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THE 



TIMES 


No 62,528 


WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 




takes over 



• Australia, Canada and Indfo are 
likely to form a triumvirate to lead 
Commonwealth action on sanctions 

• Opposition and Conservative MPs 
predict trouble for Mrs Thatcher as 
pressure for more sanctions grows 


• Pretoria annotmced a levy on all 
goods passing through South Africa to 
neighbouring blade-ruled countries 

• Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the Indian Prime 
Minister, said Britain had sullied its 
record on human rights (page 5) 


By PfaHip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


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and India 

are expected to form a joint 
leadership of the Common- 
wealth in its crusade in the 
international community to 
strengthen .sanctions against 
South Africa after the London 
summit. 

As the Marlborough House 
conference ended yesterday 
with bitter recriminations 
against Mrs Margaret 
Thatcher for her stand which 
left her isolated, leading 
Commonwealth figures, 
including Mr Rajiv Gandhi, 
the Indian Prime Minister, 
were saying that Britain had 
forfeited its moral leadership 
of the Commonwealth. 

Although British sources 
denied the accusation, Britain 
will plainly not be playing a 
part in the task set by the other 
six summit leaders of seeking 
wider international agreement 
for the new measures they 
agreed to implement. 

Instead, Commonwealth 
sources suggested yesterday, it 
is inevitable that the 
‘‘triumvirate” of Mr Gandhi, 



V.' 


—% old — 


• Yesterday’s £4,000 
daily prize in The Times 
Portfolio Gold 
competition was won 
outright yesterday by 
Mr B Ti iemey of 
Camberwell, London 
SE5. 

•There is a further 
£4,000 to be won today. 
Portfolio list page 21; 
rules and how to play, 
information service, 
page 16. 


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Kasparov win 

World chess champion Gary 
, Kasparov yesterday won the 
fourth game of hi title de- 
fence aner the resignation of 
Anatoly Karpov, bringing the 
score to one win and three 

draws Page 2 

1 

Dilley out 

Graham Dilley, the England 

■ last bowler, is out of the 
second Corn hill Test, against 
New Zealand at Trent Bridge, 
tomorrow injured and is re- 
placed by Gr^j Thomas, of 
Glamorgan. 

Page 32 

Shultz attack 

Mr George Shultz, the US 
; Secretary of State, in a news- 
paper interview attacked Pre- 
sident Reagan's decision to 
.sell subsidized wheal to the 
Russians Page 7 

Gurkha fracas 

US military police were called 
in to stop a fight between 
Gurkha soldiers and their 
British officer on a training 
exercise near Honolulu, the 
US Army revealed Page 6 

Degree results 

Degrees awarded by the 

■ Universities of Exeter and 
Surrey are published today. 

Page 7 


Mr Bob Hawke, the Austra- 
lian Prime Minister, and Mr 
Brian Mulroney, the Ca- 
nadian Prime Minister, will 
take over a role which would 
normally have been, fulfilled 
by Britain in the past. 

There were unconfirmed 
suggestions yesterday that Mr 

Gandhi ^ttaplr 5 

Challenge to Kohl 5 
Communique text 5 
Geoffrey Smith 5 

T filing article 13 

Mulroney would be having an 
eariy meeting with President 
Reagan to try to win his 
backing for tougher measures. 

Mr Shridath Ramphal. the 
Commonwealth Secretary- 
General, yesterday began the 
work — with which be was 
charged by the six summit 
leaders - of co-ordinating the 
implementation of the mea- 
sures which all but Mrs 
Thatcher agreed to. 

These were all the measures 
in the Nassau accord, includ- 
ing a ban on air Hnks, a ban on 

- The Prime Minister waves 
as she enters King Edward VII 
Hospital in London yesterday 
afternoon for an operation on 
her hand. She is to have 
surgery under general an- 
aesthetic today for a condition 
called Dapuytren's contrac- 
ture, which is pnffing the Utde 
finger of her right hand to- 
wards the palm. 

Looking cheerful despite 
her bflffetmg after the Comm- 
onwealth summit, Mrs 
Thatcher said as she went info 
the hospital: “I won’t be tong.” 

- Theopetatioo is expected to 
last an hour. Mis Ttatcher is 
expected to stay in hospital 
until tiie weekend. 


the import of agricultural 
products, a ban on govern- 
ment procurement in South 
Africa and a ban on govern- 
ment contracts with majority- 
owned South African 
countries, as well as three 
additional measures, a ban on 
new bank loans to South 
Africa, a ban on the import of 
uranium, coal, iron and steel 
and the withdrawal of con- 
sular facilities in South Africa. 

Letters will be going out 
from the Commonwealth 
Secretariat in London to all 
the other 48 member coun- 
tries explaining the decisions 
taken. Implementation of 
some of the measures is 
expected to take place in some 
countries almost immediately, 
but others wifi clearly take 
longer. 

Leaders and officials from 
all Commonwealth countries 
wifi become involved in the 
wider task of persuading the 
international community to 
take action. 

One of the first opportu- 
nities for action is seen as the 
conference of the non-aligned 
nations to be held in Harare, 
Zimbabwe, in two weeks’ 
time, when Mr Robert 
Mugabe, who will chair it, is 
expected to make' efforts to 
win over the Arab states. 

Most of the action agreed by 
Mrs Thatcher in her offer to 
the summit is conditional 
upon agreement by the Euro- 
pean Community next month. 
That indudes the ban on 
theimport of iron, sled and 
coaL 

However, advice will j 
shortly he going out front 
government departments to 
the appropriate trading bodies 
informing them of the vol- 
untary but on new investment 

Confined on page 1MI 7 


Home New* 2-4 

U* Report 

4 


5-7 

Leaders 

13 


14.19 

Letters 

13 

Arts 

15 

Prena Beads 

10 

Births, deaths. 

Property 24J5 

marriages 

14 

Science 

14 

Btrunett 

17-21 

Soon 28-3032 l 


2 

Theatres, etc 

31 

Coart 

14 

TV £ Radio 

31 

Crosswords 10.16 

Universities 

14 

Wary 

12 

Weather 

16 


nr ft ft # ri * 


Thatcher escapes 
Tory Party attack 

By Our Chief Political Correspondent 


The Prime Minister yes- 
terday escaped with remark- 
ably little criticism from 
within her own party over her 
stance at the Commonwealth 
summit- , 

She attracted a chorus of 
opposition condemnation for 
having isolated Britain within 
the Commonwealth and for 
placing strains on Common- 
wealth unity, but MPs on both 
the left and right of the 
Conservative Party agreed 
that she had successfully 
walked the tightrope between 
the pro- and anti-sanctions 
factions. 

But MPS both of the Oppo- 
sition and some Conser- 
vatives were predicting 
trouble for the Prime Minister 
as the international pressure 
for further sanctions grows, 
particularly in the United 
Stales. 

By agreeing only to a lim- 
ited series of measures she 
kept at bay the 30 or so 
Conservative hardliners who 
would revolt against the im- 
position of strong economic 


sanctions. By moving at least 
slightly further than ho* public 
utterances before the con- 
ference had suggested, she 
went some way to appeasing 
the probably much larger 
group of MPs who have been 
urging her to lake further 
action. 

It appeared yesterday that 
there was little or no dissen- 
sion within the Cabinet at Mrs 
Thatcher’s summit perfor- 
mance. She and Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, the Foreign Secretary, 
were working broadly along 
the bargaining lines agreed last 
week by the Cabinet’s over- 
seas and defence committee. 

The Cabinet wifi next dis- 
cuss the issue shortly before 
the crucial meeting of Euro- 
pean foreign ministers in Sep- 
tember. 

The Prime Minister herself 
was said to have been satisfied 
by the outcome of the con- 
ference, because of its recog- 
nition within an ultimately 
agreed communique of Bri- 

Owtinued on page 16, col 7 


Pretoria to impose levy 
on goods in transit 

From Michael Hornsby* Pretoria 


The South African Foreign 
Minister, Mr R F “Pik” Bo- 
tha, announced last night that 
a levy would be introduced 
soon on all goods passing 
through South Africa to neigh- 
bouring black-ruled countries. 
This move, after the 
announcement last week of a 
licensing system for imports 
from Zimbabwe, is seen as the 
first shot in what could be- 
come a full-scale economic 


war against South Africa’s 
neighbours. 

Mr Botha said: “If the 
situation deteriorates we will 
have to introduce more strict 
border control measures”. 

This appeared to be a 
reference to checks on traffic 
imposed on Lesotho at the be- 
ginning of this year, which 
helped to bring about the 
overthrow of the kingdom's 
government. 





Another Royal celebration: Princess Anne returning to the winner's enclosure after her first 
racing victory yesterday at Redcar on the 5-1 chance Gotfland. The Princess had cast snpez^ 
stition aside as this was her 13 th ride. Repent: page 29 


Plessey 
threat 
to Nimrod 

By Rodney Cowton 
Defence Correspondent 

Plessey announced yes- 
terday that it was teaming up 
with the American company, 
Westinghouse, to compete 
against GECs Nimrod project 
to provide the Royal Air Force 
with Airborne Early Warning 
facilities. 

The news came only a day 
or two. before the Department 
of Track and Industry is 
expected to rule whether GEC 
can proceed with its bid to 
4gke over Plessey-. 4 r 

Co-operation -between 
Plessey and Westinghouse on 
the project is intended to be 
only the start of a much wider 


Pressure on GEC 17 


collaboration which could 
bring Plessey between £500 
million and £1 billion of high 
technology work over the next 
10 years. 

The Ministry of Defence 
has given GEC to the end of 
this month to show that 
Nimrod can meet the RAFs 
requirements. The ministry is 
evaluating several tads to 
replace Nimrod and is ex- 
pected to reach a decision in 
October. 

One of the leading contend- 
ers is the Boeing AWACS, 
which is in service with the 
United States and Nato. 
Westinghouse supplies the ra- 
dar and some other electronic 
equipment 

As part of the co-operation 
agreement announced yes- 
terday, Westinghouse said 
that if AWACS was sdected 
for the RAF, Plessey would be 
responsible for important 
parts of the radar dement. 

In addition, Plessey would 
benefit from up to £200 
million of other work from 
Westinghouse under ofiset 
arrangements. 


Baker orders cut 
of 2m places as 
school roll falls 

By SheQa Gunn, Political Staff 


Mr Kenneth Baker, Sec- 
retary of State for Education 
and Science, is today ordering 
local education authorities to 
find ways of getting rid of two 
million surplus school places, 
including closing down small 
schools, by 1991. 

He is urging them to meet 
“the challenge" created by the 
drop in pupil numbers and not 
allow an estimated £70 mil- 
lion a year to be wasted by; 
maintaining half-empty 
school buildings. 

In a draft circular, which die 
local authorities ml] receive 
today, he has told them to 
come op with, plans for re- 
organizing their schools by 
November. 

He estimates that it costs on 
average £100 a year to keep 
each surplus primary school 
place in use and £170 for each 
secondary place. That money, 
he argues, could be used 
instead to raise standards and 
improve quality. 

. Mr Baker’s attempt to speed 
the reorganization has abrady 
brought protests from 
teachers’ representatives and 
is likely to cause dismay 
among the local authorities. 

The circular sets out accept- 
able minimum school num- 
bers. For instance it states a 
primary school should have 
enough pupils to justify keep- 
ing at least three teachers. 

A comprehensive school 
with fewer than six forms of 
entry, comprising up to 180 
pupils, is unlikely to be able to 
offer a broad-based 
curriculum. 

“In many cases the best 
answer from both an educa- 
tional and economic point of 
view wifi be to amalgamate or 


close some of the schools in an 
area, or to reorganize their age 
ranges, or some other strategy 
for rationalizing the pattern of 
schools in the area," it says. 

Mr Baker is known to be 
against the wholesale closure 
of smaller schools but it is not 
likely that the local authorities 
will be able to meet his target 
of removing 350,000 primary 
places and 800,000 secondary 
ptaett in five years “without 
shutting some schools. 

The Audit Commission re- 
cently estimated that 1,000 
secondary schools might have 
to close. 

The circular adds a proviso 
against the closure of “schools 
of proven worth”, particularly 
grammar schools. 

Some schools will be able to 
get around the problem by 
converting unnecessary class- 
rooms to specialist use, such 
as laboratories or an studios, 
or to allow the local commu- 
nity to use them. 

The National Union of 
Teachers said Mr Baker 
should be recommending that 
surplus places be used to 
reduce class sizes, provide 
more specialist help for chil- 
dren and better facilities for 
arts, music and practical 
subjects. 

If he wanted a general 
contraction in secondary 
schools then some grammar 
schools would also have to 
close. 

Mr David Hart, general 
secretary of the National 
Association of Head Teachers, 
said; “Mr Baker must rec- 
ognize the need for all benefits 
from such a policy to be 
ploughed back into the educa- 
tion service.” 


Eta threat to British envoys 


A letter apparently from Eta 
threatening the lives of British 
diplomats in Spain and all 
British companies and in- 
terests in the country has bran 
received through the post, a 
British Embassy spokesman 
said here yesterday. 

“We are taking ft seriously 
until it is proved to be not 
genuine," the spokesman ex- 
plained. He said that they 
were already in contact with 
the Spanish Police about the 
letter. 

The threats, including mak- 
ing an attempt on the life of 
the British Ambassador, were . 
presented as intended repri- 
sals for what the letter de- 
scribed as the co-operation 


From Richard Wigg, Madrid 

now being shown by the EEC 
countries to the Madrid 
Government 

The West German Embassy 
and the Japanese Embassy 
confirmed receipt yesterday of 
similar tetters. They appeared 
to be part of a concerted move 
against leadi ng industrialized 
nations with significant 
investments in Spain. 

The mention of increased 
collaboration in the letter 
referred to help by other 
governments in Spain's fight 
against terrorism. The an- 
nouncement of the letter co- 
incided with a visit of M 
Robert Pandraud, the French 
Minister responsible for se- 
curity matters, for talks here 


with Senor Jose Barrionuevo, 
Spain's Interior Minister, 
when they reviewed the re- 
cently increased co-operation 
between Paris and Madrid. 

Last June, coinciding with 
the bombing campaign at 
Spanish tourist resorts. Eta 
sent a letter to the British 
Consulate in Bilbao in English 
warning British tourists 10 
stay away. 

Yesterday's grimmer letter 
made no reference to tourists. 
Besides the diplomats, the 
letter threatened British in- 
vestments in Spain, and the 
installation of Spanish subsid- 
iaries of UK firms, as well as 
multinationals with a British 
participation. 





' - 


***&' - 



Shadow of Chernobyl over ‘Twelfth’ 


By Hugh Clayton 
Environment Correspondent 

Prospects for the Glorious 
Twelfth on some Scottish 
moors are overshadowed by 
continuing government in- 
vestigations of radiation levels 
in grouse after the Chernobyl 
disaster. 

Although English grouse 
have been cleared after an 
examination of five birds by 
government scientists, the re- 
sults from the more economi- 
cally-significant Scottish 
moors have not been released 
yet 


Mr David Hnghes-Hafiett, 
director of the Scottish 
Landowners' Federation, said 
yesterday that any restriction 
on the sale .of grouse would 
not affect shooting. But estates 
would lose money if they 
could not sell shot birds. 

He thought it unlikely that 
i use rales would be affected 


the areas of Scotland 

where the Government had 
banned the slaughter of sheep 
were away from the main 
grouse-shooting regions. 

The Ministry of Agriculture 


said yesterday that monitoring 
of five birds caught by govern- 
ment scientists in England had 
produced radioactivity levels 
from 75 to 328 becquereis a 
kilogram, compared with a 
risk level fora child of 10,000. 

Many Scottish birds are 
shot on higher ground where 
radiation levels in plant life 
have been high by most 
British standards. 

Some estate owners and 
game dealers are less worried 
about the impact of radiation 
than about the apparent 
continuing decline in numbers 


of wild game birds like grouse 
and partridge. 

Investigations are continu- 



ill, or sheep staggers, 
literally makes sheep stagger 
in the fields. The tick respon- 
sible is passed by sheep on to 
the ground from which it can 
attack grouse. 

The other disease is caused 
by a parasitic worm which can 
kill grouse or enfeeble a hen 
bird so much that it will 
produce a small clutch of eggs 
and weak chicks. 


Murder 
threat 
widened 
by IRA 

By Richard Ford 

Thousands of workers who 
service the security forces in 
Northern Ireland were threat- 
ened with death yesterday as 
the Provisional IRA extended 
the intimidation campaign 
which has cost five lives and 
lost hundreds of jobs in the 
construction industry. 

The terrorists issued a 
lengthy statement through a 
Provisional Sinn Fein office in 
west Belfast warning a large 
number of contractors that if 
they continued assisting what 
they described as the “war 
machine” they would be 
treated as enemies. 

Construction firms carrying 
out work at Royal Ulster 
Constabulary bases damaged 
in IRA bomb attacks have 
already been threatened by the 
terrorists but yesterday they 
increased those considered 
“legitimate targets” to include 
milkmen and bakery workers 
delivering to the security 
forces. 

Mr Tom King, Secretary of 
State for Northern Ireland, 
condemned the threats, saying 
that the IRA appeared to have 
taken on the whole commu- 
nity through intimidation and 
fear. “They are increasingly 
isolated and as a result are 
thrown back on intimidation 
and fear.” 

Within hours of the state- 
ment by the terrorists, one 
firm in Newry, Co Down, 
announced that it would no 
longer supply fuel for police 
vehicles. 

The terrorists threatened 
British Telecom and Standard 
Telephone Cables, who it said 
instal and maintain comput- 
ers and facilitate intelligence 
and Special Branch operations 
in the province. BT, which 
employs 4,700 and STC, with 
1,000 workers, both had no 
comment to make yesterday. 

One concern for BT is that 
some of its exchanges share 
sites with the security forces. 

The IRA named one 
construction firm operating 
on Larne Police station, plus 
its ; managing director . and 
another man in Co london- 
derry said to be Involved in 
recruiting labour for the 
Northern Ireland Office. 

The statement threatened 
Civil Servants, contractors 
providing fuel and catering, 
and transport companies. 
Cleaning contractors and 
those mending vending ma- 
chines in security force bases 

Continued on page 2, col X 


Sterling 
and oil 
boosted 
by Opec 

By David Young 
Energy Correspondent 

North Sea oil prices and the 
value of sterling both rose 
yesterday, increasing govern- 
ment revenues, after the latest 
agreement by the Organiza- 
tion of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries (Opec) to cut back 
on output to force prices up. 

North Sea oil for delivery 
next month rose from S 10.90 a 
barrel to $15 a barrel and 
cargoes for October delivery 
were changing bands at $ 1 5-25 
after trading at $9.24 the 
previous day. 


The pound closed in London 
yesterday up more than a cent 
at $1.4830 and held that level 
for most of the day in New 
York, after touching $1.4860. 


Sterling, which has been 
highly sensitive to oil price 
movements since Britain be- 
came Europe's largest oil ex- 
porter a decade ago, rose 
against most other currencies. 

The effect on Britain's econ- 
omy is considerable with the 
difference between North Sea 
oil at $10 a barrel and $15 
amounting to $3 billion a year 
extra for the Treasury. 

Although higher oil prices 
may eventually mean more 
expensive petrol, home heat- 
ing oil and industrial fuels, the 
new price, if maintained, will 
restore some of the smaller 
North Sea oilfields to 
profitability, improve 
employment prospects in the 
offshore construction industry 
and also restore some compet- 
itiveness to the British coal 
industry. 

The new Opec agreement, 
reached after the longest min- 
isterial meeting in the 26-year 
history of the oil producers 1 
cartel, cuts daily output from 
the present level of 20.3 
million barrels a day (mbd) to 
16.4 mbd. The agreement 
excludes Iraq and is consistent 
with Opec's declared aim of 
sending prices back up to 
around $ 19 by the end of this 
year. It will come into force on 
September I and be reviewed 
after two months. 

A year ago, when Opec 
launched its price war on the 
non-Opec oil producers, 
prices were around $30 and, 
until yesterday's formal agree- 
ment, were seen by some 
industry analysts as heading 
down as low as $5. 

Oil traders are now watch- 
ing to see if the new agreement 
will be broken, but one 

Continued on page 16, col 2 


Money growth slows 


The money supply rose 
relatively slowly in July, end- 
ing several months when its 
rapid rise broke through the 
Government's target range. 

Bank of England figures 
yesterday showed that sterling 
M3 grew by 0.25 per cent last 


month, although this still 
leaves the annualised growth 
rate 19.25 per cent 
The public sector borrowing 
requirement also grew as the 
Government overfunded by 
£1.4 billion. 

Growth curbed, page 17 



‘Rainbow Warrior’ 

26th January 1976 - 10th July 

wJS* 

YOU CAN’T SINK 
ARAINBOW. 


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•Wan a ban an dumping nuclear waste at sea aSnrrejred 
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Minke whales. 

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natnral world. 

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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY At TOT 1ST £ 1QR£ 


RUC may sue 
media over 
shoot-to-kill 
allegations 


The Royal Ulster Constabu- 
lary is considering legal action 
over media reports of the 
Inquiry into its alleged “shoot- 
to-ldir policy, it was disclosed 
last night. 

Letters were sent out from 
force headquarters yesterday 
to police officers throughout 
Northern Ireland inviting 
them to contact the RUC legal 
department if they feel they 
have been libelled. 

They have been told the 
RUC will consider financial 
help in suitable cases. 

According to the letter. Sir 
John Hermon, the chief con- 
stable, believes that the 
reputation of the RUC as a 
whole, and individual mem- 
bers, has been damaged 
through “misleading and dis- 
torted reports in the news 
media". 

The inquiry is presently 
being conducted by Mr Colin 
Sampson, Chief Constable of 
West Yorkshire. 

Mr Sampson is also 
conducting an investigation 
into Mr John Stalker, deputy 
chief constable of Greater 
Manchester, the former head 
of the inquiry, who has been 
suspended since May for al- 
leged breaches of discipline. 


The full text of the letter 
read: "Force headquarters 
wishes it to be known that 
news media reports concern- 
ing the inquiry, conducted in 
the first instance by Mr 
Stalker, and cunently by Mr 

the forces’ s legal branch. 

“The force will be aware 
that the chief constable has 
already expressed concern 
that the reputation of the 
RUC as a whole, and that of 
individual members, in the 
performance of their duty has 
been damaged through 
misleading and distorted re- 
ports in the news media. 

"If any members feel li- 
belled by these reports he is 
invited to communicate with 
the legal branch at force 
headquarters as soon as 
possible. 

"This is without prejudice 
to any action the individual 
may himself wish to take. 

“The Police Authority Is 
prepared to consider financial 
support in suitable cases.” 

An RUC spokesman said 
yesterday: "We can confirm 
that this letter went out today, 
but we are not prepared to 
comment further because it is 
an internal matter.” 


Murder threat Is 
widened by IRA. 


Continued from page 1 
were also told to publicly 
withdraw from their contract. 

“Those who continue to 
refuse to take heed of this 
warning are. in effect coll- 
aborating with our enemies 
and shall be treated as our 
enemies. All who we mention 
should take this warning very 
seriously as we are not pre- 
pared to allow these oppres- 
sive institutions to function 
unchallenged.” the statement 
said. 

"They are part of the war 
machine and those who assist 
in any way will be treated as 
pan of that war machine and 
! therefore must expect to suffer 
the consequences.” 

A week ago the IRA shot 
dead a Protestant business- 
man who had supplied materi- 
als for the repair of two RUC 
stations in Co Tyrone and Co 
Fermanagh and yesterday's 
statement has caused tear 
among many workers em- 
ployed by firms holding con- 
tracts with the security forces. 

The terrorists have killed 
four businessmen for supply- 
ing materials to the security 
forces during the last 14 
months, forcing the Govern- 
ment to bring in Royal En- 
gineers to repairRUC stations. 

More than 1,000 jobs have 


been lost in the construction 
industry in the province, 
where unemployment is 21.5 
per cent. 

Mr King said yesterday that 
it was only through intimida- 
tion that the Provisionals 
could make any impact 
“They no longer have any 
support at all in terms of 
argument or from the people 
north and south of the 
border,” he said. 

The threat was attacked by 
the Irish Congress of Trade 
Unions and the Social Demo- 
cratic and Labour Party. Mr 
Terry Carlin, northern officer 
of the ICTU said: "They 
threaten the jobs of thousands 
and thousands of people. Does 
the threat include the tele- 
phone operator who lakes a 
999 call about a terrorist bomb 
and are journalists now 
collaborators if they carry 
RUC statements?” he said. 

Yesterday's statement came 
after the IRA killed' its first 
member of the security forces 
in Belfast for 16 months and 
as a smaller than usual group 
of Noraid members toured the 
province before next Sunday's 
Republican commemoration 
fo the 15th anniversary of 
internment 

Security forces believe the 
threat and killing are part of 
an attempt to heighten tension 



ed by Mr Andre Heller, of Viemia, that will be flying 
on the start of .a series of flights over 20 European cities. The 114-ft high creations, Qlunu 

intended as a present from the city of Vienna to the people of Europe (Photograph; Suresh 


over London in the next few days 


animated and carrying fireworks, are 
sh Karadia). 


Liverpool 
parking 
fees soar 

Motorists, taxi drivers and 
stall holders have been left 
counting the cost of Liverpool 
City Council's delayed budget. 

Mr Tony Byrne, chairman 
of the finance committee, 
announced yesterday tbat no 
job losses or service cuts had 
been included in the final 
£2.6 million package which 
balances the books. 

But he said tbat car parking 
charges, taxi licences and mar- 
ket and street trading fees 
would all be going up by as 
much as 100 per cent 
Sir Trevor Jones, leader of 
Liverpool's Liberal oppo- 
sition, said that the increases 
would drive people from the 
city. 

“The city centre is roughly 
twice the size of Anfield 
cemetery and soon h will be 
twice as dead,” he said after 
the savings were announced. 

Mr Byrne blamed the Gov- 
ernment for the council's 
problems over fixing a budget 
"We have lost £500milfion 
since 1979 in central govern- 
ment grants to this authority 
It has Been particularly vindic- 
tive in singling out 
Liverpool,” he^sud. 

All Liverpool's services 
could have been maintained 
with a 7 per cent rate rise if the 
Government had not "taken 
on” the council be said 
Instead we were lumbered 
with a 16 per cent rate increase 
and £37 million deficit” 

Most of that was cleared 
with the help of a loan from a 
Japanese bank. Of the remain- 
\ £2.6 million, all but 
... 00,000 is being found 
through acountancy measures. 


All-night 
TV project 
defended 

By Garin Bell 
Arts Correspondent 

Suggestions that school- 
children may fall asleep in 
classrooms as a result of 
watching al^night television 
have beat rejected as a valid 
objection to a pilot project 
bring launched by Yorkshire 
Television on Friday. 

Mr Paul Fox, the company's 
managing director, observed 
that "people will be found 
who'll knock bell out of any 
innovative move in this 
country”, during a discussion 


of the venture yesterday. 

He pointed oat that most 
schools were presently on 
holiday, and said he was more 
concerned about letters 
complaining that the sound 
from televisions could pene- 
trate thin walls and disturb the 
sleep of neighbours. 

In any case, the overnight 
service of pop videos, inter- 
views and reviews, available 
only to viewers in the 
company's transmission area, 
was for an experimental period 
of 13 weeks only. 

If any decision was taken to 
continue it on a regular basis, 
however, Yorkshire Television 
would be deeply disappointed 
if it was not awarded the 
franchise, Mr Fox said. 

One of his colleagues added 

that young people were more 
likely to video record higb- 
lights of the programmes, than 
to stay up all might. 

Mr Fox declined to predict 
viewing figures or revenue. 
However, 180 minutes of the 
250 minutes of advertising 
time available daring die first 
week had been sold. 

The service, produced in 
London by the Music Box 
company, is already broadcast 
by satellite to more than four 
million homes in 11 Earopean 
countries. 

The main purpose of a 
company reception yesterday 
was to announce details of its 
plans to float 25 per cent of its 
shares on the Stock Exchange 
later this mouth. 

The aim was to give viewers 
and staff an opportunity to 
invest in the company. 



The Prince and Princess Michael of Emit : 

yesterday (Photograph Julian Herbert) 


£7m drugs seized in 
Anglo-Dutch arrests 


Police and customs officers 
have smashed a mu Itim ill ion- 
pound drugs ring operating in 
Britain and The Netherlands. 

Drugs with a total street 
value of nearly £7 million 
have been seized in operations 
in the two countries, and 22 
people have been arrested. 

The arrests are the result of 
a two-month operation 
involving officers from the 
newly-formed No 5 Regional 
Drugs Squad and customs and 
excise. 

In a statement yesterday, 
Essex police said that the 
operation centred on two 
commercial addresses, in Bar- 
rack Street and Hythe Hill, 
Colchester. 

In raids at the end of last 
month more than 210 kilos of 
cannabis resin, with a street 
value of about £700,000, and a 
loaded automatic firearm and 
ammunition were seized in 
Colchester. 

Four Britons and two 
Dutchmen were arrested and 
have been charged with the 
illegal importation of drugs 
and possessing dangerous 
drugs with intent to supply. 
They will appear before mag- 
istrates at Chelmsford 
tomorrow. 

Essex police said that after 
the arrests contact was made 
with Dutch police and they 


mounted an operation to trace 
friends and partners of one of 
the men detained in Britain. 

On July 30, Dutch police 
arrested 16 people, 14 Dutch- 
men, one Dutch woman and 
an Italian, and they have been 
charged with possessing more 
than 300 kflos of amphet- 
amines and cannabis resin 
with a street value of nearly 
£6 million. 

Dutch police say that they 
also seized more than half a 
million Dutch guilders (about 
£133,000) and many articles 
used in the manufacture of 
drugs. 

All the drugs seized in The 
Netherlands had been des- 
tined for Britain. It is believed 
that the smuggling operation 
involved using ports of entry 
all round Britain. 

It is understood that the 
seized drugs had been smug- 
gled into Britain through 
Sheemess, Kent, and were 
bound for various 
destinations. 

Police and customs in- 
quiries also centred on Col- 
chester. north London, south 
London and Dover. 

Three of the men arrested in 
Britain were detained after a 
high-speed police car chase 
through south London. Other 
arrests were made in Col- 
chester and Dover. 


Fake cheques cost 
the banks £ 26 m 

By B31 Johnstone, Technology Correspondent 


Men's clothes shops and off- 
licences have become the 
prime targets for cheque fing- 
ers who are now passing 300 
cheques a day during shop- 
ping hours in the UK, the 
clearing banks say. 

Last year the banks lost £26 
million from cheque frauds 
and have embarked on a 
campaign to educate the 4,000 
biggest retailers in the UK. 

The Association fin- Pay- 
ment Clearing Services, which 
represents 22 banks, says 
many retailers are sloppy and 
do not insist that customers 
sign cheques in the presence of 
their sales assistants who fre- 
quently fail to match properly 
the signatures to those on the 
cards. 

The new design of cheque 
cards and technology in- 


troduced in the past 18 
months which prevents cards 
from beifK oversigned has 
made it difficult for forgers to 
have much success in banks. 

But the men's dotbes shops 
and wine stores have become 
the favoured haunt of the 
forgers who get quick cash by 
reselling the easily disposable 
low-priced goods, although 
they are now forced to fake the 
cardholders’ signature. 

According to the associ- 
ation: "The new cheque card, 
first issued in October 1984, 
was designed to mate life 
difficult for criminals. 

" While the losses for 1985 
were held at the 1984 level, 
they are still running at an 
annual £26 million — 
£500,000 a week.” 


CHEQUE CARD FRAUD 


Fraud in the UK expressed in £ million 



Total 


Occurence 


Year 

Fraud 

Banka 

Retail 

Eurochqe 

0.207 

1976 

1.391 

0.462 

0.722 

1977 

1.857 

0.649 

1.172 

. 0.036 


Guarantee limit increased from £30 to £50 


1978 

3.678 

1.234 

2286 

0.158 

1982 

19.301 

22308 

2286 

0.158 

1983 

. - 20.828 

• 2.649 

17.206 

. .. 0.970 

1984 

25.770 

2.374 

22.818 

0.578 

1985* 

25.771 

2^39 

22.699 

0.833 


Them were 24,616395 cheque cards in issue at the ond of W85 


‘For Sale’ 
boards 
warning 

By Trndi McIntosh 

Five London estate agents 
could face prosecution for 
erecting illegal For Sale signs, 
after a crackdown by West- 
minster City Council against 
the hundreds of boards fining 
its streets. 

The counriFs planning 
committee has asked the 
Department of the Environ- 
ment to issue a directive that 
estate agents must get plan- 
ning permission to erect 
boards in the Bayswater 
conservation area, ana Elgin 
and Sutherland Avenues. 

The co until has successfully 
prosecuted two estate agents 
for erecting illegal boards. The 
planning committee has writ- 
ten to more than 200 estate 
agents asking them to abide by 
the regulations. 

Mr Alan Bradley, chairman 
of the planning and develop- 
ment committee, said yes- 
terday that if the campaign 
was successful in the 
conservation areas, he would 
like to see it extended through- 
out Westminster. 

He gave a warning that 
estetejgents who disregard 
the regulations, which limit 
the number of For Sale or To 
Let boards to one per agent, 
would be prosecuted. 


Shah unit ‘fit for Observer’ 


By Michael McCarthy 

The presses used by Mr 
Eddy Shah to print his Today 
newspaper are capable of 
prinfeg The Observer . ; the 
West German manufacturers 
said yesterday. 

Lorn-ha, The Observer’s 
owners who took a 36 percent 
stake in Today with a rescue 
operation six weeks ago, last 
week countered speculation 
that the Sunday newspaper 
might eventually find a home 
on Mr Shah's non-nnionized 
presses by denying it was 
technically possible. 

Mr Paul Spicer, for Lonrho, 
sand it had been ruled oat after 
a feasibility study. 

Yesterday, however, the 
manufacturers of Mr Shah's 
presses said that the opera- 
tion was quite possible and 
presented no real technical 
difficulties. 

Mr Shah bought his presses 
last year from M.A.N.- Ro- 
land Drnckmaschinen of 
Augsburg. He purchased five 
Uniman 4/2 offset lithography 
presses and is currently be- 
lieved to be using four of them. 


with one in storage, to print his 
32-page tabloid. 

Mr Cari-Heinz Kobe, _ a 
senior sales manager with 
M AM.- Roland, said that the 
Uniman 4/2 was capable of 
printing a newspaper of up to 
48 pages broadsheet, which is 
the c ur re n t size of The Ob- 
serverj although sometimes die 
paper increases to 56 pages. 

“Each press takes four 
webs, or reels," he said. "Each 
web can give yon 32 pages in 
tabloid size or 16 pages in 
broadsheet So the whole press 
can do 48 broadsheet pages 
without any problem.” 

The Observer’s current Sat- 
urday-night print ran of just 
under 800,000 copies conld be 
handled by Mr Shah's 
presses, Mr Kobe went on. 
"When the Uniman 4/2 is 
printing 48 pages broadsh e et 
it can print 20,000 copies an 
hour,” he said. 

"So if afl five of Mr Shah's 
presses were involved yon 
could print 100,000 copies an 
hour. That would mean print- 
ing for eight boars for the 
complete ran, but it can be 
done.” 


Long print runs for national 
papers are quite common: The 
Sunday Times print run lasts 
more than 10 hoars. 

But it is dear that if The 
Observer were to nse Mr 
Shah's presses, which are 
sited at Poyle, near Heathrow 
airport, nml Bir mingh am and 
Manchester, it would obvi- 
ously mean imming them at 
near-capacity on a Saturday 
night and would tons put in 
definite jeopardy the future of 
Sunday Today, the least 
successful part of Mr Shah's 
operation. 

On the other hand. The 
Observer would have the 
possibility of printing in colour 
which may be a great advan- 
tage Sunday newspaper mar- 
kets. 

Speculation that Lonrho 
might make the move has been 
brightened in the past week by 
the news that~7he Observer is 
planning to leave its St 
Andrew's Hill headquarters in 
the City, where its current 
presses stand idle for six days 
a week, for a new site in 
Battersea with no printing 
halL The printing is to be 
contracted out. 


Violence 
at soccer 
monitored 

The Government is to con- 
tinue to monitor the behav- 
iour of football supporters at 
matches both at home and 
abroad (David Sapsied 
reports). 

Mr Richard Tracey, Under 
Secretary of State for the 
Environment with 

responsibility for sport, said at 
a meeting with football of- 
ficials in London last night 
that there was "some way still 
to go before we see the full 
rehabilitation of British 
football**. 

This was in spite of a 
reduction in hooliganism and 
violence last season and good 
conduct from British support- 
ers at the World Cup in 
Mexico. 

Mr Tracey chaired a pre- 
season meeting of the working 
trap set up by the Prime 
mister earner this year to 
combat football violence and 
improve the tarnished image 
of British footbalL 
"Our immediate concern is 
to ensure comprehensive and 
detailed preparation for the 
forthcoming European 
Championships in which all 
four home countries are in- 
volved, and for the European 
competitions in which some 
British dubs are taking part,” 
Mr Tracey said. 


Divers in mud 
run were given 
chance to quit 

Potential divers in the 
Army “mud run”, in which 
one man died and two others 
collapsed with heat exhaus- 
tion, were offered the chance 
to drop out of toe final 
selection phase, an MP said 
yesterday. But they chose to 
complete the programme. 

Mr Peter Griffiths, Conser- 
vative MP for Portsmouth 
North, has called for on-the- 
spot medical supervision to 
prevent a repetition of the 
tragedy. 

Sapper Vincent Anderson, 
from Bath, died on the ran in 
diving suits at Horsea Island 
in Portsmouth harbour and 
John Cladingbowl, -from 
Portchester, spent a fortnight 
inhospitaL 

Mr Griffiths was told in a 
letter from Mr Roger Free- 
man, Under Secretary of State 
for the Armed Forces, that the 
men had opted to go ahead 
with the nm. Mr Freeman 
would “look very closely” at 
toe inquiry result. 


£6,000 fines 
for two pop 
tapes pirates 

A police raid at a factory in 
Rainham. Essex, uncovered 
31.000 bogus cassettes, the 
largest number to be found in 
the United Kingdom, the 
Central Criminal Court was 
told yesterday. 

Anthony Robinson, aged 
42. of Halbutt Street Dag- 
enham. Essex, and Frederick 
Cockbura, aged 39, of Beech 
Gardens, Dagenham, pleaded 
guilty to conspiring to infringe 
musical copyright, and were 
said to have been making £500 
a week by selling the fake 
cassettes in public houses and 
clubs for £2 each. 

Mr Dorian Lovell-Pank, for 
the prosecution, said that 
detectives were convinced 
there was a "Mr Big” behind 
the operation, but so far they 
had been unable to identify 
him. 

■ The two men were given six 
months jail sentences sus- 
pended for two years, and 
, fined £6,000 each. 


Elephant hunt 

Police were searching for a 
missing pink elephant in 
Brighton yesterday as the 
Great British Beer Festival 
opened. The 4ft high, 15- 
stone model was stolen from 
the pitch of Mr Ernest Price, a 
seafront photographer. ‘ 


Nuclear nest 

Nuclear power workers at 
HInkley Point A, near 
Bridgwater; Somerset, have 
helped to raise a family of 
kestrels after their mother 
mistook a nuclear reactor for a 
nest 


World Chess Championship 

Kasparov triumph 
in fourth game 

By Raymond Keene, Chess Correspondent 
World champion Gary Moves in the fourth game on 


Kasparov yesterday won the 
fourth game of his title de- 
fence against Anatoly Karpov. 

Kasparov’s profound 
manoeuvres drew praise from 
assembled grandmasters on 
Monday and at the end of the 
firet session of play it was dear 
that the world champion was 
in a dominating position. 

Kasparov had sealed the 
crushing move 41 a6 after 
which the past white pawn 
would not be prevented from 
promoting to a queen. 

On Monday, toe opening, a 
Nimzowitsch Indian defence, 
saw a new defensive ploy by 
Karpov on the fifth move. 

This led to a situation where 
Kaisparov enjoyed toe advan- 
tage of two bishops against 
bishop and knight, but in 
exchange White’s pawns on 
the queen's flank were shat- 
tered and exposed to attack. 

Nevertheless, by means of 
some wonderfully subtle 
manoeuvres with his queen 
from moves 18-20, Kasparov- 
set up immense pressure on 
Karpov’s fortress. 

On the 21st move 
Kasparov's thrust with his 
bishop left Black completely 
disorganized and by move 28 
the Black forces had been 
driven back all along the line. 

It was not long before what 
appears to be a decisive 
material gain took place on 
toe 31st move. At this stage 
Karpov only had three min- 
utes left to reach the time 
control at move 40. 

Black was not only a pawn 
down, but threatened with 
imminent invasion of his 
vulnerable second rank by 
White's rooks. Kasparov 
sealed his 4tst move. Experts 
predicted that both 41 n4 (a 
cautious move) and 41 a6 
(more aggressive) should be 
sufficient to win. 

At 4.33pm yesterday Stew- 
art Reuben, the match 
committee secretary, an- 
nounced toe resignation of 
Karpov. 

Kasparov now leads with 
the only win. There have been 
three draws. 


Monday. 



White 

Black 

21 

Ba3 

Bc8 

t 

d4 

Nffi 

22 

SxcS 

Ndrc8 

2 

c4 


23 

Rich 

Qnfi 

3 

Nc3 

BW 

24 

Rx03 

Re8 

4 

M3 

c5 

25 

Radi 

16 

5 

93 

cart 

26 

m 

Rb6 

G 

Nxd4 

0-0 

27 

Bc5 

RaG 

7 

Bq2 

<J5 

28 

m 

Rtf 

8 

Q33 6xC3cft 

29 

Bxe7 

Nm7 

9 

bxc3 

NcS 

30 

Rd7 

NgS 

10 

cxd5 

NaS 

31 

Rxa7 

MB 

11 

Qc2 

Nxd5 

32 

a4 

Rb8 

12 

M3 

Bd7 

33 

e3 

« 

13 

C4 

Na7 

34 

Kg2 

e5 

14 

0-0 

Rc8 

35 

FW3 

XU7 

IS 

NU3 

NXC4 

36 

Rc3 

Rbc8 

16 

Bd>7 

Rc7 

37 

RxcG 

Rxc5 

17 

BaS 

Nb5 

38 

NC7 

Ne6 

18 

Qe3 

Nc4 

39 

WS 

KM 

19 

0*4 

Nd6 

40 

a6 

64 

20 

M3 

RCS 

41 

adjourned 



B C D E F G H 

Four hold lead in 
British contest 

After seven rounds in the 
British Chess Championship 
in Southampton, four players; 
Michael Adams, aged 14, and 
Jonathan Mestcl. Murray 
Chandler, and Jonathan 
Speelman, are leading with 5% 
points each (Harry Golombek, 
Chess Correspondent, writes). 

Mestel and Chandler played 
a steady draw, Speelman won 
against Jim Plaskett in a 
highly tactical game in which 
Plaskett failed to find toe 
correct moves, and young 
Michael Adams played a ma- 
ture game winning with the 
black pieces against William 
Watson. 

In the ladies contest, Susan 
Arkell. Droitwich. is ahead 
with 6 Hi points followed by 
Christine Rear from Leicester 
on 5 and Regina Gruenbergof 
West Germany on 4Vi. 


■ - 




:ms Vi 


Chess tournament 
turmoil surfaces 


By Tim Jones 

There had been fears that 
toe World Chess Champion- 
ships being played in London 
between Gary Kasparov, the 
world duunpion, and Anatoly 
Karpov would be a peaceful 
battle of intellect between two 
of toe world's greatest expo- 
nents of the game. 

But soon after Mr norendo 
Campomanes, president of toe 
World Chess Federation 
(Fide), began his press con- 
ference yesterday, toe turmoil 
of toe game began to surface. 

Mr Ounpomanes said that 
he would answer questions 
only ahoat the match. He said: 
"Crass is too valuable a 
commodity for the human 
race. It is much too valuable a 
game, sport or science to lower 
to toe level of the gutter.” 

The specialist chess writers 
wanted to talk about what has 
become known as the Fklegate 
affair. That concerns toe loy- 
alty and hatred, dispensed in 
almost equal parts, which is 
displayed towards Mr 
Camporaaras. 



Mr Campomanes, who is 
canght in toe furore 


The furore, adtich centres on 
who wifl administer toe game ) » 

in fatme, had kd Kasparov to jJVS j ( ) ; ; 
allege that “world chess is run 
by an international chess '• 
mafia”. .Dili !*> 

Mr Campomanes said that 
there had been "misunder- 
standings caused by an inad- 
equacy of dissemination of 
proper documentation”. It was 
a formula he reverted to 
frequently. 

He was aware that Israel 
would not be able to' compete 
in toe Chess Olympiad later • 
this year because b is being 
held in DnbaL He was also 
aware of the allegation that he 
needs toe lfr-btock Arab vote 
to secure a farther four year 
term as president. The Israe- - 
las, he said, understood the 
position. 

Victor Korchnoi, the Soriet 
defector, who is ranked third 
among world chess players, 
said; “I shall not be going to ' 

Doha! and neither will many 
other grandmasters.” 

He asked Mr Alexander .. 

Sereda, leader of the Soviet 
chess delegation whether he 
was aware that just before 
coating to London two of 
Kasparov's aides had been ; 
called np on military service. . 

Mr Sereda said , that he knew 
nothing of it. 

Mr Campomanes's defeat- .. 

(ora accuse him of saving 
Karpov his crown by annulling 
the first match with Kasparov • 
when it appeared the former 
champion was facing defeat 
through exhaustion. - 

The federation president 
parried questions about why 
be wanted the prize money far 
toe match deposited in a Swiss 
bank. Mr Alex Cox, chairman \ 
of Batsford book publishers, s . 
who was acting as chairaittt < 
decreed some of the questions 
to be out of order. 


Gurkhas recruited to 
carry drugs, jury told 


Four British Aimy Gurkhas 
were recruited to smuggle 
worth more than 
£1 80,000 into Britain, a court 
was told yesterday. Heroin 
and cannabis resin were hid- 
den in secret suitcase 
compartments, it was allege 
But customs officers at 
Heathrow Airoort picked the 
ntlemen out from a party of 
80 Gurkhas returning from 
leave to Nepal, the hearing at 
lsleworth Crown Court, west 
London, was told. 

The accused soldiers are all 
members of the second battal- 
ion, King Edward toe Seventh 
Gurkha Rifles, based at 
Church Crookham, near 
Aldershot 

Mr Henry Green, for toe 
prosecution, said that one of 
toe men, Pumabah Bahadur 
Gumg, aged 32, had 81S_2 
grains of heroin hidden in his 
pie soldier then 

— he had another 52 

grams internally concealed” 
Mr Green said. * 


L 


The Gurkhas claimed they 
were approached by a man to 
Nepal to take some suitcases 
batik to England. He told them 
be would collect them from 

the barracks, the jury was fold. 

Riflemen Madan Kumar 
Shrestha, aged 26, Ha tire Rat, 
aged' 32, and Reshanw 
Bahadur Guroog, aged 31, 
deny smuggling various 
amounts of cannabis resto 
worth a total of £28,700. 

Rifleman Purnabahadwr 
G lining pleads not gui lty 'to 
smuggling heroin with a street 
value of£] 53,495. 

The hearing continues to- 
day. 

Cell hanging 


nangea in his cell at ptesum 
prison on Monday night, the 
Home Office said yesteroay- 
He was in Novum* 

ber 1984. 


fir ‘ S 

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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


HOME NEWS 


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Chippendale collection 
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At a cost of little more than 
£6 million the finest collection 
of documented Chippendale 
furniture m the world has 
been secured for the nation. In 
the saleroom, the collection 
■could have made op to 
$40 million. - 
The coBection of more than 
100 items is housed in Nostril 
Priory, near Wakefield, West 
Yorkshire. It faced being bro- 
ken op tor. sale to settle lax- 
liabilities on the. death two 
> of thefonrth Lord St 


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The ^National Heritage Me- 
morial Fund has now agreed 
to purehase the furniture and 
some other works of art for 
£6.1 million. They will pass 
into the ownership of the 
National Trust which was 
given the boose m 1953.- 
The arrangement win en- 
able the present Lord St 
Oswald to settle outstanding 
tax liabilities of about £4 mil- 
lion after die de ath of his 
brother. The remainder wfll go 


By Peter Davenport 

into a new charitable trust, the 
income of which will be 
devoted to the [maintenance 
and management of Nostell 
Priory and its. 2,700 acres of 
parkland. 

. Lady St Oswald said yes- 
terday that if it had been 
offered in the salerooms they 
had been told die collection 
would have fetched between 
£20 nuffion and £40 milKnn 

“So we have given up at 
least £14 miHion.lt was sorely 
tempting at times to lake the 
money, especially in the win- 
ter when the house is cold. 

“I kept thinkingof all those 
dresses h would buy. Or you 
could be somewhere in the 
sunshine or somewhere else in 
England and be absolutely 
comfortable: 

“But my husband was deter- 
mined to keep the collection 
together because of the strong 
family links and now we are 
delighted at the outcome,” she 
said. 

The money comes from the 


special grant of £25 milli on 
given to the National Heritage 
Memorial Fund by the 
Department of the Environ- 
ment last year to secure the 
future of three threatened 
country houses, Nostell Pri- 
ory, Kedleston Hall, Derby- 
shire, and Weston Put, 
Staffordshire. 

Yesterday's announcement 
marked the first of the 
schemes to be completed. 

The details of the rescue 
package for Nostell Priory 
were given at the house yes- 
terday by Lord St Oswald, 


Lord Chastens, chairman of 
rustees of 




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Lord and Lady St Oswald at home yesterday 


the trustees of the National 
Heritage Manorial Fund, and 
Dame Jennifer Jenkins, chair- 
man of the National Trust. 

Lord Charteris said that the 
arrangement was “a triumph 
of good sense in the pursuit of 
what is best for the nation or, a 
little more informally, it is a 
damned good show”. 

Dame J ennifer said: “It 
would have been a tragedy if 
the collection had been split 
up, chair by chair, and sent to 
some museum here or there or 
across the Atlantic.” 

Lord and Lady St Oswald 
will continue to live in the 
house which was begun in 
1773 by his ancestors and 
completed to a desig n by 
James Paine and Robert 
Adam. Thomas Chippendale’s 
account for each piece of his 
furniture still survive in the 
house. 

The collection includes a 
mahogany library table made 
in 1766 by Chippendale, a 
former apprentice carpenter 
on the estate, at a cost of £72 
10s. It is regarded by many as 
his masterpiece .. 


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By Marie B3Hs 

Britain's tourist industry 
corid be given a boost, creat- 
ing up to 50,000 jobs if tie 
liquor Kr«>n«ang laws are re- 
formed to allow more flexible 
opening boors, die British 
Tourist Authority says. 

Outdated Beaming tars are 
an obstacle to the gr ow in g 
tonist industry in the face of 
foreign competition and tie 
authority says reform is urgent 
and overdue. • 

A leaflet caltine for a change 
of the Jaws, winch were im- 


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posed as emergency measmes 
during the First World War, 
has been seat to members of 
the Commons and the House 
ofLords by the authority in co- 
operation with the Eogfeh and 
Welsh tourist boards. 

. Two key changes demanded 
are that licensees should be 
able to apply for the hours 
which best suit their trade 
within the Hunts of 10 am and 
and that the sale of 
drink should be 
permitted at any time in 
restaur a nt s. 

Mr Doughs Hard, Home 


Secretary, said in May that 
there was a case for consid- 
ering some relaxation of 
restrictions in the licensing 
laws, bat it is believed the 
Government has no plan* to 
legislate in the next par- 
liamentary session this 


The Government Is likely to 
back a private member's Bill 
to amend the laws instead of 
making the issue the subject of 
primary legislation .in the 
Queen’s Speed to avoid the 
humiliation it suffered over the 
Sunday Trading B3L 


‘Passion disappeared 
from lesbian affair’ 


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Debbie Fox, a feSdrian, told; 
' The Central CHnfinal Chart 
yesterday that her games mis- 
press lover repulsed her sexual 
advances for more than a year 
' - although they still shared a 
bed. 

Mrs Fox, giving evidence in 
the lesbian love triangle trial 
of Jayne Soott. a teacher of 
physical education, said the 
“passion” went out of their 
affair after Miss Scott’s father 
died in Judy 1984. 

At the mtd of a “platonic” 
year with Miss Scott. Mrs Fox, 

' a credit controller, said she 
slept with another woman, the 
deputy bead of Miss Scott’s 
school. Sue Cralcer. 

When Miss Scott found out 
the prosecution alleges, she 
attacked Miss Craker, aged 35, 
noth a daw hammer, crippling 
her. - • - 

Miss Scott, aged 30, of Croft 
Road, Farnham Royal, 
-Buckinghamshire, denies 


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bodily barm to Miss 
August 6 last year. 

It is alleged that die rained 
blow after blow on her head 
while all three women were 
staying at Miss Craker’s home 
in Barnet north London. 

The- deputy head is now 
paralysed, pram-damaged and 
can speak only in slow, halting 



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Mrs Fox said that Miss 
Scott’s enthusiasm for “the 
sexual side of the 
relationship” disappeared at 
tbe[ time her father died. 

Mr Richard CherrilL for the 
defence, said; “It was Jayne 
Scott who brought the sexual 
side of. the relationship to an 
end by repulsing your 


-'advances? 7 Mrs' Fox repSed: 
*¥&?-■’' " ^ 

Mr Cbenill -suggested: 
“When you met Susan Craker, 
you fold Soott you foilnd her 
attractive. Although yon said 
it with some levity, it had a 
serious content which she 
must have appreciated?” Mrs 
Fox replied: “Yes.” • 

Mrs Fox said it was correct 
that Miss Scott reacted with 
“some amusement” when she 
was told of the attraction. 

The court has been told that 
Miss Craker and Miss Scott 
worked together at Slough and 
Eton secondary school. 

Mrs Fox said that although 
the atmosphere during the 
weekend or the alleged attack 
was slightly tense, there was 
quite alot of joviality with all 
three jolting and laughing. She 
had been helping te decorate a 
house in Barnet inherited' by 
Miss Craker. 

Miss Scott told police some- 
one else must have attacked 
Miss Cralcer while Mrs Fox 
was out, Mr John Hilton, for 
the prosecution, said. 

Miss Craker’s nephew, Mr 
Ian Schofield, who lived next 
door in Abbots Road, Barnet, 
described Mrs Fox knocking 
at his door seeming a bit upset 
but not in shock. 

He. went with her to his 
aunt’s home where Miss Scott, 
who also looked upset, opened 
the door. The two women said 
Miss Craker was m the living 
room. 

Mr Schofield said he saw his 
aunt on foe floor with her legs 
moving slightly and heard 
“groans and gurgles”. She was 
wearing a blouse and knickers. 

The case continues. . 


as recrui^ 

[rugs< J ur - 


Teenagers 
set alight 
boy aged 5 


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• A gang of teen^ers who set 
fine to a boy aged five by 
- squirting lighter fuel over him 
was being hunted by police 


An afternoon in the perk 
almost ended in disaster for 
David Henley, who was burnt 
when the gang used a gas 
lighter refill as a flame- 
thrower. 


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***** 


The boy was playing in Bam 
■ Cottage recreation field, just 
■ . yards from ltis home in Hay- 
wards Heath, Sussex, when 
the incident happened on 
Monday. 

- Last night his mother, Mrs 
Sally Henley, demanded ac- 
tion to catch the teenagers 
whom she said may have been 


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, . * . .1 Mflr' ' sniffing the tighter gas. 

f 1*1* . -j - “I wasstandiMin tberoad, 
( j '• ,r k t just a few yards from the park 


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when David came r unni ng 
over with his hair all burnt,” 
she said. 


Doctor fined 
£7,000 for 
claims fraud 


A doctor who claimed ex- 
penses for postnatal visits he 
did not make was fined 
£7,000, with £3.000 costs, at 
Lincoln Crown Court yes- 
terday. 

Mamuddin Ahmed, who 
made almost £4,000 from the 
claims, was told by Judge 
Wilcox: “You knew full well 
what the regulations were, but 
from the very start you maxi- 
mized foe profit you made.” 

Ahmed, aged 55, who prac- 
tices from a suigery in Newark 
Road, Lincoln, was convicted 
on 17 sample charges of false 
accounting. 

Mr Brian Walsh, QC for the 
prosecution, said that Ahmed 
regularly claimed for five post- 
natal visits but in most cases 
visited only once and occa- 
sionally never. 

Mr Bernard Whitfield, for 
the defence, said that Ahmed's 
future was in the bands of the 
General Medical Council. 


A1 victim 
is hit by 
6 vehicles 


A woman died after being 
hit by at least four cars and 
two lorries on the A 1 road 
near Doncaster, police said 
yesterday. 

She was seen by a motorist 
lying on the northbound 
carriageway at Sprotbrough as 
three cars ran over bet 
While waiting fin* the emer- 
gency services, more cars and 
goods vehicles hit the body. 

South Yorkshire police said 
it was believed to be foal of a 
woman aged 43 rousing from 
Wheatley. 


£100 reward 
for statues 


A £100 reward is being 
offered by the Gloucester- 
shire-based magazine. Cots- 
wold Life > to anyone who 
knows the whereabouts of 12 
stone statues of figures such as 
Joan of Arc and Boadicea 
which used to stand at 
Cheltenham’s ladies college. 

Mr Anthony SiddaLL, the 
college bursar, said yesterday 
that there are rumours that 
they were buried in foe 
grounds just before the last 
war for safe keeping or they 
may. have been taken away 
from. the college completely. 


Branson boat 
cut adrift 


Police are looking for four 
men and a woman who rowed 
out to foe record-breaking 
Atlantic Challenger at her 
berth in Swansea early yes- 
terday,' stole two fenders and 
cm her adrift. No one was on 

board. 

A local yachtsman who saw 
the incident secured the £1.5 
million power boat and raised 
the alarm. The Atlantic Chal- 
lenger, owned by Mr Richard 
Branson, is on a courtesy tour 
of British ports. 


Baby trade 
plan from US 


The head of a surrogate 
agency yesterday flew to the 
United States to launch a 
transatlantic baby trade. 

Miss Lorrien Finlay, aged 
38, of Haycastle, Haverford- 
west. Dyfed. who is being 
investgated by the Director of 
Public Prosecutions, is hoping, 
to find surrogate mothers for 
seven childless British cou- 
ples, at a cost of £13,000 each. 


Hives branded 


Bee rustlers have been so busy 
in the Midlands that 
Warwickshire bee keepers are 
using branding irons on hives 
to stop them being stolen. 


r 



Luciano Pavarotti talking about his diet yesterday (Photograph: Suresh Karadia). 

Tenor’s battle with scales 


The Italian opera singer, 
Luciano Pavarotti, sank his 
20-stone bulk into the Use 
velvet upholstery of London's 
Savoy Hotel yesterday aad 
spoke of his “calorie 

problem’'. 

The tenor has been ifleting 
in preparation for his only 
London appearance this year. 
“After 15 days, the result is 
great,” he said. 

“I don't have a sugar prob- 
lem; I don't have cholesterol 
trouble. I just have a calorie 


problem. If I take 2,000 
calories, I am losing. If it’s 
more, I am gaining.” 

He said that he would eat 
jnst a handful of rice three 
hours before taking the stage 
at Wembley tonight Pavarotti 
was invited to appear by 
Harvey Goldsmith, foe im- 
presario who mas termi nded 
last yeart Live Aid concert 
Critics have accused the 
baker’s son from Modena of 
cmnmerdalmDg his voice, 
which many acclaim as the 


finest in foe world. But 9,000 
people have paid £15 to £45 for 
tickets, and Wembley is sold 
oat 

Asked how he felt about 
appearing at a sports venae, 
Pavarotti said: “1 am a crazy 
pioneer. The only question b if 
I can be beard perfectly. 

“Opera is made for small 
places, like Covent Garden. 
There is no doubt about that, 
but why can’t we try something 
else? We are already on foe 
moon, so why can't we 


experiment?” This year, 
Pavarotti, aged 50, who 
started out as a footballer, 
celebrates his twenty-fifth 
anniversary in opera, and 
Wembley will allow him to 
perform before as large an 
audience as possible. 

At Wembley, turning out 
with the Royal Philharmonic, 
he will sing a selection of the 
best-known tenor arias mixed 
with Neapolitan folk songs, 
accompanied by Andrea 
Griminelli, the flautist. 


Fears for safety of 
nissing schoolgirl 


By David Sapsted 


Scotland Yard said yes- 
terday that it was “extremely 
concerned” about the fete of 
Sheena Russell, aged 14, who 
has been missing from her 
home in south-east London 
since Monday morning. 

The girl left her home in 
Bostafl Lane, Pfumstead, to go 
to an adventure playground. 

I Monday’s police 
reconstruction of the dis- 
appearance of Miss Susannah 
Lamp] ugh, aged 25, a Fulham 
estate agent, has failed to 
produce any new leads in the 
hunt for either the young 
woman or the man called “Mr 
Kipper” whom she arranged 
to meet at a house. 

• Mrs Barbara Ashworth, 
the mother of the murdered 
schoolgirl^; Dawn 

Ashworth,yesterday appealed 
to the public to help find her 


daughter’s killer. 

The giil aged 15, dis- 
appeared on Thursday after- 
noon near her home in 
Enderby. Leicestershire. 

ft The killer of wheelchair- 
bound Paddy Kirwan prob- 
ably took advantage of his 
lifeline to the outside world - a 
front door key dangling from a 
piece of string inside the letter 
box ofhis home in Kent 
The body of Mr Kirwan, 
aged 52, was found on Sun- 
day. 

ft An inquest that was opened 
and adjourned at Wirral yes- 
terday was told that Diane 
Sindafl, who was killed after 
her van ran out of petrol, died 
from multiple blows to the 
head. The half-naked body of 
the woman, aged 21, a florist, 
was found in an alley off 
Borough Road. Birkenhead. 


— ■■■■■ • vi uuuivuh uiv uauuou 

Blood in car link 
with missing wife 

Traces of blood found at the The result of detailed foren 


Traces of blood found at the 
home and in the abandoned 
car of Mr Robert Healey.-who 
is believed to have faked 
suicide to cover his disappear- 
ance. match foe group of his 
missing wife and step- 
daughter. 


The result of detailed foren- 
sic tests has heightened fears 
that Greeba Healey, aged 40, 
and her daughter, Marie, aged 
13. may be dead. They were 
last seen at lunchtime on 
Monday last week at their 
home in Stockport. 


£150m is 
‘lost’ in 
benefits 
payments 


By Sheila Gunn 


The Government is being 
mged to change the law for 
payment of social security 
benefits to accident victims, 
saving £150 million a year. 

The National Audit Office 
reported yesterday that the 
Department of Health and 
Social Security had not fully 
investigated ways of recover- 
ing social security benefits 
from those awarded 
compensation for injuries 
through the courts. 

Under the existing system 
injured people can receive 
both compensation and social 
security benefits. 


A wrongdoer also can have 
oi his n 


the cost 

!y or folly 


igence met 
public 


Since 1978 governments 
have agreed that those who are 
responsible for accidents 
should not expect treatment 
under the NHS or cash bene- 
fits under the social security 
system. 

In 1982 the Government 
announced it would bring in a 
law to cover these anomalies, 
but nothing has been done. 

“The audit office estimates 
that if arrangements were 
made to recover benefits pay- 
able for up to five years from 
the date of the accident, the 
gain to social security fonds 
would be in tbc region of£150 
million per annum,” foe re- 
port says. 

The Commons' all-party 
public accounts committee is 
expected to question DHSS 
ministers and officials in foe 
next 

over the 
ings. 

National Audit Office: Recov- 
ery of social security benefits 
when damages in tort are 
awarded (Stationery Office; 
£2.40 net). 


icia «aiHJ uiuuu&u akk uu. 

parliamentary session 
the audit office's find- 


Brain-damage births rising 


Babies are born with brain 
damage because of shortage of 
staff trained in reading foetal 
monitoring machines. Action 
for foe Victims of Medical 
Accidents, a pressure group, 
said yesterday (JiB Sherman 
writes). 

The group says that it is 
receiving more and more com- 
plaints relating to brain-dam- 
aged chOdreU) many of the 
cases appear to be caused from 


badly manapp*! fafim w. 

Miss Julia rahill, foe 
group’s deputy director, said 
she bad received 30 to 40 cases 
tins year. 

Where the group has re- 
ferred these cases to solicitors, 
in many cases foe cardiologi- 
cal traces show that signs of 
foetal distress had been show- 
ing for some time before action 
was taken, she said. 

But doctors countered last 


night that there was little 
evidence that there was any 
connection between brain 
damage at birth and delays in 
reading monitoring units. 

Dr Peter Dunn, reader in 
chBd health at Bristol Univer- 
sfor, complained that medico- 
litigation was enco u ra g ing 
parents to claim that brain 
damage arose from labour 
when the problems may have 
arisen genetically. 


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i — UffBJUUE" 


If there is anything farther you wish to know about 
the pbn our fines are open each weekday ev ening 
until 8 o’clock. Experienced staff will be happy to bdpw 
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HORSHAM (0403) 59009 


Start saving now with Sun Alliance and do it! 


EVERYONE FROM 18 TO 75 STANDS TO CAIN 


The Maturity VUus show what yoor policy would be worth if current Bans levels cemmoe. Annual 
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Cspial Boon tat is KH* of the Gummed Sum Assayed. Remember as Bonuses are paid keen hum 
pra&S these rates caanot be coaraaced. 

FOR A MONTHLY INVESTMENT OF £20 

1 Present Age 




Tbai 


1 OTwd. 


Guaranteed 

Anml 

Capital 

Projected 

b&ZEKtisflU 


Sam 

ftnTHtffjl 

Booth 

Mmority 


Male 

Pemale 

Assured 


31 100% 

tUw 

Com- 

18-28 

18-32 

C2.97D 

0602 

&97D 

C8£42 

£2.970 

30 

34 

2,967 • 

*1 Cnn 

*A/77 

2X7 

8553 

2,967 

35 

y* 

2.952 

2SU 

2.952 

SyOO 

2,952 

•» 

44 

2&0 

2J58 • 

2,920 

8^98 

2,920 

45 

49 

iWS 

2^39 

2398 


’ 23W 

50 

54 

52 

2A98 

2 fffl 

8JC 

i852 

55 

59 

2J85 

2,440 

2.785 

aoio 

2.702 

60 

64 

2,741 

2,401 

2.741 

7^83 

2330 

tfi 

69 

2.709 

2.173 

2JW 

7,791 

1,978 

70 

74 

2,709 

2J73 

2,709 

7,791 

1.626 

75 

— 

2,709 

urn 

2,709 

7,791 

1247 

FOR A MONTHLY INVESTMENT OF £50 

18-28 

18-32 

OfM 

46,711 

£7,661 

C22JMS 

£7.661 

30 

Jt 

7A54 

6,705 

7^54 

224)13 

VA4 

35 

39 

7^14 

tU}70 

7^14 

21398 

7^14 

40 

44 

7J31 

6,*wr 

7J31 

21^49 

7.531 

45 

49 

7J06 

6J75 

7/06 

21,587 

5,?0b 

50 

54 

7,385 

6.4W 

7J85 

2139 

7385 

55 

59 

7-213 

6^19 

7JI3 

20,745 

6,997 

60 

64 

7.103 

&J22 

7,103 

20,428 

ajm 

65 

69 

7,029 

b,I57 

7JQ9 

2JU15 

5.1 32 

70 ■ 

74 

7JB29 

6J57 

7/129 

20715 

4318 

75 

— 

7J29 

6,157 

7^29 

2QJ15 

3334 


COMPLETE THIS COUPON OFFER CLOSES 
AND SEND IT TO US IS AUGUST 86 


Ffcaae scad me » VJOEBPtssonal Dtnctnuloa. I undencmd 
dm ibere is No Obligation and No Salesman ntfll c*lL 


I*- 


Sonai 


Alth o ug h these terms may 
be available bin; they cannot be 
guaranteed after ibis date. 


I 


os WOMW 
RrtBtmtf lifl MD_ 


kocc imnsruHl 


Jtaoods. 


Aft ngrftfBmh ^ j j . NWcot Brute- 'Agent, if Htp- 

& Tick the amendft you wish to invest each month: 


□ xiOOtma,) D £75 D £50 DlSO D £20 DfiOlmh) 

S. Answer "TES" or “NO*" 10 each qooboB below; 

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HOME NEWS/LAW 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


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Police feel confused in 
dealings with black 
suspects, report says 


By Stewart Tendler, Crime Reporter 


Friction between the police 
and black communities has 
left some officers confused 
over whether they should take 
action over black suspects, 
according to a Home Office 
study published yesterday. 

The report, on the day-to- 
day encounters between the 
police and public, notes that 
officers can build up stereo- 
types about the people. 

“One classic example is the 
assumption that West Indian 
youths running or carrying a 
bag are up to no good," it says. 

“A number of officers 
seemed to avoid contact with 
black suspects - and by 
extension with other black 
people — because they were 
aware how sensitive this could 
be. 

“They felt genuinely con- 
fused as to just what was 
expected of them. Should they 
turn a blind eye for fear of 
provoking a riot if they 
stopped a black suspect? Or 
should they risk being called 
racists for pursuing them?" 

Researchers were told that 
officers might avoid contact 
with ethnic minorities '"to 
avoid the dilemma, especially 


where there might be hostility 
which could lead to com- 
plaints about their 
behaviour". 

To gather* material for the 
study. Home Office observers 
went with officers as they 
patrolled the streets or re- 
sponded to calls. 

The observers watched how 
the officers at six stations in 
London, the West Midlands 
and Avon and Somerset ap- 
proached the public. 

They witnessed incidents or 
attitudes by which the police 
were themsdves likely to pro- 
voke racial problems although 
generally the observers saw 
little sign of overt racism. 

In one instance a woman 
police constable referred to a 
suspect as a “wog" within bis 
hearing and on other occa- 
sions officers disliked the lade 
of deference shown to them by 
young blacks. 

The report calls for fresh 
approaches in police training 
and the realization that better 
police/pubiic attitudes will be 
achieved not only by class- 
room training but standardsof 
working practices. 

Looking at the reasons for 


which the police and public 
meet, the researchers discov- 
ered that burglary reports or 
investigations accounted for 
neatly 10 per cent of all 
encounters. They represented 
the largest single category. 13 
per cent, of all meetings 
initiated by the public. 

But checks on pedestrians 
or traffic made up the largest 
category of police-initiated 
meetings with the public at 12 
per cent of all the incidents. 

The report points out that 
such encounters give the po- 
lice considerable power over 
the public which creates ill- 
feelings if mishandled. 

Traffic policing has great 
potential tor improving or 
damaging public relations and 
more study of traffic policing 
is needed. 

While the police often 
emphasize that they provide a 
24-hour crisis service for the 
public, the research showed 
that often the police were not 
equipped to offer much help. 

There should be better 
relationships with social 
workers otherwise the service 
the police provide lacks any 
value in the long-term. 


Battle to 
keep barn 
in England 

A High Court judge has 
stopped the export to the 
United States of an historic 
(arm building. 

For 500 years the crock- 
framed barn has stood at 
Stagbatch Farm, near Leom- 
inster, Hereford and Worces- 
ter, but a few days ago council 
officials discovered that the 
listed building had been taken 
down without permission. 

Yesterday, Mr Christopher 
Campbell, chief planning offi- 
cer of Leominster District 
Council, said that they bad 
obtained a temporary injunc- 
tion preventing SPS Shipping 
and British Historic B uilding s 
from exporting the bam tim- 
bers to die United States. 

The barn was one of the 
rarest and finest examples of 
its type in the county and had 
been mentioned in a Royal 
Commission survey of histone 
monuments in Herefordshire 
in 1930, he said. 


Clampdown starts on 
motor tax dodgers 


Britain's road tax dodgers 
are cheating the Government 
of £ 1 2,500 every minute of the 
year. 

But now the Department of 
Transport is launching a drive 
against the cheating motorists, 
and expects to get hack more 
than £20 million in fines. 

The department's campaign 
was launched in Essex yes- 
terday when police issued a 
warning that they were begin- 
ning a two-week special check, 
and would show no mercy. 

The vehicle licensing centre 
computer at Swansea. South 
Wales, has calculated there are 

27.000 un taxed vehicles on 
the county's roads, equivalent 
to a £2.7 million a year loss of 
revenue. 

A similar swoop on vehicles 
in Essex four years ago netted 
1,300 guilty motorists, and 
produced a rush for an extra 

20.000 tax discs. 

Some post offices ran out of 
supplies after news of the 
clampdown spread. 


Supt Mike Benning, head of 
Essex traffic police, said yes- 
terday: “We have heard all the 
excuses before, but we are 
making no exceptions. 

“We stop an average of 
2^00 cars a month, and our 
patrols have been instructed 
to look out for unlicensed 
vehicles. We will be setting up 
special check points on busy 
roundabouts and anyone 
breaking the law will be 
prosecuted." 

The Essex campaign, which 
is costing £37,000, includes 
advertisements on local radio, 
buses and in local newspapers, 
backed up by roadside posters. 
Leaflets will be pushed 
through the letter-boxes of 
half a million homes. 

Mr Michael Spicer, Under 
Secretary of State for Trans- 
port, sai± “We owe it to 
honest motorists who pay 
their tax to catch and penalize 
those who do not I am sure 
the campaign will prove 
effective." 



_ 

Some of Britain’s most promising women jockeys raised their hats to City financier Mr Terry Ramsden in London yesterday 
after learning that his company would sponsor hurdle races for women riders later fius year (Photograph: Tim Bishop). 




Girl of 16 
in second 
escape 

A girl aged 16 on a serious 
abduction charge has ab- 
sconded for a second time 
from the care of Sheffield 
social services. 

At Thames Magistrates’ 
Court on July 31, Mr Peter 
Badge, remanded the girl to a 
semi-secure home and ex- 
pressed concern that she had 
been able to escape from the 
children’s home she had been 
placed in four days earlier. 

He called for an explanation 
from the director of Sheffield 
social services and gave a 
wanting that if be was still not 
satisfied he would summons 
the director to appear in court 

Yesterday the court was 
told that the girl — accused of 
abducting and detaining a 
woman for the purposes of 
prostitution — had dis- 
appeared for the second time 
on Saturday night 

A different magistrate, Mr 
Williams, issued a warrant for 
her arrest 

A co-defendant, aged 30, 
from Sheffield, was remanded 
in custody for a week. 


Teenager’s 

heart-lung 

operation 

A girl aged 16 successfully 
underwent a heart-lung trans- 
plant at Papworth Hospital, 
Cambridgeshire, yesterday. 

The four-hour operation on 
Ursula Dawtry, of St Osyth, 
near Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, 1 
was carried out by Mr John 
Wall work, who has made the 
previous 13 double trans- 
plants at the hospitaL 
It was the second transplant 
at Papworth in 26 hours. On 
Monday, a man in bis fifties 
from the Midlands received a 
new heart 

Mr John Edwards, spokes- 
man for the Papworth Hos- 
pital heart transplant 
programme, said: “Both pa- 
tients are satisfactory.” 

The gufs parents. Edward 
and Elizabeth Dawtry, who 
were celebrating their silver 
wedding anniversary yes- 
terday, said: “We are pleased 
and glad the operation is over 
and successful. " . 

They also thanked the 
nurses and doctors at the 
Colchester Hospital and the 
Brompton Hospital for their 
care of their daughter, a pupil 
at St - - Benedict's School, 
Colchester. 


7,000 mourn priest 
who built airport 


Political and church leaders 
were among 7,000 mourners 
who attended the funeral of 
Monsignor James Horan at 
Knock in the Irish Republic 
yesterday. 

The priest, aged 74, who 
died during a visit to the 
Marian Shrine at Lourdes. 
France, on Friday, was buried 
at Knock Basilica, 12 miles 
from Knock airport, the 
£12 million project he 
inspired. 

The Irish Roman Catholic 
leader. Cardinal Tomas O 
Fiaich, an archbishop and 14 
bishops were among con- 
celebrants at a requiem Mass. 

Mr Jim Mitchell, Minister 


for Communications, a stern 
critic of Knock's “papal 
airport” project, was among 
official representatives at the 
fimeraL 

Special transport was laid 
on to Knock, including a flight 
from Dublin to the controver- 
sial Connaught regional air- 
port. constructed by the 
determination of Mgr Horan 
in the face of government 
resistance. 

The air centre was formally 
opened just two months ago 
after Mgr Horan raised 
£3 million from private inves- 
tors for its completion after 
the withdrawal of government 
funding. 


‘Mole’ to 
lay pipes 
may save 
millions 

By Angelta Johnson 

Scientists believe that they 
have found a way to save local 
authorities millions of pounds 
on renewing decaying inner 
city Victorian sewers, without 
the need for excavations and 
road works. 

The method, known as 
trenchless moling, is being 
studied by a team of engmeen 
at Bradford University. 

The technique uses a tor- 
pedo-shaped mechanical 
"mole" which is inserted 
through a manhole. The 
equipment is then pushed 
along the pipe by compressed 
air and because the “mole” is 
larger it smashes the old pipe 
as it goes along. 

A new pipe follows the 
“mole" and is immediately 
jacked in as a replacement 
before the structure collapses. 

Professor Stuart Littlejohn, 
of the the university’s school 
of civil and structural ea- * 
gineering, is leading the re- 
search team. He says that the 
process will greatly reduce the 
cost of repairing old sewers, 
and prevent traffic congestion 
caused by the usuaftnethod of 
digging up roads to lay new 
pipes. 

The project is primarily 
concerned with the pipe-jack- 
ing techniques used with clay 
pipes, which last longer under 
ground. 

Professor Liilejohn says: 
“Work of inis kind is an 
excellent example of the way 
universities are having a direct 
and beneficial effect, through 
research, on the economy of 4 
the country. Once the tech- 
niques are rally developed, we 
will be able to save town 
planners millions of pounds. 

“It can also be used in the 
laying of new water pipes and 
I anticipate a saving of at least 
one third of the current cost of 
such work." 


War bomb blasts dredger 


A dredging vessel nearly 
sank after a wartime bomb 
exploded in its suction pipe 
while working off the Norfolk 
coast on Monday night. 

The crews of lifeboats 
stemmed the Dow iff water into 
the 2^00-ton dredger, Arco 
Tees, as It drifted helplessly. 

“It's a miracle no one died,” 
Mr Benny Read, coxswain of 
the volunteer lifeboat at 
Caister, near Great Yarmouth, 
Norfolk, said. 

“Onr men were pumping ont 


the engine-room, surrounded 
by rushing water, working by 
tnrrhligiitj and not knowing ST 
the bulkheads would collapse 
and the sea rush in and drown 
than." 

The Arco Tees Is now 
anchored in shallow water off 
the Suffolk coast while its 
'owners. Axe Marine, of 
Southampton, seek per- 
mission fw it to be towed into a 
harbour. . 

“If it bad been empty, the 
force would have torn it 


apart," Richard Hawkins, 
coxswain of the lifeboats at 
Great Yarmouth, said. 

Mr Ken Lymn, aged 52, of 
Paignton, Devon, who was 
scalded by boiling water, was 
the only one of 11 men on 
board to beiqjnred. 

Wartime bombs and mines 
are hazards in the area. Nor- 
mally they are brought np'in 
the nets of fishing vessels, 
which promptly release them 
and mark the spot for Royal 
Navy bomb disposal experts. 



Court of Appeal 


Law Report August 6 1986 


Court of Appeal 


Doctor’s inexperience no defence to negligence Extradition on theft charges 


Wilsber v Essex Area Health 
Authority 

Before Sir Nicolas Browne- 
Wilkinson, Vice-Chancellor, 
Lord Justice Mustill and Lord 
Justice Glidewell 
[Judgment given July 24] 

The law required of a junior 
hospital doctor the same stan- 
dard of care as was expected of 
his more senior colleagues, and 
inexperience could not be a 
defence to an action for medical 
negligence. 

The Cowl of Appeal so held 
by a majority, dismissing an 
appeal by the defendants. Essex 
Area Health Authority, from a 
decision of Mr Justice Pain who 
on December 21, 1984 gave 
judgment in the sum of 
£1 16.199 for the plaintiff, Mar- 
tin Graham Wilsher, an infant 
suing by his mother and next 
friend. Heather Marjorie 
Wilsher. 

Mr Ian Kennedy. QC and Mr 
Stephen Miller for the defen- 
dants; Mr Stuart McKinnon, 
QC and Mr Janies Baden och for 
the plaintiff. 

LORD JUSTICE MUSTILL 
said that the plaintiff was born 
□early three months pre- 
maturely. on December 14. 
1978. His prospects of survival 
were very low and for more than 
1 1 weeks he needed extra oxy- 
gen- He lingered close to death 
and there was always present the 
spectre of brain damage. 

Yet today he was alive and 
well with his intellect un- 
impaired due 10 the treatment 

which he received during his 
long stay in the special care baby 
unit in the Princess Alexandra 
Hospital at Harlow, Essex. 

Sadly he was nearly blind. He 
suffered from reirolentai 
fibroplasia, an incurable con- 
dition of the retina which was 
said to have been caused by an 
excess of oxygen tension iti his 
bloodstream during the early 
weeks, attributable to a want of 
proper skill and care in the 
management of bis oxygen sup- 
ply. 

When the plaintiff was boro, a 
house officer in the special care 
baby unit who had qualified in 
1974. promptly began the usual 
procedures for a baby so pre- 
mature but he made a mistake 
and inserted the arterial catheter 
into a vein instead of an artery. 

It was not suggested that that 
amounted to actionable neg- 
ligence since it was an error 
which competent doctors could 
and from time to time did 

commit. 

The monitor was connected 
and electronic readings taken. 
For the whole of the next 24 
hours the doctors who were 
called in did not recognize that 
the wrong blood was being 
investigated 

The crroi was eventually de- 
tected on December 1 7 when foe 
baby had been supersaturated 
with oxygen for several hours. 
The catheter was changed again, 
this time into an artery and the 
blood gas samples therefore 
became a more reliable guide. 

it was alleged that there were 
also a number of isolated occa- 
sions during the succeeding 


weeks when the blood gas 
figures were excessive and that 
the intervals between foe taking 
of the analyses were too long. 

The judge held that the defen- 
dants gave no adequate reasons 
for not taking more frequent 
readings and had failed to 
displace the inference that in foe 
absence of additional analyses 
the baby had to be taken to have 
suffered .high oxygen tensions 
for excessive periods. 

A problem in cases of the 
present kind was that if the unit 
had not been there the plaintiff 
would probably have died. The 
doctors and nurses worked all 
kinds of hours to look after the 
baby and safely brought it 
through the perilous shoals of its 
early life. 

They probably far surpassed 
on mumerous occasions the 
standard of reasonable care. Yet 
it was said that for one lapse 
they were to be held liable in 


Nobody could criticize the 
mother for doing her best to 
secure her son’s financial future. 
Although it formed no part of 
foe defendant's argument, there 
was the rhetorical question 
whether the law had taken a 
wrong turning if an action of this 
kind was to succeed. 

It was not acceptable crudely 
to say that the plaintiff should 
count himself fortunate to be 
alive and that he had to take the 
rough with the smooth. Nor was 
there any practicable system of 
liability which would enable a 
professional man to say that sp 
long as he had provided ah 
adequate service on average, be 
should not be held liable for 
occasions when his performance 
fell below the norm. 

The risks which actions for 
professional negligence brought 
to the public as a whole, in the 
shape of an instinct on foe pan 
of the professional man to play 
for safely were serious and well 
recognized. 

But foe proper response could 
not be to temper foe wind to the 
professional man. If he assumed 
to perform a task, he had to 
bring to it foe appropriate care 
and skill. 

What the courts could do 
however, was to bear constantly 
in mind that in those situations 
which called for the exercise of 
judgment, foe fact that in retro- 
spect the the choice actually 
made could be shown to have 
turned out badly was not in 
itself proof of negligence, and to 
remember that the duty of care 
was not foe warranty of a perfect 
result. 

What was the standard of care 
demended of those members of 
the medical and nursing staff 
who were said to have been 
negligent? The notion of a duty 
tailored to foe actor rather than 
to foe act which he elected to 
perform had no place in foe law 
of ton. The defendants could 
not justify it by any repotted 
authority in the general law of 
ton. 

Instead they sug g es ted that 
the medical profession was a 
special case and public medtei tie 
had always been organized so 
that young doctors and nurses 
learned on the job. If the 


hospitals abstained from using 
inexperienced people, they 
could not staff their wards and 
theatres and the junior staff 
could never learn. 

The tong-term interests of 
patients as a whole were best 
served by . maintaining the 
present system even if it dimin- 
ished the legal rights of the 
individual patient, for after all 
medicine was about curing, not 
litigation. 

Despite foe appeal of that 
argument it could not be said 
that there should be a special 
rule fin' doctors in public hos- 
pitals. Presumably those em- 
ployed in private hospitals 
would be in a different category. 

Doctors were not the only 
people who gained their experi- 
ence, not only from lectures or 
from watching others perform, 
but from tackling live clients or 
customers, and it was not 
su gg ested that any such variable 
duty of care was imposed on 
others in a similar position. 

It would be a raise step 10 
subordinate the legitimate 
expectation of the patient that 
he would receive from each 
person concerned with his care a 
degree of skill appropriate to the 
task which he undertook to an 
understandable wish to 
minimise the psychological and 
financial pressures on hard- 
pressed doctors. 

The duty of care related, not 
to foe individual, but to the post 
which he occupied and “post” 
was to be differentiated from 
rank or status. The standard was 
not just that of the 
competent and weiJ-h 
junior houseman (or whatever 
the position of the doctor) but of 
such a person who filled a post 
in a unit offering a highly 
specialized service. 

Upon whom did the burden 
of proof rest in relation to the 
allegation of negligence? It could 
not be right to say that once the 
defendant was mown to have 
done an act which involved an 
element of risk to another, the 
court must always presume that 
his act was a breach of a duty of 
care unless he proved the con- 
trary. 

There were many instances 
where one person might prop- 
eriy take risks is the best 
interests of another and thee 
was no reason or principle in 
holding that it was for the 
defendant to justify his conduct 

In cases of res ipsa loquitur 
the plaintiff succeeded in spite, 
not because, of the uncertainty 
as to foe precise course of 
events. The injurious act spoke 
for itself and there was no need 
for any presumption. 

So for as concerned the issue 
of negligence, the facts of the 
case had to be approached on 
the footing that foe burden of 
proof rested on foe plaintiff. 

The primary case for the 
plaintiff was foal even if the 
defendants’ breach of dura was 
not the sole cause of foe 
plaintiffs injury, nevertheless it 
made a significant contribution, 
and accordingly was to be 
treated as the proximate cause 
for foe purpose of an award of 
damages. 

The weight of the expert 


evidence at the trial was that 
high oxygen levels of the kind 
experienced particularly in the 
early stages of the plaintiffs life 
could lead to reirolentai 
fibroplasia, although nobody 
could say that in the plaintiff’s 
case the first episode rather than 
some other unknown factor was 
definitely the cause or one of the 
causes of the injury. 

The following principle 
emerged from tire decided 
authorities: 

If it was an established feet 
that conduct of a particular kind 
created a risk that injury would 
be caused to another or in- 
creased an existing risk that 
injury would ensue, and if the 
two parties stood in such a 
relationship that one party owed 
a duty not to conduct himself in 
that way, and if foe party did 
conduct himself in that way, and 
if the other party did suffer 
injury of foe land to which the 
injury related, then the first 
party was taken to have caused 
the injury by bis breach of duty, 
even though the existence and 
extent of the contribution made 
by foe breach could not be 
ascertained. 

The conduct of those for 
whom the defendants were li- 
able made it more likely that foe 
plaintiff would contract retro- 
fen tal fibroplasia and he did 
contract h. The plaintiff had 
established a breach of duty by 
the defendants and a sufficient 
connection with the loss which 
he suffered and that was suf- 
ficient to establish liability. 

THE VICE-CHANCELLOR, 
dissenting, said a health author- 
ity which so conducted its 
hospital that it foiled to provide 
doctors of sufficient skill and 
experience to give the. treatment 
offered at the nospital might be 
directly liable in negligence to 
the patient. 

Although it was said that no 
case bad ever been decided on 
that ground and that it was not 
foe practice to formulate claims 
in that way, there was no reason 
in principle why the health 


authority should not be so liable 
if its organization was at fouiL 

Claims that a health authority 
had itself been directly neg- 
ligent, as opposed to vicariously 
liable for foe negligence of its 
doctors, would raise awkward 
questions. To what extent 
should foe authority be liable if 
it was only adopting a practice 
hallowed by tradition, for exam- 
ple, in foe use of junior house- 
men? 

Should the authority be liable 
if it demonstrated that due to 
the financial stringency under 
which it operated it could not 
afford to fill the post with those 
with foe necessara experience? 

However, the taw should not 
be distorted by making findings 
of personal fault against radivid- 
nal doctors who were, in truth, 
not at fault, in order to avoid 
such questions. 

The allocation of resources 
was a question for Parliament 
and not foe courts. But the 
courts would not do society a 
favour by distorting the existing 
law so as to conceal the red 
social questions which arose. 

LORD JUSTICE 

GLIDEWELL, agreeing with 
Mr Justice Mustill that the 
appeal be dismissed, said that 
foe law required foe trainee to 
be judged by foe same standard 
as his more experienced col- 
leagues. 

But the inexperienced doctor 
called upon to exercise a special- 
ist skill would, as part of that 
skill, seek the advice and help of 
bis superiors when be did nor 
might need it. 

If he did seek such help, he 
would often have satisfied the 
test, even though be might 
himself have made a mistake. 

His Lordship agreed with the 
Vice-Chancellor that in prin- 
ciple a hospital management 
committee could be held di- 
rectly liable in negligence for 
foiling to provide sufficient 
qualified and competent medi- 
cal staff. 

Solicitors: Hempsons; 
Anwater Alien, Harlow. 


accordance with the Extradition 
Treaty between foe Govern- 
ment of the United Kingdom 
and the Government of the USA 
dated June 8, 1972, which came 
into operation in 1977. 

Article 3 of the Treaty pro- 
vided that extradition should be 
granted for an act or omission 
foe focts of which disclosed an 
offence within any of the 
descriptions listed in the Sched- 
ule to the Treaty, or any other 
offence if the offence was 
punishable under foe laws of 
both parties by imprisonment 
for more than one year and the 
offence constituted a felony 
under US law. 

The list in foe Schedule 
included obtaining money or 
valuable securities by false pre- 
tences or other form of decep- 
tion; false accounting; and 
receiving or otherwise handling 
any goods, money, valuable 
securities,or other p roperty 
knowing the same to have been 
. _ . . . . . stolen or unlawfully obtained. 

®«f t a, 1 3 dWB c S 

permitted the extradition to foe 
USA of persons in relation to 
offences relating to interstate 
transport or transportation or 
foe use of mails or interstate 
facilities. 


Regina ▼ Governor of 
PentonviQe Prison, Ex parte 
Herbage (No 3) 

Before Lord Justice Stgpben 
Brown and Mr Justice Otton 
[Judgment given July 30] 

. In considering whether a per- 
son should be extradited to the 
United States of America on 
accusations of obtaining prop- 
erty by deception, false account- 
ing and handling stolen 
prop e r t y , a magistrate was not 
required to consider whether the 
conduct complained of 
amounted to an offence under 
US law as the case was not an 
exceptional accusation case. 

The Queen’s Bench Di- 
visional Court so held dismiss- 
ing Alex William Herbage’s 
habeas corpus application 
against the Governor of 
Pentonvifle prison in respect of 
his committal to the prison on 
March 25, 1986 by foe Bow 
Street Magistrate to await his 
extradition to foe USA on nine 


of the Jheft Act 1968, 13 charges 
of false accounting contrary to 
section 17(1 Kb) of foe 1968 Act 
and two charges of dishonestly 
handling stolen goods contrary 
to section 22(1) of the Act. 

Mr Alan Newman and Mr 
Antony White for the applicant; 

Mr John 


Banning governors 
from meeting 


Lockett and Another v Cray- 
don London Borough Council 

Regulation !I(3Xa) of foe 
Education (School Governing 
Bodies} Regulations (SI 1981 
No 809) and the Schedule to 
those Regulations, made pursu- 
ant to powers conferred by the 
Education Act 1980 did. not 
provide an exhaustive and 
exclusive list of -foe circum- 
stances in which a school gov- 
ernor had to withdraw from any 
governors' meeting. 

The Court of Appeal (Lord 
Justice NeilL Loro Justice 
Nicholls and Sir John Megaw) 
so slated on July 14 dismissing 
an appeal by teacher governors 
from a decision of Mr Justice 
Simon Brown on February 3, 
1986- 


The judge had refused togrant 
both governors a declaration 
foal paragraph 13(c) ofSchedule 
t to foe Primary, Seco n dary and 
Special Schools (Instrument of 
Government) Order 1981 made 
by the Croydon Local Education 
Authority under foe Education 
Act 1 980 and which was subject 
to foe 1981 Regulations was 
unlawful 

That paragraph provided, lif- 
ter alia , (hat a teacher in a 
school under foe control of foe 
authority who was a governor In 
foe school should withdraw 
from any governor' meeting 
when there was being consid- 
ered the appointment of a 
person in a post at the school 
senior to that held by the teacher 

concerned. 


Spokes. QC and Mr 
er Wilson -Smith, QC, 
for foe Government of the USA. 

LORD JUSTICE STEPHEN 
BRQWN said that an indict- 
ment was preferred against the 
applicant by a grand jury in 
Florida. Counts 1 through g 
charged him with fraudulently 
inducing victim investors to 
mail cheques from Florida to a 
company controlled by him. He 
then applied the money to his 
own personal use. 

Counts 9 through 23 alleged 
that the applicant mailed to 
Investors in the USA false 
statements of their accounts. 

Counts 24 and 25 alleged that 
be caused cheques to be trans- 
ported in interstate and foreign 
commerce from Florida through 
places within and outside the 
USA knowing that they bad 
been taken and converted by 
fraud. 

The indictment alleged that 
counts I through 23 charged 
offences in violator] of section 
1341 of Title 18 of the United 
States Code. Counts 24 and 23 
were expressed to be contrary to 
section 2314 of the code. 

. The US Department of Jus- 
tice formally requested the 
applicant's extradition on 
November 8, 1985. 

The Secretary of State for foe 
Home Department issued or- 
ders to proceed directed to the 
Metropolitan Stipendiary Mag’ 
LStrate at Bow Street for foe 
surrender of foe applicant ac- 
cused of obtaining property by 
deception, false accounting, and 
handling stolen goods. 

The United States of America 
(Extradition) Order (SI 1976 No 
2144), provided that foe Extra- 
dition Acts 1870 to 1935 applied 
m the case of foe USA in 



It was therefore apparent that 
foe offences specified in the 
secretary of state's order to 
proceed were offences listed in 
the Schedule to the Extradition 
Act 1870 and the extradition 
Treaty. 

Prima fade* therefore, they 
constituted extradition crimes 
within section 10 of the 1870 
Act. 

Under section 10 it was foe 
duty of the magistrate to decide 
whether the evidence produced 
to him would, according to the 
law of England, justify foe 
applicant's committal for trial 
for those offences. 

In respect of the offences of 
by decep- 
licant 

■_v — vu ui« blow- 
ing factual basis; 

The_ applicant was at all 
materajtimcs resident i n En- 
gjand. The company to which 
the cheques were sent was 
recent in Amsterdam. The 
victim investors were resident 
'7 Ror,d ?* They posted the 
cheques in question to foe 
company in Amsterdam. 

R v harden 
I QB 8) counsel submit- 
ted that foe obtaining" in the 

present case had to be deemed to 

have taken place in Amsterdam 
and not m Florida. It was thus 
outside foe notional jurisdiction 
of the English courts and foe 
magistrate accordingly had no 
jurisdiction 10 entertain the 
charges. 

iwi Mr Ju stice 
Megarry said that an accused 
obtained a cheque when foe 
victim made actual delivery of ii 
or made constructive delivery 
by handing foe cheque to an 
agent duly appointed by foe 
accused to receive it on his 

Counsel for foe US Govern- 


ment submitted that the obtain- 
ing occurred when the cheques 
in question were posted in 
Florida when control by die 
applicant was obtained through 
foe agency of foe US postal 
service; and that there was 
sufficient evidence to go before ■ 
a jury that the relevant obtain- 
ing took place when foe cheques 
were posted in the USA. 

He acknowledged that in the 
light of R v Tirado ((1974) 59 Gr 
App R 80) and R v Governor of 
Pemanvilte Prison, Ex pane 
Khubchandani ((1980) 71 Or 
App R 241), foe present court 
was bound by the principle in R 
v Harden. 

It might be that at some stage 
the House of Lords would wish 
to consider foe application of 
the principle in Harden to cases 
arising under the Theft Act 1968 
in foe light of observations by 
Lord Diplock and Lord Reid in 
Treacv v Director qf Public 
Proseadlons {[197 1 J AC 537) 
and noted by Mr Justi 


i by Mr Justice Kilns- 
Brown in KhubchandanL 

The facts adduced in evidence 
before the magistrate raised a 
prima Jade case that the - 
cheques were obtained by Che 
applicant within the meaning of 
section 1 5 of foe Theft Act 1968. 
Ultimately it would be a ques- 
tion of fad for the jury to decide. 

Counsel for the applicant 
argued that having regard to the 
provisions of foe Extradition 
Treaty, foe case was in the 
nature of an exceptional accusa- 
tion case and therefore requited 
foe magistrate to consider (he 
specific provisions of US law;, 
and that there was no jurisdic- . 
non under US law to try the 
offences alleged in foe American 
indictment. 

In In re Neilsen (11984] AC 
606). foe House of Lords held 
that the duty of a magistrate 
under section 10 of the Extra- 
dition Act 1870 was to decide 
whether the evidence produced 
10 him would, according to the 
law of England, justify commit- 
tal for trial for as offence ' 
specified by the secretary of 
state in his order to proceed; and 
that English law alone was 
relevant in a case where sunrn- ■ 
tier was not by foe Extradition 
Treaty in question limited ID 
persons accused of conduct 
constituting a crime of a particu- 
lar kind. 1 

However, Lord Diplock, said, 
at p621 that in an exceptional 
accusation ease it was necessary 
for foe magistrate 10 bear expert 
evidence of foe substantive, 
criminal law of the foreign state 
and make his own findings of 
fact about it. 

. In the present case the mag- 
istrate was not* concerned with . 
considerations of US law save in 
so far as it concerned the 
reservations contained in article 
r an ° ? {extradition barred by 
of time) of the Extradition 

. ma ®*s*rare was fiiDy jus- 
tified in committing the ap- 
plicant 10 prison to await 
extradition. 

Mr Justice Onon agreed. 

Solicitors; Shone A Barker, 
Stepney; Director of Public 
Prosecutions. 


t 







THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 



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After the summit: attack on UK • Tokyo, Bonn view sanctions • the differences 


Gandhi says Britain sullied 
its record on human rights 


-J. 


By Mark Dowd 

The Indian Prime Minister, 
Mr Rajiv Gandhi, yesterday 
said Britain had sullied its 
record on human rights by 
tailing to join the six other 
nations m recommending 
Commonwealth sanctions 
againstSouth Africa. 

“Britain has always stood 
for human rights, for dignity, 
for democracy, and we sec 
now that Britain is compro- 
mising those basic values for 
some economic gain,” he said. 


“We do not believe you can 
trade one. off for another." . 

This compromising of prin- 
ciples, he said, was a clear 
indication that Britain was 
losing its leading position in 
tbeOunmonwealth. 

Nevertheless, he rejected 
reports which appeared in 
Delhi last week that India 
would consider the withdraw- 
al of its “most favoured na- 
tion" policy towards Britain if 
Mrs Thatcher did not support 
the caO for more comprehen- 


sive measures. “We have not 
been thinking of this." he said. 

Mr Gandhi, said the six 
leaders would soon begin a 
concerted campaign to enlist 
wider international support 
The sanctions, he masted, 
would have psychological and 
economic impact, although 
without Britain the latter 
would not be as strong as he 
would have liked. Despite 
being under pressure to fall 
into line with Britam, the 
Commonwealth, he said, was 
now stronger. 

“We have not succumbed. 
It is for Britain to decide what 
role it wants to play. If Britam 
cannot get the pulse of the 
Commonwealth, the pulse of 
people right across the world, 
then Britain cannot retain that 
leadership." 

The Indian Prime 
Minister’s mood was one of 
sadness rather than outright 
anger, a mood shared by the 
President Kaunda of Zambia. 

“For me, it’s a sad day when 


the Commonwealth organiza- 
tion can fail to act unanimous- 
ly on an issue of this grave im- 
portance because a British 
Prime Minister has foiled to 
realize the importance of this 
critical hour," he said. 

“Mrs Thatcher cut a very 
pathetic figure at that summit, 
very pathetic indeed," he said. 
“Someone once called her the 
Iron Lady and she is seeing to 
confirm that reputation." 

Extending generous praise 
for the work of the British 
Foreign Secretary, he describ- 
ed the briefing given by Sir 
Geoffrey Howe on Sunday as 
“fantastic". What be could not 
understand was that Sir Geof- 
frey could deliver a report like 
that and yet not be in favour of 
stronger action. 

President Kaunda was ask- 
ed whether Zambia would 
withdraw landing and over- 
flight facilities enjoyed by 
Britain in its air links with 
South Africa. He replied that 


any decision would be de- 
ferred until the meeting of the 
frontline states, scheduled to 
take place in Luanda within 
the next two weeks. 

No further dues, however, 
were given on President Ka- 
unda's Sunday proposal to 
create a Commonwealth sanc- 
tions co-ordinating commit- 
tee. He would not say if he had 
discussed the plan with Mr 
Hawke and Mr Mulroney. 

Despite his pre-summit 
threats of abandoning the 

Commonwealth if Mrs That- 


cher did not agree to compre- •* 
bensive sanctions, he said: “In i- 


no way would it be a reason- 
able decision for Zambia to 
leave." 

• HARARE: Regular com- 
mercial flights continued yes- 
terday between South Africa 
and two black-ruled 
neighbouring states that have 
agreed to ban all air links with 
the republic (AP reports). 


Minerals Japan would stick to boycott 

ban least 
hurt to UK 


From Jonathan Braude 
Brussels 

Britain mold suffer less 
titan other European countries 
from an EEC ban on coal, iron 
and steel imports from South 
Africa which was was offered 
by Mrs Thatcher to Common- 
wealth leaders on Monday in 
Ben of wider British participa- 
tion in sanctions. 

New EEC Statistical Office 
figures for 1985 show that 
west Germany and Italy were 
the market for South 
African minerals. 

Britain imported coal worth 
63-6 millio n European cur- 
rency amts (£432 million), 
compared with Italy’s 340 
million Eon and West Ger- 
many’s 181 minion Fen. 

Denmark, which has now 
derided to impose hs own 
sanctions on Sooth Africa, last 
year imported nearly three 
timw as mach South African 
coal as did Britain. 

West Germany’s impart of 
Sooth African iron and steel 
amounted to 147 mfllkm Ecu,' 
compared with Britain’s total 
of 443 million Ecu. Fiance 
and Italy abo imported more 
iron and 'steet^from South 
Africa than did Britain.' 

Britain's imports of gold 
coins from South Africa were 
negligible compared with the 
98 million Ecu worth . pur- 
chased by West Germany. 

The balance of overall trade 
in goods between Britain and 
South Africa tipped in Pret- 
oria's favour last year fin the 
first time. 

At the same tune, South 
Africa improved its balance of 
trade with all EEC m e mb e r 
nations. At 83 million Ecu, 
Britain's net deficit in trade 
with Sonth Africa was still 
small compared with that of 
Italy or Belgium, bat com- 
pared badly with the 507 
million Ear surplus of the 
previous year. 

Of the other EEC nations, 
only. West Germany, The 
Netherlands and Ireland have 
a net trade surplus with South 
Africa. 

Pretoria tells 
black welfare 
worker to go 

Pretoria (AFP) — A Swedish 
woman deeply involved in 
working for black welfare has 
been told to leave South 
Africa after seven weeks in 
police cells because, she was 
told, “your sort are not needed 
in the country." 

Mrs Annica van Gylswyk, 
aged 55, was chairwoman of 
the Pretoria branch of the 
Black Sash, a women’s civil 
rights organization which 
helped blacks through the 
maze of apartheid legislation. 

She was arrested on June 13 
ami freed after 46 days in 
solitary confinement 

Police told hen “Leave or 
we’ll keep you in prison for 
180 days, then charge you." 
She pans to leave South 
Africa on Friday. 

Warning to 
Austrians 

Vienna (Reuter) — Austria 
has warned its citizens not to 
travel to Zambia after an 
Austrian woman was detained 
there on suspicion of spying 
for South Africa and tortured, 
a Foreign Ministry spokesman 
said yesterday. 

The spokesman said the 
woman, aged 30. was arrested 
in the northern town of 
Kasama and held for three 
weeks. He said that on July 1 1 
she signed a confession under 
torture of spying for Sooth 
Africa and returned to Austria 
last week. 

Nordic move 

Helsinki (Renter) — The 
Swedish Foreign Minister, Mr 
Sten Andersson, said yes- 
terday that the Nordic coun- 
tries might decide early next 
week to impose a total trade 
embargo on South Africa in 
protest against apartheid. 


From A Correspondent 
Tokyo 

Japan's industry may kid: 
and scream against tougher 
trade sanctions on South Af- 
rica, but the Government is 
almost certain to follow the 
United States and Europe 
should they decide on tough 
co-ordinated action against 
Pretoria. 

Fears that Japan, the second 
most important trade partner 
with South Africa after the 
United States, will jump into 
any. trade gap created by new 
sanctions are unfounded, Jap- 
anese Government officials 
said yesterday. 

(f Japan agrees sanctions 
with. Washington and Brus- 
sels. Japanese firms will have 
to abide by the same restric- 
tions as the others, they said. 

However, Japan will cer- 
tainly not take further inde- 
pendent action, against South 
Africa, according to western 
diplomats in T okyo. 

On Sunday senior Japanese 
officials brushed aside a plea 
from Bishop Desmond Tutu, 
the Anglican Bishop of Johan- 
nesburg, for strong indepen- 
dent action! They told him 
that Japanese policy is to seek 
a concerted international 
response. 

Figures for 1984 show that 
South African exports, to Ja- 
pan totalled $17.63 billion 
(£1 1.75 bn) and that Japan ac- 
counted for 15.5 per cent of 
South Africa's $1636 billion 
of imports. This compared 
with 19 percent for the United 
Stales, 18.7 per cent for West 


Breakdown of major Japanese 
exports to and Imports from 
South Africa, in millions of 
doBars: 

1985 1984 

Export total 1,020 1,840 

Textiles 53 117 

Chenticais.... 50 58 

MetaJ products- 101 149 

Machinery 723 1,370 


Import total 

Food 

Metal, scrap. — 
Fuetsflnc coal).. 
Iron and steel — 
Non-fer. metal -. 
Gold 


1.840 1.610 
77 71 

328 301 
413 420 
192 168 
290 309 
25 51 


Germany and 133 per cent for 
Britain. 

In the same year Japan took 
14 per cent of South African 
exports, excluding gold, ag- 
ainst 15.9 per cent for the 
United States and less than 10 
per cent each for West Ger- 
many and Britain. , 

Last year, Japanese trade 
with South Africa dropped to 
slightly more than 10 per cent 
of the totaL But Pretoria 
supplies Japan with about 10 
percent of its coal and iron ore . 


requirements, and buys vast 
amounts of Japanese machin- 
ery. Japan, with the resbofthe' 
industrialized world, buys 
many rare metals from South 
Africa which are essential to 
its industry. 

Government officials said 
that they might have problems 
in persuading their industry to 
switch suppliers for the coal 
and ore. while Japanese pro- 
ducers of machinery and plant 
will be upset about having to 
give up such a lucrative 
market 

Tokyo already forbids di- 
rect investment and loans to 
Smith Africa, and has banned 
the sale of computers there, 
advised the private sector not 
to import krugerrands, and 
has blocked cultural and 
sporting contacts. 

In inflation-adjusted terms, 
long-term Japanese trade with 
South Africa appears to be 
stagnating after a peak in the 
mid-1970s. Official figures 
show that total trade last year 
amounted to $2.86 billion, 
compared with $1.75 billion 
in 1975, and only $268 million 
in 1965. 



Dr Kannda 
to create 


la speaking in London yesterday. He failed to explain further his earlier proposal 
a Commonwealth sanctions co-ordinating committee. (Photograph: Dod Miller) 

Holocaust Bonn set to follow 
c J m E ei London’s lead 

to Kohl 


From Our Correspondent, Bonn 



Tutu calls for decisive action 


Hiroshima (AP) — Bishop 
Desmond Tutn, Bishop of 
Johannesburg, said yesterday 
he was relieved ' that Britain 
had offered Ihnited sanctions. 
• Bat the world must intervene 
decisively to prevent more 
violence, be said. 

In Japan to mark the 41st 
anniversary of the atomic 


bombing, he criticized Mrs 
Thatcher, President Reagan 
and Chancellor Kohl.ef West 
Germany for having- “pro- 
tected the South African Gov- 
ernment against the conseq- 
uences of its actions," he said. 
“In effect (they) have been 
saying all along that blacks 
are expendable." . 


Sir Lynden Pindling. the 
Commonwealth mini-summit 
sued a 
Chan- 
Germany 
(Mark Dowd writes). 

Stressing the importance of 
West Germany's future co- 
operation with any Common- 
wealth initiative, be said: “I 
would really like to see Mr 
Kohl personally and ask him- 
self if he could stand by and 
watch another Holocaust. I 
don't know if the German 
conscience can let economic 
argument permit the possible 
massacre of hundreds of thou- 
sands of human beings." 

Sir Lynden's words suggest 
a recognition that the eco- 
nomic impact of the sanctions 
agreed in the communique by 
all countries apart from Brit- 
ain may not be enough to exert' 
enough pressure to brings 
about- a change of policy in 
Pretoria on apartheid. 

Echoing the views of Mr 
Rajiv Gandhi, - the Indian 
prime Minister, he said that 
Britain had forfeited its role as 
leader of the Commonwealth. 


Sanctions against South Af- 
rica could no longer be ruled 
out after Britain's acceptance 
of limited measures, Herr 
Jifrgen Mollemann. Minister 
of State in the West German 
Foreign Ministry, said yest- 
erday. 

He said that the West faced 
a big test of credibility on its 
attitude to human rights. It 
might need to apply sanctions 
despite their disadvantages. 

Herr MoUemann added that 
it would not be easy to be sure 
sanctions harmed South Af- 
rican whites rather than the 
black majority. But Bonn 
might not be ’able to avoid 
taking such measures, given 
the “stubbornness of the 
Boers” and West Germany’s 
role in the western world. 

Herr Gunter Verbeugen, the 
opposition Soda! Democratic 
Party's spokesman on South 
Afriea,- said - that the West 
German Government was 
faced with foreign political 
isolation over its rejection of 
sanctions. 

After Mrs Thatcher's depar- 
ture from her fundamental 


“No" to sanctions. President 
Reagan and Chancellor Kohl 
were the West's only two 
opponents of sanctions. 

He went on to accuse Herr 
Kohl of having caused severe 
harm to German foreign pol- 
icy by of his “obstinate" 
rejection of sanctions, which 
showed arrogance towards 
blacks. 

Diplomatic circles here had 
forecast a tougher approach to 
the sanctions question after a 
brief visit to Bonn at the 
weekend by Mr Chester 
Crocker, the US assistant 
secretary of state for african 
affairs. 

He had a three-hour talk 
With a senior Foreign Ministry 
official on what a spokesman 
later described as “positive as 
well as negative measures 
against South Africa." 

The sources said tile-analy- 
sis m Bonn was lhat Mrs 
Thatcher now had the key role 
on sanctions. If the "London 
bulwark" fell, the West would 
no longer be able to avoid 
exerting economic pressure on 
South Africa. 


Full text of Marlborough House summit communique 


The following communique 
was issued after the Common- 
wealth Heads of Government 
Review Meeting: 

1. As agreed at Nassau last 
October, our meeting was held 
in the special context of the 
crisis in Southern Africa. At 
the outset of our discussions 
we specifically reaffirmed our 
commitment to the Common- 
wealth Accord on Southern 
Africa which, with our other 
colleagues, we had concluded 
at Nassau. We reaffirm, in 
particular, the united beHef we 
expressed in the Accord that 
“apartheid must be dis- 
mantled now if a greater 
tragedy is to be averted, and 
that concerted pressure must 
be brought to bear to achieve 
that end. 

2. At our request the co- 
Chairmen of the Common- 
wealth Group of Eminent 
Persons (EPG) General 
Olusegun Obasanjo and Mr 
Malcolm Fraser, introduced 
the report of the EPG and 
answered the many questions 
we put to them. Sir Geoffrey 
Howe, the British Foreign 
Secretary, who undertook a 
missi on to Southern Africa in 
his capacity as President of the 
Council of Ministers of the 
EEC also briefed us on the 
results of bis mission. 

3. The report of the EPG, 
mission to South Africa, was 
the central document at our 
discussions. That unanimous 
report has commanded atten- 
tion world wide as pointing 
the way forward for South 
Africa and for the world in 
relation to South Africa. We 
warmly commend the group’s 
work which has made a pos- 
itive and enduring contribu- 
tion to the efforts to end 
apartheid and establish a non- 
racial and representative gov- 
ernment in South Africa. We 
particularly commend the 
EPG’s “negotiating concept" 
and deeply regret its rejection 
by the South African 
Government. 

4. At Nassau, the Common- 
wealth unanimously adopted 
a common programme of 
action which included a num- 
ber of economic measures 
against South Africa. It was 
our collective hope that those 
measures and the efforts of the 
EPG to promote a process of 
dialogue in South Africa 
would, within six months, 
bring about concrete progress 
towards our objective of see- 
ing apartheid dismantled and 
the structures of democracy 
erected in South Africa. 

5. As envisaged in the 
Accord, we have reviewed the 


situation. We are profoundly 
disappointed that the authori- 
ties in Pretoria have taken 
none of the five steps which at 
Nassau we called on them to 
take “in a genuine manner and 
as a matter of urgency”. 
Nelson Mandela and other 
political leaders remain in 
prison. A new and more 
widely repressive emergency 
has been imposed and politi- 
cal freedom more rigourously 
curtailed; the ANC and other 
political parlies are still 
banned. Beyond these, how- 
ever, h has been a matter of 
deep concern to us that the 
EPG after its most patient 
efforts has been forced to 
conclude that “at present 
there is no genuine intention 
on the part of the South 
African Government to dis- 
mantle apartheid and no 
present prospect of a process 
of dialogue leading to the 
establishment of a non-racial 

‘Cycle of violence 
has spiralled 9 

and representative 

government". We had looked 
at Nassau for the initiation by 
Pretoria of a process of di- 
alogue in the context of a 
suspension of violence on all 
sides. Instead, as the EPG 
found, the cycle of violence 
and counter-violence has 
spiralled. 

6. We received the group's 
findings with disappointment, 
and deplore the conduct of the 
South African Government 
whose actions, including the 
raids on neighbouring coun- 
tries at a crucial moment of 
the EPG’s work, terminated 
its efforts for peaceful change. 
We continue to believe with 


the EPG that the cycle of 
violence in South Africa must 
end. It is dearly established 
that the situation in South 
Africa constitutes a serious 
threat to regional peace and 
security. 

7. It is thus dear to ns that 
since our meeting in Nassau 
there has not been the ade- 
quate concrete progress that 
we looked for there. Indeed, 
the situation has deteriorated. 

8. Accordingly, in the light 
of our review and of our 
agreement at Nassau, we have 
considered the adoption of 
further measures against the 
background of die EPG’s 
conclusion that the absence of 
effective economic pressure 
on South Africa and the belief 
of the South African authori- 
ties that it need not be feared 
are actually deferring change. 
We acknowledge that the 
Commonwealth cannot stand 
by and allow the cyde of 
violence to spiral, but must 
take effective concerted 
action. 

