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4 

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No 62,441 



SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 




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9 , 

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• A mysterious Arab group has 


•I- » 

.. 


• Mrs Thatcher aanouBced Aat more 

than 300 Xibyan student engineers and 

pilots must leave Britam by May 31 a British busmessman in France 

• The 22 Libyans expelled by the # The French Govenuoeiit has stepped 

Home Secretary for “national security* up its missile defences along the 
reasons left Heathrow for Tripoli Mediterranean coast Page 5 

By Anthony Bevins, Political Correspondent 


; •< »•' 




•■•r- 

• •« • 




The Prime Minister an- 
nounced yesterday that more 
than 300 Libyan student engi- 
neers and pilots' would be 
expected toleavc Britain after 
new government directions to 
ban all practical training work 
on aircraft 

A majority of the students 
are expected io have left the 
country by the end of next- 
month and, if necessary, de- 
portation orders will be is- 
sued. Given the pattern of 
Anglo-Libyan relations, retali- 
ation can be expected from 
Tripoli 

Mrs Thatcher said in a 
written Commons reply that 
directions had been issued by 
Mr Nicholas Ridley, Secretary 
of State for Transport, to stop 
the aviation engineering train- 
ees having access to aircraft 
“except as passengers”, and 
that trainee pilots would be 
prevented from flying solo. 

“The effect of these 
measures,”* she said, “will be 
that; such trainees will be 
unable to complete - their 
courses or obtain qualifica- 
tions. In that event their ~ 
current basis of stay will no 
longer exist and they will be 
expected to leave.” 

The backdoor expulsions 
have been made necessary by 
the' limitations on the 197T 
Immigration Act powers of 
Mr Douglas Hurd, the Home 
Secretary, lo deport people 
whose presence is pot condu- 
cive jo the public good in the 
interests of .trational security. 
MrHurif iobj Ifie Commons 


United Kingdom in support of 
the Gadaffi regime.” ; 

But he said that his powers 
of deportation were fimitedby 
criteria which were “defined' 
dearly in law.” 

Mrs Thatcher raid that Mr 
Hurd - would not hesitate to 
use his powers to curtail the 
Libyans stay, or initiate depor- 
tation action in appropriate 
cases, if they fafied to leave 
voluntarily. . 

Letters, page 9 

On the latest figures avail- 
able to the Transport Depart- 
ment, there were 334 Libyan 
trainees in Britain last week: 

1 57 trainee engineers . with 
British Airways at Heathrow, 
51 with Air UK at Norwich; 
47 with Aviation -Traders at 
Stanstcad; 21 with British 


mechanics at Perth; 1 1 trainee 
mechanics and 13 trainee 
pilots with the Air Training 
School at Kidlington. near 
Oxford; and three trainee 
pilots with. Trent Air Services 
at OcanfidcL .Bedfordshire. 

If .any of the students are 
critics of the Gadaffi regime 
and would Betbreatenedby a 
forced return to Libya, their 
cases wifi be carefully exam- 
ined by Mr Hind. 

. Mr Ridley, who. faded to 
make a Commons announce- 
ment of his decision, said m ... 
on Tuesday that he .wa&«$$-.an the BBC radio 

porting ''.21' Libyan nationals Bfruja at jGscprogramme: 
because they were “ or g H» iz m £ ^It’s entirriya security deci- 

Libyan student activity in the. skhl I don't think it would be 


and its European allies would 
have had a devastating impact 
on the Libyan economy. 

“There are two reasons why 
the Prime Minister opposes 
sanctions, both equally 
shamefoL She cam not bring 
herself, any more than can 
President Reagan, to interfere 
with the right of large and 
powerful companies to make 
money. 

“Secondly, she knows that if 
she were to agree to economic 
sanctions against state-spon- 
sored t g r o ns m in Libya^the 
CaffifoTdsfikg economic sanc- 
tions against state-sponsored 
terrorism m South Africa 
would be overwhelming.” 


Monday 


- ) 


The 40s 
dynasty 



Joan Collins was 
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ana glamorous 
— and o ver 40 



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petition today - £16,000 
in the weekly compe- 
tition, double the usual 
amount because 
there was no winner last 
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regular daily prize of 
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- details, page 3. 

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• Portfolio Gold Sst, 
page 24; weekly sum- 
mary, page 20; rules 
and how to play, 36. 


On this day 

On April 26. 1920. some of the 
300 British refugees from 
Soviet Russia who had just 
landed , in Southampton de- 
scribed the dangerous and 
squalid conditions io Moscow 
and Fetrograd Page 9 


Arab group claims 
killing in Lyons 

From Diana Geddes, Pars 

A mysterious Arab group She said she immediately 
has dahned responsibility for went to the Englishman's 
the assassination yesterday of home. “His body was lying 
Mr Kenneth- Marston, aged across the doorstep. Beside 
43. the British managing di- him was his tittle gtrL I was 
renor . of the Lyons-based very surprised by her behav- 
American company Black and iour — very calm, and she said 
Decker. to me in impeccable French: fc J 

- Mr Marston was shot down want to stay here so I can tell 
on the doorstep of his home at the police that I saw someone 
E-cnlly, on the north-western running away, in black, wear- 
outskirts of Lyons. He was hit inga balaclava helmet*.” 
in the chest . with two bullets Responsibility for the assas- 
6 red from a rifle normally sination was claimed in calls 
used for wild boar hunting. He to two French agencies yester- 
died two hows later,- with his day afternoon, 
wife, Mary, and ten-year-old In the first call, a man 
daughter ai his side. speaking French with a strong 

Mrae Jacqueline Martin, Arab accept, said: “We are an 
who lived opposite the Mar- Arab group. We claim the 
stons, said ter neighbour burst attack earned out this morn- 
in to her home about 8am mg against the head of Black 
screaming “They've killed and Decker m reprisal for the 
him! They've killed him!” American . . . (inaudible 

word).” 

In the call to the second 
agency, the speaker again said 
something inaudible followed 
by the word “Arab” before 
warning; “We will destroy all 
English and American capital- 
ist interests throughout the 
world”. 

Police, however, have not 
been ruled .out the possibility 
that the killing was connected 
with recent burglaries at the 
Black and Decker Lyons head- 
quarters which led last month 
to the arrest and imprison- 
ment of a suspected leading 
figure in the city's underworld, 
Jean Sehnaebefe. 



Kenneth Marston: killed 
with two rifle ballets. 




right and I don't think the 
public sifould understand it, if 
we allowed Libyans to train on 
civilian aircraft which are 
being maintained and re- 
paired and which might be 
going into service the day after 
they finished with ' them. 
There's always a risk there.” 

As for the student pilots, he 
said: “f don’t think, again, the 
public would understand if 
Libyan pilots were flying solo 
around Britain and were able 
to go to any part of Britain 
they chose. So I fed, reluctant- 
ly. that this must be done for 
security reasons.” 

But Mr Roy HattersJey, 
Labour's deputy leader, last 
night attacked the Prime Min- 
ister and President Reagan for 
refusing to pay “the price that 
a real assault on terrorism 
requires.” 

Caled o nian at Gatwick; . and . .He lokl a by-election meet- 
foor ! with- the Aeronautical mg ai Duffidd in West Derby- 
Training Group at Luton. shire: “A trade and financial 
" There were also 27 trainee boycott by the United States 



Clenched-fist salutes for Colonel Gadaffi as expelled Libyans walk to the plane for Tripoli, 

OiZfr 1 : " V'-aJStfifeiBfctoA v ?• > ► \ , v”. Y? - ' ^ -y.if ,V; 

Libyans 
flown out 

By Richard Dowden 

The 22 Libyans ordered to 
be deported for “national 
security” reasons were pot on 
board a Libyan Arab Airlines 
aircraft at Heathrow yester- 
day bound for Tripoli 
Anrid tight bat discreet se- 
curity, a green police van with 
darkened windows escorted by 
five police vehicles drove 
straight from Paddington 
Green police station in west 
London to the aircraft waiting 
at Terminal 2. 

It is thought that about a 
quarter of the arriving passen- 
gers on the plane were western 
Journalists expelled by 
Tripoli.- 

The men were chanting as 
the van drew op. As each was 
ordered off the bos and 
d imbed in to the Boeing 727 all 
but four punched the air with 
clenched fists and shouted 
support of Gadaffi 
Airline staff gave waiting 
journalists posters and pic- 
tures of Gadaffi's adopted 
daughter, Hana, who died in 
the recent US bombing. 

There was no sign of an 
Army presence, and only a few 
police armed with sub-mar 
dine gnus. But a helicopter 
hovered nearby and there were 
many police dogs. 

Twenty-oue of the Libyans, 
who are mainly students, were 
picked up throughout Britain 
at dawn on Tuesday; the other 
the next day. The Home Office 
said they had been involved in 
revolutionary activity and that 



An armed policeman keeping close watch on the expulsions. 

their presence was not 
condnsive to the public good. 


A friend of one of the 
deported men denied that he 
was politically involved. “I do 
not know why he is being 
expelled,” be said of his 
friend, Hashhn, a business 
student at the International 
University at Watford. “He 
did nothing. It's a political art. 
We have no quarrel with 
Britain. It's the Americans.” 
• MADRID: Spain yesterday 
ordered the expulsion of 11 
Libyans, including a diplomat 
and two other members of the 
Libyan Embassy' staff in Ma- 
drid, after the recent European 
agreement to limit Libyan 


diplomatic representations 
(Harry Debeiins writes). 

The others were teachers 
and students from an Arab 
school in Madrid. 

• PARIS: France yesterday 
announced limits on the move- 
ment and numbers of Libyan 
diplomats and nationals, in 
line with the EEC package 
(AFP reports). 

The Foreign Ministry said 
that staff at the Paris embassy 
and Marseilles consulate 
would be confined to then 
immediate areas and n ambers 
cat. and that visa applications 
by Libyans would be reviewed. 

About 30 Libyans have 
diplomatic status in France. 


Oil fall pushes Britain 
to record trade deficit 

By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 
Britain's overseas trade was figure of £434 million 


in record deficit last month 
because of the fall in ibe value 
of oil exports and a strong rise 
in imports. The pound lost 
ground against most curren- 
cies yesterday but share prices 
rose. 

There was a deficit on 
visible trade of £1,1 38 million 
last month, £800 million 
worse than in February and 
bigger by £264 million than 
the previous record deficit, 
£874 million in October 1984. 

After allowing for net earn- 
ings on the invisible items of 
trade, including tourism and 
the City, the current account 
was in deficit by £538 million, 
a record. This compared with 
a surplus of £262 mfllion in 
February and a previous worst 


in 

March last year. 

The trio of unwelcome 
records was completed by a 
deficit on trade in manufac- 
tures of £786 million, more 
than double the February 
figure. 

The oil surplus slumped last 
mouth, from £685 million to 
£397 million, as oil exports 
dropped in value by £360 
miUknt. The pound gained 
slightly against a weak dollar, 
rising to S 1 .536 7 from $ i .5355 
on Thursday. But it fell 
against the mark and most 
other currencies and the ster- 
ling index was down 0.5 at 

Later in New York, the 
pound rose to Si. 5445. 

Worst deficit, page 22 


Home New 2-4 
Oversen 4-7 
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Swazi king 
greeted by 
good omen 

Mbabane (Reuter) — Teen- 
age prince Makhosetive was 
crowned King of S waz iland 
vesterday during secret en- 
thronement rites blessed by a 
bright sunrise, a good omen 
signifying a tong reign in this 
deeply superstitious country. 

Leaders from Botswana, Le- 
sotho. Mozambique. Zambia 
and. controversially. Presi- 
dent P.W. Botha of South 
Africa, flew into this tiny 
capital to attend ihe final part 
of the coronation ceremonies. 

Thousands of Swazis, many 
of ihem in traditional dress of 
brilliant red robes, lomskins 
and feathers, converged on the 
Ezulwini valley ■ where the 
coronation took place: 

King Makhosetive is' the. 
axiy-se^eoih Ion of the late 
' Sobhuza. 

lion, page II | 


Leading Tory MPs to retire 


By Sheila Gunn, Political Staff 


Two long-standing Conser- 
vative MPs, Mr Norman St 
John-Stevas and Sir Edward 
da Cans, last night announced 
that they would not stand at 
the next general election. 

Their retirement brings to 
26 the number of Conservative 
MPS who have said they will 
be standing down. Mr St 
John-Steras, MP for Chelms- 
ford for 22 years and a former 
CaVmrt member, said he had 
{band new job as chairman 
of the Fine Arts Commission 
much more demanding than 
expected, suid felt unab le to 
Horse what had become, with 
successive redistribotioos, a 

marginal scat. 

Aged 56. he has twice been a 
Minister of Arts and was also 
Leader of the House and 
Chancellor, of the Duchy of 
Lancaster, 

At the last election, Mr St 
Johs-Stetas was returned 
with a majority of just 378 


of the long-standing 
Liberal candidate for the Alli- 
ance, Mr Stuart Mole. There 
is a dear threat that the seat 
wifi fell to the Alliance at the 
next election. 

Mr St John-Stevas said in a 
letter to his constituency asso- 
ciation; “I believe Chelmsford 
now needs someone to devote 
themselves to the seat virtual- 
ly fail-time”. 

Sir Edward has represented 
Taunton for 30 years, which 
was twice the average time of 
most MPs, be told his constit- 
uents last night He has served 
as a Trade and Treasury 
minister and is a former 
chairman of the Conservative 
Party, the Tory backbench 
1922 committee, (be Conser- 
vative Treasury and Civil Ser- 
vice Select Committee and the 
Commons Public Accounts 
Committee. He has also been 
chairman of Lonhro since 
(984. 


Sir Edward, aged 61, said 
that he can taken into account 
the fact that whoever was 
elected might have another 
five years to sen e at Westmin- 
ster. Although he felt yonng 
and strong enough to carry on 
it was more than high time 
“that I gave more time to my 
own affairs and to my family, 
both of which, I am sorry to 
say, have' taken a secondary 
place daring the whole of my 
married life”. 

At the last general election, 
the voting in Chelmsford was: 
St John-Stevas (O 29,824; 
Mole (L/All) 29,446; Playford 
(Lab) 3,208; Write find) 127. 
Conservative majority: 378. *j 

The voting in Taunton was: 
do Cana (C) 28,112; Cocks 
(SDP/Ali) 15^45; Gray (Lab) 
9,498. Conservative majority: 
12,567. 

Do Cann speech, page 2 


EEC deal 
aids UK 
farmers 

From a Correspondent 
Luxembourg 

EEC agriculture ministers 
have reached a compromise 
on agricultural prices for the 
1986-87 marketing year which 
will be reasonably good for 
British fanners, without being 
a heavy drain on the resources 
of consumers. 

The package involves a 
freeze in prices paid to formers 
for most products but will 
almost certainly involve a fall 
in the price of grains sold in 
Britain. 

It also ensures that the 
EEC's milk quota will be cui 
by 3 per cent by spring 1989. 
including a 3 per cent cut in 
Britain's 15.8 million tonne 
share. 

However. European taxpay- 
ers are going to have to stump 
up about £960 million to pay 
for agricultural policy spend- 
ing which goes beyond the 
existing Community budget. 

Although the finance minis- 
ters could still veto the pack- 
age when they meet next week, 
experts believe they are un- 
likely to make more than 
token adjustments. 

But Mr Michael Jopling. the 
British Agriculture Minister, 
claimed yesterday that the 
package would have a negligi- 
ble effect on food prices in 
Britain. His experts estimated 
that butler would go up by 
about Ip to I.5p a pound, but 
there would be little change in 
the price of beef and pork, and 
poultry prices would foil. 

To the farmer, however, the 
package will mean a substan- 
tial increase in prices because 
of a devaluation of the “green 
pound", the special exchange 
rate used in calculating agri- 
cultural prices, w’hich are fixed 
in European Currency Units. 

The devaluation was a cru- 

Contimted on page 20 , col 4 


Satanist 

given 

seven 

years 

By Paul Vallely 

Derry r Mainwaring Knight 
still protesting that he was a 
Satanist was jailed for seven 
years at Maidstone Crown 
Court yesterday after being 
found guilty on all 19 counts 
of obtaining money by decep- 
tion. 

After the unanimous ver- 
dict Judge Neil Denison said 
that the evidence had been 
compelling. 

It had been a “clever, 
calculated and above all cal- 
lous fraud, tbe seriousness of 
which Ues not in the large 
sums of money involved but 
in what seems to me to be a 
cynical manipulation of the 
Christian beliefs of so many 
good people.” 

Knight aged 40, formerly of 
Nobles Cottage, 

Dormansland, near East 
Grinstead, West Sussex, was 
found suilty of obtaining a 
total of £21 6.000 on 45 sepa- 
rate occasions from a group of 
wealthy Christians in East 
Sussex. 

He had claimed he would 
use the money to buy his way 
to the top of a nationwide 
Satanist organization and then 
destroy the order from within. 
In foct he spent the money on 
exotic cars, expensive clothes 
and jewellery, and high living. 

“I am satisfied that some- 
where he'll have a lot of this 
money tucked away. I don't 
know how much and I don't 
know where it is,” the judge 
added. In the light of that, 
Knight was fined £50.000 and 
if he does not pay, will serve 
an extra two years- in prison. 

Mr Michael West, counsel 
for the defence, said before 
sentence was passed that 
Knight continued to maintain 
that he was a Satanist In 
mitigation he added that de- 
spite all the queries raised 
about Knight's story, the 
Christian donors had contin- 
ued over a seven-month peri- 
od to “thrust money upon 
him" and that no senior 
churchman had attempted to 
stop them. 

Some of the donors still 
believed Knight’s story and 
were determined to continue 
to help free him from Satan- 
ism. Mr West said. 

In his summing-up the 
judge had earlier criticized the 
Rev John Baker, leader of the 
Christian group, and Rector of 
Newtek. East Sussex. 

The 36-day trial is estimat- 
ed to have cost £1 million. 

Mr Baker’s wife. Alison, 
later visited Knight in the 
court cells with a change of 
clothing and cigarettes. 

“He was expecting to be 
found guilty from about a 
quarter of the way through the 
trial, but he is disappointed 
with the severe sentence,” she 
said 

Web of fantasy. Bishop 
speaks, page 3 


\ Simple 
funeral 
for the 
Duchess 

By Alan Hamilton 

The body of the Duchess of 
Windsor is to be Itown to 
Britain from Paris tomorrow 
in preparation for burial be- 
side her husband at Frogmore, 
in Windsor. 

The coffin, now lying at the 
Duchess's home off the Bois 
de Boulogne on the outskirts of 
Paris, will be brought by an 
RAF VC10, accompanied by 
the Lord Chamberlain, Lord 
Airlie, and a ceremonial RAF 
bearer party. 

It will be met at RAF 
Benson, Oxfordshire, by the 
Duke of Gloucester, who will 
accompany h to St George's 
Chapel, Windsor, where it will 
lie in the Albert Memorial 
Chapel, dedicated by Queen 
Victoria to the memory of her 
husband, until the funeral on 
Tuesday afternoon. 

Burial in the Royal Family's 
plot at Frogmore will be a 
strictly private affair , attended 
only by family members in- 
cluding the Queen and the 
Queen Mother. The preceding 
ftmeral service at St Gerorge's 
Chapel will be attended by a 
bearer party from the Welsh 
Guards, who will transport tbe 
Duchess's body lo its rest 
nnder tbe plane tree where her 
husband lies. 

Tbe Queen has decided that 
there will be no court mourn- 
ing, which on the death of an 
ultimate member of the family, 
normally lasts for six months 
and would have interfered with 
the wedding plans of Prince 
Andrew and Miss Sarah 
Ferguson. 

A period of family mourning 
began at noon yesterday, at the 
end of the State visit of King 
Juan Carlos and Queen So- 
phia of Spain, and will last 
until after the funeral on 
Tuesday. It means that the 
Royal Family will cancel so- 
cial engagements until then, 
except those for charity. 

The only public obeisance to 
tbe Duchess's death will be the 
flying of flags at half-mast on 
Tuesday. 

• More than 80 love letters 
written by the Duchess of 
Windsor to Edward VHI be- 
fore their marriage are to be 
published next month 
yWeidecfeld and Nicotson. 
The Duchess's lawyer and 
confidante, Maitre Suzanne 
Blum, has been quoted as 
saying the letters are “tender, 
maternal and exquisite.” 

It is believed they reveal the 
Duke to -be -a much weaker 
person than the Duchess. 

• The mystery surrounding 
the Duchess of Windsor's 
“vanished” Royal jewels deep- 
ened yesterday when Maitre 
Suzanne Blum, said: “There 
never were any.” 

A fortune in emeralds was 
said to have been part of a 
multi-million pound collection 
amassed by the Duchess, and 
had allegedly not been seen for 
about 47 years. 



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HOME NEWS 


THF. TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986. 



AL 


— $ 


Long contracts 
sought to ease 
fears on Royal 
Ordnance float 

By Jeremy Warner, Business Correspondent 


The Government has been 
warned that plans to privatize 
the Royal Ordnance muni- 
tions factories, which are due 
to be floated on the stock 
market in July, may have to be 
scrapped unless it gives guar- 
antees of long-term work. 

Ministry of Defence offi- 
cials have been given three 
weeks to come up with con- 
tracts stretching over several 
years which would enable the 
company to be sold successful- 
ly- to investors. 

' Doubts in the City over the 
viability 1 of the flotation have 
been heightened by the 
Government's decision to 
award the £130 million con- 
tract to build the first of the 
Royal Navy's new support 
vessels to a competitor of the 
newly privatized Tyneside 
shipyard. Swan Hunter. 

The decision has considera- 
bly undermined City confi- 
dence in companies that rely 
heavily on the Ministry of 
Defence for their work. 

Treasury expectations of the 
probable proceeds of the Roy- 
al Ordnance flotation have 
had to be drastically reduced 
in the past year because of the 
effects of the MoD’s new 

Scotland’s 
‘model for 
regions’ 

By Our Political Staff 

Fragmented responsibility 
in Whitehall for regional de- 
velopment policy was less 
effective in encouraging in- 
dustry than the system in 
Scotland. Mr Leon Briitan. 
former Secretary of State tor 
Trade and Industry . said in 
Strathclyde yesterday. 

“It is hardly sutprising that I 
with such a proliferation of 
bodies and government de- 
partments with different pow- 
ers and functions, many 
people in the English regions 
should look with increasing 
interest at the way in which 
such matters are handled 
north of the bonder", he told 
Strathclyde University Con- 
servative Association. 

In Scotland one depart- 
ment— the Scottish Office— 
and one public body-ihe 
Scottish Development Agen- 
cy— were able to tackle in a 
unified and comprehensive 
way development tasks exer- 
cised by a variety of bodies 
coming under at least three 
ministries. Mr Brittan said. 

The agency helped small 
businesses, encouraged rural 
development administered 
industrial estates, improved 
derelict land, supported tech- 
nical innovation, stimulated 
inward investment and pro- 
vided venture capital, he said. 


competitive tendering policy 
on the armaments factories. 

Several munitions contracts 
that would in the past have 
gone automatically to the 
Royal Ordnance factories 
have been placed overseas or 
with private British 
companies. 

N.M- Rothschild, the City 
merchant bank advising the 
Government on the flotation, 
now expects the issue to raise 
£150 million to £200 million 
against an initial target of 
about £450 million. 

Approximately SO per cent 
of Royal Ordnance sales are to 
the Ministry of Defence. The 
company believes that guaran- 
tees of a significant proportion 
of this workload being main- 
tained will be necessary 10 
attract City investors. 

However, any guarantees of 
this sort would go against the 
Government's stated aim of 
competitive fixed-price ten- 
dering for MoD contracts. 

Figures due to be released in 
the third week of May are 
expected to show that Royal 
Ordnance made pre-tax prof- 
its of about £25 million in I 
1985 against only £ 633.000 in ; 
the previous nine months. 

Security 
tight for 
meeting 

By Ronald Faux 

Tight security surrounded 
the Gleneagles Hotel In Perth- 
shire yesterday for the opening 
of the BiMerbetg Conference, 
the annual meeting of interna- 
tionally eminent politicians, 
leaders and industrialists. 

The five-star hotel was 
closed to the pnblic and sealed 
by police as the “great and the 
good", as one observer called 
the delegates, gathered to 
discuss topics of world mo- 
ment in privacy. Journalists 
w ere kept at bay at the hotel 
gales. 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher 
and the Prince of Wales are 
said to be among those meet- 
ing over the weekend, but the 
organizers kept their gnest list 
a close secret yesterday. 

Journalists were told there 
would be no facilities for them 
and no final round-up an- 
nouncement of any conclu- 
sions reached doing the 
conference. 

A police officer at the gates 
said that the bold grounds 
were a “no-go" area. AU roads 
into Gleneagles had been 
blocked 

The BOderberg meetings be- 
gan in 1952 under the aegis of 
Prince Bernhard ofThe Neth- 
erlands. The first was at the 
Bilderberg Hotel, Oostebeek. 
Since then there has been such 
a meeting every year. 


Labour ‘has become 
the listening party’ 


By George Hill 



The Labour Party does not 
pul dogma or ideology first. 
Mr Jeffrey Rooker. spokes- 
man on housing, said yester- 
day . 

Continuing the party 
leadership's campaign to reas- 
sure voters that Labour has 
moved away from extremist 
policies, he claimed that the 
party had no need to be “coy“ 
about its record towards 
home-owners as well as 
tenants. 

“The Labour Party has 
become the listening party", 
he said, plundering one of the 
Big Four banks' publicity. 

“Listening to people so that 
we can take a fresh look at old 
problems. It is an attitude 


which has been sadly absent in 
recent years". Mr Rooker said 
in Dudley. West Midlands. 

A Labour government had 
been the first to introduce 
grants and loans to help first- 
time buyers, including those 
buying (heir own council 
homes, he emphasized. 

Labour had also been the 
first to make improvement 
grants available for owner- 
occupiers. and had enabled 
more homes to be started in its 
worst year than the Tories bad 
in their best year. 

He promised that leasehold 
reform would be extended to 
flat dwellers by a future La- 
bour government 


Labour to aid carers 


By Our Political Staff 


A future Labour Govern- 
ment would give financial and 
social help to carers. Mr 
Michael Meacher. Labour 
health and social services 
spokesman, said last night . 

He promised an extension 
to the invalid care allowance 
for married and cohabiting 
women who cared for relatives 
at home and the appointment 


of a carers' liaison officer. 

He said: “We do not accept 
the Government's feeble ex- 
cuse that it cannot afford £85 
million to pay 96.000 women 
invalid care allowance, partic- 
ularly when that same Gov- 
ernment is prepared to pay 
private nursing homes £250 
per week to look after an 
elderly person". 


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Double 

jeopardy 

policy 

changes 

By Stephen Johnson 

Parliamentary staff 

Crime suspects who have 
been officially told they will 
not be prosecuted may no 
longer be immune from court 
action if new evidence comes 
to light, MPs were told 
yesterday. 

Sir Patrick Mayhew, the 
Solicitor General, told the 
Commons that in exceptional 
circumstances the policy of 
double jeopardy will be over- 
ridden where a review of the 
case showed that a prosecu- 
tion appeared to be in the 
public interest 

The part reversal of policy 
was announced during a short 
debate on the case of Mr John 
Williams, of Luton. Bedford- 
shire, whose death from a drug 
overdose led to the first 
successful private prosecution 
for manslaughter this century. 

Mr Graham Bright, Conser- 
vative MP for Luton South, 
reminded Sir Patrick of the 
Director of Public 
Prosecutions’ repeated refus- 
als to bring a case against Gary 
Austin, aged 24, the man 
responsible for leading Mr 
Williams to have the final 
injection, because of lack of 
firm evidence. 

Sir Patrick said Austin had 
twice been told he would not 
be prosecuted. However, sig- 
nificant advances were made 
in the study of Palfium, the 
drug which caused the Mr 
Williams' death, and his 
mother had launched a cam- 
paign to gather the proof she 
needed fora successful private 
prosecution. 

Sir Patrick conceded that 
even after a prima facie case 
had been established against 
Austin, the DPP thought that 
the double jeopardy policy 
should be observed— and so 
stuck to the decision not to 
prosecute. 

“In very tare cases, a deci- 
sion has been expressed to 
have been taken only ‘on the 
present state of the evidence’," 
he said. But although the DPP 
bad agreed to revise the 
practice, such action would be 
taken only in exceptional 
cases. 

Sir Patrick said that the 
claim by Mrs Williams for 
costs in the magistrates' court 
had been or would be paid. 

However, the . Attorney 
General had agreed to repre- 
sent her ex officio in her High 
Court action to get her son’s 
death certificate amended. 



. Ynrk with a nhOtonrapn Oi rvuruyn muBnie iu tin: *uiu« n vwngut un m 

Sotheby's. London, yesterday. The inscription to the photographer. Bill Burnside, reads **To Bill, AujtluwwffltttokgB 
wttitin^ornCove Marilyn” (Photograph: Suresh Karadia). - Saleroom: P*ge4 


Prince is * 
convicted 
of dealing 
in cocaine 

A Saadi prince was convia- 
cd yesterday of cocaine dial, 
mg." Bui PrinctiMashour 
Sand Aziz, aged' 34. was 
cleared of conspiracy* to im- 
port foe drug into Britain. -J 
The Prince.-. twentyrfouF# 
son of the late Kina Sand and 
the nephew ofthe- Saudi ruter 
KingFahd .wfflbesentettccd 
on Monday Knightbridgr 
Crown Court 
Prince Washout of Cheval 
Place, Xnightsbridge. ntst 
LosdOB,admfttedto thecourt 
lliat he had. an £&Q0**reck 
drug habit and fad pleated 
guifryto possessing cocamt , 

. .At the end of % 15-week 
trial, the ju^ . unanimously 
found him guilty of possessing 
the drug wiih intent to su pply. 
Bol they found him notgnihy 
OH; two charges pfj fonspiriflg 
wiihothentoimporttbedj* 
from Amsterdam. V . * pr ‘ 


\ ♦ ’ *4 1 Mf »F.«yr( 


Students disrupt 
free speech talk 


By Tim Jones 

Jeering students were war- ]gno 
ned yesterday that unless they and “c 
conceded the right of political he was 
opponents to be beard the at least 
Government might compel addres; 
universities to allow freedom attemp 
of speech on campuses. Bradfo 

The warning was given by wich h 
Mr Fred Silvester. MP for possibi 
Manchester. Withington. as cidenu 
more than 100 left-wing stu- Mak 
denis attempted to disrupt a 0 ugh a 
meeting on free speech orga- [he fire 
nized by the Conservative Mr G 
association at Bristol Uni- won't 
versity. believe 

Facing a barrage of scream- princip 
ing. foot stamping and obscen- Mr ( 

ities, Mr Silvester told 500 econor 
other students in theaudience: tions a, 
“You are either going to said h< 
support this campaign for free heid al 
speech or deteriorate and sub- Mr ! 
mil under threat-" Bristol 

Mr Silvester has introduced demon 
a Private Member's Bill in Vest 
Parliament which he hopes disripl: 
will make universities take turned 
action against students deter- over < 
mined to wreck meetings. - given 1 
The greatest roar of chant- _ cent, v 
ing was reserved for Mr John for Tht 
Carlisle. Tory MP for - Luton.- The 
North, a favourite target be-' against 
cause of his views on South made 
Africa. weeks. 


Ignoring cries of “fascist" 
and ‘‘racist’’, Mr Carlisle said 
he was pleased that in Bristol 
at least he had been allowed to 
address a meeting. Previous 
attempts to talk to students at 
Bradford. Oxford and Nor- 
wich had failed because of the 
possibility of violent in- 
cidents. 

Making himself heard thr- 
ough a microphone in spite of 
the fire alarm being activated, 
Mr Carlisle shouted: “You 
won’t stop us because we 
believe in the fundamental 
principle of democracy." 

Mr Carlisle said he opposed 
economic or sporting sanc- 
tions against South Africa and 
said he wished to .see apart- 
heid abolished peacefully. 

Mr Michael Stem, MP for 
Bristol North, condemned the 
demonstrators 

Yesterday, the universities 
disciplinary committee con- 
tinued hearing allegations 
over disruption at lectures 
given by Professor John yin- , 
cent, who is : also-a columnist 
for The Sun newspaper. 

Tbe result of the hearing 
against T5 students will be 
made known in about two 
weeks. 


Auditors’ di 


By Colin Hughes 


Legislation to strip district 
auditors of their responsibility 
to take councillors to court for 
wilful misconduct was pro- 
posed last night by Mr John 
Banham, head of the Audit 
Commission. 

In a speech to an Associa- 
tion of Local Councils confer- 
ence at Llandudno, north 
Wales, he described the 
“distaste" which auditors felt 
for being placed in the front 
line of court cases against 
Lambeth and Liverpool coun- 
cillors for their delay in setting 
rates last year. 

“Almost unanimously, dis- 
trict auditors would welcome 
the demise of their surcharge 
and disqualification powers, 
which sit very uneasily with 
the auditor's statutory respon- 


Fowler in 
pledge 
to nurses 

By Nicholas Timmins 
Social Services 
Correspondent 

Nurses will not be made 
homeless as a result of the sale 
of nurses’ homes and other 
health service residential 
property now taking place, Mr 
Norman Fowler, Secretary of 
State for Social Services, 
pledged yesterday. 

He was attempting to head 
off mounting criticism of the 
policy from the Royal College 
of Nursing. 

It is claimed that up to 
50.000 nurses could be affect- 
ed by the sell-aft" of “surplus" 
houses, homes and flats, with 
health authorities being en- 
couraged to restrict the supply 
of homes chiefly to students. 

Mr Fowler said yesterday 
that the policy of rationalizing 
NHS accommodation, which 
could in theory raise £170 
million or more for the health 
sen'ice, “is not a policy of 
eviction.” 

He said in a written answer 
to Mr David Evennett Con- 
servative MP for Erith and 
CrayfonL "No one will be 
required to move from their 
present accommodation as 
part of this policy without 
being offered a suitable alter- 
native place to live. 

“Overall the policy will 
'provide accommodation for 
(staff who need it while at the 
, same time releasing resources 
for the development of the 
health service" 

The decision to sell off 
nurses' and other residential 
accommodation came after a 
scrutiny which estimated that 
at any one time 20 per cent of 

the property was empty. 


sibilily for value for money," 
Mr Banham. who heads the 
independent quango oversee- 
ing public audit, said. 

Councillors themselves saw 
the surcharge and disqualifica- 
tion powers as **a real obstacle 
to progress" in the auditors’ 
primary role, that of tackling 
wasteful inefficiency. 

He said local government 
was singled out for this treat- 
ment without any persuasive 
explanation, judgments were 
often subjective, and it was 
increasingly dear from the 
Liverpool and Lambeth cases 
“that one man's misconduct is 
another’s perfectly proper 
stance". 

The dilemmas were more 
acute when issues became 
political and embroiled audi- 





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■ . 9 . V. 

1 ' 


The Princess stepping out in the sanshine at the training col- 
lege in Reading yesterday (Photograph: Julian Herbert). 

Princess in black for 
nursery school visit 


The Princess of Wales was 
dressed in blade yesterday 
when she visited a nursery' 
training school in Reading. 
Berkshire, the day after the 
death of the Duchess of 
Windsor. 

Wearing a black and grey 
pinstripe coat-dress with black 
handbag and shoes and a 
black and white pearl neck- 
lace. the Princess was greeted 
in the sunshine by cheering 
children and students at ChU- 
tern Nursery Training 
College. 

Mr Gordon Palmer, rtie 


Lord Lieutenant of Berkshire, 
and Mrs Pamela Townsend, 
the college principal, were, 
presented to the Princess, who 
was given an educational walk- 
chart made by second-year 
students. It showed a light- 
house and lifeboat decorated 
with the feces of her children. 
Prince William and Prince 
Henry. 

During a tour of the toddler 
nursery, Thomas Jacobs, aged 
19 months, knocked heron the 
nose with a bunch of daffodils 
“Well, it is the thought that 
counts", the Princess said. 






A High Court judge yester- 
day Nocked an attempt by 
Conservative councillors in 
the London borough of Lam-, 
beth to use their new-found 
majority to revise council 
spending plans. 

The Tories became the ma- 
jority group last month when 
the Labour Leader, Mr Ted 
Knight, and 30 colleagues 
were disqualified from office 
for their delay in setting last 
year's rate. A council meeting 
was scheduled last night to 
push through a new, lower. 






But three and a half hours 
before the meeting was due to 
begin, Mr Justice Mann grant- 
ed three Labour supporters 
court orders preventing any 
derisions being taken on con- 
tentious financial matters. 

The ruling was greeted with 




dent notice oftbeproposals io 
be debated at- too meeting. - ' 

The judge granted Labour, 
permission to chaflenge the 
Tory plans at a frill court 
hearing. In the meantime; her 
has granted court orifets pre-_ 
venting the fixing, of a new 
rate, the adjustment of foe 
council budget, foe increase of 
council house Tests, arid aa 
addition to capital estimates 
in connection with council 
house repairs. . . _ 

It was “scartdy .arguable 
that the Tories had 


business intended tobettans- 
acted at tonight's meeting, the 
judge said. 

He rejected Tory chums 
that ai summons to attend foe 
meeting gave enough informa- 
tion about intended business: 
Labour's case was so “s trongly 
arguable” that it warranted 
m mnctions lo preserve die 


banding quantities of foedrhg 
ro frtends birt cianried he 
squandered _ most of ! his 
fjOttiOto-momh ■atenwupg. 
tin prostitutes. •; • ; .i’ V . 

;■ The Prince's former aide. 
Andrew Jamieson, of 

Gilbert Place; HoRjOtu. ;e». 
ual London, whs convicted on 
two ; charges of cocaine deal- 
ing: Apother defendant, pmo 
“Broncho" Sadler, aged 24. of 
Breiuwood Road. DumtaM* 
Bedfordshire, was convkW 
of conspircy to iraporL atvd 
supply cannabis. . ^ - Vr - 
Naztma Maharnihad, anJ 
25, was- cfeared rCdimpvn^ 
cocaine. Harvey Savoty^aged 
33, of : Ryder* Terrace,- Si 
Jofcn’sWood, north-westLon- 
dou, / was ; cleared : of two 
charges of consphacy fo nsw 


; r JiTJ T ; r»:T ;177.1 ; • ;.-9 ijiTl 


rr-an,T77j 


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ttiTiT" 




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TTii# (> HU' -!<<• 'f«i -Wi-i.Bf i 


Lambeth Tory group breached ofiSte dispute was^ unfiketylo 




' A corn order dhtpited by 
foe . Mrir^?otitto Mice re- 
qttiring<fisd«ureofCoDfiden> 
Li of -■'papers riujrnt' an 


the Local Government Act, take place before next month’s f investigation, njto 


1972. by failing to give suffi-. elections. 


fraud- or the jtuniQg of ora- 


tors in time-consuming and 
expensive litigation. Each of 
the recent cases had cost about 
£ 200 , 000 . 

Mr Banham argued for 
improving local government 
effectiveness by making coun- 
cillors and officials more acc- 
ountable to voters. 

“Paradoxically, external au- 
ditors could be much more 
effective in enhancing local 
accountability if they were not 
directly involved in legal ac- 
tion with respect to 
misconduct” he said. Howev- 
er they should continue to be 
responsible for illegalities such 
as fraud and corruption. 

Not only were auditors 
being required to “combine 
the roles of public prosecutor 
aod management counsellor”. 




role I Bu CSann 

attack 
over BL 


they were also prevented from 
keeping the public informed 
Auditors had been unable to 
issue detailed public reports 
on the Liverpool and Lam- 
beth councils, pending foe 
outcome of court cases. : 

Mr Banham said auditors 1 
had to react after losses bad 
been incurred, and were not 
free to issue reports to an 
interested parties and the 
press, “So-called jwblie.ro- 
pons can be bottled up in foe 
local bureaucratic machinery 
for weeks, if not months, thus 
blunting their impact" - 

He proposedi^islation.en- 
abling auditors to take preven- 
tive action, “rather than, as at 
present, being forced to wait 
until after foe horse has 
bolted”. 


Officer’s 
secret 
court case 

ByChugSetoa 
West Midlands police yes- 
terday denied any involve- 
ment in' arrangements fora 
court case involving a senior 
officer on drink driving 
charges to be beard 10 days 
earlier than scheduled. 

No members of the Press 
were in court when Supi Tom 
Baldwin, aged 43, who acts as 
liaison officer between the 
police force -and the Home 
Office, appeared before Bir- 
mingham magistrates - on 
April 15. ' - 

West Midlands police had 
said that he was due to appear 
before magistrates yesterday, 
but the case was heard lak 
week. 

West Midlands police said 
they could not divulge the 
outcome 

Supt Baldwin, who could 
now face disciplinary proceed-, 
ings, was banned from driving 
for 15 months and fined £150 
for fading to provide breath 
specimens for analysis. He 
had denied foe' charge, which 
arose from his arrest on the 
M6 on January X He was 
fined a total of £55- 


Sir Edward Du Cann, foe 
influential Toy. MP and 
chairman- ' of foe Lonrho 
group, one of foe companies 
bidding for Zaad-Rovmv yes- 
terday • attacked the 
Government's behaviour as 
“muddled’*' and . “very 
foolish"i \ 

Sr Edward, -.MP for Taun- 
ton and a fo rmer chair man of 
foe- Tory backbench. 1922 
Committee, said on foe BBC 
Radio Four Today .uro- 
gramme- that he . haL “no' 
sympathy with them what- 
soever" • 

The Government announ- 
ced on Thursday that plans to 
sell off Land Rover and other 
parts of the BL commercial 
vehicles operation had been 
shelved. ; 

. Mr. Paul Channon, Secre- 
tary of Stale for Trade and 
Industry; 1 ' said . in' foe Com- 
mons that the Government 
had accepted the board's rec- 
ommendation to abandon the 
sale because none of foe bids 
was acceptable -• 

Sir Edward said -yesterday 
that ministers had. shown “a 
lack of dear-mindedness" at 
the beginning of their seU-ofT 
plans and then “weakness in 
foe face bfttpposttian to foe 
sale from the BL board”- - 

He believed that, a “great 
opportunity” had 'been 
missed, saying: “ft is a shame 
not just for the company and 
foe workforce bat from the 
.point of view-of the Govern- 
ment which has made itsdf 
look very foolish.”' 1 

“I think foe Government 
has done itself immense harm 
in its relationfojp with the 
City over tiris.” - 

when the BL board meeting 
to consider foe. four rival tads 
ended on on Tuesday, it was a 
fifth option that prevailed: to 
retain Land-Rover within BL 
while preparing it -for 
privatization. ; 7 ~ ■ 

Mr Channon, speaking on 
foe -same programme as Sir 
Edward, strongly defended his 
decision, saying he did not 
believe Land-Rover had suf- 
fered “any testing damage * 1 
from the uncertainty. 


chairman of Seagrams# foe 
Grand Natkmal OTonsor* ~ 

Christopher Alfieri, 27, 
of Leicester RoaCSife, Man- 
chester. andGrahamWalte, 
aged 34, of Queens ;Driye. 
Liverpool bmh;'; jen/tSlas, 
were remanded in custody for 
a week, accused of foeftr&tffl 
an . hotel .before foe. nice te 
Aprflr - l \‘S:r • 

Action against* 
Equity^: 

A High Court juiige wai be 
asked neat ^Wednesday.' » 
order the actors* union Eqttitr 
to lift its ban -on . meaBmos 
appearing iti South Africa; . 

Marius Gorill a former " 
vice-president or Equi^v ia 
brining an action seekmg. a 
dedaratioh that foe" union 
exceeded its. powers. wbea ft - 
imposed the ran after A baDot 
of members. Mr, Goring 
swag on. behalf 
members opposed to foe han- 

Plea for hou^ 4 


morial Fund 'has* rdected ah 
application fca- funds to save 
Monktdn House which has 
been ' described as tareand 

total wodcofarf’: . ,V. ■ ' 
The house m West rDeau, 
Wert Sussex^ was designed by 
Lutyens in;.. 1902,.. ■w,> ll 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 


HOME NEWS 





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and an MP’s wife 




conman 
persuaded vicar to 

net him over £200,000 


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. Whether Derry MaUrwaring 
Knight was a Satanist or. a 
conman, or both, never 
’s eeme d the question at. the 
centre of the trial which ended 
yesterday at Maidstone Crown 
Court. 

The real puzzle was always 
' the seeming nonchalance with 
which a group of aristocrats 
‘and wealthy country folk were 
prepared to hand over money 
' totalling more than £200,000. 

' The first suggestion was that 
'some Masonic intrigue was 
involved. The notion was 
prompted by an unprecedent- 
ed statement by the judge 

■ before the trial, began, in 
which he warned potential 
jurors that anyone connected 
with Freemasonry would be 
excused service as the case 
might prove embarrassing for 

■ ihem.. 

This proved to be a red 
feerrih^. Masonry had links to 
a particular group of which it 
~ fed been claimed Knight was 
a member but, faced with the 
- possibility of expert testimony 
'bn the cult, he chose not to 
' -.repeat the daim.m court. 

' - But the true answer proved 
; no less intriguing. 

: An atmosphere of 
religions fervour 

The decisions to donate 
- / such large amounts were taken 
by the principal donors in an 
; "atmosphere .of religious fer- 
vour in which they felt foem- 
selves to be in receipt of direct 
; messages from God in die 
form of pictures, signs, voices, 
providential coincidences and 
a divine warning to distrust 
the senior investigating police- 
^ man as “a man with five 
* ■feces". . ■■■ 

’ - ' Into this crucible was 
' ’ thrown die final ingredient in 

■ any other circumstance it 
' " would have been immediately 

identified as a ludicrous fanta- 
sy. But in a aide which 
already included God, the 
Devil, a brace of viscounts, an 
eart, the wife of an MP and a 
former Hgfo Sheriff of East 
: Sussex, il somehow did. not 
•; seem too landfill to be, told 

■ ihat the head of the camiter- 
churcfa they were setting out to 

-smash was Lord Whilelaw; the 
r... deputy Prune Afinister. * 
r.v.: Deny Mainwajing Knight 
f . was giving out idigrous 
lets door to door in the village 
: .ofNewidCEast Sussex, when 
C he first met the rector, the Rev 
■. John Baker. 

: • Within three months foeex- 


By Put ValkJy 

ccmvict had told die rector the 
story off his life, beginning 
with his grandmother's in- 
volvement in the black arts 
arid ending shortly after . be 
was “bom again" when God 
spoke to ban as be sat on the 
roof of Hull Prison during a 
demonstration. Knight had 
been serving a sentence for 
rape. 1 

By February 1984 Knight 
bad moved into the rectory to 
live in . the attic. By the 
following month Mr Baker 
had raised £24,925 from local 
Christians to pay off what 
Knight claimed- were debts to 
unspedfied moneyknders. . 

. In feet a good deal of the 
money was ultimately spent 
on his gtrifieod, Angela Mur- 
doch, and on entertaining girls 
such as Samantha Sprackiing, 
a dancer, and Julie Tremain ,a 
prostitute. 

Within -48 hours Knight fen 
into a trance in which be 
informed the rector that be 
had been dedicated to Lucifer 
at the age of eight and that he 
held high office in a Satanist 
order based in Essex. 

Within six weeks, by May 
21, Mr Baker had raised a 
further £18,900, which bepaid 
in cash to Knight, who said he 
needed it to repay Satanic 
debts as a prehide to leaving 
the onkr. 

When that source showed 
signs at drying up, Knight 
made the sudden disclosure 
that he. was bound to Satanism 
certain items, of regalia 
ich he had to purchase and 
ihpn destroy, wi thin three 
months the rector had handed 
over £12,435 more. 

In September 1984, Knight 
announced that further arte- 
facts existed which enabled 
him to be controlled from afer 
through two pfarinnm dt$rg 
inserted in his forehead by a 
Satanist surgeon. 

They were invisible to X- 
rays because of their demonic 
-origin,- -he announced. By 
October 22 Mr Baker had 
given Knight another £34,750 
in used £50 notes. - 
- By November, the rector 
-.fed begun a fifth ^series of 
payments for a different set of 
.regafe which would enable . 
-Knight to take over as 
Britain's chief Satanist. 

By February 14, 1985 the 
rector had donared£98£00 in 
used £50, and £20: notes. By 
May 10 a-ftirther £25,600 had 
changed hands to repay anew 
Satanic debt 

Mr Baker had approached 
wealthy local people who were 


by < 
whic 


?! 


:Vw r *; 

, * • ■' 

: • . r : - » - 



The Rev John Bakez, left, and Dr Kemp. 


mostly sympathetic to his own 
evangelical approach to reli- 
gion. One such was Mrs Susan 
Sainsbury, . the wife of Mr 
Timothy Sainsbury, Conser- 
vative MP for Hove, and a 
millionaire member of the 
supermarirct family. She had 
beta “born again in 1975. 
Over a period she gave him 
£79,895. 

Mr Michael Warren, a fann- 
er, magistrate and former 
High Sheriff another evan- 
gelical Christian, gave 
£36,000. Lord Hampden, a 
“committed Christian" paid 
£39,250. Mr Gordon Scutt, a 
company director and officer 
of a Christian trust, gave 
£25,000. Other donors includ- 
ed Lord and Lady Brentford 
and Lord March. 

Jt was while the third 
tranche of money was being 
collected that Dr Eric Kemp, 
Bishop of Chichester, became 
concerned. He met Knight 
and asked a number of Angli- 
can specialists in the occult 
and Satanism to intervene. . 

At a meeting between the 
bishop, the rector and the 
chairman and secretary of the 
Christian Exorcism Study 
Group, reservations of the 
experts persuaded two other 
members of the aristocracy. 
Lord and Lady Ingleby, not to 
make the donation they had 
been considering. 

The Bishop of Chichester 
asked the Rt Rev Mark Green, 
the retired Bishop of Aston, to 
attend one meeting early in 
1985 and report bade. 

Special messages 
came from God 

At the next meeting the 
rector produced a detailed 
reply to the arguments of the 
exorcists. His wife, Alison, 
added a lengthy memoran- 
dum on why the operation 
should continue. It was fall of 
circular arguments and 
strange references to pictures 
and special messages from 
God. 

Bisht^J Green rent the docu- 
ments to Dr Kemp, Bishop of 
Chichester, who contacted the 
the police, -• 

On March 13, Knight was 
arrested and questioned for 
two days about foe payments. 
Soon after he was released on 
bifil be gpt the rector to 
persuade another donor. Lord 
Hampden, to buy a £37,000 
Rolls Royce for Knight's use 
to maintain his status in 
Satanist circles. 

On May 23, shortly before a 
further £200,000 was to be 
handed over for foe purchase 
of a Satantic throne, Knight 
was arrested, charged with 
theft and remanded in custo- 
dy. 

When court officials came 
to lisl foe initial bearing before 
the local magistrates they 
found that they had to send to 
London fora stipendiary. The 
chairman of the East Sussex 
Magistrates' Association was 
Mr Michael Warren, the for- 
mer High. Sheriff who bad 
himself donated £36,000. 




Aircraft 
crashed 
-into crowd 

A inicrolight aircraft 
-crashed info a crowd of 500 
.;■* during a family fun day, 
killing the mother' of two 
r- .children, an inquest m Salis- 
bury was told yesterday. 

; Mrs Mary Kelly, aged 30, of 
*- Whitsbury Road, Fordi ng- 
; .bridge was at Fofdmgbndge 
junior and infants school fete 
.m foe New Forest last 
'■'..September. . 

Mr John Elgar, the Wflt- 
: shire coroner, was told by Mr 
-..John Knight, as aircraft sur- 
veyor and engineer with foe 
v ** TCivfl Aviation Authority, that 
■* the Gemini Striker mfcrolight 

was not permitted to fly above 
crowds. . . . 

- The inqnatf. heard that 5te» 

- phen Wart>mion-Pitt.a®ed 33, 
' - the pflot and an engi«*»«w» 

: ■ company owner, of 
‘ Town Road, Rmgwood, lost 
height after taking off from an 
-• 'adjoining field and mowed! 
into the crowd while taking: 
part in a fly-past display. 

- Eight other people, indud- 

- ing four children, were m- 
^ jured. The verdict was 
;i . accidental death. 



Six years for 
: child-killer 

.. « . George Abrokwah, aged 30. 
'“‘an accountancy student, of 
Peabody Estate, felingtan, 
north London, was jaflea for 
six years at the Central Cnmi- 
nai Court yesterday after it 
heard that in an outburst of 
temper after haring a wisdom 
iooth removed be had swung 

foe child “lite a rag doll". 

He was ‘convicted of the 
manslaughter of Christopher 
Turkson, aged 22 monfos.son 
of his giri friend. The dnld 
had a fractured. skull, two 
broken ribs and a. ritpmred 
liver. 


Scargill ‘thinks he 
is outside the law’ 


Mr Arthur Scargill, the 
miners' leader, was accused in 
the High Court yesterday of 
putting himself outride the 
law when it suited him. 

Mr Georgs Carman, QC, 
represe n ting the South York- 
shire Police, against whom Mr 
Scargill is seeking damages for 
wrongful imprisonment, told 
the court in Manchester that 
Mr Scargill had sought to give 
himself greater rights than foe 
rest of me public. Yet he was 
seeking refuge in the courts 
when he needed it. 

Mr . Scaigfll claims he was 
wrongfiilly detained outside 
his home in Worsborough 
Dale, near Barnsley, in July 
1982, while questioned about 
spreding. 

Mr Scaigfll, aged 48, was 
later cleared and is now 


Mr Carman said- it was not 
an attractive spectacle to bear 
a man confess m a witness box 
that be tad made “flagrant 
and, I would submit, emotion- 
al criticisms" of judges who 
did not have the freedom to 
answer tack; 

Mr Ca rman told the jury: 


“It is an unattractive spectacle 
to have a man admit in the 
courts of this country that the 
police have n ny - times 
served him well t foe extent 
of protecting his L , and yet 
to know that over e years— 
for his own political purposes 
maybe— be has criticized them 
in tangnage that you and I may 
feel is immoderate, emotional, 
irrational and inflammatory. 

“It is an unattractive specta- 
cle to have a man speak so 
loudly and eloquently of his 
ciril rights when, in life out- 
side, you all know without me 
telling you, be had incited 
others to deprive people of 
their civil rights on occasions 
when it suited his industrial or 
political purposes." 

Mr Carman added: “Mr 
Scaigfll does not accept we are 
all subject to the law. He puts 
himself outride the law - in 
certain categories. When he 
approaches the law and seeks 
fe consolation, we should 
approach him with caution 
because we do not know what 
purpose he seeks to serve." . 

The case continues on 
Monday. 


Beautician’s damages 


Mrs Shelia Pollen, a trainee 
beautician, who suffered a 
personality change when a 
hospital gave her foe wrong 
treatment, was awarded 
£31,040 yesterday at the High 
Coon in London. 

Mrs Pullen, aged 40, of 
Colwood Crescent, East- 
bourne, East Sussex, changed 
from an outgoing woman into 
a depressed semi-invalid. 
Deputy Judge Henry, QC, 
said, giving a reserved- judge- 
ment after a bearing at Lewes 
CrowuCourt 

Entering judgement against 


the East Sussex Area Health 
Authority, the judge said he 
accepted that Mrs Pullen .was 
a “vulnerabte" woman with a 
tendency to overreact. 

But be said that negligent 
treatment at foe Eastbourne 
District General Hospital had 
contributed to the change-.Mrs 
Pullen had suffered brain 
damage after bring treated for 
bleeding that followed - treat- 
ment for a thrombosis after a 
sterilization operation. 

The health authority had 
amditted liability on foe 
fourth day of a contested tnal. 



Derry Mabtwaring Knight, who spent money on girls. Lord Hampden 

.v-; 



Samantha Sprackiing, left, a dancer, and Jnlie Tremain * 


Lord March 


Bishop speaks on dangers 


Supporters of the demon- 
strative Charismatic Move- 
ment within the Chinch of 
En glan d have watched the 
progress of the trial with some 
anxiety. 

The key donors who pot op 
the talk of the £200,000 which 
Knight was yesterday convict- 
ed of obtaining by deception 
are in the main chari Hilaries or 
sympathizers with such an 

approach. 

The manner in which the 
money was gathered has 
raised far all sections of the 
church questions about the 
negative aspects of the char- 
ism of prophecy upon which 
the movement has based ranch 
of its data to authority. 

Now the public debate has 
began with a statement issued 
by the Bishop of Chichester, 
Dr Eric Kemp, to coincide with 
the end of the triaL 

Dr Kemp, in whose diocese 
the events took place, says 
that the Charismatic Move- 
ment has “brought new life to 
many congregations bat it has 


By Paul Vallely 

also led in places to individ- 
uals and groups' becoming 
obsessed by the th ought of evil 
and believing riiar the Lord 
speaks to than and gives 
direct injunctions how to deal 
with it" 

He adds: K This is extremely 
dangerous and needs to be 
carefully checked." 

The Charismatic Move- 
ment, which gathered momen- 
tum within the church daring 
foe late Sixties and Seventies, 
places great emphasis on what 
it describes as certain neglect- 
ed elements of the pereonal 
work of the Holy Spirit. . 

In particular these are 
speaking in tongues, faith- 
healing and the gift of 
“prophecy" by which was 
meant a direct personal com- 
munication with God of the 
land which one of foe donors, 
Mrs Susan Sainsbury, the wife 
iff Mr Timothy Sainsbury, the 
Conservative MP for Hove, is 
on record as having experi- 
enced at a Bible meeting for 
parliamentary wives at die 


House of Commons. 

That was foe approach 
which characterized the meet- 
ings that sanctioned the 45 
separate occasions on which 
Knight received money. “The 
problem is that if someone 
says, ‘The Lord has told me*, 
then it stops all argument", Dr 
Kemp said. 

* Rejecting a suggestion that 
the Church needed new guide- 
lines for occult cases, he said: 
“The guidelines exist. People 
don't always follow them." 

A new set of guidelines is 
laid ant m foe forthcoming 
report of the Christian Exor- 
cism Study Group. Making 
particular reference to “char- 
ismatic casualties", it warns 
pastots against spiritual pride 
and the enthroning of evil. 

The Knight case has raised 
doubts within foe Charismatic 
Movement itseff The Rev 
Michael Barling, a charismat- 
ic for the past 17 years and foe 
principal iff Roffey Training 
Centre said: “A case like this 
does great harm." 


£150,000 
conical 
home in 
the sun 

By Christopher Warman 

Property Correspondent 

Energy-saving homes rang- 
ing from a £30,000 studio 
bouse to a conical building 
with its ground floor under 
ground level and costing more 
than £1 50,000 will be on show 
at an exhibition at Milton 
Keynes’ energy park in Au- 
gust. The show will demon- 
strate ways in which house- 
holders may save up to a third 
of their beating costs. 

The exhibition will feature 
about 50 houses built by 32 
developers from Britain and 
overseas. The bouses are not 
just for show, as Mr John 
walker, planning director for 
foe Milton Keynes Develop- 
ment Corporation, empha- 
sized in London yesterday. 

They will be for sale and 
almost all have large conser- 
vatories, which happily com- 
bine the popularity of this 
Victorian adornment with 
their use as a trap for solar 
heat used throughout the 
property. 

Milton Keynes’ energy 
park, a £100 million project. 
will eventually have 1.000 
homes for 3,000 people, and 
provide 2.000 jobs. 

Some developers have also 
employed “active" measures 
to provide alternative energy 
through solar panels and wind 
power. 

• The Department of Ener- 
gy yesterday defended its deci- 
sion to place hoax 
advertisements in The Times 
and The Guardian on April I 
on energy efficiency. Mr Da- 
vid Hunt, Parliamentary Un- 
der-Secretary for Energy, said 
in a written reply that the 
advertisement had cost 
£18,000 and had attracted“a 
significantly higher number of 
requests" for energy efficiency 
information than was ob- 
tained in response to the 
Department's normal press 
advertisements. 





Mr David Harries, a free- 
lance systems analyst pro- 
grammer. could not resist 
playing Portfolio because he 
deals all day with numbers. 

Yesterday, his persistence 
was rewarded when be won 
£4,000 in Portfolio Gold. 

“Being in computers I take 
an interest in any numerical 
competition. And I play Port- 
folio whenever I can", Mr 
Harries, of Huntingdon, Cam- 
bridgeshire. said. 

But he revealed that, despite 
foe computer's brainpower, he 
is still a fatalist. “You either 
win or lose", foe former Brit- 
ish Army Royal Engineer said. 

Yon will need the new 
Portfolio Gold card to play foe 
game. If yon have any difficul- 
ty in obtaining one from your 
newsagent, send an sax. to: 
Portfolio Gold, 

The Times, 

PO Box 40, 

Blackburn, 

BB1 6AJ. 


Airlines 9 

monopoly 

criticized 

By Michael Baify 
Transport Editor 

Deregulation which has 
halved air feres in foe United 
Slates should be applied in full 
in Europe, an economist has 
told foe Institute of Economic 
Affairs in London. 

European airlines have used 
their monopoly to exploit 
their own advantage and oper- 
ate wasteful] y. Mr David Sav- 
er, an economic consultant 
formerly with foe Department 
of Transport, said in an ad- 
dress to the institute. 

Air feres in Europe were 
twice as high as in foe United 
States for comparable dis- 
tances and costs were lVj times 
as high even though wage 
levels were only half those in 
the US. Mr Sawer said. 


NCOs deny claims of 
racism by Pakistani 


Sergeant Major Stephen 
Tuck of the Grenadier Guards 
told an industrial tribunal in 
London yesterday that claims 
that a Pakistani derk was 
assaulted and racially abused 
by three NCOs were “abso- 
lutely inconceivable". 

Mr Danraj Iyengar, aged 58, 
of Dunington Road, Clapton, 
east London, a Ministry of 
Defence employee, has also 
alleged that he was less 
favourably treated than a 
white woman in foe same 
office and that he was unfairly 
assessed in an annual report at 
the regional headquarters at 
Wellington Barracks. London. 


Mr Iyengar said he was 
assaulted three times in No- 
vember last year by the NCOs. 
Lance Corporals Robert Hall 
and Keith Bowen and Colour 
Sergeant Anthony West. 

He claimed Colour Sgt West 
called him a “Paki" and hit 
him a “terrible blow on the 
hand”, while they packed 
Christams cards. 

. The next week, he said, 
Lance Corporal Bowen hit 
him on foe back of the head. 

The three NCOs deny that 
any assaults or radal abuse 
took place. 

The hearing at Chelsea, west 
London, continues. 


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HOME/OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 




Geoffrey Smith 


The Conservative Party 
never broke ranks over Libya. , 
Only one Conservative back- 


bencher voted against the 
Government in list week's 


debate and a mere handful 
abstained. But beneath the 
surface there was a good deal 
of unease. 

This is now subsiding. 
There has been a perceptible 
recovery of nerve which can be 
attributed to a number of 
factors. 

Most MPs are slaves to 
their correspondence. When 
one person writes a letter the 
average MP tends to think 
that it reflects a thousand 
opinions. In the first few days 
after the bombing. Conserva- 
tive MPs were made to feel 
that there were a great many 
verv critical opinions around. 

The letters and even the 
petitions poured in. But now 
these have virtually dried op 
there is a sense of relief on the 
Conservative backbenches. 

Nearly a fortnight has 
passed since the bombing and 
the most horrific predictions 
have not yet been realised. 
There has been no war in (he 
Middle East, not even a 
second raid, although Presi- 
dent Reagan continues to warn 
of the possibility. The Europe- 
ans are inching their way 
towards an effective anti-ter- 
rorist policy and there are 
reports that GadalTTs person- 
al hold on power may have 
been loosened. 

The Conservative instinct to 
close ranks has been strength- 
ened by the Gallup poll in 
Thursday's Daily Telegraph 
which showed at least a partial 
recovery in the party's for- 
tunes. Possibly. Conservative 
MPs are saying to themselves, 
the crisis wilJ not have done ns 
much electoral damage after 
all. 

The political fear that one 
still hears most frequently 
expressed in Conservative cir- 
cles is that it may have made 
far more people uneasy about 
American nuclear bases in this 
country, and that it may 
therefore be harder to pillory 
Labour for proposing to get rid 
of them. But even if that is | 
true. It would mean the reduc- 1 
tion of an asset not ^ the | 
acquisition of a new liability, j 


Political lesson 
beyond crisis 


MPs criticize 


ombudsman 


v '■ 


for delays 
over claims 






By George Hill 

Delays by the ombudsman “continuing public scandal' 

. 3 V . _ MTlC WsmtaU’ relllCtSOTCt 


LlVIdVa UJ UIW UIIIUWUUHMI \ m rn \ 

in reporting on claims of of NHS hospitals reluctant 
official malpractice have been to receive patients released 


putting the credibility of his 
office at risk, the Commons 


from special hospitals, a recur- 
ring source of complaints to 




VIJIVV " L . 

committee on the work of the the ombudsman. 


ombudsman, or Parliament Some members of; the : ajra- 
ry Commissioner for Admin- mitiee called forurgent con- 
istratiorusaidyesierday. certtd Mon » ' reduce > <WW» 

__ • . i _ in such cases, the report says. 

The average ume taken to „ We pul w witnesses 

PlMtAM AM fl MttWflluint I 1 I 9 C IllCT 5 A 4 la 




. . . .. 7: 


report on a complaint was just 
over 12 months in 1984. the 
committee said. Its inquiry 
came after a complaint from 
Mr Robin Maxwell-Hyslop, 
Conservative MP for Tiv- 
erton. over a 15-month delay 
suffered by one of his 
constituents. 

“Any considerable delay in 


that the cause of the delay is 
incompetence and laziness on 1 
the part of some local health 
authorities and NHS hospi- 
tals. and they admitted that, 
such cases existed. We suspect 
that this attitude is more i 
widespread than witnesses 
cared to admit.” 

The committee echoes the 


•• • • •' • 


x* . * 


dealing with ihese cases is 0 ft en -repeated complaint of 
unacceptable”, ihe committee ^ an jfr u dsman that restric- 




Hr 


uuaccrputuisr . uic oroouasman mat restne- 

says in its annual report on the lions on h j s jurisdiction corn- 
work of the ombudsman. Mr j t0 turn away four out 
Anthony Banowdougn, QC. 0 f five of the complaints made 
But it noted that changes had -*jh e committee finds 




But it noted that changes had JQ j,j m « jjj e committee finds ! 
been made in recruitment very frustrating that so 

onn that - - . __ -T 1. 


uct.ii maw . — n very uusuaunB 

practices in his office, and that m any cases (some of which 
he hoped io reduce average raay j nvo | V e apparent iojus- 
wailing times to 10 months or should be incapable of 


«a lung iu.iw .v . ~ — - - ucej 5 I 1 UUIU UK U 1 M|MUK. UI 

less once the present backlog ,^^,55 ^ the report says, 
had been worked through. Second Report pom the Select 


UdU uvvil "Vinvu CTi.w-jv- i Jtxonu Jfuwrg tnc octcu 

The committee blames “in- Committee on the Pariiamem- 
competence and laziness” in ary Commissioner for Admin- 



the National Health Service istration. session 198S-6 
for what it describes as the (Stationery Office; £8.10) 


SteofftothSeSwhoofer?Se Tiller Girls, the 

celebrate their 100th anniversary in Brighton Tt^The mtite W2^Ahove 

left: Mr John Tiller, the founder. Right: Kann O’Bnen, from die current group. 


Gas blast 


Saleroom 


brother 


cleared 


£132,000 for royal table 

By Geraldine Norman. Sale Boom Correspondent 


No Calvi 


link 9 to 


Irish cash 


A jury yesterday cleared a 
man of blame for a gas 
explosion that wrecked a row 
of terrace houses. 


William Doyle removed a I 
gas cooker from his sister's, 
home as a favour last AugusL 
He used a hacksaw to discon- 1 
nect the cooker and did not 
seal the gas pipe afterwards. 

But he told Liverpool 
Crown Court that he switched 
off the gas supply and twice 
warned his sister not to turn it. 
back on. 

However, days later she 
returned home from hospital 
and turned on the gas central 
heating. There was an explo- 
sion and four houses in 
Grinshill Street, Toxteth, were 
demolished, causing £74,000 
of damage. 

Mr Doyle, aged 29, unem- 
ployed, of Thames Street, 
Toxteth was found not guilty 
of damaging property and 
recklessly endangering life. 


A Carlton House writing 
table made for Carlton House 
circa 1785 was sold at 
Sotheby’s yesterday for 
£132.000 (unpublished esti- 
mate £60.00G-£80,000) to 
Malletls, the Bond Street 
dealers. 

The Prince Regent favoured 
a new style of writing table 
with a curved bank of drawers 
surrounding a leather-lined 
writing surface when he was 
furnishing Carlton House and 
that is how that is how that 
style of piece got its name. 
This example is in satinwood 
with amaranth, tulipwood and 
boxwood embellishments and 
silver handles. 

Most of the best pieces in 
the sale of fine English furni- 
ture were well competed for 
1 despite a lack of American 


exception was a fragile set of 
12 Chinese bamboo armchairs 
left unsold at £13.600 (esti- 
mate £30.0000-£50.000). The 
new fashion for regency con- 
vex mirrors was resoundingly 
confirmed by an example 
framed with a seahorse and 
dolphins at play which made 
£6.380 (estimate £1,500- 
£ 2 , 000 ). 


The photograph sale proved 
popular, with a lot of museum 
buying and commission bids, 
making a total of £163,295, 
with 10 per cent left unsold. 


Two photographs of Mari- 
lyn Monroe taken by the 
Scottish photographer. Bill 
Burnside, who was her lover 
in the late 1940s before she 
achieved fame, persuaded 
three bidders to telephone 
Sotheby’s from America. 


Christie’s photographic sale 
on Thursday contained an 
early photographic record of 
the Bagetelle chateau in the 
Bois de Boulogne, where the 
Duchess of Windsor, its latest 
occupant, died on Thursday, 
at £14,000 (estimate £15,000), 
selling to an unidentified 
buyer. 


bidders, frightened off travel- 
ling by the Libyan crisis. The 


An image of her tossing her 
hair back against a fur rug, 
however, was secured by an 
elderly American In the room 
at £17.600 (estimate £3,000- 
£5,000). 


The top price was £30,000 
(estimate £30.000^50,000) for 
the first important French 
book illustrated with photo- 
graphs, Maxime du Camp's 
Egypte, Nubie, Palestine et 
Svrie, dessins, published in 
1852. The sale totalled 
£142,118, with 9 per cent 
unsold. 


Science report 



With the passage of time 
there has also come a greater 
appreciation of the 
Government's position among 
Conservative MPs. They 
know that it is Mrs Thatcher's 
decision, not President 
Reagan's, that they have to 
justify to the British elector- 
ate. I suspect that this has 
paradoxically been made easi- 
er by the repeated expressions 
of ministerial uncertainty. 

One does not expect to hear 
Mrs Thatcher explaining the 
anguish she went through 
before making a decision, or 
the Secretary of State for 
Defence acknowledging the 
doubts felt by him and all bis 
colleagues as they faced the 
choice. That is the sort of talk 
that as a general rale dimin- 
ishes public confidence. 

The air of absolute certainty 
that Mrs Thatcher usually 
manages to convey has been 
one of her greatest assets. 
“She knows her mind”, people 
tend to say, even if they 
disagree with what comes out 
of it. 

But the anxiety that most 
people in Britain had about the 
Libyan bombing was that the 
Prime Minister might have 
been so sure of her own mind 
that she did not think twice. 
Most British people believe 
that President Reagan shot 
from the hip and that she 
failed to restrain him. So every 
piece of evidence that minis- 
ters pondered and even hesi- 
tated is for once positively 
reassuring. 

There may be a political 
lesson for the Government 1 
here that goes beyond the, 
Libyan crisis. Nothing would 
be gained by giving the im- 
pression that Mrs Thatcher's 
personality had been trans- 
formed. that the Iron Lady had 
become a dithering maiden. 
But h is not her determination 
that the British public doubts, 
so there is no need for her to 
keep emphasising it ad every 
opportunity. 

She needs to be just as 
decisive as she has been and to 
develop an even clearer fine of 
Strategy. But in doing so she 
does need to convince the 
country that she has taken 
other views into consideration. 

It is because sbe and her 
colleagues have done so over 
Libya that they have managed 
to convey a much more credi- 
ble impression of bow they 
came to their derision. This is 
not the only reason why 
Conservative MPs are happier 
than they were. Bnt it has 
made H easier for them to 
believe the explanation they 
.have to present. 


• An explosion that wrecked ! 
a maisonette in Toxteth yes- 
terday, putting a mother and 
her son in hospital, was caused 
by thieves who hacked 
through pipes and ripped out 
the gas meter, police said.. 


Breakthrough claim in acid rain research 


By Tony Samstag 


Hopkirk quits 


Miss Joyce Hopkirk has 
resigned 3S executive editor of 
the Sunday Mirror , six 
months after taking over the 
post, the newspaper an- 
nounced yesterday. Mr Peter 
Thompson, the editor, re- 
signed earlier this week. 


Miner wins 


A former Cornish tin miner. 
Mr Adrian Artber. of 
Camboume, injured by Balling 
rock six years ago, won 
£50.300 damages in the Court: 
of Appeal yesterday. The 1 
judges allowed his appeal 
against a High Court ruling 
that his employers, Geevor 
Tin Mines, where not liable. 


Scandinavian scientists 
have been convinced for souk 
years that the form of air 
pollution known as “acid rain” 
affects vulnerable habitats in 
ways that should be both 
quantifiable and reversible. 

Two years ago, the Norwe- 
gian Institute for Water Re- 
search, with Swedish and 
Canadian help, started to put 
those convictions to dm test 

Although tiie ‘’Rain” (Re- 
versing Acidification in Nor- 
way) project is to last five 
years, preliminary results 
have been described as "in- 
stantaneous and dramatic” by 
project leaders supervising the 
most ambitious attempt yet to 
manipulate several large 
catchment areas by sheltering 
them from or exposing them to 
add pollution. 

At Risdalsheia, near the 
south-east coast where acidi- 
fication is most severe, two 


roofs have been built over 
areas roaghly the same size as 
a tennis court One of the 
roofed areas is exposed only to 
dean water, the equivalent of 
normal rainwater, and the 
other to its usual quota of add 
rain “recycled” under the roof. 

At a second test site at 
Sogndal to the north, two 
unroofed catchments in an 
area not normally affected by 
acidification are being treated 
with sulphuric and nitric adds, 
so creating conditions equiva- 
lent to those in the acidified 
south-east. 

At both test sites, several 
catchments near by are moni- 
tored in their natural state as 
controls. The second roofed 
site at Risdalsheia is a further 
control, receiving its comple- 
ment of acidification under a 
roof to make sore that the roof 
itself is not affecting the 
experiment in some on- 
predicted way. 


In the roofed catchment 
exposed only to the equivalent 
of normal unacidSfied rainwa- 
ter, concentrations of nitrates 
dropped almost to zero in the 
first two weeks of the experi- 
ment. Sulphate and alnmininm 
measurements showed reduc- 
tions of 30 and 50 per cent 
respectively after three 
months, and were expected to 
decline further as residual 
concentrations were leached 
from the soft. 


As expected, results at the 
“dean” Sogndal site, where 
arid pollutants were applied to 
a pristine catchment, were just 
the opposite. After the first 
snow melt of the season, water 
quality rapidly became 
“lethal". 

British MPs and scientists 
are regular visitors to the sites. 
Sir Walter Marshall, head of 
the Central Electricity Gener- 
ating Board, is expected to- 
wards to the end of June. 


PARLIAMENT APRIL 25 1986 


Obscenity on TV and radio 


Churchill Bill fails to make progress 


COMMONS 


The anempt to bring television 
and radio broadcasting within 
the scope of the Obscene 
Publications Act 1959 was 
effectively killed in the 
Commons due to lack of time 
and because not enough MPs 
supported the Bill's sponsor, 
Mr Winston Ch or chill, in his 
attempts to curtail debate by 
using closure motions. 

The Obscene Publications 
(Protection of Children, etc) 
(Amendment) Bill, which was 
being considered in detail on 
report stage, was lost when as 
time ran ouL the second 
closure motion was defeated on 
a technicality. 

it was supported in a 
division by 79 votes to 1 1 but 
in accordance with 
Parliamentary procedure it 
Failed because fewer than J00 
MPs voted for it Earlier in the 
day the same happened by 76 
votes to 18 enabling opponents 
to continue discussion. 

The controversial measure 
will now appear again next 
Friday down the list of Bills to 
be dealt with. 


She was moving an 
amendment to the Bill to the 
effect that H should not affect 
the responsibilities of the 
Governors of the BBC or the 
duties of members of the 1BA 
under the Broadcasting Act 
1981. 


"wm 



Churchill: Broadcasters 
have (ailed 


During the report stage. Mrs 
Gwyneth Dmntoody (Crewe 
and Nantwich, Lab) 
commented that before 
changing the basis of legislation 
covering broadcasting there 
had to be certainty that not 
only was there a reason for so 
doing bur that it could be 
demonstrated the broadcasting 
authorities were not fulfilling 
their duties. 


Mr OarcbrU (Bavybulme. Q 
said he had received nearly 
1.000 letters, nine to one in 
support People would be angry 
if their wishes were fnistrated. 
Everyone but the most myopic 
viewers knew the broadcasting 
authorities had failed in their 
duty. 

It had been said that last 
year no fewer than 62 X-rated 
films were put out by the BBC 
alone. Millions of parents with 
small and teenage children 
were questioning whether the 
broadcasting authorities hod 
the right in defiance of their 
statutory obligation, to put out 
material which would be held 
to deprave and corrupt young 
people. 


A four year old girl bad been 
raped by two boys aged 11. 

I ask the House (he went on) 
where do 1 1 year olds get the 
idea of committing such a 
crime from if it be not either 
from pornographic magazines 
or from the diet of sex and 
violence they see thrust into 
their homes on their television 
screens? 

It was time the governing 
bodies took their duties more 
seriously. 

Mr David MeDor, Under 

Secretary of State, Home 
Office, said the Government 
remained neutral 

Mr Geoffrey Dickens 
(Littleborough and 

Saddleworth. O said television 
was a major contributor to 
violence and the Bill provided 
protection against the rapidly 
escalating rate Of violence and 
sadistic sexual crime 
Mr Austin Mitchell (Great 
Grimsby. Lab) said people, 
especially the young, were being 


with expertise in broadcasting 
to those versed in the law. 

The amendment was rejected 
b^ 76 votes to 23 - majority, 

Mr Churchill then said he 
would accept all the remaining 
amendments on the order 
paper but the House declined 
the offer. 


Differing 
views about 
dockyards 


HOUSE OF LORDS 


Pin-up protest 


When die proceedings began, 
Ms Clare Short (Birmingham. 1 
Ladywood. Lab), on a point of ' 
older, protested that her new 
clause and amendment to the 
Bill extending the test of 1 
obscenity 10 newpaper 
photographs, had not been 
accepted for debate. There was 
tremendous strength of feeling 
on the subject, she said, and to 
prevent debate brought the 
House into disrepute. 


Lange put out by 


for withdrawal 
from Anzus pac 


The New Zealand Labour 
Party has gjven thumbs flown 
tofte Anzus alliance with 
Australia anti the United 
Siaws in a: submission 10 the 
Defence Review Committee. 

The party says the alto* 
does not provide, effective 
security for New Zealand, and 
that the military training anti 
technology which flows from 
i ft has little relevance to tire 
country's defence needs. 

It was appropriate to devel- 
op “post-Aozus arrange- 
ments” for defence. It suggests 
that this would cometh rough 
improved oo-operation with 
Australia, but indicates a lack 
of w illin gness to become in- 
volved in any proBtoas m 
Australia's near north. 

The formal submission 
from bis party lands Mr David 
Lange, tire Prime Minister, in 
another embarrassing defence 
row, just as . the Defence 
Minister. Mr Frank O'Flynn, 
is to have talks in Canberra 
with his Australian counter- 
part, Mr Kim Beazfey. 

The Labour Government in 
New Zealand publicly ’sup- 
ports Anzus and New Zea- 
land’s continued membership. 


Money lodged in a Dublin j 
bank could not be finked to j 
millions missing after tire 1 
collapse of the Italian Banco j 
Ambrosiaso in 1982, the Pres- 
ident of tire Irish High Court j 
ruled yesterday. 

Mr Justice Liam Hamilton 
nded that Banco Arabros- 
iano's liquidators bad failed to 
prove that $40 million (about 
£27 tniUiOB) “frozen" in tire 
Ansbacber Bank in Dublin 
was finked to -tire missing 
money. But the jadge ordered 
that tiie money should remain 
“frozen? 

The Ansbacber money , is 
under the control iff Brsno 
i Tassan Din, an Italian pub- 
lisher who feces charges of 
fraud in Italy. He was a Awe 
associate of Roberto Calvi, the 
Ambrosiano chief who was 
found h*wgh*g from. Black- 
friars Bridge in rLondiasi. : 


He will be reminded that 
fish populations in remit 
years have declined severely or 
disappeared in a 334KH) sq km 
area of sonth-east Norway; 
that salmon have vanished 
from seven major fishing riv- 
ers. 

The two lest rites are sepa- 
rated by an iso line, a diuretic : 
boundary created in part hj 
the mo un tai nous geography of 
Norway that detennmes pre- 
vailing winds, rainfall pattens 
and the like. . 

The Nbrweman - scientists 
will suggest to Sir Walter that 
their preliminary Jesuits 1 
strengthen not only the cow- , 
rectum between British emis- 
sions from power stations and 
acidification south of the iso- 
fine, bat also the. Scand- 
inavians' argument that 
reducing those emissions 
would be an important step 
towards redwing or even re- 
versing tbe damage* 


exposed to a level of violence on 
television which they would not 


television which they would not 
see round about them. The Bill 
did nothing about it 

Mr Alfred Dabs, an 
Opposition spokesman, said 
the ability of the broadcasting 
authorities to take note of 
public pressure and taste was 
belter than the blunt 
instrument of the law. 

Mr Timothy Brinton 
(Gravesham. Cl said the effect 
of the Bill would be to make 
the Director of Public 
Prosecutions the editor-in-chief 
of broadcasting. Decisions 
would be passed from people 


The Speaker (Mr Bernard 

WeatherilM said the 
amendment had been put 
down as a starred amendment 
only the previous day and it 
was not his practice to select 
starred amendments for delate; 

U will be in order (he said) to 
advance her aiguments in the 
course of the amendments that 
have been selected. 


When she did so, Ms Short 
said that every day over 10 
million pictures of naked 
women, deliberately posed in 
sexually provocative ways, 
were circulated to men. women 
and children in homes and 
schools. The pictures spread a 
decadent attitude about 
sexuality. 




although Washington has^iv- . 
ca a warning that. tte Ameri- 
can defence connniunent is 
likely w he withdra wn if New 4 
Zealand passes its anti-nuclear 
legislation into law, 

. Both Washington anti Lon- 
don have urged Wellington fo 
tone tiowTt the fegtriaiion and 
particularly the clau ses baa - 
ping visits fej nuclear powered , 
or armed ships, 

Mr Lange; cfeariy_ triced by 
tiie submission, saed last night 
“ft is very much * Labour 
party document’* and de- 
clined to comment forte. 

Labour's president, ’ Ms 
Margate! Wilson, itssecrerarj, 
Mr Tooi- Timms, add aaHtfP, 
Ms .Heten^ ^CfeTk* ^ emphasized 
in presenting the ^uhmBrion 
that it was the party’s vfewP 
and tkr govenunentpdhcy. 

; BuL Ms. W&oa && ra 

answer to questions from 
committee 'Chafattats. Mr 
Frank Comer, that it would be 
very difficult in future for the 
Government to dhreige from 
policy a pproved by pazty 
conferences. \‘ 

The conferences consistent- 
ly para revolution* tugiiw tb< 
Government to withdraw 
from Anzus. - -• '• 


<m 71st anniversary g . 


From Stephen Tnyh*, Sydney 


Ob a glorious autumn day 
here yesterday, exaefly 7Z 
years after the lawfing at 
GaBipofi, Anstrafiaas renera- 
bered their war dead m the 
I annual Anzac Day display of 
emotion, comradeship sad 
| solemnity. 

| ' Dawn s enfeeft stood the 
country were attended by tens 
; of thousands of ex-servfcejnea 
and women from. MtatedH 

Stewart Nkbofl. who frfrt in 

France, to Krith BotteriH,«K 
of only six men out of more 
than ZjOOO-. to survive the 
hriamoBS Str* 1 *** 1 * death 
marches from Sing^pora to 
Borneo In the Second World 

Morning processions and 
commemoration services wore 
foflomed by pah rewrite 
where fallen comrades tee 
remembered and ritnaT se* 
sfafls of two-erp *— a fera tl 
garabfing mvotving two pen- 
nies played by - Anstrafiaas 
from Vpres fo ff* j angle s of 
Vietnam— mired* - T - 

AazacDay rinmsth e aston- 
ishingly large Mdy of Ansna- 
n«iig win temtee red and 
fought for the British Empfre. 
The toll in Aastrafina fives 
was enormous, wfth a compa- 
rable effect on- national an* 
sdtmsoess. In foe 1914-18 war 
Australians suffered the high- 
est casualty rate^ among the 
empire's forces, 68 per cent. 
New Zealand lost 58 per cent 
of their men and the British 
forces suffered a 52 per cent 
casualty rate. • 


- Even now. wb cs ihe fist of 
war dead in the hafi ertbe. 

sandiest country '.tan® ' has 
basely ceased fo speak; te tte 
' firing, the. emotiOfodfoteAy 
of ■ Anzac Day ' is fangHfe 
: Normally * toogb and pfcfofr 
marie people, many Attstat- 
fite wept openly te «ftbent 
• restraint ' during - • yesterday 


InSydney^fed 


ridfegia oporrehfcteL more 
than ex-s^ricfsaiB . 

and women of the. two wortfl 
- wars, Korea . ;«. 

■arched in a three- boar ire 
cesrioa te Hyde Park. *- 
. . Aaopeotecimaiwateitbe 0 
senke m bright saaririae te 
said by the Returned Soviets 

..tmm in bare becnihehest 

yoBug peopfe lndkated Ansar 
T^ teril coptiaofe- t^he 
tofemiriwd“teag after thejast 
dugor faaisjiassetf away". . 

MbStltevDtMald Robinson, 
the Angfic ao Are h b whop Jf - 
Sydney, swtb “Many attwpfe 

ri g rifi o anc e of Ajkhc j H* 
raystiqae in tbe AastraliaD 
consciousness. We toehaafey 
for an explanation ■;..** i' ,* 
valuation because te prfcfc 
pant was so high'*. Atthoogh 
'the empire for which Awfofe ... • 
Hans had fwght hod dfoap- 
peered, and the. lariMxf tfe " 
con sti tuti on al tieswi&Britafci 
' had been dissrired thfeyeaMt 
did netcfosmlah anobfigatioo 
to hontrar the sacrifice made. 


British aid 
for dam in 
Sri Lanka 


Doctor;^ 

back from 
the dead 


From Vtptha Yap* 
1 Colombo 


Britain. West Germany and 
Japan have' confirmed they 
will help Sri Lanka build dams 
at • Rantambe and 
Samanalawewa in a 10 bilHon 
rupees (about £2,400 million), 
project, the Ministry of Fi- 
nance announced yesterday. . 

The two projects will help to 
generate 180 megawatts of 
power, making Sri Lanka Jess 


dependent on oil imi 
The nrinistry saic 


Lord Lewis, a former First Sea 
Lord, and Chief of the Defence 
Staff during the Falkiands 
crisis, gave his support to the 
Government's . plan. . to 
introduce commercial 
management 10 the naval 
dockyards at Devonport and 
Rosyih when peers gave the 
Dockyards Services Bill a 
second reading. 

He said the Bill, which has 
already passed the Commons. 

bad a very good chance of 
breaking the long standing 
dissatisfaction with the 
performance of the dockyards 

I rather suspect (he said) the 
germ of the idea came nor from 
Mr Peter Levene (Chief of 
Defence Procurement) but 
from some naval officer with 
deep dockyards experience. 

The commercial 

management approach ' was, 
however, criticised by Lord 
Hill-Nortoa. who held the 
same posts' as Lord Lewin 
during the early 1970s. With its 
risk of weak capital investment 
and desire to maximise short- 
term gain, he did not think this j 
option would best meet the 1 
requirements of the fleet 1 

He favoured the 
Government's fall-back 1 
i position of a Companies Act 
company and hoped the new 
Secretary of State for Defence 
(Mr George Younger) would 
reconsider the position * 


The. nrmistty said Britain 
and Japan would help in the 
Samanalawewa scheme. 

Meanwhile, security sources 
said 12 Tamil separatist guer- 
rillas have beeu killed inn pre- 
dawn raid on a jungle hideout 
at Verygal near TVmcomalee. 
A large consignment of arms 
was seized. 

' The raid oCcurred yesierday 
as Parliament began debating: 
the extension of. the state of! 
emergency, which was expect- 
ed to be approved by late last 
night. 


'-Caracas (Reuter)— A~yotmg 
woman doctor. w&a-wWTa®- 
sumed (tilled in a plane crash 
in, the Venezuelan jungle five 
years ago appealed- -to the - 
Government yesterday to help 
her prove she. is aliye^ ^ • . 

•: Dr -Raiza Rulz^agOd 2$, 
asked the Attorney-General fo - 
speed up the legaL battle sh6 
began in i982 tbnulfilypap«s . 
pronteang'herdeari. .- 7. rK 
, In 1981. Dr Ruiz: a,.tui?l 
doctor, was witii .tMee rite 
people in a light alrctaft^us) ; 
it crashed in Aritezote 
troy, -600 milw south* t«V” 
Caracas: . u ! : • ■: : 

-".Ste was life only - 

survive sevendaysof walking 
Uuote the j^m^.befooDB. she ; 
was Found . Indians \ftt - 
Colombia; ' v 

■ Biil rescue teams who found . 
thejjlane had decided 
tee ao survivois, : and 
was pronounced legally tkao. , 

Hersupposedremains-wfuCh 
proved to' be amhmaf ril»:and_ 
plastic bags full of Ume^wte ; 
.buried in a funeral censhon^^ 




US consults allies olpg; 
future of Salt 2 

• From Frederick Bcmnart, Brussels ^ 


Mr Paul Nice, President Although a Nata 7spoke! 
Reagan’s special adviser .on : man said ,ihe Council .dtscu 
.arms control met the North- sions were confidentfaff, .tf 
Atlantic Council ' in Brussels Nato aUics'' answw 
yesterday toconiailt the aDics sane <rinclusion._ . ,' v . .^y. 
about American adherence to ' .They havebeen.itesu! 


the Salt 2 treaty. 

President Reagan's finai de- 
tision about. diananlling two 
Poseidon nuclear missile sub- 
marines, to ensure that the US 
stays within the Salt 2 limits, 
when the Nevada, .a new 
Trident submarine, undergoes 
sea trials on May 20, has been 
delayed for these talks. ' 


a strict AmencaftiwBeteaceto^; 
Salt Isinceitsnudear mod- 
ernizationnn^ranimeopeTved 
the posribhty ofcjcceedhngtte 
agreed .limits. ; Mr-:N(fee::iS; 
understood - to' have; pointed 
ourSoyiet anj^cototol yiofer :■ 
lions, particulary bf Salt X . 

Officials say thrn the Presi- : 
dent is .likely, to -decide, .to 


Mr Niize has been to Lon-: adhere 10 the restraints for the. 
don, Bonn and Rome. He left next six'montfts «i IcasL . 


Brussels • for Paris after 
yesterday’s Nato meeting. 
General Edward Rowny. the 
Pres deni's other adviser, is 


The problem will reappear 
at the end of the year when . \ 
AmericrnisaafflgiE B52Jjomb" . 
ers are due. to be equipped 


touring East Asia on a similar wrth air-launched cruise. 


mission at ’spresent 


missiles. 








M* 


*l*lk ^ S 


r i*rv., _ i 

Mt : rv> 

v i V 


i . 4. 

i /* V 






& 


THE 


SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 



OVERSEAS NEWS 


US demands threaten 
to disrupt Tokyo 
summit’s harmonv 


President Reagan has left 


From Bailey Morris, Washington 


-■ 1U LUC 

> Tokyo economic summit, 
armed with a set of US 
priorities which could disrupt 
the carefully planned display 
.of Western harmony sought 
by the Japanese hosts. 

The formal agenda, worked 


WIVW up W»V1 . i 

a relatively minor matter if the said. 

US rhetoric is too strong. The US Administration is 
Tensions are high in Europe aligned with Europeans in 
since recent US threats to wanting more growth and 
impose quotas on EEC food open market measures from 
exports and statements by US Japan but it is Taking a more 
officials that Europe — West cautious line. 

rWmlmi in _ .. tic -. 1 - . . 


n „i . • wuuie — muuuiu line. 

fhe 9 ermany «* particular- is not US officials, noting that a 

official orenamrN^h^t 'tJSf doing enough u> sustain world harmonious summit is ex- 
lanSv SrowU» by expanding its do- tremely important to Japan 

evlnis Sf meshc w>nomy, officials said, for domestic political reasons, 

hrarbmp SU oM^ ***5 US officials made it dear in said they wanted to avoid 

KSJ25JS Mr lhe p””" 111 ™ 1 briefings that embarrassing the Prime Min- 

Keagan s deternu nation to they •* — — * — — w. u v:__ 


intend to put 


2Snriir eS i.»fSr 2 e to 4 per cent this year, that a successful summit is 

r5u Specifically, the US wants important to the political 

* '*** Wesl Germany to follow -it futures of the Prime Minister 

Wtute House and Japan m another interest and his Cabinet members, 
or wnur scay. , .... rate <***• but toe Bundesbank including the Finance Minis- 

a* 5 ® indications has so for refused to comply, ter. Mr Noboni Takeshi ta. 
unt the summit leaders could “Given West Germany's 9 per and the Foreign Minister.Mr 
Rumote over trade matters cent unemployment rale and Shin taro Abe. All are under 
dominated by a dispute be- low inflation, it has plenty of fire for promoting a stronger 
tween the United States and room to grow,” a US official yen and advocating extensive 
toe Eur opean Community said. market opening measures to 

over the recent accession of Prior to boarding Air Force appease the US and Europe. 

Snain and Pfirtnoal InnanV Ana nn i _f n... .l. i .eei.i. 


isier. Mr Yasuhiro Nakasone. 

Japanese officials warned 
the US Administration during 
Mr Nakasone's recent visit 
that a successful summit is 



The blackened remains of the Land-Rover in which five Civil Guards died in a car-bomb explosion in i Madrid yesterday. 


M ■ _ IT — — “ . >V LAAUUUIg 1 Ulk« 1UL. OUU fcUlULS. 

Spain and Portugal. Japan's One on the first leg of his But the Japanese officials, 
huge trade surplus also looms journey, Mr Reagan told Coo- while anticipating some criti- 
kflp- gressionai leaders be wanted a cism, are anxious to be treated 

But the Treasury Secretary, strong commitment from the as full partners. 

Mr James Baker .said at a pre- allies against inter natio n al Above all, Mr Nakasone is 


summit briefing that trade terrorism, 
frictions between the US and “As w 


allies against international Above alt. Mr Nakasone is 
terrorism. . determined to avoid a repeal 

.“As we consider .further of the embarrassing 1979 To- 
action against terrorism, we kyo summit at which four of 


divide us. We are determined summit” leaving Japan out. 

French strengthen 
coastal defences 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 


Europe over agricultural ex- action against terrorism, we kyo summit at which four of 
ports pose “the biggest threat are very mindful that terror- the biggest nations decided to 
to the world's free trading ists do split the West and hold a “summit within a 
system” divide us. We are determined summit” leaving Japan out. 

Embassy French strengthen 

coastal defences 

in uaDoa From Diana Geddes, Paris 

Front Mohsin AS The French Government assault ships are in Toulon, 

Washington has stepped up defences along and a tank carrier, a troop 

A United States embassy toe Mediterranean coast in the carrier and another amphibi- 
communications officer was wakeofthe Libyan crisis. ous assault ship are in 
sbol and injured in Sanaa, the ‘ 11 has installed a veritable Marseilles. . 
capital of North Yemen, a banage of anti-aircraft Roland Extra police have been laid 
State Deportment official here mipiles and radar systems on on in both towns, and the 
said yesterday military sites along the entire American Marines are being 

The officer was driving his c °a st * e asked not torn out in groups 

car when a gunman in another toman border lo tbe Pyrenees. of more than live or six. 
car palled alongside and fired V* Ministry of Defence It is understood that Italy 
five or more shots before sa ^ toere was no reason to has taken similar precautions 
driving offi the official added, dramatize the situation. The to build up its coastal 
The American whose name defence measures had been defences. 
wasnoVS^^Sfoj^ ***■ « Wtt of the Commenting on the wave of 

in the miner oart of his bodv tensions m the Mediterranean anti-French sentiment in the 
He docSDOl appear to feta b * American US after France's refusal to 

danger and is in staWe condi- bombardmen t of Libya. support the American laid on 

tion in hospitaL- Bui it is known that the Libya, M Jean-Bemard Rai- 

It iwK Ktmnd Nomine authorities have be- mond. the French Foreign 

J a come increasingly concerned Minister, said in the Senate on 

Sbe A^tSSSToS aboutthct^SKtycfUbyan Tbutsday night that it »as 
UUS^rSike^nlibvt^ 1 reprisals against France. important “to keep a sense of 

A This comes after press re- proportion" and “to avoid 

• P 005 toal American planes making a perfectly under- 

dM in fact fly over French suuutebie divlW <he 

tSrt^nV 35 SOOt 801 territory, despite toe French text for an artificial crisis” 
injured last weex. Government's refusal to allow He went on: “To do so 

• General angry: Genera] them to do so, and further would be to play the game of 

Vernon Walters, the Anted- reports that President Mitt- those who want lodivide us." 
ran representative, criticized errand had pressed President Referring to the "extremely 
the non-aligned movement for Reagan for an aft-out attack virulent press campaign and 
what be termed its brazen against Libya, deeming the even official declarations 
alignment against the US as planned American raid a mere against us in the US", he said 
the United Nations Security “pin-prick”. that France was “not in the 

Council concluded its debate The French Government is habit of arguing with our allies- 
on the American bombings of also understood to have want- particularly when that which 
Libya (Zoriana Pysariwsky ed to give greater protection to draws us together is so 
writes! toe five American warships important". 

General Walters said the US which docked into French He dismissed the rift as a 
was deeply indignant and Mediterranean ports on Wed- “divergence over the most 
would not fraget the “totally nesday for what was described appropriate method to fight 
one-sided view” the move- as a "technical stop-over”. against one particular case of 
menl had taken. Two American amphibious terrorism”. 


The French Government 
has stepped up defences along 
the Mediterranean coast in the 
wake of the Libyan crisis. 

It has installed a veritable 
barrage of anti-aircraft Roland 
iwMMtea and radar systems on 
military sites along the entire 
length of the coast from the 
I talian border to the Pyrenees. 

The Ministry of Defence 
said there was no reason to 
d ramatize the situation. The 
defence measures had been 
taken . in toe light of the 
tensions in the Mediterranean 
provoked by the American 
bombardment of Libya. 

But k is known that the 
French authorities have be- 
come increasingly concerned 
about die possibility of Libyan 
reprisals against France. 

This comes after press re- 
ports that American planes 
did in feet fly over French 
territory, despite the French 
Government's refusal to allow 
them to do so, and further 
reports that President Mitt- 
errand had pressed President 
Reagan for an aft-out attack 
against Libya, deeming the 
planned American raid a mere 
“pin-prick”. 

The French Government is 
also understood to have want- 
ed to give greater protection to 
the five American warships 
which docked into French 
Mediterranean ports on Wed- 
nesday fir what was described 
as a "technical stop-over”. 

Two American amphibious 


assault ships are in Toulon, 
and a tank carrier, a troop 
carrier and another amphibi- 
ous assault ship are to 
Marseilles. . 

Extra police have been laid 
on in both towns, and the 
American Marines are being 
asked not to go out in groups 
of more than five or six. 

It is understood that Italy 
has taken similar precautions 
to build up its coastal 
defences. 

Commenting on the wave of 
anti-French sentiment in the 
US after France's refusal to 
suppon toe American raid on 
Libya, M Jean-Bemard Ray- 
mond, the French Foreign 
Minister, said in the Senate on 
Thursday night that ft was 
important "to keep a sense of 
proportion" and “to avoid 
making a perfectly under- 
standable divergence the pre- 
text for an artificial crisis” 

He went on: “To do so 
would be to play the game of 
those who want to divide us." 

Referring to the "extremely 
virulent press campaign and 
even official declarations 
against us in the US", he said 
that France was "not in the 
habit of arguing with our allies- 
particularly when that which 
draws us together is so 
important". 

He dismissed the rift as a 
“divergence over the most 
appropriate method to fight 
against one particular case of 
terrorism”. 


Royal tour 
of Britain 
praised in 
Spain 

From Harry Debelius 
Madrid - 

King Juan Carlos's visit to 
Britain has received the nod of 
approval in his homeland. As 
the royal four coded , there was 
a genera] mood of satisfaction 
among editorial writers, politi- 
cians and other professional 
observers here yesterday, coo- 
pled with praise for the King’s 
efforts to stimulate a solution 
of the Gibraltar issue. 

A cartoon in die liberal 
1 Madrid daily, Diorio 16, 
showed the King seated In an 
easy chair reading The Times 
and gently caressing the head 
of a huge, softly purring 
British lion. 

There was satisfaction, too, 
over the honours accorded to 
King Juan Carlos in Britain. 

lbe monarchist daily ABC 
in a leading artide on Thurs- 
day, said: "For the Gist time a 
foreign sovereign has had the 
privilege of giving a speech 
before both Houses of the 
British Parliament _ 
“Although he exercised ex- 
emplary prudence, be did not 
avoid making a reference to 
Gibraltar— 

“Even if notable precedence 
of analogous speeches by Don 
Juan Carlos did not exists, his 
words in the Parliament of 
Westminster would be enough 
to accredit the King as the 
great ambassador of the cause 
of Spain at this time.” 

A leading article the same 
day in El fits said that "there 
is psychological 

resistance,whkh is main- 
tained by part of the British 
population, to the ceding of 
sovereignty over the Rock. 

The Roman Catholic daily 
Ya said in an 
editorial: 

"Naturally ft is up to gov- 
ernments not kings, to find the 
formulas, but monarchs create 
die climate in which such 
formulas can appear. That 
may be the most important 
result of this historic trip of 
the Spanish monarch.” 

Leading artide, page 9. 


Greek Cabinet sworn European plan to build 
in with 12 changes Nato transport plane 


From Mario Modiano, Athens 


By Rodney Cowtoo, Defence Correspondent 


Twelve new Greek tninis- 
ters and undersecretaries were 
sworn in yesterday. 

Mr Andreas Papandreou, 
the Prime Minister, who had 
kept the defence ministry 
since 1981 to gel the military 
accustomed io a socialist Gov- 
ernment. now feels confident 
enough to hand it over. 

The new cabinet te: 

Prime Mmtatw. Andreas Pap- 
andreou: Deputy Premier and Du- 
fenee. Yfeimis HaratemtocpouJos 
f+k Minister to tee Presidency o* 
tee Government, Mas Tsohatz- 
opomos; Foretan A ftehs. Karojps 
Papouhas; FcweignAffvs minister 
of state (EEC), Theodores Pan- 
gales, interior, Memos Koutsoyt- 


orgas; PobSc Order, Antonis 
Drcscylannls M; National Econ- 
omy, Kostas simttjs; Health, Wel- 
fare, Insurance, Georgs Yertrtf- 
matas; Justice, Apostdos KaWa- 
manis (+t Education and Re&gion, 
Antonis Tritsis (+fc Culture, Youth 
and Sports, MeGna Mercouri; Ft- 
oaoce, Dimitris Tsovotes; Finance 
minister of state, Nilas Athanas-. 
opoutos; Northern Greece, Yiarmte 
papadopoutos; Aegean, Kosmas 
Sfynoo; Agriculture, Yianois Pott- 
ans; En v i ron ment, Public Works, 
Evanghelos Kouioumtfs; Labour. 
Evangheios Yiaonopoutas; Indus- 
try, Energy, Technology, Marius 
Natsinas i+X Commerce , George 
Katsttaras (+), Transport, Commit- 
o ic aB a na . George rapadriritriou; 
Merchant Marine, Starts Alex- 
andria. (+k change 


The European members of 
Nato are considering starting a 
multi-billion pound project to 
build a large military transport 
aircraft. 

The issue wifi be discussed 
on Monday at a meeting of 
i European defence ministers of 
! the Independent European 
Programme Group in Madrid. 
Initial assessments of the need 
for an aircraft to succeed the 
Lockheed Hercules transport 
and other aircraft have been in 
progress for some time. 

The possibility is being 
examined of buikiing an air- 
craft. for the late 1990s, capa- 


ble of being used both for 
heavy transport and in mari- 
time patrol, air-to-air 
refuelling and airborne early 
warning. 

It is estimated that the 
European Nato countries have 
about 400 aircraft which will 
need replacing. 

A joint programme would 
be seen as another step to- 
wards a collaborative Europe- 
an approach to the 
procurement of defence 
equipment which could lead 
to European defence indus- 
tries competing on equal 
terms with the Americans. 


Londoners’ leap thrills New Yorkers 


From Trevor Fishlocft, New York 



Michael McCarthy getting 5* bog from a frieiri after 
charged with reckless Mdaagenmart. 


New Yorkers were plainly 
delighted yesterday by the 

historic leap from toe umpire 
State Bonding by two young 
Londoners. 

The sky divers were haded 
u toe newspapers for doing 
what no one had done before. 
And New Yorkers, who get 
moody if they do not have at 
least one sensation a week, 
were gratefal to them. 

Michael McCarthy, aged 
25, a computer programmer, 
and Alisdair Boyd, aged 27, a 
landscape gardener, dived 
head firet from the 86th floor 
observation deck. 1.050ft up, 
having attached their para- 
chute static lines to the 

r ailings . 

A minute lata; having 
steered their rectangular aero- 
foil parachutes around obsta- 
cles, they landed In Fifth 
Avenue. 

Mr Boyd gathered up his 
chute and smartly hailed a 
taxi. Mr McCarthy's chute, 
however, snagged on a traffic 
tight and two policemen ar- 
rived to arrest him and charge 
faun with reckless endanger- 


meat and parachuting within 
die city limits. He did not seem 
to mind, and the policemen 
themselves seemed to admire 
thestnnt. 

Mr McCarthy, who para- 
chuted from toe Eiffel Tower 
two years ago, and Mr Boyd 
made practice jumps from an 
antenna tower in Florida be- 
fore flying to New York and 
buying S3 tickets to toe Em- 
pire State Building. 

They carried their para- 
chute gear under raincoats, 
strapped it on and climbed 
over the 6ft rail to the parapet 
A guard shoaled “Get off toe 
fence” — and they did. 

There were plenty of pic- 
fnres of the Londoners* leap 
becaase they bad toU a photo- 
graphic agency in advance. 
They said they did not make 
any money on toe jump. They 
did it becaase it had not been 
done before and becaase life 
can be knmdnm. 

They also said the Empire 
State Building represents 
America. Back on the ground, 
haring conquered America, 
they dined on hamburgers. 


Madrid car bomb 
kills five 
Civil Guardsmen 

From Harry Debelius, Madrid 


A car bomb exploded at 
dawn yesterday on a main 
tboroughfere here killing five 
members of the para-military 
Civil Guard and seriously 
injuring four other policemen 
and at least four civilians. 

The blast demolished a 
passing patrol car, in which 
the Civil Guardsmenwere 
travelling. 

Passing motorists took the 
injured to at least six different 
hospitals and it took rescue 
crews several hours to cut 
through the twisted wreckage 
of toe car and remove toe 
mangled bodies of three of toe 
policemen. 

The car which was loaded 
with toe explosives was so 
thoroughly demolished that 
police could not immediately 
determine what model it was. 

The explosion buried a 
wheel of the patrol car through 
toe facade of a nearby hospi- 
tal. leaving a gaping bole, h 
wrecked other cars and shat- 
tered windows throughout the 
area. 

Eyewitnesses heard, a young 
man shout “Gora Eta", mean- 
ing "long live Eta”. Angry 
passers-by grabbed him but 


the police intervened before 
toe possible lynching. He has 
not yet been identified and it 
is not dear whether he had 
anything to do with toe bomb- 
ing or whether he was merely 
an Eta sympathizer. 

Streets were blocked off 
throughout toe area until close 
to midday and sniffer dogs 
searched for possible booby 
traps while helicopters clat- 
tered overhead. 

Police checkpoints were es- 
tablished on all roads leading 
out of cite capital causing 
huge traffic delays. 

Police suspect toe attack , 
was the work of the Madrid 
branch of Eta (Basque Home- 
land and Liberty), the Basque 
terrorist organization, because 
of toe familiar pattern it took. 

