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THE 


No 62,529 



TIMES 


THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


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Shares suffer 
record f 4bn 
one-day drop 


• Almost £4,000 million was wiped 
from share values on the stock market 
as the FT 30-share index suffered its 
biggest one-day falL 

• Shares of GKN fell 56p, reducing the 
engineering group's stock market value 
by £133 million, after disappointing 
interim figures (page 18) 


• The rise in oil prices will boost North 
Sea revenues, but the Government will 
continue to press oil companies to keep 
down the price of petrol. 

• The Monopolies and Ml. 
Commission has blocked GECs bid for 
Plessey on the grounds that it would 
limit competition (page 17). 


By Michael Clark, Stock Market Correspondent 


The London stock market 
suffered its biggest ever one-' 
day fall yesterday as almost £4 
billion was wiped from the 
value of quoted shares. 

The FT index of top 30 
shares tumbled a record 32.1 
to 1233.7. Its previous biggest 
one day fail — in terms of 
points — was on July 8, this 
year, when it fell 30.7. On that 
occasion a £5,478 milli on was 
wiped from shares. 

The index has fallen 
steadily throughout the sum- 
mer, worried by the effects of a 
weak pound, high interest 
rates, a felling oil price and the 
uncertain political outlook. It 
is now almost 200 points 
below its all-time high of 
1,425.9 achieved bn April 3, 
this year. 

The broader based FT-SE 
100 managed to restrict its fell 
to 21.2 at 1,540.4. 

The selling was described as 
heavy, with one leading stock- 
broker commenting: “The 
traffic is all one way at the 
moment and - it looks as 
though we have stiD further to 
fair. 

Jobbers were forced to marie 
prices sharply lower to deter 
the sellers. Losses among blue 
chips extended to double fig- 
ures. Among the sectors hard- 
est hit were the insurance 


composites, engineers and 
electricals after the 
Government's refusal to allow 
GEC to proceed with its 
£1,200 million bid for Plessey. 

The news clipped GEC 6p 
to 190p and -Plessey 8p to 
198p. Oil shares were also 
badly hit despite Tuesday's 
agreement to limit oil output 


Tomorrow 


Heritage 

homes 

From manor to 
cottage, the short-list 
ofhouses reaching 
the final of the 
Royal Institution 
of Chartered 
Surveyors/ 

The Times 

Conservation 

Awards 



• Yesterday's £4,000 
daily prize in The Times 
Portfolio Gold 
competition was shared 
by two readers, Mr K B 
Goode of Shrewsbury, 
and Mr E F Stacy of 
Hinton, Wiltshire. 

• There is a further 
£4,000 to be won today. 
Portfolio list page 21; 
rules and how to play, 
information service, 
page 16. 



Children hurt 

Four people were seriously 
injured, three of them chil- 
dren, and 10 others suffered 
minor injuries when two car- 
riages of a miniature steam 
train packed with holiday- 
makers overturned at the 
Thursford steam organ mu- 
seum near Fakenham, North 
Norfolk. 

Sydney deluge 

Six people were killed' in 
Sydney, Australia, when the 
city was hit by the worst 
storms recorded there. Thir- 
teen inches fell in 24 
hours Page 9 


Home News 2-5 
0*en« ?4> 

Appls 14,18 
Arts 15 

fintteJeds, 
montages 14 

Bnpaess 17-21 
Chess 2 

Court 14 

Crosswords 1*46 


Diary 12 

Law Report 28 
Leaders 14 
Letters 14 
Sdeucr 14 
Soon 28-3832 
Theanw.«c 31 
TV & Radio 31 
Weather . 16 
Wffls • 14 


•a It He a Hr * 


Leading article 
Comment 
Stock Markets 
Share Prices 


13 

19 

19 

21 


during September and Octo- 
ber to 16 million barrels a day. 
Dealers estimate that the pro- 
posals will only have a tem- 
porary effect on the depressed 
oil price. 

But it was interim figures 
from GKN, one of Britain's 
biggest manufacturing compa- 
nies, that really hit confidence 
in share prices. 

* Pretax profits for the first 
six months of the year rose 
from £70-5 million to £74.5 
million, but Mr Trevor 
Holdsworth, chairman, gave a 
warning that fuD year profits 
were unlikley to match the 
£133 million the group made 
in 1985. 

Mr Holdsworth blamed a 
sharp downturn in the group's 


agricultural and commercial 
vehicle markets and steel 
stockholding business. The 
news shocked the stock mar- 
ket and the GKN share price 
responded with a fell of 58p to 
288p. This wiped about £133 
million from the group's total 
capitalization and now values 
it at about £683 million. 

Other engineering compa- 
nies were hit by the news from 
GKN. Lucas Industries tum- 
bled' 14p to 516p and Hawker 
Siddeley 26p to 491p. As a 
result, maricetmen will be 
keeping a dose eye on interim 
figures today from TI Group, 
the Creda cookers to Raleigh 
bicycle manufacturer. 

The City is also becoming 
increasingly sceptical about 
Britain's economic growth as 
more and more industrial 
companies continue to turn in 
disappointing figures. 

Last month, ICI reported 
second- quarter figures below 
original City estimates. It may 
also cast doubt on the success 
and timing of the Trustee 
Savings Bank flotation sched- 
uled for next month and the 
privatization of British Gas 
expected in November. 

British Gas will be the 
biggest flotation ever under- 
taken on the stock market 


Whitehall GEC’s bid 
in petrol for Plessey 
price fight is blocked 


By David Yc 
Energy* 

The Government is to con- 
tinue its campaign of subtle 
pressure on the major oil 
companies to bold petrol 
prices down to keep the Retail 
Price Index (RPI) at its 
present low level despite rising 
world crude oil prices. 

Treasury revenues will rise 
as North Sea oil prices go up 
and so increase the 
Chancellor’s scope for tax cuts 
in his next Budget, in March, 
1987. But petrol prices are an 
important component of the 
RPI and the Government 
knows that it is this index on 
which annual wage demands 
and many' index-linked pen- 
sion payments and unit trust 
dividends are based. 

The Treasury regards the 
impact of petrol prices, lorry 
diesel, home beating ofl and 
industrial fuels on the RPI as 
being as important as higher 
mortgage rates. 

Following, the March Bud- 
get, the Government sug- 
gested that lhe-then current 
profit levels which the oil 
companies were making — 
subsequently borne out in 
their annual profit figures 
issued in April — meant that 
they could absorb the in- 
creased duty on a gallon of 
petrol. 

The oil companies objected, 
bat market forces later meant 
that prices dropped to the 
levels they were before the 
Budget. 

The Government now takes 
the view that while the oil 
companies may have lost 
money on their exploration 
and production from the 
North Sea because of the 
lower world oil price, their 
modernized refineries have 

Continued on page 16, col 4 


By Teresa Poole 

The General Electric 
Company's proposed £1.2 bil- 
lion takeover of Plessey has 
been blocked, after causing a 
split in the Monopolies and 
Mergers Commission. 

Mr Paul Channon, Sec- 
retary of State for Trade and 
Industry, said yesterday he 
accepted in full the majority 
recommendation of the 
commission that the ac- 
quisition would be against the 
public interest 

However, the commission 
report saw benefits in 
rationalization of the two 
companies' digital telephone 
exchange businesses without a 
full merger of the two 
companies. 

It said rationalization 
would give better opportu- 
nities for exports and would 
improve the prospect of 
financing the development of 
future exchange systems. 
w Mr Colin Baiilieu, a 
commission member, criti- 
cized the majority report for 
not giving enough weight to 
the international nature of the 
markets for both tele- 
communications and defence 
electronics. 

He said the merger would 
not be against the public 
interest and added: “To take 
an excessively purist line 
about a small loss of domestic 
competition is to perpetuate 
the balkanization of an im- 
portant sector of British 
industry.” 

Mr Derek Roberts, joint 
deputy managing director at 
GEC said the decision was 
harmful to the UK economy 
in that it would inhibit the 
formation of a company better 
able to compete in world 

Continued on page 16, col 3 


Cyprus gunmen known 


Nicosia (AP) — Police have 
established the identities of 
two of the terrorists who 
attacked the Royal Air Force 
base at Akrotiri on Sunday. 

Police sources yesterday 
said the identities of the two 
men were traced after police 


found two hire cars used in the 
attack abandoned at the near 
by city of Limassol. 

The cars had been hired on 
Saturday by two men with 
Lebanese passports named as 
Mr Bias Bitar, aged 35, and 
Mr Malik Nazban, aged 23. 





Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother, and a royal corgi travelling with her, prepare to board a 


flight at Heathrow yesterday for her ! 


home, the Castle of Mey. 


Mr Tom King, Secretary of 
State for Northern Ireland, 
had talks in Dublin with Dr 
Garret FitzGerald yesterday, 
daring which they discussed 
the Provisional IRA's threat to 
companies servicing security 
forces. 


bread and garden produce to 
the police, many of . the 
province's businessmen were 
refusing to be panicked by the 
terrorists' latest attempt az 
intimidation. 

However British Telecom 
has advised its 4.700 employ- 
ees to take extra precautions 
about their personal safety 
and other companies have 
attempted to reassure fright- 
ened workers. 

But the threats against 
building contractors have al- 
ready had serious effects on 
the building programme of the 
Royal Ulster Constabulary 
with work at a standstill at 
Enniskillen and a new base in 
Londonderry, work just re- 
sumed on a station at Lame 
and a maintenance contract 
ended at RAF Aldeigrove. 

A number of other bases 
have been damaged in terror- 
ist attacks at Ballygowan, 
Broughshane, Tynan and 
Carrickmore while the Royal 
Engineers have completed re- 
pairs at Too meb ridge in Co 
Antrim. 

As Mr Norman Willis, gen- 
eral secretary of the Trades 
Union Congress joined wide- 
spread business, political and 
union condemnation of the 
threat, Mr Tom King. Sec- 
retary of State for Northern 
Ireland, considered the op- 
tions open to the 
Government 

He had talks with Sir John 
Hermon, Chief Constable of 
the RUC and General Sir 
Continued on page 2^oI 7 


Pretoria retaliates 
against Zambia 


Sinn Fein 
MP backs 
death 
threats 

By Richard Ford 

The leader of the political 
wing of the Provisional IRA 
yesterday defended . their 
death threats to contractors 
servicing the security forces as 
the Government anxiously 
awaited its effect on the 
business community in 
Northern Ireland. 

Mr Gerry Adams, Pro- 
visional Sinn Fein MP for 
West Belfast, defended the 
threat of the military wing 
saying that they had made it 
clear that the firms involved 
were assisting the British mili- 
tary presence.and imtas they 

stopped they wuld find were being- made,- 

} n firhrg hue . maintaining that they were fin* 

Asked about the effects on 1 - 

unemployment he saldb'Tt's 
going to be very, very mar- 
ginal with a small section of 
the business class that is 
growing rich on the backs of 
the stnisde and which is 
actively collaborating.” 

Early indications were that 
despite the withdrawal of 
three firms supplying fuel, 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 

Africa yesterday could be cleared through 
South African, pons and was 
recoverable on written proof 
that they had reached their 
destination. 

He disclosed that the de- 
posit system had been in force 
since last Monday on Zam- 
bian imports, but had not so 
far been applied to any other 
countries. The timing of its 


South 

stepped up retaliatory eco- 
nomic pressure on Zambia 
and Zimbabwe, the two raost 
black African proponents of 
sanctions against Pretoria, by 
carrying out time-consuming 
border checks on road cargo. 

The executive director of 
the South African Association 
of Freight Forwarders, Mr 
Alan Cowdl, told The Star of 
Johannesburg that trucks and 
lorries were being unpacked 
and inspected at the Beit 
Bridge post between South 
Africa arid Zimbabwe and at 
Botswana border posts. 

The Commissioner of Cus- 
toms and Excise, Mr Daan 
Colesky,' confirmed that 


Nine South African miners 
were killed and 15 injured 
yesterday by an explosion two 
kilometres (more than 6,000 
feet) underground at the. 
Deelkraai gold mine, south- 
west of Johannesburg (Ren- 
tas report). - 


“a statistical survey,” and 
only affected goods from Zim- 
babwe and Zambia destined. 
for export through South Af- 
rican ports. Trucks, he said, 
were being delayed for a 
maximum of 24 hours. 

Similar border controls — 
ostensibly for security reasons 
— were imposed by Pretoria 
last January on traffic entering 
Lesotho. Their effect was 
tantamount to that of an 
economic blockade, and 
helped to bring about the 
overthrow of the Government 
of Chief Leabua Jonathan. 

At a press conference last 
Tuesday, the South African 
Foreign Minister, Mr R.F. 
“Pik” Botha, served warning 
of possible border checks and 
announced that an import 
levy would “soon” be im- 
posed on goods passing 
through South Africa to other 
countries in the region. 

Asked yesterday for details 
about the levy, Mr Colesky 
told The Times that it took the 
form of a cash deposit which 
had to be paid before goods 


introduction, he blandly 
maintained, was “purely 
coincidental” 

However, Mr Colesky said 
the Government “would not 
hesitate” to apply the system 
to other countries if customs 
fraud was suspected. 

Hauliers and freight 
forwarding agents said yes- 
terday that they saw the new 
measures as being designed to 
increase the “hassle factor* 1 of 
transporting goods to and 
from Zambia. 

Long delays could be caused 
if import agents in South 
Africa are not prepared to pay 
the deposits themselves, but 
insist on getting cash from 
Zambia, which is a slow 
business. 

South africa has repeatedly 
declared that its black-ruled 
neighbours would suffer if 
economic sanctions were im- 
posed against it, though Gov- 
ernment ministers refuse to 
admit that they would ever 
engage in anything as crude as 
“retaliation.” 

Homan rights record, page 7 
Pretoria retaliation, page 7 
Letters, page 7 


Reagan wins battle 
on protection Bill 

From BaQey Morris, Washington 

heavy lobbying by the White 
he free traders 


In an important victory for 
President Reagan, the US 
House of Representatives yes- 
terday narrowly defeated re- 
strictive textile legislation. 
The Administration had de- 
scribed it as the most protec- 
tionist Bill since the great 
depression. 

House members foiled by 
only three votes to override 
President Reagan's earlier 
veto of the legislation in a 
political confrontation that is 
expected to be fought again in 
the November elections. 

The final vote in the House 
was 276 in favour of the veto 
override and 149 opposed. 

A two-thirds majority, in 
this case 279 votes out of the 
419 members present, was 
required to override the 
President 

After a frantic week of 


House, the tree traders m 
Congress prevailed in the 
closely followed vote, which is 
expected to set the tone of 
other trade conflicts expected 
over the next difficult months 
when the record US trade 
deficit is expected to grow. 

Members speaking against 
the Bill said passage of the 
legislation would send a signal 
to the world that the United 
Stales was turning protec- 
tionist much as it did in the 
1930s. when it passed the 
Smoot-Hawley legislation, 
which resulted in global trade 
retaliation 

The White House had bat- 
tled to the end yesterday in a 
last minute attempt to prevent 
passage of the legislation, 
which now will be sent to the 
US Senate. 


Duty-free not always such a bargain 


From Jonathan Braade 
Brussels 

Let the buyer beware: duty- 
free goods in Europe's inter- 
national aiiports are not 
always bargains. 

According to a survey of 
duty-free prices published by 
the Brussels-based Bureau of 
European Consumer Unions 
yesterday, it is sometimes 
cheaper to buy luxury items in 
ordinary shops. 

Sometimes the saving at so- 
! called tax-free prices is less 


than the value-added tax in 
local shops. 

Him prices at Heathrow 
airport are believed to be 
particularly iniquitous: 2 per 
cent more expensive than in 
town. At Lisbon airport the 
price of the perfume Chanel 
No 5 is 7 per cent more than in 
town. 

If you have the time — and 
unlimited free travel — it is 
worth shopping around for 
duty-free goods. The bureau 
found that perfumes are 
cheapest in Athens, but Span- 


ish airports arc awash with 
alcoholic bargains. 

At Heathrow alcohol and 
cigarettes are a relatively good 
buy, unless you happen to be 
travelling to a country where 
these items are cheaper than 
in Britain. Alcohol is 49 per 
cent cheaper than in London 
shops, while cigarettes are 50 
per cent cheaper. 

Individual airports are not 
always consistent In London 
and Frankfurt, for instance, 
the price advantage is greater 
for compact cameras than for 
reflex models." 

V. 


“The travelling customer 
has — as always - to be alert 
and collect enough informa- 
tion in advance in order to 
know where to find the best 
buy." the report says helpfully. 

As a more practical solu- 
tion. U calls for a European 
Community regulation oblig- 
ing duty-free shops to display 
the level of excise duties ana 
VAT deducted from the price. 

It also calls on the EEC to 
investigate whether certain 
duty-free shops are abusing 
their monopoly position at air 
and sea ports. 


TWA grounds 
Athens flights 
due to slump 

Athens — TWA, the Ameri- 
can airline, announced yes- 
terday that it was suspending 
operations in and out of 
Athens indefinitely from to- 
day because of economic 
problems and a labour dispute 
(Mario Modiano writes). 

TWA has already cancelled 
flights between Athens and 
New York since July 27. 

The American airline has 
been badly hit by a dramatic 
slump in US tourism 


Drop in 
days lost 
through 
strikes 

By Richard Thomson 

The number of working 
days lost through strikes in 
Britain last year was less than 
a quarter of the total in 1984 
and nearly half the average for 
the previous 10 years, the 
Daparunent of Employment 
said yesterday. The falling 
trend has continued this year, 
with the number of working 
days lost in the 12 months to 
May dropping to the lowest 
level since 1967. 

The DoE's monthly 
Employment Gazette said that 
the sharp drop in lost working 
days was partly attributable to 
the implementation of the 
Trade Union Act in Septem- 
ber 1984 which tightened the 
laws surrounding strike ac- 
tion. However, the figures, as 
in 1984, are overshadowed by 
the miners' strike, which 
ended in March last year. It 
was by far the largest contrib- 
utor to the number of working 
days lost in 1985. 

However, most stoppages in 
Britain Iasi year lasted fewer 
than three days. Most were 
caused by redundancy fears 
but the second most common 
cause was pay. 

There were 6.4 million days 
lost through stoppages last 
year compared with 27.1 mil- 
lion in 1984. The miners' 
strike accounted for 4 million, 
or 63 per cent. Without it, the 
number of days lost would 
have been down to the mid- 
1960s level 

Over the 10 years to 1984 
the average number of days 
lost amounted to 1 1.1 million 
and during the 12 months to 
May 1986, the Gazette reports 
a provisional total of 2.4 mil- 
lion days lost, the smallest 
number for nearly 20 years. 

Stoppages recorded last year 
fell to 903, the lowest level 
since 1938 when 883 stop- 
pages were recorded. But the 
figures include strikes involv- 
ing small numbers of people as 
well as mass industrial action 
and do not necessarily bear a 
direct relationship to the 
working days lost 

After' the coal strike, foe 
largest industrial stoppage 
during 1985 was the teacheis’ 
strike over pay in England, 
Scotland ana Wales, which 
accounted for more than 

800.000 days lost Other in- 
dustries heavily hit by stop- 
pages included transport 
equipment and food, drink 
and tobacco. The least strike- 
prone were textiles, footwear 
and clothing. 

At the same time there was 
an expansion in the workforce 
last year, estimated to be 

192.000 million, down from 
foe growth of 5 1 2,000 in 1984. 

The DoE expects the level 
of claimant unemployment — 
those registered as un- 
employed— to remain stable 
According to DoE statistics, 
foe growth in the labour force 
over the past 1 5 years is due to 
a 1.7 million increase in the 
number of women working. 


Thatcher 
looks for 
sharper 
image 

By Philip Webster 
Chief Political 
Correspondent 

The Prime Minister is ask- 
ing Cabinet ministers to 
sharpen up television and 
other public appearances as 
part of a series of pre-election 
planning moves put in hand 
yesterday. 

Mr Norman TebbiL foe 
party chairman, announced 
the appointment of a new 
Conservative Party director of 
presentation and promotion, 
Mr Harvey Thomas, whose 
job will be to ensure that the 
Prime Minister and her min- 
isterial colleagues get foe most 
out of media appearances and 
nationwide tours. 

Mr Thomas is being moved 
from his present position as 
director of communications to 
enable Mrs Thatcher to bring 
in a new image-making chief 
for the election run-up — an 
appointment regarded as of 
the highest importance by Mrs 
Thatcher and those close to 
her. An announcement is 
expected during the next few 
weeks. 

It was said yesterday that a 
decision has yet to be made 
and several prominent can- 
didates in the advertising 
industry have been consid- 
ered. 

Mrs Thatcher is looking for 
someone like Sir Gordon 
Reece, her image-builder be- 
fore foe Tories' 1979 election 
victoiy. 

The splitting of the presen- 
tation job into two is an indi- 
cation of the Prime Minister's 
reservations about the way foe 
party's image has been port- 
rayed so for under Mr Tebbif s 
chairmanship. The announce- 
ment from Conservative Cen- 
tral Office yesterday said Mr 
Thomas's appointment was 
being made “with foe agree- 
ment of the Prime Minister.” 

Mr Thomas, aged 46. a 
former campaign manager 
and cheerleader for Mr Billy 
Graham, the evangelist, will 
help ministers spruce up their 
television performances. A 
major drive will come at the 
Tory conference in Bourne- 
mouth in October. His other 
main task is foe staging of 
party conferences. 

But his appointment seems 
set to raise a few hackles. Mr 
Thomas will be working close- 
ly with foe Civil Service staffs 
of ministers, the announce- 
ment said. Political appoin- 
tees are not always welcome in 
such territory. 

Central Office said: “The 
post is a new one and reflects 
foe greater emphasis which 
foe party organization will be 
giving to campaigning and 
presentation in the run-up to 
foe general election.” 

Mr Thomas said the new 
post has to be seen in terms of 
political evangelism. “It is 
crusading, crusading for foe 
party and foe campaign for foe 
election.” 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


Police in nationwide 
inquiry over alleged 
£8m home loans fraud 


An alleged mortgage fraud 
involving home loans worth 
up to £8 million is being 
investigated by Thames Val- 
ley Police and it was revealed 
yesterday that a solicitor inter- 
viewed by detectives has re- 
signed from his practice. 

A report is being prepared 
for the Director of Public Pro- 
secutions after months of in- 
quiries into claims that 
applications for house mort- 
gages were submitted to build- 
ing societies all over Britain 
with fake legal documents and 
involving fictitious families. 

Police refused to name the 
solicitor from the Thames 
Valley area, but said they had 
interviewed a letting agent 
from Berkshire, an insurance 
broker from Hampshire, an 
accountant from Berkshire 
and a mortgage broker from 
London. 

Up to 200 properties 


in 


By Mark EUis 

London and the Thames Val- 
ley are said to be involved and 
the total amount of loan 
money is estimated to be 
almost £8 million. 

A Thames Valley police 
spokesman said: “Our inqui- 
ries are taking us all over the 
country and we have collected 
a mountain of paperwork and 
forms, which we are now 
studying and photocopying. U 
is a very complex inquiry and 
it will take us several weeks in- 
complete. We shall then sub- 
mit a report to the DPP 

No one has been charged 
but the police say prosecutions 
are likely to follow when 
inquiries are completed. The 
investigation began in 
November last year and in- 
volves mortgage applications 
dating back to January 1985. 

The alleged fraud is claimed 
to involve false mortgage ap- 
plications. using fictitious 


names, to various building so- 
cieties, but the houses involv- 
ed were real and some had 
unsuspecting families living in 
them. 


Other properties were genu- 
inely being sold, but it is 
claimed false applications for 
mortgages were running paral- 
lel to real requests for loans. 
Building societies did not dis- 
cover the alleged fraud be- 
cause loan forms were backed 
by documents and surveys. 


Man dies 
at Boy 
George’s 
house 


By Michael Horsnefl 


A spokesman for the Build- 
ing Societies Association said 
lenders would not notice false 
claims as the word of a solicit- 
or would be accepted without 
checks. He said building so- 
cieties suffered negligible 
losses through fraud as in 
most cases they are able to re- 
cover the money through re- 
possession of property or re- 
trieving the advance. 


Masons deny Stalker link 


Officials of the freemasons 
society, accused in the past of 
obsessive secrecy, called a 
press conference yesterday to 
deny any involvement by 
their organization in the 
Stalker case. 

Journalists and television 
cameras were invited into the 
Masonic Temple in Manches- 
ter of the East Lancashire 
Province of the freemasons. 

Officials said that they had 
decided on the step after 
allegations in the news media 
suggesting a masonic link in 
the suspension of Mr John 
Stalker, deputy chief constable 
of Greater Manchester, and 
his removal from an inquiry 
into an alleged shoot-to-kiU 
policy by the Royal Ulster 
Constabulary. 


By Peter Davenport 

They were also concerned at 
allegations that Mr Norman 
Briggs, chairman of the 
Greater Manchester Police. 
Authority and thus closely 
involved in the Stalker case, 
had been a freemason. 

Mr Briggs, a Labour coun- 
cillor. collapsed and died a 
week after the allegations were 
first published. They were 
strongly denied yesterday by 
his family and the freemasons. 

Yesterday, Mr Colin Greg- 
ory, provincial grand secretary 
of the East Lancashire Prov- 
ince of the freemasons which 
has 17,000 members, denied 
that the organization had been 
involved in any way in the 
Stalker case. 

He said that “from about 
the third week in June the 
media has said to itself ‘Ah! It 


must be the freemasons. They 
are responsible for the situa- 
tion in which Mr Stalker finds 
himself” 

He said the allegations im- 
plied that the freemasons were 
“some sinister organization in 
cahoots with the RUC” and 
had tried to get Mr Stalker 
removed from the inquiry. He 
had no evidence of this. 

Mr Gregory refused to di- 
vulge the number of police- 
men in the Greater Manch- 
ester force who belong to the 
organization, or how many 
senior officers are members. 

Asked if he would investi- 
gate to see if any individuals 
had misused their member- 
ship of the organization in the 
Stalker case. Mr Gregory said 
he was not prepared to act on 
hearsay. 


Boy George, the pop singer 
who has nndergo&e treatment 
for heroin addiction, was 
awaiting police questioning 
last night after the drugs death 
of an American musician and 
songwriter at his home in 
Hampstead, north London. 

Michael Rndetski, aged 27, 
from New York, was found 
dead on the lounge floor by Mr 

Kevin O'Dowd, the singer’s 
brother, early yesterday, less 
than two days after arriving in 
Britain to help Boy George 
work on new songs. 

An inquest wfll be opened 
today at St Panoas coroner’s 
court after a post mortem 
examination at St Fancras 
mortuary revealed that the 
young keyboard player died 


from respiratory failure dne to 
an intake of drags. 

Police said that the finding 
was subject to substances be- 
ing taken from the body for 
analyss. 

A spokesman added: “The 
death is not bring treated as 
suspicions at this stage. Mem- 
bers of the family will be 
qnestioned and Boy George is 
a member of the family. No 
one is bring sought No one 
has been arrested and no one 
is in custody. 4 * 

It is fikdy that the singer, 
who was not present at the 
boose in Well Road the night 
of Mr RndetskTs death, will be 
questioned at his other Lon- 



The house where Mr Rudetski was found (top), Mr Kevin O'Dowd (left) and Boy George 


don home in Aberrant Close, 
St John's Wood. 

The body was discovered 
folly dothed just after 430 am 
by Mr O’Dowd, who is faring 
charges with three others of 
supplying heroin to the Cul- 


ture Club singer, after he bad 
returned from the limelig ht 
Club in the west end. 

Mr Rndetski, whose body is 
expected to be flown home to 
the United States after the 
opening of the inqnest, Is 


understood to have com- 
plained of fading unwell. 

Boy George, who has bat- 
tled to o verco me his own 
heroin addiction, was fined 
£250 fast month for possession 
of the drug. 


Minister 
faces quiz 
on murder 


case man 


Mr Alan Dukes, the Irish 
Minister for Justice, was yes- 
terday ordered to provide the 
High Court in Dublin with 
reasons for the continued 
detention of a man wonted in 
Belfast on terrorist charges. 

The case arises out of 
evidence from Harry Kirk- 
patrick, the Irish National 
Liberation Army 

“supergrass”. 

John O'Reilly, aged 26. of 
Eliza Street. Belfast, was ar- 
rested in the Irish Republic 
fast October. A local district 
court later ruled that be 
should be extradited to Belfast 
to face accusations of conspir- 
acy to murder and cause an 
explosion. 

Mr Rex Mackey, counsel for 
Mr O'Reilly, claimed in the 
High Court that his client's 
arrest and detention in the 
high security prison at 
Portlaoise, Co Laois, was 
unlawful. 

He said extradition war- 
rants issued against Mr 
O'Reilly by Belfast crown 
conn in January 1985 were 
defective. 

Mr Justice John Biayncy 
directed the Justice Minister 
to explain why Mr O'ReDly 
was being held and adjourned 
the case for a week. 

Mr O'Reilly has been 
charged in Belfast with 
conspiring to murder Mr 
Kenneth Shimeld, a Civil 
Servant, and cause an explo- 
sion. 


Thatcher will have sling for month 

By Philip Webster, Chief Political Correspondent 


The Prime Minister was 
recovering quickly last night 
after a successful hour-long 
operation on her right hand. 

Mrs Margaret Thatcher had 
surgery at 8am yesterday for 
Dupuytren's contracture, the 
condition which has been 
pulling the small finger of her 
right hand into the palm. 


By mid-afternoon she was 
reading government papers 
and initialling them with her 
non-writing left hand. 

