two dynamic 
but wayward group company directors. Organise 
us. bile us a«rhdp-us control and motivate a 
growing staff of 40 and rising. Efficiency without 
triplicate memos. Activity without fuss. Energy, 
dedication and expertise in delegation. The 
group ranges from computers to consumer pro- 
tection via records and deodorants - a passio nate 
interest in all these areas would be ideal (if not, 
well sell it to you). If you are the perfect 
PA/secretary and would settle for £12,000 a year 
for now, phone us on our private line. 

482 0469 or 482 4636 


RECEPTIONIST/ 

TELEPHONIST 

Leading Public Relations consultancy re- 
quire a top receptionist/tdephonist for its 
busy offices, near Fleet Street They must 
be used to the rush of a busy office, and 
be able to deal with some of the country's 
leading businessmen and financiers. The 
reward, £8,000 p.a. and various other 
benefits. Contact: 

Binns Cornwall & Partners 
01-489 1441 


Matured In Oak 

to £11,500 

Our client S a man of depth and vision - an innovative 
Wftii a superb record of achievement hi 
N*** “ MD of one of the 
wheky companies, he seeks a high calibre 
- at i 5U ^ ex - You wW coordinate his life, 
pnrfjfems in ; his absence, deal with yotir own 
etc. SenioHevd ocp-rienca Is essential. 


^rabfeSki.bOO/fiO.A 

Gordon Yates Ltd. 

3S Old Bond Street, London WI 

(Rgcrutement Consultants! 


ac * a. 





























31 


CREME 


«+ MlWITHPHOSPBCTS to £ 9,700 

worid leader the kted position for a R^wfx> realty likes to get inwol- 

ved-Hetravetefrequerdy.andwdl * ^ 

expect you toMhfcr him when s ^f s 
L,w ^Qor ts right aL the heart of ths activity and offers he s away. Skik 10050. pteWP. 

*- 01*4999179 


MEDIA- FINANCE -ADVERngNG* SALES- PERSONNEL 

College Leavers I 

2 s Spring and foremost in your jj 
»*ou«/iis is what you're going.to \ 
ao when you leave college. As ex- i 
perienced consultants we can tell' . 
you what sort of jobs are available ^ 

and help you decide which type of £ 

job will suit you best We have 6 
many opportunities in areas such i 
as Television, Publishing, Design, e 
Stockbroking and Banking. Take 
advantage of our expertise and 
come, in and discuss your future 
with us. 

I HAZELL- STATON 


§ 

3 

z 

> 


G 

5 TeL 01-439 602L 

MEDIA- FINANCE-ADVERTISING -SALES- PERSONNEL 


8 Golden Square, London WL 
L 01-439 


DRIVE AND CONFIDENCE 
£10,000 

If you are ready for a positive new career move 
you must demonstrate your versa tiity In han- 
dling Telephone Sales situations with a natural 
fair and enthusiasm to guarantee sm t e s s l pug 
traamg given to a canffidate {20’9.30's) who has 
a sound office background with an abaity to type 
and spell accurately. High financM rewards and 
generous benefits are yours for the picking! 

Call 588 '5081 



^Elizabeth Hun£ 

SECRETARY/RECEPTIONIST 

to £10,000 

An inter natio n al communications company 
seeks a young, secretary (20+) to tie based In 
their beautiful reception area. ¥00*8 greet, al 
visiting VIP's and provide secretarial support to 
their managing director. Benefits include early 
salary review. 60 wpm typing and rusty short- 
hand needed. 

SOCIAL SECRETARY 
to £9,000 

The Chairman offl famous name c o mp any 
seeks a young,’ sociaSy oon&nnt secretary to 
look after Ms many social engagements from 
replying to. invitations to shopptog al ttarrods. . 
You'll 1» based at tvs luxurious Belgravia 
house. 90/50 state needed. 

* Elizabeth Hunt RBauftmnlConsuftonb 

Bedford Sheet London WC2 012403511 


amount nno 

★ PB0PEHTY cJHQJOO + exc beas * 

Enjoy aorttmo liora boss who delegates 6 lets you get an 
■flh ifi The buestmntt Partner at tba stperiar Wfnd 
property firm ts looking for 3 well orgarased sec with 
100/60+ speeds who wants taotament « their job. Is a 
good tort-hoUer/wgaraser and can tanfle sons office 
management 

* CAREER SEC - BAHOitfi ★ 

★ cJEl 0,008 + mortgage ★ 

This small city Investment Bank are looting for a bright 
seoBary who wwdd tdterartefy Bee to ass ume an adm in las. 
You wSI be given training in Eurobond Settlements, Loans 
A dm ini st ration, Stock Exoiange Settlements eto. Numeracy, 
common sense & 90/56 




{Asantriepbom: 01-499 8078 

46 0U Bead Street LODdeo ttl. 

CAROLINE rWG SECRETARIAL APPtHNTliaflS 




A Perfect Bouquet 

£ 8,000 

It's ume n> come afari Our cfient, a disttni^ up^n»k« whe 
company urgently seeks* foehUy ounfidenr your^ sectary® 
in bocd/resnunm promo tio ns. As pan a a smaR. eJtee 
ream you wfll help to run wine- tastings, in-house lunches and 
handle VH* diem Rbcotl \bu should be bright, Uvefy wtth to of 
personality Skills 80/50. Age 21+. Salary subtea co early 
review Please telephone 01-493 S/87. 

Gordon Yates Ltd. 

35 Old Bond Street, London W1 

(Recruitment Consutants) • 


. TELEPHONE SALES 
REPRESENTATIVE 

The Conde Nast PuWications UmRieiLnMUh- 
ere orvOGUE. HOUSE* GARJDeRTATLER 
and BRIDES AND SETTING UP HOME, are 
looking for a young, bright sad enthusiastic per- 
son to join their Classified Sales team. 
Experience preferred but not essential. 

If you are interested please. write (enclosing full 
Curriculum Vitae) to: 

Mill Barter* Tim*, 

Pw f O Mi a l Director. 

Vocna fate 
Hanever Sqttara. - -.7: 
Loodvn WlR OAD. 


ITY PR £ 8,500 

very famous name consumer 

srsysMSsfiffOT 

iov constant Saisons with the press and 
aid be a good organiser as you help 
[ up regular pr ess receptio ns, anefenjoy 
test moving, informal atmosphere, 
ceflent benefits offer^ ffwfoiftw tfomis 
i gym faritttas. 90/50 Sklfe and 
ivious word processing experience 



izabefch Hunt 


CHEQUE THIS OUT £10,500 

A major firm of merchant bankers seek a 
secretary to their international lending 
“vision. You'll enjoy regular cfent contact 
and a fun PA role. You should be able to 
prioritise your day, work very much on your 
own - initiative and run the office smoothly. 
Benefits include mortgage subsidy. 

COMPUTER FUTURE £10,500 

An international research organisation seek 
a well groomed, outgoing PA to a partner. 
You'd organise meetings, set up cfient 
presentations sold bufld up a knowledge of 
his cfient fist A wfifingness to learn about 
computers and new technology would be 
oicouraged. 60 wpm' Audio typing needed. 
Superb benefit package. 

Bbobeth Hunt Recruitment Consultants 

23 Cbfege M London EC4 0-240 3551 



I 


NAT 0 -BRUSSELS 

requires (m/f) 

experienced 
secretarial staff 

Age limit: 21-30; □ required 
speeds: 45 wpm typing and 90 wpm 
shorthand; □ word processing ex- 
perience desirable; □ knowledge of 
french is an advantage; □ good 
salary net of income tax. 

Write with detailed curriculum vitae 
to: Recruitment Officer NATOt 
1110 Brussels, Belgium. 

Only thosa candidates conskfered 
suitable will receive a reply. 


r— is? 



Video & Film 

£8,500 

This is an excellent opening in a young and bvdy 
environment, with this international video' film ca 
Kbtktegas part of a small, informs] team in thetr cahle 
TV section yon will bdp to organise contracts, 


Benefits include free video hbrarjj private screenings & 
fcee health duk Good typing essential. AgeSEHr. Please 
call 01-409 1232. 


HeemUmeni Consultants 


Back To The Future 

£10,000 

Highly dynamic opening for a buaness-orientafted 
jiwewire, as See/PA to Chairman In this Futures Market 
operation. In addition to co-ordinating diary travel etc 
you wiO play an admin rote, dtreedy liaising with new 
dienes; checking references; and daily cracking price 
movements in stock and commodity indices. Dress is 
informal: numeracy accuracy and motivation essential 
ftScxxJ keyboard skills (50wpm plus) requested. Age 
23-30. Please telephope 01-493 5787. 

Gordon Yates Ltd. 

35 Old Bond Street, London W1 

(Recruitment Consultants) 


”13? 



Tasteful Temping... 

No hassles. No let-downs. Just plain, simple, 
high grade temping. 

A tasteful package of top jobs, elite rates and 
thoroughly professional service. 

If you have sound skills and experience, you 
should be talking to The Wbrk Shop’. 
Telephone Sue Cooke on 01-409 1232. 

ReCXTI^tXSM»lCoVMu|LuU8 


GROW WITH THE COMPANY 
IN CHISWICK 

Tbll it a onkiue opportunity to join a sew. bur almdjr succcu- 
Ad. consutuocy company advowf on interior dengn, office 
jyncira. furniture ana new technology. YouwiH be involved la 
alt aspects of this smaO company wooun* wiib ibe owner ia hd 
prime bouse. A sound Sfocaml background, word proccisiBg 
experience. Bex i Winy and setf-mobvabon am eamtiai require- 
ments, Non-smoker. Sal. c£i IJQ0Q. 

PkB ” m,,c 434 4512 

Cn»ieC(»kiU 

Tlau nitmarit ConaUtanta 

99 Regent Street, W1. 


YOU ARE D 7 ANTED! | 

With your top shorthand & WP skills; in the 
companies you want, doing the job you want, for 
(he rates of pay you -want and the appreciation 
you deserve - often leading to an excellent Per- 
manent appointment. Pay in the current week! 


IDYCE GU1NESS 



EXECUTIVE 

SECRETARY/PA 

Required for Chairman of 
International Trading 
Company 

The Chairman needs a dedicated PA, over 
30, with maturity, confidence and first 
class organisational skifis for this 
demanding but rewarding position. 

The position involves great responsibility, 
bang hours both during the week and at 
weekends and the requirement to travel 
abroad at short notice. 

The secretarial comem wifi vary, but wfil 
not rise beyond 50%. 

This is an outstanding opportunity for the ' 
right person who is wBSng to sacrifice 
leisure time for genuine carewj 
Starting salary is circa £15,C~ 

Reply to BOX A42.. 
c/- Tunes Newspapers, 

P O Box 484, 

Virgina St. 

London El. 


Don't miss this 
opportunity. 

Don't waste your time looking for the 
best temporary secretarial jobs in London. 
They're right here at MacBlain Nash. 

The top positions, plus all the 
advantages you'll get as a Privilege Card 



holder and member of the MacBlain Nash 
Club. Pick up the telephone and call Victoria 
Martin now . . - 

MacBlain 

NASH 

r Tfengprary 
Secretaries 
01 • 439 0601 

lbday^bestboofdng. 

WP Secretary for long term booking in 
Mktg Dept of Internationa! oil company. 



SHORTHAND SECRETARY 
£ 9 ,ooo pa 

Do. you -want a new challenge? dome and work 
for firm of friendly Chartered Acccounlants 
who have kept their sense or humour despite 
everything. ' 

Accurate typisg essential Olivetti electronic 
typewriter. • • 

Telephone Jeffrey Zmkzn os 01*262 2641 


ADMINISTRATIVE MEDICAL 
SECRET ARY/P.A 
e £11,000 p.a. 

This challenging position in our Test 
Tube 1 Baby Unit will shortly be available. 
AppBcations are Invited from Senior Medi- 
cal Shorthand/Audio Secretaries, with 
proven organisational and supervisory 
skills. Previous Gynaecological experience 
is essential. This post involves consider- 
able patient contact and therefore, a 
pleasant friendly and helpful personality is 
required as is tact and diplomacy. 

The Hospital offers excellent working con- 
ditions and a generous benefit package. 

For an application form gtease telephone 


the Personnel Dept on 

2710/2706. 


586 5959 exL 



■Hu mana H ospital We fl ington 


Elizabeth Hunt 

GUHE TO PRESS £9,000 

Join this large and successful public relations 
consultancy as secretary to a busy account 
team. You win enjoy extensive contact with 
clients and the media and should be weB 
organised and able to work very much on your 
own initiative. Beautiful offices and 5 weeks 
hofldays. 55 wpm Typing and previous WP 
experience needed. 

RESEARCH £10,000 

Mayfair based, our client, a major international 
research consultancy seeks a wen organised, 
outgoing secretary to two top executives. You 
should enjoy a busy team atmosphere and have 
90/60 skins. Beautiful offices and good benefits. 

I Elizabeth Hunt Recruitment Consultants « 

\18< Gfosvenor Street London W1 01-2403531^ 


EXPERIENCED SECRETARIAL 
ASSISTANT 

International company based in new offices in 
SWI require an experienced and responsible 
Secretarial Assistant (ape 28 - 45) for their Mar- 
keting Manager. This is an interesting position 
requiring excellent shorthand and typing skills 
(100+/60), WP knowledge, good educational 
background and a willingness to become wholly 
involved in the operational side of the division. 

Salary £9,500 plus 10% Bratus, BUPA, Lift In- 
surance and {tension Scheme. 25 days holiday. 
Hours 9-5. 

Please apply in writing enclosing CV. to: 

Mrs J Mountain 

INTERNATIONAL GOLD CORPORATION 
L5 Carlton Gardens — . 

. . London SW1Y 5AE 

(NO AGENCIES) 


TOP TEMPORARIES 

With attractive openings in a variety of 
companies: advertising, publishing, computers 
and the world of theatre, we can use your skills 
to their best advantage. 

Temporary assignments with a view to 
rmanent positions are also available. For an 
opinion of what we can offer you. call: 

Jucfi Hutton 
or 

Lucy Arnold 
on 01 -629 8063 


perman 

honest 



HODGE 

RECRUITMENT 





EXHIBITION ORGANISERS 
to £8,500 

Our cfient, a very successful firm of exhibition 
organisers, seeks a bright, confident person 
to train in all aspects of the business. You’ll 
enjoy constant contact with clients and 
should be free to travel to UK conferences on 
occasions. An 'A' level education, 50 wpm 
typing ability and previous word processing 
experience needed. 

% Elizabeth Hunt Recruitment Consultants / 

\2g Bedford Sheet London WC2 01-240 3511/ 


PA/SECRETARY 

Required for busy cheif executive ofcom- 

jrairnals. We^artf looking fora'bnght and 
experienced self-starter able to work at 
senior level on own initiative. Excellent 
shorthand needed as is ability to deal 
with people and cope under pressure with 
anything from promotional events to fil- 
ing systems. Lots of hard work but, 
hopefully, lots of fun too. Location Vic- 
toria. 

Starting salary around £9,000. 

For further details phone: 

Paul Moorman 
01 821 1155. 


CORPORATE COMMUNICATIONS 
c£1 2,000 

EadUng opportunity far an intBfligsfit articutata parson to work 
(or the Deputy Chairman ol a Ortiiy successful rapdly 
expanong company. RBsporsttWOeslncknJe liaison with high 
level executives and major pak&cal figures. nandHng 
presentations social funchons ana Pit. actMties si addition 10 
general PA. duties and personnel matters. Stalls of 100/60 
wpm, smart presentation, 'A' levels and experience *1 this OekJ 
esEsnUaL Age 27-33. 

434 4512 

Crone Coikill 

Recruitment Consultants 

99 Regent Street 


The Polytechnic of Centra! London 

Secretary/Personal Assistant 

The Head of the School of Computer Science 
requires a Secretary/PA to carry out a full 
range of secretarial and administrative duties 
fora busy department Applicants should pref- 
erably be graduates with secretarial 
qualifications ana some secretarial experience. 
Wordprocessfng knowledge would be useful, 
but full training wiU be given to the successful 
applicant 

Salary (MG 12): £7308 - £8532 inclusive. An- 
I leave: 26 


nual 


days 


For an application form telephone 01-637 
1912 or write to the Personnel Office. PCL, 
309 FEegdnt Street, London W1R 8AL 

Closing date: 25 April 1986. 

Ptt IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES EMPLOYES 


INTERNATIONAL MEDIA 
REPRESENTATIVE COMPANY 

Seeks mature executive secretary. Top office 
skills required plus good French and a pleasant 
personality. Arabic would be a useful advantage. 
West End location. Attractive remuneration 
package. 

Please ring; 

01-235 8416 


Secretary 
To a Director of 
The Spanish Promotion Centre 

TM SniuUi CavRnmnin npon promotion adin la London 
maim a warrorv lor on- of in dirrrlon, 

Working knowledge ol Seaman, good standard of typing and 
•tmrrhand. numeral*, methodical, well organised. flexUdr atti- 
tude and wtuitig manner all neceaaarv. 

Sday iweek. 9 to S. Four weeks holiday a year Salary negooaole 
according to skill and experience. 

Candidates please write with CV to- 


A CHANGE & 

A CHALLENGE 

If you are dynamic, self- motivated, with ini- 
tiative & enthusiam, and drive a good car- 
letting high class furnished properties in 
Central London could be for you. 

CALL 

PAMELA BEREND 
NOW 

01-722 7101 
ANSCOMBE 
& RINGLAND 


SECRETARY/PA 
to CHAIRMAN 

Chairman of venture capital company requires 
enthusiastic and competent Secretary/PA with 
good skills and organisational ability to assist 
him and a Director. Located in a high quality 
office in St James Street this is an interesting an 
challenging opportunity with excellent remuner- 
ation prospects. CV.s to Mrs B Davies. 2b St 
James Street, London SWI A I HA 


fSEJantMBrt CONSlinXNTS 21 Bemyegi fcarig. SW3 




FILM 


SECRETARY /TYPIST (No SH) 

A wet+eroomed. flexlhte lively Secretary with good typing 
5 kills and wp experience or willingness lo learn is required 
by a small, friendly Head Offire of an organisation which 
owns and operates historic resldeniial properties. Duties 
will include 50% administration and 6 (Na secretarial and 
the offices are close lo Covert Garden. 

We offer a non-smoker a negotiable salary of £ 8 . 000 + . 

Please apply with CV lo:- 

Mr. H. D. Brmtfay, 

C i-try Mooses AssoicoBoo. 

Al Khtnur, London WCZH BUB. 


£8,500 

Our client, doseiy connected to the movie 
industry, seeks a young secretary to their 
vice president He is vary pleasant and 
wants to Involve Ws PA. You'D need first 
class organising ability In order to set up 
social events and regular in-house 
meetings. Excellent prospects and free 
cinema tickets. 100/50 skSte needed. 

ETKabeUiHw^RBCfuftfneotConsufh^ 

18 Qosvana Sheet London W 0-2403531 


SENIOR SECRETARY 
ARCHITECTS PICCADILLY 

We arc looking for a Kvcljr, capable perwn ;o "tool afi«r‘ a 
Senior Partner and his team of architects. The job is demanding, 
involving, and requins a person with gnrd general edsenkm 
and nccDcm secraaru! skills (bO wpm u oping). Ate 23+ 
Salary cflUXH pa 

Please write enclosing CV m 

Mss M. Whftnafl, 

McDonald Hamilton & MoBtefiome, 

102 Jernqra SI. 

Undos SW1Y SEE. 


EXECECUTTVE SECRETARY/ 
ADMINISTRATOR 
S.W. LONDON - NEW MALDEN 

A self-motivated, lively and capable Secretary is 
needed to take charge of a varied and often 
heavy workload in the Marketing Group al the 
New Malden office of a major U.S. multination- 
al company manufacturing high speed diesel 
engines. 

The successful applicant will provide secretarial 
and administrative support to the Area Director. 
Africa/Middie EasL and will also be expected to 
make a positive contribution to our small and 
friendly Marketing team. Opportunities exist 
within the Group for further developmenL 

We require: - 

* Excellent secretarial skills, including audio. 

* An interest and willingness to master the lat- 
est officr technology. 

* Good organisational ability. 

* Confidence and the capacity to work calmly 
under pressure and to lough deadllines. 

If you meet our exacting specifications, we can 
offer you a competitive salary, excellent working 
environment and the opportunity to learn new 
skills. 

Please send a detailed C.V. to:- 

Chris Sage, 

CUMMINS ENGINE COMPANY 
LTD., 

46-50 Coombe Road, 

New Malden, 

Surrey KT3 4QL 

Cummins is a equal opportunities employer. 


PA TO A GENIUS 
Salary £13,000 

Personal Assistant to the Chairman of a major 
Property Group. Highly demanding and occasionaly 
pressurised role for an extra special, mature and 
ctiplomabc Secretary with total confidence in their 
skills and ability. 

PUBLIC RELATIONS/PERSONNEL 
Salary £8,250 

Liaise with clients, meefla and general public - handle 
recruitment responsibilities ana training programmes 
for this West End PR Company. Attend and organise 
Press Conferences and be responsible for an 
entertainment duties for the Company. An excellent 
attitude along with good typing and WP skills are 
necessary. 


CITY RECRUITMENT- CONSULTANTS 
58 HOUNDSDITCH - V 

LONDON EC3A7DL ..#* V; 

01-623 4636 





Records & Music 

£ 10,000 

This is a lovely, growing company — wl up bv a wll-known 
and surtiwsful folk wnprr to promote both hi- own work 
and that of a new generation of rei-ordingartisis 
V>u will work closely wiih both him and his maruuxr in ait 
aspects, liaising with clients, handling >-nic-rtaininc etc. 

You should be professional, with rwllent -kills ifift Wit 
and good education. Apr 23-32. Please telephone 
1232 


Recruitment Ore-iillanl- 



SABIC 

MARKETING SERVICES LTD 

PA /Secretary 

£9,000 + BeneKts 

Sa&c MaiVertng Services Ltd. an afftate 
oi Saudi Basic industries Corporation, re- 
quires a PA/Secretary (25-351 with 
exeeflent seoetanai skiBs. WP. gooa presentation, poise and 
inmauue. Chemicals experience an advantage. Knowledge of 
Ararat desiraote. 

Plratr hmvanf dt-rmlcd cT inui irlrphow 'i’I to: 

SABIC Marketing Services Ltd 

Portland House, Stag Place 
London SW1E 5DA. 

(No agencies, please) 


HIGH ON VARIETY 
c£ 12,000 

Are you looking lor a lob which ini-olves more 
organisation and admin than secretarial work If you are 
25 28. with a degree or 'A' levels plus a sense of humour, 
enthusiasm and drive, the international Personnel Director 
or a successful Invesimenl management co wuh lovely 
offices near Monument, needs your help. You will become 
involved In a variety of areas but sec skills of ID? 65 
(mini, are also required CHy or financial experience help- 
ful: ample opportunity to use your ituuailve. Please 
telephone: 

588 3535 

Crone Coikill 

Recruitment Consu Hants 
IS Eldon Street EC2 


CONFERENCES 

to £11,000 

Highly resofcM turn o> corrterence orcamsefs based m SWI r?eds an 
admsusraiive PA lo ass-si thetr dynanw Mansgmg O:ectoi \aj «ui 
benutte BiMtwed m me naming ot sue company and you lesacnsiim- 
itnesi «ll male conesDOncence. teoorts. assisting wan proc'Errrmes. 
some invohemeni n The corluence sue as well as omvumg full 
seoeiatQi support i30.60wpnu. Sman appearance, pend edscatwnal 
badkgiMind. sohd C V. commerieni and HexiWe approach necessary 
Please call 

434 4512 

Crone Coikill 

Recruitment Consultants 

99 Regent Street, W 1 


PERSONAL SECRETARY 
(ccii^oo pc neg) 

...For Dtrmor General c4 
London based fede-aiion 
iVvcai rFpresenilnc maim 
Bntnh industry 'public and 
ornate seciori providing es- 
wnual sef-.’fcs to the 
communlu . Appucauens in- 
vued from weu-eduraKd. 
pcrcnable relavnl and self- 
arnurwi cjndhjdii-j with 
evretlent admiwsVatA'e and 

Innmrdi skills 'incluoing 
snorrrwndi acguired al se- 
nior level, protwbte mae 
30‘s W5. Write « trte- 
Phone Managing Lhrenor. 
iteuA tsectiuve Selec- 
non. 130. Baker SirreL 
London. Wl. Ol 425 &S61. 


RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANT 

Jon us in our wci oHice. 
We work as a team wisi no 
naiwjuar targets ane plenty 
ot moral support Type cvn 
corresponcencej C.V.’s. 

Sslify fS.TOf) plus boms 
rS5 bonus £3.300 per pensa - 
cold your eHorts 
fiaoreasa t&s 1 ) 

Phone Chrfsftte Pearce 
Wood ton se Appotatinents 
01-404 4645 (day) 
61-098 8228 (eves) 


1 

» 


esi- 
»• of 
a 
rit- 
;ro- 
eld, 
saw 
Ihe 
the 
kua 
ica- 
uU- 
ack 

vim 

ean 

met 

tish 

lry. 

Mr 

to 

of 

-ide 

rign 

and 
irly 
h a 
the 

Mr 
>nth 
■nee 
Mr 
• of 
for- 
d a 
mi- 
mo- 







s l s-n=f i sr's , 0=? n ^-£> rnifra 3 w? 


Wm 

I xcrcwwLPfc'Hjiivti’ir 

I ■ . CONSULVMif 

Admin PA 
in Oil to £10.000 

Within this young, 
dynamic oR compa- 
ny an opportunity 
has arisen for some- 
one with adminis- 
trative flair. The 
Administration Man- 
ager is longing to 
delegate to a PA 
with reliable skills, 
exceflem presenta- 
tion. an outgoing 
personality and the 
ab*ty to totally 
organise Mm. The 
offices and atmo- 
sphere are superb, 
as are the benefits. 

For further informa- 
tion please contact 

tffffr- EhvoedL 

=01-491 1868= 


£ 10 - 12,000 

HELP NEW 
BUSINESSES 

The challenging 
new world of ven- 
ture capital means 
that your boss is 
monitoring around 
IS companies who 
have been provid- 
ed with funds. As 
his PA, you are 
fast thinking with 
WP experience + 
some shorthand. 
Age 25-40. 



YOU 

COULDN’T 
HAVE COOKED 
UP A 

BETTER JOB 
£9,500 

You'll DH WOTKIfUt in the 
hcrtlc environment of a ron- 

fernwt* cent™. SWi for nw 
catering manager of Ihti. 
famous food oro.inis.il ion 
Obvious talent- will Include* 
a flair for organisation as 
cofriPT(*rio*s nave lo be* ar- 
r armed. and a rompeirnt. 
urnanwW** perootialify. as 
your stxrrianal duties 'i» 
shorthand) also have io bo 
done. Some raiding and 
boo* kero no oxoenence 
would make you Ideal. 



P.R. PLUS 

Orpaning press confer- 
ce c ti and extensive 
■enior level client con- 
tact are pan or your 
hnvtoviug and exciting 
team role writing Tor a 
dynamic Board Director 
in a maU. prestigious, fi- 
nancial P.R. consultancy 
is EC4. Good presenta- 
tion. confidence, 

isiliative + 2yre City 
cap. helpful. 'A's. trusty 
shd/60typ and WP train- 
m ess. SaL c£9.500. Age 

HObstoneS 


HALF DAY 
SECRETARY 

Required end April 
for Director of 
Mayfair Property 
PLC. 9.30 - 2. pm 
daily. Suit mature 
person 30+ with 
sence of humour. 
Driving licence 
and Property ex- 
perience helpful. 
Good salary. 

Tel 01-493 6441 
Ref TD. 


£13,000 pa 

As Chairman of an 
expanding property 
company. I urgently 
require a bright and 
highly efficient sec/pa 
to organise my small 
but very busy office in 
Shoreditch E2. Short- 
hand and typing 
should be excellent 
Initiative essential. 
Age range 25/35. 


tase telephone 
Pauline Samuel: 

739 3982 


CO-ORDINATOR 

c£9000 

A tar e woortunHy to be 
came totally involved 
within IMs dynamic sates 
mam company. 

Organising U* seminars 
neat start to flntsb. you will 
midie your own com* 
spondence. Ilawe 

extensively with ctienB and 
ensure that deadlines are 
met. ran typing and rusty 
SH please wwn a knowledge 
of WP. 

Can 283 1555 

For hill details 


2 PfT Receptionists 
for W. End Wrerfeing Agy 

Hre 8.30am-I.30pm, 
and 1.30pm-6.30pm 
Salary £4.400. 
Ring LYNN LMT on 
221-5072 

Drake Personnel Agy 


SCIENCE RCTION 
£11,500 

Two senior members 
of the management 
team of an extremely 
successful venture cap- 
ital rompaav need a 
bright and capable PA. 
Dealing with top level 
clients in Ihe area of 
high technology, you 
must en>oy working on 
your own initiative 
and sometimes under 
pressure. Good 

organisational and sec- 
retarial skills 1IIO6O 
+ WPi. will enable you 
to meet the demands of 
the lob. Age 30-35. 

WEST END OFFICE 
629 96SS j 

^CSL — =* 


BI-LINGUAL 

BOOK-KEEPER 

AGE 23+ e£9,500 

RapMly expanding Fmvn 
Ml company in Wi arc seek 
i ik) a nook keeper wiih good 
payroll nxpcneiKe lo look at 
ler one of iheir companies in 
France. Based in London 
l her- will be lols of liaison 
wiih Franre and Switzer- 
land. sometimes hav ino lo go 
lo Parts Mirvi be totally flu- 
eni in French and able to 
compose and type own cor- 
respond erne. Call Stella. 
Stella Frv RecruilmenL 

01 734 2567. 

XLstdUfni 

''Recruitment 


CONFERENCE 
SUPPORT 
c £11,060 

The MD of these well ss- 
lablisned conference 
oroanisera: is looking lor 
a PA to assist with the 
ninnmg o( the company. 
You wll treaty have 
several years experience 
at senior level, he willing 
to take on more respon- 
sibility and be capable of 
working as pert of a 
team m a highly motivat- 
ed and professional 
environment. 

Attention to detail and 
good administrative 
skills are essential as 
you wiU identity new 
market areas, organise 
budgets, appeals and 
sponsorship. 

Skills: 100/65. Age: 
30/40. WP experience 
essential. 

WEST END OFFICE 
629 9586 


PERSONNEL 

A CAREER M HURKCTM 


A young and volatile 
company all in their 30s 
and early SOs orter dy- 
namism and a career lo 
Uic skilled 'advertising'. 
You direct boss ts an un- 
lidv. demanding, highly 
creative genius who 
needs your flexible per- 
sonality and organising 
abilities. Rusiy short- 
hand is okay, excellent 
presentation is a "musT. 


WP Operator 
(with languages) 

Ccngutvoe a an rntwiwnonahv 
knoan igieqn language trarawi on 
X lypeMnmg canpany non maoein 
oHcss neat Hw BR mon n Vttst 
Drawn Wt* see* a tuitnei ’.VP 
opart* c^waoryBiMnina 
lorwjn language oul eswrtusva 
laaA accuiaie wsl Thegrpeoi 
uni *ou currenty ut» G 

unn o iw tunewB&nng W ar 

gw 

Wnaiagn 23-37 Saury dunng 
Wang C7750 to"? witw, yaar W 
EH750- whinadicarosiaance. 
Writ*: Cwnputyga LUL 

Honan Panda. Hwton Hood. 
WMDnyton.Utdm. 

TW: WWS-Umt. 




PERSONNEL & 

COVER GIRL | 
- £8,500 1 

Use idw rn-bnaoi' sUb ■hen S* 
ytu mo IK leading fiendi 
Iwadvainwant Asassmanio 
M Managn *> chaiqe of m* jh- 
nm pioOun dmwqonw ctr- as 
ire. learn aUM ihe biesl W; 
adwumofe m son and h» 

■ care Hetg wth ore ittfuunan 5£: 
K sales sre«. vttowm xhb- ® 
wws shFi-kswig jnc frairwg. Si 
Deatu it* lik mait«T w«n you 
r*enek muderpans aim inns- « 
late doanems. repons ail & 
idues yi 

V yeu Ime good rypng. siren- fi 
tana and oertem Fiendi ■& 
phone JU1 CORBETT an Btt- S 
9117. ^ 

ne.ri. .... ra ..at 

TMOftMCEMmniArioNALcncue 


EUROPEAN 
INSTITltTE OF 
BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 

FONTAINEBLEAU 

(FRANCE! 

ItrOLm Ssuih of Pans! 
seeks 

EXPERIENCED 

SECRETARIES 

Bilingual i English: French I 

Loco non on edge of Fomi- 
Imcmannnal I •niversiiv 
enviMnmem. Please send 
deuilcd curriculum uuc 
business references photo, lo* 
Sen kv do pLivjnnei 

INSEAD Bd dcConsunre 

77JK? FONTAINEBLLXL* 
lET'EX. 


SNATCH THIS UP 
TODAY! 

W1 RECEPTIONIST 
£9.000 + p.a. 

WE Need an immaculate 
senior receptionist who 
will be able to run a 
busy reception area in 
these smart new of- 
fices. The ability to 
remain calm at all times 
is essential here. Please 
phone SaUy Owens on 
01-235 8427. 4 Pom 
Streei, London SW1X 
9EL 


SmwmsBRiD.&Ff- 


PA to MD 
£12,000 + aae 

Inlmiauonal jnsligwiB 
company remnre a lop 
calibre PA who e. profes- 
saonai & smartly 
prevnicd wiih good edu- 
cation and pwlleni 
skills inc SH to work for 
The new MD in luxuri- 
ous otrices based at 
Barbican. 

Call Clare McDowell on 

01-623 4202 


EXECUTIVE 

SECRETARY 

£ 10 , 000 + 

Sew Pams ol Uaytar ad aroW 
(enures a securer# e»oenenc« 
M ciyd s (BW enoujn io as'^nw 
lesaonsAiaTv to« siueiwsren oi 
myth ol itw Mrrnnpi rfte Mrtpanv. 
dd'Xtng «ooimmeni <ji severer 
■es. amaiKanon gl dreni Iijnchans 
e*c fig* J8* to motr i" W 
sunn re 'o' iirme OeUiC. please 
pnone Jana vk#»n ai 

Newlands. Kmqm & Bound 

01-493 6770 


AMERICAN SOFTWARE 


Expanding into Europe 
needs expertenevd execu- 
tive Secretary near 
Heathrow, job requires 
seif motivated responsible 
person with 9°od 
organisational -skills. 

Some familiarity with use 
of VDTs and a second lan- 
guage a Plus. 
Compensation: £9.000 - 
£11.000 pa + bonus and 
medical. 

Send resume with address 
A phone number to: Anne 
Ferguson. A SNA. P.O Box 
6610 Malibu. CA 90360. 
Interviews to be held May 
5(h 4 6th. 


DIRECTOR’S 

SECRETARY 

WEST LONDON c£9.000 9-a. 

E»«nwt ciDoodumr/ hy a Cngtit 
and Mirouifla new 'o ecrv *rtb 
ins oiireul Sefes ftrecUB stacrv 
Jo l* piomcjed :o Mjiupng 
Dmsiijr 

Agee educaled lu J Nh 
sisncard wW gtKC shontam! sec 
ryping stjlls you Should Wrt 
pio«en eiDenence at Dnectw level 
To discuss yois irtKKi htftnei 
egrao Ooiwfi Hove oi Lym 
Llovd i* J*s65i on Uxpncge (DdSol 
7rwr v **iw » 

Aflsiji CnrhdeiTna! Re^uiwaii. JO 
tie* VimtHoi snceL Uxanuge. 
Micaiesw UM 7TU 


SECRETARY 
GENERAL FACTOTUM 

New modem an 
galkr> requires a 
young person with ex- 
perience in all aspects 
of gallery work: 
Administration, re- 
search and sales. 

\n excellent remu- 
neration package is 
offered. 

Reply wiih cv and 
phoio to Box c^3. 


OPPORTUNITY IN 
WESTMINSTER 

Old established firm of 
Parliamentary aornis 
need an Audio Secretary 
for Partner. High stan- 
dard required In handle 
unusual and iniomtinq 
work. 

Good salarv negotiable 
and olher benefits. 
Contact. 

Tonv Pobertson 
01 222 >>141 
(No agencies! 


PERSONAL 

SECRETARY 

Experienced secretary 
required by chartered 
accountant near Liver- 
pool street until end of 
July ISS6 when firm 
is relocating to 
Bishop's Storlford 
Salary c£l 1.000 J». 

Tot 01-247 73S8 


SUPER 

SECRETARY 

With dnvr and rnih'Msm 
;n **nrk m hum tmndtv 
c-tat" agents omr*> over- 
looking W.innswnrUi 
Common Aye 22* Salary 
hj- nDOetiaU'in Please ap- 
plv in vvntinq wiih full CV 
lu 

Creqorv B^rerman. 

Sullivan Thomas. 

59 Bellevue Road. 

London SWi? 


PERSONNEL 

c£10,000+ 

Thij tcadio* innesimrai 
hank is currcnlh cx^andins 
in line with “Big Bang" and 
k ihcretwc looking for for- 
■her hack up in their 
Personnel department. The 
poulion u for a se cretar y/ 
auisuni who will hr respon- 
sible lor all jdminsttrativc 
suppon on the rccruilmcni 
side. The ideal Candida if will 
be used to working in a busy 
and demanding (earn. ta*r 
IBM M ultimate npenence 
bui necessarily shonhand. 
Age range 2&-3S. 

Please rime 

588 3535 

Crone Coikill 

necmnmcrti consumma 

IS Eldon Street EC2 



P.A./ADMIN 

£ 10,000 

KENSINGTON 

No two days wiU be the 
same working for the 
Chairman and Managing 
Director of this trading and i 
property company. You ; 
writ deal with all the office 
administration and general i 
running of the budding in 
addition to secretarial back 
up. and you need plenty of 
flexibility and common 
sense to deal with any 
problems which land on 
your desk. Skills SO/GO. 
Age 23-30. Ptease ring: 
434 4512 

Crone Coikill 

Rgcrwunent Consultants 


£10,500+ BENOITS 
ST. JAMES'S WL 

opportunity Tor PA as righi 
hand io charming Main Boanl 
Rumor of imcmaiional 
Company. Intelligence, poise 
pins good shorthand St typing 
essential for this responsible 
posiiioq. Own luxurious of- 
fice. Laic JO'S lo Ws. with 
good track record, 
roman Jill Roberts. 


£ 11,000 

This is a very rare op- 
portunity’ to move 
away from the secre- 
tarial field as a Sales 
Assistant with a pace- 
setting American 
Bank. A fascination for 
City activities is a pre- 
requisite and some 
experience of Trading 
Floors or the Equities 
Market would be an 
advantage. If you want 
a career with a differ- 
ence and are aged 
between 23 - 28. then 
ring us. 

SHEILA CHILDS 

Recruitment 
01 -W 9075 


ISSBDRAKE 

PERSONNEL 

DESIGN AND 
MARKETING 

Your own otfiM is snort, a*-* 
most cftc'- 

You wfl enjoy no dynamics 
ol an aflvertHig mspn' 
stvfe enwromntnL Bo able to 
handle you; own protects and 
dims. SH b only an adwn- 
taga. hi your earfy 20s w» 
sum work eminence you 
can son ths career opportu- 
nity «*ati an eaanng mm 
company. 

Can MONIKA 
WUESCMNEft on 
01-831 0688 


fPcRTAL'COU.KGL 


Universfty of London 

SENIOR 

SECERTARIAL 

POSTS 

£8092 per annum to 
£10.779 per annum me. 
London weighting. 

(1) to mn the otto of Pro 
BflCKir | External Dewet- 
opnnflQ. Good secret- 
3nal and social skas. 
sound Judgement and 
maturity essential 
requvemsnts. 

(2) As secretmy to the Ct+ 
lege Secretaiy. Good 
secretaral »td organi- 
sational abutes succ- 
essful work experience 

and wMngness to work 

aa a member oi a team 
are raquirwL 

FunM snow 



HUMMER BNF 
£ 11 , 000 + 

Tha Kanagng Dvector of 


PAJSec wnti S/hand m both 
languages. Package take 
£15,000+. 

FRENCH SPHUNG 
PA/SEC £11,000+ 

Prestige post asssfmg 
General Manager of kitor- 
national Company in EC2. 
Suit parson 37 - 35 with 
previous City experience at 
senior level. Package value 
£16.000. 

For further details ol these 
and many other posts with 
languages lor career 
linguists, ptease ring. 

(01) 839 3365 

CU Ungaago Semites 5 Co 
6 BtatargSw Street. WC2. 


KICK THE HABIT 

£ 10,000 + 

A non-smotenq PA/Offiw 
Admrnstrator s neetted lo 
nm the small London 
office of a leading 
American broking firm. 
Based hi lovely offices in 
SW7. you wN be 
responsible for helping 
arrange lunches and 
seminars, as well as 
handing the day-to-day 
work which ensures ihe 
smooth running of the 
company. You must be 
numerate and enjoy detail, 
as well as having broader 
organisational and 
secretarial skills. (100/60 
+ WP), Age 30-40. 

West End Office: 



ADVERTISING 

This Is an Important posi- 
tion and would suU an 
experienced professional 
Secretary with strong 
powers at admlntstratlon 
and a tadvottntf In Me- 
dia. As Office Manager 
youtl lake over (he entire 
running o t (he offices and 
delegate lo _ other 

personnel. arcs £HUN 

- DESIGN 

Find class PA Secretary to 
assist Head of top Interior 
Design team. You'll need a 
strong m i einrtmj d person- 
ally and exceOenl sec 
skins. area XlOjMO 




it— _-- V ! 


Lf-tort L« A-^.-wg 
. Rti. , *jilrMT.t ( S«r.i»li*fk 19 Ifv* ' 
Ccn.-nu-. l r“. £rtg:|j.nn» 
•. ndJlf.-.rt »'"c* 19bV. 


PERSONNEL 
AKUME/ ADVERTISING 


the axoong wortd ot 
W soworittinq 10 PA IS 
Ovwsou Salts Execu- 
Mors at an assistant 
a sanitary you Ml 


7^J>. ii ^ 


MAYFAIR 
PROPERTY CO 

Require co m petent expo* 
nmnd Secretary. 
Exceiienl salary offered, 
fringe benefits, summer 
holiday honoured. 

Contact Mrs Berg 

Corob HdtDngs Ltd., 
7 Hill Street 
London. W1X 7FB. 

Tel: 01-499 4301. 



DIRECTORS 
SECRETARY 
WEST LONDON 

c£9,000 pa 

E*ce*!“rtr ccwnjivfv ter a crigm 
ana ourgpng Beiscsi to «rk wtn 
c jrttr 'Sa'ts Dneco.'. snwy id 
oe a^omoiM ;o Mangn? ftracRu 
Aijec 2i - sfetawd to a ftch 
sanare. «rSs good stwrtend and 
lypre; s»"s you sn®iki have 
craw: aoerwn* r. Director 'eve!. 
~n JicusT- year mweS lurther 
Mrrao* Cwrie HtWe or Lynn 
Have re JiSfi on U*bndoe 
ioess, r:5K. or wnn :a ACSWI 
ConbSscMi Reawnrert. « hew 
Windsor irefl.*. UxSrOfle. MtfOe- 
se« lbs 


DYNAMIC? 

An excellent, flexible secre- 
tary -preferably.* graduaiei 
wiiti an aabiude for figures 
is required for a leading 
Dar-ah Inlernational Con- 
struction Company. 

Entoy a role vvhirh wiU be 
very cnailenmrig. varied 
and totally involving in a 
lively working atmosphere 
Sena tenors of application 
and evs lo: 

Mr Jan Hove 
81 Holland Park 
London Wll 

For further enquiries lei: 
01-221 A981 229 2292 


VARIETY’ 

EVERYDAY 

£S,000 

An ideal opportunity ruxa 
in this lx 1 company tor a 
consult am secretary 
<90 SOi Lots of diem liai- 
son and learn work in a 
very busy* friendly envi- 
ronment. 

Phase (ritpfcuw W *SS 

Alias Emp Agcy 


PERSONNEL 

ORGANISER/PA 

£10.000 

Are mi a iwa prefessional/ Do 
yoo en|m l prestvaus Dt* en- 
vnrenent? Thai assn the 
dwnren n Chwnon m tms es- 
MMd usOTKfl axrrony. 
Dad Win dens a dl hnete >n 
noraq conferenras. swn- 
mi out mreaswe travel 
pUmng You be ran dI iik, 
convany's emnsan are- 
genne «hae (here are lab of 
ORKrtnus lor you. 

Un yaw sfwntanil secretarial 
sMHs and nan on WP. B you 
Re jo use youi mtame cas 
1MCHELLE SAYERS on 
623-1226 


OPINIONATED 

£ 12,000 

Tire w a ftnctnaHno ro*r 
lor a dMkraied PA wnn 
qmi iklb lo work rtowy 
with a Mnrkrt Rwearcfi 



DIRECTORS^: 

SEGRETARI^ 

'^ECF.'.T-^F.ST- COSlrt C'.'tt.-CS-' 




PERSONNEL 

NWTN FLAIR 
(31500 

A tamatuc qpportimity 
awaits you as PA to me 
MD of Ml mtenuttonal 
organbatton. your boa 
wm tatvofve you as much 
as possible and win Ode- 
gate HrerdhMly. it you 
have good typing, entoy 
dealing with people, 
crave iwpons un ty. Hfce 
to work on your own inl- 
rtaUve aind are numerate 
tuts Is toe oopolunlty you 
have been walling for, 
tdeatty. you wtU have 
knowledge of RaUan at 
Imst to 'O’ level 
standard. 



LEGAL SEC 
SOUTH KEN 



A BEAUTY! 

Gel involved in 
new promotions 
and. marketing 
projects as secre- 
' tary to the 
marketing manager 
of a beauty product 
company in SWI. 
it is a small, busy 
environment and 
WP + SH/Typing 
skills are needed 
together with 
previous sales / 
marketing exp. Age 
24+ . £8-9500. 

Oiv 377 8600 

Uta* End 4397001 1 1 


Secretaries Plus 


US BANK 


SECRETARY 
£8,500 + MTGE 


Receptionist 

Bwsnsssirtassssssas.. 

jSSSsssskss. 

Hours ol work wU) bc9ara to 530pm. - ‘ M „ruiter 

If you are lntere sted.please(6atfwrringorWW{^^ : ^^y^'^ ^ 

Mrs. El^ibeth Bell, Personnel DSff® SSSoSbBI^ 

56 LeadenhaU Street, London EC3A2BH, 01-480 S50U. 

No agencies. 

DEAN WITTER REYNOLDS INC. 


CoimtmtmnsiimjtweSta- 
heOng am ol ths flmantan Bank 
has ted to the creation ol a su- 
perb csss opportunfty for a 
bngw. hwly secretary with axnt- 
Isnt nds Worfang closely W8l 
cherts and emtatevH. The suc- 
cessful candidate w8 possess 
word processing aOtey, a good 
academic record and an atremrt 
pasonaBy. Ap 19+. 

For further details DBase contact: 

n Portman 

S r,, Recnritment 

K Services 

C 01-236 11U 




PERSONNEL 

TRAINING FILMS 
£9,500 PLUS 

Jon the Interna tio n a l De- 
panmere oi this fitot 


framing films. You musi be 
able to oganise and 
pnoribsa vrthout supenn- 
sten end entoy an eiamenf 
o* research liaison with 


d s POutore win be part of 
your day. K wafl as a pro- 
portion of shorthand and 

The pace « hee*c, but you 
'wte quddy trenail from 


SEOtEMuC necnuTOW 
DCWSUU»n5 


Starting out on 
your Secretarial 
Career? 

We are acting on behalf 
of several successful 
diems who have op- 
portunities for recendv'- 
quafifted college 

leavers, if you are seek- 
ing your first secretarial 
position in central Lon- 
don with an 
enthusiastic and com- 
mitted approach in 
addition to accurate 
skitis. we would be 
pleased to hear from 
you. For an initial infor- 
mal discussion please 


PWKBTT £10480 

Top property compaaes 
organdy seek' Hetgent 
secretaries, who are 
keen to gel mvotoed s 
team how properties are 
bought, sold & managed. 
Congemt enrirooraent 
te ream fer ado and/tr 
shorthand skills pks- 
good apetoce. : 





COLLEGE LEAVERS 
£7,000+ 

Ptsteuns Amencai Bs* B 



COLLEGE LEAVERS & 
2ND JOBBERS. 

If you are geniunety look- 
ing for a secretarial lob 
wtui possible career oppor- 
tunities in fascinating 
industries, nm contact ua 
at B J CrawMtla - w» real- 
ly do have same 
wonderf* Jobs an offer to 
you. 

MEDIA GROUP 
HEAD SEC 

To hdp out In the Media 
Dept and lo be "W*W 
help" to the Head of Dept. 
Good sec skids. Salary C. 
£ 8.000 

Phone. Octavla . 

. or Amanda 

935 9692. 


TEAM SPRWT 

€£ 12,000 

Do you enjoy Playing a vital 
rate in a small team? Ota 
Ctea. a smafl finance aid 
leasitg company, is knkmg 
tar a fledbie. fun secrelay 
to join tli» busy ECZ office. 
Dm wort b varied and wil 
rango from PA duties tar 
(fee Directors to h i ring on 
rec8ptian. Age mge a«fy to 
mid 2ffs ntih qieeds d 
9Q/80 Mpm. Please imp 



ADMINISTRATOR 


' Jidy renew 

R8Hoaal ‘rirgato ^ rt fan t-tt 
seeking* graduaic 'he 
jespofmBlcfor riworj*- 
aisaxtim ®E rmrbaaSb' 
training courses. Appli- 
cants aged 22-i2f» years 
should have a in in imam 
of sir months work ex- 
perience and be good 
organisers who can re- 
late well to people and 
work under pressure in 
a demanding team cn- 
viromneaL Some travel 
wtahmU.K. 

