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TIMES 


No 62.527 


TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


Summit heads 
pile pressure 
on Thatcher 


• Commonwealth leaders in London 
were fighting for further concessions 
from Mrs Thatcher on sanctions 

• The outcome of the mini^siimmit was 
In the balance as a flurry of separate 
meetings sought to break the deadlock 


• The anti-apartheid United Demo- 
cratic Front urged the leaders not to let 
themselves be dictated to (page 5) 

• The New Zealand Prime Minister 
said that Mrs Thatcher was protecting 
British financial interests (page 5) 


fly Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


Commonwealth leaders 
were balding to extract further 
concessions from Mrs That- 
cher last night after she had 
agreed to go along with a Euro- 
pean Community ban on the 
import of iron, steel and coal 
from South Africa and other 
limited measures. 

The outcome of the three- 
day London mini-summit was 
in the balance as the leaders of 
Canada, Australia. India, 
Zambia, Zimbabwe and the 
B aham as unanimously decid- 
ed that the Prime Minister's 
response to the South Africa 
crisis, tabled during yesterday 
morning's tense and uneasy 
session, was inadequate. 

Soon after Mrs Thatcher’s 
offer a Commonwealth of- 
ficial criticized Britain's 
stance as being out of step 
with the desire of the other six 
countries to maintain Com- 
monwealth credibility. 

The conference sat late into 
the night after a flurry of 
meetings between the heads of 
government .during yesterday 
afternoon and evening man 
effort to break the deadlock. 

The apparently united aim 
of the other six countries was 
to persuade Mrs Thatcher to 
gofrirtherand to agree to more 
of the measures outlined in 
the Nassau accord last Octo- 
ber. The belief of all the other 
leaders was that Mrs That- 
cher's offer was an opening 
gambit, although this was de- 
nied by British officials. 

The immediate prospects 
for progress were not en- 
couraging. Mrs Thatcher ag- 
reed yesterday morning not to 

agreed ar^^nop^^^i^ . 
m unity summit at The Hague 
in June, which; were to be 
implemented if the Foreign 
Secretary’s mission to. South 
Africa failed. 


They were a ban on the 
import of iron, steel and coal, 
which Mrs Thatcher said she 
would accept without enthu- 
siasm. and a voluntary ban on 
new investment in South Af- 
rica which she said she would 
go along with immediately. 

The Prime Minister also 
accepted the eighth and final 
item on the Nassau list of 
possible measures — a ban on 
the promotion of tourism to 
South Africa. But British of- 
ficials quickly explained that 
the ban would be voluntary, 
and exhortation not to do 



Call to leaders 
World choices 
Sketch 


business in South Africa 
would be used rather than 
legislation. 

Both latter measures were 
quickly condemned by visit- 
ing officials as cosmetic, but 
Mrs Thatcher’s officials said 
they were a gesture in the 
interests of Commonwealth 
solidarity. Inside the con- 
ference Britain's Common- 
wealth partners made dear 


their view that Mrs 
Thatcher”s response was 
unsatisfactory. 

They accepted the British 
case for co-ordination of mea- 
sures with the European Com- 
munity, the United States and 
Japan, but demanded her 
agreement in prindple to 
more items on the Nassau list. 

Mrs Thatcher refused point 
blank a proposal put by Mr 
Bob Hawke, the Australian 
Prime Minister, for a ban on 
air links with South Africa. 
When Mrs Thatcher said the 
legal difficulties of such a 
course were great Mr Hawke 
retorted that he was prepared 
to attempt to overcome them 
and so should Britain. 

Mr Hawke was reported to 
have argued: “If it is a 
question of the unity of the 
Commonwealth and its cred- 
ibility then we would be more 
concerned with the latter.** 
The conference should act 
rather than settle for a “trans- 
parently ineffectual compro- 
mise” he said. 

Mr Hawke said he had the 
authority of his Cabinet to go 
beyond the measures outlined 
in the Nassau accord if neo- 
essary. Dr Kenneth Kaunda, 
the Zambian President and 
Mr Robert Mugabe, the Zim- 
babwe Prime Minister, had 
earlier argued for measures 
beyond those agreed at 
Nassau. 

Mrs Thatcher turned down 
Mr Hawke’s proposal, which 
was backed by others, for a 
ban on agricultural products 
from South Africa. 

Mr Brian Mulroney, the 
Canadian Prime Minister, 
who spoke after Mrs Thatcher, 
quickly made it dear that her 
response fell short of what was 
required. He predicted that 

Continaed on page 14, col 3 


Tomorrow 


Concrete 

curtain 



Twenty-five years 
ago, the Berlin Wall 
was built 
overnight 
Frank Johnson 
describes an 
international 
symbol of division 



— 


• The Times Portfolio 
Gold daily competition 
prize of £4,000 was 
shared yesterday 
between Mr 
R.H.Sheppard of 
Gerrards Cross, 
Bucks., and Mr 
P.Phillips of Hove, 

Qiiqqpy 

• Portfolio fist, page 
19; rules and how to 
play, information 
service, page 14. 


Cyprus hunt 

British and Cypriot security 
forces hunted guerrillas who 
launched attacks on Britain's 
base at Akrotiri Page 7 

Accident cost 

Ninety per cent of accident 
victims in England and Wales 
get little or no compensation 
for their injuries Page 3 

Degree results 

Degrees awarded by the 
University of Reading are 
published today Page 24 


'.bv ' 


Hera* New* 

2,3 

Events 

14 

Overseas 

5.7 

Features 

8-10 

Archaeology 

12 

Law Report 

34 

ApptS 

It 

Leaders 

11 

Arts 

13 

Letters 

it 

Bjrthsdeatbg, 

OMtnry 

12 

marriages 

12 

Science 

12 

Business 15-19 

Sport 24-26J28 

Cne» 

2 

Tbeam*ew 

27 

Church 

12 

TV & Radio 

27 

Curt 

12 

Uun 1X24 

Crosswords &14 

Weather 

14 

Diary 

10 

Wilts 

12 


ft ft * * ft ftflL 


40% of expresses 
were late in 1985 

By Michael Bafly Transport Editor 


Nearly half British Rail's 
express trains and a quarter of 
all commuter trains arrived 
late last year, the rail users' 
watchdog body said in its 
annual report yesterday. 

There was also criticism of 
overcrowding, staff conduct, 
dirty trains, and fere levels in 
the annual repent of the 
Central Transport Consul- 
tative Committee. 

Even safety, though not 
mentioned in the report, came 
in for guarded criticism from 
Mr Len Dumelow, the 
committee secretary, at a Lon- 
don press conference. 

“If evidence such as the 
inspector’s report on the New- 


COMPLAINTS RECEIVED 

1965/86 % rise 


Fares 

573 

103 

Service suitabifity 

529 

11 

Punctuality 

430 

60 

Service quality 

346 

53 

Passenger mro 

334 

23 

Stations 

248 

49 

Overcrowding 

207 

39 

Staff conduct 

202 

36 

Catering 

108 

21 

Reservations 

63 

110 

Others 

313 

4 

Total 


39 

castle derailment and 

the 


level-crossing crash near Huh, 
show that chinks are appear- 
ing in BR’s armour, then we 
shall consider what to do, and 
(hat must include a possible 
approach to the 
Government” he said. 

But the committee's chair- 
man, General Lennox Napier, 
said he had no criticism of 
BR's safety standard. The only 
worry was over serious 
overcrowding on high-speed 
trains, which could cause 
problems. 


About 40 per cent of ex- 
presses and 23 per cent of 
other trains failed to arrive on 
time last year, the committee 
said. 

the Eastern Region had the 
worst record for inter-city 
trains with 48 per cent running 
late, followed by London Mid- 
land with 47, Western with 40, 
and Scottish and Southern 
each with 35. For other trains. 
Western had the worst record 
with 28 per cent late, followed 
by Eastern with 27, Southern 
with 25, London Midland 
with 23, and Scottish with 1 1. 

As in previous years, British 
Rail refused to give figures for 
delays up to five minutes and 
to give details of complaints 
from passengers. General Na- 
pier said. But complaints 
made directly by the public to 
the committee rose 39 per cent 

In compiling performance 
figures, the committee had 
had to make use of whatever 
sources were available, includ- 
ing parliamentary answers. 

He said there had been a 
modest improvement in cer- 
tain areas of BR operations 
such as catering, passenger 
information, and stations. But 
BR had “quite a long way to 
go before the majority of 
passengers feel they are getting 
value for money”. 

BR's reported intention to 
raise feres above the level of 
inflation next January was 
totally unjustified in terms of 
quality of service offered. 
General Napier added. 

Overcrowding had reached 
“intolerable" proportions on 
some parts of BR, and addi- 
tional resources should be 
made available to alleviate it. 


Treasury 
insists it 
is right 
onTSB 


By Richard Thomson 

Banking Correspondent 

The controversy over the £1 
billion flotation of the Trustee 
Savings Banks showed little 
sign of abating yesterday as 
the Treasury issued a terse 
statement that the flotation 
would go ahead despite 
Friday's ruling by the Law 
Lords which appeared to 
throw the flotation in doubt. 
There have already been 
Opposition calls for Mr Ian 
Stewart, the government min- 
ister responsible for the share 
launch, to resign. 

On Friday Lord Temple- 
man ruled that the TSB*s 
assets belonged to the stale, 
contradicting the government 
view that no one owned the 
bank. The ruling is crucial 
because h implies that the 
Government is effectively giv- 
ing away the banks' assets, 
including reserves worth £800 
million, to private investors 
when the flotation goes ahead. 

Under a normal privati- 
zation, the sale proceeds go to 
the Government, but the TSB 
proceeds would go straight to 
the bank - 

After a Treasury meeting 
chaired by Mr Stewart yes- 
terday, officials were saying 
privately that . Lord 
Tempi eman had misunder- 
stood the Trustee Savings 
Banks Acts. There was there- 
fore no reason to delay the 
flotation, scheduled for next 
month. 

The Government vested the 
bank on July 21 before the full 
Lords judgment was pub- 
lished, using powers given it 
under the 1985 Trustee Sav- 
ings Banks Act. The move was 
based on legal advice that no 
one owned the banks' assets. 
The vesting turned the TSB 
into a public limited company 
prior to flotation, and could 
not be reversed without fur- 
ther legislation. 

The Treasury's statement 
said: “Lord Templeman did 
not rule that the surplus assets 
of the Trustee Savings Rank 
were owned by the govern- 
ment. Il would have been 
unthinkable for -the Govern- 
ment to have .laid claim to 
those assets.” 

It quotes the Trustee Sav- 
ings Banks Act 1976 as saying 
that the property of the bank’s 
central board “shall not be 
regarded as the property of or 
property held on behalf o£ the 
Crown”. 

The bank's flotation has 
already been delayed since 
February because of legal ac- 
tions brought by Scottish and 
English depositors claiming 
the bank was owned by its 
depositors. The claim was 
dismissed by the Law Lords in 
a preliminary ruling a month 
ago. 

Mr Terry Davis, a shadow 
Treasury minister, said yes- 
terday that the Government 
had put itself into a dreadful 
mess- 


UDR man 
shot dead 
in Belfast 

A full-time seaxgent in the 
Ulster Defence Regiment was 
killed outside his home off the 
“loyalist” Shan kh ill Road in 
Belfast last night. Two gun- 
men approached die father of 
two and opened fire. 

He is the seventh regiment 
member to die this year and 
the 1 58th since 1970 when the 
UDR was formed. 

Hours earlier, in the same 
area, a Roman Catholic coun- 
cil employee escaped death at 
an office when a loyalist's gun 
failed to go off. 

Parcel bomb, page 2 





tr Ixv. 


/■ 


4 " 

Aft--* ” 










Botham back in style 


Ian Botham yesterday scored a 
century off & balls In his first 
county championship innings 
since returning to izrst-dass 
cricket after two months' 
snspension. Batting for 
Somerset against Worcester- 


shire he made 104 not 
ontBotham said: I have not 
been on a desert island for two 
years. Yon do not leave it for 
two months and not be able to 
play when yon come back.” 

Page 28 


Promise of 
restraint 
by printers 

~ By Tim Jones — 

The two main print unions 
yesterday gave undertakings 
to the High Court that they 
would not assist, persuade or 
encourage members to carry 
out any acts of violence, 
intimidation or assault against 
TNT Roadfreight, distrib- 
utors of News International's 
titles, or its employees. 

Mr Eldred Tabachnik, QC 
on behalf of Sogat '82. said 
that the union condemned any 
acts of violence or 
intimidation. 

He told Mr Justice Scott 
that the union denied 
responsibility for violent acts 
at the depots of the company 
which distributes The Times, 
The Sunday Times, The Sun 
and The News of the World. 

Sogat undertook to instruct 
members not to attend any 
demonstration, march or 
picket not organized by its 
national executive committee 
and to give TNT 48 hours 
notice of any planned protest. 

The National Graphical 
Association undertook not to 
participate in the organising of 
any march, demonstration or 
picket which involved the 
commission of unlawful acts, 
nuisance, obstruction of the 
highway or interference with 
TNT commercial contracts. 

But the NGA reserved the 
right to organize a peaceful 
picket of six men at the gates 
of TNT depots. 

Mr John Macdonald, QC 
for TNT, said the undertak- 
ings were “satisfactory” to last 
them until a full hearing of 
their claim m October. 


Ill ‘silent’ 
Gurkhas 
dismissed 

By Our Foreign Staff 

Hong Kong — The British 
Army has dismissed 1 1 1 Gur- 
khas. tough fighters from the 
mountains of Nepal, after a 
brawl in which two officers 
were injured, an Army spokes- 
man said yesterday. 

He said the soldiers, many 
of them veterans of the Falk- 
lands War, were dismissed 
from the 1st Battalion, 7th 
Duke of Edinburgh’s Own 
Gurkha Rifles, after the in- 
cident during an exercise in 
Hawaii in May. 

The men had feiled to co- 
operate with an inquiry into 
the brawl, which took place 
after a party and left a British 
major, the company com- 
mander, and a Gurkha officer 
with cracked ribs. 

The spokesman said it was 
unclear what had sparked the 
incident but no criminal r 
charges were pressed. He said I 
their failure to assist with the 1 
investigation had led to a 
breakdown of trust between 
the Gurkhas and their officers. 
“The bond of trust is broken, 
they have to go.” 

The dismissal has been 
approved by the Ministry of 
Defence in London. Vacancies 
will be filled by other recruits 
from the Himalayan kingdom. 

• Decision attacked: Mr 
Kevin McNamara, Labour's 
defence spokesman, said the 
derision to dismiss the Gur- 
khas was secretive and exces- 
sive. He said blanket 
punishment was “a relic of 
Victorian times and not the 
way to treat soldiers in a 
modem army”. 


Tory fears over 
Tebbit rift with 
Downing Street 


By Peter Stothard 


Mr Norman Tebbiuhe 
Conservative Party chairman, 
yesterday described as 
“barmy” weekend newspaper 
reports that he was on the 
verge of resignation. But se- 
nior ministers have decided 
that the increasingly open rifr 
between him and the Prime 
Minister has to be urgently 
resolved, certainly before the 
party conference in October. 

There is growing concern 
that relations between the two 
previously close allies, which 
have worsened through their 
policy disagreements on the 
BL sale and the US raids on 
Libya, have now come to a 
head over the seemingly mi- 
nor matter of which advertis- 
ing agency should handle the 
party account in the run-up to 
the general election. 

Mis Margaret Thatcher has 
been presented with damning, 
new research setting out the 
Government's huge loss of 
support among the key group 
of voters considered crucial to 
an election victory. 

The substance of the report, 
prepared earlier this year by 
the advertising agency. Young 
& Rubicam. has causal a split 
between those of her advisers 
who are worried by its find- 
ings and Mr Tebbit, who 
backs the more confident 
scenarios being produced for 
Conservative Central Office 
by the party's long-standing 
advertising agency, Saatchi & 
S&itchi' 

The Y & R research is based 
on an assessment of voters' 
values and life-styles instead 
of the more common 
classification of the country 
into socio-economic groups, 
A. B, Cl, C2, D and E 

Each category of voters is 
established by answers to 
between 50 and 100 questions, 
concerning attitudes to politi- 
cal and moral issues as well as 
spending and earning. 

This research identifies a 
core group for the 
Conservatives.known as the 
“belongers”, who constitute 
between 30 and 40 per cent of 
the electorate and need to be 
won over if the election is to 
be won. 

A belonger's characteristics 
include being a patriot, a 
home-maker, a family man or 
woman with a sense of public 
spirit: in traditional marketing 


terms, however, he could be a 
senior pension fund manager 
(a B) or a skilled car worker (a 
C2). 

Political speeches and 
advertising need io recognize 
this, the Y & R men say. The 
National Health Service is 
much the most important 
issue for this group, and 
earlier this year more than 
70 per cent of them thought 
that Labour had the best 
policies. Tory successes such 
as inflation and trade union 
reform scored low 

Earlier this year Mrs 
Thatcher, on the advice of Mr 
John Wakeham. the Chief 
Whip, set up a Manifesto 
Committee of senior ministers 
in pan to head off the coming 

The Prime Minister is ex- 
pected to announce the 
appointment of a second dep- 
ot}' chairman of the Conser- 
vative Party, probably of 
minister of state rank, in the 
autumn (writes Sheila Gunn). 

The appointment, to go 
alongside the present unpaid 
deputy, Mr Jeffrey Archer, 
will probably be linked to a 
limited Cabinet reshuffle 
planned for September. 

The appointment of a Tory 
director of presentation will 
also be announced later this 
week. 

clash over advertising 
agencies. 

Several members of the 
committee, which includes 
Lord Whitelaw. Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, Mr Nigel Lawson ana 
Mr Douglas Hurd, as well as 
Mr Wakeham, Mr Tebbit and 
Mrs Thatcher, are now con- 
vinced that the party is foiling 
to take advantage of the best 
available election-winning 
weapons. 

Mr Tebbit's opponents ar- 
gue that the link with Saatchi 
& Saatchi owes more to 
Loyalty than to reason. There 
is also criticism of the role of 
Mr Michael Dobbs, a deputy 
chairman of Saatchi & 
Saatchi, who is Mr Tebbit’s 
chief of staff and relieves him 
of much of the day-to-day 
.work of running the Conser- 
vative Central Office. 

The Prime Minister is re- 
ported to have expressed 
increasingly open dissatisfac- 
Continued on page 2, col 6 


Diplomats to visit two 
who face beheading 


British diplomats are to 
visit engineer Peter Hall, and 
his Irish wife Monica, who 
foce public beheading in Saudi 
Arabia for the murder of 
hospital matron Helen 
Feeney. 

The couple were arrested on 
July 15 but the Saudis had 
refused permission to British 
diplomats in Riyadh to visit 
Hall, from Southampton, un- 


til the preliminary inquiries 
were made. 

The Saudis say the couple, 
who married in December, 
have confessed to the murder. 

Hall, aged 38. has been in 
Saudi Arabia for five years. 

His mother, Doris, aged 59, 
said yesterday the Foreign 
Office had told her a visit was 
arranged for today. 


Dates set for summit preparation 


From Mohsin Ali 
Washington 

Mr George Shultz and Mr 
Eduard Shevardnadze, the US 
and Soviet Foreign Ministers, 
will meet in Washington on 
September 19 and 20 to 
prepare for a possible summit 
here beiween President Rea- 
gan and Mr Mikhail 
Gorbachov later this year. 

The State Department said 
in a brief announcement yes- 


terday about the long-delayed 
Shultz-Shevardoadze meeting 
that they would discuss what 
“additional preparations may 
be needed for a summit 
meeting between the two lead- 
ers later this year”. 

President Reagan wants a 
second summit meeting with 
Mr Gorbachov to be held in 
the US in November or 
December. 

The two foreign ministers 
will also “review progress 


achieved in areas addressed” 
by President Reagan and Mr 
Gorbachov at their first sum- 
mit in Geneva in November. 
The two leaders then dis- 
cussed arms control issues: 
regional disputes, like 
Afghanistan; human rights: 
and bilateral relations. 

Mr Shevardnadze was orig- 
inally due to come here in 
mid-May, but cancelled the 
visit as a protest against the 
US bombing raids on Libya . 


Holiday reading matter booked for Balmoral 


By Alan Hamilton 

A biography of Karl Mara's 
wife, an omnibus of feminist 
literature, and a novel about 
postwar Japan are among 
books to be presented to 
Buckingham Palace today for 
the Royal Family's holiday 
reading at Balmoral. 

Every year for the past four 
years the National Book 
League has handed over a 
small library, selected by lit- 
erary editors who attempt the 
impossible task of attempting 
to guess which volumes the 
Queen and her family might 
tike to dip into during wet 
afternoons or long Highland 
■1 


evenings, when the cal! of the 
moors pales and the northern 
nights begin to draw in. 

Those publishers whose 
books are selected shamelessly 
advertise the feet in their 
publicity material. 

The selectors receive little 
but the most general guidance 
on what the recipients would 
really like to read, although 
after the first selection there 
was a discreet request for 
something a little lighter, with 
more biography and fiction. 

Lighter fiction this year 
includes John Le Carre's A 
Perfect Spy and P D James' A 
Taste For Death. 

Biographies include a life of 


Rex Whistler, the third and 
final volume of Nigel 
Hamilton's biography of 
Montgomery, and Edna 
Healey’s Wives Of Fame, with 
portraits of Mrs Mara. Mrs 
David Livingstone and Mrs 
Charles Darwin. 

The adventurous Duke of 
York may enjoy Arctic 
Dreams, a celebration of Arc- 
tic life, while the new Duchess 
of York may find some guid- 
ance towards a future home in 
The English House 1860-1914 . 

As a woman who declared 
she would obey her husband, 
but not meekly, she might also 
enjoy the Virago Omnibus of 
20ih’century women’s writing. 


<4 


The Queen Mother, a 
considerable expert with rod 
and line, may enjoy The 
Magic Wheel, an anthology of 
fishing literature, or she may 
prefer to sink, into the un- 
demanding romantic fiction 
of Dorothy Dunneti's Niccolo 
Rising. 

The Princess of Wales may 
or may not appreciate The 
Way To Wear ’Em. an anthol- 
ogy of fashion from the pages 
of Punch. 

This year the list of 29 
books contains eight specifi- 
cally for children, reflecting 
the Royal Family’s burgeon- 
ing younger generation. 

Prince William may learn 


how to lose himself on the 
moors by reading an illus- 
trated book on animal camou- 
flage from Oxford Scientific 
Films. 

His younger brother may 
care to' have read to him a 
book railed Harry's Mad. not 
a refection on the younger son 
of the Prince of Wales but a 
tale of a boy and a parrot. 

If. as is likely, her ever- 
expanding brood of grand- 
children refuse to sit down, 
Viciorian-fashion. and bury’ 
themselves in worthy vol- 
umes. the Queen may care to 
study a book from the 
children's list by Jill Murphy, 
entitled Five Minutes Peace. 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 




Shah control 
of Today ends 
if bid for 
rival succeeds 


By Michael McCarthy 


Mr Eddie Shah 
confirmed that he is com 
ering relinquishing control of 
his newspaper Today. 

He said that if a bid he is 
making for a group of local 
newspapers in the North-west 
is successful he would reduce 
his Si per cent controlling 
interest in the troubled daily. 

Mr Shah said that he would 
probably dispose of his un- 
warned shares to Mr Tiny 
Rowland's Lonrho, which 
controls The Observer and has 
had a 36 per cent stake in 
Today since the rescue opera- 
tion it mounted six weeks ago. 
“That would appear to be the 
Ion cal course," Mr Shah said. 

That would probably give 
Lonrho full control of Today, 
but Mr Shah said that in any 
event he expected to remain as 
chairman of bis revolutionary 
but far-froro -successful colour 
newspaper. 

Mr Shab spelt out his 
intentions on the BBC radio's 
Todav. denying a report in 
The Sunday Times that he was 
“going to quit". But he said 
that if his current bid for the 
Warrington Guardian series of 
newspapers was successful he 
would need to reduce his 
shareholding in Today to 
avoid the deal being referred 
to the Monopolies Commis- 
sion. 

Last week Mr Shah, whose 
national paper needed a 
Lonrho cash injection of 
£13.5 million, bid £5.25 mil- 
lion in cash for the series of 
weekly papers and giveaways 
based in Greater Manchester 
and Cheshire which are the 
main local rivals of his own 
Warrington-based Messenger 
Group. 

It is by no means certain 
that Mr Shah's bid will suc- 
ceed. The Warrington Guard- 
ian series is owned by a 


private company. Academy 
Court Holdings, which is con- 
trolled in trust form by mem- 
bers of the Greenall family of 
Warrington’s Greenall Whit- 
ley brewery company. 

Another bid has been made 
for the group by- Reed 
International's Northern 
Counties Newspapers. 
Though pitched at a lower 
leveL £4.5 million, it is 
thought the Reed bid is likely 
to be preferred by the directors 
as they fear the print unions 
may take industrial action, 
possibly against the brewery 
itself, if Mr Shah gains control 
of the Guardian series. The 
brewery is Warrington's larg- 
est employer. 

In 1983 Mr Shah fought a 
long and bitter battle with the 
National Graphical Associ- 
ation in Warrington over tra- 
ditional print union 
representation at his Mes- 
senger Group. 

It is understood that 
preliminary approval has been 
given to the Reed bid at a 
Guardian board meeting and 
yesterday Reed executives 
were already in the Guardian 
building examining the ac- 
counts but Mr Shah's repre- 
sentatives have still u> appear 
on the scene. 

No offer is likely to be put 
before the shareholders before 
next week at the earliest as Mr 
Christopher Hatton, chairman 
of both Greenall Whitley and 
Academy Court Holdings and 
the main trustee for the 
Greenall family in the latter 
company, is on holiday. 

Mr Shab said be did not 
expect trouble with the print 
unions if he got control of the 
Guardian series. 

“Jobs are too important," 
he said. He added that foresaw 
only “a handful" of redun- 
dancies if his bid succeeded. 


British fruit growing: 2 

Research progress 
threatened by cats 


The Agricultural and Food Research Council, 
jointly funded by the Ministry of Agriculture and the 
Department of Education and Science, is being forced 
to.makedrastic economies among the 32 institutes and 
research stations for which it is responsible. Some of \ 
the most drastic cuts affect the world- famous East 
Mailing research station in Kent, where staff fear that 
their efforts to revive the home-grown fruit industry 
may be in serious jeopardy. Concluding his two-part 
article, John Young , Agriculture Correspondent, 
examines the implications. 


At East Mailing, just outside 
Maidstone, the peaceful land- 
scape has a new addition in 
the shape of several large 
transparent tent-like 
structures. 

On closer inspection they 
turn out to be enormous nets, 
each covering several hundred 
cherry trees, most of them no 
more than 10 or 12 feet high. 

Anyone with a cherry tree 
will be well aware of the 
depredations inflicted by 
birds. For commercial grow- 
ers. the losses can prove 
crucial. 

Thanks to a new dwarfing 
rootstock, known as Colt, and 
the selective use of chemical 
growth regulators, scientists at 

- East Mailing have developed 

- small trees which can be 
' protected from the marauders 

and give heavy yields. 

■ Dr Tony Webster, a senior 
-agronomist working at the 
station, maintains that the 
: revolution has only begun. All 
1 sorts of new varieties are in 
‘the pipeline. 

Among plums, the English 
Victoria is still the traditional 
favourite: As with cherries, the 
revival of the home-grown 
industry is being helped by 
-another dwarfing rootstock, 
known as Pixie. 

Smaller trees are ideal for 
; the booming “pick your own“ 

. farms which attract tens of 


thousands of urban visiters on 
summer weekends. 

New varieties are also help- 
ing to extend the season. 

But there is no mistaking 
the mood of despondency 
among the staff at East 
Mailing. To add to their 
unhappiness they are obliged 
to refer to themselves as a 
department of the Institute of 
Horticultural Research, a 
name which they say means 
nothing to their many over- 
seas friends and admirers. 

In spite of agreement by 
growers to finance further 
research by a levy, and the 
station's own success in selling 
its expertise commercially, 
they believe the Government 
is taking a short-sighted ap- 
proach. 

“We have to be particularly 
concerned about future 
restriction on the use of 
pesticides," Dr Webster says. 

“We are working on the 
development of biological 
controls and disease-resistant 
strains, but it all takes time, 
much longer than with veg- 
etables for example. 

“You can’t develop a Cox’s 
apple in five years which will 
have all the flavour and 
quality you want and will 
create its own resistance to 
pests. It will take more tike 20 
years.” 

Concluded 



Top: The missing couple, 
Robert and Greeba 
Healey, and the house In 
Stockport where they 
lived, now deserted and 
with bloodstains in the 
couple's bedroom. 

Right: Mr Healey's step- 
daughter, Marie Walker, 
and his Vauxhall Chev- 
ette which was found in a 
Birmingham car park on 
Sunday. 



Plea to ‘Reggie 
Perrin’ husband 


Estate agent’s 
steps retraced 


By Peter Davenport 

Police searching for a hus- 
band who they believe faked 
suicide yesterday appealed for 
him to contact them as fears 
grew that his missing wife and 
stepdaughter may be dead. 

Mr Robert Healey, a self- 


employed driving instructor 
aged 37, has not been seen 
since driving away from his 
home in Long Mead Avenue, 
Hazel Grove, Stockport, 
Cheshire, last Tuesday eve- 
ning, having cancelled milk 
and newspapers. 

Yesterday detectives dis- 
closed that his car had been 
found in an NCP car park near 
Birmingham's New Street rail- 
way station. It had been left 
there fast Thursday. 

Twenty-four hours Before it 
was parked, a suicide note 
addressed to Mr Healey's 
mother had been found with 
men's clothing on a beach at 
Prestatyn in North Wales. 

Police visiting the family 
home found Mr Healey's wife, 
Greeba, aged 40, and her 
daughter. Marie, aged 1 3, were 
also missing. 

They had last been seen 
there at lunchtime on Monday 
last week and a search re- 
vealed bloodstains in the 
couple's bedroom. 

Police also discovered three 
video tapes of the The Rise 


and Fall of Reginald Perrin , 
the television series which 
features at the start of each 
episode the central character 
undressing on a deserted 
beadi and walking into the sea 
in a feked suicide before 
embarking on a new life. 

Yesterday Det Chief Supt 
Give Atkinson, who is leading 
the inquiry, said: “I am mak- 
ing a persona] appeal to 
Robert Healey to come for- 
ward and speak to me, or to 
any police officer, to relieve 
the anguish of his parents, his 
wife’s friends and his step- 
daughters father. Urey are at 
their wit's end wondering 
what has happened.” 

Forensic scientists are 
examining the bloodstains to 
see if they match either Mrs 
Healey or her daughter, but 
the police believe if they were 
still alive they would, have 
made contact 

Mr Healey's metallic silver 
Vauxhall Chevette hatchback, 
registration TEH 199R. is also 
being examined. It was left on 
level three of the car part: in 
Park Street, Digbeth, between 
7am and 8pm last Thursday 
and discovered on Sunday. 
The police want to find any- 
one who saw it being parked. 


By David Sapsted 

“Mr Kipper" walked the 
streets of London again yes- 
terday as police searching for 
Miss Susannah Lamp] ugh, the 
missing estate agent re- 
constructed the young 
woman's last known journey. 

Bui in spite of more than a 
thousand calls from the public 
since the disappearance eight 
days ago, Scotland Yard 
admitted to having no clues as 
to the whereabouts of Miss 
Lamplugh, aged 25, or “Mr 
Kipper”, the client she ar- 
ranged to meet at a house in 
Fulham, south-west London. 

“We are no nearer to solv- 
ing this than we were a week 
ago." Det Supt Nick Carter 
said. 

“A lot of people follow set 
patterns and we hope the 
reconstruction will jog 
someone’s memory." 

Several Mr Kippers, includ- 
ing one actively engaged in a 
search for a property in Ful- 
ham, have been interviewed 
by the police but all have now 
been ruled out as possible 
abductors. 

Police Constable Susan 
Long, aged 24, yesterday 
adopted the identity of the 
estate agent, leaving the Ful- 
ham Road offices of Sturgis 
and Son, as the missing 


woman had done a week 
earlier, at 12.40pm. 

Dressed in a peach-coloured 
blouse, straight grey skirt and 
short black jacket, she drove 
in Miss Lampiugh’s white 
Ford Fiesta to the £128,000, 
mid-terrace house at 37 
Shorrolds Road for her 1 
o'clock appointment 

Det Sergeant Christopher 
Ball, aged 29, dressed in a dark 
lounge suit in the role of Mr 
Kipper. 

After a few minutes in the 
house, the two left in Miss 
Lamplugh's car which, soon 
afterwards, was parked in 
Stevenage Road, a short dis- 
tance from Fulham's Craven 
Cottage ground near the 
Thames. 

About two dozen officers 
lined the route the car might 
have taken, stopping motor- 
ists and talking to residents in 
case they bad spotted the U 
Fiesta, registration number 
B396 GAN, with the straw hat 
on the rear shelf 

Although an artist's im- 
pression of Mr . Kipper has 
been compared to a picture of 
a man wanted, in connection 
with three attempted rapes-m 
Richmond, the police are not 
linking Miss Lamplugh’s dis- 
appearance with that in- 
vestigation'; ... 


Wife hurt 
in new 
mail bomb 
campaign 

The wife of a former mem- 
ber of the Ulster Defence 
Regiment was injured yes- 
terday when a parcel bomb 
exploded in their living room- 
It was the second such 
attack in the Coleraine, Co 
Londonderry, area within 24 
hours, and brought fears that 
fruther devices could be in the 
mail. It is about five years 
since letter bombs have been 
used by Ulster terrorist 
organizations, but the parcels, 
sent to the former soldier and 
a prison officer, may signal the 
start of another campaign. 

As the woman, a mother of 
of four in her 40s, recovered 
after emergency surgery* the 
RUC urged anyone notions 
anything suspicious in the 
post to r ep o rt it immediately. 

The woman, who suffered 
hand and arm injuries and 
may lose the tips of her little 
fingers, was opening the pack- 
age at her home at Articlave, 
near Coleraine, when it ex- 
ploded, causing extensive 
damage to the room. 

The device was similar to 
one defused at the home of a 
prison officer in Coleraine on 
Sunday. It had been placed in 
a hollo wed-out book and sent 
to the bouse, but the officer 
became suspicious and called 
in Army bomb disposal ex- 
erts who worked for several 
ours before declaring it safe. 

A Roman Catholic working 
for Belfast City Council sur- 
vived a Loyalist assassination 
attempt on the Shankill Road 
yesterday when he struggled 
with his attacker. 

The workman fought his 
assailant, who hit him over 
the head with a hand gun 
when it feiled to go off At 
least one shot was fired and 
the workman needed stitches 
for injuries to his head. 


Labour’s 
onslaught 
on MP 
who quit 

Mr Robert Kilroy-Silk, the 
Labour MP who is to resign 
bis scat after “three miserable 
years" at the hands of the 
Militant Tendency, was criti- 
cized by his colleagues yes- 
terday after his onslaught on 
Mr Nei! Kinnock, 

Mr Kilroy-Silk, who plans, 
to quit the Labour stronghold 
of Knowsley North in Septem-. 
her to become a BBC tele- 
vision presenter, accused Mr 
Kinnock in s letter to The 
Times of “demeaning and 
undermining" the struggle 
against Militant. 

The Opposition leader was 
adopting “a cavalier attitude" 
in his rejection of Mr Kilrby- 
Siik’s reason for resigning, the 
MP wrote. 

“In doing this you under- 
mine the credibility that you 
have so laboriously estab- 
lished for yourself," Mr . 
Kilroy-Silk added. 

But Mr David Winnick, 
Labour MP for Walsall North, 
said: “If Mr Kilroy-Silk 
continues with outbursts 
against the Labour leader and 
the Labour Party generally 
people will begin to wonder , 
how impartial be could pos- 
siblv be as a presenter with. the 
BBC. 

“Whatever difficulties he 
■has had in hts constituency, he 
now seems determined to 
engage in an open slanging 
match with the party. 

“The best course for . him 
now is that, since he has 
decided to resign, to retain 
some dignity, and tbe sooner 
this happens the better for 
him." 

Mr Martin Flannery, La- 
bour MP for Sheffield, 
Hillsborough, said: “He seems 
to have lost his marbles. He is 
attacking Mr Kinnock, who 
has supported him all the way 
and this action merely 
strengthens the hand of the 
enemies of the Labour Party." 


The attempted killing was 
the latest in a number of , 

sectarian attacks in the rhflrOgrflphfir 
strongly Protestant area. - r 

These have resulted in the fltlSCkCu 


transfer of Roman Catholics 
who worked in a local housing 
executive office after Loyalist 
murder threats. 

Mr James Molyneaux. lead- 
er of the Offical Unionists 
Party, said yesterday there 
would be no political move- 
ment in the province during 
the lifetime of this parliament 
He was implicitly 
acknowledging that Unionist 
protests will not end the 
Anglo-Irish agreement, al- 
though they could delay and 
prevent its unplememation. 

“ He said it was misleading to 
suggest that talks between the 
political parties could begin 
once the marching season 
ended. 


Man sold 
pirated 
software 

An accountant who pirated 
computer software and sold it 
to West Country firms ap- 
peared before Taimton Crown 
Coart yesterday. 

Richard Turner, aged 35, of 
Great Yarmouth, admitted 
four offences concerning using 
floppy discs. 

He was told by Judge 
WiUcocfc, QG “If what you 
did were widespread, a great 
deal of harm would be done to 
the business community." 

He said that Turner set 
about the destruction of a 
Pegasus software system, ia 
breach of copyright, which 
came “pretty close to 
dishonesty". 

Tbe prosecution said Turner 
persuaded an engineer to re- 
move the electronic security 
system from demonstration 
programmes, which he then 
copied and sold for more than 
£4,000. 

Turner, bow unemployed, 
was bound over for a year and 
ordered to pay £250 costs. 

Mr Nigel Sweeney, for the 
defence, said that the offences 
did not constitute dishonesty 
and that the “illicit profit" of 
more than £4,000 was not 
accepted by the defence. 


Miners in 
ban on 
overtime 

More than 13,000 South 
Wales miners yesterday began 
an overtime ban — the first 
such industrial action in the 
coalfields since the end last 
year of the national pit strike. 

Tbe ban began on the day 
the 17 South Wales pits 
started up after a two-week 
holiday. 

Mr Des Dutfield, area presi- 
dent of the National Union of 
Mineworkers (NUM), said the 
action was being taken be- 
cause of “frustration and low 
morale" among miners. 

The Welsh pitmen are 
complaining that British Coal 
has deliberately delayed pay- 
ing last year's wage increase 
because of a wrangle over 
pension contributions during 
the strike. 

New threats of more job 
losses in the area have also 
soured relations. Eleven pits 
and more than 6,000 jobs have 
already been axed in South 
Wales since the strike ended. 

Coal board chiefs are un- 
likely to know the action's 
impact for some time because 
the ban it applies only to coal 
production. Ordinary shifts, 
maintenance and safety work 
are not affected. 



Simon Desorgber (left) and Lawrence Casserley rehearsing a duet for motorcycles with com- 
puters which they wfl] present tomorrow evening at the Pnrcell Room on the South Bank as 

part of their Electro Acoustic Cabaret (Photograph: Harry Kerr). 


Shared housing helps job seekers 

By Christopher Warman, Property Correspondent 


Shared ownership is helping 
home-owners in the north of 
England to move to jobs in the 
south, a government minister 
said yesterday. 

The system, which involves 
part renting and part buying a 
house, enables people to re- 
invest the value of their 
homes in a pan share and so 
move up the housing ladder, 
Mr John Patten, Minister for 
Housing, Urban Affairs and 
Construction, said. 


Announcing government 
amendments to the Housing 
and Planning Bfll which will 
widen this form of ownership 
in the private sector, Mir 
Patten said it was particularly 
useful for first-time buyers in 
high-cost areas who could not 
afford to buy outright 
In shared ownership, people 
buy a share and rent toe 
remainder, later 
the rented share, 
necessary. 


Mr Patten said that so far, 
virtually all shared ownership 
had been provided by local 
authorities, housing associ- 
ations and new towns. 

“These schemes have all , 


A freelance photographer 
who works for The Sun was 
identified by a journalist who 
used to work for the news- 
paper and then beaten up and 
robbed of camera equipment 
as he covered a demonstration 
outside News International's 
plant at Wappmg, east Lon- 
don. Thames magistrates were 
told yesterday. 

Mr Barry Beattie's identity 
was made known to protestors 
by Oliver Duke, aged 34, of 
North View Road, Hornsey; 
north London. Duke admitted 
threatening behaviour and 
■was fined £200 and ordered to 
pay £50 costs. . 

Four bailed on 
fraud charges 

Four Britons accused of a 
£16 million fraud relating ton 
£40 million contract to supply 
anti-tank missiles to Iran were 
further charged in Horseferry 
Road Magistrates* Court, 
south London, yesterday with 
international frauds involving 
£29.7 million. 

The men were remanded for 
two months on bail totalling 
£169,000. Two were ordered 
not to deal in the arms trade, 
or to take any international 
telephone calls except from 
their families. 

Blast caused 
by gas leak ; 

. A gas leak is believed to 
have caused the explosion 
which extensively damaged a 
branch of the NationaT West- 
minster Bank in Old Street, 
City of London, early 
yesterday. 

The blast was in the base- 
ment and wrecked most of the 
front of the b uilding. Fire then 
destroyed about a quarter of 
tbe ground floor. A man and a 
woman driving by at the time 
were cut by flying glass but 
they were not badly injured. 


purchasing 
by stages if 


relied on public subsidy. Now \ a v 

that building societies are AliaeSthetlStS 
1 — nmng to raise index-! j- • , 

dismissed 


_ to raise 

linked finance there is a very 
rral chance that shared owner- 
ship could be entirety pri- 
vately financed." 


Market research 


New weapon in the battle for the ‘belongers’ 


Ministers act to heal 

Thatcher-Tebbit rift 


By George Brock 

The new opinion research 

- method shown to the Prime 
-Minister by Young & 

- Rubicam executives has been 

- developed from a social 

• classification originally devel- 
oped by a market researcher 
working in California, Arnold 
Mitchell. 

He evolved a series of 
standard questions which clas- 
•• sify people into one of nine 
■ groups. Known in the jargon 

- of the market research trade as 

* a “psychographic" system, it 
. was dubbed “Vais" (an ao 
r ronyra for Values and Life- 
styles). 

The Young & Rubicam 
system is called CCCC. It is 
derived from *Va!s principles 
„ although it uses some different 
. ‘ . techniques and terminology. 

Vais' unusual characteristic 
was its versatility: not. only is 
■. it used widely in business, but 
-‘.it has more recently been put 
to use by social, miltary and 
political organizations. 

Most classification systems 
used by social scientists and 


SAATCHI & SAATCHI 
COMPANY PLC. 

YOUNG & RUBICAM LTD 


market researchers divide the 
population by relatively ciear- 
cuu observable distinctions 
such as occupation, income, 
housing and so on. Vais differs 
by using psychological out- 
look as the distinguishing 
factor which creates a set of 
class distinctions of its own. 

The population is graded 
into nine categories, beginning 
at the bottom with two groups 
defined as “needs-driven". 
Those are either “survivore" 
(mainly old age pensioners, 
the most disadvantaged of all) 
or “sustained" (including the 
younger poor unhappy at fail- 
ure to better themselves). 

Next, above that, is toe 
largest single group called 


“belongers”. That group, 
consisting of about 40 per cent 
of toe population, contains 
solid, stable middle-class peo- 
ple who are conservative (with 
a small “c") in lifestyles and 
values, players by the rales 
and preservers of the moral 
status qua 

Above that level, toe 
classification divides into peo- 
ple who are “outer-directed" 
(conducting their lives in re- 
sponse to values from out- 
side). and three smaller groups 
of “in ner-di reeled" people, 
who live in accordance with 
their inner values. 

The laner groups have been 
especially useful to US market 
researchers w^o have been 


trying to analyse toe ageing 
members of the counter-cul- 
ture “me" generation of the 
1960s. 

Many of those have settled 
down (and are important con- 
sumers), but their outlook on 
life is significantly different 
from preceding generations. 

“Outer-directeds” are di- 
vided into Emulators (am- 
bitious people on toe way up) 
and Achievers (those at the 
top of chosen careers). At the 
apex of the system is a tiny 
group of “Integrateds", who 
successfully combine inner 
and outer direction. 

Opinion research tech- 
niques of that kind are never 
likely to be all-purpose tool 
supplying answers to every 
question. But, by redividing 
the market or dertorate, they 
can sometimes explain mass 
behaviour m ways unillu- 
minated by more con- 
ventional methods. 

Politicians seldom rely on 
such research completely but 
use it to strengthen thejr 


confidence. Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher, in spite of a reputa- 
tion as an instinctive 
“conviction" politician, has 
been an enthusiastic and ■ 
sophisticated user of opinion 
research. 

Mrs Thatcher saw a first 
presentation of the 
system about a year ago. 
Young & Rubicam has also 
mounted large surveys 
on drug abuse and the inner 
city disturbances. 

Nato strategists, confronted 
by continuing' opposition in 
Europe to American nndear 
defence policies, have consid- 
ered using Vais. 

The system is sufficiently 
simple to reproduce, at least 
approximately. 

The only “trade secret" 
involved is the mix of ques- 
tions (between 50 and 100) 
asked of. respondents. But toe 
confidential nature of that. . 
questioning would be likely to 
preclude any co-operation be- 
tween agencies if the Conser- 
vative Party warned to try to 
hedge its bets. j 


Continued from page 1 
tion at the work which Saazchl 
& Saatchi and the Central 
Office have been doing. 

For months she has been 
holding secret meetings at 


manifesto group, are con- 
cerned that the abrasive at- 
tacks on Labour extremism 
from the Central Office are 
proving, counter-productive 
and that the constant rep- 


Chequers, with only a few f^hon of the vast sums spent 

by tbe Government on the 
health and education services 

are not getting through. 

They want the manifesto 
committee to be a r eal force. 

They emphasize that they 
are not concerned with 
changes to government policy 
(the disagreement on this issue 
cuts across the wettiry axis 
within the Cabinet) but with 
the need to find the right 
language to express toe 
Government’s achievements 
and future programmes. 

There is considerable 
annoyance among ministers 
that a clash over so apparently 


dose aides to consider alter- 
native strategies. A more 
extensive version of the Y & R 
research has been commis- 
sioned, without the knowledge 
of the party machine, to await 
her return from her summer 
break at the end of this month. 

Mr Tebbit’s supporters ar- 
gue that the manifesto group is 
of little consequence and that 
as long as toe party continues 
with determined government, 
’the strategy and toe manifesto 
“will write itself". 

Ministers should stay in 
their departments, they say, 
and let the party machine do 


ii 


M 


11 


its job. They dann that Values small a matter as a choice of 
and Lifestyles research ' advertising agency should 


(known as Vais) is well known 
to them and is already making 
such a contribution to their 
thinking as is necessary. 

Other ministers on the 


have such damaging high- 1 

fee * toatit 
bodes iu for future manage- 
ment of toe election cam- 



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Police 


Two anaesthetists, sus- 
pended from duty pending an 
internal inquiry into the death 
of a man at toe Lister Hos- 
pital, Stevenage, Hertford- 
shire. have been dismissed. 

Mr Michael North, aged 33, 
of Vardon Road, Stevenage, 
died in the hospital's intensive 
care unit after being admitted 
with severe stomach pains. 

Roads closed 

Police evacuated pan of 
Harley Street in London and 
dosed roads yesterday after 
builders renovating a four- 
storey house on the corner 
with Devonshire Street re- 
ported that it was on the verge 
of collapse. 

238 jobs go 

. Pembroke Packaging, car- 
ton manufacturers, said yes- 
terday that its factory at 
Basildon, Essex, would dose 
»n October with the loss of 238 
jobs. Falling cigarette sales 
and overseas competition €>' . 
were blamed. 


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‘eat up 85p of 
every £ paid to 



Ninety per cent of accident 
victims in England and Wales . 
receive no compensation and 
what is paid is too tittle and 
too late; the National Con- 
snmerCcBiBcii says today. For 
every pound- towards 


now gibes in costs,.dbe coi 
estimates. 

Ks response to the Lord 
Chancellor's review of civil 
justice regarding personal 
injuries; -published today, ar- 
gues that- there is an urgent 
need for radical reform of a. 
system which the council de- 
scribes as “arbitrary, slow and 
inordinately expensive”. 

The council partly blames 
deliberate delaying tactics by. 
insurance companies, lawyers 
who lack the skills needed to 
prove negligence, the costly 
and complex legal system, and 
accident victims* own ig- 
norance of their legal rights. 
But many of the problems are 
endemic to a system which 
requires the injured to prove 
that- others are at fault. 

“Around a tenth of the three 
million people injured each 
year in- England and Wales 
engage in a difficult, long- 
winded and expensive battle 
with an insurance company. 


By. Robin Young 


How they will fare will depend 
more oo. their knowledge and 
stamina and on the stalls of 
their lawyers than on the 
intrinsic justice of their case". 

The council claims that the 
system tries to compensate the 
injured while making those 
responsible pay for their neg- 
ligence, but in most cases fells 
on both counts. The long-term 
aimshoukt be a quick and 
efficient system of compensat- 
ing all injured people based on 
their needs and regardless of 
where blame for the accident 
tics. 

The council does, however, 
pat forward recommenda- 
tions for short-term pror 
cedural changes which its says 
would help to make the exist- 
ing system more efficient and 
accessible; They include: 

More publicity about in- 
jured people's rights to churn 
compensation and a sim- 
plified claim forms: 

The right to initiate a claim 
and later withdraw without 
risking liability for 
defendant’s costs; 

A scheme enabling solic- 
itors specializing in injury 
compensation cases to ad- 
vertise the feet and a pro- 
fessional. rule that solicitors 


should normally start court 
proceedings with in six months 
of being consulted; 

Speedy provision of non- 
' means tested legal aid for 
complex cases; 

County courts courts could 
play a more active part in 
investigating accidents and 
smallflat fees might be payable 
when people start claims, with 
huger fees payable only when 
a trial date is set; 

Claimants should no longer 
risk having to. meet 
defendants* foil costs in c a s es 
where a final court award is 
‘ less than an advance payment 
intp court. 

The council, has reserva- 
tions about the suggestion that 
claims could be dealt with on 
written evidence unless either 
side requests a full trial, but 
agrees that in cases where the 
only issue is legal liability ibe 
registrar in pre-trial reviews 
might be given discretion to 
decide some simple ca ses on 
the papers, with a right for 
dissatisfied parties to appeal 
to a foil court 

Personal Injury Lilt gar iot - A 
Consumer Response to the Civil 
Justice Review, National Con- 
sumer Council, ]S. Queen 
Anne’s Gate. London SW1. £2. 


Chairman 
‘steamed 
open mail 9 

A company chairman 
steamed open a director's let- 
ters after being tipped off 
about a possible boardroom 
coop, an fodnstifal tribunal 
was told yesterday. 

Mr Bobby Garrett, the bead 
of a company selling insurance 
for film sets, bad been alerted 
to the planned takeover by 
Mrs Elizabeth Byford, . his 
secretary. 

Mrs Byford told the hearing 
that Mr Garrett stormed into 
die office of Mr William 
Cross, a director, when he was 
told aboitt foe plan. ' 

“He turned over Mr Cross’s 
desk, went into the cupboard 
where all his adminis tration 
was and steamed open the 
letters and sealed them ap 
again,” she said. 

Mrs Byford said that Mr 
Garrett was frustrated because 
when he asked the directors 
questions about the business 
“fee- couM not get straight 
answers out of thoaT. 

The boardrikun coap hap- 
pened, eventually, in October 
1982 when the fire directors, 
busted Mr Garrett, the com- 
pany founder, after buying up 
57 percent of the shares. ‘ 

■ Mrs Byford said that she 
was dismissed after the take- 
over for allegedly passing on 
information about a secret 
boardroom account - to 'the 

minority shareholders. 

Mr Garrett, who died at 72 
of cancer three weeks after be 
was deposed, had employed 
Mrs Byford 20 years earlier. 

She said that she spoke to 
him on his deathbed and 
promised to look after the 
minority shareholders. 

Mrs Byford chimed that 
some of the money from the 
secret account was nsed to buy 
□p shares for the takeover of 
Film Finances, based in 
Berkeley Sqware, Mayfair. 

Acting on information from 
Mrs Byford, shareholders is- 
sued a High Court writ on the 
directors who then dismissed 
Mrs Byford from her £4(MKM) 
job, ft was said. 

The tribunal was also told 
that the Inland Revenue was 
; the company. 


Mrs Byford, aged 40, of 
Putney HOI, Putney, south- 
west London, is daiming un- 
fair dismissal. 

The hearing, at Chelsea, 
west London, continues today. 


Lesbian ‘battered 
in jealous attack 9 


bead when her back was to her 
assailant.** ’ 

He said that when Mrs Fox 
returned she saw Miss Scott in 
distressed state saying 


A games mistress attacked 
bar deputy head with a claw 
hammer, leaving her para- 
lysed. out of jealousy because 
of a lesbian love triangle, a . 

court was told yesterday. “Debbie, it’s Sue — Sue v ' . 

Susan Craker, ago! 35, was Id an interview with the 
found in a pool ofblood after police. Miss Scott said that 
being beaten about the head Mrs Fox was out shopping and 
andfece, Mr John Hilton, for she went for a bath, leaving 
the prosecution, told the Cen- Miss Craker reading. She 
tral Criminal Court. thought she beard a noise, but 

She was brutally and fero- was in the bath and ignored it 
cions ly attacked, receiving When she came downstairs 
near-ratal inju ries She is now she found Mrs Craker, lying 
paralysed, hgv brain damagp on the floor, her face and hair 
and tier speech is very slow, covered in blood. 

“She will never be a school Mr Hilton said Miss Scott 
teacher again,” he said. repeatedly denied any lesbian 

Jayne Scott, aged 3ft of relationships and denied any 
Croft Road. Farnham, jealousy. 

Buckinghamshire, , denies 


causing and inflicting grievous 
bodily harm to Miss Craker on 
August 6 last year. Both 
women were then teachers at 
Slough and Eton Secondary 
SchooL " 

Mr Hilton told tfaejury-that 
“the horrific attack was born 
out of old-fashioned jealousy 
— not between a mail- and 
woman tiut between a woman 
and another woman”. - - . 

The attack happened while 
Miss Craker, Miss Scott, and 
Miss Crdceris new lover, Mrs 
Deborah Fox, were all Saying 
at a house in Abbots Road, 
Barnet north London, which 
Miss Craker had inherited and 
was redecorating. 

Mrs Fox and Miss Scott had 
shared a flat since 1983 and 
had enjoyed a lesbian relation- 
ship. “The physical affection 
ceased, but they continued to 
share the flat and the same 
bed,” Mr Hilton said. 

In 1985, Mrs Fox and Miss 
Craker realized there was a 
physical attraction between 
them.“It came to the knowl- 
edge of Miss Scott in due 
course. She was very upset 
One cannot underestimate the 
hurt she felt at her discovery,** 
Mr Hilton said. ■ 

He told the jury that on 
August 6, the three break- 
fasted and Mrs Fox went out 
to buy a newspaper. She left 
Miss Craker sitting on the 
floor reading a book. 

“What happened in the next 
10 minutes is a horrifying 
story. Sitting cross-legged. 
Miss Craker was attacked with 
a- hammer. She was struck a 
heavy blow on the side of her 


Miss' Craker was wheeled 
nearer the jurors so they could 
hear her replies but she broke 
down. 

After an adjournment. Mbs 
Craker claimed Miss Scott hit 
her repeatedly over the head 
with a. hammer. She said she 
was in acoma for six days and 
in hospital several weeks. 

_ When Mr Richard CherriH, 
1 for thfe defence, suggested her 
imagination had played tricks 
on her memory, she shouted: 
“Pease— no — no — no. Scott 
struck once, twice, many 
times. Yes, oh yes.” 

The case continues today. 



Miss Susan Craken battered 
with hammer. 



Miss Jayne Scott: accused 
of attack. 


Police plea oyer cell-death victim 


Police appealed to the pub- 
lic yesterday to help to piece 
together the last hours of- a 
man who died from internal 
injuries id a police station celL 
Mr Philip Howard, aged 31, 
an unemployed labourer, was 
arrested for drunkenness after 
a scuffle with a friend at his 
home after a night ouL 
His family have called for a 
foil independent inquiry into 
his death, which is being 
investigated for the Police 
Complaints Authority by offi- 
cers from another force. 

South Wales police were 
yesterday trying to trace a taxi 
driver or another friend who 


gave Mr Howard.a lift from a 
chib at Porth, Mid Glamor- 
gan, to his home near by in 
Hendrefodog Street, Tylors- 
town, Rhondda, late last 
Thursday, the night he died. 

Mr Howard was arrested at 
12.30 am and died at 
Tonpentre police station 
about four hours later. A post- 
mortem examination showed 
he died from stomach 
haemorrhage. 

Relatives claimed Mr How- 
ard was handled roughly as he 
was put into a police car and 
banged his bead on the 
pavement- . 

Mr Allan Rogers. Labour 


MP for Rhondda, said yes- 
terday that Mr Howard wrote 
to him five months ago alleg- 
ing he was being harassed by 
police. 

The Police Complaints 
Authority ordered an inquiry 
after Mr Howard’s woman 
friend,Mrs Megan Roberts, 
said she saw police banging his 
head on the pavement 

Detectives from the Gwent 
force were called ra to investi- 
gate the claims and the South 
Wales Police Authority is 
carrying out an internal in- 
quiry. Mr Howard's family 
want an independent inquiry. 


Bolshoi 
director 
admitted 
to hospital 

By Gavin Bell 
Arts Correspondent 

Mr Yuri Grigorovich, artis- 
tic director of the Bolshoi 
Theatre for 20 years, has been 
taken to hospital in London 
suffering from severe stomach 
pains. 

Mr Grigorovich, aged 59, 
was taken ill at his hold on 
Sunday night and is expected 
to remain in the Middlesex 
Hospital for several days for 
extensive tests. 

A spokesman said that a 
preliminary examination in- 
dfcatedfcgastro-enteritis. Hfe 
ainess^ras disclosed at a 
reception in the* Soviet Em- 
bassy yesterday for members 
of the ballet company enr- 
rentiy performing at the Royal 
Opera House, CoventGaidea. 

The spokesman said the 
Bolshoi tour, which transfers 
to Manchester, and Bir- 
mingham before r etu rning to 
London fate r Hik month, 
woeld not be affected. 

Mr Pyotr Khomntov, the 
tour leader, paid tribute to Mr 
Grigorovich for developing its 
dassic heritage, wUk in- 
troducing a new, innovative 
approach. 

.“Under his direction, a new 
generation of stars have 
e me r g ed . He has an intuition 
for spotting new talent, and a 
gift for developing ft,” he said. 

Mr Khomntov recalled that 
the company's first foreign 
tour bean in London in 1956, 
and said that it was delighted 
to return to appreciative audi- 
ences in Britain after an 
absence of 12 years. 

Mr Alexey Nikiforov, an 
embassy counsellor, said that 
the tour had been squeezed 
into a busy schedule after the 
1984 visit to London by Mr 
Mikhail Gorbachov for meet- 



Galina Ulanova, the former prima halieriwa, with company members Alla Mihalchenko 
(left) and Nina Speraskaya outside the Soviet Embassy (Photograph: Chris Harris). 


with Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher led to the whhdrawl 
of restraints on cnttnral ex- 
changes. “Socially, rather 
than an official Mr 

Gorbachov and Mrs Thatcher 
discassed developing cultural 
relations, including the 
Bolshoi Ballet visit, when they 


met here two years ago,” he 
said. 

Mr Peter Brightman, 
managing director of the Brit- 
ish organizers. The Entertain- 
ment Corporation, said that he 
was discussing a five-year 
exchange programme between 
lending ballet and • opera 


companies with the Soviet 
authorities. 

The company will open in 
Manchester on Angust 12, 
then in Birmingham on Au- 
gust 18* before returning to 
London for performances in a 
specially built 3300-seat the- 
atre marquee in Battersea 


Pay beds 


NHS ‘risks losing business 9 


Britain's Jaigest private 
health insurance firm has said 
the national health service 
could price itself out of the pay 
bed markcL 

Bupa, which provides cover 
for 70 per cent of private 
health insurance subscribers, 
argues that the health service 
risks losing a substantial part 
of its £48 million annual 
income from private patient 
fees if ctaaiges rise substan- 
tially nextyear. . 

“if the . NHS keeps on 
charging more h wiDget to the 
point where it will cease to be 
competitive -with private 
hospitals,” Bupa said. “It will 
then start losing business.” 

The company's wanting 
comes after complaints from 
the Comptroller and Auditor 
General that health authori- 
ties are feiling to recoup the 
full cost of expensive 
operations. 


By Jill Sherman 

The report prompted a 
consultation document from 
the Department of Health last 
June which proposed either 
introducing higher charges na- 
tionally for costly treatment or 
allowing health authorities to 
set their own charges. 

In the latter case, the health 
authority would be able to 
recover the full cost of the 
treatment but would not be 
allowed to make a profit. 

. Mr Kenneth Collis, chair- 
man of the Central Manches- 
ter district health authority, 
says his district, which re- 
ceives £1 million * year from 
private fees, is taming away 
private patients who. need 
more complicated operations. 

Mr Colbs has written to the 
national health management 
board asking for permission to 
charge patients for the extra 
costs. 

At present patients are 


charged a blanket daily rate 
based on the type of hospital 
in which they are. 

A single room would cost 
£1 20 a day in a district general 
hospital and £185 in teaching 
hospitals. 

The Comptroller’s report 
shows that in one health 
authority the cost of perform- 
ing hip replacement opera- 
tions is £800 a patient But the 
authority recovers only £300 a 
private case because of early 
discharges of such patients to 
private nursing homes. 

Bupa’s charges for specialist 
fees (covering the cost of the 
surgeon and anaesthetist) 
range from £156 for a minor 
operation such as the removal 
of a wart or mole to between 
£9l9and£l,849 foracomplex 
major operation such as by- 
pass surgery. 


Worms hit 
ancient 
teasel crop 

By Hugh Clayton 
Environment Correspondent 

Tiny worms have killed off 
most of thfe year's harvest of 
Adler's teasel, one of Britain's 
most ancient crops. 

The hooked hairs on the 
seed heads of the fnller’s 
teasel were used for hundreds 
of years to tease up the fibres 
on woollen doth. 

Hu main use today is to pall 
up the nap on the green ‘baize 
that covers snooker tables. 

The only teasel merchant 
left in Britain said yesterday 
that there was no danger of a 


Mr Cyril George, 
director of Edmund 
Huddersfield, West York- 
shire, said: “We have enough 
in reserve to compensate for a 
bad harvest.” 

There was once a heavy 
trade in teaseb between 
Somerset, where the plants 
have been grown for at least 
700 years, and . the textile 
industry in northern England. 

The cultivated plant is a 
dose relative of the wild teasel 
which looks like a tall thistle, 
but fe related instead to the 
bine wild scabious which is 
now flowering by many roads. 

Mr Gordon Cbedzoy, who 
farms an acre of teasels on a 
1.000-acre form at Curry Rive! 
near Taunton, said the crop 
there had been cut by 80 per 
cent by eelwonn. 


Dealers promote 
satellite TV 

By BiD Johnstone, Technology Correspondent 


A national network of deal- 
ers, backed by an independent 
television company, has been 
created to sell satellite aerials 
to domestic, commercial and 
educational users and to 
stimulate interest in satellite 
television. 

The network, which will 
spread across England and 
Scotland, is the idea of the 
Bristol-based Satellite Tech- 
nology Systems, backed by the 
commercial television com- 
pany Television South (TVS) 
from Southampton. 

Last year TVS invested 
£440.000 in buying 47 per cent 
of STS. 

British viewers equipped 
with the appropriate antenna 
can now receive, via two 
satellites, 17 television chan- 
nels— largely a mixture of 
German, French, Italian and 
English programming. 


The two satellites are Intel- 
sat, operated by the Inter- 
national Satellite 

Organization, and ECS- 1 
(European Communication 
Satellite-!). 

The cost of the receiving 
equipment starts at about 
£1.100 but it is expected to 
drop by at least half within 18 
months as the demand grows. 

High-powered television 
satellites are planned for 
France, Germany and Britain 
within the next four years and 
will offer consumers a choice 
of another dozen television 
stations. 

Businesses and educational 
establishments are also ex- 
pected to have substantial 
interest in satellite television. 
Businesses will be able to 
ick up live financial news 
m all parts of the world. 


& 


Court bid for carvings 


A clergyman. Dr George 
Pattison, has taken action in 
the Dutch courts to win back 
Flemish carvings worth 
£100,000. stolen from his 
church nine years ago. 

The nine fifteenth century 
carvings, depicting the Pas- 
sion of Christ, had been in St 
George's Church, Stowlang- 
toft, Suffolk, since the 1800s, 
but were stolen in 1977 and 


smuggled to the Netherlands. 

In 1981 the carvings were 
stolen for a second time and 
were eventually bought from 
an antiques shop by a Dutch- 
man, Mr Ted Mooren, who 
donated them to a museum. 

A museum worker discov- 
ered the identity of the carv- 
ings. The court action was 
initiated after Dr Pattison 
offered to buy them back, but 
Mr Mooren refused to sell 


Estate agents reject legislation as gazumping rises again 

By Christopher Warman, Property Correspondent 


An unmodernized three- 
bedroom house in Fulham, 
south-west London, requiring 
about £40.000 spending on it, 
was put on the market recently 
at £125.000. After the offer 
was accepted, an increased bid 
came in and the two potential 
buyers continued bidding un- 
til the house was sold for 
£141000. 

It was a classic case of 
gazumping which had an 
honourable ending, for the 
vendor who bad made nearly 
£20.000 more than he had 
asked, paid the expenses of the 
losing bidder. 

Mr Richard Rawlings, from 
the Fulhain office of 


Wmkworth. the estate agents, 
said that in his area, where 
gazumping was now as wide- 
spread as it had been in the 
last boom in the early 1970s, 
the vendor paid the fees of a 
losing bidder in about one in 
five cases. 

“It can happen where a 
vendor says he wants a quick 
sale, holds a contract race and 
then recompenses the loser.” 

That is Mr Rawlings’s an- 
swer to gazumping, and he 
does not want controls to 
prevent it happening. “If it 
were controlled, it would be 
easy for agents to make a sale 
stick, but it could be at the 
expense of our diem,” he said. 


House prices increased by 
116 per cent over the year to 
July 31, according to the latest 
Halifax Bnilding Society 
bouse price index published 
today. The increase over the 
past three months was 4.4 per 
cent 

The forecast for house price 


inflation thfe year is almost 
13 per cenLThe average price 
of second-hand houses stands 
at £39,675, 143 per cent high- 
er than a year ago. Prices in 
Greater London are 25 per 
cent higher than in July IMS, 
with the average price at 
£64^70. 


He did not advocate the Mr Christopher RoupelL 
Scottish system of house- . from Winkworth’s South Ken- 
buying, where acceptance of sington office, recently had an 
an offer is binding on both example in Lewham Gardens, 
parties, because it has its own when a “pretty ordinary” 
difficulties, such as the need property on offer at £85,000 
for all interested parties to was accepted, only to attract 
have a survey. . another buyer. 

-It is ■ matter of getting to - S1£L“SS 


“We do not encourage 
gazumping, or at least are 
neutral, and we will always 
make a vendor aware of the 
risks. But I do not consider il a 
dirty practice.” 

In general estate agents 
welcomed the decision of the 
Law Commission to examine 
possible ways of ending the 
practice of gazumping, but 


r.- ' -•* > 

*.*r*‘“’ 

• - * : . - •** 


were not in favour of 
legislation. 

Mr Peter Short of the Royal 
Institution of Chartered 
Surveyors, admitted that 
gazumping flourished in a 
sellers* market such as now in 
parts of London and the 
South-east but he suspected 
there was more talk of it than ' 
actual examples. 


\ 


the contract stage, and m 
Scotland they get there more 
quickly.” 

Mr Short said the problem 
could be avoided if the buyer 
agreed to sign the contract 
and if there were difficulties 
with finance or a chain, it 
could mean the agreement for 
a long completion date and 
acceptance of the need for 
bridging finance. 


£ 100 . 000 , an example that 

“whenever more than one 
party like a property, the price 

will go up.” 

Mr Roupell said that “true" 
gazumping, where offers 
continued to be made and 
accepted above the original 
asking price, was rare. 

Mr Ruaraidh Adams- 
Cairos. of Savills. emphasized 
that gazumping did not only 
affect the potential purchaser. 

w 


Cripple 
beaten 
to death 

Police launched a murder 
investigation yesterday after a 
multiple sclerosis victim was 
foand brutally beaten to death 
in his bungalow. 

Mr Paddy Kirwan, aged 52, 
was discovered yesterday 
morning by social services 
staff. The police say he was 
murdered over the weekend. 

He had lived in the council- 
owned sheltered accommoda- 
tion in Dale Street, Chatham, 
Kent, for about four years. 

Mrs Gloria Leraihan, a 
neighbour, said, he. was com- 
pletely reliant oh home helps 
and nurses. “He couldn't get in 
and oat of his wheelchair on 
his own, hot despite that he 
was generally cheerfuL" 

Insp Roger Crittenden said: 
“We have no idea of any 
motive and would warn elderly 
people to keep their doors 
locked.” 

• A workman may have heard 
a schoolgirl's screams as she 
fonght vainly for her life, 
detectives disclosed yesterday. 

At about the time Dawn 
Ashworth, aged 15, met her 
killer on a footpath near her 
Leicestershire home, a factory 
worker near by heard two 
screams from the direction of 
the path. 

But he decided it was chil- 
dren playing and took no 
action. 

Police say Dawn, the victim 
of an horrific sexual assault, 
put up a struggle before she 
was killed. 

Det Chief Supt David 
Baker, who is leading the 
murder hoot, is refusing to 
disclose how the girl died, but 
she is* believed to have been 
strangled. 

Dawn, who lived in MSI 
Lane. Enderby, disappeared 
after visiting a friend on 
Thursday afternoon. Her body 
was found on Saturday under a 
pile of hay. - 

Mr Baker said: “One can- 
not help feeling that someone 
in this community somewhere 
knows something about this 
individual and either know- 
ingly or unwittingly fe giving 
him some cover.” 

Meanwhile, 200 detectives 
are carrying ont house-to- 
house inquiries and interview- 
ing patients at a local 
psychiatric bospitaL 

Possible finks with the un- 
solved murder three years ago 
of another girl aged 15 Lynda 
Mann, less than a mile away, 
are also being studied. 

• The boyfriend of Diane 
SindalL the murdered florist, 
wept yesterday as he appealed 
for her killer to give himself 
np. 

David Beatty, aged 22, who 
planned to wed Diane next 
year, said: “He is a sick man. I 
hope he knows what he has 
done.” 

Mr Beatty, a car body 
repairer, was speaking at a 
press conference at Birken- 
head, on Merseyside. 

Diane, aged 21, was beaten 
to death after her Fiat van nut 
ont of petrol at about midnight 
on Friday. Her body, partially 
naked, was found in a weed- 
infested alley off the town's 
Borough Road, by a passer-by 
who thought it was a dummy. 

The police confirmed yes- 
terday that Mane had been 
sexually attacked. She was on 
her way home from her part- 
time job as a barmaid at the 
Wellington public house in 
neighbouring Bebington. 


* 


Umbrella 
seller 
dampened 
by court 

A street trader was fined 
yesterday after being arrested 
as he sold umbrellas in a 
torrential rainstorm. 

Ron Jordan, aged 44. was 
arrested on Sunday as he was 
besieged by a crowd of people 
outside the Trocadero Centre. 
Piccadilly Circus. London. 

After spending the night in 
custody. Jordan, of Squires 
Lane. Finchley, north Lon- 
don. was fined £30 with £5 ‘ 
costs at Bow Street Mag- '• 
istrates Court after admitting 
a charge of wilftil obstruction. ' 

Mr David Hopkin, the chief 
metropolitan stipendary mag- 
istrate, was told that drenched 
customers thronged around - 
Jordan, forcing pedestrians to 
walk off the pavement. 

Jordan, still in yellow oil- • 
skins after more than 20 hours ' 
in custody, was unrepentant. '• 
He said that he had been 
arrested “hundreds of limes” 
for street selling. 

Dunhill heir 
refused bail 

Christopher Dunhill. aged 
3 1 . heir to the Dunhill tobacco 
company, was refused bail at - 
Marylebone court, central ■ 
London, yesterday in spite of 
sureties of £105,000 offered by 
his fether and brother. 

Mr Dunhill, of Spencer 
Court. Marylebone Place, is 
charged with supplying 2.S 
grammes of cocaine and with 
charged with handling 41- 
tapesiries and carpets worth 
£105.000, alleged to have been 
stolen from outside Christie's . 
auction hall in 1984.He was- 
remanded in custody for a 
week. 

Inquest on fan 
in train death 

Peter Watson, aged 18. a 
Glasgow Rangers football fen 
who fell from the overnight 
express to London on his way 
to Saturday’s game with . 
Tottenham Hotspur, died 
from fractured skull, a Carlisle 
inquest was told yesterday. 

A boy aged 16 has been 
interviewed by the police and 
a file prepared for the Director 
of Public Prosecutions. The 
inquest on Watson, a heating 
engineer, of Motherwell, was 
adjourned. 

Thief takes 
wedding car 

A bride burst into tears 
when she left the church after 
the ceremony to discover her 
wedding car had been stolen 
outside All Saints, Erdington, 
Birmingham. 

Mis Kal Thorpe, aged 26, 
walked happily down the aisle 
with her new husband Jevan 
on Saturday, then discovered 
their vintage open-topped 
Morris Minor had dis- 
appeared. complete with rib- 
bons and flowers. 

Boy sought in 
sex incident 

A boy aged eight was being 
sought yesterday for question- 
ing about an indecent offence 
against a woman aged 77. 

Police are appealing for 
witnesses to the incident 
.which occurred when the 
woman was confronted by 
three boys as she walked along 
a footpath in the Whitley area 
of Coventry on Monday night. 

Court fight 
for job 

Mrs Olga Longden, who lost 
her job as chief administration 
officer at Bamfield College in 
Bedfordshire, after she mar- 
ried Mr Wilson Longden. the 
vice-principaL fe to ask the 
High Court to reinstate her. 

Mrs Longden, of Turnpike 
Drive, Luton, will be seeking a 
judicial review in October on 
the decision by Bedfordshire 
County CounciL 

Plain deal 

The Ministry of Defence 
yesterday opened to the public 
a nine-mile section of Salis- 
bury Plain in Wiltshire 

overlooking the Valoe of 

Pewsey in compensation for 
closing centuries-old rights of 
way across the LarkhiU gun- 
nery area. 

Chain reaction 

Villagers at Fulbeck, 
Lincolnshire, formed a human 
chain yesterday to stop en- 
gineers from Nirex, the gov- 
ernment nuclear waste agency, 
carrying out preliminary tests 
for a proposed nuclear waste 
dump near their homes. They 
plan a 24-hour a day vigil 

Hammer raid 

Seven leenlh-century silver- 
ware and other antiques worth 
£20,000 were stolen when 
thieves with sledgehammers 
raided the Clive House Mu- 
seum in Shrewsbury, former 
home of Give of India, on 
Sunday. 

Tory choice 

Mr David Wilshire, aged 
42, Tory group leader on 
Wansdyke District Council, 
Avon, has been selected as the 
prospective parliamentary 
candidate for foe safe Conser- 
vative seal ofSpelthome. 



IT ARRIVED ON SCHEDULE, 
HAD A TOUCH OF ROMANCE, 
WAS ENJOYED BY MILLIONS 
AND MADE A PROHT. 


The train was the world famous Orient 
Express, the setting for a powerful and moving 
romance. 

For Yorkshire Television it was another 
success story, both in terms of financial and 
viewing figures. 

‘Romance on the Orient Express’ was sold 
to over 30 countries, including America, Japan 
and Australia. 

In this country alone it proved so popular 
that 1 1 million viewers caught the programme. 

And no wonder when you consider 
‘Romance on the Orient Express’ boasted 
such passengers as» Cheryl Ladd and Sir 
John Gielgud. 

Yorkshire Television has an excellent 
track record in successful productions. 

Like the famous saga from the Yorkshire 
Dales, ‘Emmerdale Farm,' which enjoys peak 
time transmission twice a week. 

And appears high on the viewers tables 
week after week. 

We also produce exciting game shows 
like ‘3-2- T and ‘Winner Takes All’. 

Comedies like ‘Duty Free’ and ‘Home To 
Roost! Documentaries like 'First Tuesday! 

And it was Yorkshire Television that was 
responsible for the birth of the thought 
provoking medical programme ‘Where 
There’s Life' hosted by Miriam Stoppard. 

In our 18 year history we have reached 
many millions of viewers in over 60 countries, 
and picked up as many awards. 

We’ve won the International Emmy 
(television's equivalent to the Oscar) in New 
York twice for drama. 

Our documentaries and light entertain- 
ment programmes have not gone unrewarded. 

With such a background, it is understand- 
able why we’ve become one of ITVs most 
popular TV stations and why we're aiming for 
greater success in the future. 


YORKSHIRE 

TELEVISION 

Successful Programmes Made in Yorkshire 

feued^by Baring Erothere & Co., Limited 
on behalf of Yorkshire Television Holdings pic 


■: 


♦V 




THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


UVEKSEAS iNfcWS 


Anti-apartheid groups 
call on leaders to 
resist British pressure 


Airlines to 
seek new 
routes 
in Africa 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


By Mi 
Trans 


Michael Baily 
;port Editor 


The United Democratic 
Front (UDF), a loose alliance 
of anti-apartheid groups 
which shares the political aims 
of the outlawed African Na- 
tional Congress <AN Cf, yes-; 
lerday called on Common- 
wealth leaders meeting in 
London not to allow them- 
selves to be dictated to by Mis= 
Thatcher. 

It was clear, the UDF 
declared in a statement issued 
by its acting publicity sec- 
retary, Mr Murphy Morobe. 

that Mrs Thatcher was “more 
concerned about protecting 
. . . profits than about ending 
the system of racial oppres- 
sion and economic exploita- 
tion that are propped up by 
these profits". 

It was a ‘‘slap in the lace" 
for the people or South Africa 
that Mrs Thatcher continued 
to- defend Pretoria even after 
her Government bad been 
"kicked in the teeth" by 
President Botha when he re- 
jected the proposals put to 
him at the end of last month 
by Sir Geoffrey Howe. 

Meanwhile, South African 
Airways (SAA) yesterday de- 

Two killed 
innuclear 
plant fire 

Johannesburg —Two men 
were killed and two seriously 
injured in a fire at South 
Africa's fop-secret nodear re-' 
search and development plant 
at PeBndaha, near Pretoria, it 
was disclosed yesterday (Mi- 
chael Hornsby writes). 

Officiate said no radioactive 
material was involved, and the 
fire wasa third of a mile from 
the nearest reactor. 

The victims wee members 
oif a cleaning team "engaged in 
a routine task" and were the 
only people in die budding 
when the fire started. It was 
quickly pat out Hie mtideut 
occurred last Sunday . 

Pelindaba is part of a larger 
complex that iududes a ara- 
nnun enrichment plant which 
could give South Africa die 
capacity to. make tradear 
weapons. 


nied a claim in a newspaper 
report here that it had sold 
several of its Boeing 747 
jetliners to foreign banks on a 
“lease-back” basis, as part of a 
contingency plan for dealing 
with a possible loss oflanding 
rights in foreign countries. 

The newspaper. The Star of 
Johannesburg reported that 
SAA. byseumg the aircraft 
and then leasing them back, 
wanted to avoid being stuck 
with ownership of aircraft ft 
could not use in the event that 
landing rights were revoked — 
a sanction being considered by 
Western countries. 

SAA’s media relations offi- 
cer, Mr Francois Louw, said; 
“SAA always looks at all 
options, and this is an option,* 
but no such sales or lease-back 
deals whatever have taken 
place." 

Mr Louw said it was true 
that SAA had leased — but not 
sold — eight of its jetliners (a 
fifth of its total fleet) to foreign 
airlines to reduce excess 

capacity. This decision, he 
said, hid been necessitated by 
the economic recession and 


shrinking passenger loads on 
overseas routes. 

In the black township of 
Lamontville, near Durban, 
three soldiers were killed and 
another three seriously in- 
jured when their armoured 
vehicle overturned after coll- 
iding with a car on Sunday 
night, it was reported by the 
police yesterday. The A black 
driver of 4be car was slightly 
injured. 

In Pretoria, the Govern- 
ment's Bureau for Informa- 
tion said last night that 17 
black youths had been ar- 
rested in a shopping centre' in 
Soweto, Johannesburg’s black 
satellite city, but said it could 
not confirm reports that as 
many as 100 schoolchildren 
involved in class boycotts had 
been detained. 

• JOHANNESBURG: The 
Rev Duncan Buchanan, Dean 
of St. Mary's Cathedral, was 
elected yesterday as the new 
Anglican Bishop of Johannes- 
burg, replacing Bishop Des- 
mond Tula, who will be 
enthroned as Archbishop of 
Cape Town next month (AP 
reports). 


Lange criticizes 
Thatcher stance 

From Richard Long. Wellington 


New Zealand's Prime Min- 
ister, Mr David Lange, yes- 
terday criticized Mrs 
Thatcher’s opposition’ to eco- 
nomicsanctions against South 
Africa, saying the stance was 
being taken to protect British 
financial interests. 

He also angrily criticized 
Mr Jim Spicer, the British 
Conservative Party vice- 
chairman, for the “bigoted, 
biased" views he presented to 
the annual conference of New 
Zealand's Opposition Na- 
tional Party at the weekend. 

Mr Lange said Britain did 
not own the Commonwealth, 
and New Zealand would go 
along with the form of sanc- 
tions decided by the 
Commonwealth mini - summi t 
in London. 

He acknowledged that a 


ivy bui 

the front-line African states if 
widespread sanctions .were 
imposed on South Africa. In 
an extreme case, this would 
require a big rescue effort 
"This is a situation which, I 
think, would be rather akin to 
a Beilin airlift. If there were 
comprehensive, mandatory, 
and successful economic sanc- 
tions against South Africa, 
then you could have a huge 
operation to ensure the sur- 
vival of those adjoining 
countries." 

• KUALA LUMPUR; Mal- 
aysia's re-elected Prime Min- 
ister, Datuk Seri Dr Mahathir 
Mohamed, said yesterday the 
he had no sympathy tor the 
problems faced by Mrs 
Thatcher at the summit meet- 
ing (Reuter reports). 


Britain's two leading air- 
lines flying to Africa, British 
Airways and British Caledo- 
nian. are seeking licences- to 
fly to Botswana on South 
Africa's northern border as 
sanctions appear to move 
closer. 

Gaborone airport in Bo- 
tswana is only 30 minutes from 
Johannesburg and could in 
theory he used as an alter- 
native if direct flights axe 
banned. 

But any airline seeking to 
arcumvent sanctions in that 
way could face counter-mea- 
sures from otter African 
states. 

British Caledonian, which 
has munerons flights to west 
and central Africa, said yes- 
terday that its application had 
nothing to do with South 
AfricaJFfigbts to Gaborone 
would be justified solely on 
local traffic. 

British Airways which, un- 
like British Caledonian, has a 
large existing business with 
South Africa— its eight (fights 
a week to Johannesburg, Dur- 
ban, and Cape Town are 
thought to be worth about £10 
million a year malting it one el 
Its most profitable routes — 
said It was taking the step to 
protect its commercial 
interests. 

It clearly fears that other 
airlines serving South Africa 
will tahfr similar mMyr w! and 
it conid lose heavily if it faded 
to follow suit. 

Each airline is opposing the 
other's application, and both 
will be heard at a public 
hearing in London on Septem- 
ber 22-25. 

BA is applying for licences 
for direct flights from Heath- 
row or Gatvnck to Gaborone; 
and other flights to Gaborone 
from Harare, Nairobi Li- 
longwe, Entebbe, and Dar es 
Salaam. 

No firm proposals for ser- 
vices have yet been made, the 
air fine said yesterday; it hopes 
the eventuality will not arise. 

British Caledonian wants a 
licence for Gatwkk to Gabo- 
rone direct, and for flights to' 
Gaborone from Donate, Kano, 
Kinshasa, Lagos, Libreville, 
■mi Lusaka. 


Reagan hits Hollywood 
for glorifying drugs 

. From Minted Binyon, Washington 

President Reagan, denounc- 
ing Hollywood and rock'n'roll, 
culture for glorifying drugs, 
said drag dealers deserved the 
death penalty. - 

He told Newsweek in an 
interview published yesterday 
that the. city which nurtured 
him made drug use appear 
“attractive and funny, not 
dangerous and sad". 

Some recent films had made 
drugs appear easy and enjoy- 
able. Musicians whom young 
people like “make no secret of 
the feet that they are usere". 

He did not think drag users 
should be imprisoned, but 
should be helped. 

States should not punish 
addicts who voluntarily asked 
for and accepted aid but drag 
dealers, he believed, deserved 
to die. 

He recognized the oppo- 
sition this would arouse in the 
US. however, and said his 
own view was that it would be 
counterproductive. 

Among the President's pro- 
posals for dealing with Amer- 
ica's drug crisis, an issue on 
which his wife, Nancy, has 
launched an international cru- 
sade, was the suggestion that 
ail Cabinet members should 
submit to voluntary drug 
tests. 

He had a chance to put this 
idea to them personally yes- 


terday when he met his Cabi- 
net to discuss his . new 
nationwide anti-drug pro- 
gramme. 

Mr Larry Speakes. the 
White House spokesman, said 
the Cabinet domestic policy 
council had been soliciting 
views from nil relevant gov- 
ernment agencies and law 
enforcement bodies. 

These will be discussed in 
the next few weeks, while Mr 
Reagan speaks out on the drag 
question. 

Meanwhile, an opinion poll 
showed that nearly two-thirds 
of Americans favour prosecu- 
tion for possession of mari- 
juana. and say the Govern- 
ment is not spending enough 
to combat drag use. Six years 
ago a similar Gallup poll 
found that only 43 per cent 
believed the possession of 
marijuana should be a crim- 
inal offence. 

The latest poll found broad 
support for periodic screening 
for use, with 85 per cent of 
those questioned also wanting 
the police to take such tests. 

The poll also found 72 per 
cent wanted drag screening for 
athletes and government wor- 
kers, 60 per cent wanted to see 
this for high school pupils and 
50 per cent wanted it- for job 
categories not included in the 
poll 



Picasso held to ransom 


Melbourne (Reuter) — A 
group caffiag itself “Austra- 
lian Cultural Terrorists" 
threatened yesterday to de- 
stroy Picasso's “Weeping 
Woman" (pictured above) un- 
less the Victoria State Govern- 
ment paid a ransom and boost- 
ed funding for the arts. 

The previously unknown 
group seat a note to the Gov- 
ernment saying its members 


stole the 1937 , 

the Victorian National Gallery 
last weekend, police said. 

The Picasso, bought last 
December and valued at up to 
$ Ansi .5 million (£600,000), 
was described by the gallery 
director, Mr Patrick' 
McCanghey, one of the most 
important works of modern art 
and the climax of the gallery’s 
collection. 



.Mondpal law enforcement officers from the MtomboNrazi training college at their passing- 
out parade yesterday in Port Elizabeth, Sooth Africa. 


Muslims fail in Malaysia poll 


From M M G Pfllai, Koala Lmnpnr 


Malaysia's fundamentalist 
Islamic challenge fizzled out 
after last weekend's general 
election, in which the Na- 
tional Front was returned to 
power in the Federal Govern- 
ment and retained control of 
all 1 1 state assemblies. 

But the strong urban Chi- 
nese preference for the oppo- 
sition Democratic Action 
Party (DAP) highlighted a 
polarization between- the two 
principal races, with all the 
implications of a coming 
dash. 

The National Front was 
returned in 147 of the 177 
parliamentary constituencies, 
the DAP won 24, the Theo- 
cratic Pan-Malaysian Mamir 
Party (PAS) one and indepen- 
dents five. The National Front 
attained a two-thirds majority 
by 6am on Sunday and won 89 
of the 351 state assembly 
constituencies in 1 1 states. 

The PAS debacle had not 
been expected. . Opposition 
pressure to whittle away the 
Government's two-thirds ma- 
jority was dependent on the 
PAS doing well in the Muslim 
Malay rural hinterland- nod 
the DAP doing likewise in 
urban Chinese areas. 

Leaders of -PAS and the 
Malaysian Chinese Associa- 
tion, a member of the 
coalition, yesterday pror 
a post mortem on their poor 
showing. In the next Par- 
liament the PAS voice will be 
muted and the coalition's 
Chinese presence drastically 
reduced. 

The PAS went into the elec- 
tion with the aim of being an 
alternative government, and 


to form the government in 
four states. To widen its 
support among the non-Mus- 
lims. already suspicious of its 
fundamentalist intentions, the 
PAS entered into a loose 
alliance with prominent Chi- 
nese associated with Chinese 
cultural and educational 
groups and other non-Malay 
political parties. 

But it was clear that even 
the Malay community, most 
susceptible to an Islamic state. 

. FINAL RESULTS 

Seats in the new Parliament (pre- 
election figures in brackets): 

Party 
MIC 

MCA 

Gerafcan* 

Sabah parties* 

Sarawak parties* 

UMNO 

DAP 

In.liin nnilanla 

moewttueius 

PAS 
Total. 

* Parties in the National Front which 
won a total of 147 seats compared 
with 132 m the oM House. 

rejected it So did the Chinese 
and Indian communities. PAS 
promises to bah pop music, 
deprive women and non-Mus- 
lims of the vote and prevent 
them from holding high office 
highlighted the dangers of a 
fundamentalist Islamic 
Malaysia. 

TheDAP is the largest party 
in the opposition now and this 
largely Chinese group has its 
strength concentrated in the 
urban constituencies. Initial 
analysis indicates that the 
Government would, as it had 
promised to do during the 
campaign, ignore those consti- 



tuencies which returned oppo- 
sition members. This would 
only bring about a further 
alienation, political sources 
noted.yestcrday. 

The two main Chinese par- 
ties in the coalition, the 
Malaysian Chinese' Associ- 
ation (MCA) and the Malay- 
sian People's Movement (Ce- 
rulean), lost 19 of the 41 seats 
they contested. 

In the coalition they cannot 
articulate as loudly as their 
constituents would like them 
to. for fear of a backlash from 
the other 12 coalition mem- 
bers. The feet that several of 
their leaders were returned 
from Malay-majority rural or 
semi-rural constituencies only 
adds to their problems 

There is a growing view that 
the Prime Minister. Datuk Seri 
Dr Mahathir Mohamed. fresh 
from his victory, would have 
to devote his attention to 
cracks in his coalition. 

- Most of these were papered 
over because of the election, 
but th5 possibility of a Chinese 
electorate being represented in 
Parliament from the oppo- 
sition benches is something 
that upsets the Government. 

All coalition leaders, includ- 
ing Cabinet ministers, were 
returned without difficulty. 
The PAS lost all its senior 
leaders, although Haji Hadi 
Awang, its “Ayatollah”, 
whose views on Islamization 
were reflected in its election 
strategy, was returned to the 
Xrengganu Slate Assembly. Its 
only victory was in Kc lan tan, 
the state where it had been 
widely predicted to form the 
next Government. 


Pakistan tells 
envoys to stay 
out of politics 

Islamabad — The Pakistan 
Government has warned 
members of foreign missions 
against participating i a politi- 
cal meetings (Hasan Akhtar 
wrhes). ' 

The warning followed re- 
ports of Soviet and Afghan 
diplomats attending the con- 
vention of a new left-wing 
political party, the A wain i 
National Party 
The participation .of two 
Soviet diplomats and the Af- 
ghan Charge d'Affeires in the 
party's convention in Karachi 
on July 26 and 27 has caused a 
political controversy, since the 
new party has declared itself 
against the United Slates and 
called for direct and dose 
links with the Kabul regime. 


Family’s life 
savings stolen 
from car boot 

Soenderborg, Denmark 
(AP) - A Canadian family lost 
its entire life savings of 
$Can3S0.000 (£181.000) in 
cash, which was stolen from 
their parked car in Soender- 
borg. police said yesterday. 

Mr Fritz Kareer of Victoria, 
British Columbia, his wife 
Lizz y and two children had 
driven to Denmark from West 
Germany on Sunday and 
planned to stay only a few 
hours to see the sights. 

They were visiting Soender- 
borg Castle when 3 thief stole a 
briefcase containing the fami- 
ly's savings in $Can 1.000 
notes from the boot of the car. 

Mr Karger, a West German, 
citizen, sold his Canadian 
company before he left Can- 
ada to return and buy a house 
in Hamburg. Since the family 
had not been able to make a 
decision about a house, they 
took the money with them to 
Denmark. The cash, which 
was not covered by insurance, 
was stolen without any dam- 
age to the car. 

“The lid of the boot prob- 
ably wasn't closed property, 
because a strap from a bag or 
something was caught in be- 
tween," a police spokesman 
said. 


Pentagon told 
lobby tactics 
were not legal 

From Mofasin AJi 
Washington 

The Pentagon broke the law 
by hiring outside public rela- 
tions consultants to help lobby 

for its new generation of 

chemical weapons, two senior 
members of the House of 
Representatives have alleged. 

Mr Dante Fasten (Demo- 
crat, Florida), chairman of the 
House foreign affairs commit- 
tee, and Mr Jack Brooks 
(Democrat, Texas), based 
their allegations on a General 
Accounting Office report. 

This congressional watch- 
dog body concluded that 
Pentagon officiate had en- 
gaged in illegal lobbying activ- 
ities and misused tax funds 
promoting the recommenda- 
tions of a presidential commis- 
sion on chemical warfare. 

The Pengagoa, rejecting the 
allegations, said presidential 
commissions routinely use 
public affairs counsel. 

The two congressmen said 
the Pentagon had apparently 
spent at least Si million 
(abort £660,000) in lobbying 
for the binary chemical weap- 
ons programme. 

President Reagan told Con- 
gress last week be plans to 

resume production of chemical 
weapons 


US Republican’s advice to Nicaraguan leader 

Talk to right, Ortega urged 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 


In an extradordinary ex- 
change in Chicago with a 
right-wing Republican Con- 
gressman. President Ortega of 
Nicaragua was advised by one 
of his staunchest opponents to 
take his case to American . 
conservatives instead of 
concentrating on left-wing lib- 
erals. He readily agreed. 

Meeting in the borne of the 
Rev Jesse Jackson, the black 
leader. President Ortega lis- 
tened to advice from Mr 
Robert Doman, a strongly 
anti-communist Representa- 
tive from California, on how 
he should polish his image 
during his current American 
tour. 

“Your itinerary is very 
important." Mr Dornan said. 
The Nicaraguan leader should 
address respected foreign af- 
fairs bodies so that his trip 
“doesn't stink of radical chic." 
He added, as the two men 
were invited into Mr Jack- 
son's dining room: "You can’t 
make headway unless yon 
meet with conservatives. Let 
them hammer on you and you 
hammer back, and then 
maybe we'll get somewhere." 

“i think your position is 
correct,” President Ortega re- 


plied. using his wife as an 
interpreter. “To be frank, we 
have not given thought" to 
talking with conservative 
supporters of President Rea- 
gan. 

Mr Dornan, one of the 
Congressmen most active in 
supporting the Contra rebels 
seeking the military over- 
throw of President Ortega's 
Government, s ugges ted that 
Mr Reagan had never heard 
"the other side " He then 
offered, somewhat improba- 
bly, to arrange a meeting. 

Mr Jackson, who has cast 
himself in the role of peace- 
maker between Washington 
and Managua, escorted aim 
around Chicago at the week- 
end. and invited him to dinner 
with US reporters. 

President Ortega’s -US tour, 
itself bizarre in view of the 
Reagan Administration's vil- 
ification of him and transpar- 
ent attempt to have him 
overthrown, follows his abor- 
tive attempt in the UN Se- 
curity Council to get the US to 
abide by World Court rulings 
on Nicaragua. For this, he was 
granted the usual visa issued 
to heads of states. 

But. armed with his visa, he 


then sallied forth into the 
American heartland on a 
propaganda mission which 
has attracted considerable 
press interest - 

In Denver he likened the 
Sandinista revolution to the 
US civil rights movement, 
and got a- standing ovation 
from black lawyers. He has 
addressed Hispanic and re- 
ligious leaders, bad breakfast 
at a Catholic church, dined in 
New York with Mary Travers, 
a leading folk singer, and 
plunged into curious crowds, 
shaking hands. 

He has proposed an eight- 
point peace plan for his coun- 
try. though be has not given 
the details. This, naturally, has 
been dismissed in advance by 
the Administration, which has 
publidy ignored his visit 

Rejecting a Reagan-Ortega 
summit Mr Larry Speakes, 
the White House spokesman, 
said scathingly yesterday: 
"Our position is that Onega's 
first meeting should be with 
those in his own country who 
have problems with the way 
he's running his country be- 
fore he tries to meet with the 
President" 


Lie detector hooks the 
angler who shot a line 

From Paul VaBely, New York 


Alva Anting wfll go down in 
angling folklore as tbe one 
that did not get away. 

Tbe hapless fisherman has 
just been sentenced to two 
years* hard labour for cheating 
in an angling competitioo. 

The 40-year-old pipefitter 
did not even the prosecution 
agreed, tot out to win the 
Louisiana bass casters' tour- 
nament He merely wanted to 
bump up bis score with the 
addition of several sizeable 
specimens he had canght ear- 
lier in the week. 

He was not to know that on 
tbe day tbe weather would 
change and they would con- 
stitute a winning catch. 

In any case tbe five bass 
which be had hidden in a 
bucket underwater, to be 
palled ontonthebig day, were 
spotted in advance by tbe 
tether of one of tbe tournament 
officials while be was out 


perch Gshing. 

Hie wfly angler and his son 
polled np tiie bucket and broke 
the second dorsal fin of each 
fish. Then they- called local 
fishery officials and tbe dis- 
trict attorney. 

The next day when Mr 
Anting arrived with his string 
of fish they did not teD turn he 
had been canght out by the 
polygraph. Instead they 
awarded him first prize in the 
"heavy string" division. 

Bat when be came forward 
to accept his prizes of $100 
cash plus a S4J500 boat and rig 
he was arrested by game 
wardens. 

The severity of the sentence 
was due, according to' his 
lawyer, Mr Ernest Johnson, to 
his previous record, which 
included drunken driving, 
passing false cheques and 

flffen req agains t tfa* Migrating 

Birds Act 


Iceland and 
China agree 
energy deal 

From Tony Samstag 

Oslo 

Icelandic and Chinese sci- 
entists have agreed in prin- 
ciple on a project to develop 
sources of geothermal energy 
in Tibet, which is thought to 
have more than 500 bot-water 
springs. 

Mr Steingrimur Hermanns- 
son. the Icelandic Prime Min- 
ister, is to visit Peking later 
this year to discuss the 
scheme. The announcement 
from Reykjavik follows a 
three- week lour of potential 
sites by six Icelandic scientists 
in June, during which they 
demonstrated geothermal 
equipment and techniques to 
the Chinese. 

Iceland, the largest volcanic 
island in the world, has be- 
come the international leader 
in geothermal technology. 

Geo thermal energy pro- 
vides virtually all Reykjavik's 
domestic heating, as well as 
feeding scores of open-air 
swimmine DOOls^ 


Spanish report 
clears most 
tourist beaches 

From Richard Wigg 
Madrid 

AU the beaches in Spain’s 
Balearic Islands are open this 
summer to tourists without 
any contamination problems, 
according to the islands' 
health authority. 

After a survey of the various 
autonomous regional govern- 
ments. only Andalucia, the 
Basque country, the Canaries 
and Galicia reported problems 
at some of their beaches. 

Catalonia, which reported 
having spent more than £60 
million before the season 
started on new or improved 
sewage disposal plant, said all 
116 beaches inspected were 
found satisfactory. 

Andal ucia reported 1 38 
beaches along its coasts were 
satisfactory oui of 156 in- 
spected. Bathing from 13 
beaches in the Basque country 
was considered “inadvisable" 
and in the Canaries three 
beaches were found to present 
health risks. 




;» 


EEC aids j| 
Chinese 
typhoon 
victims 

' Brussels (AFP) — The EEC .t 
will extend an emergency aid * 
package worth more than- * 
£333.0000 to China to help* 
victims of typhoon Peggy nr- 
Guindong Province, it 
announced here yesterday. 

Delivery of the aid. the first * 
emergency help from therj 
community to China, will b<£v 
worked out between Chinese^ 
authorities and the EEC exec£* 
utive commission. "» 

Typhoon Peggy last month's* 
killed 210 people, injured ■» 
1.740 and destroyed 1 14,00CC£ 
homes. 


a 

.'i 


Marie| 


New envoys to* 
UN named :jj; 

Mr Alexander Belonogov.-** 
aged 55, has been named!'* 
Russian Ambassador to the** 

United Nations, the Foreign?* 

Ministry confirmed (Our Foiy» 
eign Staff writes). >2 

Dame Nita Barrow, a men£»< 
ber of the Commonwealth!* 
Eminent Persons Group*J 
which went to South Africa iiC* 
June, has been named the- * 
Barbados Ambassador to th*£> 

un. 

Germans flee 

Luebeck, West Germany* • 
(AP) — Two East German men ■ 
escaped through a border / 
fence, jumped into a river in * 
northern West Germany amL2 
were rescued by a passing? 
pleasure boat. 

