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';i • Libya appears no w to be rxded by a 
>t military junta of frvtvpassihly divesting 
' Colonel Gadaffi of exclusive cuttriil 


ft Nezar Hmdawi was remanded in 
custody ftl Lambetb Ma^trates Court 
charged with conspiracy to murder 


'In, 


"A 


• Britain ordered die deportation of 21 
Libyan nationals, mostly students, for 
alleged s? revolutionary activity” . 


• Hie US denied Soviet allegations 
that it -had concealed heavy losses 
daring the Libya raids (Page 5) 

From Robert Fisk, Tripoli 


•* 

- i i 




’ li 




.rrJ 






A fiye-man junta of military 
officers appears to be govern- 
ing Lib>-a m the aftermath of 
~the American air raid - a 
collective leadership which 
includes Colonel Gadaffi as 
the nation's nominal leader 
but which has divested him of 
Iris exclusive control over the 
country. • 

The Inspector General of 
the libylm Army mid the 
Commander-iB-Chief of the 
armed , forces are believed to 
be members of the new ad- 
ministration in which pilonei . 
Gadaffi now' performs the 
tasks of a figurehead rather 
-than 'the sole po&tica) and 
milila^ leader. 

. Since the air raSte, Colonel 
Gadaffi has not' appeared 
either at public rallies or al 
press conferences. Major Abd^ 
ul-Satam Jalloud. bis .deptoy; 
presented Libya's. fijnpgJ,rp-_ 
sponse to the raids at a 
meeting with- fiireign corre- 
spondents last week. Colonel 
GadafiTs old friend. Com- 
mandant HwekB al-Hamedi, 
the peputy ChiefofStaff t- 
rather than Colonel Gadaffi 
himself . *7 repri^entKl the 
Go venunen t al a mass funeral 
of civilian air raid victims 

Both Major Jalloud and 
Commandant abHamedi are 
said tobe raenibersof the new 
leadership, together with 
Mustafaliarroubi, the Inspec- 
tor General, aad Abu Boke, 
the Commander-in-Chief of 
the Army;. • 

Colonel Gadaffi is still offi 


night — when he gave* a 
rambling, 20-mnmte televi- 
sion' discourse of the allegedly 
aggresive intentions of the 
American and British 
Governments. 

Significantly — and patheti- 
cally — the only direct ac&ss 
the Gadaffi family has had to 
the foreign press came on 
Monday night when the Colo- 
nel GadafiTs wife Safi?, in a 
mood of deep personal dis- 
tress over the death of her 


Parliament 
EEC dialogue 
Mitterrand support 
Letters 


4 

6 

6 

17 


adopted daughter, summoned 
journalists to the mins of the 
family home to call for the 
“liquidation" of Mis Thatcher 

and President Reagan. 

Sitting there in a long black 
Arab robe, her hand resting on 
a crutch, she looked more like 
an avenging Lady Macbeth 
that the wire of a revolution- 
ary leader. 1 
It would be wrong to as- 
sume that Colonel GadafiTs 
personal power has been bib-, 
ken. In Libya be is seen as a 
desert, tribal man;nnd howev- 
er unpopular he is among his 
regular army officer corps and 
among the middle classes, his 
personal stature .appears to 
have increased among Liby- 
ans 

■ The formation of. a 


vem the possibility of a coup 
d'etat. 

A shift m governmental 
power could certainly have 
accounted for the brief gun 
battle foreign journalists wit- 
nessed outside Colonel 
GadafiTs headquarters at the 
Bab al-Azaziya Barracks 

Rather than an attenipi in 
oppose Colonel Gadaffi. it 
now seems likely that this was 
a conflict between two pro- 
Gadafli’s cadres in a tempo- 
rary power vacuum that 
existed before he re-estab- 
lished confidence by appear- 
ing on national television 

But it is Major Jalloud, his 
deputy, who has dominated 
the national television screens 
ever since, appearing on three 
successive nights in a rebroad- 
casting of his Friday night 
press .conference. Major 
Jalloud was always regarded 
as a possible successor 10 
Colonel Gadaffi —although be 
has always denied this — ami 
his constant reappearance has 
done nothing to dispel the 
suggestion that he could yet 
become the successor. 

In a nation which meets at 
least two of the basic criteria 


of a police state — that nothing 
lofficia' 


new 


unofficial ever happens there. 
and that anything official is 
intrinsically boring - the 
events of the past week have 
been among the most trau- 
matic' in Libya's recent 
history.' 

Supposition and rumour 



collective leadership — which - breed m such an atmosphere; 
m any ease only reflects the but the creation of the new 


canre almost 4wo day 
the - -raid ro.Wi 


s power” in which 
_ blond Gadaffi always 
aftd£ prafessed'tjb bdieve — may 
' Save been taken to pre- 



five-mari junta is among the 
marc positive developments, 
to have followed, the Ameri- 
can air strike. 


Tomorrow 


Anyonefor 

football? 



. Wimbtedon, better 
. known for teams; is 
on the brink of 
becoming an . ; 
unlikely addition 
to fooibalFs - 
first division : 



ft There is £4,000 to . 
be won in The Times 
Portfolio Gofaj com- 
petition today , aid the 


weekly prize on Sat- 
urday wnH be! 


be £16,000, 
double the usual 
amount because ttere 
was no winner last 
weekend. 

ft Yesterday’s £4,000 


prize was shared by 
four re 


fourreaders — de- 
tails, page 3. 
ft You whI need the 
new Portfolio Gold card 
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tails of where to obtain 
one if you have any < 
difficulty getting one 
from your newsagent 
appear on page 3. 
ft Portfolio Gold list, 

page 28; howto play, in- 
formation service, 
page 20, 


Rolls success 


Rolls-Royce; the state-owned 
aircraft engine manuracuffciv 
reported pretax profits oft** 
million for Mi the best ana 
the company was rescued by 
the Government in 1 971. 

Details, page 21 
Kenneth Fleet, page 21 


Htwe News 2-5 
Ovmm 6-11 
Am ■ 19 
Sinks. deaths, 
marriages 18 
Badness 21-28 
Coon 18 

Creswwtfs 14,20 
Dfary 16 


Lgv Report 36 
Parlamem 4 
Pro 3233 
Safe Room ; 
Science 5 

sSSr 3w 

Theatres. etc 39 
TV St ft*d» 39 
Weather » 


* * * * ft; 




By Michael Horsnell 


Nezar Hindawi, the Jorda- 
nian arrested after the discov- 
ery of a.' time-bomb in his 
pregnant friend’s luggage 
at Hehthxow Airport, ap- 
peared in ., court yesterday 
charged with conspiracy to 
murder and with trying to 
destroy m , H A! jumbo 
aircraft... . 

After an 18-fitinute hearing 
at the top'-seennty Lambeth 
Magistrates* Court, he was 
remanded in custody until 
May I. Reporting restrictions 

were not lifted. 

' Mr Hindawi, aged 31, of no 
fixed addressed nothing ra 
court He had been brought in 
an armoured police vehicle 
from Paddington Green police 
station, .wot London, where 
he has-been questioned since 
his arrest last Friday. 


Mr Keith Mai tland-Da vies, 
the magistrate, refused an 
application for bail by his 
solicitor, Mr Michael rasher. 


after objections by Det Chief 
Insp Chris Bird. 

Security around the court 
was tight with armed officers 
on rooftops 

Tension was heightened by 
a car bomb scare an hour 
before Hindawi was due to 
appear. A bomb disposal ex- 
pert was called in to deal with 
a suspect vehicle about 100 
yards from the'court- A brief- 
case inside was blown up with 
a controlled explosion but the 
scare proved to be a felse 
alarm. 

Mr Hindawi, whose full 
name is Nezar Narwas 
Mansour Hindawi faced two 
charges: that between Febru- 
ary 12 and April 17 he 
conspired with others to mur- 
der Ann Marion Murphy and 
other persons; and that on 
April 17 he attempted to 
destroy an aircraft in service, 
or to damage it so as to render 
it incapable of flight or likely 
to endanger its safety in flight 


Britain intensified the pres- 
sure on Libya yesterday by 
ordering the deportation of 21 
Libyan citizens, mostly stu- 
dents. for what was described 
as revolutionary activity. 

They were arrested early 
yesterday and are being de- 
tained at centres throughout 
the country while arrange- 
ments are made to fly them to 
Tripoli. 

The 21, who hare been 
under police surveillance for 
some time, are understood to 
have been involved in rebuild- 
ing the pro-Gadaflj Libyan 
students' organization among 
the estimated 2,000 Libyan 
students hr Britain. 

A Home Office statement 
said that their deportation 
would be conducive to dm 
public good and in the inter- 
ests of national security. 

The Home Secretary “has 
taken this decision in the light 
of information about their 
active involvement in Libyan 
student revolutionary activity 
in the United Kingdom", the 
statement said. It added that 
their dependents were not 
being deported bat would be 
expected to leave Britain in the 
near future. 

One of those to be deported,. 
Mr Ad3 Manmnd, who has just ' 
completed a flying course at 
the Oxford Air School, is 
alleged to have recently called 
a Tripoli radio station and 
offered to bomb an American 
Air Force base in Britain in a 
soiride mission. 

He left the school 11 days 
ago after completing the two- 
and-a- half-year course and 
was held in Norwich. The 
school is still training 10 other 
Libyan pilots and 10 engi- 
neers. Four of the pilots are 
said to have been grounded. 

Tim Libyans hare a right of 
appeal against deportation to 
the immigration arbitration 
tribunal, tat it is anderstood 
that most have waived that 
right 

A spokesman for the British 
Council of Churches raid yes- 
terday that he was not aware of 
shy calls being mate til the 
churches’ ‘♦hotline" for Liby- 
ans which was set op last year 
by Mr Terry Waite as part of 
the deal to secure the release 
of the four Britons held in 
Libya last year. 

Neither the Saadi Arabian 
Embassy, which looks after 
Libyan interests in Britain, 
nor the. Libyan representative 
In London, were told of the 
deportations. 

The order virtually expels 
the Libyans from Europe un- 
der the EEC accord agreed on 
Monday in Laxemboarg 
which bans Libyans expelled 
by one member state from 
entering another. The names 
of the deportees are_ being 
circulated to the other 
an capitals, the Foreign 
confirmed last night. 

The Home Office would not 
publish the names of toe 
deportees yesterday, tat raid 
that six were from the South- 
east, five from London, three 
from Wales, two from the 
North-east, one from die 
South-west, two from the Mid- 
lands 2nd two from Scotland. 
There is no suggestion that 


The Prince of Wales exchanging confidences with King Juan Carlos zx Heathrow yesterday. 


Banks join move 
to lower 
home loan rates 


is y Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


they werepiotting any particu- 


lar acts of violence bat rather 
f teit they were trying to restore 
pro-Gadaffi political activism 
among Libyan students and 


Continued on page 20, col 1 


Hindawi’ s brother accused 


From Frank Johnson 
■ Bonn 


The Palestinian under ar- 
rest in West Berlin for taking 
part in toe bombing of the La 
Befle discotheque, who 1 was 
named yesterday as Ahmed 
Nawai Mansur Hari, aged 35, 
is the brother of Nezar 
Hindawi, the man charged in 
London with offences con- 
nected with the attempt to 
blow up the El A1 airliner. 

Hast was living inconspicu- 
ously in West Berlin until last 
Friday, when British police 
told West Berlin police of the 
suspected link with the man 
they had arrested in London. 

West Berlin police found 
himaihis flat, no 163,.Atilla 


Strasse, in the Tempeihof 


disfricL There they found 


documents which convinced 
them that he was involved in 
the discotheque bombing. 

It is posable that they also 
found, among the documents, 
sketches of other West Berlin 
discotheques, restaurants , and 
public buildings — indicating 
that further- attacks were 
-planned. 

On Saturday, in accordance 
with standard German proce- 
dure. Hasi appeared before a 
private bearing of Tiergarten 
magistrate's court, which au- 
thorized him to be held under 
an arrest order charging him 
with being an accessory to 
causing the explosion- , 

West Berlin believes dial he 
was not the only person 
involved in the attack. 


On Sunday, he was placed 
in an identity parade before 
100 people who were in the 
discotheque on the night of 
april 5-6. 

Several are said to have 
recognised him as being there 
that evening, before the blast. 

He had been living at Atiila 
Strasse with a German wom- 
an, aged about 30. whose first 
name is Heiderose and who 
had taken the surname. Hast 

After questioning her. po- 
lice have moved her to a secret 
venue. It has so for been 
assumed that she is innocent. 

’ He is thought to have been 
married for five years to a 
another German woman.’ 
From that marriage be got 
various residence papers. 


Two of the big four clearing 
banks yesterday followed the 
leading building societies by 
cutting a full percentage point 
off their mortgage rates, with 
the possibility of more reduc- 
tions ifbank base lending rales 
fall further. 

At the same time the two 
banks, Ucyds and .National 
Wcsffiuinst-i, ftitrodikid new 
special lending terms, reflect- 
ing intense competition in the 
home loan market as the 
house-buying season gets into 
full swing 

The Bank of England sig- 
nalled yesterday that it was 
not ready for another cut in 
base rales for a least a few 
days, but there was still opti- 
mism in the money markets 
lhal there would be one next 
week. 

Interest rates in the United 
Slates continued to weaken on 
news of poor US economic 
performance, while in Britain 
there are hopes that inflation 
will sink below 3 per cent in 
the next few weeks. 

Lloyds and NatWesl both 
reduced their standard home 
loan rates from 12 per cent to 
1 1 per cent with effect from 
May I for new borrowers and 
June 1 for existing borrowers. 
Of the big four. Barclays and 
Midland nave yet to announce 
rate cuts. 

Lloyds also announced a 
new fixed-rate loan scheme 
under which house buyers can 
borrow for the first three years 
at 9.9 per cent - more than 
one percentage point below 
the new normal rate. 

At the end of three years 
they are entitled to switch to 


the ordinary home loan rate of 
the bank or continue to pay 
another fixed rate for a further 
period. The new fixed rate will 
be set according to prevailing 
rates of interest at the time. 

The fixed rate scheme is 
aimed 2 t borrowers who be- 
lieve that ordinary mortgage 
rates will remain above 9.9 per 
cent Tor most of the next three 
years. Lloyds boosted compe- 
tition in the mortgage market 
earlier this year by becoming 
the first lender to reduce the 
higher rates normally charged 
on endowment loans to the 
same level as ordinary repay- 
ment mortgages. 

The bank is planning to 
commit an initial £200 mil- 
lion under the fixed-rate 
scheme, which becomes avail- 
able from today. Lloyds will 
lend a minimum of £30,000 
and up to 90 per cent of the 
value of the property. There is 
a penalty of two months' extra 
interest if the loan is repaid 
early, but the penalty is 
waived if the loan is trans- 
ferred to a new property. 

National Westminster is 
hoping to attract new custom- 
ers by abolishing the £100 
arrangement fee which it has 
changed until now on new 
mortgages. 

National Home Loans, a 
mongage company set up six 
months ago. has also cut its 
home loan rates. From today, 
new borrowers will able to 
lake endowment loans at ! 1 
per cent and repayment loans 
31 11.35 per cent. Tne new 
rates will apply to existing 
borrowers from May 1 . 


r 




By Nicholas Timmins 
Social Services 
Correspondent 

Married women who look 
after disabled relatives moved 
a step closer to winning the 
right io receive the £23 a week 
invalid care allowance 
vesierday. 

The Advocate-General of 
the European Court argued 
that the Government was in 
breach of the EECs equal 
treatment directive by refus- 
ing to make the payments. 

His opinion, given in Lux- 
embourg. could lead to up to 
76.000 married women receiv- 
ing the allowance at a cost to 
the Government of an esti- 
mated £100 million z year if 
the fell court backs his advice 
in a judgment expected in 
June. 

The advocate-general's 
opinion was greeted with ae- 
lighi by Mrs Jacqueline Drake, 
aged 42, whose claim for the 
allowance has provided the 
EEC test case. 

Mrs Drake, a mother of 
three from Worsley. Manches- 
ter, gave up work as a school 
crossing p3trol orncer and 
cleaner in June 1984 to care 
for her severely-disabled 
mother. 

Continued on page 2, col 5 


O 9 

m 

From Richard Wigs 
Windsor 

With a public kiss for the 
Queen on her right cheek and 
then on her hand. King Juan 
Carlos of Spain symbolized 
hopes yesterday for new and 
more fruitful relations between 
the two countries when, ac- 
companied by Queen Sofia, he 
began a politically important 
state visit to Britain. 

The scene for this encounter 
on the first such visit by a 
reigning Spanish monarch in 
almost 8l years, was the 
Home Park with Windsor 
Castle towering in the 
background. 

The rain and cold, gusty 
winds held off and a little 
sunshine even came through 
as a 21-gnn salute thundered 
out and crowds of local people. 
some interested tourists and 
many flag-waving English and 
Spanish schoolchildren ap- 
plauded and cheered. The two 
royal couples stood on a 
remarkably oriental-looking 
pavilion Ranked by the flags of 
the two nations. 

This was the pageantry 
which started the first day nf 
the visit at Windsor Castle 
where the Spanish King and 
Qux-n. as a mark cf special 
affection, are staying. 

in a speech doe for delivery 
at the state banquet given by 
the Queen last night. King 
Juan Carlos emphasized both 
tbe links between the two 
nations’ monarc hs and a 
shared European ideal, but he 
also raised one of the differ- 
ences — Gibraltar. 

Beforehand, howe'er, the 
King recalled the visit of his 
grandfather. Alfonso XHI, in 
1905, and said: long time 

has elapsed ar.d it is now my 
hope (hat this renewal of direct 
links between the two monar- 
chies wifi be the happy fore- 
runner of progress in which, 
united by the ideals of a future 
Europe, we car* serve as a 
stimulus for the solution of our 
differences.” 

Tbe King did not mention 
the Rock by name or Spain's 
sovereignty claim, but his 
words were nonetheless dear. 

Referring »o outstanding dif- 
ferences. . Spain's Kicg de- 
clared: “Unfortunately, some 
of these stili persist and we 
must do everything possible to 
overcome them. 

“I am sure. Your Majesty," 
he went on. “that our two 
governments will find by- 
means of a negotiating process 
already begun, appropriate 
formulae for reaching a solu- 
tion satisfactory to ai; so that, 
resolved, what have bean mat- 
ters of conflict become ele- 
ments of understanding and 
co-operation between our two 
countries to the direct benefit 
of tbe populations involved." 

The Queen, ia her speech 
doe for delivery last night, also 
referred indirectly to Gibraltar 
when she observed; “ t here are 
of course stili differences 

Continued on page 20, coi 5 


Files on Waldheim 
ruled inconclusive 


From Richard Bassett, Vienna 


President Kirsch lager of 
Austria last night said the 
secret United Nations file on 
Dr Kurt Waldheim was not 
sufficient grounds to bring a 
case against him. 

Dr Kirschlager has spent the 
last week examining the files, 
together with some 500 docu- 
ments of the World Jewish 
Congress, which alleges that 
Dr Waldheim was involved in 
Nazi atrocities and the depor- 
tation of Jews on the Balkan 
front during the war. 

In a long television address 
the President went step-by- 
step through the evidence 
against Dr Waldheim, who is 
bidding to succeed Dr 
Kirschllger in the May 4 


elections. Although he left the 
matter for the voters to decide, 
the President left a clear 
impression that the docu- 
ments were inconclusive. 

Dr Kirschlager who is 
known to be far from an 
admirer of Dr V/aldheim, 
nonetheless left some estimat- 1 
ed 5 million A u si nan viewers £ 
Iasi r.ight convinced that the 
evidence against Dr Wald- 
heim was insufficient 

Dr Waldheim had not been 
an intelligence officer accord- 



ing to wartime documents, but 
aliai 


_ liaison officer who therefore 
had no power or authority to 
order reprisals against civil- 
ians in Yugoslavia as has been 
alleged, the president 
observed. 


A woman’s place could be building the home 


ByCotmHng&es 


Women bricklayers, plumb- 
ers, carpenters, etectririans 
and decorators cooW be in 
demand in tbe city of dreaming 
spires if Oxford council agrees 
a proposal to insist bn an all- 
female team of labourers to 
build a new centre for women. 

Tbe proposal has been pul 
forward by the cwmoTs work- 
ing group the centre, How- 
ever, there » no aB-fanale 


the female labourers from 
outside the city. All-women 
tafidiug collectives and co- 
operatives exist in London aad 
some other cities like 
Sheffield. 


m 


Oxford, so if passed, die 
proposal wiB mean importing 


Mr David Whitfield, the 
labour chairman of the group, 
said: “Since we are assuming 
that the centre will be de- 
signed, organized and man- 
aged fry women, it seemed 
logical to extend that back to 


tbe centre. 


“Apart from that, it would 
be a way oT providing an 
opportunity of labour for wom- 
en. which is something that 
the council is concerned to 
develop." 

The city already has one 
women's centre but the council 
believe that h is too snail to 
cope with expansion, it in 
searchiag for a suitable site or 
building to convert and has set 
aside £250,000 for the project. 

The council has to fold oat 
whether it is legally able to 
suspend its standing orders on 


tendering to outside contrac- 
tors, enabling tbe all-women 
labour rule to apply to the 
centre project as a special 
case, Mr Whitfield said. 

The council's fall public 
affairs committee had yet to 
decide whether it would be 
possible, and would take ad- 
vice from council solicitors. 

Major General John 
Slanyer, leader of the Conser- 
vative opposition, said he 
found the idea extraordinary. 
“In the Soviet Union it is 
claimed that women do ail 


sorts of manual work but 
frankiy. in this country. I have 
never seen a women 
bricklayer." 

Mrs Betty Siacdiugford. a 
member of the Labour group, 
said: “Of course women are 
capable of building the centre. 
They are capable of anything 
given tbe tools and training." 

Tbe centre, which will ex- 
clude men, will provide meet- 
ing space and counselling 
rooms, a creche, women's li- 
brary and bookshop, and a 
workshop. 


A monthly or lump sum investment into one 
of our wide range of school fee plans could bring 
your children or grandchildren an independent 
education. That means an education of your 
choice, the most precious gift you can give i 

any child. j 

CaH us or ccmpletethe coupon below. \ 

It commits you to nothing but it msy bs the sfert cf \ 
your commitment ic the fed. cf education and [ 

future we’d all like our children to hsve. 



The Old School Hotsss, George Street 



host to; Invest fer School "era !■££, Th? Old School Soase, 
Ceotja Ltrert, Senel Serr^sicad, Sere £72 SEJ. 

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to woo middle 

class voters 

By Richard Evans, Lobby Reporter 
The new style, super slide port uni ties through the slate 
ihour Pan v/ which concen- for ihe individual, and a nine- 


Labour Pany. which concen- 
trates more 'on presentation 
and image than full blooded 
socialism, yesterday set out to 
recapture the beans, minds — 
and votes — of the urban 
professional elector. 

It launched a £ 1 00.000 Free- 
dom and Fairness campaign. 


with glossy presentation tracks guide for action. They will win 
and a smart party political both the hearts and the beads 


broadcast, which had distinct 
similarities to a Saatchi & 
Saatchi promotion for the 
Conservatives. 

The dropping of Labour's 
red flag emblem for the cam- 
paign epitomizes the calculat- 
ed attempt by publicity chiefs 
to woo back lost voters turned 
off by the traditional emphasis 
on old fashioned state social- 
ism. 

The campaign is one of the 
leading products of Labour's 
overhauled and modernized 
party machinery and is recog- 
nition that the old style "cloth 
cap" image was not appealing 
to the middle class voter. 

With the motto "Putting 
People First". Freedom and 


pla hnJ^ • The Amalgamated Union 
health, education, housing ^ Engineering Workers’ na- 
and crime prevenuon. It 


and crime prevenuon. It 
promises a new start-up 
scheme for first-time house 
buyers, an allowance to help 
1 6-year-olds stay at school and 
more local health centres. 

Mr Neil Kinnock, the party 
leader, who helped launch the 
campaign, said the change in 
image was necessary because 
"we have not been as effective 
in the presentation of the 
values and priorities of demo- 
cratic socialism as we should 
have been. We arc overcom- 
ing our coy ness". 

The campaign will stress the 
party's role in providing op- 


urge rates 
boycott 

By Richard Ford 

Unionist leaders will today 
unveil plans to increase their 
campaign of opposition to the 
Anglo-Irish agreement when 
they urge supporters to with- 
hold payment of rates. 

They also plan to send a 
letter to the Prime Minister 
about the creation of a frame- 
work for negotiation aimed at 
breaking the political dead- 
lock. 

The leaders are edging to- 
wards resuming a -dialogue 
with the Government, and 
yesterday the Rev Ian Paisley 
predicted that they could be 
talking within two weeks. He 
insisted that Unionists still 
want the Government to cease 
implementing the Anglo-Irish 
agreemenL 

Unionist leaders hope that 
by announcing an escalation 
of their campaign they will 
regain the initiative after three 
weeks of "loyalist" rioting, 
attacks on the police and 

Catholics. , 

Letters, page 17 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL .23 1986 



II: 

' ' '-r 

•;4~: 


Ey.'"- v , ; wf; ••• . - *"$*#8* 




o 






flfV 



year-old girl. Hannah Roberts, 
has been chosen to spearhead 
the message and appears 
throughout the glossy publici- 
ty material. 

Mr Kinnock said: 'Tt is a 
reassertion of values, a state- 
ment of modern policies, a 


- . . , , . t (PhMogwfc TimBishop). 

Mr Nezar Hindawi being driven away by the police after appearing at Lambeth agistra 

Senior detectives investigating the TaWAI* {it A^» I ^ine« e n^^M i< tesai 

Ileged plot to Wow .up an ELAI I 0ITOF . London as a writer on the arts.. ' 

trimer in midfligbt have not tdenti- v recoomendatioa was made by o* 

SSSsTSS work, professor says ; 


both the hearts and the beads 
of the British people.” 

The party’s policies were 
aimed at extending "the free- 
dom of the individual — every 
individual, in every family, in 
every community and every 
pan of the country. Thai is 
what we mean by putting 
people first” 

He said Mrs Thatcher’s 
view of freedom was about 
"freedom for the few, freedom 
for the rich”. 

The Militant Tendency at- 
tacked the campaign, which it 
described as “an insult to 
Labour Party members both 
past and present who have 
sacrificed blood and tears to 
build up the Labour 
movement.” 


Senior detectives investigating the 
alleged plot to Mow up an EL AJ 
airiiiw in midfligbt have not identi- 
fied it with any known terrorist group. 

They believe the origins were 
Palestinian, but they also believe 
there is a link with the bombing of the 
discotheque in West Berlin which 
prompted the American strike on 
Libya. The West Germans arrested 
Ahmed Nawaf Mansur Hasi, brother 
of Nezar Hindawi, who is charged 
with Che El A1 attempt, after certain 
letters were foond. 

It is possible that the small groups 
now operating in Europe and the 
Mediterranean act on behalf of their 
financial backers, such as Libya and 
Syria, but also practise an indepen- 
dent military policy. Israeli intelli- 
gence analysts have pointed to groups 
such as the May IS Organization 
which has left its original Iraqi 
backers in the past couple of years. 

Professor Paul Wilkinson, an Ab- 
erdeen University specialist in inter- 


national terrorism, said yesterday 
that the group was thought to be part 
of a loose coalition of Palestininan 

extremists including the Abu Nidal 

group. 

May IS terrorists are said to 
specialize in sophisticated devices 
that would be useful to the other 
groups in the coalition. 

So far Scotland Yard has not found 
a link to Abu NidaL but the Anti- 
Terrorist Branch and Special Branch 
have not yet polled together a 
complete picture of the alleged plot. 

Mahmoud Hindawi, who was in- 
volved in his brother’s surrender to 
the police last week, has lived in 


By Michael Horsneli and Stewart Tendler 
. said yesterday Britain for many years. He is raid to 


be in his late thirties and has a family 
here and lives at West Drayton. - 

At one time he worked at Ae 
Jordanian Embassy as a clerk a nd he 
now works as an assistant administra- 
tor in the medical section of the Qatar 
Embassy. 

The brother arrested in Britain 
describes himself as a journalist- He 
has lived in this country off and on 
since at least 1979 when he met a 
Polish girl studying English. He 
eventually married her and left: her to 
Poland. In 1982 he had a brief job as a 
messenger with the Al-Arab newspa- 
per in London but was swiftly fibred . 


TadostrifaComspOBdnii 
. The Con federation of Brit- 
ish Industry yesterday^ re- 
sponded to recent critic^ of 
macrioabv launching rtsowt 
blueprint of proposals - !£ 
business, the unions arid the 
Government to achieve indu* 

v „ _ trial and economic success 

inio ibe next century. * 

Is 1984 te tried to get a job with an Afto ^mcrithS of consul. 
Arab business magazine based hi utionmid . efi^^on with 
London as a writer on the aits. The - CBf has pro* 

lecoomeudatiofl was made by other duoed-a document aimed at 
Jordanians, but the etfitor turned him every section of foecommum- 

dowB. • ty but which if hopes wJD be 

W* mw Mfes AmUVIarfe Diwmr Sludfed fay ail teWIJ pdfr 

conspiring to modern faetWemr 12 and general election. 

18 months ago. She saw -bun from 
time to time during the not -months 
as he came and went from Britain. 

In January this year be stayed af 
die Palace Hold near Marble Arch, 


appears to have ten Britain, returning 
earlier this month when he re-entered 
the life of Miss Murphy, who is now 
pregnant. 1; . 

According to Mr. -Nial Oran, a 
friend of the family ,tfee real name of 
Cite Rtodawi- brothers is HasL The 
Harf- famil y adopted tie name of the 
Hindawi dan which is a powoful 
northern Jordanian dan^ 


lional committee at East- 
bourne voted by 68 to 53 
yesterday to tell the Labour 
Party national executive that 
members refusing to heed 
warnings to withdraw support 
from Militant should be ex- 
pelled (the Press Association 
reports). 

0 The normally hard-line 
Scottish TUC yesterday voted 
for an economic package 
which did not include calls lor 
large scale nationalization, ex- 
change controls and a ban on 
foreign investment and did 
call for a pay policy. 


Threat of 
strike at 
Heathrow 

By Michael Baily 
Transport Editor 

A threatened walkout by cus- 
toms officers at Heathrow's 
new terminal four could lead to 
an ail-oat strike 
Mr Mike King, national 
officer of the Sodety of Civil 
and Public Servants, said 
yesterday that his onion would 
bring Its members bat on 
strike if management carried 
oat its threat to suspend 
officers without pay. 

The dispute arises from 
proposed new rosters to cope 
with the workload from four 
terminals. Staff objected in 
particular to a 6 am start on 
one shift a week, compared 
with 7 am previously, and 
have, to effect, operated a ooe- 
bour strike each day by not 
turning up until 7am. 

Customs management said 
yesterday that they could no 
longer tolerate this serious 
breach, and said that continu- 
ation would risk officers being 
sent home without pay. 


Alliance is Fears over bias in Joseph’s 
looking for U nder- 16 s’ economics plan 


farm vote 

By Philip Webster 
Political Reporter 

The Liberal-Social Demo- 
cratic Alliance yesterday em- 
barked on a drive to oust the 
Conservatives from their posi- 
tion as the party regarded as 
the friend of the farmers. 

It chose the two by-elections 
in West Derbyshire and 
Ryedale. Yorkshire, to launch 
a programme for agriculture 
which it said would form the 
basis of recovery and growth. 

In a package unveiled at 
Matlock, Derbyshire, by Mr 
Richard Livsey, the Liberal 
agriculture spokesman, and at 
Ryedale by Mr Robert Mac- 
lennan, his SDP counterpart, 
the Alliance proposed: 

0 Tax incentives to encourage land- 1 
lords to let more laud and a credit 
scheme to provide low interest 1 
working capital to encourage em- 
ployment of more local labour. 

• Fairer arbitration between land- 
lord and tenant over quotas for milk 
formers going out of producuon. 

• Guaranteed prices for set levels of 
cereal production, with formers al- 
' lowed lo produce more for disposal 
at market prices. 

0 Membership of (be European Mo- 
netary System to prevent discrimina- 
tion against British formers. 

• Help for research id promote new 

crops and enterprises. i 


Schools will soon be expect- 
ed to run courses on econom- 
ics for ah pupils under the age 
of 16, in spite of protests that 
they would be biased political- 
ly in favour of the Conserva- 
tive Party. 

Sir Keith Joseph. Secretary 
of State for Education and 
Science, yesterday asked the 
school curriculum develop- 
ment committee to draw up 
courses on economic aware- 
ness. He said these should 
cover the operation of market 
forces, the creation of private 
and public wealth, and 
taxation. 

In a Commons written reply 
he argued that consultations 
had shown there was strong 
support for equipping all pu- 
pils with some economic 
awareness and understanding 
by the age of 16. He said many 
people also believed that pri- 
mary school children should 

Protest on 

full-price 

spectacles 


By Sheila Gunn, Political Staff 

have lessons on money mat- The National Association of 
lers, provided they were nei- Head Teachers ' commented 
tier too sophisticated nor that the topics suggested 
over-simplified. showed a leaning towards one 

But many of those consult- Particular political party, 
ed complained that Sir Keith Some of the' strongest criti- 
had no business to be in- cisms came from the General 
volved in details of tie school Synod of tie Church of 
curriculum and implied this England’s board of education, 
was for party political reasons, which feared that too great an 
The National Association of economic fe:ts’ 

Schoolmasters/Union of w>uld encourage a matenalis- 


Helping 
hand for 
movers 

By Christopher Wannan - 
Property Correspondent 

House buyers and sellers 


every section of tie communi- 
ty but which it hopes w£Q be 
studied by ‘all tie main politi- 
cal parties m the nriHiptb tie 
general election. T . i ;\ 

After ite news at foe week- 
end that a group of private 
sector industrialists, said to be 
frustrated by CBL fetiaigy, 
was establishing a Mmeom^ 
for ■ International Trade,- tie 
CBl reacted strongly. ~ : 

. Sir James Cleminson/ ibc 
OBI president skid yestodav 
that tie ot&mzauon’skbom 
initiative was aimed at dem- 
onstrating that tie CBTs pur- 
pose was to give leadership 
and “ to make Stings happen". 

He called for an end to the 
“chronic British complaint of 
bJaming otier peopte for' oar 
fefluresr. 

‘ He said: “We have.io ki&off 
the They' syndrome. It is .not 
them, not someone ‘ebe, who 
is the problem. If we could 
accept that we -would be 
making progress.” 

Sir Janies raid the mew’ 
programme for: action bad 
been finalized, at a time of 
great opportunity. .. 

The new r^ii which will 


form tie basis for discussion 
the :Zi the CRTs annual conference 
in November, trails together 


Women Teachers told him 
they could not accept tie role 
of teachers was To promote 
the political doctrines and 
dogmas supported by tie gov- 
ernment of today”. 

The Association of Metro- 
politan Authorities replied 
that the approach was "capi- 
talist rather than mixed 
economy" with* reference 
made to the entrepreneurial 


tic approach. 

The Confederation of Brit- 
isb Industry also expressed 
doubts and suggested a more J 
practical approach to econo m - 1 
ic awareness. 

• Local authorities are ignor- ; 
ing government appeals to cut I 
education spending, according 
to evidence to the Commons i 
Education Select Committee, 
which disclosed that councils ^ 


assistance rtf - a counsellor of- 
fering comfort’ and practical 
advice nader a new package 
scheme launched yesterday by 
tie Le^al and General insur- 
ance group. 

They lave joined with tit 
conveyancing company * 
Homex, to fonn HoroeMove, 
which will offer a comprehen- 
sive deal iBdndmg mortgage, 
insurance, estate agent, legal. 


many recent CBl demands, 
including membership of -the 
exchange-rate mechanism of 
the European Monetary Sys- 
tem.' more spending on. the. 
infrastructure, . fewer : con- 
straints on business and re- 
duced local 'authority 
spending- >: 

Trade unions are urged to 
be more professional and co- 
operate with ■ ■ initiatives •_ to 


services and. even, a achieve business success.' 
“cfeambrealdng” service as a The document is critical ofJ 


last resort 

It can nil flow from a sit^de 
telephone aril, and the key to 
tie system is tie "hand- 
holding” counselor whose job 


companies which have paid 
only Tip service” to-, greater 
worker revolvement "With 
honourable exceptions, - Brit- 
ish companies pay iessatten- 


1U4UC UK euutiiisusiuMi wiuuj uuuuatw buh wuuuo <wuui%- ~ i 

employer, but not to public overspent by £706 million or is to soothe tienerresaf some [Tjon 

service employers. .. 19854*67 - - : ^tieoneraBBsii people who J.thw of <xu-_oyen^ 

• — — - — . '■ -■ — — ; — ■ — ‘" .— rt - . * move home each yearramf not ;] pmztpctitors. - 


rules under review 


as teoohteshooter.wfaen things 

v*™*- -: .. Students fail 

to win order 

matt of HomeMdve, said that : 


By Ronald Faux 



The liming of the release of 

the plan was not surprising Correspondent 

because concern over Europe- ™ 

an Community restrictions on ?nn^’ 

output through the quota sys- b ® 1115 serious eye condi 

tern and falling farm incomes 
is clearly an issue in tie by- 

menl torced to pay the 
. . “t „ ™ ~ « foU private price for their 

spectacles from July, in some 
Vf^s 9 060 ' cons * rvaave ,nflJW1,y ’ cases £100 or more, the Royal 
• A tax on pollution is urged National Inslilute for the 
in a Liberal Party Green Paper 

on the environment which ar- 1 L'*'' r 

als. hospital piatiems who fail 

to qualify for tie vouchers the 
Government is to introduce 
from July, will only be able to 
^ | get their glasses at NHS prices 

Votcill PCI CIA »f foe spectacles are dispensed 

■ /b r them by the hospital- 

fc 7 - .But no ’hospitals in Scot- 

land. Northern Ireland or 

I Wales have in-house opticians 
who dispense glasses, accord- 
ing to the RNIB, and a survey 


(Labi 9.060. Conservative majority. 
15.335. 

• A tax on pollution is urged 
in a Liberal Party Green Paper 
on the environment which ar- 
gues that those who create 
pollution should pay for pre- 
vention and cleaning it up. 

Satan case 
‘con’ is 
denied 


The Civil Aviation Author- 
ity is reviewing safety rules for 
helicopters operating over tie 
North Sea which allow them 


form in an emergency. 

Mr Malcolm Bruce, Liberal 
MP for Gordon, said yester- 
day: “Opponents of this say it 


to carry only enough fuel for is cutting tie safety margin, 
tie outward journey. Circumstances might happen 

Only one of tie four main where a helicopter would., be 
helicopter operators in tie unprepared to land' in poor 
North Sea market refuels off- conditions, but with sufficient 
shore, but it is feared others fuel it couW return to shore.” 
may do the same unless there He said tieChinookairaraft 
is regulation by tie CAA. A which was (breed down m tie 
lightly-fuelled helicopter can. North Sea in 1984 had be$n a 
carry heavier loads or more potentially catastrophic acci- 
passengers, relying oq befog dent, and it was only because a 
able to land off-shore and take ship Was near by and there was 
on foe! for the return journey, perfect summer weather foal 
or of diverting to another plat- everyone survived. 


Allowance campaign 
nearer to victory 


wasra nightmare.. - 

^theyparticnlarlyresent 
having, to deal . with many 
seemingly separate institu- 
tions to what they see as an 
uncoordinated, tune-consum- 
ing ; *nd frustrating 
experience.” 

Before launchi ng the new 
service, they commissioned 
NOP to carry out an opinion 
poll on house-baying which 
confirmed the conventional 
view that tie process is one of 
dismay and trauma. 

About 68 per cent of those 
canvassed regarded tie - pro- 
cess as ridknloiisly complicat- 
ed, and 78 per cent timfoht 
that it woakl be easy to make \ 
the business more efficient. V 

Part of tie trauma comes 
from tie time it takes, and part 
from tie condition of the house 
into which people move. . i 


Students involved in scut 
fles at Bristol University while 
protesting at the presrace of 
Professor John Vincent, who 
writes a column in The Sun. 
foiled in their High Court 
attempt yesterday to «op, # 
disciplinary action against-? 
them. ' 

Mr Justice Hiret refused to 
grant an injunction to IS 
students against the disciplto- 


umyersjriy banning 
continuing with tie action 
planned against the students 
after, they disrupted lectures 
by Professor VjncenL • • 




Mr Michael West. QG 
counsel for Derry Main- 
waring Knighu foe self - styled 
Saianist. told the jury at 
Maidstone Crown Court yes- 
terday that his story was 
"bizarre”. But he said the 
prosecution's case that Mr 
Knight was a con-man was 
"moonshine.” Mr West was 
making his closing speech on 
the thirty -third day of the 
trial. 

Mr Knight, aged 46, an 
unemployed painter and deco- 
rator. from Dormans Land, 
Surrey, denies J9 charges of 
obtaining more than £ 200.000 
by deception from wealthy 
Christians. 

He claims he needed the 
cash to buy satanic regalia to 
free himself from foe control 
of the devil. But it is alleged he 
spent foe money on fast cars 
and women. 

Mr West accused foe detec- 
tive leading foe investigation. 
Detective CTiief Inspector Ter- 
ence Fallon, of corrupting 
witnesses before the start ot 
foe trial. Mr West said foal Mr 
Knight had never given evi- 
dence before in court and had 
no need to go into foe witness 
box in this case, “to be made a 
fool of*. 

Mr West said: “This is not a 
case of someone's life savings 
being taken by a confidence 
trickster and left penniless. 
This is a case where the donors 
had foe money, gave foe 
money, could afford il and 
wanted to give it - and in the 
majority of cases still want to 
give it because- they think it is 
foe right and proper thing to 
do. 

"What Kr.ight was doing is 
not only what Satanists in- 
dulge in. but make a fortune 
out of.” Mr West said. 

The trial was adjourned 
until today, when Judge Neil 
Dennison will sum- up. 


authorities in England showed 
that only 13 have in-house 
dispensing. 

"What foe Government is 


in fact proposing is that tens of I does not. 


Continued from page 1 
If she bad been a man or a 
single woman she would have 
qualified for foe allowance. 
Because she is married she 


thousands of patients who 
have received hospital treat- 
ment For their eye conditions 
will have to pay private prices 
for spectacles foal are medi- 
cally necessary and which can 
be very expensive indeed", the 
institute said. 


The allowance was intro- 
duced in 1978 to tiy to take 
men and single women caring 
for relatives off means-tested 
benefits such as supplemen- 
tary benefit 

It ‘was not" extended to 
mamed women living with 


"They will only be able to their husbands as they would 
get them at NHS prices, which not have been entitled to 
at present range from £13 a supplementary benefit, 
pair to £50 a pair, plus frame But Frederico Mancirn, the 
costs, if the hospital has. a Advocate-General, yesterday 
dispensing system supported foe opinion of the 


European Commission that to 
exclude married women 
amounted to sex discrimina- 
tion under the - EEC's 
directive. 

The Invalid Care Allowance 
steering group, which repre- 
sents 50 organizations cam- 
paigning for mamed- women 
to receive the allowance, urged 
women who thought they 
might be entitled to the benefit 
to claim. 

*Tt is most unusuai for .the- 
final judgment to .go against 
the advocate-generars 
opinion”, a spokesman said. 

"Those - who claim . now- 
should be entitled to back 
benefit.” 


Saleroom 

Renaissance of marble prices 

By Geraldine Norman, Sale Room Correspondent - 


Marble sculpture and Re- 
naissance medals proved the 
iwo most popular sections of 
Sotheby's sale of European 
sculpture and works of art 
yesterday. Bidding was more 
selective for wood sculpture 
and bronzes. 

Marble appears to be just 


£52.800 (estimate £40,000 - 
£60,000). despite an unaes- 
foelic bald pate: while a pretty 
youth, crowned with myrtle, 
by Houdon made £55,000 
(estimate £30,000 - £40,000). 

Prices rose markedly for a 
small collection of Renais- 
sance bronze medals, most of 


coming into its own and the- which belonged to the well- 
star piece was a five-foot known Chigt family. Medal 


sculpture of the handsome 
young Meleager, wearing only 
a cloak and carrying a quiver 
of arrows, while a boar's head 
nestles at his feet. It made 
£71.500 {estimate £60.000 - 
£80.000) and is foe work of 
Antonio Gai. one of the most 
important early eighteenth 
century Venetian sculptors. 
His work was very popular 
among English visitors and 
this sculpture belonged to the 
famous British consul. Joseph 
Smith, who was also a patron 
of Canaletto. 

A Rysbrack portrait bust of 
the Earl of Wmchelsea made 


portraiture was 

fashionableduring the Renais- 
sance and foe Florentine poli- 
tician Lelio Torelli was 
recorded for posterity by San- 
gallo in 1551. The Chigi 
example of foe medal sold for 
£23.100 (estimate £1000- 
£ 1 500). setting a new auction 
price record fora Renaissance 
medal. The Venetian Paolo 
Alberti's portrait medal by 
Marescoiu made £1 1.000 (es- 
timate £1500-£2000). 

Australian paintings moved 
into a new price bracket at 
Sotheby's. Melbourne auction 
on Monday with attention 




concentrated on the group of 
Australian impressionists who 
worked around Heidelberg in 
the 1880s and 1890$. Freder- 
ick McCubbinV “Feeding 
Time” made AusS 693,000 
(estimate Aus$ 380,000 - 
Aus$450,000) or £306^37, a 
new auction price record for 
foe artist, while the Western 
Australian Art Gallery of 
Perth paid a record 
A US$440,000 (estimate AusS 

150.000 - Aus$ 200,000) or 
£194,690 for “Summer 
Droving” by Sir Arthur Ernest 
Sireeion. A British collabora- 
tor of the same school, Walter 
Withers, scored a surprise 
AusS 104,500 (estimate AusS 

9.000 - AusS 1 2,000) for his 
"Near Marysvilie”. 

Ai Christie’s yesterday the 
collection of Byzantine coins 
formed by. Hugh Goodacre 
(1865-1952), the leading au- 
thority of his day in specialize 
lion, was a seif- oul totalli 
£153,257. 


Thanks to the Spanish nose, : 

• we can enjoy 
the sweet smell of success. ; 

See Page 27 



announces that its : 
MOITTGAGELEWDING RATE; 
. will be.reduced from '• 
- , . .11.75% to 10J5% / : 

vwid^effed: from . 
Wednesday 23rd April 1986. • 


The Mortgage Corporation Limited 
Victoria Plaza. 

1U Buckingham Palace Road ' 

. London SW1W0SR, 
Telephone: OI-&54 8444 










. .... .. . 



A*~* + 


gg||gg||gEagj 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1 986 


HOME NEWS 


hj \ 

S 



Scargill claims illegal 
arrest in ‘Starsky 
and Hutch’ operation 



UPf 


The eaiiy morning peace of 
~ a Yorkshire village, home of 
J .Mr'.. Arthur . Scargiil, the 
"C miners' leader, was shattered 
by the arrival of. four police 
. cars, their Woe lights flashing, 
aiid sdyerh police officers. 

•; - The scene could have indi- 
cated that a massive crime had . 
occurred, but the police only 
.wanted ..to,, question Mr 
' - ScargiH over an alleged speed- 
mg offence, Mr Michael 
- Mansfield, representing Mr 
« 'Scafgill, told a jury at Man- 
7.' chesto High Court yesterday. 
*--7 What happened next 
amounted to the National 
.Union of Mineworkers' presi- 
J. deni being falsely imprisoned, . 
71 'Mr Mansfield auegecLHe said 
'.X Mr ScargiH was told by the 
‘ ‘ police- to wail. on the pave- 
w . merit outside’ his house and 
' ’was stopped from going inside 
< _ for more than 30 minutes. 

.. 1 After listening to tapes of 
i‘. police radio messages being 
' ,-jeKdianged. Mr Mansfield 
. . said: “It seems the theme was 
-7 ;bag Mr ScarpaL”* 

Mr Scaigiii. is suing the 
1 'Chief Constable of South. 

: ■ Yorkshire, Mr Peter Wright, 

. in a civil action for exemplary 
dama ges for alleged foi** 
imprisonment. 

‘1. -The court was told that with 
. reference to the alleged speed- 


ing incident Mr Scargill,* who there in the middle of the 
was-saM to nave driven tm the road. The blue lights were 
.MI at between J 10 mph. and flashing. It was like Blackpool 
120 mph. appeared in court at illuminations. I told police it 
Rotherham five months later looked more like a scene from 
and was acquitted. Slareky and Hutch." 

The jury was told yesterday His wife, Mrs Ann ScargilL 


that Mr Scafgill had been in who had been watching the 
London the night before the incident from a bedroom win- 
incident in July, 1982, for a dow, went into the toad 
radio interview with Miss wearing a dressing gown. Mr 
Carol Thatcher, daughter of Scargill said: “She asked me 
the Prime Minister, Mrs Mar- ‘What is wrong? Has there 
garet Thatcher. been a murder? 

He left London in his Jaguar “I said I was sorry, but I 


ne icnLonoon in bis Jaguar l said I was Sony, 

XJ6 car, in convoy with his could. not go inside. She 


chauffeur who was drivi 
Rover car behind him. 


vzng a 
n. Mr 


‘Don’t be silly. Come on in.’ 
But the police officer replied: 


me speea limit because both that I was not m a position to 
cars were governed by cruise move at all. There is no doubt 
controls set at 70 mph. He in my mind that iff had I 
said he saw several police 'would have been physically 
patrol cars but' he Was not restrained." 


challenged. 


Mr Mansfield, calling for 

.L- J fi.fi T . • 


When he arrived at his fair and full compensation; 
bungalow home at Yews Lane; told the jury that exemplary 
Wors bo rough Dale, near damages were awardable “in 
Barnsley, he had just opened circumstances surrounding 
the boot of his car to get out unlawful acts which in your 
two cases when the first police view are oppressive, arbitary 


car arrived. He was told to 
wait on the pavement for a 


and unconstitutional, an 
abuse". Mr Scargill, he said. 


motorway patio) car to arrive. . was the subject of detention 
Two other police Royer cars without authority for oppres- 



anived, followed by the patrol 
vehicle. Mr Scmgil] said: “I 
felt like a criminal standing 


sive reasons. 

The bearing 
today. 


continues 


Pc Martvn Coxen. whose dog Yerba was shot dead as it tackled bank raiders in Petts Wood, 
south London, in 1984, displays a posthumous award for the dog from the Canine Defence 
League. With him is his new dog, Othello, a nephew of Yerba. 


Model reluctantly 
acted death scene 


A model told a jury yester- 
: day that die reluctantly-agreed 
to act out a death scene with a 
noose for Geoffrey Jones, an 
amateur film maker who is 
accused of hanging another 
model. 

• Mrs Tina Atter, aged' 26, 
'said Mr Jones wanted to film 
her with the noose around be* 
neck as if she were dead. 

She told Birmingham 
Crown Court that after refus- 
ing several times she played 
out the scene, standing on ar 
chair with the noose around 
, her neck and the rope draped 
.over a plank across a ceiling 
trapdoor. 

. Asked if she had realised it 
was a real sliding noose and 
that her iife would be 1 in 
• -danger if she fefirMrs Alter, of 
HalT-Gfeea,- Birmingham; re-. : 
plied: “I must 'admit I didn’t 
think of it at 'tfae time*. - - 


Mr Jones, -aged 49, has 
denied murdering Marion 
Terry, aged 17, at his home in 
Eggington Road, HaD Green, 
last year. 

Mr Brian Escott-Cox, for 
the prosecution^aid Mr Jones 
was a “bizarre and : warped" 
man who liked to see girls in 
Mack satin dresses. 

Mr Escott-Cox alleged that 
after persuading Marion to 
stand on a chair with the 
noose around her neck Mr 
Jones kicked the chair away 
add she was banged. 

Mr Jones's girlfriend. Mrs 
Margaret Pugh, aged 40, a 
divorcee, of Great Barr, Bir- 
mingham, said Mr Jones rang 
her after Marion's death and 
asked her to call an ambulance 
because he had swallowed 100 
aspirins: She said he told hec 
“I have hung -a giri and I 
deserve punishment.” 

The tnal continues today. 


Four found guilty 
of golfball theft 


By Craig Seton 


Dog fight accused 
misses hearing 


The owners of the Belfry 
Golf Course m Warwickshire 
claimed aa historic legal vic- 
tory yesterday when four men 
who fished 448 “lost” 
gotfballs from its lakes and 
water hazards, were found 
gafity of stealing. 

The defence had claimed 
that the men were merely 
involved in a “modern form of 
scromping" but Mr Rene 
Brunet, the general manager 
of the championship course, 
said the unanimous decision of 
the jary at Warwick Crown 
Court had established that 
abandoned golf balls belonged 
to the dub where they were 
lost 

Mr Brunet said after the 
fffVHlay triab “I am delighted. 
I was told this was a test case 
in the history of golf, and lam 
sure everyone in the UK and 


across the world will be happy 
at the result 

“People picking op the odd 
ball are not a problem, but 
when it is 448, it is an 
important matter." 

The jury took nearly four 
hours to convict John 
Forrester, aged 24, and Peter 
Forrester, aged 22, his broth- 
er, both of Bribery, Birming- 
hara, Christopher 

McGiUmay, . aged 25, of 
Weoley Castle, Birmingham, 
and Stephen Smith, aged 22, 
also of Rnbery. The men, all 
unemployed, were conditional- 
ly discharged for 12 months. 

They had pleaded not gnOty 
to stealing the balls, worth 50p 
each, which the dab said were 
among 10,000 mishit by golf- 
ers into water each year on the 
course. 


i The caretaker allegedly at 
the centre of an organised’dog 
fight at his school failed to 
attend a court hearing for the 
second time yesterday. 

Alexander Funk, aged 29, of 
Aldersbrook Primary’ School, 
Harpenden Road. Wanstead. 
east London, sent a medical 
certificate to Redbridge mag- 
istrates court saying he was 
unfit He had been released 
from hospital on Monday and 
his counsel said he received 
bead injuries while trying to 
prevent a pub robbery. 

The prosecution ’ claims 
MrFunk was promoter of a 
dog fight at the school last 
October. Mr Giles Forrester, 
for the prosecution, said police 
who raided the school found a 
dead dog in a plastic bag in the 
boiler house. Mr Funk is 
alleged to have been cleaning 
up blood. 


His counsel. Mr Nigel In- 
gram. has entered not guilty 
pleas to two summonses of 
assisting in dog fighting and 
permitting the school to be 
used. Five other men deny 
assisting in dog fighting and 
aiding and abetting. 

Mr Ingram said Mr Funk, 
who works as a doorman at 
the Green Man public house. 
Leytonstone, was injured 
when he tried to disarm men 
attempting to rob the pub on 
Friday night. Mr Funk, who 
now lives at Cobden Road, 
Leyton stone, sent a certificate 
slating he was unfit to attend 
court until April 28. 

Mr Forrester asked for a 
second medical examination 
by a divisional surgeon and 
the court -was adjourned foi 
this to be arranged. 

The case was adjourned 
until June 1 


Police are 
subject 
of 2,002 
complaints 

By Peter Evans 
Home Affairs 
Correspondent 

The number of complaints 
alleging acmal bodily harm 
i referred to the Police Com- 
plaints Authority for possible 
supervision, was 94 per cent 
: more than forecast. 

The authority said yester- 
day that a survey before it 
began operations suggested 
the figure would be about 
! 1.550 cases a year. But in the 
first eight months since the 
, auihopiy began operations on 
i April 29 last year, it has had 
1 2.002 complaints referred. 

The Police Complaints Au- 
| ihoriiv succeeded the Police 
Complaints Board. The intro- 
duction of the independent 
supervision of investigations 
is the most significant change 
in procedure. 

Referring to the difference 
between the forecast and actu- 
al figures, the report says: “We 
believe that this variation is a 
result of the criteria adopted 
by some police forces for the 
purposes of the survey being 
different from those now re- 
quired under the Act. rather 
than of any dramatic increase 
in the number of complaints 
of assault.” 

The authority said that one 
example of the way in which 
the system was never intended 
to be used was the blatant lit- 
lor-tai complaint: “You with- 
draw the charge, and I’ll 
withdraw the complaint." 

The authority is forbidden 
to publish detailed informa- 
tion from the investigating 
officers’ report, other than a 
summary or other general 
statement. It wants the discre- 
tion to publish so much of an 
investigation report as it 
judges to be in the public 
imeresL 

Annual Report On The Police 
Complaints Authoring 29 April- 
31 December 1985.1 Stationery 
Office: £6.85 j. 





Fm »■ readers of The Tunes 

shared yesterday's&lOOOdai- 

ij prize jo the Portfolio Gold 

competition. 

One of them, Mr Dawood 
Nahahoo, bad always intended 
to check his card but intil te 

took a day off had not found 

time to fill it in. 

“I enjoyed my first leisurely 
breakfast for months, prayed 
Portfolio Gold and found to my 
delight I had won , Mr 
Nababoo, aged 39, a debt 
collector, of New Southgate, 
London, explained. 

The second winner, Mr 
Lionel Page, aged 50, a sales 
agent from Norwich, said: “l 
am very thrilled. When the 
game first started two years 
ago, ! came within one point of 
winning but I never gave np 
hope." 

His share will go towards 
renovating his country home. 

The third winner is Mr P 
Dixon of Leamington Spa, and 
the fourth winner is Mr 
Dismas Matunda, aged 21, an 
overseas student from Zambia 
studying at Keele University. 
He said he had been playing 
Portfolio for the past year. 

You will need the new 
Portfolio Gold card to play the 
game. If you have any difficul- 
ty in obtaining one from your 
newsagent, send a sjLe. to: 
Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40. 

Blackburn, 

BBl 6AJ. 




_ f, 




Mr Nahaboo 


New leader for Equity 


The actor Nigel Davenport 
has been elected president of 
Equity, succeeding Mr Derek 
BomL who resigned after a 
union ballot in favour of 
instructing members not to 
accept work in South Africa. 

He had appeared in South 
Africa in front of multi-racial 
audiences and had made dear 
his opposition to apartheid. 

Mr Davenport is a leading 
member of the Aa for Equity 


faction on the council, as is Mr 
Bond. He may be challenged 
as president in the next two 
months when the union elects 
a new council, the body which 
appoints the president 
The union is controlled by 
the Act For Equity faaion. Its 
main opposition in tile elec- 
tions will come from the 
Centre Forward movement 
which had control of Equity 
previously. 


Directors’ pay up by 9.7% 


Managers*., and directors' 
wages rose well ahead of the 
inflation, rate last year and 
more quickly than the salaries 
of manual workers. ' 

Directors' earnings went up 
by 9.7 per cent bringing the 
average annual income to 
£42,099, and managers’ total 
earnings rose by 9 per cent to 


By Teresa Poole 
give an average of £19,544. 

Bat Sir Peter Patter, chair- 
man of the British Institute of 
Management which commis- 
sioned the 1986 National 
Management Salary Survey 
published yesterday, said that 
managers were stilf underpaid 
compared with salaries paid in 
thcCity. 


EARNINGS BY. INDUSTRY (Managers only) 


Industry 

Banking, finance, Insurance and business service 
Chetrtcals, energy and alfed Industries 
Mixed industry groups 

Technical am scientific, transport and communicafens 
. Food, drink and tabaoco 
Whole sample (21,737 managers) 

Vehicles, electrical and Instrument engineering 

Mechanical engineering 

Distribution 

- Paper, printing and publish ing 
Other non-manufactiiring industries 
Textiles, leather, clothing and footwear 
Construction - - 

.Metal manufacture and other metal goods 
Other manufacturing industries 


How executives 9 
pay compares 

1979-1986 i 


Industry 

average 

. e 

23,387 

22,142 

21.494 

20,499 

20,457 

.19^44 

19,211 

18.795 

18£1B 

18,115 

17.670 

17,425 

15,766 

13.792 

13,750 


% 



Over the same period the 
increase in the average adult 
male manual wage was 7.2 per 
cent White-collar workers 
were paid an extra 7.7 per 
cent The retail price index 
went up by 6.1 per cent 

The higher rewards of man- 
agement are increasingly be- 
ing linked to company 
profitability. The survey 
shows that British businesses 
are following the trend of 
overseas companies in offer- 
ing bonus.payments related to 
company or personal perfor- 
mance in order to motivate 
management 

Nearly two in five compa- 
nies have introduced a sav- 
jngs-related shares option 
scheme and more than one in 
five have a profit-sharing 
scheme. The bonus dement 
for directors accounted for an 
average 15 per cent of total 
earnings and for managers it 
was 8.6 per cent 

For the first time, the survey 
.looked specifically at the sala- 
ries of women directors and 
managers who accounted for 4 
per cent of the survey sample. 
Women were less well paid 
than men in similar jobs but 
were cm average five years 
younger. Female earnings in- 
creased by 10.5 per cent 
compared wnb 1985: the fig- 
ure for their male colleagues 
was 9 per cent 
' A regional breakdown 
showed that managers and 
directors in the South-west 
and Wales are the best reward- 
ed outside London and that 
pay increases were highest in 
Eak Anglia. 

The highest wage rises were 
in the chemicals, energy and 
allied industries (10.5 per 
cent), in vehicles, electrical 
and instrument engineering 
(10.5 per cent), and in distri- 
bution (10 per cent). 

Salary data was correct on- 
January 1 and is based on 
23.41 1 executives employed at 
366 companies. 

National Management Salary 
Survey 19S6 iRemuneration 
Economics. Survey House. 51 
Portland Road. Kingston upon 
Thames, Surrey, KT1 2SH; 
£125). 


THIS 
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he some sort of proMem,’' Mr 
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Bat he denied aa allegation 
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clerical officer with Prestel 
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by. 

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Stephen Gold, aged SO, of 
Watt Lane, Sheffield, and 
Robert Schrifreen, aged 22, of 
Edgwarebury Gardens, Edg- 
nare, north London — who 
deny forgery between October 
1984 and January 1985. 


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. Marconi Marie Curie, 
Gustav Dalen, Henry Fori 
Who's the oiid one out? 


G razie, Signer Marconi for your radio . 
Merci, Madame Curie for radium. 

Thanks , Henry Ford for your motors. Tack , 

. Dr. Gustav Dalen for the Ago cooker. 

No, Dr. Dal£n is not the odd one out Yes , he 
is the only Swede. 

He was also, like Guglielmo Marconi and 
Marie Curie f a Nobel Prize-winning scientist. 

You f ve probably never heard of him, so who 
was Gustav Dalen ? He is the man to whom 
thousands of seamen owe their lives; because he 
invented a tiling called Damn's Sun Valve that 
turns a lightship’s lights on by night and puts 
them out by day, automatically. That’s why they 
gave him the Nobel Prize. 

He was the scientist so dedicated to his work 
that he was blinded in an explosion during one of 
his experiments, yet he still went on later to 
complete the experiment 

He icas also the man who invented the only 
cooker in the world that roasts, bakes, boils, 
stews > steams, simmers, fries, braises, grills, 
casseroles and toasts, yes toasts (bet you thought 
anAga couldn’t, didn't you?) perfectly. 

More than that, though, what Dr. Dal&n did 
in 1922 was to reinvent the cooker. 

He simply couldn’t find a cooker in existence 
to satisfy his exacting scientific standards. 

. So combining his knowledge of combustion, 
metallurgy and nutrition with kitchen common 
sense, he invented theAga. 

Despite the advent of microwaves and fan 
ovens, there is still nothing in the world that 
cooks food better than an Ago. 

Remembering what a pain it is waiting for 
the oven to heat up, Gustav Dalen made sure you 
never have to do that with his Ago. It's ready 
anytime. 

Then, pondering the inscrutable riddle of the 
boiling-truer pan,he came up with a simmering 
plate big enough to hold three saucepans that 
won't let them boil over. Ever. 

The boiling plate, though, boils a pint of 
water faster than an electric kettle. It holds three 
saucepans, too. 

More interesting, perhaps, is the fact that our 
Dr. Dalen just might have been psychic. 

Well, can you think of any other cooker that 
runs throughout the day on cheap rate overnight ■ 
electricity? Believe us, there isn't one. 

To Gustav Dalin, making a cooker run on 
the principle of stored heat was just the most 
efficient way to make it. It still is. 

But how was he to know the Central 
Electricity Generating Board would come up with 
’night storage' if he wasn't psychic? 

Anyway, since you can now buy an electric 
Aga (as well as one that runs on natural gas, 
IPG, oil or solid fuel), it’s the only cooker in the 
world that can run on nothing but off-peak 
electricity. 

Impressed ? We thought you might be. If 
you'd like to see a live Aga, any of our distributors 
can show you one. Or you can write to us at Aga, 

, Freepost , Ketley, Telford TF1 3BR and we'll tell 
you all about them. 

Oh yes, who is the odd one out? It's Henry 
Ford. You know him. He’s odd because he was no 
scie?itist. He was just clever enough to sell cars by 
the million, saying: “Any colour you like so long 
as it's black" 

Well, you can buy an Aga in green, blue, red, 
brown, cream, white or even gloriously black 
vitreous enamel. 

Psychic or not, the only really odd thing 
about Gustav Dalen is that his name zoasn't 
Gustav Aga. 



IT’S Amy OF LIFE. 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 


PARLIAMENT APRIL 22 1986 


Libyan crisis 


Protests at Thatcher 
statement that US 
chose weapons for raid 


COMMONS 


Labour MPs protested strongly 
when Mrs Thatcher, the Prime 
Minister, said that the Ameri- 
cans had had the choice of 
weapons when they launched 
the raid against Libya. She was 
answering Mr Norman Badran 
(Paisley South, Lab), who bad 
asked whether the Americans 
could have used a nuclear 
bomb. 

Earlier. Mr Neil Kinnock, 
Leader of the Opposition, had 
demanded direct sanctions 
against Libya, and an end of 
EEC food subsidies to that 
country. 

Mr Hugh Dykes (Harrow East 
Q: Mrs Thatcher is to visit 
Israel, arid the United Kingdom 
is to take over the presidency of 
the Council of Ministers at the 
end of June. 

Will she consider carefully the 
advantages of another EEC 
initiative lor a Middle East 
settlement because it is not only 
a matter of specifically im- 
portant anti-terrorist measures, 
but of dealing with the fun- 
damental problem of the Middle 
East, and the Americans do not 
seem to be making .much 
progress on that. 

Mrs Thatcher He is right. Since 
the end of King Hussein's 
initiative, there have been no 
new formal proposals. T was able 
to discuss certain practical steps 
with him, and I hope to take that 
forward when 1 visit Israel, and 
to talk to the United States 
about this. 

We take over the EEC presi- 
dency in July. I shall consider 
what be says, but I think it 
advisable to get more agreement 
on the steps forward before 
launching an initiative. 

Mr Kinnock: Can she tell us 
whether the action against 21 
Libyan students is the beginning 
of further steps to isolate Colo- 
nel GadaffL and whether they 
will include the imposition of 
economic sanctions and the 
cancellation of credits and sub- 
sidies for food from the EEC. 
Mrs Thatcher: The Home Sec- 
retary will be answering about 
the deportations later. It is an 
action we felt was legitimate and 
desirable in all the circum- 
stances. We are considering 
further the matter of Libyan 
pilots and further action we 
could take. Mr Kinnock will be 
aware of actions which the EEC 
decided to take, and the meeting 
of foreign ministers will be. 
continued. 

Mr Kinmck In the light of that 
answer, can she say whether she 
has ruled out direct economic 
sanctions against Libya, as re- 
ported in The Daily Telegraph. 
If that is true, it would be cynical 
and inconsistent, given the sup- 
port for bombing of Libya last 
week. 

Mrs Thatcher The refusal to 
sell military equipment is a 
direct economic sanction of a 


specific kind which we took. It 
has not been taken, apparently, 
by all the EEC countries. 

Sanctions as a whole will only 
work if everybody operates 
them, but there are some which 
we took unilaterally as Mr 
Kinnock is very much aware. 

The matter of food has to be 
pursued through the EEC, and 
we made our views known 
strongly to the Commission 
when they cut out the manage- 
ment committee and decided on 
special export subsidies for food 
to Libya. 

Mr Kinnock: Will she make 
further representations and put 
all possible pressures on our 
European allies to exercise the 
power they must have so as to 
impose economic sanctions 
which are more effective against 
Gadaffi while not so lethal to his 
people? 

Mrs Thatcher: We are doing 
that, and are particularly con- 
cerned about the Cbmmissron 
when it makes available 



Bochaa: Should Americans 
choose the weapons? 
substantia] export subsidies for 
food exports to Libya. 

Mr John Browne (Winchester 
C): A single bombing raid is 
unlikely to stop terrorism, but 
nonetheless it lays down to 
terrorists the serious cost. Will 
she agree to laydown in the face 
of terrorism yet more costs like 
the introduction of the death 
penalty for terrorism? 

Mr James Wallace (Orkney and 
Shell ands, Lk Has she had a 
chance to look at the eariy day 
motion signed by a number of 
Conservative MPs condemning 
the alleged lack of balance in 
BBC reports of the raid? 
Mrs Thatcher. The Govern- 
ment does not control the BBC 
and MPs are as free to say what 
they like about it as any other 
citizen. 

Sir Edward Gardner (FyJde, Q: 
Will she do everything she can 
to persuade the United States 
government that no country 
dedicated to the defeat of terror- 
ism can any longer afford to 
allow the extradition of terror- 
ists from its jurisdiction to be 
impeded or frustrated by the 
absurd doctrine that murder 
done under the alleged motive 
of political interest is no longer 
murder and cannot be used as 
grounds for extradition? 


Mrs Thatcher Yes I agree with 
him. The point has been made 
forcibly and will continue to be 
made forcibly and is increas- 
ingly recognised. 

Mr Tam Daly ell (Linlithgow, 
Lab): At what point did tbe 
Americans tell the Prime Min- 
ister that they were going touse 
anti-personnel cluster bombs? . 
Mrs Thatcher We set down' 
certain criteria for the per- 
mission which 1 indicated in my 
statement. The Americans se- 
lected tbe targets within those 
criteria. It is for them to choose 
the weapons to secure the defeat 
of those targets within tbe target 
permissions^ we gave, (Labour 
protests). . . _ 

Mr David Steel the Leader of 
the Liberal Party: On Thursday 
new regulations came into effect 
in the United States which give 
tbe United States authorities 
control over high tec hnolo gy, 
hardware and software person- 
nel in this country. 

In view of the Attorney 
General's opinion that such a 
claim is both illegal under 
international law and an 
infringement of our sovereignty, 
what protection is she going to 
give to British firms? 

Mrs Thatcher: There has al- 
ready been debate on this issue 
in tbe House, initiated by one of 
his colleagues, and the 1 position 
was stated in the debate and has 
been given a number of times 
since. In general we reject the 
United States claims to extra- 
territorial jurisdiction in the 
United Kingdom. 

One of his colleagues is in 
touch with the Secretary of State 
for Trade and Industry about a 
particular firm. That will be 
pursued. 

Mrs Margaret Beckett (Derby 
South, Lab): Does the more 
conciliatory tone the Prime 
.T offered 


Minister 


mean that she 


now accepts an eye for an eye 
and a tooth fora tooth is not the 
basis for the best foreign policy? 

Mrs Thatcher Tbe best bass of 
foreign policy is what is in the 
British interests. 

Mr Andrew MacKay (East Berk- 
shire, Q: After yesterday's meet- 
ing in Luxembourg many of us 
feel that our European partners' 
response to state-sponsored ter- 
rorism is woefully inadequate, 
Mrs Thatcher.’ 1 rather agree 
with him. 

Mr Norman Buchan (Paisley 
South, Lab): Does she believe 
the safeguarding of British in- 
terests includes the question of 
allowing Americans full choice 
in the weapons to use? Would 
rhis extend beyond anti-person- 
nel cluster bombs to nuclear 
bombs; for example.' 

Mrs Thatcher: We set down the 
criteria for targets which we 
believe were within legitimate 
self defence, and the use of FI 1 1 
aircraft as the best means of 
striking those targets. The pre- 
cise method the United States 
used is a matter for the United 
Slates. (Loud Labour protests). 



were necessary 


security 


Orders to deport 2t Libyan 
nationals had been issued now 
rather than earlier because of the 
threats arising out of last week’s 
United States bombing raid on 
ngbazi, Mr I 


Tripoli and — . - 

las Hard, the Home Secretary, 
said in tbe Commons in replyro 
a private notice question by Mr 
Gerald Kaufman. Chief Oppo- 
sition Spokesman on Home 

Affaire. . ... 

Mr Kpwt y—w said he did not - 
question the reasons for 1 the 
deportations but be did want to 
know about timing. Why now? 
Did the Home Office have 
evidence upon which it.- was 
basing the expulsions before or 
afterthe bombing? 

Had any further Libyan na- 
tionals been admitted for train- 
ing or extra training, since the 
murder of WPC Yvonne 
Fletcher two years ago? Some 
250 were sill being trained 
within dose proximity of 
Heathrow, Gatwjck and other 
airports. . • .' 

- It can be easier (he sard) for 
certain overseas nationals, to 
enter this country for terrorism 
than for an Indian Grand- 
mother to enter for a family 
wedding. (Conservative protests 
of “Cheap. Cheap") 

Mr | But true, true. 

After two years of com- 
placency since the death of WPc 
Fletcher, had the Government 
at last realized some potential 
terrorists were at large here or 
was this a cosmetic exercise 
following (he prime minister’s 
collusion over the bombing of 
Libya so as to cover up the 
unacceptable face of 
Thatcherism? 

Me Hard said the decision had 
to be timed exactly because it 
involved II police forces. He; 
had been anxious that a factual 
statement should be made pub- 
licly as soon as this first stage 
bad been completed because he 
did not want any misunder- 
standing in Britain, Libya or 
anywhere else. 

Steps have been taken to 
ensure drat Libyan pilots and’ 
engineers being trained here did 
no harm at airports or- near 
them. There were some legal or 
practical complications about 
further action, but these were, 
being urgently reviewed. 

Student activity to support of 
a foreign government was mot 
necessarily in itself, harmful to 
national security.But after last 
week's threats, he had. decided 
that the criteria within, which be 
had to exercise his powers had 
been met and the presence of 
these 21 was no longer condu- 
cive to national security. (La- 
bour shouts of “Piffle") 

Mr Alan Bdtfr (Benrick-upon-' 
Tweed L) will he take special 
account of the position of 
Libyans who oppose Colonel 
Gadaffi and who would be at 
risk if they went hack and 
maybe at risk here. 

Mr Hmk I am aware that by no 


means aft Libyans 

fifeodsor supporters rfGadrfft. 
Sir Edward Gardner (Swild Qc 
Do aliens who have been first 
with notice of intention mo 

dtpon have any right of ap peal, 

Mr Em* My dedshms were 
taken in the. interest of national 
security by virtue of Section o 
(3)of the Immigration Act VTFi - . 

In ihore .circumstances, there is 

no right of appeal to the 
immigration appellate 
authorities. . 

Those concerned have a non-, 
statutory right to make 
representations to a panel ot 
three advisers- They have been 
told of this right and some have ' 
already indicated they d © not 
wish to exerdse it- _ . . 

Mr Richard Douglas (Dunfcnn- 
Kne West. Lab): How many. 
Libyan- students , are at present 
residing in the UK?- .What 
information about the harmful 
activities of these 21 became 
available post-April 14? 

Mr Hard: There are ab out 1.800 

here and many most be -reck- 
oned as critics or opponents of 
the Gadaffvreginie- In the' case 
of the 21. I revie wed ro e 
information about their .organiz- 
ing activity in support of ate 
regime after- last wedfs events 
and decided; that the n p resence 
here in present circums tan ces 
was no longer conducive to 
national security; " 

Mr Terrence Dicks (Hayes and 
Hariington, C): Why only 21? 
Why cot deport' ail Libyans, 
which is what tbe vast majqnty 
of people here warn? 

Mr Himb Because my powers 
are limited as I have said. I wiB 



Hank Review of checks.- .. 

■ on Libyan pitots 

not hesitate to exercise those 
powers again when it seems to 
me that the criteria I . have 
described are mo. 

Mr Michael Mates (EasrHarap- 
shire, C): Would he not flinch 
from taking equally robust ac- 
tion agafast Syrians who might 
have been involved - to The 
preparation of tire bomb which 
nearly got - aboard tbe . Et-AF 
airliner? - ..... 

Mr Hrad: He w£Q not cxpectme 
to comment on that example; : 
My concern has- to be notjnsr 
with. Libyans; but any wane 
presence here isnar conducive 
to national security. • . ~ 
- ~ He said later there were about 
7.000 "Libyans in Btitam onder 
immigration control. 


Child custody law 
to be uniform 


HOUSE OF LORDS 


The law on tug-of-love cases 
would be reformed under the 
Family Law Bill so the threat 
that a second court could make 
a different order was removed 
Lord Hailsbam of St Maryle- 
bone. the Lord Chancellor, said 
in the House of Lords when he 
successfully moved the second 
.ending of the BilL 

The BilL he said, provided a 
scheme for the enforcement of 
custody orders within the 
United Kingdom in order to 
combat the growing serious 
social problem of child abduc- 
tion. The Government was con- 
cerned to solve this problem and 
the Bill was proof of that 
resolve. 

Fart One of the Bill replaced • 
with a uniform set of rules the 
present multiplicity of jurisdic- 
tion under which the courts 
decided custody. There was no 
change in the test for custody, 
uniform throughout the United 
Kingdom, that the welfare of the 
child was of first and paramount 
consideration. 

The Bill ensures that custody 
orders made in one part of the 
United Kingdom upon this test 
(he said) will automatically be 
enforced in all other pans of the 
United Kingdom. No longer 
will it be necessary for parents of 
a child abducted from one part 
of the United Kingdom to have 
to recommence proceedings in 
another part where the child has 
been taken. 

Lord Etwyn-Jones. a former 
Labour Lord Chancellor, said 
the aim of dealing with what had 


become known as “tng-of-Jove" 
cases was a welcome measure. It 
would limit the' opportunities 
for mischief and move towards 
the civilised settlement of 
disputes. 

The only part of the BiH with 
which the Opposition disagreed/ 
was the startling proposal that 
the Matrimonial Causes Rules 
Committee should have com- 
plete power to amend or repeal 
any statutory provision relating 
to the practice and procedure of 
the Supreme Court or county 
courts as necessary in con- 
sequence of provision made by 
the rules. 

That, be said, would allow the 
committee to abolish the decree 
absolute if it so desired. The 
constitutionality of tbe proposal 
was highly dubious. Such power 
should be the perogative of 
Parliament alone. 

That proposal was coupled 
with power in matrimonial 
cases to make financial pro- 
visions for legal aid work on a 
wholly different basis from pri- 
vate work. The fear was that this 
would result in those legally 
aided receiving an inferior ser- 
vice and would discourage 
efficiency. 

The Bill was read a second 
time. 


Animals Bill through 

Animals (Scientific Proce- 
dures) Bill which provides new 
regulations for experiments 
involving animals was read for 
the third time in the Commons 
laie on Monday night by 141 
votes to 26 — Government 
majority 115. 


New MP attacks cuts 


HOUSING 


Poor housing conditions and 
homelessness have been greatly 
exacerbated by government 
expenditure cuts. Mr Nick 
Raynsford, Labour winner of 
the Fulham by-election said in a 
maiden speech during an Oppo- 
sition debate on housing. 
MrKaynsfoid. a former director 
of the Housing Aid Centre, 
SHAC, said that Britain was at 
the bottom of the European 
housing spending league. For 
every £100 spent on housing in 
the last year of the last Labour 
Government only £30 was spent 
by the present Government last 
year. Britain spent less as a 
proportion of gross domestic 
product on housmg than did any 
other country in Europe. 

Opening the debate, Mr Jef- 
frey Rooker. an Opposition 
spokesman on bousing and 
construction, moved a motion 
calling" for a new approach to 
housing policy which combined 
investment in. good housing 
with responses to family and 
individual needs in older to 
bring about solutions based 
upon choice, freedom and fair- 
ness and to improve tbe quality 
of life. 

He said that the best year 
under the Conservatives had 
seen 217,000 new homes 
started. That was 47,000 fewer 
than in Labour’s worst year. 

Inflation had risen by 74 per 
cent since 1979 but in the same 
period rent had gone up by 144 
per cent and mortgage interest 
rates had gone up by 158 per 
cent. 

The Government should lift 
VAT from improvements and 
repairs carried out by registered 
builders. They should ensure 


that every home in tbe land had 
hot and cold water, a bath and 
an inside toilet within three 
year?. 

It was not pie in the skyto ay 
there .was a demand for repam 
and modernization. It would 
cost £18 billion to bring tbe 
public sector stodc up to good 
condition. ' : " • 

It was not prudent- financial 
management to ignore the £6 
billion that local authorities had 
locked away, in bank accounts 
since the sale of property and 
land. It had to be released. 

Without returning to the 
“quick-buiM" policies " of the 
1950s and 1960s which had 
caused so much distress, there 
was a need fora comprehensive 
national house building pro- 
gramme for all kinds of tenure. 
Mr John Fatten, Minister for 
Housing, urban affairs and 
construction, moving" an. 
amendment welcoming - the 
Government's approach to 
housing policy, said one of the 
'most popular housing policies of 
any government bad meant the 
ground had shifted not jnst to a 
point of the Conservative 
Party’s choosing bur of the 
peoiple’s choosing. 

The chief secretary to the 
Treasury (Mr John MacGregor), 
was waiting with his little cal- 
culator for evidence of bow- 
much Labour’s policies would 
cost os top of Their £24 bfltion 
worth of pledges so far. (Loud 
Labour protests). 

The management record .of 
many local authorities had sot 
made today’s bousing problems 
any easier. There were 116,000 
houses and flats standing empty, 
more than the total number of 
families accepted as homeless 
last year. Some 26,000 houses 
and flats had been empty for 
more than 12 months. Empty 


houses and flats were an -affront 
to the homeless. . . 

Many council housing depart- 
ments were simply too big to 
provide, proper levels of 
management- 

They ; bad to find ways to 
break up thrae great empires, to 
achieve more diversity of 
management and . ownership* 
and to encourage more' tenant 
' participation in the organization 
and management of their estates 
or ^blocks. The' Housing and 
Planning BiH would promote 

hfr Rayasfenl sakftftat On tbe 
most .cautious estimate about 
one in 10 properties in Britain 
were other unfit for habitation 
or lacked basic amenities like 
bathrooms or toVaiories. : 


In his i Fulham co n stit ue ncy 
were a substantial number of 
(vivaie rented prop erti e s and 
many had tbe most appalling 
conditions — some of the worst 
in. the country. - . - ' 

Many, owner-occupicre lived 
in properties they, did not have 
the- money to ma i nt ai n. Their 
houses were friendly faffing to 
bits around them. - - 

Government policy-, was not 
just a question of cuts. It was 
alsoa question ofonc-sidcdncss. 
Tbe Government had been ob- 
sessed with the owner-occupier 
market and ignored the needs of 
people who could not afford or 
did bcit want to own their- own 
.homes. ' ■ • f » •- 

What was required was more 
investment in nonse ’eonstruev 
tiou arid improvement, not n 
massive return to tire days of 

high rise bufldings» tout^a sus- 
tained programme prov iding 

a' lO-tSyfar 
period, would ensure sufficient 
homes to meet needs. . ■ 


Sogat folly lost its members their jobs 


THE PRESS 


The print union Sogat '82 had 
led its members into folly and 
cost them all their jobs in the 
tapping dispute with News 

International. Mr Kenneth 
Clarke. Paymaster General and 
chief Government Spokesman 
in the Commons on employ- 
ment, said duringquesuon time. 

Fleet Street had been 
epitomised over the years, he 
added, by robust but incom- 
petent management and mili- 
tant unde unions defending all 
kinds of rackets. 

The Government defended 
the right of trade union mem- 
bers to be consulted before they 
put their jobs at risk by taking 
industrial action. 

The operation of the indus- 
trial relations legislation in- 
troduced since 1979 was kepi 
under constant review and en- 
couraging progress had been 
made towards giving members a 
greater say in the affairs of their 
own unions, a fairer balance of 


power between unions and 
employers and better industrial 
relations. 

Mr Charles Wanile ( Bexhill and 
Battle. Cy. Does not the action 
attempted by Sogat at Wapping 
contrast sharply with the general 
reduction in the number of 
industrial disputes following the 
introduction of ballots? 

Is it not the case that Sogat 
would not be in its present 
difficulties with the courts if it 
had simply balloted the mem- 
bers it had instructed to strike? 
(Labour MPs: it did ballot 
them). 

Mr Clarke; He is correct As far 
as I am aware, the onto injunc- 
tions obtained against Sogat and 
the sequestration of its funds, 
was because it failed to ballot its 
wholesale members who they 
asked to come out on strike. It is 
important that the Government 
has given union members the 
right to be consulted before they 
risk their jobs in strike action. 
Mr Ronald Leighton (Newham. 
Northeast. Labj: When the re- 
view of the legislation is under- 
taken. would he accept that the 


majority of British people feel 
that if Mr Murdoch could carry 
out his current industrial hatch- 
ery and have the law os his side, 
there is something wrong with 
the law. 

If a union like Sogat which 
did not set out to break the tow, 
to ignore the law or be in 
contempt of the law, has every 
penny of its funds sequestrated 
within days of entering a lawful 
dispute after a ballot, then the 
law is gro&slylmfair afld is badly 
in need of reform. 

Mr Clarke: Sogat failed to baflol 
the wholesale members it was. 
calling out on strike. It must 
have known that was unlawful. 
It went before the courts and 
failed to withdraw the blacking 
instructions or purge its 
contempt 

ft has simply failed to comply 
with the law which has got great 
popular support in tire country 
ana has contributed to im- 
proved industrial relations in 
industry. 

’ This Government defends the 
right of members to be con- 
sulted before they put their jobs 




at riskl Sogat led its members 
. into folly and cost them HI their 


jobs. 
Mr J 


John Prescott, chief 
sftion spokesman im 
meant: In view of the declared 

public Sympathy of Mr Clarke 

for the printers’- dispute, is he' 
aware that simply by tire cre- 
ation of new companies Mr 
Murdoch has swindled the 
employees of £80 million redun- 
dancy pay. thrown confusion on 
the right to strike and pideetand 
allowed the sequestration of 
foods which, according to Mr 
Murdoch, is all now possible 
under the Government's 
legislation. 

A reply he gave me recently 
showed that U8 working days 
per 1.000 employees more were 
lost in disputes - under this 
legislation titan under Labour. It 
is ami-trade union legislation 
and about time he reviewed and 
repealed h. 

Mr Choke: The figures are 
virtually meaningless because 
(hey are averages inflated in our 
case by the miners' strike in one 
particular year and in the La- 


bour .Govcrnment’s case fry the. 
■ “winter of discontent?. .-. 

A number of disputes to this 
country last year was the fewest 
for 50 years. The number of 
days. lost - up. to. February this 
year was tire lowest fbr 19 years. 

• He wfll know there is a fimii : 
to the . extent to which I rani 
comment on the current dispute 
berweenNews Inlgrnatiftmil and ■ 

■the various print unions but, iff 
can speak generally, over the. 
years Fleet Street has been 
epitomised by exuerady robust 
and. rather incompetent 
management and. -extremely 
militant trade unions which 
defended rackets of all kinds. 1 
am constantly astonished at the 
way he keeps resorting to Fleet 
Street as an example of the new 
industrial relations legislation 
that would sweep. away our 
existing roles. 


Parliament today 

Commons (230k European 
Communities (Amendment) 
BilL second reading. 

Lords (230); Debate on serious 
and violent crimes. 



Tbe worst tiring tint cwfe! 
happen for Eusiepean-Ameii*: 


the Libyan oiss to be feF 
fowed by a transxriflfltic. tea* 
war. The threat is serious to 
jrfjgff fcmi modi recentttffl- 
not, esperiaBy fram the 
United States. 

Mr James Bakac, the US 
Treasury Secretary, fold the 
Organxrattoa for Economic 
Co-operation and Deretop. 
ment or Ffcrzs btsr week " ' 


resolved before they e r u pte d 
into open warfare. There has 
bees*- plethora «f predictions 
tfcattfroeisto beaneweraof 
damaging protectiouiSt togls- 
JfltiM &t tbe VS. Baf. whetr! 
spoke to Mr Malcolm 
American Cam- 
merce Secretary, tb is weethe 
struck a different note. 

It was the rise of protection- 
ism far Europe rather than the 
US that he fenced. He was net 

so fbofistr as f» deny the 
existence of protectionist sea- 
fisKot la the US, fait he was 
justifiably promt of (fa 

A jri n*., , haanWiI 

Amnwgrtawa ROnO ~*B 
wkhstawfing H. “We would 
set expect to see serioqs 
pretectiouist kgistottou^ he 
told sev "tint we 
vmMe to mist by one tnetos 
or jaaothayindadtog the pres- 
idential veto. 1 " .'. ’ • 

'■ This ctmtrasts wiffi wfcaFl 
fats bearing fan other mem- 
bers «f the R^agan Adnuitis- 
txntioA when I was , to 
Washington ins than, two 
months ago. Bat Mr 
nssessneot seats 
more conmfag oath&pafct. 


4 


Less optimistic 
about Europe - 


My-^ fcmrestim to that the 4 
pressure is very strong only to 
' tbose parts Of -America wfae 

faagpiSeJ'-fa 

Congress for electoral reasons. 

bnt thati j^ triti not ire sWm 
enough to overwheln an to 
mfaitotretton that is sufficient- 
|y deternriiv l hFrepel it Mr . 
BakfiftdgeV words were W& 
soring evidence ttf that deter- 

mtnaffan,* " ■ 

" But he was much less opth 
mistic about Etoope. '‘Unless 
the EEC cou n tries - find a way 
to address their troeroptoy- 
ment proUexa,” he warned, 
“there wffl be contiirealtoh 
creasing pressure on the EEC . 
to become more protectiomst - 
. He would therefore fike to S$ 
see European gpvcxnmenls de-. 
liberateJy e xp an din g their 
economies so as to rdfcve 
nnemptoyment Whether! this, 
to really necessary to reduce 
European pleas for protection 
may be questioned. Bat Euro- 
pean economic expansion 
would be one of the least - - 
punfal ways of ledacrafetfa 
American trade deficit; IW 
might diminis h the pressffl* 
fox American protection *bA * 
would certainly be hetfjfnl'to 
the US Government. . 

So thtre may well hare bean - - 

as efement of special pleading . 
to. Mr Baldridge’s advice. But 
his risnarks were alsa confir- 
nration of -the Reagan ^ 
Administration's tendency 4 
these days to see international 
trade qnestions in a wider 
ucenomic context v : , ; - 


liKi^atronat ; 
disenminatipn : 


But it is agricultural tritie 
chat is causing most anxiety to 
•Amezicaapowymakexs at the 
moment Mr Baldridge aridThis 
coDeagnes are partirafeciy to- 
dtonaatat. the.iaercasfag dis- . 
enmi nation - 'against .US. 
forming exports which will be 
fare j* f tire side . effects of 
Spaaish and Fwhmse acces- 
sion 'to the -' European 



production on both sides oftite 
Atlantic Utere are bound ro be 
a_ succession of, spedfic 
complaints: ; .. ' " . 

l . It was therefore OKafoagfag 
hear. Mr Baldridge' ac- 


e think that yon bare 
to toe EEC an $gregtaB 
agricotanal poGcy insofar as 
its ’effects on world trade gjfV 
he said. But he hastened to 
add tiba( “fair owtiagricoltural 
policy is just as bad if aid 
worse thantire EEC”. - 

These remarks point to? 



J 


jundanreatai reassessment Pf .. 
agricnlthrai support policies. ; 

.- ‘.Mf main conclusion, 
though, is that international 
trade problems are a symptom * 
of a deeper disorder. Tn a world * 
of floating .exchange rates 
there is .a greater . need! for 
mtentatiottal agreement on 
policies of economic manage* 
meat The best hope -for 
averting a trade war to that tire 
United States is giving a lead ' 
to tint direction, ' ^ e 


’ ; ?1 rV£s, . 


f te A Cape*. i«-i Lean o»l'Tp-r nnera. 


farm. P-i nuore niPM. »tri nwre "vwyi 










fi*.j : 
*4iiv 

^ . ' A 


- I * 
£ - 

f f i ** 


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HI 

'■■'I 


'*KSffi.V!- 





”THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APR f t n 1986 


HOME NEWS 


«S 


Better communication 


. essential to improve 

industry, minister says 

By Anthony Bevins, Political Correspondent 


. * Two-way communication 
- ‘between management and em- 
. ployees was an essential pan 
• ;of the cure for the British 
; disease, . Lord Young of 
T.Graffhara, Secretary of State 
for Employment, said Iasi 

it. 

ut he said in the Stockton 
lecture at the London Busi- 
ness School that the commu- 
nication breakdown in British 
industry went fer beyond poor 
management and hostile trade 
utiionsL 

. “The real culprits are bed- 
ded deep down in our national 
history and culture. The whole 
thrust of changes . in our 
economy since the late 19th 
century has been anti- 
enterprise” 

. There had been a century of 
9 mistrust and, although last 
■ ' year saw the lowest number of 
strikes for nearly 50 years. 
Lord Young said that the 
‘‘virus of the British disease” - 
the underlying and entrenched 
attitude of “us and them” - 
still existed in the system. 

’ * Education had little contact 
with and no regard for indus- 
try, finance had little concern 


for small business and new 
enterprise, industrial relations 
put a premium on conflict and 
confrontation, and the indus- 
trial system sought protection 
at home and abroad. 

Lord Young said that pay 
bargaining had been the “key 
failure" of industry and he 
said that profit sharing and 
share ownership, rather than 
union confrontation, would 
provide employees with the 
best job protection because 
they would ensure that people 
received a share of the rewards 
of success, and would force 
them to “adj ust their efforts to 
the fruits of failure”. 

The Government had also 
helped to even the balance of 
power between management 
and unions with its industrial 
relations legislation. 

But Lord Young added: 
“An even more important 
approach is to improve 
management's relations with 
employees. 

“The first law of manage- 
ment is good communication. 
The second law of manage- 
ment is to communicate often. 
When all in a company feel 


part of it, they take responsi- 
bility and accept 
involvement.” 

Without communication, 
there was enmity and that 
soured the whole work rela- 
tionship. Lord Young cited 
Hewlett Packard, Hitachi, 
Pirelli, Sanyo. Marks & Spen 
cer and John Lewis as working 
examples of companies which 
had broken through “the 
sound barrier” of understand- 
ing between management and 
workforce. 

He sai± “What is important 
is not the form of ownership, 
or the structure of the compa- 
nies, It is, I contend, the 
nature of the communication, 
between all who work togeth- 
er. If that can be extended to a 
form of ownership - good. 

“If it can be introduced by 
having a community of inter- 
est in the profits of the 
enterprise - so much the 
better. 

“But if it can be introduced 
by frequent communication, 
which, if I might be allowed a 
gentle reminder, includes lis- 
tening, then so much the 
best." 


* 


Expenses 
‘fiddle’ 
man jailed 

■" ; A former member of the 
Conservative Party’s national 
executive was jailed for three 
months on Monday for cheat- 
ing on his expenses. 

The world of Colin Porter, 
aged 48. began to fall apart 
when his longstanding mar- 
riage broke up, Sheffield 
Crown Court was told. He 
moved from Doncaster to 
become steward of a Conser- 
vative club in Blackpool but 
continued as a member of 
South Yorkshire county coun- 
cil 

He falsely' claimed £777 
from the council early last 
year for travelling expenses 
from Blackpool to South 
*. Yorkshire when he was stay- 
1 r £ng with friends in Doncaster, 
said Mr William Lowe, prose- 
cuting. 

Driving ban 
for Coleman 

David Coleman^ the sports 
commentator, was' banned 
from driving for a year yester- 
day at Beacohsfield 
magistrates' court and' fined 
£250 for a drink-driving 
offence. 

Coleman, aged 59. of Pipers 
Lane, Great KingshilL Buck- 
inghamshire. was just over 
double the legal limit He 
admitted the offence. 

Rugby charge 

The Welsh rugby interna- 
tional David Bishops aged 25, 
of Whitchurch Road, Cardiff, 
appeared before Blackwood 
magistrates, Gwent, yesterday 
accused of causing actual 
bodily harm during a match to 
Hie Newbridge player Chris 
Jarman, aged 24. The hearing 
was adjourned for two weeks. 

Python hunt 

A 14-foot python described 
as extremely dangerous be- 
cause it has not been fed for a 
month, is being sought by 
Leicester police. The python, 
and a six-foot boa-constrictor, 
^ disappeared after raiders 
broke inio a garage near 
Braunston Frith. 

Sniffing check 

Eight junior soldiers at the 
Prince of Wales depot at 
CrickhoweU, Powys, have 
been interviewed by military 
police concerning allegations 
that they took part in solvent 
sniffing al The camp. 


Political claims of 
TV bias ignorant’ 

By David Hewson, Arts Correspondent 


? i 


The Director-General of the 
BBC Mr Aiasdair Milne, ac- 
cused politicians yesterday of 
condemning television for 
bias out of ignorance. 

His counter-attack against 
accusations of political bias 
came the day after Mr Nor- 
man Tebbit, chairman of the 
Conservative Party, said that 
television coverage had 
swayed public opinion against 
the raid on Libya because it 
concentrated on civilian vic- 
tims and not military targets. 

Mr Milne, speaking at a 
conference on politics and the 
media at Goldsmiths' College 
in London said: “With the 
greatest respect for the load 
they (politicians) have to car- 
ry, for the interminable hours 
they have to put in, I suggest 
their criticism would have 
greater weight if they thought 
more carefully about the rea- 
sons they adduce for saying a 
given programme is superfi- 
cial- or tendentious or badly 
argued. 

‘Those views no longer 
command . automatic defer- 
ence. And attacking television 
as biased to left or right cannot 
do more than temporarily 
rally their own troops.” 

Politicians possessed a sort 
of “political colour 
blindness”.“They tend to see 


what they want to see, or, 
rather, don't want to see." he 
said. 

Parliament had the biggest 
say in how broadcasting was 
to be organized and financed 
but its members had for less 
time than the rest of the public 
to see for themselves what the 
programmes were like. 

"IF television has anythi 
like the importance impu 
to it. if it is argued that it often 
sets the political agenda, then 
it is not unreasonable to 
expect our legislators to sam- 
ple its offerings with greater 
frequency.” 

Mr Milne said that not only 
did politicians perpetually ex- 
press judgements but in turn 
were judged day in and day 
out. Their instinct was to look 
for misrepresentation. 

Meanwhile, programme 
makers always bad their an- 
tennae out to sense whether it 
was possible they might be 
used. They looked for conspir- 
acies, and saw issues with the 
clarity of observers without 
connections, issues . they 
thought were being fudged by 
politicians with seemingly all 
too many connections. 

"We have here absolutely 
the makings of an antagonistic 
set-up," Mr Milne said. 






The aircraft carrier HMS Hermes after entering Devon port Dockyard yesterday. She will undergo a five-month refit before 

being handed to her new owner, the Indian Navy. 

HMS Hermes is sold to Indian Navy 


HMS Hermes, the aircraft carrier 
which was flagship of the British task 
force during the Faikiands conflict, has 
been sold to India. The agreement was 
signed last weekend, and it is under- 
stood that the price is about £50 million. 

Although confirming that the sale had 
been agreed, the Ministry of Defence 
would not confirm that India was the 
buyer on the ground that any such 
announcement should come from the 
buying country. However, discussions 
have been in progress between the two 
countries over the future of the Hermes 
since at least last June and there is no 
doubt that India is the buyer. 

The 24,000-ton carrier entered service 
with the Royal Navy in 1959, but since 
the spring of 1984, until recently, she 
had been at anchor at Portsmouth and 


By Rodney Cowtoo. Defence Correspondent 

used only for training. She has been 
available' to go to sea if necessary at 30 
days’ notice. 

She was towed to Plymouth a month 
ago after preliminary agreement on the 
sale had been reached, and yesterday 
went into dry dock at the Royal 
Dockyard at Devonport. 

She will undergo a refit expected to 
last about five months before being 
handed over to the Indian Navy. Two 
hundred Indian sailors are expected to 
join the Hermes at Devonport in the 
next few weeks, with more arriving 
during the refit. 

It has been the policy of the 
Government to dispose of the Hermes 
once three of the In vinci bi e-class carri- 
ers were in service. That position was 
achieved last November when HMS 


Ark Royal became operational. The Ark 
RoyaL however, is the only one of the 
three available at the moment because 
HMS Invincible has recently begun a 
long refit at Devonport and HMS 
Illustrious will be under repair until late 
July after a fire in a gear-box. 

The sale of the Hermes will be a final 
disappointment to many supporters of 
the Royal Navy and the Royal Marines, 
some of whom had continued to hope, 
against all the evidence, that the 
Hermes might have been retained for 
the Royal Navy because of her value in 
amphibious operations. 

The Indian Navy already has one 
British-built carrier, the Vikrant, and 
has eight Harrier short- take-off-and- 
vertical-landing aircraft, with another 
10 oo order from British Aerospace, 
which could be operated from Hermes. 


Device ‘sniffs out’ 
hidden explosives 

By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


A portable instrument that 
detects vapours from con- 
cealed explosives is under test 
by security experts. Vapours 
at concentrations as low as 
one part in 100.000 million 
parts of air, are uncovered in 
two seconds. 

The equipment is a more 
sensitive version of apparatus 
used, together with metal 
detectors, to monitor visitors 
for hidden explosives, in- 
stalled at the House of Com- 
mons. 

The device was developed 
by Analytical Instruments, of 
Cambridge, a firm that diver- 
sified imo industrial and per- 
sonal security systems 18 
years ago, initially with instru- 
ments tor gas-leak detection. 

In addition to developing 


detectors for the Armed 
Forces, police and security 
services in 50 countries, banks 
and industry, a specialist sub- 
sidiary, Al Security, makes 
remote-control robots for trac- 
ing suspect vapours. 

Imperceptible amounts of 
vapour are pinpointed by the 
use of gas chromatography. 
The inventors say that the 
device measures only the mol- 
ecules found in explosive va- 
pours from nitroglycerine, 
nitrobenzenes and the newer, 
more elaborate explosives. 

The instrument, costing 
about £6,000. distinguishes 
between vapours from explo- 
sives and those from non- 
explosive material with a 
similar chemical composition. 



to Lord Dudley 


Lord Dudley, aged 66. re- 
ceived a public apology in the 
High Court in London yester- 
day from the author and 
publishers of the book. Prin- 
cess Michael of Kent, over 
references which reflected on 
his honour and integrity. 

Mr Peter Lane, the author, 
and Robert Hale LidUhe pub- 
lishers, agreed to remove all 
the references from future 
editions of the book, and to 
pay Lord Dudley’s legal costs. 

Announcing setilemeni of 
the libel action hiscounsel, Mr 
Richard Rampton. told Mr 
Justice Hutchison that the 
book contained imputations 
against Lord Dudley’s mo- 
tives and attitudes which were 
without foundation, and were 
a grave reflection upon his 


honour and personal integrity. 
©Larry Adler, aged 72, the 
musician, yesterday won un- 
disclosed libel damages 
against Express" Newspapers 
over a suggestion that he 
charged a fee to guests at the 
bunch party of his autobiogra- 
phy, h Ain't Necessarily So. 

The item, in the Daily 
Express William Hickey col- 
umn in October, 1984, was 
headed "You Don't Necessar- 
ily Go." 

His counsel, Mr Richard 
Rampton, told Mr Justice 
Hutchison in the High Court 
thal the article confused the 
launch party at Maxim's res- 
taurant with a dinner cabaret 
performed by Mr Adler at 
Maxim's the same evening. 

The newspaper agreed to 
pay Mr Adler's legal costs. 


Solicitors’ 
fear over 
rules of 
conduct 

By Frances Gibb, Legal 

Affairs Correspondent 

The Law Society is oppos- 
ing government proposals to 
extend the Financial Services 
Bill giving ministers and the 
new Investments Board power 

to direct changes m the 
profession’s rules of conduct. 