The operation at the private 
King Edward VII Hospital for 
officers in central London was 
performed by Mr Donal 
Brooks, a consultant surgeon. 

Downing Street said that 


Mrs Thatcher’s medical advis- 
ers were satisfied with the way 
the operation had gone. She 
was making good progress. 

Mrs Thatcher’s staff were 
keeping a tally of bouquets 
from well-wishers which has 
passed 20 by late afternoon. 

She is expected to stay in 
hospital until tomorrow 


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Two share 
lead in 
chess titles 


By Harry Golombek 
Chess Correspondent 


After right rounds of the 
British Chess Championship 
at Southampton, grandmas- 
ters Jonathan Speriman mid 
Jonathan Mestel are leading 
with 6Vi points each. Inter- 
national master Daniel King is 
third with 6 points, half a 
point ahead of grandmas 
Murray Chandler, interna- 
tional master Glenn Flear, 
Neil McDonald, Michael Ad- 
ams and Dovaki Prasad. 

Jonathan Speriman de- 
feated Murray Chandler, who 
had the better position but 
failed to play the correct line, 
and Jonathan Mestel won 
convincingly against the 
youngest player, Michael Ad- 
ams, aged 14. 

In the women's champion- 
ship Susan ArkeD leads with 
7Uz points, 2 ahead of Chris- 
tine Flear. 


Correction 


The percentages of people found 
to be vegetarian this year in a 
Gallup poO reported on July 29 
should have read 2.1 per cent for 
men, 3.4 per cent for aO women 
and 62 percent for women aged 
between 16 and 24. AH the 
figures wore higher than in the 


previous two years. This year 
of adults said they 


3.1 per cent 

were eating less red meat, 
compared with 2.6 per cent last 
year. 





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Peacock to press for 
pay as you view TV 


By Garin Bell, Arts Correspondent 
Members of the Peacock beamed directly into 


committee on 
will urge Mr Douglas Hi 
Home Secretary, to take the 
first technical steps towards 
“pay as jfou view” television, 
at a meeting early next month. 

The meeting coincides with 
active government consid- 
eration of the Peacock recom- 
mendations for creating a free 
market broadcasting system 
dictated by the consumer. 

Committee members said 
yesterday they hoped to per- 
suade Mr Hurd to press ahead 
with the purely technical 
preparations for cable and 
satellite networks, while some 
of- their more controversial 
recommendations were being 
evaluated. 

The first-step advocated by 
the Peacock report was for all 
new television- sets - sold or 
rented in the UK to be 
adapted to receive direct 
subscription services by 1988. 

About 18 per cent of sets 
now being sold already have 
the special sockets and asso- 
ciated electronics. The cost is 
estimated at £25, but viewers 
would also need a decoder, 
costing about £50. 

The aim is to give subscrib- 
ers freedom of choice between 
‘any number of programmes. 


their 

homes by satellite and cable 
networks. 

The initial phase would also 
involve creating a national 
fibre optic grid for a multiplic- 
ity of television and business 
communications. 

Mr Samuel Britian, a 
committee member and assis- 
tant editor of the Financial 
Times , said: “I will be suggest- 
ing to Mr Hurd that the pay 
socket and fibre optic recom- 
mendations be implemented 
quickly.” 

He would also be putting 
the case for increasing the 
proportion of .programmes 
supplied by independent 
producers, in spite of oppo- 
sition from the BBC and the 
independent television 
companies. .. 

Mr Jeremy Hardie, another 
member of the committee, 
said: “Adapting television sets 
for the future and setting up 
the national grid is the key to 
the whole thing. It is. im- 
portant to get the technology 
in place.” 

Professor Peacock said he 
would like to discuss with Mr 
Hurd -somft of the more 
constructive criticisms that 
have been made of his 
committee's report. 


Sinn Fein MP defends 
Provos’ death threats 


Continued fironi pagel 
Richard Pascoe, General Offi- 
cer commanding in the prov- 
ince and pledged that all steps 
would be taken to ensure 
repairs were carried out to 
security bases. 

Before travelling to Dublin 
where he had talks with Dr 
Garret FitzGerald, Mr King 
appealed to the community to 
reject the threats, from a 
“small bunch of thugs and 
terrorists who are increasingly 
isolated,” 

Leading industrialists in the 
province' will discuss the 
threat and its implications at a 
meeting on Monday but it is 
clear that organizations 
representing business and the 
trade unions are being ex- 
tremely cautious in comments 
they make on the issue. 

The dilemma facing both 


Government and indus- 
trialists is that while they 
recognize the enormous worry 
the threats have caused they 
do not wish to give more 
publicity to the Provisionals 
or to breath defiance at the 
terrorists for fear of provoking 
violent attacks. 


The Government accepts 
that it is impossible to provide 
security for everyone now 
under threat, though officials 
have been given a list of men 
prepared to carry out the work 
by the Democratic Unionist 
Party. Mr Peter Robinson, 
deputy leader of the DUP, 
said:“ There will be many 
individuals presently un- 
employed who will say. to 
themselves Tin prepared to 
stand up to the Provos*.” 


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Drugs ruse to boost grouse 


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POls disguised as grit may 
be used to persuade grouse to 
swallow drags which could 
tackle the decline of Britain's 
most famous native wild game 
bird. 

The drugs have already 
worked in experimental dints 
to control worm infestations. 
Worms are among the main 
threats to this year's shooting 
season, which begins next 
Tuesday on the “Glorious 
Twelfth” 

The pQb are described by 
Dr Peter Hudson, principal 
biologist with the North of 
England Grouse Research 
Project, in a report about a 
series of grouse experiments 
done since 1975. The Game 
Gmservaney says 1975 was 
“tbe last good year far 
grouse'*. 

Research has shown that 
the tiny worms which borrow 


try to rednee their numbers to 
tolerable lends. Drags have 
proved effective, bat it is not 
easy to persuade a wfld bird 
like tbe grouse to swallow its 
prescribed dose. 

Grease swallow grit to help 
in the digestion of heather, 
their main food. Dr Hndson 
says the prospects of a “grit 
pifi** are to be tested. “It may 
be possible to place such pills 
on the piles of grit used by 
pose and so control worm 
bankas at die critical time.** 

But there is often so ranch 
grit about that it woahl be hard 
to make sure Oat -foe birds 
would find foe pills, which 
would have to be proof against 


being dissolved by rate hat 


If the birds are follof worms 
they fay fewer eggs ia foe 
and their yoragare less 
Kkdy to survive 


Worm infection can i 
the lining of the «t and make 
it harder for foe birds to 
ab sorb t he nut rien t s necessary 
to smrhre. Worm eggs reach 
the ground hi gra nge drop* 
ptags, and once hatched- the 
young worms c&nb to foe tips 

of tbe heather where they are 


Red Grouse: 

Management (Game Gonser- 
vmicy, Fordingbridge, Hants 
SP6 1EF; £1 1 inc postage). 




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the large annul flnetnatfens 
in grouse numbers and the 
remorseless decline over de- 
cades that is wo r ryin g land- 
owners and their agents. 

Dr Hudson says that gronse 
are so heavily infected by the 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


HOME NEWS 


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concern over 




staff 


By BM Johnstone, Technology Correspondent 

British security experts are consultants BIS Applied Sys- within 

terns, about 15 big sabotage 
incidents have surfaced 


becoming Increasingly con- 
cerned about a wave of com- 
puter sabotage cases occurring 
at the hands of disgruntled 
employees, which have'eaused 
irreparable damage worth mil- 
lions of pounds to computer 
systems, resulting in some 
companies going bankrupt 

In . these instances a 
company's computer system 
is illicitly programmed with 
damaging commands, which 
are obeyed long after the 

“saboteur .has left the. 
company's employment. 
Typically the illegal programs 
are. triggered at a particular 
time or when a set of circum- 
stances occur. 

These logic time bombs, as 
they are now termed, can 
inflict such serious damage on 
companies that they go out of 
business. Recent incidents of 
this novel form of sabotage 
have destroyed valuable com- 
pany records, sales invoicing 
files, lists of diems and other 
fundamental information for 
. running a modern business. 

According to Dr Ken Wong, 
computer security expert from 


re- 
cently and in a third of the 
cases, the companies con- 
cerned have Stopped trading. 

. The principal problem Is that 
there is no check on the 
changes made by some com- 
puter programmers. 

“He can be making an 
illegal change as well as an 
authorized one," Dr Wong 
says. 

The logic time bomb is also 
being used, experts say, by 
cynical self-employed mainte- 
nance programmers and an- 
alysts, who ensure a computer 
system hiccups frequently and 
generates work for diem m the 
process. 

The disclosure follows nr 
the wake of mounting concern * 
in the insurance industry that 
banks and .financial institu- 
tions in the UK wOT again 
loose millions through elec- 
tronic fraud this year. The 
level of loss is never disclosed 
since very few computer 
fraudsters are ever prosecuted 
because of a fear of publicity.. 
A special unit has been created 


Scotland Yard to 
encourage prosecution, but 
still much is kept secret 

A more sophisticated form 
of the logic time bomb has just 
been unveiled in the United 
States. This type of sabotage is 
called a computer virus - the 
computer, is programmed so 
that the illicit instructions can 
themselves generate further 
illicit and damaging 
instructions. 

Reports this week from the 
United States rf*™ that the 
computer networks which 
control everything from bank- 
ing to air traffic control are 
vulnerable to attack from 
terrorists or saboteurs using 
these methods, although no 
occurrences were reported. 

A recently-published report 
from a group of security 
experts attached to George- 
town University in Wash- 
ington concluded that both 
military computer networks 
and the automated banking 
networks, where milli ons of 
dollars are transferred 
electronically around the 
world in seconds, are open to 
“catastrophic collapse”. 


Jealousy denied 
games mistress 


by 


Jayne Scott, a physical 
education teacher, denied that 
she felt 1 jealous of the relation- 
ship between her deputy head- 
mistress and her lover, the 
lesbian love triangle trial at 
the Central Criminal Court 
was told yesterday. 

She also dented any sexual 
relationship with either 
woman, a detective told the 
jury. 

Miss Scott is alleged to have 
attacked Miss Susan Crater 
with a daw hamm er because 
she discovered she had slept 
with her lover, Mrs Debbie 
Fox. 

Miss Crater, aged 35, who 
was deputy head of Slough 
' and Eton Secondary School at 
the time, is now crippled and 
braindamaged. 

Miss Scott, aged 30. of 
Crofthil! Road, Famham 
Royal, Buckinghamshire, de- 
nies causing and inflicting 
grievous bodily harm on Miss 
Crater in August last year 

Detective Constable Joseph 
' McGahran said that when he 
. questioned Miss Scott .she 
.denied being, jealous of the 
relationship between Mrs Fox 
and Miss Oraker. 

When he asked her if there 
was a sexual relationship be- 
tween her and either of the 
two women she allegedly re- 
plied: “No, I am seeing a 
married man." 

At the time of the attack 
Miss Scon said she ami Mrs 
Fox were spending the week- 
end at Miss Crater’s home in 
Barnet, Hertfordshire. The 
passion had gone out of Miss 
Scott's affair with Mrs Fox. 

Mis Fox had recently slept 
with Miss Crater and when 
Miss Soon found out she was 
upset. She had also appealed 
to Miss Crater to give up the 
romance, but, the jury has 
been told, she said she would 
not be intimidated. 

’ Dei Con McGahran -said he 


suggested that Miss Scon was 
trying to mate out that an 
intruder had attacked Miss 
. Crater whereas she was the 
real culprit 

Miss Scott allegedly replied: 
“1 have no reason to fabricate 
- 1 am not the person respon- 
sible. I never tefl lies. 

“I did not strike her with the 
hammer. I cannot strike any- 
one with my hand let alone a 
heavy object” 

. Before being interrupted by 
the judge. Mr Richard 
ChemD, for the defence, men- 
tioned some unsolved crimes 
and said, attacks where the 
assailan t had not been caught 
should not be eliminated from 
police inquiries into Miss 
Crater's case. 

He asked Det Con 
McGahran about the murder 
ofMrs Ann Lock, whose body 
was found by the railway tine 
near Hadley Wood, north 
London. The officer replied 
that the identity of her assail- 
ant was unknown. - 

- Mr Cherrifl then asked him 
abont Pa trick Reilly, who was 
sentenced, to life imprison- 
ment earlier this year for a 
series of rapes. The officer 
agreed that one of the attacks 

- involved a hammer.. 

The judge, Mr Recorder 
Morland, sited him if there 
was anything to suggest Mbs 
C rater had been subjected to a 
sexual assault The officer told 
him there was not MrChenill 
was asking about an unsolved 
rape case when the judge 
interrupted hint 

Det Con McGahran said 
police found about four or five 
fingerprints which .they could 
not identify in Miss Crater's 
home. - 

Det Insp Martin Herridge 
said there were no similarities 
between the attack on Miss 
Crater and the murder of Mrs 
Lock. 

The trial continues today. 


Man faces 
six murder 
charges 

A man aged 23 who feces 
three murder includ- 

ing two in Stockwell south 
London, appeared in court 
yesterday accused of murder- 
ing a further three old people 
aid attempting to murder 
fourth. 

Kenneth Erskine was re- 
manded in custody by South 
Western magistrates m Lon- 
don until August 13, but will 
not appear in court until 
August 27. There Was no 
application for baiL 

The hearing took less than a 
minute and the^chaiges were 
not read out. It was Kir 
Ers kine’s third appearance in 
court since last week. He was 
remanded into police custody 
on the previous occasions, but 
yesterday was remanded to 
prison. 

■ Mr Erskine faced four new 
charges yesterday. v They were 
that on June 28 at Somerville 
Hastings House, Stockwell, he 
in Ordered Mr Valentine 
Gteim, aged 84, and at the 
same place and time he mur- 
dered Mr Zbigliew Stabrava, 
aged 94; that on or before 
April 9 at West Hill Road, 
Putney, south-west London, 
he murdered Miss Irene 
Emms, aged 78; that on June 
27, in Stockwell, he attempted 
to murder a man aged 73. 

At a previous bearing he 
was charged with the murders 
ofMrs Janet Cockett, aged 67,' 
of Overton Road Estate, 
Stockwell fast May; and Mr 
William Downs, aged 74, of 
the same estate, lad month. 
He was also charged with the 
murder of Mr William 
Carmen, aged 82, of Clephane 
Road, Islington, north 
London. 

Reporting restrictions were 
not lifted. 


More private houses built 

By Christopher Warman, Property Correspondent 


Private house building is 
increasing and the forecast 
looks promising, ac cor d in g to 
figures from the National 
Hosse-BuUdiog ConndL 

The latest figures show that 
starts in the second quarter of 
1986 are 13 per cent higher 
than Tor the same period last . 
year and during the first six 
months are 8 per emit up. 

The total starts for the first 
six months is 91,700, while 
completions during the same 
period are 81*500, 8 per cent 
up on last year. 

. Mr Basil Dean, director- 
general of the NHBC, said the 
late spring may have delayed 
some starts until tire second 
quarter, “tat tbe good quar- 
terly figures are backed up by 


the completions figures for the 
quarter and the half year”. . 

“It begins to look fikely that 
our prediction of 150,000 
- starts for the year will prove to 
have been over-cautious.” 

House-building fignres from 
the Department of the 
Environment show that in 
June 1986, the provisional 
estimate of starts in the paMic 
and private sectors is 20,500 
compared with 17,800 in Jose 
1985, while completions num- 
bered 16^00 compared with 
15£00 in Jane last year. 

In the second quarter, total 
starts on a seasonally ad jested 

basis were-7 per cent op on the 
first quarter and 6 per cent ap 
on tire second quarter of 1985. 


While starts and comple- 
tions in tire private sector are 
showing an increase, tire sftnar 
tion is less health; in the 
public sector. The DoE says 
that public sector starts were 
up 7 per cent on the previous 
quarter but 7 per cent lower 
than, a year earlier; comple- 
tions were down by 2 per cent 
and 24 per cent respectively. 

"The NHBC says that fig- 
ures’ fw tire market share of 
timber frame bouses are 
beginning to "Pirate that loss 
of confidence in that form of 
construction has bottomed out. 

After reaching a peak of 24 
per emit in Britain in 1983 it 
declined after adverse pub- 
licity to 7 per emit In the first 
quarter of this year. 


Wells brings 
back 1924 
Paris fashion 

Abut Wells looked^ on his 
own . admission, “like some- 
thing out of tire 1924 Olympic 
Games” (Pat Butcher writes). 
>■ That was a doubly appro- 
priate appraisal of tire retro- 
grade fashion -in , r unning 
shorts that Wells, the 1980 
Olympic 100 metres cham- 
pion. was wearing in Gates- 
head on Tuesday. 

For it was ■ in the 1924 
Olympics in Paris, back- 
ground to tire Oscar-winning 
Chariots of fire that Harold 
Abrahams became the first, 
aid ouly. other, Briton to win 
the Ofympic-sprint title. 

Bat a closer inspection of 
Wells' “shorts” revealed that 
they wore not tire baggy Abra- 
hams-style, but cyclists' skin 
tight pants. 

. Wells was wearing them for 
a lot more, thaa then- shock 
value. He was trying to protect 
the fragile hamstring which 
had kept hint out of tire 
Commonwealth Games. 

At hle ti cs, page 24 



Alan Wells (left) at the finishing line at Gateshead on Tues- 
day, and Harold Abrahams, Olympic gold medallist -in 
1924. 



“The Scrubs”, a pop group made u[ 
Prison, has made a recording, profit 


of three prison officers and three inmates serving fife sentences at Wormwood Scrubs 
> from which will go to Ethiopian famine relief and to needy pensioners in west London 
(PhotograpteSaresh Karadia). 


Societies 
preferred 
by buyers 

More young people would 
prefer to use a building society 
for house conveyancing than a 
solicitor, according to a survey 
published by The Building 
Societies Association (BSA) 
today (Christopher Warman 
writes). 

The survey shows that, if 
costs were equal SO percent of 
people aged 20-24 would be 
likely to use a building society 
for conveyancing compared 
with 33 percent using and sol- 
icitor and 12 per cent a bank. 
For other age groups up to 54, 
the building society is popular, 
while overall the choice is 38 
per cent for building societies; 
40 per cent for solicitors and 
12 per cent for banks. 

The figures emerge from 
market research whioi exam- 
ines the chang in g market for 
house-buying services, and 
looks forward to the im- 
plementation of the BuDding 
Societies Act which will allow 
societies to offer a house- 
buying package including es- 
tate agency services, 
conveyancing, structural sur- 
veys. arranging insurance and 
personal loans. - 
• Forty-one per cent of 
respondents said they would 
use a budding society for 
estate agency services, com- 
pared with 26 per cent choos- 
ing estate agents, and 28 per 
cent would use a society to 
arrange insurance, rising to 43 
per cent in the 20-24 age 
group. Fora personal loan, 26 
per cent would use a society, 
rising to 43 per cent in the 20- 
24 age group. 

Mr Mark Boleal deputy 
secretary general of the As- 
sociation, said: “People find 
house purchase a daunting 
process. The survey confirms 
that baikhngsocieties are well 
placed to oner a package of 
house-buying services.” 


Teachers to give 
warning on Aids 


By Mark Dowd 

A circular issued yesterday 
by the Department of Educa- 
tion on sex education in 
schools recommends the 
inclusion of such topics as 
Aids, abortion and homo- 
sexuality and other “matters 
about which people have 
strongly held views”. 

Carrying a warning that 
teachers should take great care 
with such issues, the docu- 
ment, which is being sent to 
local authorities, teaching 
unions and churches for com- 
ment. states that the topics 
feature regularly in the media 
and are widely discussed. 

After the successful House 
of Lords amendment to the 
Education Bill which pre- 
scribed that sex education 
should inculcate “moral 
considerations and the value 
of family life”, the circular 
represents an attempt to steer 
a course between liberal and 
conservative views. 


Every primary and second- 
ary school it says, should 
develop a sex education pol- 
icy. with parents being given a 
chance to comment on the 
teaching materials used. 

Furthermore, teachers 
should warn pupils against the 
emotional and physical risks 
of promiscuity in any instruc- 
tion, emphasizing the signifi- 
cance of moral values. In 
giving advice, teachers should 
not ‘Trespass on the proper 
exercise of parental rights”. 

The circular also states that 
“the circumstances in which 
the Law Lords considered it 
might be justifiable for a 
doctor to otter contraceptive 
advice and treatment to a girl 
under 16 without knowledge 
and consent of her parents do 
not have a parallel in school 
education”. 

The document was greeted 
favourably by Mr David Hart, 
general secretary of the Na- 
tional Association of Head 
Teachers. 


Boy’s ‘18 
months of 
cruelty’ 

By A Staff Reporter 
Darwyn Day, a stern father, 
subjected the son of the 
woman with whom be was 
living to 18 months of cruelty 
at their home in Cotswoid. 
Gloucester Crown Court was 
told yesterday. 

He made Craig Day, aged 
four, stand on a chair for long 
periods with his hands above 
his head as a punishment, the 
court was told. 

Mr Eifion Win row Thomas, 
for the prosecution, said Mr 
Day hit the boy as he stood 
perched on the chair. 

When the boy's mother 
reported the incident to the 
police they found bruises 
down the child's right band 
side. 

Mr Day. aged 21, of 
Doverow Avenue, 

Stonehouse. Gloucestershire, 
denies charges of assault 
occasioning actual bodily 
harm. 


Family’s ‘insane’ dilemma 


A homeless family who want 
to leave their £165-i-week bed 
and breakfast guest boose for 
a £40-a-week bedsit have been 
told they cannot because it is 
too expensive. ‘ 

Ah anomaly between the 
DHSS and their local conacO 
means that taxpayers have to 
pick op a bill four times larger 
than necessary to keep a 
family, of four in accommoda- 
tion they do not want 
Mr Bernard Dawkins, an 
unemployed mechanic, and his 
wife Valerie, both aged 47, 
found themselves homeless 
after mov ing to Hemet Hemp- 
stead in search of work and 
then retailing to their home . 
town of Newton Abbot, South 
Devon a few months later. 


For almost two months they 
have been trying to find some- 
where other titan the Keridoa 
guest boose in Torquay Road, 
Newton Abbot, for themselves 
and their sons Robert, aged 16 
and Lee, aged seven. 

The problem is that if they 
move oat of the guest house 
they came under the rules of 
honsurn benefit, ran by the 
local Teignbridge Council 
rather than raider the DHSS 
who now pay their board and 
lodging. 

Mr JDawkins explained: 
“We fonnd ourselves a cara- 
van for £66-a-week and we 
were really excited, but then 
we went to the council and they 
said that would be for too 
much. 


“Then we fonnd a ooe- 
bedroom bouse for £40 a w e ek 
bat we were told that was also 
too expensive. It's insane.” 

Mr John Topping, who is in 
charge of housing benefit at 
the council said: “The trouble 
is we are dealing with two 
different bits of legislation. 

“There is an anomaly in the 
law, and 1 recognize it is a 
nonsense as every taxpayer 
most do, but there is another 
piece of legislation which says 
no.” 

A DHSS spokesman 
said:“We are only responsible 
for paying for temporary 
accomodation. We have no 
influence over the policies of 
local SHthorities.” 


Gurkha tells of cash 
offer to smuggle drugs 


A former Gurkha private 
offered £500 to a colleague stQl 
serving with the rcgimeiit to' 
smuggle heroin hack to Britain 
fromNepal a court was told 
yesterday. 

Rifleman Purnabahadur 
Gurung, aged 32, told customs 
officers he was offered the 
cash by Mr Bijaya Jung Gur- 
ung. a former Gurkha, to 
smuggle more than £10,000 of 
the drug concealed in bis 
body. Islewonh Crown Court 
was told. 

Mr Robert Late, a customs 
officer, told the court that Mr 
Purnabahadur Gurung admit- 
ted concealing the package 
when he was questioned at 
Heathrow last August Hdwas 
one of 80 Gurkha soldiers 
returning to their base near 
Aldershot alter 1 8 flays’ leave 
in Nepal 

He denied knowledge of a 
further £143,185 worth of he- 
roin concealed in his suitcase. 


Mr Purnabahadur Gurung has 
pleaded not guilty to smug- 
gling heroin worth £153,495 
into Britain. * ‘ 

Three other serving Gur- 
khas — Madan Komar Shres- 
tha, aged 26, Haure Ral aged 
24, and Reshambadadur 
Gurung. aged 31. have denied 
attempting to smuggle canna- 
bis resin with a street value of 
£28,000. 

Mr Lake said Mr Bijaya 
Jung Gurung met the 80 
Gurkhas when their aircraft 
landed in Nepal and later 
visited Mr Purnabahadur 
Gurung's family home and 
asked him to cany heroin 
back to Britain in a suitcase. 

When he refused, Mr Buaya 
Gurung asked him to ap- 
proach others to snuggle cases 
through customs. Mr Puma- 
bahadur Gurung refused, but 
agreed to carry the small 
package of heroin which be 
concealed. 

The case continues. 


Raider ‘copied method 
from TV programme’ 


A building society raider 
who was sentenced to four 
years’ imprisonment yes- 
terday was said to have got his 
ideas from watching the tele- 
vision programme, 

Crimewalch UK. 

Csa\ Foster, aged 26, un- 
employed, of Sussex Street. 
Plymouth, admitted at Exeter 
Crown Court three charges of 
robbery involving a total of 
nearly £5.800. He was jailed 
for four years, on each count, 
the sentences to run 
concurrently. 

Mr Andrew Maitland, for 
the* prosecution, said that 
Foster first struck at the 
National Provincial Building 
Soeiety in Plymouth last 
December. 

He wrapped the cardboard 
from inside a kitchen roll in a 
carrier bag, pretended it was a 
gun and made the cashier 
hand over £1,339. 


In April at the Leamington 
Spa Building Society in Plym- 
outh, he again pretended he 
had a gun and threatened to 
shoot the cashier. She handed 
over £530. 

Two weeks later Foster 
raided the Yorkshire Building 
Society in Plymouth. 
Brandishing a replica gun he 
forced two cashiers to give 
him a total of £3,91 5. 

Mr John Ballenden, for the 
defence, would not disclose in 
open court what prompted the 
raids. 

But a detective said outside 
the court: “He was short of 
money and got the idea of 
raiding building societies from 
watching Crimewmch UK ” 

Mr Sam Organ, the 
programme's producer, said 
yesterday that he did not give 
credence to the claim. “The 
programme is designed not to 
reveal security matters: we 
work closely with the police." 


Singing debut 
on radio for . 
Sean Connery 

A cast of top actors and 
actresses is to star in a new 
drama series on Radio Three. 

Barnes’ People UU a series 
of plays by Peter Barnes, will 
also mark the singing debut of 
Sean Connery, the former 
James Bond actor. He will be 
heard when he stars with John 
Hurt and Donald Pleaserice in 
the first of the eight plays 
broadcast in a two-week sea- 
son from August 18. 

Each of the plays features a 
cast of three. Other trios 
include Bob Peck, David 
Sucbet and David Warner lan 
Carmichael Paul • Eddington 
and Anna Massey, and vet- 
erans Renee Asherson. Wendy 
Hiller and Ann Todd. 

The first Barnes' People was 
broadcast m 1981 and fea- 
tured a series of monologues. 
Barnes' People II, heard two 
years ago on Radio Three, was 
series of duologues. 

Mr Barnes said yesterday: 
I don't think either films or 
television could assemble, or 
even afford, such a 
bus cast list.” . . 


Motorway food ‘lot better’ 



By Robin Young 

Motorway service areas had 
improved a lot since they were 
last inspected by the 
Consumers' Association in 
1980 and since the relaxation 
of regulations which stifled 
competition, according to a 
report in Whickt 

Most now provided reason- 
able service aad acceptable 
food, the inspectors concluded, 
after visiting all 56 areas on 
Britain's motorways (most of 
them twice), between February 
and Jane this year. 

They noraiaated 

Road Chefs Kffiington Lake 
service area on the M6 the 
most attractive in Britain, “a 
pleasant and relaxing stop” 
where the scenic views were 
superb and the lavatories spot- 
less, even if the food display in 
the restaurant was still 
“uninspiring”. 

Trust boose Forte and Wel- 
come Break areas offered the 
best food, “of reasonable qual- 
ity, varied and well- 
presented”, the inspectors 
Found. Granada's areas were 
tfcfmost consistently weU-nra, 
with good all-round standards, 
f 5 


but RoadChef generally of- 
fered more limited facilities 
than their competitor^ and 
Rank's areas woe found less 
attractive and relaxing, with 
lower catering standards than 
other maia chains. 

Bine Boar and Kenning, 
with only two areas each, were 
said to have foiled to keep pace 
with improvements elsewhere. 


At Ketming’s Andertou area 
on the M61 rows of bench 
seating and drab adorns made 
the inspectors feel they had 
“stepped into a time-warp”. 

Prices for food were not 

unreasonably higher than in 
off-motorway family res- 
taurants, the report said. 

Leading article, page 13 



£19,500 
fine for 
pirate 
videos 

A man who turned his home 
into a factory for producing 
pirate videos was fined 
£19,500 yesterday by Bir- 
mingham magistrates. 

When trading standards 
officers raided the home of 
Syed Zaidi in Melville Road. 
Edgbaston. Birmingham, they 
seized nearly 1,000 tapes and 
found sophisticated video 
equipment for producing high 
quality reproductions of Asian 
films, the court was told. 

Zaidi was said to have been 
making about £20,000*&-year 
from bis business. 

Zaidi, aged 39, who admit- 
ted nine charges "under the 
Trades Description Act and 1 1 
under the Copyright Act, was 
fined £19,500 and ordered to 
pay £750 costs. 