9. We are agreed that one 
element of such action must 
be the adoption of further 
measures designed to impress 
on the authorities in Pretoria 
the compelling urgency of 
dicmanTiing apartheid and 
erecting the structures of 
democracy in South Africa. 

10. In doing so, we have 
looked particularly at the mea- 
sures listed in paragraph 7 of 
the Accord which some of us 
at Nassau had already in- 
dicated a willingness to io- 
dude in any consideration of 
further measures. But we have 
looked as well to olhtx mea- 
sures under consideration 
elsewhere. In deciding on the 
adoption of further measures, 
we recognize that if they are to 


have maximum effect they 
should be part of a wider 
programme of international 
.action. 

11. The British 
Government’s position is set 
out in paragraph 12. The rest 

Sanctions 6 are a 
moral imperative 9 

of us have agreed as follows: 

(a) the adoption of further 
substantial economic mea- 
sures against South Africa is a 
moral and political imperative 
to which ‘a positive response 
can no longer be deferred. 

(b) we ourselves win there- 
fore adopt the following mea- 
sures and commend them to 
the rest of the Commonwealth 
and the wider international 
community for urgent adop- 
tion and implementation: 

(!) all the measures listed in 
paragraph 7 of the Nassau 
Accord, namely: 

a) a ban on air links with 
South Africa, 

b) a ban on new investments 
or reinvestments of profits 
earned in South Africa, 

cj a ban on the import of 
agricultural products from 
South Africa, 

d) the termination of double 
taxation agreements with 
South Africa, 

e) the termination of all 
government assistance to 
investment in, and trade with. 
South Africa, 

j) a ban on all government 
procurement in South Africa, 

g) a ban on government 
contracts with majority- 
owned South African compa- 
nies, and, 

h) a ban on the promotion 
of tourism to South Africa 
and. 



IQMfflt 


IWBAK 


Protesters at the entrance to the Johaimesbmg Citj 
an anti-apartheid coalition called The Right to 


Gty Hall yesterday before a meeting held by 


(if) the following additional 
measures: 

i) a ban on all new bank 
loans to South Africa, whether 
to the public or private 
sectors. 

j) a ban on the import of 
uranium, coal, iron and steel 
from South Africa, and, 

k) the withdrawal of all 
consular facilities in South 
Africa except for our own 
nationals and nationals of 
third countries to whom we 
render consular services. 

(c) While expressing both 
concern and regret that the 
British Government does not 
join in our agreement, we note 
its retention to proceed with 
the measures mentioned in 
paragraph 12 below. 

(d) We feel, however, that 
we must do more. We look 
beyond the Commonwealth to 
the wider international 
community. We will there- 
fore, immediately embark on 
intensive consultations within 
the international community 
with a view to securing con- 
certed international action in 
the coming months, our 
emphasis being on those coun- 
tries that presently sustain a 
significant level of economic 
relations with South Africa. 

12. The British Govern- 
ment. while taking a different 
view on the likely impact of 
economic sanctions, declares 
that it will: 

(i) put a voluntary ten on 
new investment in South 
Africa. 

(ii) put a voluntary ban on 
the promotion of tourism to 
South Africa, and 

(in) accept and implement 
any EEC decision to ten the 
import of coal iron, and steel 
and of gold coins from South 
Africa. 

13. As a further element of 
our collective commitment to 
effective action, we have re- 
quested the Secretary-General 
with assistance from our gov- 
ernments, to co-ordinate the 
implementation of the agreed 
measures and to identify such 
adjustment as may be nec- 
essary in Commonwealth 
countries affected by them. 

14. We renew the call we 
made at Nassau and the 
authorities in Pretoria to initi- 
ate. in the context of a 

suspension of violence on all 
sides, a process of dialogue 
. across lines of colour, politics 
and religion with a view to 
establishing a non-racial and 
representative government m 
a united and non- fragmented 
South Africa. If Pretoria re- 
sponds positively to this call 


which we called in paragraph 2 
of the Nassau Accord, we 
stand ready to review the 
situation and to rescind the 
measures we have adopted if 
appropriate; and to contribute 
in all ways open to us, to an or- 
derly transition to social eco- 
nomic and political justice in 
South Africa and to peace and 
stability in Southern Africa as 
a whole. 

15. On the other hand, we 
are equally mindful of our 
further commitment at Nas- 
sau that if in a reasonable time 
even these further measures 
have not had the desired 
effect, still further effective 
measures will have to be 
considered. We trust that the 
authorities in Pretoria will 
recognize the seriousness of 
our resolve. Acts of economic 
or other aggression against 
neighbouring slates by way of 
retaliation or otherwise will 
activate that resolve. 

16. Regretting the absence 
of full agreement but recogniz- 
ing that the potential for 
united Commonwealth action 
still exists, we agree that the 
seven governments will keep 


‘Situation may 
evolve rapidly 9 


Enow. Abont 1,000 people at t e n ded . and takes the other steps for 


the situation under review 
with the view to advising 
whether any further collective 
Commonwealth action, 
including a full heads of 
government meeting, is de- 
sirable. We are conscious that 
the situation in South Africa 
may evolve rapidly and dan- 
gerously. We believe the 
Commonwealth must retain 
its capacity to help to advance 
the objective of the Nassau 
Accord and be ready to use all 
the means at its disposal to do 
so. 

17. Meeting in London at a 
time of heightened strains 
within our association, we 
take the opportunity to renew 
our own firm commitment to 
the future of the Common- 
wealth and to the aims and 
objectives which have guided 
it over the years- We are 
fortified in this renewal by the 
spirit of frankness in friend- 
ship which characterized our 
discussions and our belief that 
they have helped to light a 
common path towards fulfil- 
ment of our common purpose, 
namely, the dismantling of 
apartheid and the establish- 
ment of a non-racial and 
representative government in 
South Africa as a matter of 
compelling urgency. 


COMMENTARY 



As an exercise in sheer 
willpower Mrs Thatcher’s 
performance at the Common- 
wealth mud-summit was re- 
markable. She defied not only 
the other six heads of govern- 
ment bot also the spirit of what 
her own Cabinet had derided 
last week. 

The further measures 
against South Africa to which 
she has agreed are of mini- 
mom significance. They will 
neither bring noticeable pres- 
sure to bear upon President 
Botha nor send a signal to 
other countries that the Brit- 
ish Government is determined 
to do whatever it can to bring 
an end to apartheid. 

This will not worry Mrs 
Thatcher because she has 
been consistent in her convic- 
tion that serious sanctions 
would be worse than useless. 
Nothing that has happened 
this week has shaken her in 
this belief. Isolated she may be 
within the Commonwealth, bat 
apologetic never. 

Yet the outcome ought to 
worry the rest of the Common- 
wealth and the majority In the 
British Cabinet who were 
anxious to avoid this isolation. 
It looks as if the other six 
Commonwealth leaders re- 
signed themselves to the 
impossibility of forcing a com- 
promise on Mrs Thatcher, 
believing that it was more 
important for them to make a 
stand than to do an only 
partially satisfactory deal with 
her. 


A failure on 
concessions 


If so, that was sorely a 
mistake. They have failed to 
persnade her to concede more 
than she was happy to do. The 
additional measures on which 
they have derided will be 
ineffective so long as only they 
are taking them, and the 
chances of securing serums 
international co-operation 
from the conn tries that matter 
will be reduced if Britain is not 
part of the exercise. The 
Commonwealth has not been 
made to look a more impres- 
sive organization as a result of 
this week's proceedings. 

This is not at afl what the 
British Cabinet intended. It Is 
very far from what Sir Geof- 
frey Howe wanted. He was 
deeply affronted by the treat- 
ment he received from Presi- 
dent Botha. He is a man of 
genuinely liberal instincts on 
racial questions, and he was 
concerned above all to con- 
vince the Commonwealth of 
British good intentions. 

The agreement be secured 
from the Cabinet was that the 
British strategy would be to 
encourage common action on 
further measures by the 
Commonwealth, the European 
Community, the United States 
and Japan. How this strategy 
was to be applied in negotia- 
tion this week was left to the 
tactical judgment of Mrs 
Thatcher and Sir Geoffrey. 

But the way in which the 
hand was played apparently 
owed everything to her and 
virtually nothing to her long- 
suffering Foreign Secretary. 


Confidence 
not sought 


The strategy did not oblige 
Britain to accept significant 
further measures this week, 
but it did require the British 
representatives to win the 
confidence of the conference 
that they were gen ninety will- 
ing to move towards farther 
measures if these conld be 
properly co-ordinated . with 
others. 

Mrs Thatcher does not 
seem to have sought their 
confidence, and she certainly 
did not win it. She will no 
doubt be gjven credit for 
standing up for Britain once 
again, but I question whether 
the way in which she did it this 
time will actually serve British 
interests. 

I am under no Illusion that 
the British Government can 
solve the problems of South 
Africa. It would seem unwise, 
therefore, to take the lead 
internationally on this issue. 
That would be to assume 
responsibility without power, 
and place this country in too 
exposed a position. 

But Britain can also be 
exposed to international ob- 
loquy from another direction 
by winning a reputation as 
Botha's best friend. That now 
seems a serums risk. 

There is dearly the possibil- 
ity of a switch in United States 
policy towards Sonth Africa. 
Already thane are indications 
that West Germany may not 
be so resistant to sanctions 
next time European Commu- 
nity ministers meet It may not 
be long before it is not only 
within the Commonwealth 
that Britain is isolated on 
Sooth Africa. 

If that happens, Mrs 
Thatcher has not left herself 
much room to shift her po- 
sition without the homflallen 
of a public retreat. 




OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY A1 


US military police were 
called to Gurkhas’ 
brawl at Hawaiian base 

By David Bona via in Hong Kong and Nicholas Beeston 




US military police were 
called in to stop a fight 
between Gurkha soldiers and 
their officer near Honolulu, a 
US Army spokesman said 
yesterday. 

Mr Stewart Diamond, the 
spokesman, said in Hawaii 
that the fight broke out at the 
Schofield army barracks on 
the night of May 27. 

“The US military police 
were called in to stop the fight 
between the officer and the 
Gurkhas, which occurred at a 
training field on the base." he 
said. “But the scuffle was fin- 
ished by the time the MPs ar- 
rived. and the British said they 
would handle the matter inter- 
nally.” 

The Ministry of Defence 
said that before the scuffle the 
Gurkha troops had com- 
plained about inadequate ra- 
tions of rice during the 
training exercise and of poor 
pay allowances during their 
stay in Hawaii. 

Mr Diamond said that it 
was unusual for foreign troops 
to fight while on exercise in 
Hawaii, but added that it 


would not jeopardize future 
manoeuvres. 

A Defence Ministry spokes- 
man said that the incident 
happened at a party given by 
the men to celebrate the end of 
the exercise. 

The officers were said to be 
“slightly abrupt” when they 
tried to dear a bar. but there 
was no question of the soldiers 
having been drunk. 

“Although Gurkhas are 
very disciplined, they are hu- 
man beings and they do let 
their hair down,” he said. 

The British Army major 
injured in the fight has re- 
turned to his battalion of the 
Royal Anglian Regiment, the 
spokesman said. 

He said that Major Conn 
Pearce, who was seconded to 
the 7th Duke of Edinburgh's 
Own Gurkha Rifles in Feb- 
ruary 1984, was posted back to 
Britain by the Army “m light 
of the inddent in Hawaii”. 

Almost the entire company 
of Gurkhas under Major 
Pearce's command. 111 men 
out of 136, has been dis- 
charged. 


Half of the dismissed sol- 
diers have been repatriated to 
Nepal on an RAF VC-10, after 
the mysterious fight, which 
broke out during a training 
exercise. 

Major Pearce and a Gurkha 
captain suffered cracked ribs 
and cuts to the head during the 
brawl. 

The Ministry of Defence 
said initially that only 18 
Gurkhas were held after the 
fight, but that virtually the 
whole company was dismissed 
when other troops refused to 
co-operate with -officers in- 
vestigating the incident. 

An Army source in Hong 
Kong said yesterday that the 
breach of discipline, unprece- 
dented in the history of the 
Gurkhas, had not affected 
morale, and added that there 
was anger in Nepalese villages 
that Gurkha soldiers should 
attack an officer. 

The attitude of Gurkha offi- 
cers serving in Hong Kong 
was described as sanguine, 
and the Army does not foresee 
any problems in recruiting re- 
placements for the dismissed 
soldiers. 



Princess Caroline of Monaco and her I talian - bom husband, 
Mr Ste&no Casiraghi, with their second chOd, Charlotte 
Marie Porneline, who weighed 61b 8oz when she was bom on 
Sunday evening. Their son, Andrea, was bom in Jane 1984. 


Harare minister’s wife 
faces kidnap charge 

From Our Correspondent, Harare 


A warrant of arrest has been 
issued for the wife of a Zim- 
babwean Cabinet Minister 
who is said to have kidnapped 
the baby of her husband's al- 
leged mistress and threatened 
to kill the woman in a fit of 
jealousy. 

Mrs Sheila Hove, die wife 
of Mr Richard Hove, Minister 
of Mines, felled to appear in 
the Bulawayo regional court 


on Monday to answer charges 
of kidnapping, malicious da- 
mage to property, brandishing 
a firearm dangerously and 
untiring obscene telephone 
calls. 

Mrs Hove is alleged to have 
drawn a gnu and taken away 
the nine-month-old chad, say- 
ing that no action conld be 
taken against her since she 
was a minister’s wife. 


Dubai Britons could face execution 


Two young Britons are be- 
ing held in Dubai while police 
decide whether to charge them 
with the murder of an Indian 
security guard, it was revealed 
yesterday. 

The Foreign Office said the 
men, both sons of Britons 
working in the Emirate, are 
Mark Spalding, a- student, 
aged 19, and Michael Brown, 
aged 22. 

They are accused of scuf- 
fling with an In dian security 
guard and then r unning him 


By Nicholas Beeston 

over with their car. They have 
been in custody since June 16 
and could race the death 
penalty if convicted. 

Investigators are still trying 
to determine whether to 
charge them with murder or 
manslaughter. 

A spokeswoman for the 
British Embassy in Dubai said 
that the death penalty was 
rarely carried out in the 
Emirate. 

• Prison visit: Mr Bob Mears, 
the British Consul in Saudi 


Arabia, has visited Mr Peter 
Hall, an unemployed mainte- 
nance engineer, for 45 minutes 
in prison in Taif in the south- 
west of the country (Our 
Foreign Staff write). 

It was the first time that Mr 
Hall, who feces the possibility 
of a public beheading with his 
wife, Monica, if they are found 
guilty on a murder charge, has 
been allowed a visitor since 
his anest on July 15. 

His wife also had a consular 
visit 


Syrian test for Shia Beirut 


From Robert Fisk 
Beirut 


Three Armenians belonging to 
the Asafe terrorist orgamza- 
The much publicized and turn have been released from a 
much photographed entry of French prison and expelled jj 
Lebanese and Syrian troops Beirut (Sasan^ MacDonald 
into the Shia Muslim southern writes from Paris), 
suburbs of Beirut has proved They were sentenc ed n> 
painfully disappointing to seven years' imprisonment tor 
those Lebanese who thought their part in the seizing ot 
that the deployment might some 50 hostages at the 
prove to be a turning-point in Turkish consulate ia Paris m 
the recent history of their city- 1981. , . 

The soldiers turned up just The assault resulted in the 
as they said they would, and death of a Turkish guard, 
the press along to mice A fourth man involved ® too 

pictures of them. attack hanged hmisetf in his 


The Syrian troops stood in 
the Bourj eJ-Barajneh Square 
draped in machine-gun amm- 
unition belts, and the Leba- 
nese soldiers dutifully ordered 
a few selected motorists to 
open the boots of their cars. 
But then they were gone. 

Save for a few dozen mem- 
bers of the Lebanese Army’s 
Sixth Brigade and a dutch of 
Syrian paratroopers, the Syr- 
ian security plan evaporated 
from the southern suburbs 


prison cell in 1985. 


almost as swiftly as it 
appeared. 

The gunmen of the Hezb- 
ollah (Party of God) and Amal 
bad left the streets, but ihcre 
was no sign of the three 
remaining American hostages 
whom the Syrians claim they 
wish to release; nor any sign of 
anything remotely lawless. 

The posters on the walls 
contained only the portraits of 


recent “martyrs”: me only 
objects the Syrians received 
were flowers, handed over 
obsequiously to the 
troopers by sturdy young men- 

Nevertheless, the Syrian 
Army and security services 
now have a hold on one of uie 
strongest Shia districts of 
Beirut 

They may not be near the 
hostages - perhaps they 
not wish to be at the moment 
- nor do they appear yet \o 
have penetrated any of the 
more subterranean organiza- 
tions that exist there. 

Where, for example, is the 
“Unified Nasscrite Organiza- 
tion - Cairo” which daimcd 
responsibility for the arracks 
on British servicemen s fam- 
ilies in Cyprus? 

Almost certainly some of its 
“members" live in the south- 
ern suburbs, and it is in- 
conceivable that the Synaa 
muhabarrat (security service) 
do noi have some addresses in 
their notebooks. 


Bush says 
Taba pact 
is near 

Cairo (Reuter) — Vice- 
President George Bush ended 
his Middle East tour yesterday 
with no firm agreement on 
peace Talks, but said an 
arbitration pact on the Egyp- 
tian-Israeli Taba border dis- 
pute was nearly is hand. 

He said progress towards an 
accord was well under way 
prior to his 10-day visit but 
that his talks with the Israeli 
Prime Minister, Mr Shimon 
Peres, and President Mubarak 
of Egypt, had moved the 
parties closer to a final agree- 
ment on Taba. 

The arbitration pact would 
set up a mechanism for set- 
tling the sovereignty dispute. 

Mr Bush said an agreement 
on Taba would “remove a real 
sticking point” in the overall 
peace process in the area. 


Filipino tribesmen 
in revenge killings 


From Keith Dalton, Manila 


Natives of Ata tribe have 
massacred a Chr istian family 
of four and a middle-aged 
farmer in a “bloody ritual” on 
Mindana o in the southern 
Philippines which will not end 
until another five people are 
killed, the state-run news 
agency reported. 

The killers were seeking 
vengeance for the deaths last 
month of eight tribesmen. 

At least 250 Christian fam- 
ilies have abandoned their 
homes on the outskirts of 
Malabog. a remote mountain 
v illag e near the southern city 
of Davao, after the natives, 
using spears and machetes, 
hacked to death a former. 
MarceUno Poliquit, aged 56. 
on Sunday. 

The next night the tribes- 
men attacked and killed Felix 


and Lolita Bucana and their 
two children as they slept in 
their hut the Philippine News 
Agency said. 

“The tribesmen already 
have killed five Christians in a 
bloody ritual called pangayao 
but need to kill five more to 
get even with their Christian 
enemies,” the agency quoted 
the local military commander, 
Colonel Hercules Gakm, as 
saying. 

Colonel Galon said that the 
SO warring tribesmen had 
declared a “no man's land” in 
the area. 

• Peace talks: Philippine 
communist emissaries and a 
senior government negotiator 
met for the first time yesterday 
to discuss ways to end the 17- 
year communist insurgency. 

Spectrum, page 10 


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Mother of 
strangled 
baby held 



Carol Ann Washington 
(above) the mother of an 18- 
mouth-old girt apparently 
strangled on the ermse ship 
Emerald Seas, which was 
evacuated last week after a fire 
and explosion hi the Bahamas 


has been taken into custody by 
Miami police for questioning. 

The child was found dead in 
a cabin as the ship was en 
route to Miami four days after 
a fire and explosion injared 17 
people and forced the evacua- 
tion of nearly 1,000 
passengers. 

Art broken 

Melbourne (Reuter) — 
“Weeping Woman”, the 
SA1.2 million painting by 
Picasso stolen this week, was 
not insured, Victoria's Slate 
Arts Minister, Mr Race 
Mathews, said. 

Killer rain 

Tokyo (Reuter) — Fourteen 
people were killed and two 
others missing as torrential 
rainstorms swept across cen- 
tral and northern Japan. 

Short haul 

Buenos Aires (Reuter) — 
The Soviet Union will have to 
withdraw at least 42 trawlers 
fishing in Argentine waters 
under the' terms of a new 
fishing accord. 

New troops 

Stockholm (Reuter) — Swe- 
den is planning to send about 
600 troops to the United 
Nations Interim Force ia 
Lebanon to replace a French 
peace-keeping contingent, a 
Defence. Staff spokesman said. 

Premier again 

Bangkok (Reuter) - King 
Bhumibol has appointed Gen- 
eral Prem Tinsttianonda to his 
third term as Thailand's 
Prime Minister, the official 
Radio Thailand reported. 

Lorry strike 

Karachi (Reuter) — About 
7,000 long-distance lorry driv- 
ers started an indefinite strike 
here in protest at increasing 
highway robberies. 

Patient killed 

Hong Kong (AFP) - A 
villager in hospital in Wuhan 
city, central China, was beaten 
io death by hospital staff over 
a money dispute. Five staff 
members have been arrested. 

Tehran bomb 

Tehran (Reuter) - A bomb 
hidden in a car exploded in a 
Tehran square killing a pedes- 
trian and damaging two cars. 


Craxi calls 
on vote for 
stability 

From Peter Nichols 
Rome 

Sfenor Bettmo Craxi ex- 
pects to be given a vote of 
confidence tonight by the Ital- 
ian Senatefor Ms new govern- 
ment, which be lunched 
yesterday as the embodiment 
of the country's new-found 
political stability. 

Signor Craxfs second gov- 
ernment follows the admin- 
istration with which he 
assured himself of two places 
in the history books. 

His last five-party coalition 
was fiie first government in 
Italy's history to have been led 
by a Socialist. And its three 
years gave it the record for 
longevity in the post-war 
republic. 

He reminded Parliament of 
this yesterday at the beginning 
of the speech in which he 
called for a vote of confidence. 

“Political stability is not 
everything,” he said, “but 
certainly it is the essential 
condition** for efficient Gov- 
ernment and Parliament. 

He said that the 20 govern- 
ments which had rated the 
country daring file four 
preceding parliaments were 
“the symbol of a growing and 
dangerous chronic instability 
'of our political system . . .” 

This tendency had now been 
reversed in the past three 
years and the remaining 20 
months of this ninth legisla- 
ture could see a continuation of 
this stability, he said. 

He made only an indirect 
reference to his agreement to 
leave office next March and to 
hand over the leadership to the 
Christian Democrats, the larg- 
est party. 

Th is need not in any way 
conflict with his remarks 
about stability, as the .Chris- 
tian Democrats are partners in 
the newly recons tit uted five- 
party coalition. 

Signor Craxi underlined 
that pnJUic opinion called for 
stability. It also wanted 
greater efficiency and a more 
modern approach, as well as 
smoother functioning by its 
institutions. The c ount r y re- 
quired *a more convincing 

quality 'ht the democracy 
which governed it**. 

All the parties represented 
in Parliament are now reply- 
ing to the Prime Minister’s 
speech. 

The debate will then move to 
the Chamber of Deputies, 
when another vote w31 be 
taken by the end of the week. 


Fraud alleged 
in Mexican 
state elections 

Oaxaca, Mexico (AP) - 
Opposition parties swept to 
defeat in elections in the 
impoverished southern state 
o F Oaxaca charged yesterday 
that the ruling- institutional 
Revolutionary Party (FRI) 
had used fraud to perpetuate 
its control 

The State Electoral Cbm- 
mismon suspended balloting 
on Sunday in four of the 
states 570 municipalities. It 
said peace could'not be guar- 
anteed in four small towns (Hi 
the Tehuantepec isthmus 
which have been the «*««» of 
political violence in recent 
years. 






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THE TIMF.S WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


OVERSEAS/UNIVERSITY NEWS 


>*• . 


Shultz attacks Reagan 
decision to sell cheap 
wheat to Soviet Union 


Front Michael Bin yin, Washington 


In an uncharacterisu'c out- 
burst, Mr George Shultz has 
attacked sharply President 
Reagan's decision to sell sub- 
sidized wheatio the Russians, 
saying that They “must be 
chortling" and “scratching 
their head$" at their ability to 
pay less for American-pro- 
duced food" than do American 
housewives. 

The US Secretary of State, 
long known as a team player 
who defends all presidential 
decisions stoutly, had pre- 
viously termed such sub- 
sidized ‘ sales to Moscow 
ridiculous and had led the 
opposition from wi thin the 
Administration. 

But in an interview pub- 
lished yesterday in USA To- 
day. he continued his spirited 
attacks, describing the grain 
sale as a form of protec- 
tionism. “1 don’t think it is 
good for the United States,” 
be said, arguing that it could 
lead to a subsidy war. None- 
theless, be added caustically, 
“there must be a lot of pluses 
to it, because h has been 
decided — but I can’t think of 
any myself”. 

Senator Robert Dole, the 
Republican from the gram 
slate of Kansas who proposed 


the sale, had toldMr Shultz he 
should visit more state cap- 
itals and feweij foreign cap- 
itals. 

To this tW Secretary of 
State replied tally: “I’ve vis- 
ited my share of capitals, and I 
haven't noticed people advo- 
cating taxes on Americans to 
subsidize food or Russians.** 

Mr Shultz, bng valued -by 
President Reajan for his loy- 
alty, has recerdy defended in 
public the (tension to re- 
nounce the Sat 2 arms treaty, 
which he also opposed. 

His preseit inititatipn, 
which the Whie House insists 
will not alter the decision, is 
linked to the stnain this has 
caused in US daturas with its 
allies, particularly Australia. 

As form err dumped wheat 
outside the US Embassy in 



KerriB 


Canberra 
John 
Minister of 
wfa.q. is 
delegation 
subsidy 
wheat “ 
votes at 
ense,” he 
The 
ton, 

Mr 


‘III 


Monday, Mr 
Australian 
Industry, 
a protest 
said that the 
about selling 
about winning 
taxpayers’ exp- 


rot 


dy of $13 (£8.8) a 
personally by 
win cost US tax- 


payers about S52 rafflion if 
Moscow buys an of the nearly 
4 minion tons at $91 a ton. 

• BUENOS AIRES: Argen- 
tina has told Washington that 
its decision could have reper- 
cussions on the ability of 
Buenos Aires to repay its 
foreign debt (AFP reports). 

In a communique released ] 
on "Monday night, the Ar- 
gentine Ministry of F inan ce 
described the US move as 
unfair competition. It said 
that the cheaper sales would, 
reduce farm revenues of 
debtor countries by imposing 
lower prices in an already 
glutted market 

The communique gave a . , __ 

warning that if Washington j Dorothy Hodgkin, the British Nobel 
went through with the sales it Pr ™ ®“ “*■ — — 

would be necessary to find 
solutions to the problem of 
foreign debt that would allow 
further facilities to debtor 
countries. 

“All our efforts to balance 
our domestic and foreign ac- 
counts could be useless if the 
prices of our exports continue 
to &1T, the Ministry said. 

Argentina, one of the world’s 
largest wheat producers, has 
an external debt of S4S billion. 


Prize winner for che mist ry , < halting 
hands yesterday with Mrs Umeno Kob- 
ayashi, * victim of the atomic bomb, at the 
Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Hospital. She 
was one of the thousands of people who 
visited -the city to mark the 41st 


anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing on 
August 6, 1945. 

& HffirigMs said that she was shocked 
by what she had seen. “I’ve heard how 
horrendoos the atomic bomb was. Now I 
have seen for myself; and I'm utterly 
devastated," she said. 


There is no accurate death toll for the 
bombing, but figures compiled by the 
Hiroshima City Government show that 
130,000 people died within three months 
ami 140,000 died in subsequent years. 
Hundreds of thousands of others were 
exposed to nulla don. 


Britain joins chorus of Pinochet critics 


Kudos and censure 
for La Paz Veteran 


La Paz (Renter) — President 
Paz Estenssoro of Bolivia 
marks the first year of his 
fourth term in office today, 
basking in praise for ~ 
carbed inflation bat faring 
criticism for bavin 
US military aid to battle co- 
caine traffickers. 

When he took over, inflation 
was raging at an annual rate of 
24,000 per cent, prompting 
comparisons with Weana 1 
Germany and with scenes i 
residents hanfing satchels if 
pesos to market He hnppse< a 
wage freeze and fought offjib- 
oor protests by 
day state of siege, 
ffattioa to single-digit 
rates this year. 

The President 
into office for his 
with a reputation as a ppullst 
in the wake of the agrarian re- 
form and stale takover of 
mines ordered under ais first 
period of office betwen 1952 
and 1956. - . : • ! - 

Sedor Paz Estensora, who 
is 78, has surprisedsooe pol- 
iticians by forgingm alliance 


with; 


the^ 



_ t-wing party to con- 
measures to liberalize 
y, indndlng a seal- 
inpdjpwn of state nriniiq; oper- 
atwfk. 

IBs new policies earned a 
807 million (£713 m) loan 
rom the Intmuatfonal Mone- 
tary Fand and cleared the way 
for renegotiating nearly SI .6 
billion in debts with the Paris 
Qubgroap of Western govern- 
ments. Bolivia's foreign debt is 
about $315 bilfioiL 

To his left-wing critics, me 
of the most objectionable mea- 
sures was to allow 170 US 
troops onto Botfviaa soil btst 
month to help in an anti- 
narcotics drive. 

Opponents charge that the 
presence of the troops end six 
Black Hawk helicopters is an- 
constitntional, since die Pre- 
sident tried to reek permis- 
sion in advance from Congress 
for the transfer aftbe soldiers. 

The anti-drugs drive has 
dismantled sn eocame labora- 
tories, two of them huge comp- 
lexes abte to produce two tons 
of the drag per week. 


Colony to 
end reports 
on cholera 

Hqog Kong (UP!) — Health 
officials yesterday announced 
four confirmed cases of chol- 
era, bringing the total to 14 in 
less than a week. 

They said they would no 
longer report the number of 
suspected cases, for fear of 
alarming the public. 

Almost 23.000 people were 
inoculated against the poten- 
tially fetal disease at special 
free clinics by late afternoon. 

Another 20,000 sought the 
injections on Monday, despite 
official statements that they 
were not advised for the 
general public. 

Officials on Saturday de- 
clared Hong Kong a cholera- 
affected area for the first time 
since 1979, after the confirma- 
tion of three cases that day 
and one the previous Wed- 
nesday. 

On Monday, authorities 
confirmed six more cases of 
the disease, which is charac- 
terized by diarrhoea and 
vomiting. 


From Lake Sagaris 
Santiago 

Mr John Hickman, the Brit- 
ish Ambassador in Santiago, 
has added his voice, and that 
of the European Economic 
Community which he also 
represents, to the growing 
number of countries cnticalof 
Chile's military regime. - 
In a private meeting on 
Friday with the Foreign Min- 
ister, Senor Jaime del Valle, 
Mr Hickman urged the Pino- 
chet Government “to take 
early steps towards the orderly 
restoration of democracy” ana 
to initiate “a dialogue with the 
democratic opposition.” 

The Ambassador’s com- 
ments came after a week of 
mounting international pres- 
sure on Chile. This peaked 
with the warning of Mr Elliott 
Abrams, the US under-sec- 
retary of state for inter-ameri- 
can affair s, that if the human 
rights situation did not im- 
prove before the World 
Development Bank's meeting 
in October, the US might well 
recommend the rejection of 
new credits for Chile. 

Mr Hickman also regretted 
the deaths and injuries result- 
ing from last month's general 
strike and emphasized that 
“the Community trusts that 
the Chilean authorities will 
establish and publish the full 
feels about the tragic cases of 
Rodrigo Rojas Etenegri and 
Carmen Gloria Quintana.” 


Seflor Denegri died from his 
injuries and Senorita Quin- 
tana is still fighting for her life 
after being burnt severely 
while in the custody of an 
Army pairoL Witnesses say 
that the soldiers first beat the 
two up. then poured petrol on 
them and set them on fire. 

The case became the subject 
of sharp exchanges between 
the Chilean Supreme Court 
and Cardinal J uan Francisco 
Fresno after the judge in 
charge of the case completed 
his investigation in record 
time, releasing aD the soldiers 
involved bat one, whom he 
charged with negligence for 
having failed to take the two to 
a hospital. 


Citing sections of Judge 
Alberto Echavarria's findings. 
Cardinal Fresno railed the 
judge's explanation of the 
incident clearly insufficient. 

He also urged the Supreme 
Court to conduct a detailed 
investigation. “This cannot 
become one more rase which 
remains unsolved and un- 
punished," be insisted. 

The entire Supreme Court, 
with the exception of its 
president, Senor Ra&el Ret- 
amal. responded by “reg- 
retting” Cardinal Fresno’s 
comments, because “they 
serve to confuse public opin- 
ion and undermine the pres- 
tige of the judicial system.” 

Judge Echavarria did not 



Senator Jesse Helms, left, 
who has accused the US State 
Department (rf a conspiracy to 
silence him. He says that an 
official falsely fold the Senate 
intelligence committee that he 
had leaked secret mformathm 
to the Chilean Government. 

The New York Tones has 
reported that the FBI is 
looking into allegations that 
Senator Helms, a Republican, 
passed on intelligence about 
Chile obtained as a member of 
the Senate foreign relations 
committee. In Santiago, the 
Chilean Foreign Minister, Se- 
der Jaime del Valle, has 
denied that Senator Helms 
had given Chile confidential 
information. 


question the doctors involved, 
nor were witnesses asked to 
identify the soldiers whom the 
Army put under arrest. In- 
stead he accepted the defence 
lawyers' argument that the 
severity of burn injuries be- 
came apparent only several 
hours later. 

He also accepted the official 
government explanation that 
Sehorita Quintana caused the 
fire kicking over a petrol can, 
which ignited spontaneously, 
burning her and her comp- 
anion. 

However, according to the 
doctors who treated them, 
although the two suffered 
severe bums on 62 per cent of 
their bodies, their feet were 
among the few parts un- 
touched by flames. 

The judge’s investigation 
also fells to explain serious 
injuries, caused by blows 
rather than bums. 

The case has caused world- 
wide indignation and in- 
creased pressure on the 
Chilean Government to im- 
prove its human rights record 
and move quickly towards 
democratic rale. 

In an unusual speech last 
week. President Pinochet 
admitted that he could not 
take measures he would like in 
order to preserve the peace 
“because I’m inhibited by 
international problems and 
because the calumny of 
politirans abroad is en- 
ormous.” 


Peres says 
Helsinki 
talks sign 
of change 

From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 

Mr Shimon Peres, the Is- 
raeli Prime Minister, yes- 
terday hailed as a positive 
move the Soviet Union’s re- 
quest for a consular meeting 
with Israel. It has been ar- 
ranged to take place in Hel- 
sinki, probably on Augusi !?, 
for up to three days. 

But in welcoming the Soviet 
request, Mr Peres made dear 
that in any discussions Israel 
will not forget its obligation to 
Soviet jewry. He also com- 
plained at the fen that the 
Soviet Union remained the 
largest supplier of weapons to 
radical Arab states such as 
Syria and Libya. 

In a radio interview, Mr 
Peres said of the talks: “We 
are not getting overly excited. 
But this is another step in the 
direction of the breakup of the 
reservations about Israel.” 

Coming after his recent 
talks with King Hassan of 
Morocco and the establish- 
ment of diplomatic links with 
Spain, the requested Soviet 
meeting was a further sign that 
Israel’s international political 
boycott was coming to an end. 

Apart from consular issues, 
Mr Peres said that the Rus- 
sians want to take part in an 
international conference for 
peace “which will open if the 
negotiations between us and 
the Arabs get under way”. 

He added: “We do not 
oppose their participating, on 
the conditon that they estab- 
lish full diplomatic relations 
with us, and with the hope 
that they will stop taking one- 
sided stands in the Middle 
East.” 

Mr Yitzhak Shamir, the 
Foreign Minister, said in an- 
other radio interview that it 
was too early to say whether 
the Soviet approach meant 
that it wanted to re-establish 
diplomatic relations, which it 
broke off after the Six-Day 
War in 1967. But Mr Shamir 
insisted that Israel would con- 
cede nothing unless it received 
something in return. 

The two Israeli leaders are 
insisting that if the Soviet 
Union wants to establish a 
consulate in Israel it must first 
agree to grant as many exit 
visas to Jews as are requested. 
If it wants to join the Middle 
East peace process, it must 
restore full diplomatic rela- 
tions with Israel. 

The chief Soviet concern at 
consular level is understood to 
be the amount of increasingly 
dda pi dated property owned 
by the Russian Orthodox 
Church in Israel. 


? ■ . 


Degrees awarded by the Universities of Exeter and Surrey 


The following Reter University 
degree results *e announced: 

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Harris <0.1* S M Wood OL2& F M 
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TLlteTd j Hoskins. 


(Cite S P Holmra al.1 

(D.lte L J Hubbard 01 

OLl* r S Jarvis 01.2). p E John m .. 
J M Kettle max T A Lester aLite s H 


E M Jan 

max 


OLl). 


S MAirwood 


BBttOP OLiy J E 


Burma may. o h e Carson aui: m 
H oway an): J R Parker may 1 E 
zoper (U.D 


MBi 


S ra pnn-i 

Kmuertey may o H Kinder 
W McLennan (BLlte L D , 

UL2): L C O Shrtmpton (0.1): V J 
«?•*!. . M 

R Sm an): m e 
1^ 

WhUetieaa OLl) I 

ehMi rarittriiMp 

fiTiteP J 


L Grant OLl): M Newman OLE) 

Lada rad A udi t rattan 


P s c M Capet ro.1): P D Feme OLS): 
J S Havtund a). 

HmU 

KFG Brown CB.1 K M R ; 
a c Johnston may d. r 
iPLeA 


DR Adam . 


OLite iTl'JHaninrt stay j 

.: I Bassett OLl* S H E3M 

E Budgoi ante S w Cheng 
Coggins OL2): BE Cotadi 
Corocn dllt D PJ QMV (DC 
0L2te G H DM^Ot-Ite 


R J Brown ra.]* C J Clee m.9y B G 
cott- airy, r d Dale m. i* C J Day n 
S HasUe OLl): J C Hawker^Jt* n 
H utto ra.i)- s j Morton ma w h 
OTV ehi cn.2^ M R Payne OLSte S C 

WOT (U.1). 


D M BenncO (HD: D 
A J Brook OLl): N F 
G Cot OLZte M p 
N A. Fell ralte P C 


Kings ai.t): D P 
Maran fsx.sfc M 


PA Buddln (D.l 

HU) OL2I: J Hot* 

ra.21: E Non^n^i: 


L Hoff (ILl 


0L2); I 
Jones 



QL2) 

D Barnes 
BucMnan. 
N M 

ai.i y. d j 

ftt-lte L M 

I (B. 15: M J 

Jones Ol.l): VK 


OLlte M 

Owens mar. h a mcv« i 

may. c o pumiuis ant a r smith ante 
a stone* ante _J e wjn er clso. 

Luke Andreskf* CU. V t j AvaHne 
oLijc p s Bouton ma J A 
Brassfogto (lU): s c OimmrMm 
may D c Duckett jrat j j n Ffcmr 
m3? M Hatlam OL* C Hmrne»«urtls 

S (?L Tooraba'cS^ 

nriiiiiamiM and BaataMn 

M G AbboniPmate P Cornish OLPte P 

M ROittoM 01,2). 


S p Ducat (iny. L a Edmaa* max T J 
Gowns may c T Gook am: H T 
QwwffirtCPHaniDiCJKWts 
Qte a Haynes mMJ Haywood Smith 
tPoas): O E Hinderka ante 8 L Kenton 
may S E King HL2): G C Lloyd aUte 
A R Lunn CUD: R M McNeil (im R J 
MegausdLl): G Merry OLlte P M S 
Monk Ola): G M Mess Sr. R B 

TNkhnte TO H J NqlSifflS^ O 

orraroci -a s E Randan mar. n r 
R lctiardMKi Or. N P 
M Soutar dLlte R L . 

wHwracm (?!. J): A^Wniianw OLlte K 

G winiama H : J W Woods (pass): J M 
wootricii nn£ 

Cranny ' rad Bu kp 

A L Cook ra.i): N P Tetley OLS). 

rtranut ry «d Uw 

J - - 


H S Brown (H^L R E Car CK.Xte D 
ST. F Han flL2L- J K 
MteteMsta (®0i R c 
Leiah may d s 
rryman OB): N L 


Grainger dl^te _ . 

Haywart OLlte CM 

Hln.aL2):_D S Mdjrish 

^ N G Perryman 


Ftancu ra.1): L j Goibkis may i o 
Cke» r^teJC Gudgeon am R W B 
Hagar may G M Hamaoora.1): L E 
James ®Ite H L Johnstone m.lte IS 
MacreadyuLa): J D Mctvar OLlteC W 

j - -® R H 


Lewis mar. j a uuinpioo may c m 
M acdonaM ra.i): A E MaskeB OLl): N 
Mathews Ol.iJ-A M McGonlgai (B.lte 
P E Metllow may a . j IM etchan ra.li: 
D R Monk Ol.l): C M Moozounl (11.1): 
S R Murphy Ol^teCCNorton 0L2): T 
P T Onions m.LK N Osborne may a 
P Paine Hi. l >- E Payne (112): i D 
Phillips OLlte s A PKkUjaM OLlteC J 
Ptastow (II.11.H J Pont oa-ite C J Pratt 

a j Rhodes OLlte J A Richards 

SSM 

Waison .... 

w logins OLlte M 

Wtnmanm 0L2) 


tst. riaw: A I Jau 
2nd sian 

Hiichcn: _ _ . c 

J Finch: A Hamlr^'C Havelock: I K 
Kelly: S P Rose: R W M Began D S 
Smiths E M Yea man. 

3rd otau: M J H Khar: N P Renart. 

BEng Msahanteal EngtaMrtsc 
1st class: D Stanton. 

2nd class (apper dta>: K D Aden: S F 
Dillon. 

2nd dm 0owsr Av): I Demetrtou: P R 
Walker. 

3rd Ettas T K Fong. 

Pass K J Haneef- 

Itt 

2nd i 

n 

Randall: 

YannofioU ^ 

2nd dm (lonr dtv): C Oeggc A T 
Code; a R Darwin; M L Green: A P 
McGrath: A C Mo till: P C Reynolds: p 
J smith: DCS Weston: H White: P J 
M Wright, 

3rd risss H M R Bailey: N G Brown: A 
J Burnous: S A James: W J Larknian: 
A K McKeown: a M Mather: D K 
Powell; J S Wallace; M J Wells. 


tad risss Oappar dhrt: H E ABbjttJ C 
Allen: J Barn PA Clark; L T Driven 
L J EltaiCJ Green. T A Greenwood: 
J Itewts; CM Unes: A M E Mills: M L 
Roberts: N j Rowell: N A Sayera. 
g-^o™ra«o:LJCook:PL 

v'fns.ii: 5avflle: c A c 

2ra Blass nnrar dtt): S j Johnson. 


of Science 

rad riass (kwor dw): D A Freeman: N 
Hanson: J B Homer. 

S A J Groves: S J Lawrence: T F 
Mortar iy: BAR Williams. 

Physios rath Modem Ao posU os 

*0= A Judson: C 

NrWfl. 

rad rtats (tower dhr): prj Mansfield: 
ST Rogers: K A Stroud: M A Wright. 
Pass: J B Dean. 

Physios rath MtomooMpoUnc 
1st due a S Townsend _ 

2nd class (appor d wy. M H Clark: L J 
Back: j w Ncswe. 

2nd otus power dtt): T J Ewlns: M J 
Hawes: M D Kdrofew Smnn. 

2nd Btass (upper M: a Chastney: A J 
Crampron: R D Dodd: D C Ekrombe; K 
Kwok: P Posluranonna: S G S Reed: S 
Shaw: K W Taheem. 


A E Chcsney: 
M G, While. 
P R Hayes: J 


S Reeves; 


_ B8o MenOurn 

/lSPs Law»f_ _ 


Baker: G B 


1): P G Rogers 
Ufte DJ Sayers 
OLD; R Skinner 

may a r suiiy 
OUteSE Teodor ante 
.iteS webb(Q.ite A j 

' c WDcock OLlte S 


2nd riass . 

Hotloway: M S Laws. 

2nd class Qovnr dtt): C F Dvessei: S A 
Heinrich. 

3rd class: C R CocHbear. 
Department of Biochemistry 
M c*au3«?^ a EberMfi. 


ra.ite.MR, Mi 




Koe cn.ite k RMStni 

am.' 




UCtl 


may j em 
IeC 


WMIl! 

Montague ftL2fc M _ Mugrrwa (0.1 
L NlCholh m^te 0» Pafienc* ffl.lX A 
K Raynor raTite VSim mqnos OLlte C 
H Soulhom 0L2KEA Valentine <D:S 
D void ns (ILltel Watson P M 

Waugh tu.2) 

Rrarauad Has Art 
E L Oval mi (n.ic HA SneU (ILl): J L 
Snook UL2X S C Wrtoerau mai 
Fnmw rad Conran 

J A Cowao au:^H Jt_Guder (D.lte A B 
Dcvanr 
Fisher i 
Hiinler _ 

Maitland 

Patterson (Bite C E nettards (IL2 j: A 
C G KateriS.1): R Union OLlte S O 
Wheeler m.k 


S JJBMe ffl J): N D La Tooclw OLlte K 
flu* JK Hobday gi^te ¥ s 


E Good 


R L 


Leefe OLZteC E S Painter 
PtflS auot J A Vlgne (D.l 

Ffriill rad UMliMM* 

s J Hudsoi may h KCMoraue ma) 
Fhnra.rad piidfnhy 
P J eurrwOLate TO Orem (D.l) 



C A Munngt ra.1): R M Pogh-Cook 

(BA) i 

RPJ Alya raSrSWe^o, .iteDj 
Mgeti (Hi: » A Brown OLD: J 
S2?n (B-lte S R Chubb OLl): P C 

SESVW p ** 


«»J): D A i 
inj): R - 


R A Evans 
u: M N Hat. 

gLlte,SMLhWl3f.fteT3 , J 
a K (Adnsiu dLSte A M MlBer dLit 
R W Phipps a jj: S pollock 0L2): L M 
S*erts fu.it J E Seale Oi.ii: S E 
ward rnjJteN a Woodford. (flJS) 

J 

Han on . 

Robinson (L2) 




O J AhrendBP! j c Bowes OLlte p m 
R Bravo — - - - 

Carrol) (l_ 

Constable 

Esmonds sax S C FoUand nuSte P J 
Goodrich (EDM Handley «li« J L 


P E carpenter oua): c H v Conrwefl 
■ctLlteS M Oovtoon OLlte ACQcurringe 
way M Heys (O.l): M A Phetps OLl). 

C V N BhagM QLSte J E 

A Anra aLlteB Qimui _ 
mnOL^DLJMuiQLateSM 
(8L2): D L Masson may m A Maria 
J J Spencer OLZte A J Stewart 

Spanish and Rs 

K Fowler BLlte M E U . 

_ .Ite H A 
_A Jones QLite 
.Penney OLl): 
wykas 

SBUtah rad 

R V L 

A H Carr may L Cooper pLZfc P J 
Duran! max J M F Fenwick may J 
M CtanvDK (DZ): A E Jones OIlteL J 
Maklmenl dte B Matthews my. F R 
Miner cflZte M JM SOverrajZte M G 
Smith OLite N Smoker (JuSTs E L 
Wlggans UL2te M D A WlUlatns 0L2L 
BA Law 

A Christian OLZte 

LLB 

G A Adams (UZte G R Arnold 

W Atkinson OLlte A R Barker 

Y Baxter may G M Bevan-Thomas 

olzTr our&tay. a m Boa (a.ite f 
Carr man A J ratter olt): n “ 
3ar. s QI|MoglB,UU«X ‘ 

_ Dyde I J 

. _ Fbrreswr 

Foster OLlte JRJGl^er 
Griesbacti OLlte S Frimihs (D^te T G 
Hackea (n.lte E L HandUno_Gi.lte J 
Hankfoson Ol.lte R A Harris BLZk L D 
Han Ol.l): A C Hearn ra.lr C A.L 

Herd mate A Hob) SJJ.aJg F E 

aL2k D A Hopkins (DJI. C P He. 
ilLIK M Jofflfe OIA): IF S3 Jones . . .. 

j W Kerr OLS): J L Lnvary HL2): fi H 
G Lee OlZte J A Leech m Zte K J 
gi^>: s R Lowde Kite w M 
OLlte H J McFBU OLl 


T G Btgwood tony M . Gosling (D.l). 

ChsmliTiy rad Pfes-^os ' 

H J Bewlcy 0L2): K Moore UL2te A P 
Suckley (O. _ 

S P AIBioneraR^r J BedUnOLZte P 
MCWllc.nl in,ite J JClinton csUteJ L 
Davanpon ra.i): A D Galley dills 
Garraway OLZte A R Henson OLl): A 
Jones (DZteM J Laffcfly 0L» M 
Myers war. M j nix max' R e 
R andall OLlte D V RobcrtsflLl); P 
Ruocco may I Undertun ante M J 
web b OLlte N Wobey OLl): G 
woodhead OLlte 



and OmratriiiH 

S M Braggs OLZte R A J Jukes OLZte 

S C Annette cai^Pp'Hj 

M J Barnes OLlte F Btoor 
Camps old: R w Davies OLlte S •_ 
Easton gL2k H J El way (Q.1K CRD 
Evan OLZte A M Flrid (D.l}: J M 
Griffiths CHJSte C Hodben ra,5>: M L 
Holman ol.lteN M MSsonjnjSte H L 
Rotate 01.1): S Williams OLlte 


T Bandatigh may T TBrennen ra. Ik 
FI H Davtdra.lL A E Evans (SEJE); M A 
Evans OLZte P G Fredericks OLl): N J 
Goddard (11.2): v L Grove OL2te K R 
Hebblethwalle may V MKsSflLacJ 

HtSlS.lir^RJLM Si 

mai: e a tabo — 
mar. m j swau 
mar. J a suiik . 


C E Bewshw OL23: 

(Aevotatte N Cttsperd ante J CressaU 
inay N J Codling ra.lte 6 M Ceere 
OLlte C J Coodhead lift®: C King 
m.n: K M Latham (D: A B roettara 
War. J P QulnUvan m.i): G R 
Ravenscrtai max A D Tsador 0L2K K 
E Taylor dLiteM A Walden mfiM P 
Wllderspln 01.1}. 

Para Mid Andtod M M hen rafca 
A 3 Armstrong (0.1) “ ” 

CBL2te CM Btebuyckr 

may D Lambert sK a _ 

P D Wadey 0): H E Wilson OLfite 
Theoretical F 
M A Clayton Ote M D 

&wl (Pass): B Hnr ' 

may c Knock may P a Mulheran dte 
MT Ramnos olix J A White dte 


G M Atkin OLZte I C Ball (D.lte D A 
Boulter war. 5 J Cacfcett m J Carr 
Ol.tte S N Deutsch OL2J: M j Dlmney 
MJM w Duncan OLZte M P Evans 
mar. N w Geary m.iy K J Dunam 
01.2): D J Have mite; M C Kelsey 
OLZte M A KtaghTra^te N R La 
iiioo OLl):. jr L&iss dte a a 
; C A Luery OLZte D G 
m.i): i J Moore Ote N Moore 
A J H Murdoch uLZte M A 
Patterson m.lte A Slum way R p 
Thicken OLZte M E van Sansen OLlte I 
m wicks OLZte R P wuuams wa). . 


S M 

wot auziTJ c w&ite aLir lv ' A s 

Serial srata M jw rasra rass sad Agrt- 

B l D oyne may rca KUmisan may 
S J Knapman OLZte P A (FSUUIvan 
— te G M Wells may. 

‘ i Emm ' 

A J BobaDl cruff OLlte g m 


Surrey ssw* 

ui 1 V J N K Kcmovka: 

V Pendry: C. L S’ 


The following 
announced: 

BSc 


are 


(ILI): M Htafor 
Hcnwur OLlte A M Malm 
Pauiof-lte P N StaUart 
SMiui way 


MC 
1C I D 


Ctnumie: Y W 

■ A »s^ J r R SU1Boni 


C L Blrttel OLlte R J Green 012): 1 T 
OBbarne m.lte D RoucrtsoB mate J L 
Smith m.i): S N Watson (Cl). 


Ashe: J A S Cseavcrr M 
Leung: D R Lovell: A S 


D P 3Den : M J 


j_ Crefllc-U1 war. C_L B Darungton 
^GeorflJ - - 
Hhidea) 

Ion a): 1 

s? 


DarUnaton 

AM tawtm (p: CL MicaonUd {£4 
S L Party OLZkR I J Peers (Pass); DO 
M Price OLZjTr C M Savage KLav: j p 
aieehan m.lte H J K StaaeOOteS G o 
Sot m Jte P S Smith OLlte ARC 

SmM Stodlfi In 

C M Ash 0L2): V J ‘ 

Ferdtaiand I (B.lte r 
HanunotteCrMfcon 
way E I Jenkins ‘ 

kt 


_ , e. ); NS A1 KhaMlL C 

s Buchanan: E j Gannon: R o 
Goodwin: P Z Islam: A D Murray: R 
Mustaca: S httovl: j H B So oar. J 

SrSbnn K Cstrv S S Crewefc K J 
lyes: S S Kumar: J D PwHey. 

Past: D K Bowerman: G p R Bowman. 

Deftf ofC rril Eng in eering 

1st riass: /SJSpKffc Cavtne: I 

Manden: A J Soulliwood: I D 


lit 

2nd class fl—nlBi A D Ayrton: P K 
Chpnery; TP fWc L-A Grllfllhs: E 
5 Hennessey: T Jackson: c J LycetL C 

Y Man: L J sadonun. 

2nd to (in wsr diw): R K Chopra: P j 
Gaskin: K K Rahman: N M Savlteii: Z 
A Vaughan- 
Pass: G A Davison. 

„ - amB h.* 1 — 0 

2nd riass (npper dtv): A J Anderson: S 
Alkuison: S & Courtney: J M English; 
N K Konoeka: D N NorUilttld-. Y D 
Pendry: C L Swain: C A Lrwh 
2nd class (wtw dhr): N G Desousa 
Gwaia: s R Poore: C StyHanou. 

1st rtattSA^2IbSd^ t R , ?^*saver. 
2nd class rapper taw): D P Atherton: A 

SidCttcT <lwor tap; S D p Adams: K 
Burnett: A A B Pereira: I Scoble: D M 
Trow: G M Warner. 

Chemistry 

• with award or Associaieship an d 
Including a period of Industrial 
training. 

1st 


w 


■G J Harden: ■DJSwntn. 

(Uppar dh): -M K Croissant: 

-B c Jones: "S J Lytldn. 

2nd riass (Mr dli): “C J Barlow: "M 
W Edwards: -A L Evcrehed: A j 
Folland: ■$ L Lathom-Sharp; J L J 
Pemberton. 

3rd due P C AUwk D CaUietan: *N 
J Wilkinson. 

« —.*8E SSTS’W, 

M CllU: c Akarandrn T S LomJiutsL 
J E Offer: R K Patel: L J Small. 


PJ ArnofcJR 

nurse R J Coe: S D 


Fara (ff.if I 

V J Harvey 
R Thompson 


Davies OLlte E At 



orLZ): A Brien (Hite CT Ortau Massey OLlte HJ 
B M CotttrsL way N J HO McriCW! A M 

He (Lite SH Dancer Ol.lte HH C J Normam 4 WPlrten 
U02te SC FoUand may PJ L Pratt (ILSteD J Pudi 


_ RMpudge H 

Roberts «LZte C E Robinson mTl 


S O Headea ia.sr. m l Holoas m.i): 
J T RUey 01.1): C C Taylor 0L1L 

uathfcniticai BtatMief mo Op Ra 

N J Alton m; K Andereon OLl): P E 
Barnes ra.lte P Brandpm fi! 2): c E 
Hayes Brown mar J P Burnett OLZ); 
MC cadle (ILZte 8 F Clarke 0L2 ): p j 
C taeman ffliJM Creteiisn (ILl): G J 
Donegan OLZ): A W GUbey dL3); I M 
M Grant ie 3: C A Holder (0.7): R A 
Hough (on ante A L Jones OLlte S M 
Judo OLlte e J Mansell- Lewis (ID): J p 


BwSonore^.lte I MCLellan 

' (Paasr. A R Egerion ULZte B R 

Jones m.i): 1 R Lock <lL2te T J 
Newman may S Safer (D.1J: K w 
wants m.lte MAC Watson old. 

Bgkmitai ft r loans (CMO ' 

K M winter OLD. 

rratnssrtnf HHwca (Eto c trt cri ) 

J M McCarty may 
_ E utt i torihift Brimra (M uh ra ka n 
BGMaklnson may R J Ptuipott aL2te 
J G N WUUantsuiiZ). 

BSc 

AfitAtf g f iftIWf 

Brat P D FUlfortl OLZte 


PR v Barnes max M R Lee^Ainles 
(0.1): A E LorafoOLlte 

Serin SWh* la PriMfas 

J M Aarons OLlte D P Allen r" ' 
Brand ttLi); L J Hunt ra_ 

Hutton way R E B Malwuy . 

Makln max D M Mtuien 
Pried ULZte JJP Strong OLlte j D 

ineewfinaw 

mite i £ OTfSrfe wcpS 

way r Sroa-Lawson way 

Serita hi 

A J P Bales ULite n v K~BaaiU 

Jones dL2t R M Levine (1L 
Lewis otah I J Morris OLSj! 
may 6 j rssww mar. h 
seat ra . ay c"S secry 
StdetMOom (TL21. 



Austin: ji/tlfawEuiit 

BSu C A FrosrS B Jackman: M W 
jStti O L Morgan: E J Noble: N 
Pickering: B C PurnelL S Rpbem:_D P 
Rushion; DT Stokes; D 8 Turnbull; M 

JC WroML J P wutshire. 

2nd }:£%; (towsr dM; J N S 
SeichamSrt J T P Brennan; 8 I 

KStorTp^A gw CJCgmoon P 

A Cools; fi D J Downey: J Emhu K J 
am SC Hopkins: A M Lavers: S A 
MOUtaft C M PedJgK.M D Rye: 4 M 
Setra: P R ShJIlahrar: R S 
Skandamoerthy:, M_S. Turner. 

3rd cans: L K Daturasti: M W 
HanMn- M p NkoUtdeK R J Powls. N 

HSffWgfftw 

Cl— total rad EkKtrtcal EnawrtnK 
inrauc K Nd. M Payn: D J Stocks; 
ic elraMi 1C Taylbrt A H Turner: 

it M IMS 

BUk F Darwritie: P T D Souza: M M 


2nd class (towsr dtt te: M A Carter: J S 

k N R «Uult . .. . 

_ _ S Gasper: E Jones: M A 

Sellinan. 

Hdh— Ida with *» — i ra — 

1R etas; s j N HL . . » „ 

2nd class fnpper.i»>: JPtaUnL 
2nd riass (tower dh): K W Coleman; M 
J Harrison: R j mms: C A worn, 
tod riass: S P Collins: E M Maiuriak. 
Pw L M K Chan. 

Hamwtni rath CompmlnK Srinra 

1st etasE D W Reynolds. 

2nd riass (nper dm: A P Curraw R A 
Develyn: SAHaoklnson: w P Mann: 
A MNorfoit T J C Smith: P j 

2nd rinsqMsar dhi>: K W Buuer: B O 
Williams: R A Wewy: S Wren. 

" AH Fay; A Marwaha: M L 

H Cotonwn: G H RewiMeh. 


T S Arkiess 
JPR BtSfmTte^ D^L^C 


in.ii: P G De BroaoDeniulJZ); RAF 
Bnraanan mzteT w k Chan ou 
C Clark way h P Ellis m 
Foster m.i): M P GrakeU 





Ior L T<HW. 

%E£2m d iBbk p 

BbrtMfl: C cawm I N Cooke: S 
cSmSrTT ft coUcre B: P J E llMon: P 
C Hamn^:_P j Han^ j R | ^ 


2nd etas (upper too- c e trams: L 

W otast flower «v): L J Chambertatn. 
tod riaesi H M Loerter- 



- 1 Iti V| MB' S W . . 

crur K S Lai 'com be: w Longstatte: 
P A Mullarkey; A C C No. M GOffls: 

a l taiS?Bfeiri: D arafe: j wngiiC 
T V 

tod 


ft- M| V (lra% J Bagiln: M R Coker: R J 
rad DVJ..Grasion: G W 


_ _ — S L Cunntng- 

D. A DUnond: J H HaM Abu 



BLite N 

y. if m 

A P 


Coldney ittai: R I HaTetey (ft F J 
Haysom dte D A Hid m.&t. S H 
HoktEwortn m.2te N a jtaUing OLlte D 


c a Thomas nL2te E A 
OLZ). 

&KM Sthdtajn^ri PMkqr and 

J Ben ra.lte. k E Bevans mat J T euu 
mat r m ciiSge war. cocooc w£? 

Hawwtss j a Koty 

Nicholas aiTlk R A Souto 


B B LUndaiL-NJ N 
- lantlfonl; A 
D Walsh-- 


B A SanSfortj ARleSnS 


^*S?TSieS:Ron 0 vte S ;AP 

e it^?msar“ A 

^efsss 1 


dl.Z): E J Haw* 
mar. p M NiciK 


1st riass: MC 
2nd class JW. 
Beebe; A Brakes: G. 
Doherty: A P 


N ursine 9 

1st stasis J A Kfinber. _ 

2nd riass: C M Barron: D Bishop: K 
Hairhlcy: S Holmes: M A Kemp: J M 
Meikle: V H Russell: M S Seamen: J 
Scoil D mien: I Andrew: R AshertaL 1 
L Clarke: U M Gallagher: N D 
Harding; J S Hodges; P C Hogarth; A 
H Shaw; m A De Graft Johnson, 
ltd class: H Taylor. 

ixt ctasc E c HanSSoC v E Jackson: 
P J Moynihaiu S A Parkinson. 


vri): A S-M CheukiA 

S Florentladeu: C A Kay: S J King; I B 
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SPECTRUM 



The Wall of Death lives on 


It is 25 years since the 
Berlin Wall was built, 
splitting the city to 
halt the exodus of East 
Germans to the West. 
Frank Johnson looks 
back at this grim 
border’s sudden birth 


Twenty-five years ago this month, 
shortly after one o'clock on the 
morning of Sunday, August 13, 1961, 
the teleprinters of the usually unread 
and unreadable East German news 
agency AON began to transmit 
AON took as long as usual to get to 
the poinL and it was unclear what 
that point was. But the dispatch 
succeeded in giving the impression 
that something very unusual was 
happening. 

“The present traffic situation on 
the borders of West Berlin is being 
used by ruling circles in West 
Germany and the intelligence agen- 
cies of Nato countries to undermine 
the economy of the German Demo- 
cratic Republic," the message read. 
“Through deceit, bribery and blade- 
mail, West German government 
bodies and military interests induce 
certain unstable elements in the 
German Democratic Republic to 
leave for West Germany. 

“These deceived people are com- 
pelled to serve with the West 
German army, and are recruited for 
the intelligence agencies of different 
countries to be sent back to the GDR 
as spies and saboteurs ... In the face 
of the aggressive aspirations of the 
reactionary forces of West Germany 
and its Nato allies, the Warsaw Pact 
member states must take necessary 
steps to guarantee their security and 
primarily the security of the 
GDR . . . 

“It goes without saying that these 
measures must not affect existing 
access provisions for traffic and 
control on communications routes 
between West Berlin and West 
Germany" 

What measures? This was undear. 
But as the dispatch was moving over 
the wires. East German soldiers and 
police were unrolling barbed wire 
down the middle of Berlin. In the 


Men and women 
with suitcases kept 
climbing the wire 


darkness of East Berlin, shadowy 
workmen could be seen unloading 
concrete posts, bricks and shovels 
from lorries. By daylight people 
such as waiters and cleaners who 
went from East Berlin to Sunday jobs 
were told by East German guards 
that they would not be allowed to go 
to the West for the time being they 
were to report the next day to offices 
where they would be told what their 
new jobs were — in East Berlin, that 

is. 

A western diplomat now in East 
Berlin, who in 1961 was serving with 
his country's military government in 
West Berlin, said that the West’s 
representatives in the city knew for 
several days that an unusual amount 
of building material was being piled 
up on the outskirts of East Berlin, 
but they did not know why. 

The western powers did not expect 

it. nor realize for some time what 
was happening. The politicians had 
not expected anything over the 
weekend that might distract them 
from the usual activities of mid- 
August. President Kennedy was 
sailing on his father's yacht off 
Hyannis Port Harold Macmillan, 
the Prime Minister, and Lord Home, 
the Foreign Secretary, were on the 
grouse moors for the weekend of the 
Glorious Twelfth. President de 



Gaulle was at Colombey-les-deux- 
Eglises; he was expecting a crisis at 
any moment but over Algeria. 

It was assumed that the Russians 
would do something about Berlin. 
They had been threatening to cut off 
the western access routes for some 
time because they objected to the 
Allies being in Berlin at alL There 
was also the separate problem of the 
rising number of East Germans 
flocking to East Berlin to escape into 
West Berlin and thence perhaps to 
West Germany. 

it was widely assumed that the 
only way in which the Russians and 
East Germans could stop the exodus 
would be to prevent people entering 
East Beilin from the surrounding 
parts of East Germany. This would 
not involve the Western allies. What • 
the East Germans and the Russians 
did in that part of Germany was 
considered their own affair. The 
Russians and the East Germans 
could hardly stop the westward flight 
in Berlin itself, it was feh. It would 
look too bad. It would involve their 
putting some sort of a wall across the 
entire city. 

Twenty-five years later. Dona 
Falkowski, who works in the West 
Berlin Tourist Office, is one of 
thousands of Berliners who remem- 
bers the days during which the 
Russians and East Germans did 
exactly that. 

She was aged 12 then and had 
known for a long time that some- 
thing bad was going to happen. Her 
parents were always talking about 
people who were trying to sell their 
houses so that they could go and live 
in West Germany. There were lots of 
big bouses which had become very 
cheap. But still nobody wanted to 
buy them. 

On that Sunday, men and women 
with suitcases - and sometimes with 
children — kept climbing over the 
wire and running forwards. Others 
wbo tried to do the same were 
frightened away by soldiers or 
policemen. 

Her cousin, who lived in the East, 
was being confirmed, but Ilona was 
told she would not be able to go to 
the church itself. It was arranged for 
her to overlook the confirmation 
procession from the window of a 


bouse which was just on the western 
side. 

August 13, 1961 is the date of 
much folklore among West Berlin- 
ers, quite a lot of it true. In 
Bernauerstrasse the line between the 
Russian and French sectors ran 
down the centre of the street On the 
Russian side, people jumped from 
windows to get to the West before 
guards and bricklayers could burst in 
to bride the windows up. 

But not all the guards were 
enthusiastic about their work. There 
are stories of East German guards 


3 miles 


EAST ^ GERMANY! 



Baffin wafl 


GREAT ESCAPES 


1961: August 13. Wall appears . 
overnight 
August 15. Conrad 
Schumann, an East German 
guard, hurdles a barrier 
in a dash to the west 
1964: October 3/4. A total of 57 
men, women and children 
escape during the night 
through a tunnel , 

1983: March. Two young East 
Berliners use a bow and 
arrow to fire a line 
across the wall Helpers 
haul them In 

1966: July 30. An East Berliner 
daims-to have escaped by 
disguising himself and 
three shop dummies as , 

Russian soldiers. | 

A total of 74 East Germans have 
died at the Berlin Wall in attempted 
escapes. Another 1 10 have lost 
their rives tying to break' through 
along the Bb8-mUe main border with 
West Germany. More than 197, (XX) 
East Germans have escaped. 


looking in the opposite direction as 
people escaped, and there is even a 
suggestion of a certain sympathy for 
the guards in the early days, a feeling 
on the western side that the guards 
were as much victims as anyone else. 

This changed after their first 
killing. Peter Fechier, aged 18. tried 
to climb over near Checkpoint 
Charlie, the main official border 
crossing, and died from a shot fired 
by a guard in the second storey of a 
house (the East Germans having not 
yet had time to build watchtowers). 

So it has gone on ever since. A few 
weeks ago, one of the bonier guards 
sustained gunshot wounds near the 
French sector, and was seen being 
carried away, perhaps dead. The East 
Germans told the Allies that be had 
tried to commit suicide while men- 
tally ilL Since 1961, the guards have 
probably formed the biggest single 
occupational group among escapees. 
But over the years it has been made 
more difficult for them. 

They patrol in twos and threes, 
which are said constantly to be 
changed to prevent friendships 
developing which might discourage 
them from shooting if one tried to 
escape. They are seldom Berliners. 
The Berliners like to say that they are 
Saxons, because Saxons according to 
Berlin mythology would serve any 
regime. 

In August, 1961 the wall was 
mainly a barbed- wire fence, inter- 
spersed with concrete posts, but it 
soon became all concrete. Most of 
the buildings near it on the eastern 
side have been knocked down to 
create an open space for the watch- 
towers, the floodlights, the dogs and 
the ingenious machines that fire 
bullets if anyone moves in front of 
them. 

The buildings which remain close 
to the wall have iron bars across then- 
westerly windows. Beyond the main 
wall is another wafl to prevent 
would-be escapers from gening even 
as for as the open space. It is East 
Germany's largest public works pro- 
gramme by far. 

Victorious powers place much 
importance on presiding over the 
capital city of the defeated, so after 
the Second World War Berlin was 10 


be divided into occupation sectors; 
British, American, French and Rus- 
sian. The dividing lines were based 
on the boundaries of the old bor- 
oughs. The Russian sector was the 
largest and most easterly. 

It was agreed that people should be 
fire to move to and from the various 
sectors. At one stage many lived in 
the East and worked in the West To 
find asylum in West Berlin and then 
perhaps move on to West Germany, 
someone living anywhere in East 
Germany could simply go to East 
Berlin and cross into the West. 
Republikfluchi. fleeing the republic, 
was a crime under East German law, 
but the checks in East Berlin were 
not stringent, whereas on the forti- 
fied border of East Germany itself 
about 120 miles to the east, the 
measures to keep people in were 
almost impregnable. By 1961, the 
numbers getting out via Berlin had 
reached millions. 

No peace treaty was signed and the 
world became divided. The original 
British, French and United States 
occupation forces found themselves 
defending the liberties and institu- 
tions of the 1.5 million people of 
West Berlin. The Allies refused to 
accept East German and Russian 
claims that East Berlin was East 
Germany’s capital, because to do so 
might have called into question their 
right to be in West Berlin, a right 
which Nikita Khrushchev, the Rus- 
sian premier, bad been describing as 
anomalous and unjustified for years 
before 1961. To the Allies then, as 
today. East Berlin was merely the 
Russian occupation sector of the 
city. 

The building of the wall was illegal 
because it violated the right of people 
to move freely from one sector to 
another. That right was recognized 
in the occupation agreements con- 
cluded with the Russians. In August 
1961 some of the West Berlin crowds 
jeered at the Allies, especially the 
Americans, for not knocking down 
the barrier, but the East Germans 
were careful to bnfld it a few feet 
inside the Russian sector. To knock 
it down would have represenuxl a 
potentially perilous incursion into 
what the Allies themselves said was 
Russian-occupied territory. 

Nowadays, the wall is West 
Berlin's biggest tourist attraction. 
Platforms are supplied for people to 
look over ft. Visitors sound and 
appear horrified, but they tend to be 
the world's ordinary people. There is 


The wall is West 
Berlin’s biggest 
tourist attraction 



not much evidence that the wall 
continues to horrify the generality of 
the educated classes. Professor John 
Kenneth Galbraith, asked his opin- 
ion of tbe wafl seven years after it 
was built in an interview in the West 
German weekly Die Zeil replied: “I 
think the wall is a good thing. At any 
rate, it has preserved peace." 

Over the years, however, there 
have been enough less august figures 
to cover the western side of the wall 
with jokes and rude graffiti about 
communism. “East German high- 
jump team training area", one says. 
There are also entries of varying 
degrees of affection or obscenity on 
the subject of pop angers. People 
who live nearby say that first it was 
Elvis Presley; now Boy George is 
popular. The graffiti are in all major 
languages except Russian. 

As the wall is a couple of yards 
inside the communist half of the city. 
East Berlin workmen with brushes 
and pails are allowed by the West 
occasionally to wipe it all off 
Because they are at such moments 
only a few steps from freedom, it is 
assumed by the locals that these 
workmen are the only loyal com- 
munists to be found among the 
working class ofEast Bolin. Even so, 
it is noted, two workmen are usually 
accompanied by three armed guards. 


On two wings and 


Three of us, nervously wait- 
ing. “First time?” I ask. 
“Yup”. answers one: the oih- 
ers are moving to the window 
and looking skyward. It is like 
a scene in a Second World 
War movie. We all tense when 
we hear the distant but un- 
mistakable throb of a propel- 
ler-driven aeroplane. We 
crane our necks for a glimpse 
of her green, white and red 
livery and her Snoopyish 
droopy nose. 

“There she is!" we almost 
cheer, and within minutes the 
solo flagship of Suckling Air- 
ways. Britain's newest and 
cuddliest airline, has come to 
a smart halt in from of the 
terminal building. Well, more 
a 1930s aerodrome building — 
but this is Ipswich and Suck- 


Bom on the kitchen 
table top and weaned 
despite considerable 
official opposition. 
Suckling Airways — 
Britain’s latest 
international airline 
— is flying high 


ling Airways has been flying 
for only a few months. 

Captain Roy Suckling is 39, 
a former charter pilot and 
joint-owner with his wife, 
Mcrlyn. of a £2.5 million. 18- 
seater Domier 228. As we 


\Um£Uu^BAMCHEF863 

QUAmrcMEC^REa^ 

Moulinex has identified a possible weakness in the 
blades of a small number of these blenders which may 
lead to a breakage after a period of usage. 

If the four figure number etched on the plastic base 
of your Moulinex Babychef ends in the figure 5 please - 
return it to your service agent for blade replacement 
The address of your nearest Service Agent is listed 
in the instruction leaflet. Yellow Pages, or Thomson. 

In case of difficulty telephone 01-668 2461 for the name 
of your nearest Service Agent 

Moulinex apologise for any inconvenience, and 
assure customers that the fault is restricted to a small 
number of the model mentioned above. 


a prayer 

watch, he springs smartly out 
of the cockpit with as much 
gold braid on cuff and cap as 
any jumbo jetster. He is grey 
for his age, as befits a man who 
has done battle with the 
conservative ways of the Gvil 
Aviation Authority for the last 
four years. 

"When we applied for the 
licence and Suckling Airways 
was announced as wanting to 
fly between Ipswich, ■ Man- 
chester and Amsterdam, 
someone at the CAA rang up 
and asked if it was a practical 
joke”, says Merlyn, eyes 
widening and lips puckering at 
the very thought of the CAA. 
“I made my mind up there 
and then to prove those- 
blighters wrong.” 

There's no tarmac to cross 
at Ipswich airport, only grass. 
Landing lights are an innova- 
tion. too. “1 had to fight to get 
customs here”, says Suckling, 
as he struggles with a flask of 
coffee - part of the in-flight 
catering. “We're close to 
Felixstowe and f finally got 
them to agree to come up here 
in between ships.” 

My fellow travellers and I 
are excited as we strap our- 
selves in. Globally, it's a small 
step from Ipswich to Man- 
chester but to fly it is a great 
leap forward for East Anglian 
mankind, cut off as he is from 
the motorway network. 

“I think businessmen hate 
travelling", says Suckling, 
“they just want it quick and 
simple. Some of the old oper- 
ators will tell you it's not real 
flying unless you’ve got oil 
running down the engine, but 



The flying family Suckling: in-flight Thermos flasks and home-made croissants 


travellers want service, not 
romance. Thai's why it’s 
called Suckling Airways -- not 
because I want tosee my name 
in lights but because the name 
of the complaints department 
is down the side of the aircraft 
for all to see." 

Merlyn adds: “People say to 
him when they ring up, ‘Am I ' 
really speaking to Mr Suck- 
ling? Oob. it's like talking to 
Richard Branson P.” 

Suckling hands the Ther- 
mos to the stewardess, a tiny 
girl chosen because she does 
not have to stoop in the - 
plane's restricted headroom. 
He then passes her a blue 
picnic box of pre-packed 
meals. 

Our captain, a lad who has 
worked his way up to pilot 
rank from airport fireman, 
gives the official “Welcome 
to . . recitation over the 
Tannoy; when it’s over he puis 
his head round the curtain and 
smiles. “Morning, gents". 

We rumble down to the 
airstrip. Suckling is waving 
farewell from his office. Like 


schoolboys on an outing we all 
wave bade. We taxi-down an 
avenue cut through a field of 
barley - strange to be playing 
tag with tractors. The engines 
rev. the brakes are off and we 
rise to every molehill until we 
reach take-off speed. Then, 
with one flap of its hi-tech 
wings. Suckling's albatross is 
flying. “Great machine", 
beams the pilot, “six weeks 
and not one red warning light 
yet.” 

Food next and, like the rest 
of the operation, h's no joke. 
“Eat your lemon tart if you 
can”, urges the stewardess. 
“Lucy hates it if there are any 
left-overs." Lucy is Suckling's 
in-flight caterer. This morning 
she offers fresh croissant, a 
fish mousse, and a salad of 
peach and pineapple from the 
kitchen of her Ipswich home. 

“There’s no book on how to 
start an airline", sighs Merlyn. 
“We planned it all ourselves 
across the kitchen table. I used 
to be a barrister so I had to 
start flexing some rusty legal 
muscles. Bui it was hard. We'd 


go to some of the public 
hearings and the objectors 
would tuhi up with more 
lawyers than we have staff 
I remember the first ques- 
tion the CAA asked at the 
inquiry; ‘Do you have any 
experience in running an 
airline? I looked at Roy and 
said ‘NopeT but I made a good 
speech , I had made it up in the 
bath the night before.” 

For all the scorn the couple 
pour upon the CAA, they heap 
praise on the Department of 
Transport. “They were great 
We'd ring up and they'd say 
‘Oh no, not you again', but 
things got shoved under 
ministers' noses fester than we 
had any right to expect” 

We land at Manchester on 
time, sorry it's over but as 
excited as any pioneers. As we 
leave the plane we shout 
"Thanks!” to the captain. It's 1 
a long time since a public 
uansport driver provoked 
that response. 

Paul Heiney 

QfTltiiu Net Ltd, 1980 


Clear-out at 
kitsch castle 

New York has a week to assess 
the bad taste of ex-President 
Marcos of the Philippines 


Soon after the fell of Ferdi- 
nand Marcos fa February, the 
new president, Corazon 
Aqmno, had peasants bussed 
from their ramshackle reality 
to die Malacapang Palace in 
Manila to slum them the 
opulence in which Marcos 
and his wife, Imelda, had 
lived. 

Today, an altogether more 
sophisticated crowd will shuf- 
fle through the doors of the 
Marcos mansion in Man- 
hattan, not merely to gawk 
but to buy. Virtually every- 
thing that can be moved 
Inside the seven-storey man- 
sion at 15 East 66th Sheet is 
to be auctioned later this 
month after a week's viewing. 

Satin sheets embroidered 
with Imelda’s initials, IRM; 
unopened gifts kept handy 
sbonld friends drop by un- 
expectedly; Steinwajs played 
by van Ctibran at intimate 
gatherings; exquisite sofas, 
chaises, cabinets, gfltwood 
with side tables, one of which 
is valued at £30,000, 
Marcos’s tooth mugs, every- 
thing. It is the fairest 
dearoot since the removal 
men went to work in Citizen 
Kane. 

What is astonishing, how- 
ever, is not the opulence, but 
the appalling taste. The Mar- 
cos mansion is a kitsch castle. 
Giant, vile paintings, monu- 
ments to arrogance and greed 
and self-deception, with tides 
like Triumph of Beauty and 
Triumph of Courage, greet 
the visitor. 

Here is Imelda, bejewelled 
and yomg; here Ferdinand, 
heroic and virile; here Inti, 


ippine government offi ci als, 
spent several months assess- 
ing and cataloguing the Mar- 
cos possessions, points to one 
piece: “This is typical of their 
taste. Here is a fine 17tb- 
centnry French cabinet. They 
put this shellcraft tree on top 
so it looks as if it is growing 
oat of it-“ 

Among the tat, whore sale 
price will depend on the 
po rting in on of sonvenir hunt- 
ers, there are fine antiques 
that will attract serious 
collectors. They include rare 
first editions, apparently 
bought by the yard and never 
opened. There is a George III 
gfltwood mirror, from Lord 
Wilton's Ditchley Park Es- 
tate in Oxfordshire, valued at 
£30,000; an 1810 Paul Store 
silver wine-cooler, bearing 
the arms of Devonshire im- 
paled with the arms of North- 
ampton and valued at 
£25,000; a George HI inlaid 
mahogany harpsichord by 
Baker Harris, valued at 
£10,000, and a number of 
monumental K'Ang Hsi bine 
and white porcelain vases, 
valued at £2,000 a each. 

Most of the immensely 
valuable pieces vanished be- 
fore Marcos accepted elec- 
toral defeat. It is to finance 
.litigation to recover there 
pieces, worth £75 million, and 
about £7 billion in real estate 
that the New York auction is 
being held. 

The mansion was the Phil- 
ippine consulate entil the 
mid-1970s when Marcos des- 
ignated it one of his official 
residences. It was one prop- 
erty to which tiie Aqmno 


Cart Classman 



Empty shell: washbasin in Imelda’s favourite motif 


their daughter, fine-featured 
and Italia Date. Pope John 
Paul II is surfing on a cloud. 
President Reagan, standing 
astride the great seal of the 
United States, is younger and 
stronger titan in Heuatts of 
the Navy. Each of the paint- 
ings, by Ralph Wolfe Cowan, 
cost £50,000. In fact, they are 
photographs Mown np to life 
size, overpainted, touched op 
and laminated. 

On the sixth floor is a 
rumpus room, ImeMa's per- 
sonal playpen, mirrored on all 
sides, where the first lady of 
the Philippines boogied late 
into the night. It has sound- 
synchronized strobe lights 
and a solarium. Slogans from 
ImeMa's “1 spend, therefore I 
am" philosophy are em- 
broidered onto cushions 
strewn abort: the room. “Noo- 
vean Riche Is Better Than No 
Riche At All", says one. 
“Good Girts Go To Heaven. 
Bad Girls Go Everywhere", 
says- another. 

£n the library are cheaply 
framed photographs that 
ImeMa apparently kept to 
remind her of her social 
acceptance in the wider worid 
beyond Ma i ac i n a ng — pic- 
tures of her with, among 
others. Lord Mnmrtbatfan of 
Bnrma and Princess 
Margaret 

There is sbellcnrft in every 
room - llamas made of 
seashdls, chests, lamps and 
picture-frames. Kenneth 
Lustier, who has, with Ph3- 


government was easily able to 
establish a legal claim. 
Establishing a chum to other 
Marcos property is proving 
ranch more difficult. 

Marcos minions stripped 
the walls of the mansion and 
took paintings and objets 
worth millions of pounds. 
There are holes in the wails of 
some rooms indicating the 
haste with which some of 
there pieces were torn down. 
The missing paintings in- 
dude works by Brueghel, 
Cezanne, Degas, Gauguin, 
Manet, Matisse, Mondrian, 
Monet, Rubens, UtxiUo asad 
van Dyke. 

By Ear the most poignant 
cranny of the Marcos man- 
sion is one that most prospec- 
tive buyers and souvenir 
hunters will not be shown 
today because there is noth- 
ing there to acquire. It is the 
squalid roach-infested base- 
ment quarters where, de- 
prived of natural light, a 

seamstress lived. She slept on 
a tiny cot in an overheated 
room by the sewing machine 
where she toiled. 

Down a corridor from a 
grim y com munal Hfrhwi % 
dormitory for bodyguards. 
Empty revolver boxes litter 
the room and, unlike the walls 
of the mansion upstairs, there 
is only me piece of decora- 
tiw>- ft is a poster for the 
movie Rumba. 

Peter Fearon 


CONCISE CROSSWORD No 1021 

ACROSS 

X Supporter (43 
4 Jumble (6) 

7 Praise (4) 

8 Eternal (8) 

9 Support publicly (8) 

13 Weep (3) 

16 Explosives substance 
(13) 

17 Gamble (3) 

19 Encourage (8) 

, 24 Toodcvcrfclkjw(8) 

25 Shaded avenue (4) 

26 Population count (6) 

27 Cosmetics (A2) 

DOWN . 

1 Hairless (4) . 

2 Power seizure (4. M) 

3 Lose one's nerve (5) 

4 May (5) 

5 Import tax (4) 

6 Sexual partner (5) 

10 Seaair(5) 

11 Impromptu (13) 

12 Surpass (5) 

SOLUTION TO NO 1020 
ACROSS: 1 Cleric 5 Dope 8 Merit VNmimik „ , .. 

Hmt ^Auguste Renoir 17 Even 18 s£|SSS^ 31 TuSS* a 



13 Coordinate (9) 

M American (4) 

15 Insult (4) 

14 Babylonian captivity 72 Dirtiness (4) 

(5) 23 Prune (4) 


20 Slimy secretions ( 

21 Ancient muse ha 


Still 23 Once - 24 Senses 

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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 

WEDNESDAY PAGE 


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Philippa Greaves: “The City is traditionally a male sphere, and any successful woman has to be that much better than her mat* counterpart to get on” 

Old girls, new networks 


I clinched my first job through the 
old girls’ network. The editor 
interviewing me had a sister who 
bad gone to my old school — the. 
same one that produced Esther 
Rantzen, Susie Orbach, the Jay twins 
and others. My interviewer didn't, of ; 
course, say that was the secret of my 
success, but the inference was there 
and 1 was slightly appaDed. 

Perhaps I shouldn't have been. After 
all. the old tie system has been helping 
countless numbers of schoolboys up 
the ladder from the minute they don 
their prep-school short trousers — not 
to mention all those male clubs where 
many a promotion is fixed over a G 
and T and a handshake. 

Now, however, a new phenomenon 
is emerging:- old boys' networks for 
women, created by high-flying females 
who feel the fair sex mould have a leg 
up too. The principle of luncheon 
meetings for women to promote 
contacts has long been hailed as good 
business sense in the United States, 
but has really caught on in Britain only 
in the last few years. 

The result is about eight different 
clubs here — some for professionals 
like bankers, others for more general 
disciplines like management— provid- 
ing regular meetings, guest speakers 
and informal get-togethers where 
members can air theprofilems of betng 
women in a man's world. 


Women who feel lonely in the boardroom are 
combining to create their own answer to the old 
boys’ networks that have secured many a male 
promotion. Jane Bidder reports on the clubs 
that now provide contacts and jobs for the girls 


“Only about 3 per cent of senior 
managers are women so we need 
something to stop us feeling isolated in 
the boardroom”, says Irene Harris, the 
40-year-old founder of Network, who 
runs her own conference business. 
“We meet twice a month at the 
English Speaking Union and have had 
speakers like Brenda Don and Lady 
Porter. We also have small discussion 
groups to mull over mutual problems 
like office politics. 

“A great deal ofbusiness is done this 
way: members make work contacts 
and hear of job opportunities. We can 
even go one better than the old boys* 
network because we're often more 
supportive and sharing. A member 
would be honest enough to say Tm 
terrified about making a presentation 
next week’, and in return we could 
give her support and make helpful 
suggestions. A man can’t always admit 
hisfrailties.” . 


as providing an ideal opportunity for 
brushing up on career developments 
and forging business links. Women in 
Banking (founded m 1980 by a group 
of women bankers, and with a current 
membership of 18$ in London and 
Bath) takes women from every level of 
the finance industry. ; 

“Some are still graduates or clerical 
staff like secretaries who itch, to go 
further”, says chairwoman Philippa 
Greaves, a 33-year-old assistant man- 
ager at the Saudi International Bank in 
London. “The City is traditionally a 
male sphere and any successful 
woman has to .’be that much better 
than her male counterpart to get on. 
Because of that we tend to take 
ourselves seriously rather than stress 
the social side as a men’s dub might 
We’ll meet twice. a month — once for 
an informal lunch in the City and then 
in the evening to hear a guest speaker 
talk on finance ” 

Network, founded in 1981 with 500 
senior women members from London 
to Glasgow, is much harder to 
infiltrate. There are strict entry 
requirements to maintain a high 
calibre; members have to earn a top 
salary (the average is over £20,000); 
they have to control a certain number 
of staff (Network won't give figures): 
and they have to have been at a senior 
level for at least three years. There's 
also the small matter of the £50 
registration fee (the organization is 
non-profit-making). 


s 


ante people don't know what 
to expect when they go 
through Network's doors for 
the first time. “They suspect 
we're a group of Amazons but 
mice they make trends, they realize 
that's untrue”, Irene Harris says. *Tve 
actually watched members alter their 
attitudes and dress sense, and this 
helps their careers because they’re 
more confident-” 

Women in Management (founded 
20 years ago, with a current member- 
ship of 800) welcomes women from all 
spheres including catering, computing, 
television, hotels, the commodities 
industry, teaching and hospitals. “We 
like people to have some management 
experience, but we make special 
provision for young girls entering the 


‘We’ve taken 
some steps 
forward, like 
the pension 
scheme at BP’ 

Mary Anderson 


field who might not have the know- 
how yet but want to get it”, explained 
chairwoman Valerie Boakes, aged 45, 
a commodity adviser. “We have 
members from the top and bottom 
although we do find that the more 
senior girls come to our six-weekly 
forum luncheons while the younger set 
prefer our monthly discussion 
evenings.” 

Woman power at such meetings is 
considerable and industry hasn't been 
slow in picking its brains. Women in 
Management for. example, is spon- 
sored by the four major banks. “We 
can provide information and they can 
use us as a sounding board for advice 
on how to develop a female 
. employee's career”, says Boakes. 
“We’re .also setting up a shadowing 
scheme whereby one of our members 
would be asked by a sponsor to 
L shadow one of their staff at work and 
give the company ideas on how h cad 
improve m a na g ement te chniq ue and ' 
job- opportunities. - 
“More generally, any member of 
onr group can approach another and 
_ talk out proMems.abont her own role 
.in her particular fern. And, of course, 

” there are always tip-offe about jobs in 
other companies.” 

Company roles are particularly 
pertinent to in-house old girl net- 
works. Women in BP, for instance, 
was set up in 1982 after the founder of 
Women m Management gave a lecture . 
at the company. The personnel depart- 
ment set upa women’s network to give 
staff more confidence in themselves 
through meetings on assertiveness and 
career planning, and also to make 
male colleagues more aware of un- 
tapped female talent. ‘ 

Mary Anderson, a 24-year-okl BP 


M 


economic analyst and chairwoman of 
the group, denies that it is a company 
puppet: “We operate independently of 
personnel and have taken some major 
steps forward, such as talking to BP 
about its pension scheme for women. 
We're also there if someone is offered 
promotion to another department and 
wants to know what it’s like. Before 
long, we'd like to see more women at 
the top — there aren't any at board 
level yet The strength of an in-house 
network is that we know each other's 
framework. The disadvantage is isola- 
tion from outside companies, al- 
though we do meet up with other 
networks socially.” 

ost old girls’ networks 
deny that they are femi- 
nist. Women in Manage- 
ment even admits male 
members: “There are 
only a handful but we have had one 
chap on our executive team”, recalls 
Valerie Boakes. “After an, we work 
with men and many feel they can learn 
about us by coming along.” 

The majority, however, restrict 
membership to women,, like the 
Association of Women Solicitors 
which has more than a thousand 
members all over Britain. “There 
wouldn't be any point in our name if 
we ailowed men in”, says 34-year-okl 
chairwoman Theresa Grant Teterkm. 
“We can, of course, bring them as 
guests — the other month, we had a 
valuation evening at Sotbebys which 
most husbands enjoyed. 

“Prospects for women have changed 
since we were founded in 1923 fay the 
only three female solicitors in Britain. 
But we still need to support each other, 
particularly in law where there aren't 
enough women partners. It’s vital to 
leaxn from each other and even discuss 
domestic trivia like coping with a job 
and school holidays. Most male 
colleagues are impressed by us and 
companies frequently ask us to recom- 
mend people. I'd like to think that in 
20 years’ time, we won't need to exist 
because women will be standing more 
on their own. Or maybe there’ll be an 
association of male solichorsT’ 

QltaM 



THE OLD GIRLS’ 
CONTACT BOOK 


Child snatching: hope for 
the parents left behind 


New regulations will 
make it easier to 


Wand? Ho* 


recover children 


who are taken 


abroad, reports 


Clare Dyer 


Last Friday, as Linda Bell was 
waiting, for a Portuguese court 
to decide whether she could 
see her two young sons for the 
first time in three years, a 
convention against child 
abductors came into force in 
Britain. It series to eliminate 
the trauma and expense that 
Linda Bel) has endured since 
her boys were snatched five 
years ago. 

Yet it was in 198$ the year 
before their Portuguese father 
abducted thwn. that the Euro- 
pean Convention on the Cus- 
tody of Children came into 
being. Britain and Portugal 
were among the 15 countries 
to sign. It provides for the 
return of children improperly 
removed from the custody of a 
parent and taken to one of the 
other countries in the conven- 
tion — but until it was adopted 
by Britain last week it had no 
force in this country. 

Linda Bell has seen her sons 
Timothy and Simon Franco 
only once since the day they 
were snatched from their 
grandparents’ South London 
homelSince then she has bat- 
tled through the Portuguese 
courts for three years, trying to 
secure foe return of the boys 
who are now aged 13 and 1Z 
She hopes for a decision by 
Christmas. 

The fight to regain custody 
of her sons has cost her £8,500 
so fir. To raise the money, she 



A parent may 
have no idea 
where to look 


needed the authority of the 
courts in this country to sell 
the former family home, 
jointly owned by her husband 
and herself This took 18 
months. 

-For Linda Bell, ratification 
of the convention may have 
come too late. The Portuguese 
court could wefi decide that, 
after five years, that foe boys 
are so settled in their father's 
home that it would he against 
their best interests to send 
them baric to England. 

The European measures 
| a gains t child matching came 
into force in Britain along 
with others contained in foe 
Hague Convention on Inter- 
national Child Abduction. By 
adopting both conventions the 
UK has activated reciprocal 
arrangements with 10 other 
countries — including Portugal 
— for the return of so called 
“tug-of-love" children. The 
other countries are Austria, 
Belgium, Canada, Cyprus, 
France, Hungary, Luxem- 
bourg, Spain and Switzerland. 

If a child is thought to have 
been abducted from Britain to 
another country which has 
ratified one or other of the 
conventions the authorities in 


that country will try to dis- 
cover the child’s whereabouts 
and attempt to persuade foe 
snatching parent to return him 
voluntarily. 

If this foils, court action will 
be taken and legal aid will be 
provided. The parent in this 
country need only contact foe 
Lord Chancellor's Depart- 
ment — or, in Scotland, the 
Scottish Courts Administra- 
tion — who will forward the 
application to foe overseas 
authorities for action. 

The machinery sounds 
impressive but how will it 
work in practice? Britain is 
the fifth country to adopt the 
Hague Convention, France 
and Canada being among the 
earliest in 1983. “We have not 
bad many requests yet because 
of the limited number of 
contracting countries but we 
have had two requests for the 
return of children from Que- 
bec to France, which were 
solved very quickly just by a 
telephone call to the parents 
who abducted them”, says 
Micheline. Langlois, of the 
Canadian Justice Department. 
“And in. less than twp months 
we recovered a child who was 
taken to France.” 

The new powers will not 
help a parent whose child is 
taken to a country outside foe 
conventions but several other 
countries, including Australia, 
the United States, Denmark. 
West Germany and The 
Netherlands, are expected to 
ratify one or other convention 
shortly. 

British law was tightened in 
1984 to make it a crime for a 
parent to abduct his or her 
own child. This means that an 
abducting parent may now be 
extradited to stand trial here if 
he takes the child to one of 
more than 40 countries which 
have extradition treaties with 


return may be prohibitively 
expensive civil proceedings. 
For instance Jean Bun. a 
founder of Children Abroad, 
the self-help group for victims 
of child stealing, spent 
£] 1.000 to bring her son, 
Graham, back from Kuwait 

And there is always the 
possibility that the snatcher 
may cover his tracks so thor- 
oughly that the parent left 
behind has no idea where in 
foe world to look. 

The Children's Legal Cen- 
tre. which has prepared an 
information sheet on child 

Still not enough 
countries moving 
against abductors 

abduction, emphasizes the im- 
portance of taking precautions 
against kidnapping — for 
example, lodging an objection 
with the passport office to 
prevent the other parent from 
obtaining a passport for the 
child. 

If a snatch is made, the 
police, under a new port stop 
procedure which took effect in 
May, will send out an all-pons 
message on their national 
computer network. The 
child’s name will be placed on 
an immigration stop list held 
at points of exit. But abduc- 
tions are most likely to happen 
during access visits and by the 
time the child is missed he 
may be long gone. 

“Ratifying the conventions 
and making child abduction a 
criminal offence are steps in 
the right direction but a great 
deal more needs to be done”, 
says Penny Letts, of the 
Children's Legal Centre. 
“There are still countries 
where international coopera- 
tion doesn't seem to be pos- 
sible and children are still 


j . ■ . subjected to a great deal of 

-*" 1 * f ea ^ y < -k*£ n I unel * _ distress and hardship.” To say 
child abductor can stiU choose nothing of lhe left 

a country where foe only behind 
means of securing the child’s © mm n— mmum ud, ims 


• Network 25 Park Road, Baker 
Street, London NW1. 

• Women in Banking: Phillips and 
Drew, 120 Moorgqte._London EC2 

• The Association qf Women Solic- 
itors: c/o Miss Pat Cunningham, The 
Law Society. 113 Chancery Lane, 
London WC2A I PL. 

• Women tn ~'hft 
Marryatt Road, London] 

• City Women’s' Network (for senior 
women in all professions): 20 Essex 
Street, London WC2R 3AJL 


Management : 
London SW)9 5BN. 


64 


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Office diplomacy 


From Mrs Stephanie 
Smith. Preston Old Road, 
Freckleton , Preston. 
Lancashire 

Whilst I sympathize with one 
of the cases mentioned in 
“Sexual Power Games in the 
Office" (Wednesday Page, 
July 30), was there really any 
need for theartide at aQ? 

It most serve only to re- 
inforce a popular male view- 
point that women are the 
“weaker sex" and con- 
sequently are ansmted to po- 
sitions in management. 

Surely, every woman should 
already possess a repertoire of 
“fight bid firm pat-downs”. If 
she does not have die coinage 
and diplomacy to use these 
tactics, i$ she really suited to 
management posts, which de- 
mand that derision? be made 
quickly and action taken 
swiftly? 

I also disagree with Cary 
Cooper's view that a comment 
such as ‘‘You're looking good 

today” wears down a woman. I 
occasionally make this com- 
ment to male colleagues. 

As yet, I have seen no 
evidence of this wearing them 
down; on the contrary, they 
accept it as a compliment — as 
I would. 

From Norma Acland. 

Fitziohns Avenue. London 
NW3 

The article in The Times on 
sexual harassment in the of- 
fice raises two. interesting 
issues. The first is how to stop . 
men from harassing women — 


TALKBACK 


or, more broadly, bow to create 
an atmosphere in which 
women can work on eqnai 
terms with men so as to fulfil 
their own potential; foe second 
is the question of women's own 
behaviour. 

On the Gist issue, there 
seems to be no reason not to 
address it head-on. If one 
wants to proscribe a socially 
undesirable form of conduct, 
one regulates against it and 
provides sanctions to put teeth 
into the regulation. 

What should women them- 
selves do? Should they, as 
yom article suggests, “make ft 
a joke”? 1 do net think so, 
because it is not a joke. It is 
not funny for a huge propor- 
tion of the working population 
to have its progress at wort, 
and hence its economic status, 
jeopardized by the hostility of. 
other members of that popula- 
tion. It is only too easy for 
women, whether by “langhing 
it off" or by uncertainty as to 
what to do, to appear to coUnde 
in foe situation. 

If women are to make 
progress towards the economic 
self-sufficiency they need in a 
world where women work not 
for “pin money” (whatever 
that was) hot to support 
themselves and their children 
and perhaps their husband, 
too, women must take them- 
selves seriously and insist that 
others do foe same. 



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i THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Come in, 
Joe 90 

An extraordinary manhunt was 
: launched over the weekend by 
Scottish police, apparently labour- 
; ing under the misapprehension 
that Leeds was about to run out of 

■ beer. The chase began they were 
contacted by a Bumley engineer- 
ing firm needing to trace Richard 
Chubb, a computer engineer, 
holidaying north of the border. 
Chubb, known as Joe 90 to 
friends, alone understood the 

- computer system being installed at 
the Tetley brewery in Leeds, where 
a hitch was delaying automation. 
In the early hours of Friday 
morning Strathclyde police 
telexed seven Scottish police di- 
visions asking them to visit hotels 
and guest houses to to find Chubb. 
“The brewery is understood to 
have had to stop production 

■ because of the breakdown,” read 
. the telex. David GaskelL the 

engineering consultant who made 
; the plea to the police, confesses he 

■ was amazed by their reaction. “It's 

* all backfired. Beer production has 

• never been slopped. It's a case of 
.‘send three-and-fourpence, we’re 

going to the dance’ ended up as a 
declaration of war.” And the odd 
thing is Joe 90 is still missing. 

Silk’s purse 

Labour MFs such as Martin 
.Flannery, who have sniped that 
Robert Kilroy-Silk's resignation is 
less to do with Militant activists 
than lust for a fat job in television, 
have got it wrong. While Kilroy- 
Silk denies Television Centre 
-gossip that he will be paid little 
more than £100 a show- “I 
wouldn’t work for that” — his 
salary is not, let us say. in the 
Matthew Parris league. He admits: 
“What the BBC is going to pay me 
will be less than my income for the 

■ past few years.” 

Wellington boot 

The plummy Anglo-Spanish Soci- 
ety, headed by the Duke of 
Wellington, is behaving in a 
distinctly ungentlemanly manner 
to one of its minions. It is forcing 
Thomas Layton, for 26 years the 
editor of the society journal, to 
retire with what he calls a 
“derisory” £100 pay-off Layton is 
75 and has Parkinson’s Disease, 
but he says: “I am very fit and 
have enough stuff to keep the 
magazine going for the next 10 
years.” Sir Ronald Lindsay, the 
society's vice-chairman, appeared 
dumbstruck when I mentioned 
Layton, but recovered to tell me: 
“It's untrue to say he isabout to be 
sacked.” Layton asks: “Iff am not 
being sacked why can't I stay on?” 
He threatens to set up a rival 
Hispano-British Society with its 
own journal next year. 

Drink to it 

It is flood flo see the Briuah 
Waterways Board maintaining a 
fluid salary structure. A job advert 
in PR Week for an audio/copy- 
typist (“essential features: enquir- 
ing mind, a cheerful disposition at 
all times, aptitude to absorb 
information quickly”) quotes tbe 
rates:"£7,760pa to £68 r 280pa” 
I'm applying. 


BARRY FANTONI 



ROLLING- 
STONE 
I MAP FAIR 
EjlMauiRY 

‘I dunk it’s awfnL She’s not even aW 
enough to have forgotten who be ms' 

Rusk’s ruse 

Next week's 25th anniversary of 
the building of die Berlin Wall 
prompts historian Norman Gelb, 
who was there when it went up, to 
pass on some information newly 
gleaned from Dean Rusk, the US 
Secretary of State at the time. 
Aware that Nato's Paris head* 
quarters had been penetrated by 
the KGB, Rusk used it as a 
conduit for warnings he did not 
want the Soviet government to 
ignore. Gelb says: “Rusk told me 
that signals he wanted to convey 
were likely to receive more urgent 
attention if picked up by a Soviet 
spy in Nato than if they were 
delivered by the American ambas- 
sador in Moscow.” 

Frozen out 

The Refrigercites, a group of 10 
charmingly overweight cheer- 
leaders who follow the Chicago 
Bears, are nursing bruised egos 
after being given the cold shoulder 
at Sunday's American football 
match at Wembley. The group, 
named after 22-stone Bears player 
William “Tbe Refrigerator” Perry, 
were flown to London by tbe city 
of Chicago as a publicity stunt. But 
as an unofficial group they were 
not allowed on the pitch during 
the game with the Dallas Cow- 
boys. and were absent from tbe US 
ambassador's reception, which 
was attended by die Cowboys* 
cheerleaders. National Football 
League administrator Rusty Holly 
told me he had “never heard of 
them” 1 suspect they all find the 
bouncy gals something of an 
embarrassment, JPJrlS 


P hilanthr opy and the planner’s art 


I have recently been involved in 
the long drawn-out tussle which 
developed over planning per- 
mission for the use of St John's 
Lodge in Regent's Park as a 
showpiace for Fred Koch's fine 
Victorian collections. My trau- 
matic experience — I was advising 
on a personal basis - leads me to 
believe that a drastic revision of 
planning procedures is vital if 
benevolent intention towards 
Britain is not again to be frustrated 
by procedure, abuse and misrepre- 
sentation by preservationists. 

A great an and book collection 
is now lost to us through planning 
procedures and those who inter- 
pret them. 

It began three years ago when 
Koch, one of the richest men in 
America, approached the Crown 
Estate for the lease of St John's 
Lodge, abandoned after many 
years of institutional occupation 
and crying out for costly and 
sympathetic refurbishing. Leasing 
terms were agreed, subject to 
planning permission being 
granted. Earlier, however, the 
Crown Estate had commissioned a 
report on the condition of the 
lodge, its history and what might 
be preserved. Based on this back- 
ground a new planning principle 
had developed: there must be no 
change to the lodge, which was a 
record of aesthetic taste (whether 
good or bad) over its 170 years of 
existence. This “deep freeze" doc- 


by Lord Perth 


trine spelt death to all future 
improvements, whatever their 
merit. Officials, whether of West- 
minster City Council or English 
Heritage, felt safe in sticking to it. 

St John’s Lodge is not a great 
building, but it has been listed 
Grade 2 plus star, and so comes 
under strictest planning scrutiny 
and controls. Before I came on the 
scene there had already been long 
skirmishes between Westminster 
City Council (egged on by the 
amenity societies and others) and 
Koch's eminent architects, 
Charles Young of New York and 
Michael Manser, then president of 
the Royal Institute of British 
Architects. 

The planning committee and its 
officials had almost dosed the 
door to the original planning 
application, although its chairman 
bad managed to keep it open a 
chink. In May there were to be 
local authority elections and, until 
they were over, nothing more 
could be done. 

In the meantime the amenity 
societies and their hangers-on had 
a field day. Articles and letters 
appeared in many and various 
journals and newspapers attacking 
Koch personally as a rich Ameri- 
can who was to “gut,” “ruin,” 
“wreck” the lodge. This vicious 
and virulent campaign naturally 


distressed Koch, and those fight- 
ing on his side now faced tire 
problem of keeping him in play. 

Once the elections were over, 
and Westminster was still Conser- 
vative, Koch's allies started to 
counter-attack: they lobbied the 
City fathers at Westminster and 
Lord Montagu (who had always 
favoured tbe museum plan) ai 
English Heritage. They alerted the 
arts minister Richard Luce and 
the ministers at the Department of 
the Environment (who properly 
said that as tbe final court of 
appeal they could not intervene). 

Westminster committee mem- 
bers visited the lodge and at last 
gave planning approval - in 
principle. But at the same time 
they called for tbe resubmission of 
minutely detailed plans. Nine long 
requirements were listed which 
meant many months of costly 
work (an estimated £136,000) by 
the architects. 

- After this everything had once 
more to be open to public com- 
ment, with its attendant likelihood 
of a campaign of abuse; and at the 
end of it all there would still be no 
certainty that approval would be 
forthcoming. 

The Royal Fine Arts Commis- 
sion now came into the act and, 
while making encouraging noises 
about the project, insisted that the 


reinstatement of a staircase — 
demolished by tire Marquess of 
Bute in tire 1890s — in the central 
hall must not be allowed; and that 
the hall's wall decorations (of poor 
quality and missing the three most 
important paintings) must not be 
touched. In the entrance hall four 
iron pillars — looking as if they 
had been found in a junk heap and 
supporting nothing — would have 
to remain. The principle of "no 
change” was sacrosanct 

Our last hope was that English 
Heritage would give its statutory 
approval. It did so — and now we 
could build a staircase and remove 
the four pillars. 

But there was a qualification: 
English Heritage hoped the central 
hall decorations and (unsafe) bal- 
cony would be retained. Koch had 
had enough. Attempts by Luce 
and others to persuade him to 
await the outcome of yet another 
English Heritage meeting failed. 
The work-to-rules planners, the 
amenity societies and the 
preservationists had won a fam- 
ous victory. 

Is it too much to ask that a 
parliamentary select committee be 
set up to ensure that such a thing 
never occurs again? And is it too 
much to hope that Koch, en- 
couraged by such a step, will again 
seek a home in Britain for his 
superb collection? 

The author was First Crown Estate 
Commissioner, 1962-77. 


John Kay reads the lessons for Britain in present international trends 


Tax reform is very much in the air. 
In the US, it is likely that tire 
Senate and House of Repre- 
sentatives will soon agree on a 
compromise Bill which will repre- 
sent the first radical restructuring 
of the American tax system since 
the war. Canada is likely to follow 
suit. New Zealand is implement- 
ing one of the most wide-ranging 
reforms any developed country 
has adopted. But the British 
record is disappointing. Nigel 
Lawson became Chancellor with 
the ambition, and the ability, to be 
a great tax reformer. For a few 
euphoric weeks after the 1984 
Budget it seemed as if that 
ambition might be attainable. But 
it is now apparent that these 
reforms led nowhere. The latest 
attempt to revive interest in the 
subject — the Green Paper on the 
future of personal income taxation 
published with this year’s Budget 
— has fizzled like a damp squib. 

Are there lessons to be learned 
from those countries overseas 
which are more successful in 
achieving effective implementa- 
tion? There are, but they relate 
more to the process of tax reform 
than to the substance of the 
particular changes being in- 
troduced. We have more to learn 
from the Americans about how to 
do it than about what to do. 

The precise detail of the US 
package must wait for the congres- 
sional compromise, but its general 
outline is now clear. The main 
theme is a move to lower rales of 
tax with a much more limited 
range of allowances and deduc- 
tions. Relief for state and local 
taxes, for charitable contributions, 
for medical expenses and for 
interest paid will be removed or 
sharply reduced. Capital gains will 
be taxed as other income. In the 
corporate sector, investment in- 
centives will be reduced and so 
will the rate of corporation tax, but 
the net result will be a substantial 
increase in tbe overall tax burden 
on corporations. The proceeds of 
this, and the withdrawal of many 
income tax allowances, will be 
used to cut income tax rates. At 
the same time, rates of income tax 
will be considerably simplified, so 
that the present 14 rates of tax will 
be reduced to between tyro and 
four. The top rate of income tax 
may fall to around 30 per cent 

Implementing similar changes 
here, however, would make 
surprisingly little difference. Most 
of the deductions the Americans 
plan to eliminate are ones which 
we have never had. Local taxes 
and medical expenditures were 
never allowable under the British 
income tax. Relief for charitable 
contributions has always been 
very limited — but, interestingly 
enough, is about to be extended in 
the UK. Interest paid by individ- 
uals is not now deductible, except 
for mortgage interest and business 
loans - both of these will continue 
to quality for deductions in the US 
proposals. So will pension fund 
contributions, and although the 
fate of the immensely popular 
Individual Retirement Account is 
in the balance, it seems likely that 
some form of it will continue. We 
already tax capital gains at 30 per 
cent, although we do not relieve 
most of them through indexation 
and an annual exemption of 
£6.300. The part of the US 
package which causes American 
economists most concern — the 
reduction in incentives to invest — 
is one which Britain has already 
introduced. Corporate profiiabil- 


Can Lawson 
resist the tax 
reform tide? 



ity is even no w sufficiently low 
that even if corporation tax rev- 
enues were to be doubled — which 
is impossible —income tax coukl 
be reduced by less than five points. 
And while we do have six different 
rates of income tax, around 95 per 
cent of all taxpayers pay only at 
the basic rate of 29 per cent 
A self-satisfied Chancellor 
might well conclude that the 
Americans bad at Last realized that 
the British had got their tax system 
right all along. But the more 
appropriate lesson to draw would 


If Chancellors Insist 
on polling rabbits 
out of the hat on 
Budget day, there is 
no possibility of 
achieving consensus 
for overall reform 


be that tbe deficiencies of tbe 
British tax system are not those of 
the American, and neither are the 
needed reforms interchangeable. 
American taxation has suffered 
from the openness of the political 
system to congressional lobbyists. 
The result has beeu a myriad 
concessions to particular interest 
groups, often worthy causes as 
well as powerful ones, which have 
greatly eroded the personal and 
corporate tax base. Similar pres- 
sures exist in Britain, of course, 
but their effect has been much 
smaller and tbe success of interest 
groups has been more in sustain- 
ing existing positions than in 
establishing new ones. 

But tbe Americans don't have 


From Punch, 1909 

poverty and unemployment traps 
resulting from the random inter- 
relationship between their tax and 
social security systems. They don’t 
have different and incompatible 
schemes of taxation fin: every form 
of personal saving known to man 
or investment institutions. Nor do 
they have our ludicrous inter- 
action between alternately 
progressive and regressive na- 
tional insurance contributions and 
income tax. They don't have a 
schedular system in which dif- 
ferent lands of income are subject 
to different rules and tbe totality is 
incomprehensible for anyone with 
multiple sources of income. They 
don't treat married women as 
fiscal appendages of their hus- 
bands. Their system of local 
government finance, if not a 
. brilliant success, is currently fur- 
ther away from total breakdown 
than ours. And their Internal 
Revenue Service runs its affairs at 
one quarter of the costs per pound 
or dollar collected incurred by our 
Inland Revenue. We have no less 
need of reform, but the reforms we 
need are different reforms. 

How should we go about 
achieving them? The first lesson to 
learn is that tax reform is sow 
popular. Tbe conventional wis- 
dom for British politicians has 
been that tax reform was politi- 
cally disastrous Chancellors were 
told that the gainers would never 
thank them and the losers would 
never forgive them. If you must do 
it, do it in the first year or two of a 
new Parliament so that all will 
have been forgotten by the next 
election. Yet in the United States 
we see a Congress desperate io 
rush a Bill through in time to 
enable sitting candidates to claim 
credit for it in the autumn mid- 
term elections. This change in 


sentiment was evident in Britain 
in 1984 where the commitment to 
tax reform won praise indepen- 
dently of most of the specific 
proposals. 

But the Americans have one 
major advantage which the British 
Chancellor lacked. The US re- 
forms draw heavily on the con- 
tents of two major reports 
published by their Treasury in 
1984 and 1985, which constitute a 
comprehensive review of the 
American tax system in outline 
and in detaiL Lawson came to 
office with no such strategic plan 
and it does not appear he found 
one when in office. In the US, tax 
policy is dearly a Treasury 
responsibility and their Office of 
Tax Analysis is probably the most 
sophisticated body of its land in 
the world. Tax policy in Britain 
rests mainly with the Inland 
Revenue. When reform enters the 
minds of Revenue officials, which 
is not often, it is mainly in pursuit 
of real or imaginery tax avoidance 
or in recommending the dis- 
continuance of recently in- 
troduced changes in procedures. It 
should therefore come as. no 
surprise that the most important 
components of the 1984 reform 
package were tbe abolition of 
subsidies to life insurance pre- 
miums (introduced in 1979)- and 
tbe restoration of the corporation 
tax system to broadly the structure 
which it had in the early 1960s. 

A ampler and more efficient tax 
system is not an impossible 
dream. A prerequisite is a strategic 
view of the appropriate directions 
of reform, widely communicated, 
discussed and argued over, which 
is central to the process of change 
in both the United States and New 
Zealand. If Chancellors insist on 
pulling rabbits out of the hat on 
Budget day, there is no possibility 
at all of achieving a consensus for 
any particular direction of reform. 