The society and other pro- 
fessional bodies which set 
their own rules of conduct, 
fear that the board, which is 
being set up to regulate invest- 
ment business, would have 
power to determine how they 
operate. A decision on the 
proposal is expected at the 
Bill’s report stage at the end of 
this month. 

The society is particularly 
concerned because it is al- 
ready one of the most strictly 
regulated professional bodies. 
A spokesman said yesterday: 
"The society is set up under 
statute and our professional 
rules are made under statute, 
in consultation with the Mas- 
ter of the Rolls. 

“We are therefore already 
regulated through the judicia- 
ry because of that process of 
consultation, and the proposal 
would mean powers going to 
the executive, which could 
create a conflict of interest.” 

Under the Bill, the Govern- 
ment has a similar power to 
direct rule changes in respect 
of organization si the so-called 
“self-regulating organiz- 
ations”. which will be autho- 
rized to regulate investments 
by groups such as life insur- 
ance companies. 

But the Law Society says it 
would be wrong to bracket the 
professions with such organi- 
zations. Unlike solicitors, they 
arc not already subject to 
statutory regulation. 

The Bill makes it an offence 
to carry on investment busi- 
ness without authorization, 
usually from the Secretary of 
State through the new Invest- 
ments Board. Or membership 
of a self-regulating 
oiganization. 

The society is conducting a 
survey to find out what pro- 
portion of the profession’s 
total income comes from in- 
vestment income. It may be 
difficult to produce an accu- 
rate picture because, normal- 
ly. investment services are not 
separately costed or charged 
for, it says. 


Three company directors 
accused of conspiring to ob- 
tain British Telecom shares — 
Stephen Conway. of 
Lough ion. Essex: Roy Con- 
way. of Southgate, north Lon- 
don. and Michael Coffins, of 
Radletu Hertfordshire — were 
remanded on bail until May 
20 at Bow Street yesterday. 


Science report 


Clue to early cancer test 


Scientists studying how liv- 
ing organisms react to a 
specific biological sohstaace 
might have to wait hours, if not 
days, before they can analyze 
the results of an experiment. 

During that time many pro- 
cesses unconnected with the 
tests wflj have begun within 
the cell, making it difficult to 
be precise about the effect, for 
example, a particular hormone 
was having. A marker is 
needed to signpost biochemi- 
cal responses to hormonal 
stimulation as they happen 
before other changes occur. 

One such indicator has been 
foond by scientists at the 
Weizmann Institute of Science 
to be the enzyme creatine 
kinase (CK). It has also 
thrown up a possible early test 
for cancer. . 

The scientists established 
that after hormones or related 
substances had been adminis- 
tered to tissues in laboratory 


By Andrew Wiseman 
experiments, CK production 
increased within 60 minutes. 
They foond that was also the 
first change which occurred 
when cells grew or divided, 
and, most importantly, that 
the level of CK could be 
measured. 

Because of those character- 
istics Professor Alvin M. 
Kaye, who holds the chair of 
molecular endocrinology at the 
Weizmann Institute, in col- 
laboration «rith the Imperial 
Cancer Research Fund in Lon- 
don, has been able to diagnose 
sorgically-removed breast tu- 
mours which had responded to 
oestrogen, suggesting that the 
patients concerned could bene- 
fit from anti-oestrogen thera- 
py- 

When his groap studied CK 
production in human breast 
tissues, they found that about 
50 percent of malignant tu- 
mours responded to oestrogen 
within two hours, compared to 


more than 80 per cent of 
normal breast samples. 

That confirmed that mam- 
mary tumours reacted differ- 
ently to oestrogen stimulation. 
The phenomenon had been 
suggested in previous, more 
complicated, tests. The new 
quick and direct measurement 
of biological responses to 
oestrogen stimulation was 
made possible by the behav- 
iour and properties of CK. 

Other tests involving the 
measurement of CK produc- 
tion revealed that vitamin D 
could be essential not only for 
the growth of booes, but also of 
the brain and kidneys. 

Professor Kaye and his 
team are now studying the part 
played by CK in the normal 
growth and regulation of the 
development of cells. They 
have already found that when 
uteri of rats are stimulated by 
oestrogen, the genetic instruc- 
tion for the synthesis of CK is 
doubled within the first hour. 


Money and the National Trust: 3 


A sales drive without the hard sell 


' Today The National Trust 
will acquire another piece of 
cultural property, but it is not 
a mansion. Biddulph Grange, 
a flambovant Victorian man- 
sion in north Staffordshire, 
was a hospital for more than 
50 years until the West Mid- 
lands area health authority 
derided to sell it. 

But when the National 
Trust decided to bid for part of 
the estate, it aimed not for the 
house but for its immense 
garden which includes mas- 
sive stone monuments and an 
Egyptian temple and Chinese 

was an pul ipgethcr by the 
first private owner well over 
100 'ears ago. Enough has 
survived to make the mists 
latest acquisition the finest 
surviving example of a mid- 
Victorian garden fashioned 
with the wealth of a successful 
entrepeneur. 

The cost of restoring such a 

. i atiu. 


The National Trust has decided that it must do more selling to 
raise enough money for the upkeep of Its vast estates. But, as 
Hugh Clayton, Environment Correspondent, reports in the last 
of three articles, any such venture will be In the best i 


possible 


taste. 




fmap ? nati\-epatchwork wjU be 

immense. The 

ed that to meet the “ 
maintaining such treasures^ 
must explore every possible 
Sav of increasing its income. 
Sv at about £70 million a 
vear. 


Some of its most delicate 
plans involve increasing its 
efforts at sales and marketing. 

Us staff are reluctant to 
discuss detailed plans al this 
early stage, but they are deter- 
mined to do nothing which 
would damage the trust's 
reputation. 

A jazzy sales drive that 
brought in less money than 
was lost in subscriptions and 
gifts from affronted support- 
ers would be futile. But the 
arrival of Dame Jennifer Jen- 
kins as chairman of the trust 
makes a sales drive certain. 

She was chairman for more 
than 10 years of the 
Consumers' Association, a 
body that has pushed forward 
an immensely successful busi- 
ness through the magazine 
Which? and its offshoots. 

Dame Jennifer has said that 
she wants trust shops to open 
iu as many historic towns and 
cities as possible. There are 
already several shops in the 


ifusi’s properties, but many of 
the properties are closed for 
part of each year. 

She said that the trust 
wanted to double its income 
of £1.6 million a year from 
wading activities. “One urgent 
and expensive task is to repair 
and find suitable new uses for 
the many redundant farm 
buildings and lesser buildings 
attached to historic houses”. 
Dame Jennifer explained in 
her first speech to trust 
members. 

"We have for some time 
recognized that we can and 
must do more to generate 
income ourselves for the work 
that is essential if we are to 
overtake the backlog”. She 


Mr Robin Hariand. trust 
appeals manager, said that it 
needed to work harder to find 
business sponsorship. 

"We decided to identify 
business as a target and we are 
searching Manchester, Bir- 


mingham and the West Mid- 
lands. We need money to buy 
parts of the Welsh coast. 

"There is all too much 
coastal land on offer in Wales 
at the moment, and a lot of 
people in the western half of 
England use the Welsh coast. 

“We have got to research 
our potential much more care- 
fully and beaver away at 
identifying packages that peo- 
ple will like. 

"We have to end up being 
able to put somebody on the 
ground with a limited portfo- 
lio of National Trust causes 
which he can sell to business”. 
Mr Hariand said. 

The trust also wants to 
make more use of contacts 
with its growing membership. 
Mr David Beeton, trust secre- 
tary, said that membership 
was now managed separately 
from other trust activities. 

“Common threads do not 
get followed up. If we got as 
much income from mail order 
as. say, the World Wildlife 
Fund, we would be very 
pleased. 

"Btit all these things must 
be done with the greatest care. 
The reputation of the trust is 
so valuable.” 

Concluded 



There’s good news and bad news from Africa. 
The thousands of tons of life-saving wheat, 
sorghum, other foods, and medicines Christian 
Aid has sent makes good news. 

So do the Land Rovers, lorries and 
hundreds of tons of diesel fuel. 

And the cash for fanners to buy seed, 
tools, ploughs, and oxen, so they could start 
feeding their own communities, 

Good news comes also from programmes 
we’re supporting: to help 80,000 refugees in 
the Sudan; to build communities with access 
to water supplies in Ethiopia; to enable 
villagers in Eritrea and in West Africa to terrace 
the soil, planttrees, build dams, grow vegetables. 


The rest of the news is bad. 

Africa's crisis still runs deep. Millions still 
face starvation, particularly now in the Sudan, 
Ethiopia and Mozambique. 

The crisis will go on till Africa's poor have 
the means and the opportunity to support 
themselves. 

We’ve begun to scratch the surface of the 
problem, but that’s ail. We have to go deeper 
in tackling the causes. 

Your help is still needed. Don’t stop now. 



THE CHURCHES IN ACTION WffH THE WORLD’S POOR. 


TO: CHRISTIAN AID, P.O. BOX 1. LONDON SW9 8BH. 

■I ENCLOSE CHEQUE/P.O, FOR £ /PLEASE DEBIT MY ACCESS/VISA (BARCLAYCARD) ACCOUNT NO. 

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T .ih va: World debate continues as Moscow says US fared badly 

EEC opts for increased iMmmmrnSM 

AA j 


diplomatic effort to 


view 


*■ 

^ From Richard Owen, Luxembourg 

, ,. # 1 « new EEC package roots of Arab terrorism He m 

IntkemlKOfteteraM the Mid dle Eis t 

dnstical^ to redace.tte »mn- “ “£“?V eronp wideU accepted^ other 


m use «• — - — — - nf nnti-Iibvap measures, ana uk . A „ 

drastically to redoce the nmn- contact group widely accepted by other 

Zg* ****** 

3» £&£■£££ «■" o f British dengnd, for 

are suspected of subversive Mr van den 0 f’ 2 people's bureaux throughout 

activities, the EEC plans a day torera w qmsft^of a P^es instead for 

sSte of diplomatic activity to meetmg with Cokmd Gadaffi. V&eteremmi- 

expfain the European vfewto The EEC 5£fSd Se^STrf 

a^sasMM sssu ssles Sl* 1 — • 

iKHL^ spokesman said, and TripoH capitals. 

-Mf*3S£ 

ffaKSKJ 

^t£->s*5i »«S£jli£ 


*Tn? e Greek Foreign Minis- go to India with the Foreign 


wanted the EEC to send a 
■ contact group to Libya headed 
by Mr Hans van den Broek, 
the Dutch Foreign Minister 
and current President of the 
Council of Ministers. Greece 


OtVItuuj, — — n . 

— who snreeeds him as Presi- 
dent of the Council in July - 
and M Jacques Poos, . the 
Laxembonrg Foreign Muns- 
ter, who preceded him. 

The EEC troika hopes that 


pi uiii turn uiv Ts i 

Libyan diplomats to national 
capitals. 

The EEC also agreed that 

any Libyan expeUed fromflM 
EEC state for terrorist activi- 
ties should MtwaaticaUy be 
excluded from the rest of the 
Twelve. Officials tod™ 
would apply to the 21 Libyans 
expelled from Britain 
yesterday. 

The Foreign Ministers also 
sought to defiise transatlantic 
tensions over trade by giving 
the Commission a mandate to 
negotiate with the US within 
the framework of the. General 



Campaign 
of bate 


sup 


Thatcher 


WfrvGreece refuses to join curbs 

* From Mario Modismo^thens 

Greece insisted yesterdayit ^o£of|e 

anniv the measures simp y i ..immic ^ dinkunatic corps lists the 


Council of Mimstere.uree** The EEC troika Hopes mm rf ^ General 

proposed direct EEC ! tegs India , as head of to non- JlSSSTm. Tarife and 
with Colonel Gadaffi after Mr aligned movement, will help to Agromera ^ Qfffcjais 
Andreas Papandreon, the institute an inUraatK s dia- that Europe would still 

logne on terronsm desired to ^ measure” if 


Andreas Papandreon, the 
Greek Prime Minister, held 
talks in Athens on Friday with 
Mr Ahmed Shahati, Secretary 
or State at the Libyan Foreign 
Ministry. 

The Greeks had initially 


avert further American mili- 
tary action. The EEC has als© 
begun a dialogue with Arab 
states on the causes of terror- 
ism. The Greek view that the 


varum uw* “"—f- _ - y 

retaliate “in equal measure _ n 
Washington proceeded with 
threatened measures against 
EEC farm exports. 

Letters, page 17 


Greece msisted yesiCTcfay it 
would not 

against Ubya agreed by E uro- 
pean foreign ministers at thetr 
meeting in Luxembourg on 
Monday until it had tangible 
proof" of Libyan involvement 
in terrorist acts. 

“Such proof as you know, 
has not emerged so far, an 
official spokesman said in 
Athens. The official said that 
in any case Greece had wen 
quite sceptical about the effec- 
tiveness of the measures. 


siiuuiy — - r 

dispel eventual malicious ac- 
cusations that it abetted m any 


iviiuidw j »» ; - 

diplomatic corps lists the 
names of only five Libyan 


ToTad of diplomats. Three blmk p^as 
^mial^teofUby- Sya had 35 diploraatsl«Jrf 

maSTdi^o^ta^d BriS. - 19 of ton attached 

deo^ y About 60 are listed as to the cultural section. 

ajl-s-bS 

it the largest foreign embassy Ej>yans are living 
here. lUegauy ' 


An estimated 200 other 
Libyans are living here 
illegally. ' 


bos in which 10 Awgrans 
were evacuated from Mpslira 
west Beirut yesterday. At 
least 300 heavily-armed m- 
litiamen were involved ra tne 
operation, sparked 
killing last week of two 
Britons and an American 
(Renter reports). . The five 
women and five men 

SSStiJ^ fa the 
west to Christian east Beirut, 
escorted by s sew** JSlf 
and more than 20 nmnra 
cars, heavier security than 
that for the Britons evacuat- 
ed on Sunday. 


ftom Robert Fisk 
- Tiipoft .. & 

A Britain seething with 
hatred for Mis Thatcher - in 

gg^a-ias.- 

-is beinghasffly 

the Libyan authorities in what 
has now become a concerted 
and vengeful propagroda 

Mre ’fhatdsefs deciaon to 

allow the Americans to use 

British bases in t heir r aids on 
Libya was. according to the- 
Libyan official news ^agency 
f d ia d tSf, *cofldcnHim 
Jenpunctd by aff the puties.^ 

ffirMiBzatwfiS, grbupS v. Sto - 

dents and. wdrkBrs. in Britain . 

- The Goveriunent here is 
now calling uptm the rest of 
ihe Arab wmld lb join m 
hatred of tfarPrinw Munster. 

The new mood Hof ifcgnsi 
has been manifested in aseik s 
of large coloured photographs 
. of theOadaffi family's adopi- 
ed baby daughterTianrJa, Who 
was killed in tbe Amerman air 
raids.. ' _ . ’ 

The propaganda' is ’ crude 
but it is likely to: have a 
powerful effect on Arabs of 
other. nations.' ’ 


. 0? 



Moscow says six 


From Christopher Waltec, . 

SdSe^ent evidence from as P^^Si'far-vwmrtiHs.-'Mr 
spy SS 5es to show that the Preaed . 

tlnited Stales had covered up Lomeika refused to be, mote 
}h^Ml «rent of. its tosses ^perif^Wh 1 ^ pfam» were 

co^oDdents byldr Vladi-; forffie.JISAirFona; , 4 . 
mir Lomeiko, chief Forei^i _Mrtomeiko, 1 oiie,ofnietwo 
Ministry spokesman; wha ^ain spokesmen _ tor ^Mr 
that, m addition -to Gorb«*ov; the Soviet leaden 
me. We Fill bomber re- appeared to baye beav well 
ported missing by the Penta- briefed on the claim. _ Public 

mn, the UShad tost fouEOther opmicnimtheUmtedStaiWB 
SndL ■ deprived, of ^tmthfid.-mfor- 

Mr Lpmeftto dairned timt I nattoa%l»«u d ^ a ™ T 
^riiat be called ‘"national ’ , jbo . Reagan 

nical means'* badjuncovered of whipg n^ 

the loss of two additions US fitnzlr” of 

j^anes, whito wiwka^ .« ^ jnxWioimtred agamst Libya, 
more had ; befa» found the * 7 ^. conference was 

groand, makipgatot^ot Bye. fatwi inaseries called here 

Otiier sources, he added, ^ -speariwad the vigorous 

what appeared deliberate r ch V j e | propaganda campaign 
vagueness, believed that six ■■ ■ • ‘** R - — rT — — 

US planes had been tost ; . 

The Soviet allegation air 
tracted more than routine 
interest from Westwn diiHO- 
mats because “national tom- 





/Ir Gorbachov: 


Benghazi Soviet officials be- 
lieve that Russia has secured 
widespread international sup- 
port tor its condemnation, ot 
ihe US air strikes. 

• But the series of measures 
against Libya agreed this week 
by the EEC appeared to ‘haw 
corne as an unexpected Wow 
to the Kremlin; whidi yester- 

: day accused the European 
Governments of contradicting 
earlier denunciations of the 

raids.- 

“West Europe, is taking s 
definite position showinga 
lack of respect for history, 
said Mr Lot neikq. • ^ 

• WASHINGTON: The Rp- 
; gan Administration yesterday 

categorically denied the Soviet 
Haim (Mohsin Ali writes). 


French join rare triple 
Security Council veto 


From Zenana Pysariwsky, New York 

. discontent whatever means, couM not be 


Despite deej^ disco ntent 
with the American military 
strikes on Libya, the ntjre 
Weston bloc of the United 
Nations Security Council dis- 
played rare sofidarity and 
helped to shield the US from 
censure. 

The move, on Monday 
nlgbL was expected to fc 1 
major point of departure in 
heating Western divisions, 
partknhib between France . 
and the US, after Paris re- 
fused to allow. American 
planes to fly over French 
airspace. 

Britain and France joined 
the US in invoking their power 
of veto to block the draft 
resolution which would have 

condemned 0 k Americans for 

the bombing of Libya* la 
addition, Australia and Den- 
mark, which are not perma- 
nent members of the cbandl 
and therefore do not have die 
power of veto, voted against 
the measnre. 

Nine c o imtri e g voted in fa- 


niuuL iu “ \ - 

deplored as was envisaged ® 
the draftresointioa. . 

Although the draft prompt- 
ed 'a rare triple vrto, ds 
sponsors had to tone it 
considerably in order to 
the nine mtes in . favour. Tw 
same mated.' - reaction 
striking absence of a sense » 
crisis, marited five ds^ -of 
debate ou tire bombings- . 

-A delegation of non-aligned 
foreign ministers was d ae to 
arrive here yesterday no® 
Tripoti. They were experted.tfl 
pursue Libya's case wim Se- 
Sor Jarier Man ‘do Cu«to; 
the Secretary-General, 'bm 
dipkads said it woaM .« 
difficult, as it was m to 
councfl debate, to defend Lfo- 
ya whole-heartedly. The 
group, it was said, would f 
basically going through to 
motions. ’ 

The nine members of the 
council who. voted- fer fc® 
defeated draft resofatioa were 
tile Soviet Union, Bulgana, 
China, Congo, Ghana, Ma®- 


while Venezuela abstained. It 
is nmsual for France to cast a 
veto in the Security Councfl 
and, in oncomfarlaUe situa- 
tions when pulled by divergent 
interests, it has often resorted 
to abstention. . 

M Claude de Kemodaria, 
the French representative, 
said the French veto was a 
show of France's unequivocal 
opposition to terrorism, tad be 
wait oat of his way to empha- 
size that (be- French action in 
the councfl should please the 
Americans. , , 

Denmark and Anstrana had 
also voiced strong reservations 
over the American action, bid: 
in the end joined in sending a 
dear Western message that a 
fight against terrorism, by 


ThaftamLand the United Arab 
Emirates. 

The council 1ms ended con- 
sideration of the cofflpbtfM 
brought against the US by 
Libya, Maim, BarkmaFto* 
£yna and. Oman on behalf of 
the Arab group. 

As well as condemning ter- 
rorism, the draft would have 
defined the American be rbiug 
as a variation of the Uiiei 
Nations Charter and the 
norms of international 
conduct. 

Urging a peaceful resolution 
to ub^n- American differ- 
ences, the draft also wmdd 
have asked . Washington to 
refrain from carryta^ out any 
future reprisals against LUja. 


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* Libya: French C 






5? 


It TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


action to 


topple Gadaffi’ 


v. 


Sfete»''af 




■>• v- .... 


Iosco VV says; 
^ planes k 


: r- - 






3 Ch : 


41 ni 


‘ *. 4 -y r,> > 

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>-. vately told the Uniied States 
“at France would support 
American action against Libya 
. r i fit was strong enough to bring 
-'v- 611 of Colonel 

Gadam, senior Admmjstra- 
rr^.tion officials claimed 
yesterday. 

: . But M Jacques Chirac, (he 
Prime Minister, was said to 
^ » have rejected any support for 
' last week's American attack. 
... According to the officials, 

- . there was “a lot of private 
1 encouragement” from West- 

• ere leaders for the raid, al- 
i- though the governments had 

indicated in advance that they 
would have to take a different 
stand publidy. 

At no point was there any 
■ consideration of joint military 
>- ; action between the US and - 
IV any of the Allies. The officials. 
. _ said that President Mitterrand 
_ - told Genera] Vernon Walters, 
the US Ambassador to the 
United Nations, in Paris that 
, . France would support the 

* attack only if it was sustained 
; enough to bring down Colonel 


saying that some had suggest- 
ed “that we look seriously at 
real major action” against 
Libya. A senior official later' 
noted that Mr Reagan was : 
referring specifically to 
France, the only country that 
made Lhis suggestion when 
Genera] Walters visited Eu- 
rope before the attack. 

Another, official described it 
as “posturing” by the country 
that did not want to risk open 
association with the raid. 

The Administration may 
well -be trying deliberately to 
embarrass France over the 
affair. 

Some sources here speculat- 
ed that Mr Mitterrand's com- 
ments to General Walters may 
have been taken too literally 
by the USand that the French 
President was not seriously 
advocating tougher militaiy 
action. 


The officials claimed that 
several European Allies had 
suggested that the US should 
hit Libya harder and in a more 
co-ordinated way. “Co-ord- 
mated” was taken to mean 
repeated military strikes. 


Paris angry but 
doubts remain 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 


France reacted angrily- yes- 
terday to reports from Wash- 
ington that President 
Mitterrand had privately ex- 
pressed his readiness to hack 
an aD-ont American attack oa 
Libya specifically to 

overthrow Colonel Gadaffi, 
but that M Jacques Chirac, 
the Rime Minister, would sot 
hear of it 

■ -White there was * linn **iio 
comment” at official few! from 
:the Efysfe Palace, the QnL 
d’Orsay (Foreign - Ministry), 
and'the Hotel Matignon (the 
. Prime Minister^ office), faigh- 
ranking French sources pro- 
tested off the reeord that the 
Americans were “saying any, 
old thing’'* 

The sources said: “The 
Americans have gone crazy 
over this affair. They’re not 
content with France because 
we refused to allow- their 
aircraft to nse ©nr airspace on 
their way to Libya, and now 
they’re trying to sow dissen- 
sion between Chirac and 
Mitterrand.” 

Neverthless, the doubt ze- 
mains: reports that .France 
‘ wonld have supported stranger 
US action have come from too 
- many different somces. 

Furthermore, French politi- 
cal leaders have made no 
secret in private of their desire 
to see Colonel Gadaffi re- 
moved, and French represen- 
tatives hi the US ; have 


reportedly been explaining 
France’s refusal to allow ns 
planes to fly ova- its territory 
by saying hat it coaid not 
jeopardize its entire Middle 
east aid Arab policy for a 
ample salvo which resolved 
nothing. 

“Don’t do a pinprick,” one 
French leader is reported by: 
American sources to have told ! 
General Vernon Walters, 
President Reagan's special en- 
voy,/ when he was in Puis 
shortly before the US raid on 
Libya last week. 

Bttt did France go so for as 
to say that it would actively 
support an all-out attack? 
There is some suggestion that 
this- hare may hav e been 
started running, without offi- 
cial government or presiden- 
tial hacking, by M Claude de 
Xemcndaria, France’s diplo- 
matically inexperienced Am- 
bassador to the UN, in 
nsgnarded comments at a 
private dinner. 

. Others have suggested that 
Mr Walters may simply have 
misunderstood France’s dou- 
ble position of wanting to see 
an end to Colonel Gadaffi 
while not wishmg to bec ome 
involved. 

Bat those, trim know Mr 
Waiters point oat that he is a 
highly experienced diplomat 
who speaks excellent Rend, 
and that be is unlikely to have 
made such a mistake. 


Peres says 
Jordan 


plan best 


Neighbour 
hits at his 
‘old friend 9 


Strasbourg (AP) — Mr 
Shimon Peres, the Israeli 
Prime Minister, said yesterday 
'that the Jordanian proposal 
for settling the Palestinian 
problem still held the greatest 

- promise despite a breakdown 
:jn relations between King 
-Husain and PLO leaders. - 

- Mr Peres said the -only 

- framework that held promise 
was direct negotiation;' be- 
tween a Jordanian-P&lestinian 

- delegation and an Israeli -dele- 
gation. He differed sharply 
with President Mubarak of 
■Egypt who appealed to West- 
'em Europe to take an active 
-part in preparations for Mid- 
dle East negotiations. 

- “We call upon our Europe; 
an friends to accept the inner 
■logic” of the proposal for 
tripartite; negotiations, Mr 
■Peres said. 


Stockholm — Resident 
Chadti Bendjedid of Algeria, 
on an official visit to Sweden 
has criticized Colonel Gadam 
forte use of terrorism (Chris- 
topher Mosey writes). 

“Colonel Gadaffi is an old 
friend but we cannot accept 
. the methods Libya uses,” he 
said in an interview in Dagerts 
Nyheter, while strongly con- 
demning the US raids. 

“People who are fighting for 
their independence nave the 
right to use what others may 
call terrorism but not in the 
territory of an- umnvolved 
friendly nation,” he said. 


30 arrested 


US to drop 
Arafat 


Lima (Reuter) — Peruvian 
police' said they arrested 190 
people, including 30 women 
and 12 children, in an over- 
night swoop here following a 
car bomb attack on the US 
Ambassador’s residence. 

All were freed except for 30, 
who were being questioned. 


accusation. 

1 Washington (Reuter) -The 
US. Justice Department said 
■ywteitlay it would not bring 
charges against the Palestine 


Libera i ion Organization 

SiS Thai bomb 


About turn 

Ottawa - Canada, which 
had previously advised its 
L300 citizens in Libya to use 
their own discretion, has now 
called on them to leave. 




Insists 


. . From Christopher Thomas, Washington 

pri- Some of the Allies suppos- 
iteiy told the United Slates edly wanted the US to do less. 


and others thought the plans 
were about right. The officials | 
said that France's refusal to 
alltiw fly-over rights by Ameri- 
can Fill, bombers en route 
from England to Libya was 
not connected to President 
Mitterrand’s apparent support 
for a much larger military 
operation. 

President Reagan, on Mon- 
day, alluded to the private 
comments of Allied leaders. 



on troop 



From Mario Modiano, Athens 


Unless there is agreement 
on the withdrawal of the 
Turkish forces from northern 
Cvprus, the Greek Cypriots 
will refuse to discuss any plan 
leading to the establishment or 
an interim federal administra- 
tion on the island. 

This condition was put 
forward in the letter sent by 
President Kyprianou of Cy- 
prus to Sehor Javier Perez de 
Cuellar, the UN Secretary- 
General. in response to the 
fatter s proposals on the struc- 
ture of a federal republic. 

A close aide of President 
Kyprianou said: “We want all 
the Turkish occupation troops 
to go before the Cypriot slate 
is dissolved to make way for 
the interim federal adminis- 


propenv. 

Leading article, page 1? 


Cape daily is refused 
police information 


From Ray Kennedy, Johannesburg 


King’s ‘love chair’ sold Calabria olive oil fear 


Paris —The curious fmxteuH 
d'amosr, a double-decker con- 
traption ased by the future 
King Edward VQ on his 
frequent visits to one of Paris's 
most luxurious bordellos, has 
been auctioned here for 
£20,000, four times the expect- 
ed price (Diana Geddes 
writes). 


The “lore chair” was bought 
by Madame Soubrie. a descen- 
dant of the cabinet-maker who : 
apparently designed it at the 
turn of the century especially 
for the libidinous, but some- 
what paunchy. Prince of 
Wales at the brothel at 12 Rue 
Chabanais. 


Rome - Italian producers 
of olive oil are concerned 
because judicial authorities in 
Calabria closed 95 oil presses 
for allegedly polluting the 
subsoil (Peter Nichols writes). 

According to the National 
Confederation of Agriculture, 
the ruling could have serious 
consequences for the olive- 


growing areas of ihe south. 


Already 100.000 people in 
Calabria see their livelihood 
threatened by the closures. 

Calabria is Italy's second oil 
producing region after Apulia, 
and the labour force involved 
amounts to one-fifth of all 
workers in Calabria. 


South African police are 
refusing to give information to 
one of the country's leading 
English-language daily news- 
papers, The Cape Times. 

General Johann Coetzee, 
the Police Commissioner, has 
written to the editor. Mr 
Anthony Heard, saying that it 
appeared that the newspaper 
was not prepared “to change 
its biased and slanderous atti- 
tude towards the South Afri- 
can police'*. 

The decision comes 2 fter 2 


report of the shooting by police 
of seven alleged African Na- 
tional Congress guerrillas in 
Guguietu township. 

The newspaper’s crime re- 
porter. Mr Chris Bateman, 
said that eyewitnesses had 
claimed that one man had been 
shot as he had his bands up. 
and that another was “finished 
n!T as he lay wounded on the 
ground. Mr Bateman was tola 
he was “no longer welcome” at 
the daily police crime press 
conference. 



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iri-u; v . 

ArafeL over the killing of two 
American diplomats J 3 years 
ago in Sudan. . ... 

The Department cited lack 
of legal jurisdiction over tic 
.killings and insufficient 
evidence. - 

; The ambassador, Mr Cleo 
•Noel and Charge cTAfftires, 
Mi George Moore, were taued 
■after being taken hostage m 
Xhanoum by guerrfflas de- 
manding the release pfaita 
Sirhan, convicted killer of 
'Robert Kennedy, Responabil- 

ijty.was claimed by the Black 
^ptember Oigeteation. 


Bangkok (AP) — A bomb 
exploded inside the com- 
pound of the US Consulate in 


southern Thailand early yes- 
terday, damaging the building. 


It isn’t easy to get a job If you haven’t got a skill to offer. 

But industry is looking for people who have acquired the 
necessary skills, or who are ready to get those skills. Industry is glad to 
open its doorsto them. 

Thafe why you should pick up the 'Action for Jobs' booklet as 
yourfirst vital step to pushingthose doors open. 

. The bpoklet describes a wide variety of schemes to support 
more and better training - probably more training and re-training 


schemes than you ever thought existed. 

They are there for people prepared to acquire the skills that 
industry needs, and for those industries willing and far-sighted enough 
to provide training and re-training for their workforce. 

If you'd like to know more about these schemes, pick up the 
'Action for Jobs' booklet at your main Post Off ice, local Jobcentre, or 
Unemployment Benefit Office. 

Or send in the coupon below. 


Waite willing 


Mr Terry Waite, the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury's special 
envoy., said he was willing to 
return to Lebanon to negotiate 
the release of hostages, even 
though be believed the . US 
raid, had escalated rather than 
curtailed, terrorism. ... 


Fiogrammet by theDeparirrwfil of Employment end 
the Manpower Service!. Commrwion. 


SCHEMES FOR TRAINING 

YTS Job Training TiainmglcirEnlerpriM- Vcrtito'ntormUi.Mi T-?CMclo^i. nominee rents tor Employe ■- 
Wiflei ODpwiufBBRlraminsiPrcjtianmie OpeRTec&Piogijr.me. 


To: Action for Jobs, FREEPOST Curzon House, 
20-24 Lonsdale Road, London NW6 1YP 
Please send me the ‘Action for Jobs' booklet 

(Not dll tDe&erdwnes apply nNonhetn lrelatid 
n ya: wettiHFvou Viould conrnyoor tacaUabmsHef fulullifefeiul 


Address. 


. Postcode . 


(ration. Otherwise, we shall no 
longer be able 10 order them 
out since the Turkish Cypriots 
will have a virtual veto on aii 
government decisions.” 

President Kyprianou. in his 
reply to the Secrctary-Gencrai. 
offered a choice of two proce- 
dures; either an international 
conference to discuss the 
troop withdrawals as well as 
effective international guaran- 
tees, ora high level meeting — 
a sort of Cypriot 
intercom munal summit — to 
discuss these points, plus the 
application of freedom ot 
movement, freedom of settle- 
ment. and the right to 


Lanka; 
:ained‘ 
mbas? 
suspi^ 
with!! 
is. Mf; 
nganr 
tcienf. 
while 


r) 

ireiaiL 
” Bo- 
th his' 
. Sc; 
a. on 
1 men 
ding a- 
:epen- 


Juiia . 
east- 
• with 
years 
y S«rl 
:malc 
imily 






8 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 


] 


fsri 




V 


0 


[ conventional 

f REPAYMENT METHOD 

(INCLUDING MORTGAGE 
l SECURITY POLICY) 

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includes a projected terminal bonus payment of £16,099. The borrower is a man aged 34.) 



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NORWICH 
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INSURANCE 



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o-ff fVTWr.m^ 





J 






... 










* & ~<r 


THE TIM^ WEDN ESDAY APRIL 23 1986. 



nion 


Madrid thwarts 
tactics of opposition 

From Hany DebeHns, Madrid 

The Spanish Government’s ed the dates on ^Wchthe «n 

quick decision to go for early Government 2^ c { pany) 12; 

ssss'^s-fSSa' {bs&sss&sk 
* — ^.mmsss g£& fiFss 

Ska; sa«3££; SSfaaW 

Gonzalez. hastily summoned Senor Manuel m^toaer k b R Wican Left 
his ministers to a special of the coahhon. iteprracnxd frarf oKTSd Basque Left 
Cabinet meeting, leaders of opposition m Mbpnofcliid <§«'’« a™ 
the conservative Popular Co- that the ®p“^~. m< £ ve 1 The HB MPs boycott alt 
alitioo (CP) were still debating “would_ undoubtedly ba e activity. One of 

the advisability of puttmg beenpres^rted^- _ SeCOmmunist MPs formed 
their scheme into effect- " A main the his own Communist Party. 

It entailed calling for a non-soqahsl pobnomi is his seat 

censure vote. By law, a motion contm^g governmemora^ , n tf^SeUe, the Socialists 
for censure cannot be consid- trol of the state television 534 Q f 207 seats, and 

ered in parliament, until five monopoly. the Coalition 54. Other parties 

days after it has been present- _ In the October -202 represented are PNV, seven; 
ed, and early elections may tions, fte Somhsts won repress^ ^ ^ 5 ^^ sk; 

St be called while such a vote UCD, four, Majorcan Assam- 

h Ef 5 i-. ffUSSSStflCa- bly one; Independent, one. 


nVFRSEA SNE^S 

A grim Si 
farm J 


9 


leave 






. ' 

: -cuir - 


warning 
to EEC 


Finns in 
the dark 

. . - m A strike 


days after it has been present- In the Gctqoff 11 ^ 
ed, and early elections may turns, the Socialists won _202 
Ml be called while such a vote of the ^SOsraginUieCOT- 

^ SinttMrther factors restrict- 


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Chemical 
weapons 
pact near 

From Alan McGregor - 
Genera 

The Soviet Union yesterday 

L r ~.wl B rorinc nf nmiMS- 


Howe will tell US 
to abide by Salt 2 

- . a nsniAmatk* Correspondent 


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PUL luiwoiu A aw**» “ r--r — . 

als in the 40-mtbon United 
Nations disarmament confer- J 
ence which it described as 
“removing a major obstade 
to agreement on a ch emi c al , 
weapons treaty. 

These are largely identical 
with provisions of the US draft . 
treat; tabled in tike conference 
two years ago 

dent GeorBe_Bnsh Jfl«^ m 

tom, incorporated elements 01 

a draft submitted by the 
Russians in 1982. 

Uneasy at the spectacle of 
Iran sting chemical weapom 
intheGiilf War, the- two 

snperpowerearedeartyniov- 

ing towards an apeed treaty to 
prevent these weapons becom- 
ing “conventional. 

Both now accept the priBa- 

D le of international o«-stte I 

verificatiw brt d^s«* o»Bij 

manne r of doing it.^ Mr VOctor 
Issradyan, tte So "® 1 
gam, descriisd ti»e AmoTcan 
IwSosalsforajW-toproa- 
dnre as “nmeafistic vod. 

discrinrinatOTy.” 

The new treaty will comple- 

rnent the 1925 Gum l Proto- 
col prohilntiim nse of chemical 
ami bfotogjcal weapons 


Sir Geoffrey Howe; the 
Foreign Secretary, will today 
urge the Reagan Administra- 
tion to abide by the haute qf 
the 1 979 Straie^cAmsLimi- 
tation Treaty (Salt 2) by 
dismantling two Poseidon nu- 
clear submarines when a new 
Trident submarine is ready for 

launch next month. 

He will tefl Mr Paul Nhze, 

« : U Pritoin il inCW. 




non 01 uw wra ‘*'.v\ 7 " 
deterrence. In Bntaufs wew, 
‘adherence to treses sudias 
Salt 2 is essential n arms 

reduction talks are to succeed. 

“Mr Nitze is in London on 
the first sta^ of a tour to 
“consult” allies on tlw. ques- 
tion of whether Washington 

should keep to the Stit 2 limits 

despite growing evidence 01 
Soviet non-compliance. _ e 
1 According to some reports 

from Washmgtoruquqtmgan 
unnamed semor official. Pres-. 

idoit Reagan has already de- 
cided to dismantle the two 
Poseidon submarines, which 

cany 16 multiple-warhead 
missiles apiece, whenthenew 
Trident, Nevada, starts its 
sea trials on May 20. 

Without such action tne 
Nevada’s 24 missiles wouM 
™?the US 22 over Salt 2s 


limit of 1,200 multiple war- 
head missiles. , 

This is certainly the advice 
which has been given to the , 
President by Mr Nnze. who 1 
firmly believes that the US , 
should maintain its policy ot • 
not undercutting the meaty. ] 
His views are shared by Mr 
George Shultz, the Secretary 
of State. However, there are 
powerful voices within toe 
Administ ration, notably that 
of Mr Caspar Weinberger, the 
Defence Secretary, arguing 
that toe US should respond to 
alleged Soviet violations by 
sending a clear message to 
Moscow that it will no longer 
tolerate non-compliance. 

One compromise Motion 

which has been studied by toe 

Reagan Administration would 
permit the two Poseidons to 
be placed in “caretaker status. 

Mr Nitze will hear similar 
views to those exprased by | 
Sir Geoffrey when 
West Germany, Italy, France, 
The Netherlands and Bel- 

& The West German Foreign 
Minister, Herr HansThetnch 

r Genscher, said j^terday that 

i a decision to abide by Salt 2 
would be “a positive signal to 
; the Soviet Union Mid an 
I encouraging and^confidence- 
5 ^Mitlditig measure^^^^^^ 


/U*d when Sherion Tamoff, one of those who blasted open ihe Capone vault. SO 1 

A1 Capone’s cupboard is bare 

From Trevor FisWock ^JSS^SsU fi-JES SEfffJK 

***** ■ —aairas ^ ^ » 


From Trevor Ftshlock 
New York 

Tax officers and reporters 
who gathered in Chicago for 


two-hour television show - 
The Mystery of At Capones 
Vaults - hosted by an excited 


^«Ik.KflUvhooed unseal- Vaults - hosteo oy an c.uiw« 

inerfAl Capone’s secret vault reporter with a fighter p 

ate of Mother moos^e. mso . ^ 


Hubbard- 

There was no gangsters 
hoard - no money, diamonds, 
or whisky. Nor were there any 
bones of people who had 
“onset” Capone. Just a few old 
gin bottles; and they were 
empty. 


UK vault* 

leaving an unpaid tax wu._ 

The vault is in the Lexing- 
ton Hotel once the headquar- 
ters of the Capone empire, 
from which Americas most 

^^ottwosopenedond MMQf -£3E 

EStS T b, E& rrartous 

wm loft «ith dost on ■„ my 

hands and eg; on toeir fac^ nsed to say. Doubt- 

The television host raUan^ ^ ^nld have enjoyed toe 


— — - song “Chicago . ^ 

Pdfehdfcsident leaders jaUed 

From Roger Boyes, Warsaw luon in invesli 


H f 

From Roger Boyes, Warsaw in mvestigative 

Slomka and MrKrzysiqf KroL „,ctndv for more than a year. 
The five lading members two-and-a-half years cu ^j^ems have expect- 

of an anti-Soviet, uhra-nauon- - n jail the other members, m ^ authoriues lo ma ke an 

alist, dissidentgroup m Po- ^ Dariusz Wojcik and Mr lc of lhe five men, 

land were yesterday sentenc^ Andrzej Szumanski, were im- h government 

tolonB^toimsforpl^ng pruned for two year, 


to overtorow toe communist 
system. 

A Polish court decided that 
the most prominent rolemthe 
banned organization, known 
aTtoe Confederation for an 
Independent Poland, bad 

beenp^yed by 
historian and •"Jg'jJfi 
Leszek Moczulski. and jauea 
him for four years. 

Two men, Mr Adam 


MT Lianuat »wj““ — . 

Andrzej Szumanski, were im- 
prisoned for two years. 

Although the sentences 
were tou^i in relation to toe 
evidence against them - tne 
group does little more than 
print clandestine leaflets and 

sssU 

IKSS’Mgg; 

The other four received half 

the terms demanded. 

The confederation leaders 


Many dteidents have expect- 
ed the authorities to make an 
example of toe five mcn : 

The Polish government 
spokesman, Mr Jerzy Urtoru 
ronfirmed yesterday that ^toe 

authorities might consider ^- 1 

other amnesty for Ppbural 
prisoners. However, he em- 
phasized that this move was at 
a very early stage of consider- 
atiOT? and would deptmd on 
internal stability m ^°! an ^ 
and on toe activities of those 

in toe West , who support 

nrmosition activists here. 


From Richard Owe 0 1 b y 
Luxembourg, 1 p^nU 

“S‘SSS52TS5 I farili 
fh?Xricutor7 Commi»o n - ai 

i M? Frans Andnessen. non . 
^med lhal ihc Community 3 ble 

Sradingforover-spending plar 

on the farm budget this year t hin 
S" nearly £1 na,s ™ 

next vear to £1.3 bill |0 ° - l C 
The cost of the recent j cou 
realignment of the Eu™**" ^ 

Monetary System would be A 
£247 million this year and j on : 
nearly £400 million next year, -g 

1 .Compromise pr°p<**] I j 
nn prices was proposed by Q| 
he Netherlands — which j ( 
Dlds the presidency or toe ^ 

ouncil of Ministers — late on l 
londay night, but it beganio 
rumble yesterdav as minis- 
*rs raised national objections. I 
The Dutch compromise was 
[esigned to give member I 
tates flexibility m aPpJVJPJ c i, 
he propositi co-responsibibty 1 
evy on cereal farmers. 

It also involves abandoning X 
i controversial Commission j 
proposal for ending beet 1 

im rtchael Jopling.. the U 
British Agricidturc Minister tl 

said that Italy and The Neto I P 
erlands had given J*™" « 
some support in preferring 
price reductions to toe pro - 1 ji 
nosed levy. The Dutch plan 1 1 
Ed -the toa »JV ( 
forward”, he said, as it was 1 - 
based on total cereasL 

P^Snot see how this I 

council can come to any , 
conclusion.” a British officiti 1 , 
said, reflecting widespread 

pe £S ,S Sc Commission and 
Britain favour a price freeze i 
ive this vear. but toe French and 
«r West” German Governments I 
xl ‘_ say toat this would adversely I 

"an affect their farmers. 

M Francois Guillaume, toe 
L nt new French Farm Minister, 
ent vesterday showed some flexi- 
X bilitv, insisting on a pn«nse | 
„ of 1 per cent as a gesture to 
^ French milk farmers, comnd- 
erably less than toe 4.7 per 
JfJl cent he originally wanted, 
ider- But Herr Ignaz Kiechle, toe 
l on West German Farm Minister, 
land is under firm instructions 
hose from Bonn to resist all pnee 
jport cuts, and this is an obstacle to 
agreement 


hv n^ (R s^-3 


stations »«j£vjr aC am- 

fat ? llU f n^re ra? by unions 
oaign for more f»y 
in several industries. , _ 

.fiSSSarc 

hsa US. 

on strike altogether. ' 

Envoy’s son 
detained ; 

cion of being 

: Tamil separatist guerrillas, mt. 

- Ramanujam Mannikahngam 
, was detained near the anuent- 
city of Polonnaruwa white 
M travelling in a bus. 

» Botha talks 

:f Luxembourg (Reuter) -* 

The South African Foreign 
e l Minister. Mr R F Pik Bo^ 
r, tha. held talks here with his 

i- 1 Portuguese counterpart, be: 

in nhor Pires de Miran^co. 
ig “problems . C0 . Tn .^,:“ 
o- interest”, probably including ar 

in timetable for toe indepen- 
jy I dence of Namibia. 

fsLuns prize 

Ankara (API -Tmkey has 

MS announced that the first -xte- 

f y , turk International Peace Pr^. 

“ has been awarded to me. 
ad former Nato Secretary-Gene,^ 
j I al. Dr Josef Luns. 


Talkeetna. .Alaska (UPD 
A snow bridge s P?J in , 1 . I ?f , , a . 
crevasse on Mount McKinlw; 
collapsed, sending twoFrench 
climbers plungtog w to ; i. 
deaths, toe National P*<1? 
j Service said. 

It’s a girl! 

Halifax (AFP) - Mrs Juba 
Houlton. who settled in east- 
ern Canada from Bntam wi^ih 
her doctor husband four years 
ago. gave birth to a baby girl 
this week — the first ^ m fj e 
birth in the Houlton family 
since 18S2. 



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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 



1! 


•-* * 


Soviet casualties arrive 

in 





v 


summer 


From Michael Hamfot 
Delhi 









"\ 


“NS 

\ 




Regularly, with the . 
of the seasons and the 
of the hot weather, the Soviet 
army, occupying Afghanistan 
embarks on yet another cam- 
paign to put down the 
. Mujahidin guerrillas m the 
eastern province ofPaktia. 

This year, the first Russian 
soldier sporting the bush hat 
of his summer uniform was 
seen in the streets of Kabul on 
April 6. Around that time too, 
the first long lines of lorries 
painted with red crosses and 
carrying the military wounded 
appeared outside the Shahrara 
hospital. Twelve Soviet mili- 
tary vehicles full of wounded 
soldiers were seen waiting to 
enter on April 10. Twenty- 

four bodies were brought badk 

10 the capital on Apru9. 

maiThTDefiri, ilKMtead*and 
wounded were from a bitter 


Kandahar relief 


guerrillas took advantage of 
few Cl 


Islamabad — Afghan rebels 
have broken through a Soviet 
and Afghan ring baafaring fh» 
dty of K a ndaha r to resupply 
Sporillas fighting there. Bat 
UMBDunst forces have kept 
op their relentless bombing 
and shelling as f ig htin g jg the 
narrow streets and bazaars 
cw riiitoed , rebel commanders 
said (Rente reports). 



battle being fought around the 
of Khost. » 


siege, and this year the battle 
has been taken out of the 
immediate environs of the 
town and into the valleys 
towards the border. 

Deep in one of die narrow- 
est valleys there is a virtually 
impregnable fortress under 
tile command 'of a religious 
and military leader, Maulvj 
Jalaluddin Haqqani. If the 
Russian troops could eradi- 
cate this redoubt they would 
have gone a long way to 








town of Khost, which domi- 
nates a valley close to the 
Pakistan border. Khost has 
been the centre of fighting for 
several summers now. Often 
the Mujahidin besiege it, ami 
on one glorious day actually 
occupied it, before disappear- 
ing rack into the bills carrying 
their loot. 

Last year a operation 
was undertaken to relieve the 


hampering the flow of supplies 
from the border and would do 
much to relieve the pressure at 
Khost. So far the Mujahidin 
have resisted firmly, and at- 
tacks late last year and again 
recently have been repulsed. 

The fighting has not all been 
in one direction. Last month, 
very early in the campai gning 
season, there was beavyfight^ 
ing around an Afghan army 
post in the Khost valley. The 


Nakasone exploits popularity 




Double elections 
likely in Japan 


4 


From David Watts, Tokyo 

Japan seems set for doable on its coalition with the New 




-"If 


y 






elections tills summer, despite 
denials by senior petitictans. 

An election for the Upper 
Horae is already set for Jane, 
but it is becoming mmashtey 

likely Oat Mr Yasohiro 
Nakasone, the Prime Minis- 
ter, wO) call shmdtaneora 
electrons for die Hone of 
Representatives. 

Senior members of the rat- 
ing liberal Democratic Party 
(LDP) have warned foe Prime 
Minister that there mast be 
due reason for him to exercise 
his power to dtsolve 1 


Tihgeni CM*, and thus com- 
mand a solid majority in the 

House of Representatives. 

Many of the proposals Mr 
Nakasone has bmtetad for 
domestic reform w31 need all 
the strength the LDP can 
master to pass the Diet More 
rttan that, Mr Nakasone — 
whose last general election 
showing wra a disappointment 
— wants to leave a legacy of 
strength when he departs the 
party presidency and the 
prime-nmnstash^ in the 




tv.r-.'t- 


Various highsemmug rea- 
sobs are spoken rf, but Ifc real 
"■* .one is that Mr Nakasone s 
: v enjoying unprecedented popn- 
s,. boy at this stage m a 
* government's Hfe. In addition 
-v to his skill at forego dfotama- 
V cv, his puhfic popularity runs 
at more than 55 percent 


IBs ambition to hsvea third 
Jennas leader of the party Is 
no longer mentioned. In met 
MrNakasflBedaaestimtfaeis 
seeking it 

That may he b ecause the 
Prime Minister hopes to 





Mr Noburo Takeshita; Bid 

for highest office falters. 

But, while pofitirians argne 
as they build a consensus — 
sot only within the party, bto 
also among industrialists who 
win have to provide camp ai gn 
funds — the evidence that the 
dedskm is as good as made is 
evident election posters are 
sprouting like cherry blossom 
in Tokyo, and fiund-rusqs by 
political parties has started. 

Mr Nakasone** faction of 
the LDP held a party earlier 
this week. With tickets at 
30,000 yen (£1,200) eadi, it is 
estimated to have raised about 
580 motion yen Air his politi- 
cal coffers. Such a fund-raiser 
would usually be in the au- 
tumn, and its advancement is 
one of the more recognizable 
straws iu the political wind. 

Mr Nakasone is keen to 
have die election In June 
because be wants to use his 
popularity and public goodwill 
to bolster LDP strength JO 
that ft does not have to depend 


sanding the partyto change its 
accession rales by presenting 
the leaderahqi with an ever- 
whelming victory at the polls, 
at which poitatftey may after 
him the prize hen after. That 
seems unfikefy. 

Mr Nakasone is not the 
most popular pofitioau within 
his party, because rf his go-it- 
aJone app roadu 

The so-called “new leaders” 
are meanwhile standing by to 
have their turn at the highest 
office— the Finance Minister, 
Mr Nobtwo Takeshita; the 
Foreign Minister, Mr 
Shintaro Abe; and also Mr 
Kochi Mhrazawa, a forma 
foreign mhuster. 

Mr Takeshita was generally 
thought to have beea winning 
this particular race, hut he 
fattest a llttiewitii tire foabB- 
ity to rally all of the faction of 
the fanner Prime Minister, 
Mr Kakoei Tanaka, behind 
him. Mr Tanaka has been out 
of front-tine politics since 
February last year after a 
stroke. 

Mr Miyazawa has recently 
been making some strong 


ister, bat his poorer foDowing 
within the party is a handicap 
against Mr Takeshita, and hfe 

programme to double national 
assets is both vague and .most 
Gkdy impracticable in the 
riitumsta uces. . 

As a trade-off and an escape 
from some of the knottier 
poetical problems that Mr 
Nakasone is likely to be- 


er come the autmm may 
only too happy to help engi- 
neer an for Mr 

Nakasone to carry tfaroogh bis 
own legislative programme. 







e\ 



Sixer’s death 
is followed 
by 28 suicides 

Tokyo (UPO - A > % 
voting people have taken tor 
iives in Japan in a wave ot 
suicides since a teCTage aig- 
ing star killed Derarff ^ 
jumping from a Tokyo budd- 
ing wo weeks aso- . 

“This is definitely a ueno. 
These kids see someone <Unfl£ 
it and they get fae 
said Professor Tsutomu 
Kcmazafci, of Josai Umverei- 

l> April 8. the 
Okada. a&d IS- 
after a failed love 
davs later, the suicides began- 




~r? 

.. 

4 


-v. 


DAVID ROBERTS R.A. 

theholyland 

?mrs IN ORIGINAL COLOUR 


-Traecnnog^&gfy 

London SWlX&ff 

Tab 0*3465431 


Marcos claim 
of communist 
rule dismissed 

Manila —The Defence Min- 
ister, Mr Juan Ponce Enrfle, 



/fay QJftUUSKAt U4V IVIUM 

leader’s claim that the Philip- 
pines could fell under commu- 
pfet rule within a month. 

He also denied that disillu- 
sioned Army elements could 
stare a coup against President 
Aquino (Keith Dalton writes). 

Military support for Mr 
Marcos remained minimal 
while Mis Aquino bad the foil 
backing of d vs armed forces 
and its endorsement of her 
efforts to call a ceasefire to end 
the I S-year communist insur- 
gency, Mr Enrile said. 

He described chums by Mr 
Marcos that 34. per cent of the 
country’s soldiershad desert- 
ed as. “totally fabricated and 
exaggerated". He said there 
was no "tension between the 
military and the Aquino 
Government 


cloud cover, which pre- 
vented the operation of gov- 
ernment helicopters, to launch 
the attack which foiled only 
because of the casualties they 
suffered crossing minefields 
around the post. 

The town of Khost was 
visited by Mr Nazar Muham- 
mad, an Afghan Minister — 
one of a number of distin- 
guished morale-boosters the 
garrison has received recently, 
including Major-General Mu- 
hammad Yasin Sadequi, the 
regime's chief tactician. The 
minister's convoy of helicop- 


ters was apparently attacked 
rebels, and two were 


by the __ 
shot down. 

Tension is reportedly high 
in the eastern capital of 
Jalalabad, on the road be- 
tween Kabul and Peshawar, 
supplies of meal there are non- 
existent, and the acting Gov- 
ernor, Mr Yusuf Shahid, has 
been arrested, along with two 
of his top aides. 

The Afghan Government 
has admitted that the danyig p 
caused fay the fighting cost the 
country 40 billion afghanis 
(about £275 million). A total 
of 1,850 schools and J5G 
hospitals have been destroyed. 
The Government also admits 
that considerable damage has 
been done to the economic 
infrastructure. 



Dhaka toll 
from ferry 
could rise 
to 1,000 


From Ahmed Fazl 
Dhaka 


Three-year-old Eve Van 
Grafhorst, who suffers from 
Aids which she acquired from 
a blood tran s fu s ion at birth. 
Her fondly ts planning to move 
to New Zealand because they 
have been tiring in “hostile 
social exile" in the town of 
Grafted. New Sooth Wales. 

Eve's mother, Mrs Gloria 


Van Grafhorst, said some 
neighbours had spat in ber 
face, tried to run over her dog. 
and built a high steel fence to 
keep Eve from mixing with 
their children. 

She said the sympathy 
shown in New Zealand con- 
trasted sharply with the hos- 
tility of people in Gosford. 


The death toll could reach 
between 600 and ? .000 in 
Bangladesh's wo«: pver trag- 
edy. More than 350 people 
have been confirmed killed 
after the double decker Allas 
Star was caught in a storm and 
capsized in the Dhaleshwari 
river. 28 miles from Dhaka. 

There were ar. estimated 
1.200 people or board on 
Sunday night . 

Government officials con- 
ducting rescue operations said 
that the death toll could rise 
after all the floating bodies, 
some cf which had been swept 
away six miles downstream, 
had been recovered . 

“There are hundreds ot 
bodies in the dewnsiream 
which have to be collected.*' 
Mr A R Khan, ihc- official 
leading the rescue team, said 
t yesterday. 

Scores of rowing boats were 
used on Monday ;o ferry the 
bodies trapped inside the sub- 
merged vessel to ihe port bui 
most have remained still un- 
identified in a local hospital. 

Mr Ertan Ali, Munshiganj's 
police chief, confirmed that 
200 bodies had been collected. 

The official Bengali-Jan- 
guaee daily. Doinik Banda. 
sal d yesterday lhai about 200 
people managed to swim to 
snore in rough weather and 
strong currents. 


Australia-Indonesia row 


Tourists stranded 
by Jakarta anger 


Jakarta (Reuter) - Indone- 
sia abruptly cancelled visa- 
free entry for Australians 

yesterday.’ stranding scores of 
tourists at airports in its latest 
reprisal for Sydney newspaper 
articles critical of President 
Suharto. 

About 180 Australians were 
refused entry to the holiday 
island of Bali after landing on 
a flight from Sydney. Austra- 
lian consular sources said. 

The sources said some pas- 
sengers had flown to Jakarta 
to try in get flights home, but 


about SO had refused to lea»c 
(he transit lounge at Ngurah 
Szi airport. 

An immigration officer at 
Jakarta airport said instruc- 
tions had been Issued not tn 
allow in any Australians un- 
less they hdd a visa. Austra- 
lian journalists would not be 
allowed in even if they had a 

* tS$m m 

The Australian sources in 
Bali said they were firs* told of 
ihe new policy about 50 min- 
utes before the plane from 
Sydney arrived. 


Defence pact at risk 


From Stephen Taylor. Sydney 


Reports that Jakarta was 
considering withdrawing from 
its defence co-opera lion pro- 
gramme with Australia further 
exacerbated the already wors- 
ening quarrel between the two 
countries. 

Canberra officials, anxious 
not to add to the sudden 
strain, which, in addition to 
yesterday’s developments, has 
also caused a ministerial visit 
id be cancelled, declined to 
comment 

This followed statements in 
Jakarta by General Benny 
Murdani. ihe armed forces 
commander, indicating that 
projects agreed only weeks ago 
were in jeopardy. 

Under existing arrange- 
ments, Australia provides In- 


donesia with ASIOm (£4.7 
million) annually in military 
assistance- 

A report in the Sydney 
\ for nine Herald two weeks 
ago raised long-standing ques- 
tions on the financial dealings 
nf President Suharto, his fam- 
ily jnd their associates, who 
were said to have accumulated 
assets of lie I ween $Aus2 bil- 
lion and S.AusJt billion from 
gmernmeni capital and 
concessions. 

The article, by Da' id Jen- 
kins. the paper's respected 
foreign editor, said corruption 
was tite Achilles heel of an 
otherwise able regime. It spe- 
cifically pointed a finger at 
Madame Tien Suharto, the 
President's wife. 


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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 


SPECTRUM 



Gold plate on 


Privatization was 


decried as selling 


the family silver 


by Lord Stockton, 


but it has been 


a bonanza for 


investors, writes 


Jeremy Warner 



ver 


A nyone who invested 
£500 in each of the 
15 flotations made 
under the Govern- 
ment's privat- 
ization programme would by 
now have more than doubled 
his money, on average. Only 
two companies, both hit by 
the oil price collapse, have 
failed so far to prove anything 
other than an outstanding 
investment. 

The two hiccups have been: 
Enterprise, a company formed 
out of British Gas's North Sea 
oil interests, whose share price 
has dropped 22 per cent since 
the flotation in June 1984; and 
BritoiL the value of whose 
original. November 1982, is- 
sue has declined by a similar 
figure. 

These have been minor 
setbacks in the £7.5 billion 
sell-off programme. A £500 
investment in Jaguar, for ex- 
ample. when ii was floated in 
July 1 984 would now be worth 
£1.360 — an increase of (72 
per cent — helped by buoyant 
expons of the company's lux- 
ury cars to the United Stales. 

Cable & Wireless has made 
even more spectacular 
progress. Stock in the interna- 
tional telecommunications 
operator, whose Mercury 
Communications offshoot is 
licensed by the Government 
to compete with British 
Telecom, has more than qua- 
drupled: £500 invested in the 
original October 1981 flota- 
tion would now be worth 
£2.165. And even the most 
recent of the three Cable & 
Wireless, issues - last Decem- 
ber — has since given investors 
a 24 per cent return. 

Ironically, the first Cable & 
Wireless issue got a lacklustre 
response in the City; the 
second was a flop, falling short 
of full subscription by a long 
way; and the third nearly fell 
victim to a sudden fall in share 
prices during the crucial offer- 
for-sale period. 

Privatization issues have 
not been for the faint-hearted. 
Investors in the second 
tranche of British Aerospace 
shares, sold by the Govern- 
ment a year ago, were given a 
severe bout of jitters when 
their shares plummeted from 
an opening premium of 25 per 
cent to well below the offer 
price. It took a major 
lumround in shares generally, 
and the announcement of 
some impressive international 
contracts, before they were 
back in profit. 

Indeed in many respects, 
shares in newly— privatized 
companies have done no more 


PRIVATIZED CQMPANH£&-7-j#G^D 


Company 


Issue ‘date sale price price now *£500 invested 

now worth 






British 

Aerospace 


British 

Petroleum 


Cable & 
Wireless 


Feb 81 
May 85 


Oct 79 
Sep 83 


Oct 81 
Dec 83 
Dec 85 


£1.885 

£755 


percentage 
(loss) gam 


277 "HP 

51 m 


53BR. 

26 m 


iflmersham Feb82 


£2,165 

£1.325 

£620 


£1,300 


Britoil 


Nov 82 
Aug 85 


Associated Feb 83 

British Ports Apr 84 


£2.635 

£1,095 


JAGUAk 

British 

TELECOM 


Total: £500 on 
all issues 


Jul 84 165p 450p 


Nov 84 130p 250p 


£7,500 


£1,360 


£16,740 


*£500 has been taken as a notional investment With some issues, this amount would not have been available, 
depending on how shares were allocated 


than reflea the general buoy- 
ancy in share prices that has 
ruled since 1979. If the stock 
market had been falling, few of 
the privatizations would have 
been possible, let alone show- 
ing the gains enjoyed by their 
shareholders. 

It is also true that with the 
exception of British Telecom, 
the privatizations have paid 
little more tban lip service to 
the Government's aim of 
wider share ownership. The 
massive marketing campaign 
plus tbe perk of free shares or 
telephone bill discounts ac- 
companying the British 
Telecom flotation, succeeded 
in attracting about one million 
people who had never held 
shares. 


B ut few of the other 
flotations have at- 
tracted much inter- 
est outside the 
charmed inner circle 
of professionals who take an 
interest in all new issues. 

Even British Telecom’s 
marketing campaign failed to 
generate a response outside 
the financially articulate mid- 
dle class. In some of the issues 
the small private investor 
would have have been hard 
pushed to secure more than 
the minimum allotment of 50 
to 100 shares and in one case 
— Associated British Ports — 


demand was so high that some 
applicants got no shares at all. 
The Government's ambition 
of creating a shareowning (as 
well as a property-owning) 
democracy is still a long way 
from realization. 

Some flotations have been 
underpriced, giving an imme- 
diate and substantial profit to 
those lucky enough to get in 
on the act, but the Govern- 
ment on the whole drives as 
hard a bargain as circum- 
stances permit — though with 
hindsight, it could have raised 
a lot more by delaying the 
flotations. 

But it is also true — as John 
Moore, Financial Secretary to 
the Treasury, has pointed out 
— that the share price perfor- 
mance ■ of companies after 
privatization is at feast partly 
a reflection of how the profit- 
ability and efficiency of the 
companies have increased as a 
direct result of being pri- 
vatized. 

“At the time of privatiza- 
tion. the exart scope for 
improvement was not at all 
dear and so it is not surprising 
that some of the companies 
have performed better in the 
private sector than was gener- 
ally expected", he said. 

Mr Moore argues that com- 
panies prosper in all respects 
once freed from the dead hand 
of the state to the benefit of the 


economy as a whole. “Thai is 
why the programme will con- 
tinue until all state owned 
commercial industries are re- 
turned to where they belong, 
the private sector", he says. 

P rivatization has in- 
creased business and 
economic efficiency 
and “created a cli- 
mate which has con- 
centrated the minds of those 
concerned in nationalized in- 
dustries preparing for privati- 
zation on commercial realities 
so that tbeir overall perfor- 
mance has improved. 

"It is in the nature of state 
owned industries to be more 
responsive to their political 
masters than to the needs of 
their customers because past 
experience all too often shows 
that an industry's survival is 
quite unrelated to its perfor- 
mance in the market place . 

“If British Telecom had not 
been privatized, do you really 
believe that its regulated 
charges would have increased 
by 3 per cent less than 
inflation each year?" 

The amounts raised by pri- 
vatization have provided a 
constant supply of ammuni- 
tion to critics of the pro- 
gramme. Mr Bryan Gould, 
Labour spokesman on trade 
and industry dismisses tbe 
claimed benefits of unproved . 


Things go better 
with Headroom 



As seen on TV: Max Headroom, tipped to be “as big as Donald Dock" in America. • 


efficiency and commercial dis- 
cipline among privatized com- 
panies as little more than a 
smokescreen. 

The real motivation, he 
says, is to provide money for 
the Chancellor and gifts to the 
Government's friends in the 
City. “It wouldn't be so objec- 
tionable if the money raised 
went back into industry but it 
doesn'L It has gone into 
financing current consump- 
tion and lining the pockets of 
City friends. That is hardly the 
sort of prudent housekeeping 
that Mrs Thatcher likes to 
boast of**. 

But will future privat- 
izations offer investors such a 
spectacular ride? The big 
problem is that having 
cleaned out “the family 
silver", as Lord Stockton has 
called the Government's once 
highly-attractive collection of 
businesses, the shelves now 
contain little more tban a dull 
array of old pewter mugs. 

British Gas and the water 
authorities, both earmarked 
for privatization before the 
next general election, may be 
fine old asset-rich utilities, but 
they lack the high-technology 
sheen that has made British 
Telecom, Cable & Wireless 
and British Aerospace so at- 
tractive to professional inves- 
tors. The real bargains have 
already gone. 


Max Headroom, the space- 
age television character par 
excellence, attracts a growing 
cult following as the glib, 
wisecracking host of his own 
pop video show on C hann el 
Four. 

It is no wonder that Coca- 
Cola — which boasts that it 
provides tbe refreshment for 
American astronauts — is 
using Headroom to plug tbe 
latest version of its product 

What distinguishes him 
from other talking heads on 
television is that he is an 
actor, a Canadian named 
Matt Frewer, who is trans- 
formed by prosthetic make- 
up and clever video 
techniques to simulate a com- 
puterized being. 

His only means of commu- 
nication is a television 
screen, and, in the Coke TV 
commercials made by Ridley 
Scott the director of Alien 
and Bladerunner, he address- 
es a circle of wondering 
children from a TV set which 
has fallen off a speeding lony. 

The advertising campaign, 
showing in America but not 
yet in Britain, is costing 
Coca-Cola *$25 million. The 
sale of the right to. use 
Headroom is ' potentially 
worth $4 million to the 
character's owner. Chrysalis 
Visual Programming, a sub- 

‘A question 
of greed’ 

sidiary of the Chrysalis enter- 
tainment group. . 

Max has already featured 
in British commercials for 
Radio Rentals and there have 
been books, T-shirts, calen- 
dars. and a computer game. 
Men's toiletries and a record 
with the group Art of Noise 
are on the way. Now Terry 
Connolly, Chrysalis's manag- 
ing director, plans a prime- 
time series on America's 
ABC network. “We're hold- 
ing back in America until 


The cult figure 
of the video 
age has become 
a hot property 
in marketing 

we're as big as Donald 
Duck", he confidently says. 

Max Headroom started on 
Channel Four only a year ago. 
introduced by a highly-inven- 
tive £750.000 adventure film 
establishing the character as 
an investigative television 
reporter in a broken-down 
tomorrow's world — reminis- 
cent. ironically, of Blade- 
runner. 

Tbe eventual video show 
was an anti-climax but the 
idea for a series involving 
“pop promos" had been 
hatched in spring 1982 by a 
Chrysalis executive, Peter 
Wagg, who commissioned 
them for the records division, 
and conceived a mission to 
make them as artistically 
respectable as feature films. 

The intention of the direct- 
ing and designing team, 
Annabel Jankel and Rockh 
Morton, of .Cucumber Pro- 
ductions. was to make Max 
Headroom look as if “a 
satellite was disrupting your 
normal TV service and blitz- 
ing tbe show on to your 
screen". Colin Wilson, au- 
thor of The Outsider — and 
The Space Vampires— briefly 
contributed to the pilot film's 
script 

But Max Headroom’s 
name, and most of- the 
original characterization, was 
the work of George Stone, a 
bright advertising copywriter, 
who seized the chance to 
convey his fascination with 
artificial intelligence, sublim- 
inal advertising, and the 
management of television 
news. Stone says Wagg was 
slow to share his vision: “We 


had to fight to get Mdx 
Headroom on screen". 

The Coca-Cola deal. “ in ■ 
December, only eight months 
after Max Headroom’s first 
screening, has made him. a. 
financial, not just a medic? 
success. The new television 
series, starting this summer 
in Britain and America, will 
feature less rock music 'and 
seek a wider age appeal: 
However, his future as j* 
money-spinner equal ' to 
Disney's characters hangs qn 
the fonunes of a twewtour 
pilot movie being produced 
for ABC next year. ; The 
success of Max Headroom 
has enabled Wagg to form‘d 
television production compa- 
ny but his fellow creators axe 
less happy. Morton and 
Jankel are not directing xfiq 
new British series, and Slone, 

Pop record . 
on the way 

who quit his advertising jotr 
to write for the character, has 
severed all connection, claim- 
ing insufficient credit as au- 
thor - and' alleging non- 
payment of a royalty. 

Connolly counters that 
Chrysalis spent £1 million 
developing die character, and 
required the writers to relin- 
quish copyright in exchange 
for fees and a small royalty. 
"Of course, when it’s a suc- 
cess. everybody claims credit, 
and says they were rippSti 
off". 

Stone now thinks the Coca- 
Cola ads have “pretty well 
killed" his concept of M SCa, 
“He was intended to do just a- 
little bit more than be a ge& 
in a rubber mask. 1 suppose 
it's become a question- -6f 
greed. They've turned hint 
into a short-life product The 
hour-glass has turned over,' 
and this is Max’s moment”; - 

Michael Watts 


the times umbrella l Jamaica’s dance man 



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An academic and 
former Rhodes 
scholar returns to 
Britain this summer 
— in dancing shoes 

Rex Nettieford isa dancer and 
Professor of Extra Moral 
Studies at the University of 
the West Indies. He Is also a 
political theorist choreogra- 
pher, broadcaster, writer and 
Jamaican cultural hero: a 
Caribbean Renaissance man. 

Nettieford is one of many 
leading figures who will be 
visiting Britain over the next 
nine months to participate in 
Caribbean Focss *86, an 
ambitions arts festival orga- 
nized by the Commonwealth 
Institute. Events include the 
tour, which began this week. 



CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 932 


ACROSS 
1 Characterize (6) 

4 Jew |6) 

7 Tidy (4) 

8 Convolvulus (8) 

9 First class 18) 

13 Dry wine (3) 

16 Carping (1 3) 

17 Hostilities (3) 

19 Impalpable (8) 

24 Desire (8) 

25 Meander's fever (4) 

26 Yearly (6) 

27 Wobble (6) 

DOWN 

1 Pungent taste (4) 

2 Thick fog{9) 

3 Surly youth (5) 

4 Sound producing (5) 

5 Stables streets (4) 

6 Yonder (5) 

10 Scandinavian (5) 

11 Flare (5) 

12 De1ester(5) 

■3 Eucharist (9) 


14 Placid (4) 

15 Demonstrate (4) 

18 Colorado ski resort 

(5) 


28 Test (5) 

21 Happening (5) 

22 Boyfriend (5) 

23 Duty period (4) 


SOLUTION TO NO 931 

ACROSS: I Feme 5 Fad 8 Essay 9 Notched 11 Treasury 23 
Plus 15 Unintentional 17Anld 18 Ravenous 21 Termini 22 Ab- 
hor 23 Idle 24 Natter 

DOWN: 2 Ensue 3 Ray 4 Confrontation 5 Fate 6 Echelon 7 
Restaurant 10 Disclosure 12 Site 14 Hide 16 Unbred 19 
Ochre 20 Mime 22 Am 




Self-taught: Rex Nettieford 

by the 30-strong Jamaican 
Folk Singers troupe and 
a Caribbean service in West- 
minster Abbey on Sunday. 

Last month, Nettieford was 
here wearing his academic hat, 
but be returns in the summer 
wearing his dancing shoes for 
one of tbe highlights of the 
festival: a tour by tbe Jamai- 
can National Dance Theatre 


Company, of which he is co- 
founder, choreographer and 
artistic director. 

“Until the Caribbean has a 
proper sense of its own identi- 
ty, it cannot pro gr ess", he 
says. “We’ve been paralysed 
by self-abnegation for too 
tong. This is what I try to 
teach, whether I’m m the 
lecture hall or the dance 
studio." 

Nettieford studied history 
and politics as a Rhodes 
scholar at Oxford in tbe late 
1950s. He was also President 
of die University Ballet Club 
and it was at Oxford that be 
conceived tbe idea of estab- 
lishing a Jamaican national 
dance company. . 

He cut short his studies and 
returned to Jamaica. There he 
continued his academic career, 
bat spent his free time devel- 
oping his self-taught dancing 
skills. 

In 1962, the year of 
Jamaica's independence, he 
helped found the Jamaican 
National Dance Theatre Com- 
pany. Even today, its members 
— like Nettieford — are ama- 
teurs, donning rehearsal leo- 
tards after a day in tbe office 
or factory. “But their stan- 
dards are wholly prof- 
essional", Nettieford is quick 
to add. 

In each dance Caribbean 
style dominates. “We had to 
escape from the belief that 
serious ballet only comes out 
of Sadler's Wells", be says. 

“Whereas European classi- 
cal dance is full of courtly 
posturing, and American is 
sleek and steely, like sky- 
scrapers, we're altogether soft- 
er in our lines. And more 
sensuous. But if people come 
expecting exoticism — black 
bodies writhing aD over the 
place — they'll be 
disappointed." 

Fiona Maddocks 

Details of Caribbean Focus ‘86 
from the Commonwealth In- 
stitute (01 -60S 4535). 



Total Package 



Can yon always get your copy of The Time, s? 

DearNeasjgem, please ddrier/sre oca copy oTThe Times 


ADDRESS 


















I 

THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 



15 




WEDNESDAY PAGE 


As Britain’s police seek possible links in child murder cases, Lee Rodwell examines the psychology of the killers 


The making of 
S a molester 


Paul, ago 6 


-TBis'week brought the news that 
parents would rather not 
-lave heard: Sarah Harper, the 10- 
^yeat-okigiri who had been missing 
-y fcr t hree and a half weeks, had 
']&en found murdered. 

Amid all the emotions such an 
'*apU0uncenaent brings — the surge 

sjjmpaihy for Sarah's mother, 
» die flicker of fear that one day it 
^ might be your child who is 
-sfcxiiajly assaulted and battered 
..,brf^E being dumped in a river, 
jufarense of relief that your own 
Children are, for the moment safe 
. arid" sound — one question always 
-Springs to mind . . . What kind of 
._ 3 »tson could do this to a child? 
»-~A recently published book. It's 
QfCTo Say No, which aims to help 
parents teach children about the 
dangers of sexual abuse, also raises 
the issue. Its American authors, 
Robin Lenett and Bob Crane, 
conclude that when it comes to 
those who sexually molest chil- 
dren: “We can't draw a profile of 
foe typical offender. They come 
from all walks of life". 

Dr Kevin McGuigan, senior 
dWdical officer at Grendon psy- 
chiatric prison, near Aylesbury, 
Sferees that there is no “typical" 
offender. But he did fee] that those 
who molest and sometimes kill 
children have some things in 
common. 

"Firstly, they are usually male. 
He said: “I think that women have 
a more maternal drive towards 
children. A woman would find 
this kind of thing much more 
offensive." 

■’ They are also people who — for a 
variety of reasons — may have had 
no proper sexual development or 
been able to form relationships as 
adults. “They may have dabbled 
in homosexuality. But they tend to 
be so ill at ease with adults, 
especially females, that the only 
people they do feel they have an 
affinity with are children. 

(■♦There could be all kinds of 
reasons for this. Some may have 
been maltreated by their families. 


some may have had earfy relation- 
ships which went wrong. It may be 
a genetic or a physical thing. It 
may be due to worries a man bas 
about his potency or physical 
development - and these worries 
may be justified." 

Tony Black, the chief clinical 
psychologist at Broadmoor, paints 
a similar picture. “Women may 
have the same problems but they 
don't seem to respond in foe same 
ways. They have the same prob- 
lems of foiling to relate and foe 
same kind ofhang-ups over sexual 
relationships as men. but they 
don't have the same sexual equip- 
ment or urges to express foem- 

< KiUers may progress 
op a ladder from 
fantasy to reality’ 


selves through the same means." 

But what about the Myra 
Hindleys of this world? “ There 
will always be foe odd one that is 
quite different from the common 
pattern. Those, for instance, who 
may operate together in a strange 
partnership, who become booked 
on some sadistic pleasure or some 
particular kind of violence. 

“ The men we are talking about 
lend to be rather shy, nervous, 
withdrawn people, fearful, unso- 
cial and unsociable. So for them 
children are a feirly non-threaten- 
ing form of human contact, and 
sexual contact in particular, al- 
though the sexual contact may not 
be there initially. 

“Once a boy has passed through 
puberty foe sexual urge is a 
dominating thing in his life. So if 
he's never acquired foe skill for 
making relationships with people, 
trouble will be brewing." 

Tony Black says such a man 
may at first be interested in 
children simply for foe company 
foey provide, but a relationship 
with a child may develop into 


something more intimate. If this 
kind of dependence leads to oven 
sexuality, with all foe taboos and 
prohibitions involved, and if a 
child becomes frightened, then 
panic may set in. It is this panic 
which can lead to violence. Chil- 
dren are usually told to be careful 
of strangers, but this kind of 
danger can also come from some- 
one they know. 

Dr McGuigan says that child 
molesters can be any age, although 
the figures suggest there are two 
"peak" times: many tend to be in 
iheir teens to late 20s, those who 
would normally be settling into 
normal heterosexual relation- 
ships; others tend to be in their 
late 40s, a time when their sexual 
performance may be decreasing, 
when they are faring some kind of 
mid-iife crisis, when — if foey are 
married - their own children are 
growing up and may be disturbing 
them with ideas about them. 

He also says that there is much 
evidence to suggest that men who 
ultimately rape and kill children 
do not just go out and do it one 
day. Instead they progress up a 
kind of ladder from fantasy to 
reality, first watching and follow- 
ing children, then, perhaps, gening 
a job working with children, then 
touching them, and from there 
into some kind of sexual contact. 

At this point it may be more 
than sheer panic that can lead to 
violence and ultimately murder. It 
may be a cold-blooded derision 
that he does not want to be caught 
and that he cannot risk being 
identified by the child. It may also 
be that bis sense of inferiority is so 
great that he feels he must 
dominate the child. Perhaps, un- 
able to fulfil himself sexually, he 
can only express himself through 
violence, inflicting pain and even 
death. 

Dr McGuigan is certain of one 
thing: once a man has killed a 
child in these circumstances, he 
will kill again. “Once it's done, 
you have to carry on at that leveL I 



A young child's view of the right response to strangers: understanding the psychology can help parents caution their children 


have no doubt about that at all." 

This is enough to send a chill 
down any parent's spine, but it is 
only half the picture. The other 
hair is just as bad. Apart from 
locking up child killers for life or 
bringing bade capital punishment 
there is no way to ensure that foe 
pattern of behaviour does not 
recur. 

Dr McGuigan is doubtful about 
foe value of carrying out hormone 
treatments on sexual offenders or 
even of castrating them. “This 
won't take away foe aggression. 
You won’t stop foe killing - even 
if you stop the sexual acts — and 
you may make it more likely." 

At Broadmoor, sexual offenders 
are given the kind of treatment 
that aims to belp them form 
relationships and get on with 
people. They are taught social 
skills and ways to combat anxiety. 
"These kind of people have, in 
effect a phobia about the opposite 
sex", says Black. “We try to train 
them in the way you train anyone 
with phobias, by leaching them 
how to relax, by desensitizing 
them. 

“Because foey tend to be reclu- 


sive foey are often uninformed 
about sex. so sex education can be 
helpful. If foey are aroused by a 
fetish, -such as sadism, there may 
have to be some aversion therapy. 
But the whole problem is beset by 
the difficulty of doing something 
effective to enable them to go back 
into society and not commit foe 
crime again. People don't always 
■ respond. They don't always want 
to respond. 

“We may be able to achieve a 

‘People don’t always 
respond. They don't 
always want to respond’ 


great deal and send a person out 
much more confident, much less 
dangerous. But there may be 
lapses. If it is a straightforward 
case of a neurotically, emotionally 
disturbed young man who has 
never learnt to cope with foe 
world, then traditional psycholog- 
ical methods can help him achieve 
a normal form of social behaviour 
that should enable him to gain his 


sexual satisfaction through the 
usual routes." 

At Broadmoor people receive at 
least some kind of treatment But 
most sex offenders end up in 
prison, not hospital, where their 
chances of getting any treatment 
are not only limited, but , for their 
own sakes, foey are likely to be 
isolated. As Dr McGuigan points 
out “Even when someone is doing 
a life sentence, the chances are that 
they will be released at some time 
in the future and that they will go 
■ out worse, not better." 

At present Grendon is foe only 
prison devoted to foe psychiatric 
treatment and care of the mentally 
disordered in prison. There are 
260 places and Dr McGuigan has 
200 on the waiting Usl Even if 
there were the facilities to deal 
wi fo every convicted child molest- 
er and killer, he admits foal foe 
problem would not be solved. 
“Only a small percentage of sex 
offenders are treatable. It's no 
good if you are so dim you can't 
understand what goes on, or if you 
are so inarticulate you can't 
express yourself And most of all, 
you have to be motivated to 


change." 

So where does this leave par- 
ents? Certainly it is no good 
trusting luck, hoping that some- 
thing like the Sarah Harper trage- 
dy, or the Susan Maxwell tragedy 
or foe Jason Swiff tragedy or any 
of the others in foe appalling 
catalogue of dead and missing 
children, will ever happen to you 
and yours. 

You cannot prevent foe sexual 
abuse of children totally, or the 
tragic consequences that may 
follow, any more than you can 
fully protect children against acci- 
dents. Understanding what moti- 
vates the men who prey on 
children is not enough. But if an 
awareness and understanding of 
them can help parents be aware of 
the dangers, and that, in turn, 
means you can arm your children 
with a sense of caution and a set of 
responses to all kinds of approach- 
es from all kinds of adults, then 
perhaps that is the best we can do. 

It's OK To Say No! A Parent and 
Child Manual for the Protection of 
Children by Robin Lenett and 
Bob Crane (Tkorsons. £1.99). 


A new platform for the family bear 


After a life spent in Paddington's shadow, 
Michael Bond’s daughter explains how 
she finally succumbed to the creature's lure 


P addington Bear is in foe 
study dressed up as an 
American golfer, com- 
plete with designer brogues 
initialled PB. 

Down in the kitchen he’s 
veiling his rugger kit and 
later, in foe sitting room, I find 
him standing around in a 
duffel coat and sou'wester 
style bat, canying a suitcase. 
Karen JankeL, Paddington’s 
sidekick, remains in foe same 
outfit, a tailored silk dress, 
throughout our interview. 

Karen is 27, married to an 
accountant, and her father, 
Michael Bond, wrote his first 
Paddington book foe year she 
was born. “He's always been 
pan of foe family, of me", she 
says. “As a child t did expect 
him physically to walk into 
the room. If a fully dressed 
bear had come in and sat 
down I wouldn't have been 
surprised." 

I Now she heads a company 
'which runs two Paddington 
shops - one in London and 
one in Bath - and looks after 
all his business interests ex- 
cept for foe merchandising 
which is handled by another of 



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his companies who also act for 
Peter Rabbit, The little Grey 
Rabbit and a host of other 
classic nursery characters. 

“Father and I are much 
more interested in malting 
sure that Paddington is not 
involved in anything 
unsuitable", says Karen. “For 
instance, we wouldn’t put him 
on fish fingers because be'd 
never eat them. They would 
be very un-Paddington." 

Tomorrow, she and her 
father publish foe first two in a 
series ofa dozen coloured card 
books for very small children. 
These are foe kind of novelty 
items hopefully labelled 
“educational" by publishers 
because the child has to do 
something other than sit and 
listen. In this case it's to help 
Paddington to slot a letter and 
his suitcase through each page 
until they arrive at their 
destination at the end of foe 
book. 

Karen thought up foe origi- 
nal idea and produced foe 
story-line and her father wrote 
the words. "1 wouldn’t send 
out even a letter from Pad- 
dington, without showing it to 
father first. I wouldn't pre- 
sume to do so. Paddington is 
his creation.” 

Michael Bond was a BBC 
television cameraman when, 
on Christinas Eve, 1957, he 
noticed a toy bear left on foe 
shelf of a London store, felt 
sorry for it and bought it as a 
stocking-filler for his wife. He 
wrote a few adventures 
around the bear for his own 
amusement - which is proba- 
bly why Paddington is such a 
sophisticated bear — and pub- 
lished .4 Bear Called Padding- 
ton a year later. 

In case it slipped your mind, 
Paddington arrived in En- 
gland ffom Darkest Peru - it 
was going to be Africa until 



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Grin and bear it Michael Bond, his daughter Karen and Paddington at their London shop 





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Mr Bond discovered they 
don't have bears there — and 
was rescued from Paddington 
Station by the Brown family, 
with no belongings except a 
small suitcase containing a 
half-eaten jar of marmalades 
photograph of his aunt Lucy 
who lives in foe Home for 
Retired Bears in Lima and a 
label reading: “Please look 
after this bear. Thank You". 
Intuitively, Michael Bond had 
stumbled on foe pathos factor 
which was to be such a 
successful marketing ploy for 
the “adopt a Cabbage Patch 
doll" campaign some 30 years 
later. 

Paddington quickly became 
big business. Worldwide sales 
of his merchandise - every- 
thing from foe bear himself io 
wallpaper and vitamin pills 
and bedroom slippers with his 
picture on them — add up to 
around £20 million a year with 
60 different companies in this 
country alone turning out 
more than 200 different Pad- 
dington products at any one 
time. And that's not counting 
the sales of the 40 Paddington 
books, translated into 20 dif- 
ferent languages, which now 
top 20 million copies. There is 
even a Paddington Comer in 
foe London Toy Museum. 

Karen hadn't intended to 
work for Paddington. She 
went to Exeter University 
where she took a degree in 
mathematics and was pleased 
to see all her fellow students 
arriving with Paddingtons un- 
der their arms. She then spent 
a few months selling advertis- 
ing space. 

“When you’ve done foal 
you can do anything", she 
says. "1 hated selling. I was 
extremely miserable and I was 


having lunch with father one 
day when he said that there 
was room for someone else to 
join foe company and he’d 
love to have me if I was 
interested." 

In Britain 60 per cent of 
Paddington Bears are bought 
by adults for adults (“girls 
taking their first flats who 
want a father-figure standing 
in the comer", says Bond) 

T eenage girts in J apian are 
also fond of the bear, 
and throw Paddington 
Pyjama Parties. “We haven't 
discovered what foey do at 
them", says Karen, “but I'm 
sure it’s all perfectly innocent, 

1 expea they read extracts 
from foe books and ear mar- 
malade sandwiches." 

When Karen was small, her 
father used to read foe manu- 
scripts aloud to her. "I think I 
was an unconscious critic", 
she says, “and some of foe 
things that happened were 
based on me. When I went 
water-skiing, Paddington went 
water-skiing and later, when I 
took my driving test, Padding- 
ton took his. too." 

She was 16 before she 
rebelled. “I remember saying 
to father Tm sick of 
Paddington'. I think it hurt 
him at foe time. I hope he 
realized it was just a phase." 

Michael Bond says he's 
never been actually sick of 
Paddington but he got terribly 
fed up during foe first televi- 
sion series, “It was as though 
I'd kicked a ball and there was 
no stopping it 1 had a very 
bad couple of years in the early 
seventies, writing bits on foe 
backs of packets and getting 
up at four in foe morning to 
finish scripts.” 


He was starting the day with 
a stiff Scotch and going to bed 
with a Mogadon and, at the.- 
same time his first marriage 
was breaking up. “I know it 
sounds a bit silly”, he says 
looking sheepish, “but I think 
I got strength from Padding- 
ton. I knew he wouldn't be 
fazed by it alL" 

The whole family has an 
unnerving way of talking 
about foe toy bear as though 
he was a favourite, rather 
spunky relative. "It’s very 
difficult for anyone else to 
understand”, says Karen, “but 
all my life I’ve tended to think: 
'What would Paddington do 
in this or that situation?* I 
spent several years in hospital 
with a dislocated hip and [was 
seven before i finished the 
treatment. 

“ When I was depressed I 
used to think: ‘How would 
Paddington cope rf he had 
both his paws in plaster?' and 
it helped me to see the funny 
side of it alL" Even Sue, 
Michael Bond's second wife, 
daps her hands over the ears 
of yet another Paddington, 
this time dressed in an Ameri- 
can baseball outfit, as she 
explains that she prefers foe 
British version because it is 
less cuddly and consciously 
cute: "Mustn't hurt his 
feelings", she says. 

“Oh, father wouldn't have 
married anyone who wasn’t 
fond of Paddington", says 
Karen. “We all are. He’s such 
a sensible, down-to-earth sort 
of bear." 

Shirley Lowe 

Paddington Posts a Letter, 
Paddington at the Airport. 
published by Hutchinson, at 
£3.95 each. 


From Mr Peter Houghton, 
Director. National Association 
for the Childless 
I am deeply grateful to The 
Times for highlighting the 
problems faced by people 
longing to have a baby (Spec- 
trum. April 8). The anxiety 
and stress caused by fertility 
treatment is too little under- 
stood. So are the serious 
problems faced by people who 
are ultimately unsuccessful in 
their quest to be parents. 

I would question, however, 
the comment that “childless 
women can usually receive 
consolation from their girt 
friends." In our experience, 
that is contrary to what hap- 
pens in most cases. As people 
watch their friends have foe 
children they so much desire, 
a constraint and sadness de- 
velops on both sides that 
inhibits the normal conso- 
lations of friendship. 

My association offers a 
counselling service and a net- 
work of sympathetic people 
just to talk to, simply because 
most people find it so hard to 
find someone with whom to 
share foe problem. 

From Mr John 
Bamett.Lingfield Road, East 
Grinstead, Sussex 
Your feature painted a fair 

icture of foe despair and 
stration experienced by foe 


£ 


Comfort 
for the 
childless 


TALKBACK 


involuntarily childless. I know 
as I am one of their number. 
As you can imagine I have 
given considerable thought to 
foe embryo research debate as 
well as foe controversy sur- 
rounding surrogacy and other 
passible solutions. 

Despite your comprehen- 
sive description of the many 
treatments available, you 
omitted to mention the princi- 
pal cause for foe demand of 
these treatments, namely 
abortion. 

Whatever Lady Wamock 
may say. couples faced with 
infertility have in the past had 
much more opportunity to 
solve their problem: they 
could of course adopt a baby. 
Nowadays this is is almost 
impossible. 

This is not a plea for an end 
to foe practice of abortion, but 
I would like to pose this 
question: if science is used to 


satisfy the much-vaunted 
“woman’s right to choose", is 
it not fair that it should also be 
used to help the? childless who 
have hitherto been the losers 
in all this? 

FromJ. C. Goodwin. 
Bodenham Road, Northfidd, 
Birmingham. 

Lee Rodwell’s article on pock- 
et money for children (Friday 
Rage, April 11) reminded me 
of a scheme we used success- 
fully for our three daughters. 
Theage of entry was their fifth 
birthday. There was an age 
scale of differentials with an 
annual rise. 

A Post Office Savings Bank 
account was opened for each 
child and -on January I each 
year I paid in the pocket 
money for foe whole year. 
Other credits consisted of 
presents from relatives. 

There were no restrictions 
from withdrawals but once the 
year’s money was exhausted, 
that was thaL We paid all 
expenses on outings and saw 
to it that there were always 
good quality sweets at home. 

The scheme worked well — 
in one instance leading to the 
eventual purchase of a pony 
while at the other end of the 
range foe youngest, when sev- 
en years old. drew l/6d each 
day for 10 days when on 
holiday, all for donkey rides! 



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16 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Lost 

chords 

Questions are being asked about 
the conspicuous absence of any 
work to celebrate the Queen’s 60ih 
birthday by Malcolm Williamson, 
Master of the Queen's Music k. 
The only music composed for the 
Queen appears to have been 
"Happy Birthday Ma'am, God 
Bless You," by composer Tony 
Macauley and poet Christopher 
Logue. The Poet Laureate. Ted 
Hughes, also managed a cele- 
bratory poem. Yesterday William- 
son was as elusive as his work: 
Buckingham Palace said it could 
reach him only through his pub- 
lisher. Josef Weinberger, who was 
unable to track him down. The 
Palace, which told me Williamson 
is paid an honorarium by the 
Queen off 100 a year, says that his 
last piece as Master came in I9S0, 
when be wrote a new arrangement 
of the National Anthem. Also con- 
spiciously absent was the Royal 
Opera's musical director. Sir 
Colin Davis. Opera buffs were 
horrified that Sir Colin, who 
leaves Covent Garden this sum- 
mer. was not in situ to receive the 
Queen al the Royal Gala on her 
birthday night; he is on a conduct- 
ing tour of America. 

Interest flags 

Libya wasn't the only topic of 
conversation yesterday at the 
foreign ministers’ meeting in 
Luxembourg. During the proceed- 
ings a new fiag for Europe, 
intended to become as revered as 
any national fiag. was unfurled for 
inspection. Observers who 
thought the circle of 12 gold stars 
against a blue background looked 
famihar were right: the EEC has 
poached the standard of the older 
Council of Europe. The uninspir- 
ing ensign will not even be 
officially unfurled at the Brussels 
HQ on Europe Day. May 9. This is 
a holiday and nobody showed 
much enthusiasm for sticking 
around to watch a flag flutter up a 
pole. Instead it will be officially 
flown on May 29 — a Thursday, 
when Eurocrats can be expected to 
be in. 

Doctor no 

A hundred or so middle manage- 
ment officers at the British Medi- 
cal Association have just voted to 
negotiate a “no cost" private 
health care deal for themselves. 
Doesn't exactly set your mind at 
rest about the NH^s reputation m 
the medical profession, does it? 

Women’s Lib 

If you danced with a man who 
danced with a giri who danced 
with David Steel, you too could 
get into a Liberal Party promo- 
tion: the party’s latest leaflet 
promoting its Ryedale by-election 
candidate. Elizabeth Shields, in- 
forms us that Lloyd George once 
campaigned in Pickering, one of 
three towns in the North York- 
shire consiiituency. and adds that 
Lloyd George’s daughter was the 
last Liberal MP, 35 years ago. 

Scouse nous 

In a coup for political patronage, 
Labour MP and Everton football 
fan Sean Hughes has managed to 
secure MPs' FA Cup Final tickets 
lor his Merseyside constituents, 
who are all clamouring to watch 
the Evenon-Livetpool derby. 
George Foulkes. a Scottish Labour 
MP. confirmed that Hughes has 
lobbied nearly all of the 72 
Scottish members who. like all 
M Ps. get priority over fans for two 
tickets each. The response, I am 
told, has been good, as few Scots 
rale football south of the border. 
However, the man now wielding 
more power on Merseyside than 
Derek Hatton was yesterday keep- 
ing quiet about how many constit- 
uents will be honoured. 


BARRY FANTONI 


J- POET 

JL AUREATE ! 







TUfLC TIMES 


IGUESN’S 


BIRTHDAY 
;=-.=BRflT- 

IDfla 


* . . . when all at once 1 saw a crowd, 
a host of golden daffodils.* 

Monkey’s tale 

Gerard Hoflhung would have 
loved this attempt at parking fine 
avoidance received by Harrogate's 
prosecution office: “The trouble 
was I purchased a pet spider 
monkey two months ago and I 
think you may not be aware of the 
trouble these young monkeys can 
cause. I opened the car window to 
seek directions and the monkey 
dived straight out. The embarrass- 
ment and consequences could 
have been severe as they tend to 
urinate and bite at will, and my 
visions were obviously under 
imagination immediately (sic). 
My main aim was to keep sight of 
fin's young rascal and after two 
miles of sweat and chasing I 
recaplured him. Phew! 1 thought. 1 
trust you will give me consid- 
eration with regard to this un- 
fortunate event I promise this will 
not happen again, as I have since 
shot the monkey.” The fine re- 
mained. PHS 


Why hack Herstmonceux? 


The Royal Greenwich Observatory is 
probably Britain’s most famous scien- 
tific establishment. Founded in the 
17th century it overlooked the Royal 
Park at Greenwich until after the last 
war. But optical astronomy depends on 
dear skies, and the worsening at- 
mospheric pollution in London caused 
the observatory to be relocated between 
1948 and 1958 to Herstmonceux Castle 
in Sussex. 

Increasingly, observational work has 
come to be carried out in better 
climates than Britain’s. Thanks to the 
support of the Science and Engineering 
Research Council, the observatory is 
now inaugurating, in the Canary Is- 
lands, what will be the most advanced 
optical telescope in the world. But no 
one disputes the need to retain a home 
base for the observatory in this country. 
None the less, in the middle of the great 
move to the Canaries the research 
council blandly announced that “it 
wished to move the Greenwich obser- 
vatory from its present site”. The 
observatory is to be dismembered. 

The council exists to serve Britain’s 
community of scientists. It might have 
asked some of them — astronomers — 
about this drastic restructuring of their 
discipline. Instead, it asked only eight 
universities and the Royal Observatory 


by Sir William McCrea 

of Edinburgh whether they might 
absorb the observatory. Worse, most 
non-university astronomers are em- 
ployed by the research council, so they 
are restricted in what they can say. That 
is why the outcry about Herst- 
monceux’s closure has been muted. 

The eminent scientists and engineers 
who comprise the research council 
have operated in a way they would not 
consider in their professional lives: they 
have taken decisions without evidence. 
They cite no reason for disrupting the 
observatory’s work, nor for choosing 
this time for it to abandon its home. 
They list no shortcomings in Herst- 
monceux as a base. They identify 
nothing that could be done better on 
another site. There is no science in their 
procedure, and no evidence. 

The construction of the observatory’s 
William Herschel telescope in the 
Canaries, the most sophisticated, 
ground-based optical telescope in the 
world, will be disrupted. The council 
says it will not move the observatory 
from Herstmonceux until 1990 — na- 
ively supposing that the researchers can 
concentrate on this great undertaking 
while under the threat of their dissolu- 
tion as a community of scientists. 


The Royal Greenwich Observatory 
has acquired an unrivalled reputation 
for its work on behalf of HM Nautical 
Almanac Office, its research into 
positional astronomy, and for laser 
ranging of artificial, satellites. The 
research council has canvassed the 
benefits to the observatory of associ- 
ation with a university in disciplines 
other than astronomy, while saying it is 
ready to disrupt the association be- 
tween the various fields of study within 
astronomy itself 

There is no word in the council s 
statement about the observatory’s links 
with Sussex University and its Astron- 
omy Centre, which has a solid reputa- 
tion for theoretical work on stellar 
structure, the origin of chemical ele- 
ments in the stars and galaxies, and 
fundamental cosmology. There is, in- 
stead, much about hypothetical 
benefits from hypothetical associations 
with other universities. 

The Treasury and the Department of 
Education and Science have yet to 
endorse the council's plan, so there is 
time to reconsider. For the sake of the 
well-being of British astronomy — in- 
deed, for the sake of the reseach 
council's reputation — there is an ur- 
gent need to think a gain. 

The author is emeritus professor of 
astronomy at Sussex University. 


David Miller finds both the sports boycott of South Africa and the rebel tours — most 
recently by New Zealand rugby players — producing effects opposite to their Intent 

Playing apartheid to lose 


The international sports boycott 
of South Africa is riddled with 
illusions and misconceptions, 
both among those who impose it 
and those who seek to break it 
with rebel tours. It is time both 
factions realized that their activ- 
ities enjoy a degree of publicity 
quite out of proportion to the 
South African government's sen- 
sitivity or reaction to either. 

The South African crisis can 
only be solved — bloody revolu- 
tion apart — by constitutional re- 
form. and the extent of this will 
not be influenced by international 
sporting coercion. This was re- 
emphasized by Ron Miller, the 
deputy foreign minister, when I 
discussed the issue with him 
recently during the South African 
Games, staged to mark 
Johannesburg’s centenary. 

Government resistance to fur- 
ther liberalization provoked 
Sunday’s statement by the South 
African Sports Federation in 
which it demanded the removal of 
all remaining apartheid laws and 
the creation of an equal-opportu- 
nity society. What South African 
sport is saying is that the compar- 
ative freedom of association and 
integration that has been estab- 
lished within sport is inadequate 
and that sport has had enough of 
being an exception to the general 
rule of social inequality. 

Yet the current rebel tour by 
New Zealand rugby players will do 
more harm than good to South 
Africa -never mind the havoc 
within rugby - because it pro- 
vides a convenient target for the 
forces of protest This is a high 
price to pay for bolstering the 
morale of a few Springbok rugby 
players and their followers. 

When 1 put this view to Ron 
Miller he agreed, but expressed the 
relative indifference of his govern- 
ment “The government stands 
completely separate from sports 
initiative in South Africa," he 
said. “Although our sport has 
done everything requested of i! 
internationally, it has moved no 
closer to readmission. It really 
doesn’t matter at this stage 
whether we antagonize inter- 
national sporting bodies or not 
Demands now being made lie in 
the field of constitutional reform 
and not the promotion of multi- 
racial sport. 

“It is tragic that the inter- 
national sporting community has 
not shown a positive attitude to 
our reforms, and it casts doubt on 
their sincerity when they orig- 
inally indicated that their coercive 
attitude was to promote sporting 
integration for non-whites. Their 
unspoken promise has not been 
fulfilled. But South African re- 
forms at all levels are not as a 



result of external force. There is no 
hope of the sporting boycott 
making us change (political} 
direction.” 

This affirmation of government 
policy deflates the stance of the 
sporting, as opposed to political, 
foreign protesters who are now 
overestimating the continuing 
effectiveness of the boycott. Ron 
Pickering, the British athletics 
coach, television commentator 
and anti-apartheid campaigner, 
misjudged the importance of sport 
when he said that The only way a 
just and moral situation will arise 
in South Africa is if the world of 
sport boycotts them totally”. 

Such a view, inherent in the 
Gleneagles agreement, may have 
been relevant 10 years ago, and 
may have accelerated the genuine 
integration in many sports such as 
boxing, soccer, cricket, cycling, 
tennis and wrestling. But no 
longer. 

The political force of the sport- 
ing boycott has, I believe, ex- 
pended itself, it is now achieving 
nothing in many instances; all it 
does is limit the development and 
experience of South African 
sponsmen, black as well as while. 
Thus the boycott and the rebel 
touts are each producing the 
opposite of their intent 

Where Pretoria’s policy, as ex- 
pressed by Miller, remains politi- 
cally unacceptable - not to say 
naive — is in the question of equal 
opportunity and the continued 
suppression of non-whites 
through education inequality. It is 
here that the government is being 
pressurized by the sports federa- 
tions, under the leadership of 
Eddie Barlow - the former Test 
cricketer and member of the 


Progressive Federal Party, South 
Africa's official opposition — who 
was the strategic adviser behind 
the sports federation statement 

Miller believes, oddly, that it is 
coincidental that the initiative 
breaking the boycott comes 
predominantly from white sports- 
men. Leaving aside the question 
of a financial incentive and 
selfishness, the fact is that, on a 
global scale, rugby is a minority 
sport Participants are mainly 
white and the temptations, finan- 
cial and social to engage in rebel 
tours are that much more inviting, 
given the traditional standards of 
(white) Springbok rugby. 