Cannabis plea 
fails in court 

Bayja Dauvergne, aged 35, 
of Maida Vale. London, who 
was plagued by illnesses in the 
past but is now healthy 
claimed yesterday that the 
medicinal qualities of mari- 
juana had worked wonders for 
him, but he was still fined 
£100 for growing a cannabis 
tree 

“It’s a medicine tree," Bayja 
Dauvergne, who was bom in 
the West Indies, told Maryle- 
bone court. “It's a crime in 
this country.” retorted Mr 
Geoffrey Noel, the magistrate. 

Barrister is 
expelled 

Mr Vishinsing Tahilramini 
Haridas, a barrister, has been 
disbarred and expelled from 
Lincoln's Inn for professional 
misconduct, the Senate of the 
Inns of Court and the Bar 
announced yesterday. 

He was found guilty of 
dishonest conduct in making 
false statements to obtain a 
£7.000 loan and conduct 
which might have brought the 
profession into disrepute in 
foiling to repay the loan. 

‘Python’ star’s 
operatic debut 

Eric Idle, one of the stars of 
the Monty Python television 
series, who is also a playwright 
and songwriter, is to mate his 
debut as an opera singer. 

He will sing the role of Ko- 
Ko, the Lord High Execu- 
tioner, in the English National 
Opera Company's new 
production of Gilbert and 
Sullivan's The Mikado which 
opens at the London Coli- 
seum on September 27. 

Man of 54 on 
rape charge 

A father of two daughters 
was accused at Horsefeny 
Road Magistrates' Court yes- 
terday of raping a girl aged 
eight at a south London 
church. 

The unemployed man. aged 
54, from Camberwell south 
London, was remanded in 
custody until August 13, 
charged with the attack at 
Christchurch in Brixton Road, 
Stockwell on Monday. 

Remand in 
heroin case 

Richard Milford Lundin, a 
tailor, aged 31. of Bronte 
House, Kilbura Park Road, 
Kilbura, north London, who 
appeared before magistrates at 
Horseferry Road, West- 
minster, yesterday on drug 
charges, was demanded in 
custody for 24 hours to appear 
before South Western mag- 
istrates in a related case. 

He is charged with supply- 
ing an unspecified amount of 
heroin to Andrew Gardener, 
on or before June 24 last. 

Seven football 
fans remanded 

Eight football supporters 
arrested after a testimonial 
match between Celtic and 
Arsenal appeared before 
Highbury magistrates in Lon- 
don yesterday. 

Seven were remanded to 
various dates. Frederick 
Burns, aged 26, of 
Padddington, west London, 
was fined £200. 

Boy killed on 
railway line 

A boy aged 13 died from 

electric shod: on a railway line 
at Peckham when he fell while 
searching for scrap metal on 
July 1 1, an inquest was told 
yesterday. 

John Moran, of The Cara- 
van Site. Homshay Street, 
Peckham. slipped after climb- 
ing a fence with a friend aged 
12. A train hit him and be had 
died instantly of electrocution. 

£4m appeal 

The Duke of Edinburgh is to 

be patron of a £4 million 
appeal to save Ely Cathedral 
in Cambridgeshire which is 
faced with crumbling stone* 
work and deathwatch beetle, it 
was announced yesterday. The 
appeal is to be launched next 
month. 



4 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 



* . There’s no need to pinch yourself. Until August 31st you 
really can buy a Peugeot 309 GL 1.3, at list price of £6,360, 
with 0% APR finance over 12 months. 

Which means there’ll never be a better time to experi- 
ence for yourself the qualities that have made the British-built 
309 such a huge success. Qualities like its superb suspension. 
Its intelligent spacious design. And its remarkable fuel 
economy (on an RAC observed test a 309 SR travelled no less 
than 698 miles on a single tank of fuel). But, as you can see, 
the 0% APR deal is only one of many low finance packages 
available on the 309 GL 1.3. And there are further offers 
across the rest of the 309 range. So if you were thinking of 
buying an Escort, Astra or Maestro, don’t do anything until 
you’ve visited your nearest Peugeot Talbot dealer. 

He’ll show you how much Peugeot has to offer. And also, 
of course, how little. 


309 GL1-3: THREE TYPICAL EXAMPLES 


FLAT RATE P.A. 

0% 

4.75% 

6.0% 

APR 

0% 

9.4% 

11.9% 

LIST PRICE 

(Including on road costs) 

6530.00 

6530.00 

6530.00 

DEPOSIT (MIN 30%) 

1958.96 

1958.96 

1958.96 

REPAYMENT PERIOD 

12MTHS 

24MTHS 

36MTHS 

FINANCE CHARGES 

NIL ■ 

*43416 

822.48 

MONTHLY PAYMENTS 

380.92 

208.55 

149.82 

CUSTOMER SAVINGS 

Over credit providers normal 
interest rates of 12% pa. flat 
(23.3% apr) 

548.52 

662.88 

822.96 

TOTAL CREDIT PRICE. 

6530.00 

6964.16 

7352.48 


THE LION GOES FROM STRENGTH TO STRENGTH. 


FOR A WRITTEN QUOTATION. CONTACT- PEUGEOT TALBOT CREDIT. PO BOX 7S, GREAT QUEEN STREET. LONDON WC2B SDR lUCENCED BROKERS) PEUGEOT TALBOT MOTOR CO. LTD. PRICE CORRECT AT TIME OF GOING TO Pncce ‘ 

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APR 


FINANCE ON THE qno m i s 












THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


HOME NEWS 


Teachers fear 
*; a severe cut 
in technical 
education 


By Mark Dowd 

Technical education in 
schools next year will be 
, affected by a “severe cut" in 
fj. government funding, Britain's 
largest teaching union said 
yesterda y. 

■ Mr Akm Evans, education 
officer with the National 
Union of Teachers, said that 
the transfer of the 
Government's Technical and 
Vocational Education Initia- 
tive from its present pilot 
status in 62 schools to a 
national programme next year 
will leave many schools un- 
der-resourced. 

The principal aim of the 
initiative, which was set up in 
19S3 and involves just under 
20,000 students, is to tailor the 
4 t school curriculum to make it 
more relevant to industry and 
science. 

The annual cost of the pilot 
projects for 1 984-55 was about 
£30 million. The union says 
that cmly £90 million has been 
earmarked for when the 
scheme is extended nationally 
to all students aged 14 to 18. 


The figures quoted by the 
union also suggest declining 
financial support for the pilot 
projects themselves with an 
average of £6 60,000 for each 
one in 1983. felling to 
£400,000 a year later. 

“It . is obvious," Mr Evans 
said, “that the money the 
Government is intending to 
provide for the extension of 
the initiative will mean far less 
for each school than has been 
available during the pilot 
phases.” 

Yesterday's warning comes- 
in the wake of the advice given 
to the Government by die 
Manpower Services Commis- 
sion, which runs the initiative, 
that the level of funding for 
the national extension was 
“tight". 

Mr Evans also expressed his 
concern that the transfer was 
premature. “It is surely not 
educationally sound to make 
assumptions about the success 
of a pilot study before any 
proper evaluation has been 
carried oul 


Red phone boxes 
saved for nation 

By Trndi McIntosh 


; Eight of Sir Giles Gilbert 
Scott's cast-iron, red tele- 
phone kiosks were listed yes- 
terday as buildings of special 
architectural or historical in- 
terest. 

Lord Elton, Minister of 
Stale for the Environment 
with special responsibility for 
the heritage, formally signed 
the preservation order outside 
the only surviving example of 
a K3- model, which was built 
in 1929, and stands, until it is 
moved to a new technology 
showcase next year, beneath 
the portals of the Parrot 
House at the London zoologi- 
cal gardens. 

Layang-Layang, a two-and- 
a-half year old Asian elephant, 
helped Lord Elton to make a 
“trunk call”, only to find that 
the telephone was out of 
order, to the embarrassment 
of British Telecom. 

The listing covers also a row 
of five K2 kiosks in Broad 
Street, Covent Garden, central 
London: a K1 model in High 
Street, Bern bridge, 1 Isle of 
Wight, an example of the 
earliest standard kiosks which 
were built between 1921 and 
1927; a K.4 model built in 
1930, at Bridge Foot, Warring- 
ton, Cheshire; and a K2 
model built in 1927, which 
stands north of Bow Street 


Magistrates* Court, west 
London. 

Lord Elton said that he 
hoped at least 100 telephone 
kiosks, built before 1939, 
would be listed throughout the 
country “because they are so 
much a part of our history’ 1 
There are about 60,000 red 
telephone kiosks left in Britain 
but most are K6 models, built 
after 1939 and not eligible, for 
listing. 

British Telecom began 
phasing out the kiosks 18 
months ago as part of a five- 
year, £160 million moderniza- 
tion plan, replacing them with 
modem glass booths. 

Buyers from the Middle 
East,- Japan and the United 
States are clamouring for the 
traditional Idosks. paying up 
to £800 each, to transform 
them into a poolside bar, 
changing room, aviary or 
greenhouse. 

Mr Malcolm Gilbert Scott, 
great-nephew of Sir Giles, is 
shipping them to America 
An advertisement in the 
Middle Eastern Times re- 
cently described the kiosk as a 
“unique conversation piece” 
and the demand is so great 
that British Telecom in the 
North-east has sold all 3,200 
of their old red boxes this year. 


Ex-cadet 

‘confessed’ 

toWRAC 

A woman army officer told 
a court martial yesterday that 
a former Sandhurst officer 
cadet on a drugs charge had 
telephoned her and confessed 
to being “a naughty boy”. He 
had previously told her that he 
used drugs before joining the 
Army but had given them up. 

Private Cymon Timothy 
Taylor, aged 23, now with the 
General Service Corps. Royal 
Armoured Corps Centre Regi- 
ment, denies three charges of 
possessing heroin and a fur- 
ther charge of possessing can- 
nabis or cannabis resin. 

Lieutenant Alison Hart, of 
the WRAC. told the court 
martial at Bovington, Dorset, 
that she had had a dose but 
“casual" relationship with Pri- 
vate Taylor ax Sandhurst 
.She said that he told her he 
had a drugs problem before 
joining the Army but was 
cured. He showed her some 
blemishes on his arm and said 
they were old scars from 
injecting a substance. 

After Christmas he tele- 
phoned and asked to meet her, 
saying that he had been “a 
naughty boy" over Christmas. 

The hearing continues 
today. 


Flood cuts 
off holiday 
towns 

Towns in south-west Ire- 
land were cut off yesterday 
after a record overnight 
rainfall 

An unprecedented 3.5 in of 
rainfall was recorded on 
Valentia Island, Co Kerry. In 
holiday centres near by fire- 
men had to rescue people 
from homes and cars. 

At one stage a canoeist had 
to be called in to help a 
motorist the fire brigade could 
not reach. 

The worst floods were in 
Tralee, Co Kerry, and Ban try 
and Macroom. Co Cork, 
where streets were submerged 
by up to 7 ft of water. 
‘Hundreds of people were 
stranded and tourists had to 
iven temporary accom- 
tlion 

Forecast, page 16 


be give 
modatir 


PC charge 

A boy aged 16 was re- 
manded in youth custody till 
Tuesday when he appeared 
before Balham Juvenile Court 
in south London yesterday, 
charged with causing grievous 
bodily harm to off-duty Police 
Constable Christopher Green. 


Battle over property 
advertising intensifies 


. Newspaper owners have 
gone into the estate agency 
business as an amazing tit-for- 
tat war intensifies. The battle 
began when a wealthy 
businessman. Peter Robinson, 
launched his own property 
guide where estate agents 
could advertise cheaply. 

The first victim of the war 
was Sheffield's 130-year-old 
Morning Telegraph, which 
was forced to dose in Feb- 
ruary with the loss of 240 jobs. 

The newspaper could not 
survive without the estate 
agents* advertising revenue. 

But owners of the Tele- 
graph. Sheffield Newspapers, 
nit back by offering cut price 
house advertising in their 
■evening newspaper. The Star. 
t Mr Robinson retaliated by 
‘bringing out a motor guide 
;offenng cheap advertisements 
to garages and car dealers. 

But the newspaper owners 
launched their own estate 
agency business, offering read- 


ers a complete service for £ 100 
plus VAT. The newspaper 
offers to have homes expertly 
valued and then advertise 
them four times with photo- 
graphs 

Now Mr Robinson has fired 
his latest volley — the threat to 
launch his own newspaper 
unless The Star quits the 
estate agency business. 

He said: “I don't want a war 
but I stand by my threat. If 
The Star continues in the 
estate agency business I will 
launch a new weekly news- 
paper which will include the 
property and motor guides 
and will sell for around 1 5p to 
!6p. 

“I can't understand why" 
The Star is out to break estate 
agents. They should have kepi 
the door open. Since I launch- 
ed my property guide they 
have reduced their rates. If 
they had done that in the first 
place The Telegraph might 
have been saved." 



_ _ 

Protesters from Fulbeck and surrounding hamlets democKtratiug against proposals to establish a nuclear waste damp on Lincolnshire farmland. 

Human chain preventing nuclear dump survey 


By Michael Horsnell 

Villagers in Lincolnshire 
have formed a human chain to 
block plans to tnrn farmland 
into a unclear dsst%duinp. 

People in Fulbeck and 
surrounding hamlets south of 
Lincoln have so for stopped 
engineers from Nirex, .die 
government nuclear waste 
agency, from entering the 
proposed site to carry out 


suitability tests. Police have 
been called in but there bare 
been no arrests. 

.The former Second World 
War bomber airfield at 
Fulbeck, now used for forming 
and as a Ministry of Defence 
training is one of four sites 
unfffr investigation by Nirex 
fdr the damping or low-level 
nuclear waste. 

Miss Mvarie Webster, aged 
42, who helps to organize the 


y protest a 
the 600-acre she, said yes- 
terday: “The proposal is like 
patting a lob in your larder. It 
has disrupted the lives of 
everyone in the community.” 

Several hundred people, 
from septuagenarians to chil- 
dren, bold hands 24 hoars a 
day outside the entrance, 
which has also been Mocked 
by form vehicles. It is believed 
a High Court injunction will be 


sought to allow the 
access to the fonef. 

The villagers kre trying to 
raise £12,000 to cany out in- 
dependent geological tests to 
prove the nnsmtebility iff the 
clay soil as a nuclear damp. 

Mr Trevor Cs 
38, spokesman for 
shire and No ttinghamshir e 
against Nndear Damp i n g 
(Land), said: “We are worred 


this is the - thin end of the 
wedge if we allow it to get that 
for. Once Nirex has the final- 
ity for storing low-level waste 
the site could become a dustbin 
for higher levels of radioactive 
material.” 

Nirex has not indicated 
where the waste would come 
from but it is believed the rite 
would take three traintoads a 
week for 50 years for shallow 
burial in steel and concrete. 


Kent faces 
rival peace 
group at 
march end 

Monsignor Bruce Kent, the 
anti-nudear campaigner, was 
confronted by- a rival demon- 
stration yesterday as he ap- 
proached the end of a 500- 
mile sponsored protest march. 

Mgr Kent faced jeers and 
boos from 30 members ofthe . 
Coalition for Peace Through 
Security as,he approached the 
Atomic weapons Research 
Establishment at Xldermas- 
ton. Berkshire. The former. 
CND general secretary had set 
out from the Polaris sub- 
marine base at Faslane, Scot- 
land. — using a route taken by 
warhead convoys.The end of 
the inarch was timed to co- 
incide with the forty-first 
anniversary of the atom bomb 
dropping on Hiroshima. 

Mgr Kent said he would 
demand a public inquiry into 
of leukaemia in local 
children. 

Outside the capital demon- 
strations to mark Hiroshima 
Day focused on a 'convoy of 
cruise missiles and support 
vehicles travelling from Salis- 
bury Plain to the Greenham 
Common air base 

Cruisewatch, the network of 
anti-nudear campaigners who 
track missile convoys, said six 
women staged a “die-in" on 
the A339 at the Porkbouse 
roundabout in Hampshire. 

• Police said one man had 
been arrested at Buffington 
Cross, Hampshire, for using 
obscene language during the 
protests. 



E’SONE 



STMENT THAT'S 



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If you spot one of these chaps on your tail 
this summer, don’t try to shake him off. 

He has an unfair advantage. 

A Granada 2.8i with Ford’s four wheel drive. 

It’s not just designed for mud and snow. 

The system splits the power two thirds to the 
rear wheels and one third to the front, which gives 
the car the well balanced handling characteristics 
of a sporting rear wheel drive machine. 


?■ 


The extra grip you get with all four wheels 
under power helps you drive with great precision 
even in dry conditions. And, combined with the 
standard ABS brakes, enables you to make the 
most of the fuel-injected engines performance. 

Quite a performance it is too. Especially with 
the Rallye Sport aerodynamic aids fitted, here. Its 
maximum speed is at least 50 miles outside the law. 

So why are we telling you all this? 




WeH we thought you might like to join the 
cops. You can order a Granada very similar to the 
one above It won’t have the blue flashing fights, 
. or the computer that measures your speed 

But just about everything dse is in the cata- 
logue Or shotdd we say, the book? 

Ask your Ford dealer 
for a test drive. We’re 
sure he’ll arrange a fair trial. 



Granada 4x4 




V 

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THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


OVERSEAS 


Human rights record of summit countries 




report finds fault 
its critics 


By Our Foreign Staff 

The British refusal to agree 
to wide-ranging- sanctions 
against South Africa has been 
criticized as. a moral failure 
andL asr sullying Britain's 
record on human rights. How- 
ever, countries; which are now 
criticizing Britain themselves 
have records on human rights 
which have been criticized. 

■ One example of the criti- 
cism levelled at Britain came 
from -Mr Rajiv Gandhi, the 
Indian Prime Minister, who 
said that Britain had sacrified 
the leadership of the Com- 
monwealth by compromising 
reposition on moral principle 
over economic needs. 

But on the economic front, 
Britain is a considerable 
contributor of aid to many of 
the countries that are con- 
demning its stand on sanc- 
tions. Last year. Britain gave 
£443 million, including tech- 
nical co-operation, to Com- 
monwealth countries. 

Every year,- Amnesty Inter- 
national publishes a report 
which looks at the human 
rights record of individual 
countries. It concentrates on 
problems involving the im- 
prisonment of non-violent 
political prisoners, torture and 
the death penalty. 

In its latest report, covering 
1984, Amnesty made com- 
ments on five of the seven 
nations which attended the 
Commonwealth mini-summit 
in London this week:' 

• rmtnjtoi Commented on 


events after a prison riot in 
1982, where it said there were 
reasonable grounds for believ- 
ing that prisoners had been 
tortured or ill-treated by 
.guards. The Canadian Gov- 
ernment had co-operated in 
Amnesty International's in- 
quiry, and had said it would 
implement changes in pro- 
cedures. 

• India: Amnesty said that h 
was concerned about the 
detention of prisoners of con- 
science, and about the number 
of political .detainees who 


were beW without trial, or 
were awaiting trial under spe- 
cial legislation permitting trial 
in camera. Amnesty was also 
concerned about allegations of 


peels in Northern Ireland. It 
was also concerned about 
judicial procedures in political 
cases in Northern Ireland, and 
was continuing to investigate 


torture and a number of a number of shootings by the 
judicial executions- (In 1985 security forces. In addition. 


India received £106m in of- 
ficial financial aid from Brit- 
ain. including technical co- 
operation.) 

• United Kingdom: Amnesty 
expressed concern about alle- 
gations of torture and ift- 
treatment daring 

interrogation of political su5~ 


Zimbabwe gets £llm 
grants from Britain 


Harare (Renter) — Britain 
yesterday gave Zimbabwe two 
grants totaling £10.92 jnflGon 
to finance rural development 
and agriculture. 

This brings its aid commit- 
ment to the southern African 
“frontline" state to more than 
£160 million in the past six 
years, making Britain the 
secosd-biggest aid donor to 
Zimbabwe after the United 
States. 

At ceremonies marking the 
signing of the aid accords, 
theBritish High Commis- 
sioner, Mr Ramsay Meflurish, 
referred to sharp differences 
between Zimbabwe and Brit- 
ain over economic sanctions 
against Sooth Africa. 

“Disagreeing with a friend 


does not mean that one treats 
him like an enemy. Britain and 
Zimbabwe, as two sovereign 
independent states, remain 
friends at many levels,” he 
said. 

“But it takes two to make a 
friendship and it strikes me as 
most important that at this 
juncture we should aD of ns 
keep our current major 
disagreement about tactics to- 
wards South Africa in pro- 
portion." 

The Finance Minister, Mr 
Bernard Chidzero, thnnhad 
Britain for its continued eco- 
nomic support for Zimbabwe, 
formerly Rhodesia, which 
gained independence in 1980 
after a seven-year guerrilla 
war against white minority 
dominance. 


Neighbours face Pretoria’s fury 

Counting cost of retaliation 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 


Zimbabwe and Zambia, be- 
cause of the high profile their 
leaders have assumed in the 
pro-sanctions campaign 
against South Africa, are bear- 
ing the brunt of South African 
retaliation. 

Although neither country is 
as dependent economically on 
South Africa as such small 
states as Lesotho and Swazi- 
land. they are none the less 
extremely vulnerable to South 
African pressure. 

Zimbabwe: South Africa is 
landlocked Zimbabwe’s big- 
gest trading partner, and the 
coaduit for an estimated 90 
per cent of its overseas trade, 
despite the publicly hostile 
attitude ' towards. Pretoria 
shown by Mr Robert Mugabe, 
Zimbabwe's Prime Minister. 

On July 3 1 thisyear.lhetwo 
countries signed a revision of 
a long-standing trade agree- 
ment. extending the pref- 
erences, in the form of 
reduced customs duties, 
granted' on the bulk of 
Zimbabwean manufactured 
exports to South Africa. 

In 1984, South Africa took 
18.3 per cent of Zimbabwe's 
exports and supplied 193 per 
cent of its imports. Last year, 
exports to South Africa fell 
behind those to Britain, 
mainly because of the decline 
in the value of the rand, but 
South Africa remained the 
biggest source of imports. 

■ It is estimated that Beira, on 
the Mozambique coast, which 
is Zimbabwe’s nearest port, 
can only handle 800,000 tons 
of the country’s annual ex- 
port-import volume of 8 mil- 
lion tons. The rail line to the 
port is kept open by means of 
costly protection by troops 
from Zimbabwe against anti- 
government insurgents. 


The balance of trade is 
moved through the South 
African railway and harbour 
system. A small proportion 
passes into and out of the 
South African network 
through the Mozambique port 
of Maputo. 

Relatively few Zim- 
babweans work in South Af- 
rica - only 7,742, according to 
1983 figures — and the Beira 
oil pipeline makes Zimbabwe 
independent of South Africa 
for fud imports, though the 
pipe often has to be repaired 



because of sabotage attacks by 
insurgents. 

The two countries still ex- 
change scheduled air services. 
Zimbabwe has its own satellite 
facilities, and is now indepen- 
dent of South Africa for 
telecommunications. The 
tourist trade remains brisk. 

Veterinary cooperation: 
South Africa supplied 
1,647339 doses of animal 
vaccines to Zimbabwe in 
1983-1984. 

Health: South African hos- 
pitals treated 182 Zim- 
babwean patients in 1983- 
1984, and 3300 doses of 
human vaccines- were sup- 
plied. 

Education: between 1979 


and 1985, 11,817 Zim- 

babwean students enrolled at 
South African institutes of 
higher education. 

Zambia: Another land- 
locked country, Zambia last 
year sent only 0.3 per cent of 
its exports to South Africa, but 
South Africa supplied 14.5 per 
cent of its imports, mainly 
manufactured goods and 
canned and other foods. 

Heavily dependent on min- 
eral exports, especially copper, 
Zambia's main problem is 
that the shortest routes for 
getting these to the sea ~ 
through Tanzania and 
Mozambique — are so inad- 
equate Ural ft has had to turn . 
extensively to South Africa's 
railways and ports. 

It is estimated that at least a 
quarter of Zambia's exports, 
and 35 per cent of its imports, 
pass through . South Africa. 
Zambia is independent of 
South Africa for electricity, 
and most of its petroleum 
products come in on the 
Tazara railway line from Dar 
es Salaam. 

Zambia has 18 diesel loco- 
motives on hire from South 
Africa. South African Airways 
services Zambian Airways' 
planes and trains its pilots on 
an ad hoc basis. 

Only about 1,000 Zambians 
are legally employed in South 
Africa. South African pass- 
port-holders can enter Zam- 
bia. but there is little tourist 
traffic between the two 
countries. 

Veterinary co-operation; in 
1984 South Africa supplied 
379,400 closes of vaccine. 

Education: between 1979 
and 1985, Zambia sent 890 
students to South African 
higher educational instit- 
utions. 


Amnesty was concerned about 
the arrest of miners daring 
their strike for exercising their 
freedom of expression, and by 
allegations of Hl-treatment of 
arrested miners. 

• Zambia: Concern was ex- 
pressed about the detention 
without trial of alleged oppo- 
nents of the Government, 
including one prisoner of con- 
science and several possible 
prisoners of conscience. It was 
also concerned about what 
appeared to be extrajudicial 
executions by soldiers of al- 
leged smugglers and about the 
continued use of the death 
penalty. (In 1985, Zambia 
received £26 million of official 
aid from Britain, including 
technical co-operation.) 

• Zimbabwe: Amnesty was 
concerned about the detention 
without trial of suspected 
opponents of the Govern- 
ment, including prisoners of 
conscience, and about re- 
newed allegations of the tor- 
ture of prisoners and extra- 
judicial executions of civilians 
by government security forces 
engaged in counter-insurgency 
operations. (In 1985, Zim- 
babwe received £24 million of 
official aid from Britain, 
including technical co- 
operation.) 

Results in 
London 
please US 

From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

President Reagan was yes- 
terday briefed by Mr Chester 
Crocker, the assistant Sec- 
retary of State for African 
Affairs, following his consulta- 
tions in Europe, and the White 
House said it regretted 
Pretoria’s economic retali- 
ation against neighbouring 
black African states. 

Mr Larry Speakes. the 
White House spokesman, said 
Washington deplored pu- 
nitive sanctions by any party 
as they were “generally 
counterproductive". He said 
Pretoria's jetaliatioa against 
its neighbours would not lead 
to the dialogue Mr Reagan had 
hoped for, but to the disloca- 
tions he had feared. 

The Administration has re- 
fused to comment on the 
public position taken by Mrs 
Thatcher on sanctions, or on 
the reactions of other Com- 
monwealth leaders. The Slate 
Department, in keeping with 
Washington's lowjcey ap- 
proach to the whole South 
African crisis, has also said 
nothing on specific sanctions. 

There is evidence, however, 
that Washington may be qui- 
etly pleased with the outcome 
of the Commonwealth con- 
ference. Britain's reluctance to 
impose full-scale sanctions 
does not leave Washington 
isolated in its opposition to 
punitive measures. 

Mrs Thatcher’s willingness, 
however, not to block mea- 
sures by the European Eco- 
nomic Community will allow 
the Administration to make a 
public gesture of solidarity in 
proposing similar steps when 
the Community outlines its 
measures next month. 


Chirac uses guillotine 
on broadcasting Bill 

From Susan MacDonald, Paris 

- For the fifth time since 
coming to power five months 
ago, M Jacques Chirac's 
right-wing Government has 
used the gmHotUK method to 
cot short debate and pash a 
Bill through Parliament. 

- The Socialists have ex- 
pressed their opposition by 
tabling a censure motion 
which, however, has no chance 
of being adopted as the ex- 
treme-right National Front 
has already stated it would not 
vote for such a motion. 

This tune it is the 
Government's broadcasting 
Bill which has been guillo- 
tined, because, as M Chirac 
said in the National Assembly 
on Tuesday night, his Govern- 


ment bad promised that this 
BUI would be passed before the 
end of the present par- 
liamentary session. 

‘ The Bill calls for sweeping 
changes to broadcasting, in- 
cluding the privatization of 
France's main television chan- 
nel, TFI. 

Meanwhile, Cabinet has ap- 
proved the text of a decree 
giving greater flexibility to 
employers wishing to hire 
temporary labour. 

Under the decree, tem- 
porary work contracts would 
be extended from one to two 
years, and workers could be 
hired for any reason other 
than to replace a permanent 
worker. 



American film director, 
actress daughter, 
was celehrated at his 
favourite restaurant in a Los Angeles suburb. 




Herr Braun at the press conference In West Berlin on Friday at which he described his 
spectacular ‘escape’ from East Berlin. Below, the three dummies dressed as Soviet officers. 

‘Dummy run’ escape a hoax 


From Our Correspondent 
Bonn 

A man trim daimwl to have 
escaped from East Berlin by 
car by di sg ui si ng Wwwdf and 
three shop dummies as Rus- 
sian soldiers admitted yes- 
terday that the story was a 
hoax. 

Herr Heinz Brann. aged 48, 
had told West Berlin state 
security police that he warned 
to draw attention to the build- 
ing of the Berlin Wall 25 years 
ago, a spokesman said. 

Police had searched for 
Hot Braxm amid unconfirmed 
reports that he was an East 
German spy. His West Berlin 
flat, as well as that of Herr 
Wolf Qnasner, the commercial 
escape organizer who was said 
to have masterminded the 
spectacular flight, was 
searched on Tuesday night 

Herr Walter Nenhans, the 
West Berlin Justice Depart- 
ment spokesman, said Herr 
Braun would now be investi- 
gated for joint forgery of car 
registration documents and 
the unauthorized wearing of a 
uniform. 