The next requirement is a 
balanced package of changes 
consistent with that strategic view. 
While such a package will in- 
evitably involve gainers and los- 
ers, there must be more gainers 
than losers. Norman Fowler’s 
social security reviews failed to 
win popular support because they 
could be represented as motivated 
more by penny-pinching than by 
desire for a better structure of 
benefits. If tbe options presented 
are those of having the . State 
Earnings Related Pensions 
Scheme or not having it, it should 
come as no surprise that even the 
half of the population whom 
surveys showed had never heard 
of it before abolition was proposed 
decide they would prefer to have 
it But the net cost of such a 
package could be relatively mod- 
est — the £5 billion cost of 
reducing the basic rate of tax to 25" 
per cent could lubricate substan- 
tia! changes to the structure of the 
system. 

It is. perhaps, now too late to 
define a strategy, devise a package 
of measures and implement it 
before the next election. It is not 
too late, now that it is clear that 
substantive tax reform is a vote 
winner not a vote loser, to put 
forward such a strategy in a 
manifesto. The lesson from Amer- 
ica is there if any party is willing to 
take up the challenge. 

The author is director of the 
Institute for Fiscal Studies. ■ . 


Raw paw flaw in the dog jog slog 


Houston 

The dog, for some reason best 
known to others, was railed 
Captain Kangaroo. He was a type 
of spaniel of indeterminate par- 
entage, with large eyes, and ears 
that hung down disconsolately as 
if disheartened ■ by the humidity 
and the heat. And yes, be hopped, 
after a fashion. 

In the morning he would leave 
his air-conditioned home just off 
Westheimer and follow his lank- 
haired master — with studied gait, 
the pair of them - off into some 
more optimistic future. 

The master was young, dean- 
limbed and fine-toned. He worked 
for a real-estate company in the 
heart of what was once a thriving 
boomtown, during the days when 
oil was king. Master and dog, with 
their most positive of attitudes, 
seemed determined to make it so 
again. 


In the evening Captain Kan- 
garoo would accompany his mis- 
tress on a slightly less arduous 
circuit The heat of the 99° day still 
hung over the enervating pave- 
ments. Mistress, in her Houston 
Olympic Festival sweatshirt (worn . 
sardonically, as her geometric 
hairsty le made quite clear), jagged 
purposefully bat with style. 

Captain Kangaroo, las enthu- 
siastic now, followed doggedly 
behind. The asphalt was hot and 
cruel to the paw. Small wonder 
then, as a new how-to guide 
proclaims, that tbe doggie jogger 
was beginning to feel the strain of 
modem life. 

Dogs' masters have monopo- 
lized the modish ailments for too 
long. The only topics of conversa- 
tion over the lunchtime Perrier, 
apart from making lots of money, 
have been ankle sprains and shin- 
splints. But now the pets have 


apparently, 
of somethin 


to howl about 
over the States are, 
reporting an epidemic 
something called "jogger’s paw” 
because more and more pet- 
owners have been insisting that 
their beasts accompany them on 
their tedious pavement-pounding. 
The result during the present hot 
spell has been a rash of painfiil 
burns to the doggies' foot-pads. 

Now Da via. Anne Gallup, a 
Houston public relations woman, ‘ 
has come up with a diagnosis and, 
if not a cure, at least a prevention. 
Sbe certainly knows the dog-jog 
scene. Five years ago she inaugu- 
rated the world's largest race 1 for 
dogs and their owners, which 
annually brings together 1,000 six- 
legged tandems for a two-mile test 


training. Me 
book, Runni. 


she has written a book. Running 
With Man ’s Best Friend. 

Doggie feet, she insists, must be 


kept away from foe hot concrete 
ana asphalt of Texas sidewalks. 
Sbe also recommends that pets 
should build up their endurance 
gradually, starting with three 20- 
minute runs a week. “Statistics 
show that today many dogs are 
overweight, just like people,” she 
says. Jogging can help create the. 
“total animal” equipped to cope 
with the dog-eat-dog stresses of 
modem life. 

The book warns of “serious 
behaviour problems”, that ran 
result from modern dogs having 
too little to do. There is particular 
advice on jogging with a dog in fog 
and on dealing with skunks aha 
porcupines. In the event of failure 
the reader always has recourse to 
the section on How to Muzzle a 
Dog. 

Paul Vallely 


Ted Honderich 

Ghana’s right 
to speak out 


Ghana was one of the fiist nations 
to withdraw from the Common- 
wealth Games, as a protest against 
Britain's resistance to sanctions. 
Bv doing so it laid itself open to 
criticism: what right, it has been 
asked, does the Ghanaian govern- 
ment have to preach liberty? It is 
but a military dictatorship, a 
regime owing its origins to a coup, 
sustained by force of arms. Surely 
the regime has no right to make 
gestures against oppression? 

In answering this, some history 
needs remembering. In June 1979, 
Flight Lieutenant Jerry Rawlings 
led a rising against a government 
of corrupt and rapacious generals, 
who had dpne more to drag Ghana 
down than any of their prede- 
cessors. Some of its members were 
executed by the Rawlings’ Armed 
Forces Revolutionary Council, 
which also distinguished itself by 
immediately holding a democratic 
election, and then withdrawing 
from the scene. 

The elected government^ in the 
view of a great majority of 
Ghanaians, had no real will to deal 
with either the country's patent 
social .injustices, or its economic 
decline. There is no doubt as to the 
national welcome given to the 
second rising, led by Rawlings, in 
December 1981. The Second 
Coming, as it was called, was 
bloodless, and established what is 
today still the government of 
Ghana, the Provisional National 
Defence Council. 

The ideology of this council, of 
whose nine members only three 
are military, is a kind of egalitari- 
anism joined to national aspira- 
tion. The egalitarianism is of the 
most fundamental kind, forever 
misconceived by its detractors. Its 
great goal is the raising up of the 
badly off. It has little to do with 
Marxism and is distinguished 
from buraanitaxianism only by its 
determination to take effective 
steps towards its goal. 

Those steps, it must be admit- 
ted, have included deterrent 
executions for "economic 
crimes”; immense criminal frauds 
against the state banks. These 
frauds are seen as taking food, 
medicine and books — the means 
to a barely tolerable life — from 
those who have recently had none 
of them, and now have little. 

Compare this ruling ideological 
principle to the ruling principle of 
the Thatcher government, which 
is to further advance the interests 
of those well able to look after 
themselves. By my lights, it is a 
government of moral culpability, 
compounded by an attachment to 
the barbarism of South Africa. 
Surely, then, the Ghanaian gov- 
ernment has some authority to sit 
in judgement on Its British 
counterpart? 

Still it is not an elected govern- 
ment and it has lately shot seven 
conspirator for attempted in- 
surrection. However, if the gov- 
ernment is not elected, it is none 
the less representative. Despite its 
four and a half years of struggle 
with overwhelming economic 
difficulty. I would judge it has 
more popular support than the 
elected government it replaced If 
an election were held today under 
more or less British conditions, it 
would very likely win. 


The executions are responses to 
a real threat very likely financed 
bv others than Ghanaians, as the 
recent sentencing of a boatload of 
American mercenaries in Brazil 

indicates. . _ 

What is fundamental, however, 
about the denial or curtailment of 
what are so unreflectivcly called 

-liberties”, is the effect In this 
case, the effect has been some 
small progress away from the 
awfulness of a society in which 
luxury lives side by side with 
deprivation. It is morally gro- 
tesque to run together, without 
differentiation, the constraint on 
liberty within Ghana today and 
the racist oppression of the South 
African state. The latter is wholly 
directed to the denial of the ideal 
which Ghana pursues. 

It will be said by some that the 
limited progress in Ghana towards 
the egalitarian end will ensure that 
it goes no farther: in fact, that it 
will further impoverish the soci- 
ety. Is it not just one more 
enterprise in utopianism, one 
more failure to recognize the 
realities of human nature and 
economic life? 

But an attempt to cope with 
realities has been, and continues 
to be, made. There has been an 
accommodation of the demands 
of both individuals — the cocoa 
farmers, for example — and such 
institutions as the World Bank 
and the International Monetary 
Fund. It is now not the case, as 
once it was, that someone bars 
himself from membership of his 
local Committee for the Defence 
of the Revolution by arriving at 
the meeting in a car. A new pay 
structure for public employees has 
lately been introduced. Those at 
its top now receive about five or 
six times the income of those at 
the bottom, rather than no more 
than twice as much. If Colonel 
Gadaffi visits Ghana he is fol- 
lowed, as he was the other week, 
by Jimmy Carter. 

Whatever one may think of it 
all. it is clear that Ghana is making 
its way forward mindful of what is, 
alas, the real world. 

There also exists, among what 
are called the organs of the 
revolution, tbe Commission for 
Democracy. Its brief is to receive 
submissions and arrive at a new 
form of government to succeed the 
Provisional National Defence 
Council. The inclination of its 
leader, Mr Justice Annan, who is 
also a member of the council, is 
not towards either a one-party 
state or party democracy along 
British lines. Tbe latter is identi- 
fied in Ghana with the ascendancy 
of one class and with a want of 
national concern and will. 

Annan speaks, rather, of a 
united national democratic front, 
of decentralization, and of a 
pyramidic structure of decision- 
making with affinities to pre- 
colonial African tradition. 

It would be innocent to suppose 
that the country and its govern- 
ment is anything other than 
struggling. But it is an honourable 
struggle, by those to whom we 
should listen. 

The author, a writer on political 
philosophy, recently visited the 
University of Ghana as external 
examiner. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

The scene’s 
the thing 


Have you noticed that whenever 
theatre critics are stuck for some- 
thing nice to say about the play or 
the actors, they spend a lot of time 
lavishing praise on the sets? You 
sometimes get the impression that 
sets are getting better as plays get 
worse. Accordingly, I am working 
on a major new West End smash 
hit, entitled simply: 

SCENERY 
(A Play for many sets, 
and a couple of actors.) 

The lights go up to reveal that the 
scene is Venice, to enormous 
applause. Two actors stroll on, to 
no applause at alL They are 
playing Tom and Jerry, two 
interchangeable parts obtainable 
from your local hardware store. 
Torn: Where are we? 

J«rry: (studying, the backdrop) 
Looks like Venice to me. ' 

Tom: Ah, Venice! I was in Venice 
once. 

Jerry: You’re in Venice now. 

Tom: Well, yes, in a manner of 
speaking. From another point of 
view I am standing in front of a 
painting ofYenice, to make people 
think I am in Venice. 

Jerry: My God - you don’t sup- 
pose we're in a Stoppard play? 
Tom: It’s a funny thing, you 1 know. 
To make an audience think that 
actors are in Venice, they put them 

In front of a painting of Venice. 
But if the writer had set foe scene 
in a bedroom in which one wall 
was a vast painting of Venice, it 
would look exactly the same! 

Tom; . It wouldn't There’d be a 
bed. 

Jeny: Put it another way. When 
you're in a big cinema and the 
cinema organ comes up,, how can 
you tell that the organ is not 
stationary and the whole cinema 


Shouldn't the backdrop be go 
up? The backdrop stops sinki 
and then starts rising. The su 
starts to Jill with water, t o dt 
ening applause. 

Jerry: Ah, here comes a gondc 
A gondola enters, containing £ 
size figures of John Julius N 
wich. Bernard Levin and. J 
Morris, all selling books on Vem 
It passes over. Damn, it's fi 
Enter a bridge, which stops m 
stage. Tom and Jerry climb u; 
gratefully. 

Tom: Another thing. There i 
only two of us in the play. 
Jerry: My God. You mean . . ? 
Tom: Yes. We’re in one of th< 
plays spawned by Sleuth. One 
u s has to murder the other. 
Jerry. Only he’s not really dfflKi 
Tone And comes back in dicpiii 


Magically, the Venetian set • 
isfcs and we are suddenly o 
bridge overlooking a motorwa 
there is a sign in the backgm 
saying Services Im, and we £ 
non-stop traffic noise. Ovation. 
Jerry: Well, better get on witl 


ouk. My God, it is a Stoppard 
ilay. Al this point the whole - 
ackdrop starts going down, very 
slowly. There is a round of 
dapping. - 

Jerry: Look. It's true what they say 
—■Venice is sinking. 

Tonu Just -a- moment, there's 
something wrong here. IfVeniceis 
sinking, we are going up. 


a pile-up on the road below 
police car glides on to bridge 
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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


MRS THATCHER’S DILEMMA. 


Substitutes for nuclear power 


Mrs Thatcher entered the 
Commonwealth mini-summit 
at what seemed to be a crucial 
disadvantage. She had consis- 
tently and in our view 
lightly — maintained that 
sanctions would impoverish 
black South Africans without 
bringing the end of apartheid 
appreciably neater. But it was 
thought that she would be 
compelled by Commonwealth 
pressure to accept a sanctions 
package and thus be made to 
look both inconsistent and 
imprudent. 

- . To. -resolve that dilemma, 
the Prime Minister proposed 
her own sanctions package 
which was likely to have a far 
less severe impact, whether on 
the blacks or on the Botha 
government, than the mea- 
sures sought by the six leaders. 
That did not, of course, mean 
that it would have no adverse 
impact at all. Even a voluntary 
ban on tourism is bound to 
cause unemployment among 
blacks in the hotel and tourist 
industries. 

But Mrs Thatcher, secondly, 
did-not deny the feet Far from 
arguing that her sanctions were 
unique in not being immoral, 
she candidly admitted that she 
would not wish to defend their 
effects upon South African 
families; that she .did not 
believe they would achieve 
their object; and that she had 
proposed them solely as a 
gesture -towards Common- 
wealth unity. 

It is iare for politicians to 
address difficult topics in so 
honest a fashion. The Prime 
Minister’s candour contrasts 
favourably with the un- 
convincing highmindedness of 
her critics. It is hardly credible, 
for. instance, that Mr Bob 
Hawke should have given no 
thought whatsoever to the 
advantages to Australia of 
sanctions when, within hours 




. !•: -r. 


A week is a longtime in oil 
politics. But Opec ministers 
who took that long to reach 
their new deal at Geneva, must 
consider the result, to -have 
been worth waiting for. 

World prices surged by mid- 
day yesterday in response to 
the Opec derision to cut 
production. Brent crude, a 
paltry nine dollars a barrel last 
week, had risen to fifteen 
dollars by lunch time.Prices fell 
back when it became clear that 
Opec total production, even 
after the cuts, would be neatly 
one million barrels a day more 
than the world demanded 
from the 13 member countries. 
But some of the smaller non- 
Opec ofl producers (they do 
not include Britain) are ex- 
pected to make parallel cuts 
themselves. 

The arguments in respect of 
this country have become 
familiar during recent months. 
On the one hand higher prices 
mean more revenue from the 
North Sea,.both for the compa- 
nies which are based there and 
for the Treasury. More signifi- 
cantly, on the other hand, they 
add to the production costs of 
industry, here and. -overseas, 
fuelling inflation, depleting 
world trade and adding to the 
problems of what remains a 
largely non-oil based British 
economy. 


of the conference commu- 
- nique, Reuters news agency 

- was carrying an interview with 
the marketing director of the 
Australian joint coal board in 
which he speculated enthusias- 
tically about the improved 
prospects for bis industry- 

Mrs Thatcher’s modest con- 
cessions did' not, of course, 
achieve their aim of Common- 
wealth unity on the basis of a 
compromise package: Nor 
could they have done. Both the 
communique and the press 
conferences have established 
that the other leaders are 
publicly committed to the 
view that sanctions must be 
progressively increased until 
Pretoria surrenders. They were 
not prepared to retreat even 
slightly from the Nassau mea- 
sures — and indeed added 
three additional sanctions. 

If the Prime Minister, 
following the advice of her 
domestic critics, had publicly 
accepted the usefulness of 
sanctions as a weapon against 
apartheid and offered substan- 
tial concessions for the sake of 
an agreed package, that would 
have been merely the start 
When that package failed, she 
would have been faced with 
equal pressure to support a 
further set of sanctions, and so 
ad infinitum. And having ac- 
cepted the full logic of sanc- 
tions, she would have been ill- 
placed to resist. 

By. resisting on this occa- 
sion, she perhaps contributed 
to the disarray and recrimina- 
tion with which the mini- 
summit ended. But the 
alternative was a bogus unity 
based upon an unsound policy 
that merely postponed the 
recriminations. And the meet- 
ing did register some useful 
gains. It established, for in- 
stance, that the Common- 
wealth does not always have to 
reach unanimous agreement 

OILPOLmK 

- A more profitable outlook 

for oil would encourage future 
investment m the North Sea. 
But the emergency repair job 
which Opec ministers have 
effected, is unlikely to last long 
or to have such dramatic 
effect: Indonesia has issued a 
warning through the press that 
Qpec would consider further 
measures if this Geneva agree- 
ment failed to do the trick of 
restoring order and stabilising 
prices. But that remains to be 
seen. • » 

Opec has with difficulty 
restored the quota system 
which . was established two 
years ago — and virtually 
abandoned last December. But 
quota systems create as many 
problems .as they solve in the 
long-term Opec countries 
which controlled the market so 
outrageously when demand for 
oil was high in the 1970s, have 
yet to prove that they can do so 
for long in a time of worldwide 
glut It still looks as if it will be 
the law of market forces which 
will prevail in the end. 

This could have serious 
consequences for some. The 
most significant single de- 
cision at Geneva was surely 
the one which exempts Iraqi 
from cutting back production 
from its present, estimated 
level of nearly two million 
barrels a day to its 1984 quota 


on thorny questions of inter- 
national politics. It can agree 
to differ. Commonwealth 
countries, including Britain, 
can debate their mutual con- 
cerns with a healthy concern 
for self-interest. 

The argument now moves 
from the Commonwealth to 
Europe and the US. Whatever 
package of sanctions emerges 
in America is likely to be a 
compromise between Presi- 
dent Reagan and Congress. 
And ; the Reagan administra- 
tion will almost certainly wish 
to ensure that any concessions 
it- makes are in line with 
British policy. 

Similarly, in European dis- 
cussions Mrs Thatcher will 
have the general support of 
Germany and France in shap- 
ing an acceptable set of mea- 
sures. Her pledge not to veto 
or oppose a European sanc- 
tions package must be read in > 
the light of that feet Since the 
Commonwealth communique 
declares that its sanctions 
should be part of wider inter- 
national action, Britain is in a 
strong position to influence 
whatever is finally agreed be- 
tween all the parties. Mrs 
Thatcher should use that in- 
fluence to ensure that the final 
package includes positive mea- 
sures to improve black hous- 
ing, education and 
employment prospects in 
South Africa. 

Will the debate over sanc- 
tions, however, be finally re- 
solved? It is unlikely. Should 
the Botha government make, 
the concessions currently de- 
manded, the Commonwealth 
advocates of harsh measures 
and the European supporters 
of diplomacy, and positive 
intervention would both claim 
credit - r and President Botha 
would deny that outside fee- 
tors influenced him at alL 


of 1.2 million. It is significant 
partly: because it recognizes the 
truth ' that Baghdad ■ would 
never have agreed to cut back 
anyway - given the pressures of 
its six-year-old war with Iran; 
and even more so because Iran 
has agreed to it Indeed the 
Iranians . are said: to be de- 
lighted by the outcome. 

Given that Iraq, with Arab 
support, could never be per- 
suaded to reduce, the Iranians 
have given higher, priority to 
their own no less pressing 
need, to increase revenue from 
oil. Tehran has said with more 
confidence than it can fed, 
that it is capable of stopping 
Iraqi oil getting out anyway. In 
reality "the Geneva cartel sig- 
nals that neither country can 
carry on fighting without high 
revenues from it Indeed if the 
rest of the world was seriously 
trying to hah the Gulf fighting 
it should be to the oil supplies 
that they should turn. 

But this is unlikely to hap- 
pen. Opec is more concerned 
with re-establishing its control 
over 40 per cent of world 
output Its 13 members con- 
tain several who would suffer . 
grievously from a continuing 
downward slide in prices. This . 
week's agreement is a holding 
operation which reflects in 
several ways the serious view 
they take of their position. 


FIRST TRAIN TO TIRANA 


Barring accidents, jammed 
points and signal failure, Alba- 
nia will today be joined to the 
rest of Europe by rail for the 
first time. After nearly four 
years of work, the last 13-mile 
link between the Yugoslav and 
Albanian railway networks is 
due to be inaugurated in the 
presence of delegations from 
both countries. So will end one 
aspect of Albania’s isolation, 
from the world. 

The railway, has been a 
complex project, fraught with' 
practical, diplomatic mid emo- . 
tional difficulties. The Balkan; 
terrain is harsh; bilateral rela- 
tions have been tense — in- 
deed, they still are. And when 
the rail link was first agreed 
seven years ago, there was no 
guarantee that the Albanian 
side would have the will to see 
it through. It was then- barely 
starting to chafe at the thralls 
of the anti-Western, anti-So- 
viet and’ anti-Chinese isola- 
tionism which held it apart 
from the world. 

Now, the tables have turned. 
It was Albania which com- 
pleted its stretch of track first, 
more than . 18 months ago, as 
the life of its uncompromising 
leader, Enver Hoxha, was 
drawing to a dose. And it is 
Yugoslavia, a year late in 
completing its.own side, which 
has expressed the greater 


misgivings about its useful- 
ness. 

Initially only a freight line, 
the railway will provide a 
fester and cheaper route for 
Albania’s increasing trade with 
northern and central Europe. 
For Yugoslavia, ■ however, 
which already has adequate 
rail links with southern Eu- 
rope, its financial viability , is 
dubious; disagreements am- 
ong Yugoslavia’s constituent 
republics and provinces have 
already seen to that. Moreover 
its possible role in conveying 
Albanian influence, and in 
time Albanians, northwards is 
feared. 

. Ever since 1981, when pro- 
Albanian riots erupted in the 
Yugoslav province of Kosovo 
and stalled the railway agree- 
ment the project- has mirrored 
tile state of. Slav-Albanian 
relations within Yugoslavia. 
The commencement of build- 
ing two years later was a sign of 
half-restored calm in Kosovo; 
the delays over the past two 
years have been a mark of the 
indecision in Belgrade about 
how best to combat the inter- 
mittent unrest At best Yugo- 
slavia will hope that the rail 
link will put relations with 
Albania on a less resentful, 
footing At worst, -Yugoslavia 
can do without it 


But the progress of the 
railway has also mirrored 
Albania’s slow and discrimi- 
nate opening towards the 
world outride. Tirana is host- 
ing more foreign visitors, 
including officials. - It is 
concluding foreign trade deals 
■more often and more openly. 
The main road to Greece is 
open again after 43 years. Even 
in its publicized problems — - 
the alienation of young people, 
low. productivity and abuse of 
privilege by its elite — Albania 
seems to be joining the East 
European and Balkan main- 
stream. The completion of the 
railway to Yugoslavia is an- 
other milestone reached. 

It may be said that the 
railway, indeed any new rail- 
way, is an anachro nism; tha t 

the future lies with road and 
air transport. It may be said 
too that in terms of modern 
communications IS miles is a 
mere hop. But the completion 
of the Y ugoslavia- Albania rail- 
way, and with it the extension 
of the European, railway net- 
work to all corners of the 
continent, is no mean achieve- 
ment And if it helps to bring 
Tirana closer to the centre of 
Europe, and not only by train, 
then tiie time, effort and 
money will have been well 
spenL 


From Mr John G. Kapp 
Sir, Your leader (July 31) is right 
that SizeweU has inescapably be- 
come a measure of political 
’ commitment to the future of the 
‘ British nuclear industry, on which 
i the Cabinet should make up its 
mind. However I think that you 
. arc wrong to say thai “the British 
people . . . have not yet turned 
against civil nuclear power in any 
electorally clear-cut way" since a 
Gallup poll in May showed 75 per 
cent against, and only 18 per cent 
for, and all but the Tory party 
haw publicly declared their oppo- 
sition. 

* " Most thinking people, are natu- 
rally worried about building 
SizeweU, and would prefer alter- 
natives which reduce the risks and 
increase the benefits.' Although 
conservation has been Govern- 
ment policy, with all-party sup- 
port, since 1973, its proportion of 
capital investment has so for been 
tiny. 

Spending the £2 billion ear- 
marked for SizeweU on freely 
insulating the 10 million »miggg«H 
hot water tanks and attics in 
Britain could save the equivalent 
energy output of eight Sizewehs, 
knock £1 billion a year off the 
national fuel bill, reduce feel 
poverty and pollution, and create 
a quarter of a million jobs for a 
year. 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN G. KAPP, 

53 Hove Park Road, 

Hove, Sussex. 

July 31. 

From Professor Ian Fells. FEng 
Sir, It is anticipated that the £8 . 
billion flotation of British Gas win * 
take place in the aut umn. For 
once, instead of pouring the 
“windfall” into the 
“’housekeeping", as we did with 
the North Sea oil revenues, would 

National Gallery 

From Sir Denis Mahon, FBA 
Sir, You conclude your leader on 
the future of the National Gallery 
(August 4) by justifiably stressing 
the role which contributions in 
cash or in kind from the private 
sector could play in supplement- 
ing the public funds very properly 
devoted to a nationally-owned 
institution of this kind. 

Since the recent spectacularly 
generous gifts of Sainsbuiy and 
Getty moneys are evidently, as 
you imply, quite exceptional 
benefactions, it still remains nec- 
essary to give positive encourage- 
ment to. substantial private" 
participation of a more regular 
and, even though at a relatively 
lowerleveL _ - 

Thec&is Tittle-doubt, however, ■ 

Outpatient queues^ 

FromrMr Roger Grace. . •"tV . 
Sir, 1 was fescinated to read on,. 
July 29 -that the hospitri^admin- 
istrators at St Thomas’ Hospital 
hope that a new computerised 
registration system will help to 
streamline the way people are- 
booked in as outpatients and 
thereby reduce the waiting time. I 
wondered how the magic com- 
puter could book patients in more 
efficiently than a clerk; they both 
have the same period of time in 
which to book the same number of 
patients. 

There is only one way that the 
waiting time in outpatients will be 
reduced; if each doctor in the 
clinic saw half the number of 
patients I have no doubt that the 
patients would be seen on tuna 
Unfortunately, patients attend- 
ing for the first time would have to 
wait twice the length of time at 
home for their appointment; in 
the surgical outpatients in Wolver- 
hampton this could add another 
six months to a year. Perhaps with 
current medical staffing levels it is 
better to wait in the outpatient 
department 
Yours sincerely, 

ROGER GRACE. 

The Royal Hospital, 

Cleveland Road, 

Wolverhampton, West Midlands. 
July 30: 

Hampton Court limes 

From Professor W. T Steam 
Sir, The issue over the fete and 
replacement of the semidrcular 
avenue of time trees at Hampton 
Court (letters, June 14, 23, 27, July 
10) has shifted to the choice 
between complete formal uniform 
replanting, conforming to the 
original plan of the Hampton 
Court fountain garden, and the 
informality of -retaining the 
present mature trees and infilling 
with young trees, as was decided 
about 10 years ago. The Depart-' 
meat of the Environment's de- 
cision now to fell all the trees, 
traumatic though this will be for 
local residents, has to be accepted 
The major problem now relates 
to their replacement The present 
trees are of three kinds * the 
original TiJia x vulgaris done 
preferred by Dr Piggott (July 10), 
T.platyphyflos and T.cordata - 
owing to partial replacement from 
time to time of the original 


it not be sensible to set aside at 
least part of the money to invest in 
a new energy project? 

The recent report of the Severn 
Tidal Power Group makes dear 
that a tidal barrage scheme could 
be constructed across the river 
Severn by the year 2000 for a cost 
of £5.5 billion; its capadty would 
be 7.200MW, the equivalent of six 
midear stations; the cost per unit 
of electricity generated would be 
about the same as for a nuclear 
station and 25 per cent cheaper 
than from a coal-fired station. It 
would last for 100 years. 

. The secretary of state is in a 
dilemma as he awaits the SizeweU 
inquiry report. Unless he places 
orders for some kind of power 
station very soon the power 
station construction industry will 
go bankrupt; it has not had an 
order since 1979. 

It would dearly be prudent to 
order two coal-fired stations 
straight away, but it will be 
difficult to order new nuclear 
stations for some time yet. A 
definite decision to go to the 
planning stage of the Severn 
barrage project with a dear intent 
to build would be a wise and not 

over-courageous action. 

1 am sure that in simpler, less 
bureaucratic times, bur with 
today's engineering, Isambard 
Kingdom Brunei would have 
raised the money and had the 
barrage built by now. 

Yours faithfully, 

IAN FELLS, 

The University ofNewcastle upon 
Tyne, 

Department of Chemical and 
Process Engineering, 

Metz Court, 

Claremont Road, 

Newcastle upon Tyne. 

Tyne and Wear. 

July 25. 


that this will prove difficult, if not 
impossible, for the new Director- 
designate to achieve without a 
series of specific measures de- 
signed to attract such support 
befog adopted by HM Govern- 
ment. Representations listing de- 
sirable measures to this end have 
already been lodged by such 
bodies as the Museums and 
Galleries Commission and the 
National Art-Collections Fund; 
and to my knowledge the present 
Minister for the Arts, Mr Richard 
Luce, is frilly cognizant of them. 

May we not now' look to his 
ministerial colleagues unequivo- 
cally to accept his counsels in this 
regard? 

Yours faithfully, 

DENIS MAHON. 

33 Cadogan Square, SW1. 

August 4. 

For better or worse 

■■ FmmMr James M. Kirby 
.Sir, Recently someopposition has 
Bceirshown to the Government's 
proposals for transferable tax 
allowances. I am one of many 
young working married men who 
feel that young children should 
wherever possible be cared for 
during the day by their mother. 
We are therefore struggling with- 
out my wife's income to do this. 
-The Government's proposals 
would give us some financial 
ass is t an ce in this t ask, rather than 
my wife's allowance being wasted. 
It may be argued that those on 
social security benefit are in most 
need, but that is no reason to deny 
help to working people with a 
commitment to their family. 

At the same time the Govern- 
ment should reform mortgage tax 
relief. At the moment a married 
couple qualifies for relief on 
£30,000 but a cohabiting un- 
married couple qualifies for 
£60,000. No wonder a (cohabiting) 
colleague recently suggested that I 
should sue for divorce citing 
unreasonable behaviour by the 
Inland Revenue. 

Yours faithfully, 

JAMES KIRBY, 

37 DdavaLe Road, 

Wfocheombe, 

Gloucestershire. 

August 4. 

planting. The Department of the 
Environment’s intent is to replace 
them all with Tilia x vulgaris 
“Pallida’’, a hybrid done which 
came into being, it appears, long 
after the original planting, which 
has never been grown in this 
country to my knowledge and of 
which the virtues for Hampton 
Court are debatable. 

If adequate stocks of the original 
Hampton Court form are not at 
present available, there would 
seem little reason, since the 
Department of the Environment 
is looking ahead to 100 or more 
years andthere have been 10 years 
of indecision, that time should not 
be allowed for propagation. Mean- 
while Hampton Court residents 
and visitors could enjoy the 
beauty of their doomed trees. 

Yours, 

WILLIAM T. STEARN. 

17 Hfeh Park Road. 

Kew Gardens. 

Richmond, Surrey. 

July 30. 

sign of even having withdrawn 
from its limited but laudable aim, 
slated in the House of Commons 
on May 13, to do “everything 
possjbJe" to negotiate s test ban 
treaty. The Soviet Union's mora- 
torium is now a year old and no 
one doubts its veracity. Verifica- 
tion has ceased to be a genuine 
problem, something the Pentagon 
has long ago admitted, even it the 
Ministry of Defence has noL 
This is not the real reason for 
the British refusal to stop testing. 
Like the USA, the UK appears to 
be determined to go on perfecting 
new nuclear systems. The USSR 
will eventually be forced to go on . 
doing the same. And so the 
upward spiral of nuclear arsenals 
(in East and West) win continue. 


Nuclear arms ~ 

From the Moderator and Sec- 
retary, International Affairs 
Divison. British Council of 
Churches 

Sir. May we, on this 41st anniver- 
sary of the destruction of Hiro- 
shima, which inaugurated the 
nudear era. appeal to her 
Majesty’s Government to commit 
the UK to nuclear disarmament 
with a clarity and conviction that 
is, at the moment sadly absent. If 
multilateralism is the method the 
Government chooses, let it go- 
down that road with a will and 
prove to the electorate that this 
process can produce results. 

Our Government gives every 


Taking stucco 
; seriously 

From Mr Ashley Barker 
i Sir. Mr Michael Relph (July 19) 

r asks whether anything can be done 

1 to stop the continuing impov- 

r erishment of London's domestic 

t architecture, particularly the 

I stucco work of early Victorian 

: houses and terraces which is so 

t often mutilated or even removed 

1 when repairs are called -for. En- 

r gtish Heritage shares his concern. 

■ The use of stucco in street 
t architecture was originally seen as 

an economical and acceptable 
: substitute for stone and it was 
j intended to be decorated as such. 

The Regency architects who pro- 
moted the new fashions expressed 
great enthusiasm for the material 
since it gave them more scope for 
architectural display within a lim- 
ited budget. 

, Today weare inclined to regard 
. stucco buildings as inferior to 
stone ones and to take them less 
seriously, even when their 
architectural geometry is of equal 
merit. Perhaps we are too ready to 
discount them for all the reasons 
which Ruskin gave when he railed 
against elaborate stucco decora- 
tion. 

The foci remains that the stuc- 
coed house fronts do play a vital 
part in the London scene and 
when properly painted they make 
a splendid show. When they are 
neglected nothing could look 
worse. 

The regular painting and repair 
of these facades place a consid- 
erable burden on the householder 
and the effect of VAT is to make 
things worse, but maintenance 
cannot be neglected. The removal 
of cornices and other projecting 
features is not only disfiguring, it 
leaves the structure further ex- 
posed to the weather and accel- 
erates decay. 

English Heritage, which has 
recently assumed responsibilities 
formerty exercised by the GLC for 
the care of listed buildings in 
London, proposes to consult with 
those London boroughs most 
directly concerned with tins prob- 
lem. There are powers available 
for the protection of listed build- 
ings and conservation areas, as 
weu as powers to assist and advise 
owners. We are anxious to use 
these powers to the best effect to 
keep and improve the architecture 
of London's stuccoed streets. 

Yours faithfully, 

ASHLEY BARKER, 

(Head of-London Division), 

English Heritage, 

Chesham House, 

30 Warwick Street, Wl. - 
July 28. 

Sanctions debate 

From Mr Martin Russell 
Sir, There are many like myself 
who, although not adhering com- 
pletely to any particular religion, 
would like many religions to 
continue in high esteem. A parti- 
san letter like that from the Bishop 
of Birmingham (August 1) is 
bound to lower respect for the 
Church of England amongst 
many. 

The Bishop is apparently trying 
to prove that he and the “Board 
for Social Responsibility of the 
Church of England'" have a higher 
sense of morality in the matter of 
sanctions than the Prime Min- 
ister. His letter turns on a conclu- 
sion of the Eminem Persons 
Group that “concerted action of 

an effective kind may be the 

last opportunity to avert the worst 
bloodbath since the Second World 
War”. 

That is so; it is almost a truism 
because of the use of the words 
“may be". It “may be”, on the 
other hand, that sanctions would 
cause or even precipitate a blood- 
bath which could otherwise be 
avoided by diplomatic and eco- 
nomic measures of a positive 
kind, like a plan for a form of 
Marshall Aid for South Africa, 
such as has already been proposed 
in your columns. 

The Bishop writes that Sir 
Geoffrey Howe's mission “can be 
seen to have achieved no signifi- 
cant results”. The opposite view is 
tenable. His great persuasive pow- 
ers must have had an impact on 
many with whom he talked; he 
cleared the air and he established 
that many Africans do not want 
impoverishment by sanctions 
when it is obvious that apartheid 
is on the way out. ; 

The great successes of Mrs 
Thatcher’s two governments in ! 
solving the Zimbabwe, Hong 1 
Kong and Gibraltar problems and 
in destabilizing fascism in the 1 
Argentine and possibly in South j 
America generally cause me to ‘ 
think that she is entirely right in ^ 
her approach to the matter of 1 
apartheid and in her desire to • 
reduce rather than increase eco- 
nomic suffering. c 

Yours faithfully, l 

MARTIN RUSSELL, t 

Dungrove Farm House, - c 
Tarrant Gunvfile. 

Blandford, t 

Dorset ' 

August 2, £ 

Given . existing levels of j 
“deterrence” that no longer has c 
•any meaningful relation to inter- ( 
national security. <j 

Is it really too much to ask our 
Government, on this fateful 
anniversary, to demonstrate its 
commitment to human survival . 
by supporting a universal test-ban 
and giving present negotiations f 
real impetus by announcing the ‘ 
suspension of British tests, ini- L 
tially for at least one year? 

Sincerely, J 

ELIZABETH SALTER, * 

Moderator, 1 

Paul oestreicher* h 

Secretary, C 

Division of International Affairs, 4 
British Council of Churches, B 

2 Eaton Gate, SWl. A 


ON THIS DAY 


AUGUST 6 1861 

William Howard Russell went to 
Washington in l86t to report an 
the American Civil War. He found 
a vantage point occupied by some 
senators, one of them 
accompanied by a woman with 
open glasses, surveying the batik 
area odow. First rumours were of 
a Northern success, but RusseU. 

his horse refreshed, descended 
closer and found a different scene 


BATTLE OF 
[bullrunJ 

. . J had met my friends on the 
road, and after a few hours rode 
forward at a long trot as well as I 
could past the waggons and 
through the dust, when suddenly 
there arose a tumult in front of me 
at a small bridgo across the rood, 
and then I perceived the drivers of 
a set of waggons with the horses 
turned towards me, who were 
endeavouring to force their way 
against the stream of vehicles 
setting in the other direction. By 
the side of the new set of waggons 
there were a number of commissar- 
iat men and soldiers, whom at first 
sight I took to be the baggage 
guard. They looked excited and 
alarmed, and were running by the 
side of the horses — in front the 
dust qfote obscured the view. 

At the bridge the currents met in 
wild disorder. “Turn back! 
Retreat!” shouted the men from 
the front, "We're whipped, we’re 
whippedT. They cursed and tugged 
at the horses’ heads, and struggled 
with frenzy to get past Running by 
me on foot was a naan with tbe 
shoulder-straps of an officer. 
"Pray, what is the matter, Sir? " u It 
means we're pretty badly whipped, 
and that’s a foci" he blurted out in 
puffo, and continued his career. I 
observed that he carried no sword. 
The teamsters of the advancing 
waggons now caught up the cry. 
“Turn back - tuns your hones” 
was the shout up the whole line, 

awl haftking , phm g iw g , t mhm, iwl 

kicking, the horses which hadbeen 
proceeding down the road reversed 
root, ami went off towards 
Centreville. Those behind *h«™ 
went madly rushing on, the driven 
being quite indifferent whether 
glory or disgrace led the way, 
provided they could find it. fo the 
midst of this extraordinary specta- 
cle an officer, escorted by some 
dragoons, rode through foe nick 
with a Hght cart in charge. Another 
officer on foot, with his sword 
nnito his ran up against me. 
“What is all this about?” “Why, 
we’re pretty badly whipped. We Ye 
all in retreat. There’s General 
Tyler there badly wounded.” And 
on he ran. There came yet another 
who said, “We’re beaten on all 
points. The whole army is in 
retreat.” Still there was no flight of 
troop*, no retreat of an army, no 
reason for all this precipitation. 

I got my horse up into foe field 
out of the road, and went on 
rapidly towards the front... and 
presently I saw firelocks, cooking 
tins, k n a p sac k s, and greatcoats on 
the ground, and observed that foe 
confusion and speed of tbe bag- 
gage-carts became greater, and that 
many of them were crowded with 
men, or were followed by others, 
who dung to them. The ambu- 
lances were crowded with soldiers, 
but it did not look as if there were 
many wounded. Negro servants on 
led horses dashed frantically past; 
men in uniform, whom it were a 
disgrace to tbe profession of arms 
to call "soldiers", swarmed- by on 
moles, chargers and even draught 
horses, which had been cut out of 
carts or waggons, and went on with 
the harness dinging to their heels, 
as frightened as their riders... 
The forth seems to be that foe men 
were over-worked, kept out for 12 
or 14 hours in foe sun, exposed to 
long-range fire, badly officered, 
and of deficient regimental organi- 
zation. Then came a meet difficult 
operation — to withdraw this army, 
so constituted, out of action in face 
of an energetic enemy who had 
repulsed it The retirement of the 
baggage, which was without ade- 
quate guards, and was in the hands 
of ignorant drivers, was misunder- 
stood and created alarm, and that 
alarm became a panic, which 
became frantic on foe appearance 
of the enemy and on the opening of 
their guns on the runaways. But 
the North will be all the move 
anxious to retrieve tins 


For the record 

From Mr Martin Woodruff 
Sir, I recently visited my local 
timber merchant to have half an 
inch cut off the bottom of a door 
wbich had been snagging on a 
newly-laid carpet. The job com- 
pleted, tbe operator of tbe saw 
handed me a piece of paper on 
which he had written “1 cut @ 
30p” and asked me to take it to the 
yard office to pay. 

When 1 presented ft at the 
counter an assistant pressed some 
buttons on a calculator and told 
me the total price -was 3Sp, ib& 
extra 5p being. VAT. 

He then wrote details of tbe 
transaction in a huge invoice book 
with self-duplicating paper, which 
automatically produced four 
copies of the invoice. Next he took 
from a drawer a robber stamp 
displaying the name of the com- 
pany and the date and solemnly 
stamped each of the four copies. 

He left two of them in the book' 
and tore out tbe other two and 
handed them to me. One was for 
me to keep (for which I was very 
grateful) and the other was to hand 
to the security man on the gate as I 

drove out of the yard. 

It is sometimes said we live in a 

paper age. I suspect we may all be 
slightly mad as well. 

Yours etc. 

MARTIN WOODRUFF, 
CopperwdL 
45 High Street, 

Barton, Cambridge. 

August 1. 


• \ 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


Trust marks composer’s life 0BITUARY 

MR JACK LAMBERT 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


BUCKINGHAM PALACE 
August 5: His Excellency 
Lieutenant-General Mir 
Shawkat Ali was received in 
audience by The Queen and 
presented the Letters of Recall 
of his predecessor and his own 
Letters of Commission as High 
Commissioner for the People's 
Republic of Bangladesh in 
London. 

His Excellency was accompa- 
nied by the following members 
of the High Commission, who 
bad the honour of being pre- 
sented to Her Majesty; 

Mr MahluddUi Aiunrd (Deputy High 
Commis&kmeri. Brigadier En amul 
Hug Khan (Defence Advisor). Mr 
Amsa Amin iMinbier (Consular)). Mr 


relinquishing his appointment 
as Ambassador Extraordinary 
and Plenipotentiary from the 
Republic of Gabon to the Court 
of St James's. 

Mr David Roy croft had the 
honour ofbeing received by The 
Queen upon relinquishing his 
appointment as Assistant Pri- 


A trust has been set up to 
commemorate the work of Sir 
Arthur Bliss, a former Master 
Of the (Wen's Muskrk. lt will 
establish a comprehensive ar- 
chive of his life and work. 

The Bliss Trust, which is 
organizing a centenary 
celebration of his birth in 
1991, has also founded two 
scholarships for young mu- 
sicians as a memorial to Sir 
Arthur, once described as “ooe 
of Britain's liveliest and most 


vate Secretary to The Prince of unconventional composers". 


Muftonunad Zany (CBunfrrtlcO.. Mr 
M. Rut, til Amu, , Counsellors .Mr Jala] 
Ahmed Sheikh (First Secretary). Mr 
AUur Rahman (Firs! Secretary) and 
Mr ManxK zaman (First Secretary). 


Begum Shawkat had the hon- 
our of being received by The 
Queen. 


Wales, when Her Majesty in- 
vested him with the Insignia ofa 

Lieutenant of the Royal Vic- 
torian Order. 

The Duke of Edinburgh this 
evening attended a Reception 
given by the Commander-in- 
Chief Naval Home Command 
on board HMS Glamorgan at 
Cowes. 

Squadron Leader Timothy 
Finneron and Major Rowan 
Jackson, RM were in 
attendance. 

The Hon Mary Morrison has 
succeeded Lady Susan Hussey 
as Lady in Wailing to The 
Queen. 


Sir Arthur, who was musical 
director of the BBC during the 
Second World War, wrote 
more than 130 symphonies. 


concertos, operas and ballets. 
Many of his early manuscripts 
were destroyed in the German 
bombing of London. He die in 
1975. 

The trust particularly 
wanted to locate the last three 
movements of his Colour Sym- 
phony, which made his reputa- 
tion in 1922. The first 
movement is held in the 
American Library of 
Congress. 

Sir Arthur's widow, Lady 
Bliss, who chairs the 10- 
member trust said she be- 
lieved many doemnents and 
letters were scattered in pri- 
vate hands. 



Sir Arthur Bliss 


Forthcoming 

marriages 


Mr C-FJR. Arkwright 
and Miss A-L. KeUy 
The engagement is announced 
between Charles, elder son of 
Colonel and Mis Peter Ark- 
wright, ofWiflersey House, near- 
Broadway, Worcestershire, and 


' Sir William Harding (Deputy 
Under-Secretary of State for 
Foreign and Commonwealth 
Affairs) who had the honour of 
being received by Her Majesty 
was present and the Gentlemen 
of the Household in Waiting 
were in attendance. 

His Excellency Monsieur 
Leon N'Dong and Madam 
N’Dong were received in fere- 
well audience by The Queen and 
look leave upon His Excellency 


CLARENCE HOUSE 
August 5: Ruth, Lady Fermoy 
has succeeded Mrs Patrick 
Campbell -Preston as Lady-in - 
Waiting to Queen Elizabeth The 
Queen Mother. 


Anne-Louise, only daughter of 
Mr Bernard and Lady Mirabel 


The Queen will visit Berlin on 
May 26 and 27, 1987, to mark 
the 750th anniversary of the city 
and will take the salute at The 
Queen's Birthday Parade of the 
British Forces in Bolin. 


Marriages 

Mr IX. Davies 
and Lady Barlas 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, July 26, at Goudhurst 
Church of Mr Ivor X Davies 
and Lady Barlas, widow of Sir 
Richard Barlas. Their present 
address is Walnut House, 
Ticehurst, East Sussex. 

His Honour S. Llewellyn 
and Mrs J. Banfield James 
Judge Seys Llewellyn, of 
Gresford, and Mrs Joan 
Banfield James, ofRossett were 
married quietly at Erbistock 
Parish Church, near Wrexham, 
on August 5. 

Mr MJF. McGann 
and Miss AJL Howell 
The marriage took place on 
Saturday, July 26, at Christ 
Church, Chislehurst of Mr Mar- 
tin McGann, second son of Mr 
and Mrs TJ. McGann, of 
Cambridge, and Miss Alexandra 
Howell, only daughter of Mr 
and Mis K.F. Howell, of 
Bickley. Kent. 

Mr M. St J. Slaughter 
and Miss J.V. Jewsou 
The marriage took place on 
Thursday, July 31, in Bristol 
between Mr Michael Slaughter, 
son of Mr W. Slaughter, of 
Putney, London, and Mrs Au- 
drey Wm tour, of Canonbury, 
London, and Miss Jane Jewson, 


Appointments 



daughter of Mr Peter Jewson, of 
Oxford, and Mis Anne Hone- 


Oxford, and Mrs Anne Horse- 
man, of Woodstock, Oxford. 

A reception was held at the 
Orangery, Goldney House, Bris- 
tol the next day. 


The Dean of Johannesburg, 
the Very Her Duncan Bu- 
chanan, who has been elected 
to succeed Bishop Desmond 
Tutu as Bishop of Johannes- 
burg. He is known to hold 
pronounced liberal views 
which be has voiced openly in 
the past. 

Other appointments include: 
Mr R.B. Crimson, British High 
Commissioner at Port Louis, to 
be concurrently Ambassador 
(nonresident) to the Comoros 
in succession to Mr J.N. Allan, 
who has taken up a further 
Diplomatic Service 

appointment. 


Mr Bernard and Lady Mirabel 
Kelly, of 28 Carlyle Square, 
London. 5W3. 

Mr M.P. Heward 
and Miss D.S. Grossman 
The engagement is announced 
between Paul son of Air Chief 
Marshal Sir Anthony and Lady 
Heward. of Home Close, 
Don head St Mary, Wiltshire, 
and Deborah, daughter of the 
late Mr G.R. Cross man and of 
Mrs G.R. Crossman, of Court 
Place, Withycombe, Somerset 
Mr LX Burgess 
and Miss J.C. Pye 
The engagement is announced 
between Lloyd, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs I.L. Burgess, of Auck- 
land. New Zealand, and Jayne, 
daughter of Mr R. Pye, of 
Odiham. Hampshire. 

Mr C.M. Clark 
and Miss G. Roper 
The engagement is announced 
bewteen Cohn Martin, youngest 
son of Mrs N. Clark, of Beck- 
enham. Kent and the late Mr 
RA. Clark, and Gillian, youn- 
gest daughter of Mr and Mrs JJS. 
Roper, of Gosforth, Newcastle- 
upon-Tyne. 

Mr J.C.M. Hooper 
and Miss L. Crosby 
The engagement is announced 
between Justin, rider son of 
Commander Charles Hooper, 
RN, of Tunbridge Wells, Kent, 
and Mrs Peter Stewart, of 
Lacock, Wiltshire, and Lynda, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs S. 
Crosby, of Cheam, Surrey. 

Mr RJF. Mnrray 
and Mrs DAL. Reynolds 
The engagement is. announced 
between Robin Murray and 
Diana Reynolds (n£e CollyerX 
both of Edinburgh. 


Mr R.G. Laycock Blrfhdl 

and Miss SXL Jackson OUUIIL 

The engagement is announced The Count* 
between Robin, son of Mr and Sir Ranulp 
Mrs J.C Laycock, of Calgaiy, Chris Bonu 
Canada, and Sarah, daughter of ard Buckle, 
Mr and Mrs A.T.R. Jackson, of Evans, 76; I 
Tunbridge Wells, Kent Air Marsha 

Mr D.H.F. McGee j*; * 

and Miss AJ. Tyler Mr Howau 

The engagement is announced i 

between Damian, second son of xTh'ul ha. 
Mr and Mrs Terence AJ. 

McGee, of Beckenham, Kent 
and Amanda Jane, only da ugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs Alan H. Tyler, 
of Lambley, Nottingham. 


Dr DJ. Palmer 

and MSss PJ. RoUasen 

The engagement is announced 


The engagement is announced 

* University news . 


Kendleshire, Bristol, and Penel- 
ope Jean, youngest daughter of 
Mr and Mrs D. RoDason, of 
Pontnewydd, Gwent 
Mr H.G. Rees 
and Miss B. Lennon 
The engagement is announced 
between Huw Gynne, son of Dr 
H.M.N. Rees, of Bromsgrove, 
Worcestershire, and the late Dr 
N.G. Rees, of WhaOey, Lan- 
cashire, and Bernadette, only 
daughter of Mrs N. Lennon, of 
Sheffield, and the late Dr T.P. 
Lennon. 

Dr MJL Toynbee 
and Miss A. Parry Williams 
The engagement is announced 
between Martin Richard, youn- 
ger son of Mr and Mrs A_A. 
Toynbee, of Lower Hardres, 


Canterbury, and Ann, daughter 
of Mr and Mrs Bryn P. Wil- 


of Mr and Mrs Bryn P. Wil- 
liams, of Llandudno, Gwynedd. 
Mr PJ. Woodbonse 
and Miss S J. George 
The engagement is announced 
between Philip, son of Mr and 
Mrs AJJ*. Woodhouse. of 
Mitchells House, Mersham, 
Ashford, Kent and Sarah. 
daughter of Mr T.DA. George, 
of Stubbermere, Stansted Park. 
Rowlands Castle, Hampshire, 
and Mrs EJ.W. George, of 
Hunters Moon, Lech lade, 
Gloucestershire. 


T atnet urillc ing director of the Standard 

miGal “Hla Triumph Motor Company, left 

Mrs Alice Barbara White, of £77,544 net 


Cambridge, left estate valued at 
£541,058 net After bequests 
totalling £38.000 and effects, she 
left the residue to Newnham 
College, Cambridge. 

Mr AJick Sydney Dick, of Hill 
Wootton, Warwick, industrial 
consultant and former manag- 


Mis Guendolene Upton, of 
Barham, Canterbury, left 
£1,199,322 net 

Mr John Mortimer Terry, of 
.Weston super Mere, left 
£829.108 net. 

Spitz, Mrs Margot, of London 
N12 £305,444 



Appointments 


Bums. MARRIAGES. 
DEATHS aad M MEMORWM 
fit a toe + 15% VAT 

(minimum 3 I mm) 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and hi Memoriam 


AtHMK in ccmcnn. aolhcnticaicd by the 
name and permanent address of ibe 


DEATHS 


name and permanent address i 
tender, may be soil UK 


THE TIMES 
TO BOX 484 

H inta Street 
oa El 9XS 


or Kfeptaned (by letcpiionc subs- 
ci ben only) ux BM81 3824 


ARfUTAGE. OoTtenUna Ann - On Au- 
gust 4th. peacefully at her daughter's 
home after an Illness booie with 
courage and dignity. Beloved wife of 
the late William Guy ElKanah and 
greatly loved mother of Martm and 
Caroline and a darling Qanny lo Ed- 
ward and WDItam. Family cremation 
on August 7th. No flowers please. 
Donations, if desired, to N&P.&C. 


A n nouncements can be received by 
telephone between 9.00am and 


telephone between 9.00am and 
5.30pm Monday to Fnday. on Satur- 


day between 9.00am ana iz noon. 
ffil-411 4008 arty). For puWkalion the 
taltowinE day by I.JOpm. 


illowing day by I.JOpm. 


lARNES. Julian Ronald, late or the 
Foreign Service, suddenly, peaceful- 
ly at home on July 30th. Cremation 
Oxford Crematorium at ii.45am on 
August llth. Enquiries to R. Dniee & 
Co. 7 Duckhngton Lane. Witney. 
OXON. Tel: (0993) 2675. 


HHTHCMHG MAHHAGES. WED09IGS 

nc on Court and Social Page £6 a lea 
4 15% VAT. 


Court and Social Page annouecmcnis 


can not be accepte d hy telephone. 
Enquiries KK 0H22 9953 
(after lOJOnmi or send la 

f tank*! Meet tMdM El SSL 


■WWAHD - On 2nd August 1986, 
peacefully in hospital. Mary 
Veronica In her 85th year. Beloved 
wtfe. mother and grandmother. 
Requiem Mass at SL Mary's Cathode 
Church. Ctowborough on Thursday. 
7th August at 230 pm. Family flow- 
ers only but donations to a charity of 
own choice. 


■WALL Marjory Nuttier on Saturday 
2nd August at Chesterton HaU Cres- 
cent Cremation 2pm Friday 8th 
August at Cambridge Crematorium. 
Family flowers only. Donations If de- 
sired lo Christian AM. Memorial 
Service at 2.30pm on 20th Septem- 
ber at Emmanuel United Reformed 
Church. TTurapington Street 
Cambridge. 

■ARBS Alan Edward. On the 2nd Au- 
gust 1986 aged 50 years of 7 Park 
HflL Toddtngten. Dearly loved hus- 
band of Jean and father of Michael 
and Bamaby. Private funeral and no 
flowers by request but donations 
may be sent to Ward n. Luton and 
Dunstable Hospital. Further enqut- 
nes to Neville Funeral Service. 311 
Marsh Rd. Luton, Beds, tefc 0582 
674902. 

MARCUSE, JACQUES-EUE - On 25th 
July. In Ferney-volaire. France, 
aged 75- Formerly Deputy Editor. 
Agence France Press*. Free French 
Forces Shanghai. Lea d Safsons. 
Prevessln-Moens. 01210 Ferney 
Voctatre. France. 


Please allow at least 48 hours before 
DuNmlion. 


DAVISON - On 1st August at Sherbum 
House Hospital. Durham. Reverend 
Canon David Edward aged 77. 


BIRTHS 


CAIWU ■ On Z8th July, to Salty 
Ricks) and Robert, a son. Edward 
Rory diver, warm thanks to all staff 
at Redhtll General Hospital. 

CLARK - On 4th August- at Sl Mary’s 
Hospital. Manchester, lo Louise utee 
Uoyd Owen) and Mark, a son. Adam 
James Uoyd. 

COWER - On August 3rd. at St. Luke's 
Hospital. Guildford, to Karen 'Ann 
wife Beale) and David, a daughter. 
Harriet Amelia, a sister for Hannah. 
CLSORNE ■ On August 3rd. lo Lucinda 
info Bower) and Mark, a son. Philip 
TtenoOiy William, a brother for 
Amelia and Simon. 

FRENKJEL - On August 5th 1986. at 
Queen Mary Hospital. Roehampton. 
lo Zara into DetHdkoi and Andrew, a 
son. Marek Staidslaw. 

GROOM - On August 3rd. lo BUI and 
Helen (nee Power), a daughter. 
Elizabeth Kiri Marie, at JRH. Oxford. 
HAWKINS - On 4Ui August 1986. lo 
Patricia and Stephen, a daughter. 
Louisa Chetwynd. a sister Tor Mark. 
HOLY - On August 2nd. to Janies and 
Mary, a son. Thomas. 

HORRAX - On July 30th. at Princess 
Alexandra Hospital. Harlow, to 
Sandra (n4r Simpson i and Joseph, a 
daughter. Alexandra Sophie, a sister 
for James Edward. 

JACKSON - On August 4th. at SL 
Mary's Hospital, to Philippa utee 
Man!) and Richard, a daughter. 
Tamara Emma May. a shier for 
Alaric and Natasha. 

LAGRUE - On 1st August 1986. lo 
Paula (n6e Dawson) and MtehaeL a 
daughter. Emily Claire. A ndee for 
her many aunts and uncles. 

LOWRY - On August 1st 1986. to Jane 
into Moyle) and Chris, a daughter. 
Qtatrtotie Emma. 

LUCK - On 2nd August to Carole and 
John, a son. Thomas John Clifford. 
McLean - On July 27th. at Kettering 
General Hospital. Northanls. to Jane 
and Simon, a daughter, Felicity Jane 
Georgina, a sister for Sophie. 
MUNCK70N - On August 1st In 
Melbourne, to Serena and Michael, a 
daughter. Harriet. 

THORNTONJOHES - On August 2nd. 
lo Jane infe Stammers) and Tim. a 
daughte r. Georgina Elizabeth. 
UMBER - On 3rd August m Singa- 
pore. to Helen (nee Lalng) and 
Michael, a daughter. Fiona Sarah 
Helen, a sister for James. 


MARRIAGES 


BUCKTOM : HARRADME - On 1st 

August. 1986 at SL Clement Church. 
Sandwich. Kent. Rodney to Susan. 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


HARVIE-CLARX : UMT - On 6th 

August. 1936 la Ripon Cathedral. 
Sidney Harvtedark. Rector of 
jarrow and Sheiiah Mariorie. 
daughter of Geoffrey LunL Bishop of 
Ripon and Mrs LunL 


DAWIVAY - On August 4th. peacefully 
al home. Mariorie Kathleen, aged 88. 
widow of Cuthbert Henry and 
mother of Eve. Della and Verena. 
Private cremation: Thanksgiving 
Service at West Hesterton Church on 
Sunday. August 10th at 3.00 pro. No 
wreathes please. 

FARR - On July 25th. 1986. Sybfl H-. 
daughter of James Farr. MJR.C&. 
L.R.C.P.. late of Kensington. 
FONTANA - On Saturday August 2nd. 
to an accident m Wales. Jenntter 
Mary Ahna aged 10K of Sr Albert. 
Alberta. Canada. Very beloved 
daughter of Gesare and Anne, sister 
of John and much loved grand- 
daughter of Alma Clark of 
Rohenden. 

FORSTER. Jane AUson (Janie) - Sud- 
denly In Brussels on July 24Ih. 1986. 
aged 27 years. Beloved daughter of 
John and Verity and dearly loved 
sister of Sue. Tim. Prue and Jody of 
Ooverdale. British Columbia. 
Canada. 

GRANT - On August 1st suddenly. 
Revd. DavKl Rodgers Ogllvte. aged 
60 years. Very dearly beloved hus- 
band of Denise (nee Whttcombe). 
vicar of United Benefice of Leven 
Valley. Services at Sl Anne's. 
Haverihwalte. Cumbria at 2-30 pm 
on August 7th. and 10.30 am on 
August 8th at SI. James', 
winscombe. Avon. Donations for 
missions (o Leven Valley U-B. Find, 
vicarage. Haverihwalte. 'He who 
has the son has Hfe' l. John 5. 12. 
GRAY ■ On August 3rd. Brigadier 
George Cumnrtng Gray. CB-E.. late 
Royal Artillery, aged 87 years, of 
wymondham. Norfolk. Beloved hus- 
band of Betty and father of Elizabeth 
Patience Cooper and David. Private 
Cremation. Family flowers only. Me- 
morial Service wtu lake place later. 
GRBEMfllWAfTE. Nora. MJL tOxon) 
of Laurel Cottage. Haoghtea. 
Tarporley. Cheshire. Al Wrenbuzy 
Nursing Home on 3rd August. 1986. 
Retired Principal Lecturer al Crewe 
and Abager College. Beloved elder 
daughter of the laic Mr and Mrs 
Reginald Grfsenttiwalte of Liverpool 
and much laved mend of EsmL 
Funeral private. 

HARDY - On August 2nd. at Tunbridge 
Wells. Joan Clifford, beloved wife of 
Michael and mother of Adrian and 
Julian, after a long Illness bravely ei* 
dured. Service at Sl James' Church 
al 11.00 am on Friday. August 8th. 
followed by private cremation. No 
flowers Mease. Donations, if desired, 
to Save the Children Fund. 

HARPER - On August 3rtL at Ms home 
in Bristol. George Cttfftxrd. Dearly be- 
loved husband of Margaret and 
formerly of Georgette, greatly loved 
father of Mary. Dorothy-Rose and 
Edward. Sadly missed by Ids seven 
grandchildren. Past Headmaster of 
i King Edward Vi School at Soutlfr 
1 am won and HA1X. Donations may 
be sent to Age Concern. Funeral Ser- 
vice at Westbunr Parish Church. 
Westbury-on-Tlrym. Bristol on Fri- 
day. Augidt 8th at 3L2Cnm. followed 
by cremation at Canford. 
L'AMABLE • On 3rd AugusL 1986. al 
ou Church Hospital. Romford. 
Georges Rend, aged 76. Much loved 
father, grandfather and greatgrand- 
f other. Service at St- MW* Church. 
Hornchurch atl 0-30 am and crema- 
tion at *1.30 am on 12Ui August 


MATTHEWS -On August 2nd 2 986. at 
home. Charles Edwin, aged 76. 
Canon Emeritus of South walk, lately 
Vicar of Llngftefd. Surrey. Funeral at 
East Grtnstead on Monday. August 
llUi at 11.00 am. Fhmily flowers 
only. Donations lo The United Soci- 
ety for the Propagation of the Gospel. 


WOTTl Nicole - On August 2nd. tn 
Paris. Beloved wtfe of Christopher, 
and mother of Thnathy and 
Catherine. Funeral In Guethary cm 
Wednesday. August 6th. London 
Memorial Service lo be arranged tn 
September. 


MLLEM - On July 318L peacefully. 
Edith Margaret aged 81 years of 
KUflOan. Berfchamated. daughter of 
the late Mr and Mrs P. Dreuilte 
MUten and sister of Sytifl Cowley. 
Cremation at Amersham Crematori- 
um al 2.30 pm oa Friday. August 
8th. Family flowers only but dona- 
tions. If desired, to R.S-P.B. or 
RSJi.CJU c/o R. Metcalfe. Funeral 
Director*. £84 High Street. 
BerWtamsted 4648. 


RRTCffEZJL - On August 2nd. peaceful- 
ly al borne. Evelyn Viatel CMotly) 
Mitchell, aged 9a Widow of Arthur 
Craft MltctwiL daughter of the Rev- 
erend John Hubol Ware and much 
loved mother of Coltn and Terence. 
Funeral Service at Holy Trinity 
Church. Skrane Street. SW1 on 
Thursday. August 7th at 12.30 pm 
followed by cremation at Putney 
Vale, at 2.00 pm. Other flowers or 
donations to Hoiy Trinity Church. 


NEWTON On Sb August John Joseph 
(Johnnie) Treasured husband of An- 
gela. much loved and respected 
father of Gabriel (AUson) William 
and Edward and Father-in-law of 
Clen. Caroline and Loveday and 
grandfather. Fortified by the rights 
of Holy Mother Church. No dowers 
but if desired donations to Friends of 
CObham Cottage Hospital- Requiem 
Mass Church of the Sacred Heart 
Cobham. 12.00 noon Tuesday 12th 
August. 

OUTRAN. James Richard - On August 
4th. 1986. peacefully al home. Rich- 
ardson Home. Englefleid Green. 
Egham. Surrey. Dearest husband 
and father. Funeral, family only. 

OWEN. Hugh - On 4th August. 1986. 
peacefully at Mount Pleasant Nibs- 
tag Horne. Wey bridge. Much loved 
father of Judith and loving grand- 
father of Branwen and Lewis. 
Cremation at Woking St John's ai 
10.30 am on 8th AugusL Enquiries 
to Weybridge Funeral Services. High 
Street. Weybridge. Surrey. 

PURCELL - On July 23nL 1986. In 
hospital. 1CF.CS. (Frank) of Stratford 
Lodge. Cresvenor Road. Rattunmes. 
DubUn. Beloved husband of the late 
Carmel, very deeply regretted by Ms 
loving daughters Rosemary Hay and 
Denise Muir, son Henry and broUios 
and stem s. 

ROBERTS - On August 4th. Denglas 
Vincent Roberts. wc_ of 4 Victoria 
Court. Filey. North Yorks. Beloved 
husband of Maureen, father of 
David- Funeral Service al 11.30 am 
on August 8th at SL Oswalds 
Church. FUey. Fanny flowers only. 
Donations. If wished, to St Oswalds 
Church. FUey. 

RUMGC. John ■ On 2nd August al Ns 
home, peacefully after a breve fight 
against cancer. Funeral at SI Luke’s 
Church. Eardtey Road. Sevenoak* 
on Friday. 8th August at 2-30 pm. 
Family flowers otuy. Donations 
please to international Christian 
Relief. 


ROWE ■ On August 1st 1986. peace- 
fully at home. U Cmdr A.R.C. 
OXckte) Rowe. D.$.~C.. R.N. (ref® of 
Hay don. Radstock. Dearly loved hus- 
band of Peggy and much loved fattier 
of Giles and Toby. Funeral Service 
Private. A Memorial Sendee wtu be 
held at KDmersdan Parish Church on 
Thursday. August 21st at £30 pro. 
No flowers please but donations In 
lieu may be sent to The National 
Osteoporosis Society. PO Box 10. 
Radstock. Bath. 

SARA -On Thursday. July 31st 1986. 
suddenly at home. Edward Thomas 
of Derwent, Alexandra Road. 
Dlogan. Redruth. Cornwall, formerly 
British Steel Corporation. Dearest 
husband of Ruth and laths- of 
Michael. EtizabeUi and Jane, also 
Margaret (deceased). The Funeral 
Sendee took place yesterday. Dona- 
tions in lieu of flowers for Camborne 
Save the Children Fund lo the Funer- 
al Directors. Messrs. Retallack Bros- 
Hoope r Lane. Camborne. 

SCOTT ■ On 4m August. 1986. sadden- 
hr at home. 34 Oakwpod Lane. 
Leeds. Joseph w. Scon, aged 71. for- 
merly Librarian of Bbkbeck College 
and afterwards of University Col- 
lege. London. Dearly beloved 
husband of Elizabeth, folher of 
Timothy and Simon and devoted 
grandfather of Samantha and Robin. 
Funeral Service and Committal on 
Tuesday. 120\ August at SL John’s 
Church. Roundhay. Leeds at 12.00 
noon, followed by private cremation. 
Famil y flowers only please. 

SNRTH- On 3rd August 1 986. tn hospi- 
tal. David MacLeteh LLD. DjScl. 
M.I.MECFL. E.. F. R-AO.S- F.Engu 
F.HS_ aged 86 years of 2 Rostheme. 
Cavendish Rd. Bowdon. Altrincham. 
Cheshire. Beloved husband of Doris 
uxfe Kendrick) and dear brother of 
Helen P. Smith- Funeral Service at 
Bowdon Parish Church. Altrincham, 
Cheshire on Friday, 8tti August at 
I2JO pm. prior lo Interment at Stret- 
ford Cemetery. Family flowers only. 
Donations. If desired, lo Bowdon 
Church Restoration Fund. All enqui- 
ries to Messrs John G Ashton & Co. 
Tel: 061 928 7816. 

SYOCKITT - On 3rd August Carol De . 
Butts, (nee Mocklert. ait her home tn 1 
Northampton. Cremation al 3.00 pm 
on Friday. 8th August at Northamp- 
ton crematorium. All enquiries 
telephone (0270) 68399. 

THOMPSON On Sunday. August 3rd. 
1986. peacefuky to a nursing home 
In her 90th year. Entity Kathleen, 
formerly of Bushey. Loved and lov- 
ing wlfo of the late Mark, much loved 
mother of Kathleen. Virginia and 
Note, grandmother and great grand- 
mother. Cremation Service on 
Monday. August nihat 12-30 pm at 
Barham Crernotertunj. near Canter- 
bury. Enquiries to J. Kemp. Harbour 
Street. Whilstabte. KenL tel. 272255. 

TUCKER On 4th AugusL peacefully al 
SI Peter's Hospital. Oiertsey. Milton 
Gerald Tucker, dearly loved hus- 
band of June, dear father or Graham 
and Allan, for many years captain 
Barbados Rifle Team, of Barbados 
WJ. Funeral Service at St Michael's 
Church. PhbrighL on Friday 8tii Au- 
gust at 10.45am. followed by private 
cremation. No flowers but donations, 
if desired, to O.T. Fond c/o NJLA. 
Tel; Brookwood 2213. 

WATT. EtettUl • On Sunday, 3rd 
August and is now at peace after a 
tong Illness borne with courage. Cre- 
mation at East Chapet Golden 
Green Crematorium. Hoop Lane. 
nwi l m 1 1 .20 am on Thursday. 7th 
August Family flowam. 

WOLFFE - On July 26. 1 986 at Johan- 
nesburg. Hairy Wotffe. late of 
Bulawayo. Husband of Rosa, father 
of Marcia and Mark, and loving 
grandfather of Jemca. 





Critic and servant of the arts 


Mr Jack Lambert. CBE, “lying off the Pointe de 
DSC for 16 years Literary Barfleur, rolling our guts ou t- 


Editor of The Sunday Times, 
and a noted servant of the ails. 


particularly of drama, died on fellow MTB commandcrs Jim 
August 3 after a stroke ai the evolved against German light 
age of 69. forces proved their worth time 

Jade Walter Lambert was andagain- For his part in these 
bom on April 21. .1917, and operations be was mentioned 
was educated at Tonbridge in despatches and awarded the 
School, from which he went DSC 


Birthdays today 

The Co unless or Albemarle, 77; 


Sir Ranulpb Bacon, 80; Mr 
Chris Bonington. 52; Mr Rich- 
ard Buckle, 70; Colonel J. Ellis 


ard Buckle, 70; Colonel J. Ellis 
Evans, 76; Mr Frank Finlay, 60; 
Air Marshal Sir Geoffrey Ford, 
S3; Dame Monica Golding, 84; 
Mr Howard. Hodgkin, 54; Sir 
Freddie Laker, 64; Lord 


Latymer, 85; Mr James Lees- 
Mil ne. 78; Air Vice-Marshal 
T.C Macdonald, 77; Major- 
General C.H. McVitne, 78; Mr 
Dom Mintoffi 70: the Hon 
David Montagu, 58; Sir Duncan 
Oppenbeim, 82; Mr John Reid, 
31; Mr W.E. Tucker, 83; Miss 
Barbara Windsor, 49. 


Oxford 

Dr Henry Mayr-Harting, MA, 
DPhil (Oxonk CUF Lecturer in 
Modem History and Fellow of 
St Peter's College, has been i 
elected to the professorship for 
the academic year 1978-8. Dr 
Mayr-Harting will lecture on 
Ottoman Manuscript An. 

The university has conferred the 
title of Visiting Professor in 
Maritime Archaeology on Dr 
Sean McGraiL Chief Archeolo- 
gist at the National Maritime 
Museum. He win be attached to 
the Institute of Archeology at 
Oxford from September 1. 


straight into journalism. After 
two prentice jobs, he became 
the editor of The Fruit-Grow- 
er, Florist and Market Garden- 
er at the age of 2Z 

He also published one book: 
The Penguin Guide to Corn- 
wall (1939), an evocative 
study of a county still, in those 
days, rather mysterious and 
remote. 

In 1940, he joined the Royal 
Navy as an ordinary seaman, 
rising to lieutenant-com- 
mander. He served on convoy 
escort duties in the Atlantic 
and in the Arctic, and during 
the latter part of the war was 
with Light Coastal Forces in 
theChanneL 

Here he found his metier, as 
a commander first of a motor 
gun boat and later of MTBs 
charged with interdicting the 
Channel to German E-boats 
during the passage of the D- 
Day invasion force. On the 
occasion itself none of these 
potential foes ventured from 
harbour and be later recalled 
spending that momentous day 
with his crow in MTB 691, 


„i . the Pni nt e de when not all cultural lofficiab 

lying off the “”i"* e « me iiculous. Lambert set a 

^”j«s p ^ fdili8cn " 

evolved against German light es _ Q-g— (* 0 _ 

forces proved their worth time 

andagain. Forhisp^tinth^ f ^ h ? slic ation of pro- 

m^patches and awarded the ^ y ’" As a ATS 

ary He S ne of7toW^ Smpan7^^% 

saterarg 

Bailor, and as such one of the fen. a 


He -became Assistant Liter- 
ary Editor of The Sundav 
Times in 1948; from i960 
until his retirement in 197&, 




for his sympathy towards all 
kinds of writers. 

In 1963 he edited The 
Bodley Head Saki and in 1 974 
published the useful sui^ey^ 
Drama In Britain, 1964-73. 


the field. 

He will also be remembered 
as a radio broad cas t er of 
ability and influence. He was a 
regular contributor to the old 
BBC Home Service pro- 


Hewas Asriaant Editorof gramme. TheCritig .from ihe 
The liunday Times from 1 976 mid-1 950 s until 1969 . and to 


until 1981. 

Lambert was on a very large 
number of cultural commit- 
tees. He was a member of the 
Arts Council from 1968 to 
i 976, and was on the commit- 
tee of the Royal Literary Fund 
(which administers aid to 
serious authors in distress). 
He was also a member and 
chairman (1968-76) of the 
(Vama panel. In addition he 
was on the Council of RADA, 


its successor. Radio 3*s 
Critics' Forum from 1974. As 
such he was one of the last 
links with the earlier days of 
arts broadcasting. It says 
much for him that his one 
substantial sortie into televi- 
sion. ABCs The Bookman, 
was withdrawn after a season 
in 1 961, as being “too serious" 
for a mass medium. He was 
created CBE in 1970. 

He is survived by his wife, 


and a member of the board of Catherine Martinet, whom he 
management of the British manned in l WO. and by their 


Drama League. In an age son and two daughters. 


DR RICHARD BARNETT 


Dr Richard Barnett, CBE, 
FBA, FSA, Keeper of Western 
Astatic Antiquities at the Brit- 
ish Museum from 1955 to 
1974 and an authority on 
archaeology of the ancient 
world, died on July 29. He was 
77. 

Richard David Barnett was 
bom on January 23, 1 909. and 
as the only son of Lionel 
David Barnett, the great 
Indologist keeper of oriental 
printed books and manu- 
scripts at the British Museum 
from 1908-36, he grew up in 
the Museum atmosphere. 

After taking a Classics de- 
gree at Corpus Christi College, 
Cambridge, and spending two 
years in Athens with a stu- 
dentship of the British School 
of Archaeology, he joined the 
staff of the British Museum as 
an assistant keeper in the 
department of Egyptian and 
Assyrian Antiquities in 1932. 

He had wide-ranging inter- 
ests and his knowledge of 
Ha<reira 1 archaeology fitted 
him wdl for the task of sorting 
and cataloguing the beautiful 
carved ivories found by Lay- 
aid and Loftus in the last 
century at Nimrud. Much 
preliminary conservation 
treatment of these delicate 
pieces was necessary; but, with 
the interruption of the war, the 
Catalogue, a mine of informa- 


tion and suggestive ideas, did 
not appear until 1957. 

Barnett was away from the 
museum throughout the war, 
at the Admiralty and the 
Foreign Office; and then, from 
1942-46, he served as an RAF 
intelligence officer in Egypt, 
Syria, Libya and Turkey. 

After the war, he played an 
active part in the founding, in 
1 949, of the British Institute of 
Archaeology at Ankara, and 
served on the councils of a 
number of institutes and 
schools. 

The areas of contact be- 
tween cultures such as Turkey 
and Western Iran always in- 
trigued him, and many of his 
most thought-provoking arti- 
cles dealt with such matters. 
His major work in the post- 
war period was, however, the 
publication of the Assyrian 
bas-reliefs, and his volumes 
on The Sculptures of Tiglath- 
pileser III (1962), The Sculp- 
tures of Ashurbanipal (1976) 
and Sennacherib, ready for 
mess,, will stand as monu- 
ments. 

Barnett was appointed 
keeper of the newly-formed 
detnrtment of western Asiatic 
antiquities at the British Mu- 
seum in 1955, and soon 
launched on a vigorous pro- 
gramme of reorganization of 
the storage areas under his 
care, establishing departmen- 


tal conservators to deal with 
the collections, and creating a 
students' room for visiting 
scholars. At the same time, he 
pursued a judicious and active 
acquisitions policy. 

On the more public tide, his 
major reorganization of the 
Assyrian sculpture galleries 
made much better sense of 
this important collection. 

Biblical history was a strong 
interest to which he often 
returned in his publications. 
For many years, he served 
committees of the Palestine 
Exploration Fund and the 
Bmish School of Archaeology 
in Jerusalem; he was largely 
instrumental in founding the 
Anglo-Israel Archaeological 
Society; and he concluded his 
Museum career by opening an 
Ancient Palestine room. 

Outside the museum, 
Barnett played an active part 
in the Ufe of the Sephardic 
Jewish community in Lon- 
don, ■ publishing books and 
articles on AngloJewisfa his- 
tory. 

Richard Barnett was a kind- 
hearted and lovable man, and 
though he battled greatly for 
his Museum department and 
other causes, he will be very 
much missed by those who 
knew him. 

He leaves a widow, Barbara, 
whom he married in 1948, two 
sons and a daughter. 


DR OTMAR EMMINGER 


Dr Otmar Emminger, pres- 
ident of the West Gentian 
Bundesbank from 1977 to 
1979, and formerly for seven 
years vice-president, died in 
the Philippines on August Z 
He was 75. 

Bom at Augsburg on March 
Z 1911, he studied at the 
universities of Berlin, Munich 
and Edinburgh before working 
for a doctorate at the London 
School of Economics. 

From 1947 to 1950 he was 


Lord Richardson 
Duntisboume, KG. writes : 


Otmar Emminger’s durabil- 
ity and energy were such that 
we had almost slipped into 
thinking of him as indestructi- 
ble. When he died he was — 
characteristically — acting as a 
financial adviser to Mrs 
Aquino's government For, 
since his retirement as Presi- 
dent of the Bundesbank in 


1979, he had not only kept up 


Ec^mi= Miii^-5r S contradicted any U sudT<tebiii- 

Government of Havana and in ™ articles, but had been MM uifri. .n .M. u 


of gam of qualities, aided by a 
memory which was always 
n ready to produce at a touch 
the relevant detailed historical 
‘ recollection or example, coro- 
manded for him great admira- 
_ lion from his colleagues, and 
made him something of a 
’ phenomenon. He had a 
favourite story that an opti- 
5 mi stic central banker was one 
in w b° believed that the world 
was going to pieces, but only 
slowly. His own buoyancy 


SMifLMSJS 


cber Lander, forerunner of the 
Bundesbank. For six years he 
was his country’s executive 
director at the IMF, and for 
nearly 20 years vice-president 
of the EEC’s Monetary Com- 
mittee, In addition be gave 
long service on the deputies* 


international advisory engage- 
ments. 


He was early prominent as 
his country returned to the 
international scene after the 
war, and he continued to be 
one of the most important 
Germans in the economic and 


committee of the Group of. financial spheres. Otmar 
Ten, and as member and brought to all his activities 


chairman of the key Working 
Party Three of the OECD. 

His books included studies 
of British currency policy after 
the First World War (1934) 
and of inflation and the 
international monetary sys- 
tem (1973). 

He was twice married and 
twice divorced. 


total dedication and commit- 
ment, as well as extraordinary 
abilities. He drove himself 
with machine-like persistence 
to • ensure ■ mastery of the 
material. He had a remarkable 
command of English and an 
altogether outstanding capaci- 
ty to expound financial and 
monetary matters. This amal- 


was, m my experience, always 
approachable, hdpfUl and 
courteous. 

On his retirement from the 
Bundesbank an old friend 
ventured the hope that he 
might now allow himself time 
for relaxation and other inter- 
ests. This was not to be, and 
was perhaps too much to 
expea from a man so dedicat- 
ed to his work. For, as Dean 
Inge once wrote, there is a 
price to be paid for extreme 
specialization, even in holi- 
ness. Otmar’s work, his vast 
expertise, and the genuine 
internationalism of his out- 
look, put his contribution to 
postwar financial history be- 
yond question. 


Science report 


Human fertility project helps zoos 


MEMORIAL SERVICES 


BOLTON - A Memorial Service for 
Daisy Bolton will be hdd al All Hal- 
lows Church. Ml non near Whatley 
on Thursday. August 21sL 1986 at 
12.00 noon. 

.MMHM0MMSON Kenneth. A memori- 
al service will be hdd at St Luke's 
Church. Sydney Street Chelsea, at 
12 noon on Monday September fith. 


Work done at a London hos- 
pital to overcome one of the 
causes of infertility among 
women could help zoologjsts to 
breed endangered species in 
captivity. 

When women cannot con- 
ceive because they do not 
ovulate, this condition can 
sometimes be remedied by 
hormonal treatment, which 
activates the oestrogen- 
produting tissues of the ova- 
ries and stintH tales ovulation. 

At the Middlesex Hospital, 
Professor Howard Jacobs has 
had significant success with an 
automatic pump worn for ltis 
patients, which ddiveis regu- 
lar doses of specific hormones. 

Using this device, about 70 
previously infertile women 


By Andrew Wiseman 

Group, which is a joint Medi- that all i 
cal Research females 

Council /Agrieal tore and Food within da 
Research Council project, was from the g 
studying the behaviour of mar- were reta 
moset and tamarin monkeys, stopped aj 
Those primates practice an Knowii 
extreme form of social contra- Jacobs's j 
ceptiom in each case, in the andcollea 
wild or in captivity, there is ing dm$i 
only one breeding fatale. Institute f 
Befog extremely dominant, (NIMR) i 
she physically interrupts any version of 
sexual activities of her non systei 
subordinates and suppresses regular 4 
their ovarian cycles by her releasing 
aggressive behariotBr. Because able I 
of that, all other females in tbe marmoset] 
group are effectively Infertile.' . They ca 
Dr Abbott assumed that htexMnsh 


that al) subordinate monkey 
females ovulated normally 
within days of being moved 
from the gro up. Yet, when they 
were returned to it, ovulation 
stopped again. 

Knowing of Professor 
Jacobs's successes. Dr Abbott 


night, they and all other 
SBiiraii fo their group learnt 
to ignore this medical rack*. 


mg division of the National 

Institige for Medical Research 
(NIMR) designed a modified 
veman of the automatic infu- 
non system for the delivery of 
regular doses of horaione- 
releas in g substances accept- 
able to . subordinate 
marmosets. 

. They came with a small 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


MANMNG ■ n» only Fronds William 
and Ms botoxed wtfe. Gwen, on the* 
Golden Wedding Anniversary. 
mUTCHEUmJ.. John Percy - August 
6th. 1966. Always remembering 
Hoar J J>. - Margaret. 


Using this device, about 70 there was nothing wrong phys- ing about 50 grammes and 
previously infertile women fcally with toe subordinate tailored to fit iisiivMia] mm- 
produced normal babies and a females and that, therefore, keys. It operates for five davs. 
further 30 or so are now the likely causes for their after which it has to be refilled! 
pregnant faflnre to ovulate had to be At London Zoo tea sabordi- 

As Professor Jacobs was emotionaL (Among women mite females were fitted with 
developing this treatment. Dr too, stress can produce this toe pack. Their mobility was 
David Abbott, at the Institute condition.) not impaired by it and they 

id Zoology and a. member of He subsequently dem- suffered no skin irritation m 
the Comparative Physiology onstrated that fa establishing infection. After «bmt ■ 


pregnant. 

As Professor Jacobs was 
developing this treatment. Dr 
David Abbott, at the Institute 
of Zoology and a. member of 
the Comparative Physiology 


At London Zoo tea sabordi- 

itete females were fitted with 
toe pack. Their mobility was 
not impaired by it and they 
suffered no skin irritation or 
infection. After about a fort 


The experiments are in torir 
very early stages. So fer two 
monkeys, have ondafed ami. 
one became pregnant. ‘ Bat 
there are some technical proh* 
fonts to be overcome before toe 
pump can be considered 100 
per cent effective. 

When that happens, k 
should not only be possible to 
improve the fertility of mar- 
mosets but also to study how 
the dominant females wBl 
react to a violation of a weB 
established order and how that 
mil affect toe group as a 
whole. 

The London Zoo seventies, 
who believe that their research 
smmld contribute to a better 
wisrattedin* of some-atteto. 
conditions affecting hmos, 
are also hoping to deiejap' 
hormonal pumps Eor other 
spanes, web as Mack an* 

wnwe ritinoceras - amf ' aget;-* 


*ruvK 


1 k 


JWt. • 


I 


i I FiK. ; - •’.! 


.**£> W : 



-AMBER! 

nt of the : 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1 986 


15 


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Desertifkation is an ugly mod- 
em- word for drought Vanish- 
ing Earth. (BBC2% the second 
o£ two speoal reports on die 
state of the ecosphere, flashed 
up a-nap of die world with the 
drought areas marked m each 
coodneht aod epdunined two 
different approaches to mak- 

bJoom. InBnrkhia 

FasOy xon the edge of die 
Sahara Desert, the tow-tech 
approach: went t -a little, way 
toward? hdpihgSMri-noilndto 
fanners to coax oonrahment 
from the earth. Simple mea- 
sures, such as building tow 
stone-walls to tr^i the tiny 
acoonat of motstnre arallaUe 
from' the- atmosphere, 'coaid 
enable crops to grow on land 
formed y ' churned by the 
adrapdsg deseri 
ln^ fee west^h ; Umted 
States, fee (ttsk opproach to 
drought was to throw money at 
the problem until'an -ecological 
disaster was imnnnent; the 
Dtillioa-dpllai irrigation 
scheme bringing water from 
fee Colbnulo mer raised fee 
comxntration of seleniam in 
the soil so highfeata'diffoont 
kind of infertility threatened 
the' crops. A. wild binl sano- 
tvary became a toxic dump and 
a private individual broeght a 
lawsuit to end fee biotogfcal 
nightmare. 

.This was a.dall programme, 

. k ._ . ^ riph in foreign film hat poor in 
1 intellectual analysis. The av- 
efage British television viewer 
mosrhy now know a great deal 
about the farming methods of 
femme-stricken African com- 
munities and. .scarcely needs 
another practical lesson in 
hikir v«feig snrgmn or winhow- 
ing millet, pkturesqK as these 
activities appear when they 
tte amuuiected with qne's 
owp:djet. ■ • ' r 

pK Conclusion that drought 
wmdd ' eventually overcome 
homanity’s ' piany opptKftion. 
loomed behind both, case-r 
studies,' but it was scarcely 
stated, let alone adopted as'Bm 

starting-point for the 'discov- 
ery of alternative approaches. 
Pob’tks dearly 'played a cru- 
cial' partin the war against 
drought in both countries, -bat 
tirisanalysis was abonriwng. 

. The starting point: for fee 
Great' Western Railway was 
Brunei’s imposing 7 Temple 
Mead$~stntion in Bristol from 
which locomotives of fee Aron 
Duke -dass passed ^mofes- 
ticOBy. r ferimgh fee, Qenn. 
fields' taking \ Victorian 
gpitickles'tn fee seaside, *' . 

Steam Days (BBC2) it a 
programme for hariH»em3fcJ 
way enthasiasts wHci^nbiide 
in nn. agreeably archaic s^e 
feat accords wife fee nostalgic 
charm of its subject This is 
hard on the presenter. Miles 
Kington, who was obliged to 
ptod through staged interviews 
wife glassy-eyed railway- ex- 
perts, disguising his own 
delightful conversational tal- 
ents and murmuring un gainl y 
stuff .on tiie 1 fetes of “Of 
coarse, what is so ahwm'ng is 
tint ft is such a big banding”. 
Happily ft was impossible to 
disgnise the beauty of the 
countryside around the Ere 
and tite-Tamar, or fee inspir- 
ing- scale of Victorian en- 
gineering achievement. - - 

Celia Brayfield 


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of O’Neill 


Long Day’s Journey 
into Night: 
Haymarket: 


Eugene O’NeilTs penultimate play 
— .widely regarded as his master- 
piece. and (at least in bis. native 
America) sometimes touted as the- 
greatest , thing since King Lear - 
has' attracted fine companies on 
both sides of The Atlantic. If the 
modem American benchmark is 
the 1971 ' Broadway production 
with' Robert Ryan ami Geraldine 
Fitzgerald, the English version in 
whose shade afcothers sprout is the 
celebrated National Theatre pro- 
duction (aka. of 1971) with 
Laurence Olivier and Constance 
Cummings. 

Jonathan Miller’s new produc- 
tion comes, to London from its 
success across the Atlantic with an 
all-American .cast and three Tony 
award nominations. It also comes, 
like some -fretful ghost, with all its 
imperfections on its head. These 
indude maudlin emotionalism, 
clumsy, revelation and a general 
tendency to witlessness. The sham- 


sense of proportion as a robot 
which has beep programmed to 
bang its head against a brick wall 
until its batteries have run down — 
by which time, of course, everyone 
11 


in earshot has tintinnitus. 

It has often been stated that the 
play cannot be cut without sacrific- 
ing precisely those qualities of 
repetition and re-emphasis that 
give the woric its alleged power. Dr 
Miller’s partial remedy consists of 
speeding up certain passages 
through the overlapping of spee- 
ches— and not simply splicing the 
end of one on to the beginning of 
another but actually multi-tracking 
two of more simultaneously. The 
present company has certainly 
been well drilled in bringing this 
trick off in light-operatic fashion, 
and the feet that tittle sense 
emerges from the jumbled discords 
hardly matters. The problem is 
rather that, in suggesting that the 
variously crippled characters have 
grown used to not listening to one 
another, this production presents 
them as altogether too amiable, too 
ordinary. One can almost imagine 
their neighbours in the next holi- 
day home along the waterfront tilt- 
tutting at intervals throughout the 
long day “It’s those noisy Tyrones 
again, having another family row”. 

This was not, I think, O’NolTs 
intention. Long Day's Journey was 
a conscious attempt to exorcize his 
feelings of guilt and resentment 
towards his own family by turning 
them into a kind of degenerate, 
20th-century House of Atreus (and 
it matters little that the exact 



Bethel Leslie an engagingly harrowed mother with Kevin Spacey (left) and Jack Lemmon 


historical parallels were gro- 
tesquely distorted: the best “auto- 
biographical” fiction is the story of 
emotions, not of facts). So James 
Tyrone, the father, is made par- 
simonious by his impoverished 
upbringing; the attraction of easy 
money leads him to ruin his career 
as a classical actor; his stinginess 
makes him cheapskate on bis wife’s 
medical treatment, with the result 
that she becomes a morphine 
addict; with no anchor to hold 
them, his sons drop out, the elder 
becoming a dipso, the younger 
(supposedly O'Neill himself, and 
the most sympathetic of the lot) 
succumbing to tuberculosis. 


As the prime mover in this 
tragedy, the one whose personality 
dominates everything from the 
others' relationships to the use of 
light bulbs, the father ought prop- 
erly to provide the dynamic of the 
piece, steadily growing into his true 
form as the day sinks along with 
the Jack Daniels. Jack Lemmon 
starts off fussy and irascible and 
sober, and ends up fussy and 
irascible and drunk, which is not 
the same thing as dramatic 
progress: ineffectual at registering 
concern about Jamie's deleterious 
influence on the younger Edmund 
or at expressing outrage at the 
former’s attitude to their mother. 


he fails also in the crucial task of 
making us care about any of them. 
He has. quite simply, no steel to 
draw on where steel is required, 
and no big voice for the thunder- 
claps of denunciation in the last 
a cl Playing a faded barnstormer, 
he simply tacks stagey gestures on 
to the sardonically dyspeptic per- 
sona we know so well from his film 
career. This is two-dimensional, 
cartoon acting — very professional 
and very unmoving. 

Bethel Leslie as the harrowed 
mother is considerably more 
engaging. The role has many of the 
most telling lines and she gets fuli 
mileage from them, while her 


appearances in the last two acts 
give a convincing impression of 
progressive morphine intake: 

Kevin Spacey’s Jamie and Peter 
Gallagher's Edmund have some 
excellent duets together, particu- 
larly when malting up their earlier 
squabble. The foghorn that booms 
beyond the windows is less authen- 
tic by far, sounding more like an 
electric buzzer. It might perhaps 
stand for a comment on the whole 
production: bang on cue, of ade- 
quate duration, but without 
resonance. 

Martin Cropper 


Dance in London 

Tale of two cities 


There is an unique opportu- 
nity- this week to compare, ■' 
almost side by side; fee two 
oldest surviving treatments of 
the Prokofiev Romeo and 
Juliet. They tee as different as 
can be, and neither of them 
has been surpassed by any 
subsequent version. London 
Festival BaBel is presenting. 
Ashton's version, as fine; dear 
and vivid as an Old Master 
drawing, at the Festival HaU. 
Leonid Lavrovsky's version 
for the Bolshoi Ballet is rich 
and fiill-Uooded:-more like an-, 
oil painting.-- --- :. 

-A shortened version' of it 
can be seen in 'a season of 'okl'- 
Bolshoi films at the Barbican, 
lumbered 'with an "irritating: 
commentary (this-was the-fost 
lpng ballet film, and producers 
woe presumably -nervous) but 
preserving fee incomparable 
performance of Gatina Ula- 
nova supported-^ a Romeo, 
Tybalt andMefCotio of excep- 
tional dramaticor' romantic 
presence. There are some 
young men in the Bolshoi 
Ballet today whose athletic 
virtuosity would have been 
unimaginable 30 years ago 
when this film was made, but 
something of theatrical weight 
and authority has been lost in 
breedmg them. 

We. eagerly await this week 
seeing what the new genera- 
tion can make of- Spartacus. 
There is a ballet to separate 
the men from the boys. Its 
original antagonists, Vladimir 
Vassiliev arid Maris Liepa, 
can be seep in another of the 
Barbican films. An amazingly 
youpg Vassiliev also, plays 
Innocent Ivan in the dance 


version of an enchanting Rus- 
sian fairy-tale, The Hump- 
backed Horse, with Maya 
Plissetskaya as the maiden 
whose love he wins. 

As it happens. Galina Ula- 
nova is in London to coach 
some of the leading women of 
the Bolshoi company appear- 
ing ai Co vent Garden. We 
may take it that she was 
pleased with Nina Semi- 
zorova’s Raymonda last week 
(her first performance in the 
role) since she shared fee 
curtain-calls with her prote- 
gee. This was a - beautiful 
performance, bringing out the 
great variety of tone and 
shadinglhat Petipa wrote into 
his heroine’s mini-solos. 

,Biit if is not only from fee 
Bolshoi, feat you can see 
exceptional performances. At 
the Festival. Hall qh Saturday I 
saw Trinidad Sevfflano’s Gis- 
etje: as true mid touching an 
interp re ta tion of the foie te I 
have seen from a young 
newcomer in almost 20 years. 
Sevillano also has had special 
coaching from an old dancer, 
in her case Gdsey Kirkland, 
and happily the result of 
intensi verehearsal is to enable 
her to achieve fee impression 
of absolute spontaneity in 
every, movement. 

I thought Matz Skoog’s 
Albrecht, although caring and 
skilled, too bland to make the 
most of her; Sevillano might 
be better suited opposite Pat- 
ride Annan (Ts unusually ro- 
mantic and ardent per- 
formance — another of last 
week's many London debuts. 

John Percrval 


Paul Griffiths at Denmark’s friendly musical workshop 



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Last- year the Lerchenbdrg 
Workshop, taking place in a 
large and isolated country seat 
on the "Danish coast was tel 
about getting British in- 
StTu mental isis into contact 
with "Danish composers: the 
Arditti Quartet, were there to. 
play, and discuss works by 
those wdl established and by 
young students. This time 
there ' were student pieces 
again,- but the main bridge was 
built the other way; allowing 
British' composers to work 
wife Danish musicians. rw . #fc — 

tion. Qr there were fee revela- 

Harrison JJirtwistle^and Si- ' tions of his early theatrical 
mon Bai abridge led the team projects: a piece for solo 


Deowa for soprano and clari- 
net, bis Pulse Sampler for 
oboe and daves/ and his 
Clarinet Quintet, he was able 
to talk in some detail about 
craft but perhaps the most 
intriguing insights came in the 
more open-ended ^ seminars. 

. There was the suggestion 
that all his pieces are striking 
back to fee untutored music 
he wrote in his childhood, the 
simple -music feat he mis- 
chievously. . compared wife 
Arvo Part's current producr 



for this return match, Birt- 
wistle being on tremendous 
fonn. Quite by contrast wife 
bis manner only a few years 
ago. he has become a robust 
conversationalist and easy 
public speaker. Rehearsing his 


instrument and mime ~ con- ■ 
ceived when he was nine, and 
an abstract drama wife black 
and pick decor intended for 
fee Sunday School stage but 
unsurprisingly never realized. 
Or again there was the 


GROUSE SHOOTING ISSUE 


OUT TOMORROW 


characterization of his present 
self as a sculptor more than a 
modeller of sound: one con- 
cerned not with assembling 
notes but rather with carving 
out of the continuum. 

The performances were not 
of the sort to provide similar 
sudden illuminations, but 
there were careful and dedi- 
cated accounts of Deowa by 
Marianne Lund and Niels 
Thomsen and of Pulse Sam- 
pler by Helen Jahren. As 
Birtwistle himself put it, these 
pieces are drawings, fee sat- 
ellites of his major com- 
positions. but there was 
opportunity for fee planets to 
be beard and discussed during 
a session when he introduced 
tapes of Silbury Air and fee 
majestic recent Earth Dances, 
which the luckier British audi- 
ence .will have fee chance to 
hear at the Proms on August 
27. • 

Bainbridge had rather less 
chance to show himself at 
Lerchenborg. Again there was 
a morning of tapes, which 
excited interest: one prom- 
inent Danish composer sug- 
gested a curious comparison 
wife Deirus. Maybe feat view 
would, .have been unsettled if 
we bad heard more of Bam-- 
b ridge’s music in concert than 
a very early -string quartet, but 
his contribution was reduced 
to tint by fee lack from him of 
a commssioned work and by 
unfortunate cancellations. 

Nevertheless, much was 
achieved in fee exchange of 
information. That cannot be 
bad, and surely cannot affect 
fee “national identity” that 
was a predictable subject of 
conversation at Lerchenborg. 
Birtwistle's music is as English 
and regional as fee burr of his 
voice, but as international as 
bis present celebrity. And 
maybe there is a leaf or two of 
Delius in Bainbridge's- urban 
style. 


By fee time the interval comes 
in Saturday's Prom, the Albert 
Hall arena may well have 
found a new hero. Hdkan 
Hardenberger is -24, Swedish, 
.highly articulate and person- 
' able. According to a persistent 
whisper going round the brass- 
p laying business, he might 
also be fee best trumpet player 
in the world. 

It will not be his first British 
appearance; there is fee small 
matter of fee 22.000 people 
who were present for his al 
fresco performance of Elgar 
Howarth's Trumpet Concerto 
at Crystal Palace two years 
ago. It will not even be his first 
time in the Albert HalL Last 
October he made . a guest 
appearance there al fee Na- 
tional Brass Band Champion- 
ships. Switching to the cornet 
and playing a set of virtuoso 
Victorian variations on “Rule, , 
Britannia!”, he dazzled even' 
fee hard-nosed cornet •players 
from Yorkshire - colliery, 
bands..' 

This time, however, fee test 
will be artistic as well as 
technical, for at fee Proms 
Hardenberger is to give fee 
first performance of Gordon 
Crosse's Array, a challenging 
20-minute piece for trumpet 
and 64 strings (divided, as in 
Vaughan Williams’s Tallis 
Fantasia, into three unequal 
groups). Hardenberger is pas- 
sionately committed to play- 
ing new music, and well 
acquainted wife contempor- 
ary trends. “I do believe feat 
the trumpet is fee instrument 
of today — and of fee future, if 
classical music has any”, he 
says, citing Maxwell Davies, 
Penderecki and Stockhausen 
as composers who have writ- 
ten or are writing substantial 
pieces for fee instrument 

Even at 24 he has already 
played an important part in 
this process. “I used to ap- 
proach composers to write 
pieces for me, but I have four 
premieres this season. That is 
enough for now, I think.” 
Besides fee Crosse, these are 
by Michael Blake Watkins, the 
Swedish composer Sven-Da- 
vid Sandstrom and — most 
intriguragly - Harrison Birt- 
wistle. Are composers still 
trying to stretch the technical 
limits of the insmunent? 
“Yes, some of them do make a 
point of thaL They generally 
consult to see whether I have 



Hakan Hardenberger (above) looks set 
to take Saturday’s Prom audience, and 
the whole world of brass playing, by 
storm: interview by Richard Morrison 

The trumpeter 
transcendent 


objections, but usually I 
don't” 

The most challenging part 
of Crosse’s work is likely to be 
its opening, an audacious 
cadenza which sends the solo- 
ist spinning from one extreme 
of register to the other. 
Hardenberger also points oul 
feat fee piece has few points of 
repose for fee trumpet, “but 
that is good, because in most 
trumpet concertos I just stand 
around for long periods while 
the orchestra has all the fun”. 
What about the problem of the 
Up getting tired? “Well yes, it 
is a problem of course. But 
when you have practised six or 


eight hours a day since you 
were eight years old. it is not 
such a big problem I think.” 

Hardenberger’s search for 
new materia) has actually led 
him to some very old ma- 
terial He studied fee baroque 
trumpet (though he does not 
play it publicly) to discover 
fee proper way of articulating 
18th-century music, and this 
October he will record a 
newly-discovered Siamirz 
concerto, which has possibly 
not been played for 200 years. 
His repertoire naturally in- 
cludes fee familiar items — the 
Haydn, fee Hummel — but he 
also champions little-known 


Promenade Concert 

Tautly obsessive tensions 


CLS/Hickox 
Albert Hall/Radio 3 


Before The Electrification of 
the Soviet Union , we .heard 
The Sickle. While we wail to 
see how Glyndeboume will 
receive Nigel Osborne's new 
opera next year, the Proms 
responded enthusiastically to 
his setting of two Russian 
poems. Both were written in 
response to the Revolution; 
both poets died later by then- 
own bands. 

Jane Manning, who in- 
troduced The Sickle to Britain 
in 1980, after its premi&re in 
fee Netherlands 10 years ago, 
unerringly re-created the ob- 
sessive tensions of its verbal 
ami musical fabric. Esenin 
looked backwards in his “The 
Golden Wood”; Mayakovsky 
tramped forward in his “Our 
March” Osborne, at his most 
taut and selective, drives fee 
dose-miked voice in and oul 
of speech, from nostalgic me- 
lisma to exhortation, with 
equal intensity. 

In the first poem, tight 
nerve-knots of woodwind 
threaten to strangle the poet’s 
“useless heap” of words. In 
the second, they become 


hysterical whirlygigs. round- 
ing on bis dedamation wife a 
leering irony -at which Shos- 
takovich would doubtless 
have wryly smiled. 

This, and Britten's Noc- 
turne, formed the evening’s 
substantial centres. Robert 
Tear gave fee sort of perfor- 
mance in the Britten possible 
only after years of assimilation 
of fee work's weights and 
waves of energy: corporeal 
enough to anchor fee metre of 
Keats’s "Sleep and Poetry” 
and suspended lightly enough 
above the cor anglms obbli- 
gato to echo fee assonances of 
Owen’s “Kind Ghosts”. 

If in this work fee City of 
London Sinfonia showed itself 
as an admirable band of 
soloists, then two Delius 
pieces vindicated their 
strength and sophistication of 
ensemble. Richard Hickox 
conducted long-breathed, 
fine-textured performances of 
both On Hearing the First 
Cuckoo in Spring and Sum- 
mer Night on the Ri\vr. 

Just as these two idylls 
cushioned fee human voice 
on either side, so, on the outer 
rims of fee evening, string 
music by Britten and Walton 
acted as opening and dosing 
astringent for the ear. Britten's 


Prelude and Fugue for 18-part 
String Orchestra was an- 
swered by Walton's ripe So- 
nata for string orchestra. 

Wife Andrew Watltinson's 
mercurial violin leading, one 
could not help but wonder if 
Walton had been right after tel 
to flesh out the elusive inven- 
tion of his A minor String 
Quartet into the essentially 
textural resonance of this stur- 
dier frame. 

Hilary Finch 


LONDON 

f ESTIVAL 

BALLET 

Af.iidcDi.-w.tn 

Feter Schautuss 


Frederick Ashton's 
acclaimed 

ROMEO 
AND JULIET 

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20th-century works like the 
Trumpet Concerto by Bernd 
Alois Zimmermann, which is 
also m his Philips recording 
schedule. 

One can trace this breadth 
of interest to an unusual 
training. His family is not 
musical but his father — a 
Louis Armstrong fan — bought 
the eight-year-old H&kan an 
old trumpet for Christmas. “I 
had ambitions right from the 
start”, says Hardenberger. He 
was immensely lucky, he 
maintains, to be taught not by 
a conventional brass teacher 
but by fee highly individual 
Swedish composer Bo Nils- 
son. From the age of 13 
Hardenberger travelled with 
Nilsson to master-classes and 
conferences. “I met a lot of 
famous brass players — Mau- 
rice Andre, the Russians, the 
Americans. Sweden has no 
national style of brass-playing 
in the way that England has, 
and that was good. I didn’t 
have to model myself on one 
school of playing — I took 
what I wanted from them all.” 
■ Nevertheless, a crucial in- 
' fluence was his study at the 
Paris Conservatoire ' with 
Pierre Thibaud, another un- 
conventional figure who revo- 
lutionized trumpet embou- 
chure by applying some of the 
muscular principles of karate. 

In intellectual terms, too. 
Hardenberger seems liberated 
from the brass “ghetto”. “I 
don’t really like listening to 
trumpet music”, he cheerfully 
admits. “1 prefer jazz; violin- 
ists; singers. One can learn 
about colouring, phrasing and 
breathing from them. In fact 
there is almost a way of 
applying a violinist's bowing 
principles to trumpet tongu- 
ing: ways of slurring, even an 
illusion of different bow 
pressures." 

We shall certainly be seeing 
more of Hardenberger in the 
next few seasons: concert 
promoters have been quick to 
note his potential, and he likes 
coming to Britain. “In your 
country, perhaps because of 
fee brass-band tradition, peo- 
ple are very knowledgeable 
about brass-playing, and 1 also 
like fee working atmosphere 
of British orchestras. It is a 
funny mixture of being pro- 
fessional and yet also relaxed 
and making jokes. Of course, 
it can sometimes go over the 
top.” 


London debuts 

Too little 
character 

The Leonardo Trio at present 
seems slightly ill-balanced. 
The violinist Mayumi Seller's 
playing is a little thin in tone, 
nor does she always maintain 
adequate intonation, and this 
spoils fee effect of Caroline 
Palmer's meticulously 
rounded piano-playing. Nor is 
the cellist as assertive as one 
would have desired. The 
group was much more adept 
in the firmly melodic style of 
Schubert's B flat Trio than at 
exploring the exotically magi- 
cal world of fee Ravel Tno, 
but even here the members 
still shrank from making any 
personal statement about fee 
music. 

The MfiMfeld Trio lakes its 
name from the clarinettist 
who moved Brahms to write 
various works, and therefore it 
was fitting feat they should 
have concluded their pro- 
gramme with his A minor 
Trio, Op 114. But Victoria 
Soames definitely has a long 
way to go before she can live 
up to the great man's achieve- 
‘ment There is a tendency in 
her playing to make a cre- 
scendo at every entry, and her 
tone in Elisabeth Lutyens's 
tedious Trio was unpleasantly 
raucous. It was far more the 
sympathetic piano-playing of 
Tanya Isaacson that made a 
mark. She has developed fee 
ability to listen to herself and 
her partners. 

Elizabeth Hal ton is not a 
true mezzo-soprano: her lower 
register has too slender a 
timbre. I could have forgiven 
her very indistinct enuncia- 
tion and propensity to swal- 
low phrase-endings had her 
voice been of a higher quality, 
but not until some vocally 
untaxing songs by Rodrigo at 
the end of her recital did she 
produce anything at tel ear- 
catching. I was even grateful 
that her accompanist. Piers 
Lane, was often too loud — he 
is an inspiring musician. I 
only hope feat I was hearing 
Miss Halton on an off-day. 

James Methnen- 
Campbell 



The 525,600 Minute Waltz 

Tuning is of the utmosi importance when perfecting a Steirway piano. 
It takes one year of skilled craftmanship using materials that have bon 
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fee traditional seasoning of fee woods to ensure fee excellent formation 
of fee inner and outer rim. No wonder Stdnwgy pianos have 
accomplished quality, lasting value and durability. A piles de resistance 
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Girl, 8, is the heroine of base terrorist attack 

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A woman soldier and male colleague guarding the Akrotiri base hospital 

reaction, otherwise both of them 
might have been killed.” 

She was hit in the chest by mortar 
shrapnel daring Sunday's attack 
when a round exploded in the garden 
of her home, in the base's married 
quarters. While Mrs Mai pas was at 
home, her two children were on the 
beach with a neighbour, Sandra 
Edwards, aged 25, the only other 
casualty of the attack, who is eight 
months pregnant 

“There's no doubt God almighty 
was on oar side. We were very lucky 
not to have more casualties,” Group 
C« pt«in Adams said. 


Akrotiri, Cyprus (AP) — A small 
girl was yesterday hailed as the 
heroine of a guerrilla attack on the 
British Air Force base here. 

Rebecca Malpas, aged eight ig- 
nored the dose-range automatic rifle 
fire of pro-Libyan terrorists, grabbed 
her brother Adam, aged two, and 
carried him to safety. Group Cap tain 
Colin Adams, the base commander 
said. ‘She was a real heroine.” 


Heroine Rebecca Malpas, left, discussing her ordeal with her mother, Eileen, father and brother Adam. 


Rebecca said: “I heard shooting 
and then saw two or three men firing 
in our direction from the other side of 
the fence. I threw a blanket over 
Adam ami then ran into the sailing 
dub building. I was frightened and I 
only tbongbt of getting away.” 

Ho- mother, Mrs Eileen Malpas, 
aged 32^akh “Thank God for her 


•Report denied: Turkish Cypriot 
leader Rauf Denktash yesterday de- 
nied reports that the guerrillas came 
from die Turkish sector (Renter 
reports from Nicosia). 


Pound and oil price buoyed by Opec pact 


Continued from page 1 

pointed out that even if half of 
the production cut agreed in 
Geneva is achieved. 2 million 
ban-els a day will be removed 
from the market just as au- 
tumn and winter restocking 
programmes have a firming 
effect on prices. 

The fact that Sheikh Ahmed 
Zaki Yamani. Saudi Arabia's 
oil minister, enthusiastically 
endorsed the agreement will in 
itself have a firming effect 

He said, however, that the 


Today's events 

Royal engagements 
The Queen departs for a 
cruise of the Western Isles, 
embarks HMY Britannia, 
Southampton, 6. 

New exhibitions 
One Year On: the work of 
newly graduated artists and 
craftspeople; coach House Craft 
Gallery, Gawthorpe Hall, 
Padiham. nr Burnley; Mon to 
Sat 10 to 5. Sun 2 to 5 (ends Sept 
2 ) 

Decorative Decoy Ducks; Al- 
pha Gallery. Burton Cottage 
Farm. Higher Burton, East 
Coker. Wed to Sat 10 to 4, 
closed 1 to 2 (ends Aug 16) 

Exhibitions in progress 
Oils and Watercolours by Pat 
Garford; Salisbury Library, 


agreement did not imply that 
Opec was abandoning its pol- 
icy of trying to increase its 
market share. 

Mr Michael (Jnsworth, oil 
industry analyst with the Lon- 
don broker Smith New Court, 
said: “We could see rising 
prices and a light market in 
the fourth quarter”. 

Opec is now waiting to see 
what co-operation will emerge 
from the non-member oil 
producers, but is already re- 
signed to the fact that Britain 


Market Place. Mon to Fri 10 to 5 
(ends Aug 23) 

Durham University: its teach- 
ing. research, history and stu- 
dent life; The Exhibition Hall, 
Palace Green, Durham City, 
Mon to Sat 1 1 to 4, Sun 2 to 4 
(ends Aug 31) 

20th Century Drawings: 
works by artists of the British 
School; Octagon Gallery, 
Fitzwilliam Museum, Cam- 
bridge; Tues to Sat 2 to S, Sun 
2.15 to 5 (ends Sept 28) 

Bath's Secret Gardens: photo- 
graphs by Peter Wotoszytulri; 
National Centre of Photog- 
raphy, Milsom St, Bath; Mon to 
Sun 9 JO to 5.30 (ends Aug 31) 

Kelims, Jewellery and Carv- 
ings from Central Asia; The 
Read Molteno Gallery. The 
Buildings, Broughton, 


will not officially interfere in 
current North Sea output, now 
running at summer levels of 
Z2 mbd. 

The Department of Energy 
said that policy would remain 
unchanged. 

Other non-Opec oil produc- 
ers. such as Mexico, Malaysia, 
Oman, Brunei and Egypt, are 
also expected to announce 
cuts in output. 

The new quotas, close to 
those agreed in London in 


March 1983, are Algeria 

663.000 bpd; Ecuador 183,000 
bpd; Gabon 137,000 bpd: 
Indonesia 1.18 million bpd; 
Iran 2.3 million bpd; Kn- 
wai 1900,000 bpd; Libya 

950.000 bpd; Nigeria 13 mil- 
lion bpd; Qatar 280,000 bpd; 
Saudi Arabia 435 milli on 
bpd; UAE 950,000 bpd: 
Venezuela 1.55 mini on bpd. 
ban will be allowed to pro- 
duce 1.6 million bpd, com- 
pared with its previous quota 
ofl.2 million bpd. 


Escaped convict dies 


Quarteira, Portugal (AP) — 
One of six armed convicts 
who escaped from a maxi- 
mum security prison last week 
gave himself up yesterday 
after a shootout with police, 
who said another escaper 
killed himself after the gun- 
fight 

“We surrounded a house 
they were using for a hideout, 
and told them to surrender, 
and they just opened upon us 
with automatic weapons,” a 
police spokesman said. 