Referring to the world’s sport- 
ing bodies. Miller says football 
seems to have a stronger bold on 
its members than rugby, as if 
unaware that the international 
football federation, Fife, is 
numerically dominated by Third 
World votes, and that Joao 
Havelange. the federation's presi- 
dent. owes his 1974 election to 
those votes. 

Yet Miller insists that by shift- 
ing the argument from the sport- 
ing to the political arena, by 
making their preconditions for 
international recognition constitu- 
tional issues such as one man, one 
vote, the International Olympic 
Committee and other sporting 
bodies are weakening rather than 
strengthening their individual 
voice. 

The government, he reaffirms, 
will not negotiate on one man, one 
vote, under a unitary political 
system. “It would be political 
suicide”, he says, “and we would 
be better off not fulfilling the 
demands and suffering the con- 
sequences. No black government 


in South Africa could survive, he 
asserts, unless It was communist 
and used force to maintain its 
position: which is approximately, 
of course, how foe present white 
government maintains its power. 

The argument for m a in tain in g 
foe Group Areas Act is based on 
the tenuous precept that South 
Africa is made up of many 
minority tribes whose rights need 
protection, and that foe Macks 
would not unite under an African 
National Congress electoral ban- 
ner. “We are agreed we need a new 
constitution, with a place in the 
sun for blacks”. Miller says. “We 
know we have to speed up, but we 
mustn't be wrecked by speed- 
wobble.” He hopes that “some of 
the sting” of the Group Areas Act 
will be removed under reforms 
later this year.- 

. The view of the sports federa- 
tions is that sport is demonstrating 
that life can remain stable even 
when foe apartheid legislation is 
not operating, and that normal 
sport in a normal society is a 
realistic possibility. What is 
misleading is to believe that foe 
New Zealand rebels are proving 
anything other than their own sdf- 
inieresu The irony is that foe West 
Indies rebel cricket tour, . more 
than any fiy while rebels* helpe d 
prove to white South African 
society that integration was the 
only possible future life free of 
violence. 

“The older white South African, 
is gripped by fear”, a liberal 
Springbok official told me. “What 
we have to wait for is for them to 
die. Sport is already proving that 
all our races can live in harmony-” 
The author is chief sports 
correspondent of The Tunes. 


American radio now offers the 
world foe best example of a 
deregulated mass medium, an 
achievement so far largely un- 
noticed because broadcasting 
without constraints defies at- 
tempts at documentation, lx is 
estimated that foe number of 
radio stations in the country 
passed LOW) in 1946. 5.000 in 
1 963 and is now around 10,000 — 
the average household owns five 
functioning radio sets. 

The arrival of television de- 
stroyed radio as a national me- 
dium, but gave it new life as a 
local fragmented, background ser- 
vice. But as radio came to offer 
largely national popular music 
alongside local chatter and 
advertising. Washington's appa- 
ratus of regulation, constructed in 
foe late 1920s and 1930s. came to 
have increasingly less effect 

The Federal Communications 
Commission once attempted, in 
roundabout ways, to mandate 
“serious" content or. felling that. 
10 require minimum amounts of 
local and non-entertainment ma- 
terial. These efforts were ineffec- 
tual. Even FCC requirements that 
stations stick to their agreed 
programming format became ludi- 
crous. Labels such as Rock. Al- 
bum Orientated Rock. Top 40, 
Adult Contemporary', Contem- 
porary Hit Radio, were all delib- 
erately vague. Mandated min- 
imum amounts of local input 
could be met by a disc jockey 
reading out listeners’ letters. 

Yet there was still deregulatory 


Jeremy Tunstall looks at one of the unsung 
successes of the American mass media 

Radio, free as 
the airwaves 


work to be done. Before the arrival 
on the FCC of President Reagan's 
appointees, formal abolition of 
restraints on content had been 
mooted. Reagan proposed extend- 
ing station licences, giving existing 
holders a 99 per cent chance of 
renewal. Restrictions on station 
ownership were lifted. 

Meanwhile radio had to adjust 
to the arrival of cable television, 
where much of the cheaper 
programming — such as music 
videos and nationwide phone 
lines — was really radio with pic- 
tures. According to FCC figures, 
by 1980 more than 2.000 radio 
Stations were losing money.The 
key to survival was keeping sta- 
tion operating costs to a mini- 
mum. The National Association 
of Broadcasters calculated in 1984 
that the typical station had a 
turnover of S 540.000 and em- 
ployed 14 full-time staff, mostly in 
administration or in selling 
advertising. At most only five or 
six voices would be heaid on the 
air. despite 24-hour operation. 


Americans listen to radio for 3V5 
hours a day, nearly as long as they 
view television. Over half of what 
they hear is music. At least 20 per 
cent of all radio is advertising, 
which earned the stations S6 bil- 
lion in 1984. Radio is also much 
the most pervasive source of news. 
Though all-news stations are con- 
fined to major metropolitan areas, 
the average FM station broadcasts 
85 minutes of news in every 24 
hours, or 316 minutes an hour. 

The number of stations keeps 
increasing, though radio’s share of 
available advertising has re-, 
mained constant for more than a 
decade. To remain competitive 
there has been more networking, 
particularly via satellite. Small 
local stations use syndication 
packages provided by a fest- 
growing new breed of pro- 
grammers. Deregulation has 
brought hyper-flexibility. Ameri- 
can radio offers vast amounts of 
popular music, but black voices 
are also getting a better hearing. 
And radio is good at reaching 


young people who are light users 
of both newspapers and television. 

Bui foe most specifically tar- 
geted and specialized of media is 
also, paradoxically, the medium 
that jumbles everythingup so that 
foe listener has difficulty in 
separating foe music, news, views 
and advertising; Much. is not what, 
it seems; the local prog ramm e 
may come from 2,000 mitesaway. 

The music and calk tend to be free 
publicity for rock bands, authors 
or other self-promoters. The views 
aired tend to be rabid, the phone- 
ins voyeuristic excursions into 
unstable minds. The news itself is . 
suspect. What presents itself as 
news may also be a plug for a 
r en the 


particular company. Even 

genuine news is too often un- 
diluted mayhem and murder. 

The typical House of Repre- 
sentatives District contains about 
25 radio stations. For the House 
member, local radio is a goldmine 
of free 30-second messages every 
hour. To the radio station, tire 
politician is a source of virtuous 
“live from Washington” materiaL 

In terms of hara data,. radio is 
an unknown medium. Most pub- 
lished radio audience figures are 
statistically worse than dubious 
deregulation means less docu- 
mentation, fewer figures. But ra- 
dio is. in the end, foe unknown 
success story of American mass 
media. 

The author’s hook. Communica- 
tions Deregulation, is published by 
Basil Blackwell, £25. 


William Wallace 



Atlantic bridge 


Even before the Amencan action 
in Libya, there were those on foe 
right as well as the left. 
relished foe prospect that atmudes 
to foe United States might become 
a central issue in British politics. 
“Altitudes to the US could soon 
define a new political divide in 
Britain,” Stephen Haseier wrote 
on this page. “Mrs Thatchers 

obvious self-identification with 
aspects of American culture has 
forced the issue." 

For foe new right. pro-Amen- 
canism provides a touchstone of 
political attitudes that sharply 
divides them not only from 
Labour and the Alliance parties, 
but al so from foe old establish- 
ment and the pro-European Ed- 
ward Heath wing of the 
Conservative Party. On the one 
side, a commitment to vigorous 
freo-maricei capitalism, limited 
government and 1 common law — 
the political inheritance of John 
Locke and Adazn Smith. On the 
other, 3 hankering for industrial 
intervention, , over-active govern- 
ment, and corporalist collabora- 
tion between established interests 
and foe state — foe political inher- 
itance of John Maynard Keynes, 
tainted by Continental socialism 
(andCathoticisra). ■ 

Norman Tebbitt, asked to re- 
spond some months ago on . r 
Newsnighi to Edward Heath's 
views on the future of BL,. 
attacked him first for being pro- .. 
European and anti-American, and 
second for favouring, industrial 
intervention. The ideological 
identification ., is with Reagan's- 
America, not with foe effete and 
decaying tradition . of Roosevelt 
and Kennedy. But it a playing - 
with fire in the current mood of . 
British politics to taunt one's 
opponents for anti-Americanism 
when they criticize the policies of 
the current US Administration. 
Well before the use of British bases 
for foe Libyan operation splashed 
combustible sentiments across foe : 
country, there have been signs of a 
general shift in altitudes. Opinion 
polls have shown growing reserva- 
tions about American policy 
alongside continuing warmth to- 
wards the United States. Speakers 
on senior Civil Service and busi- 
ness courses have been struck by 
the move in assumptions about 
America and Europe towards an . 
acceptance that the US is a seif- - 
interested power with which Stre- 
am has to bargain, withom benefit 
of any special relationship. 

In the aftermath of foe Libyan, 
affair it will be tempting on both 
sides of foe political divide to slide 
from an argument .about current 
American foreign policy into an 
argument over commitment to the™' 
Anglo-American alliance Itself It '. 
would be disastrous for' British; 
interests if this .proved to be foe. 
outcome, with anti-Americanism 
succeeding anti-Europeanism as a 
popular political caose^ Britain 
needs both foe United States and . 
foe Western Europe partnership; it 
is a false drchotomy to counter* 


pose one against tbeothw- 

Responsible government seeks 
re-establish consensus on 
Muindfoaican accommodate foe 
bradesistossfc fe 

an issue to be left w coirirofoR- 

ssss-dt "ESS 

modste not only 

gKHj&WoSE 

Hesdtine legacy at foe Ministry of 
Defence now is. the mast promis- 
ing formula for sk* 3. 
fmvtt nsss is to be found to foe 
chapter of the 1985 defence White 
Paper which discusses “that srite 
of foe transatlantic bridge at 
which Britain forms a 
European pillar". Bn tarn, foe 
White Paper in effect ar gues, b ow 
has only a very limited “speaar 
relationship with the 1/5. m 
nuclear and intelligence matters. 
For foe rest, from strategy and 
security policy to collaboration tri 
arms procurement, Britain s in- 
fluence is most effectively exened 
in Washington as part of the ; 
furopcan caucus. 

Successive British governments 
share the responsibility for felling 
to create an effective European 
rpum in foreign policy and 
defence - although Denis Healey. 
Lord Carrington and Michael 
Heseltine have all played^ 
constructive roles. The EuropeafiP 1 
response to Libyan support for 
terrorism has been weak, but 
Britain has not until now been 
conspicuously of the zest; 
we were held bade by foe hesita- 
tions we shared with our Conti- 
nental partners about the thrust of 
American Middle East policy. In 
practice, like other European gov- 
ernments, we have been jjto- 
American tmaindple, but critical 
of a number of. elements of 
American policy.- - 
- European disarray means that 
constructive criticisms receive lit- 
tfc hearing m Washington,. that wc 
have no coherent alternatives to 
' propose, and exert little influence. 
Left m for own as a junior 
partner; the choicer are all too 
often presented in terms tf subsefo 
vieoce or . separation The issue 
will presented -in those static 
terms .over the coming months. 
Far better foonphasEte, as Britain 
takes on the presidency of the 
European Community lot six 
months from Jiffy, that Europe 
-and Americ&are essential to each 
other. HfeseSihe’s White Paper put 
ir refy wea^ A more mfoesive 
Europe would both “contribute to 
foe^freaogth: of the Alliance as a 
whole, and enable Europe- to co- 
operate more effectively on level 
terms with the United States." 

The author is deputy director of the 
Royal Institute of International 
Chatham House. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 


a 





Next time you put ybtir hand in 
your pocket for a charity, why not , 
make it for the Moreover Rest 
Home and . Refuge for Battered 
English Cticketeris?. . . ; ; 

. Here bn _ the banks of foe 
Thames we have turned a . quiet 
country houseinto a retreat where 
England cricketers who can take 
no. more may live out the rest of 
their, days in tranq uiliiy. Young in •. 
years Nit old in experience, they-' 
have been through ordeals which 
foe rest of us can only imagine;' 
Cricket balls bursting around 
them tike hand 'grenades. Broken 
-noses and broken fingers, shat- 
tered . morale. Woefully under- 
equipped against' the ; attack 
armoury of the mightiest 
cricketing nation in the wdrkL 
These men have been serving their 
Queen ind country, just as otir 
- men did in the Great War. .Shall 
we. let them down how? 

■j. Johnny X,. a mid-order bats- 
man, tells a typical -story.!*! was. 
■batting against .foe .West ' Indies 
two mouths ago. I was armed only 
with a helmet,, fiexiglass visor, 
stainless sled legging, bullet-proof 
vest, riot shield and willow trun- 
cheon. No plastic bullets or tear 
gas. nothing like that Anyway, I 
had been in for about 40 minutes 
and scored six runs — only been 
knocked unconscious twice, quite * 
h good run really — when this 
Moke came across' no' man's lawf 
and let go a really vicious one 
which caught me over foe heart - 
“There was an immediate ap- 
peal for leg before .wicket, which 
stands to reason, as I was already 
bent over double before foe mis- 
sile, I mean foe ball arrived, and it 
was quite possible that myheait 
was in line with foe wicket Well 
the umpire thought for a moment ! 
and then gave me not out ! found' 
myself marching down the wicket 
and disputing bis decision hotly, 
claiming I was really out It was 
then I knew I had really cracked I 
mean, when you find a batsman 
wanting to be out,- there's got to be " 
something wrong, right?” 

Johnny X was suffering from 

what used to be called shell-shock. 

He still suffers from it Every night 
he wakes up shouting; -No ball!” 

Mickey Y is another one who 
bas not yet recovered from his 
baptism by fire in the West Indies. 
He is what we call a fast bowler or 
what foe West Indies call a 
medium-slow merchant. His bow- 
ing was treated by foem with 


scant respect, and even now be 
cannot bowl a ball without looking 
over his shoulder to see where it 
• has gone. But the experience that 
scarred, him came when he batted 
as a taii-ender for the English 
expeditionary force in Antigua. 

“Walking out to the wicket took 
an age”, »ys MkJcey. “It wasn't so 
much foe fear, which was bad 
.enough, as the feet that every ten* 
yards 1 was setupon by a British* 
-journalist wanting to know which 
drugs I was using and so on. Still, I 
eventually got to the wicket and 
asked for middle-and-Ieg. The 
umpire gave it to me, and I was 
just patting my crease when my 
bar exploded into 15 -pieces. I 
looked up. One of their bowlers 
had already bowled at me, and hit 
m y, tot He grinned at me and 
saw, ‘Sorry,- mao, it was meant to 
be a bouncer*. I turned right round 
and walked back to. the pavilion.” 

He was given out, retired from 
the game. These men," and many 
luce. them, still find it hard to 
adjust to everyday life. When they 
st» a stretch of green grass, they 
whimper. When they see a traffic j 
fight turn red, they duck. 

Only at foe Moreover Refuge 
can they find a haven from the 
eroel world which demands so 
much °f them. Here, beside foe 
jamming pool or on the nine- 
hote golf course, they can erad- 
“fHy Piece together the shattered 
“H** Ottered bodies which 

' " ^ at our wOTk needs money. We 
state-aided or state- 
foKtedJvayymy required to 
Setose iron back to a useful 
J2™* . ,lfe roust come from 

Private donors. Will you held? 

foiioh^ U SUUU ? the men who 
fought for you m foe West Indies? 
Or wU you see them cast otHhe 
3& e “ p of not «tt>P county 



much more of this". 

“^ lt for England 





1 ZQ> 


\ I n 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 


irv r , 

4 4 j jj ■t j 

> i'h- 

A 

OfiH 

■'.'i 



LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



I Pennington. Street, London El 9X N Telephone: 01-481 4100 

STILL NOT ENOUGH 




\ At the dose of Monday’s 
meeting of EEC foreign min. 
isters, Libya was still receiving 
what was in effect* “most 
favoured • nation” t reatm ent- 
. from ' the Community. The 
ministers refrained, as gen- 
• entity predicted, from impos- 
ing economic sanctions. What 
was remarkable, however, was 
that they also took no action to 
’ halt the Community's sales of 
. subsidised beef and butter to 
the Libyan regime. They will 
merely ‘‘review” the matter. 
For the moment, therefore, the 
Libyan economy continues to 
1 benefit from. SC subsidies. 

That the limited measures 
actually agreed upon could be 
described as “tougher 
sanctions” is a comment more 
upon the inadequacy of the 
EECs previous curbs on Libya 
_ than upon this week's delibera- 
tions. Even the mild British 
proposal that diplomatic rela- 
. lions with Libya should be 
sundered was rejected. 

That left a package of mea- 
sures to cut Libyan diplomatic 
- representation in EEC coun- 
. tries to the “absolute mini- 
mum necessary” and confine 
the diplomats to national cap- 
itals; to keep watch on non- 
official Libyans like students 
and journalists; and to ensure 
that Libyans expelled from 
one EEC country for involve- 
ment *in terrorism will be 


excluded from the entire EEC 

' The phrase “Libyan 
diplomat” is, of course, an 
oxymoron. Colonel Gadaffi’s 
“Peoples’s Bureaus” are better 
regarded as centres for 
organizing terrorism than as 
visa offices. So these are very 
modest measures indeed. 

But will even these mild 
proposals be implemented? A 
promise to reduce diplomatic 
representation to the mini- 
mum is unlikely to be inter- 
preted identically in, say, 
Britain and Greece. Indeed, 
Greece — like Spain — claims 
that it already has the mini- 
mum representation in Libya. 
Their agreement to the EEC 
package — achieved only with 
great difficulty in the Greek 
case — will therefore make 
little or no practical difference. 

It is difficult, however, to see 
what practical results might 
flow from the package if it 
were to be enthusiastically 
implemented. Probably terror- 
ists would find it marginally 
more difficult to operate with- 
out detection in EEC coun- 
tries. But the measures so far 
announced will reduce neither 
Libya's overall capacity to 
sponsor and assist terrorism 
abroad nor its will to do so. At 
best; then* they will re-direct 
the flow of terrorism away 
from EEC countries (and thus. 


by inference, towards someone 

else.) 

That might be cynically 
interpreted as exactly what the 
package was designed 10 
achieve. Its real purpose was 
not quite so craven. Iz was to 
persuade the US that no 
further military attacks need 
be made upon Libya since 
effective non-military reprisals 
had been put in place. Early 
American reactions seem to 
suggest that this persuasion 
has worked. The EEC mea- 
sures have been greeted as a 
welcome move in the right 
direction brought about by the 
American willingness to use 
force. 

But it would be a mistake to 
believe that this reaction — 
which is partly an attempt to 
restore good Atlantic relations 
— would survive renewed Lib- 
yan attacks on the US. The 
EEC measures fall far short of 
the economic sanctions sought 
by the US. They fall even 
shorter of genuinely effective 
sanctions such as a civil airline 
quarantine of Libya. 

Should Colonel Gadaffi or- 
der bis diplomats to plant 
another bomb aimed at US 
installations or personnel. 
President Reagan is likely to 
launch a further raid upon 
terrorist targets in Libya. And 
once again he will be able to 
justify it by reference to the 
feebleness of Europe. 


NO SURGERY FOR THE SURGERIES 


The Government’s review of 
the front line of health care, 
the general practitioners and 
community nurses, is in the 
main sane and sensible. 
Twenty years after the “Fam- 
ily Doctor’s Charter” rescued 
CP services from decline, a 
system of family health care' 
that still ranks — a tribute if 
nothing else to Thatcherite 
administration of the National 
Health Service — as the best in 
the world, is in need of 
overhaul. 

The deeply green paper pith “ 
poses for local doctors, no 
more nor less than the method 
of regulating' the- public sector 
the Government has suggested 
for teachers and civil servants: 
a scheme of contracts to relate 
pay and performance. Here is 
an endorsement of the growing 
thirst of patients/consumers 
for more information about 
the NHS’s operation — linked 
to a recommendation for some 
quicker and easier complaints 
procedure. 

Family practice has been 
under scrutiny for five years. 
In 198! the Treasury became 
intensely interested in trying 
to place cash limits on family 
practitioner services expen- 
diture. The idea was always 
impractical It is one thing to 
make patients queue to have 
their hernias. Risking having 
to tell a mother bringing a baby 
for a polio vaccination that the 
money has run out Tor the year 
is quite another. 

At the same time, the think 
tanks were canvassing ideas 
such as lifting or easing con- 
trols on where GPs can prac- 
tise. The ambition was, 
basically, to privatize general 
practice — for example by 
providing would-be patients 


with vouchers' covering basic 
public health care which they 
could top tip and spend in 
private surgeries. Instead of 
self-employed agents of the 
NHS, doctors would become 
health entrepreneurs. 

Ultimately neither the 
economizers nor the radicals 
were convincing. Ministers 
were left with the central issue: 
how to introduce elements of 
consumerism into a collec- 
tively provided service in 
which the power of the produc- 
ers, the doctors and health care 
professionals was strong, with- 
out jeopardizing the NHS’s 
ability to plan and deliver a 
comparable service in diverse 
local areas. 

The Government’s •un- 
certainty about what to do 
next shows through the dis- 
cussion document; perhaps 
that is why it has taken two 
years to produce. In the mean- 
time much-needed improve- 
ments in family doctor 
services have hung fire. It was 
1979 when the Acheson report 
put forward a programme to 
improve inner city care. Yet 
the discussion paper is still 
only talking about experi- 
ments with new types of 
contract for GPs in inner 
cities. 

Issues like the pace at which 
the number of GPs and den- 
tists is increasing are. ad- 
. dressed only obliquely. From 
2,400 in the mid-1970s, the 
number of patients on the 
average GP’s list will have 
fallen to 1,700 by the mid- 
1990s on present trends. Yet 
the discussion document does 
not ask directly whether that 
can or should be afforded. 

Mr Fowler- is anxious to 
secure as much agreement as 


he can from the medical 
profession to the changes 
recommended. The danger is 
that he will palliate an interest 
group rather than enhance the 
wellbeing of patients. For 
example, the recommendation 
that GPs should no longer 
receive subsidies to employ 
nurses in their practices so 
large that the GP can actually 
make a profit from employing 
them has been ruled out of 
consideration for fear of 
doctors' reaction. 

The paper proposes "health 
care shops” — a good idea if it 
were to lead to one-stop health 
provision linking .dental, 
medical and pharmaceutical 
services. The paper should 
have elaborated the financial 
and social consequences of the 
proposal 

Mr Fowler is tempted to 
present this as another great 
review of social policy. Ion to 
the social security review. It 
surely is not that. It is instead 
the interim conclusions of a 
government in two minds — 
caught between the belief that 
a collectivist system of health 
care will never satisfy , con- 
sumer wishes and the fear of 
seeming to harbour a desire to 
dismantle the still-popular 
NHS. 

The fact is, however, that 
primary care needs reform. On 
the way there brushes with the 
medical profession are prob- 
ably inevitable. Mr Fowler has 
chosen a smoother path to the 
next election, preferring to 
hope for change by building a 
consensus over time. The pa- 
per, sound though it is in many 
of its recommendations, is not 
an impatient reformer’s mani- 
festo. 


TIME TO SETTLE CYPRUS 


He hasn’t said “yes” and he 
hasn't said "no." But in his 
reply to the latest UN _ pro- 
posals on Cyprus, President 
Kyprianou has said enough to 
make it clear that Senor Javier 
Perez de Cuellar has a great 
deal of courting still to do. Is 
he not once more in danger of 
testing everyone's patience too 
far? - 

Mr. Rauf Denktas, leader of 
the self-styled Turkish Repub-' 
lie of Northern Cyprus 
iTRNC), has already accepted 
the framework for a future 
federal government on the 
island, worked out by Senor 
Perez de Cuellar and his UN 
team during more than a year 
of stop-go consultations and 
study. But the Turkish 
community had also been 
prepared to accept the earlier. 
UN package presented to 
Denktas and Kyprianou m 
New York in January 1985. It 
was President Kyprianou’s 
concern over what have be- 
come known as the “four 
sticking points” which led to 
the breakdown of the New 
York meeting. . „ 

The “four sticking points 
include the withdrawal of 
17,000 Turkish troops who 
remain on the island following 
the 1974 Turkish invasion; the 
removal of settlers from the 
Turkish mainland; the pro- 
vision of suitable guarantees of 
future independence; and 


assurances on the three "basic 
fredoms” — the right for all 
citizens to move, live and 
work whereever they wish on 
the island. 

The Greek Cypriots are not 
entirely happy about the 
constitutional details worked 
out by the United Nationa 
mediators; In some respects, 
they complain, these are less 
acceptable than those which 
were presented in New York. 
The Turkish community, for 
instance, would now be al- 
lowed 29 per cent “plus” of the 
land — the “plus” sounding 
dangerously Hi-defined to 
Greek ears. But in general 
terms the package so for looks 
acceptable. 

What still worries President 
Kyprianou is that the four 
points above have not been 
dealt with - and be is unhappy 
. about the promise that they 
will be dealt with in due 
course. The main difference 
between the position now and 
that in which he found himself 
15 months ago, is that ail other 
Greek Cypriot leaders, not to 
mention President 

Papandreou in Athens, now 
agree with him. 

It is against that background 
that Kyprianou has responded 
to the proposals, not by reject- 
ing them but by calling for a 
summit with Denktas or an 

international conference - to 


discuss die four points before 
agreeing to anything. The idea 
of an international conference 
takes up a Soviet proposal 
made earlier this year and is 
almost certainly me&nt to put 
the frighteners on Western 
powers. (The Russians have 
also urged the removal of all 
foreign troops from Cyprus - 
which includes the British with 
their airfield and radar sta- 
tion). The more serious ob- 
stacle raised by the Kyprianou 
reply is that he is unwilling to 
-proceed until the four points 
(and particularly the with- 
drawal of Turkish troops) have 
been settled. 

His objections are not al- 
together surprising because 
they had to some extent been 
foreshadowed in recent weeks. 
But they are beginning to look 
unreasonable, given that Perez 
de Cuellar has put forward a 
.mechanism for settling the 
four points in due course. 

Time is not on Kyprianou’s 
side. Meanwhile Mr. Denktas 
will continue to consolidate 
his position in the North until 
one day the division of Cyprus 
will come to be recognised as a 
perm ament feature ofthe East- 
ern Mediterranean. This 
would perpetuate an instabil- 
ity which continues to worry 
the West But it can hardly be 
in the interests of those who 
live there either- 


Policing a free > 
society in Ulster 

From Mr A. Cecil Walker, MP for 
Belfast Xonh (Official Unionist) 
Sir. 1 think it is important that 
your readers should know that 
responsible politicians in North- 
ern Ireland do not in any way 
condone the attacks on police and 
their families by an irresponsible, 
mindless minority who have 
turned on the force which has 
protected the province from the 
IRA over the Iasi 17 years. 

Sir Eldon Griffiths, par- 
liamentary adviser to the Police 
Federation, has suggested that it Is 
impossible to police a free society 
against the will of the majority. 
Knowing that the majority are 
firmly against the Anglo-Irish 
Agreement as expressed 
democratically at the ballot box. 1 
foil to understand why he supports 
this imposition upon the majority. 

Surely, if he listens to the 
representatives of the Police 
Federation, he should realise that 
the agreement, in its present form, 
win never be accepted and that he 
should be concentrating his efforts 
to protect the interests of the 
federation by campaigning for an 
alternative to this agreement 
which will command the wide- 
spread support of all reasonable 
people within the province. 

Yours sincerely, 

A CECIL WALKER. 

1 Wvnnland Road, 

Cammoney. 

Newtownabbey, 

Co. Antrim. 

April 21. 

Selling off water 

From the Minister for Housing. 
Urban Affairs and Construction 
Sir, Ir is not accurate to say. as Mr 
David Akroyd's letter (April 19) 
suggests, that the proceeds from 
privatising regional water authori- 
ties belong to local councils. As 
pan of the reform of local govern- 
ment, the Water Act 1973 created 
the water authorities as public 
bodies answerable to the Govern- 
ment It wasn't only the assets that 
were transferred; debts were also 
transferred. 

It is for Parliament to deride 
what is to happen to the water 
authorities and lb the proceeds of 
any sale. But the Government's 
Bill will provide for the proceeds 
to be paid into the Exchequer. 
This will benefit the general 
taxpayer who. in one way or 
another, paid for them in the first 
place. 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN PATTEN, 

Department of the Environment. 

2 Marsham Street, SW1. 

April 21. 

Violence in S Africa 

From the Most Reverend Dr 
' Trevor Huddleston , CR 
Sir. Your leader (April 1 5) states 
“Many of Mrs Mandela's support- 
era — and not only in South Africa 
— may genuinely believe that 
violence is now the only way to 
overcome the injustice of 
apartheid”. 

It is ironic that on the same day 
you report the election of Bishop 
Desmond Tutu as Archbishop of 
Cape Town and remind your 
readers of his impassioned plea to 
the world community for the 
immediate imposition of punitive 
sanctions against South Africa in 
order to hasten the end of apart- 
heid and prevent, the escalation of 
violence. 

It is therefore highly inappro- 
priate (to use no stronger word) to 
condemn Mrs Mandela for her 
utterance on the ground that it will 
alienate white liberal opinion 
inside and outside South Africa. It 
is even more inappropriate to 
claim that the process of change in 
South Africa is simply “slow". 
The fact is that unless apartheid is 
dismantled totally and immedi- 
ately there is now no alternative to 
escalating and ever more violent 
conflict. 

For the whole of this century the 
African people in South Africa 
have shown a patience with the 
violence of oppression un- 
paralleled elsewhere. Their pa- 
tience has now come to an end, 
and -Mrs Mandela is giving notice 
to the world of that stark fra in 
equally stark language. 

If the people of this country — as 
opposed to the Government - 
would insist on an effective sanc- 
tions policy by ending the massive 
support for apartheid which is the 
consequence of our investment in 
South Africa we would be doing 
what Bishop Tutu has so power- 
fully urged us to do. 

Only then would we have any 
moral right to be critical of those, 
tike Mrs Mandela, who express an 
ultimate frustration so strong as to 
be no longer bearable. 

I remain. Sir. yours faithfully, 
t TREVOR HUDDLESTON. 
President The Anti-Apartheid 
Movement in Great Britain, 

197 Piccadilly, Wj. 

April 15. 

Founding a hospice 

From Dr and Mrs & D. Worswick 
Sir. In urging restraint on those 
who might consider establishing 
children's hospices. Professor 
Baum (March 25) sensibly points 
to the need to consider carefully 
the demands for such hospices 
and their geographical distribu- 
tion. However, he also makes 
unfortunate analogies between the 
provision of respite care in hos- 
pices and drug therapy. 

As the parents of Helen, whose 
particular plight provided the . 
model for Helen House, the first 
hospice specifically for children, 
we are concerned that he is 
applying the methods of clinical 


Time for dedication in schooling 


From Sir li Pile 
Sir. It is usually best not to say 
anything, at any rate in public, 
about a world one left 10 years ago 
but has not forgotten. Yet it is 
hard not io comment on your 
headline today (April 15). “NUT 
barred from pay talks" and the 
report yesterday of Sir Ronald 
Gould's death (He will not mind if 
this letter is only a passing tribute 
to his life and work). 

In the early post-war years the 
education sen ice performed mir- 
acles in overcoming the physical 
damage of the bombs and in 
producing the new- buildings 2 nd 
teachers needed for the “bulge" in 
pupil numbers. Looking back. I 
believe this was possible only 
because, on all major issues, 
ministers of ai! parties. Civil 
Servants, local authorities and 
teachers all saw themselves as on 
the same side, committed redoing 
the best they could for the rising 
generation. 

Today. God help us: we are 
fighting, not helping each other. 
There is neither space nor lime 
now to speculate fully why this is 
so. But two contributory factors, 
in my view, are first, the 
politicisation of educational issues 
that could be better handled 
without being politicised and. 
secondly, the failure of the NUT 
to play the constructive role it did 
under Sir Ronald Gould and 
which, on any analysis, it should 
play as the largest professional 
union in the education service. 
“NUT barred from pay talks" says 
it all. 

Tne NUT are right to be deeply 
concerned, but wrong to be ob- 
sessed, by the question of teachers' 
pay. Teachers are indisputably 
badly paid. But the general mal- 
aise in the system *ill not go away 

Attack on Libya 

From Mr Robert Spooner 
Sir, Your leading article today 
(April 1 8) sets out “the case for the 
raid". The main thrust of your 
argument is that the bombing of 
targets in Libya may impair the 
ability and sap the will of those 
international terrorists who have 
looked to the leader of that 
country for inspiration and sup- 
port. Time will tell, but the early 
indications are rhar even these 
hopes will be disappointed. 

However, even if your argu- 
ments were accepted, the political 
consequences of the United States' 
action would still be unacceptable. 

Four years ago. our own country 
was involved, in the defence of the 
FalkJands. At that time there were 
some - albeit on the fringes - who 
argued that a strike against air 
bases in Argentina would remove 
a risk to our task force. They were 
right, but such a course was 
rejected. On a wider and proper 
view it was considered that the 
impact on world opinion would 
have been unacceptable, whatever 
the advantage in military terms. 

The action which the United 
States took on Monday has de- 
stroyed their own influence in the 
Arab world and placed at risk 

Labour’s hard left 

From Mr David Webster 
Sir, Anne Sofer (April 7) has 
misquoted my Fabian pamphlet, 
“The Labour Party and the New 
Left”, and in doing so - 1 am sure 
unintentionally - implies that a 
majority of Labour Parry activists 
in 1981 were Trotskyists. 

The pamphlet certainly did 
argue that, at that time, to win a 
majority among Labour Party 
constituency activists probably 
required only about 40,000 peo- 
ple, and that this was similar to the 
number of convinced Trotskyist 
or other revolutionary socialist 
activists. However, it did nor say 
that a majority of these were 
inside the Labour Party, and 
indeed gave figures which sug- 
gested the contrary. 

Rather, the pamphlet dem- 
onstrated the extent to which 
T rotskyist influence over the party 
bad already grown and stressed 
the party’s vulnerability at a time 
when some of its leading figures 
had allied themselves with the 
revolutionary left and when large 
numbers of younger people noi in 
organised groups were neverthe- 
less strongly influenced by 
Trotskyist ideas. 

It is only fair to add that a lot 
has happened in the Labour Party 
in the past five years. Electoral 
defeat has led to widespread 
political reappraisal; in the past 
year, a large pari of the so-called 
“soft-left" has now ended its 
alliance with Trotskyists and Neil 
Kinnock has opened up with 
marvellous effectiveness the direct 
challenge to revolutionary' left 
ideology for which my pamphlet 
called. As a result. Trotskyist 
influence over the Labour Party is 
currently in decline. 

Yours faithfully, 

DAVID WEBSTER, 

38 Crompton Avenue. 

Cathcan, Glasgow. 

evaluations to what is not, primar- 
ily. a medical service. 

The starting point for Helen 
House was not a medical one. We 
were caring at home for a very sick 
child for whom there was now no 
hope of cure. The occasional 
weekends Helen went to stay with 
our close friend. Mother Frances 
Dominica, helped us keep going. 

Helen House stemmed quite 
simply from the desire to provide 
such respite care and friendship to 
other families like ours in home- 
like surroundings. Though there 
were uncertainties surrounding its 
birth, there was never any 
"guesswork” involved in what ir 
should be like. 

Professor Baum’s use of ler- 


ssmp]> by paying teachers more 
nor e«.en by replacing the Sec- 
retary of State. A renewed affirma- 
tion ’ is needed that- at the 
beginning and at the end ot tne 

d 3 >. education is for and about 
children and not about ministers, 
politicians, councillors, unions, 
under-secretaries, inspectors, 
researchers, journalists et at. 

All ihe partners in the education 
sjsrem should re-comma them- 
selves to the service of the rising 
generation. The NUT could break 
the vicious circle of "all against 
all" and re-establish its traditional 
role of leadership by accepting 
that responsibility for national 
policies lie with Parliament, the 
Government and ministers of the 
da>. 

Let them not seek to act as if 
the> were the Secretary of Stale. 
Let them argue and argue if they 
must, but if rftej cannot persuade, 
let them not sabotage. Let them 
show that the> are more con- 
cerned than anybody else about 
the quality of their own pro- 
fessional ’ performance, the 
achievement of their pupils, the 
concern of parents, the worries of 
employers. 

I believe the public would not 
tolerate, and no government could 
defend, the grotesque under- 
payment of professional educators 
who were clearly ready to re- 
ded i cate themselves in this way to 
the service of the young and the 
interests of the nation. 

Yours sincerelv. 

WILLIAM PILE 
(Permanent Under Secretary of 
State. Department of Education 
and Science, 1970-76). 

The Manor House, 

Worships Hill. 

Riverhead. Nr Sevenoaks. Kent. 
April 15, 

moderate governments in the 
Middle East. 1 fear that our 
support for this ill-judged action 
has also removed, for a Jong time 
ahead, the ability of this country 
io act in an objective and accepted 
manner to assist in finding a 
solution to the problems which 
have been the basic cause of 
terrorism from and in the- Middle 
East. 

In short, even if you are right, 
and the attack on Libya does 
impair the effectiveness of terror- 
ism. the price has been loo high. 
Yours faithfiillv, 

ROBERT SPOONER. 

14 Berkeley Street, Wl. 

From Mr B. R. Taylor 
Sir. The gist of your leader today 
(April 18) presenting "the case for 
the raid” seems to be that some- 
thing had to be done and that, in 
the absence of a productive course 
of action, our Jeadera had no 
option but to choose more or less 
at random. On this basis you 
justify significant risk of death and 
injury to innocent civilians. Later 
you accuse Mr Heath of taking a 
coidheaned view! 

Yours faithfully, 

B. R. TAYLOR, 

5 Donaldson Road. 

Salisbury, Wiltshire. 

Musical excellence 

From Mr Barry Tuckwell 
Sir. In his letter on musical 
excellence (April 9) Peter 
Heyworth casts an unjustified slur 
on the four co-operative Loadon 
orchestras. Their artistic standard 
is nothing to be ashamed of. 

British orchestras are among the 
finest in the world. I know because 
I play with them alL The or- 
chestras of "Chicago, Vienna. 
Berlin, etc" have one thing rarely 
given to their London counter- 
parts- respecL 
Yours faithfiillv. 

BARRY TUCRWELL, 

6 Chester Place. 

Regent’s Park. NW1. 

April 11. 

Busy old bees 

From Dr Elizabeth M. Hallam 
Sir. In his letter about beekeepers 
in Domesday England (April 12) 
Mr Riches omits to mention why 
their occupation, part-time ornoL. 
was so important. It may surprise 
your readers to learn that sugar 
was an unknown commodity in 
eleventh-century England. 

Honey was the only sweetening 
agent available, and was much 
valued also for its medicinal 
properties. It was therefore at a 
premium; and in 20 counties 
manorial rents were sometimes 
paid not in cash but in sesters of 
honey. Penalties were laid down 
for any of the Welshmen of 
Archentield who tried to conceal 
their honey. 

Bees brought not just sweetness, 
but light. Beeswax candles were in 
demand by the nobility and the 
Church because they gave a far 
better illumination than the tallow 
variety. 

Some of the honey and wax was 
apparently harvested from wild 
bees, and one suspects that laie- 


minology such as "undesirable 
side-effects" is as inappropriate in 
this context as has been some of 
the over-sentimental coverage 
given to Helen House in the 
popular Press. In his anxiety to 
curb a possible outbreak of hos- 
pice-founding. induced perhaps by 
such publicity. Professor B3um 
misses the opportunity to point 
out that hospice care is only one 
aspect of the support which the 
community could offer. 

Yours faithfully. 

RICHARD WORSWICK. 
JACQUELINE WORSWICK, 

7 Park Crescent. 

Abingdon. 

Oxfordshire. 

March 29. 


ON THIS DAY 


APRIL 23 1788 

The final episode in the high 
adventure and tragedy of the 17-15 
rebellion. Charles Edward Stuart, 
the "Young Pretender", was the 
grandson o/ James II of England. 
In December. 1745, his rebellion 
teas in sight of success at Derby — 
a 10-day march from panic- 
stricken London. He faltered, 
retreated, and on April 16 the 
following year dispirited army 
was destroyed by the Duke of 
Cumberland'at Cutloden. Charles 
escaped from Scotland and 
thereafter Hindered throughout 
Europe. He died on January 20, 
1788 m Rome, where his remains 
uere re muted to St Peter's in 
1807. 


A correspondent has favoured us 
with the following Extract of a 
letter from his friend at ROME, 
which contains a more particular 
account of the funeral of the late 
COUNT OF ALBANY than any 
vet published: 

"The funeral obsequies of the 
late Count of Albany were celebrat- 
ed on the third of February, in the 
Cathedral Church at Frascati Jsic|; 
of which See Cardinal Duke of 
York, his brother, is Bishop. 

“The church was hung with 
black doth (the seems ]sirl covered 
with gold lace I . drawn up between 
the pillars in the form of festoons, 
intermixed with gold and silver 
tissues, which bad a very magnifi- 
cent and solemn effect; especially 
as a profusion of wax tapers were 
continually burning during the 
whole of the ceremony in every 
part of the church. 

Over the great door, and the four 
principal side altars, there were 
written in the festoons (in large 
characters) the following texts of 
Scripture, which were chosen by 
the Cardinal, as allusive to the 
situation and fortunes of the 
deceased: “Ecclesiastes, chap. 47, 
v. 17. Job. chap. 29. v. 5. Tobti. 
chap. 2, v. 18. Proverbs, chap. 5, v. 
17. Maccabees, book 2, chap. 6, v. 
31." 

A large Catafalque was erected 
on a platform, raised three steps 
from the floor, in the Nave of the 
Church, on which the Coffin. 
containing the Body, was placed, 
covered with a superb pall, on 
which was embroidered, in several 
places, the royal arms of England, 
on each side stood three gentlemen 
servants of the deceased in mourn- 
ing cloaks, and holding a Royal 
Banner— and about it were placed a 
very considerable number of very 
large wax tapers, in the form of a 
square, guarded by the Militia of 
Frascati. 

About ten o'clock in the fore- 
noon, the Cardinal was brought 
into the Church in a Sedan Chair, 
covered with black cloth, attended 
by a large suit of his officers and 
servants, in deep mourning. 

He seated himself on his throne, 
on the right bimd side of the great 
altar, and begun [sic] to sing the 
office appointed by the church for 
the dead, assisted by his choir, 
which is numerous, and some of 
the best voices from Rome. 

The first verse was scarcely 
finished, when it was observed that 
his voice faultered [sicj, the tears 
trickled down bis cheeks, so that it 
was feared he would not have been 
able to proceed— however, he soon 
recollected himself, and went 
through the functions in a very 
affecting manner— in which manly 
firmness, fraternal affection, and 
religious solemnity, were very hap. 
pily blended. 

The Magistrates of Frescati, and 
a numerous concourse of ihe 
neighbouring people, attended on 
this occasion; who were attracted, 
not so much by their curiosity, or 
the purpose of assisting et the 
masses which were celebrated at 
every altar of the church, as a 
desire of testifying their great 
respect for their Bishop; who 
constantly resides amongst them, 
and daily bestows upon them 
temporal as well as spiritual bless- 
ings. with a very liberal hand. 


eleventh-century beekeeping was a 
rather unsophisticated an. 

It would be an interesting 
exercise if wc could compare the 
productivity of the average 
Domesday drone with that of his 
modern counterpart. 

Yours faithfully. 

ELIZABETH M. HALLAM 
Assistant Keeper of Public 
Records. 

Public Record Office. 

Kew, 

Richmond. Surrey. 

Royal ‘rules’ 

From Mr Bernard Denrir 
Sir. Despite Dr Lan-son's doubts 
(April 12) about the legality of the 
Lord Chamberlain's ukase forbid- 
ding pictures of the royal couple 
from appearing on perspiration 
shirts, the first Queen Elizabeth 
had no qualms about being very 
forthright in this matter. 

In 1 563 an Order in Council was 
issued which, after rather dis- 
ingenuously claiming that the 
Queen had only been forced to 
take action in this matter because 

great nomber of Paymers and some 
Printers and Gravers have already, 
and doe daily, attempt to make in 
divers manners ponraiciures of hir 
Majestie wherein is evidently shewn, 
that hytheno none has sufficiently 
expressed the natural represen ia l ion 
of hir Majestic's person, favor or 
grace 

a fact which had greatly distressed 
her 5ubjecis.weni on to lay down 
that 

She straight!} chargcth oil hir officers 
and ministers as soon as may be. to 
reform the errors allredy committed 
and in the meantyme io forbydd and 
prohibit the showing and publica- 
tion of such portraictures as are 
apparently deformed, until they are 
reformed which are reformablc. 

Yours &C. 

BERNARD DENVIR. 

Arts Club. 

40 Dover Street. \V|. 


i 



run wmmcnAV. apptt 53 tQS*' 


1 1 ix. nmno WcL»i>icai>A'i ATrtiLzi l^SO 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


WINDSOR CASTLE 
April XL The King and Queen 
or Spain arrived in Windsor 
today on a State Visit to The 
Queen am! The Duke of Edm- 
burgh at Windsor Casiie. 

Their Majesties arrived at 
Heathrow Airport, London. 

The Prince and Princess of 
Wales accompanied by His 
Excellency the Spanish Ambas- 
sador and Senora de PuJg de la 
BeUacasa welcomed The King 
and Queen of Spain on behalf of 
The Queen. 

The King and Queen of Spain, 
accompanied by The Prince and 
Princess of Wales, travelled by 
motor car to the Royai Pavilion 
in the Home Park, Windsor. 

The Queen and The Duke of 
Edinbuigh met Their Majesties 
in the Royai Pavilion. 

The King and Queen ofSpain, 
accompanied by The Queen and 
The Duke of Edinburgh, drove 
in a Carriage Procession to 
Windsor Castle with a 
Sovereign's Escort of the House- 
hold Cavalry with two Stan- 
dards. found by The Blues and 
Royals. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips. The Princess Margaret. 
Countess of Snowdon. Princess 
Alice. Duchess of Gloucster. 
The Duke and Duchess of 
Gloucester, The Duke and 
Duchess of Kent and Princess 
Alexandra, the Hon Mrs Angus 
Ogilvy and the Hon Angus 
Ogilvy met Their Majesties in 
the Grand Vestibule. 

Gun Salutes were fired in the 
Home Park (Private) by The 
King's Troop. Royal Horse 
Artillery and from the Tower of 
London by the Honourable 
Artillery Company. 

Guards of Honour were pro- 
vided at the Home Park (Public) 
by the 2nd Battalion Scots 
Guards and at Windsor Castle 
by the 1st Battalion Irish 
Guards. 

The Queen invested The Kmg 
of Spain with the Royai Vic- 
torian Chain. 

The King and Queen ofSpain 
this afternoon at Windsor Castle 
received Addresses from the 
Chairman and Members of the 
Council of the Royal County of 
Berkshire and from the Mayor 
and Councillors of the Royai 
Borough of Windsor and 
Maidenhead. 

Their Majesties later visited 
Queen Elizabeth The Queen 
Mother at Royal Lodge. 

Hie Queen and The Duke of 
Edinburgh gave a State Banquet 
this evening in honour of The 
King and Queen of Spain at 
which Queen Elizabeth The 
Queen Mother, The Prince and 
Princess of Wales. The Princess 
Anne: Mrs liter* Phillips. The 
Princess Margaret. Countess of 
Snowdon. The Duke and Duch- 
ess of Gloucester .The Duke and 
Duchess of Kent. Prince and 
Princess Michael of Event and 
Princess Alexandra, the Hon 
Mrs Angus Ogilvy and the Hon 
Angus Ogilvy were present. 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


j Appointments I Forthcoming marriages (OBITUARY 


The following bad the honour 
Of being invited: 

Official Suite of The King and 
Qneen of Spain 

Excmo Senor Don Francisco 
Fernandez Ordonez (Minister 
for Foreign Affairs) an Esenia 
Senora de Fernandez Ordonez. 
Excmo Senor Teniente General 
Don Gonzalo Puigcerver (Head 
of the Military Office), Excmo 
Senor Don Sabino Fernandez 
Campo (Secretary General of 
His Majesty's Household), llmo 
Senor Don Jesus Ezquerra 
(Director General for European 
Affairs. Ministry of Foreign 
Affairs). Ilmo Senor Don Ma- 
nuel Blanco (Head of Security of 
His Majestv's Household), Umo 
Seiior Corouel Don Jose 
Montojo (Aide-de-Camp to His 
Majesty), Umo Senor Temenie 
Coronel Don Jose Antonio 
Ccrvera (Aide-de-Camp to Hts 
Majesty). Ilmo Senor Don 
Alberto Escudero (Head of 
Protocol of His Majesty's 
Household). 

Specially Attached la Atten- 
dance upon The King and Queen 
ofSpain 

The Lord Somerleyton (Lord in 
Waiting) and the Lady 
Somerleyton, Lord Nicholas 
Gordon Lennox (British 
Ambassador at Madrid) and 
Lady Nicholas Gordon Lennox, 
Mrs John Dugdale (Lady m 
Waiting). Major Hugh Lindsay 
(Equerry in Waiting). 

Ambassadors and High 
Commissioners 

His Excellency the High 
Commissioner for Cyprus and 
Mrs Panayides. His Excellency 
the Spanish Ambassador and 
Senora Puigde la Bellacasa, His 
Excellency the Netherlands 
Ambassador and Madame 
huydecoper. His Excellency the 
Portuguese Ambassador and Se- 
nhora Hall Themido, His Ex- 
cellency the Ambassador of the 
Kingdom of Morocco and Mrs 
Benabdeljalil. His Excellency 
the Norwegian .Ambassador and 
Mrs Busch. 

Members of the Spanish 
Embassy 

Senor Don Jose I Benavides 
(Minister Counsellor) and Se- 
riora de Benavides. 

Unofficial Party of the King 
and Queen or Spain 

Schor Don Fernando Gutier- 
rez 1 Head of Press Department 
of the Royal Household). Senor 
Don Santiago Salasi Principal 
Private Secretary to the Spanish 
Minister for Foreign Adairs). 
Senor Don Julian Castedo 
(Director General of Informa- 
tion. Prime Minister's Office). 

Hie Cabinet 

The Lord Chancellor and the 
Lady Hailsham of Si Maryle- 


bone. The Prime Minister and 
Mr Denis Tb3icher. The Lord 
President of the Council and the 
Viscountess Whiielaw, The Sec- 
retary of State for Foreign and 
Commonwealth Affairs and 
Lady Howe, The Secretary of 
State for the Home Department 
and the Hon Mrs Douglas Hurd, 
The Secretary of State for Social 
Services and Mrs Fowler 



■ Special Invitations 

The AnhbHhpv of eg ; iwot and 
Mrs Rumcie. The BhM Hqn . The 
Spencer and MnWealhehll.The Uxrp 
Great Chamberlain and the Mar- 
chioness of CholinoivWey. The mike 
and Duchess of WrtMHWc n. Th e Dtdsc 
and Duchess of _W*swah*s*ef - . M3T- 
Ques& off Douro.MEP and HUiUUontss 
of Douro. The E art a nd C WMian oj 
Strathmore and Kutflhorrte- Tnc Earl 
and countess jelMcoe. The Lord and 
LMy Diamond. The Lera and Lady 
OMwyn of penrhos. The Lord and 
Lady Thomas of Swynncrton. The 


Mr David Shatfock, aged 50, 
Deputy Chief Constable of 
Dyfed-Pimys police, who bus 
been appointed chief constable 
of the force from Aognst 12 in 
succession to Mr RJL 
Thomas. 

Other appointments include: 


Lord Chief of Engtgwl MVd 

Lad,' Jane. The Right Hon ihe Lord 


Mayor and UVh' Mavore«. The RMW 
Hm Dr D»td Owen. MP and Mrs 
Ou>en. 'The Rlqhl Hon David Steel. 
MP and Mrs Seel. The gani _Hw 

ewnssssL tvs.' 

Gordon** PaSwr^A^^lraJ £ S4r a v?nilMn 
and Lady Sttveiey. Air Churf Marshal 
Sir Dai id and Lady Crata. AlrCWd 
Marshal Sir Neville and Lady Sack. 
Mr and Mrs John Heath. Sir Maurice 
and Lads- Udnd. Sir Kenneth and 
Lady Newman. Sir Antony Actand. 
Mr and Mrs Corn Smith. Major- 
General and Mrs Christopher Alrar. 
Mr and Mrs Anthony JacWLn. Briga- 
dier and Mrs John PowiuU. Dr Alan 
Glim. MP and Lady Bosnia Cbm. The 
Chairman. Council of ihe Royal 
County of BorMfure and M» Morgan. 
The Mayor and Mayoress or the Royal 


Mbs EDeea Mary Northway, 
aged SO. on the staff of Surgeon 


aged SO. on the staff of Surgeon 
Rear-Admiral (Support Medical 
Services) at RNH Haslar, to be 
Matron-in-Cbief of Queen 
Alexandra's Royal Naval Nurs- 


Boroiidh of Windsor and Maidenhead. 
Dr and Mrs Raymond Carr. Mr Hush 
Dykes. MP. and Mrs_Dyhes. I 


Alexandra's Royal Naval Nurs- 
ing Service from May I, in the 
rank of principal nursing officer. 
Mr Davjd Emms. Master of 
Dulwich College, to be director 
of the London House for Over- 
seas Graduates, Mecklenburgh 
Square, in succession to Sir John 
Wilton, who will be retiring on 
January 1, 1987. 


Tristan Gard-Jones. MP and Mrs 
Gar <H -Jones. Mr and Mrs Ranald 
cnerson. Mr and Mrs Geoffrey 
Kawkinm-Bvpass. Mr and Mrs Rohm 
Leigh- Pemberton, Mr ard Mrs Harold 
Musarove. Mr and Mrs Garfield 
Weston. 


Birthdays today 


The Duke of Edinburgh, Pa- 
tron of the Institute of Market- 
ing. this afternoon visited the 
Institute's Headquarters and 
College at Cookham. Berkshire. 

His Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by Her Majesty's Lord- 
Lieutenant for the Royal 
County of Berkshire (Colonel 
the Hon Gordon Palmer) and 
the President of the Institute (Sir 
Patrick Meaneyk 
Squadron Leader Timothy 
Finneron was in attendance. 


The Princess Anne, tyrs Mark 
•Phillips this afteraoofr opened 
the YMCa St Mao's Road 
Residence. Ealing. 


Mr Malcolm Anson, 62: Mrs 
Shirley Temple Black, 58; the 
Most Rev Michael Bowen, 56; 
Lord Carew, 81: Mr Antony 
Craxton, 68; Professor Glyn 
Daniel. 72: Mr James Donleavy, 
60, Sir Diarmuid Downs, 64; the 
Earl of Drogheda. 76; Baroness 
Dudley, 79; Sir Arnold HalL 71; 
Mr James Kiricup, 65: Lord 
McAlpioe of Moffat, 79: Colo- 
nel R.A.St G. Martin, 72; Sir 
Thomas Padmore. 77; Lord 
Samuel of Wych Cross, 74; 
Professor George Steiner. 57; Sir 
Herbert Tetley. 78; Mr Colin 
Welch, 62; Sir Eric Yarrow, 66; 
Mr Stuart Young. 52. 


Her Royal Highness was re- 


Lady Gabriella Windsor, daugh- 
ter of Prince and Princess 
Michael of Kent, is five today. 


ceived by the Mayor of Ealing 
(Councillor Vladimir Kopec ky). 


(Councillor Vladimir Kopecky). 

Lieutenant-Colonel Peter 
Gibbs was in attendance. 

By command of The Queen, 
the Viscount Davidson (Lord in 
Wailing) was present at 
Heathrow Airport London this 
afternoon upon the departure of 
The King of the Hashemite 
Kingdom of Jordan and bade 
farewell to His Majesty on 
behalf of Her Majesty. 

Lady Susan Hussey has suc- 
ceeded Mrs John Dugdale as 
Lady in Waiting to The Queen. 


A memorial service for the Rev 
Richard J. Hamper will be held 
at Bloomsbury Baptist Church, 
Shaftesbury Avenue, at 3pm 
today. 

A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Sir Tain Stewart will be 
held at St Paul's, Knightsbridge, 
Wilton Place, SW1, on Wednes- 
day, April 30, at ! 1.15 am. The 
interment of ashes will take 
place during the service: 

A memorial service for Sir 
Charles Stirling will be held on 
Friday, April 25. at Chelsea Old 
Church at 2.0 pm. 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


same, mmbia6cs, 

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2 S*mue» IO 1 2 


BIRTHS 


ALLAN - on (Tip 2tst of A aril, al Prin- 
cess Margaret Hmpilal. S—ineon. io 
Mary inve Can wriqnM and Room a 
son. Henry Wjhiom AJ#**amJrr 
AU-CN - Oil I4»h April to Jane »nee 
Ward -Lee i and John, a qau-jhier 
Hayiey Claire 


CHAPMAN - On April 2CTh ai 
Asnmuion. NorinijtnhrTland io Lev 
Icy and Richard, a son Jonathan, a 
turn her for Kata. 

COATES - on i6lTi April at home to 
Harriet tree Spencer i and AJasdair a 
son 'Aidan Thomas Spencer} brother 
for Hannah and Emily. 

CORSES - On April lZUi la La (nee 
Armstrong) and Geoff, a son (Oliver 
Chariest a brother for Jenny. 

CURRY - on 12th April lo Jane I and 
Jed. a daughter jesNca Eleanor, a 
sister for Josannah. 

DEAR - On April 19th at Queen 
CharioUe's to Louise <o6e Retissi and 
John, a daughter Sophie. 

FINDLAY - on April 19th at SI Thomas 
hospital TO Catherine ■ nee Paynet and 
Cites, a daughter Alexandra 

GOLDSMITH ■ on April I9lh. ai The 
Garden Hospital, to Amanda rNee 
Cayeri and Michael, a son Dominick 
Jeremy, another brother for Alexan- 
der. Charlotte and Sebastian. 


HARRISON on April 22nd ai Westmln 
sier Hospital to Louise and Michael, a 
son Tristan John, brother for 
Batina. Prisewa and Edwui. 

HODDER - on April 19th to Anne (n6e 
Hay i and John, a son (Jamosi. a 
brother for Charlotte. 

LLOYD- On April l9lhto Marlon into 
Otcfccnsi and Jonathan a son Tom. 
brother far Poppy and Harry. 

LOWE - On April 13lh 1986. at Royal 
United Hospital. Bath, to .Anne ntfe 
Bodftsh) and Cordon, a daughter. 
Amelia Elizabeth. 


BARNES • on April l B. 1 986. suddenly 
Charles Austin in hs 67th year. 
Dearly loved and loving father of 
Francesca. Joanna and Henrietta. 
The Funeral Service will take place 
at Guildford Crematorium on Friday 
Apni 2 tHi at t2.3Qpm. Family flow- 
ers only, but if desired dona Hons 
may oe sent to Leukaemia Research 
Fund - c<o pimms Funeral Services. 
Chai ;crs Mot Road. Guildford. TeL 
67Wa. Memorial Service m London 
will he announced later. 

BENEDICT - On April 20th suddenly at 
Cn-mng Cress Hospital London. Max 
Pwr. fauicr of Setl and Janet. 
Funeral Service ai Putney Vale 
Crematorium at li.-ioam Friday 
Apri l 2S th Family flowers only. 

BENNETT - peacefully after a kmg Ill- 
ness Elizabeth Jane beloved wife of 
Fred and loving mother of James. 
Charles and Miles. Private funeral 
service on Friday 25Ui April al 
Si. Andrew's Church. Chorieywood 
al u 30 am followed by interment 
Chorieywood Lawn Cemetery. Fam- 
ily flowere only please. 

BOWEN - On 19th April 19B6. Philip 
Edward Davies, brave son of Mai 
and Ihe late Trevor L. Bowen. 
Cremation private. No flowers 
please. Donations. If desired, to 
League of Friends of Guildford 
Hosptiah 12 Poyle Road. Guildford. 
At peace. 

BRUCE - on April 17th William Ernest 
of Turwlte Lodge. Turvdle Heath. 
Honk-y-on-Tnames after a short ill- 
ness Beloved husband, lamer and 
grandfather. Funeral service at SL 
Mary’s Church IbnMhMi. on Fri 
day April 2S*h ai 2.a0em. 

CARNE . On 19th Apnl 1986 m 
hospital Oil. J dries Fs.«wcr Car no 
VC. 0 6 0. DL.. oi Srtoncoam. 
Cranium. GJos. late al Ihe 
GlourosJershito Rogimonl. Ovarii 
loved husband of jean. Funeral 
service on* ale A service of 
ihansKdv tno will be hrld ai 1 1 .30am 
on HepMUi C.in ,\anl at me 
I Church of Si. James ihe Great 
Cranham. Donations in memortum 
may be made lo The Army 
i Benevolent Fund, c o Burdock & 
Son Funeral Directors. New Street. 
Painswtck. Glas 

CATON - R.O.E (Dtcki Commander 
RN. Behaved husband of Celia and 
i father of Sarah iSunonl on 21st April 
I9S6 at Broads Grew. Funeral Fri- 
day 2S April at 1.30pm ai Great 
Waltham Church. Flowers may be 
sent lo M Lucking & Son. 19S New 
London Road. Chelmsford. 

CLAPMAM on 17th April 
1986. suddenly and peacefully In 
Northern Ireland. Jocelyn Carver 
Clapham. beloved, loyal and devoted 
wife of Brigadier Patrick Oapham of 
the Willows Church street. 
Lavenham. Suffolk. The cremation 
took Mace privately at Cavuereagh. a 
memorial service will be held on Sat 
urtfay. May 10th ai 2.30 pm al 
Lnmlum Church 

COLES - on 19th April, in Musgrove 
Park Hospital. Taunton. Helen 
Cakterwood Coles of Liuie House. 
'WUtesley. Gtos; loved mother of Bob- 
by an d Denny. Funeral private ui 
Scotland. 


c-o D. AnseB. Windsor HaD. Univer- 
sity of Reading. 

GARTHWAITE • on 20 April In hospi- 
tal. Waveney Manendi Garth wade 
In her 71st year, beloved mother of 
Nicholas, widow of Anthony and 
grandmother of Oliver Funeral 
Golders Green Crematorium. East 
ChapeL Friday 25 April 450 pm. 
Flowers lo W. Garstin and Sons. 10 
Chill ern SL London Wt. 01955 
■*863. 

CASH - On April 1 9th suddenly Robert 
Walker. Chief Executive of the Royal 
County of Berkshire, dearly loved 
husband of Rosamond and father of 
Simon and Nicholas. Oemadon 
private. No flowers please, but 
donations. If desired, lo The NSPCC. 
Memorial Service to be anranged- 

GMSSORG - Samuel, on April 2Cth 
1986 Samuel dearly beloved hus- 
band of Rose, devoted father of 
Michael. Paul and Stephen and 
adored grandfather of Katherine. 
Charione. Beniamin. Lisa. Jessie and 
Lethe. Private family hmeraJ at 
Golders Green Ownelorium. no 
flowen. Donations If desired, in his 
memory io the British Heart Founda- 
tion. S7. Gloucester Place London. 
W1H 408. 

GOSLMG • see Pakhorooff 


KAIL -April 20th 1986 suddenly Cecfl 
John, husband of Jennifer and father 
of Jeremy. David and Caroline, 
father mi-law of Manon. Service at 
SL Pefer’s Church. Formhy on 
Thursday 2«h April at 1 1 OO am. 
followed by private cremation. AH 
entwines lo Dean Bras. Tel: Formby 
72025. 


I KMCK -on April 20th peacefully after 
j a short illness borne with great oour- 
age and characteristic good humour. 
Angela much loved wife of Arthur 
I and dear mother of Dean. A very 
! special friend to many. Funeral ser- 
v ice at 3pm Thursday 24th April al 
Si Thomas Moore Church. Paicbam. 
Bnonion. Rowers to Attree A Kent 
Hove. Donations U desired to Cancer 
Bfreardi. 


McCarthy - on 12 m adh) to cau 
(nee Terhaari and Nicfiofas a daugh- 
ter Ptppa Jane Louise, a sister 10 KJ! 
and Lucy- 

MITCHELL . On 19th April at 
Colchester Maternity Hospital lo 
Helen and Robtn. a daughter. Claire. 
a sis ter far Philippa. 

MITCHELL. On April 17th to Alban 
and Graham In Miami. Florida, a 
daughter • Lacmta CJalrr. 


DOWSE on 20th April 1966. 

Suddenly In hospital, aged 73. 
Meldrum. dearly loved husband of 
Vivienne and father of Alan. Crema- 
tion and service l .30 pm on Monday 
2SUl April at Morttefce Crematorium. 
Family flowers only please to E.C. 
Mats. 88 churchfleld Road. London 
W5. Donations may be sent to the 
Royal Masonic HosPUaL 
Rat onscourt Par*. London W607N. 


O'SULLIVAN -on ihe am April In Win 
chaster io Geraldine and John, a son 
(John Thaddeus Patrick) brother for 
Roy and Joseph 


PASTERF1ELD v On l7th April in 
Singapore lo Diana inre Stead) and 
Andrew, a daughter. Eleanor bofeel. 
a si ster for Madeline. 

PRtDNAM - on 25th March, al the 
Portland HosMiai. London to Fiona 
'nee Mafihewsi and John, a daugh- 
ter. Charlotte Elizapeih. 

PURDON - On April 9th 1986 to 
Caroline nice Barken and Patrick, a 
son. Devereux Curran Brooke. 

STEWART - 'on 15th Apni. 1986. al 
John RaddHTe. Oxford, to Simone 
fNce Beard) and Paul - a son. Charlie 
Edwin. 

WANDLESS - On 7th April 1986. to 
Matri wee Steele) and John, a daugh- 
ter. J udith Margaret. 

WOODS -on 1601 April at the Portland 
Hospital. London to Ftona iitee Bev- 


Mitan a Stmon. a daughter Qmir^na 
ChertoUc. 



FAITH • on 21st April at home. Lilly 
Fanh of Hampstead, wfffe of the late 
Herbert . Cremation al Gotden Green 
on Friday 25tn April al 11-20 (East 
Chapelt. Enquiries to Leberton & 
Sons Ol 387 607S. 

FELL - at Addenbroofces Hospital. 
Cambridge on April 22nd Dante 
Honor a ren F.R-S. Private Family 
Service at Cambridge Crematonum 
on April 29tn al 12 noon. Donations, 
if desired, to Strangeways Laborato- 
ry. Cambridge. Any letters Wease to 
H R Fell. Wotiabv, Brigg. Sth Hum- 
berside. The arrangements for a 
Memorial Service wf)l be announced 
later. 

FVU3LAT ■ on April l9di. Mary Pus 
sell tMoliy i in Ivr 83rd vear: widow 
of Reginald Findlay Memorial ser- 
vice al St. James Church. Nayfand 
an Friday April S5lh al U am fol- 
lowed by Private cremation, no 
flowers or letters please. 

BAKDMER Graham on April I9th 
1986. in Princess Mary RAF Homt- 
taL Hai)on- Much loved husband of 
Sylvia, soc of Malone, brother of 
MargareL Dod to Susie. AIL Tun. 
Don and David, aranda id Tom. Pri- 
vate Cremation. Donattons preferred 
hi lieu of (towns. Chnuts payable to 
Radio Therapy and Oncology Re- 
search Fund. Westminster Hospital 


LANE - on Monday 2i« AortL peace- 
! fully ai home with her famUy. after a 
! long dlneos borne most gracefully 
and courageously. EVELINE JEAN: 

daughter of Ihe late vice Admiral Sir 
Harry KoHle. belov ed wtfe of Barry. 
I darling mother of Jubet and Antho- 
ny and dear friend of so many. 
Pnvaie family funeral at Christ 
Church. Smarmed inr Andover* on 
i Friday 25th of April at apm. No 
flowers by request. A service of 
Thanksgiving wtn oe held towards 
the end of May: there will at that 
time be an opportunity for donations 
to the Macmillan Cancer Nurses 
Appeal. 

LATT1N On APril 19th at home in his 
82nd year Frank Lattm CM C. hus- 
band of May idled :984j father of 
John (died i551> and of Peter. Fa- 
ihw in law of Mimi and grandfather 
of Charione. John. Alexandra and 
Richard He will be much Trussed bv 
fus family ana Os a tana* circle of 
friends and associates. Funeral on 
Tue-dav 29 rh April al lO.aSom al S( 
Paul s. Poowv Endue If tteurwl. in 
lieu of flowers, donations could bo 
made in hts tneraoo re Or sarrudo*. 
Bariungviav. Ewe IG6 1QG 

LEIGH - on April 21st 1966 al Urn 
Westmorland County Hospnoi Aini 
Leigh of the Castle Dam*. Kc-tidai and 
of Sunnvside. Meathap. Grange 
over Sands. A dearly loved sister & 
friend Funeral Service at 
WiUierslack Church. 11.30am on 
Thursday April 24U1 Family flowers 
only Donations if desired to 
Witherslack Church c. o the Vicar or 
Hayes and Parkinson Lid. Captain 
French Lane. KendaL Cumbria. Tel: 
0539 20105 

LONG on April 2ist 1986. John Fred- 
erick Lawrence. Peacefully at home 
in Cambridge. Wing Commander 
RAF (retired!, late Headmaster of 
Balearcs mtemaUonal School Palma 
de Mallorca. Spain. Much loved hus- 
band of Patricia Sadly missed by all 
his family Funeral Service a 
Tnunpmgion Church Cambridge on 
Friday April 25th al 2.30pm. Floral 
tributes may be ton! to Brian Warner 
Funeral Service. Cambridge 


MILAM COMPARZm. Adriano - 
Deeply mourned by dance Ciia. 
Andrea. Valeria and FTavia Via 
Bojto Tre Fossa tl 14. 50023 

imprvneta. Firenze. Haly 

MORGAN - on April 18ih peacefully al 
Fart: Side Hospital. Wimbledon. An- 
thony James Morgan most loved son 
of Lirorenani Colonel W.A. Morgan 
retired, and the late Mrs Merna Mor- 
gan darling Husband oi Rosanna, 
toting f ariter of Phillip and loving 
Step-father of Anna ana Robert Be 
Qipem Mass to be held al the Sacred 
Heart Church. Edge Hill. W imbledon 
5W19 al I Cam. 25th Apni Family 
jfc«<n only please, and donations if 
desired to Rapnaels Hospital at 
Cheam, Surrey. 

MULLER - Irene Selina, on April 20 
peacefully, at the West Middlesex 
Hospital, aged 89. Widow of Colonel 
W. A. Muller. Inspector of CotonuU 


Ponce and sister of the late Str LA P 
O’Reilly. Funeral private on 29Ih 
April, flowers to Keaies of Hampton 
Hill Please. 

mCHOLLS -On April 20 th bi hospital 
Rev. John Gfesson. aged 67 yean. 
late Rector of ChkMingfokL betoved 
husband of Dorothy. Funeral service 
at St . George's Church. Truro on Fri- 
day Apni 25th al 12 noon followed 
by In termed L FamUy flowers only. 
but donations, tf desired, to SL 
Mary's Church. CMddlDafold. A re- 
outefn memorial ma® ts to be held at 
SL Mary's Church. ChlddlngfoW <*i 
Monday April 28th al 8 . 00 pm. AO. 
enquiries to J. Gorringe and. Son. 
Telephone Godatodog 00868 6003. 

PAKHOMOFF (May GosUngt Pauline 
Anne of Beirut on April 21st al King 
Edward 7th Hospital MedhuKL Fu- 
neral al 5pm oa Friday April 25(h at 
Saint Bartbotamew’s Parish Church. 
Hazieflicre. Surrey. No Dowers to- 
stead donations lo Cancer Research. 

REV1NGT0H - on 21 st Aprfl peAcefUQy 
at Btackdown Nursing Home. Mary 
Tavy. Tavestock. Atr Commodore 
Arthur PeUiiric. C 8 -. C H E ., of 
Trtseofl. Newton Ferrers. SooQi 
Devon. Funeral Hoty c rasa Church. 
Newton Ferrers 3nm Tuesday 29m 
April. Family flowen only, bed donn- 
ttoitt tf desered to RAF. Benevolent 
Fund. 67. Portland Place. Lo ndon . 
Wi. 

SHAHHRANTDOX - Saddestfy. on 
April 7th 1966. as (he resUi of an 
, accident Denise. (DortnneX in 6 * 
French Resistance. ChevaUsr de la 
Legion cTHonneur. MedalOe de la 
RsKunce. beloved wife of the tale 
Gerald Sinclair Shaw, of Randolph 
Clift. Edinburgh, much loved sister, 
aunt great-aunt and friend to many. 
Cremation private. 

SPRAGB - on April 21 peacefully al 
Wlntoa House. Cvril Douglas (Bid) 
Spra 99 C.B E. Funeral a> Slough Cre- 
matorium 2pm Friday 2 Sth April. 
Family flowers only, bui donations If 
desired to Christ's Hospital. 36 Great 
Tower Street. London ECS 5AL. 

THOMSON On Friday April 18th In 
London. Penelope Anne. Formerly of 
windfalls. Sinah Lane. Haying Is- 
land. Short family service at St 
Mary's Church. Haytlng bland al 11 
am Monday 28th of April. Mtouw d 
by private cremation. Family flowers 
only ntease. 

TNWAITES On April 3191 aged 46 
years. David Anthony of 30 The 
Rowans. Bahtodc. Beloved husband 
of Barbara and tench loved Dad of 
Nicholas and Oirtsicoher. Funeral 
Service to be held on Friday April 
2 Sth at St Marys church. Baldock at 
22 JO pm. followed by interment. No 
flowers by request but donations tf 
desired to the Lister Hospital Scanner 
Appeal cio E H Crouch Funeral Di- 
rectors. 23a Hitctua Street BaldocX. 
Herts. Tel 04 62 893192. 

TtLTNlAN on Monday 2 1 st April 1986 
Miriam, peacefully in Avon™ ore 
Nursing Home Aid wick, widow of A 
Hovell Hitman and Mother of Peter. 
Enquires lo Reynolds Funeral three- 
tors. 27-31 High Street, Bofftor 
Reuts. Tri. (02431 864745 

TOMPKINS Dons Mariorle Evetyn 
iBassi wife of Jack Tomoktns. for- 
mi-rfy of BeXftlS and Cou bdOB. 
passed awAV peacefully on 20 th 
Apni 1936 in Tauranga. New 
Zealand 

UDALL On Vpril l«h 1986 In hospital 
after „ ,rv,rt (lines*, tackled with 
courage. Muriel Gy Ilia Udall. dearly 
loved and lov ing aster al Ceaffrey. 
Funeral Sen. ire at the church of St , 
Mao ibe virgin. Beech HIIL on Sat- 
urday 2 *rr a aril at 12 noon. Either 1 
flowers or donations to Ihe Beech I 
Hill Parish Chanlies. winch she t 
chaired with such inleceu and con- 1 
ccrn. wouic driigm hen and may be ! 
sen I to A B Walker & Son Ltd. 36 1 
Eldon Road. Reading j 

WHITE - On April J 7lft in a Nursing . 
Home after a short illness. In her 
951 h >ear. Barbara, of 29. 
Grantchester Rd. Cambridge. Eroen- 
la Fellow of Newnham College. 
sometime Tutor. Bursar and 
Registrar of the RoD Funeral service . 
al The Emanuel limwc Reformed 
Church. Trumptngum St. Cambridge 
on Thursday 23Ui April at 1 1 . 46 dm 
foltowed by cremation. 1 

WOLPSBT - D Isabel h aged 75. 23rd | 
Apni. Afler a lengthy illness peace- , 
fully, surrounded by love Golders \ 
Green Crematorium 3 20pm on Fn- 
day 25Ui Apni. Ftowm to Kenyon. 9 ! 
Pont SI. London NWS. 

WRIGHT - Loo Margaret, an April 1 
2 1 si. peacefully al Hadley Lawns. | 
Hertfordshire. Widow ar A. Gidley 1 
W right of Leicesicr. betoved mother 
and grandmother. Funeral Service at , 
12 noon. Monday April 28th 1986 at : 
the Cathedral and Abney Church. St. 
Albans. Cui flowers only please. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


A Service of TTiantegning for the Hie 
of LOUISE de BURCH win be held at 
All Samis' Church. West Lavington. 
Devizes, on Wednesday May 229 at 
2.30pm- 


MrWJLG.Hamoer 
and Miss ELA, Taylor 
Tfie engagement is announced 
between Guv, eldest son of Sir 
John and Lady Hanmer, of 
Hanrner, Whitrfmrch, Shrop- 
shire. and Elizabeth, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Ne3 
Taylor, of Frampton-on-Severa, 

Gloucestershire. 


MrM-N, Briggs 

and Miss SA*. Cla|tRi 

The engagement is announced 


between Martin Neil younger 
son of Mr and Mrs Ian M. 
Briggs, of Iffley, .Oxford, and 
Susan Patricia, elder daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Roger Clayton, of 
Sheffield. 


Mr P. ColKer 

and Miss JJEL Farter 

The engagement is announced 

between Paul, eider son of Mr 

and Mrs Kennezb Collier, of 

Horsham, Sussex, and Jane, 


oniv daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Ewart Furber, of Tittensor, 
Stoke-on-Trent. . 


Mr J£. Reynolds 
and Miss J.YJE. Leig h 
The engagement is announced 
between John, only son of the 
late Lieutenant-Ccdond D.LC 
Reynolds, OBE, and of Mis 
R.E.M. Reynolds, of Princes 
Risbo rough, Buddnghamshtre. 
and Juliet, only daughter of Sir 
Neville and Lady L e i gh , of 
London, SW13. 


Mr RX Drams 

and Miss SvM. Rietieh 

The engagentent is announced 

betw^n^S^l,soaofMrand 

M re R.W. Durians, of Huddes- 
ffeld. and Sandra, Mr of 
Mr and Mrs GJvL FrketiA, of 
Vancouver, British Coftnnliia. • 
DrR.DJ_ Hams-Jones 
and Mrs JJE. FlesJ The (fflgage* 
meni is announced tarm 
Richard, son of Dr and Mis J .N. 
Hams-Jones, of Swansea, and 
J udith, daughter of Mra L. 
N unle y and the late Mr F.W. 
Nunley, of Nottingham. 

Mr PJF. Sherwin ■ 
and Mis HJL PH«fcD-Gapfo 
The engagement is anntwnced 
between Ptter. son of Mr and 
Mis J J. Sheiwin, of Rye. New 
York, and Henrietta, daughter 
of Mr and Mrs TX. Purcdl-' 
Gilpin. 

Mr MJLA. Swire 
and Miss JXM. Kay 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark, eldest son of Mr 
Humphrey Swire, of Waterend 
House. Wheathampslead, 
Hertfordshire, and Mrs Philippa 
Swire, and Jennifer, daughter of 
Mr and Mis Ronald Kay, of 
Johannesburg) South Africa. 

Mr M.W. Thomas 
and Miss BJP.Vaiy 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael WEfliam, only 
son of Mr and Mis WJL 
Thomas, of Twinehaxn, Sussex, 
and Ruth PrisdBa, youngest 
daughter of Mr and Mis O-H. 
Vary, of Main Ridge. Victoria, 

Australia. 


Hero of the taji n Riv er 


EflMStfMgS 

asssffigE 

ranks as one of *e moj 

globus \thH? 

men is of the Kore^i war. 

After a three^ay baitfc 
during which he showed insp- 
rational powers of teateshiP’ 

Came and ^ ^^”*££5 
of the “Glonous Glosteif 

we re taken ffito ca P tl ';'J y ri J? 
conditions of «he atmojjg 
oar, an ordeal they endured 
for 19 months. - 
Born on April 1 1* 

Came had been comnns- 
doned in the Gloucestershire 
Regiment i» ^25. for spent 
of the Second Worfei 
War seconded to ihe Kind's 
African Rifles, with a brief 
interlude in Burma m I94A- 
Whh.ibe KAR didjanifcd 



fight h» way bade piecemeal 
He therefore osganised his 
battalion tnio smali parties in 
an attempt ta break oi»* and 


Marriages 


after the war, he was jfon*- 
monding a tantonal banal- 
ion, when the 1st Battabon the 
Glostere was ordered to Korea 
in August 1950. In 195! he 
won has DSO for his handling 
of his troops during an att ack 
on Hill 327 South east of, 


snofi group. . . . - - 

Th is, however, was merely 
the begEOBhig of an ordeal; in 
xhe 19 mopihs us prisoners <tf 
the North Koreans which 
followed Game asd.fcuirar 
were-., subjected 1 ! tip physkar 
pnvatioa and - psychologies] 


Mr A-K. Forman 
and Miss HJVL Perry 
The marriage took place quietly 
at St Nicholas's Church, 


Biddestone, Wiltshire, on 
Wednesday. April 16, of Mr 
Alan Keith Forman, only son of 
the late Colonel F_A_ Forman 
and of Mis CA. Forman, of 


Bromley. Kent, and Miss Helen 
Perry, eldest daughter of Major 
and Mrs AW. Perry, of 
Corsbam. Wiltshire. The Rev 
Michael Dittmer officiated. 


Mr PJJVt. Manning 
and Miss SXS. Green 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, April 19, at St 
Andrew’s Church. Cleave Prior, 
Warwickshire, of Mr Paddy 
Manning, son of Dr and Mrs 
FJ. Manning, of Heathstock 
Cleave, Wiveliscombe, Somer- 
set, Miss Sally Green, 

younger daughter ofMr and Mrs 

Jeremy Green, of Bickmarsh 
Hall, Bkleford-on-Avon. _ The 
Rev Richard Evans officiated, 
assisted by t Father Hugh 
Sinclair. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Jasper Green. Jona- 
than IgguJdoa, Claire Melanie, 
Samantha Benne. Melissa 
Trowed and Iaun Croft On- 
Atkins. Mr Peter Crofton- 
Atitins was best man. 

A reception was held ax 
Bickmarsh Had and the honey- 
moon is being spent m 
Bordeaux. 


Pierson, of Kentucky, United 
States, and Mrs Frances 
Pierson, of Uptree, E ssex, and 
Miss Tessa Louise Somerville, 
youngest daughter of the late Mr 
Stuart Somerville and Mis Stu- 
art Somerville, of Newbounie 
HalL Woodbridse. The Rev 
John Waller officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her brother. Mr 
John SomcriiDe was attended 
by Camilla, Harriet and Amy 
Aiton and Arabella and Fran- 
cesca Mercer. Lieu tenant Peter 
Clunas, RN, was best man. 

A reception was held at the. 
home of the bride. 

Flight Lieutenant J.- Stintoo, 


and Miss CCM. Wallis -! 
The marriage Took {dace on 
Saturday, April 19, in Romsey 
Abbey, of Flight Lieutenant 
Julian Stinton, RAF, son of 
Squadron Leader Darrol 
Sun ton, of Farnbam, Surrey, 
and Mrs John Cuthbert, of 
Buddand, Oxfordshire, and 7 


Miss Caroline Charione Mary 
Wallis, only daughter of Colonel 
and Mis Rupert Wallis, of 
Broughton, Hampshire- The 
Rev David Howe officiated, 
assisted by tire Rev Neil 
Crawford-Jones. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was: 
attended by iferelope Stinton, 
Miss Camilfa Barrow. Miss 
Stephanie Flower, Miss -Mar- 
garet Hal! .and Miss Sarah 
wafcw- Mr Henry Parker was 
best man. A guard of honour 
was formed by ihe^ bridegroom's 
brother officers. 

A reception was held at 
Lainston House, Sparshoh. and 
tire honeymoon is befog spent 
abroad. 


Mr NA Pierson 

and Mfo TJL. So i er r iD a . 

The ma rria g e took place on 
Saturday at the church of St 


Mary the Virgin. Newbourne, 
Suffolk, of Mr Nicholas Barnaby 
Pierson, elder son of Mr David 


He led bis baitafion through 

Pyongyang almost to SSnanju, 
and when the heavy commu- 
nist counter-o&astve began 
which drove United Nations 
troops inexorably southwards 
in the direction of Seoul, be 
was one of the last men out of 
Pyongyang city. 

Eventually as part of a 
desperate plan to stem the 
tide. Came was ordered to 
make a stand on the Imjin 
River where, on ihe night of 
April 22-23, 1951, be and his 
men came under attack fron t 
' vastly superior Chinese forres. 
For three days and nights they 
were subjected to non-stop 
im« attacks' from an enemy . 
outnumbering them .20 to I . 
and film April 24 the banal- . 
ion was completely cut off 
from die rest of foe brigade. 

During this period Carne . 
inspired his men. by moving, 
among them with compkse 
coolness under blanket ma- 
chine-gun and mortar fire. At 
the gime time be led assault , 
parties himself and oh two 
occasions, armed with a rifle 
and grenades, was instrumen- 
tal tn retrieving positions 
which had seemed to he tort. ~ 

finally, with casualties 
mounting, ammunition run- 
ning short, a jte&Bsrvc jjerim-. 
eter contracted ahnosi: to 
nothing, and his flas|3 turned, 
Carne was informed' that 'be 
could mat he^ relieved rnd 
grvea pemnsskm to by -lo 


to espavsecormnumsm. 

Many sufferedBCri-beri and 
other admen ts and Crate and 
ahroteofficerwereoonvia- 
ed of having a "generally 
hostile'’ attitude towams com- 
munism, made to read out - 
bogus confessions and put in 
solitary confinement foar long 
periods^. ■, 

Nevertheless . in prison as 
with bis tertalkuv Game’s 
influence and cppmqtie heart- 
ened net orfy British, but also 
Turkish and American war 
captives Daring periods zn^fr 
isolation be pteforyed his own 
reason hycanringrastone. 

Eventually release for Caroe . 
aodhsmatwasariangedand 
(bey arrived back 1 id Sotith- - 
ampton to a heroes' welcome 
tm October lS, r953. The 
i^atxm to hfo Vtotoria Crass 
slated fo«t he had “inspired 
his officers arid med to %ht 
beytmd.foe honnal limits of 

' privatim» in 
captivity he mertiy sa3df*l 
have graied Wadded prufein 
bring British arid have lost a 
littiewrafor. 

- . InadifiacHrto his^ VC and 

DSO be was also the recipient 
of the ^American. Dxstin- . 
guifoetfServictrCTOS. ^He was. 
granted v ibe : ftriylom , ofw 
GfoiKTsterand affrimputfr. 

. Retiring froin.the Army in 
1957 be : became a-ipefoity 
lientesant frw Cfouocs«r- 
^tiieiiil9e0L'* 
i He nrariiod in 294d, Mis 
JeanGfosofi, vridow ofLieu- 
tenant^md J. T. Gibson, 
JJSO- A - 


ALEXEI ARBUZOV 


Dinners 


Royal Society of St Gerage 
The Royal Soriety of St George, 
Gty of London branch, bdd a 


dinner at Guildhall last night. 
Mr Graham R. .Reddifle, 


accompanied by Mrs Reddiffe, 
was m the chair and presented a 
flag of St George and a donation 
to the Commonwealth Gaines 
Council for England, for whom 
Mr Sebastian Coe and Sir 
Arthur Gold replied. Mr Enoch 
Powell, Mr Deputy Bernard 
Morgan, branch president, and 
the Rev Basil Watson also 
ipftfcy- 

UniEed and Gecfl OUb 
Sr Humphrey Atkins, Chair- 
man of foe United and Cecil 
Chib, presided ax a dinner at the 
House of Commons last rnghL 
The guest ofhooonr and speaker 
was the Hon William 
Waldegrave, MP, and Mr Brian 
Goswdu abo spoke. 


SienCoflegs 

The Rev Arthur Brown. -Presi- 
dent of Sion College, and die. 
Court of Governors entertained 
the Bishop of London mid the 
Dean of St Paul’s at dinner last 
night at the college. The .Rev 
Michael Bourne, the newly 
elected president, also spoke. . . 


XSQBSu ngflliu K 


l. Alexei Arbuzov. foe 
I Union’s most snccess fi fl and 
prolific playwr^hr foam 1930 
onwards, med m Moscow on. 
Aprft 20 at foe.a^e of 78. . . 

• In the esuff 1960s he lad 
five.^ plays running simulta- 
neously st .71 • Russian' the- 
aties, and, because ^they dealt - 
with imivbrsri proWems, his 
works were quite successful 


. Arbuzov -wrote a dozen or 
more ph^s after this, all of 
them more or less successful 
in both theatrical and artistic 
terms. He was probably at his 
best when dealing with youth, 
which he did in a lyrical and 
psychologically literate 
manner. "... 


The fifty-eighth annual dinner 
of the British Paediatric Associ- 
ation was held at the University 
of York on Thursday, April 17. 
The president. Pro fe ssor' MX 
Focffcr, presided and MraJtcnee 
Sheet, MP, proposed the toast to 
the association. Those present 

included: : t ~ 


nr i« m toftr^ar j te-Syte 

gaflamtBsv 


School announcements 


Pangborane CoOcge 
Summer Term at Paqgboome 
College began on April 21. A 
memorial service for those lost 
in the recent helicopter accident 
will be held on Sunday. April 27, 
at 10 am. Confirmation by the 
Bishop of Oxford is on Sat- 
urday, May IQ. "Music fin- a 
Summer Evening" is on Sal- 


Prize day on Saturday, May 31, 
wifi be preceded by me concert 
and boding retreat on the 
previous evening. Shirley Lady 
Beecham will. attend prize day: 
A fete in aid of the RNLTand 
local charities win be held on 
July 5 and win be attended b? 
Rear-Admiral WJ. ’Graham 


uiday, June 21. and the cel e b ri ty 
piano re cit al will be given by Mr 
Peter Katin on June 28.;Tbe 
guest of honour on founder’s 
day. Saturday, July 12, wfll be 
Lead Vinson (OP). • 


(OR), Director of the RNLL 
The first XI Gcicket Festival will, 
be hekl at school on July 14 to 
18. . •- r 
Fairfogtans School 
Term begins at Fariingons 
School today. ' EDen Elan! 
continues as head girl vrith 
Sarah Knight as depaty mid 
Nathalie Crouch as hesui day 
art. The Founders' Day Service 
is oa June 20 at 3 pm. The 
seventy-fifth anniversary of the 
school wiH be celebrated with an 
Edwardian day on Saturday, . 
June 28. The new junior school 
wiU be officially opened by Lord 


& Edward's School, Oxford 
Summer Term at St Edward's 
School started on April 21. 
Gaudy will be on Saturday, May 
24. The preacher will be the 
Bishop of Stafford, the Right 
Rev John Waller (OSE) and the 
speaker at prizegiving will be Mr 
Graham Cooper (OSE). 
Confirmation on Sunddy, June 
8, will be by Bishop Paul 
Bin-rough (OSE). Term ends on 
Thursday, July 10. 

St Andrfes School 
Summer Term at St Audries 
School begins today. Old g iris 
day will be on Saturday May 17. 
On Thursday. May 22, there will 
be a performance of Rare Earth 
and on Saturday, May 31. the 
Royal School of Churrtt Music 


ibis country ova* tbejftao. 

; Alexei . Nikolayevich 
Arbuzov wasborain Moscow 
in 1908 add educated artbe 
Leningrad Theatre School 
When he was 15 he started to_ 
art; then he turned to 
direction. . 

. iHk'firrt pJayv Class, was 
produced ifr 1930. This was a 
trighiy. competent but unin- 
spired piece of routine social- 
ist realist theatre, written at a 
time when the arts were all but 
stifled by Stalin’s increasiiigjy 
paranoiac hand: *. •' 

His first play of account was 
i Tanya (1939), sometimes- de- 
scribed as the Soviet Dolls 
. Houser this., is a convincing 
^account pfa woman’s progres- 
' sion to Wisdom and maturity ' 
through marital suffering. 
Tanya, which was produced in 
England with some success, in 
no way depends on Marxist 
dogma for os effectiveness. 


•HSs choice ^of experimental# 
fbnns- and endeavours to 
mute, if not excise, erode 
Marxist ideology sometimes . 
placed him in trouble .with 
influential Soviet critics, but . 
he survived without undue 
difficulties. - - 


. The Promix (1965). which 
was translated into English in 
1967, and produced m Oxford 
and London, was one of the 
best of his later plays. With 
Cruel Games (2978) be dem- 
onstrated that even with in- 
creasing age he was in - full 
possession of his powers: this, 
’on territory familiar Ab 
Arbuzov, is an excellent ac- 
count ofhow the members of a 
group of young ’people have 
beep variously warped" by 
their upbringings. - 


Ar buzov win be remem- 
bered as noteworthy fbrbeing 
atypical at a time when to be 
typical - in the Soviei theatre - 
was lo be mediocre. . 


Hayterat 2.30 pmandevoyone 
is welcome between 1230 pm 
and 5 pm. An Old Time Music 
Hall is on July 1 1 and 12.. Sports 
day is on July 12. Term ends on 
July 15. J * • - 

St Edmond's School, 

Canterbury 

Summer Tern at St Edmund's 
School begins today. David 
Hopkins is captain of cricket. 
The Archbishop of Camerbnxy 
will be the ' preacher at the 
triennial service to be held at 
Z45 pm on May 14 in St Peter's 
Chtntfr, Eaton Square, and trill 
conduct Choir House confirms- . 
don in Cacterbury Cathedral on 
June 14. Old boys’ weekend's 
on June 7 and 8. There win be a • 
music copoert on May 22 and an 
outdoor bend concert on July 
1 1. There will be a fete foaid of 
the sports hall appeal on June 
29. The Sword af General Frapp 
will be performed on July A, .5" 
and b. Term ends .with speech 
day on July 12. . 

Cflibfaaai HaD. ' 

Sommer Term at Cobham Hall, 
begins today. The new g u a r dia n 
is Narasha Gordon- Dean. El- 
ders day will be held al toe 
school on Saturday. April 26; for 
further details contact the 
school secretary. Festival week- 
end takes place on July 12 and 
13, Term ends on Sunday, July 
13 l 


will hold its garden party at the 
school. Sports day. on Friday. 


June 13, wiB be followed to an 
exeat and half term will be man 
May 23 to 28. Speech day, at 
which the guest of honour wfil 
be Lady Rothnie, will be on 
Thursday. July 10. and term 
ends toe foDowing day. 

King William's CaOege, 

Isle of Man 

Summer Term at King 
William's College begins today. 
J.W.L. Cullen continues as heal 
of school and R.F.M. Cook is 
captain of cricket- Air Com- 
modore S.A Jones, deputy 
director. WRAP, will conduct 
the CCF annual inspection on 
May 19. The OKW dinner and 
end' of term me on July 14. 
Rossafi School 

Sum msr Term at Rossall Sdtool 
begins today. The CCF will br 
inspected by Air Vice-Marshal 
A BeilL Director General Sup- 
ply, RAF. on Friday, May 23. 


Dir Adrian <331, ERS, the 
applied mathematician distin- 
guished internationally for his 
workin fluid dynamics related, 
to both the ocean and the 
atmosphere, died suddenly on 
April I*), aged 49. 

Born in Australia he gradu- 
ated from Melbourne Univer- 
sity. He came to Britain in 
1960 as a research student at 
Trinity College; Cambridge. 
He -received lus PhD in 1963 
and continued, bis research on 

’■i. f *1*. • « 


DR ADRIAN GILL 




hydrodynamic stability at the 
Massachusetts Institute . of 
Technology.' 

In 1964 be tetdroed to 
Cambru%e and during the 
next 20 years bis published 
research included papers on 
stability theory, rotating flu- 
ids, geostrophic _ adjustment 
internal waves and ocean 
circulation theory. From 1979 
to ttWhewasa RoyaLSoctety 
Bso Senior Research Fellow:. 
His enthusiasm for research 
and lils friendly nature led to 
the development, of a strong 
and renowned research group 
which regularly attracted via- 
tois from many parts , of the 
world. 

. In 1984 he joined the Met* 
urological Office where he 
became an individual mem 
scientist ^Together with his 
research group he moved from 
Cambridge to Oxford where 
he set up s substantial group 
in ocean modelling and where- 
he helped to found the Robert 
Cooke Institute for Co-opera- 
tive Atmospheric Research - a 
joint enterprise between the 


University and Meteorologi- 
tol Office. mid the Natural 
Environment Research 
Council. 

. GiU was very -mudi an 
international scientist. He was 
a founder member erf. the 
Committee, for Climate 
Cnange and the Ocean ian 
imernational body reporting 
ultimately to toe United -Na- 
tions) and was one of the first 
to realize the importance of 
toe coupling between the cir- 
culations of thfr tropical 
Cceans and the global- atmo- 
sphere and its retevance for 
climate change. 

He had been chairman of 
toe scientific steering group 
lor a large international 
K2“t. • TOGA. (Tropical 
Ocean Global Atmosphere) - 
5* ‘Jp.Portont component of 
toe^forid Climate Research 


(Si’s eminence foul leader- 
toc field came from an 

resist which enabled him to 

ratimiflliT,* — .1 ■ 




rationalize difficult physical 
problems in terms of simple 


problems in terms of simple 
eluant mathematics .and 
from the care with which he 
fostered his students. The 
principal aims of his T resbarch 
«ere encapsulated in bis 

5J22F5 p k °? Aimasphere- 
Dynamics, published in 

tK ?l elated a FeUow of 
toe Royal Society eariifo this 

jCaT. 

H ( £^ Ss ^ v ed by his wife. 
i^K, a 4 d ^ »»«■ son and 


| jA-ab 




: ' ‘ ' ‘-r 











THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 



THE ARTS 


illy Telfe^acm 





*■» 






iil'.v 


Vi 

i » 




Sharing a birthday; as she 
does, with that lnrid Russian 

Empress Catharine the Great, 
and sharing both forename 
-and genes with n Todor des- 
pot, Queen. Elizabeth!! has 
turned out remarkably welL 
To say that she is loved by her 
subjects Is to understate die 
case her only vocaldetroctm 
are certified eccentrics. ' - 
. Last night The Queen gad 
The Common weabk (Thames) 
'presented a bland PR exercise 
: on .the strand of public life 
which ~ we are assured . Is 
. nearest her heart ?One of the 
more encouraging achfere- 
meats of imbHiup, a&< she 
‘described it.' 

Qnite what, that ’achieve- 
ment has been over the past 34 
years, - the writer/narrator 
Trevor McDonald was hard 
put to say except in negatives. 
It is certainly true that mem- 
ber states rarely declare war 
on each other; It .is also true, 
that, for example; Antigua and 
Tuvalu never enjoyed a great 
reputation, for international 
bellicosity in the first place. 
This “pleasant 'but ineffectual 
dub" would unbdoubtedfy car- 
ry more genuine authority had 
Pakistan and South Africa not. 
seceded. . 

. The Coohnoiiwealth's ap- 
peal is as sentimental and 
mystical as. Oat of Royalty 
itself and. as Mr McDonald 
stressed, its strength is identi- 
cal with that of its symbolic 
head. Reviewing her early 
global, tours on television at 
Sandringham, die Queen came 
across as a favourite aunt 
commending the children's 
diligence. “They take such an 
imm ense amount of trouble" 
she observed, as another tri- 
umphal landfall .sparked off 
another dragooned orgy of 
folkloric swagger. .* 

The Prime Ministem of the 
49 nations, meeting; last year 
in the Bahamas, seemed to' 
regard her as their favourite 
school matron as each in ten 
boarded the royal yacht for 
half an bonrVandjence of his 
individual' problems. One 
would have given several 
years' rental to eavesdrop on 
her dialogue with the Prime 
Minister of her own multira- 
cial and deeply disharmonious 
realm. ~ ; 

Bnt ft was a ran treat to 
watch the Queen receive Mrs 
Thatcher’s pushing obeisance 
with a slight frtaon-o? mcre- 
dnifty, as though a blatant 
ham had/strayed intftserioBS 
productton.lt waft boruehome 
to die viewer that the differ- 
ence between the leading to- 
dies cannot simply be . a 
question of breeding, let alone 
of planetary aspects. ■ 



Doctor Faust by 
Busoni (left) is 
more of a legend 
than an operatic 
reality, but now 
ENO have taken 
the plunge, then- 
new production 
opening at the 
Coliseum on 
Friday: Ronald 
Crichton fills in 
the background 




Kart Danuemann’s design for the Wittenberg tavern at the Dresden world premiere 


Martin Cropper 


Wreathed in vapour and nailing 
sparks. Doctor Faust appears like a 
comet somewhere in the operatic 
skies every few years. Busoni’s last, 
unfinished work has grown an aura of 
strangeness calculated to frighten 
nervous operagoers away. Rumours 
of .a long-overdue London stage 
production have been heard on and 
off for years. Now the English 
National Opera has taken the plunge. 
We shall see Doctor Faust at the 
Coliseum os Friday, with Mark Elder 
conducting a production fay David 
Pountney - in designs by Stefanos 
Lazaridis, and with Thomas Alton in 
the title-role. 

Strange this remarkable opera may 
be, sometimes disturbing, fart not 
difficult Vou do not have to be a 
medievalist or an expert on the black, 
arts, nor need you know about 
Busoni's much-discussed theories of 
“young dasacalfty”. The Faust leg- . 
end casts a spell eyen without the gud 
Gretchen, dead in this version when 
the action bQpns, although we 
glimpse her soldier brother before 
Mephistopheles has him killed off 
Busoni's Faust . plays for higher 
stakes, seducing the Duchess of 
Parma after playing magic tricks at 
her wedding least He is sot damned. 
Ai the end he denies both God and 
the Devil, by an effort of will 
transferring his soul to the dead body 
of the child the Duchess has borne 
him,, bringing the boy to symbolic 
new life is a world presumably 
beyond good or eviL 
- The music has quick wits, shim- 
mering colour^ intense longing and 
lyrical beauty. Therc is a taste of 
charcoal, a smell of' acrid wood- 
smoke. In the Tavern scene, with the 
students -of Wittenberg brawling 
about religion, Busoni fuses the two 
strains in his make-up — predomi- 
nantly Italian blood and adopted 
German culture — clothing counter- 
point with- flickering, quicksilver 
orchestration. Over the score broods 


an orchestra] interlude before the 
tavern scene. 

- Busoni was his own librettist. He 
worked at text and music from 1910 
until he died, in 1924, making shoals 
of sketches used in shorter composi- 
tions not overtly, connected with the 
opera. In his book Busoni the 
Composer (Faber & Faber, £35), a 
valuable, comprehensive and read- 
able companion to Edward Dent’s 
fine biography of 1933, Antony 
Beaumont notes no fewer than 23 
“satellite works". For his scenario 


: ■ * •>•*' . • 

<x; : iS w r w f V ' •••••■' 


although be was reasonable, even 
generous, about Puccini. Tbe true 
verismo composers, however, had 
something Busoni lacked: a nose for 
the theatre. Neither his superior 
theatrical culture (quite a different 
matter) nor his great eminence as a 
virtuoso pianist made up for that So 
the v iso nary intellectual was unwise 
enough to give his Faust already 
sorely taxed, long and demanding 
solos in each of the two final scenes. 
Puppet dimensions are far exceeded 
Length invites, and usually receives, 
damaging cuts. 

When Busoni died Faust's closing 
monologue remained unwritten. So 
did the crucial episode in the previous 
scene where Faust tries and foils to 
grasp the apparition of Helen of Troy, 
the “Ideal incarnate". Philipp 
Jarnach, another cosmopolitan set- 
tled in Germany (he had been 


Busoni's pupil in Zurich, where he 
fiat with James Joyce), was 




a*; L* 


' 1 e : -V ■ ■ 


Coliseum rehearsal: Thomas Alien 
as Doctor Faust (front) and 
Graham Clark as Mephistopheles 


the shadow of the gravely disquieting 
Sarabande, heard in its fullest form as 


Busoni devised a succession of tab- 
leaux which dodge Goethe in favour 
of the old puppet plays. Goethe (and 
Marlowe) knew them. Puppets and 
marionettes, with Rilke, Lorca and 
Gordon Craig among the devotees, 
were intellectually OK. Beaumont 
remarks that Busoni's and Craig’s 
views were “strikingly similar". Both 
men were more imaginative than 
practical. Both had a touch of the 
Higher Silliness. 