Hot Brann was photo- 
graphed lastweekat the wheel 
of a Lada estate car which had 
been sprayed a military green 
and bore Soviet military num- 
ber plates. With, him were the 
three dummies, dressed as a 
Eeatenant-colonel and two 
lieutenants. 

He told joarnafists In West 
Berlin on Friday that two days 
earlier he had driven through 
four checkpoints at East 
Berlin's Invalidenstrasse 
crossing to West Berlin with- 
out challenge by border 



Herr Nenhans said Herr 


Braun's offence id wearing a 
uniform was made more seri- 
ous by the fact that it was a 
Soviet one. This could involve 
the allied powers in Berlin 
when it came to charges, in 
which case he could face a jail 
sentence of up to five years. 

Herr Nenhans said Herr 
Qnasner had not yet bees 
questioned. 

Doubts about the great es- 
cape story strengthened on 
Tuesday night when the West 
German television magazine 
programme Koatraste, which 
covers East- West German top- 
ics, said Heir Braun had 
admitted the hoax; 

A commentator said Hot 
B raun had told allied officials 
last weekend that the story 
was a money-ma king stunt 
staged to coincide with the 
25th anniversary of the Berlin 
Wall next Wednesday, to 
make the most oat of It in 
payments from gullible news 

media, 

The Daily Mail, which 


splashed the story on its front 
page last Friday, and 1TN are 
said to have paid a total of 
£8,000 for exclusive rights to 
Herr Braun’s tale. 

Herr Rainer HHdebrandt, 
chairman of the August 13 
Working Group, which runs 
the escape museum at Check- 
point Charlie, said he was not 
surprised at the news that the 
escape was bogus. 

“I had a tip-off last Sunday 
that Braun was working for 
the East German Ministry for 
State Security. 1 passed this 
on to ear security police.” 

• LONDON: A spokesman 
for the Daily Mail said yes- 
terday that the matter was 
being investigated by senior 
editorial executives, mid until 
they have reported their find- 
ings there would be no com- 
ment on speculation that 
£8,000 had been paid for the 
story. 

ITN said it covered the 
story, but made no payment 
for it. 


Near disaster 
for Columbia 
space shuttle 

From Mohsin Afi 
Washington 

The US space shuttle 
Columbia came within 31 
seconds of being launched on 
January 6 without enough fuel 
to reach proper orbit, just 22 
days before the shuttle Chal- 
lenger exploded, killing its 
crew of seven. 

Fatigue among overworked 
launch control personnel at 
: Kennedy Space Cfentre has 
been blamed for the “poten- 
tially catastrophic'' inadvert- 
ent draining of 10,0001b of 
liquid oxygen from Col- 
umbia's external fuel tank. 

'Fortunately, the liquid 
oxygen flow dropped the main 
engine inlet temperature be- 
low the acceptable limit, caus- 
ing a launch hold, buz only 31 
seconds before lift off,” the 
presidential commission in- 
vestigating the Challenger 
disaster said in its final report 
Columbia was launched on 
January. L2 after seven delays 
because of technical problems 
or bad weather. 

The report said the op- 
erators, who misinterpreted 
what the computer system was 
telling them, “had been on 
duty at the console for 11 
hours during the third day of 
working 12-bour night shifts". 


Hisoshima 

remembers 

devastation 

Hiroshima (Reuter) - The 
names of almost 5,000 victims 
of the Hiroshima nuclear 
blast, who died over the past 
year, were added to a me- 
morial roll yesterday as the 
city silemly marked its 
devastation 41 years ago. 

Cars and trams stopped m 
the streets, people clasped 
hands in prayer, offered flow- 
ers, or simply stood and 
remembered the 140,000 vic- 
tims of the world's first atomic 
bomb. 

The mayor. Mr Takeshi 
Araki. read Hiroshima's an- 
nual peace message, calling on 
ihe world to abolish nuclear 
weapons and Inviting the 
superpowers to hold a dis- 
armament summit in the city. 


Wheat sale backlash divides allies 


From Stephan Taylor 
Sydney 

The Reagan Administra- 
tion's decision to sell sub- 
sidized wheat to the Soviet 
Union, at serious cost to 
Australian producers, has un- 
leashed a backlash here which, 
if public statements are to be 
believed, could signify long- 
term damage to the relation- 
ship with the United States. 

Political and fanning lead- 
ers have temporarily buried 
their own differences in ve- 
hement denunciation of the 
subsidized sale deaL 

“The long, friendly relation- 
ship between Australia and 
the United Slates is going 
bad,” Mr John Kerin, the 
Minister for Primary In- 
dustry. said when it became 
apparent that Washington was 


not going to heed the delega- 
tion that he took with him to 
lobby against the proposal. 

Mr Ian McLachlan, the 
fanners' leader, does not often 
agree with Mr Kerin, but he 
said: “The decision is an 
extraordinary act of provoca- 
tion by a major friend and 
ally." 

Their outbursts, coming on 
the beds of the criticism of the 
decision by Mr George Shultz, 
the US Secretary of State, are 
foelled by the latest statistics 
indicating that the cost to 
Australia's unsubsidized 
wheat exports wili be around 
SAus300 million (£120 mil- 
lion) next year. This comes at 
a time when Australia's main 
economic problem is its 
widening balance of payments 
deficit. 

The sense of betrayal and 


frustration is compounded by 
the knowledge that there is 
only one card that Canberra 
could play in negotiations 
which might change the 
Administration's mind, and 
that would be to disallow the 
US military bases here. 

The fact that security 
arrangements with the United 
States are still central to 
Australia's own defence strat- 
egy militates against such a 
course of action. 

Nevertheless, the Hawke 
Government faces a political 
problem as a result of the 
decision no less pressing than 
the one which persuaded the 
Administration to adopt it. 

As a result, it is estimated 
that the average Australian 
wheat farmer will lose 
$AusI0,000 in the 1986-87 
season^ on top of average 


already projected at 
around $Aus7,500 a year. 

The price of other export 
grains is also expected to drop 
as a result of the US subsidy 
policy. 

Canberra is still trying to 
reconcile itself to the fact that 
things are not as bad as they 
might have been. Another 
leading Australian wheat cus- 
tomer. China, has not been 
included in the subsidized sale 
plan. 

’ But there is no certainly that 
the programme will not be 
broadened in time. An agri- 
cultural delegation which met 
Mr Bill Lane, the US Ambas- 
sador. on Monday after a 
wheat-dumping protest out- 
side the embassy, came away 
with no assurance that other 
Australian markets would not 
b^affected in future. 


Black is Republicans 9 
state governor choice 

From Michael Binyon, Washington 

clearly succeeded in capturing 
considerable White support 
outside the Detroit area. 

Black support for Mr Lucas 
may have been dampened by 
his conservatism and his 
frosty relations with Mayor 
Coleman Young of Detroit. 
However, his victory is of 
considerable importance to 
the Republicans nationally in 
their attempt to lure Blacks 
away from their overwhelm- 
ing allegiance to the Demo- 
cratic Party. 

Only once before has a 
Black been nominated as a 
gubernatorial candidate. This 
was Democrat Mayor Thomas 
Bradley of Los Angeles, who is 
again the party's candidate as 
governor of California. 

The Michigan primary also 
received national attention 
because it marked the first 
phase of the protracted 
presidential campaign. 

Despite the remoteness 
from ihe actual presidential 
race, the leading Republican 
candidates have all paid fre- 
quent visits to Michigan in an 
attempt to attain visibility and 
build up early momentum. 

Mr Bush, the overall 
favourite, has been shaken by 
the strong challenge from Mr 
Robertson, whose fundament- 
alist Christian supporters 
have campaigned strongly for 
bim.The preliminary Michi- 
gan result suggests Mr Bush 
has retained his lead. 


Mr William Lucas has be- 
come the first Black to be 
nominated by the Repub- 
licans as candidate for state 
governor, after resoundingly 
winning the Michigan Repub- 
lican primary on Tuesday. 

There were also early in- 
dications that Vice-President 
George Bush held a strong 
lead over his two rivals. 
Representative Jack Kemp 
and the Rev Fat Robertson, iu 
the first elections to have 
some bearing on the 1988 
presidential race. 

Mr Lucas, aged 59. a soft- 
spoken son of West Indian 
immigrants who holds the 
powerful post of chief admin- 
istrator of the Detroit Metro- 
politan Area, is a former 
Democrat who was enthusias- 
tically welcomed into the 
Republican party by President 
Reagan last year. 

He faced a strong challenge 
from Mr Dick Chrysler, a 
millionaire who held a strong 
lead until the closing days oT 
the campaign. But the results 
indicate Mr Lucas has won by 
a margin of up to 19 per cent. 
Towards the end of the cam- 
paign Mr Chrysler was ac- 
cused of violating^ slate labour 
laws in running ms firm. 

The Republicans fade a 
strong and popular incumbent 
Democrat. Governor James 
Blanchard, who is credited 
with Michigan's economic re- 
vival. Bui Mr Lucas has 


Exchanges get 
cultural boost 

The United States and the 
Soviet Union have concluded a 
wide-ranging cultural ex- 
change programme, which will 
bring artistic and educational 
contacts back to the level they 
enjoyed 10 years ago (Michael 
Binyon writes from 
Washington). 

After months of negotia- 
tions officials front the two 
countries have announced 
agreement on 13 exchange 
programmes. These _ range 


from important art edulntioas 
to the sending of n Soviet 
specialist to teach Americans 
how to teach Russian. 


Cement crisis 
at Chernobyl 

Moscow (Reuter) — Hie 
entombment of the Chernobyl 
nuclear power station’s dam- 
aged fourth reactor is proceed- 
ing too slowly because of a 
concrete shortage, Pravda said 
yesterday. 

The newspaper said the 
plant's first and second re- 
actors could not resume op- 
erations until concrete walls 
had completely encased the 
fourth unit. 

The taper Warned the 
Chernobyl concrete factories 
for failing to work at fofl 
capacity. 


NEWS 7 

Subpoenas 
on bomb 
technology 
dropped 

Washington - The Justice 
Department has announced 
that it has dropped subpoenas 
against several Israelis wanted 
for questioning over a plan to 
smuggle US cluster-bomb 
technology to Israel (Michael 
Binyon writes). 

In return, the Department 
said, Israel has promised to 
co-operate in the 
investigation. 

The subpoenas drew angry 
protests from the Israeli Gov- 
ernment, which has been 
embarrassed by a scries of 
accusations of attempts to spy 
on the US, smuggle weapons 
technology and sell US arms 
to Iran. 

Poll rigging 
admitted 

Lagos (Reuter) — A f or mer 
Nigerian legislator has con- 
fessed that he took an active 
pan in rigging the 1979 elec- 
tions that returned the country 
to civilian rule. 

Isa Waziri, who sat in the 
Niger state house of assembly 
for the ruling National Parly 
of Nigeria, said he entered 
fictitious names in electoral 
rolls and then cast the votes 
himself. 

Whaling talks 
suspended 

Washington — An Icelandic 
minister left talks with US 
officials Here on a whaling 
dispute to go home, but both 
American and Icelandic of- 
ficials denied that the dis- 
cussions had broken off 
(Mohsin Ali writes). 

Mr Halldor Asgrimsson, 
Icelandic Fisheries Minister, 
was due to hold consultations 
with his Cabinet colleagues in 
Reykjavik yesterday. 

Manila aid 

An all-party group of MPs is 
urging the British Govern- 
ment to increase aid to the 
Philippines to help the new 
regime cope with the legacy 
left by former President 
Marcos. 

Rail disaster 

Delhi (AFP) - At least 43 
people were killed and 35 
injured when an express col- 
lided with a goods train in the 
Indian state of Bihar. 

250 flee 

Munich (Reuter) — A total 
of 147 Czech and 109 Polish 
holidaymakers in West Ger- 
many in the first seven 
months of this year have 
stayed on. 

Rebels move 

Port Moresby (Reuter) — 
Five rebel leaders from 
Indonesia's Irian Jaya prov- 
ince jailed after fleeing to 
Papua New Guinea will leave 
for Ghana later this month to 
await resettlement in Europe. 

Aids alert 

Addis Ababa (Reuter) — 
Ethiopia is to introduce stria 
surveillance to identify vic- 
tims of Aids trying to enter the 
country. 

Fall-out 

Ankara (Reuter) — A plan 
for Canada to build Turkey's 
first nuclear power plant has 
collapsed because of disagree- 
ment between the two coun- 
tries over financing. 

Swiss envoy 

Bern (AP) — The Swiss 
Government has named its 
first woman ambassador to 
another country, Mrs Mari- 
anne von Gruenigen, who will 
become envoy to Finland. 

Drug racket 

Moscow (Reuter) — A num- 
ber of Soviet doctors and 
nurses have been found guilty 
of illegally selling narcotics 
obtained from medical in- 
stitutions. the official news- 
paper Soveiskaya Rossiya 
reported. 

Writers bailed 

Khartoum (Reuter) — Suda- 
nese authorities have released 
on bail 10 journalists arrested 
after a demonstration against 
the suspension of two slate- 
owned newspapers. 

Forest blaze 

Huesca, Spain (Reuter) — 
Firefighting planes, troops and 
firemen are battling a fire in 
the Spanish Pyrenees which 
has destroyed more than 7.000 
acres of pine forest in the last 
week. 

Racing charge 

Hong Kong (AFP) — Nine 
people have been charged here 
for suspected involvement in 
Hong Kong’s largest horse 
racing scandal. 

Market opens 

Peking (Reuter) — China's 
first stock market since 1949 
has opened in Shenyang, 
China’s second-largest indus- 
trial city after Shanghai — one 
of five chosen to experiment 
with new economic models. 

Air born 

Vienna (Renter) — A Jor- 
danian woman gave birth to a 
baby gurl on an Alia Royal 
Jordanian Airline flight from 
Chicago to Vienna 33,000ft 
over southern England, helped 
by three doctors on board. 


V 



■THETIMfcS THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


HOME LAUNDRY 


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PHIUPS AWB066 800 219-95 

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HOOVER 3384 Electron 800 249-95 

INDESIT ’Onega' 1030B. 1000 254.95 

ZANUSSi 29181 800 2S935 

CREDA Conaxde 17003 1100 269.95 

INDESIT 'Omega 1 1230B 1200274.95 

HOOVER 3386 Election 1100 284.95 

ENGUSH ELECTRIC 1545W# 1000 289 JO 

ZANUSSI Z9191 1000 294.95 

HOTPOINT 18873 Mlcrotranic ...1000 29935 

HOTPOINT 9540P - 1 000 329.90 

HOOVER A3418 Computer 

controfied ...-1 100 349.95 

With BuBtrin Tumble Dryer Spin Speed 

NEWPQL Extra Dry 800 -.-800 299 JO 

CANDY Turbo 21 800 329.95 

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5ERV15 laser 115 2350 19*35 

ENGUSH ELECTRIC 1475W# — 3100 19935 

HOOVE RMAHC 5052- 2300 204.95 

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CREEft 37304 reverse action. 6.51b 94.95 

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HOOVER S1122 Dustette 

portable- — 170 2835 

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PHIUPS PS2/82 -.800 483S 

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25 1000 9635 

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1511 (0.6) 17935 

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M413* (1.2) 199.95 

4013S .tl .0)21935 

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TH£ TiMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


salem court backs 



Shin Bet officials 


grant 
most senior 
intelligence 
upheld by 
of Justice here 
u.- 

is that a 
how two, 
ed while . in 
and how 
nines into their 
liberately mis- 
abfe to bring 
some of those 
involved in the 

to be seen if Mr 
the Attomey- 
efTectively carry 
to investigate 
involved in the 
j Mr Yitzhak 
io was Prime Min- 
time and was thus 
nsible member 
nt. 

nd, unanimous 
members of 
ie COmt agreed that 
need to issue a 
ion to police to 
the affair, despite a 
_ that there was 
t guarantee that this 
•xl 

ofthese decisions 
Kraus, the Police' 
’-General, will start 


From Ian Murray, Jerusalem 

interrogating witnesses about 
the affair. According to some 
legal opinions be wfll now be 
able to find out mocwince the 
four pardoned men will be 
obliged to answer all ques- 
tions, and win not be able to 
refuse to give information on 
the grounds that it would 
mcnnunate them. 

Mr Kraus told the Knessefs 
law committee last week that 
one question he would be 
asking Mr Avraham Shalom, 
the Shin Bet chief; who is 
among those pardoned,' is to 
-explain what he meant when 
he said be had “permission 

and authority” to order the 
killing of the two men. (He 
used this phrase in his letter 
asking for pardon.) 

Mr Shamir, who was the 
only person authorized to 
grant Mr Shalom such 
“permission’’, said in a recent 
interview that there was no 
standing order to kill caponed 
terrorists. “It wasn’t In the 
form of an instruction,” he 
said. “It was a conversation 
. . -This could have been a 
general mood. This happens 
in many instances, but there 
was no such instruction-’’ - 

Yesterday’s decision means 
the President has virtually 
unlimited powers of pardon 


even, as in this case, where 
those concerned have not 
been found guilty of any 
offence. In a dissenting opin- 
ion included with the 160- 


insisted that the Presi- 
dent does not have the power 
to. grant a pardon in tiicun- 
stances of this kind: 

As the inquiry $ets under- 
way, lawyers acting for 10 
other Shin Bet agents involved 
in the rose, inducting those 
who carried out the ktiEng, are 
_ to request pardons 
their clients. 

They will now be able to dte 
the High Court ruling as 
precedent 

The politicians and organ- 
izations that brought the rose 
to the High Court generally 
were not dismayed by yes- 
terday’s decision. Their view 
was that the legal move had 
forced the Government to 
agree to the police inquiry, 
which it bad initially tried to 

prevent. 

On the other hand, Mr 
Yitzhak- Mottai, who was the 
Justice Minister when the 
pardons were granted, said the 
decision proved that the Gov- 
ernment had been perfectly 
correct throughout in its han- 
dling of the case. 




*4i 


55 


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itKi.'' t*W. 

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mm 




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/.* 





akened 
ism law 
foi* Israelis 

Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 
Meir Kahane, 
extreme nationalist 
voted in the 
to help pass an anti- 
law originally drafted to 
1 the Kflch Party he 
In the words of Mr 
ban, one of the 
s elder statesmen, the 
at midnight on Tuesday 
Casanova voting for 
commandment”, 
new law, which carries 
[ties of up to five years' 
imkisoament, has beat so 
ws ?rtd down since it was fist 
dr led that the Rabbi is 
ctfeieHS it can never success- 
fa f he used against him or 
hi supporters. 

it the same time, in order to 
support for the law from 
right-wing Likud faction. 
Labour Party had to agree 
support another new law 
wiich prohibits any Israeli 
fi m having unauthorized am- 
ts t with leaders of the Pal- 
e tine Liberation Organ- 
i ti®B (PLO). 

The watering-down OP the 
II was done to placate the 
rligisns parties, which were 
lorried it conld be used to 
Stack Judaism. The law as 
does not cover pubKca- 
that aim to preserve the 
or uniqueness of a 
Since Rabbi Ka- 
te platform is that he_ Is 
_ to preserve a Jewish 
for Jews, this is a perfect 
danse for him. 
law leaves the onus of 
on the prosecution, 
most show that state- 
of publications are ac- 
meant to incite racism 
(before there can be a convic- 
tion. It will not be sufficient as 
the orightal draft had in- 
tended, to prove tint the 
publication was itself likely to 
incite racism. 

i The new law forbidding 
: contact with the PLO is a 
further blow to the small 
dovish wing of the Labour 
Party, which, since the recent 
meeting between Mr Shimon 
Peres, the Prime Minister, 
and King Hassan of Morocco, 
has been trying to launch an 
internal debate aimed at 
recognizing the PLO in peace 
negotiations. 





Gonzalez rejects 
talking to Eta 


From Richard Wlgg, Madrid 

Socialist Govern- terrorists would in the end be 
defeated by the security forces. 


Spain’s 

ment, pleased with receiving 
the degree of anti-terrorist 
collaboration from the Chirac 
Government that it never 
obtained from the French 
Socialists, has decided to re- 
spond with equal firmness to 
calls for negotiations with Eta, 
the Basque terrorist org- 
anization. 

"There will be no negotia- 
tions, no Spanish government 
will negotiate with a band of 
terrorists,” Sedor Felipe. Gon- 
zalez, the Prime Minister, 
declared after receiving M 
Robert Pandraud, France’s 
Minister for Security, who is 
on. a visit here. Their talks 
lasted 30 minutes. 

The visit was yesterday 
being hailed here as marking a 
new high point in anti-terror- 
ist co-operation between the 
twO countries add Sedor 
Gonzilez's remarks were: 
praised unanimously by the 
right-wing press. 

In Madrid's view, M 
Chirac's Government is show 
, mg.detOT»natioo where pre- 
riousl penc^ governments 
wavered, - even though a 
framework for depriving Eta 
of a sanctuary in south-west 
France from which to prepare 
attacks on Spanish targets had 
existed for the past two years. 

Meanwhile, Spanish se- 
curity sources yesterday ex- 
pressed doubt about whether 
the threatening letters re- 
ceived by the British, West 
German and Japanese em- 
bassies here really were from 
Eta. 

They base their reservations 
on the expressions used, such 
as the reference to “Japanese 
economic penetration in 
Spain” in the letter to the 
Japanese Embassy. Eta is al- 
ways careful not to use the 
word “Spain”, experts said. 

No Basque newspapers, 
which habitually receive calls 
from Eta after attacks assum- 
ing responsibility, had by 
yesterday been contacted by 
the underground organ- 
ization. 

Sedor Gonzalez’s satisfac- 
tion with France was under- 
lined when he also used his 
meeting with M Pandraud as 
the basis for giving Spaniards 
a solemn guarantee that the 


The Prime Minister had 
evidently chosen the meeting 
as the best opportunity for 
stopping in its tracks talk in 
the Basque country about 
Madrid missing good op- 
portunities for settling the 
problem of Basque terrorism 
around the negotiating table. 

His words had the effect 
yesterday of leaving the ruling 
Basque Nationalist Party iso- 
lated there. 

However, the Basque Nat- 
ionalists counter-attacked yes- 
terday, ■ accusing the Prune 
Minister of adopting a “tone 
worthy of an army sergeant- 
major*. It was the duty of 


Hofidaymakers need not 
change plans for travel to 
Spam, but mast be os the 
much after death threats from 
Basque separatists to Britons 
working there, the Foreign 
Office said yesterday (oar 
Foreign Staff writes). 


politicians to find ways to 
eradicate violence and solve 
the country’s main problems, 
the party contended. 

The pro-Eta Herri Batasuna 
party claimed that Sefior Gon- 
zalez knew that there would 
have to be negotiations to 
modify Spain’s present con- 
stitution — a reference to Elate 
demand for Basque indepen- 
dence. “Here in the Basque 
country the present constitu- 
tional set-up is not valid,” the 
party spokesman declared. 

. Sedor Gonzalez’s winds 
showed how the impact of 
Eta’s recent spectacular crimes 
in Madrid rule out any talk of 
negotiations. 

His Government, he prom- 
ised, would push ahead dog- 
gedly with its present policies 
for combatting terrorism, 
based on police action and 
international collaboration. It 
would bring back into normal 
political life any Eta members 
who abandoned terrorism and 
were not guilty of crimes. 

The Spanish authorities are 
keeping quiet, however, about 
the price they anticipate the 
Chirac Government will ex- 
tract for this stepped-up 
collaboration. 


Tft^ 




Delhi accepts British drug agents 



Delhi (AP) ^ 

approved in principle the 
posting of British narcotics 
officers here, a Foreign Min- 
istry spokesman told Parl- 
iament. 

But Mr KR Narayanan, 
the Minister of, Slate for 
External Affairs, did not dis- 
pel doubts about political 
troubles with the drug pro- 
gramme, stalled because of 


strained relations between In- 
dia and Britain. 

Indian and British sources 
had reported that British drug 
enforcement agents would be 
posted in India by the end of 
last May. 

India complains that Brit- 
ain is not taking a hard line 
against Sikh extremists and 

extraditing Sikhs who are 
demanding, a separate Sikh 


nation in the north Indian 
state of Punjab. Some British 
newspapers have suggested 
that India was trying to put 
pressure on Britain to crack 
down on the Sikhs by holding 
off on the placement of British 
narcotics officers. 

Mr Rajiv Gandhi the 
Prime Minister, told the BBC 

last week that India was opt 

using the drug issue to bargain 
for a tough stand on Sikhs. 


Six die as Sydney hit by deluge 



South-western suburbs of Sydney, 
Australia under water (above, left) after 
the Georges River burst its banks, causing 
moto ris ts and bus drivers to abandon their 
vehicles on the partly-submerged 
MOperra Bridge, while pedestrians Eke 
the schoolboy (right) battled their way 
through the downpour. 

Alter its driest winter in a century, the 
city was-deluged by the most torrential 

which claimed six lives* aad^ wreaked 
immense daa age— d disrupti o n (Stephen 
Taylor writes). 

■ The freak conditions — a full 13 indies 
of rain fell ia 24 hours to arid-morning 


yesterday - forced the evacuation of 500 
people nua the west of the dty. 

In one tragedy a couple trying to wade 
to safety from a car trapped in the flood 
waters had their children, aged one and 
three, dragged from their aims and 
drowned. 

In two days Sydney had more rain than 
In die previous six months, bat forecasters 
say the storms have now passed. 

Tire three municipalities worst affected 
by flooding were Bfecktown, Auburn and 
Fairfield. Elsewhere in New South Wales 
tiie towns of Bathurst and Windsor also 
suffered extensive damage. 

Mr Barrie Unsworth, the new state 


premier, said it was impossible at present 
to estimate the damage. 

• PEKING: Floods have killed 30 people 
in China’s north-east Liaoning province 
(Renter reports). 

The Ckinm Daily said yesterday that 
more than 1,500 villages and tens of 
thousands at homes were under water 
after weeks of torrential rain. 

• DHAKA: At least 12 people were killed 
and 45 others were missing after the 
swirling waters of the Ganges devastated 
homes, washed away bridges and flooded 
rice fields in Bangladesh’s northern 
Chapai-Nawabgaqj district daring the 
past two days (Ahmed Fazl writes). 


Drug use 
falls in 
US forces 

. .Washington (Reuter) — 
Drug abuse among US mili- 
tary personnel has dropped 
sharply since 1980, but al- 
cohol consumption remains a 
serious problem, the Defence 
Department said yesj^gay. 

' A ' Department survey 
showed that 8.9 per cent of the 
2.1 million military personnel 
used marijuana and other 
drugs last yearydown from 27 
per cent ini 980: 

The survey showed that the 
Marines had made the most 
progress in cutting regular use 
ofdrugs(37perccntin 1980 to 
9.9 per cent in 1985), but 
remained the heaviest drink- 
ers followed by the Army, 
Navy and Air Force. 

The report, based on ques- 
tionnaires answered by 17,328 
enlisted troops and officers, 
suggested that even though 
alcohol use was slightly down 
on 1980 figures it was still 
pervasive in the forces. 

The report said 87 per cent 
of military personnel drank 
occa s ion a lly, two-thirds were 
moderate to heavy drinkers, 
and 12 per cent were heavy 
drinkers. 

While average alcohol con- 
sumption bad fallen from 1.5 
to 1 3. on a day between 1980 
and 1985, the average Marine 
drank lira a day last year 
compared to 1.9 oz in 1980. 

’Alcohol continues to be a 
very significant problem,” 
said Mr William Mayer, the 
assistant Defence Secretary. 
“In the long run, alcohol is the 
bigger problem. But the more 
deadly one at this time is 


r Mayer, who is in charge 
of health affairs for the Penta- 
gon, said the -success of the 
anti-drug programme was 
partly due to warnings about 
the consequence of drug use 
and to regular and random 
urine tests for drug use. More 
than 64,000 men and women 
had been dismissed from the 
forces in the past three years 
for drug use. 

The report concluded: “Re- 
sults suggest that alcohol use is 
far the most serious sub- 
stance use problem, although 
the use of drugs presents 
important discipline problems 
for the military.” 


Barco takes over in Bogota 


From Geoffrey Matthewsjtogofo 


Senor Vbgilio Barco Var- National Front has continued 
gas, a 65-year-old technocrat, on an unofficial basis, 
will be sworn in as Colombia's But Sedor Barco argues 
President today, amid a. na- . persuasively that m a genuine 
tional mood which cart only' r democracy the - triumphant 
be described as quiet- some- party has a mandate to gov- 


what puzzled expectancy, 
mixed with trepidation over 
escalating violence fuelled .by' 
guerrillas ahd cocaine barons. 

As President-elect since his 
landslide electoral victory ten 
weeks ago, Sefior Barco has 
been keeping a low profile and 
saying surprisingly little, ex- 
cept to reiterate his one mzyor 
campaign promise, that his 
Government’s first priority 
would be to tackle unemptoy- 
ment officially standing at 1 5 
per cent but in reality much 
higher. 

One important question 
mark still hangs over the 
complexion of his Govern- 
ment and whether it will 
continue the tradition of 
including members of the 
opposition. 

That tradition dates from 
1958. when civilian rule was 
restored after a brief military 
intervention to end a decade- 
long civil war in which as 
many as 300,000 may have 
been killed. 

Under a pact called the 
National From, designed to 
cool sectarian hatreds, the 
Liberal and Conservative par- 
ties alternated in the presi- 
dency for the next 16 years. 
Even after normal elections 
were resumed, in 1974, the 


era, while the defeated party 
has “a sacred duty to mount a 
constructive opposition”. 