Police said Carlos Alberto 


Pereira came out of the house 
after the half-hour gunfight 
and that the second convict 
Augusto Jose Ramalho, 31, 
killed himself moments later. 
One policeman was grazed by 
a bullet 

Police said only Pereira and 
Ramalho were in the house 
and the remaining four con- 
victs were soil being sought. 
Police accused two of the 
others. Jose Faustino Cavaco 
and Germano Raposinho, of 
killing three guards during the 
escape. 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,117 

13" 



ACROSS 

1 A Tory held in affection in 
the recess (6). 

4 He breaks the code of a 
Guard (8). 

10 Song evde a university re- 
jected (9). 

11 Dull as Guiderius's golden 
lads and girls, eventually? 
(5). 

12 Son is held improperly — a 
feature of the defence (7). 

13 In the middle of which 
we're completely isolated 

(7) . 

14 Order of electrically charged 
particles (5). 

15 Wind up universal com- 
bine? It’s permanent (8). 

18 Soundly thrash and grub 
about for something to eat 

( 8 ) . 

20 Many a pained cry from a 
patient supporter 15). 

23 High platform - warning to 
passengers at the entrance 
(7). 

25 What to do if she complains 
of the cold? (7). 

26 Wood for Ben's tee. say (5). 

27 A ran: drug prepared for 
backward soldiers (9). 

28 Indescribable, not having a 
handle (8). 

29 Band to take care of before 
acting (6). 

DOWN 

1 Problem causing endless 
trouble for Costa Rica (8). 

2 Prudence is an amusing per- 
son (7). 


3 In other words, cited evil 
wrongly (9). 

5 European aviator whose 
landfall in Norway was 
noted (6.8). 

6 Provide means of support 
for some heathen down 
south (5). 

7 Make out record on the 
computer that’s left (7). 

8 Poetry of a Welshman about 
a New England state (6). 

9 Alexander's application for 
a break? (7.2.5). 

16 Figure reportedly ruined 
one of the first to settle (9). 

17 Woman delivered article for 
a writer (8). 

19 Internal transmitter broad- 
cast a murder (7). 

21 Like Keats's sweeter mel- 
odies. not attracting an 
audience (7). 

22 Extremely aloof, greyish 
.Asian hound? (6). 

24 Slug with a left — it's all 
that's needed (5). 

Solution to Puzzle No 17.116 



ansma lasBBiDigtgigra 

s 





Condse Crossword, page 10 


Stockbridge; Wed to Sun 10.30 
to 6 (ends Sept 14) 

Crafts for Every Day; Fal- 
mouth Art Gallery, Municipal 
Offices; Mon to Fri 10 to 5 (ends 
Aug 15) 

China Now: Paintings by 
Modern Chinese Artists; Dor- 
bam University Oriental Mu- 
seum, Elver Hill; Mon to Sat 9 
to l, 2 to 5, Sun 2 to 5 (ends Aug 
31) 

of Siratiipef^^^he^nip 
Room. Strothpeffier; Mon to Sat 
10 to 12, 2.30 to 4 JO, 7 JO to 
9.30 (ends Oct) 

Last chance to see 
Jewellery by Jacqueline Mina: 
Ceramics by Sebastian Blaclde: 
Tapestries by Jeni Ross; Oxford 
Gallery, 23 High Su 10 to 5. 

Music 

Organ recital by Alison How- 
ell; Rochester Cathedral, 8. 

Organ recital by Andrew Wil- 
son; Brighton Parish Church, St 
Peter's, York Place, 8. 

Concert by the English String 
Orchestra; Ripon Cathedral, 8. 

Organ recital by Russell 
Missin; St Mary's Cathedral, 
Palmerston Place, Edinburgh, 8. 

Organ recital by Keith 
Wright; St Andrew and St 
George, George St, Edinburgh, 

Organ redial by Paul Trepte; 
Norwich Cathedral, 8. 

Concert by the Handel Opera 
Chamber Orc h e s tra; The Pump 
Room. Bath, 8. 

Organ recital by Wynford 
Jones; Goodrington Parish 
Church, 7.30. 

Recital by Scroja Davies 
(flute). Sarah Standife (cello) 
and Christopher Liddle (harp); 
St Olave's Church. Marygate. 
York, 8. 

Concert by die Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra; Winter 
Gardens, Bournemouth, 8. 

Redial by the Kempton 
Suing Quartet; Tewkesbury Ab- 
bey, 7.30. 

Jazz Concert by the West 
Australian Youth Jazz Or- 
chestra and the Midland Youth 
Jazz Orchestra; Beach Ball- 
room. Aberdeen, 7.30. 

General 

Mary Potter demonstrates the 
art ofbakit: Towner Art Gallery, 
Eastbourne. 2.30 to 4.30. 


Bond winner 


The winner of the £250,000 
Premium Bond prize for Au- 
gust. with number 2MB 703741, 
lives in Stockton on Tees. 


The pound 


AosoattaS 
Austria Sch 
Bel giu m Fr 
Canada S 
Denmark Kr 
FMmdMkk 
F rance F r 
Germany Dm 
Greece Dr 
Hong Kong $ 

Ireland Pt 
Italy Ua 

JftMnYen 
Netherlands GU 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
South Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
Sweden Kr 
Switzerland Fr 
USAS 

Yugoslavia Dnr 

Rates tor small denomination bank notes 


Bank 

Bank 

S 

seas 

238 

22.70 

2130 

67.45 

6335 

2.115 

■iild 

mot 

1147 

7JBS 

7J3S 

741 

931 

124 

346 

HTl 

204 

nas 

HEJ 

1.155 

1495 

SJOO 

2,100 

2a 


063 


11.45 

Ml- 1 1 

22548 

21150 

050 


207 JO 


10.75 


242 

247 

1345 

1475 

880 

810 


business. 

Hetaa Price hdecSSU 

London: die FT index dosed up 4.3 at 

1.265a 


Books — hardback 


Tho Deputy Literary Editor's selection of interestftg books published tWa 

wbqKi 

Reagan. Thatcher, end the PoSUcs of Dodfeie, by Joel Krolger (Polity, 


Reagan, 

E2SL50) 


lha Son! World of Fred Hoyle, by Sir Fred Hoyle (MfchanUossph. £1 095) 
The Extraterrestial Life Debate 1750-1900, by Michael J.Crowa (CUPJE40) 
Architecture of the Brfflsfi Empire, edited by Robert Heskath (Wektenfeld, 
£25) 

London’s Chardtes 
The Boffin Wall, 

Dfloomas of the 

Broken Swnsfiko; The Defeat 'of the Luftwaffe, by Warner Beumbach 


(Robert Hale, 

All Abo 


About the Working Bolder Cofie, by Marjorie Quinton (Pelham, £9.95) 


Roads 


Scotland: A87; Robs and Cromarty: 
single-line traffic at Glen Steel 
between 8am and 8pm. A85 
TaysWe/ Perthshire: temporary 
ngnts, Perth. ABO Strathclyde: inside 
lane closed near AuchenUns 
roundabout 

The North; M6 Merseyside: . lane 
closures for painting work around 
junction 23 (St Helens! M63 Greeter 
Manchester Widening scheme; 
avoid Barton Bridge. A19 Co Dur- 
ham: lane closures southbound S of 
Murton flyover for fenoe work. 
Wales and the Weet M4 W Glamor- 
gan; carriageway restrictions be- 
tween junctions 44 and 45 
(Swansea). A4 Wflshire: temporary 
traffic lights along The Causeway, 
Chippenham. A4S3 Ctwyd: traffic 
restrictions between Oswestry and 
Wrexham. 

The MkfiandK MS Hereford and 
Worcester: road works SW of 
Birmingham between junctions 4 
and 5 (Bromsgrove/Drortwfch). 
Contraflow. A46 Warwickshire: 
work In connection with Stratford 
northern by pass means delays 
along Warwick by pass. Ml 
Leicestershire: road works at junc- 
tion 20 (Lutterworth). 

London and the South-east Ml 
Hertfordshire: northbound inside 
lane closed approaching junction 
6A(M25) between 7am ana 3 .30 pm. 
Central London: road width re- 
duced at junction of Harley St and 
Devonshire St during removal of 
dangerous structure. A130 Essex: 
Diversions and restrictions during 
instatiation of new traffic system 
alo ng Broomfield Road, 
Chelmsford. 


Anniversaries 


Births: Alfred, 1st Baron Ten- 
nyson, Poet Laureate 1850-92, 
Somersby, Lincolnshire, 1809; 
Pan] Claudel, poet, Villeneuve- 
sur-Fin. Ranee. 1868; Sir 
Alexander Fleming, bacteriolo- 
gist, discoverer of penicillin, 
Nobel laureate 1945, Lochfidd, 
Strathclyde, 1881. 

Deaths: Anne Hathaway, 
Stratford-on-Avon, 1623; Ben 
Joason, London, 1637; Diego 
Velasquez, painter, Madrid. 
1660. 

The first atomic bomb was 
dropped on HfroshiiBa, 1945. 


Funds contest 


Nominations are invited be- 
tween now and mid-October for 
the 1986 Fundraiser of the Year 
competition, in which prizes 
totalling £13,000 are offered to 
help charities of the winners' 
choice. Details from: Melvyn 
Hayes, Fundraiser of the Year 
Awards 1986, c/o Webb Ivory 
Lid.. Biriey Bank, Preston. 
Lancs PR1 4AE 


Tower Bridge 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 2pm and 6.15pm. 


Weather 
forecast 

A depression is ex- 
pected to move slowly N 
over Ireland with troughs 
of low pressure moving 
NE across England and 
Wales. Most districts will 
begin cloudy with occa- 
sional rain which will be 
heavy at times. 


6am to midnight 


LondwiSE Engbmd.E Angfia, 
Channel be Cloudy, mainly dry at 
first, rain later. Win d S moderate. 
Max temp 20C (68F). 

Central S England, Mkflan ds , E, 
SW, Central N England: Occasional 
rain, becoming mainly dry later with 
bright or sunny Intervals. Wind S 
becoming SW fresh or strong. Max 
temp 190(660- 

Wates, NW, NE England, Lake 
District, Is of Man: Ram at first, 
bright intervals and heavy showers 
developing. Wind S becoming SW 
fresh or strong. Max temp 18C ( 
B4F). 

Borders, Etfi nto u rtei and Dundee, 
Aberdeen, SW, NW scosand, Glas- 
gow. Central M^tbmds, Moray 
Rrth, Argyll: Rain-heavy at times. 
Wind E strong to gaieJMax temp 
15C (59F). 

NE Scotland, Orkney, Shetland: 
Rather cloudy, mainly dry. Wind NE 
or moderate. Max temp 14C ( 


N Ireland: Rain-heavy at times. 
Wind N strong to gale. Max temp 
15C ( 59F). 

Outlook f o r to mo rrow and Friday: 
Brighter drier weather spreading 
from the W. 



Times Portfolio Cold rub* one as 

follows: . _ 

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of The Times Is not a condition or 
taking part 

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3 Times portfolio ■dividend’ wm be 
the figure in pence which represents 
the optimum movement in prices (U>. 
the largest increase or towg a loos ) of a 
combination of ngftt (two f rom each 
randomly dtsaibufedgroup wtatln the 
do slum) of the 44 slutn* which on 
any one day compftf* The Timas 
Portfolio UsL 

* The dally tHvtdwd ’ win be 
announced each day and the weekly 
dividend will be _announced each 
Saturday In The Times. 

6 Times portfolio w and detttfs of 
the daily or weekly divfdnd will also 
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6 If the overall price movement of 
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holding those eomirtnatkms of shares. 

T AH claims are s«*Kt smrttfg; 
before payment. Any Times Portfolio 
card Uiai K defaced, tampered with or 
incorrectly printed in any way win be 
declared void. 

8 Employees of News Interna tonal 

and distributors Of the c artU O T 
members of their immediate tamUies 
are nol allowed lo play Times 
Portfolio. 

9 All participants wUl be auweajo 
these Rules. All instructions Q". “how 
to ntav" and -howto claim ■ whether 
pubuShed In The Times or In T|mw 
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part of these Rules. The Editor 
reserves the right <o amend the Rums. 

10 In any dispute. Hie Editor's 
daemon urinal and no correspon- 
dence win be entered into. 


it If for any reason The Times 

Prices, Page » not published In Die 
normal way Timet, Portfolio win be 
suspended for Him day. 

Host to ptay - Datty Drirideod 
On iseh day your unique set of etobt 
numbers wfll represent commercial 
and industrial shares oubltahed in The 


Times Porjfo 


rill appear 


on the Stock Exchange Prices pope. 

In the columns provided next la 
your pares note the price change tf- 
— -l in pence, as published In that 
rs Times. 

After listing the price changes of 
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all eight share changes to give you 
your overall total Hus or minus «+ or - 
>- 

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must claim your pm* as instructed 
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Portfolio total. 

Add these together to determine 
your weekly Portfolio total. 

If your lola! matches the published 
weekly dividend figure you nave won 
outrtnhl or a share of Ihe prize money 
staled for that week, and must claim 
your prize as Instructed below. 

jsrssust 

i can bo zccaptM ootUM mere 


You trnia have your card with you 
when you telephone. 

If you are unable to telephone 
someone else can claim on your behalf 
but r 
The 
between 

No responsibility can be 

for failure to contact me claims 

for any reason within ihe staled 
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The above Instructions are a» 
pUcaUe lo oolh dally and weakly 
dividend claim*. 


raw- ran cuim an your ocnan 
I they must have your card and call 
e Times Portfolio dams line 
ween the stipulated times. 


Sun rises: Sm sate 
5L31 am 8.41 pn, 

Moon rise* Moon sots 
5.46 am &2S pm 
first quarter: August 13 



li ghting -up time 


London 9.11 pm to 5.03 am 
Bristol 9.20 pm to 5.13 am 
Edinb u rgh 9.4 0g m to 458 am 


pm to 5.04 am 
Ponzanca 928 pm to S29 am 


Yesterday 


Temperatures at mWday yesterday: c. 
dou& f. r. ram; 5, mm. 

C F C F 

Belfast s 1861 Otten u ny MBffl 
B’mntam 11763 In verne s s rl355 
BtKxpool s 1661 Jersey a 1966 
Bristol ( 1763 London I 1986 
Gattittl 11763 MiKhstar 11661 
EtSnbwgh M457 Newc as t le f 1763 
Oaagow 11457 fTiMaway a 1457 


Timely plea 


The Oockmakers' Company 
is seeking experienced horolo- 
gisu to take apprentices under a 
new subsidy scheme 10 help 
expand the industry. Details 
from: The Clerk. The 
Clock-makers' Company. 2 
Greycoat Place. Westminster. 
London SW 1 P ISD. 


Our address 


information for Inclusion in Tht> 
Times Information aerm ep should be 
sent so: The Editor. TTJSL The Times. 
PO Box 7. 1 Virginia Street. London. 
El 9XN. 


©TIMES NEWSPAPERS LIMITED. 
iPBfa Printed by London Post i Print- 
ers! Limited of 1 Virginia street. 
London El 9XN. WediuMay. August 

Sie’^i Effigr* - “■ ■ *-»*** ^ “ 


‘Irium virate’ takes 
over sanction fight 



Continued from page 1 

in South Africa, and on the 
promotion of tourism, which 
Mrs Thatcher said could come 
into force immediately. 

British officials said yes- 
terday that although the tens 
were voluntary the Govern- 
ment would be doing its best, 
as in the case of the Gleneagles 
■ agreement which discourages 
sporting links with South Af- 
rica, to sec they were 
observed 

The London summit ended 
early yesterday with an agree- 
ment to disagree, Mrs 
TTiatcher on one side and her 
six colleagues from Canada. 
Australia, India, Zambia. 
Zimbabwe and the Bahamas 
on the other. 

The tensions which had 
been scarcely hidden during 
ihe conference exploded yes- 
terday morning with angry 
attacks on Mrs Thatcher from 
other leaders. Dr Kenneth 
Kaunda. the Zambian Presi- 
denL said that Mrs Thatcher 
had “cut a very pathetic 
picture at the summit — very 
pathetic indeed.” 

He asked;“Why must Brit- 
ain remain behind? Because of 
the Iron Lady. Margaret 
Thatcher is worshipping gold 
and platinum and the rest," he 
declared. 

Before flying home Mr Gan- 


dhi saidrBritain is not the 
leader any more, not in the 
Commonwealth. It is losing its 
position bewuse U is com- 
promising its position on 
moral principles over eco- 
nomic needs.” 

The Prime Minister, in a 
BBC Radio interview yes- 
terday. emphasized that the 
summit communique had 
said for the first time that if 
South Africa moved in the 
direction the Commonwealth 
wanted, the sanctions it im- 
posed could be lifted. 

British officials were 
dismissive of threats of repri- 
sals against Britain detected in 
the remarks of Mr Mugabe 
after the summit. It was noted 
that they had been made lo the 
media and not in the summit. 

But the question of British 
airlines* overflying rights in 
countries like Zambia is cer- 
tain to be one of the issues 
discussed at a meeting of the 
frontline suites in Luanda 
soon. 

Sir Geoffrey Howe, the 
Foreign Secretary, yesterday 
ruled out an early visit by 
himself to South Africa, and 
appeared to rule out any 
suggestions that Britian would 
compensate frontline states 
for the effects of sanctions 
against South Africa. 


Thatcher stand escapes 
Tory Party criticism 


Continued from page 1 

tain's different interests as 
both a member of the Euro- 
pean Community and of the 
Commonwealth. 

Opposition party leaders, 
however, were savage in their 
criticism of her. Mr Neil 
Kinnock. the Labour leader, 
said that she had behaved 
contemptibly at the summit 

He said: “Only P. W. Botha 
has reason to be pleased with 
Mrs Thatcher. He now knows 
that he can treat her Foreign 
Secretary with contempt he 
can bomb Commonwealth 
countries, he can jail and kill 
to his heart's content and she 
will still appease him while 
making plaintive pleas for him 
to cease the violence upon 
which his system depends for 
its very life.” 




High Tides 


bMue sky; bo-blue sky and cloud: c- 
doudy: o-overcast: f-fog: d -drizzle: h- 
lull: mlsl-mfcst; r-raln: s-snow; th- 
ttiunderaorni: p^bowers. 

Arrows show wind direction, wind 
speed mmiD circled. Temperature 
centigrade. 


TODAY 

AM 

NT 

PM 

HT 

London Bridge 

an 

6.6 

226 

64 

Aberdeen 

224 

4JQ 

201 

4.0 

Avonmocrth 

8.40 

11.9 

841 

122 

BoHast 

12D4 

3 2 

1228 

3JU 

Conan 

8^5 

11.0 

846 

114 

Oevonport 

7.10 

4.9 

744 

22 

Doner 

12.06 

60 

122/ 

b.4 


140 

4.7 

644 

Ml 

Glasgow 

Harwich 

1.40 

12.50 

4J> 

28 

23b 

1.16 

29 

28 

Sf**“ 

11.46 

738 

5.1 

6.9 

1149 

846 

b.4 

64 

Hfracorabe 

722 

84 

746 

2/ 

LeWi 

3.53 

5.1 

420 

52 

Liwpoot 

1223 

8.9 

1243 

6.7 

Lowestoft 

10.38 

2.4 

1143 

22 

Moigato 

kBtetdHsvMl 

1.19 

738 

44 

64 

149 

742 

44 

87 

Newquay 

B 98 

6.4 

642 

67 

Obm 

727 

26 

740 

28 

Peniancn 

6.06 

4.9 

6.21 

64 


823 

14 

8.44 

21 

Porisuwotii 

1232 

4.3 

1247 

44 

Stwrehaw 

1218 

27 

1247 

54 

Southamtaon 



1241 

44 

Swansea 

7.46 

6.6 

7JB 

89 

Tees 

4.49 

5.1 

5.19 

20 

WHotMMhNw 

1.01 

3.9 

1.12 

39 


Around Britain 


SunHaVt 
hrs in 

EAST COAST 
Scartwro 1.3 

D rtdtingtoo 1.8 .13 

Cramer 1.0 .35 

Lowestoft 1.7 .04 

5.6 - 


s&ICo 


Worthing 


COAST 

7.1 - 

6.8 . 
7J3 - 

5.1 - 

5.0 - 
8.8 .04 
8.6 - 

7.6 .00 

8-7 - 

7.7 .01 

54 - 

U .01- 

4.7 .13 

3.1 .12 

Teignmouth &2 .15 
Torquay — 


Max 
C F 

IB 64 cloudy 
15 59 showers 

17 63 bright 

18 64 bright 
18 64 sum. 

18 64 cloudy 


Swanago 

Weymouth 


Falmouth 


Jersey 


WEST! 
ScHyWes 
Newquay 


3.8 .22 

67 .06 

7.5 .13 

7 a .01 
7.4 - 

92 .18 

6.6 23 


18 64 

19 66 
19 66 
17 63 

17 63 

18 64 
18 64 

18 64 

19 68 

18 64 
17 63 
17 63 
17 63 
17 63 
16 61 
17 63 
17 63 

16 64 

17 63 

19 66 

18 84 


bright 

surmy 


sunny 

surmy 

sunny 

bright 


showers 

shenwrs 

rein 

shewcre 

sunny 

showers 

bright 


16 61 sunny 
18 64 rain 1 


Sun Rain Max 
hrs In C F 
Ht ra c ombo x .65 16 61 

Tanby ZS JJ6 17 63 

CotarynBay 5.8 -24 16 61 

Mono— to B 2 .06 17 S3 

Douglas 11.0 - 16 61 

ENGLAND AND WALES 
ton to n 3J3 .01 20 68 

Blum Abjtf 82 - 20 68 

Bristol (CW) 8.5 .03 19 66 

Csftflll (Ctiq as .63 17 63 

Awtosa* 9.3 .01 17 63 

B’po ol Ahpt 6.6 .05 17 63 

MSH ct toSM * 4.3 .02 18 64 

Nottingham AS < 19 66 

JfrtMv-Tyno 2.0 .35 15 59 

Carlisl* 1.7 .14 16 61 

SCOTLAND 

Fifcita ta mub 1.0 as 14 57 

Pwataw* 32 - 17 63 

Gtaagmr 0.7 .25 16 61 

Tlreo 7.5 . 15 SB 

Stomnny 4.S .07 15 59 

1.1 .02 13 55 
Wfek 6.1 - 13 55 

Ktetow M .07 15 59 

Abtatoon 2.6 87 16 SI 

g t Andrew s 86 - 18 61 

Edhtoagh IL8 26 15 59 

NORTHERN WSAIfll 

Mb* 8.0 .09 17 63 

Thrmo mm Monday's figures 


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Abroad 


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He said that she was iso- 
lated from the Common- 
wealth. She would soon be 
stranded by the actions on 
sanctions to be taken by the i 
US Senate. 

Mrs Thatcher, he said, had 
shown that she would not rise 
to the moral challenge of ap- 
artheid. 

Dr David Owen, the SDP 
leader, said that Mrs Thatcher 
had placed Britain in a po- 
sition where she got the worst 
of both worlds. While she had 
crossed the threshold of eco- 
nomic sanctions, she had 
agreed to do too little too late 
and “we will be hauled humili- 
atingly, step by step, towards 
ever-increasing sanctions. 
Britain will gain no goodwill g 
by such a position, and instead 
we will earn the ill will of 
friends and allies.** 


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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 


;v?S 

’>>C 

Executive Editor 

^ v 



TIMES 


17 

SPORT 28 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 31 


WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


111., 


Kenneth Fleet 


in 


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STOCK MARKET 


Hix* 


FT 30 Share 

1265.8 (+4.3) 

FT-SE100 
1561.6 (+16.2) 

Bargains 

21,683 

USM (Datastream) 
121.41 (+0.54) 

THE POUND 


US Dollar 

1.4830 (+0.0135) 

W German mark 
3.1017 (+0.0437) 
Trade-weighted 

71 .8 (+1.1) ■ . 


Victory for 
Highams 


her stand escain 
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* ■ 'hRtae ; Highams, the private com- 
.. ■' *i <tpany of Mr John Whittaker, 
the chairman of Peel Hold- 
ings the retail developer, has 
won its £37 mini on bid for the 
Manchester Ship Canal Com- 
pany. Higbarns’s offer was 
declared unconditional yes- 
terday. Manchester Slip will 
become a- subsidiary of 
, Highams following Hlghams’s 
acquisition of a majority of 
„ \ 1 ^ the equity shares. 

V Highams owns or has accep- 
tances for 50.1 per cent of the 
'■ Pivoting shares representing 
. 51.6 per cent of the publicly 

: " r se i held equity share capital 
- Highams has given undertak- 
" ings to the Takeover Panel 
that on closure of its oiler it 
’* " <k- will transfer enough steues to 
; nominees to ezmUe it to 
7 -'s: exercise a majority of the 
. -a. votes, a measure made nec- 
essary by the onusual struc- 
- c? turn of the Manchester Ship 
... . Canal Company's shares. 

Glynwed £19m 

*. ~Z Glynwed International yes- 
■ " : £ terday reported interim pretax 
A '2 profit up 20 per cent to £19.3 
v million on turnover margin- 
ally down at£237nrilIion. The 

■ interim dividend was raised 
20 per cent from 3p to 3.6p net 
per share. 

Tempos, page 18 

Unitech faD 

Unitech, ■ the ' 'Electronic 
its distributor, suf- 
a 2V per cent decHne in 
pretax profits to £10.73 mil- 
lion for the year to the end of 
May. Sales fell from £204.7 
million to £198.3 milliori but 
the full-year dividend is in- 
. creased by 15 percent to 6.5p 
net 

Tempos, page 18 

Pleasurama up 

Pleasurama, the casino op- 
erator, lifted profits from £16 
million to £1 9.2 million before 
tax in the six months to June 
. 29. Turnover rose from £712 
' million to £80.6 million and 
•’ the interim dividend is up 
from 1.75p to 2p. 

Tempos, page 18 

Beer ahead 

Beer production in June 
rose 2.8 per cent on annual 
comparison, helped by good 
. weather but production in the 
first six months of the year 
was still down 0_5 per cent on 
the same period lak year, the 
Brewers Society said. Lager is 
still the big growth sector. 

Shares halted 

Wingate Property Invest- 
ments, which called off a£l 9.7 
million merger with Trafford 
Park Estates by mutual agree- 
ment last year, asked for its 
shares to be suspended pend- 
ing an announcement 


llisjhlite 


- 

4 *- 

* M 

* ■*» 


*’• 


Tempos 18 Traded Optt 19 
Wall Street 18 Money Mrkts 19 
Stock Market 19 Unh Traci » 
Co News 19 Coraawdities 20 
Coaniest 19 USM Prices 20 
ForehmExck 19 Stare Pres 21 


Westinghouse-Plessey 
put pressure on GEC 


Directors of Plessey and 
Westinghouse Electric Corpo- 
ration of Pittsburg expressed 
their confidence yesterday 
that the Government would 
abandon the GEC Nimrod 
project in favour of Boeing’s 
E3 Awacs early warning air- 
craft because they offer “The 
only no-risk solution** to 
Britain’s air defence require-: 
mem “at a price fully offset by 
new high-technology work.'*. 

A Ministry of Defence 
short-list of bidders for the 
UK airborne early warning 
(AEW) project and final best 
bids are expected in October 
and the decision before the 
end of the year. Boeing’s offer 
of a 100 per cent offset of the 
cost is likely to be a crucial 
factor. 

The choice of Awacs would 
not only be a big blow to the 
credibility and workload of 
GEC, but would also trigger 
off, with a bang, the far- 
reaching collaboration agree- 
ment - unveiled by 
Westinghouse and Plesey yes- 
terday — the eve of the release 
of the Monopolies and Merg- 
ers Commission report on 
GECs proposal to take over 
Plessey. 

The agreement is designed 
in the first place to help to 
secure the AEW project for 
Boeing. Westinghouse . pro- 
duces the radar used in the E3 
Awacs aircraft and has the 
largest Awacs sub-contracts 
from Boeing. 

Mr Jack Tymann, general 
manager of the Westinghouse 
command and. control sys- 
tems division, explained that 
the agreement covered three 


By Kenneth Fleet 


main areas of activity, “all 
contingent on winnng the UK 
AEW programme**. They are: 

• Supported by Westing- 
house, Plessey would be 
responsible for the E3 radar 
programme m Britain. 

• With the addition of the 
British Awacs fleet, there 
would be more than 70 opera- 
tional E3 radars in service 
worldwide. Plessey and 
Westinghouse would collabo- 
rate on future improvements 
to the radar for sale to this 
substantial market 

• A joint venture would pur- 
sue other technology advances 
and other export market 
opportunities — in which 
other British companies 
(Ferranti and British Aero- 
space were mentioned) would 
be expected to join. 

The heads of the Westing- 
house-Plessey agreement call 
for collaboration in 15 ad- 


vanced technology areas, 
inducting: 

A. The Strategic Defence 
Initiative (“Star Wars”), an 
area in which Westinghouse 
has already been awarded 17 
advanced development con- 
tracts by the US government 

B. GaAs — both materials 
and signal processing - de- 
scribed^ as “the key to. 
tomorrow’s defence electron- 
ics systems”. 

C Ada software - im- 
portant for all future US and 
Nato defence procurements. 

D. Electronic warfare, 
where the market is “rapidly 
expanding.” . 

E. Air defence, ah* traffic 
control, and airport systems, 
all of which are strategically 
important to Plessey and 
Westinghouse. 

Mr Tymann described Ples- 
sey as “an obvious choice as a 
UK partner in this pro- 
gramme^. Their advanced 



Jack Tymann: Plessey was 
obvious choice as partner 


Michael Whiteman; ranch 
to gain from Westinghouse 


technology endeavours and 
their entrepreneurial ap- 
proach to the world market- 
place complement our own — 
making for a very natural 
synergistic and comfortable 
team arrangement”. 

Mr Michael Whiteman, 
managing director of Plessey 
Avionics, said Pfessey's de- 
cision to go with Westing- 
house “was based on our own 
judgement of the merits of 
each contender for the UK 
AEW programme. 

“In many areas of activity 
such as self-testing silicon 
chips, gallium arsenide, inte- 
grated circuits, and active 
aperture phased array radar 
we have much to offer any 
partner in any agreement such 
as this — something which is 
highly valued by Westing 
house. Equally we have mucl 
to gain from Wesunghouse’s 
advanced technology base” 

He added: "Through 
Plessey. the United Kingdom 
can also look forward with 
more confidence than ever 
before to a significant share of 
the growing worldwide market 
for advanced electronics- 
based defence technologies 
and systems.” 

Mr Whiteman’s c laims 
would take some of the sting 
out of GECs case for a 
continuation of the Nimrod 
project, on which more than 
£900 million has already been 
spent. GEC has aigued that if 
Nimrod were cancelled, Brit- 
ain would be excluded from 
AEW technology and denied 
the significant export poten- 
tial of this system . 

Comment, page 19 


Pru Bache 
warning 
on Ulster 

From Fanl Vallely 
New York 

A leading firm of Wall 
Street stockbrokers has 
wanted its clients that invest- 
ments in Northern Ireland 
may soot become. as politi- 
cally sensitive ' as those in 
South Africa. 

The report, by the research 
department of Prudential- 
Bache Securities, has told 
investors that a “new and 
quite serious effort in the form 
of the MacBride Principles _ 
could affect your investments 
in 23 mqjor US firms that 
currently do business in 
Northern Ireland.** 

The document, which yes- 
terday was described by die 
British Consulate in. New 
York as “a serious and worry- 
ing development”, is the first 
evidence that the business 
community is concerned by 
the political Implications of 
investment in Northern 
Ireland. 

- The warning is centred 
around the MacBride Prin- 
ciples which were drawn up in 
1 984 by four prominant Irish 
activists. The principles were 
intended as a set of equal 
opportunity guidelines for US 
companies operating in the 
province. 

According to the Pruden- 
tial-Bache report 23 American 
corporations operate in 
Northern Ireland employing 
1 1 per cent of the workforce: 

It stresses that unemploy- 
ment levels among Catholics 
are double those among Prot- 
estants and notes that 
GaDaher Ltd, a subsidiary of 
American Brands Inc “has 
virtually no Catholic males in 
their workforce of nearly 
2 , 000 .” 

Yesterday Ms Janet Mclver, 
a spokeswoman for the British 
consulate in New York, said 
that the Prudential-Bache re- 
port should be taken very 
seriously. 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


New York 

Dow Jones 178456 (+16.59) 

Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow — 17414.78 (+151.68) 

Sydney: AO 1127.2 (+7J) 

Frankfurt 

18.6&3 (+42JJ) 


Commerzbank 

Brussels: 

General 

Parts: CAC 

Zurich: 

SKA General _ 


707.05 
— 379, 


5 (+56.9) 

i (+02) 


: . *’ 


n/a 

London dosing pricea Page 21 


INTEREST RATES 






m* 


** 






rv l> 

Jr' 


ri 


v 


£ 

•/* 


[ ontfan: 

Bank Base: 10% 

3-month interbank 9Jfr-9 ,3 u% 
3-nionth eligible bite9'ta£»xi% 
■ ’“-rate 


5 sr 


Prime Rate 8% 

Federal Fields fPw 

3-month Treasury BWs 5.8J-5.67 

30-year bonds 96K-98 


CURRENCIES 


London: NnrYgifc 

£: $1.4830 fc $1.4850 

£: DM3.1017 S: DM2.0885 

E SwFr25048 8: Index: 111.5 

£: FFr10.0547 

£ Yen229 J6 ECU £0.676789 
E lndex:71.8 SDR SX818250 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 

B.P. 

Britofl — 
Shell __ 


, 608p 


121 p i+l 


Press Tools — 
Outwicri Jnv. „ 

Traxmetov. — „ 

Pacer Systems 

CVD Inc. 

T.Gowie 

Poky Peck 


.21 

150p 


ft 


21 Op 
160p 

. 205p 


Standard Chart. 

FALLS: 

Boots. 


■ 143p 
, 724p 


;+20p 

+20p 

+10p 

+10p 

+10PJ 


Brown STawse 

STC 

Unitech 


Rowntree 

Nu-Switt 

Rush & Tompkins 
Stateless Metal — 
Aftken Hume 


J(-I5p 

— I68p(-7p; 
150p -6p 
188p (-7pj 
H70 


SRSB 
81 


- 129P 


GOLD 


London Fixing: 

^^M7§3a25(£241 .75- 
24225 ) 

New York: _ 

Comex $35920-359.70 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent {Sept) pm $14.00 bW($1 055) 


Rowntree expands in US 
with £155m takeover 


Rowntree Mackintosh, the 
Kit-Kal .and Yoririe sweets 
group, is taking over the Willy 
Wonka chocolate factory. 

In a £155 million deal, 
Rowntree Mackintosh is buy- 
ing the United States , based 
sweets and snacks group 
Sonmark whose WiDy Wonka 
brand, named after the fam- 
ous childrens story, is a best 
seller. 

Shareholders are being 
asked to put up the bulk of the 
cash for Sunmarfc, which is 
expected to earn profits of 
about £17 million in the 
current year compared with 
£14.3 million last tune. 


By Cliff Feftham 

Most of the profits are 
earned through its S unfin e 
and Willy Wo n lea divisions 
which sell branded sweets to 
the children’s and teenage 

mart? 1 - . . .. "" V 

S ummi t . estimates it 'has 
about four per cent of the £1.3 
billion a year market. The 
business also takes in sales of 
snacks such as sunflower and 
tpkin seeds and various 
1th products. 

Rowntree Mackintosh has 
been investing heavily in the 
United States through ac- 
quisition of Tom’s Snack 
Food company and the Orig- 
inal Cookie business. 


The chairman, Mr Kenneth 
Dixon, said yesterday that the 
company had been looking for 
a mainstream confectionery 
acquisition. The latest , deal 
would give. the~group 35 per 
cent of sales and 45 percent of 
trading profits from the 
United States. 

But he revealed that the 
company's : performance 
would be tittle changed in the 
first half of this year. The UK 
market remained strong but 
currency swings would knock 
£2 million off profits while the 
Canadian market was still 
suffering from higher taxes. _ 


Tranwood’s offer for 
Aitken Hume lapses 


By Clare Dobie 


The offer by Tranwood, the 
shell company headed by Mr 
Nick Oppenheini, for Aitken 
Hume International lapsed 
yesterday even though holders 
of 54 percent of the shares had 
accepted the offer. 

Mr Tony Constance, Aitken 
Hume’s chief executive, ex- 
pressed relief that the bid 
battle was over. 

“It has been a considerable 
diversion”, he said yesterday. 

The bid foiled because the 
independent directors ofNSR, 
an American fund manage- 
ment subsidiary of Aitken 
Hume, said on Monday that 
they would not support a 
change of control. Their ap- 
proval was a condition of the 


bid. 

Tranwood conld have 
waived the condition had it so 
chosen but Mr Oppenheim 
said the independent 
directors’ opposition could 
have put the NSR operation in 
jeopardy. . 

Aitken Hume recently an- 
nounced an £8.95 million loss 
after extraordinary items for 
the year to March 31. Mr 
Constance said yesterday that 
profits for the first three 
months of the current year 
were above budget. 

Aitken Hume's shares fell 
6p to 129p on the stock 
market yesterday, while 
Tranwood’s were unchanged 
at I5p. 


Sumrie loss halved 


Sumrie Clothes, the Leeds 
textile company, yesterday 
announced frill-year losses of 
£21 1,000, less than half the 
previous year’s deficit of 
£433,000." 

At the same time the com- 
pany, which is undergoing a 
Department of Trade and 
Industry investigation into its 
shareholding structure, an- 
nounced that one of its major 
shareholders has reduced his 


7.54 per cent shareholding to 
below 1 per cent. 

The accounts of Sumrie for 
the year ending March 29 
have been p r e p are d on going 
concern basis. Sumrie is 
embarking on a rationaliza- 
tion and reorganization pro- 
gramme which will be 
financed, according to the 
company, “under an arrange- 
ment with Retire SA, a com- 
pany associated with the 
chairman". 


Steel tube 
suppliers 
for Brown 

By Our City Staff 

Brown & Tawse, the indus- 
trial distributor and steel 
stockholder, is buying three 
tube companies for £4.35 mil- 
lion and raising £9.47 million 
net via a ono-for-three rights 
issue. 

The acquisitions are Pipe 
and Tube Supplies, BYC En- 
gineers and its subsidiary Lan- 
cashire Tube Stockholders. 
They are leading tube distrib- 
utors and will extend the range 
of tubes offered by B&T. 

The companies made pre- 
tax profits in the year to July 
31, 1985 of £764,000 on 
turnover of £9-5 million. The 
companieswil! be paid for 
with £3.1 million cash from 
existing group resources, loan 
notes and £683,000 in shares 
at 170pL 

The rights issue will wipe 
out borrowing, which stood 
at £6.9 million on July 1 1, and 
put cash back in the bank. 


Outwich talks 

Discussions are taking place 
regarding Outwich Invest- 
ment Trust's capital structure. 
These may lead to proposals 
being put to shareholders 
which could include partial or 
total unitization. 


Mail order business ‘grows 
faster than retail sales’ 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


Mail order sales last year 
rose 10-5 per cent, a foster rate 
than retail sales overall, 
according to a survey* by 
Verdict Research- 
A separate Venfict study** 
shows that department stores 
last year continued to lose 
market share to a fraction over 
5 per cent of all retafl sales. 

Until last year, mail order 
sales during this decade grew 
by 26 per cent only half the 
increase registered by all retafl 
sales. But last year mail order 
sales were IB per cent ahead 
of overall retail growth. 

This coincides with new 
marketing moves _ in which 
mail order companies are try- 


ing to make catalogues appeal 
to more narrowly segmented 
groups of shoppers, says 
Verdict, 

Market shares held by the 
key mail order co m pan ie s are 
estimated by Verdict as: GUS 
42 per cent, Littiewoods 253 
per emit, Freemans 13.7 per 
cent, Grattan 103 per cent and 
Empire 62 per cent The 
strongest growth has been 
from Grattan and Freemans. 

Littiewoods lost just over 2 
per centmarket share last year 
although sales were up by 8 
per cent and profits before 
interest rose 12 per cent, 
according to Verdict 

Department stores* share of 


retail trade, which stood at 
534 per cent in 1980, was 
down to 5.13 per cent in 1984 
and 536 per cent last year. 

But pacesetters include the 
John Lewis Partnership, 
whose sales have increased at 
twice the rate of department 
stores in general, and Marks 
and Spencer in the variety 
store sector which has easily 
outpaced rivals like British 
Home Stores, says Verdict. 

*Verdict on Mail Order** Ver- 
dict ob Departmat tad Vari- 
ety Stores, each £395 from 
Verdict Research, 54 Britton 
Street, London ECIM SNA. 



Paul Fox: seeking a wider spread of shareholders. (Photograph: John Manning.) 


Yorkshire 
TV in 
share sale 

By Alison Eadle 

Yorkshire TV, maker of die 
Emmerdale Farm series and 
First Tuesday documentaries, 
wOl sefl 25 per cent of its 
shares to the public this month 
in an offer-for-sale which will 
value the company at about 
£40 million. 

Yorkshire is the third tele- 
vision rrnnpawy to come to the 
stock market this summer, 
following Thames TV and TV- 
am. It is the only major 
independent station not yet to 
have a quote or be part of a 
quoted groop. 

Yorkshire's managing 
director, Mr Paul Fox, said 
yesterday that both the com- 
pany and die Independent 
Broadcasting Authority 
wanted a wider spread of 
shareholders. 

The present four sharehold- 
ers are United Newspapers, 
which is selling Us entire 23 
per cent stake; WH Smith, 
which is reducing its stake 
from 29 to 21 per cent, and 
Bass and Pearson, which are 
both reducing their stakes 
from 24 to 21 per cent 

In the six months to June 
30, Yorkshire's advertising 
revenue rose 25& per cent 
compared with a rise for the 
independent regional con- 
tractors of 233 per cent 

Programme rales both to 
British tderisoD stations and 
overseas networks have also 
risen from a standing start in 
1982 to £7 million last year, of 
which £3 million west abroad. 

Starting this week York- 
shire will be the first British 
television station to introduce 
24 hoar TV, when it starts a 
13- week experiment in 
br oa dcas ting Music Box, a 
pop video programme for 
young people, from .1230 am 
until 6 p m - 

It won accolades in the IBA 
mid-term review, published 
last month, with a reference to 
its “distinguished 

contribution” to network cur- 
rent affairs programmes and 
documentaries. 

Yorkshire made pretax 
profits of £3.6 million in the 
year to September 30, 1985 
and is expected to make 
profits of more than £7 million 
this year. The prospectus is 
scheduled for August 22. 


Growth of money 
supply is curbed 


By Richard Thomson 


There was a sharp slow- 
down in the growth of the 
money supply last month, 
adding to die optimism al- 
ready created in foreign ex- 
change and money markets by 
Monday’s Opec agreement 


Sterling M3 rose by 0.25 per 
cent the lowest increase since 
the beginning of the year and a 
full percentage point below the 
increase in June. 

The increase, in the middle 
of the City's range of predic- 
tions, was hailed as a welcome 
indication that the rapid in- 
crease in money supply for 
most of this year was slowing 
down. 

But it still leaves the annual 
increase in sterling M3 at 
1935 per cent well above the 
1 1 to 15 per cent target range 
set by the government for this 
year. 

Sterling M0, the narrow 
measure of money supply, 
also rose by 0.25 per cent This 
gives it an annualised growth 
rate of three per cent well 
within government targets. 

Bank lending rose by £3 
billion during duringJuly, one 
of the biggest increases ever 
recorded in a single month. 


But the underlying increase 
was a more modest £250 
million, in line with increases 
in previous months. 

There was also a sharp 
increase in government fund- 
ing. reversing the trend of 
underfunding in recent 
months. The public sector 
borrowing requirement was 
overfunded by £0.2 billion 
following sales of gilt-edged 
stock of£l. 4 billion, offsetting 
a £1.2 billion underfunding in 
the previous three months. 

The Treasury was, however, 
playing down the significance 
of the rise in starling M3 
because of distortions m the 
component figures. 

It said that the unexpected 
rise in bank lending, together 
with an unprecedented fall of 
£1.6 billion in external and 
foreign exchange transactions 
and other sterling liabilities, 
cast doubt on both figures. 

Analysts attributed part of 
the jump in bank lending to 
large purchases of commercial 
bills by the Bank of England to 
redress shortages in the money- 
markets created by the 
government's funding 
programme. 


New Telecom man may 
be next chairman 


By Cliff Fdtham 


Sir George Jefferson, the 
£170,000-a-year chairman of 
British Telecom, yesterday 
named the man who could be 
his successor if he decides to 
retire next year. 

He is 52-year-old Mr 
Graeme Odgers, one of the 
group managing directors of 
Tarmac, the building 
companywho is leaving to 
become a full-time deputy 
chairman of Telecom. 

Mr Odgers declined to com- 
ment Iasi night on speculation 
that he was being groomed to 
succeed Sir George- He said: 
“I have been offered this job 
without any thoughts to the 
future, and I certainly cannot 
comment on who might be the 
neat chairman." 

Sir George, who is now 65, 
is due to come up for re- 


election in August next year 
and has given no indication of 
whether he intends to stay on. 

Mr Odgera. who has been a 
part-time director of Telecom 
since 1983, takes over from 
the present deputy chairman. 
Mr Dcryk Vander Weyer, who 
is retiring. 

Mr Odgers joined Tarmac 
as finance director in 1979 
before being appointed group 
managing director in January 
L983. 

His departure from Tarmac 
has resulted in a boardroom 
reshuffle. Mr Donald Carr, 
now chief executive of the 
quarry products division, has 
been appointed a group 
managing direcior. The 
division's finance director, Mr 
Terry Mason, becomes group 
finance director. 



Group's overall pre-tax profit 

European and overseas activities 
produced a further 142% with Austria, 
France and India malting particularly 
good contributions. 

Sea pa's North American 
operations also continued to 
grow and despite the dollar 
factor, this vital area accounted 
for 465% of sales and 61% of 
profits. 

P A 

Manufacturersofen^neeredfabrksandroSsforthepapermakingindustry, feftsandotherspedaBsed 
textiles. The frill Report and Accounts may be obtained by writing to The Secretary, Scapa Group pk, 
Oakfidd House, 52 Preston New Road, Blackburn, Lancashire BS2 6AH. 


Is how the directors of Scapa sum up 
1985/6. The current year has started well 
and they look forward to building strongly 
and progressively on foundations which 
have been well laid 

Operations world-wide 
continued to flourish. Ona regional 
basis the United Kingdom divisions 
increased sales and profits by 37% 
and 60% respectively and 
accounted for 24.8% of the 

s c 





A 


. ««• 


* : 

M «•>* ' 





lo 

BUSINESS AND FINANCE 

®ISt 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


Dow buoyed by Opec 


New York (Renter) - Shares 
advanced from Monday's snap 
dosing rally in early trading 
yesterday, again foe I led by the 
Opec agreement. 

The expected strengthening 
of erode prices quickly led to 


stronger bank and oil shares, 
although the transport, util- 
ities and car manufacturing 
sectors slipped, analysts said. 

The Dow Jones industrial 
average jumped 8.15 points to 
1778.12 



Aug 

V 


Aug 



Aug 

** 

AMR 

51 

51% 


24% 

24* 

Pfizer 

bi* 

b 7* 

ASA 

31 Vi 

31% 

FM Chicago 

28% 

28* 

preps Dge 

18% 

1b* 

Afefld Signal 

m 

39% 

36% 

49% 

FstlntBncp 

FstPwmC 

B0I& 

7 

bU% 

7* 

pimp Mrs 
piiipsPer 

nx 

9 

70* 

ex 


314 

3% 


54% 

53* 

Foiarafd 

63% 

62* 


33 Si 

33% 

FTWachva 

42 

41% 

PPG Ind 

62% 

60* 


11 

11% 

GAF Core 

31* 

31% 

ProrGmtt ■ 

77% 

77* 


18% 

17% 

GTECOip 

5b 

b4% 

PbSE&G 

42% 

42% 


9l% 

S2% 

Gen Cotp 

bb* 

66% 

Hap! 

81% 

59* 

Am Can 
AmCynm'd 

8154 

78% 

81% 

79* 

Gen Dy nes 
Gen Electric 

71% 

73 

70% 

72% 

Tfi* 

n/a 

40* 

29% 

29% 

Gen ms 

IB* 

18% 

nockweiilnt 

41% 

40* 

Am Express 

56% 

M 

58% 

87% 

Gen MAS 
Gen Motors 

90% 

66% 

119% 

67% 

FV.fl! 1 . ■ 

■vTtl 

79 

65* 


3 

3* 

GnPbUtny 

22* 

22* 

Sara Lee 

69% 

6 ® 


Sr 

37 

Genesco 

3* 

3* 


29% 

29* 


24 

23% 

Georgia Pac 

30% 

30% 


29* 

28% 


59% 

57% 

GWetB 

44% 

43% 

i Scon Paper 

58% 

57* 


7% 

6* 

Goodrich 

38* 

36* 

Seagram 

b6% 

57% 

Asarco 

11% 
54 S 

11% 

55% 

Goodyear 
Gould me 

30% 

16% 

30% 

16% 


42* 

48* 

43% 

47* 


48* 

46* 

Grace 

48% 

4«» 


50* 

51 


33% 

33% 

Gt Ait A Tac 

25% 

25% 

88% 

9014 

Bkrs Tst MY 

411'* 

47 

Grtmd 

30% 

31 

Sony 

StfiCdEd 

18* 

16* 


17% 

12* 

GmmanCor 

23% 

25% 

34% 

34* 

BkotBston 
Sank of NY 

37 

62% 

36% 

63% 

Gull A West 
Heinz HJ. 

63* 

45* 

63 

44* 

Sperry Core 
SfelOJl Ohio 

75* 

43% 

75% 

40% 

BemstaeJ 

Boeing 

BseCascda 

7 

5941 

7 

58% 

Hercules 

Hlen-Pkrd 

51% 

38% 

52% 

37% 


49 

32* 

49* 

32% 

52% 

45* 

53% 

46* 

Honeywell 

drib 

64 

24% 

63% 

25 

Sui Comp 
Teledyne 

48% 

308% 

48% 

307* 

Bg Warner 

33 

so* 

33% 

80% 

mgered 
Inland Steel 

bb* 

18 

55 

16 

Tenraoo 

Texaco 

36% 

29* 

37* 

29 


34% 

34% 

IBM 

131% 

131% 

Texas E Cor 

24 

25 


34* 

35 

mco 

10% 

11% 

Texas Inst 

109 

109* 

Bvfton Ntn 
Burrougns 

477. 

48% 

bit Paper 

63% 

63 

Texas UWo 

33% 

33* 

66* 

65% 

mtTelTei 

51% 

51* 


52% 

52 

67* 

62% 

lining Bank 

46* 

50* 

TravirsCor 

43% 

43* 


in 

10% 

Jhnsn&Jtm 

68% 

6/% 

TRW me 

98% 

96 


45* 

45* 

Kaiser AJum 

14% 

14% 

UAL Inc 

bO* 

52% 


211% 

210% 

Kerr McGee 

25% 

23% 

UndeverNV 

213* 

209% 


33 

34% 

KmOTyCWt 

K Mart 

82* 

83 

Un Carbide 

21* 

22 


23* 

23% 

52* 

52% 

Un Pac Cor 

52* 

51* 


33* 

37 

Kroger 

L-T.VCorp 

63% 

64 

Utd Brands 

27 

28 

ChmBKNY 

44* 

43% 

2% 

2* 

US S»ei 

■s 

n/a 


33% 

36% 

Litton 

74% 

73% 

Utd Techno! 

40* 


35% 

35% 

Lockheed 

48% 

48% 

Unocal 

17* 

16 

ClttOTp 

57% 

50* 

Lucky Strs 
Man H'nvor 

24% 

25 

Jim Wader 

42* 

42% 

13% 

16% 

43* 

43 

WrrarLfltrt 

50* 

58* 


38% 

38* 

ManvMeCp 

2% 

2* 

Wets Fargo 
WstghseB 

99* 

99* 


4f) 

39% 

Mapco 

48 

48 

54% 

54% 

123% 

127* 

Marine Mid 

47% 

47% 

Weyertiser 

32* 

32* 

C'lmbiaGas 
CmO'tnEng 
ComwMi Ed 

38% 

29 

39 

28% 

Mrt Marietta 

43% 

29 

43% 

29% 

Whxlpool 

Woohrortf) 

87* 

42* 

67* 

42* 

31 

30% 

McDonalds 

62% 

82* 

Xerox Core 

52% 

53 


48% 

49% 

McDonnell 

80 

80% 

Zenith 

22% 

22* 


29% 

28* 

Mead 

48% 

48* 




GonsftKwr 


11* 

Merck 

107 

107% 





20% 

20% 

MfrestaMng 

110* 

109% 




Coming Gl 
CPC Irm 

58* 

69 

59* 

89 

Modi Ol 
Monsanto 

31% 

65% 

30* 

85* 

CANADIAN PRICES 

Crane 

29% 

29% 

Morgan IP. 

84% 

85* 

AUdbi 

21% 

21% 

CmZaHer 

37* 

37% 

Motorola 

37% 

37* 

AlcnAhxn 

C9% 

39* 

DanS Kraft 

59% 

59% 

NCRCorp 

48% 

49% 

AigpmaStt 

■3* 

13* 


21% 

7? 

NLIndstre 

3% 

3% 

Can Pacific 

14% 

14* 

Delta Air 

41% 

42% 

NatDtedre 

30% 

32 

Cominco 


11% 

Detroit Ed 

13% 

18% 

Nat Mod Ent 

22 

22% 

ConBathrat 

22* 


90% 

68% 

NatSmcndt 

8% 

8* 

Hkr/SUCan 

27% 

27% 

Disney 

47 

47% 

Norfolk Sth 

74% 

76% 

HdsnBMSn 

27* 

27* 

57% 

53% 

NWBancro 

38 

38* 

bnesco 

36 

36 


15* 

15% 

OcckJnt Pot 

24* 

23% 

Imperial Oil 
InRpe 

36% 

36* 


43% 

48% 

Ogden 

OfinCorp 

Owens-8a 

38* 

39* 

38* 

38* 

DuPont 

74% 

3* 

75* 

8% 

44% 

35% 

45 

36% 

Mass-Ferg 

Ryl Trustee 


« 

Estm Kodak 

53* 

56% 

Pac Gas El 

24% 

24% 

Seagram 
Steel Co 

79% 

79% 

Eaton Core 
Emerson E) 

65* 

64% 

Pan Am 

b* 

5* 

21* 

21% 

80 

79% 

Penney J.C. 

77% 

75* 

ThmsnN ‘A* 

28% 

28% 


til* 

60% 

PenttzoH 

52* 

52% 

WlkrHttain 

37% 

37% 

Fed Dpt Sts 

79% 

80* 

Peoisco 31% 

31 

WCT 

12* 

12* 

• Li On a Askeo C OfiMMum kEH I Marta c* 

Bed (Woeaep 

snex st«. t tomlit uowna 


Race to capture EEC 
office for Britain 


London is to submit its bid 
next month to be the site of 
.the first European Economic 
Community institution on 
British soil. If it wins, British 
companies in particular will* 
be able to save money and the 
bother of working with a 
dozen different national sys- 
tems for registering trade 
marks. 

The proposed European 
Community Trade Mark Of- 
fice would allow the registra- 
tion of a single mark to cover 
all member states. At the 
moment London is thought to 
be its most likely home. 

Cross-frontier confusion of 
trade marks has forced 
companies into tussles with 
rivals, and, at worst, lengthy 
court cases, since the Commu- 
nity was founded 30 years ago. 

Even national symbols of 
centuries' standing have come 
under scrutiny. The Irish 
shamrock narrowly escaped 
obliteration last year: the six- 
year case in its defence against 
a German company's claim, 
begun in 1979, that its own 
virtually identical clover leaf 
trade mark had been in- 
fringed, went from local courts 
to the West German Federal 
Supreme Court, and to appeal. 

Eventually, the Irish con- 
cern. Coras Trachtala, a state 
export organization, won a 
ruling that it could continue to 
use its emblem on exhibition 
stands in West Germany, and 
the complaim, by Meggle 
Michindustrie, which had 
used the mark since the 1930s 
on goods from fruit juice to 
sausages, was dismissed. 

Other cases have included 
those of pharmaceutical 
companies facing queries 
about the wrapping of drugs, 
drinks companies pursued 
about the description of their 
produce, and chocolate mak- 


By Anne Warden 

ers being investigated about 
the name on their sweets. 

Proposals for a Community 
Trade Mark Office have been 
under consideration by the 
Council of Ministers, which 
will make the decision on the 
rite, since 1982. It is expected 
to choose the place, establish- 
ing an initial 250 jobs, and an 
eventual 2,000 or so, by next 
February or March, and it is 
hoped that the office will be 
working by 1990. 

London's position as a 
front-runner means that Brit- 
ish traders can hope for a 
linguistic advantage over their 
fellow Europeans, since the 
placing of the office there 
would almost certainly entail 
making English the official 
language for the community- 
wide registry: something 
American and Japanese users 
would also welcome. 

Beyond that, companies 
based in Britain would have 
the facilities for protecting 
their goods dose at hand, and 
so within speedy reach of their 
lawyers and trade mark 
agents. 

But those hopes depend on 
beating off competition from 
at least three other contenders, 
Strasbourg, Munich and the 
Hague. In addition, each 
country claims long expertise 
in the fiekL Britain, which 
began its register, in 1876, and 
West Germany, claim to be 
among the best versed in the 
subject. 

The French, whose language 
is enshrined in the inter- 
national Madrid arrangement 
on trade marks, claim 
superiority on that score. All 
have well-established bureau- 
cracy: completion of the 
registration procedure in Brit- 
ain can take more than a year, 


and, in Italy, between five and 
seven years. 

In the pari month (since 
July 28) Britain had raised its 
profile by introducing pro- 
vision for protecting services, 
as well as products, with a 
registrable mark, and the first 
applications, already flooding 

in, will be listed officially from 

October I. 

The move brings Britain 
into line with many of its 
continental partners, and is 
part of what is seen as an 
aptly-timed modernisation of 
the elderly Trade Marks Act 
1938, with the new Trade 
Marks (Amendment) Act 
1984. 

In the next week or two 
(mid-August), four proposed 
sites in west, south, east and 
central London will be whit- 
tled down to one in readiness 
for the Government’s bid for 
the office to be put forward. 
The site thought to be most 
favoured is at St Katharine's 
Dock, near the Tower of 
London. 

The battle for the office is 
largely about pride, according 
to one of the promoters of the 
British bid. Mr Richard 
Gallafent, a trade mark and 
patent agenlj who is treasurer 
of the committee of politicians 
and businesses which has been 
urging the Government to 
make the most of London's 
case, said: “It does depend on 
where people are going to live 
and work, and where it's got 
prestige. It comes to, how do 
you fancy yourselves?" 

He believes that London's 
cosmopolitan claims, with 
style to match any palace in 
Munich or elegant frontage in 
the Hague, and international 
links looking beyond Europe 
to the United Slates in 
particular, will telL 



Adankwhkhsmns 

TWIENGTH AND BREADTH 
OF THE WORLD'S MOST 
DYNAMIC REGION. 

The Pacific basin. 

Today, the arena for over half the world’s 
trade. 

And today as for many years, home ground for 
Standard Chartered Bank. 


Standard Chartered has built a presence 
throughout the Par East which remains un- 
rivalled today 

While Union Bank, now a leading business 
bank in California, represents a successful US 
acquisition by a British bank. 

The result is a geographical spread -of over 
250 branches in the Pacific basin -which is now 
the envy of many banks scrambling for footholds 
in the region. 

It is a powerful example of the way that 
Standard Chartered’s management strengths 
have built an international network, of more than 
two thousand offices in over sixty countries. A net- 
work which is highly-integrated, built on common 
procedures and information systems: but made 
up chiefly of offices which play a central and 
established role in their domestic markets. 

And thus, a network ready to serve the needs 
of international business, of local business and of 
private individuals. 

lb find out more, contact your nearest branch. 

Strength I 

PCf^fcOSS 

mi worn. 

Standard & Chartered 

STANDARD CHARTERED BANK. HEAD OFFICE: 38 6ISH0RSGATE. IOND0N EC2N 4DE. 


r TEMPUS 

Pleasurama takes no 
chances and saves 


Pleasurama, the casino Op- 
erator, is on a winning streak. 
It is malting money hand 
over fist and banking the 
proceeds, just like one of the 
more cautions customers at 
Maxims, the Clermont or 
one of its other dubs. 
Shareholders may like to 
know how these funds will be 
used eventually, but the com- 
pany is not providing an- 
swers at the moment 

In the six months to June 
29 profits rose by £3.2 million 
to £19.2 million and would 
have been £1 million higher if 
the number of Arab visitors 
bad not dropped during the 
month of Ramadan, which 
followed the. American raid 
on Libya. They returned to 
London last month, so sec- 
ond-half profits should be 
good. 

Of the reported total, £8.6 
million came from the five 
London casinos, of which 
Maxims is the most profit- 
able, and £2.9 million from 
the provincial casinos. Fruit 
machines and their modem 
variants contributed a further 
£3.8 million and the holiday 
companies under £3 million. 

Despite the shortfall in 
May, tite casinos generated as 
much cash as ever, to the 
punters sorrow. Though the 
group bad net borrowings at 
the start of the year, 
Pleasurama had net cash of 
£19 million by the end of 
June. 

The company would dearly 
love to open another London 
casino but that looks un- 
likely. It hopes, however, to 
open more casinos outside 
the capital, to boost the coach 
holiday business still further 
after the acquisition of Na- 
tional Holidays and to ex- 
pand in amusement 
machines. Like First Leisure, 
it also has high hopes for the 
business of running discos 
and fun pubs, which lie 
between a traditional pub and 
a night dub. 

None of these plans is 
likely to make a dent m the 
company's fast-growing cash 
pile. For that, PLeasurama 
has to make a large ac- 
quisition and it says opportu- 
nities are more likely to arise 
next year than this and 
meanwhile it is harbouring its 
resources. Shareholders 
might note that their interim 
dividend rose, by only 14 per 
cent while fully diluted earn- 
ings per share rose by 27 per 
cent. 

Many, investors would pre- 
fer higher dividends, but they 
are being asked to pnt their 


faith in the company s ac- 
quisition skills. Given that 
the shares at 320p are trading 
on less than seven times 
earnings after stripping out 
the cash, the risk is probably 
(ess than on the roulette 
tables. 

Unitech 


Gloom, but not despon- 
dency. rules at Unitecn. 
where profits collapsed by 29 
per cent to £10.7 million last 
year. When a well-run com- 
pany is faced with appalling 
market conditions, there is 
not much it can do but sit it 

OUt. r 11 

Semiconductor prices tell 
almost 50 per cent last year, 
slicing through revenue and 
margins. Profits from chips 
are lumped together with the 
growing systems business 
but, even so, the components 
marketing division showed a 
profits downturn from £8.2 
million to £4.6 million. 

In theory. Unitech is now 
well placed to benefit from an 
end to destocking and an 
upturn in the semiconductor 
market. The company has 
sacrificed margins to keep 
volume, and unit sales are 
actually well up. In West 
Germany, market share has 
improved while in Italy the 
overall position has been 
almost maintained. 

The trouble is that there is. 
as yet, no sign of the upturn. 
Orders are at the same level 
as last year and the first half is 
expected to be flat Encourag- 
ing noises about the second 
half are little more than 
wishful thinking at this stage 
and increased involvement in 
system distribution and 
manufacturing will take time 
to feed through. 

Nevertheless, financial 
controls remain good and net 
debt, although higher than 
the norm for Unitech, has 
been kept below half share- 
holders' funds. The German 
subsidiary which lost £1 mil- 
lion has been dosed, another 
problematic German invest- 
ment written off, and no 
further rationalizations are 
planned. 

Unfortunately, at this stage 
there is tittle reason to expect 
any profits improvement this 
year, which leaves the shares, 
down 7p at I88p, on a pros- 
pective p/e of around 13 and 
a 4.9 per cent yield. 

Glynwed Int 

Glynwed International's 
management believes that 


success can be based on the 
simple application of sound 
business practices to ordinary 
businesses. Although it has 
some well-known brand 
names, notably Aga-Rayburn 
cookers and FTavel-Leisure 
gas cookers and gas fixes, 
mosi of in products are. 
frankly, at the unexciting end 
of the engineering, tubes, 
fillings, and steel industries. 
Nevertheless, there is a 
steady demand for these 
products. 

Glynwed is continuing its 
record of the last four years of 
making its earnings grow at 
20 per cent a year. In the first 
six months of 1986 both 
pretax profits and earnings 
grew by precisely this 
amount, helped by a drop in 
interest charges. 

Glyn wed’s already high re- 
turn on capital (28.6 per cent 
in 1985) rose slightly in the 
first half. Bui there is a limit 
to how much more perfor- 
mance can be squeezed out of 
these assets. 

In the absence of another 
fall in interest charges in the 
remainder of the year, 
shareholders will be wonder- 
ing where the bottom line 
performance is lo come from. 

The group has been gen- 
erating cash at a prodigious 
rate and has been ploughing it 
back into the business. It paid 
£9 million cash for the Ad- 
elaide company Phil mac and 
repaid £3 million of overdraft 
after its acquisition of 
Brickhouse Dudley, yet its 
borrowings are unchanged 
from the end of 1985. 

Philmac, Brickhouse and 
two small steel companies, all 
acquired this year, will start 
to contribute substantially to 
profits in the second half of 
1986, taking pretax profit for 
this year as a whole to around 
£44 million. This means that 
Gareth Davies, the chief 
executive, looks tike achiev- 
ing his objective of making 
earnings per share rise by 20 
per cent a year. Earnings of 
26.6p puts the shares on a 
multiple of U.S which is 
undemanding in today's 
market 

Further growth is assured 
in 1987 as Philmac will 
contribute £3 million in a foil 
year, Brickhouse Dudley 
nearer £4 million, and the 
steel companies £1.5 million. 
And then there is the likeli- 
hood of further acquisitions 
to be made. Which all goes to 
show what can be done even 
at the unglamorous end of 
business. 


FINANCIERE AGACHE 

Consolidated net profits 1985: FF 635 millions 

The General Assembly of Financiere Agache (formerly SFFAW) was held on 25 June 
1906 at 11.00am in Paris. The Assembly deci de d to modify the company's managing 
body from Supervisory Board and Directorate to Board of Directors, in addition to the 
appropriation of 1985 results and the internal reorganization issue, shaohoktes were 
invited to approve the transfer of company headquarters from Perenchies. in northern 
France, to 11 rue Francgte ier in Paris. 

Mr. Bernard Arnault presented the Directorate's management report for 1985, which 
featured the fofowing points: 

- Composition scheme approved on 30 September 1985 by the general assembly of 
non-secured creditors. 

' Capital increase accomplished on 5 November 1985, augmenting equity by FF400 

- Implementing a recovery plan designed to promote CSSF's industrial activities and 
improve its results. 

- Continued growth in distribution activities (CONFOAAMA, AU BON MARCHE) and 

luxury products (CHRISTIAN DIOR). 1 

l 2L ,1 TSL? r 1985 stwwed a Pro** 1 amounting to FF90 miMon, 
against a FF93 iruliion loss n 1984. 

ex f raord 'n ar y charges and proceeds, this 
resutts * ** ckfrtoution branch and 

diminishing losses m the ndustrfal branch. 

nrtproflte forig^anounted to FF635 million, after extraordinary 
charges and proceeds , including FF776 rraffon under the term^ of 

subsidiary. In 1984, the consolidated net loss amounted to FF 150 mH&on. 

* re.7 baton, inctrfng FF1 .7 baion in 
Kabwoes for which a moratorium has been granted, to be reimbu'sed over a period of 14 

Capital expeudtures amounted to FF437 miKon, most of which (PF311 rraffion) went to 

The Group's workforce wasetown from 22,800 as of 31 December icmm t„ionnn««i 

s sssarcs ssrsrr; 

at the end of 1965 and nears FFB25 todajT Bwns ^ aua P end «k reached FF650 
h 1986, the Group has set the following priorities: 

growth. strong outlook tor mee&um-term 

- Jntenstty&rg on-going efforts toward tighter mana™*n*r,i - 
maximise capital generation. «*«gemeni procedures, m order to 

Implementing these guidelines should bring about a 

consolidated current result figures tor 1988 and i*Mr7.T B ^ fican * “improvement to the 
Ufa-. The transfer ot rad ^dL!^ ^. 1 . 987 - 111 8 <«3« (of 1996 18 FF120 
partly finance payments due this FY under -I I? 6 ^Pup's o p erations wffl 

me tenns of the composition scheme. 





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.1* 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


19 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Boots tumbles 21 p to wipe over 
£154 million from value 


- •• :,;S; 

• J V .• a 

•:V.::x 
• •" ,,T& S 

InD 

: 


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- : 1 •• 

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j* k, 

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■• " i--! nw? 


-• ■! r> 3 
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'■ t y- 


By Michael Clark 


Boots, the High Street 
chemist, tumbled 21p to a 
year’s low of 222p yesterday 
wiping more than £154 ma- 
1km from its stock market 
value. The group is expected 
to announce details today of a^ ■ 


to limit production to 16 
million barrels a day during 
September and October. BP, 
which had been 45p higher at 
616^ eventually dosed 35p 
dearer at 606pu Shell spurted 
25p to 836p, after" 845 k 
l»g cash raising operation to Enterprise OQ20ptol21pand 
hdp- finance -a' mqjar US' London & Scottish Marine Oil 
acquisition. ■ 15p .to 113p. Rio Tmto-Zinc, 

Boots is tiro light to be ready which has a big stake in 

to pay*bont£550 million ftn* . Lasmo, hardened 18p to 557 k 
F lint Laboratories, a subsid- Even Britoil which recently 
iary of the mi^ity Schering shocked the City by announc- 
plm^h. As 1 mentioned- yesr .ing profits more than halved 
terday, most ofthe deal wifi be 1 * along widi the dividend, 
financed by a placing ofBoots* proved lSpto 121p 


nrv . 



JAN FS MAR 


APR 


MAY JUN JUL AUG 


The FT Index hot 30 shares 
finished 4 3 up at 1^65.8, 

having been ,6.4 np. eariicr in 
the day. The broader spread 
FT-SE 100 eryoyed a rise 16J2 
at 1,561.6. 

Government securities 
made the most of a stronger 


shares. Rowe & Pitman, the 
broker, is expected to offer the 
big City institutions 185 mil- 
lion Shares at 215p raising just 
under £400 minion. 

Boots wiB fund the rest of 
the deal with £150 milb'oii in 
cash. The shares wiU be sub- 
ject to 100 per cent recall 
which is good news for Boots*, 
private investors who will be 
allowed to apply for them. 

Boots has been the target of 
constant takeover speculation 
this year and analysts see this 
acquisition as a possible 
defensive move. The group is 
thought to have looted at a 
number of companies in the 
US and the name of Alza, 
another drugs manufacturer 
from Caiiibrnia, has been 
mentioned. But the decision 
to finance the deal mostly with 
paper can only harm the share 
price which has badly 
underfonned the market 
recently. 

The rest - of the equity 
market derided to celebrate 
the news that the Opec oil 
miimtera had reached agree- 
ment over a reduction in ofl 
output' at their meeting in 
Geneva. Oil shares, responded 
warmly to the news at first 
amid teak two-way trade. 
But signs ofred were creeping 
in toward the end of the 
session. 

The -ministers have agreed 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


to almost £1. The eageriy 

• The property developer “ 
Regestcrest, which as 
Laganraie was one of Mr 
Jim Slater’s vehicles, denie d 

S^femar'snpenmuSet'kiag 
Mr Albert Gubay, founder 
of Kwik Save Discount to Wd 
Cor the loss-making Astra 
Industrial Holdings. Astra 
eased %p to6%p. 

awaited Judy money 
figures were much in line* 
expectations showing M3 up a 


EQUITIES 


marginal per cent But 
economists were dismayed by 
the record figure of 0,000 
million lent by the high street 
banks: This compared with 
City estimates of only £2^00 
fnilHnn. 

Some brokers said the pros- 
pect of an early cut in interest 
rates now seemed even more 
remote. 

-Brewery shares shrugged off 
gloom stemming from the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission's derision to 
press ahead with its inquiry 
iqto the tied house system fra* 
pubs. Some observers in the 
drinks industry have argued 
that the system is unfirir to the 
independent brewers. 

The sector leaders that 
could suffer most from an 
inquiry were all putting on a 
brave free. Allied Lyons 
firmed 2p to 320p, Baas 5p to 


745k -Grand Metropolitan, 
the Watney and Truman 
brewer, 4p to 385k Greene 
King 3p to 218k Scottish ft 
Newcastle Ip to 187p and 
Whitbread 2p to 260p- Deal- 
ers consider that the inquiry 
will take months to complete 
and that there is little immedi- 
ate panic. 

Irish companies with a 
quote on the London stock 
market were also looking a 
hole perkier, - despite tins 
week's news that the Irish 
Government has devalued the 
punt by 8 per cent. This was 
designed to make Irish export- 
ers mote competitive after the 
weakness in sterling and the 
dollar. 

Allied Irish Bank hardened 
3p to 243k Bank oflreland 3p 
to 213k Jefferson Samrfit 2p 
to 237k after 232k ana 
GenenC Raadstone 3p to 1 1 IpL 


. ^ banks 
made a firm start, but ap- 
peared to run out of steam 
later in the session. Barclays 
Bank, the last of the banks to 
unveil interim figures tomor- 
row rose 5p to 484 k after 
489p. 

Analysts are maintaining a 
cautious stance, looking for 
pretax profits for the first six 
months up 14 per cent from 
£410 million to £460 million. 
The other three clearers have 
hoisted profits by at least 22 
per cent Barclays is now set to 
become the first British bank 
with a quote for its shares on 
both the New York and Tokyo 
stock markets. 

Elsewhere, Midland ad- 
vanced 8p to 547p, Lloyds 
Bank 8p to 387 k after 392 k 
and National Westminster 
Bank 5p to 507p. 

Ihstock Jofaasea, the facing 
brick manufacturer, rose 6p to 
182p in response to my report 
on yesterday that the market is 
pinning its hopes on a bid 


t Mr John Pwwy, chair- 
man of the US-based defence 
group Pacer Systems, is 



sop as. 

Dec 88. 
Mar 87. 
Jun87. 
Sap 86- 
Dec87. 


&21 m$l 


8048 

90.48 

90J8 

9081 

0015 


Twee 


Dec 88 

MV 87 

Junff7 

USTHeaetey Bond 

Sep or 

Dee 88 ; 

MW 87 L— 


total open interest 14708 


sa Sr 

9857 

93.49 

9859 


9081 

9060 

>9048 

9031 

90.15 


9021 

9048 

9049 
9038 
9031 
9015 


Ctoee. 

9027 

9858 

9054 

9044 

9032 

9000 


2S 1 ! +1 


Eat Vat 

•4513 

1235 

94 

26 

15 

5 


RECENT ISSUES 


Lon Utd tnv 
M6 Cash & 
Morgan ( 
OmrStoch (3^>) 
SWetd (72p) 
Sm aObon e (i 

Soundtracks 
Stanley Lebu 
TV-AM (1 
Tenby Inds 
Thames TV 
Ttobet & 

Trees 2H 
Yetvarton 
Unflock 
Mflndsmoo 
Yetvwton 



RIGHTS ISSUES 

Xbaco tny Fyp 
Barker ft Doboon NJP 
CDtoral F/P 
Dataserv F/P 
Eraldne Hse F/P 
Expamet F/P 
Le^i tatenwto F/P 
Top Value N fp 
Wtoht Coflkis F/P 
yoAmomt HJP 


(tonte price in brackets!. 


72 

*» 

195 44 
180 
141 
172 
98 
* 

443*3 

22 


Short OH 
Sep 86 — 
Dec 86 


Mar 87. 


„ .97-19 
_ 9S21 

_• N/T 

- 10142. 


PieviousdayV Md open interest 19234 
9857 9851 9855 2326 

9857 9349 9353 2582 

9849 9842 9344 99 

9829 9825 9827 .51 

Previous dw"8 total open interest 7758 
97-19 96-10 9622 6534 . 

95-21 95-21 9580 1 

. 0 


UnaOM 
Sap 86, — 
Dec 66 — 
Mar 87 — 
Jun B7 — 
FT-sewo 

Sep 36 

Dec 88 — 


• previous dajre total open Merest 1122. 
IOf-12 lOHn -101-01 435 

: 10I-01-. O’.. 

101-01 0 


Pievk w edW e total open hdee m ijlMO 
120-18 12029 12MJ5 '120-15 10317 

120-15" . 02022 ' 120-15 ■-120-10 11 - 

^ : ■ 1204J4 - -9 

N/T 12004 0 

previous day's toW open briereet 2405 

S?A isSao 


15750 19000 ,1534 

W . . 


wrm 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


HrsTOseange 

JM 21 


Aug4 
Aug 18 

cdori 


Aufll 
Aug 15 

Sep 8 


Oct 23 
Nov 6 
Nov 20 


Nov 3 
Nov 17 
Dacl 


Parkdale. Priest B, Sound Diff, TSy Horn . 

Lontra. Seen, tod. Leta. 


BriwlUtoly Peek. Lance. 
Put Smith Bros. 

Put & CaK: Bristol 01 & Mn. 


5/8/88 Amstrad, PmMch. QWnMd Law, Hyman, 
iy Homes, Barker Dobb. BS6, STC.Hrartto.BPCC. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


day's ■ . 

N York 1^0-14898 
MOntrsri 2.0456-80654 
AfT» - llan13 4357-85 173 
Brussels 64.07-647 
crphgen 11.6339-1 17403 
DubfiT 1.0811-1-1242 
Frankfart3.1021-3.1233 . 
Lisbon 21645-21574 ■ . 
Madrid 19959202.14 
Mian 213454-215088 
Osk> 105705-115527 
Paris 108573-10.1437 
SfkMni 105553-104190 
Tokyo 22959-23181 
Vienne 2181-2187 
Zurich .2500225189 


flSl4 


>14835 

2845620484 

34957-35011 

6407-6427 

115338-115566 

1.1148-1.1173 

3.1021-3.1064 
2164521807. - 
1995920027 
215450213821 

105705-105853 

100573-100744 

105553-103997 

2207923017 

21522158'* 

2503925098 


048043mm 

0J0O20p«m 

1%-lKpram. 

17-12prem 

ISWtprwn 

8-2pram 

11>lKpren 

68-1S9db 

39-79dk 


126-121 pram 

054O49pnm 

3%-3Xpram 



IX-lpram 


1Spram-4cSs 
4Xr3Xprsm 
1884605s 
127-185 da 
4-7dfa 
12ft-13ttdfa 
6X-6da 
IK-Xpram - 

SXOprartf-V 


S to dtoj fade s c a m era d»M> 115 eme up el 715 (dey^ range 717-72.1). 


OTHER STERL1NG RATES DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


Aigenflnasuetar . 
Austrslsdolar __ 
Bahrain dear. 


Brad cruzado* 


Greece drachma. 
Hong Kong ddsr . 
IndnmpM 
baqdnw. 


1268045703 
[24217-24282 
[05575415615 
m . 2047 2050 
[0728007360 
■ 7.4040-74440 
_ 1985020150 
115988-115073 
H 1850-1870 


.Irsfand — . 

u2SSto*j 


0513405141 



shares hare had a roller- 
coaster ride oa the USM but 
yesterday gamed 20p to 
21 Op after be announced 
nearly doubled half-time 
profits. Mr Rennie is keen for 
more business outside his 
mainstream defence work. 

from Steedey, the building 
products group. Dealers are 
already talking of a bid of at 
least 20Qp a share. 

Both companies have been 
ihe target of takeover attempts 
in recent years. An £115 
million bid for Steetiey by 
Hepworth Ceramic was 
blodced by the Monopolies 
and Mergers Com missi on and 
a similar fete beset London 
Brick and Redland which both 
launched offers for Ibstock. 
Steetiey finished unchanged at 
47 lp. 

Rowntree Mackintosh, the 
| Yoride and Smarties confec- 
tionery group, has often been 
tipped as a hkeiy takeover 
target but has now taken steps 
to make it that much more 
difficult 

The group is raising £144 
million by way of a rights on 
the basis of one-for-four at 
350p. The proceeds will go to 
heft) pay for the acquisition of 
the Wmy ! Wonka sweets fac- 
tory in the United States. The 
shares responded with a fell of 
17pat403p. 

■ Those companies with big 
interests in South Africa were 
a little more cheerful after 
recent ■■ nervousness. 
Maiketmen take the view that 
most of them will not suffer 
too badly hit from the sanc- 
tions agreed at the Common- 
wealth summit. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


The AWACs way out 
of the GEC dilemma 


Whatever may be said against hostile 
takeover bids, they often focus the 
mind of the intended victim and 
provoke the kind of creative manage- 
ment activity the bid-for company is 
said to lack. It would be foolish to say 
that GECs bid this year has trans- 
formed Plessey; but it is evident that a 
combination of* new direction at the 
top and Sr John Clark’s deep 
aversion to felling into Lord 
Weinstock’s dutches has coincided 
with some impressive initiatives. 

They have given fresh credibility to 
Plessey’s claims to be a significant 
force in high technology, and they add 
strength to its case for continued 
independence in an industry domi- 
nated by international giants. The 
arrival as managing director of Sir 
Janies Blyth (at present in the US 
completing another vital link- with a 
leading American company) could not 
have been better timed — a credit to 
Sir John Clark. 

The agreement formally unveiled 
yesterday for collaboration and tech- 
nological exchange between Plessey 
and the American Westinghouse Elec- 
tric Corporation will be Sow to take 
off unless the Government deddes to 
switch the airborne early warning 
system the RAF needs from GECs 
Nimrod project to Boeing’s tried and 
tested AWACS aircraft But as the 
agreement specifically recognises that 
no corporation operating at the 
leading edge of high technology 
electronics can alone sustain the 
enormous cost of research and 
development, and the need to offer 
systems and not simply products, the 
desire to cooperate will surely bear 
fhiiL Already the two companies are 
talking of collaborating in two other 
significant areas, missile approach 
warning systems and “suites” of 
electronic defensive aids. 

It is also worth emphasising that for 
its part Westinghouse sees the agree- 


ment standing even if Plessey were to 
become an “autonomous” part of 
GEC the Pittsburg giant does not see 
itself in the role of a white knight, 
carrying Plessey away from beneath 
GECs iron hooves. 

Plessey’s fete will obviously be 
influenced by the report and recom- 
mendations of the Monopolies A 
Mergers Commission, which is ex- 
pected to be published today. If it is 
true that the commission has found 
against GEC totally absorbing Plessey, 
and the Minister, Paul Channon, 
agrees with this finding, development 
of electronics and telecommunica- 
tions in this country will be arrested. 
But the Government cannot simply 
stop there. There is general agreement 
that it would make sense if the 
telecommunications activies of both 
companies, which axe mainly con- 
centrated on System X exchanges, 
were put together. 

Neither GEC nor Plessey has the 
will or the financial resources to fund 
the next generation of equipment 
against the international competition 
massing against them. But on the face 
of it, neither Lord Weinstock nor Sir 
John Clark would willingly yield 
telecommunications to the other. 

However, the new agreement be- 
tween Plessey and Westinghouse 
which is directed toward procuring 
the airborne early warning system for 
Boeing’s AWACS, offers the Govern- 
ment a timely lever which it could 
well use to bring about a necessary 
redrawing of boundaries between 
GEC and Plessey. If tfae Ministry of 
Defence were to switch from Nimrod 
to AWACS, thereby paving the way 
for a reshaping of Plessey as an 
electronics group with powerful 
American connections, Plessey would 
not be so churlish, one imagines, as to 
deny GEC its telecommunications 
division. As the price of freedom, such 
a balancing act should appeal to Sir 
John. 


APPOINTMENTS 


PacoU Mr CH Stapleton has 
been made chief executive and 
Mr LPS Beschizza a director. 

Baker Perkins: Mr George L 
Law becomes deputy chair- 
man, succeeding Mr Bernard 
Cotton. 

Committee of London and 
Scottish Bankers: Mr Peter 
Leslie has been elected chair- 
man of the chief executive 
officers’ committee, succeed- 
ing Mr Philip Wilkinson. 

- Tarmac Mr Dob Guar has 
been named a group managing 
director and Mr Terry Mason 
becomes group finance direc- 
tor fromOctober 1. 

. British Institute of Manage- 
ment Mr Mike Rohinsan has 
been made commercial 
director. 


Hotel Management Inter- 
national' Mr Roger Withers 
becomes group sales and 
marketing director. Mr John 
Maddnlay is named as 

manag in g director. 

Glaxo Holdings: Dr Brian 
W Tempest becomes regional 
director, Par East 

Nissan UK: Mr Michael J 
Hunt has been made assistant 
managing- director. Mr Stan 
Chobj also becomes assistant 
managing director from 
October. 

Authority Investments; Mr 
David Backhouse has joined 
the board as chairman. Mr 
David times has been made 
managing director 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN. 


Adam & Company. 

BCG 

Citibank Savingst- 

ConsoTidaied Cnis.. 

Continertal Trust— 
-Cooperative Bank. 
C. Hoare & Co. 


Hong Kong & Shanghai. 
Hoyds Bank. 


Nat Westminster. 


Royal Bank of Scotland. 

TSB 

(Shank NA 


_10JXTC 

-loom 

..10.75% 

— 1000 % 

-.10D0% 

_iom 
-1QJQ0% 
_ 10.00% 
_iom 
„ 10.00% 
„ 10.00% 
_10J»% 


| Mortpj pt Brae Rue. 


Africa rand 
UAEdMwn 
-Lloyds Bank 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 




Barira 

Oct 

Jan 

JSEL 

Oct 

-Jan 

2B- 

MM Lyons 

900 

32 

42 

52 

8 

9 

12 

C3Z0) : 

' .330 

15 

25 

33 

22 

25 

30 

300 

tt 

13 

18 

42 

45 

48 

BP 

500 

115 

125 

_ 

1 

3 



C608) 

550 

65 

75 

88 

6 

10 

20 

600 

28 

50 

58 

22 

28 

40 

Cons Soto 

420 

32 

42 

50 

23 

40 

50 

r«27) 

460 

13 

27 

32 

6b 

67 

72 

• 500 

4 

14 

— 

90 

ObO 

— 

CourtaUds 

260 

19 

28 

35 

10 

12 

18 

C264) 

280 

10 

16 

24 

23 

26 

29 

300 

b 

10 

— 

39 

41 

— 


330 

3 

6 

— 

99 

69 

— 

Gun (Man 

. 300 

16 

26 

36 

12 

19 

19 

raon 

330 

7 

14 

23 

35 

36 

38 

360 

3 

7 

— 

63 

64 

— 

caue&wtni 

600 

100 

115 

135 

6 

13 

20 

fSTS 

650 

55 

75 

9b 

17 

2 T 

40 

700 

■ M 

48 

65 

42 

4H 

80 


750 

9 

22 


80 

BO 

— 

Ofatftre 

600 

— 

115 



— 

4 

— 

read) 

- 650 

— 

/5 

■ — 


12 

— 

700 

— 

3/ 

— • 

— 

30 

— 

GEC 

180 

26 

32 

38 

4 

6 

8 

rise) 

200 

11 

16 

22 

13 

15 

18 

220 

4 

10 

— 

28 

26 

— 

Stand Mat 

327 

65 





2 





r38S> 

355 

42 

— 

• — 

6 

— 

— 

360 

— 

52 

83 

— 

11 

13 


382 

27 

— 


16 

— 

— 

IQ 

900 

97 

127 


10 

17 

— 

(V64) 

850 

62 

94 

107 

27 

36 

45 

1000 

34 

6b 

74 

tell 

90 

72 


1050 

17 

42 

50 

o 

& 

95 

Land Sec 

300 

32 

41 

50 

4 

8 

9 

f320) 

330 

12 

23 

32 

15 

16 

20 

360 

3 

12 

18 

41 

.A 1 . 

41 

I 1 

180 

70 

26 

34 

3 

5 

8 

1*193) 

200 

7 

13 

20 

11 

14 

15 

220 

3 

7 

11 

29 

30 

32 

ShM Trans 


eh 

153 


2 

5 



(*836) 

750 

98 

10b 

125 

3 

13 

20 



50 

63 

92 

12 

25 

21 


240 

41 

48 

66 

4 

7 

8 

r274) 

260 

PI 

31 

W 

7 

u 

14 

290 

12 

20 

28 

15 

20 

23 


Series 

Sep 

Dee 

Her 

*SE- 

Dec 

Mar 

Daechan 

300 

47 


65 

2 

7 

10 


390 

27 

35 

4f 

12 

18 

23 


420 

13 

23 

32 

■SO 

35 

38 



5 

12 

Ej 

ED 

67 

70 

Boots 

240' 

mm 

16 

22 

16 

22 

24 



4 

10 

16 

34 

35 

38 

280 

2 

4 

— 

54 

54 

— 

BTB 

• 280 

23 

30 

43 

6 

13 

18 

(293) 

307 

8 

17 

30 

20 

27 

27 

333 

2 

1/ 

— 

43 

45 

— 

Bass 

ism 

n 

n 

FI 

23 

27 

38 

T74S) 

800 

10 

27 

40 

PL’l 

60 

75 

850 

6 

15 

20 

GrJ 

Di] 

um 

aueOntfa 

SSO 

32 

53 

78 

7 

17 

22 

rS6B) 

600 

10 

30 

53 

37 

42 

47 

6S0- 

4 

1b 

30 

85 

05 

a--to 

Da Beers 

600 

40 

75 

85 

38 

60 

75 

f»0) 

650 

20 

45 


70 

35 

fcltTH 

700 

3 

30 

.1— 

120 

125 



750 

4 

12 

— 

170 

175 

— 

Dfaoona 

.300 

30 

42 

52 

3 

7 

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900 

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120 

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160 

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tor 

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500 

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60 

15 

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23 

38 

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420 

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460 

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2 

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330 

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460 

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390 

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390 

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480 

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BM— ratop—dHf— Bfa»Bto*HOFEX—dPaM. 


MONEY 


The rise in the oil price on 
the opec agreement and die 
increase in the valne of the 
pound which resalted gave 
money markets a good mUp. 
Period rates eased by Ik per 
cent or more in many cases. 
The three month interbank 
term deposit went down from 
104 15/16 per cent overnight 
to 76-13/16 per cent at the 
dose. 

Bara dim % 

Ctoarfag Baton 10 
Hranoa House 10 


4 Hants. 1186. . Totol ninniranf 16864. Cate 10189. Praa-8875. 




rib 


Haeou* Itarint Loans % 
OvwwM Hgh: 9X Low 7 
WMk&MfrSk 
T W yW» |PiB M>g 
2 mrSi 9 *%* 2mnS 9^n 


Smith 9% 


3 moth 9K 


1 mnto 9 n w5 n 32 2mnth!_ 
3mMht'fa4 n a 9mn#i PwO’u 

TradaMa (Discount 

ImnthltPM . 2mnth lO'fe 
3 mirth lOta 6 mrth 9 ,k w 

Marina* (%) 

Ovanrigftt opan 1054 dose 9 
IwraklO'ia-IO fimnmSVMC 
1 ninth IO'w-10 9mrtoi 9K-9K 
Smntti 954-9* 12imtl 954-9* 

LocatAathora y Dapoata {%^ 


2 days 954 
1 mirth 9* 

Smntti 9* 

Loeril Authority Bo 
imntfi 1014-16 
3mnSh'10K-10 
9 moth 1054-10 

Batting CD* M) 
lrwmi02% 
6tm8i 9 Jt u-9 ,, ia 
neaarCOsnq 
imntfi 640«^ 

6 mnth 840255 


7 days 
3imh 9* 
12mth 9*.. 

*|%| 

■ 2 mim 1034-10 
6 mnth 1054254 
12mtfi 954-954 

SiNltfl 9K-4HS 
12mtfi9*-S% 

3 mntfi 640555 
12mth 650545 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 654-5 7 m 
3 mnth 


7 days *54454 
3 mnth 4544)4 
Tr—ch Franc 
7 day* 7*w7i» 

amntfi 7^n-7t« 


7 days 32* 

3 mnth 456-434 

ran 

7 daw 4»»4 »ib 

3imS>4V4* 


cal 7-6 

1 mnth 6 T w9i8 
Smntti 8 ’w2 c m 

od 54 

1 mnth 4*414 
6 mnth 4 I, ia-4*is 
aa 754-654 

imnth 754-754 
6 mnth 754-754 
atff 254-154 

imnttt 454-4* 
fimntfi 454-4% 
Od 55U% 

1 mnth 
OmnOi 


GOLD 


G oMj3SB-7535935 

Ki^Hgraraa 

S3 


75) 


ECGD 


Fbrad Rats Storifag Export Finance 
Scheme IV A wraoe inference rate tor 
Interest period July 2. 1086 to 
Aupiat 5. 1968 indusne: 10009 per 
«aot 


GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


EVERY THURSDAY 


CHIEF EXECUTIVES I MANAGING DIRECTORS 

■ DIRECTORS ■ SALES & MARKETING EXECUTIVES 

■ OVERSEAS APPOINTMENTS 
1 FINANCIAL & ACCOUNTANCY 

A wide range of management appointments appears 
every Thuisdajt 

THURSDAY 
MAKE SURE YOU GET 
YOUR COPY OF 



TIMES 

























BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


***☆☆ * SL 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE. 


Bo OBer Omg VO 


M oner cmg «a 


•31. fiMwt Pawn 

fri-ea sere m aao 

Cawai Orentn Inc 
Do Accum 

Eastern a me 
DoBsmctnum 
ffflance & Proparty 
Q* i food Income 
Da Accum 


Hah Yield Income 
Do Accum 
me mcom 


Do inn 
Do s*» whom 
Managua Pune 
P reieenc e Income 
Oo Accum 
Smaler Do'* Accum 
wona Penny Shore 
Portfoto Ts UK 
POnfo*c Tst Jaoan 
Ponton tm us 

PontowTst Europe 
RWM Ta HK 

BAOUEGHTOW 
3. GtaNMaa Si. E* 
031-225 2581 (Dane 
ms Ex (22) 

J«nn Ex (43) 

UK Ex (311 
P'S X PIHH 
Pea Bkb UK 
BO America 
BG Ertargy 
BO Income Grwth 
BO Japan 

BO Tec nn ongy 


we. Urtoo EC2A IAY 
6S*<Vi£f3 

57 A 618 -00 1.71 

MO 89.0 -05 171 

1383 1473 +24 0.81 

74.1 792 +13 031 

633 677 -03 £21 

476 50 1* -0.1 334 

31.0 8SJ» -02 B34 

72 1 77.1S -03 437 

1710 13280 -12 427 
733 78.4 -09 764 

1922 2053 -25 7M 

769 322 +14 221 

789 8430 +14 221 
713 782 +12 221 

613 M3 t02 . 

292 3130 -0.1 938 
933 102.10 -01 938 
1207 137.8 -18 1.73 

97 1030 -O l 072 
748 7730 -08 T AS 

1043 10340 +13 000 

68.1 7030 -03 1 11 

1122 11820 +23 000 

*£B 4430 +15 DID 


tWMI EH3 6YY 
PTU31-226 6066) 
4291 44730 
<362 4551 
2395 25*7 
4430 471.6 
INI) 2093 
167 8 17860 
1354 1441 
188.1 2002 
1997 212.7 
1450 1552 


Anneal Sacs 
G0U3 Sen 
m Lean 
PopSmw 
Urn Energy 
Wortt Tech 
Aner Grown 
wwr tacoma 
Amer Sm»»9r Co s 
Aim Grwtn 
Euro Smaler 
F ¥ EM* 

Hong KOng Pft 

me Gam 

Japan Part 
Japan Smarter 

Exempt 

Exempt uanta! 


1898 2022 

133 135 
1103 1183 

458 488 
143 ISO 
163 17.4 
«Q 723 

402 <280 
39.1 41.70 
894 954 
569 00.7 
213 2280 
600 643 
1&J 163 
436 518c 

241 25.70 

363 373 
755 803 

134 175 
80 1 338 
647 677 


+1.1 4 32 
. . 1020 
*03 292 
- 0.1 220 
-02 290 
-02 032 
-03 181 
+03 173 
-04 068 
-OB 952 
•03 537 
-03 039 
+05 181 
•03 021 
-04 087 
•06 238 
-04 135 
-03 . 
-04 .. 

ass 

4.11 


Huh tnm Tmet 
W IFMM 
Tn Ot Mr Trusts 
Sptcni 9ta Trust 
auh Am* Trust 
Far Eastarn Trust 
MO DM 


EH Ortw enpg w 


74 8 793 +04 515 

529 S630 +05 842 
59.1 B2SC -07 206 
74.4 792 *02 241 

573 613 -08 175 

825 8780 401 056 
498 322 -05 188 


BO Oiler Cnng ym 


BD (Me Oq lid 


BO oner cunp YM 


BROWN SHWLEY 

9-17. Panynwt DO Haywards Ham 
0444 456144 

FtaendM 1230 131.6 +Or 

Smaler Cffa Acc 230 1 247 4 -0; 

Oo Income 148.0 150.1 -*L 

Hdi I name 644 583 +0 

Income 74.4 908 +04 

ManPonWtitae 58 7 627* +04 

Do Acc 999 10530 +0J 

Worth Amencen 57.7 6280 -1J 

Onent B*4) 903 -lx 

BUCXMASTBI HMMOBHENT 

The Such Exchange London EC2P 2J7 
01-569 2668 


... 209.1 2193 

DO Accum m 334.4 3515 335 

income Fund (31 1000 105 4 4.71 

Oo Accum (Q 1755 1853 . . 4.71 

ms me (2) 1278 133.7 +1.1 155 

Da Mcuen d 11811768 +14 155 

Smanm Me (5) £1127 )1960 . 2.74 

Do Aceun (8) £1231 12740* . 274 

CSfUKIIHIHflBB 

125. MXi Hotoom, London WC1V OPT 

01-342 1148 

CS Japan Fend 853 907 +05 024 

CANNON HJM) MANAGERS 
1. Olympic Wey. wsmetey. MA9 ms 
01 302 3878 

Growth 2705 23760 -13 280 

mama 3165 33670 -19 4.10 

Fir Eon 3057 2183 +23 031 

North American 1463 1578 +07 058 

GfaOU <7.7 5370 +02 130 

Europoan 493 53.1 +3.1 130 

Japan 573 B1.6 +07 050 

CAPEL (JAMES) MANAGEMENT 

PO Bor 551 Bane Mama London BC3 7 JO 

01-621 OOtt 

Capes) 3534 383.4 139 

Income Z763 2982 .. 431 

Norm Amencen 2828 3017 -23 097 

CATER ALLEN 

1. Khg Man SL EC4N 7AU 
01-823 6314 

GO Trust 102.4 1098# -081032 

CllinMLICMRDOFFMANCE()F 
CHURCH OF ENGLAND 

2. Fare Street. London ECZY 5AQ 
01-660 1815 

kw Fund 3979 4.47 

Fixed W 1444 . . 930 

Deposit 1008 .. .07® 


Fir EM 
Mann American 
GtooaJ 


EQUITY 1 LAW 

SL George hm G o rp u ranon SL Coventry CVl 
19D 

0203 553231 

UK GrowA ACCurn I4t3 1533 +06 355 

Dp Mama 1252 1331 +05 ass 

Ham m me Accum 2407 2588 +1.1 484 

TSo Income 1937 9088 +08 484 

GttfNtad Accent 101S 1088 +08 2-M 

Ootnoome 868 933 +31 088 

Nm Amer TM Main 1204 1325 -98 030 

Far Eas Tst Aocuo 1818 I6l2 -28 059 

Euro Tst Acorn 1*84 1579 -38 1.19 

General That 2309 2455 -0.1 299 

FkCUWTKUHAGBKKr 

1. Laumnca Poumay M. London 6G*R DBA . 

01-023 4880 

US Smeller Co e BOA 70 -1.7 039 

Capitel Fund 1M8 1033. -03 043 

Mama Fund 77 3 £9 +07 470 

Far Eastern Fund 735 809 -1.4 033 

Oxercau tacoma 682 73.0 -05 330 

Feed taterest 57.4 81 « -C.3 9.05 

NMjral Res Fund , 357 382 +Ol 449 

European neome 7&3 BIT -u 320 

FSBWESTMENT MANAGERS 

190 Wtet Georpe SL Oasgow G2 2PA 

041-332 3132 

Bataneed Qth am 484 482 130 

DO Accorn 44.1 483 . ■ 

Income Oti Inc 397 422 680 

Do Acorn 418 442 

Bence Go's me 475 305 180 

Oo Acorn 475 510 

TOEUTY INTERNATIONAL 
River MWl TortrMOe. TW9 IDT 
0732 962222 

Amman 1012 1084 +1.1 071 

AiMr Entity bteocee 323 3X50 +04 456 
Amar Spoil SMS «06 520 . . 172 

Ff EMhC 3*5 37.1 +413 37* 

flat a Rued tat 319 323 -01 S48 

e.-c+rth a Income 644 1015 -09 4.76 

Janan ^ecml Sue 44.7 473 +94 .. 

Japan Trust 1400 150 6 +0.7 . 

Manned W ts 1388 147.7 +1.1 OOi 

Ntataeame Eduky 787 547 +02 520 

Plutoeamnal GDI 335 352 -02 2*6 

South Eaef AMS TM 29.1 315 +05 046 

Special SM 1598 1713 -04 08* 

£^nxSg^g?St3cn EC3A 6AN 



CLERI CAL M BMCALUMT TRUST 

MAHAOBH 

Narrow Pul BrieM BS2 OJH 
0600 373893 

Amer Growth 222 239 -02 130 

Entity HWh Income *12 4*5 +0.1 470 

Etxnpatai Growth 265 26.7 -05 250 

Gnent Egurty 377 *020 +01 270 

GK & RXM tat Gth 305 31.M +03 320 

GW A Fixed Inc 2*5 2580 +02 ISO 

tadex Secuwee 252 267 +0.1 230 

Japan Growth 325 3470 -02 090 

COUNTY IIT MANAOStS LTD 


PO Bon 4 Newcn Wi 3NQ 
0603 622200 

Gras That E1155 12 

M Thiel 125.1 13 


El 165 12-26 -080 378 
125.1 1317 -08 123 


OMBSIENEH TRUST MANAGEMENT 
66. CmMn SWML London EC*N 6AE 
deoangs 01-236 msjUfJ&W 
ta wt uaa o na l Growth 1368 1*850 
tacoma A Growth 604 047 


WaridMdeRK 
Amencen (V ox* 
Japan Gtuwdi 
E u rope an Growth 
UK Growth 
PK>Ac Grown 
H*»t tacoma 
PmcecN Income 
Da Accent 


838 862 
328 3S.I 
812 658 
835 6830 
532 570 
532 37.0 
331 35.5 
52.7 581 
952 1014 


PEARL TRUST 

gs^HoMoptwavTa 


anwrei Fima me 
Da Accum 
mama fimd 
ni Eoaty me 
Do Aceun 

Un4 Trial Inc 
Do Aceum 


884 943 

1327 1412 
1181 1255 
1287 1348 
126.7 1348 
1233 1317 
2142 2288 


Exn income 
Financial 
CM income 
Odd mssme 
Do Accum 
mxme 

japan 

UMV 5 Bngaporo 

Thohetne 
DoRamvnt 
Prat Snam Fd 
UK CNMS 
SUPN.SW 
TacmHogv 
vurid incon^ ^ 
l&OfUWlOD CJpUH 


BUI Ot*u Chng YU 


ms tiifo +«.'5e.’ 
2007 278 0 ISO 

100 A 1107c +10 792 

525 560 -06 Q51 

96 3 )02 7 -11 057 

.*91 9*7 *05 5 35 

1004 10640 -13 Q 10 

Si 236 +05 277 

89 5 952C -27 068 
1104 117 7c -2 7 IB 
175 I960 1240 

690 7480 +06 139 
SI? 8860 -02 IQ7 
438 485 -05 010 

553 5910 -0*398 
1371 14? 90 -03 IH 
7*9 9*4 -08 160 

I486 1569 -1.1 120 


JSrKTrSE^ TO uw-Effll 

7DJ __ 


01-838 4781 
Far EM 6 Gd" 
Jape" 8 Of" 

Ntn Amer A Gen 
PaciK Teen 

SrSGen 


54 3 977 
53 7 57 1 
47? S3? 
61 1 M3 
6SB 58 * 
432 <59 


31 UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
J. 0^A>A LCMO" EC3A J» 

BmMHr Cos 633 882 -I I 010 


PERPETUAL MOT TRUST 

<& Han soaaL Hanley On Thames 
0*91 578888 


lid Grown 
ham 

wbnowhM Bee 
Amer Gmnn 
mu Enwigcro 
Far E*a Grwth 
European Gei 


2836 2629 
1852 l»9 
145.1 TS5.7 
. 672 722 
772 827 

31 & 


PROLIFIC UNIT TRUSTS 
222. Bahemte. London EC2 
0Vfl*7 2Mfl7 

mw mmw nal 1129 121.1 

Htan tacome 595 6*.0a 

con* A GO 986 103.8 

Far Easent 1789 188.7 


Teenntfogy 
Extra Ueuma 


1129 121.1 +07 023 

S92 04.0a .. *41 

906 1032 . . 558 

1789 188.7 +12 020 

1283 1389 +05 097 

882 735s +0.1 128 
1072 1187 +04 D17 


51-68. Marti WL Mom Essex. IG1 2DL 
01-470 3377 

Hotoom EquRy 385.7 4105 +14 324 

European 943 1003 - 1.7 059 

HObom comae 51.7 5490 -02 094 

Honom wn me 642 0020 +02 841 
Hooom tat 96.0 IOZ .10 -12 023 

Japanese 96.1 )0£2 - 1 .) 025 

N American 7X5 781 -0.9 1.07 

Hobom Soac SW 62* 6020 +0.1 £16 
Hooom UK Boa8) 7B.1 04.1c .. 222 

Bottom GM TruH 1885 197.7 +17 247 


31-40 Grasham SL London EC2V 7LH 
01-600 *177 

Quadrant General 4389 4582 .. 227 

Ouadm tacone 2312 34870 .. 541 

Quadrem lim Fd 3782 3062 .. 1.12 

Quadrant Recovery 29U Z722 . . 257 


TOUCHE RWHANT 
Merman Home. 3. PudM I 
3AT 

01-IM9 1250 

Ammon Growth 4i * 

General Growin MO 

GW T*m «• 

In co me Growth bOJ 

income Monthly 480 

Japan Grown *83 

Men E»«V TC 239 

Da Accum 239 

anas Growth *72 

SmMtar Cos 61 1 

Spatial Opps 

TYNDALL XANAOjRS 

ia esnmo* Rd. Bnatni 
0272 7*5241 

Ausmwn 508 

DO ACC 6.3 

rMWM 303 1 

ooAccum 5433 

EmMBpl □ 

Do Accum 6«9 

Far EAMflnt IMJ 

Do Aceum 1723 

Fm A Prop 51.7 

Do Aceum 815 

Get cmui 125 1 

Do Aceum 1450 

GUI Income 1100 

Da Accum 1.88 

man yimo »5 

Do Accum 116 0 

name : 

Da Aceum .161 

tad Eammgs 155 5 


+06 1.75 
+0.7 1.75 
*11 338 
*1.9 228 
+0* 578 
+08 578 
-16 S«8 
-L7 tUO 
.. 1*1 
. 141 
+07 6J8 
+08 838 
+07 9*7 
+1 1 947 
+oa aza 

+05 ua 

+07 &M 
+19 51* 
+02 £75 


London EC3V 8EU 

Ena™ Trow *99 4A2C 

Extra Income 1575 16750 
Financial 164.1 17450 

(M Brusov 5£2 1?J 

. QrexTOi tawxtnwnj 2881 28300 
tacome A Growth 382 4150 
Japanese A PkMc 1755 1985 
Nth Amer Gram 1014 1079 


Smaler Co s 
GtabN Die Tet 
Epecul SRa Ace 


1014 1072 
1072 11420 
2004 2212 
585 602 
2754 2922 


+03 421 
+05 5.60 
-05 £40 
+0.1 15< 
+05 228 
+02 *-78 
-14 073 
-14 1.14 
-02 122 
*02 129 
+0.1 555 
-05 122 



CROWN UMT TRUST aOtVKM 
Crown House. WofcMg GU21 1XW 
04862 5033 

High Moome Truaf 2312 2475 
Growth Trust 2132 23170 

American Trust 1353 13450 


88MT 

UK tacome 48.4 515 

UK Growth Acorn 485 -514 

Od DUt 485 514 

Eiaooaan Grawfi 61.7 552 

F’acft: Growth 53-2 S82 

EFMUMT1NUST MANAGERS 
4. MaMa CraecanL EdeMagh 
031-228 3492 

American Rmd 70S 785 

C«ad Fund 83.1 985 




Amencen Fund 70S 785 

CXpad Fund 83.1 985 

Buwtns-taenmd 1242 13350 


to. FUnchunoi SL London EC3 
01-133 8000 


Planned tav 
Europew Inc 
Dq Accm 
General tac 
Do Aceun 

00 YWd tac 1135 1185 +15 942 

Dq Aceum 183.1 1885 +17 £42 

Hfcfl YWd Inc 835 0950 -05 557 

DO Aecura 1672 177.7 -T2 S27 

Japan tacome 2*45 2575 -33 £10 

Da Accum 246.4 2595 -33 0.10 

N Amencen tac <85 515 -05 050 

Do Accum 583 55.7 -06 £58 

Pacwc tacome 1315 137.9 -12 £21 

Do Aceun 1*79 155.1 -1.) 021 

Sm»r co s taq 7BJ 834 128 

Du Acaan 922 905 1.88 

BRTrAHWAUNTT TRUST 
74-78 Ftaeoury Pavement London EC2A 1JO 
oi-sn 2777 DeataigOi-S38 047IW9 MnneyGUda 
0800010333 

Growth Or* 595 6£40 +0.1 041 

me Recovery 1020 I0B2 -12 £72 

SmeesrCoe 1*1.6 !Bl2c .. 179 

UK Grown 36.7 38.1 +0.1 223 

Extra me 536 3720 +«Ji 7.B4 

GB 26.1 2750 +£2 7.75 

tae A Growth 1905 203 2 *03 459 


1273 135.7 .. 323 

905 945 +15 155 

1115 1182 +£3 155 

1515 16090 -15 £88 

2084 2194 -2.1 £88 


Htfi OU Fun) 
Meiroaanal Fund 
ReeoincM Red 
Bear Jap CB S Fnd 
Tokyo Fund 
(Ex) Amta a 
(Ex) Japan 0) 

(BO Pionc w 


1065 1125 
1905 20350 
20.7 Z£1 
36-1 4£8 
167.7 17840 
1438 1484 
1125 1182 
2838 2930 


ay 

-15 1.10 
■+£1 048 
•-£? .. 
- 1.1 020 


(Ex) Smaler Jap (4) 22£1 2273 . . £10 

Enrahmd 255 2720 -05.322 

EAGLE STAR UMTTRU8TMANAQERS 
Ban Road. ChaNenham. Qoucmar OL53 7LQ 
0242 821311 

UK Balanced tac 009 714 -02 £93 

Dd Accum 630 725 -02 £89 

UK Growth Aceun 81.) 885 -04 157 

UK H^h tac tac 639 879 +05551 

N American Accum 5*5 8850 -05 1.11 
For Eastern Accum 985 10300 -04 £00 
Euupom Accum 755 8£50 -15 024 
UK G0 A FI Inc 545 579 +04 830 

Do Aaun BAD 50.7 +04 055 


European Aceun 
UK Gw A FI Inc 
Do ACaxn 


ENOURANCe FUND MANAOB4ENT LTD 
Aomta Germ. Meagon House. 28. Western 
Ro«L Hamtonl RMI ^LB 
070850988 

Endurance 1082 114.1 3.14 

BOUITAIU UNTT8 AUMIUJ1 1 IIATIOH 
35. Fourteta SL MencheMar 
091-238 5885 

7£4 77.1 +£2 329 


pu 



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nxl 

Y'-’l.'W 



UR PNOMDBiriir MANAGERS _ 

UK House. Ceene St. Seesmiry SPt 3SH 
0722 3382*2 

UK Bun 109.7 11650 -03 

PjahcBasxt 1 S 6 O 1858# -11 

N Amer 1124 11940 -A? 


VANGUARD TRUST 
65 Hotaam Viaduct I 
01-236 3053 
Growm me 
. Do Aceum 
Win Yield 
Do Accum 
Spatial Sax 
Do Accum 
Trustee 
Oo Accum 
Amer A Gan 
□0 Aceun 

Muter Ponttmo I 
Oo Aceun I 
Aomg Rdta Asti (5) 
Do Accum 
Fir East A Gen Inc 
Do Acorn 


-13 249 
■ -12 £49 
-05 SIB 
-05 50) 
-OS 237 
-02 227 
-OH 4JH 
-09 *01 
-03 1 23 
-03 123 
-024 238 
-02* £38 
.. 158 
.. )» 
-£6 £58 
-05 058 


WAROLEY UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
■Hartley House. 7. Devenahee So. London ECS 
31-929 1532 


Amencen Thai 
Far East A Gen 
tad Drowta 
ta coma Trust 
Japan Orowtn 
Smal Gompirtas 
Tachnetaoy 

luma 

UK That 
Eixopaen Growm 
Hang Kang 


838 8780 -04 170 
toil 10970 -05 090 
609 7350 -1 ® art) 
83 6 88.9 +04 550 

124 2 1336 -12 020 

109.1 1174 +02 £00 

32.9 355 -05 020 

335 30 1 +04 2 10 

1275 1357 +£« £70 

531 5650 -OS 1.10 
232 2*./ -05 ISO 


-29 257 
-32 237 
-£1 £37 
+17 127 
+18 127 
+14 4 38 
+1.9 458 
-43 087 
-45 087 
-£7 021 
-2-7 021 


WAVERtEY ASSET MANAGEMENT 
11 ChertoM Sq. Edudugh 
031-225 1551 

Aunraian QaU 182 19* +1.1015 

Pac+c Been 111 145 +02 020 

Canadtan Bat Gin 565 602 -05 097 

Grata Man Fnd (101 * 10550 +£1 750 

WWTTINaDALK (MIT TRUST MANA0ER8 
2 Homy U EC2 8HT 
01-606 8088/6 

SW DM GW Fhnd 675 889 .. £00 

us Gan Band Fd *507 510 +£i .. 

I 

WMOSOR TRUST MANAGERS LTD 

WxuHar Homs. 83. Mngsway. London WC2B 

BSD 

01-485 8331 

CBnr A Equity 475 80S .. 754 

hum 525 UBS .52* 

Growth *99 531 -£1 228 




+£* 4.49 
+08 449 


L" t ' 'Hj' ■ * 1 ' * 1 E :i ' 


m 1 ^ -• L l V. frl 


Last TNrsday of month. 




UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


€0 

*5 

130 

93 

69 

38 

1*3 

*6 

100 

32 

21 

ll 

27 

10' 

275 

183 

173 

108 

297 

20* 

1*3 

130 

121 

103 

158 

131 

790 

215 

250 

185 

355 

163 

180 

131 

620 

*43 

40 

18 

233 

180 

13* 

123 

95 

81 

7» 

09 

278 

185 

84 

88 

123 

SB 

27- 

12 

53 

31 

IS' 

7L 

91 

33 

*60 

278 

30 

15 

34 

18 

43 

41* 

135 

re 

218 

TK> 

148 

132 

27 

19 

2T0 

HO 

198 

125 

130 

75 

SSB 

200 

58 

50 

358 

178 

163 

115 

345 

230 

9 

S' 

92 

73 

180 

125 

36 

6 

42 

a 

195 

130 

320 

90 

89 

es 

WO 

86 

350 

213 

120 

6* 

110 

« 

136 

128 

IB 

7 

253 

120 

12 

8'. 