014371014 . 


Crone Corkill 

Racndtowfit Conauttants 

18 Bdoa Street EC2 


-& Associates - 
Reantment Gonadtanis 
BURqetaStreH-LoaduoWl 


BILINGUAL 

SECRETARY 

Japaoese/Ertgfish 

VMI estMstU Jmnesc Corepaiy 
naM . at Suobuy^n-Tlms 
sets aa wooweed Sauttay w*i 
a mod conwiuod ol to» tenpuvs. 
WP prevxfe sacrabmlacsatance » 
2 EwcuowB. Ftp nmig on 
MawiliqwMor. Oas Crtopwiy is 
vounOBg raptay Mo nag mwMs 
sal ottos Butin puspectk 
Cwnprtwre swanr negoine. 

For haflMH* dsMx, 
Y amto u i Lapa 
01-837 6625 


PA SECRETARY 

Private General Practi- 
rioner in Cbdsea needs 
duerftd. efficient, 

cfatnung imui n tii Tit to 
ran his hugr practice. 
Good secretarial ekiQs 
esaentiaL Previous 

medical experience not 
as important as ability 
to deal with people 
confidently. 

£9,500 per annum 
Teh 01-589 9988 


TWO-GUN TCCHI i 

: £12,000 , 

Are. 'yon . mterestod' ‘in' 
jooorse administration 
and computer^ Then 
you will enjoy running 
this office where vour 
additional responsibil- 
ities will include the 
managing of staff and! 
occasional ■ pressure, 
whilst ensuring that 
minute detail is coramo- 
nicaied to alL 
Aged 25-40, you will be 
wen-educated and have 
exccUeni presentation. 
Bookkeeping experience 
would be a help but 
good s e c ret a ri a l skfits 
are esseotiaL (100/60). 

CITY OFFICE 
726 8491 


AES B&fiiEraffiR 


ADMUBSTRATIQN 

E3L500 

Ybw oonfldw* nwawr *xJ 
oobjofeB PwsmMy ** tow 
M-mn- ten m |w to 


ummn. True CDnwwiy. tan* 

Jug gib dteartrtwep-iMwts 1 
ana cut pin ten d *w«- 
wbWoii ww widUn wort, 
man at yow vxted day. Ew- . 
toy uanayour fedww. tom ■. 
no m .nangm are oftao. 
away.- ■■ 

Tto prapacfraid tonafls are 
a aatow . in renan tar gou 
fWMn.we s to rt an dL 00 
PATTI ROSS today on 
22HMT2 

J w 

naiwwiMixiBWiUNNtofW 


TEMPORARY 

MEDICAL 

SECRETARIES 

‘join me nrecMsa 
Private practtce/NHS 
Choice of Makings . 
All areas of London 
BKcUcnt rases 
+ bonus 

-• Tet Jeraty MBS 
713 4085 
RtaSllP 34085 
Blue Arrow Medical 



SOPER SECRETARIES 


MAYFAIR 
ESTATE AGENTS 

Urgently require a highly 
motivated, confident and 
well spoken secretary/ 
assistant for their busy 
House Saks Dept. Accu- 
rate typing- dear teL 
manner essential. Superb 
prospects. Salary £9.000 
PJL 

Apply Collin Glinsman. 

Tel: 409 2020 


SECRET ARY/ASStST ANT 

£3.680 + Car 

To wrrt for Head CH Property 
Comwny SWI Dupes mu m- 
elude general admmstianan as 
well as Kiwwmq to pnvate his- 
ness mieiesis Speeds « tOO.’fiO 
Dka souret enucahoiui tuck- 

S ound essential Beal age 26 - 
> Senelils wW mdude a it ess 
dUowjncs 

For lurther delate ptease we- 

jwie- 

Veronica Lapa on 

01-837 6525 
o 


anrocom 


IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN WORKING 
FOR A YOUNG, SPORTS ORIENTATED 
COMPANY 

INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT GROUP 

THE MARK McCOSMACK ORGANISATION 
HAS THE FOLLOWING VAC A NOES 

French Speaking Secretary 

Required for busy vice president of Tclcvrsion/sports sales dept 
Good skills cornual together with good telephone manner. 
Knowledge of wp ad. Musi be able to »ork calmly under pres- 
sure as pan or a ream Lots of client con lad. 

Audio or Shorthand secretary 

Required for financial depL Suitable for first or second jobber 
wiih proven skills 

Please call or send CV. with salary requirements id: 

Sally Long 

14-1 S Fitzbaidiner Street 
London WIH 9PL 
01*486 7171 


United Medical & 
Denial Schools Guy's 
Campus. 

SECRETARY 

Ehror mw rth and rtlniral 
ural leamrei ronortnn s«. 
rn^ri lo B«ot» iniot^M In 
all jsiwclA ol itv* (h-pl Some 
mvrtiral un extvxrmrr lo- 
iriifrt wim a iiwiy 
ppivuums* an odianLw 
ADOOinunonl far unve yean, 
a Dor ox Salary on scan* 
Ciyqni C7.37S (w inti + ail 
dilHUUl ukwuiirrt for 
tpmgl -.WU, For further tte 
tails leleohone Ol OS92 
exi 2 Mi 6 «v MOO or vend full 
CV and me n,mrv oi iso ref- 
erro*. lo ltw SJallmg Officer. 
IMPS, $1 ThomJm'S Cam- 
pus. London SE1 7EH. 


SLOANE 

RANGER? 

Creal orooTluniiv ror sec- 
ond ion dot lo move mlo 
an\*TiTvn»*j working as PA 
lo Salei Martnxmq Pnec- 

lw SlM-rtv 1*3 45. wp 

Irmiunq onoi 117.000 plus 
peirunn veneme plus share 
oMinn mus i iip assurance. 

01 636 4000 
ATLAS EMP AGY 


CMBF EXECUTIVE manafltnq 
trowlnq motoring organlsniOfl 
in WA wp»s PA. Agp 25 ■ 30. 
m'f qradiMte- pmtosstonal 
malUlca/ton aakter pr ettmiL 
Pteave reply to BOX E98. 


PCRSOMHEL wen educated sec- 
retory SI+ no shorthand for 
weu known chamy in wi. 
£7000 repp lunches - 
firaume. Phone O v seircUon 
iRcc Const 01-828 B5A0. 

TfOUHGIMl EXECUTIVE PA - 

£11.000 Fluency In French 
and SpiMsh, excel Pit and 
orunisaMiul ability and good 
sec stalls are reoidred for this 
ctuUengmu post with a nm or 
tiuemafkmai consul tan Is. Age 
«w- For further details call 
Merrow Eirru Abv. The Lan- 
guage Spena lists. 626 1487. 

LEGAL SecnETARES c JN.6O0 
■ £10.000 PresHgeousaoUciurs 
to Wl & EGA Have 3 openings 
in LUtgaUon. Conveyancing nr 
Company Law - All al partner 
level with WP mining Oood 
company benefliv can Mr. 
Thammon on' 01428 GT9SL 
ksMSUod Legal 


EMellml opportumiy for secre- 
racy. 50X wffti V3* level 
education and good th ■ typing *■ 
wp dills in uvely American 
bank in Ihe City. Call Ol 377 
8600 iCttyl or Ot A59 7001 
iwnl End I ■ secretarlet plus 
•The Secretarial Consultants! 


SECRETARY TO THE 
MANAGING DIRECTOR 

£12.000+ PA 

Regurtd <or a lame Group ol Com* 
names based m wi ettaem 
otto rrnnoed 30+ Tbs job w* . 
nands good seomroU sU)s 
mrlurtng sftomund ^^5. aWir, 
:o mw on own urtranvu and urns 
uressuip Eicaiwr prasowu and 
oak'- and Dfeasam oti»» 

Wine dRdnsuig C v jo - 
PfflSONNfk ORECTOP 
BQCkFOHD DUM. GROUP 
33 NORTH HOW 
LONDON Wl 


mAVELLINC sec 1 CH SOO * ex- 

tf-iKes Visit new Mare* and 
merl no* pepph. in *hi- unu*>uF 
l».mioii fidiillnd llifmighiinl 

lie LK VIM will Itx.-nr Oi*IH*f 

oir, evpm*e> .vr vou c.irrv <vui a 
resimMDn* admin^irynlal-tl 
luncimn. Hkllb 90 to wpflv 
■Vinrrov, ihe rerruiiirMnl con* 
vuiiarm. OJ-SW SH) *• 


WESTMimTER Based pouanl 
erganvalion renin res a number 
of vrtfrUii.il vidff There are 
■aroor and lumor vacancies and 
•salaries raiwje Troni £9 000 • 
tb.SCO pa SiH is neemsarv lor 
Mbmr Util no I all loin. You rausl 
tan* accurate lyptng. al MM 
XT Irvrl nnicniian ipe Enobah 
and a cocnaivtit leimtibn* man 
net You vimum enjoy doattng 
wHh a wide imeij of people, 
both in pw*ion pm chi ihe 
trfprWHM* Hour’, arr 9 JOB.XJ 
Wiih a weeks huMoy and on 
extra d.i> each hank hohdav 
Please canton the Personnel 
Manager on 01 W2 9Sil. 


SCCRETARY PEQUWCD Short- 
fund & Audio for EiKHteh 
familv based in Belgravia, 
flnghl pcrsooalilv. luneslv. d»- 
rrrimn are msemial qualities 
p» Metre* ,vy range n SO - JO'S. 
Conn vilarv neqniuthle anrord. 
i no to j»* A rvov-nenee A other 
hepeiiiv oiipreii mrludimj free 
funrnes V* rile VL'itn full pjrucu- 
Lit* lo BOV CU&. 


HOTEL Peravnal AutKlatU iSS-h 
■ or General Muiiaucl in top 
W ml End hong u itn oodd SH A 
rv ping «prwt* who wanLv Io use 
imlialive and nrqamviliqnal 
auililies in Hus busv evening ai 
mosplvre £ld.Mo Phone O V 
*L-lf<Iioo ‘Per Cvnvi Ol-SSS 
U5AS 


CONTEMPORARY GLASS 
GALLERY 

We an? a friendly, fexpaudtnfl young Retafl Oorapany oon- 
centrattng in contem p oraiy and studio gtm tfesdsned by 
speciatat glass artists. We urgently need an organised nu- 
merate and unflappable Secretay. Stalls 90/60. good 
seme of humour essential. Benefits Include staff ittwynum 
and salary Is negotiable according lo age and experience. 

TahphoM 1 mm in 
01-340 0999. 

(No Age n ci es please) 


LATYMER UPPER SCHOOL 
King Street, Hammersmith, W6 

Headmaster’s Secretary 

required to be responsible fin* the administration- of tit® 
School Office, registrations and entrance examination 
arrangements. Good secretarial skills req u ire d . Further 
details may be obtained oa request. 

Applications together with full CV. and the names of 
tiro referees jtr. The Headmaster. Latvmer Udw 


COOL, CALM 
& CAPABLE 

Far rah S tead & Glynn's busy furnished lettings 
department in Chelsea has promoted its sec r e* 
tary yet again and now needs a calm and capable 
secretary, preferably with previous-property arid 
Wordstar experience. Salary aae. 


01-370 4329 rdf SG. 


INTERESTED IN THIRD WORLD? 

B !«*ins for a *otwy 

o 10 “W* 11 rw ***** 

with Social Forestry and PteKnl Dnetop- 
"«« proms. Salary csl £7.000 + LV*. 5 weeks bolidny. 
SSftKEl? M0O ^ yl4 H l ^P ni » tonnfc Dudley, Agrieid- 


itmmm 


Pirvcinrx* veraury Busy. In- 
i prilling wrnk In young 
irwMti* «i Multi Wed* con 
tid»ui WnHBw maimer Mim 
*ta*oying to .viom. ag i-lr. 
a** 20* raooo. Joan Tro* 
RiYrutlmml Ot 379 5515 
CONVCYAMCtMCTlUTKATION 

LU 500 ■ £l O.OOO. 2 postwiK 

for WotaialR Sotlritonv. An* 
24* with warm «». Livviv 
rate Call Mr Thanunon on Ol 
USB 5793. KlinUiUf UWH- 


Euvirannintai 

Oma ntiauan. 

Secretary- Admin Asdstanr re- 

,0 woni * *»W» 
►vet and under pmum. Typ- 
jrt .k 1 wgm nun. audio, wp s, 
7y*WetMnQ- Non-mutar, 
£■500 m Contact unu Me. 
Donald 01 335 7086^^ 


BI AWA OM O DUtECTOit of 
ter Suuare - based. , * *** 
Dramouan agency remain 
UiUous. hngnt sh tet. with W 

noenance Cwnpetuivc ntn 

according lo ear end nm’" 
«k*. Phone Met Thaver Oi* 
AM 4006. 





























































xqaa«jt.a. v. • -■ -■ _. i. .. 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 


») ® 


#Tya 


RTYB 



’ GU IDE 




PROPERTY 


VILLARS- SWITZERLAND 


TBWESHARE U K. 


IMi WML ML Oft* Mtt lime 
stuff ctuM lei Ifl In Aviemorr 
KWra 6 Fishing." golf, sporu 
comgln UOO Phcwr IH6S 
22178b or 0463 230361. 




LONDON PROPERTY 


ST PETERS SQ. We tnprcwiF 
Semi Detached name wiln urge 
nun and vai drawing roam, a 
bedrooms. 3 bamrooms. 
Spot rale Cranny Flat and ow 

In the era poullon on iiw Cjj 
>K if of U»« classical period 
square £ -I ■56.000. T Hoskins 
730 «M*S7 


MARKHAM SO CKMn LUber 
pari □( Eolli Virtnnan Hw. 
2ND floor. 2 owe Bedroom mu. 

2 bamrooms. largo 


FULHAM Lux Victorian terraced 
hww. 3 beds, bathroom, new. 
dining rtn. 3711 klirhen ronxer- 
uion UUIIU'. «r garden 
£1*6000 01 386 1340. 


■’ininB twom U-oM I fuuum SWG. Charming well 


i.irino uie Square £235.000. T 
Hose ms 730 90.37. 

RZfiCMTS PAJM . BAKER 5T. 
■Heyi Desirable ltgiil nuson- 
M|e Lill. p o«B. 25" nt. J.IL 
balhrm 88 m £126.600 Of- 
fer; moled sole tome Wilks 
Mean & Eve 9 Harley SI. W I 

ei7 K471 


COUNTRY PROPERT\' MSHOPS RD FULHAM lunnr BELGRAVIA- Defloniful pmM 


Util triptoHmM this Spring 

^ Return High! jng ,v/o ntghts it the preshge Pizza Hotel Nev; York, offered- 


mm r#: 01*30 7321 


ft PROPERTIES AT AUCTION' 

Tei: 010 ! 212 319 8550 

THE AMERICAN REAL ESTATE & INVESTMENT SHOW 

li li' i 'r i ' iii tri i Ijjjj ISIBEMSaSBS lBKS3E3BS^SgiS2 


visit the Windmill Hill 

Algarve Spring EXHIBITION 


Presenting an Exciting new Freehold 

The Algarve -prices from £42,000 r- 
WED/THURS APRIL16 th 17 th 1^SI 


Showroom: 31 ST. GEORGE STREET. FI J I( )TT 

LONDON W1. Tel: 01-491 2677 i 

(oft Hanover Square, epp, Sothebya) -v. I* 



Your Harbour... 

PUERTO ESTEPONA RESIDENTIAL 

Luxury apartments by Yacht Marine, prime 
position. 23 minutes from Gib. 

I. 2. & 3 bedrooms (between 100 and 289 m z ). 
All with large terraces, white marble floors and 
fireplace, directly overlooking the sea. 

- Parking places. 

- Swimming pool & beautiful gardens. 

- Very interesting prices. 

- Payments over 10 years. 

- Already built. 

ASERVISA 

IN THE FIFTH LARGEST GROUP 
OF SPANISH COMPANIES. 

(Marbella- Malaga) Heal Office. Serrano, 23, MADRID-1. 

For inspection Rights brochures and further details, 
call: UK Agent 

HOME & ABROAD LTD 
01-969 1133 


HOUSE HUNTING? 

Let us do It for you 
... Saving urn# and uwiblr. 
BT you are looking in Sus- 
sex. Hampshire or Kent, 
contact us today. Mortgage 
and design advice also 
available. 


spacious 3 bed U-errace now 
Willi vduM roof terrace 
Open pun living area, larar 
kitchen good sun brnromn in 
good twrorauie order Fire 


hilar d qualllv . 2 rvcogllons. 
bedrooms study bed 3. bain, 
rtoak kitchen, small garden. 
CH ob sears £285.030 King 
Mood 61 730 61 91. 


mod 3 bed use Pretty gdn. plan- 
ning Dermis for (uthrr bathrm - 
irrwng rm. gas CH £129.960. 
Tel 3H5 *207 alter bom. 
HENDON CENTRAL Superb large 
druenrd Seeds Srcm an 
room lulls lined A double 
grazed CH FH £160.000 ready 
lor moving m lo 01-202 8809 
itMGHTSBmGE Darden square. 
UdfiMB one bedroom flat, 
lully equipped, fined hJIchcii. 
soon lease. £82.000. View lo- 
day 236 748o 


good decorative order Frrr I noon mi ijuon. I hum uniu mm . - 

Bdd. £.30.000 01-730 M50 nwi RB WTO. m Vwortan 


SOITH OF THE 
THAMES' 


FUT1WY SW15 
BEAUTIFUL 

1 Malaise newfv Inienor de- 
signed flai 3 beds. 2 recepi. 
Uwwrr room, lux lulli near 
Mes. lacuzz*. bldei. aola 

p laird taps’. Lara lux kit >all 
macninm. cormcex. Owcm 
rotumm. garage. tills, entry 
phone ExcrUml Mention, 
smart Mock. * I Mrud lor 
qafck ub UIMM 

Tel 01-937 on . 
Or 01-546 7*» 


weekends A eves only, 
mvanase. cm * wick dm. in 
preuigraus Hanuigton Ad A su- 
perb 6 bed family me with spar 
Inmg accom A dunning 20 y 


terraced nouse requiring 
reiurb 7 rooms. Mill, s r use- 
mem. 2 rooms gan F hM 
£150.000 Daniel Smith Ol 830 
6o41 


sin laong gan directly to me I COVEHT GARDEN MTCZ. BrkUll 


S«S*T®71B 

i <1 023) 27961 


THE PERIOD 



rn-er C*e Si erf ( si phng 
£325.000 John Spencer 995 
3366 open all Easier. 

SUTHERLAND AVE W9 Dcllohi- 
ml raised ground floor 2 bed 
flat Bngm recep, mi. baui Ex- 
cellent flerorau ve o rder. Huge 
storage space. GCH. Curuun 
and carpets met £77.000 Tel 
289 6261 or 350 1581 

weekdays. 


mod 2 bed flat in unique detrl- 
opmem nfl Neals Vard. Fully id 
3 cpld lZ2>Tfcr £136 000 £. 


3rd floor a bed llul. lulty relur- 
bribed. long lease. tow 
oumoiikb £140 OOO Gems 
Pr coerlt es OI 723 8624. 
KHMOND. Crown Terrace 
Charming nw. 3 beds. 2 rerep. 
Lib. Sunrrv west gdn & sneq 
All Ills lor £69^00 F h 
AbtxMsbury E3I. 381 0677 


UPHILL RO. NW7. MUlhiUs pro- MAIDA VALE- Sunny 2 bed rial. 


rmer Road. A superb dntached 
■ami is hse wim a bens. dMe 
recep. kitchen and uuiily area. 
fulfgasC H. front and rear gar- 
den. patio, qaraoe. Freenoid. 
£260.000 Ocnn Properties 01- 
723 8524. 

BOLTON SDNS IPS. EinMnik 
at apl In line detached house 
ovenooking (oirly gardens. 
Needs some aflenllon 3 bed. 2 


Igc recep. bath. ksb.CH.10 5T JDfBtS WOOD MAIDA VALE 


years Renewable £165.000 
King Wood 01 730 6191. 
BOW STREET TUBE WL Rarer 
Handsome i & 2 beorm permd 
rata in guiel superbly central 


A Shaw 3 pmrv 01 240 2255 FTH-HAM SW6. V Allrar hse 3 
■ N^nLi Mii^Viumi a™- 2 r«H»- uulitv. Hi. hath. 

umS vrwix gdn Recently mod Cl 20000. 

LITTLE VENICE, Vlrlonon RldJev A CM 383 6623 

Mj^ Jll 2 , MdrJSlir , lSlV B Ilu5 HABWIEWNIW New'cn ! 
&S kTSrir na. LUX IMU. £75.<W| 

b«S 9J year lease £76 500 EWaes 289 

Tel 289 4508 f 240 4911. ° ,oa 0568 

AIDA VALE. Sunny 2 bed Hal. "«?* ,V«f ! 

rvij r arm iiitafI Ww lut *_ ora ronursions. 

dlmi^'raom. 289 

pnone £55 OOO ror quick sale 

Tel 431 0823 day 968 3924 MAIDA VALE W9 Lge 2 bed n«l 
nr wi Pre s tigious block. Ex cornu. 

NET Barnes CHI Or Sac by £l20.0fW Howard Esfalra 289 

Hammersmith Bndue 4 bed- 

rooms. Two Morey property — AfDA VALE W9 Soac Vic man- 
min south (King qrdn 2 Lae Man flal 2 bed l recepi Kil and 

rrerps. Lge LML £149.000 Or bain. £86.600 Howard EsUles 

Offers T Hoskins Tlo 99F7. 289 0104 6555. 

r JOHNS WOOD MAIDA VALE OPP KEN QOHS WE. Spacious 2 
BDRS. Bngm 2nd ffr flai in well bed. 2 bain, l 1 '? recep. kjlctien. 

nalnlained pb clock. Bedroi. <f4l with lge 5 facing balcony 

>alh. recep. kllcnm Porter 89 *ts £175.000 727 9Tf» »ti 


CCH Large lined 

tilrlvn dim no room, entry 
pnon^ as OCX) ror qwk %afr 
TH 451 0023 (Uy 968 3924 
w|< 

QUIET Barnes CU1 de Sac by 
Hammersmith Bridge 4 bed- 
rooms. Two storey property 
wim souin (King grdn 2 Lae 
rrerps. Lge LML £149.000 Or 
Offers T Haskins 1» 9937. 


BOH. Bngm 2nd ITr flai in well 
maintained pb block. Bedroi. 
bath, recep. kllcnm Porter 
Lift Lee 58 vn £58.003 Ceo 
Trollope L Sons Ol 23S 8099 


address. Low ouigotngs Clean W14 BARONS COURT I bed flai. 


basic rood. 65 yr& £69.500 
LB9KXJ Sluan VyUson 235 
<7725 ’Sun lO - 21 
SLOANE SQUARE imTi. Luxury 
audio IfJL furnished £59 000 
98 yrs Trt 684 6168 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


YflUfcOUtft 

ME&to>dil,CoAta 



CYPRUS 





All roortM Magnificent sea 
views. Lounse. Balcony. 
Swimming pool Tennis 
Court. Malang. Ctaie sea and 
Amanets Archeological 
Site. Nr Shops. 

. £53.500. 


AT CASTELL MONTGRI 
HOUDAY VILLAGE 

-2supert>5Mraningpool5.1raB(fisc8. 
restaurant, las. supannafMi. Luxury 
MoMe Homes NmiElied tor BigtiL fufly 
fitted totnlwn area, aod plumbed to will 
sttower. toaei.etc For hdi details nisi 
wnten quotaoons on toam* 
schemes. < required, ptase 
telephone our 24 to answer 
service of write. 


iSJjRoS 


I V r *i H 3 |i 5 ' Uh 

445 ^ 


Sunday 13lh AprillZ-Bpjn. 

THE post House hotel^brook street 




& THE RICHMOND HOXHOim. 
RICHMOND HILL. RICHMOND. SURREY ‘ 

Tavneistar 01-549 4251 

DminK ftouw. I.l-lff Londwi Rant Ktag^ottVpoanamaa. SmrnyKTV MU 1 


COSTA BLANCA 

1 bedroom apa r tm e nt, atom pool - tuoo 

2 Mdroom apartmaM. stored pool E 12 JD 0 

1 badmom maiaooBtte* - ' £KL 250 ' 

Z bad vB»«Bwfpwr . . C 1 V» 

FE«r 0 PfflUJW PARISH PROPERTY 

8 Station M. tftstott, Eainhs mm:2SST J24 ftrej 


V iH WN B MEMORCAT Fomdb 
lux dev bandy heath Pool 
scum «i«ml TTmH. Fran 
£20 OOO BUubrUa Lid 01-937 


MENORCA CZMk IMH share (fun 
■hTfhi rural ira nr Mahon. Fur- 
neded fore. 4 b. r. 3 fMtti POOL 
gdn. age. car Estao high rent*] 

UJCTuno 01 278 4855. 


MENORCA. VILLA. CARLOS 3 
bearewraxi 4 uiim w. h«v 
furnished TOO yams from sca- 
£21.000. Trt 04779.294 

TflUAS and ppuiiRcnB fpr pair' 
■n Menorca. Please Irle Phone 
Ol MT 4274 



THE INSURANCE COMPANIES 
ACT 1982 

ST PAUL FIRE AND MARINE 
INSURANCE COMPANY 
NOTICE IS HERESY OVEN 
th*i an Appbrawon wao on iTth 
March 1986 pramled la the Sec- 
retary of SUU> for Trade and 
Industry by SL Paul Fire and Ma- 
rine hw ura ncc Company I'tat 
Pun for the approval of UK 
Secretary of Stale purroam lo 
Section 61 of the Imuranc* Com- 
parer* Act 1982 to a proposed 
Bra infer to CIGNA insurance 
Company o t Europe SA - NV 
f-CIGNA Europe*'i of ad of SL 
PmFi rights and obhoanons un- 
der podetes wnllen by ll In Die 
course or the insurance bUttnesn 
carried on m the L rtUcd Kingdom 
by Si Paul's Direct. Marine and 
Avtadon Business Departmenls 
prior to ITUi March 1986. includ- 
ing provtstons lo wrure me 
conDnuanoti by br agabia OCNA 
Europe of any legN proceedings 
by or against Si. Paul which rr- 
lale u Uiwe ngnts orobUgMtons. 
The policies affected by Ihr appu- 
cauon comprise all policies 
wrlilen by SL Paul In the course 
of carrying on insurance business 
m Ihr Untied Kingdom during Ihr 
relevant period except non- ma- 
rine reins ur ance K6umed and 
certain Inctdenial marine poHciea 
MRTUOAL ALGARVE extra “* TrW 

uonal villa on one floor, built „ _ 

around columned courtyard * ****** 

wKh cupola, pond and fountain 

... to a warm and sunny land ^ nd of ^ "St 



PORTUGAL 


superb rerep 17 x 14 ll Galley 
k li. Brflh Gar. C H. Finrd cup- 
boards. carpels High dec order 
wllh ono Icdlurrs £54.600 
Tel- 01 385 2984. 
ALEXANDRA PARK K22. 16 
mini City. Immarulalr Edwar- 
dian terrace. 3 beds. 3 recens. 
FDG. CCH no chain £86.000 
rruxd C-l 889 4267. anylime 
CAMDEN TOWN. 4 storey Vic 
tonan terraced house. 2 firs lei 
vacant part s c spacious 2 bed 
lux nuns £126 000 ono I hid. 
Tel Ol 486 7062 
CLOSE SLOANE SQ. Oulrt 3 Dbh> 
Bedroom rial. 2 Large recep- 
item rooms immacuiaie order 
49 VRS LEASE £295.000. T 
Hoskins 730 9937 
Wl Che Montagu Sci 2 bed de- 
MWer rial in lux black Lng lie 
£140.950. Millers 01 289 

3666 


BUSH KILL PARK ENFIELD 

19oO 4 bed del house, 
lounge dining rm Idl. baih. 

rlkrm. lull GCH. gdns (rani A 
rear. gge. easy acceto transport 
'.-hr Oxford Orem.. £136.000 
01-360 0863 

KWICHTSSKIPCE SWI. A well 
prewtiled Ikuu and spar 2 bed 
omd n dal. m this rtestigp Gdn 
Sq Rerep Rm. KII Break Rm 
Balh. CH Rm Lease 29 YRS. 
£ 1 75.030 HARBODS ESTATE 
OFFICES Ol E89 1490. 


COMMERCIAL 
PROPERTY 
TO RENT 


WEST HAMPSTEAD Sculptors 
Sludto. architect dengned Sun 
gamier, photographer. 1350 
square feel. wain-, no too. £65 
pw evr. Ring 01 482 3039 


BLACKHEATH 

1st floor very snactoiia 2 
bedroom convfltolCTi 
flat. Ideal for profession- 
al couple. Well 
decorated wllh filled 
carnets, fully fined kitch- 
en. unique bathroom. 
GCH. perking srcre- 

£65.000 

TEL 01-856 2499 

AMSCRPtfOHK 


BATTERSEA. 

Very large- efegsnay -tote) 
out 3 bed flat in excellent 
Road. 3 double bedrooms. 
rccejXIoin. kitchen & bath- 
room. GCH. 
mjsoo L H M unich. 

00 

01 223 2252. 


BLACKHEATH 

Superb I bed flai with cres- 
cent windows in Grade n 
Hated Georgian Crescent 
overlooking heath. GCH. 4 
acres of landscaped commu- 
nal gardens. 

£67.500 . 

Tel 01-318 9640 



wh«v foodand wine areWm 

5STWrSaoNj?H«2?B 


b e dro o m s, three hamroem. nu 
room, dining room, kuingr and 
large lull wtUi marble floors 
Very large tilted kttchen. Long 


Lime StreeL London EC3M 7NA 
during normal busmen noun on 
any day i other than a Saiurday 


btorony^inm irtewshilr^ or SumU v or PuMto HoUdayl on 
w before Sm May 1986. 
lo maul rooms ks rugu ouAuiy wrtnM^ 


fined furniture. Ctorage (or two 

... him i.mrhhnt. Rat In tum C«TUn0 tW KTUKlrt fflUty Qf Mill 

cor^pius in nvo ^ ^ s^rmorv of Slaw for 

ve^tole ^Ssrden^mrtinoe 1 Trade and InduMry al toe Depart- 

.asr.SSS E.'S ES: 

^ABTSfSSSS S5srs2L.f!S5K-J?..<SS 


CHAN CANARIA 

PLAVA DCL8MU5LS 

largir Run average, bonoa- 
tow type vina u hub 
remplm of 22. with swan- 
■ntno port 2 beds.- lo un ge/ 
dlmT, ML. I»lh. roof terrace. 
FuHy eautpeed « him. Sea 
Views. Close to Maspalosnas 
aaff coarse. 


swimming pool and leimK 
court, plus cobbled roads and 


Smith Sirrrt London SW1P SB 
before 4lh Jane 1986. TheSrcre- 


Wry of Slate win not defermine 
the apuHcanon before ronsMertng 
ylUa wiihinjroimd s- An mam represmiauons made lo him 
services. Price mwa on kjitoim it,i« rai U 
£210000 rierthig. Qulnla_ d» 


Coluius. Quatro Estradas. 8600 
Lagos. Algarve Phone: (O' 82 
60962- Telex; 5765 1 Canone P. 

VALE BO LOBO. The Afgare r. 
Luxury villas for tale In BUs 
well-known resort 3/4 bed- 
rooms wilh pool From 
£86.000. 037366466. 


SL Paul Fire and Marine insur- 
ance Company 
401 April 1986 


RIB 


c£ 10,000. Two Mcreinrtet early 
aers ipos 2nd MObrn) wen edv 
rated, expenenced. cooUdrM 
and reaMMiaMy iqngioM 
Good now of humour. Needed 
lo w* xupport to ctomms 
young Crty Bi o he r s wpooe 
hulk toad engenders occaMonpi 
irtiqweameM. . - 6norumnd 

0C> uorto. really good typing 
lor snort leners am reports, lo- 
lermied Mrtmpohon • and 
■mnuuMii will emure toh wRii 
ioiv of fun ana real pr rape d *. 
Frame benefits. Joyre -CnfnrM 
Ol 509 8807 (flee cons). 

A LIFE OF LEISURE £9.000. Join : 
I tin very wall known Insure ■ 
tourism company a* secretary 
to a senior oittow They are 
bawd to smart -Vv 1 61 Ich am 
are looking for a wB-uawd 
Kid weH organised person to 
kiln mem. EMfUeni benefits m- 
r ruffe cheap boUdays aoroJd 
90 55 skills and orevtou* won! 
oroieiMfiO expertence needed. 
Tetesnone Ol 240 3611 fWe« 
End) Or Ol 240 3691 fCHyi. 
CJuatarfh Knur Recrufonem 
Co nud unis- 


known CdOMnomt MP seeks 

protfroforul PA- He is Invoked 
in irunv of the key issues- of Dm- 
6n vmi win RHvauuK tits 
Isle ol Westminster and in the 
innsmuenry. hi ad dto ito to 
helping lo Ofgannr lus busnen 
iniereU* SefBor -tovrl expert 
era. and KM shMaTO 60) 
requesied 4g» 26+ Salary to 
klO.OOO Hra- Irtrocwra Ol- 
493 5787 Gordon Yates 

UonsuUancv. 

PK W 80N NE L £9X100 .+ famJrag 
perks This rapfdiy expanduig 
L S. Bank need an outgotog see-, 
rrtnry wtfh exceUeol 4fuM 
i lOO 501 to «IM their two 
bust rerrullmenl ofOccrs- You 
win be I he unk between all inrtr 
depix and oueode agencies an 
recrnmmsil iMBm s o some 
one who Is on die Iran, dlscreel - 
and uoflul n mnAif. hira l- 

niyr uf IBM wp u-tni muRiiuate 
IKM AOr 204. earoanc kmg 

4ppb 01 499 8070 
BJBLBIIM to UdOOO Our ffr 
ent. a lamous name puMMnmg 
Muir, seeks a secretory n fhefr 
nurugw mrertar You should 
he wen Miucared with a stable 

raiecr twlafv and 90e0NaDk 
A knowiedoe of Ftrach a**d 
Grrmaii would be useful as you 
will lwtve Ihr opponun dy to 
travel to Ihe Eronmiat gok 
rair Telephone Ol 240 » I. 
■hnf ton w Ol 240 3661 
feus’, ntjwbeih HUM Beenai- 

mcnl Convullanls. .- 

eniieac LEAVE*. SEC Or toad, 
would enioy tfw aaaamic 

irxavntrr of professtoNl 

omnulwn who are lh loJ >ed 
with ■ ludenfs sfodsmo lor - lurt 
mer edbrauan. A*s«*llog jf 
LHrrctar lewd WU“'“ hoxx- an 

tmcrivtoO dm- deabng w dh ert 

Irqn. lecture rs and 

With good WfWQn M sk fBs rjdl 

MOfMHt A W UESCHN CT on oij 
831 Ob 66 . Drake Personnel 

A4STPCV 

MAOAXfNC «»• “T » 

AY OOO * rtbfy review. A ra- 
ted toPTUn-ortenlole d ■ • ra 
Irootno to career oex rtwraro 
inM an edUorlaf or ■ odreftumg 
hmrtum 8 ouerea bv ftsito 
htaunw house fmofved Ifl 
.kfivlWM y«j 

win b« daiwm *« e*» pnowio 
far able to make a aeytunlnbu- 
IMm Skdls 80 6C 
sinerqy. me rteruuiurn* coo- 
Slbw. OI6Sr»»9 .. 



CONVOCATION 
The Annual Meeting fit Oam-ora 
Don will be held on Saturday 19 
April 1986 In the Union Society 
Dr-ballng Chamber, ppmumon 
Building. Palace Green. Durham, 
at 1 1.30 a m. 

J.C.F. Hayward 
Retostrar and Secretary 

AGENDUM 

Annual Report by Vm-Chanrel- 
lor and Warden. 

L-nlicraly Office- 
Old Shirr Hail. 

Old EUM. 

Durham. 

DH1 3HP. 
d March. 1986. 


PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 


The Church CommMdoners have 
prepared a draft panorai scheme 
providing lor a declaration of re- 
dundancy in respect of the parish 
rhurrh of Bad Icy iSamf 
Edmundsbiiry and Ipswich dig 
cerei and lor ns rare and 
matnienancc by die Redundant 
Churches Fund Cw» of the 
draff wneme may be OMdlnrd 
from Ihr Church Comnusttonrx I 
Minoank London. SWIP 3.12 lo 
wham any rrprneniauim anouhl 
be sen! wnnin 28 days of Dir pub- 
1 trad on of uuy notice. 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


03VEMT GARDEN Experienced 
legal serrvury tor senior part- 
ner ol general practice. 
Liugaiion property and com- 
mercial WOTK Own word 
processor c£10.000 836 4571. 


WI2 CENTRAL. 3 rum unfum 
nis 4 bed (U £220pw. I bed HI 
£.120tnw Studio hi £86 I>w. Co 
lei CH Nice views, lux stan- 
dard 740 9350 day me. 
AMERICAN Bank urornlly re- 
quires luxury flair and houses 
from £200 £1.000 pw. Ring 

Bum-* EsUde 4genis68l 5136 
ASHLEY ESTATES specialise In 
renting and letunq in central 
London. Contact our new May- 
fair all i re an 01-409 0594. 
BEAUTIFUL luxury serviced data 
Marble Arch Bavswnler. Cl 50 
10 £400 pw Ol 794 5104. 01 
446 7742 or 0836 ,326523 rTf. 
FULHAM. Delightful collage. 
Recep. l>i diner, all mavn Se- 
cluded gen. Co lei £165 pw 
Tef Hell 736 1076 351 5856. 
HiCKCATE Luxury 4 room mal- 
soneiir. klictum. bainroom. CH. 
(uiu fum. Co M only £160 
pw. Phone 958 8733 
ISLINGTON N7. lovely 6 C Hal . 2 
rooms. h'JLB. CH. Avail rarty 
May. rets essenltal £400 pan 
IIK I rairnOI 609 26 *4 
KENSINGTON MIG PB block 9.4 
brerms. 1 2 rets. 2 bams. elk. 

Mod kil all machines Avail 
turn unfum 936 9512. ITI 
KENSINGTON Superb new lux 3 


URGENTLY WANTEDI Quality KENSINGTON PARK RO Mil 

flats A houses in central Lon- Suomi Irani newly decorated 

dan. Lonq £ -snort lelk. Selected flat. 3 beds. 2 baihs. Urge recra 

FlalS. 486 8878. lion room, dining hall, study. 

K14. I bed nai with W math, in excelreni kitchen, uuiily room, 

brand new ronveraon. 3 mins access lo commual garden*., 

lube Choice of 4 £120 pw Co £650 per week T«1 Henry A 

let only 937 9683. James Ol 23S 8861. 

2 BAKER STREET .Near 1 2 bed lux 
SSTiSSi' tVi^o w 'urn flat with poneraoe. park 

PMOTSr.il^ ™ lng. rtc. £260 per week for one 

*** ® 750 ,d4yl year Company Lef Mr Cotton 

W11 Stunning inienor designed ape. 1343 


rial. Lge recepi DMc bed. FF CHEPSTOW VILLAS W1I. --Stt- 
kdBaUi. Inc CH £220 pw. 749 C ^2b 1 dbto iS. 

■f™/ . . saiiinq rm isofa- bedi. mod kil 

W14 linfumbhtt! 4 beds. 2 baths, and bath. A v all now tang CQ-let 

tiwWe rccept. diner, bugr £2 OO nw Mafiltalb 

kM break, gdn. £400 pw. 749 cALING. MaghMIeanl 3 bed Orpr 


.. - 1 - 1 : , qian house wtih > rel^al 

WNCHESTDf CRT vicarage GL features nr Coni ro con. We 
Ken. Sorctacular 1 dw o/r flat. r «ep and dimnuroom LocAar 
New Fum for Co M. £166 pw den £300 pw. Ol -244.7 3C3 

«JiIie^if r8 ^L Dr HAMPSTEAD. Super 4ux /l^: 2 

ASCOT 3 tram house. 2 reerpts. beds, wood paneled spanous 

nr Irani. £8 lew others 627 lounge, new l.f klichen. Oose 

2610 Homelocaiors to iramnon. £185 p.w. Tefe- 

BARGAMI £50 pw self contained phone 01-431 1263. 
pi 1 . WIN Nr D-ans Others HOLLAND PARK mi. Beauil 


627 2610 Hamdorators. 
CASH. ST. imwal 2 bed. 2 hath 
modern fix*. £300 pw. Andre 
Lanauvre 71 225 0362. 


ENPIPKJ 1 WIN buprro ™-w no o cw , 
bed IU1 Brook Grren 2 retro. "" J“®5Sn 


all m*:hs. Ovo. nr lube Co led. 
£200 pw992 6643 


luhe C °0 pw Others 627 2610 
Homeloeaiorx 


MAVFAIR.’HTDE PARK. Lux *i GARDEN FLA T, Iran * lilted 
12 3 6 4 bed flaMl A lives ^ dffle bedims. Kil etc £250 

Liro <n« tS. bw to. «o»- 

935 9512 'TI WM Large recent. 2 dlbe beds, k 


Long snort lets. Ben prices. - Juf 

935 95I2.*TI WM Large receoL 2 dlbe beds, k 

HOTTING HILL CATE 2 bed 9f CH- CI50 pw 749 

mews hs*-. prof young rate ,*1, ' . 

wilh child Co Lei only £175 Single studio flai Tele 


pw 341 9481 a(l it 6 30 pm 
PLEASANT GARDEN flai Double 


Phone, pood 
Others 62c nr 


HI order. £S5 pw. 
261 0 Hon-.eloralocs 


bedroom Funuvhcd. CH. £80 WCST END Fully furmshed 1 red 
pw. town Dulwich Tef- 01 670 Hai Long rompany M only 
4261. K20O pw 01 48b 2148 

MIC Lux furnished 1 bed flat. WttT F F mod lour bed 
Easy access lo town Siol non- pdn oge £32 Sow 

smoking pro* couple or 3 ,n c 1C0 fell 01-675 1896. 


pw. West Dulwich Tef Ol 670 
4261. 

SWlfi Lux furnish'd 1 bed rial. 

Easy access lo town Soil non- 

smoking prof couple or 3 — > — ~ ■«»■ v.-w.a mig, 

sharers. £11 Spw 0I-67S 4773 „ 

8*7 9881 Thr number In remem 

ber when seeking peu rental CHh 

..propertirv In central and prime 027 2610 ftomelqcalors. 

London areas £150/ £2.000pw SWG. Spacious house In sough! 

, . ' „„ ^ alter area. 2 lge recepi. 2 beds 

5W1 HeaidHul brtCOW. IWL ' plus lge slud» bed 3. 2 baths, 

hrdroom^ Co Nt. sdN.-w kil. gdn. Co s only £260 pw 
02913 2830 or Ol 1 ■ Barnard Marcia. 01 602 2428 


SWI Beautiful MCOW >UL 2 
bedroom. Co Nt. 

02913 2830 or 01 121 1 .08 



SUPER SECRETARIES 


ORMBn CHARITY CB6.700. 
Join lira trading charity as as 
Administrator carrying out an 
involving rote deeuog with a 
rase load of 4000 cMUUra You 
gU set w ipooMistupa. p rpeesa 
- idltn from the children and 
cany out ail related admin. 
.Typing aiao wptn rea’d. Synrr- 
gv. the reendnnent 
consultancy. 01-637 9833. 9 

LEGAL SUPERVISOR (28*1 lor 

eUray. firm of Cdy. Sohrttora 

. . nwulMto to Marine wont. To 
sup er v i se 6 AudM Secretaries 
-rang WMMar twtH na p 
trainl Starting satory £9.500 
(reviewed afire 3 months dial) 
-pira IV>; PPP and Season 
Ticket Loan. Phone Penny on 
01-406 7201. Abieman Em- 
ptoyirantt Agency. 
a Marms contract, 

£10500- lljOOO pro ram Se- 
nior PA tar main board 


at Bt ackf r lar s Good shorthand 
■e WP SUBS tfdealty Wang) may 
wwMrr ■ 30 hour week. Can 
Ol 377 8600 (CHy) or O! 439 
7001 -AM EBdV- GeutUilK 


reorem c£7.ooo. An umi 
ogportuntor 10 enter the proper- 
ty world and receive exeeucid 
office training. DeaUng matoty 
with Nx figure rrndenUal proo- 
erhee you will meet lop cUcnts. 
hetp update thatr property reots- 
: trt and even sbu hauMS Uaa 
oc a o to pafty. Q-ptug 40 wpm. 
Caroline King Appts Ol 499 
. 8070. 



opportunity 10 gel your career 
off lo a grad sort. Worsting tor 


I 






wilhfn pro pergonnrt MM. of 

11 11: i' 1 - . 

H.TIM 


menl and 

aU levels. 

193 6618 

©OO Ex- 

tor local 


| m 







KINGSTON PA to £11,000 

Enjoy Deng closer to home in this detightftii setting. With an 
overall mow ol the Company, baise rttemaboraffy croanisina 
busy rtmorarres lor top Exacutivas. With 60 wpm typmg/WFf. 
languages and shorthand useful. 

PA SEC with FRENCHnea. £10,000 

A inajac new toree bi the financial work! with strong French 
connections requires Assistant to Chief Executive Develop your 
rate wittnn the Company es n becomes operational. Excellent 
SU(5 (100/60), fluent French are required (Genran/itakan useful 

SOCIAL PERSONALITY £9,000 

Prashgous Adverttsmq agency reaures enthusiastic mdrviciuat 
with good pitorpersonal talents comtmed with seoretansf sKiisol 
90/65. Assisting two executives, develop a strong chert rafaimn- 
ahip and organise madia schedules. Aged 21 +, WP an asset 

Telephone 629 8863 


WEST END 
ART 

GALLERY 

Requires young lady 
assistant. Previous ex- 
perience preferred. 

Telephone 
01-491 8103 



(ul sunny ILiL D. bedroonk Hw 
louncM*. kilchrn dttirr Nrw 
rouumwnl. No agmis- Co ires 
pm £ISSpw. TOQI-T41 9S77 
KENS4NTON t patara Gardnts 
irrrao*. first floor bNron» Hal. 
urgr- living room, daub* -bed - 
win. mrrty furnaSird. CH. 
£145 pw Trt- 0753 883524. 
NOTTINC HU GATE A Stotor 
newly comretcd ftal with 2 
double bnb. 2 1- inn, -pali ng 
Mich, bain; shot*rr - rBflWrE27S 
pw Bareli 724.- 3160 
REGENTS PARK, 2 b«» lux film 
flat in med block. All JmrnlBre. 
£250 pre week foe oik, year 
Company trt nnfy. -MP-caQon 
409 1343 ~r>-Y 


CHELSEA quirt 2 -bod. S.xrera. 
porter. gan. parking. £2£fi pw 
CM A MW mcl. 01 351 6639 

CMSWICH FLAT FOR 3 MNTHS 

2 roomy, kilrfwn A bairn Dom. 
CH noo pw. Trt. 01-747 1092 

.DOUBLE BEDSIT EUlh Inf. nr 
buy shops £40 pw. OUW1 627 
2eiO HomHixaiors. 


SECRETARY SWT- Fast SH and 

toping -4-111-.. maiurr and mi 

tor prrronalils' 5 mornings a 
wrek Ring Ol 493 8824 Indy 
raigimarsoii Lid »Rec Ccw 
47 Nrw Bond Sirrrt. wi. . 


DOMESTIC & C ATERING 
SITUATIONS.-. 


NEW LONDON THAI RMDUTanl 
opening mid Junr requires lull 
and part lime stall Mum tw flu 
ml in Thai language and 
<**prnrnrret in all aspects of 
Thai mod ten tee Saunn 
high and nrgonabtr Thr fol- 
lowing popltoth. are avaiiabk 
Head Chris. 2nd Chefs. Prep 
Cfurs. Hrad waller m'v 
u auer ess's. Bar stall. Cash- 
h*ts rir Reply in Hurt rr 
Engl Hi pfeaso wilh rrfreanro 
and C\ to BOX ES7 Thr Times. 
Virginia StreeL London. El 
9DD 



r£l 1.500 Join one of London* I FASHION OESWWK requires 


COSTA DEL SOL. 


THE COMMERCIAL BANK OF 
THE NEAR CAST PLC 
NOTICE IS HERESY CHV'EN 


ii- r,:ux’ 


Super srtrclww ol ep or tra eiHg . uuh (hr Sixty rounh ArmuiU Cm- 
s-Hlas. bars from £20.000- era! Mrrtlnp of this Company wm 
£260.000. Free lUgfrta lo br hrtd ol Us Reordered Office. 
Purchasers Own reg office in 107-112. Lnartenhau SarreL Loo- 
snam Mortgages avauabic. An don EC3A4AE.on Monday. i6ih 
tormounes attended lo. Cnglnh June. 1986. ol II a.m. lor the 
speaking Directors. For a trow- following purpose* - 
ble free purchase ring 0633 l. To receive and adorn Uto 


iC OUffiE LEAVBb Bright and ambitious for well 

known Ad Ag>-. Marvellous pros- 
pects. £6,500 

Tmffi REC/SEC: Rapidly expanding Creative Agy.' 