The Conservatives seem in- 
clined to agree, in the belief 
that it is smarter politics to 
stay out and let the Liberals, 
traditionally Colombia's maj- 
ority party, take full res- 
ponsibility for the incoming 
administration. Two succ- 
essive Liberal governments 
between 1974 and 1982 were 
badly tainted by widespread 
corruption, and there are 
mounting fears that the same 
will happen this lime. 

Although Senor Barco's 
own reputation for honesty is 
unblemished, there is alarm 
over political deals he was 
forced to make with certain 
notorious party hacks in order 
to ensure that the powerful 
Liberal party machine would 
propd him to the presidency. 

A cold, humourless man, 
reported to have an explosive 
temper in private, Senor 
Barco’s personality contrasts 
sharply with the man be 
succeeds today, Sefior Bd- 
isario Betancur, an indepen- 
dent Conservative, whose 
human touch was always in 
evidence. 

As he bows out, Sefior 
.Betancur’s is increasingly be- 


ing regarded as the most bold 
and imaginative of recent 
administrations. He at- 
tempted to forge peace with 
the guerrilla organizations, 
steered Colombia into the 
non-aligned group and cham- 
pioned the Contadora group's 
peace initiatives in Central 
America. 

Senor Barco seems set to 
concentrate much more on 
domestic affaire, where, say 
his admirers, his proven abil- 
ity as an administrator will 
come to the fore. 

" An economist and engineer, 
wbo has served as ambassador 
in both London and Wash- 
ington, and as a director of the 
World Bank, he has a reputa- 
tion as a workaholic with an 
obsession for efficiency. That, 
say many independent observ- 
ers, is just the kind of exec- 
utive leadership the country 
needs at a time when the 
economy, among the more 
healthy in Latin America, is 
improving. 

Today's inauguration is to be 
attended by the US Secretary 
of State, Mr George Shultz, 
wbo will no doubt be keen to 
discuss with him Colombia's! 
continuing campaign a gains t 
the drug trade. 

Last week this claimed an- 
other victim when a Supreme 
Court judge was assassinated 
by hit-men hired by the drug 
“mafia”, in an attempt to 
prevent further extraditions of| 
their brethren to the United 
States. 


Chinese 
respond to 
Gorbachov 
initiative 

From Robert Grieves 
Peking 

China’s Foreign Ministry 
yesterday responded more 
favourably and in more detail 
to the speech by Mr Gorba- 
chov, the Soviet leader, at 
Vladivostok last week than it 
has in previous statements. 

In his speech on July 28, 
now known as his “Asian 
initiative”, Mr Gorbachov of- 
fered. among a variety of 
proposals, to withdraw some 
Soviet troops from Afghani- 
stan and Mongolia, and to 
train Chinese cosmonauts. 

“We have taken note of tire 
speech,” a ministry spokes- 
man, Mr Yu Zhizhong, said. 
“We believe that he has made 
some new remarks on the 
improvement of Sino-Sovici 
relations that have not been 
made before.” 

Speaking to Soviet and 
Western journalists, Mr Yu 
said: “China and the Soviet 
Union have already begun to 
hold dialogues at a certain 
level. The question is how to 
hold serious dialogues and 
make substantial progress.” 

He confirmed that experts 
from the two countries had 
exchanged views on the co- 
operative use of the water 
resources of the Heilong 
Jiang/Amur river in Man- 
churia, and that agreements 
were being drawn up. 

Co-operation in space wasa 
proposal yet to be studied. 

When Soviet correspon- 
dents asked for China’s po- 
sition on Mr Gorbachov’s 
proposed collective security 
conference in Asia, Mr Yu 
replied: “We hope that, to 
ensure the security of the 
Asian-Pacific region, practical 
steps will be taken to greatly 
reduce the nuclear missiles 
already deployed, and to re- 
duce tiie hotspots in Kampu- 
chea and Afghanistan.” 

Moscow has about 170 mo- 
bile medium-range SS20 mis- 
siles deployed in Soviet Asia, 
and 450,000 well-equipped 
troops along the 7,200-mile 
border with China. Opposing 
them are 1.5 million less well- 
equipped troops of the 
People's Liberation Army. So- 
viet troop strength in Mon- 
golia is estimated at between 
25,000 and 75,000. 



• MOSCOW: The Soviet 
Union is ready to consider 
China's position on a dispute 
over the demarcation of their 
border along the Amur and 
Ussuri rivers, a deputy foreign 
minister said yesterday (Reu- 
ter reports). 

Mr Mikhail Kapitsa said 
Moscow was prepared to rec- 
ognize that the border passed 
along the main channel of the 
rivers rather than on the 
Chinese side. 

Mr Kapitsa, an Asian 
specialist, was expanding on 
the Vladivostok speech, in 
which Mr Gorbachov held out 
the prospect of an agreement 
on the river frontier. 

Referring to treaties signed 
tween China and Tsarist 
Russia, he said: “What this 
means is that a number of 
islands which under the trea- 
ties were considered part of 
Russian territory would be 
beyond the mainstream and 
part of China.” 


Doctors held 
in Bangladesh 
demonstration 

More than 20 junior doctors 
were arrested, and at least 35 
others wounded, as police 
fired tear gas shells and used 
truncheons # to disperse a 
demonstration in central 
Dhaka by about 300 newly- 
qualified medical graduates 
demanding government jobs 
(Ahmed Fazl writes). 

The dashes marked the end 
of a week-long agitation by 
more than 1,200 unemployed 
doctors. The health ministry 
announced last week that it 
would take on 500 doctors. 


Pakistan court 
upholds Army 
regime’s laws 

From Hasan Akhtar 
Islamabad 

A foil bench of the Sind 
High Court has upheld the 
validity of all laws promul- 
gated m Pakistan by martial 
law authorities during an 8 16 - 
year period until December 30 
last year. 

The bench, headed by Chief 
Justice Nasimnddin, rejected 

the petition of a former airport 

security officer, who had 
sought the court’s interven- 
tion against the termination of 
his employment m August 
1981, under martial law 
regulation 52. 

The High Court's decision 
was considered vital, since it 
debars people affected by mar- 
tial law -from -seeking regar 
i-rcdress. 





Troops of foe Chinese 
provide a photographer 


\ 


e’s Liberation Army perform a martial-arts exercise as part of their 
: prize- winning picture for a corapet^Sm to mark China’s Anuj^Day, which : 


Superpower rivalry In South Pacific 

Fish deals lure island states 


The price of Pacific fish and 
the superpower rivalry in- 
volved is a big issue facing 
leaders of the South Pacific 
Forum when they begin their 
annual four days of talks in 
Suva tomorrow. 

The forum comprises the 13 
independent states of the 
South Pacific, ranging in size 
from Australia to tiny Pacific 
atoll nations such as Tuvalu, 
with an area of 10 square mfies 
and a population of 9,000. 

The fishing rights problem 
looms over the meeting, cast- 
ing the Soviet Union in the 
role of the good guy offering 
lucrative fishing deals to 
impoverished island nations 
which for years have seen their 
fish bong taken for nothing by 
United States tmm men. 

In spite of nine rounds iff 
talks between foe Forum Fish- 
ing Agency and American 
officials there is stiD no agree- 
ment. The buccaneer-like 
members of the American 
Tanamen’s Association have 
budged from their original 
stance that they do not have to 
pay royalties for migratory 
tuna, bat argue that their 
catches do not warrant the 
royalties being offered by the 
Russians. 

Mr David Lange, the New 
y^ajaad prime Minister, be- 
fore he left for the meeting, 
summed 19 the dilemma tac- 
tile form members. 


From Richard Long, Suva, Fiji 

the Soviet offers as they had 
little alternative. 


era in meir outlook, they were 
having to look favourably on 


This in turn brought an 
unfavourable reaction from the 
United States and the prospect 
of Washington increasing Its 
military presence in the area to 
counter the Soviet presence. 

The prospect was for in- 
creased superpow e r rivalry in 

The countries of the South 
Pacific Forum are Australia, 
the Cook Islands, Fm, Kiri- 
bati, Nauru. New Zealand, 
Niue, Papua New Guinea, the 
Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tu- 
valu, Vanuatu and Western 
Samoa. 

the Sooth Pacific, Mr Lange 
said. “I judge that to be not in 
New Zealand’s interest and 
not in tiie Pacific’s interest” 

He acknowledged that 
Washington, aware .of_ the 
consequences, had “moved 
heaven and earth” to find a 
solution, without success. The 
tuna men said they amid not 
match tiie Russian payments, 
and Washington took the view 
that it conld not subsidize 
commercial interests. 

The irony was that Wash- 
ington would, in the end, pay a 
great deal more to be miUtanly 
prepared in the regioo. 

Last August the tiny state of 
Kiribati, formerly the British- 
administered Gilbert Islands, 
signed a £12 million fishing 
deal with Moscow. Vannstp is 


now considering an offer 
which includes, for the first 
time, onshore fetilfties. Fiji 
has said it would consider an 
offer. 

The most heated debate at 
(be forum, however, is ex- 
pected to centre on the issue of 
iodepmMience for the French 
territory of New Caledonia. 
Melanesian member states are 
expected to posh for a resolu- 
tion backing an independent 
Kanak republic. The more 
conservative Polynesians, with 
Australia and New Zealand, 
are expected to oppose this. 

Mr Lange think* it in- 
evitable that the forum will, as 
a compromise, refer the issne 
to the United Nations 
Committee on Decolonization, 
seeking New Caledonia’s re- 
inscription on the UN list of 
countries that are not self- 
governing. 

- The leaders win also ap- 
prove the protocols of foe 
Sooth Pacific nuclear free zone 
treaty, which aims to ban tiie 
manu fac ture, storage, testing 
and nse of nuclear devices in 
the vast area of the Pacific 
between the west coast of 
South America and the east 
coast of Anstralia. 

Of foe unclear powers, 
China and the Soviet Union 
have indicated that they win 
sign. The US and Britain have 
yet to decide. France, which 
continues to test nuclear weap- 
ons in French Polynesia, is 
expected to ignore foe treaty. 

u 
















10 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


SPECTRUM 


Papering under the Tory cracks 


[THEHMESI 

PROFILE 

CONSERVATIVE CENTRAL OFFICE 


C onservative Central Of- 
fice. the London HQ of 
the Tory party machine, 
is used to abuse from its 
friends. It is always an 
easy scapegoat for frustrated MPs, 
voluntary workers, even Cabinet 
ministers. If things go wrong, 
blame the party bureaucrats, goes 
the cry. Words like “idle”, “out-of- 
touch” and “spendthrift” perma- 
nently battle for space in the 
political air. 

This week, with the stories of the 
rift between Mrs Thatcher and the 
man who currently runs Central 
Office. Mr Norman Tebbit, the 
abuse has hit an unusually high 
point, even for the inured inhab- 
itants of Smith Square. 

The best way to understand the 
Tories' elegantly fronted office in 
Westminster is to liken it to a lock 
on a canal. Around the middle of 
the parliamentary term, it begins to 
fill with people and money as the 
level of election readiness rises. It 
peaks at the campaign itself and 
then the process goes into reverse. 
The people and the money drain 
away until its is time for the cycle 
to start all over again. 

With such a degree of ebb and 
flow it is perhaps not surprising 
that the party which likes to stand 
for solid British virtues seems often 
— and particularly this week — to 
have so volatile an HQ. 

It is the largest and — for all the 
occasional rows over staff-cutting 
economies — the best-financed of 
the four party organizations. But it 
has an oddly-assorted mixture of 
people behind its doors. A section 
of its staff are long-term retainers, 
untouched by the feverish en- 
trances and exits and resigned .to 
the poor pay and frequent changes 
of style, management and dogma. 
They work side by side with a 
quick-change cast of short-termers 
of whom the most senior is the 
chairman himself 
Chairmen bring in their own 
people; there is a rapid turnover of 
younger researchers who may stop 
only long enough to get their 
footing on the political ladder, 
election build-ups bring in yet 
more specialists on temporary 
secondment The inside of the 
building reflects this turnover it is 
a warren of small, poky rooms 
divided by often very temporary 
partitions. 

High policy coexists with hum- 
drum doorstep politics. The chair- 
man at Central Office may be one 
of a Prime Minister's closest 
political confidants; his colleagues 


may be arbitrating disputes in far- 
flung constituencies about coffee- 
morning accounting. On the same 
day a watch ful (but not overdomin- 
eering) eye has to range over 6S0 
parliamentary constituencies 
which have to brought to the 
election start line with a present- 
able candidate, and a minister may 
have to be briefed for Question 
Time in the midst of a crisis like 
Westland. 

For three weeks every five years, 
party headquarters has the world at 
its feet- its media hammer on the 
door while Cabinet ministers listen 
humbly to explanations of target 
voters and market segmentation. 
The moment it has helped put the 
leader in Downing Street, its power 
and influence begins to evaporate. 

D esigning an election- 
winning strategy is al- 
ways harder when a 
party is in government 
much policy-making 
will be done in Whitehall, much 
presentation is out of Central 
Office hands. There is the old 
Catch-22 facing incumbents 
campaigning for another term: 
presenung a new plan to the 
electorate is liable to provoke 
questions about why the Govern- 
ment hasn't thought about it or 
done it before. 

At the moment, the Conser- 
vatives are feeling the force of this 
over both education and crime 
rates. Public dissatisfaction has 
generally helped the Conservatives 
on these issues in the past but that 
is now offset by scepticism about 
the government's ability to make 
an impact after failing to do so after 
seven years in office. 

Worse than this are the inter- 
connected problems which lie be- 
hind the recent rash of stories 
suggesting that Norman Tebbit's 
relations with Downing Street had 
deteriorated to the point where be 
might be about to resign. At the 
heart of this is unmistakable 
evidence that Mrs Thatcher does 
not share her party chairman's 
view of the strategy which the party 
needs now. 

These snippets of information 
about secret meetings at Chequers 
to consider new research findings 
have made already uncomfortable 
Tory MPs in marginal seats even 
more uneasy. The huge par- 
liamentary majority delivered hr 
1983 by the collapse of the Labour 
vote brought in dozens of pleas- 
antly surprised new MPs who - 
short of a very dramatic turn round 



Mrs Thatcher’s image makers past and present (clockwise from bottom left): Norman Tebbit, present party 
chairman: Cecil Parkinson, party chairman at the 1983 election; Lord McAIpine, party treasurer; Sir 
Gordon Reece, communications adviser in the 1979 and 1983 campaigns; Michael Dobbs (left), deputy 
chairman of Saatchi and Saatchi on secondment as Tebbit's chief of staff, with Harvey Thomas (right), 
yesterday announced as director of promotions and presentation; and Jeffrey Archer, deputy chairman 

that our guns are amply pointing 
in the wrong direction”. 

Tebbit is confronted by a genu-, 
ineiy new problem. Every wheel 
and cog in the Conservative and 
Labour party machines has been 
designed and maintained for years 
on the assumption of a two-party 
fight. The slick 1983 campaign 
masterminded by Cedi Parkinson 
hit a tempting Labour Party target 
where it hurt most and sidelined 
the Alliance. 

Now the scene has c h a ng ed. The 


- will not be in the next parliament 
They have little else to do except 
ponder the nuances of culpability 
for the Westland and British 
Leyland debacles. 

The conclusions drawn by many 
of them are similar to those drawn 
inside the circle of non-Cemral 
Office advisers around the Prime 
Minister. 

Tebbit's electoral analysis, and 
that of his key lieutenants, is firmly 
rooted in making sure that the 
party is not distracted by the threat 


from the Alliance. Those who 
disagree with this, including the 
MPs directly challenged by the 
Alliance and not by Labour, are 
worried by the unreflectively tra- 
ditional extremism-bashing aimed 
at Labour. 

Occasionally this battle pops up 
in the coded utterances of min- 
isters; Douglas Hurd, in the wake 
of Westland, said pointedly that a 
third term would not be won by 
“scragging our opponents”. “The 
problem” one dissenter said,“is 


Alliance has steadily enlarged, ns 
hold on local councils; its opinion 
poll rating refuses to go below 20 
percent: talk of coalition and hung 
parliaments is incessant. 

Central Office projects a clear 
outlook on three-party politics 
which amounts to the view that it is 
a temporary phenomenon. This 
philosophy defines Labour as the 
“main threat” - in the words of 
one key planner — while 
acknowledging that many Conser- 
. vaiive voters were in feet defecting 
to the Alliance. But he added that 
this was a short-term tactical 
problem. 

A fter the council elections 
last year. Central Office 
encouraged its council 
and parliamentary can- 
didates to apply to Lon- 
don for help in countering the 
Alliance. The burst of energy 
quickly fizzled out and has re- 
appeared only recently. Virtually 
its only tangible effect on the 
ground has been to divide the 
regular “know-your-enemy” brief- 
ing into separate Labour and 
Alliance newsletters. 

Central Office is poised to unveil 
several new campaigning weapons 
which have been in preparation for 
most of this year. They will look 
and sound impressive - a massive 
direct mail campaign, upgraded 
computers, greater regionalization 
of campaigning, new membership 
benefits - but the message which 
these are designed to convey 
remains fuzzy. 

The Central Office defence 
against the charges that its stance is 
out of date and too static relies on 
the counter-charge that the rest of 
the party leadership cannot deliver 
a clear enough line for the head- 
quarters machine to go out and sell. 
The counter-attack will be carried 
on to the party conference at which 
many of the enhanced campaigning 
techniques will be unveiled in fulL 

Norman Tebbit suffers two dis- 
advantages. First, with the arrival 
of Cecil Parkinson to succeed Lord 
Thorney croft as chairman, the job 
suddenly became massively vis- 
ible. The Falklands war gave him a 
ready platform. Tebbit is undiplo- 
matic with the media, mistrustful 
of it. and was not born with looks 
which come across as friendly and 
reassuring on television. 

Second, his intellectual appetites 
are for policy and not presentation. 
He regards himself as one of the 
last guardians of Thatch erite 
radicalism in a Cabinet which is 
tending to forget how it all began. 
Some of the criticisms of the 
complacency of the current Saatchi 
& Saatchi plans for the run-up to 
the election simply reflect the fact 
that Tebbit finds selling a good deal 
less congenial than designing. 


George Brock 


THE TIMES 




THE 



NEW EDITION 
OUT NOW 

“The finest 
reference atlas 
ever produced 

Lord Shackleton 


Bridge for the Baltic 


99 


£ 55.00 

TIMES BOOKS 


A £ 1,000m project to build a 
bridge and tunnel Unkiog 
Sweden and Denmark across 
the 10 miles of the Baltic 
Straits could move a stage 
nearer completion next month 
when the two governments 
meet to discuss (L But the 
project, formulated two years 
ago by a consortium of 
businessmen to bring the Nor- 
dic countries closer to the 
heart of modern Europe, will 
face a rough ride from 
conservationists,particularly 
those in the countries which it 
is most designed to help. 

The Baltic scheme is just a 
small part of a colossal en- 
gineering plan that would take 
20 years to complete and 
would cost scores of billions of 
pounds. Its detractors claim it 
would choke the life out of 
Europe with a network of 
motorways, tunnels and 
bridges. 

The industrialists who are 
pressing the case for the Baltic 
Straits tunnel and bridge, 
dubbed Scanlink, include 
multi national groups like Sie- 
mens and Thyssen, and have 
as their chairman Pehr G. 
Gy Hen hammer, the flamboy- 
ant head of Volvo. 

In a 43-page report. “Miss- 
ing Links", the group argues 
that “on a continental scale, 
deficiencies in Europe's 
ground transport system con- 
stitute an effective barrier to 
European economic and so- 
cial progress”. Their remedy is 
to fill in the gaps with an 

overall scheme which takes in 
the Channel road/rail project: 
Scanlink; a road and rail 
network south from Oslo 
which would reduce the trav- 
elling lime to the centre of 
Europe by up to 25 hours; and 
a high-speed European train 
network. 

This would mean a series of 
new tunnels through the Alps; 
a huge motorway between the 
West German city of Lubeck 
and the Norwegian capital via 
Gothenburg and Copenhagen; 
and a cat's cradle of bridges 
intended ultimately to elimi- 
nate the need for ferries across 
the Fehmant Beit Great Belt 
and Qresund. 

In their original statement 
of the plan, the industrialists 
said: “Europe is a market of 
360 million people still wail- 
ing. in some respects, to be 
served effectively by the 
continent's own industrial 
companies. The failure; to 
integrate markets, the 
fragmentation, goes -tp the 

y. ■ 


Plans to link Sweden 
and Denmark are 
just part of a huge 
scheme to transform 
European travel 



heart of Europe's most press- 
ing economic and employ- 
ment problems”. 

But they have failed _ to 
convince the conservationists 
that the few environmental 
problems they foresee will be 
more than compensated for by 
the number of jobs created. 
The reaction of European 
conservationists has been 
predictable. A seminar on the 
Missing Link proposals was 
organized last August by 
Scandinavian environmental 
groups and an “anti-link ac- 
tion campaign” was launched. 
“It requires no feat of the 
imagination to grasp the ef- 
fects on tire environment of 
such a monstrous expansion 
of road traffic”, wrote one of 
the protesters in Add News. 
the Swedish campaigning 
magazine. 

“The enormously increased 
emissions of nitrogen oxides 
and hydrocarbons would 
sound the death knell for the 
forests. Fitting catalytic 
converters would, in such 
circumstances, be like trying 
la bale a sinking boat with a 
teacup.” 

An agreement between the 
Swedish and Danish govern- 
ments to build a fixed link 
across the Baltic would be the 
first stage in a process which 
the conservationists fear 


would become progressively 
harder to stop. 

The industrialists note. 
“The key to Scanlink initially 
is to build the sea crossings. 
Once this is achieved, 
Scanlink will in a sense be 
operaiionaL The build-up of 
traffic caused by the comple- 
tion of the fixed links, how- 
ever, would create the 
momentum needed for the 
upgrading of related road and 
rail systems.” 

They see Scanlink as “the 
crucial northern leg of a 
transcontinental road and rail 
corridor connecting Scandina- 
via with the motorway and 
rail networks of central 
Europe”. The philosophy be- 
hind this is straightforward. 
The Nordic countries rely for 
their prosperity upon trade 
with their southern 
neighbours. 

As transport links, es- 
pecially roads, between other 
European countries have im- 
proved, the Nordic slates have 
slipped into a position of 
disadvantage. 

Travel time by road be- 
tween Oslo and Hamburg, a 
journey of about 550 miles, is 
about 20 hours. The journey 
from Rotterdam to southern 
France, roughly the same dis- 
tance, can be made in half the 
time. 

Tony Samstag 

gmraa M w iypm LM. 1988 


Trident 
and the 
taxman 

A growing number 
of people opposed to 
nuclear aims are 


withholding the 
taxes that find them 


Every evening, Enrard Stan- 
ton waits for a vial from the 
haiiiffc. They haw been once 
this month already and taken 
away Ids electric ypewriter. 
He doesn't bclfevethat it can 
possibly fetch qnte enough 
when they auction t, so they 
are bo and to be bad for more. 

Stanton is a contact gar- 
dener in Cumbria ind owes 
die inland Revenue precisely 
£250, the sum he has cal- 
culated that the avenge Brit- 
ish taxpayer coitributes 
Mutually towards Trdeut. 

It's not that be carnot pay 
the money he owes: be has 
simply decided not to. He 
says that the weajoas of 
genocide are illegal, md be- 
lieves there should be an 
alternative tax fund fir those 
who oppose nuclear wufare. 

Stanton has been ptrsuing 
bis cause throngh the lnglish 
courts for three and i half 
years. He has qootd the 
Bishop of Lincoln's refoal to 
pay a levy towards Rcfaard 
the Lkmheait's was In 



Paying for peace: Edwad 

Stanton awaits the bailifi 

France, and a 1917 Hgh 
Court ruling that, where :wo 
statutes are in conflict, the 
one which follows Chrisian 
law prevails. Bat no judge ms 
been prepared to take am 
seriously. 

Stanton is not alone. Ir- 
thnr Windsor, a retied 
librarian from Ghmceser, 
spent three weeks in prion 
this spring for refusing to ]ay 
£109.05 to the Inland ftv- 
enne. He had sent then a 
cheque for die money he 
owed, bat had made it ootto 
the Overseas Devetopmot 
Administration. They senfit 
back to him. 

As a formal lobby, be 
Peace Tax Campaign ink 
shape in the late 1970s wha 
Stanley Keeble, a Cornih 
farmer whose furniture lad 
already twice been distraind, 
joined forces with the Sodey 
of Friends and the 1934 
pacifist organization, tie 
Peace Pledge Union, ad 
wrote a letter to The Gnardii a 
with their views. A tbonsad 
letters of support came bac 
to them; by mid-1981, son 
3,000 members were on ther 
mailing list. 

Since then the campaigi 
has been advancing stowi; 
but deliberately: an amend- 
ment has gone before Par- 
liament, and there have bees 
several 10-minnte rule hear- 
ings. None has succeeded, but 
the pressure is growing. 

1110 % are said to be some 
300 to 400 families in Britain 
waiting for the bailiffs. Some 
are retired people, others are 
librarians, school-teachers 
and farmers. The sums in- 
volved are not all «mnii_- 
Roger Franklin, a writer who 
lives near Bath, owes £4,000. 

Not one of them really 
be&ves that their movement 
is about to sweep the country. 
It is a Ear more private form of 
protest. The principle, as they 
see it. Is one of morality. The 
conscientious objectors of two 
world wars won the right to be 
exempted from supporting 
the lighting. “Why” asks 
Keeble, “should we now be 
forced to pay for others to 
kill ?” 

Caroline Moorehead 


CONCISE CROSSWORD No 1022 


ACROSS 

* Afterbirth tube (9.4) 
9 Metal rock (3) 

*0 S Argentine. Chile (9 

11 KHer(5) 

13 Wretched (7) 

16 Bullfighter (7) 

19 Decree (5) 

22 Reckless (9) 

U Silent (3j 
25 Chorea (Z6J) 

DOWN 

1 Sever (3.3) 

2 Rappel (6) 

3 Careless (8) 

4 Put end to (6) 

5 Cinder (4j 

6 Rebound (6) 

7 f^jc^ reSP ° nSive 

12 Commercial media 
body(J.l.l) 

M Debar {8) 

IS Animal pouch (3) 



16 Chic (6) 

17 Prosper (6) 

18 Amend (6) 

SOLUTION TO No 1021 

£^1^. .IBM* HD 4 Muddle 7 Land a 
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23 love excessively (4) 


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THF. TTMRS THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


BOOKS 


T hisisihe sixth section 
to be- published since 
the History of Parlia- 
ment Trust was set up 
in 1951, and . the fourth to 
appear under the general edi- 
torship of Mr P.W. jiasier. 
Tbereare.five to. come. When 
they are completed there will 
be a qintiziuous history from 
1386 to 1S32 containing his- 
tories of every constituency 
and biographies of every 
member, together with an 
introductory- volume survey- 
ing each period. It is a 
mammoth task, and win only 
be possible" if contributions 
from private donors can be 
added to the Treasury grant, 
as has been done in this case, 
notably by the Wolfson Foun- 
dation. These volumes like the 
previous sections have been 
edited with meticulous schol- 
arship, and have been admira- 
bly produced by the 
publishers. They constitute an 
essential tool for any historian 
ofthoseyears. 

Some ofthe biographies are 
fascinating for lovers of curio - • 
so. Palmerston sat for a- bor- 
ough— Newport — whose 
proprietor -made it a strict 
condition that beshould never 
set foot in the place. Thomas 
Whitmore was . “one-third 
mad** which became particu- 
larly noticeable when he was 
“two-thirds drank'’. William 
Beckford, once a millionaire, 
later suffered, m his own 
words '“from ■ purse trouble 
and the trouble which - is a 
hundred times worse than aD 
others — boy trouble**. Sir : 
Eyre Coote was. a firm sup- 
porter of flogging, but when he 
gave a practical demonstra-. 
tion of his creed try procuring 
boys at Christ's Hospital to 
whip -him there- was a -public 
scandaL -How very different — 
or so one hopes — from 1% in 
our own dear House today. 

■As .for constituencies, the 
first tiling that will strike the 
reader who comes fresh to the 
period is the paucity of con- 
tests. Although seven general 
elections ana numerous by- 
elections took place between; 
1790 and 1820, only 63 out of 
362 possible contests in the 40 
English counties went to a 


Rotten boroughs and orang-utans 


Robert Blake appraises a mammoth work of scholarship 
about the men who came to make our cradle of democracy 


THE HOUSE OF 
COMMONS 
1790-1832 
By R.G. Thorne 

Seeker & Warburg, 

5 vob£225 


polL The corresponding figure 
for the 203 English boroughs 
was 529 out of 2J245. One 
reason for the difference was 
the colossal expense involved 
in a contested county ejection. 
The electorate was for forger 
than in the boroughs with a 
few exceptions such as West- 
minster, the City, Bristol or 
Norwich- There was only one 
voting centre, and so, apart 
from bribery, candidates had 
to bear the expense ofbringmg 
electors to the poll, accommo- 
dating Them and filling them 
with great quantitites of food 
and drink — especially the lat- 
ter. Yorkshire; still undivided 
with 20X00 voters, was the 
most costly of alL In 1807 
there occurred its only contest 
in the period. Ear! Fitzwilfiam 
spent £100,000 to secure the 
seat for his son, and the Ear! of 
Harewood only slightly less, 
but unsuccessfully, for his. 
The representation was divid- 
ed between the Htzwiliiam 
heir and William WUberforce 
who was a popular hero. He 
spent less than £30,000, which 
was covered twice over, by a 
national subscription. York- 
shire was an extreme case; but 
in any county it was desirable 
to do a deal rather than fight. 