Cholera queued; 

Hong Kong (Reuter) -ef 
More than 18.000 peoph*f 
queued for cholera vaccina*-* 
lions as the number of con-t* 
firmed cases in Hong Kontjg} 
rose to 10. health officials said^v 

Road deaths (j 

Madrid (AP) - Road ao^* 
cidents during the first August > 
weekend in Spain claimed 8( ? 
lives, nearly three times as a 
many as in the same period ' 
Iasi year. . ^ 

Nuclear claim ' ; 

Stockholm (AP) — Reindeer i 
owners in northern Swedeft > 
are to demand £160 ^ 
compensation from the Gov?* 
eminent for each animal put -j 
down because of radioactive » 
contamination from the£ 

Chernobyl nuclear disaster. 

Air crash r j 

Castries, St Lucia (AFP) 4- 
fifteen people died when a < 
Caribbean airlines (List) twin? ' 
engined aircraft crashed on its ? 
final approach to Kingstown,' 
airport on the nearby Lesser* 
Antilles island of St Vincent. 

Royal birth tj 

Luxembourg (Reuter) — ‘ 
Princess Maria-Tfaeresa of? 

Luxembourg, wife of the bet;* 
to the throne. Prince Henri;* 
has gj ven birth to a son. Prince ■ 
Louis Xavier 
Guillaume. 

Killer hunted 

Breckenridgei Texas (AP) — ; 
Police are hunting a can*, 
demised murderer who es-‘ 
caped with a woman inmate* 
after locking his jailer in a cell! 
at Stephens County Jail Th$j 
woman was recaptured. « 

Athlete dies 

Houston (Reuter) — Bo$J 
Roggy, aged 29. the top*! 
ranked javelin thrower in the* 
world in 1982, has died in aij. 
accident involving a lorry \ 
here. 

Fraud claim ; 

Washington (AFP) — The 
first Fideuty Bank at Newark; 
New Jersey, was reported to! 
have laid a charge against' 
extreme right-wing politician? 
Lyndon La Rouche of fraudip 
lently obtaining $750,000: 
(£500.000) with credit cards: 

Floods toll $ 

Dakha (AP) — Roods i£« 
northern Bangladesh have, 
stranded thousands of peopled 
innundated croplands and left? 
four dead since last week. 2; 

Boat tragedy - 

Jakarta (AFP) - Between 4ft 
and 50 people were missing 
and feared drowned after av 
overcrowded boat sank in; 
stormy weather off the coast dF 
Borneo. >j 

Santiago blasf 

Santiago (AFP) — One pet* 
son died and two were 
wounded when a bomb er- 
ploded in a Santiago army 
barracks. 

Killer lions * 

Dar es Salaam (AP) - 
Marauding Hons mauled 5 
man to death in Tanzania^ 
southern Tundura district 
bringing to 16 the number <$f 
people killed by the maiir 
eating beasts in tbe area lh|5 
year. r, 

32 defect * 

Munich (Reuter) - Twenty 
Poles and 12 Czechoslovaks 
on holidav in Bavaria at tiip 
weekend failed to appear for 
the journey home, border 
police said. 2 

Air debut \ 

Peking (AFP) — China is to 
lake part for the first lime 
the Fam bo rough intematii 
air show this month. 



i 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1-986 


ICL IS A MEMBER OF THE STC PLC GROUP 




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Look at it from his point of view. 

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We now supply more electronic point- 
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The financial sector and manufacturing 
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In the public sector, you’ll find us hard 
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Essential public services like the, water,. 

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OVERSEAS NEWS 


7 



THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 



50C-w» 



Security forces 
hunt guerrillas 
who launched 
Cyprus assault 





j Cprtip-* 


Nicosia (Reuter) — British 
and local security forces yes- 
lerdav combed Cyprus for 
guerrillas who launched rocket 
and mortar attacks on Bri- 
tain's Akrotiri military base 
on Sunday night 

Major Gordon Birdwood, a 
base spokesman, said wit- 
nesses were being interviewed 
and an intensive search was 
under way in co-operation 
with Cypriot authorities. But 
officials said no suspects had 
been, found ■ 

Two women, Mrs. Sandra 
Edwards, aged 25; and Mrs 
■ Eileen Malpass, aged 3Z both 
wives of British non-commis- 
sioned officers. were slightly 
injured when 60mm mortar 
bombs, rockets, grenades and 
small arms fire tut the Akrotiri 
married quarters and a wind- 
surfing club, Major Birdwood 
; said ; 

A previously unknown 
group calling itself “Unified 
i Nasserite Organization — 
Cairo**, in a statement deliv- 
; ered to Beirut's an-Nahar 
j newspaper, claimed respon- 
! sibilily for the attack, 
i It said 'the attack was ~de- 
j signed to participate in the 
j liberation of the ftiendly Cyp- 
I riot people, retaliate against 
I British-Zionist-American op- 

K orn and (was) in revenge 
e martyrs of our nation 
i in Egypt, Libya, Lebanon, 
j Palestine and Syria." • 

| The Cyprus Government 
■ condemned the attack, 
i Mr George lacovou, the 


| Change in 
1 view for 
French TV 

From Susan MacDonald 
Paris 

France is likely te see 
sweeping changes in its na- 
tional broadcasting system, 
eliminating several important 
innovations introduced by the 
former Socialist administra- 
tion. as a result ofihe right- 
wing Government’s legis- 
lation on broadcasting now 
being given its final reading in 
the National Assembly. 

The Government has al- 
ready announced the cancella- 
tion of the contracts of 
France’s first two commercial' 
television channels, which 
were rushed on to the air just 
before the March general elec- 
tions in which the Socialists 
were defeated 

There has been continuous 
criticism of the hasty way the 
contracts were awarded and 
of the presence of the Italian 
entrepreneur. Signor Silvio 
Berlusconi, in the partnership 
which runs one of the chan- 
nels. known as “La 5”. 

The channel is practically a ( 
carbon copy of Canale 5, one 
of the three Italian commer- ; 
rial stations run ' by Signor 
Berlusconi, which owes its 
popularity to soap operas, 
variety shows and quiz games. 

Signor Berlusconi owns 40 
per cent of “La 5", in partner- 
ship with M Jerome Seydoux. 
Most of its programmes are 
made in Signor Berlusconi's 
Milan studios. 

The other French commer- 
cial channel, TV6, is a pop 
video station, run by M 
Maurice Levy. The Govern- 
ment has stated that its objec- 
tions are not to the people who 
have been awarded the con- 
tracts. but to the hasty way in 
which they were allocated 
without sufficient debate. 

Also on the Government's 
agenda is the privatization of 
France's main state television 
channel. TF1, and the aboli- 
tion of the broadcasting 
authority set up by the Social- 
ists four years ago. It is to be 
replaced in the autumn by a 
new controlling body with 
wider powers. 

The original outoy -about 
the proposed privatization of 
TFI has died down, and many 
sec the need to create a 
balanced broadcasting system. 

Meanwhile, “La 5” appears 
to be attempting to fight for 
survival. Its staff yesterday 
were called in for a pep talk 
meeting, the theme of which 
was that the show must go on, 
rather than run down. 

The impression being given 
is that it will continue in some 
form or another, with or 
without its present owners. 

China sets up 
pension funds 
for workers 

Peking (Reuter) - China is 
developing an insurance sys- 
tem to provide pensions and 
medical benefits for millions 
of workers employed under 
new' contract terms, the China 
Daily reported yesterday. 

It said labour insurance 
systems, in which workers pay 
a percentage of their wages 
into a fund, had already been 
set up in several provinces in 
eastern China. 

Since the Communists took 
power in 1 949. urban workers 
have depended on their 
employers for pensions and 
medical benefits, placing a 
huge burden on state and 
collectively-run companies. 


Cypriot Foreign Minister, will 
meet Mr John Wilberforce, 
the British • High Commis- 
sioner, to discuss the incident, 
official sources said. 

. Cypriot security sources 
said they were, investigating a 
possibility, “based on strong 
indications”, that the guerrilla 
group could have come 
through the Turkish-occupied 
northern part of Cyprus, and 
might already have returned. 

They said heavy weapons 
apparently used in the attack 
could not have passed through 
security checks at Cypnot 
pons or airports. 

The breakaway Turkish 
Republic of Northern Cyprus, 
recognized only by Turkey, is 
beyond the control of the 
internationally-recognized 
Government of Cyprus. 

An official source said 
preparations and the attack 
itself look place within the 
sovereign base area. 

He said stricter travel con- 
trol through Akrotiri, on a 
peninsula 60 miles south-west - 
of Nicosia, and Britain's other 
Cyprus base, Dhekelia, could 
cause serious problems for 
visitors to the coastal holiday 
resorts of Ayia Napa ana 
Paphos. 

Ten thousand British ser- 
vicemen, civilians and their 
dependants serve on the bases, 
covering a total of 99 sq miles. 

The bases were put on alert 
for reprisals after Britain 
backed the US air raids on 
Libya on April 15. 


Protests 
at Thai 
Parliament 

Bangkok (Reuter,AP) - 
King Bhumibol opened 
Thailand's Parliament in a 


W 














Hindus and Sikhs 
bury hostility in 
friendship march 

From Michael Hamlyn, Delhi 
In a demonstration of quiet in Tilak Nagar, however, 
brotherly affection belied by and the march, perhaps 200 
recent events. Hindus and strong, was led through the 
Sikhs linked arms yesterday to narrow commercial streets 
march through the streets of and the broad highways which 
the west Delhi suburb of Tilak divide the suburb and link n 



A tanner dumps wheat in the grounds of They came away from the meeting his power of veto over the 
the United States Embassy in Canberra saying they had been given no guarantee Australian producers face losses of 
aa.part of a protest by Australian grain that the US sales would not go even around $Aus400 million (about £160 
producers against the Reagan Admi- further than the present intention to million), and there has been a sharp 
lustration's decision to sell subsidized supply wheat to the Soviet Union, increase here in anti-American rhetoric in 
wheat on Australian markets. Australia’s market in China is also the past week. But the Government has 


Later the protesting formers had a thought to be at risk. 


said it will not take op callc by Labor 


meeting with Mr BDJ Lane, the US A Canberra delegation returned from backbenchers to use American military 
Ambassador (Stephen Taylor writes from Washington at the weekend after failing bases in Australia as bargaining counters 


Sydney). 


to persuade President Reagan to exercise in negotiations. 


By-election Bush tight-lipped in Egypt 

SHOCKS Cairo (Reuter) — The US .dealt a severe blow by the . “I have made dear to o 

Vice-President, Mr George combination of declining Egyptian friends that wc < 
TAi* HUWkP Bush, yesterday disappointed world oil prices and a sharp not snap our fingers and ha 1 
A XA Tv IVv Fovm iiv n>fn«inp m anv reduction in tourism. as a the IMF demonstrate tl 


From Stephen Taylor 
Sydney 

Shock results in two state 
by-elections, one of which 
came close to unseating the 
new Premier of New South 
Wales, have sent a clear 
message to Canberra that, for 
the first time, a government 
led by Mr Bob Hawke is in 
serious trouble with the 
electorate.- 

The outcome is being attrib- 
uted to Australia's grim eco- 
nomic outlook and the expec- 
tation that the federal Budget, 


glittering ceremony here yes- to be announced in two weeks, 
ter day, as students protested vrill be the toughest since the 


against his expected re- 
appointment of General Prem 
Tinsulanohda as Prime 
Minister. 

Deputies dressed in crisp 


war. 

Voting in what should have 
been two of the safest seats in 
New South Wales registered a 
swing of between 13 and 18 


Vice-President, Mr George 
Bush, yesterday disappointed 
Egypt by refusing to make any 
commitment on its request for 
a restructuring of American 
economic aid. 

Mr Bush said he was not in 
a position to make any 
commitments “on these dif- 
ferent problems at this point”, 
after a 2!A-hour meeting with 
President Mubarak. 

Cairo has asked Wash- 
ington to grant relief. ' on 
outstanding interest payments 
on its $4.5 billion (£3 billion) 
military debt, shift funds to 
cash assistance from project 
aid, and back a planned bid 
for help from the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund 
(IMF). 

Egypt's economy has been 


combination of declining 
world oil prices and a sharp 
reduction in tourism, as a 
result of travellers' fears about 
terrorism in the region. 

. Mr Bush said he was sympa- 
thetic towards Egypt's re- 
quests and would “continue to 
work very; closely with Egypt”.' 
But he did not offer specific 
suggestions. 

Mr. Bush told Mr Mubarak 
that Washington's ability to 
help Egypt was constrained by 
"inordinately complicated 
budgetary times of our own”. 

Asked specifically about 
Egypt’s request for help from 
the IMF, from which it plans 
to seek balance of payments 
support. Mr Bush said the US 
did not have a sole voice in the 
Fund’s affairs. 


“I have made clear to our 
Egyptian friends that wc do 
not snap our fingers and have 
the IMF demonstrate ihe 
flexibility that some of our 
closest friends would like.” he 
said. 

Mr Bush said they discussed 
prospects for a Middle East 
peace settlement and the state 
of negotiations between Egypt 
and Israel on a sovereignly : 
dispute over the Israeli-held i 
Red Sea beach enclave of 
Taba. 

With help from a US medi- 
ator. the two countries are 
trying to work out an accord 
on sending the dispute for 
settlement by arbitration. 
There have been hopes among 
American officials that the 
accord could be signed before 
Mr Bush leaves Cairo. 


white-and-black uniforms J per cent against Labor. 


stood to attention as the King 
urged the 347-seai assembly to 
devote itself to solving prob- 
lems feeing the people. 

The King, greeting the 


Mr Barrie Unsworth, who 
was seeking election to the 
lower house of the NSW Par- 
liament to validate his nomin- 
ation as state Premier, in suc- 


newly-elected deputies in the cession to Mr Neville Wran, 
ornate maible oM parliament sho U ]d still scrape home, al- 


Peres proposes votes in Two die in 
Jordan for Palestinians Beirut cafe 

From Ian Murray,. Jerusalem flAmKlDD 

Mr Shimon Peres said yes- exert the same kind of in- UUUIl/liig 


building, did not mention the 
general in his, 15-minute 
address. 

About 500 yards away, in 


though it may be by as few as 
1 00 . votes; But another Labor 
candidate, whose victory in 
Mr Wran’s old. seat seemed 


from of the new building assured,- looks likely to be 
actually used for legislative defeated.' 


sessions, about 200 students 
(ferried banners denouncing as 
undemocratic General Prem’s 


The impact in Canberra will 
be significant, but in the ab- 
sence of Mr Hawke, who is at- 


terday that the influence of the 
Palestine * Liberation Organ- 
ization (PLO) could be broken 
by direct elections for repre- 
sentatives from the occupied 
territories to the Jordanian 
assembly. 

He told the Knesset’s for- 
eign affairs and defence 
committee that he had pnt the 
idea to Mrs Margaret 


expected reappointment The tending the Commonwealth Thatcher during her visit to *~rr , "77 “2Srj”r7“” 
crowd . ,ale T swe ^ lo aboul mini-summit in London, Mr Israel in May, when she made ?*** deciao* 1 K 

500, witnesses said. Paul Keating, the Treasurer, a spee ch etring Israel to allow m ^ oar hands ’ he loW 

Students have held small did his best yesterday to dis- elections for mayors io the 
protests almost daily since the miss suggestions that the Gov- occupied territories, 
elections, ermemng both ernmeot would change course - 


flnence on national elections. 

On Sunday Mr Pieres told 
moderate Palestinians from 
the • territories that he was 
ready fo widen the authority of 
the Arab municipalities and to 
appoint Arab mayors for all 
Arab towns. 

Israel was also prepared to 
discuss ways of development 
in a variety of fields from 
economics, health, education 


Paul Keating, the Treasurer, 
did his best yesterday to dis- 
miss suggestions that the Gov- 
ernment would change course 


General Prem and politicians on ^e economy. 


who had retreated from their 
campaign calls for an elected 
premier. 

The deputies later moved lo 


Mr Keating gave a warning 
in May that Australia’s econ- 
omy would go the way of a 
“banana republic” unless 


the new parliament to elect a spending was restrained. This 
Speaker. triggered a slump in the value 

Inside Parliament House, of the dollar of almost 20 per 
Mr Boontheng Thongsawadi, cent against sterling, 
the United Democratic Party VThe Government is here to 
leader, chairman of -the ses- lead, not to be pushed 
sion and a key opponent of around,” he said. 

General Prem, declared the 


a speech urging Israel to allow 
elections for mayors in the 
occupied territories. 

Her suggestion was rejected 
by Mr Yitzhak Rabin, trim as 
Defence Minister is in charge 
of administering the terri- 
tories. He argued that experi- 
ence showed the PLO would 
terrorize voters into choosing 
its candidates. 

Mr Peres now says that he 
suggested that elections to the 
Jordanian Parliament could 
overcome this problem, since 
the PLO would not be able to 


in your hands,” he told them. 

He met die Palestinians to 
honour a promise he gave to 
King Hassan of Morocco to 
open a dialogue with people 
from the territories. 

In ■ explaining bis idea for 
direct elections to the Jor- 
danian Parliament at this 
time, Mr Peres appears to be 
trying lo help King Husain to 
find the alternative Palestin- 
ian leadership he has been 
seeking unsuccessfully since 
he broke off political co- 
operation frith the PLO 
leadership in February. 


session closed and walked out 
with a number of his party 
members before the day’s 
business was finished. 

He evidently acted in pro- 
test at General Prem’s nom- 
ination. Mr Boontheng led 
government party dissidents 
in voting against a govern- 
ment decree in May. That 
parliamentary defeat forced 
the general ' to dissolve the 
house and call early general 
elections, which were held on 
July 27. 

Thai law allows the King to 
appoint the general prime 
minister even though he -did 
not run in the elections. 


Bangladesh 
separatist 
attack kills 6 

Dhaka — Six people were 
killed and five wounded when 
separatist guerrillas fighting 
for a homeland for 500,000 
Buddhist tribesmen attacked a 
Muslim farming hamlet in the 
Chittagong Hill Tracts in 
south-eastern Bangladesh 
(.Ahmed Fazl writes). 

Interior Ministry officials 
said yesterday that 12 men 
fired shots into the hamlet 
then set the houses ablaze. 


Israeli-Soviet talks due 


Tel Aviv (Reuter) — Israeli 
and So viet diplomats will hold 
talks in Helsinki, probably 
later this month, aboul resum- 
ing bilateral consular contacts, 
senior Israeli officials said 
yesterday. 

They were unable lo con- 
firm a statement by a Soviet 
Foreign Ministry spokesman 
in Moscow that the group 
would move to Tel Aviv after 
preparatory talks in Helsinki. 
The Finnish Embassy in Tel 
Aviv now represents Russian 
interests in Israel. 


Israeli officials said there 
was no link to news on Sunday 
that relatives of Mr Anatoly 
Shcharansky. the former So- 
viet dissident, had received 
permission from Moscow to 
join him in Israel. 

• MOSCOW: Mr Shchar- 
ansky's brother, Leonid, said 
he. was told last Monday by 
-Soviet authorities that he and 
his mother, Ida Milgrom. 
must depart no later than 
August 23 (The New York 
Times reports). 

leading article, page II 


Prisons silence ‘seditious’ writers 


By Caroline Moorehead 


The Turkish editor of a 
monthly magazine, the Rus- 
sian author of samizdat arti- 
cles, a Vietnamese poet a 
Cuban political writer and a 
Kenyan historian: all are in 
prison in their own countries. 

They have been jailed be- 
cause they are writers, guilty 
of describing conditions they 
observe around them, or even 
just of possessing “seditious 
literature”. 

The fact that they have 
commented, and that others 
have read their comments, 
makes them criminals. 

• Mrs Emine Senlikoclu, the 
35-year-old Turkish editor of 
Mtktnps and author of a book 
railed They Stole Youth's 
Faith I VUh Questions, is serv- 
ing a six-year prison sentence, 
to be followed by two years* 
internal exile, for writing and 
publishing work of a religions 
nature, and for advocating a 
return to Islamic values. The 
Turkish penal code prohibits 
any attempt to change the se- 
cular nature of the state. 

• Mart-Olav Nfldus is a zoo- 
logist and teacher of English, 
who was sentenced in January 
1981 to 10 years’ special re- 


gime hard labour camp In the 
Tatar Soviet Republic for “an- 
ti-Soviet agitation and propa- 
ganda” This, is not his first 
sentence: the author of state- 
ments of protest against Soviet 
violations of human rights and 
many samizdat articles, be has 
been repeatedly jailed since 
the late 1950s. 

• Nguyen Chi Thien is a poet, 
in jail in Haiphong since 1979, 
but be has not been charged or 
tried. Author of a book of 
poems published in the West 


PRlSONERS|_ 

OF CONSCIENCE! 


as Flowers from Hell, he is 
detained under a law which 
enables the authorities to hold 
“obstinate counter-revolution- 
ary elements who have com- 
mitted acts detrimental to gen- 
eral security”. 

• Ariel Hidalgo, a writer of 
books and articles on politics, 
in which he has said he be- 
lieves that Cuba's revolution 
has little to do with Marx and 



Engels, is serving an eight- 
year prison sentence for incite- 
ment “against the social order, 
international solidarity or the 
socialist state by means of oral 
or written propaganda”. He 
has been held incommunicado 
since 1984, possibly for reject- 
ing “rehabilitation”. 

• Maina wa Kinyatti, senior 
lecturer in history at Kenyatta 
University College, author of 
works on the Mau Man move- 
ment, is serving a six-year 
prison sentence ip Nairobi for 
possessing “seditions litera- 
ture". 

The Writers in Prison Coro- 
mitttee of International PEN 
has some 500 novelists, poets 
and other authors on its books, 
known to be either in prison or 
labour ramps, in psychiatric 
hospitals or to. have “dis- 


Nagar. to show their curious 
neighbours that the two 
communities can get on with 
each other. 

The evidence to the con- 
trary had come a week ago 
when mobs of Hindus, 
screeching for revenge after 
ihe murder of 1 5 innocent bus 
passengers in Punjab, burnt 
Sikh property and attacked 
individual Sikhs. 

The Sikhs of the area re- 
sponded wiih a few gangs of 
their own. and a number of 
Hindus who innocently wan- 
dered into the conflict were 
stabbed to death. 

Tilak Nagar is (perhaps 
appropriately) named after 
one of the early extremists of 
the freedom struggle against 
the British. Bal Gangadhar 
Tilak, who was a Maharash- 
trian Brahmin. He sought 
inspiration in Hindu ortho- 
doxy. and resisted health 
precaution measures during 
Bombav's plague crisis in 
1897. 

He was sent to jail for 
incitement to violence in 
1908, after failing to capture 
the Congress Party from the 
moderates. 

After his release he played 
bis politics more carefully 
and. in alliance with Mrs 
Annie Besant and indeed the 
Muslim League, took over the 
Congress from the moderates, 
who played a considerably less 
significant role from then on. 

Today's extremists were 


with the city. 

At the head of the pro- 
cession was Choudhury Bha- 
rat Singh, the local MP for 
outer Delhi. “We did not want 
a whole bunch of poliiirians 
along.” one of the organizers 
said. There were no slogans 
chanted, and only one banner, 
which is hugely restrained for 
an Indian procession. 

They marched mostly in 
silence, watched from the 
roadsides and from the roof- 
tops by crowds who a week 
earlier had either been shelter- 
ing in panic or rampaging 
through the same streets 
themselves. The population of 
Tilak Nagar is equally divided 
between the two communities. 

“This was not a flamboyant 
demonstration.” the organizer 
said. “Wc shall have a much 
more flamboyant one on 
Sunday.” 

Tibk Nagar was under cur- 
few again last night after 13 
hours of freedom. And even 
that freedom was closely 
watched by paramilitary po- 
licemen armed to the teeth, 
lounging obtrusively. 

The police said that they 
were retaining the curfew for 
(wo reasons: one, to help 
people feel more secure at 
night, and two. as a kind of 
collective punishment. “Next 
time the traders who are 
suffering with the curfew 
might stop the hooligans, or 
might hand them over to us,” 
a senior policeman said. 


Locust threat to 
Africa spreads 

From Charles Harrison, Nairobi 


From Juan Carlos Gum ado 
Beirut 

An explosion near a cafe in 
Christian east Beirut yester- 
day killed two people and 
wounded 13 in the latest at- 
tack against civilians in the 
Lebanese capital. No group 
claimed responsibility for the 
bombing, which devastated a 
two-storey house in the pre- 
dominantly Armenian district 
of Boutj Hammoud- 

It was the fourth bombing 
in east Beirut in four days. The 
explosions followed two big 
car bomb attacks which killed 
'57 people and injured more 
than 300. The latest bombing 
came amid intense debate 
over a proposal by President 
Amin Gemayel to hold a joint 
emergency session of Par- 
liament and the Cabinet to 
discuss political reforms 
aimed at ending the civil war. 

■ The Christian President’s 
initiative was accompanied by 
friendly overtures lo Syria for 
the first lime since he vetoed a 
Syrian-sponsored peace agree- 
ment in January. 

The Prime Minister. Mr 
Rashid Karami, a Sunni Mus- 
lim. has indirectly rejected the 
idea, saying a special commit- 
tee consisting of six represent- 
atives of- Lebanon's main sects 
should be formed before to 
any parliamentary session. 
The committee would be 
given a month to draft a plan 
to end the 1 1 -year-old conflict. 

As expected. Lebanon’s Syr- 
ian-backed Muslim leaders, 
who have increased political 
and military pressure to bring 
the Gemayel Government 
down, dismissed the proposal. 

Mr Nabih Bern, leader of 
the Shia Muslim Amal militia, 
described it as a “trap” while 
MrWalid Jumblatt, the Druze 
leader of the Progressive So- 
cialist Party, predicted more 
violence, and urged his fight- 
ers to stand on the alert and 
declared: "The war is not over 

yet our enemies will jump 

on us once they have the 

chance.” 


Locust swarms are now 
building up in eastern, central, 
western and southern Africa, 
threatening vast areas of 
productive land, the United 
Nations Food and Agriculture 
Organization wanted here yes- 
terday . 

Substantial assistance will 
be needed for several years if 
the present threat cannot be 
quickly controlled, the FAO 
adds. 

For the present, the most 
serious situation is in Bo- 
tswana. Sudan, Chad and 
Mali. Bui many other coun- 
tries could soon face a crisis. 

In Botswana, up to 250.000 
acres are affected by egg-laying 
by the brown locust, one of 
several species now swarming 
in unprecedented numbers. 
The report says the plague 
could last up to five years and 
menace crops in Botswana. 
Zimbabwe. Zambia. Namibia 
and probably Angola. 

Further north, a plague of 


Saudis warn 
Iran against 
aggression 

Bahrain (Reuter) — Saudi 
Arabia, reacting to what an 
official source termed repeated 
Iranian threats to the kingdom 
and Kuwait, has said it will 
confront any aggression again- 
st ft or its Golf allies. 

The official Saudi Press 
Agency quoted an official 
source on Sunday night as 
saying: “We regret what Ira- 
nian media have attributed to 
some Iranian officials and the 
repeated threats to Saudi Ara- 
bia and its sister state of 
Kuwait. 

“Although Saudi Arabia is a 
peace pioneer and avoids 
involvement in military con- 
flicts, it will immediately ex- 
ercise its legitimate right of 
self-defence with all its poten- 
tial if faced with an aggression 
against it or any of its sister 
countries.” 

In a newspaper article last 
week, the Speaker of the 
Iranian Parliament, Hoja- 
tolesiam Ali Akbar Hashemi 
Rafsanjani, threatened that 
Iran would attack Saudi Ara- 
bia, Kuwait or any other Golf 
country which gave Iraq 
money to buy arms. 

• TEHRAN: Ayatollah Kho- 
meini has appointed Colonel 
Hossein Hassani-Saadi, a for- 
mer operational commander 
on the southern Gulf war front, 
to command Army ground for- 
ces. 


red locusts is affecting Tan- 
zania. Malawi, Zambia and 
eastern Zaire. The risk of 
further breeding will increase 
with the onset of the Septem- 
ber rains. 

Swarms of the African 
migratory locust have been 
sighted in central, eastern and 
south Sudan and in Ethiopia. 
In West Africa the Senegalese 
grasshopper has been hatching 
in unprecedented numbers. 

All countries are relying 
heavily on international assis- 
tance to finance aerial spray- 
ing and other measures to 
counteract the locusts. 

The FAO says millions of 
acres are threatened. This is 
the first time since the 1920s 
that so many different locust 
species have simultaneously, 
threatened African farmland 
Experts say the return of the 
rains last year, after disastrous 
droughts, created ideal con- 
ditions for the development of 
locust infestations. 


Havana admits 
poor secondary 
school results 

Havana (Reuter) - Cuba 
has admitted to a decline in 
education standards after poor 
results in this year's secondary 
school graduation exams. 

The official daily news- 
paper, Granma, printed a 
statement from the Havana 
committee of Cuba's ruling 
Communist Party which 
blamed the results on poor 
sludeni motivation, poor 
teaching and an excessively 
demanding curriculum. 

The results are a blow to the 
prestige of the Government, 
which has prided itself on 
establishing the best educa- 
tion, health and social welfare 
systems in Latin America. 

Last Saturday. President 
Castro complaint that about 
one third -of Cuba's secondary 
school students had failed 
their final exams this year. 

“The fault is not only that of 
the pupils, but also to a great 
extent that of the teachers,” he 
said. 

The Havana committee's 
statement also complained of 
a lack of student motivation 
and of indifference shown by 
many parents 

It said the education system 
was overloaded and that 
leachers frequently were more 
concerned with their students' 
promotion to the next grade 
ihan their receiving a sound 
education. 


Basque leader accuses Gonzalez 


The Basque Nationalist 
Party has accused the Gov- 
erment of Seiior Felipe Gon- 
zalez of wasting good op- 
portunities to negotiate with 
Eta. and so end the terrorism 
now increasingly affecting 
Madrid. 

The charge, made by Sehor 
Xavier Arzallus, the out- 
spoken chairman of the party 




Maina wa Kinyatti (left), serving six years in Kenya, and 
Mart-Oiav Niki us, jailed for 10 years m the Soviet Union. 


appeared somewhere in the . in power in the Basque region, 
world. ^ ^ just about all that was 

“All that a writer can do is needed to heighten tension 
to go on writing the troth as he between the governments in 
.... Madrid and Vitoria. 

Seiior Gonzalez, outlining 
his Government’s programme 
last month, admitted that 
Spain's security forces had 
failed to combat Eta in Ma- 


world. 

“All that a writer can do is 
to go on writing the troth as he 
sees it,” Nadine Gordimer 
said in a speech at a confer- 
ence in Durban in 1975. To the 
five prisoners above and all the 
other writers in Jail have to be 
added the thousands more si- 
lenced in other ways, banned, 
censored and ratable to publish 
their work. 


From Richard Wigg, Madrid 
negotiate under duress with 
the armed Basque separatists. 

“Eta is willing to negotiate, 
but Madrid is not. that is what 
lies behind this dialogue ofihe 
deaf.” Seiior Arzallus declared 
in Deia, the Nationalist Par- 
ty's daily newspaper. 

He was answered angrily 
yesterday by Socialist Party 
leaders in the Basque country, 
who demanded to know if the 
Nationalist Party was now in 
favour of negotiating with the 
terrorists. The Socialists ac- 
cused the Nationalists of using 
Eta to try to obtain a greater 
degree of self-government 
than Spain's other autono- 
mous regions. 

Before Sehor Arzallus's re- 


drid. but he was more cate- marks the Basque Govem- 
ric than ever that his mem had angered Madrid by 


handing-over by France of 
suspected members of Eta for 
interrogation by Spanish po- 
lice and, less publicly, op- 
posing France's deportation of 
the Eta leader, Senor Do- 
mingo Iturbe, to Gabon, West 
Africa. 

Sehor Iturbe is seen by 
Vitoria as the figure poten- 
tially most capable of starting 
a negotiating process on the 
Ela side. 

Sehor Araallus even made 
fun of the unsuccessful Sehor 
Jose Barrionuevo. Madrid’s 
Interior Minister, waiting, the 
Basque leader said, for the 
“manna” to come from 
France on how to break up 
Eta's so-called Spain Com- 
mando, the perpetrator of two 
spectacular terrorist attacks in 



s 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


a- * * sj 3- Si 


SPECTRUM 



Dod Miur 


Leningrad 
conies to 
Lugano 

An ornate Swiss villa is the unlikely venue 
for a unique cultural exchange with Russia. 
Geraldine Norman meets the millionaire 
who has persuaded the iron curtain to part 


F lowers cascade from orna- 
mental vases' where the 
blue lake laps the garden 
wall of the Villa Favorita, 
occasional home of Baron 
Heinrich Thyssen-Bornemisza, his 
wives and families. The acceptable 
face of capitalism smiles from the 
tax haven of Swiss Lugano at the 
hurly burly of Italy on the further 
shore. It is this unlikely setting that 
the Soviet Llnion has chosen for its 
first experiments in artistic ex- 
changes with the West. 

Thyssen. 63. is the linchpin of an 
international industrial empire and 
is reputed to be one of the richest 
men in the world. He is also an 
ardent art collector. This summer, 
the panelled dining room of his 
magnificent 1 8th-centurv villa and 
its adjacent salons have been 
stripped of their furnishings. Grey 
carpeting protects the parquei 
floors while Milanese designed 
glass showcases are lined with 
military precision across the 
rooms, displaying gold, silver and 
jewels commissioned by the tsars 
and pre-revolution upper crusL 
They have been entrusted to the 
baron's care by the Soviet Union's 
Minister of Culture and come from 
the Hermitage - in Leningrad, most 
of them from hitherto unransacked 
cupboards in its storerooms. 

The large boat-shaped emerald 
with gold and emerald masts and a 
white enamel sail was made as a 
pendant jewel in Spain around 
1580. It was transfered from the 
Winter Palace to the Hermitage in 
1918. A rococo Augsburg tab- 
ernacle. three feet high, is an 
explosion of gilt and silver saints, 
angels. ladders, drapery, clouds 
and rockwork and was given to the 
Alexander Nevsky Monastery in 
1750. It found its way to the 
Hermitage as a result of the Soviet 
suppression of religion. 

The silver group of a killed 
Scotsman, stag and hounds is a 
replica of the Ascot Royal Hunt 
Cup of 1847. commissioned in 
London from John Samuel Hunt 
by Tsar Nicholas I. Russian trea- 
sures include gold and enamel 
pendants of the 12th century, a 


solid gold salt-cellar of around 
1 820 and plenty of Faberge. 

Equivalent treasures from the 
baron's collection will be exhibited 
in Leningrad and Moscow this 
autumn. It is already the second 
exchange of exhibitions ’between 
Baron Thyssen and the Soviet 
Union, and the contract is signed 
for next year's exchange of Im- 
pressionists against Old Masters. 

The baron concedes that these 
artistic exchanges between a social- 
ist super-power and a western 
super-capitalist are an unlikely 
development “But it is easier for 
them to do a deal with an 
individual”, he explains. “A deal 
with a country may have strings 
attached about freeing Jews or old 
financial squabbles.” 

Besides, the baron is used to 
doing complicated and difficult 
deals with streamlined oppor- 
tunism. Thai is how he has built his 
industrial empire from the ruins of 
family endeavours demolished or 
confiscated during the Second 
World War. 

The family fortune was founded 
by his grandfather. August Thys- 
sen. who provided the iron and 
steel required by the Kaiser for 
armaments during the Great War. 
His father turned the fortune to 
artistic account by forming a 
superlative collection of Old Mas- 
ter paintings, buying the villa in 
Lugano and building on to it an art 
gallery to house his pictures. 

The present baron has added a 
collection of modern pictures, from 
1870 to the present, a collection of 
American paintings, collections of 
silver and jewels, carpets and' 
decorative ans and further Old 
Master paintings, when and where 
the opportunity arose. 

The two Chardins that he bought 
from Edmond de Rothschild hang 
opposite the desk in his study. On 
another wall is a Caspar David 
Friedrich he found in England, 
successfully bargaining a two-year 
loan to the National Gallery 
agai ist an export licence. The 
collection contains 1.400 pictures. 
600 of them Old Masters, and is 



Treasure boa ten Baron Thyssen-Bornemisza in his Lugano villa with the gilt rococo Angsberg tabernacle be found in a Hermitage storeroom 


constantly on loan to exhibitions 
round the world. 

It is a nice irony that the baron's 
first Hnks with the Soviet Union 
sprang from his interest in avant- 
garde Russian painting of around 
1900. which is still considered 
subversive and is not shown in 
Russian museums. The baron's 
chief supplier was Antonina 
Gmurdzynska in Cologne, a well- 
connected Pole. 

In January. 1983. she gave a 
dinner party at which the baron 
met the Russian ambassador to 
Western Germany, Vladimir 
Semionov. “I think he asked her to 
invite me”, the baron murmurs 
with a smile. 

n exhibition of the 
baron's Old Masters was 
louring American muse- 
ums at the time. “If you 
lend to America, why. 
don't you lend to Russia?", 
Semionov asked him. A flat refusal 
was converted to an intrigued 
affirmative one month later when 
Semionov rang the baron to pro- 
pose that a Soviet picture of equal 
calibre would be exchanged for 
every - Old Master included in the 
loan exhibition. 

Semionov told the baron that the 
project had “the unanimous ap- 
proval of the Politburo, including 
Brezhnev. Andropov ... the lot". 
Certainly the speed and efficiency 
with which the deal was put 
together seemed to indicate a 
directive from the top. The first 



approach was in January and the 
exhibition opened' in June. 

The baron asked for an exchange 
exhibition of Impressionist and 
Post-Impressionist paintings from 
the famous pre-revolutionary 
collections of Morozov and 
Shchukin, now divided between 
the Hermitage Museum in Lenin- 
grad and the Pushkin Museum in 
.Moscow. He dispatched his cu- 
rator, Simon de Pury. and his son, 
Lome, to reconnoitre the 
possibilities. 

With a preliminary wish list in 
hand, he flew into Moscow in 
March 1 983 in his private jet; since 
air traffic over the Soviet Union is 
controlled in the Russian language, 
a Soviet pilot was sent to St Moritz 
to collect him. The procedure has 
been repeated for each of his many 
subsequent visits. 

He refuses to lend his pictures to 
any town where he is not allowed to 
fly in his own jeL Moscow, 
Leningrad and Kiev have all 
received him but Novosibirsk was 
deleted from the schedule when 
landing permission was refused. - 

“I get a reception worthy of a 
head of slate”, he laughs. “There's 
•a delegation of dignitaries to meet 
me. and flowers, and the largest car 
they manufacture to sweep me into 
town.” 

The enormous success of the first 
exchange in 1983 — 300,000 people 
visited the Impressionists in Lu- 
gano while more than a million 
Russians queued to view the 
baron's Old Masters — led to plans 


for a bigger and better exchange of 
pictures this year. The other half of 
the Morozov and Shchukin collec- 
tions were to be exchanged against 
better Old Masters from Lugano. 

The project was torpedoed by the 

Reagan-Gorbachev summit last 
November. The agreement on 
cultural exchanges led to the loan 
of Soviet Impressionists, seen in 
Lugano in 1983, to the National 
Gallery in Washington. The Soviet 
Union could not send the other 
half of its Impressionist collection 
abroad at the same time. The 
exchange exhibitions of gold, silver 
and jewels were substituted. 

The selection in this case was 
more of a mystery tour, since -the 
Hermitage has no catalogue. The 
baron, his curator and an expert 
from the Victoria and Albert 
.Museum spent three days explor- 
ing the Hermitage storerooms. 
Eighty per cent of the pieces have 
never been exhibited in Russia. 
The silver had not been cleaned 
since the revolution and was 
uniformly black. There was a nasty 
hiccup when the Soviets refused to 
clean it but they relented. 

The handsome illustrated cat- 
alogues are a gift from the baron to 
the Russian people. The entries 
were written in Russian by the 
Hermitage experts, who also sup- 
plied the photographs — on con- 
dition that the baron sent them 
films for their cameras - from Lon- 
don. The Lugano staff saw to the 
translation and the printing. 

Inspired by the exchange with 


Russia, the baron organized an 
exchange of Old Master exh ibi dons 
with Hungary last year. Hints are 
now reaching him from East 
Germany that the authorities 
would iook favourably on an 
exchange of pictures with Dresden. 


T 


he second exchange of 
pictures with Russia, de- 
layed this year, is to go 
ahead in 1987 and nego- 
tiations have begun for. 
an exchange of 20th century avant- 
garde an which would bring the 
subversive abstracts of the 
Constructivist generation out of 
the cellars of Russian museums for 
their first airing at the lakeside villa 
in Lugano. 

There are inconveniences to 
dealing with the Soviet Union. In 
the course of negotiating the two 
exhibitions the Soviets have not 
answered a single letter. All 
communications are conducted by 
telephone or telex. Then the Sovi- 
ets insist on sending their exhibits 
to the West in Soviet aircrafL Ten 
days before the opening of the 
Impressionist exhibition. Aeroflot 
announced that no planes were 
available. A telex from the-baron 
threatening to cancel his own show 
in Russia brought Aeroflot to heel. 

Capitalist tactics can work mir- 
acles. and Baron Thyssen- 
Bornemisza is working miracles in 
Lugano. 

The cxhtNUon of Russian treasures at 
the 1 7 Ha Favorita in Lugano contin- 
ues until A member. 


r n NPiNGS j 


A series reporting 
on research: 
CLASSICS 


Illusion 
in Greek 
tragedy 

Dr Simon Goldhill's im- 
portant book Language. 
Sexuality. Narrative The 
Orcsteia. in which the famous 
Aeschylus trilogy is analysed 
from a “post-structuralist 
viewpoint, is provoking 
considerable controversy, not 
least from Dr John Moles, 
reviewing it in the Liverpool 
Classical Monthly. 

The meaning of a text, 
according to Dr Goidhill. is 
always illusive, as the text is 
an “unstable verbal object”, 
language being “language 
rather than a transparent veil 
through which wc pass to 
‘meaning' He is right to 
emphasize “the complexity 
and difficulty of reading the 
Orcsteia". and to open our 
eyes to its ambiguities. 

Novel discoveries 

Our knowl- 
edge of the 
Greek and 
Roman novel 
has been ad- 
vanced by the 

_________ discovery’ of 

papyrus fragments of “new” 
novels, one of which, 
Metiochus and Parthenope, 
turns ont to be the source of a 
fragmentarily preserved 11th- 
century Persian romance, 
Vamiq and ', Adhrd . 

• A preliminary and limited 
comparison of the two texts 
has been published by Profes- 
sor Tomas Hagg of Bergen. 

Roman birthday 

Remarkable 
for its histori- 
cal and hu- 
man interest 
is a collection 
of about 340 
fragmentary 
wooden writing tablets discov- 
ered last summer at 
Vindolanda. a Roman fort on 
Hadrian's Wall. The tablets 
include a military intelligence 
report concerning the natives, 
who arc contemptuously and 
uniquely called Britlunculi or 
"Brit lets"; a line of Virgil's 
Aencid apparently inscribed as 
a handwriting exercise: and a 
letter in which one lady invites 
another to her birthday party. 

Martin F. Smith 

The author is Prnfcssitr of 
Classics. L'nivcrsity College of 
A’iwt/j 1 1 ales. Bangor. 




“Kids these days don’t 
know how lucky they are” 



The picture above was taken last 
year in Bradford. 

!t was not set up or reconstructed. 
We simply asked our photographer to 
record what he found in the cities of 
Britain. 

The little boy is called Peter. 
He’s two years old. 

Peter is just one of literally 
hundreds of thousands of children 
Gvinginappallingdeprivation in Britain 
today. 

In the present economic dimate, 
that situation seems unlikely to 
improve. 

That’s why The Children’s Society 
is so desperately needed - now, more 
than ever. 

Every year The Children’s Society 
helps thousands of these children. 


Children whose fives might have 
been shattered by physical hardship, 
domestic violence or nervous 
breakdowns. 

For every child we help, however, 

thereare jnanywe can’t. 

So please help us to help evenH 
more chdi&en by sending a donation to: I 
Church of England Children’s Society, I 
Freepost, London WC1X OBR. 


Name. 


Address, 


.Amount £. 


We're grateful for your donation but to save us monc 
we wOl not send a receipt unless you tick this box. [ 

Access/Barclaycard 


• j ■ i - TT - rzJ 

2362 


The Children’s Society. Needed now more than ever. 


Out of the cold, into the fire 


How a Chilean in 
exile braved the 
wrath of Pinochet 
to film the 


-s 


plight of his country 

Miguel Litiin is a Chilean, 
political exile who dared to go 
back — and. in the process, left 
that most sanguine of Latin 
American tyrants, General 
Augusto Pinochet, with a figu- 
rative bloody nose. 

In recent years Pinochet has 
allowed some Chileans who 
fled or were forcibly expelled 
after the military coup in 1973 
to return home. Of an es- 
timated 30,000 exiles that still 
remain in the rest of Latin 
America. Europe and the 
United States. 5.000 figure on 
a blacklist of political 
“undesirables”, whose return 
is strictly forbidden and who 
are well advised to stay away. 

Linin's name is prominent 
at the top of the blacklist. One 
of Latin America's most re-, 
spected film directors, and a 
friend and supporter of Presi- 
dent Salvador Allende, who 
died during the coup whicb 
overthrew his socialist govern- 
ment, Litiin was a high-profile 
public figure in Chile. The 
military kicked him out 
within weeks of seizing power. 

Yet early last year — heavily 
disguised with a false identity, 
passport accent and “wife” — 
he slipped back into Chile 
after 12 years' absence. Six 
weeks later he came out with 
more than 23,000 feel of film 
shot on location throughout 
the country, including a se- 
quence filmed undo - Pin- 
ochet’s very nose inside his 
Mqneda presidential palace. 

That footage has now been 
edited into two films — a four- 
hour TV documentary and a 
two-hour cinema film — which 
will soon be shown to inter- 
national audiences and will 
surely add to the mounting 
clamour for the restoration of 
democracy in Chile. 

So. too. will a new book just 
published in Latin .America. 
Miguel Lilt in's Adventure — 
Undercover in Chile, ghost- 
written by the Colombian 
novelist and Nobel literature 
laureate Gabriel Garcia 
Mirquez. Based on 18 hours 
of tape-recorded conversa- 
tions. it is a devastating 
indictment of the Pinochet 
regime — both of its brutal 
repression of Chile’s people 
and of the widespread poverty 



Z*La 

Littin filming in Chile 1985, and (inset) in Bogota, 1986 


created by the junta's style of 
economics. 

But on another level the 
book is a fast-moving, nail- 
biting political thriller. For his 
most dangerous mission, 
Littin. 44. had to assume a 
completely different identity. 
His beard was shaved off his 
longish haircut short. A bulky 
man. he shed considerable 
weight. His normal casual 
clothing was replaced with 
elegant suits. He also had to 
suppress the strong guttural 
tones of his native rural Chile, 
as well as memorizing a 
detailed cover story about his 
fictional home and life in 
Montevideo. When he flew to 
Chile he was accompanied by 
an attractive young Chilean 
woman who posed as his wife. 

His landing at Santiago's 
airport coincided with the 
arrival of three European film 
crews — Italian. French and 
Dutch — at different entry 
points. Each unaware of the 
others' existence, they entered 
Chile legally, the authorities 
having approved their work 
visas for seemingly innocent 
projects. Lium ’ coordinated 
the work of each crew sepa- 
rately in producing a filmed 
expose of the regime. 

Littin's adventure often 
seems like a thriller set behind 
the Iron Curtain. Radios were 
turned up full blast in hotel 
rooms to jam possible bugging 
devices and code words and 


elaborate arrangements were 
employed to make contact 
with the resistance. 

The most poignant episode 
in Li Urn's odyssey came dur- 
ing a visit to the Pacific coastal 
home of the great love poet 
and Nobel literature prize- 
winner Pablo Neruda, who 
died a few days after the coup. 


His friends say he died of a 
broken heart because of the 
military - takeover. 

Neruda's home has become 
a shrine for opponents of the 
regime. On its walls are 
scrawled messages — “Juan 
and Rosa love each other 
through Pablo” . . . “Thank 
you. Pablo for leaching us to 
love” — left by lovers who 
were mere children in 1973. 

Littin was constantly im- 
pressed and heartened by the 
presence of young people, 
with no personal memory of 
either Allende or Neruda*, in 
the vanguard of the struggle 
for democracy. 

So successful was Liuin's 
disguise that he and the Italian 
crew even managed to bluff 
their way into the Moneda 
palace, where filming was 
briefly disturbed by a commo- 
tion as Pinochet strode by on 
the way to his office. 

Having escaped on a 
commercial flight, Liuin sees 
no early end to his exile. His 
only hope is that, at 70, 
Pinochet is unlikely to survive 
as long as Franco did in Spain, 
the regime on which the 
Chilean dictator seems to 
have modelled his own. But as 
Littin observes: “It is not only 
we who live abroad who are in 
exile. The population of Chile 
itself is in exile, for they live in 
an occupied country.” 

Geoffrey Matthews 

© Times Newspapers UO, 19*6 


CONCISE CROSSWORD No 1020 


ACROSS 

I Clergyman <6> 

5 Illegal drug (4) 

8 Worth (5) 

9 Jumpy (7) 

II Roundabout |8) 

13 Steady (4) 

15 “Lcs Parapluics" art- 
i5i (7.6) 

17 Notwithstanding (4) 

18 Birthmarks (8) 

21 Hunting call (5.2) 

22 Vet (5) 

23 On an occasion (4) 

24 Faculties |6) 

DOWN 

2 Sensational {$) 

3 Nonsense (3) 

4 Painstaking (13) 

5 Challenge (4) 

6 Stipulation (7| 

7 in two minds (10) 

10 Forward roll (10) 



W Out of mind (51 

,4, k CQm P° icr r° Cremation pile (4) 
16 Mischievous imp (7) " ^system centre 


SOLI TION TO I OJ Q 

ACROSS 1 Album 4 Semi nr „ 

Blah 13 Nationality 17 Rome l8ShmIlA ^ Bulwarks 

Strange 24 Mdcc ,B » n utters 2 1 Pitcher 22 Optic I 

DOW N 1 l Aerobe “* ttou.pi mi j . 

J 12 Pi at Turin u jL^ftB***"* 5 Nod 

chc 19 EmoI 20 Thin 

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,771" -■ •auiiung-t, 

*4 Ammeter IS Gropes 16 Psy. 









THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


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Last Friday, Yves Saint Lau-. 
rent celebrated his fiftieth' 
birthday, at a very private 
party.**! wanted to be with just ' 
my really intimate, friends”, 
explained the most Garbo- 
esque of fashion designers. 

The party, given by his close 
friend and business partner 
Pierre BergS, was more than a 
rite . of passage for - Saint 
Laurent’s half-century. It was 
a loyal recognition by his 
close-knit “ramify” of col- 
leagues of this shy, frail man's 
unprecedented achievements. 
It was also a warm-hearted 
celebration of an exiraor- 
dinaryyear. 

In the spring of 1985, 
President Mitterrand person- 
ally invested Yves Saint Lau- 
rent with the Legion - 
d’Honneur. At the same time 
Yves broke through the bam- 
boo curtain to mount- an 
exhibition of his work in 
Peking. In October he re- 
ceived a fashion Oscar for his 
contribution to French fash- 
ion. This summer, a testament 
to his art was unveiled on six 
floors of the new costume 
museum in the Rue de Rivoli. 
Next door, the Mus6e des Ans 
Decora tifs is showing Saint 
Laurent’s work for the theatre 
in a joyous and. colourful 
display ' of costumes and 
sketches. 

Last Wednesday, Yves cele- 
brated his birthday with the. 
only thing he really cares 
about — a couture collection 
that was fresh, frolicsome and 
surprisingly sexy. While the 
rest of Paris strains to re- 
juvenate haute couture, Saint 
Laurent sent out a parade of 
sinuous models undulating 
down the catwalk in sensuous 
suedes and satin, safari jackets 
lapped, in fur, satin as soft as 
lingerie draped seamlessly 
across the body, plunging at 
front and back. 

“This wasn't me in a classic 
mood, was it?” Saint Laurent 
said. “I was being deliberately 


Y ves saint 
LAURENT at 
50 is the 
undisputed 
kina of 

Pans couture. 
His 30-year reign Is 
being celebrated in 
France attwo . 
exhibitions. Last 
week’s show was 
chic, bo shocks, 
surprisingly sensuaf 

C HRISTIAN 
LACROIX, 35, 
is the rising 
star of Pam 
couture. He . 
has just been 
paid the ultimate 
compliment of being 
compared to a young 
Saint Laurent and has 
revived the trapeze 
line which Yves 
launched in 1958 


provocative." For a man who 
Wants To Be Alone, he has a 
very roguish grin. 

In the world of Paris haute 
couture, Yves Saint Laurent 
stands alone as king of kings. 
The anguish of creation may 
have haunted him ever since 
he suffered a nervous -break- 
down during military service 
at the age of 24. He was then 
already a major fashion star, 
having taken over from Chris- 
tian Dior after his death. He 
was, m die famous words of 
Pierre Bergfc, “bom with a 
nervous breakdown”. 

Paloma Picasso, one of 
Yves's few dose friends, spoke 
to me last week of his burden 
of responsibility at supporting 
his mighty fashion • empire: 
3,000 staff; 189 boutiques; the 
unstoppable treadmill of the 
collections — four women's 
wear, two menswear; and 
make-up, fragrance, bags, 
shoes, furs, even cigarettes 
selling on his name. This 
dissemination of commercial 
goods from the fountainhead 
of couture is what the Paris 
collections have been about 
for the last 25 years. Saint 
Latirent himself Iras made his 
great - fashion statements 
within the couture framewpik. 

For most of the Paris houses 
—and not least Chanel— it has 
been a case of great names in 
search of a designer. It is the 
greatest compliment toYves 
Saint Lament that the most 
interesting new designer to 
surface on the crest of the new 
couture is inspired by the 
Master. 

Christian Lacroix is aged 35 
and a designer for the old 
established house of Jean 
Patou. Last season I voted 
him couture's coveted Golden 
Thimble Award. This season 
he amply repaid me with a 
splendid collection, full ofjoie 
de vivre and based on the 
trapeze line upon which Yves 
Saint Laurent built his fashion 
reputation 28 years ago. 


Lett Saint Laurent’s trapeza-Rne dress, autumn/winter 1958-9 for Dior 
Right Lacroix autumn/winter 1986, grey flannel trapeze-line suit 



Yves Saint Laurent's sensuous evening fine: a rounded, tow-cut velvet 
bodice, off the shoulders, teamed with a sUm-fttffng fine wool skirt 


Left saint Laurent 1986, panther-printed satin with front-laced bodice 
Right Lacroix 1986, leopard-print heart-shaped strapless bodice 


Lacroix redrew the fashion- 
able silhouette by inverting its 
triangle. Instead of broad 
shoulders and narrow hips, 
there were neat bolero jackets 
and flaring panelled skins cut, 
in his own words, like an. 
“umbrella”. Up goes the waist 
to empire line, out go the 
skirts with a baby doll swing, 
and the taffeta that was the 
star fabric of the Paris season 
is wired out into a fan-shaped 
hemline. 

“It is not supposed to look 


retro” Lacroix told me ner- 
vously. Indeed it does not. 
The house of Patou admits 
that this is not a selling 
collection. 

The models looked at the 
same time innocent and 
provocative, as though they 
were dressing up in their 
mothers' clothes, but adding a 
twist of their own: the skirts 
shorter and tighter than they 
would have been in the early 
1960s, and the paisley motifs 
embroidered on a tweed 


blazer creating a cocktail of 
different decades. 

The Yves Saint Laurent 
exhibition shows the cross- 
fertilization of design ideas. It 
starts, as Yves did, with Dior, 
•where Saint Laurent made a 
black velvet dress with a grey 
satin bow that looks totally 
contemporary. Although the 
display is chronological, the 
clothes are also grouped so 
we see influences of fine 
ait on fashion from Mon- 
drian-inspired geometric 


dresses of the 1960s to the 
Picasso patchworks- 

There are exotic ideas: a 
lattice-work of African bead- 
ing for outrageous bare- 
midriffed dresses; Spanish 
bullfighter embroideries; the 
Ballet Russe collection that 
.exploded in fireworks of od- 
ours in the 1970s. 

Creative imagination is 
daunting. I found the Saint 
Laurent accessories — tas- 
selled belts, gloves with 
sculpted fingers, jewelled 


crosses and moulded breast- 
plates — as extraordinary as 
the theatre drawings, which 
include predatory plumes for 
Zid Jeanmaire at the Casino 
and lyrical costumes for The 
Marriage of Figaro. 

Saint Laurent in his early 
days made garments as wild 
and unwearable as Christian 
Lacroix's look now. Yves 
shocked the establishment 
profoundly with his see- 
through chiffon Mouses show- 
ing the breasts, and his 


Carmen Miranda collection 
which made the back of a little 
black 1940s dress as an insert 
of Chantilly lace that revealed 
the posterior cleavage. 

Who would have believed 
then that designs which 
seemed to be playing to the 
gallery would one day end up 
in it? 

• Yves Saint Laurent, 28 
Annies de Creation, Musie 
desArts de la Mode. Paris 
until October 26. 


Photographs by Harry Kerr fleW look 


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Chanel 


• Karl Lagerfeld went over 
the top (or should that be 
bottom?) in his new collection 
for ChaneL There were some 
fine ideas, especially the un- 
lined jackets that made the 
traditional Chanel suits look 
light and gentle. A new jacket, 
waisted like a riding coat, flat- 
pleated at the back, was not 
Chanel but it was magnifique. 
So were the same pleats used, 
for a slim cocktail, dress, 
bloused gently into the waist 
in white chiffon banded with 
black velvet. 

But the New Look Chanel, 
with frou-frous of net petti- 
coats pushing up layers of 
Chantilly lace, looked old hat, 
while Karl's actual bats — 
Edwardian confections of gi- 
ant abstract bows — were 
young and fun. 

This uneven collection sug- 
gested that Lagerfeld is trying 
too hard to shock Chanel 
traditionalists, by imposing 
skirts that ding to the deniire 
on the. baric suit and making 
house muse In«s de la 
Fressange parade in a mini 
dress lashed with bondage 
chains. 

• Emanuel Ungaro dedicated 
his collection to Cristobal 
Balenciaga. This inspiration 
was a happy marriage between 
couture in the grand manner 
and Ungaro's distinctive use 
of colour and form. 

Billows of taffeta were 
trapped round the hips of 
slender dresses, made into 
capes over columns of white 
satin or were caught into a 
band at the knees. Ungaro, 
who worked as Balenciaga’s 
apprentice for six years, was 
able to make this collection 
more than a homage, for 
sunray-pleated skirts and an- 
kle-length coats over soft trou- 
sers loosened up the body- 
hugging Ungaro silhouette in a 
thoroughly modern way. 


* xV ♦ •’«. V*? ? * 



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Into de la Fressange in 
Kari Lagerfeld's stretch 
lacquered sheath banded 
with Chanel chains 


• Fanl Poiret, French 
fashion’s high priest of 
the exotic, has been 
called to tW gallery of 
feme. Poiret — he of the 
lampshade dresses, 
harem rants and ori- 
ental turbans and fabrics 
— is on show in Paris, 
partnered by one of his 
three sisters, art deco 
designer Nicole GtouIl The 
Poiret clothes are less in- 
triguing than the context in 
which they are shown for his 
fashion heyday coincided with 
the finest fashion illustrators. 
An entire section of the ex- 
hibition is devoted to the 
Gazette du Bon Ton, which 
gave its fashions a social 
setting. 

A brooding moustachioed 
husband watches jealously as 
a young lover kisses the hand 
held out in the silken sleeve of 
a low-waisted 1920s' dress. 
George Barbier treats the 
clothes like theatrical cos- 
tumes against a painted back- 
drop. This must have 
appealed to Poiret, whose own 
Bacchanalian fancy dress out- 
fit in white chiffon draped 
with grapes is on display. 

Poiret worked with Dufy’s 
fruit and flown* prints. His 
dresses were pbotographed by 
Man Ray. But Lepape best 
captures, in his languorous 
drawing of harem pants 
against silken cushions, the 
exotic mood of Poiret's 
clothes. 

• 'Paul Poiret et Nicole 
Grpuh ’ at the Palais Galliera. 
Parts, until October 12. 


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THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Israeli 
offence 

The reputation of Florencio 
Campomanes. the controversial 
president of the international 
Chess Federation (Fide), comes 
under further attack today. He will 
be asked at a press conference 
about allegations of racism lev- 
elled at Fide by the Simon 
Wiesenthal Centre, the American 
institute devoted to the study of 
anii-semitism. In a telex sent to 
Campomanes last month, the 
centre's Rabbi Abraham Cooper 
expressed shock at Fide’s "racist 
and purely political" choice of 
Dubai as venue for the 1 986 Chess 
Olympiad this winter. This, be- 
cause of the ban on Israelis 
entering Arab countries, will ex- 
clude Israeli competitors. Chess- 
watchers who believe 
Campomanes was elected to the 
presidency in 1982 by swinging 
the 10-block Arab vote will ask 
whether he promised the Arabs an 
Israeli-free olympiad. Although he 
had agreed to discuss the matter 
with me. last night Campomanes 
proved unavailable. 

• Pavement artists in Edinburgh 
were in the end undaunted by the 
absence of top athletes from the 
Commonwealth Games. They 
drew portraits of Sir Geoffrey 
Howe instead. 

In camera 

Eye-witnesses to the shooting of 
President Kennedy were secretly 
flown to London Weekend's 
South Bank studios Iasi month for 
a bizarre TV “trial" of Lee Harvey 
Oswald. An empty chair stood in 
the dock of LWlTs version of a 
Dallas court room while two 
American attorneys fought "like 
dogs" to clear or damn his name. 
The lawyers, Vincent Bugliosi, 
who prosecuted Charles Man son, 
and Gerry Spence, who took on 
the American nuclear industry in 
the Karen Silkwood case, ques- 
tioned eye-witnesses, medical and 
ballistic experts, some of whom 
had not even appeared before the 
Warren Commission. The pro- 
gramme. made in co-operation 
with the American cable 
newtwork Showtime, will be. 
shown over six hours on Channel 
4 this autumn. Two verdict scenes 
have been shot but only executive 
producer Richard Dniett knows 
the result of the secret ballot by 
which the jury of imported Dallas 
citizens voted. 

BARRY FANTONI 



■First it's TVs, then it's cars, 
now it's Japanese sanctions' 

Pony express 

Yesterday, the Central Transport 
Consultative Committee accused 
British Rail of cost-cutting at the 
expense of passengers. Now / 
wouldn't call BR skinflints. After 
discovering Iasi week that they 
were spending up to £20,000 on 
badger-crossings on the East 
Grinstead line, I learn that they 
have stumped up £5.000 from 
their “environmental improve- 
ment" fund for a project with 
West Midlands Arts. The fruits of 
the £10.250 enterprise will be 12 
life-sized sculptures of horses, 
placed along the Birmingham to 
Wolverhampton line. Artist 
Kevin Atherton's iron horses are a 
visual pun. even though they are 
actually made of steel. There’s 
been nothing like it since Milton 
Keynes got its concrete cow. 

Improvident 

The Nonhem Ireland Industrial 
Development Board may be 
regretting shifting its PR account 
to image builders Burson-Mars- 
teller in London. In Belfast the 
Provisional IRA are known as 
“Pro vies", rather than “Proves". 
Last week Burson-Mars teller's ac- 
count executive made a “getting to 
know- you” visit to Belfast. Her 
name is Victoria Provis. 

Danger signal 

Shock news for unreconstructed 
Thomas the Tank Engine devo- 
tees: the Fat Gergyman's collec- 
tion of railway memorabilia may 
be split up. The Rev Teddy 
Boston, inspiration for the Fat 
Clergyman in the anthropo- 
morphic tales of steam trains 
written by his friend, the Rev 
W. Awdry. died this spring. A 
fellow puffer fan. he had built up a 
collection of railway relics, includ- 
ing a traction engine called Fiery 
Elias, and a road-roller called 
Thistledown, in the garden of his 
rectory in Cadeby, near Market 
Bosworth, Leicestershire. But with 
Boston's death there are plans to 
merge his parish, which could 
result in selling the rectory and the 
dispersal of the collection. His 
widow. Audrey, still waiting to 
hear if she can stay in the rectory, 
says that she is determined to keep 
the collection — which is currently 
open to the public on the second 
Saturday of every month -to- 
gether. Awdry says he backs her to 
the pistons. PUS I 



Poverty’s grey 
battalions 


The realities of sanctions 


The leaders of the seven 
Commonwealth countries now in 
London have before them a menu 
of actions that can be taken against 
South Africa. They can select from 
the Nassau Summit “further 
measures", the June EEC head of 
government “additional meas- 
ures" and the US Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee June 31 
proposals. While it is not certain 
that the mini-summit will agree on 
a selection — a full Common- 
wealth summit within a few weeks 
being a distinct possibility - the 
elapse of European and American 
deadlines in the next few weeks 
makes a decision by the beginning 
of October a certainty. 

Serious attempts to co-ordinate 
measures between the allies will 
probably lead to a lowest common 
denominator approach, given the 
diversity of involvement in South 
Africa. That has certainly been the 
experience within the EEC 
The assumption is that Pretoria 
will not be moved within the next 
few weeks to take the steps which 
the international community now 
deems the irreducible minimum 
for averting international action: 
the release of Nelson Mandela and 
other political prisoners, the 
unbanning of the ANC and other 
proscribed organizations and the 
commencement of political nego- 
tiations between Pretoria and 
legitimate black leaders. 

Few observers in South Africa 
believe that Pretoria will take even 
the first of these steps in the 
foreseeable future. Though the 
South African government hardly 
deserves sympathy for a dilemma 
of its own making, the fact 
remains that compliance with 
such demands would encourage a 
perception of weakness, politically 
impossible for any government to 
contemplate except in extremis — 
a position in which Pretoria does 
not yet find itself. 

Unsurprisingly, the inter- 
national uproar over sanctions has 
helped to erode the middle ground 
among the whites and has allowed 
Pretoria to shift attention from its 
domestic difficulties to an external 
focus. Even South African big 
business — caught between an 
increasingly implacable govern- 
ment and an international 
community urging it to “force 
Pretoria to heed its demands*’ — 
has turned aside from macro- 
political issues to the goal of 
getting its own house in order. 

An assessment of the economic 


Michael Spicer describes the 
international options 
as seen from South Africa 


and political impact on South 
Africa of any action taken against 
it must also take into account the 
assumption that a package will, 
receive not only Commonwealth 
support, but also much broader 
international backing. 

Past experience leeds one to 
expect widespread evasion of 
almost all the measures. The 
position of the front-line states — 
which all agree will have to be 
exempt from the application of 
measures - will both determine 
the sanctions chosen and provide 
loopholes for South African eva- 
sion. Neither Taiwan nor Switzer- 
land are members of the UN, and 
both are key trading partners of 
South Africa. They are unlikely to 
adhere fully to sanctions. 
Comecon countries, too. may be 
expected to evade sanctions, and 
the role of Far Eastern countries in 
the Rhodesian saga might be taken 
as a guide to their likely actions in 
this case. 

One might include, on a list of 
major options, a ban on new 
investment in South Africa; 
restriction or ending of landing 
rights for South African Airways; 
the imposition of visa require- 
ments for South Africans and 
restrictions on consular services; a 
ban on the imports of South 
African agricultural goods and 
wine; a ban on imports of coal, 
iron, steel, uranium and gold 
coins; and a concerted attempt to 
force down the price of gold. 

The first of these proposals is 

The Rhodesian 
experience 
is instructive 

common to all three agendas, and 
must be considered the most 
likely, as it simply recognizes a 
step which the market has already 
taken. Turning South Africa from 
a capital-importing into a capital- 
exporting nation has already had a 
measureable effect on the 
country’s economic performance. 
During the period 1964-74 foreign 
capital provided 10 per cent of 


South Africa's investment needs 
and GDP growth. averaged nearly 
5 per cent per annum. In the 
following decade there was no net 
capita] inflow and. in fact. South 
Africa had to draw on reserves to 
achieve a growth rate only half 
that of the previous decade. Since 
1980 real GDP growth has av- 
eraged only 1.1 per cent per 
annum. South Africa's population 
growth rate — 2.3 percent overall, 
2.8 per cent for blacks — means 
that any measure which makes it 
more difficult obtain a high 
growth rate will also contribute to 
burgeoning unemployment. 

To some extent Pretoria can 
mitigate this trend by altering its 
economic strategy: encouraging 
urbanization, emphasizing the 
job-creating potential of mass 
housing programmes, stimulating 
the informal sector and small 
businesses, will go some way 
towards achieving this goal 

But the Rhodesian experience is 
instructive in one major respect. 
Import replacement strategies 
necessitated by sanctions will 
stew the pattern of economic 
development away from its op- 
timal course. In South African 
terms this means dim the accent of 
both public and private invest- 
ment will foil increasingly on 
capital-intensive projects. In the 
long term, generations of South 
Africans will face the con- 
sequences of restricted job 
opportunities. 

The ending or restriction of 
landing rights for South African 
Airways will leave South Africans 
reliant on Front Line state air- 
ports. The aim of such a measure, 
articulated recently by Malcolm 
Fraser, is to give the states some 
leverage against the threat of 
South African retaliation, particu- 
larly if the move is taken in 
conjunction with the imposition 
of visa requirements by Britain 
and West Germany and the need 
to route all air freight (including 
high value mineral exports) to 
neighbouring states. However, 
though Pretoria is unlikely to take 
precipitate retaliatory action 
against Front line States, the 


eventual repatriation of foreign 
migrant labourers — so important 
to the revenue base of Lesotho and 
Mozambique — looks inevitable, 
against the background of high 
unemployment in South Africa. 

Trade sanctions, such as ending 
agricultural imports and imports 
of coal iron, steel uranium and 
gold coins, would involve the 
most economic - cost to South 
Africa. All or these commodities 
are vulnerable to boycotts, given 
existing levels of surplusesJBxcept 
for pig iron, South Africa should 
be able, on current estimates, to 
hold on to at least half to two- 
thirds of its existing export mar- 
kets. In the event of a total trade 
embargo some estimates put the 
total losses to South . African 

A total embargo 
may cut export 
earnings only 20% 

export earnings at only 20 per cent 
of the current totaL A for more 
immediate tangible result, how- 
ever, will be job losses in the coal 
and agricultural sectors in particu- 
lar. 

The threat of a multi-lateral 
attempt to drive down the price of 
gold must be regarded as a non- 
starter. There are for too many 
vested interests in . the bullion 
trade^not the least of which are the 
expanding but highly price vulnei> 
able gold mining sectors of Austra- 
lia, Canada and the United States.. 
The Soviet Union and significant 
interests in the Middle East would 
also not contemplate any such 
proposed action with equanimity. 

Such a Cooks tour of the 
economic impact of sanctions 
takes insufficient account of the 
more fundamental political and 
psychological effects. South Africa 
has been subjected to a sanctions 
proce s s since the 195%, and the 
process of adaptation is a familiar 
one. As internal and external 
pressures rise so, too, does the 
emigration rate of moderate 
whites who see no future in a dash 
of competing black and white 
nationalism. Contrary to the plati- 
tude that sanctions are the last 
chance for peace, they actually 
guarantee polarization. 

The author is public chairs adviser 
to the Anglo American Corpora- 
tion of South Africa. This is a 
personal view. . 


It will begin, this plague of earfy- 
moming cries of anguish up and 
down the country, little more than 
a year from now. The first 
envelopes will be mailed from the 
new computerized office in Glas- 
gow and a few hours later it will be 
clear that something is afoot. The 
envelope will seem loo small — 
two centimetres shorter and a 
centimetre narrower than it was 
last time. It will be floppy, and feel 
thinner than it should. What will 
have gone wrong? 

The letter will be opened — and 
then the real shock will come. 
Instead of the firm blue^black 
hard-bound little book, with its 
royal coat of arms emblazoned in 
gold (certain to put the fear of 
Mrs Thatcher into the heart of 
even the surliest immigration 
official or the most dictatorial 
government) a completely foreign 
thing will emerge, a feeble cherry- 
red notebook, its 32 .pages held 
together with thread and sewn into 
a cheap, soft, shiny plastic cover. 

Breakfasts will be spoiled by the 
thousand. Surely this is not the 
way for Sir Geoffrey Howe to 
“request and require" the outside 
world to allow British citizens “to 
pass without let or hindrance"? It 
is not a suitable vehicle, not a 
British passport at all really, more 
like a laundry list or a building 
society paying-in book. The new 
bearer of this unfamiliar object 
will leave for work feeling some- 
how diminished in his nationhood 
and status. 

Intellectually, of course, it is aQ 
nonsense. In many ways, the so- 
called European passport will be 
better than the present one. It will 
be quick and cheap to make. 
Personal details will be written in 
by a machine rather than a clerk. 
The booklet will then be assem- 
bled and mailed by another ma- 
chine. the whole process taking no 
more than five days. The new 
process will save money and 
therefore the £15 fee. half of which 
pays for consular services over- 
seas. will be stable for a while. 

Being smaller and softer than 
the present passport, it will be 
easier to carry. Businessmen will 
be able to fit it into their wallets 
and hitch-hikers into the back 
pockets of their jeans. It will be 
easier for immigration officers to 
check: all the information needed 
at a check-point. including tire 
photograph, will be on the inside 
of the back cover, which will be 
laminated and machine-readable. 
This will make it easier to check 
the traveller and harder to forge 
the passport. 

American passports already 
have the computerized page, and 
it cuts down queuing. Any Briton 
who has queued stood in line for 
wo hours waiting fora passport to 
be stamped in New York will 


Nicholas Bethel! finds the new British 
passport to be computer-readable, 
practical, but sadly cheap and ignoble 

A kingdom’s 
feeble 

calling card 


Martin Handfbrd 



appreciate the point Reading 
machines also operate in Australia 
and Canada, with other countries 
sure to follow. 

The common-format docu- 
ment — which is not really a 
European passport at all as only 
national authorities issue it - is 
seen by the seven countries al- 
ready using it as a symbol of 
European unity, and more. At 
many land frontiers it is enough to 
show it. even through the window 
of a car. and travellers are waved 
through. By 1992. it is hoped. 
European Community citizens 
will not be controlled individually 
when passing through airports or 
frontiers. The travellers will walk 
past the immigration officer hold- 


ing their “European passport" 
open at the operative page and 
only the occasional person wili'be 
stopped for a spot-checkin other 
parts of the world the new 
document, once all 12 countries 
adopt it, will be a sign of the 
Community's economic and 
political strength. 

Many British people treasure 
the present passport because .of its 
grand design. “Touch one hair of 
my head." it seems to say. “and a 
British gunboat will blast your 
presidential palace to smith- 
ereens." There are some who still 
believe this, although the threat is 
no longer valid. On the other 
hand, the power of a united 
Western Europe, if zt is ever 
■ ' C J' 


achieved, will give our travellers 
for greater protection than they 
now enjoy. 

The new passport therefore 
makes excellent common sense, 
but emotionally it is likely to 
prove disastrous. The colour, fen- 
instance, was a. matter for fierce 
debate. It could not be blue, 
because British and ‘French pass- 
ports are Nue, or green, because 
green belongs to the Italians and 
the IrislL. It was politically nec- 
essary to choose a colour which 
none of the members could claim 
as their own. and the acre 
solution — known technically as 
“burgundy” — is the colour of the 
fruit inside a summer pudding. 

A more serious difficulty is the 
computerized page. In some coun- 
tries, especially Germany, the idea 
of personal data on computers 
arises deep suspicion, and Orwell- 
ian fears of a police state. 

European Parliament members 
from tiie : seven -new-passport 
countries (France, Ireland. Den- 
mark,. Belgium. Greece, Luxem- 
burg and Italy) are already 
registering complaints. A m ere few 
months of frequent travel to 
Brussels and Strasbourg, have 
caused the plastic edges to fray 
and the pages to slide about, so 
that they threaten to foil away 
from the stitching. The booklet 
will fall apart, they fear, long 
before.theend of its 10-year period 
of validity. 

The main concern is that the 
whole look of the thing is so 
unimpressive. Maybe, they say, 
the present British passport was 
too arrogantly pend for the 
modern age. but the replacement 
is cheap and nasty, unworthy of 
the fine idea that conceived it as a 
practical convenience as well as a 
symbol of the growing unity of 350 
million people. 

In other words the new com- 
mon-format passport is just a bit 
toe common for the purpose that 
it is meant to serve. It will help 
British people, but it will offend 
our gut feelings of personal iden- 
tity and patriotism. It is a com- 
promise hammered out by a 
committee who did not lake these 
emotions sufficiently into ac- 
count. 

The idea of a common Euro- 
pean passport is well worth 
preserving and there can be no 
going back on the decision of 
principal to adopt a common 
Format. The format, presently be- 
ing used., however, is a failure. It 
would make sense now for a 
committee of the Twelve to be 
sent back to the drawing-board 
with precise instructions on how 
to come up with something better. 
Lord Berhelf -is member of the 
European Parliament for London 
North West. 

, ©Timm Newspapara, ISM 


Why are the poor,. especially in 
large numbers, so boring? Re- 
cently Michael Meacher. shadow 
secretary for social services, ex- 
ploded again, ignited by the 
government’s belated “hole-in- 
the-comer disclosure" of the latest 
poverty figures. He accused it of 
“suppressing the truth that pov- 
erty in Britain is now at its worst 
since the war and comparable with 
that of the 1930s . . . approaching 
10.5 million”. Ten and a half 
million boring poor. 

This is a foci not an insult I am 
not alone in finding the poor 
boring. Everyone does — every- 
one, that is, except Michael 
Meacher. Frank Field MP and the 
various lobbies whose business, 
financially or ideologically, is 
poverty. As I write, several days 
have elapsed since the Meacher 
revelation, during which we might 
have expected a nationwide gasp 
of horror, a societal wave of 
revulsion, a mass outcry of pro- 
test. a surge on to the streets, 
pockets and handbags turned in- 
side-out ready to relieve the 
poverty of the 10.5 million. But 
no: no gasps, no waves, no outcry 
and no surge, not even a little 
surge; no sign of a surge of any size 
or sort- 

Why not? It cannot be explained 
simply by the government's 
“underhand” timing of the release 
of the figures. Meacher regularly — 
every Monday, it seems — ex- 
plodes about poverty without 
provoking the smallest of surges- 
Britain yawns. 

One obvious explanation is that 
people don't believe the figures. 
It's not surprising. The govern- 
ment intends to alter the defi- 
nition of poverty in order to 
“massage" the figures down. But it 
will only be doing, in reverse, what 
poverty academics have been 
doing for years. They, not satisfied 
with the number of poor created 
by absolute definitions, defined 
poverty relatively (1 am poor 
because 1 have less than you), thus 
ensuring it (and their study of it) 
could never be abolished, and 
indeed would be considerably 
increased. 

Using their definitions, they 
were able to “reveal" poverty 
levels of 15 million or more, and 
have been doing so for yean. So 
many revelations of so much 
poverty have devalued the cur- 
rency and the power to shock 
when, perhaps, there is genuine 
cause for shock. 

The relative definition had the 
additional results of identifying 
poverty with inequality, which is 
what really irritated the aca- 
demics' socialized consciences, 
unwarrantably confusing policies 
designed to reduce inequality with 
those to reduce poverty, and thus 
making poverty reduction by defi- 
nition a socialist project 

Fortunately, none of this 
touched off any resonance with 
the inegalitarian, unacademic but 
considerably subtler man in the 
street Of one survey David 
Don ni son. sometime chairman of 
the Supplementary Benefits Com- 


mission. writes: “Scarcely anyone 
gave poverty the egalitarian, rel- 
ative meaning.’* . 

I suspect the man m the street 
would even be wary of the 
definition used for the Gov- 
ernment's "suppressed figures — 
which is based on supplementary 
benefit entitlement — for he sees 
contrary evidence. He knows by 
common observation what the 
High Street trading figures reveal 
about the saturation level of 
household goods in this sup- 
posed lv poverty-stricken society. 
Those lO million are not without 
baths, cookers, fridges, televisions, 
even cars. . , 

Moreover, unlike the tight- 
fisted academics, he does not seek 
to corral very different persons 
into one category: the poor. He 
persistently distinguishes, much 
to the academics' irritation, be- 
tween the deserving and undeserv- 
ing poor, the poor and temporarily 
stretched, those who waste and 
those who manage- those who 
spend all and those who put aside 
for a rainy day, women who are 
lone parents through bereavement 
or desertion and those who have 
chosen that state, the genuinely 
poor family and the teenager 
wilfully living on 'his own, the 
permanently poor and the student 
who will next year earn a high 
salary, the justified claimant and 
scroungers. In common parlance 
poverty is a moral category. 

He is also aware that the poor 
are always with us. for poverty is 
the consequence of a rich variety 
of actions: there are as many 
reasons for having a low as a high 
income and only some amenable 
to state correction. Those 10 
million — if JO million there be — 
exist after 40 years of the welfare 
state. There's many a pub or bus 
stop conversation to endorse 
Charles Murray's recent study of 
American poverty. Losing 
Ground . which shows that pre- ' 
cisely as federal spending on 
poverty increased so did poverty; 
that “interventions" (in the words 
of one left-wing reviewer) “have 
signalled to impoverished peo- 
ple — particularly black males — 
that there is little point in trying to 
escape from a life of welfare and 
crime". 

IT this is true, if the man in the 
street is not indifferent to local 
individual cases of genuine pov- 
erty, but only to official poverty 
figures and naive solutions, there 
is a lesson for those who truly 
want a popular campaign to 
reduce reducible poverty -and 
that is to tighten their definitions, 
fashioning them in the light of 
popular knowledge mid moral 
sensibility, reducing the numbers 
of the poor to a minimum. But 
poverty is a business and that 
would be bad for business. It is 
much more likely that the 
Meacher explosions, contorted 
definitions, exaggerated figures 
and Utopian faith in government 
intervention will continue; and 
with them the national yawn. 

The author is director qf the Social 
Affairs Unit. 


moreover Miles Kington 

Support your 
local sponsor 


Overheard in a pub at the week- 
end: 

Customer: I can't buy this bonle of 
Guinness. 

Landlord: What's wrong with it? 
Customer: It hasn’t got Daley 
Thompson's name on it - 

Yes, sponsorship is everywhere 
these days. I can't get dressed in 
the. morning without looking at 
my beck, just in xase I've got a 
sponsor's name, on ;it Racing 
drivers are the most extreme case 
— their driving kit and cars are so 
plastered with the names of busi- 
nesses that in some of the lighter 
cars the sponsors' slogans account 
for more than three percent of the 
total weight. There is rumoured to 
be one Grand Prixtiriver who no 
longer wiears overalls while driv- 
ing; he just has his sponsors’ 
names sewn, tightly together. 

Overheard at a Grand Prix pit 
stop: 

Mechanic: What's the trouble? 
Driver: It’s going to rain. I think. 
Mechanic Right lads! Put on his 
weather-proof sponsor's messages! 

Why, one wonders, is the 
weather forecast not sponsored? 
After all the British Telecom 
recorded time is now sponsored by 
Accurist whoever they are, but 
the .weather forecast is just the 
British Telecom Weather Line. 
Could they find nobody prepared 
to back something a little less 
dependable than the time? What 
feint-hearts they are at British 
Telecom! Why not something like 
this..? 

"Later this afternoon the sunny 
spells so generously supported by 
Ambre Solaire will be dying out as 
a series of Aquascutura squalls 
come- in from the west In the 
evening, which today comes to 
you courtesy of the Society of 
West End Theatres, the 
Glenfiddich mist wifi thin out to 
give a dear. Everest Double 
Glazing nigbL And now. to- 
morrow’s weather prospects from 
Old Moore's Almanack." 

Overheard outside a TV rental 
shoprecemly: 

first Punter: Is that girl throwing 
the javelin Fatima? . 

Second Punter The one sponsored 
L y Whitbread? • 

_ list Punter. Or is it Tessa? 

Second Punter: The one sponsored 
by the wallpaper people? 

Yes, sponsorship is everywhere 
these days. Or is it? It may have in- 


vaded sport, and the arts, and the 
very time on our wrists, but has it 
left politics totally untouched? 
. How can it .be that the Tory 
government who are so eager for 
everything else to be supported by 
willing firms, have hot yet called 
upon their aid in politics — be- 
sides,' of course, the trifling matter 
of contributing to patty funds? * 

Well I have wonderful news for 
everyone. From the next .session 
onwards^ Parliament itself is to 
receive sponsorship backing. In 
conditions of the greatest secrecy, 
an alt-party group has secured 
commercial, sponsorship for every 
day on which Parliament is open. 
The marquees which are such a 
common sight at Test matches, 
Wimbledon and Open golf tour- 
naments, wifi now be spread over 
the lawns ofWestminster - and if 
there are not enough lawns at 
Westminster, they will be erected 
throughout the cloisters of this 
venerable but under-funded place. 

Lucky clients of the sponsors 
wll be able to get themsefoes foil 
ot smoked salmon and cham- 
pagne, then stroll through the 
hallowed corridors to take their 
places in a specially endowed 
sponsors’ balcony, where they can 
watch the cm and thrust of our 
national game, cheer on their 
champions and marvel at the 
technical wizardry of Neil 
I—™/** as Je makes a sentence 
^ “yone thought 

, whic & financial giant has 
to make all this possible? 

than our own 
proprietor. Lord Moreover chief 
kwflord of the Amazon Basin and 
owner of more paintings by Ma- 

aciuaU y painted 
jj his lifetime. Yes. Moreover 

be the W3EE5 

^^1 proceeding 
nlSSS- 0 l-^ ommon s does not 

SavrSvS 

SSSsSStfS 

constituents. represent his 






THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


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ANEW CURE FOR OLD ILLS 


Restraint moderation, wage 
norms:' tbe language comes 
from ten, no. twenty years ago. 
Old talk of pay policy is heard 
once again. And who is listen- 
ing? Pay-bargainers in the 
private sector .are certainly 
not United Kingdom pay per 
head is rising by an annual 7 % 
per cent. There is a lowering 
backlog of public sector settle- 
ments. Pay comparability with 
the-privaie sector has almost 
been conceded for the. Civil 
Service. ... ’ * ’ 

Only . months, ago any such 
talk of “excessive” settle- 
ments, especially in the mouth 
of Government ministers, was 
judged not just, heterodox but 
incoherent Faith in the work- 
.frigs of the labour market in a 
context of sound money still 
held. Indeed that faith inspired 
the Government to its package 
of trade union reforms. 

But the passage of those 
reforms makes the conundrum 
the greater. If they have had 
any effect, -they have surely 
made it. 'more difficult for 
unions to exact a “mark up” m 
pay bargaining. There are 
those : who might want the 
Government to go further in its 
attack on the legal status of 
trade unions; but’ even they 
have surely to concede that the 
practical • effect of changes 
already made seem, in the face 
of recent pay figures, to be 
mysteriously puny, 

That inflation has fallen is 
still the Government's most 
ppwerfiil single cry — however 
fortuitous the contributions 
from world commodity prices 
now looks. Unemployment 
remains on' its high plateau. 
But still wages rise.. Employers 
are prepared to pay for 
substantial increases in real 
remuneration for the em- 
ployed segment of the 
workforce. - . 


Plainly it cannot last. Op- 
timists say low price inflation 
will work through into pay 
bargains soon. Pessimists pre- 
dict, as early as 1 987. the onset 
of stagflation: rising prices and 
minimal growth set within a 
continuing context of high 
unemployment. 

The intellectual problems 
are not Mr Nigel Lawson's 
alone. Any Chancellor would 
have in the later years of this 
decade to contend with what 
Sir Alan Wallers modestly 
calls the mystery of pay nego- 
tiation in an economy where 
monopoly supply of labour by 
trade unions and monopoly- 
like control of product markets 
allow enterprises to pass on the 
effect of pay settlements un- 
justified by productivity gains. 

It is at this point that the 
cleverness of the proposals 
made this week by Mr Gavyn 
Davies deserve attention. That 
Mr Dayies is a former policy 
adviser to Mr James Callaghan 
and an economist who, despite 
his success in the City, retains 
his connexions with. Labour 
policy-makers is very relevant. 
He belongs to that school of 
economists who have never 
given up their search for State 
control of. pay increments. 
Within, it the cleavage between 
Social . Democrats and 
Labourites : means little, and 
ideas have been vigorously 
traded between them. 

Mr Davies has put a twist 
on Professor Richard LayartTs 
conception of a pay policy 
based upon taxing above- 
norm pay settlements. . His 
plan would exempt from the 
tax those bargains which were 
rooted in a genuine profit 
sharing scheme — genuine 
meaning one in which employ- 
ees share in profit growth 
rather than some alteration of 
the wage/profit boundary. 


Perhaps more important 
than the details are the clues 
the scheme gives about the 
evolution of thinking on the 
economy and labour market in 
Mr Davies's sector of the 
Labour Party. That he puts 
profit-sharing by employees at 
the heart of his scheme (and all 
but ignores the unions and the 
public sector) speaks.volumes. 

Profit-sharing is catholic in 
its attractiveness. Mr David 
Steel can, quite properly, re- 
mind the world that a scheme 
for employee participation in 
profits figured in the Liberal 
Pary manifesto of 1929. The 
idea naturally attracts all those 
who hope not only to educate 
the British people about enter- 
prise and profit but also to win 
them — hearts, minds, and 
pockets — for the capitalist 
system. 

Now it seems that Labour 
can also join the Huong. Mr 
Davies and economists of his 
bent see profit-sharing as a 
mechanism that could facili- 
tate macro-economic objects 
that in the past have been 
thwarted by micro-economic 
failures, notably in the labour 
market Profit scaring could 
become for Labour what 
industrial democracy once 
was. What was the cooperative 
movement after all but profit- 
sharing? 

The Lawson green paper, 
issued last month, indicated 
that some of the enthusiasm he 
evinced in the Budget had 
cooled to tepid. Without 
following Mr Davies all the 
way, Mr Lawson might at least 
take inspiration from the 
conjuncture he makes with 
wage control. Here, to put it 
crudely, is scope aplenty for 
mutual clothes stealing. Here 
is a mechanism for breaking 
with a past of excess labour 
costs that still haunts us. 


NEXT YEAR IN TEL AVIV? 


Political . subtlety is • not 
Moscow's strong point. But it 
is unusual even for the Soviet 
Union to present its foreign 
policy strategy- with .quite as 
little guile as.it did this past 
weekend. The "coincidence of 
ihe promise of exit visas to r 
Anatoli Shchajansky’s. family 
and "the. announcement of 
.direct Soviet-Isradi talks t- 
■exposed -all the mercenary 
calculation, behind., the 
Kremlin's approach to Israel. 

Trading people for political 
advantage comes easily to the 
Soviet authorities. But the 
Gorbachov leadership has 
shown especial brinkmanship 
in this - trade. The release of 
Anatoly Shcharansky, the Jew- 
ish activist and human rights 
campaigner, was a bold step 
which at once rid the Soviet 
Union of a potent symbol of its 
human rights abuses and re- 
moved an obstacle to better 
East-West relations. 

- Lest the West see the release 
of Shcharansky as a sign of 
weakness^ however, Moscow 
simultaneously reduced the 
number of Jews allowed to 
emigrate and stalled on its 
undertaking ’ to allow 
Shcharansky’s mother- and 
brother to join him in Israel. 
Whether the Soviet Union or 
Israel won in subsequent 
bargaining will only emerge 
after this week’s talks, but 
some pointers are already in 
place. 

' Israel has never fought shy 
of talking to the Soviet Union. 


It was Moscow that broke off 
diplomatic relations after the 
1967 Six-Day war and Mos- 
cow that set conditions for re- 
establishing them. It stipulated 
.the withdrawal of Israel from 
all occupied territory^ Israel’s 
recognition of the .right' 'of 
Palestinians to establish their ■ 
own state, and the return of 
East Jerusalem io Arab rale. If 
Moscow is now discussing an 
eventual restoration of dip- 
lomatic relations, albeit at the 
lower, consular level, this is a 
minor victory for Israel. 

It is a minor victory too, 
whatever pressure might have 
been exerted by the United 
States, to have gamed exit 
visas for Shcharansky 's family. 
Reunification of families 
(abroad) has never figured 
high bn the Kremlin's list of 
priorities. And once Ida 
Milgrom and Leonid 
Shcharansky leave the Soviet 
Union, as it is to be hoped they 
will do shortly, Moscow loses a 
valuable bargaining chip; 

Nonetheless, the very fact 
that Moscow has granted these 
concessions should, and no 
doubt will, move Israel to 
exercise caution in its dealings 
with the Soviet Union. For it 
suggests that Moscow now 
assesses its need for direct 
relations with Israel more 
highly than in the past, when it 
contented itself with secret 
ambassadorial contacts and 
the use, of intermediaries like 
Romania and Finland. 

Moscow appears to have 


reached the conclusion, 
proceeding perhaps. from its 
wider review of foreign policy, 
that perpetuating • the break 
with Israel is no longer in its 
interests <if ever it was). Ger- 
tainly, the absence, of Soviet- 
Israelities, the Gimp David 
agreement and the disunity of 
the Arab countries have com- 
bined ■ to reduce Soviet in- 
fluence in the Middle East and 
frustrate the Kremlin's long- 
standing scheme for an inter- 
national conference with 
Soviet participation. 

The re-establishment of 
relations could, also work to 
Israel's advantage. It might, 
possibly, ease Jewish emigra- 
tion from the Soviet Union, 
especially if Moscow could be 
reassured that emigrants 
would not go instead to the 
United States. It might mean 
less official vitriol being di- 
rected at non-emigrating So- 
viet Jews — a powerful 
emotional bonus. Andit might 
offer ihe prospect of more 
civilized relations between Is- 
rael and its Soviet-supported 
neighbour, Syria, and raise 
Israel’s international status. 

But if the price for this is. as 
has been mooted, Israel's 
surrender to Syria of all, or 
pan of the Golan Heights, any 
serious dealing will probably 
have to wait For no Israeli 
government let alone tbe frag- 
ile coalition that is about to 
change leaders, will be pre- 
pared to make that son of 
compromise. Not yet 


THE HOUSING JUNGLE 


■u 


After winning a mate, the most 
expensive, exciting, hazardous 
and worrying commitment 
into which the average person 
ever enters is that of buying a 
new house - or, for that mat- 
ter. selling his old one. 

South of the Scottish border 
the process resembles a com- 
plex set of gears which are 
revolving at different speeds. 
One man agrees to buy another 
man's home, after which he 
has to sell his own house to a 
third party, who is doing 
exactly the same thing with a 
fourth, and so on. The time it 
all takes allows too much 
scope for gazumping, the prac- 
tice by which a vendor, after 
agreeing to sell his house to 
one party, changes, his mind 
and sells it to a later, higher 
bidder. 

This was prevalent in the 
sellers' market of the early 
1970s and has recently sur- 
faced again. In one sense it is 
the law of supply and demand, 
which regulates trade in the 
market place and which cus- 
tomers have to get used to. On 
the other hand it can lead not 
only to significant financial 
loss for the victim (who might 
have spent money on surveys 
and legal fees) but also to a 
climate of mistrust which 


discourages the conduct of 
good business. 

One solution would be for 
the res*, of the country to 
follow the example of Scot- 
land, where potential buyers 
submit sealed bids by a certain 
date — after which the deal is 
binding. The Royal Institution 
of Chartered Surveyors is in 
favour of adopting this or 
some similar method which 
would bring forward the mo- 
ment of decision. The comple- 
tion date could still remain 
subject to n^otiation between 
the two parties, to give tbe 
buyer lime to sell his own 
house. But the contract to buy 
and sell would have been 
signed. 

One objection which is 
sometimes advanced is that 
while it might operate well 
enough in Scotland where only 
40 per cent of a smaller 
population own their houses, 
it would be hard to operate in 
England and Wales, where 
house ownership is over 60 per 
cent. 

This difference hardly 
sounds insuperable. But a 
more flexible alternative will 
be outlined later this year 
anyway by the Standing 
Committee on Conveyanc- 
ing — established some time 


ago under the auspices of the 
Law Commission. The 12- 
person committee is bringing 
out a consultation paper on a 
scheme which would involve 
drafting a “preliminary de- 
posit agreement.” Both parties 
would pay between one-quar- 
ter and one-half of one per cent 
of the purchase price, as a 
deposit — to be forfeited if 
either side withdraws. The 
contract would probably be 
voluntary. But the refusal of 
either party to enter into it 
would at least send a warning 
signal to the other. 

. There would need to be get- 
out clauses to allow for the 
later discovery of dry rot or 
death watch beetle. But it 
would have the advantage of 
encouraging mutual con- 
fidence without irrevocably 
binding either party too soon 
at a time of swiftly changing 
circumstances. It would at 
least protect the innocent party 
from financial loss. 

Whether it would be enough 
to regularise the house market 
remains to be seen. But it is 
worth serious consideration by 
all sides. If a man's word can 
no longer be his bond, then his 
wallet must be — and he must 
pay for his over-private enter- 
prise. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Police training in use of firearms 


From the Deputy Chief Constable 
of West Midlands Police 
Sir. In his article (July 29), “What 
police have to leant about guns”, 
Michael Yardley starts with the 
premiss that Police Constable 
Brian Chester was “‘packaged' 
into an almost heroic- figure by 
W«st Midlands police:” 

This suggests- that his return to 
the beat after a long period of 
suspension from duty was en- 
gineered by the force as some form 
of public 'relations exercise de- 
signed as a smokescreen to hide 
alleged inadequacies in respect of 
police firearms trainingand opera- 
tions. 

Nothing could be further from 
the truth: It was public demand, as 
expressed through the media, 
which influenced the publicity 
surrounding his welcome back in 
uniform by sincere members of 
the public. Nothing would have 
suited me better than for the 
officer to have returned quietly to 
his WiUenhall manor. It was direct 
pressure from newspapers, tele- 
vision and radio in the form of 
daily telephoned enquiries and 
demands for facilities to publicise 
the event that prevented this from 
happening. 

In West Midlands both the 
Chief Constable and the police 
authority are continuously review- 
ing all aspects of police firearms 
aim the difficulties set out by Mr 
Yardley in respect of selection, 
training, assessment and deploy- 
ment are well known to us. 
However, the Chief Constable 
cannot simply sit back and wait 
for the psychologists to produce 
tbe requisite tests. He has to act 
and react to the ever-changing 
scene in which he works. 

Consequently, and subject to 
observations by the police author- 
ity, the Chief Constable has 
moved toward full-time police 
firearms units which will rotate 
their duties between armed se- . 
curity at Birmingham Inter- 
national Airport, standby duties, 
operational deployments and 
training. In this way he will avoid 


the dangers and difficulties envis- 
aged by Mr Yardley in his outlined 
compartmenied special squad sit- 
ting in barracks waiting to be 
called out. 

It is difficult to understand Mr 
Yaidley's conclusion that “tbe 
greatest problem to be overcome 
is one of police sensitivity to 
criticism”. I would have thought 
that insensitivity to criticism is the 
real danger. Fortunately, this 
country enjoys a police force 
which consults and listens to 
public criticism — perhaps never 
more so than in the field of police 
firearms operations. 

. Following the Stephen Waldorf 
shooting the police service pro- 
duced the Manual of Guidance on 
Police Use of Firearms which 
covers the whole range of weap- 
onry selection, training and 
deployments and Mr Yardley is 
signally incorrect as to the length 
of he training period. 

No force in the country limits its 
firearms training to 10 days. In 
West Midlands there is an initial 
two-day evaluation and assess- 
ments course from which selected 
candidates proceed to the KWa y 
training, followed by a minimum 
of eight clays' refresher training 
each year. Selected officers are 
then sent on a three-week course, 
the syllabus for which is split 
equally between marksmanship 
and tactics. These officers receive 
a minimum of 15 days' refresher 
training each year. 

Since the publication of the 
manual the service has made 
many changes. That process has 
not been helped by sometimes ill- 
informed opinions and the multi- 
farious expertise of the firearms 
expert s and psychologists, many 
of whom seem to be in direct 
conflict with one another. 

Yours faithfully, 

L, SHARP. 

Deputy Chief Constable, 

West Midlands Police, 

Police Headquarters, 

Colmore Circus. 

Queensway, Birmingham. 

August 1. 


Greyhound racing 

From the Senior Steward of the 
National Greyhound Racing Club 
and the Chairman of the British 
Greyhound Racing Board 
Sir, The report or tbe Monopolies 
and Mergers Commission's in- 
quiry into the supply m Great 
Britain of the services of managing 
greyhound trades (details, August 
4) illustrates that the Fair Trading 
Act 1973 must snrriy never have 
been.- intended to authorise in- 
vestigations into controlling bod- 
ies of sporting organisations. 

The monopolies commission is 
singularly ill-equipped to inquire 
into the organisation of governing 
bodies of sport and there is no 
doubt that, in. finding their task 
extremely difficult over grey- 
hound racing, they were baffled to 
arrive at any satisfactory recom- 
mendations. 

After two years of investigation, 
they could find no fault in the 
organisation of the National Grey- 
hound Racing Club and the 
control which it has exercised as 
the judicial and disdplinary body 
of the second largest spectator 
sport in Britain, nor of the British 
Greyhound Racing Board as tbe 
elected representative body for the 
sport 

Only two rules out of 185 have 


been recommended for amend- 
ment and then only after further 
discussions with the Director 
General of Fair Trading. These 
amended rules will then further 
strengthen the underlying policy 
of the NGRC so that ideally, afi 
greyhounds will race in their 
registered stud book names. 

However, this whole exercise 
has been extremely costly to the 
sport — nearly £50,000 in pro- 
fessional fees alone, not to men- 
tion the enormous cost to the 
taxpayer — and shows that other 
major sports such as association 
football, horse racing, rugby, etc. 
could face the possibility of simi- 
lar Investigation. Any sport, by its 
very nature, must have a number 
of rules that necessarily restrict the 
activities of the competitors. 