Except for late Verdi Busoni had 
little use for Italian opera in his time. 


shared a 

persuaded to complete the score, 
placing himself in the same perilous 
boat as Alfano, Halflter and Cerha 
with regard to other formidable 
torsos of the period — Puccini's 
‘Burandot. Falla's Aildntida and 
Berg's Lulu. Jarnach used material 
from the completed scenes but his 
style, applied to Busoni's linear, 
transparent texture, is like thick 
brush-strokes ,on a Durer drawing. 
Nevertheless, on ils cruder level, 
Jamach's ending works. 

A few years ago Antony Beaumont, 
practical musician as well as scholar, 
was shown in Berlin two sheets of 
detailed notes for the final scene 
made by Busoni not long before his 
death. These had apparently come to 
Jarnach 's notice after he had made 
his completion. Beaumont devised a 
new ending on .Busoni’s lines and 
made a more likely version of Faust's 
vain pursuit of Helen. The autograph 
score of the opera was destroyed in 
the war. There is a photocopy in East 
Berlin. A second photocopy turned 
up recently in West Germany. They 
provide some previously unknown 


music and reveal a mass of errors in 
the published edition. What the ENO 
performs will be nearer Busoni's 
intentions than anything so for beard. 

Doctor Faust bas generally attract- 
ed high-quality performers. Fritz 
Busch conducted the premiere, in 
Dresden, soon after Busoni's death. 
Only one name among the principals 
means much todav — the soprano 
Meta Seinemeyer. beloved of record 
collectors — but the small-part singers 
included Eras Berger and Paul 
Schoftler. For the Berlin premiere in 
1927 the conductor Leo Blech could 
boast four famous Wagnerians — the 
baritone SchotT as Faust, the tenor 
Fritz Soot as Mephistopheles. Frida 
Leider as the Duchess and Herbert 
Janssen as “the girl's brother". 

When Boult, who had Olympian 
objectivity plus the seigneurial touch 
sometimes missed by German con- 
ductors terrified of “pathos", con- 
ducted a memorable concert per- 
formance in London for the BBC in 

• 1937. the students included a young 
tenor called Peter Pears. For tbe 1956 
Berlin Festival the Stadtische Oper 
mounted Donor Faust in designs by 
Caspar Neher. Fischer-Dieskau was 
the magnetic Faust. He later recorded 
the role in a cruelly-cut version for 
Deutsche Grammophon. 

The Berlin production, more or 
less, turned up at La ScaJa. Milan, in 
1960. unexcitingiy sung and limply 
conducted by Hermann Scherchen. 
Behind me in the half-empty stalls sat 
two crones who cackled unceasingly. . 
The Italians, however, are beginning 
to forgive their errant son. Bologna, 
where he had an unhappy stint as 
head of the Liceo Rossini, last season 
gave the first production of the 

• Beaumont version of Doctor Faust 
and played to full houses. The most 
satisfying staging I have seen was at 
Dortmund way back in 1953, a 
company effort with no stars but good 
ensemble, providing the kind of 
totally absorbing experience one 
hopes for in the opera house bui 
rarely receives. 


Sheridan Morley reports on a book 
which could prove to be Broadway’s 
best written and most cogent obituary 


Terminal stages 


The history of British critics 
on Broadway has not teen an 
altogether easy one. Bernard 

Shaw never cared for the way 
New York premiered St Joan 
a vear ahead of Sybil Thorn- 
dike: and, though the Tynan 
estate must still be profiling 
from the apparently eternal 
run of Oh! Calcutta! there. 
Tynan himself discovered 
that, when he went to work for 
the AW- Yorker in 1958. the 
sense of excitement and dan- 
ger which had seemed to 
surround postwar American 
actors and their scripts in 
London was. even then, hard 
to find on Broadway itself. 

In the quarter-century since 
Tynan returned from the New 
Yorker to the Observer , though 
Ronald Bryden went to live 
and teach in Canada, the only 
British drama critics to have 
taken up any kind of profes- 
sional residence along the 
Great While Way for more 
than a week or two have been 
Give Barnes (now of the New 
York Post) and Bryden 's suc- 
cessor on the Statesman, Ben- 
edict Nightingale, who spent 
the whole of the 1983-84 
season writing a series of 
Sunday columns for the Nett 
York times. 

Now that Nightingale is 
back at least temporarily at the 
Statesman, we have a diary of 
that yean Fifth Row Center, 
published by Times Books in 
New York, is a touching and 
intelligent and often hilarious 
account of a man sent to 
inspect the health of a theatre 
that somehow no longer seems 
to be there when he arrives. 
The “fabulous invalid" has 
already become a gaudily- 
painted down crazily singing 
in a terminal ward. 

For reasons not entirely 


season. Mr Nightingale starts 
looking for the drai 


clear to him or us. Night- 
New 


ingale's editors at the 
York Times decreed that he 
was not to be allowed to leave 
the environs of the city. That 
meant he could cover Broad- 
way itself, where the first 
nights were already down to 
about one a fortnight, and 
entire shows would open, lose 
millions of dollars and close 
again in the time it took him 
to get his review into print. Or 
he could cover Off-Broad way, 
which seems to have consisted 
largely of revivals of Pinter 
plays he had already written 
extensively about in London. 
What he could not do was 
venture to Chicago for Step- 
penwolf. or to any of the other 
half-dozen cities in the United 
States where theatre is often 
now vastly more alive and 
varied than in Manhattan. 
The New York Times is still 
apparently just that. 

An increasingly mournful 
and confused English inspec- 


Irama of 
Manhattan city life, and his 
book is at its best when he 
leaves the wonderfully-titled 
“culture desk" of the New 
York Times for random street- 
corner conversations with the 
people who run what is left of 
the New Yoric theatre or those 
who just occasionally go to iL 

Sometimes he abandons the 
task altogether and drifts off 
into a masterly essay on the 
death of Ralph Richardson or 
into thumbnail sketches of 
Sam Beckett (“he of the long 
stricken face and the short 
stricken plays") or Dustin 
Hoffman (“looking as if he bas 
just returned from a clothes- 
buying spree on Devil’s 
Island"). Readers of the 
Statesman these last two de- 
cades presumably already 
know of Nightingale as one of 
the best theatre critics of the 
century” whal this book un- 
covers for the first time is a 
wryly comic, sometimes even 
bitchy, observer of daytime as 
well as curtain-time life away 
from home. 

His conclusions about the 
death-rattle of the commercial 
theatre in New York are in 
essence no different from 
those equally superbly articu- 
lated by William Goldman in 
The Season fifteen years ago: 
disastrous costs, no subsidies, 
restrictive unions, high ticket- 
prices, ill-prepared audiences. 
But what makes Fifth Row 
Center so unbeatable and 
unmissable is that Nightingale 
relates those conclusions to 
the condition of New York 
itself, one that he sees through 
the eyes of a well-meaning but 
increasingly appalled foreign 
visitor. He also constantly 
relates what he sees around 
him to what is going on at 
home, so that by extension he 
is as often writing about our 
own theatre as New York’s. 

The way things are now 
going over there, this may yet 
turn out to be Broadway's best 
written and most cogently 
argued obituary. Until a Brit- 
ish publisher has the wit and 
wisdom to buy it, you can for 
SI 8 from any good New York 
bookstore. 


Royal Gala 

Fanfare for 
Elizabeth 

Covent Garden/ 
Thames TV 


Sir Alasiair Barnett, long-time 
holder of the Royal warrant 
for .urbanity, quoted King 
George V before Monday 
night r s Royal Birthday Gala. 
“Went to Covent Garden to 
see FideliOi It was .damn’ 
■ duU." Such-a complaint could 
have been levelled only at a 
very few minutes of 1986’s 
entertainment for the Queen. 
For the rest the two-hours’ 
traffic whizzed by. 

The operatic coup was 'to 
persuade - Domingo and Car- 
reras to appear on the same 
stage. When that happened 
back at the turn of the decade 
in Vienna there was friction, 
real or invented. Peace ruled 
at the Royal Opera. Domingo, 
a little strained in a Traviota 
extract, was at. his most pas- 


sionate in Cavaradossi's “E 
lucevan". Carreras contented 
himself with “Granada", de- 
livered with ■ maximum 
charm. Both teams are fam- 
ous Caliris, but ; both were, 
happy to : leave “Nessun 
donna” to Giacomo Gia- 
comixti in tw<j pieces of 
Turdhdot loosely stitched 
together. 

Solti, the only one of the 
evening V conductors to get 
real attention from the cam- 
eras, recalled tbe first opera he 
conducted at Covent Garden 
in the Silver Rose presenta- 
tion from Rosenkavalier. And 
for those with long memories 
there was reference to another 
conductor, Sr Thomas Bee- 
cham, in Arline’s aria from 
The Bohemian Girl, one of his 
great successes at the house. 
Jessye Norman was the slight- 
ly improbable lady of the title. 

Musdally opera was in gen- 
eral resplenderitly represent- 
ed. Verbally it came in for 
some stick from the narrators, 
Judi Dench and Paul Edding- 
ton. The linking passages 
veered from ibe elevated to 


the cheapest of jibes, including 
an infamous translation of the 
plot of Carmen. 

Ballet, by contrast, passed 
without censure and here the 
extracts chosen could well 
have been influenced by Prin- 
cess Margaret. Gelsey Kirk- 
land’s Juliet, already praised 
on this page by John Fercival, 
was partnered by Anthony 
Dowell, looking exactly like 
another Romeo (non-dancing) 
of die past: Leslie Howard. 

But it was Ashton who ruled 
the evening: Daphnis, Birth- 
day Offering and a new piece 
for the evening itself to Elgar’s 
Nursery Suite. Score and cho- 
reography were both inspired 
by the two Princesses, Eliza- 
beth and Margaret Rose. It 
will surely be seen again — did 
not de Valois once use the 
same piece of music? 

No, nobody need echo the 
words of George V. Tbe 
birthday tribute to the Queen, 
produced by Patrick Garland, 
was anything but damn' dulL 

John Higgins 


Concert 

Philharmonia/ 
Ashkenazy . 
Festival IfeH 


One experienced tbe carious 
feeling in the second half of 
this concert that one was 
hearing not Vladimir. Ash- 
kenazy's Beethoven but Beet- 
hoven's Beethpven- I hasten 
jo add that thi*? was no period- 
style performance of the 
“Eroica" Symphony — they 
doubtless will be with us. in 
vast quantities soon enough. 
It was simply that Ashkenazy 


was seemingly able tor allow 
tbe notes to generate their own 
meanings. To do- that, of 
course, he needed an orchestra 
which refused to treat the 
piece as something too well 
known to be worth bothering 
themselves with overmuch. 
With the .intense concentra- 
tion that the Philharmonia 
Orchestra, lavished upon it. 
Ashkenazy struck gold. 


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Perhaps the most impres- 
sive movement was the vast 
and noble Funeral March. 
Frequently conductors are 
tempted to take this, music 
either too fast, which destroys 
its grandeur and intensity, or 
' too slow, which often makes ft 
seem impossibly and pre- 
sumptuously' long-winded. 
Ashkenazy hit exactly the 
right balance; both dignity and 
momentum were 'maintained 
and the phrasing sounded 
completely natural. Neverthe- 
, less, the most striking individ- 
[ual moments, whether dis- 
turbing discords or audacious 
harmonic shifts, were properly 
isolated, though seen as vital 
ports of the structure. 

. Technically there were de- 
tails throughout thework that 
one could have argued with. 
The timpani for example, 
tended to be ‘too aggressive 
and, at the beginning -of the 
Funeral March, the double 
bases sounded i distinctly 
.gruff In tbe tantly-atgued first 
movement the s hee r pow er of 
the strings and brass called for 
doubled woodwind in places, 


one would have thought. 
Then, in the finale, an errant 
viola once came in, horror of 
horrors, a whole bar early. 
Such details, however, faded 
into insignificance in face of 
the whole performance, and 
they were, in any case, far 
outnumbered by strokes of 
finesse. The horns and trum- 
pets. in particular, had a 
magnificent evening, the for- 
mer lending tbe Trjo section 
of the Scherzo a real punch, as 
wefl as playing with formida- 
ble accuracy. 

It is blatantly unfair to place 
any work, even the magnifi- 
cent, ebullient Second Sym- 
phony by the same composer, 
beside such a miracle; and, not 
surprisingly, both the music' 
and the performance were left 
rather in the shade. Here 
Ashkenazy mystifyingly de- 
stroyed foe balance of Ihe first 
movement by omitting the 
exposition repeat, and a 


stodgy slow movement (mir- 
ti 


rored by the manner of the 
symphony’s introduction) and 
inconsistent tempo in the 
somewhat garbled Scherzo 
made one suspect that insuffi- 
cient rehearsal time had been 
allocated to whal is by no 
means an easy work to play. 
Only in the daring cut and 
thrust of. the finale did 
Ashkenazy's usual vibrant 
musi cianshi p make itself felt. 
Before that it had seemed that 
we were in for an evening of 
depressing mediocrity. 

Stephen Pettitt 


(right) 

has been dividing his 
time between hymning 
Royalty and translating 
Brecht, whose Baal opens 
at the Almeida next 
week: interview by 
Simon Banner 


Creative 

contrast 



It can probably be safely 
assumed that the Queen and 
Bertolt Brecht have very little 
in common, except perhaps 
for Christopher Logue, poet, 
playwright, actor and journal- 
ist, who has of late teen 
somewhat preoccupied with 
them both, having written a 
song about one and translated 
a plav by the other. "Hie play is 
Baal, one of the earliest by the 
German writer, which leaves 
the song, “Happy Birthday 
Ma’am", as Logue's com- 
memoration of the Queen’s 
sixtieth birthday. 

Logue's involvement in the 
song, which he co-wrote with 
Tony Macauley, seems as 
unlikely as its words (“We saw 
your hat, well fancy that/”). As 
a pop lyricist, in fact, he makes 
a rather good translator, some- 
thing recognized by the 
Leicester Haymarket Studio 
Company in commissioning 
from him a translation of 
Baal, a production of which 
tbe company will be present- 
ing from next week until May 
6 as part of a season at the 
Almeida Theatre. 

' Logue's interest in Brecht is 
of long standing. In 1956 he 
even went to Berlin to see him. 
Brecht advised him to learn 
German, and then to come 
back, but the playwright's 
death a few months later -cut 
short the proposed apprentice- 
ship. Thirty years later, 
Logue's German is still not 
good enough to do without the 
assistance of other translators. 
Yet what he lacks in technical 
facility is made up for in 
creative understanding. His 
translation of Baal is most 
memorable perhaps for tbe 
vivid presence Logue has 
given to its eponymous hero, 
characterized towards the end 
of the play as “a murderer, 
singer, poet actor, fairground 
worker, woodsman, gigolo, 
convict, drunkard, pervert 
and pimp". 

Baal is, according to Logue, 
“Brecht's idea of a very pow- 
erful virile, wild, rather self- 
ish but not unpleasant. 


creative man. You could al- 
most say he was the antithesis 
of a Bee ken character. He’s 
wonderfully fecund, provoca- 
tive, loaded with information 
about himself and opinions 
about others, and constantly 
concerned with sex." 

It is to this remarkable 
character that Logue as a 
translator feels an obligation. 
“What I tried to do, scene by 
scene, was to give Baal a very 
good line to convey powerful- 
ly what he was in fact doing, 
rather than worrying about 
precise translations. If by 
chance the German translated 
neatly into English straight- 


away, I'd use that. Otherwise 
look for something else. 


I'd 


primarily aware of the need to 
convey the attitude of the 
character." 

As a creative translator, 
Logue dearly has no notion of 
an inviolate text. "If people 
want that, it*s there in the 
German", he says, and admits 
to having made one or two 
cuts to the “flowery and 
romantic imagery which I 
didn't like very much anyway. 
A play only has half an 
existence on the printed page 
— that page is a storage unit for 
experts to look at and to see 
bow they are going to make it 
work, which is a feeling I keep 
getting back to as a translator. 
I have to make sure it will 
work on stage at the same time 
as not betraying Brecht's 
intentions." 

The work of Brecht as a 
young man, Baal is not typical 
of his work as a whole. 
“Certainly if he’d never writ- 
ten anything else", Logue 
suggests, “it's the kind of play 
which would only be done 
today as a curiosity." What it 
does share with Brecht's other 
writing however is a certain 
unique quality of attitude and 
tone. “I don't know how to 
explain it other than to say 
that it's very 'friendly', very 
person-to-person. I like it very 
mudi indeed. It's the kind of 
quality I'd like to bring to my 
own poeny.” 


Rock 


Yielding to the star machine 


Nik Kershaw etc 
Albert Hall 


It is possible to admire the 
sheer professionalism and go- 
getting ambition of today's 
actual and would-be pop stars 
without much enjoying where 
the trend has led. People used 
to start pop groups because (a) 
they liked the noise they made 
and (b) they wanted to show 
off nowadays the generation 
of Duran Duran and Sigue 
Sigue Sputnik places such a 
high value on sharp marketing 
campaign; that a gold disc 
seems a less appropriate hon- 
our than a Queen’s Award to 
Industry. 

This dismal and unoriginal 
thought was prompted by the 
succession of acts making up 
the first of a series of concerts 
called “Sound Waves for 
Greenpeace" this week at the 
Albert HalL Of course, one 
should first of all acknowledge 
the pop world's Geldof-in- 
spired contribution to charita- 
ble work over the past year; 
and on Monday the gesture 
made by Nik Kershaw. 
Beiouis Some, Drum Theatre 
and Kira Wilde deserved bet- 
ter than the thin house which 
greeted it. Nevertheless, one 
could not help being struck by 
the lack of musical spontane- 
ity on display, and by the 
thought that such old-time 
impresarios as Larry Parties 
and Dick Clark would be 
astonished by the alacrity with 
which the aspirants of 1986 
yield themselves to the star- 
making machinery. 

For Drum Theatre and 
Beiouis Some, who have en- 
joyed a little success, the aim 
is to sell themselves at aJJ 
costs. Drum Theatre try to 
cover all bases: a blond 
Duran done at the key boards, 
a black funk-master on the 
bass, a tamed heavy-metal 


guitarist, a beatnik percus- 
sionist and a solid, nonde- 
script drummer. Their singer, 
Gari Tarn, is actually rather 
good, like a less affected Boy 
George, but the music is, as 
you might expect a real hotch- 
potch. Beiouis Some, a mid- 
dleweight Oockwork Orange 
lad with a brutal peroxide 
crop, offered an insistent and 
effective collage of borrowings 
from Ferry. Bowie and Chic, 
while Kershaw’s middie-of- 
South Moulton Street electro- 
pop was produced with his 
usual efficiency. 


Naturally, I preferred Miss 
Wilde, who is more Yamaha 
and Kawasaki than Yamamo- 
to and Kenzo, suffered from 
dreadful sound quality, sang 
the first verse of "Cambodia” 
in the wrong key and delivered 
a version of “The Kids in 
America” that provided an 
unusually clear demonstration 
of how tedious it can be to 
have to sing your old bits 
every night “Love Blonde” 
though, was Absolute Begin- 
ners in three minutes flat 


Richard Williams 


MODERN ARCHITECTURAL GLASS 


LIGHT 


A PHOTOGRAPHIC SURVEY 


VALUES 


A CRAFTS COUNCIL TOURING EXHIBITION 



CRAFTS COUNCIL GALLERY 


f? WAT IB LOO ftLACl. LOBtl ftLGINt 1TRI1T, LQbBO- SW1V *A V 
0I-1)«4I1I N [As C ST e MECADHir CISCUS J, A DM I S * I O ■ P ft L| 
TUESOAr-SATUftOAT Id-i. S US DAT *■» C L DSL 0 HONDA' 


9 APRIL-25 MAY 198 S. 



S Bob Larbey's new play 

9 “makes the 
$ West End a 
g warmer and more 
^ wonderful place” 


GEORGE COLE i 

1 


ti: l ilH 



sa 


tor therefore takes to calling 
on the joggers in Central Park, 
investigating the roaches un- 
der his high-rise cupboards (“I 
am the Exterminator”, says an 
unexpected nocturnal caller, 
thereby conjuring up sudden 
visions of transatlantic mor- 
tality) and travelling on sub- 
ways that have become 
subterranean action-paintings 
on wheels. 

Precisely because there is so 
little going on in formal 
theatres, more than half of 
which are closed for the 


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THE TIMES WF.nNF.SDAY APRIL 23 1986 


Walker talks 
clouded by 
Soviet attacks 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 




Talks between Mr Peter Britain over the wisdom of 
Walker. Sccrciar} nJ' Slate t<»i allowing the American bomb- 
l ami Millin’ Kremlin ers permission to take-off 

officials opened here yesier- from bases in Britain, 
day against a background of British sources yesterday 
mounting Soviet attacks on expressed hopes that Mr 
the role played by Mrs Walker's talks would be limit- 
Thatchers Government in ed to the subject of Anglo- 
last week's American raids Soviet co-operation in energy 
against Libya. matters. But there were early 

Bitter condemnation of the indications that the British 
British stand was voiced dur- Cabinet minister, the first to 
ing the day both by Mr visit here since 1984. was 
Vladimir Lomeiko. the chief being denied access to senior 
spokesman of the foreign Kremlin figures who had earli- 
ministry and by Tass. the er been expected to meet him. 
official ’ news agency which Despite the public condem- 
carried a critical attack by its nation of the Thatcher Gov- 
London correspondent of a eminent, Mr Walker said last 
recent television interview night that the subject of the 
given by the Prime Minister. Libyan bombings had not 
The agency claimed that her been mentioned once during 
remarks had shown that “the his first day of intensive talks 
Conservative Government is with Soviet officials, 
going to further act as an Mr Walker spoke optimisti- 

obedient executor ofWashing- eally of the attitude 
ton's aggressive plans contrary taken by his Soviet co 
to the will of a major part of pans and oficials urn 
l^c British population". with the minister exp 

The latest Soviet ploy in its confidence that an i 
relentless barrage of propagan- Soviet agreement on < 
da against the action of the co-operation would be i 
British Government is to try when the Moscow me 
to play up differences inside conclude 'tomorrow. 

21 Libyans expelled 
by the Home Office 


taken by his Soviet counter- 
parts and oficials travelling 
with the minister expressed 
confidence that an Anglo- 
Soviet agreement on energy 
co-operation would be signed 
when the Moscow meetings 



PH 
m fester 


1 



*.< -v 

4 Mx 

' '-vi 


« % : 


The Prince and Princess of Wales welcoming the Spanish royal couple qn 
, , Secretary, spent nme than boor talk- 

wrtznaed fro® p«lte a toe to Sendr Francisco Tersandez 

tween os, It would be surprising n Ordonaz, .Spain's' Foreign 


Continued from P*#e 1 
between us, it would be surprising n 

there were not.” 

Bat she added; “These are being 
bandied in a friendly and co-operative 
spirit as befits dose allies, and partners 
for to have so much in common that 


The Princess of Wales curtseying to Queen Sofia. 


Continued from page 1 
were therefore thought to be 
likely recruits for violent acts 
in the wake of the American 
bombing of Libya. 

Tbe Libyan students organi- 
zation used to be organized by 
the four-man revolutionary 
committee which had taken 
over the Libyab Embassy and 
turned it into a ‘People’s 
Bureau' on Gadaffi’s orders. 

Tbe four were expelled dar- 
ing the St James's Square 
siege, but their leader, Mr 
Abdoi Gaadir Khalifa 
Baghdadi, now heads the Brit- 
ish desk at the offices of the 
Revolutionary Committees in 
Tripoli and is believed to 
direct student activity in Brit- 
ain from there. 

Since tbe St James's Square 
siege.4,130 Libyans have been 
admitted to Britain. In 1983, a 


Today's events 



... MUK* .. 

^ V is 

m " M 


total of 2&500 Libyans were 
admitted to Britain. There are 
now thought to be about 7,000 
living here. 

0 The Prime Minister told the 
Commons during Question 
Time that the action against 
the 21 students had been 
“legitimate and desirable un- 
der all the circumstances’" {our 

Mr Douglas Hurd, the 
Home Secretary, said later in 
response to an emergency 
question that action had been 
taken to make sure the re- 
maining Libyan student pilots 1 
and engineers could do no 
harm at airports around the 
country. 

Mr Gerald Kanfinann, the 
shadow spokesman, criticized 
the timing of the government 
derision. 

Parliament, page 4 

Leading article, page 17 { The Queen and King Juan Carlos walking at Windsor Castle. 


The Queen also noted last month’s 
Nato referendum result “which the 
friends of Spain everywhere hare 
warmly welcomed*'. 

Tbe King's reference was to the 
Brussels Agreement of November 
1984, under which talks about 
Gibraltar's future are proceeding. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the Foreign 


Miidsteryesteiay afternoon at&e 
Foreign Office. 

Talking to reporters, af ter war d s, 
Senor Fernandez Ordonez qppbasfcrd 
no ^parallel conversations'" over ,G»- : 
braltarwcregnlngondnringtheKiBg's 
visit. -‘t 

They had only, the pj bn st er s»H, 
reviewed progress over co-operation 
nratte at afficrate-te*d talks mprepara- 
ttoo Coir the next lorriga rambtars 
meeting on. GibraUm ’ 

In bus speech, the King thanked 
Britain fer Its help over Spain's 
achievtag, affix difficult negotiations. 


their first state visit to Britain. - 
et dry into the EEC. •' ; ^ y'y:* 4 

a 

’■ of the 2Ist century,- the ffing pledged; 
: “We are ready. w-dB wtatre ig 

- Which we are sure We canaJwaj® count 
o u tie ^sympathy d the/Uaited 

-fc*& arrivedwifli fee 

- Dnke ofBfebwgb at Home Park jn» 


Duke of Bferiwgb at Home Parkier 

■Kbg Jua Carios, in the gate 
wdfonn of a Spanish admiral, Md 


by nwd£ra» HeamtrowAnport wbete 
(hey had been met nd 'wekonied ta 
Britain bj the ftiace and Prints of 

Wales. "-'i--' ' 


Family of six is found shot dead 



By Gavin Bell 

Six people were found dead from 
shotgun wounds in their home at 
Redruth, Cornwall, yesterday. Police 
said they were not looking for 
anyone else over the incident 

The last person thought to have 
seen the family alive, a friend who 
visited the house at 10 Park Road on 
Monday night, identified them as Mr 
Cq|m Gill, a former police officer 
aged about 40, his wife Linda, aged 
32, and four children ranging in age 
from 18 months to teens. 

A single-barrel shotgun was found 
at the scene and police believe Mr 
Gill may have 


shot his' family then turned the gun 
on "himself. Some of the children 
were shot as they slept in-bed. 

The discovery - was made by,, 
neighbours who investigated after 
noudqg that the curtains were still 
drawn, in tbe .house at lunchtime 
yesterday. - 

. Mr GiQ left tiler police force, m 
which he was a detective constable 
based at Newquay, about IQ years 
ago to take up private investigation „• 
work. He was recently appointed 
deputy registrar for the area and. teas . 
alio a county bailiff. . ' * 

- The friend who asked not to be 
identified, said: "I've known them 


for about K> years and they've 
always seemed 10 me to have had a 
happy, settled raairiage. It was the 
'second man ag e for both of them. 
When I wem round fest zught they 
*ere absolutely normal IjustcanY 
imdeist^ n. IfsitaTedibfe” - - 
” Be-saitfcXofia^wartifflring about 


bta fc d&l;Setmt:ve^2mponast 
They haiteYtakerr out' any 7 new : 
policies rcoeiirly and - he thought 
perhaps they were under-insured.* 
Hesafdthefemflyhadmovcdtoa .' 
laige ctetat^bo^M " 

oH 4jn mtrtw^g jyvrt»jpiii ^iry TUHtt f tfy* J 

coasilatelast fate v v ■ ■ . : 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


District Hospital Group, Lynch "TSwaziland. deport Heathrow 
Farm Riding Centre, Alwalton, I Airport 7.45. 


The Halifax House Price Index 


House, 



Peterborough. I. 

Princess Margaret attends a 
reception at the Banqueting 
House. SWJ. 6.45. 

The Duke of Kent visits the 
Safety at Sea and Marine 


accompanied bv The Princess of Electronics exhibition, We»- 
Waies, opens the “West Lan- minster Exhibition Centre, 
eashire Means Business” ex- GreycoatStSWt. ligand later, 
hibitiart the Sports Centre, accompanied by the Duchess oi 
Digmoor. Skdmersdale, 1.45: Kent attends the Rous Cup 
later he attends a dinner. Royal England v Scotland • match. 


College of Physicians. It St , 
Andrew’s Place, NWl. 7.40. 

The Princess of Wales visits 
The Special Schools. 
Blackamoor? Campus. Black- 
burn. 10.35. 

Princess Anne visits the Re- 
gent Belt Company. Walgrave, 
Northamptonshire. 11.15: and 
later visits the Peterborough 


Wembley Stadium. 7. 1 0. Concer 

The Duchess of Kent Patron. Si nfonia 
St George’s Hospital, attends a Chorus; 
reception in gid ofthe appeal (or Haymark 
the Hospital’s Medical School, Concer 

House of Lords. Wl. 12.05. chestra: 


Music 

a Recital by David Davies 

(flute), James Du riant (viola) 
. and Phillip Thorne (guitar): 
5 Third Eye Centre, 350 
“ e Sauchiehali St, Glasgow, 7.30. 
Concert by the Bournemouth 
Sinfonktta; Wessex Hall, Poole, 

sr. 7 > 3Q_ 

of Piano recital by Philip 

JP Pilkington; The Warwick Arts 
“■ Trust, 33 Ward Sq, SWI. 7.30. 

Concert by the Northern 
on. Si nfonia and The Sinfonia 
Is a Chorus: Si Thomas', 

for Haymarket Newcastle, 7.30. 
xjL Concert by the Halle Or- 
chestra; Wolverhampton Civic 


Weather 

forecast 




Prince and Princess Michael Hall, 7.30. 
of Kenl visit Swaziland to Concert by the Archduke 
represent the Queen at the Trio; Belvoir Rm, Charles Wil- 
Coronation of The King of son Building, Leicester Univer- 
sity. 130. 

d Puzzle No 17,027 Talks, lectures, films 

minutes by 19.6 per cent of the German Expressionist: Carv- 
w regional final of the Collins ings in wood, by Jill Lloyd; 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,027 Talks, lectures, films 

This pMzcle was solved within 30 minutes by 19.6 per cent of the German Expressionist: Carv- 
compeiitors at this year's Glasgow regional final of the Collins ings in wood, by Jill Lloyd; 
Dictionaries Times Crossword Championship. ' Whitechapel Art Gallery, 

Whitechapel High St, El. 6.30, 




New British sculpture, by Pat 
Turner. I: Shock of the New. 
Culture as Nature (film), 230: 
Tate Gallery. Millbank. 

Donatella, by Ronald Parkin- 
son. 11.30; American quilts, by 
Imogen Stewart. 1.15; Victoria 
& Albert Museum. $W7. 

Turner and Reynolds, by 
Barry Venning: Courtauld In- 
stitute, 20 Port man Sq, W l. 
530. 

Leicestershire entertainment 
from i he sixteenth' century, by 
Mrs Helen Leacroft; The Art 
Workers's Guild. 6 Queen Sq, 
WCI. 7.30. 



ACROSS 

I Talk about a name for being 
fussy! (6>. 

4 Woodcutter, perhaps, used 
to figures (Si. 

10 Girl holds a right to vol- 
untary payments (9) 

11 Extort toll, say (5). 

12 Refuses to acknowledge 

rows about implant (7). 

13 Contract to make a horse in 
pinchbeck silver (7). 

14 Main vessel for the pump- 
ing station (5). 

15 Two arms and a head — 
what an unusual sJaic.'(S). 

18 Grey Friar's dance in a 
school institution (4-4). 

2Q Married, initially. George 
Eliot, and split up (5). 

23 One who can pot a plant (7 1 . 

25 Get the sack in Oslo, or 
change round (7). 

26 French town where a rat was 
despatched (5). 

27 Webster specialises tn this 
unpleasant fate (6,3). 

28 Without being truly heart- 
less, 1 follow death ui a 
rashi enable wa> (8) 

29 As a royal breed it is 
Outstanding (6). 

DOWN 

1 Snake concealed in piano 
movement (S). 

2 Failure to exercise right puts 
new burden on king (3.4). 


new burden on king (3.4). 

Concise Crossword 


3 Shy footballer is like an ear- 
lier type (5-4). 

5 Fear of confinement is wide- 
spread, but so parochial 
(14). 

6 Lei down subordinate (5). 

7 The lady here cheats (7). 

8 Provide abundant food for 
Royal Engineers' inaugura- 
tion (6). 

9 An obvious essential for a 
costume play (5,9). 

16 Periodical of interest to 
bowlers? (3,6). 

17 Porter about to bear witness 

(8). 

19 International body has the 
impertinence to remove 
resolution (7) 

21 One part of measure about 
church district (7). 

22 The pan Brobdingnag has to 
play m making us afraid (6). 

24 Died off test month, re- 
lieved of pain (5). 

Solation to Puzzle No 17,024 


aaaaaaaas •*. aaaEs 
a-s-ar. 13 .---a %a-n- a 
sasaaina ^aaEiaaii 

a .-aj.a.ta'TB 

gtnaass-. iasuiaaagsig 

a*-: n o^ a a - &£•• 

IT - a El' 3 jj- T3 LB ill 

H3iSC3 fioiiiifl9lS2H5 
• ■-g- a --a-.n a a 
ivtnans 
a; a a a ct.q b 

_ _ 3aaoii3-a 
aisacjss asniGaEKHa 



by tomrond Irewa (Hoddar & Stajghtoa E1&9^ 

Held inTrusl Tlw Nattaral Trust for Sw^md. by lam Crawford 

Tramtannafion of Ancient Epic, by Chartos 

iSSo^Ma^S^^Y^rafecfitBd by Alan Ross (Chatto & Wtndus. 

PUffiaLsnflcea, The State and Trade IWonisinbi Britain, by Potw Hain (Vi- 

TM'lmbMbol Audi* Walter, by Andre Gkte. translated by Wade 
Baskin (Peter Owen, El 0^5) 

The Rathray StaSon. A Soda) History, by Jeffrey Richards and John M. 
MacKenzie (Oxford, £15) 


mm 


Lighting-up tune 


Lewder a<0 pm to 5.17 am 
artstot 8 j 5Q pm K> 527 am 
EdHtogh ans rm <o5.tSaW n 

fenumee BlS 8 pro to SM an 


Around Britain 


Anniversaries 


Births: WilUam Shakespeare 
(the tradiuonal date), Stratford- 
upon-Avon. 1564, be died there 
on this day 1616; J M W 
Turner. London. 1775: Max 
Planck, physicist. Kiel, Ger- 
many. 1858: Edmund AUenby 
1st Vfecount Allenby. Field 
Marshal. Bfaekenhurst. Not- 
tinghamshire. 1861: Sergei 
Prokofiev , SoMsovka. Russia. 
1891. 

Deaths: Miguel de Cervantes, 
Madrid. (616: Henry Vaughan, 
poet. Llansamffhwd. 1695: Wil- 
liam Wordsworth, poet laureate 
(1843-50L Grasmere. Cumbria. 
($50; Rupert Brooke, poet. 
Skiros. Greece, 1915. 

Today is the Feast of Saint 
George, the patron saint of 
Englaad- 



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Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 2pm a ppro xim ately. 


















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Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


|i12p:3fr(+0.T8) 


&r- ;*»■- 

*o- 


1§l§%r US Dollar . : r "/.v - m y 

-||t ,1 .5130 (same) r _:i 

"aa W German mark •■'■ 

; •3.3286.'tM0?t).;t: V. 

Trade-weighted 
£ ; : [75.4(-^.1) V : ; ; 

* i US share, 
.4 I link starts 

**'•■' $ The London Stock ' Ex- 
'*'< 2 change and .the Nasdaq com- 
^puier-based market in - the 
JJnited States began, exchange 

* ■'■•s tv . $ng deafime - .prices 'over a 
" ■ satellite link yesterday. Some 
■■-•.. * \. m 300 selected shares from mar-. 
~ kex-makers on both sides of 
'• J c ■ ? the Atlantic are being shown 

: v ’ y on the others screens 

H’ . Talks for a similar link whh 
*- A .the full New York ’Stock 
Exchange are hoped to-be 
• s ' ■>.- completed by the end of the 
year. The London-Stock Ex- 
, change wants Jinks with other 
“j- world -markets as trading be- 
-L* comes more inlemaiionBL 


By Edvard Townsenilcdnstrial Correspondent 




Q: Pf 

3; *!) 


New bank 
launched 


um-sized businesses with 
" • profits upwards of about 
£100.000. It is 70 per cent 
owned by the French banking 
soup. Credit Industrzel et 
Commercial Group, and has a 
.* capital base of £5 million. ' 

It is headed by -the former | 

- Morgan Grenfell director, Mr 

- Will Hopper. Tire two other 
‘ executive directors -are Mr ; 
' Gerald Leahy, previously dep- 

. uty chief executive of Bank 

- Julius Baer and* Mr 'David 
: Hoblyn, fonneriy of Mpigaii 

Grenfell. 

Atlantic stake 

Mr Nigef Jaggerhas joined 
the board of Atlantic Comput- 
ers after increasing his stake-in 
the company from 5.97 per' 
cent id, 15.4 per .cent Mr 
" T^T ^Jagaer. who bought the shares' 

■ - through his Panamanian-reg-- 

- -Istered Peafchurst Corporation 
at prices from 2wp to 300p 

js-afrom a non-execimve director, 
T^lr Yerhon Davies, is based in 
■the United States. 1. 

; St Ives higher 

i St Ives, tbe printing compa- 
n>% lifted profits from £2. 52 
million to £3.95 miDion before 
4 lax in the six months to 
January 31. . Turnover 
T rosefrom £27.1 million to 
?34.8 million. The interim 
dividend is 3p. 

Tempos, page 23 

.Agency ahead. 

• "c- Boase Massimi Pollitt, the. 

. advertising agency, lifted prof- 

* its from £2.58 million to £3.90 
>’ million before tax in the year 

to December 3L Turnover 
rose from £64.4 million to 
£73.0 mflbon.-The total divi- 
dend is 4.5p, up from 3.5p. 

Tempos, page 23 

CGA advance 

Shares in Country 
Gentlemen’s - Association 
jumped by 75p yesterday to 
„ £10.00. The rise foiled at- 

tempts by Bestwood. which is' 
one of two rival bidders for 
CGA to buy a further 12.97 
per cent m CGA at its top 
price of 955p. 

Ipecorush 

, The £10 million share flota- 
tion by Ipeco, the Southend, 
Essex-based designer of seats 
for airline pilots, was oversub- 
scribed more than 10 times, 
iccording to City estimates. 
Dealings in die shares, at 
1 20p, start next Tuesday. 


’ Rolls-Royce, the State- 
owned aero engine . maker, 
:• yesterday announced pretax 
profits for J 985 of £8! million 
. -r the biggest since national- 
ization in 1971 - and de- 
scribed : the 'results as “a 
'further convincing step to- 
wards a return to the private 
. sector?. - ; 

The profit was more than 
three times greater than for tbe 
previoroyear, while total sales 
■reached £1.68 billion, a rise of 
14'percenL' 

.. Sir";. Rands Tombs, the 
cha irman , made dear that 
with operating profits up by 30 
per cent on 1984 to £211 
million, the company was 
ready for privatization at the 
earliest opportunity. 

• The' Government has al- 
ready earmarked the first half 
of f 987 for the share sale, and 
Sir Francis said the good 
results were “the first step in 
our accelerating campaign to- 
wards our ‘return to the stock 
market. The earlier in 1987 
the better”.. 

The company was keen to 

Elders tells 
of need 
for secrecy 

By Alison Eadie 

Elders DCL, the Australian 
brewing to agriculture group, 
yesterday launched its court 
battle to stop the Monopolies 
add Commission revealing 
Elders? bid secrets to its target 
company AIlied-Lyons. . 

•’ Mr Robert Alexander, QC 
counsel for -Elders, told the 
court that it could be “highly 
prejudicial” to Elders to give 
Allied . information, much . 
would allow. Allied to make 
every effort to “kfil the bid.” 

Elders original £1.8' ''trillion 
bid was referred to the Mo- 
nopolies Commission last De- 
cember not on competition 
grounds, bat. on doubts over 
the financing of the bid. Tbe 
chairman. ofthe commission. 
Sir Godfrayle Quesne, want- 
ed to reveal details of the 
financing of Elders 1 planned 
bid to Afliediyons. 

.•.'•Mr Alexander -said T3ders 
felt Sir Godfiay’s approadi 
was ''wrong in law and proce- 
dtiraUy Utferr” Sir Godfray 
believed the commission had 
to -disclose theinfonnation to 
- fulfill its statutory duty. 

Although the commission 
could legitimately consult Al- 
lied for its view of the level of 
finance needed for the devel- 
opment ofthe company, it was 
not necessary for it to know 
how the finance was to be 
provided, Mr Alexander said. 

An independent finance ex- 
pert,' appointed' by the com- 
mission, could assess tbe ' 
fi n a n ci n g implication, - he 
added. 

Such a course of action was 
suggested by Elders but was 
not acceptable to the commis- 
sion. 

Tbe court hearing is expect- 
ed to last another two days. 

’ Elders wants to pursue its 
bid for Allied-Lyons, even if 
Allied's proposed £IJ5 trillion 
acquisition of Hiram- 
Walker’s drinks division. goes 

nhaad. 

Gulf Canada’s hostile bid 
for the whole of Hiram Walker 
goes ahead today. Gulf has 
indicated its opposition to .the 
sale of tbe drinks division, but 
Allied considers that it has a 
binding contract. 

Tbe acquisfiou would make 
Allied a much bigger company 
for Elders to swallow, but after 
the recent acquisition. by Bro- 
ken Hill Proprietary of 20 per 
cent ofEkiers it considers that 
it has the financial strength to 
attempt the bid. . - 


STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


be privatized, he said. “We are 
convinced we can stand on 
our own feet We believe there 
are important opportunities 
open to us by a return to the 
private sector." 

Rolls, one ofthe world's big 
three aero and marine engine 
producers and a symbol of 
British engineering excellence, 
saw its civil engine business 
increase by 29 per cent last 
year, a trend that has contin- 
ued in 1986 with orders in the 
first quarter reaching a record 
of more than £300 million. 
Civil engine sales produced an 
operating profit of £73 million 
in 1985 against £39 million in 
19841 

• During the year the 
company's share capital was 
cut by £372 million which. Sir 
Francis said, cleared the way 
for registration as a public 
limited company on May 1 as 
a necessary prerequisite to 
flotation. 

Next year additional capital 
of about £100 million is to be 
raised before tbe public sale, 
either by a rights issue or 




w» Mm 

Sir Francis Tombs: “we can 
stand on our own feet 
direct injection of Govern- 
ment cash. The flotation is 
expected to raise about £500 
million. 

Sir Francis said that as a 
result of continued buoyant 
sales of civil engines, in- 
creased pretax profits, which 
could be well over £100 
million, were forecast for this 
year. 

Rolls-Royce collapsed spec- 
tacularly in 1 971 , burdened by 
the development costs of the 
RB21 1 engine, but Sir Francis 


G5 may act over 
slump in dollar 

By David Smith. Economics Correspondent 


"tew Yotfc 

Dow Jones 184737 (-1.93) 

Tokyo 

4kkei Dow — 1571231 (-1tA37) 
tong Kong: ■ 

-tanqSang 175230 (44^2) 

XmMenlein: Gen — 258.7 (same) 
SydnerAO — 120&5 (-113) 

Jomnwrztank — 2260-7 (-12.4) 
ifussebc 

Serwral 657.21 (+4Z21) 

'arts CAC 385.1 (+5.1) 

lunch: 

iKA General 524.70 (Same) 


GOLD 


RISES: 

Guinness 

Asda-MFI — 

IG Gas — 

Royal tns — . 
Morgan Oucfcte _ 
Associated Heat - 

Greycoat' — - 

Metskax — , — 
Atlantic Computers 
Crystalata — , — 
Tozer Kemstey . — 

Rotate* : — 

■■ ; ■; — 

Stock Conversion . 

COBramaH — 

Country Gam 

Stives — 


ondoa Fixing: 

M *344.15 pm-$3«.10 

• lose 534S2S345.75 (£227.75- 
2ftS ) 

. . lew Y«k: 

>’ iimax $34620-346-70 

INTEREST RATES 

.. ondon: 

er* Base; 10.50% 

-monin interbank ilFifr-tOS 
-month eBg4Xe 

• j ^"19 0416 % 

• rime Rate &50% 

^ ederai Funds 7% ■ 

-month Treasury Bfls 5.89-&87% 

^ - 3-year bonds . - 


- 31 Op (+4 

— i60pM 

428p(+1< 


„353p+20) 
_ 248p (+12) 
_J1Mp{+7) 
.-Z75p(+1« 

„ iooopi+7g ! 
_8S0p(+5§; 
_ 235p (+12) 


FALLS:. 

Boase Masslml 3^p(-1g 

CtemCtartw iKjPHf) 

Standard Chert 

Glaxo-.. ’SIS HS 

Bentafls ’SBHJ! 

Martin Ford Wp -K) 

McCorquodate 2SQp (-23) 

CURRENCIES 

j 


The dollar slumped again 
yesterday, hit by US economic 
news and the While House's 
apparent satisfaction with its 
. slide so far. 

However, there was strong 
talk in the market of an 
imminent move by the Group 
of Five central banks to steady 
the dollar. So far, only the 
Bank of Japan has resisted its 
fall. 

US consumer prices fell by 
0.4 per cent last month, after a 
similar decline in February. 
Prices fell at an annual rate of 
5 per cent last month. 

Durable goods orders fell by 

2.5 per cent, adding to concern 
over the US economy, with 
the drop in defence orders — of 
4.7 percent — the biggest since 
August 1982. 

In this environment of fell- 
ing prices and a weak econo- 
my, many analysts expect a 
further cut in the Federal 
[ Reserve Board's discount rate, 
which was reduced from 7 to 

6.5 per cent last Friday. 

More US banks moved into 

line with the new 8 J per cent 
prime rate yesterday. 

The dollar dipped to a post- 
war low of 169.40 against the 
yen, mainly as a result of 
President Reagan's comment 
on Monday evening that the 
fell in the dollar's value is 
justified. 

The Japanese authorities, 
who consider that a rate of 1 80 
is high enough for the yen, are 
likely to attempt to push the 
rate back. 

It later steadied, closing at 
exactly 1 70 in London, a post- 
war closing' low, but with 
dealers remaining bearish 
about its prospects. 

The dollar hovered around 

Extel urges 
Demerger 
! bid rejection 

Mr Alan Brooker, the chair- 
man of Extel, last night made 
another plea to bis sharehold- 
ers to reject the £170 million 
j bid from the Demerger 
Corporation. 

Demerger, which claims to 
have 38 per cent of Extel's 
capital, under its belt, has 
extended its 400p cash offer 
until next Monday, but has 
said that it will not be raised, 
it also claims leading 
stockbrokers' analysts are in 
favour of the offer. 

Bnt Mr Brooker hit back. 
He claimed: “The vast major- 
ity ofour independent private 
I and institutional shareholders 
are continuing to reject this 
offer. It will surely fefl." 

Mr Brooker said:“Naturally 
the board will have to consid- 
er the situation, but I am very 
confident it will not be 
recommended." Meanwhile, 
in the slock market, Extel's 
shares closed 5p lower at 403p. 


another important level, 
against the mark. It dropped 
from DM2.2060, through the 
DM2.20 barrier, to 
DM2.1850, before steadying 
to close in London at 
DM2. 1 960. 

The mark is benefiting from 
dollar weakness because of 
apparent unwillingness of the 
Bundesbank to participate in 
the present round of world- 
wide interest rate reductions, 
and the realignment of the 
mark in the European Mone- 
tary System this month. 

The key to centra! bank 
intervention could be if the 
dollar's slide becomes general, 
rather lhan mainly against the 
strong yen. 

Sterling stayed on the side- 
lines yesterday, closing virtu- 
ally unchanged against tbe 
dollar at Si. 5 130, but down 
slightly against the mark and 
other currencies. The sterling 
index slipped 0.1 to 75.4. 

Tbe Batik of England sig- 
nalled that h is not ready for 
another cut in base rates, at 
present 10.5 per cent, yet The 
Bank's money market tactics, 
which included lending to the 
discount houses at 2.30 pm at 
a penal 11,75 per cent rale,' 
indicated that it wants no cut 
in rates for a few days. 

However, optimism about 
an early reduction, although 
probably not until next week, 
continues in the money 
markets. 

Rates were steady yester- 
day, with base rate hopes 
resting on the expectation of 
further reductions in the Unit- 
ed Slates and the prospect of a 
drop in Britain's inflation rale 
to less than 3 per cent in the 
next few weeks. 


said it was now an entirely 
different company and would 
be attractive to potential in- 
vestors because it ho longer 
depended on one product. 

Civil engines accounted for 
24 per cent and military for I S 
per cent of world markets, he 
said, and the objective in the 
next three or four years was to 
increase penetration to 30 per 
cent and 20 per cent 

Research and development 
spending Iasi year totalled 
£234 minion against £227 
million, and Sir Francis said 
expenditure would continue at 
about £250 million a year. 

Launch aid was received 
from the Government for the 
latest version of the RB21 1 
and the V2S00, a new genera- 
tion jet engine which is being 
produced by a five-nation 
consortium. Rolls is continu- 
ing to examine the potential of 
prop-fen engines but remains 
behind the American competi- 
tion in their development 

Military engine sales last 
year totalled £735 million, the 
same as in 1984. and the 
operating profit of £110 mil- 
lion was unchanged. 

Guinness 

placing 

bonanza 

By Jeremy Warner 

Business Correspondent 

Institutional investors ea- 
gerly snapped up a £258 ; 
million placing of new 
Guinness shares yesterday. 

The 86 million shares were 
placed by Wood ‘Mackenzie 
and Cazenove on behalf of Mr 
James Gulliver's Argyll super- 
markets group and its friends 
at 300p each. 

The shares were payment 
for the 14.45 per cent stake the 
Argyll camp built up in Distill- 
ers during the epic £2.7 billion 
battle. The placing enables the 
bruised Mr Gulliver to retreat 
from the battle with an £18 
million profit on his Distillers 
shares, although that still 
leaves Argyll liable to make 
provisions of around £32 mil- 
lion against the takeover fight. 

The Guinness stockbroking 
firms accomplished the share 
placing with such ease, partly 
because the stock market had 
been braced fora much bigger 
exercise. 

It had been widely antici- 
pated that Guinness and. its 
advisers would attempt to 
place the stock they have 
become entitled to as a result 
of the Distillers fight. 
Guinness, Morgan Grenfell 
and other associates also built 
up a near 15 per cent stake in 
Distillers during the battle. 

Instead, Guinness decided 
to buy back the ,90.6 million 
shares and cancel them, pro- 
vided that shareholders agree. 
The cost of this is not going to 
be much less than £300 mil- 
lion and might have been 
expected to send the debt 
gearing of the new Guinness- 
Distillers combine 'spiralling 
lo intolerable levels. 


Standard Chartered 
settles with ITC 

By Michael Prest, Financial Correspondent 


Standard Chartered Bank 
has won the race to recover as 
much as possible of 4he £10-6 
million it was owed by the 
International Tin Council 
The bank confirmed yesterday 
that it had agreed a settlement 
with the ITC. 

The ITC yesterday gave the 
bank a cheque for £1.2 mil- 
lion. Standard Chartered has 
also received 874 tonnes of 
tin, worth about £3.3 million. 
The bank holds another 1,500 
tonnes of tin as collateral 
against its original loan. 

It is understood that further 
payments from the FTC have 
to be finalized. But the bank 
regards the deal as final settle- 
ment of its claim against tbe 
bouncil It is unlikely to sell 
the tin at the present de- 
pressed prices. 

The ITC had 1,900 tonnes 
of unencumbered tin in its 
buffer stock. Some of ibis is 


believed to have been sold to 
realise cash for pan of the 
settlement with Standard 
Chartered. The buffer stock 
account has little left with 
which to settle other claims. 
But MacLaine Watson, the 
London Metal Exchange ring- 
dealing member owned by 
Drexel Burnham Lambert, 
will continue its action against 
the ITG MacLaine won an 
arbitration award against the 
ITG Other brokers and banks 
are considering their position 
in the light of the Standard 
Chartered settlement. 

The 22 member countries of 
the ITC recently agreed to 
provide the council's adminis- 
trative account with enough 
funds to carry it through to the 
annual budget review in June. 
But, stripped or its price 
support operations using the 
buffer slock, the ITCs status 
is uncertain. 


Buyout team plans listing 


London: 

£: St A130 
&DM&3288 
E: SwFr2.7885 
Zi FFr10.6213 
£:Yen257.2f 
£: todecc75-4 


New Yorfc 
£ 51:1530 
& DM22000 
$: index: 114.8 . 

ECU £0-961059 
SDR £1.16564 


By Richard Lander 

The managers who bought 
the domestic food and bever- 
ages division- of Chdbury 
Schweppes for £97 million last 
month in one of Britain's 
largest management buyouts, 
-say they plan to bring the new 
company. Premier Brands, to 
the stock market in 1990 with 
a capitalization of around £70 
million. 

Mr Paul Judge, former man- 
aging director of Cadbury 
Typboo who will lead the 
eight- man team, said yester- 
day the company was sure of a 
successful future. He expects it 
to be making taxed profits of 
£7 million by the time of 
flotation giving a prospective 
price-earnings ratio of 10. 

Premier, whose bar code 
logo is meant to signify the 
high-technology way forward. 



Patti Judge: confidence 
in the future 

starts business next week after 
the final legal loose ends of its 
agreement with Cadbury are 
tied up. 

Premier’s products range 
from Cadbury's Smash instant 
mashed potato to Olivers 


Marmalade and Ty-Pfaoo lea, 
with tbe Cadbury trade mark 
being used under a 20-year 
renewable agreement 

Competition with Cadbury 
is ruled out so that while 
Premier will take, over 
Cadbury's chocolate biscuit 
range, it will be prevented 
from marketing a rival io the 
Wispa bar. 

The new company has an- 
nual sales of some £300 mil- 
lion and employs about 5.000 
workers who will be offered 
share options that will lead to 
a 15 per cent stake on nota- 
tion. Cadbury itself also holds 
a 10 per cent share option. 

The buyout was orchestrat- 
ed by the American banks 
Citicorp and Bankers Trust, 
who organized a £75 million 
credit facility and £25 million 
in venture capital 


From bankruptcy tc 
a billion in 1 6 years 


Geoffrey Panic, the minister respon- 
sible for aerospace ai ihc Department 
of Trade and Industry, wants to 
return Rolls-Royce to the private 
sector by the spring of 1987. For his 
part. Sir Francis Tombs, Rolls- 
Royce's chairman, yesterday ex- 

f tre'ssed himself as keen to escape 
rom the Government's stifling 
shadow — the sooner the better. 

For the last six years the company 
has been working to a design for 
reentering the private sector. The 
latest figures, unveiled yesterday, 
provide analysis with a guide to the 
value the stock market is likely to put 
on the issue. Pretax profit jumped 
from £26 million in 19S4 to £81 
million in 1985. Turnover was up by 
14 per cent to £1.6 billion. 

However, the benefits of more 
efficient methdds of operation (the 
company has shed 23,000 staff, one- 
third of the workforce, since 1980) 
allowed gross profit to increase by 20 
per cent to £366 million. Increased 
business in civil aerospace largely 
accounted for the rise in turnover 
military sales and profit were un- 
changed. The civil market as a whole 
was comparatively static over this 
period but Rolls' share rose from 20 
per cent in 19S4 to 24 per cent in 
1985. Its share of the military market 
is around IS per cent. 

The value of Rolls-Royce shares is 
most likely to be based on the 1986 
results and the company’s prospects 
thereafter. Judging by the size of the 
order book, and further benefits to 
come from streamlining, a significant 
improvement in pretax profit to 
something over £100 million is 
feasible. Spending on research and 
development will continue at around 
the present level of £250 million 
annually, of which the company's 
share is around £100 million, written 
off as it is incurred in the profit and 
loss account — a valuable lesson 
learned from the 1971 crash. 

Rolls will be looking for much 
better value for money through 
growing use of computer-aided de- 
sign and computer simulation to test 
models, which is much cheaper than 
actually ‘building engines for testing. 

Attaching multiples to new issues 
is always something of an art, but a 
good starting place is the market 
rating of similar companies. British 
Aerospace is the only British com- 
pany to compare with Rolls-Royce 
and it stands on a raxing of 10 times 
earnings. Rolls-Royce pays no tax at 
present and its tax losses mean that it 
will not pay tax for another two or 
three years. However, on a notional 
tax charge of 35 per cenL and a 10 
times multiple, the Government 
could raise upwards of £650 million 
from the sale. 

If the issue captures the imagina- 
tion and market conditions are 
favourable the figure could be nearer 
the billion mark. For strategic rea- 
sons the flotation will carry restric- 
tions on foreign holdings, coupled 
with a Golden Share to guarantee 
British ownership. 

At the same time Rolls will want to 
raise new capital to reduce its 


Hopes of 
new bank 
bid fade 


' By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

The shares of Standard 
Chartered Bank, which is 
facing a £1 billion bid by 
Lloyds Bank, dropped by 
more than 30p yesterday, 
signalling the stock market's 
waning expectation of a 
counter-bid. This sharply re- 
duces the margin between the 
Lloyds offer price and the 
market value of Standard 
shares. 

As the price retreated from 
over 867p to S37p market 
experts sounded increasingly 
sceptical about the likelihood 
of a second bid for the 
international bank. 

They were saying: "It is nc-w 
several weeks since Lloyds 
announced its intention to bid 
for Standard and named its 
price, so there has been plenty 
of time for a second bid to 

come in. With every’ day that 

passes it looks increasingly 
likely that Lloyds will have a 
dear run at Standard with no 
competitiors." 

Standard shares have mere 
than doubled over recent 
weeks, rising from around 
420p to a high of 890p in 
expectation of a bid. The 
Lloyds offer price of 750p per 
share made lost week caused 
disappointment by failing 
more lhan £1 short of the 
market price. 

Lloyds has insisted that the 
price is a fair one, giving 
Standard a p/e ratio of nine — 
higher than for any other big 
British bank. Standard has 
actively discouraged any sec- 
ond bids by insisting that it 
wants to remain 
independent, and is not look- 
ing for a “white knight" 


debt/equitv ratio, which is still above 
50 per cent In anticipation of that, 
the balance between its long-term and 
short-term debt has been radically 
altered, making the bulk of it (£1 SO 
million) short. The company is 
expected to raise between £150 
million and £200 million of new 
money at the time of the government 
sale in order to reduce its debt to 
significantly lower levels. 

Rolls-Royce has 3 narrow product 
base in a volatile business. But orders 
in the first quarter of 1 986 have been 
pouring in at an unprecedented rate 
and this will form a solid base for 
profits in 1 987. the first year in public 
ownership. 

Here is a great opportunity for the 
Government to take its privatization 
programme a major step forward. 
Rolls is one of the few outstanding 
British manufacturing companies. To 
release it from the bureacratic em- 
brace of Whitehall would not only 
liberate the energies of the people 
who work in Rolls, it would dem- 
onstrate both faith and confidence in 
our ability actually to make things in 
competition with the best the world 
has to offer. 

Tardy referee 

The rather scrupulous but bureau- 
cratic system of vetting mergers in 
this country' is coming under strain 
from the pace of takeover action in 
the bull market. 

The main problem is that the 
reference of one bid to the Monopo- 
lies Commisssion on the recom- 
mendation of the Office of Fair 
Trading can effectively decide a 
competitive bid battle whatever the 
outcome of the inquiry. 

This threatened to happen in the 
battles for Distillers and Imperial 
Group. In both cases, some quick 
thinking at Morgan Grenfell saved 
the day by creating new bids incor- 
porating a" sale lo a third party of the 
offending overlapping assets The 
OFT then waved through the new 
bids. 

That was flexibility at work. It 
cannot always work. There was no 
such obvious way out for BET in its 
bid to put SGB together with its own 
scaffolding business. Last week. John 
Mowlera's family solution for SGB 
effectively superseded BET. 

Reference to the Monopolies 
Commission is not meant to decide 
such issues. 

The problem stems from the length 
of the commission's deliberations — 
up to six months — when City time 
horizons have shrunk to vanishing 
poinL Six months may be taken as a 
fair delay for a bid-for company to 
tighten itself up and prepare its 
defences, but seems .loo long if it is 
merely searching for a white knight. 

Either a monopolies reference 
should put all bids for a company out 
of court for the duration, or the length 
of investigations should be cut dras- 
tically — to perhaps two months. That 
could be done onl\ if members were 
less part-time and speed took a higher 
priority in such administrative mat- 
ters as printing reports. 


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_ 22 THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 _ _ — r- ' v - - ------ n fc 

MANAGEMENT PROVEN IN THE MARKET PLACE. MANAGEMENT PROVEN IM THE MARKET PLACE. MANAGEMENT PROVEN IXTHE MARKET PLACE. MANAGEMENT PROVEN IN THE PLACE . __ \. ^ ...... > 


We don*! want to 







.« ■’ r 3S 


dbury Schweppes new 



even the lemons are 20% more 


H II 



> manaoemcnt proven ix the market place. MANAGEMENT 3 cloudiness of the > component, Schweppes have a I onthqse tvo b \ 

| product. This is a result of the | better product a; a lcm or cost. § n«rf. EM fit* per year. ? 

I ‘Albedo' or pith and it’s tangible 5 The essential oil that gives J _‘j. \ 

1 proof of the real fruit presence. § Bitter Lemon (and other fruit | r- \ 

1 The trouble is it’s unstable and s drinks) flavour has to be dis- 5 . $ 

1 sinks to the bottom of the bottle. j persed throughout the drink, j This techhk^leitohip | 



1 And of course real fruit is at 1 or it would float on the top and | didn't e6ihe about ^ 5 

I the whim of the weather. A j* give you a very nasty surprise Thanks to l 

S _ . £ . 1 ry j. _• 7? . _• . 1 . i. rt. Jt ■ PIT.- '■* 


\ late frost in the Greek lemon 
1 groves results in watery lemons 
1 which give a juice which clears 
I too quickly. 


| on the first sip. 


sight Cadbury Schweppes have 
invested £8 million in . two 
technical developmental cen- 
tres at Bollis Hill, where 


1 J MANAGEMENT PROVEN IN THE MARKET PLACE.MAN AGEMENT 2 


To you, a lemon is a 
pleasant yellow thing that’s 
essential in a gin and tonic 
and handy for juggling prac- 
tise when you’re bored. 


which give a juice which clears | The essence '§ technical § 

too quickly. I ■ of huge savings. | tres at Bollis Hill, where | 

I This dispersion has tradi- | the Stakhanovite lemons were | 
'Flovedo' and 'Albedo' I tionally been done with a sol- | developed, and the" Lord | 

to the rescue. | vent subject to duty. It works, I Zuckerman Research Centre I , 

Schweppes could have 1 but the essences used for export J at Reading University. \ 

charged a premium price and % are as a result, subject to tax. So % Their research is; designed: {j 


1 reformulated with life enhanc- I Schweppes have designed an | to give ^fundamental technical f 
To a drinks technologist, § ing chemicals and clouding | emulsion which suspends.the oil | understandings ^ 5 


it’s three components — the ^ agents, 
juice, which is actually not | management i 
that flavoursome, the 3 
‘albedo' (pith) and the outer 2 ||||^^ 
skin or ‘flavedo’, where ‘real’ % IL 
flavour is found, in the form l 
of essential oil. i HHPy' 

To the Cadbury Schwep- 1 
pes management it was the f 
means to a generational ad- | 
vance over the competition | 
in technology and a massive | i 
contribution in terms of I . **» 

profitability and product | 
quality. ? 

Here’s the story of the I MANAGEMENT i 

millions of pounds Cadbury | Bu 
Schweppes have squeezed \ avoid a< 
out of lemons. % in the l 


< MANAGEMENT PROVEN IN THE MARKET PLACE. MANAGEMENT < 




I m 

■•.vSa 




iri 


| in water instead. Not only -is it | Schweppes. prpduQt^;- >£d i 
I duty free, it improves flavours. § the profitable develop 
j It also improves balance sheets. \ . superior brands in the r ihcreas r s 
I The saving on just one J ingly buoyant leisure food and | 

I flavour to one country can | drinks market. As well as the l» 
| be £250,000 per annum. With \ super efficient idiions (soon : to ? 

% an export market the size of i have their yield increased even | 

\ Schweppes’ the annual savings % further by a new deVelopment) I 
1 are huge. | there is the CBM project. The ; 

| ' 1 methods are top secret, the re- 1 

I Time fa concentrate. | suits are worth making a noise ; 

1 R&D (Research and I about. • ^ \ 


Development) at this highly 
sophisticated level has enabled 


It. will save £4 million a I 
year - a* direct return on the h, 


Cadbury Schweppes to break * research budget. 


Chief Executive Dominic 1 
Cadbury emphasises, “What I 


Bitter and Twisted. 


Until the 1950’s the only 
fruit material to be found in car- 
bonated drinks was juice, which, 
as we’ve said, doesn’t actually 
taste of much. Schweppes were 
amongst -the first to pioneer 
the “comminuted” base, using 
the juice and the best of the 
pith and peel. This led to the 


Z MANAGEMENT PROVEN IN THE MARKET PLACE.MAN AG EM ENT g down flavours to their corn^ g _ ^ Chief Executive Dominic | 

But Schweppes like to 1 ponent constituents.' J Cadbury emphasises; “What | 

avoid additives. The answer lay i By excluding the unnecess- J "matters, about our research is i 

in the lemons themselves. | ary components in drinks which | not the absolute amount but its | 

Prior to 1982, Schweppes | cannot be dissolved in the new | quality and -relevance to com- \ 

only used some of the essential % emulsion they can reduce the f mercial objectives. We judge bur | 

oil extracted from the ‘flavedo’. 1 volume of the essence; and less \ research- ••.ihvestnieht 1 ' ifejr . -tfie I 

Also, only some of the ‘albedo’, E volume means less duty. T sustainable marketing and | A 

selling the rest as cattle food. So > PRO VEN wthb market place. management proven jnthjb marketplacemanagbihentprp>’eni.vthe f V 


selling the rest as cattle food. So | 
it made sense to somehow get | 
more out of the lemons. Much | 
experimentation resulted in a | 
new process that could ‘squeeze’ 1 
lemons harder, more times. This | 
gave access to more clouding | 


■ y.' s 

■ a,:.] i 






launch of the first of the ‘whole ^ components and other flavour- S 


fruit drinks’ - Schweppes Bitter 
Lemon, One of the great suc- 
cesses of the period. 

Although Bitter Lemon is 
the sort of product people view 
with great affection it was beset 
by difficulties in the late ’70’s. 

The first was cost of pro- 
duction compared to ‘simple’ 
flavoured, drinks like cola. 
Second was shelf life. After four 
months the product tended to 


ing agents which had not been j 
attainable with the old process. | 

These newly acquired 1 
agents instantly solved one i 
problem - they increased shelf \ 
life from four months to twelve. \ ■. 

The additional clouding com- | ■ \ ^ 
ponents resulted in greater i MANAGEMENT PROVE 

stability and the fact that the ? For ii 










^ MANAGEMENT PROVEN IN THE MAJIKCT PLACE. MANAGEMENT PROVEN IN THE. MARK ET PLACE. MANAGEMENT PROVEN IN THE D 


| stability and the fact that the | For instance the famous | financial advantages it provides \ 
| lemon's yield is up by over | Tonic flavouring is concen- | us with in' the inarketplace” | 

| 20% means sensible pricing can | trated four times for export, 1 (Cij XC * ^rhwonrutc $ 

% hp maintninpH inct z Pac-a’c T I - dxJiWCfHJttv f- 


^ be maintained. So just by i Rose’s Lime Juice a staggering I 


| darken and taste stale. Third | concentrating on the basic j ten times. The savings of duty l PROVEN SfmESS:T PLACE P 

<2 Z !* . • “ 


• -MANAGEMENT PROVEN IN THE MARKET PLACE. MANAGEMENT PROVEN IN THE MARKET PLACE. MANAGEMENT PROVEN IN THE MARKET PLACE. MANAGEMENT PROVEN iS 


N 2 

THE MARKET PLACE. MANAGEMENT PROVEN IN THE MARKET PLACE. MANAGEMENT 











\2U 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 




TEMPUS 


oase 


imi Pollitt 


hits a lucky streak 


Advertising is -an uncertain 
business for young exectw 
lives; their diems and for 
investors. An agency can go 
for months without winning 
any big . new accounts and 
then its luck can turn for no 
apparent reason, and it has a 
stream of new business. 

Boase Masstmi Pollitt, one 
of the top- 10 agencies, has 
lust experienced such a 
change of fortune. After a 
very difficult patch at the end 
of last year, it has won new 
accounts worth £18 million 
in the just four months. 

The new accounts include 
£9 million for Dulra and 
work for Clark’s Shoes and 
Punm's. That compares with 
£12 million of new business 
neL of lost accounts in the 
whole of!9B5. 

Last year’s problems with 
winning new business did not 
affect profits, which rose by 
51 per cent to £3.9 million 
before tax. They could how- 
ever hold back growth this 
year, at . hast in the ip* ri n 
advertising agency. 

The effect should be offset 
by contributions from new 
diversifications. Marketing 
Solutions, the consultancy 
acquired for £10 -million in 
December 1984, probably 
made more than £f million 
last year, although that was 
not enough to .trigger off a 
bonus payment to the ven- 
dors. It should improve its 
performance this year and 
three new companies should 
turn last year’s loss into a 
profit. . 

A wider spread of business 
should make the company 
less vulnerable to /the 
industry’s ups and downs, 
bu tthere is still a risk that 
BMP could lose the Courage 
account, after Hanson Trust's . 
takeover oflm penal Group. 

That risk is probaWy al- 
ready discounted- with, the 
shares at 349p, where they are 
trading on 16 times prospec- 
tive earnings, assuming prof- 
its of £4.7 million m 1986. 
That is roughly in liiie- wfth - . 
most of the quoted advertis- 
ing agencies but in BMP's 
case the rating .is better 
deserved. ’ 


Share plan 
‘should 
include 
unit trusts’ 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Richard Clay for £19 million 
and Chase Primers for £22 
million. 

.As a result it is now the 
biggest book printer in Brit- 
ain. with 20 to 25 per cent of 
tire paperback market and 12 
per cent of the hardback 
' St Ives has been aWe to 
expand so quickly because its 
share price has risen strongly. 
In October the striking price 
was 330p but yesterday foe 
shares were trading at 820p, 
valuing the group at £98.4 
million. 

Growth has been organic as 
well as acquired. In the six 
. months to January 31- pretax 
profits rose by 57 per cent to 
£3.95 million on a like-for- 
!i ke basis. The original St Ives 
business increased profits by 
20.5 percent io£1.4l million; 
Clay's profits more than dou- 
bled to £1 32 million and 
Chase profits advanced to' 
£132 million, up by 63 per 
cent. 

. -Even though the acquisi-, 
tions were made for- paper, 
fully-diluted earnings per 
share rose by- 58 per cent in 
foe half year. 

In the unlikely event that 
St' lve$ makes no further 
acquisitions, profits for the ' 
year could rise to £7.7 mil- 
lion, assuming maintained 
group margins. But, with foe 
priming industry awash with 
bids. St Ives is unlikely to 
stand back. The chairman, 
Mr Robert Gavron, says that 
he might be interested in 
McCorquodale now that foe 
Norton Opax bid has. been 
referred to the Monopolies 
Commission. But Mr Gavron 


The reason is the high 
regard with which foe City 
regards the bidding company, 
Emess and Rota flex are both 
in the same business * 
domestic and commercial 
lighting ~ but Emess has a far 
more glamorous rating. Its 
historic p/e, after yesterday's 
15p share price rise to 317p, 
was a beady 22. Rota flex's 
rating, after its shares 
bounced 93p higher to 303p, 
was a historic 16. Before the 
bid it was 1 1. - 


By .Lawrence Lever 


Share prices drift lower as 
institutions hold back 


Emess had no difficulty 
getting its cash alternative 
underwritten at a tight 7 per 
cent discount to the market 
price, even though the bid is 
its most ambitious to rfai? 
and will if successful, in- 
crease the size of foe compa- 
ny by two-thirds. 

Emess has expanded rapid- 
ly in foe test few years, both 
by acquisition and organical- 
ly. Its taxable profits in 1985 
were 51 per cent higher at 
£3.37 million, overtaking 
Rotaflex for the first time, 
where 1985 profits were 15 
per cent higher at £33 
million. 


The Unit Trust Association 
yesterday appealed to the 
Chancellor, Mr Nigel Lawson, 
to include unit trusts within 
the Personal Equity Plan, foe 
terms of which he outlined in 
foe Budget. At the same time 
the association announced 
record sales and investment 
last month. 

The Finance Bill, which was 
published test week, refers 
only to “shares ” as potential 
candidates for the Personal 
Equity Plan, and the Treasury 
does not favour the inclusion 
of unit trusts. 

The association also wants 
to be involved in the consulta- 
tions which are planned to 
determine the precise ambit of 
the Personal Equity Plan. 

Mr Clive Fenn-Smith, 


Putting the two businesses 
together would give Emess 
access to Roufflex’s strong' 
overseas network and pro- 
vide greater combined re- 
search and development and 
marketing muscle to meet 
European and particularly. 
German competition. 



Nigel Lawson: plea from 
Unit Trust Association 


Emess is dearly not going 
to pull its punches in this bid 
It bats already criticized the 
margins Rotaflex achieves on 
its commercial lighting as 
almost half those achieved by 
Emess. It has also described 
as bizarre rts decision to 
invest in South Africa in the 
test 18 months. 


wojild only consider launch- 
ing a bid if foe price fell to the 
pre-bid level of roughly £70 
million. 

With plenty of opportuni- 
ties, St Ives is likely to 
continue its rapid growth. 
The p/e ratio of 23 limes 
prospective earnings looks 
hjgb,.battbe shares should be 


Emess/Rotaflex 


St Ives 


St Ives has lost no time since 
joining foe stock market in 
October. It has made two 
important acquisitions — 


The £3! million contested 
bid by Emess Lighting for 
Rotaflex Jias followed foe 
pattern of recent offers — 
notably Dixons for Wool- 
worth and FH Tomkins fin* 
Pegler-HattersJey — in that 
the predator's snare price has 
shot up as well as the prey’s. 


Rotaflex, however. Intends 
to fight bade. Its profits 
growth for the past three 
years has been good, if not 
dramatic. Restructuring at Le 
Dauphin in France is over 
and the company is contrib- 
uting to profits. South Africa 
has also been making money 
since last month. The board 
and friends speak for 30 per 
cent of foe shares. 


This share price at J8p 
above Emess’ offer price 
promises further action. 
Shareholders should sit tight. 


Shell-Esso seeks cheap oil output 


By David Yeung, Energy Correspondent 


The uncertainty, over world 
oil prices has forced Shell and 
Esso to rethink how to bring 
their Kittiwake field , in foe 
North Sea into production. 


The oilfield., which las re- 
serves of 70 million barrels, is 
part of a group of five small 
fields foe two companies, who 
are partners in North Sea 


operations, have named the 
Ganriet dustier. 

Studies have shown that 
development of foe fields 
cannot justify large capital 
investment while world oil 
prices are frilling. 

Mr Peter Everett, managing 
director of Shell UK. Explora- 
tion and Production, the 
operator for foe partnership. 


said; “We believe foe way 
forward is to seek the cheapest 
possible development meth-’ 
ods for five relatively small 
fields, and it has been decided 
to start with the largest of 
them, Kittiwake. 

“We are taking a fresh look 
to see whether we can come up 
with an innovative technical 
solution 










•The Company is vastly stronger than when it entered 
the downturn. Now the emphasis has switched to growth. 
We have an industry base, the borrowing capadty 
and the management to achieve this, both 
organically and by acquisition, 
lam consent that we are well placed to exploit . 
our carefully prepared base for expansion. • 



Gateforci Hi, Wforksop, Nofongtamshire S81 SAF 


Materials and products for construction. 


Unit Trust Association 
chairman of the association, 
said: “We have made repre- 
sentations to foe Chancellor, 
and we are very much hoping 
that be will change his mind 
about excluding Emit trusts, 
since they are taHor-made to 
provide foe first-time Investor 
with foe protection and spread 
of risk foal be needs. 

“Administratively nnit 
trusts are admirably saited to 
naming PEP schemes, having 
been developed over foe last 50 
years to offer foe small inves- 
tor a simple and cost-effective 
way iff Investing in equities.*' 

Both sales and repurchases 
iff nnit trusts are increasing 
substantially with foe former 
confortably outstripping the 
latter. 

The gross writ trust sales 
figures for test month, which 
include sales of nnit linked 
insoance products, reached a 
record £655 million, almost 
twice the March 1985 level, 
and an increase of £90 million, 
on the February level which 
set the previous record high. 
Net new investment, that, is 
gyoss sales less repurchases, 
was 140.1 per cent up 

The number of unitholder 
accounts rose to 2j69 milli on. 
This, however, does not reflect 
the number of actual 
unitholders as many 
unitholders hold several unit 
trusts - 

The association does not 
publish figures on the number 
of unitholders, and foe number 
iff accounts has only recently 
recovered to Its previous high 
in 1973. 


Stock markets had another 
quiet day with share prices 
drifting on further profit-tak- 
ing. Institutions held back, 
deterred by the aftermath of 
mega-bids and foe pros- 
pects of a lengthening queue of 
rights issues. Selling was light 
and confined mainly to bid 
favourites. 

There was some sign of 
support towards the close and 
most prices finished above the 
worst. Government stocks 
continued to look forward to 
further interest rate cuts with 
modest rises of a quarter. 

The FT 30-share index fin- 
ished down 4.7 at 1.389.8. 
while foe FT-SE 1 00 lost 2.S to 
close at 1,665.1. 

Leading shares were mixed, 
with falls dominating. There 
was a lot of interest in 
Gnmness which picked up 4p 
to 31 Op (after initially falling 
to 298p) after the decision to 
hay back the majority cf its 
shares issued in the battle for 
Distillers. 

Asda-MFI rallied 6p to 
1 60p after weakness caused by 
a profits downgrading. How- 
ever. Glaxo remained on offer 
at i.OlOp, down 20p, still 
influenced by last week's 
downgraded forecast by 
Merrill Lynch. 

British Petroleum recov- 
ered 3p to 54lp. IC Gas was 
favoured on revived hopes of 
a bid from Petrofina, up 10p 
to 428p. 

Properties had several good 
features. Stock Conversion 
was hoisted 25p to 7Q5p on 
hopes of a full bid from 
Sioddey or P&O. 


Rosehaogb was wanted at 
S9Sp. up I Sp. ahead of today’s 
interim statement Takeover 
speculators were stimulated 
by a surprise and agreed offer 
from Emess Lighting for 
Rotaflex. Rotaflex jumped 
93p to jQJp. some 30p above 
the terms from Emess, 15p 
higher at 31 7p. 

in contrast. McCorquodale 
slumped 23p to 20Gp on the 
referral of the offer from 
Norton Opax. up 5p at I48p. 

Stores were dull after con- 
flicting reports on Iasi month's 
retail spending. Provisional 
government figures stated that 
sales had reached a record 
level, but the latest CRT survey 
was noi so encouraging. 

Shares in the sector took 
heed of the second view with 
GUS A leading the way down 
with a fall of 20p to’lOSOp. 
Next suffered a profits 
downgrading at 285p, down 
9p. while Laura Ashley at 


2 1 Op. down 5p. was nervous 
ahead of today’s preliminary 
results. 

Ben tails, which rejected 
Monday's surprise approach 
from Capital and Counties, 
slipped lip to I95p. Com- 
ment on Monday's results 
lifted Morgan Crucible I7p to 
290p. ^ ^ 

Aurora attracted revived 
speculative support at Sip. up 
5‘op. while Dnport at 125p 
and Metal rax lOOp improved 
around 6p on vague bid talks. 

But fading hopes of an offer 
left Weir Group Sp lower at 
13Sp. In banks Standard 
Chartered tumbled 30p to 
837p following a press report 
suggesting ih 2 t Lloyds' US 
credit rating would be hit if the 
offer succeeds. There is also 
no sign of a rumoured counter 
offer. 

Motor distributors did well 
with Kenning Motor, up 12p 
to 21 5p, on the Tozer bid 


situation. CD BraraalL, report- 
ing todav. gained lOp to 29 5p. 
St Ives Group was hoisted 50p 
to 8S0p following a 56 per cent 
earnings expansion, but disap- 
pointing profits sliced 4p from 
Cradlev Printing at 66p. 

BPCC shed 5p to 297p 
ahead of today's results. Deal- 
ers are looking for profits of 
around £25 million, up from 
£22.25 million last year. 

Chrysalis lost another 8p to 
I88p still overshadowed by 


last week's disappointing prof- 
its. Scnsa also failed to please 


‘RECENT' ISSUES 


EQUITIES 


am xm m v neopi 

Asntey |LJ |135aj 
EPP (16Gp| 
B:so*r7ioun! <160p) 

Cr - . an eery Secs (53p) 
Conv S’o A 2 WO 
Cranswc* M |=5p) 
Dieiane i:2Sp) 
Ferguson (J) OQpl 
God Gm Trot (1S5 d) 
Granyte Surface (56p) 
Inoeo (55p) 

JS Pathology Il63p) 
Jarws Porter n0£p) 
K'-earlcic [1 
Lee inti (iBOp) 

Lexrocn (tl£pj 
Lodge Care (70c) 
Macro 4 (lOSp) 

Men .rale M (ii5p) 
Nora/* Sys <90p) 
Really Useful (330o) 


223 *2 
210-5 
tS5 
253 
8 £ +2 
E3T'.'-'e 
103-5 
185 
29-1 
206 
85 
48 
285 
143 
no -3 
176-1 
suspended 
91 
143 
165 
116 
333 4-3 


SAC Inti (100c) 
SPP (125p) 
Templeton (21 5p) 


Stgmex (101p) 
Snowdon & 9 I97p) 
Spice (80p) 

Tech Comp (I30nl 
Underwoods ( 180 p) 
Wellcome (120pi 
W VorX Hosp (90p) 
WieMes (I40p) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 


Bensons Crisps N [P 
EIS Nfp 
Greycoat N/P 
Hartwells N/P 
Inti Leisure N IP 
NMW Comp F IP 
Share Drug N/P 
Turner & Newafl N/P 
Wares F/P 

(Issue price m brackets). 


9 

33 

2A8 +12 

4 -1 
365 
35 
35 +1 
148+1 


its. Scnsa also failed to please 
at 45p. down 5p. in spite of foe 
70 per cent profits advance. 

Martin Ford declined 14p 
more to 80p on suggestions 
that the rumoured bid will 
only be at around 6Sp per 
share. The shares have fallen 
34p in two days. Adamic 
Compoters climbed I8p to 
2?5p on news that the 
Peakhurst Corporation had 
increased its holding to over 
15 percent. 

Country Gentlemen's Asso- 
ciation was marked up 75p to 
lOOOp as bidder Bestwood 
increased its holding via a 
market raid to just under 15 
per cent. Hillard advanced 
another 12p to 235p. on 
dealers still hoping for an 
approach from one of the 
other big food retailing groups 
such as Dee Corporation or 
Sainsburv. 

Profit-taking knocked I5p 
from a recent speculative 
favourite. Stainless 
Metalcraft. Rank 

Organisation dropped 16p to 
53 1 p as de Zoete downgraded 
itsprofits forecast 


Olivetti buys Adler 


Wolfsburg, West Germany 
(AP-Dow Jones) — Volks- 
wagen has sold its 98.4 per 
cent equity stake in the West 
German office equipment 
maker. Triumph-Adler to 
Olivetti of Italy. 

No purchase price has been 
announced but. as part of the 
transaction. Volkswagen will 
take an initial 5 per cent stake 
in Olivetti, a Volkswagen 
spokesman said. 

Volkswagen and Olivetti 
have agreed to co-operation in 
foe areas of typewriters, office 
communication and mini- 
computers, foe spokesman 
said. 

The American activities of 
Triumph-Adler. now under 


Volkswagen of America, of 
Troy. Michigan, will also be 
taken over by Olivetti, the 
spokesman said. But Tri- 
umph-Adler North America, 
of Hartford. Connecticut and 
Pcrtec Computer Corpora- 
tion. of Los Angeles. Califor- 
nia. will remain part of 
Volkswagen of America. 

The sale ends weeks of 
speculation in Italian and 
West German financial mar- 
kets that Olivetti was acquir- ! 
ing Volkswagen's troubled 
office machine subsidiary. 

The agreement between 
Volkswagen and Olivetti is 
subject to ‘approval by anti- 
trust authorities io West Ger- 
many and Italy. 


• CRADLEV PRINT: Half- 
year to Dec. 31. 1985. Sales 
£4.81 million (£3.98 million). 
Pretax profit £482.000 
(£474.000). Earnings per share 
2.7p (2.5p). 


• DE LA RUE: in a circular on 
the acquisition of Bradbury 
Wilkinson, the board states that 
the results for the half-year to 
Sept. 30. 1985. show a slight 
drop by comparison with last 
time. The board still believes 
that the full year's results will 
compare favourably with the 
19S4-$5‘s record 

• CENTREWAY IN- 
DUSTRIES: No dividend for 
1985 (O.lp). Turnover £28.03 
million (£27.73 million). Pretax 
profit on ordinary activities 
£619.000 (£58.000). Earnings 
per share 2.8p C0.7p). 


• JULIANA'S HOLDINGS: 
Mr Oliver Vaughan, the chair- 
man. reports in bis annual 
statement that with the excep- 
tion of Superspon. the group's 
businesses have started the cur- 
rent year well. However, pros- 
pects for 1986 depend on the 
group's ability to turn round 
Supersport 

• BESTOBELL: Mr David 
Ingman. the chairman, reports 
in his annual statement that the 
company’s recovery is now well 
under wav. 

• SCOTTISH CITIES 
INVESTMENT TRUST: Halt 
year to March 31. 1986. Interim, 
dividend 7p (6p).The directors 
expect that the final will not be 
less than !7p (same).Revenue 
before tax £746.000 (£631.000). 
Earnings per share 14.5p 
(I2.4p). 


.advertisement; 


a Ql CCC CU 

' r lldd cd 


U fl Tt INC .V ... 07 CCC CU 1 1 
nu I LlllC * * I LCDDCD II 



Advanced 


w ^ II IDX fortfae 

counters radar detection Wkla "* 


Mount Pleasant airfield in foe 


Plessey scientists have prodneed 
a radar-absorbing plastic only 
half foe weight of foe previous 
types. 

Called AD RAM (advanced 
radar absorbent material) its 
low weight and its flexibility 
make it ideal foradhesion as flat 
sheetsormoulded components 
to aircraft, ships and military 
vehicles as radar camouflage. 

Studies by Plessey suggest 
that AD RAM can significantly 
reduce the reflection of radar 
waves. Aircraft, for example, 
could thus be made less visible 
to enemy radar, or radar- 
homing missiles, without their 
performance and manoeuvra- 
bility being restricted by excess 
weight Reduced radar signa- 
tures substantially enhance the 
effectiveness of all other elec- 
tronic counter measures. 

Plessey has been developing 
and producing radar-absor- 
bent and radar-transparent 
materials since 1947, for uses 
such as the suppression of 
unwanted radar echoes from a 
ship's own superstructure, and 
environmental protection of 
radaramennaeai early warning 
stations and airborne insiaiia- 


WithoutADRAM 


i>$ >>§»$> 




WHhADRAM 


! I * * 


u * » 


Falkland*; has been equipped 
with a new 600-fine Plessey 
communications system. 

An advanced Plessey IDX 
exchange now links into the fixed 
mflitaJT network of CDSS digital 
exchanges also supplied by 
Plessey. 

Plessey has a mqjor role at 
Mount Pleasant, where it was 
green-field-site surveyor, acted 
as system design authority, and 
installed and commissioned 
MoD equipment for which it also 
managed flight system trials. 

In addition, Plessey air traffic 
control radac surveillance radar 
and radio equipment are 
employed. 


Areas of recent research 
include radar-absorbing paints, 
ceramic and composite ma- 
terials, and injection-moulded 
materials for radar-absorbent 
structures and components. 

With A DRAM, Plessey has 
come up with its most signifi- 
cant new radar camouflage 
product veL 

The Ministry of Defence is 
showing considerable interest 
and similar interest abroad 
suggests that AD RAM has a 
five-year lead over western 
hemisphere competition. 


SEMICONDUCTORS 


WIN QUEENS AWARD 


Plessey Semiconductors has won the 1986 Queen's Award 
mm for Export Achievement - for its sales to 42 countries from 

1982101985. 

Most prominent in these exports was an increase of 
1586 nearly 300% to Japanand the Far East, while ihose lo the 

USA doubled. 


I niqiie fmauce package 
lor Plessey export order 


Plessey has won an export order 
worth approximately £20 million 
involving a unique financing 


It covers the supply of a 
Plessey AR-3D radar system to 
an existing Plessey customer 
and brings AR-3D sales world- 
wide to weli over twenty. 

The financing involved 
Plessey arranging a sovereign 
risk management package with 
a risk participation syndicate of 
eight banks, in double quick 
time. Ills a notable example of 
Plessey commercial acumen 
and foe City$ support for UK. 
exporters. 

AR-3D - in service with the 


RAFand on foe Fhlklands- was 
developed as a private venture 
by Plessey, and was the first 
three-dimensional system pro- 
duced in the UK: 

The most successful UK 
radar system in its dass. Plessey 
AR-3D has been regularly 
upgraded for export demands. 



Saks of hieh ipaSh iBlegralpd a nulls from Plessevare iDcrc2sns *orid»td»*. 

Despiteaggressivecompeti- lnradiocommunications,its 


lion from within the TJSA. sales doubled to nearly £14 
Japan and Europe, Plessey million worldwide, of which 


Semiconductors has susta ined over 90% were exports. 


its position as leader in many 
key markets. 


0 PLESSEY 


According to foe recent 
independent survey by Daia- 
quest, in 1985 Plessey Semicon- 


Technology 




iki-PIntn sxkM arutiDKzn mrls iitTneFftt,-, Cvmpffaplc. 


duaors had a faster sales 
growth in Europe than any 
other manufacturer of inte- 
grated circuits in the world. 

The company won its first 
Queen’s Award for Export 
Achievement in 1981, and its 
further expansion has led to 
an increase of over 200 jobs in 

the UK. 



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FINANCE and uniujjIKY 


THE 


TI MESWEDNESDAYAPRIL23_12S6 




COMM od,T1£S 


foreign exchanges 


n„ vrtji-Hj; ^srstSmStss- 


Shares were mixed in early 
trading yesterday, as prqfit- 
laking trimmed the excessive 
rise from Monday’s late rally 


tors also rose. 

Diebold led the 
stocks, down by -'a 


active 
to 44. 


< Mondays late raj* to 28 in 

by Woe chips and second^ ■ 

stocks pained J2J Shares ^ risen to record 


Dow Jones industrial average 
2.11 points to 


, hv n Bonus io levels in moderate trading on 

1^79 shortly afiw the mrrr- 

mSSLb is*™® ™®™- *he.trttppetit«t«t'krtl- w 

bered declining ones by seven reduction. 1 - 


Apr 

21 


Apr 

18 


ff 


Apr 

18 


AMR 

ASA 

Aik-yd & anal 
Allied Sirs 

Alls Cnimrs 
Alois 
Anar inc 
Am fda Hs 
Am B« ands 
An Brdcaat 
Am Can 
Am Cynm'd 

AmElP^r 
Am Express 
Am Home 
ArnHcwm' 
Am Motors 
Am Sl'nrd 
AmTeteph 
Amoco 
Arm co Sieel 
Asarco 
AsrianU 0* 
Ai Richfield 
Avon Prods 
BKrsTsl NY 
aarKamer 
BX of Bston 
Bank ol NY 


59 
37'. 
51 ’■ 
Jl'f 
S*J 
40'. 
Id*. 
19V.- 
85!. 
via 
74% 
69'': 

2a". 

65". 
88 '/. 
n ft 
*'i 
42’'. 
23% 
59% 
9". 
2: 
SO-.- 
53'.- 
33% 
50V. 
17'; 
38V. 
63' 


Beatrce F<» n/a 


Beth Steel 


Boeing 

Bse Cased 


Br«n 
Bg Warner 
Bust Myers 
BP 

Burl ion Ind 
Bjrt'ton Nrn 


Bunouans 
el) St 


Cmpoeli Sp 
Can Pacific 

CaierpJler 

Ceorvese 
Central SVV 
Champion 
Cnase Man 
Ctim Bt NY 
Chevron 
Chrysler 


Oncorp 
c Equip 


Clark 
Coca Cda 
Colgate 
CBS 

Clmtw Gas 
Cmotn Er ? 
Comwirn Ed 
Cons Ed*3 
Cn Nat Gas 
Cons Power 
Cntrl Data 
Commg Gi 
CPCIntl 
Crane 
Cm Zeller 
Dart A Kraft 
Deere 
Delta Air 
Detroit Ed 
Dronai Eq 
Disney 
DowCnem 
Dresser ind 
Duke Power 
Du Pvni 
Eastern Air 
Esrm Kodak 
Eaton Core 
Emerson El 
Evans Prod 


10 
58 th 
57’. 

6i ". 
23% 
80 ’; 

34 

39- 

71"; 

63 

58 

13’. 

52% 

206V 

32V 

27% 

49V 

55% 

38’i 

41% 

K'» 

23 

117 

39'. 

138% 

36*. 

36'. 

3*'+ 

45 

48% 

13% 

22% 

79". 

68 '. 

46% 

48% 

56 

34% 

46% 

18% 

162 % 

49% 

54 

18% 

42% 

78% 

8% 

59% 

73% 

91% 

n/a 


57 Vi 
37% 
51% 
41% 

5% 

41% 

14% 

82% 

n/a 

74% 

69"; 

27% 

65 

87% 

n/a 

A\\ 

43% 

24% 

59 
9 
21 % 
60% 
52' 
33% 
49'( 
17". 
38 
68 ' 

50 
18 
58% 
57 
61% 
28 
78". 
34' 
39% 
70% 
62' 
56% 
12 

53 
209 

32% 

26' 

48 

54 
37% 
4f '■ 
61% 
23 

113 
38% 
139 
37' 
36 


Exxon Com 

Fed Dpt Sis 

Firestone 

f=3tCh*«go 

FstWtBncp 

FslPennC 

Ford 

FTWacftva 
GAFCorp 
GTE Core 
Gen Corp 
G«n Dy’mcs 
Gen Qectnc 
Gen Ins 
Gen Mdls 
Gen Motors 

GnPbUtny 

Genesco 

GeoraiaPBC 

GJete 

Goodrich 


33 

44 
47% 
13% 
21 % 
79 
68 % 
4o% 
48". 
56'.- 
34% 
45% 
18% 
182% 
46 - 
53". 
18% 
*2% 
76 
8% 
56% 
72% 
90 
n/a 


me 

Grace 

GIAHSTac 
Grhnd 
Gruman Cor 
GuH&West 
Hama H.J 
Hercules 

H'letl-Pkrd 
Honeywell 
1C kids 
IngersoU 
inland Steel 
IBM 

Ini Harm 
INCO 
im Paper 
Int Tel Tel 
hvmgBank 
jhnsn & Jim 
Kaiser Alum 
Kerr McGee 
KmD'ty ClrX 
K Man 
Kroger 
LTV Corp 
Litton 
Lockheed 
Lucky Sirs 
Man H'nver 
ManjiUeCp 
Mapco 
Manne Mid 
Mrt Marietta 
Masco 
McDonnell 
Mead 
Merck 
MmsraMng 
MottitOri 
Monsanto 
Morgan J P. 
Motorola 
NCR Corp 
NL Indsirs 
Nat Disflrs 
Nat Med Ent 
Hat Smcndt 
Norfolk Stti 
NW&ancrp 
OcoomPet 
Ogden 
O&i Corp 
Owens-Ill 
Pac Gas El 
Pan Am 
Penney JG. 
Pennzoil 
Pepraco 


5flv> 

81% 

25% 

32S 

66 % 

8'i 

84ik 

44V. 

69% 

534 

74 

86 % 

79% 

21 
74* 
82% 
19% 
2% 
32% 
92 k. 
All. 
32% 
25* 
54* 
23% 
37% 
28% 
61 
434 
48% 
44% 
76% 
45'.. 
654 
24% 
154% 
n/a 
14% 
58% 
46% 
52% 
66% 
22 
28* 
86 % 
48% 
50% 
9% 

84% 

57 

26% 

56% 


f X 


434 
56 V. 
43 % 
59V. 
B8'.. 
49'. 
180 
105% 
29V. 
63 
87 
49% 
47% 
13% 
43% 

24% 

15% 

92% 

37% 

25". 

30 

44* 

75% 

23 


57% 
80% 
25% 
32% 

66 

8% 

83% 

44% 

68% 

S3'.; 

74V, 

86% 

77% 

20 % 

75 

81% 

19 

3 

32% 

91% 

42 
32% 

26 
53% 

24 
37% 
28% 
59’: 

42 
49% 
42V. 
76 
45% 
64". 
24% 
152% 
n/a 
15% 
5BS 
46 v 
52% 
65% 
22% 
28% 
84 
47% 
50V. 
9 
04 
5' 

28 % 
56 
7% 
41% 
55% 
42% 
58% 
90V; 
49% 
179 
103% 
23* 


Pfizer 
Phelps Dge 
Philo Mis 
PTi flips Pet 
Polaroid 
PPG md 

PrctrGmW 

PDSE4G 


RCA Corp 
RynWoMet 
Rockwell Int 

Royal Out cn 

Safaways 
Sara Lee 
SFESopac 
SCM 

Schl'barger 

Scow Paper 

Saagrwn 

Sears RBck 

Shed Trans 


63'.. 

28% 

69* 

10% 

62% 

64S 
75% 

38% 

64* 

64% 

47% 

48% 

78* 

40% 

62% 

38 V, 

■& *8 

59 59% 

59* 59V. 


63% 

28 

ea:i 

10% 

62% 

64* 

75* 

37% 

64% 

64% 

47'/. 

47* 

76’/. 

39 

61% 

36 


CTEHUMG spot »WO fobwahp rates 


Veritas clow* 10 I ^cojoanr 


Mortal rates 
day’s rxnoe 

N York fEnS-15235 
Montreal 2. moi-2-;ig 
/yns 0am3.75l i-a.WZ' 
HnKsers 67.94-68.W 

rEgan 1 2^670- 1^ 94 
DtSm 1.09S-1- W 99 
Rw*turt3jMOT^g 

IM iStlfSS 

227M4-229059 
105739-10.6353 
IO^M-1 0.6347 
STlMn toSia.7798 
Tokyo SiTMSMO 
Vienna §3.21-23-19 

Zunch 2.7863- 2J93Z 


MartafimWS 


Madrid 

NUanM 

Oslo 

Pans 


^SI&TSlS 
2 1001-2.10® 
3.754M.76Q3 

6754-88.06 

12^MW?57 

1 0977-1.0967 

3 3230-3 .3274 

208.72-219.46 

eil 52-211.81 

227934-22^11 

105739-105860 

10JSS38-10.6116 

10.7130-10.7353 

256.75-257.14 

23J1-232S 

2.7868-2.7909 


0 5543^2pfem 
0^24.l2prem 
2-t*pn*n 

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frISde 

VA*l%pwn 

160*40044 

20-60d« 

2-0d» 

2%-2%«s 

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■i-irifia 

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l3%-ll%P rBm 

m-1Kptom 


sntooun. 
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430-114548 

lOfrlGOds 

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7%-9%dto 

7Xr-6%prom 

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30V26%prom 

aw-anipreni 


atenins ^ — - ,-rtTft — eschaw* 

«r— — 
■^^^VTSS S' 

quiet session offer ■!>' fa » Wt JgJfS 

m Monday. B^= 5 BW 

March ' .no r.QH.0 


OTHER STERLING - _ 1 ”fl^ 



Brazil cruzado ' n TMO41.7660 

r.«on> rtfsdtma — — s, am 


148MS 

Deo 15J0-17 

153fr35 

May — owwil 


Sterling 


Wrt compared «*.1975w»*»m 


XlSMMftW 75 * 7 *- 7 *- 


Greece drad*™- — rT^ii-837 *S»-— T“ 

Hong Kong doltar , .^tBoelW uj? - 

inrun ruoee — — n/a *“■ 


■rr:rs :1 ^ 


moia rupee 
IraqiSnar 


r.!“0.43454J, 


MARKETS -AND GOLD 


KowattdBWW 3 3.58®-3-3761 

____ Malays* dollar 760X^810.0 

-.,w Mexico p«0—-— 2J660U2.6712 

New Zealand doter 

— Saudi Arabia rtyal 3 3094-3-31 47 


COFFS 
May. 


2257-56 

— 2312-H 


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ggpf “' 2410^395 

2450-M 


ISSSJiiov, 

House 12% 


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DMcount Market Loan# *- 
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2mSS 10% 

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SpegjjCorp 


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47* 

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98* 

21 V. 

31% 

53% 

45* 

46% 


48 

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95 V. 

21% 

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3mnth 10*«> 6mn0» 10 w 


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7 days 4 | »i*-t”i» 
3imTBi 4%-4% 
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7 days 7*-7% 

3 ninth 7%-7% 
Swiss Franc 

7 days 8V6% 

3 ninth 4 3 «-4'i» 
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105 Z 
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110.4 

1015 
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Mon# 

May 

Juno 

July 

Aug - 

Sept 


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Onc'ted 1865-^ 
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Unq'tad 1Bl5 
’’-tlnq'tcd 16! 3 


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S».:;- IBM 



2.17702-1790 


Australia wmn.13890 


_ 1 -3BBO-1 W 

~ 7^72^-7.0775 


Dec. 
Feb — 
April _ 


LT-ZS.O 

12934S-B 


SierfngDro 46% 
SwrwsJP 34* 

W9* 350% 
37 * 36% 

32% 32 


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Overnight OP»> 11’/* C^B 
1 lenwii I1%-11% ormtth 9 .■« 
iSSS lOVlO* 9 mnth 9%-®% 
3 mmh I0 3 io-10 , i 


Norway- — — g.iC25-8.107| 

Denmark 2.1905-2-1918 

West Germany 8380-1^370 

Switzerland 9*720-2.4735 

"^7^6^25 

Francs 169.48-1 69-58 


Vat 

GAS CM. 

May 

June. 


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137 .50-37 .25 


“ 1 2225-22- OT 


gold 


I2rmti 9%-0'n 

L^AumccrtyDapo^T*-^ 


Gokt$34525-345.75 


Teledyne 
Tennaco 
Texaco 
Texas ECw 

Texas mst 
Texas UtUfr 
Textron 
TraxtrsCor 
TRW Inc 
UAL Inc 
UnrtwIW 
Un CarDKJe 
Un Pac Cor 
Utd Brands 
US Steel 
Utd Techno! 
Unocal 
jan Walter 
yilnw LmW 


12mth 9% 


7 days 

T moth 10% 

6 mnth 9% 

31 32% ' 

136% 135% 

34% 34 J - 

64* 64% 

1! I! Iissswa 

174* 172* 1 6 mnth 9*-9*'i2 I2mtn 


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Zl7TT*y7%° 

Hong Kong 146.50-147^0 

Porfigal — 133.65-1 33. 8C 

Spam> 1533-15.44 

Austria — 


juj, iEoo.g^ 

Aug l2 SSO®.W 

Sept 12560-25.00 

Oct — 128.00-25.CO 

Nov 13600-26.00 

to? ZZT. 135-OCFKOO 

Jan — — ■wic3 

vot 


Tone — 

SM-VSt LARGE 

voi ua 

Tone — . — 


LONDON GWUHFUTUHES 

EporBjnna 


Month 

a. 