115 

75 

158 

152 

23' 

11 

40 

26 

90 

87 

W 

53 

1)3 

in 

109 

75 

ITS 

110 

50 

X 

118 

74 

GO 

50 

3*3 

208 

108 

85 

1*3 

115 

415 

308 

re 

60 

114 

96 

138 

75 

103 

65 

97 

75 

73 

03 

17B 

116 

140 

78 

9i 

65 

n« 

195 

82 

55 

29 

20 

145 

13* 

57 

40 

135 

105 

IIS 

75 

1EM 

re 

228 

130 

UO 

345 

34’. 

18'. 

52 

39 

148 

102 

29' 

S 

325 

315 

43 

22 

are 

244 

149 

ME 

100 

61 

33 

25 

15 

8. 

215 

1*0 

2S0 

138 

2*8 

151 

90 

55 

42 

18 

ia 

12S 

7* 

72 

80 

31 

20* 

100 

80 

38 







120 

+3 

■n 

— t'tlAI 


38 


ill 

as 106 


iu 

-4 


£4 


ii 



£9 


16 



l . £0 


188 


£6 

14 5X9 


113 


77 

68 . . 


280 


93 

39 147 


141 

-1 

£3 

13 1X5 


108 

+3 




155 

0-3 

£D 

1.9 HI 


3*5 

-10 




210 

-s 




328 


44 

13342 


137 

+6 

85 

63 73 


583 


i*J 

2-5 17.8 


32 



. 78 


193 


114 

5.9 £3 


123 


741 

&7 1L2 


» 


8.0 

&9 209 


TO 


IA 

24) 1X8 


200 

+5 

71 

. 33 1X3 


84 


X7 

£8 9 l 0 


to 

+3 

84 

102 S3 


23 ■» 


£8 

£3 2X3 


<8 



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14'i 

Hp'j 


25i) 


36 

+3 


XO 


435 

0 

tun 

14 240 


10 





24 



4 3 103 


43 


1.8 


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*2 

64 b 55 163 


218 


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£3 18 7 


1*1 

-3 




19 


i.i 

S« 101 


110 


xo 

XS 7.7 


175 

*5 




114 

-1 




200 

0-5 

1£6 

03 93 


50 

-2 




308 

0+10 

50 

16 182 


ISO 

+2 

u 

£4 2241 




no 

349 103 


76 


£4 

45113 


155 

0 

IB 

1.7 153 


8>> 


1.4 

224 £3 


30 



47 


190 





90 





85 


£9 



135 

+* 

38 




+10 

179 



M2 

95 

128 


XI 

£8135 



Xi 

£4 213 




30 

423 .. 


235 

0 

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-s 

13 

£0 £8 


158 

20 

33 


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£1 213 


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113 

75 

153 

39 

35 124 



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17202 


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25 1X2 




X7 

£7 133 


118 


£5 

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7.4 

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76 

73 « 


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25 

£7 153 


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90 

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13 133 


45 



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163 

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£1 

£3 74 




14 

£2 03 


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4.9 

25 213 


24 


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44 193 


144 





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28 

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138 

tS 

£5 



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93 


107 



195 


70 



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+5 

bh 

13 284 




03 

14 183 




£5 

£1 153 


139 

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£2 241 


23V 

-1 

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1.7 173 


2*5 


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£5 HD 


24 

+2 




379 


98 

£5 174 


116 

-2 

48 

4D 184 


80 

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23 

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B 


14 

158 40 


155 

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71 

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22 +3 

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240 +5 

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70 • 

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105 

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355 -5 

106 
96 

890 +5 

125 -10 

34 
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140 
120 0 . 
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48 -1 

16 
70 

160 +4 

290 

- 2 - 


45 45 
75 *2 
£7. £5155 
112 15 IBS 

4.1 25 20.1 

37 35 .. 
£4 £0 111 

Ml 65 164 

5.1 34 184 

. . . . 75.0 

3£ 7.1 115 
XI £5 175 

45 3j6 150 

5.1 45 95 
35 45115 
45 4.1 125 

850 9£ 74 
35 IS 529 
£1 25 115 

15 35 M£ 
6.1b £4 2£0 
6.7 £4 215 

1.1 £8 182 
125 £9 185 
125 32 155 


10 27 IBS 

45 35 155 

80 13 205 

02 37103 

04 4.T U 

35 27 175 
£1 1.1 241 

12 15 1X4 

55 175 £1 
. . . . 105 

75 45 « 
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45 85 83 , 

55 34 142 I IS 

XI 15 285 I 780 

ago 

13 

25* 
B2' 
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32 25 175 8 J48 






6.6 252X2 
105X8X5 

45 02 84 
..-955 

4.7 £0 215 

45 XI 215 

11 09 173 

54 25 185 

55 25112 

45 4.4 235 
232 .. £1 
55 212 15 
35 25145 
85 £« 19.1 
6.1 55 1X2 

35 351X1 

12 25185 
• 25 05825 

67 48 10-2 

13 55 149 
52 SI 794 
X6 05 265 
39 13403 
74 35105 

£0 14 255 
35 35 ISO 

_*j ’ 44 295 

U U £4 

45 27 135 
-88 30145 

£4 155 45 


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FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


47L. 35 
71 31 

<9 21 
15* 118 
22'.- 13'. 
20’r 12 hi 
168 131 
1*0 90 

2*7 187 
«S6 86 

750 375 
9* 77 

133 75 

sao 490 

£16 163 
440 320 
290 ISO 
382 284 
114 A 
27 16 
208 153 


Amartcan Express 

SSim, 

Bnanrv* Arrow 
Daey Mol 

r°n;A - 

SecM 
Eng That 
Exco 

Erotareaon 

LSiGp^ 

Goode ID A M) 


MAO 

MernnMe House 
Psp*c ta* Tet 
Do warrants 
South New Com 


COMMODITIES 


SUGAR (From C. CzaenOnx*) 


1503«)fl 

158.4-57.fi 

170S-7D^ 
173-0-723 
177-0-7 5.0I 
^■948 



Three Months. 
Vot 

355JXJ-3S7.0Q 

TM 

ALUMMUM 


Caah 

75000-751.00 

Three Months . 76£50-7B4J» 1 

Vot 

— 1750 


Steady 


CPW 2535-2645 

Thrw Months _ 2655-2S60 


MEAT AND UVESreCK 

COMMISSION 
Avomae fotstocfc prieea at 

KfnxrtaSvemnfeHaon 
5th Aimm 

GKQSda. 95-26p per kg tw 
(-0J71 


SOYABEAN 

st. — 

Dfu* ... . 

— 129JMB.0 

— 1253-25X 
_ 12455J) 

Rb — 

Apr 

Jut .. 

™ 129.8-28.0 i 
- 130^29.0 
_ isss.jj'n 

Aim <W 77 n 

Vrf 

.17 

GASOIL 

Aug 

_ 12B.75-8LR 

M- 

firm 

13050-3035 

133^0-3000 

Nov.. 

Dec 

13* -60-34 DO 
136.003450 

* 




1554Spperkg ast 


BtgMndMdWMta; 

Cstria nos. down 9.T %, a*e. 


Sco— na : 

CStH 009. GOwh 10.7 %-Buo. 
oneo. 98.17D (-0.15) 

Sheep nee. up <7,0%, avo. 
wtS;i4&8&p(+2^6) 
pig nos. down 1.5%, awe. 
prfcB. 77.18p{+1.72) 


LONDON MEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Pig Contract 
P-porUo 

°f»i Ckao 

cS H nq - J 015 

SW Unq. in jo 

Oa Ung. 114.0 

^ Lbiq. 1153 

fob H2S- 1015 

^ Unq. 103.0 

5™ h**>' 10£5 

*** Unq. 1015 

VokO 

Pig Meat wt 24 

LONDON NEAT niTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Uve Cat— Contract 
p.perkAo 

“omh open Close 

H23- S5.0 

Unq. 980.0 

2 ° ®?lo 

KJ H?*- 

V® Urtq. 99M> 

Wf Unq. 1003 

Jun Unq- 9980 


LONDON GRAIN FUTURES 

Epertom 

Anrrth ’fS? - 9!** 

P anft CJoee Ckne 

£g J“-6| 102J0 

106.15 105,05 

to™ 109.3 

J*" 11150 1TQ00 

*>v 11190 111J0 







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0+'r 70.D X8 1X6 

0+>+ 70.0 35 134 

X9 «.) 3X» 
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35 13U.I 
95 15 345 

84 72 89 
£5 2331.1 
S -ID 175 £2185 
-3 T£9h 73 57 
+5 ms m as 
-5 XI £6 288 
-5 205 75 55 

+1 U £4 .. 

0-l' l£0 67 M 


£ per tonne 

Open Close 
129.0 127-3 
1370 137.0 

2 ioo ma 

217 JO 21?-9 

"Ugg 


ONXFfetgM Futures LM . 
report S10 per tad— poM 
freight index 

Htgh/low Om 
Oct 86 B81.HG7.0 PU 

Jw 87 ess^mo mio 

Apr 07 745O-730J) 7«0 

Jt487 085.04850 687J 

Oct 87 

Jan 88 

Apr 88 

JulSB 

VDt 307 lots 
Open interest 1830 


TAMtERI 

HtgtiAjOW Ckao 

Aug 86 10^0 

SepB6 1025-1000 lOOUfi 

Od 88 

Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun 07 

VOL T3 lots 
Open interest 40 

Spot moritet con 
Ttauoerinttoc 
111 9J)UP 11j0o 

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THE TIM ES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


daily prize money staled. If you are a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
back of your card. You must always have 
your card available when churning. 


ACCOUNT DAYS: 


Oils lead the way 

Dealings began July 28 . Dealings end on Friday. §Contango day next Monday. Settlement day August 18 . 
§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 




1906 

i* 0 h Low Co nay 


Pnea Chao dots % W 


Psora 


Msrefciift {Hailjut) 


DotufcttJRM) 


industrials E-K 


Banki. DisMtmt 


Combined 


liid Scieaiiiic 


Bfacfc 


Sand horn . 


Grand Met 


Stunrie CtfflhK 




l ES S BBEa i 


Induarals S-Z 





Industrials S-Z 


Brown Shipley* I Banks. Discount 



Utd Newspapers 


Six Hundred I Indumiah S- 


Gianida 


ESST S 5 Z 31 

IggpTJI 

■Bsaaai 


Foods .* 


Oil 


Manctacacr Ship 


Br Aerospace I.Motonu\ima(l 


Drapery. Stores 


HEEaasa i 


5E3Gt 

I I lk# II IHl.r. 


J V T b \ |. I 1 | I I I 


Weekly Dividend 





BRITISH FUNDS 


SH 

98 ’ 

02 s 

ORT 

94 V 

IN' 

S (Under Fm 
Excb 2 'i% 1388 
Encta 14 % 1966 

OO" 

97 * 

93 'a 

92 '< 

Trent ClOW 

Escb 2 V% 

1987 

1987 

J.IBP 

93 V 

Fund 6 V% 



u 



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a 

& 

ne'e 

33 V 

«V 

Trees S'A 
Trass n*/ft 
Trees 10 'AL 

1989 

tnr 


Excb 10 % 


Ur 


Btch I 0 V% 

I 960 

Pi 


E*cn 2 *i% 
Tan 3 % 
Bech 11 % 

1091 

1969 


B 4 V 

B 4 V 

Daw 5 % 
Ben 11*6 

19656 

1990 

gi 

I; a 


l: j 

pj 

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4 

39 V 

027 * 

E-T( 

pi 

jj 


»,'■ 

84 V 

SBV 

Trees 11 V% 

Fund 5 V» 
E*Ch 11 % 

Mu 


Tsaas 10 % 

1^1 

nStitt 




SLA • OjUM. 

afl 6 L 93 Q 


_ 

109 

osb 

59 

0.(00 

105 

9 / 422 . 

99 

9560 

13 

71 N 

119 

9905 

115 

9508 

35 

7.117 

85 

6981 

99 

2425 



DVER 

11 *a 91 

09 V 0 
87 9 ! 

FIFTEEN 

STraas 10 % 

VCOte 9 V 6 
I'aCone. B% 

Me 

03 V •+- 

90 %*+ 


11 *» £M 

Zf.lt 
WV 91 

VConv 10 % 
P-Excft 12 % 
ireas 9 *.% 

2002 

1099 - 02 - 

2002 

04 V + 
1 BV 4 * 
02 V •+■ 

..... 

iM'-ne 

23 ; 104 
12 V 04 
60 '. - 4 | 

V Traai 13 */% 
Trees iW/% 
v Trees 10 % 
-VFunq 8 '.-% 

200003 

2001-04 

2004 

1998-04 

30 +> 

14 V +■ 
04 V +J 
56 V + 

j:".’ 

- . 

! i - ; 

ffl a 96 
£«V SO 
17 % 94 
3 *V TI 2 
95 V 79 
07 V 102 
27 V 104 

vCorw 9 V 
VConv 9 V% 
VEKta 10 '.-% 
*. Traas 12 V% 
VTreaa 6 % 
Cam. 9 t% 
vrreas iiv% 

Vi 3005 
2006 

2005 
200305 
2002-00 
2006 ' 1 
2003-07 1 

00 >. +1 

OO*. +> 
09 V ♦ 
24 '} +J 
68 % +* 
03 V +* 
18 v +1 

*- 

£ ra - 1 



B 3 V +» 
MV +* 

ta* -■ ^ 

72 '* 57 

93 V TO 

38 113 

1 Traas 5 '.-% 

4 Trees 7 ’<% 

'.- Eacn 12 % 

ifl 

B 8 •+ 
sav + 

26*4 +* 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 




aw im Mm 

£-<& k 

2 M*t 4 ‘ Bank*OMrMMld 

^'*8 ssi ssr 
ss***** 

™ go SE^s*** 

mi as,"* 

M Jjj,' com Bwrk Wata 
112 80 ' i CanmanbMk 
ara. Pis-: ajuMdWaw, 

SI W Srawa SSea 

3 JB ag OnnaNH 

»°? 2 S SK P, “ 

*» 333 tasantnl . 

74 S5 HKgsanml 

320 313 JuapnffMpofeg 
m 136 KSfllSSSr 


*51 m UoyfSt 
8 S 3 638 Mereuy HI 
■S 3 120 Do 0 % A 
599 417 MOBM 
331 » 9 l HIM Aim Bk - 
593 423 Nat Was . 
■32 BO Onmsa 
i 448 230 Proudm 


+3 9 U 37 7.0 

933 

4 * ISO 7 JJ 

43 * 17.0 BA 

110 37112 

+2 20.0 SA R 9 

*5 233 .93 7.0 

+6 13.6 ZB 24.4 

+6 239 82 382 

26 4 j 154 

• * 1 S 139 53 

• +1 208 33 

34 49 lid 

43 '. 30 01 
200 4.7 

• -1 33 3.7 103 

-3 221 74 83 

-1 23 33123 

• 103 a SO 84 
40 138 a* 72 
-V 33 54 

17.7 3 7 202 
123 37 122 
*9 257 S 3 104 

•a 290 19 42 


+5 371 32 20 3 

*+5 

49 2 TB 94 33 
BOO 34 33 
1 S S 42 113 


90 M Rea Bras 51 Ofl 13 133 

135 102 RoaBSUdLQMd 130 »+1 7.1 S 3 93 

3 SS 260 RMBakOI Sea . 310 42 142 <2 92 

14 V 5 ’. Schrodera ' £S .192 32 T 12 

394 ' 419 SteM CBM 722 48 GOOD 30 M* 

BIS 613 Lftacn BBS *-5 528 70 B 7 J 

71 V 43 ', VMM Fargo . CBBV -V . . . . 

320 220 WMM 285 77 27130 


BREWERIES 



' . 

135 

45 146 


21.7 

29 l&d 

• *1 

15 

id i4.i 

+1 

45 

17155 

-5 

2000 16 103 

• 

7d 

45115 

•-5 

154 

27 16.1 


105 

21 208 

-5 


44 129 

+1 

75 

• ■*3 

Bd 

17125 

• +2 

105 

13 rid 


2Sd 

45 135 

+1 

25 

19152 


65 

AA 105 

-2 

Bd 

27 . 

• 

35 

29155 


0.1 

07 117 

-6 



• +2 

10d 

55115 


104 

*5 145 

+2 

. 11.1 

*3 120 

•43 

11.1 

45 121 

-2 

106 

55 275 

: s 

127 

24 19.7 

. -4 

104 

35 215 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


B 7 S an 
729 931 
276 235 
91 81 

29 IB 
73 37 
132 B* 
27 11 

158 158 
126 85 

105 60 

374 448 
488 298 
181 124 
10 * 8 * 
137 72 

104 63 

93 - 75 . 

71 34 

172 51 
68 54 

94 80 
131 106 
385 254 
130 86 
846 58 

79 42 
252 149 
620 42 B 

190 'j 126 
433 20 
.488 296 
4 S 4 286 
122 78 

81 71 
429 290 

& 

135 101 
186 161 

136 96 

444 SM 
272 171 
36 23 
130 109 
444 306 
920 798 
213 163 
234 11 B 
110 87 
385 285 
672 440 
482 340 
328 138 
191 US 1 ! 
136 87 
50 70 

516 342 


Mmrmm Cow* 2*0 

Amae 267 

AmtedUe 69 

AtfwCOttl 165 

BPB tadusma* 500 

gnjUBon) CDn.tr 29 

SffSSm. •• « 

BocMayS 920 

Out rich SGS 

BmdonUXwd HI 205 
Br Dredong - 74 
Brown licBai 24 'i 
BwW 58 

Bkyent 111 

Bwnea B Hpw iiv 

CAIMH Ratwy 158 

GeinenMloetKmne HI 
CondH Gap 63 

Cason 612 

CDmrywM 466 

Croucn IDerekJ- 10 

Dm (QaonM) 97 

Dt-flfclHGj 128 

EMi 102 

Feb • S3 

Do -A 66 

Federated Hta i 4 fi 

hotel Go 60 


ComM Grp 66 

Gotten 612 

CDmrywM 466 

Croucn IDerekJ- 165 
Dm (Gao/oa) 97 
DougfelrfC) IX 
Enth 102 

Feb . • S 3 

Do -A 66 

-Faoaraad HM i 4 fi 
hotel Gp 60 

OaMoro 89 

Oats & DamfrOnJ rai 
9 mm (MJJ 333 
HAT 128 

Haiicil Bar 226 

HmIwvGm >1 70 
Haywood Miami, 228 
rtgg* 3 tta 610 
taock JonnaKi 188 

IP I 

Lawiteee tWKw) iu 
Lfley (FJC| 73 

Lon* (Y 4 ) 410 

Magnet 3 Soudt 178 
Marewa 2 Bi 

MaSte js (Haj to) 196 
May a Hassaf 98 

Srs,^ SS 

Kgr*- £ 

Mowlam (John) 386 

NM a rt nia OSO 

Hofflnflham Bffc* 161 
Pereknmon 215 

Phoenix Timber 68 

as- ss 

Rad—i d ' «? 

SKSS--' I' 

5 “«M .a 


£ 31 ESSES* 

101 7 S Tin*. • 
va 06 Tamer -. *- 
• 3 BS 196 V tn a pte* ' * 
290 246 warn 

m *67 whim am 


11.4 48 2 SL 2 
157 69 144 

0.1 0.1 106 

41 61 37 15.1 

•-3 12 J 26 147 

• . - 102 30 125 

• -2 109 &3 . 

44 . . a .. 69 

100 67 198 

• . 44 69198 

37 1 48 128 

-a 308 59 B 8 

149 54 23.1 

-8 48 58186 

. . . . 82.8 
9 38 56 294 

48 44 14.0 

.19 

43 40 36 

29 28 148 
*3 248 b 47 98 

• +2 88 19 128 

as 62 128 

• 42 * 86 88137 

*4 29 b 28 227 

42 4.7 48 199 

.25 27127 

25 38 90 
47 32 154 
54 98 234 
68 7.1 144 
* 28 28368 
-2 79 31 132 

54 42 12.1 
.. 852 

41 24 34 1 £3 

-2 88 42158 

+2 194 32 137 

r +10 7.1 38 148 

2 S 8 a 52 147 

10.0 23 12.1 

108 23 12.1 

*1 52 48 8.1 

-1 5 J 5 72 94 

• 102 22 148 

• 74 42 196 

■M 112 4.1 178 

-•» 94 58 208 

id 72 38164 
-3 oi ai .. 

17.9 42 137 
■-1 82 33 131 

14 4 .® .. 

• . 92 72 162 

42 228 .52 112 
157 18 172 

• 92 31 135 

72 3212.0 
42 48 33 

194 58 82 
+* 208 31 148 

*2 162 39 132 

-fi 123 42183 
-'! 9.1 68 167 

-»2 33 -24 209 

. -- & 6 b 84 172 

-2 134 28 M 2 

■vr- 122 48132 

72 42125 
: 122 - 28 133 

18 21 : 30 . 
108 58 304 

134 48.142 
104 37 158 
-1 14 : 1.7 M- 

+6 68 32134 

12 28 237 
»+ 1 - 07 02 167 
2 d 1.1 208 
4;1 34 27194 


SR 

1 B 2 «*4 

10 f 

14 

« 

672 «+9 

223 • 

193 -3 

44 -I 

198 

310 +2 

315 -a ■ 

212 -2 

99 
163 

33 • 

320 • 

» 

178 

373 • 

66 -*1 

SI 

270 

300 • 

161 +1 

122 -2 

» 

196 *42 

120 -3 

» 

53 

+5 

253 *43 

255 

199 -2. 

3 S 5 «+2 

171 


az'i -i 

21 -2 

530 -1 

2S .1 

E 117 e -1 

C 13 '. • • 
MS 
168 
ZOB 


108 18168 
107 98112 
43 42 U 
0.1 07 218 

08 Q 7 88 
138 ' 28 164 
106 48 13-4 
31 1.1 244 

108 

2 . 1 ' 0715.4 
58 18212 
65 8.1128 
£4 109 198 
18 06 . 

15 45 74 
38 08 31.6 

2.1 $8 121 
4.1 23 125 
88 24 18.1 
18 15 904 
45 98 K 2 
&B 0 35198 
68 25 168 

51 18138 

24 28187 

18 b 36 168 . 
81 51 125 

& 2 o 68108 
35 45102 
1.7 35 74 
1-0 04 ■ 

12.1 48 98 

17 . 1 b 68 528 
178 78 98 

14 a 07 21-5 
154 45 128 

14 08 265 
45 18165 
07 15 81 

0.1 05 668 

am 02 975 

195 68 U 8 

75 6.1 135 

1.1 55 45 

28 09 229 

18 62 128 
575 48 

75 51 154 
7.5 45 02 
75 35 163 


FINANCE AND LAND 


246 220 Abrngnarti 220 

16 * 728 Alton Hume 129 

715 286 Antofegana 625 

710 110 Bariday Tecta 206 

26 16 Canada ties 

363 194 CUndovar 250 

43 16 Camraway 30 

2 B'i 17 Equty a Ban 28 

IBfi 137 Inry 6 Sane 132 

Mi 153 Ma»dfa 182 

78 82 - Ml Home Ltan 87 ' 

0 80 DO 6 % £86 

-M 6 114 Haw m a i t at u* 


18 08 . 
-8 35 25 94 

. 2750 44 6.1 

17.1 08 745 
97 25368 

18 48 26 . 4 . 
68 95101 

+1 88 b 49 201 


FfnaacW Tnnta appMr orf Pagi M 


il l 


1 I I 

zzm. 

S 33 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


■ 48 OB'. AK 20 N/V Bearer tOU +>. 

208 ISO Aked Coadda 195 • 

415 -291 Amarataam 405 »-1 

2*7 1 U Anchor Chemical 237 

158 106 BTP 141 • 

111 76 ’J 0 Bjer DM 50 EB 5 '. 

137 102 Bagden 121 

169 112 Bnradwns 139 

100 ST 1 . Br Baraoj 74 

136 82 Cenm^tW) 1 « *2 

306 245 Coe**B -283 -1 

168 135 Coam Bros . 196 • 

160 112 Da A* 152 +2 

20 15 Cory (Horaca) iBh 4-1 

163 127 Crnda 149 +1 

131 100 ■ DO DM 128 *45 

245 172 EasB EntoM * 210 • 

133 111 Erode 116 • 

298 215 Fbasco-Mtoao 237 41 

168 113 . Habwaa parries) 154 

453 330 Hjekaon 406 

101 'r Tp. HoactM DM 60 OT-a 4 l'a 

10 V .734 bnp Cham tad 962 42 

410 333 Lapina 366 41 

iib ioo mbn ioo • 

154 'll IS HyBi 153 +1 

SI 02 Raabrock HX3q» 8 * -Z 

178 129 RanuM 142 -1 

330 216 SNIABPD 26 * -3 

73 36 SuKWe Sowtanan 52 

233 178 VKUtmWtnm IM 226 +5 

148 67 VMaMB CtMoi 148 43 


FOODS 


Br Vendtan (BVTJ 
Cactaav^ctwraopas 


42 48 38 148 

28 108 488 
+2 11.1 38 188 

• 07 28 118 

-1 ' 5.0 55 298 

+7 17.1 82 H9 

148 48^98 

131 38. 98 

• 97 55 180 

• il* * 32-118 

44 57 38293. 

V - 78 38268 

20 T 8228 

• : 14 UlM 

(1 14-67 
: i ®3 48128 

105 ar ltd 

44 ' 108 * 2 1 S 8 

85 18 280 

• 42 158 B8'12Z 

• BJ 30 147 

-4 28 17198 

-4 47 29 158 

68 21 17.7 
• 46 81 98 
-3 . 84 18 228 

7.4 29 108 

• 28 28 130 

SO 55 68 

-5 178 38 lj? 

-1 38 18 225 

78 78 198 
18 08208 
88 38 148 

• -t 87 SO 152 

• . 118 4.1 198 

42 58 34 148 

• 60 3.6 123 

. 80 34 132 

-17 174 43 118 
+2 78 21 218 

• .. 48 31 166 

43 .. .. ;. 

. 32.1 58 115 

48 65 25210 

-1 138 48 1*8 

T3BB 57 130 

• 87 97 198 


. 605 
11.1 48 254 

48 29 134 


CINEMAS AND TV 


270 

ire 

Angle TV -A‘ 
Grampran 

246 

• . 

135 

5.6 13.0 

52 

27 

45 

-2 

25 

BA fid 

240 

176 

HTVN/W 

813 

-3 

lid 

55 95 

368 

263 

LWT HM 

341 


215 

65 117 

350 .. 

188 

6 c« TV’S ■ 

32 S 

-3 

15 B 

4.6 107 

•280 

153 

TVS N/U 

223 

•-5 

145 b 

9/4 107 

*6 

31 

TBW 

_ 45 


- 26 

55 124 

224 

223 

Thames TV 

aa* 





HOTELS AND CATERERS 


-433 328 Oran® Mai 388 47 138 35 130 

286 200 Kbmady Brooke* 236 43 21 09 122 

391 312 Larsnto 343 -43 16,1 47 168 

549 447 ton Park Hotato szo 143 20 158 

100 7 B'j Mom Chanooe as 21 24 if .7 

105 61 Pmca « W HbWa 87 • 21 24 1 S 7 

79 50 '! Quaaw to M'l 23 38 1*4 

405 370 Sandy How» 'A* 371 -2 50 18 1*8 

91 56 SOU 61 • 18 28 158 

209 146 DmaiouM Font M 8 41 78 U 148 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


90 -2 

131 -2 

11 'a +3 






|rW 



93 

379 42 

479 -1 

90 -1 

950 

3 • - 

125 

160 -fl 

69 -1 

200 

432 44 

163 - 

78 44 

141 -1 

m *-4 

Cllte 

O'. 

226 *2 

• 26 'r 4 -i 

41 

148 41 

80 

35 41 

12 s a -1 

166 42 

695 -9 

226 • 

193 -1 

303 

210 

550 

296 

2 S 7 -*3 

330 
76 
106 
IM 
359 

142 -1 
37 

113 V 41 

269 4 * 

53 

78 

86 • 

328 * 45 

■ 17 1 / ♦ . 

34 +3 

450 *49 

43 +5 

72 • 

190 

no -8 

343 

324 4 ? 

160 • 

629 46 


38 - 06 
07 18 

1&1 25 

68 24 
3-2 25 

11 7.4 

HI 38 

17.1 38 

8 l 6 48 
07 55 

68 14 
15 18 

48 18 

78 1.7 
IS 19 
116 2.1 

64 3.0 

6.1 28 
28 23 

97 38 

98 4.7 
108 23 

7.7 4.7 

14 18 

5.7 40 

107 U 
300 ZB 
300 30 

68 28 
28 67 

3.1 78 
T 28 65 
58 78 

1.1 31 
64 9.1 
68 38 
11.1 18 
167 4.7 

58 28 
9 J 13 
28 14 

62 IS 
ai 28 
& 8 n 24 
128 19 
18 13 
58 51 
48 28 
73 28 
78 58 

43 43 
66 12 
1 . 7 n 12 
33 4.7 
51 58 
113 34 


2.4 14 
11 J 13 
98 2 3 
38 a 23 
228 17 


ELECTRICALS 


398 

IN 

AB Baa 

356 

*6 

11.4 

12 

3 GJ 

1 B 1 

120 

AkKunwic 

1 S 3 

■ 

21 

1 J 

107 

136 

38 

Amebad 

TN 

+2 

05 

02 

51-5 

99 

a 

Apnea Computer* 

43 

-2 

05 b 

15 

14 

96 

83 

Artm 

M 




337 

m 

205 

AWmeCenp . 

258 

-5 

16 

1/4 

82 

56 

46 

AuteO'Fawy 

58 




17-9 

2 E 0 

140 

Aura Sac ' 

185 


25 

15 

128 

370 

940 

BtCC 

570 

. +5 

lfi .7 

58 

152 

IN 

64 

BSR 

19 

-3 

24 

25 

&5 


440 355 
91 41 

530 ZS 5 
S 3 STt 
373 283 
99 43 
299 139 

i S' 

^r* 

$ i ss 
210 128 
174 112 

11 

I ’I 

SS 
3 zS 

II 

942 214 

i» 

123 78 

£« v 
174 147 
« 1 g 

147 03 

II 

289 220 
84 'r B'r 
353 256 

383 318 
07 62 

47 V 33 V 
SO s 
1 » 110 
214 139 
06 115 

ai 

323 196 

34 IS 

££ 

30 19 

73 46 
303 200 
262 136 

.S 3 

is r 


Akanasc 
Amber tad 

* H*Wiw 
Ammon 
Aimaur 
Aih A Lacey 

Ast^ Eng 8 % 
Atrara 
Anon Rubtw 
Agtoa ItataJ 

W 1 




Barrow H apbum 
Barton Trarrajxn 

Baynes (Owtas) 


235 -2 

174 
•117 
Ml 

83 +1 

224 +2 

310 +S 

157 +1 

250 

170 •-£ 

39 -1 

27 


410 +2 

66 

307 a * +3 
293 

16 * +2 

17 V 
360 

275 *-2 

180 
151 

-232 -5 

53 
260 

22 . *1 
191 

fl - +1 

214 

396 ■ -2 


SSSSSi” ^ 


5 

BrniS Oual QW 141 

BmmhIM 160 

Back Am* iu 

BSSto^odo. « 

Biqfc US 

BtaaAnew 365 

Bodycna - 290 

Boofir 350 

Boos 222 

Biutoi (Wm) 18 V 

Bowatar Inc C 17 

Branmaita ftp 123 

Braamar 91 B 

D ram a i) 90 

D rangraan * 40 v 
Bnogand Gp 40 

Bum v *9 

BndoorpQundry . 210 

Br Smrn 260 

Br Syphon 114 

Br vw 320 

Brown hi 331 

Brranweva tads 116 

BronaKj 26 

BraotaBTOI 33 

town 6 Tama IB 

Brawn (John) 36 

towns (Mas) 66 

BeSounh 274 


Bwns-Andnrsan 73 

CSfflbKd Eng 103 

Capm tad 51 

Cm t«J 72 

Carso Eng 425 

Casmgs 104 

CMsaaon 33 

Gsnsai £ snasr 3 

Ctnnmnr tad 21 

CH wq 91 

Cnaitobn Pit 87 

CMMMtnA Ml 96 

tomr Com 248 

Oxnving 540 

o w n* in Z 7 S 

Onn Hum 46 


11.1 4 J 112 
98 b 58 208 

02 7.0 125 

168 28 108 

68 75 08 
115 58 148 

18 28 108 

111 48 ltd 

06 5.1 94 

08 18- 78 

03 1.1 138 
288 7.1 118 

.. a .. 368 
118 38 .. 
14 12 98 
98 28128 
28 54 68 

19 15 309 

228 58 128 

28 38 92 

14.1 48 11 J 
S 3 23 204 

108 98 118 

.. 168 
188 IT 12.0 
1 DZ 38 10.1 
U 4807 
28 18 178 

38 68 128 
217 a 98 90 
180 . 68 ... 
10 L 7 58 111 

38 62 63 

ss 2*155 

17.1 45 169 

t .. .. 
18 39 392 

73 78 78 
78 ti 78 78 
OI 48 29,4 
98 1.7 298 
68 13 438 

98 17153 
14 18398 
90 48 124 

■ 6.1 43138 

88 98 94 
7.1 48 103 
28 1.1 193 
14 b S 3 68 

20 08 242 
06 30 U .7 

17.1 48 111 

10.1 ^ 45142 

135 48178 


178 56 14.1 
32 38 98 

2.1 46 22.1 
05 13 207 

7.1 48 93 
74 68164 
14 1.1 698 

11.1 43 112 
43 16 111 
MO 11 116 

18 18 117 
07 22 27.1 
aa 6.1 67 
103 63 68 

43 63 138 
124 48 13.1 
18 18 211 
45 98 116 
28 a 24 173 
24 . 47 42.1 
2 JEM 43 11.1 
228 94 102 
43 4.1 97 - 
14 42114 
a 100 . 
103 

34 27 106 
58 67117 
10 93 108 
1&4 &6 ms 
207 16118 

".“a 


250 132 
1*3 » 
920 380 
216 1*1 
»V 9 

112 71 
66 26 
220 74 
970 356 
80 32 

111 63 V 
425 331 
61 40 

174 121 
224 196 
21 GV 112 V 
48 32 

319 . 207 V 
309 206 
23 ‘i 19 V 
SO 48 
ZX 178 

t 32 92 

Ufa 688 
259 171 
275 188 
.319 168 
19 V 17 
371 180 
10 CV 63 
110 98 
123 85 

190 as 
97 81 

66 72 


Gttta (Gtenem) 
Capon Sen 
Conan (A) 


OtaUXnsd Teai 
CM6K 
Corn Stascnery 
Cmk (Wml 

COOkSOn 

Canon (F) 

Com 

Cowmay Pdoo 
C owan be tow 
Gran wctaoton 
Own Housa 
Cumorts 3 LV 
DSC 
DPCE 

SO™ 

Dana 

Daws 6 Mat *A‘ 
Batos 6 Newman 

ai. 

Baba 

Daraand Stamping 


Dobson Para 

Dm 

Domwon to 


S 3 

240 -1 

99 -1 

270 

101 • .. 
273 -12 

164 -1 * 

233 -OT 

265 

12 BV - 3 V 

5 SS 

193 

32 'i .-Jf* 
315 -6 

128 *Z 

123 .- 

X 

31 • 

310 

Tlf 

ado • 


38 22 LDH 

196 V 120 V Lip- 
323 2 TB Latd 

75 . « UaW 6 * 

77 41 las (Ar*m) 71 

113 69 LPaataaO 106 

M 64 Lmad 76 

73 53 Lloyd (FH) 66 V 

35 23 LocMr m 23 V 

2 M 179 LonMdteld 196 

135 99 Do DM 100 

77 MV Lon 6 Mm 70 

227 1 » Lon W 192 

245 134 Longton tad 245 

400 310 Low A Sonar 418 

am 300 ul Hag* *on 

115 64 MS M. .107 

49 31 . IIY Hoionm. 41 V 

393 255 Maaraiya niami 355 

180 121 Madarkna 133 

79 43 UacttHan |P 8 W) 57 

280 185 UcKachrte 210 

125 78 M raK* _ 113 

635 495 Mradmnar SWo 675 

79 52 H a waata Bronta - 66 

00 63 llaAg 63 

143 65 MantaaB (Lmday) 130 

176 IDG Mete Boi . IBS 

194 128 Mate cmauraa M 3 

91 55 Mawraa so 

78 V 55 MMOial Gen 56 

12 s 70 Mttetaol Soman 113 

196 1 B 3 Maka IBS 

318 212 Magan QudMe . 270 

42 20 V Nnapsand 30 

216 « NdB (J) IN 

41 26 Nawman tada K 

153 B 2 Nawman Tbrto 149 

133 88 Node 6 Land 126 

55 43 PTOCan 47 

289 196 Norma 2*6 

2 S 8 203 Offioa Bed Mach 220 

44 * 247 Patkar KMl 'A* 383 

908 625 PamalUT- 9 U 

105 165 P-E M .165 

SOS 383 Paaraon SOS 

27 . 11 Paak 21 

09 66 Paariaas 123 

674 332 BaflMr- H — W ay • 821 

920 140 PBrStaid tad 415 

14 775 Phorotoa 212 V 

483 311 PI Biai l 400 

96 51 PtoxCanatr 77 

365 195 tank 295 

323 219 Portae Cnadbin 309 

314 239 RowoS DuHbwi 276 

16 * 95 Praamaca Mdga 10 a 

190 110 RHP 178 

158 123 Radtek Mate 1 « 

569 421 RBKHOig 406 

228 115 Ranxoma Sans 104 

138 98 RtoSHs <Gt Brtagal 130 

900 60 S RacUB A Otensi 757 

245 118 n ad t itoi crass - 20 a 

343 200 Bead D acdri 330 

2 S. 182 V Read ta* 240 

T 73 132 fWyan 159 * 

91 57 RmU 67 

102 SS Ressner 96 

SIB 345 Reuters 483 

SB 21 Remora 37 

180 110 ftcarto Eng MS 

90 53 ndtatn (Lacs) 85 

58 19 Rcnantaon wsat 39 

152 00 Robawon Has 90 

343 151 Robtaaon (Itaomat) 335 

55 M Rockwara - « 

160 06 Ropnar IN 

148 * IIS Do 'A* 118 

9 - OV RotJtirtr* 2 V 

162 116 Rorort 129 

IN S 3 RusmI (A) S 3 


U^T 5 


135 99 Do DM 

77 MV Lon 6 Mm 
227 159 Lon H 6 
245 134 Longtan tad 
400 319 Low a Bonar 
408 306 ULHsgs 
115 94 IBM. 

49 31 . IIY Hoionw. 

393 255 Macvmyi Phrant 
180 121 Me d artane 
73 43 HacttUan (P 8 W) 

288 185 UcKachrte 
12 S 78 Magneto 
696 496 itoanrWp 
79 '52 Haran a i i Bront* 
B 8 63 HaAg 
143 65 MtarMto (Lmday) 
179 108 Meal Boi . 

194 128 Mattactoauras 
91 55 Maakaa 


Neaa nan TOrtcs 
Not* 6 Lond 


05 15205 
19 b 11 Md 
OI 18 94 
3 A IB 67 * 
3 d 45 10.1 
12 3 D 205 
mam 
54 8.1 aa 
id 01 85 
M 2 72 lid 

7 A 106122 
6 d 34 111 
17 2 JUL 6 
13 d 3 d 135 
114 b 2 d 154 
2 d 2 J 10 L 0 
Idb 4 d 13 d 
16.6 47 172 
3 d 2 d 175 

27 47 jae 

142 b BJ 10.1 
48 42 10.4 
8 d Id 22 d 
42 66 7.6 

25 4 J) 7.7 

52 AOttd 

Od 42 . 

06 07*14 
12 4 d 118 

8.1 lOd 5 J 

15 4 d 13 d 

112 B 7 Id 
HI 45 111 
0.1 Od 155 
IOO 6 d 60 

1.1 11 93 d 

103 60 124 

IjQ 60 40.6 
14 3-0 52-8 

132 64 lid 
12.1 fid 9 d 
152 1913 d 


Od 42 127 
2 d 42 94 
57 19 14 J 
54 1.1 365 
1 A 18120 
4.1 2 d 162 
42 IT 94 
.172 
Id 40 97 
460 
. . 100 
92 72 Bd 
63 7 d -OI 
.. .. 12 
7.7 GO 9.7 

22 U 232 


38 

17 

274 

?14 

W 

44 

90 

40 

tftl 

an 

141 

103 

195 

120 

ITO 

04 

164 

122 

144 

IN 

UM 

m 

bit 

29 

136 

re 

143 

1 UJ -J 

SM 

708 

43 

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Dean toon 67 

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Do A' 206 

PWy PBA 143 

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Twer Kamatay iu 

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301 228 
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Son Ida 
TLada tadamMy 
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220 128 
171 98 

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100 T 3 ffl 
391 278 
393 328 
64 43 

228 134 
360 230 
72 51 
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Booser 6 Hawk 
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FS Cons 
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Gan Mtrang 
GPSA 

GM Kaigoati 

Mi* 


MattlS Errs 
Mhangm 


Rand MM Ltd 
Rand Maw nap 


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Sungra Bail 
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35 VooaV 
10 V tosda cowry 
200 tom 
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15 WMam Deep 
1 T 4 iwetem Mnaig 
113 tot Rand Cora 
88 WPMnCmak 
Ti IMnkals 
20 WM WON 
HP. 2 teimra Coppw 
2 fl ZSndoan 


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232 

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14 30 123 
Bd 49 111 
09 24 109 
429 

423 

83 65 85 
71 69 109 

49 113149 

79 n 59 95 
107 39112 
181 43 159 

249 

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549 43 
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271 85 

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479 339 
79 d 300 
280 306 
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359 82 105 
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200 500 
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299 387 
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129 7.1 49 
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557 + 1 B 314 58 74 

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15 d 273 .. 
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80 Ataad Lon 
70 Apex 

173 Aitawicn Sacs 
05 emotive 
216 BMwilP) 


M 4 Br Lind 172 

138 Braun IM 

36 Card (A] Worn <2 

210 Cap 5 Carat 233 

200 . canttl Prop 203 

1 © CamnRWieM 180 

410 Cnutartau 470 

780 CALA 860 

131 esptat i*ctoa» 146 

164 CortMk 253 

14 Coraui Sacs 16 V 

95 County 5 New 116 

117 -County -B' ' 173 

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470 Daetin 645 

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145 ' Bnw 5 'Aoency MS'. 

105 Enmas c2T 112 

140 Estates Proo 102 

03 bmm a Leads 108 

38 todOaka . £2.. 

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204 Hsraro Couoiy«k1a3i0 
432V Hammaraon 450 
IIT 1 ! DO ‘A 1 *40 

130 Hinow Druce 546 

233 H aniau g ai 295 

g70 . fn»y 350 

155 Jermyn 185 

273 Lang tool 298 

5 * Lana I n aw i o ra re 

276 Land Saeunws 320 

358 Lon * Edta Tw 035 

1*7 Do 8 'jlt _ 345 

218 Lon 6 Prov top 2*3 

151 Lon top Prop 171 

280 Lynrnn 338 

275 MEPC 328 

90 Uetaomay 100 

105 McKay San ill . 

44 Manmam 50 

125 Maraaie'Moara vm. 

60 UarSxmwtKi 70 

173 Matter Br 530 

vsio Uamdtagn £10 

38 * MOuntwaw 730 

02 Mtckuw (A 5 J) 104 

16 V Muncaat C 16 V 

73 New Cavennran 125 

*3 Patkdala 83 

235 Peachey 274 

72 V PnoM Mutana 250 

176 Prop 6 Rev 225 

307 Prop HWgs MS 

106 Prop Seamy 122 

V 8 V Ragtan 11 V 

IN RagaMn 275 

013 Rdwhaugh GOO 

253 Rush A Tompkins 263 

163 Sanual 230 

78 SOW MC* 96 < 

M2 Santa Eswra T70 

260 Goeynaw* 373 

1*4 Stand Sacs 165 

86 StcsWey so 

45 TowiCetma 53 

198 Tnrttanl Park 231 

95 UK Land IN 

525 UM Real 880 

675 Warner 680 

476 WbmWtf 615 

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49 42204 
11 62 170 

36 19159 
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5.7 1.1 510 
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7.4 7.1 169 
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1.4 29 315 
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+10 20.0 23 369 
279 32 398 
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07 27 622 
11.4 62 99 


MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 



74 32 154 

+2 7.1 59 BO 

-2 22 19 189 

+1 19 34 144 

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-2 11.1 39 159 

+3 229 47 10.1 

+1 5.0 4.1 T 33 

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42 59 62 
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6.1 49 94 

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7.6 47102 
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64 52 112 

64 83 94 
+1 4.1 49 111 

41 3.1 49124 

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SHIPPING 


312 V 187 Assoc Br Bora 205 +5 

396 251 Br OanmcnwiiWi 253 *2 

3 G 6 223 CaMOMI 22 S +3 

04 56 hstaorttames) 67 

603 400 Gra-g 500 • 

76 54 V Jacobs (JO 71 

12 '> 5 Lyra 7 V 

*1 29 Unsay Docks 33 

221 IN Ocsan Transport 2 ig *1 

576 * 2 B P i 0 DM «0 +4 

185 08 ftmeanan (WUW) 146 *3 

348 132 T.DOOOk 330 

310 360 Tumow Scott 370 -5 


7.1 17 149 

71 29 179 

7.1 11 N 9 

47 79 112 
214 42 84 
& 1 b 72 542 
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229 47 149 

71 49 310 

S 3 1.6 204 
129 39 519 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


300 

290 

FH 


32 & 

83 

25 

127 

206 

146 

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146 ^ - 

6 143 

97 

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NEWSPAPERS AND 
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260 

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Bran (uq 

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145 

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730 

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SB 

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378 

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105 

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17 

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403 

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Wd waanpapan 

415 

375 

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225 

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TEXTILES 


671 208 V AWO Tan 300 

300 135 Allans tot 256 

157 67 Basis (Jarre 154 

100 06 Beckntwi (AJ 102 

144 123 BrfcMwr 133 

127 GO BWaer 5 Lump 94 

78 V 63 V Craft 71 

315 ISO Countess 264 

175 74 Crowthfr (J) in 

276 198 Dawson 240 

57 *2 Oetron 46 

BD 26 DinlH <R 5 

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119 66 Gaskin tosteoom 98 

57 33 Hbtang Panmp u 37 

210 00 Ingram (HaitA? IN 

68 47 Jerome (Si TO 

190 132 LSmOtat 163 

183 138 Lands 176 

IlSV 64 LOtar 103 

03 74 Lytaa (S) 74 

'S V* ffickay(Mu« 106 

2 10 Minon 16 V 

IN 04 Parkland 'A' T 32 

>47 n - Raaacia 42 

156 109 SECT 128 

183 133 EMar 148 

TO 48 S mMRha w (R) 61 

140 67 Stroud. RIer 123 

IN 85 TexturM Jnsw 148 

205 05 Tomkmaoos IBS 

109 V 75 V To<M 97 

350 235 Vorldyds 270 


107 39 209 
109 39 159 
59 39 99 
62 89 129 
Bd OS 89 
7.1 79 21 J 
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167 127 Rahmans tt 


*Bcaw derd a Ex ril b Ftyacaat dhrtdBnd • KBaiiii 



































































































Vrii£ iiivJLES *v iiDNESDAV nUGUSl o i9ao 


PROPERTY BUYERS* GUIDE 
LONDON PROPERTIES 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY/1 





IP 




T 




• MORTGAGES • 10796 advanced up to 
£120,000* Jnxmalnincomeptvs • ik secondary 
income • Jiyffl ngffToomegeaten* nonaatug 

• REMORTGAGES For any reason, eg: 

• Home improvements* Business Reasons 

• Educational Expenses* Large Leisure Purchase, 
(boat, caravan, etcj • Second House, (U.K. or 
Overseas)* M a tn monai settlement 

• Consolidate Existing Borrowings 


MIIMBIVIill 




Luxury conversion of 33 apartments in a quiet 
garden square 

The development features + extensive balconies * south 
facing terraces * elegant reception rooms * resident 
porter* low outgoings 
2 bedroom apartments from £128,000 
3 bedroom apartments and penthouses from £210.000 
NEW 125 YEAR LEASES 
Show flats open daily 13am-7pm 




6 lovs: Lsne. 

London 

£CJ 


Robson 

Limited 

01-623 3495 


ACVtZfi, 
Mor;gjQC.in3 
it* A* v. - ’: P 

>or c* -varnsts. etc. 


Gorgeous grouse territory: Two sports out with their dog surrey Snailsden Moor in Yorkshire 

How sheep spoil the shoot 


'* 3 i 




WA.ELLIS 


FARRAR 

STEAD & 


174 Brampton Road 
London S W31HP 
Telex 23661 WAE 152 Fulham Road SW 10 01 -373 8425 

01-581 7654 Tefex 295B4SFSANDC 


EAGLE WHARF ST. SAVIOERS WHARF 


A unique opportunity to pre 
two spectacular Docklands 


1/2/3 bed 
sntsbyBi 


meats in these 
House PLC. 


| SHOWS FLATS VIEWING TODAY 12-5p.m. | 

Weekday viewhig anytime by appondmenl 01-403 0304 BERKLEY 
Entrance offHorsdydown Square beside Tower Bridge SE1 HOl'SE PLC 


EAGLE WHARF, 
HORSELYDOWN SQUARE 
“The exciting new Covent Garden of 
the Docklands*' - complete with 
piazzas, shops, bars, restaurants, 
theatres, etc. 

*High quality well equipped 
kitchens, fully tiled bathrooms with 
white suites 

*Most apartments with patios or 
balconies 


ST SAVIOURS WHARF, 
MILL STREET 
An outstanding Victorian Wharf 
restoration, with Jetties on to 
Sl Saviours Dock leading down to 
the riven 

* Large mortgages available to 
purchasers in these developments 
(subject to status) 

* Prices starting at £95,000 afford 
high appreciation potential- 


/=Wnkwwth=\ 

r MORTGAGES 

TERMS NOW AVAILABLE 

* 3% thires income Or. Vk times 
joint incorao 

* 100% mort ga ge* available 

* No evidence of Income req aired 
for loans up to £250,000 for 
qualifying Applicants 

* MIRAS facility available over 
£30,000 

Ring 01-235 0091 
For foil Information 
Open until 8pm today 

Winkworth 
Financial Services 

. 25a Moicomb Street 

London SW I A 

WHY NOT RE-MORTGAGE 
■ YOUR PROPERTY 

And get the benefit of your equity 
1 Installing Central Heating 
' Refurbishment of your property 
Extension of your property 
School fees 
Buying a Car 
Going on holiday etc. 

(No fees payable) 

HIRSCH INTERNATIONAL 
(FINANCIAL SERVICES) LTD. 

One of Europes leading Mortgage Brokers. 
15. Berkeley Street, London wlX SAE 
Tel: 01-629 5051/2 TELEX 28374 


TELEX 28374. 


0l£WDS s 


Lloyds (Estate Agencies) PLC 
01-7228898 


Joint Sole Agents 



■0*0 SHEET. VI Uuwttnteal M to It* dot* n Wirt fM wd «K W» But DOUBLE BEDMOOMt 
HECtPTOh ROOM BATHROOM. HTCHEfT. EMTHAMZ PHOHt EXCHlStT P0TEK1UU 

UME 135 TEARS PHKX CHUM 

PB HOUSE. SM fn ■amacatm Oh floor M m Hu modem Wort jofl Oy flu Alton Udae. UNO BEDROOMS' HECEPIHM 
ROOtt UTCHEH BATMHtt INDEPENDENT CH CHW. UJTS. PORIBmOE. USE Of COMMUNAL GWDEKS MIKING S’KZi 
ifittmun fhce nu 




santra. 5 
lao. Tan and 


ROOM UTCHEH. BATMHtt INDEPENDENT CH CWt. UTS. POfflBMGE. USE Of COMMUNAL GARDENS MIKING IFACE: 
LEASE IS YEARS PHCEnaja 

Mfllfumn HOUSE. CHB.TBMM TERMS. M3 A dcMNM Mi tar IU1 in ms pcsflmH Chelsea Mxk. Bticaw off man 
raws mdi nun Drone mb Id Uk Soak aid West DRAWING ROOM: DMM6 MIL 1W0 DOUBLE BEWOOK&- 
BATIWHU NT/BTAST ROOM CH am UR: PORTBWX. SALOMES: 

iMH *1 tears max muw 

BMLWI BWDjaK. njff » owa inane nmii smt cwntaamn to Saart Gamma. DRAMHG ROOM- P— 16 ROOM. Z 

saSSL^wwnrSS^ "****” “5 fflnwiHWTreBwiTWRret 

LEASE S3 YEARS nHX DSDJMi 

MraiTIUU.MManiS.SW7 A iron rarasW tar Hoar Its wO deed VMS Mr tto Rdw) Man M and to fark 

swaous ^ w " T ' BMSI 

LEASE 77 TEARS nKE CHUN 

wmf tSsfr# a sunfSwww’ffiu SSSSSwot/bwict 

ROOM RATO LARGE ROOF THRACE GAS Ot 



The grouse moors of England and 
Scotland wil] be echoing next Tuesday to 
sound of gunfire as die poor lagopus 
scoticus (red grouse) gets his come- 
uppance and ends up on the dinner table. 
In feet not all will because, particularly in 
Scotland, the species has been declining 
at an alarming rate. 

The result is that any good, well run es- 
tate with grouse on it, either will not 
come up for sale or will fetch a high price, 
while for the rest the market is no 
healthier than the grouse. For six years 
the North of England Grouse Research 
Project, set up by moor owners and the 
Game Conservancy, has tried to dis- 
cover the most important factors affect- 
ing grouse population. 

Diaries Dent, a partner in SaviUs' 
York office, reports that the grouse, 

^Detrimental land use 
can be arrested’ 

restricted to heather moorlands mainly 
1.000ft or more above sea level, has 
suffered through the overgrazing of 
heather by subsidized sheep, producing 
grassy hills with minimal ecological 
value. “The grants and tax incentives for 
forestry then result in those same hills 
being planted with masses of conifers,” 
he says. “These detrimental land use 
changes can only be arrested if preserva- 
tion of grouse moors can be shown as a 
viable alternative.” 

He says that in the short term, 
prospects are not good. Nine weeks of 
snow and ice earlier in the year meant 
the heather took a beating and the grouse 
could not get at it In the lower ground of 
the eastern Pennine, the Durham moors 
and Yorkshire, conditions were better, 
but there has been no news from 
Scotland and that is bad news. 

Mr Dent is, however, more optimistic 
about the long term because of the 
research into the decline of the grouse, 
caused by its loss of habitat He argues 
that the grouse has become the key to the 


By Christopher Warman 

Propert y Correspondent 

survival of the uplands. Research has 
shown that land with sheep and grouse is 
worth about £300 an acre, land for 
forestry £200-£300 an acre, and land just 
for sheep £50-£100 an acre, while rents 
for land supporting sheep and grouse are 
three to five times those for sheep alone. 

He strongly believes that with good 
keepers and good management, grouse 
moors can make a comeback. SaviUs 
reckons to have handled the sale of 1 3 of 
the last 15 such estates, so he could be 
righL Most of the grouse moors for sale 
are bought by the English, although the 
bigger ones have attracted overseas 
buyers, including Arabs and Swedes. 

Nevertheless, there are grouse moors 
for sale. Woodbead Moor, near Glossop. 
hnc been on the market for more than a 
year, but last year it was on offer with a 
ewe flock of 600 to 700. This put the es- 
tate on the market at over £300,000. The 
sheep have now been sold, and the well- 
known grouse moor, in one of the most 
attractive parts of the Peak District, is for 
sale through SaviUs and Lancasters, of 
Barnsley, at about £125.000. The owner, 
Brian Midwood, is the third generation 
of the family to have shot the moor since 
it was first leased to them in the 1880s. 
and the moor has a 12-year average bag 
of 309- brace. 

The 3,555 acres include a keeper’s 
cottage and adjoining shooting lodge, 
with farm buildings and kennels. Hie 
price reflects the decline in bags, but 
SaviUs says it is a prime example of a 
moor which could regain its former glory 
by applying the results of the new 
research.- 

Snailsden Moor, at Holmfirth, South 
Yorkshire, is a highly productive Pen- 
nine grouse moor with a 12-year average 
of 353 brace. The property includes a 
lodge with two reception rooms and 
three bedrooms overlooking Winscar 


reservoir. There is a range of farm *" 

buildings. 130 acres of grazing land/ .. 

sporting rights over 3,100 acres of moor, 
which is butted for one day's driving^ / 
and 735 acres of woodland and low. 
ground shooting. 

The moor is being sold by Geoffrey 
Brown and the agents expect “keen^ 
interest at the guide price of more than- 
£150,000. SaviUs says Snailsden Moorish 
only just north ofWoodhead Moor, and . 

Mr Dent believes they could easily be. 
run together. The moors would provides 
two consecutive days’ shooting within 
easy reach. 

Colin CampbeU, head of Strutt. 8c 
Parker’s Edinburgh office, says prices for : 
compact, easily run estates providing as . 
many different types ofspon as possible' 

The difficulty of .. * • 

pricing estates V; ; • 

11 11 “ : V 

are increasing rapidly. Other sporth# ^ 
estates, where there are heavy runnhtt ^ • 

costs or where only a limited range of ”' v h . u . . 
sporting facilities are offered, are , 

easy to sell. The 18.000-acre (Cinloclh 
esune in Sutherland has just been sold^ s • * ' 
With a guide price of more than ; 
£350.000 the estate has fishing, stalking,? 
and occasional grouse and woodcock.- w ' 

Peter Caroe. of Knight Frank & 

Rutley, agrees that estates with amenities' ■ - 
for sport are still keenly sought after. 

Knight Frank & Rutley and Jamct 
Harris and Son, of Winchester, anfc 
selling Nuilcy Manor estate in the 
Candover valley. Hampshire. With a 
Grade II listed manor house and 855-: 
acres, and an average daily bag of 185- ( 
pheasant and partridge on eight days; it 
is offered at more than £2.5 million. ' . 

The difficulty of pricing estates is; 
shown by the 3,500-acre Pickenham HaO 
estate, Norfolk, a superb property with 
its own village and an average daily bu- 
of 331 birds on 11 days a year. The guide. . 

E rice. through Knight Frank A Rutiey. is 
S million to 10 million. 


H Anna MM mHMM owrinttag Oh Sgurt SiML ORAWVIG ROOM- IWHG ROOM. 2 

dk ii a sunrt htcheh: patio area mependeht gas chum, heatmg g hot water: 

HOED ENTRANCE PHONE. 



rhciiijwoyyfi* 


20 Moxnpeher Sneer. Knightsbridge SW7 IHE, 

01-584 6106 


KNIGHTSBRIDGE 01-235 4545 
HOLLAND PARK 01-221 5114 
RENTALS 01-351 7575 


JOHN SPENCER 

SjN-PEN COURT. W7. Rcngion 1 Mottmfy EpxtaE A monad acartno*. 

S-OBD HJU>n PEACE. Wl SkamqA bed hnxy hoatartk nwr rk fm«l 
GROVE MflK. OM. Ham" 6/7 bedroom house mnlmgl pounds Indm 


SM ittiH iq pool SU54J0HL 
RUsnwawE WM. Ihmssm 4 bedraan Indy taut Mi ngratag w/ai jr 
room DR5M. 

MnwrGNTOBIX IN. invosM MnrtM 4 bodnomod msdnx nsua. 
DUKES MEME. WA. spaoaus WCMnaa bnty lose. 6 Mnwa. 3 mcrtMm. 
BO SNdin SZOML 

01 995 8904 



Hoih» In a serene square 
Lacing tennis courts, 

-vjawe annoaHtcrc. v ton- 
rooms. 2 racapdon rooms. 
MKhen/idtiier. downstairs 
cloakroom. mmroom. 
wnaralt WC. saraw. 

' Neeos some attention. 


£138,500 Only 


HOBART SLATER 


fitted kitchen a 
throughout. £115.000. Long 
je wel 

UR§EBS®£ Superb opportunity 
to obtin 1 S 2 bed tots owloak- 
fnq Thames, with bateonies. 
A^acent Our Wharf, dose to 
tu be. Rom £139.000£1 60000 
PHOSPEBT PLACE Luxurious 1 bed 
Uty fitted flat by top architect 
Parking dose City. Bargain 



3 Coeval Place Knsnhtsbridge. SW 7. TEL 01 53 i 827? 


VICKERS « CO 

UETDN 6 WVESTHEMT OR PIED A TERSE SupoD stufio M andaUe 
bdy (unshed m tanay Hegmcy unace. Close flmerts Pa* 14 Haney SL 
Wt. Doner, cb. E/ptnne Ptog. 120 yes be tfzJsm 
MARIA VALE Oum sale tea tfefpihr ana com an 2nd floor. 2 Ms. 
nwntw. w A uanream. n gas cA E/pfwne Lmg be. Only £84.850 
lUXURV HAT. W9 Suacois man m pnsUqe pm Mock pa 10 iws 
Mart* AicA- J Hats. 2 bath. Mura and doing room 001100001 , tauten. 
UL purer Gas cb etc Long Lease £180.580 

01 289 1692 


BLOOMSBURY. WC1, attractive, 4 bed, 2 bath, 
Georgian house in quiet road with garage. FreehotaL 

BARBICAN, EC2, selection of 1, 2, & 3 bed flats for sale 
on 121 yr tse from £85,000. Also 1 & 2 bed flats to let 
furnished from £210 p.w. 

CITY BORDERS, immac 2 bed flat in mod development 
facing frames . Lifts. Porter. Private pklng. 91 yr Ese. 

Frank Harris & Co. Tel: 01-387 0077 


TAYLOR DIXON PORTER 

PUTNEY, sumo VM hu. etnuaiv rebiA. y« wfii ail Denod 
tatura rt». Lwedy opw outoct 2 recejK. fabulous Bosch lot 

F**- 2 Beds - 2 1 m s™ "Wi !«“»» >«>»* * 

lunrous. E275.0O1. 

WEST PUTNEY. Substart* dauhto framed del Vtaortoi hast m 
emssnofion ar«j. Mbiw ora fratonss. 3 rewos^cellar. I» W/b'fsl m. 
Conswv. uhity, 7 bob. 3 Darts. 75' gdn Ptog. E^OOO. 

01-788 0034 





In f;l1 


HOLLAND PARK 

Spedous & recently modernised rnemsion 
flat. 3 Rec Rooms, 4/5 Beds, 2¥i Baths, Lee i 
Kit & Utility Rm, SSVSs years. £269,000 for 
quick sate. 

Joint Agents 

Boston Gilmore 730 2152 
or Farrar Stead & Gtyn 603 1221 


44 RICHMOND HILL, RICHMOND 

Sptondki Victorian family house enjoying bast address In town. 
Sal ovgf three floors, tfta ac commodatio n offers: 5/fi bedrooms. 
2/3 receptions, bathroom /W.CL 22ft x uft MKhen/fanSiy room, 
comaruatory, w.C-i’ctoeks, dry oeOer, 50 ft garden. Totally retor- 
bultad wjtfi great a tendon to detafl. Pull detals from: 

JABDINE & CO 

3 LICHFIELD TEBHACE, SHEEN ROAD BICHHOTID. 

01-940 8414 


Conveyancing 

£280 by City Solicitors 


KMKIITSHUDfiE, SW7 

ttagnMcsnt 3 bed. 8 bath, 3 
rsc flat 2 mins Hamoda. 1 
mfci Parle, ■ long luaisr, 
slashed price. Far sale by 
Wf and. £SOO.OOa 

Tel: 

Baris Woaffe A Ce. 
01 402 7381. 


KMC CUT IHIAim TUiy 
Georgian cottage, needs corn- 
dor. moeemlsaUtti 10 make 
charoUog 2 bed. a bam. Med el 
rare. C7B.OOO FreeltaM lor 
ouwe sale. 0 > asa oaag. 


ST JOHNS WOOD. SnacloaE 
r/hoU house. 6 dUe beds. 3 
recess. 3 betta <2 en tone), lux 
kitetm. CM. Quiet odn square. 
Early occuoanoa rnteUbU. 

css&ooa oi a as oisa 




A most tasteful 3 
bedroomed maisonette 
kt Georgian town house; 
fully equipped mahogany 
kitchen, Jacuzzi & marble 
bathroom, fitted carpets, 
period fireplace etc. 

042 879 3124(1) 



ARUNDEL 

HOUSE 

BARNSBURY 

New development 4 Modem 
1 Bed flats -cotwantont tube 
£ tool shops. Prices on 
raquast- 

EUURSTOW EVES 
01-226 9531 


MAIDA VALE 

Enormous potential on inmod 
ground Boor Hat n prestige 
P/b block wai Ift, porta egu . 
partana otc. Would prowria 3 
fed; 2 baft. 2 recap, k^/bk. 
Leasehold £97500. 

VICKERS ft CO. 
289 1692 


HENDON NW4. 

Panda Manstons. Vivien 
Ave. Spedous & 
convenient 3 bed 2 rec 
mate. Lgo wyeflner, batti. 

wc. WHNn 2 mka of 
Hendon central station. 

Long toe. E72£50 l 
S pycr MubIm Enas 
01-202 8131 


(+ vat and dsbmemeres) tor buying 
in the usual way on prices up to £SUX 
higher figures. 


r eellng you- home 
Ring for quotas on 


BARRETTS SOLICITORS, 

9 QUEEN VICTORIA ST, LONDON EC4 
TELEPHONE: 01-248 05S1 


KNIGHTSBRIDGE. 

Close to Bpanriwinp Pint ft Hairods 
2nd Door flat with lift, C.H & CH.W. Dbte bedrm, 
rwep rm. kit & bath rm. 

28 yis 1st Low outgoings. 

£89300. induding cpts A ctns Ot 

BERNARD WALSH & CO 
01730 9148 


mmjuto placc Mn. (etc stu- 
dio m preaMBtoua block ncenUy 
mudmilBHL 40 nor lease. 
Only CSMOO. with some coo- 
imb U. new carpel* and 
cu-uUm. f*f. Quick iale. Td 
01-821 91S4 


FULHAM PALACZ ROU P B 

Lu Seartou Plat. Lrp Re<ejM. 
2 beds. COL Oak FF utcti rjdi 
appiuncw tori. PuUy Tiled 
BaUi we. Many extras £79.800 
92 yr ktw. TeL-Ol S8t BISS 


1 jj 1 ' ± ii J i 


FRIEND & 

L FALCKE )\ 


Siwib own plai CBS Broom. Rm . di dwro la Dm usm S n 
An 3 Bet In flam™ Shoos Ra CH Ftobv Got E 
5Htt SWfi. Wo* Ml BOtOSM Mi M«aMd M44 tol 
MteteinltoiR Ha w M/Bnak Rm DnajRn 3 teds. S 

(Mi 7.H EI99JDD _ . . B 

Frwnd & Faleke 
01 731 3441 


rt Ute numndmo 
HWWkn VMtr 
B 6 JKE 

Hi dredboBa te fan 
fate. CH Uttiyw teng 










FINCHLEY NU. WoadMflh Ave 
n». 3 bed senn In popular 
location ExrrUenr Laura Ash- 
ley o*cot / curtains. cch. 

oarage wnn own dnrt. 
r87_SOO. F/H. OiMn tree. 
QlMk sale. 01-361 0058 avm 


FULHAM 2 bedroomed. CH. don- 
MegMKd (lmt floor ImnunUMe 
ItoL SsU k*' tt Edwardian con- 
version reran Uy re de cor ai ed. 6 
nuns walK Putney Bridge. Over 
looking BohOps Park- 96 mr 
. lease. £74 JOO. 01 731 2437. 


swi qWCH SALE for dehghiruL 
nuo rial in Warwick So. 
Drawinsm, 2 rate Beds. 2 
bails. UL utHHyrm. v. pretty 
gun. Lie 84 yn. El 08.000. 
Da unions 01 834 8000. 
KLtttAVIA MEWS The perfect 
PM-a4FiTP completely refur- 
usnea. 2 B. s Bath- Lge rmu. 
SS yr*. £260.000. Abootsbury 
EHaln 381 6677. 

FULHAM Hienide deietopmenL 
spactous studio, ideal pied a 
lerre. secure, porter, cellar 
store. Mng lee* c. £86.000. Tik 

01 381 8097 

HUUOA VALE BngM & Spaetous 

2 bed flat. CCH Curtains, car- 
pet*. Riled Idtebet. Communal 
garden* Long lease. ET6JOO. 
ono. Oi 286 Si 76. 

HOmiM MILL Mew* MUing. lop 
fir. spacious terrene, dettgmfui 
rrrep. bed. nwxj. hit bath. CCH. 
149 yr*. £96.000 01 836-2466 
k 330& day. OX 449 2203 eves. 
BAMKAM. KCSLIghl & wactous 
1/2 Bed ftu vdDi a Soutn faemg 
tvucon.Y. 122 yr be. £84.900. 
Bauy SWIM) C404.636 2736. 



WpOOnMD Saner 1 bed ItM. 
Smart Hock. auracUt* 
ground*. Lux mud kit. bedrm. 
batlirm. 22 mtus CUy. 5 rains 
Fora« Long leraeiootck sale 
£42.600, OI 604 2364-ieitHO. 


CCH1HAL LOMMHti Off New Ox- 
toru Si. large bnghL lux rum 
studio, stunning fully mod 
»nd. sep k/b. huge roof lenr. 
£67.300 ODO. Tel 02 -749 4232 


M-ouccsm TotR m. 

£142.000. An outtundlng ex- 
ample or accrued designed line 
gro floor cotn'erslan IUL 2 bed. 
22fl recpL Tet 01-723 6388. 


W14 - Attractive rtal nr BBC A 
lube. S/C 1 st fl. 1 dt> bed. Me 
reep. K 6 & £57.960 umolTet : 
943 us? rgun. rec oroin a ) or 
977 0086 (Mon) 


W.EAUHB BtMOOSf 3 bed p/b 

naL FCH. LBC lounge, f/f ML 
balhrm. ggr e connnunal gdns. 
Low matntenaiKO. £61 .950. Tel 
Ol 8790998. 


W2 ttmmAY. 6 Ui foor flat 
In modern Modi. HfL caretaker . 
CH. Needs some kmc. (Price 
Reflects) £86.000. ono. 01 589 
9292 Day. 741 2477 Etes. 


ASHWORTH MAMMONS flfS. 2 

beds, a bath*. aouMe reception. 
Harrods cnAaiU available. 
C 146000. Pod 11 6 Oo 499 9876 




M Hr flat SW 18 - 
Ught very 


n*7 jm m 
BV353 Om Bri EFP (MQ 
BV3S1 tm Of) - 





FttHJCO Enchanting Uttle boo** 
IS; roof gar- 
°Wl. CH. 999 year 
£186000 TeiOl So 0178 


®T JOHHS WOOD tmnuculaie 2 
J** 1 ' 2 »L reception. MKtwn 

M9 1 6186 c,4BtO0 °: TVftevw 












HAPFMU- Soutn Quay 4 bed 
send del toe m pew Braoetcy 
dnetopmeni tuaooo ri*- 
oi 266 0653 nn JriSaJ*' 


CHELSEA A 
KENSINGTON 


KDUMCTOtelmnracgterw^ 

2 iirsin third period tkdWW-^ 4. 
beds. 2 botNktl ensutte)- uoknu 
rm. rkgsnl rec. KH/dto» r- <vg . 
wm 6 mire toom KsitWjJ^ 

*»P vr |me. £155.000- TjW* « 
605 7693 / 01«4M-8425. . . - 


3UNHY 1 bed CMtore H *** • 
tome rooms, raid dumbrfgr 
garden Pm otc sale. *• 
lease D57.0W ono. oi 3S 
I57S netAehds. oi.SSVfiCSw 
exi 3048 day. 


illl 




MS 


Wfiem 


CLOSL MMTH toUAHE. SWI. 
Superb grna Or rut m pmu- 
9iotB Moch. Rec. 2 bnh. 
M/b W. bath. Porter*. CM g, 
LSf 117 m £130.000. 
Tet Tucuermam 223 Sell 
HOLLAND PARK AVE. Sunny i 
bed Rat. kb. oain. new. Long 
L*e CAl.BOa 68pm 003 8??? 

*«• l bed «aL lor creep, 

II Kll -Cl C.H. 98 m. £99.960! 
Tel 291 4100- Eves A W/IL 




W*- ,V 





































23 



THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


RESIDENTIAL PROPERTY /2 


klhdftt M 


Hiwn .Muur iu \ t . 

shoot 


Wu'lh'-.i ! 

] 

NWl'l-fi:/! 
h in : .., 

jn.1 ’ ? ' 
£<uur-d *,h. 

I hi* ST,,.... 
Hri'itii 
lllfl'W J! ■ t 

v'flS iu^l 
Mf fK*-« ... 
nm *.'■'£>*" . • 

i*c i.~r:v»i- 

Ci'S UV.vi: 

tvisii i . 
I^Krv'.i 

i. : -. 


The village 
landmark by 
|he church 

^Knightgdte.atQuenmgtoo, 

Gloucestershire, was converted in 1982 
from traditional farm bufefmgs, which 
form a courtyard dominated by a Grade ( 
listed medtevalgatehouse. The main 
archway and postern gate under a niche, 
which tradhtonaity housed a guardian * 
figure of the period, provide ttw entrance 
to the property and are a landmark In 
the vi&ge. near the bridge over the River 
Coin and the church with its Norman 
doorway. . 

Tj» home tasi tour bedrooms and two .' 
recaption rooms, vinth a coach house and 
an office or stucfio converted from the ' 
old stables, and it stands m three- 
quarters of an 8cre. Knraht Frank : 
Rutfey’s Cirencester office and Rex 
Hudson, of Northteach, are asking for 
offers of more than £195,000.' 

■ Comer Cottage, Norteywood, near 
UmkigtDn, Hampshire fa a coband 
match cottage set mine heart of the 
New Forest and thought to be at least 
250 years oM. ft has many exposed . 
tMmms and the accommodation 
comprises two reception rooms and 
three bedrooms. Jackson and Jackson ' 

^ fa-wnaow o. ... 

^ Harbour house 

■ BrttansSfip 'm Falmouth was 
originally a packet warehouse for the 
town's boat maH service established fn 
1 688 with regular saShgs to Europe, 
Canada, the West Incites and South . 
America. The resulting prosperity led to 
the bufcfing of drystone quays ami 
stone warehouses along the waterfront 
Brittans Slip was built around 1775 
and is one of the few packet houses 
remaining, ft Is now a four-bedroom 
house with two reception rooms, a 



is 


Loddoo House is a fine Grade n listed Qaeai Anne house dating from about 
1703, standing in the centre of the Broadtand village of Loddon, nine miles fawn 
Norwich. The house Is of five bays, with a later four bay addition, and Is of red 
Wide, colonr-washed on the northern side. An unusual feature i$ two signed win- 
dow panes, dating from 1706 and 1730. The house, modernized in 1984 has four 
reception rooms and a study, a main bedroom suite and six further bedrooms. 


”lc 


* r «s£ 



. v, 'd h o*' 

' ' V\T_ ' 



Price of punter’s delight 


balcony averiookmg the harbour, a 
self-contained two-bed 


.in - c.:- 

h!\ 

iiftT. .-.7 i, ; 

;... 

CBS* I.’: v. 
CVJ.U, V: 

With ;« *• 
US'.* »;•■■■ 
anil i'u-- . 
iV:-i » , 

Utr vsw - 

tl.uvis „ 

v=^nr 

tJiuUwi . 

A, nr. 1 
tihcjtKttW . 
no*!:-.'/ 

!.v 

th-.iu r. •’ 

n\ 


The ti tfficultv of 
pru*;n^ estaies 


studio, a walled 
swimming pool. 
asWng£250,0Qa 


room flat and 
and an indoor 
' Salisbury office is 



\V 


• r xi 




■ H are ton Manor, five mSes south of 
Cambridge, (an Grade IP manor house 
BVl2 acres of gardens and parkland 
running down to the river. Tire red brick 
house is probably of 16th-century 
origins but dates prindpaHy from the 
early 18Ui century. The house, with 
fine oak paneWng and flagstone floors, 

ntomsan^^entedrDOn^^raraler 
and Jennings, of Saffron Walden and 
London, are seeking offers of more than 
£4O0JttOL - 

House of happiness 

■ The discovery of old leather shoes 

in the chimney of a 1 0th-century cottage 
at Meonstoka, Hampshire, gives proof 
of an old English custom wherry 
members ofa family would hide one 
shoe each to the chimney to ensure good 
luck and happiness in the house. The 
shoes emerged when the owners 
removed six fireplaces to reach the 
original Ingtenook, white converting a row 

home. St Andrew's Cottage, a Grade II 
fisted building of brick ana flint, with a 
thatched root, has two reception rooms 
and three bedrooms and stands in 
nearly half an acre with a river frontage. 
Austin and Wyatt of Bishops 
Waltham, busking £240,000. .-. .. 


Once you have bought your house or 
your sporting estate or grouse moor, the 
□ext consideration for someone who 
wants to be truly involved in the sporting 
scene is perhaps a private box at 
Newmarket, the headquarters of racing. 

It so happens that there is now an 
opportunity to do so, through the 
chartered surveyors Bidwelis, of Gun- 
bridge, who admit this is quite an 
unusual job for them. On offer by tender 
are nine private boxes and 15 private 
luncheon rooms in the new extension to 
the Rowley . Mile Members* Grandstand, 
which is costing nearly £4 million and. 
will be completed in time for the start of 
the 1987 Newmarket season. 

There is already considerable interest 
among racing enthusiasts and organiza- 
tions connected with racing and blood- 
stock for these luxurious facilities, says 
Bernard Stewart-Dcane, of Bidwelis. In 
addition, a significant number of compa- 
. nies outside the racing industry are 
showing interest in them for promo- 
tional and entertainment purposes. 

The Grandstand overlooks the Row- 
ley Mile course, named after Charles ITs 
hade Rowley. It has enjoyed Royal 
patronage for more than 300 years, and it 
houses the Royal suite. - 

Designed by the racecourse architects, 
the Howard Lobb Partnership, the 
private boxes will be located at the top of 
the centre section looking across and 
down the course next to the winning 
post. The private luncheon rooms will be 
on the ground, first and second floors, 
some with views across Newmarket 
Heath and the Gallops. Every box or 
luncheon room will accommodate 12 
guests for a formal luncheon or 20 for a 


buffet, and the facilities will include 
colour television and the provision of 
connection for private telephones. 

The licences' to be tendered for will 
provide 17 days’ racing for 12 people, 
and two annual members’ badges for the 
licence holder entitle him to the full 29 
days of Newmarket racing. It is es- 
timated that the ■ various tickets and 
passes included in the licence are alone 
worth at least £2^00. 


The clients most pluck 
a figure out of the air 



With that basic cost, the potential 
licence holders will have to pluck a figure 
out of the air. The surveyors offer 
examples of the cost while emphasizing 
that they do not indicate the range for 
bids, and preface them with a question: 
“When a day’s shooting costs £300 a gun, 
or perhaps more, a good theatre ticket 
costs £30 or so, how much should you 
bid for your private hospitality suite?" 

At £30 a head, the amount to bid. 
including VAT, would be £9,913 for the 
year. At £100 a head, the total would be 
£26335. The tenders are being invited 
for three-year renewable licences on the 
basis of the annual licence fee, and of 
course the ^lustrations given here do not 
include the cost of food and drink, nor 
the cost of providing spare shirts for 
guests who through injudicious invest- 
ment may have lost theirs. 

Nevertheless, it is not being unrealistic 
to bet that the boxes and luncheon rooms 
will go for nearer the latter than the 
former figure — and probably above: 

CW- 


SdMAn »* 

* •’ 

» **• *■ •• 

tWM* - » 

ST61KI 


jm mt 


PROPERTY BUYERS’ GUIDE 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


THE COUNTRY 
PROPERTY 
MANAGEMENT 
COMPANY 

Property Mmuameot. Garden 
Mammnce. Rentals. Interior 
Design, catering. 

GLOWS - 0XM - WARttOB 

TCuantBMK 


HANTSJOORSET, ft 
LO.W. 


(EnssiEii 

CHRISTCHURCH 

Htgbdlffe 

Prestigious new homes and 
bungalows. 8 infiHdtal 
designs. 4/5 bedrooms. 2 
bath rooms (one ensihe) 

speafcztJons jnexetusno 

Friars raff with views across 
Ctaristdwch Bay to tbe isle of 
Wight 2a mSes from town 

centre and station with {fired 

service to Waterloo. 

HUCES FROM £112400 


OREVWEU. 

Hrif el conraAd school hooso In 
dBMfc village. 3 Ms. 2 recaps - 
toge. BaSTwc. ttchen and 
utftfy to. Dadds gtazng. GCH. 
OutOeMmp. sroQ grim, won- 
dBrM wswer temtmd. M3 1 
rode. BasaiQStolto 5 fortes. Wflcr- 
ku 50 inns. 

00 m arm! CliejBOB 

(025871)2544 


NORTH HAMPSHIRE 

Unusually epedous five 
bedroomad tamiy house 
to Andover, very tandy tor 
the station (Waterloo), 
large garden. E98i00. 
Beets, 33 London Street. 
Andover. 

Tel: 0204 57433. 


CLUTTONS 




South Devon 

Wash Farm, Buckfastlcigh 

Valuable and Compact Dairy Farm 

with attractive farmhouse, cottage 
Buildings for 100 Dairy Cows 
Milk Quota of 447297 Litres 
200 Acres 

For Sale By Auction 

(unless previously sold) 

As a whole or in Lots 

on Thursday, 11th September 1986 
10 New Street, Wells, Somerset 

Tel: (0749) 78012 


John Jeffery & Son 

Auctioneers. Estate Agents. Valuers a Surveyors 


WILTSHIRE 

FOR SALE BY 
AUCTION 

Unto, p mj Q jily said) 

UPPER LEIGH 
FARM 

lBBUaboul% acres, with 
magnificent penod 
__jnt»osc and useful Farm 
Buildings. Milk Quota available. 

_ Foil deoils from the Auctioneer s . 

Teh Shaftesbury <0747) 3331 or Salisbury (0732) 335337. 



[WfellerEggar \ 



MEM ALTON HAMPSHDK 

Urn ksud Bern 

Mtoat More, cm 

SoiCJMweiS 

snttsgsEO caw M uM n bauds at s 
SIK Oem HMK ta B* tmteU. AMh SOh 

m Ssaat Ntoa Hites, rn two BM 01 


POOLC.tara'CMnliytiouaeteiaui. 
el area ncor Poole Park. 4 beds. 
2 rets. Study, large gulden, of- 
fer* around SBSJOOfX. T*t ! 
10202) 740262 



DiHwonn. Fuay 
gdn. Meal yactibnen £44-860. 
TetQ243 576621 / 576692 


XVBth Cent 
House In mM son at mat nm 
tortc htineo town. Stone OMlt 
sale roof, many mteresdng It* 
rum. 4/6 Beds. Bate. 2 ReCep. 
Kil walled garden. 2 Canges. 
Staun. Cas Cent HUr 
C126MX). Prut.ua un. f 
man Moore St Mugford. Tel 
0747 2400. 

n— winnr hu of wkmt. 
A large, line and UtsUncttve 
bungalow In umren t % acre at 
beauUfuL sed. gounih. « beds. 
3 bails, lounge, dining, study, 
loggia had. Ut. utOdy. summer 
house. 2 garden shads, araoie 
car parking, gas CH £l 40.000 
Tel: 10983) 64206. CBwnloo). 

ANDOvn 6 - Newbury. IB. pret- 
ty cottage » autei rWgge. U 3 
acre garden. 3 beds, a rec. heal- 
ing. dm garage, workshop. 
£ 120 . 000 . Oreweutts Newbury 
(06361 46000. 

FAKOtAM 3 bedroame d de-luxe 
ehalel bungalow wtth granny 
annexe near comHetina - Sem • 
£ 120000 . COCbam 387183. 


Kno G«gn Former Rectory 
Mdt Ck»kr 3 Racecron. Pbpt idt 
■MatoW Kil; s Beds; 2 Brrtfts; Car- 
peo: Cent. Mac Dt*o. Qaage wtei 
Otar. Large (tonten. eii 2 A» Vm 

THORNE & CARTER 
Chartered 

Cu 



COMPTON DOWN, WMCHCSTCR 
OFFERS AROUND C13S400 

Astoy p tetly ttade U Lew) «■* wenwn how*, ongnety 2 

ritogmd OtedM el ■ ited ol an acra on a quur ade tong. 4 oetemt. 
nteLdks,tetong on. dmg rut kacnen. RN CH. OH, garage. 

M SOUTHGATE SDBT. WMCHESTER 
0RS2 60300 • 01-481 7868 


KQSE1 

rg<~ 
■ ■ :r. 

• ■' -n: 
r.- .’.7 
•r.?;gr:r 
■ >-. ‘r* 


-re’ 

-ir'L 

nici CZZl 

m. 61483 


Sofia i ® 
fit R- 

;, 5 i! T T 2 


CHELSEA* 

KENSINGTON 



■ PM. 120 years lease. 3 bedn 

barn. eheuUedww '. rscen. un- 

. derground gar __ 

£14&00a TW. 01402 7074 
i eves w/endsj 
•■.TOH MW DM, toctng west 
1 over gdnt. s dellghBul. mad. 
• 3rd floor flat. 9 beds* dHh 
rwwp. K* a c/ h. II. £189500 
Tfoimans. O! 370 6781. 

kMLS COURT, nvs. nngm. 3rd 

door (tel ta good order. C/ H 

Lgr nrrp, 3 beds, kit/ dtee. 

bam. Ll_ Cl IO.OOO. -- 

01 370 6781. 

AS 34.040 r/WtO COT 

36* receo. 2 double beds. bain. 

Bteed kuchon. sunny terrace 

« Abbott weekdays 4936000. 

EvcnkngsAveekends 221-7900. 

WMaa RW lIV t l Hn a m . superb. 

2 bed- flat, m purpose bum 

Nock. Rcaoy to walk Into. Ac- 

. cess to gdns. DL £159.600. 
Holmans. Ol 570 6781. 

teicra Mic vm. bunk w. 

floor flat in cMceBeni Hock. 

, Park and Cardens asoecL 3 bed 

rooms. SB yis. C26O.0OO. 
UnroM-Ud: 6Q2 6884. 

■WH OP WWQS m, W14. 2 1WW 

. touny refUrbBbednn rnslnex- 

micnt rood. From £111.960. 

Reed A Lewis 244 8577 
•IMmG|nVC>WU.IbMF 

- fir flat St terrace. GCM. Long 

lease. £601000. 573 6574 Eves. 


HAMPSTEAD A 
; HJGHGATE - 


(UMPSiaO IV3 

.. Detached wcfatoct 

ftefoned.1 



GCH. 975 
year 18888 . freehold can 
. bepurcheaed. 

. f49 5.0W 

Xefc 01-794 1687 


WOT H MW B m Attractive 
gdn BM In deteebeo Use. outer 
residential tl. nr Tube. 2 bed*. 
Jgerwen. custom buW ktC Part- 
od Mum. OCH. Share 
'freehold. £71.000 or offers. 
Tci. 4G2 9988. 


, rtt T 


HMHME MIL de mw nil sun- 
ny id ltoor -2 bsdroom btocony 
«U^£70.000.Tet Ol 7227396 


ruvwnmm r miiffw. e*- 

.coUeiri maisonene. 3 beds. 2 
bam*, garden. Long toe. 
£140.000 Pearsons. London 
-4«| 2104 

■ con* 

.» rretp. 

' 3 bMk^as CH. new roof. 92 yr 


K WIMKfUB ige top Rr • 
\mton an 3 levels, huge re 


Isf. 


• 95a 01-451 2818. 


SOUTH OF THE 
. THAMES 


II i ~ 

WV.!' 1 

««k 






m 


■re v 








AWAY FROM The crush S.E. 2 Q 

Large 5 bedroom house ton bed- 

room studio? Small endored 
garden* Aneney Station opno- 

-*4ie Easy cgmraurr London 

„ Bridge 20 mins. Croydon 7 

mlnv.. vacant noesttriy Septom. 

ber. Freehold SXffJOOO. Tel: <51. 

778 566a 

TT 4 3 b edroom. Carden, nu on 

(asbsonatsp SC14 Telegneh 

- reggtok . Own Pano* oirecn! 
American style uie&en. Ffflrd 

MriXJv A (WHIM, just 8 min- 

HUS OW OI 286 SOW. tTi. 
mJMUttATH Const Area Nr 
•SB* vv. Terr Hsc. Period Fern 

lores i /2 Reeeos 3 /a Beds. 

“SWEpteS""* Q4CH-. Patio 

Cl 24 500 onp 01-882 9090. 

L- PVTNKY Nr lobe. V mrious 

** Jweh. Lounge, 
kn/dtner. 3 bdrmv &cc eondL 

Uon-. C79.BOO. K. Donald 87A 

4 »» IH>, 481 0707-101 

♦ WANDSWORTH bcguunii 4 bed. 

2 Date now. lUH of flrig (ea- 

. lures, secluded garden, priced 

to wU flUICfcty. Cl 36.000, Day 
824 8671 . Cienlngt 874 0389. 

OVAL/STOCKWELLnat. 2 tuos 

2 rvrega. k « a. clCH. gms. 

900-yr kw. £69.980. Tek 01- 
882 4369 after .700 nm. 
PUIRET BOARDOK. 2 Mdec- 

orale d > m arnd nr Rat. to n 

Odd- GCH. ££4X00 F/H. Tek 
01^ 870 8240 iw/end/tcen. 
PUTNEY BenutUu) l bed W- Vic- 

tonan Cgmenton. Jngnaraaie 

coud QuKk sale. EE2.9SO'. Ou 

957 8484 cx365.mg 874-7399. 


TOAST MCE 
l ks dpson Real Smut) tege l Bnl 
gre te nspr Ite t 5M Gwan CBZJJotL 

VnUBSWETH COUMON 

Hsrett AC. beefed tm* tame 5 

Si te 2 "teiit are a*L 

«EWE HIHK. M» ME 

Swndi to tour An 3 Bute. 2 Bata. 2 

niLooa 


PTiom Tttey n 

01-228 0023. 


Chattered Sunnygre ^ 

fCUNMl SUTINH ItoteMM Imei 


ub« srb Wcawm unand Anne rep 

11 tt ennli itetoes • SOB OHregMH 
gndm » imn am or a 3 item 

ptoiote bdkaen A too. *W aawnitar 

M Otos n gas at C1QIUUI 
Mv my <yck reegMaa. 

228 7474 . 

140 NORTHCOTE R0ADSW1 1 


CONSERVATION 

AREA. 

N Putosy. UMdv son « tem- 
bans In prefry sSitt Ctee 
to PuHey thgb SL 4 dUe beds. 2 
Whs n » utt). elks. 3 maps. 
R tat/Mdsi to anscreaqiy. 

ore re. so: snteTtean at 
smt otog. £ 2 tsjoo f/ti 
WanrasBI 785 0222. 


SWI 8 . Conservation area. Ur- 

usual mod. chancier. -iced me. 

deWhUid communal gdn*. own 

lento* couita/ 88 Q. 4 beds. 1 + 

ihowrrrm .2 baths. 1 en suite. 1 

tettfngnu. bfst/ atelngmi/ 
kil riven & sunny potto gdn. Gge 
A oil st Nang £i«s.ooo. Tek 
Ol 070 1116. 


BATTERSEA HSVERSIDE- 2 bed 

( 1 H to presUgwro block with ex- 

ceUeni outlook onto communal 

gardens. Good condition Inc: (ti- 

led kkenen. rrstonU nortec. 
impressKe seeuray. ttexoo 
Leasehold. T el e p hone 01-646 
0166: 01-218 2732. 


PUTNEY. Lovely Edwardian fam- 
ily house. 50 fl spill leva! 
recrnOon room. huge 
kurhea/breakfast rm wUb pauo 
window ovenooking too fl 
route lacing garden. 6 bed- 
rooms. 2 bathrooms. £ 2 28 4) 00 
ono. Ol 788 3006 


MORTLAKE. Superb 1 * Poor 
ntod trn Ral. 2 double bed- 
rooms. newly filled kitchen and 
oatnroom.' open-plan Uvtng 
area. Immaculate condition- 87 
year Raw. £ 66 . 000 . 01-078 
5636. 


BATTERSEA WLLU& 1 bed 

rrjL 1 rm p. uirnen and bath- 
room. Security, porter and Oft. 
Secure parking spare. 120 year 
(tree- £60000. Teh 01 -SB 6 - 
2148 


Attractive flat off 

Oapnam Common N. side. 1 
bed. pauo. bate room, uvtng 
room, new idl/dtncr. OCH St 
cellar. £67.000 Tel : 01 360 
1306 / 871 1825 


GAUDCR ED. SW4. Superb new- 
ly com dal lo v. high standard. 
22 * ween. kH. 2 dbte beds, 
hateim. oaicony A gan. L/L. 
£79.730. OnntotOn 6 Go 01- 
SB1 4886 


1*11 - 5 bed purpose built IIH. 

r/F Mtrheo. Bauroam. cantres. 
gym. Wcuz7l. sauna and porter- 

W . 124 year lew. £68.M0 
: Ol 236 4847 <oHKe> and 
01 588 0458 (home) 


MOHTHOURE » WII. WO 

modernised 4 bed*. 2 b atb»-.fa - 
led Hicflen. 40 fl garden. 
£150000. Ol 228 7499 


SWU. one c ommon 1 be d p/b 
fUL garage, comm garden, 
share of fteehOM. £«.MW. 
Tetephone 01-874 9621 (H). 


DULWICH 


Mews haw over- 

looking Woods. 2 bnlnro. 
oarage. 87 jtor toe. £69.000. 
Tel: Ol 212 0263 weekdays, 
mar DULWICH Use 5 beds- gge. 
open vista, (rent gdn A Sih-(K 
big patio. BR uiei 12 mins. FH 
£98^00 '01-761 6579. 


Wates Estate Agency 


NORTH DULWICH 

Victoran 5 ted. 2 balhrm. 
tenfty tee. many period 
fcreoiGs. gas CH. dose N. 
Dulwich. Herae Hill 
stations. 

£129X00 F/H 

DULWICH WUIfiE 

immac da 5 bed. .2 both 
residence adj. Parte. 
£395X00 F/H 
OPEN 7 DAYS 
A WEEK 


01-299 0922 


PLOUGH LANK 

IE 22 

4 nenty bo® 2 S 3 tad lux homss 
to* to high standard. Sri in qm 
cut de sa c. Fury t CEd qustiy toch- 
ers aid modern bathrooms. 

pries from £87.500 to 


VteaSre1»N2tfribw 

VINKWoklHS 

2991722 


Beautiful Ranch teyle 6 CTs bum 
house. Enormous Drawmo 
rbom Sc Dining room. Study. 

Morning Rm. Faoutou* New 

40gc20H. Ooraervalofy- 5 
Bednns. 5 Bathrms. Super Fit 

20 x 200 -L- kil owe Oaragev 

Gorgeous V. acre landscaped 

garden. Healed Swiromtog 
- Pool. Oflers in regtott of 
£466.000 Freehold. Roy 
Brooks Estate Agent, 3S9. 
Kings Road. SW3. 362 0061. 

■EAUDFUL 4URBASK RO Very 

close to i he vmagr. contfort- 

aMe fnentay convenient and 

pranmi. this spacious del 

home has been lovingly looked 

after. 2 recaps. Ml/brtast. mill- 

ry. 6 beds. 2 baths. lOoft SW- 

faring gdn. Garage. £276-000, 

Sunday only Phone 274 8808. 

vendors agents MORGAN GIL- 

LIE 01-761 0900 Mon-SSI 


RICHMOND A 
KINGSTON 


Unmac larger than aveg collage. 

many ong features. 2 beds. 

drwvrm. Ige Ml/b'roora. tel mi. 

batertn. waited pauo gdn. GCH. 

new rariMs/ruruins. Offers e 

ni2J30o win reduce for cash 

buyer Tel Ol 940 7249. 


I/NEW- ; Stater vm 
house. 4/S beds S/3 r . 
study. 2. baths ctaak. ige Jd Riv- 
en. 28' cellar. CH. 90' garden. 
Front drive. Quick sale due too 
move. C19&0OO. Ol 948 6088 


Stun 

ning 6 year old 2 bedroom semi- 

detached villa at end of private 
cut-de-sac. Mapitnreni 2 :*x 19* 

sunny tatuge with trench doors 

to south facing patio and lawn 

garden. Filled kitchen. Avocado 

bathroom and we. Carpets and 

curtains Private parking. Free- 

hold. £67.960 Tel : 847 1412 
(Sunday after 2 pm > or 409 

1644 x 386 (weekdays) 
TWICKENHAM Chanuteg t bed 

coll, ivx Ml. through receo.. 

courtyard gdn. £7X250 lor 
QuMk Sale 01 091 6666 . 


WIMBLEDON 


2 bed m.iriniii 
2 nd floor character fiat in con 
v creed house set in own large 
gdns. 2 reerp. K & B. £67.000. 
TCt 78B 0682 ev « w-«ids 


house. CH. aon BR_ tune Si 
SUL E78LOOO. TeL (0750) 
64065 


SOUTH WMEPORi Lovely 
Victorian terraced house. 2 bed. 
ton batnrovan. 2 recent Nrwty 
lined ul Lge. w ret lacing gan 
with pauo ares. New roof. 
gch smtna ran tube and 8 R 
£66000 Tel: 0753 857254 
•day) and 01 5408901 levesi 
FARADAY ROAD. 3 bed fully 
modernised house, crtgmjj fai- 
lures. sought After mad. larger 
than average-. £79.900 one 
Tel: 01-343 6400 

■ w ee h end a /evert- 
ni mnw c™d nr com. 
reem. bed. k & h. baaemem. 
poeaiMHly to extend, dose to 
RC Church. Qwn lovely mature 
gaioen. 1 x 09 lease lor saoe. 
Curzon Cnandgs. 01-408 1611. 


PROPERTY TO LET 
LONDON 


HUH 8T KERSRMrrON. Luxury 
- 3 bedroom flaL Large nusll to i 
St dtning room. Ramos refur- 
bished. Co lea preferred. £380 
pw. 01 968 8170 


8 W . EMR ESTATES specialise 

in rendug * letang fn the West 

End St Ornirn London, from 

ample audios to luxurious 

a par tm ents. Oontaa 409 0394- 

KTMRMraM Newly dec. luxury 

gdn ftoL «tt couple. £120 P.w. 

Rmg 01 606 6677. EX 3206 
iDaygl 01 602 7369 (Evil. 
CTREATHAM Luxury s/Ullto 
bedsH close transport, pro/ a/s. 
£48 p.w. IncL Trd 01 671 8800. 


COUNTRY PROPERTY 


Lge del cottage. 4 bed. cate. 3 

rec. lge kli/brk. gas CH. dbi 

Crge. ooteouses. lge pte gdn. 5 

tmn BR- 50 min icc Walk test 

SCO*, gou. fish. SAIL £82-960 

ono. 0733 262676. 


BERKSHIRE 


MODBWtSED IgTH 
CBfTURY FARM HOUSE 

n seven icras. sR in tnaoA ogsn 

awtsvato. tea / TtaSoc 5 
frets, b beds. 2 hots ft Htaite).4 

rsqs. tope fiad tatefieo. castna- 

toy. saw coortvonf, Dacfi Bam. 

gngN. nhsr unis, scope tor 

Mention/ caoroson. Dnetapmest 
povntaL 

OFFERS EXCSS 06008. 
m (8344) 


ut 


Hoot flat in Georgian house 
wiin is acres. 3 beds, 2 receo. 
rated id triton. V. large wcO dec 
rnre.Cas CH. Oarage. 88 yr 
tons* £89.000 ono Tel. OJ44V 
761354 


BUCK 


FH« FAMH.Y HOWE. */5 beds. 2 
bates, itvagntficeni hau. Breceg- 
non rooms Sc sun lounge. 
DouMe garage. 1/2 acre of i 
lure gardens. 1/2 mHe sat 
(40 TO ns London). 20 mins 
M25. L4 95.000. (0494) 29969 


SOUTH DEVON 



A holiday home trfytxx own 

2-BEDROOM FLATS 

MDevoodRe Court bt 

mntBttttog, only Sate 


boMch. fayNyttwIii 


mom ofay --11,500 


Cda*broriapg,ftwn 
Lsndere. Chartered Swmyra. 

75 Shoe LRRk London BC4A 3BQ 

W; DM83 D905 (offia hn) or 
0V6B3 0900(24 hr) or StteOfficK 

Dautlih 96B5«5 fine wggtanm 


■MIUMIAM, Rher Dot. Super 

talk cottage dose ouay. ideal 

yachtsmen, bn maculate rood*- 

Uon. £40000. 060422 219. 


EAST ANGLIA 


CAMBRIDGE 

2 adjacent thatched cottages, 

pres used as I prop. Onnn- 

ragty modemsed. 6 beds. 2 

rcceps. 2 baihs. Huge detached 

stadia Sun terrace. Large 
sooth frdflg oiden. Truqan 

village. 12 OUl Cambridge of 

Hontumon. 5 mins lo Ml I, 
«s Oosi 38 rains. £135X00 
ona Tet (09547) 539. 


HERETO! 

WOKS, A SHSOf 


CHARACTER FARM BuSdng * 
Bam with planum 0 consent for 
conver si on to residence 2 miles 
Ross-on-wyg. I -awes MBCL 
BenUftah r P ortBo n ed group at 
OW stone huUdings with Archi- 
tect Nans- Price C 

£48/00.000. COLES. KNAPP 
Sc KENNEDY. Tddor House. 
Rooson-Wye- 0989 636S3. 

MALVERN Spacious IN A 2 nd 
door maisonette, prime residen- 
tial potmen. 8 mins B/ratl and 
Boy's GoBege- Free 
£55.000. Parhcutars MV 5962. 


NEAR ROMSEY 

16th Century farmhouse in just over 10 

3 Receptions, Kitchen/ Breakfast Room, Larue 
Utility; Cloakroom. A Beds, 2 Baths, CH. 


Sole Agents. 

Beales 0794 518237 


STRUTT & Aim 

PARKERS 


SURREY 

Guildford 3 mites. London 33 minutes 
M25 (J 10) 5 miles 

An Imposing Nso- renaissance 
country house 
with beautiful landscaped 
gardens in parkland setting 

Entrance Hall, 3 reception rooms, master suite 
of bedroom and 2 bathrooms. 4 bedrooms and 
bathroom suites, 7 further bedrooms and 2 
bathrooms 

Range 
and 

parkland, woodland “and ponds. 

About 120 acres arable farmland 
IN ALL ABOUT 160 ACRES 

London Office: Tel; 01-629 7282' 

pw. 1AQ91M) 


je of outbuildings. Landscaped gardens 
walled kitchen garden. Hard tennis court. 


01-629 7282 


BATH 

AWARD-WINNING 
NORTHANGER COURT 

KtNrmsECiHtfetji wit v jm ro» fiiuHiv w gl w til iu »g» 

cn.-vmtic daw ton now hvn rrormtod a Ihr hnl loxun Jcvilopi 
nvw hv Ibr'ktol Honv.-" wwdite fa t 

■wjvrNi unutcd hradr me K»vi Vvro Ihr (ho rviklr gailin m 
r»it» jvmtmdn^n *nJvwvu nni Fcumrs tariikk- lutl, -tiihvl wliil 
n,K«J LiKhvt! liivuiv hjjhn.ifn. with WUplUllir llln, ml Vmncn 
Ilona og The nupumcM ntlln vhWK hwWnif; nv annhl il.'lghllul 
Limtvaixvl LDortvaiih puowtinr -iHrptiiini vstnHindinfv uiihjui Ihr 
tliudfrrv til nwnuaiaF ihvm. Vit-wiof H nmiul Mi an jpjwvialHHi 
ol Itk- quahli >r iiDrr 

PRICES: £8S.908-t24SjDW 

Brochure from: 

LFTHODOMOS LTD 

SjIcv otfirr. I hnnlvinco i non Gmvr Sam Ruh BO blE 
1ft Bulk <•»$) M487 or MBS* 





WOODBfUDGE 3 MB£S 
Hm MB! House & Former Water Mil. Mettoa 

fa m pm cl cnapkMy «nm innytei 
BtPds Ito Ran Dtotoi « 72* acm te tanta 
nidi*. pMtott an* mcaaiifwl rate, 
teita. 3 feapion feum Htotemmalto. 
imok Dtecre 5 Bumo. 3 ta w . 

Gbsdk us 1 8 r 

Ohm sms nriocn 
Mai Sou l FMchv 
2S Church SKIRL WOMMdBi 
Tgfc 93943-2263 


CAMBRIDGESHIRE 

CBftibrhtaB 5 mlBK Ml 1 2 Mas: Umdon 80 mtn*. A OaauWul 
ish Manor Houm. An BkcapdonHy ting Quean Anne & 
house. Oehgmful grrids. gdns, paridands, 
hall, study. Kxinoe hall, drawing roan, 
n. krichen/txeakfast 


Engish 
~ aon 


rm. kttehen/txeakfast rm. 7 
ng. garaging, abom 12 


sitting rm. oonsennuoiy. 

bethms. 2 bethnxvns. antes, 
acres, listed grade II*. 

Sworders, Saffron Walden 
0799 22628 or 01 405 6852 


COTSWOLDS 

Chedworth-7 miles Cirencester. 

Beautiful aid farmhouse with magnificent views & 
wonderful walks. 2 Recep. Cloaks. Study, Fined 
Kitch/B’ftet room. 5 Beds. 2 Baths. Oil CH. Former 
cowman's cottage. Suitable convers i on. Terraced 
Barden. Paddock, lift acres. Offers over £200.000. 

RA Bennett & Partners, 

29 Sheep Street Cirencester, Gkxs. 
(0285) 5033 


r 


HERTFORDSHIRE 


MOM BARRET. DciignHid period 
Krracrd house. beaunfUliy ren- 
ovated rctabiiog original 
feel urss. 5/4 beteoor m. 2/3 re- 
cepwus. a bathrooms St ckwlre 
Garden. garage. Offers to 
gkra of £ 200 . 000 . viewing by 
appoiotnvenL 049 465 163. 


LIGHTHOUSE 

WANTED 

Please reply to Mr A Gard, 
155-157 Oxford Street 
London W1 


SOUTH or *T AUUR8 dope to 
MSS. Charming z bed wrra c e d 
collage, open plan r ewgitoa 
area and Ul. Facing open farm- 
land. £86.960. TeL-0727 33579 


IRELAND 


CO. DOWN Superior 4 bedim Del 
Heeon4 Acres. Rural area. 1 W 
nm m. Extensive Gdns. Pad 
dock, flabtmg etc Freehold 
£88000. TeL- 0396 8416Z9. 


EAST SUFFOLK 

Saxmtmdiam. 

A Hie Grade » fated Georgian House with adfoning Doctors 
premises ft daKghtftri waited garden wdfi planning consent for 

irectionofi 


conversion of the 


etc. Ex ca»en t 

her. Ret 


bedding ire 

ton. 6 Main 


into two ft the erection of two houses 


For sale by tender on 3nl Septem- 
Jdml Agms Sick ft Sen 


Tel: Abbots 0728 746321. 


KENT 


SUFFOLK/ESSEX 

Border. Colcbesur Stn II 
mites. Fine Suffolk btra offer- 
ing beautifully modernised 
accom. Parr walled g ar den. 
Loose Boies & Paddocks, to- 
talling 4 acres. 4/5 Beds. 
Shown & Balhrm. 4 Receps. 
CH. 

Simon Berry A Partners. 
Great Cornard. 

Tefc 0787 7239L 


•OURNE END Nr Marlow. Spa- 
cious. wen presented rood Del 
family Me. 4/5 beds, secluded 
Gdn. Beautiful views in runM 
setting. £159.000. Tab 06286 
22419 Hm. 0628 29581 Off 


tor hew. oakbeom*. « reeve. 8 
bed. 1 acre grounds. 35 mu» 
London. S mine M 2 S. Offers 
£500.000 04946 5986. 


DEVON & CORNWALL 




Couev House i 

bop Start n 

tarae ! 


EXETBI 9 WLLS 

Hoes* ate Sate t» 

ml M Mtot. 

tfi fleets.. 7 

Betel n iw 4 ta as. Baas ms 

PP to Suite (oekaM torh too 

a;w 

gem er ku ... 
iaB3ZJ2B7S.BR.jrm. 


HHBSVAL OPP BB TMfn 

nm be vm 

A seduted 14 man nopaiy and 
rottane Sa Bl 5 BOSS Vttl OWt 
him sneam ewer Joofcng ul 
P otential for use as privais 
icadenc e. Baa. hotel, or poms 
■using hare. 

PHm ttte 

THi fCS| 13259 


STH OEVOM Prawto pi. TtonetoU- 
Ulul South Hams. Derro barn 
ronvprskui 3 d/beds 2 recea 
Gartma Garage £80.00 0 ono 
Tel: 0648 880446. 


MS 7« 
□uradiT ISUi C vUlage henoo 

S bed. IU acres. Outstanding. 
C97 JOO T« 040 484 356. 


You need tanwelt fTooerry 

Mag. Deulls: 0657 876365. 


Charming 

mm- terr a ced cantoned cottage 

retaining many original fea- 

tures. 1 reception- 2 be dr ooms, 
spiral staircase, targe kitchen 6 

bate room. 2 ndputes walk from 

Sananngnem. £24jzso Tel : 

Dtss 103791 m 


SUFFOLK IFSmCH Ewre. CH. 
bung. 1 ac. lux find wl extras. 
3 bed. large bath up Siwr CH 
dng rm. lounge. £98.000 ono. 
More deutto TeL 0473 461671 .- 


ESSEX 


Dutch Farm 
House stylo 

LOUGHTON, ESSEX 
Ma gn i fi c on t house in IU 
acres. 7 bedrooms. 3 baftv- 
rooro, 4 recqitten rooms, 
Hfards room. 

Often in the tested of 
£500,0001 
TEL 01-529 6385. 


COntoriaUon viltegr 
Grade IT Design award Timber/ 
Brick Cottage 2 3 beds, nr 
wHito/sunott. often over 
£60.000. 0821 77263a 


GLOUCESTERSHIRE 


COLN ST DENNIS 

Cirencss&r 9 mte, period 
feuihouse in toveiy, 
sadudsd. nnl posrtnn in 5 
aOBS.-wfflt bans & staffing. 
3 rec. 4 bed. 
ffS ri. m 
Lear & Lear 
Bftltnhf (K 85 ) 4535 


NORTMXAOM An attractive 
stoncvbuUl conggr. formerly 
pan ot a Georgian home. 
ThoughtfuBy converted with 
deep sasb window and auamy 
onine- 2 beds, ttttfwn/dining 
room, uturty. badirooni. draw 
Ing room ww balcony. For 
Sale by auction on lOUi Sep- 
tember- PUarim. Baud TeL 

(03671 22422 


HEMPSTEAD 

BaautifuMy patented 3 bed 

CH btstgtiow. art pteasint 

coumrywlc views, bnje sun 

terrace, bnrit tatt flout* 


tteve. set in 3 h 

jobs, nwaxes f rom M 2/M20. 

35 nuns from London or the 

Coast £175X00 
m mWAY 374251 (EVES) 


HAMPTON 

HILL 

Exceptional period s/dcL 3 
beds, thru hue. modern 
kitchen A bathroom. 100* 
rear garden. Beautiful 
throughout. £130.000. 
Tel Taylor Dixon Porter 
977 0264. 


MIDLANDS 


. Secluded iSdt ren- 
tin' semf-drfadwd uin] and 
thatched cottage. Close to golf 
toil* and sandy bay. 8 bed- 
rooms (5 double}. 3 reception 
rooms <2 with Ingelnook flre- 
Piacesi. Italy fitted kuctwn ~ 
uled bathroom wiin snowi 
unit. Beamed throughout. De- 
tached garage- Standing In ’ 
acre preuy garden. CxiOlOSO 
Tel : 0304 812883 



tew efa u s rooms ft garage. 
Communal garden. 50 yrs 
teas*, some 
modernisation needed. 


Brttfah rail (London 43 TOreU. 

vmorian farm house 4 beds. 

l't bath. 3 receptions. G/h. out- 

standing joulherty views. 
Walled garden and paddock. 

vegeiabto gardens and grm 

housed. Offer* reotoi 

£160X00. T« 10892} 46473 


021 454 1696 


NORTH EAST 


BCMKMDCM. So a cknis RuaHy pe- 


riod house. 2 receps. kH/dftier. 
study. 2 wen. shower rm. B 
beds, utiULy rm. in Cramrook 
Srti caichmml. Eastiy main- 
tained gan. £125.000. Tel: 
0622 890780 9«30 weekdays. 


KCMT ft SUSSEX Border, tole of 
Oxney. £129^00. A superior 4 
tiedrooAMd Airtiiiect Detigued 
executive residence ui a sought 
after rural paftoon wnn weu 
Droooruoncd spacious accom- 
modation 6 Acres. BHS Arena. 
Stab*** « Garatang. London 1 
hr 20 nans by rail. Phone But- 
ler A Hairti waterman. Rye 
0797 223946. 

SAXMATE: L'nktue pod bon en- 
mrtog protected sea vxwiA 
woomand aspect. Teal arern- 
KCI conversion and re- 

deceratiOn. 2 beds. 2 baths, t/t 
kiirtien. detached home. AUrac- 
the gardens, garage. Freehold. 

• £76jOOO. Tela«05 *52416 tan- 
swer phone* 

■UR1HE Restdeoce Mr DOVER 
Superb view Channel French 
coa«. 4 bed. 4 recep. 2^ bath it 
pauo & sun terrace A garden. 
Garage. CH. ex conauJon. Lo- 
cahorv C97300- 0304 863257. 


COUierr DURHAM, Barnard Cas- 
tle. Bs id e r c a aie. Lame 
bungalo w litiaM In open 
countryside originally a row of 
three l 8 Ut century cottage*, 
tastefully converted in 1975 
HaH. amng room, dlntng room. 
Ulchen. two bedrooms, bath- 
room. separate wr. in an 3 
acres. Offers over £60.000 Ap- 
ply Joint Agents; Smiths Core. 
26 OonucHHe Road. Dartlng- 
KJO. Tet: (03231 462966; J. R. 
Add boo. 13 Game. Barnard 
Crtle. Tet r0833> 38094. 


NORTH WEST 


£159.960. Adtoceni to ptetw 

CMur ft htsionr village over- 

tootang rher vsBey. A trad- 

taoiial cottage s tyle 5 beta in. 2 

balhrm. 5 tecepuoci cm det- 

Airtied Commuting distance 

from Manchester. Fufl Details 
Reeves Rams 0628 822295 


MIDDLESEX 


CMBMA-UKE UlLSWATER. 
Steiawd Queen Arme home 
wun VKtonan wing. Detached 
derelict cottage. Statabir lor M- 
teensuv* uses isutaect to 
Manning). 8 bedroom s . 6 recep- 
bon rooms. 3 bathrooms. 
Garden. Eweuent view*. 

Gtabings ft Tlmrobomiw. Tel 
•07681 62095 John D Wood. 
Berkemy Souare office Tel: oi 
629 9060. 


TCDDBKTUH - Immaculate 2 I 
Bedrm vtcurun Collage off 
Nigh Si. Luxury Bain/Ktirhen. 
90* Cdn Mam BMim Shower 
en Stale Oft Street Parting 
£78000 ono. T«: 01 -945-4668 


IlilUMIelUN MiS! be seen 1 loce- 

tv 30’s PR 2 bed flat to blk of 4 

Easy access Waterloo nr riv er. 

Busney Park. Hampton Court 

and Ktotsnm C»300. 01-943 

4657 or 870 8208. 