Dedication and Good typing. Ess. 
Super OfFices/Covent Grdn. £7,000 
QBEATIVE PA: Organised Mother Bunny. For lop 

team. Leading AGV. £8.060 
78HS SEC (Kb ShJ: Real variety and scope to assist in 

Tag growing AGY. £8^00 

SQES3! SEC: Boatd Director. Highly creative. 

Leading AGY. 90/S0 Skills. £9,250 
PLEASE CALL 63SELLE BftCHE FOB A VARtETT OF 
PEBHAWrr An TEMP PiSinOBS DM 493 5455. 


SEE THE SPECIALISTS 


li 


6S1E81 124 first, Fletchers of 
Lrtcener Spanteto Property Sue 
rtaHsls. 68 London Rood. 

Leicester. 




m 


ifer 




Director,- Report and Accounts 
for me year ended 31 si Decern 
ber. 1985. 

2. To dec la re a dividend 
3 To re-etecl ihe retiring 
Director! 

4. To re-appouif the retiring 
Auditors, and lo authorise the 
Directors hi (lx Ihe rernunera 
tkm of the Auditor* far the 
current financial year, 
a To iranraci the business or on 
Ordinary General Meeting. 

By Order of Die Board. 

K.M. PEGGIE. 
Secretary. 

107 112. Leartreihall StreeL 
London EC3A 4AE. 
nth March. 1986 
Notes: 

1. Any member of the company 
(Milted to attend and vole to 
Ihe above Meeting may appoint 
another person who need not be 
a member of the Company as 
ms proxy to attend and vole 
Instead of him. 

2 There are no contracts of ,er 
vice winch are required lo be 
made available far inspection to 
Ihe mretlna- 


YOmfi REC/SEC: 


CREATIVE PA: 


most evening and remanding 
hanks as an asefcJant in Ihetr 
dratmg room Someone wllh 
gel up and go. Mamina and en- 
UiiKUKm ev needed lo keep up 
the pare You u ID be bawd on 
Ihr deal mo floor handling ri- 
eryming from Inlernahonal 
Dtmnr cans and oprtung new 
accounts lo providing a general 
admin back-up Age 21*. Caro 
line King APPU 01 499 8070 
PERSONNEL' RE CRUmMO ex 
pretence 25* and wilh a 
natural rninuuasni? L-sr your 
pnwnnrl skilh m a ditferenl 
wav as a consuiiani In our WeM 
End office, placing Mercian?* 
■n pemumant ms. Call Lin 
Cecil « Secretaries Plus on 439 
7001. 


STEPPING 


adpower 


i.7.5t>0 Ayeump me MDof fhto 

witowMm or ntofrtfj 

a eitutiitMn ornanwre J«i wm 
mwH You nwrape prepared 

lu May dim from horw. «*kr u? 
King Appto Ol 499 8070 ! 



-iNr t-rr.r 








young secretary for newb'-ap- 

DQjnuai patter. Yon-wifl twig 


needs on experienced and profl 
e»en« Secretary to lake an active 
role in h» pnvtoe practice 
£10.000. Directora Secretaries. 
OS -629 9323. 

SCO TO E HGI H ygRlM G directar 
of mator ugbung ntnfr. Viang to 
sites to promote Invotvemenl. 
hwwitekih read. B wta hols. 
WC2 £8.700. Woodhouso Hoc 
Cons 01-404 4646. 

ITALIAN SPEAKING Personnel 
far City Bank, experience pref. 
Admlntstrstlea and various 
rtenraf duties. £ neg 01-404 
9884, C amdour Agy, 

RRCRPTIOHMT w«h good typing 
lo torn expanding Propcro- 
Company In WI. Age 18 - 24 
cao P Q. Dlreaors Secretar i es. 
01429 9323. 

SEC, MO SM, for dcctgn warn 
Hrtp grg exrmafKHw A proof 
read Bdbbrftv raaienal Age 
20*. WI C&S00 Woodhouse 
Rrt Cora 41-404 4646 


to *el up systems: and UMTOBHer GERMUUt STK AUDIO SEC for 


-organise dtanes «nrespon- 
-mw nc flood typwg 
■tWWL Age- L*T Piero tele- 


Ink CRr Co £8800 Merrow 
Euro. Agy iTne Language Spr- 
rtaUHsi 01-636 J«T. 


8 MPd> Ol-4«S S787 Canton part/full-TIME good seere- 
* fc v Cori**Hl«c'ey tonal lob*. rompetrnj 

1 EHRULM ra turort wr tn Gee •trturtjers - idedL Unique Tree 


ERMAN ffi Ungual pcssCre *." 

tram. . SH- Cd appearance 

m rp i ig u e rngnner lufrcgng FA SEC W +_WP HM £10,890 



T.iiiiYiiiliil TtK> n fsTsl-i . -e. 


I 


SIX MONTHS TO KILL Cl tv ram 

pony ho* gnrei Mi months, 
leave to one of Hirer PA 1 * 
Would %-mt like to step into tier 
place and look auer her boss 
wtulr **he i* swart Yest should 
be nmfidcnl and competent lo 


A POSITIVE TELEPHONE Man 

nrr self - mol n aled and emoy 
1 people-" contact 4 6 week 
booking up-dating rllenl records 
tn our own wi offices. Call Lyn 
Cecil ol Secreunes Plus on 439 
7001. 


C1ITY oul a lull PA role Skill* KEW SPECIALIST nurkefmg 


80 GO wpm £9.000 pro rau 
Phone OI 583 1 034 Meredith 
Sroll Recraiunem 


pubUcalion on rounldown. 
n.rf-as rtfmrr.* i Minor srerreary. 
lemp nr pvrtnanani s hand or 
i*vwrt«lar iru-ful Snvill oftKe 
overlooks canal O! 28 6 1930 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


EXPERIENCED LETTINGS 
NEGOTIATOR/ MANAGER 
FOR 

OUR KENSINGTON OFFICE 

If you have a proven track record, are 
dynamic, self motivated & looking 
for a challenging & highly rewarding 
position, ring now. 

Excellent remuneration package & 

Company car. 

CONTACT 
PAMELA BEREND 

ANSCOMBE & RING LAND 
01-722 7101 


GALLERY 

ASSISTANT 


Required by West 
End Art Gallery' 
for miscellaneous 
duties, ideal for 
college leaver. 

PLEASE RING 
01-493-5464 


PART TIME VACANCIES 


Hnod-npri lor brauliful noun 
try home nrar New burs , Berks. 
Friendly nanny tomiephcrc. 
two Irefiao* daudhires, horses 
and pels .grpom aMo nnpldyed v 
AlirMClive snared bungalow ac 
r«nmauiion and pood salary 
offered to mlefligrn'. ’Vrll edu- 
ruled person Non-smnker able 
lo rook and dnif ' Lite <4 car 
and other perky Telephone 
Lindsey on 01-722 1576 1578 
between 10am - 6pm 

ROOM SERVICE Bllllrr required 
Inr luxury new Stanhope apart- 
ments situated In Park Lane. 
Operated by Metfopote Hotels 
You must have a Ihorouoh 
knowledge of food and bever- 
age Mr-nee. be very smart and 
wed spoken. Hours of work 
oam - Sum. 5 days a week. 
Pie are ring personnel. London 
Mcfropole on 01-402 JI-JI lor 
an application form. 


ATTRACTIVE Bar person with 
evperienre tor high rtase Olv 
wine bar. Mon-Hi. 10330 
Ring after 4 o'clock 606-4787 


NANNY, wo arc tmmeditorty fn- 
vilinq appiicalions lor thr 
rewarding dosUmi of Nanny u 
our 3 children- agrt 2. 4 and 7 
years A kind, malure: 'child ■ 
loving person wflh rovmd 
experience and excellent refer- 
ences is essential Debqfilful 
room v, iin colour TV m modern 
Hampstead house Ample ttee 
lime nobdai-s abroad and a de 

bgnllul (amity atmosphere 
offered. Tel. 01-456 4501 
CHEIF WARRESSES ERS 
£9 COO pa Asnuam chetf 
waitress er £7.900 pa Cook' 
£10 000 pa Japanese speaking 
ana expenenred reaulTed lor 
ruoh rlaw Japanese reslauram 
in Londun Please Irt 499 79gj 
OVERSEAS AU PAR AGENCY 
87 Regent BtrertLondon WI 
Trt 439 6834 UK, Oversea*. 
Also m. helps dotns lemp -perm 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


SECRETARY REQUIRED for 

West Ena medn-al mnir lor qen- 
oral seerelanal duties. Age 1810 
23 Hours and competitive sola- 
rv to be neuoltaied Trt. 01-938 
7873 between 9am A arm 


fra CARETAKER Handyman Driver 
f "■ non smoker seeks homely, post 

Y° with smote Borommodalibn 

where honest reliability . wilt be 
08 appreesoled. Country, private 

iwnrugiold preferrea Refer- 
ence Ph 026 786 437 


PART TIME RECEPTIONIST 
TELEPHONIST For CP's in 
SWI. Hiindav-rndav. 4 -7pm. 
£3 per hour Phone Bernadette 
on OI 235 5151. 


DOMESTIC & 
CATERING 

SITUATIONS WANTED 

PART-TIME ADMINISTRATOR I 

Required tor slimuialing Mb in I VERSATBLE GUCL, qualified rook 
Proberlv Moruaemcni in small 1 w,tn ramtoerable managerial 
experlenre require? das lime 

mb running wine bar. 
onuncsinq city luncnn or vmi- 

la i poviuon m Central London, 
w rile or nna BrtJnda Clarke 66 
Dr as roll Plore. Stol Trt 589 
3827 or 0948 860385 


freeman* mgoner Inter eshftfi 
Papuan 'wdh Cily bank. 
XMiSWim * perks. Link Un 
. grararAppU. Cl 806 97A3 


Rem. Lots admin + onwirang 
to -Whirr levrt. WES8 Ret COM 
Ol 029 0538 


ANDORRA Luxury flat- Skiing an 
aoocvro South and Wrs toe- 
ing. 4 beds. 2 boilo. Urge I King 
area £72.900. 0494 64230. 


TELESALES £9 600. Proven 
stom ability tor Amertvan ro 
bared to ten London Exr prteu 
ttaf * wnpe for aeveioomeni 
SubdaricutJ CO benefm. fling 
Lesley Milk 626 6233. 

snanphui rec cons. 


ENGLISH B AFRICAANS -to-ak 

inq person with [fieteoijh 
know-ledni- of wholesale A rrfaif 
|ewelk<n Ir.TCe 1(918(11! bi well 
known West End Jeweller. Re- 
ply 10 BOX A 26 


Proberlv Maiugemrnl in small 
Choke a- based firm Sun re. 

Hioratdr. Ttrun married person 
aged 28 -JO w|lh recrridTHII 

si ills and ability 10 solve neoiMe 
A modern problem without 
tiea Immediate start Mornings 
wifi £4 £O0 pa OI 351 9329 
Ko agefifs 

EXHiemONSPAto£4 7ao Thb . 

unusual turf tune posiinsn of. GENERAL 

lerv muni emeni in PH. 

nshibiltc.m orj and personnel. "" 

Audio Is ping jt SO wprn req'd 

SH an axvi Sinefon. ihe re- range ROVER. B rro i4e* 
cruiinieni rorauildoo. 0t<»3T Brown PAS. AJto^'vvherti.' 
' ^ B pari. Stereo CBfetfK inrnuc. 

FASHION PR Srcreiarv win. r X - 
rellrof Ivpuw Musi have SklSCO 


FASHION PR secreiarv wslh rx 
rellm! h-piiw Must have 
several years experience and 
itimin and rommunlralmn 
skin r. 3 days a week Rim Ol ■ 
493 8BM Judy Farquharviri 
lid. 47 Sew Bond Slrert Lon 
don wi . 


LAND - RANGE ROVER Personal 
export lax free sales ipecuitu 
DU main dealer- 061 224 

£205- 



















































*'5 “=T'5F'a-oq s sj\s mjaa s w=r 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 

LONDON PROPERTIES 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY/1 


Going, going, gone to auction 


}) Luxury 1 bed flats at (J 
Milner Square, Islington, 
from only £60,000 

Hirer 1 1 ar 5 mortoaije raid on the first r^.ow 

Apt*!- lojrpnw rakrnafirr ~rji Appl and Conrancd bv Uhk 


MM SM IW Ft# KOP W t*» 
id wh w ibmps a. me hmarn 
Rmo BWk* r S*5 B 2°15? 

in m MB 4 ha* WM WR 
dCUM MMM M M* D*®D9rn. 
Man 08) 

ima «« "m* *»■ 

gMMeianiw»Ml'n 
to ■* poo. Uw *«««■»»; 
mg |p am at rote Wgfl OtDtartB 


DRAYTON GARDENS 
SOUTH KENSINGTON 
LONDON -SW10 

An exciting new apartment building 
comprising 2 & 3 bedroom luxury 
flats and a magnificent penthouse 

• Double Glazing * Individual Car Parking 
* Penthouse roof garden/terrace * Lift 

• NHBRC 10 year guarantee 

• Fully Fitted Kitchens • Central Heating 

* Video Entryphone * Balconies 
* Marble Entrance Hall 


mu. Two mt* 

! Caffa S aSg n g » 

MH P*to» ecwntM »o ddObbh 
tt WHWBttMDMimS'OCSl 

Uummpiaw iww w 
i asp* to totte** BanmiOT- 
; pen moi more OB 

M nM lose Utt IIUUUU. 
1 B n ” Mwnm fJb tand wen- 
m « * BBCWa Mot osanw", 
; pbbbb nmeMi ■ ao - 

I UM wet Strata a# Bakon 
, Oat Barmen fM met. nTS 




Prices from 
£275,000 


Hla WELCOME HOMim Mm 

Islington. Waterloo Gardens. Milner Square- 
Contact Sricklev and Kent Estate Agents on 
- 01-3?9 0961 about the last remaining I bed^ 
\) fiats and mortgage paid offer. (C 



20 Montpelier Street. London SW7 1HE 

01-584 6106 

Telex £67597 

Tax 01 581 305&tGn»24 2i 


“NON-STATUS” LOANS AT 12% 

Residential up to 75% of purchase price or valuation, 
which ever is lower, up to £250.000 maximum 
(M.l.R.A.S. fully operational up to £30.000 
regardless of see of loan) 

RE-MORTGAGES ALSO FROM 12% 
PLUS 

other "Non Status" loans at competitive interest 
rates on both residential and commenca! properly - 
unlimited funds. Initial underwriting of the facility to be 
completed by this company. 

Please reply without delay to 

LB (Life and Pensions) Ltd 

10/12 EiHUUoa find Itmtm SV7 ZW 
01-501 2S11 


' MORTGAGES 

TERMS NOW AVAILABLE 

* 3 1 /: times income or 2 x/ i tiroes joint income 

* 100% mortgages up to £100.000 

* No evidence of income required for loans 
up to £150,000 for qualifying Applicants 

* MIRAS facility available over £30,000 

Ring 01-235 0691 

for full information 

Wiokwortfa 
Financial Services 
25a .Moteomb Street 
London SW1 

. Open until 8 p.m. today 


LANSDOWNC CSESC Wll.Con 
servulion arei Altrjciiv e 1 lied 
Hal. super all while ML wesl 
facing l — recep Bain, hall 83yr 
leave £*>■» 500. 01 737 3044 
NWC Supers ronverted Vicl FI 


FREEHOLD SW7 Mai-, a Beds 3 
balhs eiedani drawing rm 
|g'vl8\ se© dining rm. Zanusa 
lulls III l> II ini dev. v nmhS.md 
Owner muM veil £346.000 NO 
agmls To Cl 581 3131 


'’Sk tUi 1 ISLINGTON 3 Bed Cromain ier 


bain. CM CPIS C48SOO. 99 »r» 
he 01 761 tO°3 eves 
IMMACULATE 2nd floor 3 Bert 
room Dal lor duick tale. 
£78.000 «no 01603 4368 


Bpdu Stored. SVC. 


rated house. OCH. Kll A Dining 
rm Balhrm WC BO" garden 
Coon disorallvc order 3 mins 
King Cross £112.000 r. h Tel. 
Ol 270 5208 


CONVEYANCING 

McBride Wilson & Co 
C iff rr sou sen ice ai rcason- 
jhlc raws. 

Wh» ikjI phone Gavin Wil- 
son 'or Sandra kiywaid 

01-242 1300 

For a quota rios on jour prop- 
erty Bansacuoo. 


iafleg attractive 3 bed (own 
house fulls lunushed CbOO per 
monin TH: Ol 579 0858 


CLAPHAM Old Town SW1 Smu 
Vie DM irom spaemus 5 bed mx 
rerep 2 kll 3 hath 2 showers 3 
wc -Juds -unrenm a0" garden ♦ 
unique features £127. »v> for 
auKk sale Tel. 730 41 16. 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


VIP ESTATE 

SERVICES 

Buvinq a house or an 
apanmrnl in London but 
rant scare I he lime and 
dlort? 

Let the specialist 
An (or you 

TefepfamefOl) 740 6527 
Telex; 897121 


RIVERSIDE 
BOUSES AT 
CHISWICK 
CHOICE OF 3 
TOWN HOUSES 

Spacious accommodation of 
3/4 bedrooms. Direct river 
access with 3 acres of private 
grounds leading to Thames 
with primal* jetty and moor- 
ing facilities. Only 15 mins, 
(rem Harrods and 
Heathrow. Possibly the last 
opportunity to acquire a 
large bouse beside the rivet. 
From LlTODOfl. 

Contact 

01-995 2964 or 
994 8276 or 
994 8335. 


KNIGHTSB RIDGE 
HOUSE 

3.4 bed magnificent 
mews. 2 3 bathrooms, 
girage and elegant large 
double reception roo m s. 
Use of Caoogan 
Square. Place gardens 
Refurbished lo very high 
standard by Interior de- 
signer. 74 yr tease. 
£178400 

Tet 01 KZ7 0020/ 

01 235 06Z7 


Property buying can be the most 
traumatic as well as the most profitable 
experience of a person’s life; not surpris- 
ingly the process can turn a buyer into a 
ruthless businessman or woman or a 

81 One of the methods of buying - and 
selling - a property which cuts short the 
process is the auction- which not only 
gives the prospect to both sides of a good 
price, but adds the attraction of a 
sudden-death transaction. Though sale 
by auction forms only a small part of the 
property market, it is an important part 
of the business and is adopted more 
often when the market is io a healthy 
state. 

So it is interesting that many estate 
agents and auctioneers are announcing 
such sales now with regularity, not in all 
parts of the country but in many areas 
where prices are steadily rising. The 
spring loo is the best time traditionally 
for auctions, which explains why the. 
auctioneers are busy polishing their 
lechnique. 

At this time of the year, after the 
winter lull, there are not sufficient 
market indicators to help value the more 
unusual properties, but there are normal- 
ly a good many potential buyers looking 
around. _ 

Graham Adnitt from the Chester 
office of Jackson-Siops and Staff admits: 
“Wiib some of the properties coming on 
to our books, such as redundant farms 
and cottages, which are the most likely to 
go lo auction. I cannot be sure of valuing 
them within 10 per cent. I would be 
surprised if the price was outside that, 
but it does happen. 

He believes that spring is a good time 
for auctions because buyers then have 
several good selling months in which to 
dispose of their own properties. His 
office of Jackson-Stops and Staff is 
holding an auction on April 30 at which 
two intriguing redundant farm houses, 
both dating from the 1 7th century, will 
come under the hammer. 

One of Cheshire’s richest sources of 
period houses are the farms, as they 


By Christopher Warman 

Property Correspondent 



5 in? 3 m ii 1 ip 

»» If J itS S ' ' w 



— too of biddm who have gone above their 
q limit because of the atmosphere of the 

auction. , . ’ 

He says: "You can see furtive glances 
_ between husband and wife as they 
. .. agonize over whether co-go on. And there 
are sometimes tears .when die hammer 
fills, win or low." 

Apart from executor sales* where the 
highest mice has to be seen to be 
achieved to satisfy the interested parties, 
.one of the most popular type* of property 
to come up' tu aucikm is ifie rural 
property in need of con version or 
modernization, where il_ is not. -easy to 
put an accurate price on h. • - 
Estate agents Lawrence, based in 
Crewkeme, Somerset, announce that the 
traditional season for property auctions 
will soon be underway, and are starting 
with an auction next.' Tuesday. 

Among the lots on offer is a traditional 
barn for conversion at Lower 
Tytherleigh farm, Axminster. Devon, 
built of flint with hamstone quoins and a 
tiled roof. It has planning permission for 
- a single dwelling, and the guide price is 
? £30.000. 

Another is a cottage at- Crewkeme. 
which dares, from the 19th century, has 
two bedrooms and needs comp/ete 
refurbishment. Yours for' around 
£ 10 , 000 . 

Lawrence is offering a Dorset firm- 
house- at South Perron with 5ft- acres. 
Grade II listed, built of stone, with 
■so*™-; planning permission for conversion into 
two units. The guide price is £70,000 to 

m £80,000. 

Also in South Perron is a. group of 
firm buildings of stone and timber with 
outline permission for conversion to 
three dwellings. This is the stuff of 
auctions, with great potential, and they 
could cost £35.000 to £40,000. v 
Humberts’ Sherborne office are' auc- 
tioning the former rectory at Caiiiscock. 
hear Dorchester, on May 8. unless it has 
.'previously been sold. . j .. 

Most former rectories sold in the past 
are the larger period properties, but -now 
the Church. Commissioners are selling 


period houses are the farms, as they Suitable cases for anctioa: Court Farm Church Commissioners are selling 
amalgamate, leaving the farmhouse fo Dorset, top,a listed building with^ replamn en ipostwar modem recto- 
available for residentialuse. HoUyhedge, oa tiine permission for con verswm to "^ # 9 f SSSifill-U 
at Weston, near Crewe, is Grade II listed, tw 0 dwellings: Cherry Tree, a radon- m ^54 of local stone witit mulhon 
and has three or four reception rooms, dant form at Baithomley, Cheshire, ™nd<wsunderatilaj ‘ roofed has three 
four bedrooms, outbuildings and three half-timbered, listed, with form bufl£ re ?J uc ? «*»“ *“* *“ bedrooms. 


acres. Cherry Tree at Banhomley has - {ot conversion to residential use; •“* “■ iJSu -I 

two reception rooms, five bedrooms and ^ 0 f the ontbmldinRS at Court ** ^ au£ j! on bc ,d at 

% acre, also Grade U listed, and both are Farm , Dorset, which bS outline 

attractive half-umbered properties permission for three dwellings. They »«■ £75.000to £85.QQ0. , 

Guide price for each is £1 00,000, and ^ properties where the rmtiridnal John Eaton-Tecry.. Fox and Soos’-man 
there is great interest in them — another ^ outbid the developer- ' > Q Exeter,- looks to the unusual .property 

reason for an auction, to get the be*~ *___ for auctioning. He says: ‘tlhey-are not 

possible price. price, because the ratention is to achieve for ordinary houses. They must be of 

From an auctioneer's point of view, the highest possible result, but it is sufficient interest for pbople to bid 
ihe decision to take a property to auction possible to buy at a more competitive against each other — such as watermills 
depends on the likely demand, whether it price than in the normal market place, ip need of restoration, coach houses in 
is a type for which there will be An individual can outbid a developer at picturesque^ settings and barns for 

competition and whether the price level an auction and still have a good buy, conversion.” 

is obvious from recent sales of similar because he or she does not have to build That is where there is a known 
property or difficult because it is an in a profit margin. ■ demand, but there is a further category 

individual property. After all, a property According to Richard Etbermgton, of which goes for auction, the property I 
is worth what someone will willingly pay the Sussex-based agents King and which has not sold either because of its 
foriL. Chasemore, individuals often outbid state of repair or its location. To buy one i 

It is therefore unwise to think, if you developers, partly through sheer excite- of these is an act of faith, imagination or 
go to an auction to buy, that you will be ment and partly through grim detenni- folly. Try to decide before giving the nod 

able to find a property at a knockdown nation to get what they want. He loiows to the auctioneer. . ... . . 


The house has about 14 acres of 


CROUCH & LEE 

45 New M SM W1 

01-493 9941 

irTTUVHflCE. BUMRBJ] MUD Superti itfurfeshed Douse taring south 
ovw can a Noi kvad n. 4 beds o ijbfe) wifi arv-suCf ojjiroons Studn or 
4rti bed wab lamca. garage/stuty DM asoed lounge 37T1 * 2DK. 
S«nanc kn 20 x 1 S' aB apolwves Anra cave tram g4y rea paw and SO' 
maiure gartm Freehold (435.000. 

UT71E VENICE. RANDOLPH CRESCENT immense maeonstte am 
50 x25' garden and dreci access id 3 acre commrai gdn 5 dWe beds, 
baleofles, 3 bams, study, fixing rm 19 x15'. Icuige 30 x21 - . knUm 
13*15'. utility roam. I2f years + stare ol Freehold. £416.000. 
DORSET SQUARE. NUM Chanrsng ne*y mod 3rd how nonson Rat wlh 
Daksny owdootang Swxae. 2/3 dWe beds. 1/2 Ige receps. mod lot & 
bath. UL areata, 98 yean. EI37JOO. 


competition and whether the price level 
is obvious from recent sales of similar 
property or difficult because it is an 
individual property. After all. a property 
is worth what someone will willingly pay 
foriL 


Close lo CheKai Ekwr ncdloit mfe low bull house wah 2 bigr swiny 
teuju* A BAK« 3/4 Obis beds. 3 luDis. 2/3 lagr rectos Hied YAj D laa on. 
Garden CM F lmU 

Sedlb SM. SW3 E310.00Q 

Partrutoty •»« mooenusw penod house with 6P' omei gueity BfiJSeo dose 
P Burton's Coot A Soane So 2/2 Dans 2 bate. 2 large rectos. su>etb hud 
Ur Dlasi rm CH Fnoid 

rii*iikimi« Garden. SW3 C9SJ0S 

South lacing pted a (ene on Isi (It o* penod house with mews ol Rm< Qua 
term wfli iwoems parting Bed. oath, receo. W. 61 yrs 
Lenox Eadn. SW1 msjOB 

An exceiicm gi & in Hr maseneot n recernty convenrd ptrod nouse 
modemseo & in good onter wm superti laottris close by- 2 dbfe beds. ban. 
atom 2 reaps tot CH 29 yrs 



t hefcca Uflice 01-352 l«4 

Ctee Parian Green. SUK 

ISLAM 

1 Oetetmui ib fk fm r gaud dtarara true DWe Drt. tatfi. large receo. '» 1 

1 CH « yre 

1 Tbe MB None. WMbtodm 

080.600 

I * supert) country nou*- in beauhful Dnval* gardens m rfe hean of Wmweaxi 

1 Conmoo oewe ihe Wentouii i oeds. 2 Bate n «n su«L ennui t reaps. 

law tot son ouaiwi LX 3 car garage 35 yrs 


Fulham Office 01-731 4223 



Chabnmx Hook. SW11 (46.750 

List itn 'enwrang *> pop it* devtlotvnem dose to Waiaswonh BrxK* m*h as 
own gym sura, spa dan. roar terrace «m Dane 2 Pols receo. tor. Pstn CH 
123 yrs 

Heme Reed. Sum £59,500 

Light, waous 2 Dedrm (W newtv modernised on 2rw tlr Close io smwng & 
transport ol Bawsea Part Ro. Receo. ban. sep WC. CH Camels 99 yrs 
HMcftnta RoedSWII £13BffG9 

B*j tsacnai house Fidly modenesed «eh many ongoal Iwnees n ones 

posown Din reup. Wb'Fasi rm. cellar. 4 Dess. 2 bams Soulh taeng gamm 
CH FlUd. 

Batlersea Office 01 -228 0174 


Regents Part. Hvn . „ ST75JPB 

O/'ootong the Part a Beautihil 9 & 1 st llr fta n Nash Terrace 40 recepopens 
onto loeefy gardens 2/3 t)«fc. 3 Bate, dressaig mi. 2 xcepe. cflom. suwtj 
WUbtasr mi. id*iy CH Porte Garage Psrtung. 81 yrs 
Bnredesteay Part. KW 6 fSSBJW « SXtJM 

2 Ine aetachefi low bud houses each m BeauMii order, er qua Me wed 
Descent 1 with 6 teds messmg rm. 2 nate. 4 receps. tot ia«y. CH. dbfe 
garage 55 iloodki yadens Photo £550,000 
The odier 5 oeds 2 Uadis, i'4 'caps, tot CH. 120 Safi Hang garden. 

garage A partnq Photo £350.000 

Albert Street NW1 _ *2S5JW 

to <wde pee Inert gieei a lew ihaonan teuee weh penod lea son* 
ledecmtum requrrac 6 beds. 2 bate shower 2 receps. tot. pan CH S/cR£l 
room shower 6 tot CH 6 ff gaiden F'holfi. 

Em r oi dg Read. NOT „ _ ^ ^ 

In small mas ion hkyi besdr Pr«nnne Hdl a superti Isa *W fM mtfi Safi 
Westerly mews 2 beds hath. 2 leteps. W CH UL 49 yrs 
Eyre Caul SI Jotea Wood 

Mapnrl M dr (la moments horn Tube A Hojn Si mroroac eonfl 3 fi»e beds. 2 
Dams. 3 i eefips toe ks'b *asi rm ure/bam CH LJi Porta Panwg. 90 yrs. 

Recenw Park Office 01-267 3267 


gnaw Place, ffwm 

Ctermna mews house «rh large root terrace BeauMuOy decorated 2 beds 
haih. receo. tot CH 71 ws Jow Sole Agem Honan Slaw 01-581 B277. 

Ktogsloa Haase Rot*. SW7 C45&SM 

Superb id Mr n» n ine hraqntsbnage (docs o*ertootong Hvfie Part 3 oeds. 2 
baits arawng rm. kn. soil bed receo & ban LA Porter. CH. 43 yre. 


Mayfair Office 01 -408 0055 


KBtSnGTW FLATS 

Staflord Terrace, M O2M0 

On tne 3nl Hr gl a wlMi . suco hotfid ViODiar hose dOK to the H^i SL a 
bngM atTradrrWy decorated ftti Rkr. dttt bed v»fi nfiidv eqoppu & 
Wed 14 wfi blast area. balk. OL 32 yts. 

IWM Part Am. WIT _ tlSMM 

Wdh a ScuSwrii oudaok across die gw sward pi ittand Rrt Tenns Ctob a 
genoroDS. well decoraM tta aruhe 2nd fir t* a large coMrtedtause. 
Lovely 23 recea wed apofied tot ir dmng rm. 2 etde teds. bah. 965 yrs 
Caapde* KB gartte. M HUBS 

to a oaai raodma street on aubrey WaA. ai atnoMy dacnraiMl tasproM 
Itat wfi dblc bed. reap. hath. Wert iqi p p rd M. Ol 96 yrt. 

Kensanglon Office 01 -727 0705 

Cerodei Place. 112 2250.196 

Ai the end d a terrace a a y« «nrt cul * pat tbs Atrafiw S prafical 

house has a swmsffg N teg* mtna On 3 his red pre n^frort yadea 5 
garage 5 beds. 2 rarept Da». tat dtona Rear (teden. &. F h«t 

Covtned Stoat W2 0890 

Wed conrerteo <anUy how on 4 Bra wfi qteed tot wsensan ge enrig w«o 
pretty garden, m anraarve Wcuman terrace, fercotefi. a rwkimbai 
■ oc 3 yrs 0 * 3 due tedL 2 nafs. 3/4 neaps. U/Btsl rm fisnm. CH FTaae. 

Wenbnume Grove Office 01-221 1341 


A We dtde fronted bouse, wy weA O Mdwd. bertnd a Ipaveked dny> 
RmmsnwyongnaMeaiures 6 beds. 3 bate (2 en am§i. 4 maos. Iul dtom. 
Large Cettu 38h iron & 115(1 tear ganlea CH. Fhoa. 
leaficret Rod. SWT7 tllMW 

Lame sender Wonan house rtrae mshopang < paraenn 5 beds. 2 recaps. 
? tats bath. utMy. consanrfiay. yep WC. CaUar Large He CK 29ft gvdn 
r>hd 

Contray Rood. SWO 2UJHC 

Bnghi garden Its lecetey redecorated with new koeben 2 tub® wtovti waSang 
ostance Bed. retro. Mrh. tty Disarm. Front A 42 n Safi faang fear gzdm 
CH 96 yre 

>Vandswoith Office 01-871 3033 


John D. \Vood& Co for ihe sale and acquisition of house and flats in Central London, struentra! Surveys, vatuadon and general advice on residential property. 


CHELSEA & 
KENSINGTON 


BELGRAVIA 
CHARMING 
COTTAGE 
In Kinneiton Sl 

a tn droo ma . 2 bams on o4le. 
doubto rwcepUori room. fuHp 
lilted wtchen. oorope. *nd 
sunny root garden Gar K»i 
rtre. partly modt mle ad. pood 
DKorOne omer wWi new 
carpets tnrou^wta 

. £ 218,000 

01-245 6996. 


KENSINGTON GAIT W8 

Opportunity lo acquire a 
long lease of a line period 
house m otdH Square near 
Kensington Qrdeni Ai 
presenl arranged as 2 large 
maisonettes - for renova- 
tion to single family house. 
Head tease of 78 years for 
sale. Price £495.000. With 
possession of lower 3 floor 
maisonette - upper maison- 
ette available separately. 

MEUERSH A HARDING 
61 498 0866 


tWI. Anuxup apwcw^nd Mtn. W WI CItoSOWD W ME. Uw- 
uixnod aaartmem. 3.4 beds. dlan en d twraca.4 gwifcCTM^. 
1 2 receo. tomne paunitai. • garden . jfpa— . Z 1 12 - 000 . lei: 
£1204)00 tor quick sale. TO- 09902 66S7. 

370 1204 KMCSIOfl. Magnificent 6 bed. 

moon eMEEH Wl4 £22OX0O. kninwy rarored EdoanUan 
Period family house. « bod*. 2 drtacnM fttuafea CKW tortjr 
bains, huge rerepi. pdn. toft £269.980 Redmam 549 9033. 
room. Tel 01-502 8842 ' KMGST0H RfVBHIDE. Luxury 
KENSWCTOH W8 off tire K«i 3 bedrm apt ouenkng Thame* 
Hfi Sl large unmodernlsed 4 


BERKSHIRE 


freehold maisonette on 3 floors. 
£260.000. 937 9707. T 
QffUNS CAT* SW7- Reduced 
lor gitock sale. Outstanding 1 
bed flat, ige re-cep. anting rm. 
long foe £149.000 22S 0820. 
MMOUt RD W14 2 bed balcony 
(UL Large receo. GCH 
£09.000 Inc carpets. 01-503 
2874 OI57T 14X0 
SW7, ftnmar new *y mod 2 bail 
flat, receo. kit. ham. roof teir.. 
tnd OCH 61 Vrs. . £95j 000- 
HOLMANS Ol 370 5781. 


HAMPSTEAD 4 
HIGHGATE 


DELIGHTFUL 

3 storey Edwardian terraced 
home in gimt road- Gas 
C H. ntb- moderated yet 
retaurura ail ortonal faa- 
lures. 6 bedrooms, luxury 
Dal broom. 2 huge reception 
rooms, dining room, lured 
bllchen. front & Dock garden. 
£166.000. Tei- Ol 802 4118 
UXtyr 01-348 8629. tEvcsD 


BGHMOND HUB op exctusne ige 
bn fined 2 oed 2 hath flat, prt- 
sata ppbo £102.600 Tet oi- 
948 1346 ewes & wknd 


WIMBLEDON 


WIMBLEDON -. 
PARK 

Detached dmiMe - Tromed 
property- 5 bedroom, din- 
ing room, study etc. 118 R 
south facing t pn ini. Cas 
CH. double glazing. 
£199^00 Freehold 

REDFEARNS 
01 874 1122 


BUCKS 


LUX 2 DOUBLE ntted bed P.'S 

rtaL lsi floor. GCH. Character • 

krunga Ne%- kH * teih. Oiilco pouSOTTL. BuHUnkam S miles. 

ny Coe. Conun pans. Low r Y*g * 1 ywronar" * J”** 


outgoings. £60.960 L.'H + 
F/H- 789.6062 or 946 2266 


LONDON 


Dmscou HOUSE. 200 Tingle 
rooms £65pv> partial board 
Apply 172 New Kent Road. 
London. SCI 4VT Tei. Ol X03 
4175 


GENERAL 


BEL SOT Pit £IS5<>w 2 brq 

fum am Mm 6 mill Co let 
only Also selection available in 
SI Johns wood 6 w Hamp- 
stead. A.GH E. 586 8811. 


Keith 

Cardale ^jl 
Groves l| 


HYDE PARK. W 8 

Seleciion ol ouisrandrig 
Deaubfully eanooefi well lur- 
nshefi ewrfmerts m erciusnre 
mod block wrth terraces Jnfi 
<mre osn part Receo. kiL 
2/3 file Beds. 2 '3 Barts, 
dkrm Garatyng. rruifi sen ntt. 
Ms avybbto by smanat v 
rangefaents Ren far from E7D0 
Dsrtnc.cn. cm. Idu am 
POIBnge 


Keith * 
Cardale 
Grows 


Dm nre nets. W1 

toeiuniiaie 3rd Hoar flat set r. 
<tth managed omit bum work 
m mewi £an» viewxrg recom- 
menced f teb. recap room, 
kacsen dMe oedroom. twnnoom. 
£275. dw Nen 

Kaififiaa WB 

Onfienrsned 3 beoioixned ftii 
noa Hal sei <n aeswous man- 
wn WOO* FJ1» hlhd toioun 
Prop wmonses e.-hsi receo 
room tore ten I (JOto oeoroarti, 
1 s*qie oeown i urns ii en 
sun i £4rsa, Neg. 


« 'JBSSEBn 

KNJGHTSBRIDGE 

£500,000 

Delightful f aunty house mfti 
captiwatmq appeal luckefl 
away between Hgirods and 
WaBon Streel. 2 large recep- 
lnns. kl 2 cloaks, utilny. 4 
belts. 2 baths, plus sell con- 
tained studio with shower 
loom. Pain, roof ice. ga- 
rage. Freehold. 

01 499 2204 


UTTOISEA. Koaciotn 1 b*d 
room fbr wim South Wen 
("Cinq Pd! to Bedroom 15‘5 x 
UT9 ivilbllllnl ujidrobn Lik- 
ing room lb's 13'4 wJin 
worMna line pljre Tiled Mk 
room end WC Good rtred 
Kllrheei wiu. Tilled untie mi4 
men.hno Clow ro Ballerw* 
Pant, nwnule. « 4 |k lo 2 8 P -uji 
lions Good but route lo SIMlie 
^otun- !• numisbr idgednrt V»rsl 
tnd Lenenaid. 147'- yeura un. 

•spired C 40.000 Tr-* Ol 6T2 




CENTRE MAYFAIR 

Adiarenl lo Green Park, a 
selection of 2 bedroom 
apis in a secure portered 
block. Lonq Lease Prices 
from £ 1 60.000 

£185.000 

Please con Lid lisa stone 
Central Estates 

01-491 3G09. 


GEORGIAN LUXURY 
Parkway /Regents Park 

Georgian Luxury house. 3 
bedrooms. 2 reception 
rooms, oak kitchen, utility 
room bathroom, wc In 
Camden, off Parkway and 
Regent Park. Many 
features. 

Jt.169.9W FrefioW 
Tel 01 267 4695 
lEwt * “1 


NR. LAD8R0KE GROVE 
EDWARDIAN 
4 BEDRDQMED 
SEMI DETACHED HOUSE 

In 'nnrl ,r*t Coi~r'* l ' | h 

La-gF I Stt.ewT 

rulli- tilled m unwed lilcn- 
rn GC'H Gal d,n. Garaui- 
Mi<d.rnisrC 

Liniixn riHeb <:*1 

Tel 01 969 1025. 


BJUItKS VajJIOK. Cherifwmiuj 

■hr Gr— n aid «i.-t Corrmoii 

Liuni and ^turniw. em <ui 

lamii, bv«- i 4 b-«bi hath 
■JIMMIY UIIIIVC rm rlls 4M(. 
r- 1 -p an ■ mu rm kilinen f am 
IK rm OCH Slh frf.-inu udn 
Caiage Ofl » pin 1 : Jtf C*» 
r Hid UiI^oha. h-|pw.a7n 494^ 


MORTGAGES 

100 % to El 80,000 tfr 12 . 17 % 
95% to C300.000 «3 1i03% 
90% to 1550 000 <3 12.00% 

REMORTGAGES 
95% to El 00 000 I&- 1Z0C% 
CARRINGTONS 
STM KENSINGTON SW7 3ES 
01 225 Z377. NIGEL FERRIS 
Pension uret linked low cost 


MCHSUtrr *9. 3 dorev fcw.n 
nouM Only 2 years old wnn 
suorrb v ie*» ci er garden* Irnm 
fir-n Hoc* rerep Also 1 !*-os p 
hiihs lux ill. utiliU room ga 
raoe GCH. walled oarden 
O me Tube. Iirlih. and «*-un 
mi no pool £152000 T H 
iMMlntmars extras V low io 
day! Ol 359 6503 


CHISWICK - SUK ESTATE. 

Suaoous 5 ped fro use tr» rrrrt 
leu I pnsilron Strutluuliy 
ei-rtnc.illv bul n<M 

ebsmeiii.aliv modernised GCH 
£92 00*3 TH- .es«i 01 747 
0012 


M AIDA VALE W9. Superb return 
flal in nuirmon blk 3 begs, 
lulnrrn. %ho—er rm. Ity- rerep. 
lined kn CH. porterage, comm 
cron*- LonaKe Cl 10.000 PgtiU 
* Co 49 g g»7o 


BELGRAVIA COTTACE. for 

vseailhy Sioane Ranger 3 beds, 
pario C25S.OOO Long lease. 
Point A Co Ol 499 9876 


cmr EC 2 -Ornky' 1 bed. 1 
recep tut with rr— kit and 
haih Ind gas «. b low s r 56 
n 1 ST E49 OOP Frank Harris 
A Co Ol 387 0077 


BARMCS VHXACE Large * bed 
maaonetle Ughl ttvolo lounge, 
alcote study. Ml A bath. gch. 
£72.500. Ol 878 6391 


PUTNEY Charming Vltl gunny 
isi fir flal. 2 bed nser slew. I 
121 yr lease. GCH CSS.9SQ. 
Tel- 01 874 9964 i horns i I 


Quecnsgate Mews 
SW7 

Handsome mews bouse wiib 
tags Mimy roof finten A 
trernbouK. 2 rerepnoa. ] bed- 
rooms. 1 knebem. 2 baihrms, 

E oee. Onfunal iron talconv. 2 
b or iJDgle dwell mg. Ideal 
locauonfiiia. near strops, 
part, transport £225.000 F/h. 
01-581 8901 


PARLIAMENT HNJL NW3 Spa- 
nous 2 bed fiaL enuet leafy rd 
near heaUi. MapnmcMU views 
GCH FH £00.000 neg 01 437 
8068 day Ol 794 6266 no. 

NAWS7EAD Dei dMe. Crtmled 
hse I bid 543 rincftley Rd 
NWS. Meal for Using 6 office. 
£180.000. Ol 202 3471 m. 


Ol 689 1490. 


RICHMOND & 
KINGSTON 


HELM KENSfNCTIDN WTO SW12 BA14MM. DeUgrnful 


desperale *re properties in pert 
Ltmo-jn and .-oufltry MKaiions 
waiting purznaiers 937 J 68 J 


W YOU ARE LOOfUNC for a 

oudlili Hal in central London 
w«- hare a wide selection avau- 
able. Tel Parkers Ol rpa 4455 


MAIDA VALE. 2 bed fully fur 
rushed rial P 8 btocf 46 year 
Ir.w Lit! porterage Enel 
cond £75.«XTO Ol 289 *326 


MONTAQU MAMMONS WL 

Imm-K- 1 bed rial m prestige 
Mock All amenities CBO.OOC 
Lung tse Pol in A Co 499 9076 


ARCHITECT DCSKMID Lw stu- 
.116 V.,m kll A bath fully fitted 
!MW6- 01 o25 9384 £45.930. 


... EAST 9HEEN BW14. Sumrtrunq NWS. Meal For Using 4. office. 

special Wound fU flat 4 Beds. - , .. £180000. Ol 202 3471 m. 

BARMCS VUACE Large 2 bed 3 rev etn usual of Dees. 1.400 «q yuefnsgate Wlews 

maaonetle Ughl rtudlo lounge. JL Garage, secluded wounds. SW7 DiriuuriMn s 

ako.e study. Ml A troth, gch. Direct access ro Common and **" * RK/HMUND & 

£72.500. Ol 878 5391. 85.000 F^rote Tel: H^mc mette IkHhcJ reiA KINGSTON 

■ — BARMCS. Superb 4 bed hue In mvrihrane ^ ImwiS'riJl ■ — — 

ourei cul de sx close lo river 2 j^nbow. fu.cutyML ] ted- n t«— ... M 

PUTNEY Charming Vw sunny t>4ir». rnagniflcenl 32- recep. twSfSo bacfcTng^oroml^mrmo pSk 

1st fir flat. 2 bed met slew. dining rm. fully nt ML sasch. Witn superb slewsinprtvate 

121 yr lease. GCH C55.9SO. CPU Sunny gdn £169.500. |UB Or Ho&c diteUtBg. Weal setting rtme Gotfaub Lov^ 

Tel- Ol 874 9964 ihocns. 

RECENTLY MOO.-RCDCC bouse. PMk. transport. £225.000 F/h. su,le Fine guldens with gge. 

in quwl restdenual Street of best 01-581 8991 £328.000 Freehold MILE- 

Wandsworth 3 beds. bath. STONE A COLUS. Ol 977 

SW12 BAXiiAM. DeUgMfui targe snower m i Januty j ai. 2 rereps. 1166. 

2 neq garden flat I'll lounge. gdn FreehaM£1264)0a 

Long lease £49.750 01-675 _ ° *”"• 

9979 ^?M2 be^rtM. irt fktof SW5 VILUACET HAMPTON WKK. DN VM 6 bed 

dbM Kenway Road Beaumm 3 nse choe Riser at ungoon. 

£77 000 95 yr »se Tel 01480 bedrootned cottage sx vie house Many Gothic (eafures Broulie. 

Iip .,,11 is,.. Hid. PARK BW17 64 1 1 day or 748 3744 frome wt h p alio Freehold Fully stored F uD O CH. 2 bams, grins 

“rUSmi ro roiHS ion, jUJ c^aPHUi Prenv vL|„»» mod embed lo a Wgh Standard * 2qges £250.000 FH View 

K ‘^2’ rUd n i>J SS i1re?y?mrii?^!!^-in.^v 1 .rTn l ,T Cl 37 800. Hogarth Estates today via Vendor Ol 977 7298. 

mw%t TZFi'SSSF l!SJp* 573 9557 

km GCH. 87 yr Iraw £62800. liw. . . 

1 " Tel: Ol 223 0118 — — — - — — 

BARNES. Urgant Georgian style EXC VALUE. 2 tune bedroom w K ENSRIC T OW Spacious 2 bed irMWKWrt VAUL. K vipertJ 
me in twautiluity mauuamed rial. L7xl a ri rrsuuu roooi raw 2nd llr bat in PB tdock. COf. 3 yr old vpac am in aeltgnttui 


2 ned garden flal 1 711 lounge. 
Long lease £49.750. 01675, 
9979 


UPPER TOOTING PARK SW17 

DelMtnlui bognt 1st IU 2 bed 
flal GCH. new roof £62 000 
01 767 8471 exes weekends 


backing onto Rtmmond Park 
■mi superb slews in private 
setting cicue Golf Club. Lovely 
famarcom mcl master bedroom 
suiie Fine gardens with gge. 
£328.000 Freehold MILE- 
STONE A COLUS. Ol 977 
1166. 


ken way Road Beaumid 3 
beoroomed cottage sivle house 
with palio Freehold Fully 
mod embed lo a hWi standard 

Cl 37 800. Hogann Estates 
Sam Department. 373 9537 


VHUAGE* HA MPTO N WKK. Det Vkl 6 bed 


me close Riser at Kingston. 
Many Gottwc features Beau) re- 
stored Fun GCH. 2 hams, gdro 
& 2 goes £260.000 F H view 
today sta Vendor Ol 977 7298. ' 
ihereaRer MHMone 5 Col Us. 
Ol 977 1166. . . 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


NX. May tor 12 Muss New 2dtrie 
bed Mews house. 

Lounge /Diner. fully KIM 

kitchen All laellUtaL Garden. 
Parking. Pmt.Non smokers. 
£150 pw. l*» 341 6485 


OFF ABBEY ROAD HTML 3 bed- 
room interior designed mews 
house with luxury Ulrhen and 
bath room, bright lounge, gar- 
den; garage. £275 pw. Tet 
SelinanAOl 4S8 8814. 


■FI BR A V IA Futty jnodcharaMr 
house. 3 bedrooms 3- receps. 
wl Ututty. hath, sea shower 
r oom, garden. ‘ £378 ■ pw. 
Applegreon 381 6699. 