S8.VS1 SMALL 334 (^335.0 

SL-r====:» 


Jan 

March 

Volume: 


Owe 

11T.S5 • 
11835- 
101.70 
104 711c 
107 JS 
now 


DM 

11255 


9980 
imno 
*0G2 5 
10690 


ALWBHWM 7955-7965 Wheal 

S* S55S- r 79I WW-5. Barter 


15; fi 
1126 
1185 
1535 
1646 
vot 1429 


UFFEX 

RRLftwg M FB UW» Ud 

Apr 86 SSSSO 
S&s eeao-6420 

0096 736.0-7340 

St97 7530-7403 
Apr 87 -8250-^-0 
j?JB7 ' 740 0-7250 
37 825 0-8100 

Sr 88. 8550-&5.Q 


Close 

675.0 
6475 
7370 
7425 
8090 

735.0 v 
8130 
8275 


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INVESTMENT lRUSTS 


SSMSC 

3 mnth 10%-IOH 
9 mnlh 9V.-8* 


Bond9(%) 

2 mnth 10*-ip«'i 
6 mnth 9’V9% 
12mth 9%-S% 


•Excludes VAT 


ECGD 


wells Fargo 
tse B 


Wstghse 

Weyemser 

Whirlpool 

Woolwonh 

Xerox Corp 

Zenith 


24% 

52% 

23% 

20 % 

53% 

22 * 

47% 

56* 

94* 

56% 

37% 

75* 

80% 

60% 

26% 


24* 

53% 

23% 

19% 

53% 

22* 

47% 

56 

95* 

56% 

37'i 

75% 

80% 

60% 

25% 


? tafssis* MstiHsi 

6 mnth &S5-650 12 mtti 6.65^.60 


Fixed Rate StarUng Jgtport 

WSaS 11 . 677 6 P®r 

cent 


1:6 N DO N-:F1N A NG(AU;- 


Three Month Shrfng 

Jun 86 


SepM 

Dec 86 

Mar 87.-.. 


J£1 

91^2 

9131 

91.32 

91.18 

r*rL 


CANADIAN PRICES 


63* 

86 

47% 

46* 

13S 

43% 

24* 

13% 

91* 

37* 

25* 

29% 

44% 

76% 

22 % 

6* 

71% 

50* 


n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 


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Commco 
ConBathrst 
GuitOil 
Hkr/SidCan n/a 
Hdsn BUn n/a 
Imasco "/a 
Imperial 04 n/a 
In Pipe n/a 
Mass-Ferg n/a 
Ryl Trustee n/a 
Seagram n/a 
Steal Co n/a 
Himsn N - A n/a 
Wlkr Hiram n/a 
WCT 


25% 

43* 

18% 

n/a 

17% 

12* 

28* 

%: 

32% 


Jun 87 

PSfajfVSSSW-hrt 8 . 

Jun 86 — — 

Sep 86 


30.65 

91^6 

9157 

9157 

91-21 


Low 
9Q57 
91.20 
91 JO 
9125 
91.17 


O0M 

90.50 

9120 

91.80 

9129 

91.17 

91.04 


Dec 

Mar 87 

US Treasury Bond 

Jun 86 

Sep 


93.48 

9353 

93.41 

93213 


103-24 

m 

N/r 


93.54 g-g 

93.60 9353 

93 45 

9323 93^3 

Previous! 
104-14 103-12 


interest 19146 
1972 

93.54 1525 

93.41 104 

93-18 

interest 8063 
103-12 ' 

102-17 0 

101-24 0 


Short GW 

Jun 86 — 


45% 


Sep 

Dec 


104-00 

104-30 

N/T 


Previous 1 
104-00 11- 

iSEao 104-30 


BIT {gSI 


Sep 

Dec 86 — 


Mar 87 ..— 
FT-SE100 
Jun 86 .- 


Previous days to* 31 ', 

,2&3 ° S& 128-11 102 
128-10 0 
128-10 0 

i*s total ooen Interest 1843 


129-03 


168.00 ‘IB^S 


Previous! 


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168.85 168 55 


«sr 

19950 



Bd Cite 


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1250 VKL» 
953 101 30 
181 9 194 jc 
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1071 v*m 
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258.7 2768 


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CS FUND MANAGERS 

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48.0 K-1 

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2224 2357 
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2489 2083c 
2608 2687 
822 886 
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198.7 213-7 
4174 448.6s 
3284 3^3 
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4212 44U 
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538 582c 
302 322 
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1012 1039 
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131 7 1403 
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1009 1073 
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660 703# 
113-6 1202 
147.1 1574 


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174 1 164 5# 
147 7 1 57 1# 


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01-621 0011 

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289 0 3091# 
Nonh*Anwn(an 279 * 2389. 


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FiE««w«»oro 

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01-838 5050 
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|E«l'Amer 


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BARRINGTON MANAGEMENT 

ie Fentauron Sl London S3 
01-523 BMP 


-J6 017 
203 
025 
0*2 
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-03 171 


l2Cn 1BJ 
80 3 92# 
l«i "17 
1980 1583 
S5.1 ® 7a 

1£T7 1X5 
1911 1971 
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172 i 105' 

2CS9 ai |e 
£107 222 2c 
47 7 !C S 
552 MS 
1155 121 7# 

130 2 !»? 

7*sB 756 
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-1 2 0 22 
-C8 5 74 
-8.7 1.74 


1068 1164c 
1857 1»6 
20 4 218# 

309 330 
135 3 144 7 
142.5 1472# 

918 9*6 
7-a3 2*2.8 
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l^aia CnewrMn. Oouaiwr 0i53 TIO 
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708 
700 
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57 3 
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558 US 
482 516 
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509 5*5 
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1145 122-8 
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28 5 296# 


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UK H^l Me MC 
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755 
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788 
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61 1 


265 

2.6S 

-02 1*8 
-02 502 

1 44 

-1.0 083 
•01 1 11 
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atm* C+ntre. He«a»n House. 20. Western 
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101.0 1090 


1539 1030 
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136* 1441 
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47 4 506 
524 559 
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283 8 3085 
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5Z73 583.0 
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193 5 2069 
64 0 682# 

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102 7 '099 
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1008 11850 
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60.1 B41# 

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575 601 
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359 360 


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Hong Kong 

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8?xm4lSM 


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595 829# 
789 850 
999 1083# 
729 779# 
1019 1089# 


*63 041 
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+021 454 
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-03 334 
-09 35* 
.. 7.4$ 
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46-1 894 
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♦14 219 
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433 463 

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BS.7 685 
815 8*4a 
385 413 
9*7 1013 

56.1 sail# 
184-3 '97.1 
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88/ ma 
855 61.1# 
1106 1173# 
76J 009 
105.7 1J30C 
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97.0 103.T 
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162.1 1723 


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Au xtrafn 

Canrnnoiy 


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Da Accum 


1180 1244 
2875 2821# 
1123 1179 
528 50 5# 
101.7 1025# 


-19 291' 
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rt mo ntti. 

_ 1 im Wednwdavoi 

SsSSfiSafisUsS 

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Wadrusdoy & month. t«i 

an&©Sfii* 

(C6) 2nd Tuesday d montn. 













m$ mwkm;* 

te4fgg#M: 

v 1 : r S -'?<V-1'': . v;V? t : : 


(«+;*■.*■: 


ips 

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for example. This latest and largest 
flying bus shuttles between 
London and Frankfurt more than 


40 times a week. 

Catch a bus to Frankfurt 
Lufthansa. 


Lufthansa is proud of the European 
Airbus. Great Britain makes a sig- 
nificant contribution - the wings, 









m n tivitv * irmn.. 1004 - _ 


26 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 




19 9 6 


Scottish, English 
and European 
Textiles pic 


Manufacturers of high quality Scottish 
woolen goods congratulate their two 
subsidiary companies who have each been 
honoured with the QUEENS AWARD 
FOR EXPORT ACHIEVEMENT 1986. 


GLEN CREE LIMITED 

Scotland’s foremost manufacturer of 
Mohair products, have attained the Award 
for the first time. 


KENNETH MACKENZIE 
HOLDINGS LIMITED 

Scotland’s largest producer of Harris 
Tweed, has now become the first Scottish 
Woolen manufacturer to reeice the Award 
three times ________ 


UNILEVER N.V. 

Rotterdam The Netherlands 
ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING OF SHAREHOLDERS 


OnWodnesrfar MthMiy. T988« 10.30am i r> ths TO a. erf the -ConearHwi 

Congreagebouw da Ooctsn*. entrance KrvnpNW, SO. Rotterdam 


AGENDA 


i. 


OviwJerstoon ©» the ArmueJfteoort tar the 1985 firmnewl year wbmHwd bv tho Board 
Of Directors. 

2 . Appro iml and adoptian of the Annuat Accounts And dppnioristion or the profit for the 

tSBS financial year 

3 Appomtment at tha members of the Board of Directors- 

4. Ap a yntmonf qf Auditor*. 

5. DwBflnadon.m accordance wtthArdctes 98 end B6o of Booh 2 of the Netherlands Civil 
Code, of the Board of Directors settle company body awnortsedtn reapeex of tha Issue 
Of ah area in the Company. 

6. AutftonMtKm.in accor0ane*wHhArttc!e98a1 Book2oltheMethettentfsCi«<iCode. 
of the Board of Chrectors to purchase shares at the Company and trust certrficatBS 
therefor. 

the apmaa. me Reoon and accounts tor 1885. rogarher Amt me Report of UteAudnors and 
the further dacuntemabon penatnuifl to tne Aaenda are avaiahie for napecuon bv shareholders 
and hodere of certificates esued DvHV Nedariandscn Aommietrathr <?*> T>\js»jntoor at We 
Company’s office. Burg i Jacoopinn 1. Rorteroam. and at the other of W Bank mentioned bdiwc 
ivnere cowes may he ooramed tree c* charge . 

(A) Holders at bearer diares or sutvshama washing io attend the meennq echer <n pn«n or 
bv W’lrv appt wwed in itnnra must deoow inw sham certificates end sub-snare 
certificate* bv Wednesday. 7th May. 1986 ai me Company * ot*«a or at the c*Ve « me 
Mcflarw Bank pic. Manner House. Pwovs Street. Condon EC3N 4 DA or any of ns branches. 
Upon production of the mcarpt then esuod to them such holders «if» t» adrnmad to me 
meet ng 

101 HuV/irs of lerjaered shares tor which cernticsiK Have been esued m anortier form and 
hrftipra of boofied shares waning ro attend the meenpg ertner m person or by (rosy 
aoDomted to wnbng neat notify The Company of mi intention by tetter staling the 
number, of the Share o-iifcaSK or ol the bouiuncp tor the snares, weacn mot reach 

unlrver N«f Piatrtrv 6Httden en Coupons Burqem^aky sJsoobpWei 1. HaRCfuam. 
Tns Netnertanas. dv Wadnasday. 7th May. 1386. 

(C) Holders at certificate* tor sfiareain Un*e»e* NV issued ov N v NeoeitanpKhaorninqtrafiren 
Trusts impor ol amvunjjin. -[aedaminist certrhcmes'. wsnmp to attune in. nwei-ng wnnout 
W kind pari m ihevonng mug duooai sucncertincarespy wodnesday 7 th Man 1366 at any 
0 » tfieC'ihcesmennijneain iAiaBo»e UbonprociOonol tne receipt menisVjeatothom.SuCP 
Ne&wntrusi cor-.rficKeriotaws rnfibe Bdmrea torn*, meyfing. 

(Ol Hattr-i or certificates for snares m Unit** MV issued by NV Nedcrtandsdi 
Aamnetratie- an Irusrka-nocr in the name o' Mkho^o Bank Trust Com pan. Lonneo tor 
in its fanner name Mound Ban. Euccutor i"d 1r.,rr% Company Limuedi. 'su&snare 
cerTificnres' HSMiq to arrerd riv. moeixfi g wirmaut iv^a atn a me vomc iww aeoert 
suen suo-share curuficatrs with MsMnd Bank px 3 v WMVxnday 7th May, 1986. noon 
production at the tecetpl then esuud to them suen suo-srar. cerohcata noloers «dl be 
adnurred fc the meetinq 

lE> « holaers of ifnr certificates mentioned c |C) and |D> apou. msh to enfcae norng ng*ns 
at the m*rang cilher in perepn or bv o*t)«v soowmad « wrrmq NV. Neoettanoscn 
Admmsniire- en Truwkaniocr nf encriarqe suen rerrnoates tree of cnartje fix OTWVJI 
shares, wdi 4 wV> now m me names ctl Such nokfe'S at ns on” office (such otficy being 
the oesu^Wed place of deoomt m the event) and erefonga die tame aoaai ahfcf the 
meeting free of charge for Neoannrusi cerf cares to be issuOO to su4« homery n 
accordance wuh die conditions ol admoicinroon at mese certificates for such purposes 
homers must bv Ibeaday 6th May. 1988: 

surrender their cefflftcaie* for FI 20 w a mufriph thereat I but. *i the use ol 
armhcaies *or 7% cumutanve prererence shares, reonesenrwt a ictei normnst amount of 
FHOOu or a RMfhple thereotl to NV Neoerianoscn AOmaustraue- en Tresikantoor. 
NZ Voorburgwal 326-328 AmswrOam. and-or 

surrender thor sub-duro certificates lor FI 13 nominal amount or mulmtas thereof, 
leprwensng a iotj) nominal amount c-f at toast FI 60 per cuss n*/t n me caw at 
sub-wvnra certificares for TZ cumulative pre'erenoe shares, rapresennng a total nommal 
amount of FI 1.000 cr a muinple thereof) to Mound Bank pic. 

The certificate* so turrandared must be accompanied by a fonti obtafnabM ha* of charge 
from NV Nrdwtonoscti Adronisirawe- en Trusdcaniopr. Am&ertum. and Midland Bank pt 
London Upon production of the ircwTO then issued by N V Neoertandsch Admu>etralie- en 
Trustkantoor and Midland Bant pic respectrrefv the h_Jders witt be adimOed la hie meemg 
The recMtl issued by UMLsnJ Bank pic for sub-share corP/icafes so surrerdered 
incorporates a two-way prere torm 

THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS 


Opec seeks to win 
back lost markets 


Geneva (Reuier) - Opec's 
decision io set modest limils 
to its oil production will have 
little immediate impact on 
world prices but is pan of a 
wider plan io regain control of 
markets, analysis here said 


yesterday. 
Ten of l 


Ten of the 13 oil ministers 
of ibe Organization of Petro- 
leum Exporting Couniries 
agreed on Monday on produc- 
tion ceilings for Hie resi of this 
year. 

In the quarter beginning 
July 1, they will aim for 16.3 
million barrels per day {bpd) 
and in the final quarter 17.3 
million, with each member 
adjusting its production ac- 
cording to a formula yet to be 
devised This compares with 
current output estimated at 
between 1 7.3 and 1 7.5 million 
bpd. 

Although the result ap- 
peared meagre after a iwo-part 



and induce a gradual switch 
back to oil from other energy 
sources. 

With colossal crude oil re- 
serves and small populations. 
Saudi Arabia and Kuwait can 


afford to play a long game, 
analli 


Dr Subroto: acceptable 
price S18 to $20 
each coumiy’s quota, enlist 
the cooperation of non-Opec 
producers and stop competing 
unfairly with each other as 


they have done in the past 
“If they 


conference covering 1 6 days of 
‘ three 


ng 
corn- 


debate, and although 
states — Iran, Libya and 
.Algeria — angrily dissociated 
themselves from the majority 
decision, most Opec members 
saw it as the first step in a 
long-term plan to push prices 
back to “an acceptable level” 
while ensuring a fair share of 
the market for Opec. 

The Indonesian oil minis- 
ter, Dr Subroto, defined the 
acceptable price level as $ 18 to 
$20 a barrel, compared with 
present levels of little more 
than $ 1 1 after this year's sharp 
plunge. 

But analysts agreed that 
such a level was at least 
several months away, and 
would be achieved only if the 
Opec ministers could settle 


to 


really mean it and 
can really do it they will resain 
control, but it’s not somi 
they can do in a day” 
tnented one analyst 

Traders appeared to 
and prices were up only _ _ 

50 cents a barrel yesterday 
from their levels before the 
majority accord was 
announced. 

The defeat of the three 
minority states, which wanted 
to slash production and force 
up prices immediately, meant 
most states had gone along 
with the “low price, high 
market share** strategy of the 
rich Gulf states, and especially 
Saudi Arabia. 

Analysts agreed that the 
Gulf states believe low prices 
will force some of the higher- 
cost non-Opec producers out 
of the market, discourage new 
exploration and development. 


But smaller and poorer 
Opec producers are under 
increasing economic strain, 
and appear to have argued 
successfully for a modest Iimtt 
to output in order to restore 
prices sooner. _ . 

Ecuador's oil minister. Se- 
ctor Javier Espinosa Teran, 
told reporters: “We have sacri- 
ficed tremendously (in accept- 
ing the lower price stategy).- 1 
don't think we can go on very 
much longer.'*' 

His country is openly pro- 
ducing far above its official 
quota and does not intend to 
cut back by very much. Sever- 
al other countries, notably 
Iraq - which wants virtually 
to double its present 1.2 
million bpd quota — are 
seeking higher output, and 
almost none is willing to cut 
unless all the others do. 

This dilemma leaves fertile 
ground for dispute both before 
and at Opec’s next meeting in 
Brioni, Yugoslavia, on June 

Senor Espinosa summed up 
the intentions of the agree- 
menu “The market share 
strategy will eventually pro- 
duce two effects — maintain- 
ing at least current Opec 
‘ligher 


production with hig 
prices.” 

But if the compromise fails, 
the ministers know th3t Saudi 
.Arabia has the power to 
swamp world markets with 
cheap oil. 


US tariff 
threat 
to Scotch 
whisky 


By David Young 

The Scotch Whisky Associ- 
ation has attacked an Ameri- 
can proposal to increase 
duties on selected imports 
from the EEC including 
Scotch whisky, in retidiatjoo 
for increased tariffs feeing US 
con* products entering Spain. 

Among the com products is 
American Boar bon whiskey, 
and the US has said that, as 
Spain is now an EEC member, 
the retaliation wfil affect a 
range of similar EEC 
products. 

The US has said that, if no 


1, it will notify the 

Agreement of Tariffs and 
Trade that it wiB inoease 
tariffs. 

Sales of Scotch whisky in 
America are worth £350 mfl- 
1km a year, and increased 
tariffs could lead to foiling 
Sato? and job fosses .in 
Scotland. 

The Scotch Whisky Associ- 
ation has told the US trade 
policy staff committee in 
Washington: “Scotch whisky 
exports to the US are too large 
in volume and value to make it 
an appropriate article for re- 
taliation. Action against it 
would have a disproportionate 
effect on British trade with the 
US.” 

Mr Bill Bewsher, director- 


m Edinburgh: “ft is totally 
Blogkal to punish Spain by 
penalizing Scotch whisky. 


Norton 
sent for referral 


Norton Opax'sT! 10 million 
bid for McCorquodale has 
been referred to the Monopo- 
lies and Mergers Commission; 
it was announced yesterday. 
The grounds of the reference 
are that the combined group 
would have an estimated 46 
per cent of the personalized 
cheque printing market. 


McCorquodate has about 36 
cent or 


per cent of the British cheque 
printing market and Norton 
Opax ms about LI percent U 
is understood that the cheque 
customers — rite itig clearing 
banks -toW the Office of Fair 
Trading tbai they were unhap- 
py about the potential 
takeover. ■ - - 

The board of Norton Opax 


By Alison EadS e 

said it was surprised and 
disappointed. There was spec- 
ulation in the market that the 
company bad been about to 
race its bid when the reference 

was announced. . 

Mr John Hoiloran. manag- 
ing director of McCquqnJale, 
said he was not s urpris e d at 
the reference. He added that 
McCcrquo date had anyway 
been confident of defending 
itself against the bid . 

Norton's merchant bank ad- 
viser, Samuel Montagu, would 
not be drawn on whether they 
were trying to get the bid 
through the Monopolies Com- 
mission by agreeing to sell off 
parts of the business to reduce 
die competitive pveriap. " 


Brake on car rentals 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


Lower rates of growth in 
both the car and van rental 
markets are being forecast for. 


overall 


cent in the value 
market last year. : “ " 

This emerges from the latest 
survey by Bndgftt Rent a Car, 
one of the six bigger renters in 
Britain, i nc orp or ating re- 
search by the British Market 
Research Bureau and Mimel, 
both market researchers. > 

The overall market, valued, 
at £380 million last year, is 
expected to increase by 6.5 per 
cent this year to £405 xoiOron. 

Car rentals rose 11 percent 
to £300m last year and an 
increase of 6.6 per cent is 
being looked for this year. 


which would value the market 
ai £320 mittron. 

' The van rental market was 
worth £80 snilfion last vear, 
showing a.14 per cent rise on 
the previous year. This year it 
is. expected to rise to £85 
roifiioa,- a 62 per cent 
: increase.: • ' • • • 

Business users account for 
60 per cent of demand in car 
.rental . Business users rate the 
aS-incJnsive package, where 
the cost is dear, as the most 
important fetor when.choos- 
inga rental company. 

■ The total size of : the car 
renfel- fleet u estimated at 
betwwta. 100,000 and 1 1 5,000 
vehicles. Between 23.000 and 
3Z0OO vans are also estimated 
to be available for rcmd. 


Commercial Bank of Wales 
announces that its base Rate has 
been reduced., from 11% to 10V£% on 
the 22nd April 1986. 


Interest payable on Demand 
Deposit Accounts will be at the 
net rate of 6% per annum - 
equivalent to a gross rate of 
8.45% p.a« to base rate taxpayers. 



Commercial 
Bank of Whies 

FLC 


BANC MASNACHOL CTMBU 
Head Office: 114-116 St Mary Street, Cardiff CF1 1XJ 


Greyhound 
poised 
for London 
listing 



By Cliff Fettham 

The Greyhound Corpora- 
tion, best known for spewing 
travellers across foe United 
States, is steering its shares to 
foe London Stock Exchange as 
part of its campaign to expand 
its financial services business 
in Britain. 

Greyhound, with a stock 
market value of SL6 billion 
(£1.05 billion) already num- 
bers some big London institu- 
tions among its shareholders, 
and foe planned London list- 
ing — bong sponsored by the 
bankers, Goldman Sachs — 
should stimulate interest in 
the stock. 

Greyhound, which has op- 
erated in Britain since 1967, 
provides loans for invest- 
ments in property as well as 
for the commercial and indus- 
trial sector. It has 4.200 con- 
sumer loans outstanding, but 
it is particularly keen to 
expand its links with small 
businesses. 

The chairman, Mr John 
Teets, said : “In foe last two 
years our business in foe UK 
has grown by 78 percent. We 
can see tremendous growth in 
foe area of second 
and in providing finance 
small firms.” 

But he ruled out any expan- 
sion in Greyhound’s tradition- 
al area. “We have no thoughts 
of breaking into bus servjoes 
here. It is already too well 
catered for." 


APPOINTMENTS 


Alfred Booth Group Mr 
Roger dark has been named 
as managing director of foe 
group and of its principal 
operating subsidiary. Unit 
Construction Company. 

William Dawson (Hold- 
ings): Mr Bryan lagleby has 
been made group technical 
director. 

Trevor Bass Associates: Mr 
Cass Robertson has become a 
director. 

Boulton & Paul: Mr David 
Chenery has been made mar- 
keting director. 

Space Planning Services: 
Mr John Ewan has joined as 
finance director. 

National Westminster 
Bank: Sir Leslie Young is to be 
a director of foe bank and 
chairman of foe bank's north 
regional board. 

CUfford-Tumen Mr Ed- 
ward Pitt, Mr Keith Ross, Mr 
Nefl Harvey, Mr Mkhael 
Ehrlich, Mr Rupert Hill, Mr 
David Jones-Parry. Mr Mi- 
chael Cuthbert, Mr NeH Addi- 
son, Mr Alas Bryson, Mr 
Michael Frandes, Mr David 
Read and Mr Christopher 
Johnson are to become 
partners. 




With effect from 23rd April, t£86 
for new borrowers, and from 1st June 
fore?dstingboriowaisf ~ : 
theNatWest MortgageRate 
payable under current Mortgage Deeds 
and 1 Conditions of Offerwfll tie decreased 
from 12.00% p.a. to 1100% pA 


Time far easting Jiornmn until 30th ApriL- 13JOO% pa. and fram isC Mey u? iW Map EZOOte pM- 


A National Westminster Home Loans Limited 

' 41 Loihbury, London EC2P2BB“ : . 


This notice is issued in compliance with the requirements of the Council of The Stock Exchange 


GREAT PORTLAND ESTATES P.L.C. 

(Incorporated in England under the Companies Act 1948. Registered No. 598137} 


Issue by wey of placing of £25,000,000 nomipaf of 
9.5 per cent 

First Mortgage Debenture Stock 2016 at £97.963 per cent 


(Payable as to £25 per £100 nominal on acceptance 
and as to the balance on or before 24th October. 1988) 


I Application has been made to the Council of The Stock Exchange for the whole oftbe above! 
• Stock to be admitted to the Official List. 


In accordance with the requirements of the Council of The Stock BccbangeEH^rnlUion nominal of) 
(the Stock is available in the market on the date of publication of this notice. 


Particulars of the Stock are contained in Listing Particulars wfcicti wifl be circulated in the Extei 
{Statistical Service. Copies may be obtained from the Company Announcements Office of The 
Stock Exchange, London during normal business hourson24thind 25ih ApriJ,1986 and until 7th 
May, 1986 (Saturdays and public holidays excepted) from: • V 


Baring Brothers & Co., Limited 
8 Bfsbopsgate, 

London EC2N4AE 


23rd April, 1986 


Great Portland Estates P.LC. 
Knighton House, 

56 Mortimer Street, 

London WIN 8BD ‘ 


CasanovaS Co. 

12 Token ho use Yard, 
London EC2R7AN ; 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


.10.50% 


Mam & Company 11.00% 

BCC1 11.00% 

Citibank Sawnosf 11.95% 


Consotitiated Onto 11.00% 

Continental Trust ..10.50% 

Go-orerffivfl Bank 1050% 

C, Ho»e & Co 10.50% 

LLqyds Bank 10,50% 

Nat Westminster 10.50% 


Royal Bank ot Scotland 1050% 

TS3 10.50% 

Cflttank NA 10.50% 


t Mcrtpge Bb» Rate. 


m 



Vi 



Notice to Account Holders. 


■ Gross 
interest 

Midland Savings Accounts - ~ ; •' - 

Net 

interest - 
%pj<i 

' ^Gross ' 

Equivalent 

to a Basic . 

- Bate 
Taxpayer 
%pa 

With effectfrom 2tst April 1986 > 

. ■' 

6.35 

Deposit Account • 

IO 


9.36 

Monthly Income Account _ 



9.03 

Griffin Savers ; 

6.75- 

Ol 

7.02 

8.03 
9.16 

Saver Plus 
£100+ 

£500+ “ 

£1000+ 

5.25 

6.00 

6.85 


With effect from 19th May 1986 


6.35 

Save and Borrow 

credft balances 


■ 


\ 



Midland Bank 

•••• Midland Bank pic, 27 Poultry, London EC2P 2BX 




J 












THE TIMES WEDNESDAY .APRIL 23 1986 


% 


. " ■x'.v'S 

s' XI "ill; 





3$ . 




■h\>- 
gjTS? • 




: ?’£'<£ 


. 


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v-% ; 








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Sib. ■■■*%:■ 





'*■ ^ i\i 


-mm0H 

fc. ' 5i : *; 


Thanks to the Spanish nose, 
we can enjoy 

the sweet smell of success. 

When the world thinks of sherry it nat- 
urally thinks of Jerez. 

” Which is why we at Allied-Lyons have 

invested millions in that particular region over 
the last few years. 

The vineyards, bodegas and wineries we 
acquired have given us two main advantages. 
^ Firstly, they make us 70 per cent self- 
sufficient in sherry. 

AjjfvV Secondly, and probably more 

) important, with all those vineyards, 

* bodegas and wineries come the skill 

' . and expertise of the Spanish. 

Now we’ve the finest quality sherry 
in the quantities we need. Without any 
Jr worries about supplies we can attack with 
confidence the highly profitable world market. 

Not that we’re doing badly. 

With Harveys we already have the 
world’s biggest selling sherry with 20 per cent 

of international sales. 

This financial year with an even greater 

variety of sherries (thanks to our Spanish ac- 
quisitions) we plan on worldwide sales of over 
. £90 million. Which ,1 j | 
is not to be sniffed at. A1U0Q” JOYOUS 




GOING ON JO ROWING 



V 1 '.•.<>*«« umuai -‘UlVil'U'itj 

L- VU'I' •»*»-* ' l>» ’ 

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28 


FINANCE AMD INDUSTRY 




STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


tt: 

Ron* your portfolio card check wur 

atm staSp™"?'™?!, 0 : "“is 


Equities quiet 


am snare pns* . 

*£» pv C you t y<w ; O v c^ w^ CM 


li 5 against ibc daily dividend figure 
publish^ on this page. If a natch® y°u 
gave won outright or ■s^ r < £j* e J 2 U ! 
daily prize money statoLlf you 
wimer follow the dpi pmtgj 
back of your card. You must always have 
your can! available when daimtng- 


. *i -,o cattieiDcnt day, M®y 5. 

ACCOUNT DAYS Deali^gbegn ApnUADt^ j ^jT^^^ )llJ ^j nrai £ys. 


<SM- 

Qaims required for 
+38 points 

riiimants should ring 0254-53272 


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S4Q ES- 
SO 38 
133 85 

S00 375 
182 117 
S60 4 to 
505 HO 
830 6*0 
723 *68 
28a 165 

zw IS 

355 275 
480 405 


AJHd-lyans f* 

Gass B !| 

BTOwra" .n 

BwsM^ons 


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288 ira 
113 77 

2&1 217 
218 153 
234 163 
39 30“. 

W> 353 

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315 228 
251 IBB 
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265 195 


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BUILDINGS and roads 


268 218 
297 213 
60 52 

166 <25 
488 371 
377 284 
160 lia 
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182 125 
64 65 

n 65 
975 “75 
706 531 
270 213 
96 73 


196 

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29 


Please make a note of vour dMtyKHais 
for the weekly dividend of £16.000 in 





TVU 

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SAT 

Wfti 

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BRITISH FUNDS 


1886 _ 
ion Low Srcci. 


Pnoe Cn'g* 


a 


Gross 

Bed. 


SHORTS (Under Five Yearal 


12% 1986. 


or, 94'iDcn 2 19JB 
,inj, 100 1 : EbJi 14 • 1586 

100', 93'»7rsaSCI0 4^ 1867 
96’. «'.E*OI 2'^ 

101'j 97%E*cn 10%% 1987 
ST. ST. F«Xl ■*%«■»* 

191-* 9T»Tisss 10% i» 

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104-1 97VTr*as 12V 1 987 
gal, gzVTres* 7V% 196588 

iSRSimi WA19W 

W»V 9«. T«Si C9Mh 19M 

g?V 86'.' Trans 3% W7MB 
102% B3V Tress 9'£ 19™ 

107V WiTTSM J J *® 

105V 95: TrsS* 10-^V 1999 
1M*- 93'S E«tl ^ '«» 

I11V 94>Exds 10’A 1989 
nCwISS 2.N 1990 
inyu 04 £*ch 11% i960 __ 

92H W'ltW 1JW8 
106-4 64'-E>=H 1TV 1«0 
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i13'.im-iE»eh 12 

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JgfttlCTraS 10% 1990 106 



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27 15 

H6 85 

83 *2 
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158 124 

104 54 

95 72 
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68 58 

94 80 

123 iOG 
378 25* 
110 « 

192 56 

74 42 

22* 1*9 
820 *28 
196 <30 
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448 296 
439 286 

105 '6 

91 71 

430 290 
195 126 
230 178 

193 161 

136 98 

435 304 
259 171 
27 23 

128 1G9 

444 308 

920 796 
213 163 
223 118 
110 87 

390 255 
672 440 
48? 340 
175 150 
310 188 
191 133': 
374 226 
106 87 

81 70 

516 343 
B35 473 
<82 140 
413 328 
101 76 

ITS ISO 
301 195 
288 2*6 

69 58 

204 174 

82 67 
55 41 

481 314 
168 120 


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Wimps* lB«nW 17 * 


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54 11.7 
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39 146 
2.4 169 
26 135 
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356 270 
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107 81 

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577 383 
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153 120 
236 162 
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212 160 
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216 158 
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529 374 
2l5 170 
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133'. 1 OS’! Trees 

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172 < 97Y. Bsch 13 ■% 1994 
llXr, 63 ‘•Tress 9% 199* 

120 KB**' Trass 13% 19g« 

TS-’m SB': Gas 3*i 1990-95 
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Hf'iTlAfll U^i Ivor 

703>. 07 Tress 9% '.IS'* IS- 

i*a>1!!2‘, Tress 15'.% 1996 14? 

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131 HO Trass 13'.% iWJ 
:i="« S3'; Each i0'.% 1997 
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l*2'.l2?'iE*en .1.5% 1997 

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134'. I05 1 " Each 12% 1OT 
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180 140 

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129 100 
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10V. 79 
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AKZO HIV Bearer £48 


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770 160 
253 149 
280 234 
293 225 
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263 22 B 
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238 170 
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567 <96 
292 220 
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620 505 
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113 93 
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Baraar 8 Dobson 
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BadSYS 

Baton 

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245 


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Sahreaen (ChsW ]* 
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41 18204 

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9.7 5.4 185 

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63 17 286 

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238 230 Kmralfl ^ 

138 123 IC I sa nC Zs m 




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186 83 US 
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30 40 88 
.. 193 
20 40 11.7 
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88 80 187 
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80 106 
12 145 
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48 98 
28 178 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


HrtraiWW 

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Mafcystsn Mnhg 


.. jr.o iai .. 
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-5 .. •• 

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*3 170 85 .. 

-1 345 40 .. 

.. 890 102 .. 

s .. 4011 84 .. 

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McKay Secs 


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47 6 
5 7 20 6 
34 113 


CINEMAS AND TV 


*33 329 
286 208 
Ml 31= 
5*6 **7 
too 81 
105 67 

79 58- 
*05 375 
8t 56 
309 148 


cmno Met 388 
Kennedy Bkkmss 250 
UhMtoks 3*° 

Lon Park HOW* 5*3 
Mom cnsrtoBB 8* 
Pmoe Oi w Horan ffi 
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Savoy mw* 'A 2K 
Staka 72 

Trusmouse Foma iffi 


-5 iao 33 132 
• 2 II 06 129 
^ 181 4.7 163 

143 20 170 
-1% 20 24 118 

ii tolls 

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^ 78 43 180 


ilarsM (Lmdsyl 
Do A' 

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raenra Cotta 


5% 3 
142 97 

50 38% 
260 210 
22% 17% 
128 90 


Na« vets 


.. 100 
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Mi Ktfgurt 
Nonhgsra 


2=5 175 Anew tv -A' 
*5 27 Grsmtrsn 

240 llfl MTV N/V 
350 263 LWT HUgi 

337 168 Scot tv a 
?13 153 TVS N/V 
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213 

45 

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3*7 

337 

?13 


• .. 129 8114.6 

. 24 53 102 

• *2 114 54 97 

• -3 213 81 139 

■ *2 15J3 43 10J 

*3 114 54 102 

a .. 16 63 U3 


industrials 
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OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 

10% 2001 H0% -> 

9M 2001 1081. -% 

9% A 2000 3V] 

9% 2000 ’02% " • 

ia% 1858-05 
10% 2002 1TO% -% 

12% 1909-02 1» i -> 


DRAPERY AND STORES . 


tit% 91% Tress 
109>. BB'eConv 
32> 2S-,Cora< 
106 , 96% Col* 
137-; i,7'. Trees 
ill, 9* ; Cor% 

1?*..1US’-EMh 


ICS, 


112: 93'- 


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DC. 

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133’. 116". Tress 13%% 200040 138% - • 
T»"l04 Tress 11 '■•% =001-0* I22-. 

S’. Trass '0% 200* 111%P-;. 

BOV ^ Fond 3'^tt 19JMS W. 

100ft, SP.Conv InKJl.1 

iOB% 90 :, CMW 9 ‘i% 2005 HJ7 jP- » 

lTr« Sl-.EHJi 10-/V200S 116% 

I3*'v11?% Jisss 

gy, TV. Tress 8% 2TO-OS M% -% 
1271.10*^ Tress Ui.% 200307 126, 
?Si-. 115% Trass 13V% 20W-08 1« - * 

72 , 57V Trees SV% 2008-12 71% -% 
#3% 76V Tress 7*.% 20,2-15 -% 

135 113V E*W 12% 2013-17 135 


90 

90 

286 

86 

103 

90 

97 
90 
90 

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89 

89 
68 
88 

90 
94 
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77 
84 
89 


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UNDATED 

48% 38'. Cores* ,*% 
*2 3* . War Ln 3 -.% 

to. 44', Com 3'.% 

34% S'. Trees 3% 
29V 24 ; Comots ?'.% 
»> 24‘. Tress ?;% 


46% 

42 

B>. 

34'* 

S'- 

29% 


88 

83 

89 

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INDEX- LINKED 

153'ilH J .TlB35 8 2% 
1CS% 90 V Trees IL 2% 
108% Tress 8 =% 
103 s , 9S-, Trass LL?':% 
103V 93V Tuas IL2V% 
,08 96-4 Treat IL 2% 

10='. 92% Trsas ILZ :% 
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■N 4 *. 














Jcwi 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 


LA CRfiMF. DELACR 


T he City has -never been more pBveand 
bubbling with' new ideas. . 

The lively takeover battles advertised 
almost daily ere visible signsof the growth 
of financial advertising and-PR. 

The result? Mort jobs. “ 

All major foreign banks knoyvthey must 


have a presence in the world's biggest 
banking centre. The result? More jobs. 

Right now hundreds of City firms are 
recruiting in readmes for the Big Bang. 
The result? More jobs. 

'.. if you have first class skills, die City is 
where you should be, Fiona. 


fcltr S«iior SWwtMi#* 

' lutijodBced ns to tho 


a . t 
« 4 : 








^ Senior W 
m Secretaries 


WEST' E NO • . <f l-T ¥'» • . KNIGHTSBRIOGE • BRUSSELS 


HUMAN 
RESOURCES 
Senior Level 
£11 - £ 12,000 W.1 

This Group Director of a 
large, fast moving high 
technology Company with 
offices all over the world 
is looking for a Secretary 
with' very special abilities. 
He is responsible for 
executive policy decisions 
and his secretary has a 
great deal of involvement 
and outside contact 
Secretarial skills f 00/60 
and WP knowledge 
essential Age 35 Max. 
Telephone 01-439 0092 

SeniorW 

Secretaries 


r INTERNATIONAL. BANKING 
c £13,000 

As PA. to the Deputy Mana gin g Director of this successful Bank in 
EC2 you wffl have the pcise, self assurance and toresigm to be aWe 
i to prwnde the flawless support required. Ttas is a new position 
i demanding initiative, motivation and the willingness to absorb 
1 further responsibilities. Your senior level banking experience and 
valuable communication skills will be used to full advantage, mm 
T o this end a knowledge of German would ^ 


be useful but not essential. Age 25-35. Skills otl lIUI IV 
100/60 with WP knowledge. Ca/wv\I sinao 

[Telephone 01-606 1611 OCUCliUTCd 


COLLEGE LEAVER FOR U.S. BROKERS 
££7,500 

This is an exciting opportunity for a bright, outgoing college 
leaver to work in a top American broking firm. Working 
closely with the PA. to the Managing Director, you win also 
provide complete support for a team of dynamic young 
brokers arranging travel, meetings and social 
engagements. Initiative and tire ability to cope urith*M* 
pressure wffl be essential, together G***,.^— lairf 
with sound shorthand and typing skills. OvIliUT WF 

.Tfteptoi» oi-so6 i6ii Secretaries 


temporaries 

WITH SECRETARIAL 
AND WP SKILLS 

The City steed* you 
We need you 
You need us! 

we DONT offer holiday pay 
(with strings attached) 

We DO offer 

* Top rates to match your 
skills 

* Regular assignments 

* Professional advice and 
support 

* Understanding 

Come and make friends in 

(2fl C MerriiL TeB her about 
you and your needs. 

She wiH teU you about us and 
ours. You can do each other 
a power o* good* 
Telephone 01-806 1611 


COLLEGE ! 
LEAVER 

Are you at the beginning 
of your career and aiming 
to be a Senior Secretary, 
jf so, start the way you 
mean to go on and come 
and ssb us at Senior 
Secretaries. We have a 
wide range of jobs to 
discuss that could firmly 
place you on the ladder 
to success. 

The current posts 
available are in P.R.. 
Finance, Fashion. 

Pubfishing. Industrial ana 
Commercial, Marketing 
and Architecture. 
Telephone 01-499 0092 ■ 


Senior®" Senior®" 
Secretaries t Secretaries 


(tovnoi** 




V*. 







VVbuId youlitetowrkinthe 
Diplomatic SeWice in London and abroad? 

Well trained shorthand secretaries are required for the ' 
Diplomatic' Service. Initially you- wi!Lw6rk_in central 
*- on fi on -®ngaged in routine secretarial duties. You 
. could then be sent to British diplomatic Missions 
anywhere in the world - from Paris to Peking, Canberra 
to Caracas - with the prospect of more interesting and 
varied wgrk. We offer good career prospects for 
secretaries; for those who are interested we also offer 
opportunities for promotion to the executive grades. 

To apply you must be a British citizen (with at least one 
parent who is, or was a Commonwealth or Irish citizen), 
at least 18 years of age (although you will not be 
posted abroad until you reach 21) and with a minimum 
of 100 wpm shorthand and 30 wpm typing . from 

• manuscript 

Starting salary in London will be from £5,703 to £6,083 
depending on experience, rising to £8,752; or if you 
have 3 years' relevant secretarial experience and 3 'O* 
levels or equivalent qualifications (including English 
language) £6.687 rising to £7,972. Currently a Special 
Pay Addition of £200 p.a is payable to all secretarial r 
staff in the London Area. Proficiency allowances up to 
£1,170 can also be earned. These salaries are currently 
under review. On overseas postings, you are provided 
with-futty f umished-aceommodation and an allowance 
. to cover the. extra cost of living where appropriate. 

' Additional atlowances carr be. earned for language 
proficiency: : • ; 

For further details and an .application form, contact 
Secretarial Recruitment; Personnel Policy Dept. 
Foreign and Commonwealth ' Office, Room 060. 

2 Central Buildings Matthew' Parker Street London 

SW1 H 9NW. Tel. 01 -233 4388/5862. 

We welcome applications from qualified men and 
women, up to age 50. , 

• The Foreign ^nd Commonwealth Office is an equal 
' Opportunities ^mployet-;^ 

• ■ i- •>" r 


Foreign and 

Qimmcxiweallh 


SULTANATE OF OMAN 
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY 

A ttrodass executive secretary is required for the 

British General Manager of a major Omani 
Batik, based in MascaL .. 

The successful candidate wiH be highly efficient 
with impeccable skills (shorthand T^ping^ ami 
audio), ami banking experience whilst helpful, is 
not a pre-requisite of this position. Preferred age 
range 25-33. ~ \..\c 

Excellent tax free salary plus accomodation and 
other benefits. 

Please forward fall CV together with, a recent 
passport photograph, within 10 days,ta 

M2cs C. D. Hnrimmtt 
Cheryl ttewfcsworth LM • 

3 Berkeley Square 
Lsndeo W1X SHG 


MACHIN CONSERVATORIES 

MR nsnstatic Soatow/PA.«g«aMy wMta tor a .bug i 


PERSONNa 

PUBLIC 
RELATIONS 
. £8,000 


pcraUaanMonroflhcir 
acwm EmcuUw. in a 
great team atmosphere 
you w» o» your own 
totatlve to gat involved and 
get through your vartad 
day. 

So tf you have aa easy 
going (lexMe attitude wltto 
good secretarial stalk moi 
this sounds Me you men 
an for BO MMjUt 
jgvmtw. FHjm 

RKMUDE M 734 0911 


Bright atttBtetic Socratey/P* ingwMy raqara s tor a rey msv 
saSn a casting now rtwwto dotooprami Aa cteart xntogtore 
hmamf id ra# k.aUto to nnrmsl atff teaj sfa fca nd WP. An 
onaortMWv In taw a soaB IidtiiJIyMamMxl h BBiwA igd w^lw iiac tto t 
Bxi companytofi « HipteKW? 1 **' Or dnwr.22 !«« +-S«tay 

m p patite l%» emmll cv aX 

fflMUfl DtdgM LI&. 

RamoaM Dock, 

P ju kgate Road, 

Loodoa SWll 4 NP. 


' BANKING 
£ 11,000 -I- Rffortg 

Dynamic young General 
Manager: CUy American 
. Bank k seettnd a right hand 
PA. Hk PA wfB atobt with 
ncruttmenl/ sersooiatH 
-and demise tor hha w tow 
he to abroad. He travels ta 
Enrqpe and ms msonW- 
Vila ’ tncMde evtrdl 
ma nagement of the Bank In 
■Ole UK. suns 100/70. Age 

25 - as. 

430 1551/2053 


Vfe have a few vacancies in Shefl Centra for seaetan® interosied in 


thescopBandciiaDfflgBCrfvinddDgSxa^^niuiQ-iiaDoraiconygnjt 

. ScmJpn^sssii^sldllsarereqixi^ 

secEtanal sepehence; dwrthand/typoifl 

SSS) ^isential - you’ win be tested=at tbe interview. Wcati 
C£urts is &us asiBh BaMug wffl to: pnttd tf 
to -O' lews standSid of;edncaan is BtpiEd mdutag 

Es S^^^- < ^iSiig in expenenoe rad quafficatcns, will 

heSrancteoi OW : tB,732 p.a. 

■ S attka oonvmiently sauated by Wfeteto Staton. Benea? 
irclrdB fee ianches, five- weeks ' aramal ■ leare^ an excallait 
Ss» panstai ted, nsf fee toi .hr p^ase of annaai 

season Motet, and 


™ - - 

ajj^ickipnSEni- ; . 






These positions are based at I CL Headquarters in Pi/tney. They a re 
suitaWe for weti qualified secretaries who want the challenge of working 
with decision makers in this dynamic high-tech environment. 

Secretary to the Vice President 
teles, ICL International 
Operations - c £9600 


This is an ideal opportunity for a senior secretary who wishes to work 
in an International sales environment The VP travels regularly within the UK 
aid abroad and has frequent contact with customers, other external 
organisations and with Directors and General Managers within ICL Vbu will 
therefore need to beagood organiser who can be totally responsible for the 
smooth running of the VP’s offices atalf times. 

Ibu should preferably speak a European language. 


Office - up to £8600 

An ambitiousyoung secretary with excellent skills including audio 
luring is needed to work with the Chairman’s secretary in providing a first 
dass secretarial service 

If you are interested in eitherof these positions, please telephone 
01-788 7272 Ext 2060 foranappRcation form or send a concise. comprehensM? 
CVto: Liz Crowson. ICL ICL House, 1 High Street, Putney London SW1 5 1SW. 

ICL is an equal opportunities employer. 


Wfe should be talking to each other. 


A MEMBER'OFTtfESTC PLC.GROUP ■ . >. ' 



HUTS PA 25+ 
£18,000 

Top flgM Sec/PA nouw!^ bjrUie 
wun 110 of ite voy pnttaos 
retail Co trted n Loodoa.' 
Hhst be able m Aandto o«a 
'c u m i wdon BrtaiUI 
□aqe ol adon diflos • Ws at PR. 
PMctenfl new pranenas. dm 


CtTY- 01-4812345 
WEST END> 01-938 2188 

albatt 


0RGAWSER 
£10,500 + Bobos 

SS/Sec/PA to amort Hie 
end mgave bs fc^r oito. Lots 
ol atewnonX bean - 
Mtt—B tkws. settng np m 
sy5tont ac. Stoati owraraM 
wd pracDtOR. Phene non. 


PA M PROPERTY 
£10,500 

DynanK (vopeny Co specMb tag 
Id residential development sects 
PA/ Sac n pn thee sjthI toarty 
teem. Suoerti posoon ofleitng 
rearest & variety «i a non 
streeued enwormenL Tots 
ennhetnert n afi aspects ol the 
husness. FfactMtyirtdie desn 
ID Bant stafis s essontaL 

CITY- 01-4S1 2345 
WEST END - 01- 93S 21S8 


HIGH SPIRITS 

£ 10,200 


I CITY: 01-4812345 
| WEST END: 01-938 2188 


MARKETING 

£9,500 

Itertghng EMbcbt oMbb famnos 

a comoany reaves eaefesl 
to ocoam ewayttaa trera 

havfJ to conferences. Mua lavg a 
strang chsactof and good state. 
LV. £146 per Bay. STLS, 
Penson Sdiemo. &aal 
prospects. 

CITY: 01-481 2345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 


albatt albatt 






ioULV* SBCBEtABIES 11 

SUBJECT: fSgjgg3s£& . 

t ^m^™*”***™ ■' =°Ey/ A “ HoSSWP “ 

amiutetoi grtSfflylnToWito 
„. talCTea; 


U fstssisssssr- 

. LS863- UffQ 

C ' DelottteHasHns + BeU^_ IIOO 

"-.v 128 Street, PBOFT 


ssr DeSaitte 

dixMa OUK SKILLS 


teJ!HBS5S!7T2®i:Si",V-iT!r / ■ . ' . 

THE PROFESSIONAL APPROACH 

witti 

OUR TEMPORARY TEAM 
£6^0 p.h. 

■ Ow tasy team of prof essional temporary secretaries are stays in demand, an) it has 
esStHsried v sxeeaeit reptaaran over the years. 

If you aa a fast dass. senior level secretary witti speeds of 100/60. 2 years ejector level 
experioice in central London, and proficient won) processing skills, we can oner you an 
tmerestmg variety of tcmporaiy secretarial aEagmnerts and trie best rates in London. 

Or sifted temps are all paid the same rates and are frajuefflly ottered the opportunity or 
temping into a permanent position. 

If you would Be to temp at the level you desene aid be positively appreciated, please telephone 
for an apporntment or a factstaet 


01-434 4512 (West Bid) 


01-588 3535 (City) 


Crone Corkill 

Recruitment Consultants 




INVOLVEMENT! 

SERVICE! to £9,000 + + + 

For the 'go-getter 1 with distinct 
MANAGEMENT potential! A challenging sates- 
orrented career role needing strong leadership 
and organisational qualities, plus a highty- 
devefcped business sense. Superb bonus. 

POLITICS! £9,000 

Grass roots and top of the tree contacts 
feature highly for the intelligent, articulate and 
welt-organised SECRETARY with excellent 
skills. Full, yet relaxed involvement at the hub 
of political life. 

ACADEMIC! to £9,009 

Challenge and diversity on a prestigious, 
academic scene for the erudite SENIOR 
SECRETARY with an investigative mind. 
Excellent inter-personal skills sought for 
liaison with bo tit staff and students. 


RESEARCH! 


to £8,000 


High- interest as PA to an eminent 
Consultant/Senior Lectured The involved brief 
includes some clerical work and assistance 
with Medical Research Papers. 

TEMPS! TEMPS! 

High calibre Temp assignments too ...either 
short or long term to suit your needs...at the 
highest rates in Town for skilled Secretarial & 
WP professionals! 

Full details from: 

19/23 Oxford Street. W! Tel: 01-137 9030 
131/133 Cannon Street. EC4Tek 01-626 8315 

✓^14 -g ^ Recruitment Consultants 

Challoners 


GRAPHICS 


£ll v OOO++ 


Sopvfc position <« BHtajjuai 
(Fmtfi) 5H/Sec/PA has arisen n 
As wort) fam ous Psa ltery 
Giim. Extremely tateestng ml. 
and pastoon to i pw w 
possessmg ex r ehn s tom & 
Infest*) elite. Benefits ndude 
BUM & STU. 

CITY: 01-4812345 
WEST END ; 01-938 2I8S 

albatt 


FINANCE 
£ 11,000 pkg 

Cares pnncsaM ta the by-mni 
■to tin Byta rt aatemanaotf 
bank. They are curtrty baton 
to i tppflpM S/H se astay enm 
pood snti too toes aywng 
lad responsttoy- PVwy ol 
ton e tew tm Siva beneite 
Eastern cane prospects. 

CITY: 01-4812345 
WEST END: 01-938 2158 


Office Manager is your major role with an 
informal but large WI studio group although 
you need rusty shorthand skills to fulfill the 
PA/Secretaria! aspect for the Chairman. Out- 
going, adaptable personality essential. Age to 
35. 5 weeks hols. 

CONFERENCE 

ORGANISERS £10,000+ 

Work in tandem with the MD on research, cash 
flows and marketing and take over the 
administration. As PA you are looking for a 
rewarding career and offer numeracy + 
excellent SH /typing. Languages useful. Age: 
30’s,40's. 

ADMINISTRATION £11,000+ 

As you will be taking over the admin from the 
MD of a leasing co in WC1 you will utilise your 
legal/accountancy background to the full 
Typing is needed although secretarial back-up 
will be provided for you. Excellent bonuses. 

Wll £10,500 

Assist with market research in the 
leisure/entertainment field as PA/secretary to 
the new project manager of a record co in 
Lad broke Grove. 80 Shorthand and numeracy 
needed. 

B City 3778600 Ufest End 4397001 | 1 

Secretaries Plus 


The Secretarial Consultants 


SECRETARIES/ 
PERSONAL ASSISTANTS 
£ 7 , 000 -£ 16,000 
INVESTMENT BANK 
PUBLIC RELATIONS 
ADVERTISING 
DESIGNERS 

CONFERENCE ORGANISING 
PERSONNEL 

We are a small recruitment agency with fantastic jobs 
and are looking tor people who want to get really 
involved in a job they love. 

Whether you are arts orientated or numerate, with 
shorthand, we will find the job which is just right for 
you. But we do need you to have good typing and to be 
well spoken. 

We ere also looking for college leavers who want to 
start jobs in the summer. 

Age 17 to 25. 


IM.HemaKretLtt 

Secretarial 

Recruitment 

50 Hans Crescent SWt 




Mwhsi career 
adweeia 


PERSONNEL 


INTERNATIONAL 

CONSULTANTS 

£ 9,500 

to you inn*r«i«] in 
Mnune am* iw ntun, 
fi rid of Do you 

wwu a ootr turn vital 
inn? *» SktcUtv . PA n 

HIT Stuior Qlncnr frr fully 

uiv q hyd B oftUHH 

travel boot! non. controlling 
the on irr m Ns obwncr 
plus Huong wnn dmB In 
Plan? indunnwe. Bmcfto 
Mt emtienl lndiKlino 
NtaH. LV*. sn_ MM 

BUPA. 

H you warn resoou emm iy 
M tsuo mvMveimd ana 
tuir inonnana wwnM 

•Mta gbH ANNA MBtlS 




PR IN TRAVEL 

£ 8,000 

Alli-nd luncliOni wd 
rviiiiMiiniK wnu«na in 
IW lr,*vt>l ririd when vau 
iw INS KUBlKhM PuNbr 
Rriaimc tomnany. 

AjAMinn t^o Act oun) 
Ejih-uIivfs your 

mponbualion win mclmK 
CmnpUinH prm (VicK» And 
uhw i i UHMic dnumg will, 

qui-j low and imllaliotn 
and — nfoymg ransLanl 
lunon wilh rlimiK i rant 
am airlines and lour 
operators. Ait wmin 
demanding povilicn for a 
nmminns urm. 

With nislv Shorthand and 
Bund ivwng skills can 


. 

Smjae 



irector’s Secretary | 

Communicator :: : 

£12,000 •; 

TVTiihin a /ast-mov jn>; and pressurised media ' 

W organisation there is aJwa\ s a need tor a 
stabilising influence to maintain caJm in the eye of 
die storm, and cope with high-profile and — - 

siimulatir.g individuals. ' •’ 

The Opcraiiorts Director of this major company - > 

needs a PA »-ho can effectively juggle and ’ * 

prioritise the conflicting demands on his time, 

give a sound secretarial back-up f IC0+<fcC> and be - 

thoroughly au-are of what is going on in ihe 
company in order to be able to exercise judgment _ 

over his schedule. 

His responsibilities cover personnel and starting " 

policy, administration oi ute building complex 
and overall organisation ot day today 

produetion. i . - 

The idea) candidate will he a balanced and 
unruffled personality who is willing to act on 
initiative, and who will relish working in a 
creative high achievement environment. Age 
indicator 28-38. 

Please telephone 01-437 1564 

MacBIain 


Sc Associates Ltd 
01-437 1564 

Recruitment Consultants 130 Regent Street, 
London W1R5FE 


ENFIELD 


DIRECTOR’S SECRETARY 


A DEGREE? 

V A' LEVELS? 
AMBITIOUS ? 

Yes? 

Than «c may haw just the mb to you We nod someone too c 
dStarenL Someone with bran power, someone with enttusasm and 
energy mid s omeone too would enjoy wortang in a lugtty charged and 
mouvaKd cnwwnyrt 

DATA C0NMTT10NS s > conputtr soriwart tirvelopmetti compam. Wb 
haw grown tram 7 io «) m the last 4 years and are sU upendng. Based 
m. ErfckL we also have an ottice m Washngion D.C. 

Because ot out expansion we need someone to work lor one at or 
threanrs and othw senior managers. Tfu u a demanding |ob which 
raH use toe secretoial and admmstrative sMIs to the lull Webefeeve 
n stralchng our people ato also in growing the job they do to su! thee 
afataty and career ambmns. 

We otter the latest m otlce automaton and generous company benrtte. 
For nw ngM person, salary is never a proUem* 

Please wide entJoang a C.V. to:- 

babel BertiertsM 
Data C— awMaa Ltd 
Hass Haase, SUrtey load 
EafMd 

CONNECTION 


iitssl 


Elizabeth Hunt 

A NEW LOOK 
£9 r 500 

Spearheading new design, this lop firm of WI 
interior designers never fail to surprise. They 
seek a confident, enthusiastic secretary to a 
director who is a first class administrator and 
able to supervise junior members of the team. 
60 wpm typing ability and previous WP 
experience needed. 

NOUVELLE CUISINE 
c£1 0,000 

A top name in the world ot leisure and tourism 
seeks a senior secretary to an executive in 
charge of their hotel and catering division. He's 
a super boss who is keen to find a reliable 
person with 100/60 skills who wants an 
interesting position with excellent benefits. 

Efizobeth Hunt Reauftment Consultants 

J8Gowanor Steel London WI 01-2® £31 


ONE JUMP AHEAD 
£10,000-611,000 + Bonus 

A new financial management firm needs a committed, outgoing 
and seif -motivated Personal Assistant to match the Chef 
Executive's enthusiasm, demands and bram-wavesl It is 
essential that you are highly organised and flexible with 
initiative, commonsense and an eye tor detail. You mil be 
completely involved at an exciting venture and will also deal 
with his personal business and outside interests. Starting on a 
temporary basis the position will become permanent and the 
offices move to the City shortly. Legal or financial background 
would be an advantage: staffs lOOfSO. Age 25-30. Please call; 

434 4512 

Crone Corkill 

Recruitment Consultants 


ALL PURPOSE PA 
£104100 plus 
excefleut benefits 

A dynamic and extrovert PA 
is requred to wort with the 
entrepreneurial MD ot a 
group ol companies involved 
m marketing, PR and travel. 
Acting as hs right hand, you 
wiH need both excellent 
organisational and coatmun- 
icatkai stalls and enjoy 
woriung as part of a snail 
team. You will prowde a 
nucleus to this extremely 
busy office and should be 
flexible enough to turn your 
hand to anything. A good 
level of motivation and 
eneUent secretarial stalls 

Xjtt^ao 8 ra>uirefi - 

WEST EMD OFFICE 

629 9686 

AKSSAjae&asR 


MD NEEDS PA 
WITH FLUENT 
FRENCH 
AND SPANISH 
£ 11,000 

Although this Covert 
Carton tusea company 
deals hi Mgh finance, that 
will not be your side of 
things. Working from your 
own office, you wiU have 
respodsmiltj' for Public 
Relations, translations and 
highly coniideniia) mailers 
involved with board 
meetings. Exrencni skills 
in English and French 
courted with ai least 10 
years experience are 
needed. 

t74 Nm Bawd St+ WI. 


‘tritemational] 
i Secretaries,:! 

fte^Llj . i. 

.Cl-49l^7W0,. 



CREME DE LA CREME 

appears on pages 30.31 & 34 


* ttuwii mri mp-sj sas 






















►J » 




ACRE 


m 


DELACE 


W r. •••:>■ 


-tif-i - * i*v . : •* >M *K- 


TtoeeIq.2weeks,?WeekSt 4 WEEKS holiday pay per year PLUS. . . 

Bank Holiday pay, free word processor training, sick pay scheme and an exce ent 

choice of interesting assignments. [‘ brook street | 


3:'-: 



' i&hkf' Swindon 




Our client, a major multinational 
organisation have achieved worldwide 
success through innovation, product 
quality and an insistence on excellence in 
every sphere of their activities. 

That uncompromising approach to high 
standards is perfectly illustrated in this 
opportunity. 

The company is looking for a Secretary 
who thrives on responsibility and is 
equipoed with the confidence, tact and 
decision-malting skills to cope with every 
aspect of this demanding post- 

Demanding. because die sheer scope 
and variety of the role will test your 
administrative, organisational and problem 
solving abilities to the full. 

The management and interpretation of 
statistics and the organisation of time and 
resources are just some of the duties you 
will perform in support of the General 
Manager. 

The need is for a 'career secretary', 
a woman or man who can give their full 
commitment and energy to the job, and 
who possesses the experience and 
professionalism that comes from several 
yearn in a similar role. 



Looking for a permanent job end ^ 
time is running out? Then why not join one of 
the most sought after temporary teams in 
London? Ws can offer you a first class 
opportunity to expenence a variety of 
working environments in Central London. 

If you let us guide you towards your 
career we cart pay you excellent rates on 


Those qualities should be supported by 
evidence of first class qualifications and 
secretarial achievement with a minimum 
RSA HI typing. 100 wpm shorthand and 
some working experience of computerised 
systems. 

It's an exceptional career opportunity 
with rewards to match. 

On offer is a salary c. £10,000, free 
£UPA and life assurance and all the 
benefits expected of a major high 
technology company. 

To apply please write with full CV to: 
Confidential Reply Service, Ref AHS 1283, 

Austin Knight Advertising U K limited, j 

Brunswick House, Upper York Street, 

Bristol BS28QN. 

Applications are forwarded to the client 
concerned, therefore companies m which 
you are not interested should be listed in 
a covering letter to Mr S. Halford, Regional 
Director. g 

Austin I 

^Mnishtemaasm 

Advertising 


the way. not to mention holiday pay and the 
t a hlacfilam Mash Privilege -Card, together with a 
jS constant flow of assignments. 

Let M3c5lam Nash putsuccessatyourfinger 
tips. Contact Victona Martin on 01-439 0601 


MacBlain 



Today's best booking. 

S/h wp sec. to work in major West End company 
- temporary wrth wew to permanent Oca £10,000. 


mCE 3PGE A CABEE2 Of ASVEB33SEJG 


! Tn$ dynamic and e • pending advertising 
agency is a division of a prestigious PR Consult- 
ancy. Due to e-pansicn. a first-class Secretary 
with good or*ani”t!on 2 l and secretarial skills 
| (80-55) is needed to work for 2 Account 

: ‘ S*\ ' '* * V < 


c£10,000 


Directors. You should have the poise and per- 
sonality to deal w ith clients and 
the confidence to stav calm in a 

• IrfC 

consistently busy environment, o-kybapolos 
Age 22+. Salary r £ 10.000. OT489SH75 


•r y er.;y wgge 


•Moamonsus 




TECHNICAL RESOURCES 

Working for Director who is responsible for 
monitoring the EMI Music's worldwide 
manufacturing and recording facilities, 
installation of major new equipment, and 
technical development, e.g. compact disc 
manufacture. The duties are varied and 
interesting, giving plenty of scope for the 
exercise of initiative and responsibility. 

This post calls for a high degree of 
competence, first class secretarial stills and 
tha ability to communicate with top 
management in the UK and worldwide. 
Preferred age 30-45. 

The salary offered will be c.29,000 p.a. with a 
review in July. 

To apply, please write with full details ta 

Barbara K. Rotterova. 
Senior Personnel Officer, 
EMI MUSIC LIMITED, 

20 Manchester Square, 
London W1A 1ES. 




OOiKKflG 



- FASHION £9,000 * 

This imemauonal classic fashion company need an 
elegant secretary to assist tfc«?tr genera} manager 
responsible Tor the wholesale side of the business. You 
will deal with producriwiysaks/warehouse 
depart men is and customers. Skills 100/60 + Wp 
experience. 

* PERSONNEL £9,000 * 

Based in beautiful bi-tech offices, this well known 
construction consultancy arc looking for a self- 
motivated young secretary with tact, diplomacy and 
descrenon to join their personnel team. Excellent 
training, prospects and perks (including in-house 
squash courts!)- Skills 100/50+. 

please telephone: 01*499 8070 

46 Old Bond Street London W.l. 

% CAROLINE KING SECRETARIAL APPOINTMENTS 


d&abelh Hunt 

©©SHE SH3DTING 




A W1 video and TV production company seeks 
a secretary to their young general manager who 
wants a right hand assistant to (earn the 
business, make decisions in his absence and 
organise the office. Only 30% secretarial duties. 
5dwpm typing and WP experience needed. 

6© POB BROKE 


Judy Farciutamon Limited 

47 Nbw Bond Street. London, W1Y9HA. 
01-483 8824 

CHISWICK CONSULTANCY- 

c£l 1,000 

An opportunity for a capable, flexible PA to join this 
small successful company. The Meal candidate wQI 
combine several yean commercial experience in 
rofcasiona! marketing orientated environment with 
ist typing ($h useful) and an active interest in WP*t 
Non-smoker. Age 25 - 45. 

INTERNATIONAL HOTELS 
- WEST END 

Delightful young international Director needs bright 
secretary with initiative and immaculate appearance. 
Ability to work alone and hold the fort. Good skills 
essential. Age 21 - 25. Salary ci&SOO 


CAREER 


DESIGN 


I T E D 


MAKING PLANS FOR SUCCESS 

MERCHANT BANK - c£1 3.000 

An accomplished sscretary/PA with highly tuned organisational 
and social skills will command a demanding and diverse rote when 
asssting the successful Memaging Director orthisestafclished. forward 
thinking City Bank. 

YOUR NEXT STEP - £10.000 

Haveyou consolidated your secretarial skills and now want the chance 


DIRECTORS’ SECRETARIES 


Top Jobs for Top People 

*,5,000+ Semer RacrnSw*** Censwftwt 

5SBS5*; 


communication skills can exploit this exceptional opportunity. 

INTERNATIONAL SECURITIES - £8.000 + mortgage 

A future within an international company whilst assisting a small 
but vital team awaits a bright, energeticypung secretary who enjoys 
arranging travel, meetings and receptions. Some typing and a 
knowledge of WP essential. 

FOR FURTHER DETAILS ON THESE POSTTIONS 
TALK TO DIANE HILTON TODAY 

GRADUATES 

Exciting career awaits personable graduates within the fashion 
industry Ifyou are numerate, i n terested in retail and seek a company 
w ith p o si ti v e promotion plans. 

- TALK TO KARIN PARNABY TODAY 

EVERY G00DTEMP DESERVES FAVOUR 

Not to mention top rates (£6.00+ pertour). interesting 
assignments and holiday pay. 

if you are a PA /secretary with sound shorthand, auefio and WP 

skills together with 2 years' experience 

TALK TO KARIN PARNABY TODAY - 


1 GROVELAND COURT, BOW LANE, LONDON EC4M 9EH 
TELEPHONE: 01 -489 0889 


£13i90O . . wrefHiiP J P ■* 

Tfo. ManadnR Director of this professional end innovative 
'SLSJSTS neSuS ambitious sktilrt who 4 

SKtaS mZ ***** tteconcentmkm; » on 

client contact and business development. 

Ring Stella Boyd-Carpenter on . 


01-629 9325 


DUNCAN 
VEHICLES LTD 

FA /SECRETARY FOR JOMT . 
MAMAGMG DflBBCTGR 

Duacau Vrindn Msam teadtns-wta* m&S* wfcck 

manufacturer producing b*-tocb compact skHon s MVM, Wk * fliilll/ 
PA/Seoctary to work in a demanding senior jxwtieo. rarat bfi W W W d 

todtow lewL er ho- good A lawds (groda C in i nnim ), sogartmcwdfcwreBw* trpmg 
aadSHrtfaaod skSs. 

Sokxr- £S£OQ - £9 flOO. 

PI km u riephow fa ob cggfcatioB tom or qyly ~b wririp^ Ml C . V . etia p h o t t u gug h 

to: • 

Min K. CKpshonv 
DUNCAN VBUCUS LTD^ 

So m hjBt u War, Orton Sasakgott. Pet a han u gh, CwHpRIw WB tfW,. . 
• - - • Tek 0733 237371 ■■'•'..X • 




IRVING TRUST INTERNATIONAL LIMITED 
UK Securities Company 
of American Bank 

Secretary 

to Manager of Eurobond Team 

Due to expansion we require a highly motivated and wsS organised secretary to 
assist our Eurobond Team. The c andida t e must be able to work under pressure, 
be flexible and work tong hours as needed. Knowledge of securities ac ti vates 
preferred. 

An exceaent salary is avaBable tor the right person. 

Please send C.V. to 

# Jean MeGUKyray, - 

Irving Trust International Limited, 

Irving 36-38 Comhffl, 

Trust London EC3V 3NT. 


£ 10,000 neg 

Btoasem opportunity to work as 
Assistant/PA to MD of an 
fidnedcan owned travel ma rk e t ing 
company. You must haw state 
100/55, an assertive and 
personable nature, aged 25+ with 
solid admm/sec. experience at 
sartor level and an interest in 
{ravel. Excellent perks. - 


City tUt. - v • 

C12^S00 ikeiwfite 

The young Oteimtail et a major 
City company needs * PA wno 
son dereonsmte , discretion, 
unflag^ng energy- and dynamism! 
This is a varied and kitereetmg rote 
with plenty of efient contact for. a 
senior soxetary with min. ‘A f level 
acfctcaton. Age 27*35.; State: 
10ty5Ej/WP T 


MANAGER /CONSULT ANT 

m tbi uk m nasauun mb Hmasuam 


MI3J1 Ml M t':v5 I* III ' - \i 


Vta we tettrfrt icadWfl cQct sttf «ancr fawto bancta 
thraughom Australia ad HZ) and hare In London *■ ban cttces to 
KMfcgm end lie Stand. 

Mmear of or Straxi bonch. wu »■ hw* to eniorftnkirteiits 
your si dte ad moawfl. and an oped aa CTCttfloo md agpat 
MDuxit HnMi 

E 4 JOWK 8 , etw » a mugsr a ta ■ oomtonL Is dstedte Moot 
eerie ■»» MW 

We oto m xmatvB stay tfos gocriw wertHy ptfit sto*. Um 
Itro moaiht BBroca. lurtbaf benefit s mdttte a corappiy car, and a 
tree poking span A to ottos. 

toWBVkv.aBPaBtewmgire 

-937 


f«?l«nTflcom 


MOSTLY A0MINISTBATI0M 

CXI 2,000 

Use your secretwia) skills of 100/60 far a small part of feis job 
as Rerstral Assistant to ti» International Pwsonnef Director of 
a siKcessJul Investment Maaggnent Compaiy. He is good a 
delegating and wfll require you to write your own tetters, 
untangle ms comokcatsd &ny schedule and keep in touch with 
wtet tie is doing, tf you haw good A' levels, are aged JS-28 
and voted &b to woik in lovely offices n» Morunent tfease 
ring: 

588 3935 

Crone Corkill 

RecMtoMoicaMaitreto 

18 Ekfon Street EC2 



JFL, 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 




Go for this top position wrth a leading firm of 
Uoyds brokers. You'll tain their marketing 
division and can look forward to excellent 
career prospects, the chance to develop your 
own account and travel abroad. 90/50 skills 
essential. 

LEfizobetiiHuntRscnNbnenl 

V 23 Cotege Ha London EC4 0H2«)35a 


THINKING ABOUT A 
CHANGE OF JOB? 

We would be delighted to help. We don't 
advertise EVERY job we have on our files and 
we may have just the one to suit your particular 
skills and personality. One of our consultants 
would be happy to discuss job prospects with 
you and if we do not have anything suitable 
immediately we would keep you in mind and 
consider you for new jobs as they come In. We 
handle a wide range - from college leaver to the 
really senior PA positions. Jf you have 
secretarial state why not ring for an 
appointment to either our City Office (588 3535} 
or West End Office (434 4512). 

Crone Corkill 

rteaniWiiBrt Consuttsnts 


EVSectoMD 

£10,000 

Top quality opeougvuhin tbeestithig, expanding Beld 
of Executive Search. As PA to MD within this high 
pedigree company you will assist in ‘bead-bunflng key 
executive talent for «mw of the UK’s best known 
companies. A responsible postion, you will also oversee 
the writ of a junior secretary Excellent typing, 
accurate shorthand and 2 vnl secretarial experience 
essential. Please call 01-409 1232 
mmmmmnaam fe enat ma ct Coasuto m i Mtotoerem 


SECRETARY/PA 

required for small friendly firm of solicitors in 
the West End to work at partner level Audio 
typing and shorthand skills are required. The 
position is very involved and cross training win 
be given on WP. An attractive salary is offered 
to the right person according to age and 
experience. A^e 22-33. 

Telephone 638 543Z. 

Contact Mrs Argent. 


OIL EXPLORATION 

Company seeks secretary /administrator for ttieir 
London office. Experience in the inchEtry and 
numeracy essential For Otis varied and respondhJe 
post. Languages useful. Age 224-, salary range 
£9.500- £ 1 2.000. please contact Victoria Graham 
Limited (Rec ConsJ 01-499 3492/44©7. 



We have several op- 
portunities for Coftege 


witch can offer Gupere 
openings Into excel- 


canon. Some Invotvo 
shorthand, some au- 
dio and copy typing, 
and most offer the op- 
portunity to foam 
word processing aa an 
aid to the secretarial 
rale. Salaries are cur- 
rently c£7 JOOQ. 

For further informa ti o n 

please co ntact . - 
JOANNE GREGORY 

01-491 186“ 


College Leaver 

£7,500+ bonus 

Tl* fca rare openfoL ideally suited co someone jertejns 
a start In business iBe. You will work as part of a smafi, 

companies to make the most and 

bustoeeopponzsiide5. The company blbngwttabfahed 
and highly regarded Their offices are modern, open- 
plan and stylish. General environment — happy and 
distinctly ‘buzz/. If you have good shorthand andtyping, 
and would ifloe co know more, call 01-493 5787 icday 
Gordon Yates Ltd. 

35 Old Bond Street, London Wf 
(Recruitment Consultants) 


PA. TO HOUSE-FINDING AGENT 
Varied, ratmteing job tor 20-28 yr dd Sec. WdVspoken & 
a m hi t ioM to karo end on from West End Specisfin. 
Sbotdd be qaick-dunker & enjoy peaks of hectic activity. 
Man have exp.- of Central London Res. Agency es Sec. or 
Ncg. Win asset m Rentals A Sales. Acocne typhw. 
B/taepin* mefid (notes.). Cbr Driver. Would consider P/T 

exp entnattaiL 

T eb 01-629 3074 


‘Off Camera 

£8*500 

Irmly rernetaiia! paation within, a tn^or TV fitni 
compuis Wpuis fci‘put prajectstc^rtbc' - ' behmtfthc 
scenes, fea viD nod as put ofa sea/f tsam prepartos 
the paperwork far cable TV progrtcuncs, hairing viiin 
other departments handling fdepbone; work, etc, 
Excellent benefits indude health du& jnetnhMrt^ 
free video lihsarj; private screenings etc. Good typing 
Age 33+. Please cafltiI-409 123i ' 

RerauftaRiS Consuteuits 


Corridors of Power 

Thsbai»5y:d»rbingadrespQ^^ — ccwringa 
rich dhersfey of interest and inuchesnent in pres^iMkir 
public life. As PA to senior MP you wfll organise VveryfuU 
diary working with him on.coretkumky matrars; Sdect 
Gommicoee dd/berattans; NATO and European develop- 
ments; and day-to-day dudes arismg in the House, 'feu 
should have the capwiry co harafle research, and yaw awn 
correspondence Senior level experience and sure skfls 
(90/60) essendaL Salary CIOjDOO. Please triephone 01-491 
5787. ’* ’ 

Gordon Yates Ltd. 

35 Old Bond Stvut^Lomfon Wt 

(Rccrutonenr Consultants) : . 





Till 




P° >S“! hwe «partance of persomeledraWEDtofortThis 
J 5 * quality position within a household rente. PLC 
h«|»Hg to oortHnare -reendtmenq-gdary structures, 
pensic^efltp^s ettdfor their UK and overseas 
operations. As PA/Admln Assktant to Personnel Manner 
you will enjoy high levels of responstbftty and gQ&L 
adrnm/secrecaria/ concent. He -is a superb deferaror and 
mhmwdve wu hi tej aspects. Maturity of approach and 
(90/60) are essential. Please telephone 

Gordon Yates Ltd. ‘ 

35 Old Bond Street, London W 1 

OVecruitrntan Consuharast 


^ RO YAL INSTTTUTE 
OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS 

see&a secretary for Dteector of rantu o* . Esdeoent 
sratertei ud organfsattonai sJdBs required tar- 
“Jffotos and .(tantaiuttng post 

uSSSe, JSX!"* 1 ° 1 * 930 2235 between 

io.o»a & 6 -OOpm or write 

10 St James Square, " 

London SW1Y«^ 



mussHfi, 

£9^50 

SHWtan) l tmina MIL 
ftWsting Co. Kouin&B. Also 
tequM Audn ter Sales 
Manger. £720. 

raTKEY 


mm 



NOT OUST 
SECRETARIAL 

P**fertWy a numerate, 
tidy grariuaie. . fixfly 
®J*e and willing lo type 
and fife, but who also, 
after training, cm 
advise and interview. 

£9.500 initially. 

Telephone. 
JMK 91-723 6001 
HOME BUYERS 
- ADVISORY . 

Service 




























THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 





VOU hawe atelrfor 


inSh^2?^S af ^ ,rBc ^~ a nd ff vou want to become 

a «^ iSi^; nS<h8 FrtzzeI1 Grou P* a major privately 
2T^!^ d ^ S8rV,cea srbup ' in the new post of BAto 
^S^^ 3 TT m}catlons Manager Based In the City 


- ‘ — , . — ** *Heu iy iiuujse magi 

and assisting with all our 
conjmunjcations and PR protects, including audio-visuals. 

8 ^ mature outlook, an enquiring mind, a 
PJ^eyet^hj personality - and career aspirations. 
n? X ?n h 5?!? ,d ^'isa® reotwed and training on an IBM 
pc Win be given if necessary Ybull also need to team 

^SS* b ®S useyou ' M soon be dealing on your own 
initiative wit h printers and our advertising agency 


FRIZZELL 


Interested in a good salary and exceDent benefits? 
Then telephone or write, enclosing your av to: Mrs. Rita 
Donovan, Group Recruitment Officer. The Frizzell Group 
Limited. 14/22 Elder Street, London E .1 0DE Telephone 
01*247 6595. 


SECRETARY + 

Qxnmins Is the world's leading supplier of hi -technology 
diesel engines. We are currently seeking a Wgfi caters 
Secretary for one of our Senior Marketing Managers. 

You Ml has areOem secretarial skills, kidutfing shorthand. 
ax^o 2 jmJ Wtrdfffocassajo; proven otganisattma) abidy and a 
lively, enthusiasm and prafesak»8l dedi c ation tv ‘getting the 
job done*. 

Part of you duties will include organising and attending trade 

shoes and promofions. This wit ewote 75 to 20 days trawl 
per year aid a car drhar is a must 

In return we offer a competitive salary, good be nefits and the 
opportudy to develop within a professional emrirarenenL 

Please apply bi writing with a detailed CV to Penny Bourne. 

CUHHUNS ENGINE COMPANY LTD, 

46 - SO Comnbe Road, New Maktea, 
Surrey KT3 4Q*_ 


<k 


PA/SECRETARY 
TO THE DIRECTOR 


BOC TRAINING 




Hammersmith - West London 

The London Computer & Qectroncis School has 
a first class reputation m training young people in 
high-tech skflis and then fading teem good jobs. 

Our small team of teaching staff and 
administrators fad the work 15 interesting, 
rewarding and vary worthwhile in grvrrtg people 
new employment prospects. We now require two 
good people to join this hardworking and 
committed team. 

Placement Assisant 

To liaise with potential employees on job 
opportunities and assist trainees with their CVs 
and Interview techniques. 

An unusual and ideal opportunity tor an 
experienced secretary to move into the 
personnel held or for I PM students with typing 
skills. 

Administration Assistant 

A first-class WP operator (ideally IBM trained) to 
support the training placement and 
administration staff. Some clerical duties and 
refief recaption work. 

These Jobs offer real possibilities for 
progression, competitive salaries and good 
benefit packages) salary up to £8,500 tor the 
Placement Assistant). 

Send your CV to us or write for an application 
form fro nr The London Computer & Electronics 
School, Qenthorne House, Hammersmith Grove, i 
London W6 OND. Tek 01-741 9345. 


SWITZERLAND 

The BARK FOR 

INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENTS, 
an Internationa! institution in Basle, 
seeks 2 fully-trained 

SECRETARY/ 
SHORTHAND TYPIST 
FOR ITS GENERAL SECRETARIAT 

Candidates, who should be aged between 
20 end 25 and have English as their 
mother tongue, should have a good 
knowledge of French and German . 

The Bank offers an attractive salary and 
excellent working conditions in an inter- 
national atmosphere. 

Interested applicants are invited to write 
to the> 

PERSONNEL SECTION. 

BANK FOR INTERNATIONAL SETTLEMENTS. 
4002 BASLE, 

SWITZERLAND. 

Enclosing a curriculm vitae, 
reference end a photograph. 


SECRETARIES 

Due to expansion. iniemationat iD’esimem 

bank reflate wo sateate Jl'i 
Stan, with good shontand/OTM® skills 
sound secretarial background. t0 8fJ^ 
audio and Wang wordprocessing experience. 

The stemmy for DIRECT I tWEST MENTS 
will have a strong financial h^fpound. ano 
emov secretarial duties as well as ananfimg 
lri\d itineraries and cormnunidion with ra " 
lemalional contact. 

PORTFORLIO require a secretary; with initia- 
tive a ho has previously worked >0 a similar 
environment and able to cope wtb a high vol- 
ume of work and a variety of tasks. 

Boib positions involve general secretarial 
duties, organisation of meetings, and coordina- 
tion of travel arrangements in a busy 
demanding environment. 

Benefits include an attractive salary', pension 
and medical plan, plus life insurance. 

Please apply with CV. tot 

Personnel Department 
Invest carp International Ltd 
65 Brook Street 
London V/i f 1 YE 



RURAL/NORTHUMBERLAND 

Absolutely lop class PA secretary required 
by the Chatman and two directors of a fast 
moving go-ahead speciality Chemical 
Company trading worldwide. 

The Snags: Impatient, chauvinistic Board 
and unreasonable work load. 

The Benefits: Fresh air, hunting, riding, 
shooting, fishing and golf in England’s least 
spoiled county. Very ample pecuniary 
rewards and aft the latest communications 
equipment. 

Please reply to Linda Undorff. Arthur Young, 
Nortram Hose, 12 New Bridge Street West, 
Newcastle upon Tyne, hEI 8AD. 


RECEPTIONIST 


PERSONNEL? 

ENTHUSIASTIC? 

Do you have a 
personnel/recnjiting ■ 
background, a high 
degree of self 
motivation and wish to 


marketing skills? We 
are looking lor a 
consultant 24-40 to 
job our friendly, 
professional team 
placing secretaries in 
permanent jobs. 


temporary basis, with 
a view to permanency. 


ENGUSH/FRENCH/SPAKISH/GERKAN 

TTHUNGUAL PA SECRETARY l-’U;, fitm French and 
Spanish 0 assist MD t French' and Vp iSr-ir.rsb > of mieresucn*) 
investment bank in Mayfair. Enjlnt -eeds :o be of mother 
lontate aaotiard «nh Eiijlah st'-rJind and «oid procewns 
skills. This is a dynamic firm aad ins ,;ob Involves all rbe 
tnpaaa& and Juao n actiwiii: yyj mpr. expect Health 
insurance. pension, bonus and a tkc-ien £v. 590 sod 
£1 1.500. 

KLMGUAL PA SCOtETARY te ires: i5l » imj* in ESSEX 
for Maturing Director (French l An e»renema! self starter «bo 
»iH organise h» day and provide the trn of tudeup acrrmlly 
e x pected at this level. Fluer.i Read:, i mp e cca ble English cod 
Eoglish shorthand ate reeded This a a nr» orperturety (dee to 
retocauonl in a uel7 kna&n iatcrran ; r_al group of companies. 
Comfortable offices, pariarg. remursu. sporv. forihiies Sakry 
around £ 10000 . 

TRIUMGUAL PA /SECRETARY wife floes: French and 
Goman and English to mother teyp* <undsrd is requard by 
this wdl lmo«m cay fterctuuii bui. Must have shorthand in 
English, a kn ow l e dge of word proce s sing combined with several 
t«an experience at senior level (ideally rs a ftnarciaiK reeled 
field l The ts an neribst vacancy for someone *bo wishes to 
use iD thr ee and is seeking a salary around £1(1000 

pins a onerous benefits package. 

MULTI UNGUAL SERVICES 

Recruitment GanaUrants. 22 Charms Cross Road. London 
WC2H OHR. 

01-83S 3794/5 


MEDIA- FINANCE • •AD’.'ERTISING S.ALEA- FERfONNEL 

1 Secretary /Research £ii,soo i 

> Thu Senior Parmer in this highly protsswi'nal cveculive 7 
. search company needs an equally trcfessierjl PA 10 join his — 

— 1 cam. In addition 10 vour secretarial responsibihto >00 will 
■5 have the opportunity of assisting wiitt his research protects. 

> IdcalK of gjcdu^ie calibre, vou uiii have the mauotiy to < 

7 handle wntor level elrents and highly confidraJial »o»i. C 
" Skills. 00/W Age- 25/ 55. S 

> Television £iomo - 

> This isajoh forone who loves iheeveiunent and pressure of ft 

— T.V but »ho kno^s that it’s ALL about bourn.''. Plenty of Z 
~ scope is offered in this superb Senior Secretarial post with a 

77 strong emphasis on admin, for a talented boss in a powerful jC 

2 company. Skills: Age: 21 +. ^ 

; Receptionist c £8,000 i 

> This young professional team with lovely Wtsi End offices 7 
Z need a bnghi friendly receptioniy/secretary 10 keep all s 
r running smoothly. Vou'll greet clients, arrange a busy diary . 
■ and use vow secreunal and admin, si ills to complete your , 
~ role. Shorthand is an advantage- Skills: 60 »po Age: Id-*- v 

% College Leavers e £ 7 t ooo \ 

f Spring Board Opportunity > 

pi The Chairman of this Prestigious City Bank is looking for a £ 
second secretary to join bis team. Ideal for a bnrhi college ' 
‘ leaver with raceUcm skills and personal prescniation. This is \ 
2 a pn*iledged role where you can tain a tare insight into — 
“ commerce at the highest level. Skills: 90/50 Age: IS+. 7 


■ The Director of MHA - a m^or 
Christian Charity caring for the elderly toneed 
-is seektog an experienced PA/Secroteiypn/l). 
Essential req ui rements ane the wSHngness to 
take on responsibility as WeB as having 
personal initiative and a real settee <rf 
commitment First-class secretarial afdUa 
(including shorthand) are essentiaL 
For this very special opportunity, contact 
; Miss Reteher, - 
Methodist Homes forithe Aged, 
Epwortft Houee, 25-35 Cfty Road,' 

, . London EClY IDa ' 

* .'(TeL 01-638 1431). ' 


JOIN THE W TEAM 

Be part of^ the action oo our dynamic tempi tram whicb 
will keep yoo busy providing new challenges in a wide 
variety of assignments throughout London^ If yon are 


variety of ass 
br^htandeni 


on our team. Age 19-25. Please c 

437 6032 


Dtit 'Londoo- If yoo are 
tts of 80/1 00sh or audio 
can earn e*ceflent tales 
ie cadt " 


HobstoneS 


Anncakn fovited for Ore post of Receptionist wMch 
tsan tiamedfale reatorementiar a msntoous pofoEioiial 
CUy Wrwi. 

The success** wlD be aged mtd-twentys wan 

omerlme of recapttcn m a professional envaoBment who 
wm cOmpiemsit tbe Head Rec^Qonist in aO duties. 
Typins abflltjr Is «f < t° t tbough not Die mam criteria. A 
quick wined, common sense approach b sought rogetber 
witb a {anfessktnai pteasant attitude: Die abflOy to tiabe at 
afl Iwdi with tact ami a natural helptaL 

cbeerfal dlsposttian and a confident speaking voice are tbe 

Annual iialnnr £&SOO with fbor weeks Holidays. Hoars 
-8^50to to 4^Cpw. , 

Far tattal interview contact. 

bsdwEM. 


~ EXPERIENCED SECRETARY /PA 

h iten utlnef Seles £8,000+ 

i 

Angjo-Amertcan'H tnrit Company k sao l dn fl a raaoureaU 
Socratery/PA torla dynamic Safes and Uartsetsig ofllca band 
in Mayfar. You «• deal dossly mAh our overseas charts and 
ba in constant Uson wflb our American parent company and 
French aBBata. 

excBdant typing stete mqusd ptaa the tetey to uea (or laamj 
Wordstar plus Lotus phis TWsoc. V you Ike exdtment (and 
occasiontd pressor^ we offer e ace i n n t condfeos and 
benefis. 

For further datdfe punnet 

C&da&ne Jones on 
01*491 0536 

(No Agendas plessa) 


Secretaries Pius 


PROPERTY 

£10,000 

This well known and 
prestigious property 
company is looking tor a 
PA/Sec for one of their 
Senior Directors. The 
ability to take over 
responsibility in his 
absence wiU require a 
professional attitude, flair 
for common icalion and 
ddBs of 90/60/aoOio. Age 
25+. ■ • 

629 8863 ' 

ODGE 

RECRUmVEPJT 


A SINKING SECRETARY = HAZELL* STATON 


Is required by the Export Council of Norway, 
who's role is to promote trade between Norway 
and the UK. 

The successful applicant will have initiative and 
confidence. WP skills essentiaL The work is 
varied so you must be adaptable and organised. 
■Duties include typing, some limes of lengthy 
Market reports, answering Trade enquiries. 
Exhibition work. 

Knowjege of Norwegian or another 
Scandinavian lan guag e an advantage. Salary 
negotiable. 

Apply to: 

Export Council of Norway 
Norway Trade Centre 
20 PaD Mall London SW1Y 5NE. 
Telephone OI-839 6261. 


SECRETARIES 

81t£M + Mott a* 

Your warn expe rtis e 
and good shorthand ore 
what am needed for ttv 
Director level positions 
in a busy end team 
spirted environment 
One position requires a 



ENTREPRENEUR/ESS 

£9,000+BONUS+CAR 

Required immediately by protect development 
company operating -In West Africa. Although 
required, secretarial skills are the least of your 
requirements. The ability to think, and act 
decisively in a very wide range of differing fields, 
ranging from marketing, banking. procuremenL 
shipping and a whole range of all round 
disciplines, ts paramount 

We are a small, high profile orga n i s atio n operating 
in Mayfair, and this fob. will be what you make it. 
The potential opportunity for a career minded 
individual, prepared to work as and when 
required and travel extensively if needed, are 
considerable. 

It is unlikely that those with inflexible soda! or 
domestic arrangements will find this post suitable. 
We seek an Individual, not a list of qualifications. If 
you are truly dynamic do not be afraid to call 01 - 
560 4191 X21 1 Dalila Govt for immediate 
interview. 


SECRETARY/PR 

Eqmtfls wi PR company nesd a mU organeed. sst motrated 
secretary to myt tor a busy axoiA team. Rany ot owomffBty to tee 
c«n mwhve wdn mwtement across a broad ctero Base. 

Speeds 90/60 with WP expertise pretered plus ebflfly to cope undo 
pressure. Safety nesmabte. 

Tek Susannah Fergusson at 
SGL Communications Pic 
on 02-631 3555 


SECRETARY/PERSONAL 

ASSISTANT 

manage his office and ?«ticipsaefofcr u» ton 
administraoon of this professional assodaito roDenta**. 
Excellent secretarial sfcffis are remnred twt eqntey 
imponam are the willingness and ajgity to d ew flgp *e 
noshion into an impwtam hnk rote, botn wood oe 
asOTCfeiion and witoSside bodies, .the salary , wludi.ts 
Reeonable. will be commensorate "tdi the demands of^ the 

?te"soccessfnl appHcam ^pmtaWy be «m emeitenred 

eraduare secretsoy aged 35+ who a fr ee of faimiv 
ccmtniamCTtZpfease send a ™ 

cumcuhim vitae, to arrive by 1st May l^So w 

THE SECTrTARY, .^^ 
BRITISH DaiTAL ASSOWATHMi, 

64 WfMPOLE STREET, 

LONDON WVTW SAL- 
TEL 01 935 0875 ; 



PROPERTY 

£ 10 , 000 + 

CbaBentfng * daoawhw 
posfoon lor WpagBrt *«■ 
eduatedPAPaiBOOdsMte 
tVtinatV SenkirtfertnBr <* 

mflne propwtif » in tt® 

at*. 254-. 

Call Asm mnrnn 



Plenr wife w«b fnB details ac 


CREME DE ^ CREME 
# appears on Ba*« & 34 


NON - TYPING 
WANG SUPERVISOR 

For accounts section aflaise prestigious CSty firm. 
Supervising 18 operators. AUe to haise ai all levels 
aaddefcgare wdS. £1000O£lOS00 

WANG AUDIO 
PART OF A TEAM 

Financial services firm in Green Park need a sole 
operator who has good audio and Wang and is 
willing to help out with answering telephones, 
photocopying 'etc when required. Non smoker. 


Please calk 
Format Agency 
01-831 2885 


SECRETARY 

Long John International 

Loading Scotch Whisky DistiUors with offices 
near St James' Park Underground require an 
efficient energetic and presentable Secretary 
for their Export Department 

(deafly aged 25-30 years, applicants wffl need 

first class shorthand /aud to/typing skills. 
Impeccable English and a good knowledge of 
Spanish are essential. 

Salary is negotiable. Good fringe benefits. 

Please telephone Jenny Colquhoun 01-222 
706a (No agencies please). 


8 Golden Square, London Wl. 

~ TeL 01-439 6021. 

MEDIA- FINANCE- ADVERTISING SALES- FEFiONNLL 


PUBLISHING HOUSE 
MD’S SECRETARY/PA 

Managing Director of a well known West 
London publishing house requires a secretary 
/PA. Excellent audio typing, WP and office 
management skills are essential. Shorthand and 
foreign language or two could be useful but most 
important of all I need a well organised and 
pleasant person willing and able to turn a hand 
to any task in a busv office from making endless 
cups of coffee and keeping the diary through to 
talking to key contacts and turning out beaut- 
ifully typed policy and financial papers. Salary 
around £9.500. 

Reply to BOX A8I, C/O P O Box 484. 

Virgina Street. London El. 

• NO AGENCIES! 


PA TO MD PR CO 

Managing Director of travel and leisure public 
relations consultancy in SW1 is seeking a 
secretary /PA to him and one other Director. 
This is a rewarding position with considerable 
responsibility working with fun people. 

Fast and accurate shorthand, typing and word 
processing skills are essentiaL If you also pos- 
sess intelligence, a pleasant manner, a good 
appearance' and a sense of humour then send 
your CV. marked private end confidential, to: 

Barry Cooper 
Heet PR Ltd 
3 Grosvenor Gdns 
London SWl 
Salary is negotiable 


GERMAN/FRENCH 
English Sec Skills 
SlljBCO + benefits 

Prcaxpous merchant bank urgently seek a (ir*t class 
secretary. Idea) applicant ullJ hare secretarial experience 
and tie flueni ui German and French for frequent Uafcon 
and translation. Knowledge of Italian an asset. 

Fraley Rcc GX-CCO 5622 


M Hoar, 12* Wignire SL W1 

PR 

TO £14,500 

Tfes PR co needs an 
Account Exec with ai 
leas: 2 years PR exp anct 
a knowledge oi 
computers to work on 
high tech accounts This 
is a non-secreianel rote 
and the candidate shotAJ 
have been working in a 


MuUli 1 ! I'l 


e> pone nee. The company 
wdl pnyJtde tramwig 

causes m bom 
technology ana 


If you are a bnghf. 
switched on 21 year oks. 
this mt co needs you to 
assist the Charman. You 
should have skills ol 
90/60 and possess all the 
social graces. Superb 
opportunity to progress 


e£1G,GC9+ 
B0NUS & WORT 


Leading aichitectural 
practice needs a sec/PA 
25+ to asset two 
partners This is a very 
busy involving position 
requiring good'typmq and 
excellent communication 


This major City institution 
needs a sec/PA 1&+ (will 
consider c/I) to assist in 
personnel. You should j! 
hawe good typing and be 
friendly and outgoing. 

01-335 8235 


FRENCH 
CAN TURN A 
JOS INTO A 
CAREER 

Ane you ready lo move to 
your second job with a 
small but thriving 
company in St James's 
where your fluent French 
will be apreoated as 
much as your secretarial 
stalls. Fewer people 
means lots ot variety lor 
everyone, so nng now so 
find our more about this 
greal opportunity. Start 
33.500. 

174 Mew Bend St, Wl. 


.Vriterajj 
iS'ecietariesi 



RECEPTIONIST - 
£ 7,500 

City insurance company requires a 
smart, efficient receptionist with 
typing skills and conversational 
French to join their small specialist 
team. Beautiful offices, pension 
scheme. LV’s and other benefits. 

Elizabeth Clegg 
Tel: 01-481 3122 


ASSISTANT 
TO OFFICE MANAGER 

Expanding 60 strong archtkcts office in South 
Kensington needs an assistant to tbe Office 
Manager. Duties include som e typin g, some fig- 
ure work and general administration. 

Write with CV to Elizabeth Ldgh-Brecse an 
Michael Hadmll Associates, 7 Cromwell Place, 
London SW7 2JN, 

Telephone 01-581 8535 


PERSONNEL 

HUBS + MQRT6ABE 

Hading tiwa wa Bnk 
isgawy art to appotat a 
testacy id assist tautnart 
Dftfcas B PtisocneL 
FtodUdy & sMSiy to «erk 
ones prastre as esssta 

Vay goal Marts. 


PEOPLE FLAIR? 

£104)00 4 - BONUS 

Eim iBStmtafty. deUsr^ 
and plenty of as 

rate ssc a Seanti Braun. 
Jon dwattara ft prrp^tui 
ca zs a good w rnoieer Mti 

aaw tw b&arrn d iH towels. 
FaS typetp A WP exp. Ssty- 
nd manes. Eety rewaw. 


ARE YOU A GOOD 


[•]^Tn4; v .Wq;l 


Director requires ur^itli- a PA to help organise 
conferences and exhibitions. Good knowledge of 
German, head Tor figures and full secretarial 
stalls essential, interesting position with some 
foreign travel. 

Salary according to age and experience- 

RtRfP OS-583 6519 


01-7305148 


PRIVATE PA Wl area 
• Salary very negotiable 

VPYCTt dBcteUpwicB wirtaMo Mw rta cte rts, and n nstewb 
Ofa an. Wttngta beeart rtroMd a (Wi lari Many toons' 
and abto to wrt on owi Wdtew, in tew fmpBrtrtHoca. Mtataun 
stOBtahl duties, 1060 sn.stst + sopati te nrtts. 

PtoCoos) 


(Rec.Con.) 


WP OPERATOR/AUDIO 
SECRETARY 

Iivirfy market .re sear ch company requires WP 
operitor/aiidio seartary to look after group of 
.ateentives. S^aiy aae + wpfit 
Apply to writing to: Janet Clark, The Research 
Business, 25-27N«th Row, London WIR 1DJ 


Advertising - PA 

This importrat Ad^a rti fl ing Ptiw*or nwds and rape ri meed 
PA Secretsy with s ufid a dve rtising background and 
tapattfefed oiBtetedunal abilities. Circa £10,000. 

TV Production Co - Receptionist 

Hectic, attniuelf buy seeeptua area. Must be chsrtauig. 
•unrated rad «Lte to raa earity rath artistic creative 
people. Circa £8*500. 

Films - Production Secretary 

Golden o pportu nity for a davar se cret ar y with a working 
background in tdanaion to ratfci this busy animation 
producer. Circa £&500- 


% I l/ii! n il\ T * v r- 

ll feSg 


DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR/SSCRETARY 
£8,000 Neg AGE 35-45 

required fora Learned Society. Able to work on 
own initiative and without supervision on a 
variety of administrative dudes. Ideal for 
someone looking for involvement responsi- 
bility, and able 10 mix with people. Also require 
accurate typing (shorthand not necessary) and a 
pleasant telephone manner. Non-smcker pre- 
ferred. Please write enclosing CV with full 
details of experience to: Miss M A Simmonds, 
41 Devonshire Race. London WIN 1PE 


£7300 - £8,500 

Tibs expanding Market Research Ca require 7 secretaries 
for newly created posatons. CO wpm irunL tun training 
Oven on WP. Are you bright, confident & career mtndEd. 
and witting to became totally involved? 

can Jenny The Wantoor Street A®. 

01-734 8844 


A CHALLENGE 

If you are dynamic, self-motivated, with 
initiative & emhusiam, and drive a good 
car-letting high class furnished properties 
in Central London could be for you. 
CALL 

PAMELA 3SEEMD 
NOW 

ANSCOMBE & RINGLAND 
01-722 7101 


AUDIO SECRETARY 

For partner of busy commercial estate ageats- 


( negotiable). 

Apply in terming with CV to: 
Mrs J Hetherlngton 
Colin Buckle & Company 
Canberra House 
31S Kegent Street 
London WtR 7X8. 

Or tel: Ol 53t 1923 

(M» «c*ra**i 


BASINGSTOKE 

SECRETARY/PA FOR HANA&IHG DIRECTOR. 

Wicks & Wilson design and manufacture micro- 
graphic equipment for a worldwide market. We arc 
looking for a secretary/pa for our Managing 
Director. Essential requirement first class 
secretarial qualifications, experience at director 
level, education lo ai least A level. 

Salary £8,500 to £9.000 plus substantial benefits 

package. 

Please write giving full details of education and 

career to date to:- 

HSrs cesity Kll!Ser v 
Wicks £ Wilson Ltd., 

WeaS Ham Bnd Estate. 

Basingstoke, Homps., 

RGS2 6PQ. 

































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 


PROPERTY BUYERS' GUIDE 


LONDON PROPERTIES 


Afove to the McLean Home Counties 


There’s no wider choice of new homes North ofLoadon! 

open countryside. wd «w mth Tetepbooc^l-SMgl __ 

•_“> ", fel rail connKUons to Kings Cross *Lm« te*. Piiwnn", Pi-ila. 

jTij?’ ■ or LivotkAI Street. 2,3*4 bedroom ho«»<=s fnytn Q6JM* 161 JOO 

■; AH homes are trad iti o na lly- built. Ooe-bodvoomjnm fnm £3 °- 75 ° 

• vaSri- ' r -\- and offer a Wtde range of -reVrpfaoor: fOS8-.' 8^31^ 


- f ‘ * A superb ickcii«ief aftmcnvrty. 

y planned development*, all close ip 

I j T .jK^TfS-" open countryside, and roast with 

LE • w ", ‘ fel tail connections to Kings Cross 

B it ffl v— inCi "■ or Li vcrpoOl Streei. 