Lord John RusselL For moss 
of .the period England was at - 
war. Hence the remarkably 
large number of army and 
navy officers who had parlia- 
mentary seats. The period saw 
one m^jor constitutional 
change — a by-product of war. 
This was the Act of Union 
with Ireland -which added 
another hundred to. the 558 . 
Members of England, Wales, 
and Scotland. Carried without 
the promised corollary of 
Catholic Emancipation; it was 
to be a potent source of future 
trouble. It was widely expect- 
ed that the Irish contingent 
would strengthen the Govern- 
ment, and this seems to have 
been true: to 1801 they were 
categorized in Dublin Castle 
as “government 55 or 56; 
opposition 16; on sale 17;. 
inactive five; no comment , 
six.” 


were, it is true, reasonably 
uniform, the vote lying with 
-the “forty shilling freeholder?. 
But . the boroughs, through the 
-accidents of history and- the 
accretions of time, displayed 
an amazing variety of fran- 
chises — householder, -free- 
man, corporation, scot and 
lot, burgage, freeholder. The 
number of electors ranged 
from 12000 in Westminster 
-which, along with Yorkshire, 
was ihe most “democratic” - 
constituency in England; 


The diversity of qualifica- 
tions and numbers in the pre- 
reform constituencies was 
remarkable. The counties 


down to eleven in the famous 
Old Sarum in Wiltshire, and 
seven in the less well known 
Gatton in Surrey, which re- 
peatedly changed hands for 
vast sums of money. 
Peacock's parody in 
Meiincoun, where the speedi- 
less Sir Oran Ham-ton Bart — 
an orang-utan dressed as a 
man — is elected for the - bor- 
ough of Onevote and “virtual- 
ly represents” the numerous 
population of , the 

neighbouring borough of 
Novote, was not for wide of 
the mark. 

The rationale for such an 
odd (to modem eyes) electoral 
system was that MPs repre- 
sented historical 

“communities” rather than 
numerical majorities. On that 
theory the total numerical 
vote as between political par- 
ties in the country is irrele- 
vant The concept still lingers 
on in the first-past-the-post 
system, and is one of many 
barriers to the logic of propor- 
tional representation. By 1820 


the communities had in many 
cases become ossified surviv- 
als in the hands of small 
groups of landowners and 
proprietors who bought and 
sold them. But their reform 
came up against another barri- 
er — the sancrosanctity of the 
rights of property. 


M ichael Brock in his 
splendid book. 
The Great Reform 
Act , points out 
that “any long-lived political 
system necessarily consists 
largely of survivals” and he 
rites the House of Lords and 
the American Electoral Col- 
lege. But there comes a mo- 
ment when survivals lose 
credibility, and there are rim- 
ply not enough forces in 
society and politics to sustain 
them. At the end of the period 
covered by . these volumes 
there were many signs that 
this was happening. It is 
surprising that the system 
lasted for another twelve 
years, but we will have to 
await the next Section for an 
analysis of the ending of the 
old order so admirably de- 
scribed in these excellent 
volumes. 




T he years. covered by 
these volumes are of 
great interest politi- 
cally, for it was during 
this period . that something 
recognizable as a two-party 
system began to emerge. They 
open with the-younger Pitt in 
his heyday opposed by Fox, 
the greatest orator of his time. 
From the Pittites -and Foxiies 
descend the Tories of Lord - 
Liverpool and Canning, and 
the Whigs of Early Grey and 




Revolt without a bottom 


Nothing could be more calcu- 
lated, to spark offa correspon- 
dence to The Times than the 
accusation . that someone’s, 
scholarship is suspect. Robert. 
Reid states tharE P Thomp- 
son has described Frank Fed’s 
The Rising of the Luddites, 
(1888) as “generally accurate, 
even in detail”. Reid ripostes, 
“Alas, wherever I have been 
able .to check; Peel inde®rik^ 
have found he is generally- 
inaccurate." 

Reid's Land of Lost Content 
tells the dramatic story of the 
rise and suppression of 
Luddism in the West Riding 
vaUeys of the rivers Odder, 
Caine and Spen. Depre s sed by 
the huge recession of 1 8 1 4, the 
woollen-cloth workers of 
Yorkshire rose up against the 
mill-owners who were intro- 
ducing - newly invented ma- 
chines into their factories — ' 
the spinning jenney, the crop- 
ping machine, the steam 
loom, the stocking machine. 
The inventors found in the 
valleys that lie in the circle of 
Huddersfield, Halifax, Brad- 
ford, Leeds and Wakefield, the 
power sources, “the water and 
the coal to drive some of die 
most productive of their new 
machines” . 

. Reid concentrates on the 
machine-wreckers of this area, 
colourful characters, many of 
whom ended up transported. 
Some were executed.. The 
government used the army to 
put down the revolution and 
influenced the judiciary to 
deliver draconian punish- 
ment: , seventeen Luddites 
were hanged at York. Reid 
identifies a cloth-cropper, 
George Mellor, articulate and 
better educated than most of 
his work-mates, as the leader 
in this small pocket of resis- 
tance to change; be was the 
local Ned, General, or King 


Brian Martin 


: LANDOFLOST 
CONTENT 
The Luddite Revolt, 

: 1812 

- By Robert Reid 

Heinemanm£J5 


Lud.’Who inspired the dadbs 
of BFBSGL (“Blood for blood 
says General Lud”)oo factory 
walls. Mellor is Reid’s alleged 
murderer of William Horsfall, 
owner of Oltiwells mill, and a 
perpetrator of violence to a 
degree “never before 
experienced” by the Masters 
of the mills:. He organized 
para-military 'companies of 
masked workers, answering to 
numbers not to names, who 
held the Masters at pistol- 
point, and smashed their ma- 
chines with heavy hammers 
known as “Enochs” after their 
maker. 


Characters just as colourful 
were marshalled by the gov- 


ernment to restore order, de- 
fend the owners, and round up 
the vandals. A Scot, Lieuten- 
ant General the Honourable 
Sir Thomas Maitland, was the 
military commander called on 
to subjugate the recalcitrant 
northern provinces. Less se- 
vere than “Butcher” Cumber- 
land, be pursued his duties 
with relentless determination, 
mostly from amid the com- 
forts and bigb life of Buxton 
Spa- town, rather than from 
the disagreeable ambience of 
Huddersfield or Bradford. 
Partial to the amours of both 
sexes, he was known to have 
received some distinguished 
visitors while recumbent on 
his bed with his bottom brie; 
Sir - Sydney Osborne wryly 
remarked, “the sun rose and 


. set in Sir Thomas Maitland's 
hinder disk”. Yet Maitland’s 
analysis of I-uddism was 
. acute: there was “no solid 
bottom” to the movement, 
. and it was built on “nothing 
more than hope”. .' 

. He defeated his opponents 
by military might, in the same 
way that Soviet troops put 
down Czech workers in 1968: 

, 35,000 men were mobilized 
for the North. .His lieutenant, 
Francis Raynes, formed com- 
mandos which terrorized local 
communities. John Lloyd, a 
solicitor, became a law en- 
forcement officer, interrogat- 
ing, and torturing information 
front, his victims. A united, 
frightened establishment 
crushed the workers' revolt 
with every means, legal and 
illegal available. 

As Reid points out in a 
number of extraordinary par- 
allels, the 1812 crisis con- 
tained pertinent moral and 
political lessons for our times 
of which make bis final chap- 
ter as compelling to read as 
his narrative accounts of 
Luddite action, military re- 
pression, and judicial 
junketing: They show that the 
work-forces of British coal, 
steel ship-building, and news- 
print industries have failed to 
adjust to new technologies; 
“the arrow of time moves in 
one direction only”. Reid 
agrees that legislation or vio- 
lence might delay the advance 
of technology but they cannot 
prevent it Nor can any indus- 
try afford to rest on its 
laurel$.Today’$ computer 
technology is destined to be- 
come as outmoded as cloth- 
cropping shears. So, watch 
out! And watch your televi- 
rion. Reid’s Marie Curie be- 
came a television series. Land 
of Lost Content is sure to 
follow. 


A well-known book on ancient 
Greek law has a angle entry in 
the index under “Women”: it 
is “disabilities”. But it is 
notoriously difficult to draw 
conclusions from legal disad- 
vantage about the de facto life 
and aspirations of the disad- 
vantage! group. 

' Classical Greek literature is 
written entirely by males. But' 
a Greek tragedy by Aspasia 
would have told us as much 
about women’s life in classical 
Athens as Aphra Behn’s come- 
dies do about women’s fife in 
Restoration England. Mar- 
riage contracts, wills and 
gravestones, help little. What 
is the tone of a gravestone 
raised to a wife in honour of 
her “truthfulness and 
chastity” — surprise? Self- 
congratulation? Relief? Or 
genuine gratitude? 

But if we construct a “help- 
less little woman” image, we 
shall have to reconcile it with 
the evidence of mythology 
where so many terrifying 
women — eg Scyfla, Medusa. 
Medeia — are destroyers of 
men. Were Greek males se- 
cretly afraid of their women? 
Was it female sexuality that 
threatened them? 

These are clearly tricky seas 
to negotiate. Modern 
oppresrionist theology, with 
its unique insight into the 
desires and aspirations of all 
women, everywhere, and its 
determination to make Fifth 
Century Athenian males pay 
in full for the crimes commit- 
ted under its charter, has a full 
terrorist armada under sail, 
and it is against this that 
Professor Mary Lefkowhz has 
launched her own little 
barque: 


Misses 
as good 
as males 


Peter Jones 


WOMEN IN GREEK 
MYTH - 
By Mary R. Lefkowitz 

Duckworth , £12.95 


wider range of reference than 
that suggested by the title. 

But to the two weightier 
issues. First, Professor 
Lefkowhz draws most of her 
evidence from tragedy and 
epic. Naturally, she acknowl- 
edges that this evidence is 
written by males, and depicts 
a distant, heroic male world in 
what may be thoroughly con- 
ventionalized settings. But she 
does nothing to take it into 
account. If her thesis is to. 
stand, she must argue how the 
epic-tragic vision of fife con- 
nects with the real world. 


She contends that Greek 
males should be regarded as 
“pioneers in recognizing and 
describing with sympathy 
both the life and the central 
importance to their society of 
women” and that what makes 
Greek women “appealing and 
dangerous is not their beauty 
or sexuality but their 
intelligence”. One can almost 
hear the feather-dusters being 
primed. 

But shoals of person-eating 
scholars, basking so peacefully 
(as everyone thinks) in the 
warmth of the long vacation,, 
may also sniff blood. 

First, the book is an amal- 
gam of four previously pub- 
lished essays and three new 
ones. With so many self- 
contained chapters, the book 
is left without a sense of a 
developing argument, and be- 
comes in places uneasily repe- 
titious. Yet readers may judge 
the disadvantage outweighed 
by the fact that each chapter 
makes easy individual read- 
ing, and often embraces a 


Second, her appeal to 
“myth” is misleading. There is 
no body of Greek myth, 
handed down by word of 
mouth through countless gen- 
erations, which the Greeks 
record and freeze. We know 
the myths largely through the 
highly sophisticated and sub- 
tle reworkings of them in the 
hands of Homer, Hesiod, and 
the tragedians. Sophocles' Oe- 
dipus Rex, for example, bears 
as much relation to archetypal 
“myth” as Shakespeare's Ju- 
lius Caesar does to “history”. 
The book should be entitled 
Women in Greek— perhaps 
even Ancient — Literature. 
That in my view, lessens the 
significance of the analysis. 

The fate. then, of this highly 
readable, avowedly popular, 
book may well be to be 
chewed to pieces under a hail 
of feather-dusters. But some- 
one has to commit themselves 
to a prototype and object to 
the perversion of ancient evi- 
dence in the name of contem- 
porary political interest Will 
weightier tomes brave the 
storm? 


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• The Wychford Murders, by 
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• Upon Some Midnights 
Clear, by K.C.Consiantine 
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Mario Balric. small-town 
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He is a not-very-pleasant slob, 
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• A Single Death, by Eric 
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Wright ( Collins £8.95) As 
favour to ex-wife, Toronto cop 
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death of. social worker looking 
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poignant insights into die lives 
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• A Private Prosecution, by 
Eileen Dewhuret (Collins 
£8.95) Family claustrophobia 
reigns in grouping hunt for 
strangler ofboy dressed as girl. 
Was it is sexual error or the 
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pursuing official inquiries and 
his friend, who thinks he 
knows better. Tight plot, tight 
emotions. . 


killer, a cell of revolutionaries, 
and a believable cop. Sound 
psychology, strong action. 

• Cold Iron, by Nicholas 
Freeling (Andre Deuisch. 
£8. 95) Increasingly 
introspective Commissaire, 
Henri Castang moved to a 
new posting in the North of 
France without lessening his 
sensitive, literate murder- 
solving antennae, working 
overtime among the region's 
rich and petty powerful. Not 
the most exciting Castang. 

• The Life And Times Of 
Miss Jane Marple, by Anne 
Hart (Macmillan. £8.95) All 
you could possibly want to 
know about Agatha Christie's 
spinster sleuth (born at the age 
of 65), and her homicide- 
prone village, St Mary Mead. 
Scholarship and froth com- 
bine well for a pleasantly 
instructive read. 


Cultures clashing 
in the jungle war 


• Slow Tarn, by Mike 
Marqusee (Michael Joseph. 
£9.95) Has-beens* cricketing 
tour of India becomes en- 
meshed with umpire's death 
and bloody local politics. 
Brearley-intelligent rather 
than Botham-spectacular, 
Marqusee is well worth his 
innings- 

• Only The Dead Know 
Brooklyn, by Thomas Boyle 
(Haider & Stoughton. £ 9.95 ) 
Good local atmosphere and a 
well-crafted plot encompass- 
ing the disappearance of an 
eccentric prof a psycophatic 


FOYLES ART GALLERY 

DAPHNE 

BABOURIS 

AN EXHIBITION OF 

BATIKED SILK 
KIMONOS 
& TEXTILES 

10-6 dally iratfi 27 Ang 


Teddy Maki and Jimmy Ya- 
mamoto are Japanese-Ameri- 
can jazz musicians who find 
themselves in Tokyo as sur- 
prised as everyone else by the 
raid on Pearl Harbour. They 
are conscripted into the Japa- 
nese army along with their 
manager, Ike, whose family 
they have come to know. Both 
are attracted to his sister, 
Kazuko- She marries Yama- 
moto. Still resolutely Ameri- 
can in sentiment, they are 
drafted to the Philippines, 
where Maki escapes, some- 
what ignobly, from a jungle 
ambush in which Ike and 
others are presumed killed. 
Returning to camp he finds 
Yamamoto in grave trouble 
after showing sympathy to an 


FICTION 


Stnart Evans 


SOLDIERS IN HIDING 

by Richard Wiley 

Chatto & Windus. £9.95 


SHALLOWS 
By Tim Winton 

Weidenfeld <£ Mcolson, £9.95 


JUDITH 
By Nicholas Mosley 

Seeker & Warburg, £11.95 


American prisoner under pun- 
ishment for refusing to re- 
spond humbly to captivity. 
Major Nakamura orders Ya- 
mamoto to shoot the Ameri- 
can. He refuses and is himself 
kiOed by the officer. Maki is 
given the same order. He 
obeys. 

Soon after he is discharged 
without explanation. Kazuko 
is pregnant: nevertheless they 
make love (for once the phrase 
is accurate) and it is agreed 
that Yamamoto’s child shall 
be brought up as Maki's. After 
a period of disorientation and 
disillusion, the shared 
sufferings of war and the 
influence of Kazuko's family 
enable Maki to adjust, howev- 
er cvnically. to Japanese life. 
Soldiers in Hiding is a well- 
constructed, beautifully com- 
posed first novel in which the 
author’s knowledge of the two 
cultures at war in Teddy Maki 
makes for fascinating conflict 
foil of subtleties. There is 
much irony, none of it la- 
boured; the characters live on 
the page: the descriptions are 
vivid. Most of all, the book is 
remarkable for its 
compassion. 

In Shallows, the sometimes 
violent friction between in- 
habitants of a whaling com- 
munity rolled Angelas, the last 


in Australia, and a group of 
conservationists is reflected in 


conservationists is reflected in 
marital tensions between 
Cleveland Cookson and his 
wife. Queenie. Cookson, self- 
confessed failure, fired by the 
journals of one o^her ances- 
tors, is immersed in the 
whaling traditions of 
Quecnie’s family, the 
Coupars- She is deeply revolt- 
ed by the cruelty of whaling 
and all other forms of savage- 
ry. This sets her apart not only 
from her husband, but from 
other townspeople and her 
venerable, lonely grandfather 
also haunted by old memory. 
Throughout, there is much 
emphasis of family ties, loyal- 
ty, and misunderstanding. 

The novel is full of striking- 
ly described action. The jour- 
nals offer an imaginative 
reconstruction of primitive 
whaling and the personal suf- 
fering involved: the account of 
modem methods is unblink- 
tngly factual and sickening. 
Characterization is rich, espe- 
cially in the contrast between 
the tolerable failures and the . 
great local success — a-venal, 
repulsive tub of sweating lard 
called Pustling. 

The Shallows of the title 
refer immediately to the flats 


on which migratory whales 
end up stranded for whatever 
reason. They arc also a meta- 
phor for desperation, disaster, 
and suicide afflicting people. 
Tim Winton. in this admira- 
ble novel, deals with pride, 
loneliness, longing for love, 
and the struggle between nos- 
talgic heroics and the heroism 
of compassion. 

Nicholas Mosley's novel 
takes the form of long, con- 
sciously literary letters from 
Judith io three men important 
to hen Bert, her sometime 
lover who makes films: Pro- 
fessor Ackerman, a cyberneti- 
cist who first interested her in 
different levels of perception; 
Jason, some sort of writer who 
has also been a bed-mate. 
Judith is a promiscuous young 
actress, who after a brief run in 
a play about Judith and 
Holofcmes lakes up with satir- 
ical journalist. She moves on 
to a drug-addicted painter, 
who drags her into a degraded 
hallucinatory vortex of mis- 
ery. After one demented esca- 
pade. one of her lovers falls to 
his death from a ledge. It is not 
immediately dear which. 

She is rescued by the Profes- 
sor, to whom her second letter 
is addressed describing life in 
the commune to India which 
he has recommended. It is 
rolled the Garden and the 
guru who inspires it is jocular- 
ly known as God. A jocose 
character himself, he regales 
followers with grotesque dis- 
tortions of rabbinical and 
biblical creation myths. 
Among other exotic experi- 
ences, Judith fatefully encoun- 
ters Jason climbing into the 
Gaiden at night Chance and 
inevitable coinddcnce dictate 
that they have many mutual 
acquaintances. 

The novel is packed with 
obsessive imagery: Judith and 
Holofemes, other less imme- 
diate mythical allusions, met- 
aphors derived from Plato, 
certain pictures in the Nation- 
al Gallery, hags dismembering 
a child in a temple, people 
looking in at or out o£ a 
picture, the brink of preci- 
pices — especially a baby on 
the edge of a bed, gardens, and 
snakes. The writing is highly 
mannered. Everything is in- 
cessantly questioned Charac- 
ters think one thing and say 
something else. Sometimes it 
appears that the reader is 
addressed directly in paren- 
thesis. Challenging stuff, no 
doubt but eventually tire- 
some. The author seems to 
suggest that as repeated stress 
rouses cracks in a wall to come 
together, it has a similar effect 
upon people. Question mark. 


We liked it 
so much that we 
bought you one! 


“ . a book one turns to with constant pleasure, 

l L:.. ■ l _ - I -i i 


with much style and little prejudice? 


ns April 261985 

The Times Literary Supplement is the world's pre-eminent 
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wm 




7 1986 



Reagan’s space-weapons shift 


s THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Summit 

rematch 

■ Hardly has lhe dust settled after 
the Commonwealth mini-summit 
than another Thatcher-Common- 

] wealth clash looms, this time to be 

played out under lhe auspices of 
the Queen herself. The occasion 
will be next month's annual 
meeting of the Commonwealth 
Parliamentary Association, an 
— event which the Queen will open 
and to which Mrs Thatcher has 
already accepted an invitation. As 
A the Prime Minister recovers in 
I hospital this morning. I bring the 
^ grave tidings that delegates from 
the 100 national and provincial 
ea legislatures intend to place South 

vc Africa high on the agenda. An 

m entire session will be devoted to 

bl the questions “Will the Com mon- 
th wealth survive apartheid?” and 

to “The Commonwealth — who 

nt cares?". After the outcome of the 

pc weekend conference African coun- 

tries. I am told, are clamouring for 
ri an additional debate demanding 

m effective sanctions against South 

O Africa. Giving the proceedings an , 

at added edge. Her Majesty will 1 

p< speak at the conference. On what? j 

it “You'll just have to wait and see", 

said the Palace yesterday. 

I Deadline 

tt A intriguing tale of possible 

H American-Israeli complicity rea- 
le ches me from Cairo. A few days 

p, before the Israelis bombed the 

it- PLO headquarters in Tunis last 

T autumn, the Cairo bureau of the 

a < American broadcasting station 

tc Voice of America received a telex 

from its Washington headquarters 
fl asking for an update of Yasser 

U Arafat's obituary. This caused 

fc some surprise among the staff, but 

- all naturally became clear when 

h the bombs fell. Or did it? The 

Americans, you may recall, denied 
o all foreknowledge of the raid. 

5 Aerial attack 

p Mind you. things are not always 

0 cosy between VOA and the Israe- 

u lis. There, local ecologists are 

i, furious over plans to build a 

i] transmitter in the Arava Valley in 

0 southern Israel Not out of distaste 

7 for VOA propaganda, of course, 

q but because the station is to be 

0 built on the flight path of birds 

c migrating south from Europe. 

Protesters say that the electro- 
p magnetic radiation from the sta- 

y lion will upset the birds’ internal 

c navigation systems, making them 

f lose their way. The birds’ flight 

e over Israel could end up worse 

r than that over Lebanon, where 

s they provide sport for bored 

h militiamen. 


BARRY FANTONI 


&RDUSE 

radiation 

rear 


‘No problem — Angus wOl simply 
organize a night shoot' 

It’s a date 

A fine piece of one-upmanship 
from Burke's Peerage : Its latest 
press release announces that the 
publicity office will be closed 
“from the birthday of His Im- 
perial Majesty Napoleon I" to the 
“birthday of HRH Prince Al- 
brecht Alexander Maria Frederick 
William Carl Joseph of Wun- 
emberg”. August IS to September 
2L in other — far less-interesting — 
words. The hand-out is dated IV 
VIII MCMLXXXVI. 


Elevating 


Inspired by Prince Andrew's 
elevation to Duke of York, a 
correspondent writes to the Bir- 
mingham Mail. “Wouldn’t it be a 
very pleasant boost for our great 
city of Birmingham if Prince 
Edward could be made something 
like the Duke of Birmingham at 
some appropriate date: say his 
25lh birthday?" Edward. Duke of 
Birm ingham certainly has a ring to 
it and would be a gift to headline- 
writers ( Brummy To Wed — Of- 
ficial). Are there any other new 
titles which should be bestowed on 
those struggling along with just 
one or two? I await suggestions. 

• Fnrit trader Anthony Eliakis 
spotted this poster for Greek 
peaches and nectarines at Covent 
Garden. A divine delight, I think 
you'll agree. 

venus 

SEASON PROGRAMME: 

Peaches S Nekiarini 
— Grown in ideal climate 
conditions. 

— Mature harvested, with * •. 

kc- water pre-coolcd, 

JC (shock by hydro-cooling). 
w. Simuttanoousty. racBcaly 
A*: washed-up. 

(W — Sorted out OyspectaMsts. \ 
packed up and qutckttesl \ 
JjK> delivered-. 

iBB „a time delight 


by Lord Chalfont 


The Pentagon's funds for the “Star 
Wars” research programme, 
which have been the subject of 
heated congressional debate in the 
United States, have just been 
approved by the narrowest of 
margins — one vote — in the Sen- 
ate. This vote came, only a few 
day's after the news was leaked of a 
“secret" letter from President 
Reagan to Mikhail Gorbachov in 
which he is reported to have 
proposed a delay of seven and a 
half years in the deployment of 
spaced-based anti-missile de- 
fences once the research pro- 
gramme is completed. 

American conservative critics * 
argued strongly in the past; week 
that this threatened .delay would 
sink the prospects for funding 
since Congress would never vote 
money fora programme with such 
doubtful prospects. The narrow- 
ness of the vote gives - some 
support to that argument — but it 
is one based upon a misconcep- 
tion about the strategic signifi- 
cance of the delay. 

If it were true that all he had 
done was to offer a delay of seven 
and a half years in the deployment 
of strategic defences, it would be 
something like offering not to 
divulge the secret of eternal life 
before next Christmas. No one 
who knows anything about strate- 
gic defence seriously believes that 
it would be possible to deploy 


space-based systems much before 
the beginning of the next century. 

Reagan's purpose should, how- 
ever. be taken much more seri- 
ously. It is based upon the 
conception of strategic defence, 
not as a protective dome oyer the 
United States and the West to 
prevent Russian ballistic missiles 
getting in. but as a dome over the 
Soviet- Union to -prevent them 
getting out. This homely image is 
generally attributed to Richard. 
Perle. the Pentagon's persuasive 
and much maligned advocate; and 
the immediate reaction to it 
among critics of strategic defence 
is that it reflects a desire in 
Washington to achieve decisive 
strategic superiority — a situation 
which the Soviet Union would, 
understandably, never accept 

The president's answer to this 
charge is. in effect to postulate a 
system which would also provide 
for a similar dome to prevent 
American missiles getting out: in 
other words to share with Russia 
the benefits of any strategic de- 
fence system which current re- 
search might show to be 
practicable. It is, of course, an idea 
which provokes a combination of 
scepticism and rage among more 
hawkish American advisers. They 
argue that even if it were tech- 
nologically and diplomatically fea- 
sible, which is unlikely, it would 
be dangerously destabilizing. 


It is important, however, to 
realize that the president's offer is 
not a new thread in the pattern of 
American thinking on strategic 
defence. Nor does it represent, as 
both hawkish and dovish com- 
mentators have either lamented or 
cdcbrated,any “change of heart" 
in the White House concerning the 
use of SDI as a bargaining chip in 
the arms control dialogue with 
Moscow. The idea of making 
drastic cuts in offensive missiles 
on both sides simultaneously with 
the deployment of space-based 
defences has always been a strong 
element in lhe thinking of those 
who believe that strategic defence 
offers the possibility of a move 
from a deterrent posture based on 
retaliation alone to one based 
principally on ballistic missile 
defence. 

It has. therefore, always been 
envisaged that, at the end of the 
research period, there would be 
discussions with the Soviet 
Union, and America's allies, on 
howto manage the transition from 
one strategic posture to the other. 
The seven and a half years’ delay 
fills just that need. 

All this may. it is true, prove too 
difficult to negotiate with the 
Soviet Union. What is also im- 
portant about it. however, is that it 
reflects a determined attempt on 
Reagan’s part to create a psycho- 
logical climate in which a meeting 


with Gorbachov later this year 
might lead to serious verifiable 
arms control agreements.- and 
especially to substantial .reduc- 
tions in the number of offensive 
nuclear missiles, on both sides. 

Reagan and Gorbachov 1 agreed 
in Geneva last November on the 
general principle of a 50 per cent 
reduction, and there- have been' 
recent signs ofa willingness by lhe 
Soviet Union to follow this up 
with serious negotiations. There 
are. as well real possibilities of 
progress in the reduction of con- 
ventional forces and intermediate 
range missiles, control of chemical 
weapons and — in the much 
longer term - a comprehensive 
midear test ban treaty. 

There are signs in the US of the 
emergence of a coherent strategic 
conception which might lead to' 
agreements designed, not just to 
fulfil some vague idea of “arms 
control" for its own sake, but to 
move away from the posture of 
threatened devastion towards 
deep cuts in nuclear weapons 
stockpiles and a safer, more stable 
balance of power between the 
Soviet Union and the West Ifthat 
is what the president's letter is 
meant to achieve — and the -Sen- 
ate vote has made it possible — it 
should not be lightly dismissed. 

The author was Minister for 
Disarmament 1964-67. 


Peter Brimelow on stock market sages who outdo Wall Street experts 

Gurus with a gilt edge 


PHS 


America is a large country filled 
with a restless population con- 
vinced of the virtues of self-help, 
and one of the more popular 
means of self-help is owning 
shares: more than 40 million 
Americans — one in seven of the 
population — are estimated to own 
shares directly. The gurus of these 
40 million are the investment 
letter writers, a breed who depend 
on their colourful characters and 
loudhailer-selling tactics to peddle 
their wares at subscription rates of 
‘£45-£200 a year. They are dis- 
dained by Wall Street, but recent 
evidence suggests that a sizeable 
minority of these homespun 
advisers are outperforming the 
Stock Exchange sophisticates. 

There are charlatan s in the 
investment letter business (they 
are not unknown among stock- 
brokers) but the letters in general 
have beat most successful pre- 
cisely where orthodox opinion has 
been wrong. For example, in the 
1970s Wall Street persistently 
underestimated the danger of 
inflation. Influential letters like 
the International Harry Schultz 

gold. Calling Schultz a gold bug 
appeared less of an insult as the 
price climbed above $800 in 1980 
(he baled out at that point and has 
since been negative on gold). 

The first real evidence of the 
soundness of some of the invest- 
ment letters came with the advent 
in 1980 of the Washington-based 
Hulbert Financial Digest. Naive 
comment has focused on 
Hulbert’s revelation that the 
overwhelming majority of letters 
do not beat the market, and that 
well known figures such as the 
Financial Success Report’s How- 
ard Ruff, author of several best- 
selling books, play tricks like 
ceasing to mention unsuccessful 
recommendations. (More sophis- 
ticated observers know that aca- 
demic research long ago estab- 
lished that professional money 
managers do not do better.) 