They estimate toe car bomb 
contained 20 kilos of plastic 
explosive of toe kind normally 
used by Eta and was set off by 
remote control. 

Initial speculation raised 
the question of the attack 
being linked to Libya because 
of the proximity of the Italian 
Embassy. But, police discard- 
ed that line of speculation 
after further investigations. 


Croatian 

atrocities 

described 

Zagreb (Reuter) — A Yugo- 
slav woman said yesterday she 
had seen Croatian fascist sol- 
diers tear a child apart with 
their hare hands during toe 
Second World War. 

Mrs Mara Vejnovic, 63, was 
testifying at the trial of 
Andrija Artukovic for atroc- 
ities alleged lo have been 
committed when be was inte : 
nor Minister of the Nazi 
puppet state of Croatia from 
1941 to 1945. 

The wartime Croatian re- 
gime. which collaborated with 
the Nazis, is held responsible 
for murdering over 900.000 
Serbs. Jews, gypsies and left 
wingers — civilians and pris- 
oners of war. 

Mrs Vejnovic. a former 
inmate of Siara Gradiska con- 
centration camp, said she saw 
toe fascist soldiers rip a small 
child in half then order 500 
other children to be gassed. 

Artukovic told toe court: 
“I’ve listened to the witness - 
I never heard about these 
horrors." 

Artukovic. aged 86. was 
extradited from toe United 
States in February. He could 
face the death penalty if 
convicted. He has denied all 
three charges of mass murder, 
murder of an individual and 
seizure of property. 


Fans sue 
Juventus 
over cup 
tragedy 

Venice (Reuter) - Two 
Italian soccer fens injured in 
the riois which killed 39 
people at last year’s European 
Cup final are suing toe cup 
winners, Juventus. 

Signor Egidio Favaretto and 
Signor Giuseppe Carrara are 
seeking damages from toe 
match proceeds and accusing 
the top Italian dub of profil- 
ing from a tragedy. 

The two fens, who live in 
Venice, were among about 350 
people hurt when a wall 
collapsed during a stampede 


. - . COliapseu uuimg a Wiui^w 

by rioting supporters of Liver- 
poof at toe final in the Heysel 


poof at toe final in the Heysel 
Stadium, Brussels, in May Iasi 
vear. Signor Carrara broke his 
leg and several ribs while 
Signor Favaretto fractured his 
ankle. 

Gromyko goes 
back to work 

Moscow (Reuter) — Presi- 
dent Gromyko, whose health 
has been the subject of specu- 
lation. was officially reported 
to be at work yesterday, 
chairing a meeting of toe 
Presidium of the Supreme 
SovieLHe has had influenza. 

Wine over 
the limit 

Rome (Reuter) — The Ital- 
ian Health Ministry said that 
just over I per cent of wine 
samples tested up to now for 
adulteration with methyl alco- 
hol showed levels of the 
chemical above toe legal limit. 

Out of 71.051 samples ana- 
lysed. 850 contained amounts 
of methyl alcohol higher than 
permitted. 

Student shot 

Santiago (Reuter) — A stu- 
dent was shot dead in Temuco 
during lhe third consecutive 
day of violent protests against 
a visit by President Pinochet. 

Play it again 

Moscow (AFP) — Soviet 
television, which only briefly 
mentioned Iasi Sunday’s now 
world-famous Moscow recital 
by toe Soviet-bora American 
pianist Vladimir Horowitz, 
aged 81. will show a recording 
of it on May 4. 




THE SUNDAY TIMES 


MOST 


THIS WEEK: 104 PAGES, PLUS THE COLOUR MAGAZINE 




im 


Sir Alastair Burnet 

on the woman who stole a king 


GELDOF ON 6ELB0F: 

: The man who touched 
•: the world’s conscience 
■ tells his own story 

1 REAGAN'S WHITE HOUSE 

The inside story of how 
the President's own 
budget director lost 
' the money- battle with 
' Caspar Weinberger 

INSIDE MOSCOW 

Peter Walker on the 
shake-up taking place 
in Gorbachev’s Russia 

pujsmamammm 

YOU AND YOUR HOME 

« House and Home colour 
. supplement 
9 Five page special on 
mortgages 

• What your house is worth 


FIVE PAGES OF 
WEEKEND SPORT 


Sunday isn’t Sunday without the 
Sunday Times 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TTMBS SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 


t 








Save between £20 and £200 
a month by standing oidei; and at 
the end of 12 months we will send 
you a Yearly Plan Certificate. 

Hold your Certificate for a 
further 4 years and you will earn 
the maximum rate of return. 

Current rate. The current rate on offer is 8T9% p.a. tax- 
fiee over the five years. The table below shows how your 
money grows at this rate. 



TAX-FREE 


If you don’t want to accept 
the rate offered, just cancel your 



infc on. Ybu 


stop your payments alter 12 
months. We will write and tell 


Total invested in first year 
(if 12 payments made) 

12x£20 *=£240 


12x£50 =£600 
12x£200=£2400 


Certificate value when issued 
(at end of first year) 


£247 


£619 

£2478 


Certificate value after 
four yean 

£343 


£858 

£3434 


next Certificate. The plan will amply continue automatieally 

if you want to carry on. . 

Ifou can take your money out at any time, but you will 
get the best rate of return if you keep each Certificate for a full 
4 years. 

Invest Here and Now. Complete the 


FI l ftUZt) rtlvf 1 




The rate you will be offered is the rate current on the day 
we receive your application. It’s then fixed and guaranteed over 
five years, whatever happens to interest rates elsewhere. 


post to: The Savings Certificate Office, Yearly 
Durham DH99 INS. Do not send any money 
If investing for a child under 7, ask for a 
YP1 at the Post Office-Trustees: write to the Sa: 
Office for form YP2. 


t iTO a fi ngi i >] 


NATIONAL 

SAVINGS 


National Savings 





i 




I YEARLY PLAN APPLICATION 

I THE SAVINGS CERTIFICATE OFFICE; YEARLY PLAN SECTION, DURHAM DH99 1 NS. 

PH FDBN«n 

I LU Name and Address of Applicant (capital letters please) ueond 


FOR NATIONAL SAVINGS 
USE ONLY 


r/Mis/Miss 



All forenames. 
Address 


Date of Birth 

(Nu essennai, but may be usetuh 


_ _ - — _l — - 

Day | ] Month j | Vbar j j 


I wiH arange monthly payments of: 


minimum £20 
maximum £200 
m multiples of £5 


PM AT 

m 


[ 3 ] Other Payments to Yearly Plan: if payments are already being made to \fearty Plan on behalf of theabovei 
please give the Nfearly Plan numbers:- 


[ 4 ] 1 accept the terms of the Prospectus dated ID July 1985. 


Signature 

of Applicai 


-j— (Yearly Plan Standing Order Mandate 

'33 Please pay to the Bank of England for the credit of National Savings 


• NATIONAL- r— - - , 

. sawings ! LSQRTING CODE NUMB® j ACCOUNT NUMBER 


Daytime 

Telephone 

. Number 

(UseM rf there isa query) 


Please do not write m ths«a 
7hoTsfeNatJOnafSaumgsuseonir 


10 - 21-99 2 2 5 


Quoting 

Reference: 


on the , of each month until further notice in writing, the sum of ]_£ 



and debit my/our account acconSngly 


Please enter full Name and Address of Bank 


Banks may decline to accept instructions to charge standing orders to 
certain types or account other than current accounts 


Name of account 
to be debited 

Account 

Number 

Bank Branch 
Sorting Code 

i Sgnatue(s)cff 

I Account Hokter(s) 



See toptKfit hand 
comer of chegues 


PROSPECTUS iothjuiy 1985 

DESCRIPTION AND TAX RELIEF: t Nations/ Savings 'testy Plan. 
(Yearly Plan) s a swings scheme (the Scheme) offered by the Director erf 

jehalf of theTreasuyw«la1heNaoonalU»rsAc£19fi8 Under 
an agreement isrraaetomake12 nxjrthfypaymwrtslGadflig to 
the issue of a certificate The agreement also pravidesfcrtheappflcanttD be 
ottered an option to mate payments under subsequent agneernente. each 
of J2rrwnthJypayrrw*&OptionMrea^ , 

paymentandwflhoutmak^afurttwrapptaftonbutonfyilaileast7vaW 
payments are made underrhemnedwtety preceding ayeement and have 
not been repaid before the certificate date. Certificates issued under the 
scheme are Nabonat Savings Certificates and theSdienws subject to the 
terms of this prospectus and to fhe Savings Certificates (Yearly Man) 
Regulations 1984, or ary other regutatjonsrdating tosawngseertitates in 

(foe, wifi be a with recouse to the 

Co^riaft^F^andanyirtfeTestw^beheeofUraedKrngdbmincDrne 
tax and capital gant tax 

DEFINITIONS: Z. in this prospectus.- 'Sppttcarrt’ means an efigHe 
person (as defined mparagraph3) whoenters mtoa Yearly Plan agreemert. 
'astificatedater means the date one year after thefirst 6t the month which 
follows the month of the first payment ItwB be show on the certificate 
^certificate wfoermeansthecai^taiBedvalueof payments made under foe 
agreemerrttogstherwtthirUeresteamedonthepajmencsardwcertifkate 
date ■ . • 

■hokteY' means theperson m whose nanwpaymentsarebengmadeunder 
a Yearly Han agreemenL A certificate issued under, the Scheme will be 
registered in the ho/dert name. 

“wtial agreement" means the first agreement made foflowmg an 
appkatwmo jom the Scheme. 

Subsequent agreement* means a second or further agreement which 
foWws on from the initial agreement by theexeedseof the releirantoption. 
'mterest rates date" means the daw which determines the interest rates 
which are applicable to an agreement, setoutman otter IrttecForan inrtia) 
agreement it is the date a vahd application is received by the' Savings 
Certificate and SAYEOffice.Durham, (Yearly Han Section). Fora subsequent 
agreememitis an anniversary of thisdate. 

"tofter letter" means the letter sem loiheapplicant bytheSawngsCertrfkate 
and SAYE Office. Durham. (Yearly HanSecMn), notnyinghim df themterest 
rates and other detals of his agre^nent 

EUGIBILfTY: B. A Yearly Plan agreement may be applied for 
£i> by any individual who has reached the age of 7 years and is not 

(n) by sucha^indf«d^ on behalf of and in the name of 3 person 
under the age of 7 years at the date a vbW application is received 
at the veany Han Secnon; <x 

(a) byare ceivercmbehalfofandmthertwneofamttiiaBydecwtecad 

person, or 

(nr) by not more than 2 trustees, either corporate or mdwidiBl'where 
the benefioary of the trust is a sole individual 

APPLICATION: 4 An applicant mb# compleiganapfkatkinfem. The 
standing order mandate form which forms pan of the application must 
show the day in the monthon which payments aretobe made. Sutthe Yearly 
Han Section wA enter the month in which the first payment is to be made 
and seifothestatdmg order riunddnE to the banlt The Aiedatefor the first 
pzvmenivwSbenolesthanonemonjhand.nomoretfiaritwowjntfisafter 
the mterefl rates d3te 1b start the agreement the first payment must be 
madeontheduedateSubsecnientpaymefitswillbethjeoptltesamedayof 
the monrh in rhefottowmg 11 months. 

INTEREST RATES NOTIFICATION AND ACCEPTANCE 
PROCEDURE: 5. The interest rates applicable® an agreement wHi be 
notified to the applicant m an offer letter sent by post to the apjafeanft 
arSJreK If the ap^ km iqects the offer, the stareingwOer mandate must 
be<M]eWsoastopiwemthefirstpaymMffomb^n^ 

PAYMENTS: 6 Payments may be made only raider a standing order 
mandate acceptable to the Director of Savings ^ymMscanbemadein . 
this manner by the appikart or by any person a body on ho behrff . AB 
5udipayments. once made: wH become theproperty of thehcrider 
7.0r^Dn?payiTiempefagr£«mw!m^bem3deOTMcho/tfw12mon{h5 
of an agreement and each payment must he for the sameamount 
8 In the went of the death (other than ol a trustee or receiver) of either 
the apphtam or holder no further payments may be made under the 
agreement vwhout theconsent of the Direcforof Savings Any payments 
made mtjreadi of the parayaph will be refunded vwjhourinteresi 

LIMITS: a The minimum monthly payment under the Scheme is £ 20 . 
AUrontity payments must be m multiples of £5- The total of aft payments 
undw theSchemefor thebenefitol ary onebaktermustTwei^ 


any month. A holder who is a tiustee Ire treated separately « te 
posorai capaot^and m ha capacity asteistetandstparal*^ at resped 01 
each separate trust funct V-’l* 

SUBSEQUENT AGREEMBflS: 10; PmMedthft at fax 7 vid 

payn i en^ e madetwteranininiedgtid y precp^agwtmei^ 

the issue of a certificate the appkant has arfop&on to edernloa 

unetaSe M ^eq u ertagaemetei^^^^^^totelflhe^tottt 
does not wish to take up the option thestanding order mahdatetnuflbe 

w'WWfl. ^ s. w 

Jl. fbymBrtsoQ subsequent a^e e m en t smust befar (heanie anawr 
.andbemadeontbes*nbdayoftenio^a^lbepratedfog'BgreeiT»tt 

TRANSFERS: 1 2. Agreements are transferable onfy^ ^withtfie.cordentrrf; 
theOwedorof Saw^O°rtfib3tesan*tfffl«fosWeliTrtiesarifoi(^ • 
savings certificates . , ... • V 

(NTERE5T ON PAYMENI5 UP TO CBIW1CWTE; dAli 
13 Monthly payments in respeactfwfodva ceroftateis iss^dwSaKh 
' earn sn^Je mjtirar for each compare calendar month up to the cer^xate 
date. Interest begins on thefustd^ ctf the mondi fcflpii^themdnttetf .. 
payment if mortHy payments are repaid before the certificate date bo'., 
interests payable , . 

INTEREST ON -CERTIFICATES: ^14, A .certificate, .shtniv^.-illie: 
certmcate value at the certificate date «nfi be seif fafoe appltcart.'The 
-certificate value writ earn- interest conswunded .awuafly'Ob'ti* 
anaveesaries df theoertilicate date for each whole catendar month from, 
the certificate date the dateofrepayment or the fourth anhwesaqr 

dtitecertifiatedatet«it»che^ • j 

are made under anagreemert the interea rates to beaw^tb^i^S 


oner tetter ; ... u.:. : . X - 77. • ' 

6 wfa^paymsifcMmadetni^ titeirterestrate 

vi^be3%pialhoi&tewfl^^botbtod»indiwdiJBrpa*nttnt5and»' 
the certificate value . : S'\. 

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- - *9 



THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 19S6 


OVERSEAS N*r\xr 


Minister howled down 
by extremists angry 
over Pretoria’s reforms 



From Ray Kennedy, Johannesburg 

i«c P ^? ia w« r ^ <l8h . OM ' - 1o se 11 Afrikaner-white radicalism at 
black urbanization its worst." he said. "This rude 
gff?” P* supporters and crowd has not just 1 come from 
“if? for r possibly the Brits district, it has been 
more tar-reaching reform pro- canvassed from ail over the 
posals has got off to an Transvaal" 
mauspioous start. Mr Louis President Botha also faced 
{XJ? b Deputy Minister of loud heckling at Vereeniging. 

»h« 2**. h ° w *c<f off south of Johannesburg when 

tne platform by right-wingers he made what appeared to be a 
at apubljc meetmg. significant statement on Hack 

The new Butmu of Infor-. political emancipation: "We 

will have 


ntauon. which fells under Mr 
Nefs ministry, has been 
chained with organizing an 
intensive education and infor* 
mation programme about the 
urbanization strategy thro ugh- 
out the country. 

But at Brits, a right-wing 
stronghold about 30 miles east 
of Pretoria, Mr Nel aban- 
doned his attempt to address a 
National Party rally on Thurs- 
day night after trying for an 
hour to make himself bear! 
“This is the ugly face of 


to give political 
rights to all who do not have 
them in order that leaders can 
be identified to join us in 
negotiation because we cannot 
negotiate with masses". 

As right-wingers bowled 
their protests, Mr Botha 
adroitly set the rest of his 
audience laughing by remark- 
ing: “1 am not scared to sit 
round a table with blades. 1 
have done it often and I have 
not turned black, nor have 
they turned white". 


But Mr Nel was unable to 
make himself heard over the 
barrage of noise from support- 
ers of both the conservative 
Hersligle Nasionale Party and 
the Afrikaner Resistance 
Movement (AWB). As he left 
the hall the right-wingers, 
calling themselves "people 
who walk the straight road”, 
jubilantly took over the stage 
and appointed a former pro- 
fessional wrestler to chair the 


meeting. They cheered a mo- 
tion of no confidence in the 
National Party, President Bo- 
tha and their local National 
Party MP. 

In Cape Town yesterday, 
Mr Nel said the National 
Party would continue with its 
reforms “regardless of these 
people who do not want to see 
reason. We are not prepared to 
give a number of j " 


Policeman stabbed 
in Soweto rampage 


Johannesburg —A black po- 
lice sergeant was stabbed to 
death as mobs of youths went 
on a rampage in the black 
township of Soweto near here 
yesterday (Ray Kennedy 
writes). 

Police and Army vehicles 
were attacked with . stones as 
mobs were driven off with 
tear-gas. according to a police 
statement. 

It said troops fired rifles in 
one incident and a youth was 
slightly wounded 

The rampage began after the 
police stopped buses of school 
students on their way to a 
magistrate's court, where IS 
other youths, were appearing 
over the “necklace” killing of 


a Hack policeman last Friday. 

Blacks claimed police fired 
tear gas into the buses at 
roadblocks. 

Other youths hijacked pri- 
vate cars and forced taxi 
drivers to take them to the 
court where they were feced by 
a barrier of mounted police. 

Church ministers, members 
of the public and reporters 
were turned away from the 
court. 

Violence flared again in 
Alexandra, on Johannesburg's 
northern border, where at 
least .three people were killed, 
in unrest earlier this week. 

Police said a youth was 
slightly injured when he was 
hit by a tear gas cannister. 


Marilyn race protest 


Johannesburg (AFP) — A 
Marilyn Monroe look-alike 
competition organized by a 
South African supermarket 
chain has been cancelled be- 
cause of complaints from 
Hack politicians that it dis- 
criminated against blacks. 

A spokesman for the chain 
said here yesterday that en- 
tries for the contest had been 
accepted from aQ races be- 
cause “w dearly stated that 


there was no age, colour, race 
or sex bar” 

But because of complaints 
from Hack politicians that a 
competition asking for Mari- 
lyn Monroe look-alikes was in 
its very natnre discriminatory 
against Hacks, the chain de- 
cided reluctantly to scrap it. - 

The supermarket said it had 
already organized look-alike 
contests for Such people as the 
singer Michael Jackson. 


' right-wing 
radicals like the AWB a veto 
to our plans* 

Reaction to the 
newurbanization proposals 
and the scrapping of the influx 
control and pass laws has been 
favourable so far, although its 
welcome has been countered 
by the retention of the Group 
Areas Act. 

Mgjor Hack organizations 
such as the United Democrat- 
ic From and the radical 
Azanian People's Organiza- 
tion (Azapo) have commented 
that the Government is noted 
for giving with one hand and 
taking away with the other. 
Azapo, however, conceded the 
abolition of influx control was 
a step, albeit “a very minute 
step”, towards the removal 
“of the racist taws that en- 
trench white supremacy". 

The Southern African Cath- 
olic Bishops' Conference yes- 
terday said it welcomed the 
new identification Bill, which 
will use a common identity 
document for all races, as the 
first legislative step towards 
scrapping the influx control 
system. 

Meanwhile, police yester- 
day confirmed the overnight 
arrest under the Internal Secu- 
rity Act of the Rt Rev Sigisbert 
Ndwandwe, the Anglican Suf- 
fragan Bishop of Johannes- 
burg West The Rt Rev 
Desmond Tutu, the Anglican 
Bishop of Johannesburg, said: 
“If anyone has been working 
towards holding together a 
community that was explod- 
ing, then it was him." 


Manila 
press men 
killed in 
ambush 

From Keith Dalton 
Manila 

A senior Reuter photogra- 
pher. a provincial journalist 
and eight soldiers died in a 
roadside ambush by commu- 
nist rebels in the northern 
Philippines. Mr Juan Ponce 
Enrile. the Defence Minister, 
said yesterday. 

Mr Willy Vicoy, aged 45, a 
veteran photographer and Mr 
Peie Mabasa. a local journal- 
ist, were the first reporters to 
die covering the 18-year 
insurgency. 

Mr Emile said the two 
newsmen died in a "brazen 
and treacherous” ambush 
along the national highway in 
Cagayan province, 220 miles 
north of Manila, after 10 
rebels, dressed in army-like 
fatigues, flagged down the two 
Jeeps in which the victims 
were riding. 

The rebels of the New 
People's Army then opened 
fire. Two grenades were tossed 
at the vehicle during a 45- 
minute exchange of fire before 
the rebels withdrew, the slaie- 
run Philippine News Agency 
reported. 

Mr Mabasa. a correspon- 
dent for the Manila Bulletin 
newspaper, died in the battle. 

Suffering severe gunshot 
and shrapnel wounds. Mr 
Vicoy died 15 hours later in 
hospital. 

Reagan 
offers help 
to Aquino 

Washington — President 
Reagan yesterday telephoned 
President Corazon Aquino of 
the Philippines, offering Unit- 
ed States assistance "in meet- 
ing the challenges that lie 
before her Government," the 
White House said (Mohsin Alt 
writes). 

Jt was the President's first 
direct contact with Mrs 
Aquino since she took office 
in late February after the 
ousting of President Ferdi- 
nand Marcos. 

President Reagan gave Mrs 
Aquino details of the addi- 
tional $150 million (£100 
milllton} military and eco- 
nomic aid be has asked Con- 
gress to provide for the 
Philippines “as an important „ 
manifestation of support by 
the American people to the 
Philippines people." 





Mr Willie Vicoy, the photographer who died in an ambush 
in the Philippines, on assignment daring the Vietnam war. 

Cameraman haunted 
by Vietnam war work 


Manila (Renter) — Willie 
Vicoy, the Reuter photogra- 
pher who died yesterday, was 
still suffering nightmares 
about his work in Vietnam 10 
years after the war ended. 

But the bad dreams never 
deflected the doyen of Philip- 
pine cameramen from the love 
of his life — combat photo- 
graphy- 

Mr Vicoy, aged 45, the 
father of six children, spent 
five years covering the Viet- 
nam conflict as a staffman for 
United Press International. 
His family did not want him to 
go off to war, so be told them 
he was covering a routine 
assignment. 

But despite his outwardly 
cheerful nature — welcomed by 
his colleagues in the battle 
zones — the war left its mark. 

"Even now I still hare 
nightmares about Vietnam, 
especially when things are 


quiet in Manila, and it is the 
dead children I photographed 
who come back to haunt me.” 
be said. 

One of his nighrmare pic- 
tures — a Vietnamese woman 
holding the blood-spattered 
body of a baby in ber arms - 
brought him a prized journal- 
istic coop in March, 1975. 

The picture made the cover 
of Time and Newsweek maga- 
zines in the same week. 

Mr Vicoy was believed to be 
the only photographer to 
achieve this feat. He was also 
nominated for a Pulitzer prize, 
one of journalism's top 
honours. 

Shortly before bis death he 
disclosed he had turned down 
offers from both former Presi- 
dent Marcos and his succes- 
sor, Mrs Corazon Aquino, to 
become presidential photogra- 
pher because “1 prefer to work 
for the (news) wires.” 



official wants 



from entering US 

From Christopher Thomas. Washington 

Justice Depart- leaked versions of Mr fiber's 


A senior - . 

mem official responsible lor 
investigating Nazi war crimes 
has recommended that Dr 
Kun Waldheim be barred 
from ihc United Slates be- 
cause of alleged involvement 
in wartime atrocities against 
Yugoslav partisans. 

Mr Edwin Meese. the Auor- 
ncy-General. is expected to 
study the recommendations in 
the nest few- days. Dr Wald- 
heim. former UN Secretary- 
General and now running for 
president in Austria, could be 
barred under a section of the 
immigration law that excludes 
foreigners who took pari in 
Nazi war crimes. Dr Wald- 
heim has vigorously denied 
any such involvement. 

the recommendations were 
made b> Mr Neal Sher. head 
of the Justice Department’s 
office of special investiga- 
tions. which was granted ac- 
cess this month to a secret UN 
file on Dr Waldheim. 

Mr Sher reportedly states 
that the file shows that Dr 
Waldheim was a “special mis- 
sions staff officer in the intelli- 
gence and counter-intelligence 
branch" of the German 
Armv's Group E which was 
involved in reprisals against 
civilians in the Balkans. 

That group was command- 
ed b> General Alexander 
Lohr. who was hanged for war 
crimes in 1947. According to 


recommendations. Dr Wald 
hewn obtained ■‘03*' status, 
which meant that he was "the 
third highest ranking specia 
missions officer on General 
Lohr's staff, no mean feat fora 
voung lieutenant". 

The Justice Department 
said m a statement that "no 
conclusions had been reached, 
nor has any review taken place 
at any decision-making level 
abouiMr Waldheim's status . 
Reports that Mr Meese had 
already decided to bar him 
were untrue. 

Until last month Dr Wald- 
heim had consistently main- 
tained that he was released 
from military service in 1941. 
but he has now acknowledged 
that he served with the Ger- 
man Armv in the Balkans tn 
1942-45. ‘ 

Mr Shcr's report notes that 
Dr Waldheim was in Yugosla- 
via at the time of planning for 
Opc ration Black, a drive 
against partisans in 1943 that 
left more than i 5.000 dead. 

Mr Sher continues: "Wald- 
heim's claim that he was not 
involved in Operation Black is 
squarely contradicted by the 
photograph of him at the 
airfield in Podgorica fnow 
Titograd]. The operation be- 
gan on May 1 5 and the 
meeting with the Italians at 
the airfield was a planning 
session.*' 


Threat of ban upsets 
Austrian politicians 


Vienna - News of the 
recommendation that Dr Kurt 
Waldheim be refused entry to 
the United States provoked a 
storm of protest from conser- 
vative politicians supporting 
him for the Austrian presiden- 
cy (Richard Bassett writes). 

Herr Michael Graff, the 
deputy leader of the People's 
Party, yesterday accused the 
World Jewish Congress of 
continuing its “hate-filled, dis- 
honest attack". 

Herr Graff said the report 
from the US Justice Depart- 
ment was “the indiscretion of 
someone in that ministry 
who's clearly friendly with a 
senior member of ihe World 
Jewish Congress’’. 


It was “horrifying” behav- 
iour on the part of - the 
Congress to persist in These 
"infamous acts” despite the ■ 
appeal for calm and the care- 
fully balanced judgement of • 
President Kirchschfeger of 
Austria. 

Dr Kirchschlager on Tues- * 
day announced his conclusion « 
that the evidence against Dr e 
Waldheim was inconclusive. 

Dr Leopold Gratz, the So- *• 
cialist Foreign Minister, said 
he had ordered the Austrian 11 
Ambassador in Washington to e 
investigate the Justice Depart- 
ment report immediately. 

He said Dr Waldheim had* 
seriously damaged Austria’s e 
reputation abroad. 



Tribute to 
astronauts 

Caroline McAuliffe (above), 
daughter of Christa Mc- 
Antine. the high school 
teacher who died in the 
explosion of the space shot- 
tie Challenger on January 
28, watching a tribute to her 
mother and the six profes- 
sional astronauts on board, 
elementary school children 
planted trees in their honour 
in Concord, New Hamp- 
shire, where Mrs McAntifle 
taught- More than 100 stu- 
dents, teachers and friends 
attended the ceremony. Mrs 
McAuliffe, aged 37, was the 
first teacher chosen foe a 
shuttle trip. 


Church-state summit eases 
way for Pope’s Polish visit 


General Jaruzeiski and Car- 
dinal Glemp have held the 
first Polish church-state sum- 
mit in almost a year to prepare 
the way for the Pope’s next 
pilgrimage to his homeland. 

A communique issued by 
the official news agency gave 
away little about Thursday's 
meeting, but informed sources 
said the two men discussed 
almost every aspect of church- 
slate policy, including official 
criticism of radical priests who 
use their sermons to defend 
the banned Solidarity union. 

The Government is ready to 
accept the Pope’s third pfi- 
grimage to Poland, set for 
June next year, but wants to 
deflect any criticism from 
Moscow orother East Europe- 
an neighbours that such visits 
stiT up nationalist fervour and 
give new life to the .anti- 
socialist opposition. 

The authorities, it emerged 
from the summit, want the 
Church to co-operate more 
actively with the state, for 
example in tackling social 
problems. 

The communique explained 
the points of agreement be- 
tween church and state, em- 
phasizing those issues which 
directly support official poli- 


From Roger Boyes, Warsaw 

cy. General Jaruzeiski and 
Cardinal Glemp agreed that 
Western governments should 
lift all remaining economic 
sanctions against Poland be- 
cause they were "damaging to 
the nation”. 

The two also stressed the 
usefulness of foil diplomatic 
relations between Poland and 
the Vatican and pledged to 
continue work on an agree- 
ment which will guarantee the 
Church's legal status. 

But there is a substantial 
gap between church and state 
on many issues. The Church is 
very impatient about tbe 
Government’s slow progress 



Cardinal Glemp: Wants deal 
on Solidarity prisoners. 


in approving an agricultural 
fund that would channel 
Western money to private 
formers. The Government is 
now asking for estimates of 
how much has been paid into 
the fund. 

The Church wants special 
political status for Solidarity 
prisoners; the Government 
insists on referring only to 
“non-criminal” offenders. 

The Government wants ex- 
plicit curbs on the activities of 
pro-Solidarity priests. The 
Cburcb insists on considering 
each priest on his merits, 
transferring some from sensi- 
tive parishes but in general 
supporting their right to speak 
out about on human rights. 

However, some ground can 
be given by both sides before 
the Pope's visit. 

Tbe derisive breakthrough 
will probably come when Gen- 
eral Jaruzeiski makes his long-' 
awaited trip to Italy and the 
Vatican. The Pope has made it 
clear that he would be pre- 
pared to meet him. 

The trip has been delayed, 
however, because of objec- 
tions by Signor Benino Craxi, 
the Italian Prime Minister,, 
over the continued detention 
of Solidarity leaders. 


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Grenada 

coup 

described 

St George's, Grenada (Reu- 
ter) — The court trying IS 
people accused of murdering 
Maurice Bishop, Grenada’s 
Prime Minister, yesterday 
heard the first eyewitness 
account of tbe coup which 
triggered a US-led invasion. 

Mrs Agnes Gram, a matron 
at the General Hospital, told 
the court she was with the 
Prime Minister and other 
ministers in Fort Rupert when 
it came under fire on the day 
of the coup. 

Of tbe 18 former leftist 
leaders accused of the murder 
only a former soldier, Rae- 
burn Nelson, was present in 
court The other 17 were re- 
moved after disrupting pro- 
ceedings, as they did 
yesterday. 

Mrs Grant said some people 
is the room were wounded or 
killed by the gunfire. When it 
stopped Bishop told everyone 
to leave tbe room. 

The prosecution aCejgcs that 
after Bishop left the room, he 
was killed with eight col- 
leagues on the orders of his 
party’s Central Committee, 


Deadlock 
over war 
memorial 

From A Correspondent 
Bonn 

West Germany’s problems 
in coming to terms with the 
Nazi past surfaced in the Bonn 
Parliament yesterday when 
MPs foiled to decide for or 
against a national war 
memorial. 

After the embarrassing inci- 
dent last year over the visit by 
Chancellor Kohl and Presi- 
dent Reagan to the Bitburg 
war cemetery, the Govern- 
ment and Opposition parties 
began discreet talks on a 
national memorial. But they 
are at odds over which war 
dead the memorial should 
commemorate 

Yesterday, the Christian 
Democrats and Free Demo- 
crats called for a memorial to 
the victims of war and Nazi 
despotism, especially German 
deed. 

The Social Democrats ar- 
gued for a monument in- 
scribed with a passage from a 
speech by President 
Weizsackcr referring to the six 
million Jews who died in Nazi 
concentration camps. . . 



show problems 
facing oil industry 

From Christopher Walker, Moscow 


New evidence of the severe 
troubles facing the giant Sovi- 
et oil industry emerged yester- 
day with a report in Pravda 
that the Communist Party had 
severely reprimanded two se- 
nior government officials for 
shoddy work in the key oil- 
refining sector. 

The Soviet Union is the 
world's largest oil producer, 
but has recently suffered a 
double blow through falling 
production and the recent 
slump in world oil prices. 

West European analysts 
predicted this week that tbe 
result could reduce the 
Kremlin's foreign currency 
earnings by as much as 57 
.billion (£4.6 billion) during 
1986. 

According to Pravda. Mr 
Yuri Sivakov. deputy oil- 
refining minister and Mr 
Vasily Pyatibrat, first deputy 
minister for industrial con- 
struction. were called to ac- 
count as a result of serious 
delays in building new oil- 
refining units. 

The paper disclosed that 
only three out of 13 new units 
planned to come into use in 
1984 and 1985 had actually 
done so. The Soviet oil- 
refining and petrochemical 
industry was also taken to task 
for the under-use of existing 
capacity. 

The report of the puHic 
reprimands came only 24 
hours after Britain and Russia 
signed a far-reaching energy 
co-operation agreement which 
British officials expect to re- 
sult in substantia] orders for 


British equipment and tech- 
nology over the next five 
years. 

Hie Soviet Union has re- 
cently embarked on a pro- 
gramme which gives priority 
to energy conservation and 
conversion from oil to gas. 

Mr Peter Walker, Secretary 
of State for Energy, laid great 
emphasis on British expertise 
in the conservation field dur- 
ing his Moscow negotiations. 

Yesterday's public rebukes, 
one of the main weapons in 
Mr Mikhail Gorbachov's 
drive to shake-up the bureau- 
cracy, came after a stream of 
reports in the press about 
other problems in the oil 
industry including inefficient 
repair work and inadequate 
housing and other facilities in 
the crucial west Siberian 
region. 

The degree of downturn in 
Soviet oil production was 
confirmed in recent official 
statistics showing that in 1985. 
it produced 4.16 billion bar- 
rels. down from the 1984 
figure of 4.29 billion and from 
a record total of 4.31 billion in 
1983. 

Oi) has recently provided 
the Soviet Union with about 
60 per cent of its foreign 
exchange. Western experts say 
the slump in world prices 
combined with the shortfall in 
domestic production is the 
main reason »’hv the USSR 
ended last year with a deficit 
of S6 billion in its balance of 
payments in hard currencies, 
compared with a surplus of SJ 
billion in 1984. 


investment 

Harare (API - The Zimba- 
bwe Prime Minister . Mr 
Robert Mugabe, announced 
yesterday that his Socialist 
government is preparing its 
first guidelines for prospective 
investors since independence 
in 1980. 

The investment register will 
be published to coincide with 
a fix e-vear national develop- 
ment plan unveiled earlier this 
month. 

The plan envisions some 
£83 million worth of foreign 
private investment by 1940 
and will identify areas for 
development. 


Glasses due 


it 


Oslo intervenes to end 
its offshore dispute 

From Tony Sams tag. Oslo 


The Norwegian Govern- 
ment yesterday intervened and 
ended the dispute that had 
shot down the country's oil 
and gas production for the past 
19 days. 

It ordered binding arbitra- 
tion for thejjJispnte that had 
cost Norway an estimated 
minim am of 60 million Norwe- 
gian kroner (£5 million) a day. 

Mr Arne RettedaL, the Min- 
ister for Labour, said the 
Government decided to invoke 
its powers after the failure of 
overnight talks. He said ft was 
concerned by the economic and 
industrial consequences of the 
protracted dispute on Britain 
as well as oa Norway and the, 
safety of the offshore plat- 
forms. Corrosion, be said, was 


a particular problem although 
emergency maintenance crews 
had continued to work. 

In theory, the Storting (par- 
liament) must debate the 
Government's initiative, which 
it could not normally do before 
next Thursday: but in practice, 
the tradition has been to call 
off disputes immediately after 
the Government has an- 
nounced its intention to order 
binding arbitration. 

The four unions involved are 
thought to have indicated their 
willingness to return to work. 

The dispute began on April 
6 when the caterers' onion 
voted to strike and their 
employ ers responded by lock- 
ing out 15,000 production 
workers. 


Stockholm (Reuter) - The* 
Swedish police disclosed lhatf 
they had found a pair of 
spectacles near the spot where 
the former Prime Minister. 
Mr Olof Palme, was murdered J 
that may have belonged to his 
assassin. ' 

Police told journalists that, 
ihc steel-rimmed spectacles^ 
were found on March !. then 
day after Palme was shot dead* 
by an unknown gunman, and 
said they had appealed to all of 
the country's opticians ford 
help in tracing their owner, rf 
They think the glasses were*! 
dropped as the murderer flecL- 

9 



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SPORTS 

DIARY 

Simon Barnes 


Rigging 
the Cup 

Saturation media coverage of the 
America's Cup threatens to be one 
of the great bores of our lime. 
Yacht racing is not an all-acrion 
television sport. Bui alongside the 
racing will be what promises to be 
the most spectacular aquatic event 
since Trafalgar the five months of 
battling between tbe International 
Management Group's “gunboat” 
and the boats offilmcrews from all 
over the world. “Ways will be 
found to prevent you filming,” 
threatened one IMG man. “The 
event will be policed and we will 
have our gunboats out.” 

IMG. the megabuck sporting 
agency headed by Mark Mc- 
Cormack. bought the rights to the 
America's Cup from the Royal 
Penh Yacht Club. The agency 
wants S3Q0.000 from anyone who 
wishes to cover the event. There 
are no separate deals for. say, 
making documentary films, and 
the sum is far too large for the 
BBC. and other organizations, to 
even consider. 

But now a company called 
Derrick Offshore Limited is plan* 
ning to sail a brand new, specially 
convened oil rig to the site of die 
America's Cup races. Derrick 
Offshore believes it has every legal 
right to be in the waters where the 
finals will be held. The rig, which 
can move at more than 11 knots, 
will have a 500-seat grandstand, 
restaurant, casino, cabins and a 
hospital - as well as satellite, 
telephone and telex links. The rig 
is even computer-stabilized, to 

? ;tve the best possible conditions 
or filming. Malta men are appar- 
ently flocking to Derrick Offshore 
with inquiries. 

Six appeal 

Last summer, lest we forget. God 
was in his Heaven, all was right 
with the world. England was 
thumping Australia and Ian 
Botham was hitting every ball that 
came his wav for six. He hit a 
record SO in the season. The feat 
has prompted a new stx-hiuing 
contest, with prizes that every 
cricketer will cherish: money. If 
Botham hits 80 sixes again this 
summer, he will get £1,300. 
W 'isden Cricket Monthly maga- 
zine. in conjunction with a com- 
pany called Basic Six. will operate 
the scheme. Batsmen will receive 
£ 10 for ever\ first-class six they hit 
from the 20th onwards and 
from that 20th sixth the tenners 
become retrospective. Thus 19 
sixes win you nothing, but 21 earn 
you £210. The man who scores the 
most in the season will receive a 
bonus of £500. 1 hope the winter of 
our discontent will be made 
glorious summer by this son of 
Somerset Or to put it less 
laboriously: attaboy. Both! 

• My achievement in tipping the 
winner of tbe Grand National will 
never be forgotten, at least not by 
me. Flushed with hubris, I now tip 
Sonic Lady to win the first classic 
of the season, tbe 1,000 Guineas at 
Newmarket on Thursday. If yon 
shy from backing favourites, then 
have Chalk Stream each way. 

Dilly Daley 

A South African radio station 
came up with a world scoop 
recently when it announced that 
Bloemfontein-bom (and raised 
and educated)Zola Budd was en- 
gaged to be married — to Daley 
Thompson. The announcement 
was. in fact, made on April I. The 
joke echoes an informal com- 
petition held by Daily Mail sub- 
editors after their newspaper had 
bought up Miss Budd in that 
memorable deal a couple of years 
back. The object of the com- 
petition was to find the best Zola 
headline. The winning entry was 
“Zola has Daley's Lovechild.” But 
I seem to remember from the 
Olympics that Mr Thompson has 
set his sights even higher — on a 
former European three-day event 
champion . . . 

Net profit 

This being the age of voluntary net 
practice it is nice to see the 
Australian cricket captain Allan 
Border storming into England to 
join Essex. He arrived this week 
from Australia, was met at 
Heathrow at half past six in the 
morning, went straight to Chelms- 
ford. and by lunchtime he was 
having his first net- On Wednes- 
day, in spectacularly English con- 
ditions. he scored 80 runs, and 
already looks a good bet for top of 
the averages. Has the man not 
heard that travelling cricketers are 
supposed to do it with a whinge? 
What is the game coming to? 


BARRY FANTONT 
AL'!S BAR . 




Kenneth Minogue on the long reach of Liberation Theology 


At God’s left hand 





1 eb ; * 1 1 — 1 -a 


‘Poor Marvin, He was on bis 

way daw® town w cancel 

to Bribsfa trip, and got shot* 


Neil Ivin nock and Pope John Paul 
II have recently been facing the 
same problem: how to deal with 
the Trojan Horse of Marxism. 
Kinnock's problem is for the 
moment largely represented by the 
Militants of Liverpool; His Holi- 
ness is confronted by the Libera- 
tion Theologians of Latin 
.America, where nearly half bis 
flock resides. The problem arises 
because of the Marxist propensity 
for taking over institutions 
through masquerade — Marxism 
is even capable of masquerading 
as religion. 

There is certainly no mystery 
about Marx's view of religion. “I 
hate all gods'*, was the Prome- 
thean remark he used as the 
epigraph to his doctoral disserta- 
tion. and his successors have 
taken him at his word whenever 
thev have attained power. Leagues 
of the Godless have discouraged 
religious practices; persecution 
and often slaughter have been 
used to intimidate the Church. 

Marx thought he had good 
intellectual reasons for this po- 
sition. He inherited a philosophi- 
cal tradition, dating back to the 
ancient Greeks, according to 
which religion was a set of myths 
necessary for keeping unruly men 
in mortal fear of the invisible 
policeman of conscience. In the 
coming enlightenment such fables 
would be unnecessary. 

The real point of the attack on 
religion, however, lies in a simple 
fact about the technology of 
revolution. Any revolution must 
spring from the discontent of 
workers or peasants, but it is 
impossible to focus this discontent 
if the people continue to think in 
terms of a life hereafter. They 
must instead be persuaded that 
politics is a zero-sum game: the 
stakes are nothing other than the 
goods of this world. Such is the 
theory of the class struggle. 
Correspondingly, the theory of 
surplus value explains discontent 
not as the result of man's enslave- 
ment to sin. but as a consequence 
of the fact that the rich are robbing 
the poor: and oppression of this 
kind is much more manageable 
than original sin. 

It is easy enough to see how a 
collection of revolutionary Marx- 
ists. sheltering under the popular 
trademark of Labour, might plau- 
sibly pass themselves oft as merely 
realistic supporters of the socialist 
programme of Keir Hardie and 
Nye Bevan: less easy to see how 
Marxists might pass themselves 
off as Christians. Yet there are 
Significant affinities between these 
competitors for the. allegiance of 
populations.'. 

• One link arises from the fact 
that priests working amid the 
suffering of Latin America might 
well identify Christ's poor with 
Marx’s proletariat, of whom he 
said that “no particular wrong but 
wrong generally is petpetrated 
against it”. The argument of the 
Gospels is that wealth attaches us 
dangerously to the things of this 
world Titus the poor may be 
closer to spirituality than the rich. 
If such good people are to be 
found oppressed by a corrupt 
system, then it is easy to see that 
many priests might think partisan- 
ship with the poor to be the heart 
of a re invigorated Gospel mes- 
sage. 

A less obvious reason why 
Christianity might slide into 
Marxism is to be found in tbe fact 
that religion has lately been in- 
vaded by science and philosophy. 


There was a time when the local 
bookshop meant W H Smith or its 
High Street equivalent If you 
were lucky there would also be a 
smalL shabby and barely profit- 
able family business some way off 
the main drag. Towns with a 
glorious past and/or a university 
might fare a little better but, by 
and large, Britain has long been, as 
the trade puts it “under- 
bookshopped”. 

About three years ago that 
began to change, and this year the 
pace has accelerated to the point 
where the small independents are 
looking for radical defensive mea- 
sures. For a new breed of book- 
seller is threatening their very 
existence. 

To a remarkable extent this 
revolution parallels the changes 
that have happened in other areas 
of retailing, where groups like 
Burton and entrepreneurs such as 
Sir Terence Conran have trans- 
formed the High Street. Rapidly 
expanding booksellers — Hatch- 
ards. Waterstone'sand Blackwell's 
among them - are adopting the 
same marketing strategies as 
retailers like Next or Habitat: 
highly designed, brighter shops 
and careful targeting at the middle 
market of the aspirational young. 

But the big difference with 
books is the Net Book Agreement, 
which means that volumes are 
sold at a price determined by the 
publisher at every outlet. Its 
survival is based on the benign 
view that books are special. The 
very essence of a good bookshop is 
the size of its stock, but such an as- 
set can only be preserved — so the 
received wisdom goes'— if sellers 
are protected from the full force of 
the free market It is this that has 
kept the family business around 
the corner alive. It has been able to 
compete with W H Smith on price 
and therefore to take a slice of the 
mass paperback market to back up 
its more specialized business. 

But the NBA is only one side of 
the equation - the other side is 
costs. Smiths have long been able 
to negotiate bulk discounts of up 
to 45 per cent from publishers as 
against the 35 per cent available to 
the small shops. This was not so 
important as long as the indepen- 
dent retained the specialized busi- 
ness that lured enough customers 
away from the High Street But the 
new wave of shops comprises 
aggressive, nationwide chains that 
go for High Street sites and 


ti 



Pope John Paul 
visiting 
revolutionary 
Nicaragua 
and Derek Hatton 
addressing the 
Labour Party: two 
faces of the 
same dilemma 


In its natural state, Christianity is 
a collection of stories constituting 
what is believed to be a divine 
revelation, and the meaning of 
these doctrines and stories chan- 
ges over the generations. Taken up 
by the philosophically inclined, 
however, the stories will be trans- 
lated into the abstractions of 
current intellectual life. God turns 
into the ground of being, the 
Gospel stories become metaphors 
of renewal, the Second Coming a 
concretization of hope, and so on. 

This intellectual! zing process 
homogenizes and makes rigid 
whatever it touches. Indeed, it has 
been plausibly argued — by Lewis 
Feuer. among others -that tbe 
fundamental structure of Marx- 
ism is merely an abstract version 
of the story of Moses leading the 
enslaved people of Israel out of 
Egyptian bondage to the promised 
land. Significantly, the Vatican 
response to Liberation Theology 
invokes the Exodus story, adding: 
“God wishes to be adored by 
people who are - free:** Onraspecr 
of the Trojan Horse problem raced 
by the churches is thus that 
Marxism is in some respects an 
abstract and simplified verson. of 
one of the central ideas of 
Christianity. 

The Fbpe’s response to this 
problem has come in two docu- 
ments issued under the name of 
Cardinal Ratringer from the Con- 
gregation for the Doctrine of the 
Faith. The first came out in 1984 
and was largely critical of Libera- 
tion Theology, the second, which 
has just been published restates 
Christian doctrine in such a way as 
to absorb whatever is valuable in 
the theology of liberation, and to 
discard the “deadly errors” of 
what remains. 

The link between Christianity 
and Marxism resides in the very 
idea of liberation itself. In Chris- 



Bryan Appleyard looks at the marketing 
onslaught that has hit small bookshops 

Fighting off the 
Burtons of 
the bookshelves 


command the highest discounts. 
They carry large stocks- £60 
worth per square foot of selling 
space in the case of Water- 
stone’s - and in general, they are 
as highbrow as the best of the 
independents. 

And they are moving very 
quickly. Waterstone’s. which only 
came into existence at the end of 
1982. had 10 shops by tbe end of 
Iasi year and is opening another 
eight this year. They work on the 
basis that every store must achieve 
£1 million turnover in its first 
year. Hatchards and Claud GiU, 
two Collins subsidiaries, are 
expanding just as quickly. 

In addition. W H Smith is 
rationalizing its Bowes & Webster 
subsidiary- by renaming all the 37 
shops in the company Sherratl and 
Hughes. In September ii will 
announce national promotion of 
the chain as well as the develop- 
ment of additional shops. With 
Penguin Bookshops. Pentos and 
Blackwell's all moving in the same 
direction, it is clear that tbe smart 
new-wave, bookshop is about to 
take its place on every High Street 
next to smart new-wave clothes 
and furniture shops. 

But who is buying the books? 
The answer is difficult to pin down 
but it seems dear that the market 
is growing and that growth should 
be accelerating. For a start, 
Britain’s total book market is 
worth about £700 million an- 
nually; which means that in terms 
Of per capita spending on books 
we arc lagging well behind the 
Americans and most of the Euro- 
peans. The “under-bookshopped" 
phase may have held back the 
whole market and the new wave 
may mean we shall catch up. 
Certainly experience so far sug- 
gests that these new shops are 


creating new business rather than 
simply taking it straight off tbe 
independents. 

Furthermore, library borrowing 
is on the decline. Public libraries 
are not what they were and the 
book-borrowing habit has not 
really taken root in the younger 
generation: 

So the gap in the market spotted 
by the new wave certainly seems 
to exist and appears to be suf- 
ficiently large to allow them to 
expand contentedly for some time 
yet. Nobody has any illusions, 
however, that they will soon be 
crashing into each other in com- 
petition for prime sites and that 
the ambitions of some will have to 
be pruned or abandoned. 

But meanwhile that leaves the 
independents, increasingly pess- 
imistic about the loyalty of their 
clientele and unable to do any- 
thing about their already slim 
prom maipns. “I’m sad to. say,” 
laments Pip Cullen, general man- 
ager of Sherratl and Hughes, “that 
many of them will be forced out of 
. business.” These are not crocodile 
tears. Cullen is about to retire and 
delights in browsing through in- 
dependent bookshops. 

Tim Waterstone, chairman of 
Watersione's, takes the rather 
more robust view that bookselling 
was always a profitable business — 
witness the consistency of W H 
Smith’s figures — and it was only 
the inefficiency, of small operators 
which had given the business a 
bad name for low margins and 
poor returns. But he does add that 
the independents should be able to 
survive in more specialized 
niches - playing, as it were, the 
role of bespoke tailor to the off- 
ihe-peg High Street operations. 

A more radical solution was 
proposed at the Booksellers 


tian terms, God has made us free, 
but we tend constantly to slide 
into the bondage of sin. In Marxist 
terms, we are enslaved by capital- 
ism. but can liberate ourselves 
through armed struggle. The 
possibilities of confusion along 
this conceptual axis are positively 
vertiginous, but the cardinal man- 
ages to keep his head. His account, 
for example, of the Marxist dogma 
of tbe unity of theory and practice 
could hardly be bettered: “Accord- 
ing to the logic of Marxist thought, 
the ’analysis' is inseparable from 
the praxis, and from the concep- 
tion of history to which this praxis 
is linked. The analysis is for the 
Marxist an instrument of criti- 
cism, and criticism is only one 
stage in the revolutionary str- 
uggle ... the only true con- 
sciousness. then, is the partisan 
consciousness.” 

The anti-Christian character of 
this doctrine can partly be brought 
out by juxtaposing it against the 
Christim injunction to love ontfs 
’enemies. Conversion is' a better 
aim than liquidation. The Marxist 
emphasis on systems and struc- 
tures must be contrasted with the 
Christian emphasis on the human 
heart “The first thing tofre done ” 
writes the cardinal, “is to appeal to 
the spiritual and moral capacities 
of the individual ... if one is to 
achieve the economic and social 
changes that will truly be at the 
service of man.” A century and a 
half after Marx, when systems 
have been toppled and replaced 
without any nofable improvement 
in the human heart, the Marxist 
argument looks very thin. 

The political point of papal 
documents, however, is less to win 
arguments than - to reaffirm the 
Christian position in such a way as 
to build a bridge by which tire 
straying theologians of liberation 
can return to the Christian fold 


without sacrificing the under- 
standable preoccupation with the 
social question that led them 
astray in the first place. 

Concessions are made. An ex- 
treme case is recognized in which 
recourse to armed struggle mfeht 
be justifiable, but the overwhelm- 
ing insistence is upon tire futility 
of violence and the necessity of 
“moraflv licit" means. The 
Vatican's central position is un- 
ambiguous: “Those who discredit 
the path of reform and favour the 
myth of revolution not only foster 
the illusion that the abolition of an 
evil situation is in itself sufficient 
to create a more huma ne soc iety; 
they also encourage tbe setting up 
of totalitarian regimes”. 

For all the lucidity of the 
argument however, there is -at 
least one idea which creates a fog 
in tbe text every time it (fre- 
quently) appears. This is the idea 
of justice. It is taken for granted 
throughout that we all know what 
is, and is not just The reason no 
doubt lies in the fact that the main 
audience is in Latin America, 
where injustice will be effortlessly 
identified with the famous dispari- 
ties of wealth in that continent 
This might seem to make it 
unnecessary to consider such fun- 
- Ha me ntal questions as whetberthe 
term “justice” refers to a process 
(such as whatever happens in 
accordance with rules of law) or 
whether it describes an outcome 
(such as the fact of inequality V. 

Avoiding these hard ques- 
tions — which are by. no means, 
irrelevant to the present and 
future condition of Latin Ameri- 
can economies — is typical of 
what the economist Peter Bauer 
has criticized as the confusions of 
“ecclesiastical economics”. Rely- 
ing on. the popular conviction that 
it is bad for some to be go rging 
themselves beside swimming 
pools while others starve, the 
papal “Instruction of Christian 
Freedom and Liberation” suggests 
a merely redistributxonist concep- 
tion of what ought to be done. 

StilL the Congregation for the 
Doctrine of the Faith has at least 
clarified the central potirt;jaameIy, 
that in concentrating its energies 
on soda) change, the Church is in 
danger of sinking to the level of 
political partisanship, and losing 
its own sonL In its insistence that 
the Church is the custodian of the 
mystery of the Christian revela- 
tion, it leaves its readers in no 
doubt that a Church is one thing 
and a political movement quite 
another. • 

As the world is now rather 
overstocked with denes who, 
having (it would seem) little of 
interest to say on spiritual matters, - 
seek our attention with vacuous 
uplift ‘ on .economic or social 
topics, one may hope that there 
clarifications might extend be- 
yond the Roman Catholic Church 

Political parties, no less than 
Churches, have insecure identities 
liable to be subverted by activists 
masquerading as mere enthusias- 
tic keepers of the sacred frame. 
This is why Neil Kfanock would 
be well advised to consider care- 
fully the Vatican's response to 
Liberation Theology. For if the 
Labour Party fails to solve its 
problem of identity, a constitu- 
tional British party : will have 
turned insensibly into a revolu- 
tionary international movement 
The author is prqfessor qf political 
science at the London School qf 
Economics. 


Association Annual Conference 
which has just ended at Aviemore. 
The proposition involves in- 
dependent bookshops forming 
buying cooperatives modelled on 
organizations like the grocery 
mule's Mace. This would enable 
them to buy from publishers in 
sufficiently large quantities to 
negotiate competitive discounts. 

Appropriately this solution was 
proposed by a publisher — Desr 
mond Clarke of Faber & Faber. 
The company has done well out of 
independent bookshops because 
of its specialized output and high- 
quality backlist. Indeed, only a 
publisher would really .be in a 
position to attempt to weld to- 
gether any sort of concerted action 
within the individualistic and 
conservative book trade. 

The very fact that Clarke is such 
a publisher reveals the central 
worry about the potentially baleful 
effects of the new wave. For, 'well- 
stocked as they are, these shops 
tend, like their revolutionary com- 
rades elsewhere on the High 
Street to err on the side -of tbe 
Wand. Their poetry shelves, while 
unquestionably better than the 
less literary branches of Smith’s, 
are still largely routine concoc- 
tions of Eliot Hughes and Betje- 
man. They tend to lade the 
potential for delighted discovery 
which resides in less planned, 
possibly less market-consdous 
bookshops. 

They are in this sense outlets for 
an equivalent new wave which has 
swept through publishing .' and 
which has produced a, variety of 
market conceptions rather than 
necessary or inevitable books — it 
has. as it were, been a case of the 
bland leading tire . bland. The 
danger for the quality publishers is 
that this levelling-off of middle- 
market trade could actually leave 
them worse off than before, with 
fewer outlets for their most up- 
market titles. 

The new wave, of course, wjll 
say that their significant improve- 
ments in efficiency over the old 
independents will mean they can 
operate a. much better ordering 
service that will fill' the gaps on tbe 
shelves. Nevertheless, there will 
be those who feel that books are 
different* and that a shabby, ill- 
designed shop off the High Street 
is just the place to buy them. For 
their benefit Clarke had better 
succeed this year — time is begin- 
ning to run out 

@ ttbhm nbwiimhws ue 


*he Midwest. There fo^SSSfoSp»poliq^f 
2 vS StS SLr faAnwica at that part of Europe not occupied 

"“firf iSmt ftom Europe to Rustonoop* itea Amerja 


mla * UdO-imi 

Fortress America would have 
been accelerated. ■ 

Europeans, particularly m Bnt- 
afo, tend to think that we are doing 
the US a fa vour when we allow her 
to defend us with her forces ana 

bases in Europe. The US would be 
considerably better off if it wiu^ 
drew all its bases and troops—* 55 
per cent of its yearly defence 
budget of some S300 biffiou is 
spent on defending us. Although it 
would still spend a lot on me 
withdrawn forces the expense 
would be much less. , 

Western Europe would not only 

lose comfort by such a withd rawals 
it would lose considerable foreign 
exchange and employment. Toe 


rope are accompanied by some 
750.000 dependents. The absence 
of well over a minion Amaicsas 
permanently stationed here, 
spending dollars and giving 
employment, would be extremely 
disagreeable. 

It is sentiment more than 
necessity that Impels the US to 
defend us. If there was a war 
between Russia and the West a 
fortress America would be in o o 
greater danjger of nuclear destruc- 
tion than it is at present. If no 
noclear weapons were used Amer- 
ica would be absolutely safe. -The 
Russians could riot get large 
numbers ' of troops across the 
Bering Straits. There is no chance, 
of their being able to do a 
Hannibal over the Alps on tte US. 

Americas exports would hot 
suffer under a Fortress America 
policy — that is, until the Russians 
decided that the remnants of free 
Europe could so easily be taken 
over fry Russia that they might as * 
well do it. But even then a country 
with the vast resources of America 
would not be dented fin long. 

A Western. Europe without 
America would either have to stej* 
up its defence spending enor- 
mously or accept the inevitable: If 
the presence of large American 
forces has not made Russia relax 
her grip on Eastern Europe .the 
absence of them, and a policy not 
to send them to Europe again; 
would be an irresistible tempta- 
tion to Moscow. Gorbachov buy 
have a modem look ■ but -te 
remains an dl&fas&ioaedr Russian 
imperialist The Rnssian array has 
not left Afghanistan - 

Incidents: can eas3y .be con- 
trived to justify. thtf.takuft'oifer of 
the ' Western .sector or - Berlin; 
leading -to farther incktents and 
advances elsewhere in Europe.' 


was one of cowardice, ft was 
similar to i be tearfulness ia Bffr. 

ain during the Chamberlain days. 
Few tttnsKfercd the tang-terfa 

by"^^ 10 Thateher* would^hinfe 
brought, thinking only of the risk 
of some immediate terrorist ac- 
tion ia which they mightget hatt, 
Americans tend to take a sup- 
pier view. Libya is the main source 
of funds for Middle East terrorists 
whether they -are Libyan or. not, 
therefore Libya should he given* 
warning knock Europeans love fa 
debate all the fasaod outs beferipf 
doing anything, , Which usually 
means that nothing is done, as ti£ 
Americans found in response : '4o 


fra - joint, action against' Libyan* . 

inspired ter r o ris m. 

Mrs Thatcher's permission to 
fly shored up jfce Alliance at 'a 
moment when the US was beco&. 
ing dangerously daffiusfotied ty 
it It has done more. Alreafy 
President Reagan, in gratitude, 
wants, to make it easier to extradite 
IRA terrorists for trial in Britain. 
Sttnfrariy tbere is Hkdy to be a 

p ma pi M ced.det&»e-in»A merw^ 

fmahcfid support to tfar lRA. So 
a B tho se people who reacted 

oftnOTtaed tecremm^uT^r * 
expect an actual reduction; or no 
escalation, of vt in this country. ; 

ft is Jooearfy tq say whether 

American strike against Libya .7 

redace woH&widfc terrorisraof 
which Americans have bees the 
prindp^victims. Theresrc rips 
that something is chan^ingiu 
Libya. .-Emopeau 'countries fat 
suddenly becoming more co-op- 
erative gride fightagaiost laypr- 
ism- Al the very worst, intef- 
national terr otism ovgrapepod g 
unlikely to ktereate.:- - V., . 

- Mts Thatcher her also dnu- 
oastraiedtotJfa;^ 

US cannot even^ose bases here for 
conventional weapons iwifaofa. 
ourperin^faorcfibw^mifamdre 
that protdbrtkm would apply era 
use tfiwdafaweapoitt'of whfi& * 
we disapprovaL Tyioee, like ihe 
Labour Party; wfao^wouJdgfa rid 
of the United States nuclear toes 
Aonkt . '. uu r fa s t a nd 'that they 

her troops Over jrexe if Use is^sot 
allowed^ defend them . with * 
nuclear deterrent?. Mrs Thztdier 
has not .'merely, protected fas 
Affiance from corowfon bul ja- 
baoced Brite&in&leDCcoo Wasfr 
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David Walker 



The Secretary ' of State . .for 
Employment's Stockton Lecture 
the other night was dishonest in 
the way politicians usually are era 
subjects - deemed sensitive or. 
dectoraDy disobliging. David 
Young, the former straight-talking 
businessman, came of age as a. 
party politician. ' 

The subject of the lecture was 
billed as enterprise. It turned out 
to be a speed] about industrial 
relations - rightly so, since. Sec- 
retaries of State: for. Employment 
cannot do much about our' per- 
nicious national- culture (Lord 
Young's phrase),; while they can 
operate on the body of law that 
underpins collective' bargaining. 
Thus be spoke about trade unions. - 
Rather, he insinuated and hinteda 
great deal about trade. unions but 
stopped short of his and the Prune 
Minister’s ultimate' tenet: that 
trade unions have no place in a . 
thnifaing enterprise society. 

It is worth getting the minister's 
argument .straight Wage bargain- 
ing fry unions is anachronistic. •’ 
Trade unions are Marxist, in so far ■ 
~as 'they- 'assume -'a : permanent 
condition of struggle -between 
employers and employees. The 
union attitude is “the .virus of the 
British disease”. Union leaders are 
schooled in terms of dass war and 
exploitation suitable to the 1880&. 

■ ■The economic facts of life; Lord 
Young said, are as follows. If 
wages are con strained “firms have 
lower costs. That ertcourages fbem. ‘ 
to produce more and sell more — ' 
they can set lower prices and 
enjoy higher profits. Real demand 
and output wii) increase. 7 . 

. And where dpes that leave trade 
unions? Here : is the minister’s' 
concealment achieved by leaving 
the Conclusion unspoken..' The 
logic is'plamrtrade unions are bad 
for business . . . business is good 
for workers . . .. ergo trade unions 
are bad for workers. The role of a 
reforming ‘government, .is plain: 
abolish them. Prescriptions for 
action in Young's speech*, none. . 

Despite the 1980. 1982 .and 
1984 industrial relations ^sta- 
tion. unions stiD enjoy immunity 
from the operations of the rivS 
law. They are.' fa .short; " em- 
powered by Jaw to- inflict, eco- 
nomic barm; in a market society, 
they have no place. Turn to the 
Institute of Economic Affairs; a 
reputable source of anfaysfa in 
favour of market economics. A 
new 1EA pamphlet out this 
week*. 25 blunt “Modem union-, 
ism is an affront to the rule of law 
upon which the authority of the 
liberal state should rest Hence the . 
proper role of law would be to 
proscribe them." 


T Unfike the inimster the IEA js 
unfraid to face titefagfc of fas 
premises. Trade unions exist tit 
stop labour being, supplied. They 
should be: declared- illegal 
c o m bina tio ns. That condumA. 
leads straight to repeal «rf the 1906 
Trades DSputey ActaiuftJ^end 
of protection fee unions fa cWf 
suits for example alleging Cpn^% 
: acy to <fo cconomic han» to. in 
• • employer. L . TC-V -.7 '• -Z 


Perhaps he is an hisfottcistvwflo 
thinks the ine vicability of brsforf , _ 

. will, take -care, Of^ praWetei f* 
Trade unions are, be argued m the 
Stockton i^cturtCH* '■•tengfau.-' 
-decline. The "pfoportionr ofnw. : 
labour force fa_imians has SUfaJ 
frote neatly 60 per. cent in 1979m 
justov«r50 percept in i984. Cn ire 
it a bit more rime' and ariaie ■ . . 
unionism becomesj- like .coupfcfl 
housing, a residual category - 
hardly worthy - of attention- WE 
can ml relax, sit backhand watch;' 
Sogat ’82 and ihe NaiiGual Union . 
of- Mrneworfcers fade into - 
sunset That, with frills, seenu^fc 
be^tbe Government's position, i--. 

It is untenable. The declfafr of 
Union membership it oneitherinr 
evitable nor fast The electricians’ 
leader _Eric Hammomi. for aD^th* £ 

to”etnployers nomore .-nor less 
than harm them^ -if- the . collective : 
interests of his members are not 
served; he -is as ucacceptalde'jti 
terms of market economics.- te. 
Arthur ScargiU. MearrwhBe tbOT 
is evidence drat unit labour ctirifc 
the subject of much ministerial 

if 

unionization (where unionized 
sectors prevent a- reduction in rea£ 
wages). The government 'bdievts 
there is; , at ^ome level, a conaec* - 

rion - between; legislation- 'to . * 
deprfyflege :unfons,«Kf* maad*'. 
economic improvement - ; - 

..But perhaps ; iord Young^i(S ; : 
stared. The fear is that'«presse(l; 

Sat 

opinion a gauge of the right 'i 
balance between “both fades, bt 
industry”"— in ‘ other r wdftiS-'^S> : - 
cdnvictonTltat capital and taboos 
have competing., fatwests. Parte - 

has insinuated that public bpiniwi ■ . - 
considers ihe^ balahce sow w ire 
about right with sonrerifitger of _ 
its favour, swinging a gains t rife'' 
employer. A good and ibkibdy 


be#**-* 


but fertile moment the politics fi£ \ 
union bashing .are difficult-; That 
must be.Loni^ Young’s judgemepn - .* 

* What Right To, Strike ? IEA..2 ' 
Lord North Streeu London S W IE • 
3LB. £2. : .r 3 U-^=- 


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.■*.{-. J ' ..." • • • 




THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1 986 


i[t} 


id §■ 

‘ 1 v - J 



1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


^For any leading Spaniard to 
sJiave spoken about Gibraltar 
Tswtbin the precincts of the 
Palace of Westminster a de- 
-cade ago would have been 
tantamount to a declaration of 
’diplomatic war. That King 
Juan Carlos did so this week — 
L and brought MPs to their feet 
■shouting “Viva Espana”- says 
jnticb for the personality of the 
man and the rapport which has 
steadily developed between 
this country and his during 
'that time. But the feet that he 
"felt impelled to say it must also 
^reflect the shadow which the 
-Rock stBl casts over political 
Mhinking in Madrid. 

. It did not cloud what must 
i>y-any standards, be regarded 
as a highly successful state 
Visit, the first of its kind for 
more than 80 years. As the 
.great-great, great-great-great 
■sad great-great-great-great 

grandchildren of Queen Vic- 
toria were reunited at Wndsor 
Castle, they were able to 
Celebrate an Angfo-Spanish 
relationship, that is now closer 
ihan ft has been for longer than 
Jiriy of them can recall 

British trade with Spain rose 
■by : 20. per cent last year (even 
"before Spain joined the Euro- 
pean Community) to a total 
volume (in and out) of £3.4 
billion. The balance is in 
•Madrid's favour — and this 
country is now its fourth 
biggest trading partner. But the 
gap is narrower than it was and 
the Spanish market is now the 
tenth most lucrative for Brit- 
ain. Business for both is large 
and burgeoning. 

: On July I the new extra- 
dition treaty between the two 
governments comes into force, 
removing a further source of 
discontent Whether it will 
operate more satisfactorily 
than the last — which caused 
& resentment in Madrid over the 
cautious approach of the Brit- 
ish courts — remains to be 
seen. 

Tourism too should rise 
£gain this Summer. In I98S the 


VIVA EL KEY 


number of Bri tish holiday- 
makers going to Spain feu 
from its 1984 figure of six 
million to five million— a drop 
which has been attributed 
more to the effect of the 
miners' strike and the fallen 
value of the pound than to any 
fears about street crime on the 
Costa Brava. But more than 
six million are expected to 
return there this year, celebrat- 
ing a stronger pound and in 
desperate search of the sun 
after last year's poor Summer. 

The physical impact of Brit- 
ish holidaymakers on Spanish 
resorts may not always be in 
the best interests of inter- 
national relations. But the 
annual flow has probably 
made young people in this 
country more fei niiiar with 
Spain than with any other 
European country. Thai must 
be seen as an important 
contribution to mutual under- 
standing. 

It would be foolish to dis- 
miss the Gibraltar issue as one 
which can be put to one side 
following the 1984 Brussels 
agreement That perhaps is the 
moral to be remembered from 
the King’s two references to 
the issue, hist at the banquet in 
Buckingham Palace, and the 
second, more pointed, one in 
his address to die Houses of 
Parliament 

The speech in which be 
urged both governments to 
“stand the test of history” and 
come up with a “formula” was 
probably written not by the 
monarch but by the Spanish 
prime minister Senor Felipe 
Gonzalez, ' himself an 
Andalucian who, with an elec- 
tion this Summer, perceived 
the need to assure his elec- 
torate that he did not intend to 
renege on this commitment. In 
an age of unemployment and 
inflation, perhaps people care 
less about it than the poli- 
ticians imagine. Certainly 
many politicians themselves 
will privately admit that there 
can be no imminent solution. 


But the issue is there, as solid 
and immovable as the Rock 
itself, and will remain so 
unless and until the right 
“formula” can be found. 

There are also difficulties of 
smaller scale over the status to 
be accorded Spanish pas- 
sengers using Gibraltar air- 
field, and the overflying rights 
for RAF aircraft using the 
Rode. But on these negotia- 
tions are continuing. 

The reopening of the border 
between Gibraltar and Spain 
early last year was a significant 
advance. By the end of last 
December some six million 
people had taken advantage of 
the new opportunity to cross 
from one side to the other 
without interferernce. As 
many as 1,000 Gibraltarians 
now actually live inside Spain, 
driven out by the shortage of 
houses on the Rock, and daily 
commute to their business. 
This is the kind of easy 
relationship which can only 
help towards an eventual solu- 
tion of the whole Gibraltar 
issue. 

Without the border reopen- 
ing; it would have been diffi- 
cult to envisage a stale visit 
like that which came to an end 
yesterday. As it is. King Juan 
Carlos and his Queen came to 
Britain as the constitutional 
monarefas of Britain's partner 
in the European Comunity, its 
ally in Nato and, in a sense, a 
neighbour with whom one can 
cooperate to mutual advan- 
tage. Spain, not unlike Britain, 
is faced with rising unemploy- 
ment and with the challenges 
which membership of the 
Community has undoubtedly 
brought. But now it is not only 
their problems that the two 
countries have in common. 

Hie king has capitalised 
upon this situation, and now 
returns to Madrid with his 
reputation enhanced. He has 
already shown himself in 
Spain to be a man for bis time 
— and in Britain he confirmed 
the impression 


STELL A FUNNY FARM POLICY 


Vis 


! W v * 


■i.V 

u. 


) j • 

V * vi 


Theoutlice agreement - 
reached by EEC agriculture 
ministers in Luxembourg yes- 
terday has been described by 
Britain's own minister Mr 
Michael Jopling, as a “major 
step forward.” And, within the 
terms of the Common Agri- 
cultural Policy (CAP), so it is. 
It is a compromise solution to 
a problem which needs un- 
^ compromising attention. But 
few could realistically have 
expected all that much more 
The two stated objectives 
were to come up with a 
formula which would help deal 
with the Community’s bizarre 
burden of steadily mounting 
food stocks, and secondly to. 
ensure that the penalties in- 
volved ia reforming the CAP 
were fairly distributed. It is a 
prime responsibility of any 
agricultural minister to look 
after the interests of British 
farmers in a com m u n ity of 
competing interests and at a 
time when economies are 
s called for, -and in that respect 
at least (however the fanners 
might see it) Mr Jopling 
deserves some congratulation. 
In the wider contaxt, however, 
the package will be judged by 
its adequacy in coping with the 
problem of food surpluses: die 
17 million tons of grain, 
750.000 tons of stockpiled beef 
or the continuing over-produc- 
tion of milk — all of which 
were graphically underlined by 
Sir Geoffrey Howe in his 
speech at the Lord Mayors 
Diplomatic Banquet earlier 
this month. 

- That it is not nearly draco- 


nian enough is immediately 
apparent Hie price freeze on 
beef and the three per cent cut 
m milk quotas both fell below 
what is required. A five per 
cent cut in milk quotas, fin- 
example, would have been 
moire, appropriate. As for cere- 
als, the measures taken in 
respect of grain will mean, 
when all factors have been 
taken into account, an effec- 
tive six percent cut in prices in 
this country and in France — 
and rather more than that in 
West Germany and the 
Netherlands. Given that a 15 
per cent cut is needed to bring 
burgeoning production under 
control, tins too would seem to 
fell some way short of the 
ideal. On the other hand, 
politics is the art of the 
possible and the ministers 
have arguably done as well as 
could reasonably be expected 
of them in the short term. 

It is worth once more point- 
ing out on their behalf that in 
the United States the quantity 
of stored grain now stands at 
80m tons aud it is expected to 
double by the end of this year. 
This might sound of doubtful 
relevance, but it does at least 
indicate that the problem is 
not confined to the inefficient 
Old World. It is also true that 
in one sense the Community is 
competing with advances in 
technology — which enable 
production to increase despite 
a lower level of manpower. 
Thus the situation in which 
some 70 per cent of the hard- 
pressed European budget goes 
on agriculture, even though 


the industry supports only a 
tenth of Europe's population. 

; This latest package comes, 
moreover, after cuts of 3% and 
4 per cent in farm prices in the 
last two years. While the full 
extent of the current measures 
still needs to be assessed, they 
suggest that Europe is at least 
now heading in the right 
direction. Not so long ago 
ministers spent the small 
hours of the morning debating 
by how much farm prices 
should rise. Now they are at 
least talking in terms of cuts 
and freezes. In addition, the 
principle under which the 
West Germans may be forced 
to raise Jie level of national 
subsidies to their farmers, 
while it does little to help curb 
the growth of more surpluses, 
does at least ensure that the 
burdera of financing this 
growth fells on the Germans 
themselves and not on the 
Comunity as a whole. 

The overall judgement on 
yesterday's agreement, which 
has still to be worked out in 
detail and finalised next 
month, must therefore be that 
while it remains a compromise 
when compromise is in- 
sufficient, it also marks a 
further painful advance along 
the way to ending some of the 
EECs more absurd anomalies. 
It must be hoped —and by 
some it is already acknowl- 
edged — that Britain which 
takes over the presidency of 
the Council at the end of June, 
will be able to give the process 
a further considerable shove 
later this year. 


FOURTH LEADER 


On reading of the death of 
Dan Archer in Thursday's 
edition of “The .Archers” the 
attentive newspaper reader 
wiH have wondered whether 
he perished from eating too 
much sugar. 

Of course, if sugar is not 
guilty of killing off this weu- 
beloved character, there is no 
lack of other candidates. Cof- 
fee and tea (or anything 
containing caffeine), white 
bread, fatty meat (lean meat 
too), food that contains preseij 
vatives. food that doesn’t and 
has therefore probably rotted, 
alcohol (naturally), _ butteL 
cream, anything fried, ana 
almost every other food prod- 
uct has been found by some 
researcher or other to cause 
most of the diseases going. 

A good rule of thumb, based 
upon this long record of 
research, is that food causes 
cancer. It is unlikely that Dan 

Airher sunn ed all ibose yMR 

without occasionally 
succumbing to temptauonand 
rating the odd sandwich made 


with deadly white bread. 

The fine print in research 
papers would allay much anxi- 
ety on the part of consumers if 
it were generally read. It 
confides such truths as that the 
rats which developed cancer 
did so only after consuming 
the equivalent of 160 cups of 
coffee each day or subsisting 
exclusively on a diet of potato 
crisps (prawn cocktail fla- 
vour). These are feats unlikely 
to be widely imitated in the 
Home Counties. 

Not only are rats less able to 
object effectively to a particu- 
lar diet, blit the same food 
(even in similar amounts) may 
well have a different effect on 
human beings. ■ 

That problem would be 
overcome if the American 
proposal were adopted and 
fature experiments of this kind 
performed on lawyers. Those 
who advocate this change 
point out that there is a 
shortage of rats compared to 
the surplus of lawyers and that 
rese arc her s , who sometimes. 


develop a fondness for their 
laboratory rats, are unlikely to 
fail victim to such a weakness 
for a prominent QC 

Short of such drastic reform, 
the gourmet is advised to treat 
reports of new food scares with 
a light heart. His health is 
more likely to be suffer from 
an attack of cancerphobia than 
from eating what he likes. The 
trick is to like everything. In 
that way a balanced diet will 
arrive in the stomach more or 
less of its own accord. 

That leaves the problem of 
Drink. We would merely point 
out. with G-K. Chesterton, 
that alcohol is, after all, a 
natural food: 

You will find me drinking 
rum 

Like a sailor in a slum 

You will find me drinking 
beer like a Bavarian . 

You will find me making 
merry 

On the cheapest kind of 
sherry 

Because lama rigid vegetar- 
ian. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 



Terrorism in the Libyan context 


From Vice-Admiral Sir Ian 
McGeoch 

Sir, Terrorism, as a means of 
exerting political pressure, 
whether domestic or inter-state, is 
a threat to all civilised peoples. All 
governments, therefore, have a 
common interest in countering 
terrorism, even if some be 
templed to condone it or even, as 
in the case of Libya, to use it as a 
“continuation of policy by other 
means.” 

But terrorists are civilians (how- 
ever rigorously trained), lightly- 
armed (however lethally 
equipped), operating individually 
or in small groups from 
extemporised bases in the midst of 
urban populations. Hence the 
prime duty of statesmen, may I 
suggest, is to coordinate inter- 
nationally the counter-terrorist 
capacity of the civil power, with 
the military in a supporting role, 
particularly in some aspects of 
intelligence gathering, knowledge 
of explosives, and training in their 
counter-measures. 

Your leading article of April 18, 
The case for the raid”, would 
therefore have carried more 
weight had you argued that 
whereas the use of military power 
against terrorists cannot be ex- 
cluded, provided statesmen “re- 
strict military action to dearly 
defined military targets”, it is fin' 
more likely to achieve the aim 
when used to support the civil 
power rather than to supplant it 
Yours feithfully, 

LAN McGEOCH, 

Southerns, 

Castle Hedingham, 

Halstead, . 

Essex. 

April 22. 

From Mr Richard Terrell 
Sir. Most of the correspondence in 
your columns about the American 
raid has turned upon something 
called “terrorism” which people 
are anxious to prevent Those who 
have opposed the raid and the part 
played in it by the British Govern- 
ment have done so on two main 
grounds, (a) that innocent lives 
were lost and (b) that “ terrorism ” 
.will not have been prevented but 
will actually be stimulated 

In all this there is a general 
omission to distinguish between 
acts of terrorism directly under- 
taken by the government of a state 
and similar acts carried out by 
isolated individuals or members 
of various revolutionary groups 
not overtly directed by a particular 
state. 

The distinction, however, is 


cruciaL For. whilst the individual 
terrorist or member of a revolu- 
tionary group may well be com- 
pletely undeterred by any raids of 
the kind carried out by American 
forces, the government of a state 
which itself indulges overtly in 
terrorism is in a very different 
position. 

For states are in possession of 
military forces and equipment 
associated with national power 
and authority in the world And 
states are not governed by solitary 
individuals or small revolutionary 
groups, but political and admin- 
istrative figures obliged by their 
responsibilties to act, more or less, 
in conceit 

Whilst the individual terrorist 
may be prepared to sacrifice his 
own life for a cause, no dictator, 
however crazy, may be able to 
persuade all his key colleagues that 
a risk of heavy damage to the 
military power of the State itself is 
worth taking for the sake of the 
satisfactions to be derived from 
mere acts of terrorism. 

Colonel Gadaifi and his im- 
mediate colleagues now have good 
reasons to be aware of the dimen- 
sions of that risk, thanks to the 
determination of the President of 
the United States and to the moral 
strength of our own Prime Min- 
ister. 

Yours faithfully. 

RICHARD TERRELL. 

7 Chester Court. 

Lissenden Gardens. NW5. 

April 23. 

From Mrs Marguerite V. H. 
Minster 

Sir, I find it disquieting to re3d in 
your leading article today (April 
18) that The Times, finding itself 
in disagreement with the majority 
of its readers over the wisdom and 
moral defensibiliry of the Libyan 
raid, now sees the need 
“seriously" [to] address" the con- 
cerns of its readers “if it is to have 
any hope of influencing them 

I think I am not exceptional in 
looking to my newspaper to 
inform. I do not underestimate the 
value of argument, discussion and 
dialogue, but the spirit of evan- 
gelism in today's leading article 
makes me uneasy. 

Is this the rdle of a responsible 
newspaper? 

Yours sincerely. 

MARGUERITE MINSTER, 

28 Angetfield. 

St Stephen’s Road, 

Hounslow, 

Middlesex. 

April 18. 


Airport security 

From Mrs Carol Cox 
Sir. As a frequent traveller, I am 
concerned about our security. I 
have had a body search several 
times, but at no tune have 1 been 
asked ifl was wearing a wig (I was) 
or had my hair felt. 

Surely it is common knowledge 
that many men and women wear 
quite large wigs these days. 

Yours sincerely, 

CAROL COX, 

St Tenzing Road, 

Leverstock Green, 

Heme! Hempstead, 

Hertfordshire. 

April 19. 


Musical excellence 

From Sir Ian Hunter 
Sir. I applaud Bernard Levin’s 
article (April 1) calling for ex- 
cellence in the training of mu- 
sicians; but I question the support 
of one college to achieve that 
excellence. 

It would be sensible to reduce 
the number of students in all the 
major music colleges, whilst at the 
same time maintaining their 
grants, in order to allow better- 
paid teachers to give more time to 
fewer pupils; and thus improving 
the overall standard which, let 
there be ho mistake, is already 
high. 

What we need to create are the 
conditions to attract the world’s 
best teachers to this country. As an 
idea I propose that one college 
should specialise in the field of 
advanced teaching of the violin, 
another of the piano, and so on. 
setting up small elite classes for 
the best pupils, and only the best, 
drawn from all the colleges. 

If these teachers also gave some 
time to the Yehudi Menuhin 
School, the Purcell School. 
Cbeethams, etc, it would mean 
that really gifted children could be 
taught of supervised by the same 
great teachers right from child- 
hood through the colleges, until 
they are ready to play in public. 

The problem lies in finding 
outstanding teachers with the time 
to teach, and providing them with 
outstanding pupils. Really gifted 
students with an element of genius 
are usually drawn to institutions 
by teachers with reputations 
rather than by the institutions 
themselves. My proposal would 
solve the problem corporately 
rather than through any one 
college. 

Yours faithfully. 

IAN HUNTER. 

31 Sinclair Road, W|4. 

April 9. 


A woman's place 

From Mrs Ah*y ne Dean 
Sir. The feci that Oxford City 
Council's new centre for women is 
being organised and used by 
women has inspired the council to 
seek to have it adapted or built by 
women (report, April 23). Hey ho! 
What next? Should each minority 
group aspire to build everything 
for themselves - housing fac- 
tories. etc? What about the po- 
sition of the unions then, or good 
race relations? 

Surely the best way to help 
women and minority groups is to 
give them equal opportunities to 
prosper in the community and not 
develop new problems for them to 
overcome at some future time 
when another political parly is in 
power. 

Yours faithfully, 

ALWYNE DEAN. 

36 Manor Road Extension, 
Oadby, Leicester. 

From Mr A. P. Duggan 
Sir, Since Oxford* City Council 
have become obsessed with the 
concept of the vertical integration 
of female labour, surely they 
should take it further and insist 
that the cement, bricks and as- 
sorted hardware used in building 
should be produced solely by 
women? 

Yours feithfully, 

A. P. DUGGAN, 

35 Springcroft, Parkgate, 

South WirraL Cheshire. 


Gleam of hope 
in rhino decline 

From Mr Maurice Coreth 
Sir. Jan Raath’s timely article. 
“The fight to save a giant” (April 
14), overlooked the one real 
gleam of hope on the rhino's bleak 
horizon. 

Fifteen years ago Mr Courtland 
Parfet built a private rhino sanc- 
tuary on his ranch at Solio in 
northern Kenya, where the rhino 
population has declined from 
around 19,000 in 1970 to about 
425 today. From a zero population 
fifteen animals were introduced; 
with a few further additions these 
have bred up to almost a hundred 
— virtually a quarter of Kenya’s 
entire rhino population. 

This spectacular success in- 
spired the Kenya Wildlife 
Department's black rhino 
management plan which is now 
being implemented in the national 
paries at Nakuru, Tsavo and the 
Aberdare Salient- 

Work has started at Nakuru, 
where the 144 sq km park will be 
encompassed by an electrified 
fence to keep the rhino in (and the 
poachers out). The fence will 
incorporate unobtrusive guard 
posts and alarms activated by 
tampering. Upon its completion 
rhino at nsk in other areas will be 
moved into this safe haven to live 
and breed undisturbed. Thus the 
decline in Kenya will have been 
halted and reversed. 

This scheme is sees as Africa's 
blueprint for the rhino's reprieve 
from extinction. All is not yet lost, 
but time is no longer on the great 
mammal’s side. 

Yours etc, 

MAURICE CORETH (Chairman, 
Rhino Rescue). 

POBox I. 

Saximinriham, Suffolk. 

Campus closures 

From the Principal and Vice- 
Chancellor of the University of 
Stirling 

Sir. Your Education Correspon- 
dent (report, April 19) under- 
stands that the University Grants 
Committee “thinks that three or 
four universities would have to 
go” if the university system 
continues to suffer severe annual 
cash cuts in real terms. Comment- 
ing on which universities, she lists 
five and writes “Stirling is vulner- 
able because of its quality". 

G early such a comment carries 
grave dangers for the institution 
about which it is made. On a 
number of recent occasions, 
including its evidence to the 
Croham committee on the future 
of the UGC the University of 
Stirling has proposed much more 
openness than heretofore on the 
quality judgements used by the 
UGC in allocating funding. The 
greater the degree of selectivity, 
the more important such openness 
becomes. 

The University is confident that 
there is no feir assessment of the 
quality of its teaching and of its 
research which would put it a! or 
near to the bottom of any quality 
league table. Our recent planning 
document provided to the UGC 
sets out the evidence, and we 
would welcome its publication. 
Yours feithfully. 

KENNETH ALEXANDER. 
Principal and Vice-Chancellor, 
The University of Stirling. 
Stirling. 

Horowitz in Moscow 

From Mr J. R. Barton 
Sir. The television cameras on 
Sunday hovered for a moment on 
a Russian man as a tear rolled 
down his face whilst listening to 
Horowitz play Schumann. More 
images from the Moscow Conser- 
vatoire and the Metropolitan Op- 
era might do more to promote 
understanding than all those from 
Red Square and Capitol HilL 
You is faithfully. 

JOHN RUSSELL BARTON. 
Holders. Great Chart. 

Ashford. Kent. 

April 21. 


Hospital transfers 

From the Joint Parliamentary 
Under Secretary of State, Depart- 
ment of Health and Social Security 
Sir. Your report (April 16) 
“Handicap *traffic’ criticized”, by 
your Science Correspondent, 
failed to make dear the narrow 
scope of the study. Hospital 
Closures in the Eighties, from 
which it was drawn, and gave the 
misleading impression that 70 per 
cent of all people who leave 
mental handicap hospitals go to 
other health service hospitals. 

This is not the case at aiL In 
1984 there were 2,468 discharges 
of mentally handicapped people 
after a length of stay of one year or 
more. Only 549 of these people 
were transferred to other hospitals 
(22 per cent). 

Of these. 182 people were 
iransferrd to non-psychiatric hos- 
pitals for treatment for physical 
illnesses, leaving only 367 ( 15 per 
cent) who were transferred to 
cither mental illness or other 
mental handicap hospitals. The 
reasons for such transfer will have 


included placement in a hospital 
more appropriate for the particu- 
lar patient's needs. 

The figures in your report relate 
to what happened to the residents 
of the only eight hospitals for 
mentally handicapped people 
which dosed in fee five-year 
period covered by the study, 
which was published by the Cam- 
paign for People with Mental 
Handicaps (CMH). Most mental 
handicap hospitals have been 
reducing in size gradually over 
many years. 

Complete closures are still very 
much the exception, as the CMH 
study makes clear. But if it 
becomes necessary to close a 
hospital for whatever reason, there 
can be no question of its patients 
being discharged predpitately into 
the community if they are not 
ready for this move. 

Yours feithfully. 
TRUMPINGTON. 

Department of Health and Social 
Security, 

Alexander Fleming House, 
Elephant & Castle, SE1. 

April 21. 


Falklands fishing 

From Lord Morris and others 
Sir, Following the events of 1982 
there is today much fresh develop- 
ment and a new future for the 
Falkland Islands under steadfast 
British sovereignty, frequently re- 
confirmed by ministers and ibe 
Prime Minister herself. 

But no attempt has been made 
to claim fishing limits recognized 
worldwide since 1 977 and codified 
within the 1982 Law of the Sea 
Convention. That would give 
exclusive responsibility for 
managing the living resources, 
first call on allowable catches, and 
an obligation to give other states 
access to any surpluses against 


compliance with Falklands' laws 
and payment of licence and 
royalty fees. 

Failure to impose conservation 
measures is endangering stocks, 
and over-supply of Falkland squid 
is depressing prices and so 
jeopardising sales of Scottish her- 
ring and mackerel to Comecon 
factory ships, for want of foreign 
exchange earned from squid. 

Reported agreements with Ja- 
pan. South Korea and Taiwan to 
limit their fleets around the Falk- 
lands are encouraging first steps 
that need to be extended to 
include Spanish. Soviet and Polish 
fleets. Bui the current “pillage" 
must cease. That requires HMG to 
declare fishing limits and to 


exercise the responsibilities that 
this creates in these national 
waters, in which any multilateral 
regime would be unprecedented. 

while conservation is the first 
priority, the second is to generate 
substantial income for the Falk- 
land Islands Government We 
support the islanders' demand for 
immediate anion by HMG to 
declare limits. 

MORRIS. 

RENWICK. 

JOAN VICKERS. 

JULIAN AMERY. 

VIVIAN FUCHS. 

ERIC OGDEN. 

PETER SCOTT. 

MICHAEL RANKEN. 

T. woo on ELD, 

do 19 Bcvis Maries. EC3. 


APRIL 26 1920 



style; an** •.«««'■*« tn 

not beaten by workmen to 
death. He died in 1936- Our 
Special Correspondent urns 
Captain G. A. Scott, who had 
served as the PoPfT'saawtwU 
correspondent in St Petersburg 
for a short period. 


INKED RUSSIA 
TO-DAY. 

DISEASE, FAMINE AND 
LUXURY. 

(From Our Special 

Correspondent) 

Some 300 British refugees from 
Red Russia reached Southampton 
on Saturday by the P. & O. steamer 
Doogola ... 

The experiences of these people 
are very much the same. Many of 
them spent long months in prison, 
no reason being given for their 
arrest beyond the one that they 
were British subjects. Those who 
were not actually imprisoned were 
treated in the same manner as 
those of the Russian “bourgeoisie” 
who escaped arrest. In Red Russia, 
anyone who is not a Bolshevist 
comes under the heading of 
“bourgeois." 

THE DANGER OF PLAGUE. 

“Moscow is one great cesspool of 
disease, corruption, and iniquity,’' 
sfiiri a cultured and refined English 
lady to me at Mitcham, whither 
she and other refugees were taken. 
“Recently the order came that we 
were all to tidy the refuse-heaps 
outside our houses.’ in preparation 
of a Government inspection. The 
most refined girls of the upper and 
miAflp Hasses were formed into 
companies of 50, and were marched 
to tiie Nikola ievaky station to 
rloaw the lavatories, to load carts 
with refuse, and to deposit the 
contents outside the town. 

“What will happen when the 
great frost breaks is too terrible for 
human conception! Cholera, ty- 
phus, and leprosy already rage in 
Petrograd, Moscow, and all the 
larger cities. The canals are all 
polluted, and the open spaces 
outside the towns, where countless 
bodies have been cast into the 
snow all through the winter, are 
breaking into terrible life under the 
unwelcome rays of the spring sun. 
if s omething is not done very soon, 
not only Moscow, but the whole of 
Russia will become one great 
charnel-house, and wiH poison the 
entire world.” 

The newly-arrived refugees 
without exception state that to the 
best of their knowledge Commissar 
Zinovieff of Petrograd is dead. Like 
Sverdloff, of Moscow, he was 
beaten by workmen and died in 
hospital of the effects of his beating 
some weeks later. The authorities 
naturally kept this fact secret as 
tong as they were able . . . 

A NOTE ON CANNIBALISM. 

Many of the refugees hinted at 
the existence of cann i bal i sm, but 
not one of them could testily to its 
existence as a feet. I personally can 
do so. When 1 was a prisoner in 
Moscow Gaol last year a Russian 
prison-friend of mine, whose name 
I cannot give, as he is still in all 
probability a prisoner, came to my 
cell and showed me his bowl of 
unpalatable prison-soup. In the 
middle of the horrible concoction 
floated a human finger. It is well 
that the public should know the 
facts. 

A RED EXQUISITE. 

An interesting story was related 
which will give people some idea of 
the luxury enjoyed by the actual 
leaders of the Soviet Governemnt. 

The hospital at Tamboff in 1919 
was crowded with Red Army men, 
sick with typhus, and the local 
peasantry voluntarily contributed 
50,000 poods of flour for the 
patients. A doctor was sent from 
Moscow to Tamboff to work in the 
hospital- Lenin was at Tamboff at 
that time. He lived in the railway 
carriage built especially for the use 
of the late Tsar Nicholas-a mag- 
nificent car in rosewood, mahoga- 
ny and cut-glass. The young doctor 
had known Lenin’s secretary inti- 
mately in happier days, and before 
leaving Tamboff decided to call on 
him, with a view to securing two 
poods of flour as a present for his 
wife at Moscow. With much diffi- 
culty he gained the siding where 
the “royal red" train stood. Here he 
was stopped by Lenin's personal 
guard (who are clothed in red from 
head to foot). After being kept 
waiting for three hours he was 
ushered into “the presence" of his 
erstwhile school -fellow. Lenin's 
private secretary. This “son of the 
proletariat” was lying full-length 
on a magnificent ottoman, dad in a 
gorgeous dressing-gown. At his side 
knelt a Red Guardsman, proffering 
papers for the secretary's august 
signature. The secretary signed the 
papers and waved h is erstwhile 
friend to a seat. The coupe was 
filled with flowers and fruit, and 
was bright with silver and crystal 
fittings ■ . . 


Royal ‘rules’ 

From Lord S'orwich 
Sir. Queen Elizabeth I may have 
disapproved of the general 
proliferation of her portraits — 
although the Order in Council 
quoted by Mr Den vir todav (April 
23) makes no specific mention of 
their reproduction on clothing. 
Queen Victoria, on the other 
hand, seems to have encouraged 
such reproductions, particularly 
when imported from abroad: such", 
at least, seems to be the implica- 
tion of Francis Thompson's Ode 
on her Diamond Jubilee in 1897: 
For ve have heard the thunder of her 

goingsrfonh. 

And wonder of her large imperial 
wavs. 

Lei India send her turbans, and 
Japan 

Her pictured vests from that remot- 
est isle . . . 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN JULIUS NORWICH 
24 Blomfield Road. W9. 


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Television 

Wdl Being (Channel 4) was 
concerned with female alco- 
holism; for some reason this 
condition, like female promis- 
cuity, is considered far more 
reprehensible than in its male 
guise. In fact, of course, there 
are very good reasons why 
women are driven to drink - 
men amongst them — and last 
night's programme suggested 
that the incidence of drinking 
among the female population 
has trebled over the last ten 
years. 

As always in contemporary 
society, of course, this immedi- 
ately becomes “a problem” 
which attracts various 
“experts" with their trad of 
support groups, caring thera- 
pies and various other modern 
placebos. Sometimes it seems 
thai we live in a cotton-wool 
society which protects Its 
members only by effectively 
suffocating them. And there is 
always of course the faddish 
“health” lobby with its moral- 
izing injunctions. 

The dehumanizing aspects 
of this process even became 
evident In last night's pro- 
gramme when the women 
themselves were limited to 
aotobigraphica] reminiscences 
of a simple kind while the 
“experts" spoke in impersonal 
and authoritative terms. In 
this miniature version of a 
dietrt state, it was quite obvi- 
ous who were the rulers and 
who were the ruled. 

Of course some women, and 
men too, have problems with 
alcohol, and their dependency 
can lead to physical or mental 
dereliction. But one ought to 
keep a sense of proportion: 
oars is by no means a society 
in the grip of the demon drink, 
and I suspect that English 
people of the late twentieth 
century consume less alcohol 
riifln most of the generations 
which preceded them. The 
difference now is, of course, 
that we positively luxuriate in 
various social problems or 
difficulties; it gives people 
something to do, I suppose. 

Let me welcome Book 
Choke (Channel 4). Now that 
Book Four has been removed, 
this is the only programme on 
the independent channels de- 
voted to literature, although its 
naming time of 10 minutes 
pushes it into a ghetto from 
which it may never be rescued. 
The reviews are interesting, 
however, the reviewers are 
convincing, and the whole 
production is mercifully free of 
the kind of gimmickr y which is 
supposed to make books 
“sexy". But only 10 minutes! 
Even the so-called 
“highlights" from the House 
of Lords are given more time. 

Peter Ackroyd 


The Lamberts, George, 
Constant and Kit, 
form the subject of 
the first biography by 
Andrew Motion (right) 
poetry editor 
of Faber & Faber. 
Interview by 
Caroline Moorehead 


Enjoying a 
life of quiet 
interests 



“Make them laugh, make 
them cry, bring on the dancing 
girls", Philip Larkin would say 
to his friend and biographer 
Andrew Motion, when they 
talked about writing, particu- 
larly poetry. When Larkin 
died, earlier this year. Motion 
did his best, in a long poem for 
the Times Literary Supple- 
ment, feeling there was per- 
haps something a little 
unseemly in writing so soon 
about a man he had greatly 
admired 

But Motion wanted to cele- 
brate' him at the moment 
when thoughts and memories 
were still so strong. He could 
hear the exact note of that 
“Eeyore" voice, saying over 
the telephone “This is your 
subject speaking". 

“The first two. the laughing 
and the crying were ok", 
Motion comments on his 
poem. “I was a bit short on 
dancing girls." They were 
easier to come by in The 
Lamberts: George. Constant & 
Kit , the biography he publish- 
es on Monday. 

Andrew Motion became a 
friend of Larkin's when he was 
teaching at the University of 
Hull at the end of the seven- 
ties. They listened to jazz 
together and watched the box- 
ing on television and when 
Motion felt blue Larkin 
cheered him up, usually by 
“being very much bluer 


himself" Motion had come to 
Hull straight from the 
Newdigate Poetry Prize and a 
master’s degree at Oxford on 
the poet Edward Thomas, 
which he was busjr 
“respraying and resoldering" 
into a book The idea of going 
North had seemed immensely 
attractive: it was so unlike the 
Oxfordshire landscape of his 
education — he was at Radley 
— and the Essex marshes that 
had been his home. His father 
was a brewer, from a long line 
of brewers and his childhood 
was horsy. Even so, the coun- 
tryside beyond Hull “had 
something of the hauntingly 
odd, deserted landscapes of 
my youth that I still walk 
about in in ray mind’s eye". 

For all that, for the walks 
and the times with Larkin, he 
had enough of Hull after three 
years, missing his friends and 
the things like opera and 
movies in London that he had 
never imagined he might miss. 
He left, against dire warnings 
from his friends, and spent his 
savings on a journey to India. 
He came back, broke, to find a 
letter on the mat, telling him 
that he had won the Observer 
Poetry Prize: £5,000 and the 
lime to write a book on 
Larkin. 

Still, there was no proper 
form to his life. He became 
two day a week editor of the 
Poetry Review, commuting 
from the house in Oxford he 


had bought with money be- 
queathed by his mother, who 
died after ten years in hospital 
paralysed following a riding 
accident 

On other days he travelled 
the literary circuit, giving 
readings of his own poetry, 
growing increasingly uneasy 
that in so doing he was 
somehow becoming that 
dreaded self-conscious figure 
“a poet rather than just 
someone who sometimes 
writes poetry". 

Then came a more marked 
act of fortune. .Andrew Motion 
was visiting Chatto & Wind us. 
trying and failing to interest 
them in the life of another 
poet when Carmen CalliL the 
managing director, asked him 
what he felt about the Lam- 
berts as a subject 

He wasn't certain. He had 
never heard of George, the 
painter, and knew nothing of 
Kit beyond the feet that he 
was manager of The Who; 
Constant the composer, was 
clearer “Something, of a hero 
even, through Anthony 
Powell's Morland: I thought of 
him as an arbiter of fashion 
and man of sense." 

He was soon hooked. Better 
still, Chatto suggested that he 
join the firm, for two days a 
week as Poetry Editor, while 
he made trips to Baltimore 
and Australia, in search of 
George’s roots, and so he 
embarked on three and a half 


of the biographer's 

w and dredging. 

They went well. Three gen- 
erations meant three spans of 
time, so research was not ail 
contemporary, not all histori- 
cal; there were archives as well 
as interviews. 

The Lamberts’ interests 
were much his own: pai n tings 
through his mother, music 
through singing in the choir at 
school and pleasure in adult 
life. But Motion admits that 
while he likes Wagner, Con- 
stant preferred French and 
Russian composes; and rock 
and rod is just an adolescent 
memory. But he especially 
admired the way the 
Constants were never abso- 
lutely first rate: "In some 
ways, it’s better to value than 
for not being achievers of the 
top rank: they illuminate pre- 
cisely by not being stare.” 

Andrew Motion's conversa- 
tion suggests that his life is 
now in good shape. He mar- 
ried a year ago, an editor at 
Chatto, so the firm has pro- 
vided him with a book, a wife 
and a job. He is still only in his 
early thirties. He has a house, 
a “perfect Pooler house" in 
Hackney. There are no plans 
for more biography, but Mo- 
tion is relieved to find the 
poetry was waiting for him 
when the Lamberts were done, 
“growing up like weeds 
through stepping stones”. He 
writes a poem a month, “by 


biological regularity" -and feels 
itchy if he doesn’t, but he does 
so almost casually, hot with 
anxiousness. It remains for 
him the most enjoyable of all 
art forms. 

Andrew Motion’s small of- 
fice houses trophies from the 
Indian journey hanging on die 
wails. They include a row of 
cant- carpet beaters, fashioned 
in twirls, which serve as 
ornament and screen. Motion 
wears carved silver bracelets. 
A gainst the waQ, when I went 
to see him, lent a black cane; 
not, he said, either an Indian 
momento, nor a tribute to his 
fascination with the age of the 
Lamberts. He has had arthritis 
in his knees since the age of 17, 
which “makes me very cross 
when it rains," and forces on 
him a “slowed down life of 
constant reading”. More than 
most, his life has been circum- 
scribed by a small bank of 
interests. 

Not long ago, a friend gave 
him an astrologer’s birth chart 
site had drawn up of Jane 
Austen: it showed her life 
leading in one dear direction, 
towards solitude and writing. 
Andrew MotRm sees his own 
in prcdsdy the same pleasur- 
. able mould, a contented focus: 
poetry, biography, publishing. 


The Lamberts: George, Con 
slant and Kit is published an 
Monday (Chaco & Windns, 
£13.95). 


Radio 

Knowing winks 


Topics which refuse to behave 
themselves on Radio axe jwn- 
ished by bong mtned mto 
quizzes. No matter how good 

food looks, smells or tastes, d 

few great shakes aimakmga 
noise, so into a .qua 
Radio 4*s Questions of Taste, 
is the embarrassing result. 

The panel of four foodies, 
coyly joffled ajpnf 
convivial bast" Russell ; Da- 
vies, are a lot erf aggressively 
light-hearted tasks We lasting 
apples (“crunch , slur p, 
nunrajn, I think I £ co * n ££ 
this nne, mmmm — Russet- ) 
or, in the Pyfoonesque 
“Favourite Utensil Spot 
naming their favourite utensil, 
plus light-hearted anecdote. 1 

have never heard a studio 
audience so unamused No 
matter how many exclama- 
tion mm** the panel added to 
its inflection, only anxious 
titters resulted. One apple was 
revealed as Spartan. Ana 
where do you thrnk they come 
from? “GreeceT Tbc end 
came as a blessed relict even 
if our convivial host did send 
ns off not with goodbye but — 

yes— “Bonappetiti" 

The Law Game (Radio 2) 
fells into the same category. 

but is rather better organized. 
It centres around short sketch- 
es in. which legal puzzles are 
enacted The panel — formed 
mainly, it seemed, of other 

radio quiz show boss— had to 
give their opinion on the legal 
rights ami wrongs. The show is 

anecdotal rather than infor- 
mative. though some of the 
sketches contain some awk- 
ward explanatory dialogue: 
Solicitor “Are we the defen- 
dant or the plaintiff?" Client: 

“I can never work out which is 
which. I want to sue someone. 
What does that make me?" 
And so on. Radio 2 audiences 
are much more ready to 
chuckle hard at anything, it 
seems. Lounge-bar pause-fill- 
ers are guffawed at heartily 
and, apparently, voluntarily. 
Panellist Chris Seade, who, we 
were informed in the intro- 
duction, is very tall, was asked 
which law be -would like to 
rfranp- or introduce. He sug- 
gested "the Leg Act” ruling 
that there should always be 
room for legs ia public seats. 
The audience thought this a 
scream. 

It is a sad rule in life that the 
most capable game-show 
hosts are alsothe-mu st a/ tifi- 
dflL Paul Daniels has sn 
inability to speak nonnafiy 
through any sentence; instead 
hoards it with a tone of heavy 
irony unjustified by its con- 
tent He favours ever-so* 


naughty jokes. (He 
pronounces bosoms 
“basoooms") and 3 chummy 
kpowingness ("Sorry Frank!" 
he said after making a jofr 
about Frank Bough.) Y« K3r 
chairmanship of “radio’ s only 
card game'* - Deaton* with 
Darnels (Radio 2) does nan- 
age to make so methin g out of 
nothing. The questions are 
silly, the panellists duQ, the 
card* game connection con- 
trived. vet the show manages 
somehow to bubble with 

jollity. 

How reassuring to know 
that Robert Robinson is still 
trundhng alow avuacubriy 
with Brain of Britain (Radio 
4 jL The only overstatement to 
the show lies in the tide, 
otherwise a nostalgic, and, it 
must be said, somewhat cam ru 
Home Counties bonbomvf 
predominates. "Be s h a mftfe ss, 
Mis Shawl" says.Robinsou,-ia 
the manner of *■ 1 950s sweet 
shop owner, a Hate bit the 
smart Alec, bm always know- 
ing his place. The modesty of 
the scores (10 is hfebX and die 
merrily middle-class sponsors 
(“Yes, indeed, SirT 1 ) lend one 
the assurance that the heart of 
England fits not in the flash 
that winks from foe pan, but 
in selfe ffa cg mcm , decency 
and a smattering, of general 
knowledge, (hat tire chairman, 
whatever his- ambitions, is 
under control.. ? 

The same pleasant iflusma j 
is conjured up by veteran ¥ 
actor RkfKorf Mttrrfoch tn A 
Slight Case of Murdock (Ra. 
die 2V It ttacooycutional . 
mixture of memories of die 
great, theatrical disasters, and 
the veneration of second dm- 
sion comedians, but il.is lively 
and well done. In its early 
days, he said, the BBC placed 
a ban ter certain areas for 
jokes, amongtbem chamber- 
maids. honeymoon couples; 
commercial travellers and 
rabbits. A similar ban tin jokes 
on quiz shows about otter 
“peison^hitt rt r oCthe "Sony, 
Frank" type; might be worthy 
ofconskteratiaa. 