SffTry •= r £L'*—-f £. AH home* are [rack nonally- built. 
^ Li 'a5n ~ ' r -'.* and offer a Wtde range of 

■ '■>» * * aceomiaodanon fitreveiywie from 

‘■Sislsfak yourtR people or reiinng couples 
. 1 4> ' ra growing or established families- 

Shmvfaofncs and Sales Receptions are open from I lam - 6pm 
Thursday id Sunday and 1pm - 6pm Mondays. 

■ Campions, Moors Walk, Pams hanger Drive, 

Wchura Garden City, Herts. 

2*3 bedroom houses from £44,990 
One-bedroom apartments from £36.750 
Telephone: >0707) 371544 

Cfcesbuot Gr an ge. Rywdak Way. Chesfamn, Hcrts- 
2*3 bedroom' houses from £50,500 
Telephone: >0992 ) 38037 

Cborcb Park, Off Qmrch Field, Wattoa Rmxl, Ware. Herts. 

2 St 3 bedroom houses from £5 1.950 
Telephone. - (0920 1 69*45 

The Green. T em pl e Farm. Xtoydoa. Eo t s . 

4 bedroont detached bouses fromf) 10.000 
i Show House open Sarurday and Sunday only 1 lam — 6pm > 
Telephone: i0279 79 1 2467 


McsdowGodn. 

3 & 4 bedrocen bouaes frtna £66JoO 

3 bedroom detached bungakjy* from £68,300 
Telephone- - (07631 48239 

S heeri ng Lo rrar Rond. Sa w bri dggoortfc, i 
i bedroom houses from £49,995 
1 bedroom aparxroents from £34,250 
Tele p ho n e: (QZ79i 726*07 

» Wlckhama Wharf , Viadaet Rood, Warn, Sera. 

1 '2 & 3 bedroom apartments from £40,300 -£6Z^00 
Telephone : (0920) 69908 

W o o c ffnt u tlv .SmriinW^.Bem ham wpnd.HeigL 

One bedroom apartments from £38,500 
Telepbaner 01-207 1791 i 

* Ft ^LT ui ^^ y H ^ aM ~ t ^ J5 g jim K 

l.Z,3ik* bedroom homes 

from £36,500 |~ fiiiMliiSlli 

Telephone: (0992) 552672 . 

• SbevtoM nee ynt opep./^i !dld [, ; S 




To please a gentleman: The OU Rectory, Exiling, handy fa racing at Newmari^t The price is £275>OW-£W0, 

A county counts on prosperity 

** . < .kaiMuJcrif the South-East. 


Midland Homeowner Plus 
takes care of all the ins and outs of 
a mortgage in one complete 
package. 

It shows we're in the mortgage 
market in a big way. This year, 
we’re making one billion pounds 
available for mortgages. 

You get the Midland 
Mortgage Certificate 

This agrees your mortgage for the 
amount stated, provided the property is 
suitable. Its almost like being a cash buyer 

But that’s just a part of the package. 
Arrange a Midland mortgage before the 
end of May 19S6 and you alsoget the 
following: 

!4% off your mortgage interest 
rate for one yean 

This is worth £88.80 before tax relief 


on a £20.000 mortgage, £133.20 on a 
£30,000 mortgage. And it’s the same 
interest rate for endowment and capital 
repayment loans. 

£50 towards professional fees. 

Makes legal fees a little easier to 
swallow when buying a home. 

A Home Management Account 

This allows you to spread your house- 
hold bills interest-free over a whole yean 

You can take advantage of the 
Homeowner Plus package even if you 
already have a mortgage with someone 
else. We won't charge you a penny should 
you wish to transfer it to us. 

For full details, call into your local 
Midland branch, or write to (j* 

The Mortgage Dept.. , 

Midland Bank pic PO Box 2,f 
Sheffield SI 3GG. 

* WE'VE BEEN LISTENING.” JS 


OUTSTANDING 
Gnfur nuM 
Double tad taring to any 
Uuteoped p*t* wta ftwSgbK, 

ma- 
in wudntoe. Om enmrea. Mr 
Trie ft riots, quri Rd. 97 yr 

*“■ £59350 


Suffolk is, almost certainly, the next - Wortimn 

county tobe sucked into the house price By Christopher warman 

teveJ reaching out from London. To the Pmnerht Cnm*mnndent 

east it has already penetrated Essex and Property Lorresponaem 

this means Suffolk and Norfolk now lie 
^ThedMMdfOT property m the Soutfr. 

East as a whole — because that is where £* j"* 1 ^ thev wffl. 



ready ie walk into. 3rd flr man- 
Mon block. Batcootea facton 
wm over am. * utas a «Ww. 2 
beds. WC. aunty nan. Ml uo 
jubi 2 Am reran- 140 yi*. 
£360.000 la toe GkC 6 entire 
ML W/*tx»/£vo *70 4703 
w/days 499 2910. 



people want to live and where there are 
jobs — inevitably pushes people further 
out Suffolk is already appealing, 
both to commuters in the south of the 
county and to people from many parts of 
the country aiming to come and settle 
with the prospect of local work. 

From the Ipswich office of Hanbury 
Williams, Ronald Pennell sees the 
county as the last bastion against die 
i price o nslaug ht “We axe still looked on 
as a backwater, and we do not mind that. 
There is a rural attitude that we like, but 
there is uo doubt that prices are going op, 
and during the past 12 months or more 
have been increasing out of proportion 
with the rest of the country.” 


Vast improvements in 
the road network 

! He points to the Felixstowe Docks, the 
, A45 road corridor to the Midlands, the 
1 arrival of British Telecom and insurance 
companies, and the electrification of the 
railway to the area as reasons for the 
influx of people and the consequent rise 
in prices. “The number of people 
moving here from London is increasing 
all the time, and they are coming from 
further away, from Liverpool and 
Tyneside, because there axe jobs here, 
mainly on the technical side,” he says. 

. Mr Pennell believes the days of the 
kittle cottage in the country at a 
knockdown price have gone. “There are 
a few bargains to be found, but not 
many,” he says. The biggest increase in 
prices is in the first-time buyers' market, 
.which has increased by 15-20 percent in 
the past year, and where sellers against 
testate agent advice are asking £3,000- 
£4,000 more than the £30,000 advised — 


yw uift wvvi-v- — ■ 

market yeL but no doubt they wilL 

At the higher end of the market, 
Suffolk remains — along with Norfolk — 
than anywhere else within reach 
of London. A new buyers’ guide to 
country house values . produced by 
SaviHs estimates £55,000-£65,000 for a 
three-bedroom detached cottage in north 
Suffolk and £75,000^90,000 in the 
south, while a country house with five or 
six bedrooms andup to five acres is 
worth from £130,000 in the north to 
£1 80,000 in the south. The large country 

house with upwards of six bedrooms and 

grounds of up to 20 acres starts at about 
£250.000. _ 

That these are averages is shown by 
the prices of properties on the market. 
The Old Rectory, at Exiling village, two 
miles from Newmarket, is a fine exmapte 
of a 19th-century Suffolk house, one of 
the most substantial in die v illage, which 
fac es the village church. The house, well 
placed fin* Newmarket races, has been 
fiiDy modernized is the past five years 
and was adapted for use as a retirement 
home, though the agents, Bidwelis of 
Cambridge, say it would readily convert 
back into a family house. 

With four iuam reception rooms and 
eight bedrooms, it has a self-contained 
fiat and a coach bouse cottage in tire 
grounds of nearly an acre. A gazebo and. 
conservatory, with two footbridges 
across the stream, are features of the . 
garden, and the guide price is £275,000- 
£300,000. 

The agents say that with the vast 
improvements in the road network in 
Suffolk and Cambridgeshire, East Anglia 
is bring rediscovered by commuters 
from London. The booming hi-tech 
industry around Cambridge, they say,'. 

1y ^ngUa following. 


closely on the Ms of the South-East. A 
recent Nationwide Building Soc iety sm - - 
vey showed annual house price ‘ ncre **?5 
in Anglia az 13 per cent, *(“•* 
Bidwelis claim understate the mo vement 
of prime property prices ra the region. 

Eight miles east of Burv Si Etotmds 
Green Farm, featured ra thereceni b«- 

television series L&goyj jsberagsog by 

the BBC through Bedford of Bwy St 
Edmunds - suggesting; 

-come to an end. This fine Suffolk 
‘fennbouse. with a thatched roof and 
exposed timbers, has recently been 
modernized, and the piWtyhas ? 
range of outbuildings and paddocks- Tne 
house has three reception rooms ana 
four bedrooms, and the agrmsare asking 
for offers crTmore than. £125,000.-. . 

Savifis' Norwich office is oiferiog for 

sale a Grade II* listed town bouse. Rose 

HalL in Bungay, for around £150,000. 
The main part of the bouse was bulli on 
to an earlier core in 1739 by Admiral 
Nelson's unde; and the accommodation 

Five extra bedrooms 
are in the attic 

includes four reception rooms, four or 
five bedrooms and five further attic 
bedrooms, with grounds of nearly an . 
acre. The same agents are seu&tft 
Gardiners HaH iaSsoee Ash* near Eye, a . 
Grade fl fisted -fonnhouse believed to 
date from 1666, -villL tiaee^-teceptioft 
* rooms and six bedrooms, standing in IS 
acres. Offers around £175^000 jv* 
sough*- 

Decoy Cottage, tan, near Snape^ is 
another farmhouse set in quiet country- 
sde in about two acres, for which Smut 
& Parker's Ipswich, office is asking 
arouad £8W)0ft It im exposed-timbers, 
two reception rooms aid four bedrooms, 
and outbuildings. The same aoaos ire ' 
sellir^ Bramfbrd House, &amfor<Lnear 
Ipswich, an imposing Wiffiam and Mary . 
. house,. Both fotxrcccptiti A jwp as ‘and 
‘ five beffiodtos. feraroimd"£2Gtt<VW 




morci. ta So ft UL 2 Lm me 

2Ux2W.2»ll«R.i3ytv 

£266.000. W/cabTve 8TO 
4703. WUftrJty, 499 9981. 



® MIDLAND HOMEOWNER PLUS 


ALEXA COURTSSiTSS™ 

A major new protect of innovative design — releasing 22 
> apartments for sale on leases for 125 years 

Siuuird in a quiet and convenient pan of Kensington, almost aO 
- _ the apartments enjoy beautiful south-facing outlooks over 

‘iM’ private gardens — and many also have ibeir own 

: j Bardens or tenaccs. 

.~..i 

’ 'M' ^ oivry to flats remain — 12 reserved 

7 ) ® AFTER TBE FIRST WEEX. 

■^S. [Si! ^ Three Bedroom Flats 

..;i - iSl Iqi 10 r I V ; Vv il95,0€O-£275,0OO 

.jsS! '*i! ti • Two Bedroom Flats 

2; 3. I &115,00-&195,000 

y\ <5 - ‘ “jlftlllS One Bedroom Flat £87,500 

StTldio Hats *49,000 

~ luxurious Entrance. 




m, 

TiM 






SUPERB SHOW FLAT OPEN 
TODAY & DALLY Ham- 7pm 
(Site telephone no. 01-244 7613) 


4 • "-7.- JT 

4 -y 


Passenger Li fl, 
■f'T Resident Porter. 

■ Super Kitchens 
Z~ 2 xiand fully-tiled 
S- Bathrooms, 
r Cos Central Heating, 
Sew Decorations 
& carpets. 


Sole 

Agents: 


WAJUJSBP 


£280 

Conveyancing by City Solicitors 

For buying or selling your home in the usual 
way, we charge £280 (+ V.A.T. and disburse- 
ments) for prices up to £60.000. Please 
telephone us for a quotation on figures higher 
Irian that. We can also help you find a 
mortgage. 

BARRETTS 

49 QUEEN VICTORIA ST 
LONDON EC4 

TELEPHONE: 01-248 0551 



.A 

VIP ESTATE 
SERVICES 


Buvinq a house or an 
apartment m London but 
nui't spare the tune and 
effort? 

Lei the spectate! 

Art for you 

TeMwnMOt) 740 6 S 27 
Tfltaa 897121 



10 Collingham Place 
KenangtorvLondon SW5 

v*si I r * ve quite exceptional new 
hi ^ 31 ^ ■ a P artments » superbly fitted and 

appointed — and setting new 
standards for the neighbourhood: 

2 BEDROOM FLATS FROM £110.000 
fa ^ 3 BEDROOM DUPLEX @£180.000 
’ (LEASES 125 YEARS) 


VIEW TODAY 11a. m.-6 p.m. 
(Site tel. 01-373 2717) 


pi !^4 W AELLIS 

^r^fet^RUSSELL SIMPSON 

. ■ ■■_. . ■ — 4 ^ ■ 5 Andcrmi 9*1 London SWJ 3LU 

Taephoae0l£?«r’a^ i*?t 




ReaQy OoUgbtful bright 2 
idbte) bed Oat. Recep. 
archway to dining area, 
fully fltied RH & baib. 
Carpets ihrouWiouL 89 
year tease Intmac 
condition throughout 

£67,950. 



£200 

CONVEYANCING 

For Buying or setono your 

home »t iww» a flat fie 
Otcaoot + VAT 4 (Mow 
nentsi on p rw m to up 
00 . 000 . Cotnomnvc 
«rt« me £100.000. 

PEARCE & DAVIS 
01-472 2652/3 


ST JOHNS WOOD 


Loin unitor drefened ItoL 

Ground IWeR 4 Mlk. 3 

MM. 2 IKOT. fflo. prw 
tag. 80 year toate. £300.000 
lid carprts end nnam 

^OFFREY 
LEVENE & Go 
SOLICITORS 
01-431 1234 


ST JOHNS WOOD 

Pretty. tntf*4tbflfW tow! 
SUM 1930s P/8 UodL 
Qsss a mattes. 1 Ota 
Dad. racep. K + 8. C ft &Md 
decor. Uft/portET. consasal 


£55,000 

01-624 1829 <H) 


3 KB FLAT L* W. pti*. 999 yr 
fa*. Mr vi un. f porting apace. 
MofamtoOw pwnttred, wefl. 
rnlim w SW1. £96.000. Tel: 
057B 70591. 


2 ■ K OKOOWtO nu hi P-bA t 
MDirm. toe U. oedamsatton 
reaumf Weur ua. 999 vr tor. 
W tiunina t e r SWI. £77.600 
Tel: OSTB 78301. 


KSIMWfDL 2 awwra mad 
nab wah scope for farther- up. 
daOito. In oofai St. CCH. 98 vrs 
be. 2 M £(l&XI0a 3 Ml 
XU 30.000. Ol 622 259am. 


A HAT to ph.b. 5 beta, tor tot- 
new (irt. l nfco spare, mod re- 
oimvd. 999 yr tie- SWI. 
£105.000. T«fe 0578 78591. 


■;V>i " M ^ 








I WrrV^niFr-A 







> 1 ^ 
















































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 



omc&AppMDn Manor. in the village of 

"^abtents 

Appaworo, has been compiled, and 
Hie ri r a bedroom house, withfouT 
a *“^36 Norman 

fflitUftncehafl. Tb& {pounds of nina yr T^R ■ 
mdircle aUIhe bam, staff cottage and 
padlock, and offers over £425 jooo are 

oSKeKL 

J^agenteareasWng around 
£375.000 for The Deanery at Bampton 
which has origins In 1 1 60. Apart from 
alterations tothe.west wing In 1920. the 
property has not been substantially 

1 £52J he Cotswold stone 
house, with five bedrooms. Is set in 5 
acres including an ornamental pond with 
a collection of geese and ducfcsT^ 

S Island Lodge foms one third of an 
oppressive Queen Anne house in Wilton, 
ancient capital of Wessex, dose to 
Salisbury, for which Humberts’ Salisbury 
office is asking around E200^)0a 
Ties older part of the house, which has 
later Victorian adkfitians, has five 
bedrooms and two reception rooms, and 
it atands in grounds bordering the 
tributaries of theriver Wytye. 

Week-ending in style 

■ Hawk How at GlenrkJding, 






Broadwell Manor, on the edge of the beautiful Cotswolds village of Broadwell, is , 
a fine Grade II fisted Georgian manor house which incorporates a small part of, 
the p revious Jacobean house largely destroyed by fire in the 1750s. Since its con- 
struction in 1757 it has remained substantially unaltered and it is on the market 
for only the second tune since 1619. Standing in 11 acres, with the possibility of a 
farther 24 acres, the house has four main reception rooms, three principal bed- 
room suites and four additional bedrooms, with a granny flat and other rooms 
suitable for modernisation. The outbuUtfings include three fiats, a bothy and an 
original Tndor brew home, and there is a stable yard and paddocks. Knight 
Frank and Rntiey are asking for offers oyer £650,000 

DIY conveyancers 
make it home and dry 


CIDER WITH 
ROSIE VALLEY 

SetPconiainrC flai wtm 
splendid views in ntsonc 
rnUL 3 beds. 2 bathrooms. 
|QU|> fined kitchen. large 
sitting room, large study, 
lugtt storage healing, 
parkins space- won or 
without 5 acre wood. 
With wood: £85.000. 
W/O wood- £75,000. 
0452-SIJ3SI- 


COTSWOLD VUML IVUrtM 
ttuualov* in imn l‘- acm 
Pannramv views. 5 Bedrooms ■ 
Umw ■ Dtmno - Knrfi - nun • 
Sun Ipunor - Cjb C H Gamut 
out buddings. C7B.OQa 04WO 
6181. 


HANTS-JXJRSET, & 

Law. 


HU or WKMT. SCAVKW. Ln- 

nmiH POBMWI BIWIMU.U 
me Solenl “V-MU- CMGiqe 

SMnnair, aouMr Ironlrfl 
freehold reSKWKe of character. 
S bedroom*. 2 rccetmon 
CUh. -W C. Bottuuurti . W C 

Kncncn. Mr. Ca» mural Mai- 
mg Wot ml oarOOT and 
car 'boat parking space Aur- 
uon 29U May iU«l» Sff 
Francis Puns 3 Son. 38 UMn 
Street. Ryd* LW Trt. 0985 
65788. 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


SAVELLS 


■; overlooking UUwsater, Cumbria, was buOt 
in 1920 for Hugh Roberts, owner of 
!' the North Shipping Company at 
Newcastle- upon-Tyne. as a weekend 
'■*; home in the Lake District 

Built of local materials the house has 
three reception rooms and five bedrooms, 
.^and stands in landscaped gardens of 
^over tivee acres. There is also a detached 
cottage and a stone bufft boathouse • 
on the take. . 

The present owners are cfirect 
descendants of Roberts, who died just 
before the Second Work! War, and the .- 
house is for sale at around £1 50,000 

- through Strutt and Parker's Harrogate 
officST - 

Well-heeled choice 

■ TTw bii^er of property in jersey 
needstobewerf-heetea to be avowed Into 
the island, and the buyer of La 
Hougue, St Peter, wHl need about 
£500,000 to become its owner. It was : . 
built in 1822 by Philippe Le Feuvre In 
coloniaFstyte and its two acres of 
" garden are surrounded by a high granite 
wal 

During the Second World War it was 
■ Jaken over by the Germans, who used It 
a rest home. The only reminder of 
those days are the ceSng beams, in. what. 

- is now the study, which its temporary 
occupants carved and patoted in 
traditional Bavarian styte. 

The house has three reception rooms 
and five bedrooms, plus staff 
accommodation, ana the gardens 

include a large bam and a swimming pool. 


SOUTH OF THE 


Recent Government legislation to end 
the solicitor’s virtual monopoly on 
conveyancing has proved just the right 
fillip to reduce costs, s timulate innova* 
tion and speed the process up, even 
though licensed non-solicitor convey- 
ancers have not yet come into being — 
the Consumers’ Association concludes in 
its guide to conveyancing, published this 
week. 

The Legal Side cf Buying a House ; 
published by Consumers 1 Association 
and Hodder and Stoughton, was first 
published in 1965, the fast DIY convey- 
ancing book, and has now been revised 
in the light of recent change , having sold 
250,000 copies. It shows fast it is both le- 
gal and possible to buy or sell a home 
without a solicitor’s help, and is de- 
scribed by Austin Mitchell MP, who 
introduced the Private Member's Bill to 
break the solicitors' monopoly, as “so 
simple, even an MP can follow it.” 

It acknowledges that since the legisla- 
tion, solicitors* conveyancing charges are 
ammig down. Until recently, a buyer 
could expect to be charged two per cent 
. .of the purchase price of a property. Now 
the charge would more likely be one per 
cent or even one half per cent for the 
same service. 

At the same time, the legal profession 
is meeting the challenge of competition 
with, new ideas. Some solicitors are 
selling property in England and Wales 
following the example of their Scottish 
counterparts, and individual firms have 
.opened their own estate agents' offices, 
charging a combined fee for conveyanc- 
ing and estate agency. 

In this dimate of change, is il still 
worth doing your own conveyancing? 



UC/fUnftp V- Z *W 9 
(He. bam. GCH. oH ar. affl c. 
SGRgttv l 

* Mum. Convert casMy 4/5 
Dad*. a both*. NO igfc 
060X00 mfl 01-570 5*55 


mKAnuaa commpm sapgb 
ugttf & turnout flat owloJW 
Common. 26* reran * diner. 
Ma«Mf «tt*e Bed- S-tfow- 
hathrm. Fitted kN. »d <*H- 
Car Shared ground* * F/H. 
£49,960- 769 SOW dW 


PtnWEY QDU WMMK. 2 IH*» 
enOotd pork- Crtche. via 
tvxnr. 3 beds. 2 rec. I Htt- 
isn lot. cam. ««l south tochw 
pan owTMUng communal 
(Htm £150.000 01-874- B6ZJ 



Answering with a firm *yes\ 
Consumers’ Association guide says ih 
buyer or seller can still save hundreds o 
pounds, dictate the pace of events and 
avoid the frustrations of having to c* 
up the solicitor. 

“DIY conveyancing is straightforward 
where the house is occupied by an 
owner-occupier and the title to it 
registered with title absolute. In these 
circumstances there is no reason why 
you should not be able to buy —and sell 
without a solicitor.” 

The rhetoric of the conveyancing 
controversy has now died down, and the 
Consumers' Association accepts that it 
would be wrong to ignore the reasons for 
using a solicitor or other conveyancer. 
The savings made by DIY conveyancing 
may not be great if you need a mortgage. 
For example, although a bank or 
building society will not insist that you 
should use a solicitor for your side of the 
conveyancing, it will wrist that the 
mortgage side is done by a solicitor — for 
which you are charged. 

It would not be wise, the book says, to 
do your own conveyancing if the person 
you are buying from (or selling to) is 
doing his own conveyancing as well and 
neither of you have mortgages. In these 
circumstances, there would be no solid- 
tor in the background, primarily em- 
ployed to do the mortgage side of the 
conveyancing, who would be aware of 
problems or any major errors. 

The book costs £6.95. There is a video 
cassette Home and Dry costing £19.95. 
The two together cost £24.95. From 
Consumers’ Association, PO Box 44, 
Hertford SGI 4 1SH. 

cw 


UMIO— Ml 1930 todor Sb*d 
abaft, bessnad Jiiwu gm log 
fire, otning fain- rm. dH l«a 
-kU'DkfaM tor 3/Bac.gdns ggc 

£166000 0628 33348 


HEREFORDSHIRE, 
WORCS, & SKROP 


HOKTORD IS Mllm Grade D 
Luted Blael. -and- wtuir roR49r 
acre garden. Garage SMda 5 
Brdrma. Srudy. Htem Rm. 

EtaUiraom W1UI Asimt Good 

dtcoralivr ordtf £68000. Re- 
ply to BOX F6& 


Mw* Border, Well sttuaam 

mull well nuinouwd counm 
nme praiiding mnoui a Be- 
ceoiton. 6 Bedroom. 2 
Balhroam Country How- Bear 
garaanq. imeful ouibuMings 
9 WHqb and gmindm. bIxmji 23 
aorta. KZiOJMO ColHerv 
BwwcMd £ BewUo> 0789 
294444. 

W HEM EF OW OMimr in Wye VbI- 
tey Fine dM 6 bed country Me 

. 'Pkiam s0i tens toe. Ear lecai 
lard £76000. David a Thome 
ton Surveyor*. 137 WMenunn 
6 L Hereford 0432 278888 


MOOR PARK 

GOLF COURSE 

RaJestgn knsl completed on 
ntatullal - deuebed 
family bouse. %• acre. 

£310,000 

Enquiries 0923 777421 
or 01-253 5761 



TOtMMMSTOM Qdd cut de HK 
near vfOagr centre attached 
family house. 4 bemorn. nin- 
ny lounge, dining room wllh 
nano doon to secluded garden, 
garage. £72.960. Easy reach of 
Ml Junction 12 and London 
rad Hnk. Tel 00286 4619 


KCVU. MEM E PP W MPQC- 

5nrerb del com-ertod stunle 
block. Natural pond. acre se- 
cluded garden, hnety ouOOOK- 
Eaty commuting. 2 beds, son x 
isn >u rrn. an rm. ut. bam. 
full CH. got. exienswn scope. 
£99200. Tel: 034 286 870. 


ASMFORB Teewfidly decoroled 
3 bed*. I dole. 2 receps. fully 
onea urenen. modem tain, 
gdn. GCH. close le ameiraues £ 
fitn £72600 Beg 0233 37672 


desirable 

residence 

naceody conwwi WNsoneda, 
(2nd/3nl ftoow) canwiwfl 2 
rim** tattoo*. 2 badnnmi 
(1 go sum), tour ml inar 
bndeos. tamky m 
MSUng mad — .art wfr n 
BflL Sttai (ado*V 
**> «6«fl 

idool taana Soom •— > 


LUXURY 

PENTHOUSE. 

117 year lam 3 bedroom. 2 
taUwmm. . rafzpdon/danr. 
large lounge, fem UmbefL 
jrtwto sak. tawshed- 

£2404)00 
M4H 1321 Bart—. 


KBHWP BJ U B 8H , SWA 

Pretty ftrU floor oat In watt 
rewtenual stmt. 1 dwe Bed. 
(tacep KiL Bam. C13S pw. 
Doutfam. Lyons & Lyons. Tel 
01-236 7933 

MN 1 Newly decorated, furnished 
and carpeted hot®# win 2 bed 
large rsceg. KU. Baft. Gdn. 
CH £176 gw. Douglas. Lyons 
a Lyons Tel 01-336 7955 


COUNTRY PROPERTY 


USKCABB ComnMU. A pamy 
tgmened lOUi centmv bam 
for £59.000 with 4 bedroom, 
thing room. 2 banvoomg. two 
kitchens -and . 46 acre. Cnm g rt 
Jones 106791 20346 
SOUTH DEVON - Dose Tomes. 
Law 2 Cottage* QuaUy 2 -bats. 
Barn conversion wnh ^ragtag. 

- g a rd en s a naao. Charaaer fea- 
tures. rural area. ta7-600 FH. 
Luscomur May* 0648 7*74. 
FLTgHWTlL Converted grade o 
listed bam. I (brans dty centre 
and beaches. 2 beds <1 angle), 
garden, garage, gas C/M 
£45980. 0762-348666. 
CORNISH Slone house boot sea 
spacious living area 3 beds 
walked crK ale gun modernised 
gas CH £44000 Tel Par 6872 


EAST ANGLIA 


OBWtCH <6 rabee). DebghHU. . 

fully rnodermsM send -demched 
malchrd cxxlagc. 2 b e dr oom 
Kkunoe. etc. Pretty garden. 
£36000. TVtephoae: 000646 
271. 




igmLeDON. beautlfuny 

modernised 2 UWe bed lemced 
house. C.CJL ftraw ft lounge. 
pecJudrd garden. Quiet t oad . 

%£ | DEVON & CORNWALL 

(WorKI Ol 958 2131 % 3582. I 


Well main tamed detached 
use. own tnaiure gnwm <6 
notes Tonjuayv Dehgiuful 
Slews to raoooL dose buses, 
trains. 4 beds <2 etmrte 
snoweru. 8 WC. anrac. aned 
kU.. hot Mlte-tn. L-sbaned 
lounge, dining room, not 
lounge, uumy nalL double 
garage, add. pazldne available 


MIDDLESEX 


WINER Attractive >-odem 2 bed 
ground floor M. pailang. 
£75.000 Tel; f I 866 7823. 


NORTH EAST 


MORTHUHKKLAND rttlremenl 
or rtounay eatuge magnifiranl 
ilevrsur Alnwick £47500. 016 
er* £15000. Abo vtBage P6B 
DC49000 Ph 01658 8346 


NORTH WEST 


187* Hse^nfge CLBrB IS min 
Mwgy 30mln Mcr. 6 BO. 2 BOi 
A(ja m. oil CH. tnoe. flin. study 
cellr. ige gun. yrd. pvt rd- ^ 
0204 885621 


STONEsnCLB- Prelty detatCfted 
Cou wold cottage, recently ren 
ovated. wuh south faang 
garden * magndiceni ifews 
over opan counlrystae. 3 bods. 
2 recep. CH. 12 "SKSJTST 
lord. £72^00. 0993898327 


MI HENUCY OH 1HAIK5 Coun- 
try House uim suoero rural 
views - 6 acre oroundr - ideal 
EatMUrUn purauns. 3 reejuv 
Ku mu rm 4 oeds. baths. CH. 
DMe 99?. Oufbuddings. offer, 
around £250-000. A-CTrosI 8 
Co I049D 572134. 

SOUTH (WON outstanding con- 
temporary country home. M**J- 
ndicera views . 3 recem- s a 
beds. 2 bafts dble gge. '■? acre. 
SH 3 nub*. Ovtorc JJ mliej. 
Privaie sale, region £195£W 
neg. 0233 814711 eve* 
BMUFORO UnhemU- area a a 
house 2 bed tut* recep GasOf 
ball mtUi HI cellar walled 9fl» 
£18000 IX 0608 73763S 
THAMES VALLEY '*** nr 
imgfORi a Bed fl« nse m guict 
nose iery pmate gun dbte gH 
CH gar Ph 0867 32H166 


SCOTLAND 


SOUTH eOTSWaUM.A Iwxun 
bus 3 bedroamed flM Ht 
spttildid 17m Cemury counirv 
house ana gardens- Gas Cn 3 
inwemve receonons. Med 
Uictien. 2 bathroom (I cn 
suiUO- parking £73260 Lear& 
Lear. Siononptdr Tel 045582 
2356- Lear 6 Lear. Stroud 
04636 71M6- 


KRHWWf. Pumollno Bnope 
Drftghtful IMrd country col 
IHc. beaudlulb' renmatea m 
secluded 91 m. 3 beds, ml 
lounge . um. mn*r>. O O 
£47«XX Te) 03774 506 


QALLOWAY - Ml lhe DMUIUUI 
Soum-w couv of Scotland 
18 Utiles from Dumfries. Superb 
Luxury Scandinavian Log Built 
Mo use s loe sale S bnfrooim. 
hihnaroom. kitchen iMthtnem 
toeeuy SIIUM 00 larKMCamd 
■hi* aoo yds from imhi. ehxj 
®W tram boH course, uabies 
neartiy Foe (uH deUih write or 
Menhooe BaivM Prapemes. 

.Drat. T T. . SandyhUDv 
paibeattie. Kirkcudsnsriitshire 
038 778 665 



Lan6 Fox 

9 'H-*“ Rylands 


HAMPSHIRE - 340 ACRES 

FafTh^tn 2 mtes. London 43 mdes 

AN OUTSTANDING RESIDENTIAL AND 
AGRICULTURAL ESTATE win a mag nif icent Grada 

il Ustea Georgian House. 

4 Reception Rooms. 9 Bedrooms, 3 Ba thr ooms. Staff 

Rat 

Farmhouse. Five Conages. Bam with Planning 
Permission for Conversion. Fannouikfinga. 
woodtend. AraUa Land. Paddocks. ABOUT 340 
ACRES IN ALL. 

FOR SALE BY PRIVATE TREATY AS A WHOLE OR 
IN 16 LOTS 

Joint Agents: Weller Eggar. Famham 716221 and 

Lane Fox & Partners with Hylands 


HAMPSHIRE - NR BASINGSTOKE 

Hente^Wimney 3 Vi miles. Reading 8Vfr rides. London 

A MOST ATTRACTIVE VILLAGE HOUSE. Wefl 
situated backing onto open farmland. 

3 Receptan Rooms. 4 Bedrooms. 2 Bathrooms. OS 
fired central hearing. Magnificent Traditional Bam. 
Debghiful Garden. ABOUT 'A ACRE 


36 North Audley St., London W1Y 2EL 

Tel: 01-499 4785 




mm ch-ap.lin-i 


7 Upper Grosze nor Street, Mayfair, London WI 
Teh 01-493 5421 

WGH BEECH. ESSEX. qd London t2 mtesi Afu* lTifi cerawy 
ceuon> rejs? of mnwnx vanoa. n periea seousno n grounas cd 
a3«xa 5-i i c:es xfirr-ns :nt nsunc Eopng hues Uagnricem 6T 
recoeao na»i 3 suhim-tamg reception raoms aid QuHTy laud 
tottber.. arencaa nxnn Suoen (taster bedroom sum and * hotter 
Dedftxms 2 smcouS Setf-cootaincd nau. Exteouve garaging and 
sabling. Beauiifully wciudetl grounds, id all about I'n acta. 
KEAR CHELMSFORD, ESSEX. A superti country residence, recently 
evsmica: «rti mtizcove canzoe-styu eievaums. and bBaotuMy 
Drooonanet! ns Sant acres ol narti-Cike garaens with iwnenus 
Odhy oribuuCtngs trnj'ecirrt nnway. large (tremng rm, sttog rm and 
arum room Uktv snowp/cksakroofn Kactoi/mortaio rm. Gitav 


(tnng rocm Usury snawer/ckakrodm Krtchan/momng rm. Gifery 
i2ncoc Waste aeorm suse. 4 turner DeOmts and hiony famriy twtvm. 
Slave oua and C» garage. OFFERS IN IH£ REfiON OF £225.000 

WANTED 

(usual commission required on sale) 
APPLY LONDON OFFICE 

HAMPSHIRE. £200.000. wiwesur mpScam ssefs period 
house n milage m snuii lowri si East Mmpstwe to Surrey Donun. Land 
not necessary 

HANTS/SUSSEX, to £20JX)0 Local andcant s seeking a period 
noust. pretmoiy Georgian, wen tae and well pioooniarad rms. No low 
cakngs May sossiUy consaer a brand new house ol ndMdbal design. 
HERTS, 1 S. BEDS. Hancock of ai hast 2 aoes wth 4-b0droomed perod 
house uigerm* sougn by Si Albans appkean. own house inner otter, up 
a £225,000 

0X0N/C0TSW0LD5. £200000. Good penod house or potental 
conversion lor leumg developer. Mthm range of UHney. Not too large. 
Own raise sold. 

and at Shenheki. Essex. Tel: Bramooa 
(0277] 21 1487 



John 

German 


BUCKINGHAM/NORTHANTS Border 
near tarackley 

BracMev 4 itiQes Towcesier 7 mites Banbury 12 miles 

A BEAUTIFUL 18th CENTURY HOUSE 
WITH A MOST ATTRACTIVE SMALL ESTATE 
FORMERLY A SUCCESSFUL STUD 

HalL 4 Rcccpimn Rooms. 7 Bedrooms. 3 Bathrooms. 
Fine Grounds and Lakes. 

18 Loose Boxes and 70 acres of Paddocks. 

Lordship of the Manor. 

Lodge Cortege. Village Church. 

About 175 acres 
John German 

Lower Church Street, Ashby de la Zouch, 
Leicestershire. LE6 5A8. 

Tel: (0530) 412821 


NEW GALLOWAY 
S 

Traditional Scottish Farm- 
house. delighUuny situated 
In an area of meat beauty 
near Loch Ken. Set in 3 
acres south facing land 
wuh excellent outbuildings 
3 bedrooms 2 reception 
rooms. CH. 

Offers £70,000. 

Tel: 

New Galloway 
(06442) 471. 


FOR SALE in Scotland* highest 
s ilLtw . maonif Knii views, 
splemud lishing. walking «t. 
Thr penal hidrawp, on a 
Womans Estate. Collage in need 
of renovation therefore 
£ 20.000 secures. Trf 062B 
33996. 

ISLE OF ARKAN Brodick. Art 
Isis deiacned house overtoowno 
Brodick bay. 7 rooms, kitchen, 
bamroom ere. Large studio. Ail 
in escelieiU order £47.000 lor 
Hteeoy sake 1 07701 35S6. 

SPACIOUS 4 bed house in quiei 
Perthshire village of Stanley 
only 5 mins walk from River 
T® Solid fuel CH. 9dn Offer* 
over £29.000. 0738 B2874A 

EDINBURGH Studio fits country 
huh iOmlns city centre fully 
furnnned oilers over E 16.000 
Tef <3648 283100 EM 251 

LESMAHAOOW <20mlfc SO) Cla*- 
oowichai rains ■ laare wac h*H 
ioe Uv . din kH b~in study Bba* 
1HT oar Tef 0565895693 


SOMERSET & AVON 


SURREY 


BATH 

A line listed Georgian town 
home, fully restored and of 
nianageaulr sze. Elrganl. 
well Brooortioned room*, 
cornice* and many ItenOd 
loaf uiev. Acoomodaboin 
indiuH* 5 recess. 6 beds. 2 
bads f lirorry oardeb fUB 
Mature walled garden with 
carport. Oiler* around 
£180000 0225 64655 


BATH. Deganl IS [J<w penoa 
nai 2 oea*. m* drawmo rm. lu* 
kiirnen & bam Ga* 
carpets inrougiwui- £69.950 
odo. Trt 0225 64 578 after 6wn 


CLCVEDOM in Prime PosUkki. 
OMCh House with Full Plan- 
ning Permission for Deuiefuti 4 
Bwrooned House. £45 000 
Tel iOZ72i 874131 anytime. 


EXQUISITELY LOCATED. 62 

acre farm Burnells larm. 
Dim swr Somerwi ArchllM 
desMued d«»etlin9 5 beos. Am- 
ple Dung* Pasture land, kseaity 
suued 10 Eourvnan use. Apply 
B & Tailor i Sons. Exeter 
0392 56487. 

bkistol eonrite. w«errram 

llaU from £59.950 City enure. 
Bair on v. 2 beds Oak ch G all 
Irene Marlin - '0272) 277203 
Tliurdayi 10 Monday lOJOara 
10 SSOom or Jean Oban - 
■02721 425001 

HEMMP5. BnPd) SOM sup»«y 
reslrd medieval del Slone tae. 
ftcaurm irtmuris amt. slone 
hre. mu lid wiiww* joed*, 
rerap. lux bain, ml clk shwr. 
GCH gdn. £69960 Tel 0»4 
732819 

royal ouacaa bath Lange 
luxurv apartnwni 2000 so n a 
douhte bedroom garage gas CH 
£146.000 Tel 1 0226l 311840 

W CS T OM S K lUlt Lpmn village 
nny new 4 bed del hse 2 r« 2 
BtHTAn luv kil dblr gar Cos Cti 
£69.950 II1C CDU WSM 33 383 


EXCLUSIVE 


mm 


Waerioo 27 nuns, tevracutaisly 
presented ndiwduay dHtgned 
ctaracn d e tached home. 5 
beds. 3 reaps. 2 bate, te acre 
£325 BOO Freehold 

NORDIC ESTATES 

0932 58230 


HR DORKING Grand name conv 
Lovely courtyard. Ckdnower 
etc. GCH d Beds. 2 balhe. farm 
kil Aya COES. 4 acres uomU. 
Oflere £210X100 0306 712126 


SMALL FARM modern house, ex- 
tensive oufouildlngs. 11 acres. 
Around £130.000 More land 
available. Pnone Ol -660 9649. 


PTRF O RP S miles from U/M2S 
luncuon. i93Q*s oesacned 
nouve on ' i acre pM In pm-aie 
rd 4 beds. 2 bains. 2 reav. due 
one. gas CH. £185X100 
Goodncfc Meath 0485 234345 
•Sunday 09303 4£028| 
WOKING, individual del. 3 bed 
Georgian style house. Sed Gdn. 
Close to town, station 125 Mins 
Waterloo*. Private rd ow new 
proposed Marina dev. £92-000 
For more details Tel: 04862 
62469 Today - £ 1 eranas 
KMCSrON Nr Richmond park, 
emt tor 4 bed del Edward hse 
superb inoe. sep dinuig rm 
GCH. quiet r£L lOmins sin excel 
dec order, sect odn. FH- 
£105.000 01-546 6096 eves 
SURREY /SUSSEX Borden, nr 
Hauemere Bungalow in ■>< 
acre. 3 beds. 2 bains. 2 recs. 
UnmaniUle. £106.000 F H. 

, Dunsiokl 10486491 415 
CATERMAM 4 bed. Ite bafts. 4 
recess, dbte gge Cottage style; 
oak beams, doors, etc. Idyl Ik 
views. 069600. 0885 45868. 
COSHAM large reiiderw 
Fairmlle Esiale four recep eight 
beds details In Country Life or 
ring Coonara 62138 


BIDWELLS 


ESSEX 

STONDON MASSEY 

2» HUM 




Listed penod tense. « receptw 
rooms, 8 bedrooms. 3 bedroonwd 
cnage. Had terns can. U&efut 
familwrtttgs, moor mug reboot 
ml subtetg. Arable and gnss 
(ami 

103 ACRES M ALL 

FOR SALE AS A WHOLE NJ 
OR IN TWO LOTS 


Tsumpmron Road. Cantmdge. 
Cffi 2LD. T8. (0223) 841B41 


46 Charlocre Square. EdinbuiRh EH2 4HQ 
031-2266962 


SMITH-WOOLLEY 


CrtU , c B iC/5w?-/li'ahS v«e«jl*il6*»iCc*Ljl*S 

LINCOLNSHIRE 
HIGHFIELDS FARM, 
EVERDON. SLEAFORD 

Mo« anrncbMi port stone fanrewuse 
3 RBc aaro n rooms. 2 otaecs. knehon. 5 bodroai 



sunn 



ri » LrLri =3 






Lewes 5 miles. (Victoria/London 
Bridge 64 minutes) 

An outstamfing residential and equestrian 
estate with very attractive principal house 
with outstanding views to the South Downs. 
3 Reception rooms, S bedrooms, 3 
bathrooms, 3 secondary bedrooms and 
bathroom. Heated swimming pod. Garaging. 
Excellent gardens. Three 3-bedroom 
cottages, 2 first class stable yards with 19 
loose boxes and ancillary buildings. 

About 63 acres. 

LEWES OFFICE 
201 High Street, 

Tel 102731 47S411 
(Ref.GBC2239) 


HASTINGS ft 



'Omened Grade 2 kau Sun Mi* ‘ to psomi KCdfimsaaoe' *2 Anpum' 
~72‘ Kacnen 1 uwfn/Ooatooom* "4 Beoreonn" ‘Gnm<B tec 4 car *Roga 

ter twiner MH U iw a ft W ‘D meu idlnos Mtn aragi mdustiy use" 

Fufl Details TADUAN BAXTER 1 COMPANY 
DsjttH FWM (t «81 11943/4 Sraftr te Md wsetags 1*4024) 41705 


D. T. HALLETT & COMPANY 

THE COUNTRYWIDE MORTGAGE 
SPECIALISTS 

£50.000 to £) 50,000 mongaacs and Remortgages 
Up to 95% of ^ Valuation ai 1 1 
CAPITAL RAISING - COMMERCIAL REPAYMENT, 
ENDOWMENT, LOW START AND PENSION 
LINKED 

NO BROKERAGE FEES - FREE ADVISE GLADLY 
GIVEN 

CALL US NOW ON 

LEEDS (0532) 823026 


BATH 

AWARD-WINNING 
NORTHANGER COURT 

RENOWNED FOR QUALITY rad oo» Graft comptaul oar omoorrify- 
cemxr Ibu tovr m» bn* nrawmed BWtai hnurv dradopmau te 
ihc^KhM Hoore" tank fijrlWS. 

Supeihl> snaum beside ibe River Avon, ihe fins era* amlUv is every 
Mpeci at drtfga ud euxuuas. Fauucv mdsde: fidlyfiued toiid »oQd 
luidn. luuirv huhnMan <*uh lougjramr litas rad -Vmnco Ihwnss. The 
aufnilktiii raeUou aooe bsAbaf is in mudu ddifhihJ tmdfcraed ajun- 
umb provK)m£. debsMfal surmondmes. huIhhi ibe ihudccm of 
rauttanmieiheBL Viewing ucMcmal w aa wonwo of the quabry ■« 
lAr. 

PRICES: OSJMMZeSMO 
Brochure from: 

LTTHODOMOS LTD 

Silei Office. I Nanhueer Caul. Grove Suva. BjDi BA2 6PE 
Tdt teh (fl225i tun m tom 



Pawanu: vnw of sea & 
downs. Eflentwe Darden tones 
& affiiwm 35'xl5' recsbtm. 
GCH. 2 toga fOM bedrooms, 
lunny aaftrom targe hilly fitted 
kdchen ' Double tesge. 
E1Z5B00. 

Tft B9B3-SB4S39 


WTST SUSSEX 

Sunny positioii. detached 
Ideal family house, quarter 
mile from sea. 6 miles Chich- 
ester. 4 beds. 2 baths. 3 recep 
and kaicfcen. buih |464. easy 
lo run with huge garden. 

£79,508. for quick sate 
Tet(D243) 670235. 


iTTH comiirr warn roll. 
On fte River Rather at 
ntneworthiWK) sussexi Skill- 
fully convened to a unique and 
snacM us country house of char- 
acter- 5 bedrooms. 3 haft 
rooms. 5 ceceptmro rooms, 
b'tasl room, kitchen. GCH. Car- 
den. 2 mill pools and paddocks 
About lO aciis. Guide pnee 
£«X).00a Freehold. Apofe 
Sole Agnus. King 3 
Chasmore. Lombard Street. 
PH worth. West Sussex 0798 
42011 

WEST 3US5CX. impound de- 
uetied grade 1 1 mini house set 
in grounds of 3 acres. HenfuM 
l‘i mile*. Horsham 9 mites 
sum house with 4 bedrooms, 
haihroom. 4 mronon rooms 
Annex with 2 bedroom. Daft- 
room. 2-3 reception rooms. 
Double garage 2 targe tarns, 
several oulbujkbngs. Oilers nt 
me region « £230.000. Bole 
Agents Apply king A 
Ctennwt, 5*eyn«no Office 
09ftS a 1 6806 or Henfletd Office 
0273 493058. 



Wales 


TOtl COULD « 

'LORD of Um MANOR" 

at one third SE prices 

ISLE OF ANGLESEY 

Elegant Vjtxgnan Manor 
Hotsr 
6 

Convened Coach House 
unique 6*.'! acre 
wooded sen mg 

Unrivalled consul v»w* 
2hre mi. A'txin 
S'-.'hrs Euaon 
llMiCH, 

1 st serious viewer must buy 
ft» brauuiui property 
1EL* Md7 S307C3 


MID WALES 

BERWYN MOUNTAINS 
NR. BALA 

THE PALE ESTATE MOOHS 

Vasl tractk of moorland with 
hill grazing. Majority subieci 
to Comm** Rights Sporting 
and nuiwrai nphu in hand. 

OVER 9000 acres 
FREEHOLD FOR SALE 
IN 8 LOTS 
John Clegg & Co 
cum® st. Chesnam, 
Bucks. Tel 0494 784711 












































































BWflsSW 


r 


PROfMY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


WALES MORTGAGES 


llAHOtSUL Dl'ieO un awo- 

FCK mtgfw «*wn mwg port w 

qrntise 1 nn roll "Jocrci hdTOde 

<*QOjB*^ure P Mat 10 , 75 % MOOTCACES A Reraorl 


CtuOX) Ttf 0899 xueos 
K. WALES Upper tw valley 
utugurcanagr rttonll & exl«W- 
«a £ act' waned garden 
>bxln» room*. trt 06783 274 


rage*. 100 "« Mortgage 
av a table 3 » mm innxiw or 
3.5 * main + 1 5 . Any purpw- 
Free advice Trt Wtatnngum 
L A P: 01 247 3123 


WILTSHIRE 


WANTED • lor rt-nrai m Sansbuiy 
arc). During May or June. De- 
remoer and January Qoodflai 
or cottage ui or wimm 10 main 
01 Salisbury lor unqle English 
medical ofofwwr Most be fully 
(urmshed iCH TV no. Price no 
ohKH i for ngni property- RW 
ba* number A 97 | 

FARMS & 
SMALLHOLDINGS 


BttfCOH' (MWER Nta Pk ?15 

WTH * C&OO mu Mod 183 T 4 

bed hse V*ta c«Ue raw" 

irou) Suibsidm Manaqrmenl 
r £220 .000 0639 730828 699. 


LAND FOR SALE 


UUtO FOR THOUGHT 7 acres 
include* Wr of semi's S*»um 
Herts, grew Bell. Alter 6 OOpm 
Ol 947 8220 

row sale, nwww oatuu^ 
land «nti OP (or 21 Hals 
Prime posinon. central Graft* 
don Fine n.vnrr vie on mam 
Roart TrtuleTS muled For ful 
details. Repay it. bo\ roo 



PROPERTY WANTED 
Ohm. Berks, Hafts Area. 

American E»*cuii\e ttrec- 
(or. swim Family Ren un 
Accommodation. Starling 
June lto 4 5 bedrooms. 
deUlenea. ullage ■***"* 
de-unsMe Several monm* 
lo 2 year*. Reference* Re- 
■morn J with partKuiars io. 
39 The Grocn. Bpnhm ry. 
0 X 16 9 AE 


BBC TELEVISION 

rejurea suosomhI pwod 
Lotion house® ««•« 
(Hamfismd w smwfl AOpro 0 

USSsinn «w lati.^ww; 

rntft Ftencn 

“Tsrsap - 

tni 7p« May. 


BEDBOI AMEMCAri c «»* 

C4«nlorlaDte 2 nediow n w. 

funclroiKd nietum- 

Wml End Min g jffff Lsv 

men as possNe R«» lo BOX 

FS2. 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


HARVSWK 06 mlmdn WjUr- 

K ». iWrJM 

lot Heathrow. 6 Prorogated 

cSvmMV houK ®J" 5 £ U ‘*s 

order with *P™» ‘ 

hedroomed Pg*w | *y “SE 

ino and -ewtinroing pool. 

Sm a£t poddodts ad*"* 
attc available. ™«M 2 | 
Sronosiok* ,023G ' 

21026 , 53069 . 


millbank terraces, SW1 

One Bedroom Flat on 1st Floor 
with magnificent views over- 
looking ibe River Thames. Newly 
decorated and refurbished in 
modernised Georgian Terrace. 
f*3fi per week for a tong let 

Cbchoa Office: 01-583 5211 


-Wide range of quality fuimsfiw 
and unfurrasned property 
« Full Management Senna? 


au&snwB® 


• Lanai/Tax Advice 

• Personalised Service tttrougn 
7 computer imked oflices. 


AMSTEMOAM ROAD, EM 

Attractive Studio Flat, _ newly 
fomisbed and decorated; in this 
riverside development dose to 
shorn ing and transport. Ideal as 



■GEORGE KMC HT 
The lotting A went . 

piH 

P ygt- j d-r rf: 


aBLSTdSU 



•management 

EXPERTISE 


Hampton & Sons 


PARADISE WALK, 


cwnnraa«mmtWw.Tk» Bag lai a janp-f 8 ^ ffJSESKn 

ha "' 081 ^ SSoStti GARDi 

nsxsf as 

0 BgejH*^HmU»fiWWdWn. 2 iiDBbkWra« i*te. 2 tatk todnoos, 

baDMon. sapafaa w.t 

fi / irimgtnn Street, Londcgi SWlAlKB 


GKORGlvKNKiH I 
The [.ettin^Aecnt 


1)1-493 8222 


VACANCIES ADVERTISED BY 

BOYCE BILINGUAL 

EVERY MONDAY IN ‘CREME- 


receptionist i TEMPORWtY ^ 

*7,500 a«€ 18+ MEDICAL p 

t SECRETABIES ^ 


OVERSEAS 
R 


NEW ™-SL s a ol 

lffil 

eswa -rara (S .*s}-as*jaf , l aa ,,,<fc 

“™ ce SIK'toSEn;. 

Essex U 39 5 BO Tel: 101 } 50 A 0444 















Hlri'.'I 




£400pw - £600pw 

We reqne fist dass properties 
n central & NW areas lor mufti 
(rational cos. & overseas 
banks. 

BIRCH &C0 
01-734 7432 



barnard 

marcus 


ATLESKIHO ST SWT 
■mi mb dec 2M fl «B l tot 
MGft/to kto gcb/ctn* £ist 

t " L wwuc ow raiB 

BROWG^xmi 

incVZ twl flat raannUn nn k&b 

BAYSWJITWB! W 
iwh flee and tan 3rf B flat ai 
m«S baxk 3 beds mep mtti talc, 
dn UL rr Mt and A grtt/eta. 

^ wSabms;. ib» 


ROBERT BRUCE 

hahrham siwsi'r. swa 
Stuarwtg housn consesung at 3 
boat. 3 twn, HUB mcep m 
lot A drains rm. smal gdn. 
eesopw. 

RUTLAND STREET, S W 7 
UnmacuteW house m XragMs- 
bridge VBaga. na wty 
ow aw* fwoutpioi* eon sMras 
at 3/4 bads, stutyWt <Wng 
im. 2 baths. Avafcnte tan or 
iratan. SfiOOWf- 

ST. JAMES HOUSE 
13 KENSINGTON 
SQUARE 
01-937 9847 


01-736 48! 


CABBAN & 
GASELEE 

Sffll fa-SKrafta. 2 bad. 

Mb Terrace. EI90 
WZ Fanasoc 2 beo Has. raw 
onto wa W 8 ^ 

9+siwper £ 22 & 

SWySutwbKmittel 
t« Bb. i«ep. MB. afl iwd 
aras. S2f5 

m modem Una we raft 

ann. * tod. 2 leceo. 2 bast 

4 - Sana. (GOD 

SW7 Shat u H DesffMd 



SECRETflinr 

beceptiowst 

Heamrea W «totty 
wnatoig «»««»( ® 
North ArtDn OM 4 
ttoymone mama _ 
typing UdUs exsaHtaL WP 
experience » Afltanta* 
posiuon of tam involved 
and varied w** We« 
tootana w somehoay 2 &f 
wtu> enltRstofl ®“ 

nunaUve wto vrtshes. to 
buadl a career vottdn t» 

company. Satary. 

ICgglbUC 

(SOS 01-992 56X1 

tor WwnniWB 


PORTUGAL 


PMITUBAL. AKrarvw. Luxury 4 
torrm dNranml aluaWd on Ui* 
tK 4 cti. Fully eqmpDM. all raw 
ni(i «5 n«s»r h». 901 1 • naui9- 
wiMMirtlno. nWh* clubi and 
dec o 5 . residents swimxmnq 
pool. 3 weeXS timesfiare la 3 lst 
Decenraer SOU „ PrKe 
£ 10.000 Tel Mr Akock Ol -580 
1970 f«nce liaurai 

AL CARVE Deal (Wert with es- 
tablished Government U reused 
EMaie Ageid ui Poninvw. Ail 
aspects Dt buylnq wroneny and 
llvirra in me AJoane dean wim. 

Information, property. Lists of 
Business's pnone Planrurve 
Lea. 82 25334 Tele* 57378 Or I 
write APT 249 . 8500 FOrtimao. 

VALE DO LOB®. "nw AWarve 
Luxury slitas ^ l w 
well-known resort 3 J Bed- 
rooms w"n P^ra* frQ1T ' 

J-JiS.OOO 0372 - 66466 - 


TfMESHARE OVERSEAS 


TIME SHMIMQ CONDO. Weeks 

•J. Id. S 3 * M on Ue ocean - 
nunda E. CoaM 2 Bdrm. sips 6 . 

I urn Bind. PackW deal 

£ 14000 . Derails. 17 J/>ce Rd. 
W aUorvon Thames. Surrey 
KT 12 5 BJ. 

SAVE UP TO JE 3 L 450 2 Oedrrnd 
raarnmnl on CMU M Sol. De- 
Utk 10626 ' 61066 


PUERTO BANUS 
MARBELLA 

Nr Las Bnsas and Noha God. 
Duel bom twno 3 bed. 3 bill 
vdn m eiduave Surnmanzatra 
Daraa FuKy turn, only 2 yrs old. 
Goff stare/manDeishii avad 
£tt5JM 
01 «1 BS19 «n 
01 380 B1* M 


Kir Marteua. du 

Mrx house. 3 Alt he dntrt. 2 
baUirms. extensile termten. 
swimimnq pool, wide ramie fa- 
ciIiucl furnulied. £ 49.000 Tel 
0773 503166 for ix offline 
MARBELLA Gokten mile. Bltou 
one Bedroom house a gen with 
news io 9 )P ui presUgUMB Lo- 
mas puewo DenghUuily 

luinlWied. CHrrrt from OWW. 
C 4 T(W Call 0803 22654 
MENORCA Vina Carlos. 3 bed 
apart meni. Sep Idlrtwn A 
lourrac. iota! 90 SQ m. View 
o\rr harbour Fully (UtL 

£ 15.000 lor nukk tale. 0226 
835374 . Sun law e*«. 
ANOALUOA 50 acre hin estate 
midMaiana cowoha. of P«en- 
llal vmaH hse £56000 whole 
■ or shdie poss' BOX F 40 . 
C 05 TA BLANCA beautiful Bunpa 
low. 2 bwB. fully runuaned. 
superb qarden. near beach. 
£ 21.750 Irt 0789 293106 Us. 
LA MANGA CLUB. Luxury fum 
apart Sips 6 All amenities. 
£ 49.500 Further demds Tel 
0945 682475 alter 6 pm 
MARBELLA on CluadJIralnB AIU 
poll me. new lux Apartment.- 
Zbfds- 2 baths, oarape £ 72 . 00 a 
Tel. 01013452771188 . 
MbbBerm/MafbeBs Resales 

available. conMUMA savtnos 
on developers IM. Genuine rea- 
son lor sale 01-446 2481 . 


ALBOtMEV - the only Criatmrt is- 
land with no purdwsuw 
resifKirom. For larws* wvjc 
Hanoi pcoperiles - BELL 400 . 
Victoria Si. Alderney. CL 0481 
82 2 S 6 Z. 


FRANCE 


For sale in 
France 

la Bauhi - Atomic Coast 

BrariHnly etpdMWL 

5 hecfafBs devetorwl M. 3 tow 
from sea mcUng: ndmg school 
wdi 60 boxes, bk* school ng 
mg. dtwftna. otatata come 
and dressage, pony club wth 
snraH setaring mg. Reply to 
PJJ. Bn F 7 B. 


MLAMD VROM BUILDS Coun- 
try home on Med doses o» 
Onranes. Lourao. sal ammo. 
A «. oerts. a 1 -' WIM. a«c. esd 

patlo.2mes.9dn All mod cons 

Superb umpoUf areo arfessfoa 
A Sid. £68 000 109081 605816 . 


CANNES- cnarmlnp flat ranos 
pew l bed. Large living room. 
Sunny terrace. Sleeps 2 4 . Qui- 
et Near amentue*. Weal 
holiday or reurerneni home. 
Tastefully furnished. £ 52 . 500 . 
Tel 107321 361620 . 

BUYERS wide Mlefdon of prop- 
erties and villas, all rtrawiB Of 
France. Free ratal none on re- 
quest F N.I.. BP 78 . 53026 
Bordeaux Cede*. France. 

BRITTANY. Dordogne ft Sooth. 
Selection of properties, conaoev 
lochaieaux from £ 10.000 Bro- 
chure 01 -483 7753 .vT> 


RENTALS 


absolutely 

FABULOUS. 

swx 

Brand new luxuriously 
furnished fUfl. Short Long 
lets from £600 pw. Sen lea. 
xKHirrage Included. 

LONDON 
APARTMENTS 
01-244 7363. 


PALACE 

PROPERTIES 

Wo how a superb safeebon 
ol personally ins p ected 
lumished ano untuniiahed 
praperties in many fine 
hewdecttW dewos. rwjffng 
(ram £150 pw to £2,000 pw. 

Tet 01-486 8926 


BRITTON POOLE 
& BURNS 

bromptoh pawl ara- Brora 

I» 1ST lb m. 2 tads. iKep/ltaraj 
rm. 2 W» (1 to **e). t > VL J 
tots. Cat pkg & tesure compta. Co 
ML £ 230 D». 

LEDBURY ROAD W11. MM; | 
taQ m to races, open plan W.toiL 

Co In ElZSpw. 

81 581 2987 


KEftSMGTOH, WrD tilted luxury 

fiM With 0 « jwtota tadtotan- 

£ 100 . 00 pw. TeL 01-947 1763 . 


RARE OtoWrUNITY TO RENT 

<lai hi Chelsea previously occy- 
med by owner. Recently 
redecora led. furnished. 3 beta. 

2 baths, laroe reemoan. U«- 

en. wg lffncr.IMOKw.Co 
W. no agents. Ol 8 f 78 3814 
EAUNC, 3 beta ground rwor riM. 
SMuftfuilr fu/msbed Some Pe- 
riod pieces. Landscape garden 
with palms overtoowng narh- 
£185 per week.. Tel: Ol 567 
8871 . 

RENT YOUR FURNITURE wtUi- 
oul capital oull». For 
■mmedlaie service at arararttve 
pneess ring Mr Wdud 
Sot Bury Joint Sir and Cotv 
tracts Ud. Trt Ol -485 B 616 - 
W ANTED s t accotn at reason- 
able rent for prof married 
couple wortong In London with 
own house in counlry. Will care 
lor your property wiuw 
anroad. 839 >061 
AMERICAN WUlAUSn are 
currenHy seeking good quality 
rental atcommodallon ui 
central London for waning 
mmppny lenanls 01-937 9681 . 


HENRY A MBOS contact us now 
on Ol 23 S 8861 tar the best ge 
lection of furnished flats and 
houses fa tail in Knigntsandgc. 
KenunqiPh and Otefcea. 


LAWSON A HERMAN Dlpionian 

ft mecuUie* urgenlly seta 
quality properties in all central 
- West London areas. For atten- 
tion please nnq 01-938 3426 . 




Stmt tatay house fa qrcficgn 
rarenr M iii ima i B pool complex. 
12 acres garden wdi Ho. 4 
Recaps, 5 Beds. 3 Bafts. Sep 
staff xcunrndaoiL Anfttfc 
tmffletiafeiy tar Ovrewiy LA af 
£ 4.000 pen ndudtag oatrieu 
naal niita . 

Tel: 037284 3811 


ADVERTISING 

To £9,500 

Board Director pfwa« known 
kd Co raparre SeC/PA «U 
oceflent SH Jypmg sMte. 
Prevnus agency experience. 
Exciting accounts. Age 28+ 


Susan Beck 

RECRU'.TI/ENT 01 ' &A 6 ^-' 

im* 



and ctmnuug w* ® nas 
hts dodgn conamtar fn wo 
West £prt? There wta b* 
plenty of people contact 
eng the opportunity » 


PARLIAMENTARY 

consultants 

rjjainnaoof a® eiUblisJie4 
piddle Aftas Constancy 
mtfSs. a capaKc efficient 
PA ttrth good secraaral 

and WcsniprocessHtg sWK 

Expencoce in Whtffltafl or 
pniiti cat work vpotdd be an 
advantage.. . . , . . . 

Sntary eaca OAWL 

01-222 0702 


SECRETARY, 

c £9,000 
American company 
based in SWI a w 
seeking dineiar-M. 

secretary w tel min 
Eurfipeaa operuioa. 
Also dealing wrib office 

administration. Rtf 

731 ’Ti» Wtafe « 
ei- 83 « 3394 
R eliance 

Employment Agency. 


ARCHITECTS 
- SOUTH KEN. _ 

we reqtttru a young en- 
inuyasoc aoc/itc to Join 
ibe team. 

At least two years expe- 
rience npquttaL . 
EweOent typmg. audio 
and FMBX swttcWtoand . 
essatdaL. 

^SiUHTrttflOO - 

-37 3 8546 

an/mnaat 



wmmm-Pk 


aOMJOS «WT. 8085 

ArnbOOB* SBC capatte of 

sortie . irasewcP and 


To view our One 
selection of personally 
Inspected Hals In NW 
or Central London. 
PImbo ea* BUM f Mt# 

01-724 3160 


RUTLAND STROrjSW 75 URfb 
new dec house opp Hamids* 
tads. 2 recap, l/f lul 2 B, pan. 

Si ln®T. MATH®. W.t 

Excep mrenor desonrt awra 
tta on pmd ftr . P(b wk*. 3 
tads, dottfe tecep. l/t k + Z b. 
£750 {lw _ — — 

GREEN & CO: 
625 8611. 


MAYFAIR W1 

2 koSy^S. sSS 

s' taST ttoe (1 en sattl 
dramas on. dang no, U. n. 
portH. £500 t>w- 
1 IB* bed. to reap, drtng 
rai/Wtn Pto W. taBL sip sftBto. 
£325 pw. 

Dwa5»t 

Ml* tor Mm Om W • 


BENTVZYS LETTINGS Experti ta 
HAitunteM. s Jto/ra wota ♦ 
all N WC9I areas. 01-435 7191. 


HAMPSTEAD- Smaty newly nr- 
sswra nr flat o/ioowtraodn. 

i dUe bed. ige recep. nwwty nt 

LUrtven. £140 pw. 930 1864 


HAMPSTEAD WO. Lovely 3 bed 
2 bath «dn not- newty dec 
throughout £290 pw. Nathan 
Wilson ft Co. 794 1 161 . 


IDEAL FOR VISITORS. South 
Kensington. Fully «r»l£Wi 
lor 2 . un. pnone. cm tv. ch 
etc. 01 786 4281/684 2414 . 


MR SUMNE WJAIAME SWB. 
unarming tufty eaiapped Hot. 
Receo OW bed. £150 pw. Tel: 
01 350 8895 ' 730 1068 


1 ft. BOLAND LTD <221 - 2615 ) 
for quality homes. W 8 . 1 dMe 
bed £t 3 Spw Eaung. 1 dble bed 
C 85 pw. Wit. Studio £ 85 pw. 


W 2 QUEaNSBf AT. Mews cottage. 
2 bedrooms, living room . patio. 
£190 pw. ca. to. minimum one 
year. Tel: 01-209 686 a 

Ml Very sunny and amarttve. 
newly dec & bofumaned 
house. 4 Beds. » Bana. 3 
Recep*. KHcWm tan marttuiew. 
Terrace. Garden. C 4 O 0 PW. Co 
to. JCK K» 0040 . 


WARREN 

RENTALS 

Highly desirable Avenue in 
GuhionaUe West Putney. 
Character detached hse. 4 
bed* 2 hobs. 3 Keeps, oaone 
sweeping gdns. «t w £400 
p.«. + many other*. 

TEL: WPPA 
(01) 785 8222 


HtflW FAU K CA TE. 

ments tn>m ’fSSJSST 
CanKns. 3 bed ftai wUB Sbath. 
recep- « «l E 250 pw. Ptew 
contact Suzanne Conway al 
Saunderoof Kensington on 581 


RICHARD BARCLAY 


A member of AH LA 

Oftni 4 ta fist in tarary 
btod on Putney HSL£t A® 
pcm. OHov cW B idc t iBd for 
quid teL 

Please cafl 947 9488 


KNIGffTSBRfDGE 

Recently decortaed. Pjpd- 
em fuay luntahed IW» 
wtm 1/2 Detains, new® 
nu_ kfl & bath rat. 2 wtm 
south facing Nt race*. 
Some maid service- Meta 
tar tons or short lets. 

“iSSM&gg" 

XB fltapftwBnn, 
m"SS Eci 


COMPANY OH EMBASSY Ito 

only for pertod of 3 yea rs in 
W. 6 . 4 bedroom. 2 reoenoon 
large Wtchen 2 bathroojnv 2 
W.C. CH. * 30 Odb- week. Re- 
ply M BOX B 05 . 


nturamiL Newty m otamhed 
ft interior designed 2 be droom 
nat with ronra? •S 2 ?- *“ 52 ? 
room. Italy fitt ed MB awra.bMD 
room. Mf> Wt CTTBov Co let. 
Philip Andrews. 486 6991. 


W 1 Lux too, nrtlgc 

£ 150 PW 2-3 OBD metwoupw 
487 4986 Eves 274 - 6677 . 


EATON MEETS. SWA Quto mews 
house in mart of Belgravia- Lge 
Fctvp/dlnlrg room. jut. 2 dbW 
beds, partting. Roof Terrace. 
Fum unfum A bargam at 
£ 4 E 0 pw. CDOHS 828 8251 . 


HAfftoSTCAO Housu overfaotdM 
Heath. Bull latmiy. 4 beta. bom. 
2 WCs. 2 recs. We tarnll* Ml. 
WM. Avail from May Seta itaci 
C 29 Bpw. Marie Carter 435 - 
5329 . 


KYHAHCE MEWS, SW 7 . ENganf 
3 bed house in pretty Kensuw- 
UHI Mews. Short or long to 
£400 - BOO pw. Please contact 
Suzanne Conway al Saunders 
of Kataram on EUi MBS. 


BIO A lUK Oasham. Met 
residential street date w Com- 
■non and Tube. 2 sndous me, 
KHchea/Bathrm. CH Sail 2 
prof people rtxipio.Mofilo Frt- 
£80 pw Uid. TeL 01 670 5380 


CHELSEA 

Smafi young and tduntfy 
Jrra t* SofiStor* taquira. 
Socretaxy lor parmac; toga) 
Biqw nanca pretanwl 

■Salary ^500 negc*^ 
acccnflng to *JB «“* 
expwianca. 

Phrase Mepiwie; 

01-352 4554 
Asft tor AlBtandra. ■ - 
WUfiam Dwiwfc Sofidtors 


£10,000+ Vk MTGE 
Our efierts. ‘ a prrtigtoBS 
SteftfawBanireredoseCfflBCiP- 
/fw St Stas, seek a arcteswnS 
weS educated S/K Sec mho s 
Ktarag # CB«#f«thitrli»*OB- 
AhqftataneonlBfflSiwwfeJ 
fteusuafsBflBjaralsisVDrttoa 
bssy Marteng Sowfor. 

Mrs May 


PA SECRETARY 

£9,000+ fua. 

To assst toT TOTi 
aiTiRis&di (npofty lwicf ta 
sqaS opjmfag Hotora to 
tfetotg wft a Motor oi 
(nresytctaagdiMtotatoBw 








^ ri''i t i ibm* 



WEST E 
ANTIQUE 
GALLERY 

Experienced 
secretary; 
required. 
Please phoqe: 

02-229 9618 


Super 



EAUNG. (Matched 6 Bedrooms. 
2 re te ntion*. 2 baih*. gas cen- 
tral healing, garoge. 

Furnished or_sewii_furt tal»ed 
Company tel. Tel 0603 50546 *. 
FULHAM. S. c flat. 2 pedroorra. 
wmoe. hl. baih Immed avail. 
company lei only. £t»B pw 
PhoriTMary. 736 7133 exten- 
sion 33 - 

FULHAM DeiMhlfta smaH h oney - 
suchle-clad cottage. 2 
recep. new ui diner, wnny se- 
cluded gdn. dote tune Co to 

iitaro th: ts 6 -i 076 / 40 J 7 . 

FULHAM Tastemny furtuaned S 
bed lerrace house paha. new 

dreor. carpeg 

miff streel Co to £ 2 S 0 pw. 6 
mm twn. Ph 0476 6*568 
HARLEY STREET flaf unfur 
ntshed ire tom pony rmwenital 
to. 9 rooms. 2 bath*, i kitchen 
For 2 to 3 years minimum 
lease TeL Ol * 36-7995 
SWl*. Four bed* d hse. 10 Mins 
lube. 2 recs. mod k ft b elks, 
sriwr roi. gdns. Ota Gd ro> 
area Available now. £200 ow 

Slunps ft Son. 7«8 dSSi 
TOTTENHAM CRT RD Superior 
Pied a tore Quiet, bngni. new. 
Iv fd. ante studio Sep K ft B 
CH Tit Porterage Cd L « 
£125 pw TM-D 1 891 4788 . 
WEST KEN Mod complex, r f 

Cnarmino lux 4 bed lownlrse. 2 
balta gdn. gge £ 325 pw im 
F, K lux 1 dble bed apt. fove/y 
view. £150 pw me 675 1896 . 
AMERICAN Bunk uroently re 
tulm luxury fbls and house* 


Su/gesoEMtae Agrots ssi si 
AVAB-ABLC HOW lor 4 months 
Cosy fully otnuDM l dm garden 
r» Ken Church St 1160 
Ref* reo Ol ID 3318 . 
»iu» a BUTHCHOFF lor luxury 
■wopemes m Sf tatim Wood. Be 
miK Park- Maida Vale. Swim 

OtaftHampslMdOl '586 7561 
nuiuM Excetmnniaiiy beauih 
(Jj 2 bedrowm. lux fiaion qtuet 
mix' Ivon vmakerv £100 
pw. 01 720 0999 
DOCfOAMM. Houses and flail 
uSSuphraT we d orttlaita* area 
Jv’Sjjockiands Property Con- 

toToiSSc «K- 

oqilAMD 8 K- Wife swtoow « 
"^TdoI. bed. bej toumie. 

S'gtZSSXttMfe 
"SS.WR «k*sS 

Sl iT yio pw Oi to 

DUMnk *82 2277 
evaTnEMffS DOCK V pretty 
•^'bSdmiwSn laroe b«J*«VV 
rn'Crtooking manna £ 2 CC pw 
M 0 798 S<U 


SWS loe attractive 3 bed 2 mow 
1 1 errsuile' family flat- AU ome- 
ntlie* 2 min tube < bus Resident 
Darling. L 230 pw 3739967 . 
937 9687 The number to remem 
ber when seeking best rental 
properties in central ana prune 
London areas £lEO/£ 2 J 300 pw. 
UUnHOOSHCD 1 bedroom ftta [Sf 
John's Wood. Renl £ 3 * pw. FU 
ling* ft hxIumEIDSOO. RUM 

oner 6 ptn. 38 * tara ? 

URCCNTLY WANTED! Quality 
Dai* 4 house* in central Lon- 
don Lena 4 Short KB. Selected 
Flats 486 9144 5 . 

Ml 4 . i bed flat with W RUrti. bt 
brand new conversion 5 nuns 
rube Cham- Of 4 C 1 20 pw. Co 
to only Ol 937 9683 . 

W 2 S TUDIO flats CSO 90 pw. 1 
b«d rials £130 136 Dw. Also 
avail 2 3 bed Dais, kwo short 
lets. 221 3047 . 

ABC APARTMENTS Flatt ft 
houses at otlaMe now >» Central 
London TeL 01-937 4999 
ANDRE IAHAUVRC A CD ur- 
genrly require luxury 2 -* bed 
praperue* lo to 225 0362 . 

BA T 5 WATER twdsH. OWH UL 
phore. C 46 pw* Others 627 
2610 Homelocalors 9 «p- 9 pm . 
CENTRAL Une. Studio, redee. 
suil CUUPle. LW pw. Q«ner »627 
2 a IQ HonwiKiMn 7 day*. 
CITY SHARE Bill* paid, phone 
parking. £40 pw. atlwn noi 
627 £610 UMiwMcatare 7 days. 
CRICfaueWDCW house 3 Mdmw. 

kids, pels ok. parvmg. EtiSpw 

627 2610 Honteioeatgrs 7 days. 
DELIGHTFUL GHEUCA House 
boat 10 to. Moored Chevnc 
Walk. CSOO pw. 01-351 2874 
DENMARK HILL 3 bed turn me. 
Suiwel Rd £*SO pm. mm 1 yr 
TW 0303-30888 from TJhirs. 
HAMPSTEAD CM luro flat 3 beft- 

rrems l vr nun family only 
£200 pw Ol 794 1615 
BtlMTOH/MCHBimV S C CM 
turn nai 2 oeg rms K ft B. Cdn 
Short tom. £T 3 pW. *85 S 271 
HDUmfiTM spacious hedsll 
phone. Dill couple. IMO pw 

Ol hers 627 2610 Homelocolrei 

HMSIlTSBfmBC-HVDC TANK 

Owe! luxury mews houses. 2 s 
bed Uihq Co to S 84 1 163 

LANGE laccnofl Of mianiy 

ftils and Rowes x> Id Can 1 * 
day Samuel ft Co 7 S 6 SOXl 
LOON' NW OM. « bedim, treat. 
fwndv lube. £65 PW MW( 106 
637 2 oIO Hwiietocalgr* 7 days. 
MEWS HOUSGS In ail area* i « 
bedrooms for rrenai. Piea=«r 
phone 935 9512 if 


NCBCmATOR for Moiling Hill 
Gale Estate Agents. Pts see non 
secretarial apoennb for details 
NEW CAVENDISH ST RL Mod- 
em block. 3 beds. dMe recep. 2 
nains 91 S 9512 m 
HW 3 . Lounge. dM bed UL balh 
Ouiel id nr shons. Bflan tart 

lube. £120 PW. CCGC 521379 . 
PtCAOOtLT LIKE s eon lamed. 

pnone garden. £S 5 ph.' 627 
*10 Homeloeaiors 7 days. 
SLOAKE SQUARE & mins. Rec- 2 
todnooms K B Newly nired 
£ 17 C pw Tel: 01 5 R 9 4773 
ST. CEDRCES SQUARE 2 bed- 
room nai wtih bairony. £195 
pw Co UH 727 1788 . 

ST JAMBS" III* mod turn *todK> 

nai. k ft b. lift, avail immed. 
£120 pw all inct. 43 T 7519 . 
SW 1 bedrtp. recPL hondt lube, 
pnone. £60 pw Others mo 627 

2610 Homeloeaiors 7 days. 

W 1 Suae 2 bed flai in purp bum 
Mk Recep. Vil ft bath £ 25 Qpw 
Allen Bales ft Co. 499 1665 
LUX 1 BED FLAT Bayswato Co 
Lei £ 1 1 5 pw Tel: Ol 402 3053 

OLD HAMPSTEAD Owner of eie- 
quni private home dose lo 
Haimnirad village, tramaon 
and HeJUh seeks toiuanL The 
nuKoneltr- is situated in wing Of 
period house with owe rerpL 2 
ncurms. balh. kii. washing ma- 
chine. deep Irene. CH. Lit and 
- viowg over large garden. 


2224 2938. 

BEDFORD PARK W*. Id floor 
hint flai m tew Itawl read. Lge 
511 rm dble bed, super kiL 
washing math, well fit b alh u v 
rlud/na ttiwr easy street 
parking. 2 mins Tur nttam 
Green Hn. WNM JJ, 09W 
842476 or 0993 842 221 

AMERICAN EXECUTIVES Seta. 
mSrtXTnous** ezoo £IOCO 
pw Lsual fees ih- WJM 
hay ft Lewis. South of the WV 
CTOSei office. Ol 352 8111 or 
Noun of die Wrk. Weqcnls 
Park dfirae. Oi-TP? 

COVENT GARDEN. WCZ Bcauu 

fiaa presenlrd Isl IWr naL 2 
bed* 3 balh* (UJIV lilted kiL 
good sued reerpfion. Cos CH 
PottaMe car parking Company 
M C 3 SOpw Bra Gopp. Ol 730 
TUSS 

EAST SHEEN SW 16 - Ctoart»M 4 
bed toe Lgr rer, dimns ro»- 
mod Mi bkw. family rm ai«. 
Mlh. w shwr. ggr. gan t»C 
lot nr Richmond Itarfc Aiail 
now Goto £329 pw. Slunps ft 
San 788 4551 


MAteBLE ARCH 2 bed town 
house 3 floor* lounge dining 
room pan a 1 vr lo to co. only 
no agents £ 285.00 per week 
Tel. OI 262 7631 


SOUTH RENSMCTOH. Very 
large stylish 1 bed gdn flat (sole 
use ol pauo gdn) Only £160 pw 
(or quick to lo Co or overseas 
visitors. Tel. 573 6642 


SPECIAL OFFER Kiughtsbrtdge. 
C275 pw (normally £400*1!) In- 
credible value Hign calibre i 
bed serviced flat L “> toa. 
Aj-iesro/ta c: 3 si 23 ss m 


ST JOHNS WOOD HWK. Brand 
new Sili fir flat in portered 
Mock. 4 oeos. 2 reerps. KiL 2 
mure nu £450pw. l-w pwi- 
Im*. Kay ft Lewis 722 5135 


SUPERKM FLATS A HOUSES 
9lM A regd for mMonab. 
aicninin Long ft short ids bi 
aU areas Liplncnd ft Co. aa. 
Annnarie Si wi. 01-499 553a. 


SWS MBMSMC 1 W GTO fir fum 
(lai 2 bed. Recep. K ft B. Cdn * 
vast comm gdn. CP lei prof, b 
mih t>T £150 pw. Tet Ox 
570-651 1 No Agrnev 


vmrfMO LOHDONT Alkm Bales 
ft Co note a large stfeciwn of 
flats And Muses available far I 
week * from Cl&Ogw. 499 
1665 . 


ADJ. HARROOS. All mod hn 
light gdn flat 2 beta 2 buins- 
law rrrepiran. ti> . nm uzna. 
K 7 S B.%\ 


AY5WATER W2 f furu- Neal 
■tWe bedrni flaL Wring 
nn sofaned + kll/b. C^R avau 
immed. ES 6 .QO pw. TeL Ol 221 
2458 eve. 


non; PARK, NWS. Interior 
designed 2 bed. 2 bam. recta 
ML W Hr m. Avail burned. 
L /to. tsaeow. Pbiuita kay ft 
Lewis 722 5 X 35 . 


m 


ADM M PA 35 + no mortnamL 
some audio and pcet fcn WP 
twill cross tram) working wfih 
tog executives of large city 
based advertising proup. AH as- 
pects of Co procedures and 
personnel wtn be a shared re 
nmnslbdiO' Involving tap tod 
detnwm- cJLIO.QOO pa Joyce 
cutness 01-889 8807/0010 

noec coot). 

DO YOU WANT so break Into oub- 
Uah»g 7 if me answer to ye, 
why not work lor a ptarastiing 
company aimer within editorial 
or within marketing? (f you 
base good secretarial totals 
tsh/typi and eUMr nave a bltle 
e xp er i e n ce or are a collego lent ■ 
er men this company would Kite 
to talk io you. London Town 
surf Bureau Ol 836 1994 


OIL SECRETARY/TYPIST 

A state organisation requires an efficient secretary in its London office to 
wort in a busy research section. In addition to general secretarial skills, 
applicants must be able to use a WP (preferably IB Ml Good shorthand as 
well as interest in World affairs will be a definite asset 


SECRETARY FOR 
ACCOUNTS/PERSONNEL 

(Could suit college leaver) ‘ . 7 

We also require a young, efficient junior secretary to work in the 
accounts/personnel sections. Ideal candidate will be aged 18+, have good 
secretarial skills, be educated to at feast ‘O' level standard including “O’ 
level accounts, be adap table, diplomatic and discreet and be able io 
communicate at all levels, also be able to use an IBM Displaywriter 
(training wiQ be given). ‘ 

In return for your skills, we are offering 4 weeks holiday, BLFPA and 
company pension scheine. ’ 

Please send foil CV particulars to: - 

General Pat m ln iWH and Mineral Services (Cl) Ud 
15 Kfl Otfitsbi Mge 

Lendwi SWl 

For the attention of Mrs G Eaves. 



OHSWKK a time 
dmnuM rm. tamw- kli train. 
C H, colour TV. Mioor rtc- 
£15003 pw Tv! 01 7“8 1*12 


CHELSEA Truly attractive nwo- 
www wiui own ■* r C < !. 

Mcirm. 2 reroutxts. k fth. mt- 

wr Me. 025 ra- era to 
Hunters 837 »3fl5 


CHELSEA s«f cwitafwrai Ota- 

room w “SEt^PSi 
bath. TO Indinfr OJ i® 1 " 
£ 1 S 0 PW BW 9 Jo** <3att ° l 
352 9940 . 


rXCLUMVE Bl AB HIM Rjf gfg g: 
«mk W hw luntHiM 

au, a bed. 2 nr. K ft o. p*R * 
5 ^X 3 »pw- TctOl -883 « 16 


■-tra-BAFr (Mwramtat s emcesi , 
i Id rcguilv prtHtotStaln «nv™ 

sauUi and wmt London areas 

lor waning awtaeanetai S2t- 
8838 . 

(OCHMOND HNJL AREA Luxury 
Ota. vtata rnlry phono, brond 

nrw fttay Mitd feuenta tram- 
room ft shower room. Drawing 
room. 3 * beta newly decorai 
m and curvtwa lhroughotn. 
own carport CtDOO DcmRinC 
Mrs Pownall 01-940 MM 


CROBVENOR SQUARE Wl~ Qta- 

rt. nrvlv itaurtWItoL tWOhta. 

two bath nai. at rear o» wool 
avnknjkim) ntota Draw 
recta- large kdcftrn. cfkrm. 
porter row e .n. £42S»wini. 
Co. only. Tta: 01603 645 a 


MEWS HOUSE W 8 S beta 2 
trail**, we. ■* pw ft»w. op to 
only- £400 pw Ol 937 5383 



sec rewdred by lively, up-mar 
Pet radUMhon zuganteura k» 
lundir varted and involving 
role. Lots of adm» ano Kte- 

pnane work, wmm a maxed 

and friendly environment. You 
shotad be Wight on the bUL 
wnt> good typuig ft nmy a h. 
Age 2034 . Please tel 01-409 
1232 TW Woill SHOP- 

LIAISE AT TUT TW« mtenvabon- 
M company Dosed near during 
Cross setae mtotenoM wcce- 
■ tary io worn wtm dgmom 
PA- Preferaoty aa+ with nietiiy 
of tnlUaUVP and drive. Locs of 
responifbdtty ' aamnislranon. 
CSEmSiBSflCW. Stm 80-50 
£ 9.000 4 - hentaKs. Contact Sa- 
na Wart, nwi «n» Ree.Qsito 

01-404 4935 

MMOUTtAVMMUm up 

io LS. 500 - this small out very 
friendly chjrttaWr trust bated 
in SWi With a w me rangp of 
interesH need o wtUuta and flex- 
tbte secretary lo a*«*t Uto 
ou-enor- Cood brWno essenaai 
and a eheertui oewn-dity. 
Hours- 9 30 4 - 3 ® Preferably 
available to tanre immnMb 
Age 24 ■ 35 Telephone Angtaa 
Mor tim er Ltd. 629 9686 fRse 
Oonra. 

PUBLIC RBLAYWHS £8^00 * 

rurcttoM prospect!, for a ynuno 
sec Willi amtMlotr* In the PR 
field with Ibb small, uviucnic. 
hwh profile ronuiuancy Ocmi 

me on-round Inigtvemwil. 
Lively, tacobte envirooniem 
Some worn exnennKC ■*■ WP 
apntude rogiwsied Geodtyiaro 
essMHUL Aoe.aOk. ffime |rte- 
phone 01-493 5787 Cnroon 
Vaie* Consultancy 


YOUNC sec frtendtv Wt CO. loto 
of Stone £8.600 ■* free inealk 
4 Sf 0336 PPC lAgy-L . 


MORE rA THAN «EC , AMtotont 
lequtnrt for »*nail ««y martwi- 
mp- «me of tfriB of Estate 
Agents tpvoc* entero m an as- ■ 
peris Of portraits/.’ fltoudmg 
noRM Sow of nmnour oad 
InitiaUve namuL Use of wp 
an adrontege. salary aae. ftaf 
. LtT. 01373 0031 


MUSIC BUSMESS RocorO Pro- 
duerr iwnwro ftoOMe 
PASecmwy wan proven 
anaaoaaaodl aMito-. racetahraf 
^KntanalsHltoAna knouAMu 
of ward proccBsmg. Air coodi- 
Oonea offices in Chalk Farm, 
batary ' t- 0 . 000 . <mam 
P enny Bran on 257 4 * 99 . 


IH BC EW raiH t T to CfcJOO Smam 
confident 199 reg lured for ex. 
pandtog xxnery.-fwocunve- 
funosiar • company tn 
presngraous now offices in £Cl . 
Dunns include typing, receiving 
v rotors, aietaung In ofltce pco- 
moiain Please tta. Morton on 
01-403 1331 


MERCHANT BANK £8 800 + C*c 
perk*, total educated Secretory 
with sparkle and friendly man- 
ner lor 2 -young Managers. 
Client i t* tort, ananginci mroc- 
mqs. Rusty sh. fast typing and 
up cw. 31*vCapuai pwhw 
240 ■aS*L ofteT^xn 74 1 2064, 


mmmmm 

. , - ,r 


’ 7 ; 


’ ,1 .T,/ 





B 



m 




S 


8 

H 



rzp. 


BW 

s 


tern 


CHELSEA 

ESTATE 

. agents; 

Secretary with good 

shorthand and typing 
for busy., rentals 
department 
Sense of biirnbur. & 
iniiafive essent&t:- .. 

Salary negotiaWe . 

FRIEND 

y> ; y , 

FALGE3E 

01-684 5S0t 


fin aaency srofc se«/Wt-Hf 



i i hi 








































































THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 


PERSONAL 


self-catering 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


OLD MASTER 
GALLERY 

SI JMBM1 OH Master 
Canary fc looktna for a 
Mrumr oocttkecper wwi a 
Slew to full lime. Hour* ft 
salary KnMMk 

For farther daunt can 
01 930 306 8 


(UUMT/MOTHUf ™LF re- 
qiqird daily EMWrienretl. Far 
sole auror of Almander 20 
month* and Kitty i year hi 
wandrewlft and Fumaiwi Non- 

UMMf Til. Ol-rU ttli-OI' 
870 S2S7 

Ml PASO a Mother! Hens nr 
grimy reautrea for Bngrum and 
t-uxemMuiry. vacancies aba 
lor Ndimln In me <JK and 
abroad Fry Staff Consonant* ol 
AMrrahM. tel OM2 315369. 

CHEFS JOBS MMMHQ For un- 
safe famuiM Cornwall. 
Cwrnsev- Hants. Bucks. Toy 
sauna pun tewnm Uei 
AW. SSa KtsdMMI CMtO 
SL WB. Ol 437 4166. 

DOLLY MXnan nan* vacn- 
dd far reliable nannies, 
ww an hetos. nvr-to .. oui m 
outer London mob. Good rates. 
Call OI-M6 0281 any ante. 

an MOD nature. an 


NWS. Double room near BrMre 
pars tube. Central neating. 
£5&00 per week. 01-722 2926. 


BY THE MVOE I young find 
gent. own room, super luxury 
house, leafy river-ode estate. 
TrddtnfBon nr Klngfloa- 25 
nuns Waterloo. £140 Km. 324 
8240 day or 977 9225 eves. 

CLAPHAM SW4. Prof. [ to than 
pretty, spacious flat nr. 
CUtbtn common rube. O r. 
n/s prsf. £200 pec mootlt inou- 
stve Tel. fDavl 38049920. (Eve) 
67*8262. 


Some aveomp work. Live 
ori DDCMpbH 01-016 9946 


MAZDA RX7, 1986. hard ton 
sin sunroof. aMM blur, 
black interior, low rnUeaur. 
Turd and MOT UD Jan 87. 
owned from new. Pirriu P6"s. 
excetMH condition. £6300 
ono.Tet 0653 676006 anytime 


XTC 4 2 fCcstacy For Twol.oo 
Range Oner. 2 door. L Bm. 
Balmoral Green, lull service 
hMory- brown interior, low 
murage. v«c. Taxed 6 MOT 6 
months. £16.200 TeL06l-434 
3356 anytime 



PORSCHE 


•26 S AUTO. V ng. silver. ruB 
Navy blue learner. 29.000 
mticL 1 previous owner, prls. 
one ODOdttkm. FSH. special 92a 
re*. £19-700. 01-734 0643. 


DtSGOUNTED FARES 

Boole mom 
JoHurt Har tXO £*66 

Nairobi £270 £325 

Cam. £130 £300 

Loom £336 £336 

OH Born £230 £340 

Banffrot £193 £*30 

pma lfl WJ& 

Afro Asian Travel Ltd 

163 168 Reeeni Si w.l. 
T£U 01-437 125V 4 '7 ■’» 
AME.Vi VBA. DOVERS 



V ALEXANDER 

WOL/NIKV SPtttM. ORSBS 

Malaga fr C79 

Teoeme It £ 79 
AHcaute IT £69 
Manon fr £89 
nun rr m 




UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. JoHiHfc. Cairo. 
Dubai Istanbul. Singapore: 
K.L Deflu. RangLoA. Hone 
Koiie, Sydney. Eurtoe. A The 
Americai. Flamingo Travel. 5 
Nc» Quebec Sl Marble ‘Vich 
London WIH 7 DD. 

01-402 9217/18/19 

Open Saturday 10.00-13.00 


eotreumats am iMMs/bob 

to Europe. USA 6 mod acsttna- 
Hons. Diplomat Travel 01-730 
2201. AJBTA LATA ATQL 


CALL MOT FUOHTS tor a tare 
deal world wide. Trt Ol 631 
0167. Agts Alol 1893 


CALIFORNIA 

VACATION 

2 weeks 
in 2 magnificent 
millionaire homes 

or. LA 5urs.ee Eeaer and 
scer.:c U-:s Hsu se.7 say* 
a: escr e/.ilLa.e :oc «s.-. 
A^ailas e :rorr. Jj.y '.2 

a Sep'.e^osr 2 : :Z5s. 
Further 


MUAS 

COSTA CEL SOL 
ALGARVE. IHZA 
Brautdui mu- vi uf. pools 
Supers and meur.Uiri 
new: SPECIAL 

DISCOUNTS 

Apn: vijv June 

CORNISA VILLAS 

Of -624 8623 

(sim 358-5206) 

ATOL <0.-7 AB' r V 


msizc Pit. e:5Spw. 2 n*« 
lure, .ip; Mm e mill On lei 

oni. .tv, ^-irrtiiin aiajiaoleul 
lAhre. Wood & W HUtUt- 
xlraa ACRE 386 661 S 


Avon fcnesHfi mom 

Exoimil dalachril lully 
imcnniwd rMdlivH BWVJIS 
nun*- eavv arrre, MS Mmrirs 
from i.hops Pt> Weiton Super 
Mare 2J295 


COMPANY NOTICES 



April 1 

DT.T «;TOtJE MJRDMiE 

TT LCCRAf SCLfiKAB 
• AkTirSUKI. AB, 

TVi£ GREAT VORTHEWtv TELE 
CRAPH company LIMITED 

' or DLVVABV 

I Tlw oiquiery GENERAL 

MtETIKC 

I - id f. la ji rnSii-iTien- Mu'. H 

I «l -s:idr'** h 1 - BObh'i.ird. Capen 
I rorfrf-u Ol. Thursday IBtn Max 

l "-wi ji 1X1 pm 


SELF-CATERING 

CANARY ft MADEIRA 


CMMP OUUKY full) IUTTUMWO 
apartment in oeauuiu) coastal 
comotn SOectsl retfurtitw. 
May June, in -C&SJt 779673 
mronuEi and weekend* 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


South Of 
France 

House* to' encern.ngel tr:* 
*hp *«'. - e-«- zrv. c.-. ire 
Co-e 3A:_- Trrv .ry*'ii 

e'egaii — <a-it-*ns 

oib- roc peeci vail O'. Cap 

Fru: - •: > n. 

ccar.trv r :■_-!«» ' me A'.pea 
Maiii.i-.es c c-. , j.i'!:ni 
L. jlv: . s m.ie 

•>e5,r.g ^ GeLSU ;i ineve 

litMInc'-ST Are. Sadie- « 
vE' T » CV TfereWB.HFl 
vTCL?J.5 France Depart meni 
7 ; -43 Cadsoen Sereei 

Z..'~ y . London SW2 ZM 
* L^ijai 01-S8ICI8SI 

(3390132 - 24 hr 
IK. i Brochure servicri 


ST TMKZ Luxury ore nr flat 
CMKe M and uwn crime 
Smiri pmi and oaroms SUM 6 
AiaJM 3 tutlal. CJSSpw 
Tel Ol *M7 lbOfj 


1KKETS MAKTBk Mr Wimble- 
dan. fa Cud Final. * other 
events. Ol 223 466a 


W—LglUa Deoemare wh 
wanted for prtvale 
TMMOHMM-Ol 226 0423. 


PART TIME 
CAREERS 

Have a selection of vacancies in theQty and the 
West End for- „ 

CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS & 
BOOKKEEPERS 
TO T/B AND BEYOND 
on both computerised and manual systems. 

If you arc looking for a permanent part time job 
and are available 1/2/3 or 4 days a week or part 
of every day please ring Julia Mdndoe or Ann 
Lee on 

01-487 8103 
for an appointment 

PART TI ME CAR EERS 
LIMITED 

10 GOLDEN SQUARE. 
LONDON Wl. 


THREE FULL MT» IMT. W 
oailno Job wondaa __ for 
wriur/Kcturer with cutrurw 

and arcMUctiBBl mercatt in &» 

private home in Wl. RtoponN- 
DUKMa Include penarw 
SKRUrtal duties 00/60wpniL 
bganWog diary ana travel «■- 
rangemeMa. _ axwfBhw 

telephone wort a»6 «»i*; 
March- ' Ape 26 *. Oood 
educadon and floxHiBIty eaa«y- 
bal. cilULOCK pb. Ptem* .CJB 
454 4512. Crone CmJdfl Re- 
crudment CaMuXSOIs. 



u» ni ed in c l uding drtantnm. 
Best prices paht. Ol 226 0BS7. 
WBOUBOM UcliMS wmtted. b«»- 



FOR SALE 


CARPETS 

SKOAL OFFERS 


aw? ws 

+ VAT. Wuxiin Berber npm 
4 m Mda Hesson todmd Z 43 S 
g^aq p + VAT. Whfle socks 

.Tab 01-876 2089 

Foe atbKftfr&eBrt Gas* 


BJzrt Dotafl Nothhttg? 
wrung the Chopin Liszt 
Be m* w ttdode Maomart 
Oar Prices cant be missed 
(Bay or Him from only 616 pw) 
MARKSON PIANOS 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 





SEUF-CATERTNG 

GREECE 



OPPORTUNITY 

TWobrigbL inleUigeni people 
123-331 required for 
prafcsmml orpuiisatioo in 
the Wea End. If you are 
mature, ambitious and 

oontracrcisUy espnioioed. 
with a use for something 
different, call Nic Ingram for 
a confidential mtewtrw. 

01-409 2615 


CHEF 

PRIVATE 

YACHT 

Highly accomplished for 
Large private yactii imerij. 
Month of May nossiMy 
longer. HJfllwsi standard of 
Enqllsh and continental 

outsine - buffets, cncnail 
and dinner panics. First 
doss restaurant /hold 
experience nsenitaL Call 
Richard Taylor 01-491 
1717 iaoo&.x 


TOP DECK TRAVEL 

01-373 5095/04C6 (2-5hrs) 


SITUATIONS WANTED 


BflTUMBfT. anfcuMe. wefl- 
tnv«ucd female. Hantt^ Surrey 
Domar based, serin tnuresting 
rewanUng P. A. rtle. UK/ Over- 
tarn, Trt; 0252 9I6M8 
uunr with ihtcghitt wm 
. nre for your pranerty/aninutt 
in your absence. LAV m/ouL 
TM 01-74® 4899. 


AUSTRALIA 
FAR EAST 
WORLDWIDE 

EUROCHECK TRAVEL 


(Esfd 1970 ) 


IT’S ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 


More low-cost flights 
via more routes 
to more destinations 
than any other agency 
PLUS 

- Fast, expert, high-tech 
service - Free wo rid wide 
hotel & ear hire pais 
• up to 60% discounte 


42-48 Earls Coort Rand 
Londm W 86 EJ 
LntflHtertOf-fiM tSH 
Earofm/USA 0VS37 5400 
letreochmss 01438 M44 
ObhmhBI LhMMdnwwad 


■Demand Travel, i Dnws 
RhMaond ABT A 01-940 4073. 
W1MRI UOEMSED A Bonded 
low con tupii experts: Europe 
£ W wide. Freedom Houoays 
01-741 4686 ATOL 433 IATA 
SPAM. raiTUBAL, GREECE- 
Fliqhh from mod UK JirportS 
Many tele vpecul offen F»#dor 
01 471 0047 ATOL 1640 
TUNISIA For uuu iwiieci notiday 
with sunny dwi * carefree nts. 
Meal SpcinstSununer Tuntson 
Travel. Ol 373 44l|. 

TURKEY nnmi only to Dabunan 
6.13 6 20 Mas I 6 2 wks fr 
£159. Turkish Oritohi Hobdays 
Ol 891 6469 Aral 2047 
AW BABtttU** £*B. Sm». 
Italy. Greece, ton. Onjnrv 
5 Witt. Germany. 01-434 4326 
AUCAMTC. Farts. Matopa He. 
Omtond Trave l ATO L 1 784. 
01 -SSI 4641. Horaham 68S4* 
WMK. N^.. South Africa. 
U S A. Honp Kona. Best Fares. 
01-493 TT76 ABT A. 
flights woaumnne ■ Best 
rain. CaU CrnyOon Travel 
IASTAI 01-667 0042. 

5 YD 'MEL £618 Penh £646 All 
masN tamers » A US. NZ. Ol- 
584 7371. ABT A 
SOUTH AFRICA JoTsunp from 
£465. 01-584 7371 ABT A. 


CRUISE & SAIL .ABROAD 


HOT TURKEY. Magnif »» 
■rewrd mol or yachi fr £1000 
Bw-. 01 737 3861 i24htS».0|- 
426 1005. Alol209l . 


ISLANDS IN THE 
SUN 

Sorinp Breaks - May -June 
■Torn £l29po 

FLY DIRECT to me lovely 
bunds Of SK1ATHOS. 
CEPHALON1A. CORFU. 
ZAKYNTMAS 6 CRETE 
viius a Sudws aot* to 
atanoui beaches Some 
FREE child puces- car hire. 
FREE windsurfing on Crane. 
Availability ihroupnoul the 
Summer 

0403 59788 
ILIOS ISLAND 
HOLIDAYS 

ABTA IATA ATOL f 462 


CORFU SPECIAL OFFERS 2BUI 
April, also May/ June 1 or 2 
wk». viuas/HMefs/ApB. 

Hihrw or Gatwick Pan Wand 
Holidays Ol 734 2662 
GREECE. L rvsooUt Islands, ch rap 
n tones. villa remain efc. Zeus Hal 

mays 01-434 1647 Aral auo. 

RHODES April May Bargain* 
from ei45pp u*c. Tel Snama 
0706 8628 1 4. 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


VBXAS TYTTH A MACtC TOUCH. 

A villa, a pool and a Miami 
«ew What more could you 
want? Choose from Tuscany, 
car/unu or Ravrilo - the loveli- 
er part* ol Italy where the man 
marvel operators don't 90 Or 
combine a villa holiday wim » 
stay in VMM. Florence or 
Rome Free brochure from 
MMr of tody. Deri T. 47 Shep- 
nents Bush Green. W12 BPS 
Trt. Ol 749 7449 124 bra 


PORTUGAL 


MLOMWI MTOBHim. VUU 
HoBdayi of osuncwM toe toe 
vary lew. Tel: 01 491 0602. 73 
« James's flUtd. SWl. 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


MAZMHKM unspoilt resort in S 
Ruin villa* API* Sal Ftl Cot 
Munu (Nr La Manual. May 
Special*. Beach Bay Hot* 0432 
270165 ATOL 

MARfELLA Lux villa al Alena 
Nr Port Baiw* T Court S-Pool. 
Fr CIBOpw. 104831 273472. 