Let this be a warning to all 
sporting organisations of the 
possibility that they, in turn, may 
be involved in a long and costly 
investigation by the monopolies 
commission but, in the end, the 
mountain will only bring forth a 
mouse. 

Yours faithfully, 

J. H. S. MAJURY, 

Senior Steward, The National 
Greyhound Racing Club Ltd, 
NEW ALL Oiainnan, 

British Greyhound Racing Board, 
24-28 Oval Road, NW1. 


Lost chords 

From Mr B. J. Davey 
Sir, 1 share Dr Bums's concern 
(July 31) that the increasing 
commercialisation of St Paul's 
Cathedral and other cathedrals 
means that even a 30-minute 
organ recital cannot be listened to 
except against a background of 
multilingual guided tours, but 
surely his conclusion that in these 
circumstances there seems little 
hope for music in the Anglican 
Church is too pessimistic and 
misses the point 
The primary function of the 
skilled musicians who serve our 
cathedrals and collegiate churches 
is to provide a wide range of 
relevant music to the . highest ' 
possible standards within the con- 
text of the liturgy of the Church. 
As such they form part of the 
worshipping community of the 
Church and are not primarily 
performers seeking an audience. 

There can be no doubt, even to 
the casual visitor, that the stan- 
dard of cathedral music in this 
country is in very good shape 
indeed, and 1 hope that Dr Burns 
and Bernard Rose (July 25) realize 
that the congregations who attend 
choral services fully appreciate the 
contributions made by organists 
and choirs and believe that the 
Church would be improverished 
without them. 

The hope for music in the 
Anglican Church lies in the 
continued relevance of music as 
an element of worship and in the 
ability of tbe Church to attract and 
retain musicians of tbe highest 
calibre who share this view. The 
present level of commitment 
shown by church musicians and 
the high standards of performance 
they achieve surely indicate that 


the Anglican Church can face its 
musical future with some con- 
fidence 
Yours, 

B. J. DAVEY. 

346 Banbury Road, Oxford. 

From Mr Richard Meredith 
Sir. Dr Bums (July 31) quite 
rightly deplores the cacophony in 
St Paul's Cathedral during an 
organ recital. However. I am more 
disturbed by the ceaseless irrev- 
erence exhibited by the tourist and 
abetted by the ringing of cash tills 
and the babble of guides. 

It is impossible to enter the 
jewel of the Anglican Church and 
pray; -to contemplate the 
lriumphantism of God over the 
world or the mystery of faith 
whilst the Dean and Chapter 
appear to see themselves as ser- 
vants of the tourist board and not 
as sacred ministers charged with 
' maintaining reverence and dignity 
in the place set aside for the 
worship and presence of God. 

From its building. St Paul's has 
always drawn the curious, the 
artists and the religious. Amidst 
the city it has reminded countless 
generations of Londoners that 
there is something greater than 
mammon: but in recent years the 
bustle and noise of the world have 
entered tee cathedral and made it 
a poorer place. 

Sir. r suspect that there is more 
awe and genuine . prayer in tee 
secularised cathedrals in the 
Kremlin than in the cathedral 
church of London during tee 
tourist season. 

Yours faithfully, 

R. MEREDITH. 

Lightbownc Rectory. 

Kenyon Lane. 

Manchester. 

August I. 


Words and bonds 

From Mr Denis Barnes 
Sir, In 1913 my great-uncle in- 
vested £150 in Russian bonds at 
4W per cent. By October. 1917. 
interest payments had ceased, the 
bonds passed through various 
generations and now hang framed 
upon our walls as a lesson, or a 
joke, according to taste. 

More accomplished readers will 
no doubt be able to calculate the 
present-day value of £150 in 1917 
and tee value of accrued unpaid 
interest at 4>& per cent for 69 years. 

I find it astonishing — or 
perhaps, on reflection I do not 
bearing in mind tee performance 
of our present Government - that 


tee agreement (report, July 16) 
which promises about** 10 percent 
of original investment” could 
have been reached without any 
prior consultation with the in- 
terested parties. 

I fear that for the £15 or so we 
might obtain the bonds will better 
continue- to decorate our walls not 
only as a joke or warning about the 
USSR but also now to include Sir 
Geoffrey Howe and this Govern- 
ment for tee benefit of our 
descendants. 

Sir. yours sincerely. 

DENIS BARNES. 

Lea Lane Cottage. 

Great Braxted. Essex. 

July 16. 


National Gallery 
appointment 

From Mr Cecil Gould 
Sir. I wonder if I am alone in 
feeling grave doubts about tee 
judgement of the selection 
committee on tbe directorship of 
tee National Gallery (report, Au- 
gust I)? The mere feet that the first 
appointee, the American, Mr 
FHlsbury, saw fit to decline is far 
from reassuring. 

More disquieting still is the 
inadequacy of achievement to 
date of bote appointees. To my 
knowledge, Mr Pillsbury has no 
scholarly publications of any con- 
sequence to his credit. He is said 
to have bought well for the 
museum at Fort Worth, but with 
vast fends at his disposal this is 
not difficult Mr MacGregor can- 
not claim even this. He has never 
worked in even a minor museum, 
nor has he, so fer as 1 know, 
published anything of con- 
sequence. 

Both appointments were there- 
fore made on tee strength of what 
in tee fallible judgement of tee> 
selection committee, was consid- 
ered to be “promise". To judge by 
the Press reports tee committee 
were impressed by Mr 
MacGregor’s “charm". A charm- 
ing qualification for director of tee 
National Gallery! In any case, 
bote appointments seem to have 
been in tee nature of a gamble; 
and a gamble in tee case of an 
appointment of this importance 
may be seen as an extraordinary 
act of irresponsibility. 

In a gallery, as in other 
organisations, it is essential for tee 
staff to respect tee chief But, since 
in this case several of teem are 
vastly more distinguished than tee 
new director, this will be difficult 
and will lead to friction. When one 
considers the brilliant achieve- 
ments of Sir Charles Eastlake, 
Lord Dark, Sir Martin Davies or 
Sir Michael Levey — achieve- 
ments that they could already 
show at tee time of their appoint- 
ments — tee nomination of Mr 
MacGregor gives cause for pro- 
found dismay. 

Yours etc. 

CECIL GOULD (Keeper and 
Deputy Director of tee National 
Gallery. 1973-1978), 

Jubilee House, 

Thomcombe, 

Chard. Somerset 

Television time 

From Dr Peter Gold 
Sir, If your correspondent Mr-G. 
L Lloyd (August 2), genuinely 
believes that “a point of view has 
baacally two strands — for and 
against”, then he has quite dearly 
been brainwashed by the ad- 
versarial political system which 
has dominated our country for fer 
too long and which the Conser- 
vative and Labour parties would 
desperately like to preserve. 

The sooner we get away from 
the simplistic -notions of pro- and 
anti-. Them and Us, “if you're not 
for us you must be against us”, the 
better the hope for the future. 

The rise of the Alliance parties 
in this country is a clear 
demonstration that the electorate 
recognizes that there are more 
than two sides to an argument and 
more than two angles to an issue: 
It is thus tee electorate, as much as 
the Alliance parties, who are being 
deprived of tee proper representa- 
tion of their views through tee 
medium of television. 

Yours faithfully, 

PETER GOLD, 

39 Edgehill Road. 

Sheffield, South Yorkshire. 

Road to tyranny 

From Mr George Mandd 
Sir, Bernard Levin (August I) 
believes, on the one hand, that this 
century has seen “the record for 
the greatest number of innocent 
human beings deliberately done to 
death in tee entire history of tee 
world” and, on tee other hand, 
“that mankind in general is better 
than it was in the earlier 
centuries.” 

No doubt these two statements 
are not. strictly speaking, in- 
compatible with one another; yet 
there is such a contrast between 
them that I can’t help wondering 
whether Mr Levin’ s belief in 
progress - albeit only in slow 
progress — isn’t itself a manifesta- 
tion of tee same deep human 
longing for tee world to be other 
than it actually is that leads tee 
people he criticises to hero-wor- 
ship tyrants such as Stalin and 
Mao. 

Yours faithfully. 

GEORGE MANDEL 

the Old Stores. Combe, Oxford. 

August L 

Taxman’s over-dose 

From Mr Alan Bradley 
Sir, Paragraph 4 (2) of schedule 12 
of tbe Finance BilWealing with 
the lax treatment of pension 
scheme surpluses, reads as fol- 
lows • 

The Board may make regulations 
providing for prescribed provisions 
of this Part of this Schedule to apply, 
as from - a prescribed date, in 
prescribed circumstances, and sub- 
ject to any prescr. wo omissions or 
modifications, in relation to any 
exempt approved scheme of another 
prescribed kind. 

The “degree of prescription” of 
this paragraph (defined as the 
number of times the word 
“prescribed” occurs as a propor- 
tion of tee total number of words) 
is 11,4 percent. 

Is this a record? More seriously, 
is this an acceptable form in which 
to enact legislation giving new 
taxing powers to the Inland Rev- 
enue? 

Yours faithfully. 

ALAN BRADLEY. 

Lane, Clerk & Peacock 
(Actuaries). 

Regent House. . 

89 Kingsway, WC1 


ON THIS DAY 


AUGUST 5 1931 - 

The effect of the Rood Traffic Act 
of 1931, which introduced the 
Highway Code, had not yet been 
assessed, bul there was some 
evidence, ‘‘based on expert 
observation”, that the standard of 
driving had improved since the 
removal of the speed limit on 
private cars. The number of 
persons killed in rood Occidents 50 
yean later (1380) ms 5, 963, fewer 
by some 1300 than the figure given 
in the article 


Unnecessary Road 
Accidents 

At the moment when the cus- 
tomary toll of the roads during a 
Bank Holiday week-end is fresh in 
the minds of the public, the letter 
from ADMIRAL DENT on this 
page is an important and oppor- 
tune commentary on the appalling 
loss of life due to traffic accidents 
that goes on all through the year. In 
1930 the number of persons killed 
in Great Britain was 7,305, besides 
177,895 injured, a total greater by 
7,587 than in 1929. According to 
ADMIRAL DENT'S analysis of 
the figures only 2,027 of the killed 
(1,464 of whom were motor-cy- 
clists or their passengers) were 
occupants of the vehicles held to be 
at fault, while 4,611 were pedestri 
ans or pedal cyclists. The occu- 
pants of the motor-cars and 
commercial vehicles involved were 
more fortunate. Only 563 of them 
paid with their lives for the fault of 
the driver. So much for the fatal 
results, the magnitude of which 
makes it a matter of vital urgency 
to probe deeply into the root causes 
of the accidents. ADMIRAL 
DENT suggests a different expla- 
nation from that to which they are 
generally attributed. In his opinion 
— and there is not a shadow of 
doubt that he is right — the 
responsibility lies to a great extent 
with the road authorities. Their 
craze for opening up or 
“improving" roads which ore utter- 
ly unsuitable for fast motor traffic 
asks too much of the users of the 
roads — drivers, pedestrians, and 
cyclists alike. Tbe truth is that a 
large part of our road policy in 
recent years has been fundamen- 


tally wrong. It is extravagant, 
unnecessary, and dangerous. In 
these days wide, straight, well- 
constructed arterial roods, con- 
necting all important centres of the 
population in the island, north, 
south, east, and west, are absolute- 
ly essential The mischief is done 
by the almost universal tendency 
to go beyond this requirement. 
Tempted by the grants offered by 
the Ministry, local authorities are 
everywhere pngagpd — at a huge 
cost — in converting into sub- 
arterial - branches of the mam 
highways country roads and lanes 
tbit atthe best are alternative and 
unnecessary routes and ought nev- 
er to be made available for rapid 
motor traffic. A network of these 
unwanted motor tracks is being 
created aD- over the country. In 
their zeal to cater for outside traffic 
and to outdo each other in provid- 
ing the facilities which it welcomes 
but does not need, local authorities 
are busily engaged in widening 
existing roadway*, sac rifi ci n g grass 
margins and footpaths, cutting 
down sloping banks, and rounding 
off comers which in their original 
state, because they dearly call for 
extra caution, are themselves an 
obstacle to excessive speed and 
therefore mnlc» for the greater 
safety of all concerned, and partic- 
ularly of the rural population for 
whose use these country roads were 
and should be intended. For the 
security of their lives and limbs, as 
well as for the reason that the 
country cannot possibly 'afford 
them, the time has come to cry halt 
to the extravagant policy by which 
too many local authorities are still 
obsessed. 

Meanwhile it appears from the 
observations carried out by offi- 
cials of the Royal Automobile Club 
and the Automobile Association on 
the week-end motor traffic that the 
general standard of efficiency was 
high. There was a natural tendency 
to take advantage of the abolition 
of the speed limit, but most drivers 
appear to have paid proper atten- 
tion to road conditions and to have 
increased speed only when it was 
possible to do so without incurring 
any risk of injuring th em selves or 
others. It is particularly satisfac- 
tory to learn that there was. a 
marked absence of cutting-in, and 
that there are continued signs of 
the beneficial effect of the Road 
Traffic Act and of the High way 
Code issued by the MINISTER of 
TRANSPORT. But every 
thoughtful user of the roads knows 
that there is still urgent need for 
further improvement The number 
of reckless and inconsiderate driv- 
ers and of careless pedestrians is 
still far too large, and as the 
inevitable consequence of their 
wilful or foolish failings there are 
still fer too many preventable 
accidents and unnecessary deaths. 
It is the bounden duty of every 
motorist to read, learn, and act 
upon the hints and warnings of the 
Highway Code. It is tbe no las 
solemn obligation of aO pedestrians 
to determine never to cross a road 
without being absolutely certain 
that no approaching vehicle is near 
enough to run into them — or to be 
forced to swerve dangerously in the 
endeavour to avoid them. When all 
users of the roads have these rales 
at their fingers' ends, and when all 
authorities have adopted a saner 
policy of road- making, then and 
not till then will there be a real 
prospect of some reduction in the 
toll that the roads exact 


lit-picking 

From Dr P. J. Cuff 
Sir, The new Oxford 
Minidictionary of Spelling carries 
with it a. printed slip which reads 
as follows: 

“The following error escaped our 
notice: 


Tours faithfully, 

P. J. CUFF. 

Pembroke College, Oxford. 


wf 




12 





THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 

BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
August 4: The Duke of Edin- 
burgh attended a Reception 
hosted by the Mayor of Medina 
at Nonhwood House, Cowes. 

His Royal Highness, Admiral 
of the Royal Yacht Squadron, 
later attended the Squadron Ball 
at the Castle. Cowes. 

Squadron Leader Timothy 
Finneron and Major Rowan 
Jackson. RM were in 
attendance. 

CLARENCE HOUSE 
August 4: Today is the Anniver- 
sary of the Birthday of Queen 
Elizabeth The Queen Mother. 

YORK HOUSE 
ST JAMES'S PALACE 
August 4: The Duke of Kent. 
Patron of Kent County Cricket 
Club, today opened the new 
Stand at St Lawrence Ground. 
Canterbury. 

His Royal Highness, who 
travelled in an aircraft of The 
Queen's Flight, was attended by 
Captain Michael Campbell- 
Lame non. 


Princess Anne, Colonel-in-Chief 
of the Royal Corps of Signals, 
will lunch with the Royal Sig- 
nals Guard on duties in Central 
London at the Officers' Mess. St 
James's Palace, on August 12. 

The Queen wi|] unveil a plaque 
in Aberdeen Harbour on August 
16 to commemorate the 850th 
anni versary of the harbour. 

The Queen will inspect the 
Balmoral Guard at Bailater 
Station on August 16 and later 
arrive at Balmoral Castle. 

The Duke of Edinburgh. Presi- 
dent of the World FEIFour-in- 
Hand Driving Championships 
will attend a gala evening at 
Balzers Theatre Restaurant. 
Windsor, on August 16, in aid of 
the championships being held at 
Ascot from August 13 to 17. 

Prince Edward will attend a 
performance of the National 
Youth Music Theatre in Edin- 
burgh on August 1 8 and a dinner 
afterwards at Hopetoun House 
in aid of the Duke of 
Edinburgh's Award Scheme 
30th Anniversary Tribute 
Project. 


Inner Temple 


The following' law grants, 
accommodation awards and 
benefactors' scholarships have 
been awarded for 1986: 

C N Barton, LLB of Queen Mary Coll. 
London. £2.500. including a Paul 
Mil liven tcnoiaruup or £75: C Bayus. 
BA of Exeter Umv. an accommodation' 

award and £3.000 Including a Paul 

Mctmen schoursiup or £75: Jane 
Bewsey. BA of Jesus Coll. Cambridge. 
£750: C □ Blackwood. BA of GonvUle 
4 Caius. Cambridge. JM.OOO Including 
a Profumo scholarship of £100. R A 
Coleman. LLB of University Coll. 

Cardin. £3.000 Including tnt- Crdle 

Yahuda schoiarstuo of £ 226 . m c 
D alby. BA of Regent’s Park CD11. 
Oxford. £4.000 including me Neville 
Laski scholarship of £lOO: Raaim M 
de Vaz Carreiro. BA of Sussex 
Lnivcrslly. Dlplome d' Eludes 
Jundi nues Fl-ancastses. Strasbourg 
Unli. an accommodation award: P C 
Dudkowskl. BA of Sussex Unn. £750: 
Catherine Foster. LLB of Nottingham 
L rvtv . £1 .850 Including Uw Kenneth H 
otomon prize of £20. 

N N Green. LLB of Leicester Liniv. 
LLM of Toronto Untv and PhD. of 
Southampton UnJv. £4.000 including 
Hie Frank * Buitk Gahan scholar- 
ship of £500: Crtfflths. BA of New 
College. Oxford. £2.500. Including Uie 
Horace Avory scholarship of £450: 
Holland. BA of Pembroke Coll Cam- 


bridge. LLM of Toronto liniv £3.000 
including an Ashworth scholarship of 
£360: J D Hough Ion. LLB of Brunei 
liniv. LLM of University Coll. London. 
£4.000 including an Ashworth 
scholarship of £350: Yvonne Lewis. 
LLB of Birmingham Untv. an accom- 
modation award and £3.000 Including 
a Yarborough Anderson scholarship 

of £300: R Y Mamoorl Dara. BA of 
Downing Coll. Cambridge. £4.000 
including a Yarborough Anderson 
scholarship of £300: A Marshall. ’ 1 H 
of Uniiersuy Coll. London, an accom- 
modation award and £2.000 Including 
a Profumo scholarship of £100. 

J M Mulholland. LLB. of Leeds 
Unit. £4.000 Including a Profumo 
scholarship of £100: S J Murray. 
LLB. of Leicester uwv. £3.000 
including the Geoffrey Veale scholar- 
ship of £60. P m m Poueti. BSc. of 
Bristol Unit £750: J R P Sentence. 
MusB of Trim ly con. Dublin. BA of 
Peter ha use CoU. Cambridge. £4.000: 
H J Smith. BA of Oriel Coll. 
Cambridge. £4.000 Including the Basil 
Nldd scholarship of £250: Barbara 
Strachan. LLB of Leicester Poly. 
£3.000 Including the Philip Tefcfunan 
scholarship of £150: D S StreaBeUd- 
James. BA of University Coil. Oxford. 
£2.500 including a Yarborough 
Anderson scholarship of £300: J E 
Taylor. LLB. of Nottingham Unlv. 
£2.500 including the Michael Hodge 
scholarship oi £56: and A D Wallon. 
BA of Staffordshire Poly. LLM of 
London School of Economics. £750. 


Scottish win 

The first of the big events in 
the English Bridge Union's 
Festival of Bridge being held at 
Brighton was completed over 
the weekend. It resulted in a 
dear win for the young Scottish 
pair. W. Whittaker and J. 
Silversione. 

Swiss pairs championship: 1. W 
Whittaker, j Silversione i Scotland) 
212: 2. P Donovan. R Westwaier 
i London 194.6: 5 A Kay. D Muller 
(London) 190: 4.L Handley. J Murrell 
fKenl) 185: 6. A Mayo. G Hiller 
(London) 182-5: 6. R winter (Yorks). 


J Wood (Warwicks) 180: 7. P D 
ourdaln (Wales!. B Rtgal (London) 
179: 8. G Jepson. O Musson (York- 


shire) 178.5. 


Birthdays 

today 


Professor Neil Armstrong, 56;. 
the Right Rev A. H. Attwell, 66; 
Dr Gilbert Forbes. 78; Mqjor- 
Gcneral W. H. Hargreaves, 78; 
Miss Jacquetta Hawkes. 76; Mr 
Alan Howard. 49; Mr John 
Huston, 80; Sir Michael Kerry, 
63; Major-General J. M. W. 
Martin. 84- Lord Justice 
O'Donnell, 62; Mr Rodney 
fcuison. 43; Sir Eric Fountain, 
53; Professor Margaret Read, 
97; Lord Sefton ofGaiston. 71. 


Church 

news 


Appointments 
Canon Dr Stephen Smalley. 
Vice-Provost and Canon 
Residentiary of Coventry 
Cathedral, has been appointed 
Dean of Chester, succeeding the 
Very Rev Thomas Clcasbby. 

-The Rev N P Chrtueneen. Doctor. Si 
Barnabas. HrofWJorouftn. tf**C«* Of 
aimer, ro be also Rural Dean of 
Wirral South, same dforesc. 

The Hrt B R Coooer. Vic ar. 
Woolton Bassett- diocese of Salisbury, 
to be Rector. Wllion with 
NefherhamPlon and Fugpie&tone. 
lame dl 0 CBK< 

TtU Rev J M CrtndelL Chaplain at 

BcrUumsim School, diocese of St 

Albans, to be Chaplain of Densuoe 

College, diocese of UctifleM. 

The Rev C P Guinness. Parish 
Pries L SI Stephen. South Lambeth, 
diocese of Southwark. k> also Rural 
Dean of Lambeth. 

The Rev W H HopMmon. Vicar. SI 
Ca [fieri nr. BlrUes. diocese of Chester. 
io be also Continuing Ministerial 
Education Officer, same diocese. 

The Rev CH Jeff. Vicar. The Good 
Shepherd. Carahalion Beeches, di- 
ocese of Southwark, lo be part-Ume 
Chaplain lo Uie Community of the 
Sisters of the Church (St Michael’s 
Convent. Ham Common!, and Aaate- 
lixzil PrtesL Si Peter. Petersham, same 
diocese. 

The Rev D P Ungwood. TCam 
vicar. Ridge Team. Reddlich. diocese 
of Worcester, to De Team Rector. 
BlaJtenaU Healh. diocese of LUhflHd. 

The Rev J A C Mantle. Chaplain. 
Fitzwiiham College. Cambridge, to be 
part-ume tutor with the Canterbury 
School of Ministry, and Assistant 
PrtesL Boxley with DeUlng. diocese of 
caniefbtuy. 

The Rev PTC Mageder. Assistant 
Curate. ChingfOrd. SI Peter and St 
Paul, diocese of Chelmsford, to be the 
incumbenL GoMhanger with Little 
Totham. same diocese. 

The Rev P Norwood, vicar. Si 
Laurence In ThaneL diocese of 
canterbury- lo be also Rural Dean of 
Ttianet. same diocese. 

The Rev A M Priddte. Team Vicar. 
High Wycombe Team Ministry, di- 
ocese of Oxford, lo be Prtest-in- 
cturae. St Mary. Amentum with 
OotesWll. same diocese. 

The Rw A K Pring. Pnel-ln- 
charge. GayhursL Raven&ioke. Stoke 

GOMmgton and Weston Underwood. 

diocese of Oxford, to be Team Vicar, 
wougiuon Ecumenical parish, same 
diocese. 

The Rev A D Rose. Assistant 
Curate. Emmanuel. North wood, di- 
ocese of London, to be Vicar. St Peier. 
her. diocese of Oxford. 

The Rev S M Royie. Rector. Milton 
Abbas. Hllion with Chr»ic«um» and 
Metcombe Horsey, diocese of Salis- 
bury. to be Diocesan Adviser. 
Continuing Ministerial Education, 
same diocese. 

The Rev A Simper. Vicar. SI Mary. 
Dover, diocese of Canterbury, to be 
also Rural Dean of Dover, same 
diocese. 

The Rev JAP Stand en McDoogal. 
Rector. Tollard Royal wlUi Famham- 
Gussage St Michael. Cuauge All 
Saints. Ashmore and Chetue. and 
Rural Dean of Milton and Blandtard.i 
diocese of Salisbury, to be Rector. 
Bride Valley Team Ministry, same 
diocese. 

Canon C J Studdert-Kecmedv. Rec- 
tor. St Nicholas with a Stephen. 
Gods tone, and Rural Dean of 
Godstone. diocese of Southwark, lo be 
reappointed Rural Dean of Godstone. 

Canon A Watson. Rector. AlUngton. 
diocese of Canterbury, to be also 
Rural Dean of Sutton, same diocese. 

The Rev K wooUrause. PrtesHn- 
charae. Blrdham and West nchenor. 
and Director of Pastoral studies ai 
Chi Chester Theological College, di- 
ocese of Chichester, lo be Chaplain lo 
[he Wes! Sussex Institute of Higher 
Education. 

The Rev Dr Michael R SheanL 
Minister of Chesham Methodist 
Church In Buckinghamshire, to be 
world Mission Officer In me diocese 
of Lichfield. 

Chnrcb in Wales 
Diocese of SI Asaph 
The Rev D J WUliams. Rector of 
Uanbedr DC to be Rural Dean of 


D^ffryn^Clwyd. 


.... Rev T Pierce. Vicar of RossetL 
lo be Rural Dean of Wrexham. 

The Rev T O Jones. Rector of 
March wi el lo be Rural Dean of 
Bangor isycoed. 

The Rev R E Pain, curate of CakttcoL 
to N curatt In charge of CwmtUfery 
and She Bens, diocese of Monmouth. 


Archaeology 

Fine Viking grave found 

By Norman Hammond, Archaeology Correspondent 


Excavations in the Isle of Man have uncovered 
a densely packed cemetery of the Viking 
period, boned beneath the braidings of a 
medieval castle. One of the graves is the most 
richly famished female burial known from the 


she, at Peel Castle on the west coast of 
the Isle of Man, lies on St Patrick's Isle, a 
knob of rock attached to the mainland by a low 
sand spit 

The islet is covered by the extensive rains of 
the medieval castle, which enclose St 
German's Cathedral, seat of the Bishops of 
Sodor and Man for centuries. The excavations 
have taken place in the area immediately west 
of the cathedral, below a group of structures 
once identified as die bishop's palace. 

The cemetery consists of numerous “lintel 
graves", each banal being enclosed by a more 
or less complete surround of slate slabs, and 
the more elaborate baring a cover of slate 
lintels. The less elaborate have only the head 
area enclosed, while some bodies were in 
wooden coffins, marked now by Iron clench 
nails; others were in graves cut into the sandy 
soil and their human remains survive only as 
shadowy stains. 

Mr David Freke, of Liverpool University, 
who is directing the excavations, said that nine 
successive periods of burial had been detected, 
of which the three earliest were of the pre- 
Norse period of the fifth to ninth centuries AD, 
and the latter six of the Norse (Vflring) and 
medieval periods. The density of burials at 
between five and seven a square metre of the 
cemetery was very high, and some graves cut 
into earlier interments. 

While the earlier graves were Christian and 
therefore lacked grave goods, at the end of the' 
eighth century there were a number of pagan 
burials with accompanying offerings, perhaps 


connected with the Norse incursions in the 
Irish Sea area. 

The most impressive was a lintel grave Markham, who 

containing the skeleton of a mature woman, her j ^ t ^ e fi ret person to fly 
thigh bones bowed from too mnefa child bear- ^ ^] 3n ij c solo from cast to 
ing, Mr Freke said. Sbe stood about 5 ft 4 in 3n d whose book describ- 
talL and her skeleton was accompanied by ■ the recently became 
jewellery and household implements, including a best-seller when it was 
a pair of iron shears for catting doth, three republished after 40 vears. 
knives and an iron spit. _ died in Nairobi on August 3. 

One of the knives has a Made only 2 in long 


OBITUARY 

BERYL MARKHAM 

Kenya girl who made 

pioneering flight 


in 


and may have been for opening shellfish; the 
Isle of Man is notable For its scallops. Another 
still had part of its scabbard and wooden hilt, 
the latter bound with silver. 

The spit had been wrapped in four layers of 
doth, some of which had been preserved by fire 
oxidization of the iron. Accompanying it was a 
goose wing, probably used for sweeping out the 
oven; traces of the feathers were attached to Ac 
spit. The woman also had two bronze needles 
i In a pouch. 

Her jewellery included a pendant made from 
a fossil ammonite, with two amber beads, and 
sbe had a necklace of 71 glass and amber 
beads, the largest number known from any 
Viking .period grave in the British Isles. The 
woman did not seem to be a Viking herself, Mr 
Freke said, because sbe was not wearing 
typical dress, which would have been fastened 
by two oval brooches at the shoulders. 

As well as this richly stocked burial, six 
other pagan graves were found at Peel Castle. 
One had 13 silver wire bells at the knees, 
perhaps from the fringe of a dress. Other 
metalwork found included bronze backles and 
bells, and a gold pin head with wire decoration 
in Anglo-Norse style. 

A board of 41 silver coins of the Dublin 
Viking ruler Sitric Silkbeard, of the eleventh 
century, is the first board from the Isle of Man 
found in a good archaeological context 


She was S3. 

She was born on October 
26. 1902, at Melton Mowbray; 


rated, though not formally 
divorced until 1941 
In September. 1936 she 
made her famous transatlantic 
flight, without radio, and in 
appalling weather. In her De 
HaviJIand Gipsy she took off 
from Abingdon and landed. 21 
hours and 25 minutes later 
with the nose of her aircraft in 
a Nova Scotia bog. She was 1 


au. .7V-, •«. - slightly injured, but her repu- 

in Leicestershire, but most ot ^ made, immediately 

her life was spent in Africa, in ^ treated as a heroine, 


Forthcoming marriages 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES. 
DEATHS and IN MEMOfVUM 
£4 a lac + 15% VAT 

Innnimura J lines) 

Announcements, authenticated bv the 
name and permanent address of ihc 
sender, mai be sent to: 

THE TIMES 
PO BOX 484 
Virginia Street 
London El 9XS 

or telephoned (h> telephone subs- 
et hers only) lo: 214#1 3824 

Announcements can be received by 
iricphunr between d.OOam and 
$ f<)pm Monday to Friday, on Satur- 
das bet ween fllUam and IZ noon. 
(81481 «m gotyV For puMiealion the 
fullouing day by I 30pm. 

FORTHCOMING MARRIAGES. WHHJMGS 
etc on i'ouri and Social Pace Cfi a Rue 
* 15** VAT. 

Court and Social Page annoucemcnls 
can not be accented hi ictcphonc. 
Enquiries to: 81-822 9953 
(alter lOJam). or send UK 

1 PUntorf* Street Uadei El 9X8. 

Please alkm Pi least -18 hours before 
puNicalion. 


TtHne is mr fcinMoin. O Lord, and ttaxi 

art PUIM <r» Iwad abosr .ill 
1 cnramrlr, 20-11 


BIRTHS 


BANKS - On August 2nd 1986. to 
Outre and Julian, a son. Joshua 
Honing. 

BELL - On August 1st at Countess of 
Chester Hospital, lo Penelope tnee 
Jeffreys) and Richard, a son. James 
william Eaton, a brother for 
Charlotte. 

CASTER - On 2nd August 1986. at 
University College Hospital, to Jenny 
inec Nolan) and Charles, a daughter. 
Laura Frances Derwent. 

CRACC - Oil 28th July, in Tokyo, to 
Claudia (nee MacLeod-Johnstone) 
and Anthony, a son. Adam 
Sebastian. 

de StBERT On 1st AuousL to Isabella 
fnre son k'otzri and Geoffrey de 
Sibert. a son Frederic Alexander. 
GILMORE - On July 31*. lo Elizabeth 
i nee McGregor- Wood), and Chrtsto- 
pher. a son. James Christopher. 
GOVETT tM MOORE 
GRACE ■ On 26th July, to Mary <n*e 
Edwards) and Michael, a son. 
Nicholas Alan, a brother for 
Caro line. 

GHE1MG - To SyMa and Geoffrey, on 
August 3rd. al the Humana Welling- 
ton Hospital. Si. John's wood. 
London NWS. a daughter. Harriet 
Jessica Louise, aster for Fleur. Deo 
granus. 

JACKSON - On July 30th. at Queen 
Mary's Hospital, to Edward and 
Penny tnee HunU. a daughter. 
Katherine. 

KELSALL - On July 2lsl. lo Katrina 
(nee Beilhi and Guy. a daughter. 
Lauren ElUawth. 

KENNARD - On July 25Ut. lo Elisabeth 
inec CasMn) and David, a daughter. 
Tamsut Joanna, a sisler for Luke and 
Esther. 

LANE - On 4th August at SI Thomas's 
Hospital, lo Theresa into Bymei and 
Robin, a daughter Alice Francesca. 
MOORE - On August 2nd. at Queen 
Charlotte's Hospital, lo Jan and Mi- 
chael. a son. 

OfiLME-TAYLOR - On 2nd August to 
Peggy and Christopher, a daughter. 
Sarah Elizabeth. 

OSBORNE - On August at West 
London Hospital, to Robert and 
Lynda mtc Oavfsk a daughter. 
Sophie Wyn. 

POTTS - On 30th July, lo Moflle tnee 
Bearn) and Howard, a daughter. 
Rebecca Sarah- 

RAT1U- To toana. wife Of Indref RaUU. 
a son. Alexaodru. on August 2nd. in 
Parts. 

RODWELL - On 2nd August, to Jo rate 
Groom) and Simon, a son. George. 
RUBSE - On August 1st. ai St. Mary's. 
Paddington, to Jane fnee Liddell) and 
Michael, a daughter. Sophia Amy 
EftzaMlt. 

SEE • On August isL to Julie and 
Patrick of Brtsoane. Australia, a son. 
Brendan Thomas 

SIMMONS • On 3rd AugusL at Tire 
Wellington, to veronica and Richard. 
a son. Oliver Richard Mansell. 
SUQGHTHOUHE ■ On 29U) July, to 
Caroline tnee McEnleet and Jbn- 
iwins. a brother and sister for Meg. 
Christopher and Rosie. 


To Ruth title Loughran) and 
Philip, on July 31 st. at Birmingham 
Maternity Hospital, a son. Andrew 
Philip, a brother for Rachel and 
David. 

TAYLOR . on 31 July 1986. at the 
west London Hospital, to Simon and 
Alison tnee Pennle). a son Nicholas 
Anthony. 

WLSON - On 29th July, to Carottne 
mie WaUdns) and Anthony, a son. 
Christopher John, a brother far 
Amy. 

WINFIELD - On 51st July, to 
Rosemarie and Barry, a son. Thomas 
James Chester, a brother for Katie. 


MARRIAGES 


EVANS ; SMITH - On August 2 nd. 
1986. at SL Paul's. MID Hi 11 . Peter 
Mark Evans of Berkhamsted to 
Katharine Mary Smith of BetanonL 
Mill Hill. 

GOOVAERTS s EWING - On July 28th 
in Manila. Philippines, between Piet 
Goovaerls and Andrea Elizabeth 
Ewing. 

HAWORTH : MUNTZ - The marriage 
look place In Winchester on 1 st Au- 
gust of Walter Haworth lo Manorie 
Muntz, widow of Alan Muntz. 


DEATHS 


A HST 1 S - On August 1 st. at Derrtford 
Hospital. Plymouth. Dom C.S. iStan) 
A mils. C.R.L. aged 80 years. 
Requiem Mass at SL Mary's Abbey. 
Bodmin on Thursday. August 7th at 
1 1.30 am. 

BRAZIER On 31 st July. 1986. pe*c* 
fully m hospital after a very short 
Illness. John Albert. Beloved hus- 
band of Ethel and father of Lesley 
and Paul. Funeral Service lo be held 
al Penire Bychan Crematorium. 
Wrexham, on Friday. 8 th August at 
2 30 pm. Friends and colleagues 
wishing to attend please contact 
Hoya Lem UK Lid. 0978 61161. 

COLUNSON ■ On 2 nd August, peace- 
fully in hospital. Katharine 
MacKinnon Common, one time of 
Dulwich and lately of streaiham. 
Dear wife of the late W.M. Common, 
mother of Susan and Jennifer, and 
grandmother of Hugo. Peter. Anne. 
Nicholas. Joanna. Justin, and Maria. 
Funeral service al Brymore. 243 
Baring Road. Grove Park SE12. on 
Thursday 7th August al 11.15am. 
followed by private cremation. Fam 
Uy flowers only, but donations if 
wished to Sister Griffiths. Caroline 
Ward. Hither Green Hospital. Lewi- 
sham SE13. Enquiries lo Francis 
Chappell and Sons. Funeral Direc- 
tors 01 697 2487. 

CRADDOCK - On 1 st August. 1986. 


suddenly in Annahelm. California. 
Anthony Richard (Tony), beloved 
husband of IsabeL dear father and 
grandfather. Private cremation In 
Annahelm on 4Ui Augud. Memorial 
Service in England lo be a r ra n ged. 

CROWTHER - On August 1 st 1986. 
peacefully. Violet In her lOOUi year. 
Lale or Corfe Castle. Wareham. and 
Boldre. Lymington. Funeral Service 
on Thursday. August 7Ui al 1.00 pm 
ai Si. Augustin's Church. Bourne- 
mouth. Inlermem following at 
Wlmborne Road Cemetery. Enqui- 
ries lo Dertc-Scoh. Portman Lodge 
Funeral Home. Bournemouth 3431 1 

DAGNALL ■ On August 4th. 1986. at 
the Victoria Nursing Home. 63 Dyke 
Road Avenue. Hove. Stanley aged 
83. peacefully but after a long I Ones*. 
The very dearly loved husband . of 
Gwen, father and best friend of PaL 
dear Cramps of Simon and Jeremy. 
Service at the Downs Crematorium. 
Bear Road. Brighton on Friday. 
August 8th al 12 noon. Flowers to 
HamUngtons. 4-6 Mofiieflore Road- 
Hove 

GARSIDC - On AugiM 2nd. 1986. Air 
Vice Marshal Kenneth Vernon (K.V.J 
Garslde. C.B . D.F C„ M-A.. peace- 
fully in his sleep after a long UineSS 
borne wuti courage and dignity. 
Mast dearly loved and devoted hus- 
band of June. Adored rather of Helen 
and Paul, Funeral private. 

COOOSON . On 3rd August 1986. 
peacefully at home. Enid Clayton 
inee SwanJ aged 91 yearv Widow <tf 
Sir Allred (Bill) Coodson of Corbet 
Tower. MerebatUfe. Roxburghshire 
Funeral service In k'lrknewton 
Church on Thursday 7th August, at 
12 noon. 

HUGHES - On 2 nd Augu&L 1986. 
Harry Stanley Hughes rex R.F.C.I 
aged 92 years. Beloved husband of 
the tare Peggy, dearty loved lather of 
Pamela. Margaret and Jean. A devot- 
ed grandfather and falher-ln-taw. 
Cremation at Goidcn Green Crema- 
torium. Hoop Lane, kwh on 
Friday. 8 Ui August al 2 50 pm. E*$t 
Chapel. All enauincs to a. France A 
Son. let. 01-405 «9oi. 


GROVES - On August 2 nd. peacefully 
at home after a short Illness. Frances 
Maty, dearly loved wife of the late 
Canon Sidney John Selby Groves, 
loved mother, grandmother and 
great grandmother, aged 85 years. 
Funeral Service on Friday. August 
8 th al Holy Trinity Church. 
CucfcflekL Sussex al 1 1-30 am. fol- 
lowed by burial at Si Thomas of 
Canterbury Church. Goring on 
Thames al 4.00 pm. Family flowers 
only. Donations please to Church of 
England Childrens' Society. Edward 
Rudolph House. 69/86 Margery SL 
London WC1 X OJL. Enauirles please 
to J & R Matthews. CuckflekL Tel 
0444 413065 

KMG. Diana, widow of John Harvey - 
Peacefully on 31sl July. Very much 
loved by all her family. Service of 
Thanksgiving to be held on 29th 
August at 12-00 noon at SL Botolph's 
Church. Swyncombe. Cookley Green 
near Nettlebed. All welcome. Dotw-.| 
hons may be sent to the Sue Ryder 
Home. Nettlebed. Oxon. 
lo «AR - On August 2nd, at home alter 
a short fitness. Hugh Alan. Beloved 
husband of Stella, father of Max. 
grandfather of Amanda. Joanna. 
Kale and James. Funeral Service ai 
3 JO pm on Friday. August 8 th at 
Portchester Crematorium. Hants. 
Family flowers only. Donations- If 
desired, to (he Children's Society, 
c/o G. Andrews & Son. 81 Kingston 
CrescenL Portsmouth P 02 BAA. 

LOVELACE - On August IsL Betty 
Lovelace of wiuierden. Haslemere. 
Sister of HUarw and mother of 
Charles, grandmother of Peter and 
Julie. Funeral Service al SL 
Bartholomews Church. Haslemere 
on August 7th at 2.30 pm. No 
flowers. Donations, if desired, to The 
Friends of Atkinson Motley's 
Hospital. Wimbledon. 

MASON - On August 2 nd: at Kingston 
Hospital. Eric (Frederick Chariest. 
Much loved husband of Dorothy and 
father of Nell and Keith. Cremation 
at Putney Vale. 11.15am on Friday. 
August 8 th. Flowers to Frederick W. 
Paine. 6 Coorobe Vane. SW20. 
MATTHEWS - On August 2nd 1986. al 
home. Charles Edwin, aged 76. 
Canon Emeritus of Suffolk, lately 
Vicar of Lingfleld. Surrey. Funeral al 
East Grinstead on Monday. August 
llth al 11.00 am. Family flowers 
only. Donations to The United Soci- 
ety for the Propagation of the Gospel- 

MOKE - On August la 1986. Kenneth 
George MUne. much loved husband 
of Otenka. lather and grandfather. 
Private cremation. Family noweriL 
PHAYRE - On 2nd August, peacefully 
at her home at Little Marlow. 
Kathleen Mary inee Ritchie) aged 85 
years, widow of Commander John 
Ernest Phayre. R-N_ Funeral Service 
at Lillie Marlow Parish Church on 
Friday. 8 th August al 11.30 am. 
Flowers to Sawyer Funeral Service. 
32 West Street. Marlow. Bocks. 
POTTER - On 30th July 1986 at the 
Easi Surrey HbspJtaL after a fatal 
fall, borne with great courage and 
bravery. Mary (Bobbie), aged 93. 
Greatly cherished and much beloved 
grandmother of Tanya, and adored 
great grandmother of Jamie. Crema- 
tion will be al Uie Le a lhertiead 
Crematorium. 11.30 ajn. Wednes- 
day. August 6 th. Flowers c/o 
Sherlorks. 190 South Sored. 
Dorking. 

REECE - On 2 nd AugusL Dr Eleanor 
Margaret Reece. M D- DP.H.. at 
Selsev. aged 9a late of Kensington. 
Funeral Service al SL Peter's 
Church. Selsey at 2.15 pm on 
Friday. 8 Ui AugusL followed by 

mmatum at Chichester. 

SCOTT Edith. Peacefully early on Sun- 
day morning. August 3rd. Adored by 
Julia. David and Michael and By 
George, her privileged husband for 
over 30 yeora. Wo will miss her 
dreadfully. Private Funeral Service 
lO.OOam Thursday August 7th al 
Chifhesier Crematorium. No flowers 
please, but if destmi contributions in 
Cancer Research. 

SCUDAMORE - On August 3rd. sud- 


Mr J.W. Marr-Johasoa 
trad Miss IVLE.H. Aliford 
The engagement is announced 
between William, youngest son 
of the late Mr K_ MarrJohnson 
and of the Hon Mrs Marr- 
Johnsoo, of South Kensington, 
and Marion, only daughter of 
Colonel and Mrs J.H. Allford, of 
Whheisdale, Suffolk. 

Mr CF.P. Arthur 
and Dr R.M.F. La wry 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, younger 
son of Mr and Mrs Ronald 
Arthur, of Usk, Gwent, and 
Rachel daughter of the Rev 
John La wry, of Petersfield, 
Hampshire, and the late Mrs 
Susan Lawry. 

Mr J.C Hashun 
and Miss CJ. Boggoa 
The engagement is announced 
between John, elder son of 
Canon and Mrs Frank Haslam, 
of Chester, and Catherine Jes- 
sica. only daughter of Mr and 
Mrs Neil Boggon. of Beacons- 
field, Buckinghamshire. 

Mr PjV. Joslin 
and Miss C Stephenson 
The engagement is announced 
between Philip, son of Mr and 
Mis P. Joslin, of Wokingham, 
and Claire, daughter of the late 
Mr and Mrs J.F. Stephenson, of 
BcxhiU-oD'Sea. 


Mr SJD. Lebos 
and Miss L-M. Geraiity 
The engagement is announced 
between Simon, eldest son ofMr 
and Mrs John Lebus. of 
Cokenach House, Barkway, 
Hertfordshire, and Lydia, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Esmond Gerahty, ofWest Farm. 
Owermoigne, Dorset. 


Captain MX. Parker 
and Miss SJVL MoU 
The engagement is announced 
between Marie Laurence Parker, 
Army Legal Corps, retd second 
son of Mr and Mrs F.W. Parker, 
of Cambridge Road, Langland 
Bay, Swansea, and Suzanne 
Mary, eldest daughter of Mr and 
Mn Walter Moll, of Balfour 
Lodge, Newmarket Road, 
Norwich. 


Mr JJ. Sanderson 
and Miss C Davies 
The engagement is announced 
between John, younger son of 
the late Mr Allen Sanderson and 
of Mrs loni Sanderson, of 
Bovingdon. Hertfordshire, and 
Carol, only daughter of Mr 
George Davies, of Cwmdare, 
Wales, and of Mrs Jean Sweet- 
ing. of Southend, Essex. 


Captain C.R-M- Bishop 
and Miss R-J. Netnaes 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, August Z at St 
Andrew's. Hatfield Peverri, of 
C&ptain Charles Bishop, The 
Queen's Own Hussars, son of 
the late Brigadier RJ. Bishop 
and Mrs J. Catt, and Miss Jane 
Nelmes, daughter of Mr and 
Mrs G. Nelmes- The Rev J. 
Vyse and the Rev R. Tozer 
officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her lather, was 
attended by Helen PeQy, Ca- 
milla Ruggles-Brise, Jemma and 
Toby Clouston and Clare and 
Thomas Richards. Captain 
Miles Ambler was best man. 

Mr CH. SC J. Hoare 
and Miss &J- Dixon Smith 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, August Z at the 
Church of St Peter ad Vincula, 
CoggeshaD, between Mr Toby 
Hoare, second son of Mr and 
Mis J. Michael Hoare, of Great 
Horicesley, Essex, and Miss 
Sarah Dixon Smith, only daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs William 
Dixon Smith, of CoggeshalL 
Essex. The Rev Geoffrey Hoare, 
brother of the bridegroom, 
officiated, assisted by the Rev 
David Beeion. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Henrietta Noton, 
Sophie Mooney, Michael Bar- 
clay- Ed wards, Robert Mac- 
donald, Hugh Dobie and Alexis 
Namdar. Mr Edward Judd was 
best man. 


Marriages 


A reception was held at the 
home of the bride and the 
honeymoon will be spent in 
Kenya. 

Mr P.I. Thomas 
and Miss P J. WhitweU 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, July 19, at the Priory, 
Christchurch, of Mr Philip Ivor 
Thomas, son of Mr and Mrs 
William Emlyn Thomas, of 
Morristoo, Swansea, and Miss 
Penelope Jane WhitweU, elder 
daughter of Mr John WhitweD 
and the late Mrs Moira 
WhitweU, of Bournemouth, 
Dorset. Canon Basil Trevor- 
Morgan officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Miss Helen 
Sainsbury. Miss Kathryn 
Enright, Miss Katherine 
Symcox and Miss Caroline 
Symcox. Mr Christopher Avery 
was best man. 

A reception was held at the 
home of the bride's father and 
the honeymoon -was spent in 
Portugal. 

Signor M. Vidotto 
and Miss HJP. Sotton 
The marriage took place on 
Thursday. July 24. at Win- 
chester. between Signor Marco 
Vidotto. youngest son of Si- 

f iore Martino Vidotto and 
ignore Emma Vidotto. of 
Rome, and Miss Helen Patricia 
Sutton, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
John Sutton, of Tichborne, 
Al res ford, Hampshire. 


Latest wills 

Mr Glencaim Alexander Byam 
Shaw, of Wargrave, Berkshire, 
former director of Sadler's Wells 
and the English National Opera, 
left estate valued at £331,713 
net. 

Mr Allen Raymond MacKewn, 
of Surbiton. Surrey, left estate 
valued at £1.1 72,731 neL 
Mr Richard Duncan Faim. of 


Pinner. Lc don. Assistant Un- 
der-Secretary of State at the 
Home Office 1964-67, left estate 
valued at £127,308 neL 
Lord Jeffreys, of Preston Capes. 
Northamptonshire, left estate 
valued at £1 1 1.266 neL 

Mr Richard Jon Stanley Harvey, 
QC. of Gray's Inn. London, who 
wrote the standard work. Har- 
vey on Industrial Relations, left 
estate valued at £313.673 neL 



1906 she was taken to Kenya 
by her father. Capiain Charles 
Clutterbuck. Her parents were 
already divorced and her 
mother, who remained m 
England, played no part in her 
upbringing. 

As a child she had little 
schooling, but acquired from 
her father the love of horses 
which was to dominate much 
of her life. She was eager for 
adventure and early cultivated 
the sporting pursuits of male 
settlers in the White High- 
lands, spending her time, as 
she put iL "hunting barefoot- 
ed in the Rongai Valley or in 
the cedar forests of the Mau 
Escarpment” On one occa- 
sion she survived mauling by 
a lion. 

When she was 17 her father 
was ruined and went off to 
repair his fortune in Peru, 
leaving Beryl with a horse 
significantly (in view of her 
ftiture) called Pegasus. She 
began her career as a trainer. 


receiving, like Lindbergh, a 
tickenape welcome in New 
York. Her looks also contrib- 
uted to her success in Ameri- 
ca. since they were compared 
with Garbo’s. 

After the flight she went to 
live m California, where she 
met the man who was to 
become her third husband, 
Raoul Schumacher. With his 
assistance (for she would have 
been quite incapable of writ- 
ing a book on her own) sbe 
produced the selective ac- 
count of her early life, culmi- 
nating in the great flight, 
which appeared in 1942 enti- 
tled West With the Night 
Schumacher was a profession- 
al editor and ghost-writer, to 
whom she was able to give the 
best story he ever handled. 
Later, he wrote several other 
stories under her name. 

West With the Night was 
not a success at the time, and 
was soon forgotten amid all 
of a World 


DBU no La.cc. « « — - the excitement ot a 
and the following year one of War in which the united 
her horses won the Kenya States tad just become tn- 
Sl Leger. In the 1920s she voJved. But it caught the eye 
learnt to fly, and before long of Ernest Hemingway, who 
was a professional pilot flying described il as. “bloody 
around Kenya and into wonderful in a private letter 
neighbouring territories, to Maxwell Perkins, 
sometimes carrying mail or ery of this letter inspired the 
medical supplies. She pioneer- triumphant republtcauon of 
ed the scouting of elephant the book m I9S3. Later this 
and other wild game from the year a television documttitary 

on her life will be shown 


*■■;•** 


Baby for 
princess 

Princess Caroline of Mo * 1 
naco, who is married to 
Signor Stephane 
Casiraghi, gave birth to a 
daughter on Sunday, their 
second child. 


University news 

Cambridge 
Appointments 
Clinical lecturer, medicine:. M 
Loktian). MB. CUB (Dundee). Iran 
July 1 for three years. 

University lecturers _ 

Dtrtitity: L R Wickham. MA. PhD CSI 
Catharine's College), from October 1 

for ihree years; earth sclenem: J 

Backman. PhD (Stockholm), from 

August t mr three years: mxhooy: W 

A Foster. MA. PhD (Clare College), 
university lecturer In the department 
and a curator of Inserts in the 
museum from October 1 for three 
years. 

Awards 

. Oliver Gamy MndoitiUp. 198687: D 
Rowtich. Oare College. 

Glennie prUMS In Child.- psychtany: I . 


air.. 

Tall, blonde and attractive 
in a tomboyish way, she made 
a number of male conquests at 
this time, including proba- 
bly— to the extent that he 
could ever be conquered — 
Denys Finch Hatton, whom 
she tad the chance (luckily 
turned down) to accompany 
on his fatal flight in 1931. Her 
first marriage, to a Scottish 
international rugby player. 
Jock Purves, ended in divorce 
after two years. In 1927 she 
married Mansfield Markham, 
rich younger son of a Liberal 
MP and coal magnate. 

While sbe was married to 
him, Henry Duke of Glouces- 
ter, as yet unmarried, visited 
Kenya with his brother the 
Prince of Wales, and became 
besotted by her. Her husband, 
much aggrieved by this ro- 
mance, threatened to sue, and 
the matter was only settled 
when a substantial sum was 
privately paid over. But she 
and Markham were soon sepa- 


nationwide in the United 
States, to mark the 50th 
anniversary of her flight. 

In 1947 she and 
Schumacher were divorced 
and in the early 1950s she was 
back in Kenya where she 
resumed her career as a trainer 
of race horses, winning the top 
trainer's award five times and 
the Kenya Derby six times. 
Later rite trained for a time in 
South Africa and in Southern 
Rhodesia (as it then was), but 
in the earl v 1970s she returned 
to Kenya for good 

During the last phase of her 
life her home was a bungalow 
on the edge of Nairobi race- 
course. and she continued to 
live dangerously, being 
robbed, beaten up. and on one 
occasion shot at while driving 
in her car during an attempted 
coup. 

She tad one son by Mans- 
field Markham. He was killed 
in the 1970s, but she is 
survived 
grandchildren. 


by 


tWO 


DENG JIAXIAN 




Speech ly-DlcK. WoUjxm College: Mark 
Gnegson prize. 1986: M A Patton. 
Clare College: Harkness scholarship. 
1986: o M FWe. SI Catharine^ 
College: Sir AJbort Howard travel 
exhibition. 1986: K Bryant. Clara 
College: J ebb studentship 1986-87: G 
Whitehead. Jesus College; Frank 


Smart prize for 
between 


wxjfogy: 


divided 


equally between N D Hqpwood. 
Magdalene College and D G Kipling. 
Churchill college. 

Anthony Wilkin studentship 1986- 
87: jointly IO G N Ru" " 

College, and T Yales. I . 

Burney $tudentsnip. 19B6=8 . . 
Champion. BA. Chimchil] College: 
Crosse studentship 1966: V N 
Ortenberg. _ Trinity College: 
Danckwerts-Maxwei] prize: S C 
Capsaskts. MA. PhD. Darwin College: 
Drewiti prize: J, P Hangar, si John's 
College: Nei-Ul Moll prizes 1986: for 

an experimental prcdect in rail 2 

Physics. R A Lawrence. Clare College: 
proxlme accesseranc N K Bourne. 
Magdalene college. C I Cox. Clare 
College. M KOUnowsld. Peierhouse. T 
J R Thorne. Robinson College. . 

For a theoretical protect In part 2 
Physics: j T Ngo. Jesus College: 


Caius College: Pawingham prize. 
1986: W J BenlouL King's College: 
Holland Rose studentship: R 
Sweeunan re-riecied tar 1966-87: 
Frank Smart prize tar botany 1986: L 
□ Hum. Quire!*! College. 

Stevenson Prizes. 1966: H A 
Allaoua. .Jesus College, and C F 
Holmes. Queens' Ctutewm John Stew- 
art of Rannoch scholarships in sacred 
music- 1986: H A Lenthalf. Emmar 
College, and R EWlse. Clare CoDa , . 
university classical scholarships. 
1996. Craven Studentships: a O 
WiSijams. Trinity CoStaws: Prenden 
studentship; E M Alites. Newnti 

HoO 

Appointment 
Mr Ian Mowat, associate librar- 
ian at Glasgow University, has 
been appointed librarian at 
Hull, in succession to Professor 
Philip Larkin, file poet, who 
died last December. 


Deng Jiaxian, who built 
China’s first atomic bomb, 
and oversaw ihe country's 
nuclear and thermonuclear 
weapons programmes, died on 
July 29 in Peking. He was 62 
and had been suffering from 
cancer for some time. 

Deng had his training in file 
United States in the 1940s, 
taking his PhD at Purdue 
University. 

Soon after the communists 
established the Chinese 
People’s Republic in 1949 he 
returned home and began 
research into atomic physics. 
When China's nuclear weap- 
ons research institute was set 
up in 1958 he became heqd of 
its theoretical department 
At this point he “went 
undercover” because of the 
sensitive nature of the 
institute's work; besides theo- 
retical research he was also 
active on the practicalities of 
preparing sites for the first test 
explosions. 

In I960 the nuclear weap- 
ons programme ran into a 
crisis when the Soviet Union 
withdrew afl its aid and advis- 
ers from China, and there was 
some doubt among the 
country's leaders as lo wheth- 
er the A-bomb project could 
continue. However a ministry 
of defence party visited the 
testing grounds where they 


found Deng's team confident 
of bringing their work to a 
successful conclusion, provid- 
ed the political leadership 
gave it top priority. 

The result was China's 
home-made atomic bomb, 
which was first tested in 1964. 
Deng went on to develop a 
hydrogen bomb which was 
exploded in 1 967. 

He personally directed 15 of 
the 32 nuclear bomb tests 
which China has conducted to 
date, and was instrumental in 
the development of the 
country's nuclear arsenal. 

Throughout 28 years of 
work in this field. Deng re- 
mained, however, a rearing 
figure, whose name was not a 
matter of popular knowledge. 
Indeed it was only in June this 
year that his contribution to 
China's nuclear programme 
was first publicly acknowl- 
edged, in an article in the 
officiaJ magazine Outlook. But 
at his death he was hailed as 
the “father” of the Chinese 
bomb. 

Since 1982 he was a mem- 
ber of the central committee of 
the Chinese Communist Par- 
ty, and last month was ap- 
pointed deputy head of the 
scientific and technological 
committee under the commis- 
sion of science and technology 
for national defence. 


Science report 


MR JON HAEREM 


Joint bid to power space platforms 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


<tenly in London. Hugh Willoughby. 
Major R E., aged 7B of Hlghmead. 
Mlnctunlumplon. dot. Much loved 
by all bis many friends. Cremation al 
Gohtas Crcei an August 7th at 3.20 
pro. No flowers by tils roquet but 
donations to injured Jockeys Fund. 
New mart el. Suffolk. 

THMJTTMAN5DOHFF Anion la 
Peacefully In her steep on August 
2nd in Dorset. Cremation at Wey- 
mouth on August 6th ai 3.00 pm. No 
flowers. Donations to West Donri 
Hospice. MacMillan Service. Edward 
Road. Dorchester. DorseL 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


wilson, □taabeth Ann - Service of 
Thantegiung for Betsy's life. 
Funtlngton Church on Saturday. 61b 
September al 2.30 pm. 


British and Israeli scientists 
are working on a power system 
for space platforms under a 
“Star Wars" research contract 
from the United States 
Government 

It is thought that the inven- 
tion could provide between 10 
and 50 megatyiatts of electricity 
for each platform, or enough to 
powers small town. 

The idea is being developed 
by a network, of university 
groups brought together by 
Solmecs, a research company 
specializing in renewable en- 
ergy technologies, which has 
offices in London. 

The scientists take either a 
low grade energy sonree, such 
as geothermal heat, waste hot 
gas and water, or a diffuse 
sonree such as solar power, 
and convert H Into electricity. 

Solmecs claims that its sci- 
entists can take any heat 




source and convert it into 
electricity. 

The idea for the space 
system is based on discoveries 
in magneto-hydrodynamics, 
MHD, made by Professor 
Herman Branover, a Russian 
emigre, at the Ben Gnrioa 
University in Israel 

The concept is that electric- 
ity can be produced by means 
of a liquid conductor such as 
mercury or sodium, in place of 
the conducting coil which a 
conventional generator uses. 

Instead of a conventional 
generator using a conducting 
coil rotating between a strong 
magnet, electricity can be 
produced if a stream of liquid 
conductor, such as mercury or 
sodium, replaces the spinning 
cofi. 

In the 1960s, millions of 
pounds were spent by Britain 
the United States and else- 

£ t 


where to perfect an MHD 
machine for a commercial 
power station, bat the concept 
proved fruitless. 

However, those schemes 
were based on forcing a hot 
stream of gas, which had 
reached the state of an elec- 
trically charged plasma, be- 
tween the poles of powerful 
magnets. Tte only machine of 
that generation which pro- 
duces electricity Is n the 
Soviet Union. 

Professor Branover de- 
signed a machine that worked 
at more modest temperatures. 
Energy from a sonree of heat is 
absorbed by a gas-and-liqnid- 
metal mixture in dosed-tircuft 
pipes. The hot gas provides 
the “lift" to force the liquid 
metal round the pipes, of 
which some areas are sur- 
rounded by a powerful magnet, 
where the conversion of heat to 
electricity occurs. 


Mr Jon Haerem, MBE, the 
actor who devoted his life to 
teaching drama to prisoners, 
died on June 18. at the age of 
66 . 

Born in Cheshire in 1920, 
Haerem trained at the London 
Theatre Studio and worked in 
various repertory companies. 
He joined Agnew 
MacMaster s Shakespeare 
Company on tour in Ireland, 
then Hilton Edwards and 
Michedl MacLiammdir at the 
Gate Theatre, Dublin, -where 
his Henry Hardcastie in Love 
on the Dole was perhaps his 
most memorable role. 

With the outbreak of war, 
he returned to England to 
volunteer as a Bevin boy for 
the mines. But he was dis- 
charged on grounds of ill- 
health and worked with ENSA 
until the end of the war. 

It was at the suggestion of 
Dr Helena Wright that 
Haerem was invited to teach 
drama in the psychiatric wing 
of Wormwood Scrubs Prison! 
This was to become his life's 
work. 

The first production was A 


Sleep of Prisoners, an occasion 
which at the final curtain 
prompted one inmate to thank 
the cast for “the opportunity 
to release our emotions which, 
m our case, have been our 
undoing". Other equally suc- 
cessful productions followed, 
among them Waiting for 
bodot and My Three Angels. 

** le . successes convinced 
the then governor. Gilbert 
Hair, that drama had a place 
[5 Prison and he asked 
Haerem to form a drama 
££°«P. The result was that, for 
. nrst time in a British 
prison, professional actresses 
i. nviwd in w rehearse 
yun the men and to play the 
female roles. ” 
Most of the productions 
were comedies, and the ven- 
ture brought together inmates, 
?.?? n °^ cers ' actors and 
audience, as well as raising 
“wns for charity. 
Jome of the prisoners discov- 
JJ^en 1 for acting, and a 
number later went on to 
careers in the theatre. 

Haerem was appointed 
1979 for his work in 
tne prison. He was tuunarried. 


1 i 
! 


X * 





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13 


: " >ae,rl " h "4 l 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


r " 1 " no rv, 

Pwnccrinei,;^ 


THE ARTS 


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opinions 

: -"Mt fa a. »to«I«ni fallacy for 
...' * ■''i ^Wch tete vision .bears' much 
vrespQBsibitity tfrtt the man fa 
^}he street bas anything worth 
•r “ ^- ^ayfafr More and more the 
u ''. k-aotioB Jmi gained cnrrency 
^ > lhat yoa merely hate fa ask 

’ ^ ^ ione passing Tom, Dick « 
v ' ‘^ r Harry about apartheid, 
JemoCTacy or origiiiar sis and 
yoa-will. h* defircred of an 

. ' '^i^upmion wiiich bt not only 

^bteresthig- bat sacred. . 

'• n Channei 4's Commatf tries 

’ 1 ^bobly to disprove this by 
'aiTidiig.r.itinbersof the peblfc 
: ‘ '%" Wth strong personal opinions 
' ^mmd nff about them after 

exceflenf news bulletin. 
Smi- .^Soch ' an - access programme 
■ i . ^vibiisly becomes a target Cor 
■\ .^organizations and lobby 
- v plsroops- fewWdy* It is ased 
:■. .. I( by mm.- and' women with a 
r ^urndae or PoGtical bee in their 

I . : Invariably the bee 

-i-'.^-^hrtops bnzring as soon as they 
v ’ /'Start speaking so. that what b 
>- ..' "Sntemfed as a provocative 

. v Tstateiiwnt becomes a breatb- 
. ^iess' piece .of .gibberish by 
„ ' 'someone, looking as if he is 
. ' ; ■ 'sbont to hurst into tears. '. . 

J. *.' 85 *, Channel 4 may gain 

v iBrownie points for this enter* 
“ uprise with fliat bastion of 
biansacracy, the IB A, but I 
; tsdonbt if ft gains the attention 
; ^;Df its viewers. The prohiem 
ft lies -in fhe fad that snch an 
: : ^Important outlet is - just not 
Ai^pyen the' resources it needs. 

• * ^Judging .from their perfor- 
r.-^ntands the majority of guests 

kafa-notonly booked useen bat 
‘ c^alsb givea a_lndicro«sly short 
, ^tinte to be coached in their 

• > ddiVery and script. It was only 
rr/.by pinching oneself tiiat one 

-.- -realized Pateida Wharton’s 
. 'recent monotones concealed an 
- attack on state schools as 
-v luptbeds far '“the front hooh- 
. .gus and spoilt brats’ fa; 
/-.Xurope'” end a cry far tiieir 
/..Ir^Teedy privatization. 

: . . lad night Dr Mark Corner, 

’ - a kdnrer in religions studies, 

. pressed far a fuller partidpa- 
/. . tiop in the Church by all 
... Christians. . HiS manner of 

- argument was similar to last- 
: Wednesday's cautions, uh 

’ comprehensible, plea the 
'Yugoslav ambassador for non- 
*■; alignment. They were ripples 
on a stagnant poDd andnot a 
patch on Jari . Stephen, ’ who 
the week before had castigated 
-• fae British far bd^araceOT 

- - doset virgins. 

: ^ BBCIVnewsdM, ffeJWm 
wm 

rote. As m anmarried mother 
> “ of twtf whoretmns tb her roots, 
r she played the port with a 
pallid, dishevelled rawness 
that forced one to condnde she 
makes a better actress than 


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Nicholas 

Shakespeare 


Galleries: a long-lost British versatility comes back with a bang 

Half a dozen painters all in one 


Colin Selfs Colin 

Selfs 

ICA 

Andy Warhol 

Anthony d’Ofiay 

Roy Lichtenstein 

Mayor 

If the name of Cotin Seff rings any 
bells at all, it must be from some 
time back. In the early Sixties he 
was quite well known as a contemn 
porary and crony of David 
Hockney and Peter Blake, among 
others who were then loosely 
associated, as he was him$el£ with 
the Pop Aft movement But then 
he vanished. He has not had a 
major exhibition for 20 years, and 
has not been seen or beard of on the 
London art scene at all for most of 
that time. Now. out of the bine, 
comes a large show at the ICA until 
August 31. Its aim. very success- 
fully carried out, is to catch us up 
with the hidden developments 
during those years. 

So what happened? Well, it 
seems that Self a loner from the 
outset, became increasingly disillu- 
sioned with the commercial rat- 
race, the over-selling of Pop Art as 
an American movement, the un- 
necessary centering of all art sup- 
posedly. worth considering on the 
metropolis! He wanted out, and he 
got out He took to the country, and 
since the end of the Sixties has been 
working alone, un exhibited and 
below the poverty line, in Scotland 
and in' Jus 'native. Norfolk, by 
deliberate choice a 1 “localise* artist. 

And what sort of thing has he 


been doing, you might well won- 
der? It would be more relevant to 
ask what he has not beat doing. 
The walls of the ICA’s Large lower 
gallery are filled to overflowing 
with the 'evidence: when did you 
last see a frill Victorian “Academy 
hang" with pictures stacked up five 
deep or more, so that binoculars 
are definitely in order if yon are to 
appreciate the subtleties of the 
topmost rows? 

This, it seems, was 1 done on the 
artist's insistence, to re p res e nt as 
many strands of his work as 
possible. Even so, the scnlptmes 
were nearly left out, until be made 
a very determined case for their 
being put in: as well he might, for 
they are extremely odd and in- 
teresting , made, apparently, by * 
techically simple but aesthetically 
intricate method of his own devis- 
ing, which involves hollowing out a 
mould blind, under the surface of 
the earth or sand, then filling it 
with concrete, to dig up when it 
hardens and find what you have 
made. What Self has made is a 
series of grotesques, sculptural 
cartoons like those of Daumier, 
which for all their roughnesses 
capture the imagination. 

But his more remarkable talents 
are as painter and draughtsman. 
You might well be looking at the 
-work of half a dozen different 
people. There is, as we might 
expect from what we remember of 
his Sixties history, the “com- 
mitted” collagist making shrewd 
points about nuclear aggression, 
racist repression and the progres- 
sive dehumanization of people at 
large. These pieces, unlike so mud) 
of their kind, have the saving grace 
of a quirky sense of humour. Then 
there is the sophisticated-primitive 
image-maker of such works as A 
Vase of Flowers in Betty Forbes' 


Window (day Forbes Bakery way 
demolished) or Moneymart, a draw- 
ing on serried ranks of pound 
notes, which sometimes, especially 
when they involve human figures, 
oddly recall Burra. 

Then there is the maker of 
extraordinary assemblages in pic- 
ture form which have nothing at all 
to do with Pop Art, like the 
amazing Ploughman, which makes 
the most exquisitely simple, subtle 
use of ordinary brown corrugated 
paper to give the effect of furrowed 
earth. There is the incredibly adroit 
oriental artist who makes brush 
■ drawings like A Toad and a Rose, 
which must have been done in two 
seconds flat. And there is the 
splendid traditional English water- 
colourist of Scottish scenes like The 
Water of Deugh or Caimsmoor in 
the distance under Snow Cloud or 
of flowers and fish in the unruffled 
lakes, which suddenly transport us 
into the world of Albert Goodwin, 
and of which Ruslan would surely 
have totally approved. It is undeni- 
ably strange that this artist, or all 
these artists, should have found it 
necessary to withdraw for so long. 
But be has been anything but idle, 
and it is wonderfully satisfying to 
have him back 

Elsewhere in London there are 
shows of recent work by two big 
names of the Sixties who have 
never been away: Andy Warhol at 
Anthony (FOfiay, and Roy Lichten- 
stein at the Mayor Gallery, both 
until August 22. Both, curiously, 
are showing a series of bead 
paintings, both in very much their 
respective familiar styles. And both 
are in various ways disappointing, 
perhaps because of over-familiar- 
ity : maybe we would think better of 
them if they too had been 
unseeable for more than a decade. 

The Warhols are all sdf-por- 


traits, and I find it difficult at this 
late date to take them very seri- 
ously. They are all the same 
photograph of Warhol, screen- 
printed on canvas in various sizes. 
The smaller-sized canvases are 
then simply timed overall in one 
colour — lilac, lavender, pink, 
orange, pale blue — and so are the 
very largest The next size down 
comes m several cases with a 
variation: a patchwork of appar- 
ently stencilled random shapes is 
superimposed on the same image. 

Now it is quite possible to take 
Warhol himself perfectly seriously 
without according the same degree 
of respect to individual works. He 
has indicated as much himself with 
his constant reassenion that any- 
one could paint a Warhol and his 
quite sincere (it must be, when you 
consider how well be can draw 
when he wants to) cult of the 
impersonal and the mechanized 
image. True, be has tended to sue 
people who took him at his word 
and turned out their own Warhols, 
but that does not invalidate the 
basic intellectual position. And 
undoubtedly he has revolutionized 
our way of seeing, not only in the 
graphic arts, but in the cinema as 
welL The fact remains that, like 
Beuys, he is much more interesting 
as a person and a force than as an 
artist, a triumph of PR rather than, 
of direct creation. They have been 
the Marinettis of our day, and 
deserve all credit for h. But would 
you want an original Warhol at a 
high price when, as he would be the 
first to say, you could do just as 
well yourself? 

Lichtenstein is a more com- 
plicated case. He has certainly 
evolved since the days when he set 
the dovecots aflutter with his 
paintings like blown-up frames of 
strip cartoons, and his painted 



. Sr-.f - .1 

fnBn Self as the sophfstkated-pviinitive image-maker 
in Moneynuut, oddly recalling Burra 


textures derived from enormous 
magnification of the tiny dots in 
newsprint. Now his works are 
nearly abstract though still in- 
stantly recognizable as his because 
these same textures derived from 
the processes of mechanical 
reproduction are still present The 
latest series of paintings are all 
entitled Face or Head, and 
equipped with this due one can 
just about see how the titles are 
justified — more readily, strangely 
enough, in black-and-white photo- 
graphs than in the original. They 


are cheery and colourful and would 
fit nicely into a High Tech interior, 
but again they bear very little 
scrutiny on their own account The 
trouble with the Sixties artists' 
programmed reduction of the per- 
sonal element in art is that without 
it there is little left except dec- 
orative effect And, while dec- 
orative effect is fine in a rug or a 
jug. on a gallery wall, inviting our 
close and undivided attention, it 
can very soon grow wearisome. 

John Russell Tayloi 


Opera 


Don Giovanni 

Glyndeboume 


“Record time tonight wasn’t 
it?”, gasped one member of 
the London Philharmonic, 
beating a hasty retreat from 
the pit “Bit slow, I think”, 
was the reply. They were both 
right and that was just the 
troubled " 

Glyndebourae’s Don Gio* 
mntti has -not been on top 
form this year, as Panl Grif- 
fiths reported on this , page 
when ftopened. -Now, halfway. 

through : its - rim, Bernard 
Haitink Iras' taken over the 
baton, and ; wfcat should have 
given the revival somethingof 

a. lift; hasr. through lack -of 

adequate rehearsal -I suspect, 
caused it to sink a tittle further 
into uncertainty. 

Haitink's reading of the 
score - stately, dearly paced, 
graciously phrased — tuns 
alongside what is happening 
on stage rather than meshing 
with h and activating it And, 


with a cast of whom many 
sound simply overtired, it too 
often has the effect of elegant 
incidental music accompany- 
ing visually handsome stills. 

This Don Giovanni (Rich- 
ard Stihvetl) is a character who 
never really surfaces from the 
shadows of Peter {fall's 
production, now rehearsed fry 
Stephen Lawless; each of his 
three ladies, Carol Van ess. 
Felicity Lott and Lesley Gar- 
rett, is in her own way at 
present struggfing . between 
him and Haitink. This mae- 
stro, alas; is not one to indulge 
vocal dalliance;, as. Miss 
Garrett's Zerlina, in particn- 
larjfound out orioe.too often. . 

The focus is sharpened in 
the presence of Dimitri 
Kavrakos's Commendatore, 
and, mercifully, whenever 
Richard van Allan Is around. 
His Lepordlo, alone acting 
through, not merely alongside, 
the score, remains the real 
master of ceremonies. 

Hilary Finch 


S umm er in the City 

Haydn fresh and blissful 


ASMF/Mamner 

Barbican 


No other composer after 

- Haydn has been on terms of 
. such easy familiarity with 

■ God- Maybe Bruckner was, 
but if.se it was on a. level 
beyond^ words, whereas 

- Haydn was blissfully able to 
, chatter away, in his Creation, 

possibly because he could 
approach, the Almighty oh 
pretty equal terms. By this 
time he had survived- the 
stupefaction of Mozart, and 
his - musical language was 
pretty 'well his own creation: 
he had laboured in the art for 
six decades, and was about to 
spend a seventh in retirement. 

' .'Music- so blithe; so utterly 
straightforward in expression, 
heeds cairefTiI handling if its 


simplicity is not to harden 
into something ironic or faux- 
naif, but on Sunday night, 
with Sir Neville Marrmer 
conducting the opening event 
in the Summer in the City 
festival at the Barbican, there 
were no worries. 

Sir Neville dared to be plain 
in his phrasing, and dared to 
let the Academy of St Martin- 
in-th e-Fields sound natural 
There was freshness in the 
flutes, a nicely officious stac- 
cato sometimes from the 
horns, a rich animal noise 
from the bassoons in bottom 
register. The Academy Cho- 
rus, too, sang robustly and 
without fuss. 


her stressing of “Wunder- 
werk” was delightful in that 
respect, although the note of 
pleased astonishment was her 
key to the music throughout. 

Stafford Dean’s technique 
of sounding totally frank, 
bending the recitative to 
speech patterns and rem a in i n g 


vocally firm right down to a 
low D, was equally effective, 
and Maldwyn Davies as the 
tenor soloist offered a free 
rapture that again impressed 
for its lack of pretentiousness. 

These were the elements of 
song, but for Sir Neville The 
Creation would also seem to 


be about dancing — not in 
courtly steps but rather in the 

AnTte ganging «s of 'SS^JSSTifSfiJS: 

the same kind. Margaret Mar- 


shall used her golden radiance 
in such a way that she sounded 
surprised by herself and by 
what she was singing about: 


brisk tempos several times 
suggested. It was altogether a 
performance of stable hap- 


Paul Griffiths 


Promenade Concert 


BBCSO/ 

Pritchard 

..„tM Albert Hall/Radio 3 
i - — - 

Berlioz’s Grande Messe des 
. owns is the perfect work for a 
■Promenade Concert. It is big 
bm, despite its earth-shaking 
timpani chords and its res- 
onant brass-band calls implor- 
' ing mercy at the gaping jaws of 
hell, it'is not in essence brash. 
Instead its subtle, even re- 
served manlier — many of its 

- movements begin with a spare 
. . line .or two and most are 

predominantly slow and quiet 

■ - draws 1 even the inexperi- 
enced. listener inward to hear 
its messaged 

But that message does not 

- quite ’tally with the text’s 
' conventions, for' this is a 


personal view of the universal 
human problem of facing 
death rather than a slavish 
piece of church propa g a nd a 
or, on the other hand, a 
secularization & la Verdi All 
of whkh is to the work’s 
advantage in an age when 
individual philosophies count 
for more than they used to. 

Sir John Pritchard’s perfor- 
mance, given with a consid- 
erably augmented. BBC Sym- 
phony Orchestra and the 
small matter of the assembled 
might of the BBC Symphony 
Chorus, the London Sym- 
phony Chorus and the Pro 
Musics Chorus, was a spa- 
cious one which nevertheless 
well maintained its mo- 
mentum. Inevitably there 
were moments, most con- 
spicuously in the “Rex 
Tremendae”, where the extra 


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brass, providing us with 
spectacular surround-sound 
from the gallery, seemed to be 
behind the brat, but sound 
does take time to travel and 
here it had to trawl far. No 
doubt the effect was more or 
less as Berlioz intended. The 
orchestra otherwise [fayed 
splendidly, and there were 
some particularly fine, well- 
shaped woodwind solos. 

Stuart Burrows, the tenor 
soloist, 'made a pleasant, un- 
forced sound in the testing 
“Sanctus”, whose juxtapo- 
sition with the deliberately 
archaic style of the “Osanna'’ 
is one of the major oddities of 
the piece. I would have pre- 
ferred, though, a more pen- 
etrating timbre, and with the 
less homogeneous instru- 
ment he had to hand so might 
have Berlioz. Also slightly 
worrying were some untidy 
edges in the choral singing. 
Often the tenors were fiat and 
blended badly, and in the 
"Hi mas " one of the species 
afl too boldly embarked early 
on one entry. But for the most 
part the choral sound was 
firm, well balanced and gen- 
erously warm in tone in the 
movements that needed it, 
like the beauufiil supplicatory 
“Quarens nw". 

Stephen Pettitt 


The Maureen Lipman revival 
of Wonderful Town which 
conies to the Queen’s Theatre 
on Thursday also brings back 
to London, for the first time in 
30 years, the now 74-year-okl 
co-author of its book, Jerome 
Cbodorov. Based on the stage 
and screen success that he and 
his late partner Joe Fields had 
with My Sister Eileen, itself 
derived from some New 
Yorker short stories. Wonder- 
ful Town was written and first 
staged m 1953, three years 
before another and tougher 
musical saga of the New York 
streets. West Side Story, 
whose producer Hal Prince 
started out as the stage man- 
ager of this one. 

But for Chodorov the mem- 
ories of the show are not all 
happy ones: “In: 1957 there 
was a television, version of it 
in America, and they asked if. 
they could take my name off 
the credits because a beer 
sponsor had objected. I said it 
would cost them $75,000 to 
lose my name so it stayed 
there, but in those days that 
was happening a lot. This 
once, they decided to save the 
money and nobody wrote in to 
complain and I'm happy to 
say that the beer is now out of 
business, but I guess that was 
when I realized the tide had 
begun to turn again." 

The tide was of course that 
of McCarthyism, as Chodorov 
now recalls: “In 1953 I was 
living in New York, writing 
for Broadway, and like a Jot of 
people in those days I had 
signed my name to a lot of 
causes. I was never sent a 
subpoena to appear before the 
Committee, but word spread 
that I was not to be used. 
Luckily for me I. bad this 
partner Joe Reids, and he 


Jerome Chodorov (right) has 
mixed memories of Wonderful 
Town , of which he was joint 
author and which opens at the 
Queen’s Theatre on Thursday; 
but he is back in London for it 
nevertheless, and talks of his 
long life to Sheridan Morley 


Outlasting the 


a'A-V 



fashion 


would sign all our scripts 
because if my name went on 
any of them we immediately 
lost the chance of a movie 
draL That hurt me, but it 
didn't kill me.” 

The second son of one of 
New York’s very few un- 
successful furriers, Cbodorov 
(whose elder brother Edward 
is still screen writing at 82) 
grew up wanting to be in 
showbosiness: “I started out 
by being expelled from a 
number of schools for sheer 
ignorance. Finally I got a job 
as an office boy for a producer 
on Broadway, and the theatre 
seemed to me like a wonderful 
life. You didn't have to be 
educated, could sleep late in 
the mornings, and it was about 
the only trade I could find 
where illiteracy was a positive 
asset But when the De- 
pression came I figured I 
should try for something a 
tittle safer, so I went to work as 
a copy boy on the old New 


York World and when the 
drama critic -was away one 
njght I wrote Beatrice liflie 
her first really terrible Broad- 
way review. 

“Working in a newspaper 
drama department in those 
days was paradise if you were 
still 18 and stagestrude free 
tickets to all the movies and 
shows, and I even taught 
myself how to write. But then 
the paper got sold, so I kept 
the free theatre passes for a 
while until box-office man- 
agers started to notice. By this 
time my brother had got 
established in Hollywood, and 
after I'd failed to find much 
other work in New York he 
took me out there and I started 
as a junior writer with low- 
budget studios like Republic.” 

Republic was where he met 
up with his future collabo- 
rator: “Joe Fields was also on 
the staff there, and because we 
were both really theatre men 
we kept sneaking back to 



Broadway with scripts, none 
of which worked out at first 
But rd always been a keen 
reader of the New Yorker, and 
one time we came across these 
stories by Ruth McKinney 
about a couple of girts from 
the Ohio backwoods who 
come to Greenwich Village in 
the 1930s and we decided to 
turn them into a play. That 
was the one that made all the 
difference: My Sister Eileen 
opened in 1940, and from 
bring slaves to the Hollywood 
mill we were suddenly de- 
sirable writers. 

“After the war I went back 
to Hollywood, wrote some 
more movies and a few plays 
and one or two musicals, 
everything from Anniversary 
Waftz through Tunnel of Love 
to The Girl in Pink Tights, 
Then one day Joe and I had a 
call from a producer asking if 
we could do My Sister Eileen 
over as a musical for Ros 
Russell, who had starred in 


the movie. Originally Leroy 
Anderson was supposed to 
write the score, but he and the 
lyricist had a disagreement so 
six weeks before we were due 
to open in New Haven they 
brought in Leonard Bernstein, 
and Betty Coraden and’ 
Adoplh Green, who had writ- 
ten On the Town together ten 
years earlier, and they got the 
whole show together.” 

Chodorov then took to 
directing plays on Broadway 
for a while: “My partner died 
is 1962 and because we'd been 
a team for so long, with me 
doing the typing and him 
sitting at my elbow, I went 
through a very arid time as a 
writer. None of the later plays 
did much good, and I went to 
work for the Los Angeles City 
Opera revising shows like The 
Great Waltz. All the critics 
accused it of being full of 
terrible old Viennese 
schmaltz, whereas in fact it 
was full of terrible old 
schmaltz by me and I rather 
liked it, as did audiences over 
here: we ran two years at 
Drury Lane. 

“I always thought I was 
going to be a serious dramatist 
who wrote the occasional 
musical or comedy to make a 
little money; now I discover, 
rather too late, that the com- 
edies and the musicals really 
were my life and the serious 
plays just somehow never 
happened. I'm only sorry Joe 
isn’t alive to see this new 
production of Wonderful 
Town: everybody ought to be 
able to stay alive to see 
themselves come back into 
fashion. Not that anything is 
certain, except maybe the title 
of the autobiography I have 
just started: it's called Waiting 
for Alzheimer." 


Theatre in Scotland 

Kathie and the 
Hippopotamus 
Traverse, Edinburgh 


Mario Vargas Uosa's pro- 
found understanding of the 
human need to intertwine 
fiction and reality has univer- 
sally established him as one of 
the world's finest living nov- 
elists. The Traverse’s British 
premiere of his play Kathie y 
el Hipopotamo (fluently trans- 
lated by Kory McKenny and 
Anthony Oliver-Smith) offers 
a rare opportunity to see the 
Peruvian writer in a different 
medium, bringing another, 
physical dimension into play. 

Kathie and the Hippopota- 
mus uses this to plunge you 
into the world of the imagina- 
tion on a very personal level. 
While we all live inside the 
fiction of our own remem- 
bered lives, Llosa playfully 
explores what might be gained 
if individual memories and 
fantasies could be seen in a 
collective pool. 

It is a deeply humourous 
and richly ironic work, begin- 
ning with a gleeful and cynical 
excursion into the act of 
writing itself In her Parisian 
attic (a witty, all-embracing set 
by Bunny Christie) Kathie, a 
bored rich banker’s wife, is 
writing a travel book. She 
employs for the purpose Santi- 
ago. a fading pseudo-intellec- 
tual who chums out purple 
prose on Cairo with disarming 
ease. The transformation of 
her memories into his mumbo 
jumbo is a game that Janet 
Amsden and Robert Swann 
play whh delightful agility. 

His words however spark 
off associations for both of 
them and gradually the room 
is peopled with memories of 
their former selves and respec- 


tive spouses, enmeshing them 
in fantastical intrigues of jeal- 
ousy and infidelity. As they 
live through fantasies 
fragments from their past, the 
real reasons for their collabo- 
rative act of creation begin to 
emerge — both are refugees 
from their own failed aspira- 
tions and empty m ar riages. 
The beautiful, complex struc- 
ture of the play allows Llosa to 
build memory on memory 
and fantasy on fantasy, lead- 
ing us into areas several times 
removed from the present and 
into his characters' imaginary 
worlds. Stephen Unwin’s pro- 
duction skilfully navigates 
these coexisting layere, eiyoy- 
ing the irony that Uosa finds 
by playing off his characters’ 
limitations and fantasies one 
against the other. 

Slowly it emerges that in the 
obsessive surfing daydreams 
of Kalhie's rich husband 
(played with solidifying self- 
ishness by Alan Barker), as in 
Santiago's half-baked revolu- 
tionary ideals and sexual 
fantasies, lies an escapism that 
is essential but potentially 
destructive and morally ir- 
responsible. It is in coming to 
terms with this in themselves 
that lies the real substance of 
Kathie’s and Santiago's col- 
laboration. Amsden and 
Swann control nicely the 
opposition between their past 
and the developing curve of 
their relationship. By the end 
the gathering maturity they 
convey gently brings home 
Llosa’s understanding of hu- 
man nature and his witty, 
moving illustration of the 
moral value of fiction in 
contributing to the reordering 
and understanding of reality 
and the enlargement of the 
mind. 

Sarah He mming 


« - 


^ L " Bernard Shaw’s 

?ARMS AND THE 

open air Theatre 


REGENT’S PARK NW1 BOX OFFICE 01.486 2431 
CCDS 01.486 1933 01 .379 6433 



Flaps all this week. 
Then in repertory with 

ROMEO AND JULIET 
A MIDSUMMER 
NIGHT’S DREAM 


ARE YOU THE SOUTH’S 
SUPERBRAIN? 

TVS a re looking f or con test ants i n a new quiz series 
called *BRAIN OF THE SOUTH* with the emphasis on 
mental agility and intellect Good general knowledge of 
the history and geography of the TVS region 
(Dorchester to Dover), plus a specialist subject and the 
ability to answer questions on anything from music to 
science to the arts will be required. 

If you think you could become one of just 27 people 
from the Television South region contesting the title 
‘BRAIN OF THE SOUTH’, send your answers to 
these five questions to The Producer, 

Brain of the South, TVS, Television Centre, 

Southampton S09 5HZ by 8th August 

Ql: What is the name of the long distance footpath 
which links Biding with Eastbourne ? 

Q2: Seem giriy for the setting of “French Lieutenant’s 
Woman”. (Anagram). 

Q3: What is the missing number. X; 5; 14; ; 55 ? 

Q4: Near which market town was the Duke of 
Monmouth captured after the 1685 rebellion ? 

Q5: Wham are here in this Dorset town ! (Anagram). 


VTVS 





14 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


****☆☆ SL 


Honeymooners join birthday celebration 



The Duke and Duchess of 
York, who spent the weekend 
playing hide and seek with the 
press, surprised everyone yes- 
terday by joining the Queen 
Mother's 86th birthday cele- 
brations at Clarence House. 

There was a huge cheer 
from a crowd of more than 
2,500 when the royal honey- 
mooners appeared at the gates 
of the house with the Queen 
Mother, the Queen, the Prince 
and Princess of Wales and 
Princess Margaret 
The con pie, lightly tanned 
and looking relaxed, smiled 
and waved at well-wishers 
packing the pavement op- 
posite the Queen Mother's 
London home. 

The Duchess of York wear- 
ing a pale bine and turquoise 
suit stood with the Duke on 
one side as the Royal Family 
spent two minutes acknow- 
ledging the cheers. 

Minutes later Prince 
Charles, who was unable to 


Today's events 


New exhibitions 
Open Fell, Hidden Dell: 
photographic study of landscape 
and lifestyles in the Yorkshire 
Dales: Haslingden Public Li- 
brary. Dearden Gate, 
Rossendale; Mon and Tues 10 
to 12.30. 1 JO to 7.30. Tues and 
Thurs 10 to 1 130. 1.30 to 5. Sat 
9.30 to 4 (ends Aug 30) 

The British School at Athens: 
A Hundred Years of Discovery, 
(ends Dec 23): Jonas 
Suyderhoff: A tercentenary ex- 
hibition of his portraits: the 
Fitzwilliam Museum. 
Tnimpington Su Cambridge; 
Tues to Sat 10 to I and 2 to 5. 
Sun 115 to 5 (ends Oct 19} 
Last chance to see 
Bomber how strategic bomb- 
ing has changed the nature of 
warfare in the 20lh Century. 
Canal Museum. Canal St, Not- 


stay for the Queen Mother's 
birthday lunch, drove away in 
bis Aston Martin. 

Hie crowd, many of whom 
had waited for more than six 
hours to see the Royal Family 
together, were kept enter- 
tained by a mischievous aide, 
who teased them with repeated 
“royal waves*' through a gap 
in the garden gates. 

Earlier, the Queen Mother, 
in an emerald green and white 
leaf-patterned dress and coat, 
with matching hat, went ont to 
acknowledge the crowd, and 
was dearly touched as she was 
besieged by scores of Oower- 
dutching children. 

Smiling staff helped her 
cope with the load, while two 
royal corgis peered inquis- 
itively through the gate. 

Then the pipes and drams of 
the 2nd Battalion Scots 
Guards inarched past playing 
Happy Birthday, with the 
crowd joining in. 

(Photograph: Graham Wood). 


tinghsun; 10 to 11 1 to 5.45. 
Music 
Concert by the London String 
Orchestra: Romsey Abbey, 7J0. 

Redtal by Julia Goad (pi- 
ano). Wolverhampton Art Gal- 
lery, l. 

Chamber music recital by 
young artists, Hawkshead Par- 
ish Church. S. 

Recital by Simon Rowland- 
Jones (viola) and Ian Brown 
(piano). Charlotte Mason Col- 
lege; Rydal Rd. Ambles id e. 8. 

Concert by the Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra. Winter 
Gardens, Bonroemoiith. 8. 

Talks 

Birds of Mountain and Moor, 
by Mike Madders. Lake District 
Park Visitor Centre. Brockbole. 
Windermere. 1J0. 

General 
Book Market. Chanirv Hall 
Norwich. 10 to 5. 

Pond Dipping and Scavenger 


Summit leaders pressure Thatcher 


Continued from page 1 
the Americans would in the 
end back stronger sanctions. 

He advised his colleagues 
around the table: “Watch 
Ronald Reagan. He will 
move". 

The Republicans he said, 
would not go into the Ameri- 
can mid-term elections “on 
the wrong side of this issue” 

Mr Mulroney then gestured 
to Mr Mugabe and said: “This 
man spent 10 years in the 
slammer but he is here around 
this table because of the.Com- 
m on wealth. 

“Now South Africa has to 
be brought to the tabler* 

Mrs Thatcher clashed with 
Mr Mugabe when he said the 
Organisation of African Unity 
was now ready to back the 


armed struggle in South 
Africa. 

She told Mr Mugabe she 
had not expected such things 
would be discussed. Violence 
was only permissible in self- 
defence, she said. 

Mr Mugabe was reported to 
have retorted: “We have all 
supported Britain in the use of 
violence in the past”. 

Mrs Thatcher made her 
offer yesterday morning after 
speeches by Mr Mugabe, Mr 
Rajiv Gandhi, the Indian 
Prime Minister, Mr Hawke 
and Dr Kaunda. 

The offer, when it came, 
was about as much as the 
other leaders had expected. 

She said that “in all the 
circumstances” Britain was 


prepared to agree to some 
further measures as a mark of 
disapproval. 

But she said she would not 
wish to defend the effects they 
might have on black families 
in South Africa. 

She pointed out that Britain 
was constrained by its mem- 
bership of other bodies, notab- 
ly the European Community. 

She was closely questioned, 
particularly by Mr Gandhi, 
about what she meant by her 
phrase “not standing in the 
way or the European Com- 
munity measures. 

Indian officials said later 
that Mr Gandhi was not at all 
satisfied and that the Nassau 
accord was the minimum that 
could be agreed. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,116 



ACROSS 

I Plagiarism in writing 
Howard's End denounced 
(10). 

6 Girl gets a pound a bottle 
(4). 

10 Perfect example of English- 
Grcek letter book (7). 

11 Issue expert information 
saying why (71, 

12 Exhaust about to scrape - 
new inside needed to emit 
xapour (9). 

13 Mine in Kent possibtx 
causes ill-will (5). 

14 Northern Ireland revolu- 
tionary finds suitable po- 
sition (5). 

15 Noble seed's poorly with 
cpistaxis (9). 

17 Small caskets placed in In- 
dian classes (9). 

20 Spinner operating from ei- 
ther end (5). 

21 One of Lord Arthur 
Savilc's? (5). 

23 Who said Gama was a 
disagreeable man? (9). 

25 Small bone is close to 
disaster (7). 

26 This language is nothing 
among bridge players (7). 

27 Pay attention to what the 
man had said (4). 

28 Commanding officer told 
about right to be associated 
(10). 

DOWN 

1 European doesn't get a duck 


at the crease (5). 

2 Small power group in Lagos 
could be newly rich (9). 

3 Angry character alluding to 
a different place? (5-9). 

4 The air is uplifting in one 
mountain in Spain (7). 

5 Did new clothes do nothing 
for her either? (7). 

7 Palaeolithic enigma involv- 
ing Ancient Britons (5). 

8 No orders for amateur lec- 
turer? (3.6). 

9 Sweet fruit with trifle ( 10.4). 

14 Wear this to embrace the 

clergy (9): 

16 Out-going type to vex rotter 
maybe (9). 

18 He-otter. wild to boot (7). 

19 Chemist loses girl to poet 

22 The result of having chil- 
dren (5). 

24 Give in return (5). 



Concise Crossword, page 8 


Hunt, for 9 to 13 year olds, the 
Commandery. Sidbury, 
Worcester. 9.45 to 12, 


Angler lead 


Anglers are still leaving large 
amounts of lead weights and 
line on river banks, according to 
the Royal Society for the Protec- 
tion of Birds. River banks in 
England and Wales were cleared 
of shot and line at the start: of the 
1 985/6 fishing season, but in a 
search at the end of the season, 
3.564 pieces of shot and 7.0 km 
of line were found. The society 
has been campaigning for the 
withdrawal of certain lead 
weights from angling and the 
Government recently produced 
a consultation paper which an- 
nounced proposals to ban an- 
glers from using lead weights 
from January J, 1987. if vol- 
untary withdrawal fails. The 
RSPB is now pressing the 
Government to introduce statu- 
tory controls on the sale , import 
and use of certain lead weights 
as soon as possible. 


Save the child 


The Child Accident Preven- 
tion Trust has issued a pamphlet 
to help prevent accidents to 
children in die home. Entitled 
Keep Them Safe, it gives details 
of traditional safety items, such 
as safety gates, fireguards and 
child car seats and describes 
newer products including safety 
glazing materials, coiled flexes 
tor kitchen appliances and 
smoke alarms. It indicates the 
ages at which different items 
become important and includes 
information on cost, availability 
and relevant safety standards. 
The leaflet can be obtained from 
Dept HS3. 13-39 Standard Rd, 
London NWI0 6HD. 


TV top ten 


National top tan television programme s in 
the week anting Jtiy 271986: 

BBC 1 

1 Easterners (Thum/Sun) 18.90m 

2 Easterners (Tues/Sin) 1535m 

3 Carriage Processions 14.40m 

4 The Mamaae Service 1420m 

5 The Royal Wedding (Tues) 1225m 

6 Dirty Harry 11. 85m 

7 The Royal Wadding: London 
Prepares 11.65m 

8 Honeymoon Departure 1125m 

9 Nme O'Qocfc News (Tues) 1020m 
10 Westminster Abbey 10.00m 

10 Nine O'odocfc News (Thurs) lOiOOm 

[TV 

1 Coronation Street (Mon) IZBSm 

2 Coronation Street (Wed) 12.75m 

3 Crossroads (Tues) 11 .50m 

4 The Royal WMding (Tues) 1020m 

5 Crossroads (WW) 1020m 

6 Nam (Wed 1720) 9.60m 

7 Return To Eden (Mon) 945m 

8 Rear Window 945m 

9 Duty Free fexc. London) 925m 
10 The Royal Day 92Sm 

BBC2 

1 Dave Alan 820m 

2 Sunday Grandstand 520m 

3 SpfcT Screen 430m 

4 The Paid Dan els Magic Show 4.90m 

5 XS Commonwealth Games (Sun 
1831) 4.60m 

8 The Travel Show 325m 

7 George Washington 335m 

8 Xm Commonwealth Games (Sun 
14:14) 320m 

9 Two Rode Together 325m 

10 MASH320m 


Roads 


London and South - east M25e Lane 
closures between unctions 9 and 10 ( 
Leatherhaady A3): dockwme carriage 
Diversions tor southbound traffic on 
London Rd and eastbowd on Beckenham 
Lane: avoid. M2: Hard shoulder only open 
towards London 19 to function 5 ( A249V 
outside lane dosed on coestbound 
carriageway, 

Mdbnds: M& Pre pa ratory work for 
cont rafl ow between junctions 4 and 5 
[NEC; A452 Btrm Ingham East). MS: 
Contraflow between junctions 4 and 5 ( 
BromsgrouQ/ Dratwch): two lanes in 
each direction- Ml: Contraflow at Junction 
20 ( Lutterworth), Leicestershire. 

wales and Wee 


on both 
44 and 45 
A3& Lane 


1 and West M4c Lane re a Wctkm a 


ys between junctions 
Tea; Swansea East) 
between Exeter and 


Channel 4 

Brooksde (Mon/Sai) 620m 
Brooksxle (Tues/Sat) 4.40m 
The Cosby Show 320m 
ere 300m 


Cheers: 

St. Elsewhere 220m 
Bewitched 225m 

_ The Kit Curran Radio Show 2.15m 

8 Country Matter* 2.15m 

9 The Littfe Foxes 2.05m 

10 Tusttala 2.00m 


Breakfast letovtaforc The average 


whonewed for at least three minutes): 
BBC1: Breakfast Tone: Mon to Fn 


2.1 (12.11 
TV-am: Good Morning 
2.7 (13.6) Sat 2.9 (52Q 
Sun 1.6(152) 


Britain Mon to Fn 


Broadcasters' Audience Research Board. 


A380 at top of Haldon HflL A5: Sngle feie 
traffic between Gobowen and Chirk on 
Whittington to Cerrigydrudlon rout. 
Ctwyd: temporary faghts. 

North bn 8: Cbmraflow between June- 
tuns 8 and 7 ( Thame/M62): southbouid 
exfl and northbound access at junction 6 
dosed. A58: Single One traffic on Halifax 
Rd In Litdaborough; temporary lights. 
A 19: Lane doswes N from Seaton 
interchange, co Durham. 

Scotfemd: M8: Contraflow between 
Paisley and ErsMne. Strolhdyde. IS 
Contraflow between Junctions Band 10 
Stifling). M/A74- Contraflow N c 
Lesmahgow and N and S of Douglas. 

Information suppfled by the AA 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 7.1 5pm and 7.45pm. 