More - intentionally sotid 
than Murdoch, but Urn as .. 
unswffy, i& Robert Cushman's £ 
survey of his -10 years as & 
theatre critic; Ftra Night h* 
p re ssto a (Radio 4). In the 
first of the series; bemade rne 
wish- 1 hadn’t missed 
McKeUen’sMacbetfrapcTfor- 
manceso steeped in evil 'data 
priest would attend regularly, 
holding his ernrifix to protect 
art only himself but the 
actors.- ■' - 4 ' 



l 


Craig Brown 


Soul 

Squelchy sensuality 


SOS Band 

Hammersmith 
Qdeon 

Suburban cocktail pubs from 
Uxbridge and Romford must 
have been deserted as the SOS 
Band, a 1 0-piece unit from 
Atlanta. Georgia, settled into 
the first of their three London 
concerts on Thursday eve- 
ning. They are the latest 
representatives of the kind of 
working-class soul music that 
has nothing to do with nostal- 
gia or conceptual art and 
everything to do with the old 
pop-culture preoccupation of 
living for the weekend. 

The distinction has been 
obvious for some years. While 
the style-conscious readers of 
The Face were promoting the 
ironic eclecticism of Kid Cre- 
ole or rediscovering the ageing 
Curtis Mayfield, the soul boys 
and girls were locking them- 
selves into the sensual groove 
of Maze and the frothy pop- 
soul of Shalamar. The SOS 
Band answer the same 
straightforward urges with, on 
record at least, a similar 
efficiency. 

Their producers, Terry 
Lewis and James “Jimmy 
Jam" Harris, devised a strain 
of hyper-romantic medium- 
slow ballads, heavily depen- 
dent on simple sentiments, 
hypnotic repetition and super- 
charged arrangements for elec- 


tronic instruments — in 
particular the the kind of 
massive, squelchy-toned key- 
board bass that seems capable 
of lifting the hall off its 
foundations. It is a seductive 
noise, very danceable and 
often explicitly sexy, and the 
best of the songs, such as “Just 
the Way You Like It" and 
“Just Be Good to Me”, 
achieve an anthemic quality. 

The group’s appealing lead 
singer, Mary Davis, was gener- 
ally ill-served on Thursday by 
a show that, despite the 
audience's ready enthusiasm, 
fell wildly short of expecta- 
tions. Many of their routines 
were tired when James Brown 
was a shoe-shine boy: others 
were by any yardstick odious, 
notably the crude exploitation 
of female members of the 
audience, unredeemed by a 
molecule of wit. 

There is, too, a special kind 
of nausea reserved for the 
moment when an artist uses a 
song of which you are particu- 
larly fond as a vehicle for giris- 
versus-boys audience 
participation. “Tell Me if You 
Still Care", a torrid duet, is my 
favourite SOS Band song, but 
on this occasion its dramatic 
tension was permitted to sag 
like a piece of old knicker 
elastic — which just about 
sums up the elegance and 
sophistication of the whole 
event. 

Richard Williams 


Theatre 

Fables and frissons in old New York 


Wonderful Town 

Palace, Watford 


With elephantine musicals 
progressively devouring and 
defoliating the West End, it 
has been left to Watford (in 
the wake of the Guildhall) to 
revive this lithe early collabo- 
ration between Leonard Bern- 
stein and the Comden and 
Green team. Despite the obvi- 
ous. it is a show that lives up 
to its title: and it comes as an 
overdue reminder that musi- 
cals can have fire, wit, and 
intelligence without any loss 
in popular appeal. 

The town, of course, is New 
York: not the New York of 
42nd Street but Christopher 
Street, Greenwich Village in 
the raid-30s — a backwater 
occupied by neighbourhood 
tarts, displaced football he- 
roes, soda-jerks, and old art- 
ists. By 1953 when Bernstein 
teamed up with Joseph Fields 
and Jerome Cbodorov to 
adapt the Greenwich Village 
stories of Ruth McKenney, it 
was already a romantic mem- 
ory, a fabled zone of youthful 
self-discovery remote from 
the brutal success drive and 
razzmatazz of Broadway. 

The book tells the tale of 
two sisters hitting town with 
all the pent-up energy of an 
upbringing in Columbus, 
Ohio. Ruth, the brainy one, 
besieges editors with unpub- 



: \f ' ? 


Ray Lonnen and Maureen Lip man 


lishable manuscripts.' Eileen, 
the pretty one. wants to break 
into showbusiness, but finds 
herself folly occupied in jug- 
.gling with an ever-lengthening 
queue of besotted males. 

They share central focus 
throughout the show, with no 
rivalry but much exhilarating 
invention. When Eileen (Emi- 
ly Morgan) at the climax of the 
first act conga knocks out a 
cop and is hauled off to the 
slammer, frisson momentarily 
grips the stage. But not to 
wony, the curtain then rises 
on the Christopher Street pen 
revealing that she has taken 


charge of it and is despatching 
thei nfetuated constabulary on 
little errands before they form 
up to serenade her in a superb 
pastiche Irish ballad. 

it is true that the show fells 
into two sections: first a scene- 
setting prelude, and then a 
story. And things go distinctly 
softer once the fable closes in. 
The opening scenes put over 
the basic experiences of gener- 
ation upon generation of New 
York bohemians, and lifts 
them into irresistible comedy. 
The girls rashly hand over a 
month’s rent for a ramshackle 
basement standing directly 


over the blasting operations 
fora new subway, and under a 
favoured walk of local dog 
owners. Much passing trade 
leers in or fells through their 
window, from the randy cli- 
ents of the previous occupant, 
to Eileen's drug-store admirer. 

Against this background, 
Ruth — marvellously played 
by a perky, unsinkable Mau- 
reen Upman — gets to deliver 
Bernstein's classic primer on 
“One Hundred Ways To Lose 
A Man" (the trick is to show 
your intelligence), mid sits 
back in a magazine office 
white the editor and two 
crestfallen colleagues join 
chorus on the inumerable 
ways in which New York 
squashes hopeful talent. Then, 
from the washed-up sporting 
hero comes a hymn to die 
academic power of the foot- 
ball. Each of these numbers 
hits a nail resoundingly and 
permanently on the head. 

When it comes to the plot, 
you have to go along with the 
fiction that the editor (Ray 
Lonnen) fells for Ruth; and 
that an engagement in die 
writhing depths of the Vortex 
Nightclub counts as an entry 
into the acting profession. 
Given the snap of Martin 
Connor’s production, and the 
sensuous pleasure of David 
Toguri's choreography, I 
doubt whether there will be 
maoy complaints. 

Irving Wardle 


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Rock 


A bright blast of dynamite 


Big Audio 
Dynamite 
Empi re Ballroom 

Following a prolonged stretch 
of support acts, some mem- 
bers of the audience had 
already left by the time Big 
Audio Dynamite took the 
stage, four hours after the 
doors had . opened. Bui the 
mood of impatience was swift- 
ly dispelled as the band swept 
on, and the punchy dance- 
rhythm of “Medicine Show" 
established an instant party 
groove while Don Letts trig- 
gered an accompaniment of 
heat-box backing tape and 
sound-effects; a melee of ma- 
chine-gin fire, odd voices talk- 
ing. and snippets of the whistle 
from The Good, the Bad and 
the Ugly. 

But the revelation was see- 
ing Mick Jones in this new 


setting. The dash may have 
been second only to the Sex 
Pistols in spearheading the 
British punk movement but. 
by the time Jones was thrown 
out of the group is September 
1983, it had become a grim 
affair indeed. Yet Jones, re- 
sponding with dignity and 
imagination, has claimed the 
last laugh, and, removed from 
that dour, oppressive environ- 
ment, be now seems a differ- 
ent man. 

For one thing, he looked 
relaxed and absolutely delight- 
ed to be on stage, as he sang in 
his light nasal style and thrust 
at his gutter with the familiar 
dipped shoulder movements. 
And he has grown to fit the 
role of leader with comfort 

To form a rock group 
capable of marrying the 
sounds of Brixton to the dance 
beat of New York is no mean 


bled enunciation that was a 
trade mark of die Cash, in 
BAD he opts for a cooler, 
more tuneful delivery than in 
the past, and die words tor- 
rents of rarely repeated words 
tumbled out in a bizarre 
stylistic cross between rap and 
Dylan; a new song, “Beyond 
the Pale", which would make 
a mat single, even smacked of 
a Dylan melody. 

One punk discipline which 
they ignored, to their detri- 
ment, was brevity of expres- 
sion. Most of the songs went 
on a little too long but Don 
Donovan’s thoughtful key- 
board parts in the mesmeriz- 
ing “E=*MC?" and Greg 
Roberts’s unusually agile bass- 
drum playing in “The Bottom 
Line" were two examples of 
the much more sophisticated 
setting in which Jones is now 
cast 


Concert y--:. 

Shifts in tone for 
songs of the sea 


LSO/Hickox 
Festival Hall : 

Vaughan ~wiH hnns ?$ Sea Sym- 
phony is as vast as its subject 
and in many respects as 
unfethomahle: If it had a fault 
it is that there are moments 
when it is found wanting for 
sheer dynamism; no matter 
how big or bold the gesture 
may be, frequently it seemed 
strangely inert. ' 

There are, of course, many 
things that.do work, like the 
wonderful tonal shift near foe 
end of the first movement, or 
the sudden unaccompanied 
passage in foe finale, at foe 
words “Wherefor unsatisfied 
soul?" Somehow, for me, foe 
music never quite takes flight 
as it should and as that of the 
later symphonies usually does. 

Yet it is justly loved for its 
grandeur and ambition as for 
those big moments that all 
choral societies relish. Ger- 
tmniy the London Symphony 
Ctaonis delivered it with a 
genuine fervour as well as 
remarkable confidence and 
vitality, and with only foe 
most rare glimpse of that 
common disease, a weak ten- 
or. 

■The two solo singers, the 
soprano Yvonne Kenny, and 
foe baritone Stephen Roberts,* 


were no less convincing, each 
a sensitive but suitably heroic 
exponent of W&tmanVjpqW- 
crfidly. evocative, w in d s w e p t 
words. Even, foe hardened 
players of foe XondoaSyfo- 
phony Orchestra seemed fo 
find a deep pride is foe piece 
as well as an obvious 
affection. ... ■ : £ V-;! . 

The intensely private ano^ 
tions of MahTeV’s 
Rnckertlieder, whrefreantebe- 
fore die interval, nuufcr * " 
dramatic contrast wifo such; 
an evocation of natural ; pb&- 
noroenon. Here ,1110.. mezzo* 
soprano Ann Murray was a jt 
subtly emotive soloist, mak- - 
ing “/eft atmet einen linden' 
Duft" delicately aromatic and 
“Urn Mittemacto * suitably 
sinister and .mysterious; at— 
least until its closing affir m a- 
tion of faith. . 

But in the other worfaflineis ; 
of“/cft binder Welt dbkandat , •' 
gekommen *' she excelled ' her- ' ■ 
self, her fine control creatingiL. 
rare intensity of enntferioti.' ; 

She was marched ati foe way : 'k ; 
by the London Symphony 
Orchestra's principal _ col" - 
anglais player, Christine? - 
FendrilL who spearheaded: a : 
generally excellent orchestral ; : 
contribution under Richard ' - a 
H ickox's direction. ^ 

Stephen Pettitt 


, The world premiere of Hat 
House: Tkriving on a Riff, a 
£ibuie to Charlie (“Bud") 
Parker with choreography by 
Danny Grossman, opens the 
spnng season of the National 
Ballet of Canada at foe 
9 ^“5** Centre, Toronto, on 
■ l “ * s Programmed 
with Kyhan’s Transfigured 
Mghl and Ashton’s ^ The 
Dream. 


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THE 




April 26 - May 2, 1986 



A weekly guide to 
leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 


day of the 







E m Today jubilant tribesmen in the 

ijis' \ | tiny state of Swaziland are 

^■1/ TRANSVAAL \ § - ; 

BOTSWANA S' \ g celebrating the coronation of their 

/ Johannesburg m " ~ . ~ ~ 

r new boy Jong. The rituals have 

AFWCA been shrouded in a special African 

/ B brand of secrecy: visitors have 

; been welcome but the locals have 

prooked no outside interference. Nicholas Shakespeare 
was among the bemused guests in the warriors’ kraal 


TRANSVAAL 


{BOTSWANA 


[.Johannesburg 


ORANGE 
FREE 
STATE J 


Warriors with high shields 
and red feathers in their hair 
stand by the roadside thumb- 
ing a lift to the royal kraal of 
Lusaseni, some miles down 
the valley beyond the twin 
peaks of Sheba's Breasts. Here 
among the thatched mud huts, 
like upturned shopping bas- 
kets, the tribal regiments have 
been assembling for days. The 
hut floors may be polished 
with dung, but they are trod by 
the Teal powers of the land. 
This is the place — a kind of 
thatched house of Lords - 
where the major decisions are 
made and which forms the site 
of the coronation of 
Swaziland's king. 

Among the crowd converg- 
ing on the kraal are groups of 
chanting women. Wrapped hi 
orange and red cloth, blowing 
whistles and holding the 
torches by which they cut their 
wheat at night, they sing new 
words to an old tone. “We are 
waiting around to see the 
King”, they chant rattling 
small sachets of dried seeds 
about their ankles. “We’re 
going to die waiting to see the 
king." The air is heavy with 
the smell of uncured hide. 

In a warriors' 1 kraal outside 
the royal enclosure, is a man 
ip a leopard-skin loindoth 
with five red feathers in his 
hair and four wives in another 
town. Only-virgins are allowed, 
through the low enhance. 
Outside his hut monkey tails 
are stretched on states to 
make his necklaces and bdts. 

His name is Masodzwo, he 
says, pressing' his tongue 
against his lower teeth. Yes, he 
is an Elder. Sobhuza was his 
uncle. As for the new king’s 
prospects, “the world is mov- 
ing very fest” be saw, strok- 
ing his monkey tails. “It is 
difficult to know if he win 
have the mind of the late 
King." 

Fifteen miles away, at the 
top of a lush vaUey of tall grass 
fields bordered by the moun- 
tains is the Swazi capital, 
Mbabane. Despite a prolifera- 
tion of flags, it is strangely 
placid, like a subtropical mar- 
ket town. 

At the British High 
Commissioner’s residence, at 


the end of a red track over- 
looking the capital, two Range 
Rovers are washed again for 
the arrival of Prince and 
Princess Michael of Kent (the 
Rastafarians worshipped the 
late Duke of Gloucester for 
attending the 1930 ceremony. 
Fterhaps the Swazis will forev- 
er bow at the mention of 
Princess Michael Indeed she 
is already known as the En- 
glish Princess St Michael of 
Kent.) 

Every day a Captain Watts, 
seconded from Knefler Hall, 


seconded from Knefler Hall, 
the Army School of Music, has 
been training a band to play 
the national antham com- . 
posed by David Rycroft of 



Royal factions 
flourished 
in the vacuum 


London University. In the 
downstairs bar ofThe Tavem. 
incongruously half-timbered 
in the style of Benri Inn 
Tudor, some black girls drink 
pint mugs of lager and watch 
two-daydd ITN news bulle- 
tins and a BBC dramatization 
of Oscar Wilde. 

Swaziland has long been a 
haven for South Africans who 
wish to gamble and deep with 
black women. A girl called 
Winny tells me she is a virgin. 
She has just broken up with 
her boyfriend of two years. 
Lowering her head to my ear 
she tells me she wants a man 
die can trust “one hundred 
percent”. 

' In the corner a customer 
douches in a Coronation tee- 
shirt and winks. Then adjust- 
ing his green cap, he totters op 
to pinch a cigarette. Tm 
sony”, he says thickly. 
“That’s bad behaviour for a 


• w~ i 

■ 'V i 



Following kk war-time duties as an ARP Warden, 
Charles EiskWbas continued to fight for others. _ 

In bis vrork for charity and® a missionary hcS 
WUt unriiintfv with little financial rt-mrd. 
^ThartXv when he received a number of 
uneJaedlv seC-ere bills. Charles was 6ced wnh the 
jljospeccof "having to seU die one possession he holds 

^OntaSiS of his desperate situation wear RUKBA 

^Not^' - » stop-gap. but on a permanent basis 

^Sfve^ffiSd^ 705 from 3 Fofesdonal 

011 Wped others, don't they deserve 
help now they're in need? _ 



member of the royal family.'’ 
He is a Dlamini, he says, and 
yet another prince. Everybody 
seems to be related to royalty 
in this tiny country. I left him 
to Winny, who did not seem 
too pleated. 

Early last century the Swazi 
King Sobhuza L better known 
as Somhok), wonder of won- 
ders, had a dream. In it he 
dreamed of a white people 
entering his kingdom on 
bouses dragged fry oxen. 
When the whites arrived in 
the 1 840s the interpretation of 
his vision was that they must 
never be fought 

“When you play a piano, 
harmony arises from a mix- 
ture of black and white keys”, 
said his namesake, Sobhuza 
n, the last Swazi long, who 
continued to keep his beauti- 
ful, peace-loving country a 
multi-racial community. “We 
have seen others swallowed by 
crocodiles. We have learnt 
from their lessons.” 

For most of the 20th centu- 
ry Swaziland dozed quietly, 
shaped like a distended egg 
between Marxist Mozam- 
bique and apartheid South 
Africa. It woke with a great 
snort in 1982 on the death of 
its patriarch, whose rule since 
192rmade him the longest - 
reigning monarch in the 
world. For a country, like 
Gulliver, so bound to the 
ground by traditions, it was a 
difficult awakening. 

The key question was who 
should succeed Sobhuza: Tra- 
dition holds that the heir must 
be a left-handed minor with- 
out a full brother. Of 
Sobhuza’s 60 sons, from an 
estimated 112 wives (one 
figure puts his total number of 
children at 600) the choice fefl 
on 14-year-old Prince 
Makbosetive. 

Accordingly ,the youth was 
dispatched to Sherborne pub- 
lic school in Dorset, where he 
is affectionately known as 
Mac. It has been suggested 
that he was sent not only to get 
some O levels but also for his 
own protection. Two years ago 
a witch doctor was arrested in 
Dorset allegedly carrying “un- 
authorized substances” for his 
poisoning. 

In the vacuum left by 
Sobhuza, royal factions flour- 
ished. With the connivance of 
a 6ft footballing prince called 
Mfenasibili, the Queen Regent 
was replated in 1982 by 




lion 


Dlamini’s 

turbulent 

dynasty 

34 telephone numbers.) One <n 
oak three rating royal families 
in Africa - the otters are 
those of Morocco and Lesotho 
— the House of Nkosi-Dlamuu 
can, orally at least, trace its 
way back to Dlamini L who m 
the late 16tt century led hs 
followers from the north-west 
to settle along the Komati 
River. 



Spoiled for choice: Crown Prince Makhosedve at the reed dance; 10,000 barebreasted virgins competed to be his bride 


The laie King Sobhuza !L with 
battleaxe. in 1923 

The history of the royal 
Earnily is spangled with rich 
characters. King Ndvungunge, 
struck by lightning; 
Ndwandwa. clubbed to death 
for poisoning the seven-year- 
old heir (poisoning and witch- 
craft being very much part of 
Dlamini tradition); Maswati 
ITs fifth wife, known as 
“Medvolamafina” — “Short 
Thighs” in Siswati, the na- 
tional language. 




There was an 
absurd air 
of secrecy 


Makhosetive*s mother. Then 
Prince Mfenasibili himself 
was put on trial, charged with 
corruption. It is speculated 
that Makhosetive’s corona- 
tion has been pot forward to 
legitimize the power of the 
dual monarchy which he will 
share with his mother Queen 
NtombL as of yesterday the 
Great She Elephant 

Mbabane, thougb surprised 
by westers interest is agree- 
ably immune to it The Swa- 
zis, a cheerful, self-confident 
people, are installing their 
king. Visitors are welcome so 
long as they do not interfere. 

It was not just our own 
small contingent who had 
materialized in Swaziland. 
The world's journalists had 
descended, hungry for hard 
and exotic information. Yet as 
with much of Swaziland's 
power, the facts lay behind the 
kraal doors of the Elders (who 
only become known when 
they fell from favour). In a 
land where tradition is mar- 
rial to modernity and is very 
much the dominant partner, u 
is they who decide the course 
of events and any information 
to be released. 

“Elders see a virtue in 
postponing any decision until 
the last moment”, said a 
European diplomat “It de- 
pends on how the spirits take 
them.” This week the spirits 
are keeping their distance. 


Having several months ago 
issued the coronation date as 
April 25, officials were recent- 
ly ordered not to say anything 
about it, or about the late 
King, or even about the 
Prince. Nor do invitations — 
dress tribal or lounge suit — 
give any time. 

Such is the absurd air of 
secrecy that we are forced to 
chew over some of the facts we 
do have; at the last coronation 
in 1921 Sobhuza wore an 
ivory codpiece; today's Crown 
Prince chose his first wife, 
Poppy, from a reed dance two 
years go by video-taping the 
10,000 barebreasted virgins 
and taking the tape back to 
Sherborne. In one of the 
ceremonies performed by the 
prince during his last summer 
holidays he had to kill a lion. 
Unfortunately, lions are ex- 
tinct in Swaziland so one had 
to be imported from South 
Africa. The courtiers were so 
concerned for the prince's 
safety that they drugged the 
beast and only then did he 
nobly slay it. 

The local papers yield little 
more information. “Booze 
ban” is the headline of one, 
beneath which is carried the 
Prime Minister’s decision to 
lock up anyone found drunk. 
The only other news is a 


decision by the goalkeeper of 
the Dribbling Wizards to re- 
main in the team. “I couldn't 
leave the Wizards without the 
blessing of Prince 
Mfanasibili”. he said of his 
incarcerated patron. 

Promise to an end of specu- 
lation came with an an- 
nouncement of a press 
briefing. This was held in a 
large hall behind the Royal 
Swazi Hotel — and Casino — 
which had been designated for 
foreign dignitaries like 
P.W. Botha and Maureen 
Reagan, daughter of Ronald. 

The 400 journalists were 
asked to begin proceedings by 
standing up and praying. We 
were then addressed by the 
chief of protocol. Mr Dube, a 
small man in a brown suit 
“I’m very tired”, he began, 
and then asked us to imagine 
the chief of protocol as the 
shock absorber in a car. The 
difficulties of satisfying the 
press requirements of the 
modem world were plainly 
telling. 

He told us we could not grab 
an elder or go into the royal 
kraal. *‘The Swazis are 
policemen", he said, attempt- 
ing another metaphor. “When 
you hide in my house, tomor- 
row I take you to the 
policeman.” He warned us not 


to be deceived by appear- 
ances. “The richest man in the 
land has a metre of cloth 
round his waist and lives in a 
hut surrounded by 1,000 cat- 
tie. He is richer than you are”, 
he added, his voice rising. “He 
can employ you.” 

The assembled journalists, 
however, were more interest- 
ed in information than em- 
ployment. Any information at 
all. Who was coming? What 
was happening? When? 
Where? But the briefing ended 
inconclusively with another 
prayer. 




Back on song: 
Elaine Page on 
how Chess lured 
her to the 
West End, page 18 


SATURDAY 


Ans Diary 
I Auctions 
Bridge 
Chess 
Concerts 
Cookery 
Crossword 
Dance 
Drink 
Caring Ont 
Films 


18 Galleries 18 

15 Gardening 13 

17 Opera 18 

17 Photography 18 

18 Radio 17 

13 Review 17 

17 Rock & Jazz 18 

18 Shopping 15 

13 Tetertshm 17 

13 Tratel 12 

18 TV films 17 


FREE DELIVERY OFFER! 






The facts lay 



; - >v; trTJk U-y • 




Eyes on the throne: hope in the heart of a reed dancer 


kraal doors 


In the dark outside. I caught 
sight of Sir John Curie. Our 
former ambassador to Liberia, 
he had been advising the 
Swazis for two months on 
protocol. “It’ll be all right on 
the night”, he promised confi- 
dently. As he scratched his 
blue po'o-neck I could all but 
detect a Cheshire cat smile at 
the way the Swazis had so 
charmingly sidestepped “the 
galaxy of the international 
community", as the press had 
been so flatteringly described 
within. In this way privacy 
and dignity were being 
preserved. 

In the event, no one was 
allowed to witness the private 
rituals on Thursday night and 
early Friday morning at which 
Makbosetive assumed his 
mantle as Lion of the Swazis. 
Connected with the phases of 
the moon, and involving herb- 
al distillations and impromp- 
tu incantations. Makbosetive 
was bathed in secret fluids and 
in the afternoon presented to 
his feathered regiments. 

Today at the Somholo stadi- 
um, clad in spear and shield, 
he will dance with his people 
to the tune of special corona- 
tion music (soon to be re- 
leased on an EMI label). 
Tomorrow he will invite his 
whole nation to a garden 
party. Then it’s back to 
Sherborne for his G-Ievels. 



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almos 
beenc 
years, 
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12 


THE TIMES SATU^AY^g^6J9S6 


■ ‘.■j*' 


Edited bv Shona Crawford Poole TRAVEL ■ r to a traveller 

* ” — A " • 



n. 




From 


the Finnish 


‘ s Finland a sea congested 
with islands, or it one 
huge forest sunk with 
lakes? Ten minutes be- 
fore landing in the heart of 
North Karelia, the question, 
and any possible answer, is 
not a little disconcerting. The 
dense pine and birch forests 
yield grudgingly to a sliver ot a 
runway, inches away, it seems, 
from the next watery expanse, 
and the plane has landed. 

Joensuu must be the tiniest 
airport in the western world: 
beyond the shed which serves 
as cafe, baggage reclaim and 
ticket office, lies a sturdy 
lumbeijack of a town, less 
glamorous than its festive 
neighbour. Savonlinna, but a 
perfect centre for exploring the 
land of the Kalevala. Finland Is 
ereat folk story epic, and the 
spiritual and cultural heart oi 
the country. 

North Karelia in general, 
and Joensuu in particular, is 
just the sort of place to make 
the tourist feel like a traveller 
once again. 

Nothing, except the irresist- 
ible flat, spicy pasties, filled 
with hot potato pu«e. “ 
handed to you on a plate. I ne 
signposts in this l an d- ° ev ^*' 
oped on the very periphery of 
European political, trading 
and cultural influences, are all 
but impenetrable. 

The' language, stubbornly 
independent from more famil- 
iar European. Scandinavian or 
Slav root systems, seems to 
bear no resemblance to any- 
thing you've ever seen before. 
Does the road lead to a castle, 
a lake or a public conve- 
nience? There's only one way 
of finding out. And when vou 
do, it’s all there: museums full 
of icons, tiny wooden art 
ealleries. boat trips, canoeing, 
hiking, fishing. You do the 



houses of the 19th century line 
up on the right- 
Where the estuary curves 
into the lake shore and .the 
damp air of the marshy birch 
woods is heavy with thei scent 

of wild lily of the vaUey. the 

Vainoniemi VtUa sands Ute a 
stage-set for a Chekhov play. 
A little further on is a massive 
new open-air stadium; for 
Joensuu, like any sizeable 
Finnish town, celebrates the 
long light days of its short 
summer with festivals of mu- 
sic, song and street theatre. 

Joensuu is at die crossroad 
of three mapped routes: The 
Blue Way, the FinnKh Lake- 
land Way, and the Bard and 
Border Way. With a or, won 
one of many 

trips, monasteries, lakes and 
rapids are just minutes away. 


discovering, and every trans- 
port connection and service 
seems to click into place so 
well. 

Joensuu presents its curricu- 
lum vitae at a glance. A young, 
virile trading town founded in 
1845 where the estuary’ of the 
log-thick river Pielisjoki opens 
out into Lake Pyhaselka. it is 
still quietly industrious. Mar- 
kets. sawmills and steamers 
bustle on the perimeter of a 
tidy, sedate residential and 
university town, planned 
neatly along the axes of its 


crossroads. The longest, 
straightest avenue, the 
Kirkkokatu. displays the 
town’s ecclesiastical polarity, 
with the spire of the red-bnck 
Lutheran church at one end 
saluting the green and white 
timbered Orthodox at the 
other, camouflaged among the 
ubiquitous silver birches. _ 

It is a town for walking; 
along the Rantakatu (Shore 
Street), rafts of logs float 
downstream to the left, and 
the immaculately restored 
pastel-limbered merchants 


S tubbornly sticking out 

for the longest possible 

day and fewest possi- 
ble fellow-travellers, l 
caught the 7.30am post-™®, 
which trundled in and out of 
die Bard and Border country 
flinging out bundles of i mail 
and newspapers a 100 ®.*** 
route- The Tuupovarra re^on 
has all the fascination of any 
frontier land: Orthodox 
shrines, cemeteries, old 
trenches and fortifications are 
scattered across sparsely pop- 



ulated, gently undulating ex- 
panses of fc 


and 


jo rest, lake 

piUkJbJ W" JWW- 

agricultural land. . 

Tourism is still at its teeth- 
ina stage. At Hoilola (one 
shop, one church and a lake) a 
new centre of holiday flats, 
built in sweet-smelling wood, 
opened last June. 

Korpiselka. spotlessly clean 
and spacious, with a superb 
restaurant and crafts centre, 
was built to commemorate a 

hotel begun three montits 
before the war, across the 


Russian border, then aban- 
doned in 1939. The local 
residents, who have a strong 
sense of the historical signifi- 
cance of its renaissance on 
Finnish soil are eager to do 
anything, explain anything for 

'°01d Karelian farmhouses 
are being renovated for ac- 
commodation and as lived-in 
museums of folk culture. The 
nearest you’ll get to reindeer 
may well be the casserole pot, 
but for ornithologists, there is 
a bird sanctuary of §reat 
beauty at Lake SSapen in 


travel notes 


nearby Vartsila and, for walk- 
ere, discreetly burgeoning cen- 
tres of rest and hospitality in 
acres of space and silence. 

Jouko Ahti, who runs me 
Hoilola craft centre, wdL for 
the equivalent of about five — 

pounds, row you out in his a Fmnair Holiday Ticket, 
fishing boat, Rajasust (border offering 1 5 days ofur^mted 
wolf), to the Russian border, a air travel wrtftmRraand w 
silent, watery no man’s land avaftabfe at S25C. 
where Finns, tourists, and- prices atthe now 


Fmnair flights. London to 
Helsinki, from £167 return 
Super Apex to £500 return 
Executive Class. 


tepofanOi^odoxdrarch 

For general and 
information, brochure* on 

iwantnK nlfftTlHO lfXSUSiV0 




inclusive . 
contact the 


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SSSSSSSSSEr 

W. F.Khtoy (Atffooe _PW»s 
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Tour 
Britain 
at you* 

ownspeed ■■■ 

Discover the delights of the British 
countryside, the charm and beauty o! 
its villages and old towns, on one of 
our Car Tours of Britain. Ask us !o 
Bdvisa on your route, pre-book your 
hotels or tell you about our seven day 
tour with six comfortable overnight 
stops. 


,g me axes of its pastel-limbered merchants' berore me 

Seasoned reputations on the 

. , =. - must eat at Filippos , ar 

Take recommendations with a pinch of a 

of salt advises Shona Crawford Poole 



This year s Joensuu 

FMand festivals. wnto.to the 
Tourist Board. 


Car Tours start at £165 per person. 

and include a double room with 

private bath or shower: dinner; and a 
full breakfast 

You can add extra interest to your 
holiday at many 1nter-Hoie]& At me 
hotel or close by you could find qoh. 
water sports or guided walks for 
instance: a good opportunity to follow 
your own interest*, or hnd new ones. 
Ask for details. 

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please contact: Car Touts Desk, 
Inter-Hotel, 35 Hogarth Road, 
London SW5 OQH. 

Tel: (01) 373 3241 



The embarrassingly bad is 
even trickier to write about 
than the sublime. .Almost any 
caustic or intemperate com- 
ment will season eulogy suffi- 
ciently to banish the thought 
that ft could be advertising, 
not criticism. A convincing 
panning is less easily brought 
off. and in the case of restau- 
rants. why bother? People do 
not book tables at places they 
have never heard of. _ 

That, howeveT, is just the 
point. The two worst meals l 
encountered on my recent 
travels were eaten in places 
good reputations. I 


had been possible to. book a 
table at L’Auberge du Pere 
Bise at 24 hours' notice. Baby 
Doc was holed up a long way 
from Haiti in the hotel next 

S, on me lakeside at A^c, 

cv and a few glum French 
policemen plodded along me 
shore carrying machine guns. 

In me dining room 1 count- 
ed four men who were recog- 
nizably assigned to the Baby 
Doc story. Door-stepping, as 
hanging around waiting tor 
people to move or speak is 
Sued in this inky business, ts 
rarely done in such comton. 
Maybe it was to insure 






ttaE reslauranls when they 


guidebooks. But it is very 
disconcerting to be able to find 
not a single good word for a 
famous old restaurant that has 
three rosettes in the new 
French edition of the Guide 
Michelin. 

There had been no premo- 
nition of me disappointment 
ahead, except, perhaps, mat it 




The Fjords 
or Russia 
from £595! 


The Thermal Spa 

Salsomaggiore 

Situated tn the EmiSa Romagna 
regan of northern Italy. 5abwnag- 
<$cte has brought refief to thous- 
ands of sufferers frorn 


Now you can sail to ttie 
spectacular fjords of Norway 
or all the way to Leningrad for 
as little as ES95. including 
return flights from London or 
Manchester to Copenhagen. 

That's ttie home port of our 
luxury flagship Ocean 
princess. Every Sunday 
beginning June 1. she cruises 
to the best of Scandinavia, 
offering a choice ot two 7-day 
itineraries. 


Ul I _ - 

menu. If 6 also highly reran- 
moiled to those wto want to roa* 

andrecwwffomdresssympwns 

Ettdlenl enJision fablitae&large 

indoor and outdoor wrammng 

For Sabomaagiore brochure. 1 
contact- 



uca i“"“ . 

are three-quarters empty, mat 
the staff was loud and ingrati- 
ating. The grub when it came 
was worse than disappointing: 
it was downright poor. 

A full catalogue ot the 
ldtchen’s failings would make 
dismal reading. Not one dish 
that came to me table was 
really good. Three stand out in 
my memory as being pm™u- 
larly unworthy of any tnree 

Sl3 The^msolicited plate of hot 
one-mournful savouries mat 
came with me menus looked 
and lasted as if it had been 
reheated three P mes > 
sauce on an escalop ot tresn 
foie gras had congealed even 
before me dish was served. 
This dish was quite simply 
badly cooked and badly pre- 
sented. And as for a hot lemon 
souffle that finished the meal, 
I am not sure that I could even 
have identified lemon as the 
flavouring if l had eaten a 


must eat at Filippo’s” , and 
with little likelihood of an 
available evening, I went for 
lunch. . „ 

The old stone house has 
pleasant rustic furnishings. 
Country preserves, salamis, 
hams, fruit and nuts are its 
decorations and feature aram 
on the flat pnee menu; 30,uuu 
v:-. -. lire translates to about £1 3.50. 

v The wine is red, white or pink 

'< and it is £3 a bottle. 

There were so many inter- 
esting traditional northern 
Italian specialities on the 
menu that choice is difficult 
Decisions made, the wmt- 
ress laughed and said mat 

everything was offered, and so 

H was. A plate of prosciutto, 
thinly cut slices from the 
middle of the ham and 
thicker, sweeter ones from the 
knuckle, arrived with a platter 
of salamis to cut at the table. 
Tiny, fresh Toraini cheese 
with herbs or paprika replaced 
the meats, and were followed 
by silver anchovy fillets, 
tongue in tomato and caper 
sauce, pickled vegetables, ad- 
ads, a bagna cauda of red 
peppers and celery baked m 
oil with anchovies and anoth- 
er local dish of beans baked 
with pork rind and herbs 
called cotiche con fagiole. To 
complete mis cavalcade came 
a slice of boiled ham with 
cabbage, wine cured sausage, 
potatoes and apple sauce, 
rate oi Dishes passed between the 
about a happy tables with picnic informality. 
La Mai son de Then there was a choice of 



Mont Blanc: a splendid feast 
for the eyes at least 

mouthful with my eyes shut 
To add insult to injury the 
staff disappeared before the 
diners had finished their cof- 
fee. It was not 11.30pm. The 
bill for food alone - one menu 
at 400 francs, three hrst 
courses, three main dishes, 
and two puddings - was a 
whopping 1,675 francs. At the 
exchange rate prevailing in 
early March mat is £176, 
which could have been jusn- 
fied only if me cooking had 
been inspired. 

Now before ray next tale of 
woe, how ' " “ 1 

discovery. 


and hot chocolate sauce was 
irresistible. In fact the whole 
experience was such a dehght 
that the recommendation had 

to be shared, and the following 
evening I went bade. 

Ostensibly me deal was no 
different, but everything had 
changed for the worse. 
Filippo’s suffers from its own 
popularity and in the evening 
crush me same marvellous 
hors d’oeuvres arrived too 
thick and fast and m some 
cases not at alL The choice of 
freshly cooked pasta was not 
offered. Dishes of overbaked 
pasta were plonked down, 
followed by an unbidden as- 
sortment of main courses 
a gyun in baking dishes. 

I would not cross the old 
lady's doorstep again, but that 
is no reason why you should 
not look forward to lunch at 
La Maison de Filippo if you 
happen to be passing- 
l wonder too if the lunches 
at Pere Bise are better man the 
dinners. Or if summer, when 
they are busy and mere are 
tables set out on terraces 
overlooking the lake, is a 
better time to eat mere than 
spring when everything is 

quiet. .. . T 

All things considered, 1 
reckon those Michelin men 
have a completely impossible 
task. 



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l| | AN OASIS IN 1HE MEDMAM 













j . 7. ... ~_ . . ^ --:' 


*V v. 


■i \ Cl 





AY APRIL 26 1986 


- 

l!v‘i 


TRAVEL 


r - aoi; 


i i \ \ J ; 

w ui ^ u; 


John Young tests 
Turkish waters, 
accompanied by 
]3rian, an amiable 
surfing hound 

With ' tourism supplanting' 
travel, holidays have become 
increasingly predictable. So it 
was a stimulating change to 
join a small group cm a sailing 
holiday in Turkey,, without 
any of us having more than an 
inkling of what it would be 
like. 

As a one-time yach tsman of 
modest pretensions, I use the 
word “sailing" rather loosely-, 
all the seamanship was left to a 
professional crew of three and, 
although our admirable vessel 
equipped with stoat main 
and mizzen masts and an 
ample supply of real canvas. 
Captain Nejat showed a dis- 
tinct preference for the diesel 
engine as the quickest 
of getting from one anchorage 
to the next Perhaps “boating” 
would be a better tarn. 

Turkey has in recent years 
become an increasingly popu- 
lar cruising ground. The Ana- 
tolian coast, mostly 
uninhabited rock and scrub. 

It has all the stark* 
bright beauty of 
neighbouring Greece 

■ ■ ■■ 

rises in places to mountainous 
heights and - indented by 
thousands of deep water coves 
- it has aD the stark, bright 
beauty of neighbouring. 
Greece, whose islands nuzzle 
the Aegean coast 
For much of the year there 
is a steady stream of traffic 
between the Greek islands and 
the Turkish' mainland, mostly 
cruise liners and ferries, but 
also a significant proportion of 
private yachts. East meets 
west at dozens of junctures, 
but suggestions that the whole 
area must be a smugglers’ 
paradise were met with polite 
evasion. 

Turkey is a revelation in 


set for sea dogs 



At skIm* the gnlet, bn3Ft for comfort; bat capable of speed 



I 


has not yet succumbed to 
mass tourism, though I dare- 
say that is only a matter of 
time; and it boasts a vastly 
superior cuisine. Our meals, 
whether cooked on board or 
eaten ashore is isolated 
tavemas, were delicious and, 
thanks to a drastic devalua- 
tion of the Turidsh /ire; unbe- 
lievably cheap. 1 
As befits a country at the 


jpussroads of Europe and 
Asia. Turkey has a split per- 
sonality. Embarrassed by a 
history of political instability, 
the pro-westerners emphasize 
the country’s historic Hnl« 
with Europe. But in the far 
reaches of the eastern interior, 
we were given to understand, 
thing? are somewhat different; 
the country is almost wholly 
Muslim, yet the muezzin call- 
ing people to prayer appears to 
have little status in a society 
which rejects Islamic law and 
has no scruples about such 
things as western dress, alco- 
hol and pop music. 

One of the centres* of the 
boating boom is Bodrum, also 
known as Halicarnassus, the 
birthplace of . Herodotus. Its 
main historic attraction, how- 
ever, has nothing to do with 
ancient Greece; it is a huge 
Crusader castle with a central 
hall, bedecked in banners and 
pennants, as if straight out of 


medieval England. The town 
is small, compact, clean and 

charming. 

An increasing number of 
yachts owned by Europeans 
who are tired of cold, wet 
summers, are berthed in Tur- 
key; the owners are willing to 
forgo weekend sailing in 
exchange For a month or two 
in the sun, and hope to defray 
part of the cost by chartering. 
But ours was not a conven- 
tional yacht; it was a local boat 
known as a gulei and aptly 
named Lotus. There are doz- 
ens of these handsome vessels 
taking tourists up and down 
the coast; there is no standard 
design but they all appear to 
be ketch-rigged, broad- 
beamed and with a fairly 
shallow draught 

Some 60ft long and with an 
18ft beam, Lotus can sleep 10 
passengers and three crew; in 
fact we were only six, includ- 
ing our Turkish host, Teo. and 


THE TIMES COOK 


A healthy shade of spring greens 


Shona Crawford Poole stumbles across 


some seasonal and colourful dishes 

Filleting several dozen back Risotto verb® 

numbers of Vogue for their Saras two to four 

cookery articles passed a 1 70q (6oz) raw spinach 
pleasant evening. Seeing Tessa 3^(102) butter 

Tracer’s strong and beautiful ■■ 

food photographs spread out 1 tafatesptraoh v e oll — 

on the floor was to be deficit- 2 shaflota, finely chopped 
ed again by her creative eye. 22 5g (8oz) artoorio rice 

Kfiaeasr 

FtesWy grated Parmesan 

JB few years ago jumped from — 

the page. It was for a risotto Extract ^ juice from the 
\erde % an uncomplicated dish ij} a jujee maker, 

of rice cooked in slock and 2 teraat ively, Wend or pro- 
coloured with 5pmacnjtnce.11 cess jj without additional 
did not sound all that promisr ^ - d nntfl it IS a fine puree, 
ing. and I am not sure whyj squeeze out the juice, by 
tried it except that I have UKca ^mgmg the pulp in a dean 
so many of her recipes over doth. Set the juice aside, 
the years. pat the butter and oil in a 

It is a «fish to please heavy-based pot and 

aesthetes and trenchermen ^ ^ shallots. Soften them 
alike ami has just die right ^ the fat, then stir in the rice, 
touch of spring 10 bri dge th e Continue stirring the rice on a 
awkward gap between winter lQW heat while at the same 
roots and the first homes tinie heating the stock to 
grown asparagus. boiling point in another pan. 


WISKFIELD 

PLACE 




Day Courses in 
Cordon Bleu Cookay 
and Cottxumce Spry 
FtotDerArreugixg 

Come for an efijovatjie dflv 

out at WinkfieM Piece: 
onTues..*ted a«*Thura. 
each wee* Wmkfieid Wace 
hotels flay courses m Cana an 
Bteu Cookery, se^resttne* 
combined efithConstfince 
Sp»y FlowW Arranging. 
P/Kef IS Mpcr verson 
■nc. cxJtea. 2 ha w 

cookery dsnonsWIWI*- 

built: tunefleo*. 
and an ahemoem coonery 
or flower arranging 
demonstration totloMw 
try lea. 

Av*be*y cl Bhor. sndxxt 
courses rfi ana 

ftowar arr&"p*-"=s ** 

ffVJMOO-O 3e<>C*<W5. 

Confer Bleu foods 
areoarad at tfclrtidwM V* 
forwle and thcr* is a 
well ssxlKjshO© 

Ftw feather tftaai!* puws® 
corttacr 

i_- * ■ 


Risotto vertte 

Servos two to tour 

170g(6oz) raw spinach 

30p(loz) butter 

1 tablespoon olive oil 

2 shaflote, finely chopped 

225g(8oz)arboriorice 

750ml (1 % pints) home- 

made chicken stock 

Salt and freshly ground 

black pepper 

Freshly grated Parmesan 
cheese 

Extract the juice from the 
spinach in a juice maker. 
Alternatively, Wend or pro- 
cess it without additional 
liquid until it is a fine puree, 
then squeeze out the juice, by 
wringing the pulp in a dean 
doth. Set the juice aside. _ 

Pat the butter and oil in a 
lame, heavy-based pot and 
add the shallots. Soften them 
in the fin, then stir in the rice. 
Continue stirring the rice on a 
low heat while at the same 
time heating the stock to 
boiling point in another pan. 

Stir a ladJefull of bot stock 
into the rice, and continue 
stirring it gently on a low heat 
until the stock has been almost 
completely absorbed. Add 
more stock, a ladle at a tone, 
i ontil most or all of it has bom 
absorbed and the rice is 
almost tender. 

Add the spinach juice, stir- 
ring until it is partially ab- 
sorbed as well. Season the 
dramatically coloured risotto 
with salt and pepper to taste 
and serve it at once with a 
sprin kling of freshly grated 
pannesan cheese. 

Stirring is an important part 
of the risotto-making process. 
The fet grains of arbono nee 
are rubbed together to pro- 
duce a creamy sauce in which 
the rice is perft^ susP 6 ™^ 
the risotto should be moist 
rather than wet, and each 
S? of rice should offer a 
little bite of resistance. 

Still on the subject of spring 
greenery, and stiH in Ijaty* 
Mima wife a 5011 °* E reen 
omelette, «• tmm ** 
warm or cold. Basil is a 
traditional herb In fhflaia, but 
mine is not np-jet, so sorreL, 
which has been thriving m the 
spring showers, has been sub- 
Sitmed- Experiment with 
leafy mixtures of watercress, . 
tarragon, coriander or chives. 



Frfttata verdo 

Serves two 
3 large eggs 

A small handful of cooked, 
chopped spinach 

A small handful of 
raw.shredded sorrel 


fresh panstey or mixed 

herbs 

Sett and freshly ground 

black pepper ■ 

1 teaspoon butter 

Break the eggs into a bowl and 
beat them lightly. Stir in the 
the spinach, sorrel paisley, 
herbs and seasoning 

Heat a small omelette pan 
and add the butter. Pour in the 
eggs and cook them slowly, 
without stirring, until they are 
almost cooked. Finish the 
frittsta by cocking the top 
under a heated grill. Serve it 
hot warm or even cold. 

Small warm or cold fritxata 
can take the place of sand- 
wiches on picnics. 

A few leaves of tender 
young spinach or sorrel can 
also be included in this water- 
cress and pear salad. It is 
parti ciliary good with rich 
meats like duck, pork or ham, 
served hot or cold as the 
occasion or weather dictate. 
Watercress and pear salad 

Serves two 

1 bunch watercress 

Iripgpear 

i tablespoon lemon juiea 
For tf>« dressing 

30g(loz) Roquefort 

cheese 

4 tablespoons milk 

1 tablespoon oil 


black pepper to teste 

Wash and dry the watercress 
and remove any coarse stems. 
Arrange it in a serving bowL 
Quarter and core ' the pear. 


peeling it if you like, and cut it 
into slices. Stir these in the 
lemon juice before adding 
them to the bowL 
Blend the cheese, milk, oil 
and seasonings to a smooth 
creamy dressing. Just before 
serving the salad, toss the 
leaves and fruit in the 
dressing. 

With the addition of a few 
walnut halves and cottage 
cheese, watercress and pear 
salad makes a good light 
lunch. 

Fenugreek leaves are used 
for making methi goosht* one 
of the best dry lamb cumes. 
Methi, or fenugreek, is also an 
excellent addition to spinach 

sou&. 

Spinach and metM soup 

Serves four 


1 large onion, finely 

chopped 

1 large potato, peeled and 

. chopped 

900g (2tb) fresh spinach or 
450g (lib) frozen spinach, 

thawed 

1 bunch methi (fenugreek 

leaves) 

t_2fltres (2 pints) home- 
made chicken stock 

Salt and freshly ground 

Mack pepper 

Chopped chives or spring 
onion tops to garnish 

Heat the oil in a large pan and 
add the chopped onion. Cook 
gently until onion is tender, 
but not coloured. Stir in the 
potato, washed spinach and. 
methi, and stock. Bring to the 
boil and cook until the potato 
is tender. 

Puree the soup in a mouh 
legumes, processor, or by pass- 
ing it through a coarse sieve. 
Season it with salt and pepper 
and serve it hot with a 
sprinkling of chopped chives 
or spring onions on top. 


EATING OUT 


his English wife, plus an 
amiable sheepdog called Bri- 
an. Although dearly designed 
for comfort, a gulet can, I 
imagine, achieve a fair speed 
under 

But the sight and experience 
were denied us, since the daily 
routine was to motor a few 
miles along the coast, drop 
anchor and spend the rest of 
the day eating, drinking, 
swimming and sunbathing. 
One day we were under way at 
Sara “in order to get the 
journey over with", which 
hardly seemed quite the pur- 
pose of a boating holiday. 

But it would be churlish tc 
complain. Apart from a highly 
dramatic thunderstorm on the 
second afternoon, we enjoyed 
idyllic weather. 

Our leisurely week took us 
round the gulf south and east ■ 
of Bodrum, which according 
to my atlas is called Kenne 
Kurfezi, and indudes a large 
bay known as English Har- 
bour; it was used as a secret 
refuge by the Royal Navy 
during the Second World War. 
It seemed entirely appropriate 
that the first person we saw as 
we rounded the headland was 
a middle-aged swimmer wear- 
ing a Panama hat. 

Another day was spent on 
Castle Island which, besides a 

We saw a middle- 
aged swimmer 
wearing a Panama 

mysterious collection of an- 
cient ruins overgrown with 
pine scrub, also boasts 
Cleopatra’s Beach, so called 
because Mark Antony is re- 
puted to have shipped the 
sand from Egypt for the 
delectation of his paramour. 

Guiets tend to follow each 
other to the same anchorages, 
so that we found ourselves in 
fairly constant company with 
one full of topless Dutch girls 
and another full of English 
Hooray Henrys who were all 
right except when they became 
extremely drunk and began 
throwing water bombs. Even 
Brian the dog rather took 
exception to that 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Golden Horn Travel (01-434 
1 962) can arrange two week 
cruise packages for 
between £51 5 and £839 a 
person, depending on the 
time of year. McCulloch Marine 
(01 -452 7509) win charter 
boats from £862 to £2^77 a 

will also anunj^fllghts. 


Lakeland is a showcase for 
British food. England’s gastro- 
nomic Riviera. So what is 
special about British food? 
Well, dessert comes before the 
cheese, and if you are not in 
your seat by 8.30pm, you are 
lucky to eat at all 

John Tovey is the Master of 
Miller Howe, a boarding 
house on the grand scale 
above Windermere. His cook- 
ing has filled a pile of cuttings 
albums two foot high with 
enthusiastic reviews. 

Mr Tovey used to run a 
repertory theatre, and it 
shows. He plays to packed 
houses and likens a meal to a 
five-act drama. Miss the soup 
and you will never follow the 
plot. The audience are ushered 
to their seats together, the 
lights dim. and the food is 
served like a pageant. No 
choice before the dessert. Yet 
for all the showmanship and 
feme, there is nothing squea- 
mish: chunky liver baked to a 
reassuring resilience, bacon 
bits like bullets in the salad. 

The star of the show, parad- 
ed under the spotlights, is 
roast leg of lamb. Lakeland 
lamb is, indeed, so excellent 
that a Westmorland Gazette 
literary luncheon at Trust 
House Forte's Old England 
Hotel quite puts Foyle's at the 
Dorchester in the shade. Mr 
Tovey's lamb, beset with sev- 
en vegetables, has not a hint of 
pink. Hung for three-and-a- 
balf weeks, it could possibly 
kill you with salmonella poi- 
soning if it did. 

At White Moss House by 
Rydal Water, Susan Butter- 
worth recruited Peter Dixon 
for her parents' kitchen by 


Mouth 

watering 

lakeside 





\ -or C v.v; 


Unsullied: UDswater 

marrying him. Now patriotic 
gastronomes say that the best 
of all British food is served in 
this civilized retreat. Certainly 
my meal of Tovey-ish soup, 
pike and salmon souffle, 
crispy mallard with vivid 
damson sauce. Sussex pond 
pudding and varied English 
cheeses with home-made oat 
biscuits was ample justifica- 
tion for Susan's selection. 

Miller Howe, Windermere 
(096 62 2535). Set dinner at 
8pm (or 7pm and 9.30pm), 
£22.50 inc VAT and service. 
White Moss House, Rydal 
Water (096 65 295). Set dinner 
at 8pm, £1 5.95 inc VAT. 
Michael's Nook, Grasmere 
(096 65 496). Lunch at 1pm, 
£17.50; dinner at 8pm for 
7.15pm and 9.(5pm), £24 inc 
VAT. 

Sharrow Bay Hotel. 

Ullswater (085 36 301). Lunch 
at 1pm, £17.50: dinner at 
8pm. £27.50 inc VAT and 
service. 


Again there is no choice before 
pudding, service is at 8pm, 
and if the hotel and neigh- 
bouring cottage are full, there 
are only four spare spaces for 
racial callers. The wine list is , 
excellent. 

According to the Goad Food 
Guide, the chef at Michael's 
Nook (a mansion) above 
Grasmere is William Mac- j 
Leod. Egon Ronay says it is ; 
Paul Vidick. They are both | 
wrong, and the surprising ; 
thing is that it does not matter, i 
Proprietor Reg Gifford, sick of I 
seeing his chefs poached as ( 
frequently as the salmon, did 
not vouchsafe a name for the 
AN. Other trainee currently 
in the kitchen. Anyway, the 
meal was terrific. And I chose 
it myself. Well, all but the 
mulligatawny soup, I did. My 
visit coincided with the third 
return of the West Riding 
Food and Wine Society, no 
mean judges evidently. 

But the noblest host of 
Lakeland has to be the patri- 
cian Francis Coulson at 
Sharrow Bay on unsullied 
Ullswater. Incredibly he is 
dismissed with a mere red M 
in the current Michelin. More 
sensitive than even his finest 
ingredients (fresh scallops are 
delivered at midnight) he has 
suffered cruelly unjust criti- 
cism in the past. But this is as 
close to professionalism as 
British cooking comes. With j 
twelve in the kitchen the ever- 
changing menu is magnificent, 
and you can not only choose 
what you eat. but be spoil! for 
choice. 

Robin Young 


Plaudits on a plate for Park Lane 



V.';wL '><• 1 , 

jk ' r 



Charles Wilson (right) presents the award to Rocco Forte 


“The excellence of the cooking 
is awe-inspiring.” That was 
the Saturday section's verdict 
on Ninety Park Lane, the 
flagship restaurant of Trust 
House Forte. 

Its culinary brilliance 
earned It The Times’s Restau- 
rant of the Year Award, and 
last week Mr Charles Wilson, 
Editor of The Times, presented 
the trophy to Mr Rocco Forte, 
Chief Executive of THF. 

In our Eating Out column, 
we reported that ‘despite the 
multinational corporation im- 
age of THF, their restaurant 
had a personal touch to it 
which made it the most enjoy- 
able venue for a treat Lotus 
Outhier provided the back- 
bone of the menu, bot it had 
been expanded, interpreted 
and executed by a rising young 
British chef, Vaughan 
Archer". 

Mr Archer was also at the 
presentation together with Mr 
Matt Bucdauti, General Man- 
ager of Grosveuor House . 


■fy > «*;. ■ 


IN THE GARDEN 


Box clever 
for mini 
marvels 

Not everybody wants a large 
garden. Nor is it necessary: it 
is still possible to have a 
marvellous mini-garden dis- 
play in window boxes, hang- 
ing baskets or free-standing 
pots. 

It is important not to put 
window boxes on sills that are 
not big enough for them — and 
make sure they are securely 
fixed. Otherwise they may 
drop on somebody’s head. 

The same goes for hanging 
baskets: remember, a window 
box or hanging basket is 
considerably heavier when it 
is watered. Drips from boxes 
or baskets are inclined to 
stain, and if left unattended 
could leave an unsightly mark 
on the path patio or yard. The 
skilled gardener will mate the 
containers waterproof and not 
overwater. 

Containers require some 
time to establish before they 
are moved out into the open, 
so they should be made up 
about now. Most plants used 
for these situations are half- 
hardy or have at least been 
grown under cover. 

The secret of success is a 
good rich soil base in which 
your plants can grow. New 
window boxes and hanging 
baskets can be filled with new 
compost. Go for soilless com- 
posts such as Levington, Ar- 
thur Bowers, Verdi ey or PBI 
soilless compost. Line the box 
with compost, plant the speci- 
mens and fill in the gaps to 
ensure the container is well- 
filled. When watered the com- 
post does not wash away from 
the root balls. 

Boxes which have been used 
before are a little different. 
Ideally you should change the 
compost regularly. Mate as 
good a job as the pocket will 
manage, remove some of the 
compost and add fresh com- 
post to improve the quality. 

Free-standing tubs, boxes 
and the other types of contain- 
er used require the same 
treatment- A complete change 
of compost is needed at the 






High spot: a ha n ging basket 

end of the year. As for window 
boxes and the like, do every- 
thing possible to make sure 
the soil is righL 

Free-standing containers 
are filled using the same 
principles. The compost can 
be stronger in this case. You 
should still use the soilless 
composts, but if required you 
can make up a John Innes 
mixture. Always leave enough 
space at the top of the tub so it 
can be watered after planting. 
In a large tub there should be 
an inch between the top of the 
compost and the rim of the 
tub. 

Once filled, the containers 
can be planted if there is 
shelter and you are satisfied 
that the plants can stand the 
weather. Plant now and wean 
them so that when they do go 
into tbeir permanent positions 
they will not suffer. Watering 
at this time is very important 
as the plants are at their most 
.vulnerable. 

Ashiey Stephenson 


“isropr^ 

THE flOP 

G(«n LINK-STAKES to support 
floppy plants. Safe, unbeatable. 
Used by the National Trust 

FflEE LEAFLET Irom LINK-STAKES Ltd 
Dept MT 2. Upper Boddngion. 
i Dauarmv. NNU 60L Te! 0327 6038 


Whotadifference 



DRINK 


Winning 
ways at 
the sales 


Whatever will those auction 
rooms think of next? Instead 
of conducting sales in the 
dignified and discreet elegance 
of their plush London sale 
rooms, they are off gallivant- 
ing around the countryside. 

Next Thursday there is an 
important spring race meeting 
at Newmarket, with the classic 
1,000 Guineas Stakes as the 
highlight of the afternoon. It 
happens that Tattersalls. the 
famous bloodstock specialists 
based in Newmarket, were 
founded in the same year as 
Christie's, in 1766. and to 
celebrate this happy coinci- 
dence they invited Christie's 
to hold a wine sale in the 
Tattersalls’ Sales Ring on a 
race day. 

The auction house has pur 
together a complete package 
for the whole day, for £55. 
Starting at 8.15am from 8 
King Street. London SW1, it 
consists of a champagne 
breakfast, followed by the 
tasting and wine sale on 
arrival in Newmarket, then 
lunch plus the races, arriving 
back in London at about 
7.30pm. 

But it is more than a day out 
at the races; this small 250-lot 
wine sale has some fine claret 
vintages on offer, including 
?49$, *6 Is, ’66s, '70s and ’82s, 
plus some excellent burgun- 
dies from Prosper Maufoux 
sold under the Marcel 
Amance label. More humble 
lots are also available includ- 
ing Beaujolais, Loire and 
Rhone wines. 

Having started May with a 
bang, cost-conscious wine 
drinkers who still want to 
celebrate the arrival of spring 
in style may well like to be 
reminded of the bargain spar- 
kling wine buy of 1985. I try 
not to repeat recommenda- 
tions in this column, but this 
wine is still so ridiculously 
good and ridiculously cheap it 
would be folly not to do so. 

1 first wrote about 
G.F.Cavalier Brut three years 
ago. Since then it has had a 
name change, from the origi- 
nal Chevalier to Cavalier, due 
to the Burgundian firm of 
E.Cbevalier & Fils objecting 
to the similar name. I have 
also just learnt a good deal 
more about Caves de 
Wissembourg, who make 
G.F.Cavalier. Joyce MacOonaW 




QUESTIONTIME 


We have an eight-year-old 
Peregrine Peach tree in a cold 1 
greenhouse. The fruits, 
thinned to about 6in apart, 
drop off the tree before they- are 
ripe. We have netting to catch 
the fruit, but it still gets 
bruised. What can we do? 

Peaches often shed their fruit 
if the crop is too heavy. You 
say tire Bruits are about 6iu 
apart; this is not nearly 
enough. With trees under 
glass, watering is ranch more 
important than with trees 
growing ont in the borders. 
The tree needs plenty of water, 
particularly when the fruit is 
stoning. It will get no natural 
water, so make sure the tree 
never gets a chance to dry out. 

Before moving to my present 
address J was always able to 

f rom Lily of the Valley, but 
ere I have failed four times. 
Why? 

Lilies of the Valley can be 
temperamental, but given good 
conditions than is no reason 
why they should not grow. The 
soil should be water retentive 
bot at the same time well- 
drained; it should also have a 
high organic content. They 
will grow in full sun, bot prefer 
partial shade. Prepare the 
ground well by adding well- 
rotted organic matter. Plant in 
small clomps, four to six 
crowns, in September to Octo- 
ber. and do not plant deeply. 
The point of the crown when 
planted should be about an 
inch below the surface. Make 
sore they do not dry out 
immediately after planting. 


EfitilCpa*:!' 


This streamlined, spen- 
didiy-equipped place north of 
Strasbourg combines the qual- 
ity of French wine with Teu- 
tonic efficiency, for it is 
German owned. The price has 
increased only fractionally 
since 1 984 from £2.25 to £2.49 
(Majestic Wine Warehouses; 
Oddbins. £2.59). but its quali- 
ty is still high. G.F. Cavalier 
Brut is still a fresh, appley and 
deliciously drinkable wine. 

For the most part, the 
quality of wines from the hot, 
arid country oflsrael is pitiful- 
ly low.However. the Roth- 
schilds have been involved 
with the industry since the late 
19th century and today almost 
three-quarters of Israel's wine 
comes from two impressive 
Rothschild-donated wineries 
to the north and south of Tel 
Aviv, whose wines are sold 
under the Carmel brand 
name. 

I recently tasted an excellent 
red, Ein Gedi. from the Sam- 
son region of Israel made at 
the Carmel winery at Richon- 
le-Zion south of Tel Aviv. 
This pale crimson. 1 1 per cent 
alcohol wine u as made from 
those southern French grapes 
of Carignan and Petiie Syrah, 
and its light, fresh, raspberry- 
like fruit makes it a useful 
spring red. Priced at an ex- 
traordinarily low £1.59 from 
Tesco for the 75cl bottle, it is 
another May bargain. 

Jane MacQuitty 





BARGAINS! 


■CHAMPAGNE; DE TELM0NT N/V £6.95 

A few more days only. 

MUSCADETAC1985 £1.99 

COTES DU RHONE 1985 £1.99 

J P MOUIEX 1988 CLARETS £2.95- £3.78 
Only a few hundred eases left. 




Branches &J1 over London and at Birmingham, 
Cambridge, Gloucester, Oxford, Salisbury and Swindon 

PH0HE 01-881 6262 FOR DETAILS 











THE TIMES SATU RDAY A PRI L 26 1986 



ACRC 
1 Sil 
5 Pten 

8 Son 
rive 

9 Naz 

10 Pun 

11 Me: 

12 Gut 
14 S-ni 
17 Bed 
19 Las 
22 Brw 

24 Ovc 

25 Cro 

26 Issu 

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28 Star 





I 








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IMW, Of Riounlolns ,«a, I ml 
(warti Jun 13 30 £400. Tel; 
66 2STS8 AHer 7 pro 

TENCRtfE V/arro W«* CoW Vll_ l 
la tKW Mur beautiful qulef 
wunin- " roun ' . 

lain \iew». 0329 280659 
XMAS ’KEW YEAR in MajMa- 
new wa front apl 
pools. 5 Star luxury. £2.500. 22 
Dec-12 Jan. 07378 64»«8 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


MEOoc cnarmliK) modem | 
deface hed villa in Puw FareW , 
Sea Lake. Pr1» ale TbhiB; | 
Swimming.' Ruling Pertecl Me 
cfiKrfrm Sip* 5+. From , 
FF2.5004T4.700 per 0 wto. 
TW. OIQ 3314 261 2213 eves 
<eflqfHb sBJOfcenl 

PROVOKE W1A Mr 8. Be- 
tween Ah & A«WW. 4 beds. 3 
bams. Me heated pool uwn sub- 
slantlal grouixt* Available 16- 
30 May. 6-20 June, a ll July. 
T«H 01-788 3062. 


WTO VO ICE . Modem villa for 4 In 
Mils near Lake SI. C**l«i. Ter 
race, burden. Cannes 16 imles. 
£l6S-E27Spw 0344 480110 
fdayc Ol 90S si 66 mwoH 



Villas with a | 

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magic touch > 

1 

A villa, a pool and a 1 

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beautiful view. What ■ 
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otic 

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MENORCA 

Sups villas 8 Apts wfii pools. 
7ms from E129. 

MUAS C. DEL SOL 
Wta. pool, ear & ftts El nd 
7 nts from £163 

BROCHURE ring 
JBWMflFBt 4 KRS 
WMRM&TOH 0925 6*234 
ATOL 1321 


OCHAME MEXICO. Couple 
Will cxchaw charming 2 bed_ 
room, s bathroom bouse u> SJ 
MKpM Attend*. Meslco. with 
car and rwl foe London amrl- 
mcnf Jun- Jul * Atip. Tel: 01 
228 3450 

uji/«ifir. itfwwnjoHB 

from. Canada £165. Caribbean 
£329. Florida £198. LA. A San 
FrancrKo £309. New York 
£249. Dadas £330. Housuon 
£299. Australia £869. Fly 
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Ip we Allas Travel Tel: 01-493 
0071. visa welcome. 

■fAHE TW* OFF lo ffarla. Am- 
sterdam. Brussels. Bruges, 
geneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Sm DudUn. Rnuen. Bou- 
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. L-iniit. MtUl HKIt 

"SR** A.S*S« 


fBVCK MMIUNQ on me Oreuse 
■Loire valley i. Independanre. 
Canadian canoes. 9entiy flow. 
Ing river. unsooDi countryside, 
hotel cbmtofla. superb Mod 
Free brochure. Headwater Holi- 
days. iABTAt Tel: 0606 
782011 


SHUTWS. brtila. Aldemey is- 
land* 01-836-4383, ABTA. 


COACH TOURS IN ITALY. The 
Secret South. A Tasie ofTmrt 

nv or SWendours « me Veneto 

A select mo of value Mr money 
roach lours Also villas & nufeta 
with vwimmino pools and city 
wvefcenu*. Free oroenurr from 
Maple of Italy. Depi T. 47! snen 
herds Bush Green. WI 2 BPS 
Tel; Ol 749 7449 i24 hn 
service i 


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kmu'rf'ViUM 


Small grasps — H-21 people in 
snfftfl VUla Parties throng m 
the Med. small boats— Bodmrn 
■stbooKretir a 2fl bmh m«nr- 
ersher in TurkeflCiwce. end 
hotels with character ta Turtey 
SMB oaxlajr 2 weeks &u» S239 

eaAAbUaQSrn 


OW Swne 

Judges Terras. East Grirwead. 
fo&rtRHWW) 

TW. 0342-22-222 U-ilusl 
or 27272 (ft5l 


THE BEST VBJLAS m i n My 
palmer 3 Partier blue boots 
Available in 4W»rie. MartJefU^ 
South ol France. L ^- A- 4 West 
Indies. MOM have«aff. aU have 
nnvatc pools A none are cheap. 
Brochures 1049 4811 6413 


SHREWSBURY Town Crolrr at 

iractiveiv 

well raiUpped for 6 MMI at 
raMwiiSm and bwuuful 
ecHiuirv CM. Co) TV. GUlsUen 
S5come. Tef 0743 61662 

DMESET/MWOKET borders 

pmSfu'W 

country outage f* 1 *•**"”" 
Garden. OCE, London IT hrs 
(train i 0963 *0469 

MSS ON VVYC 3 mUn. defaehad 

country COtU9C. *■ 

able mid July Apply. Mrs 
pattrhMe 0989 87 687 

wve VALLET L<ar con sleep* 
R 10 2 bams CTV sun KfT gar- 
den views w^AloMay 
£UX»w 0B94 siedia aft 6pm 


SOUTH OF FRANCE prtvalcly 
owned luxury villas ovaitaMt lo 
rerd. Crasse & Cao Feral Con- 
tact. Susie Ashley Farrtn.VBia 
Royal* .Tel: 0753 653S8G. 


MV BRTTTAHY. Ifle comforuWe 
lw<\ Stm 7. | meaceuenl beach- 
es vac 1st wi June Sen* 4 
Oct Tel: 04946 5062. 


CITES DC FRAMCC Normandy 
ctniam. OeUdfitfuf tocalMns 
Brochure NCH 0922 20278 


NR (MASSE. Easy reach Nice. 
Cannes Comfortable Provencal 
farmhouse. i0628i 20859 


ISLAND OF KOS 
KAROAMENA 

Bel^«W ftsbnj «Haj5 0> 
KardamaB. wh® sand beaches. 
ctiuK) & good Tavenos. Good 
ouawy btidisde rooms, stsd- 
hk. vamwits & HoW. 

FULLY INCLUSIVE 
NO EXTRAS 

n» i- na 

May 7-18.14 1153 

Otter 

dates Frew ET58 

PAN PfldPC 
wnOSUWWG SCHOOL 
Cenmia corses 
£25 My «f 

PAN PACffK TtUVa 
tta SOHO SO 
LONDON W1V5S8 
01-734 30M ffdfus ansa) 
AW 2108 


ANDROS, MYKONOS 
SPETSES. CORFU. CRETE 
RHODES t SANDOMN 

Our vaned programme Whites 
suites. wUas. uny MMs and 
much more. Prices from £149 p-0. 

01-434 1647 
ZEUS HOLIDAYS 

67 Repent ffl- London W» 
ACCESS.- VISA- ATOL A1TO 


The Real 
Corfu... 

Mlllevisu - Hie N E. comu 
nalei of breMlnahmgiV 
beautiful ctMRllne. secluded 
villas. Myths lave mas and 
mag- col bays H you appreciate 
newuferhil views of Albanian 
mountain*, long and Lazy 
afternoon*, relaving on your 
terrace, swimming Jn blue. 

3 ol luted water, evening 
ks along thyme scented 
olive grave* - Ihen our Con u 
is for you. 

Stay m the great camion o* 
some of the mosf soughi after 
villa* In the Mediterranean, all 
with maid, some with wok. 

They range from the ulrtratt 
in Uumry w charming cottage*. 
MaU* 1986 the year you got 
the villa rtghu ash for our 
elegant Brochure, including 
Ciete and Paios. 
mtv moi. CV Travel (T) 
a-.- Corfu Department 
- V* . •- 43 Cadogaa street 
LTa-wJ -II London SW3 2 PR 
VjaafP 01-581 0851 
1 fW (589 0152 - 24hr 

cly t^. *— brochure service) 


PRIVATE COM P L E X of SrtW 
with large pool ro«te^4 
bartMoun at Per a. Nr AnmfHn 
and oeach.Sto a s people earn. 
Td 0042 28986 w end and 
nra. 01 654 2363 Hair*. 

ALGARVE ARWMfra. lire A 
Apl*. full avail on exclusive es- 
tate nr sea. Reduced rWea 
May June MahL S.pom tH 
042 088 237 or 042 022 432 

ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE VUla 
Holidays of (Mbncuan for the 
very lew. Tel: 01-491 0802. 73 
SI James's Street SW1. 

ALGARVE. Lovely villa, superb 
v irws. Kr Beach. Sips 6. Avan 1 
June-10 July Maid. Reasonable 
rales 0884 284343. 

ALGARVE. CARVOEUtO Ur* 
private vina steens 6/8 own 
pool maid m- beach & vfflage- 
Aot avail stb* 2 4 01-6503874. 

ALGARVE ALTERNATIVE. Vffla 
Hobdays of dlsUnctMn for the 
irry lew Tel- 01^191 0802.73 
St Minn's Street. SWt. 

LUXURY VILLAS wnh BOOL Vale 
do Lobo. Vilamoura areas. For 
cofoor bnocnurv ret 0623 
827746 ABTA 

VELAS to rent in Vale Do Lobo 
and Qtdufa Do Lago. Algarve 
Portugal also Menorca- Pb 
0572 66466 

VRJUWOORA ■ Lux apt tdP* upta 
6 adults. 4 cldltnm. 3 bathrms. 
pool. Tel 0778 343960. 


MALTA &GOZO 


SPECIAL 


CHANNEL ISLANDS 




'Unspoilt, Inieresting, 
Inexpensive 
and very pretty " 
The London Standard 


HoUafstabmiHid^coaiiuy 
fesfeffis.xid teiefe ft* 

£165 


CYCLING 
FOR SOFTIES 



SWAZILAND 

ttpydl C ssyep Mm l Sec M » 

28 Ampmt - 13 September 

A few Maces remain on mo 
special mterrit four conducted 
by professor Andrew Gowdtat 
and Dr David pnee-wnuams 
ter me RGS. A 17 day mrro- 
dncuon w Bxs rensow peaceful 
* beautiful common weanh 
Ktogdom. (a AMmal and 
BtrdUfr. Archaeology. Bonny 
and Geofogy. Mam base « 
modern study centre to a Na- 
ture Reserve. Several days In 
the magnificlent Matokxta Na- 
ture Reserve. Also bush canto 
to me Luttombo £1480 wdn- 
stve. OMUmfor Victoria Falls 
and Huange National Park 
Zimbabwe. 


Bnschare from: 



CORNWALL & DEVON 



BONOfNC STREAMS, torrr^W A 
fairy tote rastln. n*s* K” 
from Ontende. ‘"jnc 
Ardennes. T 1 * ’K®5 , *JS?v5es 
endless. A waallb o 
are offered lor inc w Mb lag; 
dy. HObdasn. Row E» P*r 
person per weeb m cortanrs. 
farms, vacabon vdiaoes or JM 
trte. Find out mow. art for VM 
Bristol brochure lr«m Briymn 
Rental Service. i75,SeWdon 
Park Road. S croymm.os 
80. Triephone 01 661 6109. 
or L-Emetne Cowaeie .Bao-au. 
DampMon. Mtritan. Abrrdgm- 
start Scotland Tel 077 
2M. Abta 24151 or Contact 
Four local Abta travel Aacni. 

TURKEY room onto to 
* ii A aO Mjy I A 2 w*s tr 

^ WTSttoftDri*gMHMkl»» 

01 891 6469 AMI 2047 

AtlWT NZ. Scran* Africa. 
USA. Hong Kong. Beal Fares: 
01-495 7775 ABTA. 

SVD.'MEL. £618 Perth 1543 «1 
maMr earners to AUSrfwZ- Ol- 
6B4L- 7371— ABTA 

SOOTH AFRIC A Jd tmrp iWs 
G46& .01-864 TS71 ABTA. 

Dtscomm in /Economy- 
els Try as 
BOOKERS 01-387 9100. 


PLYMOUTH HOC Seafront 
yarttmam hasen. taxon OCH 
penttajose amii r tuw nt. sfeeo 24. 
from Eiao pw. nvmoutn 
6609X1 910Mb or 6»7Mn 
SUPERB SEA VIEWS. Oa sand 
duncaSrane* Cove. Fttfer 
mans oonagMMepa 
Scpsri nbrr MbJWW 
108231712464 gr <0736*7376 
YOUR ESTATE AwaMs You. '7 
acres. UndrtMer. remote col- 
lage vieraug T. mid D*™o°- 
lantasdc wews *www“» 
enure TheruKi 2»BB3i now 
BET 3 KM JbWWKow. fulfa; 
rcurtnwd Nth CBnmaa <S> 
Column r £BO£l8Qpw incfa. 
else 0942 7Z3753 
DEVON COTTAGES. Agents Mr 
selected MM auaUbi henna* 
homes. samMM nr twelve 
BTOril let: 0626 2214 .24 nW 
DEVON A C O N NW1. 1 • * tree 
Hobday Bookwigwtvsr*. S gt 
. hotels. gueOlmusn ew'- frte- 
phtrae <0B9T» 23367 <24 hours* 
RWreUVDflisi boom «n> 5 
sett harbour view S mm beach 
sow tor trs Maor M Sep Oct Pb 
0120? 3608 mgW wHaM 
PLYtROOTR. select serviced 
apartment*. 2 6 persons. 
Brochure 0732 669066 
POUZATH - Bungalow with sea 
view, i min bears* and snobs. 
Sips 46 Tet 06ZS 829910 
B. DEVON COAST. ShaMon Me 
Torauay. Ttunclwd cbUaaas. 
f0636J B73709. 69pm. 

TRURO Large country note* M 2 
acres, weeps 8-10 vacant 
gooL £300 Bw. 0972 560008. 


xotways nw*rt*. tauctocrv 






iftf 






i'Jl 




lake DBTRICF \ ; SOMERSET a tm 



COTSWOLDS 


«R. PAIH3W1CK. Fuftv rinWrt 
risRaw Sim 6 ptra ns BemdHM 
views. Tel- 0432 812896. 


■Amman Fwa-taundMHT 
8 Every canvemewra. easy 
reach sMpv. bearim. UM*. 
frits. £100 par fate via* 2631. 
(Sre»miteS.tKS«* 70881. . 

LAW n. Ml Sri* .ttmuw jMr 

lagev. Fa riu ho ta m esr Cieir 
Abbey. Btocb: I0946r37»3- 


EASTASOiA 


WOmi HOKFtRJl VBWr « w 
Coast SM,e* . CtwM d* 
6-6. Tet 04858674 




D8LNHTRR. recenOv iWtvcecM 
ffirtr nara. a mtlra fcom »iry si. 
Edmonds, sleep* 2 *- Tel 

1028484) 783 eves and w. end* 

HOLIDAY COTTME- North Nor-' 
foaL Vaeanriev m June. Jilly. 
Auousl Senwiteer Triephone 


Gatev 


1 


YORKSHIRE 





NTH YORKSHIRE MOONS uMSdn 
pght of -lovely aM (anubouM 
near river. 16 AMUR - 15 Sep- 
tember £125 pw. 065 382273. 


HOLIDAY APARTMENT. Ydrtc 
cuy Centre Ptoaweuiy aoufA- 
«L Slits 6-7. Tel: 0904-2902* 



^62*64 alter dwn on SUJff 


BARBADOS Smalt Hotels- 7 

aBttSASLg 

Budfri Trav« 01-741 8491. 

UNSPOILT CARMBCAH KUU» 

dwrtea Peach /ram £!ZfOo 

now. Sll» 2- 8. 030* 823173 



SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


CORFU SPECIAL OJ-raS 

April May . June 1 or 2 
VfUas, Hotels 'AW* H»t^ «* 
Catwirt Pan World Hottdan 
01 734 2S62 lOl 736 2404 af- 
ter -turn on Sun) 

CYCLADES. Myhono*. Mwn. 

hto»m. Im TJvwwm 

A Pensfora. Stnrniy .C Hww- 
SumMy suneri Simgy Simon 
Holidays -01-373 1933. 
CO-DRIVER to Greece- May 
iont7 ProfesMotud iwrOT- 
snaring «»«. TeL Ol 8» 
4156 


PORTUGAL ■ ExguKite lisrunous 
v-Uto lo rent for month of Au- 
gust Pool, tennis court. Strep* 
iC Half mile From sea Refer- 
ences requnrd. Reply lo BOX 
Bdi — ■ . - ■ 

ALOARVE NT Loom, villa, pool, 
maid SlM or. May Jun -eept- 
FrClBOpw Tef- 0344 886291 


AlfiARVE Dem 1.8.15 May. 2 
bed viMas. Quuiia da Sand* I 
wfc. Maid. Car Hire K ex. 
GiiwKk C189PP i2 Bern No e*- 
irav Tet 02-13 778181 Patoma 
Hof-i ATOL 178 


UCUKCRMD To Lri i large aort 
Van* Spa viHag e, 5““^ 
ages mwk sleep* 6’T 9**i 
room Tel 089276 828 
ALPINE HOMES - Lu ntoV .ra ori 
menu in irwwgua m i w on, sips 
86. Tel 07034560920 


Bfr-ne-e cwBy mum cm tea 

MPa id tea Avon, uanr (Mb and 

im. u$. liaamnuB 

Mwm.WpaNMMM. 
Few food _ and _re *pwg 
a na oin riare. 2 J ran 

WMkaad Bmrts. 

MALMESBURY 
(06662) 2888 





































































SHOPPING 


How to bring the good times home 


. 



Faithfulness to th*> 
period is the key 
?o restoring hou ses 
successfully, says 
j Beryl Downing 

i How des. is your res? You 
> have oaly to look at estate 
agents' jargon to realize that 
attitudes to older proper ti es 
have changed considerably 
over the last 10 years — and 
particularly since the Prince of 
Wales made us all aware of the 
carbuncles in our midst. Peri- 
od properties are no longer 
“tastefully modernized”. The 
jpagic phrase that puts an 
extra nought on the selling 
price is “authenticalhr 
restored”. 

The problem for most house 
owners is tracking down the 
authenticity. Where do yon 
find the right front door, the 
exact ceiling rose, the bannis- 
ters, the railings, the window 
frames and fireplaces that are 
not too early and not too late 
for your particular restorer 
tion? 

One of the best ways to 
begin is to join a society which 
specializes in your period. 
There is one for each of the 
main groups — Georgian, 
itft Victorian and Thirties — and 
they offer publications and 
events each year, including 
outings to houses and build- 
ings not normally open to the 
public, lectures, study week- 
ends and walks round historic 
streets. 

„ The membership fee is 
modest — about £10 a year, 
plus the cost of the extra 
events - so the staffs are 
■ small and cannot cope with 

* individual problems. For 
more detailed advice you 
need the Society for die Pro- 
jection of Ancient B uilding . 

The main concern of its 
organizers is the repair of 
historic buildings «nn they 
have published several techni- 
cal pamphlets at £1 each 

* ••which would help those with 

less grand projects — damp 
problems, electrical wiring or 









t Pm ~m 




m 



Period perfection: the original Victorian drawing roon at Linley Samboarne Hoase 

~ CORNICES 



The sought-after Adam 



Victorian: still pfentifhl 



fire prevention, for example — 
in old houses. 

There are also two technical 
secretaries who can give gener- 
al advice by telephone and a 
group of 26 architects with 
specialized knowledge of his- 
toric buildings who can give 
on-sire advice. A file of crafts- 
men whose work is known is 
also available. 

It is not necessary to own a 
listed building to take advan- 
tage of the society’s expertise.. 

DOORS 


An example from the 1930s 


The organizers are particular- 
ly concerned at the moment 
with agricultural buildings — 
many good examples worth 
preserving have shown up in 
the current re-survey of the, 
country by the Department of 
the Environment — but they 
would not turn their noses up 
at a simple Victorian conver- 
sion. It is not even necessary 
to be a member to consult the 
society: “We are here for the 
buildings rather than the 




CEILING ROSES"| ^\(jy|Q0 

HPI§P from the 


Mid 18th center; 

■ -1 


L ale 1 8th cental? 




ml 


Georgian 


Edwardian 


From the 1930s 


people", its secretary says. 

If your problem is one of 
detail rather than structure, 
you will know how difficult it 
is to find well documented 
references. Charles Brooking 
is die expert to visit to learn 
about period detail; he has a 
remarkable collection in 
Guildford of windows, doors, 
knockers, rainwater heads, fire 
grates and staircases, all 
salvaged from important 
houses which have now been 
demolished. The collection is 
purely for reference — nothing 
is for sale. 

An exhibition of his win- 
dows representing three centu- 
ries of style is on show at the . 
Building Centre in London 
anti] May 1. 

One of the most noticeable 
trends, according to many 
architectural historians, is that 
more attention is being paid to 
Thirties architecture. Art deco 
has been fashionable in ce- 
ramics, jewellery and furni- 
ture for several years, but not 
until recently has anyone oth- 
er than a few specialists con- 
sidered houses of the period 
worth preserving. 

“It is very important to 
remember that the vast major- 
ity of arts & crafts buildings 
were not very ‘modem* ", says 
Roderick Grartidge. an archi- 
tect who has studied the 
period and is vice-chairman of 
the Thirties Society. “There 
are few examples of real arts & 
crafts houses and the ones that 
do exist are very grand and 
very expensive. 


Early 19th century 

“You are much more likely 
to find neo-Tudor and neo- 
Georgian examples, which are 
not fashionable at the moment 
and are therefore rather de- 
spised. Between 1890 and 
1 930 architects cared more for 
the welcoming warmth of the 
Tudor style and foe elegant 
proportions of the Georgian 
than at any other period of 
history, and often horrifying 
‘improvements' are made to 
the buildings simply because 
people don't appreciate what 
they have got". 

Alan Powers, a case worker 
with the Thirties Society, also 
makes foe point that Thirties 
buildings are easily adaptable 
for modern living. 

“Electric light and electric 
fires, for instance, fit into a 
twenties or thirties bouse 
much more sympathetically 
than in a Victorian or Geor- 
gian building, and it was also a 
period when builders began to 
conceal plumbing and fit 
built-in cupboards. 

“Some of foe house plans 
also offered very ingenious 
opportunities for open-plan 
living and they were built with 
quality materials and with 
great skill. Such houses are 
much more suitable for cur- 
rent needs than any of their 
predecessors”. 

Anyone who has tried to 
make a hi-fi. video, compact 
disc and personal computer fit 
in with Sheraton or foe adapt- 
ed gas chandeliers will appre- 
ciate his point. 


per year. 

The Society for the 
Protection of Ancient 
BuikSrtgs. 37 Spital Square, 
London El (01-377 1644). 
Membership £12. 

The Thirties Society. 3 
Park Square West London 
NW1. Membership £10. 

The Victorian Society, 1 
Priory Gardens, London W4 
(01-894 1019). Membership 
£ 10 . 

Linley Samboume House, 

18 Stafford Terrace. London 
WB (01-622 6360) is the 
house most studied by 
restorers of Victorian 
properties es it is the most 
perfect example in both 
fittings and furnishings. Open 
Wed 10am-4pm, Sun 2- 
5pm. Otherwise for groups of 
15 or more by appointment 

For architectural fittings: 
Amazing Grates, 6J-63 High 
Road, London N2 (01883 9590). 
Some original and a large 
range of reproduction Victorian 
and Edwardian 
mantelpieces and inserts. 


WINDOWS 


experts 

• Dan Cruickshank of the 
Georgian Group: Use tradi- 
tional techniques where possi- 
ble — for example, tack 
pointing, which was a very fine 
form of pointing used for 
embellishment in foe late 17fo 
and early 18th centuries. 

Never paint outside brick- 
work. By 1740 London ter- 
raced houses were made of 
grey/brown bricks instead of 
red and by 1760 cool grey 
brides, light cream paint and 
white Portland stone were 
popular both in London and 
fashionable provincial towns 

iikg parti. 

Panelling was never used in 
London terraced houses after 
the mid-18th century. From 
3750 plaster was preferred for 
wall covering and decoration. 

• lan Grant, deputy chairman 
of the Victorian Society: Look 
for the dominant characteris- 
tic of the b uilding and go along 
with it.Keep moulded 
skirtings. 

If a builder says something 
can't be obtained, it means he 
can’t be bothered; go Co anoth- 
er builder. There are plenty of 
craftsmen about 

Never flush doors or fit steel 
windows or alomiutum han- 
dles in any Victorian building. 

• Roderick Gradidge, vice- 
chairman of the Thirties Soci- 
ety: In neo-Tndor houses, keep 
leaded lights, brick fireplaces 
and beams. Often the beams 
put into this style of honse 
were genuine old timbers tak- 
en from older farm buildings. 

Never stick false stone fa- 
cades on twenties and thirties 
suburban semis 


ADDRESS BOOK 


Charles Brooking, 

Woodhay, White Lane, 
Guildford, Surrey (0483 
504555). By appointment only. 





/XT 


Georgian (above), Victorian 



Adaptability hi the 1930s 

FIREPLACES 




* 


fgj lrnH f Fril l 



Georgian 




Victorian 

Architectural Heritage of 
Cheltenham, Boddinaton 
Manor, Boddington. Nr. 
Cheltenham. Glos. (024268 
741). Original doors, 
panelling, floor boards, 
chimney pieces, garden 
statuary. Reproduction and 
some original bathroom 
fittings. 

G J Green and Veronese, 

24 Edison Road. London N8 
(01-348 4461). Top quality 
plasterwork and design 
consultancy for palaces, 
public buildings and private 
clients. 

G Jackson & Sons, 

Rathbone Works. Ralnville 
Road. London WB (01-385 
6616). Established by the Adam 
Brothers in 1780 this 
company still has many original 
plaster moulds. Repair ana 
restoration a speciality as watt 
as new plasterwork. 

London Architectural 
Salvage and Simply Co. Mark 
Street off Paul Street 


From the 1930s 

London EC2 (01-739 0448). 
Masonry, timber, fireplaces, 
sanitaryware, doors, 
balustrading and many 
rescued treasures. 

The London Door 
Company. 165 St John's Hill, 
London SWH (01-223 7243). 
internal and external doors, 
some original, others made 
to size. Best known for 
decorative glass panels - 
sandblasted, etched and 
stained. 

House of Steel. 400 
Caledonian Road, London N1 
(01-607 5889). Large 
selection of Victorian and 
Edwardian fireplaces and 
metal garden furniture. 

Wafcot Reclamation, 108 
Walcot Street Bath (0225 
66291). Traditional flooring, 
paring, roofing, bathroom 
fittings, doors, woodwork 
and ironwork. 

Illustrations by 
Jill Feld 


COLLECTING 


THE FRENCH GAME OF BOULES 


Pencils to rewrite 
the history books 


The fountain pen was first 
mentioned by Samuel Pepys 
who, given that even the 
excellent Shorter Pepys dou- 
bles as a doorstop, had plenty 
of scope for experiment 

Most people think of foe 
fountain pen as foe apogee of 
civilized writing technology, 
betraying a sentimental at- 
tachment to letter-writing and 
ignoring the rich and strange 
developments in writing 
equipment throughout the 
1 7th. 18th and 19th centuries. 
The Writing Equipment Soci- 
ety. created six years ago , is 
the recommended starting 
point for anyone interested in 
these arcane collectables. 

Gerald Sattin. founder 
member of foe society, has a 
Charles 11 travelling senbe’s 
seL not to mention a 
Gentleman’s Writing Com- 
panion. the Georgian answer 
to Filofax. Made by A. 
J. Strachan in 1810 it has a 
three-inch ruler, a perpetual 
calendar, a seal top and a quill 
holder behind which a lead 
pencil neatly slides out Very 
rare and worth around £1,000. 
it ts fashioned «n 1 8-carat gold. 

The Charles If example ta 
silver was made around 1670 
with a trefoil quill holder foat 
unscrews from foe to p of the 
skirted inkwell but can be 
rescrewed in the base, so foe 
travelling scribe could hold hts 

ink steady in tbe left hand 
while wnung. All such items 
are grist to Geraid SstUBS 
mill, but his real speciality is 

the propelling penal . 

He has devoted his enfousi- 
asra to these obpts. both as a 
private collector ana * 
dealer a* his shop tn- foe 
Burlington Arcade, London, 
because -they are not only, 
intricately worked pieces oi 






silver and sold but also fine 
examples of engineering. 

We are indebted to Mr 
Gabriel Riddle and Mr Samp- 
son Mordan for foe develop- 
ment of die propelling pencil 
which led to foe zenith of 
extravagant novelties in the 

The patent for the propel- 
ling pencil was registered in 
1822 -and developed in 1823 
by Mr Riddle, foe engineer, 
and Mr Mordan, foe factory- 
owner. Some of their feat 
efforts were combined with 
foe quill pen so that one sfixm 
exquisite piece of sflverwork 
might produce a quill pen at 
one end and a propelling 
pencil at the other. 

From the 1840s novelty 
b^an to affect foe fashion in 
writing equipment. The Vic- 
torian obsession with novelty 
was combined with exquisite 
workmanship. Mr Sattin has 
an early Victorian silver quill 
holder modelled in foe form of 
a hand, the engraved cuff 
separated by a gold band, a 
turquoise ring on the fourth 
finger and foe whole set on an 
ebony shaft. 

Another craftsman, Ger- 
vase Wheeler, fashioned a 
propelling pencil m the form 
of a percussion musket. The 
pencil leads are stored in the 
bun, foe hinge of which is 
invisible. The pencil shoots 
out of foe mouth of the gun 
when the notch on the barrel is 
slid forward. 

By 1870 Mr Mordan, hav- 
ing parted company from Mr 
Riddle, had got into bis stride 
with novelties and become the 
main English maker. His inge- 
nuity was formidable: a 
policeman's lantern with the 
reservoir for the leads in the 
top and the pencil released by 



;:v ^ 

' • ."VfT ' . r ;-~ : . 




top and inkwell for the travelling scribe; ebony^shafted pen 
with quill held by a silver hand with a turquoise ring and 
sold cufft Gentleman's Writing Companion in silver, with 
calendar, ruler, seal top, qufll holder and lead pencil; 
propelling pencil wbose lead shoots out of the Kan's month; 
.propelling pencil operated by polling frog s tail 

pulling foe base; a sflver-gilt 

frog whose mouth produced a i ao 

was PulfetL ^ Egyptian 405 W^The Pan Shop, 27 
mummy with foe pencil pro- Burlington Arcade. London Wl 
trading from its toes. (01-433 9021). 


pulling foe base; a sflver-gilt 
frog whose mouth produced a 
propelling pencil when its tail 
was puffed^ an Egyptian 
mummy with the pencil pro- 
trading from its toes. 

The modest propelling pen- 
cil is a miniature example of 
foe inventive mechanical in- 
genuity of foe Industrial Rev- 
olution Being rare, the pencils 
sell at less-than-modest prices: 
£95 to £800. But as Gerald 
Sattin says: “They liked to 
make things that amused peo- 
ple and the beauty of it was 
that they actually worked". 

Victoria Mather 


(01-493 3021). 

The Writing Equipment 
Society. 4 Greystones Orange 
Crescent, Sheffield S1 1 (0742 
668140). The society publishes 
a journal three times a year, 
and holds about six annual 
meetings, usually tn London, 
on topics from tetter scales to 
nibs, inkweHs, blotters and 
letter openers. These are 

preceded by swop-and-sh op 

sessions. There Is also an 
annual auction. Membership 
costs £9 a year. 


. a ©Sufncu 

Write staff: (from top) a Charles n trefoil qnfll holder with Ptniiips 
ton and inkwell for the trevrilins scribe; ebony-shafted pen Londor 


AUCTIONS 


ROYAL RELICS: A 
collection of Napoleonic 
memorabilia comprising 
200 lots, including a silver box 
decorated with portraits of 
Napoleon and Josephine and 
an ivory box painted with 
the retreat from Moscow. 
Christie's South 
Kensington, 85 Old Brompton 
Road, London SW7 (01-581 
7611). Viewing Mon 9am-7pm, 
Tues 9em-4.30pm and Wed 
lOam-noon. Sale Wed 2pm. 

KAISER BILL- A pair of half- 
moon shaped chests made for 
the Kaiser's steam yacht 
the Hohenzoflem find their 
place among doHs, Dinky 
toys, commemorative china 
and other collectors' items. 
Lawrence Fine Art, South 
Street Crewkema, Somerset 
(0460 73041). Viewing Tues 
10am-4-30pm and Wed 9- 
9.30am. Sale Wed 9.30am. 

AIRBORNE PRICES: Pre- 
war Dinky toy aeroplanes are 
expected to set new price 
levels in a sale of toys and 
railways. Several boxed 
sets of six planes are 
estimated at £500. 

Phillips, 7 Blenheim Street 
London Wl (01-629 6602). 
Viewing Tues 9am-5pm and 
Wed Warn. Sale Wed noon. 


Geraldine Norman 


gtovatilid 


24 April -10 May 

Up to 50% reductions on our 
beautiful tapestry and 
embroidery kits, unrepeatable 

oqe-only designs, neadtepolnt 
eusMons and pictures, antique 
accessories. SALE BY MAIL - 
sand £1 (refundable with order) 
for colour sets catalogue and 
details of tree kit 

GtorefOi fT) Old in House, The 
ffidOBmy, Ulfl Hill Village, London 
NW 74 EB 01-806 0212 . 









T 'he pa me of Boules. otherwise Looun as Petanque. 

suitable for all age*, demanding s&Di rather than 
physical prowess. it is perfect iorphy mg on the beach or in 
the { atdev and will provide mam houn> of cmeminmcm 
for all members of the family. 

T 'o play the game, two teams are needed of one to four 
people. The rales arc straightforward, the object of die 
game being 10 throw die boules as near as. possible to ihc 
wooden jack. Rants air awarded to the winning team and 
a game continues until one team ha> gained thirteen poinu. 

T 'wo sets are available, both made in Fiance: atwoplaycr 
«tcompnstngof6boulesi2setsor3iwiih 1 jack and 
a family sci consisting of $ boules <4 sets of 2 1 and 2 tacks. 
The boules are chrome glared and converuemk pac ked in 
a buigandu vinyl case complete with set of rules. Boihvos 
are easy to carry, making them very suitable lor the 
holidays. 

Prices - Set of 6 £ 27.95 
Set of 8 £34.95 


THE TIMES 


All prices err inclusive oj past end packing. 

Raise alia* up w 21 days for deliwry frcmrccerjH of order. 
The pnet Include* VA.T and postage. 

TJus order car. cml\ tv despatched u> addresses in the U. K. 
Money is refundable on aU goods hi ihoui question. 

Orde rs and enquiries sho uld be sent to; 
THE TIMES BOULES OFFER, 

BOURNE ROAD, BEXLEY, 

KENT DAS 1BL. 

Tel: Crayford 53316 for enquiries only. 


Please Mtad me Serfs) of 6 boules 

& C7.45 each. 

sens) of 8 boules 

©£3a.95each. 

iencfosecheqiicJPOL for £ anade payable lo 

The Times Boules Offer, and send to The Tunes BouJes Offer. 
Bourne Roud. Bexley. Kent DAS 1BL. 


Or debn my AccesvVba No.. 


Signature. 


DIAL YOUR ORDER 

H.4PID ORDU!l\G SERI tC£ I 
| BY TELEPHONE ON ; 

ACCESS OR V& A 
l ton need in comfvie nmpon 

(Crayford) 0322-58011 ' 

2A froury a day - 7 dai *■ a »eel. 


MR MRS MISS. 


m 


ADDRESS. 


ResN^saipJt* 

Cray ford 5331b for enquiries only. 







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Royal Festival Hall celebrates 
35 years of music - 3 May 


Prana. 


Ring 928 3002 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

’ RAYMOND Gl'SBAV pnacoD 

TONIGHT at 730 pm 

MOZART-HANDEL- 
JSRIEG-BHETHOVEN 

te. Moaan .. THE MAKBUMaE OF FIGARO OVERTURE 
u«M WATER MUSI C SCITE 

Sll . SYMPHONY MY* (PASTORAL) 

w ROtAL phujurmo nk or chestra 
Vi~w m-mbmueb Stephen hough tmx 
£M £L30. tun c- C*-^- QQ- 1 ” Hall m-W» 3191 CC Ot-CSSMO 



RAYMOND GUBBAY 
BANK HOLIDAY MONDAY S 


AY w 7 JO pm 

THE MAGIC OF D’OYLY CARTE 

UWpOH ry>NTjraT m»Hksm Gjoducmr FRASER GOVLDING 
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H%lln mAalrnr Tim Mandn-Thr Gamlolan. 

M K\9f HJL& Pinafore. The PSraBea of IVusaacc. IniaaAE, 

yV^y Thr Yojjncu uf dw Guani. OE- 

The Augh>> Austrian Mudc Society presents 



SATURDAY 10 MAY al 7-30 


A NIGHT IN VIENNA 


JOHANN STRAUSS JOSEF STRAUSS 
FRITZ KRHSLER 


LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
Conductor/Solo Violin: ERICH BINDER 

Leader— Vienoa Phflhe nn onic. Conehortor — 
Vkczn Stale Opera. First Loodoo Appearance 

£55a ios l f7jtt.faja.p3B hjr (Qi-as iwn cc ioi-tcb aanm 

RAYMOND GUBBAY prtsoitt SATURDAY U MAY nt TJOpja. 



ROSSINI-HANDEL- 

BRUCH-BEETHOVEN 


.THE BARBER OF SEVILLE OVERTURE 
MUSIC FOR THE ROYAL FIREWfWKS 

YKXJN CONCERTO 

SYMPHONY NO. 3(EROJCAi 

LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
Conductor URS SCHNEIDER LELAND CHEN mote 
^150. £150. /5.S0. £1. 4&5tt £150 . Hd OWS 5)91 CC OtJOBa 


FRIDAYS 9 and 16 MAY Ml 7.30 


DRESDEN PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 


BEETHOVEN 


PMHO fc OWCm i O CYCLE 


MARTINO TIR1M0 


9 ft M*y: Nn 2,1, ami 4 

MR Rtp dm 3 and S 


CA.Ce.EK. Bft Han 01428 3191. OC 01-928 i 
Special SuOacrlpOon ODW atao avjHWHa 


Wednesdav. 30 April 7.30pm Rovai Festoaf Hail 

HALLE ORCHESTRA 

MOZART S>mphony No 355 iThe Prague) 

MAHLER Symphonv No 6 

SYANISLAW SKROWACZEW'SfU conductor 
SPONSORED BY MARTINI AND ROSSI LTD 

£t0.5(L £■»• 50. £S 5«. £7.Sa £0. £4. 50. £3 50 
Mnrr/£tTfrtvrf JP«f i mnJ C ubbuy 9® 3Z91928 8800 


H ; \U Str John's Smith Square 




' 3KA. Director: rau'. Djvics 

■^ZVK>i IT.Tin-cf’.TJ . 

:ri.r»pn' At each conccf^ 


2**P» 

UCs 


740 pm 


II 
7jSpn 


Friday 

a May 
7 JO oa 


Vtoln. DAVD OWSi N0KBS t*ro 


»T*£«*rSon8B Na » a f mmor Op SB ecHans SonaNli^* 


0p ICC. B *"■ 

TTIE avGaJSh BRASS 0^WBL£ Ml ca -MtaflBB MaHBl 

LPatnfek pemoam g-piar The DwJS Pichwa Boo*. Hi wa t ow 

•BefeOuvwiVo 70p.iaaioiakc'RaBIMHaam W»btr.C**lo* 
Ouamt BHooe Bats. H«te M-te and IMca '1st parts. 

{4 so o m a e 


iLEH,d. 


FLORA GUEHRA pun) SMKOW «> - _ _ 

Mozart Sonata inBU K-3JJ BiWm Tfma naroffl OfXlJ7 
Otaamr. Dves ptModas IfCm 6ooL l. aiaarlr SmoeaNoo. 157. 

Frsneie O>o«at8 prokK» and fugua. 

E550.C-50. Q50. £3 E250 , tnwiaP.fTM»» 

EH36MBLE Palm B-cdOpUd OifBaWIWI ^I 1 ^ 
Tmn MW* mepn. JS Bade Tno m G BWW 1039: W WOT 
QWV l oar. Sanaa m E lor v>oKi and naracnanl BWV 1018. TTM 


BUM* OHcma BWV.I071 

490 OMJZ5Q 


£5 SO. £4 50 I 


iwor Con-dll wwgareg 


ENGLISH BRASS ENSEMBLE 

llenaalr Tie AEh? 

MidtadCoUins Simon Limb rick 

(Abpci'i (Pprftadoni 

MONDAY NEST 28 APRIL 7 JO pm. 
ST.JOHN’S SMITH SQ. LONDON SWI 

IMcpmdfaz liafc l 


0PEKA * BALLET 

-MJSEUM S 836 3161 CC £40 
* SZ50 

mmjsiiUTWhu. — — - 

TWTT30j5*J2a 

L™ 730 Tfca Rartare 


WMbb. 


M.U erOU MOUSE. Govern 

0t 2-0 

8s8/wi»> oc!£2S?R££ 

niKM 6903 Mon-Sai lOunv 
Mn, 69 amnW 5 eato avaH ,rom 
m me day. it* Promsv 

M from LS-OO. 


Torn*. 

* Sffjw&Btar 


EXHIBITIONS 


SAHWRSOM EXMBTTMM RRLp 

LEST. S3 Brmers fit. Wl. Ol - 
636 7BOO 8 *4 la ad Om lor 
contemporary inttrton. Apra 
23 - 9iu May Mon Sal 94Q ■ S. 


theatres 


RBELPM 836 7611 or 3«o 79U 
4 CC 741 9999-836 73S8/ST9 
64M Gra Sain «0 6123 CC 
BOOKING TO YM45 86 EXCLU- 
SIVELY wiui rim can ®i 
7200 24 Hr 7 Dot 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 
NKhUv at 7. JO Mats H'ed jt 2-30 


A Sal 4 30 A BOO 
THE 0*0.7 UVZ MUSICAL 


EVER DUOYKIF 6pecusorH 


’6 WICHCZE STREET W'H 0D~ 

MAN AG ER WilLltH LYNO 

ECX OFFICE 0!^3S2’4- VAILING US7 C3 


WIGMOREHALL 


SaMay 
35 April 
7J0pA. 


Sunday 
27 April 
1VS0JLB 


OSSET 

28 April 
720 pm. 


ESS 

7 JO DA. 


30 1 
IJOpA 


Tbmd*y 

iiur 

7J0RA 


KKy 

2 May 

yjopA 


3 toy 

7 JO pA 


ANOfCS SEGOVIA SIXTIETH ANNIVERSARY CONCSH 

Burma tno concert Segorgn** bo O Mfl e n i a dviKfigiPGoiiH lurid ol 

me He yd Pmmannomc Soooy Tne pragmanond mduda nwsc 
tram •» fim Wigtnaie Ha# Conran. 

ALL SEATS SOUQ «** ^ 

GABBIEU STWNG OUAH?tfKE»iriErt(eSsffr^ 


Staday Honteg Caffe* Coneerl lama new senes tot Sd*^ 
Ounw m C nance KA0&. Bntara: Straig Ouwmi mi G Opt 1 1 . 

£3 me Dm and coffeei snerrv or souadi arid me owtonranc* 

ad»U>(ft T flH W aKO T faq ' "”- " 

HtyekrTra flawtTra). eiAdsnor 

•rpkOK Tno *i COP 87 

fctsa 0 50.030. B , - 

ROBM BOWMAN MW 


MENHT HERFOTO oan» . _ 

Sctmmxut O-cMerwOe Oa«£ Baber M etott ci tosagtoc 
Podene CaMiamriKs. kmc Son^ 

£453.030 Ca C2 Hon 


riVKA COLANIvuMQJFTCHO BEKSOfi piano 
J u e ci to Heraen vwodet Op a BadvKoddr Fato« oonpot 
Bn ftmr Hungarian Dances Nes 1. 3 Uafaiteir Rotumeig (iM 


Ur peril. ScItoerC SonaLj m A minor 0821 Arpegvone 
ta 9a Oa]L250 Q Norma n UeCanr lrewne*yid 4r*a> 
ERE I*dia4l Copley and Dug myam Fine 


fHE : bA»«BHPOTWg^TBdtoCP|teyandPa ga^AiFto 

and A emoan OuO PloomriMne *ii inctede X Ow BrarOanfforg 
concerns iha comcaao Breinoyan SympiMiraes and WaQns^ Ring 
Crete SS. U.O.O 

ry?<nr Concm pmqucFo ns Ud/Wemom Stemrar Nnyrn 
rx crl-u 


W«i3pT5«ScEfrra5wrsiHMHyT5S5S^T65i® 

I ROBLOU rarpxncrri Georg PHBpp Tatemam: S« Santo tor 

mcraoatangoaittinvaLiia>fiuwtoe>nacto*eybo»ri _ 

£4 50 D50. rasa P Early Ui^c and jtytKM- 


Sunday 
4 toy 
1M0«B 


IDOMUS DyurakPijfxiTnomSnieiarOodQ'IAmay JaaadSopRM 
Lata Summer Capncooi eWorld ften*«reL BNnc (ton Oionel 
(Op JSBNtotoOumVafoacMoinaMwctWortelftomamjNWodar 
IHunaansn mauBjres 

£4 50 DHi g.50.0 CaniCno WaM toiopmwnt 

kmwDrmaeai 


Simday 
* May 
720 pm. 