SPECIAL INTEREST 


FRENCH. aanUN. Soaotlh 
Italian. Pormgurpe The Bni 
place m learn a lanauapr » *r» 
the country where II b spokm 
Course* for all need* Studem*. 
BuMie> Men. Tounsls For Or 
bul* con lan. Lanquw Studies 
Lid. JO- 12 James SL London 
WIM 6HN Tel Ol 408 0481 


WINTER SPORTS 



LONDON 


DSK5COLL HOUSE- 200 angle 

rooms £66sw partial board- 
Apply 172 New Kent Road. 
London. SEl. 4YT . Tel: 01 703 
4175. 


EAST ANGLIA 



UiSJk/AIKT. RETURN FTJKNfT* 

irom Canada £165. Canoocan 
£329. Florida £198. la £ San 
Franchto £309. New Iwv 
rMB DWIa* £330. Housion 
£299. Ausirriia £569. Fly 
□me Hotels on reouesJ. 
inter Alla* Travel Tel: 01-493 
0071. Visa welcome 


TAKE TME OFF » ParK. Am- 
CrnUra. Bnrtseh. Bruar*. 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague Dublin. Rouen. Bou- 
toune ft Dieppe Time OK. 8a. 
Chester Clou. London. SW1X 
7BQ 01-235 8070 

cyhkm skcuul men 

April /May /June 1 or 2 wes. 
Hriris/Aou Scheduled fits Pan 
world Holidays Ot-734 25os. 


ALDEBURGH 

FuHy turmshed iwrtv 
eonwned "use at at from 
May isl Only live mantes 
want to me sea 

TEL 072885 2878 ON 


BENTLEY &C9 

now urgently require to pnro&ase 


fmeiodiai g cash Offer. Valuations made. 

6S New Bond Street. W.l. Telephone 01-629 0651 


AMERICAN BUYERS SEEK 

/3S\ iwt ano Mocem t»S 

innuo^r irJ <* 'W 1 ^ «n futf Doen Mon - 

Chf n.erT an rju rjf« ^oiqP perawny wm™ WUI 

““ 

IAm m Nn tort) 


1 Ri per* dfi Ittf- Ccrr-wnv '* me > 
mv duung lh>- pavi vtar 
i hri^fniJimn ol In* ■maned 
Group end Company aotouni* roc 
!9«5 

3 Adoplxm oi me annual prriil 
and lov*. arraunl and oalanre 
vt— r ana an inn anrtvarqe to ih* 
Burn ot OTeriorv and the Boot a 
co Manaeemeni 

4 Pr 000*4) for the dhtnuinloo « 
prriil icr me pa*i year, mcludiria 
l hr duKtond lo nr paid 

5 ji pnriui lor me Board im 
nw share casual. Hr 
201 30t> 420. be inrreawa to »r 
SOI 959 £40 by me UlMcnpliMi 
ri Kr IOQo53 1 SO new Uiare* al 
a pr*-e n «*>-. of nomuvu value. 
ih> Company s pinmi 'durehoid 
ers neirto enuilod lo villMnplicn 
>n proporuon to Iheir nntal 
huiainas 

SuavcriptMt) will Late place in 
the n-noo from 28ih Mat to 2eah 
June. IWt twin ojs* included 
at Pnvalnaten 4 S Den Oair'te 
Bank al 1871 AHie*el*laD 
liewlvKabei hwoenhavn* 

HahilelvOank. Bamiue Pantvr. 
and Hamfiio* Bam. Limiira 
n. Prepoial from ihr Board Ihal 
me umpini v snare capital ne 
■nr leaved Irom Lr 301. 959.540 
bv up lo kr 5 400 OOO The, ram ■ 
■a' increase -haU bv oileied to It*- 
■■mMvv eesui me Com pan \ and of 
IP- Cumaant's sutcadianes • ex- 
r>m in counlnes wnrrr naiwnaj 
reaulalionv prevent inn ■ in accor 
rial, re y iir requlalmn-. laid down 
cv me Board and approx eo by ihe 
rtannJi Minniit ri Inland Hnr 
na* Crilnins ana trn— The. 
casual increase i* rilerrd lo llir 
employe** only ana nriio pre-veni 
snaiennrders a* such 
t Prosos.il Irom Ihe Board Ihai 
me Company S Article* ol assort 
aiuxi be alioreo. at Article i The 
Company's name shall be alter ea 
to ON Store Nord as Al me amt 
lime me GN Great Norair Lid a* 
.trvt a number ri secondary 
name* shall be reqisiereu 
bi Article A The me of the 
Company's snare capital and Ihe 
extern of Ihr Board's aulnonz* 
non to increase the snare casual 
ci Article t> Concerning Ihedix- 
Ktena rcupcim 

d< Article IS The time limn lor 
issuing card* ol aunvaon 
e, Articles 15 and 1? Alter 
Mriiy in Ihe spec i(ic a lions of 
dorumenl* lo be laid »1nt the 
lh* General Meetvnb 
1 1 Amrie 19 Vouna procedure 
al Ihe General Meeting 
q< Article SB The number ri 
members of Ihe Board 
Manaoemem 

hi Article 29. ungursiic 
alleralion 

7 Proposal from the Board lltat it 

be aiuhomea lo acquire bn the 
Company's benab up to 1C*S> M 
ih* Company's own snare*. 

B Ejection to the Board ri 

Directors 

9 Clemon of iwo Auditor* (or Lhe 
current year 


Arrordingto Article 1 B ri me Ar- 
neh-s of Assoctauon adopuon ol 
the proposal* under 5 and « 
above require* ihal noi less than 
one^ourth. ri ihr share capital he 
represented al Ihe General Meet. 
Ing and Ihal ihe adoption be 
passed by a mammy of not less 
than twc*third* ri ihe vries easi 
ana ri Ihe amount ri snare capital 
reofesetdea al ine Meellnp as Car 
ryrnq ioting ngtns In the even! 
ihal one-fourth ri llw share rapt, 
lai i» nof repmenivd but mal lhe 
proposal t* earned by ihe max* 
lly specified above, the proposal 
may be aoopied al a new general 
meeting convened lor thal rur 
pose, with me mammy specified 
above and irrespective ri lhe 
amounf ri ihare rapuai repre- 
senied at this qmerai mertinp as 
carryifto voting rtriih 

From ihe 30m April 1985 Ih* 
Abend* amt the full proposal.* 10 
be suMitltfM to Ihe General Meet- 
ing. together wiih ihe Company 
and Croup Accounts, and Report, 
and Ihe Auditor's report, will in- 
open 10 the inspection of share 
Bolder* al lhe company-s rifir* in 
Copenhagen and in London and 
Pan* They will also be wnL not 
later than eight oay* before me 
General Meeting, lo all sharehold- 
er* noted m the Company rrtusier 
of shareholder*, al the addresses 
noted in Ihe rrqjsur 

Cards of admwdon mav be ob- 
tained Irom the Company'* 
office* itn London. 6. St Hriui's 
Place not later than five days be 
lore the General Meeongi by 
INrfhaU5 pro* idlna Uner ngnu 
as such in accordance wtm Arti- 
cle II second pa ra&apn. ol me 
Arnctra ot Asaoctaunn. 

Me director ts employed under a 
contract ri service either wan lhe 
Company or any ri its 



MARINE PAINTINGS 
AND .ARTEFACTS 

Entries arc now being 
invik.fl lor our regular 
Coo.cs Wcel JULiton. 
Con tael Niels Scon 
on 01-564 9161. 
Bonhams Auctioneers. 
Montpelier Street, 
Knightsbridttr, 
London, 5197. 


BRIAN LOOMES 

Tne rarcidrsf oeaie w 

orfxpm i’-ifli* noc>s 
Iskwi-siim veaiv 

mnrqi^inOly 
retfxjns« futhniiy md 
j ul tor ol Siangan] T»jrl 
bows on Ck>t*S 
UnbMllM yd fenon d 
area r.impiev Now- 
nfs* uun UMO 

CALF KAUGH 
FARM. 

PATELEY BRIDGE 

Tel la dends 
04» 711163 


JUST DESKS 

Pnwia and irwoournoi'- 
ProisUi Aiwkv Puilnrrs ittov. 
wiiiun t.iom. CM import* ana 
Om num 

Wr.ir lor dHam or 
Privunal Callrrs ViKYom* 

• iiM Di-A* 1 ' Dpi 9 2 86 
*0 Chuirh Sir»ei. London NWB 
Tetrpnonc' 01-723 7975 






ApriMSovcmber 1986 
A relaxing break 
that is different! 
Spedai interest 
weekends on - 

• Victorian Glass 

• Glassmaking 



ORIENTAL RUGS 
aCARPETS 
PURCHASED 

Wellington 
(082347) 7430 

Brisiol 

(0272) 24246. 


Centre In L wrong and Leisure 
A WEST OF ANTIQUES 
1-fl June £170 OTbibW brD»wJ8 
Sylvia WngtiLMHre Fayiet tnO oftiei 
nil on. in a tnerdiy «'iotmai wav 
EvceHen cuome & condoraUeac- 
conrrotufton m hwohmI 
btrt bunding awriooMiQ me be*u- 
nlgi Imjt estuaty. 

B ut op OMP U gn. S Jcrtw TOM 

Trt: {06267) 527B. 


WILTSHIRE 


THATCtfCO COTTAOE, Fully 
equipped, muniemuned view 
over m** Rtvw Avon. Salbbun 
2 mile*. Available from 6tn 
may ra 13th June. Stem 2 
£90 per woe*. Trt. '0722) 710 
271 aflrr fi pm. 


PUBLIC 


PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
77k- Churen Caimnoianrrs have 
prepared drofl pastoral scheme* 
pronring for declaration* ri re- 
dundancy m respect ri Ihe parish 
rhurrn ol haani Lawrence, bourn 

M-’aMum ana it* appropriation to 
use tor ecclesiastical purposes 
i Norwich dtoceset provwuig tot 
pari of the parish enuren ri me 
parish ri Hove. Stunt Palricl. 
with Chrtu Church and Saint An 
drew to be declared redundant 
and lor it* appropnauon 10 w ,l* 
a cummunii* centre and purpose* 

anriiliarv inerefo iCmcnesier di- 
otisei draft redundanfV ycnwriei 
prov iding fur the sab- or mil of the 
pie ri me- former rhurrn id Great 
taarley. known a* Great Wane* 
Old Church ano the land an- 
nexed or hefriiaing thereto 
■ Chelmsford dio-.esei.iur me ,-arc 
and mainteiunre ri tne tower 
and *wrc « mr redundant cnurch 
m Low Eb-Mict Saint Stephen bv 
the Redundant Churches Fund 

and me demolition ri ini ine re 
■rounder 01 ine ouidlmg 
■Newcastle dK-Crsei lor the carp 
and maintenance ri ine redun- 
dant church ri ■Bfredon-eii-le- 
FKHd Sami Mirnaei by lhe 
Ftedumtanl Cnurcne* Funds 
iLerrestcr diocese i. and a draft 
amending redundancy scheme 
containing prov won lor Ih* sale 
ri me redundant church ri Saint 
Andrew, chu timer iCnichesler 
diocesei. 


LEGAL NOTICES 


CALOERBANK. OLIVE 

CALDERBANK'. SPINSTER late 
Of 6 Smith Avenue. CMd Col wyn 
Oriwyn Say. Qvrtd died al 
Bodelwyddan. Chvyd on 4th Jan- 
uary 1986 lEsUW about 
CJ4JXXM 

roRCER nee SCULLY. MARY 
GENCLTCVE FORCER nee 
SCI LLY. Widow late of 15 
Rov norough Avenue. Harrow . 
Middlesex died al Harrow- on 9lh 
Nnvemorr 1985 ■ Estate about 
€21 260- 

GOLLOCJT CDTTH ar RIEL 
COL' L DER Spinwei late « Flat 
1. Thrvfl House Rirennotow 
Road fnveffietd ynrkshire died 
mere on or atmul I9lb December 
J 984 ■ Estate aoouf XSCO Ol 
GRANT hotme/IV GRCTTON nfe 
HEATON VILET MARS GRANT 
■Ofmertr GRETTON nex- 
H EATON. Widow late n« Cam ri 
Treuerddan. Bow SI reel Pvied 
died mere on 2a Mi October 1984 
lESUIe about LcCOOi 
LAKE THOMAS BERNABO 
LAKE otherwise BRIAN LAKE 
Late Of 17 Do LUO Street. Bow. 
London E3 died fn Hactnev loti 
don E9 on 3IM October 1985 
■ Estate aboul I3.'300i 
MASTERTON. BRIDGET 

FRANCES MASTERSON. Spin- 
sler 'a(c of New End Hospital. 
Camden London NWS died there 
on 1*1 March 1985 lEsuto atwul 
£90001 

The Lin of the above named are 
requested '« -toriV to Ih* TrM 
jury Snlintnr <B V j. Quern 
Anne's Chambers. 28 Broadway 
London SWl H 9 Jfe- taihng wnicn 
the Treason Snlintor mav lahe 
sieps to adntfllfSMT JlK' ** ttte 


ORIENTAL 

ANTIQUES 

* Good Selection ol t9i1 Certify 
Chtrise Furniture Japanese 
Screens. Emwadenes and «oils 
al an 

771 Ftftan Hoad. 

Umtan SWS 
Tel: 01 731 SUS 
Open lOzm-opm M cm to 5a 


LLOYD LOOM 

Laro-Nloci in original con- 
tsiiioh Ctuir* from 
C5t -.spraying service 
diAiiAbh 1 RisforAtH-n a 
advire alien L plmlslcn - 
ail soil funusnings- 

Liqucniig 4 rpidJm 

Km b u of Oafld *f 
Master Craftsmen 
JILL SAUMOEBS. 
W ri tPra U an Wortivbefi 
91-93 Lett Road SWIB. 
M 01 352 1365. 


ANTIQUES 


Large wardrobe* A Mirror*. 
Dal*. Bbo*ca*e *lc 6 Prc- 
1940 hire Hu re. 

Tab Ol-Mf 6148 
or 01-228 2716 


£150 PAUL. Royal Dounon Char 
arier Jug 'Reoencv Beau' All 
Other CHarjoer Jug* wanted 
Ol 291 3506 AnvtmK- 


ROYAL 

DOULTON 

TOBY JUGS, 

FIGURINES. 
ANIMALS. ETC.. 

WANTED. 

01 883 0024 


SITTING PRETTY 

Sale of genuine antique 
bathroom piece* - basins, 
loos, baite. brass laps 
etc. up to 50% off. 

For details please pfaaa e 

01-381 0049 

131 DAWES ROAD 
LONDON SWS 


EXQUISITE 

ORIENTAL 

CARPET 

RESTORATIONS 

Keaiwdy Carpets ad Haflaay 
9A Vtm> Mmt, 
London Wl. 

01 439 0373. 


JEWELLERY TO SELL? 
Long WODtotod find* mwihjfS 
wjti ro iwcfjif iccoad rand 
iSwtnen 1 ana anwaie cjmajie 
dot is :d aw to our rinra anil 
interesting coUectiun. 
tftrte or ad ta ena/Wrtit* te- 
ABMQUR-MHSTON LTD, 
a Burfiarioo fixate. 

LoKbi Wl. 

TaL 01 493 8937 


CLASS DISPLAY DOMES: The 
Charming and effective wray lo 
*how a wul* range of coffecf- 
abl«* The Cabinet Room. Ol 
jug 21 ?7 

LARGE SELECTION Of anlioue 
irxnie* cnibrnidrries ana cu*h- 
■on* PET A hMYTH- 42 
Marcton Street Pimliro. SWl 
Tel Ol-aJO W98 


, STUDiOS;lPARTMENTS;VH.LAS, < 
CHATEAUX ii'lSlANDS-lNTHE SUN 



MONDAY EdBcaHen: Urtver- WEDNESDAY La Crtme de ta 
sily Appmntmenls. Prep, ft Public crtme: Sccreianal/PA appoimmenis 
School Appoimments. Educational over£7i00. General secretarial. 
Cbuses^cholafshfpfftFdloushiiiL Property: Residential. Comnwroal. 


La Crtme deb Creme; 

TUESDAY Gnnpster Haroons: 
a comprehensive guide to ihe 
computer inarkeL 
Legal Appafattmeatc Solicitors, 
Commcrcral Lawyets, Legal 
Officers. Private & Public practice. 


Town ft Counio'.Overseas. Rentals. 
THURSDAY Ceaend Appohrt- 

Bumv Chief Execuiives.ManaginB 
Di rectors. Direoon, Sales and 
Marieiing Execuiivesand Overseas 
Appotnmwnts. Including a hew 


Witicers. rniaic «. ruunt pidvvitc. nyjivn ■“■■■-■■-*• -o, - --- 

Legal La CmaK a new classifies- classification enuued t jopoii 
tion for top kga I secretaries. 'AceuBaaBcyAppdfafenls. 

THE WORLD FAMOUS PERSONAL COLUMN APPEARS EVERT DAY. 
ANNOUNCEMENTS CAN APPEAR WITHIN M HOURS. 


FRIDAY Morans A complete car 
buyers' guide featuring established 
dealers and private sales. 

Business lo Business: 

Selling property, franchises, 
equipment etc. to small and large 
companies or businesses. 

SATURDAY Overseas Travel; 
Holidays abroad. Low cost flights. 
Cruises, Car hire. ILK-HaveL 
Hotds. Cottages, Holiday lets. 
Entertainment 

Pen Friendsa new classification for 
young readers to contact people with 
shniUr imerestsal home md overseas. 


Fill in lhe coupon and aiuch il io your adivnt^emeni Prior lo it appearing, 
w* will contact you with a quouilton and confirm the dale of insertion. 

Rates are Lineage £4 per line Imm, 3 lines}. Boxed Display £23 per single 
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PAY NO POSTAGE. Scud to: The Times, Sbiriey Mai^olH. Group 

Classiftod AdveftaetDcot Menagtx Times Newspapers Lt4 AdverriMiiKitc Depart- 
ment, P.O.Bu-84, VEgmia Street. London El 9DD- 

NAME 

A DDR ESS 



TELEPHONE (Day time i 

ACCESSOR VISA Arc No 


. DATE OF INSERTION 

iPkjw jilt** •itTL'fretwunyatiil rtoi.-'xvini.* ■ 

J- 1 1-11 * < 1 ES 







































































































36 


SPORT/LAW 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 


tak 

an 

pat 


m2 

we 

av< 


ami 

suit 


Arr 

end 

foil. 


'fi 




T r '"— '3 


SUT 

TO! 

(Siti 


Con 


For bi 

way, i 

meats 

tclcpb 

than 

mong. 


49 





Richard Streeton reports that Middlesex and Hampshire again look set to lead the pack 



• 4 v*r«M^v«r 


Keys t0 success: Border (left), Marshall (centre) and Slack have important roles to play as their comities strive for glory. 


Title favourites face action replay 


There is Hide cause lo look beyond 
Middlesex or Hampshire to find lhe 
winners of the 1 9S6 Britannic Assur- 
ance County Championship. Howev- 
er, the present day levelling in county 
standaids is a guarantee that the five- 
month campaign will be hard-lbughL 

Once more international ndls will 
deprive some counties of their leading 
English players for half the pro- 
gramme. Middlesex, the holders, will 
again be disrupted in this respect 
more than Hampshire, who ran them 
so close last year. The probable 
candidates for prize money among the 
17 counties is a reminder of how the 
balance of power, in the three-day 
game at least, has shifted to the south. 

Surrey. Kent and Sussex are 
equipped to mount a challenge and 
might atone for recent failures to do 
so. Essex, too. remain strong but are 
entering a transitional period and 
could be restricted to one-day success- 
es. Gloucestershire and Worcester- 
shire have the right to expect a fruitful 
season after last year’s revivals, 
without perhaps, possessing the all- 
round strength to emerge as 
champions. 

Middlesex and Hampshire, howev- 
er. stand clear of the pack, as they did 
12 months ago. At that time, even 
Gatting. the Middlesex captain, did 
not expect to finish with the winners' 
pennant, remembering that he. 
Emburey. Edmonds. Downton and 
Cowans, were likely to be away at 
Tests. Slack, too, might now be 
wanted by England. The Middlesex 
reserves, though, proved equal to the 
demands made upon them in 1985 


and this will need to happen again for 
the title to be retained. 

Hampshire have different prob- 
lems. Marshall's commitment and 
fitness are remarkable but another 
penetrative bowler is needed to share 
his burden. Hampshire will hope for 
progress from Andrew and Connor 
and that Maru maintains last year's 
advance; Tremleti will be thankful to 
return to English pitches after his visit 
to Sri Lanka. If it is possible, therefore 
to doubt Hampshire's bowling and 
close catching — as compared with 
Middlesex's - there can be no quibble 
about their batting. 

Gooch, who succeeds Fletcher at 
Essex, is among four new captains, the 
others being Pocock (Surrey), Clive 
Llovd (Lancashire) and Roebuck 
(Somerset). Fletcher will lead Essex 
during Gooch's absences with En- 
gland. and Foster, too. could be away. 
Lever’s recurring physical problems 
means he must be used sparingly. 
Border, the Australian captain, looks 
tailor-made as McEwan's replace- 
ment. A new challenge could restore 
his zest. which has been so clearly 
blunted in recent weeks. 


Surrey, who are hoping they escape 
the crop of injuries they had last 
summer, are among several counties 
juggling with overseas players. In 
Surrey's case the West Indian fast 
bowlers, Garke and Gray, will alter- 
nate. It brings a new dimension to 
selection and is perfectly legitimate 
but the trend must irritate the 
administrators as they try to limit the 
overseas influence. 

Lloyd replaces Abrahams but will 
band over the reins to Simmons when 
Lancashire warn to include Patterson, 
whose pace has acquired such new 
menace this winter. Fowler's physical 
problems are behind him and be and 
Mendis (signed from Sussex) should 
provide a lively start to the batting.- 
Roebuck takes over from Botham as 
the struggle continues to weld 
Somerset's talented staff in to a signifi- 
cant team. 

Kent and everyone else on the 
county circuit will miss Knott's perky 
presence, though Underwood, who 
takes a second benefit, will still be 
there to evoke memories of a famous 
era. Dilley and Jarvis are fit and the 
Australian. Alderman, is back. Kent 


Spring washout hits Lord’s 


One of wettest springs on record has virtually ruled out the prospect of any 
play between the MCC and Middlesex, the county champions, at Lord's today 
and the chances of any cricket tomorrow or Friday are slender. 

Mr John Stephenson, the MCC assistant secretary, said: “We have had 25 
days of consecutive rain at Lord's and 3.5 inches already in ApriL 1 would say to 
anybody thinking of coming not to commit themselves to a long journey.” 

Greg Thomas, the Glamorgan and England fast bowler, has influenza and 
has withdrawn from the MCC team. Should there beany play, his place will be 
filled by Neal Radford of Worcestershire. 


also have no qualms about their 
batting. Imran Khan again limits his 
three-day appearances for Sussex, 
who look well endowed with quick 
bowlers. The promising Lenbara will 
open with Green in Mendis's place. 

Gloucestershire’s resurgence owed 
much to their new ball bowlers, 
Lawrence and Walsh, and with Aus- 
tralia on the horizon, Lawren ce has 
every incentive this summer. Worces- 
tershire are boosted by the return after 
injuries of Pridgeon and EUcock, the 
young Barbados fast bowler. Hadlee 
will be with the New Zealand team in 
lhe second half of the summer and 
Nottinghamshire could struggle with- 
out him. 

Wright, similarly, will be absent 
from Derbyshire, which solves the 
recurring dilemma over whether to 
include him or Holding. Barnett, the 
Derbyshire captain, has recovered 
from the virus which cut short his tour 
with England B. Northamptonshire 
and Warwickshire have filled gaps in 
their bowling with players from 
Leicestershire. Nick Cook could be 
the perfect foil to Harper at North- 
ampton. Parsons, together with a 
South .African newcomer, Brian Mc- 
Millan, will give Small the support he 
needs at Edgbaston. 

The rebuilding processes at Leices- 
tershire and Glamorgan need more 
time before either is a championship 
contender. Both have the fast bowlers 
and batting blend to make a mark in 
one-day events. Yorkshire remain at a 
disadvantage without overseas play- 
ers but an upward trend should not be 
ruled out 


wifiiBY union 


Threat to amateurism 
is gathering impetus 

A . A I ilM'IUlTutmt 


By David 

Afta- foe departure of so many laocy which they 


players from Barb- 
week's oea- 


tewaiy — „ 

some to a beetle winter in 
Australia, others more 
co a tfO w argaBy a South Africa 
- the International Rugby Fo«- 
baU Board began on Monday the 
dosing stages of its annual 
meeting in London. Thefc- delib- 
erations continued yesterday 
and the outcome, hi some anas 
at least, wiD be mode known 
today. 

1 doubt whether then is a 
more important area of the game 
than amateurism to concern 
them, pvtiadob amid the 
hotchpotch of rumour sumouud- 
jnc the mwffidal tour of South 
Africa fry a primarily New 
Zealand party (whose officials 
deny that the players arc receiv- 
ing more than the agreed daily 
tour allowance) and hi the light 
of tin money-malting activities 
which wfll surround oexr year's 
inangnral world tournament. H 
will be with a certain as wmt of 
relief that John Hart, honorary 
secretary to the board lor the 
hot 15 years, steps down today. 

Amateurism received gr e a t 
consideration at last week's XB 
Centenary Congress. Carlos 
Tom, president of the Argentin- 
ian Rugby Union, befieves his 
country to be one of due strictest 
in its application of the amateur 
cede: “Once yon posh open the 
door a crack," he said, “there 
■will always be people who want 
to open it farther." 

He is less than happy when 
individual players fink his 
coontry go off to piny rugby is 
Europe or elsewhere because he 
fears that they may be receiving 

iHf pil ii^rywn cn^ jm expOO 


reason Argeu^rf® 

Mes a long way towards acting 
view of the enhanced 


Aka Jones, Ao straB*^ 

Hi, while emphasino g . ats 
country's total anmKarism. 
says: “I think no person sho«w 

be paid for playfciRthegain* 
no person dhowa ** 
pocket as a result of pbyteg !*■*- 
Saw.” Where do reason***!* 
subsistence payments become 
broken-time payments? 

There are two Hnes of pareBe* 
HiiairiM mi amateurism at the 
smuot which do not seem to 

have a compromise point. Owe te 
illustrated by England's refusal 
to allow the daily tour allowance 
to be paid to their players ww 
neve favoteed in tost week's 
centenary matches because ft 
would hare been contrary to SB 
regulations, which hare not bees 
lifted even if the board itseff 
agreed — apparently in defiance 
of its own priacipfes, that allow- 
ances should be paid in this 
instance. 

England would agree with 
Argentina as fear as the crack in 
the door is concerned. Other 
c ou ntries would support the 
French approach winch says the 
amateur regulations should not 
be discriminatory. “Financial 
shortfalls should not Emit a 
person's participation in the 
game," France bare declared in 


conrepotHteoce with the hoard. 

Andy Dalton. New Zealand's 
JoaiL was quoad rewmjj 

h-lui von hare W tow a 

either ajptty good 

employer who b 

2S >WJ through « 

ares offering economic 
hardship-" 

JISTSETSSK 

different countries. AnsftaDa 

pounds returning to , unlucky 
ticket app itamtt- N o such 
crowds fin BaUrnwre to Bra- 
bane or the Sydney Cridcet 

Ground unless they haw a good 
reason for going, so the game’s 
upkeep depends ©*> 


traditional interest, t wonder _ 
we are not likely to find that to 
Britain before too long. _ 
There ray beau adding about 
the worth ef associate member- 
ship of the board. Forms, bane 
been distributed requ esting 
^i far p . wrin .1 on which seek 
membership wffi he lodged and 
those to whom it is gussied wfll 
be able to propose law changes 
directly. Many countries will be 
looking for more than that. Mr. 
Tozri said that Argentina, white 
not looking for a vote on the 
board, would tike their voice to 
tie heard on world banes and 1 
believe that they, and others, 
have earned that right 


No place in Bath cup team * 
for Egerton or Trevaskis 


Bath, rhe holders, have omit- 
ted David Egerton from the side 
to play in the John .Player 
Special cup final against Wasps 
at Twickenham on Saturday. 
Egerton, who will be the only No 
8 in England's B party ia Italy 
next month, has been replaced 
by Simpson, which restores tbe 
back row that played in the tost 
two cup finals, of Simpson, Hail 
and SputrdL 

The club's selectors, were 
helped in their decision by the 
fact that Egerton has been 
suffering from a back injury, but 
he is among the replacements 
which only points up the di- 
lemma caused by the presence 
of four top-rate back-row play- 
ers. Hall was restored to the first 
team earlier this month after a 
seven-week absence through in- 
jury and Simpson's form has 


By David Hands 

been such that ft was fell he 
could not be (eft out. 

There- has been a similar 
problem on the wing, where 
Trick, Swift and Trevaskis have 
been jostling for two places. 
Trevaskis, the Cornishman who 
played in the last two finals, is 
the unlucky one. a groin strain 
contributing to the decision to 
choose him among the replace- 
ments, leaving the right wing to 
Trick, whose form has recov- 
ered dramatically of late, and 
the left to Swift. 

Wasps, deprived of three of 
their internationals (Bath have 
not been able to choose the 
injured Scottish cap Sole since 
-February) have asked another 
Cornishman, PeBow, to play, 
centre alongside Candus. their 
captain. The 27-year-okI Fellow 
takes over the vacancy left by 


Lorowski and. subsequently, by 
Davies; but there are no other 
changes in the side that '.drear 
with Nottingham and tbeti beef 
London Scottish in-foe in the 
quarter-finals' ami semi-finals 
respectively. . . v ' 

Italy, who best B lows from 
England and Wales in May. 
themselves depart for Australia 
on May II, the day after their 
against England’ B 


in 


aam c Mteftt o 




C Up* 0 


Stinger. S sUtkCrtis 


fcaoewA ft M SSc'tt Bator. G « 5 


fMteCPlnnagV. JBowwr.D Pw/or. M 
rd 5T Pv pteJui Wi te. P. wmfnei. K 
taotMte P -Snfcetnt* J Baton A A 
toetot JtEBson. 


Chancery Division 


Law Report April 23 1986 


' Divisaoi:iI Court 


Presumption for international duty 


National Smokeless Fuels Ltd 
v Inland Revenue 
Commissioners 
Before Mr Justice Warner 
(Judgment given April 21 1 

Where words of a United 
Kingdom statute passed to give 
effect to an EEC directive were 
reasonably capable of more than 
one meaning, an English court 
in construing them had to 
presume that Parliament did 
not intend to act in breach of the 
United Kingdom's international 
obligations. Mr Justice Warner 
so held in a reserved judgment 
in the Chancery Division when 
dismissing an appeal by the 
taxpayer company. National 
Smokeless Fuels Ltd. against a 
capital duty assessment raised 
on it under the provisions of 
section 47 of the Finance Act 
1973. 

The relevant EEC directives 
supported the Crown’s case that 
the exemption from the duty 
contained in paragraph 10 of 
Schedule 19 to the 1973 AcL did 
not apply to the chargeable 
transaction under appeal. 

Mr Donald Rat tee. QC and 
Mr Roger Home for the tax- 
payer company: Mr John Mum- 
mery for the Crown. 

MR JUSTICE WARNER 
said that capital duty was in- 
troduced by the Finance Act 
1973 to give effect to EEC 
directives requiring member 
stales to abolish pre-existing 
taxes on the capital of compa- 
nies and to substitute a uniform 
t per cent duty to be assessed in 
accordance with criteria laid 
down in the directives. Member 
states were authorized to get 
certain exemptions from the 
duty. 


fS 


The taxpayer company, lo- 
ther with its parent company. 
CB (Coal Products) Ltd. were 
"capital companies" for the 
purposes of the legislation. 

The taxpayer company ap- 
pealed by way of case stated 

g ursuam to section 13 of the 
tamp An 1891 against an 
assessment to the duty in respect 
of a return by it of an allotment 
of shares. 

Before the aftoimem the en- 
tire share capital of Lhe taxpayer 
company was owned by the 
parent company. 

The taxpayer company owed 
some £30 million lo various 
banks. In 1983 the share capital 
of the taxpayer company was 
increased by the creation of 30 
million new £ I shares allotted to 
the parent company in consid- 
eration of the assumption and 
discharge by the parent com- 
pany of the taxpayer company's 
debts. 

The question was whether the 
taxpayer company was or was 
not entitled to exemption from 
the duty under paragraph 10 of 
Schedule 19. 

The Crown relied on the 
provisions of paragraph 
IGUXaHi) and <2tfbKi> in 
contending that the exemption 
did not apply. 

As between the views on those 
two provisions contended for by 
the parties, those advanced by 
the Crown were to be preferred: 
sub-paragraph ( 1 RaXi) only ex- 
empted a transaction if it was 
one by which the acquiring 
company became the beneficial 
owner of 75 per cent or more of 
the capital of the acquired 
company. 

It did not apply where the 
acquiring company was, as here. 


before lhe transaction already 
the beneficial owner or 75 per 
cent or more. 

Further sub-paragraph 
(2Mb «i) required that there had 
to remain some consideration 
for the acquisition after there 
bad been left out of account so 
much of the consideration as 
consisted of the assumption or 
discharge by the acquiring com- 
pany of liabilities of the ac- 
quire! company and that that 
remaining consideration had to 
consist, at least as to 90 per cent, 
of the issue of shares in the 
acquiring company to the hold- 
ers of shares in the acquired 
company, the balance, if any, 
being cash. 

As here the only consid- 
eration was the assumption of 
the liabilities the exemption 
could not apply. 

Thai was not however the end 
of the case because it was 
common ground that the pro- 
visions of the 1973 Act relating 
to the duty were introduced to 
give effect to EEC Directives 
69/335, 73/79 and 73/80. 

The question arose as to 
whether and to what extent 
regard to the terms of the 
directives should be bad in 
construing the provisions. 

Relying on Macarthys Lid v 
Smith <119811 QB 180). both 
parties submitted that tbe 
construction of paragraph IQ was 
so clear that the court need not 
and should not look at the 
directive. 

That was unacceptable. Hav- 
ing considered the judgments of 
the Court of Appeal in Salomon 
v Commissioners of Customs 
and Excise ([1967] 2 QB lib), the 
correct view was that if the 
words of a statute passed to 


fulfil! an international obliga- 
tion of the United Kingdom 
were so dear and unambiguous 
that they were capable of only 
one meaning, the terms of the 
international treaty or other 
instrument imposing that 
obligation could not be invoked 
to modify that meaning. 

If in such a case the statute 
failed to fulfill the obligation the 
remedy lay ia what Lord Justice 
Diplock m the Salomon case 
described as "a forum other 
than her Majesty's own courts”. 

But where on the other hand 
the words of tbe statute were 
reasonably capable of more than 
one meaning an English court 
had in construing them lo apply 
the presumption that Par- 
liament did not intend to act in 
breach of the United Kingdom's 
imemaiion obligations. 

The well-known exception to 
that was a case, of which the 
Macanky decision was a good 
example, where the United 
Kingdom statute failed to fulfill 
an obligation contained in a 
provision of EEC law having 
direct effect in the member 
state. 

It could not be said that the 
meaning of the words of para- 
graph 10 that was contended for 
by the Crown was their only 
possible meaning. 

In the result it was necessary 
to turn to Directive 73/79 to 
seek confirmation or contradic- 
tion of the views expressed. 
Thus referred to the directive 
confirmed the view already 
expressed as to the meaning oi 
the exempting provisions. 

Solicitors: Mr Ronald V. 
Cowles: Solicitor of Inland 
Revenue. 


No power 
to order 
interim 
detention 


Solicitor’s threat to port 
barrister was contempt 


Secretary of State for the 
Home Department v Mental 
Health Review Tribunal 
Secretary of State for the 
Home Department r Mental 
Health Review Tribunal for 
Wales 


Before Mr Justice Mann 
{Judgment delivered April 22] 


A mental health review tri- 
bunal acted unlawfully in direct- 
ing that a patient in respect of 
whom it bad made an order of 
conditional discharge under sec- 
tion 73(2) of the Mental Health 
Act 1983 remain in a hospital 
for an interim period pending 
his discharge- 

Mr Justice Mann so held in 
the Queen's Bench Division in 
giving judgment on questions of 
law posed by way of cases stated, 
by the Mental Health Review 
Tribunal for the Mersey Res 
gional Health Authority in re- 
spect of its direction on 
November 29, 1983 that Geof- 


In re Martin (Peter) 

Before Lori Justice Glidewefl, 
Mr Justice McNeill and Mr' 
Justice Schumann 
(Judgment given April 18] . - 
A solicitor committed a con- 
tempt of court when^ for 
correspondence with a banister 
who bad brought criminal 
proceedings against 1 the 
solicitor’s clients, the solicitor 
threatened to report the matter 
to the Inner Temple authorities. 
But a threat to institute proceed- ■ 
ings for malicious prosecution 
was held by a majority not to 
constitute a contempt 
The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court so held, imposing 


His.- Lordship reviewed the; 
relevant conespowtatee be-, 
tween Mr Ashton . and Mr 
Martin setting out the : two 
matters which the Attorney 
General alleged constituted con- 
tempt of court. 

When for matter came before 
the justices and the prosecution 
case had been concluded, the 
defence submission of no case to 
answer was ngected nod the 
bearing adjourned; however, tbe 
prosecution was subsequently 
withdrawn on agreed terms. 

Mr Unman accepted that tbe 
letters were written to Mr 
Ashton to seek to dissuade him 
from undertaking the prosecu- 


^ubmission that the reference to 
■"unlawful threats" by Lord 
Diplock. at p 313 in the Time#. 
Newspapers case, was used or- 
the sense that Land Diplock 
meant there would only be a 
contempt of coon if the threat 
was to do something unlawful or 
illegal; “■unlawful threats 7 was 
used , there to mean improper 
threats. 


a fine of £750 plus the costs of two, that pressure ws put on 
the instant proceedings on Mr to® foetr content but that m 


Peter Martin, a solicitor of the 
Supreme Court 
The action was brought by the 
Attorney General for an order 
for the committal of Mr Martin 
to prison for his contempt of the 
Guild hall Magistrates' Court in 
sending a series of letters to Mr 
David Ashton, a practising bar- 


rister, in connection with pend- 
ing criminal proceedings 


frey Stuttard be confotiorudjy 


Defendant who lied is entitled to his defence 


discharged under section 
of the 1983 Act, and that that 
direction be deferred until 
arrangements had been made 
for his admission to hospital 
pending subsequent discharge; 
and by tbe Mental Health 
Review Tribunal for Wales in 
respect of a direction in similar 
terms made on December 21 in 
respect of Sidney Gordon. 


Vann and Another f Awf ord 
and Others 

Before Lord Justice Dillon and 
Lord Justice Nicholl 
[Judgment given April IS] 

A defendant who deliberately 
misled foe court. King about the 
reason for not defending an 
action, was nevertheless entitled 
to have foe judgment and award 
of damages made against him in 
default ol’ his appearance set 
aside because he was able to 
show that there were triable 
issues arising out of the 
plaintiffs' claim. 

The Court of Appeal allowed 
an appeal by foe defendant. 
David Blunden. on stringent 
conditions as to bis giving 
security and paying costs in- 
cuffed by the plaintiffs, setting 
aside the order of Judge Fox- 
Andrcws, QC. sitting as an 
official referee, in favour of the 
plaintiffs. Michael and Judith 
Vann. 

Mr Brian Gallagher for the 
defendant; Mr Desmond 
Wright, QC, For the plaintiffs. 

LORD JUSTICE DILLON 
said that by a contract, a JCT 
agreement for minor building 
works, the defendant, in 1983 
undertook repair and improve- 
ment work for the plaintiffs for 
£28,987. 


The plaintiffs, being dissatis- 
fied with the work issued a writ 
against the defendant and also 
their architect. The defendant 
gave no notice of intention to 
defend the action and in July 
1985 judgment was entered 
against him in his absence and 
an order made For the damages 
for breach of contract, bad 
workmanship and negligence 10 
be assessed. 

Although served with notice, 
lhe defendant foiled to attend at 
the hearing of foe assessment 
and Judge Fox-Andrews. having 
gone through the plaintiffs’ 
claim, awarded them £53.783 
plus interest and costs. 

The defendant issued sum- 
monses. some days outside the 
seven-day time limit provided 
for by Order 35. role 2 of the 
Rules of the Supreme Court lo 
set aside foe judgment and foe 
assessment of damages made 
against him. 

Clearly the court had a dis- 
cretion under Order 3. rule 5 to 
extend the lime limit. However 
in February 1986 the sum- 
monses came before Judge Fox- 
Andrews and he rejected foe 
defendant's case, refusing him 
an extension of time. 

It was the practice where an 
application was made to set 
aside a default judgment forthe 


j gii 

explanation of his reasons for 
not defending foe action and 
ignoring foe proceedings. 

The defendant had chosen to 
give tbe judge a false explana- 
tion: he had said on oath that be 
had not had knowlege of foe 
proceedings as he had been in 
South Africe on business at foe 
material time. 

_ That he now accepted was a 
lie: he had known of foe 
proceedings from an early stage. 
There was no satisfactory ev- 
idence of a good reason for his 
failure to defend. 


defendant's failure to apply to 
set aside within seven days had 
to be reasonably explained by 
him and that as the defendant's 
explanation was not reasonable 
no extension would be grained. 

That was a misdirection. Such 
a rigid rule would be inconsis- 
tent wifo Evans v Bart ram. 


Mr John Laws for the sec- 
retary of state: Mr Andrew 
Sander for the tribunals. 


The House of Lords in Evans 
y Bartram <[1937] AC 473) 
examined and laid down 
priciples on which the court's 
discretion to set aside a default 
judgment under Order 35. rule 2 
was to be exercised. 


ft was clear that the plaintiffs' 
claim in the case looked at with 
foe defendant's affidavit showed 
that there were triable issues. On 
foe other band there had been 
prejudice to tbe plaintiffs - the 
delay bad kept them out of 
pocket for paying for the nec- 
essary remedial work on their 
property. 

Judge Fox-Andrews had cited 
Revici r Prentice Had 1[1969) I 
WLR 157) as establishing that a 


The major consideration was 
whether there was a defence on 
the merits; dial transcended any 
reason given by a defendant for 
his delay. 

On foe whole case, despite the 
prejudice to the plaintiffs, the 
defendant should be granted foe 
short extension of time. There 
were triable issues and the 
assessment should be set aside 
for a fresh hearing to take place. 

Even for lying and trying to 
deceive the court, a judgment of 
£53.783 against the defendant 


was an excessive penalty. More- 
rat of Ju 


over, the judgment of July 1985 
should also be set aside but the 
defendant should not be at 
liberty now to extend foe scope 
of foe action- 

Lord Justice Nicholls 
delivemd a concurring judg- 
menL 

Solicitors: R. Dickinson & 
Co. Chiswick; Turner Kenneth 
Brown. 


MR JUSTICE MANN said 
that a condition requiring that a 
patient who was conditionally 
discharged under section 73(2) 
of the 1983 Act should remain 
in hospital was inconsistent 
wifo foe duty to discharge, albeit 

conditionally. 

Section 73<4Xa) with its ref- 
erence to retail strongly sup- 
ported foe inconsistency of such 
a condition with the conorot of 
discharge. 

A direction to conditionally 
discharge the patient might be 
deferred under section 73(7) of 
foe Act There was no power 
under that subsection to stipu- 
late an interim period of siay in 
a hospital prior to such con- 
ditional discharge. Such an 
arrangement was not wifo the 
powers of tbe Act and was 
unlawful 

The making of an order for 
admission to a hospital was 


procc 

instituted by Mr Ashton against 
clients of Mr Martin in . that 
court, on the ground that the’ 
letters contained threats which 
were calculated to bring im- 
proper pressure to hear on Mr 
Ashton to withdraw or abandon 
those proceedings ' and - were 
accordingly calculated to and 
were likely to prejudice foe 
course of justice » the same 
proceedings. 

Mr David Eady, QC and Mr 
John Laws for tbe Attorney 
General; Mr Mark Littman,QC 
Mr David Pannick and . Mr 
Adrian Hughes for Mr Martin. 

LORD JUSTICE GLIDE- 
WELL. giving the judgment of 
the court, said that Mr Ashton 
had seen flying over the Thames 
a helicopter whose pflot he 
believed was committing foe 
o (fence of low flying, ana re- 
ported the matter to foe Qvfl 
Aviation Authority (CAA) 
which usually undertook such 
prosecutions. 

When the CAA declined to 
undertake any prosecution, Mr 
Ashton decided to institnte, a . 


the dreumstances .they did not 
amount to contempt of court, 
although such conduct could 
amount to contempt; see Smith 
v Lakemcat ((1856) 26 L) Ch 
305). 

His Lordship referred to foe 
speeches of the House of Lords 
in Attorney General v Times 
Newspapers Ltd <{1974] AC 
273), which both parties ac- 
cepted was the leading authority 
although foe contempt there 
related to a publication to tbe 
public generally, and related to a 
civil action and not a cr iminal 
prosecution. 

Mr Unman relied on the 
distinction to be drawn between 
putting pressure on a witness 


It was dear that Mr Ashton 
- believed foe forest to report foe 
matter to the Inner Temple 
authorities had the intended 
effect of putting pressure on him 
to withdraw foe prosecution in 
that it was made wifo a view lo a 
possible investigation as ’ to 
whether it was within his pro- 
fessional propriety to be in- 
volved in such a prosecution. 


up sai 

was no doubt from the evidence 
that such was the intention of 
the threat; ft could not possibly . <4- 
be_ suggested that in bringing a 
private prosecution Mr Ashton 
was acting, with professional 
impropriety, so that foe threat 
was. unfair, improper and im- 
moderate and on that point 
contempt was proved- . - • 


and dissuasion of a litigant (R v 
5 37X 390)), 


private prosecution and applied 
for. 


and obtained, summonses 
to be issued against the pilot and 
foe operating company at foe 
Guildhall 


KHlett (11976) 1 QB 
and the court accepted foe 
proposition that foe ambit os 
what was proper persuasion on a 
litigant was wider. 

His Lordship said that it was 
established from the authorities 
foal the burden of proving 
contempt was on foe Attorney 
General and be had to prove it 
to the criminal standard of 
proofi there had to be a real risk 
that the foe proceedings in foe 
magistrates* court would have 
been prejudiced, and putting 
pressure on a prosecutor to 
withdraw an action might be, 
Iwt was nor always, a contempt 
Of court. 

A party could take proper 
steps to- defeat his opponent, 
and foe pressure had to be fair, 
reasonable and moderate to be 
justifiable {per Lord Simon oF 
Glaisdale in foe '7inus News- 

papers case, pp 31 7-31 PL 

The court did not accept the 


Aa to the threat to bring an 
action tor malicious pro seen- . 
tson. although foe CAA was not 
prepared to prosecute, there bad 
to nave been an arguable case 
tor instituting a proseentibn. 

Thederk to foe justices was 
prepared to issue' the sum- 
monses after, examining the 
evidence presented to him, aod» ■ 
foe justices had 
rejected foe defendants' sub- 
mission of no case to answer. 

His Lordship said that where 0 
a prosecution was hopeless and 
extraneous, why should it not be 
pos^bie to threaten to bring an 
for malicious prosecu- 
tion? There was no public 
interest in the institution of a 
topees* or scurrilous prosecu- 
tion. 

Jta Attorney General had to 
satisfy the court so that it was 
wre foe c onduct was improper; 
foe tmeaz to bring an action for 
xnal mous prosecution was near 
the boundary of what was of *8S 

not proper pressure, «nrf jfoe 
by a majority decision 
found foe second change Jim 
proved. -» A 


Solicitors: Director of Public 
Prosecutions; Frere Cholmeley. 


. m - _ m j «• i-rwv vnouneM*y. 

Sentencing guidelines are not rigid 


inconsistent with a finding by 
» satisfied 


the tribunal that it was 

as to the matters contained in 
section 72( l KbXi) and (it) of foe 
Act. since the absence of a case 
for medical treatment was im- 
plicit in such a finding. 

Solicitors: Treasury Solicitor. 
Alsop Stevens, Liverpool 


Regina v Nicholas 
The Lord Chief Justice 
emphasized that . sentencing 
guidelines were guidelines and 
were not meant to be applied 
rigidly to every case. They were 
for assistance only and were not 
to be used as rules never to be 


Nicholas, aged 32, from a five- 
5£* r pmon sentence imposed at 
Knutsfcrrd Crown Court bv 
Judge David, QC, on pleas of 
gmlty to counts of burglary 
obtaining property by deception 
and theft wifo 67 other offences 
token into consideration. 

The LORD CHIEF JUSTICE 


for that sentence from 
. foe jud®j moved on the 
oaas or gurddines in foe past 


His Lordship said again that 
gwdeimes were guidelines. -The . 
nve-year sentence was correct- 


Court of Appeal, with Mr Justice appeal was disoaritv with**? ->i ^Ml^UKaaceio foe police and ft 
Farquh arson and Mr Justice 
Tucker on April 22. was 
delivering foe court's judgment 
dismissing: an appeal by Alan 


- — v iHuuuu or 


accused. Counsel 
appellant had 
culare what was 


for the 
t to cal- 

starting 


but there w5Tfoi££ot*£ 
uw approach or tbe eventual 
sentence.* 


Tbe tippea] was dismissed. 








-Jr -r > 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 


SPORT 





e to gain 
with 
in his favour 


' o5^!^ odafone Blue 

I f ■ Ri J aDd I™ 1 States at Epsom 

- -today is being run for'the first 

- time over the full Derby 
courseofa mfle and a hatf 
instead of over only the last 
mile and 110 yards as in the 
pasL So, the race, -which has 
also been demoted in status 

- .from group three to Misled" 
represents an amalgam of the 
old Bine Riband 


By Mandarin (Michael PMflfps) 


third behind Flash Of Steel in season the going was soft and 
t«e Bercsford Stakes at the the distance a mile and a 
Curragh in 'Ireland In 'the ‘quarter. Now he feces identi- 


autumn. 

, for. those who believe in 
lightning striking in the .same 
Place twice I can pointouuhat. 
Emerald Point is a fell brother 
to Glint Of Gold, who first 
revealed his true potential 
when winning the Warren 


old Blue Riband and twL winumg me warren 

S s “ kcSiWhichno, °^ SSEffiSi • So, as anotb- 

ln the absence ofDanishear 
who waits for better ground! 



my vote goes to tbnu^ 
I/Etoiie, even though it can be 
signed that he most find a bit 
on form if he is to beat BeldaJe 
Star, Dancing Zeta and 
Kolgong Heights. . Jeremy 
Hindley, his trainer, is bank- 
ing on a proven combination 
of bottomless stamina and 
ability to handle the softest 
ground. 

Having won over as fer as a 
mile and a quarter on very soft 
ground as a two-year-old 
Comine. L'Etoile should not 
find it difficult lasting another 
two furlongs this afternoon. 
Also it is pertinent to point out 
that his stable has already sent 
out a couple of winners this 
spring. 

For those who do not want 
to take the risk and prefer to 
abide by the form-book in- 
stead I can recommend either 
BeldaJe Star’s good run against 
Faustus — the subsequent 
winner of the Gree nham 
Stakes —in the Lanson Cham- 
pagne Stakes at Goodwood 
last summer or Dancing Zeta's 


er brother. Diamond Shoal, 
also stayed well. Emerald 
Point should not fell for feck 
of stamina whatever "else 
happens. 

Poonelta, a late withdrawal 
from yesterday’s Pnncess Eliz- 
abeth Stakes, can underline 
the wisdom of her trainer (5i 

^ on :;* d ! ion . b 5' of the Banstead Maiden 


cal conditions. At Kempton 
Sam an pour beat Swift Troop- 
er by three lengths at a 
difference of I31b. Samanpour 
now has 31b in band of the 
recent Folkestooe winner, 
.Straight Through, who ran 
Swift Trooper to I ft lengths at 
the earlier Kempton meeting, 
but at a difference of 151b. 

Considering that Lester 
PiggOU won more than half 
(15) of his 29 English Classics 
at Epsom as a jockey it would 
be singularly appropriate ifhe 
were to break the ice there as a 
trainer. And that be may well 
do with Geordies Delight 
(5.45) in the second division 


winning the Racal Electronics 
Handicap Stakes. Last August 
she showed that die could 
handle the gradients when 
winning a nursery here at 
Epsom in the hands of Steve 
Cautben, who has the ride on 


Pounelta’s stable compan- 
ion, Major Jacbo, can also 
prove that bis surprise, 50-1 
victory in the Ladbroke 
Boldboy Sprint at Newmarket 
last Thursday was not just a 
flash in the pan by winning the 
Princes' Stand Handicap 
Stakes against what looks like 
weaker opposition than be 
encountered at Newmarket 
Cauthen’s best ride, though, 

should be Samanpour in the — — . 

Westminster' Handicap sor and Nottingham to suggest 
Stakes. When he won first that a race like today's is his 
time out at Kempton Park this for the taking, so he is my nap. 


Stakes, although it could be a 
close shave because Piggott 
also has a good chance of 
training the winner of the 
second division of the Wake- 
field Maiden Slakes at Ponte- 
fract, which is also due to be 
-run aiprecisely the same time. 
In this instance I refer to 
Bertie Wooster, who ran well 
at Newmarket last week to 
finish fifth in a similar race 
behind No Beating Harts. 

John Saxon, from Michael 
Stoute's in-form stable, is my 
idea of the day's safest wager 
to win the earlier division at 
5.15. Last season this good- 
looking coft by Mummy's Pei 
ran well enough at both Wind- 



Land Of Ivory (left) veers into Mona Lisa and also hampers Rejuvenate (behind Mona Lisa). Cfaemicherva (right) is third. 

Seven-day ban rules Eddery out of Guineas 


By Dick Hinder 

Pul Eddery, the season's leading 
jockey, will miss next week's 
Gmneas meeting at Newmarket, 
and part of Chester, after receiv- 
ing a seven-day baa from the 
Epsom stewards .yesterday for 
careless riding oa Land Of 
Ivory, who was disqualified and 
placed fourth in the Princess 
Elizabeth Stakes. 

Eddery's suspension starts on 
May 1 — 1,000 Guineas Day — 
when he was doe to ride 
Kxngscote for Jeremy Tree in the 
fillies' classic. The Irish rider 
'was 'also due to partner Toea 
Madera for the Irish trainer 


Liam Browne in the 2.000 
Guineas. 

Eddery had forced Land Of 
Ivory home by a neck in a triple 
photo-finish with Mona Lisa 
and Chernicherva in yesterday's 
feature race at Epsom, but the 
lan Balding-trained filly, under 
strong pressure in the final 
furlong, had repeatedly drifted 
left cansing serious interference 
to the rmuter-np, Mona l-ka, 
who in tarn almost brought the 
Barry Hills's newcomer, Re- 
javenafe, to a standstilL Land Of 
Ivory was relegated to fourth 
place with Mona Lisa promoted 
as the winner. 

It has beat an nnforttmaie 


time recently Iter the Eddery 
family with Paul already facing 
a doable suspension from the 
Newmarket and Newbury stew- 
ards, and another brother, Da- 
vid. surviving a stewards* 
enquiry after winning the Evelyn 
Apprentice Handicap on Single 
yesterday. 

Ian Jnpp, who partnered Toda 
Forca Avanti, die runner-op to 
Single, lodged an objection 
against the winner for “Taking 
my ground inside the final 
furlong and causing me to snatch 
np“. This was quickly followed 
by a double objection from Luigi 
Riggio, who complained to the 
stewards that his horse. 


Tamertown Lad. had been ham- 
pered by the first and second. 

Pat Eddery, however, did 
receive some compensation, for 
immediately after his suspen- 
sion he went out and rode Nebris 
to a comfortable success in the 
City and Suburban Handicap to 
provide the Epsom trainer, Reg 
Akehurst, with a big-priced 
double after his Owen's Pride 
had earlier romped away with 
the Great Metropolitan Stakes. 
Nebris, the 11-2 favourite, who 
revelled in the soft going became 
the first horse since Hotroy in 
1967 to complete the Rosebery 
Stakes-City and Suburban 
doable. 


french RACING 

Pradier’s 
odds cut 
after easy 
victory 

From Our French Racing 
Correspondent; Paris 

Pradier, who is currently the 
leading French hope for the 
Derby, was an easy winner of 
the Prix La Sorellina run over 
10ft furlongs, at Si-Cloud yes- 
terday. 

This was only the second race 
of his life and he showed his 
inexperience when he became 
skittish after another runner, 
Saiyf. played up at the start. 

Once the race began he settled 
in a close third place behind 
Oiercheur d'Or. but Eric Legnx 
was under orders to give Pradier 
a proper test and sent him to the 
front mare than half a mile from 
home. He came over to the 
stands side, in search of better 
ground, in the straight and 
stayed on strongly to score by 
four lengths from Sun. 

Pradier, who is a bay with a 
white blaze, has plenty of scope 
for physical improvement, but 
he still has something to learn as 
a racehorse. Legrix reported; “I 
pulled my whip through to my 
left hand in the straight just for 
security. I never had to hit him. 

Patrick Biancone, who trains 
this half brother to Pawneese, 
said: “This was exactly what I 
wanted for him. He is still a big 
baby and I wanted to make sure 
he had a proper test. He may go 
for the Prix de Suresnes (also 
over 10'A furlongs at 
Longchamp on May 8), but he 
might not run again before 
Epsom.” 

Ladbrokes reacted by cutting 
Pradier's odds from 25- 1 to 20-1 
for the Derby. 

Biancone had news of his 
other promising colt, Savoldo, a 
half brother by Mill Reef to 
Sagace. Following his fine debut 
at Longchamp last Sunday when 
he easily won the Prix de 
Marronnicrs. he will be seen 
next on the same course in the 
Prix del’Avre towards the end of 
Mav. 


EPSOM 



411 003-4 GROVE TOWER (Mis R Saura-Ctaoon) R NtehoHs 8-8 . 

412 4 LANDSKI (B Munro-WBson) R Stetson 8-8 

413 4 SANET (RotOvale Lid) P I 


N Hum S 

SW*wvtfi4 
T QntamS 


* 





Televised: Z3S,.3JL 2L35, 4.10 

Going: heavy 

Draw low numbers beat 

Z0 BaF HYDE PARK MAIDEN STAKES (2-*oc£1,«& 5ft (9 runners) 

102 0 MUKHAB BR (Himdwi AUtaktoufllCBwwWadfrO 

103 MPPEDOFF(QBni)JSticBfeB-0; 

104 OLO Sg UAL LE (Mre J Ratfar) RHmnonSO. 

105 0URrtia»e(UHii)A^MnS4)^ 

107 SYLVAN OWEHr fO Johnson}? 

108 4 EMMEH GI^BI(G Dates) JBnrry 8-11 - 

109 WT LUCKYIGtesP-GonJon) R Smyth 8-11 _ 

112 - 0 PARKLAMOSBELl£(DHm^M Heynca8-11 

113 FSKPUMKM(CCoi])JDDU^a4BimB-11 
5-2 Nipped Off. 3-1 Earner Green. *2 Hit Lucky. 5-1 Sylvan Orient 8-1 Our 

Freddie, iMMufcteMir, 14-1 OtoreMafle.191 otters 


Epsom selections 

_JBy Mandarin .. 

2.0 Mnkhabbr. 235 Pormefta. 33 Hilton Brown. 335 Comine 
L’£tofle..4.l0 Majos Jackfk 4.43 Samanpour.; 5.15 Blue Brilliant. 

5.45 Geordies Delight. / 

By Qw Newmarket CoirKjioiidttit 
2.35 Grey Walls. 3.5 Broadwater Music. 335 Comme L’Etoile.4.10 
Blue Horizon. 4.45 Straight Through.' 5.45 Geordie’s Delight 
Michael Sedy’s selection: 3.5 Hilton Brown. • 


235 RACAL ELECTRONICS HANDICAP (3-y-« Mfe* £3*11: Ini 
11IWM7) 

201 1003iSK.iaiMMBruraffftnnriyStiiiOPlj^^ 

202 - GREY WALLS — — MEdJqS 

204 022221- BRAZZAKA (USA) moTte Tan} U dote 5-11 . — ; Thm4 

205 34133-0 POWEUTA WPf (1*3 A Vatemne) B Hannon 88-—--— SC *dten 7 

206 000022- MKATABffi VENTURE (Vanoxe Chemicals] R Akahurst 8-6 — QMrl 

■207 (M HIGH HALO (Mrs M Wane) I Baktng&S . Btoraog 

210 0340- LA (Mrs Y Parry) G Lewis 7-1 D MLThoouraS 

94 Brazzeka.7-2 HHi Hato.91 Gray Wife, 8-1 AxnsOi.fl-1 Miratatae Vanbea. 
12-1 Normanby Loss. 14^ La Sararata 

FORM: NOfUUIffiY IASS (9-4) 1Eth to DogmaBp (9-1) i6 wn. DOTcastBr 7T good Oct 
28. GREY WALLS (8-l233rd beaten 5KI Id SwoetMtUds (8-3)11 ran. YdoTw wfcs 
good to soft Sep 4.ERAZZAKA won ok from axoi*BtonBoyC8-fl) 9 rro. Hamnton 
Irristfes soft Oct 21. POUHELTA (9-6)4tti baaten^Kl B SwihJmopBr (8-13J8 rm. 
Kempton 1m 2t h'cad soft Mar 2& lBRATAME VENTtfflE (8-C92x>1)nMn nk toTom 
Isaac (849 S ran. Laicesur 71 O'cm Arm Nov 4. HIGH HALO «>11) won JH from Hoc 
Momi«11)6raaWarwfcklTn^6SOftMar3LlASERStATA^2)1QtotoSyhan 
■ Express (7-71 10 iwl Ascot 71 H eap good Oct.11, 

' Seltstlon: OBEY WALLS - - 


100-30 BekJate Star, 7-2 War Hero. 9-2 Comma L'EtoBaT 5-1 Dantirfa Zeta. 6-1 
Bneraid Pom, 8-1 Landstd, 10-1 Kolgm« He^us. 14-1 omars 


FORM! KOLGONG HEIGHTS ( 
imstta good Oct 26.1 
ran. Nevimarkot im stkx good * 

~ -V11)14r 


AH (8-11)8lh beaten 13VI to 


1Z%L to Bakharori (9-0). Doncaster 
Jewetod Real (8-7) 8 


4.10 PRINCES’ STAND HANDICAP (3y-a £2378: 71 11yd (9) 


03-81 ffiMMBEAO (Mrs 8 CWori G Lems 9-13 



511 441303- BLUE HORIZON (d Teo) W Jarvo 8-4 

512 00000- BLUE StEEL (Lord KtourtoMR 5ntp 

513 000000- SUMEIIHiLLSn8XX(SuianDbBSBidUdlEBiin 

515 20314-0 MANOR (T Honan) WKmp 7-13 , 


Paid Endin' 7 

WNtanmO 


8-1 GCanar |3>1 
— CRsnmrl 


Probtem 


11-4 Raignbaaii, 3-1 Mayor Jacko. 5-1 Blue Horizon. 11-2 Mkgit Move, 7-1 
dam ChOo. 9-1 Labrag. 12-1 Manor, 16-1 others 



445 WKTMNSTCR HANDICAP (3-y-tt £2,358: 1m 2f) (18) 

601 0098241 OWL CASTLE (B Over) M Usher 9-12 (SaQ — 

602 00 98 R0AMNGWSl(PJubwt)Ami97 

603 0001-1 SAMANPOUR (D)(HHAga Khan) R Johnson Houddon 


PatEddstyll 
— TIvwlS 


804 

B07 

SB 

610 

612 

614 

816 

817 

619 

021 


080- ON TO GLORY tJ Bart* 
802421 STRAIGHT THTOUGHJ 
000-9 H0NME VAFFAnElj 
000- SALES PROMOTER | 


| (JPrem) J WhWr 8-_13^ax) 


I G Lew® 8-12 


9-7 (Sex) S Canthan 2 
WCsrsoe 12 
18 


M0H-RUNMER 


MarfcMng Group) K CiaWngham-arown 

„ - B-11 L Jones (5) 5 

320004 REFORM PMMCESS (B Gadtaure) M Ryan-8-11 PRoWnaon? 

040- RAFHA fHJN (Shekh Mohammed) J Dufiy 8-10 J Raid 14 

C04MIONAcS)flO(S PowbO) JS oMft»8-10 R CocteaM 10 

8MM WA(j»3M(C Rogers RHwnon6-B RPortm(7)7 

FOOH 8MEMT RUWMW(Alnfl|aby Ms ck an tW P MM— 


>IAehM68 


627 

829 


041048 STLLOU (Mss L Dometnou) P 

000- FASTWAY FLYSI (N Gumay) J D J Davies 31 
000090 F* i)OK (W WWwnani w mmrm 7-13 _ — | 
OOWO ANGEL DflUBffi) (T Moore) A Incham wS 
.40000- BE POSITIVE (A 
0000- PUWYWALKHI 


MAMoGIOMlI 

Ktassi 



| R Voorspuy 7-7. 


33 MMORU HANDICAP (£3.791: 5ft (9) 

301 00000-1 AfiOB£KLAD(D)(StrithH8zMBfo^ad AINahayai^ MBkmshaid 

6-10-0 N 


303 


305 12HM71 

306 221090 CLANTIME ( 

307 029241 -8P4 

308 480910 PERKIN I 

309 00329® DHtavr 

311 M0190 MUSIC I 

312 8040-03 JACKIE BLAIR | 


596[l0w)RCBCtana7 


94 samanpour, 7-2 SMou, 4-1 Straight Through, 13-2 Owl Caste, 7-1 Raffia Run, 
9-1 On To Glory, 12-1 Angel Drummer, 14-1 others 

5.15 BANSTEAD MAIDEN STAKES (Dlv b 3-y-o: £2.040: Tf 11yd) (11) 

09 AUTtJMN RJITTER (Dr C Kenny) R Harmon 9-0 RCpcfcrane W 

90 B&lEPHBMM (Ms S Khan) G Lewis 9-0 PWdrMl 

IBRUJAMTIAS* “ 


>R NMhAb 6-6-6 (7<H) . 
) G Lewis 4-7-13. 


.HHmt 

' M.L Ham 3 

i N DuffiekO L CottraB 5-7-12 W Ctoon 2 

IffTIhompOTnlP HBBloffl 97-9 ___ TWWns4 
) (Jack Blair lid) M McCormack 

4-7-7 NLavrtMB (7)1 


1 

6. 00- BLUE BRLUAJft (A Stead) S Kfts 90 . 

8 009 COMEDY PTHNCEf Rues) R Sknpson 9-0 — 

11 0 GALAXY PATH (E HOOtansl L CoWS8 9-0 . 

17 - 9 MGHRLY (Mas A Brode)D A VWson 9-0 . 

“ ■ VALVWORAUAs • 


B Thomsons 


94 Broadwater Music. 100-30 Won 
Hair, 191 Oaittma, 12-1 Music Machine. 14-1 


S-1 Spaoemalaar Boy, 11-2 Jackie 



22 090 

24 ' 00090 WING BEE 

25 M2M2 COOPER It _ . . , 

2S 000090 OYNAIMC BABY (K DevwaD) A Tngtiam 8-11 .. 
28. 0449 MHANDAJUUE(D Hodges] DEbWCrtti 911. 



3.7*5 RACAL-VOOAFONE BLUE RIBAND TRIAL STAKES (3-JWK 
£11^50: Ira 4f)(9) 

403 139 KOLGONG HB®fT3 (R TAkool 8 HaTOory 9-1 — , — ^ RCortnaa? 

S ^ I 

410 9 EHHtAUI POWT P 3 IMon) 1 BakSog I 


AHcOomS 


92 Blue BriBant, 7-2 Cooper RadngNaB, 4-1 Miranda Juie. 91 Dynamic Baby. 9 
1 Autumn Flutter. 19l Galaxy Path, 123 MigMiy. 191 


&45 BANSTEAD MAIDEN STAKES (Div lb 3-y-a S2JUQ: 7f 11yd): 
( 10 ) 

92 GEOKHtS OEUGHT (USA) ShcAh MoharmnadtL Piggott 90— TlvnlO 
UGH1MIG BYTE (Me D Wm) Q_8racay 9-0 C Car ter jg 2 


r9Q. 


. W Canon 8 _ 

Pal Eddery 2 Unavce. 191 Tretowney, 



22Q44-4 

800090 TRaAWMEY 
OOm-Q USAKATY 

ms- OMMHA(l4aJ Es'ad 
0929 SWEET 
2-1 George's DeOgM. 9 
' vmey, 12-1 


Domain. 92 Porthmeor, 13-2 Onania. 192 


Epsom 


Results frdin yesterday’s three meetings 


Going: heavy 

20 (50 1. EMAMOW F UGHT (Frat 


Eddery. 9f lav 
■Corson. 

1 1-1). ALSO RAN: 5 

aSa Dancar.14 ROxTBo GoodTifrarL 
mpjSSS QhM. 1 I HAW 3hhd. 
Hi). R Harmon at EasiEvritetfi. toTE 
Z330: C1.29 ClJL Biss- 

es': £990. indn Q2J750C. After 
Stewarts' Inquiry, rest* Mood. 

238 nm 110yd) 1. 82IGLE IDayW 
Eddery. 1 1 -2 p-tav^Z Taewrton p Lad (L 
Biggio, l2-1t 3. Todo Forca, Avanft^fl 

A«lon. 1 4B|«M 

25 Any Busmaas. 

Katie,' 

VagSon; Bjictt Bott^tf»2 fl|en;^a.. 
jiOwT TSL W WfcJttnBnrtUphm. 
TOTE: £SJOt £1.70. 

DP: £27.70. CSF: fm87-Tno g »8 4g. 
imm 56.20WC Toda fan *" £.*!: 
shed second nut ^rara««w ■ x w' . 
wasrasquatfod andt*oohW«A- 
3Ji flrn 4Q *1. OWP« ™ £ 
Rodinaon, 14-1L 2. 5«yp J ***» ^ 

^.laBBSSSsSB 


Eddery. 11- 

(B Thomson. 14-1t 3, 


FoHow The Band. 

V 


TOTE: £1020; £1.69 £120. £5j00-_ OF: 
£ 18 . 10 . CSR SASM. Land 
fimahsd first but afya go e w te inquiry 
was (ftst^rafifiad and placed fourth. 

' 4.10«ra2fll.«B»B(Pat~-'- 

2 lavt 2, Esspd* (B TTi 
Thtaroar (B-ChM 
owMrtUpfrwir 
192 Bnnco; 8 ,, 

Halo. 11 Christen Schad; j4 ■ 

ssssaMssM 

«L XI, 2KL.2L R Akahurst at Brawn, 

tote £m j&aq,. 

fytan CSR SJ&3\. Tncasfc fT.067.G0. 
2nhn 19A7S0C. 

(P 



an«|*swii 

f ?pn El 92}, E&» DPI S77XR- CSR 
E1B7J91-. Trfeast £2.497.86. Unm 
ISjUsac. 

2 JadutetHotwo n. Bacepot 855*85. 

Nottu^ham 


Charles Jones. 11-2); 2. Cawarra Lad (94 
tavfc 3. Ensigns Kit (11-S. 12 ran. NR: 
FreemasorCTid. I0L J IW TOTE;. 
£7-20; E2.10. £1^9 £120. DR £13.10. 
CSR £17A9. Tncast £6951. 

3.15 an W cm 1, Sir Kemdn (Miss G 
Armytege, 4-lt 2 Pmnier Cherfle 01-10 
favl 3TRMal Ptesnve (191). 7 ran. 41,1x1 

R Amiytrae. TOTE £440; £149 H.50. 
DR £4.1 07 CSF: £8.00. 

345 (2ft) 61 tit) 1. Bemawao (Mr D 
taytor-Leytend. Evens 2. Borne 
Buskins (11-1): 3. AberwnferJSML 12 
ran. 121 5- 0 Sherwood. TOTE EM .60: 
Elia £3.10. no (flvkiontf tor third horn. 
■Df75.70. CSR C12£0l- 

4.15 Qqi CM 1. to dant dody (S Smith 
Ecctos. 2-1 French Captain (7-2): 3. 
Reddown. (IM). II wl 21. 12. N 
Henderson. TOTE £120: Fl.lO, £140. 
FI .70. DR £820 CSF: £S82. Trfcasc 
£47.30. - 

445 (2m 67 hdia) 1, Pm A Dealer (M 
Raman, 5-2 lev* 2. FUr Bavart (7-a 3. 
Lateway (25-1)- 13 ran. NR: Too Often. 
Srundy. IM 10L Mrs J Wmaa TOTE- 
S35& £260. £210, £229 DF: £720. 
CSF: £11 -3a Tncasfc £153.92. 


a Book CM Kate (91). Utte Poheir 13-8 
fev. 7 ran. 4L 1 «. WT^rorieve. TOTE: 
BL30; £220. £2.70. DF: (firat or second 
with any otter): £1.10. CSR £SdJ)4. 

4 S 13m 600 yd hdto) 1. Do Or DM 




25L O CTNeM. TOTE E6.00; £190, £220. 
£6.60. £220- DR £20.40. CSF: £5022. 
Tncasfc £426.07. 

4-35 (2m hdto) 1. Artoon Prince (A 
Stringer. 91); 2. tniman (91); a CsroTs 
Muse (54 ton. sn hd, KL 13 ran. NR: 
Hoots Of Ulster. K Stone. TOTE. 
£13.40; £22a QL3a £120. DR £4520. 
CSF: £61,12 Carols Musk; finished Oral 
but oftor a Sttwerds' ingiary was dtoqual)- 
bed and placed thsd. 

p uce p ot £248-00. 



Ptacepofc £226. 

Sedgefield 

Going: soft 


53285BC. 

KiCkTlw Habit, 12 Land OPInory (481), 16 



(14-1 L 9T0IL Wh ' . . 

\a. fa J Haneon. TOTE: £1 JO; £1.10, 
tt20. £329 DFiChflO. CSR £3330. 

225 (2m hdbl.l , Mewmariart Sana a m 
« 4 Hammond, 94 jMavfc £ QMtTNii fr- 
Sr.a BBtejliML SecretVM iWfto ’ 
4 rah. SL T2L 8 Moor*. TOTE £220. DP. . 
£3.1 tt CSR £624. 

as (3m S«W ch) IgBnudWM (Mr T 
Read. 291); 2Tuian On (i92fc a Its A 
Cepper(14-1). Canto 198 mv. 12 ran. IjS, 
aERobson. TOTE- 221 50; £820. £2.00, 
£130. DF-.SB080.CSF: £129.16. 


Coarse specialists 

EPSOM 

TRAINERS: Q Lewis. 24 wfnneretrom 96 
mrmera. 25%; J Dunlop, 15 Irem 67, 
£24%:RHannon,l21rom96. ia3%. 
JOCKEYS: P Waldron, 18 u4ns born 84 
rides. 229%; W Corson. 28 horn 132 
21.2% S Cautheo. 25 from 127, 197%. 

PONTEFRACT 

TRAINERS: M Stouts, 13 from 47, 27.7%; 
J HMJtojr. 5 from 19 . 293%; J Battel s 
from 25, 24%. 

JOCKEYS: J UbuNbs. 11 from 30.327%: 
J Btoasdata. G from 48. 125%: G Duffie*i . 
18 from 144.125%. 

WORCESTER 

TRAINERS: R Holder. 16 from 54. 29.6%; 
>J Jenkins- 25 from 114. 21.9%; J Old. 13 
60 m 62. 21%. 

JOCKEYS: S Sherwood, 13 from 38. 
34J^PScudamore.48 tram 239.20.1%; 
H Dawes. 31 from 197, 15.7%. 


Dawn Run 
to hold 
old rival 

From Our Irish Racing 

Correspondent, Dublin 

The circumstances surrounding 
the match between Dawn Run 
and Buck House at 
Punchestown are almost as in- 
teresting as the event itself The 
idea for this meeting came about 
when Paddy Multins, through 
an oversight, neglected to enter 
Dawn Run in a I Rf 30,000 
steeplechase at Gowran Park. 

The connections of Buck 
House threw down a subsequent 
challenge to Dawn Run's owner, 
Mrs Charm ian Hill, to meet 
over a distance of their choos- 
ing. She accepted and Mrs 
Seamus PurcdL Buck House’s 
owner, elected for two miles, as 
this is the distance over which 
But* House was successful in 
the Queen Mother Champion 
Chase at Cheltenham in March. 

The Purcells in turn put up 
£5,000, but Mrs Hill made no 
contribution and the balance of 
today's prize of £25,000 came 
from the Racing Board 
(£10,000). the Punchestown 
Racecourse (£5,000). and the 
Coolmore Stud (£5,000), the 
last-named being the borne of 
Dawn Run’s sire. Deep Run. 

Many Irish trainers have criti- 
cized what they regard as a 
senseless piece of expenditure 
on the pan of the Racing Board, 
but, whatever the rights or 
wrongs, it should provide a real 
crowd-puller at Punchestown 
this afternoon . 

Dawn Run, who made racing 
history by becoming the first to 
complete the Champion Hur- 
dle-Gold Cup double, sub- 
sequently stunned her fens with 
a first- fence fell at LiverpooL 
John O'Neill, who rode her 10 
victory in that unique double, is 
out of action this week, and the 
mount on Dawn Run reverts to 
Tony Mullins, who has been her 
partner in most of her 16 
victories over hurdles and 
fences. 

This will be the seventh' time 
that Dawn Run and Buck House 
have met and the current score 
is 6-0 in favour of Dawn Run. 
She has proved her superiority 
over distances ranging from two 
miles, up to two miles five 
furlongs, over hurdles and 
fences, and on a variety of 
surfaces from good to soft- Even 
though she is a better performer 
over longer journeys, she has to 
be expetted to confirm her 
lifetime superiority over her old 
rivaL 

The Purcell family, apart 
from providing Buck House, 
also figure as the sponsors of 
most of the races on this 
programme. The Purcell Export 
Handicap Chase, the next most 
valuable event, could provide 
compensation to Monanore for 
his failure to get into the money 
in the Aintree Grand National. 

Charlton out 

Steve Chariton, the northern 
jump jockey, will miss the rest 
of the season after breaking his 
right leg in a fell at Carlisle on 
onday. Charlton, aged 31. 
who has ridden 1 3 winners since 
tiie start of the season, came 
down at the last fence on Seal 
Moon in the Wintry Outlook 
Novices’ Chase and feared the 
worst when he “beard some- 
thing go.” 

Worcester doubt 

There will be an inspection at 
Worcester at 7.30 today to' see 
whether racing can take 
place. The clerk of the course, 
Hugo Bevan. said; "There are 
areas of the run in which are 
waterlogged, it depends how 
much overnight rain we have, 
but the chances are 50-50.” 


305 (3m 000yd di) 1. Nnnlaad (J K 
Ktonrie. 134ft t Grtenbank Ptek (191); 


Blinkered first time 

EPSOM: 235 Founelta; 15 Jacfcto Bfcur. 
PONTEFRACT: 4.1 5 Raputod. 


Worcester selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Crooning Bany. 245 Fire Drill. 3.15 
Mr Kay. 345 Suiytytv 4.15 Pronto. 4.45 
Fort Stef. 5.15 Penny Rose. 


.'. PONTEFRACT' ,- 


Going: soft 

Draw: 5f-6f, low numbers best 

2.45 BEAST FAIR STAKES (2-y-o: £1,935: 5f) (6) 


12 049 GOLDEN BEAU (DlDMortty 4-92. 

13 098 EASY DAY E Eton 4-9-1 


11 PEATSWOOO SHOOTER (D) M Bntfiun 96 . X Dariey 5 

01 KS.VARNET (DI F HaUmsnoaa 93 S Pin** 6 

41 SAMLEON (D) R Harmon 9-3 GDulfwM2 

DANAON Ron Thompson 9)1 R P EBon t 

33 UNO’S PET (BF)K Stone 911 

30 TOOTSIE JAY PFtttoen 98 


IDnirl 

RNBa3 


Evens Peeiswiaod Shooosr. 92 Ktoamm. 91 Samleon, 91 
lino's Pet. 191 Tootsie Jay. 291 Danadn 


Pontefract selections 

By Mandarin 

2.45 KilvarneL 3.15 Cheps tawed. 3.45 Inde 
Pulse. 4.1 5 Repealed. 4.45 Lundylux. 5.) 5 JOHN 
SAXON (nap). 5.45 Bertie Wooster. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.45 Tootsie Jay. 3.15 Billy’s Dancer. 3.45 Inde 
Pulse. 4.15 Repealed. 4.45 The Prudent Prince. 

5.15 John Saxon. 5.45 Bertie Wooster. 

By Michael Seely 

4.15 VERBARIUM (nap). 5.45 Bertie Wooster. 


3.15 BENTLEY MEMORIAL SELLING HANDICAP 

(3-jK): £842 Im) (10) 

3 049 BUTS DANCER D Date 97 G King (7) 7 

4 094 CONERSER (BN0F) J Bwiy 97 — Gay Kefleway (5) 9 

- Wendy Cara (7) 1 

0 Brown (51 2 


5 090 OUR ANNIE E C*tef 96 . 

7 009 LA MANGA PRINCE K Smne 9-5 

8 091 CHEPSTDWEO 0 Haydn Jones 9-3 . D J msanra (7) 3 

9 009 GEMMA LOUSE T Kersey 92 J Lowe 5 

10 009 MAX CLOWN W MAanon 613 N CaifMe 6 

11 -003 THE DABBER (B) G Harman 913 ! G DufMd 4 

12 009 RRE LORO G Moore 911 DCueyma 

13 090 DUKE OF MU.T1M3ERP Honan 99 S Monte 10 

5-4 La Manga Pmca. 5-2 Cnepstowad. 91 BBlyto Dancer, 

Conersor. 191 otters 

3.45 HEY SOFT DRINKS EBF STAKES (£3,720: 2m 
If 24yd) (4) 

1 090 INDE IMLSE J Hindey 4-93 R HBs3 

2 409 AYRES ROCK M Haynes 991 RFo*4 

5 190 MAJESTIC RUG (CAN) PKeHeway 

4-99 Gey Kefleway 2 

7 009 NORTHERN RULER L Lghfljrown 4-99 _ G OatfMd 1 
1-2 Inde Pulse. 4-1 Majestic Ring. 91 Northern Ruler. 91 
Ayres Rock 

4.15 HARDWICK HANDICAP (£2,253: Im) (15) 

5 009 SILVER CANNON (USAXD) R Woodhouse 4-97 . — - 8 
9 009 WELSH MEDLEY 0 Hay ~~ 

10 


_ M Birch 14 
. A Mackey 10 

15 0-00 SPOILT FOR CHOICE (D| D W Ctepman 

9900MetoBs5 

17 -040 MRS CHRIS (BMC) M Naugnum 4-9-0 M MiBer 7 

18 -21 PATCHBURG W Haigh 4-90.. J H Brown [5) 3 

19 02-0 COUNT BERTRAND w Holden 99-0. R Morse (5) 9 

20 -232 VERBARIUM (USAIOMBF Mis J Ramsoen 

9913 DWHOem (7)2 

24 109 GLENDERRV(D)Htn Jones 4-9 ID W Ryan 13 

25 02-4 QUALITY CHORISTER G Moore 998... D Casey (7) 4 

28 09 HMUS MAN (DI W Hnoen 8-6-4 JBieauulel 

29 31-3 RUSTIC TRACK (D| Oenys 5nsm 990 MFry 11 

33 030/ FAIR TRADER M Jamas 97-10 J Lowe 6 

2-1 PalchDirg, 4-1 Repealed. Vertwrken. 9l Ouanty 

Chonsier. 191 Spoilt For Choice. Welsh Medley. 191 others. 

4.45 FRYSTON EBP STAKES (£2,905: Im 41) (18) 

1 000 1 AL MURTAJAZ (USA) R Stubbs 5-94 DMkhoflsiO 

2 142- CANE ML CThomnn 4-94 M Te&oun (7) 2 

4 0/0 WHAT WILL I WEAR (8) J Grover S9-4 S UflBuum (7) t4 

5 00 WINNING STAR A Bariay 994— P BlocMnfwtd 11 

B MOD WISE CRACKER (Q) G Ricnanis 994 J Carroll (7) 4 

7 009 GENTLE STREAM J Toner 4-91 fl HSOs 1 

8 329 LUNDYLUX (DIR Hannon 4-91 AMwrayfi 

11 32-0 CHANGANOOR R HoBtnsnead 4-97 S Perks 8 

12 009 GLENMORECAPTAMC Spares 497 A Proud 18 

13 42- HY0KM0 Money L97 G Oldfield 13 

14 IVOR ANTHONY (USA) 1 8W*ng 997 -—JUattMas 18 

17 0/9 PENTHOUSE (USAHClGBatona 997 -. JWlUams 17 

18 43 PRIVATE AUDITION MUsiwr 4-97 M Wtcham 3 

20 32- THE PRUDENT PRINCE W Jarvis 4^-7 NON-RUNNER 7 

23 034- DUBAVARNACW Gray 994 I Johnson IS 

24 9 GREENACRES GRtLBMcMafton 994 - A Rooer (T) 5 

25 03 NK001A EVE JGtowar 4-94 M Birch 9 

28 TOGETHER WE STAND (USA) JWimer 

494 NON-RUNNER 12 
92 Urodykjx, 3-1 Cane MB. 4-1 Ctenganoor. 91 Private 
Audition. Hyonn. 191 Woe Cracker, 191 otters. 

5.15 WAKEFIELD MAIDEN STAKES (Div (: 3-y-o: 
£1,036:6f)(11) 

5 049 RNDON MANOR MTompUns 90 M Ranner 10 

9 (TO- JOHN SAXON MSlOuie 90 WRSwrtwnll 

10 449 JOVEWORTHJ Glover 90.— '. M Bln* 6 

12 0 PACT M Prescon 90 GDirffieUS 

16 49 SAALfflH Thomson Jones 90 AMunayS 

18 09 TACHOMETER C Nelson 90 A Clark 9 

20 090 V1RAJENDRA W Pearce 90 DNIcMto4 

25 00 GEORGIAN ROSE K Ivory 911 G Morgan 3 

28 2-2 MADAM IHJFFM (BF) J Bethel 91 1 J Marthas 1 

31 0 NO RESTRAINT WHasingsOass 911 R Lines (3) 2 

34 009 TAMALPAIS H Cofingnoge 911 G Sexton 7 

Evens John Saxon. 3-1 Madam Muffin. 91 Findon Manor, 

91 Joveworth. Saanb. 191 No Rastrara, 191 others. 

5.45 WAKEFIELD MAIDEN STAKES (Div II: 3w>: 
£1,036: 6f) (10) 

1 90 raiTE WOOSTER L Piggott 90 
4 on- DOflADE D Money 90.™ 


WELSH MEDLET 0 Haydn Jones 4-93 
REPEALED (B) W Mastwgs-flass 4*92 


Jones 4-9*3 - G DufiBeU 12 
1(3)16 


6 903 GLORIANT M Brtnam 90 

7 009 GOLDEN ANCONA E Bdei 9-0 

8 03-0 HANSOM LAD WH»gn 90 

13 009 PBIDOR DANCER K Ivory 90 

14 4-03 QUAUTAIR KMG K Stone 9-0 

17 5ELORCELE Ron Thompson 9-0 — 
27 090 KATIE RHODES R HoUvsneso 911 . 
29 090 MSTRESS CHARLEY 5 Norton 911 

4-7 Bertie Wooster, 7-2 Qusktair Km{f. 91 
7-1 OonanL 91 Hansom Lad, 191 others 


_ W RSwmbumr 

— NCrowther9 
— - K Darley 4 

— E Gum (3) 3 

0 Ntonolb5 

...W Woods (3) 8 
_. S Kewmley 6 

— R P Qfcxl 10 
S Penu 2 

— J Lowe 1 

Golden Ancona. 


Going: heavy (7.30am inspection) 
Z15H1MBLETON NOVICE HURDLE (£1-215: 2m 4f) 
(17 runners) 

1 -001 CROONING BERRY WMusson 7-J1-9 _ P Scudamore 

2 1240 MARSH MNGPHOOOS 91 1-9 _____ Q McCourt 

5 -OOP ANOTHER LEASON J Cosorave 91 f-2 JSutfiero 

6 -440 ASTON BANK p Hobbs 5-11-2 Peter Hotter 

7 0002 BIRD OF SPIRIT (BF) M Scudamore 911-2 — — 

17 DM GOLD ACE MrsEWteston 911-2 TWaU 

19 0PU4 LACKEY HOEY T Forew 9M-2 H Davte 

20 900 UFT HIGH D Tucker 7-11-2 S Earle (4) 

24 009 SHtELDAIG (B) K EkSftop 911-2 JFroM 

25 0000 SOBS! SAM RVoorauy 911-2 — MFn 

I M Tate 6-11-2 CS 

_ BPowel 


4.15 HIMBLETON NOVICE HURDLE (1.227: 2m 4f) 
(T9) 

2 0010 ONE FOR MAMMY C Roach 91 2-2 MBowfey (7) 

3 0012 BLACXWELL BOY (USA)fB)|0) A James 

S-n-9GJones 

11 -OOO CANARIME Wheeler 91 1-2. — 

12 0344 CASTLE DOUGLAS (B)P Hobbs 911-2.. Pater Hobbs 

19 0U FRESHMAN GLWykams 7-U-2 Mr B Dowfcng (7) 

24 -30P JETS FRIPOH (N2KB) A Barrow 911-2 BPowefl 

25 KELLYS AND COHENS B Cortey 911-2 - D Murphy (4) 

26 09P LAUGHTER UMES (B) K Bshop 7-1 1-2 ._... — 

28 0FW MASTER BARN T Hall 911-2 R Crete 

30 0 NETTIE THE BOOZER C James 


30 303 THE SWNERM Tate 911-2 — . — 

37 DFP BIT OF SPACE G Ham 919M 

42 9P0 GILBERTS CHOICE A Chamterlam 

7-1911 A ChanAarlBki 

4 $ P LONELY VOICE CObigyvBB 11-1911 P Warner 

re j Barca* ! 


32 F220 PAMPAROD J Jenkins 911-2 

34 4 PROVIDE S Medor 911-2 

36 P-0P RWGABWG J Cnddie 911-2.- 
38 0000 RIBY AND SAPPHRIE B 


6-11-2 Mss G Armytege (7) 


A Shape 

MrDRotHuson 


47 0-00 VICEROY LASS MreJ'Bamjw 91911 

48 0BPP WIND CHBKSDHRobnson 7-1911 

49 0000 MAMI WARRIOR (NZXB) A Barrow 

4-190 ML Harvey (7) 
7-4 Crooning Berry. 4-1 The Shiner. 91 Marsn King. 13-2 
Bed of Spirit. B-i Lackey Hoey. 12-1 Life High. Aston Ban?-. 

2.45 NEWLAND HANDICAP CHASE (£1,822: 2m)(5) 

1 0312 FffiE DULL (C-D) K Btstrop 11-12-2 (7ax). Pflicbaids 

4 IMP/ THE HERB DOuqh 

12 -0FP 

17 0P14 AWNING M HemCM» 

19 03U0 FARE LOVE EET Evans 7-190 


THE (ERSDOuteton 11-11-2 R Rowe 

5TOWELL GROVE (C-Ol W Cfey 9197 SJOYteM 

AWNING M Hermaues 6-190 NON-RUNNER 

P Warner 

4-5 Fine DnH. 4-1 Fare Love, 91 The Herb, 7-1 Stowed 
Grove 

3.15 BRAINGE HANDICAP HURDLE (2,442: 2m) 
( 12 ) 

1 0000 QUKXSTEP (C-D) M Pipe 911-10 P Scudamore 

2 032 MR KEY (USAKDMF) PHeynes 911-5 A Webb 

7 02F1 PREDOWNATEO Sherwood 91911 5 Sherwood 

11 1C00 WINART (D) RH 00 MS 8-199 S Earte (4) 

12 0030 KAMAG (C) D HoSyB-tO-B C Seward 

130004) SEA I - ■" 


S Sherwood 
G Charles Jones 
. Mr d Stanton (7) 

7-fi -2 Ifr J Cantedge (4) 
41 400P TROUT ANGLER Mss PO Coraur 

9ll-2CWtaTBn(7) 

45 40 ANAGMOfTS DAUGHTER K 0Shop 5-1911 — J Frost 

47 2000 8AU.YORNEV GIRL P RodtOrtJ 91911 CGrey 

51 30 SPLASH OF REDD Tucker 91911 S Earte (4) 

52 00 THE BEANMSOOSE K Badey 91911- Mr T Thompson 

Janes 

11-4 Provide. 4*1 BtackvreU Boy. 91 One For Mammy. 

4.45 STOURPORT HANDICAP CHASE (£2,152: 2m 
4f)(17) 

4 1000 LEGATE J OW 911-7 Mr G Johnson Houghton (7) 

6 00P0 NATIVE BREAK (USAXO) Mrs W Sykes 

911-4 H Davies 

7 4P-0 FARMER (C-OI R Hawker 11-f 1-3 E Wade 

12P3PP EMMASOn (D)J Spearing 11-11-0 'P Warner 

15 P000 NETHERBRIDGE (C-D) Dti 


IS May 7-1910 

191910 


91912 REamshow 
SMay 


E Morphy (4) 


14 DOW CONS PAL |D) J 
I LADY 


THaBen 8-UM 


17 0030 BfELDON ..... 

19 304F LADY fEWTON J Fox 910-0.. 

22 0000 ISOM DART (USA) T HaBetl 7-190 

23 ^0 STRING (D) H Juc* 


f I R Jones 19197 C Evans (7) 

' “ 1 9796 A Cante 


Samantha Oenstar (7) 
— S Moore 


I JuckesB-iOO.. 


SimNGJD)l ... . 

iVBTS PRIDE (U8AJ M Casnl 7-104) _ K Traylor (7) 


GUfiMuns 


3-1 Predom ma te. 4-1 Quickstep. 92 Mr Key. 6-1 Kamag. 91 
Vftiart 10-1 Cons Pel. MekJon Lady. 12-1 Isom par. 

3.45 RMC GROUP NOVICE HUNTER CHASE 
(£1,646: 3m) (20) 

2 /2RJ- ARDCARH Denrys Be# 19190 MrDBe0(7) 

3/4UF- BARRON'S LEAP Miss Mnpp 12-12-0 Mr G Upton (7) 
4 Pj BRITISH ISLES (BJ MfS M tkjfflptaey 

S-l2-0ICrSAndwws(4) 

13T24F GAUPmNCEpjRAnnytagB 
„ 9-12-0 Miss GArmytage 

24 PIT PIMIOREG8akfnd 7-12-0 MrSlUinem 

25 QUWC FLASH W Pnes 1 9190 Mr N OkverM 

2fi RAVEN VENTURE Sv 6 Cunaro 912-0 — 

28 OF-3 ROBERT HENRY (KQ O Sherwood 

PtW ROOSH«ANTHOf«WD»vi« ,M ^ Pf ^ U1V “ 


32 ROXSON S K«j I 

34 P-PF SHUONQ KNK&rfL Ware ham 11-12-0 MrM Mortal 1 

35 SHYLOCKS RETREAT C Bowkan 1 

37 TAFRHore»91M-_.._^l^L N Sroj 
& PW- TARVILLE J Parflo 6*12-0 MrTJonSf 

39 POO/ YELLOW COU. Miss JHoiwood 

13-12-OMssCRi 

40 P/F AUGHT1ICNT D Tucker 91 1-9 MrN 

a OPIP DEL MAR N Ttack 7-11-0 WTHsutmate 

44 -RB3 GRAYROSEACADESHC EHOwenytm' nou ** w “ e 

47 /OOP- WSS PAVEH R Hawker 7-11-9 


17 0F4U THOflNTDNI 

18 F41P MARANZI (C 

23 UW0 CHEAOLEGftBSNmjT Haaetx9l97 B Wnghi 

24 /P00 TOY TRACK (D) T Forster 9197 R Dumreodv 

27 24FP MEGABIT WS Turner 7-197 C Warrenffl 

26 2001 FORTSTAR (BMD1 S Cnnsoan 9195 X Mooney 

.29 4P4 QUAYSIDE BATTLE (B)TM Jones 9195 M Richards 

33 9PP CITADEL ROC (B)JM Bradley 11-190 □ Davies 

34 3024 GAULED(BI H Aimyoaa 11-190.. BPowel 

35 F438 BflOKWYN Mrs S Davwport 9-10-0 P Scudamore 

37 01K PLASH <CANKD)G Baking 19190 A Charlton (71 

38 oora TALLYRAND (B) A James 7-KWJ Q Jones 

91 Maranzi, 4-1 Fatslar, 91 Legate. 192 Netterorttoe. 9 

1 Toy Track. 91 Thornton. 191 Native Break. Megaao 

5.15 BOURNE LEISURE GROUP NH FLAT RACE 

(£1 ,392:2m) (26) 

01 PENNY ROSE M C Pipe 911-8 SCrookm 

00 BASRULLAHPW Hams 911-6 OStome/Tt 

| ■8SUrjS3S!;fe« 

9 CELTIC SPRING G Smal 911-6 w r ^ 

9 flMMgM 0 H c -J 01 ** 911-6 ■ UrR 
0 LEBURETWE SMft£ J A Edwards 

0° ■■ 

VBgURI D N Pantag911-5^1^* M SL5^^ 

» 0 utea 4-1 1-2 ... WHuSKm 

20 ^fi^imYTilaSiy 1 ” 


49 


SUNYLYN W MawH 911-0 


WBksms 
MrRLmvtJw 


92 Scmytyn. 4-1 Gaia Pmca. 91 Raven Ventura, 13 -? 
Shylocks Retreat, 91 Tal. 10-1 Quick Flasn, Rm«on! * 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 
8 

15 

18 

28 

29 

31 

32 

34 

35 

41 

43 

4S 

58 

60 

61 

66 

68 

71 

72 

73 
78 


13* 


11-4 


~ "'jmueiu" BU« N n Stmotoy 4-11-0 K Burii 

QEHMSTC^^CW4*m W4 ' 1-0 - 

W POETS BAY Mrs S Otaer 4-|M* 


•51. 


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I to 
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was 

was 
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Tin: Tturec nnrnMrcT» « ■' 



SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1986 


FOOTBALL: WEST HAM EXTEND SYMPATHY TO NEWCASTLE AND A CHALLENGE TO MERSEYSIDE 


SNOOKER 


ATHLETICS 



Alvin Martin inspired West 
Haia United y> an 8-1 victory 
owr Newcastle United ai 
Upton Park on Monday night 
that must have frightened 
E\enon and Liverpool, the 
leading championship chal- 
lengers. Martin scored three 
times as West Ham reminded 
Merseyside that they are not 
out of the reckoning. 

A delighted John Lyall. the 
West Ham manager, had a 
word of sympathy for oppo- 
nents who fielded* three goal- 
keepers during the match — 
two of them stand-ins — 
because o!‘ injuries. Newcastle 
lost Thomjs at half-time with 
a shoulder injury he received 
in the opening minmes and. 
when Hcdworifc. the emergen- 
cy goalkeeper, was injured 
Beardsley had lo lake over. 

"One has to feel sorry for 
Newcastle but otherwise it was 
a marvellous night for us and a 
feast of football." Lyall said. 
“A week aso. when we were 
beaten by' Chelsea, people 
were saying we were right out 
of il. But we 3te playing with a 
lot of style and after this result 
ne are right back on the 
scene." 

Bv the lime Newcastle were 
reduced to 10 men after 
Hed worth's injury West Ham 
were ?•!> up. with two goals 
from Martin, one each from 
Stewart and Orr and an own 
goal from Roedcr. 

Beardsley, the England for- 
ward. produced some fine 
saves in his unfamiliar role to 
inspire Newcastle to pull one 
back through WhitehursL 
Goddard, a substitute, struck 
a sixth goal for West Ham in 
the 81st minute. MeAvennie 
and Martin, the latter with a 
penalty, took the total to eight. 

Watford's lowest crowd of 
the season ill. 5 10) saw their 
team end a depressing se- 
quence of three defeats with 
an encouraging display in a J- 
1 draw with Nottingham For- 
est. With a little luck they 
would have won. Barnes 
opened the scoring for them 
after l i minutes with an 
athletic header. Clough 
equalized. 

For the second lime in six 
days the second division 
match between Bradford City 
and Wimbledon was post- 
poned because of a water- 
logged Odsal Park. 

Monday’s results 

INTERNATIONAL MATCH: Wales 0. Uro- 
auavO 

FIRST DIVISION: Watlo:d I. Nottingham 
Fares! T. Wes Ham Untied 8. Newcastle 
Uraied l 

SECOND DIVISION: Postponed: Bradford 
CiK » WsnoNOOn. 

FOURTH DIVISION: Rochdafe 2. South- 
end UPtec 7. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: Flrtl Cwinon: Ajlon 
Vila 0. Shemeta United 2. Leicester 1. 
Huadesliefl V. Deruy 1C. Wigan t. Second 
tftvfcw >* BUckpo O 2. SuDdertand 2; 
Oldham t. Tort i. Preston 2. Bradlord 4; 

Wwvarnampmn L Scunthorpe 0 

VAUXHALL-OPEL LEAGUE: Premier <*- 
vision.- Croydon 2. Hiicnm 0: Waimaro- 
stow 0. Hayes 0. PosJponeo: Qtfwich v 
Bishop's Startlord. 

MULTIPART LEAGUE: Postponed: 
Norwich v Morocamba 
SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Premier tfwston: 
BasmgstoKe 2. RS Southampion a. 
Cnednslora S. Bedwonh 1. CorOv 2. 
Fisher J: Gosport 0. Ayteshurv 3. 
FOOTBALL COMBINATION: fiennngham 
7. Charnon 2; Swindon *. Reading 0. 
SOUTH EAST COUNTIES LEAGUE: First 
Division Cu» SemWinafc Torrennam 3. 
Norwich 0. First Ohnston: QPR 3. W3itord 
1. 

Venue change 

The second division match 
be l ween Bradford Cn> and 
Middlesbrough tonight has been 
switched from Odsal Sud-um. 
Bradford. 10 Leeds Road, 
Huddersfield. 


p-TO 


The goal machine that had to settle for one goal: MeAvennie dunks past a United challenge (Photograph: Ian btewurt) 

Under-2 1 Moroccan surprise in store 


for Brock 

By Simon O'Hagan 

.After a iwo-year absence. 
Ke\ in Brock, ihe fix ford United 
winger-, reiums 10 tile England 
under-2] side today for the 
second leg of their UEFA 
championship semi-final 
against Italy at Swindon. 

The inclusion of Brock, to- 
gether with Wallace, ■ of 
Souihampton. and either Wal- 
ters. of Aston Villa, or Fereday. 
of Queen's Park Rangers, gives 
the team plenty of width as they 
attempt to make up a 2-0 deficit 
from the first leg ir» Pisa. 

Sihcc that match Sexton has 
undergone much the same 
experience as his senior counter- 
part. Bobby Robson, in losing 
several players through injury 
and club commitments. Veni- 
son (Sunderland!. Thomas (Lu- 
ton Town}. Cotie) < Fulham I. 
Parker I Fulham » and Lawrence 
(Southampton! have dropped 
out. to be replaced by May 
(Manchester Citjl. Wilkinson 
t E venon >. Brcackcr I Luton 
Toun) and Brock. 

Handling a rapid turnover of 
plovers is. of course, in the 
nature of any under-2 1 
manager's joh ami Sexton h3s a 
superb record of maintaining 
form and momentum from one 
year to the next. Lender his 
guidance England won this bi- 
ennial competition in 1982 and 
1984 and were semi-finalists in 
1978 and 1980- 

If England are to reach the 
final again their greater famiiiar- 
itv with the kind of muddy 
conditions thai will prevail ax 
Swindon could prove decisive. 
The Italians were dismayed 
when they trained on the pitch 
vestendav. The match kicks off 
at 5.30. 

R Mrmnre lEvenon). 7 Breacfcer tunom. N 
Picketing 'CoveniryL I Butro'worth (Not- 
w*jtwti Fow5U. I Cranson Iiaswch 
s Rottson lAnowM. w Foreflay 
tGPR) oi M Walters (Asrpfl ‘Mai. I Rartier 
|Hun Cuyi. P Wilkinson (e venom. 0 
Wallace /?. oufi>av.?mn'>. K Brock (Oxford 
UKlIdOl 


Though most of the British 
Isles xvill be focusing its atten- 
tion on the domestic feud at 
Wembley this evening, it is the 
less considered affair at Wind- 
sor Park which may have the 
greater bearing on what happens 
where it matters in the World 
Cup finals in Mexico, starting 
six weeks from now. 