Uidv.axd decelopmenl beside 
ihe Common In, mar in esery 
dei.nl ch. cUurm. supers titled 


to Tooting Beck Common and 
Svrainam Hill Station. 
£52 SOO T Hoskins 730 9937. 


kit brklrtrm. dining rm O'lkng CLAPMAM SW4 Chotce of 3 new- 
pretty gdn Irtflr drawing rm , v rang ? bed. 2 recent rtus 
'•lift rural \ J IU> f qj Qqn axr H Howam m >n > 

batn.gge £i69O0Olnc ExcfH ^g nto/^SB* 


Valin rural » » j wo. iua r q^n avn Howam nr nn 
batii.gge CI69O0OIPC EscfH O 104^56* 

T?| t {wJ Tjyt ° r D “ 011 PonrT DULWICH Vic 4 bed family 


8ARNES VILLAGE. Twist Pond 
and Riser Lqe soar Ed serm def 
fam nouve in wide rrsidenlial 
rd Although mod now requir- 
ing updating S beds. 3 oaths. 

drawing rm. dimng rm. ktt 
blast rm, cedar, utility area. 


house, fully restored, tux pme 

kiL 2 barns £95 000 Sena 
James Ol 771 6211 
STOCK WELL .'OVAL light A spa- 
rtous 1 bed flat in conservation 
area. £42.900 Tel 1 O 1 01363 
2532 1 H 1 01 682 6499. 


W9 3 bed FLAT Lor Ughl newly 
■ ont Warwick Ace lube 10 
mins COSaOO Ol 289 8703. 


lofL gch. 9«l well TELICRAPN MUL SE14 8pa- 


NEALS YARD. Gmenl garden f*«.yo Q, 2ao o 7a «_' 

VSC7 Atirtiiie 2 bed an. new mm 01 2a " “■ 

rntirlv.ud di-seK-pmenl. long 

|ea«e utr sale. tlSR.sOO Fully 

iiironned Ed* did Charles A LARGEST LIST or mews names 


Partner, Ol 935 281 1 


Lime Brand Ol 402 3275 


maintained gdn. £Z75.cOO. 
KHKM 1 A King. 01 878 4942. 

LYHBEN CATC. SWIB Newly 
rorntrurledui Regency style de 
lefopmeni Exceptional Scnu 
Dc* Use 3 receps 3 beds. 2 
baths Lin Kll. ultlKs room. 


nous man. a rtm. alt mod Lease 74 VRS. £56 950. 
comforts BR 13 min lo City. KARROOS ESTATE OFFICES 
£49.950 Can 01 639 5780 Ol 589 1490 

TRBBTY GDNS SW9: 3 bed. Terr NEAR KARROOS. Charming. 


lined kit. recep. balhrm. sen 
WC. Entry phone Good Cond. 
Fid carpets etc. No Agents. 
£59 000. 01-602 1497 eves 


SLOANS sa Charming w» 
nous. Orotf - b'nm»l mate. Ige 
recep. 2 bed. 2 bain, exe kit. 
IIS am. LI 59.000. 226 0004 

CHEYNEWALK.SW* Banxhui- 
ty dec A equtpp. 3RD floor 
rtudio flar with unrivalled 
clews south oser Riser 
Thames Eht Hall. KH. bath. 
Lease 74 VRS. £66 950 
KARROOS ESTATE OFFICES 
Ol 689 1490 


Hse. rharmmg igthCcoraersa- 
Itoo Sq ttim lngr GCH. Walled 
gdn. £87 500 01733 7386 


5TJONN5 WOOD, Imnvr newly BRA MO NEW -Q min. ddi 3 beg 


groe Beautifully landscaped SWli pretty South lacing 1 bad 
mpiiminiiil grounds imtbu of fUl with large Jdl/dl ner 
Pul no Heain duoerb Laiue £45.500. 223 0876 


bnghi 1 bedroom flat in etouni 

house. Using room wHh nrc 
puce, filled carpets and cur 


award winning riverside bevel 

opmml ftaued gmd fir flat 
offering Ige receo o'limg river. 
Fined Ml. Lge dMe bedrm. 
bdllum DMe glazed Otoe Fung 
m. Ants lo awinmuag pooi. 
Moorings A attract communal 
gmdS £69.960. View today. 
0932 747909 Thereafter Tay- 
lor OK on Porter Ol 977 0264. 
RICHMOND Pretty, modernised 
Victor tan cottage In popular 
Alberto' area. Newly decora tod. 
2 bedrooms, too,, larger than 
average bvuig room. Carpets. 
Fitted kitchen OR street park- 
ing C96.00Q for oinck sale THs 
Ol 940 8376 or 01-439 2949 
KINGSTON Newly bu« 1 bed 
luxury apt in award winning 

College Mews. Large recep. Fil- 
led kilcnen wUTt au apptunces. 
t 2 d vr nr. laa^so me carpets 
A curtains. Ol -Ml 6246 home 


SCOTLAND 


fiffi ■ im haif : I ifcUWUI tuna 

1 U l, *'T Uft W bPflUUjUj On, a e , . 

South wni roaai o € scoUan^. coasL Rcsideni Sccretaiy 
IB mure Irani Dumfries superb BTOvMes comprehensive 

security and services. 

5SSS5: I^^£f° 0,o£BB ' 000 - 

Meaily.aiuiMed an tenaxaped. * s ° r further details: - 

rtto 400 y« from beach. 800 _ 

yds from god course, ttaues The Osnrev 

nearby For fuH details write or X LRiprtgr 

»!*PhW Baremi Propertlea. Company 

Sandy nuts. Dalbeattie. Ktntcud- ACtT trnnkl 

arighBhtre. 058 778 661 t*® ' 871061 

ounbarto miibhl . I 

CMmhmM nose to M74.M8. 

M9. 4 Bedrootned. detached _ 

touitotow in. gaecviUiie Male. SOUTH DEVON Superior dHJtte. 


The Osprey 
Company 
0637 871061 



d-^ .-urpeh^ rui ill presnqious 
t4orh Dot b*d New lu> ball, 
and kll f*er.-p balr Nr tube 
,ia .ill amenilic-. 46 nut 
i.67 SCO Tel 296 6612 


WC1 FREEHOLD. Or Anne t-t-i 
5 it prop rur-entJ-. luhti.iAu. 
roil nrods renov.inmi v>u» l 
UnH. small re,r wti 
V : “ 5 W togra 7 u—uuv 7 31 
.-4246 


BARBICAN CCt Lara * on s 
■ •.er. nupi»i »iiii pii,!' i.-r 
r.e«- mi C-H -i, 12: ,r [«■ 

Ul5W Tr.ink Hans a. Kn 

oi iH- 


CAMDEN TOWN. Hramiful >u\u- 
rieVL- 2 fr-d I'o! LeriR ik?-p 
lulls tillid kll aiul iu-» 
inr- .ii Ml cum din-. GCH 

Lb- 95.3 T-f 387 !023 


ffSGHTSBRIDGC Large j 

ll.lt. ^Ite-ro rerep view ig 

li.ii me. l.ime n.ill wnn dinnwi 
uied. 2 bdins. .’ll vrs kw, 
tl&ROOO Ol SA9 bdlS 


hs.u-M- with urw m Pars Roy 
al nuiu ns Ta.toi Woodrow >9 
sH0C guaranteei fmniau 
tale ■ cHKtinor lirtl luted 
y .ir hen s nainroom 3 large 

n,Mh S with sngwer room 
0 «m kvaiPtn nr luca- 3 vuxn 
l*. nun- iimt. Ml. M25. M4 A 
MJC Te, 01 3960 

StfEST NAMPSTEAB 3T fiMS 
WOOD <eir.)i-is I us I i-tTf Atairs 
kil Brand new lututs Pal In 

rl.-tan: .T.in-mi me't 4 bds 

< web kil o ill. lulls ranwleo 
ll.'kyjd r-dund lor guick 
w.1- T-i 0923 r:2CS 


ON BARNES COMMON. Superb 
m.ui nr. -rp-ivati ilow. 2 Cbie 

twirms ilujj' drawmu ira din 
rrr. nil 1,1 Lll rlkrm mod 

haihrm y.' udn Cg» Super 
< r.nd Sc.;.. aq> nts £99.000 
TownchoiCc ’31 N»8 


QUICK SALE reuuirwl Eslrrmlv 
spaerti-r- 3 ae- oed. 2 bald mod 
V irt ng. rl-ea- Wandsuorih 
r’ljnimnn Magi penod lea 
fiir.w G-'fi i':tJ~S0 >31 622 
2590 -tti. 312 7580 iHi 1 T 1 


rnmmunuaJ grbumrt RndM of FLU with large Jdl/dlner 
Pin no Heath 5uotf» value £45.600. 223 0876 
£235 OOO HARRODS ESTATE 
Omni 01 5R9 1490. 

TELEORAPN HILL RANK 5X14. DULWICH 

a Conveniently Situated * v " 

Jernmgnam Road bicfonan 

CcmwTuon Imagr native Dev el- ^ 
oumrnl 1 x 1 Quiet Tree Lined 

lienue only 6 ntiVH npl Lon- . j. prepares 

rton Bnaor 7 4 ? oorm uualily IMMAG UCI 

Mils GCH Fid Ktto. Buirms. immr'W ww - 

CpK am Law Oucgoingv IlflllsF 

C47.0XI TM 286 8040 I1UWOK 

SW12 One Nronlmoalr Sauarr 
uiid rube and local amenriros 5 Bedrooms 2 Bathrooms I 
Lui faihili home s bedrooms. ehareri Hvma. Dtrtirra 

2 iratnrouiro 11 cmuuei. dmm 9 * aapwj “*“ 2 ; , ^ 

room. 20FI drawing room fa< fWfti faSXabl Imrury 

mg garden with French kllchen breakfast room 
Window' new fully lined ktlrh r«»,06l ttfilllv .work, 

en Gas CH £116.000 Tel- Ol- I»2«0). Wlliiy /WSR 

673 7280 roam. Doubte garage. Cas 

SW 12 MsMtatato Triage well CH 

oevoraled 3 -ipatiou* 1 bed gfd £ t AE AAA 

fir tUI. Oratmal Victorian life- 

D Lam lurqe mint lulchen, _ 

,a»p-H cellar pano uarden fd 01-693 2051 

GCH EjtreUml order I h rough. —www 

0,4 C32 OOO Tet Ol ^75 3912 
ps eulIKF 

BARNES B ORDERS hnmarutalr CARLY VICTORIAN HOUSE. Su 


rams, fined known. 65 yrs. low 1 fast Uflf f pw Wimr 7 fwd 
-.j* 1 .??'?* 30 ' Tfi *‘ I tmeany flal Mooern ui and 


DULWICH 

IMMAC DET 
HOUSE 

6 Bedrooms 2 Bathrooms I 
shaped living. Ditiing 
room 126X261 luxury 
kllchen breakfast room 
( 12 x 26 ). irtillly /work- 
room. Double garage. Gas 
CH 

£145,000 
Tel 01-693 2051 


4 ie-d. 2 bait*, mvdern town 
lunar in evrlusl'.r private Oe- 
vrHnpmenl 2 receps Vitch-n 
ui. Hi i- Cw. CH 6 nuih facing 
garden Garaoe £148.500 01 
878 2214 .hi or 794 8171 iw) 


pefb cond 4 bed. 2 buih. large 


outgoings. £120.000. Tele 
Phone Ol 727 5897 
WARWICK GDNS W*6. MagnHV 

rent unmod 1 hid imp arranged 
on 4 firs romp rial tva receo. 4 
hens, dressing rm. 2 baihrms. 
we 2 mis. ho- gdn esc iul 

F hid L450.000 Ring today 
Reed 6 Lewis ZM 8377 

du me n t op o mts ltd Are 

incased to offer 

a very ntre period house m hoi- 
sry SI with rtudio IIm p around 
£360.000. Please telephone Ol 

SRO 3S47 

PEMBROKE HOAD W8. Bngni 
panoramic awrm ModrTn p h. 
flal 220 reception. 2 both 
rooms 2 texts, -nutty, ft I Led 
kilcnen. Qiack sale £143.000 
Un ro ss U d: 01 602 566 4 
RE9GUFFE 80 KWIO. Irnmae 
Grnd ftodc fUl High ceilings 
Large creep D8LE tied. Bath, 
kll IND OCH 75 YTCs 
£89^00. HOLMANS Ol 370 
6781 

EW7 Superb newly mod fltit. 
Large rerep. (Mnl kll. 3 Obie 
beds. 2 baths 1 1 C Sl CSSkwr 
Ind OCH 2 Phtlm 125 VRS 
£169.000 HOLMANS Ol 370 
6781. 


oath Onspnal femures. GCH 
ana rare** included- £€ 0 . 000 . 
T«. at 876.1996.. 

NEW. Cakde sac art Green, so 
yds lowpath. Mad. Victorian 
collage. 2 beds. garden. 
£89 000 01940 47Z7 

day. eves. 


Integra! garage etc. Many add). 
UonH feoiurisj Often otor 
£68.000 Tel- 02367 34156 
HRNAM TERRACE.. House In 
. need of renoiaoon groPU AVAU 

a«e 3 PWlie 2 beds- KMctien ! 
bnU n onm £10000 bvtedtng pfgr 
separate £700(1 096881270 
NVEBNELL Mbdero 3.'bM butv 
Sfp*- ««wwn nr 

hbmne CuUodm. Meal home.- . 
invert mem. Mo.ooo. T« 0997 
21830 i day) or 21324 cevesi 


KU22 1 JSTS* J™- «*» Supeeb. bright 1ST Iloor 

kiiciwi bn«^Ri»J rin OCH n.v wilh vuulh f^onq ktir t q* 

aU awmmlies 8 B -mq bewoito lnfl OCH 92 YRS L13&OOQ. 

£98.780. TH OI 670 5836. HOLMANS OI 370 6781. 


A TASTE OF THE COUNTRYSIDE » THE CITY 

EDINBURGH 

LIBERTON 

87 ELLEN'S GLEN LOAN 

easy readi «aH local ramus. Aao mre a Htr oc comoraei baE'siniy 
lounge «fi sUUws eamq nun. 3 UilW tadrooms. lha master tKdnmn 
with « pc» finr sun n sole. «m bedroom or momm rown leadra to 
(Bony. Huuy tm«} wtefan. fiUf room. D&* 00 m. ctottnom wth Mh- 
btral •£ dniM garage. Wine ceUv. FuH gas cJi. RM Mutate dura i 
mrougmiL M carpets and Roar B w a u m BdudR}. RV to De ai ^ro jif ! 
VMwmg Tims &&ni Sat 10anvl2noon. Sun noon - 4 Jttera or by anra- ' 
ran let. 031-665 9216 or 031-665 B55«. ' ” 

rortiHf porcUvs Iron am offers am £85000 nr 
AILANMCDOUGALL 5 CO SSC 
HOGARTH HOUSE 
43 QUBN STREET 
EDINBURGH 

TEL 031-225 2121 | 


s 




rl 

. #*• 1 


. 

^s*-' 

& _ 

S -. -• V^-^7 ' -r^ 


■ dian end terrace.' 4 beds: cellar. in-inuium, 

garden, garage. £112000. let: . ■ 

09802 66 97. 

BNBCKNELL Recenfty ButHAbM 
ja SSL nwrlc Tudar defacbed nouse 

Large landscaped garden. GCH. 
ConventoBl* md«. M4 2 mltoA 

MINI hi ON MVERSIDC, Luxury £T6 jOOO. Tel- 0344 42274S 
3 bedrm apt Overikng Thames 

A Hampton Court Part- , , — — 

£1 16D00. Rednum 649 9036. ** ™HAY KNKS Cuddw*y 


BRACKWLL RerenOy bum 4 bed 
. mock .Tudor detached nouse 
Large landscaped garden. GCH. 
Gonveaicnl A gidet. M4 2 miles. 

, X76u000. Trt. 0344 422746 


IJKf'*' 

• e ■ " 


design mdlviduat etiatei style 
del nouse on inngr border 
Lmely view* 4 beds 3 recep 2 
baths mar many lux rulings 
£132500 Tel 07366 71476 
IRACKHZLL BERKS smtdoui 6 
beds hse bathrm shower rm 
24x20 Inge now two ctrf en- 
quire 0344489484 £80000 


NEAR WfiO B T VMHEU - A 

■mal) staieiy home wiuiin beau- 
tiful landscaped grounds of four 
acres, four' fire bedroom* 
accomadatian. rm bathrooms, 
indoor swimming pool and 
■man annexe, most impressive 
eievMlofis and country setting 
ML 1 hmcnobs 14 two miles 
away Enrton line -fMilton 
keyncsifUie tubes away. PRICE 
GUIDE £236.000. FtopeA pan- 
ners - 0908 610003 I 7 daysi. 


Luted grade LI with t?Cenlu 
ry ortoMis. an individual house 
entering curai stews. 3 beds. 
„ ... bam. 3 receps Secluded gar- 

■w Muo tfftis iitKNii ’s acre, oner? 

from Common: New 'lux de-- around £1 10.000 king * 
10 ? t l yr g > Gnas«nKcen0844) 206454 or 
speeffleations. 4 Recep. 4 Beds. ■ iqb66> 726016. - • • 

2 Baths.?. Lux KIL DMe Groe. 

landscaped gdn. £299.coo. ■ * 

KARROOS ESTATE OFFICES. C *j*** ftI f*f ***"»"* 


Exreileni rondtuon. small ChH- 
tern . _ image. , 3Vi . mUes 
Amereham. Dagcon dW eld. Good 
access MOO. M2S. ITeguenl 
trams. 3 rereptfon. kH'bkfasL 
many, cloakroom, nan teeurng 
to indoor swunming Pori, maa- 
ler bed .'dressing roomrbam. 4 
further befi. 3 baths, attached 
dble garage. 3 bother garag es 
stabling, outtndfctgs. separate 
modernised office.' 9 *. acres ■ 
fine gard e ns and paddock.- 
Guide Price £360000 TH 
0490-713248 


DEVON & CORNWALL 


CORNWALL 


Retire to recently complet- 
ed X .and 2 beds and 
penthouse apartments. 
Finished io an exceedingly 
high standard with spec- 
tacular • views over 
Newquay harbour and 
coasL Resident Secretary 
provides comprehensive 
security and services. 
From £32-500 to E5ZL000. 
For further details:- 


%’S 'Ll '■ 


byanange- 


- f uiiv ' . fum'd unnur con. 
unhvTrpd viaws Sateombi Estu- 
anr Meal . bomowner. 4.4hte 
fitted Mv. H C. Lge Inge, stone 
fire pi Cedar ■■ refling. 
Bath i sfawr. 4 'ng Bnu. 6 «**lllW. 

. unry. Duaks. Study, sewing. 

DHe 40. CEN. ura DWeOTg. 
£136.000. KtnmhrtfH* 

. 1064812942. NO agepto- 
MY W bOk BAY Cart PtynwuUi 
sound .'Bungatow -Alh sea view 
3 bed suil family hoi home retoc 

exec rearement. £49960 Wf 
eartv sale. Ptym 863169 
DEVON Sea and ertuary views 4 
bed 2 bath r*N house dMe ga- 
rage double giid Trego village 
sailing 79K to 626779468 
KEATS HOUSE Itsied ten-. Town 
yd* nverbrh auo m NUierro 
two 0 Ui rwo kll ige gdn £ 62^60 
Teftoimouth 2738 - 
%X. DEVON AxmOuth Urted W» 
Grade n nr sea Ingleaoc*. 6 
rooms KGB gdn esntaiy view 
Bargain £61.950 01-488 3271 


EAST ANGLIA 


MUeOMH caiarming period 
rolLrge near shops and sea. 
Beamed siuina rm. dMe bedriu. 
mod kHehen A bathrm. second 
bedrm .ana 2 nd wc . arrow 
small courtyard, including car- 
pels. curiam* cooker, fridge, 
hralrti £48.600 naa. Tel 072 
88S 2668. 













y 




THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY/2 





2^!? M*™*, near Newbury, Berkshire, was 

Domesday Book ft had a plough, a mOI 
paymgM shfllhigs a year and a wood for three hogs. In 

^ manor with the Dean and 
Oapter of Westnmister Abbey for 100 acres in centra! 
London including St James Park. In mere recent tunes 
papjor’s fame has been achieved through its gardens, for 
® «ie 1960s, while the interior of Uffil/ft-ceiitnry boose 


"as completely remodelled, the landscape desi 
Lanniu? Soper was employed to reform the garden, w 
slopes down to the river Lambonrn. 

The house has six bedrooms, five bathrooms, a nursery 
wing and staff flat, and the sale includes four cottages, a 
426-acre arable form, IK mi le s of fishing and a email 
pheasant shoot. SaviOs and Ayiesforda are seeking more 
than £1.75 million. 


At - ; a tune when. the emphasis always 
seems to' Be on American property 
investment in .Britain, a re mind er that " 
there -is stremg two-way trafficcomes fo; 
i the shape of an exhfoitiph taking place m 
London dram April 17 to 19, when more 
than 1 0 billion dollars’ worth of America 
goes on sale. 

The property on offer includes the 
Henry Ford estate on the Atlantic at 
Southampton, New York; which has a 
palatial mansion on 170 acres and a price 
of 526 million, or a selection of ranches 
and forms in the Mid-West, California 
and die southern states, where $250,000 
win buy a going concern of more than 
500 acres. - 

The Exhibition, the American Real 
, Estate .and Investment Show, at the ftrfc 
' Lane Hotel, Piccadilly, has been' area- 
-n«ed by. Kenneth Miller,. ;.of . Miller 
Marketing Network, worldwide consul-', 
fonts based .in New York, in cooperation 
with the Wall Street Journal in Europe. 
Forty firms, mostly American,' will be 
offering goods and services, among them 
the State of New Jersey, which wifi invite 
investors to take a stake in a wide- 



a 


bit of the 
colonies 

ranging urban-development plan backed 
by Governor Thomas Keane. 

The property for sale is new to the 
market. Mr Miller says, and includes an 
offshore development at Palmas del Mar 
in Puerto Rjcb and another in Cocoa 
/Beach, Horidav.'wbere prices for holiday 
.hongs* -range from, $100,000 to more 
than S2;jxdlfi(Mt:m wharis thought to be 
-the biggest, recreation and holiday dcvel- 
^opmeBt undertaken in die US. About 40 
per cent of the prope r ty on offer is 
residential, the remainder commercial, 
such as shopping centres, office buildings 
and hotels! 

The property is also intended to attract 
smaller investors, who can put as little as 
$5,000 into a share of an apartment. Mr 


Miller says that some of the apartments 
are occupied, which leaves their value at 
less than the vacant-possession value but 
offers tax benefits and the prospect of a 
better profit when they become vacanL 
One of the exhbibitore, Goddard and 
Smith, is offering 13 apartments in New 
York, five on Central Park South, for 
between $120,000 and $450,000 and 
giving free flights and accommodation in 
New York to the successful bidders. 

Michael Biddle, who conducts the 
firm's auctions in New York, comment- 
ed that he was looking forward to 
reversing the property buying trend of 
overseas investors in central London. 

Mr Miller, who expects buyers from 
Europe and the Middle East as well as 
from Britain, explains the attractions of 
investing in America. “It is partly for 
investors who don't want to lose money 
if.things go wrong in Europe, but partly 
because they want to have a part in the 
American dream. "His selling point is 
that the British have never had such an 
opportunity to buy back a sizeable stake 
in the country they originally colonized. 

cw 


It comes with a 
captain’s curio 

■ Sir Nftotaus Pevsner described 
West Ashby House. atWest Ashby, near 
"HomcastJe, IJicahtSWre; as “vfeuaHy 
entirely satisfying", tt smaH Queen 

Anne mansion; fisted Grade ir,onc* 
the home of the Bishop of C 
is tor sale at about £99,000 1 
Strutt and Parker/s Grantham i 

The house has kept some period 
features, including afine. carved-oak 
staircase and a carved doorway and 
canopy from the London house of 
Captain. James Cook. The brickbuBt 
house, restored and improved by the 
present owners, stands in about two 
acres erf walled garden, grounds and 
• paddock. ■ ■ 

' - . .... •: • 

AccomrrK)d fl ^oh1nc fi rdaB an entrance 
hall, dining hafl, drawingroom, Jiving . 


room, nfon bedroom suite and four 
further bedrooms. 

- ■ The medieval chantry at 
Canterbury where followers of the Black 

- Prince met to pray for his place in 
heaven has come an the market - a futty 
licensed wine bar and restau ran t 
Radigunds, aet-irt the shadow of 

.. Canterbury Cathedral, dates from 

- 1350 with extensions added a century 
later. The asking price of £250400 
through Cobbs’ Maidstone office 

-'Includes a modernized Georgian 
cottage, which would be an ideal home 
for Radigend’s owners, say foe 
agents. 

■A fine Regency house in the Royal 
Crescent at Brighton, which faces 
private gardens and looks out over 
the English Channel, is for sale at 
£2ZOjno throu^i FPx and Sons’ 

Kemp Town, Brightonoffice. The house, ' 
on foe floors, has four bedrooms and 




a self-contained flat, with a splendid 

drawing room on file first floor with a 
balcony looking out to sea. 

■ The Priory at Awre, Newnham on 
Severn. Gloucestershire, stands on the 
banks of the River Severn and has an 
earty sight of the Severn bore as it floods 
past The 17th-century listed house's 
thought originally to have been a hostelry 
for sailors and was known to be a 
mooring point for boats during the 
industrial affluence of the 18m 
century. 

Built of brick and stone under a Welsh 
slate roof, the house is set in five acres of 
gardens and paddocks, and is for sale 
at £180,000 through Hampton and Sons' 
Cheltenham office, ft has three 
reception rooms and five bedrooms, and 
has been renovated in recent years, 
retaining much of the original panelAng 
and exposed timbers; aria Georgian 
windows. 


35 


X/tMBRDGESHIRE 
ST, HEOT 5 . . 

canMiopc is man.' mm 
Crwo 60 ram*. ElMtrlUcMKU 
law iWe ; KxUvMuM 
ln*i iiuinK m mat mm 
of romirucuon. awnooUaf 
Ouw voOcv wHftWvrr front- 
off and pmw rnasma 
LnWuc draagn off m 2 OHS. 
IIIMV-HIM rm, WW' dtxv 
KM an. UdM. M rm. 
aiiWV wfH tel rm wm at 
utOe twHl rm..4 ndtotbab. 
tS an suite'. baDMn nb. gal- 
lery Jo tee Min> R»v views, 
t iv tmm n*> uah wmkrn 
(Mid OmDhig 4tsn Otters 
around C26C.0O0 trotted 

KEYS & CO 
— 0480 218200 - 


yt ciiwm wvawoMBttin- 
IMt CMr*» rf*xaw* «uq 
back id ilw ifSOH wan 4 m 
room. 2 bathrooms. 3 
rereoUom. MUiehm, MHKy 
room, mint room, immi to- 
BMtooJc orewac* m lounge. 
wraKn at oak beams. Large <*4 
building wtrti 33d wennhos on 
Isl Odor Endowd nunyM. 
only 5 man loath M Norsncfl 
m ite mmqM after vWwe « 
Mudurlsn. Cl 39 OOO. T ' 
pnotte MulMrtoo 10008) 10200 


u mv in nr . omr umnr «»- 
invai of douched dupeL 
Cunt teal Ha. Lane trod ana 
. dunnn. spanout mim 
toansr w«i mirafc ttrtsnace. 
stew and . balcony -» arnmj 
area. wefl fined warden. Saute 
-j|jffi**:K) aasuwCT hedroom. 
■MiiHMfn. ana kanna. Sun trap 
rvurHen-dHwv and waited Mm 
umui oners cve.ooo pKur 
raw Marno on 0703 61222 
morkl 0223 314508 IHwwj. 


sumMJL AumMSH i mm. 

Ic-ukii 33. rrourwaue (noage 

on 4 wtrn 3 arm or part m 

OOP tank unmleir«pted ilrw 

oitr mssOJond Of SMPra- 
Maiilnwi For Qnfflocal hid NOT 

Mintediamv. uMnune anotaw 

aoven 3-« month*. By owner- 

Urrupter Cnamnes ReMy to 

BOX A33 - - 

BUWWNLmtMIM 

14 mb tewiurM‘1 3 mb 
rern* 6 beds ■» enstete 

4 1 wild dressing rmi BMhrm. 

Idled kjl breakrm. utM. own. 

OMC nor. OH CM Co^ ortrr 

jjroj.ooo ono lei OaZBA 5074 

MtnJLK Nr NenvKLh Brood* tt 

>MnmOi onteitv 3 bed bm* 

nn yxIHed sue m *•» am. 

Peace & tr anudw "H h an a* 

nn C 65000 0605112575 

run Mouse Conaorynnwi vir 

I -np- S W- Norfolls Red a«*JL» 

bed* Walled tan. £67.600 
Tei os** 500 raa 


ESSEX 


bidwells 


ESSEX 

ST0ND0N MASSEY 

£^°»*TL 

fljaOBflgndui Sbwch Mo) 

LHWd penod house A t nesnso 
looms. 8 bedradns 2 bOtamo 
reaiay Mid twirt court US(fej 
uimiwMnQS. mew "W 
am A™** and grass 

ism 

103 ADMAIL 

FOR 5W-EAS * WHGLZKJ 
OR Vi TWO LOTS 




had mi nr Twrte P»J*enea 

faulted irni w. owl 

rmtie-im mi en cc» *« 

,S«X»CM S2BMM 

woee *^ PWAy T t y u Tfd R ?f^ 

ir-i 7 mim rootffiwM noun* 
daHi-d loW 4W2i« y™ 

Mneiie MO. £90000 
ukumtauh drwmMid termer 
roSruwtw m owt> ' at r* ffr ar. 
madniiuwi UK* 3eec kit 
^Ticr^iOC *mb.0B43 6195* 

nnaHTf Swarrb mod l»en'te« 

anrST °n r - , <> , 

lid a^oLaiL gen. le w* 

- 6r-4AJ . 400 

n * UCTCD llittffl ^ 
heridu- JndtetlteM 
■ iHiiri' .Utev. ro m M W . ^ 
M64SS OeSOTTO 
KBKT BWtee»m«i..Mo4r*5 3 
reccptw- a l “““ L 

Rjfc fcifcnnkr- dw J OTm . 

tl±SOOO 01-06 O 9M7 


r/th century 

LISTEO FARMHOUSE 

NT rinGbfngffetd. CureftaOr 
n m o r te ei L 4 bed*. 2 bteb *. 3 
TKnrtnm*. UBbii /- 

bmkfosi . room. «udlou 
doooie garage. outtsuOiBng*. 
5 tfltfeAocBa. fid cram 
H wtH HB. L acre. OJJLO. 
XSTOjMM 


EAST OF ENGLAND 


. 

Oi«*b bom* 0. 6 beds. 3 rec. 

oartUn. .Utat te tewv.*S7SOO 

teiKbo C B IWI I 2 tea. £21500. 

T«* O 

UWiOUl’caqwteWB tn- 

cnvunal tamUov S> garden 

atemdid view aanou Trent Vote 

£62600 Tei 0622 810204 


GLOUCESTER 


CIDER WITH 
. ROSIE VALLEY 

EMpeonuUMd Oat wtm 
srtenata views. tn.hWtoric 
raffl. 3 beds. 2 baihroom*. 
nay Hand kttclsen. targe 
smug room, targe uady. 
night storage beatua. 
parking space. WttH. or 
wlCioal A were wood.' 

With woodr £85.000. 
W/O wood: £75,000. 
04S2-S! 3881 : '. 


U vimmaw 
Bru*v a MraHtetarhrd 3 bed 
roomed wrente M team* «- 
Too* CH £■ 3.950 L«r * 
Lear, tsmtui (04656) 71666. 


oMiage Ad of -cnaracter. B loe 

romm £60.700 Tte rt»8S) 
SMU 68 tar written detain 
BOTVWOUXI LfCWMte 2 mu. De 

tntittnl teaue cottage. 4 Beds. 2 

iScrot £89.600 026682 0705 


HANlSJOCffiSET, A 

LO.W. 


NORTH DORSET 

In'jMtmlB-.'aKkBKne Vale 
ctwnny wb with m ai n fane 


Superb cfcvekjpistni of IS 
Luxury Onacbed Houses on 

a choice of hlfady umbered 

. sac. 

Oorts, i Rec. 4 Bote. 2 
Baths. Gas C.tL Good Plots. 

exceptional value 

£/a&5M829SB 

Far lOteoUd BWfitem! 

SFVIOR it GODW IN 
Hub Sims. f«D«amn._Donrt. 
T*te igra-iteMii 


thoirtiea tw M vUage of out' 

teaadbM natural - beatmr 
Dereci.-WWi boron- RuonL 

1 Mor taoKOOL 2 owe bednna. 

privacy Mm ww aMa a. 
£47^00. *r«!! 0747 61140 


Cnannrr prrtafl. 4 bed cMtage- 

U> mrtr* of pKB»lar40wnMM 

\iQ3o«. Odin around £89.000 

for maefc um Teb 0130 66708 



about nurd err*, extras 

M etres* oi tucwxw Tfte- 

pbrow Tim Bate* dPropetty 

04386. 

Sanga- 

tow 2D in from beam. 2 

mB* 3 Bv0rm--GCS4. tnamar- 

male, mar anctc mta lSSuQQa 

Te«»26 63968 '. 
CIHUWBWI* Dorown lb rtv- 
. « 9MrtMMb*.utuu.'raem«K 

£5f.-QS0 or 90 rear wh*. 

832071483339. 

HYDC I0W 4»tu« dte 4 mm 

M» caa CH. taue oar. gram tan 

at. lec nntcd Mtr acre, pote nt 

Ufwa.-cnsoa Rww 826*6 

A iWgu fiwWi Milage, nw 

mod eon .- te nr» uH r Aug 

t^30- Tab 0929 4SSSS2 


WEST MEON. 

Ofltrj on tl75JK»; Srte ftgems Be- 

Met atacMBii ad Pwrattad. a 

emmtagmdtpiom.iitedir-oai- 

xea Penal Wage House n gnanos 

el a* acre. Dnntew kx 2 tauau i 

itotte 4 bees. 2 taoa. 3 imkb. 2 

a wwe SC. Fea CH. Ban/sWln. 

"^PEHYARDS 

cowmrr properties 

0962 60300 


BOR- 
DERS 2 awn drive London, 
tv.- non peak: San boftt souUt 

. tacUg Hnmacmau easily run 4 

tuna baamabd cumr house 

wonderful «ww» and pronwo tt. 

•o acre. « bate. Stem, tndoar 

. te pooiAtasan. FTmeaf soucni 

after village. £ 200000 . On 

man Moore Mngiord <07471 

8400. 


HEREFORDSHIRE, 

WORCS, & SHROP 


1 Mite Junction 9 Ml. Ltoc 

up 1 * 26 . 6 Uvtag room. 8 

Lge Dbte Bedrooms. 3 b«u.- 

roonB. PCH. Fine decor, 
pmrrvtng Geo r gia n lea- 
tares; Prvt Mews wtfh an- 

port for 4 car*. £196.000. 

BUYEB HAS 1ST REFUSAL 

FDR ADJOINJNG ELEGANT 
OOTTAOE. , - 
£38DOO. 

TEL 0682 841270. 


Frontage I 

acres of « 


IT ComcHTOH NT 
PHUtoie. Family Mum of d»- 

tlnrbon in -teevawd note 

wiib tncorapaar te ite rural in*. 

lo River Avon and 11 

grotmdh. 7 bads. 3 re- 

2 EU1M. CH. 

dbte ganw. sudmnung pool. 

Pncr guide £260.000 Freehold. 

Contact Banns ft Slivers. 66 

foregate street. Worcester. M 

109051 23466. 

MOBLEY 17th C image small 
Wr cottage swtabte 
retire -uvest, note. Lge < 
bed. mod bath rm. sm rm. 

duungylot. ch. nail rear gdn. 

£24000 u lad admtmno smaB 

onmod cwL further 1/2 n 

Tel: 0432 19387 
UUKE VK property main 

Ledbury MUs. Swtebte goete 

boose shop offices etc. Good In 

VKtrnrm. £39000 0631 6288 


HERTFORE^HIRE 


IWOWE OFPUteTUMTV to North 
HerttordsMre' conservation vil- 
lage. OM targe worMhoo with 
2 -3 bedrooms, living accDnenb- 
dallon. Circa £90.000 TeU 
076384 408. 


■T. ALBANS. Quwt CUl dr OC 

-serra oetactied Nash bom house. 

Suu lamly with noraty reia- 

Bid, 3 beds. 3 recene. 
hsBBVora. anwntun snower 

and inset. Re I men known, ga- 

rage. urge wen stocked iwrom. 
. Aime r partdng. £B2Jo5T TCL 

0727 34829. 

K ta t P row. iHarpenden mten line 

ten 4 notes. SI Albans 8 mtlesi 

Del Georgian family he in 1H 

acres In village retllng. a rrc. 

. k* 4 b e dim *. 2 BMimn*. ooe. 

gdn.ft DRddocii. Oas cn. Off era 

at reaon of£i80i)00. Rumtndl 

.. Sedgwick 0727 64516. . 
tMKHVATO Harts. Old lodge 

tuUv mooemsed. mov London 

’ Heatnrow M2S Ebed 4rec 3baU 

OCH cedar* DM oar. £ 226000 

tmm OCC- 0923 778990 


KENT 


4 6 bedroamed 
Iteeugh lounge.' ir eteale dm- 

too room, urge oned kltrlm. 

utiMy. badirtnm. pomMe gran- 

ny annM». sepnair snower 
roern. (idf OCH. urge denote 

tarar. acre, a »« ** ■ Irom 

m, I QOi toe. £99.750 Tel 0233 


tpRHMtaiwMdreCtait- 

tinrd -snenarotar new «f 

London aim! Kenl ceontrytede 

3 bed* ea suite bam. fuiv fliwd 

kiictini - wtOt Neff aswbences. 

breauen and <nmng areas. 

large toange. pmatepaBo. Bum 

in warwwes. double giaang, 

-gas di. ftngr. Ul. a»<r video 
entry system. 2 penimaae* 
oHeret £176X500 Btenbury 
£<d 01-290 0388 or 0689 
«2S3& weekend ' 
FAVDSaHL Large 1904 

Me 3 reewit lge ltd Wl uUl mi 

dk. 30H bedMux oath lOCTgan 

pr tin ft B42 £79.900 

0796633478,. 


SOMERSET & AVON 


BATH 

AWARD- WINNING 
NORTHANGER COURT 

IUSNOWNED FOR QU ALITY sad now finslr aunpiaBL oar aonpc atw 
eeoue Bre tare son been rttopwol at U» best tauay dcvttopraetu by 
krtlal Home - swinb br ittS. 

SapeiMy nutated bnadr (be River Area, the Bus enter qmfitv in may 
tepen of dew *«6 eseomea. Feanwes mdnde hBy-fiiird,saU -wU 
bum. (atari bartmioais *<tih loutnnnve dun. and Amnco floods*. Tt* 
impHftrnu r m pq ihhip bwHrfmt iff i" 11 ^ fWtf t- 

ymfc pmvidiBs detabtW mnonn d inp. “Ohoai ihe dnnlfcry of 
oauanug (hen. Vows* a ascnUsI torn apprecauoa of *c qnbry nr 

PRICES: OSJM424&PH 
Brochure front 

UTHODOMOS LTD 

Sdes Office. I Nonkmcr Oan. Geo** Sotru Bab BA3 6PE 
let BmA(0Z29) am w (MM 


BATH 

FME GE08GUW HOUSE 
FOR RESTORATION. 

txccHom ncMHHiMi poesun. j 

mention. 7 taOmns. 2 batti- 

roonL Bassflmt RaL tally 

mIM ganten 

OFFEfi AflOUM) £T«MI0a 
OOfWAN REEVES 

TEL: BATH 333332. 


BKVIUCUy 
Centre 5 Miteu. An nxtraordi- 
nary country property Minted 
ta a supm» priv a te elevated po- 
, sumo wHheHManvevnwB ever 
me unrounding countryside to- 
ward ute my. This untaiie 
property has many wnwJJofi 
MBtiva including I7tti Century 
oak panelled rooms, stone roui- 
boned lattice window*, 
baliustradad terrace around 
three non of the Muse and a 
roof terrace approached from a 
ROM spiral flau lab. The 
accnmadanon t* generous Mil 
eauty maintained and to brief 
offers: Reception HaU. Drawing 
room. Dmma Room. Study. 
Kitchen. 3 Bedroom*. 2 Bath- 
room plus base m ent a 
salable for conversion tofuther 
accomadanon or setter ate flat. 
Offers in third Bi excess Of 
LI7SJ300. For details aunty 
King Miles. C ha rtered Smtf- 
m. Thornbiay 10464) 4I2S66. 


MIDDLESEX 


TWICMENHAM. Lge Rbturr Inte- 
rne- designed studio RaL Long 
tease- Ckne lo all amnttti 
£43.000 ono. 01 892 6466 


NORTH EAST 


DETACHED RURAL 3 bed auallty 
bungalow Of DC 3 miles Wesi 
Durham coy £67000. Tel 0389 
710620 evnungs 


NORTH WEST 


CW M M Atanas Sbed 2both SO 
cmi uon* bum CH saw our 
buddings iovety Pennine views 
lo Cro ssf eB £30.000 Ph 0498 
81677 or 0490 786432 - 


OXFORDSHIRE 


17* C. COUNTRY COTTAGE 2 
double bedrooms. 1 won fitted 
wardrobe*. I wiib wardrobe re-, 
cess and luxury modem 
bathroom. Large- pine fitted 
known breakfast room, ex- 
posed beams A cooker. Ample 
bnne room wMb Inalenook. AH 
rerpete A curtains. 22 Mies On- 
ion!. 2 mins Banbury. Fanoious 
views over The Warmington 
Valley, landscaped g a rde n and 
carport. Village aramnies and 
«tioo*s very close. £62XXXX 
Tel 0296 768361. 

TOOT BALOON Obrfdld CUV rest- 

■raBmUM. 1 M *. d nugr for 

further tanorovemenL Oul- 
MMdina position an edge of 
mull vllkw with maanuicem 

vvewi to i he south. F ind afters 

in the regmn at JS86C00 Daniel 

Smuh 16 King Edward SL Ox- 

ford 0X1 4HT. (0866)724811. 
SOUTH (WON DUBEUnAng con- 

temporary country home Map 
rafwnri views. 3 room. 8.6 

IMS. 2 milE- (Site ooe. acre. 

Btt 3 mile*. Oxford It miles. 

Private sate, region £196X100 

nog. 0355 814711 eves. 

COTSWOLD stone rottace: ceral 

drt. m .Pmmmm S beds, gas 

OL garden. Punning pernus- 

sMuio eneod. £*s.ooa Ph 839 

8000 x 229 

tNDRTH COKW3LD. collage 

(AOdartunr) -2 aol beds 2 reep 

mgtenoak nreMere- kd. odn. gas 

CM £69000 CQ9S81113S 


WELLS 16a Century J bed col- 
lage. InglenooK. furnished, no 
garden. CH. Good decor. 
£28000. Tel; 0749-72656 


BRISTOL CENTRE. Walcrfrtml 
(las from £89.960. City centre. 
Balcony. 2 tab. to ch. Can 
Irene Martin - (02721 277283 
Th unsays lo Monday lOJOun 
to s.aonm or Jean Olsen - 
(0272) 425001. 

LUXtmous APT. 2 bed. con- 
verted warehouse O' looking 
Manna. LtfL Nr. Ouamock 
HUH S mb MS. £39.760 
Tel-0278 4617 IB. 

80MERSCT wooden Courteney. 
Nr Mweheod. 2 bed outag e. 
Irge amc. main services. 
£36.000 064384602 - 

BATH CRESCdfT. Debehtful 1 
bed QaL Breathiakino views. 
£45X00 ono. >02261 331264 


SURREY 


COURT /EAST 
molesey conservadon area. 
Nationally featured. 1984. Ar- 
c hired desgned. Traditional 
family home, wusloo 26 
mm*. Hyde Pk Car 13 mis. 
Master bed with co-suite tax 
bath. 4 more bed*. I bath, fund 
cupboards throughout. EM lull, 
ckukrm. study, during ball, 
drawmgrm wnh targe tog lire. 
Spectacular 36' family room/- 
kitchen with integral 
conservteory. large otunyrm. 
shower rm. W.C. Date ggr. 
gardeners’ W.C. store rm. h 
acre waded garden with prorate 
rear lane to High Street. Private 
& secure. Offer* -at £ 280.000 
Freehold. 01-941 4702. 


KMBSTDN Detached vsu. dose 

to Ruer and Richmond Pane. 

25 ndns to Waterloo. 2 dbi bed- 

rooms. 2 bathrooms en suite, 45 
fl tounae. Vxmriao spiral uar- 

case. fined kttchen. gov Garden 

and off street parking. £96000. 

Tel today- 01 -6098206 or 01- 

549-9342 office hi*. 


DOBHAM near American Qom- 
nuimty School. Immaciilf 4 
(talached house. 
£1 19.950. Tel 0952 67962. 


MALCOM LEMMM Property dm. 
•uunB manage rental prop 
erne*. Chohbam 1 099061 6227. _ 
CH EA—r Anrardve DM Itte In 
prune resHMntui rd. 3 bed*. 2 
recess. Ul. breklast rm. bath. 

. elk. BTOe. superb 76FT Gan. 
£122500. Sun viewing 01 642 
9370. HARROD 6 ESTATE OF- 
FICES. Ol 689 1490. 


WALES 


FARMIMS AT LEXSUHC Outline 
pOHUung ramsenl for bouse' 
overtookUig 80 acres onteM 
pasmrebmd. 3 4 hide river 
frontage. 3 muee from M4. Of- 
f ra* Inv ited. Trt 0792 882660 
W4MTKD try academic. 
Pembroksnlrr Gael, pari tune 

uk. see hided collage- Close sea. 
vww* 1 year lease option re- 
newal . Reft. 0273 471 768. 
OVFED Fre eh old three bed room 
house aaar shops school s m- 
Ampie parking at rear Quick 
sale £17000 ono Tel C««S8i8 
H0RTW8AUS, Seafront Penl- 
IMNbe rut 2 Mdsuounge. kiL 
MCLPmwr roof area. Cenrl 
Hheted. Double GU>Md.£18000. 
SMORE-BV-SCA S Wata* 4 
MX 2rec with great araview*. 
9 am bv candy beh and conv 
mon £69500 Tel 0962 60428 
PWLLREFI DM town houca mid 
19th cent. Mod kft * badtrm 3 
DM CH «»' reach fnuntry + 
beaches. ESOOOO 0401 50199 
TRADmOHAL d DM Utn haase- 
6 miles renvoi Wale* coast, ek 
amenitw* waiung now mm 
£ 3&MO. tel 0970 86693 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


Luxury Retirement 
...in beautiful settings 

Delightful new one and two bedroom 
retirement homes with caring supervision - 
fitted to the highest standards. 


Independefii 
control 


rt and care ots 
ST. JOHNS MEADOW 
drecester 0285 69681 
CHURCHILL COURT 
Aylesbury 0296 36377 
CUNNINGHAM COURT 
Romford Ol 597 9735 
LAUREL COURT 
& BEECH HOU5E 
Norwich 0603 300220 


FLETCHER 

SHELTERED 

HOMES 


Please telephone for further 
details. 


Andrew Qrant 


Chartered Surveyors 


Bf Otantto et Mr m* Hi a Ha ntar 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE 
KINGS LEA, KEMERTOH 

Tewkesbury 6 rates. Oxtail 55 miles, London 110 rates 



A TRULY MAGMBCari QUEEN ANNE STYLE PERIOD RESIDENCE. 4 Reception rooms, taninr kitchen, 
utfly, doakroom. PfflNCIPAL BEDROOM SUITE WTTR SAUNA, 4 FURTHERKDROOMS. 2 BATHROOMS, 

second floor teenaae/guesi sute. GARAGE AND COACH HOUSE. BeaAU end iratue private gardens. 

APPROACHMG 2H ACKS. 

OFFERS OVER CSSO^WO 

HEAD OFHCE 5MB HHEGATE STREET, WOHCESTHL THEPHONE WORCESTBI 24477/8/9 


BUSTED KEYNES, 
WEST SUSSEX 

Hayvonb HnHi 7 mfei 1123 9 -Me*. 

iifltaMtataV ' ~ 

m 6 



towd 


Dnrtad oHHahkogs *od» 

■db bhM Cat awte ca n) 

Md Mtad mrtn wm m 

md pwt Siflt roan rt bfls. 

uctad. jnddocM and THilfl*l* H 81 
non Hi kml 

Tibimnn oo*a mu tv 


Hampton & Sons 


• Jbtafto SML Lrodn SWtt U8. 

Ttt *M» 02. Tflc 2941 


ESSEX, DOLLAND ON SEA. Su- 
Pwb second floor wofront Oat 
21R x 29 ft totmge. separate 
dining room. FF kitchen. 3 dW 
bralv with fitted wardrobe*. 2 
w*» vanity- unto Bathroom, 
sroerale toUK. GCH. DG. Ga- 
rage plus snare L’nmterrunifd 
»* vtew* moM rooms. Must be 
■ren £61.950. Funner details: 
0266 816328. 


PETER 

RAPSON 

CHARTCRED SURVEYOR 


SAVEHNAKE FOREST NR. MARLBOROUGH 

DETACHED SINGLE STOREY DWELLING (N 
NEED OF RENOVATION IN IDYLUC FOREST 
SETTING WITH PADDOCK TOTALLING 4.5 
ACRES APPROXIMATELY. 

Porati Entrance Lobby Kltchan Scufiery Larder Sitting Room 2 
Bedrooms. Garden end Store Sheds 
Timber and Thatch Bam with Stables 

OFFERS INVITED IN EXCESS OF £100,000 

THE SQUARE. RAHSHJRY. MARLBOROUGH. WILTSHIRE SNS ZPE 
TELEPHONE: MARLBOBOUBH (0672) 20512 


■WTACtl House SM hot cold 
Ctat CH pari DG redre report 

5mla Hmjd railway a m car 

flMcc largr garden Frunlon on 
Sea £61.950 ono 0579 71273 


HCtllBBOUl detached country 
cotupe with oaHIlnf and nearly 
4 acre* of garden and haddocks. 
Bed ul llul position 3 miles from 
mainline nation. Detail* from 
0206 578681. 