H1uiB.st i iPBlnO.narp.Ba 


GST 

SMoy 
7 JO pA 


rwa. WiBwf Joaopfuc Areatsan RridpHdy Op >32 to* Tno tor 

«o*n.oeffo.h3rp.Ffanc»bcCaamel . 

£4 SO. £350. £250. C2 ICOa a m »mw LUX 

T666S EUtlnEgaaAM tma nan> wandat lea Atobyf 


IsamNa Sanaa qpiNp iQ |toa*C amaw lcdi80to ^ B B r F^ r 


irwwS|3|i££g 

7J8N 


■ May 

7 JO pA 


9 May 
7J0pA 


TFfe ENGLISH COHC^rr toon L , . 

tijpscticrd try Timor PtencA Sraitoy Itern tog Cofla e I 

WtoSt 9N£»M n A Hum Conewto m G Coneenoto Oboe and 
Bamoan Concerto tor lu» and toa rfAmaie. Hndrt Concerto 
Grosso op 3NO 4a D50 me. prog and Irae edited. wonyvtoaMi 
afty w ylormapTfl 

bM7tN£ ENSEMBLE PkaTMC VanMKTB NN)« 51 /*■ 


c Scranaoem D Op 2S tor Mb. vmea 


Songs, al Tagonr. Bmto A Batodav ttoto iOp 90. 

Wto to totom aaaodtodandaaigbr Taamaai 

£453 050.050.0 _ Lton W iefc Ooocan 


Concen nemagangnt 


t aiuxpwo 

[hn^cto'BuaaNc All lta»tf.ScmdWw*dci)ito.toto S 9 C0toap taP». 
Rcd inaan Dory. Owitoar-Fartasy tm toaft Cannon. 

L £4 SO. £3 SO. £250. a 


P £4 SO. £3 50— 

|r>g5Q*«aMAXBt3- teJ4AH«C taetoteiUl^aH| 
llama And weed, tondy te agte. toa Waffto. toaotoa^ 
iMaaOa Cote na bac ca HrfL Gral— Jolmion, Songs rangeig 

Porrari » Puoer nX SdH 


S^roiftaiARifr 


, OuauauiFOR 18 Np I 

Biriot Quarter m A moor Op 7 
MeodaBwlMc CkJaw m E damp Op M Np 2 
l£43n.C8at29 aC JtmnHaharn ^ 



mG.UORE BALL 

Wlgmore Summer Nights 

24 g a mmer c oncern 

1 May to 31 July 1986 

•tote 


Tbe Takacs Qnznrt mb MfcbaN CeUda dannet, Dean 
Ko ruAwy violator the ionng Hungarian Quanai and Martin 

Lovcn cdbiofibc Amadem Qoaitetf: Poer Doaoboe; 

Bow— M-a^dWi A attfe e raary CeocercMlrfiacI 
Coffins and Kaibrao Stnrrock; CarnbHdflc Buskers; 
n nT h y W p i, Ftnr a dKam flthrieli ml Lin&M QMtWg 
Foo Ts’ook; Jamea Kuqc Walter KUoz: Vaterie Masrema; 
Mcioe Qimttt of Stuitgarc Lyifia MordkuvidK ->a»h 
Emembteijcifco 5or«inatera’ Almanac; 

Joecf Stris Barry TadratiL 
PBONEOl -9J5214I FOR FREE BROCHURE, OR 
WRITE TO W1GMORE HALU 


QUEEN ELIZABETH HALL 


Tuesday 29 Aprfl 7A5 p» Queen EEafaetb HaD 


GABRIELI 
STRING QUARTET 


UaydftMaoan Society WE0HE5DAT NEXT JO APRIL or 7_*5 p, 

LONDON MOZART PLAYERS 

Conductor JANE GLOVER 

DVORAK: Serenade far Straps 
M OZ ART; Vjp6p Coaccnp n G. KJJ6 
STRAMNSKY; Cacccrm ta E' Dumbarton Oaks' 
HAYDN: Symptooy NoJS 7mA 

MAYUMI FUJIKAWA violin 


BARBICAN HALL 


Barbican Centre, Silk St, EC2Y 3DS 
wll 01-638 8891/ 628 3795 


Telephone Bookings: lOam-Spm 7 days a week 

Owned, lunaes ana maragcC- ti me Csr^a-vcr-ci m- C:i. d '.±-C7-. 


toft 

Strt 

2fi Apr! 
ZOfipa 


ortegg avaaato at bmc at Pomo to pramf^ 
■SgLSH BATOQta CWJffi V OfiCKESraA. Lean Louea 
..—at i mm gnMn. Ma i iad Cabte. WBbn turner. 


I FWfit P F 1 U1WV WG W(»V11 U VIVte* to-*#' r w*. n aiwif *rvv««H 

[coridt Lama AnOoracn. Mw^ n e l Catria. WBBans TtWto 

^2S35^2£i ^$£XIE 


Tumor 
Sun 
27 Ap« 
730pm 


... _SiaraaradtiyLt^L 1 toJiau^^ 

TSSONSYUPHONY OHCHESTOA OPtohte Zteffteman 

SriSSon ftotm 


lotano] fwaom vm*on (te*L 



fSSSS'iS rgtdphawHou ^ljp&tto) 


ptey Bembom Qarni io C minor 
Dvorak Quartoi n F Op. % irimnvunl 
Sdhu b t r t Quartet a Dnaaer, t»IO i Death & xbe Maalra) 

Tickets £Z=0, £LSa £450, £550. £630 
Bootes on a 1-428 IIW. Csedk Carts 01-9S 8900 
34hr. 7 day CC on Fma Call 0I-2W 7200 rbootong toL 
TVacwen reptes (be Portughed-Gioenos FesovB previoudy advenaed 



BP, 


£450. £6, £7.£8,£9 Bo> Office (01-928 3191} CC. (01-938 8300) 


Tuesday 6 May m IAS pm 

PETER MAXWELL DAVIES 

candotfi 

THE FIRES OF LONDON 
with MARIA AITKEN S speal?er 

to ttfalriAwtvyte updating afnn early teased naat'iaag 

Missa super LTaomme arme 

preceded by a amg pciIonBucvofihc f fegab c W Bi j O fi^fai 


ue pud for full jrcpiififflc 

Sod £ 0, £5, £4, £5, £2 line. VATi urai Royal Fesmti HallOI-928 3191 
aedn cuds 01 -4J8 8800 wd SRSUS 


QUEEN ELIZABETH HALL 
SUNDAY 18 MAY 145 -5.30 pm 
Pre-Concen Symposium: 

MAHLER: The Man, The Music 
and The Message 

with Donald MfocbrH and 
Henry-Lows de la Gi 
chaired by Norman Lei 


nn finduto Tea or Cd&e at tbe ancmA. AtoaKicd 6m id taie 
Bon Office 01-028 31H C-riB Carts 01-928^X1 


UJtrr Ol 836 3878 C C 519 
6665 OC 379 6«S3. 7*1 to99- 
Cro Sal« W® l |W|» g 62 

E ‘ W7 ^lt^CKS 

Triple Tony award wfm wr 

HARVEY FIERSTE1N 

tfred'anai 6 Oun9«wT.O 

TOROiloNG 

TRILOGY 

•wuiMinr Fwmnp-Ote 

tRkfated wna p •** 
gaurur mtmrast. 


Marnnael Ftaara" PianoCcncdno Mo St Sttefaart g ymphony 
nob. -L xiftriished' BnOmME Symphony No 8, 'Fastcmr. 

ci050.C9.50.Ca50.C7.g6.C5. Rayrriogd Gubtey LW. 

ThE^ 
jeftray Itoto iconauoor) Hfc^^Harpw (aoprana) Bwwtete 
Syrrarironv te 1 ■Jdrsnanff’kteiter: SyrTteorTjr No L 
g^onnowti by MUmtpnj ■= J — 1 — 


Hapwns. norm tnrwuuwi a ia w w- 1 ■ 

SuSm i TWMar na. Famaan on -Grea n alBmi M Grt*sp Prato 

S^StoudKBtoltoute^RtoBqtetyzCatirtccto 

Borodin; Potovtsan E>ar>c«o wnco Igor. 

ca so. rs5o. rzso.caca V.HocftwstrLta. 


4 (toy 
TSOpdi 


g 3CT. LD-X1, 2. /mV. . T. 

— ri« n 1 , 1 mill Imria f*aa1te ftawlrt ri u4i i flnm 


Evn Man CMMIn, JoyScStto, David Elato Bonaventora I 

5^^3nwrap7to«r to ddMc ta »Sfc toarvStov4rtoy:Tte 

Star Soangtofl Banner BBtadteAbbo raaai ^ 

•Cumtof Sie. Co^ tomd> to ^ 

CacTwVasro *od trKJ**»i no*a3i 

ClQ. 50. C8 50. C7 50. C6 C450 . \ 


Stey 

ZJOfxa 


DPEHA G4LAXGMT. BBC Coocart Orch. Sir ibtedl toiBildn 
icondv Sandra BrantMi tmann) JaovUto VWa Itnixa) Ncoton 
Rtwna Harrione) AabnattenOnaraCbonaFtoten 
ilmn Band m Bra WUtftGuarta 

Rnarcrxf Gutter Ud. 


TwarissiittSS' 


Itee 

« toy 

746pm 




7 toy 

7A5pra 


fBS 

Btoy 

745pm 


Uorctestcs and Chons Laonart Bcmataln 

(coop) CrtonKrarrmr (wte) Myaiten Zkranom (paao) Alad 
jo«» |MM| Bemaialn: CNdM» PseJro. Seronaba 

c t00.CS0.C2S Cba m ptrgnaSCanapaatod. _ _ 

■X^^^uMC*Mru*~n*rHkfrn,A I 

Alain Usntoartl (coruJucwi Draftry SbwrtovlvKJteilJI 
Beottraven: Sympritmv Na B or F Prokofiev? Vten Coned 
S Uav k iak y: Two Ragqt Sfrwg. 

CIO Cfl.C6.50.C4S0.C35q frragwe wMKato*3H<*Ua. 
TH£ ®«TE1» FtSTWAL. London Symphony Ort^Joffn 
Maucsrt (cand. ) Bomatatn: A Mkjpcai^^ 


i Concerto rti 1 


UumsMWBd OuasJwn Btittan; Venr GrtmeY FOin Sm 
I niErtikJes Barrtitatee 13tea &0 k Swy' SyrnptKkditoM 

Sbostoovtaff: SrriprionyNoSriDmrnor. Op 47 1 

London Connacton Capttatord A Enrfltr»U 

CK350. CS50.C750.C1 


M 

Btoy 

Z4Rpm 


T>1C BHRfCTON F ESTIVAL. Lond ot^Symp dotry Octia aira A 


Kryjttei Ztaannan (ptoo) MM tern (MM. Pri» as 6 Ua% 
by Lnmjon CotmcRM CppMcwd CnSraa 

Hc*ttwilM Beaimjiorty. 


ISO 


LONDON SYMPHONY 

ailhe 

Rarbicsn 


ORCHESTRA 


Tomorrow 27 April 730pm 

TCHAIKOVSKY 


TCHAIKOVSKY... 


Overture 'Hamlet' 


TCHAIKOVSKY Piano Concerto No I 

TCHAIKOVSKY. Symphony No 6 •Pathetique' 

NAUM GRUBERT piano 
CHRISTOPHER ZIMMERMAN conductor 


Saturday 10 May 7.45pm 

EDAHAENDEL violin 

WEBER Ch-erture ‘Oberorf 

MENDELSSOHN Violin Concerto 

ELGAR The Music Makers 

FELICITY PVLMER mezzo-soprano 
LONDON SYMPHONY CHORUS 
RICHARD HICKOX conductor 

Seal Prices £ 1 050. £8^a£73a £6. W^o". £150 
Bax Office Tel. KWJ every day inc. Sun 01-638 8891/628 8795 




RAYMOND GUBBAY presents 

1V/M at the BARBICAN 

^THURSDAY NEXTI MAY at 7-45 pm 

MOZART-SCHtJBERT- 
BEETHOVEN 

Moan THE MARRIAGE OF FKARQOY. 

sdtaSm.. symphony wajwaroasHHD) 

Mm PgASOC0WCfflTDH 0U.fc W7 

B^ran OTCTONYWA tFAgtOT W 

LOfIDON PHILHAWtOWC ORCHESTRA 
OaSSejSuESJBDD STEPHBfl BOUGHpteW 
g.£»£7;XB3(L£M>.£jfl« > 

BANK WhSaF MOMMY 5 

OPERA GALA NIGHT 

ss^isasssasisitetf 

l»7g| ■ ite Hcfcftw Steto. pto*teto FtiB tifrp.Ptefag . 

IRiifll ■Dovtara Anvil Ctera. lUdaGairi ^ irriz » 

Ate, Bandte Wm* *gor Potetsan DmcwJ to* 
FfeKS Rtoa* Dmt. Cmvnaa Item JFtoaeirS tefc 
Scftote.EmaasamiSaBSortbeliscnfcK- 
BBC tXWCERTORCBBS'niA. Camtooed by 

SIR YEHUDI MENUHIN 

jEATUDCVUIAnat fBCOLAS RIVENQbldnK 
SANDRA BBOWNE taeoawFcaito 
AMBROSIAN (WEBACaORUS 

Fktoraltamtotteaftam tee Band af the BMth Gtoda 

••• £5,£6.£7>t^.£te>Ql50 

SUNDAY 18 MAY as 7-30 pa» 

MENDELSSOHN-HANDED- 

RACHMANINOV-DVORAK 

iffSk ^ S’S 

IiaWI Baefaimtoffa PIANO CONCERTONO-T 

USf Dvorak. smMIOCTNOJCNEW WOULD) 

TOTAL PSILHARMO?BC ORCHE STRA 
CwteiMCaOUSqBlWlCT RffiLIPPOWKEpcto 

£L £L£7.^Sk£m>.£»-» 

SATURDAY 34 A BANK B0UDAT340NDAY 26 MAT at L45pjoa. 

PRESERVATION HALL 

INSI ifircct Cram New Orteam 

II^BI torttTtejtefaBitinrOtotelgttoii'tfdal 

j*«toxteMj«*Buod 

Ltd by Pacy Bnotjtexy tnmipex ««h WBBe Sompkny dtono, 
tterrfa fOntoffi baojo. Frank Donate ottotece, 

Wa (Sfag) MHtar pteo. Rrate Parte drnna, Abte JrtS: tab* 
£S>£ASU&5ft£JU>0 . 

Sp on s or ed fay American Eapreas Ltd. . 

Bar OBc* (01-628 SW, OadnCne* (MAS 8»0 

JOIN OlIR FREE MAILING UST. Wore toRaytnoDd Gabtay Lid, 
t2S Tbaabaa Court Road, Londaa Wl or |tea;ffi-387aXS 




VKnro&BOCHHABSEK proem at (he BARBICAN 
laim6ite«iAArKSO 

NEXT SATURDAY 3rd MAY at 7.45 

POPULAR CLASSICS 


totrodueed and tsodociedlv ANTONY HOPKINS 

ROSSINI Or. 'tTiUotu Ttir . VAUGHAN WUXIAMS Fanma c® 
■Gttensleeto'; GRXEG Pino Coucsnoi STRAUSS Btoc Daaidx tEtits 
TCHAIKOVSKY Cepprwte Into; MASCAGNI tentB*a*»'Cj»lkn» 

fiimfiMfra'* ffAHAlWK th^nnmi fham 


RuKKan';BOROIKN KteaaDm 
NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Sotos COUNHOKSLEY 
£5,£&.£75B.£850.£9 50fagnHaBp>8 WgLtJfl 8795 daihr inc. Scadrn 


i at the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


SUNDAY 18th MAY n 7 Jfi 

TCHAIKOVSKY 



Wednesday 7 Ma v 7.45pm Barbican Hall 

BEETHOVEN- 
PROKOFEE V- STRAVINSKY 

BEETHOVEN Symphony No 8 in F 

PROKOFIEV’ Violin Concerto No I 

STRAVINSKY The Rite of Spring 

HAGUE PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
ALAIN LOMBARD conductor 
DMITRYSITKOVETSKY violin 
Seat Prices £10, £8, £6. 50. £4.50. £3. 50 
Barbican Centre in association vrhk Harold Holt Lid 
Box Office Tel: 10-8 every day inri- Son 01-6388891/628 8795 

NORMAN MEADMORE LTD pntedteS The BARBICAN 
CTinruv rrlidVriT44i 


fixate 01 836 38TB CC 679 
6566 CC 379 6433. 7*1 W9. 
Qrv Sato 9306123/836 3962. 

Far It Wwte ter 

TOM HULCE 

THE NORMAL HEART 

W uuonr kumes 

—a Rare WondciDUi ThFoincal 
Cimr Wmri __ 
-XOTWWC 1*KTW 
SOttATK»OU.“ S EO 
Pm6 trail 13 May. Opens 20 
Mur 



By W.S. 1 

ft tnaad l to frvi i n triii f d p»«toMBtg|ivBa bv to LONDON SAVOYARDS 
TtiDOR DAVIES to Ko-Kd 


Jata B-raw»|cnqd) SOy G^iff (ct«lf)Tato Itetoattfc) 

£6.r7W.gCBO-£IO-£n3«l itek 01-62g W91/638 8?9g — 


BERNSTEIN FESTIVAL 

Mnsic Director: John Manceri 

29 April-11 May at the Barbican 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Tuesday 29 Api3 7.45 pm ' 

Lukas Foss Conductor 
SOLD OUT 


rnday Z Ma y 7.45 pm 

BERNSTEIN Symphony Na I (Jeremiah) 

MAHLER Symphony No 1 

Heather Harper Soprani? Jeffrey Tare Conductor 

£ 8.50 £7.50 £6 £4.50 £3.50 only 


Sunday 4 May 7 JO pm 

Nate final casting inc. 

Terence Stamp narrator 

STRAVINSKY SurSpogfed Banner 
BL3TZSTEIN The Airborne' Symphony 
BERNSTEIN Candide Suite 
Terence S lamp Mimrur 
Mark Tinkler. Damon Evans 
Nan Chrisrie, Joyce Castle 
Darid Eisler.BoBauenrura Boone 
The Richard Hickox Sagers 
John Mauctri Conductor 

£8.50 £7.50 £6 £4.50 £3.50 only, afl others wM 


Tuesday 6 May 7.45 pm 
In the presesce of HM The Qneea and 
HRH The Duke Of Edinburgh 
BERNSTEIN Ouchester Psalms Serenade: 
Kn-stun Zimeman Piano Gidon Kremer fTtoTm 
Aled Jones Boy Soprano London Sy mp hony Chorus 
Leonard Bernstein Conductor 
Gala Concert at axJof lit LSO Trust 
£100 £50 £25 only 
Pricer include champagne G‘canapds 
Leonard Benton*" s appearance at the London concen 
on the (itkMayis made poaiblt by Ebel,ThcArthucu 
ofTune.tnceubmtmojtAetrTSihamvertary 


Thursday 8 May 7.45 pm 

BERNSTEIN A Musical Toast 

IV ES Th e Unanswered Question 

BRIT TEN Four Sea Interludes (ram ftter Grimes 

BERNSTEIN Symphonic Dances from Mfest Side Story 

SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No 5 

John Maucen Conductor 

£8.50 £7.50 £6 £4.50 £3.50 only; aU others sold 


Friday 9 May 7.45 pm 
Programme as for6 May 
Leonard Bernstein Conauclor 
SOLD OUT 


Sunday 1 1 May 730pm 

The Vest End Salutes Bernstein 
A Musical Tribuie 
Prices from £3.50. 


The Bernstein Festival is co-sponsorrd by the London 
CoruucrionCapiialcmdaudE&Uas Holdings Ltd- 
Box Office Td: 10-8 every day ind Sun 01^388891-6288795 


BARBICAN 


WEWfLSDAy NEXT N APKXt- * 745 pm. 

TCHAIKOVSKY EVENING 

0v_, Romeo & Juliet* Vioim Conoerto, 
Symphony Na4 
KYUNG-SOO WON conducts 
LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
JOHN DIMITIUE-JOHANN LEIVICI violin 


Uito fioa ‘SkcpioB Bemu'kSmte 6**^ ‘Sow LaWi 
PtmoGiMeenoNo l, S«m l B Ste 
OVERTURE 1812 WITH CANNON AND 
MORTAR EFFECTS 

NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA VUEMTAISCTmshxror 
Soton: ANTONY PEEBLES MNDOFTRECOUDSncEAMGUUIfiS 
13 N). f4 NJ. M g.f7m£g-to.f950.^0.Nlff=JHaC97b319tWa8300 


VICTOR HOCHHADSEfipraaenaai the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

SATURDAY 24* MAS at 738 

SPANISH FIESTA 



Pi M um i in mrli - i lM - HnPf fM»i <Mi. 

R1MSKWKORSAKOV CmriCDO &taeri ffiALDTEDFELE^to 
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finaSpraai watBw Bminim n i t fiitier teacca& nm tp»i a 
NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Conductor DAVID COLEMAN 


Ftoenco Sokrat: TERESA MORENO S5n»s: VAldOANOROCCA 
Gmtar PEDRO ROMERO EtANZAESPANOL ON FULL COSTUME) 
O. SO, £5, £6.50, £7.60,18.50, £9 50 tea RaU 928 319179388800 


Gbmdeboume 


trthtbe 

LoBdoa nUmmamc Onhesta 
27May-15 August 1986 
Some setts avnKbie for 

ALBERT HERRING 

tzud-week performances 
lateMay/June 




BARBARA 

DICKSON 

IN CONCERN 


The Apollo Oxford 

The Orcharf- Oarttorf 

JSSSSM- • 

The Heia^in, Readiflg 
The Hexagon, Reading 
Windsor Hall Boameffioy* 
Cofetost Hall finaon 

St Dauds Hall CanL-1 
Odeon Bi«mcSh» n 

Odeon Bsrniingbatti 
palace Theatre. Manchester 
Victoria Hail. Hanley 

Victoria HalL Han fey 
Southport IT.eaae 

Southport TTieatpe 

Harrogaw Centre 
Leisure Centre Carlisle 

Theatre Royal Glasgow 

Theatre Royal* Glasgow 

Theatre Royal. Glasgow 
Captoi Aberdeen 
Capitol Aberdeen 
Plavhouse. Edinburgh 
Cire Hafl. Newcastle . 
r»b 1 Concert HadL Nottingham 
Royal Concert HalL Nottingham 
4in juiy De Montfort HaO. Leicester 
Tic^rte writohlc «Brwd htea tht h« uCDk.** 

SATURD AY 5tfa J ULY 
ROYAL ALBERT HALL 
at 7.30pm 

Tickets SJ050 £9.00 S7J0 £5.9> 4MJ . . 
arailabte from the bo* ottee‘01-5® »21i 01-S89 3463 
and usu3l ticket ageoctes. 


IS! June 
3rd. June 
4th June 
5th June 
6th June 
7th June 
9th June 
10th June 
12th June 
13th June 
34th June 
15* June 
17* June 
18* June 
19* June 
20* June 
21st June 
22nd June 
24* June 
25* June 
26th June 
27* June 
28* June 
20* June 
1st July 
2nd July 
3rd July 
4* July 


LATEST ALBUM: GOLD 
AVAILABLE SOW OS K-TEL RECORDS AND TAPES 
Album: ONE 3312 Cassette. OCL J3K 
P»GLD£S N5V>' SINGLE Hr YOUBE H1CHT 


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SUND AY 18 MAY « 7.30 pC- 

7 yyp,ftpRTg>TSE^Snm&TGU»TKVM <Bg . CTr<BW 


Mahler’s Symphony No, 2 

“Resurrection" 


GILBERT KAPLAN 
London Symphony Orctestra 

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SotsatKK SB GtotoxMcracpsopiana: Swell Walker 

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BAY COONEY 

$S5.««»H apS HUA^pSw'crrx^ 

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RICHARD TODD 



6-18 July 1986 

GREAT EVENTS 

GREAT ARTISTS 

GREAT PLACES 


Concerts. Jaa. Catemt 
Jfacuy.BttdUtkms 
a much, more . 


IKE HKSB ME MULUU 


^senti 9x4saa pteaso) 

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01-235 2301. 


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230 7200. Crp WM 01-9806123. 

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sal tLOO & 8-00. 


NTS AWARD 


David Manner* 

UNM^S 

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CAR PARR Ban door wh. 

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RATIONAL THEATRE Stt Bank 

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Rock and Jazz records 



REVIEW 


9ZA0&7 ^ 

2£* Satozzh Once Upon a 

P.-J^wayi-.o-soum 
T^evorWatt* Moire Music 

(ARCOZ) 

Rntttlouta: Erendira (ECM 

^ ' 3 °') _ 

As the keyboardist with the 
deservedly popular Pat 
Metheny Group, Lyle Mays 
knows how to combine jazz 
and rock in such a way that 
neither idiom is vandalized. 
Metheny and Mays do not 
make the jazz of Charlie 
Parker or the rock of Eddie 
Cochran, but their gifts and 
labours have led iht»w> to the 
creation of a genuine ‘'third 
stream". 

Mays's first solo album win 
delight those who treasure the 
epic soundscape tilled As Falls 
Wichita. So Falls Wichita 
± Falls which he and Metheny 
™ devised for the ECM label a 
few years back. The Jarrett- 
like lyricism of “Minor of the 
Heart", a solo piano piece, 
and the dense textures of 
“Highland Aire" and “Teflco", 
which offer scope for the 
inventive qualities of the Bra- 
zilian percussionists Alex 
Acufla and Nana Vasconcelos, 
show the variety of approach 
he can bring to a palette of 
watercolours whose soft glow 
can almost be felt on the skin 
The album's centrepiece, 
grandly titled “Alaskan Suite: 
Northern Lights Invocation, 
Ascent" starts off at a similar . 
, ly unhurried gait Soon, 

1 though, the careful impres- 


the key to exotic lyricism 




sionism is elbowed aside by 
Acuna's muscular drumming 
and by the guitar of Bui 
Frisell, whose almost hysteri- 
cally squealing figures play off 
a meandering melody, bring- 
ing a contrasting note of 
urgency to an otherwise well- 
mannered record. 

The mood of exotic lyricism 
is maintained by the second 
ECM -album from Dino 
Saluzzi, an Argentine expo- 
nent of the banckmeon, the 
grown-up squeezebox also fa- 
voured by the master of “ new 
tango", Astor Piazolla. Once 


Upon a Time — Far Away in 
the South sets the evocative 
wheezing of Saluzzfs instru- 
ment against the windswept 
tones of Pane Mikkelboig's 
trumpet, the brooding lines of 
Charlie Haden's double bass 
and the versatile percussion of 
Pierre Favxe, a combination 
that turns out to represent one 
of producer Manfred Etcher’s 
happier notions. 

Haden's fondness for fla- 
menco, first spotted in his solo 
on Ornette Coleman's famous 
“Ramblin' " in 1959, makes 
him a natural partner for 


Saluzzi, while those who were 
knocked sideways by 
Mikkelborg's superbly sensi- 
tive playing during George 
Russell's recent British lour 
will find their enthusiasm 
reconfirmed here. 

Saluzzi manages the diffi- 
cult feat of playing quite 
happily and comfortably 
alongside jazz musicians with- 
out needing to pretend that he 
is one himself. His unaccom- 
panied reading of the tune 
Haden calls “Silence", little 
more than a sequence of 
pungent minor chords, relies 
on a talent for dramatic 
restraint very like the 
composer's own. 

Trevor Watts, the accom- 
plished British saxophonist 
who worked for many years 
alongside John Stevens in the 
Spontaneous Music Ensem- 
ble, is conducting yet another 
multicultural adventure. Moi- 
re Music is the title both of 
Watts's current 10-piece band 
and of a debut recording 
which shows it to be as 
original in concept as it is in 
instrumentation (Tour saxo- 
phones. two violins, piano, 
bass, drums and percussion). 

Watts's writing for this en- 
semble blends the techniques 
of the American systems com- 
posers with the jazz-influ- 
enced dance hands of the 
South African townships to 
create a series of tightly scored 
overlapping patterns which 
provide a basis for improvisa- 
tion. So exciting is the back- 
ground, however, that the 
solos (even Watts's own elo- 
quent efforts) can easily pass 


unnoticed — or perhaps a 
subtler point, that composi- 
tion and improvisation are 
inextricably linked, is being 
made in these two 20-minute 
pieces. 

First House is a young 
British quartet led by the 
saxophonist Ken Stubbs and 
featuring the peripatetic pia- 
nist Django Bates. Erendira, 
their first recording, comes 
with the ECM guarantee of 
technical quality and shows 
Stubbs to be interested in 
creating a highly intense, con- 
centrated form of jazz which is 
nevertheless quite melodic 
and perfectly accessible. 

Stubbs play 5 both alto and 
soprano instruments with a 
pure but attractively yielding 
tone; be seems to owe no 
overriding aesthetic debt to 
any other saxophonist. His 
compositions, too, have a 
quality of refinement that 
makes obvious technical de- 
mands on his fellows, who 
bring off the many tricky 
unisons and sudden transi- 
tions with impressive brio. 

Bates, here performing sole- 
ly on the acoustic piano, plays 
a very different role from that 
of the madcap synthesizer 
wizard he assumes with Loose 
Tubes, but the somewhat 
cloistered air of First House's 
music encourages an equally 
rewarding facet of his person- 
ality. His three compositions, 
notably the joyful, willowy 
“Bracondale", make an im- 
portant contribution to the 
success of a delightful album. 

Richard Williams 


Prince of rock’s uneasy reign 


Prince and the Revolution 
Parade (Paisley Park 92$ 395- 

The Beat Farmers Glad 'N‘ 
Greasy (Demon VEX 5) 

Paul Kossoff Blue Soul 
(Island PKSP100) 

“Women and girls role my 
world", proclaims Prince, 
-■ who, in Purple Rain, chose to 
be cast as a singularly unpleas- 
ant misogynist, and whose 
liner notes on Parade twice 
exhort the listener to “Love 
. & God". The contradictory ele- 
ments of this enigmatic pop 
star's personality pervade the 
music of Parade , the sound- 
track for the forthcoming film 
Under The Cherry Moon. 

The album has the qualities 
one might expect of a 
soundtrack, with vague; unde- 


fined atmospheric pieces such 
as “I Wonder U" and “Venus 
De Mao". The jumbled pro- 
duction and idiosyncratic in- 
strumentation, incorporating 
string and tootling trumpets, 
together with odd disembod- 
ied voices foil of decadent 
Eastern promise, recall the 
Beatles' Magical Mystery 
Tour period of psychedelic 
decline. 

But buried in the package 
are slick, sparse dance songs 
like “New Position”, “Girls 
and Boys" and the recent hit 
“Kiss". This is a sprightly, if 
patchy, Mack pop - dance 
record in an uncomfortable, 
paisley-patterned disguise. 

The Beat Fanners have 
their lewd moments, but tend 
to be more interested in bar 
room rabble-rousing t ha n bed- ' 


CHESS 


room sex, and there is no 
effete mysticism to be encoun- 
tered on their prosaically ti- 
tled mini-album Glad *N' 
Greasy. This is a stop-gap 
collection, following their glo- 
rious 1985 debut Tales of the 
New West, but it continues 
their tradition of combining 
rip-roaring roots rock guitar 
music with healthy bites of 
off-key humour 
The six tracks on Glad 'N’ 
Greasy do not embrace all The 
Farmers have to offer, but a 
surging version of Neil 
Young's “Powder-finger" and 
the good time rock V roll of 
the title track pair off with 
Style against a hick comedy 
rendition of “The Big Rock 
Candy Mountain” and “Beat 
Generation", a drunken par- 
ody of Richard Hell’s punk 


anthem “Blank Generation". 

Such paeans to a dissolute 
lifestyle ignore the real trage- 
dies that may befall the weak 
and unwary. Paul Kossoff. the 
erstwhile guitarist in Free, was 
an early victim of rock star 
excesses, and Blue Soal is a 
lavishly packaged double al- 
bum to mark the tenth anni- 
versary of his death. 

While he did little of note 
beyond his work with Free, 
Kossoff was a player of unusu- 
al passion and sensitivity, but 
with the exceptions of “Oh I 
Wept" and “The Stealer", this 
album features none of his 
best performances. Instead 
there are out-of-the-way re- 
cordings spanning his entire 
career, including previously 
unreleased material. 


David Sinclair E " s ” 



On March 29. 1886 Wilhelm 
Sicinitz won the game which 
was to crown him as the first 
official World Chess Champi- 
on. His defeated rival — by 
MVyTk — was Johannes 
Ziikertort. the dazzling victor 
’ of the meat London tourna- 
ment of 1883. 

Both claimants to the 
world title were central Euro- 
peans who had been resident 
in London, bat the inaugural 
title contest itself was fought 
out entirely on American 
soil. It was split into three 
phases, hosted by New York, 
St Louis and New Orleans. 

White: Zukenort; Blade 
Steinitz; Queen's Gambit De- 
clined, World Championship 
1886. Game 7. 

1 MM P-Q* 2 rag* WW 
3 N-083 N-4B3 4 IMO 

The modern choice here 


COLLINS 

DICTIONARIES 


THE TIMES 
BOOKSHOP 
CROSSWORD 
COMPETITION 


Daily winners of the 
competition, and the 
booksellers who supplied 
cheir entry forms for the 
17th to 23rd April are as 
follows: 

Cathy Brierley, Fife 
(The University 
Bookshop, Dundee) 

Mrs. a McUntic, Dollar 
(John Smith & Son, 
Glasgow) 

R.O. Davies, Leicester 
(The University 
Bookshop, Leicester) 

C.R. Hartnell, Bristol 
(Nailsea Bookshop, 
Bristol) 

Mis. SJ- O’Grady, 
Bangor 

fBookland & Ox, Bangor) 

W. Leadbeater, Lancashire 
(W.N. Wallshaw 
Bookshop Ltd, 
Manchester) 


COLLiNS 
DICTIONARIES 
MOVE WITH 

.■* -(V. .n, . 

THE TIMES 


The first 
champion 

would most likely be 4 PxP 
PxP; 5 B-N5. 

4 _ JNB4 S N4B M-B3 

• JHW3 PmBP T BtP PxP 

e PxP 8-K2 9 04 M 

TO 0«3 

10 B-KN5 is more to the 
point. 

10 - OQ 2 It 003 Ml 

12 OR-B1 0*4 VI M2 KH-OI 

14 XR-K1. 

And here 14 KR-Q1 looks 
stronger. 

14 — Ml 15 Ml MM3 

15 <HCZ Ml 17 WWJi B4Q 

10 B-R3 N-X2 10 002 04Q 

White has been vacillating 
with no clear strategy in 
view. Meanwhile, Steinitz has 
been piling up pressure 

against White’s Queen’s 
Pawn. 

30 MS H44 21 NOW 

A desperate move which 
should have been rejected in 
favour of 21 Q-B4. 

21 - 

A combination which throws 


a harsh searchlight on the 
weaknesses in While’s camp. 
Indeed, even 21 _ NxNP; 22 
BxR, RxB gives Black tre- 
mendous compensation for 
the modest material invest- 
ment 

22 NxN mu 23 IMS Ml 

2* 0*8 PxH 25 M* NiN 

2S fW Rn« Zf BxR 040" 

2S MB mm 29 frQBC 

Not 29 BxRP? BxB: 30 QxB, 
Q-Q&h. 


29 
SI K-R2 


MS 30 M3 
BOBS 32 0X7 


OOScB 

B-Mcb 


A neat concluding combina- 
tion to exploit the shattered 
nature of White’s King’s 
wing. 

33 MM 

Or 33 QxB, Q-R8ch, 34 K- 
MV7ch: 


N3, Q-T 


35 K-R4, 


QxBPch; 36 Q-N3, P-KN4ch, 
much as in the game. - 

S3 - Burnt 34 QxB Q-RSdi 
35 K-KS OWch 

White resigns. 

The finish would be 36 K-R4, 
Q-KSch; 37 Q-N3, P-N4ch 
etc... 

Raymond Keene 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 935 

prizes of the New Collins Thesaurus win be given for the first two 
correct solutions opened on Thursday, May 1, 1986. Entries should 
be addressed to The Times Concise Crossword Competition, 1 
Pennington Street. London. El 9XN. The winnera and solution will 
be announced on Saturday, May 3, 1986. 

ACROSS 

1 Argures!5?Aive<l l) 

9 Mode rni se s (7) 

10 Sweet medicine (5) 

11 Alfioft) 

13 Thin rope (4) 

16 Tribe (4) 

17 Relax (6) 

18 On (4) 

39 Gassy drink (4) 

21 Not ranch (6) 

22 Desire passionately 

(4) 

23 Malarial fever (4) 

25 Affirmative f3) 

28 Earth (5) 

29 Loire manor (7) 

30 Adaptability (11) 

DOWN 

2 Teat sac (5) 

3 Routine (4) 

4 Long ago (4) 

5 Average (2J) 

6 Sonrcbeny(7) 

7 Promptness (It) 

8 Un pre meditated (1 1) 

12 Lavishly decorated 
(6) 

14 Brownish-grey (3) 

15 For brief period (6) 

19 Counterpart (7) 

.20 Moon plain (3) 

24 WetaWD e(5) 

.25 Tibetan tank (4y 

26 Deer tail (4) 

77 AcdU 18(4) 



SOLUTION TO NO 934 
ACROSS: 1 Cravat 5 Memoir 8Exe 9 
Fubrer 10 Radish 11 Peon 12 En- 
trails 14 Octave 17 Smeary 19 Hind- 
most 22 Baps 24 Valise 25 Hustle 36 
Soe 27 Settle 28 Layoff 


DOWN: 2R<nw 3 Veranda 4 Ter- 
rene 5 Merit a Media 7 Insular 13 
Ram 15Chkanc 16 Vim 17 Satchel ]8 
Embassy 20 Drift 21 Obese 23Piiaf 

The vnnnmefprisc concise No 929 are 
Mr R". T. Mddak. Green Lane, NewEhham, Lon- 
don: and Mrs ALS. Fountain; The Old Rectory, 
Gimston, Blandford. Dorset. 


SOLUTION TO NO 929 (Iasi Saturday’s prize concise) 

ACROSS: I Pitchblende 9 Uncivil 19 He man 11 Duo 13 
Cusp -16 Knee 17 Unsafe 18 Warn 20 Gene 21 Colbe 22 
Tati 23 Tool. 25 Hem 28 Exude 29 Ovation 3fl Herringbone 
DOWN: 2 Incus 3 Cove 4 Bold 5 Echo < Dominie 7 Quick- 
witted $ Unrelenting 12UnfokJ 14 Pirn 15 Ashore 19 Rc- 
riase 36 Get 24 Onion 25 Hear 26 Moan 27 Barb 

Name .. ■■■■ — — — 

.Address . .. — 


BRIDGE 


A costly error that 
will plague Sharif 


The Europa Cup. spon- 
sored by Phillip Morris, has 
become one of the most 
prestigious events in the 
European bridge calendar. 
Impeccable presentation and 
prize money of 250.00QFF 
make it a privilege to 
participate, let alone win. 

The entry is restricted to 
the winners of the National 
Teams of Four champion- 
ships. This year 22 teams 
were formed into five pools 
lo contest the semi-finals. 
The winner of each pool 
would join France, the host 
nation, in the final in Paris. 
The finalists, in addition to 
France, were Austria. Israel. 
Hungary. Denmark and Bel- 
gium. 

Britain seemed on paper to 
have a relatively easy task in 
a pool that contained Ireland, 
Portugal, and an Israeli team 
which was certainly not of 
championship calibre. But 
indifferent play, combined 
with some imaginative if 
unorthodox captaincy, 
proved their undoing. 


igary 

Austria 85; France 83; Bel- 
gium 57; Israel 46. In such a 
close finish there are always 
innumerable hands that make 
players say “if only..." I 
suspect this is the one that 
plagues Omar Sharif. 

1st round France v Den- 
mark. North-South game. 
Dealer South. 


♦ 6 

T 543 
V J109 8 4 
♦ K062 


♦ 10 

v QJ 9 8 72 
•; K62 
* JB3 


N 

W E 
S 


♦ KJ972 

y 106 

V 73 
* 109 75 



Omar Sharif :*If only* 

At the final at the Hotel 
Sofitei all the competitors 
were the guests of the 
sponsor. To add to the 
occasion, the French Bridge 
Federation provided 
“Bridgevision". This method 
of presenting bridge, first 
seen at the world champion- 
ship in Biarritz, enables the 
audience to see the hands on 
a giani screen, while video 
cameras supply live pictures 
of the players at the same 
time. 

France, represented by a 
strong learn including three 
world champions, playing on 
home territory, were obvious 
favourites. But with one 
round remaining any one of 
four teams could still win. 

Hungary beat France 16-14 
to win ifie contest between 
the leaders, but Denmark 
massacred Belgium by 23-7 
to overhaul them both. 

The final order was; Den- 


# AO 8 543 
1AK 
’ a 05 
+ A4 

When Denmark held the 
North-South cards, the corn- 
men iaior debated wheiher 
they would reach the good 
contract of six diamonds. 
The matter was not put to 
the test because some spirited 
bidding by Chemla and 
Perron for France persuaded 
the Danes to double three 
hearts. Although the escapade 
cost 700. if France could bid 
the slam they would gain 12 
IMPs. 

France did bid the slam. 
Unhappily not in diamonds, 
but in spades. “If only I had 
bid six no trumps", moaned 
Sharif, who was South. “1 
win the heart lead and give 
up a diamond. Suppose West 
continues hearts. I win in 
hand and I run my tricks, 
leading to this ending with 
the lead in dummy: 


♦ 6 

r a 


THE WEEK AHEAD 


4 G 


• 10 
. sa 


* - 


N 

W E 
S 


♦ K J 
v — 

i7o 


♦ AQB 


♦ - 


“East has been forced to 
come down to two spades to 
keep his ten of clubs. A spade 
finesse gives me the remain- 
der of the tricks and a swing 
of 27 poinu." 

The Danish West kindly 
pointed out that, when in 
with the C'K he would have 
switched to a spade, breaking 
up the squeeze. Perhaps he 
would, but thal was small 
consolation lo Omar. 

Jeremy Flint 

• We regrer the priming error 
which marred ihe second 
hand in last week's article. 



Faring a Cop: Cooper with LQli Palmer in Cloak and Dagger 

Spy thriller with 
an ironic twist 


FILMS ON TV 


Cloak and Dagger, which is 
being shown on Channel 4 on 
Thursday (5-7pm), is one of 
‘those films that is more 
interesting for its associations 
than for its meriL Made in 
1946. it stars Gary Cooper, 
perhaps Hollywood's most 
popular actor of the period, in 
his first post-war role. All the 
ingredients pointed to a sub- 
stantial box office success. 

It was a patriotic espionage 
drama of the kind that was 
proving extremely popular 
with the American film-view- 
ing public. Cooper played a 
quiet boffin parachuted into 
Nazi-occupied Europe to res- 
cue a fellow scientisLAnd the 
film was directed by Fritz 
Lang who, though past his 
European peak, was neverthe- 
less highly bankable in Holly- 
wood and still capable of 
evoking extraordinary 
tension. 

It was also the first Ameri- 
can film made by LilH Palmer. 
Already a well-known actress 
in Europe, she was in Holly- 
wood with her then-husband, 
Rex Harrison, when she was 
told there was a pan going for 
a German actress. “I thought, 
what better way to begin my 
American career than in the 
Gary Cooper picture ", she 
said later. But the experience 
was not a happy one and the 


RECOMMENDED 


How To Succeed In 
Business Wrthotft Really 
Trying (1967); Very slick 
and cynical look at the morality 
of American business 
(BBC2, today. 1.55450pm). 

In The Good Oid 
Summertime (1949): Musical 
with an appealing Judy 
Garland as a salesgirl in a 
music store carrying on a 
postal romance with the boss 
she hates (Channel 4, 
tomorrow, 2.30-4.25pm). 

Laughter (1930): Early, 
funny example of fast-talking 


film was an unexpected flop. 

The ironies abound. The 
screen-writers of this ultra- 
patriotic film. Albert Maltz 
and Ring Lardner Junior, 
were laier to be victims of 
Senator Joe McCarthy's Un- 
american Activities Commit- 
tee. and among the famous 
blacklisted Hollywood Ten. 

And Cooper’s role was quite 
obviously modelled on the 
character of Dr Robert 
Oppenheimer “father" of the 
atomic bomb, who was him- 
self to be persecuted by 
McCarihyism. 

Cooper became an enthusi- 
astic “friendly witness" to the 
committee, giving evidence of 
alleged Communist infiltra- 
tion of Hollywood. He even 
made jokes with congressmen 
members of the committee, 
asking them whether they 
could trust a man who had just 
been voted the least co-opera- 
tive star in Hollywood. But be 
was never as virulent as some 
of his colleagues, and later as a 
producer, he tried in a small 
way to make amends by giving 
work to blacklisted writers. 

Cooper was greatly upset by 
the failure of Cloak and 
Dagger which, to some extent, 
marked the end of his pre- 
eminence as America's box 
office certainty. Thereafter, 
only High Noon, made in 
1952, came near to reviving 
his popularity. 

Marcel Berlins 

brittle society comedy: a 
chorus aid meets and marries 
millionaire, but... (Channel 
4. Wed. 2.30-4pm). 

The Lavender Hill Mob 

(1951): Perhaps the funniest, 
cleverest and most- 
perfectiy scripted Ealing 
comedy of them all. with 
Alec Guinness splendid as the 
quiet derk turned bullion 
thief (BBC2, Wed, 

6-7.1 5pm). 

Fahrenheit 451 (1966): 
Truffaut’s interpretation of Ray 
Bradbury's novel of the 
totalitarian state in which 
books are forbidden 
(Channel 4, Wed. 
lOpm-midnight). 


Pomposity 
on an 
epic scale 


TELEVISION 

It is very rare to see a 
programme so bad as to be 
babble; rarer still when the 
object of derision is a big 
budget series with a talented 
cast. But that is the sorry story 
of Mountbaoen: The Last 
Viceroy (TTV. tomorrow, 7.45- 
9.45pm; Mon, 9-10pm and 
1030-11 30pm; Tues, 1030- 
1130pm). 

The script is pompons, stilt- 
ed and risible. Yet the story 
should be an epic. Lord 
Louis's lifestyle was flamboy- 
ant and the bloody partition of 
India, the jewel in the crown of 
the British Empire, a tragedy 
on an enormous scale. 

Mountbatten aims for the 
look-alike and sound-alike 
school 'of historical drama, 
with potted CSE-level asides 
od tbe political, social and 
economic backdrop. But this 
translates into dkbed dipped 
English accents and pained 
expressions of actors, moving 
like sleepwalkers. 

Mountbatten. written by 
David Butler who shares the 
dubious distinction of co-an- 
thoring Marco Polo, does 
boast some distinguished cred- 
its: Nicol Williamson as tbe 
dazzling plenipotentiary to the 
sub-continent; Janet Suzman 
as gadfly wife Edwins; Ian 
Richardson as the blacked-up 
Hindu leader Nehru and Nigel 
Davenport as the crusty, cigar- 
belching Ismay. 

The King of the Ghetto 
(BBCZ Thors, 930-I035pm), 
a modern four-part thriller 
about Asian oppression in the 
East End of London written by 
Farrukh Dhondy, is a lesson in 
cultural strife, character devel- 
opment and intelligent 
dialogue. 

Tim Roth, as a scarred 
skinhead and megalomaniac 
white community activist in 
flashback, dominates the sce- 
nario of the self-contained, 
interbred Asian entrepreneurs 
clawing for self-respect and an 
avenue out of the rotting, 
exploited ghetto. 

Bread (BBCl, Thors, 930- 
10pm), Carla Lane's new com- 
edy series about a large 
extended Liverpool family, re- 
inforces the cultural stereo- 
type of the inhabitants of that 
self-destructive city as a bunch 
of spongers abasing the wel- 
fare state. 

Like the inhabitants of the 
ghetto, they are always look- 
ing for a dodgy deal, but they 
belong to the “state should 
provide rae with everything" 
moral-sapping school of ran- 
nJdpai socialism. 

It's a grand week for the 
elder statesmen of rock music. 
The formative Velvet Under- 
ground are profiled in the 
South Bank Show (TTV, to- 
morrow, 10.30-1 1.30pm): 
Frankie Valli appears as a 
mobster in Miami Vice 
(BBCl. Tups, JO-1 030pm); 
Ian Dun makes his acting 
debut as a greasy racketeer in 
King of the Ghetto, while the 
eardrum-bruising ZZ Top ruin 
tbe natural tranquillity' of 
Texas in a new series of tbe 
once soronambulant Whistle 
Test (BBCl, Toes, 6-6 30pm). 

Bob Williams 


The Raj seen through Indian eyes 


The rage for the Raj has been 
going strong for several years, 
but so far one aspect of British 
rule in India has been virtually 
ignored; what was it (ike for 
the Indians? 

A new five-part series. Indi- 
an Tales of the Raj (Radio 4. 
tomorrow. 5.05-5. 35pra). sets 
out to redress the balance. 
Drawing on the memories and 
opinions of a generation of 
Indians who were on ihe 
receiving end of British rule 
and lived to see it overturned. 

In the first programme. 
Serving The Sahibs. Indians 
tell what it was like to work 
under British masters in some 
of the key services and profes- 
sions of the Raj. 

Aleister Crowley - poet, 
mountaineer, drug fiend, sex 
maniac, and black magician — 


RADIO 


ended his days in a seedy 
boarding house in Hastings. 

In The Mischief Makers 
(Radio 4. tonight. 10.30- 
1 1 pm), several of those who 
knew him or have written 
about him wonder whether he 
was really “the wickedest man 
in the world", and why his 
notoriety has endured. 

A much quirkier insight 
into the nature of imperial 
power is The Emperor In Bath 
(Radio 4, Tues. 8.30-9pm). 
This tells the story of Haile 
Selassie's exile in England 
from 1936 to 1940. when the 


King of Kings and Emperor ol 
Ethiopia held court in a 
suburban house on the out- 
skirts of Bath. Turning a 
greenhouse into a chapel and 
installing a “wise woman" in 
the potting shed, he seems to 
have adapted to English pro- 
vincial life remarkably well 
and became a familiar local 
personality. 

The big drama production 
on Radio Four is Arthur Wing 
Pinero's Dandy Dick (Mon. 
S. 1 5-9.45pml. an evergreen 
iarce about a Dean gening 
caught up in the murky world 
of horsc-racing. The marvel- 
lous Patricia Routledge plays 
Gcorgiana Tidman. as she did 
in the last W'est End 
production. 

NJL 


VEBCM* VT IW#1 rfHX.1 ■. « M.N1 

\ LA or, IF SMITH DENHOLM ELLIOTT II til DENCH SIMON CM LOW 
HELENA BON HAM CARTER JLT J4N &4ND& DANIEL DAY LEWIS 

I \i FiSstthcv jr 

A Room wity a viem 


■ I !■ PWMC 




W— — D-VjM >1 ■ «. « ! . 144 
Imm LNl 




pra-filra-as near 
./^perfections 
:; as/fs possible | 
l^t^cohceiyeb/ 

fe'zn'.idcr.vVi.Ker - Lorivyvn Siainda: 

. -"exquisite" , 
'masterpiece” 


, JorW 7200 

HOW sHowiNocuHzmtuwmiit^^^, 

Separate performances 130pm (not Sun ), 3.45pm, 6-iOpm, a-topm 
Seats at £4.50 bookable in advance for &oopm perf. daily and 6.10pm perf. an Sat. and Sun. 

MOW SHOWING: BATH UtKi Theatre. BELFAST Queen’s FT. 6RISTOL ASC w*i<;piacties. 

BOURNEMOUTH ABC CAMBRIDGE Arts. CARDIFF ABC DUBLIN Screen. 

EDINBURGH Dominion. GLASGOW Grosvenor Hilinead. MANCHESTER Cvntrh«j$e 
NOTTINGHAM Odepn 





Sri 


iKc i iMta> sAi 

THE WEEK AHEAD 


fore 
Nor 
and 
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yiek 
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and 
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beyc 
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lurrn 
glanr 
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Slav 
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1 of i 

ealle 
“ hikir 






FILMS 

8 stri^ng 

British independent future 
exploring the tormented life enfl 
thoughts of Zina Bronstem. 

Trotsky's daughter. G^eNotting Hill 
(01-221 0220), Metro (01-437 
0757). From Thursday. 


THEATRE 

COLD STORY: Jeremy 
Gillian Barge, Joe M^aJteymond 
Bowers and Richard Easton heaa 
Recast of A Winter s Tale directed 

Strata* 

“^n(Q789 295623). Opens 

Wednesday. 


BOOKS 

on. unusually, not in South 
America, but at a resort on the Italian 

Rivierafin Normamfy, m u^- 

ciass England, and In the past. 


OPERA COHCERTS 

RUSSIAN CONQUEROR: NataSa festival 


dance 


'^^.P^alOpera House (pi- 
240 1056), Monday. 


ish Preside, 

hicari Centre ( 01-638 8891). 


Barbican Centre (1 
Tuesday; 7.45pm. 


®«Sfc 8hB 

returns w 

Tuesday. 


Playing to 
win in a 

hard game BBBsl ilia. 


ARTS DIARY 

TheBear 
necessity 




AST’ 


I t is raining as Elaine and for Elaine P*8e hereeff 
Pairotetk her white whose duet with Barbara 
West Highland terrier, a Dickson, I Know Him 
srerall placid animal Well" wr die. second bluest 
called Tugger, towar* the seUmg UX a 

Porsche was stolea wo ItK ,wm*£ ■" *“3 


■/. -it . , 


necessity ■ ■■asSSS^- 

The week of Shakespeare’s Ftefivrtora^ATiKg 

SKS? 

SST- £**£? aubinix 

Globe theatre m ^ Concho dab, the fash- 

_ Wanamaker h^tong ionable meeting pfece fin- 
ished plans to London's litenff Jfweg. »wt 

Gtobe; *e “W«n. rfttS) is. &«»,■» 

rmbca ofalSW^ tarty 


unique replica ofal6l6^» wputttiott ^ charging 

tm provided perform^esrf ^^gSr-tamM 

Shakespearian andotber, rar ag|hfl gs m a smgte aJ- 

cr, Elizabethan wwlLandte ■• started maiMe 

kepi the flame of d* GW* rccndtu* drive; K*efl adub 
alive whUe money, might which frik torecognwe 

permission and John Mortimer as be vraBcs 



Dis 
counti 
its villi 
ourCf 
advise 
hotels 
toww 
stops 
Ca 
and in 
prwatt 
full on 
Voi 
holida- 
hoielc 

wafer: 

in&iam 

your o 
Ast 
For re 
pleas 
Inte*^ 
Londt 
Tel: (C 


months ago. 

Suddenly, an agitated Bjorn 
Ulvaeus appears; his rear 
passenger window has been 
smashed and ail his car audio 
equipment stolen. “It’s proba- 
bly the same people", she says 
wearily. Still with Chess al- 
ready booked up solidly until 
October, perhaps such losses 
can be borne with fortitude. 

Earlier, Ulvaeus and his 
partner from Abba, Benny 
Anderson, who co-wrote the 
music to Chess, were to be 
found wandering around the 
studio offices nattering m 
Swedish, as the avuncular 
figure of Tim Rice, the show s 
lyricist, passed through on his 
way home for the night 
Newspaper interest in 


UK uiuaiMUi — — , 

current marketing trends, 
does it mean the show is 
already old hat before it 
opens? 

“It's the first time I’ve ever 
done it this way round", she 
says. "But there are a lot of 
new songs in addition to the 
material on the record, so the 
whole thing is fresh again. It s 
like approaching a brand new 
piece almost* 1 . 

Recently she has found time 
to learn to play chess - typical 
of her renowned thoroughness 
in tackling a role. 

"Once the show has got to 
the rehearsal stage it takes up 
vour whole life if you're going 
to do it properly", she de- 
clares. adding that her lifestyle 
then becomes subject to a 
regime of early nights, healthy 


K> ym — ■ 


IIP . : .- 


•jtotit cannot afford to go 
on. “The teadiers' strik e was a 
eontributory fector beam* 
we weren’t getting the 
throughput", says the 
Patrick Spottiswoode. »prt 

we also need a mw toot. 
With awesome optmtsm oe 
hopes that if £500,000 were 
found, sufficient work coon 
be done to re-open tire pace. 
But Wanamaker and njscj" 



i 

t ■.*•<■ 





] 

n i&l 


membeo » join regular like 
Mdvvn Bragging Jiitie Chris- 


A»'Wrff4 %vv **'T *•' 


lSSi>i ' * *t^T“ w hfle she was rehearsing for the show 

jtol^lay: Elaine Paige, who flwnd time to leain flic sobtietKS °f chess wMI* she was rebeaismg 
Koie pray: e.wu Ttw T7m« revrewo 


Newspaper luicrvai n regime wi - 

Rice's alleged romance with eaung. reduced anoking,exeT- 
Mis 5 Paige may have subsided cise and study of the part. Her 
recently .but romantic intrigue marriage to her wore may 
continues in this latest musi- partially explain, at 36. born 
cal. set in chess tournament her singular success and single 
hails and hotel rooms in Italy status, 
and Thailand. Paige plays the The daughter of an estate 
part of the Hungarian born agent who plays the dnims, 
Florence Vassy, who, while she was born in Barnet, nen- 

nui _ . J \ -L - 1. ^ j-l: a fi-nm an 


Florence vassy, wno. wimt sne was wbu m 

seconded to. and the lover of fordshire. and showed from an 

the American chess champi- early age the talent and appu- 

c.11. u..s urith his minn lhit have StOOO ner ID 


Her West End debut in 
1968, in the chorus of the 
musical Hair, steered her to- 
wards the heart of the Sixties 
hippie counter-culture, but the 
experience left little visible 
marie on the self-possessed 
career actress. 

"I look back on that period 
with very fond memories; it 
was a good, plentiful tune to 
be 18. We all had youthful 
ideals, good stuff and all that. 


proc}»i*med 


another. 

Her “overnight success" as 
Eva continued for ^O monms 
until she left the pari m 1980. 


P 


aige identified with 
the young Eva 
Peron’s single-mind- 
ed determination 


an irisiu. iuui uw ».!*», 

ster, in Granada’s Ladyknlers 

series in 1 98a was a departure 

from musicals that Paige wel- 
comed, but which filled to 
lead to similar work. “That 
did absolutely nothing for my 
career at alt I can’t think 
why”, she says, laughing. 

Since 1980, Paige has also 
pursued a parallel career as a 
solo singing artist (she 


job" The Times reviewer who. 
referred to “cheap and nasty 
arrangements” and described 
her as being “embarrasangly 
deficient in the basic abikty to 

swu^j”. ■ . ■ 

But with Chess she is retmn- 
ing to the world of the Wert 
End musical- “This is what I 
like besL I'd rather be doing 
this than playing Elaine smg- 
ing songs, because in theatre 
you are playing a character 


But WanamaKer aim - fweivyn 

directors of the Globe Pnjject tie: t£ chE. taf.comtenrt 

arenmUkriy to be dhernd: 

from their main tas k tfbunB - w dflfer .teiffGg' 

h» a replica of Shakespe»es s% at£t00ifdMa(,^#^£ 
Saire,^othe Bear Gante £5? Sat. &* &*j ?*m 

Museum wiU afanort certainly ; Company. : Membership^ 
my dosed* " then ™ jft- 

3 -dowiredfr®n*he s,a, ^’T n *?* 1 

Royal Goantbeatregoes^ gre> 
fer.to s^nd thor 


sex 


me AHICIIUUk y- wj ~fc.~ — _ . . „ • 

on falls in love with his cation that have stood her in 
Russian opponent- such good stead- When she 

When the musical opens at was 11 she taught berretf to 
the Prince Edwanl Theatre on i al 


Hen- ideals, good stuff and all that, JL. e d determination, blanches noticeably at wing three- 

oman but reaUy... rather naive. - Td battled for many years m called a T»p star"), and to same way, 

appli- Time has changed so much for ^ business, just to work, and recorded five albums w* very long 

her in everybody since then. I could relate to her struggle to conspicuous to find the coSours and mood, 

m she The big change for -Em ^3 better life and wanting ce^ Urt wncerttour, M^SSmeintiiwical 


May 14. it wiU be two years 
since the Chess album was 
recorded in Stockholm, and it 


the piano for hours" — and at 
16. while still at the Aida 
Foster Stage School, she won a 

1 . ! — . «Lj* 4aiimvia rtlllCirfll 



TOle in the mSThW 

tional hits for Murray Head rAc Roor °f t / ! f ( P^ epain ’ 
S?ih "One Night in Bangkok", the Smelt of the Crowd. 


W 

V ▼ hat did Katherine 
Hepburn say that made Anthony 
Hopkins change his life? 

Why doesn’t Britain have a 
world-class orchestra? 

Is the Bolshoi, due here in Jul* 
worth queuing all night for? 

These questions are answered in 
a very different magazine launched 
this weekend. It’s the first to cover 
the arts and entertainment in colour 
every week. 

But that’s not all that makes it 

different . 

It’s elegant, but it’s also practical. 
From cover to cover, itfs easy to find 

your way around. 

Reviews of the latest plays, films, 
records and books reach clear con- 
dusions.The same goes for concerts, 
television, dance and art 

Previews tell you about forth- 
coming events in plenty ot t ime to 
book. 

And the full 
listings guide is 

national. 

This magazine 
is called Review. 

It’s at your 
newsagents from 
April 25, price £1 
weekly. 


A uv V'O V _ 

Paige came with her selection 
for the part of Eva Peron in 
the tremendously successful 
Tim Rice/Andrew Lloyd- 
Webber musical Evita. 

The headlines after heT 
debut performance in 1978 
read like Hollywood dichfe: 


1 bUUJU IWflU- W - w . — 

make a better life and wanting 
to prove herself." 

She dismisses as exaggerat- 
ed hearsay this week’a ru- 
mours that Madonna is to 
play the part of Eva Peron in a 
proposed Robert Stigwood 
film of Evita. 


UVTIHiS — - "T 

to””* SeMo^ Com gyatoi re 


SrS BEBSaw. 


CONCERTS OPENINGS 





1 


jiv, arts and, entertainment magazine 


SEGOVIA’S SIXTIETH: P 

Celebrating the anniversary ot r 

his London debut, P&yinq h 

pieces he Included in his first a 

Wigmore Hall guitar recital. c 

wiqmore Hall, 36 VVtgmore L 

Street, London WI (01- F 

935 2141). Today, 7.30pm. ^ 

f 

ESCHENBACH/LPO I: I 

Chnstoph Eschenbach < 

conducts the LPO in i 

Berlioz's Camavsl Romain 1 

Overture, Chopin's Piano l 

Concerto No 1 (James Tocco, 
soloist) and Tchaikovsky's 
Symphony No 5. 

Royal Festival Hall. South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
3191). Tomorrow, 7-30pm. 

MOZART ^MAHLER: 

Mozart's Symphony No 38 is 
juxtaposed with Mahler's 
Symphony No 6 by the Halle 
Orchestra under Stamsiaw 
Skrowaczewski. 

Free Trade Hall, 

Manchester (061 834 1712). 
Thurs, 7.30 pm. 

JUDD/UPCk Mozart's Nozze 
eURgaro overture, Schubert's 

Symphony No 8 and 
Beeuroven's SymphonyNo 6 
are all played by the LPO 
under James Judd. Stephen 
Hough is soloist in Mozart s 
Piano Concerto No 21. 

Barbican Centre, London 

EC2 (01 -628 8705). Thurs. 
7.46p m. 

theatre 

IN PREVIEW 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES: 
Award-winning musical about 
middle-aged mate tovers who 
own and run a nfflbtdub. 

Arthur Laurents directs George 

BSSSSSSWfc* M 

Previews today. Mon-rn, May 
3 . Opens May 7. 

TROILUS AND CRESSIOA: 
Anton Lesser and Jui«t 
Stevenson in 5j®wterotes. 
Barbican (01-628 8795/638 
8891). Previews Thurs- Fn, 

May 3. Opens May 6. in 
repertory. 


POSSUM IN THE BUGHOUSE: 
Poets T. S. EHot and Ezra 
Pound meet in an insane 
asylum in 1953. 

Old Red Lion, St John Street, 
London EC1 (01-8377816). 
From Tubs. Press night Fn. 

WUTHERING HEIGHTS: Vince 
Foxall's adaptation of E mily 
Bronte's novel incorporates 
some of her poetry into the 

action. Ted Craig directs. 


adventure in exotic places, 

Leicester Square Theatre 

(01-930 5252)- From Fn. 


action. Ted Craig directs. 

Croydon Warehouse, 62 
DingwaH Road, Croydon. . 
Surrey 101-680 4080). Previews 
Thurs. Opens Fri. 

SELECTED 

GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS: 
David Mamet's hard-edged, 
acerbic vision of duplicitou s 
Chicago estate agents at work 
and play. 

.Mermaid (01-236 5566). 

THE GAMBLER: Mel Smith and 
Bob Goody lead a razor-sharp 
musical excursion into the 
sub-culture of compulsive 
gambling. 

(Hampstead 01-722 9301). 

OUT OF TOWN 

PITLOCHRY: The Crucifer of 
Blood: Festival opens with 
Paul Giovanni' s adaptation 
from the Snertock Homes 
story The Sign of Four. Brian 
Ralph. Elwyn Jonnson, 

Miranda Bell. 

Festival Theatre (0796 2680]. 
Opens Fri. 

STRATFORD-UPON-AVON: 
The Two Noble Kinsmen: The 
"tragic romance" by 
Shakespeare and John 
Fletcher, directed by Barry 
Kyte, is the opening production 
ot the RSC's new auditorium. 
The Swan (0789 295623). 
i Today, Mon-Thurs. In 

repertory. 

FILMS 

OPENINGS 

THE JEWEL OF THE NILE 
(PGk Routine sequel to _ 
Romancing the Stone, with 
Michael Douglas. Kathleen 
Tumor, and much high 


TIMES CHOICE 

cotic places. GALLERIES - 

ire Theatre 

From Fri. OPENINGS 

GUERC1NO: Drawings by the 
17 th-century Italian master. 
Ashmotean Museum. • 
Beaumont Street, Oxford 
(0866 512651). FromTues. - 

GARDEN FESTIVAL: Display 
o* lOOGWptwgsbjir _■ 
contemporary Bnosn artists. 
National Garden Festi val, - 
Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire 
(0782 289788). Frah Thurs. 

SMfTH TOOTH ERS: i • - 
" celebration of three-1 8ttv 

- unsympathetic certwy 5*2S? rs: 

recwneS.with John and WBkam Smith from 

i Hill (01-435 Sussex, (0243 774557). From. 

=ri- Fri. - . 

rm SELECTED 


SHADEY (15): Unsyntoab*tic 
essay io bizarre comedy, witn 

Screen on the Hill (01-435 
3366). From Fri. 

SELECTED 

A ROOM WITH A VIEW (W 

The Mercha nt -! vory ^ s teh of 

Esssassstm* 

(01-4893737). 

THE MAN WITH W? BRABJB 

(tS): Inventive and tn^btaarre 
comedy from Steve Martnand 
director Carl Reiner, parodying 

. mad setentet mowes- 

(CA Cinema (01 -830 3647). 


ALFRED GILBERT: Scutofrire 
monumental and minute py 
Victorian who made Eros- 

ESS 'SffShm&i 

dance 

SADLER’S WELLS ROYAL . 
BALLET: Gala premiere of 

DavW Bintley’s TheSnow 
Queen at Birmingham, Mem, 
also Tues-Thurs: then 


BOOKINGS 

- .... three-week 

FIRST CHANCE <m« 


MAYFEST: IndudesgrW^ 
from France. SwadWi^^fn. 
Nicaragua and China. May 
2-24. 

Ticket Centre, Candter^gs, 
Glasgow (041 552 5961). 

PERTH FESTIVAL: 

Personal booking opens today 
for fifteenth festival. May 
21 -June 1. _ . 

Box Office, The Concorde, 

17 Scott Street. Perm 
(0738 21818). 

BALLET RAMBERT: 

. Booking opens this week tor 


three-week season to ■ 
celebrate company s Diamond 
Jubilee. June 1™- ■ - 

Sadler's Wells, RosrtJery 
Avenue, London ECt- <01-. 

278 8916). 

last chawcF 

GUYS AND DOLLS: Last - 
performances of Natwnai - 

Theatre production, with . 
Lulu, Norman Rosslngton, 
Andrew Wadsworth. Janet 
Dibtey. 3pm and 7,30pm- • 
Prince of Wales. London - 


Prince' of Wales. London' 

WI (01-930 8681 , credit cards 
01-9300844). 


mixed biH of LesSytphkJasi j 

Prodigal Son and EBta s 

Syncopations (Fri a nd May 3)- [ 

ON TOUR: London .1 

Contemporary Dance Theatre 
isattheDemgate, ] 

Northampton (0604 2481 1 ) 
tonight and the Theatre 1 

Royal Newcastle (0632 
322061 )Tues-May 3, 
matotee WSd. London Festival 
Ballet is at the Liveipool 
Empire (051 709 1 555) today. 

- OPERA 

ENGLISH NATIONAL 
OPERA: On Wed at 7pm. the 
-second performance o&tts 

- run of Busoni's morality play, 

' Doctor Faust Thomas Allen 

takes the title rote. On Monand . 
Thurs at 7.3tom Smetana's 
folk opera. The Bartered Bride; 
on Fri, also at 7 -30pm, Ofe 
Fledenrmus with Janice 
• Cairns, Nan Christie and 
Ryiand Davtes; and tonight and 
Tues at 7.30pm two last 
. performances of The Many 
Vvfctowwtth Valerie 
. Masterson. 

' CoSseum. St Martin's Lane, 
London WC2 (01 -638 31 61). 

SCOTTISH OPERA: A new 
■ season starts with a new 
.production by John Cox of'. 

Lb nozze d? Figaro, opening on- 
Wed at 7.15pm. Gyotgy 
Fischer conducts. Mafiroe 
performance on May 3 at 

•2.15pm. 

•• Theatre Royal, Hope Street,. 

- Glasgow (041 331 1234). 

' ROCK AND JAZZ 

PAUL BRADY: The spunky 
Irish folk-rocker's new album, 
Back to the Centre, shows 
him to be ready for the major 
league. ... 

“ Tonight, Queens Ha8, 

. Edinburgh (031 868 2019); 

Mon, Southport Arts Centre 
(0704 4001 1 ): Tues, Riverside. 
Newcastle (0632 614388); 

Wed, Irish Centre, Leeds (0532 
480613); Thurs* Brewery 
Arts Centre. Kendal (0538 
s 25133k Fri, International, 
Manchester (061 224 5050). ■ 


SUZANNE VEGA: Attest v 
an alternative to the Smtths for 
lonely teenage boys. 
Tomorrow, ftocafliiiy 
Theatre, Denman Street . 
London WI (01-437 4506). 

KATRINA & THE WAVES: \ 
Summery Angto- American 


Tues, Leeds Unfveestty 1 
(0532 439071k Wed, a»flfSeid; 
Polytechnic (0742738334k : 
Thurs, Newcastle Potyfeenrac 
(0632 328761k R*,- - • . 

ktendiester Univeirslty (061 
2735111), 

LOOSE TUBES: Pracflcalfy . . 
an entire new Jazz generation , 
in one explosive package. - 
Thurs, Turk’s Head, . 
Twickenham (01-892 1972). 

CHHJS REA: "Stainsby 
Girts” brourtit Wm to a wider . 
audience wnosa admiration . 
can only be confirmed by On 
the Beach, his fine new . 
album. 

• Fri. Hammersmith Odeon, 
Queen Caroline Street London 

W6 (01-748 4081 L--. 

PHOTOGRAPHY 

ROBERT DOISNEAU: The 
French master of documentary, 
street photography has 
turned Parisians irttostarski . 
their own ^y; " : 

inatitut Francais. 17 
Queenstwry Place^UjTKton . 
SW7 (01-6^6211). 

A .DISTANT 

*ROSPECT:Aertel 
photography from the birth 
ofthemedicsn to space flight 
ABenGaHery, Alton, 

, Hampshire. 

. For ticket availability, 
performance and cpsme .; 
times, telephone tte 
' oanibers Listed. Concerts: 
Max Hairison; Theatre: 
Tony Patrick and Martin 

Cropper, Films: Geoff 
Brown; Galleries: Sarah - 
Jane Checklaud; Dance: 
John Perdval; Opera: 

( Hilary Fine*: Rock& 
jazz: Richard Williams; 
Photography^ Michael 
Yoane; Bookings: Anne 
White house 






■-T-Sr.v 

.-.i -L'. 'A 













•viw -!;v: 


THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 









COURT 
CIRCULAR 

Windsor castle I . . 
April 25: The. Kins and Queen 
of Spain, with the Spanish. Suite 
in attendance. left Windsor 
Castle this morning upon the 
conclusion of the State Visit to 
The Queen and The Duke of 
Edinbuigh. 

The • Dote of. Edinburgh. 
President. King George's Fund 
for Sailors, this morning at- 
tended the Annual General 
Meeting of the Fund at the 
Mansion House, London. EC4 
where his Royal Highness was 
received by the Right Hon the 
Lord Mayor (Sir Allan Davis). 

Squadron Leader Timothy 
Finncron was in attendance. ' 

By command of The Queen, 
the Viscount Davidson (Lord in 
Wailing) called upon the Gov- 
ernor-General of Fiji this morn- 
ing at the John Howard Hotel, 
Kensington and, on behalf of 
Her Majesty, welcomed His 
Excellency upon his arrival in 
ibis Country. 

By command of The Queen, 
the Earl of Airlie (Lord 
Chamberlain) was present at 
Heathrow Airport, London this 
afternoon upon the departure of 
The King and Queen of Spain 
and bade ferewdi to Their 
Majesties on behalf of Her 
Majesty. 

The Queen was represented 
by the Viscount Davidson (Lord 
j'n Waiting) at the Memorial 
Service for Sir Charles Stirling' 
(formerly Her Majesty's Ambas- 
sador Extraordinary and Pleni- 
potentiary at Lisbon) which was 
held in All Saints Church. 
Chelsea, SW3 this afternoon. 
BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
April 25: The Princess Anne, 
Mrs Mark Phillips, this evening 
attended the Soropdmist Inter- 
national of Gloucester and 
District's Dinner in aid of the 
Gloucestershire MacMillan 
Home Care Nursing Service at 
the Chapter House and Clois- 
ters. Gloucester CathedraL 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived upon arrival by Her 


COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant for 
Gloucestershire (Colonel Mar- 
tio Gibbs). 

Mrs Andrew Feilden was in 
auendance. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
April 25: The Prince of Wales 
arrived at Great Yarmouth 
Vauxball Station in the Royal 
.Train. this morning. 

His Royal Highness, Presi- 
dent, The Prince's Trust, sub- 
sequently visited “Work. Sport 
and lei s u re", a course for 
unemployed young people, or- 

S riized by the Trust av the 
lister Holiday Supercentre, 
Caisier-on-5ea, near Great 
Yarmouth. 

The Prince of Wales later left 
Norwich Airport in an aircraft 
of The Queen's Right. 

Mr David Roycroft was in 
attendance. 

• The Princess of Wales this 
morning opened the new exten- 
sions of the Chiftern Nursery 
Training College. Peppard 
Road, Caversbam, Reading, 
Berkshire. 

Viscountess Campden and 
Lieutenant-Commander Rich- 
ard Ayland. RN were in 
attendance. 

The Duke of Gloucester this 
morning opened the Workshops 
at Barnwell Farm occupied by 
clients of Cosira (Council for 
Small Industries in Rural Ar- 
eas). and later opened the 
Tourist Information Centre in 
Oundle, Northamptonshire. 

Lieuienan i-Colonel Sir Simon 
Bland was in attendance. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
April .25: The Duke -of Kent, 
Vice-Chairman of the British 
Overseas Trade Board, today 
visited James Howden and 
Company limited, Scotland 
Street. Glasgow. 

This evening. His Royal 
Highness, Colonel ' Scots 
Guards, attended the Regi- 
mental Association Dinner at 
the Central Hotel Glasgow. 

His Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
Captain Michael Campbell- 

Lamerton. 


> Forthcoming 
! marriages 


k 


Mr J.S.Sfade 
and Miss D. J. 

The engagement, is announced 
between John, -younger son of 
Mr T- D. H. Davies Mr and Mrs P.W. Slade, of 

and Miss J. R. Brook Lapworth, Warwickshire, anri 

The engagement is announced Diana, eldest daughter of Mr 
;t. between Tristan, son of Briga- and Mrs N.H. England, of 
dier and Mrs P.R. Davies, of Radyr, Cardiff 
Coombe House. Ansty. Wilt- 
shire, and Juba, younger daugh- 
ter of Lieutenant Commander 
and Mis R.L Brook, of Rectory 
Court, Meonsioke, Hampshire. 



Mr A. M. DaahiU 
and Miss J. O. B. *on Seiboid 
The enpigcment is announced 
between Alfred Mark, second 
- son of Mr and Mis Richard 
DunhiD, of- Little Chalfont, 
Buckinghamshire, and Juliette 
Oriane Barbara, only daughter 
of Dr and Mis EA. von Seibokl, 
of Blewbury, Oxfordshire. 

Mr J. S. Sbepberd-Bamra 
and Miss T. M. Marsh 
The engagement is announced 
between James Sutherland, 
younger son of Mr and Mrs 
John Shepherd-Barron. of 14 
Onslow Square. London, and 
Tessa Mary, elder daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Hugh Marsh, of 
The Dial House, WestmiD, 
Hertfordshire. 

Mr P. I. Thomas 
and Miss P. J. WtetweB 
The engagement is announced 
between Philip Ivor, son of Mr 
and Mis William Emlyn 
Thomas, of Morriscon, Swan- 
sea, and Penelope Jane, elder 
daughter of Mr John Whitweli 
and the late Mrs Moira 
WhitweQ. of Bournemouth, 
Dorset. 

Mr P. Shears 
and Miss M-R. Thomson 
The engagement is annou nced 
between Peter, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs George Shears, of 
Highfield Farm. Topsbam. 
Devon, and Mary-Rose, only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs Byars 
Thomson, of Holt Valley Farm, 
Clayton, Sussex. 


Mr ELN- Vandyck 
and Miss LJVL Reynolds 
The engagement is announced 
between Edward, elder son of 
Lieutenant-Colonel and Mis N. 
Vandyck, HQ AFCENT. and 
Louise, elder daughter of Group 
Captain and Mis J.. Reynolds, 
Islington, London. 


Marriages 


Mr N. C J. Fortescne 
and Miss T. J . Ainsworth 
The marriage took place on 
. Thursday at St Paul's. 
Knightsbridge. of Mr Nicholas 
Fonescue, son of Brigadier and 
Mrs Arthur Foitescue, of Wal- 
nut Tree Cottage. Skirmeu, 
Henley-on-Thames, Oxford- 
shire. and Miss Tessa Ains- 
worth. daughter of Sir David 
and Lady Ainsworth, of 
BaHyneale House. 

Co Limerick. The Rev 
topherCourtauld officiated. 

The bride, who' was given in 
marriage bv her father, was 
attended by Thomas Wrey, Max 
Hartley, Sabina and Clarissa 
Foitescue. Katie McCalmont, 
Alice Galbraith, Natasha and 
Gemma Lamg and Laura 
Wynn-Williams. Mr James 
Dean was best man. 

A reception was held at the 
Ritz and the honeymoon wiD be 
spent abroad. 

Lieutenant-Colonel N. M. 
Haynes 

and Miss G. X- Lee 
The marriage took place in 
Hong Kong on April 22, 1986, 
between Lieutenant-Colonel 
Nigel Haynes. 2nd KEO 
Goorkhas, son of Ueotenant- 
Colonel and Mrs E. G. Haynes, 
and Miss Georgina Katharine 
Lee. eldest daughter of Captain 
and Mrs E.H. Lee. 


Passover’s message of freedom 


This week, Jews throughout 
the world are celebrating the 
festival of Passover, which 
commemorates the Exodus 
from Egypt, symbolizing free- 
dom and emancipation. For 
Jews, the Exodus is paradig- 
matic: it recalls God's saving 
intervention on behalf of His 
people and points the way to a 
future redemption for all man- 
kind. 

Thar vision is at the heart of 
Jewish theology, yet little at- 
tention has been given to its 
recent emergence as a central 
tenet of Christian theology in 
the Third World. 

Over the past two decades, 
third world liberation theolo- 
gians have come to see this 
pivotal event in the history of 
ancient Israel as inspiration in 
their fight against exploitation 
in contemporary society. 

According to them, the 
biblical account of the Exodus 
illustrates that God is on the 
side of the afflicted; in the 
book of Exodus God hears the 
groaning of the people and 
remembers the covenant He 
made with them. 

From that act of deliver- 
ance, Christians derive a mes- 
sage ofhope: if God was on the 
side of the poor in former 
times, surely He still lakes 
sides with the downtrodden 
today. 

The liberationists stress that 
the Exodus was not simply a 
past event in the history of the 
Jewish nation; instead, it 
evoked a deep response on the 
part of the descendants of 
those who had been liberated 
The profundity of die Exodus 
consists in its significance for 
later generations, the past 
holds a promise for those who 


understand its relevance. 

For third world theologians, 
the Exodus is an account of 
the liberation of oppressed 
peoples, and using that frame- 
work they believe it is possible 
to understand the plight of 
those who are now afflicted In 
this context Moses* role is 
cruciaL Moses beard God's 
voice. “Liberate my people 
out of Egypt". like Moses, we 
too must awaken ourselves to 
the divine command 

Within this framework, Je- 
sus is compared to Moses as 
liberator. Like Moses, Jesus 
found his people oppressed 
and exploited He protested 
against injustice and iniquity. 
Revealing to his followers that 
he would soon leave them, 
Jesus wanted them to have a 
symbol of bis mission. 

According to the Synoptic 
Gospels, he used the Jewish 
Passover meal to do this. As 
the Sri Lankan theologian, 
Tissa Balasuriya, explains: 
“To Jesus' mind the Eucha- 
rist was essentially action- 
oriented It was a prayer and 
an offering in the midst of his 
public life at the height of his 
involvement in the political 
and social issues of the time. It 
signified his irrevocable con- 
testation of the religious lead- 
ers of his people and the 
narrowness of their message." 

Here we see an important 
intersection between recent 
Christian thought and the 
Jewish tradition. For Chris- 
tians, the Exodus has become 
a key element in third world 
theology; in the Jewish frith it 
has always been central to the 
vision of the Jewish people as 
a light to the nations. 

The Passover meal envis- 


ages the Exodus experience as 
a symbol of freedom from 
oppression, and the whole of 
the Passover Haggadah is 
pervaded by the image of God 
as the Saviour of humankind. 
For that reason the Passover 
begins with an ancient formu- 
laic invitation to those who 
hunger to participate in the 
festival: “This is the bread of 
affliction that our frtheis are 
in the land of Egypt. All who 
hunger, let them come and 
eat." Those in need are wel- 
come at the Passover table. 

During the Passover meal 
the narrative of the Exodus is 
read stressing the theme of 
human liberation. In the reci- 
tation. the leader explains that 
the Passover ceremony is a 
celebration of the emancipa- 
tion of each Jew. and in the 
symbols of the Passover meal, 
such deliverance is reenacted 

The bitter herbs are em- 
blematic of b itterne s s and 
servitude; the unleavened 
bread is the sign of affliction, 
haste and deliverance. For 
mi 11 erua such symbolic repre- 
sentation of servitude and 
salvation has awakened the 
spirit of the Jewish communi- 
ty. The Exodus is vital and 
comemponff y. it structures 
Jewish experience in the free 
of contemporary persecution 
and suffering. 

Jews and Christian libera- 
tionisis thus share a common 
biblical heritage and aim; the 
Exodus event unites them in a 
shared hope and aspiration for 
the triumph of God’s rule on 
earth. Recalling the divine 
redemption of the ancient 
Israelites, they are joined to- 
gether in the quest for the 


emancipation of those who are 
presently enslaved 
The biblical motif of the 
Exodus holds a reservoir of 
meaning for both faiths. By 
symbolizing the primal act of 
liberation, the Passover points 
to a future and ultimate 
redemption of the family of 
man. 

In pursuit of this goal, the 
people of Israel and their 
Christian brethren are linked: 
champion ingthe cause of the 
oppressed, afflicted and perse- 
cuted both traditions con- 
verge in common cause and 
fellowship in the struggle to 
bring about the freedom of all 
human beings. Such is the 
message of the Passover hymn 
which now resounds in Jewish 
homes: 

God of Might. God of Right. 
He would bow before Thee. 
Sing Thy praise in these 
days 

Celebrate Thy glory. 

As we hear, year by year. 
Freedom ’s wond’fous story: 
How God gave to each slave 
Promised liberation. 

This green word Pharaoh 
heard 

Making proclamation : 

Set them free to serve Me 
.-is a holy nation. 

Wc enslaved thus were saved 
Through God’s might 
appearing 

So we pray for the day 
When we shall be hearing 
Freedom 's call reaching all. 
Mankind God revering. 

Rabbi Dan 
Cohn-Sherbok 

Director, Centre for the Study 
of Religion and Society. Kent 
University 


Luncheons 


Reuters 

Reuters Holdings pic's anmia) 
luncheon took place yeterday at 
Merchant Taytois* Hall. The 
hosts were the Chairman. Sir 
Christopher Hogg, and the 
directors. Mr Donald B. Ander- 
son. Mr J.A. Burnet (alternate 
director), Mr P.W. Gibbings, Mr 
N.L Judah, Mr Robert Max- 
well Mr M.E. Nelson. Mr Glen 
Renfrew. Mr R.M.P. Shields, 
the Hon Sir Richard Storey and 


1986 Ofenfiddich Awards 
A luncheon was held at William 
Gram and Sons. 40 
yesterday to present the I 
Glenfiddich Awards made to 
writers and broadcasters who 
have contributed most to the 
civilized appreciation of food 
and drink. The silver pot still 
trophy and prize for the overall 
winner was presented by Mr 
David Gram, great-grandson of 
the company’s founder, to (be 
production team of the BBC 2 
Food and Drink Special Arum 


Mr Lyle TumbulL The guest goes to Sheffield, which also 
speaker was Mr Andre deLattre. ' “ * — 

managing director, the Institute 
of Internationa] Finance. The 
guests inducted: 


Renter trustees: Mr Kingman Brew- 
ster. Mr spa Clarke. Mr CND Calc. 
Mr JEC 6*cics. me Mon Alan Hare. 
Lord HartwelL Mr JGS Lnuwre. Str 
Keith Macptvmon. Lord McGregor at 
Dun-fa. Mr K Morgan. Mr RF Smith 
and Mr JS WaDwork. 

Mr RE Anwad. Dr Peter AndrieeakL 
Mr Fernand Aobertonote. Mr All 
Batiadoub. Mr RS RNdwtn. Sir James 
Ball. Mr Frank Bartow. Str Donald 
Barron. Mr John Banershy. Mr 
Robert Beale. Mr Myron Belxtnd. Mr 
LT Berkowttc. Str Kenneth BemiL Mr 
Etnme Blabey. Viscount BUkenham. 
Mr JRS Boas. Mr AJ Booth. Mr AID 

B Brook er. Mr Denis Bndef. Sir John 

Burg— Mr JF Bur kart. Mr Andrew 

Cameron. Lord Camoys. Mr Alexan- 

der Chancellor. Sir Christopher Chan- 
crtlor, Mr Dtortd ChiDO. Mr John 
Otoimelur, Mr A Chratodoultries. Sir 
Robert dark. Mr BSD Ocmpen-GarO- 
Mr Bin Coll on. Mr Gordon 
Cowan. Mr PJ David. Mr nv De 
Ouster. Mr Salvador! <M Prato. Mr 
HR Dickinson. 

Mr Hiroshi EgocM. Mr Aatas Erkin. 
Mr Don Evans. Miss Jane Eyre. Mr 
ADAW Forbes. Mr M (chart Forties. 
Mr M Ford. W Mark Foot-Andrews. 
Mr HJ France. Mr Richard Francis. 
Mr BD Caipm. Mr C Garstde. Mr 
Alfred Getrtnger. Mr GE CaehrttL Mr 
DM Gunn. Mr Roger Harrison. Mr MJ 
Hawkcs. Mr George Hajrter. Mr 
Nicholas Herbert. Mr Michael Horton . 
Mr EW HouU. Mr AC Hugh Smith. Mr 
pab Hughes. Mr F wufiam.HuHgn. 
Mr B HurnfaL Mr Ian Irvine. Mr 
Jemmy Isaacs. Mr Kenttro fannaiwa. 
Mr Tadeus? Jacewicz. Sir George 
Jefferson. Mr GW Jenkins. Mr 
Michael Jenkins. Mr HD Johnson- Sir 
John Jtmor. Mr A iraen Karfc. Mr H 
Kase. klr Clarence Key ter. Mr K 
Klkuchl. Mr M KWota. Mr Jeflfey 
KrnghL Mr Paol Korina. Mr Efrem 
K image. Mr Gerald Lea&V. Mr H 
Letob-RSnbertgn. Mr PR.Lmnie . Mr 
JohnLePage. Mr Gilbert LewttrwaHe. 
Mr Chrte Loirw. Mr w Ujtuen. 

Mr Bruno Marolo. Mr Peter Mar- 
shall. Mr David Mayhew. Mr AJUudatr 
MQne. Mr OT Mitchell. Mr D 
Mitchem. Mr Tim Monfa. Sir Jeremy 
Morse. Mr AlaatalT Morton. Mr 
George McKendrtck. Mr Christopher 
Ogden. Mr Peter O' Hara. Mr FaWan 
Ortte. Mr JL Owen. Mr I g P ark 




Rupert ^nnant-Rea- Mr 

Sir Edward Pirttertna. Lieutenant- 
Coloort T Plerce-Couviing. Mr Ed- 
ward Planer. Mr Peter Preston. Mr 
Alan Protberoe. Mr C Reeves Mr A 
Relief. Dr Hugh Richards. Mr Michael 
Rtdonhon. Mr Frank Ropers. Mr H 
Romney. Mr Evelyn deRofijechild. 
Mr Micro) Sartil Pol . Mr PVJ Sanders. 
Mr Chrtsuwher Sheridan. Mr R 
Slmmotfa/Mr Chrfa Spring. Mr Peter 
Stephens. Mr PR Stevens. Mr MA ten 
Brink. Mr Eugene Thompson. Mr H 
Tmvomura. Mr Donald Treiiort. Mr R 
Valin. Mr CN von der Spefc. Mr CNF 
Van Dtfehutten. _ 

Mr Taicashi Wad*. Mr Mrttari 
Warburg. Mr RK westmacotL Mr DA 
Whiting. Mrs Frieda wiBlamon Mor- 
ris. Mr Peter Wilson. Mr RJ Winfrey. 
Mr V De A WoaOcaiatte. Mr AE 
WrtshL Mr SM Yassukovtch. Mr tHN 
Yates. Mr Yu Gu and senior me mb ers 
of Reuters start. 


received the - radio and (de- 
vision category prize. Category 
winners were: 

Mias JancH RoWacn tfpoa writer and 
wine writer In Tnr Sunday Tana and /t 
La Court. Mr Jonathon Meades 
(restaurant writer ta A La Carte*. Mr 

gasssFM sr* 

mea t wrMer ui Caitrrr 

Miss Lesley Downer and M- 

jJSPlcSfc 

Mr William Faster (regional writer at 
the year. The Scots mart}. The judging 
panel comprised Mr Hugh Johnson. 

Mr Alan Coren. Miss Jenny Green 

and Mr Richard Edwards, with Mr 

David Grant Director at wnnan 
Grant and Sons, as chairman. 

Dinners 

lotenutiioiial Law Association 
Lord Wilberforce, Chairman of 
the Executive Council of the 
International Law Association, 
presided at a dinner held at the 
Athenaeum yesterday. 

AP Bank 

The Chairman of AP Bank and 
Marchioness Townshend. with 
the directors of the bank and 
their ladies, were hosts at the 
sixty-sixth annual dinner of the 
bank held at the Savoy Hotel on 
Thursday. The guests were Mr 
and Mis George Blunden, Mr 
and Mrs N H Chamberfen. Mr 
and Mrs AJ Davis, Mr and Mrs 
MJ Hawkes, Mr and Mrs DB 
Money-Courts, Mr and Mrs JG 
Quinton and Mr RB 
-Williamson. 

Company of Freemen of the City 
of London of North America 
The annual dinner of the 
Honourable Company of Free- 
men of the City of London of 
North America was held on 
Friday, April 25. at the Union 
Cub. 38 E 37 Street. New York. 
The guests were received by the 
Master, Mr Godfrey Jacobs, and 
Mrs Jacobs. Among those 
present were: 

Mr DM Cauffman. Prattdenl or Ow 
Carpewcrs Compan y of the City and 
county of Phuadewu*. and Mrs 
Cauffman. Mr Edwin Osorio. Mastcr 
of the Painter Stainers’ company. 
Lord Auckland. r r pr e pen Unp ttie Clly 
Livery Club, and Mr W Dorword. 
Commissioner for Hong Kong 
Gonunardal Affairs- 


Schools 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


ORTHS, HARfflASES. 
DEATHS Md H MaURUH 
a a Rm + 15 X VAT 

(minimum $ lineil 
Announccnis. authcntkaicd by the 
name and pcrmaneM address oT the 
widei r. mat be sni uu 

THE TIMES 
P0 BOX 484 

Virginia Street 
London El 

or irlcpfcpocd (by m etop e suter 
cikn otIj I *o. Bt-m 382 * 

Announcements can be received by 
n-lepbonc bciweea 9.00am and 
5„lApm Mondav io Fnday. on Samp 
da\ Pciwccn 4.003m and 12 noon. 
(Bi-Ul 4888 ONyi. For pubtaaiion the 
Aat-wme day phone by 1.30pm. 

HW T HC 0 H H 8 S WWUBB. WBMW 8 S 

nc on r.tun and SoriaJ fyge tSihs 
* 15% WAT. 

(~Min and Social Pag e 
anfKMJiKrmfftfe can aax be aeerpted 
In telephone. EnQomn to: W48 
(after ILi..Vtamj. or wnd to L 

Pmmmjtm SmaL Lomtms Ef. 


BIRTHS 




BALAAM • Op 16tn of April W Let 
(Pyci and NKTk. a son. David KeDow. 
a brother for Frances. 

BOWER - On Awnl IB to Veronica «nrt* 
wad lev j and Tom. a dauoMgr . 
Septne. 

CHAPMAN OH 11 10 AITS. I98&. io 
Dorcas and Malcolm, a son. James. 

HOBART - On April 2*0* arStMary^. 

hie of Wight to Ivatt «n» KMieiand 

John, a son. James Hemy MDo. a 
brothrr #«r George 
LCTW - Ai 34Spm on Ttmrs^Aprji 

I Tut ai Ptmc« May’s Hoswa. 
RAF Hal (on. w Dardn* »n» «ai» 
and R>ch»d a son. Nicholas Quffles 
Alan, a bfOUwr tor OariOlIB and 
James. 

MEYRICK-On 1CT April at liwfch 
HohoUI- to Sandra uw 8»aanan» 
and John, a son. MalUiew Tnomas. 

PAtCE On April ?3rd » Jute and 
Gary iwm dautfuen LanU Juae 
and Naiane Julie, seders for Garem. 


PMKMSOir On April 23ni sL ttm 
John RadcilOe HospiQI. Oxford. IO 
Maggie <nw White) and Oliver, ason. 
A brouier for Flora. 

PASXE - On 2401 Aprtt to Lucinda 
mee Hardman) and Tim. at The Roy- 
al Hampshire County HogpCbL a son 
Freddy. 

ROBINSON - On t6th April 1986 to 
Fleur (nee Rosadalel and Fletcher, a 
son WtUiara Sydney, a brother for 
George. 

RUSTEN - in Hong Kong, to KViaui^e 
Woodhain and PauL a son (Sleflbn 
James) born on 25th of Apr iT 1986. 

DEATHS 

AHFDRT - on 24th AprtL peacefully. 
Ursula Marlon, of Lacock. wins- 
widow of.Chartee Awdry. dearly be- 
loved mother of Vere. Selwyn. 
JuUirtM and Patricia. Funeral Ser- 
vice Lacock Church, on Wednesday 
30th April, at 1.30. Family flowers 
only, donations if desired to The 
Friends of Lacock Church. 

BAUJUnTME On AprB 24di 1986. 
Beryl Morse of Richmond Court. 
Bowdon. Cheshire. Beloved wife ef 
l he late William George Forsyth 
<Forsy), devoted mother of Nicholas. 
Rupert, and daughter-in-law Eliza- 
beth and much-toued grandmother to 
Cnrtstopher and Nicola. Funeral pri- 
vate and no flowers please. Enoutries 
Messrs John G Ashton & Co. Tel: 
061928-7816 

BROWN on April 24th 1986. Omries 
MeicaUe Brown. M D- Barrister' ax 
Law of Halebarns. Cheshire. For- 
merly Medical Officer Of Health for 
the City of Manchester. Beloved hus- 
band of Christine, dearly toted 
father of Sheila and Allan and a 
much-loved grandfather and greal- 
gmiWUaiher. Reonfem Mam at Holy 
Angels Church. HNebams. on 
Wednesday April 30Ui at 10 am and 
afterwards Private Committal.- En- 
o uries Messrs John G Ashton & Co. 
Tel: 061-928-7816 

■UCKMASTCK - Richard Guy. on 
April 24th. 1986. very suddenly, 
aged 68. Father of Minnie. Henry. 
Marie- Louise, and Tessa. Private Fu- 
neral Sen-foe at SI Joseph* Church. 
Avon Dam. Warwicks, on Tuesday 
29Qi April at 12 noon. No towers 
please, donattoos to Cancer Reseradi 
Brampton HoepflaL London SWi 

EDWARDS GO April 25rd 1986- 
Catherme Margaret peacerusy at 
home with her family. 

EVANS, on Friday. l«h April 1986. 
Linen fCmgerJ. aged 86. suddenly at 
his home hi CJwfcea. &eaUy adored 

" son of Yolanda Evans, via U Prato 
No 9. Florence 50123. Funeral ser- 
iK* *t GoMeis Crero Jewish 
Cemetery. Hoop Lane. NWt l tomor- 
row. Sunday 27th April at 2 pm. No 
ftouera 


FOB! • On April 20ih 1986 Lady Vio- 
let Olive DunsterviUe. aged 86. 
widow of Admiral Sir W.T Randle 
Ford Funeral at Worth Cremasori- 
um. near Limpsfieid. on Wednesday 
April 30th at 1.46pm. 

GREGORT -On April 24th. peacefully, 
and her generous, lovtng arif to the 

.end. al Momi Afrernia HospMaL 
CuUdford. Pam. adored and adonng 
wife of Alan and mother of Anne. 
Nicholas and Alteon, dearest granny 
Pam-Pam to David and beloved stefer 
of Ian. Funeral service will be bridal 
Si Mary's Chinch, stoke D-Abernon 
on Wednesday 30th April at 3.16pm. 
Family towera only. Donatons if de- 
sred to Ute NSPCC or to the Doctor 
Folkes Cancer Resesrh Fund, c/o 
Janies & Thomas Lid. Mill Rd. Cob- 
ham. Storey. 


- On 17th April at T V 
Otwen. Otwen Etxene. Beloved wife 
of the late Mr J.T. Morgan of Swan- 
sea. Private Funeral. A Memorial 
Serv ice wdl be held al a later dale. 

NEVE - On April 2«. Peacefully at 
home. Jo. beloved wife of Kenneth, 
and mother of Judy. Funeral private. 
Enquiries to John Burrows A Sons. 
Lymm. Cheshire tett092575> 2501. 


• On April 22nd 1986 
peacefully at her home. 4 Lawn Vis- 
ta. Sid mouth. Vets, aged 74 years. 
Cremation took place at Exeter 
yesterday. 

HOWE -On April 23rd 1986. sudden- 
ly in London, fan Howie. M.B.E- 
aged 71, Chairman Menydown PLC. 
dearly loved husband, father, step- 
father and grandfather. Funeral. 
Friday May 2nd at Chris! church 
Horam. East Sussex, at It am. fol- 
lowed by uri na ti on al Eastbourne. 
Family now only please, but do- 
nations u desired to the British Red 
Cross c .o R. Jarvis. High Street. 
CrossJn-hand. Id: Healhfield 2833. 
Memorial Service u> be announced at 
a ialer dale. - 

HUMBERT - On 24 (h of April on the 
eve of her 95th birthday. Jtode Aird. 
i nee ADernethy) at Woodbndge. wid- 
ow of Owen JUfinscoo Humbert, 
mother of Peggy. Christine and the 
late Malcolm. Cremation private. 

KNOX - In Hospital at ascol on April 
24Ut ana- * tong illness. Basie 
Longmur. beloved, and loving whe 
of Archie and momer of Jean (de- 
ceased}. John and Michael and 
tovtog grandmother. Funeral JOUi 
Apnl. Ham. Woking Crematorium. 
Family Bovvers only. 

LAKER - On April 23rd in Hospital. 
James Charles. (JimS much loved 
husband of Liny and adored father of 
Fiona and Angela Funeral service al 
Holy Trinity Cnurch. Wes tm Lon- 
don SWI 3. on Wednesday April 
30th al 12.30pm followed by private 
cremation al Putney Vale Crematori- 
um. Flowers may be seni hj J.H 
Sanders & Sons. Rwtumpton. Lon- 
don SWJ5 Enquiries 01-789 6865 
A memorial service wffl be held on a 
later dale, to be announced. 


- Lady. Paddy*. Claire 
Ctceiey. (nee Duncan}, beloved wife 
of David and mother of Caroline. 
Clare and Davlna. died peacefully on 
24th April. In hospital, after a severe 
illness bravely borne. 

Funeral service al Abbots (Upton 
Church. Huntingdon, on Wednes- 
day. 30th April al 2.30pm. fallowed 
by cremation privately. Family tow- 
ers only. Donations may be sent to 
DEMAND, her charity. 99 Leman 
Street London. El. No mourning. 
Remembrance service in May. 

SMITH On April 24th In Dumfries. 
Miss Dorothy Smith, devoted friend 
and housekeeper to the Keswick fam- 
ily for over 50 years. 


Enc Stanley, oo April 
23 rL peacefully in hospital. Dear 
husband of Lots, and dearest daddy 
of Maria 

1WTFELD On 24 th April 1986 Eddie, 
aged 26. Much loved son of Cather- 
ine and Donald and brother of 
GeoF(dna 


IN MEMORIAM - WAR 


PWLUPS. GODFREY SJ>. Kilted In 
action HMS Patla. 27lh April 1941 
aged 20. PHot Fleet Air Arm RNVR: 
our father MORRIS G.P. 27th March 
1951. Pilot Royal Flying Corn 1914- 
1918: our mother GRETTA (nee 
Wharton' 2nd Feb 1967 - Nena. 
HMS PATH North Sea. 27th April 
1941. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


HOUES. Roy Li v ingstone, Remem- 
bered with love on tus birthday. 
Daphne. Penny and Andrew. 


A.H April 26m 1969. To 
your nailing memory. Much be- 
, loved. MUMMY 

PETER - Beatrice May Dorothy 26th 
April 1894 to 26th March 1982. 
Auntie May. treasured memories of 
you ever recalled wiih deepest love 
and oratllude - Julian. 


ocnooi 

Term at Bedford 
School began on April 24 with 

I. 1 10 boys in the school. 
Confirmation will be conducted 
by the Right Rev DJ. 
Farm bro ugh, Bishop of Bed- 
ford, on May 4. The service in 
commemoration of founders 
and benefactors takes place at 
10.45 am on Sunday, May 18. in 
the school chapel when the 
addrea will be given by Mr 
A.C.W. Abrahams. Chairman of 
(be Harpur Trust. The Chief 
Inspecting Officer at the CCFs 
centenary on Wednesday. May 
21. will be Major-General J.P. 
Groom, Representative Com- 
mandant Royal Engineers. Old 
Bedfordians' week and the mu- 
sic festival begin on Monday, 
July 7. On Saturday, July 12. at 
noon (he headmaster and Mrs 
GI.M. Jones will be “At Home" 
to members of the Old 
Bedfordians Club. R.C Young 
continues as head of school and 
captain of boats, and AJ*-A- 
Walton is captain of crickeL 

The Leys 

Summer Term at The Leys 
begins this week, with Mr Tim 
Beynon taking up the post of 
headmaster on the retirement of 
Mr Bertie Beilis. Matthew Wade 
continues as head of scbooL 
Scholarship ocaminations take 
place during the week 
commencing May 12. and the 
summer concert is at 8 pm on 
Friday, May 30. The summer 
ball will be held on Friday, July 

I I . and Sir Alaslair Burnet (OL) 
will be the guest speaker at 
speech day on Saturday. July 1 2. 

Si Francis' College, Letch worth 
Summer Term at St Francis' 
College began on Wednesday. 
April 16. 1986 and. ends on 
Wednesday, July 9. 1986. Mr 
Patrick Nobes has taken up his 
appointment as headmaster. 
The preparatory school’s 
production of The Firemaid. by 
Robert Long, will be on Friday. 
May 2. at 7 pm, and the sixth- 
form leavers' dinner will be on 
Friday. May 16. 

St John's ScbooL Leatherhead 
Summer Term at St John’s 
School started on Monday, 
April 21. A.T. Georgiou contin- 
ues as captain of the school. 
A.C. Martin is captain of 
crickeL Open day for parents. 
Old Johnians and other friends 
ofSt John's is on Saturday, May 
24. The summer concert will be 
on Sunday. July 6. 

Ibstock Place School 
The Headmistress invites Old 
Ibstonians and FroebeKans to 
the opening of the new kinder- 
garten, Barbara Priestman 
House, on Thursday. June 19, 

1 986. al 2. 30 pm. Please apply to 
the secretary. Ibstock Place 
School. Clarence Lane, London, 
SW15 5PY. 

St Margaret's School. Bus hey, 
Hertfordshire 

Summer Term has begun for all 
pupils at St Margaret's School. 
Karen Owen is now head girt 
and Rosemary Gray is deputy 
head girL Main events this terra 
will be the triennial service of 
thanksgiving for the work of the 
Clergy Orphan Corporation at 
Si Peter's Church. Eaton Square, 
on May 14. where the preacher 
will be the Archbishop of 
Canterbury. Dr R. Runcie. The 
lower school play. Bendigo Bos- 
well. will be presented on July 4 
and 5 and open day is on Julv 5. 
The following scholarship 
awards have been made: 

Sixth -I otto academic KholanNfa 
□ln-Mary Hopto. Bhartl MakhlUrt. 
ShHIka Shah. Taman Terry. An 
scholarship; Fleur Anthony. Music 
scholarship: Tracey Herring. 

Governor*' special .award:. Joaime 
Smnh. J.M. Boys schotarstop: Alena 
Salim. 

Term ends on Wednesday. 
July 9. 

Woldingham School 
On behalf of the governors, 
religious, staff and pupils, the 
Headmistress of -Woldingham 
School, Society of the Sacred 
Heart Foundation (formerly the 
Convent of the Sacred Heart), 
invites aD old girls who left from 
Roehampian or Woldingham 
before 1950. and those who left 
Woldingham between i960 and 
1965. to a reunion at the school 
on Sunday, May Ig, 1986, from 
1 ! am onwards. Husbands and 
family are welcome. Further 
details from the secretary, 
Woldingham School. Marten 
Park, Woldingham. Surrey CR3 
7YA. Telephone: 0883 49431. 


Birthdays 


TODAY: Sir Richard Cave. 74; 
Mr Edward Cazalet QC: Sir 
John Clayden. 82; Mr David 
Coleman. 60: Sir Gordon Dow- 
ney. 58: Mr J.C.B. Gosling. 56: 
Professor J.C. Holt 64; Major- 
General Harry Knutton, 65: 
Professor Wilfrid Metiers. 72; 
Sir Oliver Millar. 63; Professor 
J.E. Morpuigo. 68: Mr Peter 
Schaufuss. 37: Miss Kathleen 
Dee-Anne Stark, 30: Professor 
J.R. Sutherland. 86: Major- 
General Sir Leslie Tyler. 82; Mr 
Morris West. 70: Air Vice- 
Marshal Sir Geoffrey Worthing- 
ton, 83. 

TOMORROW’: Professor 
Muriel Brad brook. 77: Air Mar- 
shal Sir Charles Broughton. 75: 
Sir Ross Ch ester-man. 77; 
Professor G.S. Graham. 83: Sir 
Robert Hall. 82: Mr Richard 
Huggett. 57: the Right Rev E.W. 
Kemp. 71; Air Marshal Sir 
Ronald Lees, 76: Sir Harry 
Melville, 78: Professor R.O.C. 
Norman. 54; Sir Alfred Norris. 
92: Mr Igor Oisuakh. 55: Mr 
Alan Reynolds. 60: Miss Sheila 
Scott. 59; Lord Taylor of Gryfe. 
74; Sir John Thomson. 59. 