The results show, however, that 
a dozen out of the 90 investment 
letters Hulbert follows do seem to 
be able to outperform the market 
consistently. The success contra- 
dicts the Efficient Market Hypoth- 
esis, the dominant theory among 
academics fora generation, which 
argues that the stock market 
reflects all information so quickly 
that it cannot be out-guessed. 

More recently, younger academ- 
ics have been discovering 
“anomalies" in the efficiency of 
the market For example, there is 
the “small firm effect", the ten- 


In an unprecedented personal 
appeal, broadcast over Baghdad 
radio at the weekend. President 
Saddam Husain of Iraq called on 
Iranians to accept his country's 
peace proposals and bring the six- 
year Gulf war to an end. He 
dismissed talk of a forthcoming 
Iranian offensive and predicted 
certain defeat for Iran by the end 
of the year. 

Iran's leaders have often spoken 
of launching a “decisive" offen- 
sive to end the war. But this time 
there are grounds for believing 
their words. The preparations they 
are' making and the terminology 
they are using leave no doubt that 
they are about to take the biggest 
gamble since September 1980.' 
when Iraq launched the war in an 
attempt to humiliate the Iranian 
army into surrendering hs south- 
ern “Arab" provinces. 

General mobilization has been 
in progress throughout Iran for 
weeks. Eight thousand men who 
have experience of command 
have been recalled and placed in 
charge of 500 new battalions of 
Islamic Revolutionary Guards. 
They are intended overwhelm 
every Iraqi soldier along the 
border with at least four Iranians". 
The border is more than 700 miles 
long, and Iraq has more than 
600.000 troops deployed along it. 

If this is true, it- -is a definite 
reversion to the human-wave 
tactics that Iran employed in the 
earlier phases of the war. In the 
battle for the bonier town of 
Bostan in 1982. for example, an 
army officer said that up to 5.000 



dency of shares of low-capitalized 
companies with relatively small 
dollar amounts of stock outstand- 
ing to outperform the market, and 
the “insider effect”, the tendency 
of stocks to appreciate after pur- 
chases have been reported to the 
authorities by company officers 
and major shareholders. The 
successful investment letters often 
have their roots in one or more of 
these anomalies, like plants grow- 
ing in a wall 

Already there has been some 
academic recognition that the 
stocks rated “most timely” by the 
long-established Value Line ser- 
vice have outperformed the mar-, 
ket for 30 years. Now it appears 
there are others. And a varied lot 
they are. Charles Alim on of 
Growth Stock Outlook is a former 
photographer for National Geo- 


graphic magazine. A1 Frank of the. 
Prudent. Speculator was once an 
education professor,. and before 
that a shill (decoy player) in a Las 
Vegas casino. And Martin -Zweig 
of foe Zweig Forecast taught 
college-level finance until a year or 
so ago. Their methods are various, 
often theoretically incompatible. 
But they seem to make them work. 

The investment letter industry's 
more entertaining characters have 
not helped its image much: In the 
early 1 980s, Joseph E Granville of 
the Granville Market Letter 
achieved genuine superstar status, 
travelling a million miles in four 
years to speak at heavily publi- 
cized meetings, his regular plat- 
form guests including a 
chimpanzee named Dwarfman in 
honour of a critical financial 
columnist, Dan Dorfman, and an 


Hazhir Teimonrian on Iran’s likely gains 
from the imminent push in the Gulf war 

What the human 
waves can win 


teenage volunteers had perished 
when they moved into minefields 
ahead of the main groupings of 
guards-and soldiers. 

More recently, it seemed that 
the regular army had won the ear 
of Ayatollah Khomeini's top men 
in Tehran. There was a pro-, 
nounced move away from relying 
on force of numbers, as advocated 
bytheguards. in favour of modern 
techniques of warfare, culminat- 
ing in this year's offensives that 
captured. the Fau peninsula and 
the border town of Mehran. Both 
operations were thoroughly pre- 
pared in advance and carried out 
according to plan. 

Now, however, a new factor has 
begun to change the strategic 
landscape for both sides: the 
delayed impact of falling oil 
revenues, which have financed 
more than 90 per cent of their 
imports in the past Iran expected 
to earn £12.7 billion from oil sales 
this year, but the figure is likely to 
be less than £5.5 billion. If the war 
were to continue. Iran would have 
to choose between buying the 
arms and equipment it needs for 


the war, and providing food for hs 
43 million people. 

Iraq's, position is slightly less 
precarious. Although it needs 
expensive weapons to hold off the 
Iranians, it earns more money 
from oil sales and has only 
14 million mouths to feed It also 
has large stories of weapons held in. 
reserve. Even so, it 'has had' to 
defer payment to more than 800 
foreign companies this year. 

Tehran's leaders have tried to 
explain the oO price slump in 
terms of a Western conspiracy, 
especially by'Briiain. to force.theni 
to abandon the war. They have 
vowed to overcome Iraq before- 
the full impact of the slashed oil 
revalues makes itself fell 

Ali-Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, 
the Speaker of the Islamic Majlis 
(parliament) — who seems to be 
the most powerful political figure 
in Iran after the retiring Ayatollah 
Khomeini — has said That the 
conflict must.be ended within 12 
months, and the guards com- 
mander. Mohsen Rezai. has said 
that his country ‘twill do some- 
thing this year that will put into 


iguana named Greenspan after the 
noted Wall Street economist, Alan 
Greenspan. Once, in Tucson. 
Arizona, he began his meeting by 
walking across a swimming pool 
on a plank concealed just below 
the surface, telling his audience 
“And now you know T 

Granville’s apotheosis came in 
1981, when his January 6 sell 
signal, telephoned to subscribers 
in the -middle of the night, 
precipitated a stock market col- 
lapse. But the next year he 
completely missed foe bull market 
that roared into life that August 
(and in fact has only recently 
admitted, to his distinctly smaller 
readership, that it wasn’t just a 
mirage). 

Granville’s sell signal was much 
died here in early July, when the 
stock market performed another 
record nosedive following a sell 
signal put out' by an investment 
letter; Robert R. Prechter’s Elliott 
Wave Theorist. But Prechter is a 
veiy different character. He is a 
serious young Yale graduate who -, 
lives quietly with his wife and 
children in the mountains of north 
Georgia, linked to foe world by 
computer and telephone. 

Prechter is unmistakcably sin- 
cere in his belief that market 
movies are governed by a complex 
rhythm first discerned by a Los 
Angeles accountant someoO years 
ago. And in the past few years Jhiis 
predictions have in fact been 
remarkable. 'Like Granville, 
Prechter is an accomplished mu- 
sician — before getting interested 
in the stock market be spent years 
on 'foe road with a rock group. 
Unlike Granville, however, 
Prechter is not purveying un- 
confined gloom: just a stumble of 
10% or so. be says, and then the 
bull market will be ready to charge 
again. • _ 

Some of the- investment letter 
writers began in their spare time 
and, as a result oftheir dem- 
onstrated. prowess, are now 
manag in g large amounts of 
money. In the American pan- 
theon, foe ideal of a Log Cabin to 
White House career has been ' 
supplemented by that of Kitchen 
Table to Financial Institution.. 

It may seem, improbable that 
these' outsiders can beat the Wall 
Street establishment — almost as 
improbable as two Ohio farmboys 
inventing foe first-flying machine. -] 
Peter Brimelow is the author of , 
The Wall Street Gurus: How You 
Can Profit From Investment 
Newsletters (Random House. New 
Yorf^S 19.95). 


the shade the Islamic Revolution 
itself”. 

Rezai has also said that the 
human-wave tactics^ will be ap- 
plied simultaneously along, foe 
whole 700 miles of foe front. 
While he knows that -Iraq - still 
possesses huge stocks of weapons 
with, which it has, in the past, 
mowed down lightly-armed waves 
of Iranian infantry, he also knows 
that Iran . would need to break 
through in only one location to 
threaten Baghdad, or cut off the 
south of Iraq from its north. . • 

Most military specialists believe 
that Iraq's'resistan'ce ts- unlikely to 
collapse in -the face of Iran's 
offensive. Jhe prospect is/ there- 
fore. for continued . Iranian gains 
in the southern and central sectors 
of foe front. 

If such gains were sizeable: Iran 
could afford to sit upon them for 
the time being in the hope of either 1 
annexing them — and their, rich - 
* oil deposits — as reparations for 
•foe-war, or to use them in peace 
negotiations with the Arabs once 
foe Ayatollah has gone. 

Such territorial gains could 
make Iran a neighbour — for a 
number of years, at least — of the 
pro-Western slates of Kuwait and 
Saudi Arabia. And. as foe* gains 
would be sufficient to fuel Iran’s 
revolutionary fervour for a white 
yet, it would not be a -friendly' 
neighbour— a prospect which nei- 
ther Kuwait nor Saudi Arabia' can 
view' with any equanimity. 


Ronald Butt 

A lost peace 
in politics 


“I cannot help referring to my old 
opinion, which , is now supported 
by rpore weight than 1 ever 
expected, and wonder that a man 
can be found in England who has 
bread that- will be concerned in 
public business." wrote the Duke 
of Shrewsbury to Lord Somers in 

1 701 . “Had I a son. I would sooner 

breed him a cobbler than a 
courtier; and a hangman than a 
statesman." 

■ Since politics has lately become 

subject to Murphy's law, and 
things have been going wrong in 
ways which it would have seemed 
mad to predict, it is tempting to 
think that such sentiments must 
strikes chord with aiJ east some in 
high places just now. Yet it is 
impossible to . imagine . Mrs 
Thatcher echoing (even mutatis 
mutandis) these classic words of 
Whigdisillusion. let alone emulat- 
ing Shrewsbury's political con- 
duct. For he was often infirm of 
purpose, holding high office but 
(after oscillating uneasily between 
William 111 and St Germain) 
ultimately throwing it up. Like the 
Duke of Omnium, who had to be 
cajoled into overcoming a fastidi- 
ous disinclination for office. 
Shrewsbury no doubt felt he had 
done his counny a favour by 
accepting it. Moreover, whether or 
not such men thought that foe 
quiet management of their own 
estates was a finer occupation for a 
nobleman than politics, at least 
they had estates to fall back on. 

Mrs Thatcher, however, is a 
professional politician who is 
activated by will and conviction, 
and pursues a calling that today 
absorbs far more of any polit- 
ician's life and personality than 
Shrewsbury could have conceived. 
She is never infirm of purpose, 
and disdain for foe political rough- 
and-tumble is not in her nature. 
What is more, she and foe 
generality of politicians do not 
only lack great estates and foe 
influence of grand independent 
social status; the pursuit of politics 
also leaves them no room for 
anything else. 

It is true that, at the end of the 
political road, city directorships 
may beckon some ex-ministers in 
theirdedine and fall But director- 
ships are not 18th-century duke- 
doms and in foe early stages of 
withdrawal symptoms from foe 
drug of politics, modest consola- 
tion prizes are all they are. 

Given time, however,the 
money, the freedom and foe 
comparative ease will no doubt 
persuade the likes of Patrick 
Jen kin to wonder why they waited 
so long and endured so -much. 
How did they ever bear a seven- 
day week and a 15-hour day, and 
for" such a thankless end? fi may 
not instantly strike them that 
nowadays politics can be as sound 
a road to financial independence 
as financial independence was 
once to politics. 

Time to think, and the lack of it 
is really foe heart of foe distinction 
between the Duke of Shrewsbury’s 
kind of politics and our own. Time 
is the great sacrifice on the modem 
altar of politics. Albough political 


power is real and politicians do 
change things, educating their 
departments on the great issues of 
the day. they also take too much 
pleasure for foe health of politics 
in foe illusion of power created by 
those innumerable decisions 
which are ordained by The facts 
and advice presented to them 
{facts bring as manoeuvrable a 
commodity as advice) and which 
they could not possibly sente 
themselves. The lure of politics 
can end up being not simply 
power but the illusion of power 
created by perpetual motion. 

Funnelled from place to place 
by their private offices and their 
official diaries, some acquire a 
perverse pride in not knowing 
what they will be doing this time 
tomorrow, what factory they will 
visit or what committees they win 
chair. It is apparently quite satisfy- 
ing to be able to say on foe World 
at One . and with the munificence 
of a political Paul Getty: “And 
that is why I have just spent £5 
million on this that or the other." 

Modem politics is a profession 
leaving little time for reflection. 
Busy-ness is its status symbol and 
the outward and visible sign of 
authority is foe _bjinied_ de- 
meanour which politicians think it 
advisable to assume. Once all was 
dignity and statesmen were 
stately; who could imagine Glad- 
stone or Churchill running; even 
in Macmillan’s day a certain 
statesmanlike dignity of move- 
ment was still in order. But now 
the politicians scurry out of their 
departments and into Number LO 
(or their party headquarters and 
departments) at a half-run. as 
though anxious to make it dear 
through the television camera that 
they haven't a moment to lose and 
have only-just been able to make 
iL It hardly looks very dignified, 
and if you come to think of it. 
doesn't actually convince the rest 
of us that they really take time 
enough to reflect on where they 
are going and what they should do. 
They should try a casual stroll. 

To foe extent that the hurry is 
convincing, it shows how right 
Mrs Thatcher is to want govern- 
ment to do less in hope that what 
it does it may do better. Time to 
think is the lost attribute of 
modem politics, perhaps an even 
greater loss than independence, 
foe coots outside politics and the 
willingness to resign on a point of 
principle enjoyed by foe Dukes of 
Shrewsbury and Omnium. Under 
Murphy’s law, thinking-time is 
particularly useful 

Politicians do riot take enough 
ofit They have to rely (foe weight 
of their burdens demands it) too 
much on aides, officiate and 
presrirters to think for them. It 
occurs to me, as this column goes 
into suspension for a week or two, 
that they do need their holidays 
(perhaps even more than I do) and 
they should have more of them for 
our sakes as well as their own. 
Even the most successful of them 
are not greatly to be envied. The 
Duke of Shrewsbury grumbled too 
much. He didn’t know how good 
he was having it. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 

West End’s 
best bet 


The other day I went to see a West 
End musical. I.dori*t normally go 
to musicals' more than about once 
a decade. My parents took'me to 
see Salad Days in foe 1950s. which 
was certainly the best, show ever 
written about a hunt for a piano. I 
went to see Hair in the l'960s. and 
thought it was nowhere near as 
good- as Salad Days. 1 saw 
something by Sondheim in the 
• 1970s and thought musicals were 
still going downhill; and last year I 
was taken to see Starlight? Express. 
and thought musicals had reached 
rock' bottom. 

So the Other day, when I went to 
a musical. I must have had a very 
special reason for going. I did: I 
didn't know it' was a musical. It 
was. as far as I knew,- merely a 
comedy called - The Gambler ; 
featuring Mel Smith, which had 
transferred from the Hampstead 
Theatre to foe Comedy Theatre, 
and -was about to /close. Occa- 
sionally I am electrified into 
action by notices that something is 
closing, and so 1 sped along to foe 
Comedy, quite unaware that The 
Gambler was a musical 
. Well, whatever it is, it’s wonder- 
ful It's the story of a compulsive 
amateur gambler (Bob Goody), 
shadowed by a professional gam- 
bler (Smith), and his 24-hour 
progress through a race-track, foe 
dogs/a casino and a private poker 
game, which takes in most of foe 
major forms of gambling except 
the football pools, always difficult 
to dramatize. 

The four men. on stage play lots, 
of parts, from barmaid to bookies, 
from gangsters To' - punters. The 
four musicians behind them drift 
in- and out of the action as song- 
backets. incidental musicians, 
even actors. The scenery is mostly 
confined to chairs, lights and 
flashing roulette signs. But be- 
tween them they conjure up so 
.many, different vignettes, charac- 
ters and settings that foe mind 
boggles. 

Take one example: foe big horse 
: race is poroayed by the four of 
them standing, on .'chairs, staring 
through, binoculars and reacting to 
Smith’s gradually mounting com- 
mentary. Nothing more than that; 
yet the race is a genuinely exciting 
one' for the audience, as our 
emotions are blatantly tinkered 
wifo'fey a script that knows that a 


racing commentary is very often 
more thrilling than the race itself. 

Take another example: any of 
the big. train races in Starlight 
Express, all of which I found 
marvellously boring. At foe cost of 
however many millions, the the- 
atre was revamped into a 3-D 
roller-skating track around which 
actors went pretending to be 
trains, accompanied by dreary 
music and interspersed with un- - 
appealing lyrics. 

At foe cost of a few bob. Mel 
Smith and his males — lhe script is 
credited to three of foe cast — . 
stood on chairs and produced a far 
more exciting race, through. 
theatrical means. The Gambler, by 
foe way. also has good lyrics arid 
extremely interesting, slightly jag- 
ged music by Richard Brewis. 

Andrew Lloyd-Webber is often- 
quoted as saying that be wishes 
people 'wouldn’t knock him for.- 
earning so much money. I think . 
he’s wrong: people knock him for 
not writing better music. I have' 
nothing against him earning- so 
much money — I just can't see' 
how he earns it — and I wouldn't 
even havedreami ofmentioning it ' 
now, if it ’were not that. I am ' 
enraged to see such a fine mu sical . 


as The Gambler come off ax the. 
end of this week, and Starlight. 
Express go on until foe next, 
century. I gather that the Comedy - 
is being emptied to bring in 
another show, so it is possible foal 
The Gambler may reappear some- 
where else. 'Personally, I'd rip out 
foe- Victoria Palace and put it on 
there. 

Odd, really, when you think that 
I like trains and am not much 
interested in gambling, Bui then I 
remember Irving Wardle saying, 


fast people to enjoy foe show. And 
I haye never met anyone who 
knew much about Argentina and 
enjoyed Evita.-.. 

Don’t get me wrong. I am not 
totally anti-starlight Express. The 
production has some very nice 
model trains which mn through 
foe auditorium. I enjoyed those, 
rather more than anything else, 
that ran through the auditorium. 
Ami they run foe model engines 
before curtain up, so you can 
enjoy them and leave before the 
show actually starts. 


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twtold Butt 


THE TIMES THURSDAY ATTfiTTST 7 IQgfl 


13 



1 Pennington Street, London El 9XN Telephone: 01-481 4100 


1 >i. 


SPIRIT OF COMPETITION 


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This year the Department of 
Trade celebrates 200 years of 
continuous administrative 
life. What better way,, it might 
be thought, for the spirit of the 
old Board of Trade to be ‘ 
magnified than for Mr Paul 
Channon to announce (as he 
did yesterday) that he wished 
to sustain., competition ia 
domestic electronics and tele- 
communications markets and 
so to forbld a merger between 
two leading suppliers. 

How convenient policy 
would be, if government could 
si mply . invoke Gladstonian 
free trade verities,- utilize the 
Monopoly and - Mergers 
Commission to keep the sup- 
ply side competitive and keep, 
its hands off How: dean cut 
that, would be. But how un- 
realistic. • 

British capitalism -does not 
work that way, not any more, 
and certainly not in the supply 
of ■ electronics and tele- 
communications' equipment 
For “competition" (which 
more often than not means 
market regulation : by - 
monopsonistic suppliers) to be 
made a-fetish at this stage is 
myopic. The State cannot keep 
its hands off when practically 
all demand is in the hands of 
government itself or mono- 
polistic private purchasers 
such as British Telecom. ■ 

Today's' Department of 
Trade: and Industry is con- : 
cerned with industrial 
sponsorship, the government's s 
interest in promoting the bet- 
ter organization of industry for 
the sake of efficiency and 
international competitiveness. 
Its officials' evidence to the 


Monpolies and Mergers ' 
Commission said the merger 
of the General Electric Com- 

- paoy and Plessey could create 
“an industrial structure in 
which some of the important 

. challenges feeing the electron- 
ics -industry in the United 

- Kingdom- might be address- . 

- eti” Those challenges come 
1 from abroad; without 

restructuring (fostered, when 
necessary, by the state) key 
parts of domestic industry wiQ 
go-under. ■ 

In the commission's report, 
it is the dissentient. Mr Colin 
BaiHieu, who understands this. 
The telecommunications and 
defence electronics industries 
are intemationaL That feet 
demands backing domestic 
winners, helping them to the 
size, and sophistication needed 
tocompete. Even to talk about 
a global ma rket is a- trifle 
naive: there is ITT, AT&T, the 
Japanese^ and a. few potential 
European competitors. 

In the terzns of .that re- 
stricted market; nice - points 
about domestic competition - 
have to be severely qualified. 
The two firms together are 
smaller than a number of their 
successful international 
competitors: their capacity in 
research and development 
Would inevitably be . aug- 
mented by their merger. . 

The merger- of GEC and 
Plessey brooks no textbook 
principles about competition 
for the simple reason that the 
markets, national and inter- 
national, in which- these firms 
operate conform to no. model. 
The firms already collaborate, - 
primarily on the System X 


switchboard: here the commis- 
sion does want “ration- 
alization'* to take place; 
meaning some merger of the 
two firms' activities. 

Elsewhere the arena of head 
to head competition between 
the firms is small, despite the 
attempt by the Ministry, of 
Defence to quantify the costs 
of absence of competition in 
defence electronics tendering 
The MOD — which will always 
have great leverage as a source 
of demand — lives happily 
with single suppliers in several 
areas of procurement 

Merger would not, the MOD 
admits, kill competitive 
procurement of electronic 
equipment The Government 
is happy (for it has little 
choice) to purchase defence 
equipment .. . from oveiseas; 
moreover the international. 
market for defence electronics 
is already highly competitive. 

The phrase “industrial 
policy" offends many because 
of its association with bureaus ’ 
cratic plans for controlling die 
commanding heights, and sec- . 
ond-guessing investors 1 judge- 
ment about profitability. 
Those associations should not, 
however, blight the notion that 
government can legitimately 
take an interest in shaping an 
industrial sector .and align 
state policies on procurement 
and competition accordingly. 

The absence of such a policy 
was a recurrent theme in the 
Westland affair. The absence 
of such a policy has, appar- 
ently, allowed Mr Channon to 
bow to the Ministry ofDefence 
and in forbidding this merger 
make an error of judgement - 


NEW VICnMS, NEW FEARS 


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.If a Government Minister is 
heartl using the word, “last" 
when speaking about the Pro- 
visional IRA, it is a reasonable 
assumption that he has en- 
tered the worid of wishful 
thinking Mr Tom King im- 
plied this , week that .the IRA 
hadbegun murdering-ri villains 


which explicitly threatens the- 
fives of Catholic businessmen 
and workers? In particular, 
will that support survive when 
the only way the intended 
vic tims ran lift threats a gainst 
their lives is by losing their 


that the initiative wiH some- 
times appear to have been won 
temporarily by the terrorists. 

Since the signing of the Anglo- 
Irish Agreement, the IRA has 
been looking for a new tech- 
nique to renew in die commu- 
nity the fears which had - , jobs? Those- acjditibns to lhe 
slightly diminished as a result" r already appalling - ; imemploy- 
who supply the- security forces ^ of .security successes of recent': ment. levels in the province 
in Northern Ireland as a final ye®r?t They were in no particu-" can hardly improve : Pro- 
bankruptgestiire. There may-: • Jar : hurty since they, were visfonaTSiiih Fein's -image. 
and> there should - come -a' happy to leavethe government ' * ' 

timewhen it willbeaccutateto; and-tfaepoficewiffi then-bands 
talk : (as the Prime Minister did- ■ full of -unionist, opposition for 
at the time bfihtMazehunger . the' . time “ being. The 
strike five years ='ag6) of the_'-.Proviaonak. have- been/^in 
IRA r playing :its. last card. But { existence .' for : sixteen- years; 

nothing is to be gained by 


, . Miles Kington 

it End's 
st be 


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that time has not come; 

It is not defeatist but reals- 
tic to- recognise that, in the 
short run at least, the IRA has 
discovered a -newly effective 
method of hindering the se- 
curity forces. The new civilian 
categoryonder threat must put 
thousands of people under 
threat: however strenuous the 
efforts at protection of the 
'RUC, or however effective the 
substitution of army labour 
and expertise, there will still be 
plenty- of frightened individ- 
uals and firms. 

The maintenance, of an 
effective long-term security 
policy in Northern Ireland 
depends oh the recognition 


is 

underestimating their tactical 
resilience. 

But it is also possible to 
exaggerate the potency, of this 
new development in their 
campaign. With the ; intern- 
ment anniversary at the end of 
this week, they are guaranteed 
amplified publicity each sum- 
mer during the quiet days of 
August- They have lately 
avoided much deUberate civil- 
ian murder on the cynical 
calculation that it will under- 
mine their political support in 
the nationalist community. 

That political support cur- 
rently stands at high levels. 
Will it survive a campaign 


In. a long terrorist c am p ai gn 
against _• an implacable . and 
well-rooted enemy, it is not 
easy fora weary public. to keep 
hold of lhe>. centraify-im- 
portant feet : of ,the conflict 
between, terrorist and commu- 
nity. Terrorism,.^ this episode 
amply demonstrates, is the 
creation of fear. ' Courage, as 
Mark Twain remarked, is not 
absence of fear but mastery of 
it • 

Fearof this kind can only be 
mastered by a community’s 
defenders. To do their job, 
they themselves must be de- 
fended. In this case, the se- 
curity forces may have to 
pause while they rearrange 
their own security arrange- 
ments, divert resources to 
protect those under threat or 
Spend extra money to replace 
the services of frightened con- 
tractors. . 


TRAVELLING MORE HOPEFULLY 




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Motorway service stations 
were conceived as oases — 
watering holes where drivers 
could refresh their camels and 
themselves before taking on SO 
more miles of featureless land- 
scape, distant Birmingham 
shimmering like a mirage un- 
der the noonday sun. That was 
the theory anyway. 

In practice, drivers have too 
often found the motorways 
welcome relief from the ser-- 
vice stations in between — 
from their queues, crowded 
lavatories, high prices and 
mediocre food. There has 
never very. much chance of 
travelling hopefully. 

For this the British public 
has had only itself to blame. 
For . one thing- the average 
family leaves behind.it a spoor 
of .litter which — thanks to 
modern science — has been 
rendered indestructible. Ser- 
vice stations at .„ least 
centralised the problem which 
otherwise, might have turned 
the verges of our trunk roads 
into alfresco, restaurants and 
trash cans. - 

For another, the standards 
of service demanded by the 
populace have always been 
notoriously tow. Even the 
great British breakfast and the 
cup. of hot strong tea, with' 
which bur cuisine has been 


identified, have been elusive 
targets for the discriminating 
traveller. The public reaction 
to. inadequate standards has 
been not so much to complain 
but to turn it all into a long- 
running joke. This has had its 
. effect over, a number of years, 
to the extent that the modern: 
Blackpool boarding bouse and 
the much-maligned ! British 
Rail sandwich might now 
. claim to be unfairly done by. 
But for those who seek fester 
results, the reaction of British 
consumers . has always been 
meekly expressed. 

The latest report by Which! 
is welcome' therefore for two 
reasons. In the first place it 
confirms that this self-ap- 
pointed consumers’ watchdog 
is still prowling outride its 
kennel. Its survey of all 56.’ 
motorway service' stations in 
five months this year, during 
which most were visited .twice, 
was a useful exercise. ■ ■ 

It is doubly welcome, how- 
■ ever, because it would seem to 
confirm a . general rise in 
standards since the last inspec- 
' tion was carried out six years 
ago. While criticisms remaim, 
things in the eyes- of Which? 
are definitely looking up. 

This is important for rea- 
sons which are far from trivial. 
A great number of tourists 


from Europe and elsewhere 
visit this country every year 
and take to the roads in their 
family cars. The motorways 
. are the arteries on which they 
cruise from one end of Britain 
to the other, and the service 
stations are for them part of 
. the national image. And by no 
means all other nations are as 
tolerant as this one of indif- 
ferent standards of service. 

It is also important in the 
interests of public safety that 
drivers should be encouraged 
to stop as often as they can and 
that when they do, they should 
find suitable relaxation in 
pleasant and efficient 
: surroundings. A notoriously 
poor, service station can 
encourage the weary traveller 
to cany for a few miles more, 
at possible risk to himself and 
’ others on the road. 

The direct blame for poor 
supervision, of standards must 
. be placed on the Government 
— which does in feet come in 
for some criticism in the 
report But it is pressure from 
consumers which .stirs govern- 
ments into action - and 
competition from each other 
which makes service firms 
look to their '.tea uros. and 
prime their • pumps. This 
would seem- to have worked 
this time anyway. . 


Bleak outlook 

From Mr Christopher Carrier 
Sir. The theatre In London may be 
“apt to hibernate in summo 1 ". 
(Am page, August 4), but. surely, 
in The Times A should aestivate. 
Yours faithfully,. . . 

C. CARRIER, 

149 Redburgh Drive, 

Sutton Coldfield.' 

West Midlands. - 
August 4. 


Lost awakening? 

From Mr Oliver H inch 
Sir. Geoffrey Munn’s article (July 
• 26) about destruction and vandal- 
ism in our decaying cemeteries 
reminded me of ah example of 
“lawn conversion” in the thirties. 

■ Because of its -deplorable state 
. the authorities decided to convert 

a cemetery m Northampton to a 
green oasis with seats and trees. 

■ They-proposed -to remove the 
tombstones and monuments and 


place the legible ones up against 
the surrounding walls; but to 
ensure the area’s recognition as 
consecrated ground a few of the 
flat tombstones would be left in 
situ.One morning a workman was 
.seen chalking on the selected 
tombstones: “Not 10 come up”. 
Yours etc 

OLIVER HINCH. 