SUSSEX 



pton & Sons 


SUSSEX - NEAR RYE 

AN ELEGANT AND VERY COMFORTABLE COUNTRY HOUSE BUILT OF BRICK AND 
STONE WITH TILE HUNG ELEVATIONS IN BEAUTIFUL RURAL SURROUNDINGS. 
Hafl, reception rooms. 2 cloakrooms, breakfast room, kitchen, laundry cellars, 
principal suite of bedroom, bathroom and dressing room. 6 further bedrooms 
and 2 bathrooms. 2 self-contained 3 bedroom flats. Oil fired central heating 
bard tennis court. Extensive outbuildings including stabling and garaging. 
Secluded gardens and paddock land in all about 8 acres. 

FOR SALE FREEHOLD. Further details from:- 

London Office. Tsk 01-483 8222 or Mayfield Office. Tefc (0435) 572294. 

BERKSHIRE, NEAR NEWBURY 

A DELIGHTFUL GEORGIAN FARMHOUSE IN A SMALL HAMLET SET IN LOVELY 
GARDENS AND GROUNDS OF A^pUT 414 ACRES. 

Hall, wc, 3 reception rooms, kitchen/breakfast room, laundry, S bedrooms. 3 
bathrooms (including principal suite). Self-contained attached 2 bedroom 
cottage. Fine range of original form buildings including garages for 9 cars, 
stables, stalls, indoor swimming pool with sauna, hard tennis court. Lawned 
gardens with terraces, landscaped pond, orchard and paddocks. 

PRICE GUIDE £300.000. Further details from> 

London Offica. Tab 01-483 8222. 

8 ARLINGTON STREET. LONDON SW1A IBB. TEL; 01-483 8222. 


ROD-WALE* bungalow. 3 M6* + 

lurn holiday wm® w«h book- 
ing*. Bum- with Income. 
£ SSjOOO. 068 687 458. 


WILTSHIRE 


TILLEY & NO AD 

NORTH WILTSHIRE 


UTI^to 

Oc cun yi n a an rxtremrty aftrac 
tivc tanuutn Sou di facing 
poMticn: a unique and charm- 
ing Freehold MHI House with 
ad Mining cottage ideal for con- 
veraon into a superb country 


Potential accommodation 4 -6 
brats. 2. 3 recap*. Study, two 
(bath*, kitchen bnmefact room, 
usual domestic office*. pj> lor 
garage. Very attractive waited 
gardens ft PADDOC K exte nd- 
mg lo at least '« ACRE. 

AM 650 yd*, of ungte sank 
Trout iistung. 

Otlrra invited in the region of 
£ 120.000 

Apcxy: 30 CTOS* Hayes. 

MaDnrshury Wiltshire. 

TH. 1066 63 .2749. 


CASTLE COOMBE 

ARCHWAY COTTAGE 

Unique detached character 

cottage. Picturesque setting 
m the centra of this historic 
vttege ctoee to the U4. 
Auction 21st May. 1988 un- 

toss sold previously. Pnqe 

guide £70.000 to £ 80000 . 
Full deteBs irom: 
marth a STMTFOBB 
63/64 REW BO AD, 
CHBTEHAH, MUSBRE 
0249 C58B31 


4 MMXS 814 UI 51 ITQi CrtUUry 
■imciHd cettaae overiooWno 

farmland. Beam*, tnglenooa*. 
onguMI bread ram 1 i*"**- 
ram. crtaooo. di m Si Si era 
3464 


WILTS/GLOS bonder Couwold* 

conveniraii Orencester Kranote 

M4 swmdon drismuut tu. 

alongsMr young Thame* v.-aaw 

det 3-4 bed excwneoi orraw- ev- 
west dmiurgunng CH fhld 

£96650 IDO ltd farms rat* 

cavil buyer TcJ 0285 861-445 

W8.TBMM. cnarmlag two 
bed roomed Hunched Coiuge. 

Two rme reception with ingle- 

. node* and mooted beam*. 

Modern IpUy fitted kitchen. 

About ■* acre itrwrts. £69,300. 

0480 

HHOME Near MartbeRMte 
tam century deuucned conage 
facing Church Green. J bed*. 2 
recepuen. Kitchen x Bathroom 
CH OUfMitUnars Garttrai. 
£70.875 F.-H. 0672 810767 


t KD Vlllaro Collage, ga* CH. 
MdliM garden with stream, 
very ouiet. extensive views. 
£62.000. Mart borough 20016 


YORKSHIRE 


HELMSUY N. York Moore Nal 
Pari,. SparkxE stone Oulu pm 
Od house CH.4 bds.l I double 5 
smgtes) Ctase lo all ammenitw* 
Parking Ideal for holiiuy or 
Yon commuter £60.000. Tel 
0904 42i9o5 evening* 


YORKS. WenslcydaM- viil dtchd 
stone cottage. &. room, lined mi 
< hn area. 5 bed*, bath. WC 
shower. D- stair ctoaxs wcch. 
garage, gardens suit ret hoi 
£42.000 detail* 0969 22902. 
COTTAGE m FEMME WAT. 
North Yorkshire viBagc 2 bed 
rooms, scene view* £19.950 
ono. Tel 02216 6052 
M YORKS vntara*. spacious fam- 
ily home. 3 d bed*, are dr. lux 
oak kitchen, bf garden pauo 
£42000. Tel 0748 81 1062 


LAND FOR SALE 


•LAUD FOR THOUGHT- 7 acres 
include* pair of semis. South 
Herts, green bell. After totem 
01-947 8226 


EQUESTRIAN LAMB We&l Surrey 

borders Full Manning lor large 

nou*e Substantial offer* (nviiral 

tor this umaue opportunity. 

102521 624949. 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


Furnished 

17th Century period house. 4 
bedroom* '2 double). 2 bath- 
room*. downstairs cloakroom, 
dining room. *uung room, 
study, large fully fined kitchen, 
unuiy room, large playroom 
walled garden. Central Imcing. 
50 minute* tram Irom Central 
Lonaon. easy ream GaiwKk. 
Hnimow airport.* 4vauawe 
from May 1 1 si. £600 per month. 
Call' 0732-482882 before 9 
am. and after 6 p.m. 


KENT, P te re s a e a enchanting 
small furnished Georgian house 
to lei nr Tunbridge Well* Suit 
lomgn diploman. Term 
agreed according to length ol 
M Specla c u j aj new tram 
haum- and gardens. Available 
immortal eiy Tel; Ol sa& 1432. 


OlfenslfWlK To W lumlahH. 
Cio conage. Small garde n . Out- 
el village ctOM Oxford and 
Aunodon Beamed silting 
room, doung area, good kitch- 
en. cloakroom. 2 dbl and 1 
stngle bed* wuh basins. BaOt- 
room. garage. Teh (mornings) 
Ol 238 7808. 


BRIGHTON 

ROYAL CRESCENT 

Pond Ground now 2 f«l tar m 
piesnpous back on seal mm cum 
to Minna Oam sacboeo courtyard 
and dauUp-garage a rear Corn- 
pteta ioetien. rap auahv Wnigs. 
curtaris A capos 070 jrear lease 
E73j00 

Tefc 0! -460-3700 


HOVE 

I hour London Beautiful 
ground floor Dal lovertooklng 
[he drlvev Large hallway, targe 
lounge. 2 bedrooms, bathroom, 
lined kitchen, lolly decorated. 
Lots ol parking space. 5 mm* 
walk Iron, sea from. 


CUM Occipital fw flU tofl 
Td tar wcMton t M dca 
02 USX daw sr CC SB <33 


MR LEWES. CHALVMSTON. Pe 

non tarmnoure on auira no 
Inrougn rd. in taorrous rural sol 
ling a rrerps 6 bed*. 2 tulhv 
study, utibly. dble gqe. CH. 2'i 
acres tuns and paddock. Osiers 
£170.000. ChUduipty 10825) 
872541 


nratmtlNO. 3 bed detached 
tone. 2 receps. kiL uul rm. 
pge. dMe glared. GCH Offers in 
the rrapon of £59.750 L'rgenl 
tale. Tel 0903 203181. 


UlHr 

London j. overlooking Park, hn- 

marulale 3 bratroomed rial. 

fidlv mod kll. bMh sep HC. 

very spacious. OCH. parking. 

£77.560 Tel. 01 54° 3892 
ALDWtCK BORNtW REGIS 3 Bed 

maraonellr with Vilung room 

mod kll bath sen WC GCH able 

Otar parage, beach 40 0 vo* imm 

now £39950. 0243 266552 
EASTBOURNE Wins meal in- 

vert self contained furnished 
around floor Hal CSS.000 To) 

0323 37702 

EAST BEAM Superb del Sussex 

slyfe nouse. 3 dOUWe beds. Spec ■ 

tacutar download view*, facing 

SOUlh. £82-950. 03213 2369. 


LAND FOR SALE 


4W ACRES won rural owldina 

Hie min full stannum ix-rmi*- 
vm for nursing 'te*f home s 
worceviravure For M d«a«s 
ring Hodges RKhmond ft Part- 
ner* (03861 34ii. 

BftrOLK bunding land ■* MOtal 
for sale in prune viltagc l 2 
™tes Norwich. Abbott*. 103621 

4814. 


lstnm8ParKef#l i 

01-629 7282 ll?'*""' **"**»" 


London iu n m 1901 1 



NORTH COTSWOLOS 

Moreton-n-Marsh mam line station IK miles. 
Oxford 28 mfles. 

An Attractive 17th Century Manor House 
amidst lovely countryside bordering the 
Heyfhrop and Warwickshire Hunts 

Hall. 3 Reception Rooms. 8 Bedrooms. Oil Central 
Heating. Excellent Cottage./ Stable Yard. Garag- 
ing. Heated Swimming Pool. Hard Tennis court 
Mature Gardens end paddocks. 

About 20 Acres 

Cheltenham Office 
8 Imperial Square (0242) 45444 
(Rat 11A422) 

SUSSEX - WESTMESTON 

Nr. Lewes 

A magnificent Mid 19th Century Grade li 
Listed Former Rectory set in picturesque 
dowidand hamlet with extensive views of 
the South Downs 

2 Reception. 5 Principal Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms. 
Further accommodation of 6 other rooms, bath- 
room. garden room, staff sitting room. 

Gardens and Paddocks. (House and garden may 
be sold without additional land) 

About 35 Acres 

Lewes Office, 

201 High Street (0273) 475411 

(Ref. 6BC2190) 

NORTH COTSWOLOS 

Between Boo rton-on- the- Water 2 miles 
and Cheltenham 15 miles 
A Superb 17th Century MiH House of 14th 
Century Origin Restored and Refurbished 
to the Highest Standards in an Idyllic Set- 
ting on The River Windrush 
3/4 Reception Rooms, Poggangpohl 

Kitchen/Breaktast Room. 4/5 Bedrooms. 2 Luxury 
Bathrooms. Oil Fired Central Heating. Garage. Su- 
perb Bam/ Stable Complex Suitable tor 
Conversion. Delightful Waterside Gardens with 
Extensive Fishing Rights m River and MiU Race. 3 
Paddocks. 

About 10 Acres 

Cheltenham Office 

8 Imperial Square (0242) 45444 

Ref. 111A.408) 


L 3 n 6 Fox^^. 

-£* : ;£r*?Ry lands 


NORTH EAST HAMPSHIRE 

Hartley Wintney 3 miles. Reading 9 miles. 
Basingstoke 10 miles. London 41 miles. 

A MOST ATTRACTIVE AND WELL AR- 
RANGED PERIOD FAMILY HOUSE 
Conveniently situated on the edge of a popular 
village. 

3 Reception Rooms. Kitchen. 5 Bedrooms. 2 
Bathrooms. 

Good Outbuildings. Hard Tennis Court. 
Delightful Mature Garden. 

ABOUT l *A ACRES. 

London Office 


HAMPSHIRE - NR ALTON 

Odiham 5 miles. Basingstoke 9 miles, 

M3 b'/r miles. London 58 miles. 

AN ATTRACTIVE AND COMPACT SMALL 
FAMILY HOUSE 

2 Reception Rooms. Kitchen, Breakfast Room. 
4 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms. 

Charming and well laid out Garden. Double 
Garage. 

London Office 


OXFORDSHIRE COTSWOLOS 

Burford 4 miles. Oxford 17 miles. 

AN HISTORIC LISTED COUNTRY HOUSE 

With Medieval origins 

carefully modernised and well maintained 

with frontage to the River Evenlode 

and valuable fishing rights 

3 Reception Rooms. 6 Bedrooms. 4 Bathrooms. 

2 Bed Staff Rat & 3 Bed Cottage. 

Tithe Bam. Garaging and Stabling. 

Gardens and Paddock - 4 ACRES IN ALL 
Banbury Office 


LEICESTERSHIRE 

Leicester 9 miles. Ml Motorway 18 miles 
A PLEASANTLY PROPORTIONED JACOBE- 
AN HOUSE 

Listed Grade II and ideal for modernisation and 
further improvement. 

3 Reception Rooms. 6 Bedrooms. 3 Bathrooms. 
1 Acre Walled Garden. 5 Acre Paddock. 
Stables with planning approval for conversion. 
Auction in 4 Lots - May 1986. 

Joint Agents: Fisher Hogganh. 

Market Harborough Tel: 0858 62201 and 
Lane Fox & Partners with Rylands, 

Banbury Office 


London Office: 36 North Audlev SirreL London W(Y 2EL 
Td: 01-199 478S 

Ban bun Office Middleton fhenev Banburv. CKon. 

Tefc 0295 710592 


a compromise 


Ebvsttf., -ntt^rhc ki 
Nwrnjig jnvuoal -s jdC 5 
hnb.>mikij. bul taxora -<i in j 

pfTrJw *rtijljTd 

taip.n'N^cmkB-.T 'Scfluii. 

UL-IW V>7UI. 1-J-vT- All- V)3 jI 
.’ta-kr.-.v-MiDi. n-rt jiU v 

•JtTipru, ■„ - rjl£T. . tt; . .ilk; . Li, r- - -rs 
*an if-.i m j]| Iji. T. 

;.-U plj.-J '-Uj* li-Tirv- Ir— » 

Lfta »injin*« iiurlr .Li_-.iv erjip 
\ii.ic.ra.i- *jll ukjLjU.« ijjr.,-nJ 
.'HsL-tu.tj'-iuiui n * • c jj \ H bC 
lEwljtkk'pitataTI. JB^ltl.-v'V Lr. 
?bci! .,-imal 

C-ii^kUi.m. :r.-mc_jrl. Sjrrme, 

• h.-ni MU 
k-II.ra > ;t>1ii 
Eba-w-u . «>J5i 

L.-ii-- R-iji ■< 
aliersuiiid ■ ■■ v.- An 1 ; 5 
Chunm.li! huJ Lft; 
hrx, itui'illM. 
ien uL. iim lev 
v.jjio-n Hjic Lo, . 
lic.i at.- Ff..-.i. Ure 

CLnrurt k,.«j » l.v 
I.-jcJ jti lor 



BAYMANS 

WOOD 




Glantfauis Road- ^"imi 
Brattraod- Elsa 

CUML IDkkOMBf twia I- 
UJWO". PMIUS ■ 

x ^% 



The BkirnjTd 4 hfdn>cm i teM iaJ 

Prices from around £225000. 


jSales pffice'ppeb;7,rajsjai'i\v€ek; li aw~5pni; 


For aiustrasd brodiure phone Brentwood (0277) 210226* 



Alfred Mpine 

Homes 


MORTGAGES 


EBMOO to £140.000. Mon- 
mm ft rranongagn. l« to ] 
*>S“v of valuation M - 0 1 
T Hal ten £ Co. Laea* lOsaai 
823026 


PROPERTV WANTED 


CASH BUYER vreks tott ». nou*c 
uiuun 2 hr* Lonaon 3 M 2 
rrci-te-. Carom LD lo XotXOOO 
Imo lo BOX EB7 


esi- 
k of 
■ a 
rit- 
.■ro- 
eld, 
«w 
the 
the 
kua 
ica- 

ull- 

ack 

kitn 

ean 

net 

dsh 

uy. 

Mr 

to 

of 

•'ide 

lign 

and 
trl> 
h a 
the 

Mr 
•uth 
■nee 
Mr 
• of 
for- 
d a 
ad- 
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n v>ojr“ mifra 3 W? 


THF TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 


All rijviifiuJ AdtvRfVfircitfc. 

can tv accepted bv telephone 
lewcpi ADnnunccmcnuL The 
di-Jillinc is imirm 2 dam jmor 
ip publication lie S iWpm Mon- 
daj, for wcdnmdjvi. Should 
juu wish lo send an" advertise- 
ment in truing please mriuile 
UHtr damme phone number. 
CUSTOMER SERVICES DE- 
PARTMENT. If V DU have am 
queries or problems n-taung to 
vour advcniKimni nu it has 
appealed, please contact our 
i usiihtict Services Pcpanmenl 
by telephone on 01-491 3008 


ANSOUNCEMENTS 


ALAN MOTH tjotuii. Cambridge 
(..nHeraiv Luuton Mmr. B*r 
im i* 4 b From Sirallnd. Also 
Naultr < Maiden imhwi 
PM iarvm 2 ivaKn«bi. Benin 
Conian Nina iKtnn 
Ellvmqrm. 40 Asoullh Avc.. 
1007 TOPMUO MJW IJ 6 Cana- 
da Tel < 4 IAi 960 - 30 M. 

PLEASE KELP Th* National Be 
nnciHil Fund for Uv Agnl lo 
provide ten*' maetimm for the 
rplipJ « pain In t-ondiljoni IJkr 
aruinlK. CM) buy* 4 machine. 
Donation, Wmw 10 uw Vo- 
count Ton v PdiHiv Oiaimun 
NBFA. SS. Newport SI. London. 
EC 2 MlMH 

MR SOMEJRUM lan+y budding, 
your address ptr»r and eon- 
tan SvIvm Otwin. 81 Orwatd 

SI . Thunder Has. Ontario. Can- 
ada PI A OT 2 

The law of truth was In hts 
mouth, and imqutly was not 
found in tin llm: hr walked 
wiui me in peace and equity. 

MaJachl 2: 6 

MJUHJL Always remembering, 
always feeling: as lone as Uie 
nightingale flies itaALV. ad 
mnniium 

eUTEFUL THANKS to the Sa- 
cred Heart and SI Jude for 
favours received signed j m. 


RUBY ANN IVE RS A RIES 


OAJtfflEK : do BRET - 91 n Aprs 
1946 william d' Am Gamier 
la Lavender HjractnUi de Grey, 
now at College Farm. Thonut- 
son ThelfonL Non oik. 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


RWEMScWHITE. On 9 lh Apnl 
1936 at ST Bofolph'S. 
BnhotKqate EC 2 . Murray 
James Rumens lo Dorothy Mar- 
dare f While Now ai stole 
Hed Ingham. E«n 


SERVICES 


MEET THE ARTISTS at work 
Bonhams unwue 6 week full 
time course starts 2 Hlh Apnl. 
Lectures and vKlis 10 leading 
LH artou and craftsmen. Tel 
Principal Of 504 0667 . 
FRIENDSHIP. Love or Marriage 
All ages, areas DuleUne. DcW 
■OI 61 29 Abingdon Road. Lon- 
don W 0 . Tel- 01-938 IOII 
MJUWMGE A ADVICE Bureau 
Katharine Allen iex loreign Of 
ficei personal interview* 7 

Sadley PI. Wl. 01 499 2556 . 
CALIBRE CVS professionally 
wrinen and produced 
curriculum vilae dccumenis. 
Details. 01-580 2959 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP 

London's leading spectalisl in 
new and fi-Slnced pianos fen- Ihe 
largest genuine selection avail- 
able. 30 a Hlgtigair Rd. NWS. 
01-267 7671 Free catalogue. 
BLUTMMER PIANO 6(1 2" Grand. 
EareUenl condition Black case 
£ 4.000 01-935 1333 1 work 1 or 
01-969 6619 ieves, w'endv. 
PIANOS: K-LAHE A SONS. New 
and reconditioned. Quality ai 
reasonable pners 326 Brighton 
Rd . S Croydon. 01 688 3513 
CROTRtAN-STERfWEO. 1927 
6(1 Grand. Evert lenl condlllon. 
£3 496 Tel. Ol 346 333 S. 
SALE- Piano World, secondhand, 
new. reconditioned. Unbeatable 
prices 01-485 1533 


EXCHANGES 


WMBUUON WEEK - Accommo- 
dation available. 3 rooms Mu* 
baiti room, secluded Mayfair 
mew-s. parking no problem. In 
exchange lor 2 tickets for Wim 
Medan men's final Drbenlure 
Holders' Sland or bener Con- 
tact Mrs J Vile Ol 834 3822 . 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


YOU CAN HELP 
OUR 0 PERAT10N 
BE A SUCCESS. 

OuiSuisacal Research Fund 

relies solely on donations 
from the public. 

Please help us to continue 
this vital workb> sending 
your donations to; 


lil 4- . fi , T 5ZH 

jnssEsm 



OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


COSTCUTTEHS ON nraniv nob 
10 Europe. L 54 A movr (k-ilina 
lions Pipiomal Travel 01-730 
2201 AHTA IATA ATOL 


LOWEST AIR FARES. 

Uixhinqttam Travel AUTA. 

Ol 036 8622 . 


IIH MB URS EUROPE Auarrtia 
New Zealand Gemnm- account 

Inn OTC 01-609 i 2 V- 


TAORWNA A UPARI. Sicily - 

Three cm special jpnnglime 
oflerv ilS 11 KU 1 K 17 30 April 
mi l ■ HOTEL C 4 PO TAORMI 
NA '-Superior ls( CVav'i CW 5 
hall board CATTOPARUO 
PARK HOTEL. Upan £239 B* 
B. TwO Centres. Villa 

EsJx-na. Taormina b mohlv - 
Gallopaxdo Park 7 nmtils £ 2*19 
RAB- All Holidays inci 13 
niyhL. aeconunodaiKui. mum 
daytime Galwick (light* airport 
Laves & local iransIrTv ferry 
Sicilian Sun Lid -Ol ' 222 7462 
ABTA ATOL 1907 
ALGARVE, Menorca. Tenerife. 
Ureek blind* villas A PL'. Pen 
MW* Taicma* HfllifliiYf & 
nignts Summer Winter Bro- 
chures. bookings only direr! 
(rant The SpenaUtt* lenlura 
Holiday* Tel 061 834 5033 . 
AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Svdncv 
0 IV £S 9.5 nn £645 Auckland 
o W £420 rtn £774 Jo'ouni 
o vs £ 2 n 4 tin £470 Lav Anne- 
k**o w LI 77 nn £336 London 
FlKdU renire 01 370 6132 
PLAHMNB A TTBP lo warmer 
c/imfte,- Alrey A Wheeler 
sperulpu* in Iwhiweighl ynn A 

dm hang Ready lo wear and be- 
spoke 44 PKC.KI 11 IV. LONDON 
Vs 1 . 

LATIN AMERICA. Low rod 

(Irani* eg. Rio £ 4*5 Lima 
F .475 nn AW Small Group 
Holiday- Journeys JLA Ol - 747 - 
3100 

LOW FARES WORLDWIDE 

L'SA S Amenta. Mid and Tar 
Easl. *j 4 lnca Trays ale. 48 
Margaret Sired. Wl 01 580 
2928 I Viva Ac copied 1 
RELIABLE LICENSED A Bonded 
low PCM fliqni experts Europe 
A Worldwide Freedom 
Holidays 01 741 4686 ATOL 
4 >2 1 ATA AfTO 
BOUND WORLD £795 neon Club 
fr £ 16*9 first fr £ 2036 . Syd 
nay It £ 6 S* rtn Columbus. 
Cullen Gnrdem 10 Devonshire 
Square. EC 2 01 929 4251 
DISCOUNTS IM Economy Hel- 
rls Try uv 

fall FUGHT BOOKERS 01-387 
* 103 . 

MIAMI. JAMAICA. H.TORK. 

Worldwide cheapevl larir. 
Richmond Tniiel 1 Dule SI 
Richmond AST A Ol 940 4073 
SPAIN. PORTUGAL. GREECE. 
Fligbli from mart t:K airpartv 
Manv late special micrv raider 
Ol 471 0047 ATOL 1040 
TUNISIA For lhal perfecl holfdav 
wilh sunns dav? A r.uefri-*' nil 
Ideal Spring Summer. Tunisian 
Travel Ol 373 4 J| 1 . 

TURKEY REACH HOTEL. May 
Bargains frum£l 55 inr H BA 
free walervparts Hal Turkey 
Ol 326 1005 

USJL N York £ 16 * Miami £198 
LA C 2 ** rtn Also Cheapesl 
schedule m on malor L -5 carri- 
er* Ol 684 7371 AST A. 
ALICANTE. Faro. Malawi me. 
Dimond Travel ATOL 1783 . 
01-681 4641 . Horsham 68541 
AUSSE N Z . Slh Alrira. L S A. 
Hon* Kotra. Best Fares. 01-193 
7775 AHTA 


DARTAIK 




N Yem ;.<C 2 i 9 J b *2 * fSU l-V 
IciAnq CJS'J N- 3 ;roO< C 329 - 

Syd-ieV £C 39 .-„ 6 cr_ 5 ibl: : £ 33 ' 5 ‘ 

As-ck' _ £ 750 .,.Torsnlo. [CL 4 . 9 ; 

<30 Jerir,yr.'Slr**t. S^W-Va. 

’ ' y 3 -v?.U 4 •• Mciii- 


♦ALL FUCHTS BONDED* 

E DISCOUNTS** 
★ ★TOURIST CLASS** 
★★CLUB CLASS* ★ 
★★ 1 ST CLASS** 

* svuwr * * mmmt * 


* krim * 

9 MOflART * 

* JOBuRG * 

* *uoa»w) * 

* fui * 

* MMGKIUC * 

* W1WP0« 9 

* PL«N * 

* MID EAST * 

* UfSOM * 
9 TOROKliri 6 

* l MfGEIiS * 


* BRSBANE * 
9 NElltW * 

* S AFRICA * 

* WFUIk&tW * 
*P 1 MtikESSY « 

* IOkiO 9 

* MANILA * 

* BAMWN 9 
6 NAIROBI * 

* HARARE 4 
4 VANCOUVER 4 
4 mu * 


# KfWBEAN 4 45 TONQSC 0 * 
*4 SWJIR AMERICA 44 
* USA 4 USA 4 USA 4 USA 4 

SUNWORLD TRAVEL (Esttl I 9 WI 

Suuth *. Epionl Simcj 
1037^.71 ri 5 M>/ 2 j»i<: , iibv 
’MISCAMK/JriN'' 

“BOOK SUN WORLD 

- book sECt'Krrv- 


SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save wiih Swissair's 
Super Apex. 

London lo Zurich or 
Geneva daily on con- 
venicnl afternoon 
Hiiihly. 

And daily morning 
flights London to Basie 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days 
before departure. 

Slay m Switzerland al 
least until the Sunday 
after arrival. 

Similar savings also 
from Manchester and 
Birmingham direct to 
Switzerland. 

Bookings and full con- 
ditions from travel 
agents nr 01-437 9S73. 


swissair^ 


Sir John Betjeman 
- General MacArthur 
Kenneth.More • Doris Smith 

What dd they have in common? 


Parkinson’s Disease. 

it strikes men and women everywhere. Perhaps even 
you. Researchers need your help. So do more than 
100.000 sufferers in the United Kingdom. 
Please support 

Parkinson’s Disease Society 

36 Portland Place. London WIN 3 DC. Tel: 01-323 1174 





CHEAPEST PLIGHTS HT. ItlDC - 

Bvnz Traspl. Trt 01 385 6414 . 


CHEAP FLIGHTS Worfdwido 
May marker 01930 1366 


SWITZERLAND Sctintufnf nwMs 

01-724 2 S 4 W ABT 4 ATOL 


USA rrotn t« Mamr irmM Ol 
485 9237 I AT A 


JYO. MEL £618 Perth £545 All 
maior ramvrs lo ALS NZ. Ol* 
664 7371 ABTA 
SOUTH AFRICA JOTiurg fr £466 
01 584 7371 ABTA 


SPECIAL OFFERS 
GREEK FROM £123 


16 4 iwli. 2 wks El 59 
TOLON 

18 4 iwk £ 159 . 2 wlu Cl 69 
CRETE 

25 4 lwrk Cl 59 . TwkV £189 
CAHAH T ISLA NDS 
TEHEIBFE 

X ‘4 I «6 £ 179 . 2 •** £199 
S.-C. B+B. Amort Tucs * 
nsnw. 

( 0523 ) 7719 Mf 7 TS 344 
T 1 M 5 WAY HOLIDAYS 
RH-knunuonh. Hens 
ABTA ATOL 1107 


AUSTRALIA 
FAR EAST 
WORLDWIDE 

EUROCHECK TRAVEL 

01 542 4066 

(Eifd 1978 ) 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

single rrtum 
JoThjto Har £ 30 «J C 465 

NairoM JC220 £320 

Cairo £130 £200 

Lw. £235 JJ 3 S 

Del Bom £230 £340 

Bangkok £195 £330 

Ik-imIu £420 

Afro Asian Travel Ltd 

162 168 Heucnl SI Wl 
TEL: 01-433 S 253 r 8 < 7/8 
AMEX VISA DIMERS 



PILOT FLIGHTS 

For A Fair Deal 
TO EUROPE 




01 631 0167 

Agtns AUI 1863 


UP UP & AWAY 

NaimbL Jo'Burf. Cairo. Du- 
hji. fsuohul. Smpipvrr. KJL 
Drilli. Bangkok. Horn Kong. 
Svdnej. fcuropr. £ The 
AfiKncai Fbmmgo Travel. 
J New Quebec SL Marble 
Arch London WlH TDD. 

01-402 9217/18/19 

Open Saiurday lO.WVI 3.00 




TRAILFINDERS 

Workhride low cost Rights. 
Tte best - and we caa prove it 
170.800 clients since 1970 

AROUND THE WORLD 
FROM £765 


oh* rm 
SYDNEY £392 £641 

PERTH £380 £S 82 

AUCKLAND £409 £743 

BANGKOK £198 £363 

SINGAPORE £221 £462 

MIAMI/FLORIDA £208 £376 

HONG KONG £240 £496 

DELHI/BOMBAY £250 £374 

COLOMBO £242 £424 

TEL AVIV £109 £159 

NAIROBI £231 £331 

JO-BURG £286 £470 

UMA £253 E 495 

LOS ANGELES £204 £380 

NEW YORK £139 £242 

GENEVA 175 £94 

1241 EMI'S COURI 80 ML 
LOU ON WB SEJ 
EnSM/USA FBbMc B 1 -S 37 5400 
IrmKwi Mk Okies ST 5 
Ift/SalHB Oh CI- 93 S Mi 


GENERAL 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


ISLANDS IN THE 
SUN 

Spring Breaks 

C>e« Ceohtfw'u Cgru 7 aet 

SklllllK. 

1 Wl Iron £1590 d 
3 WkS from I3Jo 0 
5 ow f RCE i SMil Wires Agrl 
1^l522» Mjt 59 li 
Why ml irew wm" Ki«nleW 
o* Summe DrVrjntW * j»Wv oilB 
& iltcv-s oos* ro (M'luus briairt 
For dstaris Tel 

0403 59788 

I bos island HoMays 

ABTA I AT A ATQl 1452 


RHOOES APRIL BARGAINS *in 

a loin Aonl A 23 Apnl. 1 w-ewk 
£145 inr Trt- Siranu 0705 
802814 

SPRMC IM CORFU April Mnv. 
vpi-rial PTirev in Our airr.vrlno 
lilUa RinoPan Woru HMiaais 

Q 1 7 J 4 W "toys 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


MDULfiE IN A MAGIC WEEK- 
END. Indulge vourvrtl \ ou 
dewrve if a wee y ena in Veil 
ire, Florence, or Rome £4 
well dunk wen. vnop wen gnd 

I nr gel mw EnglirVIS depr— «*■ 

iim uw.iher Or cnmlmie a fltv 
weeViiwl wiih a week bv IW 
sea. Frw brnChuro Irran RUCK 
nf nalv Depi ST. 47 smurterns 
Bum Or veil. W 12 SPS Tel. 01 
749 744 * fja nrv servicer 
TUSCANY UMBRIA A VENICE 
lor spring and summer non 
gays. Sfiyrme tipartmenla in 
riorenrs*. ijimMuus jnd man- 
or houses in Ihe Tuscan 
c<iuiitrv»Kk. *oftie wiih service 
Edwardian villas al Forte oei 
Mitrmi Trirpnone Ol 305 1-360 

1 24 neurit 

TUSCANY HR LUCCA. BrtIUlifUl- 
ly r on vents] property 
Panormatc views. All aPKTK 
ties Swiimning peel Available 
rune [9 lo Juf 23 Ol 674 IOM 
TUSCANY - VILLAS NALFUMO. 
A pool peace A «iv. Trt 062 
061 500 w routs* vveehroo*. 

ADRIATIC. House vJeowv 9 4 
mins, sea from Cl *0 m- May 
lo September trt 0582 832195 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE. Cvjcepnonal vine for 
up lo la wnti own pool and 
good Haft now available most 

dales Palmer and Parker 01 
493 5725 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


MAZARHOM Lifmtofll resort in S 
Spain Villas Apis Sal HI Gal 
Murcia (Nr La Manga i B-acii 
Bay Hots 0432 270185 ATOL 
ACT 1517 . 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


BRITTANY seaside collages from 
run pw Bretagne Holidays 
0225 335761 337477 
BRITTANY. Seaside roftagm 
from CICO D w. Bretagne Holi- 
days TO 25 335761 337477 


SELF-CATERING 



Make 1986 the 
year you got 
the villa right 

THE GREEK ISLANDS* 
PORTUGAL • SOOTH OF 
FRANCE • rTALV. 

Send for our 86 brochure 
-quickly. \he die the leddinq 
specialists in holiday villas. 
TTiey ro all c arefully c hosen 
forchaiacter-and unspoiled 
su/rouminys. on a beach or 
with pool All include maid 
and ( often i a cook Welt over 
half our clients re turn year 
after yearn And that Slhe 
best adv ertisement you II 
read on this paqe'iCV Travel. 
Dept RMT 43 Cadogan SL. 
London SW 3 2 PR. Or cal 
— 01 - 581 0851 .' 
:C“z!_sT 5848803 .( 24 - 
ht brochure 
service on 

VW* 01 - 5890132 .) 

■ - it.' r»s-. •’ 

The specialists in 
villa holidays. 


SPECIAL INTEREST 


TIBET, facuunng IP day escorted 
lour via Nopal Cosl £ 2-478 
Fi-w Places h*n on 22 nd July 
Call Hairs A Jars a Travel. Ol 
3 SS 3648 lor details 


WINTER SPORTS 


TIGHTS AND VAL DYSCBE IS 

April CITS PP rtn coach C 235 
pp rtn air, 19 April £109 PO rtn 
coach inctuuve raiered 
chain club Holidays Exceilenl 
snow rondlUmw Call SW VM 
on i 01 . 903 4444 or 01 - 200 
6080 I 24 hrsi ABTA 55431 
ATOL 1162 . 


SPRING SKI BARGAINS Vernier 
A val DTsate. Chalets 12 4 
£139 19 4 £ 129 . Inclining 
■deeper coach. Sid Weal 0373 - 
864811 

SKI BONNE NHHBt Apnl 12 
aval la PUIty In Courchevel 
Loads of great now snow Ex- 
tensive qutdlng. Ol- 733 2333 
SHI JET FUG NTS Geneva.- 
Zurich. Munich, cle resort 
Transfer from £69 Ski Jet 
i 0373 i 86481 1 ABTA 
SPECIAL SHI INC OFFER. 12-19 
April Catered chalet me. flight 
only £180 Ski Let Alpcs. Ol* 
602 3086 . 

SKI FLAT. Val Therms. France. 
7.500 n. 1 327 Apr. £ 6 d 
PP pw Tel: 01-948 2376 
VERB ICR. Quality caiered clvalef 
holidays. Ski Montague. Ol 5 S 2 
7077 


SHORT LETS 


HAMPSTEAD VLLGC. charming 
apart . rftrl mstnle bd rm . mf 
bwl shower, vep Imlrt. collage 
III -diner rhararler lounge, 
roolgdn.ch Prol person refs 
•vaetUiai £190 0 Qpw Trt. Ol 
794 6373 


COVENT GARDEN Lu> serviced 
flap SU~. 2 3 £275 pw 946 
7188 «Ti 


CHELSEA GREEN SW 3 Full 
eg'iiopisl ronvenwnl sunny flat 
deuofv bedded r.vxn I recep. 
min 4 moriinv i 1 70 pw 01 - 
152 B 895 581 IKHj. 

SE 4 spacious modern l double 
bedroom garden not Nr 
lube i rain 6 munUts. £90 pw. 
Tel 01 6*1 6 SM 
S KENSINGTON Superb 4 nrd 
IN- 2 re.:. 2 bain Lg kit utility 
mi e. adr 3 * monlfn. £ 380 - 
MO ow me Tel 07 b 121-631 
CHELSEA HOUSE BOAT. Dbl 
tHd. 2 recep. sun deck, el iv. 
Mav Vov. £1 30 pw 352 6841 
SERVICED APARTMENTS In 
kenMnglon. Cot TV 24 hr swbd. 
Ms Colling ham Apts 373 liJOo. 
ST JAMES SW 1 . L usury 2 bed 
fully furnished serviced apt nr 
park. Ol 373 6306 *T> 

W B Large ver*. ired bed aa m pn- 
-..lie house £40 pw inci Trt-QI 
229 1743 . 


WANTED 


WIMBLEDON Debenture short 
wamgif for pm ate l omp anpev. 
Top prices paid 01 228 0423 


WIMBLEDON TICKETS m anted 
Vve auarenlee In pj* lop prices 
ler centre and no L cewirl seedh 
Phone Mr RKhardwn on Ol- 
836 6571 

LARGE WARDROBES & Mirrors. 
Efc -4 V SOLiy ( »a* elc A Pre 1 *40 
fumiluir Trt: 01 586 0148 or 
Ol . T .*i> 27 lo day -it nignl 


wraiiled mcludiro rSrbroiures 
Br -4 inns paid 01 225 0837 

WIMBLEDON TICKETS required 
01 *28 177 E 


RESIST A CARPETS 
SPECIAL OFFERS 

Wtcanders CotkopteSl 

Tiles design natural only 
£8 95 l»r W I'd + VAT. 
Wool mix Berber catpets 
4 m wide Heston backed 
£4 35 per so ya + VAT. 
While "docks last- 
182 Uppet Richmond Rued 
Lonoon gww 

Tel: 01-876 2089 

Free estimate • Expert fnitng 


★ 209 PIANOS * 

* FOR SALE ★ 

OR HIRE FROM £16 PM 

WITH OPTHM TO PURCHASE 

MARKSON PIANOS. 

AHUny street, MV 1 . ' 
Tel: 01-935 8682. 
Aflfflefv Place. SElS. 

Tet 01-854 4517. 


BRKMTS OF WETTLEBED. 171 H 

L I 8 th Onlury rrdtKa lunrt- 
lure including Ttitman. Arthur 

Brefi Tilchmarsti a Ooodwui 

£2 nulhon Mono lor rnimedidie 
aelii er> Nrtilebctl. near 
Henley < 049 ii Mills. 
Bmirpvmaulh i 0202 i 293080 . 
Toosham ■OS 9287 I 7443 . 

Berkeley Clos <04631 810 * 62 . 
ONE LIONESS RUG MOUNT in 
rnoannirenl condinan lonaher 
wiin cvritfKale of ortglo and 
pi oof of nrsUnrnl This la a PT 1 - 
% ate sale. For further enquires 
pleaH- pnane 688 5661 far ar- 
ranging appwnUBeru Please 
noli* no ir-vderc. 

DtSCONTMUEO HEAVY DUTY 

12 n wide Wilton carpels re- 

nurm Irion £22 ner an Id lo 
£* 60 so] wl Chance rv Carpets. 
o 7 *9 Clerkenwrti Rd. London 
ECl Ol 405 04*3 
CATS, STARLIGHT EXPRESS 
weh.vvelickertfor mew and Ml 
theatre and sports. Trt 631 
3719 . *37 1716 All mayor 
rrcdii cards. 

THE TIMES 17 S&- 1 ML Other 
mle. avail Hand bound ready 
lor prevenlonon - also 
"Sundays" £ 12.60 Remember 
Vv'hen 01*88 6323 . 

TICKETS (or any rvvnl. Cab. 
Sluinhl Exp Chew. Les Ml* 
All Ihejire and soorti. 821 
66 IO '828 0*96 

A Ex • Visa /Diners 
OLD YORK PAVING STOKES 
The newest quality and mow 
compeielive in Ihe country Tel 
0626 533721 

SEA I H HULKS Any event Inc Leg 
Mis. Coven) Cdn. SUrhghl Exp. 
WirabJedon. GlvndrtXHime. 01 - 
828 1678 Maior credii cards. 
PIANO. Medium died uprtgtiL 
1 W crass rond £ 38 s Can ar- 
nisu delivers 01 0146 

WIMBLEDON DEBENTURE oeart 
1*86 ror Sale Trtephonc Ol 
630 7121 . 

WIMBLEDON TICKETS Mr sale. 
Please Telephone 737-2632 

FOR HIM 


ROLEX I 8 CT IRAN'S WATCH 

C 3 2 CO <nrwi. plus others 
Waii-ties boughi and void 01 
495 0452 


FOR HER 


BENTLEY &C9 

bow urgently require to purchase 




immediate cash offer. Valuations made. 

65 New Bond Street. W.i. Telephone 01-639 0651 


MAIDA VALE, W9 

Charming, spacious top. floor 
Flat overlooking Park and' 
close lo lube/bus. 2 bedrooms, 
reception rm.. study, kitchen. 
Excellent value. £200 per week. 

Utfta Venice Office D1-286 4632 


GEORGE KNIGHT 
T he l etting. Agent 


HAMPSTEAD HEATH 

WRtMi a Rm irinn of Rw 
Hum is nw 3 rt floor ttt sa n 
l $maH <«il mwitanad modern 
block. Wrong nceanatty 
□obd value lot money there are 
two double and one single bad- 
moms a tmng loom, a ifcrinu 
mom wHti open pUn kitchen aoo 
MOmnni ArNMHe My fi>- 
ntsJied ai SIGO I wk. Compasy 
tenancy prdeimL 
Comact Our Hampste a d Office 
01 794 1125 


Vftie range of auafity Ivrm&uxi 
aha unfurnished property 
• Full Management Service 


CHESTERTONS 


« Legai/TaJi Advice 
• Pereonabsed Service through 
7. computer linked offices 


DOCKLANDS 

We have a large range of good 
quality ftimished properties 
throughout the Docklands and 
the City area ti rent from 3 
months plus. Prices from £80 
per week. 

Please phone our new office 
for further details. 

Dndfaats Office: BV538 4921 


MANAGEMENT 
~T. : EXPERTISE 


Hampton & Sons 



6 Axiingtm Street London SW1A 1RB 


01-4938222 


ELEGANT WA 5 P 1 WAIST L act UP 
corwls Cal £2 "Vldorva-s 
S»trrt". 306 Vairvhall Bridge 
Rood. London Swi V 1 AA. 


ANTIQUES & 
COLLECTABLES 


MARCABITE. Pour, and Jrt 
Jeurt lory Wanted. 01 229 

961 b. 

ART BUYERS GUIDE 


WM RUSSELL FLINT 

Signed Prn ale collector will sell 
aH or wparale. 0243 527180 . 


FLATSHARE 


LITTLE VENCIE Young prof, 
m r. n , ESOpw fnr Warwick 
Mr. Edgware Rd futw 9 mus. 
01723 1308 


Wl Prof m I lo vhare attractive 
rut. Own room. £220 ptm FX- 
elusive. Trt' Ol 836 3474 rvl 

222 


PROF. FEMALE 30 n s WK 
acrom. itturjl NW w sw ar- 
eas Trt 0272 739303 


BAT-ON- SEA SWI 1 . Two bally 
females seen prof mate lo Shan* 
lux Ine. LI 50 o.c.m. Phon* 
now lor an audition. Julia 637 
7503 - or after 7 p»n. Miranda 
223 3878 

ST. JOHN'S WOOD - Second floor 
dal ■ lovely outlook - 2 dbte 
beds, lame reception. Irtichen. 
bathroom * BaKOlur. Company 
let £190 per week and usual 
ouiqouvn Tel: 01 286 6023 . 
PROFESSIONAL PERSON » 
ginrrd lo snare kMrty 2 
bedroom flat In Finchley Cen- 
tral lor 6 months. £200 pm 
Ring 34 * 2364 evening*. 
STRATFORD El 5 Own Ig rm hi 
hse for short let aporav 3 mlh*. 
m f. ns. CH. all larunra. 
Central. Oisrncl Lines. £36 p.w. 
Inc Trt 01 623 6646 Exl 38 
BEAUTIFUL ClGlh Ootugc by 
river. Beams, dmlng halL open 
fires etc Sun m f cwiple £300 
pan ATI Trt: 01 - 941401 6 
FLATMATES Selective Shannp. 
Welf estaft mfrodwlory servfne. 
piw lei iot apot. 01 589 6491 . 
313 Brompian Rood. 5 W 3 
2 MT mid 2 <rv share 3 bed nsr 
SWI I with t other. O/R. CH. 
£166 pm evcl. Trt 01 -228 0088 
unesi 

PROP COUPLE to share room In 
lux flat nn Oapnam Common 
wiih 2 persons £ 37 p.p.p w. Ol 
720 922 o . 7 

SW IB. F for own exba Ige room. 
All mod ran* Close Tube and 
BR. £60 pw Tet- 870 0291 eve- 
mngs 

SW 19 Professional M F 29 + 
Shore rial Own dbte room CH 
Small garden. Clow Tube ciBO 
pem «M Refs. 842 9076 eves. 
BALHAM Comfort able spactaus 
nal DM twin bed. lounge. 
KAB. grh A Trt Nr TuOC-BR 
1*5 Inc pw 671 
SrOENHAM HILL SE 26 . Prof F 
as*. N' 9 . lo shore large Ilal 
wiih 1 of hex. Own room. £130 
lyrm. Tel - 291 4729 .eves). 
CITY 1 mite Own room, luxury 
Oorgiau flal nr lube rv s. £60 
pw i nr. 91-558 3692 eves 
CLAPHAM SOUTH Prof M F 
SP* snare te*e O/R. nr lube. 
£146 pvm 675 6603 oiler 6 pm 
EALING Broadway 3 rd Person 
lor nal. O R Nonsmoker £ 1 BC 
pem ♦ phone 01 - 998.9264 
EALING W 9 prof base FN SO R 
in owner Car flat. C 150 pern 
excl Trt 01 998 9667 
FULHAM. M 'under 25 | lo share 
ream in romi'orlaMe flat. 137 
pw end 731 76«9 alter 7 pm 
FULHAM. Nr Parson's Crn Spec 
3 bed I urn mansion flat lor 3 . 4 
£ 1 TS nw. 030 OS 554 . 

FULHAM O r in lux house 
Female 20 * N V. £45 p w. 
Excl Tel-Ol 5*5 £655 anytime 
MAIDA VALE W 9 Large own 
room In lux flat. O 60 pem eve 
Very near tube Eves 286 0270 . 
M/p 28 + share I me rjdn rial SW 
IB O R Ige 136 £40 pw Tel: 
874 938 B. 

N 19 - Nr Tube Prof F N S. O R. 
Modern garden llai LSO pw . 
excl Ol 273 6631 
NWS. O R in new dec me CH. 
Lseaf kit. 15 mins centre. City 
£53 pw inc 202 2501 
SW 11 W'wde Common IF fhare 
house O R Preny gdn 18 C 
prm inrl eves weOl 228 0579 
SWL Prof m ». n x Lgn room In 
c h flat CIBO pan inci Trt - 
671 0223 I After b> 

SWI THIRD perum lo snare flat. 
On n room LSO pw cvet Phone 
Oiler 6 pm 828 239 C 
W. HAMPSTEAD. Jubilee. Prof 
girl 28 + lo share warm rneerful 
Mar o r ci* 01455 4141 
WB M i n s o r in small onv 
llal tao pw evd Tel 01«02 
6862 after 2 pm 


barnard 

marcus 


BBL 1 HAWK TCES SWI Newly 
art aiu turn gnd fl l Bed fUL 
recap. H 6 B. CH CHW £260 
nn Co’s only 

F BB UCO IM 73 X 8 
MVERNA CT IMS Mafmlflcnil 
rrluruwhed 6 th fl tlal . 5 
Beds, recen. dm haU. 2 bn UK. 
fully /I kit OCH. CHW. 
£SOOpw unturn. Co's only. 

Mayfair 4 S 3 BBSS 


STILL SEARCHING? 

We have ffie Rental for you! 
Rental Acamnnodaion across 
me foam. 37 brandies 
tnraughnn Great Britan. W» 
cam HOUSES. FLATS BEDSITS. 
STUMS A SHARES. Over t5 
vis eypenence WorMnide. 
FamJes, ungies. & pets ou 
specBlKy. 