Memorial service 

Sir Charles Stirling 
The Queen was represented by 
Viscount Davidson at a me- 
morial service for Sir Charles 
Stirling held at Chelsea Old 
Church yesterday. The Rev C.E. 
Leighton Thomson officiated. 
Mr Francis Stirling, son. 
Lieutenant-Colonel Sir James 
Scott and Rear-Admiral M-G. 
Stirling read die lessons and Sir 
John Coulson gave an address. 
The Secretary of State for For- 
eign and Commonwealth Af- 
fairs was represented by Sir 
Archibald Ross and the Perma- 
nent Under-Secretary of State 
and the Diplomatic Service by 
Mr Christopher Long. Among 
others present were: 

Lady Stirling (widow). Mr and 
Mrs Ian Sadler and Dr and Mrs 
Finian Lee per (sons-in-law and 
daughteis). and Mrs M G 
Stirling. 


Service dinners 

Kent and Sharpshooters 
Yeomanry 

Colonel Robin Leigh- 
Pembenon. honorary eoloneL 
presided a! the annual dinner of, 
the Kent and Sharpshooters 
Yeomanry Officers’ Dining 
Club- 

Suffolk and Norfolk Yeomanry 
and Artillery 

The Lord Lieutenant of Suffolk 
was the principal guest at a 
dinner given by the Suffolk and 
Norfolk Yeomanry and Artil- 
lery Dinner Club at Ipswich 
Golf Club last nigbL Major G.V. 
Lockett presidi 


OBITUARY 

DAME HONOR FELL 
Advances in cell biology 


Dame Honor Fell. DBE. 
FRS. who died on April 22, 
aged 85. was one of the most 
remarkable biologists of this 
century. 

The youngest of nine chil- 
dren. Honor Bridget Fell was 
born on May 22, 1 900. She 
was educated at Wychwood 
School. Oxford, and Madras 
College. Si Andrews. 

At Edinburgh University 
she graduated in Zoology. She 
gained her PhD in 1924 and a 
DSc in 1930. 

With a grant from the 
Medical Research Council she 
joined Dr T. S. P. Sirangeways 
at the Cambridge Research 
Hospital (now Sirangeways 
Research Laboratory). 

She has recorded her excite- 
ment at seeing for the first 
time a living cell undergoing 
mitotic division in a tissue 
culture. This experience had a 
great bearing on her future 
career in cell biology. 

Most of the sixty years of 
her working life was spent in 
the Sirangeways Research 
Laboratory, which she devel- 
oped from a small laboratory, 
founded by Dr Sirangeways 
for studying chronic diseases, 
to a major institute whose 
contribution to the biology of 
disease processes is recognised 
internationally. 

Honor Fell began work in 
Cambridge in 1 923 as 
Strangeways's assistant and. 
after his death in 1927. be- 
came director of the laborato- 
ry. a post she held until 1970. 

.As well as pioneering work 
in the area of developmental 
biology, she introduced tissue 
and organ culture as potent 
tools for studying many bio- 
logical processes. 

Honor Fell was one of the 
earliest biologists to recognise 


the contribution that bio- 
chemistry could make to bio- 
logical research. She 
pioneered the true multi-disci- 
plinary approach to biological 
problems. 

Her major contributions in 
the development of the skele- 
tal system were based on the 
culture of intact limb bones- 

The development of these 
techniques has led to major 
advances in the understanding 
of many pathological process- 
es. including those occuring in 
cancer, heart disease and 
arthritis. 

As a pioneer in the field of 
in-vivo studies, she was proud 
of the fact that she trained 
many of the current interna- 
tional leaders in biological 
sciences. 

She was elected a Fellow of 
the Royal Society in 1951. the 
ninth woman to gain this 
distinction. She was also a 
Fellow of Girion College and 
of King's College London, 
and had numerous honorary 
degrees. 

She was created DBE in 
1963. 

Honor Fell rated as more 
important than all these hon- 
ours the ability to conduct a 
successful experiment. It was 
only a few weeks before her 
death that her colleagues 
heard the familiar voice say- 
ing: “lt*s worked. Isn’t it 
exciting, come and see the 
results!*’. 

She was proud of being a 
York shi rewoman and her grit 
stood her in good stead in the 
very difficult financial times 
the laboratory experienced, 
particularly during the 1 930s. 
a determination which she 
expressed in her professional 
but not in her personal life. 



SIR CHARLES JOHNSTON 


Sir Charles Johnston, 
GCMG. who died suddenly 
on April 23, at the age of 74, 
was a distinguished diplomat 
and Britain's last Governor of 
Aden, as well as being a gifted 
poet and translator. 

Born on March 1 1. 1912. he 
was educated at Winchester 
and Balliol, where he got a 
First in Mods and Greats. 
Entering the Diplomatic Ser- 
vice in 1936, be served succes- 
sively in Tokyo, Cairo. 
Madrid and Bonn before be- 
coming Ambassador to Jor- 
dan in 1956. 

His next posting was unusu- 
al. From 1960 to 1963, he was 
the last Governor and Com- 
mander-in-Chief of Aden. No 
Arabist, and out of tune with 
the rising chorus of Arab 
nationalism, it should have 
been a difficult time for him. 
But he revelled in the procon- 
sular role which he later 
described with characteristic 
wii and elegance in his first 
book. The View From Steamer 
Point (1964). 

His last overseas appoint- 
ment was as High Commis- 
sioner to Australia from 1965- 
71. 

Retirement enabled John- 
ston to give full rein to his 
second career as poet and 
author. His own poetry, pub- 
lished in several volumes, 
revealed exceptional elegiac 
qualities, while remaining no- 
ticeably impersonal. 


His skill as a translator of 
Russian poetry brought him 
international fame. Helped by 
his adored and adoring wife. 
Princess Natasha Bagration, 
whom he married in 1944, he 
succeeded, with fidelity and 
realism, in rendering into 
English the rhythms and spirit 
of Pushkin's Eugene Onegin 
0977). 

These were outstanding 
achievements, rightly and 
widely recognised as such. 
Rather than his diplomatic 
career, however distmguished. 
they will be Johnston's lasting 
monument. 

His wife predeceased him 
two years ago and there were 
no children of the marriage. 

Since 1974. Johnston had 
been active as a member of the 
Council of Toynbee Hall. 


AIR CDRE A. P. REVINGTON 


Air Commodore A. P. 
Revingron. CB. CBE. who 
died on April 21 at the age of 
84. had a distinguished RAF 
career which stretched from 
the establishment of the ser- 
vice to the Berlin .Airlift. 

One of the first men to pass 
through the RAF College, 
Cranwell. in 1919. he was in 
the 1920s charged with the 
aerial survey of the Persian 
Gulf to find suitable landing 
sites for flying boats. This led 
to the establishment of the 
Flying Boat Squadron at Basra 
in 1928. 

At this period be was also 
involved in pioneering deck 
landings on the aircraft carrier 


Furious and. later. Glorious. 

His warti me career included 
service with the Middle East 
Air Force with which he was 
involved in covering the Sth 
Army’s retreat to Alamein. 

As AOC 47 Group from 
1948 to 1950 he played a 
leading role in the Berlin Air 
Lift in 1949. and was finally 
Senior Air Liaison Officer in 
Canada. 

In retirement, one of his 
chief preoccupations as a local 
councillor in Devon was the 
protection of the beautifttl 
coastline to the east of Plym- 
outh from the encroachment 
of unsightly caravan sites and 
holiday camps. 


Fourth Sunday after Easter 


CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL: 8 HC 
9 M. Riant Rev R Hook: tl Sun9 
Eucti. Mhaa Breyte iMozam Ay e 
Vwum (Moran. Uio Rev PGC Bran-. 
3.15 E. Rfe*e. heart thy LWO ts risen 
ijertrysj: 5. Stoute* Sg-vic* for a 
George's- tide: 6.30 ES. Rev TE 

■?WI?MINSTE«: 8. 8 45 HC. iq.J5 
Sung Euch. O sacrum comivium 
rralfei. the Suochanler: 1 1 .30 M: 41 E. 

UudWifi in sanctfa iBynU. the Pre- 

sr" PAUL'S CATHEDRAL: 8. 1 1.30 
HC. Jesus is this dark world's twtu 

I Bat hi. 10.30 M. Benedict its (Stan- 
ford:. Te Drum i Stanford). Rev Peter 
B all' 3. IS E- In exitu Israel iWesteyl. 
WESTMINSTER ABBEY: 8 HC: 10.30 
M. Lord Jesus has a garden <Trod. 
Caron. Rich! Rev EG Knapp- Ffahep. 

II 40 Sung Euch. Mtesa Brevis 
fPresiom: 3 1- Responses iSmlthi. IT ye 
be men again with Christ iGtofaoas). 
Rev AWS Brown: 6.30 ES. Rev 
Anlhony Harvey. 

SOUTHWARK CATHEDRAL: 9 HC: 

1 1 Euch. Mtesa Brevis In C. Love bade 
me welcome (Vaughan Williams). 
Tan l ion eroo (Ptainsongi. Caron Rich- 
ard Garrard: 3 E_ Blair in B minor. 
Give us Uie wings of radh (Bunocki. 
Canon Ge rald Parrot!. 
WESTMINISTER CATHEDRAL: 7. 8. 
9. 12. 930. 7 HC: 10.30 Sung Euch. 
Mtesa Paoae MarcelB rPatertrinaj. 
Regina coett 1 Guerrero). O aimudo 
diviUarum i Guerrero r 3.30 


CHAPEL ROYAL- Hampton Court 
Palace. 8.30 HC; II M. Alteud»! 1 
Heard a voice (WeeUces), the Chap- 
lain: 330 E. God Llveth Still (BachL 
Most gionous Lord of Lyfe (Armstrong 
Gibttel 


and Benediction. MagnKical lertii lorn 
(jte Montel O Demine Jesu Christa 
(Guerrero i. 

ST GEORGES CATHEDRAL. South- 
wark: 8. IO. 12-16. 9 LM: II HM. 
Rev victor McCiean. 


QUEEN'S CHAPEL. Si . 
8.30 HC. 11.19 MP. Se 
(Wall am. Ven T B artel 
qutEN-s I 
11 15 M. 


. . James's Place: 
Set me as a seal 

CHAPELOF < THE SAVOY: 

Te Deum (Stanford in Cl 

me Chaplain: 12 30 HC. O Pray tor 
the Peace of Jerusalem. 

ROYAL NAVAL COLLEGE. Green. 
Wich: MP 11. Int. We Braise Thee 
(Palestrina). A. Blessed be the God and 
Father (Wesley), preacher, the Chap- 
tata. 

GUARDS CHAPEL: 11 M. JDC NoMe: 
12 HC 

GRAY'S INN CHAPEL: 11.15 M. 
Canon Erie James. 

LINCOLN'S INN CHAPEL: 11.30. 
Morning Prayer and Sermon. 
Benedicius. The Strife te o'er iMenrv 
G Le y). Riant Rev HB Drtinani-Tani 
TOWER OF LONDON. EC3: 9.15 HC: 
1 1 M. GoUcauun Regale mowdui. u 
ye bn risen again with ChrrsJ 
(Gibbons). Rev Arthur Brawn. 
TEMPLE CHURCH. Fleet Street. 8.30 
HO 11.15 MP and HC. Te Deum 
1 and am us (Dyson in FT Jubilate Deo 
(Kenneth Letghlom. Uie Bishop of 
London. 

ST CLEMENT DANES (RAF Church): 
8 JO. 12.15 HC: 1 1 special Service. 
Fattier Michael Boom. 


ALL MALLOWS BY THE TOWER: 1 1 
Sung Eucn, Rev Gualter de MeUo. 
ALL SOULS: It Rev Un Bentley: 6.30 
Rev John S(olt 

CHELSEA OLD CHURCH: 8. 12 HC: 
IO Children s Service: 11 M. Rev J H 
L Cross: 6 E. D N noyce. 

CHRIST CHURCH. Chelsea: 8. 11 HC. 
Rev N Weir. 6 E. „ 

GROSVENOR CHAPEL. South 
Audley Street 8.15 HC. 11 Sung 
Eurh. Communion Service in F 
(Carte/. My Betoieo. Snake iHadlryi. 
Ave Verum Corpus (Saint Saen&i Rev 
Aw Marks. 

HOLY TRINITY. BromMon Road: 
a 30 HC: 1 1 M. Rev PJS Perkin: 6 30 
ES. Rev JAK Millar 
HOLY TRINITY. Prince Consort 
Road. 8 30. 12.05 HC: It M. The Rev 
Martin Israel 

HOLY TRINITY. SJoano Square- Ssp. 
12 IO HC: 10.30 Euch. Canon Rob 
efts. 

ST ALBANSJKflbom: 9.30 SM: II 
HM. Missa Aeo is Oirtsh iMatthtasi. 
Ditto tranasset Sabbatum (Taverneri. 
Fr Gasket): 5.30 LM. 

ST CLTH BERT'S. PH H beat h Car 
dens. SWS: IO HC: 1! Sung Euch. 
with a voice of stngmg rpnteftardi. 
Rev John vine: 6 Evensong and 

Benedicti on 

ST GEORGE'S. Hanover Square: 8.30 
HC II Sung Euch. W hillock In G. 
Ave Verum ‘ Elgar), the Rrctor 
ST JAMES’S. Piccadilly. 8.30 HC. 1 1 
Sunq Euch: 6 EP 

ST JAMES'S. Sussex Gardens. W2-. 8 
HC: 10.30 Sung Euch. Ireland to C: 6 
E. St John’s Service mroelti. tnsanae 
Et Van ae iH avdnl. 

ST LUKE'S. Chelsea: 8. 1 1 20 HC. 

Letohlon in D. tl we believe iCorn. 

10.30 MP. Rev DR Watson: 6.30 E. 

Nun ruhrn alle w’alder (Bach). Rev 
□P Watson 

ST MARGARETS. WesimlnMen 
8.15. 12 15 HC: ll M. Canon Trevor 

Beeson: 3 Evensoc and Sermon. Rev 

Arthur Brown. .. 

ST MARTIN-IN-THE -FIELDS: 8 HC 
9 45 Family Communion. Rev Charles 
Hedies’: 1 1 30 Monung Service. Uw 
Vrrar 2.45 Chinese Service 4. is E. 

6.30 ES. Rev Pimp Chesier 

ST MARY ABBOT'S. W8 8. 12.30 
HC 9 30 Sung Euch. Rev -tohn 
BrownseU: It . 1 5 M. Rev. John 
Bnwnsdi: A JO £. Rev Simon Attend. 
ST MARVLEBONE- MaryieDone 
Road 8. It HC. MtH Jrev* 
(Palestrina). Eere udi Lro iPnuips). 

Rev CK Hamel: 6.30 Rev □ Head. 

ST PALL'S. Robert Adam Street. 1 1 
HC. Ambrov Mason: 6-30 Re* 

ST°P^L L? i fa 1 mon Place: 8. 9 HC 1 1 
Solemn Euch. Western wind <T. 


Giles). Alleluia Psallal ■ William Ma- 
thias i. Re v David Jones. 

ST PETER’S. Eaton Sq: 8.1S HC: IO 
Family Mass.. 11 Solemn Mass, unie 
Organ Mass .Haydn j. Ave Verum 
corpus iSalnl Sae nsi R ev DB Tlltyer. 
ST SMON ZELOTES. Milner SL 8. 
7.45 HC. 1 1 MP. Let my prayer come 
up IB low). | was gf a«J < Parry j. Te 
Deum 'Stanford in B flat): 6.30 E . Mag 
i Kelly in C>. O Where shall wteoom be 
found? (Boyce). Prcb John Pearce. 
ST VEDAST. Foster Lane. U Sung 
Euch. Fiat votuntas lua jAndnessenv 

My lips shall speak of iny praise 

(Gre e n e i. 

THE ANNi NCLATTON. Bryanuon Sr 

11 HM. Mnu II rMonieverdl). Amen. 

amen dico Vobtv ide Wert): 6 LM and 

Benediction 


ST COLL'MBA'S CHURCH OF 
SCOTLAN. Poni Si: 11.5 Sacrament 
aS the Lord’s Supper. Vera Rev J 
Fraser McLuskcv. 

CROWN COURT CHURCH. Coven! 
Garden. 11. IS. 6.30. Rev Kenneth G 

Huidics. 

THE ASSUMPTION. Warwick Si 8. 
to. 12. 4. 6 LM. 11 SM. Mass for 5 
voices (Byrd). Sinq loyfuny iByrdi. 
Jusion mi a nimae 'Stanford i 
FARM STREET. Wl- 7.30. 8.30. IO. 
12 15. 4 16. 6.15. LM: 11 HM. MtSSd 
in simpllcltale iLanglatsv Ave verum 
corpus (Dupre). Tantum ergo 

<Duruflcl 

THE ORATORY. BrOmpion R(L 7. 8. 
9. 10. 12.30. 430. 7 LM. 11 HM. 

Mass Trahe me post le (Victoria). « 

have waited for the Lord (Men- 

detesohni: 3 30 Vespers. Jubilate Deo 

iHandli. 

ST ETHELOHEDA’S. Ely PI: 11 SM. 
Mass for 5 voices <Byrdi. Cantata 
Domino i Dee ring j 

OUR LADY OF VICTORIES. Kensing- 
ton- 8. 9. IO. 12 30. 6 30 LM: 11 HM. 
Mass in C minor (Kllsom. Jubilate Deo 

■Lasvusi. 

AMERICAN CHURCH IN LONDON. 
Wl: II Ron F Allison. 

CITY TEMPLE. Ho] bom: 11. a JO 
Rev Enc Wairan. 

CHELSEA METHODIST CHURCH. 
King’s Rd: 1 1 Mr Tom weailans: 6 Mr 
Anthony Cane. 

HINDE STREET METHODIST 
CHURCH. Wi 11 Rev Ken HowoofL 

6 50_Rev Sluan Jordan Hrw ™ 1 ' 
KENSINGTON CRC. Alien Si. WS. 
l i . 6 30 Rev Greta Morgan 
REGENT SQUARE PRESBYTERIAN 
URC. Tav (Mock P): 1 1 Rev j w Miller. 
6.30 Rev Peter Goodtad 
ST ANNE AND ST AGNES Gr«nam 

ST JriHN-g WOOD URC. 9.30 Rci 
jonn Miller 

WEST'S CHAPEL. City Road. EC2 
Rev Ronald C Ob(MM 
W^TMI NSTER CENTRAL HALL 
INWnodKl) 11. 6.30 Rev R John 

Westminster Chapel, aorkini 
ham Gate. 11. 6 50 Rev R T Kendall 


id. 

is 

fee 

id 

it. 

al 






THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 198j 


fore 

Nor 

and 

not 

den: 

yielc 

run* 
iron 
and 
Jo 
airpi 
beyc 
as c 
tick* 
luml 
glair 
neig: 
peril 
land 
great 
spin 
the c 

N. 
and 
just 
the I 
once 

Ni 
ible 
with 
hanc 
sign] 
oped 
Eure 
and* 
but i 

T1 
inde 
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Slav 
bear 
thinj 
Doe; 
a la 
men- 
of fit 
da i 
of i 
galle 
hikin 


Oif 

coonti 

its will* 

ourCe 
advise 
hotels 
tourw 
stops 
Ca 
and in> 
private 
tullbre 
Yoi 
holida; 
hotel c 
waters 
instant 
your o' 
As> 
For re 
plea* 
hiter-t 
Londc 
Tel:(0 


‘Clean 
TV’ Bill 
talked 
out 

By Slieila Grain ; 

Political Staff 

The Bill to clean up tclcvi- : 
sion collapsed in the Com- 
mons yesterday through the ! 
determined opposition of a : 
small number of MPs. 

The failure of the Obscene 
Publications (Amendment) 
Bill to finish its report stage 
and get its third reading means 
it has virtually no chance of 
becoming law. 

Its sponsor, Mr Winston 
ChurthiD. Conservative MP 
for Davyhulme. vowed to 
continue his campaign ta 
abolish the exemption ot 
broadcasting authorities from 
prosecution under the obscen- 
ity law. 

He and Mrs Mary 
Whitehouse, president of the 
National Viewers' and 
Listeners' Association, have 
not ruled out the possibility of 
government legislation. 

Yesterday’s debate was 
marked by a demonstration in 
the public gallery and at- 
tempts by Miss Clare Short. 
Labour MP for Birmningham 
Ladywood, to include in the 
Bill a ban on page three pin- 
ups. 

Five voung women were 
taken out of the public gallery 
after shouting “violence 
against women" and "ban 
page three". They also threw 
pamphlets into the chamber 
before being grabbed by offi- 
cials and led off. 

Miss Short protested that 
her amendment to ban pic- 
tures in newspapers of naked 
or half-naked women in pro- 
vocative postures was not 
chosen for debate. Her Bill, 
with the same aim. had made 
no progress. 

Mr Churchill used various 
parliamentary tactics to try to 
stop his Bill being talked out | 
Last night. Mr John Whit- 
nev. director general of the 
Independent Broadcasting 
Authority, said; "We welcome 
this foil "debate and we could 
all learn lessons from it. But 
let us also remember all the 
positive benefits that British 
television gives us every day." 

Parliament, page 4 


; v 


In the flight path of Amy Jo 


i Ml' 1 i 1 ■ S 

tr; tjfj 

1 yu 1 1 wji 



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jg - y " * -j- 
, •. v ■'£- ■. M - ® 

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[g 

\¥[m 


/U the bottom of Gnwo 
Square, you an 

Chwo, BooWtop. 

further down Omar Mokhtar 
Street is the Green Bouaqoe- 
Cut right into the oM Sookn 
aoS you 'corne across the 
Green Supermarket* ■ 

Yanis of shelving He emp- 
ty. The only-itemsofl\dfiP&y 
are tea. powdered coa- 


RcportcrV uowbook^ are 
filled up wilh tttihSS !, ke this. 
Ye*, wer have no bananas. 

' There aifi ewtam points of 
reference here. that remain 
constant- i be Ottoman clods 
behind tbeport" thcwagnin- 
xenlcity waJK Hte6\d Catho- 
cathedral which has been 

turned into a mosque. 

Tlnsre are the old men jwar 
the Roman gate ^fbo bcwsnl 

■ i j... iL 4imi ihcn 1 were 


Miss Eve Jackson putting her 331 lb mreroute nj«riy “** f"***'’ 


Si • ■ " / • 

*' , - * 

~ . *; -■ , •' ' • 

y -;-=v ; * ▼ ; . , 

. x , +. • «• ; . ' ■ * '•••-< 
-,VV v 


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At nmm today, weather 
permitting. Miss Eve Jackson, 
aged 28, will climb into the 
tiny cockpit of her British- 
designed aircraft “Gerty to 
set off on the world's first 
London to Sydney microKte 
fUghr. 

The aviatrix, from Thame, 
Oxfordshire, faces a lonely 
13 , 000 -mile endurance test 
aboard her two-seater mono- 
plane, which weighs 331 lb. 
She will carry a special surviv- 
al kit spare parts and an extra 
fuel tank. . 

The first leg. from Biggin 
Hill airfield, Kent to Calais, is 
one of 63 flying stops plamssd 
on the flight which is expected 
to lake between four and six 
months. The route crosses 21 
countries. 

Miss Jackson, who will m 
following in part the route of 
Amy Johnson, said of her 
flight: “Above all. it is a 
British feat using a Britisb- 
designed and built plane. We 
are flying the flag.” 

She has invested nearly 
£60.000 of her own money in 
the adventure because no prin- 
cipal British sponsor came 
forward, although 14 compa- 
nies are supplying equipment 
technical assistance, and some 
of the trip’s expenses. 


She said: “This is the first 
London to Sydney microlite 
flight. I am not afraid of the 
hazards or being enclos ed far 
such a tiny plane. Three yens 
of hard work rad phrasing 
have gone into this IligM. 

**I thrive on c&alleage; this 
is the ultimate flight is un- 
doubtedly the best aircraft 
available. But I need more 
sponsors for the final leg of the 
trip.” _ 

Miss Jackson, a tanner 
cook, waitress, factory worker 
and shop assistant learnt to 
fly with tiie British Airways 
Flying Cub at Booker, near 
her borne, five years ago, rad 
wants to become a fuB-time 
pilot „ . 

“Gerty", her Shadow Senes 
B monoplane, wQl anise at a 
maximum straight and level 
speed of 95 mph, covering an 
average distance of between 
150 to 425 miles a day. 

The aircraft's designer, Mr 
David Cook, msmging direc- 
tor of CFM MetaHax, a 
Suffolk company which also 
built the plane, said the air- 
craft leads the world in 
microlite performance. 

Mr Cooke, aged 45, was the 
first person to fly across the 
Channel in a fixed-wing hang 
glider, in 1978. 


r 



h Germany 
fCzKhotiaveMa 
fYugodavta^-^ 
Cj'.Vto 

^vV^Turkey 

ftVSaUAE 



?BanQtod«sh 


^ A ■ ■ 




EEC package will aid UK farmers 

Continued from page 1 from lhemaiket and I™**. 

dal factor in reaching the setfor.bafm^by the EEC sewra from April 


Continued from page 1 from the market and the target 

dal feexor in reaching the set for beef prices by the EEC. 

=rr atefourdaysof 

^Meanwhile, British beefand «n. 'rtdteina^e 


sheep farmers can breathe 
more easily for another year 
after the ministers' decision to 
put off any changes to the 
Community's support system 
for livestock. The variable 
beef slaughter premium, paid 
only to British farmers, has 
been retained at least until the 
end of the year. _ 

The premium is paid to 
make up the difference be- 
tween what farmers can get 


by 4 per cent while increasing 
the price of milk powder and 
cheese. This proposal was also 
intended to reduce the attrac- 


over two years from April] 
1987 

The most controversial 
question of all — the produc- 
tion tax on cereals— which Mr, 
J opting felt dismmuiattd 


intended to reduce me araat- ~T ; ~,7r n^rici i fenwnv was 
tion to dairies of selling butter JJSan* 1 • that at feast 


into EEC stores. 

Some proposals of the Euro- 
pean Commission made earli- 
er this year were adopted, 
although in a modified form. 

Fanners will be offered the 
chance to volunteer for gov- 
ernment schemes to buy up 
their milk quotas. But if not 


agreed in a way that at feast 
partly satisfies British fairs. 

A spokesman for the British 
National Farmers* Union sai$. 
vesterday that the agreement 
was better than expected, but 
was not likely to J*make 
fanners jump with joy”. 

Leading article, page 9 


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THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Solution to puzzle No 17,024 Solution to puzzle No 17,029 I Today’s events 


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The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,030 

A prize on he Times Allas of World History «n U 
first three correct solutions opened next ^ursJay. £n/r/ox hould 
be addressed to : The Times. Saturday Crossword Competition. 
Box 486. I Virginia Street. London El 9DD. The winners and 
solution will he published next Saturday. 

The winners of last Saturdays competition arc: Pam Uafy 
Tavlor. 3 : Turnpike Road. Sc*bun. Berks: Mrs S. Phikox. 
Hannone Cottage. Horns Oak Road. Harvcl Meopham . Kent. 
Miss E. M. Remolds. 7 Snrthbrook Road. Swanage. Dorset. 


Name .... 
Address . 


awM«a«t?M l wa 






■ ' ■ ■ M’-"M ' '■ ■ 






Sw'WvS 
' " 7.'P7Lr 



ACROSS 

I Roman general appears stu- 
pid to us (7). 

5 Sailor joining a vessel is a 
fool (7). 

9 Act subtly to exploit work- 
ers left inside (9). 

10 Ancient city of Lancas- 
trians. presumably (5). 

11 Artist gets odd letters from 
25151. 

12 Accords we arranged make 
one immune to attack 16.3|. 

14 Revolver' blazing away' in 
acrobats turn (9.3). 

17 Royal house's employed 
porters in Northern tourist 
area (9.51. 

21 Share in public plot (9). 

23 Thick-skinned type in place 
of Augustine (5). 

24 Animals 1 spotted in all 
directions 15). 

25 Voices raised here in the 
cathedral (5.4). 

26 Located and summoned, 
say. and seen (7). 

27 Correct to change into sec- 
ond gear? (7). 

DOWN 

1 Critical point m Atlantic 
run. chaps (ft). 



2 High land showing up on 
radar, perhaps (7). 

3 Deletes scores (9). 

4 Nobody can be expected to 
w2it for this (4-7). 

5 Flier in front of Jumbo, say 
t3>- 

6 Shaw copes with switch of 
directions (51. 

7 US transport signal helps 
TV’ speaker (7). 

8 Fish fit for a Poet Laureate 
(8). 

13 Music-lover has possibly 
gone? Correct l7-4). 

15 Hardened by exposure, 
came safely through (9). 

16 Avoids mountain route in 
some runs (8k 

18 Very wealthy revolutionary 
movement 1 7). 

19 Set olT to trudge into river 
\T\. 

2ft Stars put up with intilia! 
disapproval from audience 
tft). 

22 The section of Yard that 5 
eut crime (5). 

25 Fish caught round Land's 
End (3). 


Royal engagements ^ 

The Queen and The Duke of ■ 
Edinburgh .attend the 40th 
anniversary reunion of the 
Burma Star Association at the 
Royal Albert Hall. SW7, 6.45. 

The Duchess of Kent. Patron, 
attends a concert in aid of the 
Edward Boyle Memorial Trust, 
Birmingham Town Hall. 12. 5.' 

New exhibitions 
North American Indian Ex- 
hibition of arts and crafts; 
Mill field House, Silver St, N 18; 
Sat and Sun l J to 5.30 (ends 27 

April). „ 

Sculpture for the Garden; 
Harlow Car Gardens. Otley Rd. 
Nr Harrogate; Mon to Sun 9.30 
to 7 JO (or dusk), (ends Septem- 
ber 30). 

Modern Art from Wolver- 
hampton: Cooper Gallery. 
Church St, Barnsky. Wed to 
Sun 10 to 5.30, Tues I to 5.30, 
dosed Mon (ends May 25). 

Impressionist drawings, 
watercolours and pastels; Athe- 
naeum Gallery. Princess Si, 
Manchester, Mon to Sat 10 to 6, 
Sun 2 to 6 (ends June I). 

Tomorrow’s events 

Royal engagements 
The Duke of Edinburgh. Pa- 
tron. reviews The Burma Star 
Association's Annual Remem- 
brance Parade on Horse Guards, 
then takes part in the 
Association's Ceremony, the 
Cenotaph. Whitehall. SWl. 
11.45; later, as Trustee of the 
Prince Philip Trust Fund, he 
attends a RovaJ Variety Show at 
the Theatre Royal. Windsor, in 
aid of the Trust and the Bud 
Flanagan Leukaemia Fund 
7.20. „ 

The Duke of Kent. President 
of the Scout Association, at- 
tends the review of The Queen’s 
Scouts, the Quadrangle. Wind- 
sor Castle. 2.15. 

Music 

Concert by the Kent County 
Youth Orchestra; Royal Festi- 
val HalL South Bank. SEl. 3.1 5. 

Earlv Music Concert; The 
Arts Centre. Bamptoo. 7 JO. 


In the garden 

This is the latest spring in the 
: garden many can remember. 

Gardeners still have to sow 
seeds in the open as the ground 
has been too wet to draw out a 
drill. Those with heavy soils 
have not even been able to dig 
and manure their vegetable 
plots. They will have to be 
content with forking the ground 
lightlv and working in compost, 
hop manure ot other organic 
manures and be prepared to 
apply soluaWe feeds during the 
growing season. 

The summer flowenngcjema; 
tis. all those in the Jackmanu 
group, should be pruned to 
about 18 to 24 inches from the 
ground 

Connifer hedges which may 
not have been pruned last 
summer, may be dipped back. 

Many bamboos look as if they 
have been killed by the frosts. If 
so. they should be cut to the 
ground and they will almost 
certainly produce new growths 
from their roots. 

Many honeysuckles look 
dead. Leave them for a week or 
two but if tiie top growth is 
really dead cut it back, and 
expect new shoots from below 
ground 8H 


KOWi 


- Tb* North: AM** 'ModMcaten U 

and Grow in. R awdoa 
Widening schema between junctions * 
and a Barton Stage, iane restnc 
SceUemfe AH0c Extena we tesurt adnp 
of Ourtucher M at Dumbarton Rn 
Dahm*. Dunhanonstwu, kwg w becks 
so use ahm naura route _ between 

OunlociNirBid Beereden. A9K Sn^olne 

mine Bt N Dwwjde Rd. Banctoy, 
KincanineaWra. detoys. «4c Tqmkte 

ffBWBSffWffSSrB 


Weather 

forecast 

' A depression: near krinri 
wm move slowly, SE rad its 
associated fronts wBT ap- 
proach NW areas of fte 
British Isles. Another area of 
-low-pressure will move N over 
France toward SE Engtaad. 


to midnight 




HOOH lMAr iltmieie.il aUmile 



1 T- i fr 





For readers who 
missed a copy of TM 
week, we repeat 
week's Portfolio pan e 
(today's are on P*g^24). 

to Mh Ttor — — “ 




Gardens open 


psotonto lor sale 

TODAY AND OTHER DAYS 

Donee Wflnbame Botanic Gardens. 
Sttpeh*. VWmbome: coOecimn ot plants 
that haw become ran m cu tft awn: 
research nto hardiness ol rse species, 
maurfy Australian trass and stourt®: daft 
{n« liondays except Bank Holidays) 10 to 

MONDAY 

auge.Wes tBurtiin .5tn 
1m tram Roman VUs 
seed garden, spring 
2to& 


Anni versaries 

TODAY 

Births: Eugene ^Delaamx, 
painter. Charm loo-Saint-Mau- 
rice. France. 1798; John James 
Audubon, naturalist and artist, 
Lcs Cayes, Haiti. 1785. 

Deaths: Bjorastjerae Bjora- 
son. poet and dramatist. Nobel 
laureate. 1903, Pans. 1910: Carl 
Bosch, chemist, Nobel laureate 
1931. Heidelberg. Germany, 
1940; Edwin Pratt, poet, To- 
ronto. 1964. 

TOMORROW 

Births: Mary WoUstoaecraft 
writer and advocate of women's 
rights. London. 1759; Herbert 
Spencer, philosopher, Derby. 
1820: Ulysses Grant general 
and 18th President of the USA 
1868-77. Point Pleasant Ohio. 
1822; Edward Whymper, artist 
and mountaineer. London, 
184a 

Deaths: James Bruce, ex- 

§ loner of the Nile, Larbet 
tiriingshire, 1794: William 
Macready. actor-manager, 
Cheltenham. 1873; Mph 
Waldo Emerson. Concord. 
Massachusetts. 1882; Kwame 
Nkrumah. President of Ghana 

1960*66. Bucharest 1972. 


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A130fc spnng Bowers, spacious grounds. 

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Gsencarse. 14m Dundee. 8m Perth, en 
route. ASS. world famous coO eaW of 
azaleas, rimtodandrens. m oaw »- 
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Rales and how to play: page 36. 


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SATURDAY APRIL 26 =1986 


THE 




r r r ri^>rT7Cj 



"OGK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 
1357.9(+9.9) 

FT-SE100 
1622.6 (+7.1). 


USM (Datastream) 
118.68 HL51) 


THE POUND 


US Dollar 

1.5370 (+0.0015) 

W German mark 
3.3545 (-0.0164). 

Trade- weighted 
75.9 (-0.5) 


Toy firm’s 
£5m buy 


Dividend cut 


Dee package 


Dee Corporation, the super- 1 
market group, has. sold a 
package of freehold properties 
to : Heron Property .Corpora- 
tion for an oadisdtwedsuin.' 


Pay-out hope 

Staffordshire Potteries, 
which is fighting a £14 million 
takeover bid from theColoroll 
home furnishings group, has 
told shareholders io expert 
dividends of at least 5p for the 
year coding June 30. 1987 — 
25 per cent up on the current ! 
year forecast. • 


Citibank cut 


Citibank Sayings has re- 1 
duced its mortgage rate from j 
11.95 to 10.75 per cent. This I 
applies to both repayment and 
endowment mortgages: j 


Bids received 


Martin Ford has confirmed 
that it has received a number ; 
of bids after being put up for j 
sale last month. These are now 
being studied by its merchant 
banker, ■ Singer and 
Ftiediander. 


Application day 

Application lists for Tip 
Top Drugstores, referred to 
yesterday, open on May i and 
dealings start on May 9. 

• CLAYTON. SON AND CO 


(HOLDINGS); Total payment 
for 1985 7p <6p). Turnover 
£10.96 million (£13.47 minion). 
Pretax profit £622.000 
(£681,000). Earnings per share 
l7.9fip(JV.S6pL 
• SUTER: The chairman. Mr 
David Abell, says in his annual 
report that prospects for 1986 
are encouraging and in the i 
current year to date the j 
company’s- performance has I 
been well up to expectation*. 
The accounts reveal that Mr 
Abell's salary more t han dou- 
bled in 1985. to £20X729 from . 
£94.713 in 1984. 




FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 


Worst ever trade deficit 


at more than £lbn 


By David Smith, Economics Correspondent 


Britain had a trade deficit of 
£1,138. imilbon last month, 
easily the worst on record. The 
current account was in deficit 
by £538 . million, also the 
fcargest ever. 

The value of oil exports 
slumped by £360 million as oil 
prices fell. 

But (hat was only one of 
several reasons for the unex- 


UK TRADE BALANCE 

Em 


pectedly poor trade figures. 
Manufacturing trade deterio- 
rated sharply — mainly bo- 
cause of a sudden ' rise in 
imports — and the deficit was 
a record £786 million. 

The visible trade deficit of 
£1.138 million represented a 
worsening, of £800 milli on 
compared with February's 
£338 million deficit " 

- Until those figures were 


’.Cowan, cte Groat, the toy ! 
and giftware distributor, has 
made an agreed £5.1 •million 
offer for Chan Fonlkes Lynch, 
a company running profes- 
sional tuition courses for 
accountants. 

CFL Joined -tire unlisted 
securities market only in De- 
cember at a placing price of 
86p a share, which valued the 
company at £3.4 millio n. 
Cowan's offer values the 
shares at 129p. 

CFL directors, speaking for 
71.1 per cent of the company, 
have already given irrevocable 
undertakings to accept the 
offer. FuO acceptance would 
cause Cowan to issue 734 
million new shares, or 34.9 per 
cent of the enlarged equity. 

The acquisition represents 
Cowan's new strategy of diver- 
sification into communica- 
tions and services. CFL 
directors believe demand for 
the company's courses and 
products will continue to grow 
because of the trend towards 
examination-based qualifica- 


■-* a ? i/vv- -zoo 

M&mm — 

AHJJASONDJFM 


pound's stronger performance 
during the month. 

The volume of exports hit a 
peak in the second quarter of 
last year and has since been 
moving erratically around a 
somewhat lower leveL 


deficit on . record was £874 
million in October 1984. 


Exports fell by £454 million, 
or 73 per cent, to £5,733 
million, the lowest total since 
July 1984. 

Apart from the £360 million 
drop in oil exports, chemicals 
also fell, by £77 million, 
probably because of the 


In March export volume 
dropped by 63 per cent In the 
first quarter export volume 
was down by 1.4 per cent 
compared with the fourth 
quarter of Iasi year. 

Imports, in contrast, moved 
up strongly last month, rising 
by £347 million, or 53 per 
cent to £6,871 million, the 
highest since April last year. 


items was cancelled out by a 
fall in oil imports. All the 
other main categories of im- 
ports rose strongly. 

Import volume was up by 
33 per cent, although it fell by 
1.4 per cent in the first quarter 
compared with ihe fourth 
quarter of last year. 

Department of Trade and 
Industry officials said that 
trends for both exports and 
imports were difficult to deter- 
mine at present. 

The main official concern 
over the figures is likely to 
focus on the fact that the 
decline in the oO surplus — to 
£397 million last month from 
£685 million in February and 
£997 million in January — is 
not being offset by an im- 
provement in manufacturing 
trade. 


month's figures should not be 
taken in isolation and that the 
official forecast of a £3.5 
billion surplus for this year is 
being maintained. 


In the first quarter the 
current account was in surplus 
by £863 million, although that 
included a large one-off abate- 
ment on the 1984 EEC budget. 


The Treasury expects a 
manufacturing trade deficit of 
£3 billion this year. However, 
in the first quarter alone the 
deficit was £1.4 billion. 


While Britain’s trade perfor- 
mance hit record lows last 
mouth. West Germany's trade 
was in near-record surplus, 
improving to DmS.44 billion 
(£2.5 billion) from Dm6.84 
billion in February. 


A rise in the value of 
imports of the so-called erratic 


In fact, manufacturing is 
deteriorating at as rapid a rate 
as otJ trade. Only invisibles — 
including the monthly abate- 
ment on the 1985 European 
Communities budget — are 
improving, with the surplus 
estimated at £600 million a 
month. 

A spokesman for the Trea- 
sury-said yesterday that one 


Germany is enjoying the 
twin benefits of a cut in the oil 
import bill and strong manu- 
factured exports, although — 
like Japan, it could come 
under pressure at the econom- 
ic summit in Tokyo next 
month to expand domestic 
demand to reduce the surplus. 


The current account was in 
surplus by Dm4.S billion last 
month. 


Oil prices 
drop as 
strike is 
called off 


Abandon ADR tax Building 


says Reuters chief societies 

to merge 


. Profits at Geers Gross, the 
advertising agency, fell from 
£1.83 million before tax to 
£813.000 in the year to De- 
cember 31. Turnover wasrup 
from £122 million to £119 
million and the final dividend 
has been cut from. 2p to l.Sp. 

Tempas, page 23. 


By. David Young 
Energy Correspondent 


World oil prices fed yester- 
ay after the strike which 


day after the strike which 
stopped the Sow of oil from 
Norway’s North Sea fields Tot 
20 days was; called off. 

The return to work will put 
a million barrels a day of oD 
back into the world market, 
already awash with crude oil 
because of energy conserva- 
tion and over-production fry 
members of the Organization 
of Petroleum Exporting Coun- 
tries (Opec). 


Spot market rates in Europe 
ad North America have fell- 


^nd North America have fell- 
• ear by a dollar to about SI L90 
a barrel since it was an- 
nounced late on Thursday that 
ihe Norwegian Government 
had decided to intervene to 
end lire dispute. 

Under Norwegian labour 
laws the oil workers will 
return to work while arbitra- 
tion takes place. 

The feet that the Govern- 
ment did not intervene when 
the strike was called, as nor- 
mally happens in Norwegian 
industrial disputes; was seized 
on by Opec as a sign that 
Norway was -willing to co- 
operate hi combatting world 
oyer-supply and immediately 
sent prices upwards. 

However, the Government 
has now. invoked arbitration 
because it said that the length 
of the strike had started to 
affect the safety of some of the 
North Sea installations. 

During the dispute, which 
started when 670 catering 
workers went on strike ^sup- 
plies of natural gas from the 
Frigg field to the British Gas 
network were interrupted. 

British Gas normally lakes 
20 per cent of its daily needs 
from Bigg but was able to 
meet demand by increasing 
gas lifting from the fields in 
the British sector of the North 
Sea and using gas stored in 
underground salt caverns in 
Yorkshire. 


Reuters chairman. Sir 
Christopher Hogg, yesterday 
called on the Government to 
abandon the 5 per cent stamp 
duty omAmerican' Depositary 
Receipts (ADRs) proposed in 
the Budget 

Reuters, with a number of 
other companies whose shares 
are traded in the United States 
in ADR form, has already 
protested to the authorities 
about the proposed tax, which 
Sir Christopher said would 
make US acquisitionsin ex- 
change for shares more expen- 
sive and impose an 
unwelcome penalty on 
Reuters’ expansion in North 
America. ; -~- 

The financial information 
and news group has already 
bought Rich, the Chicago- 
based maker of dealing room 
terminals and is to take a 
minority stake in Instinet, 
whose share-dealing systems it 
markets outside North 
America. 

Sir Christopher also told the 
annual meeting yesterday that 
Reuters was expecting excel- 


lent profit and revenue growth 
this year after an encouraging 
start, although he said it was 
too early to make an exact 
forecast The company report- 
ed a 26 percent jump in pretax 
profits to £93.6 million last 
year. 

He said all the group's main 
products were doing well, with 
outstanding new business in 
Europe and good progress in 
North America, where Reu- 
ters feces its toughest competi- 
tion in the financial services 
market 

After almost six years of 
negotiations. Reuters has re- 
ceived permission to intro- 
duce its Monitor screen-based 
currency and bond dealing 
service m the Japanese market 
where the strength of die yen 
against sterling has also helped 
the company. 

The meeting also elected the 
Mirror Group publisher. Mr 
Robert Maxwell, and Sir Rich- 
ard Storey, chairman and 
chief executive of Portsmouth 
and Sunderland Newspapers, 
as directors. 


By Alison Eadie 


Woolworth to spend 
£150m on expansion 


By Oar City Staff 


Woolworth Holdings, 
which is fighting off a £1.53 
billion bid from Dixons 
Group, yesterday announced 
a £150 million expansion and 
redevelopment programme. 

The money is being spent 
ion the Woolworth chain. 
Comet electrical stores, B&Q 
do-it-yourself stores and prop- 
erty developments. It will be 
spent on a mixture of new 
openings, relocations and re- 
; furbishments. 


A total of£43 million will go 
towards Woolworth. £14 mil- 
lion to Comet and £84 million 
to B&Q. The rest will be spent 
on property. The expansion 
will provide an extra 1.7 
million square feet of trading 
space, Woolworth said. 

The long-awaited offer doc- 
ument from Dixons is expect- 
ed early next ’week. It is 
expected to concentrate on 
Dixons management skills 
and the proven retail formula. 


Bonn rates ‘may fall’ 


■ The major oil companies 
operating in the Norwegian 
sector have - started frying 
■workers to the rigs and pro- 
duction should resume .over 
the weekend. 


West Germany (AP-Dow 
Jone$)Herr Karl Otto Poehi, 
president of the West German 
central bank , said yesterday 
that he sees the possibility of 
lower West German money 
market raxes in the “middle 
term", despite the central 
teak's decision on Thursday 
not to lower its key lending 
rates. 

The discount and Lombard 


rales stand at 33 and 53 per 
cent. 


Herr Poehi said the scenario 
for a discount rate cut was not 
right in view of the situation 
on Europe's capital markets. 

Liquidity has been very 
tight on the Frankfurt money 
market after the realignment 
of currency parities in the 
European Monetary System. 


A merger is planned be- 
tween the Bradford and 
Bingley Building Society and 
the Yorkshire Building Soci- 
ety, they said yesterday. It will 
create Bn tain's seventh largest 
building society, behind the 
Leeds Permanent and ahead 
of the National & Provincial 

At present the Bradford and 
Bingley is the ninth largest 
society, with assets of more 
than £4 billion and the York- 
shire the thirteenth, with as- 
sets of nearly £2 billion. The 
combined group will be called 
the Yorkshire Building Soci- 
ety. 

The two societies have head 
offices five miles apart, allow- 
ing scope for rationalization I 
particularly in computer sys- 1 
terns- A guarantee of no staff 
redundancies for three years 
has been made to Bradford's 
1.973 employees and 
Yorkshire's 1.159 employees. 

The combined society will 
have 400 branches — 250 from 
the Bradley and Bingley and 
1 50 from the Yorkshire. There 
is an overlap in 64 places and 
the volume of business in 
some of the duplicated sites 
could justify maintaining two 
branches, according to Mr 
Geoffrey Lister, the chief exec- 
utive of the Bradford and 
Bingley. 

The new management 
structure will be shared initial- 
ly between both societies with 
Mr Lister and Mr Denis 
Macnaught, of Yorkshire, act- 
ing as joint chief executives. 
Mr Macnaught will retire in 
next year, leaving Mr Lister as 
the sole chief executive. 

The total number of build- 
ings societies has fallen from 
190 at the end of 1984 to 164 
today due to a series of 
mergers, most of them involv- 
ing small societies merging 
with larger ones. 

The largest merger so far 
was last October’s tie-up be- 
tween the Alliance and the 
Leicester, creating the Alli- 
ance & Leicester, now the 
fourth largest society. 

A potentially larger ranger 
between third-ranking Na- 
tionwide and fifth-ranking 
Woolwich, which would have 
created a society with assets of 
£15 billion, was called off last 
November. 


STOCK MARKETS MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


New York 

Dow Jones 

Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow 

Hong Kong: 

Hang Seng — 
Amsterdam: Gen 



f-ramrurc 

Commerzbank 

Brussels: ' 

General 

Paris: CAC - 

Zurich: 

SKA General 


. 18353d (44:22) 
15689-88 (+7-83) 


183432 (4-10.11) 

2703 (-0.1) 

1- N/T 


;. 2218-22 (-213) 


RtSESr 

Portafls 

Pagfar-Hatterstey ~ 

Boots 

G.KJJ 

FH Tomkins 

Wiftams Hokflngs .. 

Steettey 

Arfwest Group 

Delta — i 


, 910p (+1( 
56tp(+1ffl 
_262p(+7) 
_341p(+6 ) 
. 314p(+18) 


Budget a lost opportunity 
to tackle unemployment 9 


By Our Economics Correspondent 


675p (+20) 
.. 471p (+8) 


— 240p (+15) 


657.64 (-32.52) 
4043 (+4.4) 


4043 (+44) 
50940 (same) 


INTEREST RATES 


London: 

Bank Base: 10.50% 

3-month Interbank lO'is-KPifift 
3- month eligible bJtorlO’ icr-IO'xfifc 
buying rata 
U& 

Prime Rate 

Federal Funds 

3- month Treasure Bife 6.10-639% 
30-year bonds 120 ! *-120 


Wadgewood 

Lex Service — 

SeatsonOaft — ~ 

T Jourdan 

Extet - 

Associated Heat .... 
Christies bit — 

Reuters ... 

RT Zinc 

Chart Foufcs - 

Simon Engineering 


,250p(+10) 
396p (+!§) 
. 341 p (+23) 
394p (+20) 


r.- 330P l+O) 

450p(+15) 


SS2p 1+181 


FALLS; 

Royal Insurance — 

GALS 

prudential ~ — -- — 
Stock C on v ersi o n „ 
Home Counties « — 
C.V.D Incorporated - 


— S09pf-1gj 
.. 1 Q35p (-20) 

— 894p(-28) 

.... TOOp -10) 

— 158p (-7) 
I37pfc-18) 


CURRENCIES 


London: 

£: 51,5370 
£: DM33545 
£: SwFt2.7S73 
£. FFr10 6822 
£• yen2S929 
£: mdextf53 


KewTWc . 

L SI. 5370 
$: DM2.1825 - 
S: index: 114.T 


COLD 


ECU £7 3583 
$DR £1.17408 


London Fixing: 

AM S344.2B pm-S34445 . 
dOSe $34475-345^25 {£224.75- 
22625) 

New Ycsfc - 
Comex S345.1D-345.60 


The Charter for Jobs yester- 
day accused the Government 
of failing to tackle the problem 
of the long-term unemployed 

In evidence prepared for the 
Commons Treasury and Civil 
! Service Committee, the Char- 
ier describes last month's 
Budget as a lost opportunity. 

■ The Charter for Jobs was set 
up a year ago as an all-party 
pressure group concerned with 
unempIoymenL It has become 
established with its sister 
or ganizati on, the Employ- 
ment Institute, as both an 
expert source and a lobby 
group. 

But in the important areas 
of policy it has succeeded so 
far only in influencing MPs. 
not the Government itself. 

In the evidence published 
vesterday it called on the 
Government to catTy out the 
recommendation of the Com- 
mons Employment Commit- 
tee, of a job guarantee for the 
long-term unemployed within 
the next three years. This 
omission was.the most disap- 


pointing aspect of the Budget, 
the Charter said. 

It is a widely held view that 
the Government's reluctance 
to take the Employment 
Committee’s advice is based 
on Treasury parsimony, and 
that Lord Young of Granham. 
the Secretary of State for 
Employment welcomed the 
recommendation. 

' However, in a long and 
detailed reply to the Employ- 
ment Committee, published 
on Thursday, Lord Young 
criticized the committee's rec- 
ommendation and defended 
the Government's approach 
to the long-term unemployed. 

The Employment Commit- 
tee recommended a building 
improvement programme to 
provide 300,000 new jobs a 
vear, 100,000 extra temporary 
jobs in the National Health 
Service and the social services, 
and a wage subsidy to employ- 
ers taking on the long-term 
jobless. 

The committee costed the 
proposals at a net £3.3 billion 


but, according to Lord 
Young's response, the actual 
cost is likely to be more than 
£4 billion. 

Lord Young also said that 
the building programme was 
impracticable because it 
would lake work from the 
private sector, ihal the NHS 
could not easily cope with 
extra untrained workers, and 
that devising a suitable job 
subsidy — which would need 
to cover 850.000 jobs — would 
be virtually impossible. 

He accepted that the long- 
term unemployed were “par- 
ticularly disadvantaged", but 
said that the Government's 
approach "will provide much 
more cost-effective help di- 
rectly to long-term unem- 
ployed people . 

Mr Jon Shields, director of 
the Employment Insilitute 
and Charter for Jobs, yester- 
day called Lord Young's re- 
sponse “nitpicking and 
repetitive”. 

“The basic points that the 
committee was try ing to make 
have not been answered”. 


Executive Editor Kenneth Fleet 


Day dawns in time 
for BL rethink 


Graham Day, who formally joins 
BL as executive chairman on Thurs- 
day. will be taking over a strikingly 
different organization from the rump 
he must have expected to run at the 
time of his appointment 

E^ en Land Rover is now back in 
the BL park though its future remains 
deeply unsettled. Unipart and the 
heavily loss-making Leyland Bus are 
in the departure lounge, the latter still 
booked for an imminent painful exit. 
Mr Day’s first big derison? 

Ironically the process of privatizing 
Unipart. by undoing the special 
relationships with other BL subsid- 
iaries. has made it look much less 
inspiring: profits were down from £14 
million to £6 million last year. 

To make matters worse, the recent 
turmoil has exacerbated senior 
management problems that the new 
chairman might have met in some 
form anyway. Ray Horrocks, the 
executive director responsible for 
cars and Unipart. has stuck his neck 
out as far as it is possible to go by 
suggesting that he was passed over for 
the chairmanship for daring to 
oppose the mooted Ford deal He 
probably feels in need of repairing his 
image and his fences. Mr Horrocks's 
counterpart on the Leyland and Land 
Rover side, David Andrews, has 
similarly distanced himself from the 
BL body by his prolonged leave of 
absence to promote the Land Rover 
buyouL That was rejected not merely 
by Paul Channon, Secretary of State 
for Trade and Industry, but more 
embarrassingly by his boardroom 
colleagues, some of whom always 
refused to believe that Land Rover 
was capable of standing on its own. 

Since Mr Day, as full-time exec- 
utive chairman, replaces part-timer 
Sir Austin Bide, it may be thought 
that these happenings make it easier 
to remove a layer of management 
that is now redundanL The history of 


BL is plagued by the axing or 


voluntary departure of able deputies 
rejected for the lop jobs. As a direct 


rejected for the lop jobs. As a direct 
result, management has consistently 
been too stretched to cope with all the 
businesses at once. 

If Mr Day has inherited a much 
bigger job than expected, he is now 
short of the one thing he really 
needed and demanded — a clear brief 
from the major shareholder and 
provider of funds (HMG). Mr Day 
himself should take a major part in 
working out a new strategy. The fast 
solutions have disappeared and it 
would be better to give the businesses 
a rest from the headlines and a little 
stability while policymakers go back 
to the drawing board. 

Merely keeping the old privatiza- 
tion strategy but delaying it could add 
election uncertainty. A possible alter- 
native approach might be through 
BL's bizarre financial structure, a 
leftover from its rescue (BL was never 
nationalized). 

Successive share issues to the 
taxpayer have reduced outside 
shareholdings to a fraction of 1 per 
cent of BL's capital, but the stock is 
widely held and actively traded of 
late. After a relapse to 40p per share , 
the stock market values BL at a 
astonishing £1.7 billion. 

That is not a meaningful figure for 
BL without government guarantees. 
But the existence of the quotation 
does offer the possibility of a different 
kind of creeping privatization, that 
would give Mr Day internal freedom 
to make collaborative deals, sell 
further subsidiaries, or merge busi- 
nesses into joint companies with the 
single aim of constructing a version 
of BL that can survive without 
government guarantee. 

When that is possible.the Govern- 
ment could move to full privatization 
by cancelling some of its share capital 
or loans in exchange for removal of 
its guarantee. 


New round in tin crisis 


The evidence given to the Commons 
select committee that looked into last 


year’s collapse of the tin market was 
finally published yesterday, giving 


some intriguing pointers to the next 
moves in the game being played out 
between the International Tin Coun- 
cil and its disparate collection of 
creditors. 

The settlement Standard Chartered 
Bank reached with the ITC this week 
has left the council with precious 
little in hand with which to settle 
other claims, which in any case 
enormously exceed the resources left 
at the ITCs disposal when its buffer 
stock manager ran into trouble last 
autumn. The focus now shifts to the 
22 governments supposed to stand 
behind the ITC. 

The evidence presented to the 
select committee reinforces its criti- 
cisms of these governments. Ironi- 
cally, although the British 


Government made the greatest effort 
to whip the 21 others into an 
agreement to honour their obliga- 
tions, it is now the most exposed. For 
since the London Metal Exchange is 
in London, the creditors' easiest and 
cheapest course of action is simply to 
take the British Government to court 

But then the British Government is 
not only the most vulnerable; it also, 
in the wider sense, has the most to 
lose. 

The London Metal Exchange has 
been badly bruised by the tin crisis, 
and it is in the interests of its host 
government to help it back to health. 
Probably, the Government could 
avoid trouble by quite a modest out- 
of-court settlement — perhaps less 
than half the £50 million it offered as 
its contribution to an ITC agreement. 
The creditors could then use this 
settlement as a lever under other 
obstinate governments. 



Our fund 



plus the bes 
of the rest. 






a -\ 

w 


The newly formed Oppenheimer l nit 
Trust Portfolio Management Service will appeal 
to those investors with £10.000 or more who 
seek capita! appreciation from a portfolio of unit 
trusts invested around the world. The advantages 
of this service for professional advisers inelude:- 

4CTH I'. 4\Q /MO/.I ED \l 4\AGE\tE\T 
by the team which in 1085 produced “excellent 
overall performance” _ including the !No. I knit 
Trust. 

I / I UK ; i \TFU.tCE\CF. : it‘s our business 
to know on: . impel i tors and we will use ihis 
knowledge (n .-rh-el funds from over 120 other 
groups lo make up at least half of the portfolio. 

BETTER PRO T EC T IO V / \ BEAR \NRKF1> 


& 

F— i 


with the ability logo totally into cash- current !\ 


not possible with a unit trust. 

Q\E POIVT OF 0>\T4CT providing am- 
plified administration and regular valuations. 

To find out how the Oppenheimer b nit 
Trust Portfolio Management Service can benefit 
von and your clients call Graham fTntN 
Hunter on 01-286 2 5 58/255 0/ ' 2 o oO. i 
Or write lo him at 66 Cannon Sn-ct.ri.. 

London EC4. • 


Oppmhrimcr 

J rvTy:' "*■- W'r aW*s » . •• jp. * rc ir- 




J 





FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 




Ec 


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WALL STREET 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


COMMODITIES 


Vork (Renter) — Wall 
Street stocks edged higher 
yesterday m early trading, 
frith IBM again leading the 
actives. 

An initial decline m interest 
rates and oil prices also bol- 
stered values, traders said. 

IBM wa$ np 1 ?k to IS9‘A 
shortly after 10 am in active 
trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average was np 538 points to 


1,83730. with the transporta- 
tion average edging np MO to 
81156 and the utilities aver- 
age rising 0J6 to 186.70. The 
65 stocks average rose 1.45 to 
71461. 

Advancing shares led de- 
dining issues by a margin of 
siv-co-five on volume of 20 
million shares. 

The New York Stock Ex- 
change composite index was 
op 032 to 139.78. 


AOf 

34 


5% 

41 


AMR 

ASA 

Allied Signal 
AfcedSfts 
AJfcChknrs 
Aicoe 
Amtalnc 
Am'rtfe Hs 
Am Brands 
AmSrdcasJ 
Am Can 


AmBPvw 27% 77' 
Am Express 63"» 63 
Am Home 84% 85 ; 

Am Hospital n/a n/a 


% 


Am Motors 
Am Stnrt 
AmTeteph 
Amoco 
Armca Steel 
Asarco 


3% 

41ft 42' 

2<% 25 


9% 

20 '- 


9 


Avon Prods 32% 33 

BMsTstWY 49% 49 

Bankamer 18ft 17! 
Bk ol Bston 37% 38 


50 


Baa tree Fds n/a 
Bern Steel 19% W 
Boeing 57% 581 
BMCasctte 55% 56 : 

Brdgn 61% 62 

Bq Warner 28% 28! 

Bnst Myers 76'j 79! 

BP 33 33* 

Burt tor? inef 40 39k 

Button Ntn 70% 70 

Burroughs 61% 63 
CmpbeHSp 57% 57 


Can Pacific 
Caterpriler 
Celanese 
Centra) SW 31% 33% 


54% 53% 

204% 30Q 


Champion 26% 25 a 

Chase Man 47%. 48% 
Chm Bk NY 54% 54% 
Chevron 38% 38% 


Cftrysfer 
Oftcorp 
OartEqum 22% 22V 


37% 38\ 
61% 61% 


Coca Cola 115% 117% 
40% 39% 


136 134% 

CTmtjra Gas 37% 37% 


Cmb'tnEng 
Comwlth Ed 
Cons Eos 


35% 35% 
33‘i 33% 

44% 44% 


Cn Nat Gas 48 48% 

Cons Power 12% 13 
Cntri Data 22% 21 


Coming & 
CPC Inti 
Crane 
Cm Zeller 


78V, 76% 

67% 67% 

45% 46 
47% 47% 


Dan A Kraft 56% 55' 

Deere 32% 32% 

Delta Air 46% 47 

Detroit Ed 17% 17 % 

Digital Eq 183% 181 

Disney 48% 47% 

DowChem 55% 54! 

Dresser md 18 
Duke Power m 42 
DuPont 79% 79*1 

Eastern At 8% BS 

Estm Kodak 59% 60‘i 

Eaton Corp 73% 73% 

Emerson S 91 91* 

Evans Prod n/a 


18% 


1 & 


r 

9 

* 

Exxon Corp 

58% 

57ft 

; Feti Dpt StS 


80* 

i Firestone 

M% 

24 *i 

1 FgCbtcago 

31% 

31ft 

i Fst lot Bncp 
FgiPonnC 

S4 

63ft 

K¥a 

8% 

fa Fort 

s? 

83% 

FTWaehva 

85% 

45% 

GAFCorp 

69% 

69ft 

GTE Corp 

52 

52% 

Gan Corp 

/?% 

72% 

Gan Dy'rncs 
Gen BectfiC 

84% 

7Bft 

84 

78ft 

Gonlnst 

??% 

2tW 

GanM95 

74 

73 

Gen Motors 

81 

81% 

GnPbUtny 

19% 

19% 

Genssco 

2ft 

2% 

George) POc 

32 

32H 

, GUeto 

91% 

9t% 

GceCncti 

40% 

41 

Goodyear 

Goukfmc 

31% 

27ft 

31ft 

27 

Grace 

57ft 

58% 

GtABiTac 

2?ft 

23% 

Gr-tmd 

37% 

37ft 

GnonanCor 

28% 

28« 

GutlSWaa 

SRft 

5»% 

HemzHJ. 

41% 

41ft 

Hercules 

49% 

48H 

fTtett-Pkrt 

47 

45% 

Honeywefl 

7C lotto 

77% 

44% 

75ft 

43% 

tnqerso* 
(raid Steel 

64 

?4K 

64ft 

23% 

IBM 

1S7% 

155 

knHarvtr 

n/a 

n/a 

ISCQ 

m 

14ft 

hit Paper 

58% 

58% 

im Tei Tel 

47Y, 

48% 

Irvmg Bara 

55ft 

54% 

jnrrsn & Jbn 

68ft 

66% 

Kaeer Alum 

21% 

21ft 

Karr McGee 

29S 

29ft 

KmOlyOrk 

84ft 

8«ft 

K Mart 

46% 

47% 

Kroger 

LT.V. Corp 

Sift 

ft 

52ft 

8ft 

Litton 

90% 

91ft 

Lockheed 

54% 

54% 

Lucky Sira 
Man H over 

2Sft 

56ft 

26 

56% 

ManviPeCp 

3% 

3ft 

Mapco 

43% 

43S 

Marine Abd 

55% 

55ft 

Mrt Marietta 

4?ft 

42% 

Masco 

56 

56ft 

McOoraiefl 

85ft 

86% 

Mead 

48% 

48% 

Merck 

177% 

176% 1 

MmstaMng 

102ft 

103 

Mobil CM 

?9ft 

29% 


61% 

63% 1 

Morgan J.P. 

85ft 

85ft , 

Motorola 

49% 

48% 1 

NCR Coro 

53 

50ft 1 

NL/ndsfra 

J3’i 

13K 

NatDistks 

42% 

42% 

Nat Med Ent 

?4% 

24ft 1 

NatSrocndt 

14ft 

14% 

Norfolk Stn 

92ft 

92% 

NWBancrp 

38 'i 

38ft k 

Ocoont Pet 

75 ft 

25ft h 

Ogden 

Oen Corp 

29% 

44% 

28ft b 
44% k 

Owens-t0 

73W 

73% r 

PacGasB 

??% 

22% S 

Pan Am 

Oft 

6% S 

Penney J.C. 

70ft 

71 T 

Psnnzod 

49*i 

50ft V 

Pepasco 

93 

94% M 


9 9 


63% 

27% 

65% 

10 % 

62% 

65% 

75% 


Sera Lee 
SFESopec 


Pfizer 
PMp&DgO 
PhtfpMre 
PttffcaPet 

Polaroid 
PPG W 
PrdrGn*l 
PbSE&Q 37 
Raytheon 64% 
RCA Corp 64ft 
Ryote Met 45% 
flodrauf hit 48% 
Dutch 79 
39% 
61% 

, 35 

SCM n/a 
SeMUerser 30% 
Scott Paper 57% 
Seagram 60% 
Sears Rticfc 44% 
StaU Trans 48% 
Stnger SIS 

SnitSln Bk 95% 
Sony 22% 

smcaa 29% 

Sperry Corp 55% 
SwOvOtao 44% 
SwrtmgDr^ 48% 

45% 
357% 
37% 
33% 


33% 

64 

51 

99% 

63% 

173% 

24% 

53% 

23% 

20 % 

51% 

22 % 

45% 

58% 

93% 

54% 

37% 

70% 

797, 

56 

27% 


Stevens. 


Fargo 

UsaB 


62% 

38% 

67 

10 % 

62% 

86 

74% 

37% 

64% 

64ft 

45% 

47% 

80% 

39% 

60% 

35% 

r £ 

57% 

60 

44% 

47 

51% 

95% 

21 % 

30% 

54% 

44% 

46% 

34% 

46% 

346% 

37% 

32% 

30% 

140 

34 

64% 

51% 

99% 

62 

173% 

23% 

52 

23% 

20 % 

52 

21 % 

46% 

58% 

92% 

54% 

36% 

71% 

79% 

58% 

26% 


CANADIAN PRICES 


isw 


9l Tele 


naioe 


a 

$ 

n/a 

Z 

Z 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

"/■ 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 

n/a 


• E> ctiv a Asw4 cEidsmuMa bta kM«utcusca 1 Urn csoe. p Sfflc* sen (Trani f Umarim 


25% 

43% 

18 

n/a 

17% 

18% 

26% 

32 

36ft 

42% 

43ft 

305 

35% 

84 

26% 

29V. 

36ft 

13ft 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Market raws 
dafsiann* 
April 23 

N York 15165-1.5285 
Montreal 21136-2. (287 


Mwket r at es 


Amsdam3.74244.7B17 
(sets 67. 


Brussels 67J&£&31 


Anri: 23 
tW-IASH 

2.1250-2.(287 

3.7611-3.7659 

68.CC-68.17 


1 north 

053-tL50prom 


Snonfla 
1.27-1 -22pre»n 


OS&O.MtPBm 0394}.23pram 

1%-tftpram 4%*% 


C'phgen 12^905-123982 12J81-12M 

Dub* 1B985-1.1DSS 1.1013-1.1023 


Frankfurt 3 J1 94-35496 
Lisbon 209.82-22058 

Madrid 211.81-214 


Tokyo 254.48-256-76 
Vienna 23^523.51 
Zunch 2.7793-27985 


17-igprem 

4-3prem 

6-18tUs 

Ift-lftoren 

18548009 

SWOttis 


3537M3415 
209.76-220 J8 
21243-2(2.72 

MflanM 2Z7aHW302.74 2286.7822 95.86 Ifid* 

Oslo ! 0.6050-10.5774 i MB -AW 

Pans 10^070-10.6692 

sntm 10.7373-10.8041 107761 J0.7S8S %-ftcts 

256-36-256-70 

23.4fi-23.50 
£78800.7987 

Rates unified by Bereiay* Bank HOFEX and EattL Uoyda Bank In ter nU cm a l 
<*MBM|B8fv rf™pai edwilli1*75— SMpat7S.7(dayftfteig»754-75.7j. 


1%-l%prem 


4l41prati 

9V8 

12-36*8 

4ft-4ftpr*m 

430-1 140dw 

1QS-22Sda 

11-19dts 

mss 

7V6ftorem 

avafttrom 


12%-11%prem 31%-27ftprem 
l%-1%pretn 45i-3ftprem 


MONEY- MARKETS AND GOLD 


Base Rates % 

Clearing Bads tflft 
France House 12% 

Biaccunt Market Loans % 

OvenroM High: 11% Low 10ft 
Weekf*ed:fivs 

Ttaaawy BOa (Osawnt %) 

fmn$ 10ft imIS 10 3 i* 

3mnth 10 3mnth 9ft 

Prinw Bank BHa (Dixount %) 

1 mnth 10V10 "m 2mnth fOft-KHw 
3mnth IO'ifl-10 fimnft 9'>v9ft 

Trade BBS (Dficount %) 

1 mnth 11 2rrehh 10ft 

3 mnth 10 n m 6 mnth W tt 

Interbank (%] 

Ovorreghc open 1 1 % dose 1 1 % 

Iweek 11%-11ft 6 mnth Ififift 
1 mm h lOft-IO^v 9 mnth 9%-9ft 
3 mnth 10%-l0ft 12mth 9"«-9*« 

Local AuthwifrDapoactefft) 

2 days lift 7 days lift 

1 mnth 10% 3mmh 10% 

6 mnth SX 12mth 9 

.'A 10*4-10% 
6mntti 9V9% 

12 mm 9%-flii 

3 mnth lOft-IOft 
12mm 9ft-9% 

3rrt«n 6B5-6.60 
J2mth 5.75-6,70 


BJRO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


Cotter 

7 days eft-fi"* 

3 moth 6**0"* 


7 days 4ft-4« 

3 moth «V4ft 
French Franc 
7 days 7ft-7% 

3 mnth 7V7% 
Swiss Pine 
7 days SV8% 
3imth 4^«4ft 
Ton 

7 days 4 ’>i* 4 u «6 
3 mnth 4%-4% 


cat 
1 mnth 
6mntfi 
caH 
i mnte 
6 mnth 
oil 
1 mnth 
6 limit 1 
call • 

1 mnth 
6 mnth 
cat 
imnth 
6 mnth 


7%-fift 

e'ft*- 11 * 

6«w".. 

4%-3% 
A" /»-«•* 
4%-4% 
BK-7X 

7«n-"^ 

7V,-7ft 

2 %- 1 % 

4%-4ft 

4%-J 

5%-4% 

4 1 s«- l >w 

4"i»-4 s ie 



1.38S-13BS5 

Singapore 

2.1870*2-1890 

Malaysia 

29475^5495 

0.729541.7305 


1.3915-1-3925 

Sweden 

Noway „ 

7,0675-7-0775 

fi98DO6fiS50 

Denmark, 

West Germany __ 

8^975^-1026 

Z.19QH.1915 

- 1fi2SO-ffi3O0 

Mtertrrkiwrlo 

. . 94730-24750 


fi<S75^9S2S 

Japan ISTSO-lfifiOO 

B^juratComrn) 

IBWA - lWBtu 

44,67-44.72 

7.7780-7.7800 

Portuga! _ ' _ 

Span 

— — 14590-147.00 
139S5-13950 



OTHER STERLING RATES 



„ ...9486741811 


, . fl571ft4L57Sl 


_ 2395-21. 11 




75565-7^65 


Hong Kong doBar .. 
favSartsieB 

11fi57-11fi69 

1850-18.70 

Kuwait tfnarKD 

0.43404L4380 

3884M.M0B 


7BO.frfiiaO 

Ne# Zealand doaar 

2-8679-29683 

■?*»mA5B7D 


_ 3^351^3405 

Souto Africa rand 

3X1674-3. 0819 


UAEtteham — .. 


$5570^5970 


GOLD 


I Authority 

imnth 11-10% 

3 mnth 10V10% 
Smith 9ft-8ft 
SWribig COs(%) 
imnth I0ft-t0% 
6 mnth 9 rj i6-9 l, i, 

DolarCDs(%) 

1 mnth fl. 75-6.70 
6 mnth 6050 00 


Gok£S344 30-845.00 
K ni g w ran d* (per eornL 
S 3S.7&34725 (£225.00-226.00) 
s' (new): 

125) 

» VAT 


The prices and nnft.trast 
. quotations on this 
page refer to 
Thursday’s trading 


“"SSSS?*" 

G W Joymonand Co ite# 
SUGAR <R»w) 

^rrrir.iSuSS 

Aug — 191-.4-90LO 

194.4-S3XJ 

_fS6.4^D 

20O&»0 

- — 280 


£?- 
Dec — 
March 
May — 

vofc — 


M» 


jmy 

OK. 


March . 
May— 


1374-69 

ISMS 

1381-80 

U15-H 

144545 

1463-61 

1479-78 

-_etsa 


COPSE 


229088 


July, 


Nov. 


Jw. 

March 


_ 2408-05 
-345W1 
_ 2485-85 
2530-500 
2550480 
L~i4753 


SOYABEAN 
Jwe- — — 


Dec. 

Fab 


2&3&r* 

„ 23JJ0-60 
2350^-2 
2450-2&5 


April - 
June. 
Vot _ 


27 

. 28jMF81i> 
— TOO 


QASOfl. 
May 


Jtma 

July 


148A4&SD 

isssoasa 

130250000 

lSO2fi3OD0 

isu»ooag 

131J5-S1JJ0 

idAotraiso 

135JKF3£» 
14000-33^0 


u * ax SSSS-,SS^ se 

QtMd Iftwrilp— 
Prica i n t pT wPki Mane _ 
Star in pwca par bay 
IMoN WWr A cn. UA rapart . 

ggggjjabtm, 

.4850 
.QUM 

Three MflteW 


imanaadm. 

Mai — 

Tana -■ ■■ 


1W . 
Tcra). 

VH 


MS 


.Su9BMM 


Three Month* - 
Viol.. 

Tun* 

LEAD 
Cash 


Three Months — 
Voi 


-0 
_ 2100 
.atet 


Tone. 

ZHCSrANDfflD 
r»c*> - . - — 40030-4100 

Months- 

vd, 


Tone 


.Mb 


aSBMGM GRADE 

rim • 4330434J0 

T^, Months -443W0 

Ufj ■ 4700 

9LVERIAROE _ 

Cash 32HH5H 

Three Morahs _ S37.M3ttO 
yw - — " 

rrrrroSte 


7dne 

SAVER SMALL 

cash 

Three Mo«hs— 337J133S.0 
VU — ** 


ECGD 


Rxed Rata Sterling Export Finance 
Schema rv Average reference rate lor 
interest pertoo March S. 1986 to 
Aprs 1. 1968 nciuaive: 11677 par 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Three Meath Starting 

Jun B6 

Sep 86 91.15 

Dec 86 9123 

Mar 87 91.25 

Jim 87 91.13 

9090 


teen «gb 

55B 9c5s 


ML- 

Th 

Junes 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

US Trenory Bond 

Jun 86 

Sep 68 

Dec 86 


ilntsrest 17853 

8331 
9332 
932) 
8300 


91.16 

9127 

9125 

91.13 

9090 


Lew 

9031 

9053 

9120 

91.17 

90.96 

9090 


EatVoi 

8022 2446 

00.98 584 • 

91.12 13* : 

81.12 36 

90.96 38 

90.73 12 


Short GK 
Jim 86 — 
Sep 86- 
Dec 88— 


Long (9 
JunSS 


Sap 86 — 

Ok 86 

Mar 87 

Fr-seioo 

Jun 86 

Sep 88 


100-10 


10340 

103-53 

WT 


127-05 

127-18 

V 

16320 

NfT 


Previous day's total open Interest 1 91 37 
9331 S324 9324 2296 

9333 9326 9326 1483 

93-21 93.17 93.14 305 

9330 92-96 9231 79 

Previous dtnr's total tnen Interest 8141 
100-17 9M0 98-30 6745 

98-03 0 

<• 97-10 0 

Prewu# ttev's total open interest 1182 
10340 103-22 103-18 191 

103-53 103-53 103-36 10 


Piwtous day 'a tool open interest 13635 
127-00 12S-06 126-12 7367 

127-18 12628 126-20 3 

126-19 0 

126-19 0 


IK. 10 


Previous total open interKM 656 


ifiij 


1&2.65 

16420 


794 

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10125 9M0 

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March 10US MB 20 


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1012 1018- 
106.7 1028 

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102.0 WS 
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£ per tome 

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May 

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Apr* 

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1274)0 ^1iJ0 
158.50 MUD 
17090 IPSO 
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Apr as gmftn 10 orzo 
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Oct 88 73t.07l5.8-* 7218 
Jan 2 73*8-7288. TOO 
Apr 87 7S6.D 

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FINANCIAL THUSTS 



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'a* a* 37? 
40 4.1 134 
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S 

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- 25 2*344 
flSTO 172*3 
USb MU 
323 OB ISA 
otA arjt a 
to* 07 *0 
08 BOBO* 

ML 01 31 A 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


M Oner Chng Ud 


ABBEY tear TRUSTMANAOSte 

1 na. Boumemxm BHB S4L 


to. H o ua mw n ha Be 
0345 717373 (Uridine) 


Gdt * Food 

z&zx* 

AnwncM Growth 
Assn Paorfic 
Asms * Earns 
Casual Ksvrrt 
Cum 0 Enetm 
EiropMn Caotai 
Cm ws 

Jtpwi 

l« Growth tnc 
Do ACcum 
US Enanng Co’s 
Etjurss rtofiws 
MastsiMAcc 


1230 131.0a 
338 997 e 
1B4L2 1928 c 
15B5 1635 
41.3 44J 
970 104J5C 
646 66.0a 
ESI noa 

89. Q 946a 

1376 I47.f -Z6 289 

672 719 ‘ =1.1 
91.7 96 da -0 8 1B6 
l31fi Mtia • -4)9 l OM 
5B.1 Bit -01 0.42 
1939 2965c -35 343 

619 660 -06 15ft 


.. SIB 
-OB 496 
-10 503 
-24 233 
*0 6 293 
-12 120 
-01 1 55 
-1 7 254 
-1.2 159 


AIDED OMIM UMTimOTS 
*1ll Dunbar Centre Swindon SNi 1EL 
0793 610366 & 0793 20291 


First Tn«t 
Growth 0 income 
Casas) Trust 
BeJmcnd 
Acc um T rus t 
Amancsn bconv 
Hqh moons Tn 
Ecwty mows 
%g!t YIsH 
Govt Secs Trial 


Jsoai Find 
Paaflc Truri 
Anar Sod Stt 
Saa OlAnar T« 
Md Assst VHDS 

(Growth 
_ • Cd% 

3rd SnuDri Co s 
Pscorory Turn 
Mel Hn A entry 
O’uss Eantngs 
DOWTSI 


2251 2307 
1355 1443a 

231.0 2469a 

363.1 3867 
5407 5043 

30 4 32.4 
249.6 2659a 
1365 1475 
1424 157.7# 
30.7 320# 
773 B23 
92.1 961 
1512 1619 
659 699# 

210.1 22L7 
2279 3*27 

362 399a 
1156 123.1 
1523 1622# 
815 MO# 
712 643# 
1859 I960 
919 *7J# 
1262 1359 


Tarimriogr Tu 

mcona &*mr« 

EasniotSinaBarCa'S 22BB 2349# 
USA&snw Tram 33ZA 3523# 
arbutmnot sECunmes 
131. RraBunr Psvamant. unkn EC2A 1AY 
01-628 9670 01-280 85*00/2/3 


-02 3.19 
-1 9 115 
-37 265 
-59 393 
-07 191 
-0A 4 17 
-29 469 
-07 406 
-1.1 548 
.. 9.00 
-1 1 108 
-20 Otft 
-25 1.11 
-07 1.18 
-Z5 0.70 
-25 113 
-00 283 
-04 206 
-03 247 
-09 2« 
-1.1 235 
-10 299 
-13 093 
-09 522 
-06 274 
-3.7 130 


Crew Growth Inc 
Do Acorn 
Easterr- A Inn 
Do6% WHnrewsl 
finance 0 Property 
dt A Fraud Income 
Do Accum 
1 Income 
1 Accum 
1 Yleid Income 

1 Accum 
Wl Accum 

Oo5%UMKM 
Manned Fraxl 


■w; 

X! 


582 622 
SS9 B95 
DBA 1244 

82.4 667 
SSO SI 7 
513 549e 
640 BH9e 
752 90.4 c 

1742 1B03C 
73 0 769 
1*1.1 2043 

74.1 783 
7D4 75 2 

59.4 629 

29.1 31.1# 

DO Accum 823 99 7# 

Smalm Coe Mom 1375 147 Oe 
world Psmy Stars 90 10.4 
ftxflWO 7* UK 777 605 
PorCDiO Tst JBOan 679 901 
PortcHoTaus 89.4 7?9 
Ronfett T# &nope 10*A 1081 
PdrvaCo Tst MK 373 305 


-1.1 106 
-•3 155 
-21 091 
-13 091 
-09 233 
-01 60S 
-0.1 805 
-09 490 
-23 490 
-03 7.7 1 
-03 7.71 
-1.0 232 
-19 232 
-03 
■MM ID 40 
-Mwrare 
-05 138 
*0.1 1.17 
-1.2 160 
-13 010 
-1.1 110 
-03 0.10 
.. aio 


1 Gtanflrisa St EdrtMOh BO 6VY 
(Dsslsr*93)>226 8068) 


031-225 2581 
MEiOb 
Japan & 1*31 
UK Ex (3 Tl 
P«i P»«W Ml 
F« ten* UK 
BG America 

BG Energy 
BG Incoma Gra# 
BG Juotn 
BG TeOnotogv 


4157 *337 
3*23 357.1 
2203 2345c 
4489 4719 
1935 2099 
1016 1723 
1229 129 B 
1959 2003# 
1495 1S9 1 
1574 1675c 


1 17 

oae 

TOO 


-25 054 
-QB 153 
-15 495 
-33 000 
•29 290 


BACTIC TRUST UAMAQEHS 

25/26 Albewnsne ScraeL London W1X «aO 

01-491 0295 

American 409 523 -09 001 

Ausetfai IS 6 219 -0.1 2.78 

Jmmn A S«W 88* 6*9 -1.7 0.t7 

won Income 459 48 1 -04 739 

WWmHDOna] That TS5 806 -93 1.07 

Income Gm Tat 40.6 53 1 -9 * 24* 

Q*a A FhM *11 673 716# -OB 5A4 

GMW Mertieta 350 375a -09 197 

Stmeal Saanons *43 47Ac -03 r38 

SAMCLAYS Wacom 
LMcwn Hri«e. 352 acrotort Re E7 
01-534 55*4 


America 
Aust Accum 
Do Incorae 
ere*# 
ExmrOt That 
Extra taeome 


500 


6*3 89B 
1383 1*79 
96.7 1049 
6S9 749 
419.9 446.7# 
741 789# 

2349 2499 
2602 2769 
1389 144.6# 
57 4 601 
137 7 t*64# 


Gar A Fired Inc 
Jaoan « Gan me 
Do ACC 

Growth Accum 
Worm Trust 
Laoum Trim 
Smcw 5dUBaaro 

TTusftirLjnd 
Uw Tesh Accum 
Do Incorae 

W u rto u e Trust _ _ 

B’Tflftw Fund are 3)96 2326# 
Do me 207 1 2203# 


13B3 146.0# 
1768 1902# 
3279 3487 
783 643 
137.7 1*B4 
1896 201.7 
1077 11*5 
517 509 
SIS 5*7 
1*47 1539 


-14 108 
-12 103 
-19 193 
-13 299 

-5* 353 
-05 532 
-11 298 
-29 307 
-19 112 
9.13 
-19 0.18 
-B8 MB 
-29 Z4» 
-73 160 
-19 133 
-13 832 
-49 254 
-17 2« 
-ftO 031 
-08 031 
-39 091 
-69 132 
-44 132 


680 

620# 

-1.7 

030 

498 

532 

-04 

030 

5*5 

SOS# 

-0« 

s*o 

11Z.7 

119* 

-11 

090 

625 

8 72 

-13 

230 

B»5 

ei4 

-1.7 

030 

TBS 

04 0# 

-18 

030 

100 7 

107.1# 

-00 

080 

713 

7»9 

-14 

030 

400 

S2* 

-09 

1.80 

63.0 

BtL3# 

+ai 

zro 


8AJBNG FUND MANAGERS 
PO flew 156. Bettenhan. UM B83 4X0 
01-656 9002 
AuitnM 
Eastern 
Emny income 

Europe 
Growth A me 
Japan Spurn 
Japan Sisvm 
Fast Europe 
Fra Japan 

Fra N Amor 
first SlMUrn CO'S 

B«inW<mM MANABBIOrr 
10. Freemreh SL London Btt 
01423 0000 

nmre nr 1210 1220 *13 226 

Euoprwi Me 673 922 -BO 1.18 

Do Accuh 107.7 1147 -19 1.10 

Gerw# he 1569 168.1 -33 206 

Do Ace an 2iiJ 22*9 -3.1 208 

GdYlekJtne 1206 13* * *0.1803 

Do Aeeum 7094 19S3 +8) 993 

Hrii Yw« he 886 942# -00 058 

Do Accum 1708 1815 -19 558 

Jam income 2090 Z2i2e -16 1.11 

Do Acorn 210.8 2229c -1.7 l it 

N Ammtn tne 469 *85 >19 098 

DO Aaam 517 573 -15 098 

p»anc mama mo 12D9# -i 8 022 
OP Aeeum 13 63 I3t1 -20 B22 

SnwrCosIre 74.0 796 -03 174 

Du Accum 87 9 816c -02 1.74 

SHITAHMA UNIT TRUST 
74-78 FnsOury Psvemsm Umoon EC2* 1JO 
01-568 2777 P ste rg gi-CM 0*78/9 MumjiGurie 
08004)10-333 

Growhi 04 56 9 56.6 -ML1 0*1 

triHSCriwy 1101 1174# -MM Z52 



Bra 

Otter 

Cling Yld 

Smaller COS 

1373 

1465 

-1.1 133 

UK Grown 

304 

41.1# 

-00 187 

Extra Me 

61.7 

95. B 

-0.1 081 

0# 

279 

2a* 

. 734 

uic 4 Growth 

1963 209*# 

■41 *35 

Net Htti Me 

Prat 9w*s 

19S6 2098# 

-15 4*7 

194 

207 

.. 9*1 

CcmmOOK 

1109 

1206# 

-1* 272 

FManate Sees 

*5.1 

4&1 

-0* 230 

Dote* Gen 

167 

180 

-07 378 

Mi Leave 

100 

171 

-03 053 

Prop Snarm 

GD0 

6*8# 

-05 1.13 

Ore* Energy 

Wold Tete 

363 

*30 

394 

469 

-OS 1*0 
-0* 0*2 

Am«r Grown 

333 

995# 

-09 336 

Am# Mcome 

673 

01.1# 

-Ol 5.41 

Am# Smaa# Co e 

237 

2S3 

-02 as 

A us? Growdi 

72.0 

769# 

-OB ICO 

Euro Smaa# 

14.7 

19.7 

-02 022 

Far&« 

41 1 

430 

-07 132 

Hone Kong Prt 

Ind Growth 

233 

337 

2*9 

359# 

-03 2*8 
-0 7 18* 

Joan Pert 

as 

623 

-13 .. 

Japan Smear 

I4S 

-03 .. 

Exempt 

6*2 

602c 

-1* 357 

Ex mot Mart# 

6*7 

67.7 

.. 4.14 


BROWN 6WPUY 
9-17. Perormount Rd. Hsy 
0444 456144 
Fmancal 
Growth Accum 
Do Income 
Wgn income 
Moomf 

Man Poreoio he 
Do Acc 


Onem 
Recrwerr 
Technotogy 
Gernii 


1225 

2019 

1299 

064 

717 

ffifi 

106.4 

006 

713 

409 

1405 

HI 


1316 

318-9# 

1386# 

714# 

««S# 

664 

1147 

653 

7Mc 

419 

1587# 

363c 


-13 “ 

-1 3 1.79 
-OB 028 
-1.1 526 
-19 *3B 

-tSl* 

-03 020 
-00 332 
-2.1 090 
-19 190 


BUCKlIASTBt MANAtStBIT 

Ti# Stock Exchange London EC2P 2IT 

01-588 2866 


General he {*) 
Do Acamt (*i 
income pm] 13) 
Do Acaim 13) 
MB Inc |a 
Do Acam (2) 
Snuiarinc(5) 
Do Acorn (5) 


2139 2210 

v; s 35ii 

1019 1063# 
1766 1685c 
1225 1Z&4 
1821 1605 
E10.78 11.45 
E71JB 1210 


-22 297 
-14 897 
.. 5.16 
.. 5.16 
.. 191 
.. 191 
.. 280 
.. 200 


125. Man HotKm. London WC1V 6PY 
■ * 12 114 


01-2*2 1140 
CS Japan Fund 


729 774 -1.1 038 


CANNON FUND MANAGERS 
L OrgtgcWey. Wembley. HA8 ONB 

Growth 2820 3008 -31 289 

3203 3483 -29 393 

17*6 1869# +4)1 041 

14*0 isio# -i5 an 

CAffL (JAMS) MANAGEMENT 

no BOX 551 Bare Merita umden EC3 74a 
01-627 0011 

Captor 364.4 3696# -14 167 

hcomn 284.4 3042# -20 438 

Narh Amencsn 2724 2314# -63 13* 

CATS) ALLEN 

1. Mng UMkam SL EC*N 7AU 
01-62J 6314 

Git Trust 10SL9 1162 +0.11030 

CENTRAL BOARD OF FINANCE OF 
CNUNCH OF S« 

77 London M EC2 1DB 
01-568 IBIS 

tnv Fond 41405 .. 4.17 

Filed im 1*3 75 e . . 80S 

Deposit 1000 . . 1200 

CHARGES OFFICIAL INVESTMENT FUND 
77 London WNL London EC9N IDS 
01-566 IBIS 

Income 375 7 • ..474 

Accum £10.7265 .. .. 


CLBUCALM8NGAL UNIT TRUST 
MANAOeRS 

Narro w Pte . Bristol BS2 OJH 
0800 373393 

Mm Growth 2*8 20 2 

Easy High income 422 449 

Eriuoaon Grow* 25.1 38 

Greer# eomty 375 401 

Oh « Aum « 25.0 273 

G# t Rodim GW 303 323 

rnomi Seombea 2S0 26 Be 

Japan teowth 269 30 


COUNTY HANK IMT TRUSTS 
1ST. Oveosda. Lenoon EC2V 6EU 
oi-r 


Ceprial Accum 
Energy Tnre 
Eoxa ricome 
finanoaj 
GW Skstagy 
G rowth hi ye se nen t 
Encotna * Grow Vi 
Japanese 0 Pacriic 
Nth Amec Growth 


smaoer Co s 
Glob# Me Tst 


2663 2832C 
411 458 
1639 1733# 
1S39 1637 
564 581 
2912 3034 
40.7 CL2C 
1317 1*01 
1029 1034c 
1079 114 7 
1950 2DB2 
5&7 Q03# 


CROWN UNIT TRUST SERVICES 
Crown Hmsb. WokMg GU2l ixw 
0*662 5033 

S 5 asft«# 

2202 2355 
1291 1381 


mgh BKcme Trust 
Growth Trosi 
American Trust 


-430 190 
-03 430 
-09 206 
-415 270 
. . 950 
-0.1 HO 
-02 230 
-04 090 


-22 107 
-09 496 
-11 491 
-03 267 
*0.1 131 
-45 222 
-0.7 4.AQ 
+09 006 
•19 006 
-10 I 80 
+19 193 
-04 5.73 


-33 S.I2 
-45 106 
-15 072 


EF*I UNT TRUST MANAGERS 
e. U fa beseem. Emneurgn 
031-226 3492 


Amencre Ravi 
Carnal Fund 
Gmrih 0 mt Fred 
t+gh DHt Fred 
Manaeenei Hmd 
Revxaem Free 
9n* Jap Cot Fn> 

To*yc Kind 
IE« Aw| 

gial ... 

’§5 


70.1 750 
MS 07.1a 
1310 1401 
1083 1150c 
1820 19*7 
188 21.1# 
800 329 
1323 (*£( 
1409 1517# 
965 999 
2435 te«4 


-10 227 
-03 1.75 
-15 428 
-03 553 
-25 I TS 
-04 213 
■03 .. 
-27 0 . 18 
.. 197 
03* 
+B4 041 

+55 O10 
-02 159 

EAGLE STAR tOriT TRUST MANAQS1S 

Ban row. P ro — ire . Garenter gibs 7ua 

02*2 621311 

UK Baencad Me 669 7*5 

Op A«um so 745 

UK Growth Aoctsn 783 BBSs 
UK noi Me Inc 6*4 68.7 b 
N American ACCWI 630 600 
Fw Eastern Accum 740 TOO 
CurtSKorr Aeeum 73.6 TBS 
n Me 500 607 

Do Acorn s&S 8a? 

EKHfflANCE FUND MANAOEMENT LTD 
AOmn Cretro. Hmegan Hoop, 23. WesMrn 
Rood. Romford RM13LB 
07D856M 

e>dira>CB 1031 1108 .. 126 

gHWAteEUWW AP WS TRATION 
35. Fareoan 5 l UanaxisNr 
061-236 3685 

EOreatm firican 735 7H2# -1.7 399 


-00 20B 
-06 MB 
-06 150 
-OS 599 
-DO 147 
-14 0.63 
-14 1 II 

;i H* 


Bid on# Chng Yld 


tore Meeme Triad 712 60.1 -07 496 
OP A fhmj M 562 594 . . 794 

Tst 01 Inv Trusts 640 899 -05 190 

Sped# S*» Trust 75* 803 -15 237 
Ndt Ant# Trust 579 61.7 -0.6 1.79 

Far Eastern True* 715 70.1 -09 072 


EOUTTYALAW 
St Qarega Mae 
190 

0203 553231 
UK Griw« aeeum 
Or Means 
Inc Acerei 


G tfU Q ra B un SL Coreefry CVl 


"«r. 


Gire/Raed Acorn 
Do ncm 
Nth Amer T# Aecrei 
Far East T« Accum 
Euro Tst Accun 
General Tnat 


145.7 1549# 
1260 1940# 
230 2 2513# 

191.6 2039# 
1045 1109 

094 84.1 
1379 1402# 

129.7 137.9# 
1*73 1586# 
2282 2439# 


-25 3.40 
-22 840 
-32 4.78 
-27 4.76 
-02 

-ai 

-21 014 
-23 037 
-13 1.18 
-49 273 


FOCUMT MANAGEMENT 

). Uinncs Anw ML London EC*R DBA 

01-623 4680 

-12 039 
-1.7 041 
-09 454 
-04 036 
-1.1 3.88 


. Fred 74.1 799 

cap## Fred 108.7 1142# 
Income Rate 609 085# 

Far Eastern Fund 677 725 

Omnas Incoma 65.7 703 

FhedMarast 00 7 6*5 

natural Rat Fred 387 41.1 

Empaan Mcome 71.7 7*9 

FStNVESTBteVTMANAGSte 


-05 0.00 
-0.4 +67 
-12 323 


190 Was) Gera SL Gtaegow G2 2P* 
0)1-332 3132 


Btevraad Gth Me 

42J 

4&*B 

220 

Oo Aoeum 

43 2 

46*» 

Income GBi Me 

4)5 

4 62 

UO 

Oo Acswn 

42.4 

4S.1 

Serve* Co s Me 

44.4 

672 

180 

Oo Accun 

44.7 

*78# .. 


nDBJTYMTBMATKMAL 
Rh# WMl TMridOR 7V» 1DY 
0732 362222 

American 1009 1008 

Am# Eo#ty Income 31J 34.1e 
Am# Spacial &6s 52.1 GS9c 

Fv East Me 
G* & nraw 
Doe* 8 I neon# 
japan Sped# $» 

Japan Tnat 
Managed kn Tat 
Me* mcome 1 


30j 6 329 
314 3231 
99.4 1064 
30 305 
107.7 1152 
1325 1419 
725 77.7 
335 36.0 
Saudi Era AsM Tst 20.1 Z7.B 
154.1 1655 




FLEMNO (ROBERT) 

3. Crosby Sa London GC3A BAN 
01539 5659 

American Exempt 0094 374.7# 
Jap#l Exempt T3459 3S9 
Am Properly T*t 510795 9 

Property That 00330 • 


-19 057 
ms 480 
-04 042 

-as 4.1B 
-01 875 
-25 427 
-08 .. 
-19 .. 
-22 014 
-07 590 
-1.1 2TS 
-0.1 072 
-29 0.73 


130 

1.13 

7.75 

810 


3- London <nm 
EC2M 5NQ 
01528 5181 
An# 0 Gre Inc 
Do Accun 
AmmrTunmmC MC 
Do Aoean 
Cept# Tet Me 
Do Aeeum 
Com# a g» Me 
Do Accum 
Extra eic TM Me 
Do Acerei 
mcome Trust 
Da Accum 
hn Growth Fd Me 
Do Aeeum 
Jatksn A Gen me 
Do Accum 

Fd 


BUgs. London WM. London 


Do Aeeum 
European Me 
Do Acerei 


2239 2372 
2279 3*2-7 
21 14 2252 
2164 2322 
1906 2029# 
2299 24*2# 
889 9*4 
1169 1234 
1559 18*0 
16*9 1752 
1164 1239 
1206 1204 
1509 1890# 
T7B4 1679# 
73.0 776 
736 784 
7S2 909# 
1352 1*30 
1*02 1964 
550 SO* 
950 504 


-43 056 
-40 058 
-39 MS 
-4.1 1.15 
-13 199 
-14 190 
.. 523 
.. 623 
-19 447 
-2.1 447 
-19 *95 
-1.7 *95 
-33 090 
-37 9.00 
-14 098 
-12 098 
-0.6 *73 
-19 176 
•21 1.75 
-09 0B7 
-05 087 


Pamm End. Darting, sunny 
0)06 885095 


FP 5B*Y Dot 
Do Accum 
FP Fixed Ml Dot 
Do Accum 
S ri wa r m up Dot 
DO Acerei 


1881 2102c -44 zsr 
3279 347.1 e -72 297 
120.1 127.7# *02 593 
1339 1*1 tc *63 693 
1829 1729 e -19 213 
1675 1779e 


-89 218 


FUNDS 04 COURT 

PutAc marie, w n ga a ay. WG2 

01-405 *300 

Caoril 3*54 357.7# . . 208 

Gross Jnc 550 B 158) .. 7*3 

Mgn Yield 2179 2230 . . 590 

ariMtr MANAGERS _ 

6m Floor. 8. Drronreee 6a. London H2M 4YJ 
11483 2S7S Deamg 01-620 9*31 


UK Cap FT# MC 
DO Acerei 

Moome Fred 
Pennon Ea#rei 


95.1 1018 
1357 1*52 
76.7 6*2 
1609 167.6 
151 T 1623 
605 649C 
705 755# 
1973 211.1# 
61 4 87.1 

«« 


-25 290 
-3* 230 
-19 690 
-22 200 
-05 190 
-09 140 
-9.1 190 
-16 020 
-11 1.03 
-27 070 
-2.1 190 


US A Greer# 

Tetri 6 Growth 
Japan 0 Gen## 

F# East 0 Gen 
Eurooean Fred 
Gvmany Fred 
G4HTM0RE FUND MANAGERS 
Z 9 M#y Are. Umoon EC3A 8B» 

01-623 1212 Oeaeag 01-623 5TWD*e«na 01-622 
5808 

Amman Tran (as OB.i 
Austrorin That 167 209# 

BnMFi Tst Aecom 537 57.4 
Do DNt 47.1 S04 

ComoirrSTm 34.0 573 
European Trust 505 54.1 
Extra w ere * That 47.1 505c 
Far E*stem Treat 1123 1200 
fixed MBTOSt Fund 28.1 2*9# 

GR Trust 280 290# 

GMM FUW Accun 1695 1BI 
Do Ost 1519 161 7 

Gold 6h#e That 11.1 11.8 
Hadasa Amencre 305 3Z5 
Higi Income Trop 1304 1*81 
Neng Kang Trust 201 280 

Marne Free 72.7 779 

Msurrece Agrecrif E45J4 <045 
Trwr 1 2)9 >247 

Managed exempt 2706 801 0# -19 231 
CM r&#rgy Tnat 242 313 -19 1-50 

SpKWStfTTOK 579 84.1 --093 

UK Sn# Cb flee Tat 6*1 637 .. 130 

GOYETT (JOT# UN FT MANAGEMENT 

W n c heai re Has. 77. Undre WML London EC2N 
IDA 

01-566 5620 

MD Growth 77 0 8Z3 

Areun Orowtti 517 08.1 

Amanean me 67 2 710# 

European Grows, 2(n 9 215,9 
Grid 1 MweroM 405 *39 

Jswn Growth 1360 1475 
f Soto MGome «4J 69.1 

UK Speeri Oppa 844 907 

«teUMffl«#IW9te 

EC3P 3DN 

9503 


-0.7 09Q 
-03 035 
-OS 243 
-07 243 
-13 147 

-07 05) 
-05 531 

-13 aio 

*0.1 9.76 
+C1 633 
-2.1 023 
-1.7 023 
-02 250 

.. aio 

+09 537 
*09 131 
-19 33) 
+014 194 

-20 act? 


Md OD# Chng YW 


G#8 fi 

<&pwlh ; 


I fixed M 
Eduriy 
GuereM 
N Anwrere 

Pec*c 

Property Share 

Soma# Cemp#m 
Eucpere Trust 


1250 1309 
239.5 22SO 
2335 3041 
1307 1444# 
1943 2050# 
247.4 2632 
2005 2229# 
229.1 209 


+82 879 
-14 243 
-4.1 291 
-05 190 
-04 042 
-09 150 
-03 191 
-19 095 


0UWME9S HAHON IMT TUteT 
MANAGERS 
PO Bos 4*2. X &t Maryotte. Undon EC3P 

3HJ. 


01-623 8333 
High Income 
N Are# That 

FMoewefY 

GM Trial 
&t Wncret Me 
St Vincent US QM 


549 SBJ# 

113.0 1209# 
1919 2305# 
429 43.7c 

83.1 RT 

789 797 


Tempts mrSmCOa 1024 I7TJ 
Tempts Bar USM 3509 3783 


-1.1 027 
-29 090 
+0.1 24* 
-03 032 
-14 540 
-08 073 
.. xo 

+196 236 


N0MMOB MMK WOT TRU8T MAHUOStt 
Prone# UT aocuv. 5. Rtyritglt Rd. tevnreuM 
Cnw 

0277 217916 
U amhroa Mr Co's 1257 1837 -09 18* 

Hmrot N Am# 689 723 -1.1 03i 

u a w b rns JapOFE 10O9 W79# -13 0*2 
HanAraa Scredwi 789 814 -09 095 

Ha i erioa Brawn 343 1000# -30 0® 
Harmans Canedrin <74 504 -04 198 

Marine Eqrey Me RO 85.1 -05 4*2 

HsmCras Hgn Me 874 fi-1# -02 5.78 

I Me tre s Rea AM 573 619 -09 291 

WBWBHI WW r M Hte _ 

Premier UTranrereraeon 5. r i a yritfi fid. Mrikiri 
Brrenwood Etaes 


0277-2T723B 
Speaal Saa Me 
Oe Acamt 
Reem#rY Tnat 
entel&arih k 
Do Aosxh 


FMendN That 


1»1 1374 
161.3 1BSO 
6B9 1050 
558 685# 
843 085# 
110 8 117.7 
1444 1544 


tacame A GroMh tnc 1*79 1580 


Do Aecrei 
HVi Mcome Trnri 


Sara# CDs DM 

nun 

GW Tnat 

Tn* 


Gucoi Tech 


« 


Eu rop ea n 
Em te* 
Japan Tn* 


3019 
1700 18790 
1819 1739# 
1029 lOOSc 
409 519# 
47.0 499G 
559 583# 
099 069 
1069 1154 
309 429 
*83-1 1737# 
054 089 
3880 3869 
829 88.7* 
23E9 2514# 
002 817 
1379 1*09 
1309 1479 
605 041# 
214 229 
1379 1469 
LI 557# 


-13 085 
-12 036 
-08 130 
-09 136 
-09 190 
-19 343 
-17 848 
-17 39* 
-32 3 Da 
-19 * SB 
+07 441 
-07 5.17 
.. 993 
.. 0.76 
.. 991 
-74 031 
-19 022 
♦07 073 
-09 001 
-14 237 
.. 3.12 
-05 047 
-84 038 
-04 031 
-05 015 
-29 0.01 

-14 046 
-08 49C 
-03 131 
-19 191 
-24 OK 
-T.4 f.Tf 
-14 Olt 
+14 18C 


ssrsjyr 

Atom Srmier Gob 

Am# Racratwy T# H63 1200 
Mte* Meeme Exempt 125.0 U1.6# 

ShBJSsr era Eurept nao 12*3 
Em Exempt 1140 120.S# 

Japan Exaropi 0) 1265 1359 

N Aar 05-7 9 02 

GkM Tech & ffl 89 j0 907 

Pacnc Elan* (§ 1419 MOO# 

MLL SAMUB. UNTT TRUST MANAOCRS 
NLA Tower. MdeccnM Read. Croydon 
01080 43S 01 -SO mi 
ftMsh That Una 5*54 5003 -67 191- 

QretN That LtrtO 905 10*3 -14 231 

Oak# Tn* UriB 1605 132.1# -41 34H 

Tnat 122.7 1304 -09 071 

Tri* 1073 11*2 -1.7 2 Of 

Tn* 3594 3824# -74 2C 

G# Fried Ml Me 30* 310 . . B.H 

*1.1 *73 *02 T23 

689 TOO -07 4K 
01.6 »8c -09 *5! 

1150 1833 -14 Z3< 

305 35.7 -04 OjC 

307 327# -03 25! 
1407 1S29 -54 2JT 

104 924# +0.1 145 
959 101.7 -69 24- 


Oa Grdwtfr 

H«gn vrm dim 
M come Tn* 


... TecftT# 
Nature! Hesotrea 
Beatty Tn* 


32 Queen Area Gere. London SWTH 9AB 
01222 1000 

fl) Bit 0 Oten 1308 1309c -04 170 

g Jten kKome 041 57o# *ana»- 

B Secu rity Glfl 564 534# *02 200 

kM aa wri ni T# Fnd 06.7 709c -09 340 


20. Fgnchuroh SL LrilOOn EC3 
01423 0000 

Are# (Down Me 649 06.7 -04 

_ Do Accre* 662 702 -05 

Free 4xv TH Me t98 212 -0-1 

De Accum 260 Z&S -0.1 

HW Yireo me 130.1 1379 -12 

De Accum 210* zaoc -19 

bn Fricxwery Me 984 10*7 -04 

De Amah 103* 1069 -04 

Jure Groan Me 8S9 91.1# +0.1 
_ Do Acerei 689 914# +0.1 

8nra# con Me i«os iacw» +ar 

Do Aecrei 1054 209.5* *14 

UK Eq Grow# Me 202 302 -05 

Do Accun 464 49.7 -0.7 

WarVmde Tetri Inc 424 45.5 -03 

Do Aeeum 482 459 -03 

L A CIMrr TRUST MANAGEMENT 

S*W’ emm0mmim ' m 

Mcome Fred 4312 *40.1 • ... 

knemet ona l 8 Gan 2)64 2*12 

WDAL .0 teOHL DMT TRUST 


i . 
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Do Income 


270 9 2897 
423 4 4SZJ 
008 660 

062 728 

Far Eastern £SO 009 

G# Tnj# 82J 869# 

In* ringed 725 774 

NartW 56 6 BOA# 

N Aram Trust 73 1 782 

llK Spec* Ste 5)9 689 


-*4 2.11 
-70 111 
-06 *62 
-1.0 I4S 
■04 058 
-03 5.40 
-02 1.17 
-03 on 
-06 24) 
-09 213 


00703 BANK UMTTftUST MANAGERS 
gatewra OpL Qortig^s* wtnwg. 
Susaet 
0*44 4561*4 


Do Accun 
GnergrteT 
Do acerei 
Exn In c o me 
Do Aeeum 
Geraan GM Me 
Do A eeum 

"^Acerei 
M T«pn 
Do *cnan 
jure tNrenh 

Du Acaan 
N Am# 6 Gan 
Do Aceren 


Do Acerei 
smaa# cn 6 Ree 


1019 1042c 
31B9 3*2.0 
*84 4 84 
51 a 6*9 
1582 1692 
278 7 299.1 

II ts* 

mws* 

1793 1024 
1676 fl£4 
544 664# 
0*6 69 H 
1004 1073 
108.0 1155 
1074 115.4 
112.7 1305 

ia*B iar.ee 


-34 247 
-44 247 
-05 29$ 
-05 325 
-1.1 490 
-14 440 
-22 001 
-22 001 
-2.7 498 
-59 4.39 
-40 005 
-54 035 
•10 002 
-13 032 
-16 099 
-17 090 
-1.6 028 
-16 029 
-1.1 17 T 


Bri OR# Chng YU 


Do Accun 2056 2201 

HriWfMoa Growth 1014 W4.T 
Do Accum 25*0 271.6 

ULOYDR UPE UNITTRlSr 
20. Chfian SL London GC2AB44X 
01-920 0311 

,JM 3B 


Ot Treat 
0#r 

US ora# 
Do Acerei 


1602 _ 
543 669 
542 624 
•1.1 979# 
1044 1112# 

63.1 365#- 

54.1 579# 


-12 191 
-XA OSS 


-*M I * 
-23 146 
-Ol 428 
-Ol 428 
-09 426 
-08 438 
-14 1.10 
- 1.1 1.10 


-04 590 
-07 t80 


iJOItoOWl HAN OtetlER 
Wo bride m. Era# EXS IDS 
0392 S1S6 

General Tri* 434 *0«c 

M ea ns Tn* 300 

bnanwttanal Tn* 31.1 

850 M C B— 

Three QuM. Tow# Mi BOR 0BO 
01929 (589 

An# 8 Gen toe 2102 2282 

DO Accum 25Q.7 2B6J 

Am# Reeoewy 204 2604c 

Do Accra# 2632 2824 

Am Smo# Coe 614 652 

OoAco* 029 004 

At* 8 Gar Me 741 799 

Do Aecrei 800 005 

Comm 4 Gan Me 1513 162* 

Do Aecrei T902 212.1 
Compared Grow# 4108 4389c 
Correeraton Growth 3244 302 
DO Me 182.8 TOU 

Owdred Fried Me *184 **14 
Do Bum 21292 12.70 -r 
Erevan 6 Qatar# mi 309 ‘ 

2184 2324# . 