Anniversaries 


Health leaflets 


Births: Edward John Eyre, 
explorer and colonial governor, 
Hornsea. Yorkshire, 1815; Guy 
de Maupassant, near Dieppe, 
1850. 

Deaths: James Gibbs, Lon- 
don. 1754; Lord Frederick 
North, 2nd Earl of GuDford, 
Prime Minister 1770-82, Lon- 
don, 1792; PhD May, caricatur- 
ist, London, 1903; Arthur 
Meighen. Prime Minister of 
Canada, 1920-21, 1926. To- 
ronto. I960; Marilyn Monroe, 
Los Angeles, 1962. 


Weather 
forecast 

A slack, unstable air- 
stream will cover most of 
Britain, with a shallow 
ridge of high pressure 
over southern England, 
moving away eastwards 
as further frontal systems 
approach from SW later. . 


6 am to midnight 


London, SE, E, central N, NE England, 
East Aagjto, E MdtaadK Bnght start, 
showers developing-, wwid SW 
mmg moderate: max ramp 18 to 
(84 to 68ft. 

Cental S, MW England, W Midlands, 
Channel Wands, Lake District: Bnght 
sun but showere developing: becorring 
ooudy later wind SW moderate backing 
southerly; max temp 17 to 1 9C (83 to 68F). 

SW England, S. N Wales: Sunny 
intervals and scattered showers, becom- 
with more general rate; wind 
moderate backing southerly fresh; 
max tens 17 to 19C (63 to 66F) 
lata of Man, Northern behind: Sunny 
intervals, showere developing, becoming 
cloudy with some rain later; wind SW nght 
becoming southerjymoderete; mas temp 
15 to 17C (99to63F) 

Borders, EdMurgh, Dundee, Aber- 
deen, SW, NE, NW Scotland, Glasgow, 
cental Highl an ds, Moray FMh, Argyll: 
Rather cloudy with showers, some heavy, 
a tew sunny Intervals; wind variable Nght 
max lamp 15C (59F to 63F). 

Orkney, Shetland: Sumy Intervals and 
scattered showere: wind NW hght max 
ramp l4Cf57FV 

Outlook for tomorrow and Thursday: 
Ram al lirel followed by sunny intervals. 
Scattered showers. Temperatures a Mfle 
below normal. 


Letter from Marlborough House 

Boxing clever at 
sports summit 


It was said that Mr Gandhi 
was ready to host a full 
meeting of the Com- 
monwealth unless Mrs 
Thatcher gave way. 

Tn its memorandum to the 
all-party Commons foreign af- 
fairs committee, the Foreign 
Office estimated that tourism 
was worth about $400 million 
to South Africa in 1985, and 
that revenue from South Af- 
rican tourism in Britain was 
£88 million in 1984b 

It also said a ban on new 
investment in South Africa 
would have limited effect 
because little new investment 
was taking place at present 
and the consequences for the 
UK economy were likely to be 
small. 


The Commonwealth 
Games, as scheduled, came to 
a close on Saturday. That the 
mini-summit should follow 
so closely on its heels makes 
it difficult to resist some 
observers beliefs that the 
whole occasion is to be 
viewed as a form of dip- 
lomatic sports fixture. 

One of the chief reasons 
why this summit has been so 
keenly awaited has nothing to 
do with the issue of sanctions 
per se. It is because several of 
the contestants, especially Dr 
Kaunda and Mr Mulroney. 
indulged in a spot of oratori- 
cal muscle flexing in the run 
up to the Marlborough House 
rendezvous, which suggested 
that Mrs Thatcher could be in 
for one of the most chasten- 
ing ordeals of her political 
life. 

Even her closest supporters 
displayed mouth-watering 
anticipation. Would their 
leader’s political reputation 
survive in tact 

Soaking up the atmosphere 
after the first complete day of 
talks, it appears that the bad 
tempered showdown has not 
yet materialized (which is not 
to say that subsequent events 
will disprove this). 

Among the plethora of 
early “buzz words" which 
have begun to nestle in 
journalists’ brains, the fav- 
ourite has to be “concilia- 
tory". Everyone, we are told, 
is in favour of “conciliation". 

What is more, to extend an 
already laboured adjective, it 
has apparently become, the 
“friendly summit”. 

How officials would square 
this with Mrs Thatcher's 
sharp inteijection against Mr 
Mugabe on the subject of 
armed resistance groups is 
another matter. 

In facL one of the perilous 
aspects of a summit like this 
is the question of how to 
interpret officials briefings. 
“Discussions," we were told, 
“were a little more lively this 
morning than yesterday." 

What this really meant 
according to one reliable 
source inside Marlborough 
House, was that the morning 
session had been so tense that 
“it would need a hell of a 
lunch to defuse the 
situation." 

To return to the sporting 


analogy. Mrs Thatcher has 
extracted considerable ad- 
vantage from the fact that, 
unlike at Nassau last Octo- 
ber, when she was put se- 
verely on the defensive, this 
lime "she enjoys !he psycho- 
logical fillip of a "home 
fixture”. 

There have been no 
crowds, however, to roar her 
on. The nearest has been the 
unpredictable alliance of 
Sikh. TUC and Hare Krishna 
demonstrators gathered on 
Pall Mall. Together they have 
produced a monotonous- 
sounding back-drop to the 
summit proceedings. 

Another point in her fa- 
vour is the nature of the 
summit decision-making ma- 
chinery- The conference 
chairman. Sir Lynden Pin- 
dling, of the Bahamas, 
stressed Iasi Friday that any 
verdict on sanctions would 
have to be arrived at by 
concensus. 

The gallery of Common- 
wealth leaders, of course, 
contains some compelling 
contrasts of style and person- 
ality. it is this factor, as much 
as the issues before the 
leaders, that makes the 
proceedings so intriguing. 

Understandably. Mr Gan- 
dhi. after the abrupt manner 
of his mother's death, ap- 
pears intent on avoiding un- 
necessary’ public exposure. 
His preoccupation with se- 
curity compares markedly 
with the free and easy per- 
sona of the Australian Prime 
Minister. Mr Bob Hawke. 

Mr Hawke is renowned for 
many things, but serious 
reticence is not one of them. 
Yesterday morning, outside 
his hotel, an Australian 
journalist, in reference to 
Sunday evening's palace ban- 
quet asked: “Did the Queen 
and MrsThatchcrgct on well. 
Prime Minister?" “1 didn't 
see any sign of blows," came 
the reply. 

As the world awaits the 
verdict on the tussle expected 
later today, it seems increas- 
ingly likely that the three-day 
struggle will be settled on 
points. 

Exactly who will be claim- 
ing victory is a matter of 
conjecture. 

Mark Dowd 




Sunrises 
520 am 


Sun sett: 
8.42 pm 


b4>iue slcy: br-Mw sky and cloud: c- 
cJoudy: wnercnL I- for. d-drtzzJe: h- 
hatt: ratal-mist: r-raln. v-tnowi ui- 

thunderstorm: b-showws. 

Arrows show wind direction, wind 
wed trnphj circled. Temperature 
cenograoe. 


Southampton 
Swansea 
Teas 

W*ttnn-on-Nze 
Tide m ea sure d to metres: 1m-328B8ft 


429 am 
New moon 728 pm 


9.11 pm 


Around Britain 


Lighting-up time 


EAST COAST 


Die Department of Health and Social 
scuffiy has issued two leaflets on hearth 
care. The Health Service Today provides 
up - to - the mnute facts about the Health 
Service. Copies are datributod to MPs. 
regional and district health authorities, 
(array practitioner committees and 
community health councrts. Primary 
Heam Cam is a summary of the 
Government's consultation docunent on 
ihesutnect A senes erf open meetings has 
been arranged eo dial outdance can be 
taken m puotc. The leaflet on the health 
service can be obtested from the DHSS 
Leaflets Unit. PO Box 21. Stanmore. 
Mddsx. HA7 1AY and the hearth care 
pampniet hum the HMSO. 


The pound 


Australia S 
Austria Sch 
Belgium Ft 
C anadaS 
Denmark Kr 
Finland Hdt 
France Fr 
tarn Dm 
Greece Dr 
HongKongS 
Ireland Pt 
Italy Ure 
Japan Yen 
Netherlands GId 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
South Abies Rd 
Spam Pta 
Sweden Kr 
Switzerland Fr 

USAS 

Yugoslavia Dnr 


Bank 


2225 

6820 

2.10 

1124 

7.75 

1020 

3.18 

*17.50 

11.75 

1.137 

11*5 


327 

1120 

22220 

520 

20520 

1081 

056 

1-53 

86000 


Bank 

SOBS 

240 
2125 
6220 

ZOO 

1129 

725 

9J5 

320 

20320 

1123 

1267 

2/jSS 

22400 

328 

1070 

21050 

450 

19400 

1006 

241 
1.46 

61000 


Rates far small denomination bank notes, 
only as supplied by Barclays Bank PLC. 
Different rates apply to travellers' 
cheques and other foreign currency 
business. 

Retaf Price Inde* 3852 

London: The FT Index dosed 11.9 

flown M 1281.5. 



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London 9.12 pm to 5.01 am 
Bristol 922 pm to 5.11 am 
EdHbwgh 9.43pm to 426 am 
Manchester 928 pm to 5.02 am 
Penzance 929 pm to 528 am 


Cramer 


Margate 
SOUTH t 


COAST 


Sun Rato 
hrs In 

6.4 M 

7.4 .11 
22 OB 
5.8 28 
3.1 25 

24 


Max 
C F 

18 64 sitony 

18 64 sunny 

19 66 drizzle 
18 64 thunder 
18 64 ram 

18 64 thunder 


Sim Rain Max 

hre to c F 

- .02 15 59 Showere 

- - is 59 doudy 

2.1 - 15 59 dri 

13 - 15 59 dul 

Douglas 52 - 15 S9 bright 

ENGLAND AND WALES 


W r auomb e 

Tenby 

CWwynBay 


Yesterday 


gfcwtona 42 23 18 64 thunder 


Belfast 


Temperatures at midday yesterday: c. 
doud: l, lair: r. ran: s. sui. 

C F C F 

11559 Guernsey c1559 
f 1081 toverasss e 1355 
f 1569 Jersey c 1864 
c 1864 London c 1763 
11661 M'lKtmtr (1681 
f 1457 Newcastle c 1355 
C 1457 RHdsway (1457 


Brighton 


London 
BtiamAlipt 
Bristol (Chi) 
Cardiff (Ctrl) 


rR 





Crimewatch bus 


Exroouth 
Ttfgnmoifth 
TOrauey 
Fabnoutfi 
Penzance 

Yorkshire Metropolitan Pokes 14 57 tfMiftTr 

txkiced a “ cm* prevention EtfBburgh 

■ « 64 cloudy 
I B .02 18 64 douay 


west 

have introduced a “ enme prevention 

roadshow", a spedafly- convened double 

- decker bus, aetegned to spread the 
crime prevention message through the 
county. Vblting fetes, galls, schools and 
tetow s. a ma dispense advice on. among 
other them avowing die trap ol prowlmg 
strangers for ehMren. road safety ana 
hom 8 HCuriJ^Fufther inquiries _at the 

msnt PO Bex 8, Wakefield WF1 30?. Tel 
Wakefield (0924) 375222. ext 22045. 


M -SI '£ 61 **n 

-83 13 55 thunder 

2*1 .96 13 55 thunder 

l i 1-54 13 66 t K 

1-5 J-® 13 55 thunder 

I ? 1-15 14 57 ram 

} i 1-J0 14 57 rate 

1-5 1.40 17 83 thunder 
1.1 JS7 14 57 ran 

15 99 rato 

14 57 rain 

17 63 rain - 

14 57 showers I?** 

14 W ram g™?"* 

15 59 ram Is”?** 

16 61 dun 

17 63 bnght *££•* 

15 59 thunder 

Andrews 


12 

1.5 
03 
0.3 

0.1 

22 

23 

1.6 


Mancltts&a- 

Nnatoghem 

PTcfl-n-Tyne 

Quisle 

SCOTLAND 

F iikd ste raul r 

Prom*** 

nTiinow 


.78 


1.4 
32 
1.1 
0.7 

2.7 
Q.6 

2.4 
32 

8.5 

4.8 


2.4 

32 

42 

22 

0.4 

02 

2.8 

20 

52 

52 

x 


.02 


.02 


15 59 ttwndsr 

15 59 rain 
14 57 rate 

14 57 rate 

16 61 brisfrt 
16 81 cloudy 

15 5S rate 

16 61 rate 

18 64 stony 
18 64 showere 


16 61 cloudy 

17 63 cloudy 
17 63 bright 

14 57 showers 
12 54 showere 

.10 12 54 showers 
.05 14 57 showers 

15 59 showers 

17 63 showers 

18 64 bright 


,01 

.04 

.61 


.04 

.02 


Newquay 


NORTHERN IRELAND 

' 3.7 


- 17 83 bright 


Abroad 


Safe holidays 


Mr ones Shaw, the Home Office 
Mtofflter. has issued a reminder to 
holidaymakers to make theu homes 
secure before departure Tips include 
making sure that aM outside doors and 
windows are fined with good security 
locks • and this panmiarfy appaes to 
. which hold tools useful m a 
padtedang modem resting 
inst a house wait esneetmg aeflvenes 
or mdk and newspapers, and asking a 
neighbour to keep • check on die house. 


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Athens 

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TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


t: 


-ni-.i. 


STOCK MARKET 


FT 30 Share 
1261.5 (-11.9) 

FT-SE100 
1545.4 (-16.4) 

Bargains 

207J0 

USM (Datastream) 

120.87 (-0.25) . 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 
1.4695 (-0.0155) 

W German mark 
3.0580 (-0.0345) 
Trade-weighted 
70.7 (-1.7) 




*w. 



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■! * 





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Share sale 
shelved 

The four directors of lnter- 
", national Leisure who failed to 
'"t sell many of their shares in the 
h holiday- group in the stock 
>fsy. market on Friday have made 
no decision on when to launch 
another attempt 

• j Scrimgeour Vickers, the 
M- , stockbroker, tried to place the 
' r.M . 3.5 million shares at about 
;\v 1 18p but could not find 
enough takers. 

Most of the shares were 
■*T~r being sold by Mr Harry Good- 
C man, the chairman. Other 
• v~: sellers were Mr Sidney Perez 
- and the joint deputy diainnen 
1 Mr Stephen Matthews and Mr 
- Peter Woodward. 

Mr Woodward said rThe 
■i directors have a high propor- 
- 1; tion of their wealth tied up in 
the shares and decided to 
. , reduce their holdings. When 
■' we realized we could not place 

all the shares we decided to 

abort file exercise. We have 
made no decision about any 
. future sales. 

“The feet that we were 
-- selling did not mean that we 
have reduced our commit- 
' ' men I to the company. It was 
" purely a question of taking an 
investment management view 
\HH of our shareholdings.” 

Rush £3.74m 

Rush & Tomkins, the build- 
ing and property company, 
made profits of £3.74 million 
before tax in the 15 months to 
March 31 on turnover of £184 

• million. In the 12 months to 
December 3! 1984, ii made 

1 £3.05 million before tax on 

• turnover of £11 8 million. The 
final dividend is 12p, making 
a total of 10.7p against 7.7p in 
1984. Terapus, page 16 

Peel up 62% 

Peel Holdings, the retail 
warehouse developer, reports 
-pretax profits of £5.35 million 
.for the year ended March 31, a 
62 per cent increase. Interest 
;payable has risen to £3.91 

- million from £143,000. Earn- 
ings per share have risen by 65 

' per cent to 3289 p while net 

- asset value is 450p compared 

- -with 377p for the previous 

year end Tempos, page 16 

Coup payment 

Mr Peter Laister, the former 
chairman and chief executive 
!of Thom EMI ousted in a 
boardroom coup in July last 
year, was paid £440,000 
compensation. Thorn's an- 
‘ nual report revealed. Mr 
Laister's salary was £152000. 

Stake raised 

Glen International, the 
securities and investment 
company, has increased its 
stake in Mailer Estates, the 
property company, to 1538 
per cent, raising bid hopes. 

No referral 

The acquisition by Odbury 
Schweppes of Canvermoor 
will not be referred to the 
Monopolies Commission. 


ill:.!: 


n eii 
■ » 


Wifi Street 
Tempos 
Cmpay News 16 
-Commeat 17 


16 Traded 


Opts 
Mr lets 


17 


16 Meney Mrkts 17 
Uoit Tnnts 18 
Cbonodities 18 


tm ■ = 


$toefc Market 17 USM Prices 18 
Ftrtipi Exck 17 Share Pres 19 


Pubs inquiry 
will focus 
on profits 

By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 

Prices, margins and profits lariy into four areas which can afford simply to wait for 


in brewing appear to be high. 
Sir Gordon Borne, director 
general of Pair Trading, said 
yesterday as he ordered a new 
investigation of the industry 
by the Monopolies and Merg- 
ers Commission. 

The move, which foDows 
investigations by the commis- 
sion and subsequently the 
Price Commission, brought 
some marking down of brew- 
ery shares but mostly by less 
than the decline in an overall 
weak London mariceL 

Sir Gordon's decision had 
been widely expected but it 
was dear for the first time that 
four areas have particularly 
concerned the director gen- 
eral. He has given wide terms 
of reference to the commis- 
sion in looking at the supply of 
beer in Britain for retail sale 
on licensed premises. The- 
Commission has to report in 
two years. 

Sir Gordon, in announcing 
the decision, said: “I have 
tried to give the' commission 
ample elbow-room to make 
their investigations particu- 


appear to me to cause 
concern.” 

These, he said, were: 

• The brewing industry sup- 
plies a high proportion of its 
products through outlets tied 
to brewers so that competition 
may be restricted; 

• Because of this hold over 
retail outlets, independent 
suppliers may face difficulties 
in marketing their products; 

• Consumer choice, particu- 
larly in the on-licence trade 
which consists mainly of pubs, 
may be limited; 

• Prices, margins and profits, 
within the industry appear to 
be high. 

The Brewers' Society, which 
represents most of the 
country's brewers, described 
the inquiry as “totally 
unnecessary” and maintained 
that it would again be found 
that the many consumer and 
other competitive advantages 
of the British system of pub 
ownership would outweigh 
any disadvantages. 

But City analysts believe 
that few of the bigger brewers 


the outcome of the investiga- 
tion before taking action to 
meet a possible scrapping of 
the tie or at least radical 
changes to iL 

Breweries could be expected 
to target investment in their 
tied pubs more sharply which 
could mean marginally profit- 
able outlets would no longer 
be supported. 

Brewers would also have to 
look more closely at produc- 
tion capacity to achieve the 
highest level of efficiency with 
which to meet the more 
competitive climate if the tie 
went. The net result, analysts 
argue, could mean pub and 
brewery closures while the 
monopolies commission is 
still deliberating. 

The brewers plan to spend 
£24 billion on pub improve- 
ments over the next three 
years but in looking at the best 
investment for a tie-less 
environment some might turn 
to putting more cash into 
building up key brands which 
could then be expected to sell 
well through any outlet. 



Sir Gordon at his desk yesterday (Photograph: Tim Bishop) 


Chase Manhattan 
stags censured 


By CBfF Feltham 


Senior executives in Chase 
Manhattan Securities who 
made a personal profit in 
stagging shares in the 
Windsmoor fashion group, 
one of their own new issues, 
were ordered last night to 
hand over all their gains to 
charity and forbidden from 
ever dealing again in the 
shares of their own clients. 

The ruling followed an in- 
ternal investigation by Chase 
Manhattan after the embarr- 
assing revelation that exec- 
utives in the group’s broking 
arm, Simon & Coates, had 
been stagging the issue during 
the offer for sale. 

Chase Manhattan said no 
one has been sacked asa result 
of the afiair but last night it 
issued an internal memoran- 
dum to staff, pointing out that 
some employees had applied 
for shares m the Windsmoor . 
issue and then sold them in 
the first few days of dealing. 

It said it had examined all 
the circumstances and was 
satisfied that there was no lack 
of integrity in the behaviour of 


any individuals and no one 
involved in selling shares 
believed they were acting 
against the best interests of the 
client. 

“But there were errors of 
judgement in not recognizing 
that what happened created 
the appearance of a conflict of 
interest and all the parties 
concerned recognize that this 
type of situation cannot hap- 
pen again.” 

The statement said there 
was some inadvertent breach 
of dealing rules and it had 
decided that all the .profits 
arising out of the transaction 
are to be turned over to Chase 
Manhattan who will donate 
them to charity. 

The company has also de- 
cided, that from now on all 
dealings in “house stocks” are 
forbidden, with the exception 
of sales of existing positions. 

Profits made by the exec- 
utives are thought to be 
around £25,000 to £30,000, 
implying applications for 
around £1.6 million ' of 
Windsmoor shares. 


BICC pays £43m for 
Haden Building 


By Clare Dobie 

BICC, the cables company, 
is buying Haden Building 
Services for £43 million in a 
deal which allows the Haden 
Group to return to the stock 
market later this year. 

Haden Buildiiu Services 
made pretax profits of £6.7 
million in 1985. BICC is 
issuing 16.8 million shares in 
consideration, which are being 
placed at 260p each. In addi- 
tion, it is buying some prop- 
erties for £1 million cash. 


The agreed price compares 
with the £60 million it cost 
Haden's management to buy 
the whole company in May 
last year. 

Haden is now left with 
roughly half the original 
group, making paint shops for 
car manufacturers, mainly in 
America, which made £8.8. 
million profits before interest 
last year and is expected to 
make £10 million this 
year.The proceeds will leave 
the company with £10 million 
net debt. 


Rover set 
to sell 
Istel 

By Edward Townsend 

Industrial Correspondent 

Rover Group, formerly BL, 
has begun the process of 
privatizing its last remaining 
fringe activity, die £50 million 
Istel computer and data 
processing subsidiary. 

Ernst & Whinney, the Lon- 
don firm of accountants, has 
been appointed to conduct a 
full study of the Reddrtch- 
based company and report to 
the Rover chairman and chief 
executive Mr Graham Day 
within the next few weeks. 

A Rover spokesman said: 
^This is die first step of 
privatization and the method 
and timing have not been 
determined but ff will happen 
as quickly as is practicable.” 

Because 1st el’s expertise 
has been ased in the design of 
BL cars, it is likely tint the 
company will wish to retain a 
share in the same way that It 
has in the privatization of the 
Unipart component and spares 
company. 

Istel employs about 1,200 
people in 12 locations in the 
United Kingdom. It also has a 
United States subsidiary. 

The company, previously 
called BL Systems, was 
formed in 1979 by bringing 
together all the computer and 
data systems activities of Brit- 
ish Ley land. 

Abont 30 per cent of its time 
is spent on Rover Group work, 
with other customers including 
rivals Ford and General Mo- 
tors, I Cl, the oil industry and 
travel companies. 

Its last published financial 
results, for 1984, show a 
turnover of £37 million and a 
£13 milli on profitSince then, 
sales have risen to £50 million 
and Rover raid it had main- 
tained profitability. 


Phit hits at rival’s 
‘high risk’ assets 

By Judith Huntley, Commercial Property Correspondent 

its schemes, and that it values 


STC doubles its interim profits 


STC revealed yesterday that 
its interim pretax profit more 
than doubled from £23.4 mil- 
lion to £493 million. At the 
operating level, before interest 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


. .4 • ' « 


New York 
Dow Jones 
Tokyo 
Nikkei Dow 
Hong Kong; 

- “ ._ 190628 (+32.1 

Gen 271.4 ‘ 

kAO 11202 


. 1739.88 (-23.76) 
17263.10 (-21.69) 


32.17) 

W3 


t ••<! " 

t * 


Commerzbank 

Biussetae 

General 

Paris: CAC 

Zurich: 

SKA General 


18224 (-7.7) 


650. 


379.6 (+0. 




n/a 

London dosing prices Page 19 

INTEREST RATES 

London: 

Bank Base: 10% 

3-month interbank io4 n i«% 
3-month efigibie bBs&K-S'Vfc 
‘“-■"1 rate 






*. »*»■* 

V- «i,*n«** 




Prime Rate 8% 

.- Federal Funds 6'‘»% 

, 3-month Treasury Bills 5.75-5.74% 
•i 30-year bonds 97' is-97% 


CURRENCIES 


V. t 

.*« 


- London 
£51.4695 
>* L- DM3.0580 
'•*, £ SwFr2-4577 

V £ FFr9.9265 
>■ £ Yen226.Ce 

V £r !ftdex:70.7 


New York: 
£$1.4710 
S: DM28030 
& Index: 1112 

ECU £0689486 
SDR £0809203 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 

Thom EMI . 
Gian. Lawrence 
Ktearfoid 


wm. Ransom 
Ibstock 
JADevenbh 
Guthrie 


472p 

100p 

■Z9P 


+10p 
+10p 
+75p) 

. (+*P) 
237p(+15p) 
164p (+9p) 


FALLS: 

BICC 



Mercantfle House 
Lonhro 
Blue Circle 


GOLD 


London Fixing: 

AM $358.75 
dose $359/ 

24525) 

New York: 

Comex 5359^0-369.80 


.80 

.50 (2244.75- 


NORTH SEA OIL 


By Carol Ferguson 
charges and exceptional items, 
the improvement is a less 
spectacular but still creditable 
1 5 per cent to £58.2 million. 

The massive restructuring 
of the last 12 months has 
generated £92 million from 
disposals, enabling the group 
to reduce net borrowings by 
£133 million. This brought the 
debt/equity ratio down to 15 
per cent at the end of June 
compared with 52 per cent a 
year ago. 


International Computers, 
the mainframe manufacturer 
which dominates STCs turn- 
over and profit, had a very 
good year. Operating profit 
jumped from £26.3 million 
last year to £43.2 million. 

The dividend has been re- 
stored The directors have 
declared an interim payment 
of I.Sp, having passed pay- 
ment last year. 

Tempos, page 16 


Property Holding and 
Investment Trust has 
launched a swingeing attack 
on its unwelcome bidder. 
Greycoat Group, a rival prop- 
erty developer. 

Mr Arthur John, chairman 
of Phit, says he would now 
reject any offer from 
Greycoat, even if higher than 
the current £108 million bid, 
because of what he calls the 
high risk and relatively poor 
quality of Us portfolio com- 
pared with Phil’s. And Phit, a 
conservatively valued com- 
pany; is questioning 
Greycoat’s accounting 
methods. 

Phil’s defence, unveiled yes- 
terday, highlights the feet that 
its portfolio, valued at £161 
million, is 100 per cent owned 
and largely freehold Pearl 
Assurance, an 18.8 per cent 
shareholder committed to 
Phit, has the only joint 
development in the portfolio. 
The development programme 
will reach £45 million by next 
year and increase to more than 
£75 million. 

By contrast, the Phit board 
points out that Greycoat has 
only a part interest in many of 


its interests in subsidiary 
companies on a pro rata basis 
and does not discount them as 
does Phit. 

Greycoat is a glamour stock 
because of its high exposure to 
the booming City of London 
and West End office markets. 
Phit, with a 19 per cent 
exposure to the City and a 
higher investment in retail 
property, believes Greycoat’s 
aim- • for a -£500 million 
development programme is 
high risk. 

-Phit is telling iis sharehold- 
ers to reject the Greycoat offer 
as it would result in a 59 per 
cent drop in income and a 9 
per cent dilution of net asset 
value, Iasi put at 158p per 
share. Greycoat's share price 
fell below its cash offer for 
PHIT after the announcement 
of the bid. 

Phil's strong financial po- 
sition. with relatively low 
gearing, and its sound port- 
folio make it an attractive buy 
for Greycoat or any other 
predator if Greycoat is not 
successful Phit will be 
canvassing as yet uncommit- 
ted institutional shareholders 


Million-dollar 
American to 
head Beecham 

By Alison Eadie 

Beecham, the pharmaceuti- mem for Sir Ronald, who was 

Beecham’s 


cals and consumer products 
group, yesterday announced 
the appointment of Mr Robert 
Bauman, an American, as 
chairman of the group from 
September 15. His reputed 
salary package will be SI 
million (£680,000), making 
him the second highest paid 
director in Britain after Mr 
Richard Giordano, of BOC, 
who earned £883,000 last year. 

Mr Bauman is vice-chair- 
man of Textron Inc. the 
aerospace technology, 
commercial products and 
financial services group. 

Lord Keith of Castleacre, 
the acting chairman of Bee- 
chain since Sir Ronald 
Halstead was ousted in a 
boardroom coup last Novem- 
ber, described Mr Bauman as 
of the highest calibre. He 
would not confirm the salary, 
but said it would be paid in 
dollars and would be around 
the level Mr Bauman could 
command in America. 

Sir Ronald, who is now 
deputy chairman of British 
Steel received a salary of 
£190,000 as chairman and 
chief executive and received 
compensation of £407, OCX) for 
premature loss of employ- 
ment. 

Beecham also announced 
the appointment of four new 
non-executive directors: Sir 
Robert Clarke, chairman of 
Hill Samuel; Mr Andrew 
Buxton, vice-chairman of 
Barclays Bank; Mr James 
White, managing director of 
BunzI and Sir John Kingman, 
vice-chancellor of Bristol 
University. The company is 
also well down the road 
towards finding a finance 
director. Lord Keith said. 

The search for an “experi- 
enced and highly skilled 
industrial manager” to head 
Beecham has been under way 
since last November. The 
difficulty of finding a replace- 


ousted because 
financial performance was 
seen as inadequate, has been 
shown in the length of time it 
has taken to replace him 

The beefing up of the board 
with four eminent new non- 
executives is also a sign that 
the company believes it is 
going to stay independent 
There have been bid rumours 
for several months, but Lord 
Keith said yesterday: “If a bid 
was going to appear, it would 
have appeared by now.” 

Mr Bauman, aged 55. has 
experience of consumer prod- 
ucts and the pharmaceutical 



Robert Bauman: Britain's 
second highest paid director. 

and healthcare industries. He 
was with General Foods from 
1958 to 1981, before moving 
to Avco Corporation, which 
was taken over by Textron in 
1985. He is also an outside 
director of McKesson 
Corporation, the leading 
value-added distributor of 
over-the-counter products and 
prescription drugs in the US. 

At the annual meeting last 
month, Lord Keith, who will 
resume his former position as 
non-executive vice-chairman, 
said Beecham's trading profits 
in the first quarter this year 
were ahead of first quarter last 
year and ahead of internal 
budgets. 


UK foreign currency 
reserves drop $4m 

' By Richard Thomson, Banking Correspondent 


Britain's foreign currency 
and gold reserves recorded a 
modest fell last month, in- 
dicating that the Bank of 
England had not intervened to 
support sterling as much as 
had been thoughL 

The underlying drop of $4 
million in reserves was 
considerably less than the $50 
million fell widely predicted 
in the City. 

Analysis had expected the 
Bank of England to offer more 
support to the pound as it 
began to sink against other 
leading currencies last month. 

The fall is the first for seven 
months following a period 
when official reserves have 


risen by £1.2 billion as the 
Bank moved to limit sterling's 
increase against the dollar. 

Analysts regarded the result 
as encouraging evidence that 
the upward pressure on ster- 
ling was abating. 

The downward pressure on 
sterling grew stronger during 
July as a result of continuing 
weak oil prices and the failure 
of Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries to agree 
on a common policy. 

The figure for actual re- 
serves fell by $105 million 
during the month, leaving 
Britain's reserves at $19,083 
billion (£12790 billion) com- 
pared with $19,188 billion. 


Manchester 
Ship Canal 
cuts losses 

The Manchester Ship Canal 
Company, engaged in fighting 
off an unwelcome £37 million 
bid from Highams, the private 
company of Mr John Whit- 
taker, the chairman of Peel 
Holdings, has announced its 
interim results. The move, a 
week a.head of time, is seen as 
a defensive measure. 

Manchester Ship has cut its 
pretax loss to £750,000 for the 
half year to June 30, 1986, 
compared with £1.88 million 
for the same period the pre- 
vious year. Turnover is up at 
£1 1.44 million, compared 
with £10.39 million, with 
operating profits of £791,000 
as opposed to losses of £1.5 
million. 

Port activities and property 
were responsible for the im- 
proved results. Severance pay 
of £2 76 million was paid and 
staff have been reduced by 20 
percent. 

Property assets have been 
revalued at £36 million, an 18 
per cent increase. And prop- 
erty income rose to £938,000, 
compared with £886,000. 


Argentine call for more talks 
before Gatt’s next round 


From Alan McGregor 
Geneva 

More talks are needed be- 
fore the next round of the 
General Agreement on Tariffs 
and Trade (Gate) negotiations, 
SSnor Leopoldo Tettamanti, 
the Argentine trade 
tifltor, said yesterday. 

“If the Punte del Este 
meeting of ministers to launch 
a new round of bade lib- 
eralization negotiations goes 
ahead in the present 
confrontation and lack of 
consensus, the result will be a 
weaker, less creditable Gxtt,” 
SSnor Tettamanti, said. 

• He called either for a re- 
opening of the preparatory 
Brant (Sept) Si o.oo bu ($s.82) l committee negotiations here— 


which ended last Thursday — 
or, alternately, a meeting of 
top government officials at 
Ponte del Este, Uruguay, not 
less than a week before the 
ministerial conference begins 
on September 15. 

He accused the US, Euro- 
pean Economic Community 
and Japan of having tried, and 
failed, to railroad through the 
committee their concept of 
what the new round should 
ran at — ideas only partially 
agreed to by most Gatt 
members. 

“They have created an ad 
hoc system outside Gatt,” he 
said, referring to the 
secretariat's estimate that 
abont 120 negotiated deroga- 


tions from the agreement now 
exist “If, for instance, we do 
not negotiate properly on agri- 
culture in the new round, Gatt 
is doomed. 

“We should have continued 
negotiating until consensus 
evolved, instead of simply 
passing on to the ministers 
three different draff declara- 
tions, many points of which 
were not even discussed. 

“Where services are con- 
cerned, Gait's own group on 
this is not due to report until 
August 28. Services do not 
have to be discussed in Gatt 
alone. They claimed they 
wanted to organize trade for 
the next century and we never 
gc£ down to specifics.” 



GROWTH RATES 

T he average annual compound rate of growth in the 
price of units (on an offer-to-bid basis) of each of our 
capital growth funds between launch and 1st August 1986 
was as follows: 


Fund 

Launched 

Growth 

Capital 

Jan 69 

+ 15.4% p.a. 

International Growth 

Oct 76 

+26.1% p.a. 

American & General 

Apr 78 

+20.0% p.a. 

American Turnaround 

Oct 79 

+22.9% p.a. 

Recovery 

Apr 82 

+25.6% p.a. 

Japan & General 

Feb 84 

+25.7% p.a. 

European 

Feb 86 

+37.3% p.a. 


Every one of these Framlington funds has outperformed the 
FT All-Share Index, the Dow- Jones Industrial Average and 
the Standard and Poors Composite Index. 


"j^ach fund is fully described in the Framlington Unit 


Trust Guide 1986. For a free copy, send us this coupon: 




To: Framlington Unit Management limited, 
FREEPOST; London EC2B 2DL. 

Please send me a copy of the Framlington Unit Trust 
Guide 1986. 


Name. . 

Address 


T 5/8 


m** 









16 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


Dow falls in early trade 


New York (Renter) — 
Shares fell across a broad 
front In early trading yes- 
terday and investors were 
worried that a pattern of sharp 
drops on Mondays, which 
occurred three times oat of 
four fast month, would con- 
tinue this month. 

Analysts also said a slug- 
gish US economy was keeping 
money managers on the side- 
lines and that concern over the 
US Treasury's refinancing, 
which starts today, deterred 
investors. 

The Dow Jones industrial 


average dropped 14.91 points 
to 1748.73 by mid-morning. 

Declining issnses led ad- 
vances by an efght-to-three 
margin on a volume of 15 
million shares. 

UAL Inc fed 2ft to 50*8 in 
active tradings The airline is in 
a dispute with its pilots over 
plans to purchase Frontier 
Airlines. 

Burlington Northern (ex- 
dividend) was down to to 
46ft. 

USX, embroiled in a 
labour dispute, was ft tower at 
15**. 



Aug 

Jd 


Aug 

M 


Awg 

M 


1 

31 


i 

31 


1 

31 

AMR 

5154 

5154 

Fkestone 

34% 

24% 

Pfizer 

67% 

66* 

ASA 

31% 

31% 

FstChKago 

28* 

29V 

Phelps Dga 

16% 

16% 

ARedSip* 

m 

49% 

41% 

4854 

FstlntBncp 
Fa Penn C 

59% 

7% 

GOV 

7% 

hmm 

m 

72 

8% 


354 

3)4 


53V 

53V 

Polaroid 

62% 

61% 


33H 

B1 

FTWachva 

41% 

41* 

PPG tod 

60* 

61% 


1144 

10% 

GAFCorp 

31% 

32% 

PrctrGmbi 

77% 

77% 


1754 

1654 

GTE Carp 

54% 

55 

Pb S E & G 


42* 


9254 

93% 

Gen Can) 

B6% 

67 


Cj 

60V 

W. 1- ■■fct! 

8154 

79* 

80)4 

77% 

GenDy'mcs 
Gen Electric 

70% 

7754 

7054 

73 


%% 

2954 

29% 


1B% 

18V 

■ ^ f 1 

40% 

41 

Am Express 

5844 

87% 

6014 

S7X 

Gen MBs 

89% 

67% 

88% 

68% 


79 

6SV 

77% 

65* 


3V 

3% 

GnPbUtny 

22V 

22% 

Sara Lae 

69 

68 


37 

36% 


3V 

3% 

SFESopac 

29% 

29* 

AmTetepn 

2354 

23% 

Georgia Pac 

30% 

30% 

SchTtwger 

28% 

28* 


5744 

57% 

GtUate 

4354 

44% 

ScoO Paper 

57% 

56 


6* 

654 


36* 

37 

Seagram 

5754 

57V 


11% 

10% 


3054 

30% 

Sears nbek 

43% 

43 

Ashland OU 

55% 

5554 

16% 

16* 

Shell Trans 

47% 

47% 

At Richfield 

45* 

4654 


4854 

48% 

Samar 

SmthktoBk 

51 

51 


33% 

33% 

Gt Att&Tac 

25% 

25% 

9054 

91* 

BkrsTstNY 

47 

47% 

Grtmd 

31 

32% 

Im^alEd 

18V 

18V 


12% 

17% 


7554 

25V 

34% 

35 


3654 

3754 

Gulf & West 

63 

64% 

Sperry Corp 
StdOflOMo 

75V 

75V 

Baik of NY 

6354 

64% 

Henzf-U. 

44* 

45% 

40* 

41* 

Beth Steo) 

Booing 

BseCascda 

7 

5854 

6% 

59% 

Hercules 

H'lett-Pkrd 

5254 

37% 

5254 

39% 

Storing Org 
Stevens jp 

49* 

32* 

49% 

33% 

53V 

46V 

5414 

46% 

Honeywell 

minds 

63% 

25 

62* 

2454 

Sun Comp 
TeJodyne 

48V 

307* 

47* 

311V 

Bg Warner 
eSst Myers 

3354 

80% 

33% 

80 

ingersol 
inland Steel 

55 

16 

55V 

15% 

Tenneco 

Texaco 

37* 

29 

37% 

29% 

BP 

3454 

34% 

IBM 

131% 

13254 

Texas ECor 

25 

25V 


35 

35% 

IMCO 

11% 

11% 

Texas tost 

109% 

109V 


4854 


mt Paper 
tot Terra 

63 

63% 

Texas Utils 

33% 

33V 

IzZzrm 

65% 

66% 

51V 

53V 

Textron 

57 

52 

62% 

63% 

Irving Bank 

50V 

50V 

TravXsCor 

43% 

43* 


1054 

10% 

Jhnsn A Jtm 

6754 

68% 

TRW toe 

96 

95% 

Caturpfltar 

4544 

44% 

Kaiser Alum 

14% 

14% 

UAL Inc 

5254 


Cebnesa 

21054 

212 

m * i 

23% 

23% 

UnferarNV 

209V 


Central SW 

3454 

34% 


83 

84% 

Un Carbide 




2354 

73V 

52% 

64% 

Un Pac Cor 

51% 

51* 


37 

37* 

Kroger 

L.T.V. Corp 

64 

61% 

Utd Brands 

28 

28 

ChmBkNY 

43% 

43% 

2* 

2% 

US Steal 

■#» 

t% 


36% 

3654 

Litton 

7354 

74* 

UtdTectmol 

Chrysler 

35% 

3S% 

Lockheed 

48% 

48% 

Unocal 

16 

16 

CKIcorp 

Cterfc Equip 

50V 

16% 

5254 

17V 

Lucky Sirs' 
ManH'mer 

25 

43 

25 

44V 

•An Walter 
WmvLmbt 

42V 

58% 

42% 

58* 

Coca Cota 

38V 

39 

ManvfleCp 

2* 

2% 

Wefts Fargo 
WstghseB 

99% 

100 


39% 

40V 


46 

46* 

54V 


127% 

130 

Marine MU 

47% 

4754 

weyem-ser 

32% 

32% 

CTmtUaGaa 

39 

39V 

Mrr Marietta 

43% 

43% 

wrintpool 

Woolwoflb 

67V 

67% 

CmbtnEng 

2814 

28% 

Masco 

29)4 

29% 

42% 

43V 

30% 

31 

McDonalds 

67* 

64 

Xerox Corp 


53V 

Cons Eds 

4954 

49% 

McOonnel 

80% 

81* 

Zenith 

22* 

22V 

Cn Nat Gas 

28% 

79 

Mead 

4K% 

48V 





11V 

11% 

Merck 

107% 

106% 




Cntri Data 

20% 

7054 

MtostaMng 

109% 

111 




Coming Gl 

59V 

59V 

Mobil OH 

30% 

30% 

CANADIAN PRICES 

CPC InO 

69 

68 

Monsanto 

65% 

65% 



22K 


2954 

29 

Morgan IP. 

85V 

86% 

AbWbl 

21% 


3754 

37V 

Motorola 

37* 

37V 

Aten Ai m 

39* 

40% 

Part& Kraft 

59% 

59% 

wen Corp 

4954 

49* 

AJgoma Si 

13% 

14 


22 

72 

NLIndstrs 

3% 

3% 

Can Pacific 

14% 

14V 

Delta Air 

42% 

42 

NatDfattra 

32 

32% 

Cominoo 

11% 

11% 

Detroit Ed 

1654 

16* 

Nat Med EM 


22 


22% 

23 


88% 

91% 

NatSmcndt 

9* 

9% 


27% 

27)4 

Disney 

4754 

48% 


7654 

78% 

HdsnBMln 

27* 

27* 

Dow Cham 

5354 

54 

UuT'fe-i 

38V 

38% 

hnasco 

36 

35% 


15V 

14% 

OcddntPet 

23% 

23* 

Imperial Oi 

38% 

37V 

Duka Power 

48% 

48V 

Ogden 

OfinCorp 

3954 

39% 

to Pipe 

38* 

39 

DuPont 

75% 

78 

45 

45V 

Mass-Ferg 

n £ 


Eastern Air 

8% 

8% 

Owens- IB 

36% 

36* 

Ryt Trustee 

Estm Kodak 

5654 

56% 

Pac Gas B 

24% 

2SV 

Seagram 
Steel Co 

79% 

nv. 


64% 

63% 

Pan Am 

5% 

5% 

21% 

22 


79% 

■ TTli 

Penney .LC- 

75* 

78% 

ThmsnN'A‘ 

28% 

28% 

Exxon Corn 

60% 

60* 

Famzoil 

52% 

52 

Wkr Hiram 

3/» 

3754 

Fed Opt So 

BO* 

82% 1 

PBptSCO 

31 

30% 

WCT 

12% 13 

■QjTJTt 





Indonesian think tank 
urges state sell-off 


Jakarta (Reuter) — Most of 
Indonesia's state-owned 
companies should be sold to 
the private sector to make 
them more efficient and 
competitive, the director of a 
government “think, tank” 
urged yesterday. 

Raja Pande Silalahi, studies 
director at the Centre for 
Strategic and International 
Studies, said privatization 
would relieve the government 
of the burden of financing 
these companies and generate 
funds needed for develop- 
ment. 

The Indonesian govern- 
ment has been forced to cut its 
development spending by 22 
per cent in the 1986-87 finan- 
cial year, mainly because of 
falling world oil prices. Oil 
and gas tax revenue accounts 


for 55 per cent of the govern- 
ment budget 

Raja Silalahi said most state 
companies should be sold as 
there was no sign of an end to 
the recession. 

“State expenditure is likely 
to be cut further next year 
after being reduced this year,” 
he was quoted as saying in the 
pro-government newspaper 
Suara Karya yesterday. 

There are 215 stale con- 
cerns, ranging from very large 
businesses with monopoly 
rights like the oil company 
Pertamina and the aircraft 
industry IPTN, to companies 
that compete with the private 
sector in the plantation, bank- 
ing, hotel and other industries. 
A further 700 concerns are run 
by provincial governments. 


APPOINTMENTS 


Wills Group: Mr Derek 
Millis has joined the board as 
a non-cxecutive director. 

Macarthys Pharmaceuti- 
cals: Mr John Baseley be- 
comes group distribution 
director. 

JDK Publicity Consultants: 
Mr Keith Buckfand has been 
made a director. 

International Military Ser- 
vices: Mr NAD ShfurveU be- 
comes managing director, 
succeeding Mr EE Bridged. 

Mr GL Bradbury has been 
made finance director and Mr 
CM Chandler a non-executive 
director. 

Trico Products Corpora- 
tion: Mr Rene M Van Dyck 
joins the board. 

M & W Mack: Mr Chris- 
topher Mack is named as joint 
managing director with Mr 


Mr 


Tony Wolff, succeeding 
Donald Mack. 

United Kingdom Provision 
Trade Federation: Mr Leslie 
Broadhnrst has been elected 
chairman. 

IGE Credit Corporation: 
Mr Peter Schneider becomes 
managing director. 

Grenfell & Colegrave: Mr 
David Cole has been made an 
executive director. 

Rank Theatres: Mr Jim 
Whittell is named managing 
director from September I. 

Rank Screen Advertising: 
Mr Peter Howard Williams 
and Mr Neville Harm be- 
come directors. 

Rank Film Distributors: Mr 
George Hetyer has been made 
a director. 

Rank Audio Visual: Mr 
Peter Ross becomes a 
director. 


Poor sales put tobacco 
groups under pressure 


BRITISH TRANSPORT 
ADVERTISING 

British Transport Advertising (BTAD), a 
division of British Railways Board (BRB) r and 
British Transport Advertising Limited (BTAL), 
a joint subsidiary of BRB and the National 
Bus Company (NBO, market, sell and service 
commercial advertising on sites at BRB 
stations and other BRB property and for NBC 
and other principals. 

BRB and BTAL are seeking offers forthis 
business, ft is hoped to complete new 
arrangements by 30 September 1986, and 
accordingly, interested parties are requested 
to write to the address below no later than 
15 August 1986. 

Mr. J. B. Mander 
British Railways Board 
Room 181 

222 Marylebone Road 
LONDON NW16JJ 

Any further information will be supplied 
solely at the discretion of BRB. 

THIS ADVERTISEMENT DOES NOT AND IS NOT INTENDED TO FORM 
THE BASIS Of ANY OFFER OF THE UNDERTAKING OR ASSETS OF 
BTAD OR BTAL. 

-L 


By Derek Harris 
Industrial Editor 

Cigarette sales are plunging 
faster than last year and the 
plight of British manufac- 
turers is being aggravated by 
increasing imports. Fears are 
mounting that more jobs in 
the industry coukl be at risk as 
manufacturers look hard at 
their production capacity. 

A price increase, pro! 
adding 2p to a packet of 
cigarettes, is expected soon, 
despite the sales slump. It will 
push a number of brands to 
the psychological barrier of 
£1.50 and some leading ones 
beyond it 

Benson & Hedges king size 
special filter, Britain's best- 
selling cigarette made by 
Gallaher, is already retailing at 
£1.50. 

Imperial Tobacco, now part 
of Hutson Trust, has already 
announced an increase of 2p 
toa pack of five or six small ci- 
gars and lp to each panale 11a 
or half-corona size, from Au- 
gust 18. 

Gallaher, the second largest 
British tobacco manufacturer 
after Imperial, whose Hamlet 
cigars are Britain's most popu- 
lar brand, has notified retail- 
era that it will be following 
Imperial's lead on September 
3 . Other manufacturers are 
expected to do 
the same. 

Hamlet, which accounts for 
four out of every 10 cigars sold 
in Britain, will cost 2p more at 
£1.22 for five. The increases 
are blamed on higher costs. 

Cigar sales, which have 


CIGARETTE 



757677 7879808182 8384 BS 


escaped taxation increases in 
the past two Budgets, are 
showing some signs of recov- 
ery after declines every year in 
the present decade. In the first 
five months of this year, 
overall sales rose by an es- 
timated 1 per cent compared 
with the same period last year. 

In the first five months of 
this year cigarette sales are 
estimated to have dropped 4.7 
per cent compared with the 
same period last year. 

Last year overall cigarette 
sales were down by just over 1 
per cent, although the trough 
deepened in the middle of the 
year in the wake of the 
Budget's tax increase. 

This year, the day-to-day 
sales graph plunged most after 
the Budget, which added lip 
to a packet of 20 cigarettes. 
There have been trade reports 
of sales dedining by 7 per cent 
or more but the sales pattern 
could improve later this year 
as smoko's shrug off further 
taxation ‘ 


But it looks as if overall 
sales could drop at least 3 per 
cent and quite likely more by 
the year’s end. 

British manufacturers are 
also under increasing pressure 
from the growth of cheap 
imports, mostly from West 
Germany, whose manufac- 
turers are using up some of 
their excess production in 
supplying low-price own-label 
cigarettes to British super- 
markets. 

Own-label imports are 
thought now to account for 7 
per cent of the cigarette mar- 
ket compared with 5 per cent 
last year. Imports overall 
probably accounted for at- 
least 9 per cent of the market 
last year so are now estimated 
to be running at more than 10 
percent. 

The British manufacturers 
have fought bade with their 
own cheaper brands and the 
low-price sector is now es- 
timated to account for about a 
fifth of the total cigarette 
market. 

The only growth sector in 
cigarettes is the longer-than- 
king-size and Gallaher is re- 
launching its Benson . & 
Hedges Longer Length brand 
as Benson & Hedges 100s, at 
the same price as its special 
filter king size. 

Imperial, which leads the 
market with its Players 
Superidngs, has also recently 
launched a 100s version of its 
Regal brand. Overall these 
longer cigarettes now have 19 
per cent of the market 



At the Opec talks: Bdkacem Nabi, the Algerian Energy 
Minister (left) and FawzI Sbalcshulti ©f Libya 



crisis conference 


Geneva (Reuter) - As 
Opec’s 78th conference began 
its second week yesterday, the 
media circus that has charted 
the oil producers' rise and fall 
over 26 years was dwindling 
rapidly. Many newsmen were 
packing up and leaving. 

“We used to be very keen on 
coming here when Opec was 
in a crisis, but it has been in 
crisis for so long it’s difficult to 
maintain interest with viewers 
back home,” one American 
broadcaster said. 

The conference, held at the 
Intercontinental Hotel in Ge- 
neva, began with more than 
150 journalists and television 
crews jostling for a word from 
the 13 minister-delegates. 
Now only 20 reporters 
remain. 

In the 1970s, as oil [rices 
soared, more than 300 news- 
men regularly followed the 
Opec saga. 

Reporting on Opec’s activ- 
ities tends to reflect the health 
of the oil market. When prices 
are high and petrodollars sup- 
port their national economies, 
oil ministers willingly speak to 
reporters. 

But the price of crude oil has 
dropped since last winter from 
about $30 a barrel to under 
$10 and the ministers — many 
of them representing poor 
nations — rarely emerge from 
their luxurious hotel suites. 

When they do, they are 
usually surrounded by body- 
guards and toss no more than 
word or two over their 
shoulders before disappearing 
into limousines. 

Sheikh Ahmed Zaki Ya- 
mani, representing Saudi Ara- 


• MICROLEASE: The com- 
pany has set up a subsidiary in 
Dublin as part its plans for 
expansion into Europe. 
Microlease Lid will begin trad- 
ing on September 1 and will be 
headed by Mr Brendan Faired. 

• HODGSON HOLDINGS: 
The company has agreed terms 
for the acquisition of Cooks 
Funeral Service of Chesham, 
Bucks and Malcolm Jones Fu- 
neral Service in Berkbampstead, 
Hem. Joint consideration is 
£300.000. The two firms should 
add 500 funerals a year (about 9 
per cent) to the Hodgson totaL 
The takeover will not be com- 
pleted in time to affect the 
October results. 

• AUSTRALIA AND NEW 
ZEALAND BANKING 
GROUP: The company has 
announced an offer by » its 
wholly-owned subsidiary ANZ 
Holdings (New Zealand) to 
acquire all the share capital in 
ANZ Banking Group (New. 
Zealand) (ANZ NZ). The ANZ 
Group holds 74.2 per cem of 
ANZ (NZ) with the balance held 
by the New Zealand public 
ANZ Group intends to maintain 
local incorporation and an effec- 
tive local board in New Zealand, 
with a strong non-executive 
emphasis. Holders in ANZ (NZ) 
are being offered an outright 
cash payment of NZ$3.75 a 
share or 7 ANZ Group shares 
for every 10 4NZ (NZ) shares. 


bia, Opec’s largest oil 
producer, wields massive in- 
fluence in the group and is 
consequently the most sought- 
after minister. Few newsmen 
penetrate the security 
surrounding him. 

Many reporters have given 
up trying to breach the wall of 
silence from delegates de- 
jected by Opec’s failure to 
reach enforceable agreements 
on how much oil to produce. 

On the first (fay of the 
conference, television camera- 
men fought for the best shots 
of ministers. Now a crew from 
the United Arab Emirates and 
a local Swiss team can enjoy as 
many exclusives as they like. 

The delegates aim to find 
ways of boosting prices by 
cutting Opec’s production. 
But proposed output quotas 
calculated by Dr Subroto, the 
Indonesian oil minister, were 
rejected by several ministers 
at the first session. 

Led by Dr Subroto, some 
members offered voluntary 
cuts in their own production. 
But others rejected these too. 
By Saturday it was dear there 
was no chance of agreement 

The ministers are hoping to 
reduce output of more than 20 
million barrels per day (bpd) 
by two million bpd. They are 
expected eventually to reach 
an agreement but oil traders 
in Geneva said it was unlikely 
to be enough to arrest the slide 
in oil prices. 

“They’ll probably agree to 
meet again here in a couple of 
months and have another 
conference,” one delegate 
said. 


COMPANY NEWS 


Accepting holders would receive 
ANZ Group shares with a value 
(asat August l)of$3,80ashare. 
The shares will rank equally in 
all respects with the existing 
ordinary shares of AusSl.OO of 
ANZ Group, including the right 
to the final dividend for the year 
ending September 30. The for- 
mal offer should be posted on 
August. 22. and the offer will 
remain open until September 
26. If all the group shares offered 
are taken up. New Zealand 
ownership lu ANZ Group will 
rise from 1,7 per cent to over 9 
percent 

• BARRIE INVESTMENTS 
& FINANCE: The board has 
entered into conditional agree- 
ments for the disposal of its 
property at 187/211 St John 
Street London. fcCI. The prop- 
erty was auctioned on June 18 
and the highest bid was £1.95 
million. A higher offer of £2.05 
million was received later, 
which Barrie's board has de- 
cided must also be accepted. It 
has entered into two agreements 
for the ale of the property, both 
conditional upon Barrie 
shareholders' approval. Pro- 
ceeds of the sale after discharg- 
ing the £719.000 mortgage On 
the property and associated 
costs will be used to meet cash 
and working capital require- 
ments resulting from Barrie’s 
increased business. 

• FORMTNSTOfc The 


Traders in 
HKtold 
to tidy up 

From Stephen Leather, 
Hong Kong 

Hong Kong’s stock ex- 
change traders are likely to be 
told to smarten their image 
before the Queen’s visit to the 
crown colony in October. 

Overseas visitors to the 
gyghan g e which opened in 
April have been mm plaining 


apm- 


that the traders look shabby 
compared with their new com- 
puter terminals. 

The exchange sent ont 900 
questionnaires asking brokers 
if the Boor traders should wear 
a shirt, jacket and tie instead 
of jeans. 

Only • 250 forms were re- 
turned, but more than three- 
quarters said yes and it now 
looks certain that the casual 
image will be banned. 

“It is all part of omr plan to 
np^ade the exchange's image, 
especially with oar grand 
opening coming up in 
October/’ said Dr Anita 
Leung, for the exchange. 

“We have quite a lot iff 
overseas visitors who travel 
around the world and so have 
seen many of the exchanges. 
They think our trading haO is 
most impressive but some of 
them siggested that the floor 
traders should pnt oa a shirt 
and tie instead of jeans.” 

The “smarten up” : 
arises at a time when many of 
the 615 members of the stock 
exchange are finding it diffi- 
cult to make money, even 
though the Hong Kong stock 
market reached a record high 
last week. 

With the banks and finan- 
dal institutions now doing 
most of the trading on the new 
computerized exchange, the 
independent brokers are hav- 
ing to settle for crumbs. 

The chairman of the 
Kang Stockbrokers 
atian, Mr David Tung, is 
predicting that the number of 
actively trading stockbrokers 
could soon fall to 300. 

He says that only 300 can be 
trading profitably, even with 
the average tarnover of 
HKS477 million (£40 Bullion), 
and a farther 200 are just 
about breaking even. The rest 
are in the red, he says. 

Mr Tung has prod need fig- 
ures which show that the 
minimum costs for each trad- 
ing stockbroker are abont 
HKS3.000 a day. 


□any purchased for cancellation 
X500 ordinary shares at 200p on 
August I. This represents about 
0,07 per cent and leaves 
3 .355.744 shares in issue.- - 

• JOHN CBOWTHER 
GROUP: The assets of While 
Heather Flooreoverings have 
been acquired from Gourtaulds 
Distributors for £500.000 cash. 
Maydella Manufacturing has 
been acquired fin* £350.000 
cash, with a maximum, perfor- 
mance-related deferred price of 
£375,000. Maydella makes 
children's wear for Marks and 
Spencer and will form part of 
Crowther's clothing division. 

• AMBROSE INVESTMENT 
TRUST: At dose of business on 
July 31 the approximate asset 
value of each capital share was 
476,79p compared whh 503,76p 
m June: 

• COMMERCIAL BANK OF 
THE NEAR EAST: For the six 
months, to Tune 30,' gross in- 
come was £1.508,734 
(£1.268.011). Pretax profit was 
£497.408 (£417278). Tax was 
£186.528 (£175.000). 

• SCAPA GROUP!: The group 
has increased its holding in 
Textil Guissona, a Spanish 
industrial textile company, from 
16 -5 to 98 per cent The cost of 
the investment is £1.7 million. 

• GLOBE INVESTMENT 
TRUST: First quarter to June 
30- Pretax profit £6_3 million 
(£5.96 million). 


( TEMPUS ~~J 


STC’s way ahead 
looks unclear 


In the absence of a press 
conference, it must be as- 
sumed that STC expects the 
1986 interim figures to speak 
for themselves. 

Certainly, they were very 
good, although at the operat- 
ing level the improvement 
was only IS per cent The 
doubling at the pretax level 
was achieved by a halving of 
net interest charges to £10.9 
million and distortion caused 
by the inclusion of excep- 
tional items. 

STC is dominated by Inter- 
national Computers, which 
. accounted for 63 per cent of 
turnover and 74 per cent of 
operating profit Operating 
profit increased to £A3J. mil- 
lion compared with £26.3 
million last year, despite a 
lack of buoyancy in the 
American markets. 

Such a large improvement 
in I CL implies a deterioration 
in other areas, and it appears 
that communications has not 
had a particularly good fust 
half; with turnover down 24 . 
per cent Sales of trans- 
mission products dropped, 
while Submarine Systems, 
which is traditionally irregu- 
lar in its trading pattern, had 
no deliveries on major 
contracts. 

After containing losses in 
components and maintaining 
profits at 1985 levels for the 
electronics distribution busi- 
ness, both difficult markets, 
STC must now consider 
where it goes from here. 

Although ICL is the biggest 
computer manufacturer in 
Britain, and can count on 
moral support from Local 
Government bodies for 
whom it produces specialized 
software, there is no formal 
commitment from Govern- 
ment to support the domestic 
manufacturer and there is no 
doubt it is being squeezed by 
foreign competition. 

In telecommunications, it 
wifl have some continuing 
business from TXE4E, but as 
exchanges are gradually re- 
placed with Systems X and Y, 
STC can expect this part of its 
profits to dwindle to a 
vanishing point by the end of 
the decade. 

In submarine communica- 
tions, it is the dominant 
supplier, and this can be 
expected to be the growth 
area for the company on a 10- 
year time frame. 

. Defence, on - the other 
hand, will continue to be 
.difficult, despite a small 
profit increase at the interim - 
stage, while the expected 
recovery in electro-compo- 
nents has receded, to r?87. . . 

■Full sear profits of £120 
million imply a multiple of 
1Z5, which may reflect STCs 
product weakness in some of 
its main businesses, but con- 
tains no bid premium. 


The details have still to be 
finalized, but it appearethm 
while 4 per cent of STCs 
shares will remain with ITT, 
the American telecoms com- 
pany. 20 perc ent is likely to 
pass from ITT into the hands 
of CGE, the French state- 
owned electronics company. 
Whether it will remain there, 
or whether this will be a 
staging post in a game of 
"pass the pared", perhaps 
leading up to a bid. is unclear. 

GEC has already declared 
it is not interested in bidding, 
but Siemens and Eriksson in 
Europe and Japan's Fujitsu 
could be. 

As Patrick Wellington, an- 
alyst at stockbrokers Wood 
Mackenzie says, “It offers a 
good back door for entry into 
the British telecoms and com- 
puter systems markets.” 

Rush & Tomkins 

If Rush & Tomkins had 
aimed to frustrate inquiring 
investors, it deserves 
congratulation. Yesterday it 
released its results for the 15 
months to March, but failed 
to provide the comparative 
figures for the same period of 
the previous year, giving 
instead the results for the 12 
months to December 31, 
1984. 

It also declined to give a 
breakdown of profits to show 
the respective contributions 
of its varied activities, which 
take in building, civil en- 
gineering and property 
development and invest- 
ment Further, it did not give 
borrowing figures 

For what it was worth, 
pretax profits were £3.74 
million, implying a contribu- 
tion of only £580,000 in the 
three months to March. Rush 
& Tomkins blames the slow- 
down on about six unprofit- 
able construction contracts. 

Mr Nigrf Dunnett the new 
finance director, says there 
will not be any more such 
contracts. He must have good 
reasons for making this asser- 
tion as life in the building 
industry is notoriously 
unpredictable. 

Performance m the three 
months to March was worse 
below the line than above it 
The tax bill rose sharply* 
parrtly because of the change 
in the year end which cost 
£500,000 in extra corporation 
tax. . 

As a result there was an 
after-tax loss, worth 6.2p a 
share, in the three months to 
March. For the 15 months 
earnings per share were only 
!4.6p against 22.6p for the 12 
months to December 1984. 

The bad news did not stop 
there. Reflecting a larger 
number of shares in issue, net 
asset backing fell from 377p 
to 344p a share. This leaves 


the shares at 273p, up 3p. 
trading on a 20 per cent 
discount to net assets and on 
a historic multiple of 1 9 times 
stated earnings. On both 
counts they look exposed. 

In its defence the coin pan} 
can point to the number oi 
developments due for 
completion in the current 
vear. including its Aldersgate 
Street site in London. It 
promises to announce a new 
American partner for its 
property activities on the 
other side of the Atlantic in 
ihe next few weeks 

Those prospects may be 
enough to satisfy 1 the less 
curious type of investor. 

P eel Holdings 

Peel Holdings, the retail 
warehouse developer, is dis- 
appointed with the revalua- 
tion of its retail portfolio 
which showed only a £7.6 
million increase for the year 
to March 31. 

The company expected 
more but a bullish view on 
rental growth in the sector, 
and therefore yields, kept the 
figure down. Peel expects 
yields to fall and rent reviews 
to bring in higher levels in the 
next few years. 

The retail property com- 
pany is trading at a loss owing! 
to the high cost of borrow- 1 
ings. now refinanced with a 
£35 million debenture ati 
favourable rates, compared 
with property yields. 

The acquisition for £2.4 
million of the Stonehouse 
Investment company with 
£19.3 million of assets and 
£13 million of borrowings 
gives Pec! useful gross in- 
come of £4 million a year as 
weil as handy tax losses. 

The land holding com- 
pany, which will be revalued 
nexi year, is expected to turn 
in large capital profits for 
19S7 as it continues to sell 
land with planning per- 
mission. The proceeds from 
sales are being reinvested in 
land with hope value for 
development. Peel has 250 
acres of green belt land in 
strategic locations as well as 
539 acres where no zoning 
exists. 

The company knows that ill 
it is to maintain its phenom- 
enal growth record — asset 
value has increased by 19.4 
per cent this year to 450p per 
share— it has to hedge its bets 
over the development of 
retail warehouses. 

Earnings per share have 
nearly doubled from 19.94p 
to 32.89p. The dividend is 
showing a modest rise from 
8p to 8.75p for the full year. 
The market reacted by knock- 
ing 5p off the share price to 
495p. 


‘Pound will fall 15% against mark 9 


British exports could re- 
cover markedly, as sterling 
declines by a further 15 per 
.cent against the mark over the 
next 18 months, the National 
Westminster Bank says in its 
report. Economic and Finan- 
cial Outlook, published today. 

Other main forecasts by Mr 
David Kern, the manager and 
chief economist, are: 

• British base rates at 9 per 
cent at the end of the year and 
9% per cent at the end of 1987. 

• The pound ax $1.40 and 
DM2.94 at end of the year and 


Since a precipitate decline 
in real interest rates is one of 
the main mechanisms which 
might trigger an inflationary 
upsurge, Mr Kern thinks it 
will be necessary for real 
British rates to remain fairly 
high over the next few years, 
both in relation to historical 
levels and when compared 
with rales in other major 
countries. 

With British inflation likely 
to edge upwards slightly next 
year, once the impact of 
cheaper oil and lower mort- 


S1J2 and DM2.69 atthe end gage, rates, wears off nominal 


of 1987 

• Britain's real GDP to grow 
by 2.5 per cent this year and 3 
percent next. 

• The dollar at DM2.10 and 
Y155 at end of the year and 
DM2.04 and Y149 at the end 
of 1987. 


interest rates seem unlikely to 
fall below.9 per cent. 

Meanwhile, the British 
economy is still weak, and 
further expansionary mea- 
sures are dearly justified. 
However, Mr Kern remains 
convinced that the most effec- 


tive and prudent way of 
stimulating demand in the 
United Kingdom is by com- 
bining a moderate, decline in 
the exchange rate and a more 
expansionary fiscal stance, 
while keeping real interest 
rates fairly high. 

The massive US external 
deficit and the corresponding 
large surpluses of Japan and 
Germany are threatening 
world economic stability. 

The sizeable fall in the 
dollar that has already oc- 
curred will eventually reduce, 
but seems unlikely to elimi- 
nate, these huge imbalances. 
Powerful protectionist pres- 
sures will inevitably intensify 
and Mr Kern emphasizes that 
radical measures will be 
needed to deal with these 
problems. 


Futures firm left out 
of SRO members 9 list 

By Lawrence Lever 


LHW Futures, the private- 
client futures firm, is not 
included in the list of 142 
firms which have so far been 
accepted for membership by 
the Association of Futures 
Brokers and Dealers, the pro- 
posed self-regulating organi- 
zation For the commodity and 
financial futures market. 

LHW, has in the past .been 
heavily criticized for using 
high-pressure sales tech- 
niques. 

Mr Alistair Annand, chief 
executive of the AFBD, made 
it dear, however, that yester- 
day's list of acceptances repre- 
sents only the “first tranche” 
of the membership, and added 


that “no one has so far been 
refused membership out- 
right”. 

Mr Brian Edgeley, the new 
managing director of LHW, 
who was appointed in March 
this year, said yesterday that 
he was not concerned that 
LHW, one of the initial 174 
applicants for AFBD member- 
ship. . had not yet been 
accepted. 

“It was always .reckoned 
that as our business is in- 
dependent and private-client, 
the question of reviewing our 
application would take longer 
than the dealing-type opera- 
tions which deal only with 
professionals," he said. 


Bahrain to set up SE 


Letts Green in 
Gilbert bid 

. Lens Green Estate is offer- 
ing 15p each for outstanding 
shares in Gilbert House 
investments. There is an alter- 
native of £l of Letts Green 6 
per cent unsecured loan note 
1990. 

Utts Green, which is owned 
by family interests of Mr TF 
Parreu. the chairman of Gil- 
bert House, already owns 
30 99 per cent of Gilbert. Mr 
and Mrs Parrett own a further 
49 33 per cent Mrs RJ Camp- 
bwl, a director of both compa- 
nies, will accept for her 3.12 
percent. 

The offer is conditional on 
acceptances being received to 

*** Letts Green stake 
above 90 per cent. 


Bahrain (Reuter) - The 
Bahrain cabinet has decided 
to set up a formal stock 
exchange, according to Gulf 
bankers, to stimulate local and 
foreign investment 

The Gulf News Agency 
quoted the Development an^i 
industry Minister. Yousef Ah- 
med Shirawi, as saying, the 
necessary legal steps would be 
taken soon. 

Bahrain is the financial 
centre of the Gulf with about 
1 70 banks, but its stock mar- 
ket consists of a loose network 
of brokers dealing in shares of 
local companies by telephone. 


The, move comes as 
Bahrain s economy is suffer- 
ing because of depressed oil 
pnees. 

But bankers said a regulated 
nock exchange could boost 
the island’s income from ser- 
vice-related business. 

-sssksms 

SUSS* in 

But companies from the 
Gulf reaon might be listed 
later and, if the market be- 
came established, bankers 
international companies 
might join. 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN. 


B0CL 

Citibank Sgvlngst, 
Consohdated Crds. 
Continental Trust. 


C<HJperative Bank 

C. Hoare & Co.. „ 


. 1000 % 

..mow 

. 1000 % 

-10.75% 

. 1000 % 

- 10 . 00 % 

.. 10 . 00 % 

1000 % 


Hong Kong & ShBnohaUJOOW 

Uftfs Bank...... .10.00% 

Nat Westminster l 1000 % 

Rojnl Bank oi Scotland 10X10% 

10j00% 

CWsnk NA. 

LLJjggpg* Km. 

















™ >!«■ 

m ^ 


THE TIMES 


iDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


y 3ihe STOCK MARKET REPORT 

iclear Ibstock Johnsen jumps 8p on 




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aiivan I ha* 
l’* Si i 

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< 4 E4*«r >-i 

.'I [ViTi^jvi 

»riV i- !«*-*» K ;»i 

*i?xian\S 

ftl t 1 ' fenMiny. 

ii .t. 

EMii'y 1 it> ib ii 

Vliu*s:,'tt an 

t*Am NAiwJ 

v "ll v§ 

fir rtii»Y mfii 

oftfiiSt! Lun>- 

lurtm 1 

om kins 

fcnikin* h*<! 
»Air irttfutunf 
I doow’s 

VfYUUUv »! 
till* W-r thr h 
th Vuii tailf,! 
• irtmifVhtli*? 
4W rrhoi ««f 
w*r c tv uw 
all* f« itw I ? 
Jf»Tmhrr .1 1 . 

IWd lit fi*f .1 
jmfftt to 
ctvntnhuti.>n^ 
tmtifv which 
inf, mil rn- 
id pioprti* 
•rut mt wi- 
ll did not $n e 
iw» 

t «*\ *mlh. 
*m l * 4 

Ml I'uMiihu 

ah.».«V> m ihr 
sMftftH KunIs 
MW Ihr - 
mi 

kki owtia.it 
HUKil thi -wa 
at. wy* rt-rri 
nuff %u»n 

Lift* lh>' JVV • 

» w»r hi. :«!>.:*• 

AwirjM 


vv-.- • 

* ft ' 


hopes of bid by Steetley 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


TSB, the bank that 
likes to say maybe 


By Michael Clark 

Shares of Ibstock Johnsen, In June. Ibstock raised £23 


•S r /-\ the facing brick manufacturer, 
jumped Bp to 176p yesterday 
. amia growing speculation that 

• ’ >■ -i."., ■* the long-awaited bid the mar- 

’ [ ^ket had oeen pinning its hopes 
■:r li)L !," ;v on was on the way. 

■ ‘.^V Word is that Steetley, the 
, ;1: 'v ; building products group 
.. !p * fc which itself escaped a £115 
* Pv '*> million bid from Hepworth 
•' Ceramic in 1982 after it was 
v blocked by the Monopolies 
j* and Mergers Commission, is 
» , *'■ planning to make an offer. 

biding. Dealers say that Steetley is 
ready to make an opening bid 
of at least 200p a share which 
.i would value Ibstock at more 
’ > "f than £160 million. 

v; ^ Burton Group, down 2p 
v - t J f at 276p, may be ready to sell 
51 Harnkys, the toy shop 
chain it acquired with 
.. n.^Debenhams. Sir Philip 

• r, .. Harris's Harm Queensway 

■ has expressed interest, but 
1 1 suspect it will go to Wool- • 

- . ^ - worth. Analysts 
" believeHamieys could com- 
. maud a price df almost £20 

million. 

r "'^ ■ ' 


which were referred to the 
v Monopolies and Mergers 
' - Commission. This enabled 

-•'C.-k - Ibstock to build tip its de- 
' !l '. v-. fences. Red! and later dropped 

• 07 ^ out of the bidding before the 
■ ?• ^ Monopolies and Mergers 

- •• -^Commission was able to*de- 
' cj liver its verdicL 

London Brick was later 
J " • >. given the go-ahead to bid, but 
also decided to drop out of the 

• *..■>: running and was ‘later swal- 

lowed up itself by Hanson 
• r Trust 


million by way of a rights issue 
to help to reduce debts that 
were then running at about 55 
per cent of shareholders* 
funds. Assets are reckoned to 
be worth at least 220p a share. 

Mr Ian Madellan, finance 
director at Ibstock, confirmed 
he had heard the rumours, but 
added: “We’ve had no con- 
tact There is no reason why 
anyone should build up a 
stake." Steetley eased 2p to 
471 p. 

The rest of the equity 
market started the second leg 
.of the account on a flat note, 
still overshadowed by eco- 
nomic and political worries. 
The Government’s agreement 
to proceed with sanctions sent 
ashudder through share prices 
and sent investors scurrying 
for cover. 

Prices were allowed to drift 
with jobbers unwilling to pick 
up further stock- The FT 30- 
share index finished at its low 
for the day, 11.9 down at 
1,261.5, while its broader- 
based counterpart, the FT-SE 
100, fell 16.4 to 1.545.4. 

Those companies with 
South African interests were 
all badly bit Standard Char- 
tered lost 10pat714p,Redritt 
& Colman lOp at 7S9p as 


EQUITIES 


AnaBa Secs (fl 5 p) 
AfifavJU (ISSPI 
BB8 Design (67p) 
Beavweo fi45p) 

Borland n2Sp) 

Chelsea Man (l25p) 
Coated Electrodes (84p) 
Cofine (110p) 

Evans Hallshaw (120p) 
Retcher Dennys (70p) 
6T Management (21QpJ 
Guthrie Corn n50p) 
Harrison l(150p) 


Indicas rabasad 
dan 1 = 100 

.SOifflMcOuastream 


I FTA ALL SHARE] 


■;Blue C&clolll 
Imlustri^s-pil 


Lour ho dipped through the 
200p level to dose 5p lower at 
I98p. Bine Circle, the subject 
of several bearish circulars 
recently, continued to lose 
ground with an 8p fell to 568p. 

Qil shares attempted to rally 
towards - the dose as the buzz 
went round the market that 
the Opec conference in Ge- 
neva was close to an agree- 
ment on production levels. 
There were suggestions that 
output had been resticted to 
16 million barrels a day. The 
price of US crude oil on the 
spot market responded with a 
rise of S1.50 to $11 but 
conditions remained nervous. 

BP -finished 2p lower at 
571p, after 578p, Ultramar 3p 


RECENT ISSUES 


H9le Ergonom (92p) 
Hughes Food.(20p) 

Lon Utd inv (330 p) 

M6 Cash A C (lOOp) 
Morgan &enfsn (S«k>) 
OmnJtsch (33p) 

Shield (72p) 

SmaSbone (I65p) 
Soundtracks (40p) 
Stanley Leisure IllOp) 
TV-AM (130p) 

Tenby Inds (I12p) 
Thames TV fi90p) 
Tfcbet & Britten (I20p) 
Trees ,2H%i/I 2016 *37 
Yefverton (38p) 


93 
24<» 
73 -a 
87 
433-3 
34 
140 
160 
37 

122-2 
150 'a -1 
134 
224 
128+3 
£40 

<4 


at I58p and Enterprise Oil Ip 
to lOlp. But Shell held on to 
an early lead, dosing 8p up at 
81 Ip. 

The breweries were shaken 
by the decision to refer the tied 
house system to the Monopo- 
lies and Mergers Commission. 
Bass dropped 25p to 740p, 
Allied Lyons 5p to 318p, 
GreeaaD Whitley 4p to 179p 
and Whitbread 8p to 2S8p. 

Boots met a few sellers, 
failing lOp to 243p. There is 
talk the group is on the verge 
of a big- US acquisition which 
is likely to dispel recent bid 
speculation. But dealers fear it 
wiU be partly financed by a 

^fheweaker pound left gilts 


UrdOCk (83p) 

WirxJsnxxy nOSp) • • 
YeNerton (38p) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 

Abaco Inv F IP 
Barker & Dobson N IP 
Cokirea F/P 
Dataserv N IP 
Erskine Hse F/P 
Expamer F/P 
L^h Interests F/P 
Top Value N/P 
Wight Collins F/P 
yorismount N/P 

(issue price In brackets). 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


Throe Month Sterling Open '• 

Sap 86 mT6 

Doc 68 90.39 

Mar 87 9039 . . 

Jun87 N/T 

Sep 87 — N/T 

Dec 87 N/T 

Prewous day's tote) open interest 14483 
Three Month Eurodolar 

Sop8S 9353 

Dec 86 9353 

Mar 87 9344 

Jut 87 9324 - 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


it** *.v 

r mamc ■ • 

S mm 4 

prWyi 

HRS • 

mlflVheiir 

mi*** 


US Treasury BonrT 

Sep 86 97-tO 

Dec 86.. N/T 

Mar 87 N/T 


Short Oft 

Sep 86— 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 


70041 


sepaa 

Dec 88 

Mar 87 ‘ 

JunB7 
FT-SE 100 

Sep 86 

DecBS — 


Previous day's total open Mvsst 19165 
8354 9351 9354 627 

9355 9351 9354 894 

93.45 9341 93.45 147 

9324 9323 9326 39 

Previous day’s total open interest 7956 
97-10 96-19 9TCC 2870 

96-14 0 

0 

Previous day's total open Inmest 1012 
10046 100-35 . 10045 - 636 

• 10046' O' V 

10045 0 

Previous day's total opanlnreradt 13346 
11926 11940 119-26 6483 

11606 . 119-06 119^21 ' 10 ‘ 

119^15 0 

119-16 0 

Pmvkxn day’s total qperrintereM 2487 
158L00 15650. 15655 358 

15920 15920 15920 1 


day's range 
August 4 

N York 14660-1.4780 
Montreal 2226622419 
Ams'darn3.4290-3.4678 
Brussels 6295-63.77 
C onger 71.4634-112796 
DtSfcf 1.0875-1.1111 
Frankfurt 3.0427-327^ 
Ustxxi 
Madrid 
MMsn 
Oslo 
Parts 
St'khtm 
Tokyo 
Vienna 
Ziach 



0494L46prem 
.028-O27prBm 
154-1 54 prem 
19-13prem 
25S-5spram 

-7^-ntprem 
60-160<te 
35-60db 
par-Sdli 
45S-5pram 
254 -2Y, pram 
%-SSprem . 
IX-Tprem 


121 - 128 pn»m 

0.73-0.60prsm 

3 'A- 3 %prem 

45-37pmm 

45b-2Kprem 

4Vb-3Sprem 
175-455<fc 
125-185rfla . 

4 - 8 dis 
12 %- 13 %<fc 

1%-%prem 


■ 2% -2% pram 6^-8%pt 

%-ssprern 15S -%pra 

IX-lprem 35fr23ipr 

106% pram 2&X-23K prem 

-' 1%-1Xpram/ . . . 3t03Hprere _ 

Stsdfcg Indexcowpwd nhli197S nee dram et 707 (dey^i range T0.7-ri4^. 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Argentina wstrar 
Aus&aSa doter — 

Bahrain (finer 

Brazil cruzado ' — 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


12490-12516 
243202.4366 
0L5S5WL559O 
_ 2020-2022 
0.7090-0.7296 
72190-72590 
1962020020 
11.438-11.447 
_ 18.45-1825 


Austraaa 
Canada _ 
D eaden . 



Freed Rata Starting Export Finance 
Scheme IV Average reference rm tor 
interest period June 4, 1986 to 
July 1, 1986 Inclusive: 9-824 per 
cent 


out in the cold. Losses 
stretched to nearly £% at the 
longer end of the market. 

The decision of the Irish 
government to devalue the 
pum by 8 per cent on the 
European ■ Monetary System 
may have been good news for 
■ Irish exporters, but it turned 
out to be bad news for. their 
share prices. 

Dublin felt that the recent 
slide in the value of sterling 
and the dollar on the world's 
currency markets had made 
Irish exporters uncompetitive. 
Almost 50 per cent oflrdancTs 
total exports are earmarked 
for Britain, or the US. Irish 
stocks quoted on the London 
stock market were marked 
lower. 

Board changes at Scapa 
Group, manufacturer of 
specialist machines for the 
papa* industry, means a 
reratmg may be on the way 
for the shares, down 2p at 
496p. Mr Tom Manners 
has resigned as non-executive 
finirma^ being replaced 
by Mr Ralph Goodall as exee- 
Biive chairman, while Mr 
Jim Haythor nth waite takes 
over as chief executive. 

Dealers think some exciting 
tunes could be ahead. 

Bank of Ireland led the way 
with a fell of 17p to 2l0p, 
followed by Allied Irish 
Banks, I5p to 240p, Cement 
Roadstone, 6p to 108p, and 
Jefferson Smnrfit, Sp to 235p. 

Marier Estates held steady 
. at 530p despite the news that 
Mr Terry Ramsden’s Glen 
International, the privately 
owned investment house, had 
bought an extra 287,500 
shares in the company taking 
its total holding to 767,500 
shares, or 1 5.38 per cent of the 
totaL 

. Market men reckon that Mr 
Ramsden's decision to invest 
in Mailer is a shrewd move 
and that the Marier share price 
is destined for better things in 
die months ahead. 

Over on the Unlisted 
Securities Market, two new- 
comers managed to open with 
small premiums in first-time 
dealings despite the depressed 
conditions in the rest of the 
market. Coline International, 
manufacturer and supplier of 
electrical accessories, opened 
at 1 13p following a placing of 
2.48 million shares at 1 lOp. 
The shares eventually closed 
atl!2p. 

Shares in Qnrioitecli, a Start- 
up venture which is develop- 
ing a revolutionary new 
packaging machine for foods, 
were placed at 33p and rose to 
35p before closing at 34p — a 
Ip premium. 


Like a rash that will not go away, 
the problem of who owns the Trustee 
Savings Bank has reappeared with 
renewed virulence and threatens to 
prove a deep embarrassment for the 
Government. It is too early to say 
what the precise consequences of last 
week’s House of Lords’ ruling on the 
ownership of the TSB will be, though 
it is unlikely to put a stop to the bank’s 
flotation altogether. At worst, it could 
result in one or two resignations in the 
Government, a drastic restructuring 
of the flotation and a further delay of 
the big event until next year. 

As so often with the TSB, the legal 
niceties are somewhat bewildering. 
Lord Templeman ruled that the assets 
of the bank belong to the state in the 
form of the National Debt Commis- 
sioners and the Central Board who are 
charged with responsibility for the 
bank under the TSB Acts. According 
to the Treasury yesterday, this is quite 
different from saying that the bank 
belongs to the Crown or to the 
Government. The Treasury was coy 
about exactly what the distinction 
was, but we were invited to infer that 
it does not mean the TSB is publicly 
owned in the way, for example, British 
Gas is. Privately, Treasury officials 
took a less higb-falutin* line and 
simply claimed that Lord Templeman 
had got it wrong. 

In any event, the TSB Act 1985 
gives the Government powers to sell 
off the bank in a way that leaves the 
preceeds with the TSB. To change this 
scheme would require legislation to 


repeal the I9S5 Act and return to 
square one. and that would certainly 
delay a new flotation scheme until 
next year. 

The issue is yet another heaven-sent 
political gift to the Opposition, but it 
is unclear bow hard a line the 
politicians will take. So far the Labour 
Party has backed away from out-and- 
out condemnation of the Government 
over this issue, mainly because it has 
already given its blessing to the 
flotation plan as it stood. 

There is also the question of 
popularity. With 1 million investors 
already registered as interested in 
applying for TSB shares, there is 
obviously considerable public interest 
in the issue. 

If things become loo hot politically 
for the Government to continue with 
the flotation as it stands, it can still opt 
to swallow its pride and go for an 
ordinary privatization. That would 
bring in a useful extra £1 billion or so 
of revenue to the Treasury, help to 
increase share ownership generally, 
and satisfy the bank’s craving for joint 
stock status. It would mean that the 
TSB itself would not receive the sale 
proceeds, but this is not necessarily 
such a bad thing. The bank already 
has almost more resources than it 
knows what to do with. Another £1 
billion would at best take a long time 
for the bank to deploy and at worst 
might lead it into rash and hasty 
lending. One way or another, the 
flotation is almost certain to go ahead 
— eventually. 


Base rate cut on horizon 


August may not turn out to be such 
a wicked month after all. Suddenly 
there is a hint of cheaper money in the 
air, though it may be into early 
September before the clearing banks 
are finally persuaded to lower their 
base rates. 

Today is quite crucial in this more 
optimistic scenario in that a “good” 
set of banking figures for the banking 
month of July would strengthen the 
feeling that the money supply is 
slowly returning to within more 
tolerable limits. 

The market is looking, at best, for a 
fall of 1 per cent in sterling M3 but 
even a small increase, up to half a per 
cent, would not diminish the sense 
that change is in the air. For this the 
president of the Bundesbank, Karl 
Otto Pohl. is to be thanked. If his 
latest public utterances are to be taken 
at their face value, the West Germans 
are shifting their ground. 

-Whereas they appeared resolutely- 
opposed to cutting the Lombard Rate 
and stood with the Japanese in a firm 
line against the United States, they 
now are disposed to be “flexible.” The 
tale from Bonn is that Mr Pohl’s 


deputy, Helmut Schiesinger, is the 
true hard money man, while the 
president himself is more sensitive to 
events in foreign exchange markets 
and has a better appreciation of the 
realpolitik of international interest 
rates as they affect the value of the 
American dollar. 

The chances are that if the West 
German mark continues to harden 
against the dollar, the Bundesbank at 
its next meeting on August 14 might 
relent, “accommodate” the demand 
for credit and lose the Lombard rate. 

This would life easier for Paul 
Volcker, chairman of the Federal 
Reserve Board, who has made dear 
his willingness to cut interest rates in 
the United States but is hardly free to 
do so. except at unfathomable cost to 
the dollar, unless the Germans (and 
Japanese) are also ready to lower their 
rates. 

Such a three-cornered manoeuvre 
would suit the British Government as 
it would enable the banks to lower 
their rates without inviting unwanted 
additional pressures on sterling, al- 
ready bowed under the weight of weak 
oil prices. 


Keep it in the family 

• 

A national firm of Chartered Accountants 
with strong representation and 
substantial experience and expertise 
in helping the expatriate and his family 
in minimising their personal taxation liabilities 

We may be able to help mitigate: 

Income Tax-Corporation Tax-Inheritance Tax. 




Ffot further information on Personal Tax Planning and our complete""! 


range of services please complete the coupon and send to: 

Patrick Rushmore, MacIntyre Hudson, 28 Ely Place, 
London EC1N 6RL Telephone: 01-242 0242. Telex: 25177 


COMPANY 


ADDRESS 




__ 



Alternatively, if you require further information 
regarding our practice, please contact 
Patrick Rushmore. 

MacIntyre Hudson 

Chartered Accountants 































18 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


weeu* 

Oiler digs YkM 


«aer uwr trust RMnweewt 

80. HetMnrani Ho. Boummuh BHS BU. 
0345 ?irara (UiMnet 


CM a Faeo 
wgh lot Eourty 
wongnae Bom 
A m® Kan Goinh 
*stn note 
Assets a Earns 
CepM Reserve 
cm a Energy 
European Carnal 
General 
Japan 

UK Growdi me 
Do Arno 
U3 Eme rging Co s 
Ft aat M nogresa 
MasnnsiAce 


list 1231 
9X0 07.0* 
1918 2084* 
1482 1578 
47 G 51.1 
1020 1090 
6S.7 66.) 
725 T75 

944 1004 . 

131.6 1407* 
807 859 
952 1021 
13X3 1465 
540 577 
IBU 2002 
615 G75 


-02 975 
-02 5.09 
471 4 as 
+07 142 

+06 32) 
+01 195 

i.sa 

+08 106 
•13 128 
-02 3JB 
+07 

-04 1.78 
-06 124 
•02 083 

-06 xae 
+02 218 


ALLIS) DUNBAR UMT TRUSTS 
AM Owner Centra Sunndon SHI 
0793 610388 & 0793 28291 


Fra Th at 

Growth & Income 
i Trial 


Hqn income T« 
Eqtfy tneome 
HOD Y*« 

Gan Secs Trust 


Japan find 

PaeAc Trust 

Am® Spa Sds 
Secs Ot Amor Tst 
A*J Asset Value 
G* Grown 

SmUer Cos 
ZM Smaler Cos 
n e ct wen Trun 
HMWil Cmdly 
Ouh Erawig* 

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1EL 

-01 361 
-02 324 
-05 £61 
-1 1 330 
-12 310 
+OI 4 3* 
-08 4.7B 
-05 488 
-04 S55 
-02 029 
+05 092 
+09 001 
+12 098 
-a i i43 
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-a.l 277 
+ai 2+6 
-02 217 
+02 242 
-01 115 
+05 0.99 
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+i 1 288 
+16 1 15 

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+02 170 
+03 1 70 
+0.1 052 
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-01 7 B2 
-01 752 
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+05 225 
+05 22S 
+05 2-25 
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953 
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171 
+01 0.71 
+0.4 1.64 
-07 000 
+03 Ml 
+ 1.1 000 
+05 0.10 


3 Gtentaas St EOnburon EH3 OYV 
031-225 2581 tDa®w03l-226 6068) 
kid Ex (22) 

Japan Es (ti) 

UK E* (311 
P MM Pens IM 
Pul Pens UK 
BG Amenta 
BG Enwyy 
BG income Gram 
BG Japan 
8G Tsdmougy 

BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 

25126 ASMrmane Straw. London W1X +AD 

01-491 0295 

American +ao SI 4 +03 a» 

Ausirsksn 165 177 +02 318 

Japan A Gensral 1121 1199 +15 017 

MIKOm 445 47 6 -01 7.47 

kmmsHxal Thai 71B 795* +0.4 106 

income Gtn 1st 452 4B.4* +0 1 423 

cm i Fuea m 204 21 9 +o.i 896 

Global Markets 336 36 0 -01 2DB 

Specie SauMxms 379 405 -02 1 62 

BARCLAYS UMCOHH _ 

Uncnm House. 252 Rorawd Rd E7 
01-534 5344 
Amenta 
Anal Actum 
Do income 
Capua 
EiwMI Trust 
EaM I n e t sna 
Freanoal 
500 

General 

GH 8 fixed me 
Japan 6 Gen toe 
Do Acc 
Growtn Accuffl 
Income Trust 
LAM Trust 
Special a tueaons 

RflCOWY 
TrustM Fund 
limy Teen Accum 
Do Meome 
WOrkMMM Trust 
B Th m* Fund Ac 
Do Me 


2195 2335 
131.2 196.7 
2264 241.1 
3*58 3861 
335 5 5703 
316 339* 
2444 2889 
134 1 142.8* 
1366 147.6 
297 310 
825 87.9* 
1158 1233 
1713 1824* 
64 1 885 
2102 2234 
2207 2350 

374 380 

1184 1200* 
1532 1632 
808 660 
768 818 
1765 1663* 
85.7 912 

1225 1304* 

Exempt Smtfer Cos 2288 2425 
USA Exempt Trust 3359 3661 

MBUTMNOY SECURITIES 
131. Fnsbm T M naH London EC 
01-828 9876 01-280 6540*1/2/3 
Capita Groiidi Inc 562 822 
Do Accum 650 695 

Eastern A M 1380 145 4 
Da 8% vwm aa io ji 725 7? b 
F mance A Property 835 882 
Gn A find mam 47.7 500 ® 
Do Accra 812 SS4* 

Eauay income 726 77.6* 

Do Moan 172.1 lfl+ .DU 

Hqh VmM Income 74 2 793 
DO Accra 194.6 206 1 

km Income 75 6 MB* 

Do Accum 77.6 629* 

DO 9*> maul 782 750® 
Managed Fond 60.7 635 
Preference Income 296 31.6a 
Do Accum 95 6 1022® 

Smaler Co'S Accum 129 6 1385 
World Perm* 9vi 98 T04* 

Pordoko Tm UK 752 775* 
POIdoM Tsi JJCJO 1031 1065* 
PonfatoTstuS 68 4 708® 
Pontoko Tst Europe 1094 1133* 
Portfolio Tst hk 41 j 425* 


BC 


weekly 
Otter digs Yaw 


ran tttgti me 
Pool Shares 
ConsnoMy 
Famno* Secs 
Gam 6 Oen 
mi teem 
Prop Siam 
llrw Enemy 
WoM Tear 
Amer Growth 
Amer mcoma 
Amer Smalar Cos 
Aus Growth 
EraoSrMHr 
Fa EM 
Hong Kong Prl 
k* Grtnidi 
Japan Pen 
Japan Smaker 
Emhim 

Exempt MOM 


1885 201.1 
163 145 
1107 1161 
4$1 481 

195 162 
165 17.6 
603 725 
395 <2.1* 
395 421* 
903 963 
572 610 
21 7 231* 


00.1 

156 


64.1 

168 


409 52 2 

34.7 263* 
335 38J 
755 805 
165 179 
80 1 839 

64.7 67.7 


-05 453 
1020 
+00 193 
-02 220 
+01 287 

+01 OX 
-01 151 
1.76 

+02 ass 
349 
+02 539 
+01 038 
+05 152 
+03 021 
08G 
+07 252 
+02 153 
+t I 
+02 
-04 350 
4.14 


BROWN SHH5V 

9-17. Penymouai Rd. Kayaanta Heath 

0444 458144 


Franco! 

Smoiar Co’s Acc 
Do teCOme 

FHQn I 


Iter Pordsoo Inc 
Do Acc 

Norm Ain* c a n 

Onanr 


1225 1313 
2305 247.9 
1483 168 4 
839 88.7 
74.4 714 
582 022* 
982 104.9® 
56 7 610* 
852 91 7 


-03 273 

055 
-02 657 
-0.1 493 
-05 327 
-14 

+04 133 
+0.4 022 


209.1 

2190 

3.06 

334.4 

35 VS 

3.05 

1000 

10X4 

4J1 

17S0 

I8S.0 

4.71 

126 B 

1327 

107 

1670 

17X5 

137 

£1107 1136* 

£74 

ctxor 

1274® 

£74 


BUCXaULSTER HANAflCMENT 

The Stem Exchange London EC2P ZJT 

01-688 2B68 
General me (4) 

Do Accra (4 
Mcrae Fund 
Do Aocum 
mu me 12 ) 

Da Accun 12) 

Smaler he (5) 

Do Accun 1 5) 

C3FUN0MAHAQE R3 

J2S. H ' 

01-242 

CS Japan Fund 848 002 

CANNON FUND MANAGERS 
r o^nam way. Wemxey. HAS ONB 

2720 2884* 
3183 3385* 
2035 2164 
147.7 1S7.1 
475 505* 

European «0 MO 

japan 672 605 


1}£L Hah HdSnua London WC1V SPY 
12 1148 


Far EM 
Norm Amman 


429 1 4*7 8® 


113 

*362 *55.1 


000 

239 5 25*7 
4480 *71.8 

+00 

102 

199 0 209 6 



187.8 1780® 

+0 9 «2® 

135.4 144. 1 

+03 

142 

18X1 2000 

-03 80S 

199.7 2127 


000 

1450 1550 


006 


BX9 

890 

150 

1140 

121.4 

1.77 

81 1 

880 

1.77 

664 

me® 

3.11 

4159 

4424 

*05 

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782 

i«0 

2255 

2398 

322 

2619 

2706 

3.12 

1340 

1427 

325 

5*6 

57.4 

904 

1850 

17X0 

0.15 

187 4 

1780 

0.15 

1730 

1848 

239 

3200 

3*06® 

303 

79.0 

840 

133 

1374 

14X1 

229 

!Si 

2000 

nai® 

£40 

£98 

490 

520® 

001 

*93 

324® 

001 

144 7 

15X9® 

1.06 

3161 

3360 

X37 

2040 

2170 

307 


BARMO FUND MANAGERS 
PO Box 156. BaOkanhon. Kent BR3 
01-658 8002 

55.1 585 
566 805 
$49 59.0 
1192 1265 
60.7 652c 
1015 1083 
912 975 
1050 111.7 
850 915 
488 515* 
624 675 


Gouty Income 
Europe 
Growth A Me 
Japan Special 
Japan Sunrise 
Fra Eueoe 
Fra japan 
Fra N Amer 
Fra Smalar Cos 


4X0 

-05 030 
+05 030 
-Ol 380 
+19 080 
-0.1 230 
+25 030 
+0.7 030 
+13 080 
+0.8 030 
•03 150 
-0.1 270 


BARRINGTON MANAGEMENT 

10. Fenaruran Sl London EC3 
01-623 8000 


i Inc 
Do Accun 
General Me 
CM Accun 
GkYMhc 
DO ACCUn 
Han Y«h Hie 
DO Accum 
Japan income 
Do Accum 
N American me 
Da Accum 


. 383 

+05 128 
+15 12B 
+05 £83 
+0.7 253 
-04 950 
-06 950 
56* 


1275 1357 
685 925 
109 1 1143 
1529 105* 

2084 2216 
1125 1159 
1B1.4 1669 
8*4 68 B* 

1679 178 7 
2«78 2808 
2*95 2827 
49.0 S3 0 
569 605 
1322 1369 
1489 1563 
783 814 
928 965 
BRITANNIA UNIT TRUST 
74-78 Fraou y Pavement London EC2A 1JD 
01-588 2J77 dawigOI -638 047819 MoneyOuCM 
0800-010-333 

Growth 0* 594 803* 

Mfl Recovery 1Q29 1099 

Smaller Go’s 1416 1510 

UK Grown 36 6 39.0 

Exm me 534 57 0* 

cm Z53 273® 

tec S Grown 189 7 2022 


Do Accum 
Sm* CO* UK 
Du Accum 


+01 56* 
+3.7 010 
+3.7 aio 
•01 058 
+01 058 
+1.6 021 
+25 021 
169 
1.60 


.. 041 
+04 259 
+0.1 129 
. 223 
-01 788 
-0.1 7.00 
-12 4*0 


+0.1 024 


+44 296 
+12 AJJT 
-06 021 
-0.1 058 
+02 150 
+02 1.00 
050 


CAPEL (JANES) KUtMOEMSTT 
PO Box 551 Bows Marks London EC3 7JQ 
01-621 0011 

358* 383.4 +1.1 159 

2769 2962 +03 451 

North American 2845 3045 +06 056 

CATER ALLEN 

1. KM VWam SL BC4N 7AU 
01-823631* 

□At Trust 1035 110.1c -0.71057 

OENTRAL BOARD OF FINANCE OF 
CWRICH OF ENGLAND 

2. F on Street. London ECZY SAG 
01-586 1815 . 

rn* Fund 397 9 4.47 

FMM 1444 950 

Dspost 10(1.0 9 70 

CXAMTOB OFFICIAL INVCSTMENT FUND 
2 Fans Shew London ECZV 5AQ 
01-588 IBIS 

Meome 36414 • ..5.05 

Accun E1D.67B1 -0260 . 