HOMELOCATORS 

RfcffTAL ACCOM. PUBLISHERS 
01 720 2028 
OH CALL YOUR LOCAL UFFKE 
OPEN 7 DAYS 


Spacious Kai nr tube with 2 dMe 
beds, tale glazed, recep wtfh 
long bay wmtawa, U w/dryw, 
bath. Res porur. video envy 
phone. 

Long co ML £290 p» 

SOOTH RBBW6TW 
bnenor designed l bed IM in 
suoetw bufdmg' m tube. Res 
porter & vateo entry phone. 

Long co leL £155 pw 

GODDARD & SMITH 
01-930 7321 


CLAPHAM Ntcr 3 hedroomed 
tnute. garage, very nicety fur 
nnhed. Available lal May. 
Long lei £200 pw. 
fUL WORTH Large 5 bed home. 
Ige lounge, huge garden, off « 
parking for Scan Nr Kingston 
bypass <A 3 v £160 pw. 
BATTERSEA' VBXAGE WrtL ap- 
pointed 3 bed fully 18 house. 
Chnc to Chetiea. £228 pw. 

H L T EJfTEHWttSE 

« ra out. 


BURGESS ESTATE AGENTS of 

lec London* best "election of 
luxury fiat* and house for dts- 
renung lenams. Rtn* now Ol- 
681 6136 . 


COVENT BABDOL Super brand 
now 2 bed llal in Mock wftn lift 
A full Porterage. Kit all mactn. 
Co fong teL £ 326 pw. Goddard 
h Smith 01 930 7321 . 


EGOtnm GON 3 4 mtro Harrods. 
Fuuy furnnhed ultra lux Ughl 
garden naL 2 bods, l'r bath*, 
vpanoua lounge, kltetteo. UUB- 
ty. £480 pw 0932 62362 - 


F.W.GAPr iManagment Senilrefl 

Lid reguire properties in central 
much and nn f London areas 
lor waiting appMcanu 01 - 221 - 
8838 . 


BROSVENOR SQUARE WL 

Selectfon of superb flan. 2/3 
bed*. 2 3 baths, double receps. 
Rentals £ 760 £800 pw. Pom A 
Co: 01 499 9876 . 


KMGHTSBROaE Opp Harrodj. 
Deugmtul 1 bed flat m vmafl 
block wirti I Hi and porter. Long 
co tei £220 pw me CH -CHW. 
Goddard A Smith 01 930 7321 . 


LAWSON A HERMAN Diplomat* 
A executive* urgenlLy seek 
duality properties in all central 
w«i London area*. For atten- 
tion please ring 01-938 342 B. 


AMERICAN EXECUTIVES Seek 
lux flats horace up to £500 
pw. Lsuai fee* reu. Plumps 
Kay A Lewi*. South of Oh* Park. 
Chelsea office. 01-362 Bill in- 
North Of Ihe Part- Regent's 
Park Office. Ol 722 5135 

CAMPTOEN MLL CARDENS Wl 1 . 
New forge M 4 th floor raal- 
sonerte 3 beds. 2 able. I stnate. 
Reception Dining Rm -terrace. 
Fined KJlcfien 2 Baths. £350 
pw Tel: Ol 223 6241 . Co let 
only 

HAMPSTEAD Overlooking 
Heath Underground 5 min* 
Furnished basemen! flat. DM 
bedroom, living room. KAB. 
£100 pw including healing. 
Non-smokers only. Teh Ol 794 - 
6678 

HEW GARDENS Immaculate p/b 
ground floor flat 2 bed*. 2 
bath*. 2 receoL kll.-break rm. 
garage Gas CH. Fully fur- 
nKhetL £200 pw. Long co teL 
Philip Hodges & Co Ol 891 
0391 . 

FLATS-HOUSES, short teng lets, 
all aregs London Apartments 
international: 01 244 7363 . 

HAMPSTEAD Luxury shidfo. 
phone. £90 . Many others. 627 
2610 Home i oc a ior* 


2 boilw. garden, qutel rtreet. 
New rvfurb £ 62 Spw .937 9681 . 
MAIDA VALE. Full 3 bedim Oar 
* park views. Avail on short 
holiday Ring 491 7545 <Ti. 
MILL HOX NW 7 FuBy turn l bed 
nal. all amenities Tel: Ol 989 
3038 oner 6 pm & Wends 
ILLONDON Dbte rtaL tel. CR £BO 
inrt OUier-y 627 2610 

Hnnwlorafor*. 

OSTERLEY. Lovely not. l able, i 

MWlr ret kiL baih Co ML 
£ 535 pm 741 629 7 . B. rrj. 
PIED A TERRE IfWL. Very cen- 
tral. BAB. Own letephoce. £50 
pw Tel Ol 267 0408 . 
PUTWEY. Spacious 3 Bed*. d hse. 
£250 pw nep Pi MM Warren 
Rentote 7 B 8 7664 
SE 2 D naurt I large room, kta A 
■Mlh CSO pw Co Ml only. 778 
6797 or 381 1449 . 

ST JAIMES' lire mod. turn Sumo 
Hot. t 4 b. Idl. avail mimed 
£120 pw all hid 437 7519. 
ST JOHNS MID LgeqiBrt luvfom 
oi.ii*. £ 3 bed. 2 , 1 rw. Ml din. 
ivr - C23I PW 722-44*14 
SUNNY MMOMTSBRIDGC Mom. 
s C. CH audio flat £115 pw 
I IKt Ring 584 2728. 


fARRAR STEAD &(jLYN I 



01-603 9291 


2 flats. lo tel duvet view* over 

Hyde Part 

Newly decorated Tth Boor RM 
com prising 4 bed*. 3 baite. 3 
receps. large kitchen breakfast 
room AvaHabie unfurnished. 
Lease up M 12 year*. £ 27.000 
pa. exclusive. Company M 
only 

Attractive EUi floor flat com- 
prising 2 recede. 2 beds. 2 
barn* interior designed and 
furnished m htah standard. 
Available mtnlmum 6 momtm 
£750 per week. Company Mf 
only. 

MXLERSR A HARDBM 
01 - 09 * 0 M« 




EGERTOH TERRACE. 

Large period bouse can- 
sbllitg of d bedrooms. 2 
baUirootm. 2 reception 
r o oms , fitted kitchen 
plus self raniaiiieo base- 
ment flat of 1 bedroom. 
I sitting room, kitchen & 
bathroom. Landscaped 
garden. £900 pw. 

ST. JAMES HOUSE 
13 KENSKGTON SQ. 
01-937 9684. 


1 


DOCKLANDS- A wide range of 
flats and houses to Ml Pretty 
I wo bed collage In SL 
Katharines DocL Siwerb Geor- 
gian House in Wopping. 
«xM 2 bed IM m ware- 
house Rem* £ 126-560 PW. 
Carlton Smith A Co. 488 - 9017 . 


HAMP ST EAD- Close hi shops A 
transport. Enormous nac 3 
bedma. dre s sing rm. 2 
baflimt*. ige ming rm. huge 
hail, vrol fuOy m Ml. Newty dec 
A turn, ch, cal tv. *m phone.. 
On *i Mmg. £286 pn) fro 431 
3121 . 


H OLL AND nun 2 kwefy noa- 
ctous unfurnished flats on the 
2 nd. 3 rd floor of rtmauDsanUai 
house. Hal 3 . 4 rooms k and b. 
Flat 4 . 6 room* k and 2 o's 
Both £ 3 O 0 pw ♦ rates. 
Aylesford 6 CD. 01-351 2383 . 


SOUTH Koran CTON. Charming 
2 dbte hedroomed Mateonnctlte 
with study and Uvmg room. Su- 
perb kitchen, dining room 
including central heating. Com- 
pany teL £230 pw. Inc. Trt. 01 - 
589-9007 


IDEAL FOR VISITORS. Soutb 
Kensmohm. F oily serviced rial 
for 2 un Phone Oaf TV. CH 
etc. 01 SBd 2414 / 7 B 5 4281 . 


KYRLE RD SW 11 Large anrac 
Uve (anmy house for long ML 4 
bed*. 2 bam*, ome recpc racef- 
lenl kitctien. garden, tort 
redecorated, carpets. . curtams. 
furniture new. £276 pw. John 
Holllng* worth 736 6406 . 

FONT STREET SWI Superb ftM. 
newly i te cura ted 2 dbte bed- 
roomv 2 boOunaiKk 2 
reception roams. KUrhai wOb 
dining area. Available now 
£*00 per week. Of/CatW inc. 
Henry A James Ol 236 8861 . 


large luxury turn flat wi. 3 
bed*. 2 recop* kitchen and 2 
bath* il en suftei. gatCH. Chw. 
Ail appUances. Long Irt Prof 
£ 360 pw. Tel 01-629 6102 . 1 U. 
EALINB. 3 beds ground Jloor flat 
hrouuiulty furnished. Land- 
scape garden Min pawn 

overlooking part £17B per 
week. Trt Ol 567 
887 1 pve nfno* 

HAIM*STEAD A spacious 2 bed 
naus hi prime location. Large 
ppcpp. kllrhffi. lr room. huh. 
<ho*vu room. Long QuntfBziy ■ 
let. £275 .pw. Barget* 724 
3160 . * 

ENT YfKIR FURMRURE wtttv 
out nnxmi outlay For . 
muncfllate service al attractive 
pnee*. ring Mr MkfiM 
Norbury . Jam Strand con- 
tracls UO. TO 01488 
AMERICAN SPECIALISTS are 

currently seeking oood ouoUty 

renioi oubmmodaiMn in 
central London for wamm 
company tenants 01-937 9681 . 


GEORGE KNIGHT 
The Letting Agent 



MANAGEMENT 

EXPERTISE 


CBEVMEPUCEfiw flat 1 dbte bed. langi Uti. iditttKk&noltiti 


CH/CHW. £150 wr. 

CHElsa Fun flat Begsa antyinl eatraoce. Vay Ige tounot Bv' 
nan Ml 2 beds. k§&' CffiV. £300 pw. . 

CKLSEA Swan Wak OnBrtootaig^ mer anti 2 dblfl bats, tosngt 

col TV. in BOH «MPK J U. Oi/CKW. pw. 
l^nEWIlUSapBMrpbsiiaaow Uock 1 Ale bat Loonge. k&b 
EZ25 pw. 

All Hals suitafaie fin- Senior Executives. 

RING JANE COLE ON 01-352 9940 


[ Superior pb spaoou Mode 1 Ale bed Lounge. Ub. 



AROUND TOWN 

UB AM P«* Are. Wll 

Ekga* family houM In good 
-~w<in srea. BesuUfiBty 
f urnish ed arid B> ei ti rt Ksh 
modern docorativc order J 
Dednrev, 2 buthrm* - dbte 
recep rm. dining rm. So*- 
ctou* kitchen with A 9 > 
cooker, study /studio, gw- 
den. Co" lease 1.-3 yr* 
£ 450 pw. ' 

01-229 9966 


PLAZA ESTATES 

■WB BOrajr SXBBET Wl 
Sprang StnM ns mm Huge 
roof tee. Sep W anti to*. Long 
CtiL £200 IMF. me Orf/OW. ■ 

.ewnLfuutij met - - . . * 

-Mod ai8 miefedng bacMnr flat 
centr^v located. Bed. recap, tat 
(Hth. long tat ; £tS0 p.*, . 

BMC PUCE W2 ■ 

. Ctanipg wefl ium and dec- flat 
. Bed. recep. ML hA. Lang Let 
£140 p-w. inci CH 

01-734 3100 


psi f Quraishi 
1 ' * 1 Constantine 


For the best . . 
selection of fine 

FLATS & HOUSES 
TO RENT . 

In pdnw London wees. 

■Contact RoaamBrr Mearthui 


01-244 7353 


LTREYOR& SCXVS 


An exccptionaL suporb 
house to lei. 2 Beds. 1 
Recep. FuBy equtpped 
KU/ZUner. . _ . Bathroom. 
Newly ref u r n ishe d . - 
£260 per week 

WEST END, Wl 

SpacfoiM furnisAed 3 rd 
Boor Bat. 2 Beds. X Recep. 
KBchen.- diner. Bathroom. 
£160 per week. 


SOOTH 

LONDON 


New superb spadous 
encume a ccon wda non. 7 
Uedrowm. £750 pw. 6-12 
months negoitAks. 

Taeohone Agent on 

01 677 0750 . 



We have applicants 
from multi national 
companies urgently 
requiring homes in 
flic prime areas of 
North west and 
central London. 



- ■» -/-.ip ? i- 

'■if. f \ ■- * . . 



MOHTAOU SO' Wl. -stumdiig 
maisonette in ctegam house, 
oserfooldog ipirdra so. Fur- 

- nishM and eoumiMd' *o"*ery 
rugn auodard. Largerecep wKh 
dlnmg area, rooster bedroom . 
svilh en suite both. 2 hither bed- 
rooms and sep crate inower 
roam. fuHy nMUdURD-rtn 

- all ruchuies. Company let ooty 
£500 PW. 01 723 6160 (TX 




WEST KDiSfNGTOM. Large Un- 
furnfstiM 4 bed flat. Snacmus 
recep. kH on mart** In web 
maintained Mock - wlm gardens 
and porter* Garage space avalL 
Ob long teL £ 36 opw. fSoddant 
A Smith Ol 950 7321 


ri .i m ans. New luxury 
serviced flaL BrauUfuJ sn- 
tMues. large, roof garden, l 
bed. sitting room, dtaug rau* 
UK. bath. TV. aloiea. Trt: 236 
0260/5891697 


ELY ASTON PLACE, *W 7 - 1 st 
floor rtaL south teeing terror. 

' 2 dbte beds, recep. Mlh. fl Uf 
£ 1 B 5 pw. Please contact Su- 
raime Conway at Saunders of 
KemuigbHi on 5 SI 3623 . 


DOING ABROAD? 

Thinking of JetOng ybtro 
. IHHM Let in use our «- 
pertne lo manage your 
property We Irt lo Compa- 
ny Executives and 
Embassy personnel on 
yearly lease*. 


MARBLE ARCH 2 bed town 
house 3 Ikon Lounge dining 
room patio I yr Id taf co. only .. 
' no agents £28600 per week 
Trt.-Ol 262 768 L 


HUH. Attractive I tied funi Oal... 

- Lge recep with open Man ml w 
mach. Newly fated Mlh rm 
Oas CH. EMr*- phone Co Irt 
'only £160 pw.Ol TZS 6 I 6 O 1 T 1 


ST JOHO WOOD Luxury 2 dou- 
ble beoruom flaL i cry nr iite: 
ronall pti. block. £270 D-W-Loog 
company, let only T«Ld 2 S 3 
1196 . e 346 8009 - 


•i&.i : 
i?v- ; 




RmtUrtfBNAHH Pe riod Use lotel 
July August. 4,6 bed. 2 bath, 
rtk 9 H rm with French win- 
tow*. Lrge cam. Mt/oin rm. 
prefly gariten. Central loco- 
. UoflXAXI p.w. Tefc 0148614 ao 


*•* utetfhf mtf ui nrtl ied rasm- 
sron flat retaining many period 
features- 2 brfpM recep*. 3 

tew. 2 .-.baih* d oN gnsr 
kii.Q'tanL xaoopw. cooks 01 - 
828 8261 


OHELSEA FLAT, OfT Cfewie 
Walk. 2 bed*. 2 halm. 2 reran*. 
Mwrefurb^SSBnW 9379601 


*** * W* only 10 mins. 1 dM 
heoroom with ensurtr lncL 
shower, recent , (tinning. fuHv 
miod hlL co. lei. £ 300 . moolh. 
IRC cJi Tet 01 735 S 33 L 


■AR 8 ECAH. Luxury i 2 bed 
room flat - FuHy 

hmushed. aumpped Ring 629 
6754 alter to am 


KMJKIAY FLAT SERVICES Bud- 
shot luxury ante: Short te** 
Central London. 01 - 936-2412 


OUALITV FLATS m TKXtSES - 

avaUabte u> Jef in ok area*'.' 
R 1 +B 637 0921 . . • . 


MHM WOOa. Lax petlcd f T: 
I bed Qal tlMcw (Un « Deter. 
Cl 2894031 - 0860 321970 iTV 


Costmoed n page 33 






f . ! ; . : 


'.V 

■ »' - 


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fXLI 1 I TZU a 






































































































SPORT 


FRENCH RACING 


RUGBY UNION 


fiaiser v°ie Edbrooke is in for 


flops but 
Head still 
hopeful 


Wells against 



From Our French Racing 
Correspondent, Paris 


young Spaniards 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 




With £45,000 added to the 
sweepstakes air excellent pro- 
gramme of j umping beckons 
to Ascm^thbaiternodn and no 
one should enjoy himself 
more, in my opinion, than 
Sheikh Aii Abu Khamsin, the 
successful Saudi businessman, 
whose red and Wat* racing 
colours have commanded 
such a big following in this 
country these past few years. 

. My feeling is that the Sheikh 

could well land a treble, with 
his winners -all coming from 
different stables. The three 
that ' I have in mind are 
Bolands. Gums (230), Gave 
Brief (£0} and. Half Free 

Such is the competition, 
thoHgh,'noneof them look Hke 
finding h easy, especially the 
former champion hurdler, 
Gaye Brief, who is opposed 
not only by Aonoch, last 
Saturday's shoe* conqueror of 
See You Then, in the Keith 
Prowse Long Distance Hur- 
dle, but al so by. that *' — v 


stayer, ernnson Emt 
If there is a c hink in Gaye 
Brief s armour they will ex- 
pose it My feding is that 
although Gaye. Brief has ne ver 
raced over s& 'f&r as threo 
miles, he will relish the dis- 
tance. On the - two 
occasionsthat he has gone two 
and a half miles at Ascot he 
has looked good and I think 
that given a patient ride by 
Peter Scudamore, he will 


jabierifoi 
rivals in 


-Of^couise, . ft;xr "perfeedy 
possible to argue that if that 
remarkable result at Aintree 
was righ t Aonoch should beat 
Gaye BrieT After all See You 
Then did beat Gaye Brief by 


All Vision, who had the advan- 
tage of > previous outing, was a 
surprise winner of the Prix 
Imprudence on heavy going at 
Maisons-Laffitte yesterday. 
Raiser Volt, who was using this 
race as a preparation for the 
1,000 Guineas, made mast of the 
naming, bat dropped out quickly 
when headed by the winner 


inside the last fnrlong- 
Balser Vote finished 6V« 


seven lengths in the Champi- 
on Hurdle, whereas Aonoch 
had the champion two lengths 
in - arrears ■ at Liverpool. 
Wrongly or right J am con- 
vinced that Aonoch was flut- 
tered because See You Then 
did not getjthe trip. 

. So,' r regard Crimson Em- 
bersasthe- main. danger over 
his^vourife distance^ When 
he won tbe Waterford Crystal 
-Stayers'- Hurdle at Chelten- 
ham he had Sheer Gold, 
Against the Grain, Rising 


; ■ - - • 


Bdands Cross, who is fiuded to make op for his Call in the Son Alliance Chase at 
Cheltenham by winning this afternoon's Golden Eagle Novices’ Chase at Ascot 


Forest and King's College Boy 
well beaten at the end. 

Nick Gaselee, the Upper 
Lam bourn trainer, has made 
the Golden Eagle Novices’ 


he misjudged the fourth last 
fence of the Sun Alliance 
-Chase and shot Peter 
Scudamore into orbit; Berlin 
-because he simply ran below 
par in the .Arfclc Challenge 
Trophy won by Oregon TraiL 
The way that the last-named 
finished up the hill hinted that 
he was crying out for further, 
so he should be suited by 
additional half-mile that they 
will cover today. But I am still 
inclined to give Bolands Cross 
another chance because he 


Mac 216 lengths behind in 
second place. 

They carried the same 
weight that day. Now The 


opinion, by Jnvea Light (2.0), 
Royal Judgment (4.5) and 
Humberside Lady (4.40) — 


Mighty Mac has to give Half 
Free a couple of pounds 
simply because he has been 
penalised for winning in the 
meantime at Huntingdon, 
where he had Half Free’s 
stable companion. Carved 
Opal — also a runner today — 
seven lengths behind. 

The Mighty Mac loves to 
make all the running. So, too. 


by running Berlin in addition 
to Bolands Cross, especially as 
the handicapper pnts them. 


he won over today's course in 


feeling is that just 2fo apart m a race at Ascot 
Brief has ne ver later , this week. And that is 


February and at Kerapton 
twice before that 
Restless Shot wfl] be at- 
tempting to win the Peregrine 
-Handicap Chase for the sec- 
ond _ successive . year, but in 
this instance I am happy to gp 
nap on Half Free over what is 
-undoubtedly his best distance. 
When he won the Cathcart 
Challenge Cup at Cheltenham, 
Half Free bad The Mighty 


predscly the- . difference be- 
tween them now in this condi- 
tions race. - 

Both were expected to do 
well at Cheltenham during the 
National Hunt Festival, but 
both tinted for different rea- 
sons: Bolands Cross because 


i\yciimii t mi vrc die 

assured a real set-to at a 
Mistering gallop. But that 
should suit Half Free, who 
loves to come from behind 
and cut the leaders down at 
the death. In my opinion Half 
Free probably has most to fear 
at these weights from Road- 
ster. 

AS in all today’s jumping 
programme, which includes 
three other excellent races — 
likely to be won, in my 


puts todays two Flat meetings 
in the shad e , even though 
Salisbury is the home of two 
supposed classic trials. 

It was on the Wiltshire 
course that Zahdam won the 
first of his only two races last 
year and now I take Sheikh 
Mohammed's colt to remain 
unbeaten by winning the 2,000 
Guineas Trial. 

Half an hour earlier Sweet 


lengths behind Ad Vision in 
fifth place, hot her connections 
were not particularly concerned. 
The filly did not cut reach of a 
figure on a cold and soggy 
afternoon and tier trainer, 
CfKjsate Head, commented: 
“Raiser Vote has not property 
come fai her coat and is still 
backward. She has done very 
little work and I am not at ail 
discouraged. 

Gary Moore, who rode bar, set 
a slow pace and the winner's 
time was 1 min 35.6 sec. Highest 
Honour, who made all the 
rarnnuR to win the colt's race, 
the Prix DjebeL completed the 
straight seven furlongs over a 
second faster. 

Highest Honour is not entered 
hi the Guineas, but Cricket Ball, 
who finished seven lengths be- 
hind him in third, is a possible 
for the 2,000. 

Freddie Head, who was gam- 
ing his fourth consecutive lm- 


/UICGUIK 9UUUIU will UftC J t UUU 

Guineas Trial, sponsored by 
the BBA, if Tate Gallery is to 
be taken at all seriously as a 
fancied contender for this 
year’s 2.000 Guineas. For 
when Vincent O’Brien’s colt 
won the National Stakes at the 
Curragh last September Sweet 
Adelaide was only three 


Blinkered first time 


HAYDOOfc 34S Grundy lm; 4AS 
Golden Guldar 


previous successes having been 
on Ma Riche, L'Orangerie and 
BilOuua, had a less happy 
experience when involved in a 
three-horse pfle-ap in the Prix 
Karaway, won by the ex-English 
Luthier. 

He escaped with a bloody 
rose, bat Serge Proa, who rode 
Willanda was not so fortunate. 
He broke his right thigh. Head 
was soon back in action and woo 
the final race on Chocolate 
Avenue, a half-brother to All 
Along. 


2.0 Juven Light 2-30 Bolands Cross. 3.0 Gaye Brief 3.35 HALF 



England have had to make 
one change to their original 
under-23 team selection for the 
game at Twickenham today 
against Spain. Tim Edbrooke. 
the Exeter University back row 
man. replaces John ' Wells, the 
Leicester flanker who damaged 
a rib cartilage during his club's 
cup defeat against Bath at the 
weekend. 

Edbrooke has been a member 
of the English Universities team 
this season and captained the 
Combined England Students to 
victory over Wales last month. 
But it is cruel luck for Wells who 
has made considerable strides 
this season. It also deprives 
England of the understanding 
between him and Richards, his 
club No 8, against a Spanish side 
whose strength is likely to be the 
back row. 

This is the only under-23 
fixture this season and has 
added significance since there 
are places to be won on 
England's two-match visit to 
Italy with a B team in May. Thai 
party is likely to be finalized at 
the weekend and named early 
next week and is sure to include 
Redman, the Bath lock who 
captains England today. 

Redman is one of three 
players in today's team who also 
played against Spain when the 
under- 23s loured there two 
years ago. On that occasion, 
when England beat Spain 16-9. 
he was joined by Simms and 
Goodwin; Wells was also a 
member of the side, as were 
Morrison and Wand who are on 
the replacements bench. So. 
interestingly, was Andrew, who 
is still qualified for the under- 
23s but was considered by the 
selectors to have had as much 
pressure rugby this season as he 
could reasonably handle. 

Contact with Spain has been 
frequent over the last three 
years. A pan from England's 
visit in 1984 Wales visited with 
a B team in 1983 and hosted 
them Iasi season when Wales B 


cantered to an 80-9 victory 
against a country who were 
subsequently relegated to Group 
B in the F1RA competition after 
a play-off with Tunisia. 

More recently there was the 
encounter between England and 
Spain in the New South Wales 
international sevens tour- 
nament in Sydney when Spain 
won 2-1-6. a result which was put 
into perspective in terms of the 
1 5-a-sidt game when Spain lost 
a warm-up match against a 
combined Devon and Cornwall 
team at Torquay on Sunday bv 
30-6. 

Since then they have been 
joined by three players who 
were involved in French club 
championship games on Sunday 
but one would, nevertheless, 
look for a convincing victory 
from England's young hopefuls. 
Spain's obvious strength at Tor- 
quay was the back row of Malo, 
Loughney and the No 8. Egido. 
with Javier Diaz, who has 
appeared 14 times for the na- 
tional side, a handful at scrum 
half. 

They did not, however, enjoy 
scrummaging against the 
nuggety West Country pack 
thought the England under-23s' 
front five may not be so 
formidable. Spanish control at 
the lineout was limited and they 
will find John Howe, the 6ft 
7inch Hartlepool Rovers lock a 
considerable obstacle. 

ENGLAND UNDER-23: S Hodgkraon 
(Noitingnamt J Goodwin (Moseley}. K 
Samos (Liverpool). F Clough (Orretf). R 
Underwood (Lacesierl; S Bernes (Bath). 
S Bares (Wasps)- M lumen [Moseley). R 
Howe (Btackhaaffil. A MiriBns iDumam 


Lhuvarstty). T Edbrooke (Exeter Univer- 
sity]. N Redman (Bam. cm). J Howe 
I Hartlepool Rovers). A Robinson (Lough- 
borough UraverstyL D Richards (Letces- 
tar). Rep lac emen ts : S Bumhifl (Leicester). 
S Smith (Richmond). M Honnaloni 
(Gloucester). T Combe (Cambndge 
University), J Ward (Notnngtumj. J Mom- 
eon (Bethi 

SPAIN UNDER-23: F Puartas: R Sate. G 
Rivero. J Azkargorta. L-S Mann; J 
Moreno. J Diaz: J Alvarez. S Samos 
(Capt). T Pardo. A Malo. F Mendez, F 
Chocarro. S Lough nay, J-A Egido. 
Replacement s: a Trenzano. C Encaoo. L 
Nunez. I Gear. C Duz. A Ruiz: 

Referee: G S unfriends (Wales). 


Defeat leads England 
to make five changes 


By David Hands 


England have made five 
changes, two of them positional, 
for their final Colt international 
of the season, against France at 
London Welsh on April 18. 
After losing 14-4 to Wales at 
Whit land on Saturday they have 
moved Shaw, their try-scorer in 
that game, from wing to stand- 
off half in place of OhphanL 

Shaw, who plays for Barkers 
Buns and Warwickshire, is 
joined by another county col- 
league in Minshull, who plays 
centre with Irving, the York- 
shire wing, outside him In the 
pack, Harris moves from lock to 
No 8 to the exclusion of Baker 
and Hyde, another Warwick- 
shire man, comes into the 
second row. 

Yorkshire, winners of the 
Colts county championship this 
season, are organizing a festival 
of youth rugby over the next two 
weekends, involving more than 


800 players. Twenty clubs have 
entered at the under-14 level 
and 24 clubs at the under-! 7 
level, and the semi-finals and 
finals will be played at Morley 
on April 20. 

Lcs Bentley, president of 
Yorkshire, said; "We arc deter- 
mined to support schools play- 
ing rugby, encourage the 
introduction of rugby into 
schools not playing and ensure 
that boys denied the opportu- 
nity of playing rugby in schools 
can play the game." 

ENGLAND COLTS: A Lumaden (Reading): 
S living iCleCkheaton). J MtiunuB (Cov- 
entry!. T Outton (Sate). G Ann strong 
(Hartlepool Rovers). K Slum (Barkers 
Buns). S Gten (SudOuryt A Young 
( Rossi yn Park). R Daws (Leamington). P 
MHcnefl (Cbedennam). T tinmen (to- 
mans). R Denftanft (Mosetey). J Hyps 
(Barkers Butts). G Taylor (Barnet, cap- 
tain). M Hams (Bteckneath). Replace- 
ments: K OUpham (West Hartlepool). J 
Davis (Lydnev). P Thompson (HameDOOl 


Rover? i. R Hogan (Paignton). S Baker 
(Hanogatei. J Bryant (Royal Navy). 


Coventry fear a difficulty 


A fitness test tomon-ow will 
decide whether Paul Thomas, 
the Coventry flank forward, can 
take his place in the Warwick- 
shire side to play Kent in the 
Thom EMI championship final 


Thomas sustained a groin injury 
during the semi-final victory 
over Lancashire on March 8 and 
has not played since. 

If he breaks down on Thurs- 
day Warwickshire say they do 
not know where they will turn. 
“There is no natural replace- 
ment. not even among our six 


reserves. It would be a major 
headache." Harry Walker, the 
. match secretary, said. 

He is. however, much re- 
lieved that Tony Gulliver, the 
lock forward, came through a 
try-out in the Coventry second 
team Iasi Saturday. Gulliver 
incurred a back injury in the 
semi-final. 


WARWICKSHIRE: Steve Hall (Barkers 
Butts i. C Leake (Nureoton). R Massey, C 
MUrrcfup- Stuart Hell lot Coventry); T 
Baltimore (Laceswri. S Thomas: L Jotoi- 


Botumore (Laceweri. S Thomas: L John- 
son. A Farrington. S wake*. A Gutever . B 
Kidner. P Thomas. G Robbins I captain). R 
Trovers (all Coventry). 


SHOWJUMPING 


Britain make plans 
to win this time 


From Jenny MacArthnr, Goteborg 


John Whitaker was emphatic. 
"We mean business — we are 
going out there io win," he said 
on the eve of his departure for 
ihe final of the Volvo World 
Cup in Sweden, which begins 
with a warm-up class today. No 
British rider has won this com- 
petition — it has gone to the 
United States five limes since it 
started in 1979 — but this year 
the British are fielding five of 
their best riders, including four 
European team gold medal win- 
ners from last year. .As Whitaker 
remarked: "We ought to have a 
good chance — we have goi a lot 
of good horses between us." 

Prominent among them is 
Nick Skelton, with Raffles St 
James, who. spurred on by his 
near miss last year when runner- 
up in Berlin, could well be tho 
one to achieve a Bnusb victory 
He finished the season at the 
head of the European league 
and. with the 16-year-old St 
James having lost none of his 
edge — he was runner-up at the 
Dortmund and Pans qualifiers 
this spring — ibear partnership 
looks as threatening as ever 
Wlmaker himself is taking the 
Next Team's Hopscotch, ihe 
horse on which he won ihe 
European team gold medal, and 
Milton, a nine-year-old grey 
owned by the late Caroline 
Bradley's parents Milton 
showed his great scope by 
winning the Bordeaux qualifier 
“PH jump them boih in the 
warm-up class and see how they 
go." Whitaker said "I am a bit 
worried that Milton could just 
make a mistake because he 
hasn't jumped id such a noisy 
atmosphere as Cioieborg. He 
also wants to make sure is not 
suffering any iU-cfTcci from 
being kicked on the off-hind by 


Hopscotch during Friday night's 
boat crossing " He is consid- 


boat crossing- He is consid- 
ering jumping Hopscotch in the 
first leg of the com pout ion 
tomorrow a speed d3ss. and 
then switching to Milton for the 


bigger second and third pans on 
Fnday and Sunday. The rules 
allow one change of horse 
during the final. 

Malcolm Pyrah. lying fifth in 
the European league, may well 
do the same and use Diamond 
Seeker tomorrow and then re- 
vert to his great partner 
Towerlands Anglezarke for the 
next two legs. 

Towerlands Anglezarke has 
had only one outing, at 
s'Henogenbosch in The Nether- 
lands. since Olympia because he 
became foot-sore on the frozen 
ground tn February. 

Whitaker's younger brother. 
Michael, is another in the 
comfortable position of having 
two top horses to choose from — 
the Next Team's Irish-bred 
Warren Point, winner of the 
Dortmund qualifier, and 
Amanda, who was second m the 
Grand Pn.x at Dortmund. 
Amanda's astonishing recovery 
from the twisted gut she bad two 
years ago is giving encourage- 
ment to Cecil Williams, whose 
brilliant eight-y ear-old gelding. 
April Sun. ridden by Peter 
Charles, suffered an "imemai 
blockage two hours after setting 
off in the boat on the 24-hour 
journey to Goteborg. 

He underwent surgery on 
Friday and it is now a question 
of waiung. Charles will not be 
competing because ha other top 
horse M mm audios, has not 
competed in an\ of the qualifi- 
ing events The other British 
rider competing a Helena 
Dickinson with Just Malone 

Two other European partner- 
ships likclv to stem the tide of 

American successes ire Paul 
Sehockemohle of West Ger- 
many who wvm the Final quali- 
fier ibat month on Dewier and 
Pierre Durand of France on the 
agile Jappvloup who after his 
wins at Olvmpia in December 
and at Pans in March is Uw 
•form horse* for the meeting 
















SPC5RT 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 


FOOTBALL: ASSOCIATE MEMBERS SPELL OUT THE PRICE OF AVERTING A BREAKAWAY 


GOLF: STORY OF AN AUSTRALIAN’S UNFULFILLED PROMISE 


FIFA place 
a block 


on Mexico 
final sides 


Tbe World Cup sides will be 
barred from playing official 
matches in Mexico, against 
dobs or other national teams, 
from April 30. In their latest 
official circular the international 
football federation, FIFA, have 
laid down guidelines to the 24 
qualifiers regarding warm-up 
matches in Mexico, where the 
tournament starts on May' 32. 

The sides, already prevented 
from playing in stadiums to be 
used in the World Cup, will be 
allowed to play official matches 
on other grounds in Mexico until 
the end of this month. From then 
on only training matches will be 
permitted, conditions for which 
are no television coverage, no 
entry Tee and no official or 
reserve team colours to be worn. 

When (he finals get under way 
each team will be allowed to hold 
a 45-minute training session at 
the relevant stadium on the day- 
before a game and a 20-minute 
warm-up before the match. 

FIFA also announced there 
would be a charity match be- 
tween the Americas aud a rest- 
of-lhe-worid selection at the 
Rose Bow] in Pasadena. Califor- 
nia. on Sunday, July 27. Pro- 
ceeds will go to Mexican 
earthquake victims. 


Struggling 
to raise 
their caps 


Jeremy Charles. Oxford 
United's Welsh international 
forward, is being treated for a 
groin injury received in the 1-1 
draw with Aston Villa on Sat- 
urday. when he scored a goal 
and limped off after an hour. 
Maurice Evans, the Oxford 
manager, is fairly hopeful that 
his player w-tll be til for tonight's 
match against Watford at 
Manor Road. 

Neil Slat ter. United's other 
Welsh international, is a doubt- 
ful starter at Full back with a 
hamstring strain which forced 
him to miss the match with 
Villa. 

• If the Milk Cup final between 
Queen's Park Ranger^ and Ox- 
ford United is drawn the replay 
will be at While Han Lane on 
Wednesday. April 30. 

• Norwich City hope that the 
defender Steve Bruce will re- 
cover from an ankle injury in 
time to face Sunderland at 
Carrow Road tonight. A win for 
Norwich couid take them to 
within one match of gaining 
promotion back to the first 
division. 

• Hull are hoping to move their 
final League macch of the sea- 
son. against Brighton, to Friday 
night. May 2. Because Hull 
Kingston Rovers play in the 
Rugby League Challenge Cup 
Final at Wembley the following 
day. the soccer club are worried 
about a low attendance at 
Boothferry Park. Brighton have 
agreed to the change. Hull are 
seeking approval from the 
League. 

• Dennis Peacock. Doncaster 
Rovers' long-serving goal- 
keeper. has been forced to reure 
from the game because of a back 
injury. Aged 31 Peacock joined 
Doncaster from Nottingham 
Forest in 1*175 and was trans- 
ferred to Bolton Wanderers for 
f 70,000 in March 1980. return- 
ing on a free transfer two years 
later. He made 373 first-team 
appearances for Doncaster, 
more than any other goalkeeper 
in the club's history. 

• Reading, the third division 
leaders, are to make their home 
game with Derby County on 
April 26 all-tickeL It could 
settle either club's promotion 
hopes and is guaranteed to be a 
big draw. Reading have allo- 
cated Derby's travelling contin- 
gent only 1,500 tickets and at an 
increased rate of £4 cach.“We 
could fill the ground with our 
own supporters alone." Mike 
Lewis, the Reading managing 
director, said. 


RACKETS 


Gracey and 
Smith 
stretched 


By William Stephens 


Richard Gracey and Martin 
Smith, the Old Tonbridgians 
who were five times arr-ateur 
doubles champions, reached the 
quarter-finals of the Celestion 
open doubles championship by 
defeating two young pro- 
fessionals, Phillip Rosser 
(Rugby) and David Mackey 
(Tonbridge). 7-15. 5-15. 15-8". 
10-15. 15-10. 15-8. 15-9 at 
Queen's Club on Monday. 

In an attritional struggle 
Gracey and Smith needed to 
summon all their experience 
and resilience when 3-1 down to 
fend off the challenge. 


The only upset in the seeding* 
occurred on Sunday when 
Channon Hazell. who has re- 
cently returned to Clifton from 
New York, partnered William 
Bristowe and they eliminated 
the sixih seeds. 


RESULTS: First round: GWTAflras and J 
Feneiey W M G Griffith and JMM hoopw 
15-9. 15-6. 15-7. 15-7. OD*k and J Hunter 
bt P AsMord and T MMgan 15-4, 15-1 15- 
9. 8-15. 15-0 T Burdened and D Huck- 
Keen bt P Mallmson ind J Maibnson 15-3. 
15-iQ. 15-5. 16-13: MNP MocKndga and 
C F Worhdqe bt R H Sutton ana P G 
SwbrooA iS-5. 15-11.15-S. 15-1; S Hazel 
and W R Bristowe bt J Hughes and P 
Titth«nsr 17-16, 15-B. 12-15, 15-9. 3-15, 


Super League 
fear recedes 
as clubs back 


. - , x 


I • 



reform plan 


■ . / ... jT ' 



graduate with honours 


Greg Norman bet anrpris- 


Fmm MJfdJfiUPiatts, Augusta, Geo*sia 

to win one of the four malar. and I Eke the way my^me is for 


*'V 

■r 


15-4 ; g P D Mime and J K Rogers bt B 
MuvandDVWattiins JS-ll. 15-1 15-7.9- 


15. 4-15. 15-tt G Hairefton-Fariey and J 
Denham bl □ Barren (WaHingtoni ana T 
Tockrott 9-15. 17-16. 15-9. 15-2, 15-4. 
Second round: W R Boone and R S 
Crawiey bt Arums and Fennsiey 15-12. 15- 
7. 15-9. 15-6. BruameU and Roch -Keene Dt 
Oc* and Hunter IF-IS. 15-5.3-15. 15-11. 
15-7. lS-t. R M Gracey and M G M Smith 
bt D Mactiey and P Rosser 7- 1 5. 5-15. 15- 
B. ID-15, 15-6. 15-9; C J Huewitkama and 


N A R C iipos bt Mackhdge and Wortooa 
15-12 15-9. 15-4. 7-15, lt-15. 15-7; PX 
Nicnpus ard mw Nicnols MS Tanner and 
A Williams 15-2. 15-1. 15-3. 15-4. Hazell 
and Bnsrcww W N P A Smith and S Tufly 
JJ-14. 16-17. 16-15. 15-5. 16-14: R 
wafceiy and P bt Mttne and Rogers 
J5-5. lb-4,15-7, 15-6; j AN PrenfarrauS 

“Tti: * nd D * rtm ,s - 


The third and fourth divi- 
sion dubs have taken further 
steps to avert the growing 
threat of a breakaway by the 
first division. At a three-hour 
meeting in London on Mon- 
day the .Associate Members 
accepted nine of the 10 points 
put forward in a plan of 
reform by the first division 
clubs. 

They would not however, 
agree to the proposed rtuingc 
in the voting system, giving 
first division dubs two votes, 
second division clubs one and 
the lower division teams just 
eight between them. In accept- 
ing nine proposals. Reg Driv- 
er, the chairman of Aldershot 
and the Associate Members' 
Advisory Committee, warned 
that it would lead io part-time 
football and a loss of jobs. 


“My club will find the only 
way to cut our doth is by 
having at least some part-time 
players.” he said. 

Ian Jones, the chairman of 
Doncaster Rovers, said: “Our 
members are being asked to 
give up £50.000 a year and 


give it to the first division 
dubs. If that is the price of 
averting a breakaway then our 
members are willing to accept 
it. Don't expect us to be joyous 
about iL though." 

The Associate Member 
clubs will lose about £216 
million a year through the 
revised share out of the Foot- 
ball League pool, television 
income and the Milk Cup and 
FA Cup pool. 

The clubs will seek help 
from the Professional 
Footballer's Association re- 
garding players contracts in an 
attempt to soften the financial 
blow. They are also asking the 
first and second division dubs 
to delay the changes for a year. 

The ’threat of a breakaway 
“super league” has receded 
after a secret meeting last week 
when representatives of the 
second division finally 
reached agreement with the 
firs! division clubs. The ten- 
point package will be voted on 
by all 92 clubs at an extraordi- 
nary general meeting of the 
Football League in London on 
April 28. 


Hoeness makes a 
welcome return 


Geneva (AP) — West Ger- 
many will be missing several 
leading players when it faces 
Switzerland today as part of a 
World Cup warm-up series that 
has yielded all wins to date. 
Leading the attack at Basle, is 
Dieter Hoeness. the Bayern 
Munich veteran, who was con- 


fident: “We are going to win 3-0 
or 3-1." he said “We have to 


continue our good scries." 

The Swiss team includes sev- 
eral players from Grasshoppers 
of Zurich, which lost 1-0 to the 
Argentine national squad last 
week. Daniel Jeandupeux. the 
coach, recently appointed after 
Switzerland failed to quality for 
the World Cup finals, has 
brought three newcomers into 
the linc-up: Martin Brunner, the 
goalkeeper, from Grasshoppers 
of Zurich, whom Jeandupeux 
hopes to groom into a successor 
for Karl Engel, of Neuchatel 
Xamax. Andre Halter, of Lu- 
cerne, and Claude Ryf. of 
Xamax. 

Halter, aged 20. is teaming 
with Claudio Sulser. the veteran 
of Grasshoppers for the attack. 
Ryf. whose club was in this 
season's UEFA Cup quarter- 
finals. is expected to combine 
his defender role with forays up 
front. Heinz Hermann will or- 
ganize the midfield. 

Franz Beckenbauer, the West 
German trainer, recalled 
Hoeness. a tall 33-year-old for- 
ward. feared for his headers, 
into the national squad after a 
seven-year absence. Joining him 
for an unusual front line is Olaf 


Monday's results 


Basingstoke 2. Farenain D. 

MACdAR SOUTH WEST COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Bristol Ory reserves t. Bounw- 
moutn 4 

OXFORDSHIRE SENIOR CUP: Senti-ftral: 
Oxford City Z Oxford United 0. 


TENNIS 


Age is no 
barrier to 
Miss Hill 


Alison Hill, runner-up last 
week for the under- 16 title, 
fought all the way before win- 
ning her first-round match yes- 
terday in the Prudential British 
junior hardcourl champion- 
ships at Wimbledon. 


The Devon schoolgirl, at 15 
the youngest player in the event, 
beat Sara Hancock, of Essex. 7- 
5. b-l after coming back from 0- 
3 down in the first set and 
missing five match points in the 
second. The championships, 
washed out by rain the day 
before, were again plagued by 
the elements. Eight first-round 
matches were played before rain 
called a temporary halL 


RESULTS: Fint round GW*: J Rsevss 
(Kant) M R Atkin IN Wales) 6-2. 6-1: C 
Patstnan (Essex) W S Ambrose (Surrey) 8- 
3. 3-6. 5-0. K Hand (Berks) M K Hunter 
[Surrey) i-fi. 6-4; F Couktndge (Dorset] bt 
H Grace (Surrey) 7-6. 6-3. A HA (Devon | bl 
S Hancock (Essex) 7-5. $-4. N Corotonh 


(Sussex) biN Bamabas (N Wales) 6-3 6- 
0. 1 iWik) (Notts) bl J Pearson (Herts) 6-0 . 6- 


2. Boys G Drake (Devon) bl J Routedge 
(Cam by 6-2. 6-0. 


On the move 


Jan Berger, Spartak Prague's 
Czechoslovakian international 


midfield player, yesterday 
joined the Swiss first division 
club. FC Zurich, on a three-year 
eomracL 


VOLLEYBALL 


ROYAL bank ENGLISH LEAGUE 
fin* table 

Played w L SF 
Pokma 22 2t f 64 

22 19 3 61 


Pokwa 

SAHMI 

Bn* ton 
Leeds 
Redmond 

Liverpool 

Sea* Cl 

Mafcxy 

N'rastie 

OBCSsole 

Vi mourn 

Liverpool 


22 15 7 53 
22 14 s 46 


22 13 9 46 

22 11 11 47 


22 11 11 44 
22 fl 14 30 


M 7 15 33 
22 6 16 31 


22 6 16 2? 
22 I 21 1 




Roltl (Hamburger SV). R Fafcenmnyor 
(Emracfit Frankfurt]; D Hoeneaa (Bayern 
Munch), O Then (Schalke 04). 


Munch), O Thou (Schalke 04). 
SWITZERLAND; M Brunner (Grass- 
hoppers Zuncfik R Batmen (Basie), C b»- 
ARjon. A EgB (Grasshoppers). C Ryf 
(Neuchatel Xamax). R wefofi (Lucerne). II 
Dacastd (Server® }, P Parrot. H Hermann 


B imax): C Sulser (Grasshoppers). A 
Iter (Lucerne). 


Halter (Lucerne). 

• Bonn (Reuter) - Manfred 
Burgsmueller. Werder Bremen's 
free-scoring forward, has turned 
down the chance of joining West 
Germany's squad for the World 
Cup in Mexico, national team 
officials said. 


THIRD DIVISION: Derby County 2. Giftng- 
hamO. 

WELSH CUP: Semt-Rnal, first teg: Kidder - 
minster 4. Hereford I. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: First tflvtaion: Aston 
Villa 1. Hud den field 1: Leicester 0. 
Newcastle 0. Second drvWon; Scun- 
thorpe v Notts County, postponed 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Brighton 1. 
Birmingham t Portsmouth 0. Norwich 3. 
WatlQrd 3, Southampton 1. 

GOLA LEAGUE: Dagenham 1 . Telford 4. 
VAUXHALL-OPEL LEAGUE: Premier (£- 
vrston CXiwich Hamlet 0. Hendon 0. 
NORTHERN PREMIER LEAGUE CUP: 
Semi-Anal second leg: Hyde 4. Macoes- 

SOin-tit^U^AGUE: Premier dvtarion: 


Bridge builders 

The first schoolboy inter- 
national between England and 
Belgium under- 15s today is 
being called the "friendly 
international". The match takes 
place ai Ponman Road. Ip- 
swich. and is the first football 
link between the two countries 
since the tragedy at the Heysel 
Stadium. Brussels, before last 
year's European Cup final. Tony 
Dable. chairman of Suffolk 
County Schools FA and the 
match organizing committee, 
said: "We hope that in some 
way ihe schools can rebuild 
some or the bridges that were 
destroyed last year. We have 
booked both teams into the 
same hotel." 


7.30 unless stated 

FOOTBALL 
First division 
Man Lttd v Chelsea 
Newcastle v A Villa 
Oxford v Watford 

Second division 

Bradford v Leeds (at RL ground) 
Norwich v Sunderland 

Third division 

Brentford v Darlington p 
D erby v Bristol R 

Fourth division 

Hereford v Hartlepool 

Scottish premier division 

Aberdeen v Motherwell 

Scottish first division 

Dumbarton v Forfar 
Hamilton v Falkirk 
Kilmarnock v E Fite 
Morton v Airdrie 
Partick v Clyde 

Scottish second division 

Arbroath v Oueen's Park 
Berwick v Stenhsmuir 
Cowdenbeath v St Johnstone 
E Shrling v Stranraer 
Raith v Queen of Sth 
GOLA LEAGUE: Cheltenham v Enfield. 
Kertermg v Nuneaton. 


