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TIMES 


.No 62,525 


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page 

ByDaridSapsttd t' 

■ wiui a mgu voun injasctK A daImw ■ . 

ibanning mass picketire at tl niEhr^ta^IfJS 7 . ^ gan ***'■ 

: News International Kt * * 2M ’ 

: Waging, east Londot Sff JL 1 ** * _, 

The union’s 36-raraber re centre in n^ort’V^S't 

Son™'. S! 


# Mrs Thatcher faces tom o rrow’s 
Commonwealth mini-summit against a 
background of criticism over sanctions 

• Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the Indian Prime 
Minister, has accused Britain of putting 
material gain .before human rights 


By PMHp Webster, ChkfPoBtkd Correspondent 


The Prime Minister today 
will prepare for the Common- 
wealth summit against a back- 
ground of combined criticism 
of her personal stand against 
further sanctions from Com- 
monwealth leaders and a wide 
section of opinion in the 
Conservative 

' Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the In- 
dian' Prime Minister, yes* 
terday accused Britain of 
putting material gain before 
human rights, as the Tory 
Reform Group, which num- 
bers five Cabinet ministers 
among its patrons, demanded 
“substantial” sanctions 
against South Africa. 

It gave a warning that, 
Britain.- faced grave risks be- 
cause of its stance and called 
on the Prime Minister. to show 
leadership. 

Mr Francis Pym, the former 
Foreign Secretary, meanwhile 
imervenecT with the observa- 
tion that Mrs Thatcher was 
“obsessed" by the case against 
sanctions. 

The timing of the Reform 
Group statement was re- 
garded as unfortunate by the 
Government Mr Penn- Walk- 
er, Secretary of State for 
Energy, is its p resi den t, and 
other patrons include Lord 
Whitelaw, the deputy Prime 
Minister. Mr Kenneth Baker, 
Secretary of State for Educar 
tion and Science, Mr Douglas 
Hurd, the Home Secretary, 
and Mr Kenneth Clarke, the 
Minister fw Employment. 

Nf*nr r*f f hf^wp , s < ^ rt;p 4tf 
on .the statement Much was 
written by Mr Peter Price, the 
Tory Euro MP for London 
South-East and ft could riot 


be regarded necessarily as 
representing.their views. 

But their association with a 
■group Much is backing a line 
so Tar removed from that 
identified with the Prime Min- 
ister is an obvious embarr- 
assment. 

It said: “Britain’s economic, 
strategic andpolitical interests 
all' require us to impose 
substantial sanctions against 
South Africa. Yet perversely 
we are among the strongest 

. The Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee voted 15-2 yester- 
day for a package of moderate 
economic and diplomatic sanc- 
tions against South Africa, 
adding farther pressure on' 
Prerideot Reagan to take steps 
of his own Page 4 

opponents of such sanctions. 
Unless we looklb onr national 
interests icgeally h will be too 
late. 

. “It is inevitable that politi- 
cal power in South Africa wiD 
move from tbe 15 per emit 
white minority tathe 85 per 
cent mainly .black, majority. 
The only Questions are whai 
and how.'' Almost all coun- 
tries throughout the world 
were now prepared to act; only 
the US. Germany and Britain 
blocked the path. 

“If Margaret Thatcher made 
up her mind to use strong 
sanctions. Reagan and Kohl 
would inevitably follow. On 
.this issue the British Prime 
Minister is poceived by the 
whoio woritij as holding the 
leading portion. It « for this 
reason ' that Britain incurs 
grave risks.” 


It said that unless Britain 
looked to its national interests , 
quickly, it would suffer an 
- extensive boycott of its goods. 

* Ultimately when inevitable 
change took pJacr in South 
Africa retaliation against Brit- 
ain might involve heavy eco- 
nomic losses. 

The statement said: “Eoo- 
, nomic power over South Af- 
rica is in the hands of a few 
western countries. If they do 
not use their might to force 
speedy change with the mini- 
mum number of deaths, they 
will leave black South Af- 
ricans with violence as tbe 
only means of change. It 
would involve the deaths of 
thousands of white and black 
people. The bitterness towards 
Britain would be enormous." 

Retaliation would begin 
with reduced British exports 
to most of Africa and the 
Third World. “Governments 
and individuals would show 
their solidarity with black 
South Africans by boycotting 
British goods and services.” 

The statement questioned 
how much of Britain’s -huge 
investments in South Africa 
would survivea civil war. 

While the statement admits 
that tough sanctions would 
harm black South Africans, 
neigh homing states and Brit- 
ish exports, the effects on 
those had been greatly exag- 
gerated and would only be for 
the duration of . sanctions, 
failure to impose them would 
cause" much longer-term 
damage.; ‘ 

Mr Walker aid tater in a 
GonfrBed on page 16, col < 


Monday 


Special 

operations 



Is the buildup of 
its anti-terrorist 
forces increasing 
the risk of America 
going to war? 




— — 


• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £4,000 was 
shared yesterday 
between two readers: 
Mr S-McCaU of Oxton, 
Merseyside; and Mr 
J.M.Lodge of Ealing, 
London. 

• Portfolio fist, page 
21; weekly fist, 
information service, 
page I6r rules and how 
to play, page 26. 

• Today £12,000 can 
be won - £8,000 in the 
weekly competition 
and £4,000 in the daily. 


Chess draw 

Tbe third game of the world 
chess championship between 
Gary Kasparov and Anatoly 
Karpov ended in an unevent- 
ful draw last night after 35 
moves Page 2 


Home News 23 
Overseas AS 
Appts 18 
Arts 8 

-BlrthsdeadK. 
m ar mac s. 15 
Bridge 13 
Braiaess 17*24 
Chess 2,13 
Co«t 15 
Crosswords 13.16 
Diary 6 


Law Report 

26 

Leaders 

7 

Letters 

7 

Obituary 


RdtgkM 

15 

Services 

15 

Science 

2 

Sport 27-30,32 
: Tseuresjrtc 12 

TV & Radio 

31 

Universities 

27 

Weather 

16 


* * * ☆ 




curfews ruling 

From Ray Kennedy, Johannesburg 


- President Botha of South 
Africa issued orders yesterday 
to circumvent a Supreme 
Court ruling that curfews and 
banning orders issued by po- 
lice divisional commissioners 
are invalid. 

In a proclamation published 
in the Government Gazette, 
he decreed that the term 
“commissioner of the South 
African Police” and “commis- 
sioner” in the state of emer- 
gency regulations should 
include divisional 

commissioners. 

Earlier this week the Rand 
Supreme Court in Johannes- 
burg ruled that although the 
State President was em- 
powered to delegate legislative 
powers to the police commis- 
sioner,. a lieutenant general. 


the commissioner was not 
authorised to re^delegate such 
powers to a third paity. 

Divisional police commis- 
sioners, usually brigadiers, 
have issued numerous orders 
under the state of emergency 
gagging political organisations 
and restricting attendances 
and procedures at the funerals 
of unrest victims. 

The courts’ rulings are, 
however, overridden by a 
clause in last night’s pro- 
clamation -making the 
amended regulations retro- 
active to June 12. 

Earlier yesterday South Af- 
rica announced it is to impose 
import licensing mi all prod- 
ucts bought from Zimbabwe 
in wbat is clearly its first direct 
Continued on page 16, col 3 


Miss Joanna Toch, an 
Thatcher after pushing 

Thatcher 
target 
at Games 

By John Good body 
Sports News Correspondent 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher 
was the target of gg gg and 
tomatoes thrown by dem- 
onstrators, booing from spec- 
tators and tafifierence from 
competitors when she visited 
tbe Commonwealth Games in 
Edinburgh yesterday. 

■ The P r ime Minister, whose 
policy of not imposing sanc- 
tions on South Africa led to 
the boycott of the Games by 32 
nations, was also cross-qnes- 
tiooed by Miss Joanna Toch, 
an fa ghid team member, as 
she toured the Commonwealth 
village. 

Miss Toch, a rowing reserve 
who participated cg.-the 1980 
and 1984 Glyurpics, pasbed 
Thr ou gh a cordon of poifo to 
ask Mrs Thatcher why she 
had recommended a boycott of 
the Moscow Games hot had 
said that a boycott was ineffec- 
tive m Efinbmgh- 
Mks Toch, aged 24, a law 
graduate from London Uni- 
versity, said Mrs Thatcher 
replied that it was important 
for die athletes to d e ride for 
themselves. She had said that 
it was a pity they had not 
derided in Edmbnrgh. . 

The Prime Minister had 
tnM her that in 1980 the 
British Government had not 
stopped the Olympic team 
from going to Moscow, bnt it 
was Commonwealth govern- 
ment actions which had pre- 
vented teams from a tten di n g 
the ament rimes. 

Miss Toehsaid: “It was not 
the answer I wanted. She is a 
politician. She talked through 
me." The oarswoman from 
Battersea was late- rep- 
rimanded by ffnglainl officials 
for talking to the media with- 
out permission. 

The Edinburgh District 
CounriL which opposed the 
Prime Minister’s visit, had 

Continued on page 16, col 2 


Delhi threat adds 
to deadlock fear 


By Rodney Covrton 


Commonwealth Heads of 
Government arriving in Lon- 
•don today will plunge into an 
intensive round of bilateral 
consultations in an attempt to 
lay the ground for an agree- 
ment over sanctions against 
South Africa and avert a crisis 
in the Commonwealth. 

Fears that it may not be 
possible to bridge the gap 
between the British position 
and those of the governments 
most strongly in favour of 
sanctions, were given added 
weight when Indian officials 
declared that if no consensus 
was -achieved at this week- 
end’s mini - summi t an emer- 
gency meeting of all 49 
Commonwealthiheads of gov- 
ernment would be sum- 
moned. Delhi, would be 
prepared to host this. ' 

All the leaders attending the 
mini-summit will be in 


the activity during tbe last few 
weeks as not much more than 
delaying tactics inspired by 
Britain. One of the issues this 
weekend will be whether 
President Kaunda will stay his 
hand if there is a failure to 
agree and a frill Common- 
wealth conference is con- 
vened. 

Mr Gandhi is also emerging 
as a key participant, and will 
be host at a lunch tomorrow, 
which is expected to be at- 
tended by all seven leaders, 
immediately before the mini- 
sum mil formally begins. Yes- 
terday, in an interview with 
BBC radio, he accused Britain 
of putting material gain before 
freedom and buman values. 
■ He said that the situation in 
South Africa had deteriorated 
since the Commonwealth 
heads of government meeting 


- QN PAGE FOUR 


ajiv 

Indian Prime Minister, who 
arrives tomorrow morning. 
Sir Lynden Pindling, the Ba- 
hamas Prime Minister, who 
will chair the meeting, has 
been in London since Wed- 
nesday. 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher is 
expected to have meetings 
with Sir Lynden, Mr Brian 
Mulroney, the Canadian Pri- 
me Minister, and probably 
other heads of government 
. Although it was not of- 
ficially confirmed, it is 
thought likely that Mrs. 
Thatcher will call on President 
Kaunda of Zambia after he 
arrives today. This could be 
the most explosive meeting of 
the weekend, for President 
Kaunda has emerged as the 
harshest critic of Mrs That- 
cher's opposition to general 
sanctions. 

He has threatened to with- 
draw from the Common- 
wealth if effective measures 
are not agreed, and has made 
it dear that he regards much of 


Indian plans 
Plea to Qneen 
Diplomacy exhausted 
Geoffrey Smith 


at Nassau last October, and 
that stronger measures would 
be required to bring pressure 
on South Africa than those 
discussed at Nassau. 

Those measures, listed in 
the Commonwealth Accord 
on Southern Africa, included 
tbe possibility of a ban on air 
links with South Africa, a ban 
on investment and the import 
of South African agricultural 
products, and a ban on gov- 
ernment contracts 

There has been some 
suggestion that tbe Common- 
wealth might defer a decision 
on sanctions, to co-ordinate 
its actions with the EEC and 
the United States. However, 
Mr Mulroney has made it 
-dear that he believes the 
Commonwealth should take 
tbe lead. 


Sogat 1 ; heac extensive „ 
Hadlehh, nea The 


[thend, Essex. 

Mfc* Brenda Dcan,the 
eral seer vary, tint it 
in line witiH^e union’s pol 
of doing nollutqL.which 
jeopardize its posfeign. 
independent organ' 

She said: “The High 
judgement will do notbi 
assist tbe resolution of 
dispute. There are stilt 5, 
ordinary people who 
received disgraceful treatm 
by News Intern ationaL 
settlement of this dispute 
not in litigation but 
negotiation”. 

Tbe national executive took 
no decision on a motion 
calling for an immediate ap- 
peal against the injunction, 
which applies to both the 
National Graphical Associ- 
ation (NGA) and Sogat. The 
NGA is to hold a national 
council meeting in London 

New talks 

Mr Rupert Murdoch, Chair- 
man of News International, 
yesterday met the committee 
representing the production 
staff of the company’s plant at 
Wapping. 

Mr Murdoch told the staff 
committee that News Inter- 
national had-been approached 
by Mr Eric Hammo nd, Ge n- 
erai Secretary of the EETPU, 
on behalf of the TUG As a 
result, the company is pre- 
pared to meet the striking 
print unions again at a date to 
be arranged. 

Any part of a proposed 
settlement that might affect 
the production staff at 
Wapping will be first submit- 
ted to them for their approval 
by ballot 



which flares 
20 . 


©f\ 


today to discuss the 
judgement. 

Mr- Justice Stuart-Sinith 
ruled on Thursday that the 
number of protesters outside 
News International premises 
at Wapping, Grays Inn Road 
and Bouverie Street should be 
limited to six. 

However, the print unions 
were given permission to or- 
ganize, “peaceful, disciplined 
and orderly marches around 
the plants unless police di- 
rected otherwise”. 

Miss Dean later condemned 
the attack on the TNT depot 
at Thetford, Norfolk. “This 
union has had nothing what- 
ever to do with the violence. 
We did not organize it,*we do 
not condone it, and we would 
not finance it,” she said. 

Leading article, page 7 


were fired. mon ^ 

windows smashed, came 

Court had banned print 

the News Inter-- 
jdant at Wappipg fc 

of abort 50 ve- 

bSSH 611 08 ^e di$- 

meter fence OR*™ * 

, stoning the cars 
_ployees in the plant : 
king distribution vans, j 
they then started swjsj£ 

^ qws in the office_block 
a in panels. Flar« 
at the building but 

irt a fire, and copies 

papers recently «n- 
distribntion by van 
aiui burnt, Mr 
rner, general mfo- 

dePO !i,r^.of*e 

0 , 000 . 

Norftholice said that the 
attack W an hour. Ini- 
tially, oijo officers were 
able to rand to the incident 
and, by Vtime reinforce- 
ments «rri\ the crowd had 
dispersed. 

Road MocWre set up « 
routes leading London and 
the Home Cities, and tbe 
names and adLsses of doz- 
ens of occnpanfraken. 

■polk* were 
outnumbered 20 V one during 
the violence wanhe reason 
nobody was arre^d, police 
said. Snpt John Orson was 
last night heading t£ Norfolk 
police inquiry. He ^ould co- 
ordinate with Scotisdl Yard 
officers who have handled 
attacks on tbe Wapping |)rtL 
It was not known who' was 
responsible for the Tbetfod 
attack. Print onion: pickets* 
protesting over the dismissal 
of 5J500 workers by News 
International, have been 
linked to other violence that 
has caused thousands of 
pounds of damage at TNT 
depots in Lofton, Snodland in 
Kent and Eastleigh in Hamp- 
shire, in the past two months. 

One of the most serious 
incidents involving a plant 
owned by News International 
occurred in June when 9,000 
tons of newsprint were de- 
stroyed in a £7 million attack 
by arsonists on a warehouse in 
south-east London. 

During yesterday’s incident, 
an estimated 30,000 copies of 
The Sun were lost, either 
through fire or other damage 
Continued on page 2, col 3 


5 missing 
after ship 
hits rocks 

An air and sea search was 
launched off the south-west 
coast of Ireland last nijdit for 
five men. missing alter a 
fishing trawler sank on rocks. 
Ten other crewmen were 
rescued when tbe Contessa 
Ven hit rocks off Bere Island, 
in Banlry Bay, near 
Casiletowribere, Co Cork. 

An RAF Sea King heli- 
copter joined local boats and a 
lifeboat from Valencia, Co 
Kerry, in the search. 

The sunken trawler, with 14 
Spanish crew and an English 
stopper, left Falmouth. Corn- 
wall, on Thursday. 

The survivors, badly shaken 
but otherwise unhurt, were in. 
hospital at Castletown here. A* 
coastguard spokesman said 
that the chances of finding the 
missing crewmen alive were, 
“getting pretty slim”. 


Another estate agent incident 

Police find Mr Kipper clue 


By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 


Detectives investigating the 
disappearance of Miss 
Suzanna Lamplugh, the West 
London estate agent, were last 
night, checking a possible in- 
cident involving another es- 
tate agent and a man similar to 
the one seen with the woman 
when she vanished. 

The incident may have been 
an attempt to lure another 
woman in a sexual attack 
which foiled for some reason 
and took place before Miss 
Lamplugh disappeared. The 
informant is thought to be a 
member of the public who was 
•selling a house. 

Yesterday police refused to 
disclose-details of the incident 
which took place some time 
before Monday when Miss 
Lamplugh. aged 25, went to 
keep a lunchtime appoint- 
ment to show a house in 
Fulham to a "Mr Kipper'* and 


did not return. 

Speaking on the fifth day of 
the search for the woman, Det 
Insp Peter Johnstone said tbe 
incident involving another es- 
tate agent was being investi- 
gated as one of a number of 
leads thrown op by a public 
response of more than 700 

telephone calls. 

On the incident under in- 
vestigation, Mr Johnstone 
said it concerned “a person' 
•who may look like the suspect 
possibly with a similar name 
to Kipper. He may have been 
involved with an estate agent 
where there was some, prob- 
lem which did not amount to 
any physical attack.” 

The incident had been re- 
ported in tbe last day or so. 
The estate agent concerned is 
in another pan of London and 
not Fulham. 

The man in tbe incident 


could match the artist’s im- 
pression of “Mr Kipper” is- 
sued by police on Wednesday. 
He may have used the name 
Sldpper rather than Kipper. 

Mr Johnstone was at pains 
not to overestimate the newly 
repotted incident until it had 
bom checked. He said that the 
police were looking at the 
possibility that the man who 
made the appointment with 
Miss Lamplugh could have 
used the name Skipper rather 
than Kipper. Mr Johnstone 
revealed that the missing es- 
tate agent was dyslexic. 

Mr Johnstone said tbe po- 
lice were no closer to finding 
Miss Lamplugh as police dis- 
played the desk-fop diary in 
which the missing woman 
made her appointment last 
Monday. It refers to a Mr 
Kjpper to be met outside a 
Fulham address at 12.45 pm. 


German soldiers lop head off nuclear rocket 


Bonn (AP) — West German 


last week at a Naio base in 
Bavaria. 

Lieutenant-General Hans- 


sergeant- operating a crane ac- 


cidently strode tire rocket 
when he swung the crane in 
the wrong direction. 

The warhead, mounted on a 
Pershing 1A missile, fell 10 
inches onto a work platform 
without causing any serious 
damage, he said. 

The missile was In an 
“alert” state and capable of 
being fired within 20 minutes, 
Lt-Gen Feldhoff said the 


warhead can withstand a drop 
from great heights without 
exploding or damaging tbe 
weapon- 

West German _ and US 
troops were working in the 
area at the time of tbe inrident, 
officials said, bnt declined to 
name the base or military units 
involved. 

Lt-Gen Fddhoff said the 
sergeant operating the crane 


was experienced in routine 
missile maintenance. 

In January 1985 the solid- 
rocket fuel section of a Per- 
shing 2 missile without a 
nuclear warhead accidently 
ignited daring routine mainte- 
nance- Three US soldiers w ere 
Idled and 16 injured in the 
accident, which experts later 
determined was caused by 
static electricity. 


Majorca is 
royal spot 
for holiday 

From Richard Wigg 
Madrid 

The Prince and Princess of 
Wales are to spend a week 
holidaying on the island of 
Majorca as guests of the 
Spanish royal family, begin- 
ning next week, informed 
sources said here yesterday. 

Accompanied by their chil- 
dren, they will stay in the 
Marivent Palace in Palma, 
where King Juan Carlos and 
Queen Sofia often take their 
August holiday, the King 
spending much of it sailing. 

The -royal couple are ex- 
pected to arrive in Palma on’ 
Wednesday or Thursday. 

h was the decision that the 
Prince and Princess should 
start their honeymoon from 
Gibraltar in 1981 which 
caused King Juan Carlos and 
Queen Sofia to call off attend- 
ing the wedding. 

But last April when tbe 
Spanish King and Queen 
made their first state visit to 
Britain, it was the Prince and 
Princess of Wales who met 
them at Heathrow Airport. 

The idea of tbe Prince and 
Princess visiting Spain, which 
the Prince says he has not 
seen before, was the subject of 
conversation with journalists 
when the royal couple at- 
tended the Spanish Embassy 
reception in London on the 
last night of the Spanish 
monarch^ visit. 


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I 


n i- r - ■ 

.**•"*' 




v 





HOME. 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


. it It * * 


Ulster jobs 
lost as firms 
give up 

defence work 


By Richard! 


. - firms ended con- h£ never earned out work 

. Two more fi^«^J. orces fihe RUC" 

.tracwwth ^J eC p rt J*i s , 0Da i lother two firms named 

extractors bie Provisional IRA denied 
IRA threats i w «”W n R bg ; nvo i ved - m woril # 

w hS ulwniploy- / iy qnd RUC bases, saying 
.pfaviira where , had withdrawn after 

"JSSjUSS of the terrorist i ais inode last December. 
^ the north were he Provisionals’ tactic of 

campaign m ine 1 ibini police stations and 

• visible elsewhere vmnso^ & s Sxms w 

■ ^HP Ul 2Li«?fhr the first time > thed repairing them has 
• : bonier town to *. nera i of sed d lays in construction 

■- :i E fiV p^«esmit businessman, -k ai * increased troops 
Sn^vSo Skatad W ded 1 guard isolated RUC| 

u ^iTswwause he suppUed L »«ns. 
the IRA heca the sc- fhe P >yal Engineers l*ve 

-cement and sand to me ^ ned Tf t ^ residing 

• cunty totces. _ v-®. Me am yesteday Mr Nicho- 

-■ A ScbtJ ^iSentary Un- 

- . ierday ended its g^^^r-Seciftarv ofState of the 
contract ? >r t ^L l R ^, lracW r'orthern /reland Office, said 

■and aa electnral eo em Jie campaign would not suc- 

■ in Usnaskea^Couniy v ^ 1] xed and repairs would take 

■ PE h announced that tt ™"5ace. 

• no longer 1 swjonue He hoped people irr the 

■ tracts at die police sta n. j^ on j,» s construction in- 

the county. _ _ iVfK . * dustry could do the work and 



World Chess Championship 

Third title draw an 


*• . : IS • ,V 


m h ' : ?mk ®§ilil # ill 


A TNT truck (left) that had its windscreen smashed in the mob attack. Concrete blocks and other missies landed at the ! 
back of a private vehicle (top right) and windows at the depot bonding were shattered. (Photographs: John Manning). , 


lyal Engineers Mve 
lit some reb**ilding 
yes teda y mt Nicho- 
ParljMientary Un- 
arv or Slate of the 


Papers set ablaze 
in mob rampage 


e _ TV VBIUU 1 II,' 

pf a-^o “get out ofc 
after her bd 
Hugh, aged 44. was miV 1 
-a sectarian attack as to v_ 
■ 5 read on the Prr* 
Side of a so-called “pes* e • 
Mrs Gault, whoseT* 1 ? 
petrol bombed last ■ en ~? 
said despairingly: * ould 
v have got out yeare 801,1 
sides are no better 1 010,1 
Other. 

_ **What is wronf* P® - 
- ' Pte? They talk ™ 1 ua ~ 
- employment but ,w **“9 
' jwn't let people * here or 
there. They w let the 
police get on wfrieir jobs." 
" - .Mr Gault fcHieved 10 


; -otit publicly -Of the petrol 
. --bombing of h home. 

-.:The Provpnal IRA’s lat- 

- est threat fit any business- 
. man doin' worit for the 

- security fops was liable to be 
.executed b> stopped work on 

- - repairs tc Enniskillen RUC 
. station wit the loss of 40 jobs. 
Another 59 people wQI be 
made jdundant by John 
Laing, lhich has derided to 


‘ehd thefiaimenance contract following the murder a week 
’ : -^t RAf Wdergrove. ago of three RUC officers in a 

Workers in construction Provisional IRA gun attack 
’ 'companies are inevitably wor- After the killing there was 
ried about the threat and concern that the Army only 
> killings by the terrorists. A patrolled the outskirts of the 
•spokesman for Laing said: town leaving the urban area to 
“We make it dear fiat we the police. 

Farmers make £10m 
claim over Chernobyl 

By Hugh Clayton, Environment Correspondent 
; ‘ • Sieep farmers are to send a below internationally estab- 
V £l0 million claim for losses lished risk levels. Hundreds of 
caused by the Chernobyl radi- farms are still restricted, al- 
' ation disaster to Mr Michael though the number of sheep 


Jopling. Minister for Agri- 
. culture on Monday. 

However, the farmers ex- 
,.jpecl a hard fight. Mr Simon 
' Jjouriay. president of the Na- 
^--tibnal Burners Union, pre- 
. _ dieted that it would be some 
v - ifme before there was a 
satisafactory settlement 
-More than 1,500 English 
. and Welsh fanners have been 
. forbidden to sell lambs and 
breeding sheep because of 
high levels of radioactivity in 
parts of England and Wales. 
Radiation levels in some 
' -Cumbrian fields are still well 
r ‘above normal, although well 

;Knock ainiort 
priest dies 
at Lourdes 

' 'A village priest win defied 
sceptics to turn a boggy pla- 
1 teau in tbe west of Ireland into 
an international airport will be 
1 flown home to be buried next 
week. 

Monsignor James Horan, 
aged 74, the parish priest of 
Knock, Co Mayo, died of a 
,• heart attack in a hotel bed- 
| room at Lourdes yesterday. He 
. bad flown from Knock on 
" Wednesday as leader of group 
of Irish pilgrims. 

- Next Monday, less than a 
year after he saw his airport 
dream come true, bis body will 
be flown in for burial in the 
parish. 

He spent six years wresting 
lands from central government 
" ; and Irish exiles to give the 


Lajhe campaign would not sue- Contused from page 1 

„peed and repairs would take ■ . . _ 

“place. and almost 7,000 copies of The 

, He hoped people irr the Tima. News International 
‘ North's own construction in- s f nt 148,000 extra copies of 
dustry could do the work and the t wo papers to East Ang& 
provide supplies, but be witfun hoars of the atta ck. , 
hinted that if that was not Mr Turner said timt, despite 
passible materials would ^ dam^ to vehicles, all 
come from Britain. newsagents and di^ribmwn 

He criticized the Pro- pomts served by the Thetfind 
visional IRA and their politi- depot had rrerived atkast 
cal wing. Provisional Sinn some copies of tire two titles. 
Fein, saying no doubt they “My staff here have been 
would now complain about shsolntely first class in 
unemployment. responding to the attack. Mo- 

Mr John Hume, leader of » ejcceUent and we will all 

the Social Democratic and f*® carrying on as nonnaL,” he 
Labour Party, said the Pro- ®®ded. 
visional IRA intimidation in- Inspector Ray Wnght was 
dicated there was not the th e dep ot yesterday discnss- 
support for the Provisionals' in 8 security arrange- 

campaign which they fre- meats. TJbviousIy, additiou 
quentiy claimed measures wffl be taken,* 1 he 

“This week’s threats and ***£ 
murders serve to expose the „ ^ ***** £*^,J *2* a E a ? f 
inherent fescism of the director of TNT (UK), sani 
Provisionals The so-called la,er that tbe company would 
•pri ncipal leadership’ of Pro- be going to court 00 Monday in 
visional Sinn Fern stands — 

exposed as a proxy T*i5l 

intimidation,"* he sakL 3 kdlXk 

Since June 1985 the jj w 

Provisionals have killed four Of| QOlT 

businessmen, Protestant and wivstvix 

Roman Catholic alike, be- TP _ ____ , . 1_ L . , 

cause they worked for the J. OlV D13.il 

security forces. They shot w Mr 

dead another man by mistake. By Peter Evans 

Soldiers patrolled the town Home Affairs 

centre of Newry, Co Down, Correspo dent 

following the murder a week Prisoners who are frustrated 
ago of three RUC officers in a by their appalling conditions 
Provisional IRA gun attack, are taking out their aimer mi 
After the killing there was prison officers Mr John 
concern that the Army only Kartell, chairman of the 
patrolled the outskirts of the prison Officers' Association, 
town leaving the urban area to said yestenfay. 
the police. The Government's new 

" ' 1 W" prison plan, announced on 

dlra f lOm Thursday, to change working 

[|A.V ov 1 U 111 systems and abolish overtime, 

^ _ _ would do nothing to cure the 

Chernobyl 

The prison staff called for 
mmeiit Correspondent _ new feg^Iation so that pris- 
bdow internationally estab- oners pan complain legally to 
lished risk levels. Hundreds of the Home Office, instead of- 
farms are still restricted, ai- the officers, 
though the number of sheep Mr Bartel] said the new 
iovolv « J . h af.. dropped from laws should give the Boards of 
about «5 million late in June Visitors, the prison waich- 
to about 850,000. dogs, the power to ensure that 

Mr Gouriay is under pres- complaints were dealt with 
sure from farmers to secure properly. The Prisons Inspec- 
rapid compensation from the torate should be able to criti- 
Govemment for losses caused cize lack of hygiene in jails in 
on hundreds of small farms at tbe knowledge that the Home 


farms are still restricted, ai- the officers, 
though the number of sheep Mr Bartel! said the new 
involved has dropped from laws should give the Boards of 
about «5 million late in June Visitors, the prison waich- 
10 about 850,000. dogs, the power to e n s ur e that 

Mr Gouriay is under pres- complaints were dealt with 
sure from farmers to secure properly. The Prisons Inspec- 
rapid compensation from the torate should be able to criti- 
Govemment for losses caused eng jack of hygiene in jails in 
on hundreds of small farms at tbe knowledge that the Home 
the most awkward time of Office would have to take 
year, when lambs would nor- action, rather than pot the 


mally be sent for sale. coalmen 

But the Treasury is deter- 
mined not to allow money to 
slip through to farmers who do JJrHr 
not deserve it and there are a 1“ “r! 
number of stumbling blocks to “J?***? 
agreeing a foolproof and fair 
compensation formula. "V,. 



Mgr James Horan: his 
dream bnilt Knock airport. 

village an airport. 

He wanted the £12 million 
project to boost tbe village and 
its shrine, which the Pope 
visited in 1979. 

Today the airport is used for 
private 'and charter flights 


comment on file. 

Introducing an association 
booklet on prisoners’ rights, 
Mr Baitell said there were 
many hardships that had to be 
suffered in silence, because 
they were not dealt with 
publidy. 

He said prisoners in some 
jails protested that they could 
not have a change of under- 
clothing once a week and, 
when there was a demonstra- 
tion about it prison officers 
were often ordered to move 
them, thus causing a possible 
confrontation. 

Because of the inadequate 
washing and sanitary faril- 
I Hies, prisoners would, without 
thinking, run their wet hands, 
along the rail of the landing, so 
that it became covered in 
urine. Later, officers might put 
their hands on the raO. 

The booklet which contains 
evidence to Sir James 
Hennessy, Chief Inspector of 
Prisons, says that improve- 
ments most be made. 
Prisoners’ Rights, real or imag- 
ined? Complaint Pnxedures 
(Prison Officers’ Association. 
Cronin House. 245 Church 
Street. Edmonton. London N9 
9HW; £2.50). 


a moTf to restrain the print 
anions from illegal ac ti v ity 
against TNT depots. 

He blamed recent violence 
on a “very strong criminal 
element" tot insisted the com- 
pany would not be swayed 
from carrying out the News 
International contract which 
had the hacking of radons 
within TNT, including its 
Transport and General 
Workers 1 Union drivers. 

Mr Jones said the incident 
made tbe staff “even more 
determined to do the job". 

Very few papers were lost in 
tbe attack because of tbe 
company’s contingency plans, 
he said. 

“The staff and drivers re- 
sponded magnificently," he 
said. 

After the attack, be said, 
drives had delivered the pa- 
pers in their damaged vans. 
“That is what I mean by 
determination and high 
morale," he said. 

Audit call 
on Labour 
spending 

By Sheila Gann 
Political Staff 

Mr Merlyn Rees, the former 
Labour Home Secretary, 
uiged his party's policy mak- 
ers last night to pul their 
spending plans toan indepen- 
dent audit to wreck the “cur- 
rent deceit" from ministers. 

He was sgeakum. to his 
Morley and Soufi Leeds 
constituency association at the 
end of a week in which two 
Cabinet ministers, Mr Nor- 
man Fowler and Mr John 
MacGregor, released their 
own detailed costings of 
Labour's ambitious spending 
programme. 

Mr MacGregor claimed that 
a Labour government would 
have to raise income tax from 
29p to 53p in the pound, or 
value-added tax to 43 per 
cent, to pay for the extra 
£35,000 million promised to 
voters. But Mr Roy 
Hartereley, the Shadow Chan- 
cellor of the Exchequer, called 
those “fantasy figures”. 

Mr Rees said the Conser- 
vative Party was preparing for 
the next general election. La- 
bour must do the same after 
the annual conference next 
month. 

“Above all, however, we 
m ust put our prepared policies 
to the electorate well in ad- 
vance of toe general election. 
Where expenditure is con- 
cerned we should put our 
policy to independent audit". 

Everything that was 
happening in the House of 
Commons indicated that tbe 
Government was clearing the 
decks for a general election, 
Mr Rees said. 


Minister urged to 
act on Wapping 

By Sheila Gunn, Political Staff 


Mr John Prescott, Labour’s 
chief employment spokes- 
man, yesterday repeated his 
appeal to Lord Young of 
Grafitaam, Secretary of State 
for Employment, to intervene 
in the News International 
dispute after the High Court 
ban on mass picketing at the 
company's plant at Wapping. 

Mr Prescott said the judge- 
ment will “inevitably only fuel 
the bitterness felt in this 
dispute". 

He led a delegation of 
Labour MPs who had a pri- 
vate meeting with Lord Young 
and Mr Kenneth Clarke, the 
Employment Minister, two 
months ago to discuss the 
dispute involving 5.500 dis- 
missed New International 
print workers. Since then, he 
said, there had been no move 
towards a settlement 


dispute is escalating, particu- . TO* 

der over his moves while 

«2!Sh Karpov moved -'swiftly . ami 
decision on Thureday whidt easi r' probing fto-Stik posi- 

tivJSSt aJJd tion fi^^sabte targets. 

K“P° V massed his rooks on 
peaceftdly communicate their. -^ e ^ fiIc and threatened to 

smash through- in die middle 


The third game of tbe worid moves arm 
chess championship between log the st 
Gary Kasparov and Anatoly • match, whi 
KaipoY ended' in a draw last tnXenirign 
night after 35 moves. The split (wh 

decision, the thinf .in success- t <H Nffi 
sion, was an uirevdiriul affiur 2 e4 g6 
with the efaaOengeq Karpov, 3 W3 Bg7 
aged 35, pjaying white, emoy^ 4 $ 

Ing what experts eaHed a 5 003 £ 
microscopic edge for much of gene cxtS 

a cten ^ £ 

win in the second game Of hxs • 9 m m? ' 

worid tide defence, Kasparov .-«»• ^ 
appeared unusually subdued J, 
for game three. As inTiis first }1 ^ ' 

encounter with Karpov, the !f £2 zL 
opening was a Granftld de- i’jfrL 
fences .this tune tbe-Scfatechter j" jjE 
variation. „_ T 

After an early exchange of -JJ SS £■ 
pawns in tbe aajtre, « sym- " JJr* 
metrical position arose, but 
one in which Karpov’s pieces 
were more aggressively posted fiyp s l| 
and commanded . greater V . 
space. Kasparov appemed un- Cnfllttpi 
comfortable in that he used 45 ' 

minutes for fie. -opening After foi 

move, compared wilh^ ^ KJtetnwcat ^ 
■Karpov’s 15. . Chess- Ch 

Kasparov conthiued to pon- players shai 
der over his' moves while points: ’M 
Karpov moved swiftly and James Pb 
easily, probing the black posi- MtsteL Mi 
tion for possible .lainets. Wifliam W; 


moves around the worid dur- 
ing the second half of the 
match, which mil take place 


Id. 

ite, Karpov) 


If BM MS 
12 Ne5 8d7 
J3QU2 PfxaS 
M Brt5 Bc 6 
15 RM1- Nd7 


17 Rad MB 
1B QM _ OH 


19 QxbS tabs 

20 (3 Ftttffl 

21 M2 Rhc8 

22 e3 Ne8 

23 Rd2 NdS 

24 Rdc2 KB 

25 St Kb7 

26 Bd3 15 
V M h6 

28b3 g5 

29 M2 Bd7 

30 Rc5 06 

31 Rc7 Rxc7 

32 Rxc7 RaB 

33 Ngt NeB * 

34 Rtf ROB 

35 RxcS 
Draw agreed 


“Some of these restrictions 
stem from the re-registration 
of lhe companies involved, 
thus removing the dispute 
from Gray's Inn Road to the 
Wapping site. Even your 
Government’s 1980 Act was 
not intended to deny the right 
to picket lhe place of original 
dispute." 

Last night, Mr Clarke re* 
jected Mr Prescott's request 
“We gave up the process of 
government conciliation bo* 
tween employer and trade 
unions in industrial disputes a 
long time ago for one very 
good reason: even with beer 


He told Lord Young yes- and sandwiches it did not 
terday: “Indeed I fed that the work." * 



of the board with tbe lunge e4. 

Kasparov was obliged to fight 

back and meet this potential 
advance with an appatentiy 
weakening thrust of his “f" 
pawn. 

Karpov broke into the sev- 
enth rank with his rook, but at 
this stage the former 
champion's play slowed as Ite 
searched for a dear way to use 
his advantage. Black, formerly 
ia disarray, regrouped and 
grandmasters were foil of 
praise for Kasparov's elastic 
defensive manoeuvres. Three 
games have now been played 
for three draws. . 

Soviet officials . are im- 
pressed at the high level of 
public attention their players 
are attracting. They are cou- 


Fiveshare British 
championship lead 

After four- rounds of the 
Weinwort Gritveson British 
Chess ' Otamnionsfaip - five 
.players share the lead with 3K 
pouits: 'Murray Chandler, 
James Plaskgtt. Jonathan 
Mestd, Mark Hebden and 
Wfifiam Watson (Harry Gol- 
ombek writes); 

Murray Chandler won one 
of fie most exciting tomes in 
tto championship so for, beat- 
ing Dcvaki Prasad of India, 
Chandler sacrificed a knight to 
get fierce play and under deep 
time. pressure be found the 
only winning way. The top en- 
counter between William ' 
Watson, and Marie Hebden 
etufod in a draw after an 
entertaining game In which 
Hebden was a pawn up bat 
was outplayed by Watson's 
active faeces. 

The women's contest is led 
by Susan Arkefl, Droitwich, 
with 4- points — one point 
ahead of - Christine Flear, 
Leicester, on 3. 

The British Champion of 
1985, Jonathan Speelman, 


are anracung. I ncy sue cun- ou^laycd his opponent, Fel- 

toSkowskTfo thfo way 
British technology to relay the (wiite, Kwiaikowski): 



StoWan Opening 
. ta* c5-‘ iri* 

2W3 Nc6 12 m 

3 (M cxd4 13 85 

4 NnM Nf5 14Jke5 

5- NeB . d6 75 Nxe£ 

6- Bg5 Bd7 IBBxffi 

7 B# vaB.. 17Q«fl 
8M2 05 • 18 QxK 

5 IMM hfr 19 KM 

,t& Bh4 Bb7 20 QB 


1114 0-0 

12 NB Qa5 
1385 dxe5 
14fxe5 N*e5 
15 Nxb 5 Qxa5 
15 Bxf6 Bxi6 
17CM7 fladfl ' 
«Qxtif Q«+ 

19 KM Rb8 

20 OS Rxb2+ 
.flttgn 


Mr John Wakeham, the 
Government Chief Whip, 
whose legs were badly crashed 
in the Brighton bombing, re- 
ceived a starting posh from his 
wife Alison yesterday as he 
pot in some training for a 
sponsored cycle ride around 
his Essex constituency. It was 
his first time on a bicyde since 
the blast two years ago. 

At the same time Mrs 
Margaret Tebbit, who was 


paralysed in the explosion, left 
hospital 

The wife of the Conservative 
Party chairman is to live at 
their home which has been 
adapted for her disabilities. 

Money for continued nurs- 
ing care at home is being 
provided by a trust food set up 
by anonymous weH-wishers. 

Mrs Tebbit has been cos- j 
fined to a wheelchair and 
doctors fear that she wilj never 
walk again. 


Protester in 
Stalker 
inquiry dies 

• Mr Norman Britos, chair- 
man of the.Greater Manches- 
ter Police .Authority since 
January, died yesterday. 

. Mr Briggs, who was in- 
volved in investigations into 
accusations against Mr John 
Stalker, the deputy titrief con- 
stable of Greater Manchester, 
recently led a ddegarion to the 
Home Office demanding a 
quick end to the inquiry. 

The inquiry had, of late, 
consumed much of his time 
and energy. . 

The report junto allegations 
against Mr StaBter, who in- 
vestigated an alleged “sboot- 
to-kiir police policy in. Ulster, 
is expetned to ne completed in 
three weeks. 

Mr Briggs^ a Salford city 
councillor since 1971 and 
chairman of-.- its finance 
committee, was a member of 
Greater Manchester Council 
from 1973 to 1977, 

/He was appointed to the 
Greater Manchester Police 
Authority in September 1 985, 
four months later assuming 
the cha ir manship,! a : post 
which gave him a high, al- 
though not necessarily wel- 
come, public profile. 


Peer loses 
battle for 
family estate 

By Craig Setan 

Lord Tdgli, of Stoneleigh 
Abbey, Warwickshire, is being 
forced by rising costs to leave 
of his <«-year fiunfly home. 

. . ft may.be let for nse as a 
Irisare complex, hotel, c onn t ry 
dab or some otho- bosiness to 
meet maintenance costs. The 
decision conies after a long 
restoration battle following a 
ffre iq I960, and to meet taxes 
death unties . 

Lord Leigh, aged 50, the 
fifth baron, and h» third wife, 
are cxpected to move next year 
t»‘ : a smaller honse in 
Warwickshire or Gkmces- 

fersnirc- 

Gordon Piiff iTm 
Stoneleigh Abbey admin- 
istrator, said yeste day that a 
scheme to let two floors as 
horary offices in 1983 had not 
been sncoessfuL 
Tbe abbey, with its 15 acres 
of gardens and 700 acres of 
grimnds, was banded over to a 
preservation trust by -Lord 
Leigh's father' who died in 
1979- The part-Efizabethaii, 
partGeorgian home, opened 
to the pnbDc in 1946, came 
Imp tbe fondly in 1561. 


Regional Trends 

Fewer students reduce Foreigners put South-west falls below 


pupil-teacher ratio 


By Robin Young 

Pupil-teacher ratios differ had the smallest classes in 
widely between regions, but a England for both primary and 
lower number of students has secondary schools, 23.4 and 
brought the average number 20 respectively, 
of pupils for each teacher The South-west with 82 per 


Science report 

New alert over ‘passive’ smoking 

By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 


E rid sice that children who 
are exposed to cigarette smoke 
at home are at greater risk of 
severe respiratory Alness has 
been produced by researchers 
in China. 

, . Their findings add to tbe 
/growing view among health 
'^-experts that “passive" smok- 
r ing is hannfoL 

-^ The latest study, by epid- 
‘ emiologists at Shanghai 
Medical University, has 
shown a dear dose response 
between household exposure 
to cigarette smoke and tbe 
hospital admission rate for 
~ respiratory Alness in Infants 
under 18 months of age. 

Tbe study, pablished hi the 
latest issue of the British 


Medical Journal, involved 
1,058 infants, of whom a total 
of 764 were from families 
which in eluded smokers; in 
most cases the father smoked, 
ami In no case was the mother 
a smoker. 

Of the group. 184 were 
admitted to hospital at least 
once daring tbe first 18 
months of life, 100 of them for 
respiratory illness, and 84 for 
other conditions. Of the 100 
babies, 80 were from smoking 
families, and in 58 cases tbe 
family member, most often the 
father, smoked more than 10 
cigarettes a day. 

The relative risk of respi- 
ratory illness among the 58 


infants was 1.80, almost twice 
for those from non-smoking 
homes. 

Tbe researchers point oat 
that none of the mothers 
smoked, the habit among : 
young women being rare in 
S h ang h ai. Hence, the possible 
advene effects of nmfpny il 
smoking during pregnancy 
were avoided, and tbe harmful 
effects of household exposure 
to cigarette smoking on young 
children were made clearer. 

^This study adds further 
weight to the conclusion that 
adults' smoking may be detri- 
mental to the health of their 
children." they say. 

Snoot Trends 21. 1 9ft 6 (Sta- 
tionery Office: £17.50). 


down to 17.5. according to cent, had fewer state second- 
new statistics in the a n nual ary school pupils in comp- 
volume. Regional Trends. rehensives than other regions. 

The South-west had the In Scotland, all such pupils are 
highest pupil-teacher ratios for in comprehensives. In the 
state primary and secondary North. East Anglia and Wales, 
schools. 23.6 and 16.9 respec- the figure is 98 per cent 
lively, but at KL5 it also had More than two-thirds of 
the lowest ratio for non- secondary schools have more 
maintained schools, which 9 than 600 pupils, 
per cent of its pupils attended. There were nearly 3.000 

Six per cent of all pupils schools wifi 50 or fewer 
went to non-maintained pupils, nearly all at primary 
schools but that varied from 2 leveL concentrated in sparsely 
per cent in Wales to 9 per cent populated regions of Scot land, 
m the South-east and South- Wales. Ulster. East Anglia and 
west and 13 per cent in the South-west. 

Northern Ireland. Expenditure a head on 

Scotland had the smallest education by local authorities 
overall pupil-teacher ratio of i„ 1983-84 varied between 
16.3. Nursery schools apart, it £202 in East Anglia and £264 
was consistently below the j n Scotland. Central govern- 
LmtedKiDgdom average. menl expenditure added 
The west Midlands was the about £30 a head in England 
only region with a higher and Wales and brought the 
average pupil-teacher ratio for overall Scottish total to £343, 
nursery schools than Scotland: 

25.7 as against 25.4 in Scot- 
land, and 21.7 in the UK. 

Average class sizes were 
higher than the pupil-teacher 
ratio, particularly in second- 
ary schools. G roller London 


financial 
faith in Ulster 

Foreign -owned enterprises 
accounted for 36 per cent of 
net capital spending in manu- 
facturing m Northern Ireland 
in 1983, government statistics 
in the newly published vol- 
ume. Regional Trends, reveaL 

The proportion was higher 
than any other region, com- 
pared with 32 per cent in tbe 
South-east but only 9 percent 
in Yorkshire and Humberside 
and the West Midlands. 

Nationally just over a quar- % 
ter of manufacturing gross” 
value added <GVA) in 1983 
came from units employing 
fewer than 100 people, and 
another quarter from units 
employing 1,000 or more. 

GVA per employee varied 
widely by industry in 1983. 
from a UK average of £22,442 
in chemicals to £7.686 in man- 
made fibres, textiles, leather, 
clothing and footwear. 

Ulster came bottom for all 
industries except food, drink 
and tobacco. Its GVA was 
highest of all in the extraction . 
and manufacture of metals. 

The West Midlands was 


average for jobless 

Every region has shared the cent in the Grampians region 
increased nneinploymerit of to 18-8 per cent in Strathclyde. 


recent years, but there are 
marked variations between 
regions and \ within them, 
according to new government 
figures. 

Tbe national average rose 
from 5.8 per cent In 1977 to 
13.5 last year. 


High unemployment re- 
gions tend to have high long- 
term unemployment, so that 
in October 1985 more than 
half the unemployed men in 
Northern Ireland, the West 
Midlands and the North-west 
had. been out of work for a 


But while the South-east, year, and overa third for more 
East Anglia and fie- East than two years. The com- 


Midlands have kept' on- paral 
employment below that level, . ttoati 
the South-west has 'moved ui th 
from being for above average, ahjll 
with 6215 per cent -in 1977, to .. Th 
below average, -with 12 per were 
cent in 1985. stighi 

■ By contrast the West Mid- Soud 
lands was badly affected, by a P® - 
rapid increase in unemploy- ftW* 
mem between 1979 and 1983 
and moved from below av- Mk«j 
erage (5.5 per cent) in J 977 to *&!* 
above (15.5 per cent) last year. Th 


parable figures were around a 
quarter and under two-fifths 
in the South-east, South-west 
and Eart Anglia. 

.. .The chances of finding work 
were highest, and increasing 
stighdy. m East Aagfia and the 
South-west, where tii 1985, 40 
per cent or more of un- 
employed men were finding 
jobs, bat slimmest in the West 
Midlands, where the percent- 
age was still under 30, 

The risks of becoming un- 


Unemployment also varies employed were worst in the 
inside regtora>-Sa while the North and North-west. 


The percentages of state, characterized by low in vest- 


school pupils staying on after 
the age of 16 varied from 23 
per cent in the North and 
South-west to 31 per cent in 
Wales and 32 per cent in the 
South-east. 


ment per employee in all 

industries except vehicles and 
food, drink and tobacco in 
1983. 

Social Trends 21. 1986 (Sta- 
tionery Office; £l 7.50). 


North has the worst un- 
employment In' the mam hind 
(19 per cent) ’and the South- 
east (9.9 percent) the lowest, 
the Isle ofWight m tbe South- 


: Figures for government 
training schemes and special 


ve most Jasting 
they, are least 


cast ( { 5 per cent) is worse off needed, as in Lonfim and the 
than Cambria m; the Norfi South-east, . where more 


(12L5 per cent). 

In Scotland, the unemrfoy- 
raeni rate varies from 8.9 per 


participants are still in work 
eight months after leaving tbe 
programme. 




* * * * 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 l£86 


HOME NEWS 


i 


Father behaved ‘like 
madman’ in bedroom 
attack on daughter 


A Manchester businessman 
acted like a Jack Nicholson 
character in the film The 
Shining when he terrorized his 
daughter, the General Medical 
Council's disciplinary 
committee heard yesterday. 

Miss Anne Waterson. aged 
22. said: “He ' suddenly 
snapped. I ran upstairs to the 
bedroom and wedged a stool 
against the door." She said 
that her Either, Mr George 
Waterson, aged 49, smashed a 
hole in the door, tore away all 
the wood splinters and burst 
into the room. 

“He looked like a complete 
madman. He reminded me of 
Jack Nicholson in The 
Shining she said. 

She managed to escape from 
their family home in Hale, 
near Altrincham, Cheshire, 
and run to the nearest (ele- 

{ )hone box to call her mother 
or help. The incident took 
place only weeks before her 
eighteenth birthday. 

Miss Waterson. a nurse, 
also claimed her father had 
made “sexual insinuations" to 
her while they were alone at 
home. 

She said the behaviour of 
her father drastically deteri- 
orated from 1978 onwards 
after he started receiving treat- 
ment from a hypnotist. Dr 
Joseph Jaffe in Manchester. 

Dr Jaffe, aged 60, of Prest- 


By Tnrdi McIntosh 

wich, Manchester, is alleged to 
have turned Mr Waterson into 
a “zombie” during a five-year 
course of hypnosis and injec- 
tions with an unknown mix- 
ture of drugs Ik called “Jaffe 
Juice". 

. Dr Jaffe feces five charges of 
serious professional, miscon- 
duct between May 1978 and 
about March 198X 
. - Mr Michael Waterson. aged 
19, a student, told the hearing 
that by 1981 he became very 
frightened of his father and his 
changed behaviour. 

“He looked wild, ten to 
fifteen years older. His hair 
was wild, his eyes were wild, 
be had sunken cheeks and 
looked jaundiced," he said. 

He added that they were a 
very close family but gradually 
they were torn apart. 

He described how his father 
used to return home after he 
bad received treatment from 
Dr Jaffe. 

“He seemed to be in some- 
thing like a trance." 

His brother, Mr Peter 
Waterson, aged 17, said his 
father considered Dr Jaffe to 
be “a god". 

“He made us look at photo- 
graphs of Dr Jafle around the 
house and to listen to radio 
programmes he was on." He 
said that his father wanted the 
family to believe that the 


doctor was the best person in 
the world. 

He recalled one occasion 
when his father returned 
home and he asked him if he 
had been to see Dr Jaffa. 

“He exploded and showed 
me his forearm. It was covered 
with puncture marks;" he 
said. 

His father had replied: “Yes 
of course 1 have been,” and 
had then gone to a bade room 
and burst into tears. 

Mr Arthur Walker, retired, 
of West Hyde. Manchester, 
said he used to do various odd 
jobs for Dr Jaffe at his 
consulting rooms. His wife 
was a housekeeper on the 
premises. 

Dr Jaffa would ask him to 
check on Mr Waterson in the 
treatment room. He said Mr 
Waterson would be sitting in a 
big chair. 

Mr Walker said: “He looked 
rough, as if he had had a 
skinful of drink. His eyes 
looked as if be couldn't 
focus.” 

He said that he was con- 
cerned about Mr Waterson's 
condition and whether he 
could drive home safely. But 
he said be never told Dr Jaffa 
that be was worried about the 
patient’s state. 

The hearing was adjourned 
until November 24. 


Threat to 
Puttnam 
film study 

By Gavin Bell 

A project by Mr David 
Puttnam, the film director, to 
introduce the cinema to 
schools may have to be aban- 
doned because of lack of 
government rapport. 

The scheme, under which 
pupils would attend special 
screenings of important films 
as part of their studies, at- 
tracted financial backing from 
the film industry and prepara- 
tions were well advanced for 
its launch next month. 

However, the Department of 
Trade and Industry, which 
had been asked to provide 
£35.000, said yesterday that it 
was unable to do so. 

Mr Inn Wall, a film educa- 
tionist, who. has been . co- 
ordinating the project, said 
that it was Seely, to collapse 
unless another sponsor was 
found quickly* ' 

“The DTI decision is very 
disappointing, in view of die 
way the industry itself rallied 
round. But because we think 
the scheme is so valuable, we 
are not going to give up hope 
yet," he said. 

An initial grant of £35,000. 
from the British Film and 
Television Producers Associ- 
ation had enabled the or- 
ganizers to distribute 12 film 
study guides, to 24500 schools 
throughout Britain. 

The guides, written by 
teachers, were to be used in 
conjunction with visits to local 
cinemas at reduced prices. 
They included films such as 
Lady Jane and Revolution for 
history studies. Passage to 
India for English literature, 
and Defence of the Realm for 
political and social studies. 

A farther £35,000 bad been 
pledged by film distributors 
towards the project's budget of 
£105,000. A spokesman for 
the department, which pro- 
vided £325,000 for British 
Film Year, said that bonds for 
this year were frilly committed. 

Video violence 
‘damages young’ 

Children aged as young as 
eight were having their minds 
damaged by exposure to videos 
portraying brutal sex and 
violence, a teachers’ con- 
ference was told yesterday. 

Miss Sue McCaffrey, an 
English teacher, of Thurrock. 
Essex, told delegates to the 
Professional Association of 
Teachers conference that 
many children aged between 
IJ and 14 were now including 
in essays “ghastly stories of 
victims being decapitated or 
mutilated". 

“It is the young minds of our 
children which are suffering. 
We must inform parents of the 
dangers to tbeir children of 
exposure to such horrific 
material.” she said. 

The Manchester' conference 
unanimously passed a modem 
deploring, “the influence on 
children of newspapers, tele- 
vision and videos giving prom- 
inence to sex and violence". 1 


‘D’ day warning 
of car sales chaos 

By Clifford Webb, Motoring Correspondent 


Houts after the first ‘D’ 
registered cars appeared on 
the streets yesterday, motor 
organizations gave a warning 
that a change in the vehicle 
year “identifier”, from August 
to October, would “throw the 
used car market into chaos". 

The British Vehicle Rental 
and Leasing Association, 
whose members buy more 
than a quarter of all new cars, 
said if the switch goes ahead 
next year, an overwhelming 
number of used cars would be 
part exchanged for new ones 
during the worst three months 
of the year. 

As a result of that “glut", 
used prices would fall by as 
much as £1,300 for an exec- 
utive saloon, £650 for .a me-' - 
dium family car, £400 for a 
small family car and £270 for a- 
super Mint - 

In a letter to the Secretary of 
State-Jar Transport calling for,-, 
an urgent meeting, the.associ- 
at ion says:- “The greai/major- 
ity of the industry believes 
that the proposed change 
should be abandoned 
immediately.** 


The Motor Agents Associ- 
ation, which represents most 
garages, said the proposal 
would lead to a significant fail 
in new car sales. 

However, the Society of 
Motor Manufacturers and 
Traders, which claims to be 
the industry’s main trade 
body, takes the opposite view, 
because October does not 
favour the importers. 

Mr Trevor Taylor, sales and 
marketing director of Austin- 
Rover, said: “Less than 6 per 
cent of car sales on the 
Continent last year took place 
in August compared with over 
20 per cent in Britain. August 
is such a dead month for the 
Continentals that they can 
.smteb' production in June and 
'July - to attack the British 
market." 

- Nearly two months ago, the 
Department of Transport said 
it would reconsider if the trade 
came. up. with a consensus 
view. 

Last night the manufac- 
turers said: “We shall be 
meeting the agents on August 
26, 


Churches give way in 
city road race battle 

By Craig Seton 


Sunday services are to be 
cancelled at some churches in 
Birmingham when the city 
stages Monaco-style motor 
racing for the first time on 
public roads in Britain later 
this month. 

Threats of legal action, to 
ensure that services could go 
ahead, receded yesterday, af- 
ter church leaders accepted 
that it was too late to re- 
schedule the August Bank 
holiday Super Prix. The race 
features Formula 3000 racing 
cars travelling at speeds of up 
to 180 mph. 

The churches are on. or 
near, the 2.4 mile route of the 
two-day event, close to the city 
centre. One Unitarian church 
has cancelled its Sunday ser- 
vices for the first lime in 300 
years because of expected 
traffic congestion. 

Other churches are holding 
morning services earlier than 


usual and cancelling later 
services. Worshippers will be 
given passes to allow them 
into enclosures and will be 
permitted to watch practices 
without paying. 

Yesterday church leaders 
met officials of the city coun- 
cil. which has spent about £1.5 
million on the event. Mr 
Roland Senter, spokesman for 
the churches, said: “We did 
not want racing cancelled, but 
did want certain periods when 
our congregations could get to 
services." 

Mr John Charlton, the 
chairman of the road race 
committee, said that next year 
gaps would be arranged to 
allow services to go ahead. 

Eight miles of steel barriers 
and steel mesh fearing have 
been put up along the route 
and organizers are hoping to 
attract more than 150,000 
visitors. 



Members of the Bolshoi Ballet, Galina Chomootova, Maria Zubkova, Marina Kotova, ladwilh Charskay, Vioktte 
Voronina and Elena Akhoulkova, on an open-top sightseeing bra ostside the Hooses of Partiameid yesterday. The Moscow 
company is appearing at the Royal Opera House, Covent Garden, midi August 9 (Photograph: Bos Driukwater). 


Action to 
beat West 
End touts 

By Our Arts Correspondent 

Legislation is planned to 
crack down on agencies which 
are charging op to five times 
the face value of West End 
theatre tickets. 

The Department of Trade 
and Industry said yesterday 
that it was drafting a wide- 
ranging BOl for the next 
parliamentary session which 
would give statutory backing 
to a new code of practice on 
misleading advertising and 
prices. 

The proposed Consumer 
Goods and Services Bill would 
contain a specific danse cover- 
ing theatre tickets, to ensure 
riiat purchasers woe aware of 
their value and of agency 
commission charges. 

Westminster City Council 
recently joined a mounting 
campaign by theatre managers 
against the practices of some 
agendas. 

The council reported this 
week that only two out of nine 
agencies investigated by its 
officers were displaying book- 
ing fees. 

Mr Peter Harttey^chairman 
of the environment Committee, 
said: “This kind of extor- 
tionate mark-up is damaging 
the reputation of- the West 
End. It is almost le gitimized 
touting. We are urging the 
Government .to introduce 
tougher law& as a matter of 
urgency." 

The Society of West End 
Theatre, representing 49 
establishments, said tbit it 
was aware of instances in 
which customers had been 
charged £25 for a ticket with a 
box office value of £6. 

The profits were allowing 
the agencies to extend their 
activities by baying out rep- 
utable dealers in hotel lobbies, 
and by setting up alongside 
currency exchange bureaux. 

The campaign has been 
supported by Mr Michael 
Marshall, Conservative MP 
for Arundel, who told the 
Commons recently that the 
lack of control was “bad for 
theatre, had for our reputation 
as a tourist centre, and bad for 
broadening habits of theatre- 
going among onr own 
population". 

The Keith Prowse agency, 
established in 1780, also wel- 
comed the government action 
but said that it did not go far 
enough. 

Mr Paul Burns, managing 
director, said: “London has 
become the ticket tout capital 
of the world. We would like to 
see legislation to license 
agents, in the same way the 
authorities in New York stipu- 
late what our subsidiary there 
can charge." 


Parents fear for missing daughter 


The parents of a Leicester- 
shire schoolgirl who dis- 
appeared dose to the place 
where another teenager was 
murdered three years ago said 
yesterday that they feared she 
had been abducted. 

Dawn Ashworth, aged 15. 
was last seen leaving the home 
of her best friend. Sharon 
Clarke, in the village of 
Enderby, on Thursday after- 
noon. 

Her one-and-a-half mile 
walk home could have taken 
her along the edge of an area 
known as ■ the “black pad" 
where Lynda Mann, also aged 
15. was sexually assaulted and 


strangled. Her murderer was 
never caught. Both girls were 
pupils of Lutterworth Gram- 
mar School. 

Dawn's father, Mr Robin 
.Ash worth, who was routinely 
questioned by the police dur- 
ing their investigation into 
Lynda's murder, said: “We 
constantly warned her to be 
careful because there was a 
killer on the loose." 

Mr .Ashworth, a scientific 
officer with British Gas. com- 
forted his wife Barbara, who 
said: “Dawn will be absolutely 
panic-stricken by now if she is 
being held against her wilL" 



Dawn Ashworth: vanished 
while walking home. 


Family back Gillick over campaign 


Mrs Victoria Gillick Is to 

carry on campaigning against 

doctors being allowed to pre- 
scribe birth control pills for 
girls under 16 without parents’ 

consent. 

Yesterday her daughter 
Beattie, aged 16, who was 
recently photographed topless 
on a Greek beach, was re- 
united with tori' parents at 
their home in Wisbech. 
Cambridgeshire. 

She said she was 100 per 

cent behind her mother's cam- 

paign. “If I had daughters 
then I would take the same 

line as my mother," she said. 


Mrs Gillick had consulted 
her six older children over 
whether to abandon her 
■crusade. 

Beattie who is 17 on August 

11, was joined by Ben, aged 18, 

Hannah, aged 15, twins Tfaeo 
and Jim, aged 14. and Jessie, 
aged 12, to discuss whether 

the pressure on (he family was 

too much to bear after pub- 
licity ova- the pictures of 
Beattie topless with her Greek 
boyfriend on a holiday beach. 

Mrs Gillick said: “We came 
to the condnskn that we 
would keep the family as modi 

out of the press as possible. 


but I would carry on 
campaigning.~She would be 
launching a group called In- 
form to make the public aware 
of her campaign. 

Beattie denied there was any 
rift with her mother. 

Asked why did went topless, 
she said: “In Greece it’s the 
norm. 

“Actually the thing that 
they didn’t say in the papers 
was that I totally agree with 
my mother. I am in favour of 
her op position to the pill for 
under age girls." 

Beattie was scathing be- 
cause she said a photographer 


hid in rocks to get a the 
picture. 

Mrs Gillick, who has 10 
children, said: “Beattie has 
been one of my strongest 
supporters." Asked a boot a 
report of endless family dis- 

putes. she said: “The endless 
rows are the sort of endless 

rows that you have with ail 

teenage girts. 

“1 just think it’s so unfair 
for Beattie to be put in this 
light when she had a lovely 
holiday, the best any parent 
could want for their daughter, 

and it was wrecked absolutely 

wrecked." 


Norrington table 


Top honours for St John’s 


St John’s College has re- 
tained its seemingly unassail- 
able position for the fourth 
successive year at the head of 
Oxford University's annual 
league table based on the 
results of final honours 
examinations. 

The college has scored the 
highest number of first-class 
honours degrees, as well as 
coming lop of the percentage 
points table for academic 
achievement 

In this year's final examina- 
tion results, St John's under- 
graduates were awarded a 
total of 35 first-class honours 
degrees, eight ahead of its 
nearest rival. University 
College. 

The only tiny slain on St 
John’s otherwise glittering 
academic prize is that it has 
dropped to third place, after 
Merton and Lincoln, in the 
table in which colleges are 
ranked in order of the percent- 
ages of firsts plus seconds. 

Oxford dons regularly pro- 
fess to take no notice of the 
annual Norrington Table, on 


By Ahm Hamilton 

the ground that examination 
results are only one factor 
among many in a college’s 
overall performance. 

Nevertheless, school teach- 
ers, employers, and most of all 
applicants for admission to 
the university, traditionally 
take a lively interest in iL 

This year’s table is com- 
puted in a slightly different 
way. For the first time, it 
differentiates between upper 
and lower second class hon- 
ours degreees. 

Under the new system, five 
points are awarded for a first 
class degree, three for an upper 
second, two for a lower sec- 
ond, and one fora third. 

Whether because of the new' 
scoring system or because of 
genuine changes of fortune, 
several colleges have altered 
their placings. 

At the top, Merton has 
moved from sixth to second, 
and Corpus Christi from fifth 
to third. Lincoln has shot from 
seventeenth to fifth, Hertford 
has gone from twelfth to 
eighth, Christ Church from 


eighteenth to tenth, and Trin- 
ity from nineteenth to 
eleventh. _ 

To make way for the rising 
stars, there have been some 
painful tumbles. New has 
gone down from third to 
twelfth, Magdalen from fourth 
to thirteenth, Jesus from elev- 
enth to twenty-second. 

Lady Margaret Hall, which 
last year clawed its way from 
twenty-fourth to tenth, col- 
lapsed again to twenty-first 
Pembroke, which two years 
'ago ascended to a spectacular 
second place, has disnte- 
grated to fourth from bottom. 

One lesson which might be 
drawn from the table is the 
academic undesirability of 
single-sex colleges. St HoghX 
St Hilda’s and Somerville, 
which admit only women, 
occupy the bottom three 
places. 

St Anne’s, a former 
women's college which now 
admits men. has on the other 
hand risen from twenty-eighth 
to nineteenth. 

U niv er si ty news, page 27 


BBC wins 


OXFORD UNIVERSITY COLLEGES 


Analysis of anamination restdts 


1st 


2a 


2b" 


Position 

CoBogc 

Pts 

<%> 

t%) 

(%) 

TO 

max 

TO 

1 (1) . 

St John's 

363 


48.1 

142 

4.7 

5&f 

*682 

2 

6) 

Merton 

226 


K*1 

HL'll 

6.1- 


8 ? J 

3 

9 ’ 

Carpus Christi 
.Exeter 

155 

1 7 fl 

47.8 

19l6 

. 22 


67.4 

4 

2} 

278 


482 

18.1- 

■a e 

415- 


b 

17) 


213 

23.1 

. 58.5 

18:4 


iff 

B 

l|) 

University 



KF1 




64.4 

l 

Brasanose 

276 

21.1 

482 

24.4 

52 


612 

8 


Hertford 


185 

522 

26.1 

32 

460 

602 

IT 

9) 

Baffled 

318 

Kin 

448 

292 

42 

525 

60.6 

Lm 

J18) 

Christ Church 


17.1 


KlLI 

12 

555 

602 

It 

1?) 

13) 

Trinity 

200 

16.4 


312 

12 

335 

W.7 

Ip 

New 

335 

14 2. 

592 

212 

52 

565 

592 

13(4 

14 (8» 

Magdalen 

St Edmund Hall 

301 

288 

11.6 

1R2 

64.1 

492 

172 

272 

62 

72 

515 

495 

584 

582 

Kid 

(24) 

Worcester 

263 

17.4 


352 

62 


572 

16(16) 

Wadham 

310 

14.7 

492 

26.6 

92 

545 

562 

17(15) 

Kebla 

340 

142 

■ iT ■ 

25.0 


600 . 

56.7 

18(14) 

Oriel 


11.2 

532 

282 

8.7 


55.8 

19(20) 

St Anne's 

299 

12 J) 

462 

36.1 

52 


55A 

Kid 

(22) 


349 

15.1 

412 

34.1 

92 


552 



279 

11.9 

482 

31.7 

72 : 


552 

I. lift HP 

Jesus 

239 

132 

422 

342 

92 

435 

542 



Queen's 

231 


47.6 

31.4 


430 


24 

St Peter's 


mill 

382 

382 

9.4 

425 

ffxTj 

t-1 

(23 

Pembroke 

219 

7.1 


25.0 

142 


Fil 

F'] 


St Hugh s 

Sttffl&'s 

267 

7.7 

422 

412 

8.7 


512 

27 

[25 


32 

492 


62 

475 


28 

(27 

Somervile 

260 

3.8 

46.7 



525 

492 

Total: 7,629 


Possftte tatat 

13,135 


Average percenteges 

58.1 


Art viewers 
get chance to 
detect fakes 

Arts connoisseurs will have 

a rare opportunity to test their 

skill in detecting forgeries at 
an unusual touring exhibition 
which opens in Hull next 
weekend (Gavin BelL, Arts 
Correspondent, writes). 

In a series of challenges, the 
Arts Council exhibition, en- 
titled “Don’t Trust the Label", 
offers the choice between 
masterpieces and fakes. 

Visitors are invited to 
distinguish between a John 

Constable and a picture by his 

son Lionel, and to decide 
which is a real Samuel Palmer 
and which is a Tom Keating 
fake. 

Mr Keating is joined by 
other notoriously successful 
forgers including Hans van 
Meegeren, whose Old Master 
forgeries fooled many experts, 
and Elmyrde Horv, who faked 
a host of twentieth century 
masters. 

The exhibition also shows 
how fakes have been uncov- 
ered. for example how X-ray 
photographs exposed a mod- 

ern nail in the construction of! 
an apparently fourteenth cen- 

tury afterpiece. 

Apart from the forgeries and 
disappointments, the ex- 
hibition includes genuine 
paintings by Boudin. Lowry 
and others, watercolours by 

Turner, and original prims by 

Durer. Rembrandt. Goya and 
Warhol. 

After a five-week run at the 

Ferens Art Gallery, Hull, the 

exhibition moves to Notting- 
ham University art gallery. 
York City Art Gallery, and the 
Royal Albert Memorial Mu- 
seum in Exeter. 


All-night TV 
for Yorkshire 
rock fans 

Popular mask fans will be 
able to “rock around the 
dock" from midnight next 
Friday, when Yorkshire Tele- 
vision begins Britain's first 
all-night programme for an 

experimental three-month pe- 
riod (Gavin Bell writes). 

The service, available only 
to viewers In the YTV trans- 
mission area, wBl present pop 
videos, interviews and reviews 

The programme, produced 
in London by the Music Box 

company, is already broadcast 

by satellite to 4.5 million 
households in 11 European 
countries. 

Several other independent 
television companies, indod- 
ing Anglia TV, are understood 

to be considering plans for a 

similar overnight service. 


Soccer player 
jailed for 
hitting referee 

A football player was jailed 
for 28 days yesterday for 
assaulting the referee during a 
match. 

Keith Lethby, aged 26, a 
taxi driver, of Twitten Way, 
Worthing, West Sussex, pun- 
ched the referee, Mr Russd 
Cummings, twice in the face 
and, when he fay unconscious 
'on the ground, jumped. on his 
back. Chichester Crown Court 
was told. 

Lethby was playing for a 
working men’s dub against 
the Royal British Legion side 
at Worthing- -and Jest- his 
temper when a' free kick was 
awarded against his team. 

He pleaded guilty to causing 
the referee actual bodily harm 
and was also ordered to pay 
him £400 compensation. 


wedding 
battle 

Far’ more viewers watched 
die wedding of the Duke and 
Duchess of York on BBC than 
onJTV. 

Figures from the British 
Audience Research Bureau 
today show that 14.4 million 
watched BBC Ts live coverage 
of the carriage processions^ to 
Westminster. Abbey on tfuly 
2_ \ 

The marriage seryice irielf 
was seen by 142 million pBC 
viewers compared with sfiyen 
milli on who watched indepen- 
dent television. 

No part of the indepemfent 
companies’ live coverage at- 
tracted enough yfewers^to 
register in toe commercial 
network's top 10 for the wefek. 

Health talks?: 

Lady Trumpington, Uncfor- 
Secretary of State at ujfce 
Department of Health, and 
Social Security, will .cfaaig a 
public meeting in StonehQtve, 
Gloucestershire next weefcin . 
response to calls forgovpra- - j 
ment action over a meningitis * 
outbreak which has aifectfid a 
hundred people in the fpst 
five years. 

Polly’s £5,000 

A parrot named Polly-Vas 
left £5,000 yesterday in^Jhe 
wiB of Mrs Hilda WilsonJ of 
Hgrrogaie, North Yorkshire, 
vtfio died Iasi June, aged?73. 
The bird is in the care of her 
neighbours. . “ 

Dearer wine'J 

‘ Wine merchants in+tbe 
f* south of England charge tip to 
£1 a bottle more for afell- 
known wines than their 
counteiparts in the north, 
according to die Consumers* 
Association magazine Which? 
Wine Monthly. 

£1.6m bail but 


r 

i 


John Palmer, the jeweller 
facing a conspiracy charge* in 
connection with toe £26>giil- 
lion BrinterMat bnHiofr’Kaid 
at Heathrow in 1983, offered 
sureties of £1.6 mfihon rui a 
bail request yesterday;- ^Mr 
Palmer, aged 36,^- of 
Lansdown, near Bath, ''teas 
remanded in custody**"by 
Horeeferry Road magistrates. 

Lock inqniiy( 

An inquiry into complaints 
against the- police- by«-jMr 
Lawrence Lock,' husband of 
the woman found murdered 
near a railway . line;, in 
Hertfordshire, is to be M by 
^Mr David Scott, assistant 
chief constable of Sussex. ■ 

Bag a moor ~ 

Two grouse moors. Snail- 
sden in South Yorkshire and 
Woodhead, near Gkssdp, in 
North Derbyshire, were yes- 
terday offered for sale days 
before the grouse shooting 
season starts on the Glorious 
Twelfth. Offers of around 
£1 50,000 and £125.000 respec- 
tively are sought. 

Tin mine goes 

The Pendarvcs tin.'ffiine \ 
near Camborne, Cornwall, 
dosed yesterday. The 'mine i 
was one of three in the ccftlnty j 
owned, by Rio Tmio'Zinc ■ 
which has applied to r, lhe \ 
Government for a grant of > 
more than £15 mflfionf'The ; 
40 workers have been offered J 
other jobs. j 

Gas inquiry 

Derbyshire County Council 
is to hold a public inquiry. into 
methane gas explosion 
which demolished a bungalow 
at Loscoe last March.“The 
environment department has 
refused to sanction one. 


it' 


r 


Dockyard bids j 

The Ministry of Eie&nce I 
announced yesterday, tfiat it ; 
has received three bids-fpr a • 
contract to manage toe£jnyal j 
dockyard at Rosyth qoJ the i 
Firth of Forth. ■" j 

Dolphin tall: 

The Windsor Safari 'Park, 
Berkshire, was called inNesr 
tertlay to try to savetfeeMe of , 
a young bottienose dolphin, 
washed trp 


Escaper held 

Anthony Shilling, a Kent 
man who escaped from Nor- 
wich prison, was recaptured at 
Heme Bay yesterday. He es- 
caped with three others after 
cutting through a fence. 


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OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


* * * * 


COMMENTARY 



Geoffrey Smith 


The - diplomatic sensitivity 
with which Mrs Thatcher 
plays her hand may well be the 
critical factor at the Common- 
wealth mini-summit. 

Flexibility is the essence of 
the British negotiating po- 
sition agreed on Thursday, 
first in the Cabinet’s Overseas 
and Defence Committee, and' 
then swiftly endorsed by the 
fall Cabinet That most mean 
that a good deal of tactical 
discretion has in fact bee n 
given to the Prune Minister. 

The Government is now 
ready to consider further mea- 
sures against South Africa. 
Certain specific possibilities 
were discussed in Cabinet Bat 
it does not believe that next 
week's meeting is the occasion 
to decide on them. 

That is partly because only 
seven of the 49 Common- 
wealth members will be repre- 
sented, partly because Sir 
Geoffrey Howe undertook his 
diplomatic mission on behalf 
of the European Comnumity 
and it might look a little 
discourteous to take action 
before he has had a chance to 
report to bis European part- 
ners, but above all because of 
the need for the Commou- 
wealth to move in concert with 

others. 


Priority to get 
everyone in line 


There is some overlap in the 
measures under consideration 
by the Commonwealth, the 
European Community and the 
United States. But the lists are 
by no means identical. Yet for 
different forms of pressure 
upon South Africa to be 
adopted by all three would be 
as near as anyone could get to 
a guarantee that none of them 
would be effective. 


So the British Government 
sees the first priority as being 
to get the international 
community in line. There 
seems to be no hard and fast 
agreement as to how that 
should be _ done, but the 
assumption is that the time for 
decision will be when the 
European foreign ministers 
meet in mid-September. 

In substance, that approach 
is consistent witi. Sir 
Geoffrey's publicly declared 
belief that further measures 
would be required if his mis- 
sion to South Africa were 
unsuccessful. He cannot have 
been too displeased with the 
outcome of the discussion with 
his colleagues or he would 
surely have taken the argu- 
ment to the full Cabinet, where 
he was known to have more 
support than in the Overseas 
and Defence Committee. 


But he would still have 
preferred the British approach 
to be more specific and less 
flexible. He might well have 
liked Britain to propose that 
the Commonwealth should 
next week approve a list of 
possible measures, each of 
which would be implemented 
only if subsequently endorsed 
by the European Community. 
Above ail. he is anxious to 
convince the rest of the 
Commonwealth that Britain is 
not being unreasonable in its 
attitude towards South Africa. 

Will Mrs Thatcher carry 
conviction on that score? So 
much will depend on how she 
presents the Government's po- 
sition. It is in fact more logical 
and more practical than the 
ideas of many of the rhetorical 
enthusiasts for sanctions. 


Possible Thatcher 
counter-punch 


But it could so easily be 
represented as just one more 
delaying device, especially if 
Mrs Thatcher were to dwell 
too much on the need to 
encourage President Botha to 
take further conciliatory mea- 
sures in the meantime. 

I doubt if she win go into 
tomorrow's meeting spoiling 
for a light. But she is one of 
nature's counter-punchers. 
She is entirely capable of 
responding more vigorously 
than she originally intended if 


wealth leaders being obtuse or 
unreasonable. 


No method of consequence 

for bringing the international 
community into line on South 
Africa has been ruled out by 
(be British Government. But 
there are two possible dangers 
in its approach. Mrs Thatcher 
may not display the patience 
and tactical adroitness to ex- 
ercise successfully the dis- 
cretion she has been given; and 
the fret that she has so much 
discretion may tempt her once 
she is beyond the control of the 
Cabinet to revert once again to 
her instinctive disapproval of 
all sanctions, whatever name 
they go by. 

A number of her colleagues 
did not take it as a happy omen 
that the briefings given after 
Thursday's Cabinet, presum- 
ably by her press secretary, 
were not consistent with what 
they believed they had decided 
in Cabinet. 


South African crisis 


India plans to 
take sanctions 


call to full 


Commonwealth 


From Michael Harnlyn, Delhi 


Indian officials declared 
yesterday that if there was no 
consensus at the Common- 
wealth mini-summit in Lon- 
don beginning tomorrow an 
emergency meeting of all 49 
heads of government would be 
summoned to take further 
action. 

The officials indicated that 
Delhi would be prepared to 
host such a meeting, and that 
it could take place within a 
month or six weeks. 

Mr Gandhi said on the BBC 
World Service last night that 
he expected, because the situa- 
tion in South Africa had 
worsened since the Nassau 
summit, that a more com- 
prehensive list of sanctions 
than those agreed then would 
be drawn up. 

Mr Gandhi told the BBC 
that there was no desire to 
break up the Commonwealth, 
but his officials said the rest of 
the Commonwealth would be 
prepared to act without Brit- 
ain if necessary. The officials 
said that breaking trade ties 
with Britain was not to be 
ruled out. “Nothing is ruled 
out," it was said. 

Thanks, however, to Mr 
Neil Kinnock, the Labour 
Party leader, India is unlikely 
to leave the Commonwealth. 
According to one of the Indian 
Prime Minister's aides: “Kin- 
nock did to Rajiv Gandhi 
wjiat Pethick-Lawrence had 


done to Mr Jawaharial Nehru 
in 1956." 


During the Suez crisis Lord 
Pethick-Lawrence of the La- 


bour Party wrote to Pandit 
Nehru about India's rumour- 
ed intention to leave the 
Commonwealth as a protest 
against the Anglo-French ac- 
tion in Egypt. 

Mr Gandhi is now reported 
to be resisting the most persis- 
tent pressure from his Min- 
istry of External Affairs for 
precipitate action. He is said 
to be convinced that India 
should not alienate a vast 
body of opinion in ■ Britain 
opposed to Mrs Thatcher's 
policies. 

Mr Gandhi’s view is that 
the additional measures 
should also include an under- 
taking from Mrs Thatcher that 
if the augmented list of sanc- 
tions does not get results 
within a specified time, then 
the British Government will 
prevail upon the Americans to 
endorse a Security Council 
resolution mandating com- 
prehensive sanctions. 

In discussions and corres- 
pondence which have pre- 
ceded the meeting, it has 
appeared to Indian observers 
that Canada and Australia at 
least are proposing to water 
down the Nassau proposals in 
an effort to get Mrs Thatcher's 
agreement. 



Wheat 


offer 


by US to 
Russians 


Washington (Reuter) - The 
United States is offering the 
Soviet Union about four mil-: 
lion metric tonnes of wheat at 
current' world market prices^: 
Mr Richard Lyng, the Agri- 
culture Secretary, said. 

Mr Lyng said the US Gov-'_ 
eminent would subsidize the 
sales to make US prices . 
competitive. 

Australia. Canada and Ar- 
gentina have protested to the 
White House that they would 
be harmed by subsidized US. 
wheat sales to Moscow. 


Looting on 
blaze liner 


TV 


Three dolls, dressed as Soviet officers, (above) after they were used by Herr Heinz Braun (left) in his escape to West Berlin. 



Unions ask 
Queen to 
intervene 


Senators send new 


signal to Reagan 


By Mark Ellis 


From Christopher Thomas, Washington 


The Queen is being urged by 
Commonwealth trades union 
leaders to intervene on the 
question of Britain's imposing 
sanctions against South Africa 
with a personal appeal to the 
Prime Minister. 

Warning of the danger of 
the break-up of the Common- 
wealth. the union leaders say 
that Mrs Thatcher should be 
advised against opposing 
sanctions. 

The message was revealed 
after a special meeting of the 
steering committee of the 
Commonwealth Trade Union 
Council, which preceded to- 
morrow's mini-summit 

Mrs Shirley Care, chairman 
of the Council, said: “As head 
of the Commonwealth, the 
Queen should show that Mrs 
Thatcher is not head of the 
Commonwealth and should 
not be dictating to Common- 
wealth Prime Ministers.” 

Mrs Thatcher's refusal to 
meet the Commonwealth 
Trade Union Council was 
greeted with astonishment 
and brought fierce condemna- 
tion of her view that sanctions 
would harm the black people 
of South Africa. 

Yesterday a CTUC letter to 
Mrs Thatcher demanding 
“effective and wide-ranging" 
economic sanctions was deliv- 
ered to Downing Street. It 
said: “We are frankly aston- 
ished and deeply disappointed 
that you are not available to 
discuss these matters with us.” 


In a dear signal to President 
Reagan to harden his stand 
against South Africa, the Sen- 
ate Foreign Relations Com- 
mittee voted 15 to two 
yesterday to order limited new 
sanctions against the Pretoria 
Government 

The Republican-sponsored 
measure would ban new US 
investments and bank loans, 
prohibit imjxms of South 
African uranium and coal, and- 
ban the use of U$ "banks by 
private or government-owned 
corporations. It also with- 
draws landing rights for South 
African airlines and gives 
authority to the President to 
deny visas to South African^ 
officials. 

The Bill, in tine with an idea 
mooted by Bishop Desmond 
Tutu, recommends that Presi- 
dent Reagan use his authority 
to sell US gold reserves to help 
depress world gold prices, 
which would hit the South 
African economy. 

Additionally, the Bill would 
add other sanctions to Mr 


Britain ‘faces decision’ 


Mr Enoch Powell, Official 
Ulster Unionist MP for South 
Down, said last night that 
Britain would have to deride 
how far it would allow its 
external policies to be dictated 
by the fiction of the multi- 
racial Commonwealth (Sheila 
Gunn writes). 

He told the Horsham 1982 


Thatcher under fire again 


From Jan Raath, Harare 


The leaders of Zambia and 
Zimbabwe are expected to 
launch their most vigorous 
assault yet against Mrs 
Thatcher's reluctance over the 
issue of sanctions against 
South Africa at the Common- 
wealth mini-summit 
tomorrow. 

President Kaunda of Zam- 
bia. who chairs the Common- 
wealth committee to make 
recommendations on the Emi- 
nem Persons Group report, 
and Mr Robert Mugabe, the 
Zimbabwe Prime Minister, 
will arrive today strengthened 
in their public demands for a 
package of total sanctions. 

The Organization of Af- 
rican Unity's summit this 
week, not unexpectedly, en- 
dorsed their stand. The failure 
of the South African mission 


Kaunda lo press for the high- 
est price in their bargaining. 


But both Dr Kaunda and 
Mr Mugabe have said recently 
they would consider a step-by- 
step approach to sanctions. 

Neither, however, has given 
any indication of what specific 
measures less than total sanc- 
tions they will agree to. 

Observers here believe they 


may be even satisfied with a 
declaration of wtitingness by 
Britain to commit itself to a 
“substantial” increase in eco- 
nomic pressure. 

The possibility of either 
country withdrawing from the 
Commonwealth was discoun- 
ted. Their links with the Com- 
monwealth, say the officials, 
go too deep for them actively 
to consider such a move. 


Rich trade pickings for some 




Commonwealth countries 
could make trading gains if 
they imposed sanctions again- 
st South Africa, a confidential 
report by the Commonwealth 
Secretariat suggests (Our 
financial Editor writes). 

In an analysis sent to beads 
of government attending the 
Co mm onwealth mfni -o nnniit., 
the Secretary-General's office 


with dose economic finks with 
Sooth Africa could also be 
mitigated by diversion of trade 
with the rest of the world. 

“Sooth Africa enjoys- -a 
quota in sugar and steel in 
some industrial c ou n tr y mar- 
kets which at least partly 
could be reallocated to neigh- 
bouring states. Zambia and 
Lesotho are also keen on 


Foreign Secretary, has also 
added to their resolve. 

The fact that recommenda- 
tions coming out of the Marl- 
borough House mini-summit 
will still be subject to ratifica- 
tion by the entire Common- 
wealth is also seen to give 
room for Mr Mugabe and Dr 


replaced by supplies from 
Australia, India, Botswana 
and Zambia. Banned wool 
imports could be made up by 
Australia and New Zealand, 
and uranium supplies by Can- 
ada and Australia. 

Problems of front-tine states 


memorandum says. “A ban on 
air links with Sooth Africa 
could also result in the 
development of neighbouring 
states as transit points, revers- 
ing dependence on South 
Africa”. 


‘Diplomacy has been exhausted’ 


By Mark Dowd 


tbeless optimistic that Com- many reasons. South Africa, 
monwealth tenders would Sir Lynden said, had to be 


pjf* l Sr i 2 Ph 1? 1 5®* £* succeed hi forcing Mis kept within the sphere of 
Prune Minister of the Ba- * 0 tom some of the Western influence so that one 

hamas, said jestenky that foSpimjtSe measures day an independMt Soutii 

mentioned id last October’s Africa based on majority rote 
Nassau accord, such as a ban could return to the 
South Africa was “part of a . Knk< ^ «niciiltiiral Commonwealth, 
game plan designed to secure ^ Mrs Thatcher’s insistence 

maximum benefit for Britain.” *•' — * 


Sir Lynden will be chairing 
the Commonwealth mim-suro- 
mit which begins in London 
tomorrow. 


it j e Mrs Thatcher’s insistence 

r t. - w on the- ineffectiveness of sane- 

-TTit More of msaons by he utriaed, wa rootal 


American Congressmen, the ^ Brftala's unhappy experi- 
Eminent Persons Group . and ____ 


woup ™ ^ over Rhodes*, when sec- 
^Geoffrey Howe now shows .jorstfindostry refused teheed 


that diplomacy has finally S^rSTllSSTSSm 


m i _ J M 1 ^ UK UUI IUI on MMH* arw V WH 

In an interview with lie b ** n cxhausted ’ ** saM * expressed by the then Prime 


Times, he said he was never- Sanctions were a priority for Minister, Mr Harold Wilson. 


Berliner Haims ‘dummy’ run escape 


West Berlin — An East German said to have 
escaped to West Berlin by car after disguising 
himself and three shop dummies as a Soviet 
Army men dahued yesterday that the feat was 
his third East-West cross i ng in less than six 
weeks (Our Correspondent writes). 

Herr Heinz Braun, aged 48, told of his 
commerdaHy-organized flight at a press 
conference in West Berlin called by the August 

- 13 Working Group, an organization which 

- helps East Germans who have escaped. 

His own escape, on Wednesday evening, is 
said to have been masterminded by Herr Wolf 
Quasner, a veteran “yellow pimpernel” who 
has helped abort 1,000 East Germans to flee to 
the west in the last 25 years. 


Estate car resprayed in military olive green 
through four checkpoints to West Berlin. 

The guards were said to have been folded 
com pletel y by a dummy lieutenant-colonel next 
to him, and two “lieutenants” on the back seat. 
East Gorman guards node only nominal 
checks of the car. 

Herr Braun, a former West German who 
moved to East Germany when he was 21, said 
that be bad decided to escape because he was 
disen chanted with the communist regime. 

Official sources yesterday would not confirm 
his story. The west side of the Invaiidenstrasse 
crossing is in the British sector, but a British 
military spokesman said: “We know nothing 
abort the escape.” US and French spokesmen 


Miami (UPI) - Looters 
took cash and jewellery as 
tourists fled from smoke-filled 
cabins on the burning cruise 
ship Emerald Seas, a cruise 
line spokeswoman said. 

Ms Laura Bennett, of East- 
em Cruise Lines, said auth- 
orities were investigating “a ; 
stack of theft reports”, and 
blamed the looting on pas^ 
sengers. adding that crew 
members adhered to an “hon- 


our system . 

Zambia picks 


new envoys 


Herr Bnum. dressed in the uniform of a Bed gave similar replies, and the West Berlin dty 
Army lance-corporal, claimed be drove a Lada authorities said: “Nothing known.” 


Lusaka (Reuter) — Zambia 
has named new envoys lo: 
Britain, the United- Nations-, 
and other posts, and said it is 
dosing its embassies in Por- 
tugal and Spain to cut costs. V 
The new High Commis-., 
sionerio London is Mr Wilted 
Phiri, previously President * 
Kaunda's special assistant for 
political affairs. 


Improving relations on two Middle East fronts 


Press curb 


Reagan's present limited boy- 
cott. imposed last September 
for one year. The new mea- 
sures give President Reagan 
the option of including a ban 
on the import of strategic 
minerals from South Africa 
The Bill was put forward by 
Senator Richard Lugar, chair- 
man of the Foreign Relations 
Committee. It will now have 
to be approved by. the full. 
Senate," where Opponents are! 
expected to mount' another' 
offensive. If endorsed it would 
have lo be reconciled with a 


Bush sees 
heights 
for himself 


much tougher sanctions Bill- 
passed by the House ofRepre- 


passed by the House of Repre- 
sentatives before it could go to . 
President Reagan for sig- 
nature orveio. 

Mr Reagan is awaiting a full 
report early next week from 
Mr Chester Crocker, Assistant 
Secretary of Stale for African 
Affairs, on his talks in London 
with Sir Geoffrey Howe. The 
Administration is anxious to 
coordinate its next moves 
with the British Government 
and other allies. 


dining club in West Sussex 
that the decision would have 
to be made by a Britain under 
the shadow of a future in 
which one-third of the popula- 
tion of many cities would be of 
New Commonwealth origin. 
In the last few weeks Britain 
had seen its political indepen- 
dence threatened. 


Aqaba, Jordan (Reuter) — 
The US Vice-President, Mr 
George Bush, arrived in 
Aqaba yesterday for talks with 
King Husain of Jordan after a 
look at the Israeli-Jordanian 
border. 

“This reinforces one's con- 
victions about the need for 
pea& in the area” be told 
reporters after a military brief- 
ing at Jordan's Urn - Qais 
military; observation post just. 
2% ...miles from the Israeli- 
occupied Golan Heights! 

Mr Bush said the visit to 
Um Qais, near the meeting 
point -of the Israeli, Syrian, 
and Jordanian borders, “br- 
ings home the proximity and 
the danger of the area, given 
the closeness of the forces.” 

At the same time, he said 
Congress erred in opposing a 
military aid request for Jordan 
that was bitterly opposed by 
Israel. The Reagan Adminr 
istration never formally sub- 
mitted the request, because it 
faced certain defeat in 
Congress. .' 

“Congress was wrong on 
that, the Administration was 
right in its position,” he said 
when asked if the view from 
Um Qais made a good case for 
filling Jordan's arras needs. 
Israeli observation posts on 
the Golan Heights, seized 
from Syria in the 1967 war, are 
clearly visible from Um Qais. 

The military briefing in- 
cluded some of the details of 
the Israeli tactics that drove 
Syria from the Golan Heights 
and emphasized their military 
importance. 

Mr Bush said he was struck 
by the contrail between the 
military realities and the 
peacefulness of the valley.- 


Property and exit 
visas to figure in 

Soviet-Israeli talks 


Singapore (Reuter) — The 
Singapore Parliament ap-. 
proved a Bill giving the Gov-; 
eminent powers to restrict the 
sales of foreign publications . 
which are regarded as interior- . 
ing in local politics. 


Ceiling up 


From Ian Murray, Jerusalem 
Israeli and Soviet officials Yesterday an official cm* 


are to meet in Europe in “the 
very near future” to discuss 
consular matters, the Israeli 
Foreign Ministry confirmed 


phasized that despite the fact 
that consular matters were 
involved in the proposed 
meeting there was no question 


yesterday. The meeting was at this stage of opening 
requested by- the Soviet consulates. 


Paris — The ceiling on 
foreign ownership in newly- 
privatized French companies 
has been raised from IS to 20 
per cent in the amended 
version of the Government's 
privatization BilL 

Death crash 


Union, which has no 4ip^ • Envoy! mimed: The: new 
lomaticrelatiaas with Israeli' Israeli military attach^ to 


No reason is berag_gLvm; : Washington;. i£ to 'be Major; 
but the meeting is undtirtotod- General' Amos Yaren. aged 


to. concern the ownership of 4fr, commander of Israeli 

- 1 T— 1 ' D/uWi* rtf 


property in Jerusalem^ /: 
Since, diplomatic tieslwens 


forces in Benlit at the tune of 
the massacres in the.Paiestm- 


broken after the Six-Day. War - ian refugee- camps of Sabra 
in 1967 n .the White Russian ' and Clmtilla in 1982. . . 


Tel Aviv (AP) - Nine 
teenagers and a driver return-1 
ing from summer camp were 
killed when their van collided 
head-on -with a truck near 
Alula, 50 miles north-east of 
here, police said. 

Minnelli will 


community has taken over the 
extensive church property 
which was acquired in the 
days of the Tsars. The Soviet 
request for talks will probably 
centre on this question. 

It is possible that other 
points will be raised, with 
Israel particularly anxious to 
press for exit visas for the 


The commission of inquiry 
into the massacres found that 
he had committed a breach of 
duty and he was moved to 
head the army’s manpower 
branch. Promoted from briga- 
dier-general to major-general, 
he bias been on study leave 
since the end of last year. 

His new appointment com- 


Los Angeles (Reuter) The- 
film director Vincente 
Minnelli left the bulk of his. 
estate, including his SI mil-- 
lion Beverly Hills home, to his; 
daughter Liza Minnellhr 
according to his will filed in' 
court. 


Venice rises 


many Soviet Jews who have es at a time when there is some 


applied to leave Russia. • 

But only this week the 
deputy chairman of the Soviet 
Committee for European Se- 
curity and Co-operation, Mr 
Yevgeny Silin, told a press 
conference that Russia had no 
reason to maintai n the high 
levels of emigration of the 
1970s, when up to 50,000 a 
year were allowed to leave. 

Last month Moscow gran- 
ted 55 visas lo Jews, bringing 
to 455 the number allowed to 
leave the country this year. « 
Israeli Foreign. Ministry :Of- 
ficiais last, month, denied, a 
report that there would be a 
meeting soon to discuss, 
establishing consulates in each 
country. 


strain in relations between 
Israel and the Pentagon, nota- 
bly over allegations that Israel 
has been spying on America. 

• Taba meeting: Talks to 
end the border dispute be- 
tween Israel and Egypt are to 
resume in Cairo early next 
week after a site inspection of 
the contested Sinai resort of 
Taba and a further long 
working session between del- 
egations from the two coun- 
tries. 

Mr Shimon Peres, the Is- 
raeli Prime Minister, told 
Labour Party members yes- 
terday that there will be 
agreement on how to arbitrate 
the problem within the next 
week or two. 


Venice (Reuter) — Venice 
has stopped sinking and has 
risen by about %in since 1970, 
according to an official geo- 
logical survey. 


Jail for bribes 


Moscow (Reuter) — Former 
Georgian Culture Minister* 
Taimuraz Badurashvili has. 
been jailed for 15 yean fqjr 
taking bribes, according to the. 
latest edition of the Sovi^T 
republic’s newspaper to reach. 
Moscow. . *“ 


Guard dies 


French anger grows 
at police shooting 


Jenco has 


Madrid (AP) — A civiC 
guardsman has died froaC 
wounds suffered in a car bomb- 
attack by Basque terrorists' 
here last month, bringing the; 
death loll to II, a hospital- 
spokesman said. SI 


From Diana Geddes, Paris 


talks with Chamonix (Reuter) -£ 


The death of a young 
motorcyclist, shot in: the back 
by a policeman -on Thursday 
night, has inflamed growing 
public anger over strong-arm 
tactics adopted by French 
security forces. 

■“ -Tfae-police- claim that the 
dead man, M William 
Normand, aged 24, had 
snatched a woman's handbag 
and was being pursued when a 
bullet fired by a policeman hit 
in the back. 

Foreign currency and jewels 
were found in his pockets, pol- 
ice said, adding that he . was 
well , known to the police for 
street theft. But his Jamily and 
neighbours insist he had never 
had anything to do. with the 
police. 

.He was -an affable, honest 
young, man, they said, who 
enjoyed his work as a dental 
technician, and was about to 
many his Dutch fiancee. They 
can only assume that it was a 


case of mistaken identity. 

His -family said yesterday 
that- they intended to bring a 
civil action Tor murder against 
the policeman. " ; 

Eye-witnesses say that M 
Normand was driving the 
wrong way up, axme-way stneet- 
when a policeman jumped 
from a police car and took aim 
with his gun from about 50 
yards away, hitting the young 
man in the back. Police say a 
warning shot was fired. 

The policeman, aged 23. 
who fired the shot, collapsed 
and was taken - away- by col- 
leagues. He was being held in 


Reagan 


custody yesterday 
A fatal- blu 


A fatal - blunder . was 
committed' by the police last 
month when a young man 
with a couple of traffic- of- 
fences, but otherwise a clean' 
police record, was shot deadlh 
the back as be tried run away 
from a policeman who asked 
to see his papers. 


Sudan peace talks deadlock 


From Mohsin Ali 
Washington 

The Rev Lawrence Jenco, 
the US Roman Catholic priest 
freed after nearly 19 months of 
pqitivityin Lebanon, arrived 
in Washington yesterday and 
immediately went to the White 
Hoase for a private meeting 
with President Reagan. 

In a brief statement to 
reporters, he said he was 
conveying a confidential mes- 
sage from his captors to 
President Reagan. 

He appealed to his captors 
to release the three other US 
dtizess they are still holding. 
The best way they could do 
this would be to accept the 
invitation of Mr Terry Waite, 
special representative of the 
Archbishop of Canterbury, to 
continue the “dialogue oimwi 
at resolving the situation”. 

President Reagan said Fa- 
tter Jenco bring here was an 


Chamonix (Reuter) 
French lorry drivers demand^ 
ing international recognition; 
for their union and an end fiv 
diesel fuel tax blocked access 
to the Mont Blanc tun net 
between France and Italy. 1 


Bus plunge ' 

Delhi (Reuter) - A biis 
carrying Hindu pilgrims" seek- - 
ing divine protection against 
calamities plunged into a ra- 
vine in north India, killing 30 
people and injuring -12, the 
Press Trust of India reported. 


Tycoon bailed 


Madrid (Reuter)-- Former 
Spanish business tycoon Jose 
Maria Ruiz Mateos, awaiting! 
uial on charges of accounting 
fraud, has been released front* 
jail on bail of $2 million, his 
lawyer said. 


Test talks 


Addis Ababa (AFP) — A 
first meeting between the 
Prime Minister of Sudan, Mr 
Sadiq el-Mahdi. and" Colonel 
John Garang, leader of the 
Sudan People's Liberation 
Army (SPLALresulted only in 
an agreement that they should 
continue contacts, both sides 
said at separate press con- 
ferences here yesterctey. 

Colonel Garang said the two 


sides were not yet on the same 
wavelength, and warned that 
the airport at Juba was not 
safe for auy air traffic. 


answer to a great many pray- 
«? by “all of os.” Asked 


He denied that his move- 
ment was intransigent about 
peace -efforts, and emphasized 
that it - was fighintg for a 
national democratic revolu- 
tion for. the whole country, not 
just the south. . 


wfaethw he was optimistic, the 
President said: “I am always 
optimistic. I still have faith in 
prayer. This is evidence of ft.” 

• Waite’s offer: Mr Waite 
said yesterday that be is 
"fifing to return to die Middle 
Past at any time to tty to 
negotiate freedom for. other 
Western hostages held in 
LdMnon (Clifford Lragfef 
writes). 


Geneva — Six days of talks 
on nuclear testing between 
American and Soviet experts 
will be followed by further 
meetings early next month, a 
US communique said. 


Politics ban 


k«os (AFP) - Nigeria’s 
military authorities have 
bannwl former civilian prest- 
dent Shehu Shagari and his 
deputy Alex Ekwncrae from 
seeking elective : -office • -Of 
participating in politics for 
me, an official statement said 
here. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


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Even though Sir Geoffrey 
Howe's “mission impossible” 
to South Africa has dominated 
the first months of Britain's 
presidency ofthcEEG Council 
of Ministers. British Common 
Market policy has made a 
modestly successful beginning 
in other areas, notably in 
quietly resolving the thorny 
EEC budget issua. 

But as EEC bureaucrats 
cleared their desks this week 
for the summer break and the 
organization's headquarters 
took on a deserted air, officials 
gave notice, that a full agenda 
of unresolved issues would be 
waiting for. British ministers 
when business- asumed^in.. 
September. ... 

In addition to South Africa, 
questions likely to produce a 
stormy final four months of 
the British presidency - the 
third time. Britain, has taken 
the. chair since it joined the 
Community in 1 973 — include 
European air feres, relations 
with Turkey, the continuing 
trade war with the US and 
headaches left over from, the 
temporary budget- solution 
achieved m July. . . 

“At this rate Mrs Thatcher 
and Sir Geoffrey could well be 
handing over the presidency 
to Belgium in December with 
some: relict” one European 
diplofnat commented as the 
szoxunmexodus began. 

-Briuiiifs attempts to reform 
the Common Agricultural Pol- 
icy have yet ■ to make an 
impact^ and foa ve Jliecar ag- 

Iratter mountairrtte^nnmer 

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From Richard Owen, Brassds 

cil in engineering agreement 
on the disputed 1986 budget 
early in July.. 

But the agreed budget uses 
upavailablG EEC cash and has 
exhausted all revenues de- 
rived from the 1.4 per cent 
ceiling on VAT contributions 
to EEC coffers. If pressures for 
further, farm spending con- 
tinue and the American dollar 
continues to -fall, the British - 
presidency win be faced with a 
breach of the 1.4 per emit 
ceifingj seriously endangering 
the principal of budget disci- 
pline so dear to the heart of Mr 
Nigel Lawson, the Chancellor 
of the Exchequer. 

Britain's hopes of using its 
presidency to create jobs and 
encourage enterprise has re- 
ceived a twin boost from the 
Commission, which in July 
endorsed calls for greater !* 
bour market flexibility and 
announced increased EEC aid 

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A commission survey has 
found that job sharing , sim- 
pler employment procedures . 
and flexible working hours 
would add up to 6-per cent tp 
the European labour force, 
thus reducing nnemploymenL 

Tbe Commission -has also 
put forward a plan for refiev- 




I'h:* 


fit the US-EEC trade war over 
pasta and citrus fruits to 
match the truce achieved early 
in July over. American m an e 
exports to Europe. 

- These and other US-EEC 
tensions seem bound to ; spill 
over to the new round of Gan 
(General Agreement on Tar- 
iffs and Trade) which opens in 
September in Uruguay, and 
which is already likely to be 
marred by disagreements aver 
farm subsidies. 

September also sees a spe- 
cial conference on the renewal 
of the EECs association agrees 
ment with Turkey, a move 
which is vehemently opposed 
fry .-Greece. 

As if foiswas not enough, 
Mr John Moore, the Tran* 
port Minister, will also have to 
deal with the consequences of 
the failure of EEC Transport 
Ministers to agree on lib- 
eralization of air fares and 
routes in Europe under the 
Dutch presidency in the first 
half of the year. 

“We can only hope British 
ministers will come back re- 
freshed from the beaches,” 
one -official remarked. But 
even at . the seaside there is no 
escape from the long arm of 
the EEC 

An EEC directive on mmi- 
mnm .standards for hathiTig 


ing small businesses of some . aT1 ^ 

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- British officials point to the 
achievement of Mr Peter 
Brooke, Minister of State at 
the Treasury and current 
President of the Budget Ccrnn- 


paperwork. 

But officials warn that la- 
bour * .market deregulation 
would take years to achieve, 
adding- that proposed aid to 
small firms of £20 million is' 
relatively modest and isin toy 
case Ukefyiobe cut because of 
excessive agricultural and re- 
gional spending. 

On the foreign front Mr 
Willy de Oercq, the Commis- 
sioner for External Affairs, has 
sought to spare Sir Geoffrey 
an additional headache by 
attempting to negotiate s truce 


: grave, the Environment Min- 
ister, claimed recently that 
About half of Britain's beaches 
would probably meet EEC. 
requirements in the next few 
years. Commission officials 
will be taking a dose look at 
those which remain polluted 
by EEC standards. 

Commission offi cials are 
not impressed by the House of 
Lords objections this week to 
an allegedly “fll-conceived” 
EEC -plan for reducing waste 
discharged into European war 
ters by halt 


Ceiling up Ortega promotes his cause 

in US after veto ‘victory’ 


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Venice rise 


President Ortega of Nica- 
ragua continued his tour of the 
United States yesterday to stir 
grassroots opposition to the 
Reagan policy of aiding the 
Gontra rebels. . . ... .. 

-The Americans tended 
Nicaragua a diplomatic -vic- 
tory by. vetoing a yN Security 
Council measure wind* would 
have forced US corapfiance 
with .the ruling by the inter- 
national. Court . of JUjStMte jan 
Jime 27 against forthCTassis- 
tance to the Contras. . 

: Although. Nicaragua man- 
aged to portray foe Americans 
as intransigent, the Sandinis- 
t as did not emerge from the 
debate unscathed. 




From Zoriana Pysariwsky, NewYork 

There avowed commitment 
to democratic phirnfism. dis- 
solved under, scrutiny and 
their bid to extract political 
advantage from the World 
Court decision was brought 
into question. 

With some exceptions, Ma- 
nagua was -able only to sum? 
moa - those commies with 
extreme anti-American view- 
points to. rise to its: deforce. 
Almost all membera rf . the 
Contadora group seeking to 
promote Central. -American 
detente were noticeably ab- 
sent. 

With Thailand and France, 
Britain — the only permanent 
member of the Security Coun- 


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Presidetrt Ortega and his wife, Rosario Murillo, waving ton 
crowd, hr Denver where he spoke in an old mission chapeL 


cil - to accept the Court’s 
compulsory jurisdiction — ab- 
stained during the vote, to 
give Nicaragua a relatively 
disappointing 11 votes in 
favour. • 

The British abstention wasa 
combination of wanting . to 
shield the US : and wishing to 
highlight tire Improp ri et y of 
.Nicaragua's returning to foe 
Council tp score propaganda 
points.' ■ 

Sir John Thomson, 'foe 
British repres e ntative, said 
foatitros a misrepresentation 
to define it simply as a dispute 
between the US and Nica- 
ragua as the Sandinista leader- 
ship had attempted to da 

He said that the antago- 
nisms m the reaioh were 
rooted- in its social and eco- 
nomic inequalities. But. he 
added, with anrallusaon to foie 
Soviet Union and Cuba, that 
the situation had been ex- 
ploited by outside countries 
which had little desire to “help 
restore genuine political stab- 
ility in foe troubled area”. - 

Throughout foe. three-day 
debate, Nicaragua and the US 
exchanged harah words, each 
accusing the other oflying and 
seeking dominance in foe 
region. 

Sector Ortega opened, the 
debate by- saying that the 
American decision to defy foe 
World. Court did not angur 
weft- for. the future of inter- 
national law. 

He was oqxcted to dwell on 
foe illegality of the American 
role as benefactor to the 
Contras during stops- in Den- 
ver and Chicago after touring 
New York with his message. 

This was Nicaragua's 12th 
complaint to the Council since 
1982. The contrast between 
tiie support it ted then, when 
Western countries rallied be- 
hind it at the expense of foe 
US, and the waning interest 
displayed by them during this 
week's debate, was striking. ' 

Conor Cruise O’Brien, page 6 


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20,000 protest 
; at Bolivia 
cocame raids 

La Paz (Reuter) - More 
than 20.000 Bolivian peasants 

9 f 1 7^United Sates troops in 
a drive to stamp out foe 
cocaine trade, say labour 
leaders. 

The peasants, who grow 
coca leaves, foe raw material 
for cocaine, converged on- the 
city of Cochabamba and filled 
the main square to hear 
speakers condemn what they 
branded “the US military 
intervention”. 

One labour leader urged the 
crowd to support a demand by 
left-wing unions to the Gov- 
ernment fpr foe expulsion of 
the troops. 

. The US soldiers, backed by 
six Black Hawk helicopters, 
are supporting a police sweep 
which has dismantled three 
cocaine, laboratories and 
brought trafficking ton stand- 
still the Ministry of foe 
Interior said. 


Britain and Guatemala 
friends after 24 years 


By Rodney Cowton 


Britain and Guatemala are 
to resume relations later tins 
month, 24 years after dip- 
lomatic relations were broken 
off by Guatemala because of 
its claims over Belize, which 
was then foe colony of British 
Honduras. 

President Vinitio Cerezo 
announced on Thursday at a 
press conference in Guate- 
mala City that foe two coun- 
tries would open consular 
offices on August IS. 

The Foreign and Common- 
wealth Office in London 
seems to have been taken by 
surprise by the specific date 
announced by President Ccr- 
ezo, but said: “As Ministers 
have made dear, we have 


There will be hopes in 
Britain that foe restoration of 
consular relations will pave 
the way for a resumption of 
full diplomatic relations. Brit- 
ish interests in Guatemala 
have been represented by 
Switzerland, and E3 Salvador 
has acted for Guatemala in 
Britain. 

There was no indication in 
President Cerezo’s announce- 
ment of whether it implied a 
change in Guatemala's po- 
sition over Belize. 

Britain takes foe position 
that Belize is an independent 
nation, and its relations with 
Guatemala are not a British 


. . _ concern. Nevertheless, Britain 

always been ready, to resume has a defence agreement with 
official relations with Guate- ° 


mala without preconditions.. 
We welcome President Cer- 
ezo's recent statement. We 
hope that his predicted time- 
table proves correct.’’ 


Belize, under which a small 
garrison is maintained there: 
Its presence Is usually re- 
garded as being a consequence 
of the tensions between Belize 
and Guatemala. 


Crowds scatter as plane crashes on city centre ;i 



Rush hour crowds la Mexico. ■ 
City scattered in panic ye** * 
today when a light plane ’ 
crashed into one of the main . 
thoroughfares, left, miracn- ' 
lously lofting no one but » 

injuring at least 28. ; 

Witnesses said the injured * 
mdnded all four people in the ; 
Cessna 310-2. drivers and . 
passengers of eight can*; 
wrecked by the fatting pbme^~ 
and several pedestrians. *£ 
Officials at the scene said^* 
the pilot appeared to have-* 
tried to land on Lizaro Carrie-’. * 
lias, a njain street, after his ; 
ensjne failed. “ 

Lunchtime passers-by pan-" 1 
icked as the plane crashed,- ■ 
scattering wredcage over a.*’ 
wide area. 

It bounced off several-'* 
parked cars, flattening four of 
them, before exploding in*-* 
flames. 

The plane was due to land at-* 
Mexico City's Benito Juarez" - 
International Airport a few-' 
miles east of the crash site’"'* 
after a flight from the Pacific-* 
resort of Puerto Vaftarta. > 
The central location of theC 
city's airport dose to the 
Justice Ministry and post 
office headquarters, has led to”- 
protests from airlines who say- ’ 
it is dangerous, but the - 
authorities have consistently : 
refused to move it. 


Gorbachov 
gets tough 
with local 
officials 

Moscow (Renter) — Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov, the So- 
viet leader, has delivered 
critical lecture to Communist 
Party officials, saying his pro- 
gramme of economic revital- 
ization amounts to a revolu- 
tion and will brook no 
hindrance: 

Mr Gorbachov, now back in 
Moscow, was shown on state 
television last night speaking 
earlier in the day in the 
industrial tity of Khabarovsk 
on toe last leg ofhis tour of the 
Soviet Far East 
The officials were shown 
taking copious notes as Mr 
Gorbachov criticized indu* 
trial and agricultural perfor- 
mance and the provision of 
social facilities in their region 
as well as the sometimes 
suffocating effect of Com- 
munist Party organization on 
local initiative. 

He said foe programme of 
economic and social peres- 
troika (re-organization), 
which he introduced on taking 
power last year, amounted to a 
revolution and his meet-the- 
people tour of the Far East ted 
proved that ordinary citizens 
backed it fully. 

Sortie people still walked 
along old fines while mouth- 
ing agreement with, foe new 
values. “They have dug them- 
selves down in the tqmdiesi 
We will leave them tone and 
go forward,” he said. 

Echoing themes from his 
speech this week in Vladi- 
vostok, where lie urged rapid 
development of the Far East, 
he said local fanners were 
taking ever bigger state sub- 
sidies instead of moving to- 
wards food self-sufficiency 
and industry was showing 
decreasing returns on capital 
investment 

Some factory managers 
thought consumers without 
choice would buy any old 
goods but such bones, turning 
out shoddy products year after 
year, should lose their jobs, he 
said. 

He also said he had no 
respect for officials, though 
competent in other areas, who 
neglected social needs such as 
housing. Services in the Far 
East were two to three times 
poorer than in the country as a 
whole and this caused the 
region's main problem — lack 
of stable population, he said. 

Mr Gorbachov said his visit 
had convinced him of the 
importance of local auton- 
omy, measures to introduce 
which were announced by the 
Government this week. 

Some of the responsibilities 
of Gosplan. the stale planning 
committee, would be trans- 
ferred to the regions and 
factory councils would be set 
up to work alongside party 
and trade union committees, 
he said. 


Craxi for: 
solve Roi 


is government to 
le political crisis 


Rome (Reuter) — Signor 
Bettino Craxi the Socialist- 
leader, formally accepted a 
mandate yesterday to form 
Italy’s 45fo postwar govern- 
ment, ending a crisis which 
lasted more than a month. 

SignofCraxi presented a list 
of new ministers to President 
Cossiga that showed eight 
changes to foe five-party 
administ ration, also led by 
him, which resigned on June 
27 after inline for a postwar 
record of nearly three years. 

The new Cabinet, which 
indudes five new ministers, 
was bring sworn in yesterday. 

Signor Craxi said after 
meeting President Cossiga 
that the new administration 
was “a good government” 
which he hoped would win foe 


confidence of both houses of 
Parliament within foe next 
few days and recommence its 
work. 

The root cause of the crisis 
was a bitter dispute between 
the Socialists and the domi- 
nant Christian Democrats 
over the leadership. The Lib- 
erals, Republicans and Soda! 
Democrats make up the rest of 
the coalition. 

The agreement reached ye* 
terday ensures Signor CraxTs 
place at the helm until March 
1987, when he will return to 
ftiD-tune r unning of foe 
Socialist Party. A Christian 
Democrat candidate will then 
take over the premiership 
until foe end of foe legislature 
in June 1988. 

The resolution of the crisis 


The fan Cabinet: Premier 
Bettino Craxi (SocX Deputy 
Premier Arnaldo Foiiani (CD), 
Foreign GiuJio Andreotti (CD), 
Defence Giovanni Spadolini 
Interim- Oscar Luigi 
(CDX Justice VirgiHo 
Rognoni (CDX Finance Bruno 
Visentini (Rep). Treasury Gio- 
vanni Goria (CD), Regional 
Affairs Carlo Vrezini (Soc 
DemX Public Administration 
Remo Gaspari (CDX Relatione 
with Parlia ment Oscar Mam mi 
(Rep), CStO Defence Giuseppe 
Zamberietti (CDX kthtiom 
with Common Market Fjabbio 
Fabbri (SocX Extraordinary Aid 
to the South Sahnerino De Vito 
(CDX Scientific Research Luigi 


(CDX Budget Pier 
nxta (Soc DmnX Edu- 


Granelli 
Luigi Roimta . 
catkin Franca Falcucci (CDX 
Public Works Franco Nicolard 
(Soc DemX Agriculture Filippo 
Maria Pandolfi (CDX Transport 
Claudio* SignonJe (SocX Post 

and Tri ewmimmira twins Anto- 
nio Gava (CDX Indnstry 
Valerio Zanone (Lib), Labour 
Gianni De Michelis (SocX For- 
eign Trade Salvatore Formica 
(SocX Merchant Marine Co* 
(ante Degan (QDX State In- 
dustry Cldio Darida (CDX ' 
Health Carlo Donai-Cattin 
(CDX Toqrism Nicola Gapria 
(SocX Cnltqre Anionmo GuL 
lotti (CD). E n v i ronment Fra- 
ncesco De Lorenzo (LibX 


was further delayed this week 
by wrangling between the five 
parties over changes to foe 
Cabinet list 

Sources said Signor Craxi 
wanted substantial changes to 
strengthen the Government 
for the remainder ofhis term, 
while the Christian Demo- 
cats would have preferred to 
reap the political benefits of a 
reshuffle when their candidate 
took over. 

But Signor Cfriaco de Mita, 
the Christian Democrat lead- 
er, said it ted been foe most 
difficult crisis of foe Republic 
and one Thai the Italian public 
ted failed to comprehend. 

Asked who were the win- 
ners, and who foe losers in the 
agreement he said: “We are 
all beaten. It is the political 
system that has lost out” 

Political sources said foe 
government programme for 
foe remaining 20 months of 
the legislature was much foe 
same as that pursued by 
Signor Craxi’s first admin- 
istration. 

Bui the document includes 
important proposals for the 
abolition ‘ of secret par- 
liamentary votes on expen- 
diture laws. Signor Craxi was 
forced to resign on June 27 
when his Government lost a 
secret ballot on a finance Bill 
minutes after winning an open 
confidence vote. 


Solidarity 
prisoners 
defiant S 

Front Roger Boyes 

Warsaw », 

Solidarity activists, trickling’ . 
out of jail under a Polish Gov- ‘ 
emmeni amnesty, are re-foig-'. 
ing links with union col- * 
leagues rather than uncorking^ 
champagne. ~ 1 

Mr Bogdan Lis. one of. 
about 50 political prisoners - f 
who have already bom freed/* 
made swift contact with Mr 
Lech Walesa, chairman of the K 
banned trade union. Mr Us, * * 
former leader of foe Gdansk. 
underground opposition, was . 
jailed for discussing protest!! 
strikes against food price rises. ! 

The terms of the amnesty 1 . 1 
free most middle ranking Sol-" 
idarity organizers charged un- -1 * 
der broad “anti-state" clauses 
in article 282 of the penal* 
code. But those charged with 
trying to overthrow the state!' - 
by force — including Mn>" 
Zbigniew Bujak, the Warsaw • 
Solidarity chief — are excluded*- - . 
from the amnesty. 

Mr Walesa, Mr Lis and foe- 
steady flow of released pre- 
miers must now try to. cal- 
culate the Government’s nextl 
moves. The police were parti- 1 , 
cuiariy vigilant after the last 
major amnesty in 1984, seek- 
ing to block any opposition/- 
Now, many dissidents believe^-.- 
there will be a major trial a* 
final legal reckoning with- 
those still in jafl. 


Germans 
lose will 
to work 

From Our Correspondent 
Boon 

One of the abiding myths 
about Germans is that they 
live to work. Those who know 
than, however, say the old 
Prussian virtue of Floss (hard 
workX went out the window 
some years ago. 

The modern West German, 
at least, takes his Freizeit 
(leisure) seriously. Weekends 
often begin at 3pm on Fridays, 
Mondays are favourite “quic- 
kie sidde” days, and holidays 
(six weeks a year) have long 
been a fetish with Germans. 

The West German weekly 
newspaper. Die Zeit. yester- 
day confirmed foe sittetion by 
publishing a table of hours 
worked per year in 10 coun- 
tries around the world. The 
Japanese, predictably, came 
out top for Fleiss. The West 
Germans were last. 

The Japanese worked an av- 
erage of 2,166 hours, Switz- 
erland 1,936, US 1,912, 
Greece 1,864, Spain 1,808, 
Sweden 1,800, Britain 1,778, 
Italy 1,776, France ■ 1,763, 
West Germany 1,708. 

Die Zeit said: “The Ger- 
mans are allowing themselve a 
l uxury of a special kind.” 


Dying judge defies his 
colleagues’ censure 

From Stephen Taylor, Sydney 

Mr Justice Lionel Morphy Although constitutio n ally 

he was entitled to take up his 
seat again then, he delayed his 
return after Sir Harry and 
other judges were said to have 
objected, and die parlia- 
mentary inquiry was instituted 
to examine further his 
conduct. 

Mr Justice Murphy said 
yesterday the commission had 
notified him of a number of 
allegations, which were “ei- 
ther untrue or do not constitute 
misbehaviour”. 

He added: “My medical 
advice is that I have an 
advanced state of cancer — 
that there is no care and no 
treatment I am able to resume 
sitting oo the court.” 