Attrac vmage Her Eden v ate- 
N oi r on ai Bark Borden orerui- 
ly modem. 3/D. 2 «h. 5 Rec. 
CSO.OOO sco. Pmuim £0096. 
RMBLE V ALLEY Near CMlwroe. 
Secluded 4 bedroom bungalow 
separate mannv outigaiow 
£12.000 TeL 025*82 3367. 
WCHDHLC Gtr. m/C Mod tree- 
hold 4 bed In. del. m o/kroft. 
rouru. Inc. c/vatorv. uuy 
. C7&00O ono. 0706 32845 


LAKE ULLSWATER 

Dot* chad single storey 
dwelling with Loraside and 
Rwsr frontage. Auction (un- 
less previously sold 
privately), Penrith Tuasday 
26tti August. Full Details 
Gifabrngs A Tho nc otrow, St 
Andrew’s Place, Penrith 

(0768) 62095 


KESWICK 

New 2 Bedroom 
houses & flats. Gas 
CH. Town Centre 
location. Prices 
from £42,000. 
Tek 

Border House Sales 
0228 38133 


OXFORDSHIRE 


BAMRIRTfc Imposing Grade 2 thi- 
rd Georgian Town House. 5/4 
spacious bedroom*, orranai fea- 
tures. gone kitchen floor. 65ft 
garden. £49.600. Tel 10296} 
85995 


SCOTLAND 


PCOCKTO*. WESTER ROSS - 
DrtkfiBul Baiananstyte 
dwefUnghovae won views lo 
s«yc. 6 Bedrooms. Total floor 
area 330 m. m. i acre Garden. 
Guesi-nouse ptarnuai Further 
partmitore from and o ff ers to 
Macieed ft MacCaUum. Sobct- 
tors. 28 Oueemgate. invernese. 
TeL Inverness i0063r 239593 


■SIX or SKYE Large 3 4 bed 
renovated crall home ut Ham- 
let of Tun lu. Bromirm views of 
Cusms. eioee to the geo. Garage. 
Rayburn cooker & non c-h A 
dMr glaring. Meal for hoUdoys 
or retirement £42000, Dr 
TOommon 04712 246 


■tfAR FCRTH. Secret garden and 

cnarming nouoe requires caring 

icnani S bedim. 5 fee. oil c/h. 
large kuctwn Double garage. 
Apgty Smiths Gore. lOMehine 
Street. Edinburgh. 031 225 
6124. 

■6AULY HR RfVERMESS Dei hae 

in country setting. Lounge. 3 
bedrnis. 190 kJL util, balhrm. 
limber ctiolri. Ige ope. £58.000 
McArthur ft Co. 7 Ardruu & 
Inverness. <04651 954446 
BLACK ISLE, NR INVERNESS, 
imposing listed at country 
house. lO bedrrns. licensed res- 
taurant. 15 aeres. £130.000. 
McArthur & CO. 7 Artaoss SL 
Inv erness it*463t 294445 
CLCM1SLA Perthshire DeUghtita 
country house 4 beds, bul 
RenloMt want agprox £10.000 
w repair Often mviied iw 
a tack sale Tel: 03562 2187. 
MUUBRNiam Mansion 6 acres. 

0 miles from Aberdeen. Indoor 

swtmramg pool 6aueta. 13 
rooms. Plans pawed for Health 
CUnlc. Phone 0224 740260. 
YACHTSMANS' DREAM 4 bedrm 
wen appointed locMMe nouse. 

Soatshed mosnogb. silpw ay. 2 

ganvgrv. powrefitlM uieriiahup. 
All 1 acre. Tel 0456 810 269. 


HENLEY-EV-ARDEN, 
WARWICKSHIRE 
Close B’ham ft NEC 


H^h amenity pasture and ambb fcxtn of 284 gov, in 
bouaL floe vans, cottage, good ttahh'ng, yank, un 
counbygide. trout szream and egubikhod i 
Offers £4 90X00 

SHELDON BOSLEY A PTNBS 0608 61666 


WILTSHIRE 

Woofton Rimre. near Mariborougtt. Long ttwtetied fermhousa 
wm Tudor origsts. Wefl restored to former glory. 3 Recaption, 
Cefar. Fannhouse Wtehen. 4 bedrooms, bathroom, attractive 
garden. Bam statable lor conversion and paddock for budding 

ptat Jist under an acre. Oftars in the region oi E 2 fS .000 for the 
whole, or m lots. 

John German, Rambury, Mariboro', Wats SN8 2PD. 
(0672) 20691 


with 


"Second Home/Way out peaceful 
beautiful views and garden on 

Aberdeenshire." 

Accommodation - Living Room, 2 double bedrooms. 
Kitchen and bathroom. 

EnqufrtRs to Property Department, 
James & George CoJIie, 

1 East Craibstone Street, 
Aberdeen (0224) 581581 or 572777 


CMLLOWAY outage Twtxt Lochs 
ft Sra. Tastefully niodermvd 
ConsrrvaiOTy. ganton ft ftotd. 
£40.0 00 Tr l. OSS 668 340. 
MORAY ram 5 beta oom house. 
Id ral isobday home near golf, 
harbour ana beach. Aberde en i 
hour £20X00. 0642 40760 


SOMERSET ft AVON 


HEAR TADKTOH 

(11 miles). 

Georgian house in quiet 
part of popular viflage. 5 
bedrooms, en-state 
shower room, bathroom, 
(Siting room, sitting 
room, family room, 
sun/games room, fully 
fitted kitchen, utility 
room. Oil central Mating, 
2 garages. V acre gar- 
den. £170X00. 

Tel 0458 251S97 


CHARACTER HOUSE SomfTSK 
v lltare betwren CuUt 
Carv/ShMtianto. Nrwty reno- 
vated Hall. 2 retro, huge oak 
NEFT kllcnnt. CUc*. utility, 
master bfdroora/m state. 3 fur. 
i ncr mi bMnm. aathrm. CH. 
Fntrd carnns/curtams/. 

wardroom Inc. Garage- Lovely 
garden 5 nutm main tine (Pad- 
dington 1 l/2hrsi. £94.600. 
Tci. 0935 851126. 


EXCEFTIOHAL Country Cottage, 
bnmarutair. Lovely posibon 
Cam mien i MB/M4. Brtaiot 14 
mikv Lonoon 2 noun. £93.500 
Tci:i0272* 875117 


WIKCANTON nr DOKM M nr 
Large ind mud del hse Cm Slh 
views. 3 ree. kU/bkteL 4 bed, a 
bam. or or. gdn. 02 acres. 5 
nutot Pad and wftoo line. 
£ 92.50 0 Tel 0963 34271. 

SOMERSET Superb non Anuong 
views Penod Drop. Spat, aeon 
5 rec. 5 bed. 2 bath. 1 ac. 90ndn 
Pad CioSOOO 0963 50489. 
IESTON-SUFCR-MARC Spa- 
cious sih (anno nan floor rtu. 2 
btdrrot. balhrm. cktakrm. ga- 
rage £59.980 TN:0934 231 79. 


SURREY 


WARUMHAM, __ .... 

STYLE 4 BM Dei Home. 3 
R reds. 2 BalhL Tiled Kit/ 
L’Milb Rm. OMr Gge. Good 
Sued Gdn 10 Mins 2 BR St ft 
M25 Arresfe. Offers Around 
£179.000 Trt: 08832-8016 


CTRL VC£ I7/I8C Hae to 1 acre 

«»m Who 80 nil. 6 bed. 3 

rcpl plus Vl Bax. bed. both. 

krim. rert. Often ovt £280.000 

T rt Qo damung i048 681 6474. 

COMItMK on. con. Beams/ fn- 

Bln. 3 beds. CH. F.KiL Mr M2S/ 

23. 45 Mn L. Bridge, low rates 

(or atari. Mle £1 12.000 ojlol 

GorRtann <0885) 842845. 


HAMPTON 

COURT 

period property nr R. 
Thames. Thames Motor 
Yacht Club & Palace 
grounds - 3 recap. 5 beds. 3 
bath. K acre grounds* pad- 
dock. Coacnnousa. Stable 
block. Otters around. 
2360X00 F / H. A.C.FfOSt & 
Co. Thames DWon office. 01 
308 5801. or Country & Ex- 
ecutive Homes Dptment 
(0753) 888178. 


OXSHOTT 

Subsaiaal pan ol country house 
4 beds, foot smew, hwn Wdien 
and btern 30fi knnge dmgnn. 
ExcaUent decommp order Sumy 
locaon «i mucti sought after area 
o( Pacnersnam Part bsctaw omo 
goiicoiirse. CIS to M25 ana 
nunm BR 

£195X00 

TEL 837284 2089 


WCVBRtDSC Cottage style HM to 

private RtL 2 Rec. 5 able br 
kitrtven/ Must rm. 9 acre Inte- 
gral oarage Nr station to M28 
£167-800. 0932 48401. 

HR RBGATC ft MZS Family tue. 
4 beds, silling rm. bMst rm. ton- 
ing rm. kteh. uU rms. gdn* of i 
acre £179.500. 07572-49736. 

SPACIOUS two bedroom second 
floor flat. Superbly prevented 
Many features Garage £7?.ooo 
Pho ne womnoge ssoao. 

WtTLET Spacious fiat l/O. a 
Seds-ebok Rm. Garage CUA50 
Mato Hoc I ml Trt: Day 04868 
ease or 042879 3590 (tarn*. 

EPSOM 1 - 3 bed detached bunga- 
low Woodrow Park. £ 1 25.000 
«oo. Tel: (0372)720484 


SUSSEX 


KHTHOtUC/aOCRCSTCR Stan 
tev« to Georgian country Me in 
130 acres 12 acres of gdnL 3 
<1 tor L thapeL 2 nam*. 
sltiing living, bar area. GCH ft 
wood burner. Designer kitchen, 
roof Ottn.-sun neck, gagage. 

sea. Offers 
C 160000. 0043 781784. 

B * K:|I,T “* tarbgMfUI. 1 bed Ho 
floor Reoency style nal. En 
■inte. bathroom, sep wc. targe 
tounge. fined Mtchan. gas CH. 
Wtwwimmtuiiiiiitowaf 
““ Pier. £3 Bj00o 
T rt 01-7405423. 

FORKSTROW SUUCX2 yr utaft 
bed del 2 bean doau tounge 
?>™Mr WuBJCir garden 
tandetwrea lien* £ 1 2(18 00 
ajvo. TeL 054882 3lY7. 

CWntHK Spactoue 6 bodnn 
S/DM home/ income. Carttara. 
rae aundtng. us CM. £37.000 
rhou. tang 0323 640273 pm. 
































































PROPERTY BUYERS' GUIDE 


COUNTRY PROPERTIES 


iiiL. i'iivjLci WijjiNcbiJA'x AuuObi o i?oo 


Quraishi Constantine 


CoiitinwcH tram page 23 


WYATT & SON.; 


NEAR CHICHESTER 

Choc to Cbtcbetitr Karim and 

Gnedwrad 

A mapirficcoi period fannhoMC. 
Itflod tirade IL brined id dale 
from ibr Sriftrmb CnuiiTy. 
nmpnbeiioriv ir-TwtaM & 
modernised 10 a tagh aandanl S 
Bcdimou. i reception rooms, farp; 
kntben. tadmwu. (turner. Also a 
irttmird tisurhed range <nib 2 
bedroom 2 nxcpmxi rooms. 
JuKtKn & bathiaom. 25 ua of 
bad and ntenave range of 


WITHIN THE CITY WALLS. 
Grads II Listed budding in 
one of the finest locations 
ad). Priory Parft. Fine rooms 
and many period features, 
imposing Hal, Ctoaka. 3 Re- 
ception, 4 Bertra. on 1st R 
me. Mast er Su ite & 2nd 
Bath. 3 further Rooms on 
2nd n & Bath. Conservatory 1 
Garden Room. Garage. 
Needs some modernising 
Region £250000 
WMtabeads CBsDby House Bv. 
aontagba (B90 66) 4342 


HOVE: (1 HOUR LONDON ) 
ELEGANT .SUNNY. REGENCY, 
BALCONY FLAT. 1ST FLOOR. 

Furntthed by Karroos. Odoo 
viic sn and towns. 3 
bedrooms. Drawing ■ Dining 
room, lined kllchen. bath- 
room and shower room. Gas 
r. h v cry Quart. Parking 
s»rr. Lift and caretaker. 
OulgnnfV. 11671 pe r 
ann um. E9SJDOO INC CON- 
TENTS. I mme diate 

occupation. <02731 779560 


THE POINT 
ESTATE 

BHOSCOLYN, ANGLESEY, 
NORTH WALES 
A UNIQUE 

MARfTiUE PROPERTY 

Situated on the saltam n»a bp 
of Holy Island extendmg to some 
84 63 does and having onr H 
mile ot coastbiK wtti magnificent 
views overtootung Caernarfon 
Bay. tw Snwkna Mountain 
range and tfR htsit Sea. 

To be offered lor sale in Five 
Lots. 

"Tire Petal" - a luxurious modem 
tuigakm situated r ds Own 
grounds of some 13J5 acres o( 
rocky outcrop nidi umnterruptod 
we*s over Be sea, 

“ Tire Mol Bantam" • a small 
cottage property. 

* Hrinu" - The FrnntiousE and 
OinbuddinQS. 

Sons 68 acre* of Agrictdtaral 
Laid. 

A 2 acre (stand. 

By Aucbon 

On Wednesday. September 17Vi 
1986. AO Enqunes to: 
Derek Torrens & Son, 
Chartered Surveyors. 

4 Vernon Street Stockport 
Tel: Q61 -477-31 95 
Solicitors: 

□lion & Company, 
Centurion House, 


INCORPORATING 


iTS RENTALS 




A choice tocabon tor tins very 
roomy 4 bed modem toadied 
bungalow set m b acre i/fadng, 
mature gdn wtti mountain news. 
Spaocus lounge, lots of pne 
though out I/I taction. 

Lge conservatory. Immac decor. 
Dbiegtaz. CH_ 


Mist be sen 0341 422382 



Small country cottage, rivNc se 
tmg Mttfwi rural estate. Crerere 
we ek ende d but room to grow 
beds, bath, btchrm/breakta: 
room, smug mom. £65.000. 

Tetephoae 
0798 43382. 


HOVE SEA FRONT . Luxury 3 
bedroomed flat m prestigious 
mansion style block. Umouety 
UiuaiM on Ihe kings Espla- 
nade. Superb views. 2 
bathroom* ■ 1 ensullev. Iimmes- 
mr han. larar fully flUM 
kitchen. large lounge with al- 
cove rtlnliHl areas. £79.780. 
Tel. <0611 9601590 or 102751 
205458. 


3EAFORD 6 bed del Mr. Indoor 
hraiMs/pool& sauna. Split lev - 
el lounge Dining rm o'VooMra 
pool. Plum Kllchen. Utility 
rm 2 balls. Gas CH. Lge gar- 
den. views 3<ar garage. 
£165.000 FYiofd. Pearce Patl- 
nersmp 0273 479444 


EASTBOURNE Lin Z bed HM 
prestige sea fronl block Meads. 
Garage, communal gardens. 
£69.000 ono. Tel 1078987) 363 
or 10323) 639127 


VALE or GLAMORGAN 4 bed- 
room family house, fitted 
kitchen, lounge, dining room. 
biim room. Gas central heal- 
ing Double garage. Beach 1 
roue. Close Card ill Airport / 
Ml. Offers over £40 lOOO. 
06284 2636 / 04465 2556 
BALA NTH WALES Quietly situ- 
ated sionr semi-detached house. 
Double fronted with a bedrms. 
Large garden front and rear 
Close lo Arento and Tryweryn 
Dam. £23.500. 0678-520353. 
18C STONE Collage Snowdonia 
nr Lianbem. Tranquil locn. 3 
beds. 3 receps 2 baths. UU1. fll. 
kn ch mature gdm garage 
£46000 TR: 1 0086) 870443. 
NR CHIRK canahkle Cottage 2 
bed bungalow. CH secluded 
position overlooking River Dee. 
Ideal second home. £27.950. 
bomewtse 0978 260268. 


TALLEY, CARMS. 

Area of gnat baity nr T 2m century 
Abbey ruins and lakes. 4 
bedimmed. CH. dbto g had. fine 
aged detached hse m h acre 
grounds. F/l Mdiea Drag. Bath- 
room. Set) WC Large neap rath 
endksM paM owtfaotong mmnifh 
cent trim. «I mms Cankgan Coast 

g l. Of 40 mns Gower Coast (SWL 
Sjffiffl one. Tat 01-853 2016 
(wttkEnfs/eresl. 


PEMBROKESHIRE County Town 
Haverford west. Stylish S/DH 
Me. Pretty gdm. Obtain sin 
outlook rtrsaied roc. Family Ml 
disposal £29.500. 0464 74473. 


YORKSHIRE 


BRADFORD DM. house. 4 bed. 
Close W Qly ctre yet superb 
views of Yorks countryside. Of- 
fers £56.000 Trt 0274 596398. 


For rentals in Sussex, Surrey, Berkshire and S.W London, 
Homer Hill Ltd. incorporating Mays Rentals offer the widest 
range of quality houses and flats. 

Telephone; 037284 3811. Telex: 89551 12. 


Hampton & Sons 


01-244 7353 




6 Arlington Street, London SWlA 1RB 


Pemberton & Clark 


12 FINCHLEY ROAD, ST. MOTTS WOOD. LONDON NTO 6E8 
Tel: 01-586 5999 


ST JOHNS WOOD. KWH Uidts- 
reshed. may derate semi 
detached house n eu and. 5 Bata. 
2 news. 2 baths. modem lulty hi 
ML sen <*r. £750pw 
ST JOHNS WHO. MHL Seauhhd 
IW on Sid floor P/B Hock operate 
naan 2 Bids. Iq reau. tu hit 
tati/sen we. Aval now SZfflm. 


SWISS COTTASE, MRS. Ltooxy 
tow-house n nptrb awttcn. 4 

jai"* 

REGHTS PMX. KW1. Spoons 
newfy furnished Rat on M Floor 
P/fl Mode i bed. map. M to. bath 


Aval now £270pw. _ Sl50pw. 

^ OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK" 



FARMS & 
SMALLHOLDINGS 


BRECON NAT PARK. Total 700 
atm. 2 hrv London. Mod 
1832 4 bed hse. Subsidies. Man- 
agement avail Offers over 
£160.000. 0639 730828/599. 


LAND FOR SALE 


LAND REQUIRED, uudhsim 
dev H o p p e r seeks land. Hants, 
Berks. W Surrey with potential 
idt irmra-dlaleor Future reutferv 
Uaf devefoppmeni. Free 3 
confldenlial assessment, wtth- 
oui obUganon. Call Hugh 
Barnard. Basingstoke. (0256) 
851 155. 



a 


HOLLAND PARK UEV5.W11, 
Stunning mews house to tot 
sMteibiy fum. 2 dbie bedmis. 
2 bedhrms. 2 recaps, km ML 
gga. Terr. 

6 moun t s 4- £395 pw 

MAYFAIR, W.l. 

1st fir BM In recant refurbish- 
ment. 2 badrms, bathrm, 
recap. fijHy fit kiL 
6 moiHta s + E300 pw 

VICTORIA, S.W.1 
Exceptionally wen equipped 
house, 3 bedims. 2 bettoins, 
dbie recap, dkfm, Ufy R kit 
S months + £400 pw 



01-4938222 


COOTES 



xcoai 


GL()K(iK KNKiH i - The Letting A«ent.- 


HOUSES AND APARTMENTS 
TO LET 

Wc haw m tttcHtve ponStfio of pcnonaHy inspected proper- 
ties io it! of London's finer residential districts, rughw from 
one bedroom Dais an £175 a wocL to fivc/siv bedroosned houses 
at £1.50 0 a w eek far terms of six months or ionter. Company 
t e nan ci es are generally required- 
For im mediate and professiofral anemion. 

Tdepboac either our 

Hjaspstead Office 01 794 1125 
Or Kiughtsbridge Office: 01 589 2133 


MANACiF.MKNT FXPKKTI S K 



SAVOY HOTEL ADJOINING 

Magnificent 2 bed, 2 bath apartment To 
Let. Beautifully furnished with 
airconditioning, total security and direct 
access to all hotel services. 

Phone Mr Finn at 01-992 564-7 


CHESTER ROW Swi Family house. 5 beds, 2 baths, 3 recaps, 
kitftVTast rm. Garden. £900 pw. 

DRAYCOTT PLACE SWI Attractive RaL 1 beds, bath, recap, 
HUbTast rm £325 pw. 

DE VERE GARDENS W8 Modem ground floor flaL 3 beds, 2 
baths, brae recap, mod HL £450 pw. 

TREGUNTBI ROAD SWIO Wefl decorated 1st floor flaL 3 beds, 
2 baths, recap, mod kit £375 pw. 

ORR-EWEVG ASSOCIATES 
01-581 8025 


a 


MAYFAIR, W1 

Sriactam of taly tnnwhed taari- 

OUS Stufhta, MURMl B QU0 

mtarem loezbon jut off Grem- 
lin Sa Tte» apabnanta n sot 
n a neriy nhatmted block 
WBwari ied Omxjgfi rewtacn w 
muuglii ran Qdas ad a msUcd 
cooiiyRd. Earn apt. fiBy emved 
u a brery flmtaid reu woubf be 
dm) fur Mfwr Bocutm seatang 
Mayfav based acammataun. 
Hcntab £175-£350pe. 


1^01-629 66Q4^j 


MANCHESTER 
SQUARE, W1, 

exquisite family apment to 
rent In imposing, period 
buBding owfldng gdn so. 
Master suite witfi bathrm & 
dressing rm. 2nd bedrm 
suite. 1/5 further beds, 3rd 
bathrm, 2 lge recapt rms, 
featuring coodafi bar to efin- 
in q ro om, filmed idtehen/ 

initial remTtS.OOO per 
annum. Exclusive contents 
to to sold. Serious offers 
invited. 

Sole Agents, 
Druca, West End. 
01-486 1252 


A charming 2 Bed. 2 
Racep flat in mansion 
block. Fully furnished. 
CoieL £325pw. 

Coward & Co 
01-834 1957 


CHELSEA SW3. Maisonette fuUy | LARGE LUXURY fumtahed IteL 


No tgeu to bwn waea laBM- 
■0 1 aoow of i DW daraMt mm 
L oiriy 3x1 Now flat n readen block 
•Ah mwm. n. 2 Dbta Bek. 2 
Bade. Baconr. CSOftw HESmULE. 
is axtadc CH/Oiw. M A vjnA a 
GHWGE IKV S AVNL AY SB*- 
run wfunGEMOn 


AHOY! want to ihuk my ri-uau- 
raiM carV ’/ Elrgani rasiaurani 
. barge mi) mooring. Denial or 
pmmtagv. Trt 01228 0706 


PROPERTY TO LET 
COUNTRY 


ROYAL WINDSOR. Interesting 
fMs anr* houses In River 
Thane boatyard. Fully fur 
nSMd and equipped, service 
and main lal nance. 1 or 2 bed- 
rooms. Teleplwoe 07S3 862 
933. 


CHELSEA Prestige Area. 
Rrm RaL 2 Beds- Lounge. 
Kit S Bath. Suit Embassy. 
£250pw. 

CHELSEA Self contained 
flat Dbta Bed. K&B. Would 
suit executive. To inchxfe 
CH & CHW. EISflpw. 

Jane Cole Estates 
01-352 9940 



OVERSEAS PROPERTY 


BRmSH CO L UM BIA Tudor 
rtvarm a nan In ilw very 
PfnUgxB area Of we* 
vancover. Nr lo me Manna. 
und> bear hrv. sailing, swim- 
ming. inning.. . Many ong 
fNliim. beam, rod brick mm- 
or. 3/4 beds. I’* balhrnv 
shower. Lux lulls- fined mi wiui 
all appliances. Brkfsl rm wuh 
dutch dr leading lo gdn pado. 
Srp dining rm. Hr lounge CH. 
Opts A Fils met. pn vale gdn 
with lge towns. Driveway lo 
carport. £1 XO 00. 02098 42976 


DUTCH BARGE JOm si Ben Bum 
lor mum millionaire-. Scalable 
luxury apaiimenl/ranfmmro 
cpnlrr/noalmg mobile hotel. 
New mm nr. docked Mai 86. 
sleeps IO plus crew, lull imm- 

lory can drfuer. Cost 
£250.000 will arcepf £70.000. . 
Rival. 1 5 rue du Canal. 7MG 1 
Peronnrv. Belgtum 


BALEARICS 


BUR. Exclusive single devrlap- 
mrnl of quail ly Aparlmmis 
■ 321 Lrcellnil pmlnn wim 
oulviandino news on wMcts 
edge. Serviced. Idl. pool. etc. 
1/2 bedrooms from £27.000 III- 
nancri Dr Lolls tram Socr UK 
Aarnl Norman nwcu Asa- 
ckilev 7 Hanover Rood. 
Tunbrldgr Wells, h'cnl. TNI 
tEV Tel: 108921 27212 


CANARY ISLANDS 


IDfEinre SOUTH Large 1 
hrdrm apt furnished Overfooks 
sandi bearh Pool, lenntv. res- 
laui am Reliable mcncgiMni 

Nr Los Giganln £24.500 
07974 2511. 


CYPRUS 


SPACIOUS LUXURY 3 bed apart. 
Qtnef fun 6 min Nicosia renlrc. 
Balromev give superb view of 
kj rnn.i .v Troodov mins C£64 
K DrfalK on UK Td 0734. 
763373. 


CHANNEL ISLES 


LANCUCDOC Easy reach of Med 
and iViino super inedrrn 
house. £55 OOO. Pfudos. details 
ironr vvmdk-. La Matron du 
Call. 61 Aunm. Jersey 



SWITZERLAND 


THE S UMS S P E C IA LI STS Com- 
plefe range of properttes in over 
60 wtnier/summer resorts Egr 
Vertaer. VI liars Lake Lucerne. 
B ernese Oberfand etc. Contact 
Hilary Scon Property. 422 Up- 
per Richmond Road WesL 
London SW14. TdU 01-876 
6555 


GENERAL 


WO DE JANEIRO. Fabulous luxu 
ry bcarhlnmt 4/S bed h*e. with 
pool 01220 2101/368 8159. 
T UNISI A. Deux Oueds. Nabeul 
Beach Villa. FuUy Eauroped. 
Sips 3. £28.000. 109831 762020 


PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE 

CONNECTION 

PiesUgwHis properties m the sun. 
Luuv vites / 4«rtnuwt5 tor the 
decsmaig buyer on PortumJ's 
most bBUlfuf coast hne Com- 
preMitsive sennee tree of ctargL 
R you mm the best, try us. 


;l(,h M I 


(0925) 411882 (24 bis) 


ALGARVE Braulllul 6000 metTHi 
with building prrm talon sea 

views. IO mins Iron, Salerno 
beach. Fig a Almond trees. 
Owner sells £16.000 ono. Anto- 
nio Fernandez. Vale de BoH. 
8660 Vito do B1SPO. Portugal. 



iMASKELLS 

I ESTATE AGENT5 
BEUHUVE PLACE, SWI. 
Swob, ow ntawte y ehswm mac 
oft Brigme Sq. Lge rawing rm. 
panritad onog rm. 5 batons. 4 
taorro. geflewd Wcbea ter- 
nce. far cmatamg. Aval now 

3 imhs+ 52000 on 

■FIELD RD, SWIO. 

BnriiL imfy dec Ibl adii I dU 
tawm. song rm. mod kit & ban. 
Wear for 1 peraon. Anri no»3 mths 
e EI75 pw neg 




TEL 01-581 2216 


FUTNLW: lux balcony flat wUh 
garage. 3 bedrooms to sleep 6. 
tocireci bathroom and separate 
shower room, superb fcUchn. 
furnished lo high standard, en 
Ure coniems of rial are new. 
Suuon a mins. Water kxi/ West 
End IO mlra. £225 pw. Tel Oi- 
628 6691 tio UIL - 4 p.m.1 or 
loss 1261 4249 after 6JO pan. 


(DttMGTON - FuUy (undsned 
new house, living room with 
dining area. large 

sludio/bedraara. 3 other bad- 
rooms. 2 bathrooms. 2 separate 
WO. kitchen, garage and roof 
oarden. £BOO per week. Compa- 
ny let or overseas visitors. Tel : 
Ol 876 86X6 


furnished. 2 double bedrooms, 
outing roam. MKhen/dlaer. 
ba th room, shower roam, laun- 
dry room. Central healtno- 
Company let. £170.00 pw. Tel: 
01-937 7693 or 01-302 2326. 


FULHAM 4Ui floor 2 bed flat In 
brand new Modi oSooMng 
Park. Receu. boib + w.c_ Ut - 
all machines. Spans complex - 
swimming pool, gym A sauna + 
parking. Go long leC £20 0 pw 
Goddard A Smith 01-930 7321 


HOLLAND BARK recently refur- 
Mshed debghtfuny spaaoas 1 
bed Period flat with Idtfi ceU- 
ings. Tull lengdi windows & 
bafcooy . Kn ■ o> machines. Co 
long leL £228 pw 
Goddard A Sndttl 01-930 7321 


HYDE PAHK. Inlertor desi gned 2 
bedrooms, large double recep- 
tion. Ame ri c an kllchen. marble 
bathroom pius seperatr WC fW 
m presage Mock. AvaU&Me 
now. ShortAong lets. Palace 
Properties: Ol 486 8926. 


LANDLORDS /OWNERS if uou 

have guaWy property m lei tea 
in aooul IL We offer a profes- 
sional and rrttoMc service. 
Phone Qurakml ComumOne 
today: 01 244 7363 
UUTVB1E RD, ngg, quite 
nwKriOcviU. 6 bed. 3 recepf 
hse. Immacutaie throughout, 
avail, i yr plus. Dram sepL 
£496pw. Hen leys. Ol 736 
0089. 

W1X HOUSE Nr HMLnd Pack 
and Latimer Rd tabes. 3 
bedrms. bath. 26* recent, 
ktuhen/mner. sunny garden, 
quiet street. Long Co Let. No 
agents. £186 pw. 221 3863. 
RA KER ST; Supurb 3yra old torn 
hse 4 beds. 2 bam it eneuMeL 
tounge/dlner. ku/bfceo. Gge. 
Patto/gdn. OCH. £375 P-W. Ol- 
847-2641 / 221-8276 
BARMS, SWI 3. Spadous det 
hse wen dec 6 runt. 3 recess. 4 
beds. 2 boms. elk. Gas ch. Coc- 
Preuy gdn. Long let. £378 pw. 
Tet JW UP 949 2482. 
C HELSE A. Luxury makwoeur. 2 
beds. 2 baths. 1 reception, kllch- 
en oil machines, roof garden. 
G/H. 5 minutes Sloane Square. 
£326 pw. Tel: 788 2624 TO- 


wi . 6 ottos walk US Embassy. 
Available unmedtotety. 3 Beds. 
2 Recent. Kuenen A 2 Baths. 
Gas CH. All appliances. Long let 
pref. £360pw. Tel: 01-629 
6102 m. 


DULWICH. Edwardian ramUy 
house dose mHn BR station. 6 
beds. 3 recep- Ui/bTas rm. 
surety garden. £290 pw. Co let 
pref. KeyhalrL 733 4518 (24 
hours). 


MtERHATIONAL EX E CUT I V ES 
Urgently require flats 5 houses 
m central London ton £160 to 
£2.000 pw. Please can Solly 
Owen or Lorraine Campoefl on 
01-957 9684. 


LITTLE VENICE. Warrington 
Crescent, iratnac 2 bedrm (tat In 
Crane D Hated crescent (Nash 
type white Stucco). Co let only 
1 yr min. £260 pw. tel: 236 
6891 Ext 37 or 286 4220 


barnard 

marcus 


mam road, swh. BreAM* 

S ZteSDOnwHioiaecnaHooii 
p. lge M/dn roow. 2 owa. 
mtot Asatato to swi la 

s *”pTmugo office 

834 7316 

NIUE flAHOBO TERR. W8. At 
non 3 btd to "ft woo. 2 oate. 
II an sun). Rtceo/Mi room. 11 W. 
60 S CH/CHW. £300 wr. COS OHy 

MAYFAIR OFFICE 
493 8889 


SWI flats 
available 

1. large. 2 bed OaL £T70 

2. 2 bed & m Warwick 

Square. E180 - E2S0 pw 

1 bed fiat to Carlisle Place, 
El 30 pw. 

Ring: DAOHTONS. 

01-834 B«XX 


THE VERY BEST 
Landlords & Tenants 
come to us for 
aaesAvu. 

HABPSTtAO. 

KBtSBflGTON, HRMUfiMM 
and smflar areas. 
Phono UK 

BIRCH & CO 
01-734 7432 


KATH1NI GRAHAM 

For tha best setection furnished properties in Central 
London. 

18 Montpelier Mews 
Knights bridge 
LONDON SW7 
01-584 3285 


DIAS MNGEMENT 


NEW MALDEN spa- 
cious. 4 bed hse, gge/ 
gdn. Co iet £650 pan. 
swi 9 Lux, new, 2 bed 
nat/gge, fun him, £150 
pw. Co lei 

01 942 9883. 



For fuff Al service cafl. 
01-221 7I2WM06 2L3201 
WE WORK FOR YOUR 
CONVENIENCE 


BT14 FABHLY PLAT to cH»n Vic- 
torian mansion Mock. 
Beautifully f unshed Nr tube. 4 
beds, lge reep.. sep ML. bath * 
sen wc. CSOCtow Tef-2363113 


SUPER SECRETARIES 



F.W.CA7P Obtonagement Ser- 
vicesi Lid requ i re prope r ti es In 
central south and west London 
areas far watting appUcandOl- 
221 8838. 


COLLEGE LEAVERS 

Busy Park Lane Soficflors, 90+ shorthand. £7,000 
Gj^Managoment Consultants, typing + admin. 

Junior sacretare, 904- shorthand, to Chief Executive 
of Major City Bank. Excaflant promotion prospects. 

Bouncy personality + fast typing ftor Computer Sates 
Team ki the City, £7.000 

Shorthand + audio tar Chairman + MD of Tour 
Operators, City, £7-7,500 
krierast in g work shorthand secretary to Chief 
Executive of Management Forecasters, EC4. £7^00 

City 377 8600 VfestEnd 439 7001 I 1 



FRANCE 


ANTBCS SMmdid lge Wixho 
dPPt Lounge. Ul /diner Big bal- 
lot, v. cellar Marble tire Full 
equiaed Pool. Evaluate views 
Nr beach. 7klh Air/P £33000 
Tel 02406 5870. Ol 236 3967 


man FRANCE: Large presbvierv 
h* renovation, facing south, 
oarden. rnipnMit vw»i «1 
Pyrenem. 190.000 Francs De- 
Lirhed haute for renovation, 
oarden. hill-top town nr. Car-' 
roMonne. 97.000 Francs. Other 
proorrlin available. Yet 
France 68 60 67 66. 
CRMAtlD .Near ST Toperi stu- 
dio A bathroom firs noor 
balronv. (urnuhnL own phone, 
rural co-es ute Guardian, to 
mins sea. £20.000 nef. TCH. 
Collingvnrod 94 43 29 30. 
STONE VILLA OE HOUSE, near 
AUrbonne lAude}. 30 mins Med. 
Rcauires renovatioa. 6 rooms, 
garooe »tvj garden Overlooks 
vmre Price: £12X100. Tel: 010 

3>©a 650137 

DORDbGHC Bargam house exeL 
Male, really 16 occupy . telling 
imreonrat River Frontage. 
Cl T.POO TH. 02 43 62 H? 83 
or France 53 65 22 78 
ARE YOU BfTERESTED In OC 
•j mrlng property around in* 
Cob- d'ATUfl* 01 431 3121 1TI. 

6 POSTERS COAST. Ong stone 
Brefon canape for rend anon. 
£10.000 ONO- 02214 4052. 


mrrrm. 


Most sought after area near 
Martrella. 3 mins Puerto 
Banus. Detached 3 beraoom. 2 
bathfoom. fully furnished villa. 
2 nitre walk from die sea. 
Askmg £75.000. Must sail 
fta reasonable otter 
accepted. 

Tetytae 0502 663 387 


MAHBELLA/ LASTERRAZAS as 

featured In Sunday Tlmev. 2 
b**H/ S barhs. luxury 
apoarfmenl 0 M poslllon. 
BreaUUaklng vlevm New. Bar- 
gain for auk-k sole. CSaooo 
LM is ISA, more 1 only From 
private owner 021 7076895. 


BIARBELLA fantastic value 1 and 
7 bed lux opparf in bra udful sel- 
ling. Pool, (ennb courts, eic.. 
£17.600 and £36.000. SO°o dep 
If required balance aver 10 
years, id 0632 489064 or 
670436. 


EXCHANGE Sponsored steel wide 
brained rruisrr Taanerre. 
F cancel for apartment in een 
tral Fuetipnou or Los Boilcnes. 
£16£X». TrL 021 777 3169 


Time Share 


FwtHKJM logo 
on Mto| ■ AHY BK 
ip ite yev. duose you an al 
Bwbten «d vteatt you Mktaf 
iBcaBBK HMf Br Cere prt-ooner at 
BUT on* tel ri t.TOO a ara ro cs it 
JUSTOA. DB8MK. FESJUO 
HVWCE. StBMlW V. GflEK E- 
(TN.T. SWEO01 SWT7BWI0. 
SPAM. UL MB b obopUb Mimu& 
Poces c. E390-E1500 per «ok. thero- 
dRf ISHT-H&f to mi, (fsiiace 
wtefc m tsu nxfc scnenel 
flOQm *95)00 T»e Son Omen 
Com W 1M 

BN. TTH Fskwre BL TkDHtay. 

IN Ml « OSD 




An ajartmert m the sunny 
sounicaibeyounforthB 
next 10 years for a once 
only payment ot £350, we 
also have some 5 war 
leases id only £195. 
WHITE FOR COLOUR 


il" 1 Mi 


Apaftmedwise Ltd, 

348 Swbridge Road East 
CanHf. 

Tel: (0222) 32018 




ton available CoraderpMe 
saving on IKl- AKo Sole Agents 
for a luxury villa development 
01-446 2481 

COSTA DEL SOL New 3 bed 
linked apt f» views. £48.000 
ono 01 31 i 1100/317 8068 

HUUmnJLA-SKCL HOTEL. 2 bed 
lux apartment, superb views. 
£38.600. Te* 0464 315213 


UT7T 


3 bedimmed luxury vffla in 
TENERIFE. 1 month free- 
hold. £7.500. 

MWniSAL ■ Golfer's Para- 
dise. 4 bedroomed villa, 
private pod, adjacent to gotf 
course. £10.500. 

For fiBUnr tUte9s catt 
041-649 7921 


rEMCHDL PALM BEACH CUM 

2 Brm Weeks 48/49/60. for 
sale >07461 683786. 


£<80 wkiy Luxunous Abode 
with every candor! 3 bed- 
rooms Spacious Reception. 
Separate Diner. Available now. 
Ol 286 8040 III 
BNUMPIUN PARK SWG: fusury 
4ia noor. 2 bed. 2 balconied 
flaL overtootung private 2 acre 
park Gym. sauna, foianum. 
pool Prh parklna £195 pw 
me. Tel 01 874 1060 
GREAT VALUE KregMsbridge & 
Kensington, lge selection of su- 
perb 1. 2 A 5 bed serviced Hals 
for shad holiday lets, from 
£275 pw Aylesford & Co. Tet 
01 7?7 6663 

HAMMERSMITH/ CMSW1CK. 

CJOW rl i erode, snanouv well 
f urn A dec Me wiin 3 receoL 4 
beds. 2 baths, elk. Gas eh. All 
mochues. Avail 6/9 mnllav. 
KSSO pw JW Im 949 2482 
HAYMARKET. Newly furnished 
and fitted gui SOI noor 1 
bedroomed flat Ideal bofcitotor 
pad or mm a lerre for West 
End /St. James'. £176 pw pro. 

628 4499 red 381 

ISUHGTON. luxury mi m Gror 
plan ferraee. 3 noon, 
cansrrvalory. small garden, 
also racing gardens. rotuemeM 
transport and city. £135 Pw. 
Tei >0680811 391 
HOLRMYS A LONS LETS, Lon- 
don ro nwnt d e Prom Ud oi 
£42 9462 « 27 or Ol 831 
0366. 



ROOK COURT. 6 ndns West 
End. 2 bedroom flaL lge reoept- 
baui. 2 WC (mod kllchen. en- 
try phone, cur space. 2 Ufis. 
porter. Cl 70 pw. Ol 430 1698. 

KDtKNOTOM W8, Mod lux S/C 
matt. 2/3 beds. 2 both, lacing 
Odn Sg. dose Ken High SL 
£575 pw. 01-370 6266. 
MARBLE ARCH By park. Mod 
luxury flaL 2 beds, reception . 
hit. bath, balcony- 9dns. pKlng. 
£300 pw. Long oo lei 262 4617. 
BIAYFARL Off Curaon Si. attrac- 
tive l bed flat- may hum med 
and eoutooed. long let. £176 
pw. 01-499 0521. 

MAYFAIR, HYDE PARK. The 
most luxurious kmg / sho n let 
ants, lwk/lyr. 1/B beds. Ben 
prices. W.T. P. 01 936 9612. 
P HNUn o ac HELL. Laroe 3 bed 
unfum flaL eB lux flidngs & 
mams £310pw. Also I bed (oro 
bale not £120pw. 436 8380. 
PUTNEY Spacious 1 bedrm nalln 
mod block. Nicely dec & han 
with llfl. gge. gas ctr. £96 <rw. 
Tet JW lid 949 2482. 

SOUTH LONDON 3 bedroomed 
family house. Pets welcome. 
Washer. Carden. £116pw. Ol 
686 7376. Rental Guide 
SW4. Private Regency Crescent, 
luxury s/C Garden FlaL fur- 
nished. 3 rooms, k A B. £96 pw 
UK. rale*. 01-622 1467. 
•J79C81 The number lo remem- 
ber when seeking bed rental 
properties In central and prime 
London areas £160/£2 j000pw. 
WZ Compact p.b. 1 BM flat m 
9000 Mock. Spadous L/O. KJ1 A 
Baui/WG. PIT A IU1. £160 
Benham & Reeves. 938 3622. 
WIDE RANGE of houses, flats, 
aedsib. shares in SOi London. 
All prices, axes. Open 6 days. 
Call Rental Guide: 686 7576. 

3 BED USE. recepL TV. gge. 
£120 pw. Coll Express Rentals. 
01 883 5457. 

RRAM H AM OARDENS. Spac 4Ui 

fir flat r Hfl overtkng gd» 2 
bedrms £466pw370a60afT). 
CHELSEA Immac lux fUL Oltar 
ny, able bed. recepL UfL porter. 
£195 pw. Long ML 622 6825. 
CHELSEA! i bedroomed garden 
flaL new con ve r si on. £150 PW. 
Tel 01-375 6306. 

HAMPSTEAD VILLAGE NW3. 2 
DM. tux flat IO HI. 6-12 mths. 
£166 PW. Tel: 01 436 0764 
KOLBORN S/C 1 double bHbdOHi 
flaL fully furnished. £200 pw 
neg 708 1472 Eves. 

HOLIDAY APAHTMEHTS from 1 
week to 3 Months from £300 te 
£3.000 pw. 01-937 9681. 
BLMCTON Share wttri 1 outer, 
lux ch gdn flaL n/s. £66 PW. 
Avail 9tn Aug. 01 369 6707 
KENSINGTON. £136 pw. Excel 
Mil spadous well furnished 2 
bed garden flat 603 906&. 
KEKSMBTON. LUX Studio flaL 
Col TV etc. 6 month*. £98 pw. 

00 M pref. 01370 6681. 
LITTLE VENICE WZ. Luxury 2 

Orel room turn flal.'tmed kli. ch. 
£230 pw. T-P-M. 446 2026. 
LOOMING (or Ihe bOSI flaL du 
pies, house in Loodoo? 
£100/K»0f>w. Call 689 5481. 
MANY HOUSES, flats, bedritt. 
across iv London. Open 6 days. 
Express Rentals. Ot 883 6467: 
MAYFAIR. Small but very 
beaulfui fludw flat. £176 pw 
IK cleaner. 936 2781 TTV 
Nil. Charming 2 DM well I urn 
flat in lux pb btoek. C/n. gge. 
£115 pw T P.M. 446 S02& 

N7 SUNNY SPACIOUS Turn flat. 
SbcpB 3 Gas CH. £600 pan 
excl. Td 698 4255. 

N. LONDON. Oble BMDL £3S pw. 
Nr Tubr. Call Express Rentals. 

01 883 5487. Open 6-days. 

MW i bed mi. reeepi. pnone onn. 

nr Tube. £86pw. Express Rem- 
an 01 885 5457. 

PRHUCO: Luxury, sgactous. 2 
bedroomed flaL £300 p.w. Td 
01-834 8736 


Secretaries Plus 


TheSeavtarkdConsultants 




FIRST JOB? 


£6,500 + L.V 

Please phone Sue Crabtree on 
01-488 9951 


mmm 


H a mma rem Mi Intomatmnri trawl 
ca c£9JNX) pa +■ trawl faensfits. 
Tte b in eneflent oaoonuntty tar 
■A anMns secreraty (22+) wth 
accurate Sh and typing (90/60). 
W stfta an aOwntage. Snouu 
Hferity haw previous EJtpsTexe m 
a hflchc Mis OfticB emiuiBima 
rattan « service mdustiy. 

Write to tee 

Personnel Officer, 
Mark Travel Ltd 
1-15 King ST 
W8 9HR 
or Tel 61-741 9881 
lor mi h amtfcde irflenriew 


ouired xr Creme de b Creme 
or 586 8929. • 


SECRETARY /AMttUUU IO Dlrec- 
torsreoulrM in Bflgrivla. Aged 
over 25 Strarmami/typlne and 
general office duues- 5 day 
week 9 OO - S 30. Splendid op- 
portunity for someone wiui 
administra tive flair. Salar y by 
arrangement depending upon 
previous experience Musi be 
able lo commence immMiatety- 
Td 01-236 9315 for interview. 


SECRETARY/M 21 SO ITS re- 
quired tor Rule Lane luxury car 
export dealer soecla using tn 
sales to Royal Famines and 
Heads or stale. Accounts expe- 
rience necessary. Saury 
rommerouraie with age and ex- 
perience Send C.V. lo: The 
Manning Director, Trasco m- 
t emotional Pk. 6567 park 
Lane. London WIY 3DF 


PA TO PARTNER (no snanhonoi 
to £12.000. Join this presiiglous 
managnneni comutcancy of a 
senior level. Carrying out an 
adnxn-onenBted role, you win 
become fully involved In an ex- 
citing and varied luneuon. 
Audio typing al 60 wpm Syner- 
gy. ihe recrultmaiL 
consultancy. 01-637 9833 

PUBLIC RELATIONS ID £8600. 
Start a career in PR wuh thta 
small but dynamic company. In 
vorvM in pranauns unusual 
ev enlo, you will be In a sKuottcu 
oflertng lots of scone For devcl- 
cwmeni. Audio typing at 66 
wpm req'd- SH an auei. Syner- 
gy. the recroument 
consultancy. 01-637 9636 

SIMPLY ADMM £8308 mM 
private UivcstmefU team seek 
bright, numerate admin oasts- 
lam. ExeeUrnl tramino vodnd 
handling «uck and share irons- 
fer>, bade accounts, computer 
updates and general admin. 
Prapecn exceUeni. Age 19-23. 
Please call 01-409 1232 The 
Work $hoo 

NO SHORTHAND TO SHfcOM • 
recvpuon/sec sought iot Qty of- 
fice of presuaous Lis trading 
wmparty. PreXeHtgnal ap- 
proach and smart presentation 
essential. WP and reception ex- 
perience also rcouruM. Typmo 
nunSOwpm. Please calf 01-409 
1233 The Wont him 


DIRECTOR’S 

SECRETARY 

c. £9,000 pja. to 
start 

for small, friendly office In 
Belgravia, convenient tar 
Victoria Station. 

Interest and Involvement M 
return for audio/shorthand 
sfiifls and good edueatKxm 
standard. WP/ifficro timing 
given, if needed. 

Ring Siofahan 
01-730 5031 

(No aganou) 


Stm AUDIO 9CC C7M0U for 

younq Wni End Surveyor, lok 
of ctfenl uaeoa and Mtoh 
worl Friendly folk but de- 
manding routine for 19-21 yr 
old LVv Xmas bonus. Pinna. 
Can Michele Konoptaski Office 
Angels Recruitment 01-629 
0777 



BRUCE 


S PARTNERS 


CHARLWOOD STREET, SWI. Attractive but 
small 2 Bedroom flat. Sitting Room/Kitchen. Bath- 
room. £150pw negotiable. 

REDCLIFFE SQUARE. SWIO. Spacious flat in 
rood location. 2 Dole Bedrooms. Luge Sitting 
Room. Kitchen and Bathroom. £280pw. 
BRUNSWICK GARDENS, W8. Delightful 1 
Bedroom flat available torjong let. Sitting Room. 
Kitchen and Bathroom. £260pw. 


javes House. ' : 
l DON we 


<5lNGT<jN SUJ.M 
01 9 Cl .’ -i t'i 0 1 '< a , 


WARREN 

PIPPA TAYLOR - 

THe Putney S SW Rental Specialist - 
Vahte for Haney Property 

CT99 3 dd use. Mtn & siwr rm. Putney 

£99 1 M »l. ^ ^ 
E249 3 M Itet. 2 toun. swim pool, nan ey Co Let 
£279 Character 4Mha Pumai 
£115 Bargain 2 bed colt. gfln. Close Raynea Pk BR, Co Lit 

Tenants Wetaoma Pack - 
Phone the Agent who cam* mote for 
Tenant and Landond 
01-785 6222 



CHKSIKRTlWS 


CARLISLE SQUARE. 

LONDON SW3 
Fabufous 4 nod nouso. kranscu- 
Lazofy luimsned win opgn vtow» 
(row and roar. Largo orawnng rm 
to dxwig rm with swbng doors Id 
odn. Enormous hit. 4 dOw bods. 
Sep naif mre. 2 bath, t shwr. 
dkrm. £1.750 pw 

Chelsea Office : 
01-589 5211 


ST JOHNS WOOD, 
NWS 

Lovotjr bgm and ary larmfy 
fiat in srnan purpow ten 
Mode dosa to rape and 
dim. 3 bodrooms, l bath- 
room. oouMe rocapBon 
room, kitchen. £230 pw. 

Line Venice Office : 
01-286 4632 


B mh 


im avtolabto to rent uritt iH i on bbk twee 

3 bedroom larmfxwse wtm outtwMMgs and bam grazing awfluu) 
£1 000 p-C.ni. 

iserm-tumtahed) m sadudad pasnxi - 4 bethoom. 2 




3 bedroom Getxgan town house m OW Hattiatd C«5 0 pxjn. 

Three exclusive semt-lunwhed fids in Jmpreaaive Georgian taw 
wnhm walking oscince of stabon from £550 p ern 

rtaaaa apply for parttaflare to Dm HaHtod Parti Batate OOIn, 
rtmmem appiy m ‘"SSIK Nrata. AL» 8HQ 

Ted (07073) 84413 


IS Plaza Estates 


VOW STREET 01 

Mod. bngnt Hat on 2nd Hr 1 
bed. bam. recep. u. Loro >8L 
£130 pw. 

ora KOTMfl ST. wi 

Oebotniiti cemraUy focMM nano 
fiaL 1 bed. both, recep. to. long 
IK. £135 pw 

SALE PLACE *2 
2 nrwtv dec mod flats Easy ac- 
cess afl amamtws. i Bed. Dad. 
recap, to Lang to £150 pw. 

01-724 3100 


nut.ltti* kusktliksSl 
0;-72< 3103 01-5-91 7M5 


FURNISHES MEWS HOUW MU- 
ani Montague Sauare. Dolr 
BM. Lge Recap- Dining Area. 
K&B. Long let oref. ElSOpw. 
Tel: 01 629 6102 m. 


KWCHnBRBCC £3SOpw 

Tmnewioui value. Bunerb 1 
Bed fully eervKMflat - loo hotel 
calibre 3 wu mtn. tv. 
Ayfesforef & Oo 381 3383. 


FOB USA COMPANY 
Stveiw Nose « fiat w«b ohoi 
Siraei cnwice n Mayfra « aetgea- 
ta mtn 3/4 bemam 1/2 recess 
to 6 months /l y« 

UP TO E1.500PW. 
tanl tees rtqr 
01 937 9681 . 


* KEN. Thunoe Sa SWT Elegant 
luxury fully fum s/C fUL own 
entrance. Near tube Suit 
rouptv/stnde Co let only Mtn 
6 ralbs. £120pw. 584 3373. 


WANTED S u perior propertiM for 
lonq/inort Colrta. 01 -158 3680 
or 0836 692834 anytime in. 


WANIEDby Amertran aewtemte 
tor 1 year from mM-Aug/Sepi 
1 dean CM 1-ben flat In good 
area or lube ai 318 1082. 


PRIVATE PROPERTY COMPANY 

Situated to Chelsea requires a bright motivated wefl 
spoken JUNIOR SECRETARY -coflege leaver or 2nd job- 
ber - with 80/50, audio sk«s and ’O 1 level education. The 
successful candidate wtH undertake secretarial duties for 
surveyors and cashiers, together with ffing and reception 
duties. Salary £7.000 p.a. phis LVs and above average 
benefits. 

Appfication forms from Mrs. A. Bafi 

Cadogan Estates Ltd 

28a Cadogan Square ZSm: 

London SW1X OJH Tafe 


81*584 4391 


No Ageacfes 




The Friends of the 
Tate Gallery 

Need a fun time secretary/assistant with mod 
secretarial skills, a liking for people and an 
interest in the visual arts, to join an energetic 
team. For further detafls, and an application 
form, please apply to: 

The Friends of the Tate Gallery 
Tate GaBery 
MiKbank 

London SW1P 4RG 


MARKETMB P/A £106. Work- 
ing tor drinks lalrentmS HQ. 
Lough a nfinutr. but veuii hove 
u Dr strong! Nut for dipso or 
lant-fMaitM. if you're quick A 
nrmm. you'll rmov a big tob 
wuh enormous porks. Can 
janrtte Ratncr-Thomash Otter 
AiKMte RrcmUment 01430 
2631 


nrand Broker Busy all 
rmoraclng PA role. LVS Free 
BL.PA. Not lor « wallflower. 
Ihtt Mb. Call Jantrr Nortnmore 
Office Angels Recruitment ox- 
541 0644. 


M for directors' office nr Baker 
SB reel. Hours firxlMr Too rah* 
tor right person. Driver pre- 
ferred. Car available. Tef Mr 
Oram 01-724 1494. 


PA SHOWROOM ASKTANT re- 
quired lor wi fashion eo- 
Previous experience and typing 
essential. Phone Ronny Ol 465 
4077. 


lair lsum Agenk. Will tram on 
Pagewrfter Young, busy ofTfce. 
Cali Sylvia Lang Office Angels 
Recrurnnenl Ol -630 0644. 


SEvnkiART Charming and PJ- 1 . "- ■ * 

Itoni Good typing rxwnllal I „ 

9 005.30 Good salary. Wnir I *£C«T«tr for Director to 


wiih C.V. io Plncnm KrUow. 
Arrmieris. 234 L'pper Rich- 
mond Road. Pulney. SW1B 
bTC. i No Agendo) 

WP OP STRAND £9900. Hg /Inn 
lawyers wlin heavy load X 
train on WonlMex. Lovrtv of 
firrs. STL LVs. End of vnar 
bonus. Call Janri Robireon. 
Ofljce Ang els Recrultmenl Ol 
b29 0777. 


Mayfair Lai air Agency. Good 
shorthand, typing Own ofllce- 
Saiary C9^oo + Bonus. TKOI- 
491 2969 Ref VLP 


PIOUJC RELATIONS PA. 90/60 
A Fluent French inn Co Ore 
events. £9.000 + Co Car- emi 
Natalia TED Any 01-736 9687 


NO SHORTHAND £R£Q0. Join 
one of Ihe Lh“* up PB compa- 
nies as secretary to a dynamic 
leant of arrounts execubves. If 
you ore willing to learn and 
want to oei fully mvaivM In ev- 
erything tram ornanumii 
conferences la liaising wim ai 
mts and nave 55 wpm typhia, 
audio experience l rusty short- 
hand usetuli then call Carotin? 
King Aunts 01 499 807a 

RECEPTIONIST c£S.OOO - ur 

gently sought by this large Bank 

based in fabulous City Offices. 
As well as greeting clients and 
running inesr busy reception 
you wui be provininorecreuii 
al luck- up io a Manager and me 
Akusuok fm lywng irrnn 60 
wpmiand at Iras 1 years expe- 
rienre are requested Please 01- 
4«3 S787 Gordon Vom 

Consuilancy 

KOUStNO CHARITY - rnloy a mix 


processing/com puling an IBM 
PCs * secretarial wont (au<tk» 
for Housing AdvHor of Uvety 



SWI Silts Director Busy, var 

"to noa Sun sett ronfmem 30 
50vrold Call Suzanne Ounphy 

Office Angeta Recrultmenl Oi- 
630 0644. 


PA marketdh: DEPT CiOJ» 
♦ benefits. IBM Dttolay writer. 
™UV shorthand Busy West 
End department. I mined siarf 
Call Adrunne or Maureen. 
CAM CoreRdlams 01-491 3944. 

COLLEGE LEAVER To £7.000 
U**to «n Knttfvfabnogr tins 
very famous name company 
jrets a college leaver secretary 
to Mn their property division. 
E\, rikml training ipven 50 
worn audio aMIltl needed 
hjwnnand an assert Pira* 
telephone Of 240 351 1/3631 
<W«| End) or Ol 240 MSI 
■Oiyi Eibibfih Hum R rerun 
menl Consultant!. 

£12.500 INC LA, Top Sec Rd 

fSH A TYPI IBM WPfOr pm||. 
‘“■Hri IDI comutunis swi. 
working for Senior Parmer 
musi he highly profesatonai and 
“fgarujed wMh ttnmpcutaie per 
vwia i pre sen laoon Compinr 
Invotmrm and client conuef. 
Beneiliy ine £1.000 bonus free 
Buna NC pons sS5i£?Tto. , s!r 
«" MM. Portfolio AGY 242 

•5*76 

NO SHORTHAND <*3M - lean 
in<j Ir\ fitment hoiiu 1 irtL 

Wmv,n o * <a 

rector-lev ef you win handto 
rihtot 1 ration mu, tntorXX 
meelmqs etr. LUriy. fnrndty 

career peospeeb. Srcrerarial ex- 
ph-h-ikc preferred. Good ly«nc 

M** 01*03 6787 00,0^, 
'db-s Consul uno>. 

Typ’iro at 36 wrap reg^^s^! 
consultancy. Ol*3r e SS»3 ,Wn, 


TO £1X^00, CO M MI TT EE SEC- 
RETARY. Nauonal Cnaritaolr 
Organttanon with wide rontuig 
uiiemh and sn 1 HMquamn 
require a rommillre secretory 
tor I heir dynamic General Sec- 
retary and voluntary Executive 
Committee If you tvavecomm fl - 
tee and national organmurai 
experience, sound vcntorlol 
muik. aged 2S sears ptui and 
pood rdimjooal background 
Mu* initiative, love of pre reiir e 
and people. Pfrasr phone 434 
4612 Crane Cor kill Recndf- 
nwnt Consul Ian la. 

RM.U4CUAL FRENCH SECRE- 
TARIES we urgently require 
UP raiUne Frrnrti spk sea » 
work m director level hi the fol- 
lowing field- toirrnauonal 
banking, commodities, prrfian- 
£ry. teweliery and compdlM- 
Sauries £8. £ 11 .000 AAE Far 
detaitt on these and other blhn- 
B«ai vdcuncirv in and arounfl 
London call Merrm* trap mi i 
The Language SoeciotisB > «*» 
I4R7, 

COIWUIENCC ADMttRSTRA- 

TOR f £7,700* An e xc rt uwl 
tareer oppartuniiy for - A - 
or piAviitr dflbtoe Imcfi •* 
per away from the omer aM 

aflrew conferences rttroogbpul 
Uw L'K meeting |pp tnduArJJ** 
and speakers A mrsUOL 

^Aqgmg Bersonahiy and 

Wfstos are needed For furtlttr 
Jnfarmanon Mease tetrahonr 
C«Mhe King Anuta 01-499 
8070. 

0*»Y ROClAUMNCr liL N Ml 

fdfn ups fun bui extrerMUr pro- 
fwalonai property enupany In 
Bfriusey Square. Ah mcnW 
to two young surveyor*. V4“ 
will organise meefinra. luntSM 
and cHent panics. V you **2' 
!"**bn9 pgppk- ana like betogto 
a busy, friendly environm«J- 
mis may be nni for you s»“ 
•o wpm. typing, audio ondjg* 
•xpmence Tefephonr Canton* 
Ling Apph 01-499 8070. 

«**RK! SfCAKRM PA £lM» 
iwp A versatm- DA wffh fHn 
Arabic h sought to araM mute- 

rinraflW busmesoinan- I W** 
at 66 wpm read SH ay** 
wnregy. the rmumal cap- 

. PMtaraar. 01-437 9633 



POUT! ft CO 

GROSVENOR SQUARE WI 
Shmng comer fie m nraage 
Mock, i MlMs. 2 bans, dbta 

recep. igs kitchen. 24 br porter- 
age. fuU seamy. £675 pw 
urt u mafted of £775 pw rate new 
hxnohnffL 

PORTLAND PLAGE WI 

Vety tege traddionafiy ftnitabed 
lid a piesDQt bioric. 3 (He 
bate. 2 Mths. 2 ibohb. lge 
iatenea. + staff aaflvs of 2 
rooms ft ban £650 pw. 

* 01-499 9876 


LONG /SHORT LET proprrtlm 
from LIO0-C5 OOOpw. Personal 
Service, fll 4S8 JoflO or 0836- 
S92B24 anyhnir iTI. 


WEST I IAM9 ST CAU Newty rgn- 
v cried lumished oarden ItaL 2 
dbk 1 bed. lounge diner, mod kn. 
Clio pw inrl. Tel Ol -824 8124 


SOUTH KENSM6TOM. 2 bed lux 
fully fum tmed flat £3O0pw 
London A Plm. Ol 930 0833 


SOUTH KEHSM6TON I BM. 

£110 pw 01 389 3819 (Ev es) I 
year let. no sharing. 


furanoi FLATS A NOOSES 

araiL A read, for dtpfomat*. 
executives Lang A short lets m 
au arras. Unfriend A Co. 48. 
Albemarie Si WI . 01 -499 5534. 


5tCRi 


pdrM.2 > 


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Ng P 4 


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? nt *»■"»•. ^Ti,* 8 "25 


V ANTED [!..^ Wir 

• ttU CWFMr j! 

-V / I' mti ' •‘■w»n«y 

W». Sil JJ 

* rc C4tan» \ :> ; 

mt (wi rtt 

•37 flMMl. »** ’■ KEKUKra , 


Tf»# Fnencs of 

To?*’ 

Gallery 

« K* • - 


H--A 

* 

it * . - 


tv* “ 


fM p »*-■>** *• 

, Trir 


vm*****" 


Ii±E TiMJbS WcI/NcdDAY AUGUST 6 1966 


LA CREME DE LA CR 


Free flying lessons, no. 
WP cross training, yes. 



ALFRED MARKS 


Executive Secretary 
to the Chairman 

Perivale 

Roboserve. whose products include highly sophisticated computer ised 
vending machines, is a very successful growth company with its headquar- 
ters in Perivale. 

To provide complete executive secretarial assistance to the company's 
Chairman. we arc looking for a mature senior shorthand secretary (120/60) 
with experience of working at board level and some 'interest in finance. 

You should be seff-motivaied and confident, able to cope under pressure 
and as good at organising as you are at dealing whb problems and looking 
after VIP guests. Flexibility regarding hours is also important as is a clean 
driving licence. 

An attractive salary is offered together with all the benefits expected of a 
major company. 

Please write enclosing a "copy of your c.v. to Loretta Lavery, Personnel 
Administrator, Roboserve Limited, 19 Ainlree Road, Perivale, Middlesex. 


Roboserve 



SENIOR 

SECRETARY/PA 

ADVERTISING AGENCY 
REQUIRED FOR 

FINANCE DIRECTOR & COMPANY SECRETARY 

We are looking for a bright, professional secretary to assist 
both the Finance 'Director and Company Secretary in all 
aspects of their working day. 

You will ideally have previous finance experience at a senior 
■ level, excellent skills (70+ typing/100+ shorthand), a high 
degree of discretion, which is Obviously required owmg to the 
confidential nature of the job. You will need to enjoy working in 
a pressurised yet lively environment 

Excellent salary- offered to the right person plus staff benefits 
and annual bonus. 

Age 26+ 

If interested please write with full CV to:- 

Personnel Department, 

Foote Cone & Belding Ltd., 

82 Baker Street, London W1M 2AE. 


DONT MISS THE WP TRAIN 
Learn a New Machine - FREE 

We are offering first class temporary secretaries the opportunity to 
be cross-trained free of charge on a further word processor and be 
paid at die same time. Successful applicants will then be kept busy 
working on our professional team where everyone with the same 
skills is paid the same excellent hourly rate. 

You should have speeds of 100/60, 2 years’ Director level secretarial 
experience in London, and proficient WP dolls on at least one 
machine. 

As an express route to finding the right platform for your talents 
please telephone 01-434 4512 NOW for an appointment. This 


TEMPTINGLY 

DIFFERENT! 

Temporary Temporary Temporary 

If yon join our professional team of Sec- 
retaries we can offer immediate bookings 
with the most prestigious companies. 
Whether yon have SHORTHAND, AU- 
DIO. COPY TYPING or WP skills, 
you'll find our placements ar^ distinctly 
different! Ring or drop into any of our 
offices TODAY. 

Permanent Permanent Permanent 
MOTIVATING! to £11,200 neg. 

High standards and a strong personality are 
prerequisites for this for this marvellously di- 
verse job. If you enjoy Audio and WP, a first 
class surveying consultancy can offer a busy 
and rewarding environment. Re£ 55 1/27003. 

INVESTING! cilO^OO 

A demanding Secretary/PA position to a busy 
MD dealing with the Banking community. 
Plenty of client contact following up high level 
negotiations. Excellent skills are essential for 
extensive job involvement Ref 559/30024. 

ENTERTAINING! £10,500 

If your experience is at a Senior level your 
presentation and sppech above average and 
your expectations high, this City job will pro- 
vide a satisfyingjy rail Secretarial role. Refi 
559/31002. 

PHONE ORCALL IN NOW! 

19/23 Oxford St, W1 Teb 437 9030 

131/133 Casseii St, EC4 Teb 626 8315 
285 Victoria St, SWI Tel: 828 3845 

22 Weranrood St, EG Teb 638 3846 

y^Wj Recruitment Consultants 

Challoners 


EXECUTIVE 
RECRUITMENT 
CITY CONSULTANCY 

Secretary/PA £ neg. + Bonus 

A small and very busy office witfihi a well 
established consultancy near Cannon Street 
specialising in senior City recruitment needs 
something more than a secretary to assist 
consultants with assignments from start to 
finish (both advertising and search), spesk to 
eftents and candidates, and to liaise with their 
advertising .agency. 

Good telephone manner and absolute discre- 
tion ‘are essential, together with fast typing to 
cope with a heavy workload. Wordstar know- 
ledge preferred but training can be given. 
Good salary is offered plus bonuses based 
on results. 

Please ring Caroline Magnus on 01-248 0355 
or write to her at- 

Overton Shirley and Barry, 

Prince Rupert House, 

64 Queen Street, London EC4R 1AD. 


please telephone 01-434 
caakf be just the ticket! 


Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN HANDLER 

C.Lmtfoa c£10k + car 

scheme 

Very busy Recruitment Advertising Company - in top 5 
within its market - too rushed to complete sentences! 
Young people, client contact, campaign handling, inter- 
viewing. You, 23-30; attractive personality, excellent 
organiser (in personnel maybe?), lots of grey matter, 
team spirited (drink with the boys!). 

What’s he talking about? 

Find out - call Paul Sinclair at SBS Ltd on 01-631 1313 


EXPERIENCED 

SECRETARY 

The Institute of Peantfeiun requires an experienced 
secretary with audio skills for hs new Technical Director. 
Word processing experience useful but training will be 

C ided if necessary. Oil industry experience an asset. 

ant working environment in histone bunding near 
Harley Street Thepereon appointed will also support 
other Technical officers. 

Excellent pension/Iife assurance scheme, 4 weeks 
holiday increasing to 5 weeks, subsidised lunches, season 
ticket loan. 

Please write enclosing c.v. including present salary uk 

Annette Bridgman, 

Institute of Petroleum, 

61 New Cavendish Street, 

London WlM SAIL 


FASHION 

TYCOON 

£15,000 package 

TlK QMUeman vfl arty cmader 

anAaruiMhanniraSMid- 
net tansy who n pnpared to 
9* W*r fun EomnUMt to the 
anpontm. ** tnfOMM tats 
ol ns hugs. *uccM$Juf cm- 
pany. la is rttm a the piUe «n 
Mi s setting a i ncaptuni 

peiKMtKSHirt twatowab- 

sflri»Q rate. Mui tap suns 
ITO/SBj. aged Z5®. iff tufl de- 
ws - 

Caft 829 8883 ’ 

5HODGEE 


SALES 

ADMINISTRATOR 

c£14,500 

tab an w sq cmft fl ty fwvsM*- 
mg and processing onto* of 
many rriroons tor tte top eny 
computer company. Encourage 
and adwe tM satis mam an pro- 
cedures + monitor stojtments 
Branh ro ntdtittin Knewt- 
udne ot camoutBfiMd admin 
syoam ti important as is an un- 
darnandtig and flair lor bancs , 
and reading satis taigas. 

Cat 629 8863 

=HODGE= 

ZrECRUTTMENTm- 


MARKETING/ 

PR ASSISTANT/SECRETARY 
Are you interested in Marketing and Public Re- 
lations? 

If so. we need someone to assist the Marketing/ 
PR Manager of a major firm of Chartered Ac- 
countants. You must be a good organiser, 
enthusiastic, creative and personable with a 
strong secretarial background (including WP 
skills and an interest in computers). 

The ideal candidate will be 21+ and educated to 
a good standard. 

Applications with CK to:- 

NANCY FLYNN 

Clark Whhehffl, 25 New Street Square, 
London EC4A 3LN 
at telephone 01-353 1577 


SENIOR SEC 
IN PERSONNEL 
£11,500 + Bonos 

An attractive paction ti attend | 
i fay ttaiadina Faction compeny. 
AsetteA tee board dutm re- 
SKHtciiti tor prwomti you wtH 
handle lugWy confideMMl in- 
timation and enter extensM 
contact wte senor mortem- A 
warm. a mroafliaMe personally 
Is munxf along Mh a good era* 

I canon (graduate pretinid) & sec 
skSs ol 100/50. Age gudetiw 
25-30. 

Calfc 629 8883 




PERSONNEL 

CAREER PA 
£15,000 

Do you teriw inter pressure, 

need > last moving environ- 
ment? Then tho is for you. 
asshub Ore dynamic top 
wnwflantot one oJ tee major 
francs houses you tribe tee 
toed port at tee otic*. Me- 
mo with efienis. onpresmg 
meeungs and PR ovems and 
mating sura ail ran smootrty. 
Sod you wart to mu ntii tee 
country's top oners, have 
good tyfting and WP stiHs. 
a* PEMEilft PRBE on BM 
0388 


■HODGE: 

iRECRUfTMEINTTo 



Tasteful Temping... 

No bassles. No let-downs. Just plain, simple, 
high grade temping. 

A tasteful package of top jobs, elite rates and 
thoroughly professional service. 

If you have sound skills and experience, you 
should be talking to The ^ftbrk Shop’. 

Telephone Sue Cooke on 01-409 1532. 

HHHHI Rccruttmcn! Ctmanhmra 


ADVERTISING 




Excellent salary plus benefits 

DMB&B, a leading interuational Advertising 
Agency, is able to offer a really important job 
which wifi guarantee that every facet of your 
hard earned skills and resourcefulness will be in 
demand from the moment you start with our 
Agency. 

We employ nearly 400 people and as 
secretary/PA to the Director of Personnel and 
Administration you would be totally responsible 
for the control and organisation of his office and 
its work flow. You would need to believe cliches 
like “No day is ever the same,” “You make your 
own decisions,” “Would suit a workaholic with 
a great sense of humour," “There is no time for 
errors." Eld 

As a department we work' closely with our Man- 
agement and advertising staff and we have a 
massive responsibility to deliver the highest pos- 
sible levels of service at all times. Or work 
encompasses every aspect of Personnel and Ad- 
ministration and our success is solely because 
we are a close but informal team who all enjoy 
being able to get on with our own 
responsibilities. 

To enjoy your job and grow with us, you simply 
must' have superb shorthand, excellent error free 
typing and preferably be familiar with a Word 
Processor or PC Your natural administrative 
skills and familiari ty with numbers are taken as 
read. If you are interested, please phone Mrs 
Helen Briam 839 3422, 2 St James's Square, 
London SWI. 


ft* i ; 1 1 * ! 






Lit 





l»l>ll l ,j , MM 


; n i h; * 





HIGH TECH PA 
£10,000 

.QWWMpUlM you ablU B«o> 
CMMm orgentev wMdng MNn Ms 
WtchniWHnwiinaliiM 
poet PA/AdmMstnsior. Qet toaiy 
■Mahal) In tea running ot teti two- 
Uy m putng mnaMflMy 
known Co. ft pram mt you Inn* 
tea aapMfer to koto resporauvy 
S wort poi* Mly Mttwul snpwvr- 
Mon. A in* poeMon wan powmnd 
lor MMrcemm 

• CITY: CQ-4S12345 
WEST END-’ 01-938 2188 

aimtt 


PERSONNEL 

PA/SECRETARY 

CBS Records International Is moving its Euro- 
pean Regional Office to London W1 in October. 

The Senior Director, Personnel needs an ass- 
istant who Is able to carry out secretarial duties 
in addition to running the administration of the 
department 

This is an excellent opportunity for a graduate 
with good secretarial skais to develop Into 
Personnel; willing and a We to both hold the fort 
in the absence of the Director, and to deal with 
the many trials and tribulations of the personnel 
function. 

An attractive salary and company benefit pack- 
age is offered. Candidates should be aged mid 
to late 20s. 

Please write to David Heakins, 

Senior Director. Personnel, 

CBS Records. 

17-19 Soho Square, 

London W.l. 


PA TO SNR PARTNER 
c£10,000 

This is a key position to join one of London's most 
prestigious architectural practices, based at their lovely 
new offices in Kensington. Assisi this charming partner, 
who is keen to delegate, using your organisational abilities 
and initiative. Ideally you have excellent secretarial skills 
(inc. sh- and WP), aged between 25-35. looking for a 
friendly environment. 

Contact Melanie Laing. 

Ol 631 f54f Rec-Cons’ 

Pr\ce -')Gm esm 

Rartrero Ularowrtmv 


[ZS2S7.1 A a Am w 


£ CHAIRMAN’S SEC/PA 


ciR500£ 


The Otairman's Eteeutive Suite is the heart of Fleet Sired. An 
^ exciting, tarred, sometima hectic potman n offered 10 j top 2 
^ person who will possess good communicaiion and admut skills ^ 
& with cvccUcni SH/i\ping and WP experience. 

Please call or send CV to 

Sue SadnriU 01-734 8466 

A Slock tod Associates. 29 Ghsslreme St, Wl fttec Cm) A 






PERSONNEL 

PA IN MERCHANT 
BANK £1(MMfl + 
Mortgage Sob. 

Thnw on skMteopnp your M 
mb to tee Ml when you »a 
the MO ot m open norMs 
dMaud at ten pntMws tty 
mw*|rtt iwik. 8 MU m- 
wtvemeat. arranging sennas, 
meewgi ana owsk uavd. 
iraing rate chatns at aa tends, 
deatog Mti n personal and 
eoftMtoM ratters. Voa ml 
aoereie the Multi- Matt WP. 
Gdftpany wl cross Iran. It you 
tun oM stwoiind cecretand 
sUte cal MRHELii SAVERS 
OX 623 1226. 

TtqN'WMlVMiQKMMi-eftOUP 


msm&sa 

BANKING 

JUNIOR PA 
E7,000neg 

m esabWied Oty neenMfnant 
Conitirow urgsiilti reran a w- 
nfor Statin/ Atenrasmtar to 
assist gsmal leam. 

CanterUtes must possess accu- 

some Experience at wani nu- 
cessmg d though we nil provide 
training i necessary. A good tde- 
ptum mam is essorifll as 

there »ffl he a high level o( dient 

contact. tlnmun of 5 '0 teveb' 
mdudna mafits and Engtish. ‘A 
intis' m preferable. An eseep- 
honal aim toner would be 
cooakrad. 

01-236 1113 


PERSONAL 


UP TO £9.000 ■ LOW-INTEREST 


To support our leading team of 
property investment managers 
Central London 

As the investment subsidiary of the Prudential 




powerful financial forces in the country. To prove 
the point, we currently look after a property 
portfolio worth £2.8 billion. 

Right now, we're looking for more Assistants to 
back-up groups of two or even three 
hard-pressed surveyors at our Holbom head 
office. It's a job that calls fora calm, unflappable 
manner and at least 3 years' solid office 
experience. Since much of the work involves 
meeting people -architects, solicitors, estate 
agents, property investors and so on -you must 
also have an outgoing personality that quickly 
instills confidence. Finally, you must have a real 
flair for admin. . . . intercepting calls, preparing 
property analyses, using computers to compile 
information and, of course, undertaking a limited 
amount of typing. 

Our good salaries -up to £9,000 p.a. - are 
matched by an excellent benefits package 
including low-interest mortgage (after a 
qualifying period), non-contributory pension 
scheme, season ticket toan scheme, 
subsidised staff restaurant and extensive 
sports and social facilities. 

Want to know more? Then please write with 
details of past experience: 

Heather Ward, Personnel Officer, Prudential 
Portfolio Managers Ltd., 142 Hoibom Bars, ** 
London EC1N2NH. 


O 

CD 

CD 

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-< 

-H 

o 

CD 

rn 



PKJMNTUl 

UHMtnUD 

Aupt*i,ni>iuw*«uoi 


DIRECTORS’ SECRETARIES 


Top Jobs For Top People 
£ 12,000 

A modem ambience in seventeenth century elegance - an architectural 
advisory service in defightful surroundings requires an experienced Per- 
sonal Assistant able to organise promotional activities and attend trade 
exhibitions. 

£ 11,000 

Does the world of Fashion and the Famous excite you? The head of one 
of London's top PR firms needs a Secretary wife a sense of humour, fast 
skills and a fascination for detail and organisation. Is this you? 


01-629 9323 


SECRETARY 
£9,500 pa Deg 

Exaflent French is es- 
sential to both chent 
Seison and translation 
wok. Tenacity and an 
interest m developing 
countries would be desir- 
able to help you conduct 
ytmr own. autonomous, 
resead) irto Agricultural 
and Energy Projects in 
the Third World. Work- 
ing at Associate Director 
level within this interna- 
tional organisation offers 
a second jobber with 
rasty shorthand end an 
org an isational flee an in- 
teresting and involving 
rote. For a more compre- 
hensive job description 
piesse contact GBSm 


01-4911868' 


COMPANION/ 

PERSONAL 

SECRETARY 

An experienced, mature, unat- 
tached female of smart 
appearance, with first rate social 
and organisational skills and so- 
ber habits required for an Arab 
princess. Post involves extensive 
international travel. About two 
thirds of the time spent in Middle 
East, rest in Europe and North 
America. Knowledge of Arabic not 
essential. Pay ana benefits com- 
mensurate with experience and 
are negotiable. 

Please reply with CV 
enclosing a recent photograph to: 

Milgate House 
Bearsted 

Kent ME14 4NN 



West Erf Office 
629 9686 



in the heart ot Betgrava 
Square but an tmerea in 
tend conaamflon is a imst 
Yha AdntinfFinance DVactor 
naadsa mwAMfla* Secre- 
tary wttn good siuas and an 
eye for dead. An tmponare 
rote n* be to co-onJnnte 
papers lor meetmgs and 
tnckniound rasaareh !e> 
puttecauons. 

£ 10,000 


DIRECTORS’ 

SECRETARIES 

v.LCKt. iT>'.usr c aw: r.vCi 


01-629 9323 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANT 

COMPUTER STAFF 

Neg. Sal. + Car 
Based London 

If you are aged 25-35 and posses a proven track record 
of computer orientated account management in a cre- 
ative agency plus experience of setting computer 
hardware with a major international at senior leveL then 
our client can offer you an outstanding opportunity to 
combine these disciplines as a recruitment consultant. 
They are a leading international organisation providing 
high quality permanent and contract recruitment ser- 
vices to major D.P Enviromenu. Their strong sales 
orientation, highly original creative campaigns and 
enormous energy have made them industry leaders. 

This extremely demanding position involves the devel- 
opment of new business and long term account 
management through foe complete design and imple- 
mentation of mqjor recruitment campaigns. 

You win be rewarded bya basic salary, (6k). open ended 
commission, car and excellent p rospects in this rapidly 
developing company. 

For 3 confidential discussion, telephone 01-439 0591 
quoting reference number 7/814 

IMPLEMENT 

RECRUITMENT 

189 Regent Street, London Wl | 


PERSONAL 

^ASSISTANT 

£ 11,000 

HW Bmp Undo SWI new 
j rqu k tmi wtb urn 
mMMp «Mknw 
niriTts era ticttutauint 
IWtawWtef. t»se. mwtv j 
WjWHHjWBWBwl 
1“ win/ia 

i* Ape j}35 I 


FHffiER HI EVERY 
PIE 

£11,(H)0 + tumefits i 
Dexterity is a key atnteute 
when tafalna on this tanking 
tote os P A/Sec to util tamm 
personality wito diverse boa- 
. ness merest*. Ereefent. 
‘ shorthand. Swi beaten Call 1 
Coy 588 5081 or W«t End 
406 1631 




ASSISTANTS 




















26 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 


tO&ddWA teem.Anqej 


a 


Offic 



And call us for the latest job news from London’s newest recruitment agency. Phone us on Voicebank 01-400 0378. W 0 R It I NS — W D j 0 1 R S 


Has anyone recognised 
your potential lately? 


SIEMENS 


• Proven secretarial and wp skills 

• Available immediately/ working notice 

• Commercial experience 

• Poise and personality 

]f this sounds like you, wed like to tell you exactly what 
we can offer. First class assignments, excellent rates and 
the opportunity to convert a temporary position into a 
permanent one. 

With MacBlain N ash your career will go from strength 
to strength. 

Contact Kerena Henderson 
on 01 439 0601. 


Director's Secretary 

With good German 


MacBlain 






Temporary 

Secretaries 


3rd Fleur. Carrington House. 

130 Regenl Street. London WlRSFE 
[Entrance In Regenl PI. above Iberia Airways.) 


_MD requires top PA. 
assit him in running a 
busy bold. 

You will have fluent 
French, excellent secre- 
tarial skills and the ability 

to communicate at all lev- 
els. You also have general 
office experience to super- 
vise two young secretaries 
as well as familiarity with 
fax telex. WP. etc. A su- 
perb existence for 
someone with poise and 
the right experience. An 
excellent salary is offered 
to match the high level of 
responsibility. 




Siemens is one of the world's largest electrical and electronic engineering 
organisations. We are a true "international" with a high reputation in a wide 
rangeof fields from medical engineering to power control systems. 

The UK Director of our Medical Division is currently looking for a secretary/ 
personal assistant You will be supporting his management responsibilities in 
performing a wide rangeof administrative and secretarial duties. He is often on 
the move, and therefore needs someone who will be able to manage the office 
confidently in his absence, and upon whom he can rely in dealing with complex 
and highly confidential matters. 

You will need to establish yourself strongly as a resourceful aide in liaising with 
regional offices and our European parent A diplomatic manner is also essential 
as you will be dealing with individuals at all levels in the company, and with major 
clients and suppliers. 

You must beableto converse, write and read in German to a good business 
standard, and will havethefull complement of secretarial skills expected of a 
senior, professional secretary. 

Rewards reflect you rim porta nee to our Director, and indude, in addition to a 
generous salary, a full range of attractive large company benefits. 

Please send full career deitaHs or ring for an application form: 

Chris Greaves, Personnel Unit Siemens Ltd., Siemens House, 

Windmill Road, Sunbury-on-Thames, Middlesex TWI6 7HS. 

Telephone: (09321 752233 (24 hours}. 


Siemens — where the future happens first 


THE ROYAL SOCIETY OF 
ARTS EXAMINATIONS BOARD 

requires a 

SECRETARY TO THE 
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR 
(DEVELOPMENT) 


-491 7100 


International Secretaries 

- IBZmi 


01-4917100 


Senior Secretary 
to £11,500 

Senior manager with major British 
pic is searching for a pro fic ient and 
presentable PA/secretary. This posi- 
tion offers ful involvement if you are 
happy to be flextole and work long 
hours when necessary. An impres- 
sive career history at senior level 
and excellent skills (100/60/W P) will 
ensure an interview. 



Move On Up! 
to £12,000 

We are currently handing several se- 
nior PA positions where shorthand is 
not essential. Mora Important is the 
confidence, org an izational abffity and 
experience to handle these challenging 
rotas, combined with fast accurate typ- 
ing and WP skBs. Openings are m such 
diverse seas as research consultan- 
cies and international software. Age: 


Tbe post involves: 

- Preparing a wide range of documents iadud- 
ing papers and reports as well as routine 
letters etc 

- Organising appointments and meetings 

- Dealing with an extended huge of individuals 
both inside and outside the organisation 

- Maintaining effective records and carrying 
out routine secr eta ri al dories 

Applicants must have good shorthand and typnwj skills; 
good inter-personal dans and the ability to work under 
pressure. A high degree of sdf-oigzmsarioa is required. 
Salary £7,950 pa (including London Weighting). £1.00 per 
day Luncheon Vouchers, interest five season ticket loan, 
35 boar working week with flexi-time amusements. 5 
weeks holiday per year (pins 4 extra days per year after 
bank holidays). 

Applications to be retained by 12th August 1986 UK 
James Rkbadna, Royal Society of AMs, 

8 John Adam Sheet, Adelphi, 

London WC2N 6EZ 


Royal College of Nursing 

ADMINISTRATIVE 

SECRETARY 


The RCN is die professional voice fix over 
minion noises. Yon would make a direct input into 
the development of standards of nursing care, an 
important national issue for noises. You will work 
closely with RCN professional officers and provide 
administrative and secretarial back-up. 

In addition to a comprehensive secretarial role you 
will plan and administer conferences and seminars, 
initiate and manage an information system and 
service steering groups. 

Salary will be between £9068 - £10817 pa, and 
benefits include an interest fine season ticket loan. 
THE RCN is convenient fix Bond Street and 
Oxford Circus tubes. 

Contact the Per so nnel Department n 01-409 3333 

ext 343 for fell detxfls and appficatioe fens or write 

to The Royal College of Nursing, 20 Cavendish 

Square, LONDON W1M OAB. Application forms 

to be returned by 14th August 

The RCN actively discourages smoking on a0 its 

premises. 


SPANISH 

Braanw 5 k Biingta cm npntemh comercal, taqMgrafb an esprit e 
ogles (100 ppmj y nwcanografta a 60 ppm. para tratej* con d Director de 
■ esu u wstpo s a compatfa en d 'Dry'. 0 natejo induye teWono. WP. 


teduarin de comspondenaa y ttx y lucer d enlace antra ctentes y to 
coraprin eo ados idunas. Edad pnt. 25-35. Ettag see. 


conjjjrta on antra idunas. Edad pnt 25-35. ENag sab. 

GERMAN - TEMP TO PERM 


tnanabonata Bank sudd one gepflqte Sekretarin/ Emtaigsdame/ 
.Tetehrastti dotedw Muncrspraoe. Dfese abrnNiogsreKta rosltion 
unites Textwrateftng. Bmenong des Femsdndws und aDgenura 
Bmartwtm. EMOO+tantang benefits! 


FRENCH 

Un dwteur dormant redwrete uno Seottsra/Asristanta parfatanent 
bdmgua. de prtfaence de iangue nounwfie Irancdse. ayant au moos 3 
as d'expeneoce. Stem sna un atouL Vous sens: precise. oraantete. 
flenbte. capable de prendre de rnattve et de traveler (ode seat Age 
25+ £10000 ne* 

GERMAN -i- FRENCH 


F«i«xjdeuniiaiyntteCnyraqurKiieiHyiiomed.MmcaltRSeaehn 
with Ibex Fiendi and Goman to wort tar a tun wOui the Foreton Bond 
tndng ana. Rosy starttand and tet typng plus some WP is essential as 
is previous experience, pm. n a financial bekL Age: irtd 20s. ES.S-%000. 


BOYCE BILINGUAL 
01-236 5501 

7 Ludgata Sq. EC4 (Mon-Frl 940-540) EMP MSV 


PA/SEC TO MD 
Management Consultants 

OXFORD CIRCUS (LEFT) EXC. SAL. 


For a leading, wan established Company in busy friendly 
Office of IS people, interesting and voted job for a senior 
secretary or PA aged a28 - 40, who hB3 worked in a small 
firm or office- First class administrative experience 
Including dealing with and payment of suppliers, some 
booK-keepfeiB and good secretarial skills essential. You 
must be a fast efficient and inteifigenr worker - experience 
of using computers or WP. an advantage. Full training 
given forth is Important job. Excellent salary, bonus. Life 
dress allowance. STL and HeaHti Insurance. 


Phone Irving Gordon on 01-631 3780 
between 9.15 am and 8 pm 
(24 hr answering service) 



c£1 0,000 


If you are a smart, capa- 
ble PA/Sec with skats of 
80/50 then this interna- 
tional co needs you to 
assist their Sales Direc- 
tor. You need to be very 
switched on. confident 
and outgoing. Able to 
handte pressure and 
work on your own 
initiative. 


EXCLUSIVELY MAYFAIR 

to £12,000 


This prestigious, internationally famous pri- 
vate dub needs a competent secretary for 
their Chairman. Working with another PA. 
you need the confidence and presence to 
deal at the highest levels and the maturity 
and experience to handle a pressurised role. 
Skills 80/60, 'A' level education and outgo- 
ing personality necessary. Smart offices. 
Age 22-25. Please ring - 


437 6032 


Alternatively - if you want to temp while we 
search for the right Job for you, ring Fiona 
NOW! 






A RARE RREED 

TO £11, 000 


This tort co needs a 
smart, wed presented 
PA/Sec with good skins 
and a friendly outgoing 
personality. You wu as- 
sist the Finance Director 
and work as part of a 
team, so its essential 
that you're a people per- 
son. well organised, 
metho di cal, wishing to 
be very Involved. 


01-935 8235 

(Rec Cons) 


Assured Presence 

£9,000 


Berkeley Square beckons. Our dient, a very 
substantial name in the world of fine business 
investment, requires a young secretary to assist 
the Office Manager, working in exclusive 
surroundings you will handle admin prob- 
lems, telephone liaison and the occasional 
private errand for the Chairman (eg bidding 
for antique jewellery at auction). Rusty 
shorthand/meticulous typing requested. Age 
19-22. Please telephone 01-493 5787. 


GORDON-YATES 


Elizabeth Hunt 


£10,500 


A major firm of internati ona l research co n su lt ants 
seeks an enthusiastic, bright secretary to join their 
busy team. You'll anfoy a varied, m teresti n g day; and 
a friendly, informal atmosphere, modern well 
equipped Wi offices, good prospects envisaged, SO 
wpm «x*o abdlty and WP experience needed. 

Age 22+. 


TRAVEL AMD TOURISM 

£10,000 


Join this Interesting Wi company dosefy connected 
to the travel and tourism industry, as secretary to the 


Managing Director. This is a new posffion with great 
scope for development ExceSant benefits Include 
free travel overseas. 100/60 sk»s needed. 


Efizobeth Hurt Reauftmonl Consultants . 

23 Bedford Street London WC2 CK-240 3511^ 




Sec/PA to MD 

£10,000 


Stunning opening within public-quoted design 
company for a tip-top professional. As Sec/BY to 
Group MD you will enjoy responsibility (hosting 
meetings etc), variety (client contact, personnel. 


finance etc) and total involvement in an exciting 
young environment. Integrity social confidence and 


young environment. Integrity social confidence and 
a measure of numeracy are essential. Good 
skills (90/60)? Sound work record? Age 23+? Call 
01-409 1232. 


Recruitment Consultants 



icloria Rlraliain 


FASHION/DESIGN FLAIR? 

Lively and mature Secretaries wttn good skits required for 
I n tHinadonal Fasteon Design Group. WI. Resssratng opp- 
ortuiities. excatent benefits. Salaries to £ 10 . 000 . 

Plane telephone 01-403 4407/3492 


Are you blue because you 
are in the red? Come and 
work for high rates of pay 
in the City using your 
word processing and sec- 
retarial skffls. Your bank 
manager will kwe you and 
you will feel in the pink. 


01-606 1611 


Secmanes 



TO 
CTO 
£11,000 

la vestal eat Basking 


Senor American erector ts 
neeting a (rndn secreay with a 
gooo sense w humour and orei- 
eraWy ornate school education 
to look after tin. Helm ntoma- 
tenaJ business dealings so 
Frandinl German wado be an 


SECRETARY/PA 

Around £8,000 

A Secretary/ PA is required to join a small 
(cam based in modem attractive offices near 
Holboro. You will provide secretarial and PA 
assistance to the Director and Exhibitions 
Manager of this lively expanding Trade Fed- 
eration and be Involved in export promotion. 
Aged 21-25. you will have excellent shorthand 
typing and word processing skflls, be adaptable 
and prepared to lake on new tasks as they 
arise. 

Please apply to Mr N W Bayley, Company 
Secretary. British Federation of Printing Ma- 
chinery and Supplies Ltd., Plough Place. Fetter 
Lane, London EC4A 1AL_ Telephone 01-583 
7433. 


chinery and Supplies Ltd., Plough Place. Fetter 
Lane, London EC4A 1AL_ Telephone 01-583 


SUPER EFFICIENT 
SECRETARY/PA 


Read SEPT 1-1 5th to assist 
DIRECTORS of fast growing WI based 
SPECIALIST RECRUITMENT CO. 


Should be unflapable with sense of 
humour and good secretarial skills 
allied to an extremely professional 
telephone manner. 

Distinct possibility of PERMANENT 
JOB if SUPERB! 


TeL Lynne Atwood 
01-580 7695/7739 


Accountancy Appointments 
Europe. 


£ 11-1 

OFFICE ADMIN + 


asset if you enjoy a star-up 
straton n a tet-amndra 


strata n a tet-oqnndng 
group and wring from ray 
pleasant offices nor Oran Psk, 
teraj us. Skits 100/60. 


01-499 0092 


Senior. 

Secretaries 


Opportunity to un Suparvraoiy Admin & PR StdBa 

Office Administrator Sooth of the River 
circa £9,000 

Successful Mafl Order Fashion C o m pany 
Due to expansion we seek an experienced office ad- 
ministrator, aged 25-45 to take on the overafi 
administrative management of this rapkfly developing 
company. Reporting to the Managing Director, respon- 
sibilities wi include supervision of staff, streamlining 
procedures, development of new preducts/desgns. 
public relations activities. A methodical but flexible ap- 
proach combined with a cheerful personality are 
important attributes. Car driver and typing essential. 
Applications in strict confidence with CV to: The Man- 
aging Director, James Meade Shirts Ltd, 302-304 
Barrington Road, London SW9 7HW. Or telephone 01 
274 3100. 


RICHMOND 


You wHl supervise 
the back-up staff 
and ensure the 
smooth running of 
the office as well 
as providing a 
PA/Secretarial 
role to the Finance 
Director of a com- 
pany at Holbom 
Viaduct. Usual 
SH/typing skills, 
finance/admin or 
personnel back- 
ground useful. 

City 377 SCOO 

West End 439 7001 |— 1 


BILINGUAL SECRETARY 

£ 10,000 

Good French, S/h and WPto work for Senior 
Director 

. SECRETARY 
£9,000 

To work for Senior Parmer in firm of Architects. 

V & A Recruitment 01-948 8277 


Secretaries Plus 


!•' Hi.'.' 


COMPANY 


5 a if; 


SECRETARY 
Small office, good 
atmosphere. Salary . 
commensurate with 
experience 352 4002 or 
351 3097. 


Senior Personal 
Secretaries 

for fop management 
Central London up to £11/553 


services we 
oft and are 


currently looking for a limited number at very experienced regniy 
competent secretaries. You must be capable of assuming _ 
considerable responsibility and able to communicate effectively on 
a day-to-day basis not only with British Telecom management, but 
also with senior people in other companies and government 

dePQi |deaSyyou will be educated to W level standard and possess 
4 years' proven senior secretarial experience (consideration will be 


knowledge ofwordprocessing are essential. Some tamiharity 
with the telecommunications industry would be also useful 
Starting salary will be within the range £9,137-£ll r 553 
according to age and experience and induding London allowance. 
All salaries are under review. . 

To apply, please write endosing CV to: Sheila Chariton, 
Recruitment Centre, British Telecom, Room 26/48, Euston Tower, 
286 Euston Road, London NW1 3DG. 

British Telecom is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 


British 

TELECOM 


ONLY THE BEST 
NEED APPLY 


We are expanding our successful sales department due to 
the continued growth of our publications. 


Therefore there are opportunities for sales people who 
possess the qualities and character to complement our 
existing team. The required qualifications are a good level 
of education, enthusiasm, dedication, and a good appear- 
ance. A knowledge of typing would be desirable. 


There will be ample scope to capitalise on new business 
opportunities and full training will be given to equip you 
to meet the challenge and demands of this role. The right 
applicants will be ideally aged under 35 and will reside in 
London or within easy travelling distance. 


Your ability to respond to the competitive nature of 
advertising in order to develop new business for Times 
Newspapers will earn you the reward of an excellent 
starting salary plus bonus scheme and generous holiday 
entitlement 


Please telephone: 

June Wyse 01-833 7430 

Steven Oxley 01-837 1234, extension 7706 


-P ft' */ .■ 


THE SUNDAY TIMES 

P.O. BOX 7, 

200 GRAYS INN ROAD, 

LONDON. WCIX 8EZ 


STERLING EFFORTS 

c.£l3,000 


The young go-ahead Managing Director of an exciting fi- 
nancial services company with superb offices in SW1 needs a 
smart, discreet and highly competent person to assist him. As 
he involved in every aspect of the company’s wide ranging 
activities more particularly in mergers and acquisitions, your 
work will be of a highly confidential nature and you will 
need to be able to cope with pressure in this busy support 
role (audio 60+ wpm and WP). Good benefits and a very 
happy team spirited atmosphere. Age 27-40. Please call 434 
4512. 


Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONS! Jl TANTS 


'V f y ^ 


Sparkle in PR 


£8,500 

Puithe bounce back in your day! This great 
outfit is looking for a bright bubbly ‘grafter 1 to 
help them handle media liaison, press confer- 
ence^ product launches and exhibitions. Ybull 
gso deal with clients, look after suppliers etc. 
Energy, sparkle, a sense offtin and an appetite 
hard work aD count. So too do good 
wperfence. Ag 6 

ReeruitmtTit Con&uftante 


personnel 

PA BOARD LEm 

£10,000 

Asset the Ctamun of the 
taggt woof nanoiacurtig 


company In Europe. You mU 
also mpf tbe tin that w n 
ai uoemuur and Mads 
yon to asset lam Us 
tray and rated day. fctena 
"ft IV denis, arranging 
ther mnungs rah the Cm- 
nan. You wffl need good 
adflMdtntin and aranaal 

sUt*. ExceBant prospects 
anahyoa For wmwSate in- 
terview cad NATURE 
BROKER M 734 tell. 




ADMIN SEC 
BOOK-KEEPER 
c £10,500 


Shorthand is useful 
but not essential 
as you have the 
opportunity to 
move into admin 
as PA to the 
Finance Director of 
a non profit 

making body in 

Belgrade Square. 
Lots of preparation 
for committees. 
WP experience 
essential. 
CtySnscoo 

Ufcot End 439 7001 



AU you need on the sec- 
retarial side Is good copy 


typing. However you do 
need to have excellent 
experience in aR facets 
of book-keeping to trial 
balance coupled with 
knowledge of sStartoa 
and banting etc. 

Call Richard 

01-734 2567 


SfdUFiru, 
v Rccruitmcnt 





\sU’: 



interest: 

1DM1N!S7~A7; 

1 C L , Q 






















THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 



Mil 


• III lift 


wsonai 

ies 

igement 
I* up to £ 11 , 55 ^ 

. A . 

rtlwn i>! vrrv 

3©*apCibirnt hr 3fe, : 

Stifrih W’Lv’iv, / .. ’ 

Wipoihf^ arso « : tj; 

■■ 'Vr?t 


1 to ’A' kvp; <itu« r> . j nr 

■ aupWiiMtCV Co >s 

»0**» 

ndd# uu^.? ^ 

fWJOT id. si;:^. .. V. ‘^; c 
ifry wts.'Wbfa,-.. 

tf*P fLlrt^i' 1 - * . ' , , 

ond tfKUnimrj i 

artgCVic Sht- 
il fawn 26 4S Fi- 
X. - lwAer - : 

opportunity t^.^r » 

ish 

£LECOA\ 


HE BEST 
APPL Y 

itfut vilrs itr^nnicni dues 

tfttltC* IW Vi;rs pevjpte 8*3 
WAl'UM 1st • ■! , -l'ii-nUT.Soc 
|uai if traitors jr.- .« p.-wd ie»ji 
ShClitou. ar«i »< y:.K*d appear- 

f wnuM Iv 

NttfHtaJtv ;.:■ ivw has^njs 
(gvMll hr Vii- 'i *. ■ 
mftftth -.• ^ : t ..* r.-v Tis-ngt 
ftMDdr! ^ -i-Mwf ir 


At ic?r!i;«r!i!:«c r.Jlutf of 
|0|| fir 1 * hi;*-i'ir^ s NT T:fRS 
Ifae. rt*4-J o' J.n cvfffc 

knr 4 U*! g? serous hOM ; 


nirn%:i*- 

TI0: Sl'MHY TIME 

t>\ \ 

WN KOUV 

M t\ MV 


EFFORTS 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 


m fo Managing Director 
Wl c£J 2 j 000 neg. 


: GvA5 business is the design and fabri- 
: cation of innovative Floating Production 
Systems and other semi-submersible vessels 
-■lor the Offshore industry. 

‘ we're- looking forsorneone capable of 
acting as a confidential PA/Seoetaxy to the 
Managing Dire cro i, as well as meeting the 
secretarial requirements of the Group 
Financial Director and Finance Manager. 

You 1 !! treed first class audio, shorthand 
and copy typing skills and the ability to ' j 

deal with people at aD levels. It's equally 
important that you are highly experienced J 
intheuseofWPequipmenhdeallyAES-as. j 
you’ll need to fully exploit the potential of 1 

our equipment ■ - I 

- Omerqualities include a high degree of J 


organisation and accuracy a bright person- 
ality, the ability to prioritise and to establish 
and maintain effective records systems. 

As a highly professional RA/Secretary capa- 
‘ “hie of handling your duties with relative ease. 


you’ll be given ample opportunity to exercise 
your proven administrative capabilities In 
r return for the effort, enthusiasm and ability you 


extremely pleasant working environment. 
If you're looking for a lively and 
stimulating position please unite, with 
details of your present salary and 
career to date, to David McMiDan, 

GVA UK Ltd. 25/28 Old Burlington 
Street, London WTX 1LB. 


MARKUP G A UMIQ1TE SJBKVICB c .£9,000 

- . -This Consultancy provides a unique tnfor-* prestigious Cty offices, needs a Secretary to play 
mation service for its intemationaJ dients. a vital rote in the Company’s future. Setting up 
It keeps them abreast of worldwide current • - systems, organising presentations and meeting 
affairs, polfticaJ and economic activity which wilt clients, you will have a high degree of invok/e- 
affect business and influence decision making'at ment in a stimulating environ- Sf %MW£ S 

the highest level The Marketing team, based in ment Good SWH and WP skills. ®'*rwc^ K 


01-2567281 


city city city city city city city FiN«se ci 

.IPPOMIlKtnSOD 


Judy Farquharson Limited 

47 New Bond Street London, W1Y 3 HA. 
01-4938824 

HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW THE CITY? 

A small highly successful City consultancy soaks a 
Shrewd, anthuwstic person to join their team. Com- 
puter inputting and retrieval experience a must with 
a sound knowledge of the. CHy plus good admin, 
skills. Essantialy flexible, self -motivated and keen to 
team. Keyboard skill* 50+ wpm- Age 20s. A Level/ 
graduate. £ 12,000 + bonus. 

PA/OFFICE MANAGER FLUENT 
ITALIAN/SPANISH 

Expanding west End office of Swiss-based interna- 
tional sponsorship organisation seeks calm and 
organised PA Must have exceBent presentation, 
outgoing personality and an Interest in the arts. Flu- 
ent Italian and/or Spanish essential, German useful 
Fast typing. Age 28-32. c£1 1.000. 

TEMPORARY APPOINTMENTS 

we are always keen to interview candidates with 
excellent secretarial skills for varied temporary as- 
signments In the West End. 

Jp|^RECRUITMEN^ONSUnMTS^^ 


r onoincKinQ ^ 

TEMPS! TEMPS! TEMPS! 
EARNING £11,000 pa? 

ha nqxnencad Eacratey with WP sfcb Mubin ta~0n(n King 
taromianr Team can sxped to am in excess a! As above «Ma 
enmrino a variety of assignmems n all oros ol London. Pfc abn have 
a gnu demand lor shonmnd, auito and n»y stals. Please tekphon 
Bnmb Sicwan tor m nmdute a ppo v nmem. 

48 CHd Bond Stmt, Wl J 

L 01-4998070 A 

^ CAROLUS IdttG SECRETARIAL APPtNNTMBITS 


rwa ASXA&AQVERIB1NG 

V/// ARE YOU 

/ / Looking for a satisfying job in 

/ advertising, P.R., Theatre, 
/. Radio Publishing and the 
Creative Felds? 

DO YOU 

Have at least 6 months secretarial 
experience using shorthand, typing 
or wp? 

IF SO 

Give us a ring, we are handling lots of 
jobs in these fields at ail levels and 
we’d like to hear from you. 

01-491 8775 / 

Recruitment Consultants // 


yMS»A8ADVERnSWG 


INSIDE INFORMATION 

A leading firm of Qiy solicitors requires a top flight PA to their 
Director of administration. In ensuring the smooth running of 
the office your duties will be many and varied. Responsibilities 
include computerising information systems, providing initial 
contact on personnel matters, making travel arrangements and 
_ preparing statistical information. Your secretarial duties for the 
•; Director wifi include some personal work. You wifi also under- 
take specific projects such as arranging partners’ weekend 
■' meetings, monitoring the 'firm’s publicity material and gather- 
ing information on new equipment. You should have a proven 
track record in administration and good secretarial skills. Age 
28-40. Salary £11,000. Please telephone 588 3535. 

; Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


Top of the Temporary Tree 


Manpower temporaries are people on their way Cipi 
:-7bugh, but rewarding; assignments. Jobs where you use your 
skills - and widen 1 hem. Freetrp'ming (W/Ps and PCs) fo 
. make you a machine all-rounder. Pay and benefits 
to-mdlch. 

Management Secretaries, automated office skills 

Nearttiistopon^sIHamblijout? 

Grab Q<w of our branches... 




TOP OF THE POPS £11,000 

Assist a dynamic manager who handles TOP music 
celebrities using your reasonable shorthand skills. 

FRENCH SPEAKING 

CHAIRMAN’S PA £13,000 

Total support is the key here as you use your fluent 
French (SH and speaking) to totally develop this fab- 
ulous rote to its executive best 


Sec/PA to Director 

£9,000 

This is a lively stimulating position within a 
high profile 'consumer goods' advisory 
body Their role is to collate research and 
maintain top level contacts throughout the 
world Working closely ai executive director 
level you will co-ordinate extensive travel 
meetings, diary and liaison - with attend 
ance at VIP functions (dinners, luncheons 
etc) an occasional extra! Skills (80/50). 
Age 20-K Please telephone 0 1 -493 5787. 


GORDON-YATES 


Rccvuom Cbnuihjuti 


A CAREER IN PUBLIC £9,000 + 

RELATIONS SUPERB PERKS 

This is a star opening for a VIVACIOUS PA who enjoys a 
challenge working for a famous international entertain- 
ments company moving to Middlesex in a year's time. 
Reasonable SH is necessary. 






Secretarial & Commercial Div. 
City Recruitment Consultants, 
58 Houndsditch, London . 
EC3A7DL. 


SEGRETARY/WF OPERATOR 

£9,000 -/11,000 -AGE: 24+ 

Friendly Lloyd's Mrmhwy Agents require a secretary to be part of a small team/ to 
provide additional secretarial sapport and be responsible for the operation of the void 
processing and database systems on a microcomputer system. 

The swxeanfol applicant vciD be educated to “O’ level standard including Rn gfinh, have 
fast accnrate typing, sh o r t hand and a good r m d enrtan tBng of microcompu t er a . 

Maturity, positive t hinkin g, profterional prese n tation and the abffity to work os a 
member of a are rffw-itiel qaaKi?^::. 


THE BIOCHEMICAL SOCIETY 

ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT 

To be responsible for running the 
secretarial section of editorial office 
concerned with handling scientific articles 
for publication; and to act as P.A. to 
Editorial Manager organising and minuting 
Board meetings. Experience and good 
secretarial and administrative skills 
essential. Previous position in busy 
periodical publishing office advantageous. 
Salary £9,500. 

Apply in writing by 13 August 1986 to; 

EDITORIAL MANAGER 
7 Warwick Court 
High Hoibum 
London WC1R 5DP 


ADVERTISING PA 
£10,000 NEG 

The Chief Executive wVi rasponsibtSjy tor Creative sue 
* ut ties knifing KiyjMSbtidge Advertising Agency is bA> 
Hentiy Imaginative and wonderfii to work tor If you have 
emnuafesm. energy and tin attety ra understand and 
organise a creative person. 


No day wD be the same and you wS IW your initiative 
tuNy extended whether deeSng with top consumer cflents 
or occasionally going on location. 

Please tetepfxxie us for an Wtiat cfitcusston if you ara 22- 
28 «kh pose, a good sense of humour, fast accurate 
typtajjand reaSy know you are a up level PA ready tor an 


ADMINISTRATION? 
TO £9,500 

If you ertoy administration and are a natural on ths 
phone, join tMs famous name company dosely 
connected to the Hotel Industry, as secretary to a 
young executive, ©teat prospects and it Interested 
the opportunity to study for a day release Char- 
tered Secretaries Course. Benefits indude a free 
lunch. 100/60 skills and WP experience needed. 

k EEzobeUihfonlRecniibT>entG>nsujtonb i 

S. 23 CoflegeHB London EC4 0H3403551 J 


il 


k'iTwI 


AppB c a f kws please, «ritb Ml tr, mrlrefim day 
Ptccdy at 246 BMmiaBatB, Loadoa EC2M 4PB. 

(N* Agencies) 


t dep haae 


to Helen 



£10,500 


An exotmjj opportunity tns 
amen lor jou «toa m jon 
ms yowg aomfeng property 
conpaiy n Hwtti West Union. 
You wl HM Ito Bonces 
Owetopmeni Orator wtt m- 
kang strateges. Mtvertuang 
Bed un ma n* rentono. You 
wt be reeest tram begtonp to 
end m to toeekng ant italng 
ol to property aorfd. 11 you an 
a se* sorter, hare good admet- 
■slntion aJHMy along ott 
sinmg or ge ei eetniu il atalts. 
good tyjMQ and a drefag 
ceitce then call NATALIE 
QRUKH) CD 734 0811. 


TOP ADVERTISING PA 
£94100 

“Stung and capable " parson 
is rsqtdrad. tiwy ssyt Board- 
tow* w po i mmo m in ona of 
tr» world's top Agencies. 
Manage oomnwnicattons with 
International clients 'in s' 
young, enthusiastic onviron- 
enanitn Wl. A fast pace but 
ad agencies am always fun. 
Age 23+-+. Phone 


=3 


SaBy ORtotta ai 43 4 BC3B- 

■ODGH 

■Rra?uin®m 


PA SECRETARY FOR BUSY 
LONDON PR AGENCY 

Top experienced PA Secretary wanted for fe- 
male head of busy PR comany. Pressured but 
exciting job working for demanding boss. 
Good shorthand typing speeds, WP experi- 
ence. Large friendly team in modem 
comfortable offices in W2. Needs to be pa- 
tient, friendly and very efficient. Please write 
with CV to: 

Carole Love 

Lynne Franks Ltd 

6-10 Frederic* don. Stanhope Plata, Union W2 2ML 


MARKETING c£9,000 I I BILINGUAL SECRETARY 



J ■ 


^Rilili] 


h'Ik iii 1 li y 1 1 iii, 1 1 il.iiii y,i ; j ii I 




A Marketmg/Desigri company in South Kensington 
is looking for an experienced and efficient secretary 
to join utwyoangsaceteful team. You wiE be work- 
ing for a dynamic, overworked Marketing Manager 
who needs organising, and also providing general 
secretarial support to other members of the market- 
ing team. Enthusiasm, flexibility, and a sense of 
humour are essential, as are good shorthand, audio 
and typing skills. Age: 23+- Please send CV to Nigel 
Swabey And Partners. 7/8 Kendrick Mens, London 
SW73HG. 


German /English totally MBaypial secretary to 
organise Managing Director of small and 
friendly but extremely busy team of publishers 
representatives in West End. Good speak 
SH/Typing, knowledge of WP, with min 2 years 
experience. Sense of humour and unflappability 
essential Salary Neg depending on age and ex- 
perience. Write with CV to BOX D36. Times 
Newspapers. P.O. BOx 484. Virginia Street. 
London El 9DD. 



Dulcie Simpson 

Appointments Ltd - 


. SECOND JOBBER 

Since you tame toady had one 

job. jwc» type, ut* stMftiund 
and audto wrt use Cnaftan Rtox 

anti haw aa tits wp skBt U to 
atitaen yw care about yew job. 
and ve Ml a eta* watcher and 
would (Be waring metoomt new 
wbsI end officet jou have finslty 
■have fart to toti-youm too*- 
tog lor. nowdu you do not ntW 
wrong for ttto sertor gartner at 
Branltorbs anti Co, re, Qtariac 
2nd Straet London SW1«U To 
«rtunt ytw tttouU safld your CV. 


sta ta w togg les to fSWCE 
AUD SWITZERLAND far WP 
«*W Rm. (must taw fkcM 
Fnnto and he ow 2S) 

W» jrotaonto Chcts/Coota 
and Gfefct Gob (oti over 21) 
Mwtoe wtiUAfar Ml season 
Deesmiw.'W to Aod "87. 


SECRET ABY/AHMK 

Busy Wire Merrtiants in 
Lotts Road, Chelsea, 
need someone to run 
their office. Typing es- 
sential, wine knowledge 


■ V II i i il llilM 1 


£8.000. 

Tefc Loube HaOom 
on 01-351 6856 


PUBLIC RELATIONS 

The French Chamber of Commerce in Great 
Britain is looking for 9 responsible and 
experienced- BMingual PA. with secretarial back- 
ground to coordinate public relations activities. 

Please send CV to: R. Cleric 
FCCGB. 54 Conduft St 
London Wl. 

(01-439 1735) 


RECEPTIONIST £8,000. 

INTERIOR DESIfiH COMPANY 

Young, extremely busy office. 

Good typing ability, must be well organized 
and unflappable. 