TENNIS 


ATLANTA: WCT C M tnnioo sh ip*: Sfogte* 
that K Cunwi (USIDlT WBuson IU*. 7-S. 7- 
6 Doubles Amt A Kahftwrg jnfl R van : not 
(US) w C Sttvfl and D msm* iSaj 6-2. w. 
MARCO ISLAND. H&KUC Women'* ttaxra- 


mmt at tnam MO M E Rnat C Uoyd (US I a C 
Konae-KJscti (WG1. 6-2. 6-*- 


FOOTBALL 


FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Crystal Palana » 
Urmn Town, posiparme 


US PGA LEADING MONET- WINNERS (l|S 
imawsaredi i.J Mjhattev. $244.736 1 aocur 
£160.0001. Z C Pe«e. $230^8: 3. 6 Bean. 
$2)9 )5J. 4. H Suvan S17J810; f. B Lm$»r 
IWG) $iaasi5. Bnosr pan nos « a Lr*e 
ST22.4S2. 56. K Brown. S3SJ12. 61 N FaKta. 
S34.3J3. 


ICE HOCKEY 


NORTH AMERICA: Natans) Lmtgut (NHL): 
Chicago Biecfi Hawks 3 St Lows Bkm 1; 
Pt*iwaipi*3 5. Wwhngwn Caonas 3 

Cagarv Hjm« 6 TVHilti «o Jets 4. New 
jer«iv Daws 9. New ro« 7. Detroit 

flee Wmqs 4. Toronto Maple Lasts 2, OT- 
PMiquins 5. New Rangers 4; 

Hsiflora Wtuie»s 4 Boston 3mms 3. asiw*- 
ton Oners 3. Vancouver 2- 



■ugg wwww — 

pJayar of an eute group frwn the 
-European tour chtfS of tlw 1570s 
wba are ww plying tbdr trade 
wftb startlinz success. 

- While fefie* students like 
Sereriuo BaDestertS (two Brit- 
Opsrns* two United States 
Masters), Bernhard Un g e r 


(United States. Masters) and 
Sandy Lyle (British Open) have 
mm ipajor championships^ Nor- 
mau has-feded ft» read r such a 
level of atudnnKnt- Ail of which 
is sljgfatly disconcerting for the 
broad-skonidered Australian, 
and it is difficult to naderatand 
as he passed bis earlier 

examinations around the world 

with flying colours. 

Norman fest won la Europe in 
1977. At (hat tine Ballesteros 

was also beginning Iris m«rciirial 
career. Laager was not regarded 
as a factor and Lyle was only on 
the threshold of turning pro- 
fesshmaL Norman has won 33 
tournaments around tbe world. 
He led the. European order of 
merit in . 198 & He assisted 
Australia' to -Yktoiy in tbe 
inaugural Danhfl] Cup at St 
Andrews in October. 

Norman, however, has failed 


to win one of the four nulff 
championships (US Masters, 

US Open, British Open, US 
PGA Championship) which 
m a k e op tire grand slam. How- 
ever. be was beaten in a play-off 
for the United States Open in 
1984. 

One explanation is that Nor- 
man began playing 'at a Eater age 
than Lyle, who hit hlsftst shot 
at the age of three, and 
Ballesteros and Laager, who 
began at seven . and .nhw 
respectively. , . , 

Norman turned professional 

in January of 1975. He was 22 
and be bad struck his first golf 
ball only three years and two 
months earlier. He had repre- 
sented Queensland State at 
cricket, Australian Rules and 
Rngbv League hot he was cap- 
tivated by golf after caddying for 
bin mother, who bod a h a n dicap 
of three. 


“I see myself as bring a young 
recruit," Norman says- “ft takes 
- years and- years to get- tbe feeL 
I’ve worked border mere re- 
cently on shots of 1 00 yards and 
less. I’ve been practicing my 
bunker and chipping shots be- 
cause my short game lacked 
maturity. I like the way it is now 


“Sandy’s great because noth- 
ing ruffles Mxa. lt was matvet- 
lons for him' eo win a British 
Open and bo win the -Greater 
Greensboro Open, last week. -1 
take my hat off to tin, Helms 
what 1 term natural, talent, » in 
a way Pm more im pre s sed' by 
Laager. Bemhkfd ts Tdi work 
He has made the besxofwhathe 
has and 1 Uke .that-^ 


Langer tops new 




Thon. aged 20. normally a 
midfield player at Schalke 04 
club. He replaces Karl-Heinz 
Rummenigge. the captain, who 
cannot play because of a knee 
injury. Also out injured are 
Pierre Liitbarski and Rudi 
Voeller. forwards, while Klaus 
Allofs and Uwe Rahn, a mid- 
field player, have championship 
dub games on the day of the 
match. Toni Schumacher, the 
goalkeeper, and Matthias Herget 
and Michael Fromzeck, defend- 
ers. are unavailable 
In two pre-Mexico warm-up 
games. West Germany beat Italy 
2-1 and Brazil 2-0. Two others 
against Yugoslavia and The 
Netherlands, arc planned before 
the tournamenL 
West Germany has won 29 
and tied five of its 43 games 
against Switzerland. The last 
Swiss victory was 3-1 at Frank- 
furt in 1956. 

WEST GERMANY: U Stain (Hamburger 
SVr. K AugemhaJw (Bayern Munch). T 
Berthotd (fimraettt Frankfurt). K Foorstar 



# i 








Vi'-r. 

I'^v. : 


,2‘^j 


The Italian dab Inter- 
nazlonale announced yesterday 
that they had signed Daniel 
Passarella (above), the Argen- 
tina sweeper, from Fioventiaa 
for £230,000. Passarella. aged 
32. will have a one-year contract 
with the Milan dob, according 
to Valberto Migliani, their 
spokesman. 

Migliani said tbe dob was not 
releasing details of the player's 
salary for tbe season, but said it 
would be less than tbe £320,000 
reported in the Italian press. 

Passarella announced last 
month, after a disagreement 
with the dob's management, 
that he would leave Fiorentina. 


Last Sunday be scored the 
first of Fiorentina's two goals 
against Jnventus, tbe league 
leaders, in a game which may 
have had a decisive effect upon 
the championship: Joveutus’s 
defeat enabled Roma to move to 
within one point of them with 
three piww r wnninin g. 


Bernhard Langer. of West 
Germany, who defends his US 
Masters title in Augusta this 
week. amf Severiano 
Ballesteros, of Spain, twice win- 
ner of that event, take first and 
second places in a new world 
ranking list . announced 
yesterday.- 

The list? to be called the Sony 
Ranking,, has beep inaster- 
minded by Mark McCormack's 
International Management 
Group. The sponsors have been 
given the sanction of the Royal 
and Ancient Golf Club. 

Tbe ranking of 200 golfers will 
be updated every week after 
results from the eight major 
circuits around the world. In alL 
some 160 tournaments win be 
taken into account 

Each tournament will be 
graded according to its status 
and, except in Grade One events 
— namely the Open Champion- 
ship, the US Open, the US 


Masters and the US PGA tour- 
nament. bonus points will be 
awarded in relation to the 
strength of the field. Only the 
leading finishers will receive 
points. 

Grade Two competitions will 
include the majority of events 
on the US circuit, some of the 
leading tournaments in Europe 
and Japan and the Australian 
Open. Most of the reraaming 
events on the. European .and 
Japanese lours, together with 
the leading tournaments in 
Australia, New Zealand, South 
Africa and Asia, wifi be ac- 
corded Grade Three status. ‘ 
Grade Four will feature all other 
tournaments and invitational 
events. 

Surprisingly, the world 
match play championship at 
Wentworth, ' which has been 
organized by the McCormack 
group for more than 20 years, 
will" be included only as a Grade 


Three event, although the large 
number of players ranked in the 
top 20 usually in the field.woutd 
give it a relatively high bonds 
points value. ‘ 

The rankings wiB be taken 
from an ongoing three-year 
period, this ironing; -out any 
dramatic _ fluctuations.; in- a 
player’s form to givd ^reason- 
able indication of ms place 
among the world’s .. fowlers. 
However, the more recent the 
petformance the greater weight 
itwiflbe given..-' * 

. This factor bdped Ballesteros 
to gain second place " 



Migliani - also said (hat the 
contract of Liam Bnuty, the 
Irish midfield player, mwfcf not 
be renewed when .it expires at 
the end of tbe season.- Karl- 
Heinz Rnraraenlgge. Internaz- 
ionale's second foreign player, 
has a contract until the end of 
next season. 


BOXING 


Experience is the key 
in Feeney’s title bid 

By Sriknmar Sen, Boxing Correspondent 


BOWLS 

Eiror proves 
costly for 
champions 


England wives will fly 
to World Cup camp 


John Feeney, the 28-year-old Scottish featherweight title and 
veteran from Hartlepool, sol- carries a punch — he stopped 


diers on at the Royal Albert Hall Charlie Brown (who gave Hugh 
tonight when be meets Robert Russell, of Belfast, a hard fight 


Dickie, of Swansea, in an at- last year) tn three rounds and 
tempt to win the. British. feather- the tough little Barnet feather- 


England's World Cup 
preparations in Colorado" 
Springs are likely to include -a 
flying visit ; by wiv»~ and 
girlfriends. Bobby Robson, .the 
England manager, is trying io 
arrange a four or five-day visit 
to the party's hotel headquarters 
after the warm-up games with 
Mexico and Canada but before 
the team's departure to 
Monterrey. 

• Terry Yorath. Bradford City’s 
assistant manager, will not be 
taking a similar post with 
Coventry City after failing to 
reach agreement with the first 
division club's manager Don 
Mackay. 

Yorath was wanted as first- 
team coach by Coventry, who 
parted company with Frank 
Upton on Friday. Yorath, who 
was capped 59 times by Wales, 
was a Coventry player from 
1976 to 1979 and was keen to 
return to his former club. 

• The third division leaders, 
Reading, enter the computer age 
when they entertain York at 
Elm Park on Saturday. 

Dick Tracey, the Sports Min- 
ister. has been invited to be the 
first person to go through 
Reading's new electronically op- 
erated turnstiles as the Berkshire 


club unveil -their computerized 
iddmiiywaril syitetn. : Reading, 
believed to -be 4be' firsfidub in 
the-oonniry. to. imptemont the 
scheme, will bare- e?ght com- 
puter-card turnstiles in 'opera- 
tion on the South Bank side of 
their ground. 

• Borussia 

Moenchengladbach's Norwe- 
gian international goalkeeper, 
Erik Thors tvedL has escaped 
automatic suspension after be- 
ing sent off in a league game last 
Saturday. A disciplinary hearing 
decided io fine the 23 -year-old 
2,500 marks.(£700) but left him 
free to piay in a league match in 
Cologne last night. 

• Finland. ' - have-'., announced 
their squad' to travel'.' to play 
Brazil in an international match 
probably in Recife on April 1 7. 

Squad: 0 Hutlunan; I festoon, A 
Lahtnen, E Pefconm. M Granskog. J 
Empaaus, J Ikabran, J Ntemman. H 
Turunen. K Ukkonsn. P RauWnan, A 
Hjelm. M Toemvafl. A Vatvse, J Raraanen, 

( Lus. M Upppnon. 


t crpwn vacated;. jby Barry weight, John Maloney,, also in 


ujgajp, - 


tfarte. The defea t of Maloney is I 


Twice winder of- the British certdinfy . impressive, especially 1 
bantamweight titie in-his nine-- when "one iwalbhow the latter 


year campaign, FeoR^us one of recently destroyed Gary Nickels 
the- most experienced ‘pro- in. one round er Alexandra 
fessionafr, in. Britain, with 44 Pavilion. 


contests behind hint. He h as Feeney's boxing should keep 


been stopped once only, in the Dickie at arm’s length for most 
13lh round, and that was in of the 12 rounds. But the 


Australia where he fought Paul Hartlepool boxer, although 


Ferreri for the Commonwealth 
bantamweight title. 


fted with much of that Feeney 
mi)y ability, is too one-paced 


Dickie is six yean younger and light of punch to deter 
than Feeney and has just IS Dickie from getting stuck in to 


Tony Allcock, the world in- 
door singles champion, and his 
partner, David Bryant.- were left 
regretting a. tactical error after 
their surprise defeat - on the 
opening day of the Midland 
Bank £40*000. -world indoor 
pain championship at Bourne- 
mouth MosMfsy, ' 

The English pair- who are hot 
favourites for the title. 'tined' tip 
with Aflcock at lead and Bryant 
ai skip — ihe ot^osite order they 
had used when they came within 
one shot of Winning the world 
outdoor tide. 

“I missed too many running 
bowls." Bryan isaid- “Tony was 
playing well bur - 1 couldn't 
convert the chances that were 
offered.” 


bouts Under his belt. AH the his senior. It should be a good, 
same, he could prove a handful, hard contest with Feeney's box- 


Allcock and Bryant were 
beaten. 4-7, 9-6. 5-7 by Ron 
Jones and Bin Boe tiger, of 
Canada, . and Bryant sqid they 
would revert- to -their- outdoor 
order- for their remaining two 
qualifying matches 
Jim Baker, of Belfast, ^and his 
Irish international ioUeague, 
Sammy AUen, were in .sparkling 
form to beat the Australians, 
Don Peoples and Kenny Wil- 
liams, 10-2, 8-5. In another 
surprise. George Souza, from 
Hong Kong, and Cedi Bransky, 
of IsraeL beat Scotland’s 
Commonwealth Gaines cham- 
pions. Willie Wood and David 
Gouriay, IO-3, 8-3. ■ 

Yesterday's two remaining 
matches also produced straight 
set wins. Peter Beiliss and Phil 
Skoglund, of New Zealand, 
edged out Welsh pair Terry 
Sullivan and Russell Evans 9-5, 
6-4, and George Souza, from 
Hong Kong, and Gedl Bransky, 
of .IsraeL. beat . Scotland’s 
Commonwealth Games chain- 


A former Scottish bantam- rng and experience telling in the 
weight champiqin, he holds the end. . - ^ - 

■■ .1 r'rr - .5 . . •/ V.' •- • ■ '• ••• 


Castle kings ring in the new 


. Trank Maloney, aged 27. and 
Vince Heck m an, aged 22, threw 
their hats into die promoters' 
ring by announcing yesterday 
then- inteotioa of bringing new 


Game postponed (Sranmmr Sen writes 


feces to British boxing this year 
(Srikmaar Sen writes). 


Brentford’s third division 
home game tonight with 
Darlington has been postponed . 
because of an outbreak of 
influenza in the visitor's camp. 


TODAY'S FIXTURES 


MULTIPART LEAGUE: Caernarfon v 
Moss ley: Morecamoe v Hyde: South 


Lrveroool v Oswesny. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Pmmier dMslon: 


Alvecnurcn v Basnqstoke: Shepshod « 
fishw. HnSand drmioo: BUston * 
Wet Lng boro ugn; Lwcesrer United v Forest 
Green: Rusnaen v Moor Green; Sutton 
CtfdticHd u Mie Oak. VS RugOy « Merthyr 
Tylfil. Southern cflvbion: Canijrataa Chy 


Houratow v Monte Motors; Supennemw 
v Mormon (UOL 

NENE GROUP UNITED COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Premier dM ah a u . Newport 
PagneB v Destwraugh. 


Tydfil. Southern dhrtsiOTc Canemd^a City 
w Dover; Dunstatto v Poofe; Salisbury v 


RUGBY UNION 

UWJER-23 INTERNATIONAL: Engtend v 
Spain (at Twtckannami. 

SCHOOLS INTERNATIONAL: 18-group: 


With John H Stracey , the 
former world welterweight 
champion, as their adviser, they 
set op office in the Castle pub in 
tbe rag trade area of the 
'Comnenaa! Road, where Frank 
Warren started ap. They ala (o 
pat *'on shows at three Sooth 
London veaties. 

“Wg are going to bring boxing 
back tp ' the small halls," 
Maloney said. And to show that 
they mean business then- first 
.show, sponsored by Fry's of 


Lewisham, the car people, win 
be at the Lewisham Theatre on 
May 28, the night Warren las a 
big affair at Alexandra Pavilion, 
North London. The bill will be 
topped by Chris Blake of 
Croydon. 

’ In their “ a m ateur days" the 
two men staged two of Frank 
Bruno's contests — one against 
Joe Christie, the Irish Bseavy- 
weigbt, which Bruno lost. The 
other was one . which Warren 
would dearly like to stage today. 
Bruno against Hqghroy Carrie, 
the- British heavyweight 
champion. 

- With a record Gke that it is 

not surprising that Maloney and 

Heckman have great hopes for 
the eight young professionals ; 
under their wing; ; 


S ons Willie Wood and David 
outlay 10-3. 8-3. 


Tcw&ndqe. 

VAUXHALL-OPEL LEAGUE: Premier dt- 
vision: Yeovil v Slough. Second division 
north: Tnng » Ware. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: Fktt rflvtetoo: Aston 
Vm v Wigan: Huddersfield v Liverpool: 
Hull V Barnsley (70). west Bromwicti 
Aflxon v Nottingham Forest (7.0V 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION: Bmnfnriham 
v Arsenal (Z01: MfltwaS v Ipswich (2.0): 
Porwmourh v Southampton (7.0): Swtn- 
oon v West Ham (3.0): Tottaihani v Brtsmi 
Rovers 12.0 k Wartord v Quean'S Part 
Rangers 

LONOON SPARTAN LEAGUE: Premier 
dmsicit: Caber Row v Brvnsdown 
MORRTTT HOMES CAPITAL LEAGUE: 
Daqennam v Southend 
BUILDING SCENE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Chanerts v Bramrree: Soham v Clacton. 
Bulldog Petroleum Cup: Thrt round: 
Tipmse v Great Yarmouth 
SUSSEX COUNTY LEAGUE: first <fl- 


Scofland v Endand. 

CLUB MATCteS: Aherdlery v Tregegar 
(7.0): Cfifton v Bath: Cross Keys v 
Swansea (7.0): Ebtiw Vale v Fon ty pool. 


(7.0): FyWe v Royal Navy (6S0); London 
Irish y Mat Potica (6JJ); London Welsh v 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


iron v Mat PoHca (6.0): Londo 
Wasps: Moseley v Orreft Pen 
Fenarth (7.0): Rugby * Cove 
South Wales Potne v Bndgend 


t; Pontypridd 
Covanuy (6JJ 
bond (7.^. 


ART GALLERIES 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


FIRST OfVIStON: Cesdetord v Bradtord 
Northern: HaJifas v York (6.0): Hul v 
Leads. Hu* KR.v St Helens: Oldham v 
Featherstone. Widnas v Warrmaton. , . 

SECONOO(V»SIOfitsra«rt«v»acfcpoor 
Borough; .Doncaster v Barrow (6JJ): - 
Keigmey v Wakefield. 


AUW BAUiny. 74 Saath 
AvKUa- Street. 629 2290 April 
T th-tZUj. WATBKOLOUM 
irotrOOttc, presented tw 
T—«r teMhry. 


NCW AMT CSMTUE. 41. SMane 
BLSW1 01 6644 «uurr 

pwrnot OUi and WaMrcoloun 
Mm-FruM: sats 1 1-3. 


AMTHONY BWF4Y, 9.4 23 

peering ' Street Wt. Bnca 


ROYAL ACAOOMY OF ARTS 

pKcadmjr. wi 01 734 wsa 
Ooen dally 106 tnc. Sun. 
Iredueed .rale Sun. Until 1.401 


C2 BQ. £1.70 Cone- rate 
re booking ai 741 9999. 


vteton: Sieymng v Utttehamoton. 

GREAT MILLS WESTERN LEAGUE Pre- 
mier division: Chippenham- v Bristol City 
reserves (6 15L Frome v ExmOutn. 

HALLS BREWERY HELLENIC LEAGUE: 
Premier div is ion: Abngoon United v 


OTHER SPORT 

BASKETBALL: Baton Masters Trophy 
final (at Gatssheatt 7.30): Bwmtngnam 
BuUats v Murray Irmrnabona) Edinburgh. 
BOWLS: World indoor pairs champon- 
sups tai Bournemouth). 

SNOOKER:. Benson and Hedges Irish 
Masters (at Gaits, Co Kldaro) 

TENNIS: Prudential Bntnh junior 
championships (at Mmbtedon); LTA 
Western Counties BMW tournament (at 
Bristol). 


BAmCAH AWT GALLERY. Bar- 
bican Cemre. EC2. OltoSS 
4141. Until 77 Aflnl: ART A 
TIME, looidnn ai Uroe and the 
4fh dimenaton m modern m. 
Adm L1.SO and 7Su. Tun«ai 
i0ani«.«9Hn. San & B Hots 
I Sam -6 45am Ctond Manana, 
eswept B. Hols. 


ROYAL ACADEMY .Ptccadinn 01 
T34 9062 Ooen daily 1M Inc. - 
Son (Reduced rale Sun units 
1451 ALFRED BRJUERTi SCULf. 
TOR OF OIOS £2.SO. £1 .70 Cone, 
rate ce oootaag oi tai 9999. 


CATE. COMMA. N otttin tia. Gate . - 
737 4046 newly renovated. . 
new luxury seating. DaBw sue- ■ • 
tneo. - Mnwak RAM • rtS) - 
a-15_5'.15. B IB L- NtBbLPrl Sr 
Sd II. IS.' Advance Booki ng s. 

No Meiulietvtiip. • • • - 

umc mn t 55555 theatre - ; 

. . 990 S252 LEniu/ SS9.17B9 04 .,. - 
hero- Acce ss/ Vba BMMnew ■ . 
AESOUITE BCBDOfERS lien. 
S«r arogs Oattir. tZjSSu SJtK- 
6.10. 8 50. All progs -BooMM« . 
in Mime* - -v - 



BRITISH LIBRARY. C4 RuaSeH SL 


Aliases. Mans and Globes, vvudys 
IO& Sun.?30bv Adm free. 
Closed Good Friday. 


ZAHMNA GALLERY, l. Cram- 
well Gardens, (nop. VSLA1SW7. 
584 6612. tffilU OF ONE 


FOR THE RECORD 


HANDBALL 


BRITISH LEAGUE: Great Dane 21. Kirtby 
Se*eci 26: Leicensr 73 18. Bukanboad 17: 
Rosen Jentons 2«. Uverpooi 2S. 

ROLANDS B LEAGUE: German Tomaden 
21. Lutrerawjn Fata 9. Rosen Jenhms 12. 
wuiaheu Memos 14, Hsrowoad Town 6 
Hamwcod returns. 




WU W K A DARBY. 19 Com 
Street. London W.l. RNBR 
ORCAW. New P»inlmg«. 
C MBT DWBt HULL CALUCRY 
>7 Moiromb SnA London 
SW1. 5555 0500. VILATO 8 
Hommor la Bumtotu. ■ ■ 


An vxrubittan ny me Fraai 

P Mtera Uyi ROLAND A 
SABRMA W ICH AMB. Until IS 
May. . Mon - Sal to., a.30 
irtowd fra, sun 1 - £.30 


MHEMA KMKHTSBRn>OE-23S . 

42S& jade NKhomr A 
KatMeen Turner. NtUilS 
HONOUR (IS) uur 1.3a ««V. 
S-50. 9 00 


wnm haymarket raso 
27MI HO SUMOMICR flSV 
Sen prow Daily SIS. 600. 
8 90. All teats bookable ic ait 
vanew. - Access and • • 
teleph on e boomwea wdCC P ift - 


CINEMAS 


i950 am)i Md.-93o .reao / . 

■ 42fi»mmtMWHTS (P®. Sed 

pcow Doom open DaHy 116. ' 
4-46. 7^6. All progs BooMUi 

tn,' Advance Access end Vui 
pbane bodonra wrtcotne XJ-ed- 
B Hot Lhw 839 1929. 24 how- 
swvira. «f.60 seats nvpOebio 
Monday oil pkh: 


•vane Men: Oran A: BuTOera 5. Austria Or 
Sweden 5. Soviei Union 3. Franco 5. Hungary 
3- Derwnart 6. Finland 4: Ktey.fi, Swtaertand 


cmtostopher-huu, GAiumr 

17 Motraniti Aim. .London - 
• SWI 236 OSOQ VILATO 6 
HQmaw to' Barorteta: • 


MOTOCROSS 

CASTELNAU-DE-LEWS: French l2Scc grand 


proc Hrsr round: fitsf kg: 1. P Vteikonen 
IF oj; 2. A PanMte (Tint Z 0 Lather (WGi 
Second to? 1. uentamn: Z Panttb: 3. U 
KouKi iFtni 


BOWLS 


O Svntzarwid S. befand 3: Italy 5. FVitand 4. ' 
Grow B: Won Germany 5. Romania 1; 
Poland 5. vugHlavie l Cweiosiovaiua 5. 
NoraayO: Spwn 5. Faeroe tetavl&O-.Englanc) 

5 Betanjm 1: Netherl a nds 5. Scotland 1: 
Tirt«, 5. Wales 3. Crachontovaloa 5 Nanny 
0. Entfend 5, Nelheitands 0; SeeHend M 
Faroe sums, wftK BteguR 5. Watts ft 
Turney 5. Spate 2 PtajTHifiAtor 13th to 280: 
piacee: Enteand 5. cWnert ft,furfc*y 5. 
SwitteniindZ: Greece 5. Scotland 3.- Ireland 5. 
Faroe blends ft So«et Ungn 5, weet 


. mom RNB ART JO King SL 


St Jar ws: s wi. O pera 9 
April. ARTHUR BOYD . Recent 
AiKtraban Paintmoa- Until 9 
May. Mon - m to , S.3Q 


GUT MOftmSOM ART CM Flalnl. 
mo* Watertotours a nd Pastets. 
1»- SCOTT BROWN. Optaninp 
Today. Ole JensomSLSWi.Ot. 
930 BOOB. 


BOtfflfOUOUTH: DWteml Bank twW Moor 
pans efiampioruhtp*: R janes end W 


Germany i; HunaeiyS. Yugaatavia 1: Roma- 
nia S. Austria 4: Bogun 5. Kaiy 2. Send, 


na S. Austria 4: Bogum 5. Bate 2. 3« 
finale: France: 3. WsisJ 4: SMden 


Boenger iCam M A ABcoch era D Bryant 
iEngD-4 s-9 7-5 S Men end 4 Baker Pro) bt 
D PeopW and K WHkams fAusL 103,6-5. 




GUY MORRISON ART Oil Krint 
rnpL Waiercowm and nnris 
In Scrit-Brem opera to-day 
Ole Jnm»o Street S W.l. 930 
8008 


CAMDEN FLA2A 485 ZddSlOno. 
Cffraen T own tape) . Godard's 

__ggwed. 

CHELSEA Oimu 551 3742 
Unw ROM (Nearasi tube 
Soane So) COHO PARK mbi 

MUM, S.0Q & oa r.oa 

900. MUST END THUDS. 
From FfU 11 APRIL Exduave 
»«*iW4hon of Francesca 
bdwfs open 
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this week. 

*rEvea so I don't seo tire 
majors as the be-all and ead-alL 
If would, not mean asytbiog 
much, mace . to me in strict 
financial IriUtK if I WOn0Bft. 'Aflti 
if yea Area good play er then ye* 

can win other KHnanrah and 

people -stHS ’ WS yoo 

around.'* ” . ' : 

Of bfo fornKEorajpeadcbss- 
rootn odJasms, Norman was 
moa impressed by Briksteres. 
He added: “I played with, him 
yesterday and I mW him h was 
great to see hfoa reheted and 
a gprn. His baa bi Amer- 
ica is hard bat itV a rale. Yea 
can't expect to get off if you are 
booked for speeding. Right 
I don't think that he's as sharp, 
as seen him. 


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- 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 1986 


39 





s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Jane Henderson 
and Peter Davalle 


BBC 1 


.1 






*Vr ‘“1 


SJJO ClllH 
6 - S0 

MaWerthwatejs, 

7^7.55, BJSandBSS. 
Local news, weather and 

SdvS&SffiJS!?-' 

fS'lWdJ 1 7-20 and ■ 
837 s papers at 
930 Rotand Rat's Easter - 
gJ*wgan*aTT»iastln . 
this Easter break senes; 
L(W«ig- jn_Th e Last Chance 
(r) SL45. Why don’t you _? 


m.1 5 Slmon«nd 

Witch told by Nerys 
Hughes. 1030 piav 


funk 


— pirnnad tw lam " 

. V \ • .Lauehton with guest Chloe 
Ashcroft teajno of the - : 
cHck and the duckHnq. 

■ c 1050 Ghaihar Many Aslan 
>*■-_ • diabetics do not use 

insulin to control their 
d - jHness because they tear it 
terproducecTfcy animals. Dr 
Mohan Pawa and Kiran ' 
T ■ Shukta offer advice. 

. 11.15 Ceefax 
«L30 Neve after Noon with 
■. Richard Whitmore and 
.' ’ . ■ Frances Coverdala 
• (subttte®), ' 

„ u 1255 Regforuunews arid 
_ weather. - - ■ 

v : 1.00 Pebble Mifi at One with 

Magnus Ategnusson, Pairf. 
Cola and Marian Foster. 
Budget Cookery. Opera / 
stars Jeffrey Lawton and 
Helen Field talk about their 
highly acclaimed 
performances to the Welsh 
National Opera's new 
OteUo. 

145 Bertha The Great Pafntina 
Job (rJ/ZLOO Ceefax 
2.1 S Racing from Ascot 230 
The Golden Eagle Novices 
*• Steeplechase and 3.00 

The Keith Prowse Long 
-Distance Hurdle Race. 

352 Regional News " 
355 Mp our Street Monya ?’ 
unde is trying to bufld toe 
Sffmy. Seaweed ■ 
Hypermarkets J 
4.10 TheBlsJdtts anew 

c&rfoon about the : " L_ 
adventures of biscuit- . 
sized dogs 

" 450 Take Two You should be 
so lucky and Joni Jonas 
are the programmes wider 
discussion this week, with. 
PMMp SchofMd, who 
3 introduces two 

c o mpetit io ns: write a 
criticism of a BBC 
pragrarnmeorpainta . 
portrait of a television 
personality. Ha also 

- . . - - shews favourite efibs. 1 

.5?<, 455 John Craven's . 

News r o u nd ; 

5 JOS The December Rose fifth 
■ • episode of a leon-Garftoid 
- drama. A due to the " 
v '* , identity of Brodsky's 
woutd-be assassin has 
been uncovered. 556The 
FItotatones Fred is 
determined to win the 
Lodge picnic tournament 
this year. , 

6.00 BbtCrCiock News 655 
Regional news 
. magazines 
7jDQ_Wogan 

- 7.40 No Place IfltfrHome The 
- Crabtree fan% star* the 
school video (Coefatf - 

8.10 Date* The on Barths" ■ , 

. jBafliwrris^SuaEBerv ' - 
decides she wta go, bur J - 
R conskfarsgotog smta. . 

' 950 Party Political Broadcast 
by the Conservative Party. 

945 Newewfth Julia 

Somenritoand John ;• 


news 

955 Q.EC. The Seven Minute ' 
Mile, it's not the speed at 
wehich Doran Scotson 
runs, but the fact that he . 
' can run at all. which is 
-- staggering. Jaundice at • 
birth severely damaged hte 
brain, leaving him 
-httidicapped. buthls . 
mother's faith and 
courage have helped team 
both to achieve records. 

1045 Sp o t fraffi* Steve flkfer 
from the god course in 

Kaylor retumsto the ring 
in Boxing from the Albert 
Hatt. 


TV- AM 


*45 GpOdJHomfcig Britain with 
. Anne Dtamono-and Nick. . 
Owen news at 5. 30, 740, ■ 
750, 840 , <50 and 9.00. 
Westher 81858, 858, 
758.858 and 858. Sport 
; at 655 and 754. Cartoon 
at 75a. pop video at 745. 


fTV/LONDON 


956 Thames news' headlines 
followed by Ones Upon a. 
Time-Man. Animated ' 

loeriesabout development 
_off man: today Cn^ - - 

• Magnorimah.- 

955 How ws know the. : 
Earth moves 

10.10 The Logo of Iho tame die 

story of a fafttvheaier. 
1055 The AB Electric - 

-Amusement Arcade Belle - 
. is ready ter take Holfyvrood 
by storm, apart from her 
domestic troubles (rl . 
1140 (ration Legends of - 
Canada: Return of the 
ChHd; a young Irefian 
Brave toses We wife . 
tragkaHy. 1155 Cartoon . 

1150 AboutBritafn ; Whatisit. 
about steam engmes that 
t such-passion in . 
fanatics? This - 
looks at the 
.„.jmt6Ho»tnneoh 
the Norfolk coast and tries 
toftadoutwhysomariy ' ■ 
enthusiasts spend time on. 
steam railways. J 
1240 Portland B& New series of 
adventures of a lighthouse 
keeper. 12.10 Our 
Backyard 

1250 Tafldng Personae? Sir 

Afistair Burnet) talks to 
Lord Oaksey. the racing 
man. 

140 Newa.atOne150Thaoiea 
News with Robin Houston. 
150 The Champions. 

250 On the Market Magazine . 
. about food with market 
report radpes by Glynn 
• Christian and food news 
■- attooptnions.wrth Susan 

340 iuminuu Hyet ^ 

introduces UnfoersHy of 
- - Dundee against Royal : 

Hoitoway CoJtega. 

355 Thames news headlines 
350 Sons and Daughters This 
week JiR faces an 
uttimatum regarding her 
relationship with Terry. 

440 Portland Bl repeat oftha 
midday pr o gr a mme. 4.10 
James me Cat in the 
Takeover, the. 
megalomaniac ini 
. Is a hamster. 450 s 

f- Dob - 

4.45 The Aik Investigating the 
ecology Maxine. Hughie, - 
Chris and Rhiannon seem 

. , .to hear alarm befls ringing 

- for wBdlffB. in urban areas;' 
they sail down the canal 
wbfeMfows under. . 
Spaghetti Junction in 
arofingham on their Ark. 
IQracfc^ 

5.15 Connections the teenage 

pub Show with Sue 

Robbie. ' 

6.45 News 640 Thames Newe 
655 Help with VIv Taylor 
Gee. . . 

6u35 C rosst o a d s Driving - 
lessotisfbr Diane. 

740 TMs is Your Ufa Wffl the . , 
'Bfctinvretpstergenulne".' 
“jurprisedc shock tWs ' 
week?iOracte)--’ 

750; Cffron^on Street Kavtn 

• - Webster goes to search of ' 

a rival, btrt Mike. Baldwin is 
prepared to compromise 
■ “ (Oracle V- 

840 MfaderTtoe6cxhstk»- 
Imft? Arthur is caBed to 
service and Terry is 
charge (r). 

940 Wes^KMXt 86: The Four 
Horsemen part 2. David 
Munros second 
riocunwtiary shows that 
.supplying arms can be a 

- duptotois business and - 
that even supplying 

aid ts not 
'Ai attrutetic . 

TOrader ' - 
1040 Party Pofitical Broadcast 
by the Conservative Party^ 
10.05 Haws at Ten followed by 
Thames News Headlines. 
1055 Midweek Sport SpedM 
Tonight’s top football and 
sports news 

11.45 Rim: Victims (1979) Eato 
night thriUer about a wife’s 
desire for. the ixtiftman. 

1250 Night Thoughts with Colei 
March ant. 



Hany 7owfa(ceafn),ClariQe 
PetensanJ Eltine Dehnar White 
Soft Bines. Radiol. 750pm 


•At the end of tost week's 
fibn in David Munro’s two-part 
documentary series THE 
FOUR HORSEMEN. I was left 
feeftng so shattered by the 
images of w ar sava ged humanity 
that It seemed mere was 
nothing more the dread riders 
could justifiably InfSct on me 
In the wayof horror. I was wrong. 
Tonight, (TTV440K they ride 
again. The difference this time Is 
that they wear smarty-cut 
suits and smite a lot end shake 
hands as they seal bargains. 
They are the arms salesmen and 
the geo-politicians. They are 
kicky to navB hands. Thanks to 
them, there are thousands 

who don’t No legs, either, or 

skin on their boefies, or stoht 
But at least they are afive to 
whimper in thefr pain. As 
Munro’s cameras pan across an 
endless p8e of human skulls, 


CHOICE 


we are reminded of those forever 
sBenced by the sales taflk of 
the merchants of death. More 
vividly than any 
documentaries 1 have seen for 
years, Munro’s two films 
have exposed the sham in the 

militarists' boast that thanks 

to the nuclear deterrent the 

world has enjoyed 40 years 

of peace 

•You cannot faH to detect 
the irony in the feet that 77ws Four 
Horsemen is screened 
tonight immediately after MOD 
BC2, 8.10pm). David 
aytoris new series about the 
Ministry ot Defence which, by 

its very nature, sanitizes the 

machinery of destruction 
even more than some of the 
arms mongers ki David 
Munro's films do. No war- 


ft 


shattered bodies in MOD. 

though: only talk ot military 

strategy and budgets and 
inter- Service rivalry, and spying 
that operates under the 

euphemism of defence 

intelligence .and - an 
astonishing disclosure - British 

attaches getting beaten up by 

the Russians 

•WHITE SUIT BLUES (Radio 

3.7.30pm) follows the defunct 

Mark Twain to Heaven, surf- 

riding on his coffin fid. Adrian 

Mrtcnefl has written a lively 

and spectacular fantasy that 

be too complex for some 
tastes. I was never quite sure 

what was Clemens, and what 
was Mitchefl, or for that matter, 
whether this was Heaven or 

Hell. Tour de force by Harry 

Towb (as Mark Twain}, and 
good songs by Mike Westbrook 


may 


igs by Mike westorook 

Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


645 Open University 

Techdogy: Bectric Money 

940 Ceefax 

240 World Bowie Midland 
Bank World Indoor Pahs 
Champlonshto introduced 
by David take 

550 N ew s Summery with 
subtitles and weadier 

-555 Bridge Club introduced by 
Jeremy James. Jeremy 

. FBnt guides novices and 

regulars to improve their 

640 FinsThe Racket (1951) 
starting Robert MHchum 
as police Captain 
McOuigg, on the traB of a 
deadly gangster, in this 
drawn from a 
F926 Broadway play. 

7J5 World Bowls More of the 
Indoor charratonsNp for 
32 bowlers; Ron Jones 
and Bill Boettger from 
Canada meet the Welsh 
teem: John Thomas and 
David Evans. 

8.10 MOD OavfdTaylor spent 
nearly a year to the 
Ministry of Defence for his 
foUTL 

* • •- ^ and found the 


I per head 
per annum, and yet the 
way to which our money is 
used has been wrapped to 
secrecy. First programme. 
Keepers of the Threat, 
looks at the new Defence 


costs and achieving 
savings. 

940 M-A-Sni: Love Story. 
Radar's efficiency Is 

girlfriend backbone hasf 
qut; fortunately there's a 
new nurse, Louise- - - 
Anderson, who may taka 
— Ms mind off things. 

955 FHne Sleeper (1973) .. . 

. Woody Afler's probe into 
the world of cryogenics. 

As jazz musidan Miles 
Monro8 he wakes up in 
- the year 2173, frozen in 

suspended animation for 

200 years, and meets 
Diane Keaton playing a 
■ dflettante poet 
there's plenty of 
contemporary American in 
his projection of the foture. 
1050 Party PoHtteal Broadcast 




1055 Nevwmlght JohnTusa, 

' Peter Snow. Donald ” 

. . MacCorrrtick andOKvia - 
.’■'O^Leary. •• 

1140 Weather . 

1145 Open Onivarstty Magic In 
. toe Web of Art th e . 
influence of magic In A 
Midsummer's Dream and 
other works of art up to 
the present 12.10 The 
EnOghtenment Innocence 
portrayed by chfidren and 
animals in Hogarths work 
<»V 



Chades Azaareiirt oa Chaanel 4, 
at 1640pm 


CHANNEL 4 


2.15 Their Lontahfos ' House a 
repeat of last night's 
WghBghts. 

250 Rare Remember I eat 
Night (1935) Comic thriSer 
a party on Long Island 
causes loss ot memory 
through alcohol to most 
cases and murder in one. 
440 A Plus 4 Gffl Nevffl and 
Mavis Nicholson mix 
entertainment with pofittos 
and health then proceed to 
stir it all up. 

450 Countdown Richard 
: Wftiiteley hosts a new 

game between a Kent man 

and a Birkenhead man. 
540 Afiee American stt-com. 
550 HbtMyofaCrime 
Russian animated f&m 
640 Mother and Son. Maggie 
takes a Hobday; a new 
series of Aussie sitcom. 
Eklerty widow and her 35 
year old son to so metim e s 
uncomfortable proximity. 
650 Flashb a ck : The Bioscope 
Goes to War 1899-1902 
When British troops went 
to war In South Africa, the 
film industry was in its 
infancy; Joseph Rosenthal 
took moving pictures and 
the first newsreels of war 
were shown back home, 
but some of the Boer War 
footage was faked on 
location near Blackburn. 
The programme is drawn 
from material in the 
impe rial Wa r Museum and 

This is part One of a 10 

litrn and television tookat 

war. 

740 Channel 4 News 
840 OsB ei y Panel game 
chaired by George 
Maly, the visual 
equivalent of My 
Music, in which the 

contestants have to 

identify paintings 
from fragments and 
tefl anecdotes about 
toe painters. 

850 Chine: On fltaCBpftaltt 
Road? There are social 

mid economic changes to 

China under Deng 
Xiaoping, but is mis merely 
redistribution to benefit 

toe top fifth of wage- 

earners, and is the new 

affluence acquired at the 

expense of king term 
. development as 

Siooiogist Nevfle Maxwefl 
-- • ctafcns? His fltoris folowed- 
by studio discussion with 
Wifflam Hinton. 

940 Pr os pects Drama on the 
Isle of Dogs. Pincy is 
helping at The Happy 
Fryer but when he turns up 
for woridinds the boss 
drinking to forget Ns wife 
has left 

1040 FOircTirez aorta Pianist* 
(1960r (Shoot toe Pianist) 

another film in the Truffaut 
series; with Charles 
Aznavour In the title role 
drawn into crime by Ms 
- brothers. Melodramatic 
storyline told with brilliant 
cinematic flourishes and 
comedy. 

1150 F3m: antom* at Colette 
(1962) * Short by Truffaut 

with his autobiographical 
character, Antoine (played 
by Jean-Rena Leaud) 
experiencing adolescent 
love (for Marie-France 
PisterL 

1240 Their LerttaMps* House 
Glyn Mathias presorts 
htahfeflits from the second 


( Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. VHF si 
variations at end. 

655 am Shipping 640 News 
Briefing; Weather 6.10 


650 


FarrrtngSJ a Pr a^Br^s) 


TC 

850 News 645 Business 
News 656. 755 Weather 
740, 840 News 755, 

855 Sport 745 Thought for 
the Day 855 Yesterday 
in Parliament 857 Weather; 
Travel 
940 News 

945 Midweek with Ubtoy 
Purvea (s) 

1040 News; Gardeners' 

Question Time. 

1050 Morning Story: The Hype 
byJrmetGotdTmch. 

Reader Mary Wlmbush 
1045 Daily Service (new every 
momma, page 67) (s) 

1140 News: TraveTThe Black 
Othatio. A portrait of the 
black tragedian Ire Aldridge 

Fetters [new series] 
Suzanne Burden reads from 
the journals and letters 
of the 19th-century actress, 
Fanny Kemble. 

1240 News; You and Yours 
1257 Lord of Misrule. The 
battle for the lordship of 
a Welsh vafiey In the dark 
days of the nud- 18th 
century (9) The Conjurer 
Judged 1255 Weather; 
Travel 

140 The World at One: News 
155 A Party Pofitical 
Broadcast by the 
Conservative Party 
140 The Archers. 155 

240 Nawsf!3omaiV sHour. 
includes an inter v iew 
with toe fashion designer 
Betty Jackson. 

340 News; The Afternoon 

series of aeven^dramatized 
short stories (3). Ian 
Masters stars in Henry 
James's Maud-Eveiyn 
347 Early Recollections. 

Poems to which poets 
remember their birthplaces, 
chosen and Introduced 
by John Carroll. 

440 News 

445 The Road to Jerusalem. 
Cwota Roaan exa m ines 
the reasons for the upswge 
of religious and poBtical 
interest In the Holy Land (s). 
445 Kaleidoscope Extra. Paul 
Vaughan explores the 
celebrations which meric the 
900th anniversary of our 
earnest public record, the 
Book. 


BBC1 


day.S56-7j 

12110-12.15 


WAL89 A* London «x- 
SJ»«40pBWdMTo- 


News of VMaw 800T- 


LAW: 836-7X0 pm Raporttog Scofr 

l*i<L NOHIWMIltiBXlIk 655-iTO 

pm Todmrt Sport. 640450 McU 
[tear. 855-740 The Rfmatonu. 12.10- 
1515 Hi Northern Ireland News. 

BttLAMk Regional reegizines. 

CHANNEL ** U3n *5 “fi* 

W 75am Seeeme 

Street 1050-1055 Cannon 
1250pm-140 Judi Qoea On Holdey 140 
News 150 OffThe Rack 240-ZJO 

Channel Report 1040-1 Q5S B ems mrm- 
ars 1145 Show Expraes 12.15am 
Closedown 

TSW ^ London excaoc 94Sera 
JL2S. Sesame Street *55-1055 Car- 
toon 1140-1155 Btg Home Of Bao>- 

ty Creak 1250pm- 1 JO Mr SmWi 140 

News 150 Country Practice 246- 
250 Home Cookery 5.16 Qus Honeyfrun 
5404A5 Crossroad 640 Today 
South Wait 650-740 Amoebas To Ze- 
bras 1145 Simon 5 Simon 1240am 
Postreript, Closedown 

GRANADA 

an Folk Talea 956 ^a Rascals 
1040 Struggle Beneath The Sea 1046- 

1055 Frogs: An Investigation 1140 

Canoon 1145-1 150 Matt and Jwjnjr 
1250pm-140 Ageless Ageing 140 
Granada Reports 150-250me Banxi 
840-440 Young Doctors IJOO Gra- 

fts 050445 TMa la Your 


tiagazn 
Shipping 545 Weather 

6.00 News; Frianctal Report 
650 Film Star. Alexander 

Walker recalls the screen 
career ot Jack Nicholson 

7.00 News 
7.05 The Archers 

750 In Business (new series) 
Peter Smith reports of 
initiatives being taken, and 
problems being faced, in 
elf areas ot business activity. 
7.46 Brainwaves. Margaret 
Percy presents the 
education magazine. This 
weak: Sports Training. 

8.15 Tales from Paradise. 

June Knox-Mawer with 
stories of the British who 
want to the South Pacific 
as missionaries, teachers 
and doctors (3) 

Spreading the Word. 

940 Thirty-Minute Theatre. 
Parents Evening by 
Diana Griffiths (r)(s) 

950 Adventure. This week: 

Cave Rescue 
945 Kaleidoscope. With 

NataUe Wheen. Includes 
comment on Romeo and 
Juliet at the RSC. 

Stretford Upon Avon: and 
James Harding's book. 

Agate: a Biography. 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: The 
Battle of Pollock s 
Crossing (3). Read by Keith 
Drink el. 1059 Weather 

1050 The World Tontoht 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1150 Today in ParRament 
1240 News; Weather. 1253 
Shipping. 

VHF (available to England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except: 5.5S640am Weather; 
Travel. 155-240pm 
Listening Comer. 550-555 
PM (continued). 11.30- 
12.10em Open University 
1150 The Civil Defence 
Controversy 1150 
Technology: Beyond 
Electric Money. 

( Radio 3 ) 

Al programmes on medium wave 
except >or Open University, on VHF. 
between 655am and 655: 

Forum, Students' Magazine 
■ “ Nev 


Open 


655 Weather. 7,00 News 
745 Morning Concert 

Stenhammar (overture 
Excelsior. Op 13). Mozart 
(Gigueto G.K574: 

Ucnida. piano). Elgar 
(Spanish Serenade. Op 
23; The snow. OOp 26 No 1 : 
Fly. Singing Bird). Les 
Six (Les maries de la Tour 
Eiffel). 840 News 
845 Vieme (Carillon de 
We st m ins ter: Jane 


Parker-Smttft, organ), 
Stravinsky (Violin 
Concerto: Kyung-wha Chung 
and LSOJ, Mozart 
(Fantyasy for a Musical 
Clock: oppens and 
Jacobs, pianos). Sibelius 
(The Ooeamdas. Op 73). 
Gigout (Toccata in B minor 
Jane Parke r- 
Smithxirgan). 9.00 News 

9.05 This Week's Composer 
Bari ok. Rhapsody No 1 
tor violin and orenesra: and 
Violin Concerto No 2 
(Szeryng and Amsterdam 
Concertoebouw) 

1040 London SO funder 
Gamba and Kertssz). 

Rossi ru (William Tell 
overture). Dvorak 
(Symphony No 3) 

1050 Clarinet and Piano: Thaa 
King and Clifford 
Benson. Benjamin (Le 
tom beau da Ravef), 

Branms (Sonata in F minor. 
Op 120 No 1) 

1150 Ayres tor the Theatre:: 

Parley of tnstruments. 

Purcell (Indian Queen). 
Handel (Alchymist) 

1240 Northern Sintonia: 

Myslrvecek (Sintonia In D 
major). Mozart (Cassation 
No 1 in G major. K S3). 

Haydn (Symphony No 61). 
140 News 

1.05 Sonny RoHlns.-firet of 
seven programmes 
featuring the American tenor 
sax player. With Richard 
Cook 

150 Matinee Muacele: BBC 
Concert Orchestra 

S nder Lawrance).with 
eoffrey Srownefoboe). 