Senator Gareth Evans, 
speaking for the Government 
said the decision by the judge, 
a formes- Labor cabinet min- 
ister, was “perfectly under- 
standable, and for him alone to 
make". 

The Government would seek 
the approval of the other two 
parliamentary parties to have 
the inquiry terminated, and 
had decided to make “a 
substantial payment" to help 
Mr Justice Murphy defray the 
legal costs he has incurred in 
the past two years. 


defied fellow judges yesterday 
and took his place ou the 
AnstraEan High Court bench 
after- announcing that he was 
dying of cancer. 

The judge has been the 
subject of police and par- 
liamentary investigations for 
more than two years. 

In a day as extraordinary as 
any in the entire saga, Mr 
Mwpby said be had been told 
he did not have long to live and 
wanted to perform his judicial 
duties while he could. 

He was supported by the 
Government, which intends to 
terminate a parliamentary 
commission of inquiry into his 
conduct, and Mr Bob Hawke, 
the Prime Minister, who said 
his action was “entirely 
appropriate”. 

But Sir Harry Gibb, the 
Chief Justice, said it was 
“most undesirable” that Mr 
Justice Murphy had elected to 
rejoin him and five other 
Judges on the High Court 
bench while a number of 
allegations remained unre- 
solved. 

The judge, convicted last 
year of attempting to pervert 
the coarse of justice, was 
acquitted at a retrial in April 


Kohl plea ■ 
for Hess ; 
to be freed 7 

Bonn (Reuter) — Chancellor- 
Kohl of West Germany has; 
written to the leaders of the 
US, France, Britain and ther; 
Soviet Union appealing for' 
the release of Hitler’s former’ 
deputy, Rudolf Hess. * 

The letter, sent on July 21 " 
said Hess, now aged over 92*. 
was recently taken to the* 
British Military hospital in 
Berlin-Spandau for health rca-' 
sons. “For this reason, L 
urgently appeal to you merd- 
fiilly to release the prisoner 
into foe bosom ofhis family." 

Hess, who has spent nearly 
four decades in Berlin's Span-, 
dau prison, was taken to' 
hospital on July 8 to be treated* 
for circulation problems. He 
was returned to foe jafl, where’ 
he is the only prisoner, shr 
days later. 

Herr Kohl said Hess was an' 
old and sick man whose fife 
was near an end. 

In view of this, and foe feet 
that his sentence had long, 
outlasted any reasonable puiK 
ishment requirement, “he' 
should no longer be refused a. 
pardon on humanitarian' 
grounds. 


1 

S 


Quakes show cracks in the California lifestyle 


From Ivor Davis 

Los Angeles 

When a Lo$ Angeles tele- 
vision station recently offered 
its viewers a free Earthquake 
Survival Guide, it thought the 
response was good. Some 
50,000 booklets went out in 
pine months. 

Last month alone, however, 
the station dispatched 15,000 
more, and it is sending out 
additional booklets at the rate 
of 250 a day. 

What happened in the in- 
terim was. a series of jotting 
earthquakes, more frequent 
than California has ever 
experienced, bringing in then- 
wake more than . 100 after- 
shocks. 

Aft the shaking has turned 
the state’s 25 munca popula- 
tion, normally quite sangpfoe 
when it comes to earthqimkes, 
into a jittery mass which 
jumps at every some boom, 
stops in its tracks every time a 
neighbour's dog howls and 
stockpiles food, water and 


medical supplies as if anticipa- 
ting a gtobd conflagration. 

Fife in Calif ornia has al- 
ways been lived on the edge. 
As we sit by our swimming 
pools, shaded by our palm 
trees, cooled by foe gentle 
breezes from the Pacific, while 
the rest of the coantry swelters 
in a drought, we understand 
deep mom Puritan hearts that 
one day we will have to pay the 
price for paradise. 

That day, some of the 
experts now tell ns, couId be 
coming sooner than we think. 

The latest duster of earth- 
quakes began on July 8, when 
a jolt registering six on the 
Richter scale hit the desert 
resort town of Palm Springs. 

Within days it was followed 
fry one measuring 53 centred 
in the Pacific off the beach 
community of Oceanside. . 

That in tern was followed by 
a series of tremors in the 
mountainous area near Bi- 
shop, culminating in one of 6-1 


PPACIFICb 




iOcsaiu 


w8m 


Palm 

Springs 


“■□Centro 


centred in the Chalfont valley. 

Damage was. moderate ami 
injuries mostly minor. None of 
foe tremors, however, occurred 
on foe notorious San Andreas 
Fault line, which runs through 
California from north of San 
Francisco almost to the US- 
Mexican border town of El 
Centro. 

The entire state is cris* 
crossed bya crazy quilt of fault 
lines, but it is the San 
Andreas, the experts predict, 
which will send us “the 
one”, wreaking the land 


havoc visited on Mexico City 
last autumn. 

What seems to be disturbing 
tiie population here even more 
than the prospect of the earth 
beneath their feet going into 
spasms is the gradually dawn- 
ing knowledge that the so- 
called experts do not seem to 
know any more about predict- 
ing earthquakes than foe peo- 
ple to whom they are 
preaching. 

Do these tremors portend 
another, more massive up- 
heaval? Maybe, say the 
experts. 

If so, where will H strike? 
Perhaps in foe Sierras, maybe 
on the coast, maybe, who 
knows? 

Does the duster of earth- 
quakes mean that the stress 
that has been bnflding np on 
the San Andreas Fault line is 
being relieved and wfll fore- 
stall the coming of the mam- 
moth earthquake the Cassao- 
dras are predicting? Not 
likdy, say the scientists. 


Are the recent quakes even- 
related? On this point, amaz-'. 
ingiy. flying in the fare of* 
common sense, all the experts^ 
are; 


“No one has ever been able, 
to show that there is aj 
significant correlation between.' 
them," says Lucille Jones, rf; 
Phsadena geologist “Every, 
time someone sets out to try frrf 
find some correlation the stud- 
ies have shown that the earth- 1 
quake process is random.” ~ 

Conrad, the Los Aagdet. 
Times’s Pulitzer Prize-winning , 
cartoonist, was simply reflect-?: 
ing foe public mood when he* 
drew foe map of the entire? 
state of California faffing intod 
tiny fragments, info thee 
geologists* comments eograv-^ 
ed beneath it. 

The truth seems to be foat,- 
apart from inviting us to bd; 
prepared, the seismologist* 
can agree only that the lug one' 

is coming sometime within the 7 
next 30 to 50 years. • 


i 




m 




SPORTING 

DIARY 


Simon Barnes 

Liquid 

assets 

The chill grey water of the Solent 
will soon be bottled - to the profit 
of an Australian entrepreneur. U 
could make a second fortune for 
Cary Normal — that really is his 
name — from bottled seawater. 
He is currently marketing 
America's Cup water 250 mg 
bottles oFthe stuff from the sea on* 
Fremantle, where the cup will be 
sailed for later this year. You 
might think that such a notion 
would work only with senti- 
mental. gimmick-loving Ameri- 
cans, but hardbitten Australians 
are queuing up to spend slightly 
more than £4 a time For their 
bottled sea. 

On a recent trip to England, 
however. Normal met David Ev- 
ans. a member of the British 
America's Cup syndicate. Evans 
suggested diversification: why not, 
he said, bottle the waters where 
the first America’s Cup races were 
held: the special gul-chuming stuff 
from around the Isle of Wight? 
Normal was struck by the logic of 
this: he returns to England soon to 
begin his project of bottling Solent 
water. The Australians. I 3m sure, 
will lap it up. 

Red run 

What do members of the Revolu- 
tionary' Communist Parly do in 
the moments they can spare from 
changing the face of civilization as 
we know it? Well, the party has 
been running a summer school all 
this week at University College, 
London. Those attending have 
been improving their leisure hours 
by watching the racing on tele- 
vision — from Goodwood, the 
snootiest meeting of the year. In 
the admittedly rather unlikely 
event of these people being readers 
of this column, they will pre- 
viously have been in on the 
winner 1 tipped last Saturday in 
the Diamonds at Ascot 

Soft answer 

Further to my report last week on 
the mixed-sea softball boom, I 
have received a tragic letter from 
the softballers of Clyde Park in 
London. After eight seasons, they 
have lost the right to play there. 
They say please can they start 
again, and they are really very 
sorry about the poor park-keeper. 
They really didn't mean him to get 
clanked by the ball. 

Teed off 

Quote of the week: “American 
football? It's a sick game, that's alL 
Big guys trying to beat the crap out 
of each other." From the top 
American footballer. Jim Mc- 
Mahon. quarterback of the Chi- 
cago Bears, who play the Dallas 
Cowboys at Wembley tomorrow. 
McMahon added: "If I could play 
golf just as well. I'd do it for a liv- 
ing. It's no fiin waking up on 
Monday morning and you can't 
get out of bed. Golfers don't have 
that problem." 


BARRY FANTON1 



‘I hear the next games are to 
be sponsored by Beechara's' 


Head-burners 

As the utterly underwhelming 
Commonwealth Games move to- 
wards their timely end. I feel the 
award for doggedness in the face of 
the impossible must go to the 
people who play bowls. One 
match between Australia and New 
Zealand went on for four hours 
and IS minutes, ending at 
10.15 pm with the players illu- 
minating the game with cigarette 
lighters. 

It’s a start 

English dubs may be banned from 
European football, but Matlock 
Town of the Multipart League is 
spear-heading the way back. This 
week, the Spanish first division 
club Seville went to Matlock and 
won 1-0. Seville had been looking 
for an extra match on their pre- 
season lour, and Matlock had 
been recommended to them. The 
titanic battle was witnessed by 
nearly 300 people. 

Rhyme time 

Readers may recall the limerick 
competition fought across this 
.space in the spring. Both the 
quality and quantity of the entries 
were so high that there is now 
every chance that a book will 
come of i: all. The proceeds will go 
io famine relief; all likely contrib- 
utors will be formally approached 
in due course. Inevitably, a very 
large number of the limericks 1 
received were about cricket. In an 
effort to widen the scope a little I 
am accordingly soliciting further 
examples of sporting but non- 
crickcting limericks. The ones I . 
like best will be printed here and 
rewarded with The Times fiver, all i 
will be considered for the book. ] 


War of two faiths in Nicaragua 



G od is central to the 
current public debate 
in Nicaragua, and both 
sides constantly invoke 
His name. On all the 
main roads, near the larger centres 
of population there are huge 
printed posters reading simply: 
PARA NOSOTROS NO HAY 
MAS QUE UN SOLO DIOS 
1 Cor, 8:6. 

(" There is for us only one God.”) 
But someone has been going 
round adding to each poster the 
words: 

EL DIOS DE LOS POBRES!! 
The "one single God”, without 
further qualification, is the God of 
the Nicaraguan Roman Catholic 
hierarchy, led by Cardinal Miguel 
Obando y Brava Archbishop of 
Managua. And this is also the God 
of Nicaragua's middle-class oppo- 
sition. all of which — including 
Protestant oppositionists — looks 
to the cardinal as its political 
leader. The posters are assumed to 
be funded by the cardinal's North 
American friends. 

"The God of the poor" is the 
God of the governing Frente 
National Sandinista^ of the three 
(formerly four) Catholic priests 
who are members of the govern- 
ment in defiance of the hierarchy 
and of the Pope; and of the many 
Catholic (and some Protestant) 
clergy and lay people, Nicaraguan 
and non-Nicaraguan, who have 
worked among the Nicaraguan 
poor and who see the Sandinista 
government as generally promot- 
ing the interests of the poor. 

O n the first Sunday of 
our stay in Nicaragua, 
my wife and I went to 
the little Church of San 
Domingo de las 
Sierritas. near Managua, to hear 
the cardinal say mass and preach. 
San Domingo is a pretty little 
church, high and cool. It lies in a 
relatively affluent area, and the 
congregation was a middle-class 
one. 

There were also several tele- 
vision crews: the cardinal is 
always news. We followed the 
crews into the sacristy, where he 
was being filmed christening a 
baby. International publicity is 
pan of his armoury in his struggle 
against the Sandinisias and their 
allies. 

After the christening we all went 
back into the church. By mistake, 
my wife and 1 took the places 
intended for the baby's parents. 
Nobody even murmured. Nica- 
raguans are an unusually gentle 
people, in most contexts. 

The cardinal is something of an 
exception. Even when saying mass 
he seemed that morning to be 
spoiling for a fight As he put on 
his vestments. I thought he looked 
like a boxer getting ready for (he 
ring. He is a small, powerfully 
built man. running to feu has 
markedly Indian features, bullet 
head, thick neck, heavy jaw. His 
most marked expressive 
characteristic is that the corners of 
his mouth turn sharply down. 

The cardinal read out in a 
strong, dear voice, a letter of the 
Nicaraguan episcopate on "The 
Eucharist. Source of Unity of 
Inspiration”. It was a well-written 
statement, in high Castilian style, 
with classical overtones. "They 
blame the church for silence, while 
they silence it — ” 

It contained a long passage, 
which the cardinal read out with 
especial resonance, attacking what 
he and his followers call “the 
popular church" (iglesia popular), 
meaning those who regard them- 
selves as followers of el Dios de los 
pobres (who retort with the phrase 
iglesta institutional, applied to the 
cardinal and his supporters). 

There was another passage, read 
with no special emphasis, which 
may be oF more significance in the 
evolving struggle between Church 
and State in Nicaragua. The key 
sentence read: 

“We judge that any form of aid. 
whatever its source, which may 
lead to destruction, pain and death 
for our families or to hatred and 
division between our peoples is to 
be condemned." 

Press censorship did not allow 
that episcopal letter (or several 
others before it) to appear in the 
newspapers. But it was readily 
available from diocesan press 
offices in Nicaragua, and became 
the subject of delighted comment 
in the April issue of Envfo, a 
monthly review published by the 
Institute Historico Centro - 
americano in Managua. 

It reflects the views of an 
influential group of Catholic 
intellectuals (priests and lay peo- 
ple) who are. as they say. in 
Managua, "with the process". Tire 
process in question is the revolu- 
tionary process, especially in its 
social aspects. The review singles 
out (hat passage, underlining pans 
of it, calling it a historic step (paso 
historico ) and claiming that it 
means “the condemnation of the 
military aid of Ronald Reagan's 


administration 
revolution”. 

Certainly it comes a lot nearer 
to meaning just that than, anything 
the Nicaraguan bishops had ever 
said before; and it even seems an 
implicit condemnation of the 
position the cardinal himself less 
than a year before. 

It doesn't seem an unreasonable 
inference that a section, perhaps a 
majority, of the Nicaraguan 
hierarchy is becoming refractory 
against the cardinal’s leadership, 
in relation to the civil war. As 
regards the iglesia popular, he still 
calls the tune, but no longer on the 
Contras, it would seem. 

Some of the bishops, especially 
from the northern and eastern 
dioceses where they know most 
about Contras at first hand, are 
believed to have had misgivings 
about the cardinal's lead on this 
matter for some time, on moral 
and humanitarian grounds. Oth- 
ers, more politically minded, may 
well feel that the cardinal's line 
simply doesn't make sense today, 
in terms of the church's interests. 

The Contras have never looked 
as if they could overthrow the 
Sandinistas, and they look even 
less like it now than they did in 
1983-1984 (which was their peak). 
To call on the Sandinistas, as the 
cardinal has regularly done, to 
negotiate with the Contras is to 
rail for what is not going to 
happen. Nobody who knows any- 
thing about the Sandinisias be- 
lieves that they would negotiate 
with the Contras even if Managua 
were about to fall, which it is not 
If it ever does fall, it will be to the 
invading armed forces of the 
United States. 

It rather looks, as if prudent 
churchmen may currently be a 
rising force in the Nicaraguan 
episcopate, and that they may be 
beginning to rein in their impetu- 
ous primate. If all that is so. it is 
not surprising if the cardinal 
looked a bit grim at mass that 
April morning in San Domingo de 
la Sierritas. 

The Pope’s visit to Nicaragua in 
1983 is perhaps the most im- 
portant and certainly the most 
dramatic, episode in the great 
struggle between the institutional 
un solo Dios and el Dios de los 
pobres in Latin America in the late 
twentieth century. Both sides had 
looked to the Pope for a blessing, 
legitimizing its interpretation of 
the church's teaching. 

The Pope’s concept of his own 
authority is simply not compatible 
with the versions of liberation 
theology, and of el Dios de los 
pobres. which are fervently em- 
braced by those Catholics who in 
Nicaragua are “with the process”. 
On the other hand, it was natural 
for a Pope bent on restoring 
authority within the church to 
come to the support of an arch- 
bishop whose authority was being 
challenged and subverted. What 
was being challenged and sub- 
verted was not just the authority 
of Miguel Obando y Bravo but the 
very concept of the hierarchy, the 
whole structure of which the Pope 
himself is the apex. 

So this formidable Pope, In 
taking on Sandinista Nicaragua, 
was taking on an adversary no less 
formidable than himselft an ad- 
versary representing forces that 
may possibly defeat the entire 
purpose of his pontificate and 
leave papal authority in ruins 
throughout Latin America before 
the end of the millennium. 

C ertainly the radical cur- 
rents in the church set in 
motion by Vatican II 
contributed to the Nica- 
raguan process. And the 
result of the process was some- 
thing unique in history: a revolu- 
tionary government including 
four Catholic priests, with wide- 
spread Catholic support, and re- 
garded by a significant section of 
the Catholic Church as an earthly 
manifestation of the will of the 
God of the Poor. For these 
believers, the process is to cul- 
minate in el Reino de Dios : the 
Kingdom of God 
Among Sandinisias in Nica- 
ragua. those words “the Kingdom 
of God” crop up in speech and in 
print with a frequency disquieting 
to the secular visitor; and to some 
religious visitors as well. What is 
most striking is the casual way in 
which the words are used. People 
refer to the coming Kingdom of 
God as if they were waiting for a 
bus. 

I think it was that casual ness 
that first brought home to me how 
serious these people are. You can 
actually feel around you some- 
thing going on that you know can’t 
be switched off. either from Wash- 
ington or from Rome: that most 
intractable thing, a new kind of 
faith. 

In Poland. Faith and Fatherland 
have been aligned for centuries, 
and still are. In Latin America, 
they have not been up to now, but 
in Sandinismo they are. That is 
the profound originality of 


Conor Cruise O’Brien finds that 
the Pope (and Ronald Reagan) 
are confronted by the power 
of a faith born of nationalism 
and ‘the God of the Poor’ 


Sandinismo , and the source of 
much of its power. 

Nobody knows better than John 
Paul II the power that lies in the 
conjuncture of Faith and Father- 
land. All the more reason there- 
fore to view with alarm the form 
that the conjuncture has taken in 
Managua. For the Sandinistas, 
unlike the Poles, have not been 
content to take their faith on trust 
from Rome, but have been issuing 
their own interpretations through 
their own trusted theologians, 
much as happened in ..the. 
Reformation lands , in' the 16th 
century. And just: as Martin 
Luther found Jus princes, so the 
liberation theologians of Latin 
America have found theirs — in 
the nine comandames of the 
Frente Sandinista de Liberadbn • 
National. No doubt other princes 
are to come in other pans of Latin 
America. 

I n Managua last April, in the 
house of a woman whom I 
shall call Victoria, my wife 
and I watched a video of the 
Pope’s visit, just as it had 
been broadcast live on Nicaraguan 
television. Victoria is a practising 
Catholic and is also “with the 
process’*. The Pope’s visit had 
been a distressing experience for 
her and for many others. She can't 
have enjoyed the replay; but she 
wanted us to see how it had been. 
Victoria is a a kind of leader of one 
of the comunidades de base (basic 
Christian communities) in one of 
the poor barrios of Managua. The 
comunidades were set up in an 
effort to remedy the shortage of 
parish clergy. Most of them appear 
to have become vehicles of libera- 
tion theology, and they are gen- 
erally regarded with suspicion by 
conservatives in the church. 

The comunidades were anxious 
to play their foil pan in the great 
event of the Pope’s visit. 
Victoria's spent weeks preparing a 
big banner which they carried out 
to Sandino Airport on the big day, 
March 4, 1983. 

The video begins.The nine 
commandantes de la revolution 
are all there. Victoria’s banner is 
there: BIEVENIDO JUAN 
PABLO EN LA TIERRA DE 
SANDINO. 

The Pope is welcomed on behalf 
of the three senior comandames 
by Daniel Ortega, co-ordinator of 
the National Directorate (later 
elected president). With his spec- 
tacles and his mane of brown hair 
waving in the breeze, he seems like 
a young, progressive headmaster 
anxious to make an impression.' 

I quote from my rough notes, 
made as I watched: 

"You are being received by a 
heroic people . . . 50,000 
dead . . . social and moral 
changes”. 

Pope looks as if he had tooth- 
ache; holding jaw with left hand: 
"American threat . . . Wor- 
thy riposte to intervention 
Norte-americana ..." 

Pope’s bead bowed more and 
more on hand. 

Onega talks of Christians 
"basing themselves on- faith 
corresponding to the 
revolution”. 

Pope back to holding jaw. 

After Daniel Onega's very long 
discourse the government has to 
be greeted: the first really tricky 
bit since it includes those four 


priests. The Pope is meant to pass 
along, acknowledging the 
government's collective existence 
by some kind of comprehensive 
salutation. 

But the Minister for Culture. 
Father Ernesto Cardenal. a frail 
person with long white hair and a 
white beard, takes off his black 
beret and kneels before the Pope 
for a blessing. And the Pope, 
instead ofblessing, wags a finger of 
admonition, saying sternly: “You 
must regularize (arreglar) your 
situation with the Vatican.” - - 

“Ernesto cried,” says Victoria, 
“and everybody dime oyer to 
comfort him.” 

Ernesto Cardenal is something 
more important, in the eyes of 
many. Nicaraguans, than either a 
minister or even a . priest He is a 
poet: one of the two most distin- 
guished living Nicaraguan poets, 
in a land where poets are esteemed 
to an extent I think, unknown in 
any other pan of the modem 
world. 

When the Pope snubbed 
Ernesto, many Nicaraguans — all 
those "with the process” . and 
probably quite a few others as 
well — felt themselves snubbed. 
Ernesto himself, though hurt did 
not take the snub so heavily, or 
lose his sense of humour. He tells 
of how stricken his mother was. "I 
thought he would treat you like a 
father,” she said. 

“But he did treat me like a 
lather,” said Ernesto. "He just 
didn't treat me like a mother." 

Victoria, like others we met, was 
puzzled, as well as distressed, by 
the Pope's rebuke. It seemed 
disproportionate, gratuitous, 
petty, a needless piece of humili- 
ation. Thai is pretty much how I 
saw it myself when I saw it on 
video. 

But later, after I had looked 
more closely at what is at stakain 
Nicaragua, I felt rather differently 
about it The Sandinista fusion of 
religion and politics — not only 
religion and Marxism, but also 
religion and nationalism, which is 
much more dangerous — puts at 
risk, throughout the vast spiritual 
battleground of Latin America, 
the Pope's mission to restore the 
Magisterium. the teaching author- 
ity of the papacy. Ernesto is a 
committed ana enthusiastic agent 
of the Sandinista fusion. 

So when Ernesto knelt before 
the Pope, the Pope bad to see. not 
just an estimable if misguided 
human being, but ah insidious, 
incarnate threat to the Universal 
Church, and to the Pope's own 
mission. And not just a threat but 
a trap as welL If the Pope gave 
Ernesto the blessing Ernesto was 
asking — guilelessly as it seemed, 
but perhaps with some guile in the 
background somewhere — would 
the Pope not be seen as blessing 
the Sandinista Fusion itself? And if 
so. would he not be conniving at 
the sabotage of his own great 
mission, and of .the. church en- 
trusted to him? 

. .Thinking over that scene now, 
in terms of the forces represented 
by the protagonists, it is not 
Ernesto I am sorry for. It. is the 
Pope. 

The reason for this is that 
Ernesto and his friends are en- 
gaged among living realities — the 
cause of the poor, the defence of 
Nicaragua — whereas the Pope 
has dedicated his life to the 
resuscitation of an extinct abstrac- 


In Poland, Faith and Father- 
land have been aligned for 
centuries. In Latin America they 
have not been, up to now, 
but in Sandinismo they are 


tion, the Magisterium, the teach- 
ing authority of the church, of 
which the supreme exponent is the 
Pope. . 

Some people think that the 
Pope is succeeding in bringing 
back this authority, that is the 
meaning of the phrase “the Catho- 
lic restoration” used by some 
commentators. It is true that this 
Pope is far more popular than any 
Pope has been before. But 
popularity is not to be confused 
with authority. Catholics love this 
Pope, but when he solemnly tells 
them that they must behave in 
k some way that they don't find 
convenient, they just don't take a 
- blind bit of notice of him. 

John Paul II brought the weight 
of the Magisterium to bear against 
the Liberation theologians, but the 
thing didn't work. The spring 
seems to be broken. He is getting to 
look more and more like an 
international Canute, magisteri- 
ally perambulating all the strands 
of the world, before huge and 
admiring audiences, without the 
slightest effect on the tides. 

Now all this has an important 
bearing on the prospects for 
Sandinismo . and also on the 
prospects for efforts to contain or 
extirpate it - 

Sandinismo is apparently re- 
garded in Washington as an 
essentially alien ideology, cun- 
ningly decked out in some kind of 
Latin American fancy-dress. I 
don't know whether they really 
believe these things in Wash- 
ington, or whether they only 
pretend to believe them, but if 
they do believe this one. they are 
in fundamental error, and headed 
for more unnecessary trouble. 

Sandinismo is a thoroughly 
Latin American ideology,- with 
deep roots in' Latin American 
history, and specifically in the. 
. history of Nicaragua. Far from 
being an alien phenomenon in 
Nicaragua, it is a native response 
to alien domination: that of the 
■ United States. Perhaps that is the 
basic reason why Sandinismo. 
viewed from Washington, looks so 
alien. 

T think it would now be more 
accurate to speak of Sandinismo 
as a faith rather than an ideology. 
It is the most formidable kind of 
faith, the kind that is emotionally 
fused with national pride. And 
this kind of faith is now alight in 
every corner of Latin America. 

It is true that it is not the only 
kind of faith around. Latin Amer- 
ica is now a melting-pot where 
faith is concerned. The traditional 
Catholic Church is collapsing, not 
just on one side but on two. On 
one side are the Christian revolu- 
tionaries. enlarging that espacio of 
theirs, appropriating the symbols, 
and so on. On the other, lots of 
Catholics have been defecting to 
the Protestant fundamentalist 
sects. The Latin American bish- 
ops, in their -reply to the Pope’s 
Instruction, sought to ascribe the 
inroads of the fundamentalists to 
the activities of the CIA. I think 
the bishops overestimate the CIA. 
It looks as if there are a lot of 
people who are attracted neither to 
the old kind of Catholicism nor 
the new one, and who are looking 
for a different kind of faith; more 
individuaL more quietisL 

But it is the new Catholicism 
that has the political dynamic, the 
capacity for revolutionary social 
transformation, and the capacity 
to fuse with national pride — as in 
earlier times millennialist Puritan- 
ism did. first in England and then 
in North America. 

I s it necessary for the United 
States to take on the new 
Faith, by storming Ma- 
nagua, the new Geneva? 
There are three arguments 
by which it is alleged to be 
necessary to proceed in this way. 

The first is that the new faith is 
not really a frith at all, but a 
disguise under which the Soviet 
power advances; the second, that 
even if the new frith is native to 
Latin America, It is basically 
hostile to the US; and the third 
that the new frith is intrinsically 
oppressive and totalitarian. 

One of Sandinismo's essential 
characteristics is the restoration of 
national pride. People who are as 
fiercely and proudly nationalist as 
the Sandinistas are, are not about 
to hand their country over to a 
new master once they have got rid 
of the old one. Or rather, they are 
not about to do that voluntarily. 
They couM be pushed into it if 
they felt it was the only alternative 
to surrendering to the power of the 
United States. 

® ut Cuban precedent is 
mere. The more "successful” 
Rcsgan s pressure on Nicsmgim is, 
the more Nicaragua is likely to be 
forced in that direction. If Soviet 
power does indeed come to extend 
into Central America, it will be bv 
courtesy of Ronald Reagan. 

There is more substance in the 
second point Latin American 
nationalism. including 
Sandinismo. is anti-American; or 


anti-iVor/A-Am erican . as they say, 
being Americans themselves. The 
movement’s hero Sandino himself 
was fiercely anti-US — as well he 
might be. fighting the US Marines 
in his own country. 

There is, I think, very little 
personal hatred in Nicaraguan 
anti-Americanism. Not even per- 
sonal hatred for Ronald Reagan. 
There has been nothing in Nica- 
ragua. about Reagan, that at all 
corresponds ta for example, the 
torrent of frantic and obscene 
iconography which Buenos Aires 
directed at Margaret Thatcher at 
the time of the Falklands War. 

Sandinistas. indeed, understand 
Reagan rather better than most 
foreigners do. They understand, 
and up to a point respect his talk 
about "standing tall” because 
“standing tall” is what 
Sandinismo. too, is all about 
They recognize in Reagan, to that 
extent, a partly kindred spirit 
“Ronald Reagan,” one Sandinista 
told me. “is the Che Guevara of 
imperialism.” 

What Sandinistas cannot ac-* 
cept and will resist literally to 
their last breath, is the insistence 
that for Americans to be seen to 
stand talL Nicaraguans must 
cringe. The Sandinista elite is. 
unquestionably "joined to the* 
people”, in that unlike other, 
Latin American juntas, it has 
worked to improve the condition 
of the poor and to provide 
humane government 

I would define the nature of this 
state as elitist and authoritarian, 
but not totalitarian, and not 
physically oppressive; although it 
can be held (and is held by the 
opposition) that rule by an elite, 
and press, censorship, in them- 
. selves constitute oppression. That 
may be so. but if so. it is a milder 
form of oppression than the word, 
generally conjures up or than 
prevails in most of Latin America." 

The security forces are more 
restrained, and less apt to throw 
their weight around, than in other- 
Latin American countries. The 
penal system is mild; this is not a 
gulag state. People are not free to 
publish attacks on the regime in 
the media, but feel absolutely free* 
to attack it in private conversa- 
tion, or from the pulpit. 

A ll that may of course' 
change under the pres- 
sures of the war. and 
other pressures. I am 
speaking of how things 
are now. The picture projected by 
the Reagan administration of 
present-day Nicaragua as a sort of 
totalitarian inferno is very far 
from the truth — as even Ameri- 
can embassy officials occasionally 
admiL 

In its early years, the regime, 
made remarkable progress in the 
eradication of illiteracy and dis- 
ease. and the replacement of sub- 
standard- housing. But these 
achievements are now at ris£ 
because of the economic pressures 
on Nicaragua and because of the 
disruption of production in the. 
countryside caused by Contra 
attacks on villages and co-op- 
eratives. There are now shortages 
of vinually everything, even wa- 
ter. So in terms of making life 
miserable for most Nicaraguans: 
the Reagan pressures have been 
quite successful. But the success 
would make some kind of sense — 
eyen of a nasty kind — only if the 
misery were putting the skids 
under the Sandinistas. 

It is true that if elections were 
held now it is possible, though not 
in my opinion likely, that the 
public hardship might result in ft 
majority against the Sandinista 
Frente. But, as Washington must 
know, the Sandinistas have ho 
intention of letting themselves be 
put out of power in this way. Nor 
are unarmed masses of people 
about to rise up and expel the 
Sandinistas. 

It is true that there are sizable 
numbers who care very little about 
ta patria or el decora national. For 
those in the Atlantic provinces for 
whom Spanish is not the first 
language, and whose religion is 
not Catholic — Engl i sh -speakers 
of Jamaican origin and some 
Indians — the notions of la patria 
and Sandinismo cannot have 
much appeal. Today the prevail- 
ing attitude in these provinces 
seems to be "wait and see”. 

The Sandinistas cannot, in my 
opinion, be driven from Managua 
except by the direct use of US 
force. And if they are driven ouL 
they will still go on fighting as 
guerrillas, and others will join 
inem. and US forces will have to 
™ u e re . 10 P rev «it a Sandinista 
pome-back. And in that- way, 
Ooffled down in Nicaragua, the 
united States would be taking on 
me forces of nationalism, not only 
in [Nicaragua but throughout Latin 
America. 

i„]?^ L did not out well in 
and 1 don ' 1 ttink it 
»ouW work well in Latin America 

Conor Ott»o , Bn«H ISM 




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1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 

STILL THE LAW 


Mr Justice Stuart-Smlth's 
granting' of an ityunctibB to a 
number of plaintiff, including 
Times Newspapers Ltd., 
against mass picketing at 
Wapping by the print unions 
and their sympathisers was a 
forceful restatement of the law 
rather than an extension of it 

In stating the principle that 
both employees and visitors at 
the Wapping printing plant 
“should have the rigiht to pass 
on all roads, including the 
pavement, approaching the 
plant unobstructed by pickets 
or dem onstrators, -and particu- 
larly unobstructed by pickets 
acting in an abusive, threaten- 
ing or violent manner,” he 
was stating the legally obvious. 
But Jie applied that general 
principle to the legal claims 
relating to Wapping with nice 
discrimination and with ev- 
ident concern to balance the 
grievances-of the union mem- 
bers against the . rights of the 
company and its employees. 

For instance, he disallowed 
the plaintiff’ claim that they 
bad been subjected to the tort 
of unreasonable harassment — 
a “new” tort which had been 
produced by a judge in a South 
Wales case during the miners’ 
dispute. Far from extending 
the law, then, he cast some 
doubt on the value of the one 
recent legal innovation in this 
field. 

That left the traditional torts 
of nuisance and intimidation. 
Here the judge asked two 
crucial questions. Did the 
picketing, marches and 
demonstrations amount to 
nuisance and. intimidation of 
the Wapping employees? And, 
if they did, were the union and 
its officials liable at law for 
such torts? 

That the employees were 
subjected to the nuisance of 
unreasonable, obstruction 
from mass pickets blocking the 
highway was all . but . self- 
evident But intimidation had 
to be established more care- 
fully. Counsel for the unions 


argued — and the judge ac- 
cepted — that abuse, swearing 
. and shoving did not in them- 
selves amount to intimidation. 
The judge went on to note, 
however, that the abuse by 
pickets had frequently in- 
cluded threats and that since 
there was “an abundance of 
. evidence” of employees being 
followed, molested, assaulted 
and subjected to criminal 
damage to their cars and 
houses, such threats had to be 
taken seriously. 

' Intimidation, then, had cer- 
tainly been attempted. Only 
the fine point that the employ- 
ees had not bowed to such 
threats prevented the court 
from finding that it had been 
successfully committed. 

But were the unions liable? 
They were not liable, con- 
cluded the court, just because' 
they had organised a picket or 
a march in the course of which 
these tortious acts had been 
committed. Nor would they 
become liable merely because, 
in addition, they could foresee 
such consequences. 

It was not until three con- 
ditions were fulfilled that the 
court found against the 
unions. These were that 
substantial numbers of union 
members were involved in the 
violence and intimidation; 
that such violence and 
intimidation were regular con- 
sequences of the marches and 
demonstrations organised by 
union officials; and that union 
officials had used none of their 
disciplinary powers to prevent 
such actions by union mem- 
bers. • 

Once these had been estab- 
lished, the judge had little 
alternative but to instruct the 
unions to limit their pickets to 
six and to ensure that future 
marches are “disciplined, 
peaceful and subject to . the 
direction of the police.” 
Should these conditions be 
violated and union officials 
cannot show they have taken 
steps to prevent violence and 


intimidation, they will face 
fines. 

Such a judgement is so 
plainly in line with long- 
established law that it is 
difficult to see how the print- 
ing unions, or anyone else, 
could have expected a dif- 
ferent decision. That raises the 
question, however, of why the 
mass picketing at Wapping, 
with its regular violence and 
frequent intimidation, has 
continued so long 

One reason is undoubtedly 
practical. The police, over- 
stretched at times, faced the 
unexpected challenges of large 
demonstrations. They accord- 
ingly used their discretion to 
protect the employees — who, 
it should be remembered, have 
been enabled to continue 
working throughout — rather 
than to curtail the unions 1 
obstructive tactics altogether. 
That decision was perhaps a 
prudent one, but as the judge 
implied, it may also have 
stretched the limits of police 
discretion. 

A less creditable factor, how- 
ever, is the feeling that infects 
the Labour Party and the 
unions that physical force, 
short of outright violence (and 
that distinction is sometimes 
fudged) is a legitimate tactic 
against an employer in an 
industrial dispute. Not only is 
that wrong and dangerous in 
itself, but it also ignores the 
rights, indeed the very exis- 
tence, of the employees who 
continue to work. 

When the Shadow Home 
Secretary, Mr Gerald Kauf- 
man, described the police at 
Wapping as “a private security 
service to enable Mr Murdoch 
to pocket his profits”, he was 
attacking the idea that law- 
abiding citizens deserve police 
protection against riotous 
mobs. It is worrying that such 
sentiments are expressed fre- 
quently enough for us to be 
surprised to learn that they are 
not the law. 


MALAYSIAN RENEWAL 


The recent banging of two 
Australian heroin smugglers 
brought- Malaysfet. jincomfort- ' 
ably ‘into ■ British: rgaze-A 
mistaken impression was fos- 
tered; this is ‘ no land of. 
catastrophe and strife. It is that 
rare , creature, a Third World 
success. The armed forces are 
loyal to an elected government 
and respectful of democracy. 
The judiciary is independent. 
There are abundant natural 
resources. • 

. But the recession in world 
trade has hit hard. Malaysia’s 
gdp is expected to grow by only 
two per cent m 1986. Prices for 
all the country’s traditional 
exports are depressed; oil rev- 
enues have plunged. 

The fat years have been 
wasted. Too much has been 
spent on prestige projects such 
as the construction of the 
longest bridge in Asia, linking 
Penang to the mainland. A 
national car industry has been 
created, but every car pro- 
duced is being sold at a loss 
and 25 per cent of production 
capacity lies unused. 

-A recent United Nations 
study identified Malaysian 
bureaucracy as a major bin- 
flrance to foreign investors and 
local businessmen alike. The 


new economic policy, a 20- 
year programme to give ethnic 
Malays a larger share of the 
economiccake has created a 
handful of. Malay, millionaires 
to the detriment of impov- 
erished farmers and fisher- 
men. 

It is in this context that 
Malaysia tomorrow goes to the 
polls in the stiffest test yet 
faced by Prime Minister 
Mahatir and his National 
Front. Yet, despite economic 
reverse, it appears unlikely 
that the National Front will be 
supplanted. In the prosperous 
years of the early 1980s when 
the economy was growing at 
between 6 and 1 1 per cent per 
year, the ruling coalition won 
overwhelming dominance and 
the size of its lead will be too 
great for the opposition par- 
ties. 

The urban-based Chinese 
group, the Democratic Action 
Party, is respected for its 
vigilance over the 
Government’s doings, but is 
not going to be entrusted with 
political power. The rural Parti 
Islam espouses a Muslim state. 
The formula ought to be 
outrageous in this multi-re- 
ligious community yet the 
party has waged a successful 


campaign amongst the poor 
and the disaffected, attacking 
the Front's venality. 

The National Front has 
been rocked by scandals im- 
plicating members 1 of' Dr 
Mahathir’s cabinet The leader 
of the Chinese party within the 
coalition is facing charges in 
Singapore of criminal breach 
of trust in connection with 
share dealings. The National 
Front's 1982 election slogan of 
“clean, efficient and 
trustworthy” rings.hollow four 
years later. 

Dr Mahathir must cleanse 
the stables, endeavouring to 
make his leadership more 
responsive to the reformers 
and a younger political genera- 
tion, both within the National 
Front and in the opposition 
parties. 

The young firebrand who 
wrote the explosive Malay 
Dilemma has become the type 
of politician he once attacked. 
The Prime Minister must lake 
stock of Malaysians' needs in a 
changed economic climate and 
curb the excesses of a self- 
serving elite. Without reform 
and renewal in this rich and 
beautiful land, Islamic in- 
surrection and racial strife 
could become a horrifying 
reality. 


FOURTH LEADER 


G.K. Chesterton used to say 
dial if ever he felt like taking 
any exercise, he would lie 
down until-he got over it. 
G.K.Chesterton would not 
have got on in Japan. On the 
other hand it is more im- 
portant from their point of 
view that the Japanese should 
get on over here, and there are 
signs that they are about to go 
the wrong way about it 
" This observation springs 
from the announcement that 
the new UK branch of 
.Komatsu, which is not a 
.martial an but an earth mov- 
ing equipment company, is 
•encouraging its employees to 
sfart the day with five minutes 
'Of physical jerks. This routine, 
"commonplace in the land of 
the rising sun. is said to 
improve workers’ fitness, raise 
their morale and reduce their 
propensity to have accidents. 

“ No doubt it does. The 
mistake they are about to 
make at the Komatsu plant on 
Tyneside, is to say that the 
workers. should do it. A firm 
with more experience of the 
people of this country would 
have issued a strict order that 
they shouldn't. • 

There is in the British, not 
least those .who live in the area 
of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, 
something which we like to 
think of as the bulldog spirit. 


but which others might call 
bloody-mindedness. This 
happy breed, let Nippon know, 
does not like doing what's 
good for it. 

It is not just that the British 
are an inefficient race. It is 
actually that they do not want 
to be anything else. Trains run 
late in the Middle East and 
Africa because they cannot 
help it; and in India because 
they’re too busy with the 
paperwork to notice. Here they 
- run late because we associate 
trainsf which ran on time with 
Mussolini. Commuters may 
stamp their feet and grumble 
oh the up-line platform at 
Billericay or Haywards Heath. 
But deep down inside, they 
would not want it any other 
way. We distrust things that 
work, including ourselves. 

This dislike of regimenta- 
tion is manifested most clearly 
in the national attitude to 
exercise. For all anyone knows 
even Osbert Sitwell who wrote 
bitterly about compulsory 
games at school, might have 
developed into a wing three- 
quarter of rare gifts had any- 
one introduced an element of 
choice into his curriculum or 
even banned sport altogether. 
As it is, the muscular 
Christianity which was the 
precept for several generations 
of British schoolchildren, has 


helped to encourage the na- 
tional inclination to skive. 

There are parts of surb urban 
London through which it is 
dangerous to walk at dusk for 
fear of being knocked down, 
not by muggers but joggers. 
One might, venture to suggest 
that these hapless young run- 
ners with their beanstalk legs 
and heaving chests would no 
more pound the pavements if 
one asked them to than a 
tomcat might be forced to play 
the fiddle. They do it not 
because they think it is good 
for them, but because half the 
doctors of England say it isn’t. 

At least Komatsu have not 
made the mistake of making 
exercise mandatory. But work- 
ers are said to have been left 
with the clear impression that 
participation is very much 
expected of them. What the 
management should have 
done is to proclaim that on no 
account should any employee 
be seen to stretch his/her legs 
in the company's time. By 
nightfall had it done so, the 
shop stewards would have 
demanded a gymnasium, a 
swimming pool, a small corps 
of PE instructors, competitive 
handball at coffee break and a 
silver cup for the highest 
number of nine o’ clock press- 
ups. Ah, so 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Hospice service and Aids victims 


From the Chairman of St 
Christopher’s Hospice 
Sir, No special service, particu- 
larly one devoted to malignant 
disease, should be blamed for 
• failure to admit patients who are 
outside their commitment and 
expertise (report, July 28). 

During the 20 years of the 
modem hospice movement the 
many units and teams that have 
developed have concentrated al- 
most exclusively on helping pa- 
tients and families with severe 
problems' from terminal cancer 
and, to a lesser extent, motor 
neurone disease. 

Over 130,000 people die each 
year in England and Wales from 
cancer and the pressure on the 
fewer than 2,000 beds available is 
such that few can contemplate 
admitting patients with other 
needs unless in exceptional 
circumstances. 

A considerable body of exper- 
tise in controlling pain and other 
symptoms and helping families 
fold their own strengths has been 
developed. Much of this is passed 
bn throughout the NHS through 
many leaching programmes, and 


is relevant to diseases other than 
cancer, including Aids (acquired 
immune deficiency syndrome). 

Our own hospice policy will be 
to continue to admit patients with 
malignant disease, for whose care 
we were set up and whose need 
puts considerable pressure on our 
home care team and our in-patient 
beds, where the average stay is 
only three weeks. Any patients 
who are later found to be serum- 
positive will remain with us unless 
their care calls for the facilities of 
an acute hospital. 

As we welcome whole families 
for our unlimited visiting hours, 
any change of policy would mean 
a considerable programme of local 
education; but to suggest, as 
reported in your article, that 
hospices are failing to admit 
paiiems with this diagnosis merely 
because local concern may make a 
difference to their financial sup- 
port, is untrue. 

Yours faithfully, 

CICELY SAUNDERS. Chairman, 
St Christopher's Hospice, 

51-59 Lawrie Park Road, 
Sydenham, SE26. 

July 29. 


A separate Bar 

From Mr Ian G. Ingiis. WS 
Sir, As a Scottish lawyer I have 
followed the debate about the 
future shape of the legal pro- 
fessions in England with interest 
and some amusement. I wholly 
agree with the point made by Mr 
Brentnall (July 23) about counsels’ 
fees. It might be of interest to 
consider the position in Scotland. 

When counsel is instructed fora 
hearing no brief fee is demanded 
or paid. Counsel are paid for each 
day in court. If the case settles 
after counsel is instructed and 
shortly before the first day, the 
client is only liable to pay 
counsel's fees for the first day. 

Cou risers foes are not normally 
agreed in advance. After the case is 
finished his clerk issues a note of 
the proposed fee. If the solicitor 
thinks this excessive he negotiates 
with counsel’s clerk. If he cannot 
reach a satisfactory result the 
dispute can then be referred to the 
auditor of court who fixes the fee 
in the light of all the relevant 
circumstances. Fees for the 


preliminary work done by counsel 
in a case are dealt with in a similar 
way. 

Scottish counsels' fees are very 
much less than those charged in' 
London. In over 25 years" practice 
I have seldom had to discuss a fee 
with counsel's clerk and have 
□ever had to refer one to the 
auditor. 

Scottish counsel have always 
been ready and willing to act for 
anyone and I have known many 
cases where counsel have charged 
very small fees, even in com- 
plicated or lengthy cases, where 
they knew or suspected the client 
was impecunious. 

One result of Scottish counsels' 
moderation in charging fees is that 
there is no informed opinion in 
favour of the fusion of the two 
branches of the profession in 
Scotland. 

Yours faithfully, 

IAN G. INGLIS. 

Maclay Murray & Spens 
(Solicitors). 

Erskine House. 

68-73 Queen Street, Edinburgh. 
July 23. 


Future of cricket 

From Mr Anthony Given 
Sir, It can surely be no more than 
coinddence that the minor 
cricketing counties are all clus- 
tered in three large areas, includ- 
ing an uninterrupted ..swathe 
across England, extending : from 
the Wash to Land’s End. 

But why is this situation apparr 
ently immutable? Are the. eco- 
nomic and facility arguments 
really sa strong as never la permit 
some sort of promotion and 
relegation- system, giving the 
population of these areas the 
chance of not being condemned 
for ever to the outfield of first- 
class cricket? 

Yours faithfully. 

ANTHONY GIVEN, 

The Croft, 

Walkern, 

Near Stevenage, 

Hertfordshire. 

July 29. 

From Mr R. /. Massey 
Sir, The Middlesex Cricket Union, 
which is the member of the 
National Cricket Association 
representing recreational cricket 
in Middlesex, supports the views 
expressed by Mr David Green 
(June 24). The union realises that 
young cricketers are saddled with 
the pressure of expectation and 
competition, but it is not critical 
of this attitude provided it is kept 
in proper proportion. 

We see our members in estab- 
lished clubs more determined 
than ever to foster the growth of 
colls sections. We would be de- 
lighted to explore more fully with 


our cricketing colleagues in 
schools and the schools authori- 
ties themselves ways in which 
together we could more ade- 
quately combat the regrettable 
decline of state schools cricket. 

For the young people we have in 
mind' today who have yet to 
experience the game we are set up 
to encourage we assert that there 
will be rewarding pleasures from 
sharedaims mid achievements in 
cricket. 

Yours faithfully, 

R-'-I. MASSEY (Hon Secretary, - 
Middlesex Cricket Union), 

72 Gainsborough Road, 

Kew, Richmond, Surrey. 

Sanctions debate 

From Mr Humphry Berkeley 
Sir, Sir Arthur Sneiling (July 30) is 
unfair to President Kaunda. At the 
time when sanctions were im- 
posed against Rhodesia that coun- 
try was a colony of the British 
Crown. Until 1963 Zambia, 
against its will formed part of the 
Federation of Rhodesia and 
Nyasaland and its copper was 
used to build up industry within 
Rhodesia. The economies of the 
two countries were inextricably 
bound together. 

For these two reasons President 
Kaunda had no alternative but to 
claim exemption from certain 
sanctions and, since Britain was 
the sovereign power in Rhodesia, 
he was right to look to Britain for 
compensation for the adverse 
effects upon Zambian economy. 
Yours faithfully, 

HUMPHRY BERKELEY, 

Three Pages Yard, Chiswick, W4. 


Mixed-up plants 

From Professor D. A. G. Gallon 
Sir, Miles Kington, in his delight- 
ful piece about samphire (July 25) 
confuses two different plants. 
Shakespeare’s samphire, 
Crithmum maritimum, the rock 
samphire, is a member of the 
carrot family that grows mainly on 
cliffs and rocks, and the salimarsh 
plant he ate in Brittany and knows 
from East Anglia is the marsh 
samphire, a group of species of 
Salicomia belonging to the spin- 
ach family.- - 

Samphire, or sampier, was 
herbe aeSt Pierre, the “plant of the 
rock” once used to treat patients 
with stones in the bladder. The 
salicomias were known to the 
herbalist Gerard as glassworts 


because the sodium carbonate in 
their ashes was useful in glassmak- 
ing: they became known as sam- 
phire because they were as good to 
eat as C. maritimum. 

According to the late Geoffrey 
Grigson, Shakespeare may have 
known from Gerard's Herbal that 
“Rocke Sampier groweth on the 
rocky cliffs at Dover”, and later 
Robert Turner wrote “it is in- 
credibly dangerous to gather, yet 
many adventure it” (from the 
cliffs of the Isle of Wight, for 
dispatch to London wholesalers in 
casks of sea water). 

Yours faithfully, 

DAVID GALTON, 

Loaf Cottage, 

Cley-nexi-the-Sea, 

Norfolk. 

July 28. 


Chapel heritage 

From the Rev Ralph E. Fennell 
Sir, If more non-conformist cha- 
pels are to be preserved, as Mr 
Hassall suggests (July 26), more 
help will have to be made avail- 
able by way of grant aid. All too of- 
ten trustees are told that a 
particular chapel is worthy of 
listing but not of sufficient merit 
to warrant an English Heritage 
grant for its repair and restoration. 

This suggests that far too many 
buildings are being listed. If a 
more selective policy were pur- 
sued, there would be a far greater 
chance of gram aid being available 
and ultimately more buildings 
being preserved. 

What is more, when grant aid is 
riven, onerous conditions are 
frequently attached .which pre- 
clude alterations to the interior, 
despite the Ecclesiastical Exemp- 
tion Clause. These conditions 
sometimes pose serious diffi- 
culties for trustees whose primary 
concern is the living wort of the 


Church, not the retention of a 
listed building. 

The Ecclesiastical Exemption 
Clause is in the best interests of 
conservationists and trustees 
alike: without it many more listed 
buildings are likely to be disposed 
of or even demolished. 

In particular the clause enables 
trustees to make greater use of the 
total cubic capacity, for so often 
the problem is one of sue: 
congregations have diminished, 
the great barn-like chapels of 
yester-year are no longer viable 
and interior alteration and 
refurbishment lead to their 
preservation. 

However, the problem is not 
amply one of size. The Liturgical 
Movement has brought renewal to 
worship with less formality and 
greater participation. For a con- 
gregation to have a sense ofbeing a 
family gathered round the Lord’s 
Table rearrangements have had to 
be made. 

Church and chapel, buildings 
today are very much needed for 


community use. They also interest 
thousands of tourists precisely 
because of the successive alter- 
ations and extensions that have 
been made to them over the years 
to accommodate the living work 
and thus pass on the heritage of 
faith. 

As far as the Methodist Church 
is concerned — and we still have 
8,000 chapels — no scheme of 
repair, alteration or extension can 
be undertaken without approvals 
having been obtained at load, 
circuit, district and national level 
We are not the iconoclasts we are 
often made out to be; but our 
chapels are of no use to us unless 
we can use them as centres of 
worship and bases for contem- 
porary mission and service: 

Yours faithfully, 

RALPH E FENNELL. 

General Secretary, 

The Methodist Church Property 
Division, 

Central Buildings, 

Oldham Street, Manchester. 

July 29. 



Hovering on the 
edge of poverty 

From Mr Paul Ashton 
Sir, In your repon (July 26) on the 
Government’s release of statistics 
relating to low income families, 
you say that the figures suggest 
that “more than 10 million Brit- 
ons are living in poverty”, and 
that the “poverty line” is defined 
for a single person as £29.40 a 
week and for a couple as £48.80. 
Neither statement is factual how- 
ever, though, of course, the pov- 
erty lobby would like us to believe 
that they are. 

In fact no post-war government 
has ever released figures on the 
number of people in poverty. No 
government has ever agreed on 
exactly what constitutes poverty. 
The estimate of 10 million poor 
people is that given byLabourMP. 
Frank Field, and is based upon 
Government figures of the num- 
ber of people who receive supple- 
mentary benefit or who have an 
income at or below this benefit 
level 

People on supplementary bene- 
fit cannot be described as living in 
poverty simply because they re- 
ceive this benefit or because they 
have an income equal to it. 
Governments provide supple- 
mentary benefit so as to prevent 
poverty. So if the State benefit 
level is described as an official 
"poverty line”, then plainly those 
receiving it or who have an 
income at that level are not in 
poverty. 

There might well be a case of 
defining those in poverty as 
people with incomes Mow the 
supplementary benefit level, but 
is it any wonder that the Child 
Poverty Action Group claims that 
the Government statistics show 
that one In three Britons (about 1 8 
million people) live in or on the 
edge of poverty, when the “edge of 
poverty” is taken by the CPAG to 
be a level of income some 40 per 
cent higher than the basic benefit 
level? 

Yours faithfully, 

PAUL ASHTON, 

The University of Liverpool 
Department of Economic and 
Business Studies. 

Myrtle Street 
PO Box 147. Liverpool 

Television time 

From Mr G. L Lloyd 
Sir, The BBC prides itself on its 
impartial stance in reporting poli- 
tics. In Parliament the Labour and 
Alliance Opposition parties see it 
as their duty to oppose. 

Surely, then, the claim of the 
Alliance to a fairer share of 
television time should be denied 
on. the grounds that a point of view 
has basically two strands — for and 
against. 

What we are now seeing on our . 
screens is a statement of a 
Government position, followed by 
an anti-view from the Labour 
Party, followed by yet another 
anti-view expressed by an Alliance 
spokesman. This, then, is not 
impartiality but bias against al- 
most all Government measures. 
Yours faithfully, 

G. L. LLOYD, 

55 Woodside Avenue, 

Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire. 

Lightening of spirit 

From the Reverend S. G. Luff 
Sir. It is a pleasure to recognise the 
old "Fourth Leader", albeit third, 
in the traditional vein of Times 
humour (“Reigning cats — and 
dogs", July 28). 

1 cannot recall when this feature 
was suppressed, but in the forties, 
when I was a novice in a 
Benedictine monastery, it was the 
practice to read the Fourth Leader, 
subject to approval, in the refec- 
tory, while the brethren were 
taking their first substantial meal. 

Any student of monasticism 
knows the significance attached by 
the early Fathers to the “noonday 
demon” or accidie. Hard to de- 
fine, it has been described as 
“don't care-ishness” and 
“torpor”, though the latter is more 
appropriate to the time after 
lunch. The Times reading would 
follow a passage from Scripture 
and the combination of divinity, 
levity and a full platter seemed to 
be just the thing for getting the 
brethren through this small daily 
crisis. 

Vocations to the monastic life 
have notoriously declined. One 
hazards a guess that the absence of 
this special brand of light relief 
may be a contributing factor. ' 
Would a guaranteed revival of the 
Fourth Leader lead to a 
strengthening of our monastic 
communities at the present time? 
Yours faithfully, 

STANLEY G. LUFF, 

Our Lady's Church, 

College View, 

Llandovery, Dyfed. 


AUGUST 2 1330 

The R 100 was designed by Sir 
Barnes Wallis at the Airship 
Guarantee Company at Howaen 
Yorkshire: its companion ship, the 
R 101, was die work q/o 
gooemment team. A leader in the 
paper on the two airships thought 
that . . airship transport . . will 
some day be available far the safe 
and sure conveyance of 
passengers . . . between 
parts of the Empire. . . 
hopes vanished when the R 101 
crashed in France on its maiden 
voyage in October 1930, the 
disaster overwhelming the success 
of the R 100, which was eventually 
dismantled. 


THE R 100 AT 
MONTREAL 

From Our Own Correspondent 

Montreal Aug. 1 
TheR 100 was moored successfully 
at St. Hubert airport, Montreal at 
5.33 (Eastern Standard time) this 
morning, 79 hours after leaving 


On the final stage of her journey 
she had a trying experience, for 
shortly after 9.30 p.m. on Thurs- 
day, as she was heading up the St, 
Lawrence, she ran into a violent 
thunderstorm, which was accom- 
panied by tempestuous winds. The 
airship was buffeted about and 
tossed hundreds of feet in the air, 
but she successfully rode out the 
storm without serious damage or 
difficulty. However, it was neces- 
sary to reduce speed, and when 
news of the delay reached the 
airport the crowds which had 
assembled melted away and only a 
few people remained with the 
officials and workers. About 2 «.m. 
the limits of the airship wen 
sighted, and at intervals thereafter 
until dawn a searchlight showed 
her cruising in circles above 
MontreaL 

A few minutes before 5 aon. she 
turned her nose straight for the 
mooring tower, which was spar- 
kling with lights, and slowly and 
smoothly drifted on to the mast. 
Everything worked without 
hitch, and the mooring was com- 
pleted in half an hour. 

Several thousand people had 
gathered on the field by the time 
the R 100 was moored, and aft day 
crowds have continued to pour in a 
steady stream from Montreal and 
the suburbs to see the airship. At 
the gang-plank the officers were 
met by the official reception party. 
All showed signs of weariness, but 
they denied experiencing any ab- 
normal strain until they encoun- 
tered the thunderstorm yesterday 
evening. 

TEST OF AIRWORTHINESS 
Wing Commander Colmore said 
that the two samples of bad 
weather encountered during the 
voyage had put the airworthiness 
of the airship to exacting tests, and 
she had come through admirably. 
However, be deprecated any exag- 
gerated significance being attached 
to the voyage as, although the 
flight had proved the efficiency of 
the thick-bodied, blunt-nosed type 
of airahip represented by the 
R 100, compared with the Zeppelin 
type, all her officers were agreed 
that neither the R 100 nor the 
R 101 could be considered as 
adequate for anything like a regular 
Transatlantic service. 

Wing Commander Colmore de- 
scribed a voyage by airship as the 
most comfortable form of travel in 
the world, and said the only serious 
inconvenience had been to set back 
their watches and to drop three 
hours in one day. which brouf 
meal times painfully close together. 

LESSONS OF THE FLIGHT 
It was not to be expected that 
R 100 would complete her long 
voyage without meeting adverse 
winds at this time of the year, and 
her experiences between the Gulf 
of St Lawrence and Montreal 
justified the abnormally heavy load 
of petrol she carried. When she 
moored she had about 1,500 gallons 
of petrol left, which in favourable 
conditions might have given her an 
additional 700 miles. In the sort of 
weather she encountered over Can- 
ada this extra range would have 
been reduced to 550 miles. 

Her margin, therefore, was not 
unduly large, and the difference 
between flying in fair weather and 
in strong headwinds is shown by 
the fact that, while 22200 gallons of 
petrol sufficed for the first 1,000, 
she used 6.749 on the remaining 
2,415 miles she covered. Her speeds 
varied from 40 ' to 85 miles, and 
Wing Commander Colmore’s log 
shows the vital importance of 
weather reports in order that an 
airship may pick her course. 
Without the knowledge the com- 
mander had, she would certainly 
have made a slower voyage 


Great Eastern 

From Mr J. Menhinick 
Sir. Mr Thomae (July 30) has got 
his lines crossed! Mr Lincoln was 
inaugurated as President of the 
United States on March 4, 1861, 
so how could he have had “an 
exchange of greetings with Queen 
Victoria” over an Atlantic cable 
laid in the latter half of 1857? 

The presidency was that of Mr 
James Buchanan. 

I have the honour to be, Sir, 
Yours faithfully, 

JAMES MENHINICK, 

69 North Salts. 

Rye, East Sussex. 

July 30. 

Adult-proof 

From Mr D. M. Davis 
Sir, It is very easy to get my child- 
resistant aspirin bottle open (tet- 
ters, July 28, 30). I simply hand it 
to my eight-year-old nephew. 

If he isn’t there, 1 don’t need the 
aspirins. 

Yours faithfully, 

D. M. DAVIS, 

10 Wood Ride. 

Haywards Heath, Sussex, 

July 30. 


n ifc* 

IMf 




8 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


THE ARTS 


Television 

Golden 

oldies 


Miami Beach. Florida, is the 
wrinkly, capital of the world — 
Worthing with orange groves 
and serious money — and those 
of its inhabitants who may still 
be dignified with the label 
“middfe-aged” appear, by con- 
trast, preternatural ly young 
and vivacious. 

The Coidea Girls (Channel 
4) are four single women, 
variously divorced or widowed, 
who find themselves flung 
together in a toney, over- 
decorated “home” by virtue of 
a small -ad and a domestic fire. 
This being America, the land 
of eternal if neurotic optimism, 
they are still very much in the 
marriage stakes and lose no 
opportunity to make gleeful 
reference to the attractions of 
their situation: “It's wonder- 
fill, dating in Miami — all the 
single men under 80 are 
cocaine smugglers.” 

We are, of course, in Susan 
Harris country (she who cre- 
ated Soap and Benson) and the 
formula of social embarrass- 
ment punctured by daggered 
one-liners is the mixture as 
before. Plenty of the lines in 
last night's series-opener were 
right on the button (“How long 
is this story? Ita 80. 1 have to 
plan.”) and Blanche's narrow 
escape from die dutches of a 
six-time bigamist managed to 
ventilate the requisite taboos. 

Another four golden girls 
were pnt through their paces in 
The Fairer Sax (BBC2), an 
unexpected delight of the al- 
most-silly season. Saxophone 
quartets are the Creak-show of 
the orchestra] circus, and 
when the horns are blown by 
attractive young women, one's 
reaction unavoidably offends 
several canons in the feminist 
handbook. 

The programme's avowed 
aim of demonstrating the 
instrument's versatility came 
off splendidly, from the 
harmonium-like qualities of 
16th-century madrigals to the 
gorgeous sonorities of De- 
bossy, and while one may have 
questioned the somewhat over- 
literal use of accompanying 
photographic stills, the girls 
themselves — got up in appro- 
priate costumes and indulging 
in modest synchronized step- 
ping — were evidently having 
the most enormous fun. 

Martin Cropper 


A twin tribute to Franz Liszt 
(right) who died 100 years ago 

Honouring his 
master’s soul 


Liszt Memorial 
Concert 
Festspielhaus 
/BBC2/ Radio 3 


It was to Bayreuth that Franz 
Liszt made his last pilgrimage 
for the premiere of Parsijal, 
loyal to the end to the friend 
whose work he had tirelessly 
promoted throughout his life. 

It was there that he died 
peacefully on July 31, ISS6, 
and it was to the Festspielhaus 
that a capacity audience and 
television viewers from 14 
countries were drawn for a 
grand centenary celebration 
organized by Liszt's great 
grandson, Wolfgang Wagner. 

The "Faust” Symphony was 
chosen as the main work, and 
understandably so. as its three 
“character pieces” can be 
thought to reveal as much 


about Liszt as Faust, Gretchen 
and Mephistopheles. 

Much can be made, in 
performance as in com- 
mentary, of this presumed 
identification, and perhaps 
justifiably so, as Liszt himself 
was said to cany a walking 
stick on which were carved the 
heads of Gretchen, Meph- 
isiopheles and, significantly, 
not Faust but St Francis of 
AssisL 

The triptych can equally 
well be listened to, though, as 
absolute music, rather in the 
spirit of Debussy's Preludes, 
their programmatic tags 
slipped in at the end; and it 
was this approach which Dan- 
iel Barenboim, conducting the 
Bayreuth Festival Orchestra 
and Chorus, encouraged. 

Faust's agony of conflict 
was forgotten as the ear be- 
came absorbed in the taut 
counterpoint of strings and 
brass, pushing inexorably 
against some beautifully 



poised wind solos, and to- 
wards the stately final apothe- 
osis in Barenboim's 
lucid structure. 

G ret chen’s vignette was, as 
Liszt wanted, true chamber 
music for full orchestra, with 
each tapering phrase gently 
lifted by Barenboim in and 
out of a constantly ventilated 
texture. 

Here, rather than in Robert 
Schunk's strained final solo, 
was Goethe's ewig weibliche, 
the eternal feminine, alone 
resistant to Liszt's diabolical 
metamorphosis. 


It was again Barenboim's 
broadly paced, firmly an- 
chored control of Liszt's the- 
matic transformations which 
made so satisfying the 
evening's performance of the 
Second Piano Concerto. 
Liszt’s concertos are appar- 
ently Krystian Zi merman's 
favourite worics in the genre, 
and be played as if the piano 
were for him, as for Liszt, “my 
language, my life, my very 
self*. It was a sober, serious 
performance. 

Hilary Finch 


LSO/Conlon 
Albert Hall/Radio 3 

Besides the BBC's other 
commemorations of the Liszt 
centenary this week, it pro- 
vided a double promenade 
concert with programmes for 
organ and orchestra. 

The concluding account of 
the Dame Symphony, by the 
London Symphony Orchestra 
under James Conlon, was a 
reassurance that the composer 
did sometimes contrive to 
keep his romantic reach 
within his intellectual grasp. 

The performance achieved 
notably beautiful effects in the 
almost pastel colours al the 
start of “Purgatorio”, before 
the souls became so shackled 
to Liszt's time-serving fugue, 
growing ever more prolix as 
we awaited the invisible treble 
voices of the Finchley 
Children's Music Group who 
sang the “Magnificat” from 
the hall's topmost gallery. 

To preface the symphony 
were two examples of Liszt's 
capacity for seif-satisfaction. 
The orchestral versions of his 
Two Legends , published only 
two years ago and here given 
their British premiere, are 
now thought possibly to have 
preceded the familiar piano 
form. This performance re- 
vealed more of a debt to 
Berlioz. 


The arrangement of 
Schubert's “Wanderer” Fan- 
tasy as a species of p»ano 
concerto raised some old 
doubts about Liszt. For all 
that he kept the pianist as 
protagonist the orchestra can 
become like an albatross 
around the player's neck. 
Jorge Bolet distinguished in 
both composers, played as if 
he were unaware of the bur- 
den, and was able to relate the 
inflation of Schubert’s lyri- 
cism to the extravagance of 
orchestral rhetoric. 

Liszt- as organ composer 
featured arthe separate early- 
evening prom. Simon Preston 
here transferred his attention 
from his regular console at 
Westminster Abbey to an 
Albert Hall organ unfortu- 
nately not entirely free from 
gremlins during the latter part 
of the Prelude and Fugue on 
the name Bach. 

A transcription of one of his 
own works furnished the short 
Trauerode, more a pictorial 
description of grief than an 
expression of feelings about 
the death of his son Daniel, 
aged 20. It was a quiet 
interlude before the extended 
Fantasy and Fugue on “Ad 
nos. ad salutarem undam", 
where the organist made no 
attempt to deny the theme's 
operatic origins in Meyerbeer. 

Noel Goodwin 


Bursting pride of youth 


Opera 


Don Juan 

Vadstena, Sweden 


The second floor of a medi- 
eval castle in a little visited 
part of western Sweden may 
seem an improbable place to 
go in search of Don Giovanni. 
Improbability is compounded 
when the role of Giovanni, or 
Juan, turns out to be sung by a 
counter-tenor rather than by a 
hefty baritone. But so it is at 
Vadstena, on the shores of 
Lake Vatiera, where there is to 
be seen Alessandro Meiani's 
Don Juan, generally reckoned 
to be the fust opera on the 
theme of the rake taken down 
to hell by a statue come to life. 

The summer Academy at 
Vadstena have been putting 
on baroque operas, late and 
early, for some 20 years now, 
intermingled with a few 
contemporary pieces. The 
performers are al] in their 
twenties and at the start of 


their professional careers: the 
feeling is midway between the 
Britten-Pears School at Alde- 
burgh and St Louis in its very 
early days. Arnold Ostman 
presided over matters musical 
in the Seventies, G6ran 
Jarvefelt was among the 
producers at that time and 
Vadstena remains one of the 
places where young singers 
can show their paces. 

Certainly they could not 
wish for a more interesting 
piece than Meiani's Don Juan. 
It was commissioned by 
Sweden's own Queen Chris- 
tina and first performed in 
Rome in 1669 before her and 
26 cardinals, who must have 
been a fairly Fubankian lot to 
judge from the raciness of the 
action. 

Fillipo AcciaiuolTs text was 
written only 30 or so years 
after Tirso de Molina's El 
Burlalor de Sevilla, reckoned 
to be the grand-daddy of all 
the Giovanni plays. Acrimante 


(Giovanni) and his servant 
Bibi (LeporeUo) are ship- 
wrecked on a strange shore, 
where the first person they 
meet, such is the arm of 
coincidence, is Atamira 
(Elvira), still in search of her 
one-time lover. 

Most of the action familiar 
from Mozart and da Ponte is 
contained in the last act, 
musically the best of the three, 
where Juan, accused of rape 
(suspected) and manslaughter 
(real), is taken down to Hades 
by that statue with a number 
of Furies to help him on his 
way. Parts of Meiani's lengthy 
score are pleasant but forget- 
table. Juan's aria contemplat- 
ing death, however, is worthy 
of PurcelL as is some of 
Proserpine's ballet music. 
Mikael Bellini's Juan is the 
personification of the attract- 
iveness of sin — a touch of Boy 
George in his younger and 
happier days, coupled with a 
counter-tenor of firm darity 




THE SUNDAY TIMES 


ALL THAT’S BEST IN BRITISH JOURNALISM 


AN EXCLUSIVE POLL 



What the South Africans really think 

The Yanks who came back to Britain after all 
— but turned their backs on Europe 

How Britain’s biggest company poured $3 billion 
down the drain in America 


Colour Magazine 

A previously unpublished 
short story by 
Tennessee Williams 
Introduced by Gore Vidal 

PLUS FOUR PAGES OF SPORT 


* 


3 


Sunday isn’t Sunday without the 
Sunday Times 


Mikael Bellini as Don Joan 

rare in a country short of such 
singers. 

Melani is careful to mix the 
solemnities of seduction with 
plenty of lusty horseplay be- 
tween Juan's rough servant 
(Lennart Forsen) and the 
nurse of the Anna figure, a 
high tenor role in which 
Hugues Cuenod would have 
excelled, sung with playful 
cheeriness by Mark Barth- 
oldsson. The style is not far 
from an opera like La Calisto. 
Among the ladies Pia-Marie 
Nilsson (Atamira) is the one 
likely to move quickly into the 
opera circuit 

Per-Erik Ohm’s production, 
simple and effective, and An- 
ders OhrwaU’s conducting 
make Don Juan much more 
than a musicologist's piece. 

John Higgins 


Ariodante 
Buxton Festival 

Ian Judge's new production of 
Ariodante has many in- 
ventive, not to say bizarre, 
touches. The purists probably 
winced incessantly, as one 
glorious aria after another 
became background music for 
some vicarious thrill or laugh- 
inducing antic. But Judge 
would be justified in arguing 
that he entertained a festival 
audience far more than they 
were expecting from a Handel 
opera. 

First we had Ginevra slip- 
ping out of her clothes and 
into the bath (demurely pull- 
ing the bubbles over her 
essentials). That sets the tone 
— or lowered it, depending on 
your viewpoint. Later, the 
villainous Polinesso stripped 
down to his boxer shorts for a 
fairly explicit romp with 
Dalinda. Fair enough, I sup- 
pose; Ariodante has to believe 
It was more than a cup of 
cocoa if his suicide attempt is 
to seem credible. There was 
even a neatly- worked sugges- 
tion of a parallel with Othello: 
Polinesso taunting Ariodante 
by dangling Ginevra's hand- 
kerchief in front of him. 

A more surrealist idea was 
to have two hom. players on 
stage in their evening dress 
(the costumes were otherwise 
loosely 18th century), flanking 
the King of Scotland. And as 
the opera progressed the stag- 
ing became still more extro- 


vert. Polinesso was killed not 
by the usual sword Lunge but 
by a karate chop to the neck 
instead. 

Was all this frantic business 
hiding something? It did seem 
odd that, with 40 or more 
serviceable Handel operas to 
choose from, Buxton should 
put on one of the very few that 
requires both a chorus and a 
ballet — and then not engage 
either. 

The omitted ballets were the 
most serious aspects of a 
considerable snipping opera- 
tion. In general, though, the 
musical side was happily nur- 
tured by Anthony Hose, with 
sturdy support from the Man- 
chester Qinerata. 

Apart from James 
Bowman's suitably pasty- 
faced, sinister Polinesso — 
whose big counter-tenor was 
in good form — and Roderick 
Earle's imposing King, the 
cast was a little under- 
powered. Eirian James, in the 
title role, sang with an elo- 
quent, well-controlled tone 
and (in the despairing Act 2 
arias) considerable sensitivity, 
but an over-applied -legato led 
to poor enunciation. 

Meryl Drawer made a spir- 
ited, .rather floozy-like 
Dalinda, and - Rosa Mannion, 
if unpredictable in die upper 
reaches, conveyed the dis- 
traught Ginevra’s plight effec- 
tively, though her mini- 
cadenza in the “mad” aria was 
surely more Donizetti than 
HandeL 

Richard Morrison 


Jazz 

A naive 
ecstasy 

Jazz Warriors 
ICA 


Ever since the lights went out 
on the Swing Era. the con- 
ventional wisdom has had it 
that only an Ellinmon. a Basic 
ora Kenton can afford to keep 
a big jazz band together. It is 
with some sense of unreality 
then, that one finds oneself 
reporting the existence id 
L ondon of not one 21 -piece 
jazz orchestra, but two. 

Hot on the heels of Loose 
Tubes, whose most recent 
triumph was described on this 
page a few days ago, come the 
Jazz Warriors, an ensemble of 
very different temperament 
born a few months ago and 
fronted by. the saxophonist 
Courtney Pine. 

The five pieces they per- 
formed on Thursday night 
made it apparent that the 
polish and the sharp wit of 
Loose Tubes arc not in their 
armoury. Instead they aim for 
the kind of permanent ecstasy 
that was the characteristic goal 
of the followers of John 
Coltrane in the late Sixties, 
symbolized by their penod- 
p’iece version of Pharoah 
Sanders's “The Creator Has a 
Master Plan”. 

Stressing the primacy of 
feeling over technique can 
easily lead, as it did in an 
ambitiously scored piece by 
Pine tided "St Maurice of 
Aragon”, to a sense of naivety, 
and indeed the band seemed 
happiest when the massed 
horns fell silent and a solo 
improviser held forth over the 
loose-limbed rhythm section. 

Their virtues and defects 
were summed up in “Many 
Pauses” composed by their 
veteran trumpeter, Harold 
Beckett. Brief fanfares en- 
closed solos from most of the 
musicians, each of whom was 
free to set his own matrix of 
rhythm and harmony. As an 
ensemble piece it lacked a 
shred of meaning, but the 
vibraphonist, Orpheus Robin- 
son. as energetically swinging 
as a young Lionel Hampton, 
and the strikingly eloquent 
flautist. Philip Bent, made a 
lasting impression. 

It would be wrong, though, 
not to remark on the puzzling 
and potentially worrying ra- 
cial division between the Jazz 
Warriors, who are all black, 
and the all-white Loose Tubes. 
Is it not also strange that, in 
I986» neither can find room in 
its rahks for a woman? 

Richard Williams 

• Anthony Sher is taking part 
in an informal question and 
answer session at the Barbican 
Theatre this morning, starting 
at 10.30am. Tickets, including 
refreshments, cost £4.75. 


Radio 

Serious business of 
making ’em laugh 


The plight of the radio funny 
man is a bit like that of the 
blue comedian set down to 
entertain an audience of 
Presbyterian elders: “Ye’D no 
get a laugh oot of us, laddie”. 
Or rather “Ye’ll no get a laugh 
oot of me multiplied by half a 
million”. The precise figure is 
neither here nor there, but the 
analogy is close because every 
radio broadcaster is, in effect, 
addressing an audience of one 
(or maybe two or three) 
multiplied thousands of limes 
over, an audience who sits or 
stands or wanders about 
pretty well impervious to the 
warm tide of sympathy that 
rises when a comic begins to 
make live contact. 

The successful comedy 
shows get over this by building 
up a fond of sympathy, and 
I’m Sony I Haven’t A Clue 
(Radio 4. Saturdays, repeating 
Wednesdays) is one of them. 
We know now what to expect 
of the resident panel (Brooke- 
Taylor. Rush ton. Garden, 
Junkin) as they maunder like 
four mutinous cretins never 
quite safely under the control 
of charge-nurse Lyttelton. 

On the strength of a pre- 
vious series, I am also kindly 
disposed towards Dr Rob 
Bucbman who, in Medicine 
Balls (Radio 2, Mondays) is 
delivering a new set of mock 
medical lectures to an audi- 
ence.- Of course, Dr Buchman 
knows exactly what he is 
talking about he is a talented 
medical scientist, and last 
time his audience of students 
at a leaching hospital — and 
this audience of one at home - 
fell about in recognition of a 
fine send-up. 

This time things are not so 
happy. Some disastrous 
scheduling — he was recorded 
over Easter weekend — left 
him with thin, dull audiences 
— and It shows. He is sing- 
ling for laughs. But some of 
is lines are very good. His 
wide-eyed inquiry as to how 
any particular hair knows it is 
a pubic hair is funny, partly 
because it touches on a 
burgeoning field of research 
that has been heard to take 
itself a little solemnly. But T 
think this missed' his audi- 
ence. Although l am told his 
fourth and last disquisition 
picks up quite a lot, my advice 


would be to wait for another 
series. 

The “ make- m e-laugh- 
da mn-you” response is at its 
most active with newcomers, 
while the best wear it down. 
However, I give nothing for 
the chances of Trivia Test 
Match (Radio 4, Wednesdays, 
regurgitating Thursdays). 
That the Radio Times billing 
refers to Paul Spencer as 
“groundsman” is a gloomy 
portent and the product lives 
down to it. Here is another 
panel game, one based loosely, 
and for me so far 
incomprehensively, on the 
laws of cricket Tim Rice, 
Willie Rushton (again), Wil- 
liam Franklyn and Martin 
Jarvis are the players. Brian 
Johnston (inevitably) the um- 
pire. The questions are of such 
amazing, such heterogeneous 
inconsequence — “Which is 
the most middle-class town in 
England?" Answer Bromley— 

. that it must have required a 
very high degree of misplaced 
ingenuity to think them up. 
To be fair. Trivia Test Match 
is supposed to be, as its 
description, triviaL Bui trivia 
are first cousins to, and often 
indistinguishable from, junk. 

I tuned to A Splendid 
Discipline (Radio 4, Sunday) 
without much hope. A series 
tracing “the development of 
music within the cinema”? Oh 
dear — rivers of tunes with 
which to ride into the sunset 
Far from it a newcomer, 
Diane Shelley, presented us 
with a history of the cinema 
from camera obscura via bio- 
scope to celluloid. Maybe, 
when the sunsets . come we 
shall see them in a new light. 
Meanwhile, the first series of 
Face foe Facts (Radio 4, 
Wednesday) has ended. A 
programme on the prodigious 
waste of energy in the public 
services and how an injection 
of private money could reduce 
it gave Margo MacDonald a 
chance to put some telling 
questions and the Treasury a 
chance to tarnish its image 
still further by dismissing 
them. She may not be in the 
laughter business, but next 
lime I shall be kindly disposed 
to Ms MacDonald and her 
programme, too. 

David Wade 


An auction 
where you can 
even afford 
the time. 

If the prices don't put some auctions out of your 
reach, the viewing and sale times certainly wilL 
Sothebyb Conduit Street Sales are devised to fit 
in with your lifestyle. So there are evening and 
Sunday viewings, with the sale on the following 
Monday evening: 

You’ll find many complete room settings of 
furniture, rugs, ceramics, silver and works of art. 
As few pieces, if any need restoration, they are 
ready to take home and enjoy Delivery is in- 
expensive and easily arranged on the spot 
Visa or Access Cards are accepted. And as lots 
start from as little as £200, time won't be the only 
thing you can afford. 



VIEWING TIMES 

S™? 1 3 t r< ? August in -00 am -4.00 pm 

Monday 4th August 9.00 am-2.00 pm 

NEXT SALE 

Monday 4th August ... 530 pm . 9 00 pm 

JWlEBYS 



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August 2-8, 1986 


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This is the man that Jack built 




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Jack Lemmon, 
star of early 
Wilder films, 
comes to the 
London stage 
next week in 
an American 
classic. Bryan Appleyard met 
a veteran who still likes to 
take on the challenge of fear 

J ack Lemmon is half- New York and Roger Peters, 
way up a ladder out- the co-producer, came up lo 
side the Haymarket me and just said who 1 would 
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J ack Lemmon is half- 
way up a ladder out- 
sat the Haymarket 
Theatre Royal, dose 
to Piccadilly Circus. 
That's where the 50 or so 

photographers want him, so 

that's where be goes. “Who ees 
; zis guy?" asks a young French 
iourist, irritated at being 
L forced into the road by the 
-growing crowd. “Jack 
Lemmon . . . aah” He seems 
placated by the information. 

The crowd lurches back into 
the stalls bar, a tide of camera 
equipment and flagging bon- 
homie. Lemmon keeps going, 
answering every question, 
shaking every hand and even 
; autographing a few 
■ photographs. 

. For television, radio and the 
press, without 'any detectable 
- weariness he trots out -the 
'-same answers — “No, Tvp 
i never played on the London 
■stage before . .. Yes, it's a 
“ great thrill . . . No, I wasn't 
worried about terrorism ..." 

and every dine he sounds as 
though he means h, is im- 
pressed by the acuity of the 
questioner and would like to 
get to know him better. The 
ninny thing is that he does, he 
is and be would. 

For Lemmon is as nice, 
patient and even-tempered as 
everybody says Mis. Dressed 
in light -blue windcheater*, 
Reebok tennis shoes, grey 
' cords and a blue towelling 
. shin, he looks the essence of 
stable, tolerant, wealthy mid- 
dle America. The one negative 
touch is that he looks a. little 
- fraiL The 61 yeais have pretty 
thoroughly marked him and it 
seems improbable that he can 
sustain the three hours 15 
minutes of Jonathan Miller's 

S roduction of Eugene 

'Neill’s Long Day's Journey 
Into Night* which opens at the 
Haymarket on August 4. . 

Miller is in evidence among 
the hacks and-iells the story of 
Lemmon’s casting as James 
Tyrone. 

“I was walking through the 
foyer of the Plaza Hotel in 




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Photograph bySwaah Kandia 

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New York and Roger Peters, 
the co-producer, came up to 
me and just said who 1 would 
want to play Tyrone if I was 
directing the play. 1 said 
somebody like Jade Lemmon, 
then 1 thought and. said/In 
fact, 1 would like Jack 
Lemmon.*** 

"Done”, said Peters, and 
the show was on the road, 
running finally into Broadway 
where it picked up startled and 
impressed reviews. Miller had 
shortened the immense play 
by running speeches over each 
other. It represented perhaps 
the first genuinely new ap- 
proach to a work which is 
about as sacred as hot dogs 
and motherhood to 
Americans. - 

But Lemmon is sacred too. 
In comedy and in tragedy he 
has come to represent the 
. reasonable, guy confronted by 
the unreasonable — immoral- 
ity in The Apartment, the need 
to be a woman in Some Like It 
Hot or the enduringly cantan- 
kerous Walter Matthau. Lat- 
terly he has also taken on the 
cause of outraged liberalism in 
the film Missing and in his 
real-life support of ecology 
groups. 

Before the media Circus, we 
spoke m the Haymarket’s - 
dressing room number 10. It is 
a spartan, uncomfortable - 
place, wiihan empty-board on - 
the wall headed ‘telegrams’, 
and abed; , 

H e told me to sit on 
Ralph Richard- 
son's chair “if you 
like. He left it here 
and never both- 
ered to pick it up*'.Lemmon is 
genuinely thrilled about the 
idea of London theatre. “I'm 
like a two-year-old kid again. 
I've never played here before. 

I kept meaning to but things 
got in the way." 

His speech is rapid and 
expressive. He moves and 
gesticulates a lot to make his 
points — and there are plenty 
to make. 

“It's the first time I’ve 
played O'Neill as well and it’s 







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Almost SO films and two Oscars later. Jack Lemmon^ fi^frcm belng pcrtgrbcdhy his pomshing programme, confesses to feeling ‘like a two-year-old kid again- 


not a' contemporary - part. 1 
almost always play contem- 
porary parts —■ I think 1 
understand . them. .1 under- 
stand the' pressures we are all 
under. Tm also drawn by films 
that have a point of view 
about our behaviour. Obvi- 
ously getting the comic or 
tragic element right comes 
first, but then you need to tell 
people something. Billy 
Wilder did it in The Apart- 
ment — he grew a rose in a 
garbage pile". 

It was the seven films made 
with Wilder which distilled 
the essence of the roost famil- 
iar Lemmon persona. The 
first. Some Like It Hot, 
teamed him up with Tony 
Curtis as two musicians on the 
run, obliged to disguise them- 
selves -as women. He spent a 
week with Curtis working on 
ibe make-up and then tried it 
out by going into the women's 
room on the Columbia lot. 
Nobody batted an eyelid. 

Wilder seemed to have 
glimpsed Lemmon’s ability to 
suggest a man in the grip of a 
mania to straighten things out, 
to get back to normality, but 
whose every attempt seems to 
make things worse. This can 
be comic or tragic and Wilder 
used Lemmon for both. 

Lemmon himself is quite 
dear about the ancestry of the 
style. “ When I was young 
there were three actors who 
really knocked me on my can 
— Spencer Tracy, Robert 
: Donat and Jean-Louis 


Barrault. J think Les Enfams 
du Paradis showed me that i 
acting was much more than 
just the voice. So 1 came to use 
my. face and my body more 
and more.” 

He was born in Boston. On 
the day of the delivery, his 
lather did not want to leave a 
bridge game so they arrived 
late at the hospital. They were 
then stuck in a lift and it was 
in there that Lemmon 
breathed his first At the age of 
nine the lead in the school 
play fell ill and Lemmon stood 
in. He had a 15-line speech, 
not one of which he knew. He 
walked centre stage in a 
costume far too large for him 
and got a laugh. He walked to 
the wings to be prompted by a 
teacher and got another laugh. 
He did the same for every line 
and got 15 l a u g h s. 

“I guess some ldds would 
have never wanted to on 
the stage again. But I realised I 
could make these people 
laugh. After that I never 
warned to do anything else." 

He went to Harvard and,- 
because of the war, was 
obliged to graduate with a 
degree of War Service Sci- 
. ences — “what every actor 
needs'*. "While hustling -for 
television parts around New 
York, he met Walter Matthau. 
At the mention of the name, 
the already watery eyes turn 
even moister. 

“Oh God, that guy makes 
me laugh when he just walks 
into the room. I mean his 


walk . . .“ Lemmon leaps to 
his feet and mimics the weird, 
semi-crippled Matthau gait. 

“There was • one movie 
when he bad broken his arm. 
We took the cast off eveiy 
time he shot a scene, but he 
bad to keep his arm in the 
same position. Then when it 
healed nobody noticed the 
difference — he always bolds it 
there like he was paralysed or 
something.*’ 


A fter hundreds of TV 
shows, Lemmon 
was signed up by 
Columbia, whose 
Harry Cohn im- 
mediately insisted that be 
should change his name to 
Lennon, arguing that they 
could not nave a lemon on 
their payroll 

“I didn't want to do that so I 
asked him how he pronounced 
it — Lenin? Wasn't he some 
goddam Russian revolu- 
tionaiy? Hairy just saidi'Naw 
1 checked that, he was 
Leneeen! This is LennON* ” 
But Lemmon won the point — 
probably because Cohn was so 
impressed by the fact that he 
had been lo Harvard. 

The third- Lemmon movie 
for Columbia was John Ford's 
Mister Roberts in which be 
played Ensign Pulver. Sud- 
denly he was big box-office. 

Almost 50 movies and two 
Oscars later he is unassailable 
— utterly familiar and utterly 
likeable^ He is loved because, 
even when playing . un- 


sympathetic characters, be 
makes then understandable, 
acceptable. And even in the 
most farcical movie, be in- 
troduces what Jonathan 
Miller caDed “an edge of 
seriousness", a certain inten- 
sity. He always seems visibly 
to be thinking, rationalising, 
hoping. 

He lives in Los Angeles with 
his wife Felicity. His son from 
his first marriage, Chris, is in 
show-business, while his 
daughter Courtenay has been 
studying in London before 
going to New York Univer- 
sity. And Matthau remains his 
greatest firiend. 

Long Day's Journey Into 
Night is in London for two 
months before going to Israel 
and then Dublin — “Terrific 
booking", Matthau com- 
mented when he heard about 
it , “the Jews invented guilt 
and the Irish turned it into an 
art form". It's a punishing 
programme but Lemmon does 
not seem perturbed. He is 
evidently tougher than he 
looks ami besides, be believes 
above all in taking risks. 

“When 1 have the sense to 
do things that frighten me, 
then 1 come out at the end a 
better actor. I mean I know 
I'm a better actor now than 
when I started this.” 

Later we wander out to 
Trafalgar Square and he oblig- 
ingly feeds some pigeons for 
the photographer. Tourists 
peer curiously. I ask him if he 
gets recognised a lot 


“The hair.helps . . (his nor- 
mally short hair has been 
replaced for this production 
by a flowing grey wave) “but 
it’s a pain in the ass. 1 have to 
wash it every day and gel it 
and so on”. 

Finally one tourist plucks 
up the courage to satisfy his 
curiosity. 

“Is that Jack Lemmon?” he 


asksjne. And wben I say yes, 
the man beams with helpless 
pleasure as the old star — one 
of America's finest — ambles 
off into the crowd on the way 
back to his hotel 


Mgfit opens at thfl^fheatre 
Royal, Haymarket (01 -930 
9832) on Monday. 


SATURDAY 


Dream castles to g£KL«}? 

log cabins: the JJ » 

total experience gSS™" u i« 

of a Californian 11 ii 

tour - page 10 JJ g 


Chess 

Concerts 

Crossword 

Dunce 

Drink 

Eating Out 


13 OotandAboni II 

13 Opera 14 

14 Photography 14 

13 Review 13 

14 Rock & Jazz 14 
J1 Shopping 12 


11 Turns 


VICTORIA WINE 
OF 

The month 


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A LONG CAREER'S JOURNEY 


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One of Hollywood's shrewdest 
and most in te ll ig e nt actors. 

Jack Lemmon started in com- 
edy and has grown steadily 
more serious. Days of Wine 
and Roses, in which he played 
an alcoholic, gave early notice 
of something darker behind 
the gift for tight comedy. 

“Happiness”, said the director 
Billy Wilder, a man who does 
not suffer acton gladly, “is 
working with Jack Lemmon.” 

Polished and professional, ^ „ 

Lemmon has never given a bad :•£££ 
performance and rarely a dull 
one. His comic tinting b 
superb but he can . suffer 
convincingly as welL In either , 

role he is the nice gay trying to Essence of Lemmon: in The Front Page, 1974 (left) and Some Like It Hot,. 1959 

make sense of a chaotic world, ■ ' 

winning oar sympathy because 

he is not obvioasly smarter * 

than we are. 

His finest screen achieve- 
merit, though not the best 
known, was his portrayal of a 
email businessman beset with |S^ 
personal »«! financial prob- 
kms in Save the Tiger. To get 
die film made, Lemmon 

agreed to forgo a salary; his ^ ' 

reward was rave notices and an ■ 

Oscar. It b surprising that he 
has not tackled the (tig dassics 
before, but after James' Tyrone 
in Long Day’s Journey, one of 
the most taxing roles in the 

repertoire, he seems prepared y-.V-'" 

to scale new heights. 

Peter Waymark Light and shade: in The Apartment, 1960 (left) and The China Syndrome, 1979 


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Edited by Shona Crawford Poole 


TRAVEL 


California — from luxury to loneliness 


Fantastic diversions on 
the road to perfection 


★ Subtlety and 

discretion 
|Bm were not ex- 
actly William 

|- ec ^ saB= ^i Randolph 
Hearst's style. The image of a 
bursting cornucopia guided nis 
hand when he built a little place of 
his own in the hills overlooking 
the surf-blasted coast of California 
at San Simeon, midway between 
Los Angeles and San Francisco. 

La Casa Grande is a 137-foot 
high mansion packed with art 
treasures and surrounded by 120 
acres of fecund gardens, Greek 
and Roman style terraces and 
pools, fountains and extravagant 
Renaissance guest houses. When 
he invited people to stay - usually 
film stars - they pranced between 
the white marble statues, the 
slender palms and orange trees to 
the whirr of home-movie cameras. 

William Randolph's soaring 
fantasy spreads richly over La 
Cuesta Encamada — the en- 
chanted hill - its twin ivory 
coloured towers beseeching 
admiration from the drivers on 
Route One of the glorious Califor- 
nian coast a few miles to the west. 

Hearst Castle, as it is now better 
known, is an elaborate alabaster 
and marble memorial to what 
must have been his lusty yearning 

On the beaches seals 
and sealions roll in 
the spume of the surf 

for European and Mediterranean 
civilization. The treasures, 
though, are real enough and 
nothing was left to chance. As a 
smart-suited guide explained, the 
Gothic and Renaissance tapestries 
inside the mansion fitted the walls 
so perfectly because the walls were 
constructed to fit the tapestries. 

We saw. too. some of the 
publishing millionaire's juddering 
home movies, fading images of 
Clarke Gable, Carole Lombard 
and Charlie Chaplin cavorting in 
the sun-burnt grounds and heard 
the story of one starlet who 
refused a visit to such a remote 

f ilace in case die was attacked by 
ndians. Finally persuaded, she 
arrived at the main gate at night to 
be surrounded by Heart's staff, 
on horseback and dressed as 
Apaches, sent down to frighten the 
pompous wits out of her. 

Hearst started building in 1919 
on one of the lushest greenest 
ranges of hills on that stretch of 
the coast- As a fantasy it predates 
Disneyland by a good 30 years. 
Hearst Castle was presented to the 
State of California in 1958, seven 
years after his death, and now tens 
of thousands of visitors eagerly 
pay $8 for a conducted tour, to 

Continental 
Motoring 


traipse the Doge’s Suite, the 
Celestial Suite, the Gothic Study 
and Library, to admire the tap- 
estries, the fine wood carvings, the 
huge French and Italian fire 
mantels, the silver collection, the 
Persian rugs and Roman mosaics. 
When Heart could not replicate, 
he bought the real thing. 

Although I started my Califor- 
nian motoring tour 250 miles 
further south in Los Angeles. I 
regarded Heart Castle as the 
gateway to the part of the state I 
was to most enjoy — the beautifiil 
100-mile long Big Sur coastline to 
trendy Carmel, Steinbeck's 
Monterey, north to San Francisco 
and then east into the Sierra 
Nevada for some crisp, tingling 
mountain air. 

Carmel is a swish, expensive 
little town of bistros and galleries 
and marks the entrance to a 
beautifUl diversion on the way to 
Monterey through the pines, cy- 
press groves and private estates of 
the Del Monte Forest At its 
western edge, along the rocky 
beaches, seals, sealions and sea 
otters roll in the spume of the surf. 

As I left for Monterey, the clear 
blue skies were beginning to 
darken with storm clouds and the 
Pacific was doing a passable 
imitation of the North Sea on a 
winter's day. I made straight for 
Cannery Row, sure in the knowl- 
edge that I was about to be 
disappointed. 

The former sardine canning 
area had moved John Steinbeck to 
write: “Cannery Row is a poem, a 
grating noise, a quality of light, a 
tone, a habit, a nostalgia, a 
dream". That was some time ago 
and now it just packs tourists. 

I looked in vain for some trace 
or memory of Doc Ricketts, 
Dora’s bordello <1 did not like to 
ask) and Lee Chong's grocery, but 
found only canneries converted 
into shops, restaurants and trinket, 
'stalls. On nearby Fisherman's 
Wharf I watched theseals and 
sealions crash about among the 
yachts and fishing boats and fight 
for sleeping space on the timber 
superstructure beneath the wharf 

I was told it was impossible to 
find anything even slightly bad 
about San Francisco. I can under- 
stand why, although the city was 
lashed by torrential rain for most 
of the time I was there and 
AJcatraz Island and the Golden 
Gate Bridge made only brief 
appearances through the swirling 
mist drifting across the bay. 

The storms that were drowning 
the city in rain were dumping 
several feet of late spring snow in 
the Sierra Nevada about five 
hours driving to the east, and I was 
unable to reach my next location. 
Mammoth Lakes, on the other 
side of the mountain range. 



Mysteries that beckon 
beyond dark forests 


Pride comes with the falls; extravagance at Hearst Castle and rural splendour in the Yosenrite Park 


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Los j 
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TRAVEL NOTES 


Craig Seton flew to California on a British 
Caledonian flight (Gatwtcfc-Los Angeles, from 
£489) arranged by Jetsave. Sussex House, 
London Road, East Grinstead, Sussex RH19 
1 LD (0342-2771 1). Self-drive car hire was 
arranged by Bricar International Car Rental, 
28-30 woodcote Road, Waffington, Surrey, 
SM6 0NN (01-773 2321). An economy car 
costs from £73 for seven days. Jetsave can 
arrange fly-drive holidays with Bricar. 

Except in Yosemite Park, he stayed in Best 
Western Hotels charging from £30 a night for 
a double room. For reservations contact Best 
Western Hotels, 26 Kew Road, Richmond, 
Surrey TW9 2N A (01 -940 9766). 

The Ahwahnee Hotel costs £96 a night fora 
double room. Reservations: 5410 E. Home, 
Fresno, CA 937 27. Cheaper accommodation 
is available in the village from £14 per night 
for tented cabins. 

David Walker travelled on a three-week fly- 
drive package from British Airways with a 
four-door Renault Alliance rental can £1 ,300 
for two adults and child. Additional car hire 
charges were £1 85. Cheap out-of-season 
motel prices start at about £20 a night per 
room. The Visitors' Guide to the Redwood 
Empire is useful; it is available from the 
Redwood Empire Association, 1 Market 
Plaza, San Francisco CA 94105. 


I found myself instead a guest at 
the classic Ahwahnee Hotel in the 
stunningly beautifiil Yosemite 
Valley, in the foothills of the 
Sierras. The drive there was 
through lush green meadows and 
the lower valley was bursting into 
blossom, but winter was still 
firmly locked in Yosemite. 

Yosemite National Park is 
1,200 square miles - of -quite 
extraordinary beauty — upland - 
meadows and lakes, cascading 
waterfalls, giant sequoias and 
towering peaks. 

From the balcony of my sixth-- 


floor room at the Ahwahnee I 
could see Uuejays crowding the 
snow-laden pines while a white- 
headed woodpecker drilled for 
succulent Californian bugs. In the 
background, Yosemite falls 
crashed down the mountainside in 
a doud of spray and downstairs, in 
the huge, baronial diningroom, 
riders scoffed strawberries and 
salmon and wandered about the 
timber and granite vastness of the 
5ffyear-oId hoteL 
The snow was still deep on the 
ground, so I investigated the 
.valley on horseback, trekking 


along the river valley to the base of 
El Capitan, the mammoth, sheer- 
laced mountain of granite that is 
one of Yosemite’s many land- 
marks, and clambering uphill 
along rock-strewn paths, among 
the pines below the falls. 

Yosemite is exquisite. My last' 
glimpse was of hawks soaring 
above the peaks, deer running by 
the river and a family of coyote 
tumbling in the crisp drifts of 
snow. 

Craig Seton 


1 ~~ In summer 
the northern 
coast of Cal- 
ifomiacanbe 
misty. It was 
early winter on State Highway 
One, 250 miles of switchback cliff 
and shore all the way from San 
Francisco Bay to the Oregon 
bottler. In the late afternoon the 
view out across the Pacific to the 
setting sun was brilliantly dear. 

The destination, just before . 
dusk, was Fort Ross, the restored 
’site of an Imperial Russian out- 
post established by fur trappers 
the year Napoleon reached Mos- 
cow. And it was time to leave 
because by 5pm northern Califor- 
nia was dark. 

On the coast road motels are 
scarce. One route lay inland, into 
the forests. The road lacked verges 
and often signs; it dippe d to cross 
a succession of fast streams before 
starting to climb the coastal hills. 
And so it went for 40 night-time 
miles, every comer threatening an 
end to road, mi impassable wall of 
pine, or worse until eventually it 
became a freeway lit by neon, the 
light of civilized America. 

After the dark woods, UJdah 
_was a gaudy oasis, a working town 
of loggers and fanners with a 
latterday mixture of wine-makers 
and marijuana growers. Out of 
season the motels all showed their 
vacancy lights. On main street 
there was Ron de Voo’s restaurant 
with down-home cooking and 
matronly waitresses out of Alice 
Doesn 'r Live Here Anymore. 

North from Ukiah is the Ave- 
nue of the Giants, 33 miles of 
towering redwoods. East is lake 
country and west is the ocea n . 
Much of the terrain is only for 
serious backwoods people with 
boots and canoes and four-wheel- 
drive vehicles. But the state- 
owned forests and beaches are 
various and accessible to the more 
casual traveller: for me there was 
at least one sunny November 
afternoon on a great sandbar at the 
mouth of a small stream called 
Russian Gulch, on one side the 
surf and rocks, on the other a 
shall ow sandy stream in which the 
silver birch and California oak 
trailed their brandies. 

Highway One runs out of San 
Francisco across the Golden Gate 
Bridge into the villa-spotted hills 
of Marin County, hot-tub-land, 
then down into an eerie valley 
astride the San Andreas FaulL 
Somewhere in the mantle beneath 
are the very plates whose friction 
causes the crust of California to 
move and quake continuously. 

The road marks the boundary of 
the Point Reyes National Sea- 
shore, a peninsula out of geologi- 
cal time and place that has 
lumbered over the aeons from its 


original site off present-day Los 
Angeles. It is a mysterious terri- 
tory with sudden micro-climates, 
racing tides, desen fauna and 
English chalk diflfe thrown 
together. 

Slopping on the highway is easy, 
to picnic, to watch the birds or 
examine the plants and trees. At 
the Sonoma Coast State Beach, a 
diff path leads down to rock- 
pools. Huge Pacific gulls watch as 
you poke among the starfish, 
urchins, sea cucumbers and kelp. 

It is an empty coast and 
settlements are spread out. Bodega 
Bay, the location of John 
Carpenter’s creepy film, 77 jf Fog, 
is a small port with fish res- 
taurants on the quay; Mendocino 
is rather precious, a little town of 
clapboard Victorian dwellings in 
the New England style. 

Fort Bragg is preferable, with its 
smell of pine sap and the rumble 
of saws in its timber yards. Its 
harbour is down in .the canyon 
where the Noyo River enters the 
ocean — a deep clear stream on 
which the branches brought down 
from the mountains battle with 
the fronds of kelp drawn in with 
the tide. 

On the Noyo River little fishing 
boats ride at anchor. They bring in 
deep-sea fishand take out visitors 

The redwoods form 
a triumphal arch 
into the hills beyond 

in February and March to see the 
procession of grey whales up the 
California coast from their breed- 
ing grounds off Mexico. 

From Mendocino the road bade 
to Ukiah runs along the broad 
bottom of the Navarro River 
where the redwoods form a trium- 
phal arch into the hills. Here the 
woods soon give way to meadow- 
land and beyond that, climbing up 
the valley sides, the russet leaves 
of late wines. This is Anderson 
Valley, one of the newest and most 
northerly of California's wine- 
prod urine areas. 

The fields round Boonville 
glowed in autumnal colours and 
the roadside fruit stands offered, 
even in November, fresh-picked 
apples and pumpkin. But you are 
warned to stay on the road round 
these parts and do your up- 
country exploring in the state 
parks. For Anderson Valley and 
out-of-the-way spots like it are in 
the “Emerald Triangle” where 
pot-growing is a $2.5 billion a year 
industry. Growers tend to shoot 
first before discovering that the 
botanically ignorant can easily 
confuse marijuana -sinsemilla 
with hollyhock. 

David Walker 


SHOPPING 


Choice of over 150 hotels within 
easy during distance of Calais and 
Boulogne 

With jTJiir tlrkrts.youH be £hm a 
free tape cassette or information pack 
for the area. 

Prices, from around £51 p.p* 
Include hold accommodation and 
tore aldose. and mum hoteraali cross- 
ing with car from Dover [assuming 4 
adulis In parry). 

For a brochure see tour (ravel 
jfiml or phone 1011 554 706 1 . 


A crafty gleam in the eye 



Silversmith Sarah Jones dived 
into the lion's den this week 
when she opened a new shop 
at 12 Piccadilly Arcade, Lon- 
don W1 (01-499 8415). Hav- 
ing progressed from Camden 
Lock 10 years ago to 
Basinghall Street in the City in 
1980. she now feels ready to 
take on the challenge of an 
area that is studded wnb starry 
jewellers. 

She will still be selling her 
much-admired silver and 
enamel miniature flowers — 
the newest are pale blue flax 
and pink crane's bill, each 
£310.50 — and she has created 
a caviar spoon with a stur- 
geon-shaped handle for the 
new shop at £1 15. (“There are 


Cruise from Europe 
toAmca,Brazil 
&the Caribbean 

From £1250 including flights 

Visit a dozen exafie ports on four continents on this uniaue 
voyage across the South Atlantic. The elegant Ocean Islanaer 
sails October 12th from Malaga to Barbados, offering three 
weeks of luxury cruising from just £1250, including flights. 

. Enjoy superb cuisine, entertainment nightly and a tun-filled 
program of activities as you cruise to such fascinating 
. places as Gibraltar, Dakar, the Canaries, 

; the Amazon and five Caribbeart^^^^^^fl0||Rff9fl 
islands. — HOl 


^ As a special bonus, 

we're offering a free three-night stay 
at Heywoods, o ne of Barbados' leading 
resorts, at the end of the cruise. Space is gbsahab* 
limited, so book now! See your travel agent, 
call or write for our brochure. M. 


BAJtBADOS ■ 
MMfWMUn 
6BNADA4 


oems Bum* 


JH 


OCEAN CRUISE LINES 

10 Frederick Ossa SianhafM Ptoce; 
London W22HD. TeL 01 7247555. 


A wealth of top 
quality work 
is discovered by 
Beryl Downing 

lots of caviar dishes but no 
spoons to go with them.”) 
There is also a good selection 
of charming christening 
presents, including a duck- 
handled beaker, 2' Ain high, 
£207; Mole, Toad and Ratty, 
IVrin high, £138. Smaller 
items start at £11.50. 

• Pockets are no longer the 
only place for beautifiil old 
watches. You can now have an 
18th-century-style stand to 
show them off. Mike Fitz is a 
specialist wood turner and will 
make the stand shown in 
rosewood, paduk, English yew 
or walnut. With 22ct gold- 
plated bolsters, feet and hook 
it costs £38, without gold 
trimmings £28. Available 
from Mike Fitz Designs. 37 
Meadway. Harpenden, Hert- 
fordshire (05827 62231). 

• If embroidery and tapestry 
is your craft, your work could 
benefit from being pro- 
fessionally displayed. Chris- 
topher Wright of Printed Page, 
2-3 Bridge Street, Winchester, 
Hampshire (0692 54072), has 
framed most things from a 
blank cheque for a local bingo 
association to a 15ft tapestry 
made at the beginning of the 
century. Choose from 200 
wooden and 100 aluminium 
frames. The service takes two 
weeks and costs between £5 
and £60 according to size. The 
components are also for sale if 
you want to frame it yourself 

• John Makepeace has been 
leading his Parnham furniture 
students through the wood for 


Paris Poster 

For a free copy of hi 

attractive poster ctdipbl- 

ftiBvtitatattdbyAntblie 
together with c«jff 
brochure on mdhrichul 
tadiuin hdiJiyi to dia 
beautiful city, write to - 
Tune Off Ltd, 
ZaCtuscerObsc. 
London SWIX7BQ. 


10 successful years and an 
exhibition of his and their 
work will be on show at the 
National Theatre until August 
23. It also includes plans for a 
new School for Woodland 
Industry which will open next 
year to teach the use of 
Britain's forest resources. 

Several of Makepeace’s own 
designs are on show including 
the cabinet shown, a one-off 
made by Alan Amey in 1983. 
Similar pieces to commission 
would be from £7,000. Less 
expensive pieces for sale at the 
exhibition include walking 
sticks, hand mirrors, book 
ends and clocks from £25. 

If you are travelling fiither 
afield to the Lake District, try 
to take in the Craft North 
exhibition at The Tithebarn, 
Old Windebrowe. Brund- 
holme Road, Keswick. There 
is a particular emphasis on 
furniture this year with some 
interesting pieces by Terence 
Alexander, including a cir- 
cular folding table which open 
to a figure of eight, £750. 

Smaller pieces include 
wood-turned vases and boxes 
by Maurice Mullens and 
attractive silver jewriUery by 
Richard Curtis, inlaid with 
perspex, wood or ivory. Prices 
for earrings, pendants, tie pins 
and cuff links are from £10 to 
£50. The exhibition is open 
Monday to Saturday 10.30am 
to 5.30pm, Sunday 11am to 
5pm until August 30. 

• The Design Council is look- 
ing for silversmiths and jewel- 
lers to take part in an 
exhibition from April 29 to 
May 30 next year. The aim is 
to show the best of British 
design in precious metals and 
jewels, both production items 
and one-off pieces. Sub- 
missions are invited from 
students, established crafts- 
men and company designers. 
For more information contact 
David Hayward at the Design 
Centre, 28 Haymarket Lon- 
don SWl (01-839 8000). 


West Himalayan^ 
Holidays / 



IN THE GARDEN 

All sweetness and light 


English yew cabinet designed 
by John Makepeace and 
made by Alan Amey in 1983 


Mini Moley crafted in sQver 
by Sarah Jones, £138 



. 

Hand-turned rosewood watch 
stand by Mike Fitz, £38 


Sweet peas are in the blood of 
the Unwin family. Their pas- 
sion for the species Lamyrus 
odorata spans four genera- 
tions — since 1901, in feet, 
wheuWilliam Unwin (a 
grower of cut flowers for 
Covent Garden market) 
discovered a bold new pink 
■ sweet pea. 

The bloom was not only 
larger but the standard — the 
upright back petal — had a 
distinctly wavy edge. William 
named it Gladys Unwin for 
his eldest daughter and began 
the lineage. He started the 
seed firm which still bears the 
famfl y name and devoted his 
energies to plant breeding and 
selling. 

Charles Unwin, his son, 
continued and extended bis 
father’s work and the line 
continues: his granddaughter 
Sally works with the firm in 
the plant laboratories and his 
son, Goh'n, is chairman, f 
understand that a new variety 
to be announced for next year 
will be named. . .Colin 
Unwin. His father rated this 
sew red sweet pea as the best 
he had encountered — a fine 
parting gift. 

Charles Unwin liked vari- 
eties which have a tendency to 
produce an extra petal (known 
as duplex flowers) which are 
anathema to purists but very 
pretty. A variety which does 


WEEKEND TIPS 


• Only feed sweet peas 
when they are well into bloom 
and if really necessary. 

Use sseak sokitkm of a genera] 
purpose liquid fertilizer. 

Pick flowers continuously — 
they may stop coming ff 
pods are allowed to torn. 


c^grifmmes 

FRUIT CAGES 



Family flower: the Sally Unwin, a rich pink and cream 


this to perfection is Cham- 
pagne Bubbles, a wonderful 
froth of palest pink. Another, 
Gypsy Rose, is a cerise beauty. 

Rather to my surprise I was 
drawn to a trial group of 
sweet-smelling blooms where 
the pale base colour of the 
petals was veined and out- 
lined in a darker shade. This 
form is known unromantically 
as the Unwin stripes. 

About half the varieties 
carried by Unwins are bred in 
their own laboratories, the rest 
are bought in. It is good to see 
that some of the new kinds 
(including the variety Colin 
Unwin) are raised by amateur 
gardeners. They send seed to 

• Dead head and tie in 
cli mbing and rambler roses. 

• Start thinking about 
spring-flowering bulbs — they 
need planting this mnntii. 

• Sow corn-salad and 
spina ch beet to augment fresh 
winter greenery. 

• Sow Japanese bulb 
onions. 


Unwins who grow the plants 
for three years to test the 
trueness to type. 

Work continues towards 
improvement and greater 
distinction with several new 
varieties introduced each year 
but the great quest, for a 
buttercup-yellow sweet pea, 
has so far proved as elusive as 
the black tulip. 

Francesca Greenoak 

Sweet Peas: Their History. 
Development and Culture by 
Charles W. J. Unwin, just 
published, is available from 
Unwins Seeds. Histon, 
Cambridge (£4. 95, post free). 

PUNNED GARDENS 

Iron He-fitc twdaa. May we show 
! Ju Mat can be dooe with our 

Ssasi, 

wo) Wrwnv-flar. Soucestar GL2 7PL 


COWSLIPS 

Thp toot wU nMtq 


Leisurely waio for flowers and bird enthusiasts ■ treks over high passes for 
the advenhaous - each accompanied by our expert leaders - from £1320. 

Brochure on request 

66 Hungerford Road, London N7 9LP. 01-607 4809. 



OXSUPS ( 


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OUT AND ABOUT 




Nigel Andrew explores the Victorian 
X' fantasies of Knebworth House, 

ancestral home of the Lytton family 




»• 


- -. s 


3 ■., 


*■ ( 


Tbere is an easy way to visit 
Knebworth House, and there 
isa hard way. The "easy option . 
is to tala the Knebworth exit 
from the A1(M) at Stevenage. 
Then you tan sample the 
delights of the lavishly ap: 
pointed adventure . play- 
ground,' and have a drive of 
nearly two miles through the 
Park before you eventually get 
to the house. 

It is much more 
adventurous ro tate; the train, 
then- walk ” through Old 
Knebworth, and lake the 
house unawares in a sudden 
flanking movement. That way 
you really feel you’re making a 
discovery. 

As well you might It is an 
amazing building — from the' 
outside,.. an exuberant Vic- 
torian fantasy of everything a 
grand medieval- house ought 
to be: all turrets and battle- 
ments and Gothic pinnacles, 
romantically silhouetted 
against the sky. The walls are 
thick with griffins and 
gargoyles. 

The gardensare also great 
fun — partly formal and partly 
“wilderness”, with woods and 
ponds. Than is a lovely little 
herb 'guitar designed by Ger- 
trude JekyU A little farther 
from the house are various 
amiable devices to part the 
visitor from his. money — the 
best- being - a- narrow-gauge 
railway. 




■ft 





Edward Botwer-Lyttoa: boaxe 
was Us Victoriaa ib«un-caide 


. But tack to the house. 
Inside itis the most remark- 
able extravaganza- of history, 
and pseudo-history - a gernir' 
indy medieval house, in feet, 
but “done over” several times. 
What meets the eye is largely; 
Victorian etataration, with 
some latrirtidyin&4ip. " 

The house has always been 
in the Lytton family, and it 
was the poce-femous novelist 
Edward Bulwer-Lytton, best 
known for his best-sdfing 
blockbuster The Last Days of 
Pompeii, who finally trans- 
formed it into bis Victorian 
dream-castle. But Sir Edwin 
; Lutyens^the great. Edwardian 
architect, who roamed into 
the fondly, also left his marie;-' 
and some of Bulwer-Lytton’i 

most extravagant decorative 
schemes, have; since been 
stripped away. ' 

The great Banqueting Hall 
was once buried in Victoriana, 
bin is now restored to its 17th- 
century essentials. Everything 
is done in wood — now 
beautifully aged — and an 
elaborately carved screen and 
minstrel's gallery give an 
authentic medieval 
atmosphere. 

-There is no getting away 
from old Bulwer-Lytton at 
Knebworth.' His study is as he 
left it, complete with the 
enormous “chibook” pipe he 
enjoyed smoking— and even a 
couple of skulls from Pompeii. 

The rooms of Knebworth 
make a nice potted history of 
four centuries of interior de- 
sign. But the most dazzling of 
all is the State Drawing Room 
— Victorian Gothic at its 
highest pitch, and virtually 
unaltered. The impact of all 
that detail and colour is 
stunning . Phoney-medieval of 
course — but when ifs done 
with arth verve, who's 
complaining? 

•Knebworth' -is : full of 
reminders of other Lyttons, 
past and present — from the 
Elizabeth Lytton Bulwer who 



KENT 
Shore ham 
Distance: 
7 miles 


Parent Valley is still un- 
mistakably Samuel Palmer 
country. For a round-trip 
sampler, Mart by Shoreham 
church (well worth a look). 
Keep to the wide path through 
the fields, though It will 
eventually steer you bade on 
to the main road for a short 
stretch. 

The turning for Castle Farm 
will see you over the river, 
near a mysterious immature 
w indmill. Follow the hack 
road beside hop-fields, then 
the river path along to 
InlKngstaflc Castle, with its 
Tudor gateway, and Lulling- 
stone Roman Villa. Round 
under a fine viaduct and into 
Eynsford, a picture-postcard 
village whfa a lovely grouping 
of bridge, church and pub. 
Plenty ©f other pubs, too, and 
the remains of a clunky 
Norman castle. 

There is too mnch traffic 
bat lots of good-looking 
houses, including Willow Cot- 
tage where Graham Suther- 
land lived in the 1930s. 

The long hue up from the 
station gfres fine views and 



the footpath off it leads 
through woods, .fields aim a 
rifle range (keep a sharp eye' 
for the red flag). 

The way becomes confusing 
towards the end as paths 
multiply and signs disappear 
bnt yon should soon be back 
in Shoreham. Take a look at 
the Water House, where 
Palmer lived, before heading' 
for the Okie George or the 
King's Arms. Then a relaxed 
stroll round Shoreham, a 
beautiful village even now. 

Nigel Andrew 


Old village awaits its new green 


An exuberant Victorian fantasy at everything a medieval home should be i the imp r essive exterior of Knebworth House 


demolished three wings of the 
house to save the rest and left 
behind a recipe for “Simip of 
Snails" (possibly a cough 
medicine), to the 1st Earl of 
Lytton. who was Viceroy of 
India, and the 2nd, who 
married the great beauty Pam- 
ela Plowden. 

The house is now owned by 
the Hon David Lytton 
Cobbokl, who lives there with 
his family, and works wonders 
to keep the place going — even 
to the extent of holding huge 
open-air pop concerts m the 
grounds. But Knebworth de- 
serves to be known for hsel£ 
rather than as a {dace where 
the .Rolling Stones once 
played. 


Knebworth House Is i 
Tues-Sun until Sept 14, and on 
Sept 21 and 28. Park open 
11 am-5^0pm, house and 
gardens noon-5pm. 

OltaM Nnrapapm LM, IMS*. 


The approach to Knebworth 
House makes a good two-pub 
stroll of about lfe miles. You 
can start right opposite the 
station at a modernized “fam- 
ily pub”, the Station Hotel, 
which has a well-equipped 
garden, a family conservatory 
and a very decent, cheap menu. 

After suitable refreshment, 
bear right from the station and 
walk through the long, strag- 
gling village of Old Kneb- 
worth, past several 
pfetnresqne cottages, fields 
and woods, until you come to a 
fork in the road. Turning right 
wilJ take yon straight through 
to Knebworth Hone; tarn left 
and you can go on to the 
Lytton Arms, an unpretentious 
pub, a bit rough and ready, but 
withasarprisiiigfygood menu. 

Just next to the pub there 
mil soon be a new village 


green, surrounded by homes 
carefully to look as 

though they’re always been 
there. This was the brainchild 
of David Cobbold, the owner of 
Knebworth House, who felt 
the village needed a proper 
focal point, and invited archi- 
tects to submit their ideas. 

Knebworth has much to 
offer the Lutyens fan, includ- 
ing St Martin’s Church, bade 
on the B197 (torn left from the 
station). The original parish 
church, St Mary’s, is a lovely 
old boildiiig in the grounds of 
Knebworth House. The Lytton 
Chapel Inside — chock-a-block 
with .superb baroque monu- 
ments — was dosed when I 
visited, owing to a dangerous 
ceiling. Yon can get some idea 
of it through a sqafnL It is 
extraordinary. 


#1 

'+*i. 1 


i ■ *Rr» 



St Mary’s, in the house 
is the original 


unds, 

inch 


OUTINGS 


SUMMER IN THE CITY: 
Barbican family festival which 
in dudes many free 
entertainments from magic and 

Brasjfband concerts! Also 
workshops. Festival begins 
tomorrow at 4pm with "The 
Great Balloon Race" - 
bring your own to enter. 
Barbican Centre, Silk 
Street, London EC2 (01-628 
4141).Tomorrow-Aug 10. 

DERBY DAY: Wide range of 
activities at Derby Art Museum 
and Gallery includes tile- 
decorating, spinning, brass 

sessions urxtermtpert 9 
guidance. 

Derby Museum and Art 
Gallery, The Strand, Derby 
(0332 31 111) Today. 

10am -4pm. Free. 

LIFEBOAT DAYS: Three 
days of on and off-shore 
entertainments at Robin 
Hood's Bay, Statthes and 
Whitby, in aid of the RNLi 


includes diff rescue display - 
and air-sea rescue 
demonstrations. 

Robin Hood's Bay. North 
Yorkshire. Tomorrow, Mon, 
Tues. For details telephone 
0947880762. 

BRISTOL BOAT RALLY: 
Entertainments throughout 
weekend include boat trips, 
helicopter rides, aerial and 
nautical displays, 
exhibitions, fireworks, aquatic 
races and dockside 
diversions. 

Bristol City Docks, Bristol, 
Avon. Further information 
(0272-266031). Today, 

tomorrow. 



snorkelling, salting and 


canoemg. 

Royal Victoria Dock. 

SUvertown Way, London El 6. 
Further Information and 
booking (01-51 1-2326). Todays- 


Aug 


Judy Froshang- 


EATING OUT 


Points of 
style for " 




Jonathan Meades 
finds-a refreshing 
oasis in a desert 
of nothingness 


"Le style est I’homme mime”, 
in other words it’s his essence, 
his fingerprint, the manifesta- 
tion of his uniqueness. But 
Buffon’s aphorism is two 
centuries old and now, of 
course, style means something 
different It means the very 
opposite. 

it signifies off-the-peg 
quirks and mannerisms out of 
a can. It has absolutely noth- 
ing to do with essence, with 
the 'revelation of self! You 
need only think of “style 
writers’' whose nerveless 
prose is littered with borrowed 
tics and nicked gimmicks, of 
“style magazines” which are 
all wrapping and no gift. 

The vast majority of res- 
taurants which serve the deni- 
zens of this post-literate world 
are just another medium for 
.the transmission of designer- 
nothingness. 