Deposit 1005 850 

aanCAL MBUCAL UMT TRUST 


+01 150 
+04 4 70 
+05 2JJO 
♦02 270 
+02 320 
-02 950 
.. 230 
+0.1 090 


Narrow Plan. Bristol BS2 OJH 
0800 373393 

Am* Growth 225 24.1 

Emit* Hoh Meome *12 439 

European Grown 27.4 292 

General Booty 375 40.1® 

G* A Fbted ke Gth 29.7 313® 

GH 8 Rod me 242 25.6® 

Mdax SecurMs 252 26.6 

Japan Grown 329 335* 

COUNTY UT MANAGERS LTD 
i6i. ChaagUe. London EC2V OBJ 
01-726 1^9 

Enemy Thro 432 469c +03 404 

Extra Wow 157.0 167 0® -03 SHI 

financial 164.6 1755® -05 2*0 

Ok Strategy 561 57.8 194 

Growth kmttnant 2655 2825® -05 260 
Meome 6 Grow* 38.4 405® -02 451 

Japanese 6 Runic 1795 1880 +12 0.73 
Nm Amer Growth 102.7 1092 +1.1 1.13 
Um Recovery 1074 1142® +1 7 191 

Smaller Co s SB82 221.4 +06 159 

Gto.ua Me Tst 584 599 +04 535 

Spaa* Sts Ace 2755 293.4 +05 1.81 

CROWN UNTT TRUST SERVICES 
Crown Meuee. Woking GU21 1XW 
04862 6033 

High meome Trad 2313 247.4 +02 528 

Growth TruH 2135 2284* . . 3.15 

Amencan Thai 1255 1345® -05 074 

CRUSADER UMT TRUST MANAflBUUD 
Ragan. Surrey RH2 8&L 
0737242424 

482 513 4.47 

483 51.4 . 243 

483 514 .243 

525 565 +07 153 

5*5 575 +0.7 


UK l_ 

UK Growth Accun 
DOOM 

Euooean Grown 
pacAc Growth 


BKIMT TRUST MANAGERS 
4. MOWN Crescent Eratutt 
031-226 3482 


Amencan Fund 
Capa! Fieri 
Grown 6 Me Find 
High Dfcr Fund 
lirnmaaona Fund 
Raaources Fund 
Smw Jap Cos Fnd 
Tokyo Raid ■ 


. . Japan p) 

(Ex) Paohc (4) 

I Ex) aW * Jap (4) 2201 2273 
Eurofund 26.1 Z75* 


71.0 750 
934 999 
13*9 1335* 
106.6 1135 
1902 2057* 
316 2 25 
388 415 . 
1687 1805* 
1438 1*8.4 
1125 1162 
2835 290.0 


+02 224 
-03 1.78 
+0.1 449 
-03 597 
+1.7 159 
+03 045 
+09 .. 
-04 050 
■ 350 
0.19 
- 034 
.. 010 
+03 358 


EAGLE STAR UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
Bath Hoed. CMRanham. Q to u cmuw GL53 7LO 
0242 521311 

UK Balanced Me 67.1 715 249 

DO Accun 682 72.7 -C.I 242 

UK Qrowm Accun Bi.5 ms +02 151 

lk ragn me me 833 675 . . 533 

N American Accum 84 8 89.1® +02 05* 

Far Euum Accum 969 1034* -15 015 
European Accum 767 818* +13 092 

UK GW 6 nine 539 575 -01 827 

DO Accun 555 593 -0.1 802 

ENDURANCE njmaaMiAOEMCNT LTD 
4omm Centra. Hexagon House. 28 Wra om 
Road. Romtora RMI3LB 


Endurwroa 


1085 114.T 


31* 


EQUITABLE UMT8ABMMSTRATKM 
35. FOunoki SL Manchester 

081-238 sees 

722 789 -OT 330 


Weekly 

Ba OH* Cnge V*tt 


Hnh Meome Trust 
GA 8 Food Ml 

TM 01 hr. True* 

Spaas ats Trua 
Nm Am* Trua 
Far Eastern Trust 
km Grows 


74 4 792 

52* sMa 
58.7 636C 
74 6 794 
585 92* 
824 87 7* 
485 52 7 


-02 618 
-0.1 850 
+0.1 20* 
-03 2*0 
+06 172 
+05 058 
+05 157 


EaumraLAw _ _ 

Sl George Hae GoroonMn 6t Coventry 
I9D 

0203 553231 

UK Grown Aocum 1*36 1527 -05 

Do Mcorng 124.7 1326 -0* 

HdW Me Ueum 239.7 2549 -03 

Do income 1329 2M2 -02 

GraiFned Acaim 1087 1060 -02 

Do krame 862 907 -Gl 

N81 Aiwr Ta ABCum I3j9 **>? 

Far East T*t Atxum 1535 1832 +14 

Euro TR Aocum 1512 1S09 +22 

General Trua 2309 3*56 2J 

L^^raePaulw^l^KJon EC4R OBA 

710 760 *07 029 

1028 1092 +07 043 

785 822 -03 4 80 

788 822 +15 OK 

867 735 +07 »77 

57.6 61 7 -02 951 

356 381 +05 *50 

768 822 +15 118 


£ 


1.16 


Weakly 

Bd OH* Chije Ywtd 


aUWNESSMAHON UNTTTWST 
PO Bax 442. X2 St MrayrahW. Ltmen EC3P 
01523 9333 

-07 677 
+07 090 
+06 236 
-1.8 9 17 
-08 35* 
-02 076 
327 
852 


Hmh Inc 
Nmw 


Trust 


499 630* 
100 9 1074 

„ 8027 215.7 

Ca Trust 383 397* 

SI uincem me 829 855 
aiMCMUSOh 755 787 
TempraBarSmCos 1715 181.0® 
Tampta Bar USM 3971 385.7 


US 5m*Mr Co's 
Far Eastern Fund 
Nmrai Re$ Fund 


FS INVESTMENT MANAGERS 
190. wesi George SL Qesgow G2 
0*1-332 3132 
Baanoed G* Inc 
Do Accun 
meome Gth Me 
Do Accra 
Service Co s Me 


43'4 482 
44.1 469 

39.7 *22 
4t5 4*2 
475 505 
475 515 


2PA 

*03 190 
+03 
+02 500 
+02 
+05 1.00 
+05 


F10HJTY NTERHAT10IML 
Rrv* W. ToflOrtdge. DM TOY 
0732 382222 

1003 1073 
31.9 3«2® 
486 520 
3*5 385 
311 32.4 
811 1018 
44.4 475 

. 139.4 1499 

Managed m Tit 137.8 l+«.& 
Maxfcome Equny 785 845 
Proteraaoraa Gm 332 35.4 
Saudi Era Asa TSt 285 305 
spacrai Sm 1602 1723 


Amer 5oec»H Ste 
Far East Inc 
GM 6 Farad H 
Grow 6 meome 

ssaav 


Si 5 S^ 


London BC3A BAN 


Amencan Exempt E353.0 3805 
Japan Exempt S4222 4382 
Am Property Ta S10TO9U « 

Truer E20325 


2265 2*1.0 
231.6 2482 
2025 215.4® 
2100 2214® 
2045 2175 
2*6.4 2825 
864 915® 
1145 1225® 
1562 186.0* 
16B4 1800® 
1165 1232 
1220 1295 
1818 171.6 
1792 1906 
875 83.4 
886 942 
805 858® 
13X4 141.8® 
1455 1M2* 
582 61J 
582 618 


0.72 
.. 454 
+04 1.72 
+0.1 3-78 
906 
.. 4.73 
-05 

-1.6 .. 
-05 0.01 
-02 132 
+0.1 248 
+02 047 
+05 05* 


1.86 

054 

550 

550 


HIAIRMSrOH UMT MANAGEMENT 
3 London mm BUgs. London WaL London 
EC2M SNO 
01-628 5181 
Amer 6 Gen Me 
Do Accra 
Amer Turnarod Me 
Do Accra 
Craw T* me 
Do Accun 
Con* A OR tee 
Do Accum 
Extra Inc Tst tec 
Do Accra 
Meome Trust 
Do Accra 
ter Grow* Fd Inc 
Do Accum 
Japan 8 Gen Me 
DO Accum 
Monthly I n come Fd 
Recovery 
Da Accra 
European Me 
Do Accun 


+1.1 052 
+12 052 
+1.0 1.17 
+05 1.17 
.. 156 
-02 155 
-02 331 
-04 821 
-12 445 
-15 AM 
-01 422 
-0.4 422 
+10 
+12 .. 
+03 058 
+08 058 
-02 4B1 
+04 155 
+04 155 
050 
050 


Prxham End. Derkteg. Sumy 
0306 883053 
H> Ecurty Oct 1915 2022 

DO Accra 3183 337 8 

FP fixed Ml DA 1132 1205 

DO Accra 129 0 1372 

StewuOBtep DM 166* 1765 

Do Accra 1715 1822 

FuwamcouRT 

PuPkc Trustee Mngsway WC2 

01-408*300 

Captti 3S15 3802 

Gross Me 146* 1*95 

Hflh YrWd 2165 2205 


-05 289 
-1.8 288 
-03 598 
-02 SOB 
-02 1.78 
-02 1.78 


250 

7.74 

557 


GrUNTT MANAGERS 

Bth Floor. 8. Devonahka So. London EC2M <YJ 
01-283 2S7S DeaAng 01-626 9*31 


UK Cap Fnd Me 
Do Accra 
Mom fixvt 
Penman Exempt 
rnumuiMtsl 
US 6 General 
Tech 6 Growth 
Jaoan a General 
Far East 6 Gan 
European Fund 
Germany Ftxvl 


942 1005* 
1355 1*53 
78 6 843 
1859 1735® 
1655 1774 
58 7 607 
815 853 
2475 2651 
1105 1162 
2426 2595 
8X4 675 


-04 200 
-05 350 
+ 0.1 6.10 
-05 150 
+12 090 
-Ol 090 
-02 120 
+15 020 
+1.0 040 
*+25 040 
+07 150 


GARTMORE FUND MANAGERS 

2. ai rkhy te^UwdonE caA sop 


5806 


! Daakng 01-823 5786 DWng 01-023 


875 94.1 
175 192 
544 565® 
472 505® 
800 SX5 
SOI 5X7 


+05 050 
+02 025 
.. 155 
-0.1 155 
+09 158 
+07 034 
. 550 
+1.7' 050 
+0.1 9.78 
.. 652 
+14 020 
+12 020 
. . 229 
-02 0.10 
.. 590 
♦05-1.10 
-01 324 


Amencan Trust 
Aunnlan Trust 
Brash T» Accun 
Do on 

ConanMte Snare 

Eimipean Trua 

Extra Moran- Than -46* *07 
Far Eastern Trust 1355 145.0 
Fixed Interest Fund 26.1 28.0® 

&k Trust 26-6 27.7 

Oahu Fra) Accra i755 1882 
Do Oat 166.7 1774 

Gam so** Trust 11.1 115 

Hedged American 293 31.4 

•apt Income Trust 187.1 1488® 

Hang Kong Trust ' ZB6 307 

Moame Fund 725 . 77.7* _. . 

Insurance Agendas C4555 *690® +005 250 

Japan Trust 1495 1665® +02 050 

■gad Brant 2865 277 1 -13 247 

OH 1 "Enemy Trust 304 325 +02 1 75 

SgeMl Sate Trust 925 985 -Ol 079 

UK Smh Cs Roc Tat 715 76.7 142 

QOVETTfJOMIl UNIT MANAGEMENT 
Wlnclwster >*«. 77. London MM. London EC2N 
IDA 

01-588 5620 

MB Growdi 785 842 

American Grown 61.7 663® 

Ameraan me 664 712 

European Growth 2135 2262 
GoUAMnertes 3*7 373* 

Japan Growth 1674 17615* 


ORE UNIT MANAGERS 
Rom ExcnangsL EC3P 3DN 
01-888 9803 
GilRMH 
Grow* Equtty 
GuanVte 

N Amencan 
PscKe 

Property Share 
BnoBer Congew 
Eucpean Dun 


+0.1 1.83 
094 
•Ol 552 
+51 028 
+04 152 
+21 


1209 125.7 
1979 2106 
2790 2891 
1365 1445 
3329 2475 
2624 2792* 
208.0 2213 
2*0* 2518* 


-03 853 
+07 202 
+05 288 
+05 131 
+1 9 0.13 
-15 1.42 
+03 183 
+05 1.12 


HAABROSBANK UWTTRUST MANAGERS 
Proas* l r *<**!, 5 . Raywgh Rd. Bramvoxt 
.Essex 
0277 217916 

HsnORH SWh Goa 1285 1362* 

H&rsa N Amer 57.6 715 
Hraeroa jao 6 f e 122 J iao.i 
Hamoros Scendm 797 8*5* 

Hampros European 93 9 995 
Hamoros Coudon 48.1 512 
Hanaroa EwatyMc 825 875 
Hamhros laghlne 507 62.4 
Hamoros Res Asets 562 598a 
KanrOrtM Mil 5<ta 4S5 52) 



-04 1.90 
+03 032 
+13 046 
+12 051 
+15 092 
+06 156 
-0.1 490 
-0.1 3.6T 
+0.1 256 
+03 056 


me 

Do Accum 
Meome Assets 
Fmanoel Trust 
aicome A Grown inc 
Do Accum 
Hgh Income Trust 
Extra income 
Bnaaer Cos D*r 
Pin A OR 
on Trust 

feed tetarast Dust 


(5) 


Erxppun 
■ Eua SnWter COS 
Japan Trust 
Japan Speed Stt 
PSatc Smaler Cos 
Stegatxxe A Matey 
North Amencan 
Amer SnWter CM 
Amor Recovery Tst 
Htei Income Exempt 
SmWur CM Exempt 
Era Exempt 
Japan Exempt (8) 

N Amar 

GtaCa) Tech Exm 
Padre Exenpt (5) 


5. Raytargn Rd. Hatton 


047 
047 
-08 3.11 
+02 154 
+03 15* 
-0.1 363 
-06 2*0 
-05 371 
-05 271 
-03 469 
+02 *73 
+02 511 
-01 936 
-0.1 939 
952 
+1.0 051 
+05 am 
+04 250 
+14 051 
051 
. 2.79 

40-2 154 
+35 0.73 
+1.7 077 
+12 051 
•14 001 
+0.6 093 
+03 337 
+3.1 023 

+12 am 

+12 05* 
.. 454 
-05 216 
+25 1.10 
+07 058 
+05 158 
+ 1.1 001 
+25 273 


132.1 1413 
1885 1990 

943 1009 
635 577 
wn net 

106.7 114.7 
1405 1515 
1320 1484 
2705 2903 
1683 1813® 
1885 1895 
1075 1145® 
475 50.1 
4X6 462® 
5X9 57.1 
710 785 

1075 1165® 

40.1 429 
1625 1735 

815 853® 

368.7 377 6 
5*5 583 

2355 2SX7 
915 964 

16X4 1738® 

1765 1875 
734 785 
282 303* 
MO* 1502® 
615 554 
10X0 1102 
1195 1321 
1155 1215 
1190 1253 
1560 18420 
862 907 

MQ IQQ3 

1515 1695 


MLL SAMUEL UMT TRUST MANAGERS 


Brash Trust Urtte 
Cape® Trust Unas 
Dote* Dust liras 
Eracmn Dual 
Far East Trust 
FteencW Dust 
aa Fned Ira Me 
Do Growm 
H01 Yield Trust 
Income Trust 
Mwm an onsl 
Japan Tech Txt 
Manx® Resoircas 
Seamy Trun 
SnxUte Cos 
Special Sits 

M FUND MANAGERS 
32 Quea n Annas Ga® 
01-222 1000 
Ml Bra A O-MM 
W me Pius 
n Capra Growm 
MwM mra Tst Fnd 


Hoad. Croydon 

111 

5145 5*85 
9*5 1007® 

1802 1915 

1278 13S0® . . 

1172 124.7® +05 122 
356.1 3785 -1.7 271 

29 0 302® 

433 489 
821 86.1 

77.1 821 
116.4 1225® 

34.1 383® 

290 309 

1788 1900 
883 B4.0 
90.8 964 


-05 331 
-15 200 
-2* 309 
+1.7 023 


-0.1 955 
-02 752 
-0.1 533 
-20 438 
-15 235 
+04 035 
+4L5 270 
-03 301 
-02 131 
-21 254 


1289 1372 
560 596 
543 605 
GG5 892 


KUglWO lI T B E NSON 
20 tadudi SL London 
01-623 9000 

Amer Growdi Me 828 

Do Accra 84.0 

Fund Mv Tst Me 195 

Do Accra S3 

Yield Inc 
Accra 

IM Recovery Me 1 
Do Accum 
Jura Growm Me 
Do Aocum 
Smaler Cos Me 
Do Accra 


"ft] 


UK Eg Growth Me 
o Accra 


121.7 
a»e 
1015 
1085 
1028 
1022 
1697 
2085 

_. -- 

Do Accra 467 

Worldwide Tech Me 395 
Do Accra *0.1 

LACUMTTRUSrMANAGBnT 
fierer Hooe. Captnai Ave. EC 2 R 7BE 
O 1 - 68 B 2900 

Meome FUM 4315 4402* 
k u ametional A Gan 2420 2470 

LEGALA OBWHALUMT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

****** 


BC3 

863* 

670 

213 

270 

1260 

2180 

10B.1 

1135 

1090 

1094 

170.1 

2221 

298c 

48-9 

424 

427 


+ 0.1 1.11 
+0.1 

22* 

+05 5.74 

+1.0 

+02 150 
+03 .. 
-03 000 
-03 

-a* 271 
-06 

+01 077 

+02 

+0 7 1.13 
+07 


5.13 

107 


0277 I 
EatNy Dtetraxnan 
Do Accum 
Do Meome 


Far L_ _ 

ON Rust 
lot Managed 
N8M Res 
N Amencan Trust 
UK Special sts 


2845 2830 
*135 4422 
580 529* 
090 745* 
1B&4 1175 

7H7 8X3 

77.7 BX1* 
405 519 
754 805* 
625 865* 


-05 235 
-00 235 
-02 5.17 
+07 130 
+03 051 
-05 653 
+05 151 
+04 206 
+08 1.54 
+0.1 133 


U5YDS BAM UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
Regotnirs Dpt Gortng-By-Sea. wording. W 
Swsex 
0444 489144 
Batancad 
Dd Accum. : ' 

Energy bid 
Da Accum 
Extra Moame 
Da Accra 
German Gth Me 
Do Accra 
-Meome 

Do Accra - 
Inti Tech 
Do Accum 
Jaoan Growth 
Do Aoaim 
N Amer A Gen 
Do Accra 
PBdHc Basin 
Do Accra 


1784 1885 
314.1 3355 
*93 527c 
5*3 380c 
1501 1605 
271.0 2888 
8X1 67.4 

63.1 674 
2B04 2705 
5125 5402 
177.4 1897 
1853 IBB I 

835 BBS 

84.1 BOB 
"1035 1106* 

1118 1195* 
129.7 1307 
1354 144.8 


Smaker Cos 8 Roc 1886 201.9 


Do Accra 
HtortAma Growth 
Do Accum 
UK Grown Fund 


2114 226.0 
194 7 208 2 
27X6 2928 
483 495 


LONDON A MANCHESTO 
NMaatfe Rem. Exarar EX5 ids 
0392 82188 

General Trust *20 45.0 

Meom e Duet 383 309 

Maenaeored Dun 360 301 

Amsncra 323 346 

Jepen 445 47.7* 

Dial ot Mr 201 301 


-OB 325 
>14 355 
*0.0 248 
+05 2*8 
+02 539 
+0.4 539 
+10 0.18 
+1.0 0.IB 
-at 439 
-02 *59 
+24 046 
+25 0*6 
+06 002 
+06 052 
+1.1 056 
+13 056 
+16 018 
+15 0.18 
-02 154 
-02 15* 
+14 0.82 
+21 052 
15* 


-Ol 370 
. . 630 
+04 0.70 
+03 200 
+03 1.00 
.. 240 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


Hrwi 

OK* Digs v-era 


MAGSEXURmeS 

Three nova. Ton* HA EC3R BBO 

01-626 45* 


Am* a Gan Me 2085 2335* 

DO Accum 2*35 2808 

Am* Recovery 2312 2*74 

DO Accra 2521 2697 

Am Smaao Cos 57* 600* 

Do Accum 584 515* 

Aral a Gen tec 670 71.7c 

Do Accra 730 701 

Comm a Can tee 1412 151.1* 
Do Aocum 1806 1947 

Compound Grown 39*3 1255 
Conversion Growdi 32l 2 3*05 
Do tec 1755 1900c 

DwiOeM Fung Inc 399 l «2X0 
DC Acotm Ell ID 1241 
European 5 GeraD 2005 2125* 


Do Accra 
Extra Yietd tec 
Do Accra 
Far Eastern Me 
Do Aeon 
Fund Ol M* Me 
DO ACC 
Gerar* income 
Do Accra 
GM a Fned tel 
Do Accra 
GM name 
Do Accra 
income Me 


23917 354.1® 

21*3 327.1 

*808 <804 
1168 1781c 
1420 1534c 
2364 3605 
3718 39X9 
SKI 5322* 
£1264 12*0 
818 84.7c 
935 903 
310 3X2* 
3X1 35.4* 
3095 3306 







Gross 


1966 




On 

rat 

Hgn Low 

Company 

™ Cngo poncci 

% P/E 




8'. 

-1 

as 

7.1 100 

60 

45 

4TA Setectren 

52 


21 

40 1X8 

130 

S3 



+3 

xc 

3.1 1X7 

69 

38 

Abenmm Stt Hsa 

38 


3.1 

80 1X6 

143 

*5 

fiems &«*«• 



**1 


108 

32 





27 


11 

MSS 

n 



59 








27S 

m 

VC0 

m 

-3 

00 

14 5919 

1X1 

108 


113 


77 

&B 

297 

20* 

Mda 

28U 


93 


1*3 

uo 

Sacunaes 

1*2 

105 


20 

181X7 

159 

131 


159 

• +S 

29 

IB 150 

MO 

215 

Aon HakrorKXKs 













163 

Asoan Canons 






131 


131 


88 

66 7 0 

MO 

*43 


593 

-5 

1*0 

25 178 

*0 

lb 

Artsoc Energy 




79 


iBO 

ASO 

193 



59 83 

12* 


AIM EraHFRsnt 



70 

67 110 




90 


90 

89 209 



BBS tagi 

70 


1 4 

20 180 




195 


71 

3 8 169 


68 


U4 

+2 

57 

XB 90 



Boaiora iwittral 

60 



10 7 X8 

27' 

12 

Bunnell S Fferaam 

34 


08 

20 250 


53 31 

15' 7-. 

91 33 

*60 27B 
30 15 

3* IB 
43 41 \ 

135 88 

218 165 
14B 13? 
27 19 

ZiO 110 
198 125 
130 7S 
750 ^05 

5 a 51 
358 ire 
183 ns 
3*5 730 
9 ?' 

97 73 
IM 125 
36 6 

42 76 

195 130 
370 90 

69 67 

140 BE 
350 713 
170 64 

110 S3 
138 ITS 
IB ? 
253 170 
17 8'. 

115 75 

158 IS? 
73 11 

*0 Tfl 
90 87 

95 53 

tir in 
108 75 
175 liO 
50 30 

118 74 

60 50 

3*3 708 
JOB 85 
143 MS 
415 306 
78 GO 
11* 96 

138 75 

103 85 

97 75 

73 *3 

1TB 118 
1*D 7$ 
9! 85 

718 t9S 
62 55 
29 70 
1*5 134 
57 *0 

133 105 
115 75 
186 70 
£78 130 
460 345 
18' 


Beiroin Craps 
arkdev A Hay 
Bemetey Exp 
Eteitour <+a 
Bte HOURS 
BtemKAaraa 
Brom 

Btenchmds 
axMOad Toys 
Borland 
Browmaker 

Bnm 


48 

14'- 

33 
435 

18 

34 
43 
11* 
216 
144 

19 

110 

170 

115 

305 

52 


Breanmj Sec 
Br Bteoo o ach 
Br island 
Bnxwnwa 
Brown iCnarae) 

Bryant l Derex) 

Bull Rewuicas 
CCA Gaienes 
CM. Man 
CPS Comp 
CPU Comp 
CVD 

Catewnan Otf 
CamoMcn 
Cannon Street Mv 131 
Central TV 325 

Chancery Secs 112 
Cnecxpoxn Europr 95 
Cnwsrw Man 128 
Cnem Methods 7 
CMSIMO W 235 

Ofer 13'. 


1*8 

300 

3 

76 

155 

6'. 

30 

140 

so 

65 


Cnapnnt 
Curve Hooper 
Oogau ana 
cum 04 Hogs 
Canon Electrodes 
Cakra Enwald 

Cotne 

COVurJm Inc 
Congt FxraotF 
Compsch 
Copsuitann 
Odns Tern Mv5 
Cone Mooweve 
Courts 
CPU 

Crampnra 
Cranbroov 
Crarawick 
Crown LOdgB 

Crown MS 
Crusts 

QBE Tech 
DOT 

DJ See Alarms 
Datum 

Dawn IDY) 

Dean a Bowes 
De Bren (Andrei 
DeWor 
Demar 
Denura 
Oanmans EMC 
Dewey Warren 
Culm 
DniCk 
DuMCte 


80 

158 

20 

31 

90 
SB 

lit 

75 

153 

38 

102 

SO 

270 

100 

116 

355 

GO 

106 

75 

sa 

85 

45 

170 

91 
65 

138 

79 
74 
144 
*3 

131 

80 
93 
195 
430 
ft 


* 3 
1-4 

-6 


•-3 

-5 

-5 

♦3 

-3 

+1 


• +S 
-3 


52 

39 

Eras 

*9 

+1 

148 

102 

Eattig Boa Opecs 

1*0 

+ T 

29 

9 

Ecotnc 



325 

3*5 

era fix'd 

245 


43 

22 

Eon San 

22 

-2 

379 

24* 


379 


148 

119 

Etoctexi Mouse 

ns 


too 

61 


83 


33 

25 


25 

-1 

15 

9 


9 


215 

140 


157 

♦2 

250 

138 

rn 

2*0 


2*8 

>51 

FkBGo 

230 


90 

95 


55 


42 

18 

FargaDTOOk 

27 

-1 

100 

125 

Free® Ihtral 

125 


!A 

72 

FlMOla Dennys 



to 

31 

Rsreaoi 



SM 

100 


199 

"fl 

60 

38 

Boyd 0* 

*0 



1X5 
748 
*6 

60 14 2*0 


IB 42 108 
64B 56 159 
5 0 23 107 

1 1 SB lO'l 
• 0 55 7.7 

2 lb 10 187 

126 61 99 

4 0 7.7 90 
50 17 187 

36 24 21.7 

II 6 X9 108 

34 45113 

26 1 7 153 

14 22* 33 
e 4.7 


29 45 1X3 

36 27 195 

179 55 127 

01 20 130 

Xl 24 210 

30 420 .. 
52 22 250 

e as. 

10 19 92 

3J 21219 


3.1 20 3X1 
64 

IB 1 8 190 
71 142 336 
5 7 21 158 

37 37 130 
25 23 172 
7 4 2.1 25.1 
2 1 35 159 
78 72 92 
98 27 15.9 

60 80 13* 
10 12 1X9 
30.1 

17 10 140 

21 23 74 

14 22 92 
4 9 20 212 
30 46 193 


20 8.7 05 
20 22 16.1 
64 68 61 
107 115 63 
7.0 16 16.4 
50 1.3 281 

03 14 163 
£0 0.1 152 
31 223*3 
0* 18 1X3 

86 X5 i*.6 
. e 550 
96 20 170 
*6 39 187 
23 20 12 2 

14 150 40 
7 1 46 110 

36 16 2*7 
39 71 197 
17 52 23 


-6 356 


36 4 9 172 
62 


1986 

H&1 Low 


Ctxnpeny 


Grass 

tftv 

CtYge pence 


YkJ 

% PJE 


90 86 

220 145 
103 95 

685 420 
148 94 
ISO 95 

47 38 

83 77 

165 100 

17 11 

60 32 

IBS 85 

124 88 
126 103 

91 80 

IT* 118 
38 19 

115 93 

iao iso 
93 58 

49 36 
310 133 
755 196 

48 26 

440 383' 
390 793' 
1*5 1*3- 
415 195 
2#5 50 

96 90 

30 7 
113 110 
133 105 
158 >15 
3*0 200 

74- 22 

1 * a 

166 US 
255 IBS 
230 165 

31 IS 
118 4* 
IK) 68 
353 210 

9 3 

200 15 

37 75 
3*0 233 
190 H6 
b? as 
28 2 
1*8 105 
118 71 

70 *8 

330 253 

90 67 
300 220 

83 55 

11X 87' 
113 87 

83 37 

125 70 

43 32 

118 100 

91 7B 

r*0 95 

19B 133 

62 17 

90 86 

7*5 160 
•60 101 
T25 55 
73 54 

178 92 
35 12 

116 10* 
135 93 
363 195 
720 141 
98 75 

19 9 

75 23 
148 1<0 
390 350 
138 95 
IBS 71 
95 SB 
760 360 
220 118 
47 72 

183 87 
385 Z3i 
193 188 
220 130 
47 13 

158 108 
1?* 82 
158 1*9 

50 25 

23 15 

115 70 
156 125 
367 737 

31 13 


Ftteer Strain 'A 
GaUxod 
Gm IM) 
Gm/Ftoum 
Gouxi Lyons 
G*t» Me* 
Otterm House 
Gtetn) Gp 
Godwin warren 


Ford A Wasun 88 

French Com 180 

97 
680 
147 

99 
*0 
83 
150 
16 
45 
126 

172 

Got4d (Launraoe) 118 
Gronyta Surface 65 
Green lEmmU 120 
Greenmcti Crate 30 
Grosranor Sq 95 
Guwnsey Aaarae 180 
Hampoen Homecara 76 
Hattons 45 

Harvey * Diomo 175 
Havewcv Europa 235 
Health Care 42 

Heawree *30 

Do A LV 390 
Hsnnwrson Prana 1*4'. 
HraWom 195 

Fkghtand Pan 60 
HJfc Ergonom S3 
27 
no 


in 

335 

2*'.- 

9'. 

133 

200 

175 

17 

90 

83 

210 

6 


40 
70 
27 

11.7 

41 
37 
24 
50 
XI 

32 

3.1 

43 

XI 

30 

40 


40 110 
42 110 
20 182 
10 1X9 
20 20.1 
30 .. 
60 121 
60 164 

a* Mi* 

.. BOO 

7.1 110 
25179 
35 160 
40 90 
48 110 

4.1 120 


B0B 9.1 70 
30 10 520 

2T 20 120 
10 AB 1X8 
S-lb 30 21.7 
67 24 210 

< 1 26 167 

120 20 160 
123 32 150 

61 XI 12* 


Hodgson 
HovStn Hi 


Howrah Group 
Hu^xb Food 
Hraond Elec 
Hunter Saphv 
Hundaon Tech 
HVSTCM 
Msec 

mi Soot Energy 
knraRed 

Mfemmpe Teen 


18 200 . 
20 176 
*2 95 
27 173 
1 1 24 I 
1 8 15.0 
17.6 21 
. 100 


73 30 102 


60 

0-7 

04 

36 

21 

12 

30 


5 

20 

95 

21 

136 

ISO 

135 

48 

75 

3 * 

37 


793 180 
35 23 
1*3 85 


NOra 1 * 

Ntetkan 
Women howks 
Wi Sea A Gen 
QJhakt in spec 
Onnncn 
Opwmetnc s 
Oraama 3 LnBa 
Owners Aoread 

pa 


125 

M 

113 

19 

35 

3* 

as 

278 

32 

108 


40 30 167 
10 1.7 65 

14 30 12* 
XB 

29 83 52 


*3 1828* 
2.1 60 9 1 
46 40 123 


1966 
Hgn Low 


Congragr 


Pnce 


dh yid 

Cn'ge pence % PJE 


255 168 
79 56 
158 130 
560 206 
52 10 

SO 30 
175 143 
152 80 

148 83 

39 23 


200 135 
77 14 

34 28' 

lie a* 

73 31 

125 66 
50 25 

176 118 
783 115 
Sffi 90 
156 63 

143 115 
5'- 2 
5' 2 

306 158 
43 18 

*8 33 

123 as 
*0 1* 
105 ae 

88 40 

42 19 

190 70 

87 
81 
290 145 
139 11* 
T26 73 

48 14 

130 10* 
178 138 
112 73 

195 120 
I0B 71 


Facer 

R wane 


Parttakl Gp 
Frail M Late 


190 

63 


Penny A g4ex 170 

Rape Group 135 


'3 


IMcnaeQ 1*0 

14 

10 30'] 

PW Pat 94 

RnaepiBa 68 

Plan Invest 12Q 


Fotywch ueme 


Property Tw 10P 

QuasttT 
Redo Oty -A' 
HjtftaOlrta 


CM 

Rad TVim Control 






40 80 80 
50 X4 142 
XI 10269 

. e 220 
.. ..68 
XI 10 166 
4.7 30 130 

13b 26 592 
17 61 68 

40 .. . 

17 20 174 


30 13 19.1 

10 20 60 
44 20 102 

24 1.7 350 

64 60 126 
20 11 11.4 

44 30 132 


26 160 
i . 66 

110 130 
13 165 
67 18 
60 1X1 
80 182 
180 

01 
1.0 . 
30 349 

24 210 
10197 
34 26.0 
.. 10 
34 17 1 
1912.1 
20 1*0 

25 l«8 
18 ISO 









7 

SoiecTV 

2? 

-1 





28 





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13 


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*£._ 

me Growth Inc 727 I 770.7® 

DB Accra £1170 1240 

ted tec tec' 560 800 

"Japan 8 Gen Inc 7920 *40 

Oo Accra SSOfi 0050 

Japan Smaler Acc 927 9B7 
Mound 8 Gen Inc 5605 5944 
Dp Accra £1X95 1479 

Raceway Fund tec 3SSS 3760® 
Do Accra 4550 4914® 

Second Gen tnc 6970 7380® 

Do Accra El 326 1408 

Smalar Cos tec 8*68 8885c 

Do Accum £1009 1090 

TrugawfiMhc 445 4 4760 

Do Accra El 2 78 130S 

■WS 2 M as c 

Chankina tec*e) 331.2 3861c 
DO Actra 995010050c 

Pension Exenn (1) *56* <717 
NAAOFMcB) 3B0 C 

Do Accra (31 <58.1 e 


+10 162 
+ 1.1 1 . 6 ? 
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+29 061 
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+2* 1.68 
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-aa £60 

+10 4.19 
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+06 556 
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-00 296 
-000 236 
+0.1 401 
+000 431 
1095 
10.98 
600 
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+30 44B 
637 
637 


MM UNTTTRUST MANAGERS 
11. Dworram Sg. London EC2M <YR 
01 -f 


39X1 4105 
4975 5190 
750 800 
77* 826 

Japan Perform a nce 1*00 149.3 
DO Accra 140 7 1500 

US Spared Features 660 71.7 

DO Accra 670 724 

Gold 8 Preenue Un *1.4 *50 

Do Accra 427 «64 

US SpacW tec 573 61.7® +05 *57 

00 Accra B20 880® +05*57 

European Pert tec 835 at* 

Do Accra 9X6 865 


Eauay Exempt 
Da 
UK 
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+00 211 
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+ 1.1 100 


157 151 
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157 

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20 195 
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MLA UNTT TRUST HAHAGEMSTT 

09-100. SandUm Rd. MawStone. Kent MEM IXX 

0622 674751 . 

MLA Genanl 320 335 -0.1 200 

MLA Mtemraotel 527 858 -10 05* 

MLA GAUM 2X4 247® -011X52 

MLA income 411 424® -00 530 

MLA Bxopem 295 310 +05 000 


MANULIFE MANAGEMENT 
St Geornoe Way. Stevenage Herts 
0438386101 



Growdi Una 

724 

769 

202 

IH 9AB 

Gt« 8 fixed bit 

1120 

1100 

7 09 

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1110 

1180 

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170 

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127 4 

1354 

041 

970 

n Amencan Unas 

6X7 

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B33 

99.4® 

0.13 

340 

3 maker cos Fund 

680 

704 

1.79 


MStCAPUWT TRUST 

Urncom Hsa. 252. Rrakxd Rd. E7 

01034 55*4 

Mencap 1323 iao.7 


MERCURY FUND MANAOBOf LTD 
31 Kruivasn SL EC*R 9AS 
01-280 2860 


Amer OowBl 
Da Accra 
Amer Income 
Do Accum 
European Growdi 
Do Accra 
General 

Da Accra 

GaS fixed 
Do Accra 


Da Aaora 


Do Accra 
Japan 
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Rraovery 
Do Accra 
Exraen Dot 
Exempt Accra 


940 1003 
980 1044 

51.1 543 
5X3 567 

127.1 13S0c 
1305 1385c 
2340 2*85 
3810 4055 

87.1 870 

961 99.0 

80 6 857 
890 9*0 
2392 25* r* 
2966 3155 
1840 1959 
1884 200.4 
1320 20*4 
2052 2180 
2272 2340® 
3*73 3560® 


-IT 168 
.. 06B 
+0.4 409 
+05 436 
+10 1.18 
+14 1.16 
-03 230 
-06 200 
-OB 756 
-00 756 
-00 4.45 
-00 4*5 
+10 107 
+10 107 
+20 000 
+25 000 
-07 2.12 
-0.7 212 
+40 28i 
+61 201 


MDLANO BANK GROUP UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Cowtwo«« Hse. sever SL Head. ShMfMId St 3RD 
0742 768842 

7*9 790® +03 208 
1017 1086® +03 2*8 
1025 1093 +00 325 

144 4 15*0 +13 325 

975 613® -0.1 708 

670 71 B® +01 786 
5*2 566 -00 90* 

886 925 -03 904 

Hgh r<SU ‘1506 160.6 -01 580 

DO A00OT 2550 2720 -00 500 

1825 1733® -0.4 305 
263.1 2870® -OS 188 
285 1 3041 +24 009 

2990 3185 +28 089 

110.7 11B0 +10 107 

1320 1413 +10 107 

1173 12X1 +10 1.13 

1407 1500 +20 1.13 

1124 1190® +Oi 213 


canal M eo me 
Do Acrera 
CoramocMy 6 Gan 

Do Accra 

Extra Hgn tee 
Oo Accra 
GM S fixed Me 
Do Accra 
Yaw 
Accra 
income 
Do Accra- 
Japan S Pacific 

Do Accra - 

n American Inc 
Ho Acoxn 
Goa Gth Me 
Do Accra 
Smaaer Cos tec 
Do Accra 


1200 1275® +02 213 


MURRAY JOHNOTOC UNIT TRUST 
MANAGEMENT 

161 Hope Street Gtesgow G2 2UH 
0*1 221 9282 

American 1180 1230® +10 109 

Erapera 2«2J 2580 +18 108 

artaAer CDs 2090 223-1 -01 107 

HATKMLPROVBENT INVESTMENT 
MANAGERS 

48. Oacectarai St EC3P 3HH 
01023 4200 Ext 289 


MR UK 
Do. 

NP1 i 
Do Accum 
Far East Acc 
Amancen Acc 
Eieope en Aoc 
WortdwKM ACC 


1930 2080 
31X1 333.1 
5740 6117 
701.3 7461 

111 *«• 
570 61.7 
91.4 547 
*92 52* 


-05 200 
-13 290 
+60 070 
+70 070 
+08 010 
+06 130 
+0.7 000 
+03 140 


weakly 

Bid dirr enge new 


NORWICH UT MANAGERS 
PO B ox 4 N otWlQl NR1 3NG 
0603 6Z2200 

Group Trial £1165 1226 -000 177 

liitl Trust 129.7 1323 *i3 133 

OFPCNHBMEH TRUST MANAGEMENT 
66 Cannon Sdu«. London EC*N 6AE 
01-238 3885f8(7/afflfl) 


htamakandl Growdi 

1388 

<4X5® 

+Z0 

1.47 

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604 

647 


205 

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8X0 

468 

+07 

1 73 

Amencee Growdi 

328 

351 

+03 

000 

Jaora Growdi 

813 

856 

+0.1 

167 

EuropeHi Growth 

UK Growtn 

83.5 

5X2 

6X08 

570 

+13 

+06 

015 

073 

Paoftc Growdi 

530 

57 0 


a. oo 

Hgh meome 

331 

355 


731 

Pnaal Wceam 

527 

581 

*07 

217 

Oo Accra 

950 

101.4 

+0.1 

£17 


PEARL TRUST 

252 HWi HNKAI, WC1V 7EB 
01-405 8*41 


Growdi Fund Me 
Do Accra 
Income Fund 
ted EouKy (nc 

Da Accra 
IJnt Trust Me 
Da Accum 


884 WO 
1326 141 l 
1177 1252 
1271 1350 
1271 050 
123.8 1317 
2143 2213 


-01 2.10 
-00 2 10 
•02 3.75 
+10 123 
+13 103 
-00 283 

-a* 203 


PERPETUAL UWT TRUST 
*6 Han Street Hereof On Thames 
0*91 $78888 


km Growth 
Income 

WondwOO ROC 
Amer Growm 
tea Emero Cos 
Far East unrth 
Erapaan Gth 


265 B 2653 
185 5 198.7 
14X9 1577 
67 B 720 
770 B3.7 
752 BOB 
850 590 


PROLIFIC UIBTTBU5TS 


222 - 
01-247 
h im m oan ® 


Conn A aa 
Far Ewwro 
Norm America 
Special SOB 
Technotogy 
Extra Meome 


London EC2 

1123 1204 
980 640B 
060 1036 
1754 1801 
126.1 1392 
085 732s 
1073 1153 
880 920® 


+25 078 
-0* 442 
-01 134 
-O0 072 
-08 058 
•10 008 
+02 144 


003 

426 

504 

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007 

100 

022 

478 


PRUOSTTUL UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
51-69. Mom Hi. Mord Essex. KS1 2DL 
01-478 3377 


HoBxxn Eqixty 

European 
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Lh^ lea 

rKJron rwn me 

Hoaxxn Hte 
Japanese 
N American 
HoUKVn Soec are 
Hotborn UK Growdi 

Hoaxxn OR Trust 


364* *088 
959 1020 
519 552* 
640 68.6* 
97 0 1031® 
972 1030 
743 790 
623 662® 
79i a*.lc 
1873 1950 


+04 238 
*22 056 
+06 0 64 
-02 6.** 
+00 002 
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+00 106 
-02 215 
-01 222 
-03 2*9 


0W.TCT MAWAOBM EN T COMPANY 
31-45 Gresham SL UXWon EC2V 7LH 
01-600 4177 

Quadrant General *280 *863 207 

Quatkam Manna 231 8 2*07® . 5*1 

Quadrant bid Fd 3762 306.0 -16 1.12 

Ouaonw Recovery 298 6 2720 257 

HM RUIWBCHBJ ASSET M ANAG E MENT 
S« S««m Lana. London EC4P *DU 
01-280 5456 


2828 3000® +20 1-23 
3074 3Z70® +21122 
121.8 1400 +03 278 

862 91.7 -03 XB7 

1914 20X6 -09 am 

1385 147.7 +13 100 

NC Sm® Europ CtfS 1800 1923 +29 033 

NC Exempi GB £1300 1350 8*6 

NC Amer Prop til S7 12.18 

NC Property 1583 1662 


NC Amanca Me 
Do Accra 
NC Energy Res 
NCI 
NC. 

NC : 


ROWAN LNT TRUST 

33 Km wea n Street. Lonotxi BC4R 9AS 
01038 5878 

2195 2215 
8760 601 0 
1660 1695 
3880 39*0® 

1685 1705 
1210 1220 
2380 2*10 


Amencan (4) 
Secunhea (A 
HMl Y<«d (5) 

UWffl 

Foed anarast 
Hgh telerest 
Far East 12) 


105 
2.62 
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100 
-10 244 
+001257 
0.19 


ROYAL L0=E FUND MAHAOOWNT 
New Han Place. LwarpoM L89 3HS 
051-227 4422 
Enum Trust 
ms Rust 
G® Trust 
US lira 

atelM 


600 

64.1 


£58 

710 

7X0® 


103 

283 

278 


X27 

31.6 

336 


151 

410 

445 


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11X6 

1209 

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155 

1388 

170 0 

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091 

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-00 

4.47 

104 9 

111 7® 

-03 

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606 

+05 

086 

5X1 

61.9 

+05 

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01-930 0311 
Eauay DM 
Do Accra 
High team Trust 
Da Acorn 
US Growm 
Do Accum 


ROYAL LONDON UNTmUST MANAGERS 
Roys London House. Gokmier CO) IRA 
CODE 576115 

074 930® +03 OJtf 
1751 18X3 -07 223 

504 584® -81 804 
7X8 849 -00 402 

974 1017® -03 438 
9X1 997 .+1.1 005 

10X8 1117 -03 104 


Amencan Growm 
Capra Accra 
Gar Meome 
High Meome 
Income t Growdi 
jaoan Grown 
Special SM 


SAVEAPAOGPBt 

38. Wesnui Rd. Ramfrad RM1 3LB 
- 66-73. Quran SL EdMPurah EH2 4NX 
(Rondonl) 0708-68966 Or (fixn) 031-226 7351 . 
Am®' Inc 8 Growth 675 721 +01 670 

M.O 1050 +0.7 211 

430 465 +00 101 

413 440 +00 438 

1040 1114 +21 052 

780 811 -03 505 

562 613 +03 23* 

3X7 382 +10 000 

90S 10X2 2.87 

530 56 8 -111057 

1760 1884® +05 4.87 

1810 1727 +07 409 

820 980 -14 6*8 

641 880 -11 272 

1179 125.* +20 122 

949 IM * +02 

1288 137.7 +05 - . 

38.4 3B3 +01 303 

880 850 +10 .. 

SE AM QRhrih 993 1002 +26 203 

Scants 1273 138.1® +02 288 

Sootsharaa isos 1613 *04 188 

ScotlNMS 1504 1BOB -00 4.15 

Sdact Mw medo na l 7X5 817 +05101 

Smalar Co's Me 1570 1608 -17 4.06 

Spare® SManone 887 9*0 -0.1 208 

UK Equity 1703 182-1® +®L5 202 

US Growdi 70S 733 +05 188 

Ltenrersd Growdi 850 91 1 +03 135 


Captra ura a 

Oranxxtty 

Energy uids 
Europoen Growdi 
Ext+rei Me Bnd 
Do Md (43) 
Eipuraban- 
finracra Secs 
G® 6F1 Me 
H*jn Rahim Una 
Hxp YiMUnes 
Mame Units 
ku reM ira d Trust 
leem ra on ® 

Japan Grow* 
Japan Smalar Cos 
Masterfund 
Naw Technology 
la arowffi 


BaJ 0«- 


SCWROOgHUNtT TRUST _ 
EnMpnWt HW« POCKWOVm 
Q705 027733 


Amencan me 
Do Accra 
Auyra+i" me 
Do accra 
European tec 
Do Accra 
Gm A FnM ns 
De Accra 
Gobi Fjne me 
Do Accra 


127 fl i38 6 
1308 139 8 

50 6 54 *® 
54 9 59 0® 

113 7 121 6 
1168 12*9 
540 560® 
81.9 87 5* 
26 1 30 0 

293 31 3 
IBB 4 180 1® 
375 B -020® 
1110 1J9S 
■5*3 1650 
1*65 1588 

51 8 551 
515 572 

1281 7370 
13*5 1*19 
101 5 1085 
1061 M2 « 
2290 2458 
y 1 ?! 248* 
53 9 576 
990 < 056® 
153 7 1643® 
7*7 5 8529c 


Do Accra 

md incra*- 

Do Accra 
ixo sow Gps a« 
smgawr* * 

Do Accra 

Smaaer Cos «c 
Do Accra 

5 p««sra me 
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Tpkrt Fund tec 

Do Accum 
US Smaw Cos Ac 
UK EOlXTf me 

Do Accra 

SSSS a Chare, »! oo*.*® 

Extra Income 59* 63 5® 

SCaVTAR AS3CT MANAGEMENT 
3M6 Gnxvcramh Sr London EC3L 
01-673 5776/8711 

UK Eou*V Me ZLO “ * m 

Do Arc DJ 254 

Euro Tsi tec 2Sf 27.6® 

Do Aa 35.9 27 tm 

oJSfSn tec |0 

rv> iff 20 * * 

Miugrt Bumret 1161 1230 

SCOm SHEOUl TABU^ 

29 SI Andrews Sq. EOadxirgn 
031-6S6 9<0I 

md meome liras iff? JSe 

Da Accra 2167 230 5 

SCOTTISH UFE MWegTimiTS 

ia St Anoxews Sq. EdeMdgn 
031 225 2211 

UK FflUKV 1780 lO'l 

tg? !SS 

European 220.7 2AS.7 

SCOTTISH MUTUAL WVESTMENT 

mahaOERS „ 

109. ymeere Sl Grasgow G2 5 Hn 

041-2*8 flioa 


+ 13 065 
•13 065 
-01 222 
+01 222 
+ 16 <04 
+ 17 I (M 
4)1 863 

-08 IM 

•02 720 
+02 220 
-07 511 
-14 511 
-0 6 0*7 
+0 8 047 
•08 OdO 
-1 4 1 DC 
+ 1 5 1 OO 
+01 1 17 
-01 1 17 
•01 100 
-0.1 100 
•18 002 
•1 7 002 
•04 ODO 
•03 1*2 
•05 3*2 

207 

3 18 

207 


OAX 

-06 5 19 
-Ol 519 
+04 100 
+04 too 
-02 100 
-02 100 
400 


337 

337 


-05 18* 
+ 1 6 1 £ 
.18 DOE 
•2 8 OX. 


UK Eauey 
Gm & Fixed _ 
UK Sm® Cos Eq 
European 
N Amencan 
Pacrtc 


18X2 173 7 
1164 12X9 
14&7 lSG I 
1331 JOSS 
1096 1168 
174.1 1853 


SCOTTISH UMT TRUST 

29 cnanone Sq Ednourgh 
031-226 *372 
Frame 

world Growdi 
N American 
(nconN Fund 
European 
N Amer Inc 
UK Growdi 
Extra tec 


646 891 
3X7 3X2 
3X4 350 
400 466® 
415 43 4 
26* 2S3 
305 327 
300 330 


SCOTTISH UnDOWS 

PO Box 9(B. Eoreourgn EH 16 5BU 

031-655 5000 

Fm Eq tec 226 6 2412 

(SoAccum 2610 277 8 

SENTINEL FUNDS MANAGEMENT 
30. Cdy R4. London EC1Y 2AY 
01-638 6011 

Amer Teen 6 Gen 1000 1072 

Pxorc 19X7 2073 

Sec Income Fnd 1850 1768® 

Special Soujtmm 2033 2177 

tee Growm 320 3*2® 

Amencan Majors 89 9 74 B 

Smell Co* 38 7 41.4 

japan Teen a Gan 1108 1186 
kiumasonji mama 540 567® 

Exempi 530 0 5871® 

UK General 326 

6 x 0 Growdi 32.7 350 

Earo Income 410 442 


-O 5 206 
-05 8.05 
-02 209 
•33 108 
•0 6 1 47 
+09 0*0 


•0 5 032 
*0 I 107 
•02 018 
*93 
-03 191 
•01 2 96 
1 GO 
-01 041 


•04 304 
•0 5 104 


-09 004 

-25 OOO 
-07 4 15 
1 49 
•09 018 
•02 031 
-01 167 
.1 1 000 
•02 SO* 
225 
181 
•0 7 002 
*00 *00 


SBI0N8 0OATES 

1. London WM BMg*. London EC2M 5PT 
01-586 3644 Ext 357 

Special Sts (Si *66 520 1 

STANDARD LVE 

X George St Earaxntfi EH2 2X2 
031 225 2652 


Income Umts 
Do Accra UrMS 


244 282 
27.1 290 


139 

X39 


STEWART. IVORY UNfT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

45. cnenone Sa. EtXnour^i 
031-228 3271 

American Fund 2243 2369 

Do Accra 2S1 B 2882 

Do wanorawel 157* 187 7 

Australian Funo 935 995 

DO Accum 950 101 I 

Bntstt Fund 598 0 6356 

Do Accra 8030 836.1 

European find 2920 3110 

DoAceum mtA 3274 

japan Fun 33*3 3562 

Do Accra 3360 3579 

Sam PFP 1894 1784 

SUN ALUANCE 

Sun Akonce Hi® Hontwm, Sussex 
0403 S6293 

EqiXly Trust Acc 377 J *013 -13 264 

N Am Trull AOC. 570 608 *05 I 17 

For Ea« Trust ACC .8X6 8S.1 +09 OB 

Workhwde Bond 490 5X0 +05 7.09 

T50UWT TRUSTS LTD 

Kaara Hovae-Anpowr. Han®. SPiO IPG 

026* 56789 Dealings: 0284 83*32(3(4 


+19 23* 
+21 23* 
+14 2 34 
132 
132 
•70 438 
+9* *39 
•46 086 
+48 086 
+50 021 
•5 1 021 


Amman tec 
Do Accra 
Extra Income Me 
Do Acaen 
General Un* rnc 
Do Accra 
0 ® 6 fixed me 
Do Accum 


Accra 
Psrekc tec 
Do Accra 
Md tec 
Do Accra 
Selected Oppi Me 
Oo Accra 
Naw® Res 
Do Accra 


mo 121 3 ® 

1198 1275® 
1161 1204 
1320 1405 
151.8 1617® 
2503 2883® 
48 * ' 51 5® 
05.4 662® 
2008 2222 
3258 3468 
1600 1712® 
1861 1768® 
31*0 3341 
3870 4120 
610 850 
67 7 721 
400 43S 
420 44.7 


*09 090 
+09 090 
53* 
-Ol 524 
-03 309 
-04 289 
-Ol 843 
-01 643 
-05 400 
-08 45® 
*0 6 028 
+0 8 028 
+3* 101 
+*2 101 
-01 180 
(80 
+08 219 
+06 2 IB 


TARGET TRUST MANAGERS 
TangMHouse. Gatahaura Rd. AytaSBury Bucks 


Amer Eagle 
Ausnian 
ComoxxMy 
Bragy 
Eoray 


710 780 
1X9 170 
67.1 720 
2X0 310® 
120 S 1290 


Erapaan Spec Site 1029 1090 


-03 003 
010 
+00 139 
1 71 
-00 333 
+13 1 99 


Ixna Income 

Frnancw 

G4l income 

Goo mcorng 
Cc Accum 
Income 
Japan 

Mauy 6 S-n-jAnw 
P joke ITC 
Co Renw'I 
Pntl ?vi( f7 
UK Caorul 
SpdCMl S*i 
Teemwoov 
wo« teepme 
WOHdrece i-rtL-ji 
Eoudv E» l* _ 

Do Accra ij 


IM 


1138 

<224 

2607 

2780 

104* 

•09 7 

531 

5X6 

nr 4 

IQJ3 

78.' 

836 

id r- 

10’ 

21 6 

2) 1 

;ii 5 

97* 

t ij a 

170 4 

175 

IBB® 

M-’ 

24 2® 

tuo 

838® 

44 1 

*7 3 

55 6 

59 5® 

13" ? 

149 1® 

795 

85 0 

149 7 

icOO 


-0 4 5 7.1 
.15 ISO 

•o* re+ 
-n-i 
*1 •’ 

-04 638 

*c; r 13 
*05 :*} 
+a. - o«.«t 
•oa era 
- 02 * 2*0 
-05 ICO 
107 
-02 0 1C 
795 
>06 1 f J 
1 -9 
I 73 


thqrmKW UMT MANAGERS LTD 

Hcuad 1+ Fmsoutv Cacus Lowon COM 

7DJ 


01-038 4761 
For East S Gen 
Japan & Gm 
Ndi Amer 6 i+on 
P3PIM T«n 
Txsd 

UK a Cm 


551 
547 
*85 
51* 
563 
c3 9 


566 

691 

516 

546 

595 

456 


*12 085 
*08 ORb 
-0 5 01." 
•09 092 
+ 1 1 OS] 
-02 223 


41 B 

445 

*0 3 

069 

M2 

5*0® 

-02 

2 14 

42b 

<56 

•L<8 

a id 

581 

6l 9® 

-or 

*19 

479 

51 J® 

-01 

flttO 

489 

521 

+03 

012 

23 9 

255 

•0 1 

2 36 

238 

2S5 

+01 

235 

4*9 

51 4 

*04 

on 

61 1 

66 t 

-or 

206 

722 

789® 

-01 

157 


31 UMT TRUST MANAGERS' 

2 Sl uarv Aw LOTun ECJA BSP 
01 933-U5fi 

Snuler C 0 5 M3 673 *0* OlO 


TOUCHE REMNANT 
UgnaH HMrtC 2 Puddte Dear l 
3AT 

01 348 1250 
American Growm 
GarwrJi Grante 
Global Teen 
riKcme Growm 
nvrome Uonmiy 
japan Growdi 
Man Equrtv me 
Do Accra 
O Mis Gn-reW 
Smaaer cos 
Special dtps 


TYNDALL MANAGERS 
16 Ganvnm Ra Bristol 
0273 7337*1 

Ausnxk-m 50 3 53 7 -Ol 195 

qSacC 533 559 *01 195 

COM® 30313317® -12 343 

to Acom 541 5 578 7® -20 342 

Evtimpl 3666 J052® -05 5 79 

to Accra 659 3 703 0® -10 5 79 

Fa> Eastern 1613 1734 -17 099 

OO Accra 1739 I860 *1 0 069 

fir A Prop SI." 55 1® -10 141 

Do Accra Bt 5 BB 8® 6 3 41 

CJt Com 1244 138* -02 643 

Do Accra 14*-' 1488 -03 6*2 

GXi mom 109 J 1125® -04 967 

to Accra -1777 183 8® -06 957 

VxtIO 537 561 63* 

Accum <155 1330 *01 6 34 

mam 3316 3466® -0* 5 16 

Oo Accra 714*760 3® -10 516 

kin Earnmgs 1553 185* -66 380 

UK PROVIDENT UT MANAGERS 

uk Hjuv* CJStK St bauscurv SP1 3SH 
0732 JJ6343 

uh Eouty 1100 H6 9® -02 

PacKSAMi 157 1 166 9® *14 

N Amer 11 JD 120 l® *00 

VANGUARO TRUST 
65 ttMum Viaduct ECTA 7EU 
01-238 3053 




Growth me 
to Accra 
men Y«ua 
Do Accra 
Special 5ns 

to Accum 

Trustee 
to Accra 
Amer & Gan 
Do Accra 
More® Porrtoxo 
to Accum 


187 1 1991 
3733 2896® 
2G13 216 5® 
2080 2313 

40 8 4J5® 

41 I *3 6 
1338 143.4® 
204 1 2170® 

59 6 835 
59 8 63 5 
CS9 37 61 SO® 
£8031 Sl 76 


Atm Horn Ask i51 M33 ’206# 
Do Accra <1X3 1306 

Far East 8 Gen tec MO 5X3 
to Accra 50 0 532 


•1 1 242 
• lb 342 

•02 SCO 
-02 500 
♦O.l 226 
+01 226 
+03 399 
+06 399 
•03 123 
+0 2 133 
-0 27 ? 35 
•037 2 35 
195 
195 
-06 007 
+08 057 


WAROLEY UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 

(Kjidev House 7 Devonsnee So London EC2 


01-929 153? 
Amencan Trust 
Far Easi a Gen 
ted Growth 
meome Trial 
Japan Growm 
Scnaa Com Domes 
Tnctmotogr 
AuwakA 
UK Trust 
Eurooean Growtn 
Hang Kong 


8X2 68 0® 
1035 H02® 
89 8 743® 
823 885 
125 3 1340 
1090 1172 
33 3 358 
35.1 177 

127 1 135 3 
5X5 570® 
Z36 2X2 


•0 8 1 70 
•05 090 
+06 0 70 
580 
+13 O 
+01 300 
+01 030 
210 
270 
+1 7 1 10 
+06 160 


+04 015 
*03 020 
+0 5 097 
-01 730 


WAVERLEY ASSET MANAGEMENT 
13. Chanotte Sa EonPurgn 
031-225 1551 

Aunraean Odd 170 183 

Parte Basm 13 0 1XB 

Canwan Bai Gth 5o3 608 

era® Mao Fnd aid 3 10So® 


WWTTmaOALE UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 
2 Honor La EC3 Bar 
01-606 9085(6 

SW DU OP Fund 675 888 000 

US Govt Bond Fd «U7 5X9 


WINDSOR TRUST MANAGERS LTD 

Windsor House 83 mngsway. London WC2B 

BSD 

01-405 6331 

Cora S Beaty 475 506 78* 

wcon,# g! ul* 229 


Growdi 


• Bt thvajend e Cun dvldend. k Coro 
stock split. 9 Ex stock spot, m Cum as 
(any two or mors ol above), a Ex on (any 
iwo or mare ol above). Dealing or 
vakiaton Gays: (D Monday. (2) Tuesday. 
13) Wednesday (4) Thursday (5) Friday. 
(20) 2S(fi ot month (21) 2nd Thursday d 
month. (22) 1st and 3rd Wednesday ol 
month. (23i 20tn of mown. (24) 3rd 
ay o( month. 


Tuesday 
Thursday of month, f 
month. (27) 


i) 1st and 3rd 
4th Tuesday ol 
1st Wednesday of month- 1 


Last Thwsday of month. (29) 3rd working 
day of month. (30) )6lh of month. (31) 1st 
working day of month. (32) 20tn of month. 
(33) 1st day of February. May, August 
November. (34) last working day <4 
month. (35) I5lh of month (35) 14m ol 
month. (37) 2isi of month. (38) 3rd 
Wednesday of month. (39) 2nd 
Wednesday of month. (40) Valued 
monthty (41) Last Tfnxsday of Stock 
Exchange account (42) last day of 
month. (43) 2nd and 4ih Wednesday of 
month. (44) Quarterly. (45) 6tfi of month. 
(46) 2nd Tuesday of month. 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


1966 

Hflb Low Company 


Gro** 
am YW 

Price Ch'ge para* *■ PfE 


117 94 
780 683 

149 125 

3S8 2BB 
120 96 

120 98 

254 15B 
63V 53 
53 31 

4*8 36* 
102 80 
228 139 

157 106 
■*3 110 
364 314 

190 134 
70* 420 

206 176 
117 100 

150 119 
374 264 

158 138 
93'. 75 
160 119 

112 85 

207 142 
10 B'j 

3*6 287 
120 67 

558 *80 
193 145 
345 284 
124 B4’> 

140 109 
703 480 

191 123 
147 123 
rsz r*s 

383 107 
93 66 

109 98 

108 119 
171 138 
330 275 
143 115 
123 97 

1*7 127 
211 138 
231 18* 


Amer Trua 
Ang Am® Sac 


Br AStatt 
Br Erepy8 Sec 
Br M* 

Brurxier 


Darby tec 

to civ 

Draykxt Com 
Drayton Far Em t 
D.u,m t urn 
Dundoa Lon 
bw Am® Audi 
E cJ+ibran 
Bactnc Ban 
Engksn Im 

EnsRsn SOM 


F J C AAance 
F8 c Paste 
Rral CbarKHte 
FurtJ Scot Am® 
Rru Un Gen 
Fienng Aanncan 
fianxng Gjarar 
hnifl Entepret 
Hemng Ear East 
g* m,n a naagkno 
fienang Japan 


Fianwia Teen 

RM-gUreraraU 

GBC Craxra 

OT Japan 

Genera Funds 
Barren* Cm 

SES 0 "' 5 * 0 '* 

Glooo 

Boren ASwrec 
Gowrd i 
Govna 1 


109 


So 

33 21.1 

783 


280 

£9 3X5 

129 

' +1 

*4 

3.4 350 

33B 


X9 

£8 830 

97 


00 

08 740 

115 


XBt 

1**32 

25* 


lit 

as . 

85'.- 


XO 

5*310 

3/ 


07 

18 60.7 

420 


217 

50 270 

91 

+1 

30 

38 420 

211 

+0 

Oi 

02 .. 

150 

• 

120 

85 170 

128 




322 


14jB 

45 3L7 

ITS 

+3 

1.6 

09 

702 

*0 . 

104 

02 .. 

199 

+1 


40 350 

100 


08 

os mi 

139 

-1 

4.7 

3.4 400 

348 

• . 

6 A 

10 583 

157 

-1 

55 

35 439 

88 

+1 

£0 

20 530 

1*5 


£0 

1 A BOB 

112 


£8 

20 589 

2 tn 

+3 

£1 

1 I 770 

S'+ 


0.1 

10 . 

31* 


140 

<5 301- 

70 

♦3 

X7 

IZ4 59 


• 

00 


16* 

• . 

7.4 

48 315 

313 

• .. 

120 

4.1 340 

123 

+1 

14 

II .. 

132 


36 

27 510 

888 

+8 

X7 

00 

159 


5.1 


138 


39 

20 600 

146 

• 

33 

£0 82.1 

128 



67 209 

90 


£1 

£3 808 

tM 




IBO 

+0 

ZOO 

1.1 . 

<71 

• 

£9 

II 


135 

109 

138 

2il 

219 


^ 88 ? 

X3 b T0K0 
XI C3 810 


1988 

1*gb Low Crxiyny 


Grass 
(ter YU 

Puce Cnge pence •+ P|E 


368 2*4 

320 215 
19* 158 
308 263 
730 540 
28* 24* 
185 132 
59 45 
101 90 

132 110 
295 237 
233 IBS 

70 58 

71 B1 

128 102 
202 161 
159 128 
167 T37 
3® 215 
380 31 B 
4*0 390 
68 <9 
189 156 
6* 50 

250 188 
329 278 
81 20 

369 279 

178 1*5 
78 68 

38 31 

405 339 
171 147 

SIS 

231 TBI 
14'. 11" 

SUB 

II 


Gratnfrar 
Gresham House 


i(P) 

•ms* success 
Inv Cap 
Ivory 8 Saw 
Japan MW1 
Womwon Chan® 
mrenwort o seat 
K W ivrtEI Smelter 
Law Debemut 
Lon Morcbra Sac 
Lon Trust 
Ua r eh a n u, 

Monks 

Murray Bam 
Utxray k® 

Murray Small 
«*ray Vanturo 
New Com 
Naw Darm Ok 
928 

Nvrtirpglnces 
New Tokyo 
NJ AttwAc Sec 
Wi Sea Aaaats 
Nm Am® 

OwwWi 
Paonc Assets 
to WMe 


340 


£4 

0.7 .. 

320 

• 

89 

22 34 * 

179 

• 

64 

38 3X5 



1X4 


730 


82 

1.1 .. 

283 

-2 

66 

£5 747 

102 


60 

52 >31 

57‘r 


01 

02 .. 

9b 


34 

30 408 

120 




290 




230 


90 

39 279 

58 

-2 

30 

67 14.4 

83 


1.1 

1.7 4X2 

113 


6 18 

X4 299 

202 

+2 

37 

10 7X2 

152 

-1 

77n 

XI 28.1 

157 

• 

710 

45 335 

300 


39 

10 .. 


379 

420 

55 

165 

84 

250 


00 

5.7 

*8 

1.1 

49 

0.7 



100b 20 610 
21 J S.1 29.1 
10 604 
31 38.0 
75 1X1 
OA .. 
10 800 
... 33 233 

77b 21 670 
40 31 4T.1 

1.0 1.4 8X0 

00 10 
17 1 4 5 380 

88b X3 3O0 
12* XI 2X4 


71 20 498 

40b 34 480 
89 20 81A 

103b 30 430 
29 27 580 

2S0 8.4 1X7 

12.1 2A 540 

72 23 63.0 
2* 6n XB 335 

3|B 4.7 303 
20 25850 


1986 

W Low Company 


Gross 

®v YW 

Pnpa Cbg# pence 


P-E 


51 

35 

102 

81 

122 

95 

199 

155 

226 

201 

101 

89 

in 

U8 

IBS 

1*0 

118 

90' 

174 

139 

188 

135 

305 

237 

370 

300 

207 

157 

141 

H2 

9* 

79 

274 

217 

62 

33 

74 

56 

115 

85 

105 

80' 

366 

286 


Stfluail Bueu 

TR Austrian 


TR Cey 01 Lon DU 108 
Mrf 6 Gen 


TR 

TR 

tr Nonti Amanca 
TR Pacrffc Sasai 
TR Property 
Tfl Teen 
TR Trumees 
T emple Bar 
Thor^noflon 


189 

219 

92 

173 

181 

103 

1S8 

151 

279 


Throg Secured Cap 3S5 
Trans Ocasnc 196 

Tribune 128 

Tnotawt me 91 

US DMMtnOT 274 

Vteng Rasoucas 37 

25 
102 
SB 
383 


tMnwbottpm Egy 
■Wftn 



06 

13 . 

-2 

33 

41 ZXS 


58b 

50 303 

-1 

3.7 

30 *08 

•2 

110 

5* 235 


£8 

2 8 46.7 

+1 

1 4 

OB . 

-1 

57 

31 401 


£6 

25 480 


XO 

38 348 


Bib 

5* 2X4 

®-2 

11.90 

4.3 3X4 


55 

20 48.1 


40 

31 387 


158 

17.4 80 


93 

34 5*9 

®+1 

Z9b 

7.8 180 

-2 

20 

38 403 


30 

30*34 

S-l 

*6 

4.7 55 7 

• 

151b 

40 38* 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


15* 116 
22 13'. 

20 12 , 
158 131 
1*0 90 

2*7 >87 
106 66 
750 375 
94 77 

133 78 

900 *90 
218 163 
4*0 320 
290 190 
3 B2 26* 
113 75 
27 16 

206 152 


Amencan Express £39'. 
Aryyla *3 

2 
138 
£19 
£18'. 
143 
119 
219 
100 
730 


aitemxe Arrow 

DaJy Mad 

Do_A 
Dectra 
Eng Trust 

Franktegexi 

Frosi Gp „ 

Gaooa (O & U) in 
hwoereon Aarai 833 
H! 

Mai 
U6G 

Mramkte House 
Paatc inv r« 
to Wwraras 
Smeti mew Court 


186 

340 

240 

272 

113 

23 

176 


+ '.- 1.4 

-1 

80 

» 700 

> 700 

-3 50 

4.0 

♦2 60 
-I X3 
-10 93 

-I 64 
-2 20 
i 179 
-2 129b 

-10 220 
• 10 Xl 
-10 20 0 
00 


02 2X3 
81.1 
<3 161 
X7 134 
07 130 
41 330 
34 1&5 
27 14 1 
30 iat 
133*0 

7.7 80 

20 31 1 

21 185 
70 88 

6.7 80 
20 292 
7.4 51 
OA 


TOO 5.7 17 


LOWON COMMOOny 
EXCHANGE 

GWJoyiieon end Co report 

SUGAR (From C. Czamirow) 
FOB 

Oct 144.0-430 

1520-60.0 

TGOj4-6D0 

165.0-64 4 

1^5-885 

1730-72.0 


Dec. 


March . 
May — 

S 3 - 


Vot 

COCOA 

1519 


_ 1*62-61 


1492-SI ' 






-. 1548-46 


1572-70 

IN* 

-.2342 

COFFEE 

S T 

1710-05 


1722-20 


1745-40 

Mar 

177040 

May 

1785-60 

•Sl 

17BS-60 

1785-60 

4413 


SOYABEAN 

AU 


a 


Pec 


Feb 

Jun. 




130U-28.0 
126.2-25J 
126.5255 
129. 5-29X1 

131.0- 30.0 

129.0- 2BX1 
71 


GASOIL 
Aug 


Oct. 


Nov . 
Dec. 


10800-8.00 

115.00- BYR 

118.00- 17.0 

111.00- BYR 
114.00^Yft 


Jan. 


Feb . 
Mar. 


os- 


. IIZXXJ-BYfl 
. 114.00-BYR 
. 107.00-BYR 
. 12X00-6-00 
3059 


LONDON METAL EXCHANGE 
Unofficial prices 
OCOetaf ramowarfljgum* 

Price b £ per metric tame 
Saver in pence per troy ouRca 
Badofl WoB & Co. Ud. report 
COMER GRADE A 

Cash 68550^86-50 

Three Months. S04J040&50 

Vd 700 

Tone 


STANDARD CATHODES ' 

Cash 860.00402.00 

Three Months. B81.00^82JX) 

V6I _100 

Tone Steady but Quiet 

LEAD 

Cteah - 22S-PO-25SJO 

Three Months .. 25BEO-259.00 

Vd ■ — 1000 

Tone Steady 

ZMC STANDARD 

Cash 485XM-505.00 

Vo) m 

Tone kite 

ZMC HIGH GRADE 

Cadi 53l-60*5i&50 

Three Months . 534.50-535X10 

VO) — 2025 

Tone — 


■ Al a- 

— ee IfOdK 

SILVER LAROE 

Cash — 349^0^5050 

Throe Moratw . 35800-358.00 
Vat Four 

Tone oust 


SX.VER SMALL 

Cedi 34S 50-350X50 


COMMODITIES 


Three Months. 358-00-35900 

Vd Ml 

Tone kfle 

ALUMMUM 

Cadi 7S3 .00-764.00 

Tteesi Months . 77X00-775.50 

Vd — 1425 

Tons 


MCXQ, 

Cash ^ 2860-2670 

Three Months 26S5-3700 

Vol 2SB 

Tone 


BEAT AND LIVESTOCK 

COMMISSION 

Average tatnock prices at 

r«prMentstiY*raertiet*oQ 

Angutt4tb 

CBcartfla, 9S30p per kg to 

GB; Sheep 15X87p per kg est 

0 

GW 

Ga 

(+4.1 


periglw 


England and web* 

Catfie dfix down 72 %. ave. 


iWLdowii 133 %, eve. 
price. 1S7-2Bp(-2£S) 

pnce.8037(+4J6) 

Scoriand; 

Catileno^dowri 1U%.ove. 
pnea. 9483 (-050) 

Sheep nos dam 02 %. eve. 

prfca. 146.80 (-8.01) 

P *8 rK ?i, l £ 41 ' 2% ' a «* 

pnce.79j7(-O07) 


LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Pig Contract 
P-porkMo 

Month Open Close 




Nov 

Jan 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 


Ikiq. 

l)nq. 

Unq. 


Unq. 
Unq. 
113S 
Unq- 1T5.3 
Unq. unq. 
U«l- Unq. 
8"* Unq. 
Unq. una 

Voi; 18 


Ptg Meal vd: 38 

LONDON IEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Lira Catfie Contract 
p.perkna 

Month open Close 


& 

Oct 

Nov 

Feb 

V 

Jun 


Unq- Una 
Unq. Una 
Unq- Unq. 
Lkiq. Una 
Unq. unq. 
Unq. unq. 
Unq. Unq. 

VofcO 


LONDON GRAIN FUTURES 

Epor torine 

Wheat Bailey 
Close Ctoca 
102 ^ 
29 SIS ,O5 -50 
)ia.“ I*® 


Month 

Sep 

N» 

Jan 

Mar 

May 

Volume: 
Wheat ... 

Barley _ 


i”-<5 !ii^ 


283 

T09 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 
£perionne 

Month Open Close 
Nov 12S.00 13080 

Feb 137.00 14290 

Apr 200.00 21330 

May 209.50 225J>0 

Nov 80.00 80.10 

Vol; 2382 

BIFFEX 

GJUFreigW Futures Lid 
report S10 per Indn paM 

freJ^Ttinden 


Oct 88 
Jan 87 
Apr 87 
Jut 87 
Oct 87 
Jan 88 
Apr 88 


Htgh/low Chao 
648-641 648 


72B-72S 

660-660 


879 

725.5 

680 

740 

785 

850 


Vol: 24 lots 
Open Interest 1938 


TANKER REPORT 

Hvjh/low Close 

Aug 88 1045.0 

Sep 88 1030-1030 1030.0 

Oct 86 10475 

Dec 86 1045-1045 104&0 

M«87 1050.0 

Jun 87 1100.0 

Vol: 20 lots 
Open interest 35 


_ .rinder 
1108.0 down 10J on 1/8/86 
Dry camo index: 

554 J) down 2.0 on 1/9/80 


1 no iUYLbd' IUWl/n X AUuuoi D 1700 


AINU t-JLlNAlN^Ii 



Bom your portfolio card check your 
right share price movements. Add wm 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Equities drift 



have won outright or -a share of the tool 
daily prize money stated. If you are a 
winner follow the datro procedure on the 
back of -your card Yoc must- always bare 
your card, available, when claiming. 


ACCOUNT DAYS: 


Kgan July 28 . Dealings end on Friday. §Contango day next Monday. Settlement day August 18 . 
§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 



Ftqn Uw Company 


On YU 

Pnce Oige pence i* P/E 


MO 37B Bowthorpe 590 

280 17 r. Br Tessa® in 

M2 75 Biawn Bocal Km 102 
. IS 11V Bulat (AF) A u 

15? 6* CASE 82 

738 568 Cetfe&Wntox 653 

3MW QuncmgtekK 523 

243 183 CAP Bp 106 

57 37 CHonOB « 

2» Db7«CPF 1M 

352 303 Comap 308 

M3 2SD Cray 318 

256 TiO. Crwtrtna rif 

79 as DM EM 69 

’S ’S. S 8 ***™ .*■ 153 

. 32 29‘i DevrtwS -A 33 
36S 2S3 MiWK. 3ZO 

30 37 DlMKHBAMIS 38 

212 162 DnMV 178 

*45 3flO Etocuocoraponeats 373 

« « Oecronc SSpi 85 

82 42 EKWrona: RanoS SI 

337 S3? Bean Lighting 270 

380 255 EurahSm 300 

253 150 Fhnwa Baa 160 

158 103 Hmm 123 

53 23 Romd Toch » 

226 158 GEC 194 

1BO SO GnMrator 123 

1M 80 HOUMEkCI 80 

TK3 50 IbT 53 

358 22S ImSBNllCaHin 

W3 175 Jonax Seoul so 

290 85 Mode 250 

323 233 lM natagwnon 255 

219 124 Looca 201 

4S 270 ass 

178 128 Micro 4 171 

*433 205 Maniac 235 

82 SI V. Micro BS SB 

2» 90 unp focus SO 

58 33 MuUOneEMCT 38 

GS 47 Mirny Dud 47 

313 241V Ktown u a* (tumg m 
100V 81 NB 33V 

49 15 Ocmwi 23 

580 383 Orton) fc m rumtnlx 531 
32 18 Pnom 27 

TS4'i 116 PtMpa Fin 5Uft C11B 
"va Pns?» Lamps n/v C13V 
260 1B0 Pllco 245 

190 120 DO "A" Ud Vbtng 163 
2*6 182 Piaaeay 204 

2»V 15V Do ADR 25 ElBV 
us no Pressac mi 

45 22 Quaa Automation 26 

234 ISO Racsl Bed 188 

488 158 Rautn 483 

815 445 Sendee (OH) 572 
152 74 Snorrocfc 138 

54 31V Sana Dftsan 33V 

168 96 STC 156 

210 142 Stnm tad 188 

134 78 Sntarn Otaanan 80 

15V 13', Tbm £13'* 

2S3 in TUponi Hamit 201 
125 44 Twown 45 

629 374 Them EMI 472 

250 170 Thorps [FW] 250 
350 225 Tunml 206 

318 206 US 290 

273 185 llnasch 185 

285 155 Ud Lsnfen IDS 
15® 118 list Sam 156 
SOS 320 VQtttUMm 487 
323 225 MM 248 

n® 5« Wenan Setocaon 7« 
108 75 Whewortn Elect 85 
285 2S0 Htmtoeato Ftamg 255 


IDO 13 183 
10.7 SI 11.0 
O UU 
0.1 91 Z13 

08 07 88 
133 2.1 181 
106 <8114 

2.1 1.1 243 

. 103 

2.1 07153 

58 13234 

85- 33 110 

64 108 198 

10 O* .. 

13 43 73 

23 03313 

31 55 12.1 

41 U1U 

09 24 18.1 

18 15 WO 
45 03143 ' 
83b 33 150 
63 23 102 
31 15 16.8 

24 13 193 

uBb 23 153. 

51 21 12.1 

82# 67 103 

5.6 45 10 2 

1.7 32 7 A 

ID 04 .. 
121 50 94 

17.10 63 522 
17.9 70 99 
14* 0.7 213 

154 44 129 

14 08 269 

43 13 152 

0.7 12 9.1 

011 03 288 
o.i n 02 .. 

193 55 133 

72 50 154 

1.1 42 4.7 

26 06 232 

15 53 134 

575 30 ■ - 

73 51 134 
73 42 92 
72 35 151 

IT 22208 
.. .. 124 

43 23 1741 

7.10 13.254 
314 55123 

27 23 253 

07 21 84 

.. .. U5 

65 33 104 
03 03 158 x 

100 50 158 

25 56 23 

250 53 173 

51 24 124 
25 0919.6 

79 27 203 
as 4.« 104 
57 35 53 
31 53 128 

38 07 297 

129 52 83 
43 53 173 

22 26 110 
93 36 120 


313 240 EwMmPraa 283 

221 158 Edbro 190 • .. 

Z77 214 EB 228 

43V 29V BOM 38 -1 

1SS 102V EMco 137 

28V 17V BKVDtox (AE) S’ (27V 

104 52 Bum 18) 97 *4-1 

29V IgA. Ember E23V *V 

301 282 EDfikMi CM CMy 327 -4 

2SV 16V Enaaon (LM) B - £21 V 

164 13> Erakne Home 143 r . . 

177V 130 V Eunpmi tom 136V -2 

142 112 DoSVPrf 131 

342 158 Evmd 218 

214 124 ExpanUH 170 r .. 

411 312 Exta 353 r-1 

55 22 Fatten 11V -V 

42 28 Feeder Agile tad 38 +3 

143 IDS tone OH) 129 *M 

75 go Fun manor so 

628 408 Feme 593 -2 

67 35 Ftewtoen 58 -6 

124 84 Ftaxauo CSV* 102 

89 31 V FOM 46 

123 100 Fogarty 100 

41 V 27V FbKex Group uy 35 
199 157 FamwaM ,5 Harvey 175 

87 40 French IThamaa) SO • .. 

131 84 QB In mm.. 

385 256 BKN 344 .1 

310 260 OR 300 

118 60 Ganun Eng 108 

157 100 CMWDWr 115 0-4 

150 111 GWUBS 124 .. 

11V756V Ghuo 9SS -12 

344 «94 Qjnwed 312 -3 

505 250 corn Korr 30' 


143 53 03 
107 58 124 
93 42 123 

27 73 13.1 
53(1 43137 


FINANCE AND LAND 


248 220 Abtagworffi 

184 128 Anton Him 135 

715 288 Anocwpm 626 

210 110 Bartday Tech 206 rt 

28 18 CaraWtfl E18V 

283 194 CndiW 250 

43 18 Cantreway 30 

29V 17 Equity 3 Ban 28 

185 132 Nxy 6 am 132 

194 133 M0M 181 . -1 

78 82 NhHwm Low 87 *1 

SS 80 Do BS. £88 +1 

148 1M Newmotot 144 

235 .198 TompUDn 220 42 


13 03 .. 
32 24 57 

275D 44 &1 

17 1 03 743 

57 23 393 

13 43 254 
53 52 131 
Ub 43 259 


95 01 OoBto 
148 114 Ngwmartot 
235,198 TampMon 


131 84 GC1 In 102 . 

385 356 BKN 344 .1 

310 360 BH 300 

118 60 Gwtm Eng 108 

157 100 GMMDWr 115 *-4 

150 111 GWUK 124 .. 

11V756V Gtuxo aSS -12 

344 194 Qjnwed 312 -8 

505 250 Gang Korr 388' >-30 

182 107 Grampian Hdga 138 

312 206 GrouuM 278 -3 

10V BV OnmoM 7V • . . 

93 59V HMtt PredUM 83 

232 134 WO Eng 172 -2 

162 126 WO (M) 142 +2 

285 1B0 Hahn ISO 4« 

290 230 Habm 2sa • 

41 2SV Hampaon MO 37V • .. 
49 20 Hananax 20 -1 

191 141 Hanaon 170 -1 

180 1*5 Do menu £170 

1T6 98 DoSMbPI 108V 

124 V 116 V DO 10% C113V *V 

253 133 Hargmaw 253 • .. 

275 175 Hama (PHtoJ 250 • 

823 431 HmW SrtWay 52S -2 


nvncial *nuots appoar on Pago 




a 




48 • 36’ 

rMOO N/VBsaim 

E46 1 - 

4-1*1 

400 

88 .. 

208 T80 

AhedCWods 

195 

• .. 

58 

1020* 

.415 291 

Amanfefijn 

40b 

• 45 

KM) 

25 21.1 

247 .180 

Anchor OauScxI 

237 


51 

25 139 

158 106 

BTP 

1*1 

• -. 

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4J 170 

111 7BV Bayar DU50 

E85V 

4to 

700 

82 .. 

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168 '1T2 

BMjdsn 

121 

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1U8 

85 182 


139 

60 

42180 , 

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74 



..164 1 

139 82 

Camng (W) 

110' 


51 

4.8 IBS 

306 245 

CoaMe ' 

28* 

1-2 

107 

30 108 

168 135 


108 

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6b 

30 188 

160 IB 

Do -A’ 

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68 

44 9.4 , 

20 15 


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163 127 

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88 152 

131 100 

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210 

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298 215 

Foeaco-fcsiKs^j 

236 


120 

55 92 

168 113 

Hdttaad (Jaws) 

164 

4-1 

64 

42 110 

453 830 

Henson 

408 


21-4 

52102 

imv 721. Hoacnsr DM50 

£79 

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10 V 734 

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980 

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480 

50.110 

410 333 

taporfa 

355 

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110 

3314.7 

118 100 

l3w . 

100 

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154 VI) 9 


152 


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51-82 

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176 129 

Rantokh 

143 

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24 170 

330 218 

Etna 8PD 

257 

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233 179 

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146 

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30 112 

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70 

80 280 


20 

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102 

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94 

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7.4 

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321 

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823 431 HawWExMMay 52S -2 

150 92 Hawtoy 97 

190 81 Wy (toman) 175 

221 140 Hapmnb Canmc m -2 

2OT 98 Hostae 156 

96 65 Haw Pi 95 *2 

142 122 UghoanSJOb 135. 

81 62 Hoh&Broa 

106 68 Had Uoyd 93 

285 148 Hoptoaona 241 • 

120 91 Howdan 100 -2 

310 234 rtintmg AMOC 270 +5 

11 J 88 HunuaGrauo W m .. 

285 20Pi Hutotan vmampaa 285 *9 

191 HO AH 1G6 -2 

315 211 Kotron 229 

295 253 JactoOU Bnm 258 

133 . 90V Jardina. Math 133 +3V 

815 473 Joimon CAMnwa 566 

2TB 133 Jomon Matmay 193 0-3 

44V 22v jnmarn * re 33 ■* v 

313 23S Johnaum 320 

140 66 Jonaa-6 SiMnw 12B "-2 

132 87. Jounhn (Thomas) 123- 

.29 31 . Katomazoo . • 28 . . 

n 25 itaton 31 

325. 188 KOSOV hid 310 

130 105 Kennedy Smalo 118 

298- 230 Konxww (AJ 275 *2 

2tS 123 KtoaoE-Sa 200 • .. 


57b 34 15.1 
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52 73 .. 
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7 S 31 173 
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207 30 113 

27 23 77 

5.4 31 313 
103 53 16.1 
6.1b 39 182 

53 4.1 84 

.. • .. 282 
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57 31 134 

107 44 93 
53 U 21 
114 42 83 
83 85 72 

75 43137 
13' 03 423 
26 34 25.1 

03 82154 
83' 13131 
.. 183 
107 33 124 
53 44 84 
•53 43184 
•..23*104 94 
1.7 53214 
114 37 1S3 
200 17 207 
214 73 233 
83b 43183 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


CINEMAS AND TV 


zm 178 Arpm TV 'A' 
S3 77 ■ Gnimpaia 

2*o.- 179 . hivTuv 
368*283 LWT Manx 
350 1B8 Scot TVA' 
290 153 TVS N/V. 

48 31 TSW 

224 223' Thxroo* TV 


248 3-2 133 - 53 133 

47 +1 23 82 88 

218 .. 114 52 93 

341 *1 213 32-187 


.. 114 52 93 

*1 213 32-187 

-2 150 4.6 103 

> .. 143b&3 1(L9 

23 53 124 


*33 

328 

Grand Ma 

381 

-6 

132 

32120 

288 

208 

Kennedy Brookes 

233 


2.1 

00 120 

39T 

312 

LWXDto 

340 

-4 

18.1 

4J 182 

5*5 

447 

Urn Path Hotels 

320 


142 

20 158 

100 

7BV Mount Qwrtoae 

69 

-V 

2.1 

24 14.7 

105 

67 

Pmca 01 W Hotels 

87 

• .. 

2.1 

20 157 

re 

58V 

Queans Mom 

85V 

-1 

23 

32 140 

405 

370 

Smoy Hotels 'A' 

373 


50 

10147 

81 

58 


64 

■ II 

18 

28 150 

200 

146 

Tmstauaa Fats 

148 

-2 

70 

53147 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


FIKANOM' 




HU 




*• T“ 


•■lT 


¥ »'• 



iSTs^ 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


O’*** 3 


m-**** ( 


280 193 

oSiS 

!» l 4 ' 

B 6 
280 230 
469 364 
590 429 
48 32 
740 410 
438 286 
58 X 
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47. 33 
80 *8 
117 » 
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31? 148 
378 742 
IK 88 
291 TUB 

520 318 
198 138 - 
8ES 583 

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853 638 
1S3 120 
590 417 
331 202 
683 42fi . 
.122 ' BO • 
448 280 


AIKd Inch 240 

ABSOOOWJMWW 2 ■ 

air New 2 186 

Banumenca £8' 

Bank 01 htftnd 210 

Bam uun mw 16 
Bam Lacnm UK 240 
Bank 01 Sauna 402 
Batons 479 

Bencwwk S 

Brown Sottoy <7S 

Caw Man 308 

Canes 55 

OwUaMM £25 

nw&* Udu *70* 
CanunatzM* £93'. 
oeuDGM Baft £764 
Fnt Hal tom 179 
Ganara Nat 307 
Gwnu Pan 78 

Haims 708 

Ha Samai 380 

hk Swuysi El 

jnaapo i fl5cw« *eo 
Kng 8 SRxxxpn 144 
rOanwxi Batson no 
Uovtfc 379 

M4reu»y M 643 

DO P* A 123 

MMand _ 530 

Nat AuatBk 204 

MWea 507 

Citaman era 

PitMoant 828 


150 51 


160 87 113 
20 0 5 0 8 8 
W MU 


ELECTRICALS 


228 53 82 
COO 54 83 
1&5 47 113 


398-180. A8B»a - 

350 

-3 

114 

22 201 


163 

• 

21 


136 35 Amend 

134 

44 

83. 

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99 43 Aonoot Oomawa 

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96 63 Aden 

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33.7 

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263 

43 

58 

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220 MO Auto Sec - 

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170 

12.128 

370-240- BCC 

«S 64 asn . 


-13 

187 

58150 

85 

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28 57 


260 

178 

AAH 

337 

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230 

160 

AG 8 Research 

174 

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80 b 50 290 

127 

96 

AIM 

. 117 


82 

70 124 

671 


APV 

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160 

20 100 

111 ) 

80 

Aaremson 

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60 

70 81 

268 


town 

222 

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112 

50 140 

343 

207 

Aknamra mar 309 


85 

20180 

158 

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156 





275 

130 


250 


121 



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440 

366 

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405 

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289 

7.1 

110 

91 

530 

41 

236 

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Asa Br Eng 8 % 

41 

380 

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11-4 

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360 

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263 

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88 

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225 

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363 

BET Did 

408 

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50 

110 

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BETEC 

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277 ‘ 

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332 

237 

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293 

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204 

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280 

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300 

180 

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180 

120 

31 b 

218 

Baker Pokxie 

277 

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107 

39 

102 

210 

128 

Banro bid 

180 


88 

40 


174 

112 

Bsrtvtm 

151 

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20 

10 

170 

495 

180 


237 

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57 

411 

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53 


30 

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260 


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80 

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21 

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187 

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214 


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156 






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98 


70 

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130 

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214 


509 

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80 

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280 

62ft 

310 


588 

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163 

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105 

147 

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163 

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89 

71 

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40 

98 

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796 

178 

Stock (Pear) 

2*3 

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26 


190 

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30 

60 



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134 





480 

169 


358 

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230 

335 

187 


297 

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353 

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123 

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50 

199 

35 

110 

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287 

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214 

136 

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209 

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164 

136 

115 

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10 

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383 

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190 

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59 

80 

190 

154 

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173 

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100 

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104 



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27 

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303 

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20 


Edited by Matthew May 


COMPUTER HORIZONS 


Gassroom technology 
takes a spanking 


There is no doubt that Britain 
is rapidly heading towards an 
information society. What is 
equally clear is that it is totally 
unprepared for the task. 

Its present system is under- 
funded and its resources 
stretched to the limit, claimed 
advisers to the Cabinet Office 
in a report* last week. 

Education is now seen as 
one of the principal political 
issues in the next general 
election, and the Government 
had a blunt reminder of this 
from its high technology advi- 
sors - now disbanded - the 
Information Technology Ad- 
visory Panel (1TAP) to the 
Cabinet Office. 

These advisors, who in the 
past have attempted to in- 
fluence government policy on 
cable television and technol- 
ogy, were candid: the British 
education system is in crisis, 
and needs to be studied by a 
Commission of Inquiry ana a 
proper and more relevant 
structure created before the 
year 2000. 

The use of computers and 
other high technology props 
could be used to for greater 
effect to teach all subjects, the 
advisors said, while the teach- 
ers themselves needed the 
opportunity and the finance to 
be continually retrained. 

A disturbing statistic high- 
lighted by the ITAP report was 
the age of British teachers. By 
the end of the decade more 
than two thirds of teachers in 
Britain will be over 40 years of 
age, putting considerable 
strain on the limited resources 
for retraining. 

Those funds are inadequate, 
the advisors believe, and 
bureaucracy is preventing the 
proper use of existing modest 
funds. The educational bud- 
gets are the province of the 
Department of Education and 
Science, while funds for 
retraining are controlled by 
the Manpower Servicesi 
Commission. 

The ITAP report concluded: 
“It is clear that our education 
system is under considerable 
pressure through the effects of 
expenditure constraints and 


demographic changes, while 
contractions in the education 
service are leading to an 
ageing teacher population and 
reduced career prospects— 
Major changes in attitude 
towards and within the educa- 
tion system are evident in 
moves to alter curricula and 
examinations in the schoojs 
and in the increased emphasis 
on immediate relevance to 
national needs at all level.” 

The reference to national 
needs is an oblique one to a 
shortage of skills. These have 
in the recent post been high- 
lighted by the Department of 
Trade and Industry commit- 
tee on training, led by junior 
industry minister Jobn 
Butcher, by the National Eco- 
nomic Development Office 
(NEDO), the TUC and the 
House of Lords. 


I 


THE WEEK 


I 


By Bill Johnstone 

Technology Correspondent 

The crux of the ITAP report 
is that the education system 
should gear itself to the needs 
of an information-based soci- 
ety where technical skills will 
be required even for the most 
modest occupation, and that 
computer based leaching aids 
can easily assist that process. 

Says ITAP: “The opportu- 
nities for better communica- 
tions in education at all levels 
have been dramatically im- 
proved by the advent of the 
new information technologies. 
These technologies, such as 
cable networks and interactive 
video systems, provide access 
to information from 
databases, and the processing 
of this information, on a vast 
scale and at cost well below 
any previously achievable. 

“All these technologies de- 
pend on cheap computer 
power in the form of 
microprocessors, dense mem- 
ories and associated micro- 
electronics devices; and the 


computers themselves, as 
small,' cheap but personal 
microcomputers, are develop- 
ing as a major — perhaps 
dominant — element in the 
influence which IT will have 
on the future of education. 

“Some of the initiatives 
already under way to promote 
understanding about IT have 
been criticized because of 
their failure to provide ade- 
quately for the teacher train- 
ing and retraining necessary to 
achieve the maximum bene- 
fits from the technology. 

“There is, of course, a need 
to adapt initial teacher train- 
ing to cater for the shifts in 
educational practice and con- 
tent, but it is clear that existing 
teachers, at all levels, will need 
retraining throughout their 
careers if they are to remain 
effective, and that adequate 
provision for this will have to 
be made on a continuing 
basis.” 

The ITAP report also 
matches some of the conclu- 
sions from a report** by the 
Organization for Economic 
Co-Operation and Develop- 
ment (OECD). The report, 
about IT in education, sur- 
veyed the developments 
within the OECD countries. 
The results of the study show 
that a new role might be 
demanded of the school, since 
education is now being pur- 
sued in other places, particu- 
larly the home. 

The report found that in 
many of the OECD countries 
the formal educational system 
is being challenged in the use 
and teaching of IT by a wide 
variety of new groups. Some 
are commercial; others are a 
mixture of commercial and 
publicly funded organizations. 
ITAP is confident of a quick 
government response to its 
report. To be worthwhile that 
response must be more than 
anondyne. 

* Learning to live with IT, 
ITAP. Cabinet Office. HMSO 

** New Information Technol- 
ogies: A Challenge for Educa- 
tion, OECD. Paris, 



Colin iSaignent, as Oxford medical student doing research at 
the UK Transplant Service, with some of the patient records 
which are being transferred to computer. Mr Baignent was 
the recipient of a kidney transplant 

Time life-saver on 
vital transplants 


By Matthew May 
A new version of a computer 
system installed at an 
organization that distributes 
kidneys and hearts for trans- 
plant is speeding up the 
process of choosing suitable 
patients in the crucial hours 
after a donor becomes 
available. 

A kidney, for example, has a 
life of only 48 hours outride 
the body, but it is desirable to 
transplant it wi thin 12 hours. 
Coupled with a scarcity of 
donors that has resulted in a 
waiting list for kidneys of 
more than 3,500, choosing the 
most suitable patient quickly 
can save precious time es- 
pecially where the donor and 
patient are hundreds of miles 
away from each other. 

Rejection of a transplanted 
kidney is the major problem 
for patients. And a computer 
database installed at the UK 
Transplant Service in Bristol 
has records of the tissue types 
of ail patients to draw up a 
short list of those least likely 
to reject the kidney. 

It is an ideal application for 
computerization The latest 
version of the computer sys- 
tem checks through the many 
thousands of variations in 
tissue types and can match the 


most suitable patient to a 
donor within three minutes. 

Whenever a kidney be- 
comes available the computer 
chooses the 30 best matched 
patients in Britain for the 
transplant along with the 10 
most suitable local patients. 

The surgeon for the first 
patient is told when a donor is 
available and has Half an hour 
to decide if the kidney is 
suitable or should be left for 
another patient During this 
time the surgeon can dial 
directly into the Bristol 
database for more detailed 
information. 

If the Bristol computer sys- 
tem finds no suitable match 
for the organ in Britain it can 
access a European database 
with the records of a quarter of 
a million patients in 36 Euro- 
pean and Mediterranean 
countries. 

In order to achieve fast 
response times a mini- 
computer is used, funded by 
the Department of Health and 
Social Security. To ensure the 
system is always available the 
computers, made by Digital 
Equipment, are duplicated to 
provide an immediate 
replacement should any part 
of the equipment foil. 


Made in Taiwan’ threat 


■ Cheap personal computwsTrom Taiwan 
are becoming an increasing threat to what is 
left of the micro industry In Britain. Tne 
British Micrcomputer Manufacturers Group 
says its members have become 
"increasingly puzzled about how toe 
manufacturers out there manage to sell at 
sucti..-amaizingty low prices". The group puts it 

down to the lower cost of components tram 

high volumes, the closeness of the suppliers of 

parts to manufacturers and a tower cost ot 

production due to a “sensible degree of 

automation coupled with low labour costs . 

No solution to the problem there for the hard 
pressed British. But one justified complaint Is 

that there is higher import tariff on 
components than assembled parts —hence tne 
attraction of importing whole micros. The 
BMMG says that British manufacturers, such 

as Timex, that are able to handle huge 

orders for computer assembly can give quotes 
competitive with those from the Far East 
except for the tariff- 



systems across 
one used 
used 
u 


United’ States, including 
iress. The boy is said to have 
telephone mes to hook 
to me scnooi systems in Milwaukee and 
Cleveland suburbs and the University of 
Texas. Police say the youth also tapped into at 
least one computer used by Congress 
because he had a printout of the record of 
debates and proceedings In Congress. 

Officers confiscated his Commodore 64 
computer, discs with codes and other 
information and stolen credft card information. 


El 58 million giving a 38 par ^ 

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Take five . 

■ Tandy , America's largest retaflerof 
consumer electronic products has introduced 
five IBM-compatiWe personal computers 
that seem likely to stepup^the already rapid 

I its 



position in mo bu-wu»ju w '» .. 

which a large number of companies are making 
computer products similar to IBM 5 PCs and 
selling them at lower prices with more features. 

The new computers are likefy to put further 

pressure on IBM to lower prices only weeks 
after the giant computer company slashed 
Its wholesale prices up to 18 per cent 




1 


' COMPUTER 
BRIEFING j 


Data ignorance 

■ The speed with which British companies 
adopt technology is being threatened by the 
Government aria the computer industry 
paying insufficient attention to data security, 
says Peter Jermer, author of a new 36-page 
booklet on the subject He sees Ignorance ot 
the amount of computer fraud in Britam as a 
major handicap. "Unlike the United States, 

where by law computer crime must be 
reported, the UK has no requirements for 
org anizati ons to inform authorities about 
breaches in data security," he says in 
appealing for such laws to be Introduced 
here. 

Data Security -A Management Guide, 

published by PA Computers and 
Telecommunications at £6.50, looks at 
different ways people can break into a 
company system and the basic methods of 
protection. Further information from 01-828 
7744. 


- "TO— C 






r 




fl 


\<=f 


■u 


] 


‘Visitors find him boring. But he saves ns 
a fortune in office staff* 

West German slot 

| The Federal Cartel Office in West 



third 

largest computer company, nos reported 
fourth-quarter earnings more than double to 


uomrai imaoppuiuu 

office equipment maker Olivetti to 
Triumph- Adler, West Germany's te— 
producer of electronic typewriters from 
Volkswagen. It will further strengthen the Italian 
companys position as Europe's foremost 
specialist in office automation and give it a 
major foothold in the West German market 
for electronic typewriters. It should also boost 
European chances of fighting off 
competition in the office equipment market 
from US and Japanese firms. 


COMPUTER APPOINTMENTS 


MVS operations/ 
systems programming 
background 

SOFTWARE SUPPORT 


up to £20K 
+ car + benefits 
Slough based 


ENGINEERS 


Computer Associates is one of the world's largest systems software companies, with over 
50% on all IBM mainframes running our products. .... 

Continued growth and internal promotion have led to opportunities to join our team of 
sales and customer support engineers. 

There you will be responsible for providing pre and post sales support and problem 
diagnosis both at our offices and at their sites throughout the country. 

MVS experience is essential, gained in operations and/or systems programming roles over 



initially contact: 


* 


JOMPUTER 
ASSOCIATES 


Pam Johns 

Computer Associates 

Edinburgh House 
43-51 Windsor Road 
Slough, Berks SL1 2EQ 
TeL (0753) 77733 
no agencies please 



SYMBOL 
OF MTEORTTY 
SINCE 1966 


AU Contractors 
CV*8 Welcome 

AJK (Personnel Ha ra ga mw Q Ltd 

72C Ctardi Road 

How East Stm BN3 2FP 

Tot Brighton (0073) 721828 


COMPUTER 

PROFESSIONALS 

We can otter Progr a m m ers. 
Oper ato r s . Salesmen end 
Enoneers bettor prospects 
ana more money. Ring us 
now to discuss im prwfcig 
your potation. 

TIMES COMPUTER 
SERVICES LTD 
01-258 1878 
to 8|W 


Part-Time Computer 
Studies Lecturer 

Required by indepen- 
dent college in Central 
London for September 
course start 

Reply to BOX D57. 


Exciting Opportunity For 

ACCOUNTS BASED 
MICRO SUPPORT 
PERSONS 

in Loudon, Thames Valley & 

The Midlands 

A knowledge of popular accounting software is 
essential Attractive salary and car provided. 

Apply: 

PC Support Ltd, 

5-7 Forlease Road, Maidenhead, 
Berks, SL6 1RP 
Tel: 0628 75579 


NW + Yorks 
A/Ps, SAs, Mgrs 

061-8324184 
Leeds 468376 

irnnAutoga, Hncawyt 


Sampson. 

Sm~ 



URGENT 

CONTRACTS 


ik* BMman- 
tnmg M system 38 nmtessowfc 
£££ EXCELLENT RATES £££ 
C.V. to Sato* Cwmkn (Nb) LM. 
1*» NMtofca Baad.Cnat 

nnton , an m 

az7S25H2a 

K7I SUMS OMt/mtoMds 


BUILDING FOR YOUR FUTURE 


FOR SECURITIES MARKET - CENTRAL LONDON £12-28K 

GRADUATE ANALYST/PROGRAMMERS + CAR 

Caraway: Larne subsidiary of Monatnnto Banking Corporation mantis! in Cantral London, noth 
ottxxs n turope. Far East and North America. Provxtos financial in form atio n services Mrtdmde via 
m extensive data network. 

Several Aiatyst/Progranwiwa with good degree or eqwatent am required to wort In smaS 


SYSTEMS ENGINEERS 


BERKSHIRE 


prop a atone, within a young and ven> fnendty environment to dcagi and inteemeni new franco! 
systems serving the pr of essor ia l investment community, 

tapartoaca: SaUd COBOL pugmvnng, "C or ASSEMBLER coupled with creative software develop. 
mem. txpesure to VM/CMS and financial systems woukf be a distinct advantage as the emrimn meul 
encompasses Financial. kivestmenL Eurobond/ SeeunOM app to twns. H ar dware: IBM/Amdahl man. 
hames. Tandems and micros with ukiUivwlcahfln talks. 

G tow n fc Wonderful opportunity to ]on a tegn cafifare onpn taa Pnn at the f o ref ro nt of tfw world's 
largest financial databases. The excellent salary Is compfimeafed by rait-contnbuuiy pension. BUPA. 
bans and company ear scheme. If you respond wefl in this festmovmg aid dynamic mnronmenL 
you can expect Iasi pramofaan and tngh financial revolts. 

REF: TW 1336 


TO £23X 
+ BENEFITS 

j European company, imntved In SUran Circuit design. Based In Berkshire 
in Munich and Paris, there are hintw pkus to sat <v tfaor awn nanutadutng plant in 
Europe later this year. 

Pratewc Engineers and Protect Leadens are required tor the dev el opment of admead CAD toots. 
GSSBes wiD be wrking or SUN and DEC hardware using “trT 
B— tore Candidates must have torefl VLSI e xn enanca. preferably gained witiin a Siicon design 
envramwl Successful upptara wto have computer desigi experience and kn o wt ed g o of physical, 
s&ucmal an d htaavto uito design. Constoerable aitarost wtt be shown to caod toate s wkh direct 
exposure to msMmg products dkeetty on client sties. 

Sew An excaUcnt oocaturatv to wort for a company who, to the next tun wore, aim to ha k» n» 
toedroat at h-tech sheen design. Bensfits Include an orafent remuneration package aid stock 
options for candidates to senror .levels. REF: TX 1978 

SALES 

BERKS BASE 


ICL PROGRAMMERS /SBJ KIR PROGRAMMERS 
- TO MOVE INTO ANALYSIS 


SW LONDON 
E11-16K + 
BENEFITS 

E One of the largest and most successful computer service c om pa aas deafing with most 
groups and commen a to/dutonesB appkcaiton areas, staffed with comport and dynamic 
professorate. 

Wtes: Progammere and Server Pro gr a mm ers to move into an aialyss role and work on major 
protects, playing an xitegral pan in a smtal (gam wor k ing from the Analysis stage through to 
miptouentaMii. At the more senior level there will be team leadership. Treeing wiO bo given in 
analyse. 

'EgwrincK Programmers - 18 months - 2 years COBOL experience ganed on ICL manframes from a 
commercial or tnanoal tockpnund. Senror Prospammere - 3 years plus, prtoeratty wdh SMS. TPMS 
and team leadershrp experience. At the more junior level framing writ be green in IDMS. 
Gerard: These opportunities mua be carefully constoered by candtdaes wtoi hardware/woteram 
experience landed to one or even two users, as tha type of person has benefited considerably in the 
pel The wnaty of hardware employed and the scope of appfcations coupled with raaOent tearing, 
can lead to fast promot i on. Mater sala ries and a certam prosperous lutnre. 

REF: TF 230 

ANALYST PROGRAMMERS SURREY TO £16K + BENEFITS 
Betopray: A dynamo fast moving software house, wen respected for os production ot tinned 
jSBSSgETm the European market place. Based n Surrey with wok to Pro. 

PBttoc Analyst Progranmm retired to work in e team on the Cratopmait of besgofo systems, 
irom design to m ip lo ffl e iti toi flrt. Work mvohres regtoar travel to Pans - all expenses paid. 
Capeitrace: Upwards of 2 years COBOL pmg ram tring within si SM mainframe enwronmenL 
Exposure la CfCS DOS/VSE « MVS sssenbaL Lrie assurance or financial applications experience 

wodd be ot ptfbetoar merest 

Srant Unlimited cseer opportunities within tha company. wHh benefits todudmg BUPA. health 
msinnce and toe assurance. 

REF: TS 1915 

SYSTEMS ANALYSTS/ CITY E13-C21K 

COMPUTER AUDIT +BANKING BENEFITS 

Company: One of the World's leafing baking cftpor aM i tt . a major user at BM mwframes and 
comparer hardware. Higher tevris of excellence in technology are oonstendy bang attaund 
and for Bus to continue more D.P. profes si onals are sought 
Patera Systems Analysts to rank on a variety of hnanoai mf badmg appbeadors. partaatotyin 
the km'-ms? Audit area. Also Computer Audtore to work wimin the Bank's AuOt department, advising 
oo computer systems ato Basils between audit and DA .1 

Expetterac Upwards ot three yeara data processing expenence in Sysrems Analysis, computer auto 
ST^SHT^ssurance rolt ft w* bo advantageous ID ha* a background m finance or accounting. 
Carehdates with experience ol any hardware >- matotrame. mni or mere are asked to apply, 
Genoa; These are gaUra opportunities for career a dvancanen L not only prtvnkng a way mu 
BSaBSTbui also to work on me very latest IBM hardware. A vrey generous stoary, mongage subsidy, 
bsiking and a range ot addfflonai benefits should make these even more attractive prospects. 

REF: ID 1990 


£174)80 OTE 
BASE TO £14,000 


MOVE TO SALES! 

DATACDMS, NETWORKS 
SALES TRAINING 

C— pc Recognised throughout the ILK. as a leader In date-communfcatkws. networking and 
souon sales, this major mantdaeftaer is curentty restipdng a trainee sales propamine tor 
a ntHtiOMS computing professonais. 

Peetoec teas## waring os e sales Man represeutddM. you wfl be required to deal wllh aB 
customer erapnes and market research wtffxn iwo district mate! sectors: Le. Govemment/Local 
Authorities, and m^or accounts. Profession to mainst re am ales operation wte foUow enttisi one 
months of jotetq the company. 

tareteiw The suxessfari carefidatos wfl! amenity be working in sales sremort or tedndcal sreqwt 
nues. m aobkion. excelent commumcation skfcs and good atos aptitude is assarted. An undnstral* 
mg of datacommuKations would rahsaly be advMageous aUmugh not essential. 

Bewend: Youaq and ambtoaus individuals will recognise ras as an outstanding opportutov to mow 
into the sales arena, ta adddron to the oa s &odtng salary the company is offering toS product and 
sales tranag conducted eaemtfy by a profe ssi onal or ga n tea tm REF: TYB 1752 

SALES EXECS + SALES MGRS LONDON £40.000 + OTE 

NETWORKED IBM PC'S BASE TO £20,008 

TIMES TOP 1008 INCENTIVES SCHEME 

Fanpir One of the leading deafen ki tha ILK. with a worldwide turnover to £250 Miron, is 
artrenuy OTiiQoing a major expansion p ro gr am me. To help sustain their record of success, 
unmaKhed wdMn the rndusny today, a number of vacancies are now avabble. 
rod de r . Based at the company's new purpose buft offices in WBto London, the brief wM be to at 
9m above business solutions rto corporate accounts in London and the Horae Comtes Current 
vacancies include territory sales, account management, and sales ma na geme nt portions. 
C x p erie rac To tarffy lor these positions, ah candidates wffl need to demonstrate a sound back- 
pasSTilio4i#an sales and an Bidepth knowledge to the rncro martefptace. Famftartty with large 
©M mantrama pteg is erf partmte inwesi individuals wishkig to apply tw a management position 
should have relevant oqurance antes level 

6— at TUs company tomty befinres that salary should be commensurate witb success and 
atowvemert. To tha end. an outstanding incentive scheme has been implemented including trips 
abroad fur high acM w era. This tooedier with the axcataw earn ings potential and the generous 
benefits padoge. mate this a superb opportunity to further your career. TY 1660 

SOFTWARE SALES CENTRAL LONDON OR BASE TO £16X 
INTERNATIONAL EASTERN HOME COUNTIES UNLIMITED 
OPPORTUNITIES EARNING 

GOOD MNGMNT PROSPECTS 

Ca ropra yr TfuslniemBitwl Software CoratotancyfeprttfPtegBmtotinalionalorg Bls a i tof L teid is 
seanang nr two exsenmod consultants to jam tireir successful team. 

FeeMtec Selling tegh vtoue stoutens software nnnmg on ML DEC and other major hardware to 
ossung Blue Chip companies and into osar busness arras in Central London or the Eanero Ham 
Counties. Opportunmas to develop into European and US markets are on otter acconSng to irelvklual 
success in the UK. In adOtem. prospects tor promotion no ma nagement are antnpared. 
bpertracK Csihsbbs snouio Be aae to demonstrate a good track ream! n a retevas eawranment, 
preteriHy ilntnBM expenence n-financtei or accounting areas. Be capaMe to hgn level negobaums 
and possess outstanding comrmntcaBon skills. 

Ss— tor Its company is already tug My respected in the marketplace haring been established tor 
over ISTyoars- Tte generous range to benefits mduto tomce to car. BUPA. pension aid irfwnito: 
avrangs DOtenoai and exceUent prospect s for promotmn, REF: TB 1S51 



Inspecting the books 


The belief by the American 
government that it can restrict 
the use of advanced comput- 
ers only to those it approves of 
continues to cause con- 
troversy, Matthew May writes: 

Last month Paddy 
Ashdown, the Liberal spokes- 
man for industry, reiterated 
his requests to the British 
Government that American 
companies should be told to 
withdraw letters or ques- 
tionnaires to British cus- 
tomers which assume that 
America retains control of 
their purchases. 

Meanwhile, the Govern- 
ment has still to reply to an 
American request for its of- 
ficials to come to the UK to 
inspect the books of certain 
British companies that have 
bought American technology 
to check that it is not being 
sold on to customers America 
disapproves o£ 

A particularly thorny prob- 
lem in Britain is with the 
University of London which 
wants to take over the use of 
an American Cray super-com- 
puter already in use in the U K. 
It fears restrictions from the 
US government on who can 
use iu 

America is feeing a similar 
problem internally — though 


without the charges of trying 
to enforce its domestic laws 
abroad. Just over two weeks 
ago a Cyber supercomputer 
went on line in Princeton run 
by a consortium of 13 univer- 
sities. • 

Until recently super- 
computers were largely re- 
stricted to defence use 
including the design of atomic 
weapons and breaking secret 
code; but the new system 
allows access to marchers all 
over the USA. 

Such widespread access says 
the American government 
could wdl include researchers 
from Soviet countries and as 
such would compromise na- 
tional security. Its chief con- 
cerns arc that 'Soviet nationals 
could use the supercomputer 
to solve complex military 
problems their own systems 
cannot handle - 

Many academics involved 
with the system are dismissing 
the governments concerns as 
exaggerated and want all for- 
eign nationals — including 
Eastern Europeans studying in 
the United States to be al- 
lowed access. 

If the outcome is in favour 
of the academics, however, 
America will face an even 
tougher time trying to enforce 
its regulations abroad. 


COMPUTER SCIENCE GRADUATE 
£ 9,250 

An outstanding opportunity with a large progres- 
sive company. Full training into the development 
of Real Time informations systems using PAS- 
CAL. Coral 66 and Assembler on the most up to 
date equipment. Excellent benefits mafaiding tree 
travel BUPA, subsidised canteen and non con- 
tributory pension. 

A CHANCE NOT TO BE MISSED ! 
CV to Karen Roche 
Office Systems Recruitment Services 
. 156 Shaftsbury Avenue 
London WC2. 


. tetembew • 

10pm> 

01-311 8444 
83727 22531 

If you da Ml see a posts* dial is 
Msafly soM to you, please cafl as 
m haw toad satiable posi&e^ lor 
previous castifates wHHa Z weeks 
of dwui cwtactiflfl us. CaU oar sales 
team today, we m e&deanm to flod 
you die rnM JOS 
iMmtag to Bittata? 

We are specialists fa assisting Brit- 
ish Nationals working overseas asd 
wtsfafag to return to tte UK. 


6th Floor, Empire House, 175 Piccadilly, Loudon W1Z 9DB Telephone; 01-409 2844, (24 hoars) 


Compaq: Portable H £2700! 



Special offer on the new smaller Portable 
II model 3, 80286 processor (8mhz), 

640k RAM, 10mb hard disk, 360k 
floppy disk drive, combined graphics 
and text display. Compaq Portable 256k 
RAM, 2 360k drives, dual-mode display, £1350. Please phone 
for Morse prices on the Portable Pins, Deskpro and Desknn, 
286 products. r 

MORSE COMPUTERS Z* Hoii^SfmvaS 

" Tl Telephone 01-831 0644. Telex 262546 



Wright Air 
Consuming 

^ fix* your ccai^xitorocaii 


BIRMINGHAM 




IBMAT/E,20mb,£2 

IBM Personal Computer AT/E, 512k RAM 

IBM 20mb hard disk, lJImb floppy drive! 
mmaochrome display, mono/printer adaptor, 

Ji K keyboard, manuals and Basic. New 
XT/S/FD, 2 (hub complete, £2150. Reduced 
price on PC-C complete, £1030. |gg 

Now m stock at Morse prices; IBM AT/X and P™ 

.. 1 1 Telephone 01-831 0644. 












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2890! 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


21 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


Johnson Stokes and Master 



KONG 


Require a corporate finance! solicitor and a general 
company commercial solicitor far their rapidly expanding 
international and domestic corporate practice. Ideally 
sohritois of 3-5 ,yeaxs post qualification experience are 
sought but those with less experience will be considered.- 
Long term prospects are good for the right eant^^e. The 
overall rearaneration package is particularly attractive, 
inducting cmcdlent salary, rent allowance and generous 
boons. In additiem there are substantial meftirai benefits 
and other fringe benefits inducting leave and travel 
allowances. 

Ap pfic at i o njgi m confidence quoting reference AB/G218 
to Reuter Simkin limited, 26-28 Bedford Row, London . 
WC1R 4HE to arrive by 19th August 1986. Telephone 
01-4056852. 


REUTER SIMKIN 

LONDON • LEEDS • WfffCHESTHt 

I RECRUITMENT * MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS! 


WlNWARD FEARON & C 2 


Solicitors 


Building Contract Litigation 

This rapidly expanding practice now seeks for their Building Contract Department a further two Assistant Solicitors as follows;* 

(a) A Senior Assistant who will be a Solicitor or Barrister with at least 4-5 years call and with wide experience of 
construction law. It is envisaged that early partnership will be available to the right candidate. 

(b) An Assistant who may be newly qualified. 

For each of the above posts a high level of intellectual ability is essential 
Please reply together with Curriculum Vitae to: 

David L Conies BSc (Eng) AKC, MICE, CEng, 

35 Bow Street, London WC2E 7AU 


•Uif, 


• -■**«: 


DUE TO 
EXPANSION 

Exceedingly energetic Principal in small firm of Solicitors in 

the City urgently seeks the following »HditinnnI gtaf£- 

'(a) 'A qualified Solicitor to be an alter ego and -whose main 
attribute will be commonsense; 

(b) A competent Commercial Conveyancer with at least 5 
years experience; . 

(c) A competent Residential Conveyancer with at least 3 
years experience; • 

(d) A competent Litigation Assistant with at least 2 years 
experience. 

Salaries will be realistic and commensurate with age and 

experience. 

Apply with C.V. in first instance to: 

DJEL Rickman, Esq., 

ASHER FISHMAN & CO., 

189/191 Bishopsgate, London EC2M 3UA. 


BOND DOCUMENTATION ADVISOR C-£30,000 

City based Merchant Bank seeks solicitor experienced in Bond Issues to 
act as in-house legal advisor on Bond Documentation. Relevant experi- 
ence In either private practice or another area of finance essential. 
Subsidised mortgage available after qualifying period. 

COMMERCIAL LITIGATION CITY 

Rapidly expanding city firm require Commercial Litigators with between 
1-4 years P.Q.E. to handle a broad range of Litigation. Previous City 
experience preferred but not essential. Salary range £15-20,000 

COMPANY COMMERCIAL LAWYER CITY 

SALARY REG. 

This smaB but expanding City Practice are seeking to recruit a solicitor 


practices 
would 


by the 


opportunity 


handling high quality work within a more intimate, 
personalised environment Although previous Company Commercial exp. 
ts desirable the firm wffl consider exceptional applicants about to qualify. 

Please phone JOHN VEALE on 588 9887 or send C.V. to 

ZARAK HAY at LAW (legal recruitment consultants) 

■6 Broad Street Place, Btomfieid Street London EC2M 7JH. 


BE A PR0S0CUT1NG SOLICITOR FOR A DAY 
ON 30th September 1986 
IN BRISTOL 

Join ilia Crown Prajocutng Service is a Crown Prosecutor on lit October 
1986. Satay sak £12485 - £14.025 rising In tha CPS to £15400. 
Far mpflatow toms phone 0272 298266. Werwws mid August Appfr- 
cants must be able to atari wtot on 30th September 1906. dosing mac 
15tb August 1988. 


ChM Praratufeg Sofctar. 
An A S—sn l FaQce JUOarBy 
mr Butman. 

BUM BS1 3EQ- 


CXEVELAND 

Newly or nxenily qualified 
solicitor with good experi- 
ence' in snides sonfbt by 
four office practice dose to 
North East coast and North 
Yorks National Part for re- 
sponsible position with 
mainly contentious work 
indiiding advocacy. Coo- 
tact B. F. WQIdnsoa. Bath 
A WHktnson (0267 32208) 
Town HaO, Guisbcnough, 
Oevdand. 


COMFOTER AITOIimiENTS 



i.Y. 

Travel Expenses reimbursed 
DEC -VAX Exp Required - Min 2 Yrs. 
DEC BASIC a plus 

DARMSTADT 
PO BOX 233 
Radio City Station 
New York, N.Y. 10019 


COURT 

ASSISTANT 

(with an opportunity for training) - 
Tottenham Magistrates’ Court 
Applications are invited for the vacant post 
ef Court Assistant In the Enfield Petty 
Sessions Area, to be based at the Tottenham 
Magistrates’ Court, London, N. 17. The 
duties of the post involve dealing^ with a 
wide variety of administrative procedures, 
both in and out of Court, ana a suitable 
appointee will be encouraged to train for a 
future role as a Court Clerk. 

Salary, dependent upon qualifications and 
experience will be within the range of 
£6,354 - £7,164 per annum (pay award 
pending) plus £693 London Weighting. 

An application form may be obtained by 



Magistrates* Courts Committee. The Court 
House, Lordship Lane, Tottenham, London 
N.l 7 6RT. The dosing date for applications 
is 20th August 1986. 


Applications are invited from suitably 
qualified men and women for a vacancy at our 
Manchester Headquarters as a 

DEPUTY LEGAL 
ADVISER 

The Equal Opportunities Commission was set 
up under the Sex Discrimination Act 1975 to 
work towards the elimination of discrim- 
ination between men and women and to 
promote equality of opportunity between the 
sexes. 

The post win be o’f interest to Solicitors or 
Hamsters who have substantial legal 
experience. A knowledge of emploYmem law 
would be an advantage and candidates with 
experience of the operation of the Sex 
Discrimination, end Equal Pay Acts will be 
paitioibily wdioqme. Applications will be 
considered purely on merit and without regard 
to sex, race or disability. 

The starting salary win be £16,629 per annum 
with autojnaticprqnession by annual 
increments to £22,575 per annum. Th 
of this post is currently under review, 
a non-contributory pension scheme. 

Application forms and further details are 
available from: 

The Personnel Manager 


<§> 


Equal 

Opportomties 

Commission 


Overseas Home, 

Quay Street, 

Manchester M3 3HN 
Tel: 061-833 9244 ext 79 

Closing date for receipt of completed 
application forms is 26th August, 1986. 




overseas with 
LA. recruitment... 


ATTENTION ALL 
DAIA COMMUNICATION 
SPECIALISTS 

If you are a data communications specialist with 
detailed knowledge within any of the following areas:- 

• DC INTERFACES AND PROTOCOLS 
— X21 AND X25 

— . V24 AND RS232C . 

— HDLC, SDLC, BSC 

• NETWORK PROCEDURES AND MANAGEMENT 
— WAN’S 

— LAN’s 

• IBM PROTOCOLS AND PROCEDURES 
— IBM D/C 

— 3270 
— SNA 

— DISSOS, DCA, DIA 
— EMULATOR PACKAGES 

please call ANN ARUDGE or) 0462 57141 immediately to discuss how 
your background matches the demanding requirements of our DUTCH 
client’s new DC and NETWORKING development Code NET. 


11 BANCROFT, HITCHIN, HERTFORDSHIRE, SGS tJQ 

a daman of tndusmtl Artau Imattd and matter d FRes 
At Employment Agency EWrisymenr 8usMss-DoE Lmnor no SWJ2IM 


ESSEX MAGISTRATES' 
COURTS COMMITTEE 

TRAINEE 
COURT CLERKS 

Trainee - Admin. Div 'd' 

Up to £9204 

Vacancies have arisen in the Harlow, 
Epping, Southend, Chelmsford and 
Grays Petty Sessional Divisions for 
Trainee Court Clerks. These posts 
would be most suited to persons with 
an interest in the law wishing to pur- 
sue a career in the Magisterial Service. 
We are willing to consider applica- 
tions from persons who have 
completed the first year of the 
Diploma in Magisterial Law, Law Grad- 
uates or from newly qualified 
Barristers and Solicitors (It may be 
possible to offer articles to suitable 
candidates.) 

Commencing salary will be in accor- 
dance whh age and qualifications. As 
an indication, someone who has 
passed the Part II examinations could 
anticipate a starting salary in the re- 
gion of £6500 - £7000. 

Application form and further details 
from Clerk of the Committee (Per- 
sonnel Section), County Hall, 
Chelmsford CM1 1 LX Tel: Chelms- 
ford (0245) 267222 Ext. 2071. 
Closing date 27 August 1986. 


PART-TIME 

COMMERICAL 

LONDON 

A well-known media organisation seeks 
an additional lawyer part-time to han- 
dle contract negotiations and drafting, 
agency agreements, competition law 
and general commercial work. Salary 
negotiable. (Rec Cons). 

74 Long Lane, London EC1 Teb 01-606 9371 

CHAMBERS 


Commercial Solicitor 
Conveyancing Solicitor / Legal Executive 

Fleet, Hampshire 


Racal Electronics PLC has a bead office 
team or solicitors and barristers in Reel. 
Hampshire advising the Group subsidiaries 
in all areas of law. There are two vacancies 
to be filled^ 

1. A young Solicitor for our commercial law 
■ department is required to work on 

commercial contracts of all types; 
including joint ventures; technology 
transfers, intellectual property, company 
law and overseas law; E.E.C. competition 
and consumer law etc. 

2. Wfe also require a suitably experienced 
Solicitor or Legal Executive with a sound 
knowledge of commerdal conveyancing 
procedures to assist in handling a 
substantial volume of conveyancing 
associated with the Group's property 
holdings. The work will include both 
acquisitions and disposals of commercial 


premises with a particular emphasis on 
leasing of sites required for the recently 
launched cellular radio service provided 
by one of the companies within the 
Group. 

The successful applicants will be required 
to complete their work withou t use of ou (side 
firms of solicitors and should have the ability 
to liaise successfully with senior personnel 
within the Group. 

If you are interested in joining a friendly 
team working in modem offices and having 
a challenging post with a secure future 
please apply with full c.v. including present 
salary to:- 

Mr. A. I. Franklin, Personnel Executive, 
Group Personnel Services, 

Racal Group Services Ltd-, 

Western Road. Bracknell, 

Berkshire RG121RG 


World leaders in electronics 





LEGAL CONSULTANT 

DO YOU POSSESS A SOUND AND PRACTICAL LEGAL BACKGROUND? 

GOOD COMMUNICATION SKILLS? 

ABl*E TO WORK WITH A HIGHLY MOTIVATED TEAM? 

WISH TO APPLY YOUR KNOWLEDGE IN A PROGRESSIVE AND INNOVATIVE LEGAL 
SERVICE? 

CAN YOU CONTRIBUTE SIGNIFICANTLY TO A GROWTH-ORIENTATED COMPANY? 
ARE YOU A RECENTLY QUALIFIED SOLICITOR OR BARRISTER? 

THEN READ ON: 

I RPC he market leaders in the provision of advisory, consultancy and legal cost indemnity services. 

An exciting opportunity exists within our Legxl Advisory Department lor a Senior Legal Consultant servicing both 
corporate and individual cliems. 

The position represents an ideal opportunity for a newly qualified solicitor or banister to join our expanding team of 
legal consultants, enabling the successful candidate to apply their skills in a unique and challenging post. 
Salary negotiable according qualifications and experience and indudes benefits commensurate with working within a 
major U.K_ P.L.C. I RPC being a wholly owned subsidiary of Stewart Wrightson PLC. 

is ant 

C.V. inducting present salary 


If you have a positive and dynamic approach to the law. good communication skills and a desire to work in a 
stimiUating ana invigorating environment, please apply in confidence, enclosing a full 


Mrs. L. J. Beilis Director 
IRPC (LPIS) Limited 
StockweH House, New Buildings, 
Hinckley 

Leicestershire LE10 1HW 
Telephone Hinckley 614349 




Freshfields are looking to meet the growth requirements of * 
their specialist financing team within the Company/Co mmercia! 
Department of the firm by recruiting additional lawyers to 
manage an increasing volume of high calibre work. This, laigely 
though not exclusively, being in the fields of aircraft, ship and 
project financing, is wide-ranging and international in scope. The 
opportunity to undertake some general company and commercial 
law work will also be provided. 

Applicants, who should be at least two years qualified, would 
need to be prepared to face the demands of a big City practice 
requiring intelligence, resilience and some commercial flair. 
Experience, though desirable, is not as essential as commitment. 
Rewards would be excellent and there are no limits to the further 
progress within the firm of those who most excel. 

Applicants should write in the first instance, in confidence, 
enclosing key career details, to:- David Ranee, Freshfields, 
Grindall House, 25 Newgate Street, London ECl A 7LH. 


■ & BUnNERSi 


CONTRACTS 

MANAGER 

Co-Productions 


We are an equal 
opportunities employer 


We need a highly competent lawyer to prepare, issue 
and be involved in the negotiation of BBC Television 
Co-Production contracts. This is a rapidly developing 
area, calling for an imaginative anti coretructive 
approach based on a comprehensive knowledge of 
contract and copyright law. You should also have the 
personal skill to deal with a wide range of people in 
the television broadcasting and distribution business. 

Salary E12.567-£15,998 according to experience 
and qualifications. (Currently under review.) 

Based West London. Relocation expenses 
considered. 

Contact us immediately for an application form 
(quote ref. 7867/T and enclose s.ae.), 

BBC Appointments, London W1A1AA- 
Tel. 01-927 5799. 
















1 ^ 

LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 




■ SOLICITORS AND BARRISTERS I 


. The Government Legal Service offers lawyers an 
unrivalled chance to exercise a variety of legal skills as 
well as to become involved in areas of legal work unique 
to Government itself. 

All the work is interesting and much is intellec- 
tually stimulating. You could be assisting in the briefing 
of Ministers and officials during the passage of bills 
through ferllanient or be dealing with European 
community and private international law work. 

Wherever your particular interests tie there 
is a range of opportunities in which you would be able 
to pursue them. You could be concerned with advisory 
work in the Departments of the Environment, Health 
and Social Security Trade and Industry and the Home 
Office; advice and litigation in the Ministry of 
Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Department of Health 
and Social Security. Inland Revenue and the'Treasury 
Solicitor's Department; trust law In the Charity 
Commission in London and Liverpool; conveyancing 
in the Treasury Solicitor's Department (period or 
permanent appointment); crime and personal injury 
in the Criminal Injuries Compensation Board and 
general criminal law in the Department of Trade and 
Industry and the Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and 


Food. Otheropportunitiesareavailable in HM Customs 
and Excise, the Lord Chancellor’s- Department (Head- 
quarters. the Criminal Appeal Office, and the Chancery 
Division of the Supreme Court), Public Trustee Office, 
and the Office of Fair Trading. 

To qualify you must be a solicitor admitted in 
England, or a barrister called to the English bar. Relevant 
post-qualifying experience will bean advantage. 
Suitability for the post will be the determining factor 
in selection. 

Entry is to the grade of Legal Officer (£9960 - 
£13.990) Grade 7 (£14,315 - £19,465) or Grade 6 (£18,020 
- £24,300). Grade and entry point according to ability 
experience, and the level of work. All posts carry 
promotion prospects up to £27,065 and above. In addition 
posts in London attract London Weighting of up to £1365 
(under review). 

For further details and an application form (to 
be returned by 29 August 1986) write to Civil Service 
Commission. Ale neon Link, Basingstoke, Hants* RG21 1JB, 
or telephone Basingstoke (0256)468551 (answering 
service operates outside office hours). 

Please quote reft G(3)576. 

The Cml Service is an equal opportunity employer 


GOVERNMENT 
LEGAL SERVICE 


UTffiAHOi 
£Marfcet Rate 

A soScitor with about 
three years post 
admission experience 

is required by this 
WC2 firm to deal with 
Quality commercial 
litigation- Excellent 
prospects and 
package. Ref.7502. 
Law Placements UcL, 
(Consultancy) 
Ludgate House, 
707/111, Fleet Street, 
London EC4 2AB. 
01-353 5498 (24 hra). 


Badenoch & Clark 


COMP ANY/CO MMEHCIAL TAX TRAINEES - 

We are acting on behaH of several leading and medium On behatf of scueralof 

Qtu oradices. renuirino brioht uouna solicitors fintSOfChaifercd AccounBnts, ■run ,n t.nciiinn 


CAPITAL MARKETS 

, From £25,000 

Our diem, a UK merchant bank, seeks an experienced . _ ™ ™, IKlluy 

Lawyer aged 28-35 to take up a senior position in its A numbe r °fpur fa challenging positions at 

transaction execution group. Candidates should have - tuiiiinwaal property . trnmnowh; Qualified 

extensive experience of bond issues, swaps, and dl levels. 

syndicated loans and demonstrate managerial ipjalities. expenence 

There is some scope for progression into either a fcirttethOT career ana gam 

marketing or product development role. with firmsin London. 

fordetafcof these and otherposttioTp. please contact Jtedtt Fanner or JotaCriUen. 

. ■ .n . 


. fax or internal] ona! taxation , ana uramw 
additional training for either an ACA or ATU qualification. 
Previous taxation experience snot required. 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 
IAWYERS 

A runbe; of 522* JSSS2 

mmcroal ] 


16-1 8 New Bridge St, 


Legal and Financial Recruitment Specialists 
Bridge St. London EC4V6AU Telephone: 01-5830073 



Assistant - Company Secretary's Office 

Career role in the oil industry London 


BP Oil Limited, BP'S UK marketing and refining subsidiary, 
seeks an Assistant to join its Company Secretary's branch 
which services the BP Oil interest in over eighty subsidiary and 
associated companies. The post will initially be based at BP 
House, Victoria, but the company is expected to relocate to 
new offices in Heme) Hempstead at the end of 1988/early 
1989. 

Reporting direcNy to the Assistant Company Secretary, Ihe 
successful applicant will undertake a wide range of duties 
which require a detailed and comprehensive working 
knowledge of UK company law and corporate secretarial 
practice. 

Applicants should be chartered secretaries or possibly 
solicitors or barristers, with 2-2years' experience at a relatively 
senior level within the Company Secretary's Department of a 
medium/large sized company with subsidiary and associate 
companies. In particular, candidates should have a sound 


knowledge of company formation and acquisition 
procedures. Familiarity with Stock Exchange requirements is 
desirable- 

in addition to on attractive salary, the extensive range of 
benefits include a non-contributory p6nskm scheme and 
relocation assistance, where appropriate. Opportunities exist 
for career progression within the BP Group. 

Please write or telephone for an application form to: 
Recruitment Branch, BP Oil Limited, BP House, Victoria Street, 
London SW1 5N1 Tel: 01-821 296L 

BP is an equal opportunity employer. 

(3? BP Oil 


Legal and Contracts Manager 

A consultancy role with Britain's most 
successful classified directory 

Reading up to £14,800 (under review) 


Yeilow Pages is a highly successful and expanding 
business operation, generating a EmuftHniion 
turnover, with hundreds of thousands of customers all 
over the country We now seek an experienced 
professional to advise on all legal, ethical and 
contractual matters. 

This b a highly demanding position with direct 
responsibility to the Head of Legal Services. Specific 
duties will range from drafting contracts and 



YELLOW 
PAGES 


itaferafcaf BmuhTstocornffiunkcatiom in at* UK. 


preparing tenders to handing copyright infringements 
ond administering corporate matters. 

Candidates will be of graduate calibre, with 
several years' relevant experience and a 
comprehensive knowledge of contract law. A critical 
approach and an enquiring mind are essential. 

Starting salary will be up to £14,800. Excellent 
benefits and genuine career prospects. 

To apply, please write, indi/dng full CV to: 

Tony Cant, British Telecom, Yellow Pages Personnel, 
Queens Walk, Oxford Rood, Reading, Berks RG1 7FT. 


British 

TELECOM 


A 

Nationwide 

BuBcfing Society 

Britain's third largest Building Society 

invites applications for a new 


in anticipation of Bidding 
pected m early 1987. K provides an excellent 
opportunity for a Solicitor with a strong commercial 
background gained either in private practice or a 
corporate Legal Department 

ASSISTANT CHIEF SOLICITOR (LOJtDOH) 

As a key member of the Legal team you w9 be 
Involved m'the whole range of financial and property 
related initiatives generated by the new legislation- A 
major part of the fob wiH be to give advice to Senior 
Management as wed as parecipaW in research, 
development and imptemematton. The post caHa for 
a degree of mental agility and the capacity to work 

under pressure. The successful candidate s Hkely to 

have at least 5 years past-quabflcation experience 
and proven ability. 

Hie Society offers an attractive benefits package and 
assistance with re-location expenses wifl be available 
where appropriate. 

Candidates should send fun C.V. particulars, includ- 
ing current earnings and describing the relevance of 
their experience to the address below to reach the 
Recruitment Manager no Later than 19th August 
1966. 

R N Wharton 
RecraRmem 
Nationalwide Bu 

New Oxford House 

Mata Ho&XMn 
LONDON 
WC1V 6PW 
An Equal 

Opportunity Employer 



SOLICITORS 

SIMPSON GRIERSON BUTLER WHITE has a 
number of positions available in the corporate/ commer- 
cial field, at the senior and intermediate levels. There sic 
positions available in both our Auckland and Wellington 
offices. 

The work is varied and challenging and we are able to 
offer specialised training for those lawyers who wish to 
concentrate their activities in the commercial area but 
whose experience in the field is not extensive. The prime 
requisites for success in these positions are a strong 
interest in commercial work, a wi ll ingn e ss to feaxn. and 
the ability to work successfully as part of e team. 

The positions involve a high degree of responsibility, and 
with direct contact with clients of the ten. The remu- 
neration packages offered reflect this level of 


responsibility and are folly competitive. There are 
trinities for those who succeed to progress to 


A partner, Mr Peter Oapshaw. will be visiting London 
between 31st July 1986 and 5th August 1966 and win be 
available for interviews. He may be contacted C/- Alan 
Taylor, Alan Taylor & Co. 6th Moor. 25 New St Square, 
Loudon EC4A 3LN. Telephone 01-353-3347. Those in- 
terested should telephone or wnte to the above address 
providing full details of work history and academic quali- 
fications or if intending to return to New Zealand shortly 
write to: 

T. N. McFadgen 

C/- Simpson Grierson Butter White, 
Private Bag, Wellesley Street, 
Auckland, NEW ZEALAND 
Ph: (09) 770-620 

SIMPSON GRIERSON BUTLER WHITE 


COMPANY/ 

COMMERCIAL 

EEiceltent 

Ambitious Soidtar 
required by this 
Middlesex firm to set up 
and develop a new 
Company /Commercial 
department- ExceSent 
psrtnershlp|irD3peG3. 


Low Placements Ltd-, 
(Consultancy), 
Ludgate House, 
107/111, Fleet Street, 
London EC4 2AB. 
01-353 5493 (24 his). 


NEWSLETTER 


V Mil Hi H 




TUley Publishing are seeking a new Editor for 
Ctmpaqy Secre tar y's Review, the highly regarded and 
successful fortnigtify for senior corporate 
administrators and their ad visas. Because of the 
strong legal content of the periodical, the post could 
suit a lawyer with an interest in (and preferably some 
experience of) publishing or journalism. Management 
ability, attention to detail, a quick mind and the 
enjoyment of napnredhflftywill also be important 
assets. In return, a competitive salary; excellent 
working conditions and good prospects are offered fay 
one of the UKfe leading publishers for business and the 
professions. 

Please apply in handwriting with cv to: 
Nicholas Parrafee, TfaUey Publishing Co Ltd, Tolley 
Bouse, 17 Scarbrook Road, Croydon CRO ISQ. 

TO: 01-688 9141. 


PANNONE 
NAPIER 


BACK TO BACK? 

English Solicitor with civil law qualifications multi- 
lingual, interesting Hack record, extensive experience 
in the City and overseas, commercial company and 
banking, specialising in foreign jurisdictions, expand- - 
mg network of on-line support offices in Europe, is 
looking for space (approx 1.000 sq.ft.) for Headquar- 
ters in London in or annexed to middle-large English 
law-practice. Would go for more floor space (up to 
4.000 sq.IL) if this is a more viable proposition for the 
host film. 

Ideal arrangement would be a sub-let by the host firm 
on arms length terms to include use of wailing arras, 
library 3IK ^ conference rooms. Gqesl firm u> provide 
own switchboard, office equipment and staff and 
would operate on a totally independent basis. 
Incoming domestic English law work would be han- 
dled directly by the host firm. Use of the guest Ann's 
foreign expertise and overseas fed hues for outgoing 
work entirely optional. 

If you would like to explore the possibility of letting 
space at market rates, or acquiring new space jointly, 
with (be additional possibility of pursuing new busi- 
ness development opportunities, triease drop a line to 
John S. Brebner at SI Peterborough Road. London 
SW6 soon, or phone 01-731 5321. 


YOUNG LAWYER 


Based in Manchester. London and Sheffield. Rannone 
Napier are a fast expanding practice, with an exdting 
case load We deal with INTERNATIONAL high profile 
DISASTERand PRODUCT LIABILITY actions Involving 
negligence within aviation, pharmaceutical railway 
and similar Reids 

An opportunity exists In our busy Manchester office 
for A YOUNG LAWYER to assist in the development 
and further expansion of the practice The successful 
candidate would be working initiaBy with one of the 
senior partners 

This is a rare opportunity for the right person who will 
be recently qualified or about to qualify, and whilst 
experience or an Informed interest in private 
International law would bean advantage a dear 
willingness to (earn would co m pen sa te 

Salary, benefits and career opport u nities wHl be 
commensurate with the position offered 

Applications in writing only with full curriculum 
vitae ux 

Rl Pa nn onc. Pannooe Napier. 123 Dcansgatfc 
Manchester M3 2BU 


OPPORTUNITY 
IN THE FAR EAST 

The Lee & Ko Law firm Seoul, Korea, 
interna bonafy recognised firm offering fun 
range of legal services is seeking a practising 
English or Scottish Barrister or Solicitor for 
fall time staff position. Excellent academic 
credentials and a minimum of two years 
experie n ce in Commercial or Corporate area 
required. Att ra ct i ve compensation package 
offered. Applicants are requested to submit 
resume- to: 

Mr C M Bond 
Reid Fisher & Marbneau 
Lincoln House 
296-302 High Hoi bom 
London WC1V 7JL 


ELBORNE MITCHELL & CO. 


MARINE 

LITIGATION 


Elbome Mitchell & Co. are looking for an assistant 
solictor for their expanding Commercial Shipping 
Department. 

The successful candidate will have a good 
academic record and at least 1 years experience 
in maritime law. However, he or she will be above 
all enthusiatic, ambitious and keen to play an 
active part in this growing department. The salary 
will be negotiable and there will be a promising 
future' for the right person. 

Candidates are requested to reply 
in writing to 

Mr. A. D. Brown, 

Elbome Mitchell & Co., 

Three Quays, Tower Hill, 
London. EC3R 6DS. 


Ambitious? Young? Hard-work- 
ing? We NEED you to run and 
expand our conveyancing/non- 
contentious side. 

Genuine early partnership prospects. 
Holbom. 

URGENT 

Full CV to BOX E04. 


LITIGATION 

Circa £11,000 

The Surrey firm need a 
legal execute* or assis- 
tant sobertor to join their 
litigation depahmert. 
Dealing vwth family law 
with an emphasis on 
financial dafcns involving 


settlements. Rek749 
Law P b cwta ib Ltd, 
(Consultancy). 
Ludgate House, 
107/llf; Fleet Street, 
London EC4 2AB. 
01-353 5498 (24 hra). 


BANKING 
Circa £13,500 

. Newly qualified/ 
September qualifier 
required to deal with 
all aspects of UK and 
International 
mortgage, bond and 
finance work by this 
busy City firm. 

Ref: 7496 

Law Placements Ltd, 
(Consultancy), 
Ludgate House, 
107/1 if. Fleet Street, 
London EC4 2AB. 
01-353 5498 (24 his). 


BECKENHAM, KENT 
LITIGATION 
SOLICITOR 

Four branch go ahead practice seeks young 
Solicitor to run Litigation department based in 
Beckenham, KenL Excellent working condi- 
tions- At least four years qualified. Salary aae. 

Please write with CV to: 

1452 Loudon Rd, Norhtny, 

Loudon SWI6 4EN. 


VEALE BENSON 

BRISTOL 

We require someone with a good academic background 
and wnh at last two years post qualification experience, 
possibly with a City firm in probate work and trust, 
individual and corporate tax p ann ing. 

Veafe Benson is 8 well established Bristol firm, progres- 
sive and expanding, and the position offers an attractive 
opportunity to someone with energy and ideas, and nar- 
ucuiarly to som eone wishing to move from London. 
Salary will depend on experience. 

Please write with a detailed CV «x- 
Derck Me*. V«fc Baa—. 

14 Orchard Street BrisWL BS1 501- 


TWO 

ENTHUSIASTIC AND 
MOTIVATED SOLICITORS 
NEEDED AT EPPEL AND CO. 

a rapidly expanding practice in Central London. Opportunities to dewlnn 
wfthin partnership, and work on a wide base of company and personal 
matters. Starting salary negotiable. 

Ring Ref: WH for* initial interview 
EPPEL AND CO. 

7 Great Russell Street 
London WC1B 3NN 
01-631 1900 


ASA LAW 

SLOCUMS 

H Urgently 

Required in 
all areas 

01-248 1139 


UnMTIQN Solicitor KMftm. 
an9 firm, good iTOHm. 

H7.sk. vvenex Cortrai tarns 
0936 29195 


UMh- 

65. Annan [men b aufcttMe in 
Hampshire and Sun 
ConsuHdMs 0955 251S3 
noWTE SPECIALIST for Caro- 
lina or dwFWAdtsn. Abo tax 

■buw, E 1 SK WUHX Con- 
..suliamtOMS 25189 
CONVEYANCES C am bria— ' and 

P rWr a o romm TUtlZKWoim 
Cowdunn 0935 29193 
IX Ma OH TO W notMonlpnooas 
wort £12 K. MafV M*JeA«Wd 
Personnel 0039 919006. 
mam uunmriou* soucanr 

Cray non K Mw 

coru Personnel 0939 816506. 



MU 


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Li i *■! 


! * 

x.ii 

:::i 

v ::*v • . 


1 H?:* . 


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^■ 58 — Bvwmr ir- 

f?l executive in wcuitwa 

miaa non o r tax Maiming ip! 

pomlments. London. Kent or 

^nn. Valley. Worn Conuik. 

lints OUB Site 

amstaht Boucrnw bwvn 

•*?*** wouenvm m run Eb 
country town office. Nm 

Stew? 

CwmANB 0939 Site 0 ** 

°3jJ SEELt" ^ BK9ninw 

gty pra ctice. I yran evp nun. 

va rancy. salary e 
CBM CiU Miwy Graym 
Com 02-657 ” 


LLLYOMS. Matrimonial in. 
jral litHatJon CIO K. MUy 
Pmonnel 

dtorive Warwick- 

Bntrr. Bln maw, 

conveyancing. To £ttK. W» 

am Gomutantv c»36 asiss 

•SLESWIW CSawre. 

conyeyaocbig ana 

C10K. - 

0935 29189 

UT1QATION 




“ Bflganon. 

rnnmHuta 



C»«/E London border* 

^ 01 variety. CllK. wtw 
Owuimh ovss site • 
tmumoH loucnn tte 

30. Corn watt Sorrw< 

Ww » ' 

25189 


S. 










THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


21 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


‘•rA'.SV 


OMMEKCiai. PRnn 

LAWYF^s 0 ^ 


•IW- 


MNlifM... 







Man 

most 


^ 9 er 


DAWSON WALDRON 

SoBdtors, Sydney 




RNANCE LAWYER 


We are one of Australia' s major law firms and are looking 
for a lawyer admitted for 3 to 5 years who has experience 
in international banking and general finance woric to join 
an expandinggroup practising in this area of the law. The 
position would most suit an Australian solicitor wishing 
to return to Australia after having worked in this area in 
London. 

Applicants should have a good academic record. For 
the right applicant career prospects are excellent. 

■ Interviews will be conducted in London but please 
apply with curriculum vitae to: 

- Peter Stapleton, 

Staff Partner, . 

DAWSON WALDRON, 

. 60 Martin Place, 1 
SYDNEY, NSW 2000, 

AUSTRALIA; 


10203 




iview) 

i*i*»f>r , rv.V ;■ . 

owwivy- 

v»*?5 i 

wtetti »»*•♦ 

KK tt*! «« . 


COA\ 


HONG KONG 

leading Hong Kong firm expanding in Pacific Rim markets is 
looking for two experienced solicitors to undertake Banking and 
Capital Markets work. Candidates should have a good degree and 
relevant experience; the ability to work independently and under 
pressure is essential. The ideal candidates will have partnership 
potential. 

Starting salary (after tax) will be in the region of £60,000 per 

annum. 

Interviews will he held in London in September. 

Please submit full C.V. including contact telephone number to 
Box No. B76 


PERSONAL 


An cbsstHed odvotisemeau 

can be accepted by tritphonc 

pwep* AnnouiKoaeaUV The 

deadline is WJOpnt 2 (toys prior 

to pobfeflioo tie 5£0jim Mon- 

day fee Wednesday). - Should 
yon wish to send an advertise- 

pnem in writing please indude 

yon daytime phone lumber. 

CUSTOMER SERVICES DE- 
PARTMENT. ir you have any 
Queries or probfans referring us 
your adwnisenieni once H 

amend, please contact our 

Customer Services Department 

by telephone on 01-481 4100. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Vaughan - Ho* family 
i hank all mote who alMMHl 
ner lurreral and atao toot* who 
sent DewTv 


BIRTHDAYS 


BERNICE MARGUERITE MU- 

■MCs 60 in Btrlhday greeting* 

Irom all the lamuy. 


SERVICES 


CALIBRE CVS LM prafeaHonal 

cvtTKulum vitae dorummta. 

Details- 01 631 3388. 
fCOMFANY GOLF Days DTRUM 

tor Matt or customers. Any to- 

ration Tri 0734 872722. 
BREAKAWAY. London's dub for 

professional until hitched people 

Over 200 event* month- 

ly 24 hr bUo tape. 997 7994. 
CAMTAL CV» prepare Mph quail 

ly curriculum vitae*. 01407 

7905. 

IraKseMSHH*. Love or Marriage. 

AU Mn. area*. Dateline. Dept 

■0161 33 Aotngdon Road. Lon- 

don W8 TM: oi-93» 1011. 


LEGAL SERVICES 


[US VISA MATTERS E S Cudeon 

U6 lawyer 17 Bubo-ode SL 

London Wl 01 486 0813. 


WANTED 


ORMHAL s cum IS . trterfays. 
screefiPLiv* for American tele- 
noon. PsycholOVcai / uxrlal 
stiWed* preferred. E- 
Hemandez. RiD CTOS 948- 
3060. 


FOR SALE 



rnsnrTOg 

NE 

TION 



(TDwies 

OLD 

)PER^ 

LITIGATION SOLICITOR 

Excellent opportunity for an enthusiastic and hardworking SoPcitor, up to 2 years 
Viafified, to assist on substantial pharmaceutical related Rtigation. Medical 
Negligence/Personal Injury experience essential Attractive satay and benefits 
package. 

Write with tuff C.V. Uk- 
- Mr Simon Pearl 
- Davies Arnold & Cooper * 

12 Bridewen Place, London EC4V 6AD 


assist 


Oklna (or an ass 
Commetviai Shipps 


i: tit* 


i will have £ 9 cC - 
it 1 yea?? 

I or she w 

nd keen 
meaiment 
i writ be - 




RESISTA 

CARPETS 

SALE NOW ON 

Wool mt* Bafbifs from £395 per 
sq yd + VAT. W% wri Hewy 
Domestic Vfiton E13JJ5 w 9Q yd 
+ VAT. Cortoptasi Ues £875 per 
sq yd + VAT & many other great 
leducrions.- 

5tt Fauna Bead. 
Parana Gram, SWS. 
Tds 01-736 7551 

Free Mtham rupeif HBag. 


duality wool 

track 1 price* and under, abo 
nailable- 100 's extra. Large 
roam ttze remnants under half 
normal price Chancery Carpets 
01 405 0483. 

imam or nettubzb th* 

ultimate repika furniture «pe- 
cialbU One of England* largest 
d today* of 17th and I8lh centu- 
ry period style furniture. 
NetneOed. near Henley On 
Thames lOagu 6*1118. 
Boumemoulh 102021 393580. 
ToptMtn 4039287) 74*3. 

Brrkefey. Gk» (0063) 810962 

THE TIMES X79S-1SS8. Other 
mice avail. Hand bound ready 
lor pmematton - aho 
"Sundays". £l 2-50. Remember 
When. 01-688 6325. 

TICKETS PON AMY EVENT, Cab. 
StarUght Exp. Orem. Les Mb. 
All iMMh and sport*. 

Tel: 821 6616)828-0496. 

AXx , Visa 


OLD YORK FLAGSTONES. ena- 
ble setts etc. Nanonwtdr 
dettvertes. Tee. IQ380) 860059 
- i Wilts). 

SCATFMOCm Any overt Inc Lea 

Mb. Cowrit Gdn. Surttaht £». 

QynAtMume. 01-838 1678. 

Major credit ram*. 

CATS, CHESS, LCs MM All Uie> 

am* and sportTH 631 3719. 

637 1716. AU mator credil cds- 

raooes/ntfrwiM. cwncro. 

etc. Can you Buy cheaper? 8 6 

S Ud 01 229 1947/8468. 
OLD YORK FLAGSTONES f«r 
sale. Beautiful comuuan. TM 
061 223 0881 . 061 231 6T8S. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


THE KAMO WORKSHOP SALE. 

Genuine reduction* on over 
100 new 6 restored untru 
menu. Unrivalled afire sales 
wrutw. Free catalogue. MB 

Hiohgate Rd. NWS. 01-267 

7671, Free catalogue. 


SHORT LETS 


KINB5T0N MU KNIKOtlSC. 

Superb views over Park* Avail 

2 ninth* from Aug B. 2 beds, all 

cons: mano. parking, etc. £170 

t~. Tel; Ol 649 3314.. 


HOUDAY FLATS & hotsses avail- 

able. C200-£3.ooopw. Personal 
Service Ol -468 3680 or 0036- 

092834 anytime m. 


In 

B tn dMWa. Col T v. 24 hr Sw 

Od. Tricx. Cooinghara Aof*. 01 

S73 6306. 

ST JAMES PLACE, CW1 Luxury 

wciwa 2 Bed apartment. 

Prime location nod lo Park. Ol 

373 6M6 m 

LUXURY SOtVKZD FLATS, 
ceniral London from £326 pw, 

RJno Town Hsr Apt* 373 5033 

S HEN. Exclusive period 3 bed 

OaL Newly (urn. lovely reewo. 

CH.colTV.md. 01-373 0763. 


FLATSHARE 


BATTERSEA large double room. 

own bath in newly modembed 

house with cMner. Close 
cupnam South tube. £65 pw 

Inclusive except phone. Tel Wg- 

on 01-236 1022 X128 roayj. 

01-228 1601 (after 6 . 16 ). 


DULWICH 12 iMn* VKMria/Cuy. 
2d-*-. M/F snare rabced hse. off. 
£42 me pw. Tel Ol 670 7049 
(eves). 


FLATMATES Selective Sharing. 

Well estab Introductory service. 

Ptse tel (Or appt 01689 6491. 

313 Bronnxon Rood, sws 
KEHMH6T0N Prof M/F. O/R. 

attractive gdn flaL or tube. 

£160000 end. Day 228 9162. 
eve* 731 2786 or 736 7482 

MS. prof per s on to share bale 
ny rial. O/R. Nevern Sauare - 0 

mins Tube. £43 pw. Tet Ol 

373 6108 eves. 

SWI7. profr M-F. N/9 lo share 
large 2 bed (ML £160 pm rxcL 

10 min walk Northern line. 

Tel: 672 4266 after fiJOpn. 

PEST HAMPSTEAD nr. tune 

shops, quml friendly, mixed 

fUL pro L M/F. a/a. h>e o/r. 
£35 pw met. 01 794 £769. 
ATfERCEA. Prof M/F. N/&. shr 

air hse. cts amen. £180 pan 

ind. 01-223 5616 all 6.15 pm. 

CLAPHAM-SOUVH. Prof M 23* 

O/R spadocp Me. £160 pan 
excL Tel: 01-673 6416. . 
AST FHCHET. O/R In Hat op- 

posite tube. From £36 pw me 
hewing. HW. Tel: 01-444 7191. 

niUUM Prof. r. mare flaL o/r. 

all mod co ns. £56 Pw met Ol 

731 5773 morn bio*/ ev es 
LITTLE VENICE. Young prof F 
N/S lOOn gdn. Nr' lobes. 
£60pw thd: Ol 723 1308 
SW5 M. duet room In large flaL 

share K * a £40 p.w. met. Tel 

Ol 370 2446. 


FOR HIM 


fnvec^ns -Monriag Sails. 

Dinner Suits. 

Evening Tai Suts. 

Black Jackals A 

Striped Trousers. 

Surplus ID 

' St" ■ 


Meredith Scott 

PBSHMS LAW C. £2MN 

Solictor, pre f e ra b l y at toast 2 years qualflad re- 
quired by respected EC2 practice. 

MIXED CmVEYAKUfi C. £25^100 

Presrigioifs ECS practice seek Solictor minimum 2 
gears quaflftod for commereriiri/residenttol work- 

COMPAiY/COMMERCIAL C. £24,000 

SoHctor. with minimum 2 years experience sought 
by medium stood WC1 practice. 

MEWLY/RECEMTLT ADMITTED C. £15,000 

Private Ctients' work for major EC4 practica. 

r/Commenrial law in medium stood EC2 


Conveyancing at mtoil known ECS firm. 

CM! Litigation for progressive EC4 practice. 

For farther detaSs concerning these and other 
opportunities it private practice, both in and out 
of London, contact 

Meredith Scott Recruitment 

17 Fleet Street, London EC4Y JAA 


iw ir rwn ouixi, unmuii 

, _. sr 1 til-583 0055 or 01-541 3897 (after ofGce bn) 

to plav - 1 1 

The saW ‘ 


ri-C'.'T!- 


eeted 

to 


to 


reply 


Irown, 

m & co.. 

Tower Hi!. 

iR 60 S. 



1C ANP 

SUCITOPS 

EL AND C 


c* ' 

r ****>'•■& r 

irtwi 

* CO , 

« fttrwo! 

a SNN 




ST. ALBANS 

We axe seeking a Solicitor of maturity and 
experience to head our Probate and Trust 
Dept. The salary will be substantial, and 
eariy partnership prospects will be open, to 
the right applicant. 

We are a medium-sized firm, established for 
some 80 years in this pleasant Cathedral 
Ciiy. 

Apply:- Alan Coates 
Ottaways, 

The Mansion, 

1, St. Peter's Street, 

St. Albans AL1 3DJ. 


LE.G./C0MPETIT1IW LAW to £28K 

Opportunity at eminent City practice for calibre 
Lawyer possessing EEC experience. Good 
-prospects. 

HTELLECTDAL PROPERTY to £22K 

Prestigious Central London practice seeks 
ambitious Intellectual Property Solicitor pos- 
sessing up to three years post qualification 
experience. Quality caseload. 

TAX £ Significant 

Tax Planning Solicitor for leading Central Lon- 
don practice. Top quality workload with 
Corporate bias. Excellent prospects. 

RESIDENTIAL 

CONVEYANCING to £191 

Rewarding and quaBty caseload for able Con- 
veyancer at major City practice. 

XgwTcrsonnelwh 

Staff specialists to the legal profession worldwide 
95 AUwych. London WC2B 4JF. Tel: 01-242 1281 
(ansatriwne after office hours) 



I** r“ 


1+*** **>** rm * 


M> 


EARLY niRT1IERn«F. Dithuri- 
acup mww aWtor. . 
HMntMMrr. Bta* com«yanrin» 
Htqhty iwooKaWc WMSfX Oen- 
MXUUU* 0936 25183 

h u m wMin c iw io us eonnior 

Surrey /Greacrr London bordfr 
good pcoipccu £12 *!■ K. Mary 
Malr Accord PmomM 0936 
816606 

R EC OfTLY AU WT T E O SoUdHor 

CPwIlh rofiv-ryanclim rtv H and 
mm# Surrey to £12 1C Mary 
MaS# Accord Pmannd 0936 
816606. . 

Anns WIN AUTUMN 1986 

young court kr (or K«ni Dncuc# 
HO K. Mm Male Accord Pre- 
MXUtri 0936 816606. 


A lfi n u n o 8S/86 Southampton 
ana Portsmouth wpomtmmis. 
To £11 6K. W«9MBC CORMflanb 
0939 26183 

a&sictamt sauentMt Cum- 
om Admitted 85/86. To 
C10K- Wmmn Cnmadunt* 
0939 5B1M 

•RANCH SOUCflVR P»r M 

W. Su»u*x notwonnntt«»PP- 
Cl S K. Mary Mai# Areort Per 
umrul 0936 815506- 

cnm. urwnwi executtve 

London Wl LIMN# 30. £1 Ik 
S Corouunm* 0936. 
26183 

CfVtL LmCATWH SoiWftdr R/O 
w. Yorks £10 K Maty Male 
Arrord Personnel 0936 

.815506. 


PROPERTY 
PARTNER - £. NEG. 

Young three-partner city firm wifii 
broad client base seeks enthusiastic 
and committed practitioner able to 
service existing connections and 
develop all aspects of property 
work. 

The ideal candidate will be used to 
working under pressure utilising 
own initiative and will preferably 
have the nucleus of a following. 

£. negotiable plus early equity. 
C.V. in confidence to 
E.WJ. Jenkins FICS, Partnership 
Secretary. 

Messrs Silverman Sherliker 
Fraser-Sampson & Co. 

Hazli tt House, 

4 Bouverie Street, 

London EC4Y 8AB 


COMMERCIAL SOLICITOR 
SOUTHAMPTON 

We are a large firm of solicitors in the 
centre of Southampton. We are looking 
for a young and able solicitor to assist 
with a growing volume of important 
commercial work. 

The successful applicant would take 
responsibility for individual matters at 
an early stage and invitation into 
Partnership would follow for the right 
person. 

Please apply, in writing, toe 
Mr L Forme-Woods, Paris, 

Smith & Randall, 
Lansdowne House, 

Castle Lane, 

Southampton, SOS 4FD 


NON-CONTENTIOUS 

EJHarket Rate 

This firm in 
Nottinghamshire 


and expand a branch 
office. Excellent 

prospects (or 

ambitious person. 

Ref:7489. . 

Law Placements LM, 
(Consultancy), 
Ludgate House, 
107/111, Fleet Street, 
London EC4 2AR. 
01-353 5408 (24 his). 


MEWLT QUALIFIED ASJHSTAJfT 

urgooitv required b*- OmraJ 
.London solicnon roc mwiiv mr- 

fiallon work Tri' 01-268 3016 


CONVEYANCER with own tyv- 
Ing- SoiAh wm London To 
C9.SK WtSS« ConsUILum 

0955 75183 


CONVEYANCER 

Smou-f (nn wanima wuhaul w- 
pmuKMi. tllK Wrow 
CanMUianK t»3B 25183 


unarm wuaiw 

in- ewe. naq-cMUcnooihi. To 
£11 SK, Wessox Comulbuib 
0936 23185 


TWO 

MANAGING 

reqund for busy oar txandi otfla 
r Acton aassaattu m 
etmvpyanai^ ExcsUom pay and 
ermfldons PfBasewnBwrtiCVin: 

Erteri CratflKfc 6 Ca, 

ZSNlfh Stmt, 


TulqdaM S1-M3 77SS 


TRANSFER ART1CUEST Suctov 
fid final Kl wiih ronteyanang 
exDreieftre nreded now. Hid 
Dorn. Rrtrty l« -BOX £20. 


essek soucrrois wok oompe* 

wni uiuxtmiUM eswuani for 
mainly dome*W bul 40<«o com- 
merrul nmipyancing. Varied 
and uiirmimg work for per- 
sonal rbenh FoH advlec and 
sunen-fenon a* ailanie from Ban- 
ners Mil suressfid awl leant 
raprcled aawme 

remoncunUU' for own small <W> 
ponmmi. PHw*anl creurauy 
loeaied ofhre* m smao ooiumv 
town Rmonaoty priced 
acromodHiDn avuiabW- wraBy 
Satrv £9.000 lo £13600 Ap- 
ply reference BGC MlicheU 
Cavlken A Coney. 22 H*0h 
sued. AuMon. EMtorg 7FJ. 

TM LAW in BneioL Newraaoe. 

Norwich. Btrmmghoiwy Prac- 
ure m Coontry towny? 
Stimulating and rewarding 
omh. (or (-swore Lawyer* ai 
pw rniennd. 01-242 1261 
i An* after Bus Hn) Odt tor Apt 
and proven advice. 


MRE 

DEFT, 

22CHAHMQ 
CROSS RD 
LXMXNI WC2 


07-260 


231 B. 



OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


August avafl. 
Spend a week relaxing at our 
private beach holeL then 
week cruMog on oar yacht for 
£430. we flu H/B. tree 
w /sport*, oiher combfmilons 
poss or 326 1005. 01 737 
3861124 hru. ATOL 2091. 


COSTCUTTERS ON mghtt'hoi* 
lo Europe. USA dr most desuna- 
llons. OipiomM Travel: 01-730 
2201. ABTA IATA ATOL. 


COSTCUTTOtS ON nights/lmis 
to Europe- USA A most deeuna 
bora. OWMnU Travel 01-730 
2201. ABTA IATA ATOL. 


1ST A CLUB CLASS FLIGHTS; 

Huge Disc ount*. Sun world 
Travel. . 103727} 26097 

/271Q9/2763& 


Key 

Travel. 6a Red Uon ST. WC1. 
01 406 1496. ABTA/1ATA- 


CHEAT* FUGHIS Europe World- 
wide CUt-Edoe Travel. ABTA 
01-839 BOSMUi i g Angie 


DISCOUNTED FARES 

Sfta non 

JO tnrg/Har £300 £490 

Harota £275 £390 

Cm £150 £238 

S B £240 tm 

Bam £250 £350 

Bangkok wni 

Dawto £420 

Afro Anton IVawl Ltd 
18X1188 Mmw H. Wl 
T&; ff1-4ST 82Bjs/Wl 
Utt 3 Gax* Bootang* Wotejrw 


Fly Savely 

Jnly August flgus to 

FARO BABCaONA UNXUO 
BBfl MALAGA AUCANTE 
ATHENS ftWeSS HERAKUON 
CMR DALAMAN ANTALYA 

PLUS MANY OTHER DESTDUTKMS 

01-995 3883/4/5 

Simply Fly 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Cancer 


Together we can beat it. 

VMe fund over one ihmj of 
alt research into (he preven- 
tion and cure of cancer in 
the UK 

Hriptisby sending! dona- 
tion or make a legacy to ; 

Cancer 
Research 
Campaign 

2 Cnknn House InTOf cT 

|Dq« TT5/S L London SWlYSAR. ' 



BmrTranri. Tri Ol 335 6414. 


HSCOVNT PARCS Worldwidt- 
01-434 0734 jupnrr Travel. 


DHCOUNTZD A BROUr r ARCS. 

L'.T C open Sai. 0763 8S703B. 


LOW COST FARES to I'Sfl Mo- 
tor Travel Ol 48S 9237. IATA. 


MALAOA. CANARIES. Ol 441 
till Tthrtww. Ahta. Aid. 


SRAM. Portugal. Cheapest tore*. 
BMgk*. Ol 735 8191. ATOL. 


SWtlZERLAMt Scheduled atoms 
01-724 2388 ABTA ATOL 


HOLY an.nl ihe wriFappoint- 

ed ELI HOTEL In *ecltld 4 d Bay 

of SuH'AieMia. only 7 miles 

from Ihe elegant imimvionai 

man of taormina. p™s* 

inrL 7 mahn nur-tmard In twin 

wm. return daylunr CMwtcP 
nt* every Tuesday. Pool 6 pri- 

vate broth, irantfcri 6 airport 
laor. No redden extras SICIL- 

IAN SEN LTD 01 222 7402 
ABTA/ ATOL 1907 
AWARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
o/w £420 rtn £760 Auckland 

e/w £420 rtn £770. Jo’burg 

o/w E306 rtn £499 Los Ange- 

les o/w £2 16 rtn £405. London 
Flight Centre Ol 370 6332. 
MCRBA Fir dlrert 9.16. A nu- 

clei. Free w/s. tenms. superb 
food 6 tree wuie. QioMeadub 

4* luxury or 2* MMetm by 

sandy Beach. Lunaracane Ol- 
44! 0122 24 hre 
USER ISLANDS Algarve. 
Menorca. Tenerife, vuta*. Apr 
Pensions Taverna*. HdUayi 
frmms- Brochures/ insum 
Dookings. Vemura Holiday* 
Tel 01-250 1355 
ONE CALL tor some or the best 

dean in flights, apartments, no- 

letiand car Mre. Tel Londdo-Ol 

6365000. Mancncster 061 832 

2000. Air Travel Advhorv 
Bureau. 

LATIN AMERICA. Low cost 

< lights e g Rio £485. Lima 

£495 rtn. Also Small Croup 

Holiday Journeys (eg Peru 
Iron £3601 JLA 01-747-3108 

BANCABt NUNILNS. Ring now 

for Australia. N 2. Middle cast. 

India. Far East. ABTA. Club Air 

Travel Ol 629 2604. 


ram on ehaner/scnedidcd fit*. 

Pilot FUgm 01 631 0167. Agt 

AM 1893. 

REECE, TURKEY. CANARIES. 

Aug/SePt- avauauiuy (0923) 

771266. Tims way Holidays. 
ABTA ATOL 1107. 

LOW COOT PLIGHTS. Most Euro- 

pean destinations, vafanamter 
01-40? 4262/0062 ABTA 

61004 ATOL I960 
RAM. JAMAICA. N.YORK, 
worldwide cheapen (vn. 
Richmond Travel. I Duke Sr 
Richmond ABTA 01 9404073. 

MOROCCAN BOUND TRAVEL. 

Hotel reservations an over Mo- 

rocco. Tri: Ol ' 734 6307 

ABTA/ ATOL 

TUNISIA. Perfect beaches tor 

your summer holiday. Can for 

our brochure now. Tunisian 

Travel Bureau. 01-373 44U. 

ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga etc. 

Dbnond Travel ATOL 1783. 

01-681 4641, Horsham 68541 

ALL US ernes. Lownl fares on 

malor aairduied earners- 01 - 

684 7371 ABTA 

BEST FARES. REST FLIGHTS. 

Bat holidays anywhere. Sky 

Travel. 01 B34 7426. ABTA . 
ONE K0HB £488. Bangkok 
£369. Sing £467. Other FE cil- 
ia 01-584 6614. 

SYD/MEL £618 Perth £646. Ad 

malor nw iw i to Aia & nz. 01- 

684 7371 ABTA. 

AMERICAN VACATIONS. Bine 

Ribbon Fares. Tel: Ol 657 7853 

s. AFRICA From £466. 01-684 

7371 ABTA. 


CRUISE £ SAIL ABROAD 


WB4DSURF LEVKAS DJERBA. 

9.1?. Aug 10 On. Our* I nt*. 
an nr a reuxmg mk. 
umpoui Mrs. boat trip*. aeQ* 
1 Bop For SotoH. OsuptM a 
Fiimillr* Lunarscape 01 441 
0122 24 hn 
CRUSE Tafcey 12 berth crewed 
moUN yacht 2 ww tr £425 Pf> 
■nr (Us. Whole boat avauabk- 
oilier week* from £1000. Free 
v* Anom. h/b.Ol 326 1006. Ol 
737 3B6ki24nrat ATOL 2091. 


| SKI MAC C New v. infer 86/07 
Cotaw Brochure ouinnw gen. 
eroo* early boot, mu and group 
dKrouitU- Tet 01 «i s446 
ATOL 341 

| SKIWORUL TOP Sti Resorts. 
Lowe* Price* Brochure. Ol 
602 4026. 


CORNWALL & DEVON 


LCotflNAU. S/r wing country 
hte sap* 6/7 tl» 20Opw. 
Avan fr Aug 30tn 0579 42321 


GENERAL 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


TAKE TIME OFF to Paris. Am 
flwibm. Brosset*. Brugn. 
Crneva. Ormc, Lausanne. The 
Hague. Durum.- Rouen. Bou- 
logne A Dtepne. Time Off. 2a. 
Chester Ctose . Lon don. SW1X 
7BO 01-255 8070. 

MARBELLA A CRETE. We MHI 
■have avail. Aug/Sept 
vlllas/apt*. Some with prn 
pool Call now on Ol 724 7776. 
PLara HolKUy*. AM 2136 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEAS1CS 


VHtos, some wtlh 
pooh* apartment*, taverna*. an 
aaie« avail. Augu&l special*, 
own season (ran £156. Critic 
Honoay*. 01 309 7070 A 0622 
677071 or 0622 677076 (24 
first Alol 1772, 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


'SOLFE JUAN 4 brdroo u ie d vUL, 
wttn pool, availabe 17-31 An 
OIKI. Details from Continental 
Villa*. 01 246 9181. 


Lowest farce fr £99. 
Bagaev 736 8193. AM 1893 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


AINSLEY auem-ft* AVMSLCV 
nre FORREST. \ to LET 

AINSLErv omerww avkslev 
nee FORREST. Wk»w uurof 22 
Pollard Street. South Snmui. 
Tsiie aqd Wear died ai J arrow on 
10 th January 1005 lotixeaoout 

£7.0001 

BROWN. GODFREY CONRAD 
BROWN lore of 105 Part-wood 
Road. Bua t pcnt w . Bournemouth. 
Dorset died at Bounrnnwwin on 
Ivl March 1980. lEaUIr about 
£79.000) 

HAINES. ETHEL HAINES. Spin- 
ner tale Of 99 Napier Street. 
BXTctdey. Mtoon Keynes, Buct- 
ingMmstdre died at MUtoa 
Kesmev on 7Th October 1986. |E*- 
lair anew £67.000) 

MEALY. ELLEN KATE HEALY 
Otherwise ELLEN KATHLEEN 
HEALY. Spinster late of 'Lnteux'. 
Carmel HtfL Hotvwetl. CJwya 
died ai Holywell on 27ih Fehru 
an 1 1986. (Estate about 1 1 6.0001 
HOPKINS. THOMAS HOPKINS 
late of ParkhuraL 78 Balh Road. 

Readlno. Berkshire died at Read- 
ing on BbmOcloberl 985 (Estate 
About OL5901 

TAYLOR. AMY TAVLOR. SWIV 
&trf ate of 32 Oxiord Street. 
Lamboorn. Berkshire died In 
Reading On 4th December. 19SS. 
lEslalr about £35.000i 
WENT. HENRY JAMES VVENT 
Ur of 19 Linden Carden*. 
Bwiwmr. London *2 died 
mere on or about SOin January. 
1985. (EWAie about caOOOi 
The Wn of the above named are 
requested to apply 10 the rrra- 
wry - Solicitor «B v 1 . Queen 
Anne's OiMben 28 Broadway. 
London SWIM 9JS fading whlcb 
the Treasury Sohcllor nuv lake 
St rtn to aommisin- the cstair. 


RENTALS 


SAVOY HOTEL ADJOINING 

Magnificent 2 bed, 2 bath apartment To 
Let. Beautifully furnished with 
airconditioning, total security and direct 
access to ail hotel services. 

Phone Mr Finn at 01-992 5647 


LOWEST FARES 

Para «89 n YORK Ezra 
Franhhxt Wl LA/SF £385 
Lagos £320 Manx £320 
Nana E32S Smoapom U20 

Jo-bug E460 Bangkok £335 

Cam £205 Katmandu £440 
M/8om £335 Rangoon £350 
Hon Kong £510 Cahatoa £425 

Fkan cafl 
SUN 1 SAW 
21 Mm St LaoPto wl 
•M98 7180/437 05X7 
MUM OCAfHtt ACCSTES 


CORFU tutt. We sire rave 
.availability- Sunday 10-74-31 
Aug (or 2 wfta. Beautiful villas 
nr the beach me GMwtck- Ran 
World Monday*. Ol 734 2562 
£FKAS 12.19 Aug-SepL 
Unspoilt Creek We. Windsurf. 
BBQ's A boo. Sato* Couples & 
Families Lunancaor Ol-' - ' 
0122 24 hr* 

(HISCCC. Unspoilt bunas, cheap 
(Ughis. villa rentals etc. zna 
Mondays or 434 1647. am. 
Alto 

MAGIC G REEK M LANP t 

magir prices. FUghts & 
Hobday*. Freedom HMtday*. 
Ot-741 4686. ATOL 432. 
RHODES Lux apart hoi* ITOm 
£ 1 89pp. 6. 13. 2a 27/8. 

Slrama. 0705 662814. 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


(Or Arctiirrrts & 

Designers. Permanent a lempo- 
ra« positions. AMSASeeoMW 
Rec. Cons- 01 734 0532 
ICCMTAIRl lor Architerl* A 
Dtsgnrn Permanent A tempo- 
rary paNDons AMSA Specialist 
Rec. Cons- Ol 734 0532 


NON-SECRETARIAL 


re- 

nuiiM for Du»- West End 
private dental prarixe Salary 
EBJSOO neootlahle TrirpMotur 
01-5B0 0646 or 01-409 0994. 


SIMPLY CRETE 
HBBOWSSOS ft CHANM 

Anglo Greek (artSy aBv beaotAd 

primte vtus/tiuies. tony wqh 

poofs some DO Ihe beach 4 some 

todked away r tiny wMc Cretan 


AVAILABILITY 19TH AUGUST 

Ring for small, friendf* bmchure 

ffHM 44IQSZ2S AM T922 


DOMESTIC A CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


KW LOW FAKS WORURHDE 


Abdjtol 

Freetown 

LagosH 


E400 OuM £370 

ff-sen inanou nso 

£330 JattWl £440 

£400 kanda £275 

£260 KuKSm £445 

£360 KimH £345 

E345 N.Vorit £275 

£220 Seat/ £730 

£415 Svd/BW E7K) 

£270 Tokyo £580 

SMUMB TBMIB. LTD 
2 HUN SIHET. UMDM Wl 
• Tet 01-433 3521 
MWJHE ~ ~ 


Amman 

BmgtaA 

Bon/tW 

Cara 

Cofexnbo 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobt. Jo’Bmj. Cairo, Dubai, 
Istanbul, Singapore, ICL Dcflti, 
Bangkok, Hong Kong, Sydney. 
Europe, A The Americas. 

Flamingo Travel, 

76 Skaftraoniy Atom* 
Loudon W1V 7DG. 

01-439 0102 

Opea Satacday 10J8-13 jN 


BARGAIN FUGHTS 

Sydney £455 ' £755 
Auckland £415 E745 

Jo - Burg £306 £499 

Bangkok £209 £355 

Cairo £135 £210 

New Yak £149 £320 

Los Angeles £216 £389 

TOP DECK 
FLIGHT CENTRE 
01-370 6237 


ISLANDS ID THE SON 
AUGUST /SEPTBfiBER 

FLY DIRECT TO CORFU. 
CEPHALONM. ZAKYNTHOS. 
CRETE 6 SMATHOS. 
Boaunhi vtto ft apt* 
Oom to glorious beaches. 
FRBS wmsurting in Cmte. 

HORSHAM 0483 59708 

ILIOS ISLAND 

HOLIDAYS 

ABTA AIIO ATM. 1«2 


STTOCKHOLM SVfCOCM EnWUh 
waHog Swedish family mov- 
ing bach from London after IO 
years wttn 3 chuarrn 9.6 and 4 
years are looking for a reliable 
qtrt of 20 + wtlh a great sense of 
humour. Musi be able lo drive. 
Non-smoker. Plenty oi travel. 
Lovely noose on the sea. 20 
min urns from Cay centre by car 
or train. ReMy by telephone to 
Mr* CHamllton before August 
5th and alter August biumiOIO 
4658230048. between August 
6th and August 8th m London 
on Ol 996 6768. alter August 
11 to on 010 468 717 0600. Or 
in writing to Mr* C. Hamilton 
C/o r-MW SecunUm. 26 
Finsbury Square. London 
EC2A IDS together with 
photograph- 


GOING 

OVERSEAS? 

WE HAVE WAITING 
COMPANY TENANTS 
WANTING TO RENT 
YOUR HOME N 
QENTRAL/SW LONDON 

Buchanans 

Lellutg ft Mamgnnm 

01-3517767 


For the best 

rental selection of 

QUALITY 
FLATS A HOUSES 

in prime London arses 

me ads Cam Rat*. SWS. 


EVt lux balcony nal witn 
garagr 3 imfroom* to sleep 5 
lacuzn Dalliiootn and separate 
shower room, superb kllrnen. 
furnished In high riaiKUnl. en 
lire ronlml 1 - of flat are new 
Station 8 mire. Water loo/ West 
End LOminx L225 pw Tri Ol 
628 6591 ilO a m d pm i Of 
(026 1251 4.^49 alter 6.30 p m 


NEMSntCTOK rum- lunuuiett 
new home, living room with 
dining area. large 

vludto/bnlrnnin. 3 other bn) 

room*. 2 bathrooms. 2 xrparale 
wcs. kilrtvn. oarage aad root 
garden 1300 per wrrL. Gotnpa 
ny let or mr-rvea* venom Tel : 

Cl 876 8616 


COVDCT OAROCM nr lube, super 
brand new Hrals dreoraied I 
bed Hal in work wnn porter age 
Kit all nui nines Co long let 
£250 pw Goddard 6 SonUh Ol 
930 7521 


HEMS4MOTON MMMU0H6. Beau 
multy l urn 7 bed (tit in wed 

maimamed work wnn porter 

Lge rerep. Ige ijl all m a c hi nes 

Long lei £225 pw. JW LM Ol 

949 2482 


DttSLOW CARDENS SWT Ele- 

gant fum/uniurn first floor rial 
wtlh Ige (err o'lootong gdns 2 

beds 2 bath-. Fu kii Mus all ap 
pllarirm £375 00 pw. Tel F W 
caoo Ol 221 8838 CT1. 


■ 4MJECNS4UVTI HJUaE, SWT 
* Newly denii.Ueri Isl floor flal 
2 Brdtms Lie Rerep Rm. Din 
Hau. FT KII MOd Bath Conser- 
vatory. Terr £?50piw. Co Let. 
l yr-k Around Town 229 9966. 


Greek Island 
Villas 

It is not loo Imc m find a 
quality villa holiday In August 
on the Grech bland*. In Corfu 
*e can oiler some super small 
vlUas. many «Hh use of private 
pool; or Paro*. a comfortable 
apartment hi quiet fbhing 
village; in Crete superb water- 
front studio*. Good family 
houses too most dates. 

Day nights available every 
Tuesday ftotn Gabriele and 
Manchester. Brochure: 

CV Travel (T) . 
SICUralSM o 
uib itwaw 
eianimu < 

oMMMaaai < 

(SSS0I32 - 24 kr & 
Nato w s u vtes l < 



ARC YOU Ml EARLY MRDT We 

rewtrr an experienced rook to 
help gram load for delivery 
lo the Orient Exores* Train. 
(£7.300 p-a. for a 40 hour 
week plus overtime, including 
some weekend*. For more dr- 
am ptesne apply: Leith's Good 
Food. 1 Sebastian Street. Lon- 
don EC1. Tel: 251-0216. 
URGENT! Married couple*. Cxp. 
or auaL nannfe* bouse keeper* 
butter* chauffeurs. Ring 689 
3990 now tor Immediate posi- 
tion*. Rarncrefl of Belgravia 
tAgy). 

OVERSEAS AU PAM AGENCY 

87 Regent Street. London wt. 
Tri 439 6634 L'K/Ovcrsra*. 
Also m-hetps/dom* lemn/aerm 


DOMESTIC & 
CATERING 
SITUATIONS WANTED 


COOKS/NAMMES reeking situa- 
tion* Cannes /Nice, currently 
located AnUbea. 2 reliable En 
push gtrts. own irimspon. 
Cordon Bleu qualified. Tet 
0909 564311. Sidney Wilks. 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 



Itore low-cost ttights 
via more rautas 
to more destinations 
than any other agency 
PLUS 

Tast, export, high-tech 
■ervlee - Fraa worldwide 
hotel ft car hire pass 

• Up to CO%dtMMUIllS 

Open 9-6 Mon-Sot 
OfHhe-Spot 

Immuntsftflon, Insurmce, 
Foreign Exchange, 
Map A Book Shop 


Itit&KfRhaTrarrt- fabv 

42-48 Earte Court Hoed 


LoiwMam 0M03 ttt5 
Ettrapo/USA OMKnr 5400 

lat/BuiiblMsOf-9383444 

ia -fare ' natTHacf 


SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save wilh Swissairt 
Super Apex. 
LondontoZurichor 

Geneva daflyoncon- 

venient afternoon 
flights. And daily 
flights to Basie 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14days 
before departure. 

Stay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
SundayafterarrivaL 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travel agents or 

01-4379573 


VUAS WITH A mark; touch. 

A villa, a pool and a beautiful 
view. WNI more could you 
want? CMxnc (root Tunny. 
Sardinia or RatwBo ■ toe loveli- 
er pans of itoiy where Ihe mao* | 
market operator* don't go. Or 
rombihe a *lna holiday with a 
nay in Venice. Ftorence or 
Rome. Fire brochure from 
Magir of Italy. Dm T. 47 Shep- 
heetts Bush Oreen. W12 BPS 
Tel: 01 749 7449 <24 hra 
service) 

FLORENCE Just convened farm 
house Garden rial in Tuscan 
nan*. Steeps 5 . 2 mile* from cen- 
tre August onwards £180 per [ 
week. Phone owner Florence 
609 496 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


-CONVEYANCRK by lutiv Email 
tied Soucttors. £160 + VAT and 
standard disbursement* ring 
0244 319998- 


GENERAL 


MITSUBISHI GALANT: cham- 
pagne beige. 2L CIS. auto. C 
reg- air cond. cs. auto crude, 
extras, tn—cula to . £7.700. 
Tet Ol 773 1697 taner bpml 


rme IjONOf SHORT LET SpiTtal 

ttts. We ha I e 4 large ariecuon of 

luxury 1.234 bedroom rut* 

with maid venire interior de- 

signed and < mi rally toraied. 
Angela WtUianu. 01 268 3689. 


, SW1 Newty dec 
ft turn prrib 2 Bed nal to 

poriered niorL with attractive 

courtyard entrance Recep. Kit. 

Bath. JC200PW Coote* ■ 828 
8251. 


MERCEDES 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE. Lale summer A Au- 
tumn BvauabUUy M Portugal'!, 
exclusive Carv-oriro Oub with 
luxury vinos, apartments, pools 
ft maid service can PMricta 
WIMblood Ltd. 0349817023 or 
Ol 658 6722. ABTA ATOL 
1276. 

ALGARVE AL1ERMAT1VC. Villa 
Holidays of dtsdnetton for me 
very few. Tel: 01-491 0802. 73 
Si. James'* Street. SWi. 

ALGARVE. Lux villas with pooh 
ft apts. Avail Jul/Oct. Ol 409 
2838. vnuworid. 


| 200 5 SPEED gear box. 1983. 
Powered steering RM. Manual. 
Sun roof. Full Service History. 
New tyres. Stereo. Imnurulale 
romUttoc. 33X100 miles. 
£6.760. Ol 7293687 or Ol 739 
4886. 


SL: T. reg- Stiver »vh o 
blue tnL Rard/sofl lop. Mereo. 
good condition £9.995 ono 
Trix0464Q3361 


COURSES 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


AFTER GCE 
WHAT NEXT? 

WtachConoTWHacti Career? 


villas wtlh 

pod* A apts. Aug toOcL 01409 
2838. VUIaWorid. 


WINTER SPORTS 


British Heart Foundation 
The heart research charity- 


102 Gloucester Place, 
London W1H4E5H. 




SKI BLADON LINES 

«/S7 BROCHURES NOW OUT! 

47 Resorts n Stotrsfant 
Ausbb. France & tot/. 

The Biggest Cfwra Do Sbsf 
Ex GaMck. UMBO, ifantaeflar, 
Glasgow S Ednbuvh 

B1 785 2200 

■ndL Dm. M22 78121 

JUTA 18723 ATOL 1232 


Which OnafificgBans? 

taracdbtgfracticalAxsess- 
4 and Mdfawe avallaWe Is 

brig renob Ml yuent people 

reach Ihe MGBT drins at 

tMscradri it^i ftre tira d wre : 

• • • CAREER ANALYSTS 

m 90 Gloucester Place. Wl 

• 01-935 5452 (24 hrsj 

Qraw ii 


FINANCIAL AND 
ACCOUNTANCY 


STM AFRICAN ouaufied vMKiier 
iBnlhb SubWcUemaiei bribes 
pool lion as legal exrc/legal ad- 
visor wmi professional / 
Commercial Brm. 01-486 0869 
tEvesi 


SKI WEST bumper brochure out 
now packed with all the lop re- 
sorts. Sunday morns (mm u» 
traffic! 1 . and amntnsty Ibw 
prices starting « £59- rangtorj 
785 9999 t£tr your copy. 
ABTA692S6 ATOL1383. 


UES & 

ABLES 


ROYAL DOCA.TOM Toby Jugv. 
Figurines, animats, etc., want- 
ed. Ol 883 0024. 


BENTLEY &C9 

now urgently require to purchase 

DIAMONDS AND DIAMOND JEWBlOtY 

immertilrie nftnh offer. Va htotimM made. 
05 New Bond Street, w.i. Telephone 01-629 056J 


EATON PLACE SWI. Super, 
bright ft v spurious garden flat, 
complefriy rriurbd toru*out 
Lge recep. dining rm. mod ML 2 
ODIe bedims with ensulle 
oalhrmv. pjiio Avail now. 
Long co let CbOO pw. snaskeiu 
01-581 221b 

AMERICAN EXECUTIVES Seek 
lux (lab houses £200 - ElOOO 
pw. Usual fees reg. Phillips 
Kay ft Lpwk. Soul if or toe Park. 
Chelsea office. Ol -3S2 Bill or 
North ot the Park. Regent's 
Park office. 01-586 9882. 

AN AOMMtABLC HAMPSTEAD 
£180 wklv Luxurious Abode 
with every comfort. 3 bed- 
rooms spacious Reception. 
Separate Dtner Available now. 

01 286 8040 ill 

RNOMPTON PARK SWSi luxury 
4to floor. 2 bed. 2 batconled 
OaL overiooking private 2 acre 
park. Gym, sauna, solarium, 
pool. Pnv parking. £195 pw 
Inc. Tel 01-874 1050 
ANDUIRtM/OWNERS tt you 
have quality properly to let tea 
us about II. We offer a profes- 
stonal and iriiaMe service. 
Ounushi Constant! oe 

Trietmone: Ol 244 7353 

MAYFARt Fabulous Unrum 2 
Bed rums Ltr Rerep. Smart Hi 
■all reach 1 2 £/S Baths + 
Com/Ores* Area. AI new 
£600pw Bmlwra ft Reeves 
938 36 22 

RAKER ST: Supurh 3 yrs old fura 
hsr. 4 beds. 2 bam 11 ntsuueL 
lounge/diner. kii/bldSL Ggr. 
PaUo/gdn. CCH C575p.w. 01- 
847-2641 / 221 8276 

CLAPNAM COMMON. Lame 4 
bed. 2 bath hre off Common. 2 
mins lube Everything new. 
Long Co Lri Avail now. £225 
pw. Burluium. 3S1 7767. 

DEUCHTFUL 2 Bed wwnhouse 
in qutri cul-de-sac. Mod Kit. 
light Recep onto Bale. New 
Bath. Gae UOOgw. Bcnhatn ft 
Reeves 938 3522 

PMHJCO SWI Centrally located 

2 bedim flat. Large funy fitted 
kitchen, suit 3 professtonal 
sharers. £160 pw me CH. 244 
7363. 

VtSITMC LONDON /PARIS Allen 
Bates ft Company have a large 
selection of flats ft houses avail- ■ 
able tor I week* from £ 200 pw. 
499 1666. 

AME R ICAN BANK urgently rd 
quires luxury nais and houses 
from £200 £1 000 pw Ring 
Burgess Esiale Agent* S&l 5136 


UPFRJENO 

S.KBLCtodnBiet.weiiM«« 

taddna 2 ***• * 

ft D tac CJL EZOO P*. . 

ROUAND K. Vary SMC M* 
cor apt * good locabCft. * 

PmaaDth £165 p«. 
(MMPtilUL Umup dancer 
apt n gdn squn. (kiB 
bedims, super iocbl tirajMee. 
tt. RSifidns. £M5 to. . 
FUUMN. Nw dnor ML 
fum DM bodrm, racap. kftti. 
£125 to- 

01-499 5334 


BELGRAVIA, SWI 

Untumstaff mows housa m 
exceHem decoraore onto 
oHeing stylish accommoda- 
tion 2liodv2 baths, rec. kit 
and garage. £425 pw. 

Mayfair Office: 

l 01-629 4513 


WIMBLEDON VKLABC. Ctiarac- 
lei 1 ullage situated in heart or 
villa * ip 1 bed. lge recep usriud- 
•d u.dliea gdn hull *n»e 
per-am £120 ow. j W. Ud 949 
2AU2 


F.W.GAPP 1 Management Scr- 
vii i«ii no require prooeriresus 
rmti.il vouih and west London 
an-avfnr wAiung 40purant*Ol- 
221 HS3U 


KENSINGTON nr lube, sunny 1 
nni il.n on 3rd Hoot with lift 
and live ol Private gardens. 

£160 pw coddard ft smun Ol 

9.M 7321 


1 miviKtouv value Superb I 

Beil Hills serv Ked nal lop ttolM 

r alibi r 3 Wta mtn TV 
VV leviord ft (30 391 2303 


PIMLICO. Impnmvr 5 bed lam 
ill iw t urn ft dee to high 
Manual d AU machines Close 
lube A main line sin. £600 pw 
non JVS Lid Ol 949 2402 


MELSIA llal Lge Ught swing 
in. KII 2 beds Kitchen, balh 
room Sen WC Lw simps CH 
met LISOPW Ol 362 2677 


HAMPSTEAD Nr Heath Lux (urn 
tlai .1 hrdrnts. Iw- lounge. dtnuM 
area lounlry Mlchm CH Mm 
I year £295 PW 794 2789 


KINGSTON. Unfum fleS faintly 
hse 4 beds. 2 ballet Secluded 
odn ntrieoge Gas ih Long lei 
caoo pw JW Ltd 01 949 2482. 


LONC SHORT LET properties 
irom £1OO£3.000 pw. Personal 
Vmur O! 450 3080 or 0836 
592H24 .my 1 line ITt. 


WANTED Superior propertie* for 
lnmi/-JKitl Co lets 01-458 3680 
or OH 36 S42824 anyllme IT> 


ATTRACTIVE MEWS Hse Sw 10 
Dnie bid. Milt e/L twin bed. 
Mudv. (11 kitaU math. £450 pw. 
Andre Lanauvre 491 7822. 
AVAILABLE NOW Luxury flats ft 
nouses Cbetoea. Kmgbtsbndgp. 
Belnr.il u £200£2.000ow 
TH Burgra. 581 513b. 
HOLIDAYS A LOHG LETS, Lon 
don romlsldr Prop* Lid 01 
242 94o2 rx 27 or Ol 831 
CQofc 

KEMNSUMSTON WB Rereo. bed. 
K ft B. CH. TV. Video. South 
raring garden. £16Bpw. Tel. 
937 3954 or 370 3710 
MAYFAIR. Off Guram St. altrar 
live 1 bed flat, tony furnished 
and equipped, long let. £175 
pw 01-499 0321. 

NWS. 3 bed unfum flaL all lux 
fillings A machs £310pw. Abo 
I bed turn bale flat £120pw CV» 
lets pref. TH: 01 435 8380. 
9379681 The number to remem- 
ber when seeking best rental 
properties to central and prime 

London areas £lSO/£2.000aw. 

Wl. Very prcio- mew* house 
wilt, lge gge 2 bednrn, recep. k 
ft b AU machines Must be 
seen. Full detail* 935 9512 tT). 
W14 M/F. 2540- Own dM re, in 
lux newly con* HaL share wiuv 
I other £260 PCM net 01 386 
76S6 

ACADEMICS VKH7MG. Flab nr 
Vim roily ft Brit Museum. T« 
Helen Watson A Co. 600 6275. 
CHELSEA immac lux flat, batoo- 
ny. dblr bed. recent. Utt. porter. 
£195 pw- Long M 622 5825 
CHEYNE ROW. fW3 Superb 2nd 
fl 2 Bed nal Long l«. £15Spw. 
221 2615 s ci Boland Ltd. 
HAMPSTEAD V L ATE NWS. 2 
bed. lux nal 10 M. 6-12 mm*. 
£165 PW TH. OI 435 0764 
HOLIDAY APARTMENTS from 1 
Week lo 3 Month* from £300 lo 
£3.000 pw 01-937 9681. 
KENSINGTON. £138 pw. Exret 
lent spanous well fundshed 2 
bed oaiden flat 603 9466- 
L OO It INC for ihe best nal. du 
plex. rxMsr tn London? 
£IOO/1000pw. Cau 689 5481. 
MAI DA VALE W9 Super 2 bd gdn 
Hal Recep KftB. Co. I el. Avail 
10 AUH CI40PW. 286 4856 
MAYFAK. Small' bul very 
neauuuJ studio flat £178 pw 
1 dc cleaner. 935 2781 CD 
SWI. 2 FLATS. Brand new 
Ihtouunoul Lge 1 bed nab. 
£250/ £275 pw. 730 3435 IT) 
WAPP1NC. Lux 1 bed fum Oat hi 
nvnsidr Warehouse Convrr - 
UOn £165 pw. 01-481 9199. 
WE LET FLATS AMD HOUSES. 
Contact Richard or Mirk. Dai Is 
Wool I r ft Co 402 7381. 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


TRAINEE BROKER 

A vacancy has arisen 
in a leading West End 
brokerage. The suc- 
cessful applicant will 
be 23+ and of smart 
appearance. No pre- 
vious experience 
necessary as- full 
training will be given. 
Please call Robert 
Kay on 01-629 3082. 


LEGAL LA CREME 


LEGAL LA CREME 

LEGAL 
ASSISTANT/ 
SECRETARY 

Solicitors - go 
ahead, informal, 
small firm seek 
secretary/legal 
assistant to princi- 
pal. Start August. 
Modem, attractive 
offices. Salary up to 
£10,000. 

Phone 
Miss Anwar 
01-242 0502 


PARTNERS SECRETARY 

For small busy City firm. Excellent salary 
commensurate with age and experience. 

Contact Cuy Fraser-Sampson 
01-583 7944. 

Stfrarman Sfaerilker Fraser-Sampsan A Co. 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


EXPORT MANAGER/ 
ASSISTANT TO M.D. 

We' require person based W2 (Edgwsre Road tube). 
Folly experienced. All office admin; some simple book- 
keeping - order processing, records - all export 
documents - UtTn aod B/L’a experienced - stock con- 
trol, shipping, own gtareb o nae (Oxford area). lVP™g 
and French positive advantage. 

Aa interesting stimulating vacancy. Small bat busy 
office ami very large T/0. Excellent salary for this 
special position. Reply in writing to: *\LD\ BOX D74- 


THE SIMPKINS 
PARTNERSHIP 

West End entertainment Solicitors are looking; 
fir Receptionist and two Secretaries to work in 
pleasant, informal but hard-working offices. 

Our Receptionist will be presentable, well- 
spoken, able to operate a Monarch switchboard 
' tactfully wh 


and to deal 


with all kinds of people. 


Our Secretaries trill be friendly, competent and 
experienced in legal audio typing. We will train 
or cross-uam onto Apricot word processors. 

Top salaries apply to all these vacancies. 
Send CV with details UK 
Sae King 

12 Wyttdham Place, 

London W1H IAS 



















































































24 


LAW/UNIVERSITY NEWS/SPORT 


Law Report August 5 1986 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


Equity’s apartheid ban is unlawful 


Goring v British Actors Equity 
Association 

Be Tore Sir Nicolas Brown c- 
Wilkinson. Vice-Chancellor 
[Judgment given July 29] 

A decision by Equity, the 
defendant trade union, follow- 
ing a referendum of its mem- 
bers. to issue an instruction to 
all members not to accept 
professional engagements which 
involved working in South Af- 
rica or its dependent home- 
lands. was declared ultra vires 
and void as being unauthorized 
by the rules of the union. Sir 
Nicolas Browne-Wilkinson. 
Vice-Chancellor, held in the 
Chancery Division, in an action 
brought by Mr Marius Goring. 

Mr David A. Lowe. Q. C and 
Mr Thomas Seymour for Mr 
Goring: Mr John V. Martin for 
Equity. 

THE VICE-CHANCELLOR 
said that a resolution at the 1985 
annual meeting included a call 
for a union instruction to mem- 
bers not to work in South Africa 
and its dependent homelands. 

In March 1986 the council of 
the union held a referendum of 
all the members to whom the 
question was put Of a total 
membership of 32.000. only 
3.320 voted — 1.946 in favour 
and 1.374 (including the plain- 
tiff) against the issuing of tbe 
instruction. 

Accordingly in April 1986 the 
council issued the following 
instruction: "Henceforth until 
this instruction is lifted no 
member shall accept pro- 
fessional engagements which 
will involve working in South 
Africa or its dependent 
homelands". 

Once issued, such an instruc- 
tion hus binding on the mem- 
bers. and a member failing to 
comply with it could be lined, 
suspended or expelled from the 
union. Since, for all practical 
purposes, the theatrical 
entertainment industry was a 
closed shop, membership or the 
union being a pre-requisite of 
employment, suspension or 
expulsion would be a dire 
penalty for any member. 

In the action the plaintiff was 
suing on behalf of himself and 
all other members who voted 
against the issuing of the 
instruction. He claimed a 
declaration that the instruction 


was ultra vires the union and 
void on the ground that it was 
not authorized by the rules. 

Before turning to the rules, 
one point had to be made dear. 
The major underlying consid- 
eration in the case was the 
altitude which the union should 
adopt towards apartheid in 
South Africa. On both sides of 
the dispute, everyone con- 
demned apartheid as an abhor- 
rent institution. 

But then? were two views on 
how best to bring it speedily to 
an end. One was that there 
should be a complete cultural 
boycott of South Africa (extend- 
ing well beyond the entertain- 
ment industry) so as to isolate 
South Africa and pul pressure 
on its government to dismantle 
the system. The other view was 
that cultural links and “bridge 
building" would be more effec- 
tive to break down the system 
from within. 

Both those views were lawful: 
the court's function was to 
decide whether it was lawful for 
the union not only to adopt the 
cultural boycott view but also to 
require members not sharing 
that view to give effect to it by 
reftising engagements in South 
Africa on pain of possible 
suspension or expulsion. 

In coming to the rules, there 
were first certain points of 
principle which should not be 
lost sight of. The relationship 
between members of a trade 


the majority could only bind the 


union was regulated by contract 
of w 


the terms of which were con- 
tained in the rules. 

If a particular decision fell 
within the objects of the trade 
union as set out in the rules, 
then each member was bound 
by his contract with the other 
members to give effect to that 
decision. 

If. on the other hand, the 
decision did not fall within the 
objects, there was no contractual 
or other legal obligation on any 
member to give effect to it. 

Alterations could be made to 
the rules (and therefore the 
contract between the members) 
provided the procedures for rule 
changes laid down in the exist- 
ing rules had been complied 
with-. 

Accordingly, although most 
trade unions were organized on 
a democratic basis (that is 
majority decisions prevailed). 


minority if the decision was 
within the objects of the union 
to which the members had 
agreed. 

The question therefore was 
whether the plaintiff and those 
others who shared his views had 
bound themselves to accept an 
instruction that they should not 
appear in South Africa. 

Tbe current rules of the union 
were contained in clause 3 under 
the heading “Objects. Powers 
and Duties”. The material parts 
were: 

“A Objects. Asa non-political 
and non-scctarian union: (i) to 
promote, protect and further on 
a professional basis the art of 
theatre, variety, opera, dancing, 
films, broadcasting and similar 
forms of entertainment; (ii) to 
promote, protect and further the 
artistic, economic, social and 
legal interests of its members in 
their professional capacity; (iii) 
to maintain the professional 
rights and liberties of its mem- 
bers individually and collec- 
tively; (iv) to secure by 
organization, and all otber effec- 
tive methods, unity of action lo 
achieve the best possible terms 
and conditions of work in all 
fields in which members are 
engaged: . . . 

“B Powers and Duties, (a) To 
issue all necessary instructions 
to the members, through its 
elected council, in accordance 

with the above objects; (d) to 

take any (awful action the 
council (as governing body) may 
deem advisable and desirable to 
promote the above objects, and 
promote and further the pro- 
fessional interests of the mem-. 

bers: (n) to cooperate with 

kindred organizations societies 
or associations — but at no 
lime to affiliate ... lo any 
political party or sect, or to any 


organization society or associ- 
ation which is itself affiliated 


to 


any political party or sect: (a) to 
acknowledge the right of in- 
dividual members to hold and 
express their personal political 
and other beliefs both in their 
private and professional 
capacities.” 

The introductory words of 
rule 3A — “as a non-party 
political and non-sectarian 
union” were of crucial im- 
portance in the case and would 
be referred to as the preamble. 


The evidence sworn on behalf 
of the plaintiff showed that the 
instruction, if valid, would seri- 
ously affect the professional 
lives of some members of the 
union; some members lived 
there; others frequently ap- 
peared there; others appeared 
there only from time to time. 

The evidence on the other 
side had been directed to show- 
ing that the instruction fell 
within the legitimate ambit of 
the union's objects since it was 
capable of directly promoting 
the professional interests of 
some of its members in various 
ways. 

The decision in the case 
depended on the proper 
cpnstruction of the words of lie 
preamble: when read in 
conjunction with rule 3B(o) the 
words of the preamble, in the 
court's view, limited the express 
objects set out in rule 3A so as to 
exclude activities the purpose of 
which was primarily party 
political or sectarian. 

The words of tbe preamble 
and of rule 3Bfo) were two sides 
of a coin. Rule 3B(o) made dear 
the duty to respect the rights of 
an individual lo bold and 
express his individual beliefs; 
the preamble assured that that 
duty to the individual member 
was observed by limiting the 
objects of the union to those 
activities which were under- 
taken for professional purposes 
and did not extend to those 
which were party political or 
sectarian purposes which might 
conflict with the individual 
views and beliefs of the individ- 
ual members. 

That that was the right 
construction was demonstrated 
by an example of theatre grants, 
which were a party political 
issue, if the matter was looked at 
purely objectively, it would not 
be permissible to- support in- 
creased grants because that 
would be a party political issue 
and therefore outride the ambit 
of the union's legitimate activ- 
ity. 

The only way of reconciling 
the words of tbe preamble with 
the specific purposes in each of 
the sub-rules of rule 3A was to 
look to the purpose for which 
the proposed action was to be 
taken. 

If it was to be taken for the 
purpose of advancing pro- 


fessional interests, that would be 
authorized; but if the purpose 
was to advance the cause of the 
party, it would not be au- 
thorized, for to lake such action 
would be to act as a party 
political union. Accordingly, the 
purpose with which an act was 
done was decisive. 

That construction was sup- 
ported by a consideration of 
past amendments to the rules. 
The union existed to promote 
the professional interests of its 
members stated in the sub-rules 
of rule 3A. 

Aciivities undertaken for 
those purposes were not to be 

precluded by the words of the 
preamble. But activities under- 
taken for the purpose of advanc- 
ing a party political or sectarian 
viewpoint were not authorized 
just because an ingenious mind 
could find ways in which they 
might advance the interests of 
the members in a remote degree. 

If that view was right so far, if 
an activity of the union was 


impugned on the ground that it 
liticai or sec 


was party political or sectarian, 
there was no escape from having 
to determine the primary pur- 
pose of the activity. 

It was accepted that in some 
cases where the activity bad 
been directly sanctioned by a 
referendum, the ascertainment 
of the purpose presented great 
difficulties. But, in the present 
case, there was no doubt the 
purpose was sectarian. 

The language of the 1985 
AGM resolution was redolent of 
sectarian promotion of a boy- 
cott for the purpose of putting 
an end to apartheid; there was 
no mention of professional in- 
terests. 

In the . absence of any ev- 
idence to the contrary, the only 
purpose of the instruction which 
had been demonstrated was to 
promote a general cultural boy- 
cott of South Africa (a sectarian 
purpose), not for the purpose of 
promoting the professional in- 
terests of the members. 

Accordingly, tbe instruction 
prohibiting members from 
appearing m South Africa was 
void as being ultra vires the 
powers of the union, and a 
declaration would be made to 
that effect. 

Solicitors: Ambrose Appelbe 
Partners; Ms Ruth Gumy. 


Degrees awarded by the University of Reading 


The following degrees from 
Reading University 
nounced: 


are an- 


Ctazs 7 (Dh 3): L N Barry: H M 

«CMf ' 


Faculty of Letters and Social 
Sciences 
BA 


- Brooks: G M Coales: S C Hudson: L M 
k'nowd. A C Oltwy: A C TemrO: W j 
Young 

GMRnuliy (Human Option) 

. Class 1: A N CrMflihs 
Cbm 3 (Dl« 1): I P Bishop: M 
Bradshaw. D j Connolly: P J Fosbury. 
P S Fuller; □ J Hamson.CE Heap: C 


Aretuaotosy 

Ctas* a (Dtv 1): C Gordon: J Hay is: P 
Hudson: a Mason: A M Manerson: M 

Oju» a (ZHv I): P Cannon: A E Irwin: 
4 L Smith. 

Gins 3: c Lancaster. 

Archaeology and Clas s ical Studies 
Ctass 2 (DM l): J Simpson. H A 
Stokes. 

Class 2 (DM 7): T C Gee. 

Art 

Class J: A Grim 


J Mann: S T MrWiUlaihs: M i 
Pearson: L J Pep foe: J S Randle: N J 


Wilson: M 


Class a (DM lljK M Headman: M Bide 
l Denver: A Gower: J M Greogyr; J C 


Jones. J Jueii: S Usle: A Lucas: 


N 


McGregor: E Mowbray. 1 Patterson: S 
1 . j Weordmeesler. 


Rawwn: I Stewart. 

Class 2 (DM a): J R Rowse. 

BuxbMM Ec onom i cs 
Class 2 (DM 2): C Nine: D 
Mockenortck- 

Classtoal and ModMoal Studm 
Class 2 (DM 1): L Rush moor. 
Classical Studies 

Class 7 (DM I): C J Leonard: D E 
Penny. 

Class 2 (DM 2): F J Htghrock: A K 
Varney. 

Pass: J Newton. 

Ctautcal Studies and Sociology 
Class 2 (DM 1): Nicola M Kemp. 
Economics 

cum 2 (DM I): T J Allen: S v Barratt: 
H J Boxer: D R Davie*: C J Gagllone: 
S L Won 

Ctaua (DM 2): L J Clement*: J Grotty: 
C A Crowiher: C O Harber. s G 
Owens,: C SUnleir A R Williams. 
Clan 3: M K Albert*. 

Economics and Accounting 


,.je; J S 

Rose: M S Russell: J R 
Yardiey 

Class 2 (DM 2): C A Cherry: F C 
Langston Jones: h A J Maltby: P M L 
Napier: D M Trollope 

Carman 

Class t: M C Cocke 

Class 2 (DM 3)s S J Clarke: A K 

Hansel: C A Hayde: A M H1U; S- M 

UlUemore: K P Scarborough: C M 

Webb 

Class 1AJ Beckwith: L Golding: M R 
McLaughlin: L R Williams 

Caiman and E c onomi c s 
Pan 2 (DM i>: c J Basien; 
Fused ale: 5 J Marshall 
Clan 2 (DM 2)s a J Arnold 
Carman and French 
Class 2 (DM I): M C Wilkinson 
Pass 2 (DM 7): K Ashmore: H C 
Campbell. J A Higgins; S L Scon 
Pass; J N Wilkinson 
Carman and International Rahmans 
Class 2 (DM I): C J Marsh: P A 
McKenna 

Carman and Ifaflan 
Past 3 (DM 2)i c M Mann 
Gorman and Lfa entities 
Pass 2 (DM 2)8 E F Sledman 
Carman and Russian 
Pass 2 (DM 1)8 H H Farbowskt 
Pass 2 (DM 2): M A Beck: M E 
Kcmpc: M A Younger 

Gorman and Soatotagy 
pass 2 (DM 1)8 C J Hardwick 
Glass 2 (Onr 2)8 S E Thomas 
Glass 3: D M Lundy 
History 


& Mills: C J Raw&on: M W Tennant 
Pam 3: T P Way 

Prattles and Esanamks 
Ctasa 2 (DM 2): L Ayrton; A J Taylor 
Ctass 3: E R F Anderson: G R Hodgson 
Psychology 

Pass 2 (DM I): G B DMby: J A 
Ganiev: Z L Ceding: M Osborn: S J 
Selcon: A Todd: I Toner: S M L 
WUIurmon 


Class 2DC Griffiths: j B Ortons: c M 
Senior 


B Holmes: S J Key: LPFKBWftA 
Lewis: J S I Lonsdale: E Y Lucas: M P 


Pass 2 (DM 2): L M Beaidon; J 
r: J S M Henderson: A E 


Brewer: _ _ ... _ 

Leedham: M □ C Ltorente; L R MeU: 
w B Sailer 

Psychology and Sociology 
Pan 2 (DM 1): J A Daniel: R J 
Ryeland 

Claas 2 (DM 2): C Warren 
Sociology 


B io graphy (Physical Option) 

Class 2 (DM i): S Ashley: C P Hill: e J 
Miller 

Class 2 (DM 2): E A Llewellyn: F 
McLaughlin 

Geological C a o p hyMs 
Pam liDW Shakespeare 
Clam 7 (DM t): J M Waring: GW 
Yang 


Newton: M Palmer: M J Pension: M B 
Sinclair: R B Stanton: A E Stevens: P 
D Si evens: J C Tanner: D M Thomas: 


J Vlgar: 
j wilet 


■rax: C B Winney 




Pass 1 (DM 2)s s J w Austin: A 
Lee: R H Parkinson: J Taylor 


M 


Brumby: M H Daloo: M-R R Gatlin: M 
r Green: R Jeff, -Ties; J W Kent: F A 
Mauam: C C Rtngropevmse: C J 

isssssr-j s XewwSjI 


Parties: c A 


Pam 2 (DM 1): M P Con very: W A 
Cooke: NR Gardner: R J Herring: L 
Martin: M w Need: L C Osborne: 0 E 


Palfrey; A Hoyce 




, E L Hawes: J 

Logan: L E Marlin; L C Tailuun 
Sociology and Intamailonal Relations 
Clam 2 (DM 2): H N L Latham 
Sociology and Publics 
Pam 2 (DM 1): J R Woodier 
Pass 2 (DM 2): s J Mostyn 
Typography and Graphic Communication 


Geology 

Pam 7 (DM I): A J 
Pilcher 
Clam 3s h M BLyth 

MamomaUaal ScMncas 
Pass 2 (DM 2): A P O’Connor 
Mathematics 

Pass li H E Dodd: C a Moore: j E 
wood 

Pam 2 (DM 1): L E Ruddle* 


Bh n a slin ology 
dam 2 (DM l): s J Rawtmg 


Pass 2 | (DM 2): c G Bute M R Gravatc 


A J Hall 
darn 3: M J Maddlson 


Food Science 
Pass t P R Clarkson; S R Green: J W 
Htghnam 

Class 7 (DM IV: D J Briggs: E C J 
OofeoraoK T M Ford: P Kingman: D J 
Marrta: H I McNair: K J Shears 


Pmx 2 (ph_2): WGuyiiani 


Pam 2 (DM i)s J B Cotedough: J F 
aw: w Dickie: L J Gowans: S 


Crawshaw: .. _ 

M Jack: M H Sharp: K J shlpsldcs: E J 
Smjui: j F TyOeman 


Pam 2 (DM 2): SL Baldwin; PJ deal: 
K C FOske: M J ' 


JC pray; s J Gunner-. 

K C Koyama: J Maggs 
Clam 3: M I Wright 


LLB 


Cbm 2 (DM 1): S C Bird: R A Bound: 
A P Campbell: S M Curtin: S J 
Hathwav: J P B Kent: A L Macaulay; 
j D McCliern: R D Ntctiob: J Organ: 
J N Shaw: K L Williams 


K E Morse: B Robinson: S S ! 

J Sharpe 
Pus 2s JG Moate: M Wesum 
Mamemattes and Compotar Salonm 
Cbm 2 (DM t): D J CatcutL D 
vandepeen M I Woodrow 
Pam 2 (DM g-.RM Ayres; J Legman: 
M J Newslead: H P Roberts: J C 
Salmon 

Pamfcj E Black; PC Osborn: Qsurt: 
A S Wanning 

MiUMmadm and Meteorology 

Cbm 2 (DM 2): A P Winch 
Mathematics and Physics 
Clam 1 b k l Hodges; H S Rawtms 
Pass 2 '(DM I): T W Harvey 
Cbm 2 (DM 2): v C Woollen 
Clam 3: D J Williams 

M athe m atics and fRattsttos 
Pam Ik C Gill 

Pam 3 (DM f): J Ashton: L R Furben 
P W J Gale 

Pam 2 (DM 2* A Michael 


Pam 2 (DM 2): j s A Crirasbaw: H M 
Guilford: J HOG 


stiand: N J HoH: NPE 

Hughes: J E Lux 


E cono mics A 


Salmon: M A Vallely 
Pam 2 (Die 7)t T R De Silva: S K 
tesan OF McCUntock 


Food Technology 

Clam 1: F A Ayiward: K J Nkwl 

Holmes: J A 
ih Jones: S E 

___ i A Owen: M A 

Piper: K M Tonics 


w » r « mn«aiu. 

Pam 2 (DM 1): c M H 
Hop wood: PU Hugh 
Kemp: C J Lawrence: S A 


.Cbm 2 COM n: H Ballard: P J Bentley: 
i J Braliey: SJ Clarke: R A Cooper; C 


P Dawson; D C A Hamilton: A M 
Houghton: S G nines: A J Kruckerr M 
J Landau: P R McMulUn: S J Meek: N 
Murray: M J mull: C R smith 
Pam 3: C A N Senabulya: M 
SMlthson: D P SwinchaD 


Pam 2 (DM »: □ s Brook*, p j 
' - Goddard: S Copal. M J 


Ckus 2 (DM 1): R J Ashdown; T 
n: J L Caller. R J Carr P M 


Cmffrcdi: A K < 

Luca* 

Class 2 (DM 2): B K Amin: M K L 
Chan: M J Garrall: D Ledger. S F V 
Perry. J D Shanlrv. A G Turner. 
Pass t,U Bamfield. 

Economics and Econometrics 
Pass 3: Mario* Chrtsiou 
Economics and SocMogy 
Ctass 2 (DM I ): D J Cooper 
Pass 2 (DM 2): S J Byrne: S E 
Chnn: A J Vials 

Engttsb and French 
Clam 2 (DM I): R D Murray Brown 
Pass 2 (DM 2)8 J A Hawkins 
English and Italian 

Class 2 (DM t); A C Dicks: A E Isaacs 
English and Ung o W Ic i 
Clam 2 (DM I): C D L Parrlnder 
Clam 2 (Dtv 2): D Baker: J v Goodall 
English Lanpugc and Uteratura 
Pass ■: C L Ballon. A Blamire*: C E 
Ling: D M Waldo 
Pan 3 (DM I): P H Barnes: L J M 
Blair: J j Bryce. C M Cargill C M 
Clow. N 1 Dowmon. S C Dm er; K S 
Eve*. S J Fleming: H T Griffiths: A C 
Harris: J Hatille: s Hughes: ,\ c 
James, p j Lanslev : P A Latllmer: S P 
Meagher: S E Owen: M J Sperrinq: A 
D ibirudwtek. N J Tasfor. C. L 
Tmnbee. S Weston. S E Whittaker 


Austin: . _ . . 

Corblshley: P R Coward: A L Davies: 
H L Dai is: W j Dec Ine: A J Gray: J D 
Hannaford: G J Harris: J C HazrMen: 
S W Houghton: C A Hutton: W H 
halts: T K Jastrzebska: E S Kersey: P 
King: J D Lowton: C J O'Keefe: J E 
Pnon J M Sharpies: D Sheppard: O D 
Slade: R J Smale: D J H Voller: REA 
Wallis: R M White: A J Whybrow: S 
Woodman 

Clam 2 (DM 3): S C Adams: D Aldred: 
S L Armstrong-. H E Bennett: R A 
Broadbenl: S R Conlngion: E T Jenne: 
J C Mitchell: 6 L Perry. S M A 
Ralrilffc. G J Richardson: C J Rowley. 
S W Seale: J E SIMby: D L Sloan. G 
Soulhoaic. R E SulcUire. G C Watkins: 
HAL W cokes 

Pass 3: D J wniietocke winter 


Clam 2 (DM tU T R Bryden: R E' 
Courtneidge: S PJ 


i Cults; F E Darby: S 

C Dearsley: J A Garrett: G J Hams: P 
R HOSfont: D J C HosUng: O Ibtm: RJ 
Jenkins: S J Jones; L Lerats: P J A 


Pam Is N M Karaolis 
Pam 2 (DM 1): G S Rees: G F J 
Whiteside 


Clam 1: S R Esdale: C Whiteside 


Lock. M A Martinos; E C Oqllvte: R 

p A 


Osborne: O M J Ponen . .... 

A J Raffeny; I C RoMno: G N 
Robinson: E AO Shone kan: J A 
Spooner. NLD Taylor. A A Vigar: C 
j watson: E L wood. 

Pam 1BW Faulkner: J m J Hoyden 




Faculty of Science 
BSc 

Applied Zoology 


V<PV&iSi J Caywwd: B 


History and Archaeology 
Pus 7 (DM 2)8 H F Carter 
History and English Uierainra 
Class 2 (DM I): E M Ebbcns. V J Kemp 
Clou 2 (DM 2)s B G Hayden 
Hillary and Sociology 
CbU 3 <p*v I): P O BranL S E 
Jenkins: C E Johnson 

History ol An and Archil actor* 
Pass I: b M Pollard 


Mac klin: 

Pam 2 (DM 2): C W Dent: E Flggln: A 
& Jay: J A North 
Pats 3; B N Goddard 

Btofoglcal -Sciences A 
Pam 2 (DM 1): N J D Slee: T J 
bwinflctd 

Btofoglcal ac tonoet C 
Pass 2 (DM 2): K Y Hambrook: J E 
Williams 

Botany 

Pam 1: A Culham: M F Watson 


forth 

Pam 1 R K Chemweno: A J Spinks 
Pam; A T Brockman: M A Lawman 
Meteorology 
Pam: D A Walker 

IIHitnSilnlnnr 

Class 2 (DM 1): S B Bradshaw; d S 
Illingworth 

CtBXS 2 (DM 2): L Al-Andry: B S 
Falrclougn; J a FaDdnqbrtdge: M 
Jamas: D □ Morgan: J H Moses: P M 
A Stansbury: E A VkSale . 

Pam 1 DS fi P CM vers 


Clam 2 (DM 1): ] S Donnison: M R 
- Evan*. AM HArgfeavet: 


Emmett: A C Evans: A M 
P W Howling: J J H 
Roberts: A J T Sawyer 


2 (DM 2): D H Barker; C F 
Brazier: 6 KT 


KlrtoUdle: M J Lee 


Physiol ogy a B ttH—to try and Ku- 
tmtan o I Farm Anfwals 


Claes 2 (DM l): M J Hannah; R J 
- T Le Ussier: E A White 


Kirk man: P R 
Cbm 2 (DM 2: R J Loach: C E Toosood 


Safi Science 


Clam 2 (DM. f): P K Barrthan: A J 
Buber: P T Dorward: J 


Pam is A C Lane 


Brenner: A R 
A Thomas 
Pail 2 (DM 2); A C Mansell 


Oats 2 (DM 1): P A Hepburn: J K 
n; H K Randhawa 


Class 2 (DM 1); R C Carson: J G I 
— - T j £ r 


Class 2 (DM >): L M Abraham*, m 
C hilian: R J Clark: L b 


Cobby- T P 

Cole: R W B Dennis. E M Firth: A E 

Groom: D M Havward: J P Markham. 

L C Miller D A Mold: T A C O'Leary: 

D C Paul: A G Porfrr. A □ Ray Her: E 

m Ryan. P J SMiih: b A Timms: C 

Wilson, j A ZTcbcoee 

Pass 3 R Gutoamal 

English Uteri lure and CMulcal Studies 

Pass 1: A J Sayers 

pass 7 (DM f): M A Doherty: B H 

Howard 

Clam 3 M Dowden 

EngMh Lttetanu* and History of Art 

Pass Is J P NKTroll* 

English Ulennur* sod SocMogy 
Pau 2 (DM 2): E F Doe: N J Kohler: J 
D Rpm: a M Yales 
French 

Pass 2 (DM 1): L J Buchan: □ C 
Davie*: C M Dyniond: M A Hunl: C A 
Hutchins. J A Owen: S J Pallerson: J 
Prince. S J Pim. J J Wheeler A P 
wood run* 

Clam 2 (DM 2): K Aylesbury: P 

Clumber-lain M J Fern: P B Hagan: C 
Hoddlncill: DC E James. J M Keeling. 
S J M.irnnul. C J Oleary. E J 
Walker, d H WarreUow: E watmough 
Ctess X c A Bownes 
• 'Mention* for excellence in snoken 
and written French 

French and Economies 
Pau 2 (DM 1): S Rogers: F M Twlgg 
Pau 2 (DM 2): R J Dobell: S B Lodge 
French and English Literature 


Chandler. S J E Dennv. T D Hllller. F 
R Manners: G A McLaren. F A 
O'Neill: S D parry Jane*: A Thomas: 
K L Tinniey 

Clam 2 (DM 2): E L S Harman: A L M 
Hooklm-Ctarke: d Thwaite* Lastra 
unernattonai natations and E co no mics 
Put 7 (DM f): E A Barron: v G 
Edward* 


Pam 2 (DM 1): J D D Biggin*: F E 
vie. C P Scutt: C E Slone 


May I 


Ctau 2 (Dtv 2): M K Collard: M 


Lecouue Lorain 

Botany and Zoology 
Pam 1: A G CJianner: k E Martin 
Ctam 2 (DM 1): G N Ovendcn: J D 
Stoke* 

Pau 2 (DM 2): W L Hyett: N J Lever 


Osborn; 

Pass 2 (DM 2): S P Gardner: A K 
williams 

Ctam tJM Arndlage: C M Morri&h 
Phyatm 

Pan I* p a Kidman: H Roberts 
Pam 2 (DM 1): N A cannon; t j 
S iren oard 

Pau 2 (DM 2): D J Britton: E J Pascal 
Pam 31 C E Baldwin: M S Booth; S J 
Catven A J McGulneas 

physics and Be e ironi es 


Faculty of Urban and Regional 
Studies 
BSc 


Clam 2 (DM »: B J Green: A M 
n: H A Jeffrey* 


CCUS 3 Cpts 2)3 C Boncns: J M Da 
*. M P Felice: □ j Goucher: R A 


Cunha. 

L Guimaraero 

Italian 

Pau 2 (DM f): K F Allrtght. S J Free 
Gore. A J D Hemingway. H D Lo 
Grice: C R Marshall: A M Vogel 


Ctam 2 (DM f): R.can 


Horseman: 

Pau 3s M Banasiewicz: R G Cura 
Physics and Motaoroiocy 
Pau 2 (DM 1): P Armltage: T D 
Hewson; n Marsh: C A Walker- 
Pau 2 (DM ns T M Brurder; T J 
Chrshen T J Hitch 


Bun d in g CsswHwi 
Pau 2 (DM 2); J M Couper; A D Free; 
S A NKhOlls. 

Bothttog Soroeybig 

Pau 1: J C Bisson: N R Henshaw. 
Pam 2 (Division 1): K Ashford: S M 
Davies: R G Douglas: R F J 
n noai rick: V J Gray: MR Walters; I J 
□ WlUcox. 

Ctau 2 (DM1 si sn 2): C M Dewson: J M 
F arrant: J D FurneH: W D Mumfbrd: 
R M Noel : A J Page: DRJ Raptor P J 
Roberts: D N Thurston: D M Wilson. 
Pau 2GB Foreman; R J MaOdson. 
Past: A M Graham Clarke. 

Land 


Ctau 2 (On Z):g CJrillo: S M Clarice: 
nr: C L Parkinson 


POlaine Mayer 
Pau 3: J □ Clarice: J Morey 
Pismtstiy 

Ctau 1: A S Rand or d; EPS Barrett; K 
B Cowtlrk: R E Nussbaum 




Pau fc T B Dean 
Pam 2 (Dtv 2): K A Jackson 
Phys i ology and Btoohaodstry 
It V M O'Connor 


Pau 2 (DM 1): t B cook: R Dolby: J 
C M Harbottle: P A mglohy: S L Ja 
R S C Million: P C Stvbingion: F 


R m Lmdlev: 

Itaiiaa and History of Art 
Pau 2 (DM t)s K M Cwalkln; 8 J 
Nolan 

Pass 2 (DM 2)» R L E Rothman 
Italian and iiuaraattona) Refattons 
pau 7 (DM 1): m F Benedan 
Itaiiaa and PoHOcs 
Pau Ik T Behan 

Latin 

Ctau 2 (DM 2): C A Southern: J A 


Ctau 2 (DM 1): J E Baker: M A Btifcc 
M p Colli m.: P R Harris: J RaldHIe 


Pau 3 (DM 2): A A Baird: S J 
tvre: V C Chaw: C A Cray: R A 


Blrkmvre: 

C Harris. G I Hepworth: N G TosseU: J 
C wan* 

Pus tJC Brandon: D C Howe: M 
Thompson: S L’lloti: M Wealfwrfey 
■Pass: j a Hillman 

Chnutstry and Food Macs 
Pam 1: D N-CUmte 


Pau 2 (DM 2): C J Andrew*: s B 
n: J J Gilbert: B A Llnsey: R Sodri 


West 


Pam 2 (Dm 2): T Edwards: P P 
ion: I Y K Lee: L M Masson 


Ctau 3 (DM 1): C B Evans: T L 
’■* A: C M Maclean: M Tracy 


Johnson: 

Pau 7 (Dm 3): C J E Ortolan: S C 

Otwhir 

Franch aad Carman 

Pau I: K A Lee- 

Class 2 (DM 1): C F Garland 

Clau 2 (DM 2): F Dows*. S M Kingsley 

Clam 2SJ Booihroyd 

• 'Mention' for excellence In Sbokcn 

and wniten French 

French and History ol Art 
CbU 3 (DM 1): G D Humphries: A M 
SMiih 

French and lmemaitonal Relation* 
Pass 2 (Dtv 2): N 1 Callow; k L 
Hedlnqton 

French and Italian 

Pau 2 (DM 1): M R Hayward: c J 
Macke one: M-H OsierwcH*: O J 
Williams 


Latin and UagSitki 
Pau 2 (DM 2): G Murphy 
Latin, and H ite npHy 
Clast 2 (DM 2): P Copperwheal 
Unguistlca 

Clus i: D M Palfreynuin 
Clau Z (DM f): J A Brown; A A 
Collin*. K U Hilton: A LMtstonc; TOM 
SK inner: J Underwood 
Clan 2 (DM 2): J P Woodcock 
Pasts A C Schanrer 
Lingirisaos and I angnage Pathotogy 


jonnsion 
Pam 3: C Kelly 
Co 


Mmce 


Ctam 1: D R Goldsworthy 
Ctau 2 (DM 1): M D Heath: C MelllirtP 
L E Sleiemon: T C Ton: M H P Van 
HcKoon 


Ctam 2 (DM 2): H K Fung: D Holmes: 

” -tERF ‘ “ ” — - - — 


R E Huwins. E R Schaub: S Shaf: F N 
.dbj Wahnon 


Soper 

Pau 3: S A Chan: R Mistry 


Ctasi2^(DM 1^ A J Bale. S Daxle*; A 


V Kcailey: E A Marshall. J M 
Pejlhevtohns: N j sandtson: D M 
Saiiiie. A J Spicer; D J Steven*: J K 
Warren 

Clau 2 (DM 2): S J Boulter: C A 
Crosse. J M Mailamphy: L G Young 
Pam 3: P L Hughe* 

Modem Htstcry and tnunuOami Reto- 
ttotis 

Pus 2 (DM 1): N P Col grove- P G 
Cowling: M Gardner: K M Healh: L 
Jones: P Mitchell: A G Murohle: R M 
Oulnn: D H Slmmonds: M S SUrk. K 
A Thomas. J F Thresh le 


Clau 2 (DM »: P A Harm**: J P A' 
5J R A Ptoarro Du hart 


Michel more: 

Class X A L Porter Nassauer: N J 
Warren 


Ctam 2 row 2): R A Clark: R G M 
G Taylor H A Youngs 


Kcnna. 

■ -Men l kin for excellence In spoken 
and written French 

French and Ungntotim 
Clam 2 (DM 1): S C Allen: M Wiuta 
Fleming 

Clau 2 (DM 2): S C Davies 
dam x P A Bowin' 

French and Pokhcs 
Clau 2 (DM 1): C V Slater. A Yltrtll 
French and Russian 
Clam 7 (DM l): C J Cole: M Cussefl 
Ctau 2 (DM 7): M A Hughes: J C 
Spence 

Ctam 3: M E (luriingion Green 
French and Sociology 
Cbm 2 (DM I): J A Carr. R A Lucas 
Ctau 2 (DM 2) C Thornton 
Goognphy. (Human and Physical Op- 


tion) 


Modem tHstory and PoHtim 

CbU 2 (DM I): A M O Waits Jana 
Music A 

Ctam 3 (Dtv t): s N Hardwick: S A 
LimDrick 

Clau 2 (On 2): J Bowler: H M Bums: 
S J Danes: C A, Gray: K E HKME'. M A 
Kennedy: M J King. G Lewis: A 
Marples: A R Wood 
u- jk g 

CMU 7 (DW 1): C Tlukhcr 
PMtosogMty 

Pam 2 (Dr* t)s J Chiluer: S N Parry: 
R C Taylor 

Pass 2 (DM S)i t O Powell 
PhUnuthf and Engtiah uunon 
dam 2 (Dtv 1); a G Billing* 

CKUS 2 (Dm 2)8 M R Parker 
PUkuaphy and French 
PUS 2 (DM 1)8 MJS Goddard 
Pofctic* 

Clau 1; w J Firtdhousc 


Coapmer Srience and Control Fnglnw- 
in* 

Pau 2 (DM n: R H craven: S R 
Dickerson: A J LewM A P Passa 
Pau IMS Sraf: G C Summer*: R 
' vadgama 

Computer Sctooco aad CyhomatJos 
Ctau 1: l J A Gilchrist 
CbU 2 (Dtv 1): L H HUi: G R Smith 
ctau 2 (DM Z): W J Bursar: C P 
Downes. G D MeliVIe: S RMon* 
Class I H C Ho: R W Jones 

Computer Sctonca and Philosophy 
Pam 2 (DM l)i a D Crlpns 
Computer Science and Statistics 
Pam i: P Shuttiewonh 
Class 1 (Dh I): E R McPherson 
Ctam 2 (Dhr 2): J M Daviee: S R Miner. 
A At Rotier 

Ctau I D J Dobson: H M Hudson 
Electrical and EftetraoJa E ngineer in g 
Cbm It N J Kneebone 
Cbm 2 (DM i): p A ChMseman: w n 


Brlen: _ 

Oskoul: j S Wright 

Psychology 

Pam it w J Holmes 
Pam 2 row I): J S Ayres; S L 
Hammond: B C Hanson: J~W Levtcfc; 
M S Lloyd; A J Lownds: E M Morgan: 
E J Terry: C S Warren: C A White: H 
R Williams: C L wood: A Worrall 
Cbm 2 (DM »: C M Ferguson: L J 
Parretl; J C starling: A J Toombs 

PtycMngy and Cytieimtbs 

Pus I m Lebof: ADM Page 
Psychology and Zoology 
Pam 2 (DM t): S J Ebert: k m 
H oughton 

Clam 2 (DM 2): P J Anderson 
Pure Hathamatin 
Cbm 2DJ Farmer 

o«n — 

Ctam 2 (DM t): C E Atartexu a J 
Galling 

Cbm 2 (DM 2): M Browning; j L 
Gaunt; L R N Cheong 
Sratisfics 

Ctau l: c A Badacsonyu M R Hodgson 
Cbm 2 (DM t): C J Duxtienm H C 
Reeve 

Cbm 2 (DM 9): A Carter: D L 
NktwHtiy C T Saving 
Pau I D J Proaser 
Paut B P Kemp 

zoobnr 

CbU t I R BrtckneU; G J C 
Underwood 

Pau 2 (DM t): S J Bragg; S M 
Llndflcld 


Treanor. 

Cbm 2.. (DM. 2): A M Butten.P A 
Fulwell: J Hutchings: S M 
Ktbblewhlte: A D Locke: M P Rtardan. 
Clam I R G H Green: A J Greenholgh. 


(Rural 

sS cMM atton) 


Pam 2 (Dtv 11; J A S Crawford: S w 
r: M G Horton: I G Osborne; R 


Home: _ _ _ 

Poole: R J Pringle: E A Strgwson. 
Pus 9 (DM 2): E J F Dashwoocb A J L 
Gibson. 

Pass I J D Butler. 

Aegretac w s Hodges. 

Land Managamant (Valuation 


Pass i: s E Lucas; T J Miles: R R 
Shah:- A Wong Chi Ling. 


Gentry: P J Goswrtl: T Haden-Sooti: S 
C Hation: J e Jenkinson: P C 
LangmaKL A T v LaiL L T Lalw; M-A 
Macaulay: N J McLochUn; J C Pugh: 

it: A CA 


E J L Purnphnry: N D Simpson: A CA 
Smith:- S J Tranuns: W M 
Twentyman; G T TVlen D A 
Vestergaard: K R Voaden: G E J 
Wallace: J P White: J R Wilson. 


CUM 2 (DM 2 ): j D Bnuualdges J A 
a: P T Clark: j A Derbyshire: 


- CUSS 2 (DM 2): K J Adams S E 
Davies: A B Flaherty: M . 


_ IJ Tomlinson: 

T M Turner. D A Wright 
CbU 3s D A Ree4 . 


Otln: F C Fung'S J H HouWnsi S S 


Faculty of Agricoltiire and Food 
BSc 


Borcnam; . 

K J Davy: M Gunter C E Hncketh B L 
Lee: V L S Lee; J O MarkovUc B 
McCarthy: J D iwcCluskey: R 
Padmanathan: M B Ranmati D 
Sa vlnson: P N RmlUi: A J Tonne: T J 
Walker C C WameU: T G Williams: R 
j wood: S T woods. 

ClUS 3: M N A Hashim: N Shah. 
Pams D C Clung. 

Quantity Survey in g 

Class Is P R Boole; R S Chains: D I 
Outrldge: B S Twomcy. 

Class 2 (DM t): N Addy. J AMous Ban: 
R G Cannom: S C Carter Chu Kin Fab 
M J Cumungtvam. A C Dodd: C B 
Farrimond: R M Mcpacken: K N 
Mcison: K Paid: R S Payne: R w 
Spencer G H Telford: A WhUeiey: R 
W G Wilkinson: Ylu Cho Yon. 


Pau 3 (DM 2); S M AM W^iid;.N J 


P J Frank: Z 


Human: E N C Sing 

Ctam 3 (DM »: C H Keung: R J 
Cootnbe*: C J Grafton Robinson: R G 
Jackson: M D Slew art J S Wright 
EtottmUc C ng hb erin g 


Clam 2 (DM 1): N P BOurne: G R 
Hay thorn Uivvalte; 


_ P L sawtefl: T W 

Leung 

Pau 2 (DM 2): K Mistry: B RnUV 
Clam ± w c Ho 

foglmcring OrictiBS 

Ctau i: S J Dowling 
CbU 2 (OM t); J P Clarke: J H 
Edward e* Jones: G R Hoare: B C 
Missel brook 


. Avbutiiirtd BOtmqr 
Cbm 1: D J CnmUsy 
Clau 2 (DM 1): R D Brand ram Jones: 
S J Hlckmaiw: J C MMdleton:. B J 
peacocXe: J M Thornt«« C L weho: D 
R woodier 

): S L Congreve: S R 


sain. Kwok Shi wing; L L Lay: F 
Chun Kong: Kenny Lee Kal-Yeum 
Jew sofc Horn: c MabrfcK A A 


Cubtson: B 

Hirvvun, Kwok Shi 
Lee 

Mohd HoimiiMTfi A NwonTNg'Sin 
Ham: m S Noor. Azah; N P Reece P 
Tydeman. 

CbU 3: T Booth: C Macpherson: A N 
Pymer. 


Para 2 (DM 2): S L Cjmgrevft S R 
Gaze; A D Hide: M N HwWitt LA 
Norihmoro A C Pull: D K Survl la; N J 
Taylor; C V Wood 

Agrionunt EctmMMs 


Correction 


Cbm 2 rare 1): J R JUIpass: _J.C 
Bartlett: RC i 


Ctam 2 (DM 2)s □ f Barnes: S E C 
ctotmen D a Gra' ~ 


Pass i: j a Jones. P J KcnL D S 
Prtlcngell: E J Wrtwior 


Cb« 2 (DM 1): J P Boyne*: J Chase; S 
s:RM Mo**; T Palmer: H J 


'Ctam 2 (DM 1): J S Of £ P B Ed ; 

words: CJCly 


Jlynne: PM Kingston: J J 
Mourn: s A O’Neill' V A Reeve: D J 
Williams: J J Williams 


I C Downes; 

M Philips; D Siainrod: R A Wlnitsr: A 
J Wiihev 


Pau 2 (DM 2): N Alagh: M M Brighi- 
■U^nu C Craraou; £ A Irving: J J 
KinMake: A J Kingian: H v Kltsoa; C 


_ ratiatn: R 4 Lee 

dam 3: I J Long: N w Sulttvon: P W 
W Ulmer 

Gs o shnHlrtiy 
Cbm 1: I J Cutler 
Ctam 3 (DM ty.D A.Cpofc e: A S 
Huraihouse: A K UtUeboy; 6 T 
Rohertson 

Cbm 3 (DM 7): K D HclBE A C KKlicfc; 
M Wltierd 


_ Goaman: P P Goodwin: 

A Kyie; L R Morris. A J Pilg: B N 
Rogaiy. a Salnz de la Maaa Y: L A 
Turner a J White 

): C W Boult: M R 
IT Firbank: 
Steven 


i ui nn . h j wmw: 

CbU 2 (DM »: C M Bt 
Edmunds: T M Evans. RC 
S D A Hutchinson: B R S 


A filind um 
CbU 1i S E NKhoHon 


Ctam 2 (DM 1): T S An mad; W j Bati: 
j Beckett: SJ B “ 


— I Btosrtl: W R Buck: GW 

L Brewjj R a Brown: N J DaUpri; K J 
Dogged: J s Doutnwaue. G J Dykes: H 
jeSSmi; F J Evans D J Haggttit: L E 
n;SJI 


Harrison: J S Hepburn: 


1 Holaen: G 


The following names should 
have appeared in Cambridge 
University Natural Sciences 
Tripos. Pan ja. Class I (July 
1 5): M R Bateman. Parm iters S. 
Watford, and Rob: J J 
Baurabcrg. Leeds GS and Jes: M 
G Bennett, CTifton C and Qu. 
All attained the qualifying stan- 
dard in mathematics for part IB 
of the Tripos. 


fnhn (rnodbodv on the rise of Canadian sport 



Fastest in the world: sprinter Johnson (left) and swimmer Baumann 


How a scratch side got 
the Olympic itch 


Canada's sporting talent, 
for so long as dormant as a 
slumbering bear in the Rocky 
Mountains, has awoken. The 
world respects their power and 
potential. Men like the 
sprinter Ben Johnson, con- 
queror of Carl Lewis, the 
swimmer Alex Baumann and 
the boxer Asif Dar are univer- 
sally admired. 

In 1960 Canada took only 
one medal at the Olympics. 
Australia won 36 and Britain 
20. In the Commonwealth 
Games which ended in Edin- 
burgh on Saturday, Canada 
collected 51 gold medals, just 
one fewer than England and 11 
more than Australia. 

At the last Olympics, Can- 
ada had top six pladngs in 26 
of the 31 summer and winter 
sports — for more than their 
Commonwealth rivals. 

As Abigail Hoffman, a 
competitor of four Olympics 
and now a Director-General of 
Sport Canada, the government 
supported organization says: 
“There have been occasions 
when we have stumbled. Bat 
onr performances In Edin- 
burgh are the result of 20 
years of effort*' 

One stumble was the 1976 
Olympics In Montreal when 
Canada were scarcely off the 
blocks in detailed, conscien- 
tious preparation. They did 
not win a tide, the only host 
country in history with this 
signal faihure at the Games. 

Everyone agrees that the 
1976 Games came too early for 
Canada to reap the rewards of 
the money that has been 
poured into preparation, and 
also the long-term planning 
that is fundamental to their 
snccesses. 

Bnt Miss Hoffman agrees 
that those Games and also the 
1978 Commonwealth Games 
and 1983 World Student 
Games, both staged in Can- 
ada, provided a stimulus to the 
Olympic sports. They excited 
interest, provided a foam for 
endeavour, and supplied mod- 
ern training centres. There are 
now ten 50 metre pools in 
Montreal while London still 
only has one. 

Canada are now benefiting 
from holding these events. The 
Federal Government has rec- 
ognized this and have offered 
£25 million to support the bid 
of the five Canadian cities who 
have all applied to stage the 
1994 Commonwealth Games. 
Cardiff, the United Kingdom's 
only candidate, has no guar- 
anteed Government money. 

It is the carefully structure d 
financial programmes .which 
have been the basis of 


Canada's rise. A special gov- 
ernment grant of £25 million 
over four years for the 1988 
Olympics has allowed long- 
term planning. Everyone 
knows how the money will be 
allocated and .can make 
arrangements accordingly. 

Britain have given £3-9 mil- 
lion from the public and £1-5 
from the private sectors 
specifically for Olympic 
preparations. Although this 
will be increased through 
grants by private organiza- 
tions like tbe Sports Aid 
Foundation, the total sum is 
unknown and therefore pre- 
dudes much forward planning. 

The Canadian 

Government's contribution 
has been crucial ever since tbe 
disaster of the 1960 Oly mpics 
and tbe country's lack of 
physical fitness which stimu- 
lated some harsh words from 
the Duke of Edinburgh that 
year. 

Hie Government acted, al- 
though progress was slow until 
the mid 1970s. Daring the 60s 
Canada had to look oatside the 
country for qualified coaches. 
Three Britons, Geoff Elliott, 
Geoff Gowan, now president of 
their coaches association, and 
perhaps saddest of all Geoff 
Dyson, the national athletics 
coach scorned by Britain, gave 
Canada much of their tech- 
nical basis. As Frank Dick, 
Britain's current director of 
athletic coaching said: “Our 
national coaching foundation 
has now learnt from the 
Canadians. They are a great 
example of building from 
scratch in coaching 
education.'' 


dominant 
the pool, 


Professionals who 
understand sport 


Men like the Olympic 
champion, Lynn Davies, and 
another Britos, Derek Boose y, 
the celebrated Polish sprint 
coach. Gerard Mach, ami in 
swimming Dot Talbot, from 
Australia and Deryk Snelling, 
from Britain followed. 

They, in turn, inspired and 
instructed many of the current 
crop of home-produced 
coaches. Dick points out that 
in the daily coach in g semi- 
nars, organized by Minolta in 
Edinburgh to scrutinize tele- 
vision tapes, there were more 
Canadians present titan all the 
rest of the countries pur to- 
gether. ‘'There was an ef- 
fervescent enthusiasm about 
them.” 

Snelling, tbe head coach of 
the aquatic team, who won 
more gold medals than 


Australia, once 
internationally in 
says: “Canada have got what 
they deserve because they 
established a professional 
organization, with the people 
who understand the sport 
dictating to the 

a dmini strators.” 

Canada also established a 
“carding” system of Govern- 
ment payment to outstanding 
individuals. A competitor 
ranked in the top eight in the 
world automatically gets £320 
a month. A "B-card' compet- 
itor ranked 8-16 globally re- 
ceives £270 a mouth. A ‘C- 
card’ competitor gets £225 a 
month. Currently 750 people 
are funded in this way. 

The clarity of the system is 
attractive. As the British 
steeplechaser. Graeme Fell, 
who emigrated to Canada for 
whom be won the gold medal 
in Edinburgh, says: “This 
made a big influence on my 
derision to become Canadian. 
Yon know exactly where yon 
are.” 

Canada have overcome im- 
mense difficulties to achieve 
their new status. Ken Porter, 
the assistant general team 
manager, points out that there 
is a poor quality of physical 
education in schools while half 
the Government grants have to 
go in air fares. This is because 
the country is so vast and also 
international experience is 
needed in tbe United States 
and Europe. It cost £200,000 
to transport horses to Europe 
for an equestrian event 

Canaria have not set up 
general sports centres, unlike 
Britain. This would diversify 
the talent Instead they have 
specialist centres, usually at 
universities and funded by the 
provincial governments, which 
attract competitors. 

The decathlon is at Toronto; 
sprinting at York University; 
while boxing is based in four 
cities. 

Taylor Gordon, coach of the 
boxing team which took six 
gold medals in Edinburgh, 
says: “We have achieved oar. 
success despite onr lack of 
numbers. The Americans have ' 
more people boxing in the 
Royal Marines than we have 
in the whole of Canada.” 
Canada now have three foil 
time professional coaches, and . 
hope for five by 1988. 

Australia have now started 
copying some of Canada's 
programmes. Even East- Ger- 
many have come and admired. 
Porter says: “When their 
coaches came and saw some of 
what we were doing, they 
almost slit their throats.” 


FOOTBALL 


Receiver releases kit 


for ‘bankrupt’ team’s 


pre-season training 


Third division Middles- 
brough continued their pre- 
season training yestenlay with 
the threat or going out of 
business, still hanging over the 
club. The Official Receiver al- 
lowed players into Ayresome 
Park to collect their training 
equipment before a double ses- 
sion at the club's training 
ground. 

Ayresome Park was dosed 
last week following a High Court 
winding-up order but negotia- 
tions are continuing to find a 
formula for saving the dub. 

Manchester. United have new 
opponents for their match at 
Old Trafford tomorrow. 
Flamengo of Brazil were con- 
tracted for the match but the Sad 
Paulo FA have stopped the 
game because Flamengo are 
involved in play offs in Brazil. 
Fluminese,ibe current Brazilian' 
champions, have agreed to step 
in and fulfil the fixture. 

Among their players are the 
Uruguay international 
Romento. andBrazUian squad 
members Tato and Victor. 

Martin Edwards, the United 
chairman! said; “We have sold 
some tickets on the basis that we 
were playing Flamengo. If any of 
our supporters wish to have a 
refund we will willingly oblige. 
But the match is for the Prince 
Charles Chanty Trust Fund, the 
new opposition are the current 


champions and it is still a very 
attractive fixture.” 

• Burnley, of the fourth di- 
vision. have signed former play- 
era. the Welsh international 
winger Leighton James and the 
defender Billy Rodaway. James, 
aged 33. who was player-coach 
with Newport County last sea- 
son, returns for his third spell 
with the Turf Moor club while 
Rodaway, aged 31, captain of 
Tran mere Rovers last season, is 
back at Burnley for a second 
lime. 

• Barry Si 1km an, the former 
Queens Pack Rangers and Crys- 
tal Palace midfield player, has 
been placed on the transfer list 
by Southend United following a 
dispute with David Webb, the 
new team manager. 

. “Silkman has made it clear he 
is not prepared to adapt to the 
style of play I have in mind.” 

aid webb. who took over from 
Bobby Moore six weeks 
ago-Silkman. aged 34, joined 
Southend from Orient at the 
start of last season and still las 
12 months of his contract *to go. 

• A throat infection keeps the 
West Ham captain, Alvin Mar- 
tin. out of the side for tonight’s 
friendly at Brentford, but it is 
not expected to prevent him 
from going on the club's three- 
match trip to The Netherlands 
later this week. 


POWERBOATING 


Kennedy win 
advances 
his position 


By a Correspondent 


Art Kennedy, the American 
Formula.! driver, won tbe fifth 
round in the world. series cm 
Sunday, his first ever Formula 1 
victory. Kennedy's win in Pitts- 
burgh pushes him into equal 
second place in the points table, 
but Crone Thibodaux. his-' 
countryman, maintains the lead 
with 23 points. 


There wore four lead changes. 


during the _504ap_ Champion 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


CRICKET 


Britannic Assurance 
County Championship 
(11.0. 102 overs mWmum) 
CHELTENHAM: Q0UCS v Hants 
CANTERBURY: Kent V Laics 
OLD TRAFFORD: Lancs v Yorkshire 
LORD'S: Middlesex v Norma ms 
WESTON-SUPER-MARE: Somerset 
v Worcs 

EASTB0UWIE: Sussex v Essex 


towSpmmet II v SnmpsNra. Mteontmi: 
Suffolk v Durham. 


OTHER SPORT 


a rHLr rtcs: Kodak. Classic (at 
Gateshead). 

ajOOUET: Hurtngham tournament 

mu* ctnmptonsHps 


(p Leicester). 

English women's amateur 
championship (at BroMsttme. 


YOUNG CR I C K E T E RS TEST HATCH: 

anglev: England * Sfl Lsnfca. 
muon counties chamf XM fMfPr 
Lakgnhatn; Norfolk v Lincolnstore. Toun- 



lug Grand Prix on the 

Allegheny River. Ben Robert-: 
son, the race favourite, led for 
16 laps until his V3 outboard 
failed and Thibodaux took over.. 
But Thibodaux was forced to. 
make a pit stop because he was 
losing power and despite return- 
ing to the course he lost his lead 
to Arthur Mosten from The : 
Netherlands. With ten laps 
remaining, Mosten nosedived 
on the extremely rough course 
and submerged his boat and 
Johnson motor. Uninjured, he 
managed to restart but had 
problems keeping his motor 
running and could not return to 
his former speed. Kennedy took 
and held the lead with seven ■ 
laps remaining, watched bv ' 
400,000 spectators. 


Rick Frost the British driver, 
solved the problems that gave 
him a disappointing iStit start 
position, and forced his way 
through the field of 20 boats to 
third place. Andy Bullen from i 
Heme Bay retired after his 
steering locked. 


i Two events remain to com- 
plete the senes, in Beaumont, 
Texas and Toledo, Ohio. 




. Mo&tgrt (Netn^ Marrlon^. 


MES£R 

Vehten (Nath. 




SE/&rinmd8), a, M notnarmgi (Can. 


van dor. 


1. 




* t \ 

i -i : 
* : S ~ 


! ( i * 


* J 

: ** * ? 




* * 


» * . 
•il*» * 


$ '■ 




6J 


9 


vanad tTT^ 




ED 




*r it Hr ft tr <t SL 


RACING 




“ v ^ 
* «H 



he puts 


on the double as 
ts on pressure 


m 


race 


(W4k}KH« 

**»m«ur n 


'0r *■ Pat Edday, now a long 

. odds-on chance to become 
•*• champion jockey for the first 
time since 1977, is certainly 
piling on the pressure today. 
SHKRjmul ■ After riding in the afternoon at 
Brighton where he. has . an 
ri H JRI w 'outstanding chance of landing 
^nn a double on Lauries Warrior 
J (3.0) and on Verfla (2-fl), the 

] A _ man in the news flies to Ayr, 
aC \J A (where other likely winning 
VI I mounts awah him. 

. . Vevila, beaten only a short 


By Mandarin 

course and can record his 
fourth track and distance suc- 
cess at the expense of Joyful 
Dancer and Meet The Greek. 


Dancer and ! 
' Eddery’s 


eet The Greek, 
outstanding 


h « nQ a double on Lannes warrior 

J (3.0) and on Verfla (2-0), the 

V I |i Ok ~ man in the news flies to Ayr, 
1. ViC (jAiwhere other likely winning 
• ^ Vl mounts awah him. 

A , , ^ v | Vevila, beau® only a short 

If I f’ 1 mL head by Color Artist at Wind- 

L/Jlv 1 1 l I 1 sor, had previously run a 

•» v sound race on the first appear- 


wrM go*- 
B to Ul i mi 

m wm 
**4 *««r 

lm\nr 
Mfr *U1 hr 

(Md 11.5 

t H W 1B U 
Olfteftii' 

mm *» thm 
i ffartMglk 
wrffiftua- 
parti AM 
Hi m is 
Mbtv pn*' 

ifkmmm- 

L'lwadiao 
MrlWinh 
ftHN (hr 

i tori h| 
Ml MMUl 
•*** tu*m 
tovtfb I hat 


l a%! , ance of her career at Sandown, 

•wrinai." 1, . Mac f ^ where, after missing the break 
g,; :! in ^The Minstrel filly had come 
iiu i ! "“•'■k W Thorne strongly to take second 
inlace to Indian Lilly. VevDa’s 


anri. •* 
lafewwifl 
Mar MW 
mtMt lk 
tf mefev 
4^_Wb*n. 


im 

i iMilrfi.v 
itMHLiiair 
Iwkkck 
«■* ttoA. 
MHMMf «1 
itMi "INh 

Ipantiiiun 
'*«* (hi 

mv * r*-»‘ 

■HR 


who 


EKiS'i tT HK i L iiTv^K 

^ (form reads for superior to that 

Mja^SofRed Riding Hood and Miss 
1 " :- ‘'»rsu n j ™|fcRunaway in the Alfriston 
t^" A,iu - .^iMaiden Stakes. 

i unity i Lauries Wamdr runs in the 
t day's feature race, the £6,000 

trail*;;' MMi-m J^Duke of Norfolk Memorial 
m, ni m Nursery. The selection ap- 
•ndi« luu.iU y “Spears to have been set a 
rjuki j :n ,i Ii ^formidable task with ftst 61b to 
■* u : r ,n: rcany • in this, two-year-old 
■ nh "“J: \ ■nT-jurhandicap!, but has been show- 
itnr ijund KihJ^S steadily progressive form 
i rit.s *■"„ 0 wfe for Ron Boss and was panioi- 

i-jn! 1 ,inJ laxly impressive, when win- 
month .■££«** at Sandown Park last 
ar,- "v“ *|time oul In what promises to 

l hi > ,, . Ih , n **!. be a competitive amir Kieron 
afirj -* - “iihttePress, Olore Malle and Divine 
s!r .._V' .V Vn ih ^Charger are . others with 
* , ' , ' JSrr - Gn^ichances but Lauries Warrior 
n" «■ ’UMvaii-d to { W still looks worth a porting 
h 4 » linih| js 

m i i;i;ihur»h, «, t ; Another sound wager on the 
mac* .« hs irJlnoi, Sussex seaside track could be 
Ui-iisui!, (v Foot Patrol in the Burroughs 

\*»u kr,"« tUrt j 4 ^Computers Handicap (3.0). 
* r ‘ Peter CundelTs five-year-old 

f hj»,. o , aaa loves Brighton's switchback 

mrn V u c — 

Ripon results 

j»o!nts wflijj." Qoing: good toftm 
tN - r qualm ri* U0 (1m Ht 1. VGRITABtE (G Ranch, 

■"'■W'* raaiSSsTSiss*?.® 

ihi mn’inimne ALSO ran: 3 Cuprioom Beau (4ttA 20 
,. u ■ • ... . 1K..U Good NBtunacS 

V n 1 “t-'" Charakee. tflya 

Ihi iMj-un is sp lie* ran. Nft r'issw^ . — , — 

„ a. 2». JMb am. ZoTfeTp Hasten at 

5 l “ «'MEt Nawnwric*. Tola: OSO: £1% E1J0. 

mrSi'-i the tBaiE1.60.DF:E7aaCSfttt&77 

- ' '“-n ^«^ B ^V^^^S E u2SK 

l“ :: fr. rvsae n-2 ji-tevk 3, frav Off (M Birch. na-lT 

l -rs. ..j rs» Hazafs On. 9 Run To Wofk, Skeme 
Rocket (4lhJ. 11 FoaSHtf. 12 Causeway 
! ’■ ■' ‘‘“■■‘•I CmfinAi mOMrtrnMihin nravda Raw 


'mount after his long flight trainer to break the £2m barrier, 
north must be on Vexardi in H* 5 current return from prize 
the Heads of Ayr Stakes money at home and abroadthis 
(8.45). At Kempton in mid- RnrSSSS 

July, William festings-Bass’s / *SfS5? 'ffS 
three-y^r-oW beat one of Q uceo Elizabeth Diamond 
Henry Cecil s hot pots m the . stakes, Guy Harwood is dose to 
shape of Merano and should £1 m in prize money for the first 
have little to fear from his only time. 

two opponents. •Grimaldi, won the Brazil 

In the Cunnmghame Grand Prix (Sunday), one of 
Handicap at 7.15 the cham- South America's most iro- 
pion elect rides Absence of ponanthorae races (AP reports). 
Malice. Ben Hanbnry*s three- todden by the Brazilian jockey 
year-old showed the ability to 

beatM only teernmners ofa of Bowling. The race was 

length by Swifts Pal at Sabs- watched by nearly 100.000 
bury. However Gibferish, fin- spectators. 

^per”* Blinkered first time 

on this track and is preferred. stn*t K*b 

At Redcar, Princess Anne Han*. 

has her first chance, to dale, of REDC * fc2 - 45t **“ Pt * o y- 

ridii^ a winner on Gullland in official scratchmgs: watetbra 

the Mommessin Amateur CandBiabra States Goodwood: Rarely 

Riders Stakes (3.45). Gavin W * 1(USA) - 

Pritcbard-Gordon has already fniirco cnoAiolicfc 

placed the five-year-old V ^ UUrM5 

successfully in two of his last AYR 

lkmTnnrir,« Rnt Pttrftiw* THAtOtS: G Prtetiml-GoRJon. Ifl wb- 
three outings. But rcasmve, ners from ^Srurina^ 333%: MPrescoc, 

Who finished runner-up to BfronZl.S&SKiMHEasttrby.iafrom 

Smdy Form at Epsom is the . 

best horse in the race and with rides at 34.1 %; g Duffieu, 29 from 11a, 
Tim Thomson Jones in the ^so^KHoHspwijia tanas. 209%. 

^^S edeSPeraIdyhard ™—» 2D * 

tO Overcome. . ners from 84 rumors, 23.8%; M Prescott 

Another sound bet on the 13 tan aa. t9 7%; s PritchareMSordon. 9 
Yorkshire course wll be Vale- JoS^raffLua* 9 winn« tan 38 
fare m the . 4.45. Lester rfdes at 237 %; t iws, 19 tan 143, 
Piggott’s two-year-old was i:L3% - MUSMTOIJ 

beaten with some dx^ree of _ Ir 1 : ... 

ease when runner-up to WoV- runwra, 400 %; m smte. is tram S7. 
sey at Leicester. However 

Paleface should still be the from 67 rides, 22^%;TOiinr. 19 frrxn 82. 
pick' of the weights in the 207%; osmrtoy. sr tram 179.20.7%, 


33 Datveaii Pass. 
OurTtoora (WgT9 


Going: good to finn • 

Draw: Sf-fif, low numtMKS best 

2.0 EBF ALFRISTON MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES (2-Y-O: £1,803: 6!) (7 
runners) 

'1. 00' 

3 OSN 





13-8 VevUa. 4-1 Tamassos, Mss Runaway. 9-1 Rad Riding Hood, 12-1 mfng. 
Copper Creek. 14-1 Its Been Runomd. 


FORI* rURTTMOffl-B) 71 4th to Mileage Bank (8-11) at Chepstow (6f £2222. Arm. June 
28. 5 rank MSS RUNAWAY «-1113tfl 4th Id Purmkiakf (9-11) at Kenroton (6f. £3309. 
firm. Jufy^7, IS ranL COPP^CREBC (9-11J was 41 back in 8th. RBIIMMNG HOOD (B- 


f £2222. firm. Jww 


firm. July 17. 15 ran] 
11)5* 4th of 8 » I 


- j** . ■ ? • . , r.l'i’v K £2.80. DR E12S.OO. CSF: £57m Bought 

t,r,, ‘ r ‘ ;u ‘' lt3B: h 3^i^|)i,s0t^»44iinw : .7ft 
Z PenAend Hawk ffi Parts. B-ljt 3, 

m , • 7-4 fftv Liam (4tn) v 0 FOrtaflo Stti), *z 

1 ‘it Sechiave(6Mi).6r»n.*f.nk.1l.3l, *L H 

. . • \..rl lr 7110111900 Jones at Newmarket Tote: 
*p. * A- £3.40; £1.70, £330. Dft £9.70. CSF: 

n lt«-i W bl»i £2239. PBrttand Hawk finished 1st. after 

an obtectfon and stewards tagtey was 
• -»«' otaced2ji<r 


R* 

MM 

at 8wnrifi 
tHfMdkivd 

m apt that 


It...? l.tifuraac 44, { 1m 4t) 1, 

arid 9 Ciihsne. 4-lk 
W f-TTwmson.7-Zt3.l 


PASfT GLORIES 


*• . . „ fr , TTwmson.7-Zfc3.Podbted(T Quinn. 11-8 

»= ,c fav). ALSO RAN: 9-2 Stage Hand (5th), 9 
- U i hs*. wefl Covered (4th). 5 ran. 31. 8L 3. 101. W 
v ! . BseyatMoiton- Tote; E4.l0-.rt.80. £1.40. 

•. ■» * OF; £4.70. CSF: £1630. 


t.J h :s 1 fit 430(501 , 

VuS i 11; 2. On Yiur Princess (P D’Arcy, 6-1): 3, 
!»*•'»* Norton Mtendy (M Birch, Evans fev)- 

U -.j' \Jjr.nt' S® 1 ALSO RAN: 7-2 PerfuniBrie, 10 Over- 

(4thL 33 Garden. 


I IN (A Murray. 14- 
i (P D'Arcy. 6-1): 3. 


D RfDMGHOOO (B- 
ood to firm. July 5L 
9. good, July 28, 14 


VEVILA (9-11) sh hd 2nd to Color Artist (8-11) at LingfleW (8f. £999. good. July 28, 14 

ran). - - .. .. 

tfalecBon: VEVEA • • ■ 

Brighton selections 

- -By Mandarin 

2.0 Vevila. Z30 Foot PatroL 3.0 LAURIES WARRIOR (nap). 3.30 
Rosi Noa. 4.0 Totreya. 4 JO Dancing Eagle. 

• By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
ZO Vevila. 230 Stceple BelL 3.0 Lauries Warrior. 3.30 Rosi Noa. 
4_QTorrcya. 4.30 ALshinfarah. ' . 

Michael Seely’s selection: 3.0 Lauries Wanior. 

Z30 BURROUGHS COMPUTERS HANDICAP (£3,022: 1m) (5) 

: r 120903 ST£B43BaL(D)(VtaCBrud9nefrBnjce)M Skxite1M-10 MAOIu(7)2 
2 900210 JOYFUL OANCf 


si rJZ ■»- c - , ‘ , SjSK 

. .«:«*» 


ri. ll ‘“T MISS mu. 

a.,...,- :..i f.*r •'* a. nit J 


Ej 


Jean Jearmte (6fhL 
16 ran. 11W, 1W. Vi. 
i at Maiton. Tote 
£1.10. DP £7730. 


: r 120903 STEEPLE BELLJD) (Mrs C Bnjdene84rucMM Steute 104-1 0 M A GIm (7) 2 

2 980210 JOYFUL OANCnWQ (Vistaptan ReferaneeSystems) W Brooks B-9-9 (Bbx) 

TQulnnS 

3 112012 IGT THE GRmCJC-O) (P Goubnrti^ O Lang 3^« P Cook 4 

7 008102 FOOT PATROL (C4a (Miss L Enns) PunWieVl CMrBS 

9 40-4001 SOLSTICE BOJ. (8) (Mrs H IGblmjR Vocxspuy 47-7 LRfggb(7)1 

6-4 Meet The Greek. 11-4 Foot Patrol. 4-1 Steeple Bel. 132 Joyful Dance, 3-1 
SobticeBeL 


HMdlthr 

m** •- 

m *• 


Ml fworA «f 
mtm 

m rtw** 


kit 

in’s 

tag 

adMf # >• 


t*— 

•rtpawnn:” ’ 

***' * “ 
PHPT > +?'-"■ 

pH 'tf Ji * ' 
M» : 

0 Hwd "W* 

= fiftetei. 


mm* 

rm** 


t -wB £1080: £2J0. 

CSF: £103.03. 

.. , .m; 5JI on 1, BARGAM PACK (Jute 

.. r ^ {«:» Bowker. 9-1): 2, Hudsons MewafTUicte, 

• ...£ 15^):aGoldwtte8der(MHfnctey.5-1(t- 

fav): 4. Madamoisste Itepi (J LoweTlB- 

.. -ttiC 1J. ALSO RAN ; 5 It-fav Cumbrian Dancer. 
. .-tf 8 Tanasserim. 9 ABstentawfieW (58rt. 10 
, , . ,s:i 33- * Fsrctoto. Skritan, 11 Young PiMvJ«h)- 
n f. iz 16 Mss Prfmute. 20 Whotwrtey VWwete, 
"« Aftaitatl.Pokerae. The agin. M^Sertby. 

- Eastern Cassis. Esrfy Doors. 18 ran. nfc, 
1»L 1JM. II, 1ML Mis G Revetey at 
— TTrtStebum. Tote: £9.00; £1 JO. £3^0.0.70. 

)WERB0£ gffi»£3PE csf ; £73 ^' Tricast 

Placapot £25.75. 



! Going: good 
230 




POWERS?^ m . T “ 

r £25.75. 

K ennedj * Market Rasen ' 

;jd >lin^ G t»^^cl«1.GeanraCaMRoteifrc 

lllS l/U-’* 251. Denp Smfih. Tate £3.10; £130. 

1 r ^ £1.80. Dft B4.70. CSF; £1039. 

.■,,■.1 .I:- - '’ 3J>j2mhdte)1.R»«te Sept (M Pepper, 

. c 8-1); ^Monsanto Lad (20-1); 3. Bngadelor 
, • " .- Green (33-1). NonMksde (34 few) IS rwu 

- . 3L 2HL Tote: ES.90: £1.60. £SJ)0. £590. 

, . . ' £1.40. 0F:S13020, CSF:£11M1.Tricait I 
' .-S3J361M. 

330 (2m hdto) 1. Onamt A1 AJn (D 
. - ’ . Dutton, 5-1L 2. Uptwon RwKtiy's p-2 

' lav): 3, Sweet Snugflt 05-1). 14 ran. NR: I 
. ■< : CharefiekL O, hd. M H Easterby TotK 
.. £7.10; £2.20, £130, £3J0l DF: £1340. 

' . CSF: £2394. 

4JJ(2mcti) 1. Tumble Jkn(R Martey, 25- 
It 2, Jmpenal Black (9-1): 3 HmUV Ffench 
(^Sit-fay). Vale Chatenge (33 k-tav) 8 
.:■ ran.TWCwntngham. 

- . ' Tote: £2730: S20. £1,50. tlM DF: 

- - „ £2.40 let or 2nd with any other horse. 
CSF: £210.15. 

4J8(3mcM f. Sprete Mi (M Dwyer, &- 
U; Z *few Corns M-l): 3 Hy Tab (M). 

■ Safling By (34 fav) B ren. 2KC 7L Jenny 
Ftagehdd. Tote £5.90: £1.40, £120. 


Ftegmatt Tote £390: £1.40. £1-20, 
£1S7 dF; £f£.m CSR £2323. 

SJ) (2m 41 hefle) 1. Cointiy Jonty (M 
Dwyer, 311: 2. Sovereign Lad (131); 3, 
wnrskey lime (Ml lav). 11 ran. Nft 
Sandyla. 3. sh hd. C Tinkler. Tote £540: 
Elia £230. El.ia DF: £2980. CSF: 
£75.08. 

Ptacepot E6935. 


Newton Abbot 

• Going: firm 

, 2.i5(2m15Mhdle)1.AnmidTowaP 
. CToucher, 20- 1>. 2, feteube H»f1 1-3:1 
□meden (32). Be MyUSrtB (4-1 fmrt. 13 
' rah. 12L 151. B Forsey. Tqte_j3gjth 
£7.10. £1.70. £2.10. OF: £201X0. CSF: 
E122L29. 

• ‘ 245 (2m 150yd 
Mooney. 15-8 

£1900. CSF: £2531. 

7L2UG 

Gracey. Tote £11.30: £3.10, £230,2130. 
.• OF: £14.00. CSF: £56.67. 

' 345 Cm 150yd 1. Ftet R|0M ffl 

. GoWSan, 31); 2. Athera Sw (131k3. 
Sir Lester (7-1X 13 ran. Swingtettw nOO- 
30 lav) lift, m J 
£1530: £520. £330. £230. CK 18430. 
r CSF: £82.77. TticaiC £507.77. 


34) DUKE OF NORFOLK MEMORIAL NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: 
£4334: 71) (6) 

1 on 

2 402121 

8 1 « 

9 0004 

10 412 

12 OOM 

15-8 Lauries warrior. 11-4 Roumei, 4-1 Kieron Press, 8-1 Otore Mete. 10-1 Divine 
Charger. 14-1 Deccan Prince. 





3^0 DOWNS SELLING STAKES (£900: 1m 21) (13) 


2 000090 

3 OCSaOOD- 

5 000040 

6 0-00002 

7 003203 
9 094 

10 mm 

11 200030 

12 000000 

14 040004 

15 M00 
IB 00400 
17 9-30000 

3-1 Rosi Noe, 7-2 / 
L'Etoile Du Pates, Atari 





» Video. 9-2 Mr Music Man. 13-2 Tate The Biscuit, 19-1 
r, 12-1 Phan Bossy, 14-1 others. 



THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


•*; -'jv 

v.ir' — ■ • • — - ^ y 

• -maw '*0****"“^^ '1 


Bacheroy-Josselin Chablis 
Nursery (4.4S). 

• Michad Sioute, ihe New- 
market trainer, is on the vcije of 
becoming the first British 






firm. July 21. 15 ran), 
at Foaiaatone fl m ». 


4.0 PIER HANDICAP (&-Y-0: £1,727: 1m 41) (7) 
2 022102 
5 94232 

B 042144 

e am® 

9 00019- 
12 00904 

14 '009000 

13-8 Torreya, 5-2 Up To Unde, 7-2 Cuiga. 11-2 Frepr 
others. 


mmm 


11-2 Ftoproaf, 10-1 Mies Jade, 14-1 



4-30 SOUTH COAST STAKES (£2,448 1m) (9) 


mms m m 


. - 4.15 

Drive 

ji (av)i 3, 
+ DwalnB 
* \ \ £530: £1 


S hdte) i. RfinnUe 
2, CoomtwSpmtp- 
i (33-1 1 9 ran. Wt 
shhd. JDDavtoa.Tote 
£1.70. CLm DF:-E17J». 


1 214 

2 34090 

3 300190 

4 oeouoo 

5 1-32300 

6 834300 

7 04032-0 

8 020009 

9 40 - - . - . 

5-4 Atstenfarah, 9-4 Barrack Street 92 Halo Han*. 191 Hautboy Lady. 12-1 Afice 
HU 16-1 ottwre- 


, CSF: £15.05. Tricast £30227. 
4 j45 




Princess Anne, hoping for bar first win at Redcar on GnUland today 

Veritable delights Storming 
on Children’s day « 

Veritable, who drifted m the privately for wife, Janice, for [Sublft I1 Sie Se i984 Fren^* 
narket from 5-4 on to 6-4 £5,000 explained: “Cry For The Leger winner, in the Group I 


Veritable, who drifted in the privately for wife, Janice, for 
market from 5-4 on to 6-4 £5,000 explained: “Cry For The 
against favourite, cruised to a Qowp has had a bit of leg 
two length victory from trouble and 1 will run him in a 
Tama tour in the Children's Day “seller* again next time". 
Maiden Stakes at Ripon The winner was backed 
yesterday. heavily from 20-1 down to 8-1 

In the carnival atmosphere of and won by five lengths from 
a “Children’s Day” charily joint favourite Get Set Lisa. The 
meeting. Glenn French, the 27- profit for the racecourse out of 
year-old jockey from Zim- this selling race was £3,637. 
babwe, took Veritable into the • The Newmarket trainer, Luca 
lead from the start and was Cumani's open day held on 
never headed throughout the 10 Sunday which, despite the poor 
furlong race. The winner pre- weather, attracted 1,000 va- 
riously finished runner-up to iiors, raised approximately 
the useful Celestial Storm at £3,700 for charity. The money 
Newmarket. Pal Haslam, the will be donated to Timefbnn 
winning trainer said: “I think Charity Day and be divided 
Veritable will go well over one equally between cancer relief 
and a half milai” and cancer research. 

Cry For The Clown estab- • The Compensation Fund for 
fished a new record selling price Jockeys, the insurance scheme 
at the course when the colt was which provides injured jockeys 
bought in for 7.500 guineas after with temporary benefit, has 
the See-Saw Selling Stakes. The . been renamed to avoid, coufii- 
winner, wbo was powerfully .sion with the racing charity the 


Zahdam finished a dis- 
appointing second to Agent 
Double, the 1984 French St 
Leger winner, in the Group ID 
Grand Prix de Vichy yesterday. 
Heavy thunderstorms in the 
early morning changed the going 
from good to firm to what the 
jockeys described as soft with 
many false patches. This was all 
against Guy Harwood's three- 


profit for the racecourse oul of year-old but very much in the 

fk*p eollllMIk mrtte nrafe £3 A17 


this selling race was £3,637. 

• The Newmarket trainer, Luca 
Cumani's open day held on 
Sunday which, despite the poor 
weather, .attracted 1,000 vis- 
itors. raised approximately 
£3.700 for charity. The money 
will be donated to Timefbnn 
Charity Day and be divided 
equally between cancer relief 
and cancer research. 

• The Compensation Fund for 
Jockeys, the insurance scheme 


winner’s favour. 

Grerilie Starkey held Zahdam 
up -and brought him with a 
steady run in the centre of the 
course to take second a furlong 
ouL He could not get on terms 
with Agent Double, who had 
headed the leader. Conser- 
vatoire, just before the furlong 
pole and went on to win by two 
and half lengths. 

Zahdam had to be ridden out 
to hold second by half a length 


which provides injured jockeys from After Party, with Conser- 
with temporary benefit, has vatohv back -in fourth. Starkey 
been renamed to avoid, confu- reported that Zahdam, who 


ridden, by .Peter Bloomfield 
down the centre of the course, 
took the ’lead from one furlong 
OUL 

Alan Bailey, the Newmarket 
trainer, who bought the winner 


Injured Jockeys Fund. -The 
fund,' which - is supported by 
owners through a surcharge on 
riding fees, will now be known 
as the Profesional Riders Insur- 
ance Scheme. 


looked superb before the race, 
was never happy on the dead. 
Ground. Harwood's assistant 
Geoff Lawson, and Robert Ac- 
ton, representing Sheikh 
Mohammed, said that there 
were no definite plans 


REDCAR 


Goina: oood 

Drawn low numbers best 

6.15 EBF CHAPELPARK MAIDEN FflJJES 
STAKES (2-Y-O: £1,064: 5f) (7 runners) 

1 Cl 

2 0 



Going: good to finn 
Drawn no advantage 

2.15 RAOUL CLERGET SELLING STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£947: 1m) (13 runners) 

3 


2-1 Mss Mteeagb, 9-1 Spanish Slipper. 4-1 Utile Upstart. 
6-1 Come On Oyston, 9-1 SuesMdy/12-1 Sandm On Sam. 16-1 
SaBy Foxtrot 

6.45 AUCHENDRANE HANDICAP (£2JH£ 51) (8) 

1 1400 TOP THATJP) T Bsrcn 5-9-10 RCodweB 

2 2120 LULLABY BJJES ft» (D) M H Eastefby 3M JLmw2 



m m 


jpgsi 


3 900 MGHLA ND GLE N F Watson 396 — I — DMctateS 

4 8000 CMPENTBrS BOY (EH Mrs G Herein 994 —7. 

- 5 0040 SONHBELLE (B) (TO J S Wfbon 3-8-7 GDtdTMdS 

6 0000 MAYBE JAYNE AW Jones 3-7-13 MFry4 

7 0000 BL0CHA9W 8K0LAR (C-Q) N Bypptt 37- 12 

A ShoaRm 09 5 

8 2202 WES8REE BAY NBycroft 4-7-12 LCtamockl 

7-2 Western Bay. 4-1 LuBabv Blues. 5-1 Top That 

Sonnenefc. 6-1 Maybe Jayne, 8-1 Carpenters Boy, 10-1 
Highland Glen. 12-1 Btodtem Skoter. 


Ayr selections 

ByMandarin 

6.15 Miss MQveagh. 6.45 Wesbree Bay. 7.15 
Gitfoerish- 7.45 Lack A Style. 8.15 Emerald Eagle. 
8.45 VerardL 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
6. 1 5 Miss Milveagh. 7.15 Gibberish. 7.45 Lack A 
Style. 8.15 Fleet Footed. 8.45 VerardL 
Michael Seely’s selection: 6.45 WESBREE BAY 
fnap). 


7.15 CUNNINGHAME HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2,250: 
1m 20 (6) 

1 3031 TAYLORMADE BOY Dam SMh 9-11_ LCtamockl 

4 2002 ABSENCE OF MALICE (8HUSA) B Hantey97 

5 1303 FOREMAST P CMwr 9^7 ^4 

8 8341 BLACK BANK MWEasWhy 95 Klfcxta»5 

14 8113 SPACE TroOPB(PMD)(Bf) T RMlMM 

15 0412 OBBaOSH (B) (D) M PnttcoB 8-5 JBDMNMdi 

Atom at Mafiea. 3-1 Space Tiwper, TT-5 
GStbensh. 7-1 Bteck Bank. 8-1 Taytormade Boy. 12-1 
momast- 

7j 45 HERONSLEA STAKES (2-Y-O: £2.464: 7f) (5) 

23123 K983 BAllADCto (C4)) G PiltdranMaORion 92 

GDoffMdS 

4 0233 LACK A STYLE A Balev 8-11 RCndm4 

6 . 0 PUHTA CALAHONDA N Byotjlt ft-1 1 DMctateS 

7 01 CHANraLYLACEfFR) PKdaway 98 ' 

GayK — eeyCTI 

8 4040 LACK QF P£Af&S H Woodhousa 8-8_ A Shoaki (5)5 
11-8 Lack A Style. 94 Kkn Baladeer. 9-2Cnantfly Lace. 7- 

1 Lack Of Pevls. 91 Puna Cateimda. 

8.15 M0NKT0N HANDICAP (£2^92: 1m) (13) 

2 800 KUO'S BADGE ID) T (Mg 48-7 —5 

3 4000 SaiY BOY fC-0)N Bycroft 688 PUEddMy2 

4 0000 CANE HLLC Thornton 488 ~ — — - 

10 0203 FIST FOOTED (B) G Pritctertl-GOfUon 3811 

GDefMMIS 

11 0020 BERA1D EAGLE (C8) C BOOtt) 58-10 —8 

' 14 2120 TirWELDW {BUMS WteS 48-7 DMctuteC 

15 1322 HAWDLYN GATE (C-O) J S W3CB38 8_ 

17 1000 ABJAD R WooUVWSC 5-7-13 —AShoIte© 9 

18 0401 BAU*RW0{C-0) Denys &n«ft 3-7-12 (5*0 

MFryS 

20 0020 M0NT)CajJCBlf&Mt97-9 J Lot* 10 

21 4004 BOY SANDFORDflMQW Mack* 7-78 —NCteWt 4 

22 0000 WCKY DAWN J Wtoon 4-7-7 Jtee B(wter(7) 11 

23 0400 RQSSETT(DHBF)T (Mg 7-7-7 JQteai^T2 

4-1 Mewdyti Gate. 9-2 Bateerlna 5-1 Fleet Footed . 91 TH 

wukw, MonOceO. 91 Boy SantBord. 181 8% Boy. 12-1 Atead. 
14-1 others. 

8-45 HEADS OP AYR STAKES (£950: 1m 31) (3) 

1 0000 PETER'S K1DOC R Weodhouse 580 _ A Sheute ($12 

2 301 VERARtH W HastlngE-Bass 3813 MEddeSl 

6 REGAL CASTLE- Branbury 38-6 RCoctemS 

18 Vorartfi. 7-2 Rogal CdsUo, 191 Potofs Kkkfle. 

• Reg HoHinshead and his stable jockey Steve 
Perks, were upset yesterday after Pemland Hawk 
lost the Tommy Sfaedden Challenge Trophy at 
Ripon in the stewards room for ‘■Accidental 
interference*’. Hollinshead said afterward: “It 
was a bad derision, but there is no point in raking 
the matter further." 


5-4Gtae Nats. 91 Octiga. 91 n am a fin ht. 91 Larnam, 10- 
1 Keep Cool. 12-1 Twickenham Garden. 12 -1 Stanford Rose, 
Patricks Star. 191 others. 

Redcar selections 

ByMandarin 

2.15 Girdle Ness. 2.45 L B Laughs. 3.15 Sinclair 
Lady. 3.45 Positive. 4.15 Sender. 4.45 Paleface. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.15FlameUgbL2-45 LB Laughs. 3. 15 Good Buy 
Bailey's. 3.45Posiiive. 4.15 Sender. 4.45 Paleface. 
Michad Seely's selection: 4.45 Paleface. 


2A5 ROBERT SARRAU MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: 
£823: 2m 115yd) (11) 

1 0033 DEMON FATE fUSAIF 
3 2030 
5 3 


mm* 


7-4 L B Laughs. 68 Hopoful Lina. 91 Denbentar. 7-1 
ion Fate, 19T FUowfieid Lad, 12-1 French Design. 191 


Demon Fate, 
others. 


3.15 YORKSHIRE FINE WINES 
HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £3,158: Gl) (7) 

2 0112 


NURSERY 


r-M - i . f . 



3 0020 

6 300 

7 0110 

a mis 

9 4034 

13 1240 

118 Smeter Lady, 92 Good Buy Bateys, i38NiftyGrtfr. 
7-1 Laid Wtatgate. 81 Clown Stroakw, 181 Panboy, 14-1 
Gardenia Lady. 

145 MOMMESSIN STAKES (Amateurs: £1,251: 
1m4f)(7) 

2 0834 COUNT COLOURS (USA)(BF) S Norton 4-11-10 

3 881 FtBTOIf J»W Storey 911-10 .*F&ra£my6 

4 2101 GULFLMD(D) G Pntehard-Gordon 811-10 

Ante Pfeflpa (5)7 

5 2380 HSUUDLMfCWQMPrBacOR 5-11-10 . 

MnteeJuater5 

7 an POSITIVE (D) H Thomaon Jonas 4-11-10 

TThemaonJonaa2 

| 10 1003 TAXUDSKM»C NoMon 4-11-10 ^ Jana Mteeo jg3 

11 0 TTEBERWICX D MCfUiSOfl4-11-10_ NON-RUNNER 4 
7-4 Foettve, 11-4 Count Colows, 4-1 Gutfiand, 7-1 

Ftedom, 91 Ttedads, 191 Henwdi«L 

4.15 CAMUSET CHAMPAGNE HANDICAP (£2,169: 
1m 31) (9) 

1 3433 

3 4432 

4 4400 
5-0128 

6 800 
7 3004 
9 0040 

12 0000 

14 0133 

2-1 Bnwe And Bold. 82 Golden Fancy, 10930 Greed, 5-1 
JarteO.91 Sander, 191 oJftteft. 

445 BACHEROY-JOSSELIN CHABLIS NURSERY 
HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £1 ,730: 71) (7) 





SPORT 

SHOWJUMPING 


Broome hopes he 
can sweep to 
another victory 

From Jenny MncArthur, Dublin 


David Broome, a member of 
the team who won the Swedish 
Nations Cup at Falsterbo 10 
days ago. is hoping to continue 
his winning form at the Dublin 
Horse Show which starts today . 
Bropme. part of a six-strong 
British contingent, is taking 
three Irish-bred horses 10 Dub- 
lin. headed by the Ham's Car- 
pets team’s Royale, the horse he 
calls his “little saviour** because 
he has so often kept him in the 
winning frame when his other 
hones have been sidelined. 

Royale's win in the Hamburg 
Derby last month netted his 
rider £10.500, the largest single 
amount Broome has won in 25 
yean at the top of the sport He 
will be relying on Royale for 
Saturday's Grand Prix — an 
event which Broome has won 
seven limes (twice on Suusaive 
and Mr Softee and once with 
Sportsman, Philco and Big Q). 

On Friday, the penultimate 
day of the show, the British 
team — which will be picked 
from Broome, Nick Skelton, 
John and Michael Whitaker, 
Gillian Greenwood and Peter 
Charles — will attempt 10 extend 
its lead for the Prince Philip 
Trophy with a second successive 
win in the Nations Cup. (The 
Trophy is awarded at the end of 
the season to the country with 
the six best Nations Cup 
results). 

Four nations are contesting 
Friday’s event — Britain. Jre^ 
land. West Germany and the 
United States. The latter team, 
which includes Joe Fargis and 
Conrad Homfeld, the reigning 
Olympic gold and silver in- 
dividual medal winners, are 


likely to pose the biggest threat 
to the British. 

Skelton and the two 
Whitakers, who were all mem- 
bers of the team who won the 
silver medal at last month's 
world championships in Aa- 
chen. have been competing in 
France for the last three weeks, 
returning only yesterday. Skel- 
ton has brought Raffles Apollo 
to Dublin, winner of the Grand 
Prix last year and who. like 
Michael Whitaker's Next War- 
ren Point, will be having his first 
outing since Aachen. Whitaker's 
second horse is the mare 
Heliopolis (by Raa) a half-sister 
to his Olympic horse. Amanda. 

John Whitaker, who won the 
Dinard Jumping Derby on Mil- 
ton two days ago will have his 
legendary partner Ryan's Son, 
who is well suited 10 the courses 
at Dublin. Charles is riding Mr 
Cecil Williams's outstanding 
April Sun. an eight year-old 
gelding who has made an 
astonishing recovery from the 
operation he underwent in April 
to remove an internal blockage. 

Gillian Greenwood, the reign- 
ing Ladies National Champion 
and one of the most talented 
lady riders to emerge for several 
years, will partner Mon Santa, 
an Irish-bred gelding by Hard 
Study. Miss Greenwood, who at 
19 is the youngest of the six. 
rode the 10 year-old gelding in 
the winning team at Falsterbo 
and showed herself more than 
equal to the pressure of compet- 
ing at senior level alongside 
more experienced riders — some 
of whom, as in the case of 
Broome, were competing before 
she was born. 


Promoters go into liquidation 


Adelaide (Renter) — Promot- 
ers of the equestrian world 
three-day event held here in 
May yesterday said they have 


despite receiving Aus$7 10,000 
in public money to originally 
help stage the championships, 
but John Ban non. the State's 


been advised to go into liquids- premier, has called the loss a 
tfon, owing nearly AnsSl million debide which could not be 
(about £400,000). Hie organiz- tolerated. The debt includes 
ing committee has asked for prize-money totalling 
government aid to meet the debt, AnsSl 4.000. 


MOTORCYCLING 


Champion 
Dunlop a 
little early 

By George Ace 

The organizers of the Ulster 
Grand Pnx on August 16 may 
be a little disappointed that Joey 
Dunlop clinched his fifth 
successive TT Formula One 
championship at Imaira, Fin- 
land, over the weekend instead 
of waiting to achieve the feat on 
Saturday week. Bui road racing 
is noi the kind of sport that 
lends itself to stage management 
— you take the points and the 
chequered flag whenever you 
can and let the morrow look 
after itself. 

Dunlop, an unassuming 
young man from the tiny Co 
Antrim village of Armoy. hasn’t 
exactly had to look for his 
problems this season, and his 
fifth title was fer from certain 
some weeks ago despite wins in 
the Isle of Mao, Italy. Holland 
and Portugal Lack of fuel 
brought him no points in Ger- 
many and a car accident follow- 
ing the Dutch round in Assen 
saw a less than 100 per cent fit 
Dunlop finish fifth in Spain. 

His practice runs on the roads 
around Imatra, dose to the 
Russian border, for the first 



Dunlop: unbeatable lead 
time posed problems to such an 
extent that he started the race 
proper back in eighth place. But 
he took the flag on the Honda 
eight seconds ahead of his main 
rival Paul Iddon, on a Suzuki, 
with another Northern Ireland 
rider. Neil Robinson, also on a 
Suzuki in third place. 

Dunlop, with only the Ulster 
event to come, has 81 cham- 
pionship points to Iddon’s 61 — 
an unassailable lead 



POLO 


Harrison Cup victory 


By John Watson 


A day's sunshine transformed 
the sodden ground at Cowdray 
Park into resilient turf, making 
the going just right at 
Ambersham yesterday for the 
final of the Cub’s Premier 
Medium-Goal Tournament, the 
Harrison Cup. Jock Green- 
Arm itage’s Saracens won it from 
an original entry of 20 teams, 
defeating Galen Weston's Ma- 
ple Leafs ax the end of an 
intensely dramatic five chukkas 
by 7 goals to 6. 

Marlin Brown, playing as a 
forward, opened the Saracens 
account in the first few seconds 
with a run-away goal on his 
high-speed Argentine mare, Ma- 
rina. from whose back he scored 
again before the first bell rang. 

Bv that time, however. Maple 
Leafs pivot man, Tony Devcich, 
registered a penalty conversion, 
and Charles Graham, who occu- 
pies their No 2 position, scored 
from the open to equalize. 

Saracens then held the lead to 
half-time. On paper they, like 
Maple Leafc, were a 15-goal 
team. In practice they ag- 


gregated 1 8, Forsyth, Brown and 
Seavill all being due for handi- 
cap rises. Andrew Seavill, one of 
the youngest poloists in high- 
goal has matured out of recog- 
nition this season. 

In the fourth chukka, 
Devcich, who had his team 
operating very nicely on his 
axis, tallied another equalizer 
(4-4) for Maple Leafs: Prince 
Charles, having come through a 
good deal more than his share of 
polo in the past two or three 
weeks, has suffered correspond- 
ingly in his stables. Neverthe- 
less. he was the player who first 
put Maple Leafs into the lead. 

Seavill made it level again at 
5-5 and Brown, bringing back 
Marina for the last chukka. 
made good of a 60-yard penalty 
opportunity. Forsyth put Sara- 
cens ahead at 7-5. Finally, 
Prince Charles reduced the Sara- 
cens win to its oac-goai margin. 
SARACENS: 1 A SeaviU OK 2 M Brown (4); 

3 C Forcyth (6); Back J uaen-Annytage 

&FLE LEAFS: 1 Captain C Graham (2k 2 
hrh Princo 01 wales (4); 3 A Davctth (7); 
Back G Weston (2). 


ATHLETICS 


Owens jubilee upset 


West Berlin (Reuter) — Or! 
Lewis's announcement that he 
is withdrawing from European 
competition this month because 
of injury has upset plans to 
celebrate the 50lh jubilee of 
Jesse Owens's four gold medals 
at the 1936 Berlin Olympic 
Games. 

Lewis, the first athlete to 
emulate Owens when he won 
gold in the same events — the 
100 and 200 metres, the long 
jump and the 4 x 100 metres 
relay — at the Los.. Angeles 
Olympic Games two years ago. 
was to be the central figure in a 
special Owens jubilee com- 
petition at the West Berlin grand 
prix on August 15. But he 
injured a knee at the Olympic 
Fesuval in Houston at the 
weekend and has decided to take 
a month's break. 

The world's best sprinters and 
long jumpers have been invited 
10 lake ran in the multi-event 
contest. The late Owens, a black. 


American, set his record at the 
so-called Nazi Games, over- 
shadowed by racial overtones 
during which Hitler was said to 
have refused to shake his hand. 

Lewis's withdrawal was ac- 
cepted with less ’concern by 
Organizers of the Zurich and 
Cologne grands prix on August 
13 and 17. Res Bruegger, the 
Zurich promoter, said: *it is not 
so bad. In Ben Johnson (of 
Canada) we have someone even 
better.*’ Klaus Ulonska, the 
Cologne organizer, remarked: 
"It is just as wdL We haven’t 
really got the money anyway." 

lewis said: n m take a month 
off and see how it is going I 
would like to compete in Europe 
but it is not as important as 
competing next year or staying 
healthy." 

CRYSTAL PALACE: Mar-coittiM contact: 
1. airay, 710 as;, Z. Ken. B37A & Earn. 
589:4, fefl«^5fi9;5.Batet*a.48A5;6. 
Suuax.466, 



20. 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


SPORT 


CRICKET: DRAMATIC DAY AT CANTERBURY WHILE ROSES FIXTURE PRODUCES A RECORD STAND BETWEEN MOXON AND METCALFE 


A partnership 
that changed 
the balance of 
the game 

By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


CHELTENHAAf: Gloucester- 
shire. with S second innings 
wickets in hand, are 27 runs 
ahead of Hampshire. 

This is a good match with 
plenty hanging on il When 
bad light and light rain ended 
play at 5.30 yesterday 
Gloucestershire had just 
cleared off their first innings 
deficit of 69 for the loss of 
their opening pair. Athey is 
still (hens, batting pretty well, 
and both sides will want a 
result today. Gloucestershire 
are looking to give the rest of 
the championship field the 
slip during the festival here, 
but so they were last year and 
it rained instead. 

The balance of yesterday's 
game was quite changed by a 
ninth wicket partnership be- 
tween Christopher Smith and 
TremletL Coming together 
when Hampshire were still 44 
behind and surviving only 
from over lo over, they added 
112 and left Gloucestershire 
feeling that they had Iosl a 
vital advantage. Smith, too, 
was batting with what proved 
to be a broken finger, the third 
on his right hand. He had had 
to retire for repairs earlier in 
the day. There are no prizes 
for guessing that he had been 
hit by a rising ball from Walsh, 
who bowled a lot of short stuff 
while taking his hag of wickets 
for. the season in first-class 
matches to 89. 

For 100 minutes Lawrence 
and Walsh worked their way 
through what had been left of 
the Hampshire batting on 
Saturday evening. Only 
Nicholas with a robust 25 had 
held them up, and he, like 
Marshall, was out mistiming a 
hook. Relief came to Hamp- 
shire when, with only two 
wickets left Graveney with- 
drew his two fast bowlers, 
although such is Walsh's 
rhythm that he still looked frill 
of running. With Bainbridge 
at one end and Graveney 
himself at the other. Smith 
and Tremletl gained in con- 
fidence. By lunch Hampshire 
had gone into the lead and 
they were 68 ahead by the time 
Tremletl was caught at second 
slip. 

Driving splendidly, 
Tremletl reached his first 
championship fifty of the 
season. Using his right hand 
more to steady the bat than to 
grip it. Smith showed great 
courage in batting at all, but 
several limes he found the 
short square boundary up to 
(he pavilion with its look of a 


London station. It was 
Bainbridge who broke them 
up in the end before, for the 
eighth time this season, Walsh 
look a fifth wicket in an 

innings. 

When Marshall took 134 
wickets in 1982. the most in a 
season since the champion- 
ship programme was cut back 
in 1969. his hundredth came 
on August 25, a week or two 
later than Walsh's should. 
With both Walsh and Gray 
still only 23. there is going to 
be little respite for England's 
batsmen against the West 
Indies even after Gamer and 
Holding have hung up their 
boots. Hampshire's last wicket 
went to a catch by Russell, 
whose lovely natural timing is 
fast earning him a reputation 
as the best wicketkeeper in 
county cricket, just as Bob 
Taylor's did. 

Romaines playing his first 
match after a couple of 
months on the injured list, 
pushed the first ball of 
Gloucestershire's second in- 
nings straight to short leg. For 
a couple of hours then they 
had not exactly looked a 
championship side. But Athey 
played very competently and 
Tomlins, opening for the first 
time for Gloucestershire, ap- 
plied himself well, putting the 
bat to anything well enough up 
to him. 

After Tomlins had dragged 
a wide-ish ball from Jones into 
his stumps, bis bat some way 
from the front leg, Bainbridge 
came and stayed with Athey. 
without always knowing quite 
how, until the weather dosed 
in. 

GLOUCESTERSHIRE: First Innings 201 
Second timings 

P W Romaines c Mkfdtoton b Marshal 0 

K P TomSns b James - 30 

C W J Athey not out 32 

P Bainbridge not out 21 

Extras (El2.mil) 13 

Total (2 wkts) 96 



Yorkshire pair 
move into 
record books 


By Peter Ball 


OLD TRAFFORD: Lancashire, 
with eight second innings wick- 
ets in hand, need 215 to avoid an 
innings defeat by Yorkshire. 

After nine consecutive draws, 
most or them tedious, an open- 
ing partnership of 282 between 
Manyn Mown and Ashley 
Metcalfe a record for a Roses 
match at Old Trafford and the 
third highest on the ground in 
the championship, put York- 
shire in a strong position to 
break the sequence today. Lan- 
cashire were totally outplayed in 
every department of the game 
fori 


A W StovokJ, K M Curran. J W 
C Russefl, *D A Graveney, C A 
□ V Lawrence to bet 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-0. 2-55. 

HAMPSHIRE: First Inrtngs 
C G Greeradge tow b Lawrence 
V PTanv e Banbndqe b Walsh — 
T C Middleton c Russefl b Walsh . 
CL Smith not out 


£ 


R A Smith e Lfoydsb watsh 

Ifl J Partis c Lawrence b Walsh 

"M CJ Nicholas c Curran bWateh 25 

K D James run out - - 1 

M D Marshal c Walsh b Lawrence 3 

T M Tremlett c Athey b Bainbndge __ 52 

C A Connor c Russel b Walsh - 0 

Extras (b 8. to 9, nb 10) 27 

Total (04 overs) 270 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-1. 2-71. 3-re, 4- 
124.5-124,3-134,7-143,8-157.9-269, ID- 
270. 

BOWLING: Walsh 33-12-90-6; Lawrence 
29-7-92-2: Bainbridge 20-3-42-1; 
Graveney 10-5-184); Lloyds 2-0-1 1-0. 
Bonus points: Gloucestershire 6. Hamp- 
shire?. 

Umpires: A A Jones and R Palmer. 


Big hit Norman Cowans in the swing at Lord’s yesterday (photograph: Hugh Rontiedge) 

Edgar ioo Essex stretch out 
for Turner for desert oasis 


every department 
ir the second day. 

“It's Dial M for Murder- 
remarked a disconsolate 
Lancastrian in the Pavilion, 
which was in generally chas- 
tened mood after the outrage of 
Sunday, although they rose gen- 
erously to the batsmen at lunch 
and at their subsequent exits. 

There was little for them to 
get heated about. Although both 
batsmen were beaten more than 
once in Allotl's opening spell, 
they were in complete com- 
mand long before Lancashire's 
total of 170 had been overtaken 
shortly before lunch as the 
shortcomings of Lancashire's 
attack were cruelly exposed. 

By then even Fairbrother had 
been called upon as Simmons 
shuffled his pock to no avaiL It 
was dearly a good toss to have 
won. but if the pitch had eased 
considerably after its life on 
Saturday, once Allott and 
Patterson had been seen off 
there was hardly a false stroke. 

Moxon edged Watkinson just 
short of slip when he was 68 and 
survived a loud appeal for a 
catch at short-leg as he swept at 
Simmons at 85. The first genu- 
ine chance did not arrive, 
however, until after 250 had 
been passed and along with it 
Hutton and Lowson’s post-War 
record of 245 for a Roses match, 
and Boycott and Taylor's record 
of 236 for Yorkshire at Old 
TraffoitL 

Metcalfe was the more fluent 
as he moved to his fifth 
championship century of the 
season, equalling Herbert 
Sutcliffe's record for an un- 
capped Yorkshire player set in 
1919, and his own career best 
score in the process. He batted 
for 315 minutes, hitting 18 


fours, most of them handsome 
strokes, and can only have 
added another question mark 
against Boycott’s future, for his 
claim for a cap and a regular I 
place as opener is becoming 
clamorous. 

Moxon was more subdued, 
taking nearly six hours as he 
doubled his previous best 
championship score of the sea- 
son. His liming was sometimes 
awry, but as Lancashire s 
bowlers were reduced to going 
through the motions, the occa- 
sional cover drive revealed hts 
undeniable class. 

Hayhurst. however, had kept 
his enthusiasm and finally per- 
suaded Metcalfe who was show- 
ing signs of tiredness, to chase a 
wide one. Thereafter, Yorkshire 
lost some of their momentum 
until it was restored by Love 
and. after the declaration, their 
bowlers. 

LANCASHIRE: First Innings 170 (G D 
Menas 54; P W Jarvis 4 tar 38) 
Seeondlnnmgs 

G Fowler cBairsiawb Jarvis 0 

G D Mendts not out 5 

I Fotav tow b Deravs 1 

J Abrahams not out 7 

Extras (to 1) 1 

Total (2 wkts) 14 


yachting 

Hobday’s 
trophy on 
corrected 
time 

By Barry Pickthall 


After the gales on Saturday 
and the sheets of rain on 
Sunday, the gods conspired to 
tease the 500 crews competing 
in the Sandhurst-sponsored 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-1. 2-2. 

YOWCSWRE; First Innmgs 

M D Moxon run out 147 

A A Metcalfe c Starawxth b Hayfturat 151 
S N Hartley c Stanworth b Haynurst - 11 

P E Robinson b Hayfturat 1 

J D Leva not out 53 

^OLBahstowtowbAJipn 3 

5 

3 


P Camck c Fofloy b Hayhurst 

P J Hartley c Hayhurst b Patterson 
P W Jarvts not out 


Extras (b 1. to7. w 2. nto 1) , 
Total (7 wkts dec) 


__ tl 


Scons at 100 overs: 318 tor 2 
S D Hatcher and S J Derm CM not baL 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-282. 2-317. 3-318, 
44327. 5-336, 6-383. 7-377 
BOWLING: Patterson 18-2-76-1: Allott 29- 
6-84-1: WatMnson 22-2-77-0: Hayhurst 
26-3-69-4: Fottoy 8-085-0; Simmons 15- 
2-KW; Fatrtarattwr 3-1-74). 

Bonus points: Lancashire 1. Yorkshire 8. 
Unqstres; M J Kitchen and B Leadbeatar. 

Minor Comities 
Championship 

LAKENKAtt Noricrtc v UncoinsMre — no 
play. 

TAUNTON: Somerset B 235 tor 9 dee (J G 
Wyatt 67. R G Twoae 73; B Perry 5 for 32k 
Shropshire 29 tor 2. 

MLDENHALL: Suftofc IBS tor 8 dee (M ! 
A McEvoy 60: S Greenswort 4 tor 42) and 
11 tor 2: Durham 194 for 4 dec (J WUstar 
101 not out S R Atkinson 61). 


De Freitas prince 
with bat and ball 


Middlesex poised 
for first victory 


By Peter Marson 

Thanks to Daniel, who took 
four for 50, and Hughes (three 
for 20), Middlesex had another 
good day at Lord's yesterday, as 
Northamptonshire's bailing 
foundered in 56.3 overs for 159. 

Middlesex will be looking for 
victory today. It would be their 
first this season, and would 
avenge a defeat in their last 
match against Northampton- 
shire. at Northampton last 
week. 


At the day's start, when 
Middlesex began again at 353 
for five. Radley. 50 not out, 
walked out to take guard with 
Emburcy because Edmonds was 
unable to resume his innings 
because of a sore back. But. in 
shaping to cut Capel's second 
ball of ihc morning. Radley fell 
to a catch behind, and Emburey. 
too. was soon on his way, again 
to a catch off Capel's bowling. 

Cowans, though, at once 
showed himself to be in fine 
form, hitting a straight six off 
Cape! before turning to 
Mallendcr. whom he twice 
hitfor six on the way to 44 not 
oul as Middlesex pushed on by 
94 runs to 447 — their highest 
score this season. 

GeofT Cook and Larkins 
made a brisk start to their 
innings, and they had been 
going along at more than four 
runs an over when Larkins fell 
to a good catch in the gully bv 
Edmonds, off Daniel. Cook. 


who had needed attention be- 
fore' lunch after he had been hit 
about the body by Daniel, failed 
to reappear afterwards and it 
was with his retirement that 
Nonhams' problems mul- 
tiplied. From 50 for one. they 
descended to 55 for five, as 
Bo yd -Moss. Lamb. Capel and 
Bailey fell to Daniel and 
Hughes. Harper and Waterloo 
held fast for a while, but when 
they had put on 40 for the sixth 
wicket. Harper moved up the 
pitch to be beaten .and bowled 
by Emburcy. 

MIDDLESEX: Fwl Inrtnos 447 ( "M W 
Gattaig 158. CT Radley 50. fPR Downton 
SO) 

NORTHANT5: First Iraings 

*G Cook reared hurt 26 

W Lartons c Edmonds b Daniel 16 

R J Boyd-Moss c Edmonds b Darnel ... 6 

A J Lamb c Sack b Hughes 0 

R J Bailey c Downton b Hughes 5 

D J Capel c Downton b Hughes 0 

R A Harper b Emtxrey 27 

tSNVWatenonb Daniel 16 

N G B Cook c Minor b Emburey 37 

N A Matendar not out 10 

A Walker c Dowmon b Daniel ... 12 

Extras ( b 1. Ib2, w 1 ) 4 

Total ( 568 overs ) 159 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-44. 2-50. 3-50. 4- 
50. 565. 644. 7-112. 8-142. 9-159 
BOWLING: Daniel T&3-3-50-4: Cowans 
10-0-52-0: Hughes 1 1-5-20-3: Edmonds 9- 
3-5-0; Emburey 843-10-2: Gaffing 2-0-943. 

Second Inmngo 

S N V watsnon c Downton b Daniel 4 

W Lark-re not out 0 

NG BCoofcc Butcher b Darnel 2 

R J Boyd-Moss -3 

Total (2wkts) 9 

FALL OF WICKET. 1-4. 2-6 

Bonus points: Middlesex 8. Northampton- 

stare 2 

Umpires: J H Harris and K J Lyons. 


DERBY: Derbyshiredrew with 
the New Zealanders. 

Bruce Edgar, the New Zea- 
land left-hander, reminded 
England of his durability with 
more than five hours of 
doggedness for an unbeaten 
MO in their draw against 
Derbyshire. 

After rain interuptions. 
New Zealand settled for bat- 
ting practice for Thursday’s 
second Test and they were 
helped by some bungling in 
the field. Derbyshire missed 
five chances with Edgar escap- 
ing when he had made only 
three, put down by Andy 
Brown at fourth slip, Maher 
missing Rutherford and Fin- 
ney putting down a chance 
from Martin Crowe being the 
mostly costly mistakes. 

But Edgar offered nothing 
further to encourage Derby- 
shire. rarely looking for 
attacking options and hitting 
only seven fours as he reached 
100 of 241 balls, while sharing 
stands of 97 with Martin 
Crowe and 71 with Coney. 

Afterwards Glenn Turner, 
worried about the form of 
John Wright, accused Derby- 
shire of killing the game. 
"Derby didn't want to play 
cricket, they batted too long. 
Edgar's form is our only plus 
from the match." said the 
New Zealand coach. 

DERBYSHIRE: First innings 365 (BJM 
Maher 126. G Mfflor 51. Aa Warner 50: D A 
Stirling 4 lor 950 

NEW ZEALANDER& First innings 
B A Edgar not out 110 


By Richard Streeton 


By Ivo Tennant 


J G Wright b Malcolm 
K R Rumertordc 


: Roberts b Taylor _ 29 

M D Crewe c Brawn b Miter 51 

J J Crowe c Marples b Tayfcr 5 

■J V Coney st Marptes b Barnett 42 

EJ Grey not OUf —.5 


Extras (b 7. lb 7. nb 8) , 


-22 

Total (5 wkts dec. 79 overs) 266 

K D S Snath. B J Barren. D A Swung and 
Watson cM not bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-4, 2-63, 3-160, 4- 
177.5-2*18. 

BOWUNG: Malcokn 13-3-30-1: Warner 8- 
1-144): Fnney 17-2-71-0: Taytor 1&2-45- 
2. Miter 30-7-66-1: Barnett 943- 26-1. 
Umpires: R Jufen and D Lloyd. 


EASTBOURNE: Sussex, with 
seven second innings wickets in 
hand, lead Essex by 109 runs. 

Essex, sharing a full measure 
of resilience, emerged strongly 
paced yesterday after a day of 
tight, tense cricket. Essex first 
recovered from a potential bat- 
ting collapse. Then in the final 
90 minutes they captured three 
Sussex wickets cheaply. 

Lever’ started the Sussex 
slump when he had Green held 
at second slip, in his third'over, 
as the batsman tried to drive. 
Foster then had Parker leg 
before against a near yorker and 
at 26 he beat Lenham's Toward 
defensive stroke. 

Foster also had Alikhan 
missed in the slips as the 
opening batsman and Colin 
Wells stayed together until the 
dose. An injured thumb pre- 
vented East keeping wicket and 
in keeping with recent events 
elsewhere. Gould allowed 
Bums, the Essex second team 
wicket keeper, to deputize. 

Essex, second in the table, 
with two matches in hand over 
the leaders. Gloucestershire, re- 
main one of those sides which 
can never be discounted because 
they are equipped for most 
contingencies. After 41 overs 
they were 1 15 for five and the 
197 needed to avoid the follow- 
on resembled a distant oasis, 
which would probably not be 
reached. 

Fletcher, playing his first 
match since a finger injury six 
weeks ago, and Hardie. another 
obdurate character whose un- 
gainly style masks an efficient 
technique, jolted the camels 
however, ana slowly crossed the 
intervening desert to safety. 
They put on 128 in 45 overs 
before aggressive stroke-play by 
Pringle finally ensured maxi- 
mum batting points. 

For most of this weekend 
there has been more bounce and 
movement for the faster bowlers 
than is usually the case at The 
Saffrons. Gooch had gone on 
Saturday evening and Essex, 
resum ing at 49 for one. soon lost 


the night watchman. East. 
Stephenson and Prichard had to 
quell some lively pace bowling 
but the worst seemed over when 
three wickets fell abruptly m 
seven overs. 

Stephenson and Border were 

beaten off the pitch by Colin 
Wells’ late movement; Prichard, 
in between these wickets, edged 
a lifting ball to the wicket 
keeper. Half an hour before 
lunch Fletcher and Hardie 
found themselves defending 
with every ounce of concentra- 
tion they could muster. 

Fletcher exuded defiance in a 
situation tailor-made for a man 
of his experience. Throughout 
the stand he let Hardie gather 
most of the runs. Hardie grad- 
ually began to drive and square- 
cut as the bowlers tired, and on a 
day of hot sunshine, most of the 
liveliness left the pitch as the 
afternoon progressed. 

After two hours and a half 
Hardie finally turned a catch to 
square leg. Pringle hit eight fours 
in 35 minutes as Essex raced to 
300 and declared. Fletcher had 
batted three hours and 20 
minutes by the end. and in 
valuable effort. 


SUSSEX: First Innmgs 346 (N J 
68. CM Wrtts 106: Pnngte 584) 
Second Usings 
R I Afikhan not out . 


Lanham 


A M Green c Gooch b Lever 
P W G Parker tow b Foster - 

N J Lenham b Foster 

C M Weis not out — 


Extras ( to 1 w 1. nb 1 ) 
Total { 3wk& ) 


-18 

5 

— 0 
_ 8 
....29 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-R 2-10. 3-26 
ESSEX: First InntngB 

*G A Gooch Ibw b Poott 

J P Stephenson tow b WaBs 

f D E East tow b to Roux 


tDf 

P J Pncftard c Gould b Janes 
A R Border tow b Mate 


K W R Fletcher not out . 


B R Hartfta c Green b Ptgatt 


.31 
.43 
- 5 
.21 
_ 2 
.57 


- -80 

D R Pringle not out *2 

Extras ( b 2, to 9. w 3, nb 5) .19 

Total (Owlets dec. 97 overs) 300 

N A Foster, J K Laver. J H ChMs dU not 
bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-36. 2-62. 3-109. 4- 
111.5-115.6-243 

BOWUNG: le Roux 20-938-1: Jones 14- 
2-51-1; Pnott 22-4-77-2: We4s 21-8-45-2: 
Mays 1-0-14-0; Lentram 7-0-16-0; Greer 
12-1-50-0. 

Bonus posits: Sussex 6 Essex 8 
Umpires: B Oudaiston and P B Wight 


CANTERBURY: Leicestershire, 
with seven second-innings wick- 
ets in hand, need 179 runs to 
beat Rent 

A maiden first-class century 
and figures of six for 21 by 
Phillip De Freitas, 
Leicestershire's rapidly improv- 
ing all-rounder, gave his county 
a chance of victory in a fascinat- 
ing, fluctuating day's cricket 
Having been 43 for seven, they 
recovered to total 199, Aider- 
man taking eight for 70; and 
bowl out Kent for 87. Leicester- 
shire then lost three more 
wickets to Alderman and re- 
quire a further 179 runs today. 

On Saturday the Archbishop 
of Canterbury was here. Yes- 
terday the Duke of Kent came, 
flying in by helicopter over the 
new £600,000 stand, which be 
opened during -lunch. It had 
been built next to the Frank 
Woolley stand and has not yet 
been named, although there are 
no prizes for guessing which 
cricketer it will be called after. 

The Duke spent some time 
studying the pitch. If the va- 
garies of the cricket were 
perplexing him. he was not the 
only one. Leicesteshire and 
Kent collapsed dramatically, yet 
either side of lunch De Freitas 
and Whiuicase put on 149 in 
113 almost carefree minutes' 
cricket. 

Resuming on 21 for three, 
Leicestershire swiftly lost four 
wickets, Gower, Willey, Boon 
and Balderstone to Alderman. 
There was some movement but 
it accounted for only WiHey's 
dismissal De Freitas was fortu- 
nate. to come in as Alderman 
was finishing his first spell but 
none of the bowlers gave him 
much difficulty.. 

Ellison, alas, has lost his way, 
let alone his swing. His eight 
overs went wi eke dess for 56- 
Figures tell the story; he has 
taken 1 1 championship wickets 
this season, whereas Alderman 
has 78. The Australian finished 
off the innings with the wickets 
of De Freitas. Les Taylor and 
Ferris and showed once again 
what a trier and a performer he 
is. 

Yet this has been — thus far— 


De Freitas's match. His 106 was 
made in only 113 minutes and 
included 18 fours. Then, with 
Taylor off the field, he took the 
new ball and in two spells ran 
through some poor Kent bat- 
ting. Of his six wickets, four 
were bowled for leg-before and 
two caught by the wicketkeeper 
and first slip, which showed bow 
well he attacked the baL 
There was no stopping Aider- 
man when Leicestershire batted 
again, needing 2J8 to win. 
Butcher, Cobb and Balderstone 
were trapped in front, beaten by 
fractional but sufficient move- 
ment These wickets took Aider- 
man past his tally of 76 in bis 
only previous season of county 
cricket 1984. 

KBIT: First tontogs 329 tor 8 dec (C S 
CowdreyGO, S A Marsh 52 not out}. 

Second Imtinga 

M R Benson c Whitttcase 6 Agrow 

S J Kinks c sub b De Freitas 

C j Tavato b De Froi 


Cowes Week for the third day 
running yesterday when, tickle 

winds delayed the day's racing 
for more than two hours and a 
ha If and forced the shortening or 
most courses. 

The one saving grace was 
sunshine which helped to dry 
out soggy clothing and bedding 
while crews rafted up alongside 
in Cowes Roads waiting for the 
cannon guarding the parapets 
around Cowes Castle to bark out 
the first call to race 

First away at 1. 10pm were the 
Gass 1 entries competing for the 
Sir Waller Preston Challenge 
Cup who were led across the line 
by Chris Dunning's Marionette 
and Backlash, skippered by Tim 
Herring. 

.As the fleet headed westwards 
under a fast running ebb tide 
towards the first of their turning 
marks off Beaulieu River other 
crews in later classes fought a 
gallant but losing battle against 
the sluicing stream to stay above 
the Squadron line before their 
start times, and the cannon 
sounded as many as a dozen 
recalls before the two hours were 
out 

The sea breeze finally ap- 
peared at an indecent hour later 
in the afternoon but by then the 
decision had been made to 
shorten the courses — set this 
year for the first time with the 
aid of a computer — to one ■ 
round and after 14 miles. Kit 
Hobday's East Coast-emercd 
one tonner. Unbearable, not 
only took the winning gun but 
saved her time to take the major 
silverware on corrected time 
ahead of Blue Saxon, owned by 
Mr and Mrs J Burton. 

Prince Philip, sailing 
with the former King 
stantine of Greece aboard Owen 
Aishcr's Yeoman XXVI. had a 
less eventful day finishing 15th 
on handicap, and it was left to 
Prince Edward, sailing aboard 
Aquavit, to uphold Royal hon- 
our by scoring a fifth place in the 
Eichells 22 class. 

The 18-strong Gass 2 fleet 
completed half their 23 mile 
course with the South African 
entered Threequartcr Ton Cup 
contender. Three Spears, 
dominating the results sheet for 
the third day running. 

In the absence of any of 
Britain's Threequartcr Ton Cup 
team whose crews arc busy 
preparing their yachts for the big 
event in Torquay next week, it 
was Amaryllis of Dart, 
representing the Britannia 
Royal Naval College, that came 
dosest to dislodging this Cape 
Town based yacht with the 
French-entered Excalibur 
finishing third. 

The French also made their 
nesence fell in the premier, 
hannel Handicap class with 
Ell ora HI, skippered by V 
(TOrgeval, taking provisional 
line and handicap honours 
ahead of the two British entries. 
Sect non III and Nightlife. 


again 

Con- 


RESULTS: 


1. SJgmatfc ft. (D 


. 0 
. 8 

27 

N R Tarta r eWNMcasa b Da Fratas _ 4 


Ftot, (J Turner): 3. Nuca It, (J D Ftatfl. 
Contena 32: t. Mutiny. (N Patoson): 2 
Cantilena. (Mrs Prick* rt): 3. Roulette. (J 
Matthews). Six-metre: 1. Scoundrel. (B 
Owen): 2. Razzia Dazzle. (T Russefrj. 
Etcher i. ShamalJM SctttXit); 2. Vixen. 


D G Asiett b Aqnew 
■C S Cowdroytow b Ferris 
R_M BBson tow b De Renas , 


.16 

7 


(F M O'Ne*); 3. 
Daring: 1, Darius. (C 


de Ferranti). Dragon 1. Dragonfly. (J E 
VWHarns): 2. F\S, 0 MacDonald): ! 


Lacey). 

« . 2. La 

Garau VUl. (J B Owfc); 3. Rnesse. (Mra 

3. 


Yankee Doodle. (J G Brim). SwaUow; t. 

.(J BuckweBk 2. P ta rmigan. 


gSAMarsh b Ferris 


> RMey i 

D L Underwood b De Freitss 
TM AJdennan b Da FreltaB _ 

Extras (to 1, nb2) 

Tots! 


Boomorana. 

”Fox^*3. MhnraL(Sir W 
Mm 1. Redstart, (J Jenson): 
taqtwi. (M R Richardson): 3. Rosetta. 
(W MaBsan). Impels: 1. Kudu (A Coxl, 2. 
Tantrum (R E Pearce): 3. Unravelled (fl 


FALL OF WICKETS; 1-0. 2-24, 3*2TmZ 
5-64. 6-66, 7-74, 8-87, 9-87, 10-87. 
BOWUNG: 13-2-46-2: Oe Freitas 


~ 17 
— 2 
_ 3 
— 0 
_ 0 

_ 3 | Austin). J 24: 1. Utle Eagle (Anton 

I mil«£ CAV- 4 n^A. 


10.4-0-21-6; 
2. 


I -1-0-0; Ferris 6-2-1 S- 


SandtednV 3. Cry" Havoc "(VA 1£r J 
WoMward). SCOO: 1. Tuonefa (R J. 


LEjCESTEMSMHE: First Innings 
IP Butcher tow bDOtoy 


J C Balderetona e Cowdrey b Alderman 

14 


R A Cobbb DUey 

J P Agnew b Alderman ___ 

*D I Gower b Alderman 

P WOey c Astetl b Alderman 

T J Boon tow b Alderman 

P Whfflfcaae not out 


- 0 

- 9 

- 6 
10 

- 0 


iSSK; 

15a: 1, Forrader (R __ 
mj Kay* 3, Yahoo (A 
SatuJR LhewHtn a. super 


3..Sheen (R N Dc^. 



iSqutoeV 

Mobb®* 3. TroU’ (J Bolfen). Votary: t „ 
Eagta (B BunyBitiT 2. Zest (K Taytor); 3. . 
Zma _(J R Lear). XOD: 1. Majic Dragon (J 
• 1 Madcap (RE Smith); 3. ©earn- 


DOdd«):2. 


. P oT5? R 2? B SS.^? BttbAWBm,Bn 106 

L B T ayto r B y b Alderman g 


G J F Ferris tow b Alderman 
Extras0b2.wl.nb4). 
Total (56 overs) 


6 
7 

, igg 

BOWl ^Dfltayl6 : 4^^Alteiwan21- 
5-70-6: Undenmod 9-4-12-0- Bleion 8-1- 
564h Cowdrey 2-0-5-0. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-1. 8-1. 3-ig. 

5-40, 6-40. 7-43, 8-1B2. 9-192. 10-19SL ’ 

Second Innings 

J C- Badera tpne tow b Atemian 11 

IP Butcher tow b Alderman i 

R a Code tow b Alderman i 

D I Governor out „ ig 

PWWteyrwoul 


Class 1: 1. Unbearable (C-* 
. Sue Saxon f - ~ - ‘ 

(G A Howjson). I 


, Blue Saxon (J. Burt). 3. Local ■ 
.Ctaee 2:1, Three 



Flyer (D.W. 

Adrena hn (R . Rbdert. Class 4: 1.' 
Presto (M Duboe): 2. Stertwm 2 (P.G. 
DWcson): 3. Monster Gabtxar n (C. 
Borar). Class Srl.EHora II (V.OT 
2. Electron IN (HMS 
5. GrosV Ct* 


Extras (to l.nbt) 
Total (3 wltts) 


BASEBALL 


CYCLING 


NORTH AMERICA; American t— t u»- Bos- 

ton Red Soi 5 Kansas Coy Royals 3. New 
Vent Vankaes 12. Cie« stand Indians 8. 

Toronto Blue ta.fi G. Baltimore Orates 4. 

OJMand Athletics S, Mnnesota Twins a, 

QvcagoWTraSot IQ. Detroit Tmrsi: Texas 

Rangers 7. Wwauhee Brewers 9; Seattle 

Manners 6 CaMomu Angels a National 

League; New York Mats 4. Montreti Expaa 3, 

Phudetoraa Pistes & Ctecago ftn* 2: 
Pittsburgh Pirates 3. St Loins GardrefeO. Los 
Angeles Dodge* 2. Cncnnati Reds 1: San 
Diego Padres S Houston Astras 1. Adana 
Braves 4. San Framsco Gants 2. 


GOLF 


EXETER WH HOC mJeet t. □ Keiawav 
(Ewtert «ir 20mm 29&BC. Team: Eratw WH 
13 31 - 26 

CENTURY RC (100 mfles)' 1. I Camnwh 
(Manchester WH| 337 19 (event record): 2. G 
Plans iCtumwood CRCI 349.21: 3. M 
|*fff™3r<j eoctannam CO 3SQ20 Team: 
WVEVERN CC 1232.8 Women J Pitctrfonl 
(StnvMeo CC) 4.5.10 (season's 
Tandem- Gjjodgsai/R Manser (San Fary 


DENVER, Colorad o : Woman's national i 

am to ur n a men t: Hoal pooiSOA* (US un 
staled lr 283: A AJOXL fe 69. 72.70. 284iP 
Braitey. 71. 75, 67.71 ;C Johnson. 70. 70. 72. 
72 285: D Massey 68. 73. 70. 74 28t AM 
PatKFn. 7076 70 70. 287: V Fwgon. 72, 74. 
72. 69. 268: J Steohenson (AusL 75. 7Z 70. 
71. L Adams. 7a 74. 75. 66: J Rasanmal 71. 
75. 72. 70: M BfcKkweWer. 72. 73. 71. 72. 


FOR THE RECORD 


TENNIS 

SAN DBEGO: Woman's townamant: 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-8. 2-12. 3-19. 
^ onus PW HK Kent a. Leicestershire 4. 
Umpmas J A Jameson and o R Shepherd. 


BOWLS 


to imH a n ai iL Singhs; RirtuK 


American League 
East 


Won Lost Pet GB 


Boston 

61 

42 

592 

. 

Batomora 

57 

47 

546 

4 v. 

New York 

58 

48 

.547 

4ft 

Cleveland 

55 

49 

.529 

6ft 

Toronto 

58 

50 

526 

6ft 

Detrort 

55 

50 

524 

7 

MSwaiAea 

50 

53 

•485 

11 

west 





Cattlorraa 

56 

48 

.538 

. 

Texas 

55 

51 

.5(9 

2 

Kansas Cny . 

47 

56 

.448 

9ft 

Chicago 

46 

57 

.447 

9ft 

Searfie 

47 

59 

.443 

10 

Minnesota 

45 

59 

.433 

11 

Oakland 

45 

62 

.421 

12ft 

National League 





East 





New York 

69 

32 

883 


Pnoaotrfpma 

52 

50 

.510 

17ft 

Montreal 

50 

50 

500 

18ft 

St Lous 

47 

55 

.461 . 

22ft 

Cheago 

44 

57 

.436 

25 


Ann CO 137.40' 

ANDOVER WH (50 rates): I. G Longbnd 
( Antelope R*1. 1&L21 (course record). TOsm: 
VC Venia 6 4733 

EAST LIVERPOOL WH [SO (MM 1, M 
!J*iwe* [Bradford WH) I-W to. Team Met 
SlwopsHre WH 63 30. 

NOHLONp COMBINE (50 ndm). 1. S Jones 
[EsmetCC] 1.5834 

FAREHAM WH (2S mfesf 1. P pgncKWVdt 
I Worttvig Exert) 56mm 11 sec. Team: Wor- 
thing Excel £54.21 

BARNE3BURT CC ISO irtte). I.MSradaftm 
15732. Team Bameshury CC 

<3ptii£VERMUYOBM(25nrtes): I. R Stones 
Ip** Btoad, Kul) 57mn 09aec. Team: City RC 
WS*** B Burton (Knarasboraugh 
C0 1:01.01 

BARNSLEY RC 150 KMes): 1. V Gregory (VC 
CnesKrteid) 1.5251 

NOTTINGHAM CLARION (100 imtaK 1. N 
Boriass | MaTon OJynWt 4fl5.43.Taam Mel- 
lon Otym(K 13429. 

BROMSGHOVE GRAND PRO! (86 mteSk I. M 
Jones (HflfBtora WH) 3270 King or the 
Moimams: R ChamOerlam (Coventry Oym- 

TOSWOinH ROWLANDS CASTLE (88 
nrtesi i C Hasher (Honsiow Dtsma WH) 

SOUTH YORKSHIRE (» miiesr. I. □ Jarws 
tCnesierr«id Caureure) 1 55.00 
PENNINE CC (50 mfles7 1 . G KtnoeU (Mnga) 
l 50 47 Team. Mirage 5J049 
VORKSHIHE LAMES CA (50 mws): 1 . E Wwtf 
(KntoJy CQ 205 48 


BROCK, HfeoiK Weatern Ope n tnur- 

arm Final portions (US irtns sweat 

2B6: T Krta. 70. 75.73, 68: N Price (SAL 71. 71. 
73 7l.DFrtjs(SAV.74,GG. 71,75;FC0Wtea, 
70. 66. 71 75. 287? G Itermen (Aig. 71. 7-L 
72. 70: L Thompson. 71. 73. ffl. 74; B 
Wadkms. 69. 59. 74. 75; B Uettko. 74. 70. 73. 
70. D Mast 89. 73. 72. 73. MS: G Birra. 71. 
70. 71. 77. D Edwards. 75. 72. 73. H: MPW 
72.71. 73. TM Byram 70. 70. 72. 77 29ttC 
Pawn 73. 72. 76. ME G Hateerg. 68, 71. 79. 
72 fl Cochran. 79. 70. 6& 74 


MEJTS WORLD RANKING: 1. S Balesteros 
tSp) I125pts: a G Norman (AusL 90S. 3. B 
Langer (WGL 973: 4. T Nttewne Upn|. 709. 5. 
H Sutton (US!. 672: & M OMeirafUS)- 634.- 7, 
S Lyle (GBL 599. 8. C $nma (US). 586: B. C 
Pwte (US). 582: 10. T Watson (USL 564. 
Oman 16. R Floyd (USL 492. 17. TKna(USL 
484.21. jN*ktaus(USL4t l:23.HCIari<(G«. 
365. 27. S Torrance (GB). 337. 26. N Faldo 
(GB). 322: JO, r Woosnam (GB). JOS. m. Q 
Timer (N2). 115 


EPSON QRDBT OF IrtHlT (Bunpet: 1. S 
Otf Mto rm (SpJ. E1£B5M-7ft 2. If dart 
(gnat. £80.351.84: 3. G Brand (Erjw. 
ffi5S332 4. R Davis Musi £0877602: SI 
Woosnam (Wan. E64J083.77. 6. B Lerar 
(Mfei. £56.19833: 7 M McNulty (SAL 
£54.518 42. 8. R Rafteny IN.tra). £5X844.1 4 
9. N Faldo (Engl 03.401 95: 10. G Brand Jra 
(SOMJ £47 41776 


Rnat K Novacek (Czj W T Tiiaana (F^Si, 7- 

6 

YACHTING 

THE NETHERLANDS: Topper world 

championships: lit race {a*lM 1, j Brum; 

2. B Iran. 3. A Carter 4. a Peters. 5. A Bond. 

a ndrace ; i. A C arter ZB HatX a Taytor 4. 

A Peters: 5. 8 Womfl. 

windawimg ch a ra pion a tgpe; Round 
wetote 1. SLapwonh:Z G Fidlar. 3. J 


Park. 


. 3h Tteevyweigtit 1. J Laurara: 2 G 
Wfcochs. 3. A GtCQsia. LntSeo: l.GConnelK 
2 S Bracev-Wnght X A Wackett Yoeth: S 
Braoks Master p Baker Vsterara T 
Green hn 

ROWING 

HENLEY: Wtonere: 

EiglKx Bur. London/Vesta. II. Bk B. 
a. Senior A: IVnchenham. 1X1. 


Sew ft Thames. 2Ki Setter C: vesta. 4L 
Veteran B: City ol Oxford. ll teraranCrCtty 
otOxtard. il. 

Ooxless tours Bte- Maxtertiead. rowed 
over SenurA: Bedfrad Star. 1)41. Senior B: 
London. T«i 

Coxed touc EKe- Bedtoto Star. 1 hi. Senior 
C: Sons erf the Thames. 3L Novice: Morttatw 
Angfcan and Alpha, W. Veteran ft Heniev. 
easiy Veteran CiMaitow.eassy Veteran 0: 
London. DJ Women** Senior Efe Bedford. 21 
women’s Senior C: Henley. 2\-i women's 
nevico; Oxford. 


SartK EA» doottem Tideway Sodtera. 51 
Singles: ESte M Diserans (WWhigtord). 41. 
Senior A: C WHtams (Tideway Sorters). IL 
Se«or ft D Yaertfley. tPoptw Btadmafl 
Demon 1*.L Senior Gfl Hunpram (Poplar 
bbcxwbI and Datncfl. easty 


LEAltelCTUN SPA: Liverpool VJctorfa 
*“ “‘mmn ’ x n a tlunet aie m jon te i 

Prelenmaiy rarad: Rusaaa 
„ (EStopwiaDoreheeter. Dorset (M. 

Kenyon) M: Sraiwnham. Bata W Lane) IX 

Courtfirtd Carlisle |M Alton) 36: Oitamnam 
Park (A Papmtbm 12. Snarartn. loWMMrtard) 
22: Oxtoto C A C (I Motyneux) 20. Haynes 
Park. Surrey (C Wesson it Wtton. Nknes- 
braugh (E Booth) ffl. COwflen & Crotton. 
Horthombertand JL PM) 23; Bamwood. 
Gloucester (P Edwards) 23. Torbay (A 
Comrtt) 9; Hmgnam. Norton (V CocSu 15. 
Otoey. Bucks g Barack) 2ft Thrapaton. 
NortnantB (P Jams) 20. Stonay Strattord. 
B»*» CAHfl 17fWest Moors. WWMnw. 
Dorset (BStevens] 12 . GkIqb Park (M Ban 17; 

Pwertwtxjgti (C Anton) 12. HanmJen Park. 

Eartxiume iM Denham) i& SIC/STL Harlow 
(D ClHlI wo BatUahridge. RodMTp Dovy). 
Foras: Rrareund: St Hoktos. Cothestor (j 
POM 14. Edmonton Sports. Mtttesax (3 
Whito)27: Henisy. Lrtcestor(M CtunaertBl. 
A^m. York it Snwans) IS: Torbay (C 
Bolton) 15. Bounemouth (J Greani Tft 
§vn*wi o n Sea. SoraerM JN Taytor) 26. 
Rfltoroortt igiijB wyrera) i7:Saidy.Beds(R 
Adttson) 27. Otanens. Coitoa (L awn) II. 

Kngsthgrpe. Nonhams (E farmer) 9. Carton 

Conway. Nods (B Atherton) 2ft STC / STL 
t^Qw W Porwrl 14 . Qadb y. Letoester (P 
Green) ift Bnteh Aerospace. Byfleet ft) 

Goodin] 13. iwrt* Ladies (VSouBwatB) 17. 

Bounds Green. Middx (A Papwnh) 16. 

Ctoytota. (jTOIIn ( P Pnsk) 22: Frtmstowe fG 

RandrtD 5. Sherwood. Notts (A Gtorar) 23: 
pNngion. Leammtgon (P Jartdns) 11, 
Ledbury Hereford (E Gavnan) 20. West 
VWchHam. Kent (J Huggns) 14. Onerstniw. 
Surrey (R Surtdeyt 19; WMtoy and 
Mpntaeeton. NorihwnoertandiN Greenwood) 
IB. Dgnyett- flunrexar (A Rowe) tft Leom- 
«s»r. HeretorttG &aw) 15. Ftopner Park. 
Stockton (N Shawl 22 Redruth, Comwsl (W 
Sewnsont 13. Rnraica Park. Oxford. (P 
Rows) SB. Fpfta8tone IV Gooctonowm 27 
Krfinde (J Graham) 14; field Place. Wor- 


thaig. (J Ptacketd 17. Houghton. Durtwni (J 
nodgaraon) 21; Kinon. Somhoraa U K 
Stxi|l7. Rugby (L Heines) ift Heaton 
Mandtestar rp Mou] 7. Bramswow 
PrtJrotji. Grang harr 1 (L R yan) Cowes, 
low. (P Cole) 23; CUtomirfon. Devon 

19. March Cons (H Whitlow) 20: Mai. . 

(L Hawes) 23. Herts Laches p Bsmrase) 13: 
Pentyn. CormraX (R Kneebone) 21, Andover 


FOOTBALL 


ARGENTINIAN LEAGUE: Tempariay 0. Ferro 
Cam! Oeaie 1. Union 1. San Lorenzo de 
Aknagro i; Anemnoa Junxxs ft Daeonwo 
Esparaiol Ct SmiHa Esgrime la Plata 0, 
River Plata 1. Hosano Central 2. 
tndeoentann 4: THeres (Cordoba) 0. 
hsttuta (Cordoba) ft Racing Club 2. NetreTs 
Old Bora ft Ptatense 0. taturtantes de la 
PtoB 2: va« Santowft Raemg{Cortetj*)i; 
Boca Junors 1. Deoartwo inSano 0. 

POLISH LEAGUE: Potona Bytom 0. GKS 

KamewceQ: O mi ro to P ozn an I.MotorUjHnft 

GomnA Zabrze STRech Ctiorzow 1; Widzaw 

Lodzl. 9tat Mieloc1;ZflflWte Ui» I.LeeNs 

Gdanrtc ft- Row Szczecin 1. Siasfc Wroclaw 

1 Lego Warsaw v UCS Lodz, postponed. 


BOXING 


MONACO: World Betong OmmB bwhm- 
toathenne to hl eha rap ieog topc Jute Cesar 
Ouvez (Max. holder). M Rocky Lodouge 

(uaj-pts. 


FENCING 


SOHAzWtorMctvrapiomMps: Teen epee: 1. 
West Germany. 2. USSR. 3. tafrr. 4. Ssrav 5. 
France: ft Swteerianch 7 Canada: ft- The 
Netherlands ■ 


FOOTBALL 

Cattlin takes 
club to court 

Chris C a ttlin , who was emimj 
as Briggfatoa manner on April 
30, has started high court action 
against the second division dnb 
over bis tUsnssaL 

Bryan Bedson. the Brighloc 
chairman sank “We wfl| make a 
statement in due course, al- 
though I can confirm that a writ 
has been served," Cattlin, aged 
4ft, was fired -with nearly two 
years his contract to rim and 
he has returned to his coafec- 
nouery basmess en Brighton^ 
seafront. 

His 

gry reaction 
of Brighton 
held n 
marches 
restatement. 

Cattlin said: “I waked for six 
weeks to hw from the dob 

“Pbtimng why I was dismissed. 

Because I had beart^nothhm 
from them I was forced to miw 
8*1 act »oa, although I was 
ttcuuit. I feel thbhas dam- 
aged my professional and ocr- 
sonal fife" pep ^ 


provoked an an- 
a huge section 
Supporters, who 
and protest 
ug for h is re- 


1‘ 


1 6: 1.TauUto (LE. 

2. abet (AJ3. May): 3. 7t» 
fejvjp Hqpktrrav »rae 7: 1 ,- 

Italian fears 
increasing 

Porto Ccrvo (AP) - Three 
years ago a crew of yachtsmen 
returned as conquering heroes 
to Italy after sailing to an . 
unexpectedly high finish in the 
America's Cup. Now. 10 weeks 
before challenger races for 
yachting's most prized trophy 
begin. Italy's two challengers are - 
plagued by in-fighting and wor-' 
ned that the fate of one of their 
yachts may be an omen for their 
campaigns. 

On June is. the consortium 
boating one challenger. Italia, 
suffered a sharp seiback when its 
second yacht. Italia H, sank at' 
its launching in La Spezia. when 
the crane hoisting it into the 
water collapsed on the vessel. 
Members of the other Italian 
challenger. Azzurra. dearly 
think that Italia n's accident has 
seriously hurt its chances, “That 
CUftne cost Iiafia a vital month of 
preparation," said Andrea 
Valicelli. the designer of the first 
three of Azzurra's four yachts. 

cr.u a l icc ^‘ 1051 his position as . 
sole Azzurra designer after last., 
February s 1 2-meire world 
championships in Australia, 
finely considered a$ a warm-up 
£L? e „ n e*t America’s Cup. 

and Azzurra. fin- 
ished in disappointinR eighth 
“ti tenth places respectively. 


i- 


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• V 
1 -ii 

V. 

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27 



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tr °ph$ . 


THE TIMES TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


Today’s television and radio programmes and Peter Davalle 


i 

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6-00 Cccfax AM. . 

SJSD Breakfast Ttao with Rank 
Bough and Sun Cook. 
Weather at &55, 725, 
7-55,845 and &5S; 
regional news, weather ' 
am traffic at &57, 727, 
7Jgr and 8J27; national and 

' foternatfahat news at 7.00; 
7.30, 8.00, 8-30 and 9-00; 

■ sport at 750 and 8£0; and 

- a review of iho rooming 

- newspapers at 8417. Pus, 
the Junior and Adidt 
Advice Lines; gardening • 
hkits from Alan 
TdChmarsh; and a reaps, 
from Glynn Christian. . 

920 Dudley Oo-WghL Cartoon 

■ senes about arekidant ■ 
Mountii.925Ths . 


Mouniw. Ma lire 

MookaeK. (r) 9J0 
J'x •' NaenraundSped 


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M. Vatish,,, ( ‘ ■ ' 

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"■■■ 'fete 

"HRrirmum ' " 

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Bra ] . 



DeOuwyprescinted'by 

John Craven 9 l 55 The 

. Adventurerdf BuftwfnUe 
and Rocky. Part three-lr) 
Why Don’t You-? 




■.'V 

Rr- 

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■■j- , 

* P i»v ! 

<b**t**v ti t 
L 


. bored chBcfren. (r> 1025 
. Adventures of Buffwfnkfe 
and Rocky. Part four, It) - 
lOJtOPfay School 
. presented by Brian 
Jameson with guest, Carol 
Cheil IOlSO Ceafax. 

1 M New* After Noon with 
. Richard Whitmore and Sue 
Carpenter, includes news 
headlines with subtitles 
1.25 Regional news. The 
v weather details come from 
Bill Giles 1 JO 

; Hngemtouae. A See-Saw 




,i , 

*i ; 

S*> j 


Dl h* * 
wo 4n' *n d«i 

J 7* » Miir | 

*••0. • 

0 MWW I. 

4& I 

(t VYtohra* 
f*LMU0MI». 


L. 


’’ .J 

' -Tv.'' 

"“PiSr 


i V 


j, with lain Laucm 
and .fine Hardy. (r)l-45 
Ceafax. 

Z30 Royal National Etetedtffod 
of WOtea-Alun WHIiams; 
describes the crowning 
ceremony in the national 
Bsteddfod Pavffipn, 
Fishguard. 320 CeetRx 
4.27 Regionat news. 

4J0 The Roman Holidays. 
Cartoon series set In 
andentRome tsaiMdL 
Drama serial about a 
young orphan girt who, 
mis afternoon, admits to 
Klara that she is home- 
' sick. ftSulO Fame. More 
dramas concerning the 
students and staffof New 
York's School for the 


Beys*- 

dieXeik u 


ace 

all 



* 


>fc «“ 
r *«' 

W lv 

r-- • * •* 

dm 
■»* 


■ 

;i Vv.-.r. 

1 K~. : 

n- 

C ; r v - 6J0 NewswitiTNi 

V >. Wttchefl and Frances 

■“ Coverdale. Weather. 

-■Vi- &35 London Plus presented by 
Raul Barry, Lmda Mitchell 
r and Caroline R^hton, • 

— ' 74» Vintage Morecwnbe end 

■" - Wise ? Eml8 Wise - 

Introduces a show from ■ . 

"• . the Sixties in which he and 

Eric were Joined by Susan' 

* Maughan and The Mika 

v Samms Singers. . 

, 7 jfl EastEnders. Hannah, in 

r her concern for Cassie, 

falls foul of Pauline and 
Arthur: end Lofty asks - 
■' v * Den’s advice about 

• , honeymoons. (Ceefax) 

8J)0 Juliet Bravo. Inspector v 
Kate Longton has trcaibte 
in tee shape of a gang • 

disguised as a sraotmg 
* - . • party who take a bank - 

.manager’s wife 
-- ■ Starring Anna- - 
• and Simon Wrfflaroa-ir) • 
...... : . (Ceefax)- .... . 

IL50 Pointe of View- Barry 
Took takes anoteer^p „ 
le BBC’s- ‘ 
aOONews with Jul 
and Andrew Ha 
Regional news i 
weather. 

920 Film; 

Karen 

John Getz and Vincent 
’ Gardenia. A made-for- 

tatawMontbdtoraboifta 
New Yoritpofioewoman 
7Z* .who, although she only . 

joined the force to obtain 
^ the department’s mecScal 

... . coverage for her sick 

V son. becomes one of . 

their top undercover 
> officers. But when she is 

' given the job of trapping 

a vicious rapist her sense ' 
of priorities come Into 
conflict Directed by 
SandorStem. 

*'■ = 1120 The Taste of Health. The 
second programme in 
' Judith Hanifs guide to 
healthy cooking, (r) 

11.25 Rhoda. When Joe starts to 
extol the hostess virtues 

- i of his ex-wife, Rhoda 
becomes agitated, (r) ■ 

■ 1120 Weather. - 




X 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good 

presented by tfBw Morris 
and Anneka Rice. News 
with Gordon Honeyoombe 

at 620, 720, 720, LOO, 
820 and 920; sport at 
820 and 726s exercises at 
L% cartoon at 725; pop 
music at 726. 

JL46 WacKiay fntrcxfoced by 
Tkrtrov MalletL 


ITV- LONDON 


926 Thames news headlines 
tofowed by World Chets 

ChmnpkmsMD. A repeat 

... 

of the day’s 
Kasparov arid Karpov. 

940 Straggle Beneath the Sea. 
10.1 OJayce and the - 
Wheeled Warriors: 
Animated seance fiction 
series 1020 Galactiea 80. 
Troy and Dfllon are set up 
. as targets for a Russian 
killer sat^Re. Starring .. 
Lome Greene and Kent 
McCord 1120 
. Courageous Cat Cartoon. 

1120 AboutBrttain. Robbie 
Shepherd eomtores the 
east coast of Scotland 
fishing port. Stonehaven. 

1220 Jamie and the Mag ic 
Torch. {1)12.10 Rammr. 
Learning made 
entertaining with the help 
of puppets, (r) 1220 The 
SuMvane. Drama serial 
about an Australian famRy 
during the Forties. . .. 

1.00 NewsatOne with Leonard 
"■ Parkfo 120 Thames news 
presented by. Robin 
Houston. 120 Tucker's 
Witch. The husband and ■" 
wife detective team 
investigate a missing 
. persons case. 

220 University ChaBenge 
IntemaHeiML The second 
in tee series of three 
University of 
Auckland arid Jesus . 
Cortege, Oxford. 

Presented by Bamber 


John Bfy and Henry 
Sandon assess pieces erf ■ 
. English porcelain. 

a w Thames news headfines 
320 The Young Doctors. 
Medteal drama series set 
tee to y Australian city 

420 Jamie and the MS(tic 
■ Torch. A repeat of the 
programme shown at 
nooa 4.10 The Moomin a. 

. Cartoon series .420 
inspector Gadget. The 
first of a new series of - 
- cartoons featuring the 
fearless detective 4^5 • 

' Splash. Nino Ftretto goes 
behind the scenes at 
heaforow Airport 

5.15 Survival: A Leap In the- - 
Dark. The breeding 
season for the frogs and 
toads of East Africa. 

545 News 620 Thames news 
with Trida Ingrams and 
John And rew. 

025 Cr oss re eds. 

720 Em me r dal e Farm. Is Joe 
Sugden helping or • - ■ ■ 
hindering Oifford 
Longtoom? 

720 Name That Tune. Musical 


. . — ft--- . 

8.00 tets me pooel Athtedcs,. 

from; 


comaientatocs are Alan , 
Thirty, Steve Ovett arid 
peter Matthewi- " 
Ternittriued Od Chsboer ^ 



Hammer investigates tee 
deete of a frierxf s sis ter. 
Starring Stacy Keach. 
1020 News at Ten and weather 
followed by Thames news 
headfines. . 

10.30 Rrst Tuesday: Twifight Hi 
Befize Is tee story of an 
elderly Bigish lady who 
has spent ner fife in the 
Belize Jungle- (see 
Choice); Good VRmtfons - 
is the story of Evelyn 
Giennto, a profoundly deaf 
young lady who has 
passed out of the Royal 
Academy of Music with 
flying colours. . 

Ham me r House of 
Mystery and Suspense: 
Tennis Court. The tala of a 
couple who move into a 
Victorian house that bkfes 
an evil past Starring Peter 
Graves and Harm ah 
Gordon, (r) 

Nigh* Thought* from Pip 
Wilson. 


1120 


1225 



Dorothea Shaw: First Tuesday, 
on ITV, 1020pm 


• TWILIGHT IN BELIZE, 

Peter Kos min sky's salute to 
eccentricity which takas up 

half of this month's First Tuesday 

(fTV.l 0.30pm) -the , 
remainder is devoted to Nick 
Gray's film about the deaf 
percussionist Evelyn Glennie, 
already the subject of an 
Bxceiierrt RacSo 4 documentary - 
has more to do with 
escapoiogy than escapism. 
Dorothea Shaw, for reasons 
not property explained beyond a 
vague explanation that she ... 
felt she never reafly belonged. 

I .fled the family nest in 
Scunthorpe in the early 1 940s, 

and fetched up In a bamboo 

hut In the middle of a Central 
American jungle. The mod 
cons are conspicuously absent 

The WC is a sllttrencb, the 
cooker is the metal part of an old 
tony wheel, and the laundry is 


the plastic bucket taken down to 
the local river. Social 
Intercourse is miromaWaHy 
contact with a hen. two 
roosters and sundry dogs and 
cate, and the occasional visit 
from a helpful American 
gentleman who delivers her 
supplies from faraway Befize City 
(up the river, and through the 
rain forests) and is rewarded for * 
his pains with the greeting : 

■Gee. I've got plenty of stuff. You 
needn't have come '. 

Whatever the drawbacks, she 
says, It Is better than living on 
peanut butter in some city. But 
life in Scunthorpe does not 
have to be like that, as we see 
from the glimpses of the 
more conventional existence of 
her younger sister, with her 
brigrt bungalow and electric 


carving knife. Kosminsky's 
vivid counterpointing of the 
sfsters’ rife styles is 
I in the 

which gems from 
recorded to a packed Scunthorpe 
church, are subsequently 
played back in the jungle hut to 
an audience of two - a rooster 
and Dorothea Shaw. 

• Best of tee rest tonight 
part two of Michael Andrews’s 
important ecological 
documentary Vanishing Earth 
(8BC2, 9.55pm), Handel’s 
oratorio Sofomon at the 
Proms ( Radio 3, 7.15), and 
part one of Austin Coates's 
series about his composer 
father Eric Coates, who gave 
light music a good name^ 
long overdue tribute to a master 
of melody. (Radio 2, 9.00pm) 

Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


920 Ceefax. 

525 News summary with - 
subtitles. Weather. 

520 White Horses. Robin and 
Louefta Hanbisy-Tertison 
continue their journey on 
horseback from the 
Camargue to their 
ComwaS farm, (r) 

820 No Limits. Anew series of 
tee rock show begins to 
Scarborough where 
presenters Jenny Powell 
and Tony Baker meet 
Steve Wftnwood and 
encounter Count Dracuia. 
820 Off the Record. Andy 
Kershaw talks to Victoria 
. Wood about her record 
collection, (r) 

720 Fat Man frithe Kitchen. 
Tom Vernon prepares the 
dafights of Pakistani 
bunm-tots evening. 

Among the mouth- 
watering dishes are 
nargtsiskofta, a curried 
version of scotch egg; and 
a chick pea and potato 
dish, aak> chani. 

720 Questions of defence. ' 
Part four of John Barry's 
history of Nato examines 
the five year debate which 
led to Nato’s adoption. In 
1967, of the flexible 
response strategy. 

820 WHdife Showcase: 

Colony Z. A 
reconstruction of the 
summer of 1940 when 
Lance Richdale. a New 
Zealand schoolteacher, 
escaped tee rigours of the 
Second Worid War to 
spend time with a penguin 
colony on the Otago 
Peninsula- It was tee 
fourth summer he had . 
spent with the yeflow-eyed 
creatures and during that 
time he banded them and 
kept detaied records. But i 
the summer of 1 940 was 
special for Richdale 
because it was the last 
time his favourite, ah old 
male he had tagged Z12, 
was together with his 
mate,Z1l5. 

825 Tancho. The story of the 
crane. Narrated by Derek 
Joqes.(r) 

820 Steam Days. In this, the 
fifth programme of MDbs 
— “VsseriBSOnthe 
. at steam trains, he 

his'attentiorito the 

Great Western RaHway. At 
BristofaTemple Mead 
station hemeete the Iran - 
Duke, the firstexpress 

’tofakeWctorian • ■ 
nakeretothe 

RNfeNi. and then 

takes a rkstaJ^c trip to 
Torbay. 

920 George W eah lngtqn. The . 
final partof the serial 
about the first President of 
the United States. It Is now 
1 780 a nd tee War of 

marching north from 
Georgia and General 
Clinton holds New York for 
the British. 

925 VanfetitogEaritLlhls 
second and final part of a 
Natteal World special 
focuses on water, 
something with which the 
United States has a 
problem along wtth most 
of tee Third World. 

Narrated by Sue 
MacGregor. (Ceefax) 

1020 Newsniglit. 1125 
Weather. 

1140 Open University: 

Manpower Sendees and 
the School. Ends at12.ia. 


CHANNEL 4 


225 Ffcrc SmBa* Through* 
(1932) starring Norma 
Shearer, Frewic March 
and Leslie Howard, 
(tomantic drama about an 
orphan drl who falls In 
love with the son of a 
murderer. Directed by 
Sidney Ffankfin. 

420 Maaoo Beets the Heat A 
cartoon in which the 
myopic Mr Magoo 
mistakes the desert for the 
beach. 

420 Dandn 1 Days. The disco, 
Dancin' Days, is 
relaunched to greet 
acclaim. 

520 Bewitched. When 
Samantha defends her 
husband against h er - 
mother's claim that he is 
vain, Endora casts a speH 
tumbg Darrin into tee 
. wortd^ most self-centred 
man. 

520 Pets in Particular. In this 
week's eefition Lesley ' 
Judd and James Aflcock 
discover why pigeons, 
fancy and racing, are k 
pets for a lot of people 
(Oracle) 

820 Remington Steele. The 
second and final part of 
the adventure in which 
Laura and Remington 


ideal 

nannlB. 


investigate the death of a 
young-Mexican boy found 
on Laura's doorstep... 
Starring Stephanie 
ZimbaMt and Pierce 
Brosnan. 

625 Murun Buc he tene an gur. 
Adventtees of a revolting 
creature that fives ina 
cracked sink. 

720 Channel Four News. 

720 Comment Wrth her views 
on a topical subject is 
Corina Flamma-Sherman, 
an artist and musician. 
Weather. 

820 Brooluida. Amabels cals 
Paul's bluff; and the police 
charge a man with Snefia’s 
rape. 

820 The Wine Prey a m me. In 
part two of her series 
Janos Robinson visits 
teree English winemakers 

produces his wine to the . 
Thames Valley; AJastalr 
. . Robertson makes port in 
' Portugal’s Duoro Valley; ■ 
and former advertising • 

! man John Dunkfey has • 
fulfiRed his life's dream 
' and is making wine to 
Tuscany, (r) 

920 Intern ati onal A lM atl ce 
The Kodak Classic 
" meeting between Great 
; Britan and the 
- Commonwealth. 

(continued from ITV) 

1020 The Way They Were. A 
compilation of cSpe from 
tee controversial late night 
rock series first shown ten 
years ago, So it Goes. The 
programme was the 
starting point for many 
popular groups and many 
of them are seen tonight 
including The Sex Pistols 
and Blonde. 

1120 The Max H e a droom Show 
featuring Roger Daltroy. 

1125 Tbo Close For Comfort 
American comedy series 
about an over-protective 
father and his two 
daughters, Sara and 
Jackie, who five in the 
apa rt men t be l ow We. TWi 
week, father discovers 
contraceptive pfifs to 
Sara's cupboard who she 
is away for the weekend. 
Sta rring Ted Knight Ends 


( Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. VHF variations at 
end. 

525 Shipping. 620 News briefing; 
Weather. 6.10 Farnitog. 

825 Prayer Ts) 

620 Today, ind 620. 720, 

820 News, 645 
Business News. 625. 725 
weateer.720. 820 
News. 720 Letters. 725. 

825 Spwt 745 Thought 
for the Day. 

843 Lake Wobegon Days. 

827 Weather; Travel. 

920 News 

9.05 Tuesday Call: 01-580 
4411. 

1020 News; From Our Own 
Correspondent. Lite and 
pofitics abroad. 

1020 Morning Story: The Last 
Pub in tee Docks, by 
John Harrison. Reader 
Phlip Rowlands. 

1045 Daly Service (New Every 
Morning, page 97) (s) 

1120 News; Travd; Thirty 
Minute Theatre. Cess 
and Tot. by James Robson. 
Story oi two refuse 
collectors turned grave* 
diggers. With Derek 
Smith and John Branwell (s) 
1123 The Living World. 

Presented by Peter 
France. 

1220 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer advice with 
Pattie CoWwefl. 

1227 Brain ot Britain 1986. 

First semi-final. London 
and South (s). 1225 
Weather Travel 

1.00 The world at One: News 
140 The Archers. 125 

220 SSShm* SHOUT. 

With Sue MacGregor. 

320 News; The Afternoon 
Play. WiH and Lou's Boy, 
by Rose Tremain. With 
Jonathan Tatter. Bryan 
Pringle and Rosemary 
Morale (s) 

420 News 

425 Soundings. Satan and afi 
his Works. Ted Harrison 
examines what the Church 
under s tands about evil (r) 

420 Welsh Arts Week: Crw 
Man and Ns Choirs. 

Brian Kay talks to Richard 
WUiams and members of 
his choirs In Tonyretal. 

520 PM. News magazine. 

520 Shipping. 525 
Weather. ■ - - 

6.00 News; Financial Report 
620 Counterpoint Musical 

knowledge quiz chaired 


7 00 j5£jJj dShBn1n(sJW 
725 The Archers 
720 Too Hot to Handle. Gerry 
Davis presents a 
s e l ection of popular music 
on radio which has 
caused eyebrows to be 
raised over the past 50 


LOO South East Europe 
Journey. Julian Hate 
examines tee Greek 
Orthodox Church. 

820 The Tuesday Feature: 
The Man. the Dog and 
the Worm Within. Geoff 
Watts visits Brecon to 


men who own dogs 
which eat sheep which have 
the worm. 

920 In Touch. For people with 
a visual handicap. 

920 Writers on Blue Paper. 
Grandma's Earrings, I 


945 


Mita Mukhopadhyay. 
by Shireen Shalt 
Welsh Arts Week: Gvi 


Arts Week: Gwyn 
Thomas— anew 
Reputation. Professor Dal 
Smith says the time has 
come to celebrate the 
writer's literary 
achievement 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: 

Under a Monsoon Cloud, 
by H R F Keating (7). Read 
by Sam Dastor. 1029 
Weather. 

1020 The World Tonight 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1120 Liszt at the Keyboard. 

John Amis explores the 
composer's achievements. 
1220 News. 1223 
Shipping. 

VHF (avaKabie in England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except 525220am Weather; 
TraveL 125220pm 
Listening Comer. 5.50-525 
PM (continued). 1120- 
12.10am Open University. 
1120 Open Fonmc 
University Magazine. 1120 
Social Sciences: 

Sovereignty. 

( Radio 3 ) 

On medium wave. VHF variations at 

end 

625 Weather. 7.00 News 

725 Concert Grieg fin 
Autumn overture), 

Beethoven (Duo in E flat 
Prim rose/Feuarm arm). 

• Schubert (Impromptu in A 
..flat, D 899 No 4: . 

Horowitz, piano), Wteniawski 
(Violin Concerto No 2: 


Stem/New York 
Philharmonic SO). 820 
News 

825 Concert (contd): Muffat 
(Concerto Grosso in E 
minor Cantilena), Sor 
(Variations on theme by 
Mozart. Op 9: Bream, 
guitar), Turma (Santana 
Santa. Lorengar, soprano), 
Respighi (The Beds 
suite).. 920 News 
9.05 This Week's Composer 
Brahms. Die Mainacht 
Op 43 Noi Sormtag, Op 47 
No3. withScMotz. 
tenor), and Piano Concerto 
No 1 performed 
Rubnsteto/Ch 
Teacher and! 


moo 


Hnsteto/ChteagoSO 
Brand Pupil: SNO 
Gibson. Rlmsky- 


byRul 
Tead 

under Gibson. Rimsky- 


Korsakov (Mlada suite), and 
Stravinsky (Symphony in 
E flat Op 1) 

1025 BBC Northern Singers: 
with Peter Noke and 
Helen Knzos (pianos). Works 
by Mendelssohn 
(including Andante and 
Variations in B flat Op 

' Liebeslteder, Op is) 

1120 Pied Piper the late David 
Munrow on the life and 
songs of Robert Schumann 

and Clara (r) 

12.10 BBC Phflharmonic (under 
Downes), with Ernst 
Kovacic (violin). Part one. 
Lutaslawski (Funeral 
Musk:), Stravinsky (Orpheus 
bafist music). 120 News 
125 Concert part two. 

Dvorak (Violin Concerto) 

140 Guitar Encores: Costas 
Cotsroks plays works by 
Ariel Ramirez. Ratael 
Duchasne. Jose Quinton. 
Edmundo Vasquez and 
Pablo Escobar 
ZOO Bach: St Matthew 
Passion. Raglan 
Baroque Players (under 
Nicholas Kraemar). wtto 
London Oratory Junior Choir 
and TaMs Chamber 
Choir. With soloists Wynford 
Evans ( as Evangelist}, 
'Booth-Jones. van der Skns. 
Cable, Wlnstede. and 
Davenport. Part two at 3-15. 
News at 425 

520 Mainly for Pleasure: with 
Jeremy Stepmarm 
620 The Flowering of Italian 
Lute Music: Christopher 
Wilson and Tom Rnucane 
play works by Giovanni 
Antonio Terzi, Girolamo 
Kapsberger, Atessando 
Pi can mi, and Michelangelo 
Galite* 

720 Proms 86: Handel s 
Solomon. With Choir and 
Orchestra of the English 
Concert (under Pin nock), 
and soloists Palmer, 
McLaughlin. Auger, Ian 
Caley. Stephan Roberts, 
Defia Jones and Jennifer 
Smith. Act one 


8.10 Handel: Organ Concerto 
toBf!atOp7No1 
(Simon Preston with English 
Concert under Pinnock) 


820 Proms 8 B: part two. 
Second act of Handel’s 
Solomon 

9.15 Handel: Organ Concerto 
in D minor. Op 7 No 4 
(Preston/ Eng6sh Concert) 

925 Proms 86: third act of 
Solomon 


1020 Crossi 


the Riven 
; Major 


Wiley and Trevor Laird play 
the sister and two 
brothers m tha short play by 
Caryl Phillips 

1045 Albion Ensemble: Elfott 
Carter (Quintet), 

Macon chy (Wind Quintet) 
11.15 Bournemouth Smfomelta 

K r Andrew Litton).. 

eissohn (Symphony No 
1). 1127 News. 12.00 
Closedown. 

VHF only: - 

625 Open university. Until 
6.55am. Modem art 
Vortfcism. 

C Radio 2 ) 

News on file hour. Headlines 
520 am. 620. 720. 820. Sports 
Desks 125 pm. 222, 322. 4.02, 
5.05. 622. 6.45 (mf only). 9.55. 
Cricket Scoreboard 7.30 pm. 

420 am Cohn Berry 520 Ray 
Moore 720 Derek Jameson 920 
Teddy Johnson 11.00 Jimmy 
Young ind medical questions 
answered by Dr Mike Smith 
1.05 pm Dawd Jacobs 225 Gloria 
Hunnrtord 320 David Hamilton 
525 John Dunn 720 Denis Lots 
presents ... The BBC Radio 
Orchestra. 920 Enc Coates King 
of Light Music (new senes) 

Written and narrated by his son, 
Austin Coates. (1), 1020 Non- 

Stop Stotz. (Stutz Bear Cats) 1020 


Sloe Coaches starring Roy 
Kinnear and Andrew Sachs 
Round Midnight 1.00 am 

Mghtride 320*420 

Music. 


1120 


ALfttle Night 


C Radio 1 ) 

News on the half-hour from 
620 am untd 820 pm then at 1020 
end 1220 midnight 
520 am Adrian John 7.00 Mike 
Smith's breakfast Show S.30 Simon 
Bates 11.00 Radio i Roadshow 
from Aberystwyth 1220 pm 



Newsbeat (Frank Partri 
Simon Mayo, ind at 620, Top 
40 singles /20 Janice Long 1020- 
12.00 John Peel. VHF Stereo 
Radios 1 8 2:- 420 am As Radio 2. 
1020 pm As Radio 1. 1220- 
420 am As Radio 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 

620 Newsdesk 620 Couitorpoim 720 

News 7.09 Twenty-Four Hours 720 Tha 

PanicUtar Place 7.45 Network UK 820 

News 629 Reflemww 8.15 Even Day A 

Hoty Day 820 Aspects of Lmt 920 News 

926 Review ot Bntsh Press 9.15 Worid 
Today 920 Fkianoal News M0 Look 

Ahead 9145 What s New 1020 News 1021 

Windows on the Universe 1120 News 

1129 News About Britain 11.15 Wave- 

1125 A Letter From Scotland 1120 

1220 Radio Newsreel 12.15 

B > Natural Kilers 1245 Sports 

p 120 News 129 Twenty-Four 

Hours 120 Network UK 1.45 Recording OT 

the Week 220 Outlook 225 PMNp Jones 
Brass Ensutnble 3.00 Radio Newsreel 

3.15 A Jody Good St»w 420 News 429 

CORvnematy 4.15 Omrabus 525 Spoils 

Round Up 725 Report on Rellgkxi 820 

News 829 Ttoemy-Four Hows 820 

Omribus 920 News 901 On The Bax 9.10 

Book Choice 9.15 Proms 86 1020 News 

1009 Worid Today 1025 A Letter From 

Scotland 1020 Financial News 1040 

Reflections 10 j* 5 Sports Round Up 11.00 

News 11.09 Commentary 11.15 New 

Waves on Shortwave 1120 Recruiting 

Natural Krttors 1220 News 1229 News 

About Britain 12.15 Redo Newsreel 1220 

Omnibus 120 News 121 Outlook 120 

Report on Religion 1.45 Country Style 

220 News 229 Review of British Press 

2.15 Tenor and Bantone 220 Mystery of 

the Blue Tram 320 News 329 News 

About Britain 3.15 Worid Today 425 

Reflectors 420 Financial News 520 

News 529 Twenty-Four Hours 525 Wtxld 

Today. AN times mfiMT. 


_ i Today 

B2S-7207hs Firestones 1120- 7T7-. 
1125 News and weatherSCOTLANfr • ■ 
12.45po»-120 Decades 625-720 
Reporting Scottand 1120 - 1120 Three's 
Company 1120-1125 The Taste of 
Heteft 1125-1220 Wetowr NORIMBM 
■BAND 420420 Heidi 420426 
Fame 5 952 . 40 Today's Sport 540426 
ktskla Ulster 126-720 The Roman . 
Holidays 112CMT25News and wmtter 
BtoUNO 626pm-720 Regional 

news msgarine* 

&50-1U0 FBm: Rockets Galore 

120 News 
6.15- 

Crossroads 

825-720 News 920-1020 
Brideshaad Revisited 1120 The Doors 
are Open 1220aaiJobfinder 120 
Closedown. 

ANGLf A A* London except 
— ■ ■ ■ aasem Sesame Street 
1020 Gatoon 1B2S Gtenroe 1120- 
1120 Once U pon aTbne - . . Man 
12J0pm-1 20 Gardens for All 1-20- 
120 News &152A5 Emmerdale Farm . 


620-625 About Anglia 720-720 MeH 
5 My Girl 920-102uBndesheed RevWt- 
ad 1120TJ Hooker 1225am TUes-M 


day Topic. Ctoaadown. 

About Britain 1020 Gurkhas oi Nepal 

1020 Granada Reports 1025-1220 
Roses Cricket 12Afcm-100 Cricket 120 
Granada Reports 120-220 Cricket 
320-4200ScetS.155A5CriCket620- 
625 This is Yoiv Right 920-1020 

Brideshaad Revisited 1120 Man in a 
Suitcase 1220am Closedown. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


YORKSHIRE 

end the Wheeled Wantora 950 Stmt 
Story 10.15 Cartoon 1025 About Britain 
10JW-1220 Roses Cricket 1220pm- 
120 LuncfitkneUva 120 News 120-220 
Cricket 328-420 OrScket 5,15-525 

Cricket 6.00-625 Calendar 920-1020 

Brideahaed Reristed 1120 Mann's 
Best Friend 1220 Stow Express 
1220am Closedown. 

World ot Stories' 1126-1120 Ride 

120pm News 120-230 The Baron 
5.15-5X5 Me A kty GM 820-625 News 
920-1020 Bridwtoao Revated 

11.30 Mwt tnaSUtcasa 1220am 

Ctosedwm. 


HTV WALES 

Sesame Street 620pmwSfe at So. 


SCOTTISH 

ons 10.15 Adventures of Rexy 1025 

Cartoon 1025 Gtenroe 1120 Jacksons 

1 125-1 120 Cartoon 1220pm-120 

Gardening Tmts 120 News 12tKL30 
Man in a stitcass 320-420 Sons 

and Dauamers 5.15-&46 Emmerdate 

Farm 820-BJ5 News and Scotland 

Today 720-720 Take The High Road 
920-1020 Bndeshead Rews&d 
1120 Late Call 1125 Simon and Sknon 
1220am Cfoaedown. 


iORreasyssss&« 

1025 FeNx the Cat 1020 Roboatwy 
11 20-1120 One* Upon a Tfena . . . Man 
120 News ±30-420 Sons 

525445 Mpand MyGaf 
Look around 920-1020 
Bridashead Revisited 1120 Mann’s Best 
Friend 1220 Ctosadown. 

CHANNEL 

1020 Jack Hofeom 1025 Cartoon 

1120-1120 Captain Scarier 120pm 
News 120-220 Country Practice 

5.1S-5A5 Sons and Daughters 62Q 

Charmei Report 6.15 Guernsey Tom 

62IHL35 Action Rtplsy 920-1Q20 

Bridashead Revisited 1120 Myster- 

ies of Edgar Wallace 1225am 
Closedown. 

T\/S Lorxkxi except: 92Sam 

Sesame Strew 1020 Jack HoL 

bom 1025 Cartoon 1120-1120 Cap- 

tain Scarlet 120pm News 120-230 
Country Practice 5.15-5A5 Sons and 
Daughters 620 Coast K> Coast 62S-625 
PoBca 5 920-1020 Bridatoaad Re- 
visited 1120 Mysteries of Edgar Wallace 
1225am Company. Ctosadown. 

TSyu As London except 926am 
Sesame Streef 1025 Capwn 
Scariet 1020 Max The Mouse 1120- 
1120 Connect] ons I220pm-120 Leave ft 
To Mrs O'Bnen 120 News 120-220 

Hart to Hart 329-420 Sons and Daujh 

MR 5.15 Gus Honeybun 520-5.45 
Crossroads 620 Today South West 625 
Televiews 625-720 Carson's Law 
920-10.00 Brtdesnead Revisited 1120 
Postscript Diary 112S Mann's Best 

Friend 1226am Closedown. 


G**m ms&sXto* 

Thlnfl 920 Once Upon A Time 9JH 
Sesame Street lOtel.Short Stoty.11-16- 
1120 Smurfs I220pm-120 Garden- - 
ing Tarn 120 News 120-220 Family 
Theatre 5.15-5A5 Emmerdale Farm 


t220am News, Closedown. 

Sesame Street 1050 Groovte 
Ghouies 11.15-1120 Cartoon 120pm 

Umcfttime 120-220 Ch^s 320-420 

Dreams 5.15-525 Joan w Loves Chachl 
820 Summer Edtoon 620 Dtary 
Dates 620-625 Cartoon 920-1 020 
Brideshaad Revisitea 1 120 The 
boors Are Ope" l&25am Closedown. 

S4C Starts 120pm Dancm' Days 
120 Alice 220 GutO GOCh A 
Malwan 2.15 Intarval 220 Eisteddfod 
320 tntennl 420 Sons of Abraham 420 
Bewitched 520Pappno520Car54, 
Where Are You ? 620 Looks Farmfiar 8A5 
Lert Panel Frangla® 720 
Newyddlon Satih720 Hwy) YrWylB.45 
Bsteddfod 10.15 Athletics 11.15 Max 
Headroom Show 1120 FHm: Hidden 
Hand 1225am Closedown. 

nWEHES—S-^ 

&30 Sesame Street 1025 New 
Squadronax»10A5-ll20 Lithe House 
on the Prairie 120pm News 125 
Lookaround 120-220 Gibraltar. Rock of 
Apes 320220 Cncket 5.15-545 
Cricket 620825 Northern Life 920- 
1020 Brideshaad Revisited 1120 
The Doors we Open 1220am The Eyas 
Hav® H. Closedown. 


E53TEK1AINMENIS 


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8891. Toon T.«5 to kw r •* 
St Mwto to thi rto M s . M> 
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Levine. Jonathan Rees. Briony 
Shaw, imikis. 


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•MYAM - YBTIBU; A« 
TODAY - A M EMMfHN’. 

OaUy lOsnrepm. July 30 to 
Austin io. Crane H eU. 
Otympta. AAaMoo FREE- A 
i amity cxhWUon an about 
Saudi Arams. tnerudingsMctBl 
pvcm* for children. 


SLA 

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pmenu YOUHO ausrreM un- 
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fca n % Rtn* Ol 8M 2699 for 
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with the London Ptmharmonk: 
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OUT. PoasiMe reruras only. 
BOX Ofriff 02Z5 812411 






ROYAL PCrftVALHAU.^M 

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LONDON FESTIVAL 

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11-16 AOtn 


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THEATRES 


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MSS C(V Sales 900 6123 FM 
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MG BBNAMP IWIE BERT 8 


ALDWTCH THE ATRE 01-836 
6404/0641 CC 01-379 62S3 


“40 -vspoM marvel" Times 

ANNIE GET YOURGUN 

From the CMcneeter Festival 
Theatre 
Stamn o_ _ 

BUD QUATRO 

“Ltoht** up the nWt -. the mote 
dazzJine west Ena detmt — 
har te dmr" O-TM 
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E 437 2663 

430 3598 First Can 01-240 7300 
THUUMBcr CC 379 6433 
Mon-Frf 8.00 Sal 4.30 & 8.16 

“MASTERU" F.T. 


-MAO&nC£NT~ OJvtair 

Vrinmr. 1986 Tony Award But 
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STARLIGHT EMPRESS 

-A MUSICAL THAT SURPASSES 

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RREAWte Trevor S?2SEl 

Wed A Taur THE tiEftoMBW 

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0343 781312 

MM EVRE/TME MUM! 

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01-930 

2S78. CC 741 9994. rtrri Ml 
34 nr 7 day CC 240 7200. rap 
Sales MO 6125 Mon-Frl 8.00 
Sal 6.00 A 846 

THE GAMBLER 

W BflCVYtS. GOODY A WITH 
A comedy aocKal wim 

MEL SMTTH ■. 

worn GOODY PETER BREWS 
PINUP DAVIS PAUL BOWK 

-A moowric nentre Wte On 
-Mtwriy *lwaW« F.T 



’ 928 2233 CC 
■National Thaatrfr* man aum- 
U»Ouml Previews Toni 72a 
Opens Toroor 7.0 0. Th a r 7jq 
Then Aua 138 16TKMRM- 
CAN CLOCK By Arthur Miner. 


Ah- pond S930 3216 
.7379 


CC 379 3363/379 6433/741 
9999 Ores S36 3962. eves s.oa 
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RUN FOR YOUR WFE! 

WrlUen and directed by 
RAY COONEY 

Over 1400 II 1 1 a m % perte 

^SHOULD RUN FOA UF**’ S. EX 


BOUBIBON TMEAIBE Bg Office 
01 880 8848/01 636 8338/9 OT 
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to PAV E CtA BKV | 

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AS 'THE ROCK STAR* 
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FORTUNE (Air Cond) S CC 836; 
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JANE ROGER 

LAPOTAIRE ■ REES 
DOUBLE DOUBLE 

-A csaaric of Wtxxlunttry as 


un&rateMe- Tiroes E Sore. 
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meat s 836 4401 cc sn 

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8ko fee let call za hr 240 7200. 
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Wed 3 sal a. 

Andrew Lloyd Wensrr PreoiB 


LEND ME A TENOR 

. **A HRfllRNBP TOT»o 
-FILLS THE THEATRE WTTH 
THE -SOUND OF LAUGHTER” 
& Exs 

Ait American Comedy ny 
Km Ludwig 

Directed tv David Cflmofe 



C ai« >r Time* k> fw 

raiittiamt contest re 

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HAMP S T EA D 722 9301. Cure 8. 
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Anrrie ter 1*84 

BEST MUSICAL 

STAMMRD DRAMA AWARDS 

voted 

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Wl Comedy tty Richard Harris 
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youwLrr 


SRAY-TO 

AT" D Tet 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR! 


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JACK LEMMON 

LONG DAYS JOURNEtf 
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Directed By Jonathan Miner 
Eaw only MoDSar 720 


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ew — BLAHELV 

-A brilliant ft tuyoatty 
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In 

Tue Nanonai Theatre* aedatmed 
production of 

ALAN AYCKROURNTS 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

• H e a rtbreak! r>tfy runny” Gdn 
-Hllanous — - a Times 
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men men Auo22 io 28 RRIOH* 
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■ATFAOt S CC 629 3036. Moo- 
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THE BUSINESS OF 
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THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OKRA 

Starring 


Sarah Steve 

Britfilman Barton 

Mwx t>y AMOftCW LLOYD 


uorrno ear RICHARD 
8T7LGOE ft CHARLES HART 
Directed try HAROLD PRINCE 
Opera 9 Oct. 


HOWS HEAD 286 1916. Until 
Aua 16 Dar 7. snow Smn. 
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TUESDAY AUGUST 5 1986 


Botham reaffirms 
hero’s place in 
Somerset hearts 


WESTON-SUPER-MA RE: 
Worcestershire, with all sec- 
ond-innings wickets in hand, 
lead Somerset by 109 runs. 

Ian Botham, playing his 
first championship innings 
since his two-month ban from 
county cricket, returned to his 
most flamboyant form here 
yesterday. 

Botham, overlooked by the 
selectors for Thursday's sec- 
ond Test against New Zealand 
at Trent Bridge, hit a century 
in only 65 balls as Somerset 
declared at 2S6 for four in 73.4 
overs. 

The England all-rounder, 
who was suspended by the 
Test and County Cricket 
Board for his drug-taking 
revelations in a Sunday news- 
paper. had seven sixes and 10 
fours in his 64-minute 
innings. 

When Peter Roebuck, the 
Somerset captain, declared, 
Botham had scored 104 out of 
123 in IS overs during an 
unbroken fifth-wicket stand 
with Nigel Felton, who fin- 
ished with 52 not out 

Botham, who has missed all 
this summer's Tests because 
of his suspension, which 
ended last Friday, came in 
when Somerset were 163 for 
four. He soon lifted Patel over 
mid-wicket and mid-off for 
two boundaries in one over. 

Botham then accelerated, 
sweeping and driving Patel for 
two sixes in one over, one 
landing on the roof of the 
press box. 

He took 18 in one over from 
Radford, a straight drive and a 
hook going for sixes, and 
reached 50 in 37 balls with 
four sixes and three fours. 
Soon afterwards, Felton 
reached his fifty in 124 balls 
with a six and four fours. 

Worcestershire tried to slow 
Botham's run-scoring by plac- 
ing seven men on the bound- 


By Out Sports Staff 

ary. but this did not hamper 
him.He reached his century 
and then hit the next ball for 
four before Roebuck declared. 

Earlier Roebuck himself 
had made 68, including a 
straight drive for six off Patel, 
before being caught at extra 
cover. 

Worcestershire were 16 for 
nought in their second innings 
when rain stopped play. 

• There is no denying who is 
still the hero in Somerset 
hearts (Alan Gibson writes). It 
was a fine morning at Weston, 
giving way to a cloudy after- 

WORCESTERSHflE; First Innings 379 for 
4 (lac (D M Smith 165 not out, P A Neale 
70, T S Curts 64: Bowing: Gamer 13-3- 
37-1: Davis 11-3-55-1: Botham 20-3-70-1; 
Coombs 24-3-87-1: Marks 33-13-68-0; 
Richards 8-1-41-0: Haitian 3-04-0). 
Second Innings 

T S Curts not out 6 

D B D'OSvetra not out 9 

Extras (nt> 1) 1 

Total (no vrio) 16 

SOMERSET; first Innings 

B C Rose c Patel b Radtoti 8 

■P M Roebuck c Mngworth b Patti - 68 

R J Harden c Rhodes b Radford 10 

I V A Richards b Newport 36 

N A Patton not out — — 52 

I T Botham not out 104 

Extras (10 5, nb 5) ID 

Total (4 wktn dec. 73.4 overs) — 286 
VJ Marks, fT Gam M fl Davts, J Gamer 
and R V J Coombs did not ML 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-6. 2-31. 3-78, 4- 
163. 

BOWUNG: Radford 22-3-77-2; Mdgaon 
10-3-34-0: Newport 13.4-2-75-1; 
USngworth 12-3-40-0; Patel 16-2-56-1. 
Bonn po i nt s. Somerset 4, Worcestar- 
ahre 5. 

Umpires: H □ Bird (R Thome) and J H 
Hampshire. 


noon, and a rainy evening. 
Worcestershire declared at the 
impressive Saturday total of 
379 for four. Somerset pro- 
gressed, during the morning, 
fairly adequately against 
them. Rose was caught at 
square-leg, mis-hitting a ball 
off Radford. Harden, never 
looking happy, edged a ball to 
the wicketkeeper. Roebuck 
was the usual placid anchor- 
man. Richards played a series 
of beautiful strokes without 


ever quite suggesting perma- 
nency. Felton settled in and 
played competently. 

But it was none of these the 
large crowd had come to see, 
not even Richards, currently 
the greatest batsman In the 
world. They had come to see 
Botham score a century, and 
when he came in, at No 6, he 
duly obliged them. It was not, 
perhaps, technically, one of 
his better innings: some bangs, 
and some swishes and some 
bits of luck comprised most of 
it But it spoke volumes for the 
spirit of the man, and made 
one feel that whatever his 
personal faults, we should be a 
poorer side in Australia were 
we to go without him. His eye 
seemed as sure, and his con- 
fidence as supreme, as ever in 
the past 

Roebuck declared, still well 
behind once Botham had 
reached his hundred in a 
laudable attempt to make a 
game of it But soon after- 
wards it rained and then 
rained again, more heavily. So 
it may be difficult to achieve a 
positive result Never mind 
Somerset men here this day 
will be telling their grand- 
children, with accounts lum- 
bered with erroneous detail, of 
the Great Ian's return after 
those London blighters had 
endeavoured to do him down. 

• Botham said later “It could 
not have gone better. That's 
what i do best play cricket I 
have not been on a desert 
island for two years. You 
don't just leave it for two 
months and not be able to play 
when you come back. 

“I played today the same 
way that i do all the time, 
nothing different I just go out 
to bat and enjoy it When it 
comes off I enjoy it and the 
crowd enjoys iL It's my stage, 
it's got me where i am.” 


Brown gives his promise of 
a clampdown on racism 


Tony Brown, die Somerset 
secretary, yesterday promised 
that the county would take a 
strong line on racist agitators 
and drunken spectators at the 
dub's matches, though they 
are instructing players not to 
get personally involved be- 
cause of the risk of being 
attacked and injured. 

His statement follows 
events during Somerset's John 
Player Special League match 
with Worcestershire at Wes- 
ton-super-Mare on Sunday, 
when Viv Richards leapt into 
the crowd to try to identify a 
troublemaker who was s limit- 
ing racist remarks at him. 

Brown said a dose watch 
was being kept for racist and 
drinking problems at Somer- 
set grounds in an attempt to 
preserve the pleasure for 
everyone. He condemned the 
mindless minority whose 
repetitive chanting and ob- 


scene and Insulting behaviour 
spoiled cricket for others, and 
said they would be removed 
from the ground. Players and 
public were being asked to 
help by identifying the trou- 
ble-makers. 

On Sunday, Richards, hav- 
ing been subjected to taunts, 
stepped over the fence when a 
wicket fell and remonstrated 
with the crowd. The response 
was silence, and he returned to 
the field to applause from that 
section of the crowd. “The 
incident was short, but I did 
what I had to do,” Richards 
said yesterday. 

Nine people were charged 
with public order offences 
following disturbances at the 
match. 

• Lancashire yesterday 
apologized to Yorkshire over 
Sunday's incident in which 
Martyn Moxon was the victim 
of obscene abuse from an Old 


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Trafford member. “It was an 
appalling incident and we are 
still trying to find the culprit,” 
said Cedric Rhoades, the Lan- 
cashire chairman. 

• Dickie Bird, the Test match 
umpire, was forced to poll oat 
of the championship match at 
Weston-super-Mare with a 
back problem. Bird said: “I 
tried to last through, but my 
back became worse and was 
impossible to continue.” 

An emergency call was 
made for a qualified umpire 
and Ron Thorne, a local 
official, took over Bird's coat 
He stood at square leg, with 
John Hampshire officiating at 
the bowler's end in the match 
between Somerset and 
Worcestershire. The TCCB 
will provide a replacement 
from the umpire's panel today. 
Thorne has deputized in a 
county match before in similar 
circumstances. 


YACHTING 


Bottomley is 
main choice 
for Britain 

By Barry Pickthall 

Robert BottomJey’s De- 
cosol Car Care headed the 
selectors choice for Britain's 
three-quarter ton cup team 
when the Royal Ocean Racing 
Cub announced the 10 boats 
yesterday to compete in the 
world championship, starting 
in Torbay on August 15. 

Bonomley's Rob Hum- 
phrey's design, a development 
of Jade. Iasi year's one ion cup 
winner, was the convincing 
winner of both offshore races 
during the three weekend 
trials, and having also per- 
formed well in the six inshore 
races, her crew, which include 
David Howlett the Olympic 
helmsman and David Robin- 
son must stan as firm 
favourite to win the series. 

Another promising entry is 
Graham Walker’s Audrien- 
designed Indulgence, which 
was selected despite its failure 


More yachting. Page 26 


to appear in the two onshore 
races. Indulgence was being 
remeasured yesterday after 
801bs was taken out of the keel 
last weekend to reduce the 
yacht’s rating down to the 24.5 
three-quarter ton limit. If her 
crew, which include Eddie 
Warden-Owen. from the Brit- 
ish Americas Cup team, can 
display the winning form in 
four of the inshore trials, they 
too must stand a good chance 
Ranged against them in the 
championship are five entries 
from France, three from Italy, 
two each from Denmark. 
West Germany; and the 
Netherlands, and single en- 
tries from Belgium. Norway, 
South Africa, and Sweden. 
TEAM: Appiecore ( j stater): Sarebonas p 
Edwards): Dscosoi Car Cara (R 
Bottomley): indufoenca (G Walter): Juno 
‘ ‘ Scenario 


Cyrax); Wings or COwtty 


SPORT 


FitstpridiAedhlTSS 


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It?' 




AMERICAN 

FOOTBALL 

Bears hug 
fresh 

converts to 
faith 

With nil the fanaticism that 
only really belongs to late 
converts, Wembley and Brit- 
ain have embraced American 
football as an exciting new 
sporting alternative. 

Chicago Bean, the Soper 
Bow] champions, and Dallas 
Cowboys may have already 
shaken Wembley's sodden 
tnrf from their feet and re- 
turn ed to the United States, 
but memories remain of an 
estatic 82,699 crowd who lost 
all English inhibitions on Sun- 
day and yet remained ns 
wholesome as grandmaw's ap- 
ple pie as the Bears mauled 
the Cowboys 17-6. 

As a marketing exercise it 
raised £2 million. That is twice 
as much as the FA Cop final, 
but wouldn't leave the Bears 
much change out of paying the 1 
annual salaries for William j 
“the Fridge” Perry and Walter I 
Peyton, their two leading play- , 
ers. Nevertheless, the Na- 
tional Football League want 
the American Bowl to become 
an annual Wembley curtain- 
raiser to their season. 

Amid the euphoria gen- 
erated at Wembley, there is 
even talk of London eventually 
raising a club to compete in 
professional gridiron and torn 
it into a Transatlantic com- 
petition. With 70 teams in 
Britain now playing a game 
that was a mystery until three 
year's ago, that dream may 
turn into reality. 

To a background of pure 
showbiz, with the Cowboys' 
cheerleaders whipping up the 
hysteria, Wembley enjoyed an 
occasion which made the 
impending return to football 
about as appealing as a trip to 
the morgue. Football hooli- 
gans would have felt as orach 
out of place as the 22-stone 
“Fridge" would on a weight- 
watchers course. 

The match itself belonged 
mostly to the second-string 
players and rookies who are 
trying to force their way into 
both dab's final draft of 45. 
Even so, the Bears gave ample 
warning that trying to wrest 
away the Super Bowl title may 
prove as difficult as stopping 
“the Fridge” Grom dose range 
to the end zone. Not even seven 
Cowboys could do it on Sun- 
day, while Dave Duerson, the 
safety and later voted most 
valuable player, snapped up a 
fumble for a touchdown that 
ensured the Bears eqjoyed 
their Wembley picnic. 


ATHLETICS 


A family feast to 
follow the fast 

By Pat Botcher, Athletics Correspondent 


The match between the 
United Kingdom and the 
Commonwealth, sponsored 
by Kodak at Gateshead to- 
night, with its non-stop pro- 
gramme of events crammed 
into just over three hours, will 
seem like a feast after the 
fosting of Edinburgh. 

The presence of a dozen top 
athletes from boycotting na- 
tions adds the notion of a 
family reunion. But without 
Cram. Coe, Ovett and Tessa 
Sanderson — who has dropped 
out of an instant return feud 
with Fatima Whitbread — it 
will be a little like the plum 
pudding without the silver 
sixpence. 

At least, there is a prodigal 
son seeking a way back into 
the fold: Allan Wells is run- 
ning in the 100 metres for the 
Commonwealth. The -former 
Commonwealth double sprint 
champion was originally se- 
lected by Scotland for Edin- 
burgh but was dropped after 
consistently missing opportu- 
nities to prove his fitness. 

Wells endured the Games 
from a seat in the stand and 
said: “It was terrible having to 
watch the damn thing. It's up 
to me now to try to pick up the 
pieces." Wells is seeking a 
place in Britain's European 
team for Stuttgart later this 
month. 

He could not have a harder 
trial, for be partners the 
Commonwealth champion, 
Ben Johnson, the fastest man 
in the world this year, and 
Johnson's Canadian col- 
league, Desai Williams,' 
against the United Kingdom 
trio of Elliott Bunney, the 
young pretender to Wells's 
Scottish crown, Lincoln As- 
quith and Clarence Callender. 

Miss Whitbread has taken 
the only sensible approach to 
the rest of her career after what 
was evidently a cataclysmic 
defeat by Miss Sanderson last 
Thursday. Miss Whitbread’s 
soul-searching in front of 
opponents, spectators and 
television millions seems to 
have purged her. She was 
talking animatedly yesterday 
of the motivation to do better 
in the European 
championships. 

“It's a dosed book now” 
she said. “I can't harp on the 
past, otherwise I'd never 
progress in the future. I’m 
only 25 and I've a long time 
ahead of me in the sport. 1 feel 
very confident about the 
European.” 

Zola Budd returns to the 
UK team and is partnered by 
Scotland's only gold medal 


SPORT 


winner, Liz Lynch, who won 
the 10,000 metres. Miss Lynch 
selected that distance as the 
one at which she had the best 
chance of winning a 
Commonwealth title and now 
wishes to be considered for the 
European 3,000 metres. 

She is foster at that distance 
than Yvonne Murray, her 
Scottish colleague, who beat 
Miss Budd over 2,000 metres 
last month. Against Lynne 
Williams and Debbie Bowker, 
who were first and second in 
the 3,000 metres in Edin- 
burgh, this should be the trial 
to prove Miss Lynch's worth 
at the shorter distance. 

There have been selection 
anomalies, which it is to be 
hoped will not be repeated, 

UK teams 

MB*: 100 metre* E Bunney. L 
Asquith, C Callender. 200m: M 
McFartane. S Bakd, M St Louis. 
400m: D Redmond, K Akafausi. B 
Whittle. 1,000m: D Sharpe, S 
Crabbe. Mam T Hutchins, J Boakes, 
J Gladwin. 3400m: T Greene. C 
Thackeray, C Walker. 2,000m 
steeplechase: T Hanlon. N Peach, 
P McColgan. 110m hurdles: W 
Greaves, J Ridgeon, N Walker. 
400m hordes: M Robertson . M 
Hottofi), G Oakes. High jump: G 
Parsons, H Pierre. Pole vault A 
Ashuret K Stock. Long lump: j 
Sheppard, D Brown. Triple ftmip: J 
Herbert M Makm. Shot: B Cole, G 
Saboray. Discus; R Slaney, P 
Mardle. H am mer D Smith, M 
Girvan. Javefin: D Otley. M Hffl. 
WOMEN: 100 metres: S Jacobs, P 
Dunn, W Hoyte. 200m: H Oakes, K 
Cock, S Whittaker. 400nc S Joseph, 
H Barnett A Pfggford. 1,000m: Y 
Murray, K WadeTA Purvis. SJWftic 
L Lynch, Z Budd. 100m: j Simpson, 
S Strong, S GunneH. 400m hurdles: 
Y Wray. A Milts, V Lee. Hghjunpc D 
Davies, S McPeake. Long fump: M 
Berkeley, K Nagger. Shot J Oakes, 
M Augee. Discus: V Head, K Pugh. 
Javewi: F Whitbread. 

when the team for Stuttgart 
are chosen tomorrow morning 
. For example, Phil Beattie, of 
Northern Ireland, has to run 
in the Commonwealth team 
tonight in the 400 metres 
hurdles because Robertson, 
Holtom and Oakes, of En- 
gland were chosen before 
Beattie beat them to the 
Commonwealth title. 

This, and the omission of 
Janet Boyle, who won the high 
jump bronze medal, caused 
much anger in the Northern 
Ireland camp but that can be 
placated if the pair compete 
reasonably tonight and get 
selected for Stuttgart. 

• Sebastian Coe, who had to 
withdraw from the Common- 
wealth Games because of ill- 
ness, has pulled out of the IAC 
meeting at Crystal Palace on 
Friday. He may resume light 
training in the next few days 







GOLF 

Schoolgirl 

finds 

herself the 
favourite 

By John Hennessy 

Susan Shape© tL of Knowle, 
Bristol, stands in the unusual 
position for a 16 year-old 
golfer, of being favourite for 
the English Women's stroke- 
play championship, spon- 
sored by National 
Westminster Bank, at 
Broadstone this week. 

This is partly because of the 
absence in the United States of 
Jill Thornhill and Patricia 
Johnson, two of our Curtis 
Cup heroines, but substan- 
tially on her own merits. She 
beat Miss Johnson in the 
English match-play semi-final 
at Prince’s and was over- 
hauled by a determined Mrs 
Thornhill in the final after 
winning three of the first four 
holes. 

Since then she has played a 
leading part in England's vic- 
tory in the European junior 
championship, winning all six 
points available to her; won 
the Bristol and District Alli- 
ance from a field including 
Karen Davies, another of pur 
successful Curtis Cup team, 
and Susan Moorcraft, an En- 
gland international; won the 
South West Girls' champion- 
ship; and, more imposingly, 
won the English Girls' 
championship at Hudders- 
field last week. 

Huddersfield was not an 
unqualified march of triumph, 
since she finished several 
strokes back in the qualifying 
competition and lost the first 
four holes in the first round of 
the match-play to Wendy Day, 
of Suffolk. All that, however, 
was put behind her when she 
overwhelmed Nicola Way, sis- 
ter of the Ryder Cup player, by 
7 and 6. 


Victory for Kite 

Oak Brook (Renter) - The 
American, Tom Kite, birdied 
the first extra hole to win the 
$500,000 Western Open tour- 
nament on Sunday in a play- 
off against the South Africans 
Nick Price and David Frost, 
and his compatriot Fred Coa- 
ples. Kite played the finest golf 
of the day to record a four- 1 
under par 68 and a two-under 
par 286 total. 


She was unable to take part 
in the British championship at 
West Sussex in June because 
of O level examinations (eight 
of them) and thereby forfeited 
any chance of gaining a place 
in the Curtis Cup team. Even 
as it was, the selectors felt so 
convinced of her qualities that 
she was made first reserve. 

But it would be unfair both 
to Miss Shapcott and to other 
worthy challengers to take a 
blinkered look at the tour- 
nament. Three other members 
of the England team. Pat 
Smiltie and Clare Hall alo 


A sorry 
tale of 
a team in 
turmoil 

From Michael Coleman 
Montecatini Terme 

The world of modem 
pentathlon, assembled here in ' 
this Tuscany spa resort for the I 

annu al world championships, 'll 

has found itself these last few I 
days a spectator to the sad 
theatre of a United States 
team strangling themselves 
with legal writs over their own 
composition. 

While the billing should be. 
Masala versus Starostin vet- - 
sus Mizser, the iron men of 
Italy, the Soviet Union and 
Hungary respectively, an 
American side-show has 
moved to centre stage. 

In the dining room of the 
Hotel Florida last night there 
were, dotted around at dif- 
ferent tables, seven men all 
with claims to a place on the 
three-man team. Two had just 
hurried in from Texas expect- 
ing to take part on the strength 
of a legal older granted in their 
favour in Houston. On arrival 
they learnt the ruling had beta 
overturned by a Federal judge 
in Washington. An appeal to 
the UIPMB, the sport's 
governing authority here, was 
planned forthwith. 

Needless to say the UIPMB 
is viewing the legal wrangle 
with dismay. They are already 
at full stretch in attempting to 
get these three tide contests - 
the first time they have been 
staged together — for senior 
and junior men and women, 
successfully launched tomor- 
row at the three surrounding 
cities of Florence, Lucca and 
Peseta. 

An internecine 
squabble 



The sport, still trader a 
drugs cloud it has yet to shake 
off. can ill afford the inter- J^ v - 
nerine American squabble. W " 
To recap: three athletes, j| 

Blair Driggs, Bob Stoll and ft * 
Mike Gosticain, first, second f 
and seventh respectively in the * • 
United States championships, ' — 
were found to have taken the 
recently prescribed drag > 
gftrtethiraide. The three faced 
a six-month suspension, hot £ 
claimed they were unaware the : 

drug had been put. on the *»/-■ 
banned list Because of this £y .~ 
their governing body imposed 
minimum penalties and, to- 
nether with two other athletes, IggJ; 
John Scott and Mike Burley, 
they were sent to Moscow for 
the Goodwill Games. - 

What had been overlooked, . 
however, was the power vested j / 
in American sportsmen In .7 ) 
challenge not only their / 

associations in foe courts, but f j 
their fellow sportsmen. Con- ”, jf / . 
sequentiy, two colleagues, 

Laszlo Beres and Harvey 
Cain, third and sixth at die . 
nationals, appealed against • 

the leniency of the penalties, ‘ 
feeling, no doubt, they were 
worthy of places in the na- 
thmal squad. 

Cain's mother happens to be > ' ' 
a lawyer, and just before the ; “ 

party left for Moscow she filed ' 
a grievance with the United v, . , , 
States Olympic Committee's -i;.’ - 
athletes' advisory council, say- ; : - 
ing that Messrs Driggs and 
Co. were not worthy of^’:*:* - 
representing the United States . 
in Moscow or Italy. As a result $ '• 
an unsuccessful attempt was 
made at the airport to serve an 
injunction on the departing , 

team- ' 

Running short 
of time 

Back in Houston, mean- 
while, the determined Beres 
and Cain lodged an appeal , 
with a Texas arbitrator who, ";L, 
despite their absence, found v U:,j| 
against the “defendants” or- 
dered a six-month suspension 
and told the association to put , 

Beres and Cain on the work! 
team instead. 

Time was running short ; 

Pedak, the new national coa- 
ch, and his ****«» of hopefuls 
were already en route to Italy* , 
ana ware of this latest decision- 'jj.| 
Meanwhile, to guard against “ u i|/ •>,. 
any restraining order be** . “‘i 

placed on them, Beres and 

indirect route. Theyarrived in ' 
Montecatini expecting to find 
that the US Nam leader, 

Danny Strinmann, had ah 
ready told Pedak's men to IP * . 
straight home. ‘qU - 

They had been outwitted, • -u ^ 
however, by the speed of the 
American legal system. Attor- 
neys acting for Driggs and 
Stall had already bees 
gwnttti, and served, a JO-dg . 
restraining order on the IIS 
association. That means that : 
the suspension will not he % 
imposed, if at all, until after „ 
these championships have < V 
been concluded. As ksto* .*/ 
therefore, the ream which ww 
march behind the Stars and 
Stripes in tomorrow's opena^ ^V 
ceremony will consist of Scott, 'i\ 
Burley, Stoll, Driggs (as re- y 
serve) with Messrs Beres, . 

Cain and Gosticahi to the •, 
spectator stands. But who v* 
knows? 

9^*/ aWTAUt S**» M4* R l 

DMahony. P Hart MMtt S , 

•> ■