Jane Dodd (piano). Dvorak 
(Slavonic Dance in C). 
Janacek (BaliadaL Strauss 
(Accelerations), Koper 
(Divertimenfo Pastorale). 
ButienMorth (Gigues). 
Jamefett (Berceuse and 
Praeludium), Nielsen 
-(Fantasy pieces), Svandsen 

g tmlval in Paris) 
ch more or Less 
Italian: Maggie Cole 
(harpsichord)- Italian 
Vanations. BWV 989: 

Italian Concerto, BWV 871 
3.00 The Coolidge 

Commissions: Ravel 
(Chansons madecasses: 
Norman.soprano), 

Webern (String Quartet Op 
28). Copland 

(Appalachian Spring, for 13 
solo Instruments) 

4.00 Vespers: from Clifton 
Cathedral. 455 News 
5.00 Midweek Choice: 

Hummel (Flute Sonata in 
D. Op 50: Boustany.ffute and 
Lomas, piano), Handel 
(Dixit Dominus.with soloists 
Palmer. Marshall. Brett. 
Messana. Morton and 
Thompson) Cyril Scott 
(Piano Concerto No 


i:Ogdon.wtth LPO). 
Ippdiftotf-l' 


ippomov-fvanov (Caucasian 
Sketches) 

7.00 Debut Margaret 
bon(piano). Hummel 
(Rondo in E flat, Op 11). 
Janacek (Sonata 1 X 
1905). Carr (Four short 
concert studies) 

750 White Suit Blues: Harry 
Towb stars in Adrian 
Mitchell'a fantasy based on 
Mark Twain's writings. 

With music by Mike 
Westbrook. The setting: 
Heaven 

955 PhyHis Tate: 

Performances ot 
Movements for string 
Quartet in F (Allegri 
String Quartet). Scenes from 
Tyneside: Six 

Northumbrian Songs (Falser 
Trio, with Margaret 
Field.sopreno) 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


Right 11.45 Bsnson 12.15am Short 

Story Theatre 1240 Ooaadown 

border aassss«- 

1040-1045 Cartoon 1140-1145 
The Rida 1240pm-140 Portrait Ol A Leg- 
end 140 News 140-240 Love Boat 
340-440 Yowg Doctors 640-645 Look 
around 1145 Freeze Frame 216am 

Ctocedowa 

ANGLIA As London except 
■ 945am Saaame Street 

1045-1045 Cartoon 1140-1140 Ad- 

venturer 1 230pm- 1 40 Three Lrtrte 
Words 140 News 140-240 Country 

PracBoe 5.15-545 Btocfcbusters 640- 

645 About An^e 11.45 Short Story 

Theatre 1215em In Convers a tion. 
Ctosedown. 

HTv.Mmagsasff^ 

1045 Sinbad Voyage 1140-1145 

WHd Work! O! Animals 1230pm- 140 

Glenroe 140 News 140-2foHart To 

Han 6.00845 News HAS Gwtie to Ab- 

BOhite Beginners 1215am 

Ctoseaown. 

HTV WALES SSaU. 

945 Cartoon 640pnv645 Wales At 

Six. 

GRAMPIAN 

! 640 Sesame 1045- 


ntghr 1045 Film: Teielon (Charles 
Bronson) 1220am News: 

Closedown. 

TVS *» London except 948am 

Sesame Street 1040-1045 Car- 
toon 11.00-1145 FireDaD XL5 
1230pm- 140 Judi Goes On Holiday 140 
News 140 0« The Rack 200-240 
Rrouetn Page 340-440 Young Doctors 
5.15-5.45 Bkjckbusters 640845 

Coast To Coast 11.45 Show Express 
1215am Company. Closedown. 

CENTRAL *• I 4ndon except: 

Vrcri i riMfr. 9i5im . 10JS pa,,,. 

John and Jute 1 1.00 Home Cookery 

1145 About Britain 1140-.1200 Block- 

busters 1230pm-140 Survival 140 
News 140-230 Scarecrow and Mrs King 
640 Crossroads 645-740 News 
1145 F4m: Term Ol Trial (Laurence Ollvt- 
er)1.40am (Sosedown 
S4C Starts 140pm Countdown 
S22Z 140 An Ot Persuasion 240 

Ffaiabalam 215 Interval 3.00 The 
Christaris 4.00 A Pkis 4 440 World Of 
Amo 3000 4.45 LJytr Uotfion 440 
Deri Dm 540 BiWowcar 540 Marvin 
GBye: Transit Ostend 640 BrooksWe 
B40Concwest 740 Newyddion Salih 
740 Portreadau 840 Dramoetn v 

F(w 840 Y Byd Ar Bedwar 9.05 Film: 

Suftvan'S Travels 10-50 China- On 
The Capltahst Road7 1140 WSD Being: 
The wall Of Silence 1220m 

Ooseoown 


1040 Six continents: Foreign 
radio 

broadcasts, monitored by the 
BBC 

10.40 Eric Satia- Cinema, 
entr'acte from baUM 
R ei aerie: La belle 
excentnpue, Fantasie 
serieuse: Takahashi and 
Planes.piano duet) 

11.00 London Mozan Players 
(under Jane Glover). with 
William Bennett (flute). 
Mozart (Symphony No 
32). Gluck (Dance of Blessed 
Spirits). Thea Musgrave 
(Orfeo M, tor flute and 
stnngs) 

11.57 News. 12.00 Closedown. 

( Radio 2 ) 

On medium wave. For VHF 
stereo, see Radio 1. 

News on the Hour. Headtines 
5.30am. 640. 740 and 840. Sports 
Desks at 145pm. 202. 342 
442, 545, 642 6-45 (mf only), 

945. 

440am Colin Berry (s) 6.00 Ray 
Moore (s) 740 Derek Jameson (s) 
940 Ken Bruce 1 1 .00 Jimmy 
Young plus listeners’ questions 
about education answered by 
Chris Patten. Minister of State fix 
Education. I.OSom David 
Jacobs (s) 200 Gloria Hunrtford(s) 
(phone- m) 340 Party PoWical 
Broadcast by the Conservative 
Party (s) 345 David Hamilton (s) 
545 John Dunn (s) 740 Folk on 2 


Desk 10.00 A Slight Case of 
Murdoch (new series) Richard 
Murdoch chats to a live audience 
about his 60 years in show 
business 10.15 Harvey and the 
Wail bangers 1040 Look What 
They've Done to my Song (Steve 
Race on the role of the 
arranger) 11.00 Brian Matthew 
presents Round Midnight 
1.00am Charles Nova (s) 340-440 
A Little Night Musk: (s) 


WORLD SERVICE 


640 Newsd&sk 640 Merman 740 News 
749 Twenty-Four Hours 740 Develop- 
mem '66 840 News 8.09 Reflections 615 
Classical Record Review 840 Brain of 
Britain 1986 940 News 949 Review of the 
British Press 9.15 The World Today 940 
Franco] News 9 AO Look Ahead 945 
Flanders and Swann 1040 N3we 1041 
Omnfcus 1140 World News 1149 News 
About Bntam 11.15 Onana 1145 A Latter 
from Wales 1140 Mention 1200 Radio 
Newsreel 1215 Nature Notebook 1245 
The Farming Worid 1245 Sports Roundup 
140 News 149 Twenty Four Hours 140 
Development 86 240 Outlook 245 Re- 
port on Refegmn 3.00 Radio Newsreel 3.15 
Byways ol History 330 The Al Head 
Show 440 News 4.09 Co mm entary 4.15 
Counrarpoim 5A5 Sports Rounds 745 
Good Boons 640 News 849 Twenty Four 
Hours 840 Assignment 940 News 941 
Network UK 9.15 Atium Fane 9.45 
Recanting ot the Week 1040 News 1609 
The World Today 1625 A Letter horn 
Wales 1040 FmanclB) News 1640 
Reretetions 10.45 Sports Roundup 1140 
News 1149 Commentary 11.15 Good 
Bocks 1140 Top Twenty 1200 News 
1209 News About Bream 1215 Ratio 
Newsreel 1230 The Al Reed Show 140 
News 141 Ouvook 140 WaveqCde 140 
Book Choice 1.45 Master Cdhsts 200 
News 24B Review ot the British Press 
215 Network UK 230 Assignment 340 
News 315 The Work) Today 4.45 Finan- 
cial News AS Reflections 640 News 549 
Twenty-Four Hours 545 The Worid Today 
(Al times In GMT) 


140-240 A country Practice 615-5.45 
Blockbusters 600^45 North To- 

“tsisflfysssss™- 

1625-1635 Cartoon 1140 Sport Bil- 
ly 1140-1140 Cartoon I230pm-140 Sea 
In Their Blood 140 Lunchtime 140- 
240 Country Practice 346440 Look 
Who's TaHufm 606635 Good Eve- 
nmg Ulster i f.45 Off The Rack 210are 
Nbws, Closedown. 

YORKSHIRE 

tons Funnies 940 Mart and Jenny 
16161045 Terranawks 11461145 Un- 
der The Mountain IZJOpm-l.ao Cal- 
endar Lunchtme Live 140 News 146 
240 Falcon Crest 640-545 Calendar 
11.45 Cher at Caesar's Palace 1245am 
Closedown. 

TYNE TEES * L®*°n«- 

■ J Clpt. 94Saw Nows 

940 Sesame Street 1040 A For 
Agnetha 1655 Movie Makars 11461140 
Cartoon 1230pm-140 A Woman's 
Place 140 News 145 Where The Jobs 
Are 146230 Country Practice 
6306645 Northern Ufa 1145 Living 
Dust Closedown. 

SCOTTISH 

Street 1045-1045 Blue Knight 
11461145 Struggle Beneath The Saa 
1230pm- 140 Clegg's Peopte 140 
News 140 Job Spot 1 45440 Fibre The 
Cabfomia Kid 3464JX) Report Back 
5.15-5.45 Blockbtetere 606635 News 
end Scotland Today 1949 ran: Blue- 
beard (Richard Button) 1240am Late 
l. Closedown. 



CONCERTS 



■ASmCAft HALL 6T8 87^5:638 
ne«i Tom r 4 6 Ww 
eteMa B w OntiMlM. Ntmai 
Ntkraw cond Setowts from 
trip Borina Own- 


OPERA & BALLET 


1 » couecmw s sse sioi cc sw 

KMOLX5M NATIONAL OT0IA 
Tent. 7.30 Tbr W ny 
tow Tomer 7.30 Ito fcn- 


ROYAL OTOUI iNOUML Oewnt 
Garden. . W. a4 P 

>066/191 1 CC S StyntPyinfo 
. m 830 6905 MorvSto idM- 
spm.eftanuihlveatoavauirem 
loam on ow TiiWtt 

. own inn JC7 mo. 8aHr» Iron i 
£5 00 

TOOT .640 The Reitoi flww 
Svn ii ranHfle iOwi«ri ettO- 
Tbmor 700 a ratitoia 




MOUCm WELLS 

From Tomor to Atirtl 19. Eves 
7 30. Sal Mai 3-50 


y 


with The 

Or ate t i* (April !*M» S 
RMeHrid Neuman and Dent- 
era. HU &IO. »n T Jonn. 
AlW Zmnr and Cot 


THEATRES 


■eO AOCLPHI asoni ter 3Vr 7913 
y * CC Ml W9 836 

uu Of D Satot 930 6135 CC 
BOOHING TO -XMA5B6 rtOL 
sn-CLV uuh.nm Caa oa zno 
7200 20 Hr 7 Da»s . 

ME AND MY GIRL 

1W LAMBETH WALK - 
■ MUSICAL . . 

Ntohllv at T 30 Mfri Wed « 3JO{ 

. . tHf ONLY Live MUSICAL FW 
«« OOOYB^Kpert-ror 


ILmY Ol B56 CC 379 

rtSec sTs 

. Crp Stole*. 9SO 6123/836 3962- 

r.M T. it Ssfi ?0 4 7 JO. 

LAST***®** 

Tnplr Tboj e*.er« LyiBto er 

HARVT^ F1ERSTEIN 

n tin 

TORCH SONG 

mHHU5M^ti^nMtY«(X)d. 

■ Rirhsrd wra& piavv ‘AmoM’ at 

ftauram naanum 


ALDtWCN Ol 436 MOerOMl 
CC 3T9 623 3,-Flw t Call »hr 
CC Ol 300 T20O. Cia T.SO 
Mai wed 2.30. Sal a O & s.0. 


UXIMHN wwntow 4 
nun. BMBLLCV Iti 

MADE IN BANGKOK 

WUh CrirUMtifter Fqtrord 

and Cam YB 

-ANTHONY MHOnUt 
HHUAMT PLAY WI TH A «U - 
p»ca»t 


■juraWTo. Tel 


UBXSMIIOM wed 3L WC2. 
Ol 836 61X1 CC Ol 836 
1171/741 999V Group Saks 
on 930 6129 Mao-Thors at 
»n A Safer tea 6 846 


XT 


OOOoStD 
jam QUAY U 
CAROL SILfHLN 

Hiinau . u minute 
- wm* RAYMOND tiRANCt* .'. 

WIFE BEGINS. AT 
FORTY 

A dehahthu cemedy.- Bpoktos 
uirotran June 1986 


APOLLO VICTORIA SS 828 8S6S 
CC 630 6262 Gn> SNto 900 6123 
Even 7AS Mats tue A Sal 30 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 


AHYT WHC A ROONP W EVERY 
DWSMOPDbp ■ 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

. MUSIC BY 

TUNDRCW IXOYD WESKR 
lyrics to wCHM Ut snuaac 

□netted to’ ItiMR KX .NN 
UR.Y DAM.VjeO.4KW UWU 


ASTORIA THEATRE Box OB. 
tate. 

CC A Osops Pl’T3 e-A287 
OI45T B77Z 

, BEST MUSICAL 1585, .• 

Trie Time* 

LENNtW .' 

a cpufaramm aime Hfe an d nwag 
of John IfliMB- "THEY 
COOUHTT HAVE POKE IT 
B ETT E R. ** CWm UA LEMMON. 
"A WOMERRUY BRAVE 
■MOW MOTH THE BEST Of 


- AfOUO THEATRE. S IMH H dB u ra 

< A, As? 2663 w rtni 

Call 01 340 T20Q. Cro !uto« Ot 
. 950 »i?S Opens Totl. Emb 
f aim. Sal Mari 430 

ALBERT FINNEY 
r <-" . ORPHANS - 

c -YC4I MUST SEE ORPHANS^ 

STlhe 

Op«h TewT 0>r a 12 we» Season 
Od»' . - 


IIAVXL PVeOrT-.TO HOOMO .--r 

VMS MW THERE CfUUWtS 
«rtH RVCRVOK CUE AT nc 
OVL** 

uddmonai Mat. San, at a.o. eih 
tan u Sat 8.0 MM tto A Son 
4,0 


tMHKM OT 62* 8798^63* 

COMPANY 

'BARBICAN THEATRE tart 
7.30. tomor SCO A 7 30 THE 
MERRY MrtVEtiOF WINDSOR. 

. MCPMlSTO to , A raa* 
MBOBCnkiiv rrtma -;i is 

Yh2wT trmfT.JOjnraer 200 
A 7 JO PHILISTINES OT Matem 
Oorte' irUm 9 WH . 


book YouTmS — 

PT MUr BntwanL ff you 
aonT km a Bardaywd rtne 
0272 21 7272 Mr an aspucaucn 
new. or write to BwctoorL 
Dept- &I82.-3. FWIPOSr. 
NerOramptai NN1 I VO 


03*3 781312 

MORE SET VOIR CON Preve 

trim 2 1 Apr Opens 16 Apr al X 

Eve* 7-50. Mato Thu A Sat 240 


•»* 928 2282 CC 

(National Theatre's smell audi- 

torlucnX Today 200 * 7JO. 

l&en Aprs. 18 A 19 last oerts 

ik mcia nr orchard ar 
Chektuv. Toner 7.30. Chen 

Apnl 11 6 12 * Atoll 22 ID 34 


CMtTUOOK. S 930 3216 CC 379 

6660 3796*33 T*1 9999. Croups 

636 396Z Ew 8.00. Thd RIM 

230. Sat &30 it 830. 

‘■ BA T UM I FARCE AT IT* BEST* 
d. Mad 
TnaThoatreor 


JAN HUNT 

OAACTM HUNT 

RUN FDR YOUR WIFE 

wnnen and dtorcted to 
RAY COONET* .... 

Si^.'reHOwS RON FORun* 
S Exp. Theatre /mnher/Crttefloa 

R we nt -Stans or cw« £1726. 


HOTLINES Ol 380 88AS B OX Of 
nee Ol 636 8S»N OT Ol WO 
9562/3. Firsi Call24Hr7Itoy CC 

TIME 


CLIFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK STAR- 
THC PORTRAYAL OF. 'AKASH- 

LAIBIENCE OLIVIER 

Wdli-ni 7-30 Thu MM 230 Sat 6 

A 830 

OPENS TOmCHt AT 7te 


DAUBY LAMS THEATRE ROYAL 
01-836 8108. 01-240 9006/7. 
First call 24-hour 7-aaat « tikss 
200 72DO 


Mi Wto rr l sV ti 
Duuar at mM tte I te. 


Hulnl Awards lor 19M 

vorrd - • 

BEST MUSICAL 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARD* 

rated 

uuSSHmito. 

voted 

• BEST MUSICAL 

■ plays A PLAY ER* 
UMPqH THEATRE CRITICS 

8 6 Mari V.TM XO sat SO A 

L Group San 930 «23 

NOW BOOKING UNTIL 


ML'S 


836 824372*0 9648. 

pint Can cc 240 7200 
<24 tm T days} CC 741 9999 CC 
379 6433 

Beb Urtcrt nn* comedy. 

A MONTO OF SUNDAYS 

MAKES THE WEST KMO A 
WARMER AND 

IH. PLAI 

Gnrrtnp 

GEORGE COLE 

Eves a Wed mats S. Sals 6 * 8J0 

NOW BOOKING THROUGH TO 

SEPTEMBER 1986. 


DONE OF YORKS 836 8122 CC 

836 9837/741 9999 Grp Sales 

930 6123 FlTB Can 24 Hr 7 OBV 
CC 240 7200. eves 8.0. 

Thu MM 3. Sal 5 A 840 
2nd YEAR OT THE AWARD 
W INNING COMEDY HIT 

STEPPING OUT 

. “TRIUMPH ON TAP" EW SH 
HI Comedy tiy .Rtctiara Harris 


OF THE YEAR 


T ou “Had Uir audience yefUno 
tor wnT D Man “MuM rarely 
late (he town- Gs NOW" D TM 


FORTUNE > CC 836 2238/9 741 

9999. FW* Cdi Mhr 7 day CC 

2407200. Eve8 Frl/Sat 6RBAO 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Laonmce OUvto- Award 1984 

UP AND UNDER 

By John Cuter 

“A womocrful comanr* S 

Times -SPLENDID- D TM 

“One of me funmaw and least pre- 

tentions Mays you are ever 
IP see. TOTALLY KYSTEM 
Otis “ A JOY” S Exp 

2nd HILARIOUS YEAR 


GARRICK. B Ol 836 4601. CjC. 

379 6433* CG. 24 hr/7 day 240 

7200. Gn> Sales 930 6123. Eves 8 

pm. Wad mas SO. Sal sOom&O 

NO ^X, PLEASE- 
. WEUE BRITISH : 


aOK43TlMB.FMCaiMlr 

T day CC 240 7200. Grp 3MB 
930 6123. Eras 8. Macs Wed S. 

Mumwws. 


LEND ME A TENOR 

SHWNELY FUNNY- F-Tta 


■OF THROAT PARIS FltOMH 
laiiritinn TOO MUCH** Today 


r Wa^« Britton -B raa«p to 

vary tapa y— 3-TUnes. 

A Comedy ay Ken uiteh 

DMdM By OMd Cttmorc. 


a mnnoiitw oi-ass 

77flfe.EvyT4S mM.Ba i wo. 


JSSt 


m ALAN AYCKBOURIK 

mmvaTRtMM 


KAMP STEAD 722 9301. Ptol 

■ from Tomor. Eves Bpfti. PaM 

binirtisat 

I SLER. written to PMarBrawto, 


i oRloe * ec 01-930 9832 Flrd 

1 24 hr 7 day cc bast 240 7200 

PETER OTOOLE 

wttti 



THE APPLE CART 

By B ERN AR D BNAW 

evga 7 JO Mai Sh SJO 


HER MAJESTY’S 930 4025 
930 6606 cc HdUBte 741 9999 
Flrvl call 24 boor 7 day 


cc MOXtato 240 7200 

**A WiBdsnm fha 111 !■ toll Maal 
•y taBerad la aar — flrirst «ar 



r.T. “Tte. „ 

J Mall on Bun. 

Evpa 7.30 MaM Wed A SM U 3.0 

FMAI. WEEK 


242 


'A 

7040. 


JACK SPNATT VC 
“MARVELLOUS** TLA New 
Musical Eves 730. Mats 
SM/Wed 230. 


LYM THEATRE S MtotiW 

Ave W1 01-437 3686/7 01-434 
1060 CC 01-434 1860 01-734- 

8166/7 First C»u 24 hour 7 day 

CC WUM 01-240 7200 


MANTA la 

UERMER A LOWE’S MD5KAL 

GIGI 

Ol r e t- l e d by John DeXMr 
“Greeted wtm. tumuKous 
a eW ii wr - boUy Cxprtai 

Evps 730 SMS 80 A 8.16 

Wid Mats 3.0. 

Grain Sales 01930 6123 

LAST 2 WEEKS 


LYTTELTON 1‘ 928 2262 CC 
iNaomai Theatre*! pramMan 
■taoei Ton t. Tamar 7 43. men 
A PrO I8ta«l IMS W ARRESTS 
PROFESSION av Shaw (act 
LOVE FOR LOVE m printed in 

ManetL April 11 to 14 peris Ad- 

teal Farm Baton overseas lour. 


437 7373. 

437 2053. CC 734 8961. 
379 6453. 741 9999 FIrS Can 24 
to- 7 Day CC 240 7200 

Grp Saris 930 6123 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 6 DEN2S 

QUtLLEY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

A LOVE STORY YCKJTL LAUGH 
ABOUT FOR A LIFE TIME 

Pnrvtrws from April 22 

FWM NNM May 7 


LYING HAMMERSMITH Ol 741 

2311. Eves 7 48 Wed Mats 330. 
8at Mats 4.0. 

THE BEAUX STRATAGEM 

LYRIC STUDIO; From IS APTS 

ANGRY HOUSEWIVES. 

MAYFAHt 8 CC 629 5036/741 
9999. Fust tea 24hr 7 day CC 
240 7200. Mon-Thu 8 Frl/Sal 
8.40 A 8.10 

RICHARD TODD 


THE BUSINESS OF 

MURDER 

Thr Ml thriller to Richard Harris 
“The teat Mhr hr years " S 

Mir “An unabashed wtnrier" S 

Exp -A thriller (hat achieves II all. 

Sensational** Times -The mtol in- 

genious mystery lo has e ap peared 
In a decade- D Mall 

6th GR EAT Y EAR 

OVER 2.000 PERFO RM ANCES 


. CC l no booking tee) 

Ol 236 5568 or 741 9999/579 

6433 «■ (8kg Fee) 24 hr -7 day 

240 7200. Grp satoa 01 930 6123. 

Em 8.0. Fri & Sat S O 3 SJO. 

NTS AWARD-WtMNMe 


David Mamet's 

GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS 

directed to BUT Bryden 

"IT B BY PAR THE BEST TKMB 


may offi 

Pre- Theatre Food 6 Drink 

CAR PARK next door 9Sp 
Other NT snows see National TTv 


NATIONAL THEATRE SUi Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COM PANY 

See SEPARATE LNTW Ua under 
OU VgR/LTTTELTWt/ 
eOTTEBLOC Cscetlenl ehesp 
seals days or peris all theatre* 
from IO aot. RESTAURANT .928 
2033) CHEAP. EASY CAR PAR, 
TOURS OF THE BUNJNNB line 
Barkatagei £2. Info 633 088 0 
NT ALSO AT THE MEKMAJO 


NEW LONDON Drary Lane WC2 
01-405 0072 CC 579 6433 Eves 
7 48 Tue 3 Sal 300 A 7 48 

THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
/T3 ELIOT MUSICAL 


HU- 


APPLY IMI. 


Ora Bpownos 01-405 1567 or Ol 
930 6123 Potui appHcanom now 
nemo a c ce p te d mu Auousi so. 


OLD VIC 928 7616. CC 261 182 

Grp Sam 930 6123. E» e* 7 30. 

Wed Mat* 230. Sals 4.0 8 7 46. 

RICHARD 


DAVID MALCOLM 

LYON STORRY 

In die Welsh National Opera 
production ol 

_ AFTER AIDA 

"WHOLLY DEUCtrmfL" Gdn 
“A REAL DOJCMT-T.Oul 
"EXQUBITTLY CAST^CJJmlB 
Dlrrcled by te m rd Pa ri— 

A new play by fed— Mfatel 

baaed on Ute IHe 6 later work ol 


LAST 2 WEEKS 


OLA VIC 928 7616 CC 261 IBS! 

From 22 April. 

Gflberi and SuUri’an'a. 

HMS PINAFO RE 

ft“.D Mali. 


OUVBER *S' 928 22S2 CC mo- 

tional Thaaire's open Rapei 
Today 2.00 (low price mall A 

7. IB. then April IT to « * 


by Alan Ayckbown. Tomor 

7 is. uien Asm 11 lo 12 Into 

peris THE REAL MSPECTOR 
HOUND wtm THE CRITIC 
April 14 to lo TPWAPAB IIHI 


pruned m leaned. 


PALACE THEATHE 437 6834 

CC *37 8327 or 379 6433 

OP sales 930 6123 

THE MUSICAL SENSATION 

LES MISERABLES 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET - STEAL 0NE“ s» 

Etes 7 30 Mats Triu A Sal 2 30 

Latecomers not admired until trie 

interval 

BEAT THE TOUTS BY EMQUIR- 

MC FOR RETURNS AT THE B OX 

OFFICE NEW BOOWW tt 

TO OCT 4 NO 


PHOP R X 836 229* cr 240 9661 

741 9999 1st CaU 24HR 7 Day cc 

240 7200 Eves 8 Mai Thu 3 

Sal 6 A 0.30 

BEST MUSICAL OF 1985 

S te wa r d Drama Awards 

MARTIN SHAW 

As EJv,« Presley 

•‘JUST AMAZING THE PERFOR- 

MANCE IS A LANDMARK" D EX 

ARE YOU LONESOME 

TONIGHT? 

BY ALAN IP FASDALF 
m MAOmCEMT" Otis 

Rayjrwm will play EJtn prestey 
on Monday Evec only 


THEATRE 437 
CM. 734 MM Cretin Card 
Hotline* 379 6S6S. 741 9999 
Grp Sales 638 3362.930 6123. 
- "A WHMasil Musical" BBC 

DAVID FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINY! 

T iren oot n spcctacufcrb 

Orar IIS Wa i di i H Oa a Uima 
Eras 8.0 Mato Wed 3 8 Sal 8. 


PRMCE COWARD Box Ofhce 
73d 8961 Flrv Call 24 Hr 7 Days 
CC Booking 836 3464 Grp Sales 
930 6123 

CHESS 

THE MUSICAL 

Opens 14 May at 7pm 
Red Pncc Previews from April SO 


01-930 

8681 '2 CC KoOirw- Ol 930 
0844.6/6 Croup Sales 01-930 

6123 K. Prowse 01-741 9999. 

Firsi call 24 hr 7 da>- CC Bookings 

240 7200. 01-374 6433 Ei« 

7 30 Mats TMK A Sal al 3 O “One 

Of tte Creat Crra l Bto ric a la " 

S Times Tte N a ltoa a l Theatre of 


GUYS 4 DOLLS 

Siamnp LULU 
NORMAN JANET 

ROSUMCTON DWLEY 

ANDREW C WADSWORTH 
TKKX WILSON 

"Wradw hd Bafortahanaat" S Tel 

“A Classic ol lu kind" □. Tel 

“bmaraRe" O. Mad 
LAST 3 WEEKS Musi end April 
"26 


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Coatinaed an page 38 



























WEDNESDAY APRIL 9 198 


SPORT 


Sowness steps I Great expectations 

I .... ( i ' . W'l'i.i: . y : ... 


London 


up 



stays 



to earth 


By Hugh Taylor 


Oraeme >ouness, rne Scot- 
land captain, yesterday ac- 
cepted the most coveted but 
most intimidating of the 
country's football jobs with a 
cool confidence which must 
ha\e reassured the directors of 
Glasgow Rangers FC that they 
have ended their search for the 
man to make the club great 
again with a master stroke. 

In contrast to the all too 
familiar “over the moon” 
jargon of the modem manag- 
er. Souness. in confirming that 
he is to be the player-manager 
at Ibrox. talked in the club's 
dignified Blue Room to a 
packed Press conference with 
the assurance of a practised 
lecturer. 

He struck the right note at 
once. After a short speech 
from the Rangers’ chief execu- 
tive. David Holmes, who said 
they had found a manager of 
"poise, personality and 
class”.he opened the door to 
allow Souness. in true Holly- 
wood fashion, to burst in. 

But anyone who thought the 
latest recruit to the new trend 
in football management 
would be dressed in extrava- 
gant. modem gear was disap- 
pointed. The imposing 
Souness. who has three more 
games to play for Sampdoria 
before he joins Rangers, does 
indeed look like an Italian 
film star, tanned and hand- 
some. but he wore the sober 
blue blazer, grey flannels and 
red. while and blue club tie of 
Rangers to be every irtch a true 
bluein the old Ibrox tradition. 

He was at ease from the 
sLan. "What about your 
macho moustache?" was the 
first impertinent question — 


highly disciplined Rangers 
have" a rule that any facial 
adornments must be shaved 
off. “Ah," smiled Souness. “I 
have it protected in my 
contract." 


century was raised. 

“Will you sign a Catholic 

playerTThere was no humour 
in "his reply. “How could I 
possibly have taken this job if 


While Rangers’ directors 
are undoubtedly^ dazzled by 
the charisma of one of the 
world's great footballers, not 
all the Rangers' supporters are 
of the opinion that Souness is 
the man to restore the club's 
fortunes. Many feel that he has 
no experience of management 
and little knowledge of the 
game in Scotland. 

Souness deftly fielded that 


I was not allowed to sign any 
nlaver I wanted? How could I 


More football page 38 


one. “1 am new to manage- 
ment and little did 1 expea to 
start the career 1 have always 
dreamed of with such a big 
club. 1 know I will make 
mistakes, but I don't think 
that they will be big ones.” 

He had the Rangers* sup- 
porters among the ranks in 
front of him purring when he 
said of the club; “We” — a nice 
early touch — “are second only 
to Manchester United and are 
much bigger than even Liver- 
pool Evcrton or Spurs, and it 
is my job to make us the 
greatest club in the land." 

He promised the Rangers’ 
followers that some of the 
biggest playing names in the 
game will be brought to Ibrox 
and was courageous enough to 
put his head on the block 
when, inevitably, the burning 
topic which has bedevilled 
Rangers for more than a 


player I wanted? How could I 
have gone home to my wife, 
Danielle, who is a Catholic, 
and told her I was unable to 
lake on a good player because 
of his religion?” 

Many felt that if Souness 
does bring a Catholic to 
Rangers that will be more 
important for the image of the 
club than winning the Europe- 
an Cup. Souness’s honesty 
was appealing. “Of course I 
can't promise success," he 
said. “Of course I would like 
to follow in the footsteps of 
my friend, Kenny Dalglish, 
and do as well in management 
as he has so far, but don't 
forget that mine is a far more 
difficult job than Kenny’s.” 

Although Souness has for 
years lived glamorously at the 
top. revelling, he said, in the 
sunshine and gaiety of Italy, 
he is looking forward to 
working in the less exotic 
setting of Glasgow. “I'm a 
Scol.” he said. “And I will be 
glad to return home.” 

He added that there will be 
no flamboyance in his mana- 
gerial style. “To me the great 
managers were all down to 
earth. Bill Nicholson. Bob 
Paisley and Joe Fagan. I hope 
some of their talent rubs off on 
me. But what I seek is the 
happy medium, for the most 
difficult part, as player-man- 
ager, will be equating being 
one of the boys with not being 
one of the boys.” 


CRICKET 


Influence of Gower tells as 


Gooch heads for Antigua 


From John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent, Port of Spain, Trinidad 


Each morning since last 
Saturday Graham Gooch has 
been on the tennis court below 


my hotel room by 6.30. having 
a mostly base-line duel with 


a mostly base-line duel with 
Bob Willis, the team's assis- 
tant manager. They were there 
again yesterday, and unless 1 
am much mistaken Gooch’s 
mind was no more on his 
forehand drives and backhand 
passes than on the obsession 
which has been preoccupying 
him for most of the tour. 

In persuading Gooch not to 
go home in a huff. David 
Gower is said to have played 
his best innings on the tour. 
Gooch was evidently more 
sympathetic to an appeal from 
the captain on behalf of the 
team than he had been to the 
official line from Lord's. 

He came round in the end 
when the official statement 
was made to contain a request 
that Gooch's position should 


"be interpreted correctly", in 
other words, neither inferen- 
tially nor in any other way. 
was he giving best to Mr 
Lester BircL Antigua's Foreign 
Minister. 

His mission successfully 
completed. Donald Carr, the 
secretary of the Test and 
County Cricket Board, flew 
back to London last night 
With him was Peter Willey. 


England's wounds, page 16 


suffering from a recurrence of 
an old knee injury which 
would have kept him out of 
action until the team all go 
home next week. Gatling be- 
ing available again, Willey 
would have been unlikely 
anyway to play in Friday’s 
fifth and final Test match. 

Carr had followed lunch 
with a game of golf with 
Gooch and Gatling. Everyone 


is delighted by Gooch's deci- 
sion, as I am sure he will be 
himself when he'has had time 
to reflea on it All that 
remains now is for him to 
come up with the best of all 
replies to Mr Bird — a hundred 
It has been quite a week for 
delicate side-issues concerning 
the tour, for while Mr Carr 
came to mediate with Gooch. 
Tony Brown went to Antigua 
yesterday, ahead of the main 
party and in company with 
Ian Botham, to umpire the 
first reunion between Botham 
and . his wife. Kathy, since 
Sunday's “revelations" about 
the cricketer's private life. I 
am not sure what Law 42 of 
the Marriage Guidance 
Council's handbook has to say 
about “fair and unfair play", 
but Brown is a man of the 
world and has practice as a 
reconciliator after Monday's 
day-long meeting with Gooch. 


HOCKEY 


Art of one-upmanship by Potter 


From Sydney Friskin 
Karachi 


Great Britain 2 

Australia 2 


Great Britain salvaged a 
point with a goal six minutes 
before the end of this match in 
the Champions Trophy tour- 
nament here yesterday. With 
one match to play against 
India. Britain have a chance of 
winning the bronze medal. 

In the first eight minutes 
Australia forced four short 
comers, two of which led to 


scuffles in from of goals. The 
Australian defence tumbled 
under an onslaught and the 
British took the lead in the 
twentieth minute. 

Leman sent Bhaura racing 
down the left flank and his 
centre was picked up by 
Batchelor, who scored at the 
second attempt. Eight minutes 
later Britain could have been 
two goals ahead, Leman fol- 
lowing up to hit a post after 
Snowden had saved from 
Kerley. 

A minute before the interval 


Taylor obstructed Patch to 
concede a penalty stroke, 
which Birmingham convened 
to send the teams into the 
interval on equal terms. 

Nine minutes after the re- 
sumption of play Australia 
took the lead, Hawgood scor- 
ing from a back-pass by 
Mitton; but Australia's securi- 
ty was always threatened and 
the equalizer was obtained 
from a scramble which fol- 
lowed a short comer. Potter 
scoring after Shaw, a substi- 
tute. had hit a post. 


SPORT 


Unhappy 

birthday 


Sarah Hardcastle received 
some unwanted news on the 
eve of her 17th birthday 
yesterday when she was forced 
io withdraw from the British 
team for the Sun Life swim- 
ming international against the 
Soviet L [ nion and The Nether- 
lands at Coventry this 
weekend. 

The double Olympic mcdall 
winner failed a fitness lest on a 
pulled shoulder muscle. Gary 
Watson, the 1 7-year-old 
breaststroke swimmer from 
Glenrothes, has been denied 
his first Great Britain cap 
because of tonsilitis. 



Reardon woe 


Ray Reardon's miserable 
snooker season suffered an- 
other setback yesterday as he 
was bundled out of the first 
round of the Benson and 
Hedges Irish Masters at Coun- 
ty Kildare. The six-times for- 
mer world champion was 
beaten 5-2 by the London- 
based Dubliner, Eugene 
Hughes. 


Title bout 


Hardcastle: injured 

Cook hits six 


No 1 aim 


Britain's Davis Cup tennis 
quarter-final against Australia 
is almost certain to be played 
at Wimbledon. The All-En- 
gland Gub's management 
committee meets tomorrow 
week to discuss the Lawn 
Tennis Association's request 
for the tie to be staged on 
grass, on No 1 court. 


GeoffCook. the Northamp- 
tonshire cricketer, reported 
back yesterday to start his 
16th season at Northampton 
and set a county record as 
captain for the sixth season in 
succession. 


Copenhagen I Reuter) — 
Steffen Tangstad, of Norway, 
the former champion, will 
meet Andre van den Oeielaar. 
of The Netherlands, for the 
vacant European heavyweight 
boxing title in Randers. Den- 
mark. on April I 8. 


Wright out 


£50,000 move 


Whitehaven, the Cumbrian 
second div ision Rugby League 
club, have made a move in the 
region of £50.000 for Rob 
Ackerman, the Welsh interna- 
tional Rugby Union centre. 


Colombo (Reuter) — John 
W’righL the New Zealand 
captain, was yesterday ruled 
out of this week's inaugural 
Australasia cricket tourna- 
ment in Shaijah after fractur- 
ing his right hand while 
fielding against Pakistan here 
on Monday. 





., 4 ? . 

. . 




stage 
for Seko 
return 





By F&t Botcher . 
Athletics Correspondent 3 


Yiaw ■" y* . 

■■ . ' A 























flsWbVj 









, ToshDuko Set* tote of the 
great Japanese' marathoners 

recent years, is ttrhm the 
London event on April 20, hh 
first marathon since his disap- 
pointment of finishing foar- 
teenth ax the Olympic Gaines 
in Los Angeles m 1984. 

Under the tutelage of Dr 
KiyosJu Nakamura, who acted 
as a Zen master to him as 
much as a coach; Sefeo won the 
Fuknoka Marathon three 
times in snccessi6a,'froa 1978 
to 1980. on die last occasion 
running the second half of the 
race in 63min 30see, still the 
fastest “negative split" (fat 
which an athlete rats th«? 
second half of a. race faster 
than the first). 

Seko won the Boston Mara- 
thon in 2 hr 9mia 26sec. Then 
in early 1983, in Tokyo, the 
Japanese ran his fastest mara- 
thon time of 2HJ8J8, then the 
fifth fastest in the world. Two 
months.later.in Christchurch, 
he set world track records for 
the 25km and 30km, but chose 
to miss the first world champi- 
onship marathon in Helsinki 
later that year, as did hb 
compatriots, the Sob twins, in 
order to . prepare 1 for the 
Olympics.-. 


But going into the Olympic ^ 
ce with five successive vie- 


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Bred to win: A six-day-old colt with his mother, AH Along, one-time winner of the Prix Arc de L'Triomphe. The father is 
deceased Epsom Derby winner. Mil] Reef, which makes die foal a priceless commodity. (Photograph: Snresh Karadia) 


race with five successive vic- 
tories, Seko' managed only 
fourteenth. There was already 
an incipient split with Dr 
Nakamura 'over whether Seko 
should get married before or 
after Los Angeles.' Doctor 
Nakamura died while swim- 
ming last year; many felt it 
may have been suicide. 

Sefco’s principal adversaries 
in Load Bn will include Chris- 
topbeHerie. of JiVest Genna- 
oy.Pat Peterson, of the United 
States,' and tihree 'former win- 
ners, lBK£,Simonsesi, of. Nor- 
way (1981V; Hugh .Jones 
(1982) and Mike Grafton 
(1983).:Charife Spedding and 
Steve Jones, winners in 1984 
and 1985,-. have been pie-* 
selected for the English-? 
Conanonweath Games team 
for Edinburgh and the British 
European championship team 
for Stuttgart respectively. 

GMe Waits, of 'Norway, 
win be Che favourite '-for the 
womans race, although the 
form of VetWiriqae Marat, the 
French woman who became a 
British arizen- two' years; ago 
and die holder of the national 
best of 2.28.04* ^suggests that 
she coald get as dose.as any 
British marathon riuner to 
Mrs Waitt. . ' 


iiiVi « 


Past masters of the tennis trade offer fresh hope to British youngsters 


The wise men make their point 


In the second of two articles. 
REX BELLAMY, oar Teams 
Correspondent, enjoys the 
company and the acquired 
wisdom of t wo once-great dour 
bles champions. Ken Fletcher 
and Frew McMillan. Both are 
based in Britain and have 
strong views about British 
tennis. 

Anyone who plays tennis in 
a cap and bits almost every 
shot two-fisted is almost os- 
tentatiously eccentric. There is 
much of that in Frew 
McMillan's nature, too. Be- 
hind that somewhat saturnine 
mien is one of the sharpest 
minds in tennis, plus a dry. 
quirky wit embellished by 
irony and paradox. One way 
and another. McMillan knows 
how to make a point- The 
other day he told me. in effect, 
that the British did not take 
Wimbledon seriously enough. 

“On our doorstep, in our 
homes, we have the greatest 
tournament in the world." he 
explained, “but British players 
do not prepare for it well 
enough. For a month or more 
before Wimbledon, the play- 
ers and management of British 
tennis should be directing 
every ounce of effort to doing 
as well as they possibly can. 
The players ought to have 
severe. Hopman-type train- 
ing. as if for a World Cup of 
tennis every year. The eyes of 
the world are upon them. If 
they are going to make any 
kind of break-through it 
would do their confidence far 
more good to make it at 
Wimbledon. If you do that 
the money comes back to you 
in the long run." 


One British player, Sara 
Gomer, made a sudden leap 
forward in Brisbane last No- 
vember under the tutelage of 
Ken Fletcher. “She practised 
hand, did things on grass that 
she should have been doing 
before, and had a couple of 
good wins,” Fletcher says. 

Sue Mappin. the women's 
national team manager, has 
engaged Fletcher to help three 
promising girls in their late 
teens. “English girls are be- 
hind the test of the world," the 
genial Queenslander asserts. 


“because they are just finding 
out, now, the things they 


out, now, the things they 
should have learned at 14 and 
IS — technically, plus the 
court craft. Ordinary little 
things make all the difference 
but there's nobody around to 
tell them. 

“There are kids of 1 6 and 1 7 
who don't know how to win 
points from particular posi- 
tions. In our day we knew 
exactly what we were going to 
do. We might not win the 
point — but we knew the play. 
Apart from having the talent 
to play it, tennis is a very 
psychological game. A lot of 
kiJs can whack the ball up and 
down the court but you need a 
bit more than that" 

Fletcher and McMillan cer- 
tainly had “a bit more than 
that", and each has cause to 
respect the other. “Ken is one 
of those guys who invoke a 
chuckle," McMillan says, 
“and he's somebody I will 
never forget — because it was 
against him that 1 won by first 
Wimbledon title. He was a 
typical Aussie, with that in- 
nate Aussie confidence — and 


a great forehand, hit very hard 
with fairly heavy topspin.-” 
And let Fletcher remind us of 
prime McMillan: “His game 
suited doubles, because he was 
two-handed on both sides and 
could control the art of dou- 
bles. which he played to 
perfection, in singles he was 
limited because of his reach.” 

Both men had Bob Hewitt 
as a partner in Wimbledon 
and French finals. “He was a 
volatile person,'’ Fletcher 
says, flirting with understate- 
ment, “but we got to the finals 
the only year we played. Bob 
was one of die best fust-court 
players of that era.” McMillan 
and Hewitt were Wimbledon 
champions three times. “Both - 
to play with and to watch. Bob 
would be dose to the top of 
the list.” McMillan says. 

Fletcher's tennis matured in 
the company of some great 
Australian Davis Cup players. 
“I was always fortunate to 
have a partner 1 felt I could 
win with. The second year I 
played at Wimbledon. John 
Newcombe and I got to the 
semi-finals. We were only kids 
at the time. He was just turned 
17. four years younger than 
me. And 1 got to the final with 
Roy Emerson on two occa- 
sions: he was very good to play 
with because he was so athlet- 
ic, so fit, so fast around the 
court.” 


Court-Fletcher team was al- 
most invincible. “Margaret 
was the best lady around, 
along with Billie Jean King. 
She was a tall girl and would 
cover her lobs. You always 
knew where you stood. So we 
played to' the golden 'rules, a 
perfect example of playing 
mixed as if it was men’s 
doubles. But she used to get 
nervous, especially m finals. 
You had to keep geeing her up. 


Wimbledon , 
tops the 
£2m mark 


By Rex Bellamy 
Tennis Correspondent 


“Bueno had great touch and 
was a great volley player. But 
like Goolagong she had a 
weakness on . the forehand 
(whereas Margaret could 
come over it a little bit and hit 
it hard) and you fell that if you 
were going to get beaten, that 
forehand — besides your own 
faults — was the side they 
would exploit which they did 
in the finaL But it was a one- 
off and we nearly won. I was 
pleased to play with two such 
great players.” 


Wimbledon's 100th men's 
singles champion will win . 
£140,000, an increase of 
£ 10,000 on last year's figure. 
The women’s champion will 
receive £126.000 compared 
with £1! 7,000 a year ago. The 
total prize fond, which is 
something! of a misnomer 
because it .includes sumsother 
than thqse paid to Wimbledon 
competitors, has been raised 4 \ 
from £1,934,760 tq - 
£2, 1 1 9, 780. This represhits hn 
increase of 9.56 per cent in 
sterling and, because of adjust- 
ments in the exchange rate, 
21.73 per cent in dollars. 

The prize money allocated 
to the eight senior events will 
be £ 1 ,9 1 1 260, with the follow- 





ing percentages: men's singles, 
38.09; women’s singles, 3 1 .60; 
men's -doubles.’ 10.74; 
women’s doubles, 8.60; mixed 
doubles, 5.03; men's 35 and 
over singles. 3.15;. doubles, 

1 .69; and women's plate, 1. IQ. 

. . Other, than the fabt that 
Wimbledon continues to toe 
an international line by giving 
the doubles shamefully. .low 4 

percentages, the most contro- 
versial. point is., that the 
£83,520 allocated to the men’s 
and women’s qualifying com- 
petitions is not far short of the 
£96, 120 awarded to that popu- 
lar championship event, the 
mixed doubles. 

The first Wimbledon tour- 
nament; rn ; 1877. was restrict- 
ed to men's singles. The l(X)th. 

. from J une 23 to July 6. will be 
marked in several ways.. The 
most enterprising and’endur- 
inginnovanon w»H be‘a“Last . 
8 Club" a marquee reserved I 
for ihe relaxation -and. refresh- 
ment, of players who have 
achieved- what the title im- 
plies' by reaching the singles 
quarter-finals or the doubles 
semi-finals 

. The championships will 

r bably be swiftly succeeded 
another big event the 
Davis Cup tie between Bn lam 
and Australia, from July 18 to 
20 The AH England Oub have 
yet to give their. foimal“ap- . , 
proval but tins almost certain # 
that this will be the first Davis 
t up ue played at Wimbledon 
since liaiv beat Britain. 4-1 m 
■1976 - -r 


There is no time — more 


precisely, space — to stroll any 
further down Memory Lane in 


Fletcher's peerless record in 
mixed doubles was achieved 
with Margaret Court, though 
he also partnered Maria 
Bueno tn a Wimbledon final 
(“ Margaret was having a baby 
or something”). Far years, the 


further down Memory Lane in 
the wise and witty company of 
Kenneth Norman Fletcher 
and - Frew Donald McMillan. 
Perhaps we can get back to 
them (and to Fletcher's “gold- 
en rules”) later. All that' 
strictly matters for the mo- 
ment is that these formei 
champions are based in En- 
gland and are ready to ad- 
vance the tennis educations of 
the young. If only' British 
tennis was as rich m gifted 
athletics and racket-handlers 
as it is in present and potential 
coaches. 


YACHTING 


TABLE TENNIS 


Cape Town excluded Return to top flight 


When the 13-strong 
Whitbread Round the World 
race fleet set out from Puma 
del Esie in Uruguay this 
afternoon on the final 6.281- 
mile final stage back to Ports- 
mouth. the 1 3 crews and their 
sponsors leave Rear Admiral 
Charles Williams, the race 
chairman, with a painful deci- 
sion to make on the next race 
in 1989 (Barry Pickihall 
writes). 


ly announced that Cape 
Town, the traditional first 


port of call would be among 
the stopover ports next time, 
despite the political uncertain- 
ty in the region. 


England healed a wound 
when they beat Denmark 5-0 
m the European champion- 


ships in Prague yesterday (A 
Special Correspondent 
writes). The victory ensured 
they regained at the first 


Two weeks ago. the South 
African-born admiral deliani- 


But at a meeting of skippers 
held this week, pressure from 
sponsors - not least 
Whitbread — has forced him 
to announce that it was now 
99 per cent certain that the 
South African port would not 
be included. 


attempt the top-cateaory sta- 
tus they lost for the first ume 
in Moscow two years ago 
Desmond Douglas, the na- 
tional champion, and Alan 
Cooke, the No 3. both won 
twice and Carl Prean once 
against the Danes Douglas 
and Prean were subsequently 


rested from the match against 
Belgium which decided, for 
those who were interested, top 
place m the category 

Joy Grundy, the national 
champion, produced two wins 
in a 3-1 victory over the 
Netherlands that ensured the 
women finished either fifth or 
sixth 

In the semifinals. France 
came from 2-4 down to. teat 
Poland 5-4. a repeat of their 
win in last year's final, and 
will now meet Sweden the 
favourites "