The important things are 
these: the tab should be out of 
all proportion to the meal; the 
waiters should look- like Jean 
Gabin playing a waiter in a 
“stylish” film (one made in 
the “stylish” 1930s or 1940s); 
the puttiers, should be either 

The food is gutsy 
and generous 

incredibly famous (have had 
their photo in The Face, have 
sung backing vocals with - The 
Jesus and Mary Chain) or 
fairly famous (have “written” 
for The Face, humped amps 
for The Jesus and Maty 
Chain). Most important: de- 
cor is an, food is nothing. 

This neat and tidy formula 
is complicated by a place like 
Orso. The place is certainly 
one of -recondite make-be- 
lieve: it pretends to be a 
iimeless(1950s. say) basement 
in Milan or Turin. But the 
food is very good: thankfully, 
it ignores the cliches of Lon- 
don-Italian catering and goes 
in for something closer to 
north Italian home cooking - 
pizzas, for example, are made 
with pastry rather than dough. 

But here I am talking grub 
when I should be telling you 
ihat^ the waiters (who are 
efficient and well-mannered) 
do indeed look like models 
pretending to be Gabin or the 
young Barrault, that the floor 
is marble parquet, that the 
sand-coloured walls are hung' 
with black-and-white photos 



Rands MoiiBy 

taken on these to of neonrealist 
films, that there’s a bar with a 
porphyry top, that there’s 
much grey panelling which 
recalls Milanese architecture 
of the early 1950s, that the 
manager’s dog-tooth suit was 
in an early 1960s cut, that the 
plates are homespun (and 
available at Divertunenti), 
that the bundles of blade that 
ambulated past my table now 
and again were simply my 
fellow diners in their wantonly 
unstructured clothes. 

There weren’t many of 
them. The place was three- 
quarters empty, Fm sure this 
is because, as I say, the food 
doesn't fit the formula. It's too 
gutsy, too generous — not the 
kind of stuff you toy with 
while striking interesting po- 
sitions. It is that of a serious 
restaurant, possibly the most 
original Italian restaurant in 
London. 

There is a filling starter of 
mozzarella fried in bread- 
crumbs rather than between 
slices of bread which is the 
more usual Italian practice; 
there’s another of a. peppery 
leaf called arugubi with pro- 
sciutto and leaves of par- 
mesan: all . the ingredients 
were sound quality, and the oil 
in the (elegant) vinaigrette was 
virginal enough. 

What is described as a small 
pizra U in fact quite a big pizza 
and made with fresh, though 
unskinned tomatoes. Our 
main courses tended to be a 
bit on one note: calfs fiver 
with onions, sweetbreads with 
shallots, chicken with olives 
and tomatoes. . . _ . . . 

The rusticity of these dishes 
might be mitigated a little. 
Vegetables are served luke- 
warm, as in Lombardy. There 
are no potatoes, which is silly, 
nor is there bread — con- 
cessions, no doubt, to the 
designer lobby. Someone 
should think again. 

Sweets include a dentist- 
friendly cake of gooey choc- 
olate, meringue, hazelnuts, 
nut brittle etcetera. Or you can 
dunk not very nice almond 
biscuits in Vin Santo, which is 
the sweet wine of Chianti and 
not a notably good traveller. 
With the meal we drank a 
classy 1977 Vaipoficella from 
Tedeschi. Two will pay £50. 

Orso, 27 Wellington Street 
London WC2 (01-240 5269). 
Open Mon-Sat, noon- 
rtodnight 


GUEST COOK 


Impromptu invitations for simple meals 


.. Over the next three weeks notable chefs will 
describe wlut they like to cook off doty. The senes 
is opened by ROBIN and MARION JONES, 
whose restanrant, Croqae-en-Boudie in Malvern 
Weils,® the smallest to boast a Mkhelin rosette 


Masochistic though it may 
seem, sometimes at the end of 
a really busy “slog" in the 
restaurant, one of us will say 
“Why don't we invite the so- 
and-so’s round for a meal?” — 
and we da 

At home, we like to serve 
simple food which does not 
involve dashing into the 
kitchen every few minutes — 
preparation ahead being the 
key. We cook and serve 
together rather than following 
our professional roles of cook 
and waiter. 

We prefer a number of small 
courses, starting usually with a 
tureen of soup. At a recent 
dinner for eight this was a 
lettuce, pea and savory soup, 
light and summery. It’s a 
favourite, and we used the 
first of our mangetout from 
the garden as a garnish. 

Some cold anti-pasti fol- 
lowed: mushrooms sauteed in 
oil with ground coriander 
seed, seasoned, with lemon 
juice and coriander leaves; 
garden courgettes with red 
pimento and onion as a sort of 
raiatouiUe; and green flageolet 
beans, with Florence fennel in 
a mustard vinaigrette. 

This meal was a good 
occasion to experiment with a 
“parsley-shadow” pasta 


sauced with salmon, tomato 
and lots of green and purple 
basiL 

The next course was a 
selection of grilled meats: 
small steaks of beef fillet, 
calves’ fiver and pork loin 
(marinated in Hoi Sin, garlic 
and soy), with some spicy 
Algerian-style merguez sau- 
sages, cooked quickly on a 
cast-iron Le Creuset grill 
There were plain boiled new 
potatoes and a simple yoghurt 
and cucumber sauce. 

The cast-list for the home-- 
grown salad included red let- 
tuces, endives, mesdan and 
rocket, with sorrel, chervil, 
nasturtium and garlic-chives; 
not forgetting the 
marvellously frilly Red Lolio, 
named after Gina 
Lollobrigida! The salad was 
dressed with extra vergine 
olive oil 

A taste of cheese, including 
th e D ouble Berkeley from 
nearby Dymock, was followed 
by a summer pudding of local 
raspberries, blackcurrants, 
cherries and gooseberries. We 
aim for minimum bread and 
maximum fruit, and stick in a 
generous doDop of Crtme de 
Cassis liqueur. This was the 
first of the summer, and th» 
best. 



“P ar sle y -Shadow" togUatolle 
with salmon and basil 
Servos six 


3 largo eggs 
1 teaspoon salt 


1 tablespoon ofive oil 

Approx 285g (lOoz) 
semolina flour, or strong whits 
bread flour 

Small bundi of flat-leaved 
parsley 

For the sauce 

V* Spanish Onion, chopped 

1 dove of garlic, chopped 

450g (11b) large ripe 
tomatoes, peeled and chopped 

1 teaspoon tomato pur6e 

2 tablespoons olive oil 

150ml (% pint) dry white 
wine 


2 ta 
(optioi 


fish stock 


i) 


Pick of the bunch: Marion and Robin Jones in their garden 


Lettuce, pas and sunmer 
savory soup 

Serves eight 

35g (1 %oz) unsalted butter 

2 large Webbs lettuce, 
washed and roughly shredded 

1 bunch spring onions, 
chopped 

1 dove garlic, chopped 

1 tablespoon flour 

1 -35kg (31b) fresh peas 

2 sprigs summer savory 

and 2 sage leaves, tied 

1.2 litres (2 pints) ham stock 
A little cream, a few 
mangetout peas and extra 
summer savory for garnish 


Shell peas. Melt butter in large 
saucepan and soften spring 
onions and garlic without 
browning. Put ham stock in 
another saucepan and bring to 
boil; add peas and herbs; cook 
for a further three minutes. 
Meanwhile, add lettuce to 
spring onions and garlic, stir 
until cooked down. Add a 
little black pepper. Pour peas 
and liquid over lettuce mix- 
ture, bring to boil and remove 
from heat Liquidize soup and 
pass through a moidi-legumes. 

To serve, heat gently, thin- 
ning down and adjusting 
seasoning as necessary. Gar- 
nish with cream, tiny raw 
mangetout peas and chopped 
summer savory. 


To finish 

340g (1 2oz) salmon, cut 
Into postage stamp size 
pieces, VUnch thick 

30g (1 oz) unsalted butter 

A large handful of fresh 
basil 

Approx 55g (2oz) freshly 
grated Pecorino or Parmesan 
cheese 

Put the eggs, salt and oil in a 
food processor. Blend, adding 
after a few seconds a steady 
stream of flour until a firm 
ball of dough is formed. On a 
marble slab or a work surface, 
knead the dough until smooth 
and glossy (use more flour as 
necessary). Cover with a bowl 
and allow to rest for an hour. 

Roll the dough flat Then, 
ideally with a pasta machine, 
roll until medium-thin. 


Spread individual . parsley! 
leaves intermittently along ,a 
sheet of pasta. Lay a similar-^ 
sheet on top. and pass through' 
the pasta machine on medium ' 
thickness to seal the parsley, - 
Allow to dry over a rolfing-pin 
for half an hour. 

Finally, use the cutting 
roller to make K-inch 
tagliatelle. Imitate by hand 
and rolling pin if you do not 
have a pasta machine. The 
parsley will give a pretty green 
pattern to the pasta. Leave to 
dry for an hour or so. 

Saute the onion and garlic 
in one tablespoon oil until 
tender. Add the tomato for a 
minute and then the puree, 
fish stock and wine. Season 
with salt and pepper. Simmer 
for three minutes and put to 
one side. 

Bring a large saucepan of 
salted water with one table- 
spoon of the oil to the boiL 
Add the pasta and cook for Uh 
minutes until just tender. 
Wash away the excess starch 
under hot water. Drain, and 
toss in the rest of the oil over 
heat in the saucepan, adding a 
little black pepper. Arrange 
round a large serving plate and 
keep warm in a low oven. 

Meanwhile, season the 
salmon and saute quickly in 
the butler for one minute. Add 
the sauce and simmer for one 
minute. Then quickly chop 
the basil. 

Pour the salmon and sauce 
into the middle of the pasta: 
sprinkle on a thick layer of 
cheese and basil Turn all 
together at the table. 


DRINK 


Perfection behind the packaging 


“Never judge a book by its 
.cover” was one of those silly 
truisms that we ail had to learn 
in the classroom but how 
pertinent it is 10 wine and 
wine labels. 

Garish, lurid labels are of- 
ten wrapped around some of 
the best bottles. It was there- 
fore with an open mind that I 
approached Alsace Mart*,. a 
2nd Humbrecht Alsace wine 
whose red and green baccha- 
nalian cartoon label is an 
excellent example of French 
kitsch at its best. 

And Tm glad I did. For this 
’84 Edelzwicker is not the 
usual basic blend of boring 
Oiasselas and Sylvaner but a 
100 per cent Muscat wine. 
More than that, this delicious 
deep golden wine with its 
elegant, dry fruity-flowery 
taste, is the finest Edelzwicker 
that I or anyone else is likely 
to taste. (£45.08 per case 
including delivery or £3.75 a 
bottle from The Pavilion 
Wine Company, FinsburyCir- 
cus Gardens, London EC2J 


Eric Beaumont 



Choosing red wines for 
August, our traditional holi- 
day month, is rather more 
difficult than selecting whites. 
Lightly chilled Beaujolais is 
the obvious choice but whik 
the splendid 1985 crus Beau- 
jolais are still on everyone’s 
lists it is silly not to buy. But 
do not expect these wines 10 be 
cheap: even supermarket crus 
Beaujolais is now almost £5. 

The Pavilion Wine Com- 
pany again have an excellent 


’85 ChirouWes. Domains du 
Qos Verdy from Georges 
Boulon. Its brilliant crimson- 
purple colour and vibrant 
raspberry and retknirram-tike 
fruit is a fine example of this, 
the lightest of the nine Beau- 
jolais crus. (£67.51 a case 
including delivery or £5.62 a 
bottle.) 

With the weak pound and 
increased European wine 
prices, the UK wine trade is 
having a difficult year and that 
must be one reason why so 
many wine merchants are 
running special summer sales. 

The Hungerford Wine 
Company’s Summer 1986 
Sale looks especially appeal- 
ing. Magnums of the Louis 
Roederer Extra Quality non- 
vintage champagne, now no 
longer obtainable, are on offer 
for just £24.80 and their useful 
summer halves of Monsieur 
Bailly’s. highly regarded 
Pouiliy Blanc Fumd, Les 
Grumes are priced at only 
£195 each. 

Given that BoDinger ’66 was 


served at the Duke and Duch- 
ess of York’s wedding, roy- 
alists may well like to try 
Bollinger’s 1975 RD, or re- 
cently disgorged, champagne: 
it is textbook Bollinger at its 
best, with a deep buttercup- 
gold colour and rich, meaty 
style. £26.25 a bottle. 

The Hungerford Wine 
Company also have dozens of 
different clarets on offer. 
Write to them at 128 High 
Street, Hungerford, Berkshire 
for their sale list. 

Another good cut-price 
champagne offer this month 
comes from The Champagne 
House at 15 Dawson Place, 
London W2. They are selling 
three different Blanc de Blancs 
champagnes at specially re- 
duced prices until next Friday. 
My favourite amongst the trio 
is Albert Le Brun’s Blanc de 
Blancs, whose smoky bouquet 
and rich, gutsy taste is a 
revelation. It comes at £9.98 a 
bottle instead of £10.94. 

Jane MacQnitty 



flaiesfic 



Warehouses 


1985 Clarets. A great vintage. 
Opening Offer. 


A small selection of our last 
dwindling stocks. • » 

Chateau Xroploiig-Mondot, 

SkSmilion £ 75.00 

ChateaxiLa Croix-de-Gay, 

Pamertil £ 100.00 

Chateau Grand PnyLacoM^ 

PanHLac £ 140.00 

Chateau Palmer, Harganx £ 240.00 

Chateau Margamc, M ar gaiix £ 450.00 

Prices are for X2 bo titles (76cl} lying In Band, London, 
exclusive aTVAT and Duty. 
MibB)latwrtatolC^aBtteWtDBWaw)wmMHTJinS«d,(MraMBw8, 
Part Road. Iitmrtnin HI B8HT or phone Grant Farqnhar m 0L881 6368. 

rnn mall order service araffalrta. 








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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


THE. SOUTH BANK CENTRE 


. i V{£'l *£ O ION Sf * |l * * ? OX O M I C f. I • r s ™ T 3/. V 5 7 i t. G t . * 2v J ’ 


Open all day wiih free exhibitions ond lunchtime music. Coffee Shon Buffet, Bora and Rnwside Cafe. 

Jazz group* oray Fri/SoH5un eramgs. En^oy tfw nmgtvficgnl wimn of Big Bon ond fat<OP»ntfmm(*Frtraradgarafa. 


• .ROYAL ITTSllVAL HALL 


SeWday 

W,- 


CHILDfiEN~S (UT ON THE SOUTH BANK - Roy» Festival Hag. Craft 
CrnriR luonocui F*m insane ana Nnond Thajoa * naval tamay 
ertwlammant by gig me* Puppeb, mal ah opi. btra tee-*Ofta. 
music onMUnarg ana km 

Afl eiena FftSE Tha South Bam. 8cmd 


LONDON HESTIVtt. BALLET u> own DartDntunoaSGf QMM (Mon 28 



TCHAIKOVSKY EVENING ■ London Concert OicbeaDni Band s/ tut 
CoUMun Quanta. T i— «» GoaHHnQ tccnol H al rn l m Bfen iDOOl 
Tcrrtkomky Uvcn Saw. Canes Mw Plano Concern) No 1. 
Suite. Tiwiuoacw. Owwe ’BtZ 

£4 C5 Co . U CBSO eg 5 0 DOM Raymond QubOay UP 


Sunday I POPULAR CLASSICS - Naw Symphony On 


TJOpm 


icondi Andrew Hatgn ipnoi Cnadrtar Emn. DUkaa The Lxceitt's 
Aocwnse. Ganhmn Riuondv m Blue. Tctrtkonfcy Swan Lake on 
Boar Pornp S Cacunutance No. 1 Ranal Sohap 
c4j 0 tsso EJ.ce 5o ebso tiaso mi u» 


Sb"*t* 
IB Aug 
7M pm 


STRING QUARTETS OF THE 20tfi CBfTUflY ( 

TakBd an Ooartat Bum Quote! No 2 I 

m»v, Watxni 5o Bagrtrtak Op 9. BretaOuarnn Na S 
£2. S3. C1 tfl TM Gaums 

MOZART; 'SOS f*H TU7TE 


700 pm 


FM*m (duwttr) Dmd Ao^r {aeugnarj 
5t«> KB» a pad only) £8. Q . 02 
Wednesday MAN JUwKHS 
U Aug -Ammafynaiito and contemporary growof 

MSpa tnunong a nectrum cl adhiance Wan Urn 
£3. £4. ES _ 

Ttandar STRJNfl OUAHTYTS OFTHC ZDOlCkNTUHY ( 


O HLLN' ELIZA B El I I HALL 


SUMMERSCOPE 

STRING OOAKTETS OF THE BOOl CENTURY (1) 

EnfeOkyiSmg Ouanti Barton Quarrel No.38atgLync5uae Webern 

Fuc Mntoynn Op 5 Brtnn Quarter No J 

0.0 Cl ff. The Scum Ban* Brero 

i nrunrua h wik Y 

Banna ?'■ 0*>ws ■» rtunwn lutotorMU On Owm. 

TakemkMi ijanjan Ram Debussy Suaa Frencaee. P isr kl TncM tor 
Brail Wat KJeav? OearoKnenmfik 

CUUK Tbs Soon Bare Bam 

THE ART OF TWE POPPET 

A Gaia Erenun oi Pucner Theme ’ran SpMng I image to Tha Barry 
Snath Theob* man gumi star I Maa Banttie. 

L5 CIO U3^ Puppet Conn Trust 


2 AuQ 

745 pm 
Sonny 

3Auq 
7.45 p" 


Sunday 
3 Aug 
M. IS pm 


Turk Thu BSRTWtSTLt YahT 
Bar Aug Oprrj Factory Lon 
i i»ri Dm 


TE THERA 
Sh 


«l Bgar Hoaratfli (concn Onto 


Tna South Sana Bond 


7 AS pm Freeman i«ri DM Roger loewjnerl 

£i Hi raav oi pen gray iff a Ci2 
W a anre rta y MOZART c'Osi FAN TUTTE 

6 Aug Opera Factory London S ad on tot t* . Pml Danlal icongi O a od T i ae a ian 

7.00 pm iQtmori Pawa Huger titeilgnar) 

£450 t» a Oi TnaSouBt Barn. Bond 

Frida, 

■ Aug 

7 AS pm 


LONDON SINFOMETTA Young Bntun Craapo ag ra. DHgo Ml 
icunoi CtirWopar ran Kampgn iCfUol Jam Harta ( u>l Frank Lloyd 
i norm tUdOMiav Smf.3nena 1 1 u peril ana uorks by 5. T ' 

A Turnaga. S. Hot anc G. Bennnm. 

1250 £3aO C 50 CM 


Thu Soutn 0er* Soars 

SalATua BIRTWISTLE.- YAW TAN TETHERA 

9 A 12 Aug - Opera Factory London SudorueOa. Bgar H oaa u di loonouctot) DaaU 
7.45 pm FrcanuiidK^rWii DaM Rogar i-sea^nar) 

£150 Ida. ol cunorm fcb CD t'i Tbo Soutn Bam- Boons 

[ TOM MERR1FIELD EXHIBITION 

I SodptiireaiadDmakig&2g>ltdy— 31 ABMiat 

I Main Foyw Royal Foadaal HalL 

From ti arnto 1QiJ0pui{l1 am— 10 pm San) 


MAua 
7.45 put 

Frfday 

15 Aug 
7 AS pm 


a Aug 


SUMtoy 
3 Aug 
TAD pm 


Monday 


TOeaday 

5 Aug 
7 JO pa 


U iw N ty gi to y 01 m m . Jantc a k Quanto No L&gCkjwteLUMNlI 
OuarMNo 1.RaMOumanF 

CZd Ei re The Sauoi Sank Basra 

DMLISH OahCC THEATRE. Eob Cmoe Muse. Gary Ctopantor. 
Cnor»ci(papny t Deaign Ed VMba MuaMn. Vaar Yan» lenw) 
Smnnpry inuisrcansngea tor Impunoi) Dm Jmenon. W VwQi 

i Transfer imped rmnt) 

The &mmi Bank Board 


PURCELL a ROOM 


THE BARRY BSBTH THEATRE and Ok w ml M t a r cI r P 
pm Music ■ Drafts - kmcntne tasgrouta emenaHimerH 


_ The Soutfi Bank Bran 

fTiaias Itoint Outofet T. SoaHer M^eea. mtan Brooks De 
Harraorsuoi cUxiiawL P.Ctoaa Company O. Runantok Loony Tunes 
ti* w* & Wacom o< PceoKSam Room Ramon iVa London 

pan) pr'i .Kl TtlB ” uln Ht ”* d 

TanyHUay Salome Dances tor PaaoaBado A no nn a PaiT l.BanyOuy 
Road to Rian (Lon prera) 

£2 050 15 The Sown Bare Basra 

MAUREEN BRATHWATTE non 
GrMmJuhnaaalpnol 1 Hayes Dream' Rp^rarmestckatoitonst 
by Ckralca Wood, B Uftukw Gross. Wood, aaontsslmgs. Si 


7 JO pm 


CLO.E4 ThaSomh Bank Board 

Wnareday THE ELECTRO-ACOUSTIC CABARET. OnraMOvUCasatoteyt 3. 
B Aim Dsaorghar. BlaNyn Poore (tube) London Riaaa McholaiWBsaniDna) 
Lawrence Cumber imomr-BAe arc) Mantres gam dsri mum) 
Programme incksMa pooular cureaca. mime ft many suronan 

UH Tha 5ouQi Bank Basra 

SONG OF THE CCHTUHY (1) London antonteda Were A Tha 
SengmaNam' Almanac. Frtcfty Mere im-sopj Rtehara Jackaon (bar) 


7 Aug 
7 JO pre 


BAug 
7 JO pm 


Graham Jeftnaoa (pra) Song& by Mehr. Murf. Bag. Ratal, 
suiumeiug. Vaughan Ware a Oalngac. 

£350 15 .HieSoudiBraABoara 

DAMDwiOBNSBraBR 


Dated Oawi Narits Ipnoi Programme 
Kabteaiimy. stimuli atlrh. OuBar. 
Rents, dad 



AOffttaaioaninKCOian 


28JUUT- 
31 MIGOST 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 



RAYMOND GUBBAY pmom 

TOMORROW at 7 JO p.m. 

TCHAIKOVSKY 

MARCH SLAVE: CAPRICaO IT ALIEN: 

' PIANO CONCERTO Na U THE NUTCRACKER SUITE 
OV’ERTURE 1812, 
with comma imd mortar cffecu 
LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
Conductor FR.VSER GOULDING .MALCOLM BINNS puna 
BAND OF THE COLDSTREAM GUARDS 
LAi'5.£6,f7,iS-3O,£ , >j0.£IO.5O HallOl-MS 3141 CC01-TO8800 


RAYMOND GUBBAY praam SUNDAY IT AUGUST at 7J0. pm. 

MOSCOW VIRTUOSI 

VLAOLVUR SPIVAKOV diiector/violm 

Mozart . .EEVE KLECVE NACHTMUSK 

. Bach VIOLIN CONCERTO IN 

A MINOR, BWV 1041 
Vivaldi THE FOUR SEASONS 

iA. iS. £?. £S^>- £*50, £1050 HaU 01-928 JI9I CC 0I-92S 8800 



VICTOR HOCHHAUNER prrecaraal the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

SUNDAY 10th AUGUST at 7 JO 

POPULAR CLASSICS 

ImroJuced & conducted bv; ANTONY HOPKINS 
NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Solonc ANDREW HAIGH 
CHA BRIER — 



DUKAS. 
GERSHWIN-.., 


— The Sorc e r e r 's 


TCHAIKOVSKY Swan Lake Soke 

ELGAR Pomp A Circumstance March No. 1 

RAVEL- -Bolero 

C- km-ou ki t r t k5(n»mtiowiireiHjn«M mna.nBaai) 


«MMl VICTOR HOCHHAUSER & the Sootfa Bank Board 
KI#J| praeat at the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

ygVi FRIDAY 22nd AUGUST at 7 JO 

WfiiHITS FROM THE SHOWS 

NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Cond: John Owen Edwards 
Soloists: Marilyn Hill Smith, John Lawrenaon 
Excerpts from CATS, WEST SIDE STOR^ 
KING AND I, MY FAIR LADY; OKLAHOMA, 
CAROUSEL, HELLO DOLLY, CAMELOT, 
ANNIE GET YOUR GUN and many more. 

£3.50. LA nO, £5.50. £7, £8.50, £9.50, £10.50 from Hall 928 3191/9288800 



VICTOR BOCHHAUSER & the Sooth Bank Board 
proem ai the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

SATURDAY 23rd AUGUST at 7 JO 


GLORY OF VIENNA 


Introduced ft conducted br ANTONY HOPKINS 
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
JOHANN STRAUSS Or. Die FkdrraniB, Hunt to: PnBa, VncaorSpnnCi 
CucknoToUa. Rjdcnfci Match, Egrpiian .Much. Cha mpagn e ftUo. fttpemum 
Mobile. FL=xwn Mta. Thr Blue Danube: WALDTEUFEL Eipma; 
SCHUBwti Symphom No.OlL’nAnlabed) 
lAS'. I».5fl. £5 50. t:. £a SU.i-1 W. £10 50 Iran Hall 128 5191*288800 


OPERA & BALLET 


COLISEUM BooklngOpraeAupd 
I nr IW6/T Snrnn 
EMCUSH NMTKMAL OPOU 

Prndialmir, inrludr- I 


nparo-TlM 
BteteHh. Ring Oi 83o 2099 lor 
Itsillpi 


with It*** London Pluinarmonu- 

Oi t th-Jr j i ini u ism Auguei 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 93« 

J|t| CC. «»2B 8800 

Twkrtnwropr 37* tM3 

LONDON FESTIVAL 
BALLET 

L nlil Auc le>. Etna 7 30. Sal 
Mam 5pm Today Cl ai ll a. IM.1I. 
rakmrini/nnllr-rca/hafz. Cm 

Sr, Iiunn/Sloao/Awnwi 
From Mon Auai RrrefftJe 
UteL ll-lfr Ana C appa ll a 


ROYAL OFOIA HOUtMC Cgiml 
C-iidm. WCT 01240 
IMb/llll tob amont -HSU, 
.nail (mm lOam im lire dav 
THE BOUtm PALLET 
Tod.iv 2 GO & 7 30. Mon. Tup 
7 30 Thr DnMm Ann Wad 
7 »0 T7.ur 2 on A 7 30 Sparta 

rin rrl ~ 30 Pj\mwHki 


MDUirs wtus ?rn bmia 
H manATHM«L AUTUMN 
OANCE BALLET SEASON 

Call OI 2TH CMS5 lor colour 
In nr Hum 


CONCERTS 


BLOOMSBURY THEATRE 

Cordon !»l WCI. 3FT7 OrOSi CC 
3HO 1453 

HARVEY' &. THE 
WALLBANGERS 

No. HP, CorearK 

tjyu prrf Tim'l 9pm 
Trll. Irnm £5 20 i.rennl 


EVENTS 


HAMPSTCAO ROOK FARL M 
IM ft k tete rer re Irtel ft 
Frteh. Son 5 4un I lam lea 
Old Town. Hall. Hacrmock 
HiU NKS.Orp Prfei.-r PL Sim 


EXHIBmOMS 


RAVWAMD 
Rank SCI SCANDINAVIAN 
painting 1900 and 
PHOTOGAPMT ft MHBKAL- 

ItM I'nm 5 Chi Adm. 
£2»/tl SO Rm-ornrd into OI 
Jhl '\2I~ 


-RIYAOH - YESTIROAY AND 
TODAY - A l uudl Eapartanca'. 

Onry lOatti^pm July 30 Hi 
Irani'l IO Grand H all 
Olyfnbia ftdadaalau FKL A 
laimly nxlmmion all about 
Midi Arabia, including locctal 
nfiih )nr chikheti 


THEATRES 


ADCLPfU H3fc 701 1 OT 240 7913 
/4 CC 741 90C10/&50 7360/379 
CdM Grp Sain 930 0123 First 
Call ?<ltir 7 tlai CCS4O72O0 ibkg 
Irr' NOW HOOKING TO FCB 
1907 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 

Mghlli al 7 30 Mats WM al SJSC 
A Sal 4 30 A 800 

“TO* HAPPWST SHOW 
m TOWN- S Lwu 


ALBCRY Air Cated H Ianed Tire 

am OI 63b 3S70 CC JTg SSeA 
0433 Group S.ilr -1 tue 3*02 

10HN SHEL^I hr 
THE NORMAL HEART 

m LARRY KRAMER 
•raftAOMnCEMTI- Tim* 
HWMM SHORT or 
SENSATIONAL- S E«p 
r.sre a Mat* Tnur a. Sal 4 30 
EXTENDED BY OVERWHELM 
INS DEMAND UNTIL SEPT S 


ALOWYCM THEATRE 01-836 
reKM.'Oreti rc OI 379 AZ33 


"EkPMMin Suttrei" Today 

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

Front Ihr CMrlteAcr FetUsal 
ThMUr 
Slamnq 

sua QUATRO 

“A popular hit contains mere 
famotu *oitgs than any oihar 
rental ol lire endury" Timm 
Csgs 7 30 Mat* Wrd A Sal 2 X 
24 hr 7 day rr boohing on Firm 
Gan 01 240 7200 ibkg (rrl 


E 437 MB! 
434 3S4A Fim Can OI 340 720C 
TKhrlmMn cc 379 6433 
Mon Fit B OO Sal 4 30 A B.I9 
Tliury mat* 3 00 


-■MASTERLY- F T 
HOWARD ROLLINS 
-MACNtriCCNT- D.Mall 
Winirei l9He Tony Award Bml 
Play 

I'M NOT RAPPAPORT 

"WONDERFULLY FUNNY” 
DEjo. 


APOLLO VICTORIA SS 828 M&S 

CC 630 6262 mnnuurt <c 379 

r»V53 1st rail cc (2«iri 240 T20C 

iHhg rrri Grp Salm 930 «I23 

Cm 7 45 Male Tub & Sal 3 0 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

-A MUSICAL THAT SURPMKS 

ANYTWNO AROUND M EVERY 

CHMENStON” D Cap 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

Mimic By 

ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
Hrim oy RICHARD ST1LGOE 
DimlM hk TREVOR NUNN 

APPLY DAILY TO BOX OFFICE 
FOR RETURNS 

MOW BOOKING TO MARCH 1807 


Ol 028 8795/030 
0891 CC i II ion-sun IQun- 
Hpmi ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 
COMPANY 

BARBICAN THEATRE Tamm 
£004. 7 30. Mon A Turn 7 30. 
TROHJIS ft CRESSHM. 0-7 
Aug THE OANTOM APT AIR. 8- 
12 Aug TO* MERRY WIVES 
OF WINDSOR. 

THE PIT Sal 2 00 A 7 30 . Mon 

A Tun 7 30 REAL DREAMS by 

SSgjgSSKSr.*- 7 AU9T * 


ORMMftESTCR 0243 781312 
JANE EYRE, -THE RELAPSE 

E*«i 7 3Q. Mato Thu A Sal 230 


CHURCHILL Bromlry 400 0077. 
SALAD DAYS. Cl« 7.45 Mat 
Thur A Sal 2 30 


E 01-930 
2578 CC 741 9990. Flnt Call 
24 hr 7 day CC 240 7200. Grp 
Sale-* 930 0123 Mon -Fn 8.00 
Sat 600 & 043 

THE GAMBLER 

try BRLWFS. GOODY A SMITH 
A ennredy musical win 

MEL SMITH 

DOB GOODY FETED BREWH 
FTUUF DAVIS PAUL BOWN 

“A nywnc nmng' Wtc On 
" Hourly rnlovablr— F T 

-flrtMahL vary funny ladaad" 

Otetrrrr 

-A WINNER ALL THE WAV- 

D Mail 

ONLY UNTIL AIM ■ 


COTTE SLOE 1’ 928 2232 CC 
iNaiional Tlrealrr'e email audl- 
l or nun i Pminwe Ton*L moil 
T ire 7.30 Opens Wrd 7 00. 
Then Aire 71 Aug ISA 16TNE 
AMERICAN CLOCK By Arthur 
Miller. 


CMTERMM Air Com S 930 32 1 e 
CC 379 6505/379 6433/741 
99og Con mo 3902 Era 8.00 
Thu nvH 2 30 Sal B SO A 8.30 

-BOTTOM FARCE AT ITS BES T ” 
D Mail 

The Theatre oi Comedy Company 

MV MUOO RALPH BATES 


HE LEN 

COTTEMLL 


RUN FOR YOUR WIFE 

wniirn and dinned by 
RAY COONTV 

Oirr 1.400 elite epIHWlw perf* 

“should mm pom urr* a. t» 


Tire BBC pr«ctns the 9 2nd Menu <•! Henry V'iud Pnunctudc Cumcru 


FROMS 



IS July — 1’ Sepretnber 

Royal Albert HaU 


TONIGHT 7 JO BOU 
RETURN SEATS ONLY 


Watki by TdnAdnkjr ft SHruuky 


TOMORROW 7 JO 
RETTTLN SEATS ONLY 


BBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Goode Mcme des mods BERLIOZ 


MONDAY 4 AUGUST 7 JO 
RICHARD HICKOX 
JANE MANNING 
ROBERT TEAR 


£8. £5.80, £4, CUM 


Pro - Pro en calk by MbcI Oehomc A. IS pm 


CUT OF LONDON SIN FONIA 
Pichi deand Fift nefix 18-put BRITTEN 
eiiiigi otcbcsoi 

On bmaoxtbefini Coctao in Spriax 

D ELIUS 

Nocturne BRITTEN 

SumtneMnebt an the rnrer DELIUS 
The SwUe NIGEL OSBORNE 

Swi i u forkikigordntn V ALTON 


TUESDAY 5 AUGUST 7.15 THE CHORUS AND ORCHESTRA OF 
THE ENGLISH CONCERT 
RETURN SEATS ONLY Sokmm HANDEL 


WEDNESDAY 6 AUGUST 7 JO NATIONAL YOUTH ORCHESTRA 
MARK ELDER OF GREAT BRITAIN 

CYNTHIA MILLAR UMer DEBUSSY 

PETER DONOHOE TurenglBi Symphony 

£5^0. £4, £240 ONLY OLIVIER MESSIAEN 


WEDNESDAY 6 AUGUST 1AM NEXUS OPERA 

LIONEL FRIEND Carfew River (inmd) BRITTEN 

RONALD EYRE MARK CURTIS 
ROBERT POL’LTON, DAVID G WYNNE, JOHN RATH 
ALL SEATS £4.00 


THURSDAY 7 AUGUST 7JABBC PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
EDWARD DOWNES 

DMITRI STTK0VET5KY Viofin Concerto No. 1 SHOSTAKOVICH 
Pine not change of mkH! rad p mprammr 

£8. £5.88, £4, £100 Martial Symphony TCHAIKOVSKY 


BBC PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
Eptleme LUCIANO BERIO 


FRIDAY 8 AUGUST 7 JO 
EDWARD DOWNES 

ELIZABETH LAURENCE Vioin CoaCBta 
IONA BROWN Pmee of Rome 

i«.£5i«l.£L£2.W 

Pre-Prom talk by DuvM Oemood-Smbfi 6.15 pm 


WALTON 

RESPIGHI 


PROMENADE TICKETS AVAILABLE ON THE NIGHT ONLY 
£t.*KArem^£l JO 'Gfttayl 


POft V— OW TMCATRC BOW OilKr 
OI 580 8846/01 636 8888/9 Of 
Ol 680 9562/3. ft BUI CALL 
2ftr 7 Day CC IN MM. 
Grp Sale* 930 6123. 
DAVE CLARK'S 

TIME 

THE ULTIMATE EXPCKMMCK 

CUFF RICHARD 

AS THE ROCK STAR* 
THE PORTRAYAL OF ‘AKASW 
BY 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

Mon Fn 7 JO Thu Mai 2-30 SM e 

SOME SEATS STILL AVAILABLE 
FUR T OOAYt PPWUB M AM CX . 
SPECIAL CON CE S S IONS AT fl 


OAFS. UMOY. S TUDENTS 
6»5B*R IP*. 


OOMMAR WAREHOUSE Cm Can 

240 8230 cc S79 0606/6433 

—TREAT YOURSELF- M on 

Sun 

ME by « by SONOHEBH 

Tue-Sal 8. Sal Mai 6. Store 

4 ft 7. SAT ft SUN MATS ALL 


LATE 


Fn ft SM 


NIGHTS; 

l Ipm . Serna tQpi 

WELCH In her award- winning 
NV - 


DRURY LAME THEATRE ROT AL 

01 836 8108. 01-240 9066/7 
Fim call 24- hour 7-day ff Dkgs 
240 7200 (no booUng fee) 

DOTH Marrtch’a 

42ND STREET 

A SNOW PON ALL THE FAMILY 


voted 

BEST MUSICAL 

STANDARD DRAMA AWARDS 

BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE OLIVIER AWARD 
voted 

BEST MUSICAL 


AWARD 

Evge 8 O Male Wed 3.0. 

Sal 50 A 8 30 
Group Sate* 930 6123 

i A* 


DUNE OP YORKS 836 3122 CC 
83*> 9837/741 9999/240 7200 
Lin 8 Thu 3 SM 6 A 8.50 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

a t a w deed On— Award MM 


STEPPING OUT 

"TRIUMPH ON TAP- SM 
HH Comedy try Richard Harrte 
Dwrctrd by Julia McKhuh 

-LAUON YOURSELF SILLY- T O 
FERFECT DELMHT— O TH 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR 


FORTUNE (Air Cared) S rr 836 
2238 KP 741 9999 GroSa lee 930 
6123 Mon to Fn 8 Sat 8.30 Mai 
Thu,* A SM 3-00 

JANE ROGER 

LAPOTAIRE REES re 

DOUBLE DOUBLE 

-A clanre oi whodunury n 
rmeruinnirnl Doutile DouMe & 
unbeatable- Time, E surra. 
-Stun* lire audienee- s. Too 


830 4601 CC 379 
6435 & CC 24 hr/T day- 246 
7200 Eire. 8 Wrd mat 3. SM S4t 

8 NO SEX. PLEASC- 

WTIII BRITISH 


SLOBX 437 1692. CC 379 6433 
Bkp lee let Call 24. hr 240 7200. 
GroSale* 930 0123 Cvee 6 Male 
Wrd 3 SM 4 
Andrew Ltovd Webber Preeetile 


RONALD H0LCAT1 


LEND ME A TENOR 

“A MARVELLOUS COMWNA 
tion or wohiocjRruL 
FARCICAL MOMENTS FUNNY 
LISt5 AND FRENETIC 
PERFORMANCES" T. Out 
An American Comedy tat 
Km Ludwig 

Oi retied ay David Oilman 


HAYMARK8T THEATRE ROYAL 

Ban oilier and CC Ol 930 9835. 
Firai CMI 2« nr 7dayCC bookingi 
OI 240 7200. Preview* TonnjN 
T so. Ooen* Mon at 7.00. 
Dirm (ram Broadway 

JACK LEMMON 

LONG DAYS JOURNEY 
INTO NIGHT 

By Eugene CTNciO 
Ol reeled by JbnaUUn MHter 
Evn only Mandat 730 


cmnnai theatre Oi-aee 

7766. Evenlnoe 7.46 Mai Sal 

230 OAYLE IRRINICt 
S ANBNA raOUNSON, “Spat 
mi C aal bia" Times In THE 
ftHSS FIRE C RACK ER CON- 
TEST try Brih Henley. “A 
Crart tar- D. TeE -Vhariiea 
Daily MaU. 


KAMI 1 II LAD 722 5001. Era ft 

SM Mate 4 JO) 



•UNO'S WAD 225 1916. UMU 
BENTICE ^J U yj|g >im ' 8nm- 
nomdar demand In her show 


LONDON PA UA D KI— 457 7373. 
437 2056. CC 734 8901. 379 

0433. 741 9999 (no bkg feel. First 

Can 24 Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200. 

Grv Sates 950 6123. 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 

ft OEMS QUILLCY 

LA CAGE AUX FOLLES 

-A SLDRKMIS CELEBRATION^. 

A PU L L-THROT TLE 
ENTERTAB U 8EWT- D Mad 

Mon-Frt 7 JO. Mata Wed 2.00 
SM 2.30 A 8.00 
SMnl rnnre ael nm avaiL al doo 
Mon-Frt A Sal maM 


BOOO SCATS STILL AVAILABLE 

FDR TODAY'S P ERFORM ANCE. 


LVRM THEATRE ShMMury 
Avr W1 01-437 3086/7 01-434 
1650 01-434 1060. 01-734 

5166/7 

COUN BLAKELY 

-A brilliant A uyoudy 
comic pertornuutca- F. Tim 
in 

The National Theatre's acetatenod 
trod union of 

ALAN AYCMSOUOrS 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

-HranoreaMngly tunny- Gdn 
-HUanous.. “ S. Times 
-A rare evening of 
comic rxMlanuian- Tunes 
Eves 7.30. Man Wed and Sal 3.0. 

rap Sales 01-930 0123 . 

Reduced price matt Student ft 
OAP Stand- by 

FIRST CALL 24HK 7 DAT 
CC BOOKING* ON 01 240 7200 
(NO DOOKDM FEE] 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL 
JAN *87 


LYTTELTON T 928 2252 CC 
OMauenal Theatre's prosce n ium 

stage! Today 2 16 How pnee 

mall ft 7.45. Mon 7 46. then 

Aug 12 to 16 A mat Aug 18 

T1BC PEI I HUN by Brian CUrfc- 


MAVFAM 8 OC 629 3036. Mon 
mu 8 Frl/SM 6 40 ft 8.10 

RICHARD TODD re 

ha Best TbriBar far yeara” s M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

“An ambushed winner 1 * 8 Exp 
“Sensational- Tiroes 

6TH THRILLING YEAR 


AIT Cond 236 6668 cc 
741 9999. First Call CC 240 7200 
124 Hn 7 Day) Mon-Fn B. Sato ft 
8 JO 

KAFKA’S 

METAMORPHOSIS 

staged by 

Surveo BERKOFF 


THE ATRICAL EVE HtNC W THE 
WEST ORT CL Limits. 

U mi ted C e da nn 
(PlHhNUt fond ft drink) 


yss BARBICAN HALL 

■D Barbican Centre, Siik St, EC2Y SDS 
Wlf 01-638 8891/628 S79 5 ••• 

Telephone Bookings: 10am* 8pm 7 days a week 

O'rf/r'-ed furCeC ^ n c oiiniigiM] thf CotporiKcfro^ City ol LcHVjon 



Today MASC OF VIBMA. Johann Strauss Orchestra and ctaoear&M 

2 Aug coctuoie. Dtr/Vki John Oadtuv AimJammsoa) Garatome 
380ft 9toph*nwn(cfior)E 1 rogincl««rksDv Johann Strauppl ft B.JomI 
800pm Strsuu, Ffanz Lafrtr Era CIO 50. Cfl 50. E850. C7 C6. C5 

MasEB50.C7.5Q.tS.50.CS C4 Raianono Gullfuv Latf 

SUMMER IN THE CITY FESTIVAL 

3-10Auqu8 

Itonor ACAOMY C38-TSI MAgrtH-W-THE-HLUIS. Br MowMa MfTlng/ 

3 Aug fcrodl Margaret MarehMI isooi UaWyn DaymiKni 

730pm SUftord Dorn (baKiAcsdeniyCberus-HAYON THE CREATION 
Sunq in Oferman CIL Efl 50 CB50. C7. C6 CS. 

Mon flABRSEU STFUHQ QUARTET. Lunchtime to SI GUes'. 

A Aug Cnpptegatc Haydn: Stmg Quattei m D iwmx Op 43 

LOOpm Bhathoven: String Guana m F Oo S9 No i ■Razumsvsky' 

ALL SEATS £2. 

4 Mon ROYAL PHB-HARMOWC ORCHESTRA- MIcbOlM Ctcobury 

■ 4 Aug foonci Alan BrindiuiokniiWainar BBCMkinq Muattan ol toe 

I 7.46pm YfaaT S88) Mgndalwofui Fwatfs Cane Schubert Unfingnetf 

I EUSO.CfOSa C950.EA C7.CB Ravmont] GoDCm IM 

Hup SARAH WALKm (Mezzo Saorwul Roger Vignolas (ortno) 

SAug LmtoUmaat St C*W. CripplegatB Songs for Sommer 

LOOpm Aftamoona. ALL SEATS 

Tue ACADBHVOF ST MARTW-M-THEHHfcLDS- Iona Brown iDe/VIni 

745pm Conaall Gtossj tn B BaL Op a Na l. Ammo/. Op 3No8 Bnwvx. 

Oo 3 No TO. TtlB FOur Seasons. E9. £8. E7. 05 CS 

Wed OABRtEUSTTOHG QUARTET. HpyrttSmngQuaJtttUnlrtshea 

6 Aug Op 103 Bgsttwwan: String Quamt in E mmor. Op 59 No 2 

LOOpm ■Razumowskv' AU. SEATS £2. 

WM ACADEMY OF ST MAHTlII-ltt-THE-/IB-BS. SteNovDeMantnar 

8 Aug f condutaor) IreiB toraH fcsUoi Rnfll: Ma Mem lOya 

745fOT Sainf-Saeftt CMO COnfiorto Ho 1 in A mmor Fftuifc Bette 

Btab Svmohony to C. £950. £3.50. £780. £8. CS 

Thu PETfcH DONOHOE. Luncfattow at SI OSoa' Church. Ptano 

7 Aug Rootal Debussy: tmaget. Booh iflachmanlnmr:Pra<uaBS.Op32. 
LOOpm ALL SEATS £2. 

Thu atarah^ BAND. ChUdrenh and HnHhr Fun Concert 

7 Aug ft presented by Aferah Bon-Rwim. ICE. Smcol Summer 

Sul programme of muac and musical tun. Chlltyen are mvited to 

SAug bm a reconler or g»uteporcussKminsmjnieM. la tom nundaf 
3j00pm Alaiah's baton ALL SEAT5E3 50 

Thu CWItSTOPHER PLUMMER - SM «VLLE MARRMEH and ine 

7 Aug London Symphony Orch—B. An ewereng ol Shahespeag and 
Z45fsn muse. ThggtiMt speerties tram Shakespeare's Henry V 

MsfKMtoSQlm: Ov 'A MWBummar HriiTs Dream'. WUton: Henry V. 
Prokofiev: 'Romeo 8 Jukei' 

CKJ50. C8 SO. £750. C6. £430. £350 

R1 QABRELl strng OUARTET. LuncMbno si St Gees. Hndn: 

8 Aug Smnc Ouanei to Bmaior. Op 33 Ho 1 Beethoven: StnngOuBRef 
LOOpm to C. Op 59 No 3 ’Hazumovskv'. ALL SEATS £2. 

Al ACADEMY OF ST MARDN-lN-TH E-FIELDS- Kenneth SMtO (Or) 

8 Aug McheleRetrifrecofderiHandefcOoncemGrBSSDinAintoar. 
745pm Op 6. No 4 Rerootesl Concewa No 6 Vhrtdt: Reconler 

Concerto n C Titemarot Suite n F for Recorder and Stnngs. 
TfchstoDvafcv: Serenade for Stmoa to C £9. £8. £7. £8. £5. 

SM LONDON SVWfONY ORCHESTRA. Lorin Meszsl (conductor) 

SAug Berthoven: Sympbonv NoBdF. Op93 Mahier: Symphony No lmD. 
aOOpm E H.50. Cfl 50. Cfl.OO. Eb 50. C5, C3J0. i taowed to 

KMfijm FRK Litre NIGHT CONCERT WITH FmEWORKS. Lakertttai 
Thiraoe. London Syngihony Orcheftn Brago And Wind 

Ensemble Handrt: Mime lor the Royal fireworks with Hreomrtca. 

Sun ACADEMY OF ST MARnNriN-THE*fiELDS. Sir NevWe Marrtoor 

10 Aug (cond) Ariecn Auger (soot ANrada Hodgson (mezzo-aao) 

730pm Ketti Lgwte [t»nor) John Tbfnffnson loess) AcAdemy Chorus 
VhatkS: Glana Beethoven: Symphony No 9 m D imwr 'Choral' 

CIL £9.50. £2.50. £7 E6. CS 


HER Hk E IT YI. Haymartref 

930 4025/6606 2046/2856 
TrekrtmasUT 379 6)31 
F-ird Call CC 240 7200 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

Starring 


Sarah Slave 

Bnghuiun Barton 

Mtnlc by ANDREW LLOYD 
WEBBER 

Libretto bv 8ICHARP 
STILOOE ft CHARLES HART 
ChiTctrd try HAROLD PRINCE 
Ohm 9 Ocl 


NATIONAL THEATRE Sin Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COM PANY 

See SEPARATE DITTOES under 
OLIVER /LYTTELTON/ 

Excellent cheap 
irate days of peris all iMUm 
from IO am. RESTAURANT (928 
2033). CHEAP, EASY CAR PAR, 
lido 633 0880. AM COND 


NEW LONDON Drury Laor WC2 
405 0079 CC 379 6433 Eves 7.46 
Tue ft Sal 3.00 ft 7.45. 

THE ANDREW LLOYD WEBBER 
/T3. ELIOT M US ICAL 

CATS 

APPLY DAILY TO POX OFFICE 


Grow Bookings 01-406 1667 or 
01930 6123. POSUI bOrtcmoi 
only now be le g acrrpied lor perts 
from ow l to May 30 1987 or By 
t rie pho ne on 01-379 6433 


OUVKR T 926 2202 CC iNa- 
mmui Thcanrt ooen stagei 
Today 2.00 How pnee mail ft 
T 15. Mon 7.15. then AuuB Iso 
ft Aug IBIsZOMCOROWSKY 
AND THE COLONEL, by Wer- 
ici. veraon by SN Beimnan. 


TI tag 
745pm 


POPULAR CLASSICS- New Symphony Ch U i ema Dated Cotamun 
loond) Robwt Brightmom igular) Rossini; Ovenuro The 
Soroer al Sevftef Grieg: Pror Gynt SulW No 1 nodrigo: 

Conowio do Annum KtiactwiFhn: Gfl)aii«i' SattB Danes 
Rmteky-Konako* SdiBhBrazada. 

C 10.30. £1950. C850. E7. Cfl. Koaf HoeMausar IM. 



VICTOR HOCHHAUSER yraentt at tbc BARBICAN 

SUNDAY 24th AUGUST at 7 JO 

TCHAIKOVSKY 

' Strife from •Senm Lata’, KnitroclLcr &ritc\ Vimaa CowWto No t 
OVERTURE 1812 WITH CANNON AND 

MORTAR EFFECT S 

LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
Conductor GRAHAM NA$B Sokwr. AILANSCHUXER 
£600. £7.00, £S.SK £9.50, £50.50 bon Hall 528 8795*638 3691 


RAYMOND GUBBAY presents 

at the BARBICAN 

TODAY ax 3 pan. & 8 pjn- 

MAGIC OF 
VIENNA 

JOHANN STRAUSS ORCHESTRA AND DANCERS 
Oacomroof the period) 

ANN JAMES vapana 

The Glorious Music of Old Vienna 

See B a t h i te i i pend far full daub 



MONDAY NEXT 4 AUGUST at 7 AS pan. 
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 
ALAN BRIND Violin 

(BBC YOUNG MUSICIAN OF THE VEAR) 
CoodtKton NICHOLAS GLEOBURY 
See BninaapmdibrMl JeaBs 




IWSun 

12/17 Aug PACO PENA 

f!£L. AND MS FLAMENCO DANCE COMPANY 
/.uapni 

Soi Dteecl horn Spain n a Spectacular SpanWi Flasta. 

SolSm CI0 5O.C0S0.CBS0.C7.C6. Itaor HocMmutar IM. 

lOOpro 


Sommer in the City conceits by the 

ACADEMY OF 
STMAKITN- 
IN-THE-FIELDS 

Tomorrow 3 August 730pm 
HAYDN— THE CREATION in German 

MARGARET MARSHALL soprano 
•MALDWY1N DAVIES tenor 
STAFFORD DEAN bass ADADEMY CHORUS 

SIR NEVILLE MARRINER conductor 

‘Pfcase vote riionge of so/oui 

Seat Prices £11, £9.50. £8-50. £7, £6. £5 


Tuesday 5 August 7.45pm 

VIVALDI - THE FOUR SEASONS 

Conceni Gross in B flat. Op 4 No 1 ; A minor. Op 3 
No 8; B minor. Op 3 No 10 
IONA BROWN director/ violin 
ADRIAN LEVINE 

JONATHAN REES. BRIONY SHAW violins 
Seal Prices £9. £8, £7. £6. £5 


Wednesday 6 August 7.45pm 

RAVEL...... Ma M&el’pye 

SAINT-SAENS Cello Concerto No I in A minor 

FAllRE. Hegie 

BIZET Symphony in C 

SIR NEVILLE MARRINER conductor 

LYNN HARRELL cdlo 

Seat Prices £9.50. £&50, £7^0, Id. £5 


WEDNESDAY 2S AUGUST « 7J5 pure 

SUMMER LOVE CLASSICS 

su*™= gssBSSBi 

9 -‘^ m Gris PEER GTNT SUITE NOl 

BUJEDAMJBEWALg 

LONDONCONCEiTTORCHESTKA ‘ ' 

CHRISTOPHER ADET ANTHONY GOLDSTONE pona 
Amt a S ummer Roae for every tody m e mb er nflbe aadrare 

£*.£*.£ 7 1 £a5B,£MO,£IOL30 

THURSDAY 21 AUGUST at 7-45 gun. 

BENJAMIN LUXON baritone 
ROBERT TEAR Conductor 

P HTI.HA RMON1A ORCHESTRA 
Brahora Concdxn Onarons Handel ^ner May 
Vauzban-WnUams Songs rf Trod; LroocaroUa 
p/BBR ProJ^cfrora 'Ptgliaca'; Uosan PepiBeno'i dm truaiTbe 

■ Uirr Flatc'jW^aer 0 du mem Holder Abeoihrern men 
TtonbuBg’; Motiart Saomte and C h a n | ng to Ana train 
'Don GioraonT; Symphony Na 4a 
£6, £7.50. £9, £inW,£ll.W. £ I2M 
FRIDAY 22 AUGUST at 7 M pan. 

Handel ... ARRIVAL OP THE QUEE N OF S H EBA 

Mozart EINE KLEINE NACHTMUSIK 

I'OK Bach VIOUN CONCERTO IN A MINOR 

VteahS THE FOUR SEASONS 

CTTY OP LON DON SI NFONIA Qmducnjr IAN WATSON 

NIGEL KENNEDY violin 

£*£7.£*£R«.£lO-»£ii.50 
Boa OtDoc 1)1-028 8793 CC 01-638 BN! 




486 2461 CC 379 6433 
CC Hollbre 486 1933 


l ft JULIET Today 2250 
ft 7 45 ARMS AND THE MAN 

all nnd wrrk. Em 7.4S TMir 
ft 5m Mb) 2.30. Uirenwioyed. 
Frvr Tickets aH nutlnn). 
snonrored by Marks ft Spencer. 


PALACE THEATRE 437 6834 

CC 437 8377 or 379 6433 
FH Call Z4Hr 7Day CC 240 7200 
Orp Soles 930 6123 


LES MISERABLES 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET - STEAL ONET sid 

Evm 7 30 Mate Thu A Sal 230 
Ld oiMin not odmKMd 
unnl lire Interval 

■CAT THE TOUTS BV PHHBH. 

me for rcturns at the box 

OFFICE. 


PMEMX 836 2294 cc 240 9661 
741 9999. Fhrt call 24 bn 7 days 
240 7200. Ora Sates 930 6123. 
Eves7-30.Tburnui3.Saud A 8- 

THE COCKTAIL PARTY 

by TS. ELIOT 


HCCAOK.LT THEATRE Air Con- 
dStoiwd- 437 4606. Credit Card 
HeUbres 379 6565. 741 9999. Cm 
Sates 836 3962/930 6123. 

2» SENSATIONAL TEAR 

DAVID FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINY! 

“SPECTACULAR MUSICAL " 
Review Magazine 
Era 8.0 Matt Wed 3 ft Sal 6 


Frida; 8 Angus! 745 pm 

M1CHALA PETRI — Recorder 

HANDEL Conform Gimo in A traitor 

PERGOLESI Concertino Nort 

VIVALDI Reconler Concerto in C 

TELEMANN 5utk’ m F ior RucuftJer and Strinp. 

TCHAIKOVSKY Serenade furSmngsmC 

KENNETH SHUTO director 

Seal Prices £9, £8, £7. £6, £5 


Sunday 10 Angus! 7.30pm 

VIVALDI C 

BEETHOVEN Symphony No 9 ‘Choral* 

SIR NEVILLE MARRINER conductor 
ARLEEN AUGER soprano ALFRtDA HODGSON mezzo 
KEITH LEWIS tenor JOHN TOMUNSON bass 
ACADEMY CHORUS 
Seal Price* £11. £950. £&50- £7. £6. £S 

BARBICAN HALL 01-638 8891/628 8795 


ATARAH’S 

BAND 


sytte n«r 


Jfff 

*%wcanJ\ 

Thurs 7 Aoh & Sun 10 Aug at S 


A special summer ptooramne 
of music and rmisicai fun. 

The bast introduction 
tn concert-going 
for any child and 
hasgfioauogia! 

All seats dM. 

BOOK HOW! 

01-638 8B9U628 8795 


Tfiursctey 7 August '.45pm st :hc B; 



Christopher Plummer 



Ip ar. evening 'of mUi! 
injured Hy Siukt-spear 
with '.he gr-.'jT speeciit; 
.rspriscntinii ’.he uniir 
draoia i-f Shak*;jpejre 
l' and Walton 
rT!«!>oraiJl? film rit'tisii 
. ' : Prugalsoir.; 

' .,R'jn)“- dnd Juliet 


- 

Overture A Miiisumirier Night's Drftfn ': '‘^mULsohn 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESm 
SIR NEVILLE MARRINER conductor 


Scat Price* £3.3tl-SlO;3fJ 


1LSO 


OJ-638 SS.dl '62 S S7S5 


BARBICAN HALL 


Saterday 9 AngP8t»l8JUp«n 

LORES MAAZEL 

conductor 

BEETHOVEN Symphony No 8 

MAHLER Symphony No 1 

LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

To he folkmed hy a free amcen the LSO Brass & Wind Emcnititc 
Fnrworitton ibe Lafceside Terrace 
£ 1 1 .in. PL5U. £S. EA.50. £5. 13-5U 
B ot Office TeL lO-Heveiyday iniiSDn.tH-ft3HWWl.'6JKK79S 



ROSSINI.. 

GRIEGS 


VICTOR HOCHHAUSER pracots «t dte BARBICAN 

MONDAY Uth AUGUST at 7.45 

POPULAR CLASSICS 

,i„im>»»,i.ii,... nM .Oicro« “The Barber of Seville’ 

: Jeer Gym Suae No 1 

i.Condcnod* Artuqucz' 


....Skbi*D*Htfi«B ‘Gmadt' 
Scheherazade 


RODRIGO 

KHACHATURIAN 

RIMSKY-KO RSAKOV. 

NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Condocror DAVID COLEMAN 
SokMC ROBERT BRIGHTMORE 
£h.OO. £7.00, £8-50, £9 JO, £10.50 firen Hill ftMfcTWMS 8891 


WARD Bax Odk* 
734 8961 First Call 24 Hr 7 Days 
cc Booking 836 3464 Grp Sites 
930 6123 

MoreSM a. Mat Thun ft sat 3.00 

CHESS 

“A GRAND MASTER OF A 
SHOW” tewrat 


2 BRICK OF WALES 01-930 8681 

/2 OCHaUlite 930 0844/8/6 Grp 

Sates 930 6123 Keith Prowte 

741 9999/379 6433. First Call 24 

hr 7 day 240 7200. 

TO-T4 WIHB OOOOf D. Mill 

“SEVEN BRIDES FOR 
SEVEN BROTHERS" 


*9 DCFT AMYONE NOT TO 
ENJOY II- F.TVne 
“HEVEMTH nuvnr E Shorter. 
Eves 7.3a MM Thur ft Sal 3. 


01-734 1166/7/ 
0261 /0120. 

- tn 


WONDERFUL TOWN! 
LOW PRICE PREVS. NOW! 

Mon-Sat 8 Mate Wed 2-30 Sal 6 
OPENS AIM 4 AT 7.00PM 


NOVAL COURT S OC 730 1746 
Eves 80. Sal Matt 4.0- A 
COLDER CURATE by Karim 
AintwL Dir. by Slman Curds ft 
Max Start ord -Clark- 


ROYAL COURT UPSTAIRS 730 
2554 Front Aug T. Era 7J0. 

Sal ram 330 WOMEN AND 


SAVOY 01-836 8888 CC 01-379 
6219. 836 0479 Eventual 7.45. 
Matt Wrd 3. Sal 6 ft 8.30 

STH YEAR OF 
MICHAEL FRAYN'S 
A WARD- WINNING FARCE 

CHRISTOPHER GODWIN 
STEPHANIE HUGH 

COLE PADMCK 

k OOiAE L COCHRANE 
COLLI It TIMOTHY 

GLEESON CARLTON 

NOISES OFF 

Dir by MICHAEL BLAKEMORC 


ST MABTHTS 01-836 1443. Sre- 
trtOCNo 379 6433. EVgs 80 
Toes 246. Sal SO and 8-0 


THE MOUSETRAP 


-“'’sSEwr&J 

CAB SF— — 




Starring 

WAYNE SLEEP 

EH reeled 

MJlTy 3 00 
sat 4 30 A 8 15 

BOOK NOW __ 

l l tol M ip ii aro Hiu jw- ”* ?*!_* 
Tale Today I 30- - . 

■tot TOntghl. Mod 73 Q._D*y 
Tire, wed 7.30 
Kto w ■ Today 1 » 

Mam Tontgm. Mon 7.30 
TUT. Wed. 7.30 For *WOa) 
wte theatre 

ltop QLW rmq 1(178*1 67JW_ 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

“The irry Best of Brl lam's Comte 
latent'* Daily Ma ll , 

See wtunlr enlrre s und er. 

ODTEHON THEATRE/ 
TONTPIALI. THEATRE/ 


uiinmin t r WC2. Box Offlre 
and CC Ol 836 9987/5645. 

Can (CC 2a hr* 01240 7200 8*0 
tee) Eies 7.30 Eves 7.30. Wed 
Mats 2.30. Sate 5.0 ft 8. IS. 


CABELL 
JOANNA VAN CY9KOHEM 


BUTOE SPfRir 


TMOROUOHLY 

DUOYAnTT T Over 200 Perts 

LAST 4 WEEKS 


VKTOBIA PALACE 81-834 1317 

Eve* 7.30 Matt Wed ft Sal 2.45 

CHARLIE GIRL _ 


Ftekutone FrtyoUly- Stretoard 
RAUL NICHOLAS 
CTO CMAHBSC 


MARK WVNTER 

CHARLIE GIRL 

.K'sw'' Tbnrs 
AMO book on FIRST CALL 24Hra 
7 Dayv tBkg Feel 01-240 7200 ft 
ALL USUAL AGENTS 

W LftIMIKS TWH 01-834 0283/4 
cc B34 0048 Fir*) can cc 24 hr 7 
day* 240 7800 & cc 74i 

9999/379 6433. Grp Sale* 930 
6123 Eve* 7.45. Wed Matt 5 Sat 
6 ft 8 15 

MYTOZ DAWN PORTER 


WALSH 


Murder Myttery 

DEADLY NIGHTCAP 

“The ray beet ei Tte B inr* 


“MDCH BETTER THAN ASATHA 


SW1 Ol 930 
7765/839 4466 CC OI 379 
6565/6433. 741 9999. GrtM Ol 
8363962. Mon-Fri 8.00. WM MM 
300. Sate 5.00 ft 8.30. 
THEATRE UP COMED Y prroente 

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED 

By J.B Prmtley 
Dhrclrd by Ronald Eyre 

“YOU WILL NOT FIMD A MOM 
ANY 


WORLD- S. Exprctt 


Air Condi Uoned. 
836 3028/3796565/3796433 
Grp* 836 3962 

Era 8 Satt 5 ft 830 

Per A Limit id to— ■ 

FAYE DUNAWAY 

-Electri lying- IO Mam tn 
CIRCC ft BRAVO 
By Donald Freed 
Detect ed by HAROLD P OT T ER 
“A Sttmulanng play. Literate 
andwiny~TTmes...-Funo(Dap- 
ton. coorern and outrage" Oly 


YOUNO VIC STUDIO 928 6363 
Eves Soto- WRm«I Tb— tee Co. 
■mem THE 

PARKER SHOW. 


ART GALLERIES 


ANTHONY d 1 OFF AY 33 Dcrtng 
SL Wl ANDY WARHOL 499 
4100 


BANB 1C AN ANT GALLERY. Bar 

btran Cenbe. ICS. 01438 
4141 CECIL BEATON, over 
700 photogr a phs drawlnga. 
costumes. e p he u rer a : 


IOam-6 48pm. Sun ft B Hate 
12-54Gpav Cl e—d MiN g s. 
exrept B. Mott. AUmtesian £2 ft 

LI. 


•MTOM UBRABY CUIumU SL 

WCI. Tlw I h f H i MPto H THE 

CTTY 1 MAPS tol d a n Mn 

Ben at ST AUGUSTINE OP 

OTPPO (J»4 4 30y. moo - Gal 
IPS. Sun 2-306. Adm tree. 


NATIONAL 
LENT si Mariuil Place London 

WC2 Tol Ol 930 1552 JOHN 

PLAYDt PORTRAIT AWARD 

Unui 31 Aug Adm. free 

TT PON TODAY ■ 


unm 26 Aug. Adm. SOp Moo- 
Frt IDO Sat 106 Sun 2ft 


PARKIN OALLERT II MOKOmb 
SI London SW1 01 235 8144 


i ART 1925-50. 


ROYAL ACADEMY DP ARTS 

ptreadinv Wl Ol 743 9052 
Owen dariy loft me Son 
CLOSED ON rtlh AUGUST FQQ 

summer 0 cxmamoN 

cz 1 40. Cl 60 cone rale 
irrditrrd rate Sun. unm 1 43) 
IT tMOMIM Ol 741 9099 


UMTTCD 

Pmelion CSO ; SPeeial antra 
until end AtiguM. OCA nd l rt n 
iCkrt*tto‘a C — teikperary ArQ 
H Omer snroL Lo«ton. W|. 

TIM Ol 409 6701 


VICTORIA ft AJUKRT MUSEUM 
. Tba Natleaal Maeerea el Art ft .'■ 

PartJTii. S KeiningMn ML- . 
LIAM MU LBEADT Ntnltmi 
PAUL AND THO MAft ftANQRr 
wjlrrrohiurv MAftTUPHtlU 
OP PM0T08HAPHY. MRI, — 
CAN POTTERS TODAY. — 
Rrvnrdrd Info. Ol 881 4894. -f 
tohiUkv IO 3 JQ Sum 2-30 . 

5 SO CWMCd FTXMYV 


OALLERT 1 CrB im re u i 
Gar<tenv. SWT 584 5613. GEN. 
TURKS OP SOLD • Tba 
CaJnace •( MMSwM Mra, Un- 
lit 5 Curt Tire Sat 10-5.50: Sun 
12-5 30 Adm Cl 


CINEMAS 


BARBICAN 1= Ol 628 8793. Stu. • 
dniKMKv CS all pertv Ttchrti u 
oeokante. THE CARE BEARS B .. 
IL‘i IIS 
TIY1H. iU> * 13 A a 15 Today . 
Kidv Club Itnvlanl Mndmiw 
THE CARE BEARS B lU) 11.00 
A 3.30 


BALLET FILMS. I All beset* C2> 
POEM OF DANCES tUI 300. 
IVAN THE TEROTBLE iUi 7 OO 


CAMDEN PLAZA 485 2443 MB 
ft NANCY 1 181 rum al 1 30 - 
3 50 6 15 ft 8 45. . . 


381 3742 
CHARLOTTE GAINSSOURC 
tn AN IMPUDENT 6ML list 
Film at 2 30 4.35 6 40 8 50 - 

COTtZON MAYFAIR Cuma R ' w 
499 3737 Fird Call S4Hr 7 Day - » 
rc 240 7200 I8k9 Feel Magpia 
Smtlh. Denholm EIB ML Ju dl .a. 
Dmrn in A ROOM WITH A 
VIEW (PO| FHn at 1.30 INK ._ 
Sun) 3 45. C. to ft B 40 
«rm ATCURMM RttTOQ. 



COTtZON WEST END ShattMbofy >■ 
Avenue Wl 439 4805 Fin* 
Call 24 Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200 . 
iBkg Fort Maggie Smiib. 
Drtthohn ElltoU. JudlDrticb to.' 
A ROOM WITH A VIEW IPO). * 
Film al I 30 (Not Sunk 345. ’ 
6.10 A 8 40 . 


CATE CINEMA. NolHng HHI . 
Gale 727 4043 SID AND NAN- 
CY Il8i 2 30 tNot Sunl 4.40 ' 

O 50 9 CO L N II 13 SUNDAY '•* 

2.15 THE CA T AND TOE « 
CANARY iPGi U1RHK UK ' 
DMOMIIR iPC" LNtghl SUB 

11.15 SAMJWtO iPGI ABO .. 
REBELLION IPGI ALL SERFS - . 
BOOKABLE 


L EICES T ER SQUARE THEATRE 

930 5262 iEngi/930 7615 (24 - 
hr Arras/ visa/ AmEx Book- 
ingsl Wall DKoey'v PWOCCIBO 
(L- 1 Pluv OUMM1 BEARS A MM 
BEGMMKMiUiCani progs Dal- 
ly 170 3 40 6.00 820 AU V 
proto bookable hi advance - 




CINEMA 379 3014/ 

836 0691 SRI ft NANCY tlSJ. 1 _ 
FUm at I 30 5ftO 6.16 8.45. 
LATE SHOW FHI ft SAT ONLY “ 
AT It. 15PM. AR 

CONDITIONED 


235 4225 Meryl Streep ft 
Robert Bedford -OUT OF 
AFlDCA-iPGi DJBytB.O 6 0 90 


(930 

27381 Wan Dttney's FANTASIA 
■UI Sro proas Daily i so Loo 
8.10 AB seals bookable to ad- 
vance. Acre** and visa 




A 


■930 61 111 Mo 930 4250 /_ 
42S9 HAN N AN AND HER 
SISTERS list Sro proas Doors • 
open Dally 2 00 500800. Late 
Might Show Fn ft Sal Doors . 
Open 1 l l Sum. Credit Card Hoi 
Line (Arress /Vtta /AmEx) 839 . 
1929. 24 hour service E2-SO 
real- available Monday an - 
perts, AH progs bookable in ‘ 
advance *• 


20111 THE KARATE K»^ 
PART R (FBI Sep Proas Doan 
ooen OaUy 3.06. 5.36. 8.05 Re- ' 
duced pnm lor under id's. 
Student card hotders. UB4Q 
Holder*. 0. A. P'S. Manner's 
only CARE BEARS MOVK R • 
A NEW OENERATRM (U| 
Doors open Mon - Sal 1.15. AO 
veatt Cl .80 




•::r 


BENOM 857 8402 
1 AN IMP U DE N T CURL HSJ. . 

F«m » 2.25 4.36 6.45 900 
2. POLICE (151. FUm at 1.454.00 
6 -30 845. AIR 

CONDmONED 


SCREEN AT THE EtECTRIC 229 
KM. DESERT HEARTS *181 
3 30. 5 15. 7 10. 9 06. Seals 
bookable. Plenty ol tree parking 
nearby 


935 2772 1 1 Oscar winner best 
anrraa Geraldine Page TRIP TO 
ROUNTIFUL <U) 236. 445. 
6-50 ft 865. 21 Martin 

S onrsw e's Can nr* Pi ue rehmer 
AFTER HOURS <19i 3D0.4.SS. 
T.oa 906. Uc Bar. Seats 
Bookable 


SCREEN ON (SUNOTON OREIH 

226 3820 Steven O p u tosrgV “ 
THE COLOUR PURPLE (IS n 
2.06. 5.00. 8.08. Berta 

boofcaMe ai advance. 


M THE HHJL 436 
3366/9787 DESERT HEARTS 

(181 300. 4 45. 7 OO. 9.08. Uc 
Bar Seats Bookable. Air 
Condi boned. 


PERSONAL, 


1 NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 

BATBWATERW2. 1 bed flat low- 
er ground, tastefully renovated, 
daw to tube and amenUlra. 
Lone teas*. Offers £63JXX). Tol 
01 243 0652 eves 

HYDE PK ESTATE 2 bed mate in 
this unique development. Mod 
kit ft bath. Recep to secluded 
pro pauo facing woodland ■sel- 
ling. £196.000 tod CH. CMW. 
under ground Ptdng ft com 
cans. 196 yr Lie. Ol 402 9856. 

HAMPSTEAD £ 
HIGHGATE 

BT18I2C PARK - Sumy. 2 bed 
garden flat Lounge, kitchen ft 
bathroom W south- west gar- 
den. OCX. v. low ouiqoiduv- 
Exc. decor FH. £89.950 for 
quev vale. Tel : Ol 722 3709 

PRIMROSE HU delightful sun- 
ny 1 st door 2 bedroom balcony 
OaL £75-000. TOL Ol 72? 7396 

CANARY ISLANDS 


FRANCE 


DEAUVILLE 

Fo*jp furrashed mezzanine apart- 
ment (Habrta fumtue). in mariaa 
refill private mooring in front & 
dose proximity fa both race 
courses, jpraga. steps 6, mastor 
iitnJmoiD , chnJs room op spnl 
staircase. fabUous views bum pa- 
M wntfows. Cully fined kitchen. 

FB9IMB 

TH. (0703) SSZ767 


SPAIN 

COSTA BRAVA nr PofetfrugeO. 
Superb apart with extensive 
Hews of tea A mountains, bal- 
cony ft ige roof I err, 4 beds. 3 
baths. rocepL gge. mm use 
tenure « ft s pom. easy waudog 
distance MKIln ft shoes. 
£55000 OZ73 853545 

LEGAL NOTICES 


THE COMPANIE S ACT 1988 
IN THE MATTES OF 
ALTOSAFE LIMITED BY OR- 
O ESOF THE HIGH COLTIT OF 
JUSTICE Dated 9 October £988. 

W7UJAM MOBYS ROBERTS 
BECKET HOL'SE. 1 LAM- 
fCTTIPAJLACE ROAD. LONDON 
swi 7EL. have been appointed 
Hqvudawr M the above comanay. 
An debtt and claim ahouid be 
pent u the (or nmng addren. 

WILLIAM MOBYS ROHERTS 
LIQUIDATOR 


H ft F HOLDINGS LIMITED 
on v-ohiniafv UonlctaUon) 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
that the CrodKon of lire above- 
named Company are required, on 


or before the 18th day of August 
1986. to send their names and ad- 
dratara. vrtin particulars of inetr 
detott or dauns. and the names 
and addneraes or their SrttcUors 
Uf anyL to lire undersigned. 
B.R.A. Grttaghan of HOI 
VaHacore Hanguig O reord Houae. 
21 WMtefnarv arwt London 
EC*Y SAL. the Uoutdator of toe 
void Company; and. tf so required 
by nonce In writing by the said 
UaiddaMr. are. by their SOttcnars 
or personally, to come In and 
prove uteir said debts or cWlms at 
such ttmc and place as shall be 
speclned tn such notice, or tn de- 
fault thereof they win be 
end tided from toe benefit of any 
dlstrlbuoon made before audl 
debts are proved. This notice Is 
purely formal and all known 
Creditors have been, or wBl be. 
paid In full. 

DATED 2401 July 1986 

B.R.A. CALLAGHAN 
UQU1PATPR 


IN TH E HIGH COURT OF JUS- 
TICE No- 004736 of 1986 
CHANCERY DIVISION 
IN THE MATTER OF HESTAIR 
PLC and TN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT 1986 
NOTICE IS HEREBY OVEN 
that the Order or Ore Hfgtt Court 
of Justice Chancery Dtvwwn dat- 
ed 21M July 1986 ca njb nil ng me 
cancellauon of Ore Share Premi- 
um Account of toe above-named 
Company was registered by the 
Registrar of Cawmiei on the 
24to July 1986. 

CttHd this 2nd day of August 
1906 

Alien ft Ovary 
9 Cheanshte 
London EC2V 6AD 
Solicitors for me 
above-named Company 


KING STON PRINT ft DESIGN 
LttUTEp i|N LIQUIDATION) 
NOTICE IS HEREBY OVEN 
that um creaHorv of m« above- 
nanred company, which is being 
woundup voluntarily, are re- 
mured on or before me 3isf day 
of August 1986. to send melr 
names, addresses ana particular* 
of their claims lo the utHMSpM 
" ‘ "amlUorvSmilh of LMham. 

V ft Davte. Stanhope 
H ouse, no Durv Lane. London 
WC28 ear. Uw Laqutaaior of use 
ny. ar w defaun (hereof 
Ihev win be excluded from Hie 


Dated th» asm day of July 1986 
NJ. HAMILTON- SMITH 
LIQUIDATOR 


K AMLIN LIMITED 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 


Sian hone Home, no 


made before such 


RE- HAILES 
LIQUIDATOR 


Ei ANDERSON WHITE ft 
JONES BLILDERS LTD 

Ml THE COMPANIES ACT 
1 965 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, 
wnstunl Id Section 588 of me 
companies Ac L igasttiaiaMeef- 
log of Ibe Cred IVora of the above. 
named Company win be held at 
The Barbican Otr how. Central 
Sn*. London EC1 on Thursday 
Sf }5 U L <t r* v J* Augmt. 1986 41 
lOoctorti In Hre roronoon. for the 
pmpotef romlioaM in Sections 
SB9ind 890 of the »d ACL 
DATED thks 241)1 day of July 
1986 

JAMES WHITE 
DIRECTOR 


RENTALS 


flat Lae Hght sitting 
room. 2 beds. Ktttlwn. bath- 
room. Sep WC Exc shops. Os 
fiver. CI60PW. Ot 362 2677 


I /SHOUT LET properties 
from EtOttESXOOpw. Personal 
Service. 01-458 3680 or 0836- 
592824 any tone m. 


OVAL. 2 double roams la knety 
new house. Available approx 
£165 pm exc. Tel Andrew. Ol- 
736 8986 to view mis w/md 


Exqutsllaty fur- 
ntshed 2 bedroom flat In 
prmooe Mock dose loall jnwul- 
Bes EI2S pw. 946 7333 


SOUTH KEMSONTOM I Bed. 
Cl IO pw. 01 289 381 9 [Eves) 1 
year leL no shartng. 


SOUTH LONDON HOUSE. Flats, 
bjdgte ft shares. Most areas. 
OHSSacceiiied In some props. 
686 7576 Renlal Guide 
8379881 The number to remem- 
ber when aertdng bm rental 
ptortiw In central and prime 
London areas £150/ £2 jOOOpw. 
WZ -LANCASTER CATE. 1 Bed 

Srorvi"^ 1 °V W ■ Garden. 
Jia^L-ng/tetort HI. Ol- 

* 8 EDHM FLAT with yard ft 
N , r J r i5* SOI £85. 686 
7576 Ranlal Gutde 
rim -R * lmmac lux flat balco- 
“f- rrew - boner. 
£195 pw. Long let 622 5828- 

POUB UE ■CB SITTEH. Own toL 
has Wrotwwre. Nr rtnerei. £40. 
686 7576 Renlal Guide 
KDWWBTOIL sum pw Excel 
tent spacious well fumttlKd 2 
bed garden (tat. MS gao* 
LOOKBac fw the best flat, du- 
P*cx. Vknw toi London? 
£100/I000nw. Call 5B95481. 
IMHIA VALE W8 Super 3 bd gdn 
K*B Co lef. Avail 
IO A ug lliopw 286 4856 
Mtws OOTTAftE WS. 2 beds to 

f" - 2 , l"T ,u,q 8 ff«i»n. 
t> w ™ 01 998 6604. 
■VAPFBCQ. Lux 1 bed turn flat In 
Comer- 

'•on £165 pw 01-481 9199 

WE LET FLATS AND HOUSES. 

Davl » 

WooKe ft 00 402 7381 


Fully 

new house, living room wtto 
dining area. Urge ’ 
etudKk/bedroom. 3 other bed- - 
rooms, 2 bathrooms. 2 separate 
WOs, Idlctwn. garage and roof r 
garden. £500 per week. Compa- 
ny M or overseas via tors. Ttt 
Ol 876 8616 


CHELSEA Kntgnttbndge. Brtgra-,. 
via. PlmUcp. WnimMte. - 
Luxury Mura and flats iuii-.% 
arte for king or -JTort tett.' 
Please rmg lor. currenl ttt , . 
Cooiev. 69 Buckingham Mace . 
Rd. SWI 01-828 8251. 


SUPERIOR FLATS 

avail 4 . read- far diploaiatt. 
executor* Lanq ft short lett to 
all areas. Unfriend ft Oa 48. 
Albemarle St wi.oiAgg 5334 . 


WANTED Swneir p r u ne rites tor - 
tongAhorTCotets 01-458 3660, 
or 0836 592824 anytime (TV „ 


AME HtC AH EXECUTIVES Seek 
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Classical records 


REVIEW 





ndrfcks/Battea/van 

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i'i'^vwtho^iekls/Marrirwr. 
1 *^5i>0-2pCDs;alsb«ac 

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■** 


jr Neville. Mamneris operatic rep- 
* t 4^ory « as^yet liraited — and may ii 
t V^AiulUpty -r; fcut bc is wdl acquainted 
*■ &nth die Aimayivas and the Figaros. 
®le haTToirawetr Jus much admired 


“ ' 'jarbiere of a couple of years ago'with . 
xNi 


•tlft.Ua 


maMas?" 


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tidJUt t.lfc;' 


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utnu 


N, Velcomed -for -many of the same 
~ "n. sasoiis: There is Sir Neville’s own 
approach, always enngetic but rarely 
^^yer-statedand certainly never slack. . 

' ’fhere is an excellently picked cast 
*** *y.iut ipost'Of all there is a constant 
''iterplay between each and every one 
the perfijnneiSf with the ping-pong 
H ~ . of changing emotion nipping to 

. “ t^nd fro over the net. 

* Jos6 van Dam in Ihe.title role, one 

• « to . V^e sangofi the Karajan-set in the early ' 

'"^Seventies, Hfflls'as'a contented map, 

" ^ - before: venting his - 

1 * ---•■• £>£ngcr or;: O thers,- inducting poor ' 

1 ■**rhetiibmQin “Noupnl andraT’. The - 
; 't\ct tV c ~aria~is "masterly, as is ' 
* **/Iarriner^s accompaniment of the. 

•. tl „ ^‘•y, ireceding radiative, -where as so often 
’ ' *-'c» Mozart most -of the feelings are • 

• Exposed before the aria actually 
7 ^tarisl"I .'. " _ ' 

* b " cm Ruggero ^ Raiznondfs - Count is 

.* -equally “volatile: suavity itself when 
cnq^>je wants to be persuasive as in .the 
V li'^vooing of-^usanna- or in -that final 
,' v '^Perdono”, which even the most 
^oNffrorited Countess. could not resist, 

*1 fall of fury .in “Hat gia vinta la 

• “V* ■ J’ausa’?. Raimondi may have to fudge 
= vr s , l ; J j 2 -j^pccasuinal!BOte, birt. he and 'van' “ 
^Dam-are-two of-the most powerful - 
- Opponents on record in this opera. 

The- "women are scarcely less 
.. y tiimpressiye. Agnes Baltsa has movtxl 
.wm ^^jrom^ Rosina in' the Barbiere to 
■ teT^CherulriiK) here and has given that - 
• ../-silken boy. a quivering adolescent 
->' , sexuhUty whether in the; high-speed 

**5 



Romantic note: encounter hi the garden, from the cover of Philips’s new digital recording of Le oozze di Figaro 


“Non so piti" or in “Vol che sapete”. 
where, as be tells us himself he is all 
a-trembte (“lo sono si tremante”). 
Lucia Popp's Countess is creamy and 
dreamy to start with — “FOigi amor” 
almost -always goes better on record 
than on stage — before summoning up 
those reserves of resptutefulhess she 
must have-had to many a man like 


celebrating the 200th anniversary of 
that first performance in the 
Burgtheater. Places must remain on 
the shelf for Giulini, B6hm and 
Davis, but for those who want the 
present-day team in first class sound, 
Marriner is the choice. 

As Claudio Abbado leaves La Scala 
lb lake up his position as’ music 


cast, led 
notable 
recommended. 


and Bruson in 
All are highly 


AJmaviva. • ;_.director of the Vienna State Opera in 

My own reserves centre mainly bn ~ the autumn, DG have just reissued on 


Barbara Hendricks’s Sttssgnaj always 
cleanly sung bm ladtihg the charm of 
a Grist or a Jvfathis. By the standards* ' 
of this set it is a cool interpretation. 
But with performances of tire strength 
of Robert Lloyd’s Bartolo and Febo- 
ity Palmer’s Marcellina this is a 
Figaro in. every way worthy of 


.CD' a notable range of opera record- 
ings he made with the forces of the 
Milan house. Pride of place goes to 
Verdi: Simon Boccanegra (41S 692-2, 
2 CDs) with Macbeth (415 688-2, 
3CDsX both recorded m the late 
1970s. Ballo (415 685-2 2 CDs) came 
a few years later and found the male 


EMI too have been probing into the 
Scala archive and their latest CD 
transfer is Puccini's Manon Lescaul 
(CDS 7 473938, 2 CDs). It is a one- 
woman set, but since that woman is 
Callas enthusiasts will need no fur- 
ther recommendation. But' the ' cast 
assembled around her was one of the 
weaker ones among her major com- 
plete recordings and the EMI en- 
gineers have not been able to do 
much with the distant sound of the 
orchestra under Serafim 


John Higgins 


».*t iu 




r *«*: 
• * 


hkii-bI 

’«*u 



sets 

fire to the senses 


’* w 4 Chopin; wattzas, etc absorbs hours oT thought and, 

■ UpafisJEMl CHC 7473902 • ^ in the A min or and B minor,-* 

V Debmsy: Preludes, Books •: rubato which is no more and 
‘ * iid less than the breathing of 

their' entire harmonic and 




. ^ 1 and tl Ousset EMI QC 27 
■vi 04323(2 LPs:ca^ette also 

avaHabte) : 

•« •«?, Schubert SchwanengMang 
' * HaefSoer/Dgliler. Cfaves CD 



melodic being. 

-Cfecile Outset’s wide-iwake 
Debussy celebrates life exu- 
berantly. This new recording 
of. the complete Preludes pro- 
vides an acoustic spacious 
'enough for her to -revel iiuthe 
pyrotechnics of the — Feux- 
' ' d’artifiett" (even if «Ts bal- 
EyV- ancedin favour of the Roman 

Orchestra/Feresiraik. : 7 • candles), -to swaggCT with all.. 
...We Hungardloh HCO 11B8tr2.: •** the flamboyance, of “General 

Lavme”i and to bask in the 

j 


Vivakfi/Handef/Mozart/ Qluck 
AmeHng/LeipziQ 
Gewandhaus/Masur. • 

_ PhUips'CD 412 233-2 (LP and 
cassette'alsonuaHabJe} T . . 
Liszt HWbaa So temnia 



Spirituality shines 
through the style 


Badu Mass in B hGnor 

MarshaD/Baker/T ear/Ramev/ 
ASMIF/ Marriner. Philips 41 6 
415-2 (CD, also black disc and 
cassette) 

Purcell: Dfafo and Aeneas 

Norman/ AUan/McLaughlin/ 

A CO/ Leppard. Philips 416 
299-1 (Black disc, also CD and 
cassette) 


. Sir Neville Marriaer’s B Mi- 

nor Mass,- was recorded in 

EUy Apreling’s accorapa- 19TS - ud now re*|pe*ts m 
hits, the UrfprigGewandhaus ; compact disc after a mnaitere 
-Orchestra under Kurt Masur, flm yy. °f rreal digtally^ 
. .are also no mere supporting .- cor “ e “ perrod-st^e _ 

- r - - - mances by Parrott, Gardmer 


S^mtueous: Dina Lipatti 


as iadeed is Gard- 
iner’s. Here the problem is not 
me of vocal quality and power 
but rather one of style. Robert 
Tear’s “Benedtetus” is woe- 
fully pedestrian, and there are 
far too many gratmtons 
swoops, while Samuel 
Ramey’s “Qaoniam To solas 
Sanctns” sounds equally 
wooden. 

But these are small prices to. 
pay for a reading that is 


. . ~ - 7 - L^vme i ana ro oasit m ine hprwv record nflRrH--. mances oy rareon, baramer 

Ever since his death ot _da^m&.fi^oriAS Coflmes^ beUamto it is their -had Rifkiii, which offer -a wide 

«« ...... teukaerairin; 195dat the age of d’AnacaprT- . lightly-sprung, vividly respon- ^ interpretative sola- 



ENTAL 






• ii»- 


mm* . ** 

i am* Hi - 


_ 33, Dinu lipatti’s has been a 
■.u.n»js ”” name spoken quietly, loyally, 
' and none too often. . His 
■ > - 1 . Chopra recordings, as few as 

his.years, remain as tantaliz- 
ing vignettes, moments of 
. . .% xm i* insight cherished even as they 

slip through the fingers. This 
..T new and remastered ’ CD 
^‘compilation,- which, draws 
^ from single and multiple 
black-disc_ recitals, liberates 

( the physicality of Lipatti’s 
playing and the ardour of his 
responses in the months of the 
k last, temporary, drug-induced 

reprieve. 

Even the sibilant rustle in 
the background of the Barca- 
rolle and the OP 27 No 2 
Nocturne is wiped out by the 
ear as it focuses on the sheer 
momentum generated by 'a 
velocity of imagination equal 
to that offoe fingertips- And it 
is very much Li path the jazz- 
busker' who lurks mis- 
chievously' behind the two A 
flat -waltzes- (Nos 2 and 8), 
both of them audacious (ours- 
de-force of timing. 

The waltzes, above all, 
ephomize. the spontaneous 
combustion of his imagina- 
tiqn and technique: a 
“minute" waltz, whose flight 


ni ; 


r* — ' ' 


But fn the evocation' of 
more illusory ' qualities — 
wind, sound, perfume, silence 
itself - even Ousset’s most 
meticulously placed details 
never-quite tingle with that 
essential frisson of un- 
predictability. I prefer the 
shameless corporeality of her, 
“Pour le. piano": Debussy 
lionized and feted in a vora- 
cious Prelude and big-boned 
Saraband e. 

The fortepiano, an 1820 
Viennese Broadmann, 
snatches a good deal of the 
limelight in Ernst Haefliger's 
new recording of the 
Schwanengesang. As in their 
earlier partnership in the 
Winierreise it is the fingers of 
Jorg Ewald D&hler which pro- 
vide the performance’s chief 
raison d'etre: in the keen bile 
of a single sforzando, and the 
precise balance between- bass 
chords 'and treble figuration 
in. for instance. “Die Stadl" ' v 

“Der Doppelgahger” creates 
a unique chill simply through 
;the . chemistry of the tenor 
register and the forte piano’s 
timbre: but Haefliger is gen- 
erally a little too content to let 
the voice’s lyrical fluency run 
on automatic 


CHESS 


ltghtly-spnmg. vividly respon- 
sive playing, .flecked by an 
ever-changing palette of con- 
tinuo and obligato soloists, 
which so sharply distinguishes 
each shifting idiom, from 
Paisiello and Peigotesi to 
Handel and Heinicben. • 

Some eyebrows will doubt- 
less, be raised at Amelina’s 
own gilding of “Caro mio 
-ben", and of Dido’s Lament. 
-But heT phrasing makes flaw- 
less musical sense, and her 
voice shows little sign of 
weariness in maintaining an 
incessantly- high athletic 
profile. 

The only new Liszt release 
to arrive in time for the week 
of his anniversary is Hungar- 
oton’s CD remastering of a 
1977 performance of his 
blockbuster, the Missa 
Soiemnis, under the baton of 
the late Janos Ferenczik. This 
-was one of the works in which 
Liszt Ferenc asserted himself 
over' and above Franz Liszt: 
this recording -is as rever- 
berant as if it had been made 
in the very basilica ' at 
Esztergom for whose 
consecration the work was 
composed. 

Hilary Finch 


turns. 

Despite the experiments 
and advances these represent, 
this reissue, which sounds 
marvellous in its new, digitally 
spruced-up format, can still 
bold its own. It sounds marvel- 
lous and has the positive 
advantages of Margaret Mar- 
■ shall and Janet Baker in the 
female soloists’ roles; the -lat- 
ter in particular is heard at her 
glorious peak in 
she does, most notably, 
course, in the “Agnns Dei". 

The performance is weakest 
in some of the arias for male 



obbligatos are well done, while 
the Chorus of the Academy off 
St Martin-ia-the-FTekl sing 
crisply and accmatdy. Speeds 
are generally oo the test side^ 
and articulation well pointed, 
sometimes even affectedly so, 
b«t never at the expose of the 
work’s essential spirituality. 

Purcell's only true opera. 
Dido and Aeneas, is jnk as 
great in a slightly different 
nay, and Jessye Norman was 
bound to have recorded it 
sooner or later. In some ways 
one wishes she had not It is a 
superlative voice, of coarse, 
but one has to question an. 
approach that turns Dido into 
a character of quite such 
supercilious nobility, ignoring 
the more human side of her 
nature that Emma Kirkby, on 
the other hand, emphasizes 
too much. The perfect balance 
is still that strode by Baker in 
her famous reaming of the 
1960s. 

One advantage e€ the 
present version, however, is 
Thomas Allen's Aeneas. No 
fool, this, but a thin 


At her glorious peak in Bach’s 
B Minor Mass; Janet Baker 


44. 




Look East, young men 

Chess could help 


wrr 



O PI vV 

ncRso' 

VKKt l *- 1 

HE * 


Mf 


■s 





Why have the Japanese man- 
aged to embrace computer 
technology with such enviable 
speed and startling success? 
The answer could lie -In the 
fact that their language is 
pictograramatic, representing 
objects and ideas pictorially 
rather than phonetically. As a 
nsult they are naturally drawn 
te activities involving pattern 
recognition, a basic element of 
computer programming. 

Britain’s record in the use of 
computers is. dismal _by 
comparison. By late 1984, 98 
per cent of our schools had a 
micro-computer. Yet stones 
of machines lying idle, or 
being used inadequately, are 
legion and fears are growing 
(hat by the 21st century Brit- 
ain will not have the necessary 
business and industrial skills 
for success. 

How are we to catch up? We 
can do nothing, of course, 
about our language, but we 
(an foster areas of pattern 
recognition in which we al- 
ready exceL One of the most 
obvious is chess. In 1984 the 
English team took the -silver 
medals at the Chess Olympiad 
and with no less than 10' 
Grandmasters the. UK is now 
posing a threat to the Soviet 


us to rival the 
■industrial success 
of Japan, says 
Raymond Keene 


. Jana Miles, the English Inter- 
national Woman Grand- 
- master, by 2-0 — the first time 
a computer had beaten a 
G randmaste r under standard 
tournament conditions. 

. White Hftech (Computer). 
Black: Jana Miles. Caro-Kann 
Defence. 


3 rm 
S NO 
7 BB64- 
> QaZ 


tS 

& 

BUT 

0-0 


2« 

4 U 
fi woS 
8 Brfti 


-- An unsound 


10 Muf 
12 03 
14 0-0 


11 QMS 
ttOts 


If 14_ Nxd4_15_ Qxc8f; 

16 Nxe7+. Perhaps Blacl 
been relying on this resource, 
but' only now spotted the 


our schools we could provide 
an early and digestible , iitr 
-troduction to the abilities 
needed for computing ■ 

A flourishing branch of- Black should prefer 9. 
computer science is concerned 
with programming machines 
to play chess to the same level 
as the best human beings. 

Practice with game-playing 
machines is a relatively easy 
way of introducing children to 
computers, as an experiment 
conducted at the 1981 Scisys 
Brighton Chess Tournament 
revealed. 

A group of children aged 
between 10 and 12 were 
instructed in the use of chess- 
playing micro-computers. 

Within half an hour they had 
all fully mastered the func- 
tions of the machines. 

The following game illus- 
trates the power of Hitech, the 
world’s strongest chess playing 
computer program. In a two- 


d5 

& 


sacrifice. 
Bc6. 


Nefi 

RcS 


trap. 



IS NM 

Rc7 

IB OuS 

17 BUI 

Ne7 

IB e* 

IS Radi 

OK 

30 dft 


BH 

ws 


This pawn advance is deci- 
sive. . . ... 


an - ■ 

72 Qxa5 
24 IMS 
» OC5 
2ft Ml 


has n< 

30NiM 
32 K02 
34 06 


Bdft 

21 t>4 

aft 

Oc3 

23 as 

IMS 

Ok* 

as war. 

BU7 

OH 

27 HOT 

BBS 

bft 

29 QxM 

NM 

t desperation, 
real attack. 

Black 

Oh 2+ 

3t M7 

am* 

Haft* 

33 KJ3 

ota. 


Union’s domination of world - day match played in London 
chess. By teaching the game in on June 17-18 it defeated Dr Black resigns. 


sensitive person simply 
in confusing circumstances. 
The orchestral sound is what 
you wonld expect from- 
Leppard: rich, fulsome, wholly 
of the 19th century; very nice if 
yon like that sort of IMng in 
Pnrce'L 

Stephen Pettitt 


Bridge 


on the air 


Western 
bid for 
maturity 


FILMS ON TV 


“He was the man who rode 
into our little valley out of the 
heart of the great glowing 
West and when his work was 
done rode back whence he had 
come and he was Shane.” 

That is the closing sentence 
of Jack Schaefer’s classic 
story, which in. 1953 became 
even better known as a film 
and has gone into the history 
books as one of the half dozen 
most famous cinema 
Westerns. 

Shane (BBC2, today, 8.40- 
10.30pm) was made the year 
after High Noon and they 
became regarded as peaks of 
the genre. The Western, it was 
argued, had finally grown up, 
no longer the simplistic tale of 
cowboys and Indians but an' 
adult form which need not be 
patronized. 

But reputations change. 
Shane is meatier stuff than 
High Noon, a thinly disguised 
allegory on the McCarthy 
witchhunt, and draws its res- 
onance from authentic West- 
ern themes. 

One is the feud between 
homesteaders and cattlemen, 
here played out in Wyoming 
in the 1890s. On the one hand 
are tiie folksy Starretts (Jean 
Arthur, Van Heflin and their 
son, played by. the 1 1 -year-old 





Touching drama: hero Alan L tyttf with Brandon de Wilde 


Brandon de Wilde). On the 
other, trying to drive them off 
their land, are the Rykers. 
abetted by the deliciously evil 
hired killer. Jack Palance. 

Shane also uses the familiar 
Western theme of the gun- 
fighter trying to live down his 
past -but being drawn back 
reluctantly into violence. Alan 
Ladd plays the title role of the 
mysterious stranger who rides 
into the valley, befriends the 
Starretts — a friendship recip- 
rocated both by mother and 
son — and does what any 
decent Western hero has to do. 

It is a leisurely film, directed 
by George Stevens with a 
sometimes ponderous touch. 
But if his striving for art is 
sometimes too conscious, it is 
still an impressive piece, with 
a quiet grandeur that power- 
fully enriches the Western 
myth. 

Peter Waymark 


RECOMMENDED 


The Strawberry Blonde (1941): 

Charming period comedy with 
James Cagney as a demist 
who falls for Rita Hayworth 
(Channel 4, today, 2.45- 
4.35pm). 

City Lights (1931): Funny, 
touching Chaplin story of a 
tramp and a blind flower girl 

(BBC2. today, 4 .55-6 .2 Opm). 

* Ordinary People (1979): 
Robert Radford's sensitive 
study of a family tragedy (ITV, 
today, 9.1 5-1 1.30pm). 

The Treasure of the Sierra 
Madre (1947): Humphrey 
Bogart and friends in a 
frustrated search for gold 
(BBC2, tomorrow, 10l50pm- 
1am). 

* Hamlet (1976): Celestino 
Coronado's bold and quirky 
version has Hamlet as a split 
personality played by two 
actors (Channel 4, Fri, 
11.30pm-l 2.45am). 

* First British television 
showing 


Fighter in a losing battle 


TELEVISION 




Hazel O’Connor’s fiery but 
flagging singing career mir- 
rored her starring role in 
Breaking Class, chronicling 
the rise and fell of a war- 
painted rock star. 

Jn Fighting Back (BBC1, 

Mon, 9.30-10.20pmX she is 
cast in a Julie Wallers role, as a 
mother of two with eyes like 
.lasers who flees a live-in, 

Russian roulette-baying lover 
m Liverpool— to- -return to 
Bristol, scede of a mis-spent 
childhood. 

But instead of being clasped 
in to the welcoming bosom of 
her family, Viv is met with 
slammed doors and the same 
problems of eking out an 
inner-city existence, exacer- 
bated by a natural talent for 
running foul of authority. - - 
, - _ . Granada celebrates the 

otherwise ngtron. . jf - like, professionally obnoxious 

ashamedly ripe. All the other ' • - ■ . . 



No hoper: Hazel O’Connor 
is Fighting Back 

Blondie, The Jam, Iggy Pop, 
Wreddess Eric. Tom Robin- 
son and The Gash. 

The music is rough and 
ready,. but there’s no stopping 
the raw energy and aggressive 
enthusiasm- of the gargoyle- 


sion of punk music and. cm-- punk performers. They blow 
tore with a fine culling of the today's video bands off stage. 
aSthiv« of So It Goer, itF late- —The -b ile level in The 
night- rock programme. The Queen's Anns (BBCI, tomor- 
Way They- Wen (Channel 4, row, 9.05- 1 0.20pra) puts 
Tues, 10-1 130pm) features gobbing;punks to shame. Rob- 
definitive peformances by ert Uiquhart, guv’nor of a 


down-at-heel London pub, 
survived the parachute drop 
into Arnhem, but is being kept 
afloat by massive infusions of 
brandy, while his young wife 
(Linda Marlowe) entertains a 
stream of wide- boy customers 
in the matrimonial bed — 
leaving a servile Irishman 
(Dermot Crowley) to nanny 
the establishment 

Vanishing Earth (BBC2, 
Mon. 10-10.55pm;Tues, 9.55- 
10.50pm) is a tear-stained 
description of man-made 
deserts and the suicidal 
destruction of this planet’s 
capacity for growing food 
through deforestation and the 
resultant washing away of 
irreplaceable top soil Bui 
Michael Andrews's docu- 
mentary offers simple solu- 
tions for the Third World — 
where it should be seen. 

The Blessed Ones (Channel 
4. Thurs, 9.30-1 1.05pm), is 
Ingmar Bergman’s first video 
production, based oh a play by 
UUa Isaksson. It makes for an 
austere wrist-slashing drama 
of paranoid middle-aged love. 

Bob Williams 


From concert hall to sleepy lagoon 


RADIO 


He is best known for his radio 
signature tunes, for In Town 
Tonight and Music WhileJYou 
Work ■ for “By the Sleepy 
Lagoon", which still ' in- 
troduces Desert Island Discs, 
and his “Dambusters March", 
which made the hit parade 
during the 1950s. 

But these were only a small 
sample from the jolly, rousing 
and evocative pieces penned 
by Eric Coates, a doctor's son 
from Nottinghamshire. He 
was born 100 years ago and 
radio, which made him a 
celebrity, appropriately leads 
the centenary tributes. 

Eric Coates - King of Light 
Mask (Radio 2, Tues, 9- 
9.55pm) is the first of a four 
programmes by his son, Aus- 
tin. -It is the 1 story of a 
precocious musical talent, 
who made his first concert 
appearance at the age of 10, 
resisted parental pressure to 
become a bank clerk to study 


at the Royal Academy of 
M usic. He was good enough to 
play the viola under Beecham 
and Henry Wood but bis real 
forte was composing and he 
made peculiarly his own that 
distinctive, territory between 
classical and pop. 

The Jot of the Victorian 
woman was hardly a fulfilling 
one, even if she was the wife of 
the Governor General of In- 
dia. “It is so provoking to be 
utterly useless", wrote Char- 
lotte Canning, left to idle at 
home while husband George 
slaved at his imperial role. 

With little to do but choose 
the names for dinner parties, 
Charlotte became obsessed 
with the dullness of Anglo- 
Indian society and the dis- 
comfort of living amidst 
cockroaches and ' mosquitos. 


She also had plenty of time to 
write letters. 

These are the basis of 
Charles Allen's revealing 
three-part feature, A Glimpse 
Of the Burning Plain, which 
starts on Radio 4 tomorrow 
(10.15-1 1 pm). Many of the 
letters were written to Queen 
Victoria, who sometimes re- 
plied. Charlotte is played by 
Gaire Bloom and Victoria by 
Prunella Scales. 

A woman who did make it 
in a man's world was Ivy 
Benson. In Lady Be Good 
(Radio 2, Wed, 10.30-1 1pm) 
.she tells the story of her 
'■pioneering all-girls band in a . 
programme presented by one 
of her former trombonists, 
now radio disc jockey, Sheila 
Tracy. P.W. 


Art of the slippery Pole 


Poland’s emergence as a lead- 
ing bridge power has been one 
of the features of the last 
decade. In the early 1970s, the 
Polish team would invariably 
-start well but fade in the 
closing stages of a champion- 
ship. However, they broke the 
ice with a win in the 1978 
Rosen bium Cup, and strolled 
away with the European 
Championship m 1981. 

Yet Poland’s notable 
. improvement in teams of four 
competition is overshadowed 
by outstanding achievement 
in International Pairs events, 
where the method of scoring 
seems especially suited to 
their approach to the game. 

Piotr Gawrys is one of 
several talented young Polish 
players. In the Royal Viking 
playerof tire year competition, 
he suggests that many players 
mistakenly consider the open- 
ing lead merely as a matter of 
“putting the ball in play”. 

He rightly argues that with a 
little foresight the opening 
lead can create for the declarer 
a false and enduring im- 
pression' of the defender's 
Land. He rites this example 
when he was West defending 
against a celebrated French 
International' in the 1982 
World Pairs Championship. 


East-West 

South. 


game. Dealer 


This was 
ending: 


the seven card 


+ 01065 
C 5 AQ7 
O KJ1093 

+ 6 


+ Q 1065 
A07 
£■ - 

♦ - 


S KJ94 
KJ943 
O 7 

+-Q53 


W 


N 

W E 

s 

J! 32 

ff 85 

0 642 

+ K J 9 4 

ff KJ9 

O — 

N 

W E 

+ KJ10S74 

*- 

s 

♦ A87 



+ A87 

Y 1082 

1 

? 1062 


+ 32 
'7 85 

r. _ 

* K J 10 


• A 82 


N 

E 

S 

_ 

' _ 

1C- 

1+ 

3v 

NO 

1NT 

NO 

3+ 

3NT 

No 

4+ 

4ff 

No 

4+ 

66 

No 

No 


Iff 

NO 

NO 

NO 

NO 

NO 


With an awkward lead 
Gawrys rejected a major suit 
and considered that a trump 
would be supine at best 
Almost by default, he opted 
for a dub, but which club? 
Yes, the Qfieen. 

This seemingly insignifi- 
cant tactical stroke was to 
have a telling effect in the 
end game. Declarer took the 
4>A and ruffed a club in 
dummy. He then returnecLio . 
his hand with the OQ and 
ruffed his remaining club 
before drawing two more 
rounds of trumps, ending in 
his hand. 


* e 

' ♦- 

• Declarer played a low 
spade and successfully fi- 
nessed dummy’s 410 when. 
Gawrys followed with the ♦4. 
Pladng Gawirys with 4KJ4, 
the 4J and three hearts to the 
King, declarer was lulled into 
a false sense of security. He 
returned to hand with the 
♦A, on which Gawrys craftily 
contributed the 4J, and 
happily took the heart fi- 
nesse. But his face fell when 
he played a spade from 
dummy, losing to the #9. 
Gawrys continued with the 
♦K and declarer could no 
longer avoid defeat' 

Notice that when the 410 
won the seventh trick the 
contract was assured, provid- 
ed. declarer ducks a spade. 
Now either the spades break 
or West is squeezed in the 
majors. 

Jeremy Flint 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO i018 

Prizes of the New Collins Thesaurus will be given for the first two 
correct solutions opened on Thursday, August 7, 1986. Entries 
should be addressed to The Times Concise Crossword Com- 
petition. 1 Pennington Street, London, El 9XN. The winners and 
solution will be announced on Saturday, August 9, 1986. 

ACROSS 

1 Corpse stiffness (5.6) 

9 Worry (7) 

10 Used up (5) 

11- Disapproving cry (3) 

13 Gloomy dean (4) 

16 Aureole [4) 

•17 Cheerful (6) 

18 Respiratory organ (4) 

20 German aiomicsd- 
. enrist (4) 

21 Barrows (6) 

22 Rake (4) ' 

23 Vomit (4) 

25 Surprise exclamation 

(3) 

28 Wheel radial (5) 

29 Water bub Ner (7) 

30 UK horse auction 

(ID ' 



DOWN 

2 Cake topping (5) 

3 Lambeth cricket 
ground (4) 

4 Encounter (4) 

5 Reposei4) 

6 Japanese flower an 

' M 

7 PmkCif ing por- 
celain 1 7.4) 

8 Hypericum (15,4) 
12 God of heavens (6) 

14 Ovum (3) 

15 Bring about (6) 

19 Nerve tumour (7) 

20 Of him (3) 


SOLUTION TO NO 1017 
ACROSS: 1 Rushes 5 Entity 8 Lax 9 
Scampi 10 Eclair 11 Reel 12 Wat Tyler 14 
Affray 17 Cosset 19Frcakout 22 Eddy 24 
Ripoff 25 Lead on 26 ETA 27 Veneer 28 

Nearly 

.DOWN: 2 .Uncle 3 Himmler 4SUpwav 5 
Exeat 6 Tally 7 Trireme 13 Too IS fur- 
tive 16 Ask 17 Catalan 18 Smetana 20 
Atone 21 Offer 23 Drool 

77 ip dinners of prize concise No iOI2 ore: 

F. M. /nine. The IVoodjiMs. Sanderseod. South 
‘Croydon. Surren and Mrs O. Paver, St Mary’s 
Road. WimNcdon. south-west London. 


24 Corolla pan (5) 

25 Make hot (4) 


26 Fur (4) 

27 Region (4) 


SOLUTION TO NO 1012 (last Saturday’s prize concise) 

ACROSS: 1 Dardanelles 9 Aviator 10 Lyric 11KH 13 Lass 16 
Drip 17 Acumen 18 Only 20 Omen 21 Put off 22 Ooze 23 Flit 
Am 28 Gangs 29 Adaptor 30 Demi-pension 
DOWN: 2 Amiss 3 Date 4 Nark 5 Lilt 6 Eardrum 7 Marl- 
borough 8 .Acupuncture 12 Icebox 14 Say IS Auburn 19 Loz- 
ettgc 20 Off 24 Lotto 25 Ant 26 Tame 27 Bass 


25 


Name _ 
Address. 










THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


THE WEEK AHEAD 













Wjtym- 

mm 


BOOKS 

PART THREE; Nicholas Mosley in 
his new novel, Judith (Seeker and 
Warburg, £9.95pm), charts a 
woman’s search for identity from an 
Indian ashram to a peace protest 
at an American airbase. The book is 
the third in a sequence begun with 
imago Bird an d Serpent 


m 


GALLERIES 

NORTH STARS: Sir Henry 
Raeburn’s portrait of Isabella 
Mcleod, painted around 1798, is 
one of the highlights in a major 
exhibition, “Painting in Scotland: 
The Golden Age”, at the Talbot Rice 
Art Centre, South Bridge, 

Edinburgh (031 667 101 1) from Fri. 





f si 


* (U 
O 

H 


TELEVISION 

DRUMBEAT: Colin Blakely and 
Rowena Cooper play a middle-aged 
white couple trying to come to 
terms with the black regime in 
Zimbabwe in Drums Along 


Balmoral Drive , a new play by 
Douglas Livingstone. BBC2, 


Douglas Livingstone. BBCZ 
Wednesday, 9.25-1 0.35pm. 


THEATRE 

CITY LIGHTS: Maureen Lipman 
leads the Leonard Bernstein musical, 
Wonderful Town!. Set in the 
1930s, it is the story of two country 
girls from Ohio trying their luck in 
the big city of New York. Queen's 
Theatre (01-734 1166), opens 
Thursday after previews. 


ROCK 

FOLK ROOTS: Richard 
Thompson joins Ian Matthews and 
other former colleagues in 
Fairport Convention for the annual 
reunion of that pioneering British 
folk-rock group. Half Moon, 93 
Lower Richmond Road, London 
SW1 5 (01-788 2387). Sun to Wed. 


Mhalri McKenzie-Robinson is a power behind the zanier 
and more unpredictable scenes at the Edinburgh Festival 

Flurry with the 
Fringe as tops 




I n just a few days' time 
Edinburgh will be trans- 
formed. On every wail 
will be a poster, on every 
pavement inch a person, in 
every school hall a perfor- 
mance and in every bar a 
pseuds' comer as the 40th 
Edinburgh Festival Fringe 
erupts over the city. 

For three weeks, as the 
official Edinburgh Festival 
proceeds more staidly, hun- 
dreds of Fringe groups will 
display their artistic wares, the 
truly famous alongside the 
truly infamous - and the truly 
dreadful — in what has be- 
come the most exhilarating 
and absurd arts festival in the 
world. Behind the spontaneity 
that is synonymous with the 
Fringe, however, lies an im- 
mense feat of co-ordination, 
the responsibility this year of a 
tall, slight, but indefatigable 
26-year-old — Mhairi 
McKenzie-Robinson. the first 
woman Fringe administrator. 

Sunday morning finds her 
in a tiny room above the 
Fringe box-office, breakfest- 
less but full of good cheer, in 
bright pink dungarees that put 
the grey weather to shame. 
Looking out over the Royal 
Mile, where the pavement is 
still visible, she admits she 
once made the mistake of 


trying to stay in London 
during the Festival Fringe- 
“But I couldn't slay away. By 
the time it got to July I 
thought, this is crazy. I can'r 
bear not to be in Scotland - so 
1 came back.” 

Once back she stayed, 
becoming full-time assistant 
to her predecessor, Michael 
Dale, in 1982 and admin- 
istrator herself at the end of 
last year. Bom and bred in 
Edinburgh, her working assoc- 
iation with the Fringe goes 
tack much further — to 1977, 
the summer before she started 
a psychology degree at Dur- 
ham. Then, as a “stroppy 17- 
year-old”, she was given a 
part-time job by administrator 
Alistair Moffat. “Part-time 
job” proved something of a 
euphemism. “He said, ‘Look, 
here's a desk, here's the phone, 
here's a pile of envelopes. Fin 
going out', and just left me. 
Brilliant!” 

The Edinburgh Fringe dif- 
fer from almost every other 
festival — including the Edin- 
burgh Festival — in that it has 
no artistic director. Since it 
began in 1947, when eight 
groups formed a spontaneous 
alternative to the first official 
Festival, its growth has been 
autonomous, undirected and, 
so far, unchecked. This year 


BOOKINGS 


some 500 groups will present 
more than 900 shows. 

“It's doubled since I have 
been here. It's quite incred- 
ible'', says Mhairi, restoring a 
pink hair grip, which she had 
been using for emphasis, to its 
rightful place. 

In principle anybody can 
join in — and anybody and 
everybody does. Mhairi cites 
the case of one enterprising 
soul who came two years ago 
as a spectator and was so 
enthralled by the whole at- 
mosphere that he is tack this 
year as a performer. 

H e may go far. At the 
back of every 
Fringe performer’s 
mind is the dream 
of “being discovered” and the 
roll-call of early performers on 
the Fringe includes names like 
Derek Jacobi, Jonathan Miller 
(now Fringe chairman), Tom 
Stoppard, Rowan Atkinson 
(tack in Edinburgh this year), 
and Julie Covington. 

Buthe may sink likeastone. . 
As the Fringe continues to 
grow, it is amidst muttered 
criticisms: that it has become 
too professional and is seen 
only as a springboard to 
television; or that the admin- 
istrator should exercise artistic 
control or at least place a 


FIRST CHANCE 

a....... ■ i rt-4 tn¥ 


ENGLISH NATIONAL 
OPERA: General public 
booking opens Mon for 
autumn season. 

ENO. St Martin’s Lane. 
London WC2 (01-836 3161). 

MICHAEL CLARK: Opens 
Sadler's Wells autumn dance 
season. Sept 17-27. 


Avenue. London EC1 (01-278 
8916; info: 01-278 0855). 

TOKYO BALLET: Personal 
and phone bookings from this 
week for company s first 
visit. Sept 1-6. 

Royal Opera House, 

.London WC2 (01-240 
1066/1911). 


LAST CHANCE 


CAMBRIDGE FESTIVAL: 
Ends this weekend with 
concerts in King’s College 
and St John's College 
Chapels, plays, exhibitions 
and circus burlesque show. 

Kett Mouse, Station Road, 
Cambridge (0223 357851). 


THE TIMES WOOL SWEATERS 

T hese high quality fine-knit j" ^ I 

V-neck sweaters have the x 


A V-neck sweaters have the 
unmistakable softness of pure wool 
and arc stylishly designed to look 
good on both men and women. 
The V-neck is a classic practical 
style, and the easy-fit raglan 
shoulders and ribbed neck cuffs 
and hem make these sweaters both 
smart and very comfortable. Team 
them with casual clothing for 
everyday leisure wear or with 
tailored skirts and trousers for 
more formal occasions. Scottish- 
made from 100% Botany wool, 
they can be hand-washed or dry- 
cleaned, returning to their silky 
softness every time. 

T b add an extra touch of distinc- 
tion, we have arranged for 
some of the sweaters to be 
embroidered on the left breast, with 
‘The Times’, in the paper’s own 
typeface. Choose from the 
following:-— Naw blue with white 
embroidery. Wine with gold 
embroidery and Light blue with 
navy. Sizes:— Small (34” -36”), 
Medium (38”-40”), Large (ATT- 
42”), Extra Large (44"-46”). 

PRICES: £19.95 with logo 

£18.95 without logo. 
Hie Times Wool Sweater Offer, 
Bourne Road, Bexley, 

Kent DAS IB L. 

Tel: Crayford 53316 for 
enquiries only; 

THE TIMES 


DIAL YOUR ORDER 

HAPtn LtPPERfyG ICE 

i BY TELEPHONE ON 
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addresses in the UK. 


Please send me. swe at qft 

each with logo, and £18 


as indicated below 0C19.95 
W each without logo. 


COLOUR I 34/36in 1 38/ 40m |40/*;&j«4/46id 

Naw With Logo 

Navy Without Logo 

Wine With Logo 

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Light Bine Without Logo ____ 

I endose Cheque/ PO for £ made payable to Times 

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Or Debit by Access/ Visa No 

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Send to Times Sweater Offer, Bourne Road,&»tey, 
KemDA51BL 

Mr/ Mrs /Mis* ......... 

ADDRESS 



CONCERTS 

MUSIC MAN: Sir Neville Marriner 

is the artistic director of Summer in / 
the City, a festival of 1 8 concerts 
in eight days. It opens tomorrow with 
Sir Neville conducting the 
Academy of St Martin-ln-the-Fleras ip 
Haydn’s Creation. Barbican 
Centre (01 -628 8795). 

MidraaCringean . 


ARTS DIARY 

Backstage 
backbiting 

The bloody battle of 
Glyndeboume triggered by Sir 
Peter Hall's refusal to film this 
year's season for the BBC, and 
thereby losing musicians ami 
technicians considerable 
sums, has found another vic- 
tim — Hall's wife Mara 
Ewing. 

Miss Ewing, due to sing her 
farewell performance in 
L’incoronazione di Poppea 
this evening, has missed sev- 
eral performances. She has 
had a painful attack of shin- 
gles but according to sources 
at Glyndebourne. has also 
been suffering from painful 
attacks from the backstage 
crews who blame her for her 
husband's decision not to 
televise the season. The bitter 
atmosphere has not helped her 
recovery, although Miss 

Ewing's agents say she has not 

RSHBH : -SEMI been “T" * ,he critida,u - 

Keeping posted: Mhairi McKenzie-Robinson — *the Fringe is completely open. It gives people die chance to do anything' ChCCk 


ceiling on the number of 
participants. 

On this subject Mhairi is 
more than usually emphatic 
and the pink hair grip comes 
back, into play. “L think it 
would be absolutely wrong to ' 
try and impose any guidelines 
on the Fringe because its 
greatest strength is that it is 
completely open. There is 
nowhere else like it in the ■ 
world. |t gives 'people .The 

chance tb experiment, to be- ' 
come famous, to sink — to do 


anything. We simply couldn't 
have an artistic director on the 
Fringe - not if it’s to stay the 
same sort of size and maintain 
its inventiveness." 

. It is.tjbe unpredictable and 
tiie topical that make each 
Fringe unique. “Certain festi- 
vals are always remembered 
for certain kinds of shows. 
This ‘year there are shows 
about terrorists and hooligan- 
ism. and. .plays relating, to 
.unemployment mid Aids. 
What we see here from year to 


year reflects what is happening 
in the world." 

Meanwhile, she remains 
trapped inride the box-office 
by a constant stream of idio- 
syncratic requests from 
performers and public alike. 
And while she may not have 
designs on the direction the 
Frin^ should take, she has 
definite; ideas bn where the 
- box-office and the Fringe Soci- 
ety should go — several , hun- 
dred yards up the road to 


desperately needed larger 
premises. “For the last three 
years my dream has been to 
see this organization move 
offices. 1 would like to be here 
when that happens.” 

Sarah Hemming 

The Fringe rims from Fri to 
Aug 30. For programme, send 
28p in stamps to the Fringe 
Ticket Office. 170 High Street, 
Edinburgh EH1 IQS (031 
226 5257). 


TIMES CHOICE 


Crayford SJjlbforc 


sonlj.Rrs.8W46 


CONCERTS 

ALL TCHAIKOVSKY: Fraser 
Goutding conducts the London 
Concert Orchestra in 
Marche Slave. Nutcracker, 

1812, Caprfcdo ttafien, and 
Malcolm Birms solos In Piano 
Concerto No 1. 

Royal Festival Hall, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
3191, credit cards 01-928 
8800). Tomorrow, 7.30pm. 

THE WINNER: Alan Brind, 
winner of the BBC Musician of 
the Year co mpetiti on, solos 
in Bruch’s Violin Concerto No 
1, while Nicholas Cleobury 
conducts the RPO in 
Schubert's “Unfinishecr 
and Dvorak’s "New World” 
symphonies. 

Barbican Centre, Silk 
Street London EC2 (01-628 
8795, credit cards 01-638 
8891). Mon. 7.45pm. 

LA MER* The National 
Youth Orchestra of Great 
Britain play Debussy's La 
Afar and Messiaen's exotic 
RurangaBa Symphonia. 

Royal Albert HaU, 

Kensington Gore, London SW7 
(01-5896212). Wed, 7pm. 

MANFRED, 

MICHELANGELO: Edward 
Downes conducts the BBC 
Philharmonic in Tchaikovsky's ' 
"Manfred” Symphony and 
Shostakovich's Michelangelo 
Albert HalL Thurs, 7.30pm. 

photography" 

MASTERPIECES OF THE 
20TH CENTURY: A selection 
from the Gruber Collection 
which includes Man Ray, Cecil 
Beaton, and Robert Capa. 
National Museum of Film 
and Photography, Prince's 
View, Branford (0274 
727488). 