4712 0002 

170.7 1034 

itej ms • 

240.7 255.1 • 

374 0 3904 ■ 

6169 655.1 

Y1223 1171 -I 
074 - 

994 1012 • 

340 379 • 

393 339 ■ 

3199 3*22 ■ 

6*6.1 9073 ■ 

7350 7604 
21172 123* -A 
009 SOT# ■ 

6374 Bms -1 
6824 727 3 -1 

757 09# - 

5*51 S039# - 
*1346 1451 -< 

35)4 3614 -3.1 383 

4812 4800 -4.0 39) 

Second aen mc 6982 7*12 -42 151 

DO Aeeum E1344 1440 .-009 341 
Brawl# Coe Me 638.1 6M.1 *02 247 

Do Accent 985410750 *02 237 

Treerie Frind Me 4492 OOB# -*6 *M 
Do Accun E1247 1377 -013 42* 

CMAariksG .12)4 ..7010 

DO Accun (Si 3999 . . 10.10 

OrirthndMcffl 3957 3987 .. 5*5 

DOAeraj^ £1030 1030 .. 845 

tendril Brew* fu *737 496.1c . . 491 

NAAQFtaaf 404 .. 793 

Do nearer#} *nn .. 728 

■6MUM7 TRUST HAN40E86 
i). juroang So Londoo EBU 47B 
0WB8 4273 


no ... 

BretYMM Mc 
Do 4oeam 
firEMMhc 
Do Accun 
Fred Ot Mr MC 
Da Aa; 

General Mcome 
Do Acerei 
HiAriM 
Do Acerei - 
Grid team# 
Doran 

T ricon* Mc 
Aecrei 

kri Growth Inc 
Do Accun 
Ml Mo Me 

I Geo Me 




Japan 9m*w Are 
Mcawnd A Gan Mc 
Do Aeon 
nre reeq r find Me 
Do Accun 


4057 4224# S3 220 
. . . 5122 5349# -79 225 

UK Nrirtret Fwatuee 704 753# -04 148 

DO Accun 727 77 9# -04 149 

Japan Pert reiire ee 1124 1203 -04 0.12 

rpoAeoa 1112 1204 

us Spec* Fevoms BR.1 729c 
Do Accum 004 712e 

Grid A Precroue M# 387 <24 
m Accun 3B9 *63 

US Soec* me 674 014 
Do Accun 614 054 

European Part h* 7B9 9*9 
□0 Accun 788 8*9 


-02 0.12 
-14 070 
-09 070 
-08 121 
-47 1.7J 

■MSS 


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»1D0. Sandriio Rd. MridMone. NM ME14 Dot 

0622 674751 

MLA General SU ft] -07 2.13 

mla j r re m rao rai suj s*4# -09 oos 

MA Gat Uret 253 2fi4o -Ol 870 

MLA tocorra AOS *34e -04*61 

MLA European 294 312 -04 090 


a _ 
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GM A f 
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101 

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HI Unt 504 504 .. 11.73 

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. Uri* TIM 763 ..03A 

i Un«3 824 B0J3 -..022 

Co* Fund . 884 738a .. 1« 

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01-2)4 55*4 

136.1 1447# -14 AW 

■tetoORY FUND MANA08ISLTD 
31 Hngjmam SL EC4R 9AS- 
0)-a02B 50 
Am# Qrjwei • 

Do Accum 
Am# Incorae 
Do Aeerei 
noon Growth 
Oo Aoaan 
General 
Qs ran 
G# 4 Ftroc 
Do Accun 


Do Acerei 



Do Accun 
Joan 
Do Acraan 
memory 
DO Accun 
Enana era 
Exempt Accun 



2180 2314 
2882 2809 
1364 MS9 
1384 1489. 

7189 2 09.1m 
2094 2229# 

2*88 2*92 
338.5 VBA 

■OLAND MmaNartMrTRwr 
■0MGER8 
CarewodHaa. SRteSt. Haad, teMtawd Si 6RD 
07*2 75012 
CaoorMnre 
Do Acerei 
Coramooiy 6 Gan 
Do Accun 
Ean High me 
Do ton 
GW 8 Fried Mc 
Do A«rei 
Trite 

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Mcoma 
Do Acerei 
■rip* 6 Parae 
Do Aeeum 
N American MC 
. Do a care 
E#0 G)1 MC 
Do Accum 
& naa # Oft Me 
Do Aoaan 


Tl 



OB# Chog VM 


TBS. Hope StraaL Brig# G2 SJH 
04)2218232 

Ariancre 1102 1174 -14 XB 

E u cooee n 2334 2*84 -Z.1 083 

SBwivCce 2127 2279s -VJ 137 


NATIONAL 
MUiAGEM 
48. GrttAril Eta# JHH - 
01-023 4300 fit 208 

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TfflT' 

AtaartcanAoe 187' OO*. . -04 -ttd 
DODW ■ 00* 0OJB -OS 170 


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0603 ,T f* ln 

Th* blir 1228 -027 334 

. 1228 1208# -20 IM 


SSJ" 


60 Careen ternac. LondraS>N 0Ae 
deategi 01-296 386WrffW0 
»iriii*mal<6o#G» T3B4 HOC -21 030 
Mromw 6 GNMte 02 3 673 -07 180 

soeoaisa 663 M3 -09 300 

American Grorr* S3.1 315 -94 OOP 

Japan Growdi 917 sbac -a* 140 

EuaMan Grow* • 623 008 -42 ZM 

UKQiomm 6*9 567 -07 OW 

PwcBta Grow# 437 469 • *09 190 

Htfi Maw# . 305 3*7# +0.1 7.10 

fiacdcM Moon# - STf M8# -02 220 

Do Accun - 83* BOA# -0* 220 


WCTV7SB 




Do. Accun 
Mcome tend 

UahTnm Me 
Do Accun 


999 MS# -07 186 
1344 M24# -14 185 
1189 120.0# -12.399 
1237 1314 -22 147 

1237 1314 -22 1ST 

1899 1347 -14 3.10 

2109 2308 -6.1 618 


nsvcTUALUwrTiwvr 

Saeal. Hreiay On Hama 


48, terr 
0*1 S7t 



31-45 Graun SL London EC2V 7LH 
01-000 4177- 


247 


ttradront M Fd 37&s nos# ~ 1 JO 
ora* Beooewy 2699 271 S# . 074 

vWW MW 

tae Z723 *03 ’ -89 14* 
2834 9129 -07 144 

1314 1309 -07 T 

809 963# - -19 i 

’ 1738 -*■ L._. 

. . 1G5# -O* 294 

1083 1801 -44 035 

*1334 1364# .. 047 

HI97 12.18# ■ .. 

1739 1028# 


London £Cffl MS - 




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NarmiFieca urorpoei UB 3HS 
051-827 4422 


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28 9 
919 
937 


-03 1*3 
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-03 140 
-44 030 


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" ' ‘ ' ««#coi WA 


, Lon don Houee. C a ktei i# ( 
I 370110 


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?3 


798 


968 9Z0 

Acerei 19)8 1947 209 240 

. ome S9J 629#- 828 

HtfiM cg nu _ 784 B3 -to) tS 

mcome « Growte 977 10*4# -1* *9* 

J**" Growth - 7TJ 709# -1*040 

SWErilSte .987 )000* -19 139 

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CapridUNri go* «52 

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BttgyWs *29- 45.7 

bnpaan GroMh 088 1089 
B#Mrt Me Bno 813 877 _ 

O0MV(*3) ' 002 ©Ac -00 290 

Extent#) 37 J 409 -0A O00 

HmiSecs .. 328 989 -19 240 

(tol 8 Ft Me ’ 554 SU# 4011053 

' Mum IMS 1624 mO -M 488 

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hcotna Unto. 857 1029 -4* 627 

Tn* - 052 91.1# -02 200 

. 1087 1 163m -1.1 3*9 

753 045 -17 

™_ Coa- 1054 113.1c '17... 

MaatefiM 273 2S0C -09 611 

£*a srffl ' rea ’wie.'. I* 

Seeos 1260 w? -i* 619 

Strew** 1009 1714 . -14 331 

SeWR UC ri 1561 104 - -13 09* 


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D09MWB , 868 772 ■ -Op t. 

CUmperai mc -iM tara — ii ud 
D o Accun 7108 109# , .-1*1.0 
GW S Fried Me : ST3 M3 - HM 632 
-Do Acorn ■- 862 SLf- -4t 637 

Grid FrettMe 269 3*9# -47 047 

■: «0 Acre# . 308 3X4# —47 007 
ten - ... 1763 U7M -13 423 

Oft Acorn/ 3662 *00 : -49 *73 


' RU tOlc -88 070 
wf w9# . -w aro 
tlTJi .084 -.49018. 

-54 122 
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Spate sa Me ■ •#42* 1065# ,-06 088. 

Do ACM 1062 *08# -Off 089 

Triryo Fries Me - Ml* IMAri -63 226 
Do Accun ' . TtU RUe -38 020. 

Doran 1070 1089 .v‘ao* 

■m* TTBJ -*jf. 

5065 1262 :. : t : *TS 

■— i. . 


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W2 1579c -26 1JO 

1019 «IJe'..4i 006 
2X72 8329# -lAriltt 


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TOO, Wraanl St Oriago# 02 SWF 
0*152*8 SJOO 


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1682 1794# . -39-221 
12U) 129*# +01 T97 
- 1438 138.1#- -09 T*4-f 
«Z8 139S# .-SO 084 
1074 1138#. -19 198 
W 1808# -‘--OS 1,74 


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«w*c - -1889 

SaeMccuBfintf 1729 184 8# 
teacUBriotetea 2129 nrac 

M#Grovdn. 274 244 

£Ss.“*” ss .gr 
^sts; a ss 

SS-- ^5‘jb* 

Euro Gro>#n - - ao.1 322 
6ft Moon* 880 960# 


-14 006 
- 1*001 
.-42 *0* 
-22 2.18 
-00 013 
-03 1.12 
-02 1*5 
-2.1 041 
-37 440 
.. 243 
-09 292 
-05 003 
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sratetOriri 


16* 170# *02 Ite 
612 6U -*>* A 06 

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787 816 -4*087 

474 <02 +0) 010 

160 pa 4119 
nu 1408 -24 «3i 

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1330 U) Ite 


W2 71*0 *49 018 



-A3 DT8 
-44 122 
-0* DU 
-07 356 
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-08 198 
-02 2 » 
-49 299 


MadteU Nteaa X fritfri Dote. Umdre Stef 
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Jriiaricanterete «Oi 42J 

Grew# OTOnh 630 570 

Tate «J ^ 

480 039# 

340 368# 

412 «44e 
01.1 46 1* 

•7* 712 

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6613 6607 .. 300 

75S3 7338 . 300 

2*32 2561# +1-7 284 
2 T22 mtm *1.6 U4 
^ +62 071 

2709 2068 +71 071 

- +12 640 

.. 087 
1*74# .. GO* 


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'-.J. ci • - ! r\ -•'•• , • ’ .y — 


THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 


FINANCE AND INDUSTRY 



TEMPUS 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


threatens oil 
sset values 


Caution rules as rally peters out 


(MI companies am likely to 
begin making provisions for a 
drop-in the valueof their oil 
and gas assets this year if the 
oil price does not. improve 
■dramatically. .... 

-The impact of lower oil 
prices on these assets and the 
accounting treatment wiD 
vary across the industry. Not 
'all .oil companies report quar-- 
teriy.bat for many, the next 
reporting date is their quar- 
terly results on March 31. . . 

Tricentrol is one of the few 
mpanies to provide share- 
holders with an estimate of 
the impact of felling oil prices 
on its assets. Ami in its 
accounting policies h states 
that “further depletion is 
if necessary, to en- 
sure that capitalized costs do 
hot exceed the estimated net 
present value of the related 
reserves.” This is the so- 
called “ceiling test”, and it is 
applied annually. 

Tricentrol has not yet de- 
cided whether it win begin 
making any provisions for 
loss in value of assets in its 
first quarter results. 

. In its report for the year to 
December 31, the company 
shows the discounted present 
value of its oil and gas 
reserves assuming an average 
1986 oil price of S18;per. 
barrel and a $1.45/£1 ex- 
change rate. - 

On a 15 per cent no minal 
discount rale, which is rough- 
ly equivalent to a 10 per cent 
real discount rate, the present 
value is £432.6 million, be- 
fore petroleum revenue tax. 
After deducting PRT, the 
present value fells to £30512 
million. This is below the 
£315.5 million book value of 
its oil assets. 

Included in the valuation 
are probable reserves valued 
at £80.9 million using the 
same discount factor. How- 
ever it must be the case that 
at current oilprices, a propor- 
tion of these reserves will not 
be economically viable. 

Sometimes, when ceiling 
tests are applied, the worth of 
the assets is worked, out 
before PRT on the basis that 
exploration costs will relieve 
the company of having to pay 
the lax. 

In 1986, the industry is so 
squeezed that exploration 
programmes are being cut 
back to the mrmrnmn. which 
means that the tax shelter 
disappears.. Indeed, Wood 
Mackenzie and Co, the stock- 
broker. has forecast that even 


at; $20 oil, Tricentrol wd 
show a cash flow' deficit in 
1986 of £28 million — hence 
the need to sell the Amethyst 
gas field for £30 tmHion. 

• Much depends oh the as- 
sumptions used, in making 
these valuations. A lower 
discount factor will give a 
higher value, while more up- 
to-date oil prices and ex- 
change rateswifl give an even 
lower value. 

. The oil price is very vola- 
tile at present, and no one is 
suggesting Unit the industry 
provides for loss of value in 
assets based on the end 
March price which was one of 
the lowest ever. But the time 
is fast approaching .when 
some recognition of what is 
happening m the marketplace 
-will have to-be made in the 
-accounts. 

Geers Gross 

Shareholders found little to 
comfort them in yesterday’s 
figures from Geers Gross, the 
advertising agency.. It is still 
not dear how the company 
will get round its fundamen- 
tal problem, which is that -it 
makes low profits on a huge 
turnover. 

In 1985 it made £813.000 
before tax, despite sales of 
£129 million. On that basis 
the return on sales was only 
0.6 per cent, far less than tire 
return achieved elsewhere in 
the industry. For example; 
Abbott Mead Vickers made 
2.9 per cent on turnover. 

Profits fell from £1.83 mil- 
lion to £813,000, mainly 
because of the loss of a highly 
profitable account for ESPN 
Cable Network-in the United 
States. 

The company has suceeded 
in winning enough new busi- 
ness to replace that account, 
in volume terms. But the new 
accounts- are much less 
profitable.. 

Geers Gross says, however, 
that staff cuts and other 
overhead reductions have 
saved £1 million .a year, 
which should hdp profits this 
year. 

. Meanwhile, shareholders 
have to wait for the publica- 
tion of the annual report and 
accounts for details of the 
balance sheet 

At the end of 1984 the 
company had net borrowings 
of £23 million against 
shareholders’ funds, net of 
goodwill, of only £2.9 
million. .* 


In the interim the multiple 
of nine times prospective 
earnings, assuming a recov- 
ery to £1.8 million before tax, 
with the shares at 74p is high 
enough. ... 

Hooseboilding 

George Wimpey’s claim to 
have toppled Barratt Devel- 
opments from the top of the 
housebuilders* league .has 
caused quite a stir in the 
industry. While the majors 
affect indifference to absolute 
numbers, preferring instead 
to talk of prices and margins, 
they are nevertheless gearing 
up to challenge Wimpey. • 

In 1985 Wimpey sold 9,700 
houses, up from 9,100 the 
previous year. Barratt sold 
8,700 houses last year and 
Tarmac, the third contender, 
probably sold 8,000. C.H. 
Beazer, which took fourth 
position after acquiring 
French Kier, will probably 
sell 5,000 in the year to June i 
1986. 

In the present year compe- 
tition for number one spot 
could be tough. Wimpey 
plans to increase output by 
only 600 houses or so, but 
Barratt’s is recovering to 
between 9,000 and 10,000 
with Tarmac not far behind. 
All three will be competing 
with the do-ft-yourseJfer, who 
builds 1 0,000 bouses a year. 

The overall number of 
private houses completed 
will, however, be little 
charged from last year, at 
about 150,000,- but 
favourable conditions — no- 
tably the availability of mort- 
gages and lower interest rates 
— will help profits. All the 
majors are increasing their 
average selling price, not just 
by raising margins but by 
moving upmarket 

Mr Adrian Goodall, of the 
stockbroker Laurie Mfilbank, 
suggests there will be a move 
away, from London, where 
the greatest profits are now 
befog made. He says that 
because the fen in interest 
rates is national it gives a 
disproportionate boost to the 
regions, where prices .have 
not risen so quickly. That 
should help builders like 
Wimpey and Barratt, who 
have plenty of sites out of 
town. 

Barratt is the purest 
housebuilder of the majors 
but there are still doubts in 
the City about the extent of 
its recovery. . - * 


The market ended the two- 
week account on a subdued 
note yesterday. An early rally 
soon petered out with inves- 
tors still sensitive after this 
week’s sharp shakeout in share 
prices. 

Thursday's disappointing 
first-quarter profits from 1CT, 
a record trade deficit for last 
month, the financial year-end 
for at least three leading 
jobbers and the unwinding for 
speculative positions caused 
by soured takeover activities 
were all given as reasons for 
caution. 

The FT 30-share index fin- 
ished at 1.357.9, a modest 9.9 
rise, while FT-SE 100 rose 
only 7.1 to 1.622.6. 

The undertone was steady 
enough, illustrated by the 
number of firm features 
among secondary issues, 
mainly on bid hopes. 

• The Government stocks 
managed improvement of an 
Vs -or so. encouraged by the 
continued strength of sterling, 
prompting the view that an- 
other fell in interest rates was 
not too fer away. 

Properties turned mixed 
and builders lacked decisive 
trend, but small engineering 

Paul plans 
Indian 
share sale 

By Clare Dobie 

Mr Swraj Paul, the chair- 
man of Caparo Industries, is 
negotiating the sale of his 
shareholdings in two Indian 
companies. Escorts and DCM. 

He plans to inject the 
proceeds, which are expected 
to be £1 1 million, into Caparo 
Industries, which is quoted on 
the London Stock Exchange. 

Mr Paul bought the shares 
three years ago but the two 
companies refused to register 
them. The courts ruled in his 
favour but be nevertheless 
decided to abandon his chal- 
lenge to the Indian business 
establishment. 

The money will be held 
initially by Caparo Group, Mr 
Paul's private company which 
owns 75 per cent of Caparo 
Industries. He intends to use 
the money to maintain control 
of CL 

Caparo Industries plans to 
make an acquisition for be- 
tween £20 million and £30 
million in the autumn. 


groups were wanted after the 
recent spate of bids. 

Among leaders I Cl at 917p 
picked up 3p of Thursday’s 
15.4 loss that followed the 
figures after touching 930p in 
early dealings. 

Boots rose 7p lo 262p on 
vague takeover talk but other 
stores presented a gloomy 
picture with Gus A down 2 Op 
to I035p and Woohwth 20p 
lower at 820p. Conrtanlds 
recovered 5p to 264p and 
Guest, Seen & NettfefoMs at 
341p up 6p was supported by 
press comment. 

Hotel shares were still wor- 
ried by the threat of a fell in 
tourists due to the Libyan 
situation. Trust* case Forte 
fell 4p more to !65p. 


EQUITIES 

Abbott M V (IBOp) 

SPMV** 

Brookmount (IfiOpt 
Chancery Secs (63p) 
Com 3% A 2000 
CranswicK MJ,95p) 
Davies DY (iKpf 
Dialene (128p) 
Ferguson (J) (lOp) 
Goto Qm Trot J165p) 
Granyte Surface (Sop 
Inoco (55p) 

JS Pathology (trap) 


215-10 
206 +1 
180+5 
253 
84 

3P8+'* 
103 
182+6 
165 
27 
203 -3 
60-3 
45-2 
275-6 


• WM BOULTON GROUP: 
Half-year to Dec. 31, 1985. No 
ordinary dividend and the pref- 
erence dividend due on April 
30, 1986, will not be paid. 
Turnover £3.78 million (£9.57 
million). Pretax loss £428,000 
(loss £465,000). Loss per share 
Ip (loss Lip). 

• ANGLO-AFRICAN FI- 
NANCE: Results for 1985, com- 
pared with the previous 1 7 
months. No.dividend. Turnover 
£1 12.82 million (£230.47 mil- 
lion). Income before tax £1.83 
million (£8.3 1 million). Loss per 
share l.lp (0.7p). 

•AUDIO FIDELITY: Taxable 
profits of £170.000 for the' eight 
months to December 31, 1985, 
compared with loss of .£36,000 
for the six months to October, 
1984. Turnover £329 million 
(£1.87 million). Earnings per 
share 4.49p (loss of 1 .3 Ip). 

• J ROTHSCHILD HOLD- 
INGS: The company has pur- 
chased for cancellation 1 million 
ordinary shares at £ 1 35?/ iep per 
share. 

• YORK MOUNT GROUP: 
The group has sold its Offshoot, 
York Mount Construction, to 
Jetrise. The estimated net worth 
of the company at the comple- 
tion date was £190,000. 

• CHEPSTOW RACE- 
COURSE: Dividend lp (same) 
for 1985. Turnover £715,624 
£654,832). Pretax' profit 


SSlsSSo 7pk — 


Oils were overshadowed by 
Sheikh Yamani’s warning of a 
$ 1 0-a-barrel spot price and the 
lifting of strike action by 
Norwegian workers. 

However, one or two small 
exploration stocks did well 
with Conroy Petroleum I2p 
higher at 55p. 

Among engineers F H 
Thom kins jumped ISp to 
3 14p on hopes that the compa- 
ny will be successful in its 
aquisition of Pegler 
Hauers fey. William Holdings 
at 675p recovered nearly all of 
Thursday's 25p fall. 

Steed ey at 47 lp and Reu- 
ters 443p improved 8p after 
their respective optimistic an- 
nual statements. 

Blue Circle added- 5p to 


Jarvis Porter (105p) 
KiearfoM (118p) 

Lee Inti <180pl 
Lexicon (115p) 
Lodge Care (70p) 
Macro 4 (IDSpJ 
MenveJe M (ll5p) 
Norank Sys (90p) 
Really Useful (330p) 
SAC Inti (lOOp) 

SPP (125p) 
Templeton (215p) 
Slgmex (101 p) 
Snowdon & a (97(4 
Spice (80p) 

Teen Comp (l3Qp) 


145 
115+5 
■. 163-6 
suspended 

94 
143 
160 
118 

381 +8 
137 +2 
150 
•' 210 
74 
120 

95 

222+1 


• BRENT WALKER: Pretax 
profits jumped by 78 percent to 
£3.7 million in 1985. Turnover 
fell to £15.7 million, from £19.9 
million. The total dividend is 
4p. 

• AUSTIN REED: Year to Jan. 

31, 1986: Pretax profit £5 mil- 
lion (£4.23 million). Sales £60.9 
million (£57.3 million). Total 
dividend 5.5p{4.5p). " 

• WM LOW AND CO: Interim 
dividend 4.5p (4p). Turnover 
for the 28 weeks to March 22, 
1986. £125.6 million (£100.3 
million). Operating profits £3 
million (£3.4 million). 

• GRAMPIAN TELE- 

VISION: Year to Feb. 28. 1986. 
Pretax profits rose by 35 per 
cent to £1.67 million. Total 
dividend 2p (L66p). Earnings 
per share 6.94p (4.4 ip). 

• WHATMAN REEVE AN- 
GEL: Pretax profits for 1985, 
£5.61 million (£4.62 million). 
Turnover £31.64 million 
(£33.55 million). Dividend total 
2.45p (2p)_ The directors say the 
current year should be excellent 

• EPICURE HOLDINGS: 
Pretax profits forthe six months 
to December 31, 1985, were 
£409.000. against a loss of £1.1 7 
million, on a turnover of £9-22 
million, against £12.61 million. 
•OFFICE AND ELEC- 
TRONIC MACHINES: Pretax 
profits in 1985 were 31 percent 
higher at £2.54 million, on sales 
14 per cent ahead at £28.53 
million. The total dividend is ' 
higher at 8.5p. 


666p in front of next 
Tuesday’s results. Barratt 
gained 6p to 148p as mortgage 
rates declined. APV at 550p 
gave back 6p as the company 
rejected the approach from 
Siebe lOp better at 895p. 

Adwest shares were strong 
at 240p up !5p after recent 
figures while Delta Group put 
on lOp to 250p on reports of a 
bid from BICC. 

Firmer Electronics featured 
Unftech up I2p to 260p but 
profit-taking cut lOp from 
Amstrad at 5 1 4p. Hopes of US 
takeover activity boosted 
Wedgwood 23p to 34 lp and 
Christies International 1 7p to 
3 50p. 

Lex Service Group was an- 
other firm spot at 394p up 


Underwoods (180p) 
Welcome (120p) 

W York Hasp (BOp) 
VWckes (140p) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 
Bensons Crisps N/P 
E1S N/p 
Greycoat N/P 
HartweBs N/P 
mtL Leisure N/P 
Snare Drug N/P 
Turner & Newell N/P 
(issue price in brackets). 


• E.UPTON AND / SONS: 
Year to Jan. 28, 1986. No 
dividend (same). Turnover 
£4.62 million (£4.71 million). 
Pretax loss £202,000 (£386,000). 
Loss per share Up (I9p) and 
folly diluted loss per share 6p 
(lip). 

• SAW BERISFORD: After 
last Thursday's purchase for its 
own account of 1 million 
Berisford shares at 242p. 
Kleinwort Benson, which is 
deemed to be acting in concert 
with Hillsdown Holdings, which 
is bidding for Berisford. has now 
purchased 21.55. million (11.26 
per cent) of Berisford shares. 

• SPRING RAM: The chair- 
man. Mr Bill Rooney, told the 
annual meeting that, following 
the sixth consecutive year of 
record results, there has been an 
equally buoyant start to the 
current year. 

• LAFARGE COPPER: Agree- 
ment has been reached for the 
company to make an equity 
investment of at least 10 per 
cent in the holding company 
which will acquire control of 
National Gypsum if the lever- 
aged buyout by NationaTs 
management goes ahead 

• BRITISH ASSETS TRUST: 
Halfyear to March 31. 1986. 
Second quarter dividend 
0-475p, making 0.95p for the six 
months (0.862pUndicating a 
rate for the current year of not 
less than 1.9p (I.775p). Pretax 


2 Op. Chart Foulks shares were 
lifted 2Sp to Il8p following 
bid terms from Cowan de 
GrooL 

Thursday’s newcomer D Y 
Davies hardened 3p more to 
180p following news of a 
Guildhall contract- Beatson 
Clark at 20Sp and Metal 
Closures at 157p were specula- 
tive favourites to rise I3p and 
6p. 

Fading bid hopes left Euro- 
pean Ferries 3p down at 149p. 
Satisfactory results supported 
Sunlight Service at 205p and 
Geers Gross at 74p both up 
2p. 

Associated Heat Services 
climbed 1 Sp to 450p awaiting 
bid developments from CGC 
of France. 

P&O lifts 
stake in 
bid target 

By Richard Lander 

Just a day after revealing a 
£377 million takeover bid, 
P&O was yesterday able to lay 
claim to 37.26 per cent of its 
target, the Stock Conversion 
property group. 

P&O announced yesterday 
that it had bought another 1.8 
million Slock Conversion 
shares, equivalent to a 3.44 
per cent stake, in the market at 
prices ranging from 700p to 
7I4p. 

Meanwhile, Henry 
Ansbacher, the merchant 
bank, has also thrown its 
weight behind the P&O bid. 

It said yesterday that in the 
absence of any rival offer, it 
would take the P&O bid for 
the 7.28 per cent of Stock 
Conversion shares it holds for 
itself and non-discretionary 
clients. 


Hiram Walker 
taken over 

Gulf Canada Corporation 
has captured majority control 
of Hiram Walker Resources in 
Canada's largest takeover. 

Gulf, controlled by the 
Reichmann family of Toronto, 
will pay jusi over Can$3 billion 
(£1.4 billion) for about 81 
million shares. 

The Reich manns are appeal- 
ing against an Ontario Supreme 
Court ruling which allowed 
Hiram Walker to sell its liquor 
distilling business to Allied- 
Lyons. the British foods and 
brewing group. 






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moment. 

Profits. 

B fpma> with European mark ets risin g 39% * on average 
last year, there’s no mistaking the potentiaL 
‘ And now. Save & Prosper (one of Britain’s largest unit 
trust groups) befieve the time is right to bring yon a new 
interpretation of the European theme. 

Europe. Wife a higher safel y fact or . 

Hoe’s why. 

A FEW WORDS ON WHY 
YOU SHOULD INVEST. 

AH the^gM fa Europe are adding up to excellent long- 
term growth prospects. 

•Underdeveloped stock markets that are now attracting 
more and more invasfos both domestic and foreign — 
and, despite last year’s gains, are stiD cheap compared 
with other major markets. 

•Improving economies with inflation and interest rates 
under control. 

•Incre as ing productivity. 

•And company profits on thtir way up -and now helped 

by lower o3 prices. 

There's evtsy chance of esceBent returns. 

But stock markets are relatively small (Even Ger- 


one third the size of Britain.) And small markets can be volatile 
—which is why our experts are now recommending anew invest- 

mwrt min. 

THE VOICE OF EXPERIENCE. 

Onr new fund win invest primarily in the major markets of 
Conti* 1 *"*** 1 Europe in high-yielding equities (mainly of larger 


To: Sove& PracoerSecorities Ltd. FREEPOST. Romford RM I IBR. 
Tctcptnnr : Free Moneyline 0800 282 101 Prestri *481284 


Surname riUnMn/Min) 


• LA Ufr c 

^ V EUROPEAN /> 

INCOME & GROWTH 
FUND 


A "*» that is different from most other European funds. 
Because it stifl aims for high growth. But also indudes the higb- 
yiekling equities aDd fixed interest content for income -and, as 
importantly, for a degree of safety which we befieve is sensible 
in these smaller markets. 

And we ought to know. As the first unit trust group to 
innTM-ti a European fund .22 years ago, we’ve had plenty of 
experience in getting the best out of Europe. 

FDren PRICE OFFER UNTIL 2nd MAY 
mPl IE . . BIEN . . WUNDERBAR . . .) 

You can i nvest in the new E uro pe a n Income & Growth 
Fund from £250 or from £20 a month -and until 2nd May we’ll 
be holding ‘the price of units to50p- 

Just complete the coupon or talk to your professional 

adviser. ... 

Yon s houl d remember that the price of units and income 

from t Vm can go down as weO as up. 

But we befieve with. this new European investment mix, 
the etgws are aU good. In anyone's Language. 


Ending Accmail No. flf any) 
Sp IMW * 


I wiib la invest I* I I minimum £250 initial);. 1100 nb- 

■equemly)inSa«& ftwptr E u rop ea n income A Gro»tfa Fond at the fixed offer price of 
50p per unit fin- appKtadota received by 2nd May 1W6. and sateeqnendy •( die oflir price 
per unb prevailing oa the day of receipt of m y application. 

I «■*» a cheque made parable id Save & Prosper Securities Limited. I am over 18. 
1 nculd Uhc di sirgiuti oat erf Income le be reinvested in the pnrebase of lartber unM*. 
•dehseif you wunincBi* to be paid dim to you. 

□fPteMC send me dearth of nnfag 6n £20 a month. 


SAY \. & 
PROSPER 



FOR OFFICE USE ONLY 


R.R. RJL C.CINo. 


Tta> otter Udm mfldir nRSUeessef ibrtaMb- 
Ikc of Intend. 

Ren. m Sodand No IWJS. 

Red office: 6*T3 Quea Smn. Emrdinfefc 
EIC4NX. 


DETAILS YOU NEED TO KNOW 

OBJECTIVE. To tKDvfSt i hLghgr^ieKknQ seamliK Imaged m Eunm 

PBtCES and HELD Uo«2ndUjy 1986 the o#er pnceolunCwaoe treflaiMp and Mo esurafed/oj 
SBWBVWOSWIPJ PncaaMme jteUuOiDeouataJtbayflleamngiHtorarafw^ 

DEALING IN UWTS. Unas nay be Dough a arid nocnrily on any wning chy. Cmfficate nomaly bt 
(onanflB«wihui Wdsys W^unKatssoni^loOwMmD^lByiintniisnonTBllyntjdsiiidnn.Tiays 
of ow teeming rtoouKBd caditfleE 

NET ilCOUE DSnoSUTTONS. 15ft Ward aod I5tt SeotenftBf eaco iw 

CHARTS irsfijlclBCiie 52H DheaiwnSi^atflualinartnol eacceacbiig trie hw«r cd 1% or 1.25ope: und. 
Utah £ nauoea m Be dObt owb si uiSs. florauwaan td isas avabH on lequeai wii K ibd a 


suttip«o p:ics«iai afiv«r5 Aw'd 1 aw bmw .aw o* it* Fua otti =- ' y 
rnaurncm of 1 :SH aft* vat - ntfiec re 3 hsbki Inc s aeaurec hs" w* »y>: •. ~r* 

Uarase:i stperaes ittouom; Trjv« % w 

Wi/STMENT PflWBS Unto rhe Trust Deed tbEUarjawrfiSy ouithaa ZM HsJsl MMcs.siJmbI 
a imiiBMKt cDHTip, px DcMnn^: d Iran? & nosirv 

5AFEGUnRIKi He Fine >5 2>' 74 ZKMzrj m Stale tn Trace S tmS) ans isa new -range' 

nwsqiac uaser me Trustee iressreKs 9u )?6l Trusa Sank Scouem) 

MANASE3S Savrr S Sesidiw IraW. 1 r-MCurv Anew. London EC2M 2flY Tttoflwe r.-aSS 
1>ir A ineieer $ me owl Tpjk Asaciitm 













STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES^^ 

ui ■« i ii ■ 


DIVIDEND 1 DIVIDEND 
£ 4 . 000 .. 

Qg^sreqmrwi 

for 

449 points 


Claims feq°ircd 
for 

+206 pomis 
0254-53273 


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No. Corapany 

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w» «■• •55*5 SJ 2! §£ fit' '* * ! 

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$ a Bsaft- 

1W 147 Buhrsr IH PI 


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251 217 

248 153 
234 IBS' 
39-» 3CP. 
548 353 
313 2M 

315 *2! 
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505 410 
MS 195 


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119 39109 
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898 40 117 
119 ** 119 
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97 ' 65 m, 

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129 18 

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78 

280 210 

«* » 

2G3 177 
180 137 


178 W5 Vaao 


insurance 


buildings and roads 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of vour oafly 
for the weekly dividend of £16.000 in 
today's newspaper. _ 


II mu] 


BRITISH FUNDS 


Dit 
counti 
its ville 
ourCe 
advise 
hotels 
tourw 
stops 
Ca 
and in* 
privalt 
fullbre 
Yol 
holida; 
hotel c 
waiers 
instant 
your O' 
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pleas 


123 


89 


29 


117 


129 


102 

# . 

29 



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7TB 5» St» 
BZ7 772 Sun 



LEISURE 


248 228 

18* 13 

510 300 
ITS HO 
28 20 
2*6 194 
40 1« 

27*1 17 
383 183 
185 183 

1» 1g 

48 37 

49 40 
148 114 


FINANCE AND LAND 


sars. a * a 

Ant nEKBStt BIO • -- 

gsa. T - s •* iw 

gSSS, « *Vr ffa 

M uii «3 

a a « 

NMada 198 M 

N« Horn* U« Jg '.• Ain 

Do B% -4 «» 

wmaaiai 140 


(7 85U9 


14 27 OS 

3® 43122 

U 2*187 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


48 36'j f 

195 160 t 
393 291 i 
241 180 ‘ 
140 108 I 
111 76'j I 

13 102 I 
189 112 I 
87 57': I 
138 82 l 

285 2*5 
160 140 ' 
T42 112 

20 15 

103 1Z7 
129 100 
249 172 
298 215 
iflO 113 
453 330 
101'. 78 
10 734 
410 335 
118 102 
225 179 
85 82 

178 134*1 
222 216 
51 38 

213 ’S 

128 87 


AKZO N/V BH 
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a n a w i n 


Sfjr 0 ^ g. 

a " 80 s* ; 

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pZ 222 

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400 99 .. 
S3 29 179 
89 29179 

8.1 39 129 
5.7 A1 209 
700 7.4 
109 MM 

69 M 17.1 
889 

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85 9*139 

86 *9 M 
69 82 09 

03 *S 62 

100 M 139 

.. .. 104 

aa *9 189 
119 49 109 
8.4 49 119 
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47il 5.1 109 
119 39 1*9 
4.7 42 179 
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35 25 172 

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11.1 59 au 

42 35112 


160 128 4 
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366 238 t 
128 100 t 
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190 1*6 I 
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183 180 . i 
270 160 
253 1*9 
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2S3 225 
201 151 
316 251 
263 228 
988 788 
2*5 170 
320 161 

88 75 
567 *99 
232 220 
110 S5 
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620 505 
830 *95 
113 93 

202 ISO 
257 215 

B2': 83*. 
292 258 
190 152 
137 1Z7 
246 157 
523 386 
*18 344 
163 122 
210 15* 
658 520 
380 265 
208 219 

203 219 
161 138 


FOODS 


ASO«4*n 156 

Atom Dw« 23 

52&od « 

M^Tmhwfcs as 

Anna 572 

bw (Stmy cj 3i8 
Banr 8 Potwon 13'* 


[Jjrr f»a _ 3g 
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FWW (ADWI) 1B7 
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IWllwnnn Foods 7W 
MWds 5*8 

HMdwMHUgs 311 

Homo Ftm » 

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K“* 8 * w * - f™ 

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Lovol |GF) * 

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mm (JN) (VHTT1D) 230 
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Nam Foods M 
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189 29 179 
149 49 M 

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39 29 128 
52 32 219 
74 79 27.8 
29 ID 12.4 
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'■ 103 '38 159 
109 49-183 


MINING 




15 212 


68 

22 282 



12108 

B4b 35 18 
390 65 53 

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49 17 





43112 



43 83 


39 

83 163 



83107 

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65 M3 


31-4 49 181 
7A 2.1247 
124 49 179 

138 5JSS 

89 82202 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


CINEMAS AND TV 


OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 



BANKS DISCOUNT HP 




250 193 

81 J§ 

38 2W 
12 a E^a 
300 356 
9'.- 8 
260 -T30 
489 38* 

W 429 
55° «0 

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199 138 
830 585 
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22 fl a -8 21 

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«t a+1'5 23 9* N3 

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^ . 1.7 29 17.0 

188 -1 72 42 187 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


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52 27 
42 22 
188 U 
11.1b .22 

67 5 S 
12 22 
132 39 
89 22 

22 42 
129 83 

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86 1.4 202 
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M 43242 

23 82 S3 

87 82 88 

5.7 59 62 

32 48 186 
119 17 72* 
>42 92102 

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39 32142 

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121 42222 
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182 27 198 

181 99 149 

12 82144 
190 91 181 
72 8* 194 

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a6 19 37.1 
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1*3 8-0 S O 

90 49 97 

54 42 1 22 

98 91 172 

64 42 132 

24 13 1B9 

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17.1 52 148 

93 35 189 


192s 125 ... 
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32 42 119 
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1.4 44 159 
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11 44 122 
1 55 96139 

50 5.1 
16.7 63 
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133 19 

1 79 a* 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


SHIPPING 


625 37* woe » Bans., 585 

386 331 8- Owno n sal W 3M 

SM 291 CaladOTW ' 

0* 05 fisnar {JsnwH 70 

803 480 &*tt 

85 54': Jacobs- UQ «> 

12'? 8 MS 8’: 

SB 28 Massy Docks 39 
210 180 Ocsan Trsnapoit 191 
558 428 P 8 O DM 5*3 

108 t» nunckanflWM 88 
380 380 TWntad SeoH 370 


143 35 111 
93 1122 
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47 S3 73 
179 14 2*9 

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129 19W5 


7.7 90 114 

20 un* 


| SHOES AND LEATHER j 

980 290 FO 348 a .. 03 27 133 

as 184 Qanar BOW 194 S 13.1 83 SB 

38 32 HaatSara Sana S* . . ii« 01 77 

218 188 Lsmbsn hoarailb 208 art 92 19 11.: 

82 88 NawDokJ i Bran 78 44 58 230 

110 82 PW»d 110 a .. U U 71 

168 110 SStmg 8 Hsnar 148 a-+2 114-77 59 
373 Iff Srrta ' 2*8 -9 94 28 30 7 


TEXTILES 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS . 


Z23 i« AesosBos h Sg • 

333 220 ASSOC NSBM(TOSr 285 rt I 

315 980 BffiW IA 4 C) » - J 

too 810 WWW ... “9 ■- * 

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11 820 Nswa > mw4 danW flW. • . ■ 1 

CM 470 Oesapu* . . Sffi art 

138 118 Portsmoo* Swd 1M . . 

440 220 Tflndy W 435 art 2 

355 280 UM S sia p ips rg HO .. 2 


305, 206*: MMd Tan 
200*136 AOdnuHroa 
1*0 B7 BaWa UOTnl 

104 88 Bsckman W . 

144 1Z3 Br MoRSk 
-82 60 Bdnw Alone 
'.33® 143 coats. Paoca 
73 S3', COmh 

316 190 -GounwAJa 
148 74 CKMWiwtJI 
333 108- Daman 
63 42 Damn 

378 224 Damn (PI 
is* 114 Don Bum 
.1 80 28 Dura MB 

110 83 Foam (joM) 

. 113 88 OhM BrPStfOon 

38 -33 Hcungr PehMcon 

167 90 topam (Harold) 

90 E6 Jaws (S) 

188 136 lAUdS 
- 77*1 84 law 

i 91 Wtrami ■ 

22 IS Munton 
128 9*. PWttand A 
40*: 30 Rusdicoi - 
155 10S SECT 
34 25’j'LftSw CStpett 
182 133 Sadar 

4 J -SSSSfW 
S 8 i TSS ££T 

S7h 76 1 : Toots! 

325 235 YoMyoa 


50 rt 

343- 

114 -2 

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320 


03 39 19 2 
81 5-0 «TO 

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88 an 7« 

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7.9 1» 138 

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21 16 106 

89 401*7 

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4.8 M J7 
5.7 190 *0 
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B4 06 209 
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7 30 67 4* 

39814.1 1*2 

$4 36 142 

19 fi* as 
SB IT 172 
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A* 22 15* 

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Sr JJ 























































THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/1 


Edited by Loma Bourke 



y 


Groans as well as sighs 
of relief after the will 


C 


INHERITANCE 

TAX 


) 


Accountant JACK 
HARPER believes 
pension benefits conld be 
. put in jeopardy by the 
■ new roles for inheritance 
tax 


One of the most unwelcome 
features of the new inheritance 
tax is “the ' gift with 
reservation”. Property, given 
away that falls foul of this rule 
is treated at the time as any 
other gift (so tax could be 
charged if the gift is not made 
to an individual outright or to 
an accumulation and mainte- 
nance tnist). 

But if the donor dies with* 
out having r elinquished the 
reservation the property (or 
property representing it) is 
treated as remaining in bis or 
her estate and is taxed at the 
death rates (with credit for any 
tax paid earlier on the lifetime 
transfer). 

The concept is taken from 
State duty, with some modifi- 
cations. It caused a- lot of 
trouble and its demise on the 
introduction of capital trans- 
fer tax (which did not incorpo- 
rate it) was greeted with rebet 
Corresponding groans have 
accompanied its unpleasant 
renascence. 

A gift is subject to reserva- 
tion if, and as long as, either 
possession and enjoyment of 
the property is not bona fide 
assumed by the donee or it is 
not enjoyed to the entire 
exclusion, or virtually to the* 
entire exclusion, of the donor 
and of any benefit to him by 
contract or otherwise or by 
“associated operations”. 

The Chancellor intended to 
stop ar r an ge m ents for having 
your cake and eating ft. For 
example, where a house is 
given but the donor continues 
to reside in it, where a settlor 
of a discretionary trust is also 
a beneficiary and, this was 
perceived as the main mis- 
chief, under certain insurance 
schemes (inheritance trusts, 
PET A plans, discounted gift 


be excluded from benefit. So 
gifts within the donor’s nil rate 
band (now £71,000) into dis- 
cretionary trusts or insurance 
schemes may still be viable as 
long as the donor is not a 
beneficiary (and beware recip- 
rocal arrangements by 
spouses!). 

Furthermore, as under es- 
tate duty, a statutory excep- 
tion is introduced for a donor 


the second Hie fineness of the 
line is indicated by the fact 
that the six or so leading cases 
under estate duty were decid- 
ed at the highest level. 

Where an employer estab- 
lishes a pension fund the 
benefits will be held on discre- 


tionary trusts from the outset. 
Provided 


a lump sura benefit 
on death in service is not 
payable as qf right to the 


who occupies land or contin- employee's personal re pr e se n- 
uesjn possession of a chattel ta lives, he has not irrevo- 


for fiill consideration in mon- 
ey or money's worth. In other 
words, if you give your house 
to your children and continue 
to live in it you wiQ have to 
pay a market rent if you want 
to be sure of avoiding inheri- 
tance tax. 

Nevertheless, the concept 
introduces a degree of uncer- 
tainty and complexity into die 
tax system which is excessive 
as a reaction, principally, to 
the heavily marketed insur- 
ance devices. One might pause 
here to remark on wehther it is 
really fair for the Chancellor to 
regard such devices, and dis- 
cretionary trusts with the set- 
tlor as a beneficiary, as 
pernicious. 

The impact of inheritance 


Certam gifts 
are excepted 


cably nominated during his 
lifetime who should have it. 
the sum will not fell into his 
estate for tax purposes. 

Where the scheme is non- 
contributory, no question of 
gift with reservation can arise. 
If it is, the mere possibility 
that the lump sura should be 
paid, at the trustees's discre- 
tion to his estate, would not be 
a benefit reserved by him (be 
will be dead, by definition!). 
But what if he survives to take 
the pension and lump sum 
commutation rights? 

His contributions would 
normally be exempt gifts un- 
der the “normal expenditure 
out of income” exemption but 
it is not a ‘gift with 
reservation'? The same fund is 
growing to provide either the 
death in service benefits or the 
retirement benefits, depend- 
ing on whether or not the 


tax on the email estates re- employee survives beyond re- 


mains vicious. Tax on an 
estate of £31 7,000 is £110, an 
effective rate of 29 per cent 
Such an estate is not vast 
wealth for someone who has a 
house in the south-east and 
has retired with a pension 
lump sum and some good 
investments. And remember, 
this “low” rate is levied on 


tirement He cannot be said to 
keep the -retirement benefits 
but only give away the ffeath 
in service benefits. 

The logic of this analysis 
may be difficult to swallow 
when h comes to a huge fund 
run by a big company with 
many members. But it is 


easier to see its force in 
that has been acco- relation to a one-man airange- 
muiated after paying income ment, now so justifiably popo- 
tax and capital gains tax. lar as an alternative top-up to 
By contrast, the Chancellor additional voluntary contri- 
has given the enormously butions or as a parallel fund 
wealthy the opportunity to for greater portability, 
give away unlimited sums The setfemployed. and em- 
subject to seven-year survival ployees in non-pensionable 


schemes) where the taxpayer 
fits m his 


retains a right to bene 
lifetime. 

As is often the case with 
anti-avoidance measures, 
there may still be loopholes 
and they may catch commer- 
cial arrangements in a way 
never intended. 

It is not necessary (nor was 
it under estate duty) for the 
donor’s spouse and children to 


tax-free. Certain gifts are ex- 
cepted from the rule. For 
example, transfers between 
spouses and gifts to charities 
and (naturally) political par- 
ties. No special exception is 
provided for pensions benefits 
and there may be an unexpect- 
ed problem here; 

A fundamental but difficult 
distinction is whether what is 
given is the whole asset with a 
benefit reserved out of it for 
the donor, or whether only, 
part of the asset is given and 
the rest retained. The concept 
applies in the first case but not 


Best of the buyers’ market 


( MORTGAGES > 


The cut in mortgage rate — 
down from 12 to 11 per cent, 
coupled with a flood of new 
entrants to the home loan field 
in recent weeks and a multi- 
plicity of new offers, ranging 
from a discount of half a per 
cent in the basic mortgage rate 
from Midland Bank, to help 
with moving house from legal 
& General — has produced a 
bewildering array of mortgage 
offers for the would-be house 
buyer. 

Is an endowment loan with 
the Midland better value than 
a repayment loan with the 
building society? Would £50 
towards the legal fees bill be a 
better bet than a “chain- 
breaking facility?” Such ques- 
tions are puzzling those about 
to buy or move. 

This week Lloyds Bank 
complicated things still fur- 
ther by coming into the mar- 
ket with a fixed rate home 
loan at 9.9 per cent. You have 
to be prepaid to stick with the 


‘Not really aiming at 
first-time buyers’ 


mortgage for a minimum of 
three years as there is an early 
redemption penalty of two 
months' interest if you repay 
the loan within the first three 
years. This would, for exam- 
ple, work out at a hefty 
£247.50 on a £30,000 loan. 

“With the high minimum 
loan of £30,000 and the early 
redemption penalty, we are 
not really aiming at first-time 
buyers.” commented Ten 
Harman of Lloyds Bank. 

The arrangement has the 
merit of letting you budget 
effectively — you know abso- 
lutely what your outgoings are 
going to be during the next 
three years. But what you are 
really doing is taking a gamble 
on the way interest rates will 
go. 

And you could, of course. 


find yourself paying 9.9 per 
cent two years down the line 
when everyone else is paying 9 
per cent on an odinary vari- 
able rate loan. 

Conversely, if interest rates 
rise you will be laughing all the 
way to the bank. 

“We are allocating an initial 
£200 million to this new 
scheme and I am sure it will be 
welcomed by bouse buyers as 
a significant addition to the 
range of options for buying 
property and for the opportu- 
nity of budgeting with certain- 
ty for the first three years.” 
said John Dawson, director of 
Lloyds' mail backing. ■- 

However, the experts be- 
lieve interest rates will be 
down below 1 0 per cent before 
the end of the year, and if they 
were to fell still further in the 
remaining two years, this 
Lloyds Bank offer might not 
look so attractive. 

But the experts are by no 
means unanimous and some 
say base rates could start to 
rise slightly next year as a 
general election looms. 

The National Westminster 
Bank, on the other hand, is 
talking about an average bank 
base rate of 9.4 per cent over 
the three-year period starting 
January 1986. Home loan rates 
are usually 1 percent to L5 per 
cent above bank base rates, 
although at the moment fierce 
compelion for the business is 
keeping the differential lower. 
On this scenario the Lloyds 
Bank fixed rate mortgage 
sounds attractive — but it is a 
bit of a gamble. 

Undoubtedly the most at- 
tractive loan offer at the 
moment is Midland Bank’s 
package which gives home 
buyers a discount of 0.5 per 
cent on the normal mortgage 
rate of 11 per cent for ihe first 
year. Fust-time buyers get £50 
towards their legal costs, and 
for anyone switching to the 
Midland from another lender 
.(possibly one that is still 
charging over the odds) the 


YOU WtfIMr SOCX&X, 

(l L VmTIHEVW. KMB> MIL 



legal fees associated with the 
switch will be borne by 
Midland. 

As the table shows, if you go 
for the Midland's straight 
repayment loan, monthly net 
pavments for every £LOOO 
borrowed over 25 years work 
out at £6.86 - some 82p per 
£1,000 per month cheaper than 
a building society repayment 
loan at U per cent. 

On a £30,000 loan you will 
be paying £24.60 a month 
more than you need to by 
staying with the building soci- 
ety’ — even one which is 
offering loans at the basic rate 
of 11 per cent The larger the 
loan, the greater the saving, 
and if you are paying a 
premium for your money as 
well, say an extra 1 per cent, 
this Midland offer is one you 
cannot afford to ignore. The 
offer ends on May 3!. so don't 
delay. 

The perennial argument 
about whether the endowment 
method is better than repay- 
ment has now swung in favour 
of the endowment method. 
The difference in the after-tax 
relief cost of a building society 


repayment loan and an en- 
dowment-linked mortgage is 
now only a few pence. Yet the 
cash benefit at the end of the 
term could be substantial. 

For example, a 35-year-old 
taking out a £30.000 loan over 
25 years will be paying 
£230.40 a month for a repay- 
ment loan -- or £234 a month 


‘Agony aunt’ to soke 
all yonr problems 


for the endowment-linked 
method. After he has paid his 
mortgage protection premium 
of around £7 a month for the 
repayment loan, this definite- 
ly works out the more expen- 
sive method. The 
endowment-linked borrower 
will not only have his loan 
repaid at the end of the term 
but there will be an estimated 
cash surplus of £36.930 on, 
say, a Standard Life policy. 

Of the other home loan 
packages available, nothing 
really begins to compare with 
the Midland offer. Legal & 
General has put together a 


scheme that looks largely gim- 
micky. According to L & G 
one single telephone call to an 
“agony aunt” will solve your 
house-moving problems. 
Homemove L & G offers 
advice on mortgages (no 
doubt linked to an L & G 
policy which is not the best 
value), insurance, estate 
agente, legal services and a 
"chain-breaking” facility. 

Most people except the idle 
would probably prefer to deal 
with these matters themselves. 
As a last-ditch measure, the 
chain-breaking facility might 
be usefol.L & G says that if 
you are part of a chain and are 
unable to exchange contracts 
on the property you are sell- 
ing, Homemove will buy the 
property from you — but at a 
discount to the market valua- 
tion. You have to use a 
Homemove estate agent to be 
eligible. Properties over 
£70.000 will not be considered 
in this context. The fee is 
£150. 

Lorna Bourke 
• Pension mortgages, 
page 26 


Bank of Scotland 
Home Loan Rate 


Bank of Scotland announces that 
with effect from 2nd June, 1986 
Bank of Scotland Home Loan Rate 
will be decreased to 1196 p.a. 
For new Mortgages granted from 
2nd May onwards, the 11% 
Home Loan Rate will apply 
immediately. 

Bank of Scotland, 

Head Office, 

The Mound, 

Edinburgh EH1 1YZ 


employment, who make re- 
tirement annuity contribu- 
tions have been advised, quite 
properly, to settle the death 
benefits under the policy on 
discretionary or flexible power 
of appointment trusts for 
spouse, children and depen- 
dants. The form of trust 
wording correctly reserves to 
the settlor the retirement 
benefits — the pension cannot 
be assignable if the policy is to 
be approved and the lump 
sum is in partial commutation 
of that pension. 

Is this not a gift with 
reservation? Again we are 
looking at a single policy that 
may provide different benefits 
for different persons depend- 
ing merely on whether or not 
the contributor takes his bene- 
fits before death. 

The separate policy (under 
section 226A rather than s226) 
that provides death benefits 
[seems clearly outride the nile.| 

The practice of the Revenue 
under estate duty was not to 
cla im duty under the corre- 
sponding statutory provision 
dealing with gifts subject to 
reservation on any benefit 
payable under approved occu-j 
palional pension schemes 
retirement annuity contracts. 
Even if this is confirmed fori 
inheritance tax it is too im 
tant a matter to be left ing, 
practice. 


NET MONTHLY PAYMENTS PER £1,000 OVER 25 YEARS 


& 


B sac repaymt loan 11 % 


£7.68 

B soc endmnt loan 11% 

Total 

£6.50 (interest) 
£1.30 (end prem) 


£7.80 

Midland repaymt loan 10.5% 
Mkfiand endmnt loan 10.5% 

Total 

£6.86 
£6.14 (interest) 
£L30 (end prem) 

Lloyds fixed rats endmnt loan 
9.9% 

£7.44 



£5.85 (interest) 


Total 

£1.30 (end prem] 



. FOR £S.00C Art DOVER 




00 % 




68 %> 


r 


^ 60-DAYS’ NOTICE SHARES 


Premiums for the endowment loans assure the borrower is a 36-year-old 
male. In al cases the cash residue from the endowment after repayment of 
the loan » estimated to be 0.23* 


HIGHER 

INTEREST RATES 


30 SAY SHAKE 

IHKH 


Ifcmim h immii £500 


s 12-BB^j 


l&mnnn breumett tSoO 


90 SAY SHAKE 

I9H*= I-20& 12-89* 


Withdrawals al 60 days' notice or on demand with 60 days' 
loss of interest. No notice or loss oi interest if balance of 
£1010) maintained. Monthly income available al 850% net. 


For investments of £500-24,999 
8.75% net = 12.32% gross* ■ 


'Equivalent yield to basic rate taxpayers. Interest rales 
variable. 


To. Walth a m sto w BuikSng Society. Freepost Walthamstow El 7 
let 01-531 3231 £2*1 hr i 


4BR Tet 01-531 3231 (2 4 hr service). liWe enclose cheque tor 
£ la open a 60 Days' Notice Shares Account with 

interest added annually Q or paid monthly imm. balance £5.0001 
ntormahon on 60 Days' Notice Shares Q 


Q Please send further ini 

Namets) 

Address 


106% 


We are able to offer inves- 
tors up to 106% allocation 
of units in a new Bond being 
launched by a major Life 
Company. 


For hnhrr aeuds or dm apctcMn fom 

Hune comet in *t 


BAR0NW0RTH LTD 


Ftecmki (no uamp requred) 


370 Cranbrook Road, 
Gants Hill, Ilford, 
Essex IG2 1BR 


Telephone: 01-518 1218 


3 YEAR SHAKE 

9-41*5 0-8& 



<8K°BABK OF SCOTLAND 


Our Triple Bonus Account 
rewards you for investing more. 
So when you increase your in- 
vestment we increase our rate 
of interest 

Three high-earnin g rafogL 
You can open an account 
with just £1,000 and you’ll 
attract 8.3% net p.a. straight 
away. Build your deposit up to 
£5,000 and we 1 !! build the in- ,. 


BRISTOL 


1 1 a mf 



ACC9BI4T 


terest rate up to 8.55% net p.a. 
And when you reach £10,000, 
you’ll be earning 8.8% net p.a., 
one of the highest returns avail- 
able anywhere. 

Short notice , 
or no notice at ali. 

With Triple Bonus, we only 
require seven days notice 
for withdrawal without loss of 
interest. If you leave £10,000 or 


more invested, we’ll waive the 
notice period altogether. 

O pen an account now. 

With over 500 Bristol and 
West branches and agencies 
around the country, there's one 
near you with full details. 

Or write (no stamp required) to 
Triple Bonus Department, Bristol 
and West Building Society, 
FREEPOST, PO Box 27, Broad 


Quay, Bristol BS99 7BR. 

The gross rates for ourTripIe 
Bonus Account are: 

£1,000 to £4,999 11.69% p.a., 
£5.000 to £9,999 12.04% p.a., 
£10,000 and above 12.39% p.a. 



Head OH«K&oad<W Bristol BS89 TPX. US 2*4271. Assets uwred £2550 m*on. ^*esAssoc^and>n^^ 


■> * 


■d. 






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THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 


C C 


Pick up our heaviest returns. 



6 The new 90 DAYS Account pays 
out our top rate of 9.0% net. And alt 
you need is £500 to open an account. 
$ Give us 90 days* notice of with- 
drawals and you lose no interest. 
For instant access, all you lose is 
90 days’ interest on the amount 
withdrawn. 

O Or leave a balance of £10,000 and 
there’ll be no penalty for immediate 
withdrawal. 


r 


Wof pros 



N/ 


National^ Provincial Building Society 

I in iRtafemd in managing in, money better with National A Provincial Building Seaecy. 


Postcode 


l/WTenctmc j eheguefarf 


to be lovstodm a N> Pays Account 


r information 


TTWl 


1 Signatured) 

| Send to: ClUr M. Hamad. National ft Provincial BaHdlnf Soctety. FREEPOST. BfMlonL WotTforVihireRD) 1DR. 


NATIONAL, A PROVINCIAL BUILDING SOCIETY. FREEPOST. BRADFORD. WEST YORKSHIRE BOI 1BR. AU INTEREST RATES QUOTED ARE APPLICABLE FROM B.JJM AND ARE CORRECT AT 
TINE O* GOING TO PRESS. BUT SUBJECT TO VARIATIONS. CURRENT VS DATS ACCOUNT INTEREST RATE IS Wt NEE. I lABK GROSS EQUIVALENT WHEN TAX IS PAID AT TM» BASIC RATE 


Y v; i£ 


FAMILY MONEY/2 


Homework is 
the answer for 
right choice 


C MORTGAGES 1 


Homebuyers have rarely had 
it so good and the news this 
week of another 1 per cent off 
the mortgage rate wiH send 
many would-be borrowers 
bade to the calculator to work 
out how much they can afford. 

But deciding on the best 
value-for-money mortgage for 
a particular pocket is becom- 
ing quite an ait and it is 
essential not to accept the first 
suggestion but to compare the 
pros and cons of repayment, 
endowment and, if you are 
self-employed, pension mort- 
gages. Thousands of pounds 
are at stake. 

Gone are the days when the 
repayment or term mortgage 
was the obvious choice for 
hard-up first-time buyers, 
thanks in part to the arrival of 
MIRAS. Now that the build- 
ing societies and other lenders 
do not charge higher interest 
for an endowment mortage, 
this type looks as attractive as 
the straight repayment loan. 

Although in many i ttsmnre s 
the repayment mortgage 
works out a little cheaper — 
this can be crucial for the first- 
time buyer smashing every 
piggy bank to own ms own 
home— for only a little extra a 
month the endowment mort- 


sum at Urn end 
ment period. 

For example, the Norwich 
Union, in extolling the won- 
ders of the endowment ver- 
sion, |ives a convincing 
illustration. A man aged 34 on 
29 per cent lax rates, taking 
out a repayment mortgage of 
£30,000, pays £237.41 a month 
(assuming the current 11 per 
cent mortgage interest rate) 
after tax relief at the basic rate. 

At the end of the repayment 
period he receives nothing 
extra. But if he took out an 


endowment mortgage with the 
Norwich Union he would 
collect a lump sum of £21,047 

and For only an extra £2. 76 a 

month. 

This comparison favours 
endowment mortgages; repay- 
ment mortgages often are as 
much as £15 a month less (see 
thble). The benefit of an 
endowment, as opposed to a 
repayment, mortgage becomes 
even more obvious for the 
higher rate tax-payer. 

For example, according to 
the Noiwkft union again, a 40 
per cent tax payer, 34,. taking 
out an endowment mortgage 
would pay £204.40 a month 
after tax relief on an endow- 
ment scheme, for the same 
£21,047 surplus. He would 
pay an extra £12 a month on a 
repayment mortgage without 
getting a pay-out at the 
end. Given the need to check 
these differences, and the 
heightening competition be- 
tween different building soci- 
eties and between societies, 
and banks, Trafalgar House 
Group's Ideal Homes mort- 
gage service for its customers 
could not be more timely. 

Now you can call at- any 
Ideal Homes development site 
around' Britain — the group; 
sells 4,000 homes a year — and 
get a complete run-down of 
everything to do with mort- 
gages in a matter of minutes, 
including which is better value 
for you — repayment or 
endowment. 

The Ideal Homes computer 
digests your financial data arid 
comes up with a printout of 
how much you can- borrow 
and what deals are being 
offered by 10 and more com- 
petitive building societies and 
hanks. The service will also 
tell you additional costs such 
as land registry charges and. 
stamp duty. 



‘And they lived as happily as their mortgage wonW alto* 


Having had first-hand expe- 


rience 1 ^ the. Ideal Homes 
computer, I . would recom- 
mend people planningto buy 
a house or flat to visit their 
nearest Ideal Homes site pure*- 
iy.to check the costs and what 
differe nt budding societies 
and banks are offering now. 
For example, on a joint 
salary worth £22,000 a 


the Abbey National wiQ 
£50,000. On 


wo a property worth 
£50,000, only the Abbey out of 
the computer list offers a 100 
per cent mortgage. Barclays 
Bank and the Bristol & "West 
come bottom, offering only 
£45,000, that is, 95 per cent of 
the property value. 

As our table shows, lire 
Ideal Homes service gives a 
.comparison between .repay- 
ment and endowment. The 
Alliance & Leicester offers an 
endowment mortgage costing 
Hearty f?? a month more than 
its repayment version.' But for 
that the home buyer receives a 
£23^00 bonus at the end 
- Not surprisingly. Ideal . 
Homes does not cover pen- 
sion mortgages as they aie too 
specialized. Bui pension mort- 
gages are a must for tire self-, 
employed or anyone without a 
company pension scheme. 

The pension mortgage has 
been around for several years 


but is only now, with tax refief 
•on endowment premiums a 
thing of the past, begriming to 
be fidfr appreciated. 

The advantage of a loan 
linked to a personal pension 
y hawE is that you get tax 
relief on tire mortgage interest 
in tire normal way. But you get 
full tax relief at your highest 
rate paid on the contributions 
to a personal pension plan. 
The mortgage is eventually 
repaid ar retirement age from 
tire commuted lump stun 
benefit you are allowed to 
draw at retirement from your 
personal pension plan. 

As our table shows. Sun life 
worked out a pension mort- 
gage on the same criteria as the 

Ideal Homes examples. For 
under £27 a mooch more, our 
35 Lyear-old on retirement at 
60 not only receives a handy 
£11.246 in cash over and 
above the amount needed to 
repay the loan. He also re- 
ceives a pension for life of 
more titan £17,000 a year. 


- And as every life company 
wiQ point :6ut, it would en- 
courage someons taking out a 
pension mortgage to increase 
the annual payments to keep 
pace with hnUtiotr if possible 


HBaireGozner 


Net monthly cost of £45,000 home loan over 24 years at 11% for a borrower aged 35 


Repayment 


Endowment 


Nat mart rpyrnnt 
Mart prat policy 
Total 
End of term 


£ 

374.90 

10.69 

385.59 

nil 


Net int 
Endow prem 
Total 

End of term cash 
residue after 
toanrpymnt 
(ind terminal bonus) 


332.75 

7048 

403.23 


Nat int 
Natl 


23,000 


Basie rate 

.332.75 
iprem 97.98 

. . ' 43670 

End of tana cash 
renkJuoafter 

foan fpymnt -v .• ;■ 

plus pension of 


60% taxpayer 
£ 

247.50 

5520 

302.70 


. 11,246 
17.309pa 



Vanguard 


V 

* 

V: *v . 




rt 

N 

si 

re 

hi 

tir 

Wi 


A Double First! 




For the second year running, Vanguard 
Trust Managers won the Observer “Small 
Unit Thist Group of the Year” Award. 

The average gain of our four funds 
was 36.7% — better than all other unit trust 
groups. 


We have also been awarded the Money 
Management“Small Unit Trust Management 
Group of the Year” Award for 1985. We were 


iup,b^ their criteria, to have 


achieved 100% above-average performance 
over one and three years. 

A contributory factor was the performance of Vanguard Special Situations Thist, 
the only Unit Trust to have been in the top 3 best performing UK Growth funds over the 
last 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 10 years. 

Short term performance is often a flake — long term performance is not. 


A Proven Performance Record 

Over one, two, three, five, seven and ten year 
periods, the trust is among the 3 best performing 
U.K. Growth Funds*, registering gains of 
62.4%, 138.6%, 218.3%, 383.7%, 480.2% and 
865.9% respectively. No other U.K. Growth 
Fund has managed to perform so consistently. 
*Mone>j Management figures to 1st April 1986. 

Offer to bid, including net reinvested income. 


Investment Objectives 

The investment policy of this Trust is to 
provide capital growth from an actively 
managed portfolio consisting of shares of 
smaller companies and carefully selected 
special situations. 

These could be companies that have 
fallen on bad times, but are now 
turning round; they could be 
companies that look ripe for a 


take-over or perhaps companies 

)dui 


with new, innovative products. 

We also have the power to invest 
up to 25% of the Trust in USM stocks, 
as well as in traded options in 


General Information 

Upon receipt ol your application form a contract note 
will be sent, followed hy a cPrtiricaiH in 3T»da> s. Unit 
prices and yield* are quoted in the Fina nciai Times. 
Unite can be fold back tr. the Managers. »l n« Jess than 
the minimum bid price rjlculated U> a formula opppived 
by the Deparunem-oi Trade. The Trust is authorised by 
the Department of Trade and constituted by a Deed 
dated March 1971 las amended i. Aniniualchartreof5% 
is included in the otter price of unite, from u hich 
remunernion is payable to qualified intermediaries at 
nne> availuhle i m req Ufst The annual ehartce is set at 

plus VAT '»f c he value of the Trust (a*. Opposed W a 
maximum ol tfr permitted in die Dee>1i. This is deducted 
from the press income and is allowed Kirin the current 
press yield. Distributions will be paid twice yearly at 
the end of February and August. 

tustee: Royal Bank of Scotland pk 1 . WIT Old Broad 
Street. London EC2. 

Managers: Vanguard TVust Managers Limited. 

H3 Ho (burn Viaduct. London EOl A SEU. telephone: 
01-230^05-3. Member of the Unit Trust Association. 

Thin n/jerix not uniilabte tu n'Mdunt* pf Eire. 



accordance with the guidelines set by the 
Department of Trade. 

You should. remember that the price of 
units and the income from them can go down 
as well as up. 

An Enviable Pedigree 
Vanguard Trust Managers is the wholly owned 
subsidiary of stockbrokers Capel-Cure Myers, 
one of the City's most quoted and authoritative 
sources on investment topics. They currently 
look after over £L5 billion of funds on behalf of 
institutional, private and pension fund clients. 
Since 1985 they have been a member of the 
ANZ Group, a major international bank with a 
worldwide network of offices and with balance 
sheet footings exceeding US$30 billion. 

Act Now 

Tb invest in this Trust, please 
complete this application form 
and send it to the Managers. 

For your guidance only, the offer 

_ ■ _ f . . n A A •! -4 Ar»A • 


price of units on 24th April 1986 
was 44.0p per unit The Estimate 
Current Gross Yield is L8%pa. 


Estimated 

rross Yield is L8%pa. 


To: Vanguard Trust Managers Ltd, 65 Holborn Viaduct, 
Loudon EC3A 2EU, Telephone 01-236 3053. 



I/We wish to investfmuiiinura £15001 £ 


in the Vanguard 


Special Situations Trust at the offer price ruling on receipt of my 

made payable to Vanguard Trust 


application. A cheque is enclosed 
Managers Ltd. Tick box for accumulation units □ 


I 


FirstNameslinfull). 


Surname » Mr/Mrs/Miss) , 

BLUCKLETTEBS PLEASE 

Address 




Signature 

Date 



! a month rising 


•First 16' 

to £402^26 in years IB to 25 
** Afl figures except where stated (pensions) assume tax refef a? basic rate onlywfjera appropriate 
Sources: Sun Ufa and ideal Homos ■ 


MiG OFFERS 


Heasetlckihe appropriate box for full details of the 
folloiving services. NO SALESMAN WQX CALL 

Ufllt IrUStS offer managed investment inBritisliand 
overseas stock markets for £1,000 or more. 

Savings Plan enables you to invest in unit trusts from 
£20 a month with no’extra Chmges. 


i 


i 



zsan 


inexpensive way for you to exchange shares worth £1,000 or 
morefor any M&G Unit Trust 

Planned Income Portfolio provides 

ten income payments spread through fbeyearfrom an 
investment of £2,500 or more. 


□ 

□ 

□ 


i 


i 


I 


l 


i 


i 


i 


□ 


Uf © Cover Plan offers you high levels of life 

cover protection at low cost 

Flexible Pension Plah : for anyone who is self- 

employed or not in an employer's pension scheme* you get 
complete tax relief on contributions. - 


□ 

□ 



, , - - T ^equivalent to 

a gross compounded annual rate of 1103% {correct at time 
of goingto press). High Interest Cheque Accoimtwith 
Weiiwort, Benson L&nited, administered by M&G as agents.’ 
\finimum initial deposit £2,500. 


□ PERSONAL □ COMPANY ..Q PARTNERSHIP 
n CHARITY Q TRUSTEE Q CLUBORSOCIETY 


-Mr/Mrs/Miss INITIALS 

SURNAME 

r ™ — 

ADDRESS 

- 


- 1 


POSTCODE 


|#A481715 "] (^LiratTmstAssocabon 




THE M&G GROUP 


AA' 9 ’ 



I 


II: 









FAMILY MONEY/3 


Hi’WW 


■K«»7.xwv;ra 


Calling all 
investors, 
nationwide 

■ How wouk! you find out this 
price of gold, the most active shares 
or the latest price for traded 
options? For people in the London 
area the answer has often been to 
dial CrtycaH, British Telecom's 
business phone-in service. Now 
CrtycaH is going nationwide and win be 
available to aH telephone 
subscribers in response to the many 
demands from businessmen and 
private investors who want to keep 
tabs on what their shares, gold or 
foreign exchange is doing. 

Citycair offers two-minute reports 
on company news, active shares. 


Remnant says that the benefit of any 

reduced commissions resulting 
from aggregating purchases wdl be 

passed on to the saver. 

Like all savings plans the benefits 
are generally tong temi. Tourfie has a 
p ood tr ack record. Had you 

£1 .000 five years ago and 
spat it between all their investment 
trusts, it would now be worth £2.634. 
or £5,527 over 10. 

Details from Peter Kysei.Touche 


KVavwmr "fix? /Kwrawrurar 

am am imiaPtKxrmrm..» 


foreign exchanges, leading shares 
(A to K), leading shares (L to Z). traded 
options, the unrated securities 
market, new issues and BBC News, 
and gives a general market report 
and stockbrokers' analysis. CltycaB 
aims to extend the range of 
bulletins during the coarse of the year 
and anyone wanting details of the 
service should cfiaf 01-241 1557, 


Flexible savings 

■ Investment managers Touche 
Remnant have come up with what 
looks Nke a good deal for savers. 

They have launched a savings plan, 
which Is flexible and inexpensive, 
whereby your savings are invested In 
a selection of their 10 investment 
trusts. 

Existing holders of Touche 
Remnant Investment trusts — or, in 
fact, of any quoted shares — can 
have their dividends automatically paid 
into the savings plan. 

Ordinary members of the public 
can either pay £25 a month Into the 
plan, selecting the trusts 
themselves, or make occasional 
payments of at least £250. Regular 
contributions to the plan can be made 
under deed of covenant 

There are no charges to those 
starting a savings plan, beyond the 
stock exchange commission and 
stamp duty payable oh purchases of 
shares. Peter Kysel of Touche 


Remnant 2 Puddle Dock, London 
EC4V3AT. 

New company rules 

■ The hew rules concerning 
disqualification and personal liability of 
directors come into force on 
Monday. One of the targets is the fly- 


aflows his company to go merrily into 
liquidation and then sets up a new 
company, with a similar name and - 
identical trade Immediately 
afterwards. 

The rules do not go as far as had 
originally been planned, in that 
disqualification of a director will not 
be automatic but will require a court 
application and order. 

The grounds for (jtequaHflcation 
and other useful information aimed at 
informing directors of the new law 
are set out clearly in a new leaflet 
produced by the Department of ' 
Trade and industry. This, and a more 
comprehensive guide to the law, . 
called Guide to the Insolvency Act, can 
be obtained from Insolvency - 
Service, 2-14 BunhiH Row, London 
EC1Y 810.(01-6064071). 


Expat account 

■ Cheltenham & Gloucester is the 
latest building society to offer a non- 
resident account that is paying 11.75 
per cent without deduction of rax. The 
maximum investment is £250,000. 
Interest Is paid annually and 
withdrawals can be made without 
notice or penalty. You have to be able 
to show that you are non-resident 

in the UK to be eligible for the account 
Investors in the society's 
International Account will also have 
priority access to a home loan on 
return to Britain. FuH details from 
Cheltenham & Gloucester 
branches. 

Farmers’ guide 

■ ‘To survive the 1980s the farmer 
must pay as much attention to the 

does to su^^ngs^y^lsf pests 
and the weather, says Barry 
GamWe m his book, The Farming 
Business. The book is described 
as being the bridge between the 
farmer and his financial advisers 
and accoimtants. It covers topics such 
as the organization of the industry, 
elementary farming systems, business 
structures, including tenancies, 
financial management and control, 
and audit and taxation. The book is 
published by the Institute of Chartered 
Accountants, £1 1 .95. ft is available 
from Chartac Books, the Institute of 
Chartered Accountants, 399 
Silbury Boulevard, Witan Gate East, 
Central Mttton Keynes, MK9 2HL. 

Motor claims 

-■ Ham bra Legal Protection 
reckons It has the largest slice of the 
fast growing motor uninsured loss 
market dealing with as many as 
22,000 claims at any one time. The 
Motor Legal Protection policy now 
covers 875,000 vehicles giving 
motorists protection against tne high 
cost of going to court if they are 
involved In uninsured losses or 
personal injury claims. Hambro has 
now introduced a "phone-in service" 
that can be used by a if Motor Legal 
Protection members. “Sorting out so 
many motor claims has taught us 
what the motorist feels in trie dark 


Hambro Legal Protection Ltd. Hambro 
House. East Hill. Colchester. Essex 
COt 2QN (0206 870570). 


Insurance on time 

■ Datapost the Post Office's 
courier service, is now offering free 
consequential loss insurance and a 


WWW*' 



such as speeding, etc." Full details of 
the policy are available from 


From Data post: Better service 

money-back guarantee for customers 
who use International Datapost. if 
the consignment is not delivered on 
time. Rates for Europe and the UK 
are also being cut. The Inland 
Datapost service guarantees 
overnight delivery by 10 am the 
following day to more than two- 
thirds of the UK, including all main 
centres. Full details are available 
from your local post office. 

Sunny Sun Life 

■ Sun Life is turning In a truly 
remarkable overall performance with 
its unit trusts, having no less than 
eight of its eleven funds in the top ten 
of heir sector - two in top 
position, two in the second slot, one 
third, two fourths and a sixth. The 
best-performing fund is Sun Ufa 
Japan Growth which shows a 93 
per cent rise over the 10 months to 
April 1 this year. Even its worst 
performer, the UK income Fund, still 
managed to put on 33 per cent 
over the period. Full details from Sun 
Ufa Trust Management. 107 
Cheapside. London EC2V 6DU (01- 
606 7788). 



HOARE 

GOVETT 

The International Stockbroker 

Members ol The London Slock Escnange 


: '>vr i 


reasons 
oareGwett 


y./ith more than 900 unit trusts avaiLsC'l* it i=. 
becoming me singly chit:,- uit it no; impci- Hde. 
I,;,i the private mvtraiot io lino tiii vi.:;/ ihi . ugn tn* 
unit fruit maze. 

II you s hare our view that independent advice 
is likely to be the best advice and •.voul-n ill your 
portfolio to have full access to all the 900 Fusts 
available, a Hoare GoveK Unit Trust •> Acc ount 
may be iusl whai you are lo<> met 
0 A choice cf mveslmenl v.it.itegi-: s is inee : 
capital growth and nigh income objer rive i 

• A portfolio of unit 'i‘.!*t = ; -I- 1 -’ fi :>m 
whole range available we do not manage 
any unit foists of our own. 

• a monthly in* ;ime tac ihi; 

O Regular investment rep-: :f v.-i riuai: r-n* 
together wiit>noirnnee tin den, its Mlec lion and 
capital gams i.^* sei.ices 

0 Annual acirm'i, ; t 1 a l , on :e-' suit oni-, G2o p a 
tjusi £j\5 c-n our minimum i., lr. ?ce c*t 

£6 C'lXr, 

For further mrc-rnidti-ir on no-.., open a Hoare 
Cover! Un it Ti -j s ■ s A • : j r.i c on \ at. t John Sa v age- 
on 0i-J 0-4 or ;>ii t. :re : luoori beie.v 

1 ; 1 

• j-.trn 1 

I HO-'iie ■>:.■. «r" '. ■ >7 Tim - A.;- . ‘l-r ' . <•: es L'd 

■ He* f ,n H.'.uve . ’ v : J~. ri|."ir> Hv 

I I ii'ii, ,''. * I “Pr 

i ; 

1 -1-. ■ r -. . • i">. c ■- 

>>. or '• I 

jrj.:.-,e 




-aCt" 1 


\== 


LONDON ■ NEW YORK ■ TOKYO ■ HONG KONG ■ SINGAPORE • AUSTRALIA - CHANNEL ISLANDS 


Shades of trust 


“There are 87,000 people 
walking around somewhere 
with holdings in the 17 
“blacklisted" bottom perform- 
ing income unit trusts," says 
Peter Edwards of Premier 
Unit Trust Brokers. “That's 
£300 million of investments 
going to waste." 

He has once again compiled 
his “white list" “grey list:" 
and “black list" of the top, 
mediocre and bottom perform- 
ing income unit trusts. “Many 
fund managers continue to 
muddle along year after year. 


ing for when he compiles his 
white list is a proven record 
over three years of increasing 
net dividends at least in fine 
with inflation. Capital most 
also increase at least in line 
with the All Share index. 
During the latest three-year 
period inflation has ran at 16 
per cent and the All Share 
index is up no less than B6 per 
cent. 

The black list members 
have met neither of these 
criteria. Among those trusts 
that get a. raspberry from Mr 


with a constant pom- record of 7~Edwnrds are Guinness Mahon 
dividend growth ia 'particular. High Income, Backmaster In- 


A MAJOR INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITY FOR 1986 


THE LAUNCH OF 
- 6 NEW FUNDS - 



Their unitholders really are 
long suffering — or w the 
dark," be-says- — 

We include the white Bst — 
the best peformers m our table 
— but the Madt list shows that 
no less than « quarter of 
income fund managers under- 
performed inflation over three 
years, and half Jailed to beat 
the share market generally. 
Among the worst performers, 
dividends were raised by only 
16 pm- cent in three years, 
compared with. 70, 80 and 90 
per cent fin- those at the top of 
the charts. 

What Mr Edwards is krak- 


eome, Wardley Income, Baltic 
High Income, St Vincent 
Hi^lL.Incfime,-TyndaQ High 
Yield, Mayflower Income, 
Quadrant Income, Henderson 
High Income, Tyndall Smaller 
Companies Dividend, Target 
Extra Income Britannia Extra 
Income Baltic Income & 
Growth, Canlife Income, S & 
P Income, Gartmore High 
Income and Henderson Small- 
er Companies Dividend. 

If you are a bolder of any of 
these trusts then you would do 
well to give your in vestments a 
thorough review. 

LB 


INCOME UNIT TRUSTS: WHITE LIST 1986 
(Both efividends and capital growth better than inflation/the FT All- 
Share) 



Schroder income 
Fidelity Grth & Inc 
Equity & Law H Inc 
F&C Inc 
Perpetual Inc 
Stewart Iv Brit 
Allied H Inc 
Capel Inc 
Prolific H Inc 
Rothschild NC Inc 
Peart Inc 
Royal Tr Inc 

Hifl Sam Inc 

Henderson Inc & Assets 
Midland fnc 
Henderson Inc&Grth 
Lloyds inc 
Midland H YJd 
Brown Shipley Inc 

Bridge Inc 
FramJington Ex Inc 
Allied Eq Inc 


Source: P remier Untt Trust Brokers 


% 

% 

% 

+91 

+126 

4.78 

+80 

+151 

4.10 

+79 

+157 

4.55 

+75 

+125 • 

4.55 

+70 

+143 

4.82 

+67 

+129 

4.44 

+63 

+129 

4.66 

+60 

+169 

- 4.62 

+60 

+143 

4.09 

+56 

+147 

3.76 

+53 

+151 

3.95 

+53 
div cut) 

(85 

+125 

5.21 


AIMING F( 
CAPITAL 




+52 

+50 

+49 

+47 

+47 

+46 

+42 

divN/C) 

+40 

+40 


+132 

+127 

+122 

+122 

+122 

+117 

(85 

+135 

+120 

+143 

+126 


INCOME TODAY 
+ GROWTH TOMORROW 
= PLANNED INCOME ACCOUNT 


If you have £10,000 or more to invest and would like to find 
out more about Planned Income Account from Quitter Unit 
Trust Advisory Service (QUTAS), please complete the 
coupon below or ring Chris Busby or Angus Agnew 
on 01-600 4177. 

Or come and see us at our QGC Money Centres: 

Debenhams Oxford Street 
Debenhams Bristol (Broadmead Centre} 

3 Calenick Street Truro. 


Ptes* compete and sew to. QUIA&'PJamted Income Account 
QtfNterOoodtonttBnpany Unated Garrard House. 

3145 Graham Street London £C2V 7LH. 


PAST RECORD OR FUTURE PHOSPEriTb 1 

Its true Id sat that manv invpMmniK in umi rru*U »eeni lo be 
made on the basis nr-irai-L rerord - . This, of i-nurse. G lialancvrt h\ 
the sobering real lid lion that todays “lldiiinrrif the month _ is raroli 
tomorrows. 

It's also true, however. I hat some »r the must speUdtuiargHin* 
have been made when I he opportunity has been seized to "vi m *i 
the ground fToor - at rbe initial laum h of a new fiinri wnh all ih- 
advaniages “new money” can briny. Sr.meiimes, these funds fi.ivi- 
iio retord to speak of. 

The problem for die investor, then, is how in *pm an 
uiiereslingoppurluiiny when ii tomes up. 

We. believe it is here now. A new Management Company - 
but with excellent credentials. A new range nr Funds - but 
wnh parallels of proven success as comparisons. 

And d new environment of encouragement lor investment as 
exemplified by the Chancellors Budget remarks. 

The next few paragraphs will give vnu the background to this, 
the newest Investment Management Companv. Judge the 
prospects for yourself. 

THF. THORNTON A CO GROUP. 

Richard Thornton has spent the la-i ji veers specialising in 
in vest men! maiidgemeiit. He was the ,.c,Tnmider nf GT Manage- 
ment in WW and was their Chief Investment fllTicer with direct 
responsibiliiv for IIA hillmn. 

Thornlon Ac Co. Lnjnied was ■•-l.ililished i« Rt« haul 
Tliuruhin in early joNf and is a holding cum pans having -uhsid- 
luries m ihe L.K.. Hong Kong. San Fra in isro. Bermuda and 
Guernsey. 

The speuahsi companies which make up iheThornmn ,k C«* 
Group are lodav responsible for ihe management funds in 
excess of £200 million throughout the vxurld. 

FE NDS UNDER MANAGEMENT 

We manage fixe mutual funds denominated in l .S. dollars, 
ihe majority of w Inch invest in Far Eastern markets 

Regulations don’t permit anything nun* than tins statement 
of fact, but your fnlermedian or Professional Advisor will be 
pleased to give you further information. 

We nlx.i manage three UK quoted investment trusts 

THE LAUNCH OF A NKU POMPANO - 
THORNTON I NIT MANAGERS LIMIT ED 
axiom of any successful business is to play to rt> stmigihs 
Thornton Unit Managers Limited has been funned speufically it, 
do just that. 

The strengths of the Thornton Group are inv,«simeuf 
expertise and a considerable prior experience and success in the 
field of unit trusts. 

We will capitalise on our partirular strength in ihe Pa, ific 
Basin area, where our oifici-. on the spot in Hong Kung. beneliis 
from additional mpm from San Francisco and the American 
viewpoint as well as from London. 

However, in the choice of theM- six new null trusts, we are ulso 
offering a I k. and General Fund for those investors who wish to 
sec- pan of their portfolio devoted to our mv n ilouK-sUc market 

THE INVES I MEN f APPROACH. 


Commune atnui and speed uT rear non is our strong suit W isli 
broad expi-rienre in intemalional markets and operating from 
overseas offices as well as in London, we have immediate u>. res. i.. 
information on local companies and i liaiiges. however rapid, in 
economic and political rondilnnis. 

Because »i- can reait quickly this allows us to safeguard 

invesunent’i. 

Our objective i< to achieve a high degree oT capital growth in 
the long term Tor our ime&ior>. rather than the provision of a 
regular income. 

Our philosophy is to achieve tins through the prudent 
management of our clients' asset* around the world- laktng 
advantage of the Opporfumiies **nr skilled local resutinvs 
identify and, h> the Sirar token, using those same skills lo 
minimise the risk whenever possible. 


\ CHl.tfl E OF SIX FUNDS. Th-- six umi trusts .ill li.oc.ipn.il gruwih .„ :l« -r ,iii,~tmrni „li|> 


IHURMt.tM K ANDtiFNFRAI. 


I I HUB* 
FIND. 


Th, FI VII Mi.ir,- Inn.-, Ii.,. In j 

U1*,V|. .ill,'.,,) In n.-W I'-mldfev, Isdiirin-: ilia- tl|s| ■ 

■lu.-iriei •> I |OMi. Wot lining itnln ■ 

l , ,a,kiliu In ■ ! > In, -r llt.lli II Im- la -r a king f Ilia.-. ! 

sa-lla r.il iai.til-lri.il r»-»ri ll< till III" aip|.,.rlail,ll,a-. 

Ha- still -Iglllfll Hill It inla-la-sl r.lla-s lllaava- llaawn- 1 
Waral- .1* ,-Vpa-ala d .attal -»• rllllg a ■ alll I ,l,J.-s III II. , ifr-4 

pra-.B.|il r.aiig.. ifg.aiii'l aallu-r ■ iirr<-ii, la-- lta.-ra- 1 

.iiaalrlal ll.- a -..-n » a ..... ! 

grow ili rin- sharp fell in ilia- pri ml is .akn ., m.a|..f 

aiJvHiiiaga- in in.iiiiifei luring nuliisiry. 
hi! Mil > n't/- (il/ii •• 


2 THilhVlt»\ MIRTH AMI- K|f. AN 

VMI riKNFR M. FUND 

Tin- l V liH - itla- tviirlils l.ii-asi . 

with ., Cir.a-s Naliani.il PrmJu. i „1 nva-r S“i V n-il- 
llniiui I't.s'a Tln-allr.li Haiti nfaiia-a niiiinlt .a- 1 . 1 1 Ha- 

all, I I I a- this I- I ha- |,nla irli.il In Itrial 

sii,-a es-fnl inva , sim. , tit I'japiirr, until-- .iiitniig.i 
llie raiji,'. I-I .all . .11111 ,< a r|a,r« • lair ••fin a* ,11 s >.m 

Fi.iii ai. in -nifia ipaia in-mi. .iiial 

tak<- .ta !v .llltag,* ■ ,1 ln<>»» Illa-ill. Ill ll,- IN.irf 
la.-.- .j *. . i ii.- S/a 'I A>i/'l. l-l il ll//»l •• 


4 : IIIIRN 1 1 IN 1 \fr\\ -\U 

t.l M If, I I I \H 

1 In -im. >!, :»i (ii- I 

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- -S.- . • ll ... I 

>.,l. .Ill I a III -a lla V till- 111- U. -. • I* a. 

dial.- ft, 1 lit . . - 11 , 1 . I||| l-||.l. aj aval 1 - >1,. 

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la. ,il . r !• r- .11. ••• :|m -l.np tail :,, i : >- 

}>n, •• III III! 

Ur !•••:' ; /• •••/:«.. .• 


5 11 It Ills Hi' I [i.KH 
I l \l> 


3 1Hi»H\|ii\PAC ihi. 

TM HNi >1 Qt.V H Ml 

f he Pa< lf,« Baslll (rum .Idpdll I a ■ Nllla /ll, V.,lll-\ 

in Cad'lnriii.i has pr.aal il ih.- 111 . 11.0 t.-. Inia •!,<- 

Uli-dl H.|. •Ilia e- th>- last ala-a .Ilia- Wa- tal l |l • ltl.,1 
•ridny ie,-hi*‘ilngi »!•.■ 1. in ilnsarr-.i.ni' ■ nn.-nil* 
uDala-rv jlu,-,l a in I la.ive verv s„.j,l long ii-rru 
gn>n ill |,..lt-l,l,.al. 

Irfj a- 1 -.j 'Ur' l.nr.i/nn ll/ill I ml .■'//nr/fW/i.iif 
prv: id- if !• -• /■'/.- f/aing A.inc aini 'an Fninii-,,i 

iit/jf a— 


IIUW T ft l\\ IsT 

Vl.fj I. -ik«* .'-.ri . .Il.lii^a- a.] 'I il. ■ 1 1,1. all’s ,l<-.a si r-j.-rris.- 

b- investing ,11 an, r, u u it r .if • > , 1 1 n«-tv luual- lii . -i..,- ■ li> aul'i. 
h,iw,va-r. la-gHral 'll nni> n us| iii.isiii„-i,i. ..« la,i,g t- nn 

Tlr.-t -till, till -its.. | a-llla.lnl.a-r ill at til-- Jll >■•-!■! Hints a, -ll "I.. 
iruoitu- 1 rnm liiMiia . . 1,1 gaa ■lni -,11 |s n.-ll.i- up 

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ami reii>rn n. iiaat-ilia-r i’ll!, -..nn 1 1 ).. i'u T I,, 11 , , : 1 , < ■ 1 1, 1 ;t 
■lUi'siineilt ina-iv luml isAnlitl. 

'i^S' 1 1 r.i ..HMD.- - 


;. J b , i-h--ii 1 1» rial I 

.■■Hill, i|a . I..I fetrp ■ 


a- 


n *1 r- .11 ,* •!>,. -h- ,..r-.l .<»l ••l.r.....a ...,- ... |... 

I" > 1 . *-n lr ,a u . 1 . uni*- .a. ,.. . . • 

Th..r..|.-,.l V ■n*ll.. ai- a iltunil *• • Cl. a- _ . . , 

I '.in .ar, V-ni 1-r.ara. -n ana an n. rjl I,...’ .1 . 

1' ir .I." «!. l-< S'.,,..'., Vp.i.l V* I 

lhul 1 ) 1 , an I.a|,C ,mi , a. a.rr il ‘an,: -j , 

TKvi,ni.','t.(;.'kMl "1 *. 

I ,a i 

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t-t.nCijn HJX1 ~01 •>'....•1 ■— I •■•I,-. •..•<- 1,11 ... ..... s. • - -. 

M 1 y I— i .".n. I I 


In- ••-an ..-ill - wilt I..- • ,|.|..|i.->- 

I ■ I If, an;. h ,, , , !t- 1 1 " f'lalll.lMala-,. ... 

M-ll.l'-l tl. ii-.- • I,' in. .It. at s n ,|;,. 

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■ilia a'V a -> k at, S,,|,-t, h","l "I.., I.alk' ,1. .alll ill- 

I II III ! II, .. Unit a ,1 » till, II •• • I . . ■ 1 1 - . - - 1 :,r ,..;.| 

t I I l 1 I 1 i-*-.-s. 

• ri.ilij-- fi>,|iL k-'ig ..Ii • ‘..tl l‘> 

alll". 1 1 - I." I- -, - 1 - , 1 1 I • I - 1 - ! . l-l: n I- s ,- H,.|. 

spall I *i." -p. ■ a.al .ii.iaa., :> 1 |, 1 1 la - I . ■ • - ' . - 1 r . ■ J • - l . — ,11'- - 

hi - .- .■■■//■■ tU. !/. 

U|HHM«i’s|.VK f \-s ‘ ,\|i |] 

LjfsfHU. n Ml 

Thl, Fund ,s .ll ,1. ia. in a .1* 1.11 | ->• II. 

Ill llk.-l- l.lll r-. t 111' ■ II. 

s,.iill, h-Ti ., ail, I liii-.-.. ,ii ta,,: | -in 

■ 'p|,a<i iiaiin,. % i>a i:i,i-i , 1 , r-,isi 

in.n f ■ i- 

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THORNTON 


THORNTON I'MT MAN At, F R s 








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THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 


■ ;|J 




F - . : . _ 4 . , . - 


■ <> "si 

• S*;- .-. 










MITSUBISHI GALANT 1.6 GL-£6899 
NISSAN SUNNY 1300 GS — £5726 
VAUXHALL NOVA 1300 GL— £5939 
HYUNDAI STELLAR 1.6 GSL-£6199 
VOLKSWAGEN JETTA GL — -£7174 


ALFA ROMEO GUIUETTA 1.8-£795Q 
TOYOTA CA 

L6 LE£5899 
ANZA 1600 GL — £6551 

>710 

S^ 

VAUXHALL CAVALIER 
FIAT REGATA 100 SUPER £7540 


VOLKSWAGEN PASSAT CL— £7760 
FORD ORION 1600 LD- £6792 


FIAT REGATA 85 COMFORT-£6095 
AUSTIN MONTEGO 1600 L— £6799 


RENAULT 9 BROADWAY 1.4-£5520 
TOYOTA COROLLA 1300 GL-£5700 

FORD ORION 1600 GL £6719 

NISSAN BLUEBIRD 1.8 DX— £6399 


1500 GL— £5770 


;6130 


FIAT REGATA 85S AUTO £6' 


AUSTIN MONTEGO 1.6 HL— £7590 
VOLKSWAGEN JETTA CD — £6861 


RENAULT 18 DEAUVILLE GTD£6955 RENAULT DEAI 


DAIHATSU CHARMANT 1.3— £5549 




t Y 
hr 
si 
re 
h; 
lit 
wi 


FIAT REGATA 70 COMFORT-£5925 
RENAU1T 9BR0ADWAf 1.6 D£6I30 
AUSTIN MONTEGO 1600 
MITSUBISHI LAI 

RFNAI II T 

NISSi 
VI 
TJ 


MITSUBISHI LANCER 1 


149 


£6095 




£6899 


£7350 


ROVER 213 SE AUT0MATIC-£7323 


£6990 FORD ORION 1600 GHIA— £7875 



CAVAUER 1.3 L— £6409 

£7187 


£6990 


igOVER 216 SE 



VAUXHALL CAVALIER L3 L— £6409 
AUSTIN ROVER 216 SE £7187 




SSgSj* 

NISSAN^ 





MONTEGO 2.0 HL— £7899 

£6539 






MAZDA 323TM$3^,^ 





lif 


**<£?*■ 


VAUXHALL CAVAUER 1.6 £6362 


■ n r or 


SEAT MALAGA 1500 GLX — £6293 
VOLKSWAGEN JETTA TX £6568 







NISSAN SUNNVlSfeS^^w 
FORD ORION 1600 DGL 11 ^^^^^ 


HYUNDAI STELLAR 1.6 SL— £5599 
VAUXHALL CAVAUER 1.3- — £6015 
ALFA ROMEO GUIUETTA 1.6-£7350 




As you can see, they were all in there pitching to 
become Which Car?'s 'Best Buy’ - the Orion, Cavalier, 
Montego - family cars from Alfa to Volkswagen. 

But it took the Fiat Regata to show them all the 
way home with a combination of virtues that put the 
result beyond doubt 

To use Which Car^s own words: 

"Performance is one of the Regata’s strong suits 
...The twin cam 100 Super can manage a class-leading 
109 mph‘ and the 0-60 mph dash in under 10 secs!' 

. ride comfort is good . . .and handling safe and 
predictable!' 


‘The Regatas interior is spacious. ..equipment 
levels are high too. In total, the Regata is quiet and refined!’ 

‘A truly massive boot makes the point that the 
Regata is a very competent load carrier as well” 

"Fiat have gone to a lot of trouble to make the 
Regata one of the most refined economy machines in its 
class . . . All versions return very good fuel economy, however 
hard they are driven" " T . 

And to sum up: 

“Buy a Regata and you get a lot of car for your - 
money. All models are well equipped when compared 
with rivals and although the Regata never sets out to be 


if ^ f 5 Inten ? r s f )ace to greateffect 
jSi' al ' n L od ^ s are Pleasant to drive, handle 
predictably and shouldn’t cost a fortune to run” 


But talk to him now - he mav h#» ahi Q 

tompt nt - a 



REGATA 



RANGE FROM £5.695-13.460 tPRICE CORRECT ATTIME OF GOING TO PRESS. BUT EXCLUDES NUMBER PLATES. DELIVERY AND ROAD TAX OFFICIAL DOE FUEL CONSUMPTION FIGURES FOR THE REGAIA 10QS fll 1 1 WTPATrn a-,ZTZI - 

35.8MPG i7.&L TQ0KM'AT A CONSTANT 75MPH. 2Z5MPG fKML'fflOKM) URBAN CYCLE. ’WHERE LEGAL SPEED UMfTS PERMIT. ALL DATA FROM WHICH CAR? FEB 86. • 4Z9MPG ^ 9L/100KWi 


AT A CONSTANT 56MPH, 



-.«x- 
-. v 



THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/4 


ta 

ri 

n 

ises ii 

tt 

tl 

ie ] 

Ea 

st — aeain 

SKIPTON- SOVEREIGN -SHARES 


C UNIT TRUSTS and 


The most recent stars of the 
unit trust performance tables 
are the Japanese — alter a 
fairly miserable 1985. 

The most recent three- 
month performance figures 
‘{pm Planned Savings show 
that the top seven unit trusts 
are either Japanese or strongly 
invested in Japan. Bear in 
mind that these figures are on 
an offer-to-offer has*^ only; 


that, in reality; three 
months is precious little time 
to judge performance. Re- 
member 190 that the com- 
modity unit trusts were high 
fuers in the first statistics 
released for 1986. 

That said. it is good to see 
the Japanese back where they 
were two years ago, at the top 
of the. performance tables. 
Last year only two Japanese 
unit trusts stood out The 
MIM Japan Performance ^ 


JAPANESE UNIT TRUSTS 

Resutta of E100 investment held over 

3rntha* t wr 

3yra 

Abbey Japan 

124.7 

11ft2 

2466 

Allied Dunbar Japan 

1285 

136.6 

2246 

Arbuthnot Portfolio Japan 

13222 

1506 

Baltic Japan & General 

126.1 

132.7 

1726 

Barctayuntt Japan & Gen. 

IlftS 

1356 

2t86 

Baring First Japan - • 

125.5 

Baring Japan Special 

131.7 



Baring Japan Sunrise 

111.9 



Barrington Japan 

131.7 

1416 

- 

BG Japan 

129.0 

1576 


Britannia Japan Performance 

146.1 

153.7 

248.4 

Britannia Japan Smaller Cos. 

127^ 

125.7 

County Bank Japan Growth 

147.6 

17a.O 

22ft4 

CS Japan 

141.2 

1556 

Dunedin Japan Sm. Cos. ' 

121^ - 


EFM Smaller Japanese Cos. 

118.1 

123.8 


EFM Tokyo 

115.6 

122.1 

209.1 

FWefity Japan 

128.2 

119.4 

3036 

Fidelity Japan Spec Sits. 

120.1 

131.1 

FramSngton Japan & Gen. 

115.6 

1236 


Gartmore Japan 

1332 

170.7 

2836 

Govett Japan Growth 

129.4 

1426 

Grofund Japan 

186.4 

1296 


GT Japan & General 

122.7 

131.1 

226.1 

Henderson Japan 

1345 

. 153.5 

2546 

Henderson Japan Spec. Sits. 

13&2 

' 144.1 

2486 

HOI Samuel Japanese Tech. 

106l5 

1096 


Hotbom Japanese 

122.6 



KJnwrL Benson Jap. Growth 

131 

149.0 


LASJaparo 

122.5 



Lloyds Bank Japan Growth 

129.7 



London & Manchester Japan 

12&5 



M&G Japan & General 

123.7 

1356 

260.4 

M&G Japan Smaller Cos. 

117^ 

1306 


Mercury Japan 

132.0 

144.7 


Midland Bank Japan & Pacific 

129.1 

1476 

2566 

MJM Japan Performance 

135.6 

176.9 


New Court Japan 

1253 

1306 


Oppenheimer Japan Growth 

141 J) 

160.1 


Prov. Capitol Japan 

119.7 

1396 


Royal London Japan Growth 

120.1 



S&P Japan Growth - • - 

127.1 

1366 

2106 

S&P Japan Smaller Cos. 

117.1 

1276 


Schroder Japan Smaller Cos, 

130.9 

1886 


Schroder Tokyo - 

121.4 

1416 

2126 

Scot Equitable Japan 

123.6 . 



Sentinel Japanese Technfy. 

1283 

126.9 


Stewart Ivory Japan 

1154 

1346 

2406 

Sun life Japan Growth 

129.1 



Target Japan 

145J 

174.7 

3046 

TR Japan Growth 

123.6 



Tyndafl Japan Growth 

120S 

128.6 


Wardey Japan 

1406 

1476 

2726 

Average 

1276 

1416 

2436 


r Otfa to offer, tncoam oat T6ttmst*d Source: Planned Sating* Uegaam 


Companies funds were well in 
front of the Japanese competi- 
tion last year and highly 
placed among all unit trusts. 

Briefly, the main reason for 
the Japanese star waning last 
year was that many of the unit 
trusts were iu the wrong 
stocks. The Japanese high 
technology exporters, which 
had served the trusts so well in 
the past, proved to be their 
downfall. Instead domestic 
stocks, in areas such as real 
estate and the financial sector, 
boomed. As these stocks, on 
fundamental matters such as 
price/eamings ratios, did not 
look like good buys to an 
overseas investor, many of the 
trusts either missed out or 
were too slow is switching. 

Several factors have stimu- 
lated Japanese unit trusts in 
recent months. Lower interest 
rates and a strong yen have 
undoubtedly boosted perfor- 
mance figures, as indeed have 
lower oil prices. • 

The Schroder Japanese 
Smaller Companies unit trust 
has risen by 85 percent since 
the end of June last year. 
During this period the yen has 
increased by 25 per cent 
against sterling and in sterling 
terms the Ntkkei-Dow has 
risen by 53.5 percent The fact 
that the trust has outstripped 
both currency and market 
factors is very much to its 
credit 

“We have tended to special- 
ize in small undiscovered 
domestics," says Jan Kingsett, 
the manager of the trust The 
investment research necessary 
to spot the opportunities 
among the type of companies 
that the trust invests in is 
carried out by the four ana- 
lysts in Schraders* Japanese 
office. 

“ A lot of the new ideas that 
our analysts are now coming 
up with are in the high 
technology and electronics 

The pattern may 
not be repeated 

areas," says Mr KingsetL“But 
it is very much a stock fund, 
picking the right stocks with- 
out agonizing about the result- 
ing sector consequences.” 