Northern Ireland take on 
Morocco, who aa* feliow World 
Cup qualifiers, in the national 
stadium in a match that may be 
a pointer to ihe global achieve- 
ments of the Irish and English. 
Nonhem Ireland meet Algeria, 
ihe African bedfellows of Mo- 
rocco. in a tricky opening match 
in Guadalajara. Morocco are in 
England's group in Monterrey 
and are much on a par with 
Algeria, who caused a stir in the 
last World Cup finals in Spain. 

Some astute observers believe 
that Morocco could be capable 
of similar surprises. They are 


By Clive White 

certainly laying solid founda- 
tions at home. Their youth side 
were impressive winners of the 
Friendship youth tournament in 
Qatar this year when Brazil, 
Italy and Uruguay finished on 
the’ losing side against the 
Africans. 

Morocco were given a wet 
welcome yesterday to the British 
cnvirODnienL a world away 
from whai ibey will happily 
encounter in Mexico. But those 
who believe they will be in for 
another startling and inhos- 
pitable welcome from the Brit- 
ish style of play tonight may be 
in Tor a surprise. 

Morocco's squad have been 
built around the royal Armed 
Forces team and are prepared 
for any kind of physical 
intimidation. Their manager 
was behaving as shrewdly as his 
opposite number. Billy Bing- 
ham, by refusing yesterday to 
divulge his team. 


Local heroes to the rescue 


An injurv crisis has forced 
Jack Chariton, the Republic of 
Ireland manager, to name what 
is virtual!) a shadow side for the 
visit of Uruguay to Lansdowne 
Road tonight. Having resigned 
himself to lacing the South 
American heavyweights without 
key players such as Mark 
LaWenson. Paul McGrath. 
Kevin Sbeedy and Jim Beglin. 
Charlton arrived in Dublin 
yesterday to discover that the 
replacements. John Anderson 
and Gerry Murphy, had also 
withdrawn. 

Not renowed for his patience 
with the vicissitudes of club 
management. Big Jack put a 
brave face on things as he 
named a learn th2i included two 
local heroes from the Famous 
Fried Chicken League of Ire- 
land. one cf whom, central 
defender Barry Murphy of St 
Pat's, he had never seen in 
action. 

Ironically. Chariton had cbo- 


From Earn on Dunphy, Dublin 

sen to leave Liam Brady and 
Ronny Whelan out of the squad 
originally chosen for this match. 
Whelan's omission is explained 
by ihe fact that the Republic is 
uniquely well off for left-sided 
midfield players, with Kevin 
Sheedy and Tony Galvin 
challenging the Liverpool man 
for inclusion in Chariton's start- 
ing line-up. Brady's absence can 
be put down to his indifferent 
response when Charlton cast 
him in an attacking role against 
Wales last month. There is 
speculation here that Brady, an 
automatic choice before 
Charlton's arrival, has some- 
thing to prove to the new regime 
before regaining his place in the 
side. 

Oxford United's trio, Dave 
Langan. Ray Houghton and 
John Aldridge all line up along- 
side the veterans. Gerry Daly 
and Mick McCarthy, and the 
Tottenham wing. Tony Galvin, 
who reiums 10 the side after a 
long, injury-plagued absence. 


Hugh Taylor pays homage to the wee blue devils 

Wizardry has vanished from Wembley 


For the first time since Wembley became 
their Mecca the tartan army have given the 
cold shoulder to the England -Scotland 
international, once the most glamorous 
attraction in the Scotsman's sports diary. 

Special trains and buses have been 
cancelled, tickets are available by the 
score. Umbrage bas been taken because 
the Scots consider the English FA have 
degraded the great game by changing the 
date from a Saturday to a Wednesday 
evening. 

Undiminished. buwwer. is the legend of 
the Wembley Wizards and this week there 
wil! stiff be a gleam in old men's eyes as 
they (eil great grandchildren about the 
Scottish footballers who gained the 
country "s most celebrated victory. 

What \s the truth about the W wards, the 
wee blue dwils who pulverized England 5- 
3 in 1928? Were they really the greatest 
Scottish side? Or would they have been 
mercilessly outplayed and nntpowered by 
tbc method teams of today ? _ 

Those who were there maintain that the 
display nf the Wizards was the most fluent 
ever seen by any British international team 
and still cannot refrain from talking of 
those mighty midgets, wee wisps with fiery 
tempers and whiplash tongues, who as- 
sailed opponents and each other with a 
Doric cacophony of yelps, bawls, com- 
plaints. snarls, adricc and encouragement 


and played bigger and stronger opponents 
into the ground. 

Time, aias. has eroded the sparkle of the 
occasion. Today many denigrate the 
Wizards, sneering at Jimmy McMullan's 
heroes, classing them as a missile expert 
would bowmen at FI widen. It is true that 
the Wizards enjoyed tremendous lack and 
only an early break saved their skins. That 
was ad mined by Alex James, the master 
mechanic who made the wheels of the 
wizards go round. 

He once told me. “Cf course we had 
luck. We got il in the writing of the critics 
at home. We weren’t given a chance — far 
too wee, they said. That made ns mud. Bat 
our lack bus in at Wembley. It rained 
heavily, the pjicb was treacherous. That 
soiled our short-passing game. Wp small 
chaps had the English slithering. But the 
break came in Ihe opening minutes when 
Billy Smith, the Huddersfield winger, 
missed a great chance, hitting the post." 

W bo can say if the " izards would have 
lived in present-day football? Players nf 
today are better trained, better drilled, 
perhaps more intelligent and more moti- 
vated to win. But no side coaid have been 
more entertaining than that of James and 
Co. ft was a triumph of Scottish style — 
close co-operation between the half backs 
and forwards, with the hall invariably kept 
on the wet turf, and the Wizards indulging 


in precision passing with the triangle, 
prettiest of nil runes football can provide, 
tinkling in the blue ranks. 

la 1928 attack was still che keynote of 
football and Scottish style was supreme. 
.No one admired the Wizards more than 
Iran Sharpe, the Englishman who bad 
played with distinction before becoming 
one of our most renowned sports writers. 
He was enchanted by the Wizards and 
never tired of talking about their methods. 

Eren in 1928 there were different styles, 
different outlooks, some teams potting 
their faith in power and fitness, others 
relying on a more subtle touch, but Sharpe 
believed that the best football had to be 
cultured and beautiful. 

“It was a triumph of sheer skill at 
Wembley." be said, “and perhaps these 
midgets would have been overweighted and 
poshed out of the picture on a number of 
English first division grounds 1 could 
name. In mud those little monkeys could 
not so merrily have danced and capered 
and might have stuck. Their artistry would 
have been reduced by the ploughing tactics 
of heavy English half backs. But on (he 
fresh turf of Wembley their football had a 
fair chance and they gloried ill U." No 
Wizard Is alive today. Tiny Bradshaw was 
the last fo die — only a month or so ago. Bat 
the memory will not die. 


7 .30 unless son* 

FOOTBALL 
International matches 
England v Scotland (at Wembley. 
7.46). 

N Ireland v Morocco (st Belfast! 
Rep of Ireland v Uruguay (at 
Lansdowne Road. Dublin;. 

European 

Untier-21 championship 
Semi-final, second leg 
(first-leg score in brackets) 
Enqtand (0) v Italy {2} (at Swindon, 

Under-2i international 

Rep oi Ireland v Romania (at Derry;. 

Second division 
Bradford v Middlesbrough 

(at Huddersfield FC) 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Premier fflirtstot 
Aylesbury v woreesrw Basest cue v 
F aiebam. R S. Soanamawn * Goscot 
Southern dmton: Cambntioe v Bumum 
sic H. Watenoowite v Durable. 
VAUXHAa-GPEL LEAGUE; Premier aj. 
vimxe Cravaon v Carsnaw. Cuiwcn 
rtsnset V Swap's SK'ttanL Second 
drvjQ.-rxi south: Hois'wm v iflfckeig. 
Pet*ra»ieta v EasSoenw UKL flmslg 
Manor v ajewtiurv <7 

CAPITAL LEAGUE: Wycombe v 
Sc umend 

MULTIPART LEAGUE: Oswestry v 
GsHKSorough. 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: F(c« (Svraimc 
Vifla v Lewtsif r 17 OJ: v WesJ 

Sromwich AJamii (7 0): taanenaster City v 
HutMersfieW (& «5): NawcesTa v Laws 
(7. Qi. Second dhmon: Dmnasra*’ » Sonon 
iT Oj; Port Vale * 3 jrnley 17.01, 

RUGBY UNION 

CLUB MATCHES: Abewrn v BnojWtJ 
17 01 Abartillery v Pe*unh t? 0j: Salh v 
Cardm (7 15k Coventry v NoThernpion 
(7. <5t. Glamorgan Wanderers * 

Newbridge (7.0}. 


FOR THE RECORD 


RUGBY LEAGUE 

5 ECONO DIVISION: RoeUate v Barrow. 
Kg.qrtev -i Vicrnmxcn: VSlWBh&ien v 
Snemeic. 5 ramie/ v Murrora h. 

CRICKET 

CAMBRIDGE.- ««br.£^0 UlMWSCy « 
Esse - * Il • 2C a £.30/ 

OXFORD: 0nfO»d URMBOft v GL3UC«im- 
vs'eill30»€JCi. 

UX&-& MCC V Mujakexxtf 1.30 to 6.30>. 

OTHER SPORT 

SPEEDWAY: Lea** Cep: (Vord r 
Cmenm. Hpumai league: wmwedon v 
NewKisJB: L3"C Eatrn « 9os»n. 
SNOOKER: Erruas-.^ world cnampen* 

*"=s '5T Sbaffieici 

TENNIS.* L7A foureamenr la! Owen's 
CiyB. Kenngnnt. LTA pre-tajantying 
toerrament :ai TeltcnJ; 

REAL TENNIS: BatWMl OM - - Bniaei v 
Francs, tstra&a v US jat Qi-eer.'s CfaM. 
K^rsmSTon;, 


BASEBALL 

UNITED STATES: Amwtcjft L e ag u e . Davos 

1-rs.ii 5 &3S^n R*a So* «: TcetmiJ Bwo 
ja'i* ’ Pa™j?te 6 ClfrttanG (nprars 7. 
Sitrw 0etfi« 0: New rm y«xw5 8. 
i*ansai CTi Fora's * Oa^Via AS 6. 
CdM >"a An5« 2. LtaneSOQ Twms S. 
f-'arh> Manner: 7 No penal League: AWma 
&t jrts S Huurcc Astros 2. Mew vert. Mets 
5 PiSiburq^ P'rarw 5: San Francisco &a«s 
5 Las Argstes oovjcn i . 

ETON FIVES 

HKJHGATE: Ladies’ OwnffSmp "sS 
beats: h vaross end J Hana a B tins wad 
anc -j ,ie»ie». «%I0. MI 1Z-1. l2-». V 
vemgn are k Carueo tn S Bereon ana B 
fraensiece 13-n. >2-?. 12-5 Fuat vargea 
and HaVeacnVemon ana CarvaA 13-12.9*1 2, 
VM.TtS. 14-11 

FOOTBALL 

FOOTBALL COMBINATXM LuiW Town 7. 

roTpT-rjni HorsOor 2 

COLA LEAGUE: CreBonnam » toUcnt 
EOiSonefl. 



Oinumvcn - a 

Stevens is No challenge troin 


Campbell, Nottiogbam 
Forest's new find, has quickly 
proved himself to be a prolific 
midfield scorer - a serious 
deficiency among Irish teams 
over the years —.and Bi n gham is 
sure to try him at some stage of 
the proceedings. McNally, of 
Shrewsbury Town, is another 
who might make his debut after 
considerable time with the 
squad. 

Hamilton, recently bad: in 
action after a knee operation, is 
a doubtful starter. He had hoped 
to prove his fitness to Bingham 
but has had a reaction since 
coming off cortisone injections 
b5i week. 

To give him ?nrf others, tike 
the former captain, Martin 
O'Neill, more chance of recov- 
ery from serious injury, Bing- 
ham bas delayed announcing his 
squad for Mexico until nearer 
the FIFA deadline of May 22. 


happy to 

stay in the 

top 10 

By Sydney Friskin 

Kiri: Stevens, of Canada, had 
to wort: harder than he probably 
expected to defeat Dean Reyn- 
olds 10-6 in the Embassy world 
championship at the Crucible 
Theatre. Sheffield, yesterday, 
but be left no doubt that he was 
gradually putting his game to- 
gether again. • 

**1 couldn't settle down and l 
am not ’playing as well as I 
would like to but I have been 
practicing hard. Of course I 
want to win the world title but at 
present I am concentratir» on 

staying in the top ten of the 

world ranking,” Stevens said. 

. There was some great attack- 
ing play in this match which 
Stevens Vqn with a clearance 
break of 96. Reynolds made his 
own contribution to the day's 
excitement by drawing level at 
S-S in the morning and later on 
produced a superb clearance 
break of 115 to- cut Stevens’s 
lead to 8-6. He seemed to be on 
his way to making it 8-7 but 
missed a crucial shot on the pink 
and Stevens clinched the frame 
to go 9-6 ahead. 

Stephen Hendry, of Scotland, 
aged 17, the youngest player 
ever to take part h» the world 
championship, enchanted a 
large audience when he faced 
Willie Thorne. Almost im- 
pudently Hendry won the first 
two frames and Thorne was 
made to struggle. Hendry, who 
won the Scottish professional 
title only a month ago. is a gifted 
player who wastes little time 
with bis shots. He took only six i 
minutes to make a break of 79 1 
which enabled him to lead 5-1 : 
against Thome. But at the half- > 
way stage Thome led 5-4. 

Jimmy White sighed with 
relief after his hard-earned 1 0-7 
victory over John Virgo on 
Monday night. He qualified for 
a second round meeting with 
John Panon who had earlier 
beaten Tony Meo. Viigo, a great 
fighter, had levelled at 7-7 with a 
smooth clearance break of i 12. 


for de Castella 

Bv Pat Butcber, Athletics Censspofflteit 
uj rat o aiitedf maiatboo. isafao 

Rob de Castelia_^ P^. jSparrfy- Tbs >=ar s 

himself back tu the £-c*tion June 8. is w be rna m 

world marathon running wtib .. - .^pjjoo with die Great 

his Boston victory on M®?** North Run Ncwcasrie* Bui. 
afternoon in 2hr 7nia JJJJJ*** thc rasX has been Opra w frm . 
third fastest ever. But an d under-! 7s in ttttfe 

the Australian is coromonb someitin® that AAA. bus 

S££5n ** S?1J5K The C^nigprs 

his Commonwealdiftde ^ ^ w Jontuwe the 

summer ^ foe 0ms &rfoe . 

est marathon roan. to r e ^' hax'e refused a permit, 

man Steve Jones, mho ton ***■ an annoubcemert » soon 


man OLE vw. m 

distinction, is only running the 
10,000 metres. . 

The pair will meet in Edf® - 
burgh, for de Castella is runouts 
ihe 10.000 metres, too Jones is 
using the race as a 

. - rhommnn«hiS5 


Since an announcement is soon 
fo be made about foe amount 
oronev that Jones or any of fos 

Sets «ouU lT ^ 

bwu- for the fits* nme wihtf 
marathon-. tire MKicr evttientiy 


using foe race as a 

fo* Europran CtempionshiI» issue of Zola 


UlC r 

marathon a month lucr<a 

decision which dc Castella said 
yesterday surprised him. for we 
a fMt that with hjrnscn 


The issue of Zola Bums 
eligibility to comprtem foe 

Commonwealth Games tc- 

j tnef Arnflvc 


yesterday suyriseti him. for^ emerged at yesterday’s 
Australian felt that with bimsdf . . Board Press coo- 

and foe Tanzanian. Juraa There is much specula- 

who bat rup under jhr 

— sawadfeSBi 

OPPWJUOI, Ihm. m Smngart. ^ 

“■"SsSStS wsKisassaass! 
SSSSasrssE NpiS35E£'- 
SES&AWf* 

Jones’s next potential big race, tster the sport. - . 


HORSE TRIALS POWERBOATING 

firs Green Hodges 
loping for calls 
letter luck it a day 

By Jenny MacArthtir BiYfcttjStiteS 

tiler her disappointing Bad- Perc « jw 

nton Lucinda Green is hop- Bn ?“! * 
for a change ofluck when she 
□petes in today's Titiworfo 

ttT Horse Trials in Hamo- ***** “» 5™^. 



BOXING 


Liam O'Brien, a 2 1 -year-old 
midfield player from Shamrock 
Rovers, who was named 
Ireland's- Player of foe Year ihis 
week, wins bis first cap. 

With next autumn's Euro- 
pean Championship campaign 
in mind. Jack Chariton will be 
most interested in the. perfor- 
mance of the new attacking 
partnership of Aldridge, who 
made a spectacular debut 
against Wales last month, and 
Frank Stapleton. Other than 
that his principal interest to- 
night may be to assess the 
Uruguyans first hand in 
preparation for his television 
commitments in Mexico this 
summer. . 


TEA Wt P Bonder 
(Oxford UtdL M M 


Cityl, B Murphy (Si Pat s). C HmMqh 
trsi. ft HmgMKi tOxtont Uftfl, G Defy 
ijwsDtryX L (rBrten [Shamrock 
ovors) A GaMn (Spurs), F Stoteton 
(Manchesw Uid). J Akfrulge (Oxford 
uaJ|. SuUsdfutes. P Byme (Stonruck 
RWI) J Byma (OPR). A (YNdSi (Dun- 
oak). P Ecctes [Shamrock RovsrsV 

£ 250,000 
for City 

Birmingham City are to re- 
ceive- a £250.000 loan from the 
city council to help them sur- 
vive their financial crisis. 

The club, £2 million in debt 
and doomed to relegation to the 
second division, will repay the 
loan, with interest, over three 
years. 

Cllr Dick Knowles, leader of 
Birmingham City Council, said 
yesterday: “Soccer is part of our 
great city’s way of life and it is 
unthinkable that such a local 
institution as Birmingham City 
should be in danger of going out 
of business.'’ 

Ran of foe deal involves the 
club becoming folly involved 
with foe community, opening 
up St Andrews for events such 
as coaching sessions for young- 
sters. and Birmingham players 
s’isiiing local schools. 

Billy Wright Birmingham 
City's captain until the arrival of 
the new manager. John Bond, in 
January, -was one of four players 
gven free transfers yesterday. 
The others are Lee Jenkins, who 
broke an ankle on his Bir- 
mingham debut in October, 
Peter Shearer and Kevan 
Braadhurst. 


Graham’s 
US debut 

By George Ace . . 

Herol Graham, the- un- 
defeated British and European 
middleweight champion from 
Sheffield, is poised to make his 
American debut on the Bob 
Arum promotion in Las Vegas j 
on June 23 — foe night Barry j 
McGnigan defends his WBA 1 
featherweight tide against the 
champion of Argentina. Fcr-’ 
nando Sosa. 

Graham’s manager. B J 
Eastwood, who is currently in 
the United States with 
McGuigan on a whistle-stop 
tour of 1 2 cities to promote foe 
Las Vegas spectacular, which 
also features Thomas Hearns 
and Roberto Duran, said before 
leaving for- New Yoric “I am 
fairly confident that Graham 
will be on the Las Vegas 
promotion. I have had prelimi- 
nary discussions with Aram and 
I will be disappointed if we 
cannot reach agreement. All the 
portents are that we will.” • 

• Harry Gibbs. Britain’s lead- 
ing refenre. who was retired fast 
month by the British Boxing 
Board of Control has been 
appointed, one of the judges for 
the World Boxing Council light- 
heavyweight championship 
bout between J.B. Williamson, 
of United States, the holder, and 
Britain's Dennis Andries. from 
Hackney, at Picketts Lock. 
Edmonton, north London, on 
April 30 (Srikumar Sen twites). 


Mrs Green 
hoping for 
better luck 

By Jenny MacArtlnEr 

'After her disappointing Bad- 
minton Lucinda Green is hop- 
ing for a change ofluck when she 
comperes in today's Tidwoith 
Army Hone Trials in Hamp- 
shire, the fifth event in foe 
MacCoanal-Mason Mercedes G 
Series of.1 1 horse trials. 

Mrs Green, who is none the 
worse for the two falls She ! 
suffered on Saturday, rides SR I 
International Ltd’s Brass Mon- 1 
key aod Count De Bofebee in 
today’s open intermediate class. : 
Count De Boiebec was . one of 
her two Badminton entries bat 
was withdrawn after foe dres- 
sage because of the deep gpiog. : 
The going at Tidworth ts. in- 
evitably. soft but, being on tire 
side , of a hill the land drams ■ 
wdL ' - ■* j 

Mrs Green’shusband. David ^ 
whose top horse. Walkabout, 
dropped dead at Badminton, 
has had to withdraw .fare other \ 
advanced ride. Gucci from ! 
today’s class because The frotse 
strained a shoulder earlier this 
month. With his intermediate 
horse. Whisper, also offfor the 
rest of foe season (be struck into 
himself in the fieklj Green 
remains philosophical about his 
ill-lock. Til just have to con- 
centrate on my novice horse aod 
hope for rbetter fuck next 
season.”he said yesterday. v 

Rodney Powelt who. also,, 
knows something of the ups and 
downs of eventing, haS two rides ; 
today. They are Michael Rentes j 
intermediate horse. General St -I 
Majors, winner of his novice 
section last year, and bis own. 
The Irishman, who won lus first ; 
intermediate ■ ' class - at 
Brockenburst m Hampshire ear- 1 
tier this month.. If Powell shows 
the same determination today as 
he did when fimshing foird on 
Pomeroy at Badminton, be win 
be hard to beat. . ' . 

Other Badminton - riders 
competing, but on different 
horses, are Rachel Hunt (Friday 
Fox). Claire Mason (Burilngzon) 
and Jane' Holderaess-Roddam 
who has two horses entered in 
tomorrow^ • novice • ' section. 
Richard Meade who was with- 
out a horse for Badmimori, has 
two intermediate rides, Scara- 
mouch and Trench Blue. • 


and the ttard-pbeed finisher, 
Berta W3c. have not been able 
h> find spowotsbi? for a tstrenit' 
foal has been drastically 
curtailed.". • ■'••V ... 

Negbtiations .bad been taking 
placc wifo a potential European 
backer, but when the; caleodw 
was announced a few weeks ago 
and contained a maximum of 
only two gxand prix races rn 
Eurcqjeanychanceof a deal was 
-•tefia.-- 

With six rffthe races to be run ji 
tn r Iforth '-.Ainwrca, "Chris w - 
Hodges, foe team manager, was 
not prepared te samble at this 
toestagconpiclciiirup sponsors 
on a band4o-womh basis to 
supplement the prize money bis 
dnvetx •; would undoubtedly 
seeaxe. ." .*.•■'.• 

Hehad already written to 32 
. American companies asking for 
•suppcKiciwrwas. unsuccessful 

even foc$gb. Spalding had 
proved to be the worid No. I, 
beating foe American, Ben 
Robertsratt, into second place. 
For ins part r Wik bad pushed 
Gene Thibodaux. another 
Araerican.-into : fourth place. -: 

Spalfot^'has wk fiifty recov- 
ered froDL a , brain operation 
during the dore season and may 
be forced to sit out tire season. 
Wilt; - on the other hand, is 
almost certain to be mapped up 


node a remarkable entry mto 
fo rmula one racing last year, 
showing a gfeat natural 
aptitude. - :* 

Hodges, a boatbuilder is Nor- 
folk, invented the highly-praised 
safety cockpit fo tiine tbr foe 
start of last Reason’s campaign. 
It followed foe death of Tom 
ftrtivaL his partner, fora crash 
the previous year. 

He has not decided where his 
foture lies, but has had numer- 
ous requests to bufld craft for 
people in formula two and 
formula five. However, if the 
European section of the world 
series returns next season .to its 
former sire, Hodges ra Ukoy to 
put together anodwr -raOTg 



THE RIGHT PLACE TO BE 

Si >dM<w (f sSctn The TimoOMtfleil. 

M in ytw nlmmesKiu Wi rHe «f»»e hdnw i|n<necr 

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Rafc-. orc LAIl) per knr luppr, mJovmcV >"«i wink, 
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tfry* m tic wla p ne Wc n tine, Hmiiiwi, tjd. 

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Wf a Mi,qr l Mi i mw ihi j Ijd. i%. ih e r tt e i ^ mq 
UeawtMM. BO. SnaL tVM Sact*. Unto 


RymclekWiooe-. 


THE *&a8sTlMES 


Now yon can be an Artist! 

LEAIW TO DRAW AND BUNT 
Everyone has the ability 
to become an artist 

_Now in. die privacy of yum own borne We-cen.teac& 
you afl the uimflHjy tedunqnes to euriAa you to nnjey 
foie absorbing and &d-fiBing pastime. Well show ywi 
sfep-by-sfep how to draw, the uu of water cokunx, oSv 
puf*4l how to deal with penpactiw landscapes. ’&SI- 
iife. figures and portraiture. 

-You wor k at home - at your own abend- goaded and 
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IDiiatrated lessons, easy to B&derMand -rtrertfr topee 
and lota’ of aotistn materials to ghw yoa'&U we need to 
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Plraw write for omr PREE bobk -Drawh^ * 
Paintiiig-. and Ybu-phadetaOeof tutiqua PRJEE 16-day - 
trail offer. No s ta mp needed. ... 

THE ART SCHOOL 

MCEEFOST CDPIO. LONDON 


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IHfc iliVlfc^ WfcL>iNfcMJA3f ATKIL t^ao 


ay’s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 



BBC 1 


&0O CMfffic AM. . 

&5Q Breakfast Time with Frank 


at ff.SB 7 .25. 

% 7J5,8^Sandi5^ 

- ^ regional news, wsffther 

and traffic at &57, 7.27, 
7.57 and $.27; national and 
inte rnational news at 7.00, 
■■■;•. -7^0,m«J0andft0f- 
spcrt at 7.20 arnf 8^0; tte 
•*”t. latest pop music news at 

7J32; and a review of the 
1 .morning newspapers at 

Bx37. Plus, Beverly Alt’s 

.. fashion tips; and AOson - 
' : Mitchefl's 'phone-in- . 

financial advice. - 

. 9-2Q Ceefax 10.05 Qharbw. A 

newer complained that a 
piece of poetry recently 
recited on the programme 
was fin ted taste. The 
viewer discusses the 
", with the, to her, 

poet, Nafeae Salem, 
ptay School. * 

1050 wBd Siioolnr. Eddie 
Chariton plays the dosing 
frames of his first round 

natch with CBff wflson, 
write David Taylor begins 
Ms assault on metftie with 
a gama against 
EugeneHughas. 

■ 1230 Wews Aft er Noon with ■ 
Richard Whitmore and 
Frances Coverdale, 
includes news headOnes 
wWisubtttes1£55 
) news 
wather. 


Regional i 
andweath 


1,00 Pebble MR etOne 
presented by Paul-Ccua. 
Josephine Buchan and 




i ‘.1 



i creates a 
traditional English dish; 
while the Cambridge 
Buskersmake music m 
their own inimitable i 


Roy Kinnear with SheBa 
Water. I 






(r) 

200 Worid Snooker. Further 
J;. first round action from 
matches involving Eddie 
Chariton and David Taylor. 
SJOCeefax 252 Regional 
/ .If- news. 

“ &55 Up Our Street Jimmy's 

Story, by Nick Waton(r) 

’t-i 4.10 Dogtanfan and the 
Three Muskefrounds. 

. - . Cartoon artventures.(r)' 
4J5 Take TWo, presented 
“ by PM Bp SchoWfeld. This 

under 

December Rose. 

, &0O John Craven’s 

Newsround5J}5Joesy , s 
Giants. The first of a new' 
comedy series about an 
ex-foomefler who 
becomes coach of a • 
schoofoqyteamof no- “ 
hopers- Starring Jim 
Barclay. (Ceefax) 535 The 
FBntatonaa, Cartoon 
series. 

6M0 News with Nicholas 
Wrtchett and Andrew' . ' 
Harvey. Weather. 

235 London Plus. 

- 7 M Wogan. KenrothWHBarns 
...7 - entertains Michael RaHn, - 

Stephen Fry and Jufian 
Critchley. Music is - 
vided by The Shadows. 
PtacaUke Home. Its 
s and Arthur's Steer 


7A0 


ong anniversary and 
they -bom organise - 
surprises for each other. 


210 uaHa*.This 200th episode ^ 
features the Being- ■ • : 
sponsored charity rodeo. ' 
(Ceefaxy ' 

94)0 News with JuBaSomerriRe 
and John Humphry. 
Weather.- 

230 QJLD.A Wolf in Dog's .- 
Clothing. A documentary 
about canine wotenca, 



1200 Sportsntaht Introduced 
by Steve ffider. Highlights 
of tortght's football match 


1210 


in Belfast between ... 
Northern Ireland and 
Morocc o; World 

ttre^H^fStba 

Greyhound TV Trophy 
from Newcastle; and. 
WghUghtsof last night's 
• !-_ i In Belfast 


TV -AM 


&15 Good Morning Britain, 

- presented by Anne 
' Diamond and ffck Owen. 
News w#b Gordon 
Honeycombs at 230, 74)2 
7.30, 202230 and 94)2 
sport at 240 and 7A5; 
exerdscaat 256; cartoon 
at 7.25; pop video at 7.55; 
the histoty of St George 's , 
Day 8t232; video review 
at 240; Patricia Grant at 
. . . 9423; a discussion on 
. anorexia nervosa at 212 


ITV/LONDON 


225 .Themes news headlines. 

232 For Schools: celebrating 
the arrival of a new baby 
; 247 A tour of the 
Portuguese capital, Lisbon 
1204 Discovering 
. subjects to write about 
12SH Bicycles old and 
new 1233 Engfish: WOW 
. RuseUs The Soy with me 
Transistor Radio 114)0 - 
Janni Howker talks about 
herffrst novel. Badger Inb 
the Barge 11.20 How to : 
use adjectives and nouns. 
For the hearing ki 
11.40 Chemistry: 

Formula by Micro 
11-H5 Cartoon featuring 

Courageous Cat 1200 
Portland Bffl. Adventures 


For the young 12.10 Our 
Backyard. Lava makes a 

' - - <r 


1230 TaBringParaonaBy., 

Dunn in conversation with 
mountaineer Chris 
Bennington. 

14K) News at One wltt) Carol 
Barnes 1.20 Thames - 
news presented by Robin 
Houston.- • . 

1-30 TrieCftampIpm. Trie 
Nemesis Merits uncover a 
macabre spy plot in Wales. 
Starring Stuart Damon and 


34)0 


Bastedo. {i) 
230 Farmhouse KHchsn. 
Grace Mufligan and her 
guest Joan Tyers with 
advice on cooking meat by 
microwave. 

University ChaBenge. St 
David’s College, Lampeter 
v University erf Bath. 
Presented by Bamber 
Gascoigne 225 Thames 
news headlines 340 Sons 
andQaugfttera. 

Portland BO. A repeat of 
the pro g ram m e shown at 
noon 410 Trie Banders. 
Cartoon series about an 
accident-prone family 220 
ScoobyDoa Cartoon 
adventures 445 Making of 
the Ark. A behind-the- 
scows took at the making 
of the environmental - 
series, The Ark. (Grade) 


215 Connections. Quiz game 
tor teenagers , presented 
by Sue Robbia 

.245 New with. Afastair.- . - 
Stewart S4)0 Thames 2 
news presented by John 
• Andrew and Tricta 
Ingrams. The weather 
details come from Jack 
Scott • •• 

HelfriViv Taylor Gee with 
news of the Central 
London Youth Project 
535 Crossroads. Nicola 

receives ertaped message 

- by post 

T4» Coronation Street Mte 
antfSusan arrange to see 
Hie Rev WakefieW white 
Bet finds herself in foe 
muddle of Gloria and her 
-- ex-boyfriend {Oracle) 

7M International Footbatf 
SpadaL England play 
.. ..Scotland at Wembtey. 
Presented by Brian Moore 
with comment from Brian 
Clough and commentary 
fay Martin Tyler. A Scottish 
vfew of play is provided by 
Manchester ©ty manager. 

. Bifly McNeffi 

104)0 News St Ten with Alastafr 
Bumetand Pamela 
Armstrong. Weathw, 
followed byThames news 
headines.. : . 



Jean DesaiHy J’rancMse Dorieac 
oa Cfaannd 4, 104)0 pm 


•wnat oo they go m me us 
when a dog's bite proves to be 
worse than his baric? Take 
mm to a cfinc. mat's whatAnd 
indues a species indicative 
factor ki him, le. put him through 
e course of anti-aggression 

therapy .Whatever it co s ts - and it 
can cost a emeu fortune- it is 
better than the alternative. Dogs 
can mutilate and kill, and the 
fallacy of thmkmg that dear Wtie 
Fxto would not hurt a fly. let 
alone bite an 81 -year-dd woman 
to death, is explored in A 
WOLF IN DOG'S CLOTHING 
(BBC1 , 9-30pm).We must 
danva umai comfort we can from 

the assurance that only some 

dogs will be provoked by certain 
cffcumsiancas. To me, that 
smacks of keeping all options 
open. Reafisticatty.however. 
we must accept it can sometimes 
take no more than a 


■ CHOICE 


thunderstorm to turn a Jekytl of a 
dog into a Hyde mat bites 
lumps out of a wifa.Butifitistrue 
that dogs understand 
everything mat te satd to them 
(as is implied m this fUm), I am 
surprised that the sheepdog tfrat 
one American busnessmen 
takes to the office to be 
introduced as chairman of the 
board .does not sink its teem to 
his master's teg tor behaving 
tike an idiot And lafiting like an 
idiot, too-His previous dog, 
the aforementioned canine 

equivalent of JekylJ and Hyde, 
was hteraBy a person, he says. 

•A TOUCH OF GOLD- 
PLATING (BBC2. 8.10pm) has its 
lair share of gobbtedygook, 
too.The third him in this . 
documentary senes about the 


defence of tne realm has an arms 
manufacture: correcting 
himsell when talking about tne 
lulling power of a tank. Sorry, 
he says. 1 meant to say terminal 
lethality. A fine distinction 
mat. t believe, would be tost on a 
vicem of me tank. 

•Stephen Rea. m a 60- 
mmute tour Ce force mat never 
once had me consulting my 
watch, lets loose twin torrents of 
love and hate against his 
Gargantuan musical instrument in 
Patrick Suskmd s THE 
DOUBLE-BASS (Radio 3. 
7.30pm)Ap8rt from anything 
else, tne musicology content of 
the soliloquy is saggenngiy 
high.... Musical highlight: 

Wattaris mighty Belshazzar s 
Feast from Liverpool, and under 
Ricnara Hickox s baton 
tRadio3. lO.bSom). 

Peter Davalle 


egg 


1030 Fane RoBovw 11981) 
starring Jane Fonda and 
Kris Knstofferson. A 
widow tries to rurrher 
- murdered husband's 

- petrochentical empire in 
: tandem with a fteandal 
troubteehootar. They 
graduaBy realise that 
/ someone is manipulating 
both of man. Directed by 
Man J Pakula. 

1240 M^itThoughte. 


BBC 2 


aSS Open University: 

technology- Dutch Heat 
Ends at 722 

94M) Ceefax. 

239 Daytime on Twocstienes- 
- seeds and ptaras 1200 

For four and five-year okte 
10.15 Young people use 
CSE maths at work 1238 
Statistics: sampBng amd 
robab«ty 11 The story 
of the farmer’s Old Brown 
Hat 1 1 .17 Part one of a 
th ro ows oed adventure ki 
French 11.33 Aobtoms for 
10- to 12-year olds 11.40 
Sandra is so embarrassed 
-. when her mother insists 
on attending her party 
1210 Ceefax. 

1230 Worid Snooker. First 

round matches tevohmtg ■ 
Eckfie Chariton and Oavtd 
Tayk>r. 

143 Daytime on TWo; a 

German-tanguage version 
of yesterday s programme 
about a mountain rescue 
operation 200 Haw bricks 
are made and examples of 
brickwork 218 Historic 
buikteigs as the basis of 
art prefects 240 Sbeeiagh 
Gitoey explores the 
Parthenon. 

34)0 Worid Snooker. Cliff 
Thorb urn plays fellow 
Canadian BUWerbemuk; 
and me dosing frames of 
the match between Steino 
Francisco and Rex 
WBiams. 

200 Ycxmg RSusician of the 
Year 1982 Humphrey 
. Burton introduces me five 
Brass finalists. 

240 Worid Snooker. First 
round matches tevoMng 
Eddie Chariton. Cliff 
Thorbum. Stelno 
Francisco and David 
Taylor. 

7 AO Gomg to Pot The first of a 
new series for tedoor 

i, presented by 


n Hampshire and 
Geoff Hamilton. Miss 
Hampshire is In Kew 
Gardens to see how exotic 
plants torivem the 

- greenhouse; and Mr 
Hamilton has advice on 
how to make them prosper 
at home. (Ceefax) 

210 MOD. in this third 

programme on the series 
on tne inner workings of 
the Minishy of Defence, A 
Touch of Gold-plating, 
David Taylor enters toe 
world of the arms - 

- salesman, (see Choice) 

200 Worid Snooker. Tony 

Knowles opens Ms tne 
attempt this evening wtth a 
first round match against 
Neal FouWs. DavidTayior 
and Eugem Hughes 
complete their last round 
encounter. . 

230 Hehnat Part Avert the 11- 
finds Maria 
a letter from 
Paul which means the and 
of her relationship wtth 
Otto. Nine-months latar 

• PauT s ship arrives from 
the United states but he is 
notaflowedtoland . 
because he cannot prove 
that he is of pure Aryan 
stock. The foBowing day 
Hitler declares war on 
Poland. 

1230 NewsnightU.15 
Weather. 

1120 A Hot Summer tfight wtth 
Donna. Part one of a . 
concert starring Donna 
Summer, (r) 

11.55 Open UMverefty: 
Contrasts in Musical 
Language 1220 The 
Ruins of Rome. Ends at 
1252- 


CHANNEL 4 


11^0 The King of Spain Speaks 
to PsrtnunenL Aiastair 
Burnet presents live 
coverage of King Carios's 
histone address, in 
Engfish. to both Houses of 
Parliament. Ends at 1-00. 

215 Thek Lordships' House. A 
repeat ofiast raght’s 
highlights of the day's ' 
proceedings in the House 
of Lords, 

230 Channel 4 Racing from 
Epsom. Brough Scott 
introduces coverage of the 
Racal Electronics Stakes 
(235); toe Minoru Stakes 
(34)5); the Racal Blue 
Riband Trial Stakes (335); 
and the Princes Stand 
Stakes (4.10). 

430 Countdown. Yesterday’s 
winner of the anagrams 
and mental arithmetic 
game is challenged by 
Geoff Taylor from 
Southsea. 

54)0 Alice. Met takes note of 
Tommy's marketing 
advice and is tempted to 
fire Alice. 

530 Unicom in toe Garden. An 
animated version of the 
James Thurber story. 

535 Mother and Son. Domestic 
'series from 
i about a widow 
and her recently divorced 
son who lives with her. 

630 Flashback. This third 
programme in the 
repeated film and history 
series focuses on films 
made for the Home Front 
during. the First World War 
and features Rms made 
by toe Ministry of Food 
and by the Ministry of 
information. (Oracle) 

7JJ0 Channel Four news with 
Trevor McDonald and 
Nicholas Owen. 

7.50 Comment This week's 
political slot Is taken by 
SOP MP. John Cartwright 
Weather. 

200 Gallery. Arts 
presented by 
Meily. The regular team 
captains, Maggi HambUng 
and Frank Whittord are 
joined by Harry Rabinowitz 
and Mark Boxer, and 
students. DanieNe Lafltte, 
of the Byam Shaw School 
of Art, and Neil Skehel 
from Brighton Polytechnic. 
(Oracle) 

230 Eric Bristow -'Arrogant, 
irresponsible Genius' A 
about the 
world darts 
champion and pert-time 
pub landlord- 

200 Prospects. Plncy and Bfily 
arrange a shipment of 
cigarette lighters but 1.200 
. packs of butter arrive 
instead. 

1200 FUm: La Peau Douce* 
(1964) starring Jean 
DesaWy, Francoise 
Dorieac and Nefly 
BenedettL The Francois 
Truffaut series continues 
with this cold-hearted look 
at adultery. A Parisian 
pubtisher has an affair 
with an air hostess when 
attending a co n ference In 
Lisbon and continues with 
It on his return to Pari*. 
After a violent argument 
with his wife, he moves 
• out of his home and 
begins a new Ufa in an 
apartment Unsure of hb 
own fBeUngs he starts to 
feei trapped, with Ms 
mistress on one side and 
hte wife on the other. 

1205 Their Lordships' House. 

f'S 

in the 

of Lords. Ends at 1222 


( Radio 4 ) 


On long w* 
ot Radio 4 


wave. VHP venations at end 


555 am Shipping- 64» News 
Srtefing; Weather. 6.10 
Farming. 225 Prayer (st 
630 Today, ind 630. 

732 230 News. 246 
Business News. 252 
735 weather. 7.02 200 
News. 735,225 Sport, 

7 AS Thought for the Day, 
835 Yesierdayin 
Parliament. 257 Weather; 
Travel 

200 News. 

205 Midweek with Libby 
Purveste). 

1200 News; Gardeners’ 

Question Time. Listeners 
question the experts (r). 

1030 MomngSrory: The 
Sappho Lectures by 
Mark Boume. Read by 
Robert FUetiy. 

1245 Daily Serves from 
Chester ($). 

1130 News; Travel; Echoes of - 
Lost Tibet The 
Memories of British 
travellers on the Roof cf 
the Wortt (r). 

11.48 The King of Spain s 
address to Part ament 
Live coverage of Juan 
Carlos's speech at 
Westminster. 

1237 Around the WOrfd in 2S 
Years. Johnny Moms 
recalls some of the places he 
has visited. This week 
South America. 1235 
Weather. 

130 The World at One: News. 

1.40 The Archers. 135 
Shipping. 

200 News; Woman's Hour. 
Includes an interview 
with the Japanese concert 
pianist Mitsuko Uehida. 

330 News; The Afternoon 
Play. The StoryteHers. 

Fifth In a series of seven 
dramatized short stories: 

The Trumpet adapted from 
Walter de la Mare s 
original by Alan England. 
With Timothy Hyam and 
Danny Kodtcefc (sL 

3A7 A Thought for 

Shakespeare's Birthday. 
Written and read by John 
CarroV. 

430 News. 

4416 FHe on 4: Nicaragua: 

Could It Realty Threaten 
America? A report by Stuart 
S/mon (r). 

4.45 Kaleidoscope. Last 

night's edition repaated.lt 
includes comment on the 30 
Years On exhibition at 
the Oesign Centre, and 
House and Home on 
BBC 2 Also. Prime Levi's 
book If Not Now. When ? 

200 PM; News Ma 
250 Shipping. ! 

Weather. 


630 News: Financial Report 
230 First Nairn (s) (new 

senes] Rooert Cushman 
recalls his years as Drama 
Cnoc of The Observer. 

730 News. 

735 The Archers. 

730 In Business. Peter Smith 
reports on tne succssslul 
ana not-so-successful m an 
areas of business activity 
today 

7A5 Tales hem Paradise. 

June Kncx-Mawer stirs 
memories ci me British who 
w ere m me South Pacific 
at toe time of the war against 
tne Japanese ir. the 
iS40s. (5) Guarding the 
Beacnesis). 

830 Cavalcade. A production 
fcrStGeroge s Day of 
the patriotic pageant by Noel 
Coward. Casi incudes 
Dtnan Sneridar., Jonr. Pullen, 
Christopher Good and 
Janet Maw (si. 

1030 Kaleidoscope: the 
Screenwriter. 

1215 A Bock at Bedtime: Mr 
Wakefield s Crusade 3). 
Read by John Row. 1039 
Weather. 

1030 The World Tonight. 

1 1 .1 5 The Fmanaal world 
Tonight. 

11.30 Today m Parliament 
1200 News, weather. 1233 
Srupatng 

VHF (available m England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except 5.55-630 am 
Weather; Travel. 11.00- 
1200 For Schools. 1200- 
1237 pm The King of 
Spain's address to 
Parliament 135-3.00 For 
Schools. 530-535 PM 
(continued). 1130-1210 
em Open University: 1130 
Calculus: Inequalities. 
l130Technotogy: Learning 
From Europe. 1230-1.10 
Schools rugm-tirne' 
broadcasting: Gujarati 
Language Magazine. 

( Radio 3 ) 

On medium wave. VHF variations at 
end ot Radio 3 listings 
255 Weather. 730 News 
735 Mommg 

. ConcertTeiemann (La 
bouffonne suits). Mozart's 
ana PupiUe a mats' Kiri Te 
Kanawa). Chopin (Fantasy in 
F minor. Op 49: 
Perania.piano). Debussy 
(Jeux). 830 News 
205 Concert (contd): Haydn 
(Symphony No 53). 

Poulenc (Trio: easier, 
Faeandier and Fevrier), 
Gershwin (By Strauss: 
Ameltng.sopranq). 

Johann Strauss (Emperor 
Waltz). 930 News 


9.05 This Week’s Composw*-’ 
Schola 

Centonjm.Parts.from the 
1 890s to 1970s. De 
Severac (Sous les farmers 
roses: CkwAm.pano). 
Roussel (Symphony No 3), 
Satie (En habit de chevaf: 
Poulenc and Fevrier .piano 
duet), de Severac 
[Tantum ergo sacramentum). 
1030 DeJm© String Quartet 
Haydn (Stong Quartet In 

B flat Op 71 No 1). Hobart 
Walker (String Quartet 
Not) 

1130 Entfish Songs: Brian 
Ravner Cook 
(bantonel.RogBT Vignotes 

(piano) Warlock 

(Youth.Sleep. My own 
country. As ever I saw); 
Adrian Waiiams (The 
Morning Waits) 

11.40 Rbtch: Bmo State PO 
ptay the Symphony No 1 
1215 Concert Halt Alan Grevill 
(piano). Beethoven 
(Sonata in F min -x. Op 2 No 
T). Debussy (Suite 
bergamasque). 130 News 
135 Sonny Roams: 
recordings by the 
saxopnonistPresented by 
Richard Cook 

130 Matinee Musicals: BBC 
Concert Orchestra 
(under Lawrence), wtth 
Crtristopher Cradwell 
(tenor sax) and Cnrlstme 
Crowshaw (piano). 


Meyerbeer (Torch Dance No 
3). Paul HarveyfRua 
Maunce-Berteaux-for sax 
and piano}. Elgar (Dream 
Children. Op *3 No a. Yuste 
(Solo de Concours. Op 
34). Cowles (In Memortam), 
Faure (Masques et 
bergamasques) 

230 Handeie and Bach: First 
Thoughts. Academy of 
Araxent Music. Handef 
(Concerto in D major, 

HWV 3355a. and Bach 
(Smfoma in F major, BWV 
1046a) 

330 TheCooMdge 

Commissions: Bartok 
(String Quartet No 5). 
Hindemith (Concert 
Music. Op 49,WTth Paul 
Crossiey.piano) 

430 Choral Evensong: from 
Lichfield 

Cathedrai.Organist and 
Master of Choristers: 
Jonathan Rees-Wiliams. 
435 News 

530 Midweek Choice: 

Rachmaninov (Isle of the 
Dead). Watthew (Sonata in D: 
Forbes and Foggin). 

Bntten (Ballad or Utde 
Musgrava and Lady 
Barnard: Alley .piano). 
LocateBi (Violin Concerto 
in A. Op 3 No 11: 
Lautenbacher. violin). 
Schubert (Quintet in AThe 
Trout, with Andras 
Sch iff. piano and Hagen 
Quartet members) 

730 Debut David Kuyken 
(piano). Franck 
(Prelude.Chora) and Fugue). 
Schoenberg (Six little 
pieces. Op 19) 

730 The Double-Bass: by 
Patrick Susklnd 
(translated by Roy Kiffi.Wrth 
Stephen Rea 
830 Roth String Quartet 
Elizabeth I 


(Ouartetto Corto). Haydn 
(Quarrm in G major, Op 
77 No 1) 


9.00 English Music Royal 
Liverpool Philharmonic 
(under Hickox). and 
Liverpool Philharmonic 
Choir .with Stephen Roberts 
(baritone). Part one. 

Delius (Brigg Fair), Poole 
(Visions) 

245 Six Continents: foreign 
radiobroadcasts, 
monitored by the BBC 


1205 Concertpart 2 Watton 
(Belshazzar's Feast) 

1030 Shakespeare's Memory: 
David De Keyser reads 
the Short story by Jorge Lias 
Borges 

11.15 John Ogdon: piano 
recital. Beethoven 
(Sonata in E. Op 109). Liszt 

e i Sonata) 

. 1230 Closedown. 
VHF only. Open university, from 
635am to 255. Open Forum. 


( Radio 2 ) 

On medium wavs. VHF 
variations at end of Radio l . 
Headlines 230 am, 630, 730 
and 230. Sports Desks: 135 pm, 

? iw. <109. 4.02, 205, 632 245 
(mf only) 9.55. 

4.00 am Colin Berry (si. 530 
Ray Moore (s). 730 Derek 
Jameson (s). 930 Kan Bruce 

S ,). 11.00 Jimmy Young(s). 135 pm 
avid Jacobs is) 2303Uorta 
Hunmford (s) incf phone-m 200- 
245 (01-580 4444). 330 David 
Hamilton (s). 530 Johnb Dunn irxx 
at 635 (mf only) Sport ane 
Classified Results (s). 730 Foflc on 
2 ( 5 ) (continued on vtrf only). 

7J3Q International Soccer SpedaL 


Murdoc^Sichai'd Murdoch chats 
to a live audience. 1215 Harvey 
and the Wall bangers. 1030 Look 
Wnat They've Done To My _ 

Song (Steve Race). 1130 Brian 
Matthews presents Round 
Midnight (stereo from m id night). 
130 am Charles Nove (s). 330- 
430 A Little Night Music. 

( Radiol ) 

On medium wave. VHF 
variations at end of Radio 1. 

News on the half hour from 630 
am until 930 pm and at 123 
rntdrognt 

630 am Andy Peebles. 730 
Adrian John. 930 Simon Bates. 
1230 Newsbest (Frank 
Partridge). 1245 Gary Davies. 330 
Steve Wright. 530 Newsbeat 
(Frank Partridge). 5A5 Bruno 
Brookes mcl. at 630. new Top 
30 album chart. 730 Janice Long. 
1200-1200 John Peel Is). 

VHF RADIOS 1 & 2 4.00 am As 
Radio 2 730pm Folk on 2 (s). 830 
The McCalmans and Fnands 
(s). 930 Listen to the Band (s). 9-55 
Sports Desk. 10.00 As Radiol. 
1200-430 am As Radio 2 


WORLD SERVICE 


630 Newscast! 630 Meridan 7.00 News 
739 Twenty-Four Hours 7.30 Develop- 
ment 86 830 news 839 Reflections MS 
Classical Record Review 830 Brain of 
Britain 1 986 930 News 839 Review of the 
Bnosn Press 9.15 The Worn Toaay 930 
financial News 9.40 Look Ahead 935 
Flanders and Swann 1030 News 7031 
Omrnbu& 1130 News 1139 News About 
Britain 11.16 Onana 113S A Letter from 
Wales 1130 Mendan 1200 Radio News- 
reel 1215 Nature NorotxxW 1225 The 
Famwig World 1245 Sports Rounduc 
130 News 138 Twenty-Four Hours 130 
Development 86 200 Outlook 245 Re- 
port on Religion 330 Byways ol History 
330 The A] Read Show 430 News 439 
Commentary 4.15 Coumarpomt 545 
Sports Roundup 7.45 Good Boon 830 
news 839 Twenty-Fair Hours 830 As- 
signment 200 News 931 Network UK 
9.15 International Soccer Speoal 1030 
News 1039 A Letter from Wales 1030 
Financial News 1040 Reflacuons 1045 
Sports Rowiup 1130 News 1139 Com- 
mentary 11.15 Good Books 1130 Top 
Twenty 1200 News 1239 News About 
Bntam 121S Radio Newsreel 1230 The A1 
Read Show 130 news 131 Outlook 130 
Waveguide 140 Book Cnatca 1.45 Master 
CeHistt 230 News 209 Renew ol the 
British Press 215 Network UK 230 
Assignment 3.00 News 339 News About 
Britain 3.15* The World Today 445 
Financial News 435 Reflections 530 
News 539 Twenty-Four HotfS 545 The 
World Today. All tlroea m GMT. 


FREQUENCIES: Radio W053kHz/28Sm;l089kH2/275m: Radio 2: 693kHz/433m; 909kH/433m; Radio 3: 1215kHz/247m: VHF -90- 
92.5; Radio 4: 200kHz 1500m: VHF -92-95; LBC: 11S2kHz/261m; VHF 97.3; Capital: 154BkHz/194m: VHF 95.8; BBC Radio London 
1456kHz/206m: VHF94.9; World Service MF 648kHz/463m. ' 


L BBC1 W*l£SUSp»M0 
f HSiii wuee Toaay 635-730 Go ter 
| M 1210ea>-1240 FUm 88 1240- 
1245 News and weather SCOTLAND 
635pm-730 Rrocrang Scotland 
NORTHStN IRBJUBTS3SpB>-540 

Today's Sport S40-&00 inside Ulster 

635-730 Video Gossip 1030-1 2 tOam 
Spo n enldlB from Northern fceland 
ftnamatsonal Footbefc BodnaRugby 
llntan: Snooker GmhOiXtdsEN- 

GLANO 6JGp»730 Regional news 

magextaes. 

YORKSHIRE 

Ctasnatr Lunchtime LNe 130 News 
130230 Falcon Cleat 686438 CeieP- 
der 1240 m Ctoeadoan. 

As London ex- 
cepc 1230pm-13Q 
t30 News 130 JoO 
Rtac Hewtdne; Death end 
the Malden 330-430 Report Bach 
6. 15-646 5-W.AJ_K.83C News end 
Scotland Today 730-1030 Scatsport 
1240am Lett Dafl. Ctaaedown. 

SENTOAL. SHS ffig, 

the Cotswota Way 130 News 130- 
230 Scarecrow and Nfrs King 530 
Crotsroeds &»730 Newel: 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


TYNE TEES ^ London ex- 
JJJ2E-LSS2 opt I230p»-130 

Sea In Their Blood 1JO News 135 
Where the Jobs Are 130-230 Counfry 
Practice 8.00-635 Noone m Life 
1240am Faith of a Man Csted Mark 
1230 Closedown. 

CHANNEL 

Goes on HoMey 130 News 130 Off 
me Rack 200-230 Problem Page 330- 
430 Young Docm 5-15445 
S.WAJ_K 630435 Channel Report 
124tam Closedown. 

HTVWEST*?J?X™°*- 


Gtanroe 130 News 130-230 Hen la 
Harr 630435 News 1240 sd 
C loseoovm. 


; As HIV west 

w axcapt 930am- 
11.15 Schools 1130-1 135 Looking 
Forward 6.00p m 035 Wales at Six. 




GRAMPIAN {aSgU* 

Ai Home 130 News 130-230 Coun- 
1 Practice 5.15445 S-WA4-K 530- 
1 Norm Tonight 1240am New3. 
Closedown. 

TVS AsLondonexcept:1230pm- 
-Li2 1 30 Judi Goes on HoBday 130 
News 130 Oft the Rack 2JXF 230 
Problem Page 330-430 Younp Doctors 
5.15-545 SW.A4_K. 630435 Coast 
to Coast 1240an Company. Closedown. 
TSW ^ London except 
10 ■ 1230m*-130 Mr Smith 130 
News 130 Country Practice 225- 
230 Home Cookery 5.15 Gus Honeytiun 
530445 Crossroads 630 Today 
South Wen 630-730 Emmardato Farm 
t240em Postscript Closedown. 

GRANADA SgBKu. 

Ageless Agamg 130 Gransda Re- 
ports 130%36The Baron 330430 
Young Doctors 630 Granada Re- 
ports 630-730 This Is Your Right 
1240am Closedown. 


Starts: 1130am King of 
Ssai Spam Speaks » Perkament 
130pm Countdown 130 4 What It's 
Worm 200 Oaaaryadtaeih: Japan: yr 
Ynysoedd Pobng 220 Ftalabam 230 
Ratang from Epsom 430 Duttwi m Russia 
530 Miflowcar 530 Pocket Money 
Programme 630 Brookstae 630 
Concwest 730 Newyddion 730 O na 
ByddaVn Hal o Hya 60S Uwvbreu Nstur 
530 uygad y Gemma 9.05 Fam: That 
Forsyte Woman 1 1.15 Snwcer 1135 
-Spike 1235am Closedown. 

Ill QTPR As London except 
UL-OICn f 230pm-130 Sea In The* 
Blood 130 Umcnume 130-230 
Country Practice 330-430 Look Who's 
Taking 630435 Good Evening Ul- 
ster 1235 am News. Closedown. 

London except 

Portrait Of 
iCoun- 
Younq Doctors 


RORDFP As London exc 
BU1WCI1 I230pm-I30 1 
B Legend 130 News 130-230 


try Practice 330430 Young Dot 
63G43S Lookaround 1246am 
Closedown 

ANGLIA ^gggy^ume 

Words 130 News 130-230 Country 
Practice 5.15-5.45 SWALK. 630435 
About Angba 1240am In Conversa- 
tion, Closedown. 


entertainments 



OPERA A BALLET 


- COLKCUM S 836 3161 CC 240 


T«n 7 30 TW Swri. Wf; 
Tomoc 730 na dartamd 


ROYAL OKRA HOUSE. COWRl 
Garden. WC2 Ol 240 
Jose/ ten. Oc S sramUwmie 
Ol 836 6903 MorHSai i»m- 
Sum. 68 amoM mm 5 man from 
. 10 am on Bic 6*y TXMtK 

Opera from E7.EO, BalUrt from 
£600 

Toni 7 30 7W aea Hti l Hj 
Mrtitnx- dl Slv,q*ta- Tome^7.30 

tSfllHBl MM .Krthday 

OflrrmofTTw Sock, of Ho rns /A 

■ Month tn in^ Oouutnr. 
camim Into: Ol 2*0 9815. 


MBUm WELLS !T8 Wrt. 
ywS»CAH ttAMC E «tA8QH 

Apm 29 to May 3 MTtaJJ 
Air Tit Zn> A Co May 6 .to lO. 


THEATRES 


AKUPM 8S6 76 H W 240 7913 
■A CC 741 9999.836 7338.379 
6438 CSrp SAM- 930 6123 CC 
BOOKING To XMAS 80 EXCLU- 
SIVELY wan First CaU On 240 
7200 24 Hr 7 Days 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL . . 

NMUIV at 7.30 MM WAA «T 3-30 

Evn- DUWfiafr soeaunr - 



ALBERT Ol 836 3878 PC 379 
6B6E CC 379 6433. 741 9999. 
on S4K9 9» 6123/836 »62. 
ElB 7 15. Saw 2XC6 7.30. 
LAST a WEEK* 

Triple Tow award-winner 

HARVEY FIERSTEIN 
•EflmmceM A OteraoeeurT-D 

TORCH SONG ' 

"smujuum.Y 

OHijiard wtms ptaw Arnote at 

^jwirrmy nMtffKCtt 


MBERY Ol 836 3878 O C-579 
65® CC 379 0433. 7«I 9W 
OVSalM 930 6123/836 38o2. 
Fora ItwIM ***"> 

tom hulce. . 

THE NORfAAiJffART 

“A RAPE WOKPOtOUe _ 
THtATTBCAL EVENT”. 

ny ianry Kta nwr _ 
mri from 13 tur. Opens » 
May j 


ALDWYCH 01 836 6« 4/OML 

CC 379-6233. Firs Cad 2«f 

CC 01-240 7200. tote 7 JO. 

■EluSSS WWJWW » 

. ram. shells* m - - 
MADE IN BANCTOK 

wan O reiP tatr FoBoro 

mjZ 

— □, ™. 


AMBASSADORS West St. WCt 
Ol 836. 6111 CC Ol 836 
1171/741 9999 CTPJ MteSM 
6123 Mon-Thurs at 8pm.. Fri & 
sai at 6 6 846 



LEATHDtLAND 

mmi RAYMOND FRANCte 

WIFE BEGINS AT FORTY 

A drMMfuL ramedy. Boekmg 
inrough June 19B6. 


AAOLLO VICTORIA S8 828 0666 
CC 630 6262 Cn> Sales 930.6123 
Em 745 MiaTarfi SM 3.0 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS^ 

-A MUSICAL THAT HISWMO 
AMYTMNtt AROUND M EVERT 
OMENSKm'* O Exfr ' 

-STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

ML SJC BY 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
Lyrics by RtCHARD ST1LCOE 

DUWWU.W TREVOR NO NN 

APPLY DAB. Y TO BOX OFFICE 


ASTORIA THEATRE Box OW. 
info. __ 

CC & Group* 01-73 4-4287 _ 
01-437 8772 

BEST MUSICAL 1985, 

The Twa 

LENNON. 

A cvMntton of trw hfv endmiMc 

«•.' Jotm LCTjipn. .IP *! 

cSSSa i? £SS«£ 

S* WOMXRFULLY BRAVC 

'feBUBfflSsiS 

HAVE UWtti IT** . 

WAS UP IKK CRECHM 
WITH EVERYONE. ELSC AT THE 


fUStUOooM MM- torn. M4.CL EVBS. 
VtwStoSH 8.0 Mats SM & Sun 

4 D 


babmcmt-oi «ae bwm«. 

8891 cptMun«uD lOam-apnu 

WrALMAXWCAH! 

■* CO Wff W ** - 

•ARSICAK THEATRE (MIX 
TxCromor 200 ft J30 
mephsstd. nmol me 
Klaus Mohn. THE MEHRY^ 
WIVES OF WPTOSCW- TCto M 
j f % AnriL TROILUS ft CUES- 
StDA ltd. P«1M PXr® 5 09“ 1 

nffPir Mbit TSOLtomerj 2 B> 

&730 IL owaoAKTw 

caonUnognme. PHILIB TWES 

By Maxim Ooriy rttira 2i». 

April. . FHn 30 - Apr REA L 
dr E A vc urn Play' by Trever 

- criWUw. - 

wucm B 0803 781312 

CCTYOW «w prer 

7 SO. MAK TWO * Sat 230 


COWDT THEATRC Bm DfflW 

’ en ssissf 

EouEk 'Mwre* 

•MrfKtly MetaM* SMM . 

ACROS FROM THE 


corrasLoe %• «a 2202 qc 
(NaUooal Theatre's small 
uriwm). Toni. Thur 7 30 . 
Torpor 2 -50 a. 74 0. then May.8 
lo 13 FUTURISTS by Dcsty 

HuehoL Apnr 2 6 a, » only s 

prrft ONLY 14 UBiwiip 
3 /Wty 3 p«f* DOW* CEW- 
■ Tiler ROAD.- Ik* Lw li m p s 


CRJIUUON. S 9303216 CC J79 

6666 379 6433 741 9099 Group* 

B36 3962. EVB» 8.00. Thu mat 

2 30- Sat 3-30 &.8.3Q » 

"Uirea FARCE AT ITS BEST” 
D Mall 

The T hrone M Conway MW 

eric *»«rr 

LAN HURT - HELEN Hi 

an d 

BAKTH HUKT 

RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

Written, and mmcttd by 
. RAV COONty 


trOTUNES ajHM BOXOt 
«62*/V nnl Can 24Hr7 Day CC 

836 ^ «war m 

' TIME 


. CLIFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK STAR- 
THE PORTRAYAL OF 'AKASW 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

Mon- Fri 7.30 Thu Mat 230 Sat 6 
Jr 8-30* 

LA TECOM ERS WILL NOT BE 
ADMITTED tWTtL A SUITABLE 

break in the performance 


BRUNT LANE THEATRE ROYAL 

01-836 8108. 01-240 ^»Ob6 r7 
First cao 24-hour 7-eay ec hues 

2AQ7X ^ M mm^ . 

- 42ND -STREET • 

A SHOW FOB ALL' TMC FAMB-Y 


- Hasfcal Awwda Mr ISM 

toted 

BBT MUSICAL 

. STANSABD PRASU AWARDS 

voted 

BEST MUSICAL M 

U UmMC S OLffR AWARD 

voted 

best musi cal 

flats II 

iqwnfMi THCAT8C CWTTCS 
AWAWb ■' 

AO Mata Wfd 3.0 Sal B.O* 
' Group Sales 9SO 6123 

NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
JAN 1987 


0UC4KSS 836 82*3/240 9648 

-FIKI Can CC 340 7300 
(21 bn 7 (Uyci CC 741 9999 CC 

B 06 aaomr- 

A MGNTO OFSUNWjYS 

MAKES INS WEST END A 
‘ WARMER AND MOM 
' 'wo* dfltra, PiACE“ D.MaO 
- ■ starrlAg 

GEORGE COLE 

haft. Wed nuu S. SM S A 8 JO 
MCTW BOOKING TW WQH, TO 


DUKE m YORKS 836 6122 CC 
836 9837/741 9999/240 7200. 

Eves ®0. 

Thu Mat 3. Sat 5 ft 830 
2nd TEAR OF THE AWARD 
WINNING COMEDY HTT 

STEPPING OUT 

“TRIUMPH ON TAR- Eve SKf 
HH Comedy By Richard Harris 

Dtrmod by JuhaMcKeTra* 
COtREDY OF THE YEAR 
Standard Drama Award .1984 
"LAUCK Y GMBPf 8U.W 
T Out “Had the audience yelllne 
tor more" D Mrti “M» surely 
take Inc town.. Co NOW D Tct 


lOmiK SCC 836 223S -9 741 
9999 rtrrt Can 2«tjj 7 day CC 
2407200. E>e8m/S4l6 4 8 40 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Laurence Olivier Award 1964 

UP AND UNDER 

By John Goaoer 
>4wawomJLct»EDT’s 
Times -6B*L£HDID” D T« 
“One of the lucntew and teasi pre- 

Om-A JOY- S Exp 

2nd HILARIOUS YEAR 


•AHncK. S 01-836 4601. CZ. 
579 6433 ft CC 24 Iff /7 1 »y 240 
7200. Grp Sales 930 6123. Eva § 
pm. Wed mat 5.0. 8ai S.o and 8.0 

NO SEX. PLEASE- 

WFRE BRITISH 


GUWE 437 1592. CC 3796433. 
Fhst Call 3a nr 7 day CC 240 
720a ttP Sates 930 6123. Eves 
8. Mats wed 3. Sal 4. 
Andre w u w d wewr. preKW 

’ LENDME A TENOR 

"CUKmELY rtlNNY" F Times 
“HBJUtfOUSLYOVER 
THE TOP-Cpn 


OF THROAT PAWS PROM 
LAUCMNC TOO MUCH- Today 
-An mnncfat earol ea W 
n— ■ m u BeM i j . • R re^y la 
eery tanl^ Tima. 

a cmiiuai' by hen Ludwfr 

DtTNied fay D*wd OUmore. • 


C REIK W tCH THEATRE 01-838 

7756 Evas 7 as mu sat 2 30. 

«rakSouim < s >n RnjiTi^v 
BRAKIHG 'A JOY- J£- 
TREMELV FUNIin-- 6TD. 
-thoroughly dwovable* 
F.Tbaea 


HAYMARKET THEATRE ROYAL 

Box office & rrOI 950 M KF1HI 

CaU ao hr 7 toy cc Dkn 240 7200 

■ PETER O'TOOLE 

wiui 


DORA BRYAN 
MCNAEL DENISON 
• M AJ BUS O OBUIC 
. CGOmOY KEEN 
DAVDKWC 
MOM USTEK 

PAUL R OPER S 
OMAN SNEM1AN 
BAteD WALLER 

SUSANNAH YORK 

THE APPLE CART 

bKRNARD SHAW 

Eves 7 JO Mai Sat 230 


LONDON PALLADKAH 457 7373. 
437 2036. cc 734 8961. 379 
6433/741 9999. First CaB 24 Hr 
7 Day CC 240 7200. On Sales 
930 6123. 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

DIRECT FROM BROADWAY 

GEORGE HEARN ft DENIS 
QUUXEY 

LA CAGE AUX F01LES 

A LOVE STORY YOU 'LL LAUGH 
ABOUT FOR A LIFE T1MI. 


MoriSet 7.30. Mats Wed ft 
23a First NWJMWT 


EVEMKC OP YOUR LVE 


LYRIC . . 

Axe Wl 01437 3686/7 01-434 
:56a 01-434 1030. 01-734 

5166/7. Red Price Prevs. Item 
June 4. Opens June 11 M 7.0. 

COLM BLAKELY In 
The National Theatre's acriatrsed 

. . prtKttXTKKT Of 

ALAN AYCKBOURteB 
Award Winning Comedy 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

Ex-os 7 SO. Hats Weds ifTOni Jane 
18) and Sari 3.0 Advance Book- 
ings Period Now corn June 4 - 
AU9 30. Group Sales Ol 930 
blZl/RST CALL MMt 7 DAT 
CC BOOKINGS ON »1 240 7200 
[NO BOOKMG FEEL 


LYTTELTON 7* 928 2262 CC 

(National Theatre's pnstxnwni 

siapr). Toni 7 as. Then April 
29 <□ May 1 BRIGHTON REACH 

MEMonttiBy Nell Simon. Toni 

6pm Cnd Nillltl la Orieo. 46 

imnnianorm peri *a tm ȣ2 oo. 


tUYTMt S CC 629 3006/741 
9999. JSHTTttCC 200 720D 
Mon-Thu 8 Frt/Sat 840 8.10. 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

The MS ihriBr r ^ Richard Harris 


"The hast — _ 

B Mir. “An un ah rifted wlnna-S 
E9. ~A thrnler mat srht su m u 
an. riuitiinnirTfi — I “The 
most tpQsdouB mysMnr to have 
appeared tn a def df -D.M aa 

"" *^WS5uS3a tnao 


MERMAID CC lae faooktap Ik) 
01-336 6588 or 741 9999/379 
6435 ec (Bko Fuel 2* ltr/7 day 
240 7300. ttv sole* 01-930 BIOS. 
Ex-C* 80. Fri ft Sar 50, 4 B.O. 
LAST 4 WEEKS 
KTS AWARD^raRMM 

PRODUCTION 

David Mamert 

GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS 

dtrectM tn Bffl ttud en 
"f T ttftt FAR THE BEST TlflNC 
5 H0mN B M 

l O WP t N rSDeqam r. PTC Tneairr 
rood ft Drink 

CARPARK next doer 9Se 
Other NT shows see National Hi. 


MEW LONDON Drury urns WC2 

01-409 0072 CC S7» 64» Eves 
7.46 Toe ft SM 300 ft 7.48. 

THE ANDREW LLOYD WtBBER 
/T* ELIOT RMStCAJ. 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFT1CE 
FOR RETURStS 

Grp Booktnm 01-406 1067 or Ot 
9306129 Portal spoHrottpra now 
faerng nccepud until AuguH 30. 


NATIONAL THEATRE srfa Sank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMP ANY 

See SEPARATE CNTRHE8 under 
OLIVIER/LYTTELTON / 
COTTESLOE Exeetfcnt cheap 
seals days o t pe ris an theatres 
iron to am. RESTAIMMYT fW28 
2053). CHEAP, EAST CAR P AR. 
TOUM OF THE CUUMO Unc 
Baaatapel E2 Info 633 088 0 
NT ALSO AT TNE MENMAB 


OLD VK 9» 7616 CC 261 1821 
Opens Toni Tpra. Sub Eves 
7 30. S ari 4 .0 ft 7 46 

TSJs Snatore 


•> 928 2262 CXI 

'Nano net Theatre's open stapri 
Today 200 daw price Bril ft 
Tift. Tomor 7. I6JHSH May 8 
to ID T* THREEPENNY 
OPERA by Brectrt. xvUh music 
by KOI WHO. 


PALACE THEATRE 437 6834 
CC 437 8327 or 379 6433 
Grt> Men 930 6123 

THE MUSICAL BEKSATUM 

LES MISERABLE? 

“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET - STEAL ONE" sw. 

Ev as 7 30 Mats Thu ft Sri i 230 
Laierumeri n d ad ndwd untfl the 

BEAT THE TOC 1* BY EN QIltR. 
W G FOR R ETURNS AT TKEBOX 
omn NOW BOOWNG TO 
OCT 4 


P M OE MD C 836 2294 ec 240 9661 
741 9999/240 7200 EM 8 Mat 
Thu 3 Sal 5 ft B 30 

BEST MUSICAL OF 1985 

SUMard Drama Awards 

MARTIN SHAW 
As EWS Presley 

•WtTiUUZW THE PERFOR- 
MANCE ts A LANDMARK” O EX 

ARE YOU LONESOME 
tonight? 

8V ALAN ELZA5WLE 
-rr» MAGtePKENT" Otis 
nay jewers «riD ptay ETvt» Presley 
an Monday Eves opty 


MCCADRLY THEATRE 437 

4606. 734 96» Cririu <>»d 
Hotlines S79 6668. » Cro 

Sales 936 3960 930 61 Z3. 

"A Hrfliart M ual ro l" Re 

DAVID FRANK 
ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTWY! ^ 

TBDteMIS SPECT ACLTOdp 
Over lift at anfflP C DepBpps 

Eves 8 0 Mats Wed 3 ft Sat 6 
New Booking penod ntn« open to 
CM « September 


PRINCE eMMRO Box Office 
734 8961 FHH CaB 24 Hr 7 Days 
OC 836 3064 Ort» Sale* 930 6123 
Mon-Sri 8. MM Tbuts ft Sri 300 

CHESS 

THE MUSICAL 

Opera 14 May « 7pm 
Red Pn« Preview * h um ftprtt 30 


PlimCE or WALES Ol 930 8681 
/ 2 CC HoOlne 930 0844 /S/6 Crp 
Sales 930 6123 Keith Prows* 
741 9999 First CaU 24 hr 7 day 
OC Botwxnm 240 7300. 
-TOC-TAPPMG GOOD* D. Mati 

"SEVEN BRIDES FOR 

SEVEN BROTHERS’* 

THE BLOCK BUSTER MUSICAL 
"I DEFY ANYONE NOT TO 

ENJOY ITT Tins. 

From May 8th Eve* 7 30. Mat 
Thur ft Sat i. 


PRINCE OF WALES 01-930 8681 
/2 CC HOttine 01-930 0844/5/6 
Croup Sales 01-930 6123 K. 
prows* Of 741 9999. n*"« CaU 
24 nr 7 a ay CC Bocrkintp. 2JO 
7200. 01 37 9 6433 Esps 730 
Mat Thur ft Sri 3 ,00 *y — 01 *• 

Th rown sec t Britain 

GUYS AND DOLLS ■ 

Starring UIUI 

JANET 

_ ra m T Y 

ANDREW C WADSWORTH 
THICK WILSON 

■ W rodarti d B fa rota lam rot" S Tel 
“A CTrosl e ot ' its. buid-JP. Tet. 

LAST 6 PERFS 
MUST END SAT 26 


QULUTS 01734 1166. 734 

1 167. 73* 0261 754 0120. «9 
3849.439 4031 First Call OC 24 
nr 240 7200. Grp Sales 930 6123. 
Exes 8pm. Wed ft Sat Mats 3pm 

MAGGIE EDWARD 

SMITH FOX 

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WEDNESDAY APRIL 23 1 986 


THE 


. pX'S/V 


TIMES 


SPORT 



war 



world away 




exico 


Stuart Jones, Football Correspondent 


Of 3ll the World Cup prac- 
lice maichcs that ha'c been or 
□re about to be staged around 
the globe, none will be more 
irrelevant than tonight's fix- 
ture in north-west London. 
The forthcoming proceedings 
in Mexico might as well take 
place in craters on the moon 
for all the resemblance they 
will bear to the earthly event 
inside Wembley. 

The annual game between 
England and Scotland is inev- 
itably another domestic haule 
in the oldest of sporting wars 
(it has been waged since 1 872). 
Driven on by a v ocifcrous and 
wildly partisan audience, the 
two k'ts of troops are tradi- 
tionally ablaze with a fiep 
passion and enveloped in 
dogged determination. 

Caught up in a pace that will 
be twice as fast as in Mexico, 
the players will run twice as far 
this evening than they will 
over there, where the tempera- 
ture will be twice as high. 
Tonight’s conditions will also 
be significantly different since 
the turf will be wetter and 
softer. 

Apart from the occasional 
explosi\e burst, the rhythm 
wifi be generally languid, al- 
most casual at times, in the 
debilitating heal at the high 
altitude of Mexico. There will 
be neither time nor room for 
much more than the odd 
touch of sublet* and finesse in 


the comparatively hectic fury 
at Wembley. 

Vet the match is far from 
inconsequential. The result 
matters not so much because 
“the auld enemies" have each 
gained 40 victories but be- 
cause both sides are aiming to 
continue their unbeaten se- 
quences. England and Scot- 
land have not lost in their Jasi 
eight internationals and be- 
tween them they have conced- 
ed only three goals. 

Individual performances 
will be even more crucial. 
Three Englishmen in particu- 

More football, page 58 

lar will be playing for their 
places in the World Cup 
squad, which is to be an- 
nounced on Monday. One of 
them is Hodge, of Aston Villa, 
who could become the under- 
study for the disturbingly 
fragile Bryan Robson. 

Hodge made his debut as a 
substitute last month in the 
Soviet Union. Told to relax 
and start with a few easy 
passes, he promptly gave the 
ball away in his first two 
attempts. His subsequent 
marked improvement per- 
suaded Bobby Robson to 
“have another look at him". 
This is his last chance. 

So it is for Watson. Norwich 
City's captain, whose four 


TENNIS 


Vilas seeks winning touch 


It rained one year when 
Guillermo Vilas was playing 
Jimmy Connors in the final 
here "at the Monte Carlo 
Country Club. They got as lar 
as 5-5 in the first set and the 
match was abandoned, never 
to be completed. 

There were those of us 
watching Vilas playing his first 
round match of the Volvo 
Monte Carlo Open here yes- 
terday against a little Czech ol 
moderate ability called Mar- 
ian Vajda who" wished that 
this match had been aban- 
doned too. This was not 
because Vilas lost or that he 
played particularly badly. On 
the* contrary, there were mo- 
ments when the left-handed 
Argentinian looked quite good 
out there in the vast open 
spaces of the centre court. 

His form, after seven 
months of typically methodi- 
cal preparation, certainly 
looked a great deal better than 
a year ago when he contrived 
to lose 6-1. 6-0 to Ronald 
Agenor. of Haiti, in Marbella. 

It was more the fact that he 
should have won and did not 
(he served for the match at 5-3 
in the second set) that set the 
heads shaking over the £20 


From Richard Evans. Monte Carlo 

i lunches being served up on the e 
i terrace. At the age of 33 the d 
I knack of winning becomes \ 
> increasingly elusive and no <] 
r one likes "to watch a great I 
? champion search for some- a 
r thing he can no longer find. p 
And Vilas, let it be remem- 
s bered. has been a great cham- „ 
H pion. Only Wimbledon s 
a remained outside his realm ol l{ 
r capability. That in itself, was f 
i a little strange because grass 

- was not necessarily the probf 

it km. He won his only Masters 1 

- title on grass in Melbourne c 
it and followed it with two 3 
e Australian Open crowns on F 
i the same Kooyong court to t 

- add to the French and US ~ 
i Open titles he won in 1977. t 
J Few players of any era have S 
t worked more studiously on v 

their game, played more 5 
rt matches or spent more hours 
i- on court. In an ill-tempered 
\ age. Vilas remained a most 
n courteous competitor and 
d there was no justice at all in 
d the fact that the Pro Council 
i. singled him out for allegedly 
e accepting a guaranteed pay- 
il mem at Rotterdam in 1983. 


Although illegal under the 
rules of the Grand Pm. the 
practice is widespread yet no 



appearances so far have been 
on the summer tours of South 
America and Mexico. Had 
Wright not broken his lef. he 
would not now be in consider- 
ation. Bui as Robson points 
out: "There is perhaps still a 
vacancy for a special ist central 
delender 

Robson waited until last 
night to decide whether to 


oner a final opportunity to 
either Francis or • Dixon as 
well. After various confused 
reports it was discovered that 
Francis had indeed fractured 
his cheekbone. .Although he 
was eager to take the risk of 
further injury, England's man- 
ager was reluctant to accept 
the heavy responsibility. 

Scotland, who had already 
lost Sharp and Stracban, are 
also without Dalglish, who 
yesterday failed a fitness lest 
on his troublesome knee. Alex 
Ferguson, the manager, has 
therefore chosen a new strike 
force of Nicholas and the 
volatile Speedie. They are two 
of five changes 

Rough replaces Goram in 
goal. McLeish comes in for 
Narey to partner Miller, his 
Aberdeen colleague, and Nicol 
will fill Strachan's role on the 
right side of midfield. En- 
gland. marginally more set- 
tled. are the slight favourites 
but the odds are that the 1 04th 
Anglo-Scoaish battle will end 
in the 24th draw. 


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evidence has ever been pro- 
duced against anyone else. 
Vilas, angered and hurt 
dropped out of the world's top 
10 for the first time in 10 years 
and has never been the same 
player since. 

He is. however, a stubborn 
man and is convinced he can 
still climb back towards the 
top 20 of the ATP computer 
from his current ranking of 34. 

“I continue to play because 
I love the game." he said 
disanninglv after losing to 
Vajda 1-6. 7-5. 6-4. “I love to 
play and I love to practice, f 
trained for several weeks in 
Argentina and some days the 
temperature reached 40 de- 
grees centigrade. But that is 
what you have to do to get in 
shape." 

And he intends to. He will 
play a full Grand Prix pro- 
gramme. including Wimble- 
don. for the rest of the year. 

RESULTS: First round: M Vajda (Cz) 
bt G Vilas (Arg). 1-6, 7-5. W; A 
Krickstain (US) at B Dyke |Aus). 7-5. 
&-t; D Perez hjrug) bt E Sanchez 
(Sp). 6-1 . 6-3: P McNamee (Aus) W P 
Lundqren (Swe). 6-3. 6-1 Second 
round: F Luna (Sp) bt T $mid (Cz). 5- 
3. 6-3; M Moor (Cz) W K Cartsson 
(Swek fr3._fr3. 


YACHTING 


Crebbin is 
in line 
for title 

From a Correspondent 
Hyeres. France 

The British team yesterday 
showed some promising form 
on the third day of the French 
Olympic Regatta here, with 
places in the top 10 of most 
classes. The best overall plac- 
ing by a British competitor 
was achieved again by Philip 
Crebbin in the Soling class. 
His fourth place keeps him 
well in contention for the 
overall title. 

In the fight and fluky airs 
Crebbin made the first marie 
; in sixth place and improved 
j this to fourth at the end of the 
next round, but could make 
little impression on tbe three 
eastern bloc leaders. Boris 
Budnikov, from the Soviet 
Union, and the two East 
German boats helmed by 
Jochen Schumann and 
Helmar Nauck. 

In the first of yesterday's 
two races for the 470 class, 
British crews at one time held 
four places in the top 10, a 
record that was spoilt with a 
capsize. The remainder fin- 
ished in sixth, seventh and 
eighth places. 

RESULTS: String (race Sk 1. B 
Budnikov (USSR); 2. 4 Schumann 
(EG): 3. H Nauck (03L Bntsth 
ptoctags 4, P CfBb&w/J Falkner/M 
Dowiand: 17. G Saitey.® Hodga/A 
Fnend: 18. G Chartes/M Wa/kw/J 
Heyes: 23. W NgndersonyA 
Sawe/M Squire. 

Flying Dutchman (face 3): I. S 
Borodino* (USSR* 2. S Haakman 
(Ned); 3. H Kofiing (Nath). British 
ptactflQs: 8. R Yeoman/N Burqui: 
10. J Tumer/P A'tam; 14. C 
Apthorp/J Pearson. 

Tornado (race 3): 1. R Cattgr (WG): 
2. H Sach (WG); 3. E Trost (WG). 
British platings: 27. C Brewer/S 
Marsh: 36. N waiuantyl WaJbank. 
470 class, women (race 2): 1. S 
Meyer (WG): Z B Hatlung (WG); 3. C 
Brand (Frj. British platings: 16. K 
Hedgecbck/R RushaH. 


By the time sportsmen pass 
their 55th birthdays it would 
be reasonable to expect some 
lessening of urgency, perhaps 
even a genuine commitment 
to the old Olympian adage 
about playing rather than 
winning. 

It may be the case in some 
games, but certainly not in 
squash, if yesterday's Hi-Tec 
British open vintage final is 
adequate illustration. 

Bob Griffin, of Gloucester, 
won 9-5, 6-9. 9-0. 6-9, 9-7 in 5 1 
minutes against Rashid Haye 
of Cheshire. Their combined 
ages totalled 1 12 years, more 
than half of them actively 
involved with chasing speed- 
ing black balls around little 
white rooms which, to be sure, 
these days seem to grow 
slightly larger with each visit. 

Yesterday they transferred 
to the all-transparent Perspex 
court at Wembley Conference 
Centre with the age group 
finals which set the scene for 
2,500 spectators awaiting the 


By Colin McQraUan 

most important finals of die 
year, between Jahangir Khan 
and Ross Norman for the 
men's title. Susan Devoy and 
Lisa Opie for tbe women's. 

Griffin is a fiiB-time profes- 
sional coach at Delabere 
Country Gub, Cheltenham. 
This was his third vintage 
final. He lost to Kevin Parker, 
of Canada, in 1984 and defeat- 
ed the legendary Hashim 
Khan last year. Haye is a 
consultant dermatologist in 
Manchester who commuted 
daily from “his hospital to 
compete aiWembley'. 

Ironically, it was Griffin 
who helped Haye transfer to 
squash from tennis a quarter 
of a century ago- “ We were 
among the first to volley the 
ball in squash." says Griffin. 
“People kepi telling us we had 
the game all wrong,’ we twin 
playing the ball for too early.” 

Now they meet regulariy in 
an ever-widening over-45 
competitive environment and 


BASKETBALL . 

Rebels losing sight of their cause 


for 2 (Bowling: Davis *-3-1-1; Tsytor 2-2- 
0-O; Wants 41-2-A-O; Dredge 4*6-1). 
Match abandoned. 


. Confusion reigned yester- 
day as to the future of the 
proposed breakaway Basket- 
ball League. While the English 
Basket Ball Association, the 
sport’s governing body, said it 
would carry on. as normal in 
preparing for. next season, 
some of the 10 rebel clubs 
have indicated ;i sudden reluc- 
tance to join the new league. 

Among those believed to be 
experiencing -dissent within 
ihe ranks are Happy Eater 
Bracknell and Hemel/Watford 
Royals. Others who play in 
council-owned sports centres 
- in particular Crystal Palace, 
whose home is the National 
Sport s Centre — are likely to 
meet with opposition from 
their local authorities if they 
go ahead with plans to com- 
pete in an unrecognized 
competition. 


By Nicholas Harling 

The participation of Sharp 
Manchester United, the 
Carisberg League champions, 
cannot be guaranteed either. 
Twice in the last two. days 
United have contacted the 
l-BBA asking fora provisional 
draft of next season's fixtures. 
According to their director, 
Nigel .Roden, the club were 
ready to join the breakaway 
league provided it was sanc- 
tioned by the EBBA. It is 
much the same story with 
Sperrings Solent Stars and 
Leicester, too. are believed to 
be reluctant rebels. 

John Deacon of Ports- 
mouth. chairman of the Bas- 
ketball League,, insisted there 
was no confusion. "There will 
be problems,'' be said, “ but 
we will iron them. out. The 
dear message from all of out 
members is to go ahead." 


Golf event 
cancelled 

The International Golf As- 
sociation (IGA) has cancelled 
this year's World Cup tourna- 
ment. scheduled for mid-No- 
vember in Orlando. Florida, 
and plans to review the way 
the it has been run before 
resuming the event riext year. 
The IGA cited a “lack of 
common interest among the 
sponsors" as the reason for the 
cancellation. 

Burch Riber. the IGA exec- 
utive director, said yesterday 
“the question is how to struc- 
ture the event so it fits into the 
golf world today. The World 
Cup has 32 years of tradition 
behind it" 

Nash captain 

Derek Nash, the Ruislip 
professional, has been ap- 
pointed non-playing captain 
of the Great Britain and 
Ireland golf side to meet the 
United Slates in the PGA 
Cup. sponsored by Bell’s, in 
Illinois from September 17 to 
19. 

Gay defended 

An Association For the De- 
fence of Terre Battue l shale or 
clay) has been formed in 
France (Rex Bellamy writes). 
Jn 20 years, the percentage of 
French shale courts has fallen 
from S3 to 25. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 


r 

r 


■ - .£'3 


Cooney back 


. si/ . I 

Radley: new contract 

Radley stays 

Give Radley, the former 
England batsman, who will be 
42 on May 13. has been given 
a new three-year contract and" 
a second benefit, in 1987. by 
Middlesex. He was consider- 
ing emigrating to New Zea- 
land. where he had been 
offered a post but will now 
stay in England. 

Two starters 

Maureen Garner, wife of 
John Garner, the former Ry- 
der Cup golfer, and Carole 
Swallow, the former British 
girls* champion, will -be mak- 
ing their professional lour 
debuts when they appear in 
the Ford women's classic at 
Woburn from April 30 to May 
3. 


Genry Cooney. 29, the for- 
mer No.l heavyweight con- 
tender, who has boxed only 
twice since losing to Larry 
Holmes nearly four years ago, 
is to make a return to the ring. 
He will begin his comeback 
against Eddie Gregg, bis fel- 
low-American. in a 10-round 
contest on May 31 in San 
Francisco. 


Reynolds post ; 

Brian Reynolds, 
Northamptonshire's coach for . 
the past 13 years, and credited 
with more than 400 appear- ‘ 
ances for the county -in a 20- 
year career, has been 
appointed tbe club's cricket, 
development officer, a new. 
post Bob Carter takes over as 
county coach. 

Ticket aid 

Manchester United and 
Manchester City, of the first 
division, arc backing' 
Altrincham's bid to draw a 
massive crowd to Wembley 
for their FA Trophy final 
against their Goto League 
rivals Runcorn on May 17. 
Both dubs have offered to sell 
tickets for the game from their 
own ticket offices and are 
advertising the final on post- 
ers around Old Traffont and 
Maine Road. 




Britain go 
two up 
in singles 


The sharp end: Thorne (right) under pressure from Hendry, aged 17, at tbe world snooker championships. Report, page 38. 

CRICKET “ SQUASH RACKETS : ^7“' 

No match A vintage display as Griffin 
for the shrugs off the hecklers 

WCfltuGF By Colin McQmOan . 

FENNER'S: Cambridge Cni- gy the time sportsmen pass most important finals of tire frequently combine force s m 
versity drew with Leicester - th^r 55^ birthdays it would year, between Jahangir Khan an all -conquering Eognsfrvrn- 
shire! be reasonable to expect some and Ross Norman for the tage team. Haye has been 

Leicestershire's seam lessening of urgency, perhaps men's title. Susan Devoy and Cheshire open dtaropmn in 
bowlers took three wickets even a genuine commitment Lisa Opie for tbe women's. his lime. Griffin, as a working 
cheaply yesterday during the to the old Olympian adage Griffin is a fiiB-time profts- professional, was precluded 
85 minutes of play possible in about playing rather than s j ona l coach at Delabere From “most coippeutions until- 
the morning before hail, heavy winning. Country Gub, Cheltenham, the game went open in 4Vau- 

rain and, finally, a thunder- ft may be the case in some jhis was his third vintage - “I was a starter. hy any 
storm, brought an abandon- games, but certainly not in R na j He lost to Kevin Parker, competitive standards, he 
mem (Richard Streeton squash, if yesterday's Hi-Tec 0 f Canada, in 1 984 and defeat- admits, although aDmowet^- 
writes). Lea. Bail and Price all British open vintage final is ed the legendary Hashim ing he lacks ncrthingjn deler-. 
fell to close catches. adequate illustration. Khan last year. Haye is a mutation. The Wembley 

Fell played some firm Bob Griffin, of Gloucester, consultant dermatologist in crowd cast Gnffin as. vll “in 
drives, but survived a chance won 9-5, 6-9. 9-0. 6-9, 9-7 jn 5 1 Manchester who commuted when he crushed 67-year^jld 
to the wicketkeeper ofi minutes against Rashid Haye from “bis hospital to Hashim last year. Agaiqst 

Potter’s left arm spin just 0 f Cheshire. Their combined compete ai'Wembley. Haye. a renowned drop snot 

before the end. As with Ox- ages totalled 112 years, more , . „ _ ._ expert, he was more than 

ford, Cambridge have seven than half of them actively Ironically, it was Gnmn happy, to assume the same 
Blues available this year, but involved with chasing speed- who helped Have transfer to mantle. ... . .. ; 
finals will cause them to miss i n o black balls around little squash from tennis a quarter Hissing and- booing from, a 
several matches. white rooms which, to be sure, of a century ago. “We were large- Manchester contingent 

LBCESTEHSHiR&RrsUnnngs 2S4torS ikpu rf av c seem to etow among the first to volley the ,- fl the crowd foiled to deter 
SSSKSoireS Sngs slightly larger with each toil ball in squash,” says Griffin. . btm from the task of winning. 
t j Head c Butcher b Agnm* . i Yesterday they transferred “People kept telling us we had results: vintage .anat r 

n^Z^T rbBenpu, " n -32 to the all-transparent Perspex the game all wrong, we were 

O J FW not out *" || r if p rm nlflviflp thp hnll for too csiriv* 9r0i 57* RINn VWOTW foJJlfc 

PACBaicgmbBOTjarnm- I court at Wembley Conference Paying me ratirarrooeany. K (Austin MlTstin (Pak). 6- 

nw&^^rt OflFr0te8 7 Centre with the age group Now they meet regulariy m 9 ^ 9*2. women** 

zrrrrrr 1 finals which set the scene for an ever-widening over-45 . wte«i»’SBi|BDryiw«(GB)»A 
Tots) "m 2.500 spectators awaiting the competitive environment and Manley (GB* 3-3, 9-4. 9-6. - 

SRGonrOT.tAO 0 iwn.CCEttBon.JE - ■ - - - - — 1 — — n - ■■ - - ■ “ ? ' ‘ * ' . * " 

Dawosan and A M G Scott dti noc UaL RAQirPTBALL 

FALL OF WICKETS; 1-6. 2-C. S39. 4-4 9. PrtJlU- l 

Rebels losing sight of their cause 

<NlirrPV In By Nicholas Harling 

UUJX . Confusion reigned yester- The participation of Sharp With the EBBA : refusing to 

Surrey County Cricket Gub day as to the future of the Manchester United, the sanction the new. league, the 
have secured a £60.000 spon- proposed breakaway Basket- Carisberg League champions, breakaway group stand to be 
sorship deal from 10 compa- ball League. While the English cannot be guaranteed either, excluded from the- European 
nies for the new season. Basket Ball Association, the Twice in the last two. days dub competitions because 
Among their main backers are sport's governing body, said it United have contacted the they would not be affiliated to 
Poundstretcher, the British would carry on as norma! in IBBA asking fora provisional FIBA (the International Fed- 
Airways travel subsidiary, preparing for next season, draft of next season's fixtures, cralion of Basketball). Brian 
who are in their second year, some of the 10 rebel clubs According to their director, Naysmith, acting commis- 
and Nescafe. have indicated a sudden reluc- Nigel .Roden, the club were sioner for tbe new league, said 

Fmerv’s chance 131,06 tQ j°^ n ^ new league, ready to join the breakaway they would consider taking 

Among those believed to be league provided it was sane- legal action because this 

MwntBen.waw experiencing dissent within tioned by the EBBA. It is would “constitute a restraint 

former Hampsture player, ts ihe ranks are Happy Eater much the same story with of trade." 

set to make a return to firat- Bracknell and Hemel/Watford Sperrings Solent Stare and The 10 dubs involved will 
class enckei wjto eitner war- Royals. Others who play in Leicester, too. are believed to hold another meeting m Lon- 

wicksmre or aomeraei inis council-owned sports centres be nductam rebels. don on Sunday. If the new 

season. Warwickshire base - m particular Crystal Palace. John Deacon of Ports- league does go ahead.- the 
offered terms to tne seam whose home is the National mouth, chairman of the Bas- hardest hit clubs would be 

bowter * Sports Centre - are likely to ketball League,, insisted there Derby and Calderdale - • 

No nlav vesterdav meet With Opposition from was no confusion. “There will whose hollow reward for being 
• " . . their local authorities if Ihev hi* timhlems " he said. “ hiit (W,n, (ha civ-nn^i 


lo .1970 hr Mexico, daring 
the first roafed of the World 
Cup finote. 1 bad a bet with 
CkoMm Freud. He there * 
writing for Tde Sta newspaper 
anff bad jet to ascend the 

cerebraf clkrtbs of tbemwher 
of pstffctments. Freed, j» posi- 
tive about faotialt .as show 
dop.End, asserted, that fJro- 
gmr> were,m a wqcd, asriess. I 
said f-thengh< they ^oofd 

reach the senri-finals- 
. They heat Israel drew with 

It ab (ne goals seed X say), 
tost to Sweden, and qualified 
for the quarter-finals with 
three points- They beat the 
Soviet Union by the only goal 
and duly reached foe semi* 
{foals. Where they led against 
Brazil list tost -3-L in foe, . 
tatorizs 16 years, -I bare not 
seen.Freod to collect my fiver. 

Ob tire T: brink of anotte 
finals cranpetkiea, now r as 
ttiett, Cragoay : have some 
mamSOBs players; More than 
any nation except. Brazil or 
YngosUvia,. mare so l think 
even than their neighbours 
Argra few, they produce a 
profusion of instinctive, imagi- 
native players wire sire mo- 
ment caress the ball Tike a 
mother bathing a baby and the 
next moment accelerate into 
fluid ■<*«*- They are proba- 
bly mere intelligent add, when 
necessary, ruthless defenders 
dan anyone. 

Their World Cap history 
holds as many- grudges as 


frequently combine forces in 
an aTl -conquering EngKsfr vin- 
tage team. Haye bas been: 
Cheshire open champion in 
his lime. Griffin, as a working 
professional, was precluded, 
from most competitions until 
the game went open in T 980. 

“1 was a late starter .by any 
competitive standards," he 
admits, although acknowledg- 
ing he lacks nothings deter- 
mination. The. We mb fey 
crowd cast Griffin ay villain 
when he crushed 67-year-Old 
Hashim last year. Against 
Haye. a renowned drop shot 
expert, he was more torn 
happy, to. assume foe same 
mantle. 

Hissing and- booing from a 
large- Manchester contingent 
in the crowd failed to deter 
bun from the task of winning. 
RESULTS: MenFs vMMtt .flnab R 
Griffin fGB) bt R Hayo(G§). 5-5, &-9. 
9-0. 5-9. 8^7. Mates vataan*’ final; 
K ttiscoe (Aus)i« M Yasbi (Pak). 6- 
9. 9-5. 5-9. 9-6. 9-2. Woumn’s 
. vetsfans’SntfrBDrylUrtttG^lUA 
Man toy (QBJ* 9-3. 9-4, 9-6. - 


Last act of 


With the EBBA; refusing to 
sanction foe new. league, the 
breakaway group stand to be 
excluded from the- European 
club competitions because 
they would not be affiliated to 
FIBA (the International fed- 
eration. of Basketball). Brian 
Naysmith, acting commis- 
sioner for the hew league, said 
they would consider taking 
legal action because this 
would “constitute a restraint 
of trade." 

The 10 dubs involved will 
hold another meeting m Lon- 
don on Sunday. If the new 
league does go ahead.- the 
hardest hit clubs would be 
Defoy and Calderdale - 
whose hollow reward for being 
promoted from foe second 
division would be to partici- 
pate in a first division . of 
inferior quality. - - 


By William Stephens 

. Britain lead France 2-0 in 
foe Bathurst Cup amateur 
team competition after win- 
ning both singles at Queen's 
Club yesterday . The doubles 
will be played this morning 
and foe reverse singles tomor- 
row 

Alan LoveH, tire, amateur 
champion, . defeated Denis 
Grosdanovitch, of Paris, 6-1, 
6-0, 6-4, then Julian Snow, 
who lost to ; Lovell by two 
games in last month's amateur . 
championships, beat Bertrand 
Sariangue; of Bordeaux, 6-1, 
6-5, 6-2.- Grosdanovitch 
played a robust game while 
Sariangue is a delicate player 
of elegance. Sadly, they lack 
match practice at this level. 

.Providing Britain win a 
third rubber, they wiB meet 
the wmneivof Australia and 
the United States on Friday,' 
Saturday and Sunday. An 
indication of form was provid- 
ed in the Queen’s Club cento- 
nary tournament last 
weekend, which was won by 
Lovell who defeated Kevin 
McCollum, foe US amateur 
champion. 6-5, 5-6. 6- 
4.McCoUum bad beaten Snow . 
6-3, 2-6, 6-5 earlier in tbe day. 


and Sduaffato of foe past 
Mazurkiewicz, a saperb goal- 
keeper, jnobfte defenders in 
Mojica, Mon tern and 
AsK^retz, ‘inventive midfield 
area ft Ubmss and Maneiro, 
notgrtil forwards in CntuHa 
and Esparrsgo. Before their 
semi-final fon c«aplaii»eito 
Sfr Sfouley Rons, die presi- 
dent of FIFA, about being 
made to travel ta.Gnadafojara, 
from where Brazil bad nt 
moved, threatening to with- 
draw. Sir Stanley said that 
was fine, bat weald, they, jast 
let Russia, know if they did. 
Half an hoar later, the Ure- 
guayan president wasback w 
the phone to Sir Stanley. Why 
let the Russians know? “Be- 
canse lf yoa don't go to 
Goadalajara,the Russians wffl 
be delighted to go." Hardly 
surprising that Uruguay voted 
for Hareftoge and not Robes as 
prerident four years bier. 

In Wrexham on Moad« 
■tight, a pitdu wtf 

saw that once agaia Urngtisy 
have same soperh expoaente. 
Cfo dry ground and m fflwe- 
tontiag stfoshiae, what prob- 
lems the South Ammon 
champions ate going to pose 
for Scotland, West Germany 
and Denmark, and anyone rise 
who gets in their way. At this 
stage ! would make them dear 
Javoarifes- . ...j 

Alex Ferguson, Scotland's 
manager, observed that .they 
are. so well organized 1 fo de- 
fence it would be a surprise if 


any team scores move than one 
goal against them. He add 
Franz Beckenbauer were ba- 
presserLas wefftbey migfo be. 
by the -dexterity of da SDffi* 
the Atiriico Madrid forward 
who bas foe touch and vision 
of Tostao, and of foe otber rire 
forwards, ■ AJzamendi^juid 
Francescoli. ■ • \ ' 

Tbe old ruthless streak is 
there, mind you. Theaunropri- 


ately-named BesstO, one. « 
their markers, was booked; 
and Beckenbauer » concerned 
at their evident potentiai for 
physical intunidatiou, though 
the Grnmans should hardly 
complain after ihefr own per* 
romance in the last SteLi - 

Yet, above all, Uruguay play 
with the collective assmtfM* 
of a team which expects to do 
wriL They are ift more coher- 
ent than Brazil; Omar Boons 

on. t^s evidence, pro* 
deced.a team which, perhaps 
more than at any Hwe since 
1^54, is always fookiiig fo 
attack with cxciti^ sabtlety. 
Mark Hughes, creatu% a few 
openings for Wales cany 
thinks Uruguay may tile occa- 
sionally vulnerable, hot I 
doubt ft come June. . . 

They revealed to a Welsh 
crowd a dimension of the gS*® 
which we seldom see in Brit- 
ain. -if they do not slip back 
into traditional negative idfr 
todes in Mexico, it could be on 
entortakriug World Ctq». 

. David MHIer