GALLERIES 

OPENINGS 

HOUSEWATCH: Extraordinary 
video art performances where 
images appear on the windows ■ 
of buildings. 

At 89 Gt Russell Street, 

London WC1 tonight at 9pm 
(for information 0T-370 3879). 

IAN RODGERS: Observations 
of people at work and in the 
pub by the Nottingham artist. 
Midland Group, 24-32 Carlton 
St, Hockley, Nottingham (0602 ’ 
582636). From today. 

SELECTED 

FROM TWO WORLDS; 
Contemporary work by artists 
of non-European background 
working in Britain. 

Whitechapel Art Gallery, 


Whitechapel High Street 
London El (01-377 0107). 

SCANDINAVIAN PAINTING: 
Important show of Norwegian, 
Danish and Swedish paintings. 
Hayward Gallery, South Ba/ik, 
London SE1 (01-928 3144). 

FILMS 

OPENINGS 

YELLOW EARTH (PG): A 
Chinese story of family and 
patriotic duty, set in the late 
1930s, filmed with great 
simplicity and power by Chen 





NOT THE RSC FESTIVAL: 
Second season of 
performances, workshop®, 
debates etc by members of the 
RSC Barbican company, in an 
unoffical capacity. This week's 
programme includes Kurt 
Weill's first American musical, 
Johnny Johnson (Wed, 11pm) 
and Carol Ann Duffy's 
confrontation between women 
peace protesters and a missile 
base guard, Little Women, Big 
Boys (Fri, 3pm). 

Almeida Theatre (01-359 4404). 
From Tubs at lunchtime, 
evening and late night 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL: Colin Blakely 
heads a mostly new cast in 
Alan Ayckbourn's own 
production of his quirky 
celebration of amateur 
operates. 

Lyric (01 ^437 3686). 

OUT OF TOWN. 


Factory London Sinfonietta. 
Further performances on 
Thurs and Aug 9. A new 
production of Cosl fan tutte 
plays on Wed at 7pm. . 
Queen Elizabeth Hall, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01-928 
3191). 

PROM OPERA: Britten's 
church parable. Curlew River, 

B&» N " <us0pera - 

Royal Albert Hall, London 
SW1 (01-589 8212 or 
TJcketm aster 01-379 6433). 

ROCK AND JAZZ 

ANTI-APARTHEID 
FESTIVAL: Feargal Sharkey, 
Uoyd Cole, Latin Quarter, 
the Pogues and others. 


&L ' -- ^ ~ 


Kaiqe. A star of last year's film 
festivals, and winner of the 
1985 BFI Award. 

ICA Cinema (01-930 3647). 
From Fri. 

SURVIVORS, THE BLUES 
TODAY (PG): Docuraentmy 
record of a weekend blues 
festival in St Paul, Minnesota. 
Cannon Charing Cross Road 
(01-437 4815). from Fri. 

SELECTED 

DESERT HEARTS (18): A 
discreet splendidly acted story 
of lesbian friendships in Reno 
during the 1950s. 

Screen on the Hill (01 -435 
3366), Electric Screen (01 -229 
3694), Cannon Tottenham 
Court Road (01-636 6148). . 

KING KONG (PG): The world's 
most famous monster returns 
in anew print stnick from the 
original negative. - 
Cannon Premiere (01-439 ‘ 
4470), 

THEATRE - 

OPENINGS 

THE AMERICAN CLOCK: 
Arthur Miller's play, set in the 
Depression. Michael Bryant 
Sara Kestteman, Nell Dagftsh. 
Cottesloe (01-928-2252). 

. Previews today, Mon, Tues. 
Opens Wed; ... 

THE GARDEN GIRL&Ffrst full- 
length play try ex-prisoner 
Jacqueline Halborough, 
founder of the Clean Break 
Theatre Company, is set in a 
women's open prison and has 
an aQ- worn an. cast 
Bush Theatre (01-743-3388). 
Opens Wed. Press night Fri. 


EDINBURGH: The Festival 
Fringe opens officially on Fri. 
Details from the Fringe Office, 
170 High Street Edinburgh 
EH1 (031 226 5257). 

GUILDFORD: Rookery Nook: 
Theatre of Comedy production 
of the Ben Travers farce, with 
Tom Courtenay, Peggy Mount 
Ian Ogilvy, Lionel Jefmes. 
Yvonne Amaud (0483 60191). 
Opens Tues. 

OPERA 

BUXTON FESTIVAL: This 
year’s Arthurian theme turns to 
Handel's Arfodanta for the 
entertainment tonight and 
Thurs and to Purcell's King 
Arthur on Wed and Fri. Both at 
7.45pm. On Wed. Thurs and 
Fri at 2J30pm, Richard 

Blackford schHdran's 

opera, Sir Gawain and the 
Green Knight 
Opera House, Buxton, 
Derbyshire (0298 71010). 

SOUTH BANK OPERA: 

Hantaan Birtwistle's Yan Tan 
Tethera receives Its world 
premiere on Tues at 7.45pm, 
presented by Opera 


For ticket availability, 
performance and opening 
tunes, telephone tiie 
numbers listed. Concerts: 
Max Harrison; 
Photography: Michael 
Yoons; Galleries: Sarah 
JaneCheckland; Films: 
Geoff Brown; Theatre: 
Tony Patrick and Martin 
Croppa - ; Opera: Hilary 
Finch; Rock & Jazz: 
Richard Williams; 
Dance: John Perrival; 
Bookings: Anne 
Whitehorse 


Today (from 3 pm), NEC. 
Birmingham (021 780 4133). 

MANU DIBANGO: Best 
known for the disco classic 
"Soul Makossa". 

Tonight Town and Country 
Chib, London NW5 (01-267 
3334). 

BILL BflUFOHD QUARTET: 
The former drummer of Yes 
and King Crimson teams up 
with three smart young British 
jazz musicians. Including 
the keyboardist Django Bates. 
Tomorrow, Bloomsbury 
Theatre, London WC1 (01-387 
9629). 

LISBON JAZZ SEXTET: 
Visiting as an unexpected 
element of the Portugal 600 
festival, these musicians are in 
their mfd-20s and play in a 
post-bop style. 

Tues, Barbican. London 
EC2 (01-628 8795); Wed, The 
Mattings, SnapeO- 

DANCE 

LONDON FESTIVAL 
BALLET: Giseile twice today. 

then a week of Ashton's 
Romeo and Juliet, Mon-Aug 9. 
Festival Hall (01-928 3l9i)T 

BOLSHOI BALLET; 77le 
Golden Age today, Mon and 
TJ«s. Spartacus on Wed. 
Thurs, and Raymonds on Fri. 
Gwent Garden (01-240 

BOLSHOI FILMS: Twice 
darfy unta Aug 14. The best th/f 
week are Romeo and Juliet 
(tomorrowat 3pm: Thurs, Fri 
7pm)arrd TheUttfe 
HMptMedHorseQten, 
Wed, Fri at 3pm). ’ 

Barbican Cinema 2 (01-638 

^AMAteA NATIONAL 
DANCE THEATRE: Toure to 
Cfty Hall, Sheffield (today) 
Grand Theatre, Leeds 

™rum, Manchester fMgni 
Walsall (rues), 
Aston University Grand HaU 

SraBS&SSV 


They may fancy they're rad- 
ical, but bosses of the Institute 
of Contemporary Arts hold nc 
magic for the wage slaves whe 
tend the bar and sweep the 
floors — traditionally out-of- 
work artists who have offer 
been promised an exhibitioc 
of their work k has nevei 
materialized. “AH we want ic 
do . is show our work, but tht 
ICA isn't contemporary 
enough to show it”, say. 
sculptor Sue Morris. So ar 
alternative ICA exhibition - 
itself a contradiction in terms 
has been arranged in Islington - 
starting next week. 

• With the National 
Portrait Gallery taking her 

seriously enough to accept — — 

a handful of her pictures. Koo t 

Stark has finally come of > 4 i:r. 

age as a photographer and oat ^ 

her past behind her. Or *7^- , 

has she? A set of her pictures : <••• ; 
adorn the West End . 
theatre where the musical 
Steppin’ Oat is playing. 

The theatre's called The 
Duke of York's. 

Just for laughs; v 

Following the premature ; ,* 
death in the West End of • 
Entertainer last weekend, the 
Shaftesbury Theatre has de- 
cided to change its name.: It 
will now call itself the Shaftes- 
bury Theatre of Comedy, just ' 
in case there is any doubt as. to ; 
what it'll be serving up. The;' 1 


»:s_ 



Jeffries and Courtenay 


Shaftesbury, at the «o* v 
fashionable end of Londqp’s 
theatre district, is to revive the 
Ben Travers comedy Rookery 
Nook, first seen in 1926, with ' 
Tom Courtenay and Lionel 
Jeffries leading an all-star a»St 
It opens next month. 

Body blows ; 

Watership Down author Rich- 
ard Adams is at the centre of a 
row between his publishers. ; 
Sidgwick and Jackson, and the \ •. 
trade journaL The Bookseller. \ 
Adams's new book, Te Turn, 
is a poem based on a South 
Sea legend. It contains a few v 
scenes of temptation, which . 
have been admirably iflus- 1 
trated by the artist UI de Rjca ‘ 
Sidgwick descibe these as 1 - - 
"slightly on the erotic side" ■; 
Jut The Bookseller* LofliS £ 
Baum was appalled when ^ ' 
asked to carry an advertising »•- 
insert featuring the drawihga .\- 
Baum agrees the advert was C, 
thrown out on grounds? of »\ 
taste: “It was just wrong ft? ■' ‘ 
The Bookseller. Sidgwick/ri 
claim it was an ind&focr\\; 

illustration of a coupler 
cuddling up, “We are shocked- • <’ 
horrified and amazed”, Vs 
told me as they shifted dual V .■ 
advertising 10 ■* . 
Publishing News. 

Christopher Wflfifc* <. v 


r 








THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


15 



CONCERT 


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COURT 

CIRCULAR 

PALACE OF .:■■ 
HOLYROODHOUSE 
August I: The Prime Minister 
and Mr Denis Thatcher left the 
Palace of Holyroodhouse this 

morning. 

The Queen, accompanied by 
The Duke of Edinburgh, 
honoured the Edinburgh Cham- 



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Sheraton Hotel, Edinburgh. 

Her Majesty and His Royal 
Highness were received in Festi- 
val Square by Her Majesty’s 

Lord-Lieutenant for the Gty of 
Edinburgh (Dr John McKay, the . 
Right Hon The Lord of Pro- 
vost). walked to the Sheraton 
Hotel, and were received -by the 
» A DTf 3»rrsident of the Chamber (Mr 
! ■ ' A | \ nii.'4i6ben Dowlas Miner). 

— ■ Afterwards The Queen at- 

B /^-s tended the Commonwealth 
“ t'M-n* .Games Bowling event at 
UV.K V Of BaJgreen Bowling dub. 

The Secretary of State for 
> Scotland (the Right Hon Mai- . 
colm Riflund, MP, Minister-in- 
Attendance), the Countess of 
Airlie- Mr Kenneth Scott, Mr 
Michael Shea and Major- Hugh 
■ ''Lindsay were in attendance. 

IThe Queen and The.Duke of 
- -.J K -Edinburgh gave a dinner party 
i O at the Palace of Holyroodhouse 
'at which The Prince Edward was 
jjresenl. 

' ■" _V .The following bad the honour 
1- : jif being invited: the Secretary of 
■Stale for Scotland and Mis 
- RiCkind, Major and Mrs Henry 
'Brcwis, the Earl and Countess of 
. ^Morion. Lieutenant-General Sir 
I. ^Jarman and Lady Arthur, Sr 
r„'?_ Kenneth. and Lady Alexander, 

■ -Professor Sir Patrick arid Lady 
' Forrest, Mr and Mrs James 
Gordon. Mr. and Mrs Peter 
; ■ Millar, Mr and Mrs John Gibb. 

> ' ‘ Mr and Mrs Lester Borley, Miss 

-Mary Harm oil, Mr and Mrs 
.—^Thomas Johnston, Mr and Mrs 
: uAItsiiur Lynn, Mr and Dr Mait- 
"‘ -tand Mackie, Mr and Mrs 
'V.Douald Miller, Mr and Mrs 
. Robert Watt arid Professor and 
Mrs Peter Wilson. . 

*. - Tbo Duke, of Edinburgh this 
-"morning attended the 
Commonwealth Games Wres- 
tling event at the Playhouse 
Theatre. Edinburgh and in the 
afternoon attended the Shooting 
- ■“event at Musselburgh. 

• - The Duke of Edinburgh, 

•* ^President of the Internatiooal 
..'Association of Lighthouse 
. Authorities, this evening visited 
• ■ _ the Headquarters of the North- 
- - em Lighthouse Board, George 
Street, Edinburgh on the occa- 
sion of its Bicentenary. 

His. Royal Highness was .re- 
ceived by Her Majesty* Lord- 
‘ ; 1 Lieutenant for the' Gty. of 
• ■-'• Edinbhrgh<Dr John McKay, ibe 
• '•Right Hon the Lord Provost) 

\ - ■ ' and the Chairman of the Board 
. (Sir Frederick O'Brien); 

Major Rowan Jackson, RM 
was in attendance. 

The Prince’ Edward this eve- 
ning attended the Common- 
wealth Games - Official 


i\..iu]v.diCc 


COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


Reception at Parliament Had. 
Edinburgh. 

Major Hugh Lindsay was in 
attendance. 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE . 
August I: The Princess Anne, 
Mrs .Mailt Phillips left the 
Palace of Holyroodhouse this, 
morning. 

.Her Royal Highness sub- 
sequently opened the Z 500th 
Sheltered House btdh by the 
Biekl Housing Association at 
Hinockbura, Stirlingshire. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mailt 

Her 

. for 

Stiningsfure (Lieutenant-Colo- 
nel James Stirling) and the 
Chairman of the Association 
(Mr J. Murphy). 

Afterwards Her Royal High- 
ness visited Stirling Enterprise 
Park (Director of Development, 
Mr D. Gavin) and opened the 
Second Phase of the develop- 
ment at. John Player Building, 
Stirling. 

The Princess Anne, Mrs Mark 
Phillips then, visited die GuikEry 
of Stilling and was admitted as 
an Honorary Guild Brother. 

Her Royal Highness was re- 
ceived by the Dean (Mr L. 
Hynd). 

The Princess Axme, Mrs Marie 
Phillips, atte n ded by the Hon 
Mrs Legge-Bourke, later left 
Royal Air. Force Tumbouse in 
an aircraft . of The Queen's 
Flight. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
. August 1: The' Prince of Wales 
left the . Palace of 
Holyropdhoose this morning. 

His Royal Highness, Presi- 
dent, Scottish Business in die 
Community, subsequently vis- 
ited the Offices of Bathgate Area 
Support for Enterprise Ltd 
(BASE) and the West Lothian 
Business Development Centre, 
Bathgate. West Lothian. 

Hb Royal Highness later left 
Royal Air Force Tumhouse in 
an asrcreA of. The Queen's 
Flight. 

Sir John Riddell, Bt, and Mr 
Rupert Fairfax were in 
attendance. 

The Princess of Wales. Colo- 
nel-in-Chief, The Royal Hamp- 
shire Regiment, present new 
Colours to the 1st Battalion at 
-Tidworth, Hampshire today. 

- Her Royal Highness, attended 
by Mbs Alexandra Loyd and 
Lieutenant-Colonel Brian 
Anderson, travelled in an air- 
craft of The Queen's Flight. 

KENSINGTON PALACE 
August I: The Princess Mar- 
garet, Countess of Snowdon, as 
President of The Friends of the 
Elderly and Gentlefolk's Help, 
this afternoon visited The Old 
Vicarage, Moulsford, 
Oxfordshire. 

Her Royal Highness, who 
travelled inanairaaft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
The Hon Mrs Wills. 


John Cole 


Mysteries beyond reason 


V : 


The Queen will visit Clydebank 
on August 9 to marie , its 
centenary. 

The Queen will visit 
Ardnamiircban Lighthouse on 
August J 1 to marie the bi- 
centenary of the Northern 
Lighthouse Board. 


In a culture devoted to material 
prosperity and dominated by rational 
technology, both highly desirable 
achievements, the contemplative wis- 
dom ofthe mystic tends to be Defected, 
and even distrusted by some scholarly 
.minds; for, as so many of the mystics af- 
firm, it is through the inactivity of his 
reasoning powers that man is united by 
his highest faculty to Him who is 
imknowable- ■ 

Thus, by knowing nothing he knows 
that which is beyond knowledge. Such 
wisdom acquired by experience in a 
sphere beyond, but not contra to, r e aso n 
is sometimes perceived as dangerous 
nonsense. 

From one point of view it is just that 
It is indeed "non-sense” that is beyond 
die perception of the limited world of 
human senses. So are many other things 
that exist, even in the. world of sensation 
itself; tike the colour world of the bees, 
the' smell world of dogs and the 
; direction finding ability of migratory 
birds. 

The world of human senses in which 
reason is active, is very limited and even 
when human reason expands into 
abstiact philosophical concepts like 
justice, we are told by men who know 
that “God’s thoughts are not our 
thoughts nor God’s way our ways”. 

That is to say, there is a reality beyond 
the limitations of human reason and 
understandingl Also, when we rational- 
ize about' love, we are reminded that 
rtbe love of God is broader than the 
measure of man's mind”. 

Evidently, the world of “non-sense” 
is as real to tire mystic as is the world of 
sense and reason to all. To enter the 
world beyond reason, the world of 
“non-sense” is also dangerous for it 
challenges existing beliefs and can lead 
to psychological and physical persecu- 
tion. It is also dangerous in a deeper 
sense. The Homilies of Origen tell us 


that “the Saviour saith he who is near 
me is near the fire” and while fire 
warms and gives light it also bums. 

This concept that contact with divine 
mysteries in the sphere beyond reason 
■ hi a dangerous quality-is almost lost in 
Western Christianity, buz is still found 
in the Orthodox churches of the East 

Western Christians tend to lack a 
sense of awe, of holy fear - one of the 
gifts of the Spirit- in the presence of di- 
* vine mysiery, overlooking the feet that 
“the fear of the Lord is the beginning of 
wisdom”. 

. One of the traditional aims of 
Christian worship is to express through 
the liturgy, the ritual and the symbols of 
faith, awe and holy fear in the presence 
of the Mysterious, thus bearing witness 
to realities beyond, but -not contra to, 
reason. At the same time, scholars 
within the church with their theology 
provide a steadying influence on the 
emotions. . ... 

The fiery inspired visionary prophet, 
with his message to the heart, and the 
conservative scholarly priest theolo- 
gian, speaking to the head, supplement 
and need- each other, lest the one 
becomes a deluded fanatic and the other 
pragmatic rationalist preserving an 
institution in which the fire of the Spirit 
no longer burns. 

This tension between the mysticism 
of the heart and the rationalism of the 
mind is permanent in any living faith 
and prevents it exploding into chaos or 
withering into sterility. A living faith 
can only survive as king as it contains 
within itself the dynamic of 
“dangerous” “non-sense” and the 
counter balance of cool reason, which 
prevents the supranational degenerat- 
ing into the irrationaL . 

Any chord) at any period in history is 
influenced by the pschological climate 
of its time and by the thought forms of 
those to whom it ministers. This is 


necessary ff it is to. keep “in touch” but 
at the same time it also has a duty to be 
true to its vocation and to express those 
aspects of eternal tiuihs which are 
unfashionable. 

In this age of materialism and high 
technology, reason is pre-eminent in 
current thought while the mystical 
beyond reason element of the faith 
tends to be over-shadowed. 

True, at the ordination of priests we, 
with the wisdom of the ages, still pray 
“Come Holy Ghost our souls inspire, 
and lighten with celestial fire” so that 
, we are not altogether oblivious of the 
fact that freedom and prosperity are not 
the whole of the good news of God's 
kingdom. 

Nevertheless, we need continually to 
ask whether as Christians we are bearing 
witness to the mysteries of frith beyond 
reason and thus meeting the spiritual as 
well as the ethical and social needs of 
our contemporaries. - 

Men are not hungry only for freedom 
and bread, as the growth and discipline 
of esoteric' cults show. Even in a 
materialistic and rational age the hu- 
man soul needs to worship and to find 
in the church's liuftgy, not sq much 
participation and undemanding as the 
sptrtual nourishment of divine mys- 
teries and “the peace that passeth all 
understanding”. 

So. sometimes there is the need to say 
in the words of the ancient Greek hymn 
from the Liturgy of St James: 

“Let all mortal flesh keep silence and 
with fear and trembling stand. 

Ponder nothing earthly minded, for with 
blessing in His hand. 

Christ our God to earth descendith our 
Juli homage to demand". 

The author, an Anglican priest, formerly 
researched in physiological psychology. 


Birthdays . 

TODAY: Lord Benson, 77; Sir 
Basil Enghoim, 74; Professor E. 
Maxwell Fry, 87; Mr John Gale, 
57; Sir Christopher Hogg, 50; Sir 
Reginald Muriey. 70; Lord Mur- 
ray of Eppsng Forest 64; Lord 
Justice Nrifl, 63; Mr Peter 
O’Toole, 54; Lieutenant-Colo- 
nel the Hon Thomas Ponsonby. 
56; Dr A. W. Spence, 86; 
Professor Sir Peter Swnmerton- 
Dyer, 59; Mr David Wadding- 
ton. QG MP. 57; Mr Alan 
Whicker, 61; Lord Wigram, 71; 
Sir John Willis, 78. 

TOMORROW: Air Marshal Sir 
Peter Bairsio, 60; Lieutenant- 
General Sir Alexander Boswell, 
58; Mr Denis Carey, 77; Mrs R. 
C. Chilver, 72; Lord 
DrumaJbyn, 78; Miss P. D. 
James, 66; Sir David A. Soon, 
67; Mr Martin Steen, 46; Mr 
Jack Straw; MP, 40: Sir Jock 
Taylor, 62; Sir Keith Unwin. 77; 
Sir George Waller, 75; the Right 
Rev Dr R. P. Wilson, 81; Mr 
Terry Wogan. 48. 


Appointments 

Latest appointments include: 
Prince Michael of Seat to be a 
member of the Horserace Total- 
isator Board from October 1, in 
succession -to the Duke ' of 
Devonshire. 

Mr DovgUs Cree, Acting Dep- 
uty Assistant Commissioner A 
(Operations).' and Mr Alan 
Yoang, Commander A8/9/I0, to 
be Deputy Assistant Commis- 
sioners, Metropolitan Police. 


Forthcoming marriages 


4 ^ 

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** V*?r 

. 

P t 
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Kfc«r 

JAZZ 


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1 -It * 

ITft 

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Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memorisin' 


!0f 


IV-- 



BHraS, MAHttASES, 
Dans mi m mmmm 

» a foa + 15% VAT . 

( minimum 3 fines) 

Announce me ms. atnhcniicucd by ike 
same and permanent address of Uk 
lender, may be sen) ux 

THE TIMES 
P0 BOX 484 
Virginia Street *■ 

El 


or Ktephopcd (tor telephone wtn- 
nben only) wc VUM1 MH 

AMomwemcnis can be nxcM by 
Kkpbonc between • 9LOOam and 
■ UOpa Monday lo Friday, on Satur- 
day between 4.00am and 12 noon. 
UMIt UN Myi. For publication I he 
fcHowns day photic ny 1.30pm. 


i NUUHMGES, WEDOWBS 
Coun and Social rape CS a bt 
VAT. 

Court -and- Social Page aimnncc- 
mqnu m ini (c accepted by 
telephone. Enquiries UK SI -122 MU 
(after lOJOamt or send hk 

1. Piw'nN i tad, Uadaa 11. 

Pk*sr allow s! fcoat 48 horns before 


. Vtomi wot walk u my ways, n keep 
my (Mum and my commandments — 
then I wh lengthen thy days. 

. -t Kings S: 1« 


BIRTHS 


h; 


I'll 


n- 


'' MUCK . On 31st Juty. to Jon and 
, Jantoe. a daughter. Domintoue. . 

' JMOMUV - On JuW 36th. to Kay Ort* 
Attctwnt) and Roger., a son. 
v Sebastian Mrtiaei Alan. 

- -MIME . On July ISth. to Barbara 

«n*e Sharp) and Patrick, a daughter- 

- CUMSTOUMWHJLNaTT - On July 

29th. 1966. In Edinburgh. 10 
Maureen into CNetU) and Jonathan, 
a daughter. Chloe, 

CMEMON - On 28th July, lo Kate- and 
Roger, a bay. Adam Charles, a 
brother for OanM. 


r. 

!*’■ 


£ «.r 




A 


■■FAME - on 31M July. 10 suki <n*e 
Mttcnem and Eddie, a daughter. 
. Lhsde (EUzabeib Heten Ctomenttne). 
*. .FtMUn . On 25UI July, to Shelagh 

■ (n^rBaflUoiandSwohan. a daughter. 

- x Rosanna twy. 

. IKYUfVMTHWNIIE-On JulySlsLat 
t?uwn Charlotte's, to Pautma and 
"*• Jam**, a daughter. Jessica Louise, a 

■ stslar- for Annabel, vwona and 

' James. 

' UMT . Qn July 16th, to Alison (nto 
v. James and. Peter, a son. Hugh 
wjuuni ettndon. 

' " MMM - On 30lh Jubr. In Satbbwy. lo 
Carottnc and Mkhad. a son. 
Benedict Thomaa Verc. 

. MCHMXS - Oh July 26th, at 
Wytheratawe Hosrital. Manchester. 
*- lo Patrtcta fn*r Rees) and MOOty. * 
son. Benndct Jonathan Noel. 

. OUVIOt • On am July, to Jane Qtza- 
J - beth. tnfe Voting) and George, a son. 
"■ ‘ Jotyon Ctories. a brother for Hmry. 

OWU - On 21si July, lo Camaia 
■ ntof EUdat) and Charles, a son. 

■- RKhard wmiam- 
i^OVAIH ■ On jmy 24th. to Patriot and 
Sarah, a son. John. 

' ''REYNOLDS - On July 30th. to Joanne 
infr Pickup) and Raymond, a 
daughter. ChJoe. AD w*a 
-m.SOWLMY : To Andrew and AhtgaU 
Cnee Day), on July 27m. 1986. ai 
■< Mutoo Keynes, a con. Jake. 

THOMPSON . on July 31*. in She#- 
(told, to Uszte (hie Wallis) ana Stove, 
a daughter. Fiona Cthaneth. 

WSMYSS - On 30Ut JuW. to Diana 
. .. mee SHv) and Henry, a daughter. 
Eleanor 


MARRIAGES 


On July 

26th 1986. at Ayr Baptist Church. 
Mark only son of Mr and Mrs 
Geoffrey Budenberg of Lower 
WltMngton. Cheshire to Joyce only 
daughter of Mr and Mrs J. McCrindte 
of DaimeUngion. AyrelUre. 

JONES fin. On 2nd AugusL 1986 at 
SI. Swtuun's. Homesfletd. Roger 
Tudor Jones lo KUtuyn Margaret 
Lee. KaUe. with aU my love. Roger. 


DEATHS 


On 28th July, suddenly tai 
Cannes. France. John. Dearly he- 
lmed husband of Susan art lovtng 
lather of Gavin. Resident In Lo# 
Angefes. CaHfomia- Service ai 
CMMems Crematorium. Whlelden 
Lane. Aioershanv. Bucks on Wednes- 
day. 6th . August at 11.00 i 
Ftowenmay be sent to Flat 3. Elm- 
hurst. High Street. Great Mwenden. 
Bucks by 10.00 am. or J-H. Kenyon 
Lid. 12 CMlIern ShveL London. WI 
teL 9» 3728 by B-BJD am. 

DfXON ■ On 27lh July 1986. peaceful, 
ty in Worthing HospUN. Elaine of 
F erring, west Sussex. Atl enoutrtes 
lo H.O. Tribe Ltd. Teh. Worthing 
10903) 34616. 

EARL • On Juty 29th. peacefuBy. hi 
Alton Hospital, after a short tones*. 
Joyce Mary Eari (nee Tanner), wife 
of Robert and beloved mother of 
Rtchard and Anna. Cremation at 
Aldershot on August sin at 2.30 pm. 
No nowets please, donations if 
desired lo S.AT. Benevolent Fund. 
67 Portland Race. London. 

HAWROOB . On Sunday. 27th July. 
1986. suddenly at Pulley. Jean tnfe 
Burton- RoulL Mother and artist, a 
warm, iovtrtg. generous, trusting and 
lively character. Much loved and 
satBy missed by Lawrte. Nikki and 
Berea. Funeral ai 10.00 am on 
Wednesday. 4th At«ust at St 
Aldan's Church. Coubdon. AD enquk 
rtes. tel. 01^60 3006. Flowers to 
Stoneraan Funeral Sonina. Doran 
Court Rdpte Road. RedtilB. 

HUMBERT- On July 30th 1986. sud- 
denly at Nation Lodge. BudMgh 
SalKrton. SWA Mary, aged 86. Wile 
of the Me Gordon Johnston, mother 
Of Audrey and.the late Ann Hutton. 
Grandmother and great grand moth- 
er. Funeral Service SL Peter's 
Church. BudMgh SaRerton. Thurs- 
day August 7th. 12 noon, followed 
by cremation. Family flowers only 
please. Donations in Met*. If desired, 
to BudMgh Saiterton Hosptsiare, e/o 
The Health Centre. BudMgh 
Sancrion. 

KELL. Nancy ■ On Juty 29th. 1906. 
aged 70. oeacefully. but after a long 
Illness feariesBiy borne. Deer sister of 
Monty. Carl and Marie and beloved 
mother of Dourias. No flowers 
ple a se, but donations nay he made to 
The Spastic Society. 12 Park Cres- 
cent London. Grievously mourned. 

LYDDOM. Marina . Peacefully with 
her family on Juty SlsL Cremation 
at Tunbridge Writs on Tuesday. 
August 50i at 12J0 pm. Flowers to 
Francis Otappril A Sens. 3 London 
Road. SevenoakSL Kent. 

MASON. Helen Margaret - On July 
27th. only child of the laie Suud 
and Janet Mason and dear. Wend of 
Margaret TUley. at her home In 
Dedham. Essex In her ninety second 
year. 

MATTHEWS ■ On July 30Ui 1986. 
peacefully in me Yeovil Hospital. Iiib 
K athleen aged SS years. Widow or 
Biandf ord of the Kendalls. Mtftcimn- 
Stour. GUhngtmm. Dorset. Much 
loved mother of Sheila. Jiaie. and 
Franey and the late NortV. Adored 
Granny and great Cranny. Creme 
bon Private, a Thanksgiving Service 
win uk* plate at uie Church of SS. 
Stmon and Jude. Mi Korvon-Stour on 
Tuesday. August 50i at 3-00 pm. Do- 
nations for toe Milton Church Solre 
Appeal nay be sent to Breacher 
Broutrrs. F/D. Gillingham. Dorset. 
Tel: *07476) 2094. 


On July 3om 1966. ' Sir 
Leonard MUlis. CA.E-. J.P- beloved 
husband of Ethel, father of Ehz^rih 
and Jocelyn, and grandfamer of 
Deborah and William. Family funer- 
al on Ttnnday. 7th AugusL Family 
flowers only pleeae. but donations, a 
desired, to water Aid. 1 Queen Ann's 
Cate. London. SWIM 9BT. A M emo- 

1 rial Service wn be arranged. 

PARKER . on Tuesday. 29th- July at 
Cambridge. EHuMh Mary, peace- 
fully after a short Illnes s, aged S3 
years. Daughter of the tote Charter 
Parker. FJLC&. beloved cousin of 
Jeoncti Parker, fmuiet KM. Factory 
Inspector, private cre mation no 
flowers. 

PRITCHARD - On July SlsL Laurie 
Alfred Pritchard, aged 86. Oema- 
Uoo a Etoeter at 12 noon on Friday. 
August Bth. No flowers. Donations to 
British DtebeUc Association, c/o 
Midland Bank. Seaton. Devon. 

MBL Ramadan - On Thursday. 3lst 
Juiy. after a long Alness, in hospital 
In BetrvA. Beloved husband of Zeinab 
me* Osseiran). father of NaML Imad 
and Leena. fathefMnJaw of Pamela 
and grandfather of Rasfia and 2rina. 
Funeral look place on Friday, itr 
AugusL 

SAVER • On July 30th. pencefufly et 
Hfndbead. Muriel Hamer, in her 
92nd year. Cremation at Guildford 
on Wednesday. August 6th at 2^50 
pm. Family flowers only but dona- 
aons. if - desired, lo Help the Aged. 

SCOTT ROHCm - On Tuesday. 
July 22. 1986 Francis Josep h 
Robert, aged 55, of Great RtostngUm. 
Gtouoesterabice. tost tragteady at sea 
off PortugaL Memorial Service to be 
arranged. 

SVKES - On Thursday. 31 si Juty after 
a brave fight in hosphaL John Trevor 
of Moorhouse laic. HrkcsMhaw. 
Bradford. The adored and tovlng 
husband of BeryL a devoted father 
end grandpa. Service at Bradford 
Cathedral on Tuesday. 5th August at 
UJ»an. followed by private cre- 
mation at Dewsbury Moor 
Cremator! isn. Family flowers only, 
rtnnan ons. if desired, to the British 
Heart Foundation. 

WtflTE - on Jidy 30th. suddenly at 
home. Doris, widow of Vidor, moth- 
er Crf Michael and Leonte. beloved 
grandmother of Joshua. Liberty. 
Sasha and Benh- Funeral private. 

vmsON Dr E*K Frederic of Counsel, 
international Foreign Law cansul- 
tant. Beloved husband of Ntta and 
rather of Yves Frederic and Jctei- 
Jacoues. pmcefuDy at home al Land- 
scape Vida, □mdene. London SE18 
on 30th July 1986. Requiem Mass at 
lOiOOam ai St Peters Church. WooF 
•rich. Stifi on Wednesday. 6th 
August followed by interment al 
Shooters Hill Genwtery at 11.00 am. 
Family flowers only tod donations, if 
desired, to his memory to Brook Hos- 
Pto) Caiaac Fund. Shcxuere H1U Rd. 
SE18. May he rest in peace. 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


TURNER - a Thanksglvlna Service tor 
the Hves of Geoffrey and Eleanor 
Turner wNI oe held ai Sl Mary 
Magdalene Church. Latimer VHiage 
on Friday, sth August at noon. 


(N MEM0R1AM - PRIVATE 


victoria Mary. 3rd August 
1983. Lux perpetua lucrat ea. 
Rebecra. 

SHAKSPCARC - Rtchard Warwick. 
3rd August 1984. Fondly 
reme m bered. 

Tllir. John - August 3« 1936. The 
saddest day of my Ule. You are aid 
(he greatest. Kate. 


ANNIVERSARIES 


WALKER r WRATttUtW tie Mtii ei lU 

- On Aug 2. 1941 ai SL Mark's. 
Billon. Rugby. Richard Bfcfcerstefh 
Rascoe fDWk) to Ursula Eleanor 
LuaiMBa (Bun). 


Dr S. M. Bortfr wick 
aRd Mbs HJVLE. Sparrow 
The engraemeot is announced 
between Robin, elder son of Dr 
and Mrs WJML Bonhwick, of 
Westhill, Inverness, and Helen, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs DJEL 
Sparrow, of Heme! -Hempstead, 
Hertfordshire. 


DrSLA. Baras 
and Mrs HJ. BlnmGeld 
The engagement is announced 
between Stewart Bums and 
Haze! Bhnnfiekl (nfe Palmer), 
of Staplehorst, KenL 

Mr LB. Creber 
and Mias LS. Gray 
The engagement is announced 
between Ian Broughton, only 
sod of the late Mr Richard 
Creber and of Mis Pamela 
Creber, of Brighton, Victoria, 
Australia, and Elizabeth Sally, 
only daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Frederick Gray, of Waroinglid, 
West Sussex. 

Mr-F.G- Entsmos 
aad Miss J. Garey-Hams 
The engagement is announced 
between Ferdinand, son ofMr J. 
Erasmus, of Benoni, South Af- 
rica. and of Mis A. Erasmus, of 
Duiban, South Africa, and Jane, 
only ’daughter of Mr and Mrs P. 
Harris, ofWdwyn Garden City, 
Hertfordshire. 

Mr M.G. Fallon, MP, 
and Miss Wi Payne . 

The engagement is aimoanced 
between Michael, son of Mr 
Martin Fallon, of Perth, and. 
Mrs Hazel Fallon, of Easter 
Ballindean House, Indmirc, 
Perthshire, and Wendy, elder 
daughter of Mr and Mrs PJL 
Payne, of Bursea, Holme-on- 
Spalding Mom; York. 


Mr SJ. Hayward 
and Miss SJ. Fall 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon Jeremy, son of 
Dr H.T. Hayward and Mrs S. 
Hargreaves, of Worcestershire, 
and Sharon Julia, elder daughter 
of Lieutenant and Mrs P J 7 . Pall, 
of Dumbartonshire. 

MrWJP. Mackesy 
and Miss AJ. Coder ■ 

The engagement is announced 
between william, son of Mr 
P.G. Mackesy, DLitt, of 
Heythrop, Oxfordshire, and Mrs 
A.N. Frankland, of Eynsham, 
Oxfordshire, and Alexandra, el- 
der daughter of Mr W. Colfer 
and the late Mrs. W. Golfer, of 
Somerset. ' 


Mr H. Marshall 
and Mbs LP. House 
The engagement is announced 
between Hany. second son of 
Mr and Mis Geoffrey Marshall, 
of Eynesbury, St Neots, and 
Laura Perelia, elder daughter of 
Mr and Mis Adrian House, of 
Argyll Road, Kensington. 


Mr J.C Masgfcan 
and hfiss AX. Lamarqs* 

The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan Charles, 
youngest son of Mr and Mis 
Michael Maughan, of 
Roebampton, London, and Ana 
Lourdes, youngest daughter of 
Mr and Mrs John Lamarque, of 
Miami and Puerto Rico. 


Dr GDJL Rose 
and Miss S. Chtypole White 
The engagement is announced 
between Charles David 
I juthhn, only son of Mr and 
Mrs Tom Rose, of Kin«wood 
Outage, Sheffield Park, Sussex, 
and Susan, elder daughter of the 
Rev Douglas and Mis Ciaypole 
White, of Turvey, Bedfordshire. 
Mr P.WG. Smithies 
and Mas GJD. Ward 
The engagement is announced 
between Peter, youngest son of 
Dr R.W. Smithies, of Harrow- 
on-the-Hfll, and Mis J.RH. 
Pinkerton, of Wracbesier, and 
Gina, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
W.H.C Ward, of Marloes. 
Pembrokeshire. 

Mr MX Whitfield 
and Miss AX. Haigh 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark, only son of Mr 
and Mrs A. Whitfield, of 
Churchgate Street, Old Harlow, 
Essex, and Alison, eldest daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs I. W. Haigh. of 
Tipiofts Manor, Saffron Wal- 
den, Essex. 


Marriages 


MrW.T.Hoath 

usd Mus H.M. Meggfeaen 
The engagement is announced 
between Wfliiam Trevredyn, 
youngest son of Captain mod 
Mrs P.T. Heath, of Farnham, 
Surrey, and Helen Mary, eldest 
daughter of Mr and Mrs 
C.R.Megginson, of Sheriff 
Hutton, North Yorkshire. 


Mr M.R. Nee Id 
and Mns HjG. Baines 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael Ridunund, 
son of Mr and Mrs Ralph Ncdd. 
of Combe Hay, Bath, Avon, and 
Helen Grace, elder daughter of 
Mr and Mrs John Baines, of 
Priors Marston, Warwickshire. 

Mr M£M- Roberts v 

and Mm RJV. Chariesworth 
The engagement is announced 
of Mamn. son of Colonel and 
Mrs N. Roberts, of Uanvair 
Discoed, Gwent, and Rhian, 
eldest daughter of Major and 
Mrs D. Charieswonb. of Stoke 
Feny, Norfolk. 


Mr MCL Crosby 
and Miss MX GascrngM 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, July 26. 1986, at St 
Pelrox, Dartmouth Castle, 
south Devon, of Mr Matthew 
Crosby, only son of Dr and Mrs 
J.L. Crosby, of Stanhope. Co 
Durham, and Miss Mary Gas- 
coigne, youngest daughter of Mr 
and the Hon Mis Crispin Gas- 
coigne. of Stanton Harcourt. 
Oxfordshire. The Rev John 
Butler officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her lather, was 
attended by Miss Louise Ruck. 
Frances Newman and Julian 
Gascoigne. Mr Richard New- 
man was best man. 

A small family reception was 
held at the home of the bride's 
grandfather, Major-General Sir 
Julian Gascoigne, Sanders. 
Stoke Fleming. 

MrSJLNias 
and Miss D-A- White 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, July 26, at Minley 
Manor, near Camberley, be- 
tween Mr Simon Richard Nias. 
The Cheshire Regiment and 
Miss Denise Ann White. 


Memorial service 


Mr WJD. Lacey 
A service of thanksgiving for the 
life of Mr William Daniel Lacey 
was held yesterday at St 
Margaret's, Westminster. 
Canon Trevor Beeson offici- 
ated. 

Mr Bryan Jefferson, Director- 
General of Design Services of 
the Property Services Agency, 
also representing the Par- 
liamentary Under-Secretary of 
State at the Department or the 
Environment, read the lesson 
and Mr Patnck Harrison, Sec- 
retary of the Royal Institute of 
British Architects, read Nurse's 
Song by William Blake. Mr 
Colin Boyne gave an address. 
Among those present were: 

M«)or and Mrs J Ctorfc, Hr anti Mrs e 


Peter Shepfleard. Sir TO 
• Sir wfiim PUe. Mr jonn 


Ostiorn. Mr Andrew Osborn. Miss 
Dtabeth Osborn. Mfcto Katharine 
Osborn Mr and Mrs L Chandler, Mr 
and Mrs N Harris. 

_ Sir Hogh Barnett. Sir Anthony Cox. 
Sir Aten Harris. Sir Aniony Part Str 
“ ‘ ~ - — — - weaver. 

toy (chief 

at Edu c ation 

and Science). Mr John Dole (Control- 
ler of thtOwm SttoPbersX Mr R E 

T P.R Carl (director. British Board of 

an Standards tnstUuUoaj. M r a c 
M anae (Ctrfef executive. PSA. also 
representing (hr Secretary at Stale for 
the Environment). Mr R J Patterson 
tcountv architect. Dorset County 
Council) and Mrs Patnrson. Mr 
Morris J le Fleming (chief executive. 
KertfonhMfw County Council). Mr S 
Bex and Mr D R Maldn (Nottingham- 
shire County Council). 

Mr Michael powe rs. Mr A B waters. 
Dr w ABen. Mrs Goun. Boyne. Mrs 
Patrick Harrison. Miss C Harrison. Mr 
E Hollamby. Mr John Lynch. Mr John 
Partridge. Mr Don Room. Mr W 
SharpTwr Tim Blackburn. Dr RG H 
Watson. Mr Francis wdtoy. Mr G 
Wiggiesworth and Mr G F. Woodwwd. 


Service dinner 

Essex Army Cadet Force 
The County Commandant, 
Colonel E. T. Boddye. and 
officers of the Essex Army Cadet 
Force dined at Penhale Training 
Camp, Holywell, Cornwall, yes- 
terday. Lientenant-Colonel D. 
G. Mullis presided. Brigadier J. 
S. Symons, Colonel W. 
Paken ham- Walsh and Captain 
R. P. Laurie were the principal 
guests. 


Inner Temple 

Judge Hawser. QC, has been 
elected treasurer For 1987 and 
Judge Monier-WiUiams is to be 
reader. Sir Robert Armstrong 
has. been elected an honorary 
master of the Bench. 


Services tomorrow 


Tenth Sunday 
after Trinity 

CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL: 8 HC. 
ArchOWiQO Thomas Seeker: 9-50 M: 
11 SuftgEuCh. Canterbury Service 
fHowi. Pnto to thee. .Lord * 



Leighton 

fW* 


HC 11 
Watson. 

HOLY TRINITY. 


Thomson: 6 E. Pre6 

CHELSEA. SW3: 

Parish c. the Rev d R 


Brampton Road. 


jSctnXzX. the Rev A M Aflchtiu 12.A5 
Tne Queers own. Bum Serijw of 
acitem bran cy 3.16 E (MujrtiO. Re- 
spouses {Tomkins). Czpectana 
expeewi (Wood). 

ST PAUL’S CATHEDRAL: & tl JO 




Maas la F (OariwL 

»* wnupw two m. 

Te Deum iQMora]. 


Aw JO) 
Benedtews 

UbbonsL the R*v 

Graham Routiedge: 3.13 E. (PurceU la 
B>. H ear iw prayer (PurceU). the vea 

UP«^R^AB8EY: a 11*0 

10.30 m. Jumiat* (Brmen). Te 

Deum (lrelamb, Cartate Domiito 
(MenteveMrme Rt Rev E □ KaasP- 
Pnhef- 3 E. (NaytorL O gladsome DvU 
(Dartirt. the Rev David H Hutfc 6J0 

Cnidfijaa 

the Rev David PaUHen 3 E 

(WahoKtoiata adtu Israel fWetoeyX 


SW7: 6 JO HCi It Sung Euch. me 
fevN K Ur. 63Q ES, Prat. JT C B 

HOLY TRfNITY. Prince Consort 
Road. SW7r BJO HC It Eucft. the 
Rev Martin Israel. 

HOLY TRINITY. Stoene Street. SWl: 
830 12.10 HC: 1030 Euch, Canon 
Rooetts. 

ST ALBAN’S. Brooke SL EC1: 930 
SM; It HM. Mbsa Sannl fticotel 
QSaNBO. Sing kWfuHy <jg«U- Brother 


THE GREAT. 
£ Prso 




conunerclum (Despres): 330 V. 
MawU flam sepond toai iSuriano), oemau 
A ve ve r u w c orp u s (Hendriex 
ST GEORGE'S CATHEDRAL. Soatth 
wart: S. 10. 12.15. 6 LM: 11 KM. Fr 
Louis Scent. 

Ir^gfeHT DANES (RATpnaehi 
WC28.30 HC: 11 curt) (Stanford). 

Ave nran Corpus (Byrd), the Vea G 
p Reaawdea 


Charles 

ST BA1 

SmltnneKL EC4: 9 HC u 
Hu gh, ream : 630 E. 

ST BRfl3E*S, Fleet Street. EC4; tl M 
and Euc n: 630 E. Canon John Oates. 
ST CUTHBEirrS, PhUbeach Gardens 
SW& 10 HC: 1 1 sung Euch. mode ill 
fCoatesL Lautiale nornen , Domini 
n>ei. Itie Rev jona vim; 6 E and 
Benediction. 

ST GEORGETS. Hanover Square, wi: 
mP na Sf 1 * Euch »uirtion). 
ST JAME^S. Ptccad«y. WI: 830 


.. Chetsaa. SW3: B, t2.X£ 

1030 Sung Eucn. Sarantocea 
I (Syr®, the Rev N «&■; 630 


ALL HALLOWS BY TOE TOWER: 11 

S w Young: 6 £ and Beoettiction 
iSianfordi. Save us, o Lord 
(Baintova the vicar. 

ALL SOULS. Langham Place. WI: 
830 HC ll. the Rev John Stott; 6-30 
Family C. the Rev Michael Lawton. 


E, AJrajgfay and everlasting Cod 
t&bOonsT the Rev p R Watson. 
st margaretsT Westminster. 
SWi: ii Sung Euch. Canon James 
Mantel. 

MARTIN-IN THE -FIELDS. WC2: 
.. 9*5. 1230 HC, the ftry Slghen 
Rooens: x 130 MP. (he Rev Wtuip 
Cheaer: 2.45 Chinese Service: 6.30 
£p. me Rev PtiiBp Oiesier. 

ST MARYS. Bourne Suret- SWi: 9 . 
9A5. 7 LM: It HM. HH f« three 
volns iByrcU. Glona Dm Domtne 
(ByrdU In Cod's world {Purcell), 
canon E L MasealL 6.15 E and 
Soteran Benediction. 

ST MARYEEBONE. MaiYletxuie 
Road, Wi: 6. 11 HC (MtfDfrte), the 
Rev C K Hamel Cooke: 6.50 Ministry 
of Heal Ins. Laying on of hands, lhe 
Rev D Duncan. 

Rev J Falconer. 


SI STEPHENS. Gloucester Road. 
SWT: g. 9 LM: HM. Mass for three 
voices (Byrd), the Rev ftofca* Browne: 
6 Solemn Evensong and Benediction, 
lhe Rev Perry Burter, .. 

ST VEDAST. Foster Lane. EC2: II 
Sung Euch. Flat voluntas lua 
(Andrfesseni. He shall Iced HB Rock 

THE ANNUNCIATION. Bryanstan 
street. Wl: it HM. Mttsa Ecce ouam 
bonum (Hatoteri.^ Car tate OraMno 
eanticum novum (Hassier): 6 LM and 
Benediction. 

ST COLUMBA'S CHURCH OF SCOT- 
LAlSpont Street. SWi: 11 aje 
very Rev J Fraser McLuskey: 6.30. 
Uie Rev JWinH Burnfc 
CROWN COURT CHURCH OF SCOT- 
LAND. Coven l Carden. WC2: 11.18. 
630. the Rev Keith M McRoto 12-20 
HC. 

THE ASSUMPTION. Warwjdt Street 
WlT ClOLlS d. 6- LM: 11 SM. Mlara 
Me contewH- (PaJeshtnaL Unse r Hm 
Jesus Cnrtstu * ISc hatt). O sacrum 

^^^7^730. 830. la 
121S. 4.15. 6 IS. LM: tt HM. Miras 

Prim l Tort iLgfJO. Salve Regnut 

THE ORATORY. Bromotm Road. 
SW7: 7. 8. 9. 10. 123a 430. 7 LM: 
11 HM. MBsa in Simp lid tote 
(Langlab). Salvator mimdJ rTaJllsj; 
5.30 v. Ave vgw (Gounod}. 

ST ETHELDR£DA*S. Ely Place: 11 
SM. Meeee de rEgiise Ste M a de le i ne 
rfheodore Doboav yenl Crcamr 
Sstrftus (Theodor* de la Haenei. 
SllERICAN CHUROI W LONDCKV. 
Wl: 11. the RevRon F Ateson . 
HINDE STREET METHODIST 
CHURCH. Wl: 11. lhe Rev John 
Lampard: 6.90. the Rev Ken 
HOtocran^. URC , Alto ^ i 


KENSINCTON 
W8: 11 HC .6 


630. Dr Kenneth : 


M*. Miller. 


ANNE AND ST 


AGNES 
E& 11 


REGENT SOU^E PP^YTOilAN 
L.RC. TavtstocK Ptora: WCl: ll. tite 
Rev O J BakkeR 63a lhe RcV J W 

_ . fLu- 

WESLEY'S CHAPEL-* CltV Road- EXX: 

NALL 

I Met hod 1st). SWI: 11. 630. the Rev R 
John Tudor 

WESTMINSTER CHAPEL. Buddng- 
ham Cite. SWI: 

Red pa in. 


11. 630. Dr Alan 



OBITUARY 

CARDINAL CARLO 
CONFALONIERI 
Respected papal confidant 

Cardinal Carlo Confel- 
onieri. dean of the Roman 
Catholic College of Cardinals 
since 1977, who was personal 
chamberlain and secretary to 
Pope Pius XI throughout his 
17-year reign, died yesterday 
at the age of 93. • 

Bom on July 25, 1893, at 
Seveso, in the archdiocese of 
Milan, he was educated at the 
dicocesan seminary and at the 
Gregorian University, Rome, 
where his studies for the 
priesthood were interrupted in 
1 914 by his call-up for service 
in the Italian army. 

He continued to study as 
opportunity allowed, and so 
impressed Cardinal Ferrari, 
then Archbishop of Milan, by 
his persistence in the face of 
difficulties that special per- 
mission was received from the 
Holy See for the cardinal to 
ordain him to the priesthood 
before he reached canonical 
age. That was in 1916 while 
the ordinandus was on leave. 

He immediately returned to 
active service and took part in 
the bitter fighting in the Italian 
Alps. He was finally demobi- 
lized in 1919 and awarded the 
War Cross of Merit. 

After two years as a parish- 
priest in Milan he returned to 
Rome with Cardinal Ratti for 
the conclave which elected the 
cardinal as Pope Pius XI. 

Confelonieri was appointed 
private secretary to this pon- 
tiff. who was noted for his 
hostility to Hitler, and re- 
mained at the Vatican 
throughout his long reign. 

When Pius XI was dying, 

Confalonieri assisted Cardinal 
Pacelli in the administration 
of the Last Sacraments and in 
prayers at the Pope's bedside. 

On Pacelli’s election as 
Pope Pius XU in 1939 the 
appointment was renewed, 
and continued until 1941, 
when Confelonieri was nomi- 
nated Archbishop of Aquila 
and consecrated personally by 
tbe pontiff. 

His time at Aquila was 
marked particularly by the 
retreat of German forces 


through Italy after the Allied 
landings. The town itself was 
threatened by a decision to 
blow up important buildings 
as cover for the retreat. The 
archbishop intervened, called 
on the officer in charge of 
operations, and reminded him 
of his duty to the civilian 
population. An order was 
given to cancel the plans, and 
years later the officer, whose 
name the archbishop refused 
to divulge, wrote thanking 
him for his encouragement to 
act humanely. 

In 1950, Confelonieri was 
translated to the titular see of 
Nicopofis and Nestum on 
appointment as Secretary of 
the Sacred Congregation for 
Universities and Seminaries. 
He was made a cardinal by 
Pope John XXIII in 1958 with 
the title of St Agnes-withoui- 
the-Walls. 

He also served as prefect of 
lhe Vatican Congregation for 
Catholic Education, and pre- 
fect of the Vatican Congrega- 
tion for Bishops. 

In 1977. by now in his 80s, 
Confalonieri was chosen as 
dean of the College of Cardi- 
nals, a titular post in which he 
represented his fellow cardi- 
nals at official church 
functions. 


TEDDY WILSON 


Teddy Wilson, the Ameri- 
can jazz pianist who came to 
prominence in tbe 1930s with 
tbe Benny Goodman Trio, 
died on July 31 in New 
Britain, Connecticut He was 
73. 

In his yean with Goodman, 
Wilson was rated the most 
accomplished pianist in jazz. 
Apart from the feet that his 
participation in the Goodman 
trio made it the swing era's 
first inter-racial group, and 
gave acceptability to the idea 
of black musicians playing 
alongside white ones, he 
brought to its output harmon- 
ic refinement and a restraint 
which . influenced not only 
other jazz pianists, but other 
instrumentalists as welL 

His many compositions and 
arrangements attest to a skill 
in this department which is 
fortunately captured on the 
many recordings he made. 

He was born Theodore Wil- 
son in Austin, Texas, on 
November 24, 1912. While he 
was still young tbe family 
moved to Talladega, Ala- 
bama, where his father be- 
came head of the English 
department at the university, 
and his mother the librarian. 

His own musical training 
was a rigorous one; four years 
learning piano and violin at 
Tuskegee were supplemented 
by studies in music theory, in 
which he majored at Talladega 
College. 

In 1929 he moved to De- 
troit where, with the Speed 
Webb band, be began his 
career as a pianist. In the 
following year hejoined Mil- 
ton Senior in Toledo and 
travelled with him to Chicago. 
Here, in the period 1931-33, 
he played with musicians of 
the calibre of Louis Arm- 
strong. Erskine Tate and Jim- 
my Noone, an experience 
which gave him exacting stan- 
dards of comparison and laid 
the groundwork for his 
technique. 

His next stop was New 
York, where be joined Benny 
Carter in 1933. And his first 
claim on international atten- 
tion was a recording for the 
foreign market with Carter’s 
Chocolate Dandies. 


A year ( 1 934-35) with Willie 
Bryant followed, and he also 
accompanied the Charioteers 
vocal group. But celebrity 
came when he was invited to 
join the Benny Goodman Trio 
on tour. 

Though his career was to be 
a long one. the four years that 
followed represent tbe core of 
his achievement His relaxed 
phrasing, imaginative melo- 
dies and balanced legato idi- 
om, were well-nigh 
revolutionary in their time, 
and he brought rare beauty 
and symmetry to the art of 
jazz keyboard playing. A series 
of great record dates, some 
with vocals by Billie Holiday, 
have preserved this pinnacle 
period of his career. 

When he left Goodman in 
1939 he formed his own 
excellent big band, which, 
though short-lived, gave rein 
to his considerable dulls as a 
composer and arranger. Dur- 
ing tire remainder of the war 
he worked mainly with a 
sextet in New York. 

For some years after the war 
he largely abandoned per- 
forming, devoting himself, in- 
stead, to teaching. And -his 
annual summer courses at the 
Juilliard School of Music, 
between 1945 and 1952, 
testify to bis prestige. 

- However he did take to the 
road again in the 1950s, 
touring Britain and the Conti- 
nent as well as night clubs in 
the United Stales. To the 
regret of admirers of his 
compositions he fell silent as a 
writer, but he continued to 
tour into tbe 1970s. 

Connoisseurs of his heyday 
performances might feel with 
inner pang, that a certain 
floridity had crept into his 
passage work; and in the sheer 
(and undiminishpd) virtuosity 
of his keyboard method, hun- 
ger for the unvarnished integ- 
rity of the high swing era. But 
perhaps this was more to do 
with the feet that the ethos had 
changed, and that the delight- 
ed creative impulses of the 
Thirties fell strangely upon the 
ears of a harsher, more care- 
worn age. 


MR DAVID HENLEY 


Mr David Henley, who 
created the Rank charm 
school in the 1940s to^room 
potential stars for the cinema, 
has died at the age of 92 

He became a director of the 
Rank Organization in 1945 as 
director of artists with a 
particular responsibility for 
finding new acting talent. He 
started the charm school in 
imitation of similar organiza- 
tions in Hollywood. 

At any one time the school 
had more than 70 names on its 
books, and though many fell 
by the wayside, several did 
become well known, among 
them Christopher Lee, Diana 
Dors. Barbara Murray and the 
broadcaster Pete Murray. 

The school was associated 
with theatre repertory compa- 
nies in Worthing and Tun- 
bridge Wells, for which 
Henley organised Rank* back- 
ing to provide his young 
hopefuls with acting 
experience. 

David Henley was born in 
London and was an actor for 
many years before succeeding 


A M. Wall as general secre- 
tary of Equity in the early 
1930s. 

From Equity he joined the 
London office of the Ameri- 
can agency Myron Selznick, 
where he managed such stars 
as Vivien Leigh and Robert 
Donat, and acted as a talent 
scout for film companies. 

He left Rank in I&9 to join 
City Share Trust and was for 
several years afterwards in- 
volved in film production and 
distribution. 

Mr William A. Peter, who 
died on July 2S at the age of 
69, was a former chairman of 
the Tribune International 
Corporation which publishes 
German-language newspapers 
in Chicago and Milwaukee. 

In 1971 the West German 
government awarded Peter its 
highest decoration, the 
Officer’s Cross of the Order of 
Merit, for helping 10,000 East 
German refugees ro settle in 
Nebraska after the Second 
World War, and for his contri- 
bution to the preservation of 
German culture in the state. 




lu 


Gemayel 


in peace 
offer to 
Syrians 

From Juan Carlos Gnmodo 

Beirut 

Under increasing pressure 
from Syria. President Ge- 
mayel yesterday unexpectedly 
offered' an olive branch to 
Damascus and to Muslim foes 
who demand his resignation 
and proposed a joint quest for 
a new formula to end the 
Lebanese civil war. 

“I personally call on brother 
President Hafez el-Assad to 
continue what he has already 
begun and pledged over the 
years." the President said 
during a ceremony — boy- 
cotted by Muslim military and 
political leaders - to com- 
memorate the Army's day in 
Christian east Beirut. 

“The pitfalls that laced his 
and our efforts in the past 
could serve as a lesson for the 
future." he said. 

Hours afterwards a Leba- 
nese Army soldier was killed 
and 23 civilians were injured 
when a small bomb exploded 
near a factory in the Christian 
suburb of Dora. It followed 
two car bomb attacks in east 
and west Beirut early this 
week which claimed 53 lives. 

Mr Gemayel's clear call for 
Syrian help came amid reports 
that Syria overnight had sent a 
new batch of soldiers to west 
Beirut, where nearly 500 Syr- 
ian troops and plainclothes 
agents are helping Muslim 
units of the Lebanese Army to 
try to restore order under a 
Damascus-sponsored “secur- 
ity plan" launched a month 
ago. 

Syrian military 1 presence in 
the Lebanese capital has 
caused widespread suspicion 
and bitter criticism among 
some Christian politicians 
who see Syria's policies in 
Lebanon as a threat to na- 
tional sovereignty. 

The President's words em- 
bodied the first conciliatory 
gesture towards Damascus af- 
ter months of strain provoked 
by the presidential veto to a 
tripartite peace accord signed 
in Damascus by Lebanon's 
most powerful Christian and 
Muslim militias in December. 

The accord, never applied, 
sought to give Muslims more 
power. 




Some of the owners with their collie dogs which have been entered for the National -Trust Sheepdog Trial at Chartwell (Photograph: Surest K aradia). 


Thatcher visit 
target of 
Games attack 

Continued from page 1 

closed its hospitality suite 
during her stay in case she was 
inadvertently taken there for 
refreshments. In fact, the only 
person refused entry was Mr 
Robert Maxwell co-chairman 
of the Games organizing 
committee. 

He later announced that a 
Japanese philanthropist was 
likely to underwrite the ex- 
pected £2 million deficit from 
the Games. 

Mr Maxwell said he would 
make a formal application to 
Mr Ryoichi Sasakawa after 
the accounts had been com- 
pleted, adding that he would 
make sure that everyone who 
owed money “plays their 
part”. 


Botha sidesteps curfews rule 


Continued from page 1 
move to warn its black neigh- 
bours of the two-way con- 
sequences of economic sanct- 
ions. 

The Department of Trade 
and Industry announced in 
Pretoria that it was giving 
importers of Zimbabwean 
products “timeous" warning 
that special import licences 
will be needed from next 
Friday, August 8. 

It said in a statement: "It is 
incumbent upon the South 
African Government to pro- 
tect local commerce and in- 
dustry and to safeguard the 
sources of supply of their 
normal requirements. 

“Against this background 
and in view of other develop- 
ments concerning South Af- 
rica. the Government has 
derided to introduce a system 
of import licensing on ail 


imports from Zimbabwe.” 

It would enable the Govern- 
ment to monitor the volume 
and nature of Zimbabwean 
imports, the statement said. 

South Africa is by far 
Zimbabwe's biggest trading 
partner and the conduit for the 
bulk of its overseas trade. 
Two-way trade between the 
countries was worth 382 mil- 
lion rand (£100 million) last 
year. 

In 1984, South Africa took 
18.3 per cent of Zimbabwe's 
exports and supplied 19.3 per 
cent of its imports. 

It is estimated that between 
68 and 90 per cent of 
Zimbabwe's exports go 
through South Africa and 
between 65 and 80 per cent of 
imports. Zimbabwe's natural 
outlet to the sea. Beira in 
Mozambique, can handle only 
about one tenth of 


Zimbabwe's annual export- 
import volume, according to a 
British study. 

A spokesman for Dr Dawie 
de Villiers, South Africa's 
Minister of Trade and In- 
dustry, said importers of 
Zimbabwean goods would be 
able to get licences without 
any trouble. 

He said: “This measure 
does not imply an embargo on 
imports from Zimbabwe and 
should by no means be inter- 
preted as a deviation from 
South Africa's official trade 
policy not to unnecessarily 
intervene in international 
trade.”. 

Earlier yesterday the Min- 
ister of Manpower, Mr Pietie 
de Piessis. warned that strong 
action was planned against the 
estimated 1.7 Million workers 
from neighbouring states who 
were in South Africa illegally. 


Thatcher will 
stand alone 
on sanctions 

Continued from page 1 
statement that the Govern- 
ment adhered to the European 
Community programme to 
take a range of measures if the 
South African Government 
refused to negotiate peacefully 
changes in its “abhorrent 
system” within the coming 
months. 

Mr Pym said the whole of 
the world, including Britain, 
was hostile to apartheid. But it 
seemed that Britain had not 
been taking a lead in getting 
international agreement. 

“1 think Mrs Thatcher has 
overstated the case. She seems 
to have become so obsessed by 
the case against sanctions, 
which is a perfectly valid case, 
that it seems as though the rest 
of the problem was forgotten.? 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Solution to Pnzzle No 17,113 Solution to Puzzle No 17,108 


anaisansn 
n 

uSI 

0 
E 



.4 prize o/The Times Atlas of World History will be given for the 
first three correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 


ie 

Entries 

should be addressed to: The Times, Saturday Crossword 
Competition PO Box 486. J Virginia Street. London, El 9XN. 
The winners and solution ail/ be published nest Saturday. 

The winners of last Saturday's competition are: I. C. McNicol. 
10 Oakhill Court. Oakh'ill Road, Surbiton; Miss Julia 
Broadbent, 18 Newlands Road, Rottingdean. Brighton: Mrs D. 
M. Ford. 3 Dock Mill Cottages. Napier Road, Southsea. 

Name 


Today’s events 


Address . 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,114 



ACROSS 

1 Nearly broke after gamble - 
that's the wav in the Giv 
(S.4). 

9 Barely sufficient fish — 
something the Walrus's 
mate can deal with |9). 

10 Hunter personified in Maori 
on the warpath (5). 

11 Character Maugham wrote 

about specifically 16). 

12 With Phillis he makes hon- 
est pair (S). 

13 Port for Charles is a natural 
selection (6). 

15 Increase overnight journey 
across snow by compass (S). 

18 Sign that should be taken 
down? 1 8). 

19 Good-looking boy's fall 
from grace reluming after a 
party (6). 

21 Wine expert easily carried 
away (8). 

23 Curious afiair of the Mada- 
gascan palm (6). 

26 Having spoken, remained 
sober (5). 

27 Dailv to give advance notice 
<«>. ' 

28 Married scorn bothered tra- 
ditional erne trainer 1 6.6). 


DOWN 

1 Company passed what Black 
may have done at board 
meeting (7). 

2 Period suitable for fashion 
(5). 

3 Drop in and resolve inher- 
itance for her (9). 

4 Collapse of one in mara- 
thon? (4). 

5 Dtfpan in darkness (5.3). 

6 Turn up in honour of Greek 
heroine (5). 

7 Noble like an eagle? (4-4). 

8 One not known as a neg- 
ative follower of Faislaff(6). 

14 Force into transport merger 
(S). 

16 Handv gear for plant assem- 
bly (91 

17 Something of a block- 
buster. this craftsman (8]L 

18 Jeopardise being out of po- 
sition 16). 

20 Pretty careless kitchen maid 
17). 

22 Sound typist (5). 

24 Fellow managed copyright 
for cash (S). 

25 Positive gain (4). 


Royal engagements 

The Queen, accompanied by 
the Duke of Edinburgh, attends 
final athletics events and will 
close the XUI Commonwealth 
Games, Meadowbank Sports 
Centre, Edinburgh, 1. 

The Duke of Edinburgh at- 
tends Cowes Week, embarks 
HMY Britannia, Cowes, Isle of 
Wight, 8.4a 

New exhibitions 

Ghosts: Recent Sculpture and 
Drawings by Esmond Bingham; 
Drawings and Prims by Sasa 
Marinkov. New Work by Ste- 
phen Turner; Sculptural In- 
stallation by Picne VivanU 
Woodlands An Gallery. 90 My- 
cenae Rd. SE3; Mon to Fri 10 to 
7.30. Sat 10 to 6. Sun 2 to 6. 
Last chance to see 

Children's Books of the Year 
1986. National Book Le ag u e , 
Book House. 43 East Hill. 
SWI8: 10 to 4. 

Painting into Ain Works by 
Douglas Swan. Quinton Green, 
5/6 Cork St, Wl; 10 to 12210. 

Paintings and prints by 
Fcrmin Rocker. Stephen Bartley 
Gallery, 62 Church St, SW3; 10 
to 4. 

Music 

Concert by The Wren Or- 
chestra of London. Kenwood 
House Concert Bowl, Hamp- 
stead Lane. NW3, 8. 

Talks and lectures 

The Restless Earth: The San 
Andreas Fault (film); The Geo- 
logical Museum, SW7. 2.30. 

Astronomy not Astrology, 
2.3ft The Moon Our Nearest 
Neighbour, both by Paul Daw- 
son: National Maritime Mu- 
seum. SE10, 3.3a 

Supply Lines to Antarctica, by 
Ian Coliinge, Natural Histore 
Museum, Cromwell Rd, SW7, 3. 
General 

Children’s Day On The South 
Bank: films, demonstrations, 
face painting and Punch and 
Judv. South Bank Centre. SE1, 
12 to 6. 

Collectors Record Fair, 
Bonnington Hotel, 92 
Southampton Row, WC1. today 
10 to 6. tomorrow 10 to 4. 

Special Circus Performance: 
circus skills display for 7 to 14 
vear olds: Riverside Studios. 

Crisp Rd. W6. 12. 


Tomorrow’s events 


Concise crossword page 33 


Royal engagements 

The Queen gives a dinner 
party for the Heads of Delega- 
tion to the Commonwealth 
Review Meeting. Buckingham 
Palace, 8.1S 

New exhibitions 

Embroidery and Textile 
Graphics by Janina B Rennie, 
Peter Rennie and Joan Syren. 
Hampton Court Palace, Apart- 
ment 39; MontoSat 10to5,Sun 
12 to 5 (ends Aug 17) 

General 

Summer in the City: Family 
Festival of free children's 
entertainment, foyer music, sea- 
side shells painting competition, 
late night concert and fireworks 
display: Barbican Centre, EC2, 
today until Aug 10. for info tel: 
(01)638 4141 exL 218. 

Canterbury Pilgrimage Bike 
Ride: meet Charing Cross, 9.25 
for train to Ashford. 

Fourth Covent Garden Day 
of Artists with Disabilities: po- 
etry. music and drama: West 
Piazza. WC2. 1 1 to 6. 

Book Fair. The Old Town 
Hall. Ha vers lock Hill, NW3, 1 1 
to 5. 


In the garden 


week in dry spells. 

Gather and dry herbs 
winter use, cut eryngii 
stance and other evensu 
flowers when they have 
opened and are at their besL 


is; 


keep free of dust until required 
for winter use. Watch for signs 
of virus disease on lilies - 
streaking of the foliage and 
stunted growth - and remove 
and burn infected plants. 

- The hot weather has caused 
outdoor woodwork, fences and 
gates, to shrink and if rain 
penetrates the joints they may 
rot Apply wood preservatives 
now and IT necessary spray it 
generously into shrunken joints. 
RH 


Gardens Open 


P- Plants tar Sato 

TOMORROW York***: Gotoum Cot- 
tage, Upper MO. nr OWhan. in Grerailwtd 
v*aoe. on A63S between OMnm and 
Hotmfirttt one acre, he at hers, shrubs, 
ro d kp ten ts and stream pardon; It to B. P. 
Aberdeen : Leith HaO. Kennothmont on 
B90C2. rock garden, herbaceous borders, 
lame wares, ponds, bird ob se rvation 
haft. Soay sheep, highland cattle; 2 to 
550. 

BotuMitt: Orchard Cottage, Sutton 
Road. Cookham. 3m N Ol Mafctanhead on 
A4094; one acre. 500 roses. 400 daMas. 
watar garden, herbaceous. shrubs, fruit 
herbs, large greenhouses, many unusual 
plaits; also open August 10. 2 to 6. 

Kent Oswalds. Btabopsboume. 4ir 


Canterbury, off A2 at 


4m S of 
: 2 acres, year 


rock plants, kitchen garden: 2 to 5. 
Sussex: CobtSers. Mount Pleasant. Jarvis 
Brook, Orowbdrough: from A2B at 
Crowborotigh Cross lake B2100; Zerxes, 
siopng garden, tarn collection herba- 
ceous shrubs, water garden, all season 
colour; also open August 24 and 31: 250 


Anniversaries 


TODAY 

Births: Nicholas Wiseman, 
cardinal, 1st Archbishop of 
Westminster 1850-65, Seville, 
1802: 

Deaths: wnHam 11 (Rnfhs), 
king of England, reigned 1087- 
1100. Lyndhurst, Hampshire, 
1100: Thomas Gaatsboraegh, 
London. 1788; Jacques Etienne 
Montgolfier, balloonist, 
Annonay, France. 1799; Enrico 
Caruso. Naples. 1921; Alexan- 
der Graham BEfl, inventor of 
the telephone, Benm Bh rough. 
Nova Scotia, 1922; 


Roads 


London and South 
Contraflow between si 
and junction 4 f Frimtay): delays, partacu- 
lorty southbound. Ml: Contraflow N of 

1 notion 8 ( Hemal Henipst 

IHarpenden): approach 
Contraflow at hnaon 5. 

MjdtamJt; Ml: Contraflow either side of 

Qrotwfch) and t *junSxi n0 4 Jn { ^ A38 
Bro msy twa); only two tgnas open in each 
direction- - 

Wales and wash Delays caused by 
‘ National Bstaddfod of Wales. 
Dyfed ( will Aug. 9J. Extra 


The pound 


traffic on A30 today end tomorro w, 
gene ra ted by Exeter Air 136, Exeter 
Axport Devon. Expect c ongestion on M4. 
MS. A3C and A 38. 


MBS NEWSPAPERS UMTTEp. 

. Printed tor London Post <Prtni- 

<Tt> Limited of 1 Virginia Slice L 
London El g.\N. Saturday. August 2. 
iwt Hegto fercd » » ntwnww at 


Bank ' Bank 
Buys Sett 

AushaBaS 25*5 2435 

Austria Sch 22.7 21-5 

Bateumft 6755 63.75 

CanodaS 2125 2025 . 

Denmark Kr 1222 1157 

EMmdUkk • 758 706 

1 Ranee FT 1053 9JM 

GanrnmDm 3246 3 « 

Greece Dr 219X0 395X0 

Hong Kong 3 1155 . 1145 

Ireland Pt 1.10 1JM 

Italy Lira 2225 2108 

Japan Yen 242 m 228JM 

Nafteftands GU 354 345 

Norway Kr 1146 10J8 

Portugal Esc 22500 214M 

South Africa Rd 540 450 

Spain Pta 2055 1975 

Sweden Kr 10.77 1022 

SentaalandR 2605 2455 

USAS 155 148 

Yugoslavia Dnr 580100 61050 

Rates lor smafl denontlnmton twA notes 
only as supptod by Barclays Bank PLGl 
D ifferent rates apply 10 travellers' 
cheques and other foreign currency 1 
buskwK. 

RatoB Price katnc 3855. 

London The FT Index dooed up 14 at 
12734. 

New Vote The Dow Jones Industrial 
overage dosed 11 57 down at 176354. 

Sb/!A 

ild 

who 
of ] 

peat h 
io price 
page 21 

Ttof M 

/• 

f 

— at 

For readers 
missed a copy 
week, we re 
week's Partfol 
(today's are on 

^ Mm Ttor .SM 

nay have 
urns this 
elow the 

■mu r 

M Tata 

7 

+2 

44 

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6 

+2 

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7 

+5 

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B 

+3 

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11 

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1 

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21 

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P 

22 

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47 

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25 

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+2 

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r~ I 

27 

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B 

a 

28 

+3 

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c 

29 

+3 

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30 

45 

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+3 

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45 

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Y 

32 

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33 

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34 

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~ ~ m 

1j 

35 

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r 

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44 

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42 


a 


Weather 


deep depression 
id near western 


NE. 


6 am to midnight 


London, SE Engtaad, East Angae 


*n places 
becoming briefer later; vwtd SW 


S6 


Central 8, E,NW, central N England, E, 
V Mktands, N Wains: Dry, sunny 
winds: wind SW fresh- locaiiy strong: 
iax temp 20 »22C (68 to TOP). 

Channel Monde, SW England, S 


Lake DKrict, Me of 


68F). 

of Man, 


aw 


: Rather cloudy, rain Bttbnos. biUitar 
d showers; rend SW 


OuSook tor tomorrow and Monday: 

ji N and W. 
to eastern 


Sen, Strait of 
E* Wind SW 


force 4. Rain then 


force 8 dec reas ing force 4 or 5. 
vers. VMbftty good. Sea very rough 



mMmfcn: r-rauu s-snow: Uv 


fnoU cim®d- Temperature 


Letter from Delhi 

Cola crisis fizzes 
in the Punjab 


In India, where ihe combi- 
nation of extreme heat and 
teeming population makes 
the manufacturers of soft 
drinks drool with anticipa- 
tion, the American giant 
Pepsi-Cola is again trying to 
open up. ... 

Neither Pepsi nor its 
deadly rival, Coca-Cola, is 
sold in this country, perhaps 
alone in the world. The 
Americans manage to oper- 
ate even behind the Iron 
Curtain, but. they were 
thrown out of India at the 
time of the Janata Govern- 
ment in th e late 1970s. 

Bid to learn 
elixir secret 

Under India's rigorous 
policy of protection for its 
own industries, and in its 
determination not to be 
exploited by multinational 
capitalists, the Government 
would allow the Americans 
to own only 40 per cent of 
the manufacturing and bot- 
tling companies here. 

They also tried to insist on 
learning the secret of the 
prime elixir, from which all 
Cokes and Pepsi s are made 
when diluted with fruit 
juices. 

The US companies said 
that they would sooner die 
than part with the secret, 
and asked the Indians how 
they would like being the 
only country in the world 
where Coke and Pepsi were 
not available. To the 
Americans' chagrin, the In- 
dians answered that they 
would like it just fine. 

And, as a result, you need 
a friend in the American 
Embassy if you want to have 
a genuine US cola, or else 
slip over the border into 
PaJa stan or Bangladesh. 

The Indians make their 
own colas, called Cam pa 
Cola, or Thums Up. 

Now the new Govern- 
ment in Punjab has come up 
with a suggestion that Pepsi 
should be allowed to brew 
and bottle its dark ambrosia 
in the troubled state, thus 


bringing refreshment to the 
warring factions and em- 
ployment to the under-occu- 
pied youth. It would also, 
say the Punjabis, provide 
another useful outlet for the 
state's fruit production. 

The proposal causes some 
embarrassment to the cen- 
tral Government, because it 
does not wish to be accused 
again of depriving the Sikhs 
of opportunities — they have 
been accused often enough 
of what the Indians like to 
call “step- motherly" 
treatment. 

The proposal was leaked 
in Delhi’s newspapers this 
week, and has instantly 
caused trouble in the upper 
house of the Indian Parlia- 
ment, the Rajiya Sabha, or 
States Assembly. 

Mr N. D. Tiwari, the In- 
dustries Minister, told a 
questioner that this proposal 
from the Punjab company 
was different from the previ- 
ous attempts by Pepsico Inc 
to set up in India, because 
this time the concentrate 
would not be imported and 
because the Americans were 
prepared to accept less than 
40 per cent participation. 


Opposition is 
not satisfied 


That has not satisfied the 
opposition, which says that 
it does not believe that Pepsi 
means to part with its secret 
formula. 

The Indian soft drinks 
industry is responding with 
a publicity campaign, the 
central point of which is to 
say that Pcpsi-Cola’s entry 
into the market would desta- 
bilize the Indian industry 
and put a million people out 
of work. 

Of Mr Suijit Singh 
Bamala. the chief minister 
of Punjab, the Indian soft 
drink manufacturers say: 
“Mr Bamala should work 
for peace, and not for 
Pepsi." 

Michael Hamlynj 




•:v;\ 


■!iA 


* .-.m« ;Vv 


MOON TODAY ftuaw b shown h raUUbatt FRONTS Worn 

WjwW l — — ■ J i»ii ik i| «M| 


A AAA I 

533 Ocdmkdl 



High Tides 

TODAY 

AM 

HT PM 

HT 

TOMORROW 

AM 

HT PM 

HT 

Loudon Bridge 

- 

- 12-26 

5.B 

London Bridge 

1.01 

55 122 

6.0 

Aberdeen 

- 

- 12.16 

3,3 

AbsreSsen 

1256 

3.6 1.05 

35 

Avonmoud) 

5351 

103 6.04 

108 

AvonmouBi 

657 

108 6.57 

112 

B®5fis*t 

9^4 

25 10.10 

3.1 

Belfast 

1036 

25 1052 

.32’ 

Cardiff 

5^0 

8.6 5A9 

95 

CanW 

022 

10.1 042 

104’ 

Davenport 

359 

43 431 

4.6 

Devonport 

459 

45 522 

45' 

Dover 

ID-01 

55 1021 

55 

Dover 

10/46 

55 1154 

5.7; 

Fafenorah 

329 

4.1 4-01 

4.4 

FahnouBi 

459 

45 452 

4.6,“ 

GttSWM 

Harwich 

1127 

1033 

3£ 11JS 
3/4 1052 

4.1 

3.4 

Glasgow 

Harwich 

1151 

- 1225 
35 1158 

AS’ 

35: 

nannmma 

9.15 

452 

4.4 9/40 
09 526 

AJ 

55 

ilnLifirararl 

noryiuMKi 

1053 

5/45 

45 1019 
62 6.16 

45. 

6.1. - 

ttlm raaiMire 

428 

6J9 4J6 

75 


523 

7A £44 

75 

Lerik 

1.00 

AS 127 

45 

Iran 

155 

4.6 222 

45- 

Liverpool 

957 

IS 10^4 

75 

Liverpool 

10.48 

75 1157 

83 

Lowestoft 

ais 

2.7 058 

ZJO 

Ltmnatoft 

SUW 

22 9.47 

21 ••• ; 

HfcuHi 

1038 

4:0 11J77 

AS 

Margato 

1126 

4.1 1157 

4.1- 

MHordKawan 

4.46 

53 5l16 

S.6 

IHtordHnwan 

5.41 

5.6 652 

55; 

Newqiray 

3^2 

5 A 4.10 

5.7 


454 

5.7 454 

6-0 

Oban 

439 

3.1 007 

35 

Oban 

552 

32 £46 

3-3' 

Penzance 

306 

AS ass 

45 

Pamrarca 

452 

45 424 

*£, 

Portland 

4A4 

5.18 

• 16 

Portlaad 

651 

1.4 626 
45 11/19 

1.7' 

nhuaiMuu 

1023 

3^ 1034 

46 


11.12 

4.1. 

Shoraham 

9-56 

AS 10.18 

£.0 


1050 

5.1 11.05- 

55. 

Southampton 

9.48 

3.7 958 

as 

Saunmaptaa 

1057 

35 1042 

45; 

Swansea 

4.43 

7.4 5.12 

7.7 


SCO 

7.7 559 

81. 

Tool 

2.14 

4.4 ZAO 

4.4 


259 

4.6 326 

45. 

Wlton-CD-fiae 

1028 

35 1056 

35 

Wtoon-on-Nze 

11.19 

35 11.44 

35 


Sunrise* Smarts 
525am MS pm 

Moon rises: Moonsots: 

J 1-21 am 7.32 pm 

New moon August 5 





8.16 pm 


Around Britain 


Lighting-up time 


L49 pm to 430 am 
;934 pm to 43Tan 
934 pm to 523 am 


S pm to 5.08 am 
■ 9.47 nm to 452 am 
m 932 pm to 459 Off 


Yesterday 


Belfast 


Cardiff 


C F 

.1 1355 Guernsey 
f 1864 Inverness 
f 1763. Jersey 
f 1763 London 
f 1763 MfKtMtor 


C F 
S 1763 
c 1559 
s 2170 
1 1968 
f 1783 



SunRifci Mm 
hi C F 


17 63 sunny 
IB 64 sunny 
22 72 ctou 3y 

19 66 sunny 

20 68 sunny 
20 68 sunny 



Sim Rain Max 

hre in C F 
WEST COAST 

Seay Me* 1.6 34 16 61 ram 

Newq ua y ZB 33 16 61 ran 

gfoh ce ntoa 4.0 31 17 63 rain 

Tenby 0.1 .4* 15 59 Mn 

CpfrrywBar 45 .02 17 63 brtf* 

Dongtos 7.0 .21 13 55 rain . 

ENGLAND AND WALES 
London 9.4 - 20 86 swwy 

B’hraaAhpt S5 51 18 64 rain 

Bmrtol 52 .09 17 83 rain 

CanfflflfCtn) 45 24 W 64 rah 

AntfMtv 55 .12 16 61 ram 

5*Po°f Airps 6.3 .02 IS @4 rain 

8.1 4B 17 63 rafo , 

nSKE. » 4 .- 8 8 St : 

Cnrtala 6.0 52 16 61 rein 

SCOTLAND . \ L 

Fstr O tf o m dr 2.4 - 15 50 . 

gra*»wlek 65 - 15 SB. bright „ 

OtoTO M - 17 63 Origin *- 

Wntaaa 6.7 - 17 63 sunny 

Abwttoen 6JJ jQI 16 61 ah0*W* / 

SL Andrews 9.4 - 19 86 sunny ■ 

E dfofe w gb JL3 - 16 61 sunny * * 




Abroad 


London 


YMtordty; Tamp: max 6 am to 6 pm. 20C 


_____ 1 iii 

S 33 Si Fw : S 53 S**? 11, 


Highest and lowest 


AMMa 

AxrelM 

AtortMa 

Algiers 

Amsfdnt 

Athens 

Bahrain 

tetrads* 

BarceJna 

Beirut 


-Isaas? 

S r^g“** 


Highest day tomcc 
. lowest day max: C 
‘ ^MT raWafl: — 
sunshine: Hems Bay. 



niiiinide* 

8 t&mtz 

Bonto’x 

BouTne 

Hninoli 


f S “tew 
S 27 8T Anew 
_ _ Geneva 
s 32 90 Gtattar 
c 21 TOHeMnld- 
f 29 84 Hong K 
® 85 77 tarabrek 
t 24 75 iatanfacd 
Jeddah 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 


b Aires- 
Cairo 

Cape Tn 
Cbfona 
Chicago* 


C F 

s 29 84 Cologne 
S 29 84 Sp££ 

Corfu 

S 31 68 SET 
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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


17 

SPORT 27 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 31 


SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 
1273.4 (+1.4) 

FT-SE 100 
1561.8 (+3.7) 

Bargains 

19101 

USM (Data stream) 
121.12 (-0.27) 

THE POUND 


Bid likely as 1 4% 
of RHM is sold 


US Dollar 
1.4850 (-0.0075) 

W German mark 

3.0925 (-0.0313) 

Trade-weighted 

71 .7 (-0.3) 


US buy 
for Lex 

Lex Service, the Volvo and 
electronic components distri- 
butor. yesterday announced it 
had invested more -than £9 
million in the US electronic 
Components industry, even 
though it can see no signs of 1 
any improvement in demand 
until next year. 

-1 Lex has paid SI 3.5 million 
(£9.1 million) Tor Richey/ 
Impact Electronics of Los 
Angeles which distributes 
connectors and other passive 
electronic components. 

In the six months to the end 
of June, Richey/Impact made 
trading profits of $243,000 
(£163.000) on sales of $19.5 
million (£13.1 million) com- 
pared with trading losses of 1 
$548,000 (£368.000). 

100% Yes 

The Management Group's 
agreed £6.6 million offer for 
Authority Investments, the 
banking and property com- 
pany, is unconditional follow- 
ing 100 per cent acceptances 
from the A ordinary 
shareholders representing 
72.56 per cent of the enlarged 
share capital. Dealings in the 
new shares and loan stock 
start on Monday. 

SIB attacked 

The Consumers Association 
yesterday said it was 
“appalled" that under the new 
rules proposed by the Securi- 
ties and Investment Board, 
pension plans couktbe sold by 
foot-in-lbe-door salesmen. It 
said if a ban on selling 
pensions by cold calling could 
not be achieved, it would 
campaign for an extension of 
the cooling-off period from 
the present 14 days. 

Canal battle 

■ Highams. the private com- 
pany making a £37 million 
hostile bid for the Manchester 
-Ship Canal Company, pro- 
educed its offer document yes- 
terday, offering shareholders 
■625p per ordinary share cash. 
fThe Manchester Ship Canal 
I’Company retaliated by bring- 
; jng forward its results to 
.'Monday. a week earlier than 
-usuaL 

Tempos, page 18 

Extel purchase 

ExteL the communications 
and publishing group, is buy- 
ing The Dealers Digest an 
.^American financial publishing 
^and database operation, for 
» $40 million (£27 million). 

* =: Tempos, page 18 

BAA transfer 

’The assets of the British 
Airports Authority were trans- 
ferred to BAA pic yesterday in 
preparation for privatization. 

Jt is expefcted that the whole of 
she share capital will be sold to 
the public during the first half 
of next year. 


By Cliff Feltham - 

A full-scale Takeover bid for 
Ranks Hovis McDougall, the 
Mothers Pride and Mr Kipling 
Cakes bakery group, looked 
imminent last night after a 
crucial 14.6 per cent stake in 
the business was bought by the 
Australian food producer 
Goodman Fielder. 

The shareholding had been 
picked up for £107 million 
from S & W Berisford. the 
commodity group, which has 
long been Lipped as a seller. 

The price put a value on the 
shares of about 258p.' They 
shot up 34p on the stock 
market to a new high for the 
year of 244p, valuing the 
group at just under £700 
million. 

The news appeared to take 
RHM by surprise. A spokes- 
man said: “Who are these 
people? We’ve never heard of 
them. Our first task is to find 
out something about them.” 

One analyst said: “ It looks 
certain the Australians will 
now make an offer. My best 



Sir Peter Reynolds: 
taken by surprise 

guess is that it will be around 
the 300p~a-share marie" 
Goodman Fielder is the 
product of a three-way merger 
in the Australian food In- 
dustry pul together earlier this 
year With considerable back- 
ing from Mr John Elliott’s 
agricultural and financial ser- 
vices group Elders IXL, which 
still retains a stake of about 14 
per cent 

The group has sales of about 
£500 million, ranging from. 


processing wheat to consumer 
products and is capitalized at 
about £506 million. 

RHM. headed by the chair- 
man Sir Peter Reynolds, 
earned profits of £71 million 
last year and analysts have 
been forecasting an outcome 
of about £80 million for this 
year. 

It is the largest British flour 
miller with 33 per cent of the 
market, one of two major 
bread bakers with a market 
share of 28 per cent, and has 
well known grocery brands 
such as Bisto. Cere bos, and 
Saxa. It operates about 350 
bakery shops, 50 shops and 
restaurants and 45 fish and 
chip shops. 

It also has a 70 per cent 
stake in Gerebos Pacific which 
produces and markets a range 
of grocery products in the Far 
East, Australia and New Zea- 
land, which would be of 
considerable interest to Good- 
man Fielder. 

A leading firm of Australian 
brokers said : * The prospects 
for expansion in that area are 


very limited at the moment so 
it would make a lot of sense 
for Goodman Fielder to go 
further afield. ' Ranks Hovis 
McDougall would offer a fine 
opportunity.” 

Mr Mark Simpson, of the 
London stockbroker Phillips 
'& Drew, said: “ Some of the 
Australian merchants are go- 
ing through a difficult time so 
they want to bolster earnings 
from elsewhere. It looks likely 
that a full bid win come — ana 
it could be around the 300p 
mark.” 

S and W Berisford has 
made a handsome profit of 
about £50 million on the sale 
of the shares, which it picked 
up when it acquired British 
Sugar four years ago. 

The company — itself the 
subject of competing offers 
from Tate and Lyle and the 
Italian group Ferruzzi now 
being examined bjr the 
Monopolies Commission — 
has been looking at ways of 
cutting its debt 

News of the share sale lifted 
its own shares 7p to 249p. 


Prudential adds Reeds Rains 
to its estate agency network 


Prudential Assurance, 
Britain's largest life company, 
yesterday announced the 
extension of its estate agency 
operations with the ac- 
quisition of Reeds Rains, the 
largest independent residen- 
tial agency in the North of 
England. . 

Reeds Rains has 54 offices 
from Cumbria through Lan- 
cashire to Derbyshire and 
Staffordshire. In the past 12 
months its 460 full and part- 
time staff has handled over 
10.000 residential property 
sales for a net value of more 
than £300 million. 

As with other Prudential 
estate agency purchases, no 
price is being put on the deal, 
which will be paid for partly in 
cash and partly by the issue of 


' By Alison Eadie 
£2.25 million worth of shares. 

The acquisition takes to 167 
the number of estate agency 
outlets owned by Prudential 
Property Services. The Pro’s 
six other agency purchases in 
the past year have been 
mainly in southern England. 

Its position as Britain's 
third largest estate agency 
remains unchanged, behind 
Hambro Countrywide (Mann 
and 9 Co and Bairstow Eves) 
with 7 around 380 outlets and 
Lloyds Bank’s Black Horse 
operation with about 240 
The Pro is on target to 
achieve its objective of a 
national network of 500 estate 
agency outlets by the end of 
next year. It hopes to have 
extended its network to 250 by 
the end of this year. 


Although it has not yet 
declared how much it has 
spent on buying agents, it has 
stated that it expected the cost 
of buying and developing a 
500-strong network could be 
£100 million to £2 00 million. 
Last May the Pro called on 
shareholders for £357 million 
in a rights issue, pan of which 
was earmarked for developing 
estate agency operations. 

The Pro is developing 
comprehensive range of estate 
agency services, including 
mortgages from various banks 
and building societies. 

It is also working on a 
“chain breaking facility” * A 
overcome the difficulties 
clients who are all set to move 
and suddenly lose their pur- 
chaser. . 


$200m FRN issue by 
Morgan Grenfell 

By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 
Morgan Grenfell, the raer- million was allocated to Mor- 


chant banking group, yes- 
terday announced the issue of 
$200 million of perpetual 
floating rate notes only a 
month after it raised £150 
million of new capital through 
a share issue. 

The clearing banks have 
been prolific issuers of per- 
petual FRNs, but Morgan 
Grenfell is only the third 
merchant bank to raise capital 
this way. 

The bank said that the 
proceeds will be used to back 
its merchant banking activ- 
ities. Mr David Ewart, group 
finance director, said: "Our 
ablility to take large positions 
and to help clients in mega- 
mergers will be substantially 
enhanced.” 

Of the share issue, £100 , 


gan Grenfell's growing securi- 
ties operations, but at the time 
the bank warned that further 
capital raising would be nec- 
essary. The bank ran into 
trouble with the Bank of 
England this year for taking 
very large positions on behalf 
of clients in the shares of target 
companies during takeover 
bids. 

The Bank introduced a role 
that banks could only take on 
shares during bid battles 
worth up to 25 per cent of 
their capital base, it is tighten- 
ing up rules on Large lending 
exposures to individual clients 

The FRN issue will raise 
Morgan Grenfell's banking 
capital to more than £400 
million. 



Woman chief 
for Hanson 

Mrs Yve Newbold, above, has 
been named company sec- 
retary of Hanson Trust from 
September 1. Mrs Newbold, 
aged 45 and now with a firm of 
City solicitors, will be the 
highest ranking woman at the 
company. She formerly 
worked for IBM, Walt Disney 
Productions and Rank Xerox. 


Pergamon 
heads for 
new role 

By Teresa Poole 

Mr Robert Maxwell’s pri- 
vate company Pergamon yes- 
terday moved doser to 
becoming an investment bold- 
ing company with the 
announcement that Hollis, the 
educational supplies and tim- 
ber company which it con- 
trols, proposes to buy a 
number of Pergamon busi- 
nesses for £30 million. 

The provide goods and 
services to the professions, 
financial services sectors, gov- 
ernment oiganizations and 
industry. 

The package includes Aber- 
deen University El Arnold & 
Son, the stationer and educa- 
tional supplier, and Bum pus 
Haldane & Maxwell, the li- 
brary supplier. On a pro forma 
basis, the companies made 
pretax profits of £4.4 million 
in 1985. 

Pergamon will be left with 
its newspaper interests, 
induding the Daily Mirror, 
the Pergamon scientific and 
technical books business, the 
cable and satellite television 
interests, and various share 
holdings, including the 75 per 
cent stake in British Printing 
and Communications 
Corporation. In March, BPCC 
bought' Pergamon's magazines 



A harassed Frankfurt foreran exchange dealer raping with 
the dollar’s fall yesterday. 

Miserable week for 
pound and dollar 


and journals business for £239 
million. 

It is still Mr Maxwell’s' 
stated aim to float off Mirror 
Group Newspapers but this is 
unlikely to happen for at least 
18 months. 

Yesterday’s deal, which 
needs shareholders' approval, 
will raise Pergamon’s voting 
stake in Hollis from 77.5 per 
cent to almost 82 per cent 
Hollis, at last week’s suspen- 
sion price of65p. is capitalized 
at £45.6 million. 


Both the pound and the 
dollar came under renewed 
selling pressare on foreign 
exchange markets late yes- 
terday to complete a miserable 
week for the two currencies. 

Early Emopean speculation 
against the dollar, news of a 
fall in the US unemployment 
rate to 6.9 per cent and a 0-3 
per cent advance in the de- 
layed leading indicators re- 
vived the weak US currency, 
but not for long. 

In New York late, the 
dollar fell to a record low of 
DM2.0870 hot ended above its 
worst against the yen at Y154. 
Over the week, the dollar has 
lost more than 4 yen and 6 
pfennigs. 

Sterling's late weakness In 


London cat the Bank of 
England's sterling Index from 
724) to 71.7, down 1.7 on the 
week, despite the fell in the 
dollar. Selling then continued 
in New York as dealers re- 
sponded to a remark by Dr 
Mana Saeed Otaiba, the 
United Arab Emirates oil 
minister, that Opec was still 
far from agreement The 
pound dosed in New York at 
just $1.4775, down from 
$14915 opening in London. 

The Opec conference in 
Geneva will continue today 
after fire days of negotiations. 
A stopgap sofetion still looked 
the likeliest outcome yes- 
today, after members had 
offered about 2 million barrels 
per day in voluntary cuts. 


Cautious 
welcome 
for new 
MFA 

By Onr City Staff 

Negotiators from 54 nations 
reed yesterday on an 
amended multifibre arrange- 
ment (MFA) which will run 
[ for five years, the third exten- 
sion since the measure was 
introduced in 1974. 

Despite prolonged oppo- 
sition from . China, the US 
succeeded in having the 
“new” natural fibre ramie 
covered by the MFA. but did 
not maintain its original de- 
mand that silk be included. 

The original surge (of im- 
ports) clause has been re- 
placed by a procedure 
permitting importing nations 
to apply restrictions selec- 
tively following consultations 
with the exporting country. 
More specific data will be 
required as justification for 
restrictions, including the 
state of the importer’s domes- 
tic industry. 

In Britain, the British Tex- 
tile Confederation , gave a 
cautious welcome to the 
MFA’s renewal but said the 
European Economic Commu- 
nity must now stick to hs 
negotiating mandate in draw- 
ing up the bilaterai agreements 
with individual countries. 

Under the new agreement, 
more liberal conditions will be 
offered to Third World ex- 
porters who open their mar- 
kets to industrialized nations' 
textile and garment exports. 
Special consideration will be 
accorded new and small 
exporters. The new MFA also 
includes, at the EEC's request, 
an injunction against copying 
styles, models and designs. 

Not covered by the new 
protocol are jute, sisal, coir 
and similar fibres “traded in 
significant quantities before 
1982” and used in sacking, 
mats, carpets and luggage. 

While no specific period is 
mentioned, a new clause, pro- 
posed by developing country 
producers, says the MFA 
should be “ultimately phased 
out”. 

The MFA applies to about 
half of the $100 billion (£67 
billion) annual trade in tex- 
tiles and dothin^ induding 


T h • a m /r • i • j > ii J$I5 billion of imports by 

Priest Marians bid talks 


By Judith Huntley, Commercial Property Correspondent 
Friendly talks are under primarily cadi offer of 240%p 


way which could lead to Priest 
Marians, the property com- 
pany, bidding for Lincroft 
Kilgour, the Savile Row tailor 
and investment company. 

Priest Marians has bought 
the 26.48 per cent stake in 
Lincroft held by Mr Jeffrey 
Steiner, the American arbitra- 
geur, for £2.94 million. Mr 
Steiner resigned from the 
Lincroft board yesterday on 
the announcement 

If the talks succeed, the 
property company will make a 


a share for the textile company 
in September. Lincroft’s direc- 
tors and family interests speak 
for 37.95 per cent of the 
. company. 

Priest Marians is placing 
550.000 new shares at lOp 
each with Laurence Prust the 
stockbroker, to raise £121 
million. 

It is interested in buying 
Uncroft for a high-quality 
income stream which will be 
useful to offset the cyclical 
nature of profits from prop- 
erty development 


irdWorid sources. 

The US negotiators were 
under extreme pressure to 
achieve. an accord before Au- 
gust 6 when the House of 
Representatives will- again 
vote on the Jenkins Bill 
calling for drastic reductions 
in imports of Hurd World 
textiles. 

The vote, which needs a 
two-thirds majority to over- 
turn the Presidential veto, is 
expected , to be very close. 
Textile imports into the US 
are growing at 17 per cent a 
year and the industry is win- 
ning support for protectionist 
measures. 


Broad Street 
takeover 

Broad Street Associates, a 
private company which pro- 
vides corporate and financial 
public relations and advertis- 
ing advice and services, is 
being reversed into Stanelco. 

The price agreed is 1,562 
ordinary and 184 deferred 
Stanelco shares for 10.885 
Broad Street shares, based on 


SEE. IS 

Wall Street 18 
19 

Stock Market 19 
Money Mrkts 19 

Fordga E w* 19 
Traded Opto 19 
Unit Trams 20 
Cmnmedities 20 
USM Prices 20 
Starr Pres 21 

a forecast of net pretax profits 
for Broad Street of not less 
than £850.000. Stanelco made 
an operating loss of £1 1 1.160 
for the year to February 28. 

| MARKET SUMMARY 

STOCK MARKETS 

MAIN PRICE CHANGES 

New York 

{tow Jones 1763.64 (-11.677 

Nikkei Dow ~. 17321.33 (-187.78) 

Hong Kong: 

Hang Swig 1874^1 I+ 18 ;. 6 ®) 

. Amsterdam: Gen 284.6 (+0.8) 

' Sydney: AO 1124.9 (+1.4) 

Frankfurt: 

Commerzbank 1825.1 (-16.9) 

■ Brussels: 

General 836.67 (+10.09) 

Paris: CAC ... 378.9 (+0.4) 

"Zurich: 

RISES: 

Wiggins — 154p(+11p> 

Burgess- .._ .246p(+16pj 

WM Cook - 220p <+20p) 

Hahna - — .288p(+13p) 

Bowthorpe 535p(+20p) 

Orptoma 205p (+12pj 

J A Devenrsfi . — .. . 221p(+14p) 

Freemans -. .... 430p (+10p) 

Nu Swift - — — 180p (+I2p) 

Cable & Wireless 663p(+10p) 

ParktiekJ S45p(+15p) 

Authority Inv 355p (+15p) 

W M Hansom 355p (+25p) 

T Wamnqtin 80p(+11p) 

. London dosing prices Page SI 

Press Toots 136p (+I2p) 

Youngs Brew 310p (+25p| 

M L Holdings 400p (+9p) 

Blue Circle 576p <+8p) 

INTEREST RATES 

• London: 

- sank Bass 10% 

3-month Interbank 
'• 3-month etigiWe 

■ buying rate 

Prime Hate 8% 

■ federal Funds 

. 3-momh Treasury Bias 5.76-5.75'?'® 
30-year bonds 97 ’'k- ,j m 

Scapa Group 498p (+Bpj 

FALLS: 

Lucas 523p (-8p) 

GOLD 

London Firing: 

AM S360.S0 pm-5361.00 
dose S362.00-362J0 (£244.00- 
244.50) 

Hew YoHc 

Comes S360.60-361.10 

CURRENCIES 

London: New York: 

£: 51.4850 £51.4775 

. : £.- DM3.0925 S: DM2.0855 

£: SwFt 2.4S22 $: Index: 1112 

£ FFr10.0535 

• £ Yen228.54 ECU EO. 660270 

& lndex;71 .7 SDR £0.807588 

NORTH SEA OIL 

Brent (Sept) S9.82 M»(S9 70) 


Ex-USM glamour firm 
calls in the receivers 


By Our City Staff 


Metal Sciences, which was 
oversubscribed 108 times 
when it came to the Unlisted 
Securities Market three years 
ago. has suspended dealings in 
its shares and called in the 
receivers. 

The shares were hailed at 
6 (< 3p valuing the business at 
around £ 1.3 million compared 
with the ofler-for-sale price of 
Up and a peak of 37'';p_ 

Metal Sciences was floated 
by London Venture Capital 
Market, the issuing house, and 
at one time was headed by Sir 
Monty Flnniston, the former 
British Steel chairman. 

The company, which of- 
fered a process for turning 


scrap into shot-blasting grit, 
last year turned in a loss of 
£535.000 and reported in the 
opening half of the current 
year that it was £259,000 in 
the red. 

A private company called 
the John Delaney Group came 
in with a refinancing package 
at the end of last year after 
Metal Sciences said it was 
running out of cash because 
the production process had 
taken much longer to develop 
than had been expected. 

• MY Holdings, the sports 
equipment group, is buying 
Sharp and Cathedral, the vac- 
uum-formed packaging 
maker, for £4. 1 million. 


Trafalgar’s 

French 

connection 

Trafalgar House is setting 
up a joint company with 
Bouygues, France's largest 
construction company, to 
work on projects relating to 
water supply and sewage treat- 
ment The link-up aims to 
exploit the worldwide demand 
for water treatment and sew- 
erage plants. 

The 50-50 joint company. 
Cementation Saur Water 
Developments, will be formed 
in Britain. Trafalgar House 
and Bouygues also plan to 
cooperate on other types of 
international construction 
projects. Nearly half 
Trafalgar's £1.2 billion 
construction order book is for 
overseas work. 


Holmes a Court report adds 
to Standard bank confusion 


The confusion surrounding 
the future of Standard Char- 
tered Bank deepened yes- 
terday with reports that Mr 
Robert Holmes a Court, the 
Australian businessman, in- 
tended doubling his stake in 
the bank to 16 per cent. 
Despite the news. Standard's 
shares hardly moved during 
the day, rising 2p to 724p. 

In an interview with an 
Australian newspaper. Mr 
Holmes & Court is reported to 
have said that he was likely to 
increase bis holding from the8 
per cent level reached two 
weeks ago. 

Doubling his holding would 
cost around £90 million. It 


By Our Banking Correspondent 
would bring him slightly above the 


the 15 per cent stake held by 
Sir Yue-Kong Pao, the Hong 
Kong entrepreneur. 

It would also bring his 
holdings under the dose scru- 
tiny of the Bank of England 
which must formally be in- 
formed of any shareholdings 
above 15 per cent in a British 
bank. In practice the Bank 
lakes a dose interest in the 
suitability or bank sharehold- 
ers at an earlier stage. 

Mr Holmes a Court was 
also reported as saying that he 
was opposed to any plan to 
split Standard since it would 
make it more vulnerable to 
takeovers. This is contrary to 


policy believed to be 
favoured by Sir Yue-Kong of 
floating off key parts of the 
bank to maximize its value. 

Both shareholders, who 
played a cnidal role in fending 
off Lloyds Bank's bid for 
Standard, currently face largo 
paper losses on their holdings. 

Banking analysts in the City 
still believe there is a strong 
possibDity that Mr Holmes a 

Court will sell his stake on to 
Westpac. the Australian bank.- 
At the same time. Sir Yoe- 
Kcnq's family confirmed yes- 
terday that he had been 
offered a seat on the Standard 
board bnt did not say whether 
he had accepted. 



Europe-go 
for the encore. 

Following spectacular growth in 1985 
European markets have consolidated in the 
first half of this year. Many financial advisers 
are looking again towards Europe for dynamic 
growth. 

The Oppenheimer 
European Growth Trust 

aims to capitalise on the obvious benefits of 
low interest rates, low inflation, dramatically 
reduced energy costs and the general climate 
of political stability. European markets are still 
relatively cheap. 

In addition to the healthy outlook for 
stockmarkets clients will benefit further if the 
pound continues to weaken against , major 
European currencies, for example the Swiss 
Franc has appreciated 15% against sterling so 
far this year. 

Oppenheimer was one of the first to forecast 
the major European potential in late 1984. 
Our European fund was the top performing 
of all authorised unit trusts in 1985 and is 
currently up 59-9% over the 12 months to 
1st July. 

For a copy of our latest Euro-] 
pean brochure call 01-489 1078 
or write to Oppenheimer at ^ 

66 Cannon St, London EC4N 6AE. 

A umber eoriuaqr (rfM Mamie HnseQme. 





c 












\ 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1 986 


* * * * 


WALL STREET 


Late decline for Dow 


New York (AP-Dow Jones) - 
Shore prices slipped hi dull 
trading yesterday. Some fu- 
tures-related selling pro- 
grammes and an apparent 
reluctance to hold stocks into 
the weekend accelerated the 
declines late in the day. 

’ “People jnst seemed to want 
to lighten their positions going 
into the weekend," Mr Rich- 
ard Roslnnd, a block trader at 


. Kidder Peabody & Co, said. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average fell 11.67 to 1,763.64 
after spending all but the final 
3® annates of trading boraring 
near Thnrsday's dosing level. 
For the week, the index lost 46 
points, or 26 per cart. 
Yesterday's decline took the 
index to its lowest level since 
May 19, when it bottomed at 
1,758.18. 


Dragonair loses battle 
for UK routes licence 


TEMPUS 


Aug Jui 

1 31 


Aug 1 Jui 

1 31 


Aug Juf 
V 31 


AMR SIM 

ASA 31% 

ADM Signal 39% 
Ailed Sirs asm 
AD eCMmrs 3» 
Alcoa 33% 
Amaxlnc 11% 
Am'ida HS 17% 
Am Brands 92% 
Am Can SIM 
Am Cyran'd 79% 
Am BPwr 29% 
Am Express 58% 
Am Home 87% 
Am Motors 3% 
Am Sinrt 37 
AmTetepti 23% 
Amoco 57% 
ArmcoSwel 6% 
Asarco 11% 
Ashland 01 55% 

At Richfield 45% 
Awn Prods 33% 
BkrsTst MY 47 
Banhamer 12% 
ShoiBston 36% 
Bank ol NY 63% 
Beth Steel 7 
Booing 50% 
BseCascde 53% 
Brdan 48% 

Bg Warner 33% 
BnstMysre 80% 
BP 34% 

Burl'nnlnd 35 
Bud'ton Wn 48% 
Burroughs 65% 
CmptwflSp 62% 
Can Pacific 10% 
Caterjxler 45% 
Catanese 210% 
Central SW 34% 
Champion 23% 
Chase Man 37 
Chm BkNY 43% 
Chevron 38% 
Chrysler 35% 


Rrestone 
Pst Chicago 


FstlntBncp 

PsiPetmC 

Fort 

FTWacftva 
GAP Carp 
GTE Carp 
Gan Corp 
GenOy'mce 
GsnSectric 
Gen Inst 
Gen MBs 
Gen Motore 
GnPhUtny 
Ganasco 
Georgia Pac 


Pftnsr 67% 
PhetpsOge 16% 
PhOto Mrs 70% 
PtlMpsFW 8% 
Pohrold 82% 
PPG bid 60% 
PrctrGntt 77% 
PbSEAG 42% 
Raytheon 89% 
RCA Gore 


Corp n/a 
RynktoMet 40% 
RockwoK Int 40% 
Royal IXBch 79 
Safoways 65% 
Sara Lee 89 
SFESapac 29% 
ScWborger 28% 
Scott Paper S7% 
Seagram 57% 
Sears RUck 43% 
Stm Trans 47% 
Singer 51 

SnwMnBk 90% 


Dragonair, the fledgeling 
Hong Kong airline funded by 
Sir Y.ue-Kong Pao, the ship- 
ping tycoon, will not be al- 
lowed to fly to London. 

The decision by the Air 
Transport licensing Author- 
ity (Atla) is a blow to Mr 
Stephen Miller, Diagonal's 

general manager, who had 
Fought intense opposition 
from Cathay Pacific and Brit- 
ish Caledonian. 

The tiny airline, which has 
only one Boeing 737, had 
fought a David and Goliath 
against its big rivals to 


From Stephen Leather, Hong Kong 

S fly two routes to Europe: a e 
y direct Hong Kong to London tl 
>- route with a stopover iu New li 
I- Delhi, and a Hong Kong-New a 
Delhi-Amsterdam-Manches- 
r ter service. 


GouMInc 

Grace 

QAtt&TUC 

GrTwd 

GrwnanCor 

GuH&wan 

Heinz HJ. 

Hercules 

HTetWfad 


Dragonair had earlier been 
told it would not be flying the 
Amsterdam and Manchester 
routes and yesterday Mr 
Miller was told he wfll not be 
allowed to fly to London. 

The four-page Atla judg- 
ment says Dragonair is “sml 
very much an airline totally 
inexperienced in long-haul op- . 


eraiions. Understandably, as 
they do not hold any relevant 
licences, they do not yet have 
any long-haul operations. 

“As no traffic rights are 
available in Manchester, it 
will be some time before 
Dragonair can start flying the 
Amsierdam-Manchester , 
routes, if at alL" 


Property assets key 
to Highams bid 


• The US Transportation 
Department has approved the 
merger of Northwest and 
Republic airlines, a move that ; 
will create America's third! 
largest commercial airline, i 


COMPANY NEWS 


• PCT GROUP: Results for 
1985. Total dividend 3J2p 
(3.2p). Turnover £16.2 million 
(£8.39 million). Pretax loss 
£666.000 (profit £501.000). Loss 


per share lO.lp (earnings 8Jp). 
• LONDON A SCOTTISH 


Sony 18% 

St) Cal Ed 34% 


1 Sperry Corp 75% 
SKIM Ohio 40% 


Honmwrt 
1C Ms 


Swung Dra 49% 
Stevens JF 32% 
Sun Comp 48% 
Tatedyno 307% 
Tarawa) 37% 
Taxaco 29 
Texas £ Cor 25 
Texas lost 109% 
Texas IWs 33% 
Textron 52 
TravIrsCor 43% 
TRW Inc 96 
UAL Inc 52% 
UnienrNV 209% 
UnCartiide 22 
UnPacCor SiK 
UtdBreiXfS 28 
USSM n/a 
utdTectmol . 40% 
Unocal 16 
Jim Walter 42% 
i WmerLmM 58% 


CterX Equip 16% 

Coca Cota 38% 

Colgate Sfc'A 

CBS 127% 

CWtWraGas 39 


• LONDON A SCOTTISH 
MARINE OIL: Agreement has 
been readied for tire sale to 
DSM Energk: of Lasmo’s 
exploration and production in- 
terests in the Netherlands. The 
price is $22 million (£14.7 
million) in cash. 

• ASPREY: Year to March 31. 
Total dividend lOp (6.66p). 
Turnover £51.82 million 
(£29.19 million). Pretax profit 


£10.92 milli on (£7.57 mi] lion). 
Earnings per share 3 3-07 p 


ings per 
(23.340). The board reports that 
the financial position has 


Wads Fargo 99% 
, WsWue B 54% 
wayfiftrser 32% 
Whtfpool 87% 
WOOhronh 42% 
Xerox Corp 53 

20nltfl 22% 


Cmfc'tn Eng 28K 
ComwtthECI 30% 
Cons Edts 49% 
Cn Nat Gas 28% 
Cons Power 11% 
Cran Data 20% 
CormngGI 59% 
CPC inn 69 
Crane 29% 
Cm Zeller 37% 
DartS Kraft S9% 
.Deere 22 
Delta Air 42% 
Detroit Ed 16% 
Digital Eq 86% 
.Daw 47% 
.Dow Cham 53% 
.Dresser ind 15% 
.Di*s Power 48% 
DuPont 75% 
Eastern Air 8% 
-Earn Kodak 56% 
•Eaton Corp 84% 
Emerson B 79% 
-Exxon Corp 60% 
• FadDptSts 80% 
• Lid* « token eb 


CANADIAN PRICES 

AMtH n/a 22% 


AMU n/a 
Men Alum n/a 
AlgomaSfl n/a 
Can Pacific n/a 
Comlnco n/a 
ConBathret n/a 
Kfcr/StiCan n/a 
HdsnBMn n/a 
bnasco n/a 
Imperial Ofl n/a 
In Pipe n/a 
Mass-Ferg n/a 
RyiTruatco n/a 
Seagram n/a 
SunTco n/a 
ThrenN'A' n/a 
Wlkr Hiram n/a 
WCT n/a 
Mchsritirndeirui 


Cardiff Property soars 


continued to strengthen, with 
shareholders' funds up from 
£36.2 million to £39.4 mini on. 

• HILL SAMUEL GROUP: 
Hill Samuel Investment 
Management Group is to ao 
quire Travelers Corporation's 
50 per cent interest in Travelers 
Hill Samuel International, an 
equally-owned international 
investment adviser to US in- 
stitutions. The venture is being 
dissolved because of changes in 
the long-term strategic objec- 
tives of both parents. 

• HUNTING PETROLEUM 
SERVICES: A subsidiary. 
Hunting Oilfield Services, has 
bought Big Inch Marine Sys- 
tems, an offshoot of the 
Heerema Group, for S 800.000 
(£536,000) in cash. The business 
of Big Inch is to engineer and 
manufacture connector 
components. 

• JEBSENS DRILLING: Six 
months to June 30. No divi- 
dend. Turnover £83 million 
(£193 million). Pretax loss 
£11.3 million (£8.8 million). 


Loss per share 39.8p (32.2p). 

• A A M GROUP: Dividend 
0.4p (same) for the year to Jan. 
31. Turnover £4.45 million 
(£3.35 million). Pretax profit 
£642,792 (£838.851). Earnings 
per share 0L75p (1.41p), 

• MIDSUMMER INNS: The 
company has bought Good 
Time Liquor Co for £100,000 in 
shares. In addition, it will 
assume Good Time's indebted- 
ness of about £237,000. Good 


Cardiff Property more than 
doubled its pretax profits from 
£4.87 million to £12.3 million 
on ordinary activities in the 
half year to March 31. 

The interim dividend is 
unchaged at 3 per cent. 

Demolition and building 


work at its White House 
development in High Street, 
Egham, Surrey, is expected to 
be completed next summer. 
The finished project will com- 
prise 6,000 sq ft of ground 


pnse b,uuu sq it ot ground 
floor retail shopping space and 
6.000 sq ft of fust floor offices. 


Time operates a puubc bouse m 
Standish, Lancashire. Mid- 
summer has also acquired an- 
other two Lancashire pubbe 
bouses — the Rani's Head Hand, 
Tarieton, and Rosie CFGrady's 
Good Time Emporium, 
Westhoughton — for £163.000 in 
cash. 

• KWDK-FTT (TYRES A EX- 
HAUSTS): The company has 
sold a substantial pan of its 
investment property portfolio to 
Chigwdl Properties for £6.25 
million in cash. Kwik-Fit will 
also be entitled to further 
payments. 

• IRISH SUGAR: Six months 
to March 3L Pretax profit 
Irfl.67 million (£1.58 million), 
against Ir£539,000. Sales 
Ir£93.1 1 million (M99.77 mil- 
lion). The year's results are 
expected to show an improve- 
ment on last time. 

• PEARSON: Following the 
decision to restructure Ftirey 
Holdings — the engineering 
sector of Pearson — Fairey 
Marine of Cowes, Isle of Wight, 
has been sold to Marmteknik 
International of Hong Kong for 
£455,000 cash. 

• DRAYTON FAR EASTERN 
TRUST: Six months to June 3a 
Interim dividend 0.4p (same). 
Pretax revenue £66,300 
(£132,700). Earnings per share 
0-24p (0.47p). 

• DRAYTON JAPAN 
TRUST: Six months to June 3a 
No interim dividend (nil), but 
the directors expect that a small 
final will be paid (lp last time). 
Pretax revenue £220,300 
(£27,400). Earnings per share 
0.47p (loss 0.26 p). 

• JSD COMPUTER GROUP: 
Hestair's offer has been ac- 
cepted for 5-25 million shares 
(96J5 per cent). It will remain 
open until further notice, but the 
cash alternative has dosed. 

• HAWKER SIDDELEY 

CANADA: First half of 1986. 
Pretax income Can$16.5 mil- 
lion (£8 million), against 
CanS 1 5. 1 5 million. Sales 
CanS2 15.72 million 

(CanS 190.93 million). 

• COMMERCIAL RANK OF 
WALES: Pretax profit for the 
year to June 30 £1.05 mlDioa 
(£963,000). Earnings per share 
2.57p (2.93pX 


Film Cooling Towers: Mr RJ 
Clark has become marketing 
director; Mr JD Stevens re- 
search and development 
director; Mr SI Thatcher 
projects director and Mr GW 
Ward engineering . design 
director. 

Matthew Garik & Sons 
(Holdings): Mr PD Kelley has 
been nude a non-executive 
director. 

UDO Holdings: Mr Robot 
Flasbman has been appointed 
a director. 

John Laing: Prince Michael 
of Kent has joined the board as 
a non-executive director. 

DCE Group: Dr Clive 
Smith has been made tech- 
nical director. 

Coline International: Mr 


Tan Brookes has become dep- 
uty chief executive and fi- 
nance director. 

VFP Fluid Power Mr Rich- 
ard Jasmslri has been ap- 
pointed managing director. 

Unread: Mr John Disney 
has been made managing 
director, commercial products 
division. 

Airoil Flaiegas: Mr Andrew 
Firmston- Williams has joined 
the board. 

MDA Management Mr 
Tony WarraH has become a 
director and Mr Brian 
Rowirtree and Mr Mkhad 
Horton are made senior 
executives. 

Bridon: Mr Anthony CR 
Elliott has been appointed a 
non-executive director. 

Spicer and Peglen Mir Ingle 
Dawson, Mr Edgar Harvey 
and Mr Godfrey Ainsworth 
have been admitted as 
partners. 

£ Thomas & Company: Mr 
Jerry Armstrong Taylor has 
joined the board. 

Cray Electronics Holdings: 
Mr DSTrndgill has joined the 
board and additionally be- 
comes managing director of 
Cray Instruments and Control 
Division. 


Highams' £37 million bid for 
control of the Manchester 
Ship Canal Company is the 
first contested bid to take 
over a statutory authority 
that even long City memories 
can recall. 

The attractions Tor 
Highams, the privately- 
owned company of Mr John 
Whittaker, the chairman of 
Peel Holdings, the developer 
of retail warehouses, are 
Manchester Ship’s property 
assets. These were last valued 
at £30.8 million. The plum in 
the portfolio is the 300-acre 
Barton site — only four miles 
from Manchester’s city centre 
— which would have tremen- 
dous potential as retail space. 

Highams' attempts to wrest 
control of the Manchester 
Ship Canal Company from its 
present board have been 
complicated by the strange 
nature of the shareholdings as 
well as by the fact that the 
company still has statutory 
obligations to fulfil. 

Of the 21 -strong board, 1 1 
are members of the Labour- 
controlled Manchester City 
Cbundl which is opposed to 
the idea of entrepreneurial 
property developers 
capitalizing on the assets of a 
largely moribund industry. 
And they will object to the 
idea of developing a £100 
million out-of-town shopping 


down thro 
to take its 


to take its 625p-a-soare casn 
offer. Most of the institu- 
tional shareholders have al- 
ready sold their shares. 

It is no coincidence that 
Manchester Ship's results 


have been brought forward a 
week and will appear on 


week and will appear on 
Monday. The board is 
continuing to tell sharehold- 
ers to resist the bid outlined 
in Highams' offer document 
which went out yesterday. 

It is likely that there will 
another revaluation of the 
property portfolio, designed 
to boost Manchester Ship’s 
asset value in an attempt to 
thwart the Highams' bid — or 
at least force it to raise it 


influence a further 5 per cent 

With turnover of $8.8 mil- 
lion and profit before tax of 
$2 i million in the first 10 
months of the current year to 
August 31, the Dealers Digest 
will make a significant im- 
pact on Extcl. 