Obviously the success of the 
fund means that some of the 
“undiscovered ” have now 
been well and truly discovered 
and the criteria for selecting 
them are in some respects no 
longer valid. “The more that 
people see the opportunities 
out there the more difficult it 


will become to seek out the 
son of stocks we want. But the 
window of opportunity in 
smaller companies is still 
there,” says Mr Kingsett. 

He cautions that the fond isf 
not one which will always] 
track the index and that he' 
regards h as a trust on which 
to take a long-term view. 
Investors should not therefore 
jump in on the back of past 
performance because it will be 
surprising if the pattern of the 
past nine months will be 
repealed in the next nine 
months. 

The County Bank Japan 
Growth fund is riding high at 
the moment, although it is 
managed from London, by 


Geographic approach 
to stock selection 


Paul Graves. “The crust is tiny 
in size, about £7 million in 
all,” be says. “It has a limited 
band of about 25 to 30 selected 
stocks which makes it fairly 
easy to monitor. 

“We avoided the traditional 
foreigners* approach, the blue 
chip electronics, for instance, 
and went for those we saw as 
the greatest beneficiaries of| 
the domestic stimulation.” 

Mr Graves says he has 
adopted almost a geographic 
approach to stock selection 
and has invested heavily in 
railways and large land devel- 
opment projects. The trust 
re tains its heavy emphasis on 
domestics, although Mr 
Graves says he is not going to 
hang his hat purely on the 
domestics peg. “There are 
spectacular opportunities in 
the high-tech companies,” 
says. 

Bill Stuttaford, chairman of] 
Framlington, is concerned 
that people do not seem to be 
very interested in buying 
Framlington’s Japan and Gen- 
eral Unit Trust It has not, 
however, been a good per- 
former. “The Japanese market 
is the one to be buying at the 
moment If any country is 
going to benefit from the lower 
ofl prices it will be Japan,” he 
says. 

At the beginning of 1983 
America was in favour with 
investors, and Japan at the 
beginning of the following 
year. Europe, according to Mr 
Stuttaford, captured the 
imagination at the beginning 
of 1985. Could the Japanese 
be bade this year? 

Lawrence Lever 


NOW’S THE TIME TO MOVE 
TO A BETTER RATE! 

f 

I 



NE TW^/0 

ON £10,000 OR MORE 



NO NOTICE 
NO PENALTIES 


If you’ve £10,000 or more to invest you won’t find a 
better home for your capital than Skipton Sovereign 
Shares. 

You'll get just over 3°/b extra interest (9.05% - 
gross equivalent 12.75%*) and a genuine no-strings 
access to the whole of your investment So you can 
pay in or withdraw all your money whenever you like, 
without notice and without penalty 

If your investment is below £10,000 the following, 
equally impressive rates, apply:- 


HMVESTMENT 


INTEREST RATE 



NET 

GROSS EQUIV- 

£5 ,000 OR MORE 

8.60% 

12.11% 

£500 OR MORE 

865% 

11.62% 


The Difference is 
the Skipton Factor 


ASSETS US3 MILLION' RESERVES rrp MILLION 


MONTHLY INTEREST paid direct to your bank, 
is available at 8.60% on balances of £5,000 or more. 

For investments between £2,500 and £4,999 the 
rate is 825%. 

FREE POSTAL SERVICE It’s easy to open a 
Sovereign account Simply call at your nearest Skipton 
branch or just Freepost your cheque with the coupon. 

From then on you can pay in or withdraw by post, 
whenever you wish, and we'll pay the postage. 

rTsKIPTOW SU VER eTgN^H ARE IT1 

Please use block capitals. Tick where appropriate. 

□ 1/We wish to open a Sovereign Account and enclose a cheque 
for £ 1 Max. £250,000 per account) 

I O I/We wish to open a Sovereign Monthly Interest Account and | 

enclose a cheque for £ (Min.£Z500- | 

Max. £250.000 per account) a 

Cheques should be made payable to Skipton Building Society I 
□ Please send me more details. I 



NAME. 


ADDRESS. 


I 


POSTCODE. 


L skiptonbuilding society, freepost, SKIPTON. I 

NORTH YORKS BD23 1BR. | 

BRANCH ES AND AG ENC1ES THROUGHOUT THE UK. TIB | 


FREEPOST SKIPTOV NORTH YORKS BD151BR TEL f07Wn4i8l 
BRANCHES AND AGENCIES THROUGHOUT THE L K MEMBER OF THE BUILDING 
SOCIETIES ASSOCIATION A INVESTORS PROTECTION SC HEME 


I lUcnsi paid annually Rale, and uroB variable. 


‘For baste rale lax payen. 


3: 


+ 60.6 


0 


/ in the 22 weeks since launch* 

- that’s Wardley's International 
{y Growth Trust 


•offer 10 bid taewne not re- invested. colcniattd period 21.1 L8&-21A86 


IFYDUMOT 
THE W3RLD.BUY IT 
FRtMWAKDLEY! 


The International Growth Trust 
Back in Not Hmbet i£W&. when Wardfey decided 
In iv launch their international Growth Thist 
lfwnueri> Lhe Wanfley Natural Resoorees Thist) 
they did so for very good reasons. 

Market Movements 
Every year investors see some markets perform 
exceptionally well and others do badly Over lhe 
lasl \var the most attractive has been Europe 
whilst marteis such as Hoag Koogand 
Si ngiporebave performed with much less Bale 
in the kwg term one can expect cyclical 
performance from any market but in the short 
term you need to check regularly that \ our 
moTMy is invested in the right area. 

Investment Policy 

Our Managers set about creatinga unit tn«t 

that could move around the world ai wilt And 
imoany market be itortfinaiy shares, fixed 
intend securities or simply hard oirrencv. This 
policy has been put into practice with 
substantial gains after only twenty two weeks 
In that time, investors who placed £tOW with 
the Wardlev bi ternationai Growth Trust have 
seen it gro^' to £l 606 netof charges! 

Of course, this rate of growth cannot be 

guaranteed in continue and the value of units 

rind fo rtune can en down as weflagop- 
However Wardley is confident dial it wp 
continue to invest in Lhe right markets at the 
right time - with all-out capita! growth as the 
prime targe!. 

Current Tactics 
Till- International Growth Thisl is truly 
lnienta!iniwl-«varecurTentK invested [as at 
Si 1 S6 ) as folk** *: USA »J«. LR Japan ISti. 

Swi-dwi France Gtrmany K*. 
Netherlands 5'ti. haiy £»*■. others and cash 


Wanfley Around file World 

Wardley with its extenave network of - 
on-tinHspot researchers and investment 
professionals, is particularly well equipped to 
bqv the world. 

In Hong Kong. Ibkyd Sew tork. Melbourne 
and Singapore Wkrdiqy offices continuously 
monitor and invest In their own markeis- 
co-orfflMted from our office in the City of 
London. Thus, when changes occur in Jar away 
places, w are ideally placed to react with great 


Recently, the stockmarkets of Japan. Spain 
and interestingly the Philippines experienced 
some significant rises. WartUeys International 
Growth Thist reacted by buying into these 
markets with excellent results. 


GENERAL INFORMATION 

Dc*MUbIMkI B»>nb'hMcM«iik'idU<<*WinrrwaBt 
br-aw (to wwrirti Bflto-to- iwrtwd I If ■ O** lb* I «B3M 

wvd ««■>•- »ton i w»«rf>w«pto P*™*'* 1 "**■•?*■*££* 

ft— ITWaMlMlot 


Wardley’s Pedigree 
We are a wholly owned subsidiary of the 
Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation, 
wh ich has over 40.000 fmpknws worki ng in 
more than 1200 offices in over 50 countries. 
Hilly international! 


Application for 
Investment in lhe 
Wardlev International 
Growth Thist 


*;nw 


rim 


itoi Hi 3»E A^rll Mhw UMW 


nam i iniiiiilil — r-"*l i r 

— rr i3t^,MtrtW-il*ni ■■■ !> ■ t i n Hi, im^t j nr — Jrir m— 


ii~r«i til — "n hi't - *-^' - -*** 

iiaMtoi— 


LiKkoFrrHjHN - 



l Winsppfvfcironflfi mihr-iAjwn# V, 


.imbiCunn 


4Br*«loUrrprvvi«pprr<p»i>l ibb-nCfto-M-n 


FUM 

Addn~v 


StenarrM- 


A. World of Experience 


I In lb>- iqqiBnUuik. rmti UUM 49) ad hiuHi IbD 

nm»l 

flHMi Ufk itri 'flpBnfriW hriUn4 ifv* s«uM 

ill imaii,- dHUiiailann*. num-finl 

ill) (k-uA.i4»urSlian'KvtiaiUi--Hi<na- 

|Hl*'ialt«i<nvakirmi»ahl\^nlnC' iZ 

IV^--ivHhf.i,«Tl-li'd»i[ipliniimnlnfTii.Tnrfrl)n|tii'liiril>i- 

uimnu « « «i «* 4 j 1. 1 InirM !■ n 

WanUey Cnft ' Th*a Managers Limited 
WanUey Hnu-*-. 7 1 h a i tnshirv Njuaiv. 

L4rfNtt> y.i "jv thn. 

Tfelephone; 0I-KJ9 or 15M. 

| IMiuappUi-aWf-InHin-l ^ 


The pick of the 
woiids Investimits. 
Without lhe 


problem of choosing 


A NEW UNIT TRUST FROM ONE 
OF BRITAIN’S LARGEST 
FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS 

Standard Life’s new Managed This nflere 
yon invest mom oppommitii^sona truly inter- 
national scale. By profiting from invesiniems 
in difierom comporacs, maricets and countries, 
over lhe medium to Icmg t*^rm you could expect 
real capital growth. 

PROFITING FROM THE 
INTERNATIONAL '80s 

With Siandiird Life, imillmlders can make 
inwsimemsall rotmdtiie uorkL 

T1 loro's a le.iinnfoxTKTlssf'airiuiigforgrKit 
n] ipnn unil ies. ami 1 Tinging ycxi the lienefus ol 
&andard life's w orkiwidc investment expertise. 


THE MANAGED TRUST - 
LEA VE THE INVESTMENT 
DECISIONS TO THE EXPERTS 


S|ioci;tUsi unii lnLxtsap^lsisrilinnlie 
idoti lint expens do i!h> rhy-to-iL-iy inking and 
selling Dcvirfing »1Wi pun of the worki iifTors 
most oppommity islefi lutlicinvesmr.aiRl 
lliat'sdiffioiift. 

Sian dan! Ure’s MaaignlTYiLsi, IwucniT. 
lakr-s all Divestiuem ikxisioiisofryoiirslioiikirrs. 
Tlieir expens will cl n » <so wlioie to invest yot ir 
im mcy.imdwill mr»ve it aroi indiotako^lvmiirige 
of tlielx.'SJ ojijwjrtniiiiirs worldwide. 

PROMISE & PERFORMANCE 

b'x ikiitgUii k over 1 1 ie List (on y* urs, inyrsl - 
login the m<>«li:ni LT\niiii mist iias|ffcnfui.-e«i 
stilsiniutillyU-nor routnw Mvm tlvtseavaiLihle 
from BuildmgS* *eictk*s or Naikuuil Savings 
CeniTh-ates. Invest nu-nt inSuindiml Lire's 
Managed TYilsi *illers you tlie prospect or real 
growth mw tin* medium to king tenn with flu' 
security Hun tvmesfh mi i lavingtiie fimtlai 1 ivtly 
liKinagril aerussall nuiriceisby profcsaimals. 

Wli'ilc die Mareiged TYust will appeal to all 
investors, it's uiik T-mude fertile first- lime 1 «u>ct 
oftniii iruas 

GENEROL' S BONU SES GI\T. YOU AN 
E\'EN BETTER INVESTMENT 

Tlvie are l u nit is-sTor investing si niigl it 
aittiv. Yongpt 2*ti more units for your money if 
you Imy Ik-Iitt 15il i May, 11 W »,or !'Si exi r.i if^xui 
iiuy Imiu’i-en May liiili and 31a. 

Them are al« > ! * muv-sfi t inv* -ainnrtsmvr 
SWim I'fc extni foreviiy JilJKH! in nil ymi get 
t**!s , jr..lHHl I aml rn*mtiic]itmy*Hige( yiMniift' 
luiris fir every exim IlKmsanil |xHint Is. 



THE NEW MANAGED 
TRUST HAS 160 YEARS OF 
STANDARD LIFE’S 
EXPERIENCE BEHIND IT 

The Managed Trust is new, but Lhe record of 
Investment success Standard life has achieved 
for their life assurance and pension funds has 
already given us a formidable reputation. 
OtvrSin billion a/erumpnify managed on 
behalf of more than a million policyholders. 
The investment results, which have been 
published in independent surveys, have been 
both consistent and outstanding. 

When it conies lo experience. Standard Life’s 
new unit trusts aren't new at alL 


Hav TO INVEST 

Jiisi cnm| ileie i i h:- ;i| q 'lir.it i« m r«»nn :it ilw 
Torn nf this advert bvnic-m, mni send it dinM in 
Sitin' tirrl Life with vnnr rii'-qiie. \'uti «<n :ib»i 
Imy units tlinnigli your iisimI fuinm uil mlvisrir. 
or sini| 'ly pi kw h? Silii k km 1 1 jf'? I *ei wei -n funn 
anti 5 pm on any l»nsw?SR»tiy:ciili FREEPHONE 
tiSfttt :jcJ777 aivl rt-siTvv your units. 

That's all vkii luiw toito to oj*»n up ji tvorW 
ofinvesliiK-ni npinrumiiy. 

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36 div liivfsjuu iils ui Siambnl Life I’nii Thisis an ■ in a avaitil* ■ iiiilw ■ Kii«l dk- 1 «T Ip-LiihL 


Suncunr Mr "Mis "Miss. 


-Ofii|«iJhiiL 


Fir«J N:uin-(-)_ 


.■Vkln-sv- 


Sigaiuin^-V 


THE MANAGED 
TRUST FROM 


ft.il". 


I • UH 'wi’iip-iiviT ISj-i-arsufngi'. 


TSlil 


Standard Life 


porallofyourlife 










THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 





Pi 


65p per section 
£3.25 per 5 sections 

STOCKS • PETUNIA 
ANTIRRHINUM • SWEET PEA 
CARNATION • PANSY 
LOBELIA • ALYSSUM 
MARIGOLDS • ASTER 
MESEMBRYANTHEMUM 
SWEET WILLIAM 






\y &■ 

1«V 












PATK) SUITE COMPOSING 

SbS«®4CHA»S - 






£44 95 


rnmisS* 


iN&££?»9fe> 


QUALCAST CONCORDE E30 
ELECTRIC CYLINDER MOWER 

With Grassbox and approx 
40' coble 12" cut 
MRP £82.49 




, p . 





FLYMO M1NIM0 TWIN 







UNDER 



SHOP LATE 

’TIL 8 





LIlU 


2.5 UTRES 



CROWN 
PLUS TWO 
LIQUID 
GLOSS PURE 
BRILLIANT 



-■ c 



£$19 


viXE-: 

PURE 

LLIANT 

99 mm 


mm 

IDGLOSS 


BLACK & DECKER 
D154RF Va" 


SPEED REVERSING 


ACTION DRILL 











BLACK & DECKER 
HG991 HOTAIR 


iJWliltttNljj 


MRP £28. 




CHAMPLAIN 
6" CERAMIC 


, A ftOWER 

£249 £2^ 



ilk 


XV 


11 


$0* 


This luxury bathroom 
comprises acrylic bath, side 
panel (end panel extra), basin, 
pedestal, w.c. and cistern. 
Complete with wastes, taps and 
toiler seat. (Design may vary) 


COMPLETE SUITE | ^ 

£ t69 95 ltf39 95 


CAROUNA 


EXTERIOR 


78" X 33 


. ><r vT 

N,. 

... 

I ttSs x 

from ^ ^ *95 

PER ROU| 


GAINSBOROUGH 


£049 








1 & * ! 




ONWS OOOlY 21«r Aprtto lim MOV 
1986 and ws subject la ovadaMtty. 
Sans shown are appromnata. Al 
paces Include V. A. I M.R-P. = - 

Mamifaduras Recommended Price. 
*fteady Assembled Pnee is ftejm* 
you pay tor kitchen units reedy 
assembled tor you and Includes free 
dedvety within 20 rates of the stum. 
Other kitchen prices are lor sell 
assembly Rat packs. Ml prices exclude 
sink lops, worktops. lops, appliances 
ana accessories, tsonwot our smafer 

Supercentres may nor have ffie tufl 
range at products, please phone to 
check before frauellmg. 




fi . L 



SHOWER 7Kw 


m 



£4^5 


BATHROOM BLISS' 

RUBBER BACKED WASHABU 

CARPET 2 METRES WIDE (NomlnaD 






PART OF THE 

WOOLWORTH 
HOLDINGS 


Ybu can do it when you B&Qit! 


WOOLWORTHS 
































.sS5w?:-'-jKS 

r V=S 





sinn 

' j. :•:•••. ■'■■.■:■: ^'x' : ' ..' 'V'.v-i 

t '.: - v - + v. , • :• fcga 

Hi liiiliteii ^|| 

'■ : VwV-i v; *p! 

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... ■■ , . «’ ■ ^U iii i ; ■ I m £ i £ * > • ■■ a 


V i '% . I | 

V' 2) l^ZoO? 
i; : ‘^ jjj 3 




:m 


pivV^Vv 

J/v • * ■<• ■ '■ 












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-w&z 




EXAMPLE 


1000mm 
HIGHUNE 
BASE UNIT 


READY SELF 

•ASSEMBLED ASSEMBLY 
• PRICE* (FLAT PACK) 


w £49.5? 


*&%$$$ v • - i 




F m H KtHiU — . v-^ ; 

i ---Bg^TTrSS^ 


jIMfll, 






1 *£408 CREDITS £17 

PH 

wm 1 

s *£504 CREDIT Sw £41 

&I 

■DSffl 






Up»£10O>*hw»amc«KWaftorlCnb 




cuaftsman 
, mis Kitchen features 
1 superbly crafted solid 
* oaK doors with antique 
style handles. 


ready SELF ASSEMBLY- 
pt EXAMPLE ASSEMBLED j (fLAT p ACK ) 

ST 



„..m, . .. 

’• v - 


6 m& fe 24 tiroes yotir monitty payment 

APR=32.9% m 

I Cticlscei 

gS^^SSSffi“ W I AvaflaWein bbTgreaT 
BMteosc«B8dc»t«teDtei. | Formica laminate with 

fiflW odk effect edges 
and handles. 




1000mm 


BASE UNIT 


S» >‘v'v 

im#, 



PHILIPS 60cm W* 

COOKER HOOD MODEL CK004 


mE£30-oo 

J When you purchase an 
^3 appliances together: 

NON ONLY 


ELECTRIC HOB 
MODEL AKB526 

OR GAS HOBMODEL l N0RMALLY£32&85' 

when purchased separately. 




w 



ip 

mr 




%£&*yy 




% 


irl^ fv3> 


. READY 

EXAMPLE (ASSEMBLED SELF ASSEMBLY 
price * 1 (FLAT PACK) 




ENAMEL INSET A 
SINK TOP, BEIGE,. 
WHITE OR BROWN 

#* 


(SWdop specifications 
may vary from Illustrations). 







m BOWL AND DRAINER /Efi or 
INSET SINK TOP 




OPEN MON TO SAT 

9am to 8pm 

AISO SUNBAy Pam to 6m IH SCOILAII® 



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o :**\-5*wr ■«**- 


T»6u'>'-«i» W“ _ 


»iwr .■**» «&»•*’*•* 


^ ‘ ; f |j^M<>rtyage~B»e Kate. 


















THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 





CONVENTIONAL 
REPAYMENT METHOD 

(INCLUDING MORTGAGE 
SECURITY POLICY) 


MONTHLY NET COST 

£25169 


YOUR MORTGAGE REPAID 


NORWICH UNION 
MINIMUM COST 
ENDOWMENT 





SURPLUS 


YOUR MORTGAGE REPAID AND FOR 

ONLY 71p PER MONTH MORE A 

SURPLUS OF £20,000+ 


{Examples based on a 25 year mortgage loan of £30,000 secured in the case of the conventional repayment method through Norwich Union, a gross interest rate of 12%, income tax^^ 
maintenance of Norwich Union's present levels of annual and terminal bonus, which depend upon future profits, and, therefore, cannot be guaranteed. The Minimum Cost Endovmient Plan sufplus 

includes a projected terminal bonus payment of £L6,099. The borrower is a man aged 34.) -v_- .i-: 






\ more than ever, 
repay your ; 


theN 



Just think of it. For only a few pennies more 
than a conventional repayment mortgage, you 
could be looking forward to having paid for 
your home -and enjoying £20,000+ to spend (J 

as you wish. §jj 

Alternatively, if you had taken out a 25 year | 

policy 2 0 years ago and were to cash it in this | 

year, it could repay your mortgage in full. L 

Compare this with the conventional 
repayment method. You’d still have five years (^81111 

left to repay- and at the end of it all, no tax-free 
lumpsum. « 

WHY NORWICH UNION f MSk 

Norwich Union’s £6 billion investment 
portfolio is managed with flair and care ,dSS l|piPl 

to produce generous bonuses that once / ^ggl ||Rp§jg| 

awarded are permanent additions to the value 
of your polic y. RfflBtff 

Don’tbe misled by high ‘terminal’ bonuses, 
which can vary, up or down. Amounts refer to a 

GROWTH AND SECURITY ESKSK 

The pound symbol illustration gives some based on a 25 year 
idea of just how much Norwich Union can for a man of 29 pa; 

make your money grow. 

Some companies project benefits that are more than they have 
ever achieved. 

Not Norwich Union. 

Our track record shows us to have produced consistently 




Amounts refer to current payouts for Norwich Union, 
and UK. Industry figures (published in the latest 
Money Management Survey May 1985). All figures 
based on a 25 year with-profits endowment policy 
for a man of 29 paying £30 per month. 


P I higher returns; it is our past performance that • 

enables us to have confidence in the future. + 
With Norwich Union you have the security of 'A 
knowing your money is in safe hands, produc- / 
ing high returns, year after year. + 

FLEXIBILITY and real peace of mind 
Flexibilit y, because the Plan is transfer- .:”i 
table; even if you move to a more expensive 
home, it is a simple matter to take out an . 
additional policy. ■ . >| 

Peace of mind , because mortgage pro- ’ 

tection is built into the Plan. Should you die, * 
your home is paid for. 

With the interest rates differential on 
endowment mortgages abolished, and interest ■ 
rates down, now is the time to invest in the ■ . 

Norwich Union Minimum Cost Endowment - ■ * 
Plan. '■ : ‘ 

CHECK WITH THE EXPERTS 

. Do go and see your bank, budding society : 
985). aii figures or insurance broker. Ifyou are already reoavins - 

ST'"*' 

- — T-rrr-r 1 y°u ^ &d tt costs linfc to swireh 

N^^on Pbn - and i, could pay handsome dMden“in . ' y 

We’re sure tot your fciancW adviser -will agree that hv W i 





NORWICH 

You’re better off the Norwich Way 














AY APRIL 26 1986 



Units you can trust for a good return 


•y: 




UK shares have risen by about 

<0 per cent in the past year 
and stock markets around the 
wwid are well upto dAg good 
mws fin: unit-trust investors, 
0ost of whom will be shting 
on very healthy profits. 

But it 'presents a dSfemma 
for people^ with fresh capital to 
invest If they put die new 
money into unit trusts, mil 
they be buying at the top of the 
market? Is there likely to be a 
setback which will provide a 
cheaper buying opportunity or 
will the stock market carry on 
relentlessly upwards? . • - 

I asked three' unit-trust in- 
vestment advisers what funds 
they would recommend to 
someone who wanted to put 
£10,000 into unit .trusts right 
now. Bearing mmhtd the land 

■JSf doubts investors have 
.about, the continuance of the 
stock market's boom, what 
would they reco mm end as a 
safety first portfolio? - 

Peter Hargreaves of Har- 
greaves Lansdown probably 
speaks for ji lot of managers 
when be says “I would deariy 
love to 5ee a 200-point shake- 
up, which would provide a 
dear, buying opportunity. I 

think there is inevitably goin g 

to be a setback in thellK stock 
market some time. And the 
old adage sell in May and go 
away really does seem to have 
an effect on people.” 

Mr Hargreaves points out, 
however, that the UK is the* 
■ / only industrialized nation that 
•V has maintained rlwhalaw. of 
v payments surplus for rite last 
■\ six years. So despite the 
v current high level of the UK 
stock market he has no' 
qualms about committing 40. 
* per cent of the money here. 

He would put £2300 into 
’< the new S tandar d life Equity 
’■ Growth fund, to be lamped 
” at the end of the month. He 
says: “Basically Standard Life 
has a good investment record 
’■ and managers tiy harder with 
a new fund. With a flow of 
new money it could also. take, 
t advantage of any temporary 
“ market setback." 



Hargreaves of Hargreaves 
Lansdown: Wants a shake-up 

PETER HARGREAVES 


WHERE 
THE CITY 
EXPERTS 
WOULD 
PLACE 
THE FUNDS 

GLVNNECLAy 


Standard life 

S»E2£5“ 

Growth 

T»get European 
Special Situations 


Fifteen hundred ■ pounds 
would be committed to anoth- 
er UK fund, Holborn Special 
Situation. "Hie Prudential 
has only recently taken the 
plunge into unit trusts and it is 
trying hard,” he says. Mr 
Hargreaves believes that if 
there is a setback it w£Q be 
among the blue-chip compa- 
nies — another reason for 
choosing a specialist fond. 


portfolio - £2,500 — would «> 
into Japan, the biggest benefi- 
ciary of the recent fell in oil 
prices. He would invest in the 
Baring First Japan. ■- 

He explains: "The weak 
dollar is good for US industry. 

I would put an other £2,000 m 
Abbey American Growth 
Fund: -You have to be careful 
about the currency ride. This 
fond seems, to have got its 
hedging right and I think the 
American stock market is 
-cheap.” 

And he would commit. 
£1,500 to European stock 
markets through the Target 
European Special Situation 
fund. “We have seen some . 
spectacular rises in European 
shares but the major industrial 

c njmpaniey pry gpmg In hnyw^fit 


r? cn n Hblbon Special 

■***"■■ Sitantiaoe £24)00 

£L500 Mercury Japan £3,000 

£2<QB MAG American A Go£l,75D 

S A P European 

£2,000 lac. A Growth £24)00 

P e i y faal li)t< » *iia (vwwl 

£1306 Growth &L250 


enormously from falling oil 
prices.” 

-Glynne Clay at advisers 
Richards Longstaff is more 
cautious about the prospect 
for the UK market, saying: “I 
think we are bound to see 
some profit-taking. There are 
some big rights issues around 
to mo^ up liquidity as well as 
the British Gas flotation later 
this year.” 

A mere £2.000 of a £10,000 
portfolio- would go in a UK 
fimd and like Peter Har- 
greaves he chose Holborn 
Special Situations. Indeed the 
fund was indeed by all three of 
die investment luminaries I 
consulted. - 

Mr Qay says: "You are not 
just buying the UK market 
plain and simple. A good 
special-situation fund should 
be able to find interesting 
investments in any kind of 
market. It should be a good 
bet if you are a bit uncertain 

about thing* " 

Mr Clay would put the 
biggest smgfe chunk of his 
portfolio — £3,000 — in the 
Mercury Japan fund. “A top 
analyst is joining that ream,” 
he says. Another£l,750 would 
go into M & G's American & 


i 

Savage of Hoare Govetfc 
Optimism about UK 

JOHN SAVAGE 

HoIborB Special 

Situations £24)00 

Prolific Special 

Situations £2,000 

Fidefity UK Growth 
and Income £ 2,000 

Baring First Europe £L,000 

Target American Eagle £ 1,000 


General fund, which has a 
consistently good record. 

The US stock market poses 
something of a dilemma for 
investment managers. On the 
one hand they believe that US 
shares might perform very 
welL On the other they are 
nervous about further rails in 
the dollar. All the US funds 
picked by the three were 
chosen because they success- 
fully hedged a^mst the cur- 
rency risk. 

Glynne Clay would put 
another £2,000 into Europe. 
He says: "The European stock 
markets have risen sharply 
and there are signs of over- 
heating. I have picked the 
Save & Prosper Europe In- 
come & Growth fund, which 
has a 5 per cent yield It's a 
new fund which is often an 
advantage in performance 
terms. And it has a high yield 
because it invests in fixed 
interest as well as equities so 
it's not quite so exposed.” 

Finally, £1,250 would go 
into the Perpetual Interna- 
tional Growth fund because of 
its excellent record. Mr Clay’s 
choice is weighted overseas 
largely because it is those 
economies, particularly those 
of Europe and Japan, that 


should benefit from the mas- 
sive reduction in oil prices. 

However, John Savage of 
Hoare Govett's Unit Trust 
Advisory Service would put 
60 per cent of the portfolio 
into the UK. He says: “I just 
fed that it*s silly to expose a 
UK investor to too much 
currency risk. Lots of people 
have been saying the market 
cannot keep going up and they 
have been saying it for three or 
four years and look what's 
happened The factors that 
have put shares higher, things 
like lower inflation and greater 
efficiency are still with us. 
That's why I'm optimistic.” 

Like the other two, he picks 
Holborn Special Situations - 
£2.000 would go there. He 
says “I feel that the Pro is 
g oing to ntalfff this fund 
work.” 

Another £2,000 would go 
into Prolific's Special Situa- 
tion fund Like the other 
investment advisers, Mr Sav- 
age thrnk* lhat at this stage of 
the market there is less to gain 
in the standard blue-chip 
funds. Two thousand pounds 
would go into Fidelity’s 
Growth and Income fond 
"That's a safety first fond 
really,” he explains. "The 
yield is 4 per cent and the 
income shares should do well, 
even if my judgement on the 
UK market proves wrong.” 

Half the money committed 
overseas would go into Japan 
— through Gartmore Japan 
fund "This fund concentrates 
on the domestic sector in 
Japan rather than the export 
orientated companies,” says 
Mr Savage. "I think this is 
right because a stronger yen 
will hit Japanese exports.” He 
would put £1,000 into Baring 
First Europe and the remain- 
ing £1,000 into Target Ameri- 
can Eagle fond because its 40 
per cent hedged against the 
dollar. 

He concludes: "I think that 
despite the rises we have seen, 
worthwhile gains can still be 
bad in all the world's equity 
markets.” 

Maggie Drummond 


FRAMLINGTON 
r lH\TT TRUST-, 
GUIDE 1 

for a free copy of our 
1986 Guide, iritk full 
details of our top- i 
performing funds and I 
both lump-sum and I 
monthly investment, I 
simply send this | 
coupon. j 

To. FRAMLINGTON. i 

FREEPOST. LONDON EC’B 2D!_ I 


Name . 
Address 


BP TO 105% 

GENUNE IMMEDIATE ALLOCATION 
INVESTED N HXM.Y SUCCESSFUL 
SCOTTISH LIFE OFFICE WHOSE TOP 
TVREE FUNDS HAVE PRODUCED 
SINCE LAUNCH:- 

+ 7U« European 

♦ 3&2% btmn^ Mio ne l 

♦ 34.9% SmaBo co mp aniM 

OFFER TO OFFBt BASS 

LIMITED OFFER 

MUST CLOSE 2VTH MAY 1986 

C RICHARDS FINANCIAL SERVICES 
FREEPOST. WOOTON UNDER EDGE 
GLOUCESTER GL12 7BR 
TEL 0453-843626 


FREE INFORMATION GUIDE 


All you need to 
know about 

PENNY SHARES 

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[EC2M 7AY. ReTPS^J 




school fees 
plan now and 
decide which 
school later. 


Wanning in advance for your child's private 
education can save you thousands of pounds. 

Forexam pie, with an Equitable pla n^n a Ici n g 8 
annua! contributions totalling £14,95$ you could 
provideforschool feesof£50,301.overThe following 
10 years.* Or, if you’d radier,you can pay monthly. 

With The Equitable, you need not specify the 

school until a month before the first payment is due. 

And you can transfer tire payments to another 
school if your child moves, or even to another child, 
if necessary 

Even more convenient, you can vary the 
amounts and the intervals between making your 
contributions. 

For more details on The Equitable's outstan- 
dingly flexible school fee trust plans, send the 
coupon or speak to us direcron 01-606 6611. 

* If cun™ ^tuumv rates and onion tonic. kith mcluAnf; terminal hwnuv are 
mjjnumcd throqgfu-nr Future arniuny two. ai *HJ as Jnlurr bonuses uiucb 
depend on faof its. cuinoi be gua ranwea 

Recommended h NaaonaflSIS 


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LENDING 

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ABN 

Man 5 Compaq 

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embank Saaigst 

Consoijtaed Cuts 

Continental Trust 

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Royal Baric of Seated 


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d 10.50% 

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f Mortgage Base Raze. 


TARGET JAPAN FUND 

Invest Now in The Future Growth of 
The World’s Second Largest Economy 


Since the beginning of this year, unit 
trusts investing in Japan have, once 
again, featured high in the performance 
tables. 

An investment of £l/)00 into the 


AN ENCOURAGING OUTLOOK 


In the future, we consider Japan will continue to be 
a favourable area for investment Recent developments 
lead us to the conclusion that the huge potential of 
the domestic sector could be the nuyor influence on the 
Japanese stockmarket this year. 

The important arguments for this view include: 

• The dramatic fall in oil prices. Japan is heavily depen- 
dant upon imported oil and. as such, stands to benefit 
considerably from the halving in prices seen this year. 

• The 30+ percentage rise in the value of the Yen against 
the Dollar. Since the Group of Five’ meeting last 
September has enabled a significant reduction in interest 
rates. 

We believe this will benefit the economy and help 
encourage investment in the stockmarket. 


average Japan Fund made on the first of 
January, 1986 will have grown in value 
to over £1,270. 

In Thrget Japan Fund, this investment 
would have grown to over £1,370. 


THE MANAGEMENT PHILOSOPHY AND THE RECORD 


The Manager of Target Japan Fund will seek to select 
the best opportunities available for maximum capital 
growth, whether these be in domestically orientated 
stocks or the shares of export earners. It is intended dial 
the portfolio of Target Japan Fund wfD be relatively 
concentrated to secure the most profitable return. 

Consistency of performance is an indication of good 
investment management Over 6 months, 1 year, 2 years 
and since launch Target Japan Fund has consistently 
ranked among the top 5 unit trusts investing in this 
market 

.An investment of SI000 made on the launch tlaie. 
22nd December. 1982. is now worth an outstandin g 
£3.286 - compared with a return from the average Japan 
Fund of£2.$52. 

Please remember that the price of units and income 
from them can go down as well as up. 



The Japanese Government intends to stimulate the 
economy through a variety' of measures. Legislation on 
urban redevelopment and the bringing forward of many 
key construction project s should lead to stronger 
growth. The projected rise in real earnings should 
create a more buoyant consumer sector. 


Deregulation of the financial 
s ystem is talring on increasing 
importance. The Japanese 
authorities have shown i heir 
intentions to develop Tokyo as 
a world financial centre equal 
to London and New York. 


isures. Legislation on HOW TO INVEST 

iging forward of many To Invest in Target Japan Fund complete the 

lead to stronger application form below and post it togei her wit h your 

jamings should cheque to t he Freepost address, or telephone our dealers 

on Aylesbury (0296) 594L 

For your guidance, the offer 
^ priceofunitson22nd April. lOSti was 

rp A ttx I' v r» I I I I f i J n an estimated 87.1p, with a gross 
1 /\ tH I 1 annual yield uf O.Ua 

J-/ VLW-Jl — i X If you retain the services of a 

TARGET GROUP PLC MWX professional advfaervwarong- 


A- .3L V-_. 


recommend that you contact him 
without delay regarding this offer. 

Vlin-ur— MOiinl..rrHr ||> M m> i*itih r* - invi— inj 
April |mjm, 


UNIT TRUSTS- LIFE ASSURANCE -PENSIONS FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 


i lEXERAL ISFi Httl ATH 

ThcminimummiiuliniMm-nt in T.ns-i UpjnFiinili-i'iiHi 

Kuhnrqueni im wtmii- dui fviti 

I nusarv-drali <tail> anflibt-pnir jni!>Mfli-puMrsh«lil*il> in rhi- 
Flnanuil Tlmm-iiHi Timi-i 

will X ■ .. nir.nl wipmiII>». 

ilnfuiilinl.in n c -.l in nf \.wr jn-UrtniHi ji» 4 t ih-- uni’s 

>nnhoM will PriMiiHluniuiiJ ^2aiy-ai(-riiu-(4jii-.irpiir'-iijw* I mis 

ran hnMihllMr-L n»ihe>Linap^r-di j pni»- i»h k— Ilunlh.-IH.I |ir- .• 
i-jl.-iibi.'d in j>mriLtni>-uiili [wtunn'-rn ..iTrad’- rnfluLiip'ii-ani| j 
i tttuUf will bt* heil *, nhin |iitl<> — if r^.vi|« ail -irikiI nb j’r 

An mnal i-ture»-i>r V’i Kim liuini ui x»i.-«ilU*r ;.ri. w>U- 
Kimunrr3li><n r-fUKlli'^iMiilln! ini-rro-i|i ir»— I:<-ju 'hi* -furs* Pjh » 
*vaiidblpi*nr»‘i|*i<'*i Vn mir'ial itisro-i-ll . i}>in*\AT><* ih*m. inlir.aii 

tm-FnialtgruNS uH-nmi- 

ThrFlin'l > *r\.(lisinlHiil‘>ndarri* M-f inlr dml im<im>- uill l»- 
rii*lrihuin1 ii>mnfr>Mlhd.Vljruc-— Urpnn lith ^r|>iniih.' 

Tnrdir Tin ft.ii.dl fliiik t*f -• 'iILiihI |.t* Amlii-.r* KMi1Th.4n-.at> 
Mi-KIIPli"-k M.iiaj|j<r*- Tn»*i .\|iuuu>.i*Ln«iini KiQtnml 111 

L'Bfijnil \n kjt'.Jii 

l^rurtlfcaiM- Avb-*bnr> Um-Lk HPN-IEP 


»: Target TroBt Monageis Limited. FREEPOST. London EC4B 4EH. 


I We wish in invest 


in Tarss« .la pan Fund 


(minimum £5001 at ihopria-r* ruling "n rereipi ririhisapplicaiir.it 
Fiease make .vour ctieque pliable luTargrt TniS Maiwgrr> Limned. 


Mv prefessional adviser is?u 


| Plp asi» wnd details < *f hi uv in vxdkinpi> shares flirunii i rusi s 1M , OJ 


K.VKHii nil i/i.-v*— — l 


















- Et 


34 


THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 


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M 


RETIRED? 




How? 

♦ By advising you which investment gives the 

ITlOSt income i man aprd 63 with nn hfr assurance cuuki 
etepea to nfeeh-e 12. t>%paon guaranteed. 

♦ By redudng your income tax bill 

many retired people foe ot* rnmecexarily on the '3fp' allowance. 

♦ By making your capital grow to increase your 
income in the future. 

Knight Williams has specialised for many years 
in identifying income investments for retired 
people. Send for foil details. 

Knight Williams 

Independent financial advice 

33 Cork Street, London W1X IHB. 01-409 027L 


Name_ 

Address. 






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SOCIETIES 


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There are tax free monthly and annual savings plans and attractive 
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Your savings could be earning U).G4"op.a. lax free ( 14.I4*o gross 
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FAMILY MONEY/6 


Tenants who buy from the council find hills can take the pleasure, out of 


Flat family face 
£20,000 repairs 



( PROPERTY ) 

For an increasing number of 
council house tenants who 
bought their rented flats at 
substantial discounts, the joys 
of borne ownership nave 
turned into a financial 
nightmare. 

On the Churchill Gardens 
Estate in south-west London, 
Renny Hudson and the other 
lessees who have bought their 
council flats enjoy a good 
relationship with their land- 
lord. Westminster City Coun- 
ciL But they have now been 
told to expect bills in the 
region of £13,000 each for 
major work that is needed to 
the properties. 

Mr Hudson said: “The 
‘right to buy legislation’ en- 
abled people like me to buy 
property and have the security 
of ownership. I bought to 
enjoy a contented retirement 
which is now shattered." 

The 1980 Act as amended, 
does provide that where a 


Test case now 
going to court 


tenant buys his flat, he cannot 
be charged for any work in 
rectifying structural defects 
found within 10 years of his 
purchase, unless he was told of 
them al the time he bought or 
unless the council did not find 
out about the defect until 10 
years after the sale. 

The difficulty is defining 
what is a “structural defect" 
for which lessees may not be 
liable, and what is a “structur- 
al repair" which may be their 
responsibility. 

The London borough of 
Sutton is considering bringing 
what it believes is tbe first test 
case to court. A lessee who 
bought under the “right to buy 
legislation" is refusing to pay 
towards the cost of a new roof 
She is alleging that the new 
roof is a structural defect and 
her lease makes her liable for 
repairs only. The council con- 
siders that the replaced roof is 
part of the tenants' obligation 
to repair. 

Tenants who bought before 


the 1980 Act came into force, 
cannot even lake advantage of 
citing the 10-year structural 
defect rule as this part of the 
Act does not apply 
retrospectively. 

Felicity Jessup bought her 
council flat prior to the Act In 
1973 she and her first husband 
had taken a tenancy, in 
West bourne Gardens, west 
London, of a newly converted 
top-floor council flat which 
had a completely new roof Six 
months after they moved in, 
Mrs Jessup says the original 
developer and an architect 
carried out an inspection of 
the property and she was told 
that the flat had a 30-year 
period before any major works 
would need to be done. 

They decided in 1978 to buy 
the flat from Westminster City 
CounciL They did not have a 
private survey but the council 
itself gave them a mortgage. 

Throughout the time of 
their ownership they have had 
problems with the condition 
of the flat, particularly the 
roof. They have constantly 
been concerned with the de- 
lays on the council's part in 
doing repairs and with the 
standard of workmanship 
when tbe work was eventually 
done. 

Mr Jessup said: “For the 
last six weeks we have had 
scaffolding at the property, for 
which we have to pay, which 
apparently is to stop pieces of 
stucco dropping on passersby. 
Tbe council has told us that 
the whole roof will have to be 
taken off and replaced. The 
dry rot is so bad that I 
understand that some of the 
external walls actually have to 
be taken down. We have been 
told that as a rough guide our 
share of the cost which is 36 
per cent of the total for the 
property, could be between 
£20.000 and £40,000. 

“ The difference in the two 
figures is because the council 
would like us to move out of 
the property and the higher 
figure is incurred if we decide 
to stay and the builders have 
to work round us.” 

They feel that the council's 
alleged neglect and misman- 
agement over the years have 


caused the predicament that 
they are now in. They are 
freed with having to sell their 
flat to pay the repair bills as 
they already have a substan- 
tial mortgage on the property 
and are unabfe to pay £20,000 
or any similar figure. The sum 
of £40,000 is even more out of 
the question, yet they daim, 
that they are unable to move 
out as they will have to pay 
both the costs of rented ac- 
commodation and the 
outgoings on the flat 

When asked about the 
Jessups' allegations of mis- 
management and neglect, a 
council spokesman said: “Do- 
ing all the repairs at once 
works out less expensively 
than doing patchwork repairs 
over the years.” 

As regards the cost of the 
work the council said: “The 
exact figures for the cost of the 
work are not available and the 
figures we have given are a 
rough estimate. It is always a 
good idea to have a full survey 
of your property before you 

New legislation 
is on the way 

buy. The council does have 
extended payments for financ- 
ing available for its lessees. 
The Jessups do have redress to 
tbe court. If the court . feels 
they have been mistreated it 
will find in their favour.” 

The Jessups are taking legal 
advice on the council's ac- 
tions. Meanwhile, new legisla- 
tion is on its way. The 
Housing and Planning Bill is 
going through Parliament and 
it is likely to become law in the 
summer. Tbe Bill will place 
new limits on the charges 
payable by council flat buyers 
tor repairs during the first five 
years after they have bought 
and ii introduces a new right 
to a loan in respect of repair 
charges. 

There may, therefore, be 
some limited help at hand for 
tiie future but council flat 
tenants should still beware if 
they do decide to join the 
nation of homeowners. 

Susan Fieldman 



No joy for the Jessups; The dost fa just * nightmare 



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confidential review, 
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FAMILY MONEY/7 


A few days 
in the life 
of a cheque 

1 We all know that we Kve in an wait a fun 10 days after 
ffL™?*'® “rtonwtion and depositing the cheque before 
com puters have revolution- allowing you to withdraw any 
nea the speed mid efficiency . of the money from it But you 
with which b a nks and other do not lose any of the interest 
fi nan cial i nstitu tions can pro- because once the cheque is 
ass our ^ fin a nc ial tra n s ac- cleared it is credited to your 
“®5®» j n 1 account from the day yon paid 

Or do we? Why, then, do it in. 

. moa bin Wing societies specify The National Savin® Bank 
-a delay of JO days between the lops the lot in inconveniena 
tone an investor deposits a by specifying a wait of two 

■ cheque and the time the whole weeks — a recent change 
money can be withdrawn from from when it specified only 

- file account? Why does the eight working days. 

; National Savings Bank go Thar is fine when the system 
1 f v 5 n fo ™ r *“* specify two works perfectly — it does not 
: ' « , - . . always do so. “After the 10- 

Why do banks, which oper- day wait many cheques have 
ale the cheque clearing sys- still not deared," says Mr 

■ tan, insist that yon 'should Hnnwicks, “bat we have to let 
allow at least seven days for a our customers withdraw their 
cheque to clear? Where, in money if they want. This 
act, are the benefits from all creates terrible proble ms for 

:■ tins automation we keep hear- us because if the cheque then 

bounces no money comes into 
we think cheque clearing the customer’s account and if 
is a terrible system. Itis so old- he has withdrawn some he 
fashioned,” says Trevor may end up with a negative 
. ' Hun wicks of the AngHa B uild- balance.'* 

- mg Society, echoing the views This means, to the rest of us, 

of m any involved in money that be has an overdraft — but 

- t ran s mi ssion. ’ building societies are not al- 

That is not entirely the feult lowed to give overdrafts, so 
of the banks which run the they have to use a different 

name. “In that case we have to 

‘The system still write 10 him and ask for the 
i,^ money back again,” says an 

relies on bits . . . anguished Mr Hun wicks. 

of paper that ™ s 5 0 ^ n0 Vv. h S rev ‘ :r ’ 

/ r f j ■ explain the refusal by Nation- 

travel around wide to allow a cash withdraw- 

fhA pnnntrv 9 «* against a cheque being paid 
me country - m _ drawn on the Alliance 

■ Building Society, now the 

system through which all - Alliance A Leicester. Did the 
cheques being paid and re- Nationwide really think the 
ceived have to go in order to cheque would bounce? 
reach their corned destina- A long delay in having a 
lion. - “The trouble with deposited cheque credited to 
cheques is that there might be your account is not only 
; Ibts of technology to bop the incon venient: it can be expen- 
• process along but the system shrc in lost interest This is 
still relies on bits of paper where the banks gain. For the 
travelling around the whole' tone that a cheque is 
country,” says Mr Hcnwick- going through the clearing 
Every day vans arrive at a system you get no interest on 
car park in central Londo n it, but one or other of the 
and sacks of cheques are dealing banks does, 
exchanged- by all the banks in “If a Barclays account hold- 
the clearing system. er pays in a cheque at a 

Certainly it' would work a NatWest branch, NatWest 
lot more slowly, without any earns interest on it for one day 
computerization. ’ The Bank- mid Barclays for two,” says a 
ing Information Service says; Barclays spokesman, 
the dealing system nowhan- Building societies take a 
dies more than four billion niore lenient approach. Most 
transactions a year, a large stint paying interest on the 
proportion ■ of which are money from the moment you 
cheques. That makes a. lot of deposit the ch e qu e , even 

bits of paper to process and — — ~ " — 

distribute around the country, YOU SuOUlu make 
and the feet that it works at all _ 

is something of a mirade. Few SI COmplaint tO 

other countries have a system VOUT hank if 

as efficient as mbs. 

What happens foa cheque is ID© tTailSSlCuOIl 

feiriy complicated. Suppose S» fnn clow 


“If a Barclays account hold- 
er pays in a cheque at a 


you pay in a cheque at a 
National Westminster branch ' 

to go to your deposit account though you may not be al- 
at Barclays. On day one it goes lowed to withdraw any of the 
from the NatWest branch Into money for at least 10 days, 
the dealing system. On day Other types of tra nsmi s si on, 

two it is cleared and passed such as standing orders and 
over to Barclays. On day three direct debits, also have their 
it moves through the Barclays problems, but they have re- 
. system to the relevant branch centiy became more automat- 
and lands in your account. ed and the system has speeded 

But if you are paying it into up considerably, 
an account with, say, a build- The introduction of the 
ing sodety which is outside Bankers Automated dealing 
the clearing system, it should System and the Clearing 
take an extra day to extract the Bouse Automated Payments 
cheque from the system and System (which bandies 
it to your society. That amounts of more than 
extra day win disappear for £10,000) have improved these 
those societies which choose types of transactions enor- 
to join tiie clearing system mously by el i m in ating the 
when legislation in 1987 al- amount of paper in the 
lows them to participate. process. 

So for so good. But then you These transactions should 
have to allow for weekends. If go through more quickly than 
.you deposit a cheque on cheques, and if you find they 


You should make 
a complaint to 
your bank if 
the transaction 
is too slow 


^ . . f - • 

L>i 


. ■; T i • * ;* 




Friday afternoon it will not get jo not you should complain to 
into the clearing system until your bank. 

Monday, adding extra * what hope is there that all 

«>«« ProoSLs will improve 
S ^ thU Sn ^ the future? At the moment, 
very little. So for, there is no 
string things out for longer ^ ^emative to cheques as a 

cJ, .hfcrw.j, ♦*,- ««w«e fn fo*™ of non-cash payment 

AtttK - of 

banks say you should expen _ 

to wait about seven before you One day, however, the Elec-. 

can be sure the money has 

made it to your account. “The Of Sale (EFTPOS) system will 
process wifl be instantaneous catch on. This will allo w 
only if you deposit the cheque automatic payment by card at 
at the clearing bank branch the shop counter which will 
where you hold your electronically debit your cur- 


account,” says Barclays. 


rent account It is unquestion- 


Likewise, transfers between abjy fast. Conservative 
two accounts with the same estimates suggKi that it takes 


building society should be roughly 0.3 of a second to 
completed instantly. complete the transaction. 

Some building, societies, Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 


such as the Woolwich, Anglia 
and Nationwide, oblige you to 


National Savings that 
still lead the field 


We’ve said it before but it wffl 
bear saying again — in the face 
of falling interest rates, those 
who depend on income from 
bank and bariMmg society 
ij wi^cffc rfrtll y s honld not miss 
the opportunity to lock into 
today’s races before they case 
down any further. 

For basic higher rate 
taxpayers this means not 
missing the current issue of 
National Savings ce rtific a te s. 
It pays 7.85 percent wx-free 
over the five-fear term- 
And if you write to National 
Savings, you can get an “in- 
come scheme" which details 
how to get income by 
successive eacashmettfs of a. 
series of certificates. 

The ret ur n from burning 


society extra Interest accounts 
(nobody much now invests hi 
the ordinary share account) is 
around 7 to IS per cent but 
this will fell following the 
societies’ announcements tills 
week of cuts m the mortgage 
rate — down from 12 per cent 
toll percent. 

If the societies take only 
half a per cent off the invest- 
ment rate (and itis likely to he 
mare than this) then it leaves 
the 31st issue of National 
Savings certificates at 7.85 per 
cent looking a very attractive 

dpfll. 

However, National Savings 
could withdraw this issue at 
any moment, so don’t 
deiay.The maxmam invest- 
ment is £5,000 per person. 





PERSONAL 


RENTALS 


AS Llaaifnl advcnaoncnis 
Can be accepted by telephone 
(except A wt—awnW . The 
deadline r 5.00pm 2 days prior 
to pubbenvoa (ie SbOpm Mon- 
day far Wednesday}. Should 
you wish to send an adveniu- 
■ncm in writing please include 
your daytime phone number. 
CUSTOMS SERVICES DE- 
PARTMENT. IT you have any 
queries or proMemt relating lo 
your advert aeraenl once n has 
appeared, please contact our 
Customer Services Department 
by telephone on 0M81 #100. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


B> YOU HAVE ever ha* a reac- 
tion slip (nan a pubunwr. or 
■sent and are Intnola) In 
tonrnna a Society of Unpub- 
lished Authors. SUPA. 42T. 
Upper Bld u iicnrf Road West 
SW14 7PJ 01-948 1049. 

MATURE active widow often 
share of tune & home comforts 
with hiflb standards. Sun b«M- 
br lady nr snllniun. Surrey. 
104831 60091 after 6 pn. 




FOR SALE 




ANTIQUES & 
XJLLECTABLES 


FORE 8! HU. I CaUery. ExrWT - 
munuifk pruu&. law 6 var- 
ied SOdi. 105921 21 5789. 
RICHTER'S "ANCHOR*- Stone 
Stocks wanted by Collector 
T« COta 6191 12 
ROYAL BOULTON Toby June. 
Fisurliws. animate, etc. want- 
ed. Ol 883 0024. 


CHELSEA & 

KENSINGTON 


LARGE DESIGNER HOUSE 
CHELSEA SW13 

Newly isiwnuad snm- 
deucoed house. 3 beds. 2 
bams fl m sane with 
lacuzzfi. dLocnq ro om . Lge 
Nett kitchen A utility era. 
Own narVtno warn, 
onraenve 4 tf paved wren 
Seif cwiiamN basereeni flat 
or Office GCH 

<3501000 Frrenoid 
TRM-B2S7M 


RICHMOND & 
KINGSTON 



MEET THE AH1WI& at work 
Bonha ms mmue 6 w e t fan 
ttmr course Btarts gntt, April. 
Lectures and vtsHs lo IMdtns 
UK arttMs and craftsmen. Tee 
Principal OX S84 0667. 
KUST HMHM Eactastve m- 
■roductioas for Uw unattached. 
SB Maddox Street. London Wl. 
Telephone 4934937. 
mnWHIP . Love or Marrtaue. 
as ages, areas. Oafctlnr. Dept 
iQiSj 23 AUngoon Read. Lon- 
don W8. Tat; 01-938 ion. 
ROLLS BOYCE witn MMHF 
rec omm ended Oumffeur for 
private hire AH occasions. Also 
freelance Ctiaufleurtpu. London 
/ Berkshire. Tat : 0628-30966. 


Offer Tab 586 4981 


professional vatuatioo £1.750 
TcLOl -467 0610 UVCS/WIWM 


MIDDLESEX 


STRAWBERRY MU, Tweton- 
ham. 4 bed room. 2 bathroom, 
sch. runy furnished town house 
with garaoe In Fortcsonr Park 
Estate Close to anwnttys. 
strawberry »W reala t»» 
QCMB Ud KOCBl f £30000 

p/w. comp any let avpIUMe 
now. Ht 01-8389600 «3d 2464 



Cornea « arbde wnOng. short 
stones, staff i cumto nn . wnmg 
far chldren. T.V and Radto 
Pfaywriurg and others Frae bro- 
chure bom The London School 
ol Joumaksm. Ret DT 19 Hert- 
torn Street Park Lena. London 
W1Y ffia Tat 01-499 sssa 


T WIOI m LOWHW rent a TV or 
vWra by day. wfc or moatb. 
TOPS TV 01-720 4469. 




FOR SALE 


RESISTA 

CARPETS 


SKYTtNIB STANDBY hoUday m 
crcecr-2t-28m May. 4 persons, 
were CW.OO each, wta swap 
for any dmumitoh any outer 
time in Maw. Tefcf0953l 87583 


PTflpniiP 






LAOHROKE RROVE M ft. 20/30. 
to share beatdiful entta pe with 
garden. Own room. £50 aw. 
Inclusive. Tel: 01-221 -5644 
BATTWEA. Lianna Gardens. 
ra»y travel over River. Prof F 
SX Own room in autef nun- 
ton wock fbU. LSO pw esd. 
(Offlcsl Ol 430 6482; i£ves>01 
622 2630. 

FEXTWAN ED IM. M/f lo tftr 
flat with prof/m OnmedUlaty. 
O/bath. CM. CISC pan exd + 
dec. Tel- 688-6464 x 2419 <w) 
735-1678 Uii 

FLATMATES Selective Shartne. 
WeU estob UUitiQoctory servte- 
P<se erf for eppL 01689 «9t. 
313 Brarepum Road. SW3 
HARROW, M/Flo share comfort- 
able iwae wtm prof F. Own 
room. Nr tubes £60 pw +_bflJB- 
Tef Ot 907 3436 Call 6301 
BARREL Prof 3rd person. O/R. 
to shr conif me wtm 2 oth ers. 
£170 pan ntL 876-7907. 
BUHGTON. M/F In share lire 
fm. O/r. N/S. wpsh reach. 
£170 pan exd. 01-354 OISB 
HZ Own . room, non 'smoker. 
Prof. Qukf lux flat Only one 
Other. £180 pan. 444 6762 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


CHURCH 


The 1 87 th Ammo] Meeting 
of members will be held at 
”00 pun. on Saturday. 31 
May at Christ Church, 
Kcsmington Road, London 
SEl. 


Cancer 


Together we can beat it. 

W* fund oter one third of 
all rweareh two the preven- 
tion and cure of cancer in 
the UK. 

H<*lp ns by wndingj dona- 
tion or nuLe a lefpcwoc 


DOMESTIC A CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


CAMBRIDGE 

Mather’s heip 

required Mr 3 cHIdren. 13. 
7 and 4. Must be kind. 

resourceful, responsible and 

have a sense of humour. 
Non smoker. 18+ . eve In or 
cm. 9 - 330 weekdays. Ref- 
erences uacnfiui. 

Tel: 0223 6S3S4. 




NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


£200 

CONVEYANCING 


For buytne or seflinu your 
home w« cwy a FLAT FEE 
ot £200 VAT A Dtsbume- 
ments i aa BtoerBes up 

£100.000. CompMBVf 

quotes over £ 100 . 000 . 

PEARCE & DAVIS 
01-472 2652/3 


Cancer 

Research 

Campaign 


iOirh-n HmiM-Ti it* «■ 
iDrpinww 1 1 iwidofl Sft’lY 5^R 


tensive outbUUdtnfn. tl acres. 
Around £140.000 More land 
avaltaolo Phone 01-660 9949. 


1BTH Cantor farmhouse wing. 
Uncpodt Wehh hUte. Heated 
pooL squash, s o l ar t u rn, sauna. 
Steeps 6. M 06603)479 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


FRANCE 


COTE D'AZUR. vnu/Buna- 3 
D/BTl Unique she 40 mins 
NKe/skltos. Walkers .-wrtterc' 
paradise. £7&AOO. Details Hum 
0730 64227 < until 5m May) 
then 010 9342 6024. 


■URSULA Lux. town house in 
peaceful resksendal area. Sun 
terrace wnh sea A luoanlsln 


hachrms. ample atorape apses, 
kitchen fuUy equlped.. igr 
living . dining cm with lag bus- 
ing fire place, recepi are a. »Bo 
garden, off street oarkloe- Easy 
access to lawn centre and ame- 
nities. 3 swimming poofs In 
com pies A landscaped gardens. 
Low CUfajUna- freeh o l d . 
£86.000 OO Coui act owne r m- 
nd on: 01034 42772880. 



TKASDHE COAST 

Ran® - USA 
IB class resort 
BEACHFRONT APARTSEKTS 
Can. tenns. fisimg. tram E83S0 
per pffson pei week, fty to 
Mans v Ortmlo (Deney 
WtafUj. 

Fw sitomcaioa wME 
Nmen Ttrjraas, 

PO Bor 96} Pivi SEotd, 
Honda 33492 USA. 


TIMESHARE 



PERSONAL IMPORTS 

Save S££ on most Bates 

You could not buy a new 
mpofted car in a more ratable 
& sate way. Guaranteed low 
press. Based on the lowest 
continental list pree + extra 
discount. For fuD deeds i tree 
leaflets please call or wide. 

SHEEN ENTERPRISES 

18/11 Bshogs Coot, 
tad Bfiri. Lades EC4M 7EL 
81-848 2B2S or BV488 8817 


ASTON BURTai WL 1980 Oscar 
India Metallic Blur with cream 
lather mlertor. automatic. 
£11.750. Tel. Mr Ufah 01-261- 
3732 daytime. 


GENERAL MOTORS 
wanted 


LOTUS CARS. For the b«B na- 
aonwide cash buyers. Phone 
Locus teorfOU, 0603 407766 fTV 


*8X1 CARRERA SPORTS TARSA 

June 1986. nulmeg 
metallic brown leather mom 
iNk. all mm. 5.000 nules 
only, to new. £27.960. Tel 
Knowie 105645) 70247. 


MERCEDES 

AUTHORISED DEALERS 


SUE RAMU6 CALLERYfiTO Fid 
turn Rd. 9w«,. Hi ten WBua C 


MERCEDES 



SVfS KDfSMCTON flat. Quart. 
tpanotH ground floor flat 3 
bedroom. 2 baUH. hung mean, 
dining room, kurnen. hallway. 
I place, tomi-furmshed. carpet- 
ed. ad modern appUnreL 
Ogem onto 5 acre* of private 
parpen Ideal for fam ily- C erpo- 
rale let I year pluv £3t6 P w. 
I76Coieherne01.TH.01 530 
2396 or 370 3861 No aaeim. 


err cohmauskt square wl 

Seconds from Hyde Park. Selec- 
tion of 1 or 2 bed roomed luxury 
llau tn eiegani pmod house. 
Newly decorated and futnfahed 
lo high Mainland. Security 
parting Company fete prefer ed 
on shore long term- From £350 
pw nen Oefcrt Park Eitair*. Ot 
724 SS51. 


CtKLSEA KiUBhUandar Bcfora- 
v la Pmullro. westnunaier. 
Luxury hciuaes and Rau avail- 
able for long or short lei* 
Please ring lor eurrenl lw 
Gootes. 69 Buckingham palace 
Id SWl. 01-828 8281- 


EXCLUSIVE HEAR KAAVSTEAB 

Hiqniy Pre-tfWous. Kr lux fUr- 
muted fiat in aaei res. area. 2 
bed. 2 rrc. k & b. Paoo* Cdn. 
Suu Person See* mo Privacy 
£180 pw. Teltol 883 4116 


mm«.entm, cotmim* sow* 

modern Executive house, doo- 

ale ming room, study . luHv 
eouipped kitchen. 4 bedrooms. 
2 bathroom*. 2 garages. 9*rden. 
Close to pood schools. Onib 
nlrnl access to Cm"™* 

f-bsunrow. Co let pH erred- 
£450 pw. Tel DI 879 0309. 

AMERICAff CXECUIfVES Seek 
luyftats/h onset £200 - £1COO 
p w, Lsuai fees reo. RulliM 
Kay A Lewis. South of the Park . 
Chelsea oQice. 01-352 8111 or 
North of the Park. Regent's 
Park office. Ot -722 5135. 

HOLIDAY AfABTHOfTS. We 

have the best selection of luxu- 
ry furntehed flats In 
Kemtogiaa. Chetora. 

Kiughabrldge. Mayfair. Si 
Johns Wood and Hum mar ad. 
From £20 0 pw Ol 244 7363. 


HOLLAND PARK E<HU*ne newly 

decora led. I bed maisonette 

wun. large bainroam. Ukhes. 
CH and sunns roof lereare 
£290 plw. COMPANY LET. 
TeLOl 229 45X3 'davl 


BATTERSEA Prince of Wales 
Olive Prof M F 25* O ft. O/ 
bauum. w M etc. snare tell . in 
larar lux flat overtootono PJrtv. 
£6S pw Ind. Tel: Ol HZ' 9951 


Kimm FLATS A HOUSES 

avail. 5 read, for dfpMnals. 
ewnalvn. Long A shore lets in 
all areas, upfnend * _Co. 48. 
AlbemarteStWl. 01-499 5334. 




MERCEDES 3SOBLC l973Metal- 
bc blue. 1 owner. Offers 
milled- TeL 0705 373666 
daytime. 


ROLLS ROYCE & 
BENTLEY 


5R.VER SPIRIT *82. Coral 
red / magnolia ev ertlex roof . Ra- 
diophone. 11.800 miles. 
£39.500. Penn <0494811 6671. 


HC2 RUEEMSWAY. Mewv canape- 
2 bedrooms. Irvuig room . patio. 
£190 pw. co lei. numrmirn one 
year Tel: 01-229 6860 


BELGRAVIA LOVEMEST. 1 Bed 
secluded Med a lerrr flat £200 
pw Tel. Ol 235 1341 


UtGHGATE Lux mod town lieinr. 
a tods, study, large lounge. 2 
bathrooms, garage- co lei. £600 
pw Nigei Holder 883 3255 
LITTLE CNALFOMT. SOmins 
from London, in country. 4 bed- 
room furnished house. £550 
pm. Tel: 1024041 4670. 

SWS Lge attractive 3 bed 2 baths 
■ L rnsulei family nal All ame- 
nlUrs 2 run lubc/bns. Residenl 
parking £230 pw 373-9967. 
113 COMPANY seek* fun prop- 
erties in nm London arras. 
CABS AN A GASELEE fEstale 
Ageoni 01-589 5481. 

W2. BAYSWATER, Luxury well- 
equipped nal DM bed. creep. 
ML diner, bam. garden £125 
pw . Co lei. Tel: 229 6597 
cm studio, bills paid, phone. 
£65 pvv. omers wo. 627 2610 
Homrtocator* 7 days. 
HEM5MCT OH s c flaL suit 3. 
£39 pppw Others 100627 2610 
Horn repeal ors 7 days. 
KMCMTSBRR2GC/MYDE PARK 
Quire luxury mews houses. 2-6 
bed Long Co lei 584 1 163 
MAVFARt 6 e studio. CH. Phone. 
£1 IO pw. Others loo 627 2610 
Homeiocaiors 

MW? Garden flat, handy time, 
reepi phone. £7B pw. Others 
loo 627 2610 Homefocalorv 
PIMLICO. DesaM recep. OMe 
bedrm 4- single todrm. CH. CM 
TV. £120pw. 01 834 9724. 
RICHMOND / SHEEN. 2 bed lux 
p.b. flat dose Park £120 pw 
met Ol 892 0344.iT) 

SLOANC SQUARE 5 mills. Rrc. 2 
b edrooms. K B Newly filled. 
£170 pw. Tel: 01 589 4773. 
Wl. tge pabo flat. Fully fined and 
euulpd 2 dbte oedrms. Mlrhen 
etc £220 pw. (034282) 4307. 
WM - MS. l tod lux p.b. flats. 
Short lets. Close Stn. £130 - 
£175 bid. Ol 892 0344 m 


PERFORMANCE CARS 


tANCC ROVER VOCUE Auto. 
1982 iYc PAS. Elec windows. 
Air cond Slereo. Venetian Red. 
4 doo r 40.500 mb. £8600 
Tel: 0245 361203 eves'wkend 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


Nonce K hereby given that the 
Annual General Meeting of the 
Governors will be MM ai the 
BRITISH HOME A HOSPITAL 
INCURABLES CROWN LANE. 
LONDON SW 16 3JB on Wednes- 
day 28ih May 19B6 ai S pm lo 
transact the ordinary business o< 
such meeting. 


COURSES 


WOL&EY HALL: home Muds- lor 
GCE- Decrees (London BA BSC. 
LLB. Warwick MBA) Piatoc- 
lus: The Principal. Depl AL9. 
Woucy Hall. Freepotl Oxford 
0X2 6BR Tel: 0865 622000 
(24 hrvv 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


Contiaued from psfie 16 



FICCAORJ.Y THEATRE 437 

4606- 734 9536 Credit Card 
Hotlines 379 6565. 741 9999 Grp 
Soles B36 3962. 930 6123 

“A BrtBato M osteal** BBC 

DAVTD FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINY? _ 

TREMENDOUS SFCCTAdJE*Cda 
Orer 115 Utofac Ot s Msto 

Eves 8 0 Mats Wed 3 & Sal S 
New booking period now open 10 
end of September 


PRDfCC EDWARD Box Office 
734 8951 Firsl Call 24 Hr 7 Daw 
CC 836 3464 Grp Sales 9306123 
Mon -Sal 8. hUl Thurs A Sal 3.00 


THE MUSICAL 

Opens id May ai 7pm 
Red Price P re views from April 30 






SHAFTESBURY THEATRE 


THEATRE ROYAL Stralf ord Ea$l 
Ol S54 0310 BALLROOM. A 
new may wun music by Robert 
Pugh wim Philip Modoc, hu 
mour and intrlgur in Ihe Welsh 
\ alleys Eves al 8 


^ -y-ry .-i , 




iViiVan.vr. 1 J 








■SasfiaKgiwl i 


QUEEM’S Of -754 1166. 734 

1167. 734 0261. 734 0120. *39 
3849.439 4031. First Call CC 24- 
hr 240 7200. Grp Sales 9306123. 
Eves 8pm. wed A Sal Mats Sum 

MAGGIE EDWARD 


FO 


mm 


ROYAL COURT 5 CC 730 1867 
unUI 3 May THE NORMAL 
HEART by Lam Kramer Eves 
apm. Tue Mai 3pcn. Sal .Mat 
4 pm. 


VICTORIA PALACE Ol 834 1317 
OPENS Jl'NE 19 REDUCED 
PRICE PREVS FROM JL'NE 1 1 

PAUL CYD 

NICHOLAS CHARiSSE 

DOR.A BRA'AN 
NICHOLAS MARK 

PARSONS WYNTER 

CHARLIE GIRL 

Box Office open Daily 9am • 9pm 
Sun Tel CCBhgs. only 1 lam - Tpm 



SONS OF CAIN 

Direct (rom a vdl-oui 
Australian season 
Reduced once preview 14-n 
May opens 19 May. 









AST GALLERIES 




SfMPEL FILS 30 PB i iesSl . Wl. 
493 2488 ALBERT BOTIN New 
palnlinm 


SSm 


* mxtm 




ramato i 




mm 



WWTFORD & HUCNES. 6 Duke 
StreeLSi James's London SW] 
Tel. 9309332 MODERNISM 
AND TRADITION, an exhibition 
ol paintings from the 20% and 
30's April 17th Mai- 9th. Moo 
f ri ioam ■ 6pm. Sal 10am - ipm. 


CINEMAS 







CHELSEA CINEMA 381 3742 
KiD9i Road jNrorest lube 

Skvane So) CARMEN (PCI 
Film 41 1 25. 4 50. 7.45. MUST 
END WED 50 APR. From 
THLWS Kurosawa's RAN (151. 
Film ai 1.30. 4 AO. 7.55. Seals 
Bookable lor eve pent. Acres 


CtIRZON MAYFAIR CUreon SI 
499 3737 Fir* CbH 24Hr 7 Day 
ce 240 7200 <8Lg Feei Mawe 
Small. Denhc rttn Elli ott. J udl 
Dench in A ROOM WITH A 
VWW (PC) Film al 1.30 INot 
Sun I 3 456.10 A 8 40 Seals 
blade ai £4.50 in advance for 
8 40 pert daily A 6.10 on sm 8 
Sun. 





JIMDS CMEMA 579 3014/ 
836 0691 Si Martin's Lane. 
WC2 ancewer So tub*). Derek 
Jarman's pin winning CARA- 
VAQC30 118). Film at 1 00. 
£ 55 4.50.6 55. 9,Oa LK. Bar. 
SEATS BOOKABLE lor rvr 


' ‘a™ 


<9 30 6111 /.Into 930 J2SO / 
4259 REMO UNARMED AND 
DANGEROUS <15i Sep progs 
Doofv open Dally 1.45. 4 45. 
8 CO Late Nlgni Show Fn & Sai 
D oors open 1 1 15pm. An progs 
Bookable in Advance. Access 
and visa phone bookings wel- 
come Credit Hoi Line B59 
1929 24 hour service £2.50 
seats availabM Monday all 
pens 



SCREEN ON THE HILL 438 3366 
Kurosawa's Oscar -Winning 
RAM <!Si. progs 4 jos. 7 40. 
Plus daily at 2.46 LK. (the 
making of Ran, 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


STRAND 836 2MO CC SJ6 
31 90 J 2-JO 7200 Mpn-Fn 3 

Wed mat 2 30 Bum Rota as 
from Sm AprH 26. SM parts 
wm be at *1L3L 
•A STAR IS BORIC Gdn 
LESLEY MACKS 
■a Jody Caetood to 

JUDY 

A NEW MUSICAL 

“AN ASTONISHING TOLIR DE 

FORCE:- S Exp. "A BLAZING 
THEATRICAL PERSONAL- 
ITY- D T»rt - BRILLIANT - 
Mall on Sunday 


Important Spanish Wool-Spinning 
Company specialising in “fantasy 
fashion” wiih outlets all over Europe 
needs 

SOLE AGENT 

for its products in the United Kingdom 
market. Must be a specialist in woollen 
yarns and experienced in the home market 
with sales experience in the knitting indus- 
try. A knowledge of Spanish preferable. 
Applicants should apply in writing enclos- 
ing a curriculum vitae as well as stating 
salary desired to: 

SELEX PSICOLOGIA APLICADA 
C/ den Bastard, 1-2 
SELEA Terrassa (Barcelona) 

SPAIN 


1 1 iu 








































































































36 


LAW/SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26.1986 


Law Report April 26 1 986 House of Lords 


Shipowners not liable for 
damage after risk passes 


Lejgft and SflUvan Ltd v 
Ali a kro on Shipping Co lid 
Before Lord Keith of Kintal, 
Brandon of Oakbrook, 
Lord Brighiman, Lord flrifflihic 
and LordAckuer 
[Speeches sold April 24] 

Buyers of goods damaged in 
carnage could not sue the 
shipowners in negligence for 
damage done to the goads at a 
time when the risk in the goods, 
but not then the legal property 
in . them, had posed to the 
buyers. 

' Mouse of Lords so held ia 

dismissing an appeal by the 
plaintiff buyers, Leigh and 
Sul i van Ltd, from the decision 
of the Court of Appeal (Sir John 
Donaldson, Master of the Rolls, 
Lord Justice Oliver and Lord 
Justice Robert Goff) on Decem- 
ber 7, 1 984 (The Times Decem- 
ber 8, 1984: [1985] QB 350) to 
allow an appeal by the defen- 
dant shipowners, Aliakmon 
Shipping Co Ltd, from the order 
of Mr Justice Staughton on July 
3a 1982 ((19831 I Lloyd's Rep 
203) giving judgment for the 
buyers for £83,006. 

Mr Anthony Clarke, QC and 
Mr Nigd Teare for the buyers: 
Mr Nicholas Phillips. QC and 
Mr Jonathan Sumption, QC, for 
the shipowners. 

LORD BRANDON said that 
the appeal arose in an action in 
which the c and f buyers of 
goods claimed damages against 
the owners of the ship in which 
the goods had been carried for 
damage done to such goods at a 
lime when the risk, but not yet 
the legal property in them, bad 
passed to the buyers. 

The main question was 
whether, in those circum- 
stances. the shipowners owed a 
duty of care in ton to the buyers 
in respect of the carriage of such 
goods; and. if so. whether and to 
what extent such duty was 
qualified by the terms of the bill 
of fading under which the goods 
were carried. 

There was a long line of 
authority for a principle of law 
that, in order to enable a person 
to claim in negligence for loss 
caused to him by reason of loss 
of or damage to property, he 
must have had either the legal 
ownership of or a possessory 
title to the property at the time 
when the loss or damage oc- 
curred, and it was not enough 
for him to have only had, 
contractual rights in relation to' 
such property which had been 
adversely affected. 

The question whether c i f or 
c and f buyers of goods could 


recover from shipowners loss 
suffered by reason of want of 
care in tbeir carriage at a time 
when the risk, but not yet the 
legal property, in the goods had 
passed to such buyers came up 
for decision in Margarine Union 
GmbH v Cambay JPrinee Steam- 
ship Co Lid (The Wear Breeze) 
([1969] 1 QB 219). It was held 
that ibe buyers were not entitled 
to recover in negligence. 

The buyers in the present case 
contended that The Wear 
Breeze should be overruled, 
relying on five main grounds. 

1 The characteristics of a c i f 
or c and f contract for sale 
differed materially from those of 
the contracts in ibe other cases 
in the "non- recovery" line of 
authority. 

But the circumstance that c i f 
or c and f buyers were, if the 
contract was duly completed, 
destined later to acquire legal 

owneiship of the goods, did not 
seem to his Lordship to con- 
stitute a material distinction in 

law. 

2 Under a c i f or c and f 
contract the buyer acquired on 
shipment of the goods the 
equitable ownership of them, 
and they could sue the ship- 
owners for negligence without 
joining the sellers. 

In his Lordship's view, how- 
ever. if a person was the 
equitable owner of goods and no 
more, be bad to join the legal 
owner as a party to an action for 
negligence against anyone 
whose want of care had caused 
loss of or damage to the goods. 

His Lordship did not doubt 
that it was possible for equitable 
interests in goods to be created 
and to exist, but it seemed 
extremely doubtful whether 
such interests could be created 
or exist within the confines of an 
ordinary contract of sale, but it 
was unnecessary to deckle the 
point on the present appeal. 

3 The law of negligence had 
developed significantly since 
The Wear Breeze bad been 
decided. 

ft was submitted that the 
proper approach to the present 
case was to answer the two 
questions set out by Lord 
Wilberforce in Anns v Merton 
London Borough Council 
([1978] AC 728, 751-752V 

It had to be observed, how- 
ever, that Lord Wilberforce was 
dealing with the approach to the 
questions of the existence and 
scope of a duty of care in a novel 
type of factual situation which 
was not analogous to any factual 
situation in which the existence 


of such a duty had already been 
held to exist. 

He was not suggesting that the 
same approach^ should be 
adopted to the existence of a 
duty of care in a factual situa- 
tion in which the existence of 
such a duty had repeatedly been 
held not to exist. 

Where a general rule, which 
was simple to understand and 
easy to apply, had been estab- 
lished by a long line of authority 
over many years, his Lordship 
did not think that the law should 
allow special pleading in a 
particular case within the gen- 
eral rule to detract from its 
application. 

The genera) rule, which had 
been recently reaffirmed by rbe 
Privy Council in Candlewood 
Navigation Corporation v 
Mitsui OSK Lines Ltd (The 
Mineral Transporter) ([1986] 
AC I). ought to apply to a case 
like the present. 

4 Any rational system of law 
ought to provide a remedy for 
persons who suffered the kind of 
loss suffered by the buyers in the 
present case. 

English law, however, did, in 
all normal cases, provide a fair 
and adequate remedy for loss of 
or damage to goods the subject 
matter of a c i f or c and f 
contract, and the buyers in the 
present case could easily, if 
properly advised at a time when 
they had agreed to vary the 
original c and f contract, have 
secured to themselves the bene- 
fit of such a remedy. 

The variation had produced a 
hybrid contract of an extremely 
unusual character. 

5 The principle of transferred 
loss, based on the judgment of 
Lord Justice Robert Goff below 
([1985] QB 350. 399). 

But his Lordship said that 
that principle, however useful it 
mighL be in theory in dealing 
with special factual situations, 
was not only not supported by 
authority, but was, on the 
contrary, inconsistent with it 

Even if it were necessary to 
introduce such a principle to fill 
a genuine lacuna in the law, his 
Lordship should be reluctant to 
do so. There was, however, in 
truth no such lacuna. 

Having examined and re- 
jected all five grounds for 
overruling The Wear Breeze, his 
Lordships conclusion was that 
it was good law. 

Lord Keith, Lord Brightman, 
Lord Griffiths and Lord Ac loner 


Solicitors: Anthony King & 
Co. Billericay, Holman, Fen- 
wick & Wiilan. 


Deciding value of dai 


Regina v Salisbury Justices, 
Ex parte Mastin 
Before Lord Justice Glidewell 
and Mr Justice Schiemann 
[Judgment given April 17] 

Where a prosecuting author- 
ity which sought to prefer' a 
charge of criminal damage 
against a defendant was in 
difficulties in establishing the 
value of the particular property 
allegedtobavebeendaiiuged.it 
was entitled to say that it could 
prove the minimum amount of 

Hamay 

Accordingly, justices were en- 
titled to accept representations 
made to them that the value 
involved for the offence charged 
did not exceed £400 and proceed 
to summary trial, unless some 
other material was put before 
them which gave them real 
doubts as to the accuracy of 
those representations. 

The Queen's Bench Di- 
visional Court so held when it 
dismissed the application of 
Peter Mastin for, inter alia, an 
order of certiorari to quash the 
decision of Salisbury Justices on 
September 18, 1985. when they 
denied the applicant the right to 
be put his election, and a 
declaration that ibe value of the 
property alleged to be da m aged 
exceeded £400 or it was not clear 
for the offence charged whether 
it did or did not exceed £400. 

Mr James Wood for the 
applicant; Mr Nigel Pascoe for 
the prosecuting authority. 


LORD JUSTICE 

GLIDEWELL said that damage 
had been caused to a crop of 
beans in a field when the drivers 
of vehicles, who had been 
prevented from getting id Stone- 
henge by a police roadblock, 
drove into the field. 

Effectively, die crop, which 
was valued at £5,800, was 
ruined, and the applicant with 
about 30 others, was initially 
charged with unlawful assem- 
bly. 

Subsequently, those charges 
were dropped and charges of 
criminal damage were brought 
but the value of the damage 
done to the crop was stated to be 
unknown in respect of each 
defendant 

The effect of section 22(2) (3) 
and (4) of the Magistrates’ 
Courts Act 1980 was that if it 
was dear to the court that the 
value of the alleged damage did 
not exceed £400, the court was 
to proceed to summary trial; 
that if it exceeded £400. the 
defendant had to be given his 
election; and that if the value 
was not dear then the defendant 
had also to be given bis election. 

Before the justices, the 
prosecution had represented, 
inter alia, that the basis for 
assessing the value of damage 
was by measuring the distance 
between the stationary vehicles 
in the field and the point at 
which they bad entered the field 
so that the minimum distance 
could be proved, and the dam- 


age to the crops was thus 
calculated at between £16 and 
£117 in respect of each vehicle, 
and accordingly the damage 
caused by any individual defen- 
dant did not exceed £400. 

His Lordship rejected the 1 
applicant's submission that 
what was in issue in the case was| 
a joint enterprise which could be 
inferred from the evidence that! 
all ibe defendants were together. 

On the further submission 
that the prosecution had made 
an artificial calculation and foe 
justices should not assume in 
relation to any one defendant 
that he bad followed the shortest 
route into the field, his Lordship 
said that the matter had not 
been represented to the justices 
that in respect of any individual 
defendant there was some ma- 
terial on which they could 
conclude that he had driven 
much further than the mini- 
mum distance. 

The peculiar rireumsiances of] 
foe present case posed diffi- 
culties to the prosecution in 
establishing foe value of foe 
property damaged and it was 
dear that the prosecution were 
entitled to say that it was wrong 
for them to seek to prove any 
more than they could prove 
with clarity. 

Mr Justice Schiemann agreed. 

Solicitors B. M. Bimberg & 
Co: Collyer-Brisiow for Mr R. 
A. Prickett. Chippenham. 


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Senna first to devour 
the appetizer again 


SAN MARINO GP 

IM0LA 


Ayrton Senna's traditional 
domination of pre-race qualify- 
ing was maintained here yes- 
terday when once again his 
Renault-powered JPS Lotus was 
significantly quicker than all 
other care entered for the San 
Marino grand prix. 

Nelson Piquet, whose Canon 
WiUiams-Honda had set the 
quickest time during the special 
lest days staged during the pest 
two months, managed to im- 
prove slightly on lus previous 
best time. But he ended the day 
still more than eight tenths of a 
second adrift of Senna's time. 

Nigel Mansell's effort in the 
second of the Williams team 
cars was hampered by an inter- 
mittent engine misfire and in- 
completely heated tyres and in 
the circumstances he dkl well to 
claim the fifth best time. 

A similar engine problem 
thwarted Marlin Brunale's ef- 
forts in the latest Data General 


From John Knnsden, Imoia 

Tyrrell, at present fourteenth in 
foe list of 26 runners. “It was 
frustrating," Brundle said after- 
wards. "The further along the 
straight we got the more the 
engine seemed to be bedding 
back." 

The problem, which was later 
diagnosed as being almost c er- 
tainly due to fuel starvation, 
cost him considerable time in 
the pits, and when he went out 
for a final effort with the best of 
his part-used qualifying tyres, he 
ran out of time as the hour-long 
session drew to a close. 

Johnny Dumfries again pro- 
duced a highly creditable result 
in the second of foe JPS Lotuses, 
even though he was dis- 
appointed by his own efforts. "I 
missed a gear on the last comer 
of one lap, and on another lap 1 
messed up a comer and lost 
valuable lime there." 

Michele Alboreto and Stefan 
Johansson gave the Ferrari team 


a considerable morale boost by 
setting fourth and seventh best 
times, a significant improve- 
ment on recent form and 

achieved after rectifying further 
brake problems, which bad 
caused the team so much trou- 
ble in Spain two weeks ago. 

Everything went strictly 
according toptan for Alan Jones 
in the new Ford-powered Team 
Haas Lola. After settling in the 
new engine and chassis in the 
preliminary practice, Jones was 
given a change of gearing to 
enable him to use a few more 
revs, the boost pressure was 
raised a fraction above the 
intended race setting, and, of 
course, he used the stickier 
qualifying tyres. Tire result was 
seventeenth fastest time (four 
places behind Patrick Tambay 
in the team's Hart-engined car) 
with still some work to do on the 
new car’s chassis balance in 
order to achieve optimum ban- 





tiling on this undulating and 
demanding circuit. Given dry 
conditions in the final hour of 
qualifying, tire team seem to be 
on target to qualify tire car for its 
first race somewhere in the top 
15. 

A variety of mechanical prob- 
lems meant that few teams were 
ready to take advantage of a 
clear ixackas the qualifying 

A more than usual traffic 
towards the end of the period 
and a huge group of drivers who 
ended the day saying that things 
could have been better if only- 

(aMUFVMG IMEStt. ASern JPS 
Lfltus-RanauR. imln 25. 05 Os aa. 

.SKKK 

Maroon McUren-TAG, 12&27& 4, M 



Borattor-BMW. f.2BJ59;Ti. _J 



Bam Arrows-BMW . lgfl-9 31: Vo- * 

zTj Rimer iGBL wast Zahspoad. 

FtowTlSi*"; 25. 

- - — Romeo, 26. 


Retiring editor leaves his stamp on cricket’s hardy annual I An American football hero unmasked 


End of a Wisden era 


One Wisden is usually much 
the same as another I mean, a 
connoisseur is needed to detect 
foe differences from year to 
year, unless there is a major 
revolution in presentation, as 
last happened in 1938. All the 
same, we shall remember 
Wisden 1986, foe publication of 
which was celebrated in London 
on Thursday night, as the last of 
the Woodcock era. The editor's 
stamp, unobtrusive but discern- 
ible. has been upon foe last six 
editions. 

The editor of Wisden has not 
usually been an exceptional 
writer himself. The Pardons and 
the Prestons were masterful 
assemblers, not literary artists. 
So when the Sage of Longparish, 
one of the leading cricket writera 
of his time, was appointed to the 
job. there was speculation as to 
how he would approach it — and 
indeed what his motives were. 
Was he finding all those years of 
touring for The Times a strain? 

Woodcock carried blithely cm 
with both jobs, and spent less 
time than ever in his beloved 
Curacy (a listed building), much 
to the relief of the Longparish 
trout He was appointed Cricket 
Correspondent to The Times 
when he was only 27, but that 
was in 1954. and it seemed 
reasonable that he would soon 
diminish his responsibilities. 

. Well, so it has proved, but it is 
Wisden that has suffered, and 
not The Times: and this, though 
I have no knowledge of his 
meditations, is bad news for all 
readers of Wisden who do not 


lake The Times. As readers, the 
groups are not coterminous. We 
may hope with fair confidence 
that his successor and former 
assistant Graeme Wright has 
acquired benefit from his train- 
ing, and that Bill FrindaH (one 
of the few statisticians who is 
demonstrably sane) will con- 
tinue to look after foe records, 
and R.L. Arrowsmifo the births 
and deaths and J. Arlott the 
books. 

I sometimes wonder whether 
Arlott actually reads all the 
books, but when 1 check on any 
that I have read myself it is 
perfectly dear that he has. Thai 
omnivorous reading appetite 
never seems to Bag. Also, this 
year I notice he has overcome 
his natural goodwill to slip in. 
now and then, a welcome touch 
of acidity. 

Writing improved 
throughout 

My concern about 
Woodcock's departure is in the 
general standard of writing. Not 
only has be set a splendid 
example himself ("Notes by the 
Editor" have never been more 
influentially trenchant, yet more 
courteously expressed,) bat he 
has improved the writing 
throughout, especially in the 
feature articles, which, it must 
be said, had been sinking to a 
rather dismal level before his 
time. 

This year we have a piece by 


Sir Donald Bradman, his first 
since be wrote Cricket at the 
Crossroads in 1939. This one is 
called Whither Cricket Now? 
The editor explains, I suspect 
with a touch of seff-exultanon, 
that both titles were Bradman’s 
own. The articles contain much 
wisdom nonetheless, including 
the ominous sentence; “I am 
satisfied that one-day cricket, 
especially day/night cricket, is 
here to stay.” 

Mike Brearley writes well 
about Alan Knott, 
EM. Weflings a useful piece 
about foe covering of pitches; 
John Kitchin reads some sense 
into the seasonal groans about 
the weather (be concludes that 
1903 was the worst of them afl), 
and Jack Bannister writes about 
foe financial situation of pro- 
fessional cricketers, without al- 
together removing the thought 
that the rich get richer and the 
poor get poorer. 

The five cricketers of the year, 
an award which the players 
themselves esteem highly, are: 
McDermott, of Australia, 
Robinson, of Nottinghamshire 
(both obvious choices), 
Radford, of Worcestershire (the 
only bowler to take 100 wick- 
ets), Ellison, of Kent, and 
Bainbridge. of Gloucestershire. I 
was slightly surprised, though 
by the choice of 
ibridge. 

Wisden Cricketers' Almanack 
1986 (John Wisden, £14.50 
cased, £12 JO soft cavers) 

Alan Gibson 


Calling on the old class and the new 


In the second of his school 
previews. George Cheste rt o n 
assesses prospects for the new 
season. 

At Amplefarth seven 1985 
regulars are back; Kelly, the 
captain, has a sound knowledge 
of the game and should make 
runs. A winter tour to Pakistan 
uncovered some new talent for 
Brighton and confirmed that 
Panto, this year’s captain, is a 
fine bowler. Most of last year’s 
successful XI return at 
Bryaastoo. including their four 
main bowlers who took 130 
wickets between them. 
Ecclestone, who averaged 55, is 
also bade and should be the key 
batsman. 

Canford, with a winter tour to 
Kenya in prospect, will be 


looking to Forward, who 
amassed almost 600 runs last 
year, and Steam, who took more 
than 40 wickets. Cheltenham 
have four (rid colours and look 
for a good balance made up 
from fast year’s colts and some 
experienced second XI players. . 

Pethers, Fox and Raper, who 
spearheaded Harrow’s attack in 
J 985. are afl back. Five of the XI 
are in their third year as colours. 
Another school where last year’s 
opening bowlers are available is 
IrariHg. Cloke should be a 
formidable prospect, having 
taken over 50 wickets in 1985. 
Higgo, their wicketkeeper cap- 
tain, is in his fourth year. 

There was plenty of talent in 
last year's under- 1 6 XI at Marl- 
borough. Many of these will join 


the three remaining colours; 
Fane is their captain. Sh erb o rne 
have 12 players with first team 
experience; Peters, who toured 
Australia with' the South-West 
Schools, will lead their attack. 
Shrewsbury are likely to rely on 
tbeir spinners and will look to 
Bullock, their captain, for runs. 

Nine of last year's young side 
return to do duty at St 
Edward's. Kelly and Sharp, their 
opening bowlers, should be a 
hostile partnership. In the bowl- 
ing department at Winchester 
much win depend on Winzer 
while Thornycroft. the captain, 
Warren and Riaz win be looked 
to for runs. Sadly, foe long- 
standing two-day fixture against 
Etna is to be reduced to a one- 
day affair. 


Dolphin relaxes 
in goldfish bowl 


Sprat Is aH about heroes. The 
greater the hero, the more we 
want to know about him; the 
more we learn, the less heroic he 
becomes. And so it seems that 
America* football has become, 
with the British at least, the last 
refuge of the true hero. We see 
the great men of the game in 
hly tantalizing weekly 
throagbout the an- 
and we know nothing 
whatever about them other than 
that they play foofoalL 

First. American football is an 
exotirism, the rales obscure, the 
heroes utterly my&terieus. They 
don't even have bees they play 
masked, -How doubly and trebly 
wonderful they are because of 
their mysteriousaess: "Dan 
Marino!" draw l s foe com- 
mentator. “Shotgun!" and we 
wait for foe magic to begin. 

Marino is a true hero for foe 
British. To hear that Miami 
Dolphins play in foe day’s 
featured game puts an extra 
snap into oar striae, and we look 
forward to those long, high 
passes, foe counterpoise of 

hem aHd*'battfeu*Bst who is 
Marino? He is just a resonant 
name, and an obvious talent we 
barely understand. 

The American, I have no 
doubt, could tell us what Marino 
has fra breakfast, when he will 
stand for President, what M- 
meat he uses, and. every other 
vital manifestation of his 
personality. Bnt the new British 
enthusiasm for the game is stifl 
restrained and tfistaofe rather as 
.in foe old days when cricketers 
were not foe trumpeted fellows' 
they are today, bnt were aloof 
men on cigarette cards whose 
remnant names (Sherlock, . 
Jeeves) sang to yon from laky 
newspapers. You admired them 
from a distance, they were 
heroes. 

Practically all men are benric, 
if foe distance is great enough, 
just as practically none are when 
yon get to know them wefl. 
Cricketers have therefore lost 
their heroic state: instead we 
have heroes like Marine, whom 
we know not at aH. 

Marino was ia London fast 
week, and I hud foe faeffaHe 
privilege of meeting him. Inter- 
views longer than 15 minutes 
were not permitted. Quite right 


Simon 

Barnes 


too: tins man is a hero, not a 
person. 

He looked quite naked with- 
out his helmet, with a vast face, 
superb manners, and hands like ( 
little spades. This pleasant, 
hulking Allow Hag, however, 
caught the British imagination: 
"Well I guess it's partly because 
I'm a pretty good player." I 
began to panic at Ods. Would 1 
be able to spin this interview oat 
for a Bril 15 infantes? u WeD, this 
season HI get $400,000 (about 
£270400) for playing football, 
and I also do promotions. Yeah, 
foe money Is pretty good, sure, 
but I don't want to say how 
modi." He's a nice guy with a 
solid wan of gtans between 
himself and the nou-foofoalfing 
world. He has that spectacular 
and peculiarly American facility 
for dealing with media ques- 
tions: "Yon just get used to ft - 
after all you do it from Ugh 
school on. I just by to Is 
myself." Not a taxing task, i 
would imagine. ^ 

This media facility revolves 
the eschewing of all couvenu- 
tioual risks, miring the safe 
option every ting in short, the 
complete reverse of the Marino 
playing method. Marino at work 
is a nerveless taker of risks, a 
mu who revels in t hro w i ng 
passes long as a Levm sentence. 

r 'The one time this style did not 
come off was on foe biggest 
occasion of them alb jrnea 
Marino took foe Dolphins Co the 
Seperbow) and lus own game fell 
apart. Didn't ft?"I am not going 
to dwell on things, especially not 
losing ~ But after the Saperbowl 
game, I jnst thought: Jeez! Can 
we do that again please? 
Tomorrow?" 

We have a great desire to 
learn more about the sportsmen . 
we make our heroes, but as we |f 
team more they stop being 
heroes. Marino never said he 
was Oscar WDde, even if they 
both wear knee breeches for 
business. He is just rather 
heroically good at throwing 
afootbalL 


WEEKEND FOOTBALL, RUGBY AND OTHER SPORTS FIXTURES 


3.0 unless stated. 

First division 

ArsanaJ v WBA 


A ViBa v Chelsea — — 

Ipswich v Oxford 

Liverpool v Birmingham 

Luton v Watford 


Manchester Utd v Leicester 

Newcastle v Manchester C . 

Nottingham F v Everton 

Q PR v Tottenham 


Second division 

Barnsley vC Palace — 
Bradford v Shrewsbury 

Brighton v Sunderland - 

Charlton v Blackburn _ 

Fulham v Huddersfield _ 

Grimsby v Norwich 

Leeds v Carlisle 


Southampton v Sheffield Wed 

West Ham v Coventry 

Gola League 

Altrincham v Maidstone — — 
Barrow v Wealdstone 

Cheltenham v Wycombe 

Dagenham v Scarborouepi — 
Frickley v Kettering 

Northwich v Barnet 


Middlesbrough u Mfllwal — 
Sheffield Utd v Portsmouth 

Stoke v Oldham 

Wimbledon v Hid 


Third division 

Bolton v Bristol C 

Brentford v York — — 

Bristol R v Chesterfield 

Lincoln v Wigan 

Newport v Darlington _ 
Plymouth v Blackpool 

Reading v Derby 


Fourth division 

Bumtey v Scunthorpe . 
Chester v Southend _ 
Crewe v Colchester ~ 

Hartlepool v Wrexham 

Hereford v Haffax 


Scottish premier division 

Aberdeen v Rangers 

Celtic v Dundee 


FTeet- 


Nuneaton v Dartford 

Stafford v Boston _ 
Telford v EnfleW 


Weymouth v Runcorn 


FA VASE: Final: Southrt v H atoa ow o ii 
Town (atwembtoy). 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Prater dhMoB 
Aftrechurch v Gosport Che tms tard v 

Basingstoke: Gortoy v Bedworth; Crawtay 

v RS Southampton: Faraham v DiKfey; 

Foftestone v wnenhsR; Gravesend v 

Worcester tong's Lym v Aylesbury; 

Witney v Shepshaa Wdtond mmern 

Banbwy Utd v Gloucester City; Couerary 

Sporting v Bridgnorth; Forest Qrsen 
Resere v Hednasfard, Lafceator UK) v 
Stourbridge; Mile Oak. Rovers v 
Grantham; Moor Green v Bteton; 
Rushden v Brmtsgrawe Ravers: Sutton 
CokSMd v ReddKch Utd; VS Rugby v 
WWHngeorouoh. SooOmra revision; Dor- 
cheater v Hastngs; Dover Athletic v 
Cambridge City: IXtnstaM v Enth end 
Betvedere; Poole v Chatham; 

UM v Tonbridge; Thanat Utd v I 

Tiwfcridw v Ashford: WasrioovSe * 

Corinthians; Woodtart v Burnham. 

VAUXHML-OPEL LEAGUE Prater <fr 

time Bruner v Hendon; Cerehtftqn v 

Hitchin; Tarnbrough v Dulwieh: 

Kingsionien v BOwtcay; Sutton UM v 

Hamm: Walthamstow Avenue v Tooting 

and Mitcham; Windsor end Eton v 

Croydon: Wotonglum v Yew* WWWng * 

3ougti. first dtasfen: A*ei#y V_ Ma rten- 
head utd; Borehem Wood v Sasftton Utd; 

Brontey V Greye AMeue Leathettiead V 

WontUer. LoftansUoe H&0 vFtn^Vgf; 
Leyton Wingate v Chesharn Utt Oxford 

City v Hampton St Al tera C ity y 

Starnes IMndge v Le ws; Walton anri 

Hereto!* v Hornchurch- Second dhtetae 

north: Bar h hamsted v Stevenage Bor- 

.ough; ChaMom S» P*«r *_cMore 
’Hewflekl Utd v Cheshuni; Hemet Hemp- 


Swtfta v Kin 

Motors; 

dhteton south: Doridng v Souths**; 

Eastbourne Utd v Femnc Eoham v 

PaurefleU Utt RaeJowl Heath v 
Banstaad Attc Horsham v Cambertey, 
Motasey v Hungertont; Wfiytakwfci v 
Nflwbunr: Woking * Met Polca. 

MULTnurr LEAGUE: Burton V Bangor 
0*r; Buxton » Moatey; Chortty V WJttom 
Gateshead v Caernarfon; Hyde v 
Morecombe: Mattock v Marine: Oreewry 
v Norwich: Southport v f»iyt WortWton v 
Gainsbor ough; Worksop V South 
LnvpooL 

LONDON SPARTAN LEAGUE: neuter 

dWatate Hsnwtev Cotter Row: Pennant * 

ThMchwn: ReohG v Nonhwoesd; watttum 

Abbey v Veedng. 


NORTH WEST COUNTESS LEAGUE: Hrat 

rMsfan: Accrington Stanley v Reseat 

Cables; Bootle v Oran Ashton; 
Eastwood Hanley v FOnnby: Gtoeeop v St 

Helens; Congkaon v CHfnroa: Led 

BuracourtK Radctffe Borough v FK 

wood; SUMridge Otoe v 
Wmstord Utd v NatoerflekL 
ESSEX 8ENKM LEAGUE: Brentwood v 

Wtanhoe: Convey Wend v Bon Manor; 

East Ham Utd v WRharn; East Thurrock v 

BrfeisSresfiffi Ford Utd v HatelWd; 

MaSdrai * Chefenstont Sanbridgeworth v 
BowareUKL 

GREAT MILLS WESTERN LEAGUE: Piw- 
nter DMakm: Bemsteple v Chert; Bristol 

cay V MangotetMd; Bristol Manor v 

Swash Utt Ctandown v Pautton Rovom; 

Exmouth V Ctovfldon; Frame v Dawfish; 

Shapton mm v uakeard Afltettc; Tor- 

nogton v BWefort; WoatrvvKipw-fcterB y 
Ptymouttt Aigyto- WMabta Sl-akfc Hub 
Cafeg v Mea Sh am. 

SOUTH-EAST COUCHES LEAGUE: FM 

dMatare Cambridge Utd v Portsmouth; 

Ipswich v FUteam: MUwal v Tottenham; 

Norwich v QttMsm: Oriertt v Queen's 

Park Ranger*; Watford v Cheteou: West 

Ham v Southend Utd. Second d M ato n: 

Crystal Palace v Colchester Utt Swindon 

V Wan® Tottenham v Oxford Utt 
Wimbledon v Southampton. 

DRYBROUQHS NORTHBW 

First dhriakxt: Bdingtiam * Bohop Audc- 

tand: Brandon v Speroymoor; (Sort * 
Peterieec Fmyh* v Gretna: Whitby v 
North Shields. 

BULGING SCStE EASTERN LEAGUE: 
Braintree v Lowestoft Bury * 
stowmarhet Chatteris v HeverhHl Rovers; 

Clacton v March Town Utt CQtchMter 

Utd v Fefixstowe; By Oty vTlpttoe Utt 
Great Yarmouth v Soham Town Rsngerc: 

Htston v Goriestorr. Thetford » Braianam 

Athtetfe WfstMch v Sudbury- 

HALLS BREWERY HBJJ9K LEAGUE 
Premier Division: Hounslow v 
Suparnterina Maktanhaad v Bicoston 

Moreton v Yate; Pegasus Juniors v 

Sharpness; Raynors Lam v Falrfard; 

Sf'»-tEffirfvMorria Motors gL.'Sfc Thame 
Utd v Abingdon Utt WaSngtord * 
Ahnon dab ury. Grmmvay Wmtoge v 
Abingdon Town. 

NENE GROUP UNHID COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Planter DMatore AmptM v 

Rothwefc Arto&ayv Bourne: Brackteyv St 

Neots; IrthSngborough » StotfQkfc Long 

Bucktw v 8arnfottt Northampton Spon- ■ 
osr v Newport Pagnei; Potton v Buttdng- 
Itam; Rounds v Eymsbury; Corby v 
Dnboraugft; Wooten v Hofiesch. 

NORTHERN 'GOWTSS EAST LEAGUE: 

fou|lu iBiiiaL m I i-iwiTn hoi Cri-fb, ^ J , ■■ 

I lUIWUr OHBKHE AuffioV n mina acvh V 

Eaton Utd; Armthorpa Wears v 
r. Arnold v Heertor Town; 

, rvAffraton: Eastwood* Pontefract 
cohi Bitey w ThaeMey. GUstey v Daneby 
utd; aesttt v Sutton; Sprang utd v 
FnnteyCetieBatWeyVWv Boston. 


Rotherham v Bournemouth 
Swansea v Notts Co . 

WateaB v Bury _. 

Wotverfiampton v Cardiff 

HERTS SENIOR COUNTY LEAGUE: Pre- 

odor division: Bac Stevenage v 

Laawssdan Hospital; Cocktostera v 
Bacfcnond Sodat Rote Rayco v Mount 
Grace Potters Bar (2^ Sun 
Rows: 


Northampton v Cambridge 

Peterborough v Aldershot . 

Preston v Exeter - 

Rochdale v Mansfleld 


Sandridge Ro 
Mergarwstxvy. 


Sussex county leagub nst <«- 

vMoic GNcheatar Gay v Lfttehempton; 

Eastbourne Town v Horsham YMGA ffjjfc 
HaRshem v Arundel 12.0); P onft wl v 
P eeoahaverc Rtogmer vBurogea HBt 
Shoreum * 

Steyntog. 


FOOTBALL COMBINATION: | 

8MIRNOIT RtSH LEAGUE: Ards v Ban- 

gor f2O0): Batymena v CSftonvflta (2-30£ 

Cwrick v Coleraine (240* QJenavon v 

Lams (ZOO): Gtentatan v EXstfiory (230); 

Nawiy v Poriadown (230). 

CRICKET 

BRITANNIC ASSURANCE 
CHAMPIONSHIP 

(11.0 ute» stated, 110 overs) 

La te— te r Leteeateretilra v Kant 

Lawfe: Middles— v OerfayaWru 
T rent Bri dge: Nottinghamshire v 
Hampahho 

Taunton: Somerset v Yorkshire 
Novae Susa— v Uncashta 
E iy«»a« W ar wi ckshi re vEssax 
J Worcestershire v Surrey 

Other Match 

Cambridge: Cambridge Untvarsityv 
Northamptonshire (if. 30 to &3 Of 


3D urins stated 

FOOTBALL 

GOLA LEAGUE: Bamat * Scarborough 
(11-30* Bath V Runcorn. 

MULTIPART LEAGUE: Bongor City v 
Gooie (230): Choriey v Buxton. 

SOUTHERN LEAGUE: Prater dMttac 
Foreham vWBtanhafl (11.30). 

CENTRAL LEAGUE: First dHMR Not- 

tingham Forest v Manchester City (2UL 
Second dhMDtt: Notts County v Coventry 

pan. 

WOMEN'S INTERNATIONAL: Ebropean 
“ ‘ QuaSfytog match: En- 

! v ReoubSc ct Intend (at Rosdng, 


CRICKET 

BRITANNIC ASSURANCE 
CfMMPfQNSNP 
(12^0 latest stated, 110 

Bristol: Gloucestershire w 

(11.0) 

Ls i o eo f ; Leicestershire * Kent 
Trent Bridge: Nottinghamshire v 
Hampshire 

Taunton: Somerset v YarioNn 
Howe: Sussex v Lancashire (11, 
Edgto n aiom Warwic kshi re vi 
Wor ce atoc Wor ce s tershire v Surrey 


Torquay v P Vale (7.30) 

Swindon v Orient 

RUGBY UNION 
JOHN PLAYER SPECIAL CUP 
Final 

Bath v Wasps (at Twickenham) 

SCHWEPPES WELSH CUP 
Final 

Cardiff v NwHport (at CanStf) 

MERIT TABLE B 
BaracmvOrral 

CLUB MATCHES 
Abenflary v Croae Kaye 
Bristol vCowtiy 
Chettenham v Northampton 
Gloucester v Exeter 
GosfarttivMoriey 
HaMexv Vale of Luna 
Kgadlngley vFylde 
Launceston v South Wales Poloa 
Leicester v Moseley 

Liverpool v SheMen 

DnnteUlVn 

NewOOdga 


Dundee Utd-v St Mirren 

Hearts v Clydebank 

Motherwell v Hibernian 

Scottish, first division 

Alloa v E Fife 

Ayr v FaNdrtr 

Brechin v Clyde 


Dumbarton v Hamilton 

Montrose v Airdrie 

Morton v Forfar 

Partick v Kilmarnock » 


Scottish second division 

Albion v Meadowbank _ 

Berwick v Dunfermline , 

Cowdenbeath v Stirling 

E Stirling v Arbroath 

Queen of Sth v Stranraer 
Ralth v Queen's Park 


tWey vRugby 
Plymouth vdtfton 
Roastyn Parte v Ns 
Roundhay v Sale 
Saracens v Orrad 
Wakefield v West of Scotland 
Waterloo v Pontypool 
West Hartkvodv Nuneaton 

SEVESBTOURNAHBCT: Sussex Sevens 
(at Wording 12.0). 