Call Louise on 01-431 2627 


AUDIO SECRETARY 
LONDON SW1 

Professional firm of Quantity Surveyors needs first rate 
Secretary for 3 Pttiaerc. Excellent wp skills and sound 
commercial background. Under 30 preferred. Salary up 
to £10000. 

Ring Sue Ireland 
01-730 9901 



FILM A VIDEO 

ite Dtracus of a Hm and Video 
Facttoes Company in London Wl 
ream a sn ort na nd Smsay 
mm me age at 25. wue apej- 
ence amTuatont* twM 
Stony ss-noooo uta 
wring conditions and Mend), 
team. This can be a pan time 
appointment far the right 
appfcaa 

In the fast hjtanoe please tde- 
ptwne Mn Btako on 

81-488 2881 


Kiii SEfiEj 


PA /SEC 


• r/J j 



shorthand), and admov- 




to 



SECRETARY 
to E9JK0 + mortgage 

Expanding international bank 
urgently requires a bright 


department Candidates 
should be looking farata- 
teer in this field md must 
possess flexibility, patience 
and orginisaiwnaJ ffair. Rusty 

shonband will be sufficient 
but proven typing and WP 
skills are essential. Aged 
19+. An mcebatt COUege 
leaver would be consxJerad. 

-23611 



01-228 0023 


£9,500 

Tte faresstB upoutoi toema 
tonal campanv tnsad n to 
iMflol Uaytar a looking for a 
Meoal pereon to Van mm a 
«w saoatoy oostoon to a 
pareonto Bsto to btaatto 
■xfumfeogs m a ham onuni. 
men yw ml asset to hd n 
te heir tor. So d as nnn 
appetong and you tine good 
towtoad and typtog sfctos - 
and a bogiage wutd be an ad- 
vantage - then pleau ctol 
LOUISE BRA I ME for an 
nmetfaie mtente* on 221 
5072. 


SECRETARY 

For busy Putney Estate 
Agent. Interesting end varied 
duties. Excellent working 
comfittons. Preferred age 20 
- 25. Seiary ne g oftttte. 

Please contact: 
James D’Arcy 
01-785 2122 


RECEPTIONIST 

c.^10,000 

On behalf of FIDELITY INTERNATIONAL, a leading 
independent Investment Man a geme n t Group we seek an 
experienced and confident Receptionist aged 25+. 

With the support of one other person your varied responsibil- 
ities will include gree tin g a steady- stream of vishor*, 
operating a busy Monarch switchboard and managing 2 
dining rooms. As the company’s initial contact with diems 
and outer vision, your pone, presentation and ixroTessmul- 
hm will be crucial, as will your proven organisational ability 
and proficiency in keeping a cool bead underpressme. 
Attractive offices near monument. Phase call 588 3535. 

Crone Corkill 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 


AUSTRALIAN STATE GOVERNMENT OFFICE 
IN LONDON 

requires capable and experienced secretary with good 
shorthand speeds preferably with cofflptxar and word 
processing background. Salary £10,000 per annum. 
Position is temporary with prospects or contract 
employment for a further period. A knowledge of 
Australia would be of advantage. 
Applications in writing to: 

Official Secretary, 

South AustraHIa House, 

50 Strand, 

London. WC2N 5LW 


DEMANDING RUT 
APPRECIATIVE 

Kensington b a sed motivation researcher debgtucd to pay thou- 
sands oTpouods (IQ. actually) fara PA who can type with splitting 
infinitives, talk without dropping His. add up without dropping 
zeros and serve gin & ionics wthota dropping glasses. 

Phone: Martin Daniels 

01-225 1677 (day) 

01-937 0173 (evening) 


irector’s Secretar 

Top of the Tree 
£12,000 + excellent benefits 


XXjeolor sccreury/PA to work at main board level 
in their central London Head Office. Tbe success of 
die group is basal on traditional, lonp beW interests 
and major new aujuisi cions, led by a highly successful 
forward-thinking management. 

Hx Head Office team is at dw nucleus of the group, 
and the Director wiQ expea from bis assistant an 
immaculate back-up service appropriate to die lewd at 
which he is operating. There will be plenty of outside 
conua with press, and fyoup members, and tbe 
successful candidate will understand die need to 
balance a pleasant helpful approach with discretion 
and professionalism. Secretarial speeds required are 
100/60, with a senior lewd background and the poise 
to Ell a high status position in a prestigious 
environment- Age indicator 27-40, 

Please tdcpboae 01 -437 1364 


& Associates Lid 
01-437 1564 

Recruitment Consultants 1 30 Regent Street, 
London W|R 5FE 


RECRUITMENT 

Wc are successful, personal, small and somewhat eccen- 
tric. We need an insiant impact personality with a sense 
of humour only equalled by business acumen and ambt- 


on our answerphone. 


Susan Beck R 0^584 6242 


Upmarket Temping 

' to £11,000 

This summer, join an exclusive and 
upvmidK-iTiobilt: elite The pick of Londons 
prestige jobs. Rewards that pay foil 
recognition io excellence. And something 
more. Longer- term career growth. Financially 
our pay- structure reflects your development. 
So too our training unit, where without 
charge or dbligatk.ni you can bring your- 
self tp to dare on ihe Luest in WP, Find our 
more about upmarket temping, Call today: 
01-4935787. 

GORDON-YATES 


Rrcruummi Comtotuut 



Hot Property 

£9,000 *■ J 

This is a challenging top slot for a fast-moving 
young>See/RL Our- client a fcvely; go^setting 
restaurants group urgently needs your admin skills 
and organising flair to coordinate their property 
projects division, -'ibu will deal with new 
acquisitions, management 'and related property 
matters — . and front up the department 'in the 


executives' absence. Skills 80/55- 
Please caJ] 01-409 1232. 

IWnu'Unrfll Conwitanto 


Pref age 22+. 


DIRECTORS SECRETARY 

c £9,000 + perks 

Wholesale fashion company requires 
fast and efficient Secretary/PA. You will 
need excellent shorthand typing, have 
initiative and be keen to give full 
administration support At least 5 years 
experience essential. 

Applications with CV to BOX D22 
c/o Times Newspapers 
PO BOX 484 
Virginia Street 
London El 


BA. in 

Public Relations 

Ambitious, enthusiastic, energetic, 
efficient, experienced PA/Secretary to the 
Ch airman of a fast-gro wing PR consul rancy. 
Responsibilities include: organising press 
conferences and lunches, issuing informa- 
tion, co-ordinating diaries, traveLand office 
activity. WP training given. 

Salary negotiable a^e.+ benefits. 

Applications to Anne Garland on 
01-4891441 


iumdrameI 

PERSONNEL 

PA IN FABULOUS 





MEDICAL SECRETARY 
WC1 

Consultant Denratotogst re- 
quires experienced reliable 


ape am wpertenca. 


Be modi mot thsi t score- 
cey vton ynu mrk far fin 
Brandi Manager ot Hut tnter- 
mtonto EhtoSers Conuwiy. 
Every month you wfl organise 
and aniKf «me uomg par- 
ties and assist in the 
rrmamfl 0» new wrta and 
eoetoai nsxfares Your boss 
■ill annecats your ideas and 
jdmm&vafcw atthaes m nm- 
tua to o toe CU MARE 
THERESE OSTROWSH on 
831 0666. 

^ n fa va 


mty tor an amtHfavs eom- 
petant penon to work in thwr 
iraenwionto sate olfica. Ytw 
preferred age to 18 + wtth a 
100/50 s*wrth*rxytypi «8 and 
some knowledge of WP. Has 


make a carom tathtoWuv 
try- Please phone tor 
immediate Interview: 

SelU&if (CJhf 
Appointments Uri. 

30 Rom Lana. London BSC 

01 236 0669. 


UP TO £10,000 

Use yoer WOrtvo rad Ujto to 
mgme rartaencx* a«l eto 
Mans m ths super CasMon 
house. Y« excetoa seaeual 

su: ml to apprecflied hy 
you boss - to ML Tate 
resjjoraofay tor ynor mem- 
bere to sbh. am wto 
EBressontoiw, satis urges 
and ham Mb tone &wa 
oeer mOi tbs teawfl cem- 
pay Mh tooto* on UOtos. 
bra or psftng and «toMnd 
Met a you Mnt l chfi- 
toge. caa SMEflA BATES on 
OitoE 0787 fcdayf 


SHOWROOM/ 

PA 

SALARY £10,000 


tem see skills. Fashion 
background esemuL 
Coniaci Michele Strong 
439 6031 


I. ’ :|lc > 


PEfiSONNa 


PORTICOS 

£10,000 

Boom tan of toss paanus 

sfruMHos. ton m lap d< 

wniv when you become PA tp 
to sena togoor ot oae ol to 
most prestigious property 
vws n to WML Ttes Inter. 
nit>oiHl Iitid contioi and 
owetop Sdto ol to moet not. 
ng ptMda otto doode and 
astaftyMMBbe ctatoy 
"Wtoei! « al toe actMm. 
you w( nod «t«6enl mob- 
taw suts inefeteng shtrtond 
and to ttosn a sucBced. Ctoi 

S0HA BflASLAVSKV on 734 


TRAVEL PR 

Supsr-effitiBtit 
PA/Secratary to work 
kwth team haixlfog 
exciting travel PR 
accounts. 

Adaptability, exceHent 
SH/typandspeffing, 
ability to cope in hectic 
condwons, eagerness to 
learn and be part of 
busy team, are pro 
requisites. Good salary 
aae: some travel parka; 
small, friendly, non- 
smoking office. 

Can R B A: 
01-437 9475/7445/7448 
(NO AGENCIES) 


ii ir / (imuti 





































28 


SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


PERSONAL 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


JACK SAYS um-W 


PLEASE HELP Tnr National Be- 

IWolenl Fun d |«r IW Avrd IO 

provide "TENS’ martiuw* for 
inr rekrt of pain In condition* 
nil* artnrifi*. £60 ouy* a ma- 
ctww. Donations please to The 
Viscount TOuypandjr. Chair: 
man. NBFA. 3 B. New Broad St.. 
London ECZM iNH 
WOULD PETER MV« SVOTTWK 
nvhfl left NewrroUDd in 1931 
SO) ptoase con (ati Jean Marie 
Draw or 77 Peel sL Westport. 
New Zealand. 

I JOSEPH O’MEL wish lo make 
ine folk) wing announcement 
that Wednesday to my official 
Birthday 

PAUL! please come luxnr to Nina. 
Mike. Cameftne A James. All 
love you desolate. 

BIRD, A with eternal love. Sealed 
Together, paul. 


BIRTHDAYS 


CHRIS HUNT - 21 TODAY. C<m- 

qraiLiia>to<»- Hwinm and 

good luct for me lunire. 


SERVICES 


CALIBRE CVS Ltd prrtfratonal 
curriculum Mae documents. 
Detail*. Ol <WI 5388. 
COMPANY «HJ Dwt organised 
(or stall or customer* Any lo- 
ctflaa. Tel 0734 3727Z2 
BREAKAWAY. London's club lor 
professional imatUKIwd people 
SMIOvrr zoo events mon in- 
ly. 2a nr Utfo tape. 997 7994. 
CAPITAL CY» prepare high Quail 
ty curriculum vUan. 01-607 


MARRIAOE A AOVKE Bureau 
Katharine Allen in forrtgn Of- 
fice) personal interview*.? 
Serf ley PI. Wl. Or 499 3556 
LONDON TV NETWORK has stu- 
dios available Full make-u p A 
dressing lAci lines. Ol 453 4377 
for details I !-9pm Mon-Fn. 


Send S.A E 14 Beauchamp pi. 
SW3. 01 267 6006 . Essex area. 
Ol 604 4142. Hnh success rate. 
Men 40-65 In demand. 
FRIENDSHIP. Love or Marriage 
All ages, areas. Dateline. Depf 
1016 ) 25 Abingdon Road. Lon- 
don WB. Tel: 01-938 lOll 


LEGAL SERVICES 


ecOHVEYAHCMG by fidly ouau- 
lied Solicitors £160 * VAT and 
standard disbursements ring 
0244 319398. 


WANTED 


ORKtNAL SCRIPTS, (deploys, 
screenplay* lor American lele- 
isian. Psychological / social 
sub peels preferred. E. 
Hernandez. Pn.D 17031 948- 
3060. 

ELECTRIC MVALID BED Any 
make considered. TeL 01-699 
9824. 


FOR SALE 


« WAITS hand 

caned fulls toe snooker table m 

mahogany Exceptional condi- 
tion. together with revolving 
cue stand and Rollertull score- 
board. £7500 Would conader 
Uklng car PX. Tel: 091 
4876849. 


HALF PRICE SALE at Tom 

means TV's tram only £26 + 
dozens of bargains In TVs and 
videos. 9! Lower Shone SI.. 
SWL. 730 0953 

Bill C UTS or HETTLEBEO CMP- 
pendale and sheraion style 
dining luralture made lo order. 
Over 60 dunng suMes always 
available for Unmediaie deliv- 
ery. Nelllehed. near Henley on 
Thames 10491 1 641116. 

Bourne m o u th 10202) 295680. 
Toputam. Devon 1059287) 
7445. Berkeley. Qos (04551 
810952 

FINEST guallty wool carpels- At 
trade prices and under, also 
available 100's extra. Large 
room sue remnants under half 
normal once. Chancery Carpets 
Ot 405 0453. 

9JBMTDM STYLE Dining Ta- 
bles. chairs, sideboards and 
desks. Catalogues from Wllbam 
Tillman. Crouch Lane. Borough 
Green. KenL 0732 883Z78. 

THE HMD 17BS-1MS. Other 
biles avaU- Hand bound ready 
for 


mday*“. Ci2 SO Remember 
When. 01-688 6525. 

TICKETS FOR ANY EVENT, Cats. 
Marllgfif Exn. Chess- las Mis. 
All theatre and spans. 

TH 8216616 8280496. 

A. Ex . Visa , Dine rs.. 
F1HDCES/ FREEZERS- Cookers, 
etc. Can you buy cheaper? B A 
S Ltd. Ot 229 1947/8468. 
OLD YORK FLAGSTONES for 
sale. Beautiful condition. Tel 
061 223 0881.-061 231 6786. 
BOLSHOI August 9th maf Orches- 
cra stalls. Tel: 0983 730831 
SEATTMOCHS Any event Inc Les 
Mis. Coven! Gdn. StarUght Exp. 
dyndeboume. 01-828 1678. 

■ Mator credit cards. 

CATS. CHESS. Les Mts. AU the- 
atre and sport. Tel 631 3719. 
637 1715. All malar credit cds. 


RESISTA CARPETS 
SALE NOW ON 

Wool mix Berbers from E3S5 
per sq yd + VAT. 80% wool 
Heavy Domestic Wittm El 3.85 
per sq yd + VAT. Carkopiasl 
Dies EB.75 per sq yd + VAT A 
many other great reductions 

182 Upper RfctMwnd Road 
London SWM 

Teh 01-876 2089 

FiM l lflmHH Dpul flUng. 


•sat nr wm music 
SAY IT WITH MJLRKSWS 

and choose from hundreds at 
iipngtu and grand monos tor 
safe « twe mwn arty £16 pm. 

MMHBM piAROS 
NW1 


Albany a 
01 «5 


AitiBety Place. SE18 
01 854 4617 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 




Our. 


YOU CAN HELP 
OUR OPERATION 
BEASUCCESS. 
d Research FUnd 

. ondonatuns 

bom the public 
{lease hdp us to continue 
this vital woifc by sending 
your donations to: 

THE SURGICAL 


KESEAJtCH FUND 

PcyalCofcpflfSwpttB 
41 laxBfcrt ton Pete Undon 

WC2A3PN 




umraBsm 


Arthritis: 
Children 
get it too! 


Flout, adonodoo hrUpusoBM 
A Ugatytoktlpta mtkefumn. 

flHE ARTHURS AND RHBJMAnSMl 
C0UHCB.FO8 RESEARCH 
41 Ei(ScSacn,LnrtaDWClK4AR 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP SALE. 

Genuine Mudidm an over 
lOO new A reaiored imiru- 
iwnlv Unrivalled after uki 
service Free catalogue 30a 
Hjqhgale Rd. NWS. 01-267 
7671 Fir. catalogue 
ALMOST HEW BUck Kawal up- 
right puno No. 1504344 CX4 
£1.100. Tel: 01 748 8486. 
MOHLEY Boudoir Grand Plano. 
Beautiful lone £950 Buyer col- 
let is. Crowbars' 1 08926)4300 


SHORT LETS 


HOLIDAY FLATS A houses avail- 
able L300C3.0006W Pergonal 
Service Ql -458 3680 or 0836- 
692S24 anytime IT). 

KENS. WB. Sonny v/c flat. She, 
5/4 Hoar i err Use gdns. Holi- 
day M. Nr sham & lube £160 
£175 pw 370 3047 msm/tve 

SERVICES APARTMENTS In 

Kacungan. Crt T v 24 nr S" 
Ba. Telex Coiungnain Apt*. oi 
373 6300 

ST JAMES PLACE, SWT Luxury 
serviced 2 Bed apartment. 
Prune local ion next lb Park. 01 
573 650b «TI 

WANTED: ISUNGTOM/ HAMP 
STEAD 2 uedrm Dal regulred 
immediaiely for 6 weeks Re- 
sponsible covenant 457 8924. 

KENSMOTON Charming studM 
flat avail IUI 18 seM £176 pw 
Tel Ol 957 8526. Ol 957 1 124. 

KENSINGTON Sunny garden flat 
in Vogue magaune Lounge. 2 
beds. £220 pw. 602 5941 

LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, 
mural London from £326 pw. 
Ring Town Hse Apts 573 54313 

5 KJEM. Exclusive period 3 bed 
flat. Newly I urn. lovely recep. 
CM. col TV. maw. Ol 3730753. 

WC1. August Lovely 2 bed flat, 
big garden. aU machines. Rea- 
sonable 689 698a 


FLATS HARE 


DULWICH 12 mins VI 
24* m/F share mixed hse. i . 
£42 exc pw Tel Ol 670 7048 


NIB 2nd prof M/f cSO yrs lo 
share lux Me. O/R t mm lube 
£40. p.w i Month returnable 
deposit ♦ refs. Ol 889 7962 


SW4 Prof. male. n/s. to share 
flat. pan. nr lube. Own dbf rm. 
£40pw exc OI 720 8600. eves. 

OAPHAK L<*r room In spacMUS 
well-equipped / situated flat, 
w/m. TV 2 sharers. £60 pw. 1 
person £46 pw. Tel'iO) 839- 
3422 X4290 / (Hi 627-809a 
MADA VALE i person lo share 
comfortable flat with 1 other. 
Own bedroom and full use of 
flat Close lo lubes. £200 plus 
bills pern. Tel: Ol 423 4160 
RAT7ERSEA. M/F lo share lux 
hv O/R. gdn. all com. £160 
pan exet. Tel- 'day) 736 9620 
tevesl 228 7996. 

BELGRAVIA Luxury appanmenf. 
Unique opportunity lor Profes- 
sional lady, non-smoker. £1 10 
per week 235 4648 
BELGRAVIA SWt - professional 
female. Own large tunny room. 
Non-smoker £50 pw. exclu- 
sive. Tel 730 S616 after 6pm 
BROOK GREEN WG. Bedroom + 
Sitting room etc. lux block, tem- 
porary period, suit mature M/F 
N/S. Tel Ol 603 2960. 
CHISWICK Prof M req to share 
race hse nr lube Cal TV CM. 
Wash Mach. O/R. £40 PW Mr 
Dowdell eves 996 0604 
CLAPHAM SOUTH: 3rd person to 
shore centrally heated house. 
O/R £<70 pent excf. Tel: 01- 
6736063 (after 6-30pnt). 
FLATMATES Selective Sharing, 
well eslab introductory service. 
Pise (ei for aopL 01 689 5491. 
313 Brampton Road. SW3 
HA Female with arts InleroL 
N/S. Lge new 2 bed CM SC nr 
Tube. With John (211 drama 
student £60 pw 01 348 093a 
SOtriWIELDS SWIG. Prof per- 
son to share mixed house, 
o/roorn. n/s. £26 per week 
exd 01 870 6446 eves. 

ST JOHNS SESs prof m/I. 10 
share spacious house, garden It 
3 cats O/r. £36 p.w. excl. Tel 
01691 3652 

» lfc F lor single room. Gdn. 
machines, cleaner. BR 2 mine. 
£37 pw Inc. Tel. Day 630 9864 
Eve 947 2311. . 

WEST 1 HAMPSTEAD nr lube 
shops, quiet, friendly, mixed 
fiaL prof. M/F. n/s. loe o/r 
£56 pw incl. Ol 794 6769. 
YOUNG PHOT FEMALE urgently 
requires room In-house or flat. 

. Norm of i he river Tel Day and 
Eves Ol 761 2799. 

GDN SQ HI. Prof M/F own dM 
rm in lux fUl. Nr Tine. £60 pw 
Inc 493 0534 day 
LADBROKE Ot M/F 20's. O/R 
in beaui collage. £216 pm 221- 
5644 iMior 739-5816 tO) Cara. 
LITTLE VENICE. Young mol F 
N/S lOOft gdn. Nr MM. 
£60pw HwJ: 01 723 1308 
N4 Nr Tube Prof. F. O/H New 
conversion. CH Quid Rd. £36 
pw 806 1472 after 6 JO 
NW7. 2 Females, own sep room. 
Ckne BR. Pleasant area. £115 
each exet. TH Ol 969 2785. 
MMUCO O/R in pretty garden 
square flat. N/S. Close lube. 
£50. pw 834 9088 After 6 pm 
SWB. M/F. 18-25. N/S- Lge dM 
rm maa. mod com. roof gdn. 
£38 pw 01622 6438. 

SW5 Gdn flat Attractive spadous 
dMimnr Tube. £80 pw. 688 
6464 x 2060 O 373 6816 H. 
SWt: N/v lo snare 2 bed garden 
flat with own room. £60 pw 
Inc. Tel-01 -834-7323 
WZ Prof! M/F lo share gdn m«i«. 
O/R. Nr tube £260pcra HIC- 
TH: ot 727 *087 eve*. 

Wl Professional. F. Urge, super 
room In luxury flat. £69 pw 
Incl. Tel- 01 486 3081 
WX: Own room tn nugntfleenr 
Georgian house. Shared facili- 
ties. £60 p/w Inc. 01-387 1699 
ws o/R in House lsi Sept - 20tn 
Oct. £3Spw Ot 219 3728 (day) 
049 161 2441 (eves) 
WlCpi/Zf For tgc dM rm in 
spacious flat £3SPW each. 
Excl 380 0141 eves 
W14: Friendly hse share. Own 
dbe rm. M/f. Nr tube. N/S. 
£180 Inc pcm. 602 7867 eves 
WRKPOLC ST. Lge o/rm In tux 
lop llr flat All mod cons. Fern. 
Co3 pw C.CL Ol 936 0204 
Wit Profcswonal female re- 
quired lo share lovely flal. 
£2bOper month Tel: 486 9976. 
STNEATHAM Nr Station. Own 
Rm. All mod eonv £155 pcm all 
incl. Call 674 1670 after 7pm. 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


DISCOUNTED FARES 
male wum 
JoDurg/Har £300 £490 

NjfflOi S27S £390 

Caro £150 030 

Lagos £340 £360 

OeRloni HSO £350 

Bangkok £2211 £350 

Dnuaia fCD 

Afro JMlan T r m m l Ltd 
1MU1G8 hgMt SL Wl 
m; IWBSIW/S 
Late £ Group Bookings W stats 
MffiLVE* BURG 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. Jo'Bart, Cairo, Dubai. 
Istanbul Singapore, K.L Delhi, 
Bangkok. Horn Kong. Sydney. 
Europe. & The Americas. 

Flamingo Travel, 

76 Shaftesbury Avenae 
London W1V 7DG. 

01-439 0102 

Opes Saturday 10.00-1 3 AO 


BARGAIN FUGHTS 

Sydney £455 C755 

Auckland £415 £745 

Jo’Burg £306 £439 

Bangkok £209 E355 

Cano £735 £270 

New Vote dag £320 

Los Angelas £216 £399 

TOP DECK 
FLIGHT CENTRE 
01-370 6237 


LATIN AM COCA. Low con 
flHhH eg. RIP £485. Uma 
£495 tin. Also Small Croup 
Holiday Journey* leg Peru 
from £3 SO) JLA 01-747-3108 
BARGAIN HUNTERS. Ring now 
for Australia, hi .2 Middle east. 
India. Far Eon. ABTA dub Air 
Travel 01 629 2684 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 


FAST SECRETARY 

£10,000 

+ COMMISSION 

Tha oiw is a tat tffl to antf An 
upmarket dub for motor r»c- 
Nvg buffs to opening a new 
once. You'll sac h up and rwt 
it «a caong arcuts and help 
wrth hospiMty. Commission 
on introduem new membets. 

ixtrovedS Qt^ we Chink. CaB 

Amanda Frister oa 
434 0038. 

HODGES 

RECRUITMENTS 


RECEPTIONIST/ 

TELEPHONIST 

Required for small tain of 
Chartered Surveyors in 
WC2- Must be of smart ap- 
pearance with a good tele- 
phone manner. Herald 
swticftboxd. Accurate au- 
to typing essential. 
Salary 

£8,5004.000 

Phone Kate: 
01-836 2214 


HOT TURKEY. Auguol ovott. 
Spsod a week relaxing al our 
pnvoie beach hotel, then a 
week cruuing an our yacht for 
£460 ioc fit. H/B. free 
w/ipom. other comnmauons 
HU. Ol 326 1005 OI 737 
3861 i24hn). ATOL 2091 


COSTCUTTEJIS ON fnghlt/hOH 
to Europe. LfiA A mod desflna- 
Uons. Dipionuf Travel- Ol -730 
2201 ABTA IATA ATOL 


AFTttCA SPECIALIST*. Key 
Travel, SO. Red UM ST. WC1 
Ol 405 1495. ABTA/1ATA. 


CHEAP FLIGHTS Europe WwM 
wide. Gin-Edge Travel: AGFA 
01 859 6053 Ring Angie 


worldwide. 

Haymarkef 01-930 1366- 


DtSCOUHTES 6 GROUP FARES. 

L T.C open SOL 0753 857033. 


LOW COST FARES lo US A. Ma- 
lor Travel. Ol 486 9237 IATA. 


MALARA. CANARIES. 01 441 
till Travel ww AM*. AM. 


SPAIN. Portugal- Chropeo fare*. 
Btgalev Ol 735 8191 ATOL. 


BWTTZERLAND Scheduled nights 
Ol 724 2388 ABTA ATOL 

HONG KONG C488. Bangkok 
£369 Sing £457 Other FE eli- 
te* 01-584 6514- 
SPAM PORTUGAL GRCECEi 
Flights FaMor 01-471 0047 
ATOL 1640. AKes*/VMa. 
SVD/MCL £618 Penh £645 All 
mator earner* la A us A NZ. Ol 
584 7571 ABTA. 

6. AFRICA From E465. 01-584 
7371 ABTA. 

LOW FARES WORLDWIDE 

USA. S. America. Mid and Far 
East. S Africa. Trayvale. 48 
Margarof Street Wl Ol 500 
2928 I Visa Accepted I 
ART « A R CHAEOLOGY TOUR 
OF SICILY Exceptional value 
tale-season Grand Tour, spe- 
cially designed lo satisfy wide 
Utsie*. with sensible dally mile- 
age Departure* Tuesday 30 
Sent. 7.14 & 21 Oct £298 Incl 
day fOflhtS CalwKk. 7 ntghU 
H/8 in 3/4 star hotels, airport 
taxes, entrance fees. Special of- 
fers a bo in TAORMINA, fact 
1*1 ml heed E268 H/B. beach 
hotel £218 H/B. pens! one £171 
B A B. all for 7 ntshls. same dep 
dal®. ISLAND SUN 01-222 
7452 ABTA/ATOL 1907 
AIRFARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
o/w £420 ran £760. Auckland 
o/w £420 rtn £770. JoDurg 
o/w £306 rtn £499. Los Ange- 
tri ct/w £216 ran £406. London 
Flight Centre 01-570 6332. 
OJERBA FTy direct 9.16. Aug- 
Oct Free w/s. letmb. ween 
food A free wine. Choose a dub 
4-6 luxury or 2-* ho lets by 
sandy beach Lunaracatw Ol 
441 0122 24 hr*. 


LOWEST FARES 


Fans C8? 
Frsnkkxl E&Q 

Lagos E320 
tSobl £325 
Jobixg ueo 
Caro 

Oel/Bom 1335 
Hang Kong £510 


N YORK £275 
LAfSF E395 
Manx £320 
SPoapare £<» 
Ban^M £335 
habnwxto euo 
R angoon £350 
"" £425 


SUN & SAND 
21 tadn SL Libdm VI 
tl4X nBtfU f BS37 

tituolcarm 


HEW UW FARES WOmnffiE 



FOOD 

Orta 

£371) 


F41K1 

Wanbul 

£180 


ran 

Jetton 

£440 


film 

KVKrt 

rm 



KuDSm 

£44i 

to* 

mtc 


ra*s 

Bon/CM 

CMS 

NYort 

£775 


ran 

Stool 

im 


fits 

Sydffltf 

£765 

OvraacoB 

£270 

Tl**> 

080 


StnUMD TRAVB. LTD 
2 DEMUR STREET. UUDOX Wl 
TV 91-439 3S21/8N7 
ABUNEBOUED 


★ALL FLIGHTS BONDED* 

★ ★SAVE Ts Fs rs** 

★★TOUfllST CLASS ★★ 

★★CLUB CLASSY* 

★★1ST CUSS^* 
★★AROUND THE** 

★ ★WORLD FARES** 

* SVIMEY * * MELBOuns * 

* PERTH * * Bfljsaut V 

* HOBART -* * AOELWCE * 

* XBURG * * -9 AfflEA * 
V ttlOOMO V AVfLLWGTUI * 
4- FUl * 9 FT MORESBY * 

* BAfffltftt * * TOKYO * 

* SMSAPORE * * MWKA * 

* DUBM * * BAMIAlN * 

* MO EAST 6 * .ftAHH * 

* LUSAKA * HAHAft * 

* TORONTO * VWWCOUVER* 

* L ANKLES * * MUM * 
+ GARBSEJN *- *S FRANCISCO * 

** SOUTH AlCtaCB ** 

* USA * USA * USA +U$0 * 

SUNWORLD TRAVEL 

(Esfd J969) 

S') Sotlli Sl EpWffl . Sotttt 
103727) 27539/25530/27109/ 
253 1 5/24932/24097 


SWITZERLAND 
FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissair^ 
Super Apex. 

London to Zurich or 
Geneva daily on con- 
venient afternoon 

flights. And daily 
flights to Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days 
before departure. 

Stay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday after arrival. 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travel agents or 

01-4379573 


IT’S ALL AT 
TRAILFiNDERS 


— Hil te km tea MgKi 
Tke bast - sad r dm pane U 
1BU00 tin** tec* 1178 


HHB TK vou nan C78S 



PI 

snwrr 

KV-iTW 

rtn 

PWH 


■sn 



£74« 

BW«0* 

ms 

E3BS 

SNGtfOft 

£2D9 

£418 



£496 

Of l *808847 

sat 

07* 

aU0M80 

BIT 

MWf 

tSTAWUL 

£152 

£18) 

NMR06J 

£242 

E36B 

JO BURG 



LAW 

■ ^>1 

£*9S 

LOSMGELES 


£425 

Wl* TOT* 

£170 

EBO 

GtWVA 

£75 

£94 

■ . r\ v : .mi 

£174 

£36 





42-48 EARLS C88RT BOAS 
LOOM WIKJ 

Einpf/USA FfadKs 01-937 $400 
Long Had Fkdto 01-603 1515 
ISLBusresB us 01-938 3444 
Gmenmunt Itansad/Dmded . 
ABTA IATA ATOL 1458 


SUPER HOLIDAY 
SALE 

(Ml Corfu, Ante. Kol Sm*r 
Greek isM*. The Aiganh Dcaaia 


EIB9 B39 
£199 £249 

Sr "" 

teJMTAati 09 £220 


89i6.fi Are 
I] 15 1$ 1718 i 
20222324251 


123466/2 
fait.12 Sat 


£199 


Ib«M snot W* MU«S 
■a n^b nm uwa. law md 
IWWF UN k » Wl 
Ako Secuoa oea mh Bratiuts 
(24tnl/lreM D«M CM Bwwte 
ONLY DIRECT FROM 



Tat Landaa 01-251 5<SG 
T*t SheSsU 9742 331100 
T*fc HuckesNr B61 834 SB33 
ATOL 2034 


OMt CALL for MAH- Of ate bat 
deals in ftWits. apanmnit*. no- 
Ml* and cor lure Tel London Ol 
636 6000. Manchrsler 061 B3Z 
2000- Air Travel Advisory 
Bureau. 

WORLD wore FUgratspeclaBSog 

ui Fira. Club daaa. Economy to 
Australia. Far Eau. S. Africa. 
ISA. Lisbon. Faro 6 Geneva. 
Phone Travel Centre 01-686 
7025 ABTA 73196 
EUROPE/ WORLD TOC lowest 
fare* on cfianer/wheduled fits. 
Pilot FHgtn 01 631 0167 Afll 
AUH 1893. 

GREECE. TURKEY, CANAKL 

Aug/Sept aval Uteliry i092 3) 

771266 Tiro** ay Holiday* 
ABTA ATOL 1 107 
LOW COST FLIGHTS Most Euro- 
pean dr-di nations. V Alexander 
01-402 4262/0053 ABTA 

61094 ATOL I960 
MIAMI, JAMAICA. N.YOHK. 
world wtdr cheapest fares. 
Richmond Travel. I Duke SI 
Ihcnmond ABTA 01-940 4073. 
MOROCCAN BOUND TRAVEL. 
Hotel rescnalions 4U over Mo- 
rorw. Tel: 01 734 5307 

ABTA/ATOL 

TUHBU PerfeO beaches for 
your summer fioJktty Call for 
our brochure no w. T iaiman 
Travel Bureau. 01-373 4411 
ALICANTE. Faro. Maup etc. 
Donono Travel ATOL 1783. 
01 581 4641, HorWtam 66641 
ALL US am. Lowm lares on 
mator scheduled carriers. Ol- 
684 7371. ABTA 

AMEHCJN VACATIONS. Hatted 
Drat* Under The Sun. Ol 637 
7863 

CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 

WINDSURF LEFKAS OJERBA. 

9.12. Aug to Oct Direct Flu. 
active A relaxing hot*, on 
unsoatlt hies, boat inns. BBQT 
A Bon. For Sotoh. Couples A 
FamlUes Ltuiarscur Ol 441 

0122 2“ hr* 

FLOTIUJI SAILING H0UDAT9. 

A voilatullly from mid SepL Tel: 
Ol 969 5140. AUH 2155. 

GENERAL 

TAKE TIME OFT to Ports. Ara- 
ctcrdam. Brussels. Bruges. 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague. Dublin. Rouen. 'Boi- 
logne A Dieppe. Tbne Off. 2a. 
Chester Close. Lon don. SW1X 
7BQ 01-235 8070. 
avpnn ■ a A CRETE. We «a 
have avaiL Aug/Sepf 
vHlas/aofs. Some wfth prtv 
pod. Call now on 01 724 7775. 
Playa Hobdays. Akil 2156 


SELF-CATERING 


LUXURY VILLAS with poofs and 
staff sun avail. South of France. 
Maroefla. Aloarve. West tndhs. 
Connnenfal Villas Ol 246 9181 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARICS 


vino*, some with 

pools, apartments, lavernas. an 
dates avaiL August specials, 
high season front £156. Critic 
Holidays 01 309 7070 & 0622 
677071 or 0632 677076 124 
hrsi Aral 1772. 

MENORCA. Private H ol i d ay 
Houses. Late summer avaftaMl- 
lly call Pamela WUdbMod Ltd 
0249 817023 ur 01 658 6722. 
ABTA AJOl 1276 

SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


OCE. Lowed fares fr £99. 
Biggies. 736 8193. Alol 1893. 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


CORFU VILLAS. We stn have 
availability Sunday 10.24.31 
Aug for 2 whs. Beautiful visas 
or the beach ear Guwick. Ran 
World Holidays. Ol 734 2562 
LEFKAS 12.19 AUpScpC. 
UnxxxU Greek Me. Windsurf. 
BOOt A bop. SoiM co up l es A 
Families. LunarscOpa 01-441 
0122 24 hr* 

GREECE. UnspoUt hlands. cheap 
flights, villa rentals etc. Zeus 
Holidays. Ol 434 1647. AmL 
AJJo. 

MJUHC GREEK HLANDS Ot 

magic POcra. FMoM* A 
holidays. Freedom Hobdays. 
01-741 4666. ATOL 432. 
8HOOES Lux apart hols from 
£189pp. 6. 13. 20. 27/8. 

Suama. 0706 662814. 


Creek Island 
Villas 

h Is not too late to find a . 
quality villa holiday In August 
on the Greek Islands. In Corfu 
we can offer soma super small 
villas, many wfth use of private 
pool: or Pesos, a comfortable 
apar t ment In quiet fishing 
village: hi Crete superb water- 
front stilettos. Good family 
houses loo med dams. 

□ay flights available every 
-Tuesday from Gacwfck and 
rt«m Chester. Srochurt- 

CV Travel (T) 
43Ca4*paStal o 
LhmMIM t- 
01-3B1QUU < 

fll-M«WQJ < 

IHHU2-MII S 



ISUUDS M THE SU 
MJGUST/SS’TBHBER 

FLY DIRECT TO CORFU. 
CEPHALONIA, ZAKYNTHOS. 
CRETE & SK1ATH0S. 
BoautiW tntes A apis 
Oosa to gkxtous B aachaa. 
FREE wtnwEflng In Crata. 

HORSHAM 0403 59788 

ILIOS ISLAND 
HOLIDAYS 

ABTA WTO ATOL 1452 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 

VRJLAS WITH A MAGIC TOUCH. 
A villa, a pool and a beautiful 
view. Whal more could you 
want? Choose from Tuscany. 
Sardinia or RaveOo - the loveli- 
er parta of Italy where lha moss 
nurM operators don’t go Or 
combine a villa honoay w«h a 
slay In Venice. Florence or 
Rome. Free txorauire from 
Magic o 4 Italy. Oepl T. 47 Shep- 
herds Bush Green. W12 BPS 
Tel: Ol 749 7449 124 hre 
service l 

FLO R E N C E Just convened farm- 
house. Garden flat In Tuscan 
hiUs. Steeps 5. 2 miles frmn cen- 
tre. AugvW onward* £160 per 
week. Phone owner Florence 
689 496. 


WINTER SPORTS 


SKI BLADON LINES 
8S/S7 BROCMIRES NOW OVn 
47 Rasotts r? Se/gztrtaod, 
Austro. France S toiy. 

Vm Biggest Choice On. Shd 
6t Gaf«*, Luton. Matcfester, 
GfaK)o« A Ertntugh 

01 785 2200 

MMCfc. DapL 0422 7H21 
ABTA 15723 ATOL 1232 


SKI WEST bumper brochure out 
now packed with an the top re- 
sorts. Sunday flights (heal the 
iratnc-i. ana amazingly tow 
price* starting al £59. Ring (Oil 
786 9999 lor your copy 
ABXA692B6 ATOL1383. 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


tux virus wnn 
pooh «• opts. Aua to OcLOl 409 
2838. VOUWOOO 


CORNWALL & DEVON 


MHD DEVON, rial. Ntepg 4. pool, 
fenrus. trampoline, fresh trout, 
avail 9-16 and 23-50 AUS £120 
p w BicUefgh <08845) 282. 


LONDON 


prmC O LL HOUSE HOTEL. 200 
snrte rooms. £66 pw re. 172 
New Kml FUL London. SGI 
4YT 01 7t» 4176 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE. Lux villas with boots 
ft urn. Avail Jul/Od. 01 409 
2838. villa World. 


ARE YOU IN A PANIC? 

Tits Algarve Alternative have jiar two vias left In the School 
HoCday period, so ywr problem is solved: 23rd August tor 2 or 3 
weeks - Sensational house far 6; pool and ataH. £1200 p.w. 28tf) 
ist lor 2 vweks - Sumptuous house for ia staggariftg vtaws; 
and staff. £1.960 p.w. Other sensaliCiMl ficueae gtreAMe 
± Cal ug Today. 

The Algarve Alternative 
01-491-0802 
73 St James’s St London Wl 


MERCEDES 


200 5 SPEED gear bn. 1983 
Pawned slrerfhg- Red. Manual 
Sun root Fun Service Horary 
New tym Sme. Hmantuir 
Condition 33.000 mtlev 
16.750 01 7293657 OTOl 739 
4886 

356 SLl T. reel. BUvcr with d 
Hue M Hord/sofl Mb. Veres. 
good condt Itofi. £9.995 ono 
TeM0454C3361 


GENERAL 


ctiara 

cogne beige. 2L GLS. a uto. G 
reg. air cond. rsr. buto <r pH* . 
extras, M wand ai r . £7.700 
Tei 01 773 1697 lifter 6 p m.) 


DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


STOCKHOLM SWEDEN English 
so raking Swedish /amity mm 
ing back from London after 10 
yean with 3 children ^ and 4 
year* are looking for a reiiaMe 
gtn of 20+ with a wet same of 
humour Musi be able to drive. 
Non-smoker Plenty of travel. 
Lovely home on the sea. 20 
mtmde* from Cuy centre by car 
or tram Reply by teiepnoae to 
Mrs C-Haraltton before August 
Bn and alter Augmt 8th on OIO 
46 582 300 «& Between AuguM 
5Ui and August 8th in London 
on 01 995 6766. after August 
1 1th on OIO 468 717 0500. Or 
tn willing to Mrs C-Maratltoii 
C/o £n*kdda Securities. 26 
Finsbury Square. London 
EC2A ids together with 
photograph. 


TOP C ALI BRE residential rook 
req. SW3 oa dally basis, 
hours neg. Salary £200 per 
week. Contact Mbs Lana BUO- 
Beigrovta Bureau 564 4343. 

Live M MOTHER'S HELP req 
Beeuiifut country farm Kent. 
Easy tram access London. Use 
of car. Friendly yoong rotate + 
6 months baby. Good salary 
and, accomm. TMephooe Mrs. 
Hutctimson Jeeves Licenced 
Aqv 01-589 ia»Z32a_2063 

PUBLIC NOTICES 


BALLARD nee JONES. EDITH 

MARY BALLARD nee JONES. 

widow lair of S2 Kingsley Road. 

Ml lion. Poruntoout. Hampshire 

died At Portsmouth on 10th 

March 1986 tEstale about 
£18.0001 

CORSINN! otherwise CORSNI. 

ANGOLA CORSINN! otherwise 

ANGELA CORSINI. SPINSTER 

late of Mount Pleasant HooMal. 

North Rood. Southan. Middhnex 

died There on 29th Noverober 

1986 lEsrale aboot £ OAOOl 
O’NEILL. GRETA HONORA 
rVN rn i SPINSTER (ale of 
Sunlteld. S7 Prom Lane. 
Heswoll. WJrral. Merseyside died 

There on or about Slst December 

1985 ( Estate about £45.000) 
ROD. ALFRED HENRY REID 

late Of 200 Wfliford Way. Hen- 

don. London Nwa died Al 
Hendon on 171h March 1966 (Es- 

tate abort CAfXXti 

ROBS otherwise SDNLEY nee 

SUNLEY. EVA JANE BOSS oth- 

erwise EVA JANE SUN LEY nee 
SUNLEY. SINGLE WOMAN Die 

of 5 Chanctonbufy Rood. Hove. 

East Sumex died At Bngmon. 

East Sussex on HOi November 

1986 (Esiaie about £17.700) 
VANCE nee HAMILTON. ALICE 

MARGARET VANCE Dee HAM- 

ILTON. WIDOW Die of 22 
Sutlons Avenue. Hornchurch. E> 

srx pm ai HaroM Wood. Essne 

on SOth November 1986 i£siair 

about £59JXXn 

The kin of the above-named are 

rrouested lo apply lo the Trea- 

sury Soncttor CB.V.t. Queen 
Anne's Chamber*. 28 Broadway. 

London 5W1H 9JS. failing which 

the Treasury Sobcuor may take 

Uros to ad na raster me estate. 

CHARITY COMMISSION 
Chanty Charfnrs Adta mf stererf 
and managed by Uie special 

Trustees for Mlodlesex Hospital 

it) Cancer Research Fund id) Hen- 

ry MUls Trust (Ui> David Hughes 
Hospital Trust Uv> Cancer Wutg 

Fund 

The Charity conuntseranrri 
propose to make a Scheme for 
this Chanty- Copies of the draft 
Scheme may Be obtained from 
mem iref- sssmi-A/i -UHatSL 
Alban's House. 57-60 
Hay market. London SWiv 4QX. 
Objections and suggesttom may 
be sent to mem within one month 

from today. 

PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
The Church Comndsnoncrs 
have prepared a draft pastoral 
scheme providing for declaring 
redundant the church of si Ml 
cfiael. Colliam In the parish of 
Newark wltti Hawton. CoUum 
and Shelton. (SoothweD dtocesci. 
Comes of fhe draft scheme may be 
obtained from me Church Com- 
missioner*. 1 MSIbank. London 
SWip 3JZ to whom any rnre 
senlattoias should be senl within 
28 days of the pobllraUan of into 
notice. 

LEGAL NOTICES 


DU THE MATTER OF T ALPUA 
RUBBER COMPANY LIMITED 
AND IN THE MATTER OF THE 
COMPANIES ACT 1985 
NOTICE IS HEREBY GWEN 
that the Creditor* of the above- 
named Company, which ts being 
voluntarily wound up. are re- 
quired. on or before the 30tb day 
of August 1986. to send tn thMr 
ndl Oinstlan and surnames, thefr 
addresses and descnpltoDS. fun 
particulars of their debts or 
claims, and the names and ad- 
dresses of ihetrSoOcuorsuranyL 
to the undersigned. Brian Regi- 
nald Anthony Caflaghan of 21 
Whnefrtars StrecL London ECAY 
8AL lire Liquida to r of tne said 
Company, and. U so required by 
nabce tn wriUng front me said 
Ltquidator. are. personally or by 
thefr SoUcttocs. lo come tn and 
prove their debts or claims al 
such time and place as shall M 
raectfted in such notice, or In de- 
fault thereof they wUI he 
excluded from the Benefit of any 
dtowbudon made before such 
debts are proved. 

DATED OUS 3001 day at July 
1986 

B JLA. CALLAOHAN 
LIQUIDATOR 
Tha notice to purely formal. All 
known creditors have Been, or 
win be. paid m fun. 

IN THE MAV im S T VUB1PO 
LIMI TED 

AND IN THE MATTER OF THE 
COMPANIES ACT 1965 
Noncr IS HEREBY GIVEN 
that the Creditor* of the above- 
named Company, which is being 
voluntarily wound un. ore re- 
quired. on or before the SOth day 
of August 1986. to send to Ihetr 
lull ChitoUan and surname*, ihetr 
addresses and desertobotto. full 
particulars of thefr debts or 
claims, and the names and ad- 
dresses of Iheir Softeners (if airyc 
lo the undersigned. Brian RegL 
naid Anthony Caflaghan of 2i 
Whftefrlan SireeL London EC»Y 
BAL the Lnuklator at uw said 
Company, and. If so required by 
notice in writing from the said 
Liquidator, are. personally or by 
their Solicitors, to come In and 
prove their debts or claims at 
such time and place aa shaft be 
specified in such nonce, or in de- 
fa till thereof they wUI be 
excluded from the benefit of any 
dUO million made before such 
debts are proved. 

DATED Utto 30th day of Jrty 
1986 

B.K-A CALLAGHAN 

LIQUIDATOR 

COMPLETE O FFICE SYSTEMS, 
LIMITED 

NOTICE te HEREBY GIVEN 
pursuant to Section 688 pf the 
Companies Art. 1983. that a 
Meeting of the creditors of Lhr 
above named Company win bo 
held at fhe off! res of LEONARD 
CUR-ns ft CO - situa ted at 30 
EASTBOURNE TERRACE ■2ND 
FLOOR) LONDON W2 6LF on 
Thursday me i«Ut day of August 
1986 al 12.00 o'clock midday, 
for the pu rpos es provided (or In 
Sections 589 and 59a 
Dated the 29th day of July 1986 

A WATSON 

D [RECTOR 

SS CONTRA CT FU RNISHING 
LIMITED 

NOnOEl IS HEREBY OVEN 
pursuant lo Seaton 588 of the 
Companies Art. 1985. that a 
Meeting of the craUlon of the 
above named Company wilt be 
held al the offices of LEONARD 
CURTTS 4 CO- situated al 30 
EASTBOURNE TERRACE i2ND 
FLOOR) LONDON W2 6LF on 
Wednesday the 1310 day of Au- 
gust 1986 at 1200 o'clock 
midday, lor Die purposes provid- 
ed for in Sections 889 and 590 
Dawn the 29Ut day Of July 1986 
R.V. SHAW 
DIRECTOR 


COURSES 


WOLSCY HAII I Home study far 
OCE. Degrees. Profeirtom. Pro- 
spectus Dept AL2. Wotsey HalL 
Oxford. 0X2 6PR. Tel 0646 
62300 (24 hnt. 

GENERAL 

APPOINTMENTS 


BIG BANG 

Where will you be 
when it happens? 
Trainee position 
in Europe’s lead- 
ing brokerage for 
individual 25+ 
with ambition 
and flair. 

Jofti Kilb«rff-Tc?frifl 
01-499 7800 


ANTIQUES & 


COLLECTABLES 


OLD WRISTWATCHES WANTED 

ROLEX 
PRINCE 
18ct £1.200 
Set £800 
Silwr £500 
Sled £300 



JAEGER 
REVERSO 
18ct £900 
Set £500 
Steel £200 



CARTIER 


1 Set £1,000 


PATEK 

PHILIPPE 

Moonphase 

£3.000 

Chronograph 

£1.500 


All other Rolex/Quality Hatches Wanted. 
Or* Eiatagt Datrl) Cumpanp 


tuia 0602 3331 38 


AMERICAN BUYERS SEEK 

md Modern Jmtotor. nws. Sfcw aid Ptoa. Fbom. 


ftoatto. Eeaatoi hand. Jaae. Prow. Qack*. FtonoonL . 

•Gtos. OU (Mb. Toys sti Tsjdy Bon tic M«mT| PH IMh 

“ - “ ‘ 1 6 pour. _ . - - _ 


Sate. Pairtnmrt toft*. Sancton. Cus- 
tom Jetetoy. Lace. Irons, d ll te en c toms. OU nateti Boas & ktsBimante 
apdjJngwdM 6 mesbiiB trades. fcnatateR cart by maim tor J ro rt wy md 
ortsi Jrtrtes sm by pest 

Ov e gxn cm cal oa yog or car par vo naB y rokgnt gWuallniL 
Opts Mas - Sal 900 130 am. 

OALLQBSS. 117 K g nsto rt pn I 
WS 7LH. Tgt 01-229^614 


The 

Nanking Cargo 





AcopportamiyCD 
pmetose a sdecfioo 
of tins fine porcebsa. 
hfaybe bonghlby tdepbonc, 
deBsay 2 Tpp ypirnft fn jK fo 
Open weekdays & Sondays. 

Ro^r Bradbury 
Antiques 

Qnncb Street, Ct^oll, 
Norfolk NR127DJ. 

TeL (0603) 737444 

JL 


BROWNING 
ANTIQUES 
01-699 7198 

BomI DouBor Toby Jugs. 

Character Jugs am 
Figunnas rsquired. Also sD 
other Oortton wear + 
other good quality china 
required. 


JOtW WTO. a csmptde framed 
sat ot -Death in Venice 
sequence. £5500 ono. 
TeL 0226 60626 lev Ml 
TWO OU) FHIKBACKS wm Tu- 
dor rose, lion and wucarn. 
£350 each. Hr 009$. view 
Shropshire. Tel 1069 1B» 468 
CSASAJtS PALACE sponsored 
1982 Las Veaas Grand prtx. 2 
lockets, oner*. <03081 56898 
ROYAL DOULTON Toby Jugs. 
Ftgunnes. animals, etc- want- 
ed. Ol 883 0024. . 


BUYING ANTIQUES? 

Cn fi y i lt R rets i rf c 


armijnpv lii a^j jy i tto. 

CS3ciTOGiiDE 


0-281 ESN kxa toe secroneaer 


NEWSPAPERS 

11 690*9-1 890*s) 

-Ortgtnal - 

r Beautifully Preserved - 
PROM ei&OO EACH. 
0492 - 31303 
E JONES 

43 OUNDONAU3 ROAD 
COLWYN BAY 
CLWYD 1123 THE 


JEWBiEIY TO SELL? 

Long abbWinMMy janlK 
tort to purchase second hand 
prttoy art acfiaue carnage 
docks lo Ml B cu vanad and 
fdercsong cotirchcn. 
WtitoorcafllncHfldMcalK' 
ARKBUR-WKTOR LTO, 

•■a rwr* 

TsL 61-453 SOT 


PMCIIACL SUTTT: Englian and 
American Herttage dosed edi- 
tion piece* • LionheorL Henry 
V. Black Prince. Stour. Yanoo, 
Bronco. Ring Stare Mngne*. 
preferably w e e k ends dr eve- 
nings on: 01-429 1190. 


LV. 

New fine Arts and Antiques 
Centre In ro to ted Palarto with- 
in open galleried courtyard in 
the old City of Lao Palmas. 
Gran Canaria. Twelve month 
season. Pan of E.E.C. tou no 
V_A.T_ Galleries fr £LOO pan 
01 689 09iaor 01 461 6021 
NUR ML VCR IS 1 * Oval Meat 
diene* and 42 piece 12 place 
Old English CuUery and 10“ 
Entree Mi Mazarine ft Liner. 
About 276 07 all to. £4.500. 
TeL 0732 451619. 


SOPER SECRETARIES 


Pnff—rl firere pfi 24 


TOUtiBa 10 £8000 4- exc 
benefit*. Total Invoivement to 
to# widest prtwhlng i unction n 
offered within this unusual po- 
tobon. Camrtog out an ad mto- 
orfeiualed role, you ws be 
. qtiiung exp which wUIe naMMh 
your career in the media field. 
Tyumgat 66 wpm req"d_ 3H on 
asset. Synergy, the recruiBnant 
cons ultancy. 01-637 9535 
RECORD* - You are to your 20**. 
and would entov a hectic Infor- 
mal environment as secretary 
to Uie MD + Financial Director 
of a Record Marketing Go to 
NW10 a lively personality and 
SH and typing skffis esteotfal. 
08 577 8600 iCRyt or 439 
7001 (Well End) Secretaries 
Plus. The 


RICHMOND TO E1CMKXL WTftr 
ronunule when yon can work 
locally? Join IMS leading com- 
puter company as Secretory to 
a Dtrector and entoy a fun PA 
role. 90/66 Skills and previous 
wp experience needed. Pf e as e 
telephone Ol 240 3611/3551 
(West End) or 01 2*0 3551 
iCftyL Elizabeth Hunt Recruit- 
ment Consultant*. 


Mid 20** tor prestigious co ECl. 
Good typing speeds tor mtotma) 
secretarial work, sales admtois- 
■rattoa background requested, 
good organiser, open to now 
technology, from s t OT W. ESc- 
cefJent telephone manner, ctterl 
ttarton. Sal Neg 10 KIOEOO 
AAE. Phone Miner McNtsh Roc 
Gens 734 3768 or 437 8476. 

SECRETARY FOR CMEF EXEC- 
UTIVE International co 
employing 1600 plus world 
wide. 1 st doasrtdlls and experi- 
ence plus toldaOve easenUaL 
German a Ofg MIB. Further de- 
cafis contact. Richard Newton- 
Trt 0707 328161 or write with 
CV to A v del Lid. Mundetis. Wel- 
wyn Garden CUy. Herts 
AL71EZ. 

TELEVWOM PHflMUfUlNl 
£9000 + Aug review. This lead- 
tog TV co is seeking a young PA 
lo Become Involved to maior 
prorootlons. with lots of admin, 
you win need Initiative and the 
aojtjty u Uaise al a lop tovrt. 
Skills 100/60 wpm. Synergy, 
the recruitment consuitanQ'. 
01-637 9633 

COLLECT LEAVER £7,680 ■ 
soutet by weU-known murdi 
tortllutioa. Young, friendly and 
dynamic envtronmenl. Short- 
hand optional. Typing BOwpm. 
Age 1 8+. Please telephone 01- 
493 6787 Gordon Yale* 

Coqguhancy. 

COLLECT LEAVER £7000+401 
■» , C ** 5 1_ TT> *> sman 

company Involved to exatton 
£!? ytu yteh saeiang H^Sg 
5ec to Decqroe generally to- 
wu** the ono to get out 
of Ihe office, you win be gaming 
err exp. SkUs ro/as^^T 
Simergy. on recrtdt mej ii con 
teUa nry. 01-637 9533 

9CRSOIMCL to £9000. mm p 
rareer to the personnel Held 
with urn tofluenttal company • 
You win or ganis e courses, be- 
come involved to recruitment 
M Personqei 
admtn Skins 90/55 wpm. Syn- 
ergy. the recruitment 
cohaunaocy. 01-637 9533 

TkHMGtWL mwmi 

/FREHCM PA Seh for Director 
of Property 00 . Fluency tn both 


ana outgoing pereonaUty Very 
responsible pas*, lots or ertent 
roniart. IZ£9DX. Mc-row 
trnpAgy (The Lana SocaaHsis) 
W U 97 

ADVERnmilC 2 Secs read tor 
jwtmg. lively aty based firm. 
Good typinq. persona) presenta- 
tion and seme or humour 
noenttal. Age Stn with mini- 
mum 2 years exp. £7.500 *■ 
bonus Aq» Bee Cora 01-638 
8987/0600. 

S E CRE TA R I ES fo r Architects & 
Designers Permaneni ft lerapo- 
racy pad dons. AMSA Bpertoiw 
Rec Cons. 01 734 0632 


ADVERnSIHC Young rttert ban- 
ddng group of * needs 
exuberant shorthand Secr e tary 
with previous Advertising expe- 
rience to Han their industrious 
and My atmosphere. Salary c. 
£8SQ0 Please contact Octavia 
or Amanda at BJ Crawfords 
iHec Const on 936 9692. 


TEMPTING TIMES 


9 MONTHS! 

Temporary secretary with 
good S/H ft typing urgently 
needed to look attar two 
young Dtectocs in t^merkat 
Bond Street offices during' 
maternity tea re. Generous 
rates. 

CALL 

JILL ROBERTS 



PA’S 

€100/60). Bom rales even Hoi 
pay wp training. Rmg Moira 
00 01-229 9244, Office Over- 
load Agency 


B I -UNC O AL SECS Eog/FYench 
HOO/6Q' for prestigious 00 tn 
WB Ring Moira on Ol 229 
9244. Office Overtcod Agency. 


NON-SECRET ARIAL 


AT LEAST 2 

personnel /rerrtdttng experi- 

ence. a positive personality and 
a key to prove your success la a 
€40 ng professional rovlraii- 
met*? A consul lam. rmd w* + 
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fice* to place se cre t a rie s to 
pennanrni lobs Salary package 
£13-lSDOOr*. Call Lyn C3rcU 
of Secretaries Plus on 439 7001 
MATURE g gyiDWT ro- 
eutred for busy West End 
private dental practice. Salary 
£6.600 negotiable. Tatowtoite: 
01-680 0646 or 01-409 0994. 


PART TIME VACANCIES 


PART THE fwtth a view lo lull 
bme) assMOBt wanted for 
tndependant nursery school 
opening September 1986. Moo- 
kroon. P.P.A.. or infant 
lea t her training prellered. Tel 
OI 675 26Z1 day or eve. 

PT FLEXIBLE am or pm. peer ei- 
ther 9 30-3.00 OT 12.006.00 
Lang boK If needed for working 
mother Legal Sec toep da* No 
S/H. some WPitrgrtveni. Sala- 
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desirable. Ol 831 2828. 

TWO op OUR mast esteemed cli- 
ent* need two pan-tbne 
secretaries tone with shorthand, 
one wuhouii tn work rtextbW 
hour*. Good salary London 
Town Buff Bureau 01 836 
1994 

PART-TIME SCC/PA whh oxcep- 
Bonal irtoptrane anauy for 
smart young company In Wl 
area. Aged 25-36. Tel: 01-724 
0848 

LATE PM/EARLY CVCMN8 

part time sec sought for Oty of- 
nee or tiuemattanai company 
Hour* a 7pm daily WP expert, 
ence. and typing fSQwpmi 
emcnual Salary neg to £7 per 
hour Please telephone Ot -193 
6787 Gordon Yale* 
Consultancy 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


RENTALS NEGOTIATOR 

A young go-ahead person with the abiliiy lo went in 3 
busy expanding office with the mrainurradf supervision. 
Car driver essentiftL Salary oegotiabk in aocofdance 
with age and experience: 

Apply C Edmondson 
Tel: 01-586 5929 


TRAIN FOR A NEW CAREER 

An established consultancy is looking for 
mtetfigent arid ambitnus men and mmen am i 
22+ with t trie, initiative and good 
communicative skills, lo join diem as bamee 
sates executives. £7.000 (negotiable regulated 
fotyeareammes 

01-930 2492 


modern pentathlon 

Hungarians pose 
biggest threat 
to the Russians 

From Michael Coleman. Montecatini Tenne 

Ninety Italian horses sweating impregnable. > a khwn 8 


in this hot Tuscan town for ine 
world championships, wnicn 
begin today, hold the answer to 
any hope of a British success. 
The last time the British team 
came to Italy - Rome in 1982 - 
the contest virtually ended for 
several countries on the first 

day. Many found the horses they 
had selected unmanageable and 
this ended the hopes of Britain. 
Poland, and the United States. 

Two competitors in particular 
who were affected dial day and 
are here now in different capac- 
ities are Danny Nightingale, one 
of Britain's gold medal-winning 
team from the Montreal Olym- 
pics, and Janusz Pyciak-Peciak. 
the reigning champion. To the 
indignation of the Romans and 
the officials, Peciak accused the 
Italians of doping his horse to 
ensure that a local hero. Damele 
Masala, would win the title that 
hod just eluded him in Poland 
the year before. _ 

Drama continues to dog 
Peciak. In his new role as 
United States national coach, he 
has brought here a team in- 
volved in a drugs dispute. 

Masala, who went on to win 
the Los Angeles Olympics, 
though in the absence of the 
Eastern Bloc, remains the main 
Italian hope here, though his 
team colleague. Carlo MassulJo. 
a much better runner, might 
snatch the honours from him. 

The team title, however, does 
seem to be an affair to be settled 
between the Russian and 
Hungarian camps. Led by the 

g erfectly tuned Anatoliy 
taroslin. just edged out of the 
title last year in Melbourne by 
the Hungarian, Attila Mizscr. 
the Russian squad does look 


| III ■ V O .T. , a v . . — 

Yagonohvili, their No 1 is a 
former world junior champion 
who won the recent Goodwill 
Games contest in Moscow with 
a remarkable total of 5.5$ I 
points, with Starostin fifth on 
^ 466 , and Igor Sbvarts. third 
i cam man here, third with 
5.495. . . . .. 

It will need an almighty slip 
bv one of these three to allow in 
ihc Hungarians who. as well as 
Mi-escr. have the talented Laszlo 
Fabian. The Magyars have 
brought their own Transport and 
will be able to move from site to 
site in comfort. The contests are 
being staged not only in 
Monlcc 3 tini. but also at Lucca. 
Pcscia and Florence. The other 
teams have to use nan-air- 
conditioned coaches that are 
provided by the Italian Army. 

Britain’s chances look reason- 
able. Richard Phelps, third in 
the recent Birmingham inter- 
national, just behind Stalostin. 
is tit and seems to be shooting 
belter, the laid-back Dominic 
Mahony. having just emerged 
from the London School of 
Economics with honours, will 
give strength in the fencing, and 
the newcomer. Peter Hart, will 
ensure Britain wins the cross- 
country team race on the closing 
day. next Sunday. 

the women and junior men 
are competiting for titles, loo, 
both opening up today with the 
epee fencing. Nightingale has 
the job here of helping to get 
Wendy Norman. Teresa Purton. 
and Louise Ball, another new- 
comer. back up on the winners’ 
rostrum. It will be a tough one. 
with the Poles and Russians 
row dominant, and the French 
trespassing. 


SPEEDWAY 

Riders bid 
to break 
losing run 

JfrXeitbMacklin 

August will be a wickedly 
busy month for England's Inter- 
nationa] riders with the World 
Team Cup starting at GOreborg 
tomorrow and the three-match 
series against the United States 
beginning on Sunday at 
Sheffield. 

During these next two weeks, 
we will probably see an exercise 
in kicking the cat by the English 
riders, who may get a mauling 
from Denmark in the team cup 
and take it out of the weakened 
Americans in the international 
series. 

England are seeking to end a 
run of defeats at the hands of the 
United States, and their cause is 
enhanced by the injuries which 
have this season dogged top 
Americans in the Moran broth- 
ers and Lance King. The biggest 
threat to an England revival is 
the form and influence of the 
overseas champion, Sam 
Eimolenko. The Americans are 
great team riders and fierce 
competitors and they will con- 
test every inch of the Sheffield. 
Oxford and Ipswich packs. 

After his disappointment at 
being left out of the squad for 
the world Team Cup. Marvyn 
Cox, of Oxford, is included in ail 
three matches against the States, 
along with other world individ- 
ual championship finalists in 
Neil Evitts and Chris Morton. 
However, it is puzzling that 
Kelvin Tatum another Kato- 
wice qualifier, appears in only 
one international against the 
Americans, at Oxford, while 
being named in the England 
squad for all three World Team 
Cup matches at Gtiteborg. 
Vojens and Bradford. 

Presumably the England team 
managers. Eric Boocock and 
Colin Pratt, know what they are 
doing, though their borses-for- 
courses policy has caused some 
head-scratching. For instance, 
the National League rider, Paul 
Thorp, is brought in for the 
Ipswich match but doesn’t get a 
nde in the other two matches, 
though he has a good knowledge 
of the Sheffield and Oxford 
tracks. 

There is an interesting quote 
from Boocock regarding the 
World Team Cup in which 
.England compete in Group A. 
Boocock says: “We are so 
inconsistent at the moment that 
we could finish top or bottom.” 
Bottom perhaps. Top. with 
Denmark around? If England do 
finish bottom of their group 
they will be relegated to Group 
B in 1987. 

For the record, England last 
won the World Team Cup in 
1980. when Boocock shared the 
managerial role with lan 
Thomas. 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 


CRICKET 

BRTTANMC ASSURANCE 

COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP 
(1 1 .0 to GL30. 110 overs minimum) 
CHELMSFORD: Essex v Middlesex 
CHELTQWAM: Gloucestershire v 
Nottinghamshire 

CANT ERBUR Y: Kent v Hampshire 
LEICESTER: Leicestershire v 
Yorkshire 

NORTHAMPTON: Northampton- 
shire v Glamorgan 
WESTON-SUPER-MARE Somerset 
v Warwickshire 

ITffi OVAL: Surrey v Lancashire 
EASTBOURNE: Sussex v 
Derbyshire 

SECOND XJ CHAMPIONSHIP; Date*: 
Djrtjotaa v Lfifcssfsrstita; Meat 
GtoureataraWra v Hampshfra: BtiMd: 
^*ti<^ te^vSurTBy:ltew^^^te>^c?tTk)gha^>- 
stm v Nortftsnptorahn; BrixtaLSomer- 
w * Gla morgan; Worcester: 
wwrasteretee v fontattre: Hwm- 
gilK Yakahn v Kent 

COWmES CHAMPIONSHIP: 

rtshHTK CambridgeshflB v Kereotu- 

DVfnSni. 

OTHER SPORT 

ATHLETICS: Southern Countea AAA 
ragresentalw match (at Crystal Rotate 

CROQUET: HurOngtvn tewnaneat. 

TENM& Berkshire opgn TmimiwiMfci w 

Readtej tMvarelM^Hamilkinpte^ 

mk* Bournemouth tournament (at vSat 
Hants LTCk Siaday Park I Hotel 



RUGBY UNION 

England to 
train in 
sunshine 

England will prepare for next 
year's World Cop in Australia 
and New Zealand with two 
expenses-paid sunshine breaks. 

To acclimatize England's 
players tn the heat and hard 
grounds in Australia, where they 
play their early matches, the 
Rugby Football Union art 
proposing to send the squad to 
Portugal from' October 30- 
Norember 2 with another trip to 
either Italy or Portugal set for 
April 16-21. 

The players have already 
received expert advice on fitness 
and wiH be monitored through- 
out the season. A squad session 
was held at Warwick University 
last weekend and another is 
scheduled for Loi^bboroagh on 
September 13 and Id. The 
selectors are also considering an 
England trial at Twickenham on 
January 3 before the inter- 
national season after the di- 
visional championship 
competition. 

Australians 
struggle to 
keep record 

Wanganui, New Zealand, 
(AFP) — Australia's tour team 
struggled to beat lowly rated 
Wanganui province 24-17 here 
yesterday. After leading 12-9 at 
half-time, the Australians spent 
most of the second half 
defending. 

Four penalties from Leeds 
were ail that stood between 
victory and defeat, allowing the 
Wallabies, who were fielding 
what amounted us a second 
string, to maintain their un- 
beaten tour record in New 
Zealand. Wanganui took a six- 
point lead with penalties from 
Hardie and Love. 

Leeds finished with 16 points. 


YACHTING 

Plan to fill gap 
with races for 
a cruiser class 

By Barry Pkkthall 

A draft plan for a restricted 
offshore cruiser racer class de- - 
signed to fid the fast grow i ng 
gap between the horrendous ty " 
expensive Grand Prix end of the 
International Ocean Racing 
fleet and the limited choice - 
among Ak One-Design classes ■ 
was floated by the Royal Ocean 
Racing Chib yesterday in an 
effort to widen interest in the 
sport, particularly among din- 
ghy racing enthusiasts. 

A committee, led by Jonathan 
Brad bear, vice-coaxmodore of 
the RORC, which includes de- 
signers Rob Hmnphreys, Ste- . 
pben Jones, Ed Dubois and 
David Thomas, bare bees 
discussing the parameters for 
the proposed class since Feb- ' 
rnary and their draft proposals 
which limit size, displacement 
and cost could prove just the 
answer for dinghy crews who 
have cut their teeth fat restricted 
designs such as the National 12, 
Matin Rocket and Inter- 
national 14 classes and are now 
looking tor new fields to - 
conquer. 

The design of the new d*» 
will be limited to 31 ft overall 
with a 10ft beam, min*™** 
displacement of 6£00Ibs and a 
maximum sail area of S30sq ft* 
The use of exotic materials, 
including Kevlar safts, would he 
banned , sranftinga strictly cea- 
trolled and a decent accommoda- 
tion demanded, tt 

headroom and six berths ts 
ensure rift die y A t * mutate' 
a high resale valne as a fan fly. 
eraser. 

The conteriuce plan to hflM • 
senes of pnhfie iw<rfnf» at 
rations sailing c anti n a mmi 
the country hi Srpwhrr » 
»"8e the demee of 
these plans wfllliaw 
see the first ti 
time for next: 




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THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


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RACING: GULFLAND PROVES LUCKY THIRTE ENTH RIDE FOR ROYAL JOCKEY IN REDCAR AMATEUR EVENT 

Princess 
Anne 
ndes first 
winner 


Eastern Song 
to extend 
Nelson’s fine 
recent run 

By Mandarin 

Charlie Nelson is the trainer Shah's Choice for the Arundel 




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train in 
sunshine 


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r'i 


in the hot seat at present Last 
week at: Goodwood the 
Lamboum handler landed a 
big-race double with Rich 
Charlie and Double Schwarz. 
On Sunday he flies to Dublin 
where Ministrella is strongly 
fancied to reverse Newmarket 
placings with Forest Flower in 
the Heinz 57 Stakes, Europe’s 
richest two-year-old race. 

This afternoon Nelson goes 
pot hunting at Brighton where 
he has . hopes of landing' a 
doable with Sure Landing and 
Eastern Song. After winnin g at 
York Eastern Song was cer- 
tainly nor disgraced when 
third to Acushla in the Baroda 
Stud Stakes at Phoenix Park 
and looks capable of outclass- 
ing the opposition in the 
Hassocks Stakes (4 JO). 

Sure Landing, on the other 
hand, appears to be faced with 
a suffer task in the British 
Thoroughbred Racing and 
Breeding Handicap (2J0). Of 
the lightweights Helawe has 
an undeniable chance judged 
on his coarse victory in Nune, 
bat Ballad Rose won tike, an 
improving filly at Salisbury 
and can now defy 9 st 71b. 

The Brighton Challenge 
Dip (3.0) looks a tricky affair 
solve. Voracity, tne ;top 
i tubs well on 
Fleeting Affair 
was regaining her best form 
for Guy Harwood when run- 
ner-up to Elaafhr at Wolver- 
hampton. But House Hunter, 
a three-length winnerat Wind- 
sor in July, was not disgraced 
when second under a big 
weight on & return visit to the 
Thamesside track last week 
and is napped to repeat his 
1985 win fra 1 Con Horgan in 
this mile and half handicap. 

Holiday racegoers certainly 
have a wide choice of meet- 
ings today and those visiting 
Ayr will see Pat Eddery in 
action on the Scottish track for 
the second day running. The 
champion jockey-elect could 
well land a treble on Maftir 
(2.45% Aitch n f Bee (3.45) and 
Ktarara, who runs in- the 
Carbieston Stakes (4.15). 

The last two of these selec- 
tions are trained by John 
Dunlop and Eddery* is-ateO"* 
expected to win the famous 
Grouse Handicap (3-15) on 


trainer. But another imorov- 
ing three-year-old. Keep Hop- 
ing, penalized 31b for winning 
a similar type of event at 
C&tterick, is preferred. 

The best bet at Ayr could be 
Ben Led! in the 2.15 event 
Peter Easterby is something of 
a genius when it comes to 
improving horses, and Ben 
Ledi. the five-length winner of 
a seller at York on Magnet 
Cup Day,- may now take a 
successful step upwards in 
dass by defying 9 st 41b in the 
Tamdhu Single Malt Scotch 
Whisky Handicap. 

For Yorkshire ptmters there 
is the first afternoon of the 
two-day Pontefract meeting. 
In the £5,000 feature, the 
Pontefract Handicap Stakes 
(3.45) All Agreed, a game 
winner at Chester for John 
Winter, is sure to make a bold 
the 

shown sign* of running into 
form and Mary Revdey, that 
astute trainer of sprinters from 
Stokesjey, has engaged her 
favourite apprentice Adam 
Sfaoults for the consistent 
seven year old. Man ton Mark 
still looks reasonably treated, 
despite a 7Ib-penaity, but the 
choice is Music Machine, who 
is taken to complete a treble 
for Patrick Haslam. 

The Jrm Gun din Memorial 
Stakes (4.15) looks like an- 
other nightmare for punteis. 
Knight’s . Secret, 
Scoutsmistake and Nioro are 
but three of several with 
chances, but Haslam can com- 
plete a double by winning this 
One mile handfr«p with Virgin 
Isle. 

Always just bong carried off 
his legs when fourth to Patri- 
arch m the Bunbury Cup at 
the Newmarket July meeting, 
the five-year-old should find 
this lesser opposition more to 
his liking. 

And those, whose appetite 
for betting in handicaps is 
insatiable, could. do worse 
than risk a little on Angel 
Target in the concluding 
Motorway Stakes (5.15). 
Geoffrey Wragg’s filly has 
foiled to catch the judge's eye 
m three outings this season, 
but has shown enough to 
suggest that she is capable of 



... .. »k. a .■ 




ways well catered for at Yar- 
mouth, as Michael Stoute and 
Henry Gcril are but two of our 
top trainers who mate a habit 


Peter Easterby 's treUe-seekmg Ben Led! , who is in action at Ayr 

Stewart's filly, Nordica, al- 
ready a winner on the trade 
this season and subsequently 
nmner-up to Simon’s Fantasy 
in a handicap on the course, is 
another to be considered. But 
at the weights the choice must 
be Tender Type, who, after 
winning comfortably at 
Hamilton, was unlucky to be 
defeated narrowly by Space 
Trooper at Ayr. 

Connoisseurs as well as 
compulsive gamblers are aL 


improving enough to figure in 
the finish of what appears to 
be a distinctly moderate affair. 

At Yarmouth, East Anglian 
unravcilers erf 1 puzzles will 
have their wits tested by the 
Poutin’s Holiday Handicap 
(3.15). Lester Piggott’s consis- 
tent Geordie’s Delight will 
have his share of support 
despite his big weight, particu- 
larly with the foicefiil. Tony 
Ives in the saddle. Alec 


Today’s course specialists 


BRIGHTON 

TRAVERSE H CbcL 11 wfcrnen from 20 
rumen, 55.0%; Q Harwood. 32 tram 118 
27.6%; H Thomson Jones, 13 tarn 48, 
27 .1V 

JOCKEYS: W Canon, 42 etna Iran 
199 rides. 21.1V T Ojfem. 19 ton 92. 
207%; Q SUrieey, 37 from 179, 207V 

YARMOUTH 

TRAMERSe H OkO, SS wkswn from 15B 
runners,' 3SL6V A Stewart 9 itoni 36, 
2SnVLCumani, 35 trom 169,207V 
JOCKEYS: S Cauthen. 25 wtaiers tarn 98 
rides, 2&5VR Quest. 13 from 74, T7.&V 
lit Mfrer, 12 tram 90; 133V ‘ 

PONTEFRACT 

TRAVERSE H Cedi. 10 wfcmera from 23 
runners. 435V B Hvtoy, 8 from 36, 


16 .7V M Preecott. 6 from 36. 117V 
JOCKEYS: G DufMd, 18 vtrmers from 
1 70 rides, I0£%j K Hoddaon, 7 from 71. 
9JV J Lowe. 18 from 2ft MV 

AYR 

TRAVERSE G Hufler. 7 winners from 14 
runners. 503V J Dunlop. 18 from 53, 
34JVB HRs. l8frornB4r2fl.1V 
JOCKEYS: Pit Eddery, 15 winners from 
44 tides, 34.iv 8 Thomson. 9 from 48, 
18JV 0 Mchole, 20 from U2. 14.1V 

DEVON 

TRAWBE: D Bmmrtfv 20 wfrswra from . 
68 runners. 303%: M Pfce, 37 from IBS. 
20-OVJJenldne, 20 turn 101,193V 
JOCKEYS: C Brown. 18 winners from 1 17 
rides, 137V JFtaet.11 from 96, 11 A 


introducing their more 
promising hopefuls at the 
seaside trade. 

In the opening event 
Stoute’s newcomer is 
Sanaa hell and Fetoskfs half- 
sister may prove to be too 
good for the more experienced 
Nabras in the Cliff Park 
Maiden Fillies' Stakes (2.15) 
and in the concluding Family 
Resort Maiden Stakes (4.45) it 
may be CedTs turn to hit the 
bullseye with the previously 
un raced Fearless Action, a 
$385,000 purchase as a year- 
ling, who comes from the 
same family as the 2,000 
Guineas winner Known Act. 

Blinkered first time 

■RtQHTON: 20 Rododto Squaw. 230 
Mvnrmoio. 

YAMjount 345 FMk Rom. 
POMTEFRACn 5.15 SdntRMr. 

AYR: 2.15 W WMfr ng WtandarJCaoarM^S 
Clawi o n Thorm. 


Princess Anne won her first 
horse race yesterday when she 
partnered GtUfland to victory in 
the Motnmessin Amateur 
Riders' Stakes at Redc&r. 

The Princess, who was having 
ter 13th ride, -was on board the 
5-1 chance for the Newmarket 
trainer Covin Pritchard-Gor- 
don, and had little difficulty in 
beating the odds-on fovourite. 
Positive. 

In the race. Princess Anne 
tracked the leader Count CoV- 
ouzs early on and did not panic 

when Positive took command 
two furlongs out. She then 
deverty switched her mount to 
challenge just inside the final 
furlong and soon afterwards 
sent the five-year-old chestnut 

gelding into the lead. 

Thereafter, die was never in 
danger and Guifland drew away 
from the opposition to win by 
five lengths. Positive was sec- 
ond with Henadura a further 
seven lengths away, third. 

Afterwards, die Princess said, 
**You enjoy riding out and going 
to the races, but ruling a winner 
makes it even more enjoyable.'’ 

Faflowfidd Lad, a S-J chance, 
kept up the fine winning ran of 
the Tinkler family to land die 
Robert Sanau Mafoen Stakes by 
three lengths 

Colin Tinkler was enjoying 
his third winner in as many 
raring days. Bdlowfirid Lad was 
following successes for the 
trainer at Newton Abbot on 
Saturday and Market Rasen on 
Monday. Nigd Tinkler had 
earlier won the selling event 
with Girdle Ness. 

Tote to sponsor 
Newbury hurdle 

The Tote Is to take over the 
sponsorship of the big hurdle 
race at Newbury in ramiaxy, 
recently vacated by Schweppes 
in favour of a later date. It is to 
become the Tote Gold Trophy 
and will be ran with identical 
conditions except for minor 
alterations to the trophy value. 

The Jump race pattern 
committee has agreed that the 
Tote Gold Trophy win receive 
listed status and the race win 
continue to be worth £25,000 
with the Tote giving £18,000 
towards the prize money. It wfll 
be run next year on Saturday, 
February 14. 

Sir Woodrow Wyatt, the Tote 
chair man, said “ Despite bad 
lock with the weather m recent 
years this event remains a major 
ante-post attraction at a ttime 
wwhen the betting market is ala 
fairly low ebb: It is a Kg crowd- 
poller and it is entirely appro- 
priate that the Tote should si 
in to assure the eontinu 
strength of the raring pro- 
gramme on this day." 

However, the Tote has with- 
drawn its support of the £ 1 0^000 
Tote Credit 4-Y-O Hurdle be- 
cause this race now dashes with 
the rescheduled Schweppes 
Gold Trophy. 


Australians 
Nirusplcw 
keep record 


Going; good < 

Drew: low numbors best 

2.15 TAMDHU SINGLE MALT SCOTCH WHISKY 
NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £2,131; 6f) (9 
runners) - ■ . 

-NH4 
. GFnacfr? 


12 BTO KTO , H0PWG(BRGf*iffarS-7-7f4«) — NCuMbI 

18 BOM 8TRMQ Of BEADS M J EtMriogloa 4-7-7- — 3 

14 0U1 OGNALTO Oflnys Srotti 3-7-7 L CH — nrlr t 

*'114 Shift's Choice. 10030 Kiwi Haftog, 4-1 Duka Of 
OoHs,- B-1 Pwtaet DoeHs. 8-1 OpynBsdi, 1M Wesen, 12-1 
OensttD, M-1 othan. 

3A5 PTARMIGAN MAIDEN STAKES <£1,889: 1m) 

( 8 ) 


2 B3f1 BENLEHflMMHEuMqrS?- 

3 1BE BRUTUS JSWtaavM 


4 4000 KACSUE (KP Ctfwr 8-13_ 
^JWfconB-10- 


6 4002 SKY CAT J 

7 0380 NM8TIJNQ WONDER 

10 moo 


12 4310 BROWS ADOmONK 


J Barry 8-8 _ 
ION K Stems 


I U Brittain 8-10 


MRVS 


1 MAN W Anti 49-7. 
•40 AHCH MS (BFJJDurfOp 34-11. 
M KMYRAR 14 Stouts 3-0-11. 

0- LE MANS JtWtan 38-11. 


W- 


PM&frJwya 
, GBroeal 




rt *• 


t t* • 


a* *■ • 


• !'♦ - 

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t 

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15 0044 DAMN OMCBt M W Euarty 7-13 — LCbamockS 

18 0003 PAY QBfTgB) T Frirhura 7-10 JCMhghn (7) l 

7-2 WhtetSng Wondar, 4-1 Bon Lad. 9a Sfry Cat B-1 
Danum Dwcar, 8-1 Bratus. 10-1 pay Ofrt, 12-1 Broan's 
Addtkm, 14-1 E nwwr Groan, 18-1 Kacera. 

Ayr selections 

By Mandarin. 

Z15 Ben Ledi. 2.45 Maftir. 3.15 Keep Hoping. 
3.45 Aitch bPBee. 4.15 Klarara- 4.45 Thirteenih 
Friday. 

. By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2 45 Maftir. 3 15 Keep Hoping. 3 45 Kaiyran. 
Michael Seely's selection: 2J5 Ben Ledi. 

2A5 PINTAIL SELLING STAKES (£887: 61) (4) 

NUknl 
,J0dra(q4 


10 00M RANHY ROBM Osnyx finMi 388. 
12 0000 KICK TIE HABITC Brtlttfci 
15 00 SPRMGWB|.G»friKer388J 

17 0 8UMUY OWES BHfe 388^ 


b2 

■sas 

■ Crtrtl 
.RUWS0|4 
, BTUant 


-84 Aitch N' Baa, 5-2 Sunday Cftanaa, 82 Kaiyran. 81 
Fanny Robin, 181 Kick The Hat*. 181 othara 

4.15 E B F CARBIESTON MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y- 
& £1^33: 70 (9) 

1 22 AUTHBCnCNTHttarM KfeaTtatfv&3 

2 003 OAllARTfUSA) E Wbynias 98 E 

0U1HI COVB( K Sfrjoe 80_ 


8 

10 

15 

16 
18 
18 
21 


0 PORT OF THE Danya Smith 
04 BLACK MANS BAY JEtfurti 


RWdMARBAJJW Watts 811 

30 M A SPIN 14 Bnton 811 

4 KLARARA J Oirtco 811 
4 VITAL CARGO ECaitar 811 



2 0000 MAFTIR | 

3 0000 

8 0000 SWEET L .. 

9 0000 AMPUFYMBrttain385. 


815 Kfarara, 82 Authentic, 81 Fobrfna, 81 Danait 12-1 
In A Spin, 181 othara. 

445 HIGHLAND PARK SINGLES MALT SCOTCH 
WHISKY HANDICAP (£2^81: 70 (9) 

1 0091 8H WKJHRE (USAJ (Q E Waymas 4813 


W Co enorionl 
KDariay 3 


4 0020 BHERALO EAGLE (QCBoofft 582. 

11 0310 tENBOKY (CO) nmooft 5-811. 

12 -004 KflG COLE Mrs I 


IfiStT 


1811 Mattr. 84 AropBy, 7-2 Triconoo. 81 Banal Bra. 

3.15 FAMOUS GROUSE HANDICAP (E2£53: 1m 
51) ( 

2 -raw WESSEX fC-WBFI HttnWar 487 KrtU rtltfS) T 
4 <403 arm BACH (Sh M Camactio.4811 — BTtejaonJ 

B 843 SMAlTSCHOiaJ.Pirtpp 882 PatEddanr* 

9 0130 MOUUBRS J VWaon 481 — A 

10 0013 DUKE OF DOUSW Sway 7-7-S_ — 

11 0022 PHtreCT DOUBLE WPoarca 878 — 


Rawtoy 4-87 

13 0001 BOLORCWLEY TO JSYf8scnB-88 D 

14 0000 CURSOR THMmm Danya SnWt 88-4 




LCfearnodc 7 

K Stone 4-7-12 KDariay • 

__ 7-7-11 JQurtfll 

.YtMJBFJWPBarce 4-7-10 


7-2 Bold Rowtoy. 82 Emerald Eagle, 81 MortneKy, 81 
King Cote. 81 Sfr Wltnor*. QuaStalrewi.10-1 Thfrteenth PMey. 
Rasaae. 181 othara. 


...-.I- 


If'*' 

, S-' 1 


", 


DEVON & EXETER 


Going; firm 

Z30 TELEGRAPH HILL NOVICE HURDLE (£585: 
2m If) f13 runners) 

5 s eassRiaRsss^ sas 

• *■ ^’ ra,GB S?SS'?=r«" 0 2!S 





Diane day (71 

BPvmN 

Ur T Moor* 


N 5 * 


7 RUSTY RUPStTKCMaV 

8 

10 GObbSHOOTMG J M BTDdey 4-1(W 

11 OUR PC (f^R Cfwmpton 4-f07 

13 084 GOLDEMVSwUBForewWfW 
17 8 M USCAT R AMBLEB W Cfay 8185 

IS’ RHOOETTEGCEWdfl# 5-185 

19 P- BIRD ASH PJ Ruton 4-182 _ . 

20 008 EKAYTKIPWaft«e8102 SSrtU&de* 

11-4 0w Pie, 7-2 Chief Bumwr. 94 Rtoco Moon. 81 

Bcayiee,8T Gotten Merim. 181 MuateetRembter, 181 Gray 
Tomedo, 14-1 others. 

Devon selections 

By Mandarin 

2.30 Prince Moon. 3.0 Get Away. 3.30 Swingle- 
den Yc 


12 092 WELLS OWEAMEO FGftanl 18192 

IhaDf. 

13 Pf8 TUN2ENBB« NR McM 18192 TMtcfteO 

81 Saringletree. 81 Dance Master, 82 Stettin, 11-2 

BrosaiotT. 7-1 SnanWi Gold. 81 CheetorfleAT 181 
Tutzenoerg, 181 others. 

4JD MHXBROOK NOVICE SELUNG HURDLE 
(£568: 2m If) (14) 

1 008 DISCOVER GOLD KS Bridgwater 81810 

S 308 OR COn t CUW fltt q»Han 81810- 

4 008 DREAMCOAT (USA) M C Ptpo 5-10-10- 

5 208 EMCSWBHBPnece 81810. 

8 P08 WWEOfFDRSantrtiWMO. 

' 9 008 MODERN KAN J Ml 

11 sap- TRBUpeuncr ' 

12 ora- WREPOUR’ 


in 


IN J M BradW 81810 

ICfUSAVDR Tucker 81810— 1 
I MWEtogm J H Bator 8181 



tree. 4.0 DreamcoaL 4.30 Ogden 
Ban. 


folk. 5.0 Brcac 


3-0 POWDERHAM CASTLE NOVICE HURDLE 

(£599: 2m 5f) (12) 

1 408 AI PU C K P J Rcfrartt 81810 CBnw 

4 6|8 DUNCUFffiQAUCSl N 8 Thanson S-1MD 

D Hants (7) 
Cf 


G Daria 

.SMcNeW 

I Bator 81810 

LHamay(7) 

16 -0P8 MANHATTAN BOY (B) J Fteft-Heyer 4-15-7 r _ ^ 

18 408 WR&0N LAD CGTiWhe 4-187 A9»pe 

19 IK- OKIE'S WATTLE J CosgRwe 5-1&5 TPfaWd 

20 8 NOEL'S ANGQ. R G rS 5-10-5 JFnw 

23 08 ROZA COCCINEAW) WGMTuner 4-192- CJKan 
25 8 SPOOK U8& TO RCtwratan4-182— GHcCooU 

11-4 Hte Oft. ,4-1 DraoncoBt 52 Spend ftlNKLVhn 
Pour VNra. 7-1 Erie's Wish. 181 Manhattan Boy. 181 Dr 
Gomofius, 14-1 Others. 

130 RUTH BAKER MEMORIAL HANDICAP 
HURDLE (£2,145: 2m If) (10) 

1 011- OGOEN YORK J Francome 5-12-0— ■*&>•*£) 

3 018 IBRENOPEIVLC CTrietira 8114--—. MSeatoyffl 

4 40F- MARPfERS DREAN R HoBiahead 811-9 — - PDwer 

5 838 MONZA (&OP D Cuidal 8114— — Rto* 

6 148 ROYAL BAJZEjBNHfirter 811-5 LHarwy 

94P/8- AimCAN GIRL H O'Neti 7-1811- R 


5 318 F WAL CL EAR J A Old 81810 

6 FOB- nJnERVKlEJBREPaacocfc 7-1810. PSeadSraen 

8 438 LAUTREC C LPofTam 81810 S ” 

«8 UFTHBHDRTWw7-1H01 

11 OPD- LUCKV CHMUEJRjBflMfts 81810. 


13 008 HAWMIAKHBRTOhSrtWCtty 7-198 DtottCtrt 
15 080 G0UEN MATCH (8QMrs S Henf 


I? SSF SWJOrSBNMIWCley 81810. 

s sss anNMssR9ftM=i 


_ MAyCT* 

J white 

BPawal 

“ L 1?S 


2-1 Ogden 
Drawn, More h 


S Hentxuri 8184 

NCeksn 

RBQ0EN J L Speartw 8183___. A Watt 

CRACKBUAlMfS EKarat) 9180 R fcaafc 

Yoric 81 Monza. 81 RoyK Babe. 81 Mannere 


TROPHY 


-COw 

GoMKbm 


, 4-1 Get Away. 11-Z Lucfcy 

I Aneriok. 181 atttara. 

CHASE (Amateurs 



■ L Popfaam 11-11-7 

TQranfcratm 
| R Chwirton 181T-6 ■ Oazai (7) 

| C Heine* 1811-2 — — 

1 11-1813 MMcfoadapI 
17-1811 

, . PeanyFIlfcii-HeyeaCT 

7 POP- B E MYLU CKRJHodoae 5-189 PNacEwaaM 

8 POO/ OCSTBmSJ) P JHoMa 8102 Rttottim 

9 0/8 STOP BOHTMaTIWM 18192 JDerteft 

to UF8 WOW1ER HH.M Cento W94. NwJhaaanffl 

11 348 SHOraNGHOWaa 11-192 Gaya Am*** ft 


3 IV8F SWMGLEfRB 

4 00-F DANCE 11 _TZ_. 

5 2U8 BROSTA1GH Mrs _ 

6 140*- 8MDNBOUVAHJ 



. I ftorai Bata 

i Hopeful, 181 Cracfcop. ftteoerv 14-1 othara. 

SJ> VISCOUNTESS PETERSHAM 
HANDICAP CHASE {£1,662 3m IQ (14) 

2 0/P8 LEADING ARTIST N A Gesriee 11*122— A Adaaw(7) 

3 108 MAJ0RTDM flnWGWofmnan 911-8— MNwitartan 

5 138 BREAC BAN K41) R Oamplcn 811-6.— .GMcCoort 

6 1P» ALEOS (FH) WGM Tunar9-n-6_ - — — CWanwifH 

7 0P8 JWMYMFF (MR I PWWfc 14-11-4- — SJ OYteN 
9 P81 GtOtlA WAY 0 R Gandotfo 7-1 M (4att PJtoq 

.SMcNeM 

. CMane 
’-185 . RRewe 



13 OOP- OEYTARQ!mTOJJBrid0er14-184 

14 034- SAIUUUAJH Baker 81IM 

15 P3tt NORW DOWN BPnan 18190 

17 FP8 ALKBfTMENTD R Tudcar 810-0 

18 PP- SABI NB Thomson 12-190 
83J3Iola Way, 82 Braec Ban, il-2 Aleos. 81 1 


Malor Tom, 18' 
rthera 


JSnmy MB L Norti Dawn. 



YARMOUTH 


BJ0HA(U8A)LCunwnl811- 
MONTWUUtAGWiaop 811 J 


Draw; high nrenbara bast 

2.15 CUFF PARK MAIDEN FBJJES STAKES p-Y- 
O: £1^400: 81) (9 runners) 

2 

o' 

7 

8 

10 
11 
12 
13 

188 Natett. 81 Mona, 91 Gmatiel. 7-1 Sheer Roytoy. 
81 Spaedbkd.181 Saneaflonal Lady, 12-1 odiera. 

245 BURE SEUJNG STAKES (2-Y-tt £688: 6f) (0) 

S u'ltilarl 


4 DMO ISKX-PLAMB SB R Amsfrong 93 SCattfran7 

8 0304 FANCYPANRMA) W lflifri gi n — 91 Tlraei 

7 3MP 8PONnNB«OWBOMCNHlBlM Jttri iBORatt I 

^MtoiarS 


8 488 row I rnoaeflBG HcWar 913 _ 

9 -800 L0NEGALAXIEp|URSttbta812.JH 

15 M00 BEAirSREVBidEWHaldan84 R 

17 30H GARDA'S QOLUMBriBabi 93 I 

18 900 OUR MMHffD Dele 7-7 Q 




92 Puoiara Utt. 11-4 Rare Sound. 81 FhaMe Rose. 1S2 
Lone Gettxtt. 7-1 Une*-Pttlned. 81 Sportkig Sowra«n. 12-1 


3 NABRAS OF) HThomaon Jonas 811 AMmtff 

NO UE G PrfrcfMnVGorrfcn 811 PWrtfroeB 

SANAAS8-L M StOUto911— WRSwtafrMi 

SENSATIONAL LADY C Brittain 811 S Grattan 4 

0 SNEER ROYALTY (BR W OGorman 811 Tiaaal 

ran 811 NDayt 

!MraaOD811 MWIafrtel 


DMRyahf 

ROKWN 


1 1400 FANTMEmjnNTMdar813. 
4 003 SWEET WSOLO 6 Holler 811 



UTTLEIAWB Rictvnond 

8 000 LYNDA BROAD P Buraoyne 
7 3032 MSS ACACIA RSUtic 88 

9 NATIONS ROSE R S&rt* 

10 0000 RaJUiPEGOK Noryflfr ... 

13 009 mere TOOWrWWG Lewis 88 

11-4 Who'a Zoomin' Who, 10030 Fmttia. 7-2 Sweet 
Piccolo. 91 Mba Acade. 181 Lynda Broad, 191 Nations 
Rose. 181 others. 


3.15 PONTINS HOLIDAY HANDICAP (3-Y-O: 
£2,700: 1m 2fl (10) 

1 1422 QEOROe^SOBJ6WpHAJLP<93oe97 — T Nee It 
3 -130 ALSHAMttHfUSAJTOHTtowan Jones 90 

5 1012 NORDCA (Q(BF) A Sttwart 98 Mtebrti 

BOOM MARSHAL MACOONAU) WHokton80_ SCaattMl 
8 0043 fCSREWOMANR AnmtronogB WRSrttoomS 

10 3403 ADMIRALS ALL J Wrter 83 PUttaal 

11 0012 TEWBITYPE(8F)MToraplcinaB-3f5eK)HCaettttie2 

CRUSAte ffF) G Lams 81 PWrtfrnnS 


Yannonth selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 SanaabriL 2.45 Who's Zoomin' Who. 3.15 
Tender Type. 3.45 Famine Rose. 4.15 Parson's 
Child. 4.4S Fearless Action. 

By Onr Newmarket Correspondent 
2 15 Nabras. 2 45 Sweet Piccolo- 3 15 Nordica. 
3.4S P nTham Mills. 4 IS Deserted. 4 45 Fearless 
Action. 

Michael Sedy’s selection: 3.45 FAMUJLE ROSE 
(nap). 


4.15 BRTTAM4IA MAfbEN STAKES (£1.288: 1m 6Q 

P) 

3 MAimwJMW — : M C a d— « 

8 -042 DESERTED (USA) G Prttchaid-Gonion3-85__ Tleea 2 

12 002 PARBOIfS CJ8LD flJSAIL Draani 885 — RGraatS 

13 2232 THREETNKSALADY0BF)PKattW*y885 

14 000 TONQUMJ Tolar 385 P Ratttt— 1 


12 


M 0002 RGttSIMNMacwrty7- 
18 DOM TOWER FAME EBdn7-7 


7-10. 


198 Throe ranee A Lady. 94 DaawwcL 92 Parson's 
ChkL 81 Tonquln. 181 Abydoa. 

445 FAMILY RESTOR MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O C 

& G: £1,322: 71) (8) 


7-2 Georda^ DeighL 82 Al Stemfidi. NottSca. 11-2 
Marshal MacdonakL 6-1 NeedBwoman. 81 Admirals Al. 181 
King's Cnisade. 181 others. 

145 SEACROFT HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £1267: 7f) 
( 10 ) 


1 

2 
3 
5 
7 
B 
9 

10 


CABOT W Hotter 90- 


FEARUSS ACTION 
4 QBTTLE QAHUJSMI 

2 Mtefs omreJ, . 

■■■reQttA)GHuaer90- 

FOFOOUiCBrttrti9fr. 


ritONMU) 

USMRyanS 

iMASTBtfU 


TOO 

H Cad 90 — S Carfban 4 

90 RCschmneS 

(USA) W Jarris 90 A Mraay 3 
^ MMarl 


PfttMnaBn2 


2 0912 PULHAM MKLS HD (teTOI E B*l 87_ QKIagSIO 

3 1-2 RAHE SOUND (C)P Karaway 93- O ey Katia —y ffl I 


0 SYAKT-IIIEW Crewman 90 MDN H UNN PI 8 

04 SUNSET BOULEVARD L Piggoc 90 Th«ea 7 

11-4 Smart BortavenL 10930 Faartaea Action, Graan s 
OU Master, 91 Gentle Deriue. 181 SttrtJttB, 181 Mtoian. 28 


PONTEFRACT 


Going: good 1 
Dra«c»-6U 


tofmn 

(ownumbwsbtttt 

145 E B F FEATTERSTONE MAIDEN STAKES (2- 
Y-O: £2^67:61) (14 runners) 

1 BARNABYBBCZMH EastarfayOO KH»iHgaan2 

2 tt «KB«ttAMBEHJl*W»90l SMonhlS 

4 0 BtflCBOFTRWiialirtM- KBradrimaffllA 

5 203 COJKAT RALLY JW WdB 90 GtMMdl 

9 0 DANUM LAD Ron Thompson 90 SPGMNtoll 

10 FRBKK ASHTON DMcriw 90 8 Parts I 

11 0020 JOHNNY SHARP (USA) S Norton 80 — JLmwB 

12 fl JUMA MONTY J Payne 90 PD-JUerS 

13 4 MAD MAX P Hasten 90 TWteiil 

14 220 WSKfUSAIHCBrtOO W Ryan 4 

15 03 WCtoCXETRQRThattpBnOO RPBUtll 

16 OH DANNY BQY EWMnei 9-0 

17 RAYMONDS STAR Mmuglttn 90 —9 

28 48 THANK HAVONDM0riey811 — AMcGtattia 

1M MUfc, 92 Cohwy Rate, 81 Johnny Stem 13-2 Ttank 
Hawaa 181 Mad Max. 14-1 othara 


145 POMFIffiT HANDICAP (£3,817: 5f) (7) 

QDnfWdS 

; TO Mm G R e aa tty 794 

A8froa teTO 7 
lT8arron991 S W a ft arl 


1 0021 ALL AGREEpO) J MMar 5-910. 

2 0043 HN8 CWUtLGMONE | 


5 -800 HELAURA BGLLE ( 


7 18n WUBCMACtttlL(fcb>PHaattra5813{7i . 

JSaly(7)4 

B 0001 MANT0N MARK fflt M Camacho 9812 (7ex} J Loa* 5 

12 6030 PNKBTARatiPsBF) A BaUog973 — A Mertay2 

13 098 tMHTAW&KiNTOGCBlrtrt^SPGrtrttteC 
74 Music ktechtna, 91 Manton Mara i l-Z Al Ag reed. 7-1 

King Chertamagna. 181 Ptostar, 14-1 UgM Me, Mebura Bate. 


4.15 JW GUNDU1 MEMORIAL HANDICAP 

(£2^82: im) (9) 

4 4BW VMM UJ^DIP Hasten 54? --T WW a ma l 

5 tm B8GHT8SEaET(D«KBiOMHEasWby54« 

KHodam2 

IHH7 


6 0332 aCOtfraUSTAKEt 

7 4000 MOORES METAL 1 
9 400 RUSS&LCBEEKl 


Pontefract selections 

By Mandarin 

2.45 Misk. 3.15 Lucky West. 3.45 Music 
-Machine. 4.15 Virgin Isle. 4.45 Robbama. 5.15 
Angel Target . 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2 45 Misk. 3 IS Britton's MDL 3 45 AD Agreed. 
4.15 Viigin We. 4 45 Kmanga. 5 15 Nawadder. 
Michael Seely's selection:!!. 45 Music Machine. 


IB McMahon 785 G 
| R HotinsheBd 895_ S Petite 0 

.RPBWS 

7Y(lRAMde586 AMackay4 

15 0009 GOOLORDT layer 6-7-11 —9 

19B Not, 5-2 Krfrttt Secrrt. 82 Virgin tate. 6-1 
Scoutsmistake, 181 Kempglow. 12-1 Moons MetaL 181 
oOwra 


10 813 MOROniSA) R jdnisan Hsughton : 

12 0003 KAMPdlMROriThnnBariZM- 

13 0000 SUKMNB BOY (Dl A Mde585 


3.15 CUDWORTH CLAIMING STAKES (£1,047: 1m 
20(10) 

2 0300 OLBBBWVTOHtt Jones 88T $ Pedal 

5 040/ ROYAL VALEuR P Bavan 994 JttRIM(7)7 

8 dni THJAY TO P Bavan 7-94 T Warn 4 

7 000 BUS7H)ttAV0URWJanla993 W RyanS 

11 1002 STONEBROKBI (D) D Haydn JOflBS 4*812 

MO M B BNN B BB 

13 1000 lUCKY WESTS »Ajora887_ Atedajr3 

14 0024 BRITTDt«l«ipiSA)(BnMPrBBD«3 ^ ^ ^ 

15 -0« PfBMEWWStP CON 388. — .Khrtrttt 

» 0242 CAPRICORN BLUE (B) (BF) Jimmy fitzgorald 881 

J Love 6 

27 D» EXPERT Wn?eSSB MCl9*l 881. B Cmari a y » 

11-8enBon‘sfraL81 Caorlcom Btae. 91 Lucky West, 81 
Expen witness. 181 Busted Flavour. 281 ottiera. 


4.45 HOLIDAY TIME STAKES (£2^3& 1m) (4) 

t 0112 COMHANDBI ROBERT J Hanson 4-910, — J Love 2 
8 3123 BADARBAXR Johnson Houston 389— A McGhee 3 

12 m RENANMOIH Cert 384 WRyral 

131943 ROBBAMApjBAJ J ftrtop 3-8-8 GIMM04 

118 Kenrage, 78 Rob da raa, 7-2 Badarttoc, 81 
Commander Robert. 


5.15 MOTORWAY HAMMCAP (3-Y-O: £2,052: 1m) 
( 12 ) 

2 989 ntreAJol»FtzGerak!87 GBttdarl 

8 0103 NAWADDER B Hanbury 93 AJOarao{7J12 

11 994 DAWN LOVER RHattaheto91 5P«ta3 

12 -009 ANQB.TARaEtGWmgg8l2. 

15 0000 HOTL0BNBFCbt87 

17 3000 TAMALPASH 

18 -800 WCOUM 
28 0S00 

24 980 CStLLAG P Balay 8-0 

26 0000 SSNDBnLGBrtteg80. 

27 0003 ROIDESOLBLM Steward 7-H. 



ftRMrfflIO 

AMadayi 


92 Newaddv. 4-1 Rol de Soiea, 81 Dawn Love. Fteas. 8 
Ternttpatt. 181 otan. 


29 9309 MY DBtYA (B) B McMahon 7-7 
92 Nawadder, 81 Hoi 
1 Angel Target. My Derya. 


BRIGHTON 


Going: firm 

Draw: 5f-6f, four mnnbras best 

2J0 STAMMER SELLING HANDICAP (£958: 71) (18 runners) 

2 onom tCLSOH%LAinfafDI{MraJJackc«4CHQrgnS89 ISrtnnnl 

3 00*00 RUSSELL FLYER (B) (K Bowy) R Hoad 4-97 G Carter fflS 

4 980000 PORT DUCWSNEfK p/fctefcwtek 4-95 R Carter (5) 10 

5 008120 GERSHBnNMnEO'OamTODOUonnali 

5 0330*0 OSTENTATIOUS IT 


I 003 OUTMYSOH 

■ TURCY BOY 
■ COMPOSED 

298303 SANDRONH 


9 

10 

11 ■ 

12 449800 ROCKVILLE SOU 
T3 209800 CYGtSrOameEl 
■ 20000 COUNT ALMA VIV 
I HI llll MINT II Ilf 


14 

15 
15 

17 

18 
19 
21 

198 , 

Sancton. 181 



109803 SAUQHTRSSfH Keswick) PWrtam 3811 I 

000004 DALLAS SMITH TO BttAlt&QlfP&rtWUChapRan 588... 

320000 BLACK SPOUT <Mra itohKfsiH O’Nari 587 


BLACK SPOUT (Mra E Retards) I 

TOWS NAP HAND (T Steddort W R WMama 587 . 

GREAT OWNG (0 Hook) A Dlriun 48*7_ 


WHew n e s l 
G Saxton 3 
Paul Eddery 2 
Uetaaentt 
S Damn 5 
NHOwaf 
.D Brown 13 


92 Count Aknawra. 81 Russel Flyer, 7-1 Nelson's Lady, 
~ 12-1 Ostentttous. 181 Guymysoa 181 otters. 

POMt IS^ON'S LADYg-4) 1%| 5tt to Far Too Busy (7-9) at UnatleU (7f. E2S60. 
good. July 12. fl ran). RU8&LL FLYER (8® 7tt Mat US*. pranouslYa-12) 2MI 3rd to 
Nanor(M) at Yarmouth (6f. £751, good toted, July 18, 13nmL GREAT OWING (87) 
behind. Uttastar saSng wnn#r GERSWW was (88) a fuming on 1 541 5tt to Maidan 
Bttdarjfrfl) al Ctepffiw, CVGNE (84) brttedJW, El 371. ten. July 9, 1 7 mL 
OSTENTATIOUS (S-SmoO down ritMn 7tt to Mr Ron (Ml rt Newmarket (7f . £3157, 

! L 8 eulto (7-1% 9 Att to R(»tt Dtom ^ rt NawniKkK (Gf). COM- 

2Vjl 4tt to Dualling (8-2) at Hartten (fit, £2553. ten. July 18. 5 ran). 

8 (8ffl 21H Leicester 3rd to Knafe (80). COUNT ALMAVIVA »«7tt (1m, 
£1149, good to ten. Juiu 15.23 ran). 
ttttBra RUSSELL FLYER 


Brighton selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Ostematious. 230 Ballad Rose. 3.0 HOUSE HUNTER (nap). 
330 Kamensky. 4.0 Iunishmore Island. 430 Eastern Song. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
230 Helawe. 3 0 Voracity. 4 0 Loch Seafbrtb. 4 30 Angels Are Blue. 
By Michael Seely 


230 BRITISH THOROUGHBRED RACING & BREEDING HANDICAP 

(3-Y-O: £3,012: 7f) (7) 

(N Abbott) PCott 87 TGtateal 


f (A Knannan) M Jarrii 87 . 


r CNatson94_ 

. I2.. 

811. 

R Hannon 83. 


WCBmiT 
J Raids 


1 Start** 1 
.. P CookS 
. B Room 2 

W Alto— 4 


1 284321 BALLAD ROSE 

2 1-10204 AMBROSM 

3 042034 SURE LA 
B 989014 HELAWE 
8 430380 y Affir 

11 00-0020 LYDIA LANGUISH (J Doris) R. 

13 980000 MERRyMOLES TO (A BJngtay) M McCourt 7-10 

.. 11-4 Heiewe. 81 AmbrnM. 7-a BaBadRoaa. 81 Sura Landing, 81 8ttek Sophia. 
91 Lydia Languish. 291 Menymotes. 

FORM BALLAD ROSE (811) beet Gnat DBamma | 

ten. June 26. 16 ran). 

earlier (91) 1L Epsom 2nd to Bnaser 

LANDHQ (8-11)7*1 4tt 10 
Ytten(9En%l2ndtoFintDiba.. 
ran). HELAWE (98) 2X1 4tt to War „ . 

Review (81 1)2 XI hero (6f. £2194. goorfto linn. June 


Great Mamma (811) 1X1 at Salisbury (7f. El 447. 
■(89)B*i 40) to toanrny'B Favourite (87) test time. 

to Bnaser (97) (7 r. £4390, good. June 5, 15 ran). MJM 

Myra's Special (9-1) at Chapstow (81). pemapa boatatfcvt 
ba(80) et YtanAck (1m. mdn. EB58. good to ten. June 7, 17 


»3Il5r 

ss (7-13) 


15 ran). LYDIA I 


1(84) 

behind then, next tme (86)2X1 fid to Gircfie Neu (7-13) (tm. ettkn, £2963, good to 
ten. July 14, 19 ran). BLACK SOPtffi below par this season, last year (80) SXISrd to 
Drirtw» Fgn|9^ JrtLriortttf (71. £2832. ten. Sept 23, 14 ran). 

3 JO BRIGHTON CHALLENGE CUP (Handktep: £4,331: 1m 4f) (5) 

2 004-232 VORACITY BAMs J INfrito) J Wbitar 787 J Rato 4 

3 11102 FLffiTBlGAmUR JC- iXbfJ ( toaS Latti) G Httwood 887 . GBWkayS 

5 918034 CADMRMfSMIriiRMKlialalP Cola 489 TOutael 

7 290412 HOUSE HUNTER (C-OXBF) (LAs M Campbell) C Horgan 5-8-4 PratEddary2 

8 202M0 PELLWCOURT(8D) (A SpeflOB) R Atahurat 481 RCmt3 

7-4 House Hunter. 92 Fleeting Affair. 10890 Voracity, 13-2 Cadmium. 81 

Pafiocourt 


, at Wotwerhampun (1m 41. 

Ml iiiWm 1 1.1 1 TING AFFAIR (813) 1X1 courae and dtetenoa 

(£3727. good toten. June 24, 9 ran). VORACITY ratt 

in 3rd and HOUSE WNTERp^mxriher 8Xi bach In 6th. HOUSE HUNTPt 


FORM: FLEETWG AFFAIR 

e38!B,goodtoten.Jutv2T 

irinnar mam PELL 

waaXlewayln3r 

112nd (813) to Strfta Home at Windsor (82) on Monday, previously (81) had CADMIUM 
S«5XI back in 4tt when Windsor winner pm 3f 150 ms. £2586. qM. July 21. 9 ran). 

PELUMCOUOT Gttrt Baft tem time nm SI), Barite (&d) beat VORACrTY(91 0)1 XI har* 

n m 4f. EZ729. tea Jtrt 3. 4 rani 

SaiaatiPR VORACTTY ’ 

330 BBC RADIO SUSSEX MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O C & & £1363: 
6Q(5) 


M ANYOW (REA Boll Bott Ltd) C NaNon 80, 
CORNET (Mrogroup H^^^B 


800 CASTLE 
0 HARRY-EM 
032 KAMBtSKY 
KMG 


r(lrtogro^HoiAig^R Hannon 80 . 

— ", 

(D HurrtHQ) J Dunlop 90 


J Raid 3 
IHooaaS 
P Cook 2 
1 


W Carson 4 


94 Kamensky. 84 Anyov, 81 King Richwd, 181 Caade Comet 281 H«vyBn. 


FORM: ANYOW (81 1)4X1 3rd to Micro Love 
rani CASTLE CORNET (811) taBed off 

» £11453, tern, June 19. 13 ran). KAMENSXT 

HtedrorpL T^3. ^^ood to tea June 16). 


43 LANES E B F STAKES (£2393: 1m 2f) (5) 

2 VXBUO HARSH HAMER 1U8A1 (C-U) (F MQ A Moon 5-80. 

3 442111 LOCH 5EAFQRTH Sr O Whi H ( 

5 013031 UWDSMfMMfBUuroVni 

6 312203 MWSHHORE BLAND (Mrs A 

7 CELTS BELL (A Wttdraou) W R 



'. E834.flrm. Jrty8.6 
at Ascot (W, feted. 
CRhyttan (811) at 


P Cook 2 
PattEsfcten4 
S WMtworttl 
W Carson 3 
NHeveS 


11-10 frmtshmoro blend, 11-8 LocftSaeforth, 7-2 LandafcL 381 Marsh Hanfar, 50 
1 CeWcBeL 

FORto LOCH SEAF0RTH(88) completed hm-triefc arid) VI Windsor defeat of Pocftad 
O-IQ) nm3f 150yds. £382l(nod. Jtey 7. 9 r^. lANDBKl (84) beat SrtY Sm So (82) 
M rtCartslB (im it 60yds. £2^. hard. July 25. 3 ran). INNffiriMORE ISLAND (8715X1 

3rdto^to>Moj9^rt ^cot^l m a, £7070, good, July 26, B ire). 