The company remains in a 
net cash position and is well 
placed to make further 
acqusitions. but it- will prob- 
abJv take it a good few 
months to absorb this one. 

Cookson Group 


Extel 


centre so close to the city. But 
they hold no shares in Man- 
chester Ship. 

Highams had been grad- 
ually increasing its voting 
and non-voting 

shareholdings in the com- 
pany until it reached a point 
where a bid was automati- 
cally triggered. The com- 
plicated structure of 
Manchester Ship means that 
Highams has. bad to reduce 
its shareholding to 48.48 per 
cent at the request of- the 
Takeover PaneL If sold its 
surplus shares yesterday at 
28 lp. 

Its bid win go through once 
it has 50 per cent of the 
company. But this will only 
give it about 31 per cent of 
the votes. The Takeover 
Panel has undertakings from, 
Highams that it will break 
down its shareholding 
through nominees to obtain a 
majority of the voting rights 
once it has a majority 
shareholding. 

Highams has to convince 
smallshareholders — many of 
them local families whose 
shares have been handed 


Extel has not let the grass 
glow under its feet since 
seeing off the unwanted £170 
million bid from Demerger 
Corporation, but any sugges- 
tion that its moves since 
April have been defensive are 
roundly rejected. 

Following the purchase of 
CRE Barber and CFE 
Publishing and the sale of 
Royds Advertising, came 
yesterday's news of an ex- 
pected large acqusition in the 
United States. Ai £40 million 
(£27 million) the Dealers 
Digest, a financial publishing 
and database operation, is the 
biggest acquisition yet made 
by Extel. 

The Dealers Digest is a 
private company and is being 
paid for by a vendor placing 
of 7.9 million shares at 330p 
to raise $38.5 million. The 
remaining $1.5 million will 
be paid in non-interest bear- 


ing notes in three years. 

The vendors are retaining 
1.6 million shares and 6.3 
million have been con- 
ditionally placed with 
institutions. 

Ordinary shareholders of 
Extel, including Mr Robert 
Maxwell, will be able to apply 
for the new shares, also at 
330p, on a one-for-seven 
basis. The price looks quite a 
snip compared with 
Demerger’s 400p cash bid 
and the price at which Mr 
Maxwell was most recently 
buying. 

Last month Mr Maxwell 
succeeded in blocking a rou- 
tine move by the board to 
obtain shareholders' ap- 
proval to issue new shares. 
Mr Maxwell has a 13.8 per 
cent stake and appears to 


Cookson Group, the metals, 
industrial chemicals and 
ceramics group, continues to 
look for new acquisitions as 
part of its policy of finding 
industrial niches in which n 
can seize market leadership. 
But it still has problems in 
electronics. 

The sector is only tottering 
out of a counter-cyclical 
trough, although the effects of 
that on profitability are being 
more than offset by strong 
trading improvements, 
particularly in tin. 

This is the picture emerg- 
ing as Cookson. operating on 
a calendar year, moves into 
its second half with analysis 
looking for a full-year pretax 
profits improvement of about 
25 per cent or £85 million. 

That compares with £67.6 
million, up 27 per cent, last 
time. 

Cookson, after a rapid 
series of acquisitions, has 
about 60 businesses, with 35 
per cent or more of its 
activities in the United 
States, about 25 per cent in 
Britain and as much again in 
the rest of Europe. It is 
looking mostly east to India 
and the Pacific rim for more 
growth. 

The electronics sector 
downturn bit profits in the 
latter part of 1985. There has 
been some improvement this 
year but a marked recovery 
now looks likely in 1987. The 
company emphasizes that 
there have not been losses in 
electronics but reduced 
profitability. 

Titanium dioxide, used to 
whiten paint, plastics and 
paper, is a sector of strong 
growth where profit margins 
are good and tin will be a 
boost, not only because prices 
have dropped, but because 
Cookson will profit from the 
new freedom to strike 
advantageous deals directly 
with producers. 


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STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Share prices stagnate after 
nerves grip investors 


By Michael Clark. 


Investors decided that dis- 
cretion was the better part of 
valour yesterday and witb- 
Idrew to the sidelines, awaiting, 
the outcome of a number of 
worries troubling, the market 
J The renewed pressure for 
sanctions against South Africa 
before this weekend’s 
of Commonwealth heads 
government, the oil crisis and 
political and economic un- 
certainty have all left their 

maiic on share prices over the 

past few weeks. 

The result has been that 
prices have staggered firom 
one .crisis, to another while 
looking for a kad. This has 
proved too much for some of. 
the bigger fond managers who; 

• IQeinwortGrievesoB, 
the broker, expects Norton 
Opax, the printing anl pa- 
per group, to refcrancn its bid 
for its larger rival, 
McCorqoodaJe, in October— 
if given the alt-dear by the 
Monopolies Commission. 
Kfemwort is convinced that 
the shares are worth nearer 
l60p — compared with 
yesterday's dose of 138p — 
and rates the shares a boy. 

have decided to wait for a 
dearer picture before commit- 
ting any more of their funds. 

Turnover was down to a 
trickle yesterday and share 
prices were left to then own 
devices. The FT index of 30 
shares rose, fey 1.4 points to 
1.273.4, while the broader- 
based FT-SE 100 index edged 
forward by 3.7 points to 
1,561-8- 

Gilts suffered losses stretch- 
ing to ££, affected by the 
renewed pressure on sterling 
on the foreign exchange mar- 
ket in the free of the continu- 
ing oil crisis. - . 

However, relief could be at 
hand. Several - leading stock- 
brokers are again forecasting a 


half-point cut in bank base 
rates this month, or early next 
But -the Government is un- 
likely to make any move until 
after the next set of money 
supply figures. 

Attempts ip place up to 4 
million shares <7 -per cent) in 
International Leisure, the 
package tour group, af 1 18p 
each ended in failure when, 
they were withdrawn because 
of poor conditions in the 
market. 

The bulk of the shares 
belonged to Mr Hany Good- 
man, the ' chairman, who 
owned 11.7 million shares at 
the last count, amountmg to 
23 - per cent of the totaL The 
rest were divided between 
various directors. The. last 
share sale by directors was. 
over a year ago. International 
Leisure lost 5p at 1 20p. ■ 

Ranks Haris McDoagaO, 
the food manufacturer, leapt 
34p to equal the year’s high of 
244p as it entered that Mr 
John Elliott, chairman of EL 
ders DCL, the Australian brew- 
ery, was involved in the sale of 
S & W BerisfonTs 14.6 per 
cent stake to a little-known 
Australian food group, Good- 
man Fielder, for £107 million. 

The 4133 million shares 
were sold outside the market 
at about 258p a share — 
leaving a lot of disgruntled 
jobbers and brokers scurrying 


Him 

SHARE PRICE 

hMfica* rebased 
Janl -KW i .. . 

'SCUfCftfllMH Itrteftl 



JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG 


EQUITIES 

Secs 
(1 

BBS besign 
Braverco (145p} 
Bipe! 37 1-(2p) 
Borland (125p) 
Bredaro (I45p) 
Ctwtsaa Man (125p) 
Coatod Bectrodes 
Evans HaBsftmv (1 
Batcher Dennys 
GT Management 
Guthrie Coro (1~ 
Harrison [(150pj 


142+1 

202-2 

70 

150 

42'z 

145-2 

150 

128 

90 

117 

74+1 

203 

155 

157 


about the mariretphre after 
the news broke. 

JBerisford inherited its stake 
in RHM with its acquis tion of 
British Sugar. 

Mr Michael Ashcroft’* 
Hawley Groop has been buy^ 
ing more shares in Brengreen, 
the industrial cleaning 
contractor which is the subject 
of an agreed , £26 million bid 
from BET. Hawley — un- 
changed at 98p — has paid up 
to 46.5p a share for an extra 
730,000 shares. That com- 
pares with the BET cash offer 
of 4Sp a share. 

Mr Ashcroft now speaks for 
1 3.025 million Breogreen 
shares, or 20 per cent of the 
totaL But marketmen remain 
undecided about Hawley’s in- 
tentions. Some are convinced 
Mr Ashcroft will launch a tad 
of his own, while others feel he 


RECENT ISSUES 


rime ergonom 
Hughes Food 
Lon Utri fnv ( 

M6 Cash ten 
Morgan Qranfoe 
Shrfd (72p) 

Smaftxxw (I65p) 
Soundtracks f4Gp) 
Stanley Leisure (110p) 

Tenby Inds^l 
Thames TV 
Tbbet A Britten (1 
Trees 2HWUI 2016 
Yetveiton (top) 

Unfock (63p) 


will use his holding in 
Brengreen to try to force a 
higher price out of BET. 
Brengreen was unchanged at 
463p as BET firmed 2p to 
410a. 

No-Swift Industries, the fire 
extinguisher manufacturer, 
where Hawley owns a n ear-30 
per cent stake, improved fey 
lOp u>. a fresh peak of 178p, 
still hoping for a full bid from 
Mr Ashcroft 

Shares of Uncroft Kilgonr, 
the tailoring and investment 
bolding company, returned 
from suspension lOp higher at 
250p, after the market learnt 
that Priest Marians, the prop- 
erty development and invest- 
ment group, had paid just over 
240p a share for 131 million 
shares, or 26.48 per cent of the 
total, belonging to Mr JJ 
Steiner, a director of Uncroft, 


who has now resigned from 
the board. 

Priest Marians is now 
considering making a similar 
offer for the remaining 73.52 
per cent of the equity, which 
would value the entire group 
at £11 million. 

STC was a firm market 
ahead of Monday's interim 
figures, rising 4p to 166p — 2p 
shy of the year’s high. Analysis 
are looking for pretax profits 
for the six months to June 30 
to climb from £21.4 million to 
between £40 million and £48 
million. A figure of about £1 1 2 
million has been chalked in 
for the full year. 

The shares have been the 
subject of constant bid 
jlation, but this week 
denied that it was 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


A whiff of twenties’ 
deflation in the air 


• Mount Charlotte, the . 
hotels group which produced 
interim profits up from 
£7.28 million to £838 million 
earlier this week^ rose an- 
other 2p to 89p yesterday. 
There are whispers of a bid 
soon from Pleasunima, the 
leisure group. Pleasurama 
recently acquired National 
Coach Holidays and deal- 
ers are convinced that Mount 
Charlotte would be a natu- 
ral extension to the business. 



\Mndsmoor 11060, ) 
Yetverton (3Bp) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 
Abaco Im F/P 
Barker & Dobson N/P 
Cotorofl N/P 
Dataserv N/P 
Ersftine Hse F/P 
Expamet F/P 
Ltfgtt Interests F/P 
Top Value N/P 

CoUns F/P 

• N/P 

(Issue price In brackets). 


Wight CoUr 
yonanount 


107 

•« 


73+1 
•z 
21 
21 -5 
141 
172 
96 
t 

443 

22-1 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


- - 

1 

I 

9PS 

S& 

9051 

Low 

9021 

9045 

. Oom 
9022 
9046 

EatVol 

1122 

226 

. 

rWHR 

90.46' 


Mar 87 .. 

.• . 00x47 

‘90x47 ■■ 

9043 

9045 

38 

“ 

-UmttT 

9040 

9040 

9038 

anas 

30 

■ . • 

Dec 87. 

9028 

NT ‘ 

9028 

9028 

9023 

80.12 

10 

0 


Prevtous day * total open Interest 14471 
T Tr en Mo n tti fT i w h iM i 

Sep 86 S3£l 

Dec 66 93.61 

Mar 67 93-51 

Jwi87 9334 


USTraasary Bond 

Sep 86 

Dec 87 

_Mar67._.. 


toOS 

97-15 

NT 


Pmtous day's total open interest 19426 
S3JS3 9334 9S35 2774 

93.63 9334 9336 1985 

9334 . 9344 - 93.46 222 

9334 • 9334 9337 170 

Previous day> total open Interest 7616 

96- 16 ■ ■■■97015 • 9M9 8872 

97- 16- . . 97-00 . 96-28 . 7 


S*pr96. 
Dec 68. 
Mar 87. 


— NT — — 10063 0 


LongQBt 

SapBS. 


Sep 
Dec 88 — 

Mar 87 

Jun07 — 


FT-SE 100 

Sep 66 

Dec 86 


Pierious day's total apenintera M 185 01 
120-08 120-15 119.18 119-19 7279 

1T939 -. 11929 ■ 11929 119-15 • 1 

. NT ! — — 11909 0 

NT — — . 11909 0 


157.70 

160.40 


15945 

16040 


Previous day’s total ooan Mwaat2392 
5 15730 1M.40 179 

161.40 1 


160.40 


Ffcat D vteii fl S ~ 

July 21 
Aug-4 
• 7 18 


ss 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Aug 1 
Aug IS 
Sept5 


Green Dank. BSG. Amstrad, Ryan 
WooOwad. Barker 6 Dobson. 


Oct 23 Nov3 • 

Nov6 . - Nor 17 

Nor 20 . Duel 

Britoi. Wiggins. Poly Peck, W»n Bouton. 
Hawley. Poe Sltetfak. FNFC. B. Priest. J. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERUNG SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


August 1 

N York 145 i 6-1 .4930 
Montreal 2349+23597 
Am'dmMTtMSIB 
Brussels 6433-6434 
{rpbgan 11 . 6383-1 1 . 7441 
Dutm 1348913611 
Frartdurt 33693-3. 12C3 
Lisbon 216x45-21935 
Madrid. 200x40-20237 
Milan 2121x402144.70 
Oslo 10377911.0450 
Paris 103550-1 0.1428 

SrkMm 103329194010 
Tokyo 22830-22939 
Vlenn*, 21392135 
ZlWk, it 2x4782-23038 


Aegustl 

1x46491x4865 

23494-23529 

3x49093x4954 

64398426 


Q49043pram 
CL3l-a22prem 
1 %-IXprsm 
1913pram ■ 


11378911J011 DMurem 

- 10 S 


13504-13514 

3393933973 

2163921828 

200x4420973 
2122.12-212632 par-3ds 
103779109927 4-4K«S 

103615-10.0787 

103349103490 

22839228x47 

21292125 
.2x478^2x4944 


4-1 C 
IH-IKpron 
69160cfis 
3S-80dis 


2X2pram 

IX-Kprero 

5 

154-1 


Snorthe 

13912Sprwn 

0-70-055pram 

3%-3%piwn 


4X-3Kown 

i80-4a5db 

125-I90dn 

6-10tfia . 

1234-135tdfe 

WWUtprecn 

91Jtpram 

925torwn 

2®4-Z3Xp*ar 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


Brazl cmzadoj 

Cyprus poutdft 
Fktend maria ■ 
Greece drachma I 
Hong Kong dobar 
India rupee 
Iraq dinar . 

Kuwait (fnar KD 
Malaysia dokar | 

Mexico peso te 


12707-13733- 

1245092x4700 

0580905640 



925-375 


New Zeeland dalar 2860928700 

Sam* Aabta rryd 5379953190 

Singapore dote—; .3230932400 

Sooti Africa rand 0730932700 

UAEtSrtiam 54595-6x4095 

Uoyds Bank 


■nt7u«kn»6 

• 712-7UL. . 

DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



asp?--— 

gjgj 

Auitcaka 



sm 






mm 

Piiatiiulinil * 


Mamnrianrfa 

■■I 


ss* 




B%lum(Cor*i9__. 

ratifh 

Pn»?-pl - T .. V 

mm 

Spain' 

mm vtttvcr. 


considering on offer if its 
present bid for Plessey is 
blocked by the Monopolies 
Commission. The US group 
TTT continues to bold a 
crucial 24 per cent of STC and 
may now be a willing seller. 

GEC was unchanged at 
1 96p yesterday. The company 
is expected to hear next week 
if its £1,200 million bid for 
Plessey will be allowed to 
proceed. The market is al- 
ready of the opinion that it 
will be blocked. Plessey rose 
2p to 200p. 

The agreement between the 
US and Japan over semi- 
conductor chips is thought to 
be good news -for Britain's 
electronics companies. As a 
result, dealers reported a 
flurry of activity with demand 
for shares such as Rowtborpe, 
20p higher at 535p, Diploma 
12p at 205p, 
Electrocomponents 7p at 
375p. FarneU EJectromcs 7pat 
170p, International Signal 7p 
at 24Sp, following publication 
of its annual report, while 
BSR International on 8Sp, 
CASE Gnmp on 82p and Cray 
Electronics on 320p. all. added 
5peach. Whispers ofa bid also 
added 1 3p to Memec at 238p. 

Lex Sefvkxywhicfrreported- 
an increase in interim pretax 
profits of 87 per cent to £14.8 
miilion on Thursday, is alto 
expected to benefit from the 
deaL It has also just made an 
acquisition in the US for £9. 1 
million. The shares responded 
with a 7p rise to 309p. 


The US index of leading indicators 
rose by 0.3 per cent in June, having 
fallen by 0.1 per cent in May. This 
may be just enough, allied with the 
July unemployment figures, to sustain 
the faith of the prophets who, standing 
on a mountain of scepticism, claim to 
see a revival in the US growth rate in 
the second half of the year. Un- 
employment dropped to 6.9 per cent 
last month, the third monthly foil on 
the trot and the lowest figure since 
January. 

The key statistic, however, remains 
the US trade deficit which reached the 
monumental total of $150 billion and 
shows very little sign of diminishing. 

The counterparts of the US balance 
of payments deficit are the substantial 
surpluses accruing to Japan, West 
Germany and the rest of Western 
Europe, which are returning to the US 
to finance the American deficit. As in 
the 1920s, when Britain could not 
continue to underwrite the interwar 
monetary system and the US was 
reluctant (until 1936) to do so, the US 
is no longer able to fill this role. 

Having become a net debtor in 
1 985, the US is now dependent on net 
capital inflows to finance its domestic 
and external deficits. Neither Japan 
nor West Germany has any ambition 
to take the place in the system vacated 
by the US. 

This is not the only parallel with the 
interwar years, as Tony Baron dem- 
onstrates in the July issue of Chase 
Manhattan Securities' Spotlight. In 
Britain, the theoretical approach of 
the Government's medium-term 
financial strategy, introduced in 1980, 


is not for removed from zfte economic ’ 
orthodoxy that ruled in the 1920s and 
there is more than a whiff of deflation 
in the global air. 

The parallels and the atmosphere 
have important implications for mar- 
kets and those who use them. In the 
first place, as Mr Baron suggests, huge 
international payments imbalances 
mean highly volatile foreign exchange , 
markets, where the US dollar will -! 
continue to depreciate until deep cuts 
are made in the US budget deficit The 
second probability is that interest 
rates will fall. 

This scenario of deflation and 
declining interest rates is favourable ^ 
for bond markets in general, though 3 ; 
not all fixed-interest paper will apprc- * 
date because the same scenario will 
cause problems for overextended 
companies. First-class government 
bonds is the message here. 

Though impressed by the similar- 
ities between the 1980s and the ! 920s, 
the Chase Manhattan soothsayers J 
stop short at predicting another Great 4 
Depression. They also remain fairly ? 
equity-minded, in the light of falling : 
energy and commodity prices and the 
rise in the real value of earnings as - ' 
inflation drops. ^ 

If “it would be premature to 7. 
conclude that the equity bull market * 
of the 1 980s is complete,” the * 
preference is for finandal assets rather '■ 
than real assets tike land, property and 
gold. And if the rapid expansion in 
credit is not likely to bring about an 
upturn in inflation in the near future, 
the preference if for bonds rather than -Hj 
ordinary shares. 


Rebels with a just cause 


Dr Maurice Gillibrand and Mr David 
Wilson have tittle in common other 
than a deep sense of grievance over 
the management and performance of 
the two companies in which they hold 
shares. 

This week, at separate meetings of 
the battery group Chloride and the 
engineering business 600 Group, they 
resumed what is becoming an annual 
pilgrimage to press for changes and 
extract explanations from the direc- 
tors of these two companies. 

So for their mission has apparently 
had little success. Predictably, when 
the counting takes place they are 
crushed by the weight of proxies cast 
in favour of the board. Their persis- 
tence in the face of sometimes 
downright hostility from directors and 
more often than not indifference 
among other small shareholders is all 
the more praiseworthy. 

They also deserve credit for setting 
an example. When the the legendary 
apathy of small shareholders is suf- 
ficiently disturbed to query the board- 


room performance, how long overdue > 
is the for more potent attention of. 7 
institutional shareholders? Many 
other companies spring to mind j 
whose performance does little credit -j 
either to the board or to the sharehold- ", || 
ers who each year meekly approve the 
accounts without question. 

What became apparent this week at 
both the Chloride and 600 Group _ 
meetings was how even the faint 
stirrings of revolt from the ranks can 
prompt boards into adopting a more 
frank and open attitude towards 
shareholders than they have shown in : 
the past 

And while it is the weight of the be- - 
hind-the-scenes lobbying from the big " 
institutions which ultimately forces 
the pace of change, the highly public ' 
displays of dissatisfaction voiced al ^ 
annual meetings provide awkward* 
and uncomfortable occasions for.;* 
directors called on to give a more open- 
account of their stewardship. 

The message is carry on Gillibrand^ 
and Wilson. Your cause is both timely ■ 
and just 7 


Austria. 


14.691420 


lyBarday* Bank HOFEX and 


.ONDON TRADED OPTIONS 



Series 

Oct 

tele 

Jm 

JBL 

Oct 

Puts 

Jan 

J£L 

Allied Lyons 

300 

37 

45 

53 

6 

6 

w 

(*323) 

330 

17 

2/ 

33 

20 

25 

27 


360 

9 

15 

18 

40 

43 

47 

BP 

500 

80 

92 


2 

5 

_ 

f573) 

550 

37 

48 

65 

13 

to 

to 


600 

12 

26 

37 

40 

43 

46 

Cons Gold 

- 420 

32 

45 

- 44 

32 

38 

50 

f421) 

480 

15 

25 

27 

62 

87 

75 


500 

4 

15 

— 

92 

100 

— • 

CourtaUds 

280 

21 

30 

41 

9 

13 

19. 

("286) 

280 

13 

18 

30 

to 

25 

30 


309 

b 

IT 

— 

36 

37 

— . 


330 

Z 

6 

— 

63 

64 

— 

Cora Union 

300 

17 

27 

37 

12 

16 

19 

C302) 

330 

7 

15 

24 

25 

36 

38 


380 

3 

8 

— 

63 

63 

— 

Cable & Wire 

600 

95 

105 

125 

10 

15 

25 

(-667) 

850 

50 

t» 

90 

22 

35 

45 


700 

70 

40 

58 

4/ 

55 

65 


750 

8 

-20 


85 

88 

— 

DtstBars 

600 


115 


_ 

4 


("710) 

650 

— 

7b 

— 

— 

12 

— • 


700 

— 

37 

— 

— 

30 

— 

GEC 

180 

76 

32 

38 

4 

6 

8 

(196) 

200 

10 

19 

24 

14 

14 

18 


220 

5 

10 

— 

26 

to 

— 

Grand MM 

327 

66 




2 


_ 

(*383) 

355- 

43 

— 

— 

5 

— 

— 


360 


55 

67 

— 

8 

13 


382 

30 

— 

— 

18 

— 

— 

ICI 

900 

105 

132 



12 

18 

_ 

(*988) : • 

950 

67 

97 

112 

25 

35 

44 


1000 

40 

67 

77 

50 

57 

67 


1050 

18 

.44 

55 

84 

65 

95 


300 

33 

43 

53 

- 4 

* 8 

9 

(*323) 

330 - 

15 

JM 

35 

14 

17 

19 


360 

4 

13 

18 

40 

40 

4T 


180 

73 

30 

36 

3 

5 

8“ 

(196) 

200 

8 

17 

23 

10 

12 

15 


220 

4 

9 

16 

25 

27 

29 

SheaTrans 

700 

113 

127 



3 

9 

— 

(*803) 

750 

68 

83 

102 

.12 

18 

25 


300 

30 

47 

72 

30 

42 

43 

Tralalgar House . 

240 

34 

41 

49 

3 

6 

8 

C268) 

260 

19 

76 

35 

7 

10 

14 


280 

9 

15 

24 

17 

to 

25 


Ssrias 

s*p 

Dsc 

Mar 

Sep DSC 

Mar 

BeeehBTi 

360 

53 

83 

70 

2 

6 

10 

C4CS) 

390 

32 

42 

50 

10 

17 

24 


420 

18 

28 

35 

27 

83 

37 


460. 

6 

15 

23 

58 

65 

68 

BOOtS 

240 

20 

27 

35 

5 

S 

10 

r253J 

260 

10 

17 

26 

15 

17 

21 


280 

3 

9 

— 

29 

30 

— 

8TR 

280 

23 

33 

45 

8 

12 

J7 

r293) 

307 

8- 

16 

— 

20 

27 

— 


333 

3 

9 

— 

43 

45 



< 750 

33 

65 

75 

18 

25 

35 

(765) 

flOO 

13 

30 

48 

47 

50 

57 


850 

6 

15 

30 

65 

90 

90 

BlueCkda 

SO 

40 

60 

83 

5 

13 

18 

1*576) 

600 

13 

35 

55 

30 

38 

43 


650 

5 

17 

32 

80 

80 

80 

DeBoers 

900 

40 

75 

85 

38 

60 

75 

(*590) 

650 

70 

45 

60 

7U 

85 

10O 


700 

9 

30 

— 

120 

125 

* 


750 

4 

12 

— 

ITU 

176 

— . 

Dot one 

300 

34' 

46 

54 

3 

7 

12 

(-330) 

330 

14 

24 

34 

12 

16 

22 


360 

4 

12 

24 

32 

34 

38 

BKN 

300 

fiO 

58 



2 

5 

— 

(*345J 

330 

30 

39 

48 

7 

10 

15 


380 

11 

23 

29 

20 

24 

£8 


390 

3 

8 

17 

48 

51 

54 

Glaxo 

900 

100 

130 


25 

35 

— 

("967) 

950 

65 

95 

125 

38 

60 

60 


1000 

40 

70 

100 

65 

80 

85 


1050 

28 

55 

80 

100 

110 

115 

Hanson 

13S 

40 



1 

_ 

— 

P71) 

150 

25 

mm 

■- 

- 1 

— 

— 


160 

16 

23 

28 

3 

5 

8 


180 

5K 

13 

17 

12 

15 

18 


200 

2 

6 

9V. 

30 

30 

32 





mm 



Puts 



Series 

Sept 

Dec 

— r Sep 

Dec 

Mv 

r«r 

500 

32 

47 

60 

15 

25 

so 

550 

12 

25 

40 

48 

83 

88 

BOO 

4 

•15 

2S 

97 

100 

106 

Thom EM 

420 

52 

70 

82 

5 

12 

17 

C*S3 

460 

25 

40 

55 

20 

28 

to 

500 

8 

23 

27 

48 

57 

82 


550 

2 

6 

— 

90 

90 


Tesco 

300 

70 



2 

._ 


CMS) 

330 

42 

50 

— 

3 

G 

— 

380 

18 

30 

45 

10 

15 

22 


390 

4 

17 

25 

30 

35 

38 


Series 

Aog Nov 

Mb 

Aug 

Nov 

Feb 


460 

35 

55 

70 

10 

19 

22 

(*463) 

500 

15 

31 

47 

28 

3b 

40 


550 

2 

15 

28 

70 

70 

73 

BAT feds 

360 

40 

52 

58 

3 

6 

9 

(*395) 

toO 

18 

30 

37 

11 

16 

22 

420 

4 

12 

20 

30 

35 

3/ 


460 

* 

5 


67 

70 

— 

Barclays 

460 

37 

55 

65 

3 

12 

17 

T494) 

500 

18 

28 

48 

30 

32 

42 

550 

2 

13 

22 

67 

72 

77 

BritTatacora 

160 

14 

» 

32 

2ft 

7 

10 

(*190) 

200 

3 

12 

18 

12 

17 

21 

220 

1 

6 

9 

toft 

31 

34 

Cadbury Schwpps 160 

11 

17 

23 

3 

8 

11 

(166) 

180 

4 

TO 

13 

15 

19 

21 

200 

2 

3 

6 

38 

35 

38 

Imperial Sr 

f*>» 

300 

55 

63 



1 

2 



330 

» 

33 

— 

3 

6 


360 

10 

18 

— 

to 

23 

— 


300 

46 

52 

59 

TO 

2ft 

6 

(*344) 

330 

21 

29 

40 

6 

9 

12 

360 

7 

17 

22 

to 

28 

27 

LASMO • 

90 

12 

17 

25 

4 

9 

12 

(-98) 

100 

6 

12 

19 

10 

12 

18 

- 110 

TO 

9 

14 

19 

20 

28 

MMand Bank 

500 

45 

60 

74 

3 

9 

17 

CS44) 

550 

17 

27 

40 

23 

37 

40 

600 

2 

9 

22 

70 

7b 

80 

P&O 

460 

37 

48 

65 

4 

13 

18 

(-480) 

500 

9 

85 

42 

to 

33 

40 

550 

2 

10 

to 

53 

65 

70 


600 

1 

4 

— 

113 

113 

— 

Racaf 

180 

28 

38 

42 

2 

5 

6 

(*18S) 

180 

13 

21 

30 

6 

10 

11 


200 

4 

12 

18 

16 

20 

22 

RT2 

550 

15 

42 

50 

17 

27 

37 

1-5381 

600 

3 

22 

30 

62 

8/ 

70 

550 

TO 

9 

17 

107 

110 

114 


700 

TO 

4 

9 

157 

160 

184 

vm Haste 

45 

9* 

13 

14 

1 

2ft 

4 

(*53) 

50 

TO 

10 

10» 

2ft 

5ft 

6% 


60 

TO 

5 

TO 

10 

10ft 

12 


Series 


Nov 

Mar 

*J5L 

Nov 

Mar 


218 

4 

IS 

_ 

24 

26 



raos) 

220 


aara 

18 

— i 


29 

236 

1 

7 

— 

40 

41 

— 


240 


— 

9 

T-e 

v— 

47 


255 

1 

3» 


59 

60 



Series 

*SL 

Nov 

Fab 

*S_ 

Nov 

Fab 

Tr1Ht%1991 

106 

l T » 

2% 




ft 

— 

TC108) 

108 

* 

1*.i 

TO 

ft 


2ft 

110 


»t« 

>*1* 

Z*N 

aft 


It 11** 03/07 

114 

4 

S'* 

_ 


to 

— 

rsiiB) 

116 

2*f 


5ft 

ft 

2’w 

■"is 

118 

1% 

Vn 

4 ’ll 

7'n 

3 

4 


120 

•*» 

Pi* 

3*-. 

Pra 

4 

5 


122 

■a 

TO 

2’ is 

4<.« 

5*18 

6ft 


124 


1ft 


6<» 

7 




Oct Nov Aug Sept 

Oct 

War 


FT-SE 

1550 

43 

55 

72 

90 

17 

S 

35 

44 

Index 

1575 

28 

45 

58 

75 

30 

38 

43 

55 

1*1 5GD) 

160Q 

17 

32 

47 

— 

47 

55 


— 

1625 

9 

22 

37 

— i 

70 

72 

77 

mm 


1850 

5 

15 

27 

aa 

90 

97 

100 

mm 


1675 

2 

8 

18 


120 

122 

125 

— 


1, 1986 J Total cootractm 12345- Cabl4H. Mb 4141. Undarlylng aacarity priea. 


MONEY MARKET 
AND GOLD 


Clearing Banks 10 
Finance House 10 


OvemaW Hloh: 9% Lota 9X 
Wwfcfcad.-S'S. 


» (Discount iq 

' fmntli 9 *b 
3 ninth 9% 


fSjas 

3mnth S% 


1 mnth 2mnth _ . 

3 ninth 9V9*n 6mnih 9»io9»,* 

Trade SMs (Discount %) . 
ImnthlO’M 2mnth 10”3* 

3 mnth 10X Smndi 10 'm 




Overnight Open 10 dosa 10 
1 weak 9 ,5 w-9% 6mnth 9*i*9X 

I mnth 9*w3Xi 9 mnth 9*i*9?i 

3 mnth 12mth 


2 days 9% 

1 mnth 9* 

6 mnth S% 

Local i 
1 mnth IWk-1014 

3 mnth 10*-10X 
9 mnth IOfc-10% 

Star** CDs (%) 

1 mmh 10-9 1 *!* 

6 mnth guMa 11 * 




7 days 
3 mnth 9X 
12mth 9% 


2 mmh 1(Ht-10)t 
6 mnth 10 X -10 
12nittr9X-9K 


3mnth 9K4X 
12mth 9 ll iH} ,, ii 


irrmh 640^35 3 mnth 649645 
6 mnth 64964S IZirth 6x45-6.40 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 

3 mmh 6’ “ 


7 days 

3 mnth 4»»4*s 


7 day* 7=,*-7'>. 

3 mnth 7*i#-7*>» 

Sana Franc 
7 days 2K-2K 
Smith 4”»4?m 
Yao 

7 days 4*ifr4 u « 1 
3 mnth 4 u »-4 ,, w 6 mnth 


cal 74 

1 mmh 

5 mnth 6 , w&ie 

cte 5-4 

1 mmh 4 n i*4>>* 

6 mmh 4><ifr49ia 

cal 7)4-flS4 

1 mnth 7*i«-7*i* 
8 mnth 7V71t 
cafl 214-1)4 

1 mnth 4 ,, l t-4*i* 
Bmttih 4”w-4 9 « 
cal 514-454 


4“W 1, S 

4X-4S 


GOLD 


GOktS382DO-38250 
Krugerrand* (par coin): 
$3fTLOO-382jO (£24325-244.25) 

.095725) • 


TREASURY BIOS 


£1000 worth £1384 after 12 months 4 

Over the same period and ower 3, 5, 7 and 10 years Globe has consistently 
outperformed the average unit trustf, and beaten the returns from 
building society and bank deposit accounts. 


WE’RE STILL ON THE UP AT 

GLOBE 


Antes: £546.1 m . aflatad: ElOOm 
adr £37.63% received: 80% 

Last week: £97.83% received: E3% 

Awe rata: £85021% lastwk£9£31S% 
Next week: £1 00m replace n 00m 


ECGD 


Fa*d Rate Sterling Export Fmanc* 
Schema rv Average reference rata ter 
interest period June 4. 1986 to 
July 1. 1966 inclusive: 9-824 per 



Three months results * 
to 30 June 1986 
• Targets beaten in both 
income and asset value growth 
• Income up 4.56% (RJP.Lup 2.596) 
ft Net assets up 0.94% (EX Actuaries 
All-Share Index up 0.64%) 

• Profits up to £4.3 million 

(£4.1 million 1st Quarter 1985) 

Our first three months' results continue to show 
bow Globe turns shr to profitable advantage, time 
after time. Our dividends hate increased every tear for 
the past 20, beating inflation by 60%. 

Knd out how you can benefit. 

Globe Group Services limited 


GLOBE INVESTMENT TRUST RLG 

BRITAIN'S LARGEST LIFTED INVESTMENT TRUST 


Tot John Core. The Secretaries Globe Imcstmcnt Trust PLC. 

I FREHPOST Eiectn Hot&e. Tvmplc Place, Lundun Vt\^R 3BR. 

1 Telephone 01-836 b6 

] Pkascvmdme(iitkbt«asappnipriBc) “ 

I A cop»- of >oor L« Quarter Results Q 

Dcuib of >tmr Shareholders' Soiinps and Srut Purdiasc Scheme Q 
I \inn-. 


\Jdrew 


to SOJune l0t«6 * source xUTCSunsdo. Sen-ice tsomcc Planned SMhpSatisks 


-ft Mu nk*. 


'T 3/8 






\ 



THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


M 


Weekly 

Offer Ctigs r<ou 


UBCV UNIT mUST MANAGERS 
W Hptoanburai Rd BOunWMMi BUS 8AL 
03*S 717373 iO*kw) 

C*l A Fiutf 


Hgn inc Eauey 
wartCMH Bona 
American Oo*tti 
«SWI PeeAc 

Anaia « Earns 
CWH Horan m 
Ccmra j, Energy 
Eieoown Carnal 
Gonm 
Japan 

UK Grtmffi Inc 
Bo Aceihi 
US Emerging CO'S 
Equtas Mnu 
MutemiAcs 


1188 

12X3 

06 

9.73 

923 

9810 

0B 

565 

13X8 

2083# 

+X8 

4.7D 

1*75 

1589 

00 

143 

470 

505 

05 

327 

101.9 

1089 

• 10 

196 

»7 

«1 

02 

133 

718 

788 

+6.7 

107 

9X2 

991 

♦4.2 

12S 

131 B 

14090 

+1.6 

102 

BOO 

0X2 

-10 


95* 

1025 

♦D5 

1.78 

136.0 

1*7 1 

09 

124 

Jj3Q 

575 

-15 

pip 

1886 

2006 


£37 

8X2 

672 

+0.4 

£17 


ALLIED DUMBMUMT TRUSTS 
AHea Ojnoer Gamra Srtodon SN1 
0793 Slum X 0793 28291 


1EL 


Firs Trns 
Growtn I Moome 
Cegnai Trust 
EMinced 

« ct»h Trust 
American Income 

h^i income Ta 
Bjuby rncomt 
wgn v«d 
Com Sea hwi 
tetonuuanai 
Jaoan Funa 
Paefte Tiua 
Amor Sod Stt 
Secs Of Amur Tv 
*u Asset value 
Get Growtn 
Eiraa» cos 
mo Smaaar Co s 
K«o»er» Trua 
MHUdll Cmay 
o w Eteiwiga 


Teetinolqcy Tri 
income Erarntx 


■emptSmal 

USA Exempt 


2 1 9 6 mo 

1315 1402 
2285 241.8 
M7 a 062 
5372 572.1 
317 33M 
2445 260.7 
1345 1435a 
138.0 1485 
288 312 

82.1 87 4a 

1145 122.4 

1698 mm 

84J 8&4 
209.7 2233 
221 5 2358 
375 39.1 
1155 124.ia 
1532 163.1 
BOB 882 
785 81 8 
1765 1884a 
853 905 
1227 130 ia 


Trust 334 4 3515 


♦10 351 
♦OB 333 
♦15 251 
*15 229 
•58 359 
-02 435 
-25 *77 
-15 498 
-25 653 
-01 953 
♦06 093 
•06 001 
♦09 099 
-1.1 153 
-44 094 
-0.7 XX 
•O.l 259 
-03 278 
-15 248 
-0 7 3.17 
-04 243 
-02 3 IS 
+03 059 

-14 824 

-09 299 
-75 1.16 


131. Frabunr Paramam. London ECZA 1AT 
01-628 9876 01-280 6540/1/2/3 
975 619 

64 0 602 

1355 1453 
729 779 
639 683 
47 8 503a 
813 8SJS® 

725 77.Ba 
1725 1845a 
743 793 
1946 2001 
75.1 603# 

771 824a 
69.7 745a 
603 635 
296 31.8a 
958 102 2a 


Carnal Quran he 
Do Aceum 
Eestern 5 ton 
Do F- wi nTr -e 
Finance 5 Property 
Om S Brea income 

Do Accun 

Eouxy Income 
Do Accum 
i Yaw ncome 
Accum 


V, 


Do Accum 
Do 5*. Wimdnrf 
Managed FuM 
Preferen ce Income 
Do Accun 
SmaUr COS Accum 1296 1385 
Wood Penny 9m 9 7 103a 
PorOofco Tv UK 748 775« 


PooMki Tsi Japoi 1038 1075a 


-06 1.71 
-06 1.71 
-38 082 
-25 OK 
219 
-0 7 750 
*0.1 760 
-35 462 
-8.1 462 
-32 765 
-83 755 
+20 2.28 
+2.1 228 
+18 236 
+1.1 . . 
0.1 903 
-04 083 
-32 1.71 
-01 072 
-05 155 
-03 0.00 
-12 1.11 


Pcrthlia Tv US 68.1 rose 
PortWko Tv Euopa 1083 1122* *35 000 
ParPaM Tv HK 405 415a *05 210 


BAEUEDFFORD 
3 GtonSnUs SL 
031-225 2581 " 
Ml Ei CT 
Japan Ei Ml 
UH Ex |3IJ 
Pui Pens me 
P'MJ Peru UK 
BG America 
BG Energy 
BG Income Grata 
BG Japan 

BG Teomoiogy 


EH3 6VY 
1-226 60661 
429 1 4478a 
4362 4551 
2336 2603 

4405 4716 
1995 2095 
187 0 177.7a 
1X1 1438 
1884 2005 
1997 2127 
1455 1553 


113 

020 

157 


-24 036 
+15 1.43 
-38 53S 
-24 050 
-15 0.68 


-15 078 
-02 332 
-15 0.17 
.. 745 
+15 1.07 
.. 424 
-Oi a oo 
.. 209 
+0.1 151 


BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 

25 <26 ribermaiM Seam. London W1X 4A0 

CM -491 02S5 

American 47 7 51.1 

Austratatn 183 175 

Japan 8 General no.7 1184 
Income 445 47.7 

International TruM 742 79.4a 

kiaxne Growtn Tsi *5.1 483a 

G*a & Fneo <1 203 216 

Qcnal Markets 3X5 355 

Special Situation* 320 40.7 

BARCLAYS UtOCOHN 
Uncom House. 252. Romford Rd E7 
01-534 5544 

8X9 892 
IM2 121 4a 

6I.1 082# 

664 706# 

4185 4424 

7X6 782 
2285 2398 
2619 2786 
1342 1427 


B# 


waeuy 

Offer Cnge THU 


Net High Inc 
We* Snares 


Com nadir* 
financial Sees 


Gold & Gen 
M U*ire 

Prop snaree 




WOrU 

Amr Grown 
An* income 
Amur Smoler Cos 
Aim Grown 
Euro SmaAa 
Far East 

Prt 


japan Pari 
Japan Smaaar 
Etempl 

Exempt Merkel 


UNO W.l 

-19 454 

183 

■95 

0 1 1020 

1102 

1174 

+1.7 294 

463 

4830 

02 £19 

149 

ieie 

09 248 

184 

175 

05 052 

683 

7X9 

01 151 

335 

42.10 

05 1.76 

395 

4190 

0* 090 

903 

963 

04 £49 

E7.0 

60S 

05 656 

216 

2800 

06 038 

59.6 

636 

+45 1.94 

153 

163 

05 8X1 

489 

522 

08 056 

244 

2M# 

04 259 

367 

381 

01 154 

74.7 

79.7 


188 

17.7 

02 .. 

605 

843 

.. £94 

8*7 

872 

.. 4.1* 


bhmnshbut 


9-17. Panynouit Rd. Haywwtte Haiti 


0444 
FMancad 

Smaar Co * Acc 
Do Income 


um PortfoBo Inc 
Da Acc 

North American 


mi 131.7 

2305 2475 
1483 1594 
64.1 685 
745 795 
589 £3J» 
995 1084# 
M3 627# 
849 915 


-09 272 
+aa .. 

+85 055 
-1.1 589 
-0.1 454 
-05 333 
-03 
-19 134 
-02 022 


SUCKMASTSt MANAGEMENT 

TIM S(0di Eadienpa London EC2P 2ST 

01-588 2866 


General He (4) 
Do Accum 14) 
hcoma Fund 13) 
Do Accum 0) 
Ml he (2) 

Do Accum BO 
SmaAv he IS) 
Do Accum (5) 


208.1 2199 
334 4 XI . 5 
10QD 105.4 
175.6 1853 
1X8 132.7 
1678 1785 


-15 3JB 
-15 305 
-1 7 4 71 
-28 4 71 
• 18 137 
+20 137 


£1127 1196# -OIO 274 
£1201 12740 -0.10 274 


C8PIMO MANAGERS 


129. non Hotoxn. London wciv GPY 
12 1148 


01-342 
CS Japan Fund 


CANNON FUND MANAGERS 
T Wambhy. HAS 0N8 


Ewcpaan 

Japan 


2707 2820« 
3173 3374# 
204 0 217.0 
147 8 157.2 
473 303a 
485 527 
572 60.9 


-36 298 
-08 409 
+13 031 
-25 038 
-05 ISO 
+04 100 
-06 030 


CAPS.. 

PO Box 561 8 
01-621 mi 


Marks London EC3 7 JO 


CMW 


367.4 3823 
2786 2959 
XU 3009 


•6.6 1.90 
-40 4 11 
-30 OK 


CATS! ALLS) 

1. King W0am SL EC*N 7AU 
01-623 6314 


am Truer 


1037 1108c -081080 


CENTRAL BOARD OP FMANCE OF 
CHURCH OP ENGLAND 
2 fire Spool London EC2Y 5AQ 
01-688 1815 

Me Find 3B7.9 -155 4 47 

Fixed M 1444 -25 990 

Demon 100. a . . a 7a 


CHARmES OFFICIAL INVESTMENT FUND 
2 Fore Street London EC2Y 5AO 
01-588 1815 

hcomo 304.14 # -1573 SOS 

Accum £10.9441 

Depose 1000 .. BSD 


CU9DCAL MEDICAL UWT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

narro w Plain . Borax BBS OJH 
0600 373393 


America 
Au« Accum 
Do Income 
Captji 

Erero pt Tnnt 
Eraa Income 
Financial 
500 

General 

Get 8 Fixed Inc 
Jaoan I Gen he 
Do asc 
Growth Accum 
Income Trust . 
tram Tnm 
Special Sounnom 
fiecratoy 
Trustee ROM 
Um* Toch Accum 
Do Income 
Mrtdmde Tmv 
B Tv h* Fund Aoc 316.1 3382 
Do he 20«3 2175 


54 6 574 
1855 1785 
1874 1780 
1735 1843 
3202 3406* 
79 0 84.0 
1374 1481 
1885 2X5 
10X5 110.1a 
49 8 528# 
493 524# 
144.7 l! 


-08 130 
•18 177 
+14 177 
-II 311 
+35 455 
-06 542 
-15 322 
+0.4 3 12 
+0 4 225 
-01 954- 
*02 015 
+02 015 
+01 239 
•1.7 283 
+0.1 133 
+0.1 £29 
+05 240 
+04 296 
-03 021 
-04 021 
-07 106 
+20 137 
+13 237 


BARI NGFUM] MANAGERS 

PO Box 156. Beckenham. Kent BR3 . 

01-658 9002 



Ausiraka 

586 

58* 

+22 030 

9 

Eastern 

581 

599 

+87 030 


Eawty income 

559 

591 

02 5.80 


Europe 

117* 

13*5 

01 890 

4 

Growtn 5 tec 

805 

6X3 

01 230 


■team Special 

992 

1058 

-42 0.33 

1 

Jaoan Sunroa 

905 

965 

-22 030 

“ 

Frai Eurooo 

1039 

1102 

+22 880 

1 

Fry Japan 

BS2 

907 

00 830 
-12 180 

■a 

FrM N Amor 

483 

5160 


Frsl SmaBer Cos 

6£S 

67.1 

03 270 


BARRINGTON MAMAGEtOTT 
10 FuixJxpUi SL London EC3 
Di-623 BOW 


Piatmed In* 
European Inc 
Da Accum 
General Inc 
Da Accum 
G# »■**> inc 
Do Accum 
Y« me 
1 Amen 


1275 135 7 
87.7 92 1 


1082 1123 
1620a 




1524 
2078 Z209 
1125 1183 
182.0 1075 
844 895# 
167 5 1785 
2441 2572 
245 B 2SS0 
489 520 
56 1 602 
1X5 1371 
1470 154 3 
783 K4 


-04 353 
+20 129 
•25 IX 
*06 284 


+0.9 284 
-1.8 9.47 


-1 7 9 47 
-89 555 
-1.9 5.65 
-4 1 010 
-4.1 010 
-07 056 
-0.9 058 
-11 022 
-12 022 
-07 168 
-09 1.68 


1 Accum 
N American he 
Da Accum 
Pacrtc Income 
Do Acsun 
Sn* COS hC 
Do Accum 82 

BRITANNIA UWT TRUST 
T4-7B FraBuv Pavement London ECZA 1JD 
01-588 2777 OaafenffOl-638 0478/9 MOneyGude 
0800-010-333 

GiOwth G4I 59 4 80 3# 

ln« Recovery 1023 1094 

Pmaiw Co's 1415 J503 

383 SO 
535 57 la 
310 27 4# 

1905 2015 


HA Growth 
Ei fra Inc 

Gilt 

he A Growth 


.. 041 
-05 270 
+02 13 
+01 £23 
-06 788 
-01 777 
-20 438 


Amer GtCMffi 225 240 

EmMy »gfi Income 41.1 433 

European Growth 269 33.7 

General Eauey 375 3939 

GUI A fixed M Gm 293 31 4# 

Git 6 Fixed Inc 245 253# 

index Securws 232 266 

Japan Growth 328 348a 


-02 150 
-04 4.70 
+<L9 200 
+QA 2.70 
-84 320 
-03 950 
.. 2 JO 
+0.1 050 


COUNTY IIT MANAGERS LTD 
181. CheuMde. London EC2V 6EU 
01-728 I® 


exua mcorna 

firuncxJ 
Gm Strategy 
Growth Imw — went 
hnans 8 Growth 
Japanese 5 Pacific 
Nth Amer Growth 
Ind Recovery 
Smder Co c 
□Kvai he Tn 
Specoi 80S Acc 


429 455 
1573 1673c 
1851 1755a 
56.1 579 

2681 2830a 
W8 410c 
1758 1685 
101.7 1X1 
1055 1123# 
207 8 220.8 
580 995a 
275 3 2925 


-0.4 351 
-09 552 
+0.1 191 
+01 1.73 
+09 £76 
-05 4.73 
-07 054 

+1.4 on 

-14 151 
-05 158 
+0.1 532 
+05 1.71 


CROWN UWT TRUST SERVICES 
Crown House. Wohxig GU21 IXW 
04882 5X3 


H41 income Tun 23i.i 2472 -3.1 529 

Growth Tnat 2'XB 22830 -03 £15 

American Tun 1285 1353# -15 074 


CRUSADER UNTT TRUST MANAGERS LTD 
Sumy RH2 8BL 

*242* 


n +l warw ; 

0732 424 


UK Income 482 513 

UK Growth Acorn 483 51.4 

□0 Dot 483 514 

European Growth 51 8 552 

Pacific Growth 513 565 


-81 447 
+04 243 
+04 243 
+14 IX 

+1.1 .. 


Em UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
4, MehrBe Crescent. GdititMqh 
01-225 3492 
American Fund 
Copra Funo 
Growth 1 inc Fund 
High ov Fund 
International Fund 
Resmxcra Fund 
Sn* Jap Cos Fnd 
Tokyo Fund 
(Ee| Amer 0 
(Eel Japan p) 

(E») Pause (41 


Ex) Pet* 
Ex) Sma 
iurotund 


708 757 
936 1082 
124 8 13X5# 
1059 1133 
1X6 2035a 
203 21 7 
37.9 40 5 
1591 1809a 
1435 1484 
1125 1182 
2KB 293.0 


Smalar Jap (4) 2201 227 3 
255 27.6# 


-12 225 
♦84 1.70 
-35 448 
-05 596 

+01 .. 
-£S 800 
-15 3.69 
+09 819 
-04 034 
-12 010 
+87 2K 


EAGLE STAR UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
Bath Road. CMtannsm. GMuce s tar GL53 7LO 
0242 521311 

67.1 718 
683 728 
813 867 
633 675 
845 885# 

982 104.7# 

Europeoi Accum 755 8050 
UK Get 8 R Inc 549 57 8 
55.7 594 


UK Balanced he 
Do Accun 
UK Growth Accum 
UK N0| Mh 
N American Accun 
Far Eastern Accum 
Accum 
UK Get 8 R he 
Do Accun 


+09 245 
+19 241 
♦04 T91 
+0.1 533 
-84 054 
+21 0.15 
+25 893 
-0.1 825 

-0.1 ax 


ENDURANCE FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 
ArJnWi Centra. Haxamn House. 28 Whvam 
Road. Ramtard RM1 3UB 
0708-65966 


1X6 1141 -03 214 


EOKTABLE UNITS ADMINISTRATION 
35. Foirtflm SL Man ch ester 
061-236 5685 

EOUMIM PWKW1 723 770 +04 330 


BeJ 


Waauy 

01 for Digs Txdd 


Hwh income Trust 744 784 -82 6.17 

MS Fund hi 525 559# -03 648 

Tit 01 h* Trusts 50.6 6XS1 +0T 205 

Spam at* Tnat 749 78 7 +83 239 

NSi Amer Truer 580 6i.8 -12 1.74 

Far Eastern Trust #19 872a -0.7 057 

tna Grawti 495 5 Z2 -81 IX 


EQUITY 6 LAW _ 

St Georoa H9e Corpor au on St Covwwy CVT 
190 


02X 553231 
UK Growth Accum 
Do ton* 
teg Acctm 




144 1 1512 
12-SI 1X0 
2399 2552 
1X1 2094 
1X5 1082 
BOB 


GMS/Axad Actual 
Do noenw 
rniAmer Tsi Accum 1312 1385 
FFEMTS ACCuP 1X1 1614 
Ban Ts Accum 149.1 1588 

General Trust 2389 2455 


*13 354 
+1.1 354 
+54 453 
+07 455 

-as £68 

-05 268 
-34 038 
+03 858 
+44 122 
♦05 258 


FECUMTMANAaeaCNT 

1. Laurence Poumey ML London EC4R BBA 
0T-823 4O0 

US Sooner Coe 70« 713 -£7 029 

CapM Fiaid 1025 1 m -15 844 

henma Ftmd 77.1 825 -M 4.x 

Fm Eastern Fund 7S< X7 -07 833 

Own inc o ma 680 728 . . am 

Rxed tetemn 574 813 *02 696 

Nehaal Ras Funo XI 37.8 +05 446 

European tacoma 753 604 +26 324 


re INVESTMENT MUHAOen 
IX West George SL Glasgow G2 2PA 
041-332 3132 


Balanced Gm tec 

Do Accum 

hcom Gm Inc 
Do Aocum 
Saner Co e Inc 
Do Accum 
FIDELITY INTERNATIONAL 
Rra walk. TbMM. TW9 1DY 
0732 362222 


XI 459 
438 466 
395 420 
41 3 444 

479 50.0 
47 4 504 


-08 IX 
-aa . 

-88 190 
-05 


gw Offer Chgo VwW 


GUINNESS MAHON UMTTRUST 
MANAGERS 

POBcw 442 32 St Ktey-ai-HM. UM0n EC3PJIAJ 
Qi-673 S3X 

586 543# -81 689 
1083 1X7 -£5 OX 

2021 211T 
480 41 Sc 
63.7 883 

75.7 755 

TampteBMSmCp’a 1715 181.0a -396 337 
Temple Bar U5M 357 1 3857 -4 62 792 


non K 
N Amer 


Trout 
n ecewary 
Git Trust 
St Vincent he 
SfVnwmuSGtn 


-2/4 £37 
+03 878 
-02 5^9 
-24 875 


mUKSROS BANK (JOT TRUST MANAGERS 
Premrer UT Aom. 8 Rayleigh RO. Bmetwood 
Emu 

0277 5)17916 

Hanttras So* Co's 1284 1385# 

Hamm N Amer 679 71.8 
Hu«ii»Jbp&FE l£i.i 1289 
HpnnOiae SCWKMl 784 835# 

Hamros EuRSMan 924 xa 
Hemoro# Caraien 47.8 505 
mintnu e Etp«y he XI 874 
Hsnsvus Hgn me Xtr 02.5 
Haottros Res Aesb XI U.7# 

Ksmom tea St* 48.7 514 


-81 IX 
-19 OX 
-29 047 
*05 092 
♦24 OM 
+82 IX 
-1.1 459 
-83 SX 
+04 258 
+1.1 097 


HENDERSON ADeOBSTIlATIQN - 

Piwna UT Adnsnstmton 8 Ftmgb Rft naan 

Biari l wood BMx 


Amer Special ats 
Fer Era tee 
on 1 Fined H 
Growth t i 


TruR 

Managed M Tv 
Mastecorae 


sr 


1083 

1073 

-13 0.72 

319 

3420 

09 45* 

482 

518 

-15 1.74 

3*4 

387 

0 6 380 

31.1 

324 

02 906 

981 

1019 

.. 423 

445 

481 

0.7 .. 

1489 

1515 

+35 .. 

13&2 

147.1 

0 6 801 

787 

84.7 

-1.6 631 

3X1 

353 

+82 2*6 

28* 

383 

04 8*8 

1984. 1714 

04 OLB 


a. Crod^kt- London EC3A BAN 


01 

Amancan Exempt 0539 3605 +0.74 LX 
Japan Exempt E42£7 4382 +1X12 094 
Am Property TV It 07890 0 ..55® 

Property Trust 00320 .. 640 


FRAMUHGTONIRffr MANAGEMENT 
X London Wei BMge. London 
EC3M 5NG 
01-828 5181 
Amer 8 Gan Inc 
Do Accun 
Amer Tumvnd Inc 
Do Accum 


WM. London 


CteKaJ Tn me 
Do Accun 
Con* 6 GM he 
Oo Accum 
Extra Inc Tat he 
Do ACCua 
Income Trust 

Do Aceum 

tel Growth Fd Inc 

Do Accum 
Japan 6 Gan he 
Do Accun 
Momny Inc Fd 


Do Accum 


Do Accum 


2255 a- M fl 
230 4 2450 
201 6 >144# 
2092 2224# 
204.6 2176 
2465 2622 

me 920# 

11U 1224# 
157 4 167.4# 
1708 1814# 
1169 1234 
122.4 1X0 
1X4 1705 
1780 189.4 
87 0 824 
674 9X4 
619 3S.B® 
133.0 141/4# 
1445 1538# 
585 814 
582 614 


-82 OX 
-64 052 
-64 1.18 
-84 1 18 
+0.4 193 
+05 1.X 
-02 540 
-05 540 
+14 4.45 
♦1.4 459 
+0.1 441 
+84 441 
-83 .. 
-38 .. 
-15 OX 

-is am 

.. 490 
-04 1.65 
-04 IX 
+14 090 
♦ M OX 


nmam Era). Dorking. Surrey 
UX 885055 


FP Eauiy Dot 
Da Accun 
FP FetM M ONI 
Do Accun 
SWw a tdttvp Dot 
Do Accum 


1814 2035 
3194 339.4 
1188 1X4 
1293 1373 
1X6 1788 
1720 1825 


+22 24B 
+87 Z6B 
-02 5 95 
-03 54S 
+21 1.78 
+2.1 1.78 


FUNOS IN COURT 

Putjee Truvea Ktegswey wc2 

01-405 4300 

Capra 3519 3882 -15 280 

Grose tec 148.4 1498# -1.7 7.74 

tfcgn Yield 2180 2206 -14 557 


GT UWT MANAGERS 

8th Roar. 8 Devonglwe X. London S2M 4YJ 
01-283 2575 Daatog 01-626 9431 


UK cap Fnd he 

Oo Accum 

henna Fund 
Pe nw c n Ex empt 
Incemadonai 
U3 6 General 
Teen t Growth 
Japan 8 Gmaral 
Far Eav 6 Gan 
Bvopaan Fund 
Oarnany Fund 


94.7 1013# 
1X4 1459 

78.7 844 
1665 174 4# 
1844 1784 

585 XB 
613 65.6 
2489 2334 
1X5 1174 
2399 2565 
825 674 


♦II XX 
+25 390 
+82 640 
+1.7 IX 
+04 OX 
-14 OX 
-25 IX 
-11 OX 
-03 040 
+70 840 
+1.7 IX 


GARmORE KJN0 MANAGERS 


2 El Mary Am. London EC3A 88P 

1 1212 Dnlng 01-823 5766 Daa8ngOT823 


01-623 
5606 
Amancan That 
AuSKMton Tnat 
Brian Tn Accun 
Do Dot 

C u nr nudit y Share 
Euopewi Tnat 
Extra Income Trust 
Fw Eastern Thai 
fixed hteresl Fund 


874 936 
109 169 
545 585# 
473 588# 

494 526 

495 530 
4SA 487 
1334 1433 
200 279# 


GA TruM 264 27.7 

dotal Fund Acoen 17X7 1844 
Do Dal 1855 1X1 

Odd Shore That 11.1 114 
Hedged Amancan 295 314 
>*#■ teoome Tnat 137.1 1468# 

Hong Kang Tnat XI 30 1 

Income Fuid 725 779# 

Insurance Agencies £4551 4885# *802 IX 
Japan Tnat 1+69 158.40 +05 090 

Managed Exempt 2674 2784 
on « Energy Trust 302 32+ 

Special Sits Trust . XI 96.7 
UK Smk Gs Rec Ta 7l5 787 


-39 OX 
+05 035 
+84 196 
-0.1 IX 
-0.7 141 
+26 835 
-04 SX 
+05 OX 
-ai on 

-Ot 852 
*34 040 
*39 OX 
+0.4 239 
-81 810 
-45 SX 
♦14 1.10 
-13 133 


+01 248 
-84 IX 
-83 878 
+14 1.42 


GOVETT (JOHN) UNTT MANAOEMBfT 
WBtetwster Use, 77. London WML London BC2N 
IDA 


01-568 5620 
mu Growtn 

Amancan Growth 
Amancan he 
European Grow# 
Gold 6 Unarate 
Japan Growth 


784 844 
81.7 663# 
863 714 
2105 2251 
3M 384# 
1X4 1788# 


.. 144 
-14 034 
-04 550 
♦7.0 OX 
-83 154 
-33 .. 


ORE UWT MANAGERS 
Royal EMSwnga. EC3P SON 
01-60S 8903 
GW A Fuad m 
Growth Etpoy 


Pao*c 


Snuaw Compjmes 
Eurooaan Trust 


1214 1X0 
1973 2099 
2783 2883 
1344 143 6 
231.1 2454 
2835 250.7# 
207.7 221 D 
2375 2S2 7# 


-05 877 
+14 208 
+49 287 
-89 IX 
-1 l 813 
+23 142 
♦20 178 
♦7.1 1.13 


0277-217238 
SoacoJ B4S I IK 
Do Accun 
Recovery Trial 
Capra Growth me 
Do Accun 
Income Assert 
financial Tnrjl 
Income 4 Growth Inc 1386 1484 
Do Accum 2788 2914 
High Income Thai 
Extra Income 


1321 1414 
WO 1X9 
844 1013 
5X7 574 
61 7 689 
1064 1145 
141.7 1524 


+82 047 

ts* 

♦87 
+87 
+81 362 


0.47 

ft 


+04 239 
349 


P>ef S G* 

Off Trust 

FnM Merest Trust 


B) 


1886 1815# 
1X8 IE97# 
1065 1143# 

47.1 582# 
4X7 463a 
535 E7.ia 

70.1 710 
1064 1144a 

39.7 «25 

1514 17X6 
615 653# 
3587 3774 
M3 XI . 
2322 240 7 
895 087 
1822 1725# 


+14 
+X0 269 
-87 4.98 

♦-ills 

-03 934 
-1.1 937 


Japan Trod 1822 1724 

Japan aacai Eds 1754 1884 
Pacrfc Smiter Cm 725 783 
Singapore 8 Matey 


274 30.0# 
137.4 1470# 
DS X.7 944 
TM 1019 1099 
1186-1X1— 


-1.1 091 
♦13 001 
+33 202 
•23 801 
-1.1 801 
-30 27* 
+21 IX 
+74 874 
+27 OX 
-34 801 
+29 801L 
+88 0.93 
♦1.1 "340 
-27 044 
- 1.1 001 
-24 055 


SimAor Coe Exempt 1184 1S25 +14 215 

Eixo ExWTtet (S) 117.11483 +43 1.12 

-Japan Eranpi OBJ- - 1553 18X5#-— 04-OX 
N Amer 853 885 -14 199 

Tech E»^5) 94 8 998 +88 0.01 


Paohc Exempt | 


I486 1565 +88 X78 


HU. SAMUEL UNIT TRUST HANAOBB 
NLA Twer. AddbconiM Road. CronHsi 
01-886 4356 01-828 8011 


Bnash Tnat units 
Capra That Unas 
□alar That Unu 
European Tnnr 
Far East Trust 
Anral Tnat 
GA fixed hr he 
Do Growfi 
Hqn r«u Tnat 
Income Tnat 
Msmawnal 
Japan Tacti Tsi 


+85 3X 
+T6 275 


Seamy Trust 
SaeCer Co* 
6peaaf Sts 


5287 5545 
HJ 1025# 

1625 1944 -20 395 

1269 134.1# +X4 074 
1166 124.1# *08 IX 
357.7 3806 
at 303a 
435 48.1 
622 884 
79.0 84.1 
1183 1X5# 

3X7 359# 

20.5 30.4 

1785 1903 
885 944 
926 984 


-0.7 270 
.. 952 
-81 7.4* 
-07 533 

-03 496 
-1.7 233 
+82 836 
*05 275 
+54 390 
-+86 IX 
♦14 240 


BIRMD MANAGERS 

32. Quean Annas Gets. London 8W1H BAS 
01-222 1000 

l» B» 8 ersan 1289 137 2 +85 IX 

IBI Inc PM 58.0 56.6 -Ot 9.70 

IB1 Capdal Growth 545 584 -02 290 

Invastmait Ts Fhd 659 692 .. 340 


X. Fa sJ iu L ti 5t London 
01-823 6000 


ECS 




Amv Growth he 

Do Accun 

Fund he TS Inc 
Do Accum 
YMd he 
Accun 

ht Recovery he 
□d Accun 
Japan Growth tec 
Do Accun 
Snete Cos he 
Do Aceum 
UK Ea Growth me 
Da Aceum 
WarUwtes Tech he XI 
Do Accun 384 


624 

639 

194 

254 

1214 

2014 

1013 

1087 

103.1 

1035 

1604 

209.8 

27.7 

455 


884# 
87.7 
213 
279 
129.1 
2155 
1074 
11X8 
1083 
1» 7 
1781 
2222 
284C 
485 
414 . 
420 


-24 1.11 
-24 

+83 224 
+04 .. 
-19 5X 
-14 .. 
-07 IX 
-87 .. 
-04 800 
-88 .. 
-23 271 
-29 

-03 878 
-03 .. 
-03 1.15 
-as .. 


LA C UNIT TRUST MANAGEMENT 
Pwct House. Goptnal Ave. BCZR 7BE - 
01-588 2800 

UKDoe FM 4313 4402# -124 513 
hnemakonai 8 Gen 2420 2474 +24 147 


LEGAL A GENStAL UMT TRU8T 
MANAOBIS 

5. Raytean Rood. Brarvweod Essex 
0277 234834 

D ow bulion 
_ Accun 
Do tecome 
Eurepaan 
Far Eastern 
Qm Trust 


■Wl 


Managed 
Nattrnl Has 
N Amancan Tnat 
UK Spacai SB 


2SS1 28X5 
41*4 4410 
999 6X1# 
09.1 7X9# 
1X1 1107 
794 835 
774 824# 
482 515 
745 BOO# 
824 665# 


+37 235 
+55 235 
.. 5.15 
+23 131 
+82 801 
+86 8K 
-84 102 
-82 298 
-1.4 IX 
♦14 IX 


LLOTDSBANXlMrr TRUST MANABBtS - ■' 

Ragotftes DpL Gadog-By-Seo. Wpnhhg. W 
Sussex 


0444 458144 
D lA j i md 
Do Accum 
Energy hd 
DO Aceum . 
EVn Income 
Do Ac cum 
German Gm he 

DO Accum 


Do Accun 

Ml Tech 

Da Accum 

Japan Growth 
Da Accun 
N Amer 8 Gan 
Do Accun 
P»oAc Bran 
Do Atxun 
Smelter CO* 8 Roc 
Do Accun 
WorUenda Growth 
Do Accun 
IK Growth Ftmd 


1771 188.4. 
315 4 3373 
486 S2.1c 
534 574c 
i486 1503 
2704 2894 ' 
_K1 884 

6X1 66.4 
2505 2784 
5125 5484 
175.1 1873 
1829 1855 
833 88.0 
835 093 
1024 1095# 
1104 1182# 
1282 137.1 
13X9 1412 
1884 202.1 
2115 2263 
1933 2087 
2715 290* 
483 494 


. +84 .123 
+08 123 
.. 250' 
250 
-23 5.40 
-35 840 
♦25 0.17 
+25 817 
-23 449 
-44-440 
+14 847 
+14 847 
+84 802 
♦84 852 
+81 097 
+81 057 
+84 818 
+05 0.18 
-83 153 
-03 IX 
+23 ax 
+39 052 
+83 IX 


LONDON I MANCHESTER 
Whahde Park. Exeter EX5 IDS 
0382 52155 

GsnerM Tnat 42.1 45.1 

Income That 383 385 

hwmatem s i Trust 553 37 J 

32.0 343 

443 47*# +83 IX 
XI XI *01 240 


+87 3.70 
-01 890 
.. .0.70 
-04 200 


Thru cl In* 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


m 9' 

H) 45 
130 93 

69 30 

143 45 

m a: 


A 6 M Gp 9': 

ATA S elec t ion 52 

Aooeyciest 1i« 

Aoenteon Stk Hjo X 


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r~5 in 
in ids 
7i: roe 
143 IX 
VI 103 
153 131 
2n0 215 
.-50 IX 
)W 163 
HW 131 
fc-XJ 443 


Acorn Comp 
Ado 

Adam leisure 
Ai Cm 
Aesptmg 
AtdA 

Angfca SeCunOM 
Anwar 
Acpteuee 


40 

II 

IB 

191 

113 

260 

142 

105 

153 


05 53 88 
21 45 119 
18 12 162 
XI 82 108 
441 .. .. 

.. .. 28 
. . . . 59 

. . e . . £0 

26 1 4 605 
77 68 . 

93 IB 147 
23 16 197 


ACd Mmograolka 255 


40 IK 


.TO 190 
124 123 
95 61 

'I 59 
:rs 165 
K 68 
123 56 
21 . 1? 
53 31 

15' 


51 35 


4« 278 
’C 15 
M IB 
42' 4V. 
1.15 S3 


Do Wmn 
Awn Comm* 

AspnaH 

Astray 

A»cc Energy 
ASO 

AOu Etuoment 
Automate 
B8H Design 
BPP 
BTS Grp 
Bedtmo iw#am) 
Bpnnon 6 Fduntaei 24 
Bensons Cneps 
D erkeiev 8 Hay 
Berkeley Exp 
Berketev Go 
B» Isolates 


215 

323 

<31 

588 

32 

193 

IX 

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70 

193 

82 

60 


29 16 14.7 


13' 


44 1 4 33 5 

58 66 70 

145 24 2X2 
7.9 

Hi 59 53 
70 57 112 
8 0 6 9 209 

1 4 2.0 166 

7 1 XB 159 
57 7.0 B6 

04 10 7 55 
80 25 2SB 

. . . . 1X5 

.. .. 233 

■ ■ ■ 50 

69 1 A 24.0 


Bcwi 
Banduras 


24 


18 44 106 

54b 54 165 


2 ? B 

166 

Biuetert Toys 

216 


80 

23 189 

14 

8 

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9'. 

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42 95 










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19 

SrtnwTOifWT 

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Himagn Teen 

195 


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110 


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69 7 7 




175 


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136 


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353 

210 

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210 




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298 

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50 


9 

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115 







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116 


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145 






CCA Galfemra 












153 

125 

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155 

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25 

1.7 153 

190 

116 

■toques Vat 

173 


79 

46 163 


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220 90 

69 62 

143 BG 
JM 2U 
120 64 

110 83 

179 126 
IP 7 
253 120 


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140 

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115 75 Crcaanm 


158 152 
23 11 

43 28 

90 67 
95 53 

109 25 

1*5 110 
M 30 
118 24 

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W 200 
1C8 SS 
143 115 
415 308 
H 63 
114 99 

Ijn 75 
133 65 

S' 75 
73 43 
178 116 
1iB 78 

91 78 
215 195 

02 55 
29 X 
145 lit 


CPS Comp 
CPU Comp 
CUD 

CjJWomjn OH 
Camotecn 
Cannon Straal uw 103 
CMW TV 325 

Cnancmv Secs 112 
OteCAPOM Europe 95 
OuKoa Man IX 
Otem UMhotS 7 
Chevwa w 235 
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158 
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75 
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50 
275 
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116 
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29 43 1X3 
3 5 27 196 

179 U 127 
31 28 1X3 


Darke Hoooer 
rinqxi Gold 
Dull (N Hugs 
Cojkw Etedroeei 
Coaa Emeram 
Cotprgen Inc 
Ccrop Fvunaai 
torauT 
C Omul lari* 

Con* Tem tews 
Coml UcronM 
Ce*re» 

CP U 

Cramonom 
Oanbrack 
OransuHtA 
Oamn Lom 
Crown inp 


3 1 24 21.0 

10 429 . 

5J 22 25.0 

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33 21219 


Ousrv 
DBE Tech 
DOT 

DJ Sec Alima 
Dalrcte 
DBMSS (DY) 
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De Bran (Andre) 
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45 

173 

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195 

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21 181 
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72 92 
17 155 

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12130 
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1.0180 

22 74 
25100 
25 21.0 
44 380 


57 

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132 

105 

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131 




183 


115 

78 

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' 73 




385 

231 


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107 


153 


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130 

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195 


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221) 

130 

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13 

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168 

108 

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139 




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63 

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Eqjou 







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138 

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151 

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175 

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90 08 

220 145 
103 65 

655 420 
148 94 

150 95 

47 3B 

83 72 

185 100 

17 11 

CO 32 
■66 BS 

124 68 

126 103 

91 60 

124 118 
39 19 

H5 93 
IX 160 

92 58 

49 36 

210 <33 
235 196 

48 » 


Ford A Weston 
French Cam 
FmMaka 

fieri Sneth A' 

Gutecp 
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Gee iCaoq 

Ooe/Roson 
Demon Lyons 
Gijbs Mew 
a*>« House 
Grow Gp 

Godwin Warren 

GcOOteOM Pm« 
GoUil (Lauancal 
Granyte Surface 
Green (Emesn 
GroerwwQi Came 
Groevsnor So 
Guanoey Adame 


180 

97 

650 

142 

96 

40 

63 

ISO 


45 

IX 
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118 
66 
119 

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44 45 114 

75 44 114 
27 24182 
11.7 14 155 

4.1 29 XI 
17 29 .. 

24 60 121 

80 8.0 13* 

27 25 487 

.. ..550 

34 7.1 11.0 

XI 24 182 

44 XS 184 

51 44 95 

34 44 119 

45 4 1 125 


390 393'. 
145 143V 
415 195 
70S 50 

96 X 
79 7 

113 110 
IJ3 105 
050 414 
156 115 
?03 MS 
183 134 
340 200 
24 a 


Hampooo Hcmec a re 77 
Hamms 45 

Harvey A Thome 175 
Havelock Europe 235 
Hecro Care 42 

Heamrea 430 

Oo -A- LV 390 

Hantarion Prana l«4 
H#ii-Pmni 195 

romraui Pan so 
Hei Erganom 93 
Hoenon X 

HodQ*on 110 

Honan H Ydro i nan 12a 
Holmes A Merchant 670 
Ho*nes Protection 124 
Home fucoani 
Do 'A 

Howard Group 


+a 

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BSP 9.1 7.5 
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21 27 124 

18 48 188 
81b 35 21.7 
57 24 21.8 
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124 29 155 
124 32 184 


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0 1 XI 124 


25 XI 145 


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178 

335 

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30 27 184 
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5JU> 28 115 
50b 25 109 
60 10 283 
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118 73 
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330 253 
90 67 

300 320 
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123 


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113 
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1Z5 70 

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91 7B 
140 95 

198 133 
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245 i« 
150 101 
IX 55 
73 54 

176 92 
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13S 93 
263 .195 
220 141 
98 75 
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148 140 
390 350 
138 95 
9'r 4 
102 71 
95 59 
760 360 
220 118 


Jaypunl 
Jensens 
Jmrneen 5 Jorg 
Jomsiones Pants 113 
Just Rutxra 60 

KLP 305 

ham (jrnn) 63 

i^mwon Secs 200 

Kavns Systems 78 


67V Klsit-Tefcn* 
67 LPA hd 


Inf#* Thomson 


75 

93 

63 

TOO 


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Lewmar 103 

Laege Care 78 

Lon 3 Qydsute 118 

LOIM Bam 190 

LysandM Pm 18 

M6 Cash 8 Csfiv 87 

MW Comp 235 

MeLaudam 3 Har 118 
■lapese MaisnNs GO 
Hammer 70 

Uansi (RonakO 158 

Uawpnm 


0.4 a7 275 
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55 «5 140 
81b 5.4 125 
25 42 05 

47 13 172 

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1.7 22 115 
1.4b 15 1X7 
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45 64 75 

54 54 12.1 

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29 XT 155 
80 88 105 
XB 15 187 




Miyhsws 
. Meadow Farm 
Maco Teen 


Memory Comp 


13 

105 

131 

210 

141 

97 

13 


56 28 187 

100 85 85 

45 87 84 

.. .. 955 

47 *35 215 


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♦5 


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1 1 88 17.7 
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45 44225 
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50 21.7 15 
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135 

34 

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385 

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140 

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290 

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1.7 2317.7 

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35 05 285 
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. 1 .. 

20 14 255 
19 13 150 


♦6 


21 43 244 

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45 25115 
86 30153 
£4 141 45 


Encana Preps ^8 


Do 

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Nraran 
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Osborne S LTOfc 
Orewre Abroad 


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45 

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158 

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156 

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680 

206 

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540 

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30 

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174 

143 

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170 

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128 

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28 

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200 

135 

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27 

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14 

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£9 

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116 

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MAosecwimes 

Three Quays. Ti 
01-825 4688 . 
Amer 8 Gan he 
Ek> Accum 
Aid# Recovery 
Do Accum -- 
Am Gme ser Coe 
Do ACClim 
Apr 8 Gen he 
Do Accun 
Comm A Gen tec 

_Do Ac cu n 

Comoouno Grown 
Conwraon GnMh 
Do he 

DwTObsI Fund he 
Do Aceum 

E u rop ea n s Genera 
Do Accun 

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Do Accum 
Far Esaurn tec 
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DO *CC 


truer H* EC3R 6BO 


Do Accum 

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Dp Accun 
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Do -Accun 
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Trustee Fung tee 
Do Accum 
CnaSMnd he 13) 
Do Accun I 


ctanlima Bic^gJ 


Da Atxun i . 
Petnion Evarnpl it) 
naacif me.ir 

Do JtCCUR I 




MN (INTT TBU3T MANAGERS ' 
it. DevoittBire Sq. London EC2M4YR 
01-823 4273 ‘ “ 

DC 3829 4183 

. Accun 4972 5195 

UK Medial Fnatm 745 787 
Do. Accun 770 621 

Jocen PartormanCw 1X2 1484 

Do Accun 1397 149.0 

US Special Fanres 055 705. 

Do Accum 6&4 TIB 

Gate A Preooos IM <QI 444 
Oo Accun 421 455 

US Speo* tec 565 012# 

Do Accum 615 B83# 

European Pari he 625 87.7 
Do Accum 820 875 


*1.1 211 
+15 211 
-87 158 
-05 156 
-31 0D1 
-25 90S 
-15 020 
-20 OX 
+4.1 154 
+41 154 
-10 481 
+05 461 
+25 101 
+20 101 


MLAUMI TRUST MANAGEMENT 

89-108 sunning Rd. Madstone. Kent ME14 1XX 

0822 874751 


MLA General 321 3* 0# +83 220 

ULA U iw maeora 523 59.4 +25 OSS 

MLA CM Ural 2X4 345# -881048 

ULA Incrane 402 426# -Oil 5.28 

MLA Europrai 295 387 +05 881 


MANUUFE MANAGEMENT 
Si Georges Way. 8Mvmagi Hera 
0439 356101 
Grown UNte 
Gfl 6 -fixed b* 

Hter beam Una 
Man YMd G* Upt 
m Growth Urate 
N Amancan UiMs 
Far East Una 
SmaBer Coe Fund 


724 789 
1113 1163 
1Y1.0 1180 
67.1 591- 
1274 1354- 
887 7X0# 
SX3 994# 
682 784 


-03-252 
+02 723 
-86 5 67 
.. B »r 
+81 041 
-15 848 
-05 013 
-0.1 1.79 


NENCAP UWT TRUST 

town Hat. 25X Rootord Hd. E7 

01-234 5544 

1323 140.7 -04 4 7B 


Mena# 


M3KURV FUNO MANAGERS LTD 
33. King WRttn St EC4R BAS 
01-260 2860 
Amer Growth 
Da Acrem 
Am# tecome 

Da Accum 

Euopean Growth 
Do Accun 


Genera 

Do Accun 
GCA fined 
Do Accugi 


Do Accun 


Do Accum 


De Accun 

Recoway 

OS Accun 
Eken#l Doe 
EaensR Accun 


944 1084 
982 1044 
50 7 5X9 
325 582 
1255 1335c 
1X2 137.4c 
2345 2495 
381. B 4081 
87.9 887 
880 995 
805 880 
884 95.1 
2380 2531 
295.1 31X5 
181.7 1932 
1855 167.7 
1625 205.1 
2055 2185 
2233 2302# 
3413 3515# 


-XI 058 
-33 058 
.. 438 
01 438 
+X2 1.13 
+32 1.15 
+84 227 
+07 227 
08 703 
05 7.83 
04 447 
-04 4.47 
+04 158 
+05 158 
+81 050 
+81 000 
+08 21X 
+88 213 
+45 286 
+45 256 


WDLANDBAIK GROUP UWT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Go u twoodl tee. Steer Si. Heod. Sheffield SI 3RD 
0742 7G3S<2 

748 795# 

101.5 1083# 

1015 1084 
14X2 152.7 
57 6 614# 

671- 71-6# 

544 588 
865 928 

HgHYWd 1507 1607 

Do Accum JMS 77X0 

■629 1737# 

289 7 2878# 

2023 3Ot0 
2905 3T8X 
109.7 1170. 

1310 1403 
1157 123.4: 

1387 1455 
1123 1187# 

1185 1275# 


Carnal incu ne 
Do Aceum 
GommoAty A Gen 
DO Aicoioi 
Earn Hgh.tac, 
Do Acorn - 
amt fired me 
Dd Accun 
Y Md 
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Do Accwn . . 
Jepen A p»c« 6 ‘ 
Da Accun . - 
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. Da Accun 
Euro Gth-lne 
Do Accum - 
SmaS# Cos he 
Do Accun 


+85 249 
+1.1 249 
+1.1 358 
+10 358 
08 785 
-87 756 
-0F-001 
02 9.01 
-14 509 
41 A 59 
00 354 
-0 7 384 
+87 009 
07 809 
-10 12 # 
-17 128 
+X9 1 14 
+401.74 
04 2.13 
04 2-13 


MUMMY JOHNS TONE WmilW 
MANAGEMENT 


162 Hops Street Gtoegow G2 2UH 
041 221 9252 


American 
European 
Smafcr Cos 


1145 1212c -25 XT3 
2X5 255.1 +100 1.10 

205.1 2232 *1.7 107 


NATIONAL PROVIDENT INVESTICKT 


48 Greeacnuieh ft. EC3P 3HH 
01-821 4280 Bet 258 


NPf UK : 

Dp-Accun 
MR Ovweeoa- 
Do Accun 
Fer ESat Acc 
American Acc' 
Euopean Acc 
WMdwda'Acs 


1945 2088 
31X9 3348 
0887 8050 
69X7 7385 
856 915# 
574 6(1 
387 54.0 
.489 52 1 


+1.0 290 
+Xi 298 
+42 070 
+01 070 
07 OIO 
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+14 050 
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WceUy 

Offer Ctige V#U 


NORWICH UT MANAGSIS 

PO Box f Wnwn NRT 3NG 
0803 W ?” 1 

Group Treat PI 63 1227 00* 3® 

us Treat 1244 131 0 05 1-32 


OPPWsaaMER TRUST MAN^BBSTT 

58 Cannon SWdL tanoon EC4N 8AE 
dealngs 01-238 3855/9/7 WWO 
.branaSoraH Grown i486* 
Ino oras A Growth ' .50.4 647 
Woridwteo Ree 
AMnw Glar'd* 

Japan Gr rarh 
Eudpsan Growth 
UK Growth 
Pacdc Growth 
Hah tecome 
Pneoa) income 
Do Accum 


623 881 
320 348 
61.4 6S.7 
023 66.7# 
527 584 
632 57.0 
3X1 3S0 

320 380 
952 1012 


♦17 147 
-12 225 
07 1-2 
05 000 
00 107 
+25 a is 
07 873 
04 000 
0.1 751 
+02 217 
+85 217 


PEARL TRUST 


252. HUi Hi 
Bl<41 


01-4051 
QrwrnvRM toe 
. Do AcCUn 
Income Find 
ms Eauey he 
Do Accun 

UM Treat toe 
. Do Accun . 


HODCm WCIV 79 


sex 941 
025.1419 
1179 1284 
1250 1330 . 
125.9 1339 
1340 131-9 . 
214 .7 228 4 1 


04 XlO 
00 210 
01 374 
+87-125 
*OJ IX 
06 283 
+1.1 283 


PERPETUAL UMf TRUST 

48 Mart Street Hentoy On Thirties 
0491 576585 


ind Growth - 


28X4.2827 ... +J0 OZB 
1855 i«l 08 4« 


Am# Grown 
me Emarg Coi 
Far East WWW 
European Oh' 


WO 1578 
688 7X7 
787 B45 
74 1 79.6 

-588 SBJ 


04 105 
-18 0 72 
+10 OM 
00 090 
+21 1.45 


mOLVKT UNIT TRUSTS 


XX 

01*47 


Hen herana 
Cuw Gw 
Far E astern 
Norm Amancan 
Specra as 
Tachn rtogy . 
Extra tecome 


1123 1204 
585- 54.0s 
96.0 1038 




1W .. 
883 732# 
1072 TI50# 
886 920# 


08 893 
0.1 428 
0.1 584 
+85 000 
-24 057 
+1.0 150 
-22 022 
+83 476 


PRUDENTIAL UNTT TRUST MANAGERS 
51-68. Wort -MB, Herd ESSSK. IG1 2DL 
01-478 0377' 


Bohan Equity 3840 4080 
European 938 99.7 

S«h am -ClBim 31 A 546# 
HOteotn HW» he CCT 68B# 
M 96 A 102-S# 

97.7 1030 

735 780 

HObom Spec SBs 8X0 65.9# 
Hcteom UK Growth 792 8«2c 
HObom GU Treat 1681 1985 


HOteOm I 


♦TJ X35 
♦XB 008 
-01 064 
04-8.42 
01 061 
+1.8 005 
-1.0 108 
+1.1 218 
05 222 
02 248 


0UK.TBR MANAGEMENT COMPANY 
31-45 Gresham 6L London EC2V 7LH 
31-800 4177 

OuaOam General 4X9 *583 +*9 267 

□usHJranf hcomo 2315 2487# 05 8*1 

□uaorent mi Fd 3777 3976 +25 1.12 

Olisdrert Recovery 255 6 2725 . 00 257 


HMROTHSCMLD ASSET MANAGEMENT 
SL SwSMns Lane. London GC4P 4DU : 
01-260 5456 - - 


MC Amerca he 
Do Accum 
NC Energy Has 
HC toeuno 
NC Japan 
NC Sorter Cos 


2809 2988# 
305.4 32+8# 
T3T 4 1387 
-H0 0X0 

1923 2040 
137.7 1484 


NC Sm# Euop Go's 1780 1883 

NC Enemot G* £1380 13SU 

NC Amer Prop S1107 1216 

NC Prapeffy 1583 1682 


-25 124 
-25 1 23 
-LX 279 
01 356 
01 0.81 
08 152 
+82 004 
.. 8.48 


ROWAN UWT TRUST 

33 King imn street London ECifl 9AS 
01438 5878 

2190 22X6 -40 (55 

6780 691 0 -400 282 

165.0 1690 +70 663 

3880 394.0# +110 1.90 

1785 1715 +XO 243 

1200 1210 001202 
2380 2415 +99 019 


fif 

Sacwmes (2i 
Mi vnm IM 
Mem n (3) 
Fixed unrea l 
l Ugh hteresl 
Far Era (2) 


ROYAL UFE FUND MANAOEMENr 
New Has Place. Lnorpool L89 3H5 
051-227 4422 


Ecuty Treat 
inti Tnrsl 

683 

715 

64.1 

76.3# 

+85 

-1.0 

£58 1 
133 

Git Trust 

285 

275 

-4J2 

B27 

US Tree! 

318 

336 

05 

151- 

Pacrflc Bran Tat 

415 

445 

♦13 

849 

20 cam St London EC2 




01-920 0311 

Eovtv Dim 

114.1 

121 4 

+1.1 

15* | 

□a 4ccum 

-160* 

1707 

*15 

154 

He* tecome TruM 
Do Accun 

893 

95.1# 

0.1 

4.46 

1052 

112.0# 

01 

446 

US Growth 

584 

601 

-15 

057 . 

Da Accun 

57.7 

61.4 

-15 

057 


ROYAL LONDON LNT TRUST MANAGERS 


Royal London House. Coteheshr COT IRA 

rafe 5 


578115 
Amenean Growth 
Capnal Accum 
Gfl hcrane 
Hign hcortw 
hcoree A Growth 
Japan Growth 
SKcKS See 


87.1 927# 

175.7 187.0# 
. 555 580# 
680 852 
. 97.7 1040# 
= 9X1 : 980 
1071 41*0 


01 881 
+89 222 
03 852. 
07 450 
05 437: 


-12 005 


104- 


SAVEAPHOEPER 

28 Meaum Rd. RoMtort RM1 3LB 
■ 68-73. Queen ft Edmaergn EH2 4NX 
(Ramtard) 070888968 Or (EO^ 031-228 7351 
Amer Jt* 6 Groeti , 87.4 ' 720- 0? 8.71 

• 983 105.1 

‘431 488 
-41.0 *OT 
1022 1X2 
792 .8X4 
579 619 
352 370 
.960 10X2 
549 565 
1787 1875# 

1888 1720 
928 900 
842 909 
1180 12X4 
947 1012 
1283 1372 
280 300 
87 8 ns 
988.105 
1Z7.1-I3S5# 

1500' 1689 
1505 1610 
788 882 
1585 1885 
888 B45 
(890 1819# 

70.1. 745 
840 905 


Capital Unite. 

OonmrodCy. •. 

Energy Inos. 
European Growth 
Exempt tec BnD 
_Oo Hid (4 3) 
Et|lu>4ion 
FhandaJ Secs 
GM* FI tec 
t*flh Reiun Unite 
Y wld LhKs 
tecome Itetta 
Sn ea wi ni Trust 


Japan Growth 
Japan Smalar Cos 


Nrar-Tectamiogy 
SE Asia Growth 
Scaoes 
Sco M taras. 
Stxaywfcte 


SmaserGo'e Inc 


UK Eqiiiy 
US Growtn 
Unwreal Growth 


2.12 
.. 194- 
-11 450 
+22 853 
05 523 

01 205 
01 800 
-10 297 
021885 
-1.7 458 
05 4.47 
-1-1 6A5 

02 2.72 
+20 328 
+05 ... 
+oa .. 
01 394 
00 .. 
♦1.1 251 
-1.4 288 
-l.l 358 
-10 415 . 
+02 152' 
-1.1 496 
-10 208 
04 253 
09 158 

.. 108 


3CHWBEE (RUT T RUST 

Ei rap t u m H ouse. Ppramtoim 
0705 627733 


An n a ran he 
DO Accun 

Auvrukan tec 

DD Accun 
European he 

Do Accun 
Gte t Fixed Me 
Do Atxun 
Goto fund Inc 

- Do Accun 


Do Accun 
M tecoms 
Ob Aceum 
Jap Smite Co ■ Ac 
apore A Many 




1265 13X3 
1295 1383 
50« 54 1# 
5*8 saw 
1122 1200 
1152 1232 
54.1 570# 
BX7 87 7# 
27.9 298 
291 31 1 
1081 (608# 
3772 4034* 
1112 1189 

153.6 1W2 
147 8 1580 

583 337 
92 1 55.7 

1261 1389 
134.4 143.7 
10>4 1084 
105.1 1123 
2252 2449 

230.7 248 7 
530 57 2 
B87 1055# 

1532 163.6# 
7570 8525 


Smara Cos tee 
Do Accum 
Special 5 *b Inc 
Do Accun 
Tohyo.Fund K 
Do Accum 

U3 Smeser Cos Ac 

uk Eowiy me 
DO AQC U« 

SlCMD 9&2 6W4# 
Extra Income 814 835# 

SQMITAfl ASSET MANAflEMPjT^, 
■3306 Graeaawch a LonOon-EOV 
01-623 5776/8711 

W * — !£'”f 

EtteB TV tec *72# 

Do -Atx 55 Sn 

&ObOi CWiJnc 2^ S'? 

Do ACC £80 381 

Managed Exemci iiBi 1230 

SCOTTISH eOUTAQL E 

28 St Anhews So. Edmbugft 
031-566 8101 

hd tecome Urate 1*35 16*2 

Do Aceum 2187 2305 


-18 060 
-20 066 
08 22* 

• I 7 224 
♦37 ' 05 
.37 106 
.1 9 861 
02 861 

♦ I 7 221 
+19 221 
-15 SOT 
04 SN 

•02 a*? 

+83 847 
-13 090 
•19 102 
♦19 102 

04 1.17 

05 1|7 
.15 100 

-i. 9 1 go 
01 022 
02 022 
-1.9 090 
02 343 
04 3*3 
-23 207 
3.l6 
0.1 707 


OAK 


-81 517 
01 3.17 
07 100 
♦07 1.00 
.. 100 
100 
0B 400 


-23 £37 

00 307 


SCOTTISH (JPG INVESTMENTS 
19. a Andrews Sq. Edndurgti 
031 225 2211 

1781 (916 
1435 1540 
177.7 1981 
2272 24X0 


UK EQdtV 
Airartsn 

PBOhe 

European 
SCOTTISH MUTUAL INVESTMENT 
IUKAO0S 

Its. Vmcera St Glasgow C2 5MN 
041-2*8 8100 
UK EouRy 
G# 8 Fued 
UK Sm# Cos Eq 
European 
N 


+17 163 
-XI 13* 
09 005 
*75 860 


16X7 1742 
1189 124 4 
1489 1583 
1899 2021 
1090 1160 
17X3 TB4 4 


•21 255 

•oi. ao: 
•14 209 
+85 1 10 
-13 1 48 
08 040 


SCOTTISH UNIT T RUST 
29. Cnattone Sq. EdrAurgh 
031-226 4372 
Pen** MI 

WWW Gromn 359 3|.i 

N Amenean 3X2 356 

Income Fund 4XS *§5# 

piirvywi 402 43 1 

NAmThc W0 £2 

UK Growtn 305 M-7 

Extra Inc 309 3X1 


06 032 
05 107 
08 016 
-19 *93 
+13 092 
02 297 
01 150 
04 509 


SCOTTISH WIDOWS 

PO Bax 902 BSnOugh EH<6 SBU 

031-855 6000 

Eq rc 2280 2*08 

Accum 2688 277J 


V. 


+10 306 
+12 XOS 


SENTWCL funds man^jott 

30, Cay Rand, irawon EDIT 2AY 
01-838 6011 
Amer Tech 8 Gan 
PacHe 

Gee Income Fnd 
Soeoat SOuadcra 
Ind Growth 

Amman Mafars 
Smel Go's 
Japan Teen 6 Gan 


Exempt 
UK General 
Eure GrowBi 
Earu Income 


1019 1081 
1910 204-7 
1055 177 5# 
2030 2177 
780 53 6# 

69.7 745 
388 415 
1090 1170 

54.7 585# 
530.0 567.1# 

326 353 
321 3*0 
485 430 


02 824 
- 1.7 000 

05 *.i9 
+XB 1.49 

06 892 
01 001 
00 167 
06 000 
05 504 
+29 225 
0B 181 
•18 032 
+32 4.00 


WON A COATES 
1. London Wsl T 
01-688 3844 Ext 
Special S4S (5) 


London EC2U 5PT 


486 520 -1.1 078 


STANDARD (VE 


X Georoe SL EOnburgh EH2 2XZ 
11 2252563 


te c ome UMi 
Do Accun urais 


244 

27.1 


262 

29.0 


03 £41 

+00 X4i 


STtWART. IVORY UWT TRUST 
MANAGERS - 
*5. Crorknte Sq. EdmbuOT ' 
031-226 3271 
American Fund 
□a Accun 
Do Vwharavai 
Ausnsan Fund 
Do Accun 
Bnkih Fund 
DO Aooan 
Euopaan Fund 
Do Aceum 
Japan Fund 
Do Aceun 
Saras PPP 


222 5 2370 
2*96 268.1 
1581 1660 
9X5 990 
959 1011 
5980 6284 
7847 B*&4 
287 8 3060 
3028 too s 
3290 3510 
331.1 3527 
169.4 1784 


-43 256 
-41 206 
01 236 
09 102 
+89 102 
+15 4.44 


+10 444 

+11.7 


887 
+1ZS 087 
+12 021 
+10 821 


SUN ALLIANCE 

Sun AMance Has. Horsham. Srasaa 
0*03 56293 
Equity Thai Acc 
N Am -Trust /kc 
Far Era Trust ACC 
Woriorwde Bond 


37B0 4025 +43 261 
587 K3 09 198 


529 

48.4 


.525 


+04 001 


TSH UNTT TRUSTS LTD : ■ 

Keens. House. Andover. Kua*. SP10 >PG 
036* 56789 Dealings. 028* 83432/3/* ' ' 


Amenean he 
Dd Accun 
Extra hedme hi; 

DO-Acdtan ' 
General Ural tec 
Do Accun 
GA C fixed he 
Da Accun 


Aavn 
Part* tec 
Do Accun ' 
hd he 
Do Accum 
Sahcttd Opps Inc 
Do Atxun 
Natural Rra 
Do Accun 


1131 120.4a 
1160 1288# 
T131 no.* 
1321 I486- 
1522 1829# 
2500 2887# 
' 490 51.8# 
650 883# 
2090 2227 
3280 3*7.4 
1681 1704# 
1654 1780# 
310.7 3305 
36X6 4083 
619 655 
67 7 72.1 
483 425 
414 441 


-10 058 
-15 090. 
09 32* 
-10 50* 
♦15 259 
+22 259 
01 B4l 
01 841 
.. 4*0 
. 440 
-19 028 
-19 828 

04 123 

05 123 
+1.0 150 
+ 1.0 100 
+88 222 
+85 222 


TARGET-TRUST MANAGERS 
Target House. Gatehouse Ro. Aytovaay .Bucks 


Amer Eigh 
Australian 
Co mm otMy ■ 


-T7I.8 76 4 -19 003 

159 '170 0 1 810 

. 889' 718 +08 1.40' 

Enemy ; 28.0 312# -10 1.71 

Edurfy • 121.1 -130 1 -10 132 

Euooesn Spec Ska 1817 1079 +*0 202 


fc'urj mcraw 

FrtkMKiOl 

G<» income 

GoK income 

Oa Accum 
mcpmo 
JJP4T 

M*I, 6 Shgaparo 
Pjcj« me 
DO RetewAI 
frei Snani Fo 
UK Cjdoji 
S peCVH 5m- 
Tecmougy 
WOfU hepmo 
WOrldwKM CapdJK 

’Eauh E* i3) 

Do Accum (3) 


114 + 

1126 

09 

566 

262 a 

279 6 

-1 0 

IV) 

lO+.fl 

1101 

-0 5 

76e 

513 

Si7' 

4I ra 

OST 

950 

1020 

•39 

017 

’90 

441 

-02 

5 35 

1014 

Ida# 

09 

0 ID 

21 + 

tt 0 

• 1 1 

290 

910 

9K4 

-1 1 

069 

112 s 

M95 

-1 3 

065 

1.-6 

190# 

-Or 

1220 


7a .-# 

01 

139 

B3D 

686# 

01 

107 

442 

472 

07 

010 

Mfl 

595# 

02 

395 

1383 

149.-0 

02 

1 79 

795 

690 

-1 7 

179 

1497 

1800 

-31 

1.79 




■nanmOU ««T managers ltd 
P ark House *6 Fosbuy Circus London EC2M 
TOJ 


01-638 4761 
Far Eav A Gan 
japan A Gen 
Nth Amer A Gan 
Paste Toed 

iTiaon 


5*0 574 
53 9 373 
48 0 91 0 
50 5 53 * 
54B 58* 
01 455 


+05 857 
+0J 067 
-1 1 098 
02 094 
+13 095 
+02 210 


S UWT TRUST MA NAGE R S 
2 Si Mary A>e. London EC3* 8flP 
01 936-3356 

SmDter Cos 6C9 689 *15 010 


TOUCHE REMNANT 

uoimud Horae. 2 Puddh Dock. Lonccn EC4V 
JAT 


01-248 1250 
Amenean Grown 
General Growth 
GoM Tech 
income Growtn 
Income MonWy 
japan Growth 
Man Faulty M 
Oo Accum 

□ sera Growth 
SmWtr Cos 
Special Opps 


41 5 

442 

-10 068 

te 


50* 

S4 2# 

03 214 

* 


415 

448 

06 010 

m 


583 

82 I# 

05 456 

■ 


*68 

514# 

03 859 



06 

518 

05 012 

■ 


236 

2X4 

+01 236 



236 

25* 

01 236 



475 

510 

07 100 



61 : 

892 

•00 iao 


K 

723 

77 0# 

0 1 157 




TYNDALL MANAGERS 




Australian 

Du Acc 

Casual ' 

Do Accun 
E tempi 
-Do Accum 
Far Eastern 
Do Accum 
fin 6 Prop 
Do Accun 
GUI Capul 
Do Accum 
G*t tecome 
Do Accum 
vtMd 
Accun 

tecome 

Dc Accun 
ted Earnings 




501 
532 
3037 
54X4 
2871 
860 1 
1596 
1722 
527 
82 I 
12*6 
144 4 
1096 
1780 
527 
115* 
3319 
7153 
1559 


536 
558 
3229# 
5787# 
336.7# 
7030* 
170 7 
18*2 

56 Ic 

57 4C 
1286 
149 1 
U2 9# 
UB4# 
SGI 

1229 
2479# 
761 6# 
1660 


09 195 
09 195 
+12 341 
+31 341 
-56 5TB 
-52 576 
♦10 070 
+ 1 t DTD 
03 337 

05 3 37 
-0 5 641 

06 6*1 
02 95* 
0 4 954 
08 63* 
-1.7 634 

02 515 
00 SlS 

03 279 


UK PROYBJENTUT MANAGERS 

UK House Cause ft Saesoury SPi 3SH 
0722 3382*2 

UK Emmy TI02 117.1# 02 

PaoK B*M 1558 16S5# +27 

N Amer ITZ6 1196# 05 


VANGUARD TRUST 
65 Hoitxxn ttafluet EC1A 
01-236 3053 
Growth he 
DO Accun 
View 
Accum 
Special 54* 

Oo Accum 
Treaira 
Oo Accum 

Amar A Gen 

Do Accum 


2EU 


V, 


1581 
270 7 
2033 
207 8 
*0 7 
410 
1335 
2036 
595 
595 
£5989 
£599* 


Do Accum 

Abng Rah Alls (9 11X3 
Do Accum 1133 

Fat Era 6 Gan me 49* 
Do AcCute 494 


1960 
286 0# 
2163# 
22i i 
434# 
437 
142 I# 
2168# 
633 
633 
8122# 
6i.« 
120 8 # 
1206 
528 
528 


*i 4 2*6 
•20 3*5 
00 $00 
0.0 590 
04 238 
+84 238 

03 * on 
•03 40B 
07 122 
07 132 

+806 238 
0 07 238 

04 195 
04 135 
02 0.47 
02 047 


WAROLET UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
Weraiav House. 7. Oavomlve 6a London EC2 
01-929 1532 


Amancan Trust 
Far Era 6 Gen 
hd Growth 
Income Trust 

Japan Growth 
Smart Compaiam 
Technology 
Aus train 
UK Trost 
Eurooaan Growth 
Hong Kong 


62.6 

874# 

07 

170 

10x1 

1087# 

-1 1 

050 

692 

73 7# 

+12 

070 

B3J 

885 

06 

560 

134.1 

133 5 

-20 

020 

1085 

117 1 

-13 

200 

331 

3X5 

01. 

.020 

351 

377 

02 

210 

1271 

136 3 

05 

220 

5i 9 

553# 

• T9 

110 

2X1 

245 

•04 

1 60 


WAVStLEV ASSET MANAGEMENT 
IX Chanooa So. Ederougn 
031-325 1551 

Austrafcan Gold 188 17? 

PaohcBasm 12 7 (35 

Cowman Bai Gd) 58* 683 

Obrana Mae Pna <1014 1058# 


+19 0 15 

0 3 020 

01 097 
04 7 30 


WHnTWGOALE IHB7TRU8T MANAGERS 


2 HoneyLa ECS 507 
1-606 9085/6 


01-606 1 

Sm Did GK Fund 67 5 686 
US Govt Bond Fd <50 7 509 


+02 


890 


WINDSOR TRUST MANAGERS LTD 

VMndSOf House. 83. Kmgsmir. London WC28 

USD 

01-405 8331 

Com « Equity 475 506 +03 784 

Income 525 559# . .524 

Growtn 588 532 03 229 


• Ex (flvWend c (Sum dividend. It Cum 
stock spirt, s Ex stock -spot m Cum an 
(any two or mom of above). # Ex a# (any 
two or. more of above). Dealing or 
valuation dais: (ll Monday. (2) Tuesday. 
(3) Wednesday. (4) Thursday. (5) Friday. 
(20) 25th of month. (21) 2nd Thursday of 
month. (22) 1st and 3rd Wednesday ot 
month. (23) 20th of month. (24) 3rd 
Tuesday of month. (25) 1st and 3rd 
Thursday of month. (26) 4th Tuesday of 
month. (27) 1st Wednesday eA month. (28) 
Last Thursday a! month. (29) 3rd working 
day of month. (30) 18th of month. (31) 1st 
working day ot month. (32) 20th of month. 
(33) 1st day of February. May. August. 


November. ' (34) Last working day of 
5) 15tn oi month. (36) 


21st of month, 
of month. 


14B1 of 
3rd 
2nd 


month, 
month. 

Wednesday. 

Wednesday of month. (40) Valued 
monthly. (41) Last Thursday of Stock 
Excnange account. (42) Last day of 
month. (43) 2nd and 4th Wednesday, of 


month. (44) Quarterly. (45) 6th of month. 
(46) 2nd Tuesday ot month. 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


Hign Low 

Comparer 

Price Chge pence 

% P/E 

Mgh Low 

117 

94 

Aba 

108 


88 

33 21.1 


244 

780 

Ub3 

* Since 

763 


295 

19 365 


215 

149 

125 

Amar Tlx* 

128 


44 

34 3X7 

■Pi 

198 

356 

266 

Ang Amar Sac 

338 

•-a 

88 

Z5S32 

■ VJ 

283 

120 

96 

Attanac Asian 

97 


89 

09 74 0 

■rrjl 

540 

120 

86 

Bankers 

115 

• .. 

19b 3 * *02 


2*4 

254 

159 


25* 


15b 05 . . 

166 

132 

62' 

53 

Br Assets 

85V 


80 

X4 3T.0 

59 

45 

53 

31 

Br Eretora Sec 

37 


87 

IJ80.7 

101 

00 

*46 

36* 

Or In. 

*20 


21.7 

62 £79 . 

132 

110 

102 

60 

Bran* 

00 


33 

3.7 419 

205 

237. 

32B 

139 

Cneffln Japan 

208 





157 

1UU 

Derty tnc 

150 

• .. 

1£B 

85 175 

70 

50 




-Ifl ■■ 

' — 1 — 

— 



3b* 

314 

Drayton Gena 

322 


145 

45 31.7 

128 

1IB 

IM 

134 

Drayicn Far East 

172 

-1 

15 

09 .. 

200 

181- 

70* 

420 

Drayton Japan 

-«» 

-1 

1.4 

82 .. 

ISO 

128 


206J7B Dundee Ute 
ii7 100' Eteri “Amer 'Axset 
ISO 119 _ 


374 2B4 
158 . 138 - 
33’- 75 
160 I1B 
112 86 
107 142 
10 8V 
346 287 
120 07 

556 460 
193 1« 
345 20* 
12* B4V 
10 109 
703 *60 
181 123 
1*7 123 
162 143 
396 322 
93 86 

109 88 
IBS 118 
171 138- 
330 275 
1*9 116. 
123 97' 
1*7 127 
209 138 
231 18« 


E UKj ui gh 
HaerecGen 
Engrtti tat 
EfflkMI 3(01 
Eutugn 
fTc i 


f it Aims 
Pi C Pecftc 
Prat ChirtaiM 
first Scot Amar 
FteV Ur Gan 


. Enwrpttea 
Fleinmg Fv EM 
Fleming Fudging 
fierauig Japan 


"197 
100 
139 
348 
158 
. 87 
1*5 
112 
197 

8>i 

314 

87 

SIS 

164 

313 

122 

132 


80 b 4.1 35.1 
~ as ofl-m- 


-2 

0 

• 0 


FMnxng Overran 
Rimteg Tech 
Ftouwg Lbwareal 

GBCCnaW 
ot Jim 
G onm fupos 
G eneral Cans 
Otaegow Stack 
GioSa 

Gown Atlantic . 
Gdren Ctenucra 
Goran Strategy 


ISA 

138 

MS 

363 

90 

88 


47 . £4 09. 
M IM 583 
&S * 85*41 
2JJ £3 527 
£0 1.4 60.6 

28 23 588 
£1 1.1 76.1 

0.1 18 .. 
143 48 M l 

87 180 58 

92 1.6 64.4 

78 48 318 

129 41 342 
1.4 1.1 . . 

38 £7 510 

SJ M .. 
8T 32 *1.1 
£9 28 S83 

33 28 62.1 

88 T202A 

' £1 £3 006 


298 #0 


200 1.1 i. . : 
20- 1.7 89.1 


134 

no 

137 


84 - 26 647- 
52 4T2B3- 
40b 20 *2.7 
38 * 1661 7 
.81 £3.618- 


Ctei#Biy 


ftico 


Groes 
dw vjfl 

Cti go penco. •» P/E 


Greehsm House 
Hamoroe 
mt (Pi 

tewesi ei Success 


3*0 

320 

179 


he Cap 
tutor * Sima 


.Khwoi Charter 
Meorwon o IM 
Ktenwort Smoler 
Law DabeMura 
Lon Mercrent Sea 
Lon Trust 
Merchants 


167 137 
300 2TS 
380 318 
*40 390- 
86 49 
IBS 158 
84 -50V 
2*6 185 
329 278 
81 23 

368 279 
178 1*5 
76 M 
36 31 

*2 37 

405 336 
171 147 
256 216 


Murray Income 
Murray bra 

Murray Smel 
Murray venture 
NtofCoun - - 
New Damn 04 
928 

Nwtnmg. he 83 
New T&yo 
Ntn assmc Sec 
NBi Sm Assets 


730 

265 

132 

57 
95 
120 
290 
230 

58 

63 
113 
sn 
153 
157 
300 
378 
420- 

54 

105 

64 
2*7 
323 


• +Z0 
•-1 
-I 
0 
-1 


— i 


X* 87 . . 
88 £2 344 

6.4 36 39l5 
154 56 287 

82 1.1 .. 
6.6 25 783 
88 52 181 

‘ ' 02 


ai 


84 £6 409 


96 
£2 ■ 


-1 


1.1 


+1 


6.ib 
87 
7.7 n 
7.1b 
89 
10.0b 
.+ 2L3 - 
09 
87 
46 


-I 


1.1 


231 161 



40 

0-7 

7.7b 

48 

18 


£9 27 9 
55 148 
12*82 
54 S O 
<8 765, 
58283 
45 3X5 
18 .. 
26 620 
5-1 29J . 
1.7 M3 
XI 380 
75 181 
84 .. 
15908 
38 26.7 
21 87.3 
81 41.1 
1* 887 


05 13 .. 

17.1 45 388 

88b 53 380 
l£4 6.1 284 


IA’. 11V 

iso ns 
374 297 

373 273 .... __ 

U3 88 Scot Eastern 
Scot Mara "A 


7.1 28*85 



318 2*5 
870 570 

as. u . SAC or I 

81 67 Sraathr CP# 


S -1 


45b X* 483 
68 25 61.4 
183b X3 4X5 
29 ' 27 57 1 
258 : 84 19.7 
1X1 . £4 548 
78 = 25 330 
2*5n 30 S3 4 
35b 4 7 305 
20 25 566. 


1986 

Hi^i Low 


Company 


Gross 
O* YU 

Chg# pence ■- P.E 


51 35 

HD 82 
122 85 
199 155 
SE 201 
IDT 89 
172 118 
IBS 140 
118 90'. 

174 139 
169 135 
305 237 
370. 300 
207- 157'; 
141 112 
94 79 

.274 217 
62 33 
74. 58 
115 85 

105 BOV 
356 286 


Stewart Enterp 
tr r 


45 

83 


TR Oty Of Lon DM 106 
M i Gan 


TR mrf i Gan 190 

TR Natural Roa 217 

TR North America 92 

TR Pacific Baste 172 

TO Property 182 

TO Teen 103 

TR Tnatetw 156 

lemma Bur 1S2 

Thtogmoiian 231 

Threg Sacurao Cap 355 
Trans Ocaatuc iao 
Trtrene 126 

THoteraet he 91 
US Detxgniura ' 274 
Wong Resources 36 
Wrttuool 58 

WVRW boau iii Egy 102 
Wfiten 99 

Yeomen . 353 


08 18 ■ 

3 3 48 292 

56b 52 303 
5 7 30*18 

115 54213 
26 26 482 

14 05 . 

87 3.1 tOt 

£6 £5 486 

<50 35 346 

Bib 5 3 26 6 
118b 48 3X6 


' 55 26.49 1 
4.0 31387 
158 174 82 
93 3*545 
25b 61 17.T 
. £2 25 41.7 
£3 .X? *24 
*5 *5 563 

181b 45 384 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


47V 35'- 
71 31 

48 21 

154 116 
22V 13'i 

20'. 12'i 

158 131 
10 go 
247 187 
106 66 
750 375 
9* 77 

133 75 

900 *90 
216 163 
4*0 320 
290 190 
36£ 354 
113 78 
27 10 

208 152 


Souuead 
ftnanru Arrow 
OaSy MM 
Do A' 


Eng Tnmi 
Exoo 

Eiptoraaon 


Frost I 
Goode ft) 8 Ml 
fitoxunon AOno 


43 -3 

1.4 

XJ 239 

31 


. 835 

130 

80 

43 16.1 

£19 

700 

87 11* 

C1B 1 - • . 

700 

17 1X2 

145 +1 

59 

41 3X5 

119 

4.0 

£4 165 

217 

80 

£8 1*0 

101 

33 

33 133 

7*0 

BJ 

13 3*4 


8* 

113 


Mia 

MtownMe Houoe 
Paatic te» T« 

Do Warrants 
Snwn New Com 


84 

£5 

175 


350 -I! 

230 

282 -7 

113 +1 

23 ' 

172 #0 


7.8 94 
22 31.7 
. XI 185 
129 b 7.7 85 
2Z» 68 *2 

8.1 '27279 
200 7 T 52 

05 04 


180 55 85 


COMMODITIES 


LONDON COMMODITY 
EXCHANGE 


G W Jhyrtaoa and Co report 


SUGAR (Fran a Czamftow) 
FOB 

Oa — 147.8-47,4 

Dec — 155-0-54.0 

March — * 163,0-6X0 

May — « 167J«.4 

Aug - 171.4-706 

OS X 79 Jf 74 £ 

Vot 2453 


COCOA 
Sep — 
Doc 


Mar . 
May. 


sjjp ■» 

Dbc_ 


1417-15 

1458-57 

1490-69 

151048 

152746 


154500 
155744 


Wr* 



COFFEE ' 

1724-720 





Mar 

... - 1765-760 

May 

. ... 1800-775 

•Hy” 

- 1640-790 

Sop 

1850-780 

SOYABEAN' 
Auq ' 

131.6-29.0 


Dec, 


Feb 

Apr. 


12X0-27 J) 
128.0-27.0 


_ 131449-5 


132.0-30.5 


Jun 130.0-29.0 

Aug : 130.0-29.0 

Itof: - '121 


GASOIL 
Aug ; 9825-95.50 


oa. 


99.0048.75 


Hfcw . 


Dec . 


102^5-2.00 
105.00-400 
107-504 50 


Jon . 


Feb . 
M*r, 


109.00000 

114.00-7.00 

114.00-7.00 

11440-7.00 

9Q 9R 


LO»BX3H METAL EXCHANGE 
- Unofficial price# 

- Official Tumovor fl g f oo . 


Price hi E P#r ra a l ric tonne 

SDmrtai pence par jpoy ounce . 
RttdaM WbH 8 Co. Ltd. raput 
COPPER GRADE A ‘ 

Cash 8855048650 

' Three Months . 9045040550 
Vol ' 2300. 


-Ton® , 


Firmer 


STANDARD CATHODES 1 

Cash .^J 857.00-868 OQ 

ThriM Months . 88050482.00 
Vol 450 


TO» , 


LEAD 

Cash 254.00-2S.00 

Three Months . 259-50-26000 . 
VOI — — 50 


Tons , 


.Quiet 


ZINC STANDARD 

cash — : 51550425.00 

Vol NO - 

Tone — : idkr 


•ZBtCMGH GRADE 
Castr — u. 541 50-54250 

Three Months. 5455044850- 
Vol 3380 


Torfa 


. Firmer 


S1LVS1 LARGE 

CaUi 3335043450 

Three Months . 3515045250 
VOI ; Nil 


Tone 


Quiet 


SILVER SMALL 

Cash 3335043450 


Three Months . 35150-35250 

Vtf M( 

Tone — kUe 


ALUMNUM 


Cash .... 


757.00-75800 


Three Months . 7G9.QO-76950 
Vol 2650 


Tone 


, Firmer 


NICKEL 


^lh — -.. 2630-2640 

Three Months 2fifl54670 

va — _ Steady 


Tone 


Lower LeveN 


; MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 

COMMISSKm 
Average fafttock prices at 


w prcee n t tB i m marireta on 
I 1st August 


QBe Cadta. 95.02p per kg fw 



15822pperkgeat 


Pft kQ hr 


En^and and Woles: 

Cattle nos. down 35 %. ave. 


.3 nos. up 42%. ave.. 
, 157.47p(-459) 

( roo. 31.1 %.-Bve. 

>(44i7fl -- 


Scotland: 


Cattle nos. down 15%. an. 
. 95.440 (-1 50 
. i nos. up 235%. an 
,14620p(-W — 

Jim. — r 

pOC8 — 


LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 


Month 

S3 

Nov 

Feb 

Jun 


Rg Contract 
p. per Mo 

Open Close 
Unq. 9750 
Unq 10350 

Unq- 105-80 
Unq. 100.00 
Unq. 100.00 
Unq. 100.00 


Vol: 48 


pig Meat vok 119 


UtttJON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
- Uve Cette Contact 


Month 

ago 


Oct 

Nov 

Feb 

Jun 


p. per Mo 

Open Close 
Unq. 9850 
Unq- .9850 
Unq. 98.00 
Unq. 99.50 
Unq. 100.0 
Unq. 100.0 
Unq. 100.0 


Vot 12 


1 <»®0N ORAM FUTURES 
- - - £ par tome 


-Month 

Sop 

NOV 

Jan 

Mar 

May 


WtaM Barley 
Close Cto» 
105.10 igloo 

iwS 

10950 
*13.00 111.40 

1 15<25 112.60 


Volume: 

Wheat _ 

Beriay _. 


.634 


-126 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 
£ per tonne 


Month 

Nov 

Fob 

Apr 

May 

Nov 


Open Close 

130.00 12S.20 

145.00 137.00 

212.00 204.50 

219.00 214.00 

8250 7500 

Vol: 1359 


BIFFEX 

GJLL Fnright Futures Lid 
report S10 per Index pota 
frtigfn index 


Oct 88 
Jon 07 
Apr 87 
Jui87 
Oct 87 
Jan 88 
Apr 88 
Jul88 


Hlgh/Low 

640.04405 


aose 

641.0. 

672.0 

727.0 
6625 
7750 
7975 

650.0 
8000 


V0k 8 Ms • 

Open Interest 2310 


TANKER REPORT 


Jug 88 

Sap 86 — — 

Oct 86 

Dec 8S 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 - 

VM: 10 tots 
Openritorest46 


High/Low Ctoee 


1025.0 
10250 

1050.0 

1070.0 

1050.0 
1100-0 




I up 25 On 31/7/88 



V. 

V 


4 


I 

J 



lASiaui^u 


"nInwItw^ 




STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 



— ^old— 

From your jjortfolio card check your 
eight shat*, price .nwvcmaits. Add them 
up- io give you your overall total. Check 
this against the daily dividend figure 
pub&soed on this page. li ft matches you 
have won outright or a share of die total 
daily prize money stated. If yoa are a 
winner follow the daim procedure on die 
back of your card. Yon must always have 
your card available when chum pig. 


“W/— 


ACCOUNT DAYS: 


Dealings began on Monday. Dealings end next Friday. §Contango day August 1 1. Settlement day August 
- §Forward bargains are permitted on twa previous business days. 


DAILY 

DIVIDEND 

£4,000 

Claims required 
for 

+48 points 

C laiman ts shook 


WEEKLY 

DIVIDEND 

£ 8,000 

Claims required 
for 

+186 points 
0254-53272 




. Ml SB Dm Bra* 61 - u in m 

135 102 RaffiaOdd fJ) W 1» *-1 T.T 53 95 

Beyl BHfcOt sew 3». -« 1U (] M 

tf'» 5’n Sorodwa -B6* ■ .. ;1M ai llj 

£* m . sure ckwj - 73* +a suh>«6 86 

BIB 613 Union * 678 *-5 " S2J 7JJ 603 

71 V«'. Mem Fargo . £87 " «-* .. .. 

am ago ¥**wt .. m ..73 ar ias 



Hinrftsn Whampoa 


Hcwin U) 





Weekly Dividend 


Please make a note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend .of £ 8,000 in 
today's newspaper. 



BRITISH FUNDS 




Aberdeen Conor 

240 


U4 

43 222 

Amac 

Z70 


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63 MB 

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113 

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410 

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112 

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Riewt* 

296 


123 

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152* 

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132 

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33 

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Smart (6 

Bl 

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Tarmac 

492 


134 

26194 

Taylor Woodrow 
Tm»*y Group 

310 


1X3 

40 136 

168 


74 

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417 


1X2 

£9 103 

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75 


IB 

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171 


100 

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331 


134 

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221 »+3 108 43 1X4 

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300 -3 2.1 07 1SB 

320 -45 SB IB 22JS 

217 -1 S6.UU.1- 

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325 «-3 2B 06216 

30 41 2.1 05 14.1 

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378 #47 U 24 1*2 

65 IB IB BOB 

SI .. 46 9BM2 

275 Ub 321GB 

29S . *46 SB . 23 IBB 
ITS 47 3.1 IB 1U 

124 42 0* IB ISO 

30 -4 1B0 2B 1SB 

WB «42 6.1 XI tZ 4 

123 .. SB* 61 MS 

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201 ... 1.4* 07 21B 

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100 

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27 24255 

07 21 64 
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Hgn La* Company 


Cron 
ON YW 

Pnce Cngepenca •• PTE 


312 200 

so a 

120 39 
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280 BO 

BIB 153 


CHOU N RM 

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LASUO 
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Pioneer 
Royal Dutch 
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TncontnJ 
Tmon Eurapa 
UKramar 


IB 44 12.1 
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433 
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SB 31 
158 127 
107 77 

395 325 

4 DO 301 
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283 183 
72 51 

258 190 
260 190 
213 126 
SO 30 
580 559 
224 Bl 

200 153 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


CdAngtun 

FUsy (Jama) 
Kamion CrasMd 
mono* 

Jack* (Vttn) 
Lwma 
Ocean Waon 
P W weori Zocn 
DO -A- 
nay Pack 
Son* Derby 
SM Brsa 

Tcear it ami ley 

yum Cano 




AND LAND 



13 

06 .. 


02 

14 57 


2750 44 01 

♦7 



+* 

171 

06742 


57 

26 395 

♦* 

13 

40 204 


S3 

52 101 

a. 

89b 48 201 


CHEMICALS, 




45 

S3 148 

XB 

113486 

11.1 

35141 

07 

26 115 

M 

01295 

92136 

146 

43 96 


.. 232 

1X1 

36 95 

97 

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32 115 

07 

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74 

96 264 

20 

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84 

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54 87- . 

103 

103 

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01.116 

100 

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32 

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156 

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22 

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47 

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86 

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74 

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26 

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176- 

93 174 

36 

13225 

75 

73156 

16 

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08 

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27 

36108 

10* 

40 140 

00 

35 M3 

80 

971X1 

00 

23 W5 

174 

41 113 

75 

XI 213 

43 

XI 187 


CINEMAS ANDTV 


270 17B An(J*aTV 'A' 
52 27 Qrwapwn 

240 178 HIV k/V 
388 283 LWTHUM 
350 188 ECOI TVA 1 
260 153 TVS NJV 
46 31 TSW 

224 223 Thenwa TV 


250 • 1X9 SB 13.1 

48 -1 U 13 65 

218 46 1 1B SB OB 

540 .. 21B. 63 136 

330 .. 15B 45TOLB 

226 • . . 146b 66 109 

45 4-1 U SB 124 

224 4.1 .. .. 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


433 329 and Mat 368 46 135 - 35 125 

230 203 KBmtly Bratted 233 46 21 ffljJ 120 

301 312 Udbrafce 344 .. 18.1 4.7 154 

545 447 LOO Pa* HMafe 820 .. 146 26156 

100 78* Mom Qiartotta 89* 46 21 23 147 

105 67 Prtaee OTW HoWa 87- • .. XI 24 157 

79 58* Queens Moa! 88* -1 26 65 146 

405 370 SawyHeMa'A* -373 - SB 16 147 

81 56 SOM* 84 «41 IB XB15J 

209 . 145 ThMbooM Font 180 -2 7B 56 HB . 


L*i im 

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BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


280 193 MMdNtfi 255 

*5 « Anabaehar (Henry) 72 
298 188 Aim Maw Z IBB 
12 * 8b Sanhamanca £8* 

260 17B Sark 01 Inland 227 
9* 8 Bank Laura M C8 
280 230 Bank Lun UK 240 
469 M4 Bank « Scodind 404 
690 420 BMtMyt 494 

46 32 Bancnmark 40 

740 410 Brawn SHOMy 4N 
438 288 C» Alan 313 

Mv 36 Canai 55* 

3?' 3f* Chaw Manhamn 125* 
33* coon £3S 

U 46 Cora Bar* Wale* 70 
"2 80* CeranaratanH 02* 
270 .215* Ownscne Bank C251 

£12 J*8 Rnt Nai taanca 179 
378 342 C arrara M at 302 
102 M Omra Paat tv 
251 £1 Hmfro* 213 

430 333 Mtaoul 366 
74 S rn swum 9 

52 ***** 4io 

198 136 Rug 4 fouwor w 
555 666 wmm Banaon TZD 
451 293 Lloyds - 394 

053 638 H*mM BBS 

153 CO DO 8* A -123 

599 417 IMHno ' 544 

321 20! Hal Aua Sk 208 
5C3 428 NHWH 514 

122 80 Ottoman 2115 

448 280 Prandam aao 


“ “JS 

150 U .. 


16B 67 116 

2U m u 

EBB 54 7.1 


Rm n* Pnance 
Gorrara nh 


Rug ( Suwon 14* 

Mamm Banaon 720 
Lloyd* 394 

Maiemka an 

DO 8b 'A' -09 


Nal Aim Sk 
nb was 




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.. 800 52 90 

.. 156 4711B. 


393 180 AS Baa 
181 120 Alptanunc 
132 38 Arasnd 
99 40 Apricot C om p wu * 
96 03 AlMn ^ 

300 205 AMnConp 
50 40 AaM RoaHy 
220 140 Ado Sec 
370 240 BCG 
136 64 BSR 


353 +5 114 52 286 

163 *46 21 16 157 

130 42 06 52 406 

48 06* IBM 

80. 346 

200 -a' M MU 

55 .. .. ...1 M 


185 42 26 12 12B 

270 42 157 £4 157 

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38 

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ABM* Ufa 
Am* Aka 
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Brausiock 
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t ura a lmut Truata ap p — r on Papa 20 


LEISURE 


W4 96 
220 129 
171 98 

58 34 
22S 158 
410 325 
62* 49 
81 85 

128 93 
131 94 

103 32 

190 137 
1B9 130 

an 2 re 

393 826 
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360 237 
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Bair 0 WA ‘A* 134 

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Carapan 48 

Cnrysata 188 

Rm Lasura 363 

GRA 51 

npiuW/B OwmS W 

Henna irate 114 

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Jdana'a Mdga 38 

14* M 169 


Roaly Useful 375 

may Lama* 47 

Saga Hoiam 134 

BamiMaon Gp 2*0 

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Zanen IBS 


103 73 105 
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86 55 SB 
7.1 SB 11.1 
43 113 148 

7Bn SB X5 
107 36134 
1X1 43 154 

.. .. 263 

SB *9116 
54 14 166 

57a 861X5 
7.1 56 107 


PAPER. PRINTING. ADVERT G 


PROPERTY 


» 

£2 

10H 

34 

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U 

203 

158*120* LM 

126 


X9& XI 

2*8 

323 

219 

Laird 

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228 

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480 

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22 • 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 




Edited by Loma Bourke 


FAMILY MONEY/1 


The losers 
in the 
property 
boom 

Building society mortgage ar- 
rears are running at record 
levels and in 1985 the societies 
foreclosed on 16,770 homes. 

Repossession through the 
courts is their last and most 
drastic method of making bad 
debts good. And last year 
foreclosures were running at 
more than three times the rate 
than in the smaller home loan 
market of four years ago. 

Almost a third of first-time 
purchases in the first quarter 
of this year have been financed 
by 100 per cent loa ns. A s 
house price increases outstrip 
wages, new buyers are bound 
to require more credit. 

Interest rates are no longer 
quite so firmly set on the 
downward path. A sterling 
crisis on the foreign exchanges 
could push base (and mort- 
gage) rates two points higher. 
Does this mean today's gen- 
erous credit will he tomorrow's 
financial albatross? 

Not according to the build- 
ing societies. Donald 
Kirkbam, of the Woolwich, 
and Jim Murgatroyd, of the 
Halifax, insist the twin causes 
of bad debts are unemploy- 
ment or short-time working, 
and marital break-up. Mark 
Boleat, of the Building Soci- 
eties Association, says high 
prices are positively beneficial 
for borrowers in trouble: “If 
prices rise by, say, 20 or 30 per 
cent, it's always easier to get 
out of the problem. You have 
the choice of taking some of 
the capital to fund the debt, or 

Kindness can turn 
into cruelty 

selling and moving 
downmarket." 

For first-time buyers, how- 
ever, the only option may be to 
move out of the market. 
Admittedly, a large proportion 
of the one in three who are 
baying first time with a 100 
per cent loan are baying 
artificially cheap property, 
such as council houses. Never- 
theless, lenders must be care- 
ful not to pay out too much 
rope to eager borrowers. 

“The difference between a 
loan of £30.000 and £35,000 
can be the difference between a 
good borrower and a bad 
debtor," says Mr Kirkham. 
Mr Murgatroyd stresses the 
need for a conservative view on 
how much is lent in relation to 
income. 

But how are first-time buy- 
ers to finance purchases in 
expensive markets such as the 
South-East? The Surrey 
Building Society will lend 
three times joint income, while 
the Halifax's nationwide norm 
is 2.1. If interest rates rise 
sharply the generous lender 
may discover how suddenly 
kindness can turn into cruelty. 

If you are unable to meet 
your mortgage commitments, 
the advice from all societies is 
to see your building society 
manager right away. The 
sooner yon deal with the 
problem, the more likely a 
solution will be. _ __ 

MB 


Franchise catastrophe 


On Friday, November 
15, 1985, the Young's 
Franchise Group went 
into receivership- Ten 
days later it was 
bonght for £1.5 million by 
Cyril Spencer, former 
chairman of the Burton 
Gronp. Many 
franchisees of the La 
Mama division of 
Young's, which sold 
franchises in maternity 
wear shops, have lost 
their life savings and 
their homes and face 
| bankruptcy. Their 
I stories illustrate the 
dangers of franchising 
and of regarding the 
readiness of the banks 
to finance a franchisee as 
endorsement that the 
franchise is commercially 
sound. LAWRENCE 
LEVER reports 

When Barclays Bank pulled 
oui of negotiations to rescue 
the Young's Franchise Group 
last November, Young's 
called in the receiver. 

Barclays was still advertis- 
ing “preferential terms" avail- 
able to anyone taking out a 
franchise with Young’s. A 
leaflet entitled Finance 
Scheme for Franchisees of 
Youngs Franchise Group, pre- 
viously produced by Barclays, 
had not been withdrawn. 

Barclays' decision to call in 
the receiver was very much 
against 'the wishes of the 
British Rail Pension Fund, 
which had been considering 
ways of rescuing the company. 

Fourteen months earlier the 
fund had invested £750,000 of 
railwaymen's pension 
contributions in Young’s to 
acquire a 17 per cent interest 
This entire amount was lost 
when Young's went into 
receivership. 

“The investment looked a 
very' worthwhile proposition 
at the time." a former member 
of the British Rail Pension 
Fund team told The Times 
last week.“Barclays could 
have taken a more flexible 
view." 

The former chairman of the 
Burton Group. Cyril Spencer, 
who bought Young's from the 
receiver, has much the same 
sentiments about Barclays. 

“Before 1 even bought the 
company. I saw Barclays with 
British Rail and Edward 
Young and tried to persuade 
them not to pull the plug,” he 
says. “I even offered to under- 
write part of their loan. 

“They pulled the plug. They 
were extremely inflexible, 
considering the number of 
people who had their liveli- 
hood depending on the 
company.” 

Exactly one month before 
the receivership, on October 
15. 1985, a Barclays repre- 
sentative attended the 8 th UK 
Convention of Young's Fran- 
chise Group Ltd. held at the 
Grand Hotel in Eastbourne. 

The representative of 
Barclays addressed a business 
and financial planning semi- 
nar. in terms which gave no 
indication that the Young’s 
Franchise Group might be in a 
parlous financial position. 

According to franchisees of 



The new owner: Cyril Spencer bought the group 


the La Mama, maternity wear 
shops, which were .one of the 
three types of shop franchised 
by Young's — the other two 
are the Promt ptia bridal wear 
shops and the Young’s formal 
meanswear shops — he spoke 
favourably of franchising and 
of the La Mama franchise. 

Barclays was the 
major creditor 

“He said what a good thing 
franchising was in general and 
how good the La Mama one 
was." claims one investor who 
bought a franchise. “Some of 
us were already extremely 
nervous at that time.” 

So far as the would-be 
investors in the La Mama 
franchise were concerned, the 
fact that Barclays was present 
at the meeting and seemingly 
prepared to lend money to 
those who bought a La Mama 
franchise was interpreted by 


most as an endorsement of La 
Mama by the bank. 

One month later the com- 
pany was in receivership, with 
Barclays bring the major cred- 
itor. When Young's was sold 
on November 25, 1985. just 
10 days after the receivership, 
the vast majority of the £1.5 
million realized went to 
Barclays. 

The p referential creditors — 
the Inland Revenue and Na- 
tional Insurance — took their 
slice and Barclays got most of 
the rest Sources dose to the 
receiver say that even then 
Barclays was left substantially 
out of pocket on the deal. 

In fairness to Barclays Bank 
and the view that it took of the 
La Mama franchises. Young's 
is still trading and by all 
accounts the Pronuptia and 
Young's franchises are doing 
well. 

For almost everyone taking 
out a La Mama franchise the 
experience has been a finan- 
cial catastrophe. 


At the time of the receiver- 
ship there were 25 La Mama 
shops. 23 of which were 
franchise operations. 

We spoke to seven of the 23 
La Mama franchisees. They 
have all lost substantial sums 
of money, the highest being' 
around £70.000 and the lowest 
approximately £20,000. Some 
have already dosed down 
their shops. 

La Mama franchisees claim 
that at a meeting on July 15 
the new owners of the Young's 
Franchise Group told them 
that 20 out of the 23 La Mama 
franchises were not currently 
commercially viable. 

Although Barclays repre- 
sentatives were present at the 
La Mama franchisees' Octo- 
ber conference, it is perhaps 
ironic that most of these 
franchisees’ loans were and 
are with the National West- 
minster Bank, which also 
produced a promotional 
leaflet. 

“National Westminster 
Bank in conjunction with La 
Mama has arranged a finance 
scheme designed to assist 
franchisees to start up and 
develop their own La Mama 
outlet,” says the opening 
paragraph. 

The leaflet has the NatWest 
logo at the top and bottom 
with the La Mama logo in 
between. 

A list of the people invited 
to attend the Young's con- 
ference one month before the 
receivership indudes Peter 
Stem, from the National 
Westminster Bank’s small 
business section, and his wife. 

Three franchisees 
had to sell homes 

Mr Stem is also named as one 
of the contacts at the bottom 
of the NaiWest-La Mama 
leaflet 

At least three of the seven 
La Mama franchisees to 
whom we spoke have to sell 
their homes to pay off their 
drills, while one has been 
advised by bis lawyers to file 
for bankruptcy. The seven lost i 
all or part of their life savings 
to boot 

Some of their stories, which 
will be told next week, are 
truly heartrending. 



BEWARE! 

pEblSIOMS 

MINEFlELb 




Pension with a shock 


What the banks say 


Barclays Bank does not deny, 
that the La Mama promo- 
tional leaflet was still in 
circulation at the time it palled 
the ping. 

The bank says: “It was not 
withdrawn. But it merely con- 
stituted an approach to make 
an invitation to our franchise 
unit. 

“Had such an approach 
been made after the bulk had 
been made aware of any 
difficulties, such an approach 
would have been dealt in an 
appropriate manner”. 

The Barclays spokesman 
also confirmed that there was 
a line of contact between its 
franchise unit and the branch 
which handled the financial 
affairs of the Young's Fran- 
chise Gronp as a whole. 


“There was dose liaison 
between the two,” the spokes- 
man . 

“We were seeking to sustain 
the business and a recriverhip 
was a means of doing that, 
protecting the interests of the 
franchisees. We were con- 
fident that Che business coaid 
be sold out of receivership as a 
going concern, thereby 
protecting the interests of the 
franchisees. 

“Had Barclays not re- 
sponded to the request of the 
directors to appoint a receiver, 
liquidation could have ensued, 
resulting In substantial loss 
for all concerned. 

“We did not actually finance 
any La Mama franchises and 
the last loan to a Young's 


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franchisee we' provided was in 
January 1985, ten months 
before the receivership.” 

With regard to Barclays' 
presence at tile Young's con- 
ference a week before tire 
receivership, the spokesman 
says: “The bank's repre- 
sentatives did not address the 
convention hot merely at- 
tended on an informal basis as 
gnests.” 

The National Westminster 
Bank says that it has asked all 
the branch managers where 
the franchisees have their 
accounts to be as helpful ns 
possible to existing La Mama 
franchisees. 

No advances have been 
made to new franchisees since 
the receivership in November 
1985. 

Just part-time 
money-making 

■ As the new crop of graduates 
launch themselves on the jobs market a 
useful stopgap until a permanent job is 
found could be part-time work from 
home. Two writers, Alan and Deborah 
Fowler, have compiled Making Money 
Part-Time, to explain the pitfalls and 

the advantages of Afferent types of part- 
time work: freezer cooking, modelling, 
upholstery, furniture-making and dotnes- 
hiring. The book contains genera/ 
advice too on basic accounting, 
marketing, setting, planning and 
finance. It even covers writing books part- 
time. 

Making Money Part-Time Is published 
by Sphere at £3.95. 

Expat interest 

■ The Abbey National Building 
Society is upping the rate of interest paid 
on its expatriate accounts — the Gross 

5 Star Account — from 10.69 per cent 
(without deduction of tax) to 11 per 
cent The account Is aimed at investors 
not normally resident In the UK- The 
new rate was effective from yesterday 
and the minimum investment is £500. 
Withdrawals can be made on demand mid 
without penalty. Investors resident in 
the UK are not eligible to open a Gross 5 
Star Account 

Details: Abbey National branches. 

Taxman strikes 

■ As the Inland Revenue net closes 
around small businesses, dealing with a 
PAYE investigation becomes ever 
more likely for many companies. 
Accountants Spicer and Peg ter have 
just produced a 700-page guide on how 
to cope with PAYE and PAYE 
investigations by . the Revenue. tnJ981 
there were just over 20,000 PAYE 
audit inspections. During the past four 
years that number has more man 
trebled to yield some £65 mfffion in unpaid 
tax. No wonder the Revenue is 
tightening up. ‘Tax deducted at source 


*****£«**. 


The pension gurus say * 
pension planning is a 
long-term business. 
MARTIN BAKER 
examines the case of 
one man who tried to 
make np for lost time 
and fell fool of the hidden 
charges 

John Hatcher left it too late. 
He ran a microfilm processing 
business which, sadly, did not 
do welL One result was that 
for 12 years he made no 
contributions to a pension 
plan. 

When he stopped working 
for himself be was in his (ate 
fifties and realized he had left 
it very late indeed. He began 
to work for another company. 
Data Design, as a graphics 
manager, in November 1984. 
He was 58 and concerned 
about his pension arrange- 
ments. He asked for the first 
three months of his £15,000 
salary to be put straight into a 
pension plan. 

The company was small and 
had no pension arrangements, 
but Mr Hatcher learned that 
the chairman, Clive Holmes, 
had a knowledge of pensions. 
“1 left Mr Holmes in charge of 
things.” says Mr Hatcher. A 
company scheme was estab- 
lished with Mr Hatcher as the 
sole subscriber. 

After the first three months* 
salary had been paid in. Mr 
Hatcher committed £250 ev- 
ery month to the scheme. This 
was with Abbey Life, for 
which Mr Holmes had for- 
merly been a salesman. Dur- 
ing his 14 months of 
employment with Data De- 
sign. Mr Hatcher ploughed 
£6.790 into his pension 
scheme. “I was anxious to 
improve my inadequate pen- 
sion arrangements," he wrote 
later to Abbey Life’s chair- 
man, Michael Hepber. 

Data Design is no longer 
trading, and Mr Hatcher is out 
of a job. His pension scheme, 
however, still exists. When its 
administrators wrote to Mr 
Hatcher with an estimate of 
his pension on retirement he 
was surprised at what he 
considered to be a very low 
figure, and thought about 
transferring his money into 
another scheme run by Lon- 
don Life. 

Imagine his distress when 
he discovered that the transfer 
value of his £6,790 amounted 
to less than half of the 
premiums paid — £2,913.52. 

There are. of course, admin- 


istrative costs in transferring 
the value of an employee's 
contributions between compa- 
nies. and this diminishes the 
value transferred. Again, dif- 
ferent actuarial assumptions 
may cause a lower value to be 
taken. But the figures, when 
quoted to Paul Stainbridge. of 
London & Manchester, 
sounded “absolutely 
amazing". 

Mr Stainbridge said : “It 
sounds like a clerical error. 
Transfer values can carry 
penalties, but they run at 5 to 
10 per cent in most cases. The 
subscriber should at least have 
the value of his 
contributions.” 

Was it a clerical error? If 
not. where has the money 
gone? Some rapid checking-up 
showed that, in feet, only one 
of Mr Hatcher's two policies 
(a regular plan and a lump 
sum commitment for the first 

The money has gone 
on commission 

three months' salary) had been 
quoted. The true transfer 
value is £5.857.12. This is 
better, but still £1,132.78 less 
than the amount contributed. 

A pension scheme, for all 
the complications of tax 
breaks on contributions and 
the like, is no more than an 
investment Most of the 
money goes more or less 
directly into shares, property 
and other investments. That 
Mr Hatcher's money appears 
to have fallen in value by 
more than 16 per cent while 
the world's stock markets 
have been booming is. to say 
the least surprising. For Mr 
Hatcher it is almost 
catastrophic. ' 

His apparent fosses are to be 
set against the managed pen- 
sion fond into which his 
money went -The fond has, 
according to Abbey Life, 
gained 18.5 per cent per year 
for the past five years. We are 
left with the question of where 
the money has gone. The 
answer is simple — commis- 
sion to the salesman. 

“We are not a charity,” says 
Mr Hepher. It was the stan- 
dard tale of the intermediary 
taking his share at the outset 
of the policies, and the pen- 
son company making its 
money over the duration of 
the plan. 

“With any life assurance or 
pensions policy you’ll be 


caned if you surrender it in the • 
first couple of years.’ says .. 
Harry Verney. of Pensions - 
Advisers, an independent pen- •- 
sions consultant. Some T 
charges are levied early on in 
the life of a plan, while the rest _ 
are spread out over its dura- - 
tion. On early encashment or 
transfer the companies take 
their profit and the policy- . 
holder is left with the rest 

Mr Hepher insists that ifMr 7 

Hatcher chose “not to aban- “ 
don the company, we could . 

offer him an excellent return . 

But he added: “We cannot 
subsidize those who break 
with us atthe expense of those - 
clients who stay. 

“This sort of charge is a - 
normal life assurance industry 
situation.” T’ 

Mr Verney agrees. He finds ’. 
the transfer value “a little on t 
the low side; but not surpris- . 
ingly so". Abbey Life is “in the ;; 
lowest third of companies 
making charges, although . 
middle market in terms of 
performance". 

So where has Mr Hatcher ■ 
gone wrong? Mr Verney 7 
thinks he was wise to get into a 
pension plan and pour in the-~* 
money. The tax relief means ; 
Mr Hatcher would have seen 
about £4,000 of his £6.790. It ; 
could be argued that be is, in 
feet, showing a profit If the.: 
company had not ceased trad- 7 
ing he would be taking advan- L. 
tage of the tax breaks without *~ 
suffering the high charges ra- 
the early years. - 

Mr Hatcher says: “As far as 
I*m concerned there are no 
early or late years — just five 
or six left.” He is disappointed . 
to have entered a scheme with • 
heavy front-end charges. ' 

Yet Abbey Life’s chargings 
structure '.seems more gen-’ 
erous than mostin an industry ^ 
which seems to do very well’’ 
out of the taxman's generosity -J 
to pension subscribes. 

“A lot of what we do as an _ 
industry is justified.” says Mr - 
Hepher, “but some of it isn't... 
The industry will be improved^ 
by competition.” 

Mr Hatcher’s -practical 
problem now is whether to > 
transfer to London Life or not. ; 
If he does, there may be more - 
early charges — the standard ’ 
practice in the industry. He is * 
taking independent advice ; 
this time/ Undoubtedly. . 
though, his biggest mistake ' 
was leaving it too late. 


well try wrr my ton* 

KING t/PWMRDLY MOBILE.. 

£D J 


f EXECUTIVE 

removals I 


under the PAYE system is now the 
Inland Revenue’s biggest single cash 
flow. No company is sate from a 
potentially crippling PAYE investigation, 
explains Michael Reader, the author of 
thcMjjukJe and a partner of Spicsr and 


Mortgage gamble 

■ If you fancy a gamble on the way 
interest rates will go, a fixed rate 
mortgage might be just the thing. The 
Housing Enquiry Service is offering home 


loans at 1 0.25 per cent, fixed for three 
years. The scheme differs from other 
fixed rate schemes in that there is no 
early redemption tee on sate of the 


property, although there is a fee if you 
simply remortgage. The minimum loan is 
a fairly high £50,000. There is ah 
arrangement fee of £1 50 and you will be 
asked to take out an indemnity 
Insurance for that part of foe loan which 
exceeds 80 per cent of the property's 
value. 

Details: Housing Enquiry Service, S 

Square, London W1M 6 AJ 

Cash warning 

■ Sole traders and partners should 
fry to avoid excessive cash withdrawals 
from their company in years when 

low, warn accountants.Clark 
Whitehill in their latest Business 
Letter. The Inland Revenue has 
apparently been challenging some 
deductions of bank interest in years In 
which private withdrawals exceeded 
the current year’s profits. And sole 
traders ana partners who run an 
overdraft on their business bank account 
could find that foe Inland Revenue 
disallows a deduction for bank interest if 
you draw out too much of the profits. 

Full details from Clark Whitehill. 25 
L ° naQn EC<A 

NSC form 

■ In case you missed foe 
anrouncement. you can no longer buy 

^ os V 0 t f! c » s - Instead you have 
toffli in an Application to Purchase- ' 

*** «rtiflcates. You 
record the purchase in the new 

sasssr 1 


j MWIMW LOAN CMJOO 

Cuiirirt Snrtwn 

0260-273272 

HEATH ft BLACKSHAW 
am 1 Ham. Sm Bjjjfc. Cb h^m w. 


Extending deadline 

■ The new Building Societies Bill now 
on Its way through Parliament is due to 
come into force next January, but not 
all its provisions will be Implemented 
immediately. The building societies 
have asked for more time to establish the 
Ombudsman scheme and this wfH not 
now be set up until July 1 , 1987. Powers 
enabling societies to turn themselves 
into limited companies mil also be 
delayed until January 1988. It has also 
been decided to scrap the provisions 
which forbid a loan being dependent 
on buying some other service from the 
society, provided the societies can put 

together a satisfactory Code of Conduct 

to be introduced by January 1988. 

The new legislation gives societies 
wide ranging powers to offer new 
services, such as conveyancing, 
Insurance and estate agency facifittes as 
well as allowing them to offer 
unsecured loans. 


Sea 2 - c* 1. 5 _ s T>w - I 

H II! iiiiiiiil!! ISll 

m f ill Ji Hi 1 Ilf h * k j 1 j 

Ell 0=5 g5 

kEI - 

P |gB 8 i-gi f-egj- a | ££»? 

OUR NEW ’MAXIMUM INTEREST BOND’ 

IS WORTH MORE THAN A SIDEWAYS GLANCPi 




()\ 


;U;1 ♦ 

gs'l 
s i'l 

Jill 






THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


23 


FAMILY MONEY/2 






DBnstable House, In an idyllic setting by the Thames, became the scene for strife 


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PROPERTY 


The leaseholders of Dunstable 
House - in Marlow, 
Buckinghamshire, used to 
have* quiet life in their luxury 
block overlooking the 
Thames. But the past three 
years have seen harrowing 
legal, battles which have left 
the leaseholders emotionally 
drained, and their freeholder 
more than £7,000 out of 
pocket 

Duo stable House consists 
of six flats on two floors. Each 
flat is worth about £100^00. 
In 198] the leaseholders and 
the freeholder, Stanley Clarke, 
became aware that the roof 
was m need of substantial 
repair or renewal . 

The following year the free- 
holder built a penthouse on 
the roof and at the same time 
he laid put ihe rest of the roof 
space as apatio garden and re- 
covered the roof As early as 
July 1983 the residents were 
concerned about the standard 
of the repairs. Solicitors’ let- 
ters started'flytng. 

Several of the leaseholders 
refnsed-io pay their share of 
tbecosiof the repairs and they 
paid only part of the sum due 
for property insurance. In 
October 1983 Mr Clarke 
started const proceedings 
against one of them, a widow 
aged over 70. He sought to 
forfeit her lease for non- 
payment of the amounts due. 

Her solicitor explained the 
outcome: “The freeholder was 
in America, and he did not 
give s good enough excuse for 
not -coming back for the 
hearing. His application to 
forfeit the lease was dismissed, 
and the court held that he had 
overcharged on the 
insurance.'* 

Costs of £2,740 were 
awarded against Mr Clarke 
but he did not pay. The 
lessee's solicitor had to pur a 
garnishee order on his bank 
account to recover the money. 

A.momh laTerthfccedir^iOf 
the balcohyof one ofthe top- - 
floor flats collapsed. - James 
Robinson;.: chairman of the 
Dunstable House Residents' 
Association, said: “The ceiling 
collapsed and over 1001b of 
materials crashed down.*' 


The freeholder refused to 
accept that the roof was the 
cause of the problem. Mean- 
while, water was penetrating 
into the flat below. In heavy 
ram, water came through the 
ceiling and the elddiy flat- 
owner had to catch the drips in 
bowls. In her flat and the flat 
above a black fungal substance 
appeared on the walls. 

The leaseholders contin- 
ually asked for repairs to the 
roof to be carried out, but the 
freeholder appeared to do 
nothing. Eventually one of the 
leaseholders, with the support 

‘Attitude in court 
was cavalier 9 


of the residents' association, 
decided to go' to the county 
court. She claimed Mr Clarke 
was in breach of his covenant 
to repair in the lease. 

The case was finally decided 
in February 1986. The lease- 
holder won the day. The judge 
said of Mr Clarke's evidence: 
“His claim of work done, 
unsupported by' any docu- 
ments, was, to say the least, 
unconvincing: I find Mr 
Clarke not to be worthy of 
beb’ef and I found his attitude 
in the witness box cavalier.** 

The leaseholder was 
awarded £200 towards the cost 
of redecorating her flat, and 
£500 general damages. Costs 
were again awarded against 
Mr Clarice. This time he is due 
to pay £4,538 in addition to 
his own legal fees. 

The judge also appointed an 
independent receiver- man- 
ager lo ensure that the roof 
repairs were carried out The 
work is due to start on August 
II- 

Mr Clarke is reluctant to 
comment but be insists: 
“There is nothing wrong with 
the roof." When asked about 
the contractor who is due to 
start work on the roof he said* 
“I do not know anything 
about thaL”- 

In feet, Mr Clarke has 
acknowledged receipt of a 
letter, from the receiver-man- 
ager which staled: “A con- 
tractor has been selected and 
wishes to commence work on 
August 11.” 



issue of 



When you have at least £5,000 to invest you 
want the top rate of interest. Look no further 
than the second issue of the Sussex 90 Day 
Account. Our 8-25% net isequal to U.62% gross 
a ssumin g you pay tax at the basic rate. But don't 
look for too long, this is alimited issue only. 

SUSSEX 90 DAY A/C 

-SECOND ISSUE 



NET 


MINIMUM INVESTMENT £5,000. 

AFTER 90 DAYS’ INVESTMENT 90 DAYS’ NOTICE 
OR 90 DAYS' LOSS OF INTEREST 


•braes raKi arc Baljocabctow £3-WM pay 3-25 no - 7~3®% gitm. 

To: Sussex CbirntySuilding Society. FREEPOST, 
FriarsWalk, Lewes, East Sussex BN7 2LW. 


1/Ufe enclose a cheque number. 


-fori 

(intamum investment f&OQQj 

to be investedin the Sussex Ninety Day Account (Second Issue). 

FULLNAMEfS) ' 

ADDRESS 


Mr Clarke's solicitor was 
considerably more helpful: 
“There is a lot of personality 
in the whole dispute which 
probably colours things a bit” 
But whax does Mr Clarke . 
mean when he says there was 
nothing wrong with the roof? 
The solicitor says: “I think 
what that reflects is that the. 
parties never were in agree- 
ment and they are still not 
now. The judge has beard the 
evidence and made a decision 
and obviously that does not 
satisfy everybody. 

“Apart from the roofing 
works which were in dispute, 
what is not in dispute is that 
out of doors there is a great 
deal of maintenance work to 
be done. That is going entirely 
as you would expect it." 

Mr Robinson does have a 
final piece of advice for other 
leaseholders who have prob- 
lems with their freeholders: 

“You need a good solicitor 
who is on the ball, a good 
surveyor, and a good hamster. 
When you end up in court 
with an elderly lady on the 
point of tears wondering 
whether she wiD lose her flat, 
this litigation business is not 
to be entered into lightly." 

Susan Fieldman 


The Robinsons, and the flats full of problems 


POSTCODE 


SIGNATURES 


DATE 


SUSSEX 


Tt 



BUIUHXG SOCIETY 

WI1 give job a little help with your dream. 


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Just £500 nets you a big 8%. 


If you leave your money in an Abbey' National Higher Interest Account for 
a year/that 8% grows to 8.16%. This is the net compounded annual rate when 

r our half-yearly interest remains invested 

Or you can take your interest as a monthly income. 

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y'our bank account 

INSTANT ACCESS 

Should you need your money instantly, it’s yours, subject to 90 day's’ loss 
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^"~To: Dept. HIY, Abbey National Building Society', FREEPOST, 201 Grafton Gate East,”" [ 


MILTON KEYNES MK9 IDA 
I/We enclose a cheque for &_ 


_to be invested in a Higher Interest 


Account at my/our local branch in 

Please send me full details andan application card. I/We understand the rate may vary. 
I/We would like A the interest added to the account half-yearly □ 

B. to take advantage of the monthly income facility □ 

(ockappmprcacbim 

Full name(s) Mr/Mrs/Miss 

Address 

Postcode Telephone - 


Signature^). 


-Date. 



ABBEY NATIONAL HIGHER INTEREST ACCOUNT 


ABBEV NOTIONAL BUILDING SOQETY.ABBEYHOUSE. BAKER STREET. LONDON NV1 6XL 


SKcr. 











THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/3 


Banks set to jump 
on the bandwagon 



■' The big banks are beginning to 
. t warm 10 the idea of a sbare- 
J. owning democracy. Having 
«_ noticed the huge response to 
the British Telecom issue they 
are now presumably expecting 
something similar with the 
flotations of the Trustee Sav- 
ings Bank in September and 
British Gas in October. 

The thought of all those nice 
dealing commissions just 
waiting to be picked up may 
' not be making the banks 
drool, but they are dearly 
attracted. 

Barclays was first off the 
mark, announcing that it has 
specially established a new 
Slock Exchange member com- 
pany. Bardayshare, to offer 
share-dealing facilities to the 
man in the street. 

National Westminster also 
intends to set up a share 
service, though more mod- 
estly to offer a special dealing 
facility in British Gas shares. 

Barclay share will not be- 
come operational until Janu- 
ary when it will start offering a 
service for people investing in 
. a Personal Equity Plan, the 
; share investment scheme with 
J tax incentives being promoted 
• : by the Government. 

You will be able to invest 


regularly in your PEP. 
transferring money from your 
Barclays account to your 
Bardayshare account, and 
Barclaysbare will look after 
the rest. 

It will manage the share 
portfolio on a discretionary 
basis (it makes the investment 
decisions, not you) and will 
look after all the paperwork 
such as registering your hold- 
ings and keeping your share 
certificates sale. 

The service will cost an 
annual management fee. 
Barclays is not disclosing ex- 
actly how much this will be 
yet, but promises that it will be 
competitive. Other details of 
the plan are also not available 
as the precise form of tbe PEP 
scheme will not be certain 
until legislation has brought 
them into existence. 

Further into the future the 
bank will be offering a regular 
share-dealing service to cus- 
tomers — a pilot scheme in 
selected branches is starting 
next year and the service may 
become nationwide by the end 
of the year. 

Barclays customers will be 
able to buy and sell shares 
over the counter in Barclays 
branches, making their invest- 
ment decisions themselves. 

Again. Barclays will not say 
exactly what the commission 


Host or our mbjimm Acauws 
— teum to m ft&Brsttmstms 
— Do m TmuKumKA cfflmm! 


The road show 



•1 v > 


for investors British Gas 




charges will be but insists they 
will be cheaper than its 
present charges. In common 
with most other banks it 
charges the normal broker’s 
commission plus the mini- 
mum extra, cost of £5 per 
transaction. 

The new service will not 
just be a cut-price, no-frills 
broking service because free 
investment advice will be 
available by telephoning the 
Bardayshare central office. 

Baricays Bank branch staff 


however, win not be au- 
thorized to give advice. There 
will be share price screens in 
the branches so that customers 
can check how the stock 
market is moving. 

One word of caution, 
though. The bank says that 
where possible deals will be 
channelled through Barclays 
de Zoete Wedd, its securities 
and investment banking arm. 
That means there is a danger 
you might not get the best 
price on the deal but only the 


price BZW is prepared to 
quote. 

But Barclays insists that it 
will transact deals on a “best 
price” basis and win continue 
to use a wide range of brokers 
to do so. It will be up to 
customers to keep an eye on 
the buying and selling prices 
they are bang offered to make 
sure that they really are getting 
the best. 


Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 


British Gas is hitting the road. 
A huge publicity campaign has 
been set in motion for the 
November flotation of the 
company, involving television 
and newspaper advertising 
and 16 road shows. The 
intention is to bring the 
biggest government sell-off yet 
to our attention, whether we 
like it or not. 

The road shows are aimed 
at professional advisers and 
intermediaries, while the pub- 
lic can call a share information 
office in Bristol or drop into 
their local gas showroom for a 
pack of information, including 
a brochure on British Gas, and 
a booklet on how to buy and 
sell shares. 

Furthermore, you will re- 
ceive a leaflet advertising the 
issue with your next gas bilL 
The leaflets are going out at 
the rate of quarter of a million 
a day. 

Once an inquiry has been 
made to the Bristol office the 
caller will automatically be 
sent further information on 
the flotation as h becomes 
available, and, when the time 
comes to buy (or notX a 
prospectus and application 


But the advisers are keeping 





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WORTH MAKING A SONG AND DANCE ABOUT. 


At this rate, the new Alliance 8C Leicester Investment Bond 
will be a favourite for people on the lookout for a generous 
return on their money. 

Especially as the minimum investment required is just 
£2,500. 

The investment remains in die account for at least one 
year/ during which it will certainly pay you handsomely. 

Because no matter what fixture interest rates may be, during 
the first year of your investment the Bond guarantees to pay you 
annual interest ata level 3.25% above our basic rate.* 

Alternatively, you can receive monthly income for the first 
year at a guaranteed 3 % above our basic rate.* 

Then, at die end of the year, you can have access to your 
money with only 28 days’ written notice. 


With such attractive terms as these, we hasten to add dmt 
the Alliance 8C Leicester Investment Bond is a limited issue. 
Which means, of course, first come, first served. 

So hurry along to any one of our 430 branches throughout 
the country or send off the coupon (no stamp needed) to 
Alliance SC Leicester Building Society, FREEPOST, Hove 
Park, Hove, East Sussex BN3 2ZU. 

I i— d i / </P 


Investment Bond 

D I/We enclose a cheque for £ 

Investment Bond Account (minimum £2,500). 


.to open an 


ADDRESS 


POSTCODE 


ALLIANCE' ■■■ LEICESTER 


A brighteridea altogether 


^E^Ti5WWAlDRJCAN*WiVU.'Afi3rwtiV T .«tS:w ‘.;m\ -- - MONTHLY INTEREST RAIE&SS* HEE1MNMUU HWtSTWW rtJKro WC YEAR THEN IMTHOfWBHJS AT 28 OATS' WBnHMNOTlCL ‘BASK RATE BOOT TO THE VA»ABtfR«0YM0^Yf^MTigunREHTLY 5 B5SICI 


some matters fairly dose to 
their chests. Although we 
know that British Gas 
employees will be able to 
purchase shares at a discount 
and that gas consumers will 
receive favourable treatment, 
we do not know who will be 
regarded as a “consumer”. 

Owner-occupiers with their 
names on the gas bill obvi- 
ously qualify for the privilege 
of a discount on bills or a 
bonus share issue. Tenants 
and those who share a gas 
supply may not be so lucky — 
only one application per me- 
tered gas supply will receive 
the benefits. j „ 

If you decide to buy and sell 
straightaway you will certainly 


5 H A B * 


jkfoumation 


OFFICE 


Saleability: The symbol to 
promote privatization 


lose the right to any sharehold- 
er tasks. As yet there are no 


er perks. As yet there are no 
details of how shares are to be 
bought and sold. The Post 
Office or even British Gas 
showrooms may or may not 
be involved. But dealing m tbe 
shares “will be quite easy”, 
according to the merchant 
bankers responsible for the 
issue. 


But is it going to be a good 
investment? The balance of 


stockbroker opinion is 
favourable, although the 


nosedive in the price of oil has 
made many rather pessimistic 
about energy-related stocks. 

The short and rather easy 
answer is that it is far too early 
to tell because of the large 
number of variables that in- 
fluence the issue — the price of 
the shares, the state of the 
stock market and the future , 
for oil all have to be consid- 
ered. 

Tbe Government is trying 
to sell British Gas to more 
people than ever before. Brit- 
ish Telecom attracted 13 
million subscribers, and the 
hank ers behind the issue want 
to improve on that. It seems 
that if they want to make sure 
of that objective for such a big 
company — it should bring in 
at least twice and possibly 
three times as much as BT - 
the flotation will have to be 
cheap. 

A telephone hotline will be 
set up at the Bristol informa- 
tion office this month. If you 
want information now, write 
to British Gas Share Informa- 
tion Office, PO Box 1, Bristol 
BS99 1BG. 



Sii||ir;iiij 



illiliHiSf 





*-• \ . 


acting today will earn 

YOU IP TO AN 

00/ bonus 

O /O ALLOCATION 
TO INVESTMENT NOW 


... 


THIS OFFER CLOSES ON 
AUG 2GTH 


TO ENSURE SWIFT ACTION 
PHONE 0761416730 OR 
SEND COUPON TO: 
CAVENDISH. I. BROKERS, 
CAVENDISH HOUSE. Wft- 
TON. MIOSOMER NORTON, 
BATH. 


Martin Baker 


l NAME — 
1 ADDRESS. 


PEP specialists 
on tiie line 


I TEL NO:. 


Fund managers Fidelity are 
setting up a special team of 
investment advisers to answer 
questions on Personal Equity 
Plans, and their telephone 
advice service (0800 41461) is 
now in operation. 


‘CAPITAL ^ 
! AVAILABLE X. 


nr 1 1 

r t h 


Success in naming PEPS 
and keeping costs to a mini- 
mum will depend very much on 
the right computer systems. 
Critics of the scheme have said 
the administrative costs and 
marketing charges would more 
than cancel out all the tax 
advantages. 

“We already have the com- 
puter systems in place for 
PEPS and I believe we are 
better placed than any of our 
competitors to handle die 
administration,” said Barry 
Bateman. Fidelity Investment 
Services managing director. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN 

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BCCl 

Citibank Savings? 

Consolidated Cnb 

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A MUST FOR ALL LLOYD’S MEMBERS 


I 


Jus* out; 32-page Advance Summary covering over 90% of die 
Syndicate Results, including underwriting performance, investment 
return and cheque per £10.000 share for each syndicate. 

Pubfched by the Association of Lloyd's Members — offered ro Lloyd's 
members in UK and Europe at £35 (USS55) and In other coantrfes at 
US$70 (£461 to Include a further comprehensive results analysts In 
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Send cheque for your copy by return of post, to: 


Association of Lloyd’s Members 
Lloyd's. Suite El 
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London EC3M 7DQ <T«L 01-023 7100 E*. 4«W) 



mto action 

. The .j OI ? d ’ S 1 ? r 8 est unit trust group has 
advanced plans for this new tax clcicnt investment 

FideWs%Ip^i and y 0 ” ^ station to 

naeutysPEP seminar, post the coupon now. 


FREE PEP SEMINAR 


scrmriar invitation. 





«AK»C MONEY MAKE WWY 














THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


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OVERSEAS TRAVEL 

FIRST COW, RRST SOWED 

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Sydney £466 £765 


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AUSTRA L!. 

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LAMZABOni Plans dal Carmen 
2 bedroom apart. Iwtotauh. 
AvaUanie from September on- 
ward*. £IOO gw. OL-441 4332 


b de eg s Z4L Fra* car hire. From 
£SS gw. 10903) 093101. 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 

LA MMDK. Nr Lawandou t st 
Trow* 3/4 hr) Apt. tops 4. Nr 
eair brad* shop* Btstroe. wind- 
surfing. From Sew 20 Ul From 
C100 pw. Tel: 1027783) 366. 


6 rural cottage* 16 August 
oimmr ds /Sept. Br etag n e Mon- 
days 0228 357477 
STJMXHB: Lovely. bflbSdt do- 
mam. beautmu. moBOe boro* 
sleeps 6. all mod an* £l30gw. 
Avan Aug/SepL 0702 6B830a 
■H— 08 N E , MHUC. Bga- 
cmu* wdLeoutaPed House. 16 
Aug-3. Sept 031 343 1988 
NR Cimm Unan lea PtniL Mod 
sea rrool dpl pgr. SO yds sand* 
Now on. Br*ghto*V02T5J362S6. 
FONT MR— UU ttULF a Tro- 
pe* Bupnr» apt. alas 4/6 on the • 
ie* Ol 462 1269. 

SELFCATERING . 
GREECE 

(SUMM YME SM 
AUGIIST/SB’TBnBI 

■ FLY tHREGT TO- CORFU. 
CEPHALONW. ZAKYNTMOS. 
CRETE A SK1ATH0S. 
P g nttfJ vfltas 3 spta 
Ctoda to riorioug baachg* 
FREE MbidwrWig ir Crow. 

MMSHAM B4Q3S8788 

HJOS ISLAND 
HOLIDAYS 

mn MID ATOL 1452 


o, w £396 rtn £695. Andrlond 
o. w £420 rtn £788. Jotog 
o. w £306 nn £499. LOB Aogc- 
lea O/w £216 rtn £406. London 
FlIgM Centre 01-370 6532. 


lo Europe. USA 6 most destina- 
Uom. Dtglomat Travel: 01-730 
2201. ABTA IATA ATOL- 


OMC CALL for some of the best 
deala in flpi* sa e e tmt n ii . ho- 
lds and car Mr* Trt London Ol 
636 6000. Manctwater 061 B32 
2000. AU- Travel Advisory 


THE GREAT 
AMERICAS 

OFFER UNBEATABLE VALUE 
PEAK SEASON FARES 

N.Yoi Cm Dalbt »S 

Bmua £3H Hnoux OM 

llwine__£»9 CkMgntal^OW 

Horan Cto L» Vrpn. CPV 

A rt a n n D** VancocncT.fM 

Ptubdrigba CJ55 WtaiDRCWLlSO 

FLY DRIVE USA 
Flonfa 

t'rtrtbmn . ,..fM 

AIR PASSES FROM £59 
HOTEL VOUCHERS £28 
PER NIGHT 

Toot to McxiayHxmqf 
Caymw Wwds 
- Btoe but e now available 

PEREGOR TRAVEL 

Ribfip (0X36) 30871 pfi sod JWOO 
UTA 47859 IATA 


Huge Discount* BunwprM 
Travel. 10 3 727) 26097 

/271 09/27838. 


LOW C06r FARO to US.L Ma- 
jor TTaveL Ol 488 9237- IATA. 


fXCUHm KO I ILL* Wtoi good 
food In exorUem tocaaonsintnc 
Balearic* and EJnace. CaO Ol 
299 0214. 


IwMrii i If tori flMdi 
lb M - ari go oa prase K 
HUH clasts rim 1178 
IMMB Hi MU RM CTM 




gj 

' Ti. 


TEr 

s 

1 

i 


LOW COST FUOHT* Moat Euro- 299 0214. 

AUmMt N2 ~ S*ulh AM* tlt/HO. £618 Perth £645 AB 
2ii3w ABTA ILL Hong Kong. Best Fare* nmo c rsr rlera to AUS/N2L Ol- 

61004 ATOL 1960 01-493 7776 ABTA. 884 7371. ABTA 


42-4* EMU CMKT HUB 
LHHH N KJ 

Empe/USL FigUs 01-937 5400 
Ion IU FMtt 01-603 1515 
UfAmsAH 01-938 3444 
Jjwwuiwil Uanari/Bonded 
ABTA IMA ATOL 1458 


DtoCOUMT FARES Worldwide; 
01-484 0734 Jupiter Travel. 


Houdays/fHght* brochures/ im 
ttanl booking* Ventura 
Holiday* TM 01-280 1366. 


SWITZERLAND' 
FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissair'S 
Super Apex. 

London toZurich or 
Geneva dailyoncon- 
venient afternoon 
flights. And daily 
flights to Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days 
before departure. 

Stay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday afterarrivaL 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travel agents or 

01-4379573 


mator c a rr i ers m AUS/N2L Ol- I SOWVH AFRICA JolMirg from 
664 7371. ABTA l £466. 01JS84 7371 ABTA. 


SELF-CATERING PORTUGAL 

ARE YOU IN A PANIC? 

Thd Mguve Attomattva hew Just two vfe* toft In the School 
Hofctay period, so your problem is solved; 23rd August far 2 or 
3 weeks - Sonsadonei house tor 6; pool end start. £1.800 p.«v. 
2®h August tor 2 weeks - Sumptuous house tor 10. staggering 
viawK pool and start. £1.950 p_w. other sengritorallMUMui 
avaBabto Sept/Oct Cal us Today. 

Th« Algarva Alternative 
01-491-0802 
73 St Jhws’s St London W1 


CORNWALL ft DEVON 



SELF-CATERING TURKEY 

TURKISH DEUGHT 
HOUDATS 

Inclusive Holidays 

1 OR 2 WEEKS 

from £299 

Alst, Asgast/September availability 

01-891 6469 


Ashley Courtenay recommended 
This dc^ufid Vicioran Couniry Hook sands in its own 4 acres 
oTgudens and paddocks in the beautiful Dartmoor NaUooal Park. 
The peace end tranquility of its mnouxiiao make it * place 
where one can really relax. 

The hold has its own croquet lawn with riding/fofamg/golf 
arranged nearby. 

Well behaved dogs welcome. 

Special breaks, log fires and personal anenuon assured by ihe 
tween. 

Fen* (briber details telephone: 

Mr A Mis Chilron {082 28 1 >466 

Mary Tary, Nr. Tavistock, Devon 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


RN U pMmd to amount* Mi 
SOth Bb-tMay today. No wrtn- 
Uri yrl. Hair ail my owa • «UU 
u» original coioar. 

LAMORA COKt “Touctef Con- 
tact ttuwan Dmny or Baity ts 
WUtUUIV. LOW Marvin. 

v aauuF i c. i ton you. 


SERVICES 


Contact 

the team wtti the best 
experience World-wide 

ACHIEVEMENTS 

DEPT TT, NOHTHQATE 
CANTEHBURV CT11BA 

TELl 0227 482818 


BOAT CHARTVR 1965 Nimbus 
3000. 6 b*fth luxury onuew tor 
charier with supper on South 
Coast of Devon and Cornwall. 
Available by me hour, day or 
w««. Trt Peter Oyer, Prym- 
oulh 0762 76861 1 

BREAKAWAY. London's cWB for 
professional unattMched people 
2jjj,0'* r ZOO events maptn - 
U 1 24 hr Mf o use. 997 7994. 

TME MARRMSC bureau - 

HEATHER JENNER. 124 Now 
Bond Ol wt 01-629 9634. 

WIEN M LOMMM Rnl a TV or 

video by day. wk or monttv. 
TOPS TV 01-720 4469. - 

BS55 55R Love or MatTtao* 

AU age* area* Oaieftoe. Deri 
|Q16) 23 AUogdon Road. Lon- 
don W8. Tefa 01-938 1011 


mOCO PLAYERS —The perfect 
2nd video owe you money. 
Latest model Ir £179 or rent 
Too* 91 Lower Soane SL 
SWl 7300933. 

RRMMTS Or NETTUBak. 6oUd 
BrazUlan Mahogany, dintog ta- 
bles to toe SholWl A OMnoen- 
dale manner, mate to attend 
specification* UnMmlted choice 
or chair* aWeteanl* display 
cabinets A book arte* Netttebod 
nr Henley an TBame* (0491) , 
641116. Bo tm tmouih (0202) I 
29368a Toosham Devon 
(039287) 7443. Berkeley Ctos 
10483) 810962 . 

THE m m 17W-IML Other 1 
tides avail. Hand bound ready 
for presentaten also 

“Sundays”. £12-60. R e me mb er 
When. 01-688 6323. 

newra FOR AMY KVDrr, Cat* 
StarHghl Exp. Cnee* Lea Mi* 
All theatre and sg ott* 

Tel: 821-6616/8280496. 

AJEx / Visa / Otaers. 


WUM SHMH6BR SWanM* KC 
Reghured. Must sell urgently as 
low pttc* Ascot 10990) 23132 


EXCHANGES 


LUX FLAT CMm London, stos 
3- Reguirrd stmDar a/co eat 
Devon/ Cornwall approx 4 

weens aim-ScM Ol 636 1901 
Ol 286 MM6 


PORSCHE 


BU 6C Sport Cotta®- 82 model In 
guards red. 30000 miles with 
fSH. any tnfgectta n .wetoom* 
£10600. Te£ 0708 46619 (Of- 
fice) 0376 61343 (eves) - 


MERCEDES 



a.1^8 

Aegra. Poroalwk 2wk 
Ttooc. Toton 190 229 

Bghta km E128JJ0 


Toh OT-4BS 9955 

Corfii 
IOlHSI Amgnt 
aod awty Smday in Serismber. 
BaaiSM vllas by the Sea. Hotels 
MroawM dadrogho ulAogHta 
SipMffcf. 

mg Paa World 
Hefidajs 
Open Sri 01-734 2S62 
(Ste 01-734 2464) 


JAVCA Attractive vflta own pool, 
not estate, sleeps 4. vacant 9- 
30ui August and iBBt Oct 
onward* (028 126) 3218.. 

COSTA SOL FUCMOIROLA. CM 
fir as* Stea 4. Ige POOL superb 
location near aerie. Vac 9/30 
August JC160PW. 0225 843717. 

MABBKUA. S mt bed 2 bath vffl- 
te. Real, peace, tovhy view* all 
dale* ftotn £280. 014169 7307. 

■■ BB K tl A Writer 6 wtth own 
pool 21 All* 2 wks £800 winy. 
Primer * Parker 01-493 8726 

SUNNY VILLA dose teammate* 
nr Fuenglroie avaxaue 23m- 
30tti Aug. 01-428 6381. 


WINTER SPORTS 


MU MAC a. New winter 86/87 


•ms early booking and group 
dteconnt* Tel Ol 361 6446 
ATOL 341 


ATOL 2047 


WINTER SPORTS 


SH BLADON LINES 
19/17 BOCMMB HOW OUT! 
47 Resorts in Smut rtoxt 
Austria. Ann A Italy. 

The Biggest Choke On SkU 
Ex Gat's**, Loloo. Manchester. 
Glasgow ft EfUbwflb 

81 785 220ft 

Ranch. Dml 00279121 

ABTA 15723 ATOL 1212 


MO toft** bumper brochure oul 
now packed wuh all Ow top nr- 
sort* Sunday mghts (Beal the 
trafRcn. SM amazingly low 
prices starting at £69. Rtog (Ql) 
785 9999 (Or your copy. 
ABTA69Z86 ATOL1383. 


Enjoy top vabe skfin&axnfmlabfc.TOeft-^ 
located chalets, the ultimate m ski holiday 
professiooaJism. Cdka a John Morgan jfll? 
ti^brodmre from ynor travel agent 
orphoncnsnowmftteisfiddpinO) 

68621 or 0M99EH1 
(24h 4 


MU SOL Bx Ho DO 


FOR HER 


bte setts etc. NaUomdte 
dedverte* Tet (0380) 660039 
(Wilts). 

KAIVMMRi Any event incLes 
Ml* CovsntCdn- Starlight Earn. 
Ctyntebourna. 01-828 1678. 
Mrior entdn cam* 
lEMflMM Any went tnc Les 
Mte. Coveivl Odb. StartVght Bm. 
Otynoebome. 01-828 1678. 
- - Mater credit cart* 

OLD YORK FLA8ST0HCS tor 
sate. Beautmu condWon. tm 
061 225 0881/061 231 6785. 
B8TM AIRRVO lft A R YT M agnum 
chanagogna vintage 1926. Exr 
CsUentCood. £86.01 6006727 


DISPLAY 
KITCHEN SALE 


t*Rt IMfl That lovety soap from 
Spain b called Mata. Samples 
from RDM Lid. Freepost. 
BakawdL Derb y s hi re DE4 
1XA. 


HOME ft GARIffiN 


togne. 64 coiourful page* 
Hundreds of colour pictures or 
bums and (towers plus useful 
growing hint* with 38 cettsec 
uttve orid medals ai Chrian. 
you’re assured of the boiL 
Write Ron Btom. Degt T12. 
Leavmdcsv Watford. WD2 
7BH. Or phone 0923 672071 
(24 h n). 


(80 SLt T. re* Saver wim <L 
bftte IM. Ham/ sod ton. stereo, 
good ro n d rtta n. £9.996 ono. 
TaUXM64)23361 


GENERAL 

SPAMSH METALLIC 
STUNK FACIMY 

wishes lo Putins* 
KQUriCmUES a good mnri- 
tkm. ban BOD to 2000 tare, ftnpte- 
aettog) 

TetophouK 81BJHJ0L7a 17 17 

/ 72S 11 ZZ 

Trine anil 

Trirtrc B1U4JX72S 4Z ID 
OmanE KM — W I UMB1 
SLtta. l en toet. I* Tft 
FririTA flwtriiaa) laris 


...LliFKAS 

te?*iST- 

MM ■ riaam tab oa snaril 
Gnsk bb. dnstM tanas* 
mebtiLkril a** BBa-sl teg f* 




50% art Poganpahl 

too iwiw ®p. Up 
ritHrifftHwawfi 
mens - offers suti 


WANTED 


UMCMYLY WAHID. Top cash 
paid ter antique Ccorglah and 
Victorian towsltery- Contact 
WIuustb. 43 Lamto Condidt SL 
wci TH 406 8638. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Cancer 

Ibgether we cut beat iL 

We fund ©»«■ one ihtrd of 
aU research into the preven- 
tion and cure of cancer in 
the UK 

Help us by rending* dona- 
tion or make a legacy to; 

Cancer 111 
Research IP « 
Camp% , »I 

2 Carbon Houtr Terrace. I 
(Dept TCW (.LondonSWrr 5ARI 


JUST KITCHENS 

242 FULHAM RO. 
SW10 

TEL 01-351 1616 


RESIST* CARPETS 

SALE NOWON 

Wool ink Botes 
from EL95 per iq y& + VAT. 
80% woofMewyOorriesfcMfflan 
EU85 per sq jb + VAT. 

■ifsw- 

ft mttf rife* pari nWrifci 
14 < WMlnnrft Bridge M 
ParsMt Gran. Si» 
Tel: 01-731 3368/9 

hat t ite U i r M* rt 1R| 

MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


THE TILE BOUTIQUE 
OF FULHAM 
SPECIAL OFFER 

Plain THcs@ £9.99 per sq. yd. 

H a n ds»HiKd Ocro/aW peace crib 

A sckciioa of fhtl quality ce- 
ramic floor aod wall tiles at 
half price. Also latest designs of 
new arrivals together with mah- 
>ks. mosaics and ani tary ware 

CBUUMCA & 

IL MONO LTD 

794 Fulham Road 
London 3W6 SSL 
(near Putney Bridge) 

*Td 01*736 7251 A 01 731 1898 
Also open Saturdays 10-5 

SHORT LETS 


COURSES 




CO RF U VUM dU ten svaU- 
abtttty Sunday la 24 &31 
August for 2wks bsauttful villas 
nr tor Bench from Cslwiac. 
OomBsL Pan worm Holiday* , 
Ol 734 2662. 1 


mpM* vna rentals ate. Znn 
Holiday* U 434 1647. AIM 
AUo, 

ATHENS lAb Aag-lriUi SesL 2 
bedroom (1st stems M. C12S. 
01-341 3603- 

HBNTCH. Ses front ■KBtinmL 
Cancellation Septe mb er I3tn - 
October 4th. Tel: 1097081) 431. 
BlinilFY Lux apart hois Iran 
£18900. fr. 13. m 27/8. 
Sttama. 0708 862814. 



UX HOLIDAYS 

DGCOVaiHEBEAimniL 

UNSPOILT SUPFfflJ COAST 

Btegria ImriuL 2 t#tt tmm. 
9 ft B to» £49. Esaaita tori, 
cel. 

IV. Ui Briar, ml 
AA*** WHITE UM HOTO. 
Sarinri. Ahriaagh, SlAA 
Tel: (072 885) 2720 


ACTIVITY HOLIDAYS 


man Msrkscm Tennis comp • 
flntshes 31 Aug. Intanrive 
coaching by top motets ton ala 
far all ages ft Haudrirt* tad 2 
soeesai wMs lor adiini asty. 
For free cotour brochure wm* 
■o Jonathan Madam. Trams 
camp. Hertford College. Oxford 
or Tel: 01 727 4811 (24 hr*) 


Genome rHixUpia on oter 
100 new ft restored instru- 
ment* Unm-rited after sales 
service. Free enutogur. 30a 
Htghgatc Bd. NWS- 01-267 
7671. Flee cwalogue 
AUMrirr hew black kawai 
ugnriiipianpNo 
£1100 Id Ol 748 8486. 


Superb views aver Parks. Avail 
2 tnnlhs Irtm Am 8. 2 beds. 4U 
cons plana, parking, etc. £170 
pw. Tel: Ol 649 3314. 


HOLIDAY FLATS ft houses *vaH- i 
awe. £zooja.ooopw. Parwml i 
Seecte* 0l-*68 3620 or 0836- I 
892824 anytime m. 

le nm n aT OH wic a/3 mcnai 

let. Lux 2 dMr bed furnWted 

balcony rtri, «i«> pw. avmi 

now. Tel 01-408 25=6 x 282 
UTXOKY SOVKXD PLAY*. | 
Central London from O M pw. , 
Ring Town Hse AM: 373 3433 


FLATSHARE 


STRCATHAM mi -2nd prof, le- 
lAtfr. non smoker. 264. fa 
share anracilv e IU* Own room. 
CH, waritlpg machine, ganton- 
Near BR. OSOPCni exCUS 
months let. 671 3646 
' mURROUMmi Prof M/F. own 
room In charming flat- AM mod 
cob* Musi bs tnananOaiety 
dean ft non smoker. fTOflpcm 
tan TCI (Oil 748 6067 


STEPPING STONES 


SM ESPRIT Now iterating stair 
lor winter resort* Chalet girl* 
i nannies (NNEB) and repnsenia- 
uves (flnnn French and hotel 
managemeiit experience). Fleet 
(0S52) 62S176 


DOMESTIC ft CATERING 
SITUATIONS 

RHDonilbla nuure parson 
requrad a Bwhs Companon/ 
Hwsetewf b My 73 yon. 
Remote country Rouse near 
Railing in riyfic setmg. 
Wrakands free, claan driving 
licanca. sane nosing ppananat 
useful tut na essattri. sasy 
negatbble, rrioons pleas* 


TafcMsB 
fa flat 


9143S till 

tei la 


IVERSEAS AD FARC AOKMCY 
07 Regent StrniUndon wi. 
Tel 439 6534.L1C/Oi:efMa*1 
Also mtetoa/doms wi u ft M u 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


villa* wmi a Rueae touch. 

A villa. ■ pool and a beautiful 
view. What more could you 
Choose Dm Tuscany. 
Sardinia or Ravrita ■ the loveli- 
er parts of Italy where tor mass 
market operators don't bo. Or 
. ctxnbirte a vHU holiday wuh * 
stay In Venic e. Fta rmc e or 
Rome, Free brochure from 
Magic af Italy- Dapt T. 47 Shep- 
herds Bush creen. wia sps 
T el: 01 749 7449 CM bra 
semen 

FUBRH3KC juri converted larnv 
hoose Oanten Rai u Tuscan 
MB* Steeps 6. 2 mites hom ceo- 
tm August onwards flSO per 
teee* Phono owner Ftorsnrs - 
669 496. 

TDKAienri sore - ia/g. 4 pe» i 
P*e for mated villa pony. £190 I 
per oemon-Tec 01.7490866 


SELFCATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE 

MOMRflQUE HILLS 

Lovely prjvatgfy owned 
vat. steep* 7. pooL maid, 
trattoria 24 July - 7 Aug 
and 21 Aug -4 Sept Also 


Tel 07131 248. 


ALAARVfl Rocha Brava. 2 bed- 
mom house, steep* «. araitoMe 
from Sogte ii d ier. 6 mte beach. 


/bar nr.. From QOO pw lad. 
Tci 10784) 242134 OL 


TtoBUT mmen Ov flthtog 
course* Devon. September. 
CMBatoet (082 286)281. 


WEEK-END BREAKS 


naro style motor racing conies 
Id the street* or Rttmlngbani 
Avgurt Bank HoUitay. August 
2«n and 26th. Book at one of 
over too hotels tor a wee k end 
of gtanwur and a x client a f iL 
ROW 021-780 4321, 

W.UOM gag RAUL. Thou, 
sands of world buy ns and 
number* of me Subtle come to 
the Birmingham Jew entry 
Quarter every year ter thr Mg- 
oni chows and Ihe mm pries* 
Ring 021-780 4321 and wm 
And yon Uta right setting. 

SYBIL FIX IT. R tnsy be Ihe. 
anunpanon or the 1992 
Otymaics but tbere are mere 
ntness wee k end cnatoes ta 
RttiMnoham man anywhere. 
Ring 021-780 4S2i and we-B 
give you aH the deWM. 

OTHHMl i O BIT. How couia Ry. 
nunghem be anything stei with 
over co.gotf ctutM.-anOjenongh 
idghl rlubs to make a n ywhere 
else green, rang 021-780 4321 
tor a hotel. (Ml well up to 
■much.- -• - 

A BORN WUKCMBh A week- 
end In the Btack Oiosby b a 
very real eapens no e. rust ale. 
rest taup and real gtoss cryual. 
Ring 021 .780 4321 lor a bosun 
good hotel deaL 


FOUR POTTO PM TWOl True 
imp Uvre an a romanur week- 
end la me Big Heart of England 
Rtog 091-780 4321 and weU 
make your dreams come true. 


C0TSW0LD5 


wnroLM comas unex- 
pecuMBy available Aug/BeM. 
For free oroctrare gnoov 
Btacwey K)5B6> TOO 678. 


(REVTY OMswM cotta«r. fatty 
eguipped. on farm. luM renovat- 
ed to Mgh standard. Sleeps 6. 
Tennis court. Tel : 0666 7206 


tr HBURY. DrngntfU nmvty 
renovated cottage. Available 
end Aug ft Sep* S tas 2/ B. £130 
plus heating pw. iOPSS) 74210. 


DORSET, HANTS, ft 
LO.W. 

DISCOVER DORSET! 

U BELLE ALLIANCE! 

Fundi ayte coortry mutant nth 
moms offers m 1 supra* task 
wth gaurmu ctnao 8 ^uuramg 
bedmoa ai on sufe Uau 

mit* teal of Dona kir Brtcstnby 
tnfia&onfeRs.MDmacotft- 

Mm or the ftrtsda. torfy cououy ft 
BR Now Foust 

Tzfc Badhri Ffenn 


DEVON AT ITS BEST 

Math Rifl batten caaaBfhaae 

hnraion ibrrtff n fFmwif St^rfiwl, 

h u si i n s b r d m mi nith panomnic 
rian, ettatte htt h nu to . Shim Ut, 
bdeornte Witate bate 0930 
Wkhki obj itsch ctTifatixi SR or 
4-4X . rieHS. 


»R0S2IMirariUK 

wu. out 

Site Mtota. W. Dew EOS38Q 


TORQUAY 

Hto db ael trier yoa Okos sic, tnfl 
«e do offer you 1 idrag hahtiy a 
ipfcamn senro mi 75te 
tan « tort. As mudi goal food 
s tnu Be (dnn ol mens). 24 oi 
Sato non* From £110 pp p« ac. 
VILLA MARINA HOTEL 
(AA/RAO 
Cockinctcm Latte 
(8803) 605440 


BUDE 

FLORIDA HOTEL 

ItegnUcaiit views of beach ft 
town. AB doubta/femly rooms 
an suita. Four choice menu 
incJ. cfaWron* Taa/cortao/ 
redto ri rooms. FemBy ol 4 
special £345 per week. Teen- 
age rooms ft (rirrijr acfivNtos. 

TEL: ( 0288 ) 2451 


CORIHWA1.L ■ Avon Awp/Beg* 
Cberndna conv e rted barn. 
Strega 4/s. Folly awtaged 

Mi chen. Walking ft Oshing. 
£130 pw. Tel : 046030 361 


MRIROM NAT FKi PeHglU 

con. ttos 6/7. every nuv. rap 
view*/ walk*. TO 01-624 OPM 
or 0342 23364 (w/ends) 


PLI3 20H. TeL 0903-20406. 


romtiAY/MAltMA COURT s/C 
hnury a p art m e n t * unrivalled 
stews of Torbny ft Marin* 2/6 
person* from £i3O-£6O0 + vat 
pw. Torquay (0803) 27612. 


THE ROYAL 
YORK HOTEL 

SMOOTH. % DEVON 
RAC*** Mb) CMtrtaaay 
FtAy icusad. Cadre Entarato 
oHflooksn shl rival staging 
ctntk La. good nod. to rooms 
T.V_ lads, lo-taue nnttos. ntsr- 
con. tea/cofise tatties. tMth 
Coinide*5pi pool adatom, tea 
Maiad. stem cabinet, exercise 
amipmat Buoay retaiuanL dose 
to HI anfldm. 



Brochure aid fufl brtfts 
by rekira or phone 

03855 3043b 


DEVON MAGIC 
MANOR HOUSE HOTEL 
WOOtSEHY DEVON 

FamfiyhOtBi.2”AARAC.AB 
rooms ensuta Colour TV, 
baby fistming, heated swim- 
ndna pool, om (pounds, 
dose sea. A la carts and 
vegetarian menu. Licensed. 
CJakJ fm orter for August 

CLOVELLY 

(02373) 380 


fUM • - 23 caoceUation. Uunat- 
ous apt wtthin beautiful manor. 
Own mala, sunbed. £26Ctaw. 


Mouse. Plenty to <to. see and 
col. Special £89 Per week, din- 
ner. BAB. TeL 0822-83(2442. 


roam cY uoumm norm -mvei 
I ft 2 wk* 2 centre*. Ily -drive, 
staling, tad lunette* Charter ft 
scheduled or fUgntaoniy-ltity ft 
Aug delta avaH. Bracniue. 01- 
434 1962 or O l 788 8030 <24 
hnt ABTA ACCESS Vt&A 


LONDON 


Shepgerlon. a bedrm. steeps 6. 
Ige gun. rowing dinghy, ideally 
ML lor London. Windsor. 
Hampton Court. 0932 226738 
KIM. court. WL lux iMftoay 
serviced apt. 1 day to SmOi* 
(tea with E.T.8. Ol 937 0077 re 
960 7247. 

HRHHNSTON Wtt Lux Serviced 
apt* Coi TV. IMrom Lid. 18 
□gin Oc* Wll Ol 451 3094 
SW1S Lux 1 bed (IM. Recent, 
kbrtv bam. FurntMMd. 
C160PW. Tek 01-942 9883 


EAST ANGLIA 

ROROU 

FELMBKNAM HALL 

Channins 16th c manor 
bouse in eoimuytidc Kiih«. 
acres of garden A woodland. 
Superb food, swimming pool, 
all cn suite bedrooms A 
warm personal service. A de- 
hghtful summer hideaway. 

(069 289 228) 


SUFFOLK Coast. Comfortable 
bunpHow. staa 2. Use of boated 
bool and ndenstVF (rounds. OM 
FcUxsiawe House. FettxMowc. 
Suffolk. TeL 0994 284141. 

SWAFFMAOL Beamed rarmhoinc 
gyrttont load ft accomra 
MWton. BftB ft 4 course EM 
£20. Tek 1076061 2». 

"“■WU. Peaceful cottage- 
steeps 6/7. nr Mrd reserves sm 
ft Oct £76 p.w. 0603 S630B. 


SCOTLAND 

— * Superior term house . 
■te Banchory sleeps 6/7. 
From 9 August. £130 pw. Tri 
(0224) 734774 evenings 


FDHfBtlRUil FESTIVAL. Due to 
We cancedatton. flat sips 6. 
Phone 0626 688 29a 


FERTtoHNORE Super coftog* aratt 
frerp July, stas 2«-- Sandy 031 
223 6379 Quote TER 261. 

Wf In Perth vtnagp. 2 
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Nr a 94 20 Mts Perth. 60 mis 
A benteen. Tel (0692) 890117 
WP CL U BOP C OUMIRV House 
™««te R. Triy. Stos 4/6. 
ton NE Perth. Newly AitfbM* 
From July. Defalls 026063354 


SOMERSET A AVON 



PLYMOUTH /OAftWCAM. Htar 

ride. 1 bed Hat. Sips 2/4. CTV. 
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£160 pw. Tel: (000928) 41CL 


•OUIM BEVOM House tor 4/8. 
toh -160i ft after 23rd Aim. 1 
mile bench. 0092 67947 


•o BR I BE VALLEY - Del. cot- 
tage* tennis «tl barbecue - few 
vacancies. Trie 0806 22642. 


WALES 

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re sisu rriiu or bar bwoi* 
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lages. Otatets etc C rry Abbey. 
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litdc Hanhwlbld Farmhouse 
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w — am ctmmryiMe eettage 
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AUGHT RYE Chantung central- 
ly Rivaled cottage to let SM 4. 
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Seal onwards. 0273726780. 


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Bed. taoklsd and enatac bmO. £16 
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26 


LAW 



Co urt of Appeal 

Problems of sentencing 
young offenders 


T HE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 

Law Report August 2 1986 


House of Lords 


TSB depositers own only their accounts 

,he Rev Mr Vincent Mr An- fte 


Regina v Fairhurst and Others 
Before Lord Lane. Lord Chief 
Justice. Mr Justice Nolan and 
Mr Justice Macpherson 
[Judgment delivered July 31] 

Guidance on sentencing prob- 
lems arising from the interrela- 
tion of statutory provisions 
concerning detention and youth 
custodv was given by the Lord 
Chief justice in reserved judg- 
ments of the Court of Appeal on 
appeals by seven offenders aged 
between ih and 19. 

Section 7|S) of the Criminal 
Justice Act 1982 provides: “An 
offender aged less than 17 years 
shall not be sentenced to a term 
of youth custody which exceeds 
12 months at a lime . . 

Section 53(2) of the Children 
and Young Persons Acu as 
amended by section 2 of the 
Criminal Justice Act 1961. pro- 
vides: “Where a child or young 
person is convicted on indict- 
ment of any offence punishable 
in the case of an adult wiLh 
imprisonment for 14 years or 
more, not being an offence for 
which the sentence is fixed by 
law. and ihe court is of opinion 
that none of the other methods 
in which the case may be legally 
deali with is suitable, the court 
mav sen ic nee the offender io be 
detained for such period not 
exceeding the maximum term of 
imprisonment with which the 


section 53(2) of the 1933 Act 
that the crime commuted 
should be one of exceptional 
gravity, such as attempted mur- 
der. manslaughter, wounding 
with intent, armed robbery or 
the like. 

2 On the other hand, it was 
not good sentencing practice to 
pass a sentence of detention 
under section 53(2) simply be- 
cause a 12 months' youth cus- 
tody sentence seemed to be on 
the low side for the particular 
offence committed. 

3 Where the offence plainly 
called for a greater sentence than 
one of 12 months' youth cus- 
tody and was sufficiently serious 
to call for a sentence of two 
vears* youth custody or more 
had the offender been aged 17 or 
over, then it would be proper io 
sentence to a similar term of 
section 53(2) detention. If the 
offence would merit a sentence 
of less than two years but more 
than 12 months for an offender 
ngpd |7 or over, then the 
sentence should normally be 
one of youth custody and not of 
section 53(2) detention. 

It could not be said that the 
difference between a sentence 
of. say, 21 months’ and one of 
12 months' youth custody was 
so great that 12 months could be 
regarded as an inappropriate 
term. 

4 Where more than one 


Ross v Lord Advocate and 
Others 

Trustee Savings Banks Cen- 
tral Board and Others v 
Vincent and Others 
Before Lord Keith of KinkeL 
Lord RoskilL Lord Templeman, 

Lord Oliver of Ayimerxon and 
. Lord Goff of Chieveley 
[Speeches sold July 31] 

Depositors in a trustee sav- 
ings tank had no interest in the 
assets of the bank other than the 
right to receive tack tbeir 
deposits together with the in- 
terest thereon. 

The House of Lords so held in 
giving their reasons for their 

_ . decision on July 3 dismissing 

Utively to or concurrently with the appeals of Mr James Mat- j ng farther - - 
each other - see Gaskin and R * thews Ross, of Milnathort, ana banker/customer relationship. 
McKenna ([1986] Crim LR the Rev John Vincent, of Shef- [ n particular there was no trace 

field, depositors of TSB Scot- - - ' 

TSB England and 


determined that a section 53(2) 
detention sentence was appro- 
priate for the first offence and 
wished to pass a sentence or 
youth custody in respect or the 
othert J ._. 

There were great differences 
between the procedures ap- 
plicable to the two types of 
sentence. To pass such sen- 
tences either to run consec- 
utively or concurrently would 
produce complications. 

It was undesirable that sen- 
tences of section 53(2) detention 
and youth custody should be 
paccpti to run either consec- 


drew Momtt, QC and Mr 
Christopher Symons for the 
TSB Central Board and the 
trustees of TSB England and 
Wales: Mr Timothy Lloyd, QC 
for the Treasury. 

LORD KEITH said that 
trustee savings tanks were at 
present regulated by the 1981 
Act and by their rules. The 
depositors could have no rights 
other than such that were con- 
ferred upon them by the Act and 
the rules and such that they 
might have acquired by contract 
with the bank. 

As regarded the tatter, there 
was nowhere to be found any 
indication of a contract extend- 


ssKErFS 

JjSrts over a f ld PT ^ )V 1 ? | _l^n r ^Iw^cStors at the date of 
deposits and interest ^5^° ■ . ,ggj \ci had no proprietary 

SSewouldbenosuM^wbe assc^of 

paid over to ihe Central Board. not there- 


simple interest but that pro- 
vision said that if and in so for as 
the produce was not withdrawn 
it was to be accumulated at 
compound interest. 

What was withdrawn could 
only be interest and likewise 
what could be accumulated at 
compound interest could only 
be inierest. There could not 
possibly be any question of 
accumulating at compound in- 
terest any increment in the 

assets of the bank which could M comrawuuu w«w«r --r ; ■- iruas »v - . 

come about through capital “ .j. was consistent with the 0 f deports was founded on tne 
appreciation of investments in legis iation which in 1817 estab- erroneous assumption watpnor 
= ‘ “ lished statutory savings banks 

and with the legislation which 

had since then regulated their 

afl No^evidence had been pro- 
duced that, prior to the appeal 


lord templeman, 
agreeing, said that under the 
1981 Act no depositor in a 
statutory trustee savings tan* 
was entitled to anything other 
than the return of his principal 
and contractual interest . i na* 


transfer^ 
those assets to the successor 

^DeS^with the cross-appeal 
the theory that statutory savings 
tanks held their assets upon 
trust to provide for repay" 1 *"* 


offence is punishable in the case office was involved for which 


of an adult as may be specified 
in the sentence . . .” 

Mr F. J. Muller. QC. assigned 
by the Registrar of Criminal 
Appeals, for ihe appellant Jona- 
than FairhursL 

THE LORD CHIEF JUS- 
TICE said that cases involving 
sentences of detention under the 
1933 Act and of youth custody 
under the 1982 Act had been 

listed for consideration. 

Points of difficulty had arisen 
which their Lordships wished to 
try to resolve for die benefit of 
sentencing courts in the future. 

Three points were of particu- 
lar importance: (1) the “14 
> cars'* requirement; (2) the 
requirement that no other 
method of disposal was suitable; 
and (3) the conviction had io be 
on indictment. 

There were two poles of 
judicial opinion: R r Oakes 


section 53(2) detention was 
available but the offences varied 
significantly in seriousness, pro- 
vided that at least one offenre 
was sufficiently serious to mem 
section 53(2) detention, deten- 
tion sentences of under two 
years* duration, whether concur- 
rent or consecutive, might prop- 
erly be imposed in respect of the 
other offences — see R v Gaskin 
((1985) 7 Cr App R (S) 28L 
The next problem was where 
there were two offences commit- 
ted by a IS or 16 year old and 
one of them (A) carried a 
maximum sentence of 14 years 
and the other (B) carried a lower 
maximum, then generally 
speaking it was not proper to 
pass a sentence of section 53(2) 
detention in respect of offence A 
which would not otherwise 
merit it in order to compensate 
for the fact that 12 months’ 
youth custody was grossly inad- 


0983) 5 6 App R(S) 389) and 

^?^ a,984)6CrAPPR ‘ it could 

it seemed that d *?**. on “J B was part and parcel of the 
Oakes on the one hand an (?vent5 giving rise to offence A, 

SST£ ^ 2* of Sen, in «*££'*** 

° P 0?Ihe onehSdthere existed Their Lordships had been 
the desirability of keeping particularly exercised by the 


voulhs under the age of 1 7 out of 
Fong terms of custody. 

On the other hand it was 
necessary that serious offences 
committed by youths of that age 
should be met with sentences 
sufficiently substantial to pro- 
vide both the appropriate 
punishment and also the nec- 
essary deterrent effect and to 
certain cases to provide a mea- 
sure of protection to the public. 

A balance had to be struck 
between those objectives. 

1 It was not necessary in order 
to invoke the provisions of 


desirability or otherwise of pass- 
ing consecutive or concurrent 
sentences of section 53(2) deten- 
tion and youth custody. 

The difficulty arose where one 
of the offences carried a maxi- 
mum penalty of 14 years or 
more but where the other car- 
ried a maximum penalty of less 
than 14 years or equally where 
the other offence came before 
the crown epurt on committal 
for sentence under section 37 of 
the Magistrates’ Courts Act 
1980. 

What was the court to do if it 


195). 

It was not, however, always 
possible to avoid that. The only 
way out of the problem in 
general might be to impose no 
separate penalty for the offences 
for which section 53(2) deten- 
tion was not available. 

Although that solution was 
not altogether satisfectory. it 
seemed to their Lordships that it 
provided fewer difficulties than 
any other possible method. 

If that was done and the 
offender successfully appealed 
against conviction on the count 
carrying the section 53(2) deten- 
tion, he did not automatically 
walk free. That was by reason of 
section 4 of the Criminal Appeal 
Act 1968. 

In R v Dolan ((1976) 62 Cr 
App R 36. 39) the Court of 
Appeal held that where a 
conviction was quashed leaving 
in existence convictions on 
other counts in respect of which 
no penalty was imposed, the 
court was entitled under section 
4(2) to pass such sentence as 
seemed to them appropriate on 
the latter counts. 

Problems still would anse. 
however, where for example the 
convictions had been in respect 
of two separate indictments. 

Finally, COOTtS Should be 
aware of an anomaly which 
existed in that area as to the 
extent to which time spent in 
custody on remand counted 
towards the eventual sentence. 
Some of those anomalies were 
set out in Home Office Circular 
42 of 1983 paragraphs 25 and 
26. 

Section 10 of the Criminal 
Justice Act 1982 extended to 
detention centre orders and 
youth custody sentences the 
provisions relating to imprison- 
ment in section 67 of the 
Criminal Justice Act 1967, so 
that those custodial sentences 
were reduced by any period 
spent in custody in connection 
with the offence for which the 
sentence was passed. Those 
provisions did not. however, 
apply to sentences of detention 
under section 53(2). 

It followed that courts should 
bear in mind when deciding on 
the proper length of a sentence 
under section 53(2) that allow- 
ance should be made for time 
spent prior to the hearing 
whether in custody or in care in 
secure accommodation. 

Consideration was then given 
to each of the seven appellants’ 
cases. 


land and 
Wales respectively, and allow- 
ing a cross-appeal by the TSB 

Central Board and the Cus- 
todian Trustees for TSB En- 
gland and Wales. 

Both appellants had been 
refused declarations that the 
assets of the bank, after settle- 
ment of liabilities, belonged on 
closure to the depositors and 
that the effect of the Trustee 
Savings Banks Act 1985 was to 
deprive depositors of their rights 
in those assets without 
compensation. 

The Scottish appeal was 
against an interlocutor of the 
First Division of the Court of 
Session on March 12 allowing 
the reclaiming motion of the 
respondents against an interloc- 
utor of the Lord Ordinary (Lord 
Davidson) on November 12, 
1985. 

The English appeal was m 
respect of the judgment of Mr 
Justice Scon {The Times April 
29, 1986). The Rev Mr Vincent 
appealed against the judge's 
order that the depositors were 
entitled to repayment of the 
principal amounts in their ac- 
counts and interest but to no 
other amount. 

The cross-appeal was a g ains t 
the judge's order that the assets 
of the bonk were, however, held 
subject to the statutory pro- 
visions and the rules upon trust 
to provide for payment to 
depositors of the sums due to 
them respectiveley. 

Mr W. D. Prosser, QG and 
Mr W. S. Gale (both of the 
Scottish Bar) for Mr Ross; Lord 
Cameron of Lochbroom, QC, 
Lord Advocate, the first respon- 
dent. in person with Mr A G 
Johnson, QC (both of the Scot- 
tish Bar); Mr John Muiray, QG 
and Mr Donald J. D. 
Macfadyen, QC (both of the 
Scottish Bar) for the second and 
third respondents, the trustees 
of TSB Scotland and the TSB 
Central Board. 

Mr J. G Hicks, QG Mr A C. 
Taussig and Mr David Sears for 


of the type of contract which 
mutually bound the members of 
a voluntary association. 

To ascertain the nature and 
extent of the rights falling into 
the former category it was 
necessary to construe the rele- 
vant provisions of the Act and 
the rules. No assistance was to 
be gained from looking back at 
the long series of repealed 
Trustee Savings Banks Acts 
from 1817 onwards. 

The House was concerned 
with the present state of affai rs, 
not with any which might have 
existed in the past and been of 
interest to former generations of 
depositors. While some present 
depositors could have first be- 
come so under legislation later 
repealed, they were now bound 
by the legislation and rules 
currently in force. 

It had been argued for the 
Appellants that the word 
“produce” in section l(3Xa) 
(“an institution . . . to . . . (ii) 
accumulate the produce of in- 
terest . . . and (iii) to return the 
deposits and produce to the 
depositors . . .”) meant more 
than merely interest on the 
deposit and embraced any in- 
crease or appreciation in the 
total assets of the bank which 
was attributable to employment 
of the deposit in its busi n ess. 

Further, it was argued that 
section 1(4) drew a clear distinc- 
tion between “produce" and 
“interest", so as to indicate the 
intention that the former word 
should have a wider mea nin g 
than the latter. 

The construction contended 
for presented serious _ diffi- 
culties. Section l<3XaX‘u) re- 
ferred to accumulating The 
produce of the deposits (so far as 
not withdrawn) at compound 
interest". The parenthetical 
words qualified “produce" and 
not “deposits" . 

If deposits were withdrawn 
they could no longer have 
produce, whereas if the produce 
was withdrawn the deposits 
would continue to earn further 
produce. The depositor might 


which it chose to invest ns 
funds. 

Then sub-paragraph (iii) re- 
ferred io returning deposits and 
produce to depositors after 
deducting expenses. Such return 
could, no doubt, take place 


any comptamt had been made 
ihat in making dispositions oi 


to the 1S28 Abt a depositor 
possessed some >“nd ofed- 
uitable interest in the assets or 
the savings bank. 

A depositor after the 1820 Aja 
and before the 1828 Aft cook* 
hope to obtain at the discretion 
of the trustees additional m- 


when the bank dosed, but it mai |U . ... , 

could also, and more regularly. ^ separate surplus funds of tcest or a capital bonus, but that 
take place when depositors siatutor y trustee savings banks depositor did not confer any 
chose to withdraw their depos- ( ^ am time w time. Parliament -liable interest in assets on a 

depositor and did not apply to 
profits made after 18-8. 

Mr Justice Scott had dis- 
cerned differences between a 
statutory trustee savings tank 
and a clearing bank but be 
accepted that a depositor in a 
savings bank was entitled to no 
more than a depositor in a 
clearing bank, namely to a 
payment of principal and 
contractual interest It would be 
strange if the same cont ractua l 
right produced different propri- 
etary rights. 

The depositors* rights under 
the rules did not suffice to 
convert creditors into Hurt 
beneficiaries. The proposition 
that a statutory trustee savings 
bank held its assets upon mist to 
repay its depositors would cre- 
ate a new kind of floating charge 
hitherto unknown to the law 
and possessing unexplored in- 
cidents and priorities. 

The transfer of the banks 
assets to a successor company 
under the. 1985 Act did not 
interfere with any of the rights Of 
the depositors. 

If thev dislike being depos- 
itors in’ a company bank as 
opposed to being depos torsin a 
statutory trustee savings bank 
they had had foil opportunity 
since the enactment of the 1985 
Act to withdraw their deposits 
and they were at liberty to 
withdraw their deposits now. 

Lord RoskilL Lord Oliver and 
Lord Goff agreed. 

Solicitors: Martin & Co. P»- 
liamentarv agents, for Drum- 
mond & Co. Edinburgh; Mr A. 
A. McMillan. Edinburgh. Trea- 
sury Solicitor Theodore God- 
dard for McClure Naismnh 
Anderson & Gardiner. Edin- 
burgh and W. & J. Buntess. 
Edinburgh. 

Martin St Co for John Howell 
& Co. Sheffield; Theodore God- 
dard; Treasury Solicitor. 


its. 

It was inconceivable that in 
the latter event any depositor 
could demand to receive more 
than the amount of his deposit 
with interest, compounded so 
far as appropriate. He could not 
expect to receive some share, 
which it would be impossible to 
quantify in relation to the 
amount of his deposit, in any 
appreciation in the value of the 
assets of the bank which might 
have taken place during Ihe 
currency of his deposit. 

Trustee savings banks bad 
power to borrow money, which 
enabled the banks to earn 
revenue profits. To regard those 
profits as attributable in 
ascertainable shares to individ- 
ual deposits was plainly out of 
the question. 

The appellants disclaimed 
any suggestion that depositors 
might be entitled, upon with- 
drawal of tbeir deposits white 
the bank was a going concert^ to 
receive any share of the capital 
or revenue profits of the tank 
earned during the currency of 
particular deposits. But they 
maintained that such a right 
would arise upon closure of the 
bank and that the distribution 
would be an equal one. 

But the notion of equal dis- 
tribution was inconsistent with 
a depositor being entitled to the 
produce, whatever that ought 
mean, of his own deposit 

Those considerations led to 
the irresistible conclusion that 
“produce” could only mean 
interest Further, sections 20(1) 
and 21(1) contemplated that the 
aggregate of the sums owed by 
the bank to its depositors was to 
be ascertainable at any particu- 
lar time and also that the bank 
could have assets of a value in 
excess of that aggregate amount 

Section 32 provided that 
when a bank was dosed the 
trustees were to pay over to the 


from ume . . 

had been guilty of expropriation 
or unfairness towards depos- 
itors. . . . _ 

No evidence bad been pro- 
duced that prior to the appeal, 
any depositor of a closed statu- 
torv savings bank had laid claifn 
IO share in the surplus funds of 
the bank. 

Depositors who disapproved 
of the abolition of the statutory 
trustee savings banks by tne 
1985 Act were entitled to voice 
their disapproval and to mark 
their disapproval if they so 
wished by withdrawing their 
principal and interest from the 
limited liability successor 
companies to which their depos- 
its had been transferred by the 
Act. No one doubled the ability 
of the successor companies to 
meet their obligations to the 
depositors. 

The appellants had pressed 
the emotive arguments that if 
the hanks and their surplus 
assets were not “owned” by the 
depositors then the banks had 
no owners and the surplus assets 
were in limbo. The arguments 
were false. 

The 1817 Act and its succes- 
sors enabled savings banks to 
volunteer for and submit to 
nationalization upon filing their 
rules and claiming the benefits 
of the AcL 

Statutory trustee savings 
banks and their assets belonged 
to the state subject to the 
contractual right of depositors 
to the return of their deposits 
and interest and subject to the 
powers and duties from time to 
rime conferred and imposed by 
Pari lament or the National Debt 
Commissioners and the Central 
Board, both institutions of the 
state. . . . . 

The 1985 Act privatized the 
statutory trustee savings banks 
and Parliament decided to 
present their surplus assets 
amounting, it was said, to £800 


Failing to answer to 
bail through mistake 


Prisoner has to fund journey 
to court for his civil action 


Objecting to discovery 


Davies v Eli Lilly & Co and 
Others 

Before Mr Justice Hirst 
[J udgment given July 23] 

In an appropriate case it 
would be permissible to allow 
someone who was not a 
prospective expert witness and 
who was neither a party to the 
action nor a party's legal adviser 
to inspect documents in the 
capacity of a scientific co- 
ordinator entrusted with the 
task of collating documentary 
evidence. However, it was open 
to the other party to establish a 
reasonable objection to the per- 
son pul forward as such a 
coordinator. 

Mr Justice Hirst so held in the 
Queen's Bench Division, in a 
chambers judgment released for 
publication on July 25. when 
refusing the application of the 
plaintiff. Joy Rosalie Davies, 
that Mr Charles Mcdawar. a 
medical journalist and writer, 
who was assisting the Oprcn 
Action Group in assembling and 
organizing documents for litiga- 
tion. should be allowed, subject 


to the usual undertakings, to 
inspect the defendants' docu- 
ments. 

Mr J. Melville Williams, QC 
and Mr Oliver Thorold for the 
plaintiff; Mr Jonathan Playford, 
QG Mr Michael Spencer and 
Mr Andrew Prynne for Eli Lilly 
& Co; Mr Andrew Collins. QC 
and Mr Justin Fenwick for the 
Department of Health and So- 
cial Security. 

MR JUSTICE HIRST said 
that the exceptionally complex 
nature of the documents, their 
number and subject matter jus- 
tified in principle the services of 
a coordinator. Without such a 
coordinator inspection would be 
very gravely handicapped. 

There was no real significance 
in the fact that he would not be a 
witness, since his essential pur- 
pose concerned the documents. 

In the exceptional circum- 
stances of the case the need for a 
coordinator had been made out. 

That left the crucial question 
whether the defendants had 
established, the burden of proof 
being on them, that they bad a 


reasonable objection to Mr 
Mcdawar which ought to pre- 
vail. 

The objections of both groups 
of defendants were valid, 
reasonable and extremely 
powerful Mr Mcda war’s main 
life's work in recent years had 
been a powerful and public 
crusade against practices in the 
pharmaceutical industry of 
which he strongly disapproved. 

It would be difficult for Mr 
Medawar, even with the best 
will in the workL to be sure that 
he could honour his proffered 
undertaking, the genuineness of 
which was not questioned, and 
to segregate in his mind the 
information derived from the 
defendants' documents from 
that derived elsewhere. 

The defendants' objections 
were entitled to prevail No 
reflection was cast on Mr 
Mcda war’s integrity. There was 
a persona] exception to him 
inspecting the documents. 

Solicitors: Owen White, Fel- 
tham: Davies Arnold & Cooper, 
Treasury Solicitor. 


tafdbw v Atkinson 
Before Lord Justice Stephen 
Brown and Mr Justice 
McCowan 

[Judgment given July 23] 

There was no reasonable 
cause for failure to surrender to 
bail where the defendant, be- 
cause he handed bis charge sheet 
to his solicitor without making 
any note of the date on which he 
was to surrender to custody, 
mistakenly formed the opinion 
that he was to surrender on a 
later date. 

The Queen’s Bench Di- 
visional Court so held allowing 
a prosecutor's appeal against the 
decision of Alfred Gelder Street, 
the Kingston upon Hull Stipen- 
diary Magistrate, that the defen- 
dant had reasonable cause for 
foiling to surrender to custody 
and was accordingly not guilty 
of an offence under section 6(1) 
of the Bail Act 1976. 

Mr Peter Heppd for the 
prosecutor; Mr Keith Walmsley 
for the defendanL. 

MR JUSTICE McCOWAN 
said that the explanation put 
forward on the defendant's be- 
half for his failure to surrender 
to custody was that the charge 
sheet had been retained by his 
solicitor and that he had not 
been given a copy, that he was 
given an appointment by his 
solicitors for a formal consulta- 
tion on a dale after the return 
date of the bail and that at that 


time the defendant had been 
involved in other court proceed- 
ings. As a result the defendant 
mistakenly formed the view that 
his duty was to surrender to the 
Hull Magistrates’ Court during 
the week subsequent to the bad 
date. . 

The learned magistrate was of 
the opinion that this was not a 
matter of mere confusion on the 
part of the defendant but that 
those extraneous factors caused 
the confUsion to arise. It was not 
suggested for a moment before 
the magistrate that the 
defendant's failure to surrender 
was ddi berate. 

No doubt the reasons out- 
lined played a part in the 
defendant's confusion and 
could be said to amount to 
mitigation, but there was no 
question of anything having 
arisen to prevent the 
defendant's attendance. 

He bad been told when bailed 
of the date on which he was to 
surrender to custody and been 
given a signed copy of the bail 
form. If he was going to pan 
with it he should have made a 
note of the date. 

The error was his responsibil- 
ity and it could not be said that 
those reasons could amount to a 
reasonable cause. 

Lord Justice Stephen Brown 
agreed. 

Solicitors: Mr Leslie M. Bell. 
Hull; Andrew M. Jackson & Co, 
Hull. 


Delay in taxation gives rise to nominal award 


Jones v Roberts 
Before Lord Justice Parker. 
Lord Justice Noursc and Sir 
Roger Ormrod 
{Judgment given July IS] 

The power conferred by Or- 
der 62. rule 7(5) of the Rules of 
the Supreme Court (as it was 
before the Rules of the Supreme 
Court (Amendment) (SI 1986 
No 632 (L2)> came into force on 
April 28). to award a “nominal 
or other sum” for costs to a 
party who had failed to procure 
or io proceed with taxation, 
could be exercised where tax- 
ation had in foci been initiated, 
or proceeded with, provided 
that ii could be shown that there 
bad been delay in procuring or 
proceeding with taxation which 
had caused prejudice to the 
party against whom costs had 
been awarded. 

Where the delay had been 
such that in the opinion of the 
taxing officer it had rendered 
fair taxation impossible, il,was 
not necessary for specific prej- 
udice to be established before 
the power could be exercised. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
in a reserved judgment, allowing 
an appeal by the defendant. Mr 
Paul Roberts, from Mr Justice 
Evans who, on July 1. 1985. had 
granted an application by the 
plaintiff, Elizabeth Anne Jones, 
under Order 62. rule 35 for 
review of Mr District Registrar 
Freeman’s decision in 1984 to 
allow- her only nominal costs 
(£51 in respect of an action in 
which she had obtained judg- 
ment in early 1981. 

Mr Duncan Matheson for the 
defendant: Mr Alexander 
Carlile. QC and Mr P. Michael 
Farmer for the plaintiff. 

LORD JUSTICE PARKER 
said that Drake *£ Fletcher Ltd v 
Clark ((1968) 112 SJ 95) was 
direct authority for the applica- 


tion of the former Order 62, rule 
7( 5) or the Rules of the Supreme 
Court to cases where taxation 
was instituted or continued with 
only after inordinate and in- 
excusable delay and that delay 
had prejudiced ihe paying party. 

In Chapman v Chapman 
{[19S51 I WLR 599. 603-4) Sir 
Robert Megarry, Vice-Chan- 
cellor. had expressed doubts 
about the correctness of Drake, 
and in the light of that the 
plaintiff had submitted that 
Drake had been decided per 
incuriain. since it did not appear 
that the application of the rule 
had been seriosuly argued. 

That was an insufficient rea- 
son for the Court of Appeal 
refusing to follow its own pre- 
vious decision (see Mortile Ltd v 
IVakeling ([1955] 2 QB 379). 

and the court was therefore 
bound to follow Drake, about 
which his Lordship had no 
reluctance. 

The fact that the rule spoke of 
failure rather than delay was of 
no significance. If a party did 
nothing for two years the paying 
party seeking to invoke the rule 
coulti properly say that the other 
had failed to initiate or procure 
or commence taxation. If in 
response the other were 
galvanised into action he would 
require an extension of time, 
until he obtained which he 
would still have foiled. 

Were it otherwise the remark- 
able result would be that a party 
entitled to taxation could in all 
cases avoid the operation of the 
rule. A party, having done 
nothing for ten years, could give 
notice of intention to proceed, 
seek extension of time and. 
with 


7(5) was not intended to be used 
in cases of delay, they were 
concerned with disallowing 
costs in the taxation in the event 
of delay, whereas rule 7(5) gave 
the additional power to disallow 
costs in the action to prevent 
prejudice to any other party. 

Drake &. Fletcher Ltd v Clark 
had been cited in successive 
editions of the Supreme Court 
Practice ever since it had been 
decided. That was of itself a 
good reason not to depart from 
iL since where a decision had 
stood and been acted upon by 
practitioners fora long period it 
ought not to be departed from 
without compelling reason, es- 
pecially when it acted as a 
powerful incentive to prac- 
titioners to conduct their affairs 
with reasonable speed. 

The administrative machin- 
ery under which the Supreme 
Court offices sent the perfected 
order on the trial of an action, 
and a copy, to the appropriate 
district registry did not effect the 
beginning of taxation proceed- 
ings for the purpose of Order 62, 
rule 21(1): the party entitled to 
taxation must always initiate it. 

The only substantial question 
before the district registrar on 
the trial of the defendant's 
application under Order 62. rule 
7(5) had been the extern, if any. 
to which specific prejudice had 
to be established to warrant an 
assessment of a nominal sum 
under the rule. 

The registrar, having been 
referred to Drake and Pamplin v 
Fraser (So 2) ([1984] l WLR 
1385). had decided ihat, al- 
though there was no affidavit 
evidence of specific prejudice, 
the delay of nearly two years in 


appUcati^underOrder 62. rule tins case, which the plaintiff had 
7(5L could say. “I have not not suggested to be other than 
failed to procure taxation. Here inordinate and inexcusable, was 
lam" >" itself bound to have caused 

Neither rule 8(6) nor rule 7(4) *°* e 

of Order 62 indicated that rule in Chapman, the Vice-cnan 


cellor had construed the ref- 
erences in Pamplin to delay 
which sufficed to establish prej- 
udice as referring only to cases 
where delay had made it impos- 
sible to adduce evidence of 
prejudice, and not as entitling a 
paying party to refrain from 
adducing such evidence and to 
rely on prejudice being inferred 
from mere delay. 

In his Lordship's judgment a 
delay could be so prolonged that 
the inference could be drawn, at 
least prima facie \ that no fair 
taxation could be held. If for 
example, there had been a five- 
year delay, it was not necessary 
for the paying party's solicitor to 
depose that he could not 
remember ihe details as well as 
he could have done five years 
previously, although it would be 
open to the party entitled to 
taxation to displace the in- 
ference. for example, by show- 
ing that memory was 
unnecessary. 

Where an experienced taxing 
officer considered, as he had 
here, that a proper taxation was 
impossible, there was no reason 
to demand any evidence of 
specific prejudice. 

Moreover, it should be borne 
in mind that a party who had 
foiled to institute taxation, or 
having done so had foiled to 
proceed, would require an ex- 
ercise of discretion before he 
could proceed at alL 

Where the delay was pro- 
longed and inexcusable, there 
was no reason why an extension 
of lime should not be refused. 
The applying 1 party would then 
be in mercy and have to satisfy 
the taxing officer that he should 
be allowed to proceed. 

It was for the party seeking to 
rely on Order 62, rule 7(5) to 
satisfy the taxing officer that if 
the taxation proceeded nor- 
mally there was .a substantial 
risk that a fair and jnst result 


would not be achieved. 

If that were shown, it did not 
follow that nominal costs only 
should be awarded, since the 
power was to award a nominal 
“or other sum”. That required 
the taxing officer to consider 
whether a larger than nominal 
sum could be awarded without 
causing prejudice. 

Prejudice could be avoided if 
the taxation proceeded on the 
basis that the party entitled 
should be allowed only such 
sum as would inevitably have 
been allowed on a taxation in a 
case of its type, bearing in mind 
the time taken to try tbe case 
and assuming that proceedings 
had been commenced and con- 
ducted expeditiously. 

If the paying party paid only 
such a sum he would not be 
prejudiced if the only prejudice 
on which he relied was inability 
properly to challenge tbe other 
party’s bill. On the other band, if 
the paying party's financial po- 
sition had deteriorated, as had 
been the situation in P ra ^ that 
approach might be insufficient 
to prevent prejudice. _ 

The judge, on the plmntiffs 
application under Order 62. role 
35, had erred in concluding that 
no prejudice had been shovm. 
This was an appropriate case for 
exercising the rule 7(5) powcc- 

The role was not intended to 
punish the dilatory but to 
prevent prejudice to the paying 
party. On that footing an award 
of.a nominal sum only was not 
justified. The appeal should be 
allowed and the application 
remitted for the district registrar 
io consider what “othersum to 
allow, looking at the biUs if he 
thought that they would assist 
him. 

Lord Justice Nouise and Sir 
Roger Ormrod agreed. 

Solicitors: Garrard Mitchell & 
Co. Shrewsbury; Harrison & 
Sons, Welshpool 


Regina v Secretary of State for 
die Home Department and 
Another, Ex parte Greenwood 
Before Mr Justice Macpherson 
[Judgment given July 23] 

Where a prisoner petitioned 
the Secretary of State for the 
Home Department for an order 
producing him at a court to 
conduct litigation which he had 
commenced, it was not un- 
reasonable for the secretary of 
stale to refuse to order his 
production on the ground that 
the prisoner had no funds to pay 
for the cost of his transport in 
advance. 

Mr Justice Macpherson so 
held in the Queen's Bench 
Division, dismissing an applica- 
tion for judicial review by Ian 
Greenwood, a prisoner at 
Ganree Prison, of the decision 
of the Home Secretary and tbe 
prison governor dated Septem- 
ber 4, 1985, whereby they 
refused to order his production 
at Daventry Magistrates' Court 
on September 5. 1985. to enable 
him to conduct his private 
prosecution of a police con- 
stable on a charge of assault. 

His Lordship refused to quash 
the decision or to grant the 
applicant a declaration that in 
deciding whether to produce the 
applicant at 3 cow] to pursue 
civil or criminal litigation, the 
question whether the applicant 
was willing and able to pay for 
the costs of his production in 
advance was an irrelevant 
consideration. 

Mr Tim Owen for the ap- 
plicant: Mr Nigel Pleming for 
the secretary of state and the 
governor. 

MR JUSTICE MAC- 
PHERSON said that the ap- 
plicant was serving a nine-year 
sentence of imprisonment at 
Ganree Prison. While on re- 
mand at Bedford Prison in 1985 
he commenced . a private 
prosecution against a police 
constable for an assault. 

The case was due to come on 
at Daventry Magistrates' Court 
on March 26. On March 18 be 
petitioned the secretary of state 
for an order for his production 
at the court but was told, orally, 
that he would have to bear tbe 
cost himself in advance unless 
an escort was coincidentally 
travelling there. 


He paid no money *nd was 
not produced on the day. The 
matter was adjourned and a 
hearing fixed for June 27. 

On April I, he received a 
letter from the Home Office 
informing him that they were 
not prepared to bear the cost of 
producing him at court. 

The applicant made no com- 
plaint at that time to the High 
Court, nor did he do anything to 
have funds made available — he 
never had had funds available. 

On June 27, be was in fact 
produced at the magistrates’ 
court, but the matter was ad- 
journed to September 5. On July 
26, tiie applicant was transferred 
to Ganree Prison. He did 
nothing about asking to be 
produced at tbe court until 
September 3. when be made a 
request of the governor and 
petitioned the secretary of state. 

He had no money and no legal 
aid. He was told that as be could 
not bear the cost he could not be 
taken to Daventry. On Septem- 
ber 5. the justices dismissed the 
information against the police 
constable. 

Tbe question was whether the 
secretary of state acted so un- 
reasonably in imposing the con- 
dition of prepayment that his 
anion was perverse within the 
principles laid down in Asso- 
ciated Provincial Picture Houses 
Ltd v Wednesbury Corporation 
([19481 I KB 223). 

It was submitted for the 
applicant that the secretary of 
state's decision was unreason- 
able and therefore unlawful in 
that it impeded the applicant's 
access to the court in breach of 
his right of unimpeded access. 

It was true that a convicted 
prisoner retained all those com- 
mon-law rights which were not 
taken away expressly or by 
necessary implication; that he 
had a right of unimpeded access 
to a court; and that that right 
could only be taken away by 
express enactment. 

Bui Raymond v Honey 
([1983] I AC 1). from which 
those principles were' culled, 
dealt with the suppression of a 
prisoner's letters to and from his 
solicitor and did not assist the 
applicant 

Similarly. R v Secretary of 
State for the Home Department, 
Ex parte Anderson ([1984] QB 
778) was important on its own 


facts in relation to a prisoner's 
access to lawyers, but did not 
particularly assist the applicant 

Section 29 (1) of the Criminal 
Justice Act 1961 gave the sec- 
retary of state an unfettered 
discretion to order the trans- 
portation of a prisoner to court 

In Becker v Home Office 
([1972] QB 407). tbe Court of 
Appeal considered section 29. 
Lord Denning, Master of the 
Roots, said, at pp4l6 and 417. 
that the secretary of state could 
lawfully require payment of a 
prisoner who wisbedio be taken 
to court to conduct his own case. 

The case was similar to Ihe 
applicant's, although there the 
prisoner had the means to pay 

When a prisoner had no funds 
was it necessarily a wrong 
exercise of the secretary of 
state's discretion to refuse to 
fund his transport to court? 

In the instant case, because 
the applicant was a high risk 
prisoner (which was no one's 
fault but his own), the cost was 
£121 each time. 

If tbe submissions made on 
the applicant's behalf were right, 
the result would be that every 
prisoner conducting his own 
litigation would have to be 
transported to court free if.be 
had no ftinds. Such a result was 
unacceptable. 

The applicant's inability to 
get to the court was not such an 
impediment to his access to the 
courts that the secretary of 
state’s decision should be im- 
pugned. 

No common-law or statutory 
duty compelled the secretary of 
state to assist, at no cost, in 
conveying a prisoner to court. 

The applicant was no worse 
off than a person out of prison, 
save that he could not actually 
walk to the court. He was 
prevented from proceeding by 
his own impecuniosity ana. his 
access to the court was not 
impeded in any way- which gave 
him a remedy. 

There was nothing unlawful 
perverse or unreasonable in the 
secretary of state's general prac- 
tice of demanding payment 

If the applicant obtained legal 
aid he could still bring civil 
proceedings against the police 
constable. 

Solicitors: Ms Marie Staun- 
ton: Treasury Solicitor. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


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LtwifiiaMwKKJ UraiDltacA 
LomuM cTowflen: CJ MacGregor: 
pROMann: JMarttn: W L Martin: BE 
iMcCauaund: J McOatMtiHiu K. M 

W53E J « 

Newsenc A P NtobeM K C Orifanlore D 
k PadunanattunTs v Ptoses t; L M 

teflBSroBH 

RwBaixt M K Shah: H SbahktuBah: R 
M snort: EM arum: SP Stanley: MP. 


Out I raw 

BOCWesT D R __ 

HWe: OM Lee: 

■MotteriwmL 
Clan l (Dtv IQ: J A Ford: S Matthews: 
P Moore. 

^V^^ HWtoChb0W - 

Mining Engmecrios 

1r T Mad f ortn. 

^TO AMCravwl,lw:KM 

w« 2 TOW DiJC PaJerson: D A 
Shaw: K Thompson, 

Bias* 3: A L Pfatnos. 

Prodnctioa and Operathns 
Mameefuent 


telTy%&? v * ns:JWDW *- 

8 %&.* N r 6- * M 

• »SC . 

Electronic En gi nee rin g and 
Mathematics ■ • 

am 2 row U): D S Soon. 

Ctan now Brookes. 

' BSc 


Ctaa 2 (pw ID: G j ChaninttraK JD 
Jonkimu R M jonniton: a m Me- 
Mahon- G J MtDS S J Moore. A J 
Potter: T Waimsley. 

- - Geology. .. 

out v K Pvrvta: S M Reddy. 

5^8 : <KSSIS«AE 

J r-CribbtK R R W KnlgtiC M J 
Lawson: Jp C Mantle: J PuvPy, 6 P 
Price: C TyreU; j m wwero. 

Ctasl (DW II): LJCIbbiDS Godfrey: 
s M LeMfiton: d c MUCtwll: R v 
Tomiajr. c P Wong. 

Cta k C M Pooler. 

Mathematical Physks 

CM' If MD Aden: A Baker; H C 
Perry: n G Walker. 

Om 2 COW DiMS Cflthorpe; P A 
Hodges. 

Ctau 2TOW U): J a BanmvLP S Beta; 
c A strum. 

- Mathematics :. 

Ctaa l: L J Briggs: E S CMMyr J tf C 
Curtis: M C Freeman: S A Freer: MS . 
Homen A J H King: j a Mcfttny: C J 
Norreyru A Pinseitb i t* homasoo: E 
M wetfrip: P m Wlggleswonti. 
OHS2 row n: P D Avte D N Bettor: 
p R Cheer: L€ CuttlntcL M Famee C 

& J PttffllPK A P Smith: C A Sowortw: 
K R Younger. 

§1MS^m"SBS£ ! e j m J b S 

Waal: J T emxmu i oougURmgR c 
Taheiingwn: A . Fair uuiifc a t d 
G rantham: J t Cuy. l B Htward: P Q 

ss?migs#ffssM|I 

pniuinc c J Pulley; k j RoUnoorop J 
Rose K J Slater: c P Spenceley: S P 

CM * D Barff: S M EUWon: D E 
Gutter: J MHaw^n,- 1 P Kcamc J t 1 
How: N A Park: NTWbt: C M wasoa- 

Mathetnatks ivithConipntiag 
CBM fiPJ Treeot 
2. 


1 row Qi M A Cowne D R 

Evtane: C a Fuffort. j s Grimn; A N 
jacksoor P J Somttgaw. 

CM 2 (pw B)s M A GWritts H J 


CM 2TJ Alack. 

Mathematics with Compadng 
and Statistics 
CM 1: N □ Carter. 

Ctan 2 row Qf C C Annan: P M 
TOmllnson. 


Electronic Englnaering}: M M Q-NagM 
flSectrlcai and Electronic Entttnear- 

fe N zapdl IMccrumlod 




_ _ penitr*" ff i art: 

JEU^dcR^JiMvkcHPDmm 
d: P’R Hj 



R J Pwo rakoywfcfc 


V- A OIterUxt J « w 


6W!lT|H 

_ Lewis: P j 

ODertod: J « W Peck: J A • 

: A E Rooke: S J SomecK J c 

OaS -iMrSw-jQ : H C Aahaflb D M 
Gold ham: M Optoy: HR DarleK A 
Dawson: If J <5trrtrujT: S j Lev J D 
Leigh: A -.Mansell: J C Moat I W 

«£r J u ^ L «SS£. CE 

.1 .tank' k RdM on 

•W cm. jjTe 1 j 'Aden: S M 
3 DuBon: J J NlchoUs: 
t A Rawdoc M A 


YoML 

BSc 

ft M A BUghC P J HoddtnoCL 

» row Oi S C Alcocte C.E 

AUMDp: A J Beard: * H Brough: O L 
Brown: J C F Bruoe: C G BOcHand: J 
A Cawthray: A J &ttchlow: N” C 
Dann: C Dartyshlrtc D J mvW: P L 
□am: H J F gores: M A Ebdon: L J 
FarmbtaK K SW! D T Hemmomt J 
D Handfon 


D Handiiont P Jf Hewitt T p MMB 
5 V HpyiaiKt: E A Hmsonc H J ftzsnt: 


BfS-A. JL,*SLJ&SF&31 „ *23 Mathematics with Statistics 

CM ft I L Drydeu M A GouWer. PP 
Hall: A E Pack: D A Stephens. 

?SSL 9 ^ 

Troalee. 

CM 1 <DW mi M R Bennett: 8 A 
Howe: A J Uncobu R A Retd: R 
Smith. 

CM 3s T Him. 

Physics 

den ft M J Brunt: h J Chapman: C L 
Fooem.T J Foster: C R GUI: H G 
Hanes M a Hill: S M Milton: N G 
Morawuz: P Oiiey. 

wyeu. 1 ^: s’sklsx 

Croc J W DoolMr: L A Dunlop: AM 
iRTr 


QrB Enghetring 

CM ft J O Bird: J A Jones. 

J - Caicteole: G Ghotra: P J 
Summerflrid: S Whatley. 

CM2 row RftCRACton: CS Allen: 
I EBanham: A J DuHln: S-CJ Hoque: K 
k Lee: CE Stead: I R wmiaros: W h 


L dements: M F Copping: Kl Downs: 
M J Emwn P H Euen A F OonlK N 
C Cray: K j vtodgea: 0 l Hunt K R 
Jones; S D JoneTsi M Jones: A S 
Lewin: R O M^rmlon: HM«Dm#e H 
l Meecham: SJ NKhoKon: S J Pass: J 
.Pearson: A Piatete C 1 P orter: T 
Rawden: j L Riehaftaom J A 

ion: ft D Huotrwoe: D JS Hope: Sj. 
. Kemp: p R Markham: A E Rattray: L 
Y Reeve K A Rogers. 

CM ASM Hayes. 

BA Architectnre and 
Eimroameatal Desiga 
CM ft E w Homing: P Jacobs: R l 
Plant 

CM 2 row Q: N G Allen: M 

CM 2 row n>i P E Aim K j 
Hughes M J Kingsbuiy: A S LyHC B 
P Maoutre A Meck- M K Mufler. T 8 

Ryam C H Thomas 

Economics 
CM 2 row 1)1 D M D canon: C 
CouitMlI; ■ S J Ddykln; JT M 
HwMMtdL S A Jones: I W Kent: J 
Lcog: s D Marks B L MtlcheO: W 
MOurad: F M Nicholson; P 
Oirarringtea: C J Sot A Spowen P 
k Spencer; R E Turner 
CM2 row DiDC ArioOtt N Bailey: 
FSG DoddsTT w Ewan: V Jackaon: F 
D LfthflWy: S K V Lee: A D Lord: 8 1 

CM K S AFShayh 

Geography 

CM ft M C camion: A w Rctaon 
CM 2 COW DSJ Andrews S T 
Barlow; T D Barnard: D J Bennett; E 
M Bowen: T P Bray: V J D Brown; M 
A Bryant: M J Cottnorpe: I T Crook: L 
A Tftnneu: E A Hawidns N jjoteav: C 
F (Odd: M J Lea: R A MartteM L 
McOuiian: S J Nietoen: c s Price: A 
M Robbins Kr A SoenttT ARStafflev: 
S J Thorn Umv A L Turrnoh; A M 
Turherffekl: N M Wade: D J Wallace: 
J M Watters: C E wood 

fenSsrr?h£ n ^p M J c ^jtt m 

Warwick: J H White: C M Wright: M 
Von: K D Zwcfsloot 
OM ft R I Shaft: H C Vivian 

Industrial Economics 
CM ft M Sayers 

CM 2 row hr A D Bennett; A J 

Hrycyswyn: J Km: A C Lamb: A L 
Lawre n ce: s F I Lee: J Man: M H 
Netiohoime; L e Psrtmgton: s J 

Walton: H Walls: C D Whittaker: ft j 
Wilson 


Chadwidcrs i 
AH Quinn: 


A Jones: A P M onUdrd : 1 M 

‘ > - OMV Tjc * J U *C»tctipo»e: B C 



Ltedham: J A Lister: DTHLMH 
E Mantetth: G M Morekm: J w 
Pendleton: C M PtruUnseam J F 
porter: C M M ReynobbTow (modes: 
kjaSBr. J L woft tn eon: a Ftam 

MSE\ T tes& 

WaddeO: M J WeOK D G Whitt. 


A W Wbbett; J-A s Hior/ns: l Jacob: 



sc 



affri 

fS row iot Pj Howant 
rft Hama, (Anna 

MSjpJT**'* 1 

ass 

M.wwwr 

Sm r p&^^JifialcK J D 
Lockett: A P ttorris: J Sankey: R C 
SHtei: AM aittoil 
Cats 2 (Dra nj Emmoson: N J 
Sutton: E H Wetton; R A White! ey: 9 
A Willey 

Joist Hodovs 

American and EatfM ttadlei 

2 rmw r>: j d Qtann . 

t (Mi B: I D Assay: H 

waudnson: S HWtiaker-'' • .■ j- 

Sf ■<> 




wooiMOti: l woreOekL - 

CM ft P J Berryman: J a Knight 

* BSc (Ovdlttvy) 


CJ Blarionao: S Chaai-E W C 

Lam: G 8 NUtan. - 

Electrical • and -Electroafc 

F a g lmf pB| 

CM ft P OBdc M F Doody: R J 
Evans: 8 N Heywood: S KUng. 

2 (DM Ds T C K Chong: J 
Ik M S Fosweifc HPHKAJ 
WE P W M LatL- J D Moons T R 
r. 

2 mW D: D Ketlaway; W-L D 
c C W Loo: G J Nash: P D 
e K C Yeung: Y w Ytng. 
CM ft J V John: Pp Langfbnk 8 C 
Morgan. 

Mechanical Eagbeeriag 

CM ft A A StaMes: D C WaHtman: 
M J Withers: P K ZBMenkL 
CM 2 row DMA Ballinger: t M 
Chew; JH Hewttt: P JUddlSc M A 
Loasby: D L MountforU R V Owen; A 
JParfcer: p A Rigby: J A Salmon: PR 
Sfanidic T H Wood. 


Freeman: 


Grimes: P Hawker: S A 


Hotddns: C Jones: O D KocaL J K 
Plwntx: N D Walker: D Warren; D R 
WletaUTUtn: A J WHkfesL 
CM 2 row mi A J Buck: S J Bragin: 
C P 8 Oean:J Down ion: S R Fleur: K 
C&MiaTs G Hall; S C Hewitt P H 
Umn: J A McKenzie: A P OndL A J 
N QulxICK I J Reflty; I A Wright 
Cttss ft J T Allen: A J Angus: i C 
Baker; T W Baylta: w A Bonny: R 1 
Brazier: D J Buxlon: a M Davis: M 
Dawson; W J Hendon: R M Massey: N 
J McManus: M E MeadMR F M 
Moreton: TAD Timmins: M D 
Woofcey: A A Wright 

Psychology 
CM ft J A Hughes. 


ns 2 row H)r A I AdUKP G Beard: 
A D Charnbeta: S J Fraser: A D 
Harhutt: D J Hargrave; E J Knight: I C 
Lime: S Marioson: P McHugn: C E 

S Thomas: K Trtner: L T L Tsang: G J 
Willett 

Law 

CM > row D: J D Aubrey: N C Blanc: 
E R Lee: M J Lynchehaiu 8 M Wise 


CM 1 row Dt K J Ho 
HounseM: R L IWtaartU HM 


Hodsorr. C L 


S Taylor: P 
k wboney. 


wmstamey: C 


M E Goddard; lC 
Homewood: A A 


Db LM JJIffiE 

Haynes; G P .. .. 

Hudson: C V L Ingram: M N 
Kenworthy: L K MtaiHS Nya: L A 
Wood. 


DW Kt W R AnrUtage: D P Btrks: HM 
E DoogteFUte: M D Eari: 


Cane: RLE! 


-K A Farauhar-ThomKMi; A J Howard: 

A M Htroar: S E Otlewril; H H Patel: 

E A WHMam. 

MEag 

Chetical Eagfnr r ring 

CM ft D A Atherton: J S Birch: DP 
Buiunide: 8 Cunningham: p M 
Lambert: D G NlchoiM: P M Taylor. 

Class 1 row Di R C Baldwin: J P 
Crawsnaw: M Dawson: M R 
Lepoinotan: P A Loudmc. A B 
M^i?p 8 RymaiuEv jubb: K C 
smaa: _A D lam- 

^^8&&Z£r~-* ac 


„ 2 row H):FI Bnmbin K T 

FvaiMr i Forsyttc C A Franutn: C 
S Hoyle: T D Knowles: K H Lane N K 
Mtortry; D Rowe: j B WhUenc R 
Wong. 

Metallurgy and Materials 
Sdence 

CM 2 (DW Os R M GMopl 
CM 2 row QiM M Browne: S 
Falmlngton: K E FisguMMK T P 
Norton: N Thompson: SC Ward; EL 
Wilkes. 


Green: C J HamngtoK J J Last. 
Zoology 

CM It D J Conway: R J Dyke: D A 
GrewoocK- ' 

Pass 2 

A Hammond: “A “R’ llbudi; M P 
Jankowski: M R John: C F Knight: S J 
Ledhigham: J Macdonald: P Raynes; & 
M Salt A J Stubbing*: J E Tosotaid: R 
H Turner: C J Walker. 

Pass 2 (DW H); Y J Abraham: J 
Barken CR ff 
Storey. 


row Ift C A Bath: C N 
n: G R <£rtsbe: S J Fttiau: R 


Berry; J A Cooper: T J 


Mining Engineering 

CM ft S M Johnson- 


Joiat Honours 


2 row m s a Bedford; p R 

Brown: G CtarC P w Cockcroft: o J 
rellln: R G Croft: ANKEUMOOiGM 
Holland: L R1 Jooes. 

CM t row St R J Caaweq: a d 
. - - ~ HogME R P Nuim: P 


ft A P 

Philosophy): 


Boswell (Physics/ 
K JD .EUtt 


Catfd^l 


CMIEBgjM«tB« 



Prodnctioa Eavaedring and 
Production ftnaagenieat 


__ • Ara tia e rit^ 

cm 2 row ijr 

Lowndes 

_ Art HMani aat 

3 A R Johnstone 


Waniu D A Woodward: M H Your 


cm x row an s j. 

CttssoM: MD~ 


Ctaa ft 
m r fuel 


p 

„ . J 

YOUP9* 

(PWftJD nasai. RJHaad: 
teniun; C TayttR Y c Yeung. 


jamas. 
M ' S 

Duhscomhe: vl Edwimls: 

M D Fm nkMn: M E C Fryer; G P 
Hswttft M J Lambert: DR IMcNalrr N 
J MoWneux: A W Msm: 8 Nikpoun 
R G Pooiey: J H T Rond. 

CM ft C G Thomas. 


CM2 



IDs Y B Hyland 

jrqsrrsrDTfflK"" 

iri-llvidln 

H M J fines 8 J 


Stmmons,, 


and 12S WMO 

looked German 



Metallurgy and Materials mg). 
Science 

OM 2 row Di A F G Robson. 

Minlax Engineering 

CM ft I Walker 

Prodnctioa Ea g he cri ng and 
Production Management 

CM 1 row OiGA Had: P T Smlth- 
2 OIW ID> A P J FUiey. 


BEflg 


BSc 

BMogy 


CM-Tl T M Oftams-; L A R-MBriftK K 
J saxfty. 

CM 2 row Q> A J Bridgen: D 
Chandler; J R P Creisy: M CCrowtey: 
M G Dent: S E Drake; C R Frost: AD 
Hart S D Hobbs: C H Jones: M A 
J MuDen: A P 


■(Mathematics/ Economics): P RR 
Lewington (Mathematics/ Pnyslca): M 
R Scrapie (Ptopstcs/Anotied PhyrictK 

§ ■ J SbanKS (Physics/ AnoUed PtnisKW 
■ j Wakes (MMhcmahcs/Pftysics). .. 
CM 2 ro w Ds J. N _ Abbott 
(MatbeniaaokfManagamsnt -SbJdtesK 
D J Barm* (PtolMcs/AyMIed PhvUCW 
P (TBafT (MatlwmMCVECOnMMciO: c 
M J Boden f Geotogy/ Oeograpta y k a 
M toxrwn CBomny/Geogranliy): E J J 
QrigeJCheraiabyjTMotfteniWy): L C 
Cower (Chernisirv/BiocheinHfry): A 
M Davies (Genetics/Btoctieralstryl: C 
J Dixon (Zoology /EMocheroMryl: s P 
Dkmk CZoologyyBiocheralstry): C D 
Evans (Ptivsto/Anntled Physics}: K D 
Hail (Ptiydcs/Apwied Physics): D J 
HaOarn (catemWiy/Managsmeni Eco- 
nodal: A H Hammond (Genetics/ 
Bfochamtstry): K J Henderson 
(GenetKS/BIOCtieiuUIiyl: P Hodgson 
(Physics /Applied PtoAcSk G HuSrat 
iMattwmaUcs/ Ptiysicsk R. W Jones 
(Physics/ Appded Physics}: C . J F 
Kalghin i GeuHlC* /Biochemistry): C M 
Lammas (Chemistry /Management 
Economics): P A G Mann (Physics/ 
Philosophy): A J Nunn (Physics/ 

Omuheinancs/Eoononiics): R J Place 
(Matbematics/Econoniics): D - P 
Ra mada n (Mathematics /Phlknoohy): 
ECSdeboUiam (Ptayslcs/ApMed| 


M 


Smith 




MeroiA 

Hall: j a Howaftc J. Mayan A J 
Simpson: U M Young 


BScABEng 
Chemical EogUMering 


i-nnw. 


^mVCTGSKJ: D J 
SSm?TOW H)I A w jurat F A Reed 



wm'rv Q f B A Hobb ts 


wibon 

M CM <dW l)i J A Amote C L 
Aylom A j Badoox A p Mlu § 
SettSShf: a c Best 6 J Buckley: E F 
OlUuupOwcn^J E OapnaK A M 
(wkwpod: J CheU: C P W Cbu: 8 E 
M Chubb: H Owie ow G Cettinra J 


Haaloo: J Parvliu E A Puwnan: M C 
Pock: A P Sarnackt P N Senior: R F 
Thomas: N JTUrnen J R D Walken A 
J Wright. . 

Electrical and Electronic 
R^ a ra r ia g 
CM It M S Leeaan. 

CM 2 flNv Ot P R M e rt ura: N D 
Smith: M P Towers. 

Pan 8 P Cree (CtNndcal Engfimr- 
IngX 

BSc 

Civil Engineering 
CM ft B B Reynolds, 
dan 2 row Dt P J Costs M P GuftuT J 
Rkdifre: PITayMr. B F vesbkinl. 
CM3(DWB):P A Brown: R Rntovg 
J s Heame: KM liinK ft e 
Laayon: w j A onwayTSt 8 Poote. 
i ft N J Baggett M G Loma s: ELuh 
F P Mohan: N Muegrove; D K 


U»dv J A Ludlam: ___ 

hHchotooK K J Peberdy: D R Pepper: 
C R Sonar p H wnuams. 

CM 2 (DW HU E J Aden: S V Brooks: 
M A Buxton; fc M Buxton: AAHflL A 
F John: C J McWHHann M E Turner 
C S Walken R Waring. 

Botany 

CM 2 row DiSJ Barrett Z M Z 
Mukmaka: Z A Warn. 

RCFtaUK 


CM 2 row ID: A J 
D J Ftrn: B w Ru 


Che mlUi y 

CM I: J D Bougheyr K.E EUR 
FWi A L HamUtoncA 


HuKhlnoon: TAG, 
t^rtric J J RanMdR L I 


Heavers: S E 
riocau A P 
SkeatK D A 


ft R 8 BattRP Brown: S 

..the; A M Dawton: B L 

Edgan C M Febty: P R Foley: S P 
GehUtaarc 6 Hares: 8. Jaffen M □ 
James: K J Manuand: J J McGowan: 
CJMDne: J w Oram: G A Rogers: K 
SmaOwoott M Tankard. 

CM2 row NO: JMBarnsby: GBeO: 
D K dm- C E ct^croft P. J 
Coleman: M Cook; P H Dobson; A H 
Doncan: RGGlpp: JR DOeenwood: 
“ ' - n: if D North: S J 


jrlJim: R D_ _ 

P 1 m K s J D R » :T 

CM ft H C Archer: P B. 


Buchanan: P G Dodd: K D 
R Kemp; E CMw AJ Prichard: 


M R 
N 
A 



Electric*) aid Electronic 
Engineering 

CM ft D B Hoskins: M A Stott. 
CM2 (DW DlP E ; 

PP Davy: 10 
R Holding: H. 

C< 

Va 


Genetics 

CM ft P R HomasiL 
CM* row Dt 8 P Adams: R A Allen; 
P S couier: N P Evans: K Jeffery: S 
vickcra. - 

cm 2 row IDs .. a Brown: w J 
. Carbery: R G Ftokr L Hotand: □ M 
Horecrod: D J Rhodes; K E waller. 

Geography 
CM ft K M Sambtts. - 
CM 2 (DW D: K AUspm P M 
AtUnfion. v M BlajakBr. DJ Booth; E 

ssmi UMAXSAm 

Smllh. 


(OiHntt^ry/Blotdieiniatryft M P 
Westarman (Physics (Applied Phys- 
tot D J WMey (Pbysta/AppUed 
Physics): L J Zurawaki 

(Phystcs/APPUed Physics}. 

CM 2 (DW Bft J F Anacomfa 

J J Hgptdnson tGenebCB/Blochcm- 
istry): J R Kane (Mamemadca/ 
Psych oJo* .: H E Marczak tMalh- 
ematics/Managranent Studies): G A 
Parry (Physics/ OeraUtryj: a Paw 
(Chemistry /Blochetnlstry): A M Piatt 
(Physics/ Applied Physics): S I Rev HI 
(Mathematics/ Psychology); M S 
Robinson (Phyrics/AppUttl Physics): S 
k Rooney (Pranfcs/ Applied. PnysioD: 
J E Silvester JPhysta/Applied Phvs- 
jqg , J. H Smit h (Ph yaics/Appbed 
Physics); P A Steshens (Physics/ 
Ptulosopoy): S H WrtWi (Phy- 
riCs/AppUed i PhysksK J Wheatley 
(Physics/ Applied Physics). 

CM ft T J Dudley qntyHa/ApgUed 
Physics): 8, • P Gouldlng 

(Physics/ Chemistry): K L 4 Scaly 

i B l?TS 

Whatley (physics/ Applied FhysMM. 

BSc 

FatK R H Barnett (Phystaoe I D 

ner (PhysKSK J B CSoaien (Mathemai- 

I (MiysiraV D A 
wfth sramucs). 
. rpW Ds S M AdsheatL- P L 
Drake: O . M HHNgrshon: G S 
Hardman; N M Roper: P A Wort. 

Coates: P J 
■ Hulnrn: T J 

JR Smith: D P 

StockwefL 

Bacbelbrof Pharmacy 

CM ft E A Baruin: J Y Couren. 

A^Cwft^haeU^jfSttK R 


2 row II)! S L Andrew; J R 
Burns: J L Carter; N D Couchman: J B 
W Leonard: M L Leonard: K M Lewis: 
J J Pawley: a S Peach; M A Pearson: 

j A Preston: A Slnha: C F Wttben M 
Woifenden 
CM ft j Carter 

Politics 

Class 2 (DW D: AS Brown: H P Giles: 
C McDermott: M A Phillips; PA 
Simmons: J A VasR P M Wade: JAR 
Ydtfbi 

CM 2 (DW ID: C M Agnew: S 
Andrews: D Cloke: R H Gibson: M C 
Rieder de Miguel: S L Shields: M *mi: 
R J Townsend 

Psychology 

Class * (DM DrVK' Archer: E Block: O 
I Clayton: RAM Grtnuhs: LJ HaUaas 
s Johnson; j L Outranu S Scott: j c 
Smith: S K Thomas 
CM 2 (DW B)iTW Baker: A Darwin: 
H L Bfbson: S T Goddard: J C Humble 
A Katz: J E Lambert: 8 E Maftlngiey: 
S E Mirams: S F Round: S G Schotty: 
L C Shaw; a C Smith 

- Sorial Administration 

CM t (DW Oi B M Airtort: J E 
Andrew: S J Brnett J A Carter: P B 
Chi mis: 8 C H Conway: I N East C J 
Forward: C A Haydoo: M M Lang: A 
Mathers: O F d O ‘Council: k J 
Osborn; C J Painter: N M Svensott D 
Whllaker 

CM 2 row H): D Batty: J A Chipping: 
L E Collins: A vj Davies: S M 
Dunstan: H M Flynn: S J Gallagher: j 
P Gregg: L M Hamilton: a M 
Harwood: D 8 Heame: M R A Hood ay; 
C E Hurd: N J rowley; J A Spray; J E 
srudholme: K- E ThomMOn: S E 
Throps T-Watson: P M Westwood 
CM ID JS Walker 

Sociology 

rCM 2 row Ds J Burnetft D j'Cody: C 
KnWit M B Lakeman: F A Moyle: A 
C Naah: H- L RoMnaon; L G 
Sutherland: J A Turner . 

Class 2 (DW 0: DT. BoiCtier: J GarinL 
S J Harney: S Hussein: J M Milne: AJ 
Ralph: LE Smith: R E W ta e l e rr J G 
Williams 

Joint Hodovs 
Economics Bad 
AgricattBral Economics 

CM2 (DWO: J R AUdwam: M D Cot- 
ton; K Y Korke; B Crawdno- Vakhas C 
M McCabe: R J Proctor 
Ctan ft N J CMvenon 

Economics and Eomoautrics 

CM 2 row Q: B G KM H J 
Tomkins: A M Wome 
CM 2 (OW 0: F Blackmons J Curts: 
8 D King: M R Payne 

Law and Politics 
CM 2 row D:DJ Cooper: E L 
GaUetU: G L Jones: T E Waller 
Cftm 2 (DW N)< C J Irvine SLKkktT 

M ti dr um 

CM ft S A Nlsbet 

Psyckologsr and niQosopliy 
CM 2 row D AJ Mactdnc P E 
Sutton 

BA 

Pass: C Channon-Bailow (Lawk K W 
chow dndustrlal Economics): R M 
Mohr (Architecture and Environ- 
mental Design): M G Renshaw (Social 


BLL 

CM ft L D Baimon: D Thompson 
CM 2 (DW Oi Q A Adams: J M cole: 
S T Conroy: A C Dobbs: B / Evans: P 
A Farrar. Jw Hoinrook; s v Jones: S 
J Lyon: CMP McKeraia: B R 
Mellstrom: P M Moss: M F O'Brien: A 
Pearson: R M Po niton: B J Rengen: E 
J rtekett: A P Smith: V L Smith: M D 
Bnktn S P Vaughan 
CM2 (DW ID: S J Allport: M Beattie; 
T C Bharath: A S Carruthers: E F 
Chapman: D dements: R M Coleridge: 


YACHTING 


Cowes weak and not 
so sacred any more 



Graham: S 1 Hughson: P J Keattngs: F 
M Kenur. N M ITCldwast M Kitchen: J 
J Lewis: M A Made M W J 
McCutggan; R M«k J E Nfltchrtl: A L 
NeUo: S A Nrwion: C H Piter P M 
Rooney: S K Roscow: J C Salmon: D J 
Shurman: S 4 Smiih: LTteraatMKX 
A Taylor: J D turner; J L VMenUne: J 
S Vincent: A J Whlnlnaton: a R 
Wlnterowrora: N J D Wright: H 
Young 

CM ft R M House 
UnstassMsO: J A Talbot 

Bacbelor of Architecture 
Class . 1: M S Askeyr K J BurreB: C 
Courearft: 4 T Pickard 

Harun: M C Healjn J.Lno: S J 
Mulhearn: R 8 Rhodes: S L Yak 
CM ft C A Faikln: A W Fflby: 8 D 
Tron 

Parer M A Barker; A M Barry: A J 
Hide: E Strewn 


Oxford Class Lists for Modem Languages 


Moduli Xangaages 

F iiKUcam 

cum) use®* FrenoL L 
ih Greek, r In Ualiaa. I _ 

R In Russian and S 4a 

a j. 

H. 
S 

... ... ... R 

Chiapetta SI Anne, no school oh'en: 

Pem^^i9^HrtJSh S bs: J nthm. 
Ex- Stocknon cSoi M HamllKm. 


LWWVHi 


iwai 

SchrtWd St EdH. King Edward VL S. 

souttumoipH; b M Shuttttworth 
Mm. wincMsUR G M BBaarmg. 
H«tf: J&tehester RGSi P J Stevens. 
™h- Trh*y a. Croydon: KE Stoke# 

msmm 



Bowden. Kebtt. Portsmouth OS: 8 E 
Bowes. Wore. Roedean s: CD E Muce. 
Hertr. Haberdashers' Aske's cart*. 
Hotcham: a p Buckinghant. K J. 
Trinity 8 Crtwaon: R Kin ling. S Ed 
H, CulkHOni JJS: J R Ca*hen. Trin. 
Birkenhead s M Onto CD Ch, 

inson. Qu. Bradford OS: R S Ooombe. 

CDuMon. Or. 

, '_«Mt 

Bablngton House : Si s E F Day. New. 
WlnchtsHr t^ iT C gab.' On, Owen 
EUaabeth-s.Clrts^. 

Douglas. Magd. Fvnham C: (FS) M I 
R Elba. Men. Loreto QAC Fean, fit 
HIM. Convent of the Nativity: F Dy 
Wasgow, g» J. Tapton Comp. Shef- 
field: J L Cram. Jesus. Harrogate C8s 
A L Green. BalL SurtMion HS: (S) M E 
t Haney, wore. Leed s Girts h& iGj a 
4 Hartnell. Sa Anne. Portsmouth CW: B 

sSwaW^wJ 

feadinS: M&I3S; 

rs: GAD Hotmes. B. Nimthorpe 

^ York; DJ Homeas. Kebie. Eltham 

" Hsmr - ^,,^SS^SS!W 
c’i.SKsa 

Bradford C& C C Keane., a Anne. 
Loreto C. ManCheater. N iTH KendKts. 
it Cam. Manchester CS: M E Ketuiy. 

Snh«nu&waSi 

M jucw. SBen. H. Downside: M C 
Langan. Ou- Thomas Rotherham SFC: 
D ft Leosx. Pemb. Laura Bank & r j 
C h (^|k Birkenhead St.ft Leech. 


Nverhampton CS: K J 


T c Martin. Ex. St swununi s. 


Richard Taunton C: J T CWK>Jones. 
Wore. Etcm SWOwpl Wtoh. Queen 
Elizabeth Cambria S. Carmarth en : I M 
Partane. Or. SouthM HS: era S L 
Pattfton. S Anne: Dovar C IGI PE 
PeiyL St P. Dulwich: W O ^weB. 
Pemb. Gwernyfed HSi J D Ranoon. 
Bin. Attesm-sS. Dujwtolv H M 
Roberts. StHooh. HarTOOHeGS: JD 
Rowland. Si Ann*. Qocfc ITOft U»per 

BrYanslofU C E Simpson. LMH. Fovle 
& Londonderry _C: L B_So per. So m. 
Rocheoer carls S: M D Sawowm. St 

SKS™sfg&.’3aiS.‘B|K 

- R Taylor, St Anna. Leeds C& 
Eleanor J Troten. St Hugh, Alice 
Otitty: S JuUede TowhjdJ. N*». St 
caiherine'^ Brent loe Jame E Town- 
end. Qu. Owen Mary 
owk TfwveUyan. Qu. »uu>n K& F 
Saiaua M Tru&cL Som. Tun bridge 

Wrih^te os: AWteJ v* n^.H«g: 

JLofWo convem OS. Attrintham: Jac- 
queline L Waricrw. StHugh, Dcyon- 
smt HS: DIP Watts. Ex. wii* 08- JR 
M wnuams. Unc. Steynlng OS: 
Amanda E Wo odnrao.. jta ru. bnp- 

nm wnofi» 
j^iimaRps 

Latymer 8: Helen J BwratL Som. 
Hboley Park Comp: F8 Ruth Barwam. 


awe Minx jam. at 
txH given; (SI Pilar M ] 
. Surtdten H& C J J. 
SFC: C A Kem. Wore. 


Beattie. Line. fiowriT* S. -- 
Carole S Bockerman. Wwc. Oxford 
HS: Hsyley M Bower s. St J. King 
Outlet i 8- Kldderounstor: Nicola J 
Bnmsdgru St HIM. ChottenjumJ Ladta 
O F vusaaria M BUUoch-.St Hugh, st 

cSSks. s 

Georobta w Cheetlunn. Wadh. Shef. 
fMd arts HS: Swaang C Ourtto. 
Mart, wenuunw Orta » P Daetsu 
St Cath. Merchant Toy tors: D J 


Dickinson. New. Latymer Upper & S 
M Downie. St Cath. SI Joseph's C. 
Bradford: F Edwards. Qu. PrUKy. S. 
Shrewsbury: US) M CO. BMC. Dr 
ChaB oner's HS. Little ChaHom: Char* 
lode E mrtuum. BalL Wesanuater 
Tutors: (F) R P Furntts-Roe. BalL 
Teteunouth $: SS» P Gairia. Qu. St 
David's ureuttn# Convent. Brecon; k 
W GUI. Or. Eastbourne C: t FS) ASM 
Gunner. Wbdh. Oxford H& L L 
Haupiice. Sum. Woodford County HS: 
A GHancoCL SI Caih Oieaerfield S: 
J Hartand. Si Hugh. GOesgatt Comp. 
Durham: k R Hill, wore Haber- 
dastiers*s ASkcN; M p Hop*, si Calh. 
Manchester G& T Hubbard. LMH 
Casenon S. Klrkby Lonidaie: s E 
HubboM. Univ. Queen Mary's HS. 
watsall; F tmngwonn. sa Cath. Prince 
WitUara S. Oundte: tGI M A Jago. St 
Anne. No selwrt given: 

Jenkins. -BMC. 

Wore. Solihull L _ . . — 

Westminster: I A King. UQ. Bluecoai 
S. Liverpool. S M Lies. Si Ed H 
Mckmanswarth Maaemc St ft m 
unlay. New Reading GS: M E Lloyd. 

g Cath. King Edward VI CampHUi 
rts S. Birmingham: V Layton. Trin. 
Ernest Bailey OS. Mattock: J M 
McCann. Jesus. King's HS. Warwick: 
T J D MacneaL si P. Eton: L A 
Maktari. Som._ Putney HS; A T 
Moore. Keole. Coiehener RCS: S M 
Murrey. St HUd. Royal Northern CS S 
H Parent. St HIM. HivesOekl Oru S; 
«3UE Piettier. St Hsa. stake Park 
Gams. Coventry: V C PhUhps. Ch Ch. 
no school given: F J Pineda. St Cam. 
Si seders C. Mancheaer: G J 
PwKHWtttt. EX. -CIMadle Hubne & F 
C Rtjwlms. Si p. King Edward's BoiT* 
A Birm i ngham; J Reason. Trin. 
Queen's C. Taunton: a w m Rm. 
wore.- Wincbolcr. F M A Rosen. 
New. Peter SymoncB' C. winchester: 
C J Samuel. St Anne. Haywards 
Hearn SFC: f d J Schofield. BMC. 
Manchester G& s D Scnoies. a j. 

S rest S. VkWnerafu A M Sew. Som. 

ford HS: G M Sharp, a Hugh. 
Brentwood S. M E Sherstooe. Line. 

Stand c. Mancnesm: F J C Simms. St 
E« . H. Royal BeUasi Acadecnkal 
tnsntuncm: w M Smallwood. New. 
Priori S. Yoric P K C T Smith. & 
HIM. Longstade Upper 9: K E SpQler. 
Wfncnester: M R Smith. Unc. a 
Qu. Bmswooa hop nls. Leamugtah 
Spa: S S E ter Laag. New. West- 


minster: L Thortey. St J. Dtnstone C: 
S J Tuck. LMH. Howells S. Denbigh: 
L van den Brul. SJ Anne. Thurston 

Upper S. Bury a EdmvndK K VagL SI 
Ed H. Portsmouth GS: I J KL Watey. 

New. a Paul's Girts S: C ft Watson. 

Jesus. Radyr Comp: CRM Watson. St 
Anne. Wimemsea HS. Humberside: S 
J wet Kebie. Mmole Ridge HS: P A 
Wesion. LMH. Oongieion CS; A 
Wiuons. Oil Ayiobuiy HS: H M 
WiUiams. Ch Ch. St Feli x S:. J J M 
WorraUL Si Hugh. Loreio SFC. Man- 
chester: H Zanbiropoulos- BNC. SS 
Helen ft Katherine, Abingdon. 

CM ft S E dark. Kebie. King Edward 
Vi HS. Stafford: K CaiSa. New, 
McAulev S. Doncaster: E.M Hamer. 
New. Rodeaa S: R Hayley. St PauTs 
S: CO N 111 man. Or. no school ah.«v 
C E Malone. Qu. HOty Trtrilty 
Convent Bromley. L A Maskdl. 
Wore. Rewon: A K May. LMH. 
BlnswoodJlaU S. LeandhrauuE: T 
PoUinger. Sr Anne, sr Paurs $;TJC 
Sparrow. KeMe. Stowe: c L M Taylor. 
Trin. A Ottley S. Worcester: 


sT 


Taylor. Hertf. Hayes Manor S: C R 
von Bettnuaiui-HoUwre St Ed H. 
wea Somerset & T C waken. 81 
Cam. Bury Girts GS. 


Corrections 

In the list of Bristol d eg r ees 
published on July 7 the name of 
Janine H. Jones was omitted 
from -the Chemistry, second 
class honours, first division 
section. : 

In the Newcastle degrees list, 
BSc in biochemistry, names 
should have appeared as 
follows _ 

ftu t p E Boehmcn C A Small. 
CM 9 (DM>: B F Br^todCSPXftg 

SSrlMrt S C PUC C TwSffi M 
Trisum. 

tn the University of Easi Angtta Usl 
the name or p j Foen w» omitted 
from um> BSc Joint degree uh in 
businm finance and economics. 


The first Saturday of August 
and yachting traditionalists 
have their oflies, tan slacks 
and blazers packed for the 
annual pilgrimage to "Sacred 
Cowes” - the country's largest 
and most prestigious Week. 

This year the entry list of 
more than 550 yachts is well 
down on previous year; and 
the Cowes Combined Cubs, 
the organizers of this “Royal 
Week”, sponsored this year by 
Sandhurst Marketing, are left 
to wonder what can be done to 
reverse the decline. 

The chance of rubbing 
shoulders with royalty and the 
famous in the heyday of 
Cowes Week was enough to 
persuade anyone of social 
standing to swallow their 
KweUs and cross the Solent to 
Queen Victoria's favourite 
haunt Today it is the standard 
of racing that counts, not the 
mix of the Martinis later, and 
after a series of unfortunate 
breaks with the weather in 
recent years the new breed of 
“professional amateurs" have 
sailed off in search of more 
demanding challenges. 

When raced with a similar 
decline 30 years ago former 
commodores of the Royal 
Ocean Racing Club instigated 
the Admiral's Cup series, the 
biennial international team 
event to encourage greater 
foreign competition with the 
Week. That series started in- 
conspicuously the following 


fy Barry Pk&thaH 

year (1957) with just one 
three-boat team sailin g from 
the Stales to challenge the 
British. They lost but this did 
not stop others following in 
increasing numbers. The se- 
ries is now regarded as ocean 
racing's premier event. 

The four original admirals 
who lent their titles to the cup 
could never have envisaged its 
success - or the problems it 
would bring in the intervening 
years. Last year a record 19 
countries took up the chal- 
lenge and Cowes was bursting 
at the seams with the 
Admiral's Cup overshadow* 
mg the traditional Week. 

The 60 to line up for 
yesterday's 210-mile Channel 
Race to France and back, the 
customary opener to Cowes 
Week, is by comparison less 
than half the size of last year's 
fleet — a poor turnout even in 
non-Admiral's Cup years — 
and with a similar deteriora- 
tion among other classes,, 
other than the Channel 
Handicap fleet (78 strong 
against 60 competing in the 
premier I0R divisions), 
something has to be done to 
arrest this “fellow" year de- 
cline. 

One radical suggestion find- 
ing favour is to divorce the 
Admiral's Cup from Cowes 
Week and change the date of 
the Fastnet Classic to coincide 
with the famine yean to 
guarantee continued interest 


In Cowes Week from both 
home and abroad. 

The plan is to hold the 
Admiral's Cup inshore races 
during the days preceding 
Cowes Week, then send the 
three-boat teams on a special 
Fastnet course of their own' 
during the opening weekend - 
of Cowes, giving these inter- 
national crews the chance to 
return midway through the 
Week in time to compete for 
the New York Club Challenge 
Cup, 

There is no doubt that the 
traditional 605-mile sailor's 
Everest out to the Fastnet 
Rock and bade to Plymouth, 
which has attracted more than 
300 entries in the past, would 
provide fresh impetus for 
foreign crews to return to 
Cowes in the non-Admiral’s 
Cup year. But while the idea is 
gaining widespread support 
here some competing nations 
in the Admiral's Cup are less 
enamoured of the prospect. 

An Australian competitor, 
'Peter Kurts, a member of the 
Admiral's Cup management, 
committee, voices another 
side to lfre argument. Speaking 
from Brisbane this week, he 
said: "One of the reasons we 
can our boats and crews 
halfway round the world every 
other year is the prospect of 
winning the Fastnet. To sepa- 
rate the Admiral's Cup from 
this race and Cowes Week 
would be a tragedy." 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 



Conducted town Cowboys Joel Batten (left) and Brian BaK 
dinger ran into colourful London character Stn Newman 

Wembley prepares to 
stage American Bowl 

By Robert Kiri ey 


After s week of bone-crraich- 
faig workoots, the Chicago Bears 
are ready to play the Dallas 
Cowboys before 80,000 support- 
ers at Wembley tomorrow in tbe 
American Bowl *86. Chicago, the 
Super Bowl champions* will be 
led by the flamboyant quarter- 
back, Jim McMahon, naming 
back. Waiter Payton, and defen- 
sive tackle, William “the 

Refrigerator’’ Perry. Dallas, 
who have played in five Soper 
Bowls In the space of 20 
successful seasons, are led by 
tbepowerfnl running back Tony 
DorsetL As t est a men t to the 
Increasing popularity of gridiron 
football in Britain, tickets were 
sold out shortly after going on 
sale by mail-order hi April. The 
game, which starts at 6 pm, will 
be televised live in the United 
States and Channel 4 will 
broadcast highlights tomorrow 
and Monday. 

The sides offer contrasting 
approaches to the game- Cow- 
boys are a sttte-af-tbe-art, high- 
tech team, relying on computer 
analysis and sophisticated 

psychological testing in tbe 
search for the best players in 
college ranks. Tbe Bears, 
founder members of the Na- 
trona] Football League more 
Hian 60 years ago, pay heed to 
high-tech bat rely heavily on an 
aggressive, take- no-prisoners 
style. 


Chicago trounced Dallas last 
season 44-0 — but then, the 
Bears were virtually unbeatable 
en route to the Soper Bowl tide. 
Their defence is the best in the 
NFL hot crucial to the outcome 
will be control of the line of 
scrimm age. The finemen, who 
weigh on average in excess of 18 
stones, usually determine tbe 
SBOcess or tamne of the plays. 
Tbe Bears have the biggest of 
them all in Perry, who became 
an international celebrity hi his 
first professional season last* 
year. When asked why the Bears 
selected the 22-stone player, 
whom some dabs considered 
lac king in agility because of his 
size. Bears’ coach Mike Ditka, 
said: “We didn't want to play 
against trim." 

As th e ga me tomorrow is an 
official NFL pre-season match, 
all the players win be batttiiig to 
win coveted, regular positions. A 
danger man for the Bears is the 
Ibzmgly quick Willie Gault, 
wide receiver, bat special atten- 
tion should be pali to Payton, 
aged 32, who draws an annual 
salary of Si million. He is the 
most prolific rmming back in the 
history of the game . Phenom- 
enally durable, he has missed 
only one game through injury in 
eleven seasons. “He is the very 
best football player I have ever 
seen, period," Ditka said. “At 
any position, period.** 


WEEKEND FIXTURES 


TODAY 
CRICKET 
Tour match 

(11J3, IOQovbts minimum) 

DERBY: Derbyshire v New 
Zealanders 

Britannic Assurance County 
Championship 
f 11 . 0 , 110 overs minimum) 
CHELTENHAM: Gloucestershire v 
Hampshire 

CANTERBURY: Kent v 

Leieesteshire 

OLD TRAFFORD: Lancashire v 
Yorkshire ■ 

LORD'S: Middlesex v 

Northamptonshire 
WESTON-SUPER-MARE: Somerset 
v Worcestershire 
EASTBOURNE: Sussex v Essex 
Young Cric k eters Test Match 
HEAMNGLEY: England v Sri Lanka 

OTHER SPORT 

CROQUET: mringnani toumamant. 
CYCLING; National track ettampionsfaps 
(at LacestftQ. 

GOLF: Engirt! ansttur championsnips 
(at HitartteT THF Santor championship (at 
Mere): B toor Homes Eastiaigti Ctoac far 
Rarag Park). 

MOTOR RACING: Formula Three meeting 
(«r Brands Hatch). 

ROWING: Hantty Town and WstttW 


YACHTW0: Cowas week; Firefly na* 
tmnals (at Tenby). 

ass 

TOMORROW 
CRICKET 
Tour match 
(1W. 100 overs rrintmum) 


DERBY: Derbyshire v New 

Zealanders 

John Player Special League 

(2.0 unless stated, 40 overs) 
CHELTENHAM: Gloucestershire v 
Hampshire 

CANTERBURY: Kent v Leicester, 
shire (1.30) 

OLD TRAFFORD: Lancashire v 

Yorkshire 

LORD’S: Middlesex v 

Northamptonshire 
TRENT BRIDGE: Nottinghamshire v 
Glamorgan 
WESTON-SUPER-MARE; Somerset 
v Worcestershire 
EASTBOURNE: Sussex v Essex 

EDGBASTON; Warwickshire v 
Surrey 

Young Cricketers Test match 

HEADINGLEY: England v Sri Lanka 

Minor Counties Championship 
KNYPERSLEY: Staffordshire v 
Bed for d sh ire 

OTTER SPORT 

AMERICAN FOOTBALU CNcago B89TS v 
Dellas Cowtoys (tf WomWoy.o-OOJ. 

CVCOWfc National track championships 
(at Leicester). 

GOLF*. THF Sartor UMUffJ tan th ip (at 
Mare). 

MOTOR RACING: RymutS Three (« 
Brands Hatch). 

MOTORCYCLING: British Grand Prix Cat 
Sfrerstono). 

POLfc Cowdray Park Challenge Cup. 
ROWfNQ: upper Thames sprint 

WATER SKJMG: European champion' 
ships (mihorp*4ft-the Hlfl. Linootenra). 

YACHTING: Cowes Week. 


MOTOR CYCUNG 

Lawson is 
intent 
on victory 

By Michael Scott 

Circumstances suggest a bat- 
tle royal at the Shell Oils British 
motorcycle grand jprix tomor- 
row. At least six nders have a 
chance of victory on tbe long 
and merciless straights of this 
Northamptonshire airfield dn- 
cuii. where races are often' 
derided only on the final bend. 

As local police made unprece- 
dented security arrangements, 
including closing local pubs, in 
preparation for the invasion of 
the often rowdy leather-clad 
army of fens, practice started 
yestnday, dominated as usual 
by the battle between tbe works 
teams of tbe Honda anti 
Yamaha factories. 

There is a championship at 
stake as welL For this reason 
Eddie Lawson may settle for 
caution. The most successful 
rider in a year that saw Freddie 
Spencer, the reigning champion, 
drop out, be has scored five 
victories >n eightraces and need 
finish only in the top four to 
preserve his championship lead. 
But the Marlborough-Yamaha 
rider has different ideas. 
“Silverstone is a really big race 
for me, and I mean to win." 

His rivals include Wayne 
Gardner on the V4 Rothmans 
Honda. The Australian, who is 
based in the United Kingdom, 
was fastest yesterday morning. 
Although the fierce character of 
tbe power makes his Honda 
difficult on slower circuits, he 
thinks SEIverstone will give him 
a chance to use bis top speed 
advantage. 

The third joint fevourite is 
Randy Mamofca, twice a winner 
here. His Lucky Strike Yamaha 
effort- has gained momentum, 
and he is second overall. 

The remaining Yamaha riders 
all have a chance of victory: 
Christian Sarron on tbe French 
GauloLse Yamaha, like Mike 
Baldwin, the American, on tbe 
second Lucky Strike bike, and 
Rob McElnea, of Britain/ 


to change bis Silverstone 
tunes, and prove his worth as 
Lawson's team mate. 

Light rain in tbe afternoon 
meant that there were no 
changes to the order established 
in morning practice- 

PRACTICE TMESc 1. W Gardner (Austra- 
lia. Honda), 1irtn2S.16soc, 119.52;vph; 2. 
R Msmoti (US. Yamaha) iasa 3. E 
Laswon JUS. Yamaha) 129.00c «. C 
Sarron (Runes, Yamaha). 129.15; 5 M 
Baldwin (US, Yamaha). 12937; 6. R 
McBnaa. (G8. Yamaha), 129.43. 


GOLF 

Turner bursts 
ahead with a 
course record 

UUna (Reuter) — Greg 
Turner, of New Zealand, broke 
out of the pack yesterday to take 
a one-stroke lead with a course 
record 10 -under-par 62 in tbe 
second round of the Scandina- 
vian Open golf championship. 

In a spectacular round. 
Turner, tbe brother of former 
Test cricket captain Glenn, 
scored one eagle, eight birdies 
and nine pars to break the 
previous record by one shot- “It 
was my best round ever, a near 
flawless round," said Turner, 
who honed his game playing 
college golf in the United States 
for four years. 

Today he goes, into the third 
round on '131, 13 under par, 
with a one-shot lead over former 
U-S. Masters champion Craig 
Stacfler (66) and Ian Baker- 
Finch (67), of Australia. Reman 
Rafferty had a 66 to take fourth 
place on 1 33, while framer Open 
champion Sandy Lyle slipped to 
eighth place with a 71_ 

LEADING FIRST ROUND SCORES (G8 
urtoss ntttfk S& I BtiwAich (Aus). SC: 
M James, CSttdter (USVS7SR Raflwty(N 
KASLyto-MiG Otomor WM B Befl 

W W Matey (US). 6ft S Torrance, I 

Moray. V Fernandez (AraLG Tumor (NZ), 

OiMJfama,ASwve<te&(re),JSta 
(US), LCartxmoal (Arm, Mumr | 

70: N Ratcfltto (Aus).T Wrt 
Cfoa. J OLoary Ore), S BWngton 1 
om (Aus), W Hufl Jrays, V j 
(Aus). M Sunauon (Ewe), P Sorter (AusL 
J Ferara (US), p Man, M Few, H ThiBfS 
Go). J Rhmro (Sp). 


ay 


j.%* 1 ^ ter*- 


\ 




28 


arum 


THE i iMta JbAlUKOAY AUGUST 2 i*ao 


<r ☆ A it 


Maysoon in festival mood 


By Mandarin 

Maysoon is a confident choice to 
continue Michael Stoute's record-break- 
ing season by winning the Vodafone 
Nassau Stakes on the closing afternoon 
of Goodwood's five-day summer festi- 
val. Both Midway Lady and Sonic Lady 
have continued to emphasize the ex- 
cellence of this year’s crop of three-year- 
old fillies and Maysoon can now carry 
on the good work. 

After winning Newbury’s Fred Dar- 
ling Stakes and finishing second in the 
1,000 Guineas, Maysoon was sent to 
Epsom, where she was third to Midway 
Lady and Untold. A furlong and a half 
from home backers of Walter 
S win burn's mount were already count- 
ing their winnings, so easily was the filly 
travelling. But her stamina then gave 
out as Midway Lady swept to victory. 

Park Express has always been held in 
high regard by Jim Bolger. and she 
justified her trainer’s faith in no 
uncertain fashion when beating Mill On 
The Ross and San tiki in the Lancashire 
Oaks at Haydock. Stamina is obviously 
her strong suit and the Irish-trained filly 
could be the one to exploit any chink in 
the favourite’s armour. 

Of the other runners. Asteroid Reid 
ran well when second to Maysoon at 
Newbury but disappointed in the Oaks. 
English "Spring ran the rare of her life 
when beating Bedtime at Ascot but has 
subsequently performed indifferently in 
Ireland. Dick Hem's Cocotte won a 
Bath maiden by 10 lengths, but would 
have to show dramatic improvement to 
trouble Maysoon. who is the subject of 
glowing reports from Newmarket 

The Racal Chesterfield Cup looks 
certain to be a far more keenly contested 
affair. King’s Head, the top weight, ran a 
storming race for Guy Harwood when 
third from an impossible draw to 
Patriarch in the Royal Hunt Cup. 
Patriarch confirmed the excellence of 
that form in his subsequent win in the 
Banbury Cup and King's Head is sure to 
make a bold bid despite his inevitable 
rise in the weights. 

No-one has a belief record in big 
handicaps this season than Patriarch’s 
trainer. John Dunlop. Sultan 
Mohamed. the Arundel handler’s can- 
didate on this occasion, is clearly a 
progressive three-year-old and looks 
reasonably treated for his venture in this 
kind of company. The evergreen Mail- 
man, Albert Hall and Master Line are 
others with obvious chances but King’s 
Head gets the vote. 

The afternoon starts with the Berk- 
shire Electronic Maiden Stakes. Here 
my best advice is for Henry Cecil's 
candidate, Kristal Rock, a chestnut colt 


RACING: STOUTE’S GLORIOUS STREAK LOOKS ALL SET TO CONTINUE 

Back in the 
Hunt and 
flat out for 
the title 

By Christopher Godding 
The proper sport. National 
Hunt racing, is back with os 
today with meetings talons place 
at Newton Abbot and Market 
Risen. The prize money might 
not amount to moefa, bnt die 
enthusiasm will be brimming 
from all ^Barters. 

This year the jockeys* 
championship is a wide open 
contest. Peter Scudamore, the 
champion last season, rode only 
91 winners, the lowest figure for 
11 years. This emphasized that 
the share of winni ng mounts are 
becoming more evenly spread 
dee to the retirement of John 
Francome, who dominated the 
championship to seven seaso ns . 

Phil Todfc, who will be first 
jockey to the Penrith trainer, 
Gordon Richards, this year, has 
the right stable behind him to 
become a champion jockey. The 
last time the championship was 
won by a northern-based rider 
was in 1979/80, when the now 
retired Jobs O’Neill collected 
the title. Richards said: “If I 
have a good season Phil wD] 
become the champion.” Rich- 
ards has helped in the past his 
former stable jockeys, Ron 
Barry and John O'Neul, to win 
the championship. 

Tuck, who has already shown 
his prowess as a top dass jockey 
when warning the Cheltenham 
Gold Cop on Bmroogh 1X31 Lad, 
said yesterday: “1 am looking 
forward to the new season; 
Gordon has a lot of ammunition. 
At the moment I am stSQ tiring 
at Amptetotb in Yorkshire, hot 
1 soon expect to move closer to 
the stables. I will continue to 

ride for Mick Easterly, who I 
ride oat for most mornings. ” 

At Newton Abbot Martin 
Pipe, the leading trainer numeri- 
cally with 79 winners last sea- 
son, can open his account. Pipe 
has three runners at the meet- 
ing, and his best hopes tie with 
He*cr in the Dimplex Selling 
Hurdle. John Jenkins, who 
always has hts stable geared foe 
the early season meetings, last 
year saddled three winners on 
the opening day. His best chance 
at Newton Abbot is Red Zulu, a 
recent winner on the Flat, m the 
Dimplex Novices Hurdle. 

Peter Walwyn, who is better 
known for is success on the Flat, 
can win the first race on the card 
at Market Rasen with Parang. 
Half Shaft, who is fit from on 
recent outing on the Flat, can get 
the Bishop Auckland trainer, 
Arthur Stephenson, off to a good 
start. 



_ _ 

Cfainoiserie on the way to victory in yesterday's Extel Stakes M Goodwood from 
his stable companion Celestial Storm (left) (Photograph: Tin Bishop) 

by Kris, who is a grandson of the 1 ,000 
Guineas and Oaks winner. Altesse 
Royale. Other likely winners on the 
Sussex track are Roysia Boy, Gaelic 
Flutter and Island Set 


Roysia Boy has been working his way 
down the handicap and now tools 
weighted to beat Manimstar and Lonely 
Street in the Albeit Stakes. Gaelic 
Rutter, recently a comfortable winner 
of a Wolverhampton handicap for Kim 
Brassey, should find Codices and Local 
Silver to be his principal opponents in 
the Surplice Stakes. And Island Set, 
runner-up to the progressive Albert Hall 
at Haydock looks as though his winning 


turn may have arrived in the Trundle 
Stakes. 

Newmarket features the Colman of 
Knowledge Stakes and the Mail on 
Sunday three-year-old handicap. No 
less than five of those declared for the 
sponsored nursery were successful last 
time out and Panache was also first past 
the post at Leicester before being 
disqualified and placed third. However 
Peter Easterby's southern raiders ate 
always to be feared and FnO Of Pride, 
an easy winner at Newbury before 
finishing runner-up to Ongoing Situa- 
tion at Pontefract, appears to be on an 
appealing mark. 


GOODWOOD 


Going: good to firm, straight 
Drawtff-fif, high numbers be 


Televised: 2.15, 2.45, 3.25 

course; firm, round course 
best 


2.15 BERKSHIRE ELECTRONICS MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: £4,142: 
6f) (8 runners) 

102 DYNAMIC STAR |C Cyan M Usher 93 AMcGkoaT 

103 EVEN SHARPIE JMttmJLCattwBWI I Johnson 6 

105 KRISTAL ROCK lifts VHufrWaamaJHCeO 94) S Carthen 3 

106 . MUMMY'S LUCK (R Khan) R Hannon 3-0- W Canon 5 

108 STARTLE (USA) (Mis G Bronfman] B Hits 9-0 BThonson4 

109 SUPER LUNAR (JMecheH)RShaattwr 9-0 0 Starts* 1 

112 MSS DAISY (Greenland Part* Ltd) I Baking 8-1 1 Put Etfctey 2 

113 RANKSTREET (Mrs LBur*erfleld)M Haynes 8-11 — 8 

4-6 Kristal Rock. 4-1 Miss Daisy. 9-2 Starts, 8-1 Super Lunar, 14-1 Mummy's 

Luck. 20-1 others. * 


Goodwood selections 

By Mandarin 

115 Krisial Rock. 145 King’s Head. 3.25 MAYSOON (nap). 4.0 
Roysia Boy. 4 JO Gaelic Flutter. 5.0 Island Set. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
11 5 Kristal Rock. 145 Atoka. 3.25 Maysoon. 4.0 Roysia Boy. 4.30 
Prince Orac. 5.0 Island Set. 

By Michael Seely 
3.35 MAYSOON (nap). 4.0 Lonely Street. 


2.45 RACAL CHESTERFIELD CUP (Harxficap: £16,466: 1m 2f) (11) 

201 120-3 KING'S MEAD (USA) (A Ward) Q Hanwod 4-810 G Starkey 5 

206 2-32314 PROMISEO ISLE ID) (E Lady Rosebery) Lady Harries 5-82 TQnmnj 

210 42-1213 SULTAN MOHAMED (D) (Dana Stud Ltd) J Dunlop 3-6-12 W Canon 8 

211 10-0004 PATO (D) (Lord Matthew) I Matthews 4-8-11 W Woods (3)6 

212 

213 

214 ___ . . 

216 033001 RUNNING FLUSH (Bi (D| fN Capon) O Ajflfflon 433.. 

217 D22111 ALBERT HALL (USArD) IR Songster) B Hbs 88-6 D Thomson 11 

218 
220 


10-0004 PATO (DJ (Lord Matthew) I Matthews • . 

433304 RANA PRATAP (USA) (Mrs G Thambetty) G Lawns 68-11 PWaMron7 

OfMCS GUNDHEDA (0) (Miss M CamnfjtDn-SnHth) C BmtaJn 4-8-fl — SCautheoi 

000403 MABJ4AN IC-DJ (Mr* J McDougaW) I Batting 7-8B Pat Eddery 2 

~i FLUSH (B](DI (N Capon) O Ajgfflon 4-fl-fl BCroeateyS 


022111 ALBERT HALL (USM(O) lft SangsteQ B I 


000103 MASTER UNEIDXBF) (Mrs 0 Anderson) H Candy 535 — CRUUr(5)10 

001134 ATOKA (GERXDXBF) (H Kosekiwsky) John RtzGonrid 4-8-3 P Cook 3 

11-4 Albert Hal 7-2 King's Head. 11 -2 Sultan Mohamad. 13-2 Running Rush. 15-2 
Atoka. 10-1 Master Line. 14-1 Maftnon, Gundreda, Promised Isle, 16-1 others. 

FORM ICINGS HEAD (B-6)3ftl 3rd to Patnach (7-i2)at Ascot (im, E28314. firm, June 18. 
32 ran) RANA PRATAP (7-8) was 41 back m4th and RUNNING FLUSH (7-9)1 5th. PROM- 
ISED ISLE 4ih at Ascot last Wna (im). previously (8-11) bear RANA PRATAP (84) 1WI 
no 40i when winning at Sannown (1m 21, £12447, good to firm, uty 4. 11 ran). SULTAN 
MOHAMED (B-3) » 3rt to 6 to Wassl Touch (8-3) n stakes race at Newbury (1m 2f, 
£6597. good to firm. July 19). RUNNING FLUSH (1 f-7) 4 J winner from Pactrtus <10- 10) in 

-- 1 goR, July 12. 14 ran). ALBERT HALL 

had N 


amateur s event ai Salisbury (1 m 2t. £191 2, good to soil 
Clever nk Yarmouth winner (1m 21. tern) last hme. 


(8-91 


3'>l bock ft 3rd when Unafraid winner (1M21J3142. good. July 11. 4 ran). GUNI 
(9-71 was *Ll back m 40i. Batter MAILMAN (8-8), a past winner of 0Ss race, ran 3ftl4th to 


MAILMAN (9-5) 
BREDA 

. ... . ...... 41401 tO 

Netxtt (9-8) at Lwq tWd ( lm2l, £6106, good to soft. May 10,7 ran). PATO (8-10) was sh 
hd away in 50i. MASTER LIMs (9-3) beaten hd and nk amen 3ro at 8 to Handlebar (8-11) 
at Rtpon(1m2f. £3246. firm. July 19). 

SetectKKt MAILMAN 

3-25 VODOFONE NASSAU STAKES (Group 11: ft Hiss: £33,045: 1m 
2f)|7) 

301 244101 ENGLISH SPRMG (USAKD) (P Mellon) I Baking 438 SCwthen4 

303 130-123 MAYSOON (M AI Maklouni) M Smute 3-8-6 WRSMnbum3 

304 130441 PARK EXPRESS (P Bums) J Boioar (Ira) 34-6 JReM7 

305 14-2030 ASTEROID ROD |USA)(C) (Snewh Mounted) B Hits 3-8-5 ... B Thomson 2T 

306 224-001 COCOTTE (Sir M Sobeti) W Hem 3-8-5.. W Canon S 

310 12800 TENDER LOVWG CARE (B) (Pioneer Bloodstock Farm] B ffrfls 3-8-5 P Cook 6 

31-10 TRALTHEE (C-D) (A Ctorel L Cumarv 3-8-5 “ * 


311 


PM Eddery 1 


13-8 Maysoon. 7-2 Parti Express. 5-1 English Spring. 7-1 Asteroid Field. 8-1 
Traimeo. Cocotte. 20-i Tender Loving Caro. 


FORM: MAYSOON (9-0) 1 
good. June 7. 15 ran). ASTEROID FfELO (9- 


3rd to Midway Lady (9-0) in the Oaks (1m 41. El 19852. 

i-0)lsd over 8f then lirashed 12^1 back in 70). 


and TRALTHEE 19-0) was 10th. Prawousty ASTEROID FSEUB (9-0) 21 3rd to Sonic Lady 
(9-OJ at uwQnighilm. £68809. good to soft. May 24. 19 rani. PARK EXPRESS (9-0) 
was 1O0 l TRALTKE (8-1 1) Had beaten Altiyna (8l1)2 ,, il over couse and dtatance (1m 
21 hated. £1 1 960. soft. May 22. 6 ran) PARK EXPRESS (8-1 1) ran on wefl to beat DM On 
The FJossjB- It) 1 '1-1 at Haydock (lm4i. £31458. good to fern. July 5. 9 ran). Prmoualy 
PARK EXPRESS (8-6) relegated to 4th having ftnesned 2 1/2L 2nd to Fleur Royale (8-8) at 
the Currogh (1m 2). £20087. good. Juie 28. 8 ran) ENGLISH SPRING (9-13) was last 
having previously (8-12) beaten Bedtime (9-4) nk at Ascot (1m 2f, £37183. firm. June 1 7. 
9 ran). fENOER LOVING CARE betund last time (im 41). in 1 985 (8-6) ran 3L 2nd to NM- 
way Lady (8-6) ai Doncaster (tm. £15423, good to firm. Sept 12, B ran). COCOTTE (8-6) 
ia " 9 ( another 2UI back last 

4.0 ALBERT HANDICAP (£4.877: 6f) (8) 

401 000021 MAMMSTAR (Of (S Brower) P Maiun 6-9-10 J RddS 

404 00.1030 PRECIOUS METAL (C-O) (G Moore) A Ingham 3-9-3 RCnmt4 

406 31-0020 FLYAWAY BASE (USA) (Shetti Mohammed) I Saldino 3-8-13 Pat Eddery 7 

001214 FERRYMAN (C-O) (W Plummer) 0 Bsworth 104-13. A McGkwe 3 

031200- NUMISMATIST (C-D) (A Sofromou) M E Francis 733 R Street 2 

31-0003 COMPLEAT (Food Brokers Ltd) G Lewis 3-8-7 P Waldron 5 


409 

412 

413 

414 
417 


01-0000 ROYSIA BOY (C-D) (P Martin) G Prsehard-Gordon 6-8-5 W Carton B 

202032 LONELY STREET (C) (T Lyons 


I (T Lyons II) P Arthir 5-7-7. 


100-30 Manimstar, 7-2 Lonely Street 9-2 Roysia Boy, 5-1 Compteat Flyaway 
Ends. 10-1 Perryman. 12-1 Preoous Metal. 16-1 Numismatfet 


430 SURPLICE STAKES (3-Y-O: £4.305: !m) (11) 

501 340401 COOKES (USA) IP Locke) G Harwood 9-5 □ Starkey 11 

502 200-301 GAELIC FUnTERJFR) rr Chicfcl K Brassey 9-6 WH BwM wm7 

Ml LOCAL SILVER (l^AWOj IShwkh Mohammed) W Hem 9-5 W Carton 9 

0301 ESFAHANiNAvetyiTDirtapM Pat Eddery 3 

3040 ALHWAN(B)(A Soinxiou) D Arbuthnot 9-0 R Street B 

0-00010 BflOtgE WALfUSAKO) (Mrs E Weinstein] G Balding W) R Weaver 2 

MW FABNC0M86 (ft (A Behan*) H O'Nei M BPraewl 

0- HfflHBUEST(Faiman|PC<rtM T Quasi 1 

3 PRINCE ORAC (D Lemos) C Brntam 94) G Baxter 6 


503 

505 

507 

510 

5)2 

513 

514 

517 

518 


TAVMI (USA) (K Bucnanan) G Harwood 9-0. 


3 CANESARAlHHAga Khan) R Johnson Houghton 8-11. 


A Clark 10 

SCauttwn 5 


11-4 Prince Orac. 4-1 Esfahan. 9-2 Gaelic Rutter, 6-1 Local Star. Codcas. 10-1 
Canesara. H^hWesl. 14-1 Bronze Opal 28-1 others. 


5.0 TRUNDLE HANDICAP (£4,752: 1m 4f) (8) 

602 3/038-00 RUSTY LAW (M Banks) G HarwOOd 4^-7 G Starkey 7 

603 411-022 ISIAND SETJIBAHCXBF) (G Kellflil L Cunten 4-9-1 Pat Eddery 3 

604 144202 FOUC DANCE ID) (Mra JMcOougaU) I BaMmg -tO-1 sCauthwO 

607 21-0400 THE JOKER (FR) ludy Hams] G Balding 6-8-12 R weaver 4 

609 410-012 PACTOUISftSAKDJKBFKiAaG Harwood) GHanwoofl 3-8-6 w Woods (3)6 

fill 00000 VINTAGE PORT (USA) (Mrs M Widens) R AXehuret 4-7-1 1 W Canon 1 

612 400-000 STANDARD BREAKFAST (XH (A Ctora) B HBs 4-7-10 B Thomson 2 

613 300403 FOR A LARK p)(R Lawson) DA Wilson 4-7-9 CRteter(5)5 

5-2 island Set 3-1 Folk Dance. 9-2 Rusty Law. 6-1 Standard Breakfast, 7-1 

Pactoktt. 8-1 For A Lark. 16-1 others. 


NEWMARKET 


Televised: 1^0. 2.0. 2^0. 

Going: good 
Draw: no advantage 

1.30 BROOKE BOND COFFEE CUP (Amateur: 
£2^69: 1m 4!) (15 runners) 

4 0411 SARYAN TON Callaghan 3-11-2 T Thomson Jone* 14 
6 008- MGH FOREST MHIndiife 4-11-1 

QxabethGandoMo^)5 

8 840 PaEORWOTM McCormack 4-11-1 L Lay 15 

g THE BERWKKO Nicholson 4-i1-1_ RBewn@l2 

11 WELL WSER 0 Nicholson 4-11-1 An* PbBtoe (5) 13 

12 040- BB1NISH LADY B McMahon 5-1 0-1 2 E McMahon > 

13 LIBERATED GRL P Fatden 6-10-12.. Kate Italii (B) 1 

15 -000 ROSANNA OF TEDFOLD A Davison 8-10-12 

K Santana (5) 10 

16 41 OSRlCMRwn 3-10-10 JRy»4 

19 10 VAQAOOR (CANjp) G Kamood 3-10-8 

Amanda Harwood (5) 9 

20 0203 ARROW EXPRESS (USAKBF) D Ftatger 3-104 

DRbgerfSiS 

21 BUCKLETLCumani 3-104 Sara Cmoti (5)2 

23 0003 UERMS Norton 3-104 R Htectoaon 11 

25 4322 SWBtt.ro MSteUte 3-104 Mexine JusterS 

26 08-0 SPARXUNPBRFORIER Mbs BSandere 3-KM 

Tin Pit ^)7 

13-8 ShWL 10040 Vagador, 5-1 Saryen. 7-1 Osric, 
I^Wtrrow&pr^JS^MeftijjjjiaridejjJBj^rtMra^ 


6 0111 CBOHfefl*S CUME (D) J WBson 8-12 ■ 
9 1034 PEATSWOOO SHOOTER 


_ r|7| B 

I M Bnttmn 8-12— K Dartay 11 

10 Of MOON MDKOC Brittain 8-8 R Cochran# 5 

11 1W0 HARD ACT RHamonB-9 14 Roberta Ifl 

12 1444 SAXON STAR roJWMar 88 B Route 7 

13 0421 H0WGM(p)GHtiflerM(7ex) G Carter (3) 12 

15 0234 PACMC BAaN (USA) W O'Gornan 85 That 8 

17 12 FULL OF PRDE(B^MH Easterly 83 M Birch 3 

21 1203 PANAC1C{1MD)P Hasten 7-7 T WW— 2 

23 2310 HUKIBRSlSp(D)GM Moore 7-7 APtsndl 

3-1 Crofter's COne. 7-2 Hunter's Leap. 5-1 Panache, 
6-1 Moan bitfgo, 8-1 Ful al Pride, Hard Act 
FORM: BAG (TRHYTHM (8-11) « Windsor winner Bom 
Kamenky (5£ £953, good to Sm. Juno 1& 13 rmA. 
MUNAASIB J8-1 1) 41 Did ondHARD ACT ((MllsnotfNr 51 back 
5th behind Roundlat (8-8) M Newbury (71. £5472. good to ftm. 
July 19. 7 ran). BUTTERFIELD ROAD (8-11J if Nottingham 
winnerfton i WaeswnghtoiXX«(8-1t)(6L£1119.fimuJunC30.8 

ran). CROFTERS CUfE.41 Ayr wkmer (9-5) Iran Scottish Firm 
(8-11) last time (51), previously (9-3) held on to treat LtaumteTI) 
hd at Ripon (6f. £ZB6. good to firm. June 4. 10 raft). HUNTSro 
LEAF [8-11) was 91 back in 5 Hl MOON BttBGO (8-11) nk 
Sandown winner from Last Dance (8-11 L winner since BL 
E4201. good to timi.Jidy 4, 8 ran). PACIFIC BASIN (8-1 1)4KI 4th 
of11toGeitsar(8’11)uWlndsor(6f.E1B1Q.good.Juiy14).PA- 
NACHE, 3rrf tv Goodwood nursery on Thursday j fl. Barter (8-9) 
beat PACnC BASIN (9-7) 1 Klin ctemingrace at Leicester (61, 
9 , 18 ran). HUNTERS LEAP (8-11)5X1 5th to 


£2030, firm, June 9, 


I ran). MATTERS LEAP (8-11)5* 
Lockton (8-7) at York (71. £3179. good to firm. July 12. 6 ran). 


: HUNTERS LEAP 

&0 EXETER STAKES (2-Y-O: £4,479:7f) (4) 


WRy»4 


Newmarket selections 

By Mandarin 

1.30 SbibiL 2.0 Reality. 2J0 Fulj Of Pride. 3.0 
Nordavana 3-30 Lone Galaxie. 4.0 Tafiy 
Templar. 4.30 Blender's Choice. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
].30Saryan. 2.0 Something Casual 2.30 Homing 
In. 3.0 Nordavana 3.30 Touch The SaiL'4.0 
Taffy Templar. 4 JO Lastcomer. 

Michael Seely’s selection: 2J0 Full Of Pride. 


2JQ 'MAIL ON SUNDAY 1 3-Y-O SERIES HANDICAP 
(£4,123: 1m) (13) 

1 1140 NIGHT OUT PBBUF8 G Wring 9-7 PRoUnaonS 

2 0-11 REALnv (p) R Johnson HouKiBn 94 (Era). WRyanl 

3 1234 CHEF PAL (D) p Walwyn 8-12 Patti Eddwy9 

4 0204 BEAU 8HER B Hateuty 8-B M Roberts 7 

5 0102 MAHOGANY RIBI (D) M H Easterby 88 — MBkMO 

6 4000 MUDRK C Bensmad 8-7 BRonaeS 


2 1 WVTTBJ GUEST R Armstrong 8-11. 

3 0312 KMG BALLADSR (0) G PritchaTOGoroon B-11 

GDnfMdS 

5 4 ACCOMPAMST(USA)B HBs8-8 MWbZ 

7 2 NOROAVANO (lAA) M Jarrts 8-8 Tiwel 

13-8 NorOatano, 2-1 Accompanist 10030 Invited Guest 

3J0 COBNUT CLAIMING STAKES (3-YO: £3^63: 
6f)(17) 

2 0020 GLOBAL TV Musson 9-7 B 

3 M0 LOW KEY W Musson 9-7 : 

4 0000 SKYWBD (B) M Brtmkt 8-7 

5 -802 SUP® FRESCO B Hanbury 9-7 AC 

6 0020 WSSTHtS FEAST MMcComack 9-7 _ W 
10 1212 LULLABY BLUES (BR M H Easterby 9-3 — 

12 GRANGE FARM LADTM Tompkins M_ M 

13 BOLD RStYP Hasten 8-13 TV 

14 MOD HUON MANOR MTonpktes 8-13 R Morse ^ IS 

18 LADY SCMAT1CP Hasten 8-10 BFMt4 

17 00- NO BOLDER R Hannan 88 B Rouse 6 

19 0000 FUDGE N Vigors 8-6 S Dawson 13 

20 M0 LONE GALOaEIUSMR Stubbs W_JH Brown (5) 5 

21 -042 TOUCH IRE SAB M TompMns 8-6 R Cochran* 15 

23 333 LOVE AT LAST (BF) W Hashnps-Bass 8-4 Tkm7 

24 0302 THE STRAY BULLEn (BKBFjB McMahon 6-3— 8 



25 2243 teSSTONAEEmroOHayrte Jones 80 

DT” 


7 0003 SOMETWNG CASUAL (B) A Hide 85 R Quasi ■ 


M010 


8 0001 BELOW ZBtO (IR A Baiay 04 R Cochrane 11 

0 400 DUNLORJNG G Pmchsrd-wvitan 8-2 GIWMd4 


10 

12 040 ETTA’S PET R Sheather 7-13 


15-8 Love Al LuL _ 100^30 Lutet^Bkias. 6-1 Touch The 


-133 ARTFUL DAY J Dtstiop 


. T team 12 
. JHbl 

14 3230 SOVEREIGN LOVE (D) W Hastings-Bass 7-9 

GFtancMS 

15 0022 RIM BY JOVE (USA)(B)(D) P Hasten 7-7 T ^ < | < ? 

100-30 SametMng Casual. 6-1 Run By Jows. Below Zero, 

13-2 Antiti Day. Mahogany Rim, 7-1 Reality. 8-1 Chtet PaL 

FORM: REAUTY (94)pushed put to beet Geoftfle’s Dtetaht (9-7) 

1V4I at Sandown (81. £3153. good to firm, July 24, 5 ran). BEAU 
SHER (WJ) 8L 40i to The Taleteller (M) at Windsor (1m 21, 
£1266. good, M/1.23 ran). MAHOGANY RUN (97) 21 npon 
runner-up to Canadkui Star (8-61 (8f, £3224. firm, Jitiy 19.8 ran). 

SOMETWNG CASUAL (8-0) IVil 3rd to Then Again (9-7) hare 

with CHEF PAL (8-0) II back 4th (81, £11921, good to firm, JUy 
19.11 ran). EarSer CHIEF PAL (8-3) 41 &<d to Aventino (7-12) here 

(80. NIGHT OUT PERHAPS (8-12) 9th then, eartar (86) 5KI 4th 

Ol 14 behind Dalla s (8-7) at Ascot (81, £11720. firm. June 20. 24 

ran). BELOW ZERO (7-9) in the rea r there. (8-9) beat (8-1) 

1 Let Satsbury last time (7f. £2727, firm. June 28, 20 rari). Back in 

Apri BELOW ZERO (7-12) 2!W 2nd to Digger's Rato here (7ft 

wtth DUttLORMG (8-3) 1 1/2L back 40) ol 17. 

Stoectkw SOMETHING CASUAL 

2.30 COLMAN^ OF NORWICH NURSERY 
HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £10,098: 6f) (13) 

1 21 BAG OYIHYTHM J Hhnfiey 9-7 M HKs 9 

2 3012 MWAASSI (USAKD) P W*wn 9-7 Pad Edden4 

7 1 BUTTERFELQ RCUtO (USA)pj) M Usher 8-12 

MWIptamtS 


Safi. 6-1 The 
4.0 EBP 
£3,476:60112) 


nns^^m 

MAIDEN 


t 

2 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
10 
11 
12 
13 
15 


ALA HOIMAK F Durr9-0- 

CAPE WHOM SUUta 90- 


KHKWAN G Huter 9-0_J 
MAD MAX P Hasten 9-fL^H 

HOST WELCOME G WrapQ 9-0 J 

POHTHfTOUS G Wagg «)__■ 
SCHMUTOG (USA)L&imani 90 . 


GFraachS 

.AKMMtev2 

. G Carter 4 
T WWtena ft) 


. P Robinson 12 

_S Bride (7) 7 

__ . . R Guest 1 

3 TAFFY 1EMPLAH (BF) J ffindey M MMal 


UPTOTHEHILTJ^H 

GREAT ACT C Brittain 


Dunlap 9-0- 

rtttain»-11_ 


IB Item 11 1 

M Roberts 5 


HBMETTA PLACED Plttchetd-Gandm 8-11 w Ryan 9 

0 TABARSK F Durr 8-11 R Cochrane 8 


94 Cape WBd. 7-2 Most welc om e. 9-2 Uptotfnhtt. 6-1 
Schmutzm. 8-1 Portentous, 10-1 Ala Houra£ 

430 CARDINAL HANDICAP (£4,090: 1m 2f) (9) 


3 0-22 AL-YABIR4 

5 2040 CHICLET ( 

6 6000 MERLE) 

7 0012 


1C Benstead 4-6-7- 
[ P Wakwyn 4-9-2 


MUSAXDOiro M SUtia 890^ ^ ^ i 

8 2000 toFAKTRY OfTlCHt M Prescott 4-8-13 — GOoftMdB 

10 0)11 BLEP®5S CHOICE (DJKBjassey 484 SMNteort)2 

11 -430 POWER BSOBtGPntchvd-Gorcian 4-8-2. WRwi9 

12 mna AYLESRELD rap-O) A Hide W) 5 

16 0400 THE KOWAfllTto) I Matthews 4-7-9 G0itoda3 

158 B l en ders Choice, 52 Lastcomer. 4-1 Al-Yablr, 7-1 
ChktieL 10-1 AytosfisU. 12-1 hftantry Officer, 14-1 ottws. 


EVENING RESULTS 


Newmarket 

6.15 1, S S Santa (R Mono. 11-2: 2, 
Highest Note (11-2): 3. Max Clown (7-2 
(avj. 4|. nk. M Tompkins. Tote: £740; 
£2.00. £1-50. £1.80. OF: £10.80. CSF: 
£31.38. Tncast £107.02. 

645 1. Top Quest (P Eddery. 68 on 
lav): 2. Orban (USA) (7-2): 3. Gray Salute 
(33-1). 6 I. 2. nk. G Wring. Newmarket. 
Tote: £2.00: £1 .10. £1-207u-60DF: £250. 
CSF: E451. 

7.10 1. Margam (A Mackey 6-1): 2. 
Chants Rato (TTves, 14-1): 3. Ho Mi CWn 
(W Carson. 13-1). JS f. K, %. P 
WaJwyn.Tote: SS^Kfc £2.10. £S00. £250. 
OF: £1 10.40. CSF £80.59. Tricast £908.76. 

740 1. Mr Rosa (P Hutchinson 9-2); 2. 
Blue 8r*ant (B Thomson 0-2): 3. 
Kamaress(M WighamIMM. Eurcharis 
(W Carson. 4-1 frv). IK L *. 111. ft. R 
Hutahnson. Tote: £740: E2.00. £120. 
£2J». £1.30. DF: £1070. CSF: £2550. 
Tricast £198.46. 

8.10 T, Bashdance (Q Starkey. 64 Javfc 

2. Ftuttery is Cautlwn. 114ft 3, Royal 
Nuggaft.(wSwirtoum,92). 1»L7,2ft.G 
Harwood. Torn £2J2a Ei 4a n.4o. 
£160 OF; £350. CSF: £644. 

8JS 1. Arabian Shafidi (W Carson. 8-5 
fav): 2. The Uonheart (6 Thomson. 12-1); 

3. Alpenhom (W Ryan. 18-1). 1 L ». 2»„ J 
Di totap. Tote: £240: £180. £350. £120. 
OF: £1560. CSF; £21.36. 

Edinburgh 

6.16 1. Persian DeBgM (G Carter. 1 14): Z 
Actualizations (74 tm 3, Sana-Doflar 
(15^1 Head. ‘A L G Hufler TotK £4.00: 
nja ci.oa ei.40. df; case. C$F: 
ET 2L 


7.15 1 . Ockarman (G DuffieU. S-1) 2. 0 1 
Oyston (9-2) a. Kamptoow 20-1. TOr- 
toenth Friday (4th, 4-rfav). ft L ft. M 
Prescott Tote: £4.80: £2^X £230. £1.70, 

OF. 1 1 7.70. CSF: £2647. Trtcast £379.43. 

a 2 WnoesSh^ 

£350. £420. OF: £22.00. G9F: £4849, 
B.15 1, Banqua PrheefG DuffieU. 2-1 it 
54 2- My witow (1 1 -2): 3, Mttala Maria 
g-'jP «SV 1ft I. 5. B HBS. Tote: £250: 

£1.50. £130. £15a DF: 

£12.73. 


£&5a CSF: 


£1.60. DPX8w0a CSF: £2288- 


A481, P ontyate a (C Dwyer, 334): 2.' 
GreenhOrg Girl (5-1): a. White It Lasts (4- 

TL_4. BaBydurrow JZ-1 lav). H, h. J S 
VWson. Tote: EK40: £480. £3.10. £1.60. 
DF; £13850.03=: £18022. 

• Richard Merton, the clerk of 
the course ai Devon, bas warned 
West Country racegoers to allow 
plenty of time to get to this 
season “s meetings. Major road 
building is taking plan outside 
the track and this is likely to 
continue for some months. 

• Sam Morshead, Mark Ponca 
and Alan Jones, the National 
Hunt riders, who missed most 
of last season, return to the fray 
at Newton Abbot today. 

, Perren broke his left lee when 
nding Smith's .Man in the welsh 
Grand National ax Chepstow 
last December. Jones returns to 
the same track where, in March, 
he broke his right arm in two 
places inafalionFireDrilL 


Course specialists 

GOODWOOD 

TRAINERS: H Cod. Z7 winners tram 94 
runners, 28.7%; L CumsnL 15 fram53, 
283%; G Harwood, 53 from 214.24.8%. 
JOCKEYS: G Starkey, 40 vrinrws from 
198 rides. 202%: Pat Eddery, 51 from 
267. 19.1%; w Carson, 45 from 259, 
17.4%. _ 

NEWMARKET 

TRAINERS: M Stout*, 55 wtonera from 
338runrwra. 165%: G Harwood, 50 from 

358. 14.0%; W O'Gorman, 24 from 184. 

JOCKEYS: S WMwarth. 8 wmnere Iron 
52 rides. 154%; S Dawson. 10 tam 69. 
HJftfcTWttvns. 11 from 101, 109%. 

THIRSK 

TRAMBtS: R Johnson HougMon. 6 
winners from . '17 runners. SJV H 
Thomson Janes, 14 from 43, 326%: J 
Wfltte. 11 from 58. 19.0%: , 

JOCKEYS; N Connorton. 10 wtews ftom 
79 rides. 12.7%: M [Fry. 8 from 74. 108%: 
JLnm. 


i. 1Z7% M Fry. B fra 


TRAINQtS: A Stewart 6 winners from 17 
runners, 35.3%; W Ham, 12 from ST. 
228%: M Stouta. 13 from 58. 224% 
JOCKEYS; Pat Eddery. 58 wkmera torn 
272 rtdu. 21^%: GS&ritey. 28 from 145. 

TRAINERS: □ ESsworth, 16 winners frorn 
63 rwwers. 25.4V j JsnkWs, 31 from 
129. 24.0% D Ganrftjffo, n frten'5A 
20-4% 

JOCKEYS: P Leach, 25 wfcmeraftom430 
rides. ia2%;PBarton 11 from 59. 18.6%; 

“■■"iMBiftaite: 

TRAINERS: J Hartg 12 wlnnera from 4S 

n3. 219% Denys 
200% 

JOCKEYS: D Browne, 12 wkmera from 42 

rides, 28JV C Grant, 9 from 66, 138%; 8 
Johnson. 18 from 136, 132%. 


runners. 26-7%; J ti Rcmerald. 27 from 
5 twl 8 from 40, 


THIRSK 


Going: good to finn 
Draw: 5f-6f high best, 71 and above low 

2J0 TOPCUFFE STAKES (2-Y-O C & & £2^63: &) 
(7 runners) 

5 1 JUSTAFUimRmMJervlsM—; Ttatet 

7 012 SAHHAHJ1»A1H Thomsen Jones 92 — AltertyS 

8 1 WELSH ARROW (0)JWWarM — AI 


ATAKASHACK G I 


18-11 


n monaj- 
lM4Cfcay5 
A Bono 2 

13 4M StYSSPECttLVwas»tw8-11— -—KHodteenJ 

14 0 MBjBROVEJBherintonn8-11 — . rJ * Vao ? l 

- 0 TW DEVIL'S MUSWfiEhWolt 8-H — LChamock 7 

4-6 Just A Flutter. 3-1 Sarihah. 13-2. Wtoah Arrow. 


17 


Thlrsk selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Just A Flutter. 130 Imperial Sunrise. 3.0 
Myth. 3 JO Dunninald. 4.00 Dunlin. 4.30 
Alfiuazda 5.0 Bills Ahead. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.0 Just A Flutter. 2J0 The Lidgate Star. 3.0 
Tempest Tossed 3.30 Linda's Magic. .4.0 
Inshirah. 4 JO Moore Stylish. S.O Sequestrator. 


230 PLAYTEX SELLING STAKES (Amateurs: 
3-Y-O: £1,404:61) (21) 

1 0400 

2 0-00 CAPISTHANO CUMAX Capt J W8son 9-7 

GenkfineRetsa 

3 00ft- CLASS HOPPBIWBaay 47 Lein Rohan (7) 12 

6 0301 DORADE in D Motley 9-7 — — 8 

8 0-00 MAN M THE MOON &PJ Fatten 9-7 

Atita Fleming) 21 

10 0000 MURRYL CANNON Mra G Raveiey 9-7 

ArtiteeBaattBOrtRII 

12 0421 FBtCtefOf — 

13 0000 PLANTER ( 

15 0000 THEUBGA 

16 0000 ALEXANJO A P Jervb 9-4 EWna Bortre (7) 2 

17 0000 BOIMY BRIGHT EYES R Hctifinshead 9-4 

CkarmtoM Cantee <7) 1 

18 2301 COOPER RACMG NAB. (D) J Berry 9-4 Dana Hater 17 

19 4300 HWPSUAL SUNRISE M W Easorby 9-4 

SxkMmUdCvBotklO 

20 DON JEMFCR BROWNING T Barron 9-4 

CteirtoaMcCtotocfcS 

21 0000 MARSHALL ORALS RWNteker 9-4 Sandy Brock (5) 7 

22 0003 MRS NAUGHTY 1 “ 

23 2000 

24 0023 

25 00 SLY HAD B RkftmorafSM Lynda Pearce (5)4 

26 0040 SONHENELLE fiJ) J S Wlson 94 „ Lklda Parrott (7) 5 

27 4003 WlHQMGPATH(t8 R hcftnaneail 

Jennla GaeMag 15 


MAKUH«ttj.DreLLaHwnteker»4 ^anoy oroo« pj i 

MRS NAUGHTY (D) W Wharton 9-4 Kefiy Marks M 

MUSK TEACHER 03) A Robson 94 LynRntaOB02D 
PUNCLE CREEK GMoore SM Dfana Jcaee g)13 


wSaSS- HANDICAP (£2.484: 

Iff! 4f) (7) . , 4Q.li (mv) .. • - RMU3 

iiH*SRB*£CS 

8 0403 TEM^TOSSa)(USA>RWArT«lrtm33M^ i 

9 0/20 FOURTH TUOOT (1^*1 B ***»»/ ^CaWP^P 5 ! * 

10 0000 BREGUET LcSmoek 2 
ti WOHOSW (D) Dtiorjte*" 0 ‘SL»TT^d. 

15-8 Myth. 3-1 Fou 7 l .PfSiara* #mp8St 

6-1 Regal Sl^ 8-1 htoroSfeM-lcmwrs.^^^^ (2-Y-O 

3JOEU1RTON AGNES STUD STAKE5 ^ 

Fillies; £2,666: 60 (7) MWood7 

i a? aSerrsi 

,5 l 

64 Sttintng Watw. 114 LKHW^gc. 4-1 Durmwiid. 

NURSERY HANDICAP 

G MMTO 9-7 . 0 CwaHJJJ 

3 0 020 BOFMREE AGAIN L LlSSS ■ 

c im i nuKLIN (USA) S NOftonS3i5fl<). - ■-r' — Juw 3 

10 am W “rh»i J 

11 10 iWtAH(USA)roH Tht>ri«XiJo^ . 

BMO B * oz - 

4J0 BED ALE STAKES (3-Y-O: £2^62: 1m) (6) 

I bb SSWSbSS^ssbS! i 

» 0 &Y STREET DWsrttolM SaSiSl ■ 

S DIALECT Eteosa 58 

27 00 MOORE STYLISH R Armstrong 88. — ** ■** • 

7-i AHarazdq. 2-1 Moore Stylish, 4-1 HariayfoTO Lad. 

S.0 BRAD^B HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2.939: 71) (9) 

1 1-00 TOPPESHAMME(U8A)P)EWeymes9-7 EOa^m* 

7 yrn UHTASH (d J Etne?ni#3n 9-2 I 

4 0034 TRY HARDBT (0) J BnGoraW 513 * *•»»•» 6 

6 -144 TRK»0«1^T(BMt>O) J 

14 0300 IRISH PASSAGE T Barron 8-1 rr ~7? 

15 411 ROPBIROWfnMHEasartwWJfiOT)-.- Jljjj - 

18 OOOO SEQUESTRATOR W Musson 7-13 AMeetayl 




23 0001 
2-1 Bins Ahead. 3-1 
7-1 Try Harder. 8-1 Far Too 


| R Smyty 7-7. 


— « 

M Frf 5 


Row. 11-2 Tnck Or Trato. 
1 , io-i Vittaah. Irish Passage. 


WINDSOR 


Gomg:i 

Draw: high numbers bast 
6.10 SPRINGFIELD STAKES (2-Y-O C & G: £976: 

etjfisr 

1 01 BOLD GAFCQM (D) C Neban 9-4 JReid3 

2 4100 FOUHWALK (D) tes N Mecsttiey 94 • — g 

3 1 JUVBUEDBJNQUENT A Bailey 94 — .. R Carter (5) 9 

6 0 BATTLE STWGOOutiitan 8-11 BCronMy19 

7 BUCO D Thorn B-11 G Saxton IS 

9 CASTLE TRYST Lady Maries 8-1 1 NHmrelO 

10 
14 
16 
17 

19 

20 
21 


7.0 ROBERT W1LMOT NURSERY HANDICAP 
(2-Y-O: £2,131: 5f) (11) 

22 JAH BLE SS P Haynes »7__--. "jRNdl 

] AOartrl 


5 1000 PAMS GUEST (DlfttMttnefi 9-1- 

6 4100 RMBEAU(D)F Jordan 9-U 


7 s BsaabH&-s5=i2isa 

rar caoaty a 
. B Roo*# B 
Wdreona 
T WMten »2 


9 0321 BHTTRADE P Melon 6-12 

10 0001 SWIFT PURCHASE (DIR Harmon 

11 0100 GLORY BEE JHon 7-12 


13 0303 WKHABBRCBfflttffld7-a_.- 


r Lady Her 

HBWbtl 

I R Smyth 8-11 LRkHto(7)11 

C Bentoead 8-11 Pwfidroa 17 


CBfTAtm JUSA1 BfMs 8-11 B Thomson 7 

00 JOCKS BROTHER I . 

■ LYRICAL LOVER c Bentoead 8-11- — _ 

23 NUA0UBR AkafWtoB-11 — PC00k4 

41 SANDS OF TUE PH R Simpson 8-11 —KRadcMta 12 

SHANNON RIVSI J Bastay 511 RWemh«o5 

0 OMWSH CALM RGhatoher 8-11 MRtemar13 

0 TAWARDLEMBoinnB-11 RMcOtt14 

00 TWIRTASCH (HI) Mrs C Raavey 8-11 — I Johnson 1 

IWORMrTYMStouteS-ll WRSwWwnB 

40 WHATAGUrPMAoMtiS-ll Q Carter (3J 16 

----- ,2 


WflTODGE D Laing 8-11 Doakn 

WOODMAN WEAwl J Oouglas-Horae 8-11 


25 
23 

27 

28 

29 . 

W Mewses IS 

7-2 Bold Garcon. 4-1 MuatTrSi. 11-2 Juveotodetmuent, 
UntfomSty. 8-1 Crwtairi. Sands Of Time, 10-1 VWwt A Guy, 

Windsor selections 

By Mandarin 

6.10 Bold Garcon. 6JS Sweet Gemma. 7.0 Mr 
Mumbles. 7.30 Ticfcford. S.0 Miss Know AiL 5.30 
Boon Point. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
6.10 JuveniledetinquenL 6.3S Greenhills Boy. 
7 JO Curvaceous. 830 Waajib- 


14 010 IIBSS MAHJORIE (O) J Hob 7-7. - rr - r N Adi WlS 

15 2014 ttWn«P^(WJD»5^^ 

7-2 Bertrade. 5-1 Mukntotor. 11-2 Mr MumUes. 8-1 IntaMa 
Maria. Jto) Bless. 10-1 Pans Guest Pmk Pumpkin. 

730 KINGSBURY HANDICAP (£2,674; 
1m 3f 150yd) (12) 

5 430 TICKFORD (USA) G Harwood 3-8-7 OStertreyS 

6 0100 WtSHLON (USAHC-OJ R Sroytfi 3-M — Prt Eddery 1 

7 043 CURVACEOUS MStoute 342 WRSwttaml 

ID 010 PRINCE SATIRE (USA) MJanns 58-13. Pftatton (7)3 
11 M0 COmE GIRL M McCourt 4-8-13 RWarohamta 

13 -000 MISS MONROE (B) R Hannon 4-88 8 Route 6 

14 0101 TGBITTO N Vigors 3-8-8 (5es) FCaokr 

15 2023 CRAMM4G W Musson 3 S-5 MWIgharatB 


16 4000 MOON JESTBT M Usher 6-8-5- 


6J5 HARCOURT SELLING STAKES (£952: 1m 
70yd) (20) 

1 0030 EASTBl RAMBLBt (BXC-DKBF) P Butter 445 


A WOks (7)3 
488 — R Carter (5)4 


2 0000 FORT DUCHESNE MUsdgwk* 

5 -000 OULPHAfl J Jenkins 4-9 3 _ __ 

6 0-00 JUSTCAM1G) DAtMbon4^0 WNswn ss 20 

7 0230 POCO LOCO A Davison 4-9-0 —11 

8 000 SPAMOFORD LAD MDOtemrlh 4-80 
DatiMaWhs«ter(7)17 

H Adams 7 


11 0000 SARAVANTAJH0lt4O.il 

12 0000 SONG ANTIANCE MAN M McCourt 88-11 

RWamtaamlO 

13 0830 SWOT GaniA roDHaydnJon«48.ii 

DWMams(7)1B 

14 0-0 ANTHONY GBURD P Mskfil 886— FtoEddan If 

15 40 BEEKAY-ESS R HokterM-8 JRtodS 

16 0300 00UNT AUlAinVAMBbuntitertf 3-88 NQNJttINNBI 5 

18 00 GHEBMLS BOY M Ryan 888 N Day IS 

20 080 RUN CHARLIE FYartlay 3-88 1 Johnson 13 

21 00 TROJAN SPUSH P Haynes 386 N Homs 18 

23 0000 BUIE FANTASY BStewns 383— T Warns 14 

24 DM CLAP YOUR HAWS FYardey 383 _ A Proud 12 

25 CONDOVBI SAX Miss B Sanders 383— RMcOMii 

27 0000 KACHMIT8US Motor 3-83 MWIgbam9 

29 -000 MSS COmy (B) Miss LBormr 3-8-3 PMcEatee (7) 2 

10030 Swato Gemma. 4-1 GraenhHs Boy, 5-1 Saravante. 


18 m GOLDEN TRIANGLE J BoSorts 5-8-3 — S 

19 0400 SHIRLSTAR TAXSAVER J BerhoU 38-2 — W Carson H 

20 000- GICVANM S Meftor 4-7-tO T WfBansl 

7-2 Tcktord. 4-1 TatHtto. 11-2 WisNon. 8-1 Cramming. 

Curvaceous. 10-1 Pnnce Satire. 12-1 Shirtster Taxsavar. 

8J) WESTMEAD SPRINT HANDICAP (£1.557: 5f) 
<13) 

2 100 t BELLE TOWER R Smyth 4-98 CRuBtr(5)1 

3 -000 MS& KNOW ALL (USAVD)B HBs 3-9-7. BTIwmsonS 

4 0140 BINCLEAVES ID) M McCormack 883„ PsnlEddsiyfi 

5 2100 FARMER JOCK (BKD) Mrs NMacaitiay 43-1 

S Whitworth 13 

8 0000 MGH EAGLE RHoUar 83-11 JRtadY 

7 0010 PENOOH DANCER (BKpiK hoty 38-10 - G Baxter 12 

8 2304 FREMONT BOY (Q(&0)roCJm 43-10 

WCtesan4 

11 0000 PADDINGTON Bai£(B)B Stews 334 

RWantenU 

14 0403 MLMAYW Charles 43-0 PCOOk2 

15 4040 MISS METAL-WOODS S Mrdor 4-7-13 NHOwet 

16 0300 UNION STARCHY J ODonoghua 5-7-12 

PHetaMnaonfiOO 

18 0000 SKARito (BXtnBStewa 87-7 _>-•>— -.TWUBana 11 

20 -000 HfLDALAMnlS M Ballon 4-7-7 G Carter (3)5 

3-1 Mss Know AI, 44 Blnclaates. 8-1 Beta Towar. 
74 Hfimay, 81 Farmer Jock. 81 Pander Dancer. 

8 JO LYNWOOD STAKES (3-Y-O: £959: 

tm.2f 22yd)(11) 

3 231 WAAJffl A Stewart 9-3 M Robarts 8 

5 0300 BOON POINT J Dunlop 810 Pal Eddery 11 

B Route 4 


I Dunlop 8-1 
6 088 HOUAMC6anstead8l0_ 


11 800 SOFT SHOE 8WBFLE Min BSaundara 810 

P Waldron 2 

12 04 eAVAlBBg.lBa0iaaa3 — pCaakT 

13 800 LA MUSCADEC Nelson 8-7 JRaM5 

14 80 LYWSGIRL(WNKefflick87 R Street 9 

15 800 MS»IF0REPWMwyn87 PaitiEddstyS 

18 PYJAMA PARTY J Dunlop 87 G Baxters 

19 3032 RH3 SHOES W Hem 8 7 W Canon 1 

20 00 SUPS? SIHL0UETT1K Ivory 87, W Woods (3) TO 

153 WuMx 94 Boon Paw. 81 Had Shoes, 74 La 

Muscade, 9-i Sott Shoe S/iuWe. Jt-i Ikraam, f8i others. 


NEWTON ABBOT 


Going: finn 

2.15 DIMPLEX TANGO HANDICAP CHASE (£2^17: 
2m 51) (7 run nets) 

RJI 

2 118 ALLIED NEWCASTLE | „ 

Cl 


1 131- WS0CT1MHIWT Kemp 8187 

TIE |C4Q D R Bsworth 8114 

3P40P- TEA18Y LADS Malar 11480 GCksries Jones 

4 228 THE FLOOfULAYERJHBaksr 8180 L Haney (7) 

5 038 CtTADB. HOCjn J M Bradtay 11-180 G Davis* 

6 048 PRINCELY LAD (C-D) M TMe 810-0 PScud— re 

9 0(08 WH1S OWEAItt O F GBard 1810-0 

Mrs D SptecerJenes (7) 

2-1 Ateed Newcaatfc, 81 WSbcTmea.81 Teafcy LAcL 


Newton Abbot selections 

By Mandarin 

Z15 Allied Newcastle. 2.45 Hever. 3.15 Discam 
Boy. 3.45 Karnatak. 4.15 Red Zulu. 4.45 Bashful 


2^5 DIMPLEX OPTIMA SELLING HANDICAP 
HURDLE (£735: 2m 150yd) (IQ) 

1 318 HEVER 

4 0PP- .... . 

7 40B- SCOTTISH (MSI RE Peacock 81 13- P Scudamore 

8 008 CHAM OF REASONMS (USA) HG Rost T8T13 

9 MB- OYPSEY LEA PWBkeiy 8113 Berne KktigM 

10 008 MARME C Holmes 8114 -Ctfinn 

12PTO8 HAWSPROE (USA) MCastefi 7-1093 MBmriby (7J 

13 408 VAL CUM^9t (USA) M CasteR 810-7 M Permit 

14 FD8 ATHENS STAfljCTJM Bradtey 11487 O Davies 

17 fPO- BULANDSHAR D C Jenny 7-185 QOfd 

10 OOP- TASH OHYA J R Jenkins 4-1 U-5 J' 

20 008 EAST STRS7WG Turner 8183 A. 


HEVER (B) M Pipe 11-183 

KASSAKN R frAM1 18113- 


,B 


S3 


23 WTO- GOLD FLOOR (C-O) J M Bradley 8181 DTaagto 

24 038 TDURALONa KB WWW 12-181 M Bastard 

25 30P- HIKVOrinUffl) (USA) A Barrow 44D-1 JHanl(7) 

27 303- OANEDAMCBt KCmniinhanhBnnvn 4-180- A Water 

29 200- EMPEROR NAPOLEON FWte 8403 R Lteknan 

30 0B3- VIVRE POUR VWRSprVJJH Baker 8103 L Harvey (7) 
11-2 Chain Of Reasoning. 81 Hever. 74 Tashonya, 81 

Scottish Green. Athens Scar. 1 8T Hue vonito, Vfvre Pour Wro. 
3.15 DMPLEX SUPERTRONIC HANDICAP 
HURDLE (£2.173: 2m 5f 110yd) (13) 

3 4A8 DUSKY MO WN QQO recey 811-13 NDenfftr 

5 001- STAHS AND STRIPES (CJRGFTOM 7-11-11 —jSuet 

6 002- BALUCHI (B) 0 Preece 5-11-10 SKofiaod 

7 0*8 KAMAQ D Holy 81 VS .MrP Homer 

9 018 DSCAiN BOY 6 Tatter 811-1 G McCourt 

12 008 PLAZA TORO WGTbmar748l2—. Tran Tamer (?) 

13 20P- PAMPAHOto J R Jenkins 81812— J Wren 

14 141- ROYAL SHOE M C Ptoo 4-1812 P 

17 008 GOLDEN MARCH (03) Mrs JHembrow 8103 


CHASE 


. . Jfttig74M 

23033U- PRBDEN JttMY (Q T B Hatett 7-10-0 

SteMUftaDnsterp) 
81 Stare And Stripes. 82 Royal Shoe, 81 Pamparold, 74 
OscatiBay. 9-1 Dusky Bamu 10-1 BeBtchi, Kama. 

3.45 DIMPLEX LYNOHURST NOVICE 
(£2,159: 2m 150yd) (14) 

1 008 BSJJVER PRMCE J H Baker 811-7 B Wright 

2 020- BLUE CAP Mrs J Barrow 1811-7 

6 FOP- BUY BflfTtSNGHniy 811-7 ^Krp'ffiwS 

9 P2P- J0HWUM8WW Derm 811-7 P Leach 

10 008 LE CHAMP TALOT FR) RC Armytage 1811-7 B Powafl 

U 0F8 RUSSELL HJNTM OSver 7-1 1-7 RDonwoody 

16 0R8 YANGraEJOAHCJM Bradtey 811-7 1 

2030PP- JETS FFDPON(B)(NZ) A Barrow 8l 13 JHnraim 

21 M*8 KARNATAK JLapasring 81 T3 S Morshead 

23 328 CB9P AND KfflfK B ntuto 811-2 GMcCout 

24 oogr WSSSSICUJRPD Rodgers 811-2 CGnty 

25 W- MBS TULLULAHmBFbtsay 8113 PCroudiw 

26 "008 SWEET RASCAL J M Bradtey 7-113. G Davies 

27P041- RBlAJNDESGnLJ Colston 81812 JSuhem 

73 Kamatak. 4-1 Crisp And Keen. 81 Jorinrunw, 

4.15 DIMPLEX STUDIO JUVENILE NOVICE 
HURDLE (3-Y-O: £759: 2m 50yd) (10) 

KOU8(WAl(B}RSknson187 GMcCovrt 

0f8YK»fe(UMJRGFh]«187 J Frost 

RED ZULU JRJenWM 187 JWfrfte 


3 

S 

• 6 

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113 Tzu-wong, 153 Kous. 81 Red Zulu. 

445 DIMPLEX ELECTRIC HEATING HANDICAP 
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1 241- BASHFUL LAD M C*W U-180 R Dtewoody 

W G Turner 81813 C Wreren (fl 


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(12 runners) 


2 008 CALM J Gtorar 811-0 

3 08 CARIBBEAN SUN Mrs 8 Brunt 811-6. 

4 328 PARANG PI 
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TAJ SttiGN Denys Sntitii 8103 


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7-4 Parang. 10830 Fortune Rnder. 81 Summer Stop- 


Market Rasen Selections 

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6.0 Parang. 6 JO Minature Miss. 7.0 Half Shaft. 
7.30 Target Man. 8.0 Gone With The Vet. 8 JO 
The Yam per. 


6-30 LOUTH JUNIOR SELLING HURDLE (£599: 
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HEEH KEG J Parkes 4-1140 Ik 8 Cumteahsai (7) 

8 WHATALJNE Mrs G Revetey 81 1-10 Pftran {*) 

Uiiunn.-i.. c Mr H Brairo 


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ROBBIE GRANT W Wharton 8185 
BAUDAAEEN J Partes 8180— 

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2 121- TARGET MANJCT W A Stmhenron 

3 3»- MASTER TEROaDTfSnl81145 


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4 230- COTTAGE RHTTHM (D) Jones 18113 


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fr fr* * 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


SPORT 


29 


RACING 


H: 







.BI 

»•• i 


s 

Ik 


_ By Mldael Seely 

Richard .Quinn certainly' the^ost half a length in front 
experienced -thet ■ ups. and ofwiljie- Carson amF Sweet 
down? of a jockey's life on Moverio give the Newmaiter 
Goodwood's switchback or- trainer bis third consecutive 
cuit - yesterday. After being, triumph in one of the most 
fined £200 by the stewards for 'competitive handicaps of the 
bitting ' his. mount,' Summer - season. Celestial Storm, the 3r. 
Sky, over 'the_ head in the t favourite, who was the more 





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•**>.. t..r 

AW* N '« 

•tojftirvr.*' J - 

MW jr.-t. 




opener, Paul - Cole’s contract 
rider ended the aftembon in a 
blaze Of glory by exjncatmg 
Nisnas from several impos- 
sible situations to add a'16-1 
quote to the St Lcgcr with an 
eventually decisive, win ixr the 
Alyqdan Stakes. 

The- jockey raovrid up the 
I t-IO" favourite rapidly 
approaching the straight only 
to fold Armada bailing 1 .his 


MOMfBT * 

f-O- U !..=■ 

■ MhLr.-. 
*m «M*wr- 


fended of the Cumani pair, 
finished a dose third only 
three' quarters of a length 
behind. - 

i Four hones were racing in 
line abreast a furlong "from 
home after Nilambar had 
taken: the lead from Enbarr 
half way . up foe. straight 
Celestial Storm flattered ‘mo^ 
mratarily l but Iveses forceful 
. . _ driving saw Ghhioiserie prove 

Then, after - foiling to . jpst too strong for the ranner- 
btcef Nisnas between Queen’s up: 


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Soldier and Wassl Touch, he 
switched his - mount to the 
inside- rails. -And it was only 
after- foiling to make any 
impression foal Quinn pulled 
Nisnas back- to foe outside. 
Gening the upper hand in the 
last furlong the pair forged 
dear to beat Queen's Soldier 
by IVfe lengths. The consistent 
wylfo took third place, only a 
neck behind. Both Armada 
and WasSl Touch finished weH - 
beaten. ;; ; 

Cole was delighted with the 
courage and s tamina shown 
by. Nisnas, who .has not .been 
seen in public an« finishing * 
slightly .unlucky fomf to Bon- 
homie in foe King Edward VI 
Stakes at Royal Ascot. 
“Nisnas has had a -good rest 
and was 10 kilos oyer Ms best 
racing .weight”; he said, “As 
you saw, a mile and a half is 
hardly for enough for him a$. 
he .only got. on top at the. 
finish. Nisdas might go for foe 
Great Voitigeur Stakes at 
York, bin theLeger remains '. 
his main (fojectrye. rv Nisn» is 
owned., by’ Fated Salman, 
Cole's . .chief . patron; at : 
Whatcombp, iTbe-_ Berkshire 
handler has now sent .out 44 . 
winners from foe 107 horses 
he Iras, in paining at this 
historic centre. Qumh, who 
had handled a difficult situa- 
tion with great intelligei&ce, 
has now ridden 47 winners. ' 

Just over half an hour 
earlier Luia Cuman£s feritas- . 


i 




ttw 


rf 


tic run of success in the Extd 
Srakes^onrinued - when ‘Tony. 'dddsnon fovourit 


“Chmoiserae is already a 
seasoned handicapper and a 
■real professional,'’ said the 
trainer afterwards, “and it was 
his experience that stood him 
in good stead. I really fended 
Celestial Storm as he's got 
plenty of improvement in 
him. However, inexperience 
and the feet that be probdfly 
needs further told against him. 
fll have to go home and think 
about future plans r -btn.Cdes- 
tial Storm wfll probably go for 
a listed race overamiie amLa 
half" Yesterday's winner be- 
longs to Ivan AUen- of 
Camraancbe Run feme. .. 

At foe start of the afternoon 
Wiffie Carson had joined Wal- 
ter Swinburn in the lead in the 
race for the Ritz Chib Charity 
Trophy when forcing Garnet 
past the post a head in front of 
foe fast finishing Jaisahner 
p as t the post in the Ralph 
Hubbard Memorial Nursery. 
In the absence of Dream 
i Phasing Moonbeams 
started a short price favourite; 
but was always struggling to go 
foie pace under 9.7 aqd could 
only finish fourth.- r : 

Steve Cauthen amid only 
finish second on Diggers Rest 
to Geoff Lewis's consistent 
handicapper, Reignbeaa, in 
the Hofmeister Stakes but foe 
reigning champion jockey 
rimed foe afternoon by join- 
ing Carson and Swinburn in 
foe lead for the race to be foe 
leading jockey of the meeting 
with* a^iiartbw win .-nn foe 
Hendeka; 
States-' 


S M4* j « 

•«! 

UH w *“ r 

n !»«* 



lb 


to return in France 


Lead On ffefe the Mount .-■wimec of the. Imd 1,000 
Pat Eddery. wbo has not nin Gameas at tongchamp in May, 


ROWING 


Bohemian 
: life 
as others 
labour 

From a 

Roandnice, 

It was a spare 
for the corapriifiOTS 
Jmdm rowfag cfaua p fons h^ s, 
.tat hi TUatasa' Game Park of 
sooth Bohesak, die coancO and 
commission membere -of FISA 
and the BE relax ata are 
Javislii^ enfertaiped by forir 
Codmsldrak hosts. 

WhOst the - eii 
elfe enjoy -ttameetas at tar* 
tacaes, kMddag at the wfld life 
and n-rfrniig tn Bnhf niien me 
ste. the yoaag mimhi aad 
aumramen of the world prepare 
IhmmiP-ifMthii rmnijaaei mi 
final and (for those who snccco- 

fafly qomlifj) the even more 

demaadiiig fiaal mods tomorrow 

-aadSoday. 

On Thmsday 
del and gust) 
s eated those who were stffl at 
foe boat epdoewe together with 
those officials, who, at ' die 


tahest-aPTi 

dent of FISA, hod reshed to 

ensare the safety of die emit 

AObmgh one ar two boats were 

Mown off tbefe- recks, those of 
the British teaeClw " 
safely tied 


There are no semi-final races 
in the women's 

today as none have had more 

than 12 entries. However, Brit- 

ain have tar cr ews in the awn's 
jaatar semj-fhwh. No 

there races can expect an easy 

time. Every one of them six 
crews ht each heat wfll be 
pr epared Jo sell themselves 
dearly for enr.of the places in 
Sunday's finals, and tires the 
ctahceofamedaL 
BrftahV coxed four axe ore 

only crew to avoid both East 

Gennany nad the Soviet llta 
in their scad-final. Ore other 

r ep re sentati ves are in the doable 

sridb, the taxless pan-s and the 

coxless fores events. 

Attention wfll be especially 
foenssed on ore coadess pair 
Halls and Sn gflgM , who last 
year rode hi the Great Br ilaia 
silver m eda l w iun iag enden 
fore In foes 

and on ore coxless 

contains one other 
Matthew Brittin^ of last year's 
medai-wtaBipc crew, both . of 
There crews- having won their 
fhst rpond heats. 


Incompleat 

angler 

Francis 

By Conrad Voss Barit 



FISHINQ 


CRICKET 




injury mars 
BracewelPs day 


market rasen 


* kj. 



M»rt* ! 


Silccno^ 


since being beaten by Fausus in 
the Qerical Medical Greenham 
Stakes at Newbury in April, can 
return to winning form tomor- 
row. The colt runs in the.six and 
a half foriong Prix Maurice de 
Gheest at Deauville. 

'^Dlivlerl%tori>*p cojtieadi a 
four-strtmg British c haflen ge 
which indudes Sperry . (?aul 
Eddery), from the Peter Walwyn 
stable, who broke foe -track 
record when winning the Cork 
and .Orrery .Stakes, at. Royal 
Ascot. -Orojoya (Michael Hills) 
and Grey Desire. (Kevin 
Darley). 

Lead On Time may have 
most to fear from Robert 
Sangsier's Baiser Vde. The 


Baiser Vole has plenty of speed 
and may prove too good for the 
specialist sprinters. 

• Highland Chieftain, the 
mount of Wfllie Carson, who 
was beaten a head in the Grand 
Prix Prince Rose atOstend on 
July ,21, -can find whraihg form 
in the Group 2 Grosser- Amdahl 
Deutschland-PokaKBayerisfoes 
Zuchtrenuen over 10 fhriongs at 
Munich tomorrow. 

Blinkered first time 

OOODWOOOt S2S Tantar LoWng Cam. 
4 JO « Olwwi. Famcorobe. 

NEWMARKET: 130 Patagto. 330 U 
Tonfla* 

WINDSOR: OSSMiss Canady. 730 Mas 
Monroe. 130 ton's GM. - 
TtreSKSOO Trick Or Tleat.... 


0 



;■ : YESTERDA Y’S RESULTS 

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VTUtlUTTWu 


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CMng: ftnt raiind coursa: good to' arm, - 
strtignt 

. ISfl M 1. BARNET (W Ca«0il..1M|r ? 
i M—t nm (A -McGtona; Wt 3,. 
(tafaian fT WWama, 7r1k ALSO FtMCY- 
* Chasing Mog ib— B Sumner 

Sky. to testWn. T4 . 

Dancmg Diana (5thfc Artful Maid. Stan. 
NR: Dream touch. od, nk. W. Ni, 2J4L R 
Boss at Nawmarfcat Tone ES^ft £1.10. 
E1.6G. £2-30. DR £19:70. C8R 08030. 
Tricasfc E2303Q. 59.41SSC: . 

3J) (7f) 1 , REIQNBEAU (P Waldrorv 5-1k 
2. Hggw?a Raat p Cmttwn, 7-Yk i 
tonmmp (T WMams, 11-1>. ALSO RAN: 
9-2tovTflhnah (4th), 6 HMon Bream (Sth). 
Steady EddJa. IQ Heao SunMna. 11 

■Fw?KMSpBdas. 50 Ow>Mirtina12 
ran. 2Laihd.nk.nk. 3L G towfs at 
Epsom. Tote: £830 £1.70. £2.10, £330. 
0^0200. CSF: KXL22.Trte««t£33X54. 

:Unn2B.i2aac - 

s 330 Qm 2ft 1. CWNO WC R IE {T Iwe, 
14-1); 2iSwaet Mover (WC«on. 14-V ~ 
MnU Stona W R SwWxan. 3-1 
ALSO RAN: 9-2 Enbarr. *?Nsvaizsto. 


Kl. 1KL XL 4L 10L N Cadt at 
ItovanaikaLTore £1^40 £1-10 EIJa 
E1.20. Df: £330. CSR £5.11. Into 
1Z33saC. 

Ple cape C M O OOJeck p a fc C10301.7S. 


Thirsk 


S an taS a Mae (BtM. « Ntombar f4th).12 
a. 14 flat Dibs, 25 Sararias. 33 


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1« tor Rretts (58i). 7-2 PWt SowaHon. 
6 Patriotic MM. 14 Fka Lord. 20 Sur to 
( 681 ). 8 ran.8L 4L toto 1I,7lSftortonffl 
Barririey. Tola: E4.10; £130. ttm. £130. 
Df : £21440. CSR £7531. Wfinnar Uought 
kv 

2A5(5A 1 . BAO RAVER (K Dartmr^S-n: 
2, EchewB (N Connorton. S-lk J. 
PeaStoaTj CNtafon. 16-1). ALSO 
-RAN: fr2 5v Joa Sugden. 3 Pom 

frss^ 7 rtS, B ap! 

Tola: £14.70; 

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£10X42. Trtcaae £1^3041 


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Chartno. Final Try JWiX TVaml .Mystery.. 
13 ran.- KL KL 4L nk, nk. L Cumani at 
Newmarket Tote: E20-70; ESfo- E2.0X 
£190, DF: £101.1 X CSF£1 8038. Tricait 
£879.15. arm OSJKJaac.- 
' AID (im 41) i.toswisrr Quinn. Brans 
tor); Z Quean’aSoteter M Ryan. 7-1£ 1 
Wytte (B Rouse. 20-1). ALSO RAN: 11-2 
Armada. 6 Wassl Touch (5A). 7 AlSatta 
(4th). 50-Beldale Star (WO. 100 Norton 
Sonata. 8 ran. 1 KL ok, ah hd. sn MLflUL P 
Cote at Wh ate ombe. Tote: £230:-£1.1X 
£1.10, £3.10. DF: £540. CSF! £7.99. 2 rrto 
3X22snx 

' 4AQ (71)1. LUZUM (A Murray. 100-30); 
a BengMFi«ra Caultan. tl-tfc & Barra 
Cumtogham (W Caam, 11-6 Iw). ALSO 
RANi altaytt (5th). 11 Wood Louse. 2D 
Someone Else. 25 A( M«h*mry, 
ChudeiViay (ftW. MdhoBande; Nofele Ad 
■Mh). 33 Laena. Red Haro. VWwt.Stew. 50 
Bahte Haights. Braknwto.' Chester Tab- 

iiaSsBaasafiaigt 

,KL H Thomson Jones at tawm a r krt . 
Tote: £330: £1.70. CUfe-»- n ‘. Df: 
£37.40. CSF: £42.05. Into 2X81 sec. 

. &10 m 1, HENDEKA (S Caathan. XII 

OW 


s ewusasMaag- 

6L 31 R jSraon HougMbn at Btewtwry. 
TOte; £230. DFJE73XCSF: £1234. . 

335 (71) 1* PBN 8AL LADY 
Rk*ards.>1 ' 

Fry.4-T 
ALSO - 



KL1KL3L KL . 

iatNaamiBlnLTDre2330c£1.70. 

£130. DF: £9.70. CSF! £14.19. 

«»ftaaisBa|ias- 


(W Careon. 4-1) 


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Ubran Star (taJ.11 Fartarfim)30 Ow 
Freddie (&h)36 Charmed Prinoa. Water 
Waard. Bren. Technocrat Wanter Bra**. 


£2,00. — 

£64.80. Stays Choice (94) atadrewn. 
not Under ordare - nm 4 apptot to al 
bets, deduction iflp h me pound 


It 2 Dtete Of DeMi (J Otoin. » 

HelireWnn (Jana Coom Mol * 

RAN: 54fav Wteasex. 4 WWter The toeat 
(8thL 9-2 Smack (Sth). 5 AMe DUdns. .12 
■ "-n. 8 wlKL 2L 1L tL SLftlta 
m. Tote £1130; £1 
-£4330. CSF: 

Ptecapoc E23830 


TENNIS 


. 1 

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* - 


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U.' • c ■ 

• Vi-eW'- '*-• 

m awu* 9 * - 

Mi JX 




McEnroe back again 


*m|. m 


T '' . _ - ■: 


i are .* -w: 

7 rife pt • 

* 5 “ i T' f 


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- John McEnroe returns -to 
1 competitive tennis, next Tues- 
. day with .a first-round match 
against. -Brian. Teacher,, of the 
‘‘ United Stales, -in the -Stratton 
, Mountain .international men's. 
- tournament McEnroe, seeded 
fourth-. wiQ be playing his first 
match on the .grand prix circuit 
in seven mouths after taking a 


voluntary break from the game: 

The tournament's top two 
seeds are linn Lendl (No.'l), of 
Czechoslovakia, and Boris 
Becker, the Wimbledon cham- 
pion from West Germany. 
McEnroe, placed in the bottom 
half of the draw, is positioned 
for a possible semi-final match 
with Becker. 


:Tlii 

ternary of foe paMfeaftai 

book foal chanted the course of 

ctalkrire— fining nod of foe 
death- of foe ran who h 

leading inflneoce in prapt 

foe donate- at opinion for that 




The book was HaKonTs 
Fhmtiag Flies (1886) and foe 
■u who had a leading part in 
pobfiazmg foe fflpqtrag fiywas 
Francis Fhuxh. fegiiag «dJtar 
.and eohtondst at Tte fieU, who 
praised fts ase on the Hamp- 
shire streams. 29 yearaeariier in 
1857.- 

Ffoadi was foe ssn of a naval 
officer, bora Fraacis Morgan at 
Seaton in Devon to 1822, bat 
(tanged Ms saranme to Francis 
in accordance with the stipula- 
tion of an inheritan ce. Widely 
y ri»j > sometimes 
with Izaak WaRon, his writing 
infinenced Sknes mad Senior, 
Halford and Cox 

His main book, covering every, 
aspect -of acting, -coarse, spin- 
stag and fly,/# BookomAegUMg, 
was farin advance of anything 
that had been pifotished before. 
Soane it Is stul quoted, notably 

this: - \ V - 

“The Jadidoas and perfect 
appficatkm of dry, wet and arid- 
water fiy fishing stamps the 
fta istad fly fisher with foe 
hallmark of efficiency.** 

The comparison with Walton, 
so frequently made m those 
days, has oot stood foe tost of 
time. Frands. a great technician, 
did not have the charm bat there 
Is a memorial to boo in Win- 
chester Cathedral, not for from 
Walton's grave, which has 
brought them together, and a 
c ommemo r a tion service address 
by Gsoon Wedderspooa drew on 
co mp arisons between -foe two 
great fishermen. .. 

More than. 30 descendants of 
Frands Francis, aged from four 
to 93, were among foe coogrega- 
tkm whe mwa wreath laid below 
foe Francis memortsl. 


FOOTBALL 

O’Leary stays 
at Arsenal 

David- O’Leary, foe Arsenal 
central defender,' "yesterday 
ned a new, three-year contract 
wnich will .keep: him .at 
Highbury until his 31si-triith- 
day. The Republic -of Ireland 
intetnational has a testimonfel 
gamV next Tuesday against foe 
Scottish champions. Critic, who 
will include O'Leary's brother. 
Pierce: 

Clyde, foe Scottish first di- 
vision club, have appointed 
John Clark, the Stranraer man- 
ager. as foeir new manager. 
Clark, formerly an assistant 
with both Aberdeen and Celtic 
and a manager at Cowdenbeath, 
will, take- over from Craig 
Brown, who is released to join 
the Scottish FA as assistant: io 
the -national team manager. 
Andy Roxburgh. .. 

Lincoln City have made New- 
castle United an - offer for for- 
ward Tony Cunningham. 
• Steve Ptnney, Britton’s 
Northern Ireland forward, has 
ned a new three-year contract 
er further talks with -his 
manager: Alan MuHery. - 


NORTHAMPTON: North - 
amptonshire drew with the New 
Zealanders. - 

John BracewdI hit foe second 
century of his career as foe New 
Zealanders match against 
Northamptonshire petered out 
in a draw. BraceweO faced only 
94- balls, hitting three sixes and 
IS fours, as foe Kiwis finished 
on -246 for five in reply to the 
home side's 300 for six declared. 
The one sour note was an injury 
to Gray. tbe New 7<whnri off. 
spin bowler. 

A victory for either side was 
always unlikely after the loss of 
the first day to rain and foe. 
tourists opted for batting 
practice. 

Edgar and Wright shared an 
opening stand of 73 bm both fell 
in successive overs. CapeL who 
had earlier scored a fine un- 
defeated 48/ turned in a livriy 
spell with the ball after lunch, .' 
beating both batsmen, and be 
wa s re w a rded wifo foe wicket of - 
Wright for 48, raught by Geoff 
Cook, ai deep square leg; as hie 
attempted to- book. Edgar fb^ 
lowed In foe next over, t ra pped 
leg before to Wild for 27. to 
leave foe tourists 76 for two. 
Five nms later W3d added a 
second victim, forcing Ruther- 
ford to play on for five: 

Jeff Crowe bad made only 
four before foiling to beat a 
direct throw from Fbrdham at 
extra cover and the New Zea- 
landers slumped to 96 for four. 
Coney, foe captain, and Gray 


carried the total to 111 when 
Coney was foe next to go for 21 . 
New Zealand's problems 
mounted when Gray was forced 
to retire with a wrenched right 
thumb after running into 
BracewriL However, the New 
Zealanders recovered with foe 
dominant Bracewell and Biain 
adding an unbroken 135 for foe 
sixth wicket against a varied 
attack. ’ 

NORTHMVTONSMRE: FM ftMteg> 

M R GouRMom tew b Barrett 3S 

A Fbrdham c BWn b Watson 4 


Glancing Mow: Faiibrotber, of Lancashire, helps to steer his side towards a NatWest Tro- 
phy senfffinal during bis 93not oot against Leicestershire yesterday . Report, Page 32. 

Yorkshire 
admit to 
pitch error 

The Yorkshire groundsman, 
Keith Boyce, has admitted mak- 
ing aa error of judgment in his 
soKtion of the pitch for this 
week’s NatWest Trophy quar- 
ter-final against Sussex at 
Headingley. The pitch, which 
was tiie same one used for the 
secernl Test match between En- 
gland and India, was reported by 

the aspires as unfit for first- 
class cricket. 

Boyce said: “The surface held 
up very mD for the Test match 
and I thought it would be about 
the same pace for the Sussex 
game. I never foresaw there 
would be so much bounce in it 
and I am vexed about what has 
happened." 

• Derbyshire have called up 
Andrew Brown for their match 
against tire New Zealanders 
starting at Derby today. Brown, 
aged 21 r aJeft-handed batsman 
.who made his first-class debut 
last season, replaces the injured 
H3L The former England all- 
rounder, Mflferjs d o u b tful with 
n damaged fiaserbut Fimrey has 
recovered frost a buck injury and 
plays his first game since late 
Jane. 

• L eice s ters hire add tire bats- 
men, Butcher and Bowler, to the 
XI who lost to! encash ire in the 
NatWest Trophy qnarter-final 
yesterday, for the championship 
match a gainst Kent at Canter- 
bury. Whitaker, Clift and Benja- 
min, have not recovered from 
foil 


RjBmd-MowbSMM. 

R G Wttwnt c Stein b SSrfng . 

R JBafcyc Stain b Grey— 

□ J Capri not out 

DJWMcBttnbBwratt 

tD Ripley not out . 


93 


95 

48 
- 8 
1 


ExttwPb3.wl.nb11). 15 

Total (8 vMs dec) 300 

*G Cook. NGBCoak and AWaScertfd not 
tot 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-15. 2-16. 3-73. 4- 
218,5-275, 6-291; 

BOWLING: Staring 17-1-75-2: Watson 
18485-1; Ban«t{ 15-2-82-2; Grey l+3- 
45- 1; Bracawettl 4-2-48-0. 

. NEWjptut W Patfc ftat lntogs 

BAEdgwtewbWRd 27 

J G Wright cG Cook b Capet 48 

K R Rutherford .b WBd ■ • 5. 

J J Crewe nai out .... ... 4 . 

-21: 

- 17 
100 
17 
-7 


•J V Corny c WMams b Wid 
E J Gray retired hut _____ 

JGBracewelnotaut 

fTE BWn not oot 


Extras (fc 6. *1) 
Total (5 wicts) . 


□ A Sttrtog. WWateor and BJ Barrett dd 
not bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-73, 2-78. 381. 4- 
98.5-111. 

BOWUNGtWttfcar 13*41-0: CapeMI-8- 
25-1: woams 21-357-0: Wid 244-5D3; 
N G B Cook 104-230: Boyd-Mon 3.1-1- 
7-0: Briley 34L354L 
Umpire*: J H Hampahka and R A White. 


Cheshire’s reign threatened 


Minor cotmties cricket by Michael Berry 


Cheshire’s supremacy 
the Minor Counties we 


over 
Western 

division, established by run- 
away wins in the bst two 
seasons, is bong threatened 
from several sources, not all of 
which are familiar. 

With only two wins from 
seven games, they have a duster 
of counties ready and waiting to 
suc cee d therit One -of them is 
Wiltshire, who have emerged as 
genuine . title candidates from 
foe position of being last 
season’s wooden spoonists. Few 
in Wiltshire readily reminisce 
over 198$. Not only did they 
finish bottom, bm they also had 
a traumatic, and some say 
controversial, change in cap- 
taincy. Yet adversity has re- 
kindled a refreshing new spirit. 

Norman Peters, their chair- 
man, has found new allies m 
Eric Burston and Chris 
Sheppard to provide foe 
commitment behind Richard 
Cooper, foeir genial skipper, 
who is one of foe game's true 
characters. 

Cooper’s side embraces a 

enct\olffoe; more recetit'ao- 
quisitions. foe most notable are 
Seaman, a fluent opening bats- ' 
mao; Trenrbath, an 
adventurous hitter who can also 


challenge could still come from 
Northumberland, Suffolk or 
Durham. 


Cumberind 


Staffs 

Suffolk 

Bads 

Combs 

Durham 

Lines 

NorfoSc 


Cheshire 

Somerset U 

Own 

Mtshire 

Dorset 

Berkshire 

Bucks 

Devon 

ShropeMre 

Cornwell 


L D* D* D'NRPta 
1 3 0 0 0 


open the bowling; Cullip, a 
wicketkeeper who recently took 
five catches and two stum pings 
in an innings against Cornwall; 
and Merryweafoer, who is 
following in a family tradition 
that saw his father {day for 
Wiltshire for more than 20 years 
and his brother in 1981. 

In contrast both Meehan and 
White have played since foe 
early 1960s, Meehan holding the 
distinction of being foe oldest 
current player in the champion- 
ship at 48. - 

Oxfordshire, the 1981 cham- 
pions. and Somerset second XI, 
who have given notice to pull 
out of the competition at foe end 
of the 1987 season, are also wdD 
in contention for Cheshire's 
crown. Interestingly, Cheshire’s 
final two matches are against 
Oxfordshire and Wiltshire. 

In the East, Cuafoeriaad look 
favourites to hold-off the chal- 
lenge of a chasing pack. Two 
successive defeats, sandwiched 

Cerezo moves on 

Day final have hit the hopes of 
Hertfordshire. Staffordshire, 
who recently introduced Banks, 
the former Worcestershire 
player, to great effect, now trail 
the leaders by 12 points with 
s. left, hi 


(Up to and Inducing July 30) 


0 30 
0 27 
0 27 

0 23 
0 22 
0 20 

1 18 
1 8 
0 6 


0 31 
0 27 
0 26 
0 26 
0 20 
0 19 
0 18 
0 15 
0 11 
0 7 


. (e) 

ftst tejtoga points in one match tost 


two games. 


but a realistic 


The Brazilian footballer 
Toninho Cerezo, who was 
sacked by the Italian club Roma 
two months ago. has signed a 
one-year contract _ with 
Sampaoria for an undisclosed 
fee. 


GOLF 


Big guns silent as 
Langmead sights 
final with White 


By John Hennessy 

of total 
Amateur 
bound to 


After a mormn 
upheaval the E 

Championship was 

suffer from lack of atmosphere 
when foe semi-finals were 
played in dripping tain yes- 
terday. at Hillside. Southport 
With foe big guns silent, 
Bernard White, foe Surrey 
champion, and Jonathan 
Langmead, of Newton Abbot, 
came through to face each other 
over 30 holes today. White beat 
Wayne Henry (Porters Park) by 
three and one and Langmead 
(Stover) beat Robert Bardsky 
(Denton) by one bole. 

Henry, for all his tender years 
(he is still only aged 16) seemed 
likely to be a prominent figure 
today, but he could never find 
his true form and after a taut 
struggle. White ran away to win 
four holes in a row from the 
fourteenth without having to do 
anything at all spectacular. 

Henry hooked fatally at the 
14th and 16th and in between 
needed three putts. A birdie four 
at least was White’s for the 
taking at the seventeenth, for he 
was only four feet from foe hole 
in three, but when Henry missed 
from twenty feet, there was 
nothing for it but to shake 
hands. 

Langmead is a slim lad of 18, 
olyfivef 


feet eight and ten stone 
at be has a lovely 


only 

in weight, but 
rhythm and was well able to 
keep up with his burly oppo- 
nent. There was never more 
than one hole in it either way, 
which generated an air of un- 
predictability, but the match 
ended in a sad anti-climax. 
Langmead won with a five after 


Baidsley had hit a three iron 
into deep rough and taken two 
more to extricate himself. 

A more unlikely line-up for 
foe semi-finals could hardly 
have been imagined, for the four 
losers included foe force 
remaining seeds - Peter Baker, 
Mark Davis and Da rid Gilford 
— players, moreover, who are 
shortly to try their luck among 
the professionals. The fourth 
man to go out was Gary 
Wolstenhomte. who may not 
cany the lustre of his father but 
was, nevertheless, expected to 
beat White judging by compar- 
ative form this season. 

Davis and Wolstenholme at 
least got to foe I8fo hole, an 
accomplishment denied the two 
Walker Cup players Baker and 
Gilford. Baker tost his touch on 
the greens and his opponent 
finally fashioned an unlikely par 
at foe seventeenth after twice 
being in the sand. Gilford 
vanished at foe same spot, 
taking two to get out of a 
greenside bunko- when be 
needed to win foe hole to 
survive. 

Davis, perhaps, had the more 
cause for self-reproach for he 
buried his second into a sandhill 
after a drive that deserved a 
better reward. Even so. 
Langmead had to hole sturdily 
from ten feet for the match, as 
did White against 
Wolstenholme. 

SIXTH ROUND: W Henry (PwtefS Parte) M 
D G8tofd(Trtnt!wm Pirt) 3 and 1 : B White 
(west Ha) u O Wobranhakne (Leiceswr- 
shre) 1 hole; R BanHey (Denton) Dt P 
Baker (UMiall Hell) 2 end 1; J Langmead 
(Thomdon Park) 1 


ST 0 

now. 


beetM Davis « 


- SEMFFMAL: WNte beat Henry 3 and 1: 
Langmead beat Bardriay one hole. 


Veteran completes 
a winning start 

From Elaine Scott, Hutchinson, Kansas 


A 30-foot par-saving putt by 
the veteran Belle Robertson on 
the final green gave Great 
Britain and Ireland a 3-0 lead 
after the morning foursomes on 
the first day of the Curtis Cup 
match at Prairie Dunes here 
yesterday. The par four halved 
foe hole, and gave her and team- 
mate Mary McKenna victory 
over Kathleen McCarthy and 
Kim Gardner by one hole, and- 
made history in that it was the 
fast occasion that a Great 
Britain and Ireland team had 
taken all three points in the 
foursomes of the first morning. 

The pairing of Jill Thorahm, 
aged 43. and Lillian Behan, aged 
21, strode away with consec- 
utive birdies at the fifth and 
sixth. By the turn, they were five 
up and two under ' par and 
regulation figures at foe next 
three holes proved sufficient. 
The two combined . magnifi- 
cently with a mixture of superb, 
accurate approach shots from 
Lillian and excellent putting 


The second point came from 
the young paruership of 20- 
year-old Patricia Johnson and 
21 -year-old Karen Davies. 
Danielle Ammaccapane fell foul 
of foe rules at foe third hole 
where she stood with one foot in 
a bunker to play a shot out of the 
rough. Finding her stance diffi- 
cult, the 21-year-old used her 
foot to build up a step of sand, 
oblivious of a breach of the 
rules.. 

The hole was immediately 
awarded to foe Britain ana 
Ireland pair. 

A bolt of lightning called a 
hah to the afternoon's play after 
only a few holes. The situation 
looked promising, however, for 
the British and Irish girls who 
were up in all foe singles 
matches bar Vicki Thomas, who 
was one down to Kandi Kessler 
after the. fourth. 


RESULTS: 
Johnson 


& MomAio ton 
and K Davies 


beat 


from Jill who holed just about l 

fir.iT, mJil:. c ana ii j i normu ana l csafian oeax iv 

everything from witnin ten teet, wd c Schrayer, 7 and 6; B 

didn't allow the Americans to Robertson and M McKwra beet K 
get into any sort, of stride. _ Gardner and KMcCerthy, one wl 

Panton chases leaders 


The Scoitish veteran, John 
Panton, returned a one-under- 
par round of 69 in foe £23.000 
Trust House Forte Seniors golf 
championship at Mere, Chesh- 
ire, to move to within three 
shots of the four half-way lead- 
ers: Gary Player; NeD Coles, foe 
title-holder, Peter Butler, and 
Ireland’s Mike Murphy. 

Player, who achieved three 
birdies, became the first man to 
break par with a 69, for a one- 
over-par 141, but failed to take 
the outright lead by three- 
putting at foe 16th hole. Neil 


Coles was coasting to a 68, when 
his approach to foe I8fo took a . 
bad bounce, and finished just 
five inches from a wall, resulting 
in him returning a six for the 
hole. 

Butler returned a 71, and 
Murphy dropped two shots in 
the last seven holes for a 70. 
Christy O’Connor, seeking a 
record seventh title, also faltered 
over the dosing holes, taking a 
six at foe 15th, before finishing 
on 72 to trail the leaders by one 
shot on 142. 

Scandinavian Open, page 27 


POLO 


Los Locos have the will 


By John Watson 


Los Locos wiD meet Royal 
Berkshire in the final of foe 
Jaeger-sponsored Cowdray Park 
Challenge Cup. In foe first of the 
semi-finals, which were played 
off at Arabersham, Sussex, yes- 
terday, Los Locos (received %) 
defeated Windsor Park by 8!fc 
goals to 7. 

No team in the world shows a 
greater cohesive will to win than 
Los Locos, and yesterday then- 
tactical play, pivoted on Claire 
Tomlinson (it must be the first- 
ever season that a woman has 
occupied the No. 3 position in 
high-goal polo), has never 
looked more polished. 

The way their Stefan Macaire 
comes through from Back to 
take foe initiative in the forward 
line just at the right moment is 
most impressive; but perhaps 


foeir main hero was their No. 2, 
Gene Fomigno. from Florida, 
who, giving a quick and accurate 
performance, registered six of 
foeir goals. 

Although it was not a particu- 
larly open match, Windsor 
Park, too, displayed some ex- 
cellent team play. Wfo a 60- 
yard penalty conversion they 
drew ahead to a 7-6Vi lead in foe 
fifth ehukka. Los Locos 
untimately triumphed, 

LOS LOCOS: 1. S Tontoson (4V 2. G 
3. C Tomtoson (4): Back. S 


Rnrt(2):2.JHorswal 
* Back, w Lucas (4). 


Maeara 

WINDSOR PARK: 1, D RekJ (4); 2. M 
teo wgi ,Wi 3. C Graorta (10): Bach. HRH 
The Prtnc8 of Wales (4). 

TOTAL BERKSHIRE: 1.B Morrison (It Z 

ROMMU0O: i . D Fteart t 
(6); 3. D Smektas (7); I 


FOR THE RECORD 


BASEBALL 


NORTH 


Fram&so Gesnsa 3, Malta 6FMS?Aimrt-L 

Ctei-toMK Cattoma Ante 8 OWOto 
UMOKQmIM MM8, DemSTigars 


Sn 


United States fc-Soute Korn KNethertands 

Antes 4. 


KMMy. MMXS 3. 1172: 4. Dates. 1156: 5. 
Edywan, Uta 

GOLF 


CRICKET 


Kart N 270 tD Safes 1 

" iLfttttSlor 


and 157 (C S 

3 312 ter 


EssaxB! 

a&VRidpathTqantmStor 


9.USC 

2(Q- 

wfckea.-Brtsiafc Gtoucasmi**-8 168 


2 (Q Trnbte 57 nor au). &su R won 8 


G M Cftartmanti 5 tar SI) 
Sto14OTWM<ittdto1PWRMlfete*81 n« 
oulA J Wtegrt 63 not ouft WvMdafei n 54 

ta np fen dsc and S« tar 2. Mata down, 

Khm Sussax 11299 lor 7 dec ffiKSanang 

157: M A Cotta 4 ter 48) ml ite (S D Mte 

55:PCR7UnelBtar26):l«ddteanB2SSte 
3dac (K R Brawn 125 not out A R Harwood 
79) and 173*sr2(K R Brtte79 «X ML J D 
Carr 59). MM dteaa* R wen by 8 wtefcate. 


lLancasfeal17for4.M atadawn. I 
mnor coumes: t«^ 
222loc7dac(J Grtkp51 notoucDYtofateyA 
tir?2) md tor 3iR toncrtxxy IOStkx ma 

R Cooper 59 not sue Devon 1SdtorSdBC(M 

OSve 118 na ouQ. 


• GLIDING 

MHUMORM. UfltefeE Open 
pton aM p * Per twfc 21Rfln 

Pmaijaeteanrand at 

sowcp. 


OAK BROOK, ■MteHen'i Western open: 

FM rweid (fe US* « BtadSf, L RfiSafeQ 

j.taBWSdklnf.Ttat2ar.CRjm,T 

Stetson, D MbL H ttwttvS Stepson. 7ft T 
Kee.FCtxmtaRBtefe.-MGoea.rasfnsnts, 

B An*ao<TByrun. R Betts. D feoptas. 

Otter earn: 73: N FSBofBSJ. 

DENVBL Crtnrertrr'Wo— 0*0 tteraswwrt: 

Ret route (US urteea smedfetocO Massey, 

J DCkteOn. S Fbglsmsn. Eft S Satyera V*A 
B Pearson. 70c C Johnson. A Bsr£p 

Katiml-A-M Mb (Fr). SUBS (SA), L Mans, 

CRanex. H FSrr. - * 

MQNncnt S cu nte k Baste* ~i inr 
stttoe:’ tosrtiHtate: C Br ook s fGlemwi 
S i MHonn (Bsmsste}. 8 sod iPOw 

{PissMwSt Ntehetes) R 5 Dochsdy ronfen 
Bay). 5 and 3; A mornson (Ayr BsSaista) a G 

MacBragor (GtenconsL one hois; a Mott 

JWlMfcq rt G Snsw (Haggs Casda). a the 

CONWY; Weteh — tew 

fliHer Heel* Rees U Jones 6 and 5; 

Wdn aw i M Roderick 4 and 3: UeLean tit 

pnos 2 sod 1: Kntar rt Cakert 2 ant t. 
HUDOCRSFKDc Eagdab gMs ctefea- 
ship: finfe S Shapcos (Knovria) bt N Way 


65. 67. 70. 2Dfc A Shsard(SAJ. 87. 68. 8R2lte 
M WMker 67. 69. 67: J Corewcimn. 71 .65. 67. 
204: M 7hOrtSOfl, 8*. 69, 71; L Date, 69, 66, 
59: C Pswoa 71 . 85. ». C Sharp. 66. 7 1 . 67; 
P P—WTm (US). 71. 67. 66. 

orienteering 

MISKOLC. Hurpanc Sludart jesHd ta? 

. nerttor MrnU MJfec 1.A-EOteOO(^l. 
B3nto 338SC. British Recta* Z8. & Hate, 

8ft48;37. TTstt KCSf: W. A Mtefeu 10&45; 

40. D PeaL 10330. weart Uox 1. A 

Kottonan (Fte). 64.13. Brtteb ptedtaOK 3D. L 
Dunn. B&06; 34. C Whafay. 69:16; 42. M 
rtamtfttn. 9622. 


HWCASTLE: ESAB l urniB Hee L - Man's 
aln gja e: Sa m i W re li: PMOt amai e (Aua) R J 
Turner. 6-3. 3-6. 6-3: B Taroczy (Hung) M M 
WtMcer. 6-1 . 4-6. 6-3- Wonm*! skigtes: Rnet 
J Louts MJ Wood. 6-2. 8-4. 


YACHTING 


SPEEDWAY 


NATIONAL LEAQUE: Poetponert Glasgow v 

Miron Keywe and Bfemfngham.v Baranck 

BSsHUaB^^oclord 1 60. Wqg t Ijrti IB . 
OoUsehatoet M Cos (WCter) 

lOTCKOIffCUROuartaMlM te. eecen d teger 

EdnOurati 38. Eeattoume 40. Eastbourne rtn 

on saemBiB BM5. Hackney 39. Arm 

Essaeto Arana Ease* te» on agoegete 82- 

74. 


Tam: Hrtey netonet ... 

Fouth points race: 1. F3193. 

Steter. Swrongusi SCf. 2. F3S23. 

FUner (S and L McCteean. Castaways SC): . . 

F341S. Lureher (C and S Jotinsonfc 4. F3119. 
Honor (P and J Poynar. Emswortti SQ: 5. 
F3433, Junglt FraSi (M Cfepman and L 
Osborne). Fete nee: 1, Pommy Powe r 3. 

F999. Alarm (D and NDsrtw. Castaways SCt 

3. Honor A, Magic A Uaaisr . Rate owes 

pteclngc 1. Pommy Power : 2. IWc : 3. 
Horror : 4. Atom ; 1 1830 Mstskrt (Rand P 
Bofeaon. Kitty SC). W Rata Chsl- 
leage Ttepiiy: 1, Porimy Power ; 2. Atenn ; 3, 
Honor . Mario* Trophy: 1. Ft 956. ITS 
Lartitogn'CanaiK 2. raatf 
lone). 


412. Fait Reactor (J 


fif w nitfftyMtfiiftt (Qumh Mvy SC}s Bh & 1 a 

R Lonsoaom (Austntei Navyfc 5. M Lteatey 

{AumaMan Navy): 3. C McKae (Setae. USL 

EXaKMJTK Nmml 12 dwwitensiB: Shall 


| HenrtP .7and6 


TENNIS 


. . 1. J Gtesaop. ASW 17. 156Am. 

546pts: Z F Paata s . ASW 22. 1518km. 
527;3.FDSteS. Kssttel. 18. 1518k«.52S:4. 
H Brown. Kast ml 19. lasOen, 620: 5, J 

Edyre en . Vanes a 1488km. 518 Ownh 1. 

POzartkS. i25to>K a Kay ASW 22, 1221;& 


Cheafewt Tnta Hoes* Porte PGA 

mi r Meirinnehlrr Terreei inmit 141;N 

if&gxjui). Tt. TO P Brttergwq. 71. 70: 

S 25 

wmcMoni, 7vi 7* hw l uonss (noyi 
Cotrty Dteji). 7t, 7% n Drew (Bangert/TO. 
76 l*AKteg(Bstasnrlt)Part).7£7». : 
IHh D Hirttoson (SA). 74. 78. 1st A Coop 
(Dean Wood). 70, 81.. 

FiamB PARK: Btoor Item— - Tif 

r— ■ m— nl— ■**T , TWn 1r l HTm1 


WASWNOrotk DC na ttq—r efetaie ifetf 

roota K CarfaeBn (Swe) M J AneseiSp). 62. 

M : A Kncfcsra (USl or M Oram rrtnJ. 64. 
3% . 7-6: T Tutesna (Ft ) fe R Aaongr (H3&4- 
6. 6-4. 7-8; J CerteSOn « « Dwla (US), 

1-6. 6-4. 6-l:AGomez(ieu)txFLuna( 

7 7-6. 6-2: J Arias fU3)»H feta Pena | . 

7-&7-5:M Jarts (ten) tttF Amyl (Pefuj, 7- 

fra K Nomcok (S« W G V8as(Arg). 7-5, 


ewnti Quarter itertr C Krthman (ua M E 

i(US)«D 



T Muster 

(Austria) K M Meek (CZL 46. 7-a 7-5: M 

20ft B Lixwfort (US). 87. 89, 86: SBtrudwiek. Ctastnq(Neth)fa(AMaurer(tMG3.fr«647-8. 


poirta race: Scertwraufe YecM Ckb eateer: 

1. Twice Shy (P Athtee and M WBsna); Z 
Trgsr U|MM5 Mon); & Monsoon r 
Robtoson and T Cooper}: 4. Cltoa Otets ( 
and J Shomxas): 5. Snent RwirtoB K: and 
Dsrkng): 6. teofeel (W H ender so n and A 

CstrtOOteL OreraS rtauRte 1. Twin Shy 

(Atkm); Z CMna Crisis [Snorroewk 3. 
Stcyds Caps (Sears): 4. Safe Anne 
(Hayworti): 5. GrtiSy nan d Mi (Ross); 6, 
Slam Ruwring (Darihg). 

HYT1C. Kart: Scerpmn 
Pi e ate a w 's tee i. &mpu 
Mower. Stanouth sS Z 

Aaanson and c Moxwonny. Eton 

Steaz o bcwtS Rajph and A Ssrtea. Bolton and 
Dote SC)- a > « pm»BT>ertyt. Shock wavs (j 
Turner and RPstaiw. Sktaoutti SC): 2. Ehal 
The Aanhsrk (R Hayden and F Heydan. 
Papereourt SQ: 3. Eggipixt. 


WATER SKIING 

Mapple out 
of slalom 

Andy Mapple, the world 
record holder, went out of the 
slalom at the Prudential Euro- 
pean Waters ki championships 
when he lost foe rope handle 
completing his second pass. 
Conditions at Steetiey likes, 
Lincoln were far from idea], 

QUALIFYING RESULTS: Womart’etenoc 
1.K MorM(GB), 3&£m:2.0( 

(USSR), 34A 3. A Wopptng 
4. H tgsUamter (Sw^. 33^; 5. P I 
(GO. 31 .7: 6. M4>S6«n6urJM. 30A 7. B 
Onto (Austria), XA; 8, C Gusanbaufe 
(Austma). aX Wonwn’a aWow equal 

1. Roberts and Morse. 2 buoys at 13 

mottos; equal a G SentoSa (tt and 

S^ieur, 14Vi: 5, Qouburanko. 2K at 
1«i & Kjetanisr. 0 at Mlt; 7. 
Qutonbauar. 4 at 16: equal & N 
Rbumiantseva (USSR) andSandvad 
iL 5 at 18K. Men's tricks: 1, P Martin 
B£70pts; a A Alessi (tt. 7JS0; a J 
. Jsday (GB), 7520; 4. A kterte (ML 
ZV30-. 5. M Haztevood (CB), 5.77ft 0. $ 
Csrmte(Fr).6£70:7.ARooto{GB).M70; 

p Buzzotta (i 

5,480. Man's < 

buoy an lit; 2. BHIaday.frX at 12: a A 
Cavarma (IQ. 5 rtl% 4, PCamto r 
«l 12: a ' 


Perez(Frt.1»tt12:7.M 
latlia - " 


FObartetttwr (Austria).' 

it at 1 jTiB. MO. 2 


_ , .. . at 11 

9. M Datitberg (Swa). 2tt at 1 a; ' 

at ia 1 1. M Jonsson (Swe) K at 1% 1% W 

Scfautz (Austrie). 6 at 14U. 


is 


PV'-'T"-' 









Three badminton 
golds for England 


Canadian wrestlers 
are stopped short 



10001986 
^COMMONWEALTH 
GAMES 


Canadians shade 

England in ring 


New Zealand take 
second bowls title 


Unique project that can 
benefit competitors 
from smaller countries 


The anguish of little Ber- 
muda may not have been in 
vain. The Commonwealth 
Games can be saved from 
future political disruption, I 
believe, by a joint declaration 
of Commonwealth heads of 
Govern men t, similar to the 
Glencagles agreement pledg- 
ing commitment to participa- 
tion in the Games, the only 
public manifestation of an 
increasingly frail brotherhood. 
The present South African 
crisis would need to be solved 
firsL 

Such a declaration, a kind of 
Gleneagles in reverse, would 
place the responsibility on 
government instead of mem- 
ber associations, many of 
whom, as we have seen in 
Edinburgh, are without auton- 
omy. Since the involvement 
of politicians cannot be 
avoided, they have to be 
enlisted, under the old adage 
that if you can't beat them, 
join them. 

Sonny de Sales, the presi- 
dent of the Hong Kong Olym- 
pic Association who has been 
involved in nearly 30 inter- 
national Games, is chairman 
of the constitution revision 
committee of the Federation. 
He says: “I do not see bow any 
solution so far suggested will 
stick. But with such a proposal 
as this, in the event of a 
boycott it would be govern- 
ments who would be seen by 
the public to have reneged. 
Fines or suspensions of mem- 
ber associations who do not 
attend on political grounds 
cannot work." 

The declaration could be 
negotiated by Sir Sonny 
Ramphal. the Commonwealth 
general secretary, under the 
proposal by Prince Philip, the 
Federation's president, at last 
Sunday s assembly. De Sales 
would like the declaration to 
have two pans: 

• Governments would ensure 
that youth was given the 
opportunity to take part freely 
in international sport. 

• Governments would pro- 
vide the means, where nec- 
essary, lo ensure their 
country's presence at the 
Games. 

A clause which could be 
written into the constitution 
would be a £ 100 per compet- 
itor refundable deposit to be 
paid six months in advance. 
At present, there is a non- 


By David Miller 

refundable £3 per head 

deposit 

Many of the smaller 
Commonwealth nations are 
desperate for realistic com- 
petition. which the Games, 
now concluding, partially pro- 
vide. In the last few days a 
unique project has been taking 
root in Edinburgh: a World 
Island Games. 

The initiators are Douglas 
Colder and Robert Newnes of 
the Cayman Islands. The Is- 
land Games would be in die 
year following an Olympics, 
for islands individually affili- 
ated to the IOC or the 
Commonwealth Federation 
and with a population of less 
than one million. Calder has 
bad preliminary discussions 
with Austen Sealy, president 
of the Barbados Olympic 
committee. 

There are some 37 eligible 
islands such as Bahrain and 
Iceland, yet excluded by 

Today’s events 

ATHLETICS tat Meadowbank): 
12.30: Men's javelin final; 1245: 
Men's triple lump final; 1pm: 
Women's 1500m final: 105: Men's 
shot final: 1-20: Women's 4 x 100m 
relay final; 1.45: Man's 4 x 100m 
relay final: 1.55: Men's 1500m final; 
205: Women's 4 x 400m relay final; 
3.05: Men’s 4 x 400m relay final; 
330: Closing ceremony. 

CYCLING: 300: 100 mites road 
race. 

population would be rel- 
atively powerful nations such 
as Cuba and Jamaica. 
Outstanding sprinters from 
the smaller West Indies is- 
lands, cyclists from the Isle of 
Man and boxers from Cyprus 
would no longer be swamped 
by the conventional powers of 
world sport. Barbados is a 
candidate for the first Island 
Games. 

It is Bob Newnes’s intention 
to include the more social 
sports of tennis and squash, 
popular among residents on 
tourist islands, and he thinks a 
budget of £4 million could 
stage a Games, including 
travel and accommodation 
subsidies. He is planning an 
approach to Olympic Solidar- 
ity for assistance. “At present 
the smaller islands are 
swamped even in events such 
as the Central American and 
Caribbean Games by coun- 
tries like Mexico and 
Colombia" he says. Newnes’s 
father was captain of the first 


West Indies Test team in the 
Twenties. 

The feeling that smalt coun- 
tries within the Common- 
wealth Federation should be 
encouraged may favour Car- 
diff in their bid to get the 1 994 
Games, in preference to the 
five potential Canadian can- 
didates. There is a reluctance 
to pass the privilege around 
among the five main white 
countries in the absence of a 
capable city from Africa or 
Asia Ron Waikiss, the Tory 
chairman of Cardiff council, 
believes they can already 
count on 13 of the 28 votes 
they would need in Seoul in 
1988. 

Cardiff is politically united, 
like Birmingham for the 
Olympics, in us attempt Lord 
Brooks, a life-long socialist 


has promised to raise £40,000 
towards the promotion of the 
bid. and a key factor could be 
the promise by James Calla- 
ghan. a former prime minister, 
to bring to bear such influence 
as he can within Africa. “We 
are a one-party state" Lord 
Brooks jests. 

Waikiss, with plans already 
underway for a new athletics 
stadium on the other side of 
the road from Ninian Park, 
the home of Cardiff City, has 
been planning the campaign 
for over two years, visiting 
Brisbane last year. He thinks 
Edinburgh’s problem has been 
that they looked back to their 
success of 1970 rather than 
forward; and that, as has 
already been said many times, 
their view was parochial 
rather than international 

It has not, after all setbacks 
of boycotts, intimidating Scot- 
tish weather and widespread 
inefficiency, been a bad 
Games as seen by the public. 
The proliferation of mistakes 
have largely been evident only 
to competitors, officials and 
journalists. The public, as it 
always will has responded to 
some excellent finals on the 
track, in badminton, rowing 
and cycling. There has been 
plenty to see, in spite of 
diminished heats, and the 
stadia have been nearly foil 

It was a pity about the 
absence of Coe, but we shall 
remember famous names like 
de Casiella, Johnson, Cram, 
Redgrave and Sze Yuan*! 
magnificent competitors who 
did not win but set the tone 


Aggresssive Baddeley’s gold raid 



Steve Baddeley 
earned England's 
first-ever men's 
singles Common- 
wealth gold medal 
with one of the 
finest perfor- 
mances of his career yesterday 
with a 15-8. 15-8 victory over 
Sze Yu. the Chinese-born 
Australian, whose wing-heeled 
performances had made him the 
unofficial favourite. 

The top-seeded left-hander 
from Enfield, who has been a 
hero for England in two Thomas 
Cups, would not commit him- 
sclfon whether the all-out attack 
which penetrated the defence of 
one of the world's most mobile 
players had been his best perfor- 
mance. “But it was the one that 
gave the most pleasure." he said. 


ATHLETICS 


Men 

1,500 metres 

Sera)- finals 

(First four m each heat plus two fastest 
losers to ftnafl 

HEAT ONE: t. S Cram (Eng) 3mln 
43.96sec 2, J Gladwin (Eng) 3:44.45: 3. P 
Bourfcs (Aus) 3-44.77; 4. D Campbell {Can) 

3:44.78.- 5. A Cume (Scot) 3:4402 6. M 

GAdirsl (NZ) 3:4531; 7, S Hoogewerf 

iCam 3:46.80: 8. M Kirk (N Ira) 3:47^65; 9. 

G Mthembu (Swari 3:50.16. 10. T Hanlon 

(Scot) 35057; 11 . P MoghaB (Los) 
3 52.31. 12. G Mambosasa (Maf) 354.15. 

HEAT TWO: 1. R Harmon (Eng) 3mtn 

42.69MC: 2. U HtadtfAas) 3.4276; 3. N 

HonliekJ (Wait 3:42 83; 4. P ScanxneU 

(Aus) 342.92: 5. S Martin (N ire) 14305; 

6 . J Robson jScotj 3:4301; 7. R Loneraan 

(Can) 3:43 48; 8. M The* IBM) 146.1S9. 

P Renner (NZ) 3:47 .0ft 10. 1 Ganuga (Man 

350.11 11. N Hand (Goer) 350.75; 12, B 
Prasad (Fiji) 4-04.27 

Marathon 

1. R Oe CasteOa <Aus)2tir iQmin ISsoc: 2, 

D Edge (Can) 111.08; 3. 5 Monettmni 

(Aus) 2-11.18; A J Graham (Scott 2rfiLlO: 

5. A Bateau (Can) 1125& 8. P 0'8nen 

(Eng) 2.14.54; 7. 1 Elks (Wal) 115.12: & K 
Forster (Eng) 2:1636: 9. M Deane (N 1 
2:16 49: 10. F Dyne (Scot) 217.30: ~ 
Butter (Can) 2ULS2: 12. S Htawe (Swaz) 
2:20.06. 13. J Campbell (NZ) 221.25; 14. 

B Manama (Bert) 224.05: 15. G Wood 

(Aus) 226.48: 16. K Htasa (Lest 129.47; 
17. G Mosweu (B0t> lim 18. J 

Mbangiwa (Bat) 13&11 IS. B Holden 

(Gust) 139.12; 20. T Maama (Lbs) 

2. -45 13. C Speddng (Eng) (M not fimstL 

Pole Vault 

FINAL 1 . A Ashursf (Eng) (Games 
record): 2. B Ferguson (Can) 521 3, N 
Honey (Aus) 521 4. D Slew (Can) 5.10; 5, 
B Hooper (Eng) 5.00; 6, 0 Thompson 
' 4.90; .. 5 Alltel (Aus) 4.75; ft 8 

i (Scot) 4.45; S Wibcm (Aus) no 
ne^tii recorded. 

Discus 

FINAL 1. R Laztfans (Can) 58.86m; 2. P 
Nandap (Aus) 57.74: 3. W Retterer (Aus) 
57.34. 4. P ManSe (Emj) 56.90: 5. G 
Savory (Big) 56.42; ft R Sianey (End 
56.00; 7. V Slavnc (Aus) 54.4ft ft G 

Patience (Scot) 5354; Bu ni na le d: 9. 5 

PKkennfj (Wal) 51.30; 10, J Reynolds (N 

Women 
1,500 metres 
Semi-finals: 

( Fnt tour at each heat and tiro fastest 
losers to total) 

HEAT ONE: 1. D Bowker (Can) 
26.7290: 2. K Wade (Wal) 42720: 

Jus! fAuri 427.69: 4. C “ V 
4-27 7ft 5. G Dainty (Eng) 42fti 
WTnttmgham (Scot) 423.01; 7, 

(U51 4-48.43. 

HEAT TWO: 1. Y Murray (Seat) drain 
u.ffisec: 2. C Borer (Bg) 4:1132: 3. L 
MacOaugaS (Scot) 4:13.07; 4. L WHams 
(Can) 4.13.49; 5. A Ham (f*n 4-14.44; ft S 

Money (Eng) 4:18.89; 7. S Pining (10M) 

4.24 76: B. P Monkoe (Les) 4:48.60. 


By Richard Eaton 

There were special reasons for 
saying so. 

Four years ago at Brisbane 
Baddeley had also been the top 
seed but became ill and had a 
temperature of 104. Six months 
ago he relinquished his most 
marketable title when he sport- 
ingly agreed to play in the 
English national championships 
immediately after returning 
from the Far East in order to 
support the sponsor and tele- 
vision. Now he has another, and 
a better one, and justice has 
been done. 

England won the other singles 
gold when Helen T roke retained 
her women's title with another 
professional performance in 
beating her compatriot Fiona 
Elliott 11-4. 1 1-4. 


A third gold went to 
Englandwhen the European 
champions. Gillian Clark and 
Gillian Gowers, beat Johanne 
Falardo and Denyse Julian, of 
Canada. 15-6. 15-7 in the 
women's doubles; but hopes of a 
fourth English gold were dashed 
when Mike Scandal era and Au- 
drey Tuckey. of Australia, beat 
Andy Goode and Fiona Elliott 
1 5-7. 1 5-5 in the mixed doubles. 

But the night's highlight which 
had the Meadowbank Sports 
Centre applauding for two min- 
utes afterwards, was the straight- 
games win for Billy Gilliland 
and Dan Travers, of Scotland, 
in the men's doubles final that 
denied England the chance of a 
dean sweep of golds they had 
been seeded to win. 



England exceed 
their hopes in 
taking five titles 

By Srikuraar Sea, Boxing Correspondent 

Even IT the medals nobbled bnt rrfnsed to go dwa, 
have been some- The bout developed uko a toe to 
what devalued by toe affair wfth Doaglas throwing 
the absence of the the deaner and better shots, bat 
Africans. the Harding to cries of “Aussie 
Aussie" gave some tack and ass 
fighting well right to the end. 

Earlier, Marti Eptra, the 
England light flyweight nas 
surprisingly defeated by Scon 
Olson, of Canada. The dimin- 
utive Olson gave Eptoa no time 
at all to get used to the height 


Pole position: Andrew Ashnrst, of England, taking gold 



Faith pays 
dividend 
for Loban 

By Philip Nicksan 

Noel Loban, 
En gland 's light- 
heavyweight wres- 
tler, went into his 
final against Dong 
Cox, of Canada, 
quoting the bibie 
to himself — and came away with 
a gold medal “Cox told me 
afterwards be felt very nervous 
out there, but I Mocked off the 
nerves through ray meditation," 
be said, after receiving his medal 
from the Duke of Edinfarjg&L 
Despite that, tire Englishman 
ldn*t get things all his own way. 
After moving three points ahead 
in the first round be found 
himself at the mdihg end of a 
clever fnnndfan tactic. Unable 
to overcome his opponent by 
outright wrestling, the Canadian 
managed to manoeuvre Loban 
into appearing passive. As a 
result die Englishman was given 
two formal cautions — a third 
would have brought instant 
disqualification. 

Keeping cool however, Loban 
took over tactical command. 
With two urinates to go. and five 
dear points ahead, he let the 
Canadian take a point as the 
time ebbed away, and the tide 
came closer. With 20 secoods to 
go, the Canadian gained one 
more point, bnt ft was too Etde 
too late. 

Brian Aspen, who foiled to 
retain bis 57kg tide, gained 
some consolation when he beat 
Paul Ned ley, of Scotland, 12-2 
to take the bronze. Having done 
so, he then announced his 
retirement from competition to 
concentrate on coaching. Two 
others to announce their retire- 
ment are Dare Kilpin (100kg) 
and Keith Pea cbe (130kg), who 
both bowed oat in style with a 
bronze medal apiece. 

There is little doubt, though, 
that these Games wjQ be remem- 
bered for the impact made by 
Canada, with a finalist in every 
weight category and a total of 
nine out of 10 possible golds. 


Dickison survives 
his final gold test 


By Gordon Allan 


M 


New Zealand’s Ian 
Dickison. aged 34, 
won the men's sin- 
gold medal at 
Walgreen yes- 
terday when he 
beat Richard 
Corsie, aged 19, of Scotland, 21- 
12. It was, Dickison said, his 
most difficult match of the week 
both psychologically and 
technically. 

He is the second New Zea- 
lander to win the gold, the first 
being James Pirret at Auckland 
in 1950. With Peter Beilis 
having won the World 
Championship at Aberdeen two 
years ago. New Zealand now 
bold the world's two principal 
singles titles. 

Dickison began preparing five 
months ago. His Dunedin club, 
the Leith* put a specially treated 
green at his disposal so that he 
could become accusiomed to 
the heavy conditions expected 
in Edinburgh- He lost to David 
Bryant in the Masters Finals at 
Worthing in June but beat 
Bryant in a qualifying match, 
alter which he said — and Bryant 
agreed — that he was convinced 
he could win the gold medal in 
Edinburgh. 

Asked about a possible future 
as a professional, he said he 
would decide nothing until he 
had talked things over with bis 
wife. It was she who had made 


all the sacrifices to enable him to 
play in the Games. They have 
four children, including eleven- 
month-old twins. 

He said the first part of his 
match with Corsie was the best 
performance by two singles 
players in which be had ever 
been involved. After nine ends, 
Corsie led 6-5 but Dickison then 
scored two threes, the second of 
them fortuitously when Corsie 
knocked all his own woods out 
of the head with a drive. 

A four at the fourteenth end 
took Dickison into a 17-7 lead. 
Corsie, with a drive, saved 
himself at 20-10 on the nine- 
teenth, but could not do it again 
on the next Ian Scbuback 
(Australia) finished with the 
silver medal and Corsie the 
bronze. 

Wendy line (England) won 
the women's singles gold medal 
on shot difference. Her closest 
rival Senga McCrone (Scot- 
land), had to beat Joan Hum- 
phreys (Hong Kong) and Eileen 
Beil (N Ireland) to take the gold, 
but lost 21-11 to Mrs Hum- 
jjhreys and took the silver. Flora 
Anderson (Botswana) won the 
bronze. Wales beat Guernsey 
18-16 to win the men's fours — 
their first gold medal — the rink 
assured of a welcome in the 
valleys were Robert Weale, 
William Thomas, Haford 
Thomas and skip Jhn Morgan. 



record books will 
show England ex- 
celled themselves at Ingliston. 

For they not only surpassed 
ibeir remarkable achievement in 
the Brisbane Games when every 
member of the sine strong team 

came back with a medal bat a Iso „ 

increased their gold tally from difference and from the first bed 
two in those games to five, got stock into tnc tBglbn boxer 
p a«iqHa poshed (i»w into sec- cuffing him wtt a beautiful 
ond place with six. New Zealand right hand. Epton tried to get his 
took one gold medal Scotland left hand going but the lisle 
and Australia b ad three silver Canadian went to work inside 
each, Wales two. Northern Ire- the Englishman and belaboured 
land one w nd Swaziland one. him with both i hands forcing him 


Kevin Hickey, the England coa- 
ch, was delighted at his team's 
showing. “If we can keep this 
side together until the 1988 
Olympics it will be a great side** 
be said. 

But be was not sore how many 
he would lose to the pro- 
fessionals and it was not surpris- 
ing to bear him say that be was 
most displeased at the BBC 
using Terry Lawless, Britain's 
most saccessfnl professional 
manager, as a commentator, “f 
think it is most unfortunate that 
the BBC saw fit to ose Terry 
Lawless as a commentator at a 
major amateur event light years 
away from the harsh, commer- 
cial world of professional 
boxing" Hickey said. 

The men most likely to go to 
the professionals are Darren 
Dyer and Rod Douglas though 
they may not of coarse go to 
Lawless. Dyer is expected lo be 
signed by Mickey Duff, a match- 
maker mid a dose associate of 
Lawless. 

Dyer's contest with James 
MacaUister, of Scotland, lasted 
just one minute 22 seconds. The 
first solid right hand on 
McAllister's head split his left 
eyebrow. The referee* took 
McAllister over to the doctor 
who had no hesitation in stop- 
ping the bom, much to the 
disgust of the Scottish crowd 
wbo loudly cheered every move 
of McAllister, however trivial to 
the rafters. It was Dyer's tenth 
inside the distance win in eleven 
contests. 

Douglas, at middleweight, fig- 
ured in the most exciting contest 
of the night beating Jeff Har- 
ding, of Australia, on an nnani- 
mons decision. Douglas, 
scorning defence, went all out to 
swamp Harding with two 
handed hooks. The Australian 
became redder and redder in the 
face, swayed and sometimes 


to take standing counts in die 
second twice. 

This defeat however was 
quickly rectified as John Lyon at 
fly weight picked up his first 
Commonwealth Games gold by 

Moran receives 
timely bonus 

Jim Moran, of England, who 
last night added the Common- 
wealth Games light-heavy- 
weight gold medal to his aBa 
light-heavyweight title, has been 
named in a list of 65 British 
sportsmen and women 
representing nine sports who 
will receive grants totalling 
£68.000 under a Minct awards 
scheme. 

On hearing the news. Moran 
said This could not have come 
at a better time. I have been out 
of work since Christmas and 
this is the first time I have had 
any financial help with my 
boxing”. 

Two other England boxers at 
the Games arc also to receive 
grants. John Lyon, flyweight, 
and Sean Murphy, 
banta mweight. 

stopping Leonard Makhanya, of 
Swaziland. Lyon boxed smartly. 
He stood out of Che way of 
Makhanya's right ham! that 
knocked out Kerry Webber, of 
Wales. Lyon moved in and out 
with well-timed punches scoring 
with both hands and though is 
the second round Makhanya did 
catch the Englishman with two 
quick left hands Lyon shrugged 
them off and knocked him to the 
floor with a left. 

Sean Murphy gave England 
another gold when be stopped 
Roy Nash, of Northern Ireland, 
in the third round. Murphy 
never let Nash get his boxing 
going and floored him . 


Kelly takes his place 


-i v 

A 


Nigel Kelly, the 
Isle ofMan's main 
hope for a Games 
medal was well 
placed after the 
first two stages of 
the Skeet individ- 
ual shooting event at Kippen 
yesterday. Although appearing 
somewhat nervous under the 
pressure, Kelly, aged 22, 
dropped just one bfrd from a 
possible 50 to share the lead on 
147 with Brian GabrieL 


Just one hit behind the joint 
leaders stood John Woolley, oft 
New Zealand. Ian Marsden, of| 
Scotland, and England's Joe 
Neville, with Australia's Ian 
Hale two adrift 
In the centre fire pistol event 
at Musselburgh, Rex Hamilton, 
of New Zealand, held a one- 
point lead at the halfivay stage 
over the Australians, Phillip 
Maxwetl and Rod Hall and a 
two-point lead over Robert 
Northovec, of England. 


YESTERDAY'S RESULTS 




Marathon 

1 . L Martn (Aus) 2hr 26nuni 07 sec: 2. L 

Manor (NZ) 228.17; 3, 0 Lapterre (Can) 

2:31.4ft- 4, L Bussleras (Can)ft35.18: 5. L 
Irving (ScoU 23634: ftA Pam (Eng) 
23737: 7. G Penny pig) 238.47: ft M 
O'Neill (N lie) 2:42.29: 9. M O'Connor (NZ) 
2:46.43: 10. V Tftury (BoD 2:47.24; II. M 

Odd* (IOM) 239.05: J Gates (Eng) did not 

fetish. 

100 metres hurdles 

FMAL: 1.S Guinea (End) 1329sec: ft W* 
Jeal (Eng) 13.41 ; 3. G Nurm (Aus) 13.44; 4, 

J Rocheteau (Can) 13.46: 5. L Skeete 
(Eng) 13.06; 8. J RermrancjAus) 7, 
K Moriey (WaL) 1333; ft J Rodgera (N Ira) 
nn. 

High Jump 

FINAL: 1. C Stanton (Aus) 102m; 2. S 
McPeake (N be) 1.90: 3. j Boyle (N be) 
1.90: 4. D Davies (Eng) 1.90: 5. 6 BrU 
(Can) 1.88: ft T Pantar (NZ) 1.86: 7. J 
Bametson (Scot) 1.83; ft J unto (Eng) 
183: 9. V Browne (Aus) 1.83; 10. T 
McCunJy-Csmsron (Can) 1.80; 11, L 
Manning (Eng) 1.75: 11. J Tafeot (Aus) 
1.75; A Armstrong (Can) no height 
recorded. 

Long Jump 

FWALjl. J CHadapo (Eng) 6 43m; ft M 

Smtth (Can) 6.13; ft N Boegman (Aus) 
ftOft- 9. G Regan (WaT) ft^BbiraeS 
10. M MdJtan (Aus) sift n. L Spenst 
(Can) 5.60: 1ft L Campbell (Scot) ftfift 


BOWLS 


Men 

Singles 


R^jM ^Wal) bt K_ Bosley (HK) Z^-lft S 
Dickison 

CorsieM 


Ire) bt R Youtg (Mai) 21-15: I 
(NZ) bt R Corale (Sco) 21-12; 

0 LeMamuand(Jei) 2 J-ftE 8 pie 

bt (Mason 21-18; A Thomson (Ena) bt 
Scbuback 21-14; M David (BoD bt A 
waiace (Can) 21-14; HB bt La Marquand 
21-18. 

Pairs 

W Boettger and R Jones (Can) bt M B 
H4; S WBshira 


M W Hairing and D 
Adrdn and G 
and W Naim (NZ) 17-1 3: 

btJ. 


Hassan and DTso 

and L Pattons (Wa 

Broad WMft 

AStack aiwK^^dcks (Aus) bt J Jones 
and M Coutouty (Jm) 27-13; Hassan and 
Tso bt Symes aid Nsdm 23-20; Jow and 
Coutouiy bt J Thackray and R 
Mascaronhas (Bot) 20-17; WRsfera and 
Pwfcins bt R McCutchaon and D HamMon 
(N be) 19-18: Attain and Knox M Black 
and Henncks 27-14: D Want and C Ward 
I M M Nicatto and W Crawtord (Guar) 


BOXING 


Light-flyweight 

FINAL: S Otean (Can) bt M Epton (Eng), 
pis. 

Flyweight 

FUiAlj; J Lyon (Eng) bt L Maktamyn 
(Swaz). bo 2nd 

Bantamweight 

FINAL: S Mupfiy (Eng) bt R Nash (N be), 
rsc 3rd. 

Featherweight 

FMAU w Downey (Can) bt P English 
(Eng), rsc 1st 


WRESTLING 


100 kOograms 

FTTH AND sorm PLACES: W Robertson 
“ bt I WeirfN JreL 

1 AND FOURTH PLACES: D Kflpin 
) M G Toth (AuSL 
: C Davis (Caro bt R Algta (NZ). 

57 k Bograms 

FIFTH AMD StXW PLACES: P Kirby (Aus) 
bt P Fbnugte (Matta). 

TMHD Aral FOURTH PLACES: B Aspen 


BADMINTON 


Men 


Fours 

§n5)«! < vkl« fR ! w 
Thomas. H Thomas. J Morgan) 1ft Hong 
Kong 28. SwaaSand 19: Botswana 1ft 
En#nd (M Sa^w.J- Bo wden, J Hynes, p 
B rarAehq 31: ^ 21. AustraBa iftHong 
Kong 20. wales 14? New Zealand 2£ 
Scotland (G Robertson, M Graham . W 
Hardness. J Boyle) 17: Guernsey] Ift 
Swaaiand 1ft England 8*. Fqil7; Canada 
15. Austrafalft 


Knox Lightweight 

FINAL: Astf Dar (Can) M N Haddock (Wal), 
NO 1st- 

Light welterweight 

HNAL: H Gram (Can) bt D Ctonoe (Aus). 


Welterweight 

FMAL: D Dyer (Eng) bt J McAlister (Sco). 
rsc 1 st 

Light middleweight 

FINAL: D Sherry (Can) bt R Finch (Aral 

pa- 

Middleweight 

HNAL: R Douglas (Eng) bt J Harttng 
(Aus), pa. 

Light heavyweight 

FINAL- J Moran (Eng) bt H Lawson (Sco), 
pis. 


U M Ostberg (Can) bt S RaMteld 

(NZ). 

62 kOograms 

FIFTH AND SOCIH PLACES 8 RMar (Sco) 
bt M Bowman p beL 
THBD AND FWJHTH PLACES: S Bal(NZ) 
MG Beswick (Enjft. 

HNAL: P Hughes (Can) bt D Cununfng 
(Aus). 

52 kilograms 

THIRD AND FOURTH PLACES: N 
Donohue (Eng) M S Stannett (NZL 
FINAL: C woodcraft (Can) ht JMcAlary 
(Aus). 

90 kfrograms 

THIRD ANO FOURTH PLACES: G English 
(Sco) bt A Thompson (Aus). 

FMAL: N Loban (Eng) MD Cox (Can). • 

74 kilograms 

TWRD AND FOURTH PLACES: F Walker 


68 ktioorams 
TWRD AND FOURTH PLACES: S Cooper 
(End) bt C McKay (Soq). 

FINAL; D McKay (pan)HZ Ketevta (Aus). 

130 kflograms 

THUtD AND FOURTH PLACES: K Paache 
(Eng) bt □ Schaffer (Aus). 

Ml W Brlghtwed (Can) u A Patrick 
(Sco). 

46 kilograms 

R Moncur (Can) bt D 
Conduc&ig bout in group. No 
Medals daddad on group placings. 

82 kOograms 

FINAL: C Rinke (Can) bt W Koenig (Aus). 
u!gsneva.10TVnfiffiS_ 


TV TIMES ~1 


BBC 1: OftOO-ftlPpoK Athletics, eyeing. 
ft35pin-11.es; fflghlghts and reports 
from the fetal day's events 


KEY 


Auk Austrafia; Berne Bermuda; Bob 

Botswana; Cam Canada; Cam Cayman 

(stands: Cook: Cook (stands: En- 

gterwfc Fa de FaWand Istevte RyT-Gfe 

^rattar Gonr Guernsey; WfcHonokong; 
IOM: We of Mam Jm: Wlm 
Lesotho; Mnfc Malawi; Malta; NZ: New 

Zealand; Nk NortoSc Wands; H km 

Northern Ireland: Soot Scotland: 


fbtG Marsh (AusJ. 


FINAL; S Baddeley (Eng) bt Sa Yu (Aus) 
156. 15-8. Bronze medal ptay-offc N 
Yates (Eng) bt A White (Scot) 15-6. 15-10. 

Doubfea 

FINAL: B GWand and □ Travers (Scon 
M A Goooc and N Tier 154L 15-5 r 


Bronze medal play-off: K Hantson andG 
Siewan (NZ) bt M Scandolera and P Kong 
(Aus) 15-12, 15-11. 


Women 

Singles 

HNAL: H Trokfl (Eng) M F Stott 
4. 11-4. Bronze medal play-off: G 1 
(Big) WDJuben (Can) 11-3. n-3. 


4min 

a p 


.LMpopeHe 


oodties 

FMAL: G Clark and G Cowers (Eng) bt J 

Faferdeau and D Jufon (Can) 15ft, 15-7. 

Bronze medal ptay-otf: H Troka and F 

EBwtt (BW) bt C Sherpe and L Oogder 
(Cart) fs«l5-ii. 


Mixed doubles 
PINAL: M Scandoiera and A Tuckey 

(Aus) bt A Goods and F Efeott (Eng)1S-7. 

155. Bronze medal ptay-off: B GBtand 
and C Heavy (Scot) bt K Foote and l 
Cknitror (Can) 15-12. 17-14. 


Women 

Singles 

N Hunter (Can) MG Fahey (Aus12lJ2; A 
— T WP La Tsstef (Goer) 21 -3; J 
| bt S McCrone (Sco) 21- 

r ^ bt E Bail (BCr) F 

Anderson »oq bt M uwrOn (ra) 21-12: S 
McCrone (Sco) M E Bel (w) 21ft: G 
Fahey (Au^ bt P Le Ussier (Guer) 21-& 

Pairs 

M Smith and J N)eq5a (Gu«) M JAcM and 

andM Pomeroy (Wefl 20-17; DMacey and 

A Dunsalf (Cart bt H Ppehon and B 
Godfrey (Aus) 29-12: E Thomas end M 
Green IBM) bt R McMahon aid S Zatoshe 

am N MumoflandfSco) bt J Osborne and 

M Khan (NZ) 22-20. 

Fours 

Botswana 13. F? 19: a«nsw.|F 

zS m§' 24. wSBwrtiSj% Mgafi- 

h Hamtion. M Mafon. N MtoMift 
Swamand 10, New Zeal and 33; Sc oteid 
(S Gourtay. A Evans. J Mandra. F Whito) 

Si.- Northern Ireland 14: Canada 15. 

Austratai?: FS 15. Wales 18: Hong Kfing 
19. Australia 1«. 


rman (Engl . 
193: 7, J Farrefl 


Heavyweight 

FMAL: J Peau (NJJ bt D Young (Sco). ko 
3rd. 

Super-heavyweight 

FMAL: L Lewis (Can) bt A Evans (Wal), rsc 

2nd. 


SHOOTING 


Shotgun Skeet Individual 

■FINAL: 1. N Kelly aOM)19Us;2,JNevae 

(Eng) 195 [alter ahoot-Offt3, B Gabriel 

■■ 

l^ftTounlop 
(Sem 190; 9, D Kwesnyda (Can) 1B0; if, 
B Thompson (N be) ira; ii. r Hate (Aus) 
188; 12. A McKeown OOM) 186: 13. A 
OfetefAus) 18ft 14, SBretwte (Guer) 185: 

vStaasmwt 

W 182: ift P Hung Stq 181; 2ft s 
(tkierj 180: 21. P Woodward fell) 
141; 2ft B Vercoe (M) withdrew. 

Centre Rre Pistol Individual 

FMAU 1. R Northover (Eng) 583pts: ft P 
Adams (Aus) 58ft 3. R Han (Aus) 580: 4, 
R Hamfcon (NZ) 579: 5. M (Eng) 
577; 6. B 0'NneJNZ)577; 7. S FtarMm 
Seag 575: B, J Toftan (Scad 57S: 9. K 
§aniwd(N Ira) 57ft iaDNa5i(VVaD 571; 
11 , &B»rtU (HQ571; ifts AmoWjCan) 
ssa 13. S MlteheS (WaD567; 14. P Mason 
(IOU) SfiO: 15. S EariepOM) 53ft 


England cyclists have 
little to shout about 


Home cydisis will cot look 
back too kindly on the track 
events at the Commonwealth 
Games in Edinburgh, and not 
just because of the miserable 

weather. England won a silver 

through Colin Soirgess, aged 17, 
of Leicester, in the 4,000 metres 
individual pursuit early in the 

week and a bronze in the 4,000 

metres team pursuit on Thurs- 
day, Scotland won a bronze 
through Eddie Alexander, of 
Inverness, in the sprint. 

Three medals from the 
United Kingdom is not too 
much to shout about when 
compared to . the brilliant 
Australian team wbo made a 

clean sweep of all five track gold 

medals and threw in a silver and 


bronze as well Three of their 
live golds were won yesterday 
when Gary Neiwand, who is 19. 
won the .sprint; Wayne 
McCarney snatched the 10 mile, 
championship and they easily 

took the 4.000 metres team 
pursuit title. 

But irrespective of tfie results 
one foot was dear. Never again 
should track events be staged in 
a velodrome without a roof The 
cydbu spent more time dodg- 

ing in and out of the rain than w 
riding round the 250 metres 
•track. It made a mockery of 
much of the proceedings, 
though the Australians, for one. 
will not be complaining. Five 

golds can brighten even the 

darkest day. 


REGfONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS^ 


Continued from facing page 

SATURDAY 


BBC1 WALEftft20pn>-ft2S 

sports New* Wales. SCOT- 
LAND. &20m-&25 Sconab News 
end Sport NORTHBM IRELAND. 
5JtODmftL2S Northern Ireland News 
and Sport ENGLAND. 540pm-545 Lon- 
don— Cartoon South-West — Spot- 
light Sport end News. All otter English 
regions - Regional Nows Bid Sport. 

channel 

Terrabawla 2J0pin-3g00 Survtral of 
the Fittest 11 JO 20 Years On 12.15m 
Mog 12A5 1 Hear the EUuas 1 JO 
Closedown. 


On 12.15am Mog 12A5 1 Haw the Blues 
IJOan Conpeny. Closedown 
HTVWEST ^tondgnjnc- 
_ cent lljoan-lftoa 

Terrehawks 1 JWpm-ioo Font- The 
Jokers iftOO New SqusdronairBS 
1240am Closedown. 

HTV WALESNo mtationAI pro- 
grammes are ttw seme ss HTV West 

CENTRAL 


Trarahawks l-OOpoKLOO Film; Anrio 
ft05 Return » Treesure Island ftOOftJO 
Gnmbteweeds IftOO Rbn: Cuba 
Ooseteg 1 Mem JobfMer 2A0 
Ctoaedown. 


Tteebugs 1 jnpet-GJIO FBnu 
DJafnonds.12.45na At the End of the 

Day. Closedown. 

^sgiEffj asasssu. 


jgjiifaaiii i Maas 

Traabneni 530 Chart Show 6.16 

SpM g«A7 j» rat Curran 7.35 

Bodglell^^reThe Night Has 

Eyes 12 55— Closedown. 


GRANA DA As London ax- 

jaaaatawa^''*' 

Clos e down. 

YORKSHIRE Lo ndon «- 

mOam- 

Cncket 


1.15 FsJjGuy ftlOftjn Cn5wt S3s r». 

brni to TVvasura Island 6 JUftJi 
TYNE TEES London es- 

* ^T" 1100 

sawe* 

Poetry of the People. 

SCOTTISH '^*- . 

GRAMPIAN A» London ex- 

saaaSg-” 


SUNDAY 


BBCl wales. — , 

Hymns of Wa 


JJ«N»w.scqnjuia n^oam- 


•7.15 
IftpOtan- 

IPS®-- 


CHANNEL ^London BMMnr 



3-55-4.00 News 11.05 Fife Ufa 11 J5 
Mann's 8est Fnends i2JHem Company- 
Oosedown. 

HTV WEST AALowtenex- 

" FtWJ.. cept SL2Sein Max Tha 
Mouse 9JS-1IL00 Robostory 1 JJOpn 
Gardening Tone iJOCatdoma Highways , 
200 FrtrmWMe Feather 400 Thais 
My Boy 400 CaropbeBs 500 Survival 
Special BOOftOO ABKm Market 
7AS-IL40 Crazy Like a Fox 1105 Battle 
for Superspy IftOSam Ctoseoowa 

HTV WALES SSSTSnr : 

200 Play 8 Safe. 

906-1000 Jayce and the Wheeled 
Wamars lOQpra Gardenmg Tone L30 
Film; True Grit 250 Blowhard A00 
Mind Your Language A30 CampbeAs 
500 Survival Special 600-&30AW- 
on Market 7A5-8.40 Crazy LAaa Fra 
1105 Cnmo ln& IftOSeni Jabfmder 
105 Closedown. 

ANGLIA As Landon "“te* 

iraivvii.iiw gjqam.1000 First Suvfey 
100pm Bevertv HBbAes 105 
Weather 100 Farming Diaiy 200 By- 
gones 200 FUnc League of Gentle- 
men 400 Campbeita 500-500 AHon 
Market 11-05 New Avengers 
1205am And That’s the Gospel Truth. 
Closedown. 

BORDER As London except 

SOSara Qantfantng Tane 
905-1000 Border Diary lOOpm 
Farming Outlook 100 Whakets and Wflf 
Nosee ftOO Love Boat 300 Gttnness 
Book of Records 400 Look Who's Tah- 
teg 400 CampbaBs 500 Survival 
Special 600-800 Albion Market 7.45- 
ft40 Crazy Like A Fox 1105 Johnny 
Cash in San Quentm 1200 CtasedoWi. 

S4C SQrts: lOOQtn Oedfa'r Bora 
11.15 Close 205pm Gordenan' 
Calendar ft30 Up and Coining 300 
FttwTheNii 

4.45 South i 


Inin my Number CSme lip 
Atnca Decfatan Hme 
5.15 Mmd of David Berates 600 Polo 
700 Newyddton 700 Ffanffer 800 Y 
Cawr O Rydcymerau 900 TwflWS Zone 
1000 American Foomafi IftOO W 
light Zone 1ft30an Ctoaedown. 

TSW ^ London except ft2Sem- 
iSSi 1000 UnklTSLook and Sea 
1100 South West Week 11.55-1200 
Fpstsamt Diary 100 Scarecrow and Ms 
»ng 200 Whose Baby? 200 The 
Duke Live On - John Wayne 300400 
Now You See It 400 Gardena for All 
500 Survival Special SOOftOO Albion 
Mattel 7.46-ft*) Crazy Like a Fox 
1105 Duck Factory lioo TheTs Holly- 
wood 1105 Postscript Ctoaedown. 

YORKSHIRE {gESSo* 

uratllOOHeasons IL^IftOO 
FarmfngOiary lOOpm The Baron ftOO 
Srng to the Lord 200 Ffeit A King'a 
story A15 Smurfs 400 CanvbeSs 500 
Survival Spedal 800-600 AUon 
Jterkat 7*4L40 Crazy bke a Fox 11 
Ouatermass Experanent 1ft35em 
Five Minutes. Closedown. 

GRANADA 

Jtajgaftao-lftOOoSSwrtFaitffe 

12-59 Seasons HOS Aap Kaa Hak 1100- 
«O0 This is Your Right lOOpm 
Small Wonder 105 F& C& 3.45 
CMipb^4O0 Cricket 500 Aibton 
Market 600-600 Cricket 7.15 Survival 
S0eaaJ8.1Oft40 Winner Takes Al 

nWETEESjjagag 1 ^ 


Anon 
Llket Fox 


■*** HQton 

fcsstssMar’ 

ftOOSurmral Special 60 C 

SCOTTI SH London ev- 

^ - cm. ftftSara Foo too 

s^Fartnmg Outlook 1000-1100 

7ABftOOO*zy Like ■ FW 

'lSL5i5S»SJ t ' r * Und ''“ 

aasssaap^ 

ULSTER As London except . 

Mnrf iiL_- ui_ - L Smt> IftOOem-llOO 

^saaasjsss 






w / 




THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


31 





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•vy. 


Saturday 


Weekend televisioa and radio programmes 
Edited by Peter Dear and Peter DavaDe 


Sunday 


BBC 1 


7,10 Open IMvsrafty. Until 


850 TheF fcmton— . Cartoon 
series about a modem. 
Stone Age famHy. 

940 Grandstand Introduced by 
Desmond Lynam. The final 
day’s covwaaa erthe 
Commonwealth 

t with a review of the 
tof the Games so' 
far. Then, 1250 Men’s 
javelin; 1245 The triple 
jump; 1250 new* 
summary and weather. 
1.00 women’s 1500m; 

1.05 Men’s shot; 1^0 
Women’s 4x1 00m 
145 Men's 4x1 00m 
.135 Men’s 1500m; 235 
Women's 4x400m 
3.05Men -84x400m 

Pius, the 100 ptiee road 
cycling race. And Racing 
from Goodwoo d . The 
2.15, 245 and 335 races. 
5.10 Now* wtth Richard 

Whitmore. Weather 550 
Cartoon. 

53$ How to Shoot Steffca. The 

skill of Ron and Val Taylor, 
Austrafian divers and flm- 

- malws who shot the ■ 
famous dose-ups for the 
flm.Jawa.Ttia narrator k 
fan Holm. (4 

530 ’nwDulwoof HaxsanL 
Boss Hogo <fiseovers that 
the Duke farm was signed 
overto Ms ancestors n 
1 872 and promptly evicts 
' Unde Jesse and the rest 
of the family. When 
packing to feave Jesse 
discovers an otd tSary. 

6.35 Sony! A jobbing 

gardener’s gossip leads to 
suspicion and jealousy, 
something of which a 42 t 
year-oM bachelor should 
notbe a part Starring 
Ronnie Corbett and 
Barbara Lott M (Ceefax) 
735 Rim: The Zany ‘ 
Adventures of Robin 
Hood (1984) starring 
George Segal, Morgan 
FairdSd. Robert Hardy 
and Roy Kinnear.The 
traditional opening and 
ending to the weiHoved 
adventure but In between, 

' when Robin Is fighting 
King John, raising the 
ransom lor King Richard, 
and winning the hand of 
the fair MaH Marion, the 
tale takes adWerent 

complexion. Directed by 
Ray Austin. (Ceefax) 

8.40 The Bob Monkhouae 
Show. The entertainer's 
guests are comedian 
Frankie Howard, and 
Sandra Bemtard, the 
American actress who 
starred in the hit flbn. King 
of Comedy, (r) 

&20 News end si 


.With 


I sport. W 
Richard Whitmore. ' 
Weather. 

935 Xlii Co m mo nwe a l th 
Games. Desmond Lynam 
reviews the hightights of 
• the Games and the dosing 
ceremony. (Ceefax) 

1135 Heart Beat 8S. Highlights , 
of a day-long concartneld 
at the National Exhibition 
Centre in aid of 
Birmingham's Children's 
Hospital. Among those 
appearing are The Moody 
Blues, Hobart Plant. The - 
- • FortunesrTffrAftti^aawr 
UB40 and George 
Harrison. Presented by 
Jasper Carrott Pater 
PoweB and Jim Davidson. 
135 Weather. 


TV-AM 


nmgBritem 
seated by Richard 

i. Weather at 638; 
b with Geoff Meade ^ 
730; regional report at 
7.06; and sport at 7.10. 

730 The Wide Awake Ctufa. 

' Tocfay's guests include 
comediennes. The 
Flaming Hamsters. Plus, a 
news special at 930. 


ITV/LONDON 


935 Get RmM in Whitehaven 
Harbour, Cumbria. 1130 
Wake Up London. With 
the Vicious Boys. 

1230 News with Trevor 
McDonald 1235 
Wresting. TWo bouts 
from BuxtonPavHton. 

130 FtofcBlomfle Brings Up 
Baby (1939) starring 
Penny Singleton and 
Arthur Lake. More comic 
- adventures mvotvtng the 


famBy. Directed by Frank 

R Strayer. 

230 That's Bfy Boy.Gomedy 

. • series starring Motile 
SugderL 0)330 
CMst^herCohanbua. 
Episode two of the . 

. adventure serial 1 based on 
the fife of the celebrated 
ttalansalor. 445 Watt 
* Dieney Presents. Baggage 
Buster. 

530 News. 

$35 The Gnimbteweecfs . 
Show. Comedy sketches 
and impersonations. 

535 John Saver's Return to 
T^MSure isteid. Long - 
John lands on the pirate- 
held island of Macnado. 

630 And There’s Mom 
Cricket Comedy with 
Jimmy Cricket 

730 We Love TV presented by 
Gloria Hunmmd. 

730 Sun w neirtkne- S pe cl ai.- 
Vartety show presented by 
Michael Barrymore. 
Among those on the bfll 
are Stan Boardraan and 
Su Pollard. 

830 AH 8ter Secrete, 

■■ introduced by Michael 
■ pBridnson.(OrBete) 

930 Newsand sport. 

9.15 FUncOnfinary People 
' Dw*d 


srfandarid Mary Tyfer 
Moore. The story of the 
Jarrette, an upper 
mkktaclass American 
family, who are shattered 
by the death of their eldest 
■on in a oritto accident 
Conrad, the dead son's 
younger brother wtto lived 
kt his shadow, is plagued 
with gult for not being able 
to save his brother’s fife, 
and Ms mother cannot 
. cope with the toss of the 
apple of her eye. The film 
marked the- directorial 
debut of Robert Redford. 
(Oracle) 

1135 Mog. Comedy adventures 


1230 


of a petty crook. 
LWTNew 


News headfines 
foHawedby20YearsOn. 
David Frost and his 
guests, Mary Whitehousa. 
Molly Parkin and Hunter 
Davis, discuss how Ufa 
has changed since the 
SwkwfngSixfies. 

IZSOr New From London. The 
f Sbu k wThun dert x rds ki 


concert. 

136 Greet Western. In praise 
• . of tiieGreat Western 
Railway. 

245 Night Thoughts. 



James Cagney and O&via 4c Havffiand: The Strawbcny Blende, oa 
ChamKl 43t-245pm 


BBC 2 


730 Open University. Until 

230 The Ctoekmaksr. An 


of 


Burgess. 

Z2S Fftn: The Chapfin Revue- 

• (1958)Aconiptationof 
two of the comedian's 
best stem films beginning 

■ with Shoulder Arms, an 
anti-war ffon made in 1916, 
in wWch he plays a First 
World War reendt 
dreaming of the dai 
to come; then, The 
a film made tn 1923 In 
which he took the part of 
an escaped prisoner who 
■ becomes a man of religion 
in a matter of hours. 

345 Laramie, (r) 

435 The Sky at Night Patrick 
Moore talks to Dr Paul 
Murcfin about the 
supernova discovered 
intne Centaurus A galaxy. 

435 Cfty Lights* (1931) 

starring and directed by - 
Charlie Chaplin. A 
romantic comedy about a 
trantoi a blind girl, and an 
eccentric mllionaire. 

630 World Chess Report. 
H^Wghts of the first 
week’s games in the 
return series between 

- Karpov and Kasparov. 

7.10 NewsView. The day's 
news and sport the - 
week's news in pictures 
with subtitles. Weather. 

730 ZUbin Mehta Masterclass. 

- The celebrated conductor 
casts a critical eye over 
five wo ufd-be conductors 
as they each wield their 

baton ewer the Israel. 

' Philharmonic Orchestra In 
the opening movement of 

• Mozart's ‘Prague’ 


840 


Symphony, (r 

FHm: Shane 


Shane (1953) ' 
Alan Ladd. A 
dassichomesteadefs v 
cattlemen drama with 
Ladd piling the title role, 
that or a mysterious 

with a past who is 
into the conflict 
Directed by George 
Stevens. 

1030 Helen. A drama, starring 
Ian Holm as a wealthy 
businessman who is 
obssessed by a' beautiful 
woman who refuses to 
(r 


1135 FHni: Jennifer { 

starring Lisa Pel Bran. A 
horror movie about a 
hfflbifyscftoolgfriwho 
uses her strange powers 

to wreak revenge on her 
’ snobby schoolmates who 
are making her life hei. 

. Directed by Brice Mack. 
Ends at 1240. 


CHANNEL 4 


1.15 Channel 4 Racing 

N e wm ar ket The 130 

2.00 and 230 races. 

245 Fine The 
Blonde* (1941) 

James Cagney, 
drama about a man who 
woos and tosesa - 

- strawberry blonde and 
marries someone else on 
the rebound. Directed by 

Raoul Walsh. 

435 FBm: Phoney Express* 
(1943) starring the Three 
-Stooges as patent 
medicine peoars mistaken 
for detectives. Directed by 
Dei Lord. 

445 Family Circus. A Mr 
Magoo cartoon. 

530 Brookside. (rKOrade) 
.'630 Right to Reply. Tbe Jimmy 
: Young Television 
Program me with Norman 
T abort was nothing 

than a party political 
/ broadcast tor the Tories, 
say critics. The 
programme's producer, 
Panina Ranee, defends. 
630 South Africa -Shotting 
the Door. Tim Cooper . 
investigates the problems 
that would be faced by 
Commonwealth countries 
if they imposed sanctions 
on South Africa. 

730 News summary and 
weather followed byThe 
Son* of Abraham. The 

- story of the Haskfim. 

730 And the Beat Goee On. A 

in the life of I 


i more 


ilnfivei 
parts of the country. . 
■30 New ha rt. American 

domestic comedy series. 
930 The Organization. Drama 
series set in the pubic 
relations department of a 
large organization, (r) 

1030 H£ Street Bhiee. Captain 
Furiflo does not refian the 
thought of fecteg an open 
meeting packed* with local 
commtmlty members 
. protesting over the death 
of a man found dead in his 
ceH.(Orade) 

1130 FBnt: Come F9 the Cup* 
(1951) starring James 
Cagney as a reporter who 
loses his job through 
excessive drinking. When 
his friend who helps him 

kick the habit is murdered, 

the reporter goes on the 

traiof the kifer. Directed 
by Gordon Douglas. 

135 FfincTwo Men and a 
Wardrobe* (1959) Roman 
- " PolanM's first fikn.Tnade 
as a students' exercise at . 
the Polish Flm High School 
about two workmen .* 

- carrying a large piece of 
furniture. Ends at 130. 


FREQUENCIES: 
923; Ratio 4; 
1458KHz/206m: 



Ratio 2i 6S3kHz/433m; 909kHz/330m; Ratio 3: 1215kHz/247m:VHF-90- 
— rrc VHF 973; Capttak 1546kHz/194m: VHF953; BBC Radio London: 


C Radio 4 ) . 

On long wave. VHF variations at and 
535. Shipping. 830 News briefing. 

6.10 Prelude (s) 

630 News; Farmlrg 850 
Prayer 835 weather 
Travel 

730 News. 7.10 Today's 
. Papers. 7.15 On Your 
Farm. 745 In Perspective 
(with Gerald Priesttand) 

730 Down to Earth 735 
weather Travel 
830 News 0.10 Today’s 
Papers B.15 Sport on 4. 
Presented by Tony Adamson 
from Ednburgh on the 
final day of the 
Commonwealth Games. 

837 Weather Travel 
930 News 

935 I'm Sony. > Haven't a 
CtuelL Panel game 

chaired by Humphrey 
Lyttelton. ■ 

93S A Sideways Look 

At ... by Anthony Smith. 

930 News Stand. Martin 
Wainwright reviews the 


1035 The 

Westminster, with 

Robert Carvel of the London 

Standard. 

1030 Loose Ends with Ned * 
Sherrin and guests. 

1130 From Our Own 

Correspondent Ufa and 
politics abroad. 

1230 News; A Small Country 
Living (new series) 
presented by Jeanine 
McMullen 

1237 The News' Quiz (s). 1235 
Weather 
i.oo News 

1.10 Devon Journeys. Tom 
Salmon explores the 
island of Lundy (s) 135 


230 News: The Afternoon 
Play. Conffict of Doves, 
by David Buck. Dramatic 
‘ comedy about HWer and 
Co araf the 1935 Olympics In 
Berlin. With John Castle 
as Hitler end Cheryl 
CampbeUss Lent . 
Rwfenstahf (i)(s) (r)(s) 

330 NevncTraval; 
international - 
Assignment BBC 

correspondents report 
430 Tbs Saturday Feature: 
CtvUisatfon, Intsffl g en t 
Seeks Similar ... Peter 
Evans reports on the 
science behind The Search 
for Extra-Terrestrial 
InteSgence. 

445 in Keeping With 
Traition. Keith Alton 
meets Ann Dunn, a level- 
crossing keeper m 

Northwnbariand. 

530 The Living World. Derek 
Jones Bxpkxes Thome 
Moon inYotteNre. 

535 Week Entflng. Satirical 
review. ! 

535Wfl 

630 News: Sports Round-up 
635 Stopthe Week with 
Robert Robinson (s) 

730 Satuntev-Nloht Theatre. 


. .WflhShawv 

m 8RL 

Ironside’s A Very Private 
enterprise, read by Lewis 
FtondsrCBL 938 Waether 
1030 News 

10.15 Evening Service Mr 
1030 The Good Book- Brian 
Redhead continues Ns 
exploration of the BH*. 
1130 Science Now. With Peter 


Evans. - 

1130 Dont Stop Now- IT* 
Fundstion. Comedy 
• cabaret (s) 

s; Weather. 1233 


W 


1230 News 

<^r^^e in Engtand and 
S Watos only) as above 
except &»<30am Weather; 
ThweL 430-830 Options 
430 Ray Goelfng Gets a Taste 
Of . Ykfcish 430 Not 
Another Diet Pro^amate 530 
Modem European 
Authors (Robert MusQ 530 
Back on Course. 

( Radio 3 

On medkxn wave. VHF variations at 
end 

638 Weather. 730 News . . 

735 Aubede: Goldmark 
(Sakuntaia overture). 

Liszt (Hungarian Rhapsody 
No 12; Botet. pteno). 

to UszQ, Haytte 


I by Dittrich). 
Brahms (Piano Quartet 
No 1, witt GHefe. piano), 
Dohnanyi (Fhxafe 
hungaricaj. 930 News 
935 Stereo Roeese: Haydn 
(Trio In D. H X197), 

Mozart (Ptano Concerto 
• No 19: l‘ 

Bgson,r 
Baroque 1 
Bruckner (Symphony No 1) 
10.40 French Flute and Piano 
Music: James 
Dower/John Lenehan. • 
Damase (Sona» en 
oonent Op 17), Ptere 
" 36), Gen in 
Lin) 

1135 PMadctohia (under 
Muti), wrtt Malcolm 
Frager (piano)- Haydn 
. (Symphony No 43). 

Weber (Piano Concerto No 
21. Prokofiev (SlnfonJetta, 
Op 5/48), Liszt 

Hurvwnschlacht 
gg nphon to poem). 130 

135 My ctiBdhood: Michael 
Deacon reads from Cart 
Nietean'smemoirs (1) 

130 Oer RosenkavaMer 
Strauss'sthraMct 
opera, sung in German. 
Kleiber conducts Vienna 


State Opera Chorus and 
Vienna TO. Cast includes 
JurinacH Reining, Weber. 
Poell. Hetfwig, and Petar 
Klein. Act two at 240, and 
act three at 930 
530 Jazz Record Requests: 

with Pater Clayton 
545 A Study in 'Evolution: a . 
report by CoHn Tudge on 
the Taung Diamond Jublee 

830 Ck^an music 

umsopmr rwncx 
rtays Uszfs Fantasia and 
Fugue on the chorale Ad 
nos. ad salutaram undam 
730 Chandos Baroque 
Players: trivaid works 
findoding Sonata to A minor, 
RV 86 and Concerto to 0, 
RV94; and Bolamortier's 
Sonata in A minor. Op 37 
No 5 


730 Proms 86: Bournemouth 
SO (under Rudolf 
BanhaQ. with Pater 
• Donohoe (piano). Part ■ 
. one. Tchaikovsky (Piano 
Concerto No 2) 


8.15 My dear Muscovite: 

Robert Stephnts as 
Fteubert and Stephen Moore 
- as Turgenev in extracts 
from their correspondence 


935 Proms 88 (confrft 

Stravinsky (The Firebird) 


930 Haydn: Salomon String 
**■ — Quartets in 


10.10 


lat. Op 71 
dor. Op 71 


No 2 


i)., 

Hardenberger 

(trumpet). Musgrave 
(Variations). Bktwfstle 
(Grtmethorpe Aria). 

SansomT 


trumpet, brass band), 
Michael Blake Watkins 
(Aubade) 

11.15 A Conversation about 

Sconce: Peter Quigley 
' reads the story by John 
Cameron Bixnslae 
1135 The Jazz Pianist: 

Chari as Fox presents 
recordings by John Taylor, 
including his May Day, 
and February daze. 1137 



nwrife ChapUn, Virginia Chenill: City Lights, BBC 2, 4^5 


News. 1230 Cto e a d cown 
VHF variations: 

535 Open University. Untl 
635. Managwnemand 
tteschooL 

( Radio 2 ) 

On medkan Wave. See Redo 1 
for VHF variations 
News on the hour untl 
1-OOpnMhen 330.030, 730 and 
houny from 1030. 

Commonwealth Games reports at 
83am. 932. 1032. 1132, 

1232pm. Sports Desk 1032pm. 
Crickat Scoreboard 730pm 
430am Dave Bussey 630 
Steve Truakrve 835 Davki Jacobs 
1030 Sounds of the 60s 1130 
Album Time (with Peter Clayton) 
I30pra Huddwinks (starring 
Roy Hudd). 130 Commonwealth 
Gvnes SpectoL The final day's 
events. Pius CricketfDerbyshire v 
New Zealand) Racing from 
Goodwood, and Golf (Scandinavian 
Open) 630 Gloria Hunnlford 
presents TWo’s Best 730 Three to 
a Row 730 Gaia Concert BBC 
Concert Orchestra, with soloists 
including Nigel Kennedy aand 
the Hot String CM) 930 String 
Sound 1030 Martin Ketoer 
1235am Night Owls 130 Steve ' 
Madden presents Nightrida 
330-430 A Littie NJgnt Must 

C Radiol j 

On medium Wave. VHF 

variatkxaatend 

News on the half-hour untfl 


Poweti 1030 Dave Lee Travis 
1.00pm Adrian Juste 230 Ratfio 
Racao 0) Alan Freeman 330 The 
American Chart Show 530 


630 In 
Simon 


Concert (Madness) 730 
Mayo *30-1230 The 
ht Runners Show with 


Dbda Peach, featuring Frankie 
MIBer. VHF Stereo Radios 14 
2 430am As Ratfio 2 130pm As 
radio 1. 730-430am As Radio 
2 


WORLD SERVICE 


630 Newsdesk. 630 Meridian.- 730 

News. 739 Twenty Four Hours. 730 Rtooi 

the Weekfies. 735 Soortwwrid. 630 

News. B39 Reflections. 615 A JoBy Good 

Show. 930 News. 939 Review oTBrttsh 

Press. 9.15 World Todey. 830 PktencW 
News. 940 Lock Ahead. 945 Ahout 

Britain. 1030 Nam. 1431 Here's Humph) 

10.15 Lenar From America. 1130 Maws. 

1139 News About Britain. 1115 Tenor 

and Baritone. 1130 Meridan. 1230 Radto 

NewsmeL 12.15 Arwthing Goes. 1246 

Soons Roundup. 130 News. 139 TVnnty 
Four Hours. 130 Setuntey Spedal (Com- 
monwealm Games). 2JN) News. 231 
Siturdey SpedaL&OO Rado Newsrert 

3.15 Saturday SpedaL 430 News. 431 

Consnemani: 4.15 Satuntey SpecaL 5^ 

Sports fkxmdup. *30 Naws. 939 Twanfr 
Fow Hours. 830 Jazz For The Asldna. 

"iWhers 


1080 


980 News. 931 Sponsworid. 815 ' 

New. 930 The Junior Mrsaer. 

News. 1809 From Our Own 

dent 1830 New Idees. 1040 1 _. 

1045 Sports ftoundup. 1130 Maws. 1139 
Commentary. 11. 15 A Perfect Spy. 1130 1 
BeSeve ht Yesterday. 1230 News. 1239 
News About Britain. 12.15 Redto Newer 

raeL 1230 Pray of the week (The 

Adventures of On Ingenious Gartfaman 

Don Quixote da lx Mancha). 230 Naws. 

9 Review at British Press. 2.15 
sponsworid. 230 Aftum Tima. 200 

News- sea News About Britain, us Rom 

our own CtXTBsponosm. 4LAS ReSoesiom. 

440 Rnancal flaw**. 580 News. 888 

Twenty Four Hours. 545 Lenar From 

Amarica. AS times in (H4T. 


Regional TV; on facing page 


BBC 1 


645 Opwi Unhwsity. Until 


845 pipy School (r)9.i5 

Knock Knock. Songs and 

. stories for children on the 
theme of taking risks to 
help others. (r)9-30 This to 
the Dtp. A simple rafigiou& 
» service from a viewers 

home to Malda Vale, 
London. 

1000 Atian Msgazkw. A 

selection of music from 
previous pr o mammes in 
the series 1IL30 The Great 
■ Palace: The Story of 
Parliament Part six. 
(Ceefax) 11.20 Camea 
The wildlife of the East 
African lakes. (0 11.30 
Seabrook's Yeer. SeF' 
lambs at Bury St I 
market (r) lloo Cvteoo. 
12.1.0 See Heart Magazine 
programme for the ■■ 

nearing ImpakBct (r) 12JS 
Fermtog. Reports from the 
Game Fair at Harewood 
- House, Leeds; and Sheep 
’88 at the Three Counties 

Showground, Malvern. 

1Z58 Weather. 

1.00 News headfines 1JK» 

Bonanza. Ben gives Jamie 
a lesson in growing tp. (0 
1_55 Cartowi 2.0 0 
EastEndecm. (rXCeefax) 
X00 Farm Edward, My Son* 


- and Spencer Tracy. A 
drama about a man's 
ruthless ambition ruining a 
happy marriage. Based on 
a play by Robert Mortey 
and directed by George 
Cukor. 450 Cartoon. 

5.00 Great Railway Journeys 

of the World. Michael 
Frayn on a train tourney 
from Sydney to Perth, (r) 
(Ceefax) 

6j 00 W5d Britain. Young swifts 
Hmber-up for three years 
of continuous fight a 
bteTibie bee's nest is spied 
upon; and a balloon ffight 
■ across The Wash.to 
observe the sates. 

6J0 News with Richard 
Whitmore. Weather. 

640 Home on Sunday. Cfiff- 
Michefenora visits the 
Border country home of 

novefist Catherine 
Cookson. (Ceetex)^ 

Darren I 

Robert Vaughn, and 
Pamela BeNwood. Sdenee 
fiction adventure about a 
supposed UFO that 
.crashes in the Arizona 
desert and hidden to an 
abandoned Air Force base 
to Texas. Two astronauts 
who were witness to the 
event have to be I 


7.15 


quiet at any cost Directed 
byJamasLi 


by James L Conway. 

8J0 News with Richard 
Whitmore. Weather. 

9l 05 Play: The Queen’s Aims, 
by Alan Berrie. Spring 
1 982, and the Falkland^ 
confBct looms. How wil it 
effect ex-paratrooper 
Sam, the landlord of a run- 
down pub who prefers to 
drown his problems to 
drink rather than face 
them?. Starring Robert 
Urquhart Dermot Crowley 
and Linda Martowe. 
(Ceefax) 

1(L20 Choices. Why have 

chtldren? is ascussed by 
Juia Neuberger, SMrtey 
Wiliams, Mgr Michael ■ 
Connelly, Valerie Riches, 
and Simon Salzedo. 

1130 Favourite Wteks. Bil 

Oddte goes on a bird wtek 
on Fair late, (r) 

11^5 Motorc ycl ng. The 1986 
Shed Oils British 
Motorcyfe Grand Prix from 
SUverstone. 

12.00 Weathec. 


TV AM 


5.55 Good Morning Britain 
bwins wtth 'A Thought for 
a Sunday' 7.00 Are You 
Awake Yet?; 7.25 WAC 
Extra includes a report on 
the Duke of Edinburgh's 
Award Scheme. 

830 Kefey On Stmdsy (nefodes 
news at 832 and 930; a 
review of the morning 
newspapers; and. among 
the guests, irv Kupdnet, a 
Chicago cftat-«how hote. 


ITV/LONDON 


825 Waft Dimey Presents 845 
Woody and Friends. 
Cartoons, (f) 945 Roger 
Ramjet Cartoon, (r) 

1800 Morning Worship. Mass 
from the Shrewsbury 
Roman Catholic Cathedral 
of Our Lady Help of 
Christians. (Oracle) 11.00 
Link. Salty Robertson of 
. the Disability Alliance with 
advice on the uprated 
dteabtfty benefits 11 JO 
PaulSieghart 
Men, Ted 
and Richard 

Soratt.it they befieve we 

havea free wffl. 

1800 Our Bomb: The Secret 
Story. The first of two 
program m^t raci^ tt e^ 

nuclear deterrent 
Presented by defence 
writer, John Barry. 

140 Catweazte. (r) 140 

Tetebura. Cartoon series, 
(r) 240 Siwival of the 
Fittest. The Downhill Run 


240 

followed by FQnt 

Heroes* (1961) 
j Anton Rodgers 
and Dermot Welsh. 

Second Worid War drama 
about a group of seven 

sokSers, imprisoned to 
Battalion headquarters in 
rural Ranee, awaiting 
courts martiaL Directed by 
Ernest Morris. 

4.00 TheCteiipbefls. 

00 Albion Market (Oracle) 
830 Survival Spec^: 

Galapagos - How They 
Got There. The first of a 
series of four programmes 
examining the mystery of 
how the creatures who 

inhabit the Galapagos 
came to be on the islands. 
640 News 

640 Appeal by Mart! Ctene on 
behalf of the Crossroads 

Cara Attendant Scheme. 
646 Highway. HighBghts of Sir. 

Harry Secon W s travels. 
7.15 Winner-Takes ALGame 
show. 

745 Murder, SfM Wrote: 
Murder in the Electric 

Cathedral. Who killed 

Jessica's friend - her 

family or the television 
. evangefist? 

840 Return to Eden. Amah! 
offers to buy Eden. 

(Oracle) 

9J5 News. 

9£0 The Real Wori±HeOo_? 
Do extra-terrestrials exist? 
(Oracle) 

1(L20 The Jknmy Young 

Teteviteon Pro g ra m me. 
Drug taktog among young 
people is tne subject Witt 
the studio audience are 
actor David Kossoff, 
whose son (Bed of dn^ 
abuse; and Dr Meg 
Patterson, the specialist 
who is treating Boy 
George. 

11.05 LWTNews headfines 
fotiowed by The Irish RM. 
Major Yeates is inwted to 
play polo with a 

maharajah, (r) 

12.00 Show Express. The music 
of James Last 
12J0 Night Thoughts. 



Dieter Plage asd albatross: Swvivmi Special (LWT S30pm, bat 
times vary in some other ITV regions) 


BBC 2 


850 Open University. Urrffl 

Siaiday Grandstand 
introduced by Steve Rider. 
Motorcycling. Murray 
Walker and Barry Sheene 
are the commentators at 
Sflverstone for the Shell 
03s 500CC British Grand 
Prtx and, if time permits, 
for the 250cc and sidecar 
events. Cricket The John 
Player Special League 
match between Kent and 
Leicestershire. The 
commentators at 
Canterbury are Peter 
Walker and Ralph Dellor. 

650 Foley Square. Attractive 
assistant District Attorney, 
Alex Hamgan, has to go 
into the wolfs lair when a 
lady-killing film actor is 
reluctant to give evidence 
in a fraud case. 

7.15 Play: Absent friends, by 
Alan Ayckbourn. Julia 
McKenzie introduces and 
plays the role of Diana in 
tttstateol friends being 
shocked by one of trite r 
number's reaction to a 
bereavement. Diana asks 
Paul to join her and their 
other friends for tea in 
order to cheer him up, but 
his behaviour Is a 
revelation to a8 With 
HyweJ Bennett, Tom 
Courtenay, Dtosdaie 
Land Bn, Maureen Lipman 
and Kate Lock. Directed 
by Michael Simpson, (rt 

845 Under SaH, A summer 
' cruise on the Asgard U, 
built in 1980 to give Irish- 
children the chance to 
taste fife under saiL (r) 

945 The Paul Daniels Magic 
Show. On Loch Ness, with 
actor Fulton Mackay, Paul 
Daniels tries to lure a shy 
and retiring Nessia. in the 
' studio the guests are 
mime magician from New' 
York, Jett McBride: the 
mechanical toys of the 
Cabaret Mechanical 
Theatre of Covent Garden; 
and puppeteer Jimmy 
Peacock, (r) 

950 George Washington. 

. Episode four of foe six- 
part dramatization of the 
■ fife of the first President of 
the United States. The 
British Army have the 
disorganised American 
Army In disarray, despite a 
declaration of 

. . independence by 18 . 
states. Despe r ate 
measures are required of 
Washington. 

150 FHm: The Treasure of the 
Sierra Madre* (1947) 
starring Humphrey Bogart. 
Walter Huston and Tim Holt 
as a trio gold prospecting in 
the Mexican mountains. 
When they strike ft rich, the 
oldest of them's predictions 
oome horribly true. Directed 
by John Huston. Ends at 
.150. 


CHANNEL 4 


155 Irish Angle. With Irish 
newspapers speculating 

on an election before 
Christmas and the 
possibility of Charles 
Haughey leading the 
country once again, Irish 
Angle examines what this 
wflfmean to the Anglo- 
Irish accord, and reviews 
Garret FitzGerald's 
coalition's performance 
over trie past nfne months. 

150 Model Magic. Model 

railways are trie subject of 
today's programme, (r) 

250 Kids* Kate- The final 

programme of the cookery 
for children series. 

250 Fikw The Home and the 
Worid (1984). The fourth 
and final fflm In trie Satyajit 
Ray season. Sat against 
the background of political 
turmoil in tum-of-the- 
century Bengal, the story 
of the emotional triangle 
between a wteMo-do 
couple and the husband’s 
revolutionary friend. 

5.00 The Mind of David 

Berg las. Peter Cook puts 
the paranormal world of 
David Berttas to the test. 

545 Polo: The Cartier 
Inte rna tional The 
Engtand/Mexico 
encounter, from Smiths 
Lawn. 

750 Nawa and Commonwealth 
Conference Report 
Weather. 

7.15 The Arabs. Abdetoamid 
Sabra, an historian of 
sdenee, describes the 
Arabs' heritage of Islamic 
science and teaming, (rt 

8.15 Country Matters: The 
Black Dog, by 
A.E.Coppard.Jarte 
Lapotaire and Stephen 
Chase star in this tale of a 
young man who falls for a 
young woman he meets 
on the sunlit croquet lawn 
of an Edwardian house 
and is drawn into the 
conflict between her and 
her father's mistress. 

9.15 People to People. Wefl 
You Didn’t Expect Us to 
Sit Around Doing Nothing, 
Did You? is the first of two 
programmes made by 
members of the 
Unemployed People's 
Alliance. 

10.00 American Football 
Highlights of the game 
played at Wembley earlier 
today between the 
Chicago Bears and the 
Dallas Cowboys. 

1250 The TWiight Zone: The 
Trade-Ins* An elderly 
couple, both crippled with 
pain, visit a clinic which 
offers to replace old 
bodies with new, youthful 
ones. 

1250 The TaB-Tale Heart 

Animated version of Poe's 
fate of murder and 
retribution. The narrator is 
James Mason. Ends 124a 


C Radio 4 

On long wave. VHF variations at end 
555 Shipping. 650 Newt Briefing; 

Weather. 810 Prelude (s) 
650 News; Morning Has 
Broken. 655 Waathen 
Travel 

750 News 7.10 Sunday 
Papers. 7.15 Apna Hi 
Char Samajhiya. 745 BeSs 
on Sunday. 750 Turning 
Over N«w Leaves. 756 
Weather Travte. 

850 News. AIDS 
Papers- 8.15 

(Religious news and views) 
850 Juife Christie 
ppeate on behalf of tha 
ape Counselling and 
Research Project 855 
Weather Travel 
950 News. 9.10 Sunday 
Papers 

9.15 AAstalr Cooke 
950 Morning Service (from St 
Thomas More, West 
Mailing. Kant) 

1815 The Archers. Omntous 
addon. 

17.15 Pick of the Weak. 

Hlghlignts of recent 

, presented by 


12.15 Oesert Island Discs. 
Traveler and author 
Norman Lewis is the 
bastaway on Michael 
Parkinson's island (s) 1255 
Weather 

150 The World This 

Weekend: News. 156 

250 

series) Susan Marfing 

with members of the Jubflee 
Ladies's Fishing Club. 

250 The Afternoon Play. A 
Man Alone. Three i 
by Andrew RIssSlI 
Anthony. Starring fl 
Pickup. BenedtefTaytor, and 
Tessa Peake-Jones (r) 

330 A Splendid Dedpine. 

The development of 
music within, trie cinema (2) 
Spel bound In Darkness. 
450 News; Northern Lights. 
History of the Northern 
Lighthouse Board. . 

450 The Natural History 
Programme. Diseases 

affecting antoiat populations. 
550 News; Travel 
555 Down Your Way. Brian 
Johnston visits 
Newhaven, East Sussex. 
550 Shipping. 555 
Weather 
650 News 

815 Weekend Woman's 
Hour. Programme 
highlights. 

750 Thought that FUed, by 
R ud yard Kipling. Final 
e pisode o f a th ree-part 

850 AGoocMtaadivitt Brian 
Gear. Humphrey 
Carpenter and isobei Qulgly 

850 fte Music Makers. 

Edward Seckeraon 
meets Simon Rattle (s) 

950 News; A Word in 
• Edgeways. Brian 
Redhead and guests (Sscuss 
how far writers and 
composers should be 
involved in Interpretation 
and performance of their 

950 Law in Action. Witt 
Joshua Rosenberg. 955 
W eat her; Travel 


1030 News 

1815 The Sunday Feature: A 
Qfimpse of trie Burning 
Plato. Dramati z ation dr 
Charles Allen's recent 
book. Starring Claire Bloom 
as Charlotte Canning 
- and Prunella Scales as 
Queen Victoria. 

1150 Before the Endtogof the 
Day. Late evening office 
of compline (s) 

1155 Hush . . .Money. Laurie 
Taylor. In the first of four 
programmes 3) 

1145 TenThousand Miles on 
an Overdraft First of 
lour programmes. With Fred 

1250 News; Weather 1253 

VHF England and 

S Wales otty) as above 
except 55&550am Weather; 
Travel 730-830 Open 
■ University: 750 Maths 
Foundation Tutorial 750 
Humour in Classical Music 
7.40'SocW Sciences; 
Grutevtoe. 430-630 
450 Inside Castro's Cue 
450 The Scots Tongue. 530 
Back on Course. 55D Get 

by In Italian. 

( Radio 3 ) 

On medium wave. VHF variations at 

end 

655 Weather. 750 News 

755 Vivaldi's Venice: 

recordings of Vtvakfl 
works Including Concerto in 
■ B fiat for Strings, RV 167. 
and Concerto ri C,- RV 537- 
Aiso works by Afljmoni 
(Concerto to D major. Op 7 
No 8). and Legrenzl 
(Sonata to E minor) 

850 Plena Foumton 
recordings by the 
celebrated cettst Bach Suite 
No 2. BWV1008, 

Beethoven Sonata in C. Op 
1 02 No 1 . and BoccherW 
Concerto In B flat 950 News 

955 Your Concert Choice: 

Strauss (WSddmeister 
wattzv Bach( Cantata No 
82, with Fischer- 
Dieskau). SuWa (Variations, 


played twtQulda 
ttoreelf), C P E Bach 



1845 PromT 

Wright includes Gordon 
Crosse talking about his new 
work for trumpet and 
strings. Array. Also an 
interview with Nigel 
Osborne 

11.15 Borodin Piano Too; 

Mozart (Piano Trio to E 
major, KSA2), Ravel (Piano 
Trio in A minor.) 

1255 Beethoven and Matter: 
Scottish Chamber 
Orchestra/Scottish 
Philharmonic ~ — 
soloists Hai 
Baglay and 
White. Beethoven 
(Symphony No 9 and 
overture Leonora No 3 ), and 
Matter (Des Antonius 

von Padua F tec hprsdgt. and 
Lobdeshohen 
verssnds etc from Das 
Knaben Wiindarfioni) 

255 Martin Hoscoe: 
redtaLHai 


•taydn (Sonata In 
C sharp minor, H XV136], 
and Schumann (Sonata 


in F sharp minor. Op 11) 
250 Nash Ensembla: with 
Henry Harford (baritone). 
Reger (Clarinet Quintet in A 
minor. Op 146), Schubert 
(Gehetoies, Ganymed.Der 
Fischer, Rastiose Ltabe)., 

Webern (Five Early Songs), 

Schubert (The Trout 


455 Bournemouth SO 
Handli 


waiiams (Symphony No 

550 The Harlequin Years: 

Roger Nichols on 
Parisian musical Me after the 
First World War. Part one 

6.15 Qszt and the Piano: 

Maria; TWo Lefpncb (St 
Francis's Sermon to the 
Birds, and St Frands of 
PaoJa walking on the 
waters) 

545 Boccherini and Haydn: 
Salomon String Quartet 
Boccherini (String Quartet in 
C. Op 58 N0 1) and 
Haydn (String Quartet in G, 
Op 77 No 1) 


750 Proms 86: LSO (under 
Sir John Pritchard). BBC 
Symphony Chorus. Pro 
Musica Chorus, and 
tenor Stuart Burrows. 
Berlioz (Grande mes&e 
desmorts) 


955 Water. Snow and Ice: 

Patrick Romer reads 
poems by George Szlrtes 
955 Baroque Redta£ 

Haztezet (flute), Huggett 
(violin). Cunningham (vioUa 

dagamba), Mmerson 
(harpsichord). Telemann 
(Paris Quartet No 6), 

DuphN (Las graces and La 
Vanlo), and Guianan 
(Violin Sonata No 4) 

1820 Debussy and EUiott 
Carter Lowri Blake 
(cello), Carofine Palmer 
(piano). Debussy (Sonata 
m d minor), Carter (Cello 
Sonata) 

1055 StemdaJe Bennett: Ulster 
Orchestra (under Hilary 
Davao Wetton).wftt Malcolm 
Bln ns (piano). Bennett 
(Piano Concerto No 4). 
Haydn (Symphony No 
97). 1157 News. 1250 
Closedown 
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mythology: Keats 


and 


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1150 Desmond Carrington 250pm 
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Chartie Chester with Sunday 
Soapbox (tat 061-228 1684) 

755 Old Stagers. (Jack Hi 
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Vernon and Ma * J 
Where Do You i 

series). WHh The Archbishop of 
Canteroury 800 Personal 
Choice. Edward Heath MP with 
some of his favourite music 
1805 Songs from the Shows 1050 
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C Radio 1 ) 

On medtom wve. VHF variations 
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News on the half-hour untfl 
1150am, then 230pm, 358 458 


1250pm 

Jimmy savito's *010 Record' 
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Time. 450 CSianbusters. 

(Bruno Brookes) 550 Top 40 
(Bruno Brookes) 750 Anna 

RfflSflStent^^^OO 00 
The Rattan' Miss P (with Culture 

Rock). VHF Stereo Ratios 1 A 
2^ 430am As Ratfio 2. 250 Benny 
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Something Simple. 550 As 
Radio 1. 12.00-4. 00am As Radio 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 



Robert XJrqatert: BBCL 945jn 


630 NawsdeM. 630 Jazz lor the Asking. 
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Myra Rutett Show. 200 News. 25b 

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415 Racnrfng Nature! Kfitors. 535 
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Regional TV; on pang page 














\ 


32 


* ☆ * * * 


SATURDAY AUGUST 2 1986 


Troubles left 


behind by 


de Castella 


By Fat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent 


■ Robert de Castella, of 
Australia, became the first 
n>an successfully to defend a 
Commonwealth marathon ti- 
tle yesterday, while his compa- 
triot, Lisa Martin, won ihe 
inaugural women's race in a 
personal best lime. 

.For de Castella the race 
ultimately proved less of a 
problem than the one he 
encountered two weeks ago 
when he was almost banned 
from the Australian team in a 
move which, he claimed yes- 
terday, “would have had 
repercussions up to govern- 
ment level.” 

De Castella, who. like Mrs 
Martin, is based in the United 
Slates, wanted to compete in a 
road race in Kansas on July 
12. The Australian athletics 
authorities told de Castella, 
however, that as a team 
member he was contracted to 
attend a match against Bel- 
gium and England Under-23 
icr Brussels the following day. 
Ifhe were not present, he was 
ibid, he would be dropped 
from the team. 

‘ De Castella, who also holds 
the world's fastest marathon 
time this year with the 2hr 
7min SI sec he set in Boston in 
April, said yesterday; “What 
upsei me most was that sev- 
eral of the team members were 
prepared to vote against me as 
well. There are still people 
annoyed at the idea of some- 
body making money out of the 
sport." 

In the event, de Castella ran 
the 10km race in the United 
Slates, finishing second to 
Britain's John Doherty, and 
-caught a succession of 
connecting flights"in order to 
arrive in Belgium at ten the 
next morning and sit and 
watch the match in the 
afternoon." 


Yesterday, hjs problems be- 
" i, de 


hind him, de Castella took an 
immediate lead, putting in a 
series of surges which even- 
tually got rid of his last 
opponent, John Graham of 
Scotland, by 17 miles. The 
Australian's victory was such 
that he was able to look 
around and relax in the final 
stages and enjoy his victory. 


More Games 
reports and 
results, Page 30 


The five mile ‘splits’ were 
indicative of de Castella's 
domination of the race. He led 
every one of them, docking 
24m"in 24sec, 49.27, !hr 
I3min 37sec, 1:38.31 and 
2:04.05. The cheer when he 
came into the stadium to win 
by almost a minute in 2:10.15 
was. to pul it mildly, in 
distinct contrast to the recep- 
tion the Prime Minister had 
got when she took her seat an 
hour earlier. 


Despite his insistence on 
slaying in Kansas to run his 
“money* race, de Castella 
knows his priorities He said: 
“It's just not satisfying enough 
to win the big money races 
and- not win the champion- 
ships as well." 

His only championship set- 
back since he won the same 
title in Brisbane and the world 
title in Helsinki in 1983, was 
to finish fifth in the 1984 
Olympic Games. His immedi- 
ate plan is to race in New Y ork 
in October and then begin 
preparation for next year's 
World Championships in 
Rome, and the next Olympic 
Games in SeouL 


Mrs Martin's victory in 
2:26.07, also a personal best, 
was even more decisive than 
that of de Castella. She had 
dedded the night before that 
the last thing she should do 
was to lead at any stage before 
the last couple of miles — the 
aim was to leave the incentive 
to Lorraine Moller, of New 
Zealand, who has beaten Mrs 
Martin consistently in the 
past. The Australian, in fact, 
led from the start moving 
immediately away from Miss 
Mofler and increasing her lead 
throughout to win o y more 
two minutes. Miss Moller was 
second in 2:28.17 and Odette 
Lapierre. of Canada, was 
third, in 2:31.48. 


Leaping the pain barrier 


By Pat Butcher 


Joyce Oladapo, of England, 
won the Commonwealth long 
jump title yesterday with the 
only jump that the pain from 
an injured foot would permit 
her to lake. 

Miss Oladapo developed a 
stress fracture of her right fool, 
the one that she uses to take 
off for the long jump, at the 
end of ApriL It is still injured. 
"I knew I had to get it right on 
my first jump,’’ she said. "The 
pain was so bad that 1 ran 
through a second attempt. I 
risked everything on the first 
one and fortunately it came 
off." 

Miss Oladapo’s winning 
jump of 6.43 ‘metres was no 
great result in world terms but 
with 30 centimetres, less than 
a fooL between the first and 
seventh place, it was a great 


competition. Mary Berkeley, 
also of England, was second 
with 6.40 metres and Robyn 
Lorraway, of Australia, was 
third with 6.35. 

Sally Gunnell and Wendy 
Jeal had another 1-2 for 
England in the 100 metres 
hurdles final, with 1 3.29 and 
13.41 seconds respectively, 
beating Glynis Nunn, of 
Australia, the Olympic 
heptathlon champion, who 
was third in 1 3.44. 

The two English women 
and their colleague, Lesley- 
Ann Skcete, who finished 
fifth, revealed that they had all 
received a good wishes card 
from the champion, Shirley 
Strong, whose injuries last 
year had caused her to miss 
selection for these 
championships. 


The second touching in- 
cident came with the awards 
of silver and bronze medals in 
the high jump behind the 
Australian winner. Christine 
Stanton. Second and third 
were Sharon McPeake and 
Janet Boyle, both setting per- 
sonal bests of 1 .90 metres, two 
centimetres behind Miss Stan- 
ton. For the medals were 
presented by one of the hero- 
ines of British track and field, 
Mary Peters, also of Northern 
Ireland. 


Steve Cram swung his way 
towards the Commonwealth 
800- 1 .500 metres double when 
he easily qualified for today's 
final at the longer distance, 
winning in 3 minutes 43.98 
seconds. John Gladwin 
was second- 


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YACHTING 


When top 
contender 
is not rated 


By Barry Pickthall 


Graham Walker, president 
of Britain's America's Cop 
challenge, was forced to with- 
draw his Th reeq narter-T oa 
Cnp contender Indulgence 
from the Channel Race hours 
before the start at Cowes last 
night because his yacht did not 
have a valid rating certificate. 


The 210-mile Cowes Week 
opener also forms the final 
selection trial for the British 
Threeq oarter-Ton Cop team 
and, having also missed the 
first offshore trial last week- 
end, Walker's yacht may now 
be discounted for a place in the 
British team — despite haring 
won four of the six inshore 
trial races. 


A disappointed Walker ex- 
plained yesterday that a rating 
check made on his yacht two 
weeks ago indicated that the 
Andrien design measured 0.1 
feet, higher than the 
Threeqnarter Ton limit, which 
he thought was caused by the 
changes in the method' of 
measuring the yacht's inclina- 
tion factor. 


Last weekend the skipper 
agreed to hare 40kg removed 
from the yacht's keel to rectify 
the discrepancy but since then 
the winds have been too strong 
for a farther induction test to 
be made. 


The selectors, who are due 
to announce Britain's 10-boat 
team for the world champion- 
ship on Monday, are laced 
with the dil emma of either 
using their discretionary pow- 
ers to include Walker and his 
crew in the line-ap or discard 
this top cop contender, (earing 
the French an opportunity to 
charter her for their team. 

Cowes preview, page 27 


rw% 


First published in 1785 


It * ★ 


SPORT 



The challenge that everyone 
expected from Charlie 
Spedding lasted for only 10 
miles. Spedding, England's 
Olympic bronze medal win- 
ner, was, like many unsuccess- 
ful marathon runners, at a loss 
to explain why he fell so bad 
that he dropped out after 20 
miles. He said: “My prepara- 
tion had gone as well' as for 
any marathon. I felt good 
enough to beat Deke, and at 
worst 1 thought Td finish 
second." . 


Dave Edge; former Black- 
pool and Fylde club member, 
now running for Canada, was 
second in 2:1 1.08. taking two 
seconds off his previous best 
time, while a surprising third 
was another Australian. Steve 
Moneghetti. running,, his first 
marathon. Moneghelti, fifth 
in the 10,000 metres last 
Saturday, only decided to 
apply for the vacant marathon 
place three months ago, and 
only lost the silver medal to 
Edge in the last 400 metres on 
the track. 



Mixed donble: Australian col 
other's victory in 


Robert de Castella and Lisa Martin celebrate each 
r's marathon events (Photograph: lan Stewart) 


FOOTBALL 


Butcher hits the high road 


By Hugh Taylor 


Rangers created a record in 
Scottish transfer fees yes- 
terday when they completed 
the transfer of Terry Batcher, 
England's World Cup centre 
half, for a sum believed to be 
£750,000. The capture of the 
Ipswich Town defender brings 
Rangers' summer investment 
in new players to £2. million 
and will make Butcher prob- 
ably the highest-paid player in 
the country. 


the magnificent stadium and 
talking to the manager, 
Graeme Sonnes s." 


Built oa the formidable lines 
of centre halves who have 
become Ibrox legends, the 
newcomer is to become dnb 
captain and be said be was 
delighted to join a dub as 
ambitious as Rangers. 


Butcher will not play 
against Tottenham Hotspur, 
one of the dubs who are 
interested in him, in today's 
friendly at White Hart Lane, 
but be is assured of an ecstatic 
welcome from a. capacity 
45,000 crowd at Ibrox on 
Tuesday when he leads out 
Rangers for a warm-op match 
with Bayern Munich. 


will end. for the time being, at 
least, the astonishing spend- 
ing spree which earlier saw 
Soiiness, Woods and West 
become Scottish football's 
most expensive imports. 


The supporters of Rangers, 
for so long starved of higher 
success, can hardly wait for 
the start of the season and 
they may see yet another new 
face in the team on Tuesday. 


Delighted that he has ac- 
quired one of the world's most 
outstanding centre halves, 
Souness, whose work rate 
since he became player-man- 
ager has been untiring. In- 
dicated that his first objective 
was to prevent ! *the loss of silly 
goals". 


"I know many people are 
surprised that I have decided 
to come to Scotland when I 
could have joined a top En- 
glish dub," Butcher said , "but 
I always knew Rangers were 
one of the biggest dubs in 
Europe and 1 have been even, 
more impressed since seeing 


Souness is talking today to 
officials of Maccam and he is 
hopefnl that he will conclude 
the transfer of Avi Cohen, with 
whom be played at Liverpool, 
in time for the Israeli inter- 
national defender to partner 
Botcher against Bayern. 

If Cohen joins Rangers It 


Certainly he has pleased 
those Rangers enthusiasts 
who have maintained that the 
real secret of their team's 
success in the past was a 
strong, backbone of outstand- 
ing goalkeeper, centre half and 
centre forward. The fact that 
the new Rangers spine of 
Woods, West and Botcher is a 
pure English construction will 
not matter a jot to the Ibrox 
following if they bring trophies 
back to a bare cupboard. 


End of Buckley’s reign at Walsall 


Alan Buckley was sacked as 
Walsall manager yesterday 
following the takeover of the 
third division club by London 
businessman Terry Ramsden. 
Coach Garry Pendrey was also 
dismissed. The new manager 
at Fellows Park will be 
Tommy Coakley, the former 
manager of Bishop's 
Stortford, with former Bristol 
City player Gerry Sweeney as 
coach. 


Buckley, who has been at 
Walsall as player and manager 
for more than ten years, said 
"I am shocked after the suc- 
cess we have had in building 
two good teams in the past 
four years and reaching the 1 
semi-final of the Milk Cup". 


acquire 62 per cent of the 
shares, has worked with 
Coakley — who played nine 
times for Arsenal in 1 966 — in 
non-league football. 


Both he and Pendrey recently 


signed new one-year contracts. 
Rar 


imsdcn, who is under- 
stood to have paid £400.000 to 


He announced plans to im- 
prove the stadium and said 
old. age pensioners would be 
admitted to matches free of 
charge this season. Those who 
attended 10 games would get a 
turkey at Christmas. 


SPORT-IN-BRIEF 


Newman 


for Italy 


Azelio Vicini has been ap- 
pointed the manager of the 
Italian national football team. 
He replaces Enzo Bearzot, 
who lea Italy to the World 
Cup championship in Spain 
four years ago but tbe holders 
were eliminated in the second- 
round at the finals in Mexico 
this year. 

However, Bearzot has not 
been dismissed by the Italian 
Football Federation. He has 
been named 'supervisor and 
co-ordinator of the national 
teams, including the uuder-21 
and Olympic squads. Federa- 
tion sources said Vicini and 
Bearzot were going to operate 
jointly, -with the latter 
supervising the work of the 
new manager. 



Transfer hitch 


St Helens yesterday lost out 
on two signings from Austra- 
lia (Keith Macklin writes). 
They had expected to sign 
Neil Baker, a half back, and 
Craig Dimond, a forward, 
from the South Sydney and 
Cro nulla dubs, and agreement 
had been reached. However, 
South Sydney announced a 
change of mind and will not 
release Baker, while Dimond 
suffered art injury Last Sunday 
and needs an operation. 


Quick return 


Training row 


Consolation 


John Emburey, the England 
off-spinner who missed the 
first cricket Test match against 
New Zealand because of a 
broken nose, returns to the 
Middlesex team for the county 
championship match with 
Northamptonshire at Lord's 
today. Thai will be encourag- 
ing news for the England 
selectors who picked the side 
yesterday for foe second Test 
at Trent Bridge next week. 
Hie side will be announced 
tomorrow . 


Susan Shapcott, beaten in 
the final of the England 
women's golf championship 
two months ago. yesterday 
won foe English girls* title at 
Huddersfield. Shapcott aged 
16, from Bristol, who won the 
British girls’ championship m 

last year, was foree-under-par XIp™ fPnriFVP 
when she completed her 7 and ^ c w r CpiIC.YC 
6 victory over Nicola Way — 
foe younger sister of Ryder 
Cup golfer Paul Way — in foe 
finaL 

Miss Shapcott, who now 
goes on to defend her British 
title at West Kilbride later this 
month, was much the more 
solid hitter of foe two. 


Hull Rugby League club 
have transfer-listed two play- 
ers for missing pre-season 
training. They are foe former 
Great Britain prop Trevor 
Skerrelt and Andy Gascoigne, 
a scrum half Both players 
have told foe club they cannot 
attend training three times a 
week because of work 
commitments. 


Short fuse 


Middlesbrough have until 


Monday to prove they can 
i Fo< 


Wolverhampton Wanderers ■ 
look certain to be playing in. 
the . fourth division when' 
League football begins on 
August 23. League officials 
met foe Official Receiver yes- 
terday and agreed to extend a 
deadline for foe reconstruc- 
tion of foe club. - - 


continue as a Football League 
club. David Dent, foe assis- 
tant League secretary, said: 
“Middlesbrough are living on 
a time bomb and it could go 
off on Monday. We have 
given them the weekend to 
come up with a rescue 
package." MiddTesbrough, 
wound up in foe High Court 
with debts of £1.9 million, 
were forced to cancel a 
friendly match at- Hartlepool 
last night. 


England job 
in Australia 


for Stewart 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 

eland B side to Sri Lanka Iasi 

6 » : punnlid in miHlin 


The England team m 
Australia next winter will .be 
captained by Mike Gatting 
and managed by Peter Lush, 
Public Relations and Market- 
ing manager of foe Test and 
County Cricket Board. The 
assistant manager will be 
Micky Stewart and foe physio- 
therapist Laurie Brown. In 
other words, the conservatives 
with the TCCB have won foe 
day, though for the first time 
the assistant manager's role 
has been defined in writing. 

In announcing the four 
choices, Raman Subba Row. 
chairman of foe board, 
stressed that the captain, and 
no one else, would be in 
charge of foe cricket. Because 
this is considered fun- 
damental to foe success of the 
England team, both at home 
and away, a football-style 
“supremo" has not been ap- 
pointed. David Brown, 
Warwickshire’s cricket man- 
ager, and Ray Illingworth were 
both asked how they saw the 
assistant manager’s job. but 
only Stewart was offered it. 

After foe tour has been 
reviewed next Spring, and if 
both sides so wish it. Stewart 
could again be offered a two or 
three year contract carrying 
with tt foe title of team 
manager. The party’s fitness, 
their practice arrangements 
and day-to-day discipline will 
be his special responsiblity in 
Australia. As a member of foe 
lour committee he will also be 
a selector. 

As the senior officers 
Messrs Gatling. Lush and 
Stewart are obviously of less 
fame and experience than 
some of their predecessors: 
Jardine. Warner and Pal ai ret 
in 1932-33 for example, or 
Peter May. Freddie Brown, 
Desmond Eagar and George 
Duckworth (baggage master) 
in 1958-59. 

But Micky Stewart is a man 
of strong principles and Mr 
Lush, who managed the En- 


Fairbrother in the 


driving seat 


By Richard Streeton 


LEICESTER: Lancashire 
Ivai Leicestershire by 6 
wickets 

Neil Fairbrother, with a 
masterly 93 not out, steered 
Lancashire into the semi- 
finals of the NaiWest Trophy 
yesterday as Leicestershire 
yielded with a surprising lack 
of resolve. Lancashire, need- 
ing a further 139 from 37 
overs, lost only one more 
wicket and won easily with 6.3 
overs in hand. 

After two miserably wet and 
cloudy days, foe sun shone 
brilliantly as Fairbrother and 
O’Shaughnessy finished foe 
game with a scintillating stand 
of 93 in 19 overs. Fairbrother, 
who had come in on Thursday 
evening with Lancashire 28 
for force, was completely 
dominant and was given foe 
man-of-fofr-raatch award by 
Roy MarshalL 

Nothing went right for 
Leicestershire, who were let 
down by their bowlers. Ferris' 
could seldom find a proper 
line or length and was guilty of 
a number of wides and no 
balls, while De Freitas began 
well but started to over-pitcb 
and was freely punished. 
O'Shaughnessy. on 18 and 
with the total on 172, was 
missed by Potter at first slip 
off Ferris and this was foe last, 
slim opportunity Leicester- 


UEttoVntRBMRE 223 for 8(00 ovorrtJP 


AJ De Freitas 68: PJ WAJtaH4 tor 28. A 
Haytura 4 tor 40)_ 

LANCASNBRE 

G Fowtar c Gower b Taylor 12 


G D Mem&s c Whabcasa b Aqtww — 2 

J Abrahams c Potter b VWDsy 34 

*C H Lloyd c Gower b Taylor — .6 

N H Famrothar rat out S3 

S J O'Shaughnessy not out* § 

Extras (16 5, w 16.11b 5) ; — 26 


Total (4 wkts. 534 overs) 226 


f j Stanworth, M Wattdnsan, J Shumans, 

jr ■ 


l W Anon and A N Hayburst eftt not ml 
FALL OF WICKETS: t-4, 2-20. 3-28. 4- 
T33. 


BOWLING: Agnaw 1 1-5-30-1 , Tartar 9-1- 
35-2; De Freitas 1D-1-5WJ; Potter 2-1-7 


■7-0: 


WSey 12-1-46-1: Farm WMM: Gower 
0.3-04-0. 

Umpires; D O Osleer and B Leadboaftr 
Photograph, page 29 


Draw that Botham on 


recalls 


first final. 


Worcestershire's prospects 
of reaching the NatWest Tro- 
phy final for the first time for 
20 years, received a boost 
when they were drawn at home 
against Sussex in the semi- 
finals on Wednesday week. 
The game is a repeat of the 
first limited-over final back in 
1963. It was then the Gillette 
Cnp, 65 overs per side, and 
Sussex won. 

Worcestershire’s only other 
appearance in the September 
final was in 1966, when they 
were beaten by Warwickshire. 
Their last apearance at Lord's 
on a big cup day was in the 

1976 Benson and Hedges fi- 
nal. when they were again 
losers, this time to Kent 
Worcestershire are certainly 
giving their home crowd value 
for money. 

Surrey have their second 
successive home tie, apii^ 
Lancashire. Surrey have 
««hed foe NatWest final 
three times. Their opponents, ’ 
when foe unfinished business 
at Leicester is settled today, 
will be either one of foe roost 
or least experienced comities 
,B . this tournament. 
Leicestershire's modest record 
UKMdes a solitary appearance 
in foe semi-finals, while Lan- 
cashire have four titles from 
six finals. 

draws Worouterahbn v Su»ex 

EEawswsss 


top of 
the world 


Ian Botham prepared for his 
return to senior cricket with a 
power-packed innings of 94 
for an England XI against a 
Rest of the World side at 
Jesmond yesterday. 

His timing after a nine-week 
suspension was remarkable as 
he made his runs from 57 balls 
with the help of six sixes and 
10 fours and helped foe En- 
gland XI to a win by three 

wickets. Botham returns to the 
first-class game for Somerset 
against Worcestershire at 
Weston-super-Mare today. 

The Rest of the World 
attack consisted of Marshall 
and Holding operating off 
shortened runs arid Border 
bowling spin. Botham's- big- 
gest hit against Border landed 
on the roof of a terraced home 

His spectacular display fol- 
lowed a fine performance with 
foe ball when he took three for 
33 and inspired a collapse by 
foe Rest of the World. He had 
conceded 26 runs from five 
overs before his first success, 
Harper trying to run a delivery 
down to third man but 
succeeding only in presenting 


Pringle with a catch at slip- 
>f his 


. Later, at foe end ol 
eighth over. Botham took foe 
wickets of Holding and Lillee 
in tw o balls. 

JfoST OF the WORLD 278 (C G 
GreenBjge 74. A R Border 61: 
Laver four for 57); BWLA5© M 277 
fer seven fl T Bottom 94; R A 
Harper tour tor 38). 


r\ 


winter, is a specialist in public 
relations. He went to Lord s as 
one of the TCXB's assistant 
secretaries in 1974, He is 47 
and was previously in 
advertising. Stewart, who is 
53. has been cricket manager 
of Surrey since 1979. He 
toured India with the MCC 
side of 1963-64 and has taken 
two Surrey youth sides to 
Australia. His son, Alec, is one 
of several promising young 
cricketers coming through at 
the OvaL 

While Messrs Lush and 
Stewart were meeting foe 
press at Lord's yesterday eve- 
ning. Gatling was elsewhere in 
the pavilion helping to choose 
the England team for next 
week's second Test match 
against New Zealand amid 
rumours that David Gower 
was to be given a rest If so, the 
timing of it will be profoundly 
ironic, for it was be who 
fought hardest of all to get 
Gatling to India two years ago. 
Gatting, 1 am sure, would not 
have wanted to drop him now, 
but although he wiu be able to 
get his way in Australia over 
matters such as that, at foe 
moment he is only one of five 
selectors. . 

• Sussex, who begin East- 
bourne cricket week with a 
match against Essex starting 
today, rest Imran Khan, their 
Pakistan all-rounder (the 
Press .Association reports). 
However, he will return for 
the John Player Special 
League match between the 
teams tomorrow. 

• Northamptonshire will 
be back at full strength against 
Middlesex at Lord's today as 
they seek their fifth champion- 
ship win. Lamb and Harpq 1 
return after the matches at 
Jesmond, and Larkins. 
Mallender and Waterion will 
all lake their places in the side 
after resting during foe 
county's match against the 
New Zealanders. 



shire had to stay m the match. 

Tbe Lancashire batsmen 
were able to sustain a comfort- 
able momenium from foe 
start, with Fairbrother con- 
stantly finding the gaps as he 
drove and pulled 1 3 fours. The 
scoring slowed briefly as 
O'Shaughnessy flayed himself 
in, but Lancashire never lost 
foe initiative for long. 

Abrahams, who. the day 
before, had helped Fairbrother 
turn the tide after some early 
setbacks, stayed a further 12 
overs before he was wdl 
caught by Potter at short mid- 
on. trying to loft Willey into 
foe deep. Lancashire needed 
77 from foe last 20 overs, but 
the mathematics soon became 
superfluous as foe runs 
flowed. 


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