27 Lingwood Gardens, 

Osieriey, Middlesex. 

July 28. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Failure to agree on sanctions 


From Mr Dp/e Scarboro 
Sir;.. Your editorial (August 4) 
supporting Mrs Thatcher's oppo- 
sition -to economic sanctions 
against South Africa claims to 
present a rational analysis of the 
issue, yet I. can find in your 
argument little that could properly 
be described as rational. 

After suggesting, for example, 
that a “small sacrifice of minor 
sanctions'* should be employed as, 
a gesture towards Commonwealth 
unity, you argue that the failure of 
such sanctions should be taken as 
proof that sanctions do not work. 

According to this logic, the in- 
advisability. of painting your 
hpuse can be deduced from the 
failure of an inadequate coat of 
paint. ■ , 

You argue that tire imposition 
of sanctions would reduce our 
influence with Pretoria by sever- 
ing our economic ties with the 
State;. Rational analysis would 
conclude from this that the British 
Govern me nt .should be actively 
encouraging investment in South 
Africa. If mutually beneficial eco- 
nomic .links are to be used as a 
political lever, h can only be 
through the threat of their sev- 
erance. 

It is a sad day when specious 
'arguments are presented in the 
name of rational analysis. If this is 
The Times', s reaction to the South 
African, crisis, no. .wonder the 
South African Government treats 
British policy with contempt 
Yours, •• 

DALE SCARBORO. 

10 Fairfield Walk, 

Leckbampton, 


Cheltenham, Gloucestershire: 
Augast-4.- 

From Prqfessor Julius Gould 
Sir, At least twice in recent days 
Mr Malcolm Fraser has broadcast 
his view that the British Govern- 
ment should show itself on “the 
right side of history” by pursuing 
his line on the future of South 
Africa. 

This demand is presumptuous 
and its assumptions are absurd. It 
is neither sensible nor responsible 
to claim that history has a “right 
side” Even if h had one. I suggest, 
without disrespect, that such mo- 
mentous knowledge would not 
first be hastily vouchsafed, on a 
privileged basis, to any former 
Commonwealth prime minister, 
however vocal and controversial 
Yours faithfully, 

JULIUS GOULD, 

Reform Club. 

pafTManrswir" • , * 1 — ' 

August 1. 

From Sir Richafd Dobson 
Sir, This country is at a moment of 
crisis. Should 'not the Prime. 
Minister recall Parliament and 
cause a free vote to be taken in the 
House of Commons on the matter 

;■ Yours feithfully, 

RICHARD DOBSON. 

16 Marchmont Road, 

Richmond, Surrey. ■ 

Fron Mr R. J. White 
Sir, The failure of the Common- 
wealth summit on South Africa is 
surely testament to the shoddiest 
performance by a British Prime 
Minister for many decades. 


If her fears are valid that 
sanctions would harm black peo- 
ple there and are anyway ineffec- 
tive, why is undiluted delight 
being shown at her stance by the 
regime in Pretoria? 

Can it be that Mrs Thatcher's 
concern is. as Mr Lange believes, 
no more than to protect British 
finance? 

Yours faithfully, 

R. J. WHITE 

6 Camden Row, Blackheath, SE3. 

. From the Reverend A. G. He/lier 
Sir. Sir Gilbert Longden (August 
4) i$ confident that apartheid will 
fell hi the long run. What, 
however, if it should prove to be 
durable and survive internal re- 
volt, external sanctions and pos- 
itive intervention? Have we 
reason to believe that any of these 
will succeed? 

Should we not. therefore, take 
Sir Gilbert at bis word and decide 
that it is no business of ours? For 
many years we have made it our 
business and very well we have 
done out of it, too. just as the slave 
trade contributed greatly to our 
former prosperity. 

Perhaps this is an evil that we 
cannot overthrow, but at least we 
can ensure that it is none of our 
-business. 

Yours sincerely, 

A G. HELUER, 

Monmarsh End, 

Marden. Hereford. 

From Mr R. F. Coales 
- Sir. The Bishop of Birmingham 
(August I ) claims that the applica- 
tion of sanctions is the only 
peaceful means of persuading the 
South African Govern menu 
Peaceful? Sanctions are intended 
to hurt, to harm, to starve into 
submission. They have to be 
enforced by a naval blockade. 
They .are one of the first acts of 
war. Is this Christ's teaching? 
Yours feithfuUy, 

R. F. COALES, 

Park House, 

West Rasen, ■ 

Market Rasen. Lincolnshire. 

From Mr C M. S. Whit daw 
Sir, I hope that the Prime Minister 
of India, Mr Rajiv Gandhi; is 
making the same effort to elimi- 
nate un touch ability in India as be 
is making to abolish apartheid in 
South Africa. 

Yours feithfuUy, 

C. M. S. WHITELAW, 

1 Lansdowne Crescent, 

'Edinburgh. 

• From Mr Raynatd Franks ~ 

' Sir. Must it always be “Thatcher 
does this ...” or “Thatcher does 
that...”? 

It seems unfair that this poor 
lady should be the butt of every 
.criticism of Government policy 
and the recipient of most of the 
. rotten eggs thrown by the manner- 
tessandlheun disciplined. “' - 

. .'This must berseen as a tribute to 
her splendid qualities, but tends to 
obscure the fact that many mil- 
lions voted for the Conservative 
Party -and its policies and not for 
any particular individual leader. 
Yours faithfully, ' 

RAYNALD FRANKS. 

Stables Cottage, 

Weald Manor, 

Bampton, Oxfordshire: 


All-in schools 

From Councillor Sidney Grose 
Sir. In an interesting review of 
comprehensive schools Anne 
Sofer (feature, July 28) makes 
several errors of feet which lead 
her to conclusions so dated that 
they, offer no new stimulus to the 
success of a courageous experi- 
ment. 

Here m Richmond upon 
Thames the Conservatives m 1973 
enthusiastically- introduced com- 
prehensive schools and London's 
first tertiary college in 1977 and 
have given them their unwavering 
support ever since - as, it must be 
said, have the Alliance party, who 
took control of the council in 
1983. (It is fiction to write of a 
Conservative attempt to convert 
to a selective system in 1984 
causing them to- lose control of a 
council of which they had already 
lostconool in 1983). 

Where Anne Sofa's assessment 
of the comprehensive system is 
feuhy is that she is obsessed with 


average results and she has drawn 
conclusions far too early in its 
development Let her concentrate 
on the remarkable achievements 
of top performers,' as in this 
borough, and take comfort that 
such standards are attainable by 
alL 

. Some of us have always been 
cautious about the 'time scale 
necessary to achieve gigantic 
change — we thought it likely that 
progress would sometimes falter 
and occasionally disappoint It 
was at such times, when our high 
hopes were not realised, that we 
determined, in the words with 
which Anne Sofer concludes her 
article, “what we need is a 
dramatic raising of sights, not an 
insidious undermining of the 
whole system”. 

Yours faithfully. 

SIDNEY GROSE 
Municipal Offices, 

London, Borough of Richmond 
upon Thames, 

Twickenham, Middlesex. 

July 3J. 


A separate Bar 

From Mrs Winifred M. Ewing. 
MEP for the Highlands and Is- 
lands of Scotland (European 
Democratic Alliance (Scottish 
National Party)) 

Sir, For many years I had the 
honour to be secretary of the 
Glasgow Bar Association and 
subsequently its president I must 
contradict your Edinburgh solic- 
itor correspondent (August 2). 

There is both a considerable and 
informed support for a unitanr 
‘ jal profession in Scotland. It 
works well enough in the United 
States and m Europe, What is so 
special about the United King- 
dom? 

Yours feithfuUy. 

WINNIE EWING. ' 

52 Queen's Drive, Gasgow. 
August 3. 


Great Eastern 

From Mrs H. P. Madden 
Sir. I write with reference to your 
letters (July 30. August 2) on the 
Great Eastern laying .the first 
Atlantic cable. My great-grand- 
father. Sir Curtis Lampson. vice 
chairman of the Atlantic Tele- 
graph Company, sent a message 
from the Valencia station on 
August 17. [858. It commenced 
2-33. ended 2.41 and read. “We get 
your current but can't make word 
out”. 

I have a piece of that cable, a 
small portion of the actual mes- 
sage in Morse code. 

Yours faithfully. 

JANE de VERE MADDEN. 

3 Old Rectory Close, 

Thorpe St Andrew. 

Norwich. Norfolk. 

August 4. 


Market forces on 
market places 

From Mr Harvey R. Cole 
Sr. In virtually every highly 
populated pan of the country 
plans are being put forward for 
laige stnalled “regionaP shop- 
ping centres. At present at least 47 
are awaiting determination. 

Whilst there is undoubtedly a 
role to be played by a limited 
number of such developments it is 
essential that they should be 
carefully sited so as to ensure 
against over-development. The 
planning system needs to' be 
invoked for this purpose: the 
issues raised cannot be satisfac- 
torily left to market forces alone. 

In certain cases, however,’ - 
where, for example, the rules of a 
particular enterprise zone do not 
- rule out retail development or 
where a local district council owns 
a site — planning permission can 
be forthcoming almost automati- 
cally. and with no proper 
evaluation of proposals. 

So far from discouraging a 
piecemeal approach to the prob- 
lem. the Government see ms to be 
. encouraging it. On occasion, as for 
example at Whitstable. the sec- 
retary of state has approved, on 
appeal, smaller superstore 
developments in' circumstances 
which, it is agreed, allow scope for 
only one. leaving competition to 
determine the outcome. More 
seriously stilL in Penzance, he 
recently accepted the principle 
that although one of three sites 
proposed for shopping develop- 
ment was dearly the best, that was 
not. in itself, “a relevant 
consideration”. 

All such schemes should be 
called in automatically by the 
Department of the Environment 
and a special inquiry, on the lines 
of a planning commission, should 
be held for each of the country's 
conurbations of other areas which 
attract these applications. 

Yours etc. 

HARVEY R. COLE 
9 Clifton Road. 

Winchester. Hampshire. 

National Gallery 

From Mr T. H. Hughes- Davies 
Sir. War is- much too serious a 
thing to be left to military men — 
or education to teachers, medicine 
to doctors, papers to editors, or 
ships to masters. 

Management has reached the 
National Gallery, and is even 
eyeing the lawyers.. Mr Gould 
(August 5} should not expect a 
scholar in charge rather than in 
attendance. .... 

Yours sincerely. : " 

T. H. HUGHES-DAVIES, 

Slades Cottage, Breamore. 
Fofdingbridge. Hampshire. ... 

Sex and the Chnrch 

From FatherPeter Knott, SJ - 
Sir, In his aitide, “Cynicism and 
sexual morality”, August 4, Clif- 
ford Longley gives the impression 
that the Catholic Church believes 
that sex has been designed by God 
for one single purpose which is the 
reproduction of the species. 1 

The following quote from the 
second Vatican Coundl should 
help to correct this view; 

Marriage is not merely for the 
procreation of children: -its nature as 
an indissoluble compact between 
two people and the good of the* 
children demand that the mutual 
love of the partners be properly 
shown, that this love should grow 
and mature. Even in cases where 
despite the intense desire of the 
spouses there are no children mar- 
riage still retains the character of 
being a whole manner and commu- 
nion of life and preserves its value 
and indissolubility (Gaudium ct 
Spcs n.S0J. 

Yours faithfully* 

PETER KNOTT, 

St Anthony’s. Slough, Berkshire. 

Wrong rig 

From Mr F. R. Welsh 
Sir, I hope nautical readers will 
not take too seriously the picture 
of our trireme you published on 
July 31. The masts and sails of the 
model have been rigged the wrong 
way round, giving the unfortunate 
vessel something of the appear- 
ance of the “push-me-pull-you”. 
When ready for sea trials, which 
are planned for April 1987, they 
will, I trust, be correctly mounted 
Boris Rankov, of St Hugh's 
College, Oxford, is recruiting a 
crew of oarsmen for the trials, and 
will be happy to hear from suitable 
volunteers. 

Yours faithfully. 

FRANK WELSH (Director. 

The Trireme Trust). 

Bridge House. Bridge Street, 
Bungay. Suffolk. 

Worst enemy? 

From Mr Ray Ward . 

Sir. I’m not surprised the North- 
ern Ireland MPs were cross about 
Professor Thompson's Dogs (Ac- 
cess to Foodshops) Bill (letter, 
August I). Perhaps the professor 
told them of his apparent belief 
that Northern Ireland is part of 
Great Britain. 

Yours faithfully. 

RAY WARD. 

38 Lancaster Gate. W2_ 


The Queen’s role 

From Dr J. F. McEldowney 
Sir. Constitutional conventions, 
according to Dicey, were intended 
as “a whole system of political 
morality, a whole code of precepts 
for the guidance of public men". 
By their nature they represent the 
morality of the Constitution, but 
as they are unwritten they are 
difficult to enforce. When given a 
legal meaning. Dicey distin- 
guished conventions from law and 
- believed that conventions “are not 
in reality laws at an since they are 
not enforced by the conns”. 

Geoffrey Marshall (feature, July 
28) obscures Dicey’s legal mean- 
ing of conventions. His suggestion 


that they arc suitable for consid- 
eration by the Judicial Committee 
of the Privy Council might imply 
enforceability tor the courts. It is in 
the nature of conventions that, 
while they may be recognised io 
exist by the courts, the courts 
cannot enforce a convention and 
certainly not against the sov- 
ereignty of Parliament if enacted 
in stature. 

His suggestion that conventions 
are akin to the common law when 
he writes thai “questions of 
precedent and principle that de- 
fine constitutional conventions 
are not widely different from those 
involved in disputed questions of 
common law” runs counter to 


Dicey's legal understanding and 
meaning. 

Little could be gained from a 
codification of conventions as 
they are presently unwritten, 
sometimes- they are obscure, and 
they are n on-legal rules of the 
Constitution. This is not to dimin- 
ish the importance of conven- 
tions. because they properly 
belong as generally accepted 
political practices which are not 
enforced by the courts. 

Youis sincerely. 

JOHN F. McELDOWNEY, 
University of Warwick. 

School of Law. 

Coventry. West Midlands. * 

July 30. 


ON THIS DAY 


AUGUST 7 1821 
PIRACY AND MURDER. 


(Extract of a letter, dated Stomswav. 

July 27.) 

. , . . Late on Monday, the 23d 
insu, it then blowing a hard gale 
from t he southward, I received 
intimation from a Mr. Mac Iver, 
tacksman of the farm of Tolstay, 
near the But of the Lewis, that on 
Sunday evening his tenants had 
perceived a wreck at some distance 
from the land, and that on going 
towards her they discovered the 
wreck to be a copper-bottomed 
schooner, waterlogged, and on her 
beam ends: that they made fast to 
her, in hopes of being able to bring 
the wreck to some place of safety, 
in which they would have probably 
and eventually succeeded, but for 
the gaJe of wind which had just 
then come on, and which drove the 
vessel that night on shore into 
cove near Toktay-head. In the 
morning it was discovered by the 
vessel’s parting ' that her cargo 
consisted of hogsheads of oil. bees 
wax, paper. &c. which were floating 

about in all directions. 

On my rising early the next 
morning (Tuesday) I met the 
collector of customs, who informed 
me that a boat's crew had been 
surprised the preceding evening 
within a few miles -nf Stornaway 
which, from the information of 
boy who bad turned King's evi 
dence, proved to have been a set of 
pirates, who had murdered their 
captain and a seaman; and having 
plundered the ship of a consider 
able quantity of specie oil the east 
side of this island on Sunday 
morning last, scuttled the vessel 
and abandoned her, but were, from 
the interposition of Providence, 
prevented by the gale of wind from 
effecting their purpose of reaching 
the main land. The crew being 
immediately made prisoners, 
precognition was taken before four 
magistrates, and at which I attend 
ed for three days: and the following 
narrative is a brief statement erf 
what was elucidated from therm- 
The schooner Jean, of about 100 
tons, owned by a Jew house of the 
name of Louis, or Lewes, at 
Gibraltar, loaded there in the 
month of May a cargo, consisting 
of sweet oil, bees'-wax, jars ofj 
olives, paper. &c., and 3E000 to 
40,0000 dollars in specie, and sailed 
from thence on the 19th of May; 
her crew consisting of the master. 
Thomas Johnson: the mate. Peter 
Haymow three British, one Italian, 
one French seaman, and a Maltese 
boy; the captain, and Paterson, 
seaman, were murdered on the 


morning of the 7th of June, then in 
6'£ degrees north laL, when pirati- 
cal-possession was taken of the 
vessel, and her papers thrown 
overboard. After .various schemes 
being proposed, it was resolved to 
steer - n o r th for the. Lerisses. and 
afterwards to land on the east of 
Scotland with the specie: they first 
made the north of Ireland, then the 
island of Barra, where they bought 
large -boat, for which they paid 
about 15 L, the Captain now, 
formerly mate, assuming the name 
of Rogers, and pretending to be 
from New York, bound to 
Archangel. 

On last Saturday morning they 
sailed from thence, and steered 
their course to the northward, 
inside of the Long Island, until 
being in the evening abreast of] 
Stornaway, they descried a vessel 
which Uiqt took to be a cutter this 
immediately caused them to alter 
their former resolution, and in- 
duced them to determine on aban- 
doning the schooner, and making 
the best of their way to the main 
land in the large boat Having; 
accordingly proceeded to the 
northward, they collected their 
specie, and shipped the same into 
the boat, with their other effects, 
and having scuttled the schooner, 
Anally abandoned her. They then 
steered for the main land, when 
□ext morning they were providen 
tially overtaken by the gale of wind 
which forced them to put into the 
creek in which they were discov- 
ered: they at first came to 
grapnel and continued some time 
riding by it, but at length were 
driven on shore, and the boat stove. 
This put them under the necessity 
of secreting the specie, and they 
rdingly buried the greater part 
of it in the sand, and the rest they; 
concealed among the baggage, ev- 
ery man’s share being previously 
divided, and sewed up in canvass 
bags, fairing charge of his: 
own, trusting that they could have 
repaired their boat and put to sea 
again when the weather; 
moderated. In this situation they 
were surprised by the officers of| 
customs, when the pretended cap- 
tain. under the new name of Ledly, 
(having formerly at Barra gone 
under .the name of Rogers), 
trumped up a story of shipwreck, 
and said that be had been mate of a 
ship from New York to Liverpool 
.The Maltese boy, however, found 
an opportunity of communicating 
to the Surveyor of Customs the 
information of the atrocious act 
that had been committed. . . They 
were immediately rnnA, png omcia, 
and after a very minute investiga- 
tion before the magistrates, they 
folly admitted the facts communi- 
cated by the boy. . . . 


Degree of doubt 

From Mr M. T. Phillips 
Sir. According to your correspon- 
dent (report, July 29) “British Rail 
has a number of crossings in the 
pipeline . . . but these wiU now be 
put on ice” 

Though contrasting in degrees 
Celsius, this reminds one of the 
beleaguered football manager 
who. when asked last season what 
he intended to do about his team's 
plight replied that be had several 
irons in the fire, but that be was 
keeping them close to his cbesL 
■Yours faithfully, 

M. T. PHILLIPS, 

12 The Mafl. East Sheen, SW14. 


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24 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


. COURT 
CIRCULAR 


HM YACHT BRITANNIA 
August The Queen, accompa- 
nied by The Prince Edward, 
travelled to Southampton 
Docks this afternoon and, hav- 
ing been received by Her 
Majesty's Lord-Lieutenant for 
Hampshire (Lieutenant-Colonel 
Sir Janies Scott, St), embarked 
in HM Yacht Britannia and. 
escorted by HMS Glamorgan 
(Cfepiain H. Pelior. RN), sailed 


(C^piain H. 

for Scotland. 

The Hon Mary Morrison. Mr 
Kenneth ScoU and Major Hugh 
Lindsay are in anendance- 
The Duke of Edinburgh dis- 
embarked from HM Yacht 
Britannia this afternoon. 

The Duke and Duchess of 
York embarked on HM Yacht 
Britannia today. 


The Princess of Wales will visit 
Roxburghe House at the Royal 
Victoria Hospital Jedburgh 
Road, Dundee, on August 26. 
The Princess of Wales, Presi- 
dent of Dr Barnardo’s, will visit 
the Dundee Family Support 
Team at 14 Dudhope Street, 
Dundee, on August 26. 


Birthdays today 


Air Commodore Colin Cadefl, 
81: Mr Greg Chappell, 38; Sir 
Maurice Dorman, 74; Professor 
H.L Elvin, 81; the Right Rev Dr 
Launcelot Fleming, 80; Sir lan 
Fraser. 63; Sir Paul Hawkins, 
MP. 74; Mr Kenneth Kendall, 
62: Major Sir Guy Lloyd, 96; Mr 
Qwen Luder, 58; Dame Ella 
Macknighl, 82; Vice-Admiral 
Sir Hector Maclean, 78; Bar- 
oness Seear, 73; Mr Philip 
Snow. 71 ; Mr Waller Swinbum, 
25: Mr iA. Young. 65. 


Luncheon 


Diplomatic and Commonwealth 
Writers Association 
Mrs Lynda Chalker. Minister of 
State for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, was the guest of 
honour at a luncheon given by 
the Diplomatic and Common- 
wealth Writers Association of 
Britain at the Royal 
Horseguards Hotel yesterday. 
Mr Michael Evans, acting presi- 
dent of the association, was in 
the chair. 


Administrative Law 
Bar Association 

An Administrative Law Bar 
Association is being established 1 


and its inaugural meeting will be 
tober 30. T “ 


on October 30. The officers are: 
President: Lord Justice Woolf; 
chairman: Mr Michael BeiofT, 
QC; vice-chairman: Mr Andrew 
Collins. QC treasurer: Mr Rob- 
ert Carnwath, QC secretary: Mr 
Michael Suppeistone. 

■Applications for membership 
from members of the Bar in- 
terested in Administrative Law 
can be made to the secretary at . 
1 1 King's Bench Walk, Temple, 
London EC4 7EQ. 


Royal Institute 
of Navigation 

The following awards have been 
made: 


Honorary membership: Professor K E 

karwaifi; bronze medal: V W aowooU 

and A Benoit: reuowsidm: T s Brims, 
Souadron Leader ! B BuHocfc. C S 
Edwards. E R Hargreaves. Captain D 
H Indie. Or S Naooaka. Admiral 
Ibrahim adou □ Nasr. Motor E 
Southin' Tailyour and Professor A 
SoMe. 


Appointments 


Latest appointments include: 
Mr Colin Hewett aged 56, 
National Drugs Intelligence co- 
ordinator, to be a Metropolitan 
Assistant Commissioner of Po- 
lice from September !. 


The following Metropolitan Po- 
lice officers to have the rank of 
Commander from September 1: 


Chief Supt Nell Dickens, Det 
Chief Sopt Thelma WagstafT. 
Chief Supt George Ness, Chief. 
Supt David Cansdale, Chief 
Sopt John Howley, and Tem- 
porary Commanders Peter 
Lewis and Leslie Poole. 


Mr Tony Hall aged 40, director 
and secretary of the British 
Agencies for Adoption and 
Fostering, to be director of the 
Central Council for Education 
and Training in Social Work 
towards the end of the year, in 
succession to Miss Priscilla 
Young: 


Legal 


Harry Kllboome 
to be a recorder 
the South-eastern 


Mr 

Frisky, 

Sitting on 
Circuit. 

Professor ZA SUberstoa and 
Mr AJ.M. Bedey to be mem- 
bers of the Restrictive Practices 
Court 


Judge retires 


Judge Bruce Griffiths, QC, has 
retired from the circuit bench on 
the Wales and Chester Circuit 


Latest wills 


Mr John Bertram Strong, of 
Marlborough, retired farmer, 
left estate valued at £1,095,191 
net Among various bequests he 
left £50,000 to the Royal Agri- 
cultural Benevolent Institution 
and £20,000 each to the Oncer 
Research Campaign and 
Bamardo's. 

Dr Oral Humphrey Vivian 
Sutherland, of Cumnor. Oxford- 
shire. keeper of the Heberden 
Coin Room. AshmoCean Mu- 
seum. 1957-75. left £226,374 
net 

Marjorie Ethel Goldsmith, of 
Northampton, left £104.5S5 net 
After bequests totalling £2,000 
she left the residue to the RNLI. 


Wilhelmina Penn Sparrow, of 
Leintwardine, Herefordshire, 
left £546,781 net She died 
intestate. 

Other estates include 


Brough, Mrs Elizabeth T 
of Market Drayton — £369,6 
Clarke. Mr Herbert Leonard, of 

Ipswich £324.836 

DePanla. Mrs Pamela Elizabeth 


Markham, of Long Crendon, 

Buckinghamshire £358,81 3 

Jacob, Mrs Annie Marjorie, of 
Lichfield £503.165 


Johnston, Mr Paul Alexander, 
of North Carolina, US, estate in 
England and Wales ... £755,602 
Newaham, Mr Reginald Ed- 
ward. of Southboume. Dor- 
set £387,611 


Archaeology 


an slum clearance found in City 


Evidence fbr London's first 
slum clearance has been found 
the heart of the Q'ty. 


By Norman Hammond, Archaeology Correspondent 
on the north side of the great overlie the remains of build- 


in 


Archaeologists excavating the 
remains of the Roman Basil- 
ica have discovered that when 
it was built, working-class 
homes were swept away and 
flimsy tenements replaced by 
the largest building north of 
the Alps. 

The proof that redevelop- 
ment in London goes bade 
nearly two thousand years 
comes from nearly 25 ft below 
modem Leadenhall Street, 
where- the construction of 
shops and offices just west of 
the new Lloyd's building has 
given archaeologists their 
opportunity. 

It had long been known that 
the Basilica, the law courts of 
Roman Londinium that stood 


open space of the Forum, lay 
in this area, partly under 
Leadenhall Market Joint 
sponsorship by English Her- 
itage and Legal and Genera! 
Assurance, the developers, has 
allowed the ate to be 
investigated. 

Isolated stumps of walling 
are ai! that is left of the 
northern ranges of the Basil- 
ica. but the consistency of the 
stonework, with a four-course 
layer of tiles running through 
it like jam in a cake, “shows 
that we are dealing with a 
single massive building'', 
according to Mr Brian Hobley, 
of the Museum of London. 


On the north side of the 
Basilica was a roadway, and 
when that was removed a few 
weeks ago, it was found to 


ings on a different alignment 

Mr Gustav Milne, co-direo- 
tor of the excavations, said: 
“These were humble domestic 
structures, with walls of tim- 
ber and unfired clay bricks set 
on flimsy foundations." 

The buildings were only 
one-storey high and were di- 
vided into single-roomed 
dwellings, each with a hearth 
and up to 17 ft square. They 
date to between AD60 and 
100. when the Basilica tias 
erected. 

T o one side of the dwellings 
was a massive rubbish heap, 
which would. Mr Milne said, 
“have been a festering sore. 
When we excavated it we 
could almost smell the rats". 
The demolition of the build- 
ings for the construction of the 


Basilica was, he said, truly 
slum clearance scheme. 

Nevertheless, the new Basil- 
ica. “the Lloyd's building of its 
day", according to Mr Milne, 
was built in something of a 
hurry, and the foundations 
that have been excavated so 
far are riven by large cracks. 

More stable, although some 
1,400 years later, is the west 
wall of the fifteenth-century 
Leadenhall which has been 
found during demolition work 
to have survived to a height of 
45 ft as a party wan between 
two properties. 

Although it is being care- 
fully recorded, this last frag- 
ment of one of London's 
major medieval buildings will 
be torn down early next year, 
because it was felt that 
would cost too much to 
preserve it. 


University news 



enameertns. Swansea- 


Read erships 

Dr P Atkinson, sociology. Cardiff: Dr 
R W Evans, metallurgy and materials 
technology. Swansea: Dr D o Fon- 
tana. edurauon. Cardiff: Dr Roger 
Morgan, botany and micro biology. 
Aberystwyth: Dr D J V Jones, history. 
Swansea: Dr R D Jones, materials 
science and metallurgical anlneerm^ 
Cardiff: Dr R B Kemp, zoology, wales: 
Dr Dianne Morgan, plant sciences. 
Cardiff: Dr M J FPoole. business and 
economics. Irvstmue of Science and 
Technology. Cardiff ( from October 1. 
1986k Dr M F Scanlon, medicine. 
College Of Medicine. Cardiff; Dr N J 
Thrill, geotyap&y. Lampeter. 


New Vice-Chancellor 
for East Anglia 

Professor Derek C. Burke, 
rice-president and scientific 
director of Canada's largest 
biotechnology company, 
Allelix Inc, who is to be East 
Anglia University's next Vice- 
Chancellor from Jan nary I, 
1987. He succeeds Professor 
Michael W. Thompson, who is 
leaving at the end of the year 
to become Vice-Chancellor of 
Birmingham University. In 
1969, Professor Bmfre, who is 
56, became founding professor 
of biological sciences at War- 
wick University, where he 
bnilt a research team that 
became involved in die com- 
petition to done interferon. 
Other university news 


Heriot-Watt 

.Dr Geoffrey R Tomlinson, se- 
nior lecturer in engineering, 
Manchester University, has 
been appointed to a professor- 
ship in the department of 
mechanical engineering from 
September 1. 

The title of professor emeritus 
has been conferred upon Gor- 
don R. Nicoll formerly profes- 
sor and bead of the department 
of electrical and electronic 
engineering. 

The title of honorary professor 
has been conferred upon Mr 
Gordon Butters, group leader of 
processing and particle technol- 
ogy. BP Chemicals. 
Grangemouth. 