TOMORROW 

RUGBY LEAGUE 

SLALOM LAGER LEAGUE; Mmhjp: 
FM romefc St Helens v Leeds: Warring- 

ton v Wfldnss; VMgtni v HuS KB. Second 

dswsisaiG Satiw v Whitehaven; Stanley v 
Workington (320k Doncaster v Leigh 

OJQfc Fu»ani v raiddcrsfistt K' 

Barraw (3.15); Mansfield v ~ 


Stenhsmuir v St Johnstone 

RUGBY LEAGUE 
StAtWAGBICHAMPIONSHftPra 
leraMpi Ftret ratnd: Halfax « HuS (2.15) 

OTHER SPORT 
ATWJETOA^ts^egere.MrMayh 

ffE HpCKE YTBttne k en chtenptonsMi 

aateW 13 * 

LAWN TOMS: LTA tournament (t 
auwn's Cluto). " 

SNOOKBC Bnfasssy world ara fesMa w 

champtanal te s (at Windsor). 




Blackpool 

GUXfc Runcorn v Hunalefc Sheffield 
fagtas v C&riafa (OS <fc MWSfiaU V 
Rochdale £L30). 

OTHER SPORT 

RUGBY UMON: B op ra e to te tee aatete 

TIM Army v The Territorial Army (11-0). 

RICHARD CROSS MEMORIAL MATCH! 

London Irish international XV v Irish 

Selection {Swtoury). 


Swal ere; R aw ;o«suo; 
JtoiardwJfirst dJviatoreiWIIS^ 
boys* Colchester Gtadtator^^cdH 
9rasa v Remfing Renegades fi>{ 
Bow Mere v Chetoi al ord Che 
teetotal!: Lons 


ation: First dMskac Sutton Braves * 

Besldon Raiders; Crawley Bans v 
Coblam Yankees (24fc Barnes Stonren 
• Afield Srortana v 

HAMDGALL: Mldtewf b Megan: Bedford 
Cofisgs v German Tanadf»(2fl). 

ICE HOCKEY; Helnekan League 

btey,J 

AMERICAN FOOTBALL: British Leeotie: 
National Coherence: Bhntog ham butov 
jv Porte- 

Manchester Atatare v 



titeSten^Pjmouth Adn 


ssisunzus.' 

WtoWngtonP jSSten" 

£22 KS&slss 


tans v leads Cougars (23% Tynesm 


dub 










■M 


THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1 986 


RACING 


can give 



Today marks the 30th run- 
ning of the Whitbread Gold 
Cup at Sandown Park. In all 
that time one famous name is 


By Mandarin (Michael Phillips) 

Ryeman and . Arctic Beau > 
L are others who have won since 1 
1 this handicap was framed, but ’ 
5 . 1 much prefer I Hav en ta li ght. 


still ’ missing from the roll of At least he has won over three 




»n rew* 

.ir- .‘"A 

“"ini* 



honour, that of Fred Winter. miles whereas Ryeman is Welcome; 

. However. ! expect to see I ■ essentially a two and a half Door Latch should be none 
Haventaugiit (nap) help the miler. the worse for bis unfortunate 

.great lam bourn trainer fulfil Arctic Beau would surely be experience in the Grand Na- 

one of his few remaining much happier if the ground tional when he got no further 
ambitions by capturing was a good as it was at than the first fence, 
jumping's- oldest sponsored Liverpool when he won last . _ „ 

race in the hands of Peter timeout H t rwood , 

Scudamore, who has also still - — ■ ■ Michael Stoute, three of 

to win it. /^Amvn n«A<nAlSn 4 v * ■ names in Flat 

What a way that would be to COUTSe Specialists raang, will each have a runner 
cement National Hunt's latest SANBXJWN in the Guardian Classic TriaL 

trainer-jockey partnership, a 

pairing which, was nrohablv o.-m g Harwood, a from iaz. zzm*. u «we in me past. 

e&mcS ssm&bs^skss u £a i aL fc «g 

- rode I Haventalight to win the 141 ■ 

SuKS&ftSS"" etsa£^ B gitsg ,ai5 - 1% = *■*- -g,-* p™™* ■ 

After that race, I notices a JoafaretM»aM««. a rinn« Newbury last September 
glint of admiralionrin Winter's LEICESTER Yet I must admit that 

■eyes, and with good reason traders: h coca. 32 winner* tram 72 Bonhomie’s greater - experi- 
because Scudamore had just £ SSL* «n« is a worrying factor. So 

ridden like a man inspired. jockeys: t cSSC i^SSnSs Som as with the Pulborough horses in 
Watching him drive I •^i5.i^itowaiifron«89.i2A%: such fine form just now the 
Haventalight home up the hill .***■ 19 presence of Primary in the 
that day ten lengths ahead of TTa^rSS^Siorsaomas field makes this a race to 
Western Sunset, I made up my rumen. 302 %; j Edwards, 15 tram 53. watch rather than one to bet 


18 woman from 55 
nwws, ot-i-K. m snouts. 35 tram 129, 
27.1%: G Harwood. 29 from 132. 224% 
40CKEY& W Corson. 47 wfmws from 
212 rides. 22L2% Ml R SwMwm. 23 from 
141.188% 

RIPON 

TRAMERS: P Kdowsv, 7 wfrmsre from 21 
rumors, 33-3%JBeny. 8 from 53. 15.1% 
E Weymes, S from 42. 148% 

JOODEY& Mas G Kaftauy, B wtnrars 
(ran 14 rids*. 428% 

LEICESTER 


stable's first siring. It is hard to 
be quite as dogmatic when 
weighing up the chances of 
Josh Gifford's two runners. 
Door Latch and You're 
Welcome; 

Door Latch should be none 
the worse for bis unfortunate 
experience in the Grand Na- 
tional when he got no further 
than the first fence. 

Henry Cedi, Guy Harwood 
and Michael Stoute, three of 
the biggest names in Flat 
racing, will each have a runner 
in the Guardian Classic TriaL 
which has been an informa- 
tive race in the pasL 

My feeling is that the Royal 
Lodge Stakes winner Bonho- 
mie may be hard pressed to 
give Sib to Shahrastani, who 
shaped with such promise at 
Newbury last September 

Yet I must admit that 



SPORT 


RACING ABROAD 


Fast Topaze may 
thwart Zahdam 


From Our French CorrespondentJParis 

Fast Topaze, whose connec- returning from injury, "as 
lions insist he is the best ihree- beaten a further - « 
vear-oid in France, should win with Manctho 2 4 lengths be- 
tomorrow’s Dubai Poule d’Essai hind him. 
des Poulains (French 2.000 Zahdam won two prizes at 
Guineas) at Longchamp. at the Salisbury and Ascot in Sepiem- 
main expense of another un- ber and returned with an easy 
beared colt, the English hope success over inferior opposition 
Zahdam. in the —000 Guineas tnal at 

, Salisbury earlier this month. He 

paze. who was in is a son of Elocutionist, also ihe 
Jewmarfcet for much sjrc of Guv Harwood's 1981 
in. did not make his p ou ] e d’Essai winner, 
after his transfer to Reciution. 


Milton Burn in command at Sandown yesterday (PhotographJan Stewart) 

Waiting on Tate Gallery 


towe rs: h ceco. 32 wfcmam (ram 72 Bonhomie's greater - experi- 

^fcMra , C r Rtov*y!Vfrom 50. uS*?*' a nTS2IS nB J? 1 Ct0r ‘ 

JOCKEYS: T Quinn, 14 wfrmere from S3 With Ihe PulbOTOUgh horses m 

jffi 5 l'9^a^88% ron,89 ' 114%: 511011 fin ® fonn ^ D0W the 

UTTGXETER presence of Primary in the 

TRAINBt&J WnMvtr 13 Mxvum makes this 3 T3C£ tO 


mind there and then to side 
with- him again in-today's race, 
even though this represents an 
unchartered journey as far as 


till* frUDUUIbV » 1 V 

view is that be will relish rt 
and I know that Winter is of 
the same opinion. 

The handicapper will un- 
doubtedly set I Haventalight 
harder tasks in the future in 
view of his latest win. So as 
there are no penalties for 


283: D McCMn. .11 (ran 74. 148% !tmi1 

JOCKEYS; P Barton. 8 wfrm«s from 41 “P 00 - 


rides; 185% R Crank, 7 from 39. 187% 
G McCourt, B from 39. 184% 

HEXHAM 




Following that fluent per- 
formance in the Earl ofSefton 


By Michael Seely 

A gallop fromomm morning at 
Ballydoyle will determine 
whether Tate Gallery attempts 
to 0re Vincent O'Brien his fifth 
victory in the 2,000 Guineas at 
Newmarket next Saturday. 

“The colt worked well on 
Wednesday." said Robert 
Songster after watching his 
four- year-old Field H and beat 
Scottish Reel in a thrilling finish 
to the Trnsthonse Forte Mile at 
Sandown yesterday. 

Saogster said of Tate Gallery, 
“ He flinched away from the 


l - T* • Vi *7, ' T, ”T ' 


- ago. Supreme Leader does 

joStEYirj Hansen, s winners from 38 look the one to be on in the 

WesibuiyEBF Stakes. 

■" WiLh Steve Cauthen at 
i San down. Willie Ryan, his 


addition to I 
Haventalight, Winter wifi also 
saddle Plundering, who fin- 
ished a dose fourth in the race 


today's race, he looks to have ff? 
a undeniably good chance »rm points to I 

with lOst.fflb to^y. ; Haventalight being the 


understudy at Warren Place, 
looks set to enjoy a successful 
day at Leicester where he 
should land a double for Cedi 
on Startino (100) and Homo 
Sapien (3.00). 


the Carragh and - 

that it still might be worth 
bringing him over." 

Field Hand looked like win- 
ning easily when Brent Thom- 
son sent the colt into a dear lead 
a fhriong and a half from borne; 
Then Scottish Reel rallied 
gamely and there was only 
threeqaarters of a length to 
spare at the tine. The style of 
Field Hand's victory certainly 
played a handsome compliment 


to his three-length Newmarket 
conqueror. Supreme Leader. 

Barry HiDs was delighted with 
the winner's performance. 
“Field Hand is nmcfa improved 
this season," be said “HeU now 
go for the Locking* Stakes." 
The Lamboern trainer then said 
that Sure Blade bad worked in 
tremendous style yesterday 
Michael Stoute, announcing 
that Scottish Reel w»M also go 
to Newbury, said that Souk 
Lady Maysoon. the first and 
second favourites for next 
Thursday's 1,000 Guineas had 


UUUI I m il Uiwii 

yesterday morning. “They both 
worked weft,” be said, “and it 
now remains to be seen if they 
are good enough." The New- 
market trainer also said that 
Shardari, the Aga Khan's much 
improved four-year-old would 
have his first race of the new 
campaig n in Chester's Ormonde 
Stakes. 

Chester's Pattern race was 
also announced as the somewhat 


ambitions target for Milton 
Barn after Tony Richards’s five- 
vear-old had won the Audi Sport 
Stakes carrying 8sUHb. “1 know 
its a bit of a step np in class," 
said Hugh O'Neill, the winning 
trainer, “but Mr Richards has 
never been afraid to have a go-" 

MOton Burn's owner is also 
the proud proprietor of Bold 
Arrangement, who ran such a 
fine trial for the Kentucky Derby 
when finishing a dose third in 
Lexington on Thursday. 

Pat Eddery was certainly 
showing no signs of jet lag after 

anitino trarli in liinitiin at 


1130am. Bold Arrangement's 
jockey celebrated his return 
home on a gloriously sonny 
afternoon by riding Saxon Star 
to a 10-length victory in the 
Juvenile Maiden Fillies' Stakes 

Favourite backers had their 
first success of the afternoon 
when Peter Greenail rode Bor- 
der Borg to a 15 length win in 
the Andi Grand Prix de Chasse 
Hunter Chase final. 


Fast Topaze. who was in 
training at Newmarket for much 
of last season, did not make his 
debut until after his transfer to 
Georges Mikhalides at 
Chantilly. 

He won the final group race of 
the French season, the 
Criterium de Saint-Cloud, by 
four lengths and half a length 
from Flying Trio and Maneiho, 
and then returned with a 
comfortable two-length success 
over the provencially-irained 
Kalisian in the Prix de 
Fontainebleau, run over the 
Longchamp mile three weeks 
ago. 

Splendid Moment, who was 


Air de Cour should have little 
trouble disposing of Dene) and 
Grandcourt in the Prix 
Vicomtesse Vigier. 

• Bold Arrangement _<Pat 
Eddery) ran an excellent trial for 
the Kentucky Derby on Max 3 
by taking third place behind 
Bachelor Beau (Larry 
Melancon) and Bolshoi Boy in 
the Blue Grass Stakes, run over 
nine furlongs at Kecneiand on 
Thursday night. 


Derby favourite on trial 

From Onr Irish Racing Correspondent, Dublin 


Imperial Falcon, currently 10- 
I joim-fevounie for the Derby 
with Armada and Floravami. 
makes his second appearance of 
the season in the 10-fiiriong 
Ballysax Race at the Curragh 
this "afternoon. 

Pat Eddery, whose suspension 


next week, is free to continue his 
partnership with this Northern 
Dancer colt who cost more than 
$8 million as a yearling. 

He finished well down ihe 
field in his only Curragh sum 
Iasi year but has made a good 
deal of improvement, judged by 
the decisive style in which he 
dealt with the opposition at 
Phoenix Park recently. How- 
ever. this was only a maiden 
event and he must win imp res- 


SANDOWN PARK 


. Televised: 2 J 0 , 230, 3.10, &40 

Going: soft with heavy patches 
Draw; 5f, high numbers best 

2^SAWOWN PARK MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-ffc C* G: £3443:50(6 



LEICESTER 


ACQUISITIVE (C( 
CAPITAL FLOW 0 
HAILEY ’S RUM (5 
0 TOPPED Of? nf) 
4 QUICK SNAPfofi 
nSXME(Ffl}|p 


I M Uttar 94 

test R Hamm 9-0 ______ 

xxil G Pritctard-Gordon 9-Q 

w) J SuKSHb 9-0__ 

>ra) A Ingham 9-0 

|PKateS«yM__ 


54 Acquisitive. SM Quick Snap, 5-t Risk Me. 6-1 Haley's Run. 12-1 Coital Row. 


# luttoxeter 


Going: heavy 

2.15 TOM BECKETT HANDICAP CHASE 
(Amateurs: £1 .625: 2m 4f) (10 runners) 

1 4P03 CARETA Forster 10-11-10 T Thomson Jones 

3 OQFO DINGBAT (D) Mrs S Davenport 10-11-9 ULnr(4) 

5 P0P0 BEACON TRIED McCain 12-1 vi — 

70FPU ST0WELL GROVE W Clay 0-10-13 JTutt#(7) 

9 /00- THE GO-BOY Mrs W Sykes 12-10-10 “ 

10 00P3 I0LLEGAR KM J Wabfier 7-10-9 Mbs J Henry (7) 

11 -OOP SHADY DEAL G A Hubberri 

13-10-7J Levitt- Scrmnsr (7) 

20 3UPP SAWYEITS SON Mrs P Rigby 

7-10-TMneL Wallace Q 

21 B02F ROCKMAN Mrs Pftaby 510-7 AHooifalym 

22 B40 JUDGE JAMES J man 12-10-7 CKetfefO 

5-4 Cars. 3-1 Kategar Jim. 6-1 Judge James. 8-1 Hackman. 

12-1 Stowed Gram. 14-1 others. 


Uttoxeter selections 

By Mandarin 

1 1 5 Killegar Kim. 2.45 Forever Mo. 3.20 Roll-A- 
JoinL 4.0 Gear The Course. 4.30 Marcetlino. 5.0 
Siate Diplomacy. 



Z45 BAYER SELLING HANDICAP HURDLE (4-Y- 
0: £777: 2m) (9) 

3 0010 M-TECH BOY WG turner 11-7 Tmcy Tomer 0 

8 0023 FOREVER MO G Baking 11-1 ROuen (7) 

10 POP TERRA Dl SENA D J Vlrnide 10-13 ACarrofl 



3 0010 M-TECH BOY WG Turner 11-7 

8 0023 FOREVER MO G Baking 11-1 

10 POP TERRA Dl SENA DJVftnie 10-13 __ 
If 000 DECEMSBEfflJEJ Alston 10-13 

13 0H>9 SILVER DUCAT B Richmond 10-12 — 

14 00FP STRANGE BREW M C Pne 10-12. — 

15 OOPO AVIETIE M Castsd 10-12 



13 am SILVER DUCAf B Richmond 10-12 p Corrigan (7) 

14 00FP STRANGE BREW MCRpe 10-12- — 

15 OOPO AVIETIE MCasM 10-12 XTr»ytar(7) 

16 4000 WAMOOR UNCLE (D) J R Jentans 

10-12 MkD Robinson 

17 OPO WISE MAJOR D McCain 10-12. — 

5-2 Forever Mo. 11-4 HiTech- Boy, 4-1 Silver DucaL 11-2 

Wamor Unde. B-1 Avwt», 12-1 others. 

3^0 MIDLANDS GRAND NATIONAL HANDICAP 
CHASE (£6,427; 4m 4f) (18) 

3 1000 SOMUeLERRSGcm 8-11-7 C Brown 

4 U10F THE TMWKER W A Sispoenson 6-11-6 — 

7 0003 RUPERTWO E H Owen |un 11-10-13 R Strange 

9 013U WALNUT W0ND8I R Hickman 11-10-3 J Brian 

10 23PP BOLD YEOMAN J T Gifford 10-10-3 Peter Hobbs 

11 2214 ROU.-A-JOWT fCMBF) G Thomer 8-10-0 P Burton 

12 4F0P COLONS. CHRISTY H ONM 11-TO-O M H am mond 

13 -000 MR MOLE(O-D) Mrs S Gil 11-10-0 A Webb 

14 R002 GREENBANK PARK (CJ D L WfiBams 9-10-0 R Crank 



2.15 VOLKSWAGEN FIGHTING FIT HANDICAP 
CHASE (£1,552: 2m 4f) (6 runners) 

3 3114 PREBEN FUR (DKBF) 0 W RKharris 9-104 PTnck 

6 2102 BMGE (DlJW Ayrnsny 10-HM__ CHmMm 

7 2231 DUHC0MBE PRWCE (v4) J M Jarierson 

7.10-2 (4)MM (7] 

8 1231 OOSJR VAUJANT (OH) V Thoflmson 

8-lti Mr M Thompson (4) 

12 FFO0 SLASIBI (DIG B Fakbavn 12-10-0 — 

16 231P WARDSOTF (B) T A CutWwrt 9-10-0 — ■ 

114 Preben Fur. 3-1 Duncombe Pnnes. 5-1 Bmge. B-1 
Cota* Vafliant 10-1 Wardsott. 12-1 Slasher 



19 0302 HAZY DAY C J HrtcWngs 7-1M — 

20 0P00 BRDGE ASH p-DIJ I Johnson 13-10-0. — R MHbnan 

21 3P23 SONNY HAY G A Hubbard 10-10-0 R Fahey (7) 

22 iDOO PENNYWASTE G Roe 10-10-0 MRcbatfs 

23 2U22 SMALL MONEY Mrs W Sykes 7-10-0 PWmer 

24 3243 LAURBICE RAMBLER S Meter 

12-KMJG Landau (7) 

25 030P PRWCELY CAU Mrs G Jones 12-lM — 

26 -P2P FLYNG JACKDAW H ONeb 10-10-0 SJOtM 

30 0302 WESTERN BORDER A J IMson 10-10-0 JSUBen 

5-1 RoV-A-Jofrn. 5-1 The Thmfcer. 13-2 Sommeker. 7-1 
Greenbank Park. 8-1 Hazy Day. 10-1 Laurence Rambler. 

4.0 DRAYTON KILNS NOVICE CHASE (£1.404: 3m 
2f)(11) 

2 1212 RAND0«.Y(BF1C JEM 7-11-10 — 

3 P011 8WFT MESSENGER (B)DLMUans 7-11-5 G Wiliams 

5 0212 ARDESEE(BF)DJMoortead6-11'4 U Hammond 

6 142F WOODLAND GENERATOR (C) P A Pmclwd 

7-1 1-4D Chinn (7) 

7 021 BRBGETOWN GIRL J Webber 6-10-13. G McCourt 

8 0014 CLEAR THE COURSE T A Fewer 6-10-13 - H Davies 

11 0044 COME ON SONNY KB While 7-lO-I2_._._G Even m 

13 -P02 STABLE LAD J A Edwards 7-10-12 P Barton 

14 0FPR TKALi BOV W Clay 7-10-12 S JOYfetf 

15 P0FP CUUR90LEIL Mrs J Croft 6-10-7.. W Humphreys (71 

16 0-P0 RJLL OF LOVE Mrs A Lee 7-10-7 

11-4 Bridgetown Girt. 7-2 Swift Messenger. 4-1 Clear The 
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4.30 BASS WORTHINGTON HANDICAP HURDLE 
(£2.918: 2m) (8) 

4 2F30 MERRY JANE (C-D| E H Owen iun 5-11-7 - K Bmfte (4) 

B 0/01- BLUEBIRDMO fC-D) Mrs J Ramsden 7-11-1 — 

12 0110 MARCELUNOP A JWlson 10-10-11 J Sultan 

14 0000 JADE AND DIAMOND (B)(D)G Bakteg 

£10-9 R Guest (7) 

16 -3P0 ASCBMOOR (MS R Bowring 7-106 DShaw 

17 2013 AISITRAGE ID) G Thomer 5-10-5 P Baton 

23 MW 5AUNS0NB0Y IB) (D} J P Sm&i S-'D-D P Corrigan m 
25 0000 MSS MALINOWSKI (B) (D) W Oay 5-100.— _ /items 

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5 JO OSMASTON NOVICE HURDLE (4-Y-O: £987: 
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5 OOF CHANGE-YOUR-WAYSGwSttanls 

.! 2525= P<UJCB Mre F Gray 11 - 11 -/" 11 mS.'tgS 

15 0000 PERFECT IMAGE W Skyey 6-11-5 DTeRwm 

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18 -000 JUM8ELUNA Mes Z Green 5-11-0 Mr L Hudson 

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4^5 CARRS OF HEXHAM BROADWAY NOVICE 
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20 SPUD TAHSON J h OKrar 5-11-2 ... ... ' T GdS 

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15-8 Warwick Suite. 4-1 Pay Zone. Walhude Harbour ft-i 

Doughty Rebel. 8-1 Marts Choka. 10-1 TarUmTorSta^'iii 
Ofnefs 


• Today’s Ripon mecung is 
subject io a 7.30 inspection but 
the other four cards are expected 
to go ahead without inspections 
following a general improve- 
ment in the weather yesterday. 
The Ascot stewards will inspeci 
the course at 10am on Monday 
id decide whether Wednesday’s 
meeting can go ahead. 


Today’s point-to-poinfs 
Detete And Whal Of Yore, Hornby Caste 

£01. Barts And Bucks, Kingston Btoul 
(2.0). Dartmoor. Flats Park (2D): Essex 
And Suffolk. Higham t2_Ot FM And 
DenMh, Eaton mu (2-01 rnmMp Farm- 
m, NBdge|2 0). Ponterah. Uantwn Mawr 
f2.30L- Saute DoreaL Badbury Rings (£0). 
I**®***., C I lm P I® 0). Worcester, 

Chaddssley CorbetMl.lS) 


Blinkered first time 

SAN DOWN 20 Chuck Snap. 

LEICESTER: 2J) Man m The Moon. 2 30 
Cutler Ridge. 4.0 Master Knowoll 


sively today if he is to retain his 
position in the Derby betting. 

Vincent O’Brien. Imperial 

Falcon's trainer, saddles Beau 

Monde and Equator in the 
group three Tetnarch Slakes but 
both are likely to need the run 
and Mick OToole's Air Dis- 

Is 

a? 

id 

it. 

al 

play. who had no luck when 
second to Lid ha me in the 


Gladness Stakes, is preferred. 

1 

1 3 

Barry Hills runs Sweet Ad- 

ie 

elaide in the other group three 


race, the Mount Coote Stud 

ft) 

Athasi Slakes. This filly was 

rt 

third to Tate Gallery over 


today's course and distance last 


year but this is a very compet- 

'g 

n 

itive race with the opposition 

i 

including The Bean Sidhe and 


Carol’s Luck. 



























E< 


38 


SPORT/TV 


THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 


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FOOTBALL: MERSEYSIDE TITLE CHALLENGE BEGINS TO FEEL THE STRAIN 


West Ham are 
prepared to 
take pressure 
at the top 


By Clive White 

Rather than West Ham 
United cracking under the 
strain of playing too many 
matches in loo little time (they 
now have three in five days) u 
would appear that the strain is 
beginning to tell on the joint 
Merseyside leaders — judging 
by the way their players 
dropped out of the inevitably 
bruising international encoun- 
ter at Wembley in midweek. 

No doubt ibe withdrawals 
were for precautionary rea- 
sons as much as health, but it 
would seem that West Ham 
are the finest of the three. 

Liverpool have had Dal- 
glish. their manager, Hansen, 

Molby. Lawrenseu. Gillespie 
and McMahon all under treat- 
ment this week, while Everton 
have been concerned about 
the various ailments afflicting 
Lineker, Reid, Sharp. Van den 
Hauwe, Raicliffe and 
BracewelL Most of them will 
struggle to the starting line 
today but. one wonders, in 
what sort of condition? 

Given that West Ham’s 
own strength will not alone be 
enough to lift the champion- 
ship. they could call upon few 
better teams than Nottingham 
Forest to give them a helping 
hand. Since it was Forest who 
seriously dented West Ham’s 
hopes earlier this month with 
a 2-1 win over the Londoners, 

West Ham might reasonably 
expect Brian Gough’s team to 
inflict similar damage upon 
Everton today. Forest are 
unbeaten in 10 games and 
defeated Everton at the end of 
last season at the City Ground 


Bryan Robson, the England 
captain.wfl] not tarn oat for 
Manchester United against 
Leicester City today because he 
has not folly recovered from a 
hamstring injury. 

Robson said: “I got through a 
five-ft-side match, but felt a 

slight strain. I wdl definitely be 
OK for next Saturday- There is a 
lot of time between now and the 
World Cop to get tolly fit and I 
do not see any real problems.” 



TENNIS 

Frawley 
battles 
through 
to final 

. lex Bel 
Teams 
John Frawley* aged 20, comes 
from Redrfiffe in Queensland 
and » one of- the - brighter 
prospects foe the future' of 
Australian tennis. He teamed 
the game on courts .made of 
processed anthills, so it is barfly 
surprising that he plays, welron 
shale, a similar surface. Frawley \ 
will play Denys Maasdorp, of| 
South Africa, at- Queen’s Club 
today, in the final of the second 
tournament on the Lawn Tennis 
Association spring rircoit. 

But Frawley is worried.** Tm 


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But Everton’s League title was 
already in the bag. 

Now the pressure is really 
on, with Liverpool's three- 
point win bonus guaranteed at 
Anfield against Birmingham 
City, who were relegated last 
week. Everton could find 
themselves three points adrift 
with little comfort to be found 
in their game in hand — 
against a desperate Oxford 

United at the Manor Ground „ . . . .. . , . . - _ . 

on Wednesday. There was a Wounded hero: Peter Reid, under treatment for a knee injury but hoping to be fit for Lverton 
on that they looked 


{ Moore resigns 

Bobby Moore, who led En- 
gland to their World Cup tri- 
umph 20 years ago. yesterday 
resigned as manager of South- 
end United. Moore, aged 45, 
will see out the remainder of the 
season at the fourth division 
club, but not the remaining two 
years of his contract. He said: 
“My reasons for leaving are 
purely personal, but I want to 
make it dear there was no row. 
We are parting on very friendly 
terms."* Moore joined the dub 
in 1983 and assumed control in 
February 1984 when Peter Mor- 
ris was removed as manager. 


in their narrow 1-0 

ome victory against Ipswich 
Town last week. Liverpool, 
also, were not too impressive 
at The Hawthorns. 

West Ham could hardly be 
in belter shape, physically or 
mentally after their awesome 
8-1 devastation of Newcastle 
United. They are unchanged 
against Coventry Gty, who 
have every reason to offer 
more resistance than Newcas- 
tle. Their head is hovering 
beneath the noose and after 
numerous reprieves over the 
last 19 seasons not too many 
tears would be shed for their 
passing into the second divi- 
sion. 

Oxford, the new Milk Cup 
winners, find themselves un- 
der not loo dissimilar pressure 
to that which weighs upon 
Everton. They too face the 
prospect of watching their 
closest rivals putting signifi- 
cant daylight between them as 
they battle it out for survival 
The fate of Norwich City, last 
season’s Milk Cup winners, 
must linger disturbingly in the 
back of their minds. Like 
Norwich tbev would not de- 
serve relegation, but justice 
has little place in these 
matters. 


Hearts ache for revenge 


Although Heart of Midlo- 
thian were not at their best, and 
perhaps fortunate to draw with 
Aberdeen in their last match, 
they should beat Clydebank 
decisively at TynecasUe today 
and virtually assure themselves 
of the Scottish League 
championship. 

A warning note has. however, 
been struck by Alex Mac- 
Donald. the Hearts manager, 
who points out to his players 
that not only have Clydebank 
surprised nearly all the leading 
dubs in the premier division, 
but were also the last team to 
beat Hearts before the League 
leaders began their astonishing 
run of 30 matches without 
defeat 

The result at Clydebank was a 
1-0 win for the home side and 
although the fortunes of the 
dubs have contrasted vividly 
since that afternoon in Septem- 
ber. Hearts have been left in no 
doubt by their manager that 
their opponents are still capable 
of playing a quality of football 
which belies their lowly league 
position. 

Such is Hearts’s determina- 
tion and commitment that they 
should secure the two points 
that will make the arrival of the 
League flag in Edinburgh almost 


By Hugh Taylor 

certain, making the task of 
Celtic, their only challengers, 
almost hopeless. But Celtic will 
fight on to the end and they are 
capable of beating Dundee at 
Parkbead. even though the 
Tayside team will battle fiercely 
as Uieycontinue their drive fora 
place in Europe next season. - 

Even a point would have 
Dundee followers rejoicing, for 
the club are a point ahead of 
Rangers, who are their rivals for 
the right to play m next season's 
UEFA Cup. 

The play of the Ibrox team 
has declined to such an extent 
that not even the most loyal 
supporters can visualize them 
gaining a point at Pitiodrie 


where Aberdeen, who have 
surrendered their chance of 
winning the championship for 
the third year in a row want to 
end the season on a winning 
note and find the form to 
enhance ibeir chances of beating 
Hearts in the Scottish Cop 
Fmal- . 

In the other games, Dundee 
United should defeat St Mirren 
and a draw can be the result of 
the Motfcerwell-Hibernian 
game. 

Perhaps the main interest of 
the afternoon will rest in Gree- 
nock where the unlikely Forfar 
Athletic hope to beat Morton to 
make themselves firm 
favourites to gain promotion 


Richmond swallows his pride | g*. 

Sentiment played no part with The other difficult choice for 
Gordon Banlett, manager of Bartlett was in goal where be has 
Southall, when it came to pick- p referre d Stuart MacKenzie, 
inghis team for today’s FA Vase who has just returned from a 
final against Halesowen (Nicho- knee injury, instead of Steve 
las Harling writes). He has left Bridges, the recent deputy, 
out Randy Richmond, the dub's Halesowen, who will be making 


longest serving member. 

Bartlett had a surplus of 
players in midfield from whom 
to choose. Richmond, a veteran 
of over 250 games for the 
Vauxhaff-Opel League second 
division club, will be substitute. 


their third Wembley appearance 
in four years, will have Lee 
Joinson. die scorer of two goals 
in last season's 3-1 triumph over 
Fleetwood, in their attack- He 
has receovered from a groin i 
strain. 


injury. I 

know what to. ab."*. l*m. 
confused.” Mike Walker* 
Colwyn Bay, who is- the same 
age. knew about all ibis bat 
could not profit from it yes- 
terday: Frawley beat him 6-3, ,6- 
2. 

The left-handed Walker was 
not disgraced. He ranks only 
twelfth in Britain and spent a 
fortnight as an odd-job man to 
raise enough money .to pay. his 
way round this circuit. After two 
weeks Walker. Andrew Castle 
(Taunton) and Stephen Botfidd' 
(Chingfbrd) have bens' records 
**than more fancied British 
contendere. - .. .. 

Maasdorp. like . Frawley,. 
weighs-tn at a muscular 12 stone 
7 lb. The odd thing about 
Maarsdoip, who looks as^if he 
could chew nails, is that he hits 
his .backhand two-fisted. This 
suggests that be goes In for over- 
insurance and maybe uses a 
hammer to drive home drawing 
pins. The answer, simply, is that 
Maaredorp has always played 
that way because his one- 
handed backhand never 
worked.- Yesrerday he won 6-2, 
6-2 against Danilo Maredino. 
aged 20, who is 6ft 3tain tall ami, 
presumably, the most promising 
player to emerge from Bahia in 
Brazil. 

In the women’s final, Pascals 
Eichemendy. aged 19. who di- 
vides her time between Biarritz 
and Paris, and must therefore be 
assumed to know what is what 
in the way of a good fife, will 
play Helena Olsson of Sweden, 
ged 21. Miss Olsson, almost 
ve inches shorter but robustly 
built, has a good touch but is yet 
to buikl on her p romi se as a 
junior. That brings us to the 
frail-looking Natalie Zvereva, 
aged IS. from Minsk, who was 
beaten 6-1. 6-4 yesterday by the 
wiser Miss Olsson, but she could 
be a more familiar name by; the 
time of the 1988 Olympics 
RESULTS^ Han's staifllM, amf-finala: J 
Frawley (Aits) bt M Water, fra. 6-£ □ 
Maasdorp (SAj t*D M*ra*no(Bi?. «. &■ 


Radio NamM MS Satw- 


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inoa 

From our own Coneapondart TOJOtew 
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6-1,6-* 


SCHOOLS RUGBY 

Only one 
slip by 
England 

By Michael Stevenson 

The final 18 group interna- 
tional was won by Ireland, 
who beat Wales 17-3, leaving 
England much cause for en- 
couragement. The only match 
England lost was to Scotland 
(10-7) through a penalty in 
injury time. They defeated 
Ireland, France and Wales 
and, more importantly, played 
splendid rugby in the process. 

St Mary’s and St Joseph’s 
School have recently returned 
from a tour of California 
where they played five and 
won four of their matches, as 
well as being beaten finalists 
in the Californian sevens. 

That tireless worker for 
rugby, Graham Lyddington. 
president elect of Yorkshire, 
has just taken Hipperholme 
GS on tour to Canada. They 
played five matches, winning 
three and losing two. 

King’s Macclesfield, follow- 
ing cancellation of their first 
fixture in Portugal, beat 
Belenenses (17-16) and 
Benfica (45-0), both matches 
being at the National Stadium 
in Lisbon. 


ATHLETICS 


Moorcroft’s show 
back on the road 


By Pat Butcher 

Athletics Correspondent 

David Moorcroft runs his first 
serious race in Britain since 
injury blighted his Olympic 
final in Los Angeles, when he 
competes in the AAA 12-stage 
road relay in Sutton Park, 
Birmingham, this afternoon. 

A pelvic displacement has 
meant that Moorcroft, aged 32, 
has been able to run only on a 
handful of occasions since he 
culminated his world-record 
breaking season with the 
Commonwealth 5,000 metres 
gold medal in 1982. He needed 
pain-killing injections in order 
to run in the Olympic Games, 
but the strain of three races in 
four days was too much, and he 
finished last in the 5,000 metres 
final — almost a lap behind Said 
Aouita, the Moroccan winner, 
who last year went on to take 
0.01 second from Moorcroft’s 
world record, with I3min 
0.40sec 

Moorcroft’s pelvic disorder is 
more common in footballers 
and Iasi summer he finally 
decided to have an operation 
performed by a surgeon con- 
nected with Bayern Munich, the 
West German football dub. A 
further injury prevented 
Moorcroft making his come- 


back at a track meeting in 
Gateshead near the end of the 
season, and when he could only 
finish 26th in a short road race 
in Italy in mid-September, he 
opted for a winter's training 
without racing to prepare for 
what is likely to be a final 
attempt to extend one of the 
most distinguished inter- 
national athletics careers by a 
Briton. 

It was in this same national 
club relay four years ago that 
Moorcroft gave notice of his 
potential to break the 5.000 
metres world record. The Cov- 
entry Godiva Harrier look one 
second off Brendan Foster's lap 
record, covering the five miles 
706 yards in 24min 2 7 sec. The 
record still stands. 

Steve Harris, the man who 
looked likely to break that 
record this year, has withdrawn 
from the Shaftesbury team with 
an adductor strain, incurred 
during his fine victory in the 
Perugia 17-kilometre road race 
last week. 

Sebastian Coe continues his 
preparation for an occasional 
5,000 metres this summer, when 
he runs one of. the short laps 
(three miles) for' Haringey AC. 
Tipton Harriers, the West Mid- 
lands holders, who also won the 
national cross-country team ti- 
tle. look set to retain the trophy. 


OLYMPIC GAMES 

Bid to end 
‘hypocrisy’ 
is vetoed 

There will be no open Olym- 
pics before 1992, Juan Antonio 
Samaranch, the president of the 
International Olympic Commit- 
tee (IOC), said yesterday. 

The !OCs plan to alter the 
rules in time for the 1988 Seoul 
games was effectively vetoed 
this week by delegates to the 
genera] assembly of the Associ- 
ation of National Olympic 
Committees. Only two national 
committee leaders supported 
the proposal following a wide- 
ranging attack on professional- 
ism and commercialism in sport 
by Marat Gramov, the Soviet 
NOC president. 

The supporters were Lance 
Cross, of New Zealand, and 
Charles Palmer, of Britain, who 
called for an end to hypocrisy 
and for the Olympic movement 
to face the reality that pro- 
fessionals had already partici- 
pated in the games. 

The IOC will choose the sites 
for the 1992 Games onFriday, 
October 17. The cities compet- 
ing for the summer games are 
Barcelona. Paris, Amsterdam, 
Birmingham, Brisbane and Bel- 
grade. The winter sports can- 
didates are Berchtesgaden. 
Lillehammer. Falun, Albert- 
ville. Cortina and Sofia. 


BOWLS 


Accurate Ottaway 
in the last four 


By Gordon Allan 


John ' Ottaway. last year’s 
losing finalist and one of the 
best leads in England, recorded 
a -21-17 victory over Geny 
Smyth yesterday as he made his 
way- into the semi-finals of the 
Lombard Champion of Cham- 
pions indoor evem. at Rugby, 
where he will meet Tim 
Haywood, who beat Martin 
Goldsmiih 21-15. 

Onaway, from Wymondham 
Dell, Norfolk, was joined in the 
semi-finals by another East 
Anglian, David Frost of the 
Gallow club at Fakenham, who 
scored a remarkable 21-20 vic- 
tory over David Ramsdale. It 
was remarkable not so much for 
the score, which .is common 
enough in the game, but for the 
feet Ramsdale once led 1 5-6 and 
was bowling well enough to give 
no inkling of eventual defeat. 

Frost, egged on by a 
coachload of highly vociferous 
supporters, turned in a fair 
imitation of the tortoise beating 
the hare, as he caught up and 
passed his opponent to lead 19- 
17. Ramsdale levelled the scores 
at 19-19 and again at 20-20 
before the' deciding end, when 
Frost had two bowls on the jack 
that could not be bodged. 

The defeat of Ramsdale as 
well as Goldsmith meant the 


end of a northern challenge. 
Frost’s victory brought him up 
against Gary Harrington, who 
defeated John Fenner 21-9. 

There was plenty of precise 
bowling in the Ottaway-Smyth 
match. Ona way’s draw was m 
slightly better order formudb of | 
the time and it took -him to 
within one shot of victory at 20- 
12. Then, almost predictably, 
Smyth experienced a mini-re- 
vival that added five shots 
before Ottaway, determined, yet ] 
as self-deprecating as ever, got a 
touch on aside wood to roll, in 
for the winning shot. 
RESULTS:QuafWr-fiuals: D - Frost. 
Fafcsnnamj w D Ramsons 
1 gt-20, G Ha mn gi o r^^a'^ at J 

Haywood' (guiniai be IbT GotdNntttr • 
(Sundariand) 21-15: J .Orta way 
(WwTOTjWiajn bWQ bt 8 Smyth (Paodmg- 

St Andrews again 

The 1-1 9th Open’ go!f| 
championship will ' be played 
over the Old Course at St 
Andrews from July 19 to. 22, 

1 990. The final qualifying com- 
petitions will be held at 
Scotscraig, Lundin, Leven links 
and Ladybank.The 1991 
championship will be held a 1 
Royal Birkdale from July 18 to 


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ICE HOCKEY 



summit 


By Norman de Mesquita 

The British ice hockey season Kirkcaldy area and improve die 


reaches its climax this weekend 
with its annual showpiece, the 
Heineken championships at 
Wembley. Dundee Rockets. 
Durham Wasps, Fife Flyers and 
Mmrayfield Racers will contest 
today's semi-finals (1 pm and 
6.30 pm) with the final on 
Sunday (3 pm). 

Wembley is a great celebra- 
tion and the continued support 
of Heineken. together with the 
increased interest of BBC Tele- 
vision. confirms that the current 
revival must be taken seriously. 

But there are trends that have 
followers of the sport wondering 
if the revival can be maintained. 

The post-war ice hockey 
boom was based on imported 
Canadians, a policy that proved 
shon-sighied, for the game was 
virtually priced out of existence. 

Nowadays, despite a stria 
limit on the number of imports 
of three per club, they are still 
heavily relied on with most 
Canadians getting far more ice 
lime than their British col- 
leagues.. Too many clubs are 
looking for high-scoring for- 
_ wards to bring immediate 
success. 

There are exceptions. Ron 
Plumb, whose Fife Flyers won 
the championships at Wembley 
last year, has done a great deal 
both to sell the game in the 


standard of Flyers' Scottish 
players. 

This season, Garry Unger — a 
veteran of more than 1 .000 
games in the National Hockey 
League — has done a similar job 
for Dundee Rockets. In a league 
where the emphasis is on scor- 
ing goals (IS a game in the 
premier division) it is signifi- 
cant that Fife and Dundee with 
their fine coaching.- are second 
and third, defensively. 

The best defensive record is 
held by Durham Wasps, who 
finished five points ahead of the 
field to win the premier di- 
vision. They also ’ won the 
English section of the Norwich 
Union Cup and their success is 
testimony to the good sense of 
encouraging local talent. 

As well as an imports cut the 
sport also needs more and better 
facilities. In the 1950s. Wem- 
bley Pool. Harringay Arena and 
Empress Hall (Earls Court) all 
staged ice hockey on a Saturday 
night, played to packed arenas. 
Some 22300 people watched ice 
hockey every Saturday in Lon- 
don alone. 

A typical weekend nowadays 
will see between 15.000 and 

20.000 watching a total of 16 
games. We are not helped by the 
current trend which, thinks an 
ice rink needs no more than 

1.000 seats. 


RUGBY LEAGUE 


Champions at risk 


The last premiership to be 
sponsored by Slalom Lager 
starts today with the televised 
Halifax v Hull first round tie 
and continues tomorrow with 
the remaining three matches. 

The premiership gives a final 
money-spinning boost to the 
season after the Challenge Cup 
final and enables at least one 
dub to salvage a trophy from 
what might be a barren season. 
The top eight play ofT and it is 
possible for the eighth dub to 
fight its way through and win. 

The once-mighty Hull travel 
to face the ncw|y-crowned 
champions Halifax at Thrum 
Hall today and they are quite 
capable of winning against a side 
still suffering from the after- 
effects of Sunday’s celebrations. 


By Keith MnckJin 

Ian Oram, the Chstleford 
half-back and Lindsay John- 
ston, the Australian forward 
with Hull Kingston Rovers, 
have both been ruled out of 
next week's rugby league Silk 
Cut Challenge Cup final 

Wigan, who finished second, 
entertain a Hull Kingston 
Rovers side whose minds may 
be on next Saturday's Wembley 
final. This looks as if it wifl 
bet he most keenly contested' 
game of the day. 

Fulham's second 1 division 
match against Hunslet at Chis- 
wick tomorrow has been post- 
poned. the Yorkshire club 
refusing to play two matches in 
two days. 


THURSDAY’S RESULTS 


THRO WVlSKMt Oarflngton 0. Bolton 
Wanderais 1 . 

(SOLA LEAGUE: A kr inc ha m 3, Dagenham 
1; Kenonng 0, Runcorn ft Kiddennnstw 


8, Wycombe 2. 
CENTRAL L£ 


LEAGUE: Rrat dvfatoK Not- 
Forest 2. Mancnesw ItanadD: 
1. Barnsley 3. PoHponad: Derby 
Wednesday: Sheffield 
_ ... * Hull Crty. Seoood dmtelt Nona 
County 2. MCtfatorouffO 3. Scunffxxpe 1. 
Preston Cfc Rotherham Z BtekpoM 3; 
Stoke 2. Sunderland 3: York 0. Bradford 
Oty £ Wblwss 0, Qkfltam 3. 

NORTHERN PROBER LEAGUE: Cup 


final: Hyde 1, Marine 0. 
MULTIPART 
t. 


LEAGUE: Souoport 1. 


PA YOUTH CUP RNAU M h* Man- 
ctester United 1. M^cne^rOtv i. 

VAUXHALL-QPS- LEAGUE: « . 

1, Sutton tinted 3. Poaponei 


Hamlet v Sogrtor Regis, nm onrrnm 
Button l7 Hampton 2 FJncway 3, 
BiOTtey Z Harlow 1 . Urttege 1; Mafoen- 
need a Leytonstone- Word Ts Tilbury a 
Lewes a Walton ana Hersnam 1. 
Basham Wood 0- 

FOOTBALL CO*®«A7tO«r MStattl 1, 
1 3 ; Ronsmomn ft Waflord 2 

ArttO. 

: cnamtord 0. 
BramtooiSZ ^ 

SOUTHERN JUNIOR FLOODLIT CUP: 
SemLflnafc TonsnnamO, Arsen* Z 
MACBAR SOUTH-WEST COUNTIES 
LEAGUE: Carat! 2. Torquay 1. Poet- 
pemd: Hertford * Bownemoulh. 

WEST GERMAN LEAGUE: -Bayer 
Uenhngon 1. Emoscht FranktulQ. 

RUGBY LEAGUE - 

SECOND CltRSION: Bachpooi Borough 
22. WaKSfiM 18. 


FOR THE RECORD 


ATHLETICS 


GOLF 


SUNDAY 

Radio 2, continued from the 

fitting page 

Classics in stereo. ( 1 7)jazz 


PHILADELPHIA: Pomte^W 

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HOUSTON: HouatM C 

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ST PET^SBUna. RSfai 9t 


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isssSESL 

9^0 Your Hundred Beat Tunes 


BASEBALL 


water; j OsfMr 
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7: Cl 


UNTTSO STATES: Antartoan I— par Nmr 

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Laaguar New Vork Men 6. Si Loaa CardhnlB 

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table tennis 


TOKYO; O0o«M6 sanaK Europe bl Japon 5- 


TENNIS 


TULBA: Baft at OkMoma.Cussc: Rm 

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triayori: forea _3. Canaoal. F»h- 
jl^affc New Zealand. 2. Australia 

ICE HOCKEY 

NORTH AMERICA: twtqaai Laagoa 

FtaKritK St Loud Stuas 7. Toronto 

Lean 4 tontenn aerim Uni Mt 
E*nwtoi Otes 7, Cttguy Raws a tserta 

mmmm. man itnnumiiuaiiu 
roent Sowat Untan 7. Canada * 
grace terptecoa 5-ft Untea San 7.. 

£50^000 prize 

Cbarrihgton. the London 
brewers, are offering a £50^000 
prize to the first runner to break 
tire one-hour barrier in the East 
London haif-maraifron on Sun- 
day. May 25. The. world best 
time for ihe half marathon is 
60min SSsec, set by Mark Curp 
in . ‘Philadelphia last - autumn. 











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THE TIMES SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 




Weekend television and radio programmes 
Edited by Peter Dear and Peter Davalle 


Sunday 


635 


BBC 1 


LWwwty. UntT 


830 The Sstmfay Picture 
Show. The first of a new 

Mark 


The studio audience will 

be treated to a fast- 
moving mixture of 

cartoons, chat, Sms, 

vKleys, features, 
rntervtaws and . 
competitions . 

10A5 Grandstand introduced bv 
Stave Rider ThefirtM 
■s 10.46, 1.10 and 430 
Snooker; the Embassy 
WorW Professional 
Championship. 1220 
Boxing; Gary Mason v. 
Maurice Gomie. 1240 
FootbaB Focus; 1.00 . 
News summary and : 
weather, 1.40 Squash: the 
H?-Tec British Open finals, 
2-15 Motor Sport truck 

Hemaken League 

■SKBafifi?" 

Leagues Slalom Lager 
Premiership Trophy - - 
match. 330 Half-times 

spore* and reports, 430. 
rural Score 

535 News with Jan Learning 
Weather 5.15 
Sport/Rogiond news 
530 The Moppet Show. The 
guest is American 
comedian, Dom Dekiise 
535 The Dukes of Hazzartf. 
Luka comes to the aid of 
an old flame who te also a 
country and western 

... singer Her fife is 

threatened by hardebti- 
ridden manager 
630 Every Second Counts. 

' : show 
Paul Daniels 
7.05 The Collectors- In this . 
week a drama concerning 
customs officers, Calvin 
receives a tipoff about a ' 
vessel with a cargo of 
cannabis (Ceefax) 

7.55 Ffbn: Chisum p 370) 
starring John Wayne, 
Forrest Tucker and 
Christopher George 
Western adventure, set si 
New Mexico ki 1878, 
about cattle baron whose 
vast empire Is under threat 
from a corrupt 
businessman The baron 
enlists the help of BHIy the 
Kid and Pat Garrett in his 
battle to keep Ms land and 
cattle Directed by Andrew 
VMcLagen (Ceefax) 

9.45 News and sport With Jan 
Leemmg Weather 
10.00 Cagney and Lacey. With 
May Beth on maternity 
leave Christine is 
partnered by the detective 
who is the pariah of the 
force after shopping six of 
ins corrupt colleagues 


1050 FfcaFM <1978) starring 
Michael Brandon and 
EBeen Brennan Drama, 
set m a Los Angeles 

musio-artiy radio station, 

about the staffs battle 
wtth new management 
who wart to increase • 
advertising revenue The 
fsm mducfes a Bwral ... i.; 
helping of West Coast , 
music, ncludtog tracks ■ 
from, among others. Billy 
Joel and Linda Rondstadt 
Directed by John A 
Atonzo 

1230 Weather. 


TV- AM 


&55 Good' 

introduced by-Mike Morris 
News at 7JM& regional 
report at 7.08i sport at 

7.15 The Wide Awake Club 
includes guests, pop 


__ — — , Temple, 
and antmaJ expart, Jimmy 
McKay Newa * at 835. 


ITV/LONDON 


935 No 73. With Jools Holland 
and Belouis Some Last in 
‘ the series 1130 Captain - 
Scarlet Science fiction 
adventure series frill 30 
Secret Valley. The Spider 
Gang tryto disrupt the 
children s and their city 
guests overnight camp on 
me beach 

12410 News wtth Atastav 
Stewart 

1205 Saint and Greavate. Ian 
and Jimmy discuss the 
football news. 1230 
Wmsflfng. Two bouts 
from The Dorking Hails. 
Surrey 

1-20 AirwoK. John Bradford 
Horn is after the woman 
who stumbfed on the 
location of Airwott. 

215 Benson. Panic 
when Benson, a 
babysitter, learns that tha 
s parents are 
m a snowstorm. 

245 Internatio na l Tennis. The 
Mm s Singles semifinals 
of the Monte Carlo Open 

4.45 Results Service. 

SUM News with Alastair 
Stewart 

5.05 Connections. 

535 Robin of Sherwood Jason 
Connery, son of Sean, is 
joined In the cast by 
Cathiyn Harrison, grand- 
daughter of Rex, and - 
Jeremy sinden, son of 
Donald, in this weeks 
adventure,. The 
Inheritance 

&30ChacftPiay. Bob 

Carotgees and Joanna 
Monro try to unravel 
Irens 


7.00 Cannon and BML The first 


MfchaelAspeJ 
730 The Price Is Right Game 
show 

830 Tarby and Friends. The 
guests are Max Bygraves. 
Jennifer Rush, Karen Kay 
and Tom Pepper 
9.15 CLA.T3. Eyra. Fred and 
Tessa Join the staff of a 
gnfs school when a pupil 
claims that she was fodked 
m a dungeon 

10.15 News and Sport 

1030 The Big Match. Brian 

Moorelntroduces 
highfights from matches 
a/fact^ championship 
and relegation issues 

11.15 LWT News headlines 
followed by The Late Cfhm 

. James. Ira guests are 
David Attenborough and 
BWyConnoHy 

1200 FOnfr AflMght Long <1981) 
starring Gene Hackman , 

. .and Barbra Streisand 
Romantic comedy about a 
bored executive who Is 
demoted to night-shift 
duties at one of Ms 


stores Directed by Jean- 
CiaudeTramont 

130 raghtThooghts. 





The Princess of Wales inspects the troops in Berlin in the final 
instalment of the German TV series Royalty f Channel 4. 93Qpro) 


630 


BBC 2 


University. Urrtfl 


135 FBm: How to Succeed in 
Busin^^^toMn^ally 

Lee and Rudy Valise 
Broadway musical 
comedy by Prank Loasser 
about a window-cleaner 
who, on his way to work, 

. buys a career-enhancing 

book, the contents of 
which he puts into practice 
with spectacular results 
Directed by David Swift 
3.50 Laramie. Frank Lammus 
returns to Laramie hoping 
to re-open Ms saloon, wHn 
SUm as his partner 
Starring John Smith and 
Lyle Bettger (r) 

440 Bach from E di nburgh. 
Stanislav Heller Nicholas 
Kraemer and John Tofl 
play the Concerto m C 
major (BWV 1065), they 
are joined by GflDan Weir 
for a performance of the 
Concerto in A minor (BWV 
1065) They are 
accompanied by the 


5.10 World Snooker.! 

Vine introduces highlights 
of this afternoon s frames. 

635 Horizon: The Men Who 
Bottled a Cow. A 
documentary about the 
20-year fight of Dr Gtyn 
Vale and nls cofleagues to 
eradicate the tsetse tty (r) 

7.15 NewsView. Jan Learning 
with today s news and 
sport; Moira Stuart 
reviews the week s news 
with subtitles Weather 

7.55 Aroieid with Afitee. Peter 
Miss plays a few selected 
holes of Addington Golf 
Chib with Robot 
Sangster 

835 World Snooker. David 
Vine introduces further 
coverage of second round 
action 

9.45 Hehnat Episode eight 
covers the years 1 345 to 
1947 Paul Simon returns 
to the village with an 
ostentatious display of his 
wealth and throws a party 
complete with a Glenn 
Miller-style band But he 
does not inpress Maria 
who rejects his advances 
1130 Rugby Special. Hlg 
of toe John Player 1 
Cup Final between I 
- and Wasps, and the — 
Schweppes Welsh Cup 
Final between Cardiff and 
Newport 

1230 Worid Snooker. The best 
of the evening s action 
from tha Crucible Theatre, 
Sheffield Ends at 1.35. 


CHANNEL 4 


1.45 Channel FOur Racing from 
3 Sandown 


Sandown.The 
Park 2-y-o Malden Stakes 
(2 00): the Guardian 
Classic Trial (230); the 
Whitbread Gold Cup 
Handi c a p Chase (3 10). 
and toe Westbury EBF 
Stakes (3.40). 

430 Hkn: San Ferry Ann* 
(1965) starring Wilfred 
B ram bell, Warren Mitchell, 
Barbara Windsor and Joan 
Sims A comedy without 
dialogue about a group of 
Britten tourists in Franca 
Directed by Jeremy 
Summers 

535 Brookside. (rXOracte) 

630 Right to Reply 

PhtosopherMichael 
Beaney accuses The Inner 
Eye series of being 
confused and iflogbai The 
programme s presenter 
Dr Nicholas Humphrey 
defends 

630 News Summary and 
weather followed by 
Credo, presented by John 
Stapleton A number of 
Christian leaders have 
been questioning many 
fundamentals of faith 
including toe existence of 
Heaven and life after 
death This programme 
examines what the church 
now believes happens 
when we die (Oracle) 

730 Africa. Part one of aseries 
tracing the history of 
Africa, (r) 

830 Held in Trust Diana Rigg 
continues her exploration 
of National Trust for 
Scotland properties 
(Oracle) 

930 Royalty. The fourth and 
final part of the German 
series on the British Royal 
Family 

1200 WH Street Blues. Police 
are sent to assist with the 
evacuation of residents 
from an apartment block 
due for demolition An 
elderiy occupant threatens 
to jump from the roof 
unless he is re-housed 
(Oracle) 

1130 «m: Abbott and Cratefio 

Meet Frankenstein* 

(1948). The two fumy men 
pit their wits against the 
combined forces of 
Dracula, Wolf Man and 
Frankenstein s creature 
Directed by Charira 
Barton 

1230~FiimrThe Mummy’s 

Curse* (1944) staring Lon 
Chaney Jr as toe 
murderous Mummy 
Kharis, creating havoc m 
the bayous of Louisiana 
Directed byLasJJa 
Goodwins Ends at 135. 


FREQUENCIES: Radio 1:1053kHz/285m;1089kHz/Z75m; Radio 2 693kHz/433m; 909kH/433m; Radio 3: 1215kHz/247m: VHF -90- 
925; Radio 4; 200kHz 1500m: VHF -02-95: UBC: 1152kHz/261m; VHF 973: Capital: 1548kFte/1i 
1458kHz7206m: VHF 943: World Sendee MF 648kHz/4S3m. 


194m: VHF 953; BBC Radte London 


C Radio 4 ) 

Oniongwavs VFF variafionsatend 
of Radio 4 

555 am Shipping Forecast 630 
News Bneflng 6.10 
Prelude Music selected by 
Michael Ford 630 News. 
Farming 630 Prayer (s) 8^ 

. Weather Travel 
730 News 7 10 Todays 
Papers 

7.15 On Your Farm 
7.45 In Perspective Rafignus 
afters (with The Rev Roy 
Jenkins) 

730 Down to Earth 

(Weekend rarderwig) 

830 News 8,10 Today s 


8.15 Sjwrton4 

248 Yesterday in Parfiament 
837 Weather Travel 
930 News 

935 Breakaway Guide to 
holidays With Bernard 
Falk 

930 Newsstand Martin 
Wamwrigtt reviews toe 
wetfdy magazines 
1036 Tha Week n 

Westminster wftti Peter 
RiddeS. Pokricai Editor of the 
Rnanaal Times 
1030 Loose Ends with Ned 
Sherrin and his regular 
team 

1130 Fromour own 


1200 News. Money Box 
1227 Question of Taste Panel 
game about food and 
drink 1255 Weather 
130 News „ 

1.10 Any C^fflsfions? with 

Gavin Laird, Becky Bryan 

and MPs Enoch PoweB and 
Jim Prior (r) 135 
Shtopora Forecast 
230 News. The Afternoon 
Ptay Mytosand 
Legacies by Vaterte Windsor 
wito Ftosroe Crutchtey 
Dante Massey and Patrick 
Stewart to) (s ) . 

330 News, international 
Assignment BBC 
correspondents report from 
around tha work} 

430 The Saturday Feature 
Echoes of Lost Tiber 
The memcmes of Brwfs 
travetors on toe roof of - 
the world (2) The Forbidden 


530 The Living Worid 
Magazine edition 
presented by PetBr France 
535 WeekBxfing Satirical 
review of the week s 
news 530 Shipping 535 
Weather . Travel 
630 News. §3orte round-up 
635 Stop the Week wtth 
Robert Robinson 
730 Seturday-Nidht Theatre 
Asking Chanie by 
Christopher Denys With 
Geoffrey Bw*s as the 
man obsessed by a virago 


830 Baker's dozen 

Baker with records (s) 
930 Thrffleri Part 4 of Ruth 
Renders A Judgement in 



Stone read byP 
Daneman 938 weather 
1030 News 
10.15 Eveni „ 

10^1 The Mischief 

The story of Aiefster 
Crowley who tfeflghted in 
hemgcaOed The 
wickedest man n the world - 
1130 Science Now (Peter 
Evans) 

1130 Bodgere, Banks and 

Comedy series 

5. Weather 1233 
Shipping 

VHF (available in England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except- 53K30em weather 
Travel 430-630pm 
Options 

( Radio3 ) 

S35 weather 730 News 
735 Aitoade Nicolai (Mtery 
Wives of Windsor 
overture), Purcell Masque of 
the Four Seasons, from 
. .. The Fairy Queen, wtth . 
EDO/Ambrosian Opera 
Chorus and soloists), Chopin 
[Botero„ OpIB" 

Ashkenazy, punctt, Berfioz 
(Absence. Las runs 
(fete Frederica von 
Stactesoprano) Rameau 
(Dardanus Orchestral Music 
(rom Acta 2 and 3), Ravel 
(Lavaise Argerichand 
Frsb^pianos). Mozart 
' tartaAh. toprevktt Te 
Kanawa), Prokofiev (Acte 
3 and 4 scenes from Romeo 


Sass, soprano), Vaughan 
WBttams (Serenade to 
Musfo^rcheetral version) 
930 News 

9JB Record Reviewdncludes 
Michael Kennedy s guide 
to recordings of the Mahler 
Seventh 

10.15 Stereo Release Scriabin 
No 1 


Orche stra/Westrmnster 
Choir/soloists Toczyska and 


11.10 Chicago SO fonder 
Michael Tilson 
ThomasJPart one Ives 
(Symphony No 3), 

Gershwin (Nocturne for Lily 
Pons). Varese (Arcana) 
1135 This Sporting Life talk 
by Tom McNab, former 
Olympic coach 
1200 Concert part 2 


135 Pferre Reach; piano 
recital Mozart P 
in C tenor K- 
Schumann 

(FascMngeeohwankaus 

Wien), Debussy 
(Ctddran's comer suite) 
200 Vaughan Wilfiams in his 
Time: Rossini 
rarmdeo 
: (imermezzo, 
Fennhnore rad Garda). 
Haydn (Symphony No B), 
Vaughan Wlttama (Sinfonia 
AntarticO 

330 Boccherini and Paganini- 
Boccharte Quintet ffe 
7LPaganini(Quffliet No 
. 7Lwitfi KantorcNtf. 

Tntear Rowfand-Jonas 
.Ba«ie and Gifford 
4.10 Russian and Erteish 
ityPakrar 
^ ' Vignotes 
0). Works f 

TSttekovsky. 

and Walton 

530 Jazz Record Requests 
wtth Peter Clayton 
535 Critics Forum: Includes 
comment on the fBm 


FtetzstenHeknaLon 
- BBC2 

635 Organ Music Andrea 
Madnarte plays works t 
Banchfan ancf Martini 
7.10 A Most Bewtttiwu 
Presenca Mariorie 


Westbury with more of 
Cw^oia Rosen s theatrical 
reminiscences 
730 The Bassarids one-act 
opera byy Hans Werner 
Henze, sung fei English BBC 
SO/BBC Chorus, end 
cast including Alexander 
Young. Regina Sarfaty 
Helen Watts, Owyn Griffiths 
and Francis Egenon 
935 Pan Portraits. Dr 

Christopher Barnes on 
the Rainer Maria Rice - 
Pasternak -Marfa 
Tsvetaiyeva correspondence 
10.15 Music Group of London 
Arnold Cooke fTriao for 



Khachaturian (Trio 1 
clarinet, violin .piano) 

11.00 Continental Cabaret 
Chansons Murder, and 
other Anti-Social Behaviour 
1130 Poulenc Paul Crosstoy 
' Works Include 

nortts 

1137 News 1200 

VHF 
to655 

( Radio 2 ) 

News on the hour until 1.00pm. 
then 330, 630, 730 and hourly 
from 1030 Headlines 630am. 

7.30 Sports Desks 11.02am. 
1032pm Cricket Scoreboard 
730pm. 

430am Martin Stanford (s) 630 
Steve Tnteove te) 83S David 
Jecobsjs) 10.00 Sounds 1130 
Album Time wtth Peter Clayton (s) 
1.00pm The News Huddflnes 
130 Sport on 2 includes Cricket 
(reports from three matches 
including the game at Lords where 
Middlesex plays Derbyshire), 
m Sandown Park a 


Racing from 
fli 


Park and 
v Wasps at 
Also news from 

Cardiff where Cardiff play 

Newport) 530 Sports Report 630 
Ken Bruce presents Two s 
Best 7.00 Pop Score 730 Stars of 
Friday Night e Musk) Night 
(James Lockhart wtth BBC Concert 
Orchestra) 930 String Sound 
(BBC Radio Orchestra) (s) 1036 
Martin Ketner (a) 1236am 
Luring Legends (s) 130 BUf 
RenneUs (s) 330-430am A 
Little Night Music (a) 



BBC 1 


635 Open University. Until 


8J35 Play School. 9.15 Knock 
Knock. A selection of 
stories and songs about 
friends and friend ships.(r) 
930 This Is the Day. A 
service of prayer and 
fellowship from an tona 
Community home in 
Birmingham 

10.09 Asian llagaztee. Kapil 
Dev talks to Peter walker 
about his life and career 
1030 Switch On to 
Engistt. Quiz show for 
Entetsh language (earners 
10L55 Women m Science 
and Engineering Choice, 
presented by Baroness 
Platt (r) 11.45 With a Little 
Help from the Chip. How 
toe micro can hetp toe 
disabled (r) (Ceefax) 

1210 Sorry, Mate, I Dkfnt See 
You!. Accident prevention 
advice for motorcyclists 
(0 1235 Fanning. 
Responding to doctors 

demands for less fat in toe 
national diet fanners are 
producing leaner 
livestock But is this what 
toe customer wants? 

1238 Weather. 

130 This Week Next Week. 
David Dimbleby talks to 
Peter Walker, back from 
Moscow, on Anglo-Soviet 
relations after the attack 
on Libya 230 
EestEndera. (r) (Ceefax) 
3.00 Bonanza. Ben is held 
hostage at the Nevada 
State Prison 

3.45 FBm: Days of Glory* 

(1944) starring Gregory 
Peck, in his screen debut 
Second World War drama 
about a group of Russian 
freedom fighters helping 
to rescue a Russian 
dancer stranded behind 
Nazi lines Directed by 
Casey Robinson 
5.10 Eurovision Song Contest. 
The second of two 
programmes previewing 
the entries in next 
Saturday s event 
535 Antiques Roadshow from 
Watford (Ceefax) 

635 Appeal by Richard Baker 
on behalf of the 
Winchester Cathedral 
Trust 

630 News with Jan Learning 
Weather 

6.40 Praise Bel The first of a 
new series. (Ceefax) 

7.15 Hancock's Half Hour*. Our 
hero makes an 
Impassioned plea for toe 
patently guilty Sid (r) 
(Ceefax) 

735 Miss Marple: A Pocketful 
of Rye. Part one of a two- 
episode Agatha Christie 
mystery .(r) (Ceefax) 

8.35 Mastsmiind.The 

specialist subjects are: the 
Labourgovemment 1964- 
70; Norse mythology; toe 
life and works of Btzabeto 
Gaskeif; and the We and 
works of Richard Strauss 
935 News with Jan Learning 
Weather 

9JZ5 That's Life. Consumer 
affairs 

10.10 BfidwatctiUvefrom 
Florida. Tony Soper 
presents the first of three 
live reports tonight, from 
Port Orange, 50 miles 
north of Cape Canaveral 

1035 The Rock Gospel Show. 
The guests include 
Stephanie Lawrence 

11.10 Geoffrey Smith’s Worid of 
Flowers. Fuchsias 

1135 The Sky at Night Patrick 
. Moore with toe story of 
Saturn 

1135 Grand Prix. highlights of 
the San Marino Grand 
Prix 

1230 Weather. 


TV-AM 


6.55 Good Morning Britain 

fins with A Thought tor 
l Are You 


a Sunday 7.00 Are You 
Awake ret 7.25 Cartoon. 
730 The What's News 
quiz. 8.10 Jem Barnett s 
Pick of toe Week, 837 
News headlines 
830 Jonathan Dimbleby on 
Sunday. 


ITV/LONDON 


935 Wake Up London. The 
Vicious Boys decide to 
play cricket 935 Woody 
and Friends. Two 
cartoons 935 Roger 
Ramjet- Animated 
adventures of a flying ace 

1030 Morning Worship. A 
Passover celebration 
1130 Link. Part two of the 
NIMROD story 11.30 
Once a Thief-? The fourth 
programme in Marcel 
Berims series examining 
toe variety of options 
available for dealing with 
young offenders 

1200 Weekend Worid. Is toe fall 
in interest rates an 
indication that toe world's 
economy is on toe mend? 
Brian Walden investigates 
1.00 PoSce 5 Shaw Taylor 
with dues to unsolved 
crimes in the London area 
1.15 The Smurfs. Cartoon 
series (r) 1.30 Small 
Wonder. Comedy senes 

200 Platform. Paul Johnson 
presents another 
programme in his series 
on how life is teflected in 


me media His guests are 
Janet Raddrffe Richards. 
Murray Watts, and Anna 
McCurfey, MP 

230 LWT News headlines 
followed by International 
Tennis. The Men s Singles 
Final of toe Monte Carlo 
Open The commentators 
are Bin Threifatl and Frew 
McMillan 

4.30 The Campbells. Part one 
of a new drama series 
about a widower doctor 
with three children, striving 
to serve a small 
community in 19th century 
Scotland Starring 
Malcolm Stoddard 

5.00 Albion Market Morns 
assumes high office once 
again 

630 Now You See It General 
knowledge game 
presented by Jack 
McLaughlin 

630 News with Alasta ir 
Stewart 

6w4Q Highway. Sir Harry 

Secombe is in the Falkland 
Islands 

7.15 Catchphraae. Game 
show, introduced by Roy 
Walker (Oracle) 

7.45 Lord Mountbattetr: The 
Last Viceroy. Part one of a 
three-episode serial to be 
shown on consecutive 
nights, tracing India s 
struggle for independence 
under toe guidance of 
Lord Mountbatten 
Starring Nrcoi Williamson, 
Janet Suzman and Ian 
Richardson 

9.45 News. 

1030 Spitting Image. Topical 
satire mouthed by cruel, 
latex puppets 

10.30 The South Bank Show. 
Metvyn Bragg traces the 
story of the group, The 
Velvet Underground, who 
ruled the rock roost 
between 1966 and 1970 
1130 LWT News headlines 

foHowed by Trapper John. 
Medical comey drama 
series set in a San 
Francisco hospital 
1220 Night Thoughts. 





BBC 2 


6.50 Open University. Until 135. 

1.55 Sunday Grandstand, 

introduced by Stave Rider 
Motor Racing: toe San 
Marino Grand Prix. ice 
Hockey: tha Heineken 
League Championship 
Play-offs. Worid Snooker: 
Second Round action in 
the Embassy World 
Professional Snooker 
Championship, Squash: 
toe Men s Final of the Hl- 
Tec British Open 

6.40 The Money Programme, 
presented by Brian 
Widlake and Valerie 
Singleton, includes a 
profile of Canadian, 

Graham Day, who, next 
Thursday, takes over as 
Chairman of British 
Leyland During the past 
three years he nas closed 
shipyards, sacked 
management, and 
ruthlessly cut workforces 
What has he m store for 
British Leyland? 

7.15 Young Musician of the 
Year 1986- A pianist, a 
wind player, a string player 
and a brass player 
compete for toe award 
and a place in the 
Eurovision Young 
Musician of the rear 
competition They perform 
in the presence of the 
Patron of the competition, 
the Duchess of Kern, and 
to a distinguished panel of 


Harry 
David Ellis, Alun 
Hoddinoft, John Manduelf 
and Bryden Thomson The 
results win be announced 
by the chairman of the 
jury. Lady Barbirolli The 
BBC Phi (harmonic 
Orchestra is conducted by 
Bryden Thomson 
935 HeimaL Episode nine 
covers the years 1 955 and 
1956 Kiarchen leaves to 
have an abortion, the 
result of the affair with 
Hermann 

11.45 World Snooker. Highlights 
of this evening s second 
round matches Ends 1.00. 



Judy Gar land and Hester Keaten: 
on Channel 4, 230pm 


CHANNEL 4 


1.05 Irish Angle - Hands. The 
art of lace-making 
135 The Making of Britain. Dr 
Kevin Sharpe assesses 
the reign of Charles I 
200 The Pocket Money 
Programme. Financial 
advice for the young, from 
the young 

230 Film: In the Good Old 
Summertime (1949) 
starring Judy Garland and 
Van Johnson A musical 
set in tum-of-the-century 
Chicago about a music 
shop assistant and her 
colleague who she thinks 
she hates Directed by 
Robert Z Leonard 
435 Film: Movie Maniacs* 

S starring The Three 
as as acting 
hopefuls mistaken (or 
efficiency experts 
Directed by Del Lord 
435 DurreU in Russia. Gerald 
and Lee DurreU visitthe 
delta of the River Volga, a 
haven for millions of 
waterfowl and other birds 
(Oracle) 

5.15 News summary and 
weather followed by The 
Business Programme. 

An interview wtth Paul 
Channon. Secretary of 
State for Trade ana 
Industry and 3 report 
contrasting the retailing 
methods or Dixons and its 
takeover target. 

Wootworth 

630 Second Glance. A filmic 
impression of hands 
6.15 Swimming. The Speedo 
Fast Water Meet from toe 
Maindae Swimming Baths. 
Gwent 

7.15 Path of the Ram God. The 
third and final part of the 
senes following the cycle 
of water from a Belize 
mountain peak to a coral 
reef (Oracle) 

8.15 Sinfonietta The London 
Smfometta. conducted by 
David Atherton, perform 
toe first movement of 
Alban Berg s Chamber 
concerto with Paul 
CrossJey (piano) and Nona 
Lidded (violin) 

930 Zastrozzi, A Romance. 
Part three of the 
dramatized version of a 
novel written by Shelley 
1030 Sweet Disaster. An 

animated short reflecting 
on a post-nuclear world - 
10.15 FBm: Love Story* (1944) 

- starring Margaret 

Lockwood and Stewart - 
Granger Melodramatic 
story of the love of a 
concert pianist, with only a 
few months to five for an 
engineer who is going 
blind- Directed by Leslie 
Arliss 

1215 FBm: Christmas Under 
Fire* (1941) A 
documentary about how 
Londoners celebrated 
Christmas. 1940 Directed 
bjrjtarry Watt Ends at 


( Radio 4 ) 


On long wave VHF variations at end 

of Raofo4 

535 

6. ifi "Prelude Music 
selected by Mjcftaal Ford is) 
630 News; Morning has 
sxokan (hymns). 635 
Weather; Travel 

730 News 7.10 Sunday 
Papers. 7.15 Apna HI 
GharSamajhiye 7.45 Beta 
730 Turning over New 
Leaves 735 Weather- 
Travel 

830 News 8.10 Sunday 
Papers 

8.15 Sunda. _ 

Clive Jacobs). 

830 Pauline Godins with the 
week s Good Cause 
835 Weather, Travel 

930 News 9.10 Sunday 
Papers 

9.15 Letter tnxn America, by 
Alistair Cooke 

930 Morning Service from St 
Giles Church, Wrexham, 
Ctwyd 

10.15 The Archers Omnibus 
edition 

11.15 Pick of the Week 
Programme highlights 
with Margaret Howard (s) 

1210 It's your world: 01-560 
4444 Phone-in to Lord 
Carrington, Secretary- 
General of NATO 1255 
Weather 

130 The World this weekend- 
News 1JS5 Shipping. 

200 News. Gardeners 
Question Time 

230 The Afternoon Ptay A 40 
Year Old Man by 
Shusaku Endo dramatized 
by Penny Leicester With 
Denis Lil(s) 

330 Lang May Yer Lum Reek 
The story of the 
Dagenham Girl Pipers (s) 

430 News. The Food 

programme With Derek 
Cooper tr) 

430 The Natural History 

is The care of 


SJOO News. Travel 
535 Indian Tales of the Raj 
(new series) Roshan 
Seth on what the Indians 
thought of the British and 
toe if legacies (i) Serving the 
Sahibs. 


5.35 A dream In three 
dimensions. Richard 
Cork visits Monkton House 
and meets artists and 
critics who believe it snouki 
become national 
property 530 Shipping. 535 
Weather 
630 News 

6.15 Weekend Woman 6 
Hour With Sally 
Feldman 

7.00 Travel; Joseph Andrews 
by Henry Fielding. Part 4 
(s) 

830 Bookshelf with Hunter 
Davies 

. 830 The Monarchy in Britain 
The history of 
Buckingham Palace, 

Windsor Castle and St 
James s Palace 
930 A very warm welcome 
Laurie Taylor towns to 
John Bowman 
930 Six Men Six views on 
being a man 13) Terry 
Waite 935 Weather 

10JD0 News 

10.15 Tha Sunday Feature 
Enterprise: Where are 
they now7 A report on soma 
of me companies which 
have been fatured in 
Enterprise over recant 
years 

1130 Ray Short Al Fresco The 
Rev Ray Short reflects 
on the way we see 
oursetves. our world and 
our God 

11.15 in Committee 
Parliament's Select 
Committees, and their 
functions 

1200 News. Weather 1233 
Shipping 

VHF (available In England end 
S Wales only) as above 
except' 53&630am Weather 
Travel 730-830 Open 
University- 730 Formula 
Iteration 7J20 'Scribble 
Scribble, Scribble. Mr 
Gibbon 7.40 Social 
Sciences Grapevine 430- 
6.00pm Options 

C Radio3 ) 

635 Weather 7.00 News 
7.0S Franck and Ns Ode 
Franck (Piano Quintet in 
F minor Curzon/Viaznna 
Philharmonic Quartan. 


Chausson (Poeme for 
vKJkruarchestraiwith 
Kyung-wha Chimg.inolln) 

830 David M unrow directs 
Earty Music Consort of 
London Dufay (Giona ad 
modum tubas, and 
Chanson etc). Rubbra 
(Medttazioni sopra 
Coeurs desoles). 930 News 
935 Your Concert Choice 
Kedrov (Our Father). 

Komitas phe Apricot Tree). 
Dvorak (Sextet in A, Op 
48). Babajanlan (Violm 
Sonata Levon 
Chilmgirlan and Clifford 
Benson). Smetana 
(Scherzo. Festive Symphony) 
1030 Music Weekly-tnckides 
David Matthews on 
Beethoven and the 
Prometheus theme, and 
Alan Tyson oon Some new 
evidence on Mozarts 
Figaro 

11 16 Michele 

Campanei la, piano 
recital Works by Liszt 
including the Fantasia 
and Fugue on B A C H and 
Sonata in B minor 
1215 Scottish National 

Orchestra (under Eros), 
with Pauk, violin Haydn 
(Symphony No 88), 

Dvorak (Vioim Concerto in A 
minor). BartOk 

(Miraculous Mandansn suite) 
1.40 La Capricdosa Mitd 
Meyer son (harpsichord) 
plays partitas by Buxtehude 
2 10 Nash Ensemble Tippett 
(Sonata for tour horns). 
Holloway (Serenade for wmd 
quintet and string 
quintet). Mozart (Serenade m 
B flat K 3661) 

3.45 The Conflagration 
Singspiel for 
marionettes Music by 
Haydn BBC Concert 
Orchestra/Sc hutz Choir of 
London With soloists 
Montague. Dickerson. Nicod 
and Gokfthorpe Act two 
at 4 30 

5.15 A Captive Lion Paoia 
Diomsotti stars inn Elaine 
Femsteln s biography of 
Manna Tsvetayeva 

6.15 Russian music for String 
Quartet Albemi Quartet 


play Les Vend redes. Book 1 
(toe work of many 
Russian composers) 

635 Changes verse 

anthology With Robin 
Holmes. Rosalind Shanks. 
Guy Holden 

7.05 Russian Musiapart two 
Quartet on tha name 

Belayev 

7.40 The Modem Novel John 
Stevenson reads his own 


830 BBC Philharmonic (under 
Aimone-Marsan). with 
Alexander Bailiie (cello) 
Bloch (Rhapsodie 
hebraique Scheiomo). and 
Dvorak (Symphony No 6) 
9.10 Anthony Payne Jane 
Manning (soprano). John 
McCabe (piano) Tha song 
cycle Everting Land 
930 The Quality of Cabinet 
Govammentp) Peter 
Hennessy talks to Lord 
Wilson o( Rievauix (r) 

1030 Pater Donohoe piano 
recital Bach (French 
Suite No 5 m G, BWV 816). 
Busoni (Toccata. 1921 
and Elegie No 2). Bach 
(Toccata. Adagio and 


Fugue in C 
564 tra 


trasnertbed by 
Busoni) 

11.00 Samuel Wesley New 
insh Chamber Orchestra, 
with Malcolm Proud 
(harpsichord) Includes 
Wesley s Symphony m A. c 
1790 and his Symphony 
mD 1784 

1137 News 1200 Closedown 
VHF only: Open 
University From 6 35am to 6 55 
The fiction trap 

( Radio 2 ) 

News on toe nour Headlines 
7.30am. Sports Desks 1232pm, 
1.02 202 3-02 4.02 532, 

6.02 1032 Cricket Scoreboard 
7.32pm. 

430am Martin Stanford (s) 630 
Steve Truelove (S) 7.30 Roger 
Royle says Good Morning 
Sunday (s> 9.05 Melodies for you 
(s) 11.00 Tribute to Harold 
Aden 11.30 Desmond Carrington 
(5) 230pm Benny Green is) 

3.00 Alan Dea(s) 430 Jazz 




SCOTCH WHISKY 





SCOTLAND’S 
NUMBER ONE 
QUALITY 
SCOTCH WHISKY 


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i's 

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40 SATURDAY APRIL 26 1986 


THE TIMES 


SPORT 


Cup holders aim for third successive win 

Bath should tame 
inspired Wasps 


By David Hands, Rugby Correspondent 


In 1981 Peter Wheeler, then 
the captain of Leicester, 
showed his team the newspa-' 
pers which confidently pre- 
dicted his club's demise in the 
cup final against Gosport. 
Leicester then proceeded to 
win the cup for the third 
successive year. At Twicken- 
ham today, Derek Arnold may 
do much the same before 
Wasps contest their first John 
Player Special cup final 
against Bath, the holders. 

Bath are overwhelming 
favourites to win their third 
successive final. They have 
the form, the experience and 
the motivation. Wasps were 
not unduly impressive in their 
last two rounds, against Not- 
tingham and London Scottish. 
Injuries mean they are with- 
out three international backs 
as well as those promising 
forwards. Ellison and 
O'Leary. 

But it is no coincidence that 
Wasps have reached the final 
in the same season that they 
have acquired a coach from 
New Zealand. All Blacks, 
appropriately enough in view 
of the club's sombre strip, 
have had much to do with 
Wasps' rise to the top: Marie 
Taylor in the late 1970s and 
early 1980s and now Arnold. 


Arnold played 10 seasons 
for Canterbury and spent two 
years coaching them. He wifi 
return to Oirislchurch on 
Monday week after six 
months with Wasps which 
leave him regretting how 
much there remains to do at 
Sudbury. 'The 

coaching/training situation is 
vastly different from New 
Zealand which I found a bit of 
a culture shock, but there is a 
lot to be brought out of the 
players," be said. 

“They have the ability and 
the club has the ability, in the 
matter of direction and steer- 
ing from someone at the top. 
This team has so much poten- 
tial I would love to take them 
to New Zealand fora couple of 
years and then see what they 
are all about. 

“They are not good yet, 
there is an awful lot more to be 
done, but the quality is there. 1 
would very much like to come 
back for another season but I 
don't think that likelihood is 
right around the corner." 

There were those who de- 
scribed Bath’s seroi-finaJ with 
Leicester as the true cup final, 
which is not only an insult to 
Wasps but a trap which Bath 
officials will have steered their 
players round. True, that win 


represented a valuable psy- 
chological hurdle for Bath but 
they will not be so foolish as to 
underestimate today's 
opponents. 

These are two teams who 
have the ability to play out- 
standing rugby if they are able 
to set caution aside, but Bath 
have a distinct advantage at 
half back and. conceivably, 
back row. Hall has returned 
from injury with an increased 
appetite and will be able to 
match Rose at the back of the 
Uneout while the sheer phy- 
sique of Simpson and Spurrell 
will give them an edge over 
the lighter men, Fegler and 
Rigby. 

Much responsibility lies on 
the 18-year-old shoulders of 
Rees, the Canadian stand-off 
half who has revealed such an 
old head for Wasps this sea- 
son. At nearly 14 stone he is 
big enough to withstand fierce 
tackling and his tactical kick- 
ing will ensure a busy after- 
noon for Martin and his 
wings. Rees will hope, too. to 
bring the best out of the 
bustling Cardus and two inter- 
national wings. Bailey and 
Smith. 

1 suspect that Bath's scrum- 
maging will allow them to 
contain Wasps tight forwards 


and that Redman wjU give 
them a Jineout advantage. 
Rumour out of Bath suggests 
that heavy bruising to 
Barnes's, toe may limit his 
ability to kick goals. We must 
wait and see the truth of that, 
but Palmer and Trick are 
adequate deputies. Halliday 
will be keen to sign oif for the 
season with a flourish and I 
think his club will win; 1 hope 
they do so with a flourish too. 
BATH: C Martin; D Trick, j Palmer 
(raptain), S Hafiday, A Swift; S 
Barnes. R MB; G Chrfcott g Daws, 
Ft Lee, J Hafl. J Morrison. N 
Redman. R Spurrofl, P Sttnpson. 
Replacements: B TrwasMs, P Cue, 
C Stanley. C Lfliey. G Bess. D 


!: N Stringer S Smith, R 
Cardus (captain). R Petow, M 
Bailey: G Rees. S Bates; P Rendal. 
A Simmons, J Probyn, M Rigby, C 
Pfcinegar, J Bonner, D Pager. M 
Rose, Replacements: P Mrihan, K 
Titoombe, P Balcombe. J Samuel, A 
Isichei. J EBisoa 

Referee: F A Howard (Liverpool). 

• Several players from 
today's game are due to 
appear tomorrow in a match 
at Sunbury when a London 
Irish invitation side takes on 
an international selection to 
raise funds for the family of 
Richard Cross who died in 
January after breaking his 
neck playing for a London 
Irish junior side. 


Ring holds the key for Cardiff 


By Gerald Davies 


Anyone assessing the rela- 
tive merits of Cardiff and 
Newport, who play rn the 
Schweppes Welsh Cop final at 
the National Stadium, Cardiff, 
this afternoon, will find that 
the teams are as strong as each 
other on the limited platforms 
which they lure constructed 
for themselves this season. 

Both have battle- hardened 
front row forwards, which 
gives them power in the scram, 
they have ball-winning capaci- 
ty in the linesont and each has 
an aggressive and energetic set 
of players in the back row. 
Their scrum halves are largely 
link-men who allow the stand- 
off halves to exert their influ- 


ence on the style of play. 

All the predictions so for 
emphasize a tough, uncompro- 
mising contest between two 
powerful sets of forwards play- 
ing to the kicking tempo of 
Davies and Turner at half 
back. If ft is to be so, then 
Cardiff must fervently hope 
that John Scott win have 
recovered from a strained 
hamstring. His absence from 
the back row would leave a 
gaping hole in an area in 
which, crorially, the match is 
likely to turn. He wfll make his 
decision this morning. 

Apart from the dnei between 
Turner and Davies, Powell 
and Collins of Newport wfll 


compete with Golding and 
Roberts; Waters, though at No 
8. will roam up and down to 
pursue the threat of Norster in 
the Une-out. And in tire front 
row the hookers, Watkins and 
Phillips, the captains of the 
two teams, might want to 
believe that there is a sane or 
two that they have to settle. 
Their rivalry, so ft would 
appear, has not always been of 
the healthy kind. It needs to be 
today. 

The break for Cardiff conld 
Wellcome from the stylish and 
incisive Mark Ring in the 
centre. He has returned this 
last month to the team and has 
played competently and confi- 


dently, though not always with 
the easy dash that he showed 
before his agonizing knee 
injury last year. The last time 
the two teams met in the final 
was In 1977 when Newport 
won 16-15. It wiD be no 
surprise if ft is jast as dose 
today. 

NEWPORT: P Knkpit M Batten, D 
Pitt, P Daniel, J wrote; P Tumor, N 
Caftan* J Ravens, M J WaUdns 

(KSciJSya J 

Waters. 


> Peny, R PoveS, D 


CARDIFF: M Rayw? G Cordta, A J 
Donovan. M Ring, A H adl ey , W G 
Davies, N O'Brien; J WMtsfeot, A J 
PWBpa (eapO, I Ekfcnan. O GokSng, 
K Edwa rd s, R Hotter, G Roberts, J 
Scott 


SNOOKER 


Johnson finds his rhythm 


Joe Johnson, of Bradford, 
who has found diversions 
from snooker by singing with 
a pop group called Made In 
Japan, made a clearance break 
of 1 10 at the Crucible Theatre, 
Sheffield, yesterday, on his 
way to an 1 1-5 lead over Mike 
Hallett in the second round of 
the Embassy world 
championship. 

The break, in the thirteenth 
frame, put Johnson into a 9-4 


By Sydney Friskin 

lead in the scheduled 25-frame 
match. He had slarted the day 
5-3 up and soon consolidated 
his position, adding to the 
century with breaks of 60, 73 
and 85 to go 11-4 ahead. 
Hallett won the sixteenth 
frame after a struggle. 

Jimmy White and John 
Parrott were tied at 4-4 after 
the first period of their sec- 
ond-round match. It was a 



Muscular Dystrophy has caused David 
■ too much suffering for far too long 
At four, he began to find it difficult to 
walk. By the age of ten, this relentless, 
musde-wastirig disease had confined him to 
a wheelchair. 

But to end the disease, our scientists 
need to know how it begins. 

The more you help, the sooner they can 
find the cause 

To save other children from suffering like 
David, it canft be a day too soon. 

MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY 

35 Macaulay Road, London SW40QP teg Chanty Na 205395. 


strange encounter in which 
neither player had complete 
control 

The referee in charge of the 
second round match between 
Steve Davis and Doug 
Mountjoy appealed to a sec- 
tion of the crowd to refrain 
from comment while play was 
in progress. But nothing could 
stop Davis taking an 8-4 lead 
after starting the day at 4-4. In 
the second frame Mountjoy 
was leading 58-1 only for 
Davis to dear the table with a 
break of 67. 

Alex Higgins recovered af- 
ter conceding 10 points from 
his first two strokes to take a 3- 
1 lead over Terry Griffiths, 
including several delicate 
shots. 

ClifFThorburn said after his 
10-5 victory over Bill 
Wcrbcniuk on Thursday night 
that his concentration was in a 
bad state, but he hoped it 
would improve. 

RESULTS: Ttiuraday*s Brat round: 
C ThortHim (Can) M W Werteniuk 
(Can) 100. Frame scorro gfrotbum 


61 - 64 . 103 - 3 . 16 - 79 , 

58 . 63 - 42 . 22 - 74 , 904 , 93 - 17 . 82 - 24 , 
64 - 38 . 69 - 17 . 10 - 85 . 88 - 0 , 67 - 60 . 


TENNIS 

Weather 

beaten 

From Richard Evans 
Monte Carlo 

Tbe sliding roof, which has 
saved this rain-drenched 
Monte Carlo Open from being 
waterlogged over the last few 
days, suddenly slid bad: in tbe 
middle of Stefan Edbeqfs 
much interrupted match with 
Andreas Maurer yesterday 
and brought everything to a 
soggy halt. 

The problem was the wind. 
It blew against tbe sensitive, 
automatic control that guides 
the cantilevered rubber cover- 
ing, exposing players and spec- 
tators alike to the steady 
downpour that turned the 
normally resplendent Monte 
Carlo Country Club into an 
aqua park. 

Edberg, having lost the first 
set 6-0 on Thursday night, was 
leading 4-2 in the second but 
10 minutes resumption yester- 
day was all they were allowed, 
during which time the Swed- 
ish No 2 seed edged forward to 
5-3. Edberg bad just taken the 
second set 6-4 when the roo. 
disappeared 

More tennis, page 38 


GOLF 


Garrido disqualified 
for half-inch ‘theft’ 

From Mitchell Plaits, Madrid 


Antonio Garrido, tbe for- 
mer European Ryder Cup 
golfer, was disqualified from 

the Cepsa Madrid Open here 
yesterday after being accused 
by Paul Way, the PGA cham- 
pion, of breaking the rules by 
incorrectly marking his ball on 
the greens. 

Garrido. aged 42. who was 
born and bred in Madrid, left 
the course in tears with his 
wife. Alicia. He said: “I will 
never play golf .again. I have 
played golf all over the world 
as a professional for 20 years, 
and nobody has ever accused 
me of cheating. I don't mind 
shooting 90 or 100. I don't 

cheat” 

Way, however, was ada- 
mant with his daim. “I felt it 
my duty to tell Antonio he was 
at fault and 1 called the referee 
oyer on our last green. Anto- 
nio marked bis ball incorrectly 
on at feast five occasions. I 
asked Gordon Brand Jar. who 
was in our group, and our 
caddies to watch. They agreed. 
When I told Antonio, be went 
berserk and I thought be was 
going to whack me.” 


Garrido momentarily came 
dose to losing his self-control 
on the last green. After a 
heated debate, Garrido, vigor- 
ously denying the accusation, 
lifted his putter in anger and 
shouted at Way: “No, no, noP 

Garrido had taken 6S shots 
in his second round but Way 
refused to sign his card. John 
Paramor. the tournament di- 
rector. then interviewed all 
concerned. Brand said: “This 
is not the sort of thing one 
does lightly. Paul however, 
did the right thing and I 
support him." 

Paramor said: "Paul and 
Gordon told me identical 
stories. They both claimed, for 
instance, that Antonio marked 
and replaced his ball on the 
penultimate green, where he 
gained approximately half an 
inch fora 1 5-foot putt. He is in 
serious breach of Rule 20, for 
which he is disqualified." 
LEADING SCORES: Second round 
(gB unle ss state d): 138: HdarK, 70, 
68. 129 : j Heggarty. 70, 69: G Brand 
Jnr, 89. 70. IWTj Ofeztitf (SpL 72, 
68. 141: M Moreno fSp). 70, 71; I 
Mosey. 69. 72; M McNiAy(8A). 72. 



Key role: HalTs renewed appetite rill lest Wasps's Rose at tbe hsek offee Uoeout 


CRICKET: SEASON GETS UNDER WAY IN FAMILIAR STYLE 

Prichard Willingness goes 

unrewarded 


shows 
his class 

By I vo Tamant 

FENNER'S: Match aban- 
doned as a draw. 

It was as well for Cambridge 
that the weather forecast was 
accurate. Teetering on 25 for 
five in hopeless pursuit of 349 
to win, they were spared by 
thunder and lashing rain soon 
after tea as much as by their 
opponents' Deed of batting 
practice. 

Essex extended their second 
innings until lunchtime, by 
which time they had an unas- 
sailable lead. Hardie did not 
reappear, owing to a bruised 
hand so Pringle partnered 
Prichard and an enjoyable 
partnership ensued, as they 
pat on 98 in 95 minutes. 

As anyone who has seen 
him bat will know, Prichard 
has a rosy future. He scored a 
stack of runs in Australian 
dub cricket in the winter and 
yesterday made his 77 runs 
with shots all round the 
wicket 

Their options limited, Cam- 
bridge got off to another poor 
start Lever again accounted 
for the openers, again taken in 
the slips. Lea, who took a 
century off Essex in this 
fixture two yean ago, does not 
now get fully to the pitch of 
the ball. 

ESSEX: Rr*t Innings 268 tor 4 fee M R 
Border 60) 

Second Innings 

AWLBjgcPMoebfiam 3 


By Alan Gibson 

THE PARKS : Oxford- Univer- 
sity drew with Gloucestershire. 

Both captains showed a 
willingness to push for a 
finish, but in the end the 
weather proved too great an 
obstade to a satisfactory con- 
clusion. Oxford, 106 for three 
overnight, batted until lunch 
and declared on 179 for nine. 
Thorn, who made 72, saved 
the follow-on with his second 
successive six to give further 
evidence of his undoubted 
ability. 

Gloucestershire then batted 
until tea, when they dedared 
at 79 for four and set Oxford a 
winning target of 210 runs in 
two hours. Unfortunately, it 
rained again. With a slight let- 
up in the weather, the players 
braved tbe conditions mice 
more only to be sent scamper- 
ing for cover in tbe middle of 
the second over. 

For Gioncestershire, 
Stovoid was well caught at slip 
when be had made 15 and 
Romanies was bowled by 
Dawson when on 38. Wright 
was out to a skier to mid- 
wicket and Lloyd to a splendid 
catch — Cope changing direc- 
tion before diving to his left at 
the wicket. Oxford bowled 


steadily and with few half- 
volleys. and their fielding 
showed some improvement 
on their earlier play. 

'GL0UCESTER8MRE: Bret (ratings 309 
tor 6 dac (K M Curran 108 not out P 


Second Innings 

A W 8MwM c Rutnacn* fa Thome 1 1 
PW Romanes bDawKxi20 
A J Wright c Mm b Oswson 34 
KPToR*nnotQBMt 
J W Lloyds e Cope bRutnagwO 
DAGrawneynotoutl 

Extras (fa 1. nb 1) 

Total (4 wife deg 79 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-15, 238, 3-78. 4- 
78. 

BOWLING: QuHan 12-4-30-0: Thome 8- 
MM; Dawson 103-21-2; Rutaagur 6-1 

OXFORD UMVERSfTft ftM kilting*- 

D A Hagen b Salisbury S. 

A A SUw b Payne _ 2 

CDMTooWyblk^fe 


1) A Thome cPaynab Lloyds . 
T PBlal o Gra«v*y b Uofda_ 
M J Kftiun Ibw Sarabory 


R S RjtnagUrcSfcnroM b Qrarondy „ 6 
P C MacLamon c Stovoid fa Payna 

J Cope not out 

J D CUntan fa Graven*? 

TAJ Dawson not out. 


Extras (b7. to l.wl.nb 10) T9 

TocaipwfctBdK) 179 

FALL OF MCKETS: 1-6. M2. 3-104, < 
138. 6-139. 6-160, 7-163, 8-183. 9-175. 
BOWLMte Salnstwy 29-12-43-2; Curran 
1*6334* Payneis-frata: Oman* ifr 
6-11-2; B a tobodge 61-19-0; Lloyds 1W- 


31-3. 


PA Hagan notout 
A AG Mae not out 


Second Innings 


— 1 

— 0 
--2 
— 3 

BOWUNG: Batnbrtdg* 1 -1-0-0: Payna 04- 
0 - 2 - 0 . 

Urrotre* J Brtwnrfaw and D Uoyd. • 


Extras (M> 1 , rfc f) . 
Total (no wkf) . 


Davison is forced out 


BR 


i rebad hurt . 


P J Prichard e sab b Gorman . 
DRfJWe not out 


. 23 

. 77 

63 

ID E Eatt c Brown b Davidson - 4 

Extrn(b6, b8, w2.nb3) ,_1§ 

Total (3 wife fee) 191 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-3. 2-169, 3-IBl'. 
BOWUNG: Devttwn 1662-62-1; Scott 
16664-1: Stood 3-1-60; Goman 11-3- 
45-1, 

CAMBRIDGE IMIVERSTTV: Ffc* tonkin 
108(D L AcMd5tor38J 

Second tonings 

T J Heed c Border b Lever 1 

A E Lea c Border fa Lever 3 

D J Fai not out 10 

PACBalcEmb Lever — 1 

*DG ftte* few fa Lever 0 

DW Browne cFrlchart bCWfe 6 

S R Gorman not out 0 

Extras (bawl) 4 


Total (SwWsJ .. 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-2. 2-5. 3-13. 4-13, 
625. 

BOWUNG: Lever 12-6-12-4; Prtogle 4-4- 
60: Topley 1 1^2-10-0; ChOds 343-1. 
Umpires: M Hendrick and MJ Kitchen. 


Back to the 
future 

Philadelphia (Reuter) — Ire- 
land's Eamorni Coghlan, prov- 
ing his fitness in a return after 
iqjury and competing in what he 
called his event of the future, 
ran the fastest 10.000 metres in 
the world this year with a tune 
of 28tnin J9.3sec at the Rem 
Relays athletics meeting. 

CoghJan, aged 33. said be 
would ran the 5.000m is the 
European championships this 
summer, but added “My long- 
tom plan is 10,000m." 

Boston barrier 

Boston (UPI) - Plans to 
make tbe Boston Marathon the 
1988 women's US Olympic 
marathon trials have been 
blocked by new Athletics Con- 
gress demands which indude a 
ban on all top foreign rumns. 

Real setback 


Brian Davison. Glouc- 
estershire's 39-year-old Rho- 
des! ao-bom batsman, has 
been forced to give up county 
cricket following a Home 
Office decision not to issue 
him with a British passport. 

David Graveney. die coun- 
ty captain, who had hoped to 
include Davison in his side to 
play Glamorgan said: “We 
were hoping the Home Secre- 
tary would give *Davo’ a 
passport in recognition of his 
long years of service to English 
cricket.'’ 

Sussex will be without 
Imran Khan for their opening 
Britannic Assurance champi- 
onship match of tbe season, 
against Lancashire at Hove 
today, in a game which pro- 
vides the former Sussex open- 


SPORT IN BRIEF 



bn Botham (above) pet the 
disastrous cricket tear of foe 
West Indies behind Mm yester- 
day as be prepared for foe new 


with Somoset He said: “I am 
lookmg forward to a successful 
season. After coming botto m 
last year we canariyai up. I feel 
great, tremendous.” On foe tom; 
be said: "West Indies outplayed 
ns and on their wickets tbey are 
foe best ride in foe world; bat we 
are the second best" 


Britain's chances of defeating 
the United Slates to retain the 
Bathuret Real Tennis Cup were M , 

damaged wtim Alan LoveB SuSStTP S 1*016 


withdrew (William Stephens 
writes). His replacement, Mick 
Dean, lost to Kevin McCoDum 
at Queen's Chib yesterday, but 
Julian Snow beat Ralph Howe 
to level foe rabbets for today's 
doubles. 


Bombay (AD -The young 
cricket alRonnder, Ravi Shas- 
tri will captain India in the 
absence of Kapil Dev for the 
tour of Holland beginning on 
Sunday- 


er Geban Mendis, making his 
Lancashire debut, with an 
early return to Hove. 

Yorkshire, without Geoff 
Boycott, who has a back 
injury, take a squad of 12 to 
Taunton for their match 
against Somerset. Ashley Met- 
calfe, who recently married 
Ray Illingworth's daughter, 
Diane, is likely to open the 
innings with Martyn Moxon. 
• The first day of 
Gloucestershire's champion- 
ship match against Glamor- 
gan at Bristol has been lost to 
the weather. Heavy rain over 
the last week has left the 
ground unplayable and there 
will be a further inspection to 
see if play can take place on 
Sunday. 

More crkfcet'Page 36 


New battle 

Tbe controversy involving 
Severiano Ballesteros and tbe 
ban imposed on him try Deane 
Beman, tbe commissioner of 
the USPGA tour, has taken a 
new twist They will play gainst 
each other in the Gurofls Irish 
Open from June 19 to 22 

England spur 

Jakarta — England’s women 
sewed their first win of foe 
work! badminton team champi- 
onships by lairing a 3-0 lead 
against Canada in foe Uber Cup 
(Richard Eaton writes). -This 
means foal their hopes of 
earning a - medal have not 
disappeared. They will have to 
surprise South Korea tomorrow 
and Helen Troke will have to 
produce a more confident 
formance than when she 
Claire ' Backhouse 741, 11- 

5, u-a ■ 

Bribery bid 

Sexrai (AP) - An official and 
a former player of foe Greek 
first division football dub, AEK 
of Athens, have been sentenced 
to one year in prison - for 
attempted bribery, Ykxgos 
ChrisovitsaiKJS. tbe general di- 
rector. and YfcxBcis Rigas were 
convicted of offering 
Panserraikos players money to 
throw a 




Leading 
the way 
towards 
alight , 

One of the tngeffies ip 
South Africa is that the sub- 
stantial advances m aon-ncW 
integration achieved by sport 
are now being impeded not by 
white but by black radical 
politicians. There are non- 
white elements who, provoca- 
tively, are looking for 
confrontation rather than 
peaceful consensus, 

Mark PMies, the national 
marathon champion, who, 
ironically, was prevented by 
the nd-apartbeid movement 
from competing in tbe London 
marathon on Sunday, w as to 
have opened the recent Sooth 

African Games, hot he had tejf 
be replaced becanse of threats 
to burn down his house by 
fellow blacks. Reprisals 
against non-whites, wbo_ are 
w illin g to collaborate in inte- 
grated sport, by their own 
people, are distressingly com- 
monplace. 

It was not true, for instance, 
that there was a total Mack 
boycott of the Games (inade- 
quate though they were). Hun- 
dreds of non-whites, from 12 
year-old wrestlers to the first 
10 men home in the 10,000 
metres, participated. Th e two 
black-majority sports to with- 
draw were football, largely 
becanse of a recent split in the 
main professional league, and 
boxing. 

Tbe boxers muted to take 
part but were threatened with 
reprisals. Yet boxing led the 
way to sporting integration 
with the first black v white 








Boxing has been 
amalgamated 


r.£Ss*i 




"£ 7 ii~ V - 

fp: 

•fe: 

- 

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professional bout in 1973, 
between Bob Faster, iff Ameri- 
ca and Pierre Fonrie at file 
Rand Stadium, since when all 
professional boxing has been 
amalgamated under the Board 
of Control with single non- 
racial champions. 

Those in Britain who, * 
aftrustically, tried to persuade ' 
Frank Beano tint he was 
supporting, the racialist gov- 
ernment by fighting Gcrrie 
Coetzee were unaware of the 
truth: that pr o fes si onal boxing 
in South Africa is more racial- 
ly harmonious than you will 
find anywhere in Britain, as I 
witnessed at a promotion at 
Yandcrfayipaift, the steel town 
near Johanaesbra&with total 
integration of spectators, 
fighters/m an ag er s, framers, " 


■c: 


•x . 

t : • 


Federations 
in a dilemma 


referees, and judges. Stanley 
Christodooloa, executive dir. 
rector of the Board of Control , c 
is one. of the world's top 
referees and handled the 
McGnigan-Pedromi contest 

Tbe Sooth African sports 
federations are at this moment 
faced witha dilemma. Peter 
Madasa, of foe Transkei, has 
invited foe Republic to take 
part in foe annual Homelands 
Games next month, staged by 
tbe tribal areas which are not 
internationally recognized and 
are sees by some as an arm of 
the apartheid system. 

The Homelands Gaines in- 
dnde five sports, all of them 
integrated in foe Republic 
football, boxing, tennis, athlet- 
ics and netball. Yet the sports 
federations know that they will 
be criticized whichever deci- 
sion they take, rejecting or 
accepting the invitation. Liber- 
al whites and black South 
African spots admini stra tor s 
believe foat taking part would 
not be implicitly encou raging 
apartheid but extending valu- 
able relationships. 

Sooth Africa is tortured by 
its history. John Barrie, a vice- 
president of file Federations, is 
a representative on foe Inter- 
national Yacht Union. His 
grandfather helped to build 
the Hartebeesport Dam where 
foe Western Transvaal YC 
sailed. He is siocerefy commit- 
ted to integrated sport, yet his 
manner occasionally reveals > 
traces of sub-consdons inhibi- 
tions which are part of human 
nature, which are there be- 
tween Scots and English or 
between Canadians of oppos- 
ing tongues as much as be- 
tween bracks and white 
Tbe inhumanity of some 
South African whites means 
that every white South African 
is now measured by a standard 

morality which whites all over 
the world would be tard- 
pressed to meet . 

South Africa stiD has a huge 

distance to travel to achieve 
the most fundamental of 
equalities which condition all 
othm, social, economic and 
cattnral: equality of education. 

It is ga lling to see young black 
hox«s m a community centre 
,n * Johannesburg suburb 
enthusiastically shadow-box- 
ing like a would-be AH in 
wont out leather shoes with- 
out evenjaces because they 
ranw* afford a pair of gym 

Yet the , gymnasiums are 




.V» 


Africa anfr that, insufficient as 

sportra ay be w«h,hi vfoole 

society. 

David Miller 



— -xt: • MK-'; L ‘.*«C