430 HASSOCKS STAKES (£1,721: 6fl (7) 

1 28213 EASTON torn Ms WTrtocMCftton 3811. 

3 02301 ANGHJS ARE BLUETT RarttdemM Rjr*i 3-95. 

4 60-0200 BOOTLE JACK — ^ 1 ^ 

8 I0OSO 80SCQUEST 

9 309000 SWBOfECc . . 

10 490000 ZUUIKMQHTMsLWtamnfl 
12 622-000 BtfTHAYHA (H Al Mrirtoum) H ' 

_ 13-8 Eastern Song. 84 Bulhayna. 91 Angels Are Blue, 91 Zulu Knight, 181 
Stanbo. 281 Boottle Jacfr. 581 Some Guest 

FOMfc EASTBM SONGffl-10) 41 3td to Aotthb ff-7)jn Group 3 event rt Phoenls Park 
(8L £11383. good. July 26. 8 ran). ANGELS ARE BLUE (811) beat Sunny Match (811) 
mte. £1373, firm. July 28. 12 ran). BOOTLE JACK bast effort when (8 



Thomson Jones 88T1 


I SONG 


Brighton results 

Gate: Good to ten 

vTrn 1. vevila (Pat Eddery 813 
tev): 2. Mbs Runaway OM R Svrinbum 7- 
2); 3. Copper Creek (J Reid 291] 
ran: 12 Tamessoa (5th). 14 Red 


Hood (BthL 2D WrJ^ftv. 50 tts Been 

Rumoured 7 ran. 2X L 1L 2XL 1 »L 31. L 

Cumani at Newmarket Tote: el AO; £1 2a 

£1 A0: OF: £2.10. CSF: £235. 

2JQnmt1.FOOfTPATROL(CRuHsr7- 

4 tev): 2. Meet Hie Greek (P Cook 81); 3 
JoyM Dancer fr Qwm 1 12). Abo rare 8 

2 Staepie Bell (4ft). 33 Solstice Ball (5th). 

5 ran. sm hd. a. a. a. P CundeS at 
Cogaon-Tott: E2AO; £130. £150: DP. 
EZ30.C5F: £5.11. 

3A (7R: 1. LAURIES WARRIOR (Pat 
Eddery 1 1-8 tevg Z Olora Mrtb fL Jones 
14-1); 3. ReumsA ( R HBs 11-2). Mao i 


4.15 (1m 31) 1, BRAVE AND BOLD (W 
Ryan. 182); 2, Sender (R Canor, 4-1 S3. 
Qofrtoi Ftoey (R Irickors. 81). ALSO 
RAN: 1 1 -a lav Graed (4ft). 5 JanteO (SV0. 
12 Ebrtm, 14 Bold Answer (6tti). & 
Mexican ML Frame Of Power. 9 ran. XI, 
XL XL 21. 6L N Caflaghan al Newm»fceL 
Tote: £7.10; £2A8 E2 20. E2JXL OF: 
£32.70. CSF) £29.55. 

4A5(7f) 1, KHADRUF(A Moray, 4-1): 2, 
Paletace (T Ivea, 94 fav); 3, Wbe Tlaiee 
(M Wlgham. 5-2L ALSO RAN: 11-2 FWr 
Part tSft), 8 J J Jimmy (6ft), 14 
Rabannem (4ft). 6 ran. NR: Arinaaaoh. 
IKL1XL 2XLM.7LH Thomson Jorwsrt 
Newmarket Tot* £450: E2J0, £1.20. OF: 
£5.10. CSF: £10^5. 

tawgrattuo. (Lord Wengate rapttcu 

Monday’s late results 

Folkestone 

Going: Good to ten 
6.9(71)1. 


£1A0; £1.10, £3AG OF: £7.00. CSF: 
£983. 

3JO nm 21) 1. ROM MOA (S Cauftan. 

11-4 lav); a Andra Video (J Raid. 4-1); 3. 

tCamM(B Rouse. 181). ALSO RAN; 


BushyBay. Sir 
ran. NR: No 


Bolder. 31 


.12 

shhd.P 


Krtbway at N e wm a rt e t Tote: £950: 

£1.60. n.60, £3.00. DF: £&48 CSF: 

JE13JJ3. Bought in 2500 gns. 

K i 41) 1. CURKU (Part Eddery, 1 1- 
To Unde n. Jones. 81 tetfc 1 
TorreyatM HBs. 108M). ALSO RAN: 82 
fireproof (Wi)l 16 Bemigra GM (8IW. 25 
Miss Jade (4th). 33 Solem Express. 7nm. 
hd. 1XL 10L 121 2L P wahwvn at 
Lamboum. TatK £2.60; £1.40. £1.70. OF: 
£4.10. CSF; £835. 


i (D Gtoson, 4-1) 

a Hatching (381); 3, Royal Berks r 
Sparkler gjlnt and Hopeful Katie 
tev. 9 ran. 1L2L DAloriey. Tote: £7J 
E2JXL £5X0, £lXa DF: £15388 CSF 
£91.18, 

6JO (6t) 1, Bferaradea (R Wsmham, 8 
ih 2. &wp Decision (81) end ReporfEm 
(20-iL 15 m. Tumwer Fair and Jlanna (8 
1 A Fav)2L dd ht D.Munaranift. Tew 
£9.60; £4^0. Snap Decision £2-50. 
Raport-Em £8.40. DF: Mareroda with 
Snap Decision £1420; Marcrada wfft 
Report' Em 253J0- CSF: Marcrada with 
Snap Decision £2056: Marcrada with 
Report-Em E54J2 Tricasc Marcrada. 
Stop Decision. RaporTEm £46926; 
Marcrada. Report 1 Em. Snap Decision 
£48838 


Tompkins. 1 

£2a5TcSF: 


CSF: £7.17. 


430 


n 


1. HALO HATCH 


Banacfc Street (4th). 33 ABce HOL Dawn 
Mirage (5th). 66 Steal Peas. Tootsie Roll 
(6ftL9ran.41.4l.Ki.5l. XLKBrassayat 

Upper Lamboum. Tote; £19.00: £2£Q. 

£130. £1.70. DF: £1430. CSF: £3041. 
P ta c a poE tBM. 


Redcar 


Going: good to ten 

2.15 (im) 1. GIRDLE NESS (Kim Tlnlder, 


CottralL Tote: £330: El 30. £17.30.12^0. 
DF: £30230. CSF: £124.95. Tricaat 
£1.048.80. Trackers Jewel (8 1) with- 
drawn. Deduct lOp In potato. 

M (50 1. ShaMnt S Cauthen. 11-10 
Ibv): 2. Atrayu (7-11:3. 5»ny Pride ( 81 ). 9 
ran. Kl. sh hi. fl Houghton. Tote: £2.10; 
£130. £2.10, El .80. DF: £530. CSF: 
£991. 

330 tni. Booty (I Johnson. 81): 2, 
Sana (11-8 fm*3. Bate of Budapest (39 
U 11 ran. 3L2L R Steamer. Tote £640; 
£1.90. £1.00. ESJO. DF: £438 CSft 
£1741. 

Ptoe epottEBBuOO 


(8th). RomeSom. Laroem 
Mbtendfath. 20 Standford Rom (4tn). 
Mercte Goto Moloch. Lotto LimeMn. 13 
ran. 1XL5LftL2Lttofi Tinkler at Melton. 
TOte: £230: £1.20. £230. £3.70. DF: 
£1230. CSF: £16.11. Bought in 2,100gns. 


&&& Woirahampton 

6-0(7 


Fo» (6ttL_ iBHebenon French 

OMiflft. & Gold Somraqn. Ntttto 50 
hMchertstown. Qute Pokey. 11 ran. 3L 51. 

1 L 41. 25L C Titikier at Meltoa Tote: £430; 

£130. £1.40, £2.10. OF: £5.10. CSF: 

£1437. 

3.15 (8Q 1. MFTY GRVF OC 8nd8h8w, 
14-lb Z Lord WestgatefM Wlattsm, 81k 
a Good Boy BaBey's (A Steutt, 91 J. 
ALSO RAK S CKmn Streaker (4th), 
Penboy (5tW. GaTOema Lady (®h)- 6 ran. 
M. 3L 1 XL SL 2L R YINttkera: Wattwtoy. 
Tote: £530: £330. £130. DF: £19.70. 
CSF: £3145- SinoUr Lady withdrawn not 
un d er on te ra. ride four arofcs to el bets. 
50p detection in the potato 
345 (im 41) 1. GULFLAND (Anne 
PMUfps. 81k 2. Positive (W T Thomson 
Jones. 4-6 favr. 3. u e n a d era (Maxine 
Juster. 811. ALSO RAN; 8 Tartads (SftL 
10 Cart Colours 


i ( W 1 1. Trtn oa lefca (T Nes.3-1 

VSffltL 

PtogotL Tote: ES.70: £230. £2.40. £230. 
□^£17.60. CSF: £4238. 

630 (5ft 1. Boottwm Lad (T hws. 33-lt 
Z,HugoZHackenbush “ 

Drunmond Q-2 
Brittain. T«e:£1 

OF; £41 .10. CSF: £11438. 

73 (Sf) 1. CaptefrYa BMfr _ 

Ik 2. Tax>Rn7n^lM: 3. DartRS^. 10 
ran. NFt Be Lyrical 2L 1XL R Whi 

Tote £2230: £430, £1.70, £130, . 

£7630. CSF: £92.77. TrkasttS3S324. 

JSCBxaasiaEa 


i.oouBwniLaaii nes.3»-iE 

teckanbushtS^ttfavkS, kflas 
I (92 it tttoB ran. 1XL 2L M 
to: £1840; £230, £1.70, £130. 


ftthk fiafdom (4ftL 
5L 7L 1L sh hd. 1GL G 


ran. NR: Bera**. L _ . _ 

PritchanFGordon at Newmarkat Tote 
£530: £1.60. £1-10. DF: £330. CSF: 
£ 221 . 


^lysiFSnf 

(33-lt 4. Bucks Bolt ( 81 ). Sohnon 81 
rav. 19 raa Shhd.3U.hcLM Torcpttnr 
TOte £1030: E23a ElSa £330 030. 
DF: £16.60. CSF: £8221 Tricast 
£2.12734. 

83 rtm 66 1. JUacatHD (W Canon. 8 
Ik 2, Don't Ring Mb <81 jttevt 3. Acttao 
Time ®-1L81 Slav Dry Gin. 15 ran. 1 )U, 
J SpefiteL toteBWO: Cf JR, £2.60, 
£430. DB &I20, CSR £6841. Tricaat 
£42037. 

630 tim 11) i. Mia m Ryan. 81k 2, 
Top Oebunrtofil-a:3, Hooked Bttn-IL 
Stirty Groan 2-1 tov. 21 ran. NR: Native 

Yurto 1XL5L H cart. TOte £970; £27fL 

£230. £520. DF: £2030. CSFS £8778 

RnabNotwi 














«fc. 


\ 

\ 








30 


SPORT 


THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


CRICKET: LEICESTERSHIRE’S LAST PAIR ARE FOILED 


Alderman’s shrewd 
counsel settles issue 
with five runs to spare 


CANTERBURY: Kent (. 24pts f 
beat Leicestershire (4) by Jive 
runs. 

This most fluctuating of 
matches reached a splendid 
climax yesterday when 
Leicestershire's last-wicket 
pair werejoined needing nine 
to win. They had made three 
of them when Terry Aider- 
man, the most competitive of 
bowlers, took his fourteenth 
wicket of the match to settle 
the issue. It had been a truly 
great game of cricket 

Leicestershire required 179 
runs at the Stan of another 
sunny day, seven wickets in- 
tact Much depended on their 
two England batsmen, Gower 
and Willey. Both began 
convincingly, Gower cleanly 
booking and driving Dilley for 
fours in one of his early overs 
and Willey punching anything 
short through the cover ring. 

There was a little in the 
pitch for the bowlers. At 63 
Alderman extracted enough 
movement to find Gower’s 
outside edge. Marsh taking the 
catch. Having taken the last 
eight wickets to fell in 
Leicestershire's first innings, 
Alderman had now removed 

LeRoux 

foils 

Border 

By Richard Streeton 

EASTBOURNE: Sussex (6pts) 
drew with Essex (8). 

A fine match ended with 
Essex narrowly failing 10 com- 
plete the victory which would 
have kept them on 
Gloucestershire's heels at the 
top of the championship table. 
Allan Border, Gooch and Prich- 
ard led a stirring assault on a the 
stiff target left by Sussex — 319 
in 105 min utes and 20 overs — 
but they finished 16 runs short 

Border, with a chanceless 108, 
carried the Essex challenge al- 
most single-handed in the clos- 
ing stages when 78 were needed 
from the final 10 oven. The 
pendulum swung away from 
Essex, though, when le Roux 
had Fletcher caught at deep- 
square-leg and East leg-before 
with the first and last balls of the 
same over. It left Essex requir- 
ing 59 from six overs and it was 
too much. 

Gooch and Prichard were the 
first to light the Essex torch with 
a second wicket stand which 
bristled with boundaries. Prich- 
ard hit 10 fours and outscored 
Gooch, who finished with 13 
fours, both men driving and 
hooking with great power. 

They were separated when 
Prichard hooked a catch into 
long leg’s hands. Gooch pulled a 
catch to deep square kg just 
before the last hour began. Essex 
needed 156 from the 20 overs 
and there seemed every likeli- 
hood they would make them as 
Border launched into a barrage 
of aggressive strokes. 

Essex stuttered a little, how- 
ever. when Pringle was caught at 
mid-on and Harare at mid-off. 
Fletcher joined Bonder and the 
run rate increased before le 
Roux's crucial breakthrough. 
Border reached his century in 
the game's penultimate over. He 
finished with a six and 1 1 fours 
having faced only 86 balls. 

On another day of warm 
sunshine, tempered only by a 
breeze, the pitch was more 
benign than at any time in the 
match. Essex dearly hoped to 
bowl Sussex out and until lunch 
used only Foster, Lever and 
Pringle in the attack. Sussex, 
resuming at 63 for three, an 
overall lead of 109, lost three 
more wickets during the morn- 
ing. all to Pringle, who kept a 
good line. 

Colin Wells followed his hun- 
dred on Saturday with another 
useful innings, hitting 1 1 fours, 
before he was bowled. Standing, 
in a shorter stay, made some 
neat strokes before he was well 
caughL by Foster low at first slip. 

SUSSEX: First tontog»346 fC M Wads 
708. N J Latewn ea OR Prmgfo 5 tor 64). 
Second Innings 

R i Alkfian tow b Pringle 59 

~ ncnbLewr 5 

0 
8 


A M Groan e Gooch bl 
PWG Parker tow b Foster 
N J Lenham b Foster . 

CM Wells b Pringle 
D K Standing cFost 


otter b Pringle .. 

, JGffliW rwtoiit 

iSte Roux not out. 


Extras (Sj1.w1.nfi2) 
Total (Bwkts dec) 


- 59 

- 21 
-.43 
- 72 
_5 

272 


FALL OF WICKERS: 1-9. 2-10. 3-26. 4- 
110.5-148.6-161. 

BOWUNG: Lever 18-4-47-1: Foster 27-5- 
99-2: Pringle 19-4-57-3: OntCs 7-3-10-0: 
Stephenson 2-0-5-0: Barter 5-1-53-0. 


ESSEX: First 
Harms 80. KWR 


300 ter 6 dee [B R 
57 not out). 


Second Innings 

ibCMWote- 78 


*6 A Gooch e Lenham 
J P Stephenson b le Roux 


6 


P J Pric ha rd c Jones bCMWeBs 60 

A R Border notout — 108 

D R Pringle c Mays b Jones - 12 

BR Karate g to Roux b Jones 4 

K WR Fletcher cAlkhanb la Roux „ 11 
tD E East tow b le Roux — 0 


N A Foster not out 


Extras (b 3. lb B, w 1. nb 1) . 
Total (7 wktt) , 


11 

J3 

303 


FALL Of WICKETS: 1-11,2-126.3-152.4- 
197. 5-221. B-2S9, 7-260. 

BOWUNG: le Rats 1152-443; Jones 
10-1 -532; Mays 4-1-404J; Plgw 12^-72- 

Weis 11-1-81-2. 

Umpires: B Dudsston and P 8 Wight 


By Ivo Tennant 

their first four second innings 
wickets. 

Boon stayed 46 minutes for 
a single before pushing Under- 
wood into short-leg’s midriff. 
Underwood then bowled 
Whitticase with a ball that 
kept low. Then De Freitas as if 
tinng of playing a bit part to 
Willey alter hts heroics on 
Monday, was bowled attempt- 
ing something not in the text 
books. 

The caterers grew con- 
cerned. They bad reckoned 
without Willey’s resolve. Ag- 
new, dropped on 12, gave the 
all-rounder fine support 
Their stand was worth 57, 
Willey having reached a cen- 
tury m 234 minutes with 13 
fours when he played one of 
his few false strokes. Alder- 
man, back for his umpteenth 
spell, had him caught at mid- 
off from a miss-hook. 

It had been a gritty innings, 
as one would expect from 
Willey, but not bereft of fluent 
attacking strokes, largely kept 
on the ground. Taylor mus- 
tered a few runs after Willey 
was out until he spooned 
Dilley to mid-off and, hard 
though Agnew tried to hold 


the innings together. Aider- 
man was too much for Ferris. 

Alderman finished with 
match figures of 14 for 144, 
which took his tally of wickets 
this season to 81. Not since the 
1960s, when Alan Brown and 
Norman Graham took a hun- 
dred wickets apiece, has a 
Kent fast bowler readied that 
milestone. Alderman's con- 
tract expires at the end of this 
season. One only hopes for 
Kent's sake that be returns 
next summer. 

KBIT: First Innings 329 for 8 dsc (C S 
Cowdrey 60, S A Marsh 52 not out), 
second Innings 87 (P A J De Freitas 8 tor 
21) 

LBCESTERSHffiE: FM Imlngs 199PA 
J De Freitas 106; T M Alderman 8 for 70). 
Second Innings 

J C Bakserstone tow b Aleman 11 

I P Butcher Bwr b Alderman 1 

RA Cobb tow b Alderman 1 


*0 1 Gower c Marsh b Aldermen 29 

P WBtoy c Cowdrey b Alderman . — - 104 
T J Boon c CcmAsy b Underwood — 1 

tP Whlttcase b Underwood 1 

PA J Oe FreAas b Underwood is 

JP Angawnotout 27 

L B Taylor c Alderman b May 10 

G J F Ferris Ibw b Alderman — 1 


(b 1.8)5, rib 4) JO 

Total 212 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-6, 2-12, 3-19. 4-63. 
5-96, 8-106. 7-138. 8-193. 9-209. 10312. 
SOWUNG: Alderman 32-8-74-fl; Dfiey 21- 
2-59-1: BSson 13-3-46-0; Underwood 19- 
9-27-3. 

Umpires: J A Jameson and D R Shepherd. 



Roebuck leads side 
to remarkable win 


Lamb carving ahead: the Northamptonshire batsman on the 
attack against Middlesex (Photograph: Hugh Koutledge) 

Fairbrother spoils 
Yorkshire’s day 


By Alan Gibson 


By Peter Ball 


WESTON-SUPER- At A RE: 
Somerset f20pts) beat Worcester- 
shire (5) by five wickets. 

Roebuck had declared 93 
behind and we spent the morn- 
ing, a fine one though with rain 
forecast, wafting for a declara- 
tion. Roebuck takes his bowling 
more seriously than the rest of 
us do, and was probably dis- 
appointed that the two wickets 
to fall went to his rival change 
bowler. Rose. Botham bowled a 
few optimistic bubbles. At 12.30 
Worcestershire left Somerset to 
score 341. It was not very 

S nerous, but sides cannot af- 
rd to be too generous in 
declaring with Richards and 
Botham in the opposition. 

The pitch was placid and 
Worcestershire were soon on the 
defensive against, I suppose, 
what 1 must now call Somerset's 
demon bowling pair. Rose was 
the fust out, at 99. Roebuck 
followed him to his 50 soon 
afterwards. Harden came in at 
No. 3. somewhat surprisingly, 
but encouraged us with a power- 
ful six to long-on. At tea the 
score was 154 and the clouds 
were mounting. Some of the 
Somerset crowd were suggesting 
that Worcestershire were keep- 
ing Roebuck in, others that he 
should get himself out, so that 
Richards could come in. 

It was Harden who was out, 
however, soon after tea. And 
then, after a boundary which 
certainly suggested mighty 
things, Richards was leg-before. 
Botham began bravely, but 
could not work the miracle 
again, and was bowled attempt- 
ing a powerful pull which did 
not connect Felton was caught 
in the slips. 

With 20 overs to go the score 
was 223 for five, but now it was 
Worcestershire who were sniff- 
ing victory. Roebuck reached 
his hundred, the last few rather 
slowly, but the crowd bad the 
grace to applaud him warmly 
and perhaps a shade apologeti- 
cally. Without his steadfast ef- 
fort Somerset would have been 
in a pickle. 

But he did more. He contin- 


ued to score with increasing 
freedom. At the other end 
Maries derided to chance his 
arm, and did so successfully. He 
also ran smartly between the 
wickets, even if sometimes al- 
most colliding with his captain. 
With 10 overs to go 66 were 
needed; with five overs to go the 
target was down to 32. 

With two overs left only nine 
were needed, and they were duly 
obtained with five balls to spare. 
I have always thought that 
Marks is a better batsman than 
he is given credit for. He played 
admirably yesterday, as did his 
captain. It was a remarkable 
win, when you come to think 
that 379 was Worcestershire’s 
first-innings score. 

WORCESTERSHIRE: First knVrtqs 379 for 
4 due (DM Smith 165 not oat PA Noah 
70, T S Curtis 64). 

Second tamings 

TS Curtis c Harden b Rose 

D B trOtoeira c Botham b Rose . 

D M Smith not art -. 

G A Hick not out 


Extras ( nb 1 ) . 


- 74 

- 91 
.38 

- 43 

- 1 
247 


Total (2 wkts dec) 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-143. 2-182. 
BOWUNG: Botham 8-1-65-0: Davis 2.4-0- 
B-0; Richards 6-0-400; Roebuck 7-0-75-0: 
Rose 60-28-2; Marks 40-170; Coombs 
4-1-190; Harden 1-04-0. 

SOMERSET: First Innings 286 lor 4 dec 0 
T Botham 104 notout, PM Roebuck 88, N 
A Fetal 52). 

Second Innings 

BC Rose b Newport 56 

PM Roebuck not out 147 

R J Harden c Curtis D Radford 28 

I VARfchards tow b Radford 4 


I T Botham b 


b Newport . 
cSmihbR 


VJ Marks not out. 


Extras (b 1. to 13. nto4) . 
Total (5wM$) 


_ 17 
— 0 

- 71 

- 18 
841 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-69, 2-1 60. 3- 173, 4- 
207.5-208. 

BOWUNG: Radford 1004103; PrWgeon 
21-3-93-0; Patel 13-1-430: Newport ?30- 
50-2: UHngworth 122-2020. 

: A G T WMehead (replaced H D 
) and J H Hampshire. 


Umpires : » 
Bird) and. 


• The Northamptonshire cap- 
lain, Geoff Cook, has declared 
himself fit to lead an unchanged 
side against Glamorgan at 
Northampton. Code suffered 
deep bruising when hit on the 
shoulder by a delivery from 
Wayne DanieL He was not able 
to continue his first innings 
against Middlesex at Lord's. 


OLD TRAFFORD: Yorkshire 
(8pts) drew with Lancashire (I) 

For the second day running, 
the 22 1 st Roses match produced 
a record. A resolute Lancashire 
baiting performance, illumined 
by a fine, undefeated century by 
Neil Fairbrother, extended the 
sequence of draws to 10. 

Some, in chiding frustrated 
Yorkshireraen and the repre- 
sentative of another paper 
enduring his first taste of Roses 
-cricket, would suggest it is an 
unwanted record. The ghost of 
Neville Cardus. however, un- 
doubtedly watched happily as 
Lancashire slowly, b at study, 
ground out the day in the best 
puritan tradition established in 
the days of Emmott Robinson 
and Roy Kilner. 

Certainly it was difficult to see 
what other option was open to 
Lancashire as they began the 
day still needing 2 1 5 to avoid an 
innings defeat. For the third 
time m seven matches they did 
so with almost untroubled 
aplomb. It is becoming a habit. 

Abrahams and Fairbrother 
provided the mainstay, both 
resisting for four hours to thwart 
' Yorkshire’s increasingly pedes- 
trian attack. It was not, though, 
simply a self-denying ordinance, 
for both are much too attractive 
to be totally dull even in such 
restricting cfrcumstances. 

In the morning Abrahams 
unleashed a square cover drive 
to equal anything revealed by 
Moxon .and Metcalfe in less 
pressured circumstances of the 
previous day. 

After tea Fairbrother at last 
gave full rein to his exquisite 
array of strokes. Only the most 
grudging Yorkshireman could 
deny the quality of his achieve- 
ment His imperturbable tem- 
perament was matched by 
flawless technique throughout 
the sixth century of his career, 
and the third against Yorkshire. 

Until the arrival of the second ' 
new ball, Lancashire bad few 
moments of concern as, with 
Jarvis hampered by a back 
injuiy, only two wickets fell 
before tea. In the morning 


Mendis. to his evident surprise, 
was given leg before by Barrie 
Leadbeaxer after 90 minutes 
ofresolute resistance. 

Ab rahams, however, was im- 
movable, and Fairbrother 
joined him to see Lancashire on 
the long road towards safety.. 
Yorkshire’s best chance of 
reversing whax already looked 
inevitable came nine overs after 
lunch as Faixbrotber, then nine, 
edged Hartley to slip, Moxon 
putting down a straightforward 
catch. 

With that chance gone York- 
shire had to wait until five overs 
before tea for the breakthrough 
as Garrick found unexpected 
bounce and Abrahams turned 
the ball to short leg. After the 
new ball had accounted for 
Hayhurst and Waxkmson in 
quick succession, the unfortu- 
nate Moxon erred again soon 
after Fairbrother had seen his 
side into the lead. This rime 
Yorkshire knew the game was 
up, and they gave up the straggle 
with 10 overs left. 

LANCASMRE: Hrat Innings 170 (G D 
Mends 54; P W Jarvis 4 tor 36). 

Second Innings 

G Fowler cBairstowbJarra 0 

GD Mends tow b Carrie* 25 

I Fotoy tow b Dennis - 1 


j Abranams c Metcalfe b Carrie* 
N HFairtyother no t om 


. 80 

116 

ANHeyhuntcBairatowbPjHarttBy 14 

MWatttnsontowbPJ Hartley 1 

J Simmons notout — 8 

Extras(b3.w1 l nb2) 6 

Total (6 wfcts) 251 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-1, 2-2, 3-74.4-156. 
5-220.6-227. 

BOWUNG Jarvis 16-437-1; Dennis 19-2- 
47-1: P J Hartley Z1 -8-42-2; Cwricfc 33-16- 
67-2; FletclW 193-38-0; Lora 4-0-16-0. 
YORKSHIRE: First tamings 339 for 7 dec (A 
A Metcalfe 151. M D Moxon 147; AN 
Haytwret4lor69). 

Umpires M J Kitchen end B Lsadbeater. 

•Two players, aged 18, follow 
in their famous fathers' foot- 
steps when they take the field for 
the National Association of 
Young Cricketers in their two- 
day game against the MCC 
Schools' XI at Lord's starting 
today. They are Gary Lloyd, son 
of the former Lancashire and 
England batsman, David, and 
Mark Ealham, whose father, 
Alan, captained Kent during the 
1970s. 


The style of a spinning swashbuckler 


In the first of two extracts from 
Phil Edmonds A Singular Man, 
by Simon Barnes. Edmonds 
himself analyses his OH7i highly 
successful technique of spin 
bowling. His aim is not to 
frustrate the batsman into dis- 
missal but "turn him inside 
out . " 

People talk about “slow 
bowlers with East bowlers’ 
temperaments" as if this were a 
bizarre phenomenon. In troth 
there are a lot of East bowlers 
who do not have East bowlers* 
temperaments, and a good num- 
ber of spinners who are fiery, 
aggressive, ultra -competitive 
and mortally aggrieved each 
time the ball passes the bat 
without talcing a wicket. Tony 
Lock Is a classic example. So is 
Phil Edmonds. “The more 
slowly I bowl, the more aggres- 
sive I need to be, and the more 
strength and the more body I 
need to put into each delivery,” 
he said. 

The comic strip notion of the 
spin bowler is the Cat kid with 
glasses and a vagae, benevolent 

expression, who can make the 
ball sing the Hallelujah Chorus. 
It doesn't apply to Edmonds. He 
sees spin bowling as a task fora 
strong man with a strong mind: a 
matter that is romantic, beauti- 
ful. and spectacular. While he 
admires Btaben Betti's ability to 
shuffle in, applaud boundaries 
struck of hxs bowling, and 


generally charm, in every sense 
of the word, his opponents out, 
Edmonds knows that such wiles 
are not his. He approaches spin 
bowling with the nature of a 
swashbuckler, be sees bowling 
as a matter of grace, style, class* 
and controlled aggression, 

I remember trying to draw 
Edmonds out on the technicali- 
ties of spin bowling with the 
question: “What is yonr stock 
ball?" Edmonds replied: “Men- 
tally, my stock ball pitches leg 
and hits off.” The reply sums op 
Edmonds's approach to cricket: 
be is not generally trying to 
winkle and weasel a ba t s m an 
out: be is not basically seeking to 
tie down, to frustrate and to bore 
his nun to a dismissal. He alms 
to turn a batsman inside out with 

a ball that turns somersaults. 

The constant optimism, 
aggression, and self-belief are 
Edmonds's meat strengths as a 
bowler — and have also been, on 
occasions, his weaknesses. His 
restless seeking for wickets was 
one of the many things that 
made Bob Willis, when he was 
ra pnia of l E"g*«»d- nneasy 
about Edmonds. Wilis once said 
that the art of captaincy com- 
prises having better fast bowlers 
thaw yonr opposite numb er ; 
which is one of those remarks 
that says a peat deal more about 
the speaker than it does about 
the subject. “I would want 
Edmonds to bawl a string of 
maidens to ghe the seamen a 
rest, to bowito a tight field, and 


to stop the scoring while the 
seamen had a Mow,” Willis 
said. “But that was not what 
happened. I would put Edmonds 
oh, and be would be bowling 
three different kinds of deliv- 
eries in an over.” 

“I don't really have the 
modality to plug away offside, 
offside, offside,” Edmonds said. 
“I might be a lot better off if I 
did. Indeed, in India on the 
1984-85 tour, it was essential to 
bowl long, tight spells, and I 
bowled hundreds of hmMm*. 
But normally, the old-timers 
would come alas® and say, yon 
should have been bowling to a 6- 
3 offside field, saving die sin- 
gles, and there might be a lot of 
truth in what they say. Bat Fra 
not sure I really have the 
temperament for it as a long- 
term strategy. It's not ha my 

personality to bowl that way. I 
can renumber one match against 
Northants, though, on a slow 
wicket with Dotiting happening 
and I thought: all right. FU try it 
the old-fastuoaed way. I'D bowl 

off-stump to a 6-3 field. And I 
did, right through the matHh 
and I got Allan Lamb twice. On 
a hard wicket, be would have 
crucified me, down the wicket, 

and over the top, but on a slow 

wicket h e couldn't do ft. And K 
frustrated him out twice over. 

But normally I find it difiDcnlt to 
contain my aggression like that. 
I can't ray to the hflmmw 
you’re going to make a mistake. 


I say: I'm going to getyou out.” 
There » a world of difference in 
the two approaches. 

Mike Brearley is critical of 
Edmonds's men t al approach to 
bowling. “He hasn't made the 
best use of his abilities,” he said. 
“He might attribute that to me — 
1 attribute it to him. He hasn't 
learnt enough. He often bowls 
worse to ordinary players. John 
Emburey is different: better on 
green wickets, a good nib bier of 
tbe balL He is net as capable of 
bowUng the reaOy good ball that 
gets top players out on good 
wickets, and on a real spinner's 
wicket he is unlikely to get the 
results Phil would. But Phil is 
always trying to attack — and 
often yon want a bowler to be 
defensive.” But David Gower 
attributes modi of Ms success to 
India to Edmonds's restrictive, 
mean-spirited bowling. 

Allan Border, on the losing 
end of a Test series with 
Edmonds and Emburey bowing 
against him, said: “It a tbe fact 
that Edmonds and Emburey 
bowl n tandem that makes th en 
so dangerous. One spins fan. one 
spins miL Emburey is playing a 
waiting game, while Edmomls is 
attacking you with every ball.” 

• Tomorrow: F r ightening mo- 
ments fielding closer to the bat 
than any other first-class 
cricketer. 

• Phil Edmonds A Singular 
Man is published by Hie 
Kingswood Press al £ 955 . 


Middlesex 
bowlers 
ensure 
first win 

By Peter Marson 

Middlesex claimed their first 
success in the Britannic Assur- 
ance county championship this 
season at Lord's yestentay, and 
with Northamptonshire well 
beaten by an innings and 43 
runs, a rewarding and resound- 
ing triumph it had been. too. 

The county champions bad been 
made to wait a long time, in feet, 

since the Last day of tbe 1985 
season, when they had made 
sure of the championship title in 
an emphatic victory against 
Warwickshire, at Edgbaston. 

Allan Lamb kept his side in 
contention in an innings of 1 17. 
his second hundred in 
successive matches against 
Middlesex, but Gatting's 
bowlers persevered and Daniel, 
who took eight for 1 OS in the 
match, Emburey (5-85), and tbe 
rest, moved in behind Gatling's 
big innings to see the matter 
through- 

In making a start by taking a 
look at the relevant fects and 
figures, Northamptonshire will 
have concluded that their 
opportunities for making their 
escape looked to be slim. Des- 
tiny too, might still have a part 
to play, so it seemed, for at tbe 
start Boyd-Moss bad fallen to a 
fine one handed catch by Ed- 
monds off Daniel's bowling 
with only seven runs added to 
their total overnight of nine for 
two. After another 15 runs had 
been added, the position wors- 
ened as Geoff Cook, who was 
suffering still from a bruised 
shoulder, a legacy of his joust 
with Daniel on the previous 
day, was beaten by Gowans's 
speed and bowled off his pads. 
That was 31 for four. 

Larkins and Lamb then 
successfully moved on to tbe 
attack, putting on 96 for tlie fifth 
wicket, but it was at ibis point, 
as Northamptonshire were mak- 
ing ready to sit down to lunch, 
that Larkins fell leg before to 
Emburey, and that was 127 for 
five. Bailey and Capd then 
helped Lamb in stands of 35 and 
44 for the sixth and seventh 
wickets, with Lamb moving to 
his hundred along the way. 

MIDDLESEX: First brings 447 (M W 
Gatling 150, CTRadtey 5a PRDownton 
50). 

NORTHAMPTONSHnE: FbS brings 159 
(WWDanW 4 ter 501- 

Second Innings 

+S N V Waterton c Downten b Dante! _ 4 

W Unions few b Emburay 43 

N GB Cooke Butcher b Daniel 2 


c Edmonds b Denial — 

b Cowans 


R J 

*G< 

A J lamb c Downten b Bnburey 

R j Bailey b Daniel 

DJ Capri e Radley b Edmonds 
notout 
NA 


R A Harper not o 

N A MaJtenderc and b Bitorey 
A Writer run out 


Extras (b 5, to 3, nb 6) 


Total, 


■ 14 
245 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-4. 2-6. 3-16. 4-31. 

5-127. 6-162, 7-206. *234. 9-237. 10-245. 
BOWUNG: DanieM 8-4-55-4; Hughes 7-3- 

27-0; Effl&uFw 33-12-753; Cowans 6-2- 
20-1: Edmonds 34-14-57-1; Butcher 1-3- 
3-0; Catting 1-1-04. 

Umpires: JH Harris and K 4 Lyons. 

Botham’s 

chance 

The England cricket selectors 
have been given the opportunity 
to pick Ian Botham earlier than 
expected, in the Test and 
Cbunty Cricket Board's three- 
day match against New Zealand, 
starting at Edgbaston next 
Wednesday. 

Tbe hastily arranged fixture 
has filled a gap in the tourists' 
itinerary and could provide the 
England aU-rounder with a 
chance to play in what may 
amount to a Test or tour trial for 
players on the fringe of 
selection. 

The New Zealanders were 
scheduled to play La n cas h ire or 
Warwickshire after the Trent 
Bridge Test. Bnt Lancashire are 
involved in a NatWest Trophy 
semi-final against Surrey, while 
Warwickshire have already 
played the tourists. 

If he is chosen, a good 
performance from Botham — 
who has just returned to first- 
class cricket after a two-month 
suspension — could enhance his 
chances of a recall for the final 
Test, at the Oval on August 21. 

The match should give the 
England selectors a chance to 
look at a number of young 
contenders, among them Robert 
Bailey, the free-scoring North- 
amptonshire batsman, Ashley 
Metcalfe, of Yorkshire, fresh 
from centuries in three 
successive matches, and tbe 
Leicestershire all-rounder, Phil- 
lip De Freitas, who was born in 
Dominica but is qualified to 
play for England. 

• With Mike Gatling, John 
Emburey and Phil Edmonds 
also playing for England, 
Middlesex have added Keith 
Brown, John Carr, Graham 
Rose and Jamie Sykes to their 
squad for the game with Essex at 
Chelmsford. 


CHAMPIONSHIP TABLE 



15 
18 

Yorkdiire(ll)17 
Wares (S) 17 

Notts (B) 15 

Lricshe} 16 

Kent (9) 15 

Derby (12) 16 

to-thantfi {10)15 

SnSTRj ll 

Wemta*s(15)l6 
agw»(7) 16 


L D BtBwl Pis 

1 7 36 50 230 
4 5 33 47 178 

4 6 36 48 164 

6 5 34 50 164 

3 10 48 42 162 

5 8 42 50 156 
Z 9 40 50 154 

4 8 39 47 150 

4 7 28 49 141 
3 8 24 50 138 

2 9 36 36 136 
2 10 40 31 119 

2 11 34 36 116 

3 11 34 43 109 

7 7 28 37 97 

8 7 29 49 94 

5 10 SB 34 79 


ejgttpotntstor 
stashed feral 


YACHTING RESULTS FROM COWES 



2. Sirens (A Ban): 3. 
. -ton IS 1. Forrader fp 
i): Z Flash Danes (R J Kay): 3. 
Frisky (D Lees). XOD: 1. Heyday ( 


fPVnsa.. 

fteW 1. iMctwrip l^nefta2,Spin(Mt(M 
Upnn): 3, Mistrai (Sr W Bfeunt). Re«. 

wnw 1 , Redstart (J Jansen); 2, BHia Jgy 




of Beauteu (K Robinson), tanpric 1. 
SxTO^CKirU 2. Uprgarn 
teyV 3, Kudu (A Ccna SqoHc 1. Razzo 
SoAo (J B&VE l Slipar tapper (J 
MobbS); 3. Sstu(R Hewitt). 


Tenacity (M A Rfchl J 24: 1. Little Eade 
f Airier Cofl. SA); 2. Just Enufi (Mrs V 
Roberts}; 3, Juggernaut (C Kearns). 


Sonata: 1. 


2. Atter- 


te p^^Jawtet^amz ptf Temam). 


l HflrtSnqfc 2 , uendrta 


Marionette JC During)- Class £ 1. 
Bathsheba (Sir M Laing); 2. White Gc*l HI 

Airmail (R Roded, 3. Courtesan (C 
Brown). Ctesa 4s 1 . DfemondjO Sanders* 
Ztof Presto (M Oubod: 3, Swr&om 2tf 
Dickson). Cfeas S: 1 . t®gtnMe (Q GTOS); 2. 
PWtora i| (F walker? 3. Talisman (M 
Stephens), aau fc i. The FMng Fob (D 
Hopkins); 2. Bluet (A Moy); 3, &sto H « 
Hrion-Levefl. Class 7: 1. Cktaon (R 
Waiters): Z. Blue Ribbon (K Kerin): 3. 
Bumble IP Chnwefl). Stans: 1. Smttion 
tP NriKxson); a, fnskinfe (A Brtgden); 3. 
starawwft'5? SrtteLOODS* 1, Nazes n (J 
Fteat);2. Eta H Turner): 3, Mickey Mouse 


Speedway hope 

Wolverhampton speedway, 

dosed last week by the pro- 
moter. Peter Adams, looks set to 
re-open- Two local groups have 
expressed interest in taking over 
from Adams. Three Wolver- 
hampton matches have already 
been called off But Chns Van 
Straaten. a dub official, hopes 
that next Saturday's fixture at 
Coventry will go ahead. 


ATHLETICS 


Nehemiah to resume amateur career 


Five years after becoming the 
first man to run the 1 10 meters 
hurdles in under 1 3 seconds, the 
world record holder, Renaldo 
Nehemiah, who swopped ama- 
teur athletics for professional 
football, makes his track come- 
back-tomorrow. 

Nehemiah's record of 
12.93sec has never been threat- 
ened in his four-year enforced 
absence and no other hurdler 
has broken the 13-second mark. 
The re-appearance of Ne- 
hemiah. whose name figures 


five times amc 
performances 



the six fastest 
time, has, 
itedmas- 

usoally low- 

key annual meeting at 
Viarcggia. 

Nehemiah's return, con- 
firmed by organizers here yes- 
terday. was allowed after the 
International Amateur Athletic 
Federation (IAAF) restored his 
amateur status last month On 
the basis , of a written statement 
that he. would forgo future 


financial compensation from 
football. 

Nehemiah, aged 27, turned to 
professional American football 
In 1982 and became a wide 
receiver with the San Francisco 
49ers. He has set 13 indoor and 
outdoor, world records but has 
not run outdoors since 1981 in a 
remarkable summer in which he 
set bis I2.93sec mark in Zurich. 

His opponents tomorrow wflj 
include a fellow American, 
Keith Talley, and Jhe Italian 
champion, Danide FOntecchio. 


FOOTBALL 


England are rated 
eighth in the 
world by FIFA 


Zurich (AP) - Argentina, the 
world champions, are top of the 
rankings issued by FIFA yes- 
terday. West. Germany are sec- 
ond. then France, the winners of 
the game for third place, fol- 
lowed by Belgium, who were 
beaten in that play-off. Brazil. 
Mexico and Spain — three 
quarter-finals losers on penalty 
kicks — finished fifth, sixth and 
seventh. England arc eighth. 
Scotland and Northern Ireland 
are not in the top 16. 

The points awarded cadi 
team were not made public, but 
each side's rating was based on 
their showing in the World Cup. 
No points were given to teams 
who won on penalty kicks. The 
rankings list, together with the 
performances of countries in 
forthcoming tournaments, will 
help determine the eight seeded 
national teams for the 1990 
World Ctip in Italy. 

TOP SIXTEEN: 1. Argentina; Z WMt 
Germany; 3. France; 4, Beigun; 5. Brawl: 
& Mexico: 7. Spate: 8. England; 9. 
Denmark: 10, Sowat Union; ii. Morocco; 
ia tay: 13. Paraguay; 14. Pound: 15. 
Bulgaria.' 16. Uruguay. 

• Scunthorpe United have been 
given the green light to move to 
a new ground for the 1987 
season. The go-ahead came 
from the local council, who 
voted IS-15 in fevour of plan- 
ning permission to develop the 
Old Show Ground into a shop- 
ping complex. The fourth di- 
vision club, which is £400.000 in 
debt, intend to sell the ground 
and erect a £3 million purpose- 
built stadium on a site to be 
decided. 

The club chairman. Graham 
Pearson, who attended the town 
council meeting last night, said: 
"We are delighted and we must 
now work with the council and 
their officers on this matter. The 
sale ofthe ground will solve our 
present financial problems and 
give us financial security into 
the next century 

• Leeds United are to pay about 
£120.000 for Keith Edwards, 
aged 29. who has scored 201 
league goals in an i 1-year career. 
Billy Bremner. the Leeds man- 
ager. has been chasing Edwards 
smee the closing stages of last 
season when he was quoted 
£200.000 for the player. The 
forward will be Leeds's sixth 


Tour by Havelange 


Joifco Havelange, president of 
FIFA, will visit three Bir- 
mingham football dubs today in 
a whistle-stop tour. The BrazQ- 
fan, aged 70, who was re-elected 
for a fourth terra before the 
World Cnp finals m Mexico this 
sornmer, will visit the Haw- 
thorns (West Bromwich Albion), 
Villa Park (Aston Villa) and St 
Andrew's (Birmingham). 


FOR THE RECORD 


ATHLETICS 


CYCLING 


CRYSTAL PALACE.- Mar-coMim cwnpatt- 
Onc 1. Surrey. 710ptK 2. Kart. 697.5. 3. 
Essex. S8B: 4. Hamwtwv, Stt: 5. Bwufwv. 
4844.-6 .Susmx.488. 


AMERICAN FOOTBALL 


BWLJptay-utQ; Loads Causers 40. Mrn- 
Md Express 6c Portsmouth Wsrnore 12. 
LacesMr Panttwrs ift Glasgow Urn 39. 
Edntagh Hus Eagles 0. 


BASEBALL 


NORIN AMERICA: Amreican Lssguc Bate- 
more Ortalas 12- Toronto Blue Jays Z 
mswsiAm Brawats Si Now York Yankees 4; 
Chicago WNta Sox i. Boston Rod Sox ft 
Minnesota TWms 6. CaKonia Angeu fc 
SeatUe Mariners 9. Oakland Athlftics 8. 
National League: Chicago Cobs 4. New York 
Mels 2: Ctncmam Reds 2. San Rancuco 
Giants 1; Sr lotto Ovdmate 3. Piuadafehia 
RMBas 2: AHantt Braves 4. San Diego Padres 
1; Montreal Expos 5. PWsburgh Ptreree 4; Los 
AqgalBS Dodgers 7. Houston Asoxx 3. 


4mph): 2. p Kkton (Eng. Suzuo): 
i (Ena. SunriU). 4. A Andarsaon 
i; 5. JSiteonon (fin. Yamaha): & 


BOWLS 


1EAMWGT0N SPA: Uwtpool Mctaria 


8: B Drat twoodmgdean. Sussex) 2i. C 
KeeUe (Hertford) 18: JVa4s(Rayneararft| 21. 
V Brows lEaawor. Heretord) 18: S Onane 
(Msfco mS o Regis. Dorset) 21. B Grtnrod 
(Woodford) j Da rne l s (Newham. Cerate) 
21 , B NQbfo (Luton) Bl G Wtesforw (Oxford) 21. 
N Edwards (Burnham) 13: 1 McxynmixrOidan)) 
21. D Draper (Pemywel. Durham) 21-18: P 
Carter flJncom 21. D Lewis tftofisy. Lmces- 
terl 2fc V Chartrtd (PhimMud) 21 . jNewnan 
(Loon) 6; B Watters (PenrhorougH) 31. G 
Berry (HatteW) & An mad: tTwtoodtay 
(Worn Bid. Swindon) 21. W Boon (BUby, 
Lota) 13: J Dame* (Newham. CamOe) 21. B 
Durrant (Woodngdaan. Sussex) 13: J VaBe 
(RaynesPk. Surey) 21. G Wfostane (Oxford 
CQ 10: M Steele (Sunbunr, Middx) 21. B 
Warns (Patortnrauan) 1& J Hwna <w 
Bndgtord. nobs) 21. n Greenwood (Wtuday. 

19: T Drayton (Epsom Pta) 

19S J Ctatanr 


Cl, V nw __ _ 

Mdaraon(ltedcsd2l.P£dwar&ifBamatoOd. 

17: j Ro-jisrico (NWiah*n) it. E Payne 
— 

Ms) 18; J Hawns 

Krepei (Botort i_ . 

21 . P Dampen (GEC/ab. l . 

(Roddttdi) 21. A Cornish 
Bonraxi (FoStfWtooo) 21, P 
Sough)!!; M "Afore (St Austen) 21. N 


TENNIS 


ATP RAWONGS: 1 , 1 Laodl fCzt 2. M WStancW 

• “ "~c4.Y'Nnaii(n);5.J 


|Sim): 3. B Becker (WQ; 

Connors (US* ft S ECberg 


7. J 


'tetojaj; j Mi*** (YortO 
11; J Muddaman ILaankigton Spa? 21. M 
Trend: pertain) 16: B MAey 
M Robertson (Tiverton) liToWKr 

BE®®asS«s 

16. 

_• — round: tendon Wa trator (J 
PdM 21. Norm Wttsham (j Roytrce) iS- 

Ruasel Parti 21. Coortfieid (&®iK<Stera 

WHM8 Jfeita. Bedford (E Staoert 14, Oxford 


McEnroe (US): B. J Nystrom lSwt& 9. H 
leccree (Fr): 10. T TuUsneiFr): ii. A Gome* 
(Ecuador!: it T Mayotte (US): 11 M Pemtos 
(Eta): M. B Gltoert (US). 15. A 
18. M Jane (And: 17. J 
Sanchoi (Bp); IB. P Are 

mi n^omose i. M navredore (US): 2. c 
d (US): 3. 5 Grel (WG); 4, H MareMore 
r. 5. C Kohoa-KAach fWG): 6, P Shmw 
7. H Sokova (G* 8. B Gadusak (US): 9. 
_ rirf (US); 107 m MMaro (Brft iXO 
SriawsMjpt 12. IGaroon (USfc 13.SWW 
(US). 14. CLmdqws: iStak IS. C 8eas« 
(Can); 16. K Jordan (USk 17. WTWnDWWflf 
18 . B Potter (US): 19. H Wlta (US): aL * 

Autrien greed prtx ttyma- 
menc Hret rorext P Cane (K) W O do* 

G SchaUar/Ausma). 6-1. 6-1: C MtouWlteW 
P I&J. 6-7. 6-1.64; J AgutoraiSpibtR 

I. M. 3fe.8-1 : ■ 

. 7-6. 6J. E Sanchez fSp) « M 

Avondano 85p) m R Arauaaauwa. 8-3. 6A N 

SWff C4uttfo) M A Manwi SST m. M g 
Pena (Uni) be M Wesqtal (WG). 7-6. « S 

Jfeta Hrel raand (US sta 
PRanfoa M V Van Patten. Tte. MM 
s(S«ral MCrf Laura (Parui, W. 6* T 



dose season signing as Bremner 
has been reshaping his squad m 
a determined effua to regain a 
first division place. "Edwards 
has a record which speaks for 
itself.” Bremner said. "He wifi 
be a key figure in our bid for 
promotion.” 

• England and France will play 
a schoolboy international before 
Saturday week’s General Mo- 
tors Charity Shield match be- 
tween Everton and Liverpool at 
Wembley. The under- 16 inter- 
national. featuring the boys 
from the Football Association's 
National School of Excellence at 
LilJcshall. will be for the AC 
Dclco Trophy, which England 
won 3-2 against Yugoslavia last 
vear — a march played before the 
Evcrton-Manchesler United 
Shield game. 

• Manchester United’s midfield 
player. Rcmi Moses, feces 
strong disciplinary action for a 
breach of dub rules. Moses flew 
to Amsterdam last Thursday, 
without club permission, for 
treatment to his damaged ankle. 

The United manager. Rem 1 
Atkinson, said: “II was his own 
decision and it was token with- 
out our knowledge. We have no 
evidence whatsoever that he was 
going. He is having private 
treatment. Disciplinary action 
will be taken when he returns. It 

is a serious breach of dub 
discipline.” 

Moses, who is expected back 
on Wednesday, is having treat- 
ment in Amsterdam from the 
Dutch physiotherapist. Richard 
Smith, the man who treated the 
England captain. Bryan Robson, 
for a hamstring injury earlier 
this year, 

• Middlesbrough have called 
off a pre-season match against 
the Northern League dub. Blyth 
Spartans, because their players | 
are without insurance cover 
after the club's winding-up. A 
match against Sunderland at . 
Ayresomc Park on Saturday 
could go ahead if the survival 
package is accepted. 

• Les Berry, aged 30, who made 
more than 400 first-team 
appearances for Charlton in a 
12-year career at the London 
dub. joined Brighton yesterday. 


Birmingham is one of 22 
destinations to be visited world- 
wide in the next two months by 
Havelange in his other role as a 
member of the International j 
O lympic Committee. Havelange 
is inspecting the prospective 
sites for toe 1992 Games. 
Birmingham's attempt Is being 
strongly opposed by Barcelona, 
the favonrites. and Paris. 


LEICESTER: BrtWi track cfcamptamNfM: 
Woremc MMn remit Final: T Dark 
(Zen an). 4nan 4.7sec. tx L Bramoam 
(Rawnstocipe), 4.-085. Mare One Wfomatra 
tom Mat Final: l.GCoHrnan(ZeniOi). t 08.02 
(track record): 2. Q Rowland (Dinnmgloti). 
1.09.08: 3. R Brymra (Luton). 1:1009. 
COPENHAGEN: Ttour ol Denmark: LaatelM 
antawM plachwa; 1, H-H Oaretad (Den). 
Sniin 37sec: 2. J N*daRi (Nuh). 02sec tetaxt 
3. A Pafoar (Aus). (H; 4. J Worn (Dan), urea 
tan* 5. B OosteTOoscfl (Nath). 07: 8 J V 
Pedersen (Den). 08: 7. J Bogart (Neth). same 
rene. 8, R Soeranaon (Oon). 12. 9. M ran oac 
Hum (Nath). MIN Bme: «. H Fraqn (Bel). W. 


MOTORCYCLING 

MATRA: Hitaeti grand prac 
Fonnrfe 1: Wadd chentaoniMp: 1, J Dixtlop 
(tra. H onda. 94mpti): 2. PKldonl 
3, N Robinson I - “ 

(aw.Sun*Q:l 

M Grinslo (WG. Yamahe). 

SOOca t ta apae r chwa oto nHfe e 1. E 
Hyraertnen (fin. Honda. 92nwvj; Z £ 
Kupahnen (fin. Honda): 3. P Unden (Eta. 
Honda): 4. PStoekilSta. Honda): 5. A ValNl 
(ii. Honda); 8. M Papa (It. Honda). 

125ce: European championaNp: 1. P Bordes 
p. MBA. SSn^W; 2. C Macoona QL MBM 3. 
G Qraaieai (ta. MBA); 4. A Stader (WG. MBAta 
S. F Wsttup (pen. MBA). 6. M Leaner (Aus. 
LCR). 


, RUGBY UNION 

WANGANUI, New Zeetao ± Tear 
Wanganui 17. Amtmua 24. 


SPEEDWAY 

NATIONAL LEAGUE: Exeter 50, Rye House 
28: Newcanfo 33. WlraUedOn 45. 

BRITISH LEAGUE: Reading S4. Bradford 2*. 



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GOLF 


5331,774: 7. jMatuB*; 

Sff i JSA"8 t .»sSft3 

£247.891: 19. *■ ” 


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Poteni fat Brenebaa. frZ. M; IftSfe 


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wfiSSBlm 


YACHTING 

“UJWgtaLMa. Tta Hiteaitaay-aa, 
am raw \ 





THE TIMES WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


31 


Today’s television and radio programmes and Peter Davalle 


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BBC 1 


6J0 Cetfax AM, News 

headHnes, weather, travel 
and sports bulletins. 

6J50 Breakfast Ttoe with Frank 
Bough and Sue Cook. 

Weswher at 6.55, 7.25, . 
7.57,3^5 and 8SS; 

regional news, weather 
and traffic at 6.57, 7.27, ; 
7.57 and 627; national and 
. international news at 7,00, 

7.30, 8.00, 8-30and 9-00; 
sport at 7.20 and 6-20; a 
review of the morning 
newspapers at 837; and 
the latest pop music 
charts atWWL 

9L20 Dudley Do-Right Cartoon 
w series about a 1920s 

mountie.9J25 SSas. 
Adventure serial about a 
young man who runs away 
from a dreus. (r) (Ceefax) 
8J50 Newsrouiid Special 

■ DeSvwy, presented by 

. John Craven, includes a 
t from Skomer, In ' 
s, due to become one 

of Britain's fast marine 
nature reserves ftiS The 

- Adventuresof QuUwtnkie 
and Rocky. Part flve. fr) 

:1(MX) Why Don’t You-? ideas, 

for bored youngsters, (r) 
d 025 The Adventures of 
BulwinMe and Rocky. 

Part six.(r) 10JJ0 Ptay 

■ Schpol presented by Brian 
Jameson with guest, Janet 

' Palmer. 

10:50 Gharbar. A programme of 
1' Eastern music. Among 

those performing are me 
Delhi Sisters, Kajal 

■ Benerjee.and Ustad AH 
Akbar Khan 11-15 Ceefax. 

1.00 News After Noon, with 
■ Frances-Coverdaleand 

Sue Carpenter, includes 
news headlines with 
- , subtitles. 1.25 Regional 
news. The weather details 

- come from John Ketttey 
1 JO Choc k a Block; A 
See-Saw programme for 
the very young, (r) 1.45 

Ceefax A27 Regional 
news. ... 

. 4.30 The Roman Holidays. 
Cartoon series set in 
ancient Rome 4 JO HeUfi. 

. Drama serial about a 
. young orphan girt, (r) 

5.10 Fame. More dramas 
■ kwphring the students and 
staff of the New York 
drama school. Tonight, 

• anight dub entertainer' 
Jeopardises hts future at 
the school and also delays 

- his efforts to win his 
tether's affection. Starring 
Carlo Imperato (rl 

6.00 News with Nichous 
WHchefl and Andrew 
Harvey. Weather. 

- &35 London-Plus, presented 

by Paul Barry. Linda 
Mitchett and Caroline - 
Wrighto'n. 

- 7.00 Wogan. Among tonight's 

g uests are Hazel 
r Connor, currently 
starring the new BBC * 
drama serial lighting 
Bade Myles Copeland.the 


Oft THE RECORD 


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.‘.i“ Mr.V 

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. > : v>* 
v.-i 


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V»‘ ‘ ‘ 



The Police; and I 
singing stars Pearl Carr 
„_-JTaddy Johnson. ' 

7140 Lame Ducks. Comedy 
series, starringjohn ' 
~i ' Duttine and Lorr^ne a - - 
■ Cbase. abouta group of 
people trying to escape- 
-the rat-race, (r) . 

8-IO DaBas.J.R. takes a fancy ' 
.to his ex-wlfearel tries to 
. get her to gd wffltfiirrifo 
. Martinique; Cliff muses 
over Ram's offerto buy his 
- ' j: - shares in the emerald 

mine; and Jerma lets 
Donna in on her guilty 
.. — “ secret (Ceefax) 

_ 9J0 News wrth Jufla Somervffle 

and John Humphrys. 

Regional news and 
- weather. 

9 JO The Thom Birds. Episode 
one of a repeat of tne five- 
part drama serial, based 
.on CoUeenMcCuBogh’s 
novel spanning half a 
century, about tbe 
. forbidden love between a 
woman and a man of the 
doth. Starring Richard 
Chamberlain and Rachel 
Ward. (Caetex) ' 

11.05 Matt Houston. A hunt for a 
somewhat tawdry painting 
leads Houston Into danger 
. and the world of art 
forgery. Starring Lee 
Horsley, Pamela Hensley 
and Lincoln Kilpatrick. 

11 JO Weather. 


— '* CIS* 




■ - 

„■ aw* 


JFES^ 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good Morning Britain 
presented by Mika Morris 
and Ann aka Rica. News 
with Gordon Honeycombe 

at 6J0, 7.00, 7 JO, 8J0, 

8J0 and 9.00; sport at 
6^0 and 7 M; exercises at 
6J5i cartoon af7J^ pop 
miteic at 7 J5; Jem Barnett 
tours traditional eel and . 
pie shops at 8J5. 

8.45 wacaday WBsented by ' 
Timmy Maliatt. His guest Is 
magician. Fay Presto., __ 


ITV/LONDON 


9l 25 Thames news head&nas 
followed by Survivat The 
Quick Brown Fox. In 


1.00 


'r) 9J0 Rfika. Corttiniing 

the adventures of a young 

. , man delivering a reindeer 

- from Upland to theParis 
Zoo 10:15 Cartoon ^OJO 
The Children of - 

Indonesia. 

1035 Pick ma Up atfeggyte 
Cove. A young man has to . 
laam the lessons of Bte : 
the hard way after he is 
-abandoned by Ws father . 
one summer, (r) 11.00 The 
-- WuzzJes. Cartoon series 
about six unusual bears ; 
11J5 Courageous Cat 
' Cartoon. 

11 JO About Britain. Robbie 
Shepherd meets -the 
monks of Pluscarden. . 
-12JM The UtHe Green Man. 
Adventures of a visitor 
from outer space. ( 4 12.10 
Our Backyard, (i) 

12J0 Hair. Trevor Serbia 

demonstrates tinting and 
highlighting, (r) 

Newa with Card Barcas 
UO Thames news. 1.30 
Man to a Suitcase. The 
second and Ante part of 
the adventure story in 
which McGill almost 
makes a fortune, (rl 
2J0 Massage. Caroia 
Bersiford-Cooke 
demonstrates Silatsu 
massam therapy. 3J0 

- Take me High Road 3J5 
Thames news headlines 
3J0 Sons and Daughters. 

4J0 The Littte Green Man. A 

- repeat of the programme 
shown at noon 4.10 The . 
Moomkis. Cartoon series 
4J0 Do It, presented by 
^leelaghGifoey, Norman 
Tipton and Nan Buchanan. 

•. (Oracte} 4.45 Razzmatazz. 
Pop music show. . 

5.15 Whose Baby?. Geoff 
Love, Nanette Newman 
and Emlyn Hughes try to 
guess the famous parent 
or parents of a succession 
of toddlers. 

5.45 News with Martyn Lewis 
6.00 Thames news. 

6J5 What If s Worth. - 
Consumer queries . 
answered by Penny Junor 
and David Stafford. 

6J5 Crossroads. 

7 JO Where There’s Ufa^ 
Mkiam Stoppard 
discusses dvorce with, t . 
_ three-times married David ' 
. Sinclair, (sea Choice) 

7 JO Coronation Street Bet 
• and Betty have angry 

- -words about the p&ns for 

_Jt»i»atBdyei5ii_ 

8.00 Dee wid l e Brat of 
, Quests^ HfgMtahtsfrmrr 
. Das O'Conoors previous 

Lsteies. Among the guests 

... appearing ihs evening ara 
- — -June M^on,^k^raro--- ' 

■ *. 

9J0 The Retard Of Sberiock 

nQIIKttrTlTvADDQy ■ 

Grongd: The Baker Street 
detective investigates the 
death of Sir Eustace 
Breckenstzdf, bludgeoned - 
to death in his (fining room 
with a poker. (Oracle) - 
10J0 News at Ten with Alastair 
Burnet and Pamela - 
Armstrong. Weather, 
followed by Thames news 
headlines. 

10J0 Crime Inc. Pert five of the 
seven-programme series 
on the Mafia fannies. . 

(Oracle) (i) 

11 JO Mann’s Best Friends. 
Comedy series starring 
Fulton Mackayas a 
martinet trying to bring 
order to a cflsorganised 
household, (r) 

12J0 World Chess 

Championehlpk Kasparov 
v Karpov at London’s Park 
Lane Hotel. ' 

12J20 Night Thoughts. . 



Hngh Quarshie: Drums Alone 
Balmoral Drive3BC3, 9-25pm 


• On the face of it, there Is 
absolutely nothing in common 
between Douglas 
Livingstone's play DRUMS 
ALONG BAUtoRAL DRIVE 
(BBC2, 9 J5pm), about a white 
couple in a Rhodesia that has 
just become Zimbabwe, and this 
week s edition of WHERE 
THERE'S UFE (TTV, 7.00pm), a 
studio chat about divorce. 
Unconsciously, however, a 
thrice-married writer who 

sets the ball rolling in Where 
Thera's Ufe, does establish a 
flnk. And it is qiite a strong one. 
David Sinclair, a dear- 
thinking man who should know 
what he is talkfrig about, 
invites us to contemplate divorce 
more as a recognition of an 
altered state, and less of a finis in 
a relationship. Pain, he says, 
can be helpful if approached in a 


CHOICE 


Balmoral Drive is about nothing If 

not about an altered state, 
and the resulting pain of writing a 
preface to a new relationship. 

In the engineer (Cofin Blakely), 
who adopts an 

accommodating attitudeto his 
new black masters after 
years of despising the Africans, 
there are distant echoes of 
David Slndak’s thoughts about 
taking a realistic view of a 
tragedy, ft is far more difficult for 
the engineer’s wife (a 
marvellous performance from 
Rowena Cooper) to adapt to 
the altered state, and her fate is 
not entirety unexpected. 

Oddly enough, there is an echo 
of her prewament too, in 
Where Them's Lite. It comes 
from the sOBctor who, stating 


that the termination of his 
marriage was less 
consensual that Sinclair's, chides 
the journalist for faffing to 
recognize the horror of divorce. 

• Berlioz comes across 
faithfully to Titus Leber's 
extraordinary exercise in 

surrealism, SYMPHONIE 
FANTASTTQUE: ANIMA 
(Channel 4. 11.00pm), and the 
Beloved Woman - the kfea 
fixeof the work - is rarely off 
screen in some guise or 
other. As for the rest this is just 
about the most outrageous 
visualization of the Berio* 
symphony that could 
originate m a tormented brain. 
Titus Leber makes the 
gmtesqueries of Hieronimus r 
Bosch seem as charming as 
tee forest frolics of Disney's 

^“Peter Davalle 


BBC 2 


6J5 Open Un iver sity : ' 

i -Database -Data 

Dictionaries. Ends at 7 JO. 

aJO.Ceetoc. 

1-35 The Physics of Matter. An 
Open University 
' production ifiustratinghow 
sateffites are tasted t&r 
performance before they 
are Wasted into space. 

2.00 Ceefax. 

5J5 News summary with 
subtitles. Weather. 

5 JO White Horses. The final 
programme of the series 
following Robin and 
Louetia Hanbury- 
Tenison's horseback 
journey from the 
Camargue to their farm on 
Bodmin Moor, (r) 

6J0 FHm: Trial by Combat 
(1976) starring John Mills, 
Donald Pleasence and 
Peter Cushing. An 
eccentric, retired poHce 
commissioner brushes 
with the Society of the 
Knights of Avalon, ted by 
the evil Sir Giles Martey. 
The Society has been re- 
dedicated m order to dote 
out ritual retribution to 
criminals who have 
escaped the long arm of 
.thetaw. Directed by Kevin 
Connor. 

7.25 Cartoon Two. 

7J0 Designers. This fotsth of 

six programmes features 
a consortium of designers 
who are persuading shops 
and stores to accept . 
modem furniture design. 

8.00 Sweat of the Sun, Tears 
' ofthe Moon. Part five of 

Jack Pizzay's series bn 
South American society. 
This evening he meets 
. three of foe continent’s 
' stars -Jairo Antonio, a 

PamSa^oTOoTthraB 
world boxing champions 
to have come from the 
same smafl Colombian 
villaoe; end Christina 
ns.astarof Brazffian 


9 JO NTA*S*H. After treating ' 
victims of an accidents 
- bombing raid by4he Umted 
States Air Force on a. - 
-■ friendly @buth.Korean 
vfflage, Hawkeye, Trapper, 
r ' .FramandHotflpsdeaoe 
. .that news of the raid 
should be made known to 
“ tee meefia. But their efforts 
. come up against the blank 
wail of. bureaucracy-, (r) 

Drone Along 


9J5 


ScraenPtay: Dram 
Balmoral Drive, by 
Livingstone. 
QbfinBWceiy, 
Cooperand H 


10J5 


Douglas I 
starring Cbfinl 
Rowena Cooper and Hugh 
Quarshfe--A drama.set in 
London ahdZhnbabWe, - 
about a' white couple 
facing up to the fact that 
the husband's new 
employer is a black man. 
Directed by Jane Howe! 
(see ChoIcej_ ■ 
Newsntaht me tatest 
nationafand I n tern a tional 
news Indudng extended 
coverage of one of the 
main stories of the day. 
With Peter Snow, Donald 
MacCormtck and Olivia 
O'Leary. 
niJO Weather.- 
)ll J5 Music at MghL Paid 
Williamson and Phfflp 
Astie perform O admirable 
venensydolum, and 
Quand je voi yvar 
ratoumer. 

Hi JO Open li ni vere l ty: Leeds - 
I A Study In Civic Pride 

11 J5 Visual Illusions: Now 
You See It- Ends at 
12J5- 


CHANNEL 4 


2J0 A 

e 


To Remember* 

starring Loretta 
bung and Brian Aherns, 
A comedy thriller about a 
novelist and Ws wife who 
take an apartment in 
Greenwich VSage wMIe 
the husband is writing hfs 
latest terflter. But fiction 
takes second place to fact 
when they discover a body 
in the bath. Directed by 
Richard Wallace. 

4.15 Fins Three LitUe Beart* 
(1935) starring The Three 
Stooges as impoverished 
young men who enter a 
. gotf tournament in order to 
raise money, and turn the 
competiton into chaos. 
Directed by Del Lord. 

4J0 Dancfo' Days. Money 
probtems seem to be 
getting on top of Alberico. 

5J0 Afica. Jolena's family visit 
her in Phoenix but 
overstay their welcome. 
Mel's efforts to help leads 
to Jotone being disowned 
by her father. 

5J0 Tne Abbott and Costeflo 
Show* Bud and Lou 
become involved in a bank 
robbery when they are 
hired as guards to two 
men who seem to be in the 
money (fistribution 
business. 

6.00 Famfly Ties. American 
domestic comedy series 
starring Michael J Fox. 

6J0 Flashback. This second 
programme in the series 
indudes dips from 1920s 
films to fflusrate how 
single women were 
poitrayed as objects of 
desire, and married 
women as paragons of 
domestic virtue. 

7 JO Channel Four news with 
Trevor McDonald. 

7J0 Comment With her views 
on a matter of topical 
importance is Judy 
Davison, a Metropolitan 
Police Chief Inspector. 
Weather. 

8J0 The Blood ofthe British. 

In this final programme of 
her series tracing Britain's 
ancestry, Dr Catherine 
Hflte examines the 
Normans, (r) (Oracle) : 

8J0 Diverse Reports. 

' Advertising executive 
Roger Edwards' casts an 
. expert and critical eye 
over press coverage of - 
'crack’, the new drug 
-craze. Is the reporting on 
- -the drug glamorizing 

— .Instead c? damn'mg this 
'super concentrated . 
cocaine'? 

9J0 FHecTheSwissmakera 

(1978) starring WaloLind 
' and EmU Stelnberger. A 
satirical comedy about two 
Swiss policemen checking 
the background of three- 
candidates for Swiss 
citizenship- Directed by 
RotfLyssy. 

11 JO Sympnoree Fantastfque: 
Ankna- A freely adapted 
visual interpretation of 
Berfloz's Fantastic 
Symphony. The Budapest 

— ‘ Orchestras 

by Charles 

iby”' 

Leber, (see Choice) 

12J0 Eifibie Gold. Christopher 
Logue reads three poems 
about (fifferent aspects of 
war - The War Song of the 
saracens. by James Elroy 
Flecker Wilfred Owen's 
Duice et Decorum Est; and 
Robert Burns's I Murder 
Hate by Field or Flood, (r) 
Endsat12J0. 


( Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. VHF variations at end 
5J5 Supping. BJO News Briefing; 
6JQ Today. «rid 6JQ.7J0, 

8J0 News. 645 
Business N&ws. 6J5, 7J5 
Weather. 7.00, BjOO 
News. 7 J5, 625 Sport 7 j45 

Thought for the Day 

643 Lake Wobegon Days. 

Part 3. 

600 News 

9JS Midweek, with Libby 
Purves (s) 

10J0 News; Picnics. Susan 
Marling ioms the Jubilee 
Ladies Ftsnmg Club (r) 

10J0 Morning Story: Ghost of 
Honour, by Pamela 
HansfonKJohnson. Read by 
Hugh Dickson 

10X5 Daily Service. New Every 
MorTNrn.page21 (s) 

11 JO News; Travel; 

Civilisation. IntaHJgent, 

• Seeks Similar ... Peter 
Evans reports on the 
science behind The Search 
for Extra-Terrestrial 


11.48 Last Words. Or Anthony 
Clare reveals the three 
"secrets oi life" he would 
pass on If he had 10 
minutes to live. 

12J0 News; You and Yours- 
1627 I'm Sony, (Haven't a 
Clue II. Panel game 
chaired by Humphrey 
Lyttelton (r). 

1 JO The Work! at One: News 

1.40 The Archers. 

2J0 News; Woman's Hour. 

With Sue MacGregor. 

3J0 News; The Afternoon 
Play; The Valley of 
TreJamia, by Peter Redgrave. 
With James Aubrey and 
Maggie Tarver. Drama, set in 
Cornwall (s) 

647 African Encounters. 
Journalist Ferdl Dennis 
comes to the end of his five 

e iys in Mozambique. 

4.05 Dancing a Hornpipe in 
Fetters. Suzanne Burden 
reads from the journals and 
letters of Fanny Kemble 
4.15 South-East Europe 
Journey. Julian Hale 
examines the Greek 
Orthodox Church (r) 

4j 45 Welsh Arts Week: The 
Dwnon of Creativity. 

Patrick Hannan in 
the links between 
and creativity in Welsh 
literature. 


600 PM. News magazine. 

5JQ Shipping. ' 

6 JO News; Financial Report 
630 Tnvia Test Match. With 
umpire Brian Johnston ' 
and team captains Ten Rise 
andWime Rushtonfs) 

7 JO News 
7J5 The Archers 
7 JO Safe m Our Hands? (new . ■ 
series). Give Cookson 
examines controversies 
surrounding the 
financing of the National 
Health Sennce. 

7.45 Setting Sail. With Sean 
Casey. Jill Tweedie and 
others (s) 

615 A mess of Secrets. 

James Naughtie marks 
the 75th anniversary of the 
Official Secrets Act. 

SjOO Thirty-Minute Theatre. 

Cess and Tot. by James 
Robson. Comedy about 
refuse collectors turned 
grave-diggers (rKs) 

630 A Night Out. Phil Smith 
goes prowling at 
unsociable hours (2) The 
Night of the Dawn 


9J5 Welsh Arts Week; 

Mother's Tongue not 
Mother Tongue. Wyn 
Thomas talks to young 
Welsh poets. 

1615 A Book at Bedtime: 

Under a Monsoon Cloud, 
by H R F Keating (8). Read 
by Sam Dastor. 

1630 The World Tonight 
11.15 The Financial world 
Tonight 

11 JO The Mischief Makers. 

Studies in talent and 
perversity (1) Baron Corvo(r) 
12.00 News; Weather 
VHF (available in England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except: 655-6J0am Weather; 
Travel. 1.55-2. 00pm 
Listening Comer 5J0-5J5 
PM (continued) 11JO- 
1610am Open University: 

11 JO Draughtmen and 
Craftsmen, ii JO Social 
Sciences: Grapevine 

( Radio 3 ) 

On medium wave. VHF variations at 
end 

6J5 Weather. 7.00 News 
7J5 Concert Beethoven (the 
Leonora No 1 overture), 
Haydn (Sonata in C. H 
.. XVI 48: Andrite Schift 

i), Babefl (Concerto fit C. 

. 3 No 1. with Mrchala 
Petri, recorder), Kozeluh 


(Symphony 'm F). 8J0 
News 

605 Concert 

(wrrtd); Khachaturian 
(Adagio, from Spartacus). 
Chausson (Chanson 
perpetuelie. with Frederica 
Von Shade, mezzo). 
Vaimhan Wlftams (Fantasia 
onGreensleeveslr 
Dvorak (Czech Suite Op 33). 
Chopm (5tudyOp10No 


605 This Week's Composer 
Brahms. Gestiltte 
Setmsucht. op 91 No if with 
Flagstad, soprano). Violin 
Concerto (Szaryng/ LSQ), 
end Von ewiger Liebe. 

Op 43 No 1 (victoria delos 
Angeles) 

1600 Vilwrs Piano Quartet 
Dvorak (Plano Quartet in 
Eilat, Op 67) 

1640 Cleveland Drchdstra 
(tinder Szell). Beethoven 
(FtdelfO overture). Schumann 

(Symphony No 1) 

11 JO Chopin Ballades: Frank 
Wibaut (piano)plays No 1 
in G minor. Op 23, No 2 in F, 
Op 38. No 3 and No 4 
12.00 BBC Welsh SO (under 
Brian Wright). Bliss 
(Checkmate suite). Elgar 
(Grama and Diamnd 
Incidental music and funeral 
march), Walton 
(Variations on Hbictentith 
theme). 1 JO News 
1.05 The Essential Jazz 
Records: another 
selection by Max Harrison. 
Includes Woody Herman 

and his Thundering Herd, 
and Count Basie Quartet 
1 JO The Grand Duke: 

excerpts from the G and 
S operetta. BBC Concert 
Orchestra and John 
McCarthy Singers. Cast 
includes Peter Pratt (title 
role), Kenneth Bowen and 
John H addle Nash 
2J0 Bach: Malcolm Pride 
(harpsichord) plays 
Partita No 4 in D. BWV 828 
3.10 Haydn and Simpson: 

Couti String Quartet 
Haydn (Quartet in F minor, 
Op 20 No 5), Robert 
Simpson (Quartet No 10) 

4J0 Choral Evensong: front 
Ripon CathedraL 4L55 
News 

5J0 Midweek Choice: Alwyn 


de 


Price 


_ ret 
, Rossini 


(String Sonata No 5). 
Durum (Requiem: 
ECO/Corydon 



7 JO Proms 86- National 
Youth Orchestra of Great 
Britain (under Mark Elder), 
with Cynthia MIHar 
(ondes Martenot). and Peter 
Donohoe (piano). Part 
on a. Debussy (li mer) 


7J5 Atthe Menuhin School: a 
report by Michael Oliver. 
Yehudi Menuhin is among 
the contributors (r) 


7.45 Proms a&i 
Messiaen (Tur 
Symphony) 


610 Six Continents: foreign 1 
-• radiobroadcasts, 
monitored by the BBC- : 


9 JO Scarfs ttl Sonatas: 

Catherine Mackintosh 
(violin). Richard Booth by 
(ceao), Robert Woolley 
(harpsichord). The 0 minor, 
KK77-.D minor Kk89;D 
minor. Kk90, and the G 
major. Kk91 

1600 Proms 86: part three. 

Nexus Opera present 
Bnnen's Curlew River. With 
soloists Nigel Robson. 
Robert Poidton. David 
Gwynne . and John Rath. 

11.15 David WUde: piano 

recital. Chopm (Fantasy 
in F minor). Beethoven ( 
Sonata in C mm or. Op 
111). 11 ST NBWS. 12.00 
Closedown. 

On VHF only: - 
6J5 Open University. Until 
655am. Ouen Fi 

Untverstiy 

( Racfio 2 ~) 

4.00am Coim Berry 5J0 Ray 
Moore 7.30 Derek Jameson 9 JO 
Teddy Johnson 1 1.05 Jimmy 
Young 1.05pm David Jacobs 2.05 
Gtona Hurmilord 3JQ David 
Hamilton 5J5John Dunn 7.00 Folk 
on 2 630 Jim MacLeod (new 
senes) featuring Jim MacLeod's 
Scottish Dance Band 9.00 
Listen to the Band 10 JO Jimmy 
Jewel Remembers. Jimmy 
Jewel in conversation with Derek 
Sarey 10.15 Ton^ and Stod 


11 JO Round 


inigh 
Night Music 


( Radio 1 ) 

SJOam Adrian John 7.00 Mike 
Smith's Breakfast Show 9.30 
Simon Bates 11.00 Radio 1 
Roadshow from Tenby 12.30pm 
Newsbeat (Frank Partridge) 

12,45 Gary Davies 3.00 Sieve 
Wnqht 5J0 Newsbeat (Frank 
Partridge) 645 Simon Mayo, mcl at 
6 JO. Top 30 album chart 7 JO 
Janice Long 1600-12.00 John Peel. 
VHF Stereo Radios 1 & 2> 

4.00am As Radio 1 10.00pm As 
Radio 1. 12J0-4JOam As 
Radio 2 

WORLD SERVICE 

600 NamdHk 6X1 Mention 7.00 News 
7J9 Twenty^our Hours TJO DeveioD- 
mmr B8 OJO News 60S Reflections 615 
Classical Recoiti Review 630 Biam ol 
Bntaxi 600 News 609 Review of Brush 
Press 9.1S World Today 630 Financial 
News 640 Look Ahead 6<5 Land ol Song 

10.00 News 1601 OrnnOus 1VO0 News 

11.09 News About Britain 11.15 On The 
Box 1125 Lenar From Wales 1150 
Mention 1MB Ratito Newsreel 1615 
Nature Notebook 1625 Fanning World 
UL45 Sports Roundup 1.00 News 1 JB 
Twenty-Four Hours 1.30 Development -88 

2.00 Outlook 645 Report on Rebaan 600 
Rada Newsreel 3.15 a Ruler's Gudc to 
Repression 630 Radio Active C00 News 

4.09 Commentary 4.15 Counterpora 645 
Sports Roundup 7.45 Good Books 600 
News 609 Twenty-Four Hours 630 
Assignmem 600 News 601 Network UK 
615 Album rime 645 Recording of (Meek 
1600 News 1609 World Today 1625 
Letter From Wales 1630 Financial News 
10.40 Reflections 1045 Sports Roundup 

11.00 News 11.09 Commentary 11.15 
Good Books 1150 Top Twenty 12J0 
News 1609 News About Bn tarn 12-15 
Radio Newsreel 1630 Rarfio Actwe 1 JO 
News 1.01 Outlook 1J0 Waveguide 1.40 
Book Choice 145 Piano Roll 600 News 

2.09 Review of the Bntish Press 2.15 
Network UK 2J0 Assignment 600 News 
3J)9 News About Britain 615 World Today 

. : 4-45 Reflections 4.50 Financial News 5J0 
1 News 609 Twenty-Four Hours 6fS Work! 
J : Today. AB4hAa fat GMT. 


ROM WALES. 690FBOTB. 835 
HHSii 600 wwes today. Regional 

aewsroagazlnv-635-7J0GoFor K. 
Robbia vSnentend Angharad Muir check 
an the Bui Famiy of Usk in Gwent to 
see how they ha ve fared with theft) for It 
rffialenge.il JB-YL5S News of 
Wales haadhea and weather. And 

closedown. SCOTLAND &3Spnt-7J0 

Reporting Soottand NORTHBWBIE- 

1JU4D 4JOyn-650HeUi 656-635 ' 
Fame 5i3S-S40 Today’s Sport S464LOO 
hskfa Ulster. R4fl*cmal newsmage- 
tme. 635-7.00 The. Roman HoflSyS- Car- 
toon series set in Rome kt AD 25. 

1U6-1 1^5 News and Weather D*- 

OAND 6i3Spm-7 Jo Regional news 

magazines 


GRANADA fa London ex- 
UI1ANAUW oapt625ea Granada 

Reports 940 Secret Vatey655 
Paystrsak 161 OUncom Tales 1035 
wuzztes 1U0 Granads Reports 
11J5 Adoot Britain 11 JO-llLOOConnec- 

Grenada 

Itap«u 1364J0 Randan & Hoputk 
(deceased) 636440 ShprrSKxY Theatre 
615-545 Never the Twrtin 600 Gra- 
nada Reports 630-6.35 This is Ycx* 

Rigm 11 JO Mann’s Best Friends 
12 JH 8 Show Express 1235am 
Closedown. 


tout As London except 625am 

Sesame Straw 1625 Adventurer 


165O-HJ0 Max the Mouse 
12J0pm-1 JK) Gardens for AH 1.20 News 
1 JO-2J0 Country Practice 615 Gos 
Honeybun 620-546 Crossroads 600 To- 
day South West 636-7 ■ 

Emmerdaie FBnn 11J0 Mnder T630 
Postscript. Ctosedown. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


YORKSHIRE 

' Starfleat 650 Legsnds ol the Screeo 
1045-lUO Short Story 12Jopm-1 JO 
Luncfffime Uve L20 NewsT JO-2JO 
SWrxflo 615-545 Stxvival oil the Rttost 
60OSJ5 Calendar 11J0 Legmen . 
lUOem Ctosedown. 


TYNE TEES 

630 Sesame Street 1625 New 
SqiXKkonakas 1645-11 JO Cartoon 
1239pa>-1 30 The Year 
was ... 1974 1JJ0 News US Where the 
Jobs Ara 1 J30-2J0 Country Practice 
615-645 Survival ol the Rnost 600-635 
Northern Ufa 1131 Comedy Tomght 
1600 The Eyes Have It. Ctosedown. 


Folk Tiries 

1Z30pm-U0 That's HoWwood L20 
News L3O-2J0 Country Pnrcflce 615- 
545 Cormechona 606635 North 
Tonight 1130 Mam's Best Friend 12J0 
News. Closedown. 


Sesame Street 1650-11 J» Max the 
Mouse I230pm-i JO Survival ctitheFlt- 
test UO Uinctimne 1 JO-2JO Coun- 
try Practice 3J0-4J0 Look Who's Talking 
61 5-5 j 4S Beverly HiOWSes 600 
Summer Edison 620 Which Way Now 
630-635 Cartoon 1130 Mann's 
Best Friend 12.00 News, Closedown. 


1030 Cartoon rime 1635-1U0 
caenrod.T230pm-l 30 Whose Btiby? 
126News130-230 Country Pratx 
tka 615-545 Connections 600635 
About AMte 1130 Doom are Open 
izaosm Shalom Chsverim, Ctosedown. 

OAR DPR As London except: . 
SyjSHED 625m Sesame Street 
1035-11 JO Unlcam Tales 1230pm- 
L00 Spiced Ute 130 News 130-230 
Country Practlca 600-330 Scntffila 
615-645 WTwm Baby» 606635 
Lookaround 1130 Return ot the 
Sami 1230am Closedown. 


C4p Starts: 1.00pm Daman' Days 
=3Si 130 Model Magic 2J0 Goto 
Goch A Mahven 2.15 fmorval 230 B- 

steddfod 330 Scotland Yard 4J5 Flash- 

back 435 S4ents. Please 5J0 Draw, 
Drawlt y Dwyraln 530 Pete in Particular 
600 Brootakle 630 Family Ties 7 JO 
Newyddton Saith 730 Hwy) Yr Wyl B45 
Bsteddtod 1615 The Way They 
Were 1145 Diverse Repons 12.15am 
Closedown. 


scornsH^^nex- 
Beath^shaan Neontach 650 Car- 
toon 10J0 Under the Mountaxi 1625 Ad- 
ventures dRexy 1635-11 JO 
Gienrae1230pm-1JODavkJ Bryant at 
Homa 130 News 136-230 Country 
Practice 600 venture 630-4.00 Report 
Back 615-645 Connections 600- 
635 News and Scotland Today 1130 
Mann's Best Friends 12J0 Late Cafl. 
Ctosodowa 


CHANNEL As London except 
y BSviy™- 938am Sesame Sheet 
.1030-11 JO Totabuns 12JMpm-1 JO 
‘A WiSman's Ptaca 130 News 130 Nam- 
ing But The Best 2.00-230 Whose 
Baby 4 330-4JO Young, Doctors 615- 
645 Poo The Ouesbon 600 Channel 
Report 615^35 FWx Tha Cat 11 30 Live 
atCityNa# 1200 Comedy Tonight 
123mm C t os ed ow n . 

• ' i ■ - 

TVS As London except 628am 
iiS Sesame Street 1630-11 JO 
Telebugs i230pm-i jo coast to 
Coast People 130 News 130 Nothaw but 
. the Best 600:230 Whose Baby’ 
6304JO Young Doctors 615-545 Pop 
the Question 606635 Coast to 
Coast 1130 Live at City Ha>12J0 Come- 
dy Tonight 1230am Company. 
Closedown. 

Street 1625 Jacksons 1650-1130 
Certoon1230pm-1J0Glenroe 130 News 
130-230 Tucker's Witch 5.15-545 

whose Baby? 600-635 News 11.30 The 

Doors are Open 1230am 
Ctosedown. 

HTV WALES 

1035 Sesame Street 600pm -635 
wales at Six. 

CENTRAL fa Londofl wcepc 

■ 1 - 935am Btockbusters 

930 Wioales 1615 Ja* Hotoom 
1640-II^M Roots Ot Rock «' ROM 
1230pm-1 JO Ten Green Bottles 
130 N ews 130-230 Hart to Hart 615- 
645 Whose Babyi 6SQ Crossroads 
625-7.00 News 1035 StreetWe 11.05 
F*n.- And the WaU Came Tumbling 
Down 1230am Jobtinder 130 
Ctosodowa 




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WEDNESDAY AUGUST 6 1986 


fr ■ in n m Li^O 


First published in 1785 


SPORT 


Gloucestershire’s 

surge increases 
their title chance 


(7) by 17 runs. 

With a splendid win over 
Hampshire yesterday Glouc- 
estershire look their lead over 
Essex, their nearest rivals in 
the County Championship, to 
56 points. They left Hamp- 
shire needing 1 16 to win and 
dismissed them for 98, Walsh 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 

CHELTENHAM: Gloucester - done their job and told him to took two very good catches 
shire (22pts) beai Hampshire pitch the toll up. the chances round the comer, Tomlins 
_ are that Hampshire would saved vital runs m the covers 


have won. As it was, in the 
morning session James took 
four wickets in 10 overs by 
bowling at the stumps and 
Marshall one in 1 1 because be 
bowled at the batsmen. 

But to get back to Walsh 
and Lawrence and 



and Lawrence bowling un- Gloucestershire's surge to vic- 
changed and doing the job lory. By tea Terry had been 
with the help of some fine • 

C "S„Shire are one of Thomas is Called 
four counties — North- Greg Thomas, the Glamor- 
amptonshire, Somerset and gan fast bowler, has been 
Sussex are the others — never called into tbe England side 
to have won the champion- for the second Cornhill Test 
ship since it was officially match against New Zealand, 
constituted in 1890. Now they starting at Trent Bridge to- 
have a peat chance, Essex, morrow. He replaces the in- 
however. have two matches in jnred Graham Dilley.^ Thomas 
hand of them, and these alone will open the bowling with 
could be worth 48 points. It is Gladstone Small, who will be 
too early yet to start counting playing in his first Test match, 
the Cotswold chickens, but Martyn Moxon will be fit to 
Gloucestershire's victory yes- take his place in the side. The 
terdav evening came on a Yorkshire opener injured his 
rising tide of excitement. hand while trying to take a 
Hampshire had gone away catch against Lancashire on 
with such a rush that after Saturday but precautionary X- 
nine overs they were already rays have revealed only 
39 without joss. But Lawrence bruising. 

removed Greenidge just in — — — — ~~~ 

lime, Athey taking the first of bowled by Walsh, pushuig half 
three good catches at second forward, and Nicholas caught 
slip. All credit to Lawrence for at deep third man; Middleton 
this. He had been hit for three had taken 10 overs over a 
thumping fours off successive single and Robin Smith, when 
balls in his first over by playing well, had pushed 
Greenidge. and Graveney down the wrong line at Walsh, 
could well have been on the Although nothing like a 
point of taking him off. In- reportable pitch, it was not a 
stead, the longer Lawrence gnat one. Even so, with much 
bowled the better a partner he at stake — had Hampshire won 
made for Walsh, and the more they, too, would have started 
tentative Hampshire's efforts to fanc^ their chance of the 
became. championship — the 42 that 

It is not often that one Hampshire needed when their 
would suggest that Marshall’s fifth wicket fell were already 
bowling cost his side a match, seeming too many, especially 
but it may well have done so with Christopher Smith, be- 
yesterday, he pitched so cause of a broken finger, able 
shockingly and dangerously to come in only at No. 10. A 


and persistently short. Had he 
bowled an acceptable length, 
or even if the umpires had 


forward, and Nicholas caught 
at deep third man; Middleton 
had taken 10 overs .over a 
single and Robin Smith, when 
playing well, had pushed 
down the wrong line at Walsh. 

Although nothing like a 
reportable pitch, it was not a 
great one. Even so, with much 
at stake — had Hampshire won 
they, too, would have started 
to fancy their chance of the 
championship — the 42 that 
Hampshire needed when their 
fifth wicket fell were already 
seeming too many, especially 
with Christopher Smith, be- 
cause of a broken finger, able 
to come in only at No. 10. A 
startling catch in the gully by 
Graveney, diving to his right 
accounted for James; Curran 


GOLF 


and soon after 5 o'clock 
Gloucestershire had won. 
Lawrence's last wicket was his 
50th of the season and Walsh's 
last bis 95th. 

There was one other 
Gloucestershire hero and that 
was Stovold. Hit on the hand 
early on by Marshall, he made 
a wonderfully courageous 48 
at a time when it seemed as 
though Hampshire might 
have to get only a handful to 
win. He added 45 with Cur- 
ran, whose life from 
Greenidge in the gully when 
he was two, a chance that 
Greenidge would have swal- 
lowed 29 times out of 30, was 
also a telling factor. Fancy 
having to go and watch yet 
another Test match when the 
championship is producing 
days like this! 

OtOUCESTStSIBlE: First Innings 201 
Second i nni ng s 

P W Romanes c Afidcttewn b Marshal 0 

KPTomknsb James 30 

CWJ Athey c Parks b Connor 36 

P Bamtmdge c R A Smith b Marshall 21 

A w Siovakl tow b James 48 

K M Curran c H A Smith b James — 14 

J W Uoyds b James 0 

fRC Russell c Terry b James 9 

*D A Graveney not out — 2 

C A Walsh b Marshal 3 

D V Lawrence b Marshal 0 

Extras (bl.bianb 2} _21 

Total 184 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-0. 2-55. 3-96. 4- 
102. 5-147, 6-148. 7-178. 8-179. 9-184. 
BOWLING: Marshal 22-6-44-4; Connor 
12-0-44-1; TramteH 15-4-43-0; James 16- 
4-34-5. 

HAMPSHRE: First tarings 270 (C L Smith 
72 not out, TM TramieB 52; C A Walsh 8 
for SO) 

Second innings 
Greenidge c Athey b Lawrence 
Terry bWalsti 




*M C J Nicholas c Romaines b Wafsh . 7 
K D James c Graveney b Walsh 
M D Marshall c Athey o Walsh 
T M Tiemiatt e Busses b Lawrence 

tfl J Parks c Curran b Lawrence 

C L Smith c Cunui b Walsh 

C A Connor not out 

Extras (nb 5) 

Total 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-39, 2-39. 383. 4- 
69. 5-74. 6-83, 7-88. 8-92. 837. 
BOWLING: Walsh 163-5-34-6; Lawrence 
16-2-64-4. 

Umpires: A A Janes and R Palmer. 

Other cricket, page 30 


Favourite in one-stroke lead 


Susan Shapcott justified the 
form book on the first day of 
the English women's amateur 
stroke-play championship, 
sponsored by the National 
Westminster Bank, at 
Broadstone, yesterday. With a 
round of 73, level par, she led 
by one stroke from Julie 
Walter, a former English 
match-play champion, with a 
cluster of players on 75, 
including the elder Shapcott 
sister, Allison. 

For all her tender years {she 
is aged 16} she seemed un- 
daunted by the fact that she is 
regarded as the favourite for 
the title. But as a reserve for 
the Curtis Cup with the two 
English members of that 
victorious team. Patricia 
Johnson and Jill Thornhill 


By John Hennessy 

still in the United States, she 
clearly has the highest 
credentials. 

On a sunny day that called 
for the retrieval of sunglasses 
from distant comers. Miss 
Shapcott went to the turn in 
36. one under par. and came 
back in 37, one over par. She 
played composed, measured 
golf, unimpeded, apparently, 
by the arm hand she wears as a 
protection against tennis 
elbow. 

She feels no pain when she 
plays and did not seem to 
favour the arm though sub- 
consciously it might have 
affected her. Certainly she did 
not have the advantage in 
length one would have ex- 
pected over Catherine Bailey, 
one of the players competing 



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necessarily a guide to the future. At each anniversary since 
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for the inaugural seniors 
championship. 

Miss Shapcott began with a 
birdie at the first, playing a 
lovely pitch shot from 50 
yards which checked obedi- 
ently and nestled two feet 
from the hole. Another birdie 
beckoned when she fashioned 
a three-iron to a hole tucked 
near the left edge of the short 
sixth (157 yards), but the ball 
ran to the back and her chip to 
three feet failed to get the 
proper response from her 
putter. 

A three-iron reduced the 
ninth to a three, and that 
without a view of the flag, let 
alone the stick or the hole, but 
from 175 yards she put the ball 
to within a foot, relying on her 
yardages and a marker post. 
Three putts cost her a stroke 
on the ninth and a wayward 
drive another on the 12th, but 
she got one back with a bunker 
shot to 10 feel and a solid putt 
on the long 16th. 

Miss Walter, 11 times the 
Cambridgeshire champion, 
played her usual steady round, 
puemated by uncertain behav- 
iour from her putter. 

LEADING SCORES: 73: S Shapcott 
74: J Walter. 75c A Johns. L 
Chesterton. A Saunders, A 
Shapcott 76: S Moorcraft, L Per- 
pvaJ. C Dotty. 77: M J Cornelius. M 
King, J Wade. J Coflingham, L 
Newton, S HaHflL P SmUHe. 78: S 
Nicklm. Unzi Fletcher, K Ntcholls. 
79: C Bailey. J HiK, J Rhodes. A 
Booth. 

Davis stays an 
amateur for 



Captivated by Cowes: class one yacht enjoys sea and wind (Photograph: Julian Herbert) 

Juer sails in to join a royal 
occasion with Prince Philip 


Ernest Juer gained a memo- 
rable win in the Britannia Cup 
race at Cowes yesterday, al- 
though King Edward V would 
undoubtedly have approved 
that Prince Philip crossed the 
line first to celebrate the 
golden anniversary since his 
beloved Britannia - one of the 
most successful racing yachts 
with a record of 231 first 
places m its 43-year history — 
was scuttled ceremoniously 
off the Isle of Wight The 
Britannia Cup is one of the 
principal pieces of silverwear 
in the Sandhurst-sponsored 
Week. 

It proved to be a classic race 
In conditions that sadly have 
been all too infrequent in 
recent years. The sun shone all 
day and the force 3-4 south- 
westerly breeze gave crews a 
comfortable test around an 
ideal 31-mile course. 

Yeoman XXVI, with Prince 
Philip and former King Con- 
stantine of Greece sharing the 
helm, was among the first 
away and soon had the mea- 
sure of Backlash, last year’s 
cup winner, as the fleet short- 


By Barry Pi ckthall 

tacked up the northern shore 
to the first turning mark at the 
entrance to Beaulieu River. 
Chris Dunning’s Marionette, 
carrying the Duke of Kent and 
Princess Michael of Kent, 
remained in dose contention 
until a jammed runner hin- 
dered progress, but any time 
they lost was made up later on 
the long tack across the Solent 
to Hampstead Ledge Buoy, for 

Results, page 30 

when spinnakers were hoisted 
for the run back towards 
Leeon Solent, there was little 
to divide these first three. 

It was Yeoman who held the 
advantage as tbe leaders 
passed through the Royal 
Yacht Squadron line at the 
end of this first round, 30 
seconds ahead of Marionette 
with Basil Rizzfs Trilogy II 
fighting a valiant battle 
against Tim Herring's Back- 
lash for third place. 

On handicap however, Juer 
and his crew on Fair Lady 
were already in a dominant 

FOOTBALL 


position, 90 seconds up on 
Blazer, their nearest One ton 
rival and three minutes ahead 
of Yeoman on corrected time. 
An hour later after a second 
circuit of the Solent, the white 
Beneteau-design crossed the 
line in ninth place, 1 1 minutes 
behind Prince Philip to take 
the trophy on corrected time 
by a 90 second margin over 
Formidable, Peter Vroon's 
Dutch entry, with Marionette 
third. 

In class two. Sir Morris 
Laing's Bathsheba success- 
fully ended the string of 
victories scored so far by Thee 
Spears, the South African 
entry which finished third. 
Tbe South African % tonner 
has undergone a subtle name 
change for this series but this 
may not be far enough re- 
moved from the Cape Town 
based outdoor equipment 
manufacturer Three Spears 
which sponsors the yacht for it 
to avoid disqualification un- 
der rule 26. The Royal Ocean 
Racing Cub have sent an 
urgent telex asking the South 
African Yacht Racing Author- 
ity to clarify the situation. 


Three relegated for match-fixing 


Milan (Renter) — Udinese 
were one of three dabs rele- 
gated by the Italian Football 
Association (IFA) yesterday 
after a disciplinary hearing 
found them guilty of match- 
fixing last season. 

Another dob were denied 
promotion by the IFA’s disci- 
plinary commission, which 
also banned six dab affi nals 
for five years and 38 other 
players and officials for peri- 
ods ranging from one month to 
more than three years. Tbe 
dabs were said to have fixed 
reselts of some 30 matches 


Wolves in 


Udinese wore ordered down 
to the second division next 
season and Lazio, of the 
second division, were rele- 
gated to the third. Lanerosri 
Vicenza, who won promotion 
to the first division at the end 
of last season, will remain in 
the second. Third division 
Perugia have been ordered 
down to the fourth division. 

Two second division sides, 
Palermo and Cagliari, were 
told they would each start next 
season with a five-point handi- 
cap while another second di- 
vision dab, Triestina. are to 


SPORT (N BRIEF 


England place the clear 


Telephone No 

CU Life is for living. 


CGA/rsayv 


Assurance 


Mark Davis has been cho- 
sen for tbe England team to 
compete in the home inter- 
national tournament at Royal 
St David's next month (John 
Hennessy writes). Davis was 
one of three players who had 
said that they would be turn- 
ing professional, but he has 
had second thoughts. 

The other players, David 
Gilford and Peter Baker, have 
been left out, but Gilford, aged 
20, is included in the England 
youths' maich against Scot- 
land at Carnoustie on August 
19. a fixture he can slot in 
before turning professional. 
SENIOR TEAM: S BottonHay (Ship- 
ley), P Broadhtifst (Atfterstone), D 
Curry (PrudhoeL M Davis (Thom- 
don Park), R Eggo (I’Arxresse). J 
Langmaad (Newton Abbot, Stover), 
P McEvoy (Copt Heath). S Richard- 
son (Lee-on-Soterrt), A Robertson 
(Seaton Carew), J Robinson (Wood- 
hall Spa), R Roper (Catterlck Gar- 
rison). 

YOUTH TEAM: J Cook {Leamington 
and County). F George (Beacons- 
fieid). D Gifford (Trentham Park). P 
Hall (Harrogate). Langmead, Mus- 
croft, Richardson. Robertson, Rob- 
inson. A Rogers (Ealing), R win- 
chester (Sidemouth). 

• Peter Baker, who played in 
last year’s Walker Cup golf 
match in America, has turned 
professionaL Baker, aged 18. 
from Shropshire, will make 
his debut in the paid ranks in 
this week's open tournament 
! at Falsterbo in Sweden. 


Wolverhampton Wand- 
erers' future was virtually 
guaranteed yesterday with the 
success of a joint £3 million 
offer by Wolverhampton 
Council and Asda, the super- 
market chain. 

The council plan to buy 
Moline ux. the training ground 
and social club, while Asda 
will dear the dub's debts and 
build a supermarket adjacent 
to the stadium. The official 
receiver, in whose hands the 
club has been placed, is 
recommending tbe Football 
League to accept tbe offer. 

Lead role 

Sean Melior, who won a 
second division champion- 
ship medal with Leigh last 
season, has been named as 
captain of the British squad to 
take part in the inaugural 
student Rugby League world 
cup, starting in New Zealand 
on August 23 (Keith Macklin 
writes). 

SQUAD: S Melon 0 Stephenson (both 
Uwrpool Pom. a Baley, L Freeman (both 
Salford Uitv). S Carter. J Jenkins, M 
Kettles, H Sharp ufl Leeds PoM. D 
ESoo. P Roden (bovi Bradford 
Brennan, M HlneMHIs (bath 
Paly). S Marshall. K Murphy. T Oats 
Tram PoM. M Hancock (North Stans 
Potyl. R Bridge (West London Inst). P 
Coady (Loughborough Univ). G 
MacMuUen (Edge HH Co#. M Ragan (Oe 
La SB«e(mTT 0 Uft OM Unwl.R Tong 
jSeufh Gtetnorgari ih£). P Webb (West 



i-.r.y'tv '■} '■ /v- . * A 


si.:- 


Higgs: standing by 

Higgs on call 

Ken Higgs, the former 
Leicestershire captain and 
current coach, has been put on 
stand-by by the county for 
their home Britannic Assur- 
ance championship match 
against Yorkshire, starting to- 
day. The former England 
player, who will be 50 next 
January, is in line for a recall 
because of a number of inju- 
ries and players on England 
duty. 

Riding high 

Prince Philip, the Duke of 
Edinburgh, will be one of nine 
carriage drivers representing 
Great Britain at the four-in- 
hand world driving 
championship at Ascot, Berk- 
shire, next week. 


have one point docked from 
last season’s total and will 
start the next season with a 
four-point handicap. 

Among those banned for five 
years were the Udinese presi- 
dent, Lamberto Mazza, 
Perugia's former president, 
Spartaco Ghhn, and Dario 
Maxaschin, an official with 
Vicenza. 

Napoli, of tire first division, 
and fonr second division debs, 
Sambeuedettese, Empoli, Bre- ! 
sria and newly relegated Bari, , 
were all acquitted. 1 


Long jump 

Phillip Whitlock, of En- 
gland, has made the biggest 
jump in the latest ranking list 
issued by the International 
Squash Players Association. 
The Exeter player has leapt 
from 68 to 48, following two 
wins and one semi- final plac- 
ing in lower grade IPSA events 
in France and West Germany 
this summer. The top 17 
places remain unchanged with 
Jahangir Khan, of Pakistan, 
No. 1. 

Ruled out 

Jarmila Kratocfavflova, the 
women's 800 metres world 
record holder, has conceded 
defeat in her race to be fit for 
the European championships, 
starting in Stuttgart, West 
Germany, in three weeks' 
time. The athlete, aged 35, 
who has been considering 
retirement, has not recovered 
from an Achilles tendon op- 
eration she underwent in 
March. 

Racing on 

Bristol City councillors yes- 
terday agreed in principle to 
allow the powerboat grand 
prix to continue. Held an- 
nually in the city docks, the 
course is renowned as one of 
the most dangerous in the 
world and has claimed five 
lives in its 1 5-year history. 


Britons 
cash in 
as US 
slipup 

From Jenny MacArthur 
Dublin 

Michael Whitaker wasted 
no time hitting top form at the 
Dublin Horse Show when he 
won yesterday's MSD 
Eqvalan Stakes, the opening 
international class, on Next 

Courtwav. 

Whitaker, who has just 
returned from a three-week 
lour in France, galloped round 
the slippery arena, hardly 
taking a pull — the brilliant 
Irish mare apparently needing 
only to be headed in the right 
direction. 

Their astonishingly quick 
time relegated Ireland's top 
speed horse. P J Carroll, 
ridden by Paul Darragh, to 
second place. Britain’s Gillian 
Greenwood, who is competing 
at Dublin for the first time, 
produced a well-judged round 
on her 1 9-year-old mare. Sky- 
Fly — the horse on which she 
became the ladies' national 
champion — to finish third. 

The United States riders 
provided the two most dra- 
matic moments of the class. 
James Benedetto was still at 
Dublin Airport when the class 
started, but managed to get to 
the arena in time to compete. 
He was flying round in great 
style when he suddenly- 
slipped over during a sharp 
turn and had to retire. His 
compatriot, Joe Faigis. would 
probably have won the class - 
but he, too. slipped up on the 
Irish-bred Mill PearL 

If the West German riders 
continue lo ride as well as they 
did yesterday they will be hard 
to beat in Friday's Nations 
Cup. Kun Gravemeier. on 


RESULTS: MSD 
Next Courtway 
62.21 sec; 2. P J 


ratlin Stakes: 1. 
Whitaker) 0 In 
Tod (P Darragh, 


Ireland) 0 in B3.57 sec; 3, Sky Fly (G 
Greenwood) 0 in 65.11 sec. MSD 
tame Stakes: 1„ Wembley (K 
Gravemeier. WG) 0 in 64.98 sec: 2. 
Desirtra (K Reinacher, WG) 0 m 
65-36 sec: 3. CarroH’s Flight (E 
Macken. Ireland) 0 in 65.57 secs. 


Wembley, and Klaus 
Reinacher, on Desirfe, fin- 
ished first and second in the 
MSD Ivonec Stakes with 
Ireland's Eddie Macken third 
on Carroirs Flight. 

Meanwhile, in the smaller 
outer rings the judges of the 
middle and lightweight hunt- 
ers had their work cut out with 
huge entries in all the classes. 
Dick Saunders, a joint-master 
of the Pytchley Hunt, and 
David Walters, the judges of 
the lightweights, were faced 
with 25 entries in the five- 
year-old gelding class alone. 
After a bnsk appraisal 13 were 
sent out — but there was no 
visible sign of discontent from 
tbeir riders. What mattered 
was that they were here at the 
Dublin Show where tbeir 
horses could be seen — hope- 
fully by prospective buyers. 

The eventual winner of the 
class was Hugh McCuskers 
Chubb Guardran, a chestnut 
by Stetcbworth Lad who was 
exiiertiy shown by Robert 
Oliver. The lightweight 
championship class, to be 
judged with all the champion- 
ships tomorrow, looks set to 
be a duel between Chubb 
Guardian and the six-year-old 

Offside. 


DRESSAGE 


Veteran 

leads 

challenge 

From a Correspondent 

Cedar Valley, Ontario 

The 1986 world cham- 
pionship in Canada starts with 
the sad news that the reigning 
champion. Ah tench, has been 
left behind in Germany to 
recover from an injury. 
Ahlerich’s rider. Dr Reiner 
Klike, still has a chance to 
defend his title as he has 
brought the 1 1 -year-old Pascal 
with him. His greatest rival 
and runner-up at the 1984 
Olympics and last year’s Euro- ! 
pean championships, Anna- 1 
Grethe Jensen and Marzog, of 
Denmark, are struggling to 
find form. The British are in 
high . spirits. Christopher 
Bartle has a remarkable ability 
to get his veteran. Wily Trout, 
to perform at his bat on the 
big occasion. If he can do this 
once again, and the others ride 
up to their best, then Britain 
cannot be ruled out Strongly 
tipped is the 1976 Olympic 
champion. Christine 
Studdeberger. who has found 
a very talented successor to 
her great horse, Granat, in 
the II -year-old Swedish stal- 
lion, Gaugin. The other fan- 
cied horse is the 10-year-old 
holsteiner. Corlandus. ridden 
by Margh Otto-Crepin.The 
most reliable combination, 
however, is Jo Hinnemann. 
who won .Aachen’s Grand Prix 
special on IdeaaL 

In the team event, the 
Dutch field four team mem- 
bere who have reached the top 
1- at the last four inter- 
national shows. Canada has 
high hopes of medals. Their 
star, Cindy Ishoy, has won 
everything in the Americas 
with her nine-year-old Dy- 
nasty but has not yet faced the 
Europeans. 




A ride on 
the long ’ 
coat-tails ; 
of fame t 

As Bernard Darwin, the j 
former celebrated Golf I 
Correspondent of this news. > 
paper, once observed, “Sports 
writer" is tbe most loathsome 
label by which (be correspon- 
dent can be known. As op- « 
posed to. say. Author. “Spor ts 1 1 
writer" conjures up a picture of J) 
wanton ink-smudged idleness, v 
a scraffily dressed scratching 
of a living by riding on the 
coat-tails of other people's 
leisure, and only marginally 
less socially undesirable than 
being a gossip columnist. The 
only blacker sheep among us, 
as Jeffrey Bernard would 
testify, are raring columnists. 
“Does it keep yon amused 
writing about sport?" a lawyer 
acq uaintan ce once said to me. 

It does, of course, have its 
rewards. Many men covertly 1 
envy one's attendance at all 
those events which, as they sit 
bunched in front of the silver 
screen after hastening borne 
from the office, threaten their 
conjugal equilibrinm. It 
doesn't enhance my equilib- 
rium. mind you. being overseas 
almost half tbe year, bet ay 
convincing anyone. 

“Come on, don't tell me you 
don't enjoy it," Princess Anne 
said reprovingly last week, at a 
reception hosted by Paul 
Zetter for the Sports Aid 
Foundation. 

Performers’ lack 
of co-operation * 


Relations with performers, 
rather than record big their 
exploits, nowadays give cone- 
spondents their greatest diffi- 
culty. Canadian and 
Australian colleagues in Edin- 
burgh were bemoaning the 
lack of cooperation by per- 
formers in many sports, yet we 
should hasten to admit that 
newspapers have much to 
answer for with their intrusion 
into every nook of a sports 
star's existence. On the other 
hand, those like Carl Lewis 
and Ian Botham cannot justifi- 
ably complain of pressures on 
tbeir families when they will- 
ingly collaborate with inter- 
views for Time and Womans 
Own, or receive more from 
ghosted columns than they do 
for hitting a balL 

The personal “rights” of the 
professional performer are a 
tricky area. Steve Cram tried 
to argne last week, in defend- 
ing Thompson's refusal to 
attend a winners* Press confer- 
ence, that “we're just athletes, 
not pop stars". That suggests 
the esoteric, self-indulgent life 
of the athlete entitles him/her 
to a Garboesque existence 
outride tbe channels of normal 
life. 

Cnun, I must say, is the 
most agreeable of persons, yet 
I think he is wrong to believe 
that such public performers as 
Thompson can be exclusively 
private when they are taking 
substantial professional fees 
in a high-profile competitive 
arena. We do not expect 
Askenazy or Pavarotti to give 
Press conferences after _ every 
appearance, but theirs is not, 
mostly, a contentions activity. 

Thompson cannot 
scorn courtesies 

Thompson cannot exhort 
public acclaim almost every 
minute the television cameras 
are upon him, yet scorn normal 
courtesies. Greg Norman and 
Jack Nkklaos were under far 
more pressure, against better 
opponents than Thompson, 
the previous week, yet Nor- 
man brought a crate of cham- 
pagne to tie Press tent, and 
Nicklans stayed on for half an 
hour talking abort the tor- 
ments of his first round. 

If Thompson was unfairly 
lambasted over his clash with 
a Scottish official who was 
even more rode than he was, 
that is tbe price of bis reputa- 
tion. He is expected now to be 
rude. It is no help that Rod 
P ickering, so altruistic in bis 
work for the multi-racial Har- 
ingey Athletic Club, sincerely 
encourages Thompson to 
think that, as a talisman of the 
coloured British population, 
his non-conformity is accept- 
able and even admired. 

Moving from the slightly 
ridiculous to tbe supposedly 
sublime, there is canse for 
concern in the too-potisbed 
public relations of Frank Bra- 
no. Loveable Big Frank came 
all the way to Edinburgh in bfa 
silk suit, nursing 1 ^ still swol- 
len face, to bend the ears of the 
boxing scribes. He intends to 
continue in the ring, be says, 
which worries me. though that 
is another matter. What is 
alarming is that to help dew 
mmfrate what a loveable guy 
be is, and what a nimble brain 
be has even after Witherspoon 
has whisked it, Bruno now has 
in his camp a scriptwriter to 
provide him with the 
wisecracks. 

Is. Frank concerned abent 
becoming panch-dnuik? “No, 
I'm more worried about getting 
AIDS," ha, ha. They’re get- 
ting Bruno ready for Smtihend 
Pier* it seems, not the world 
tide. 

David Miller 



• iCluC 


Jiii i 


*5;::.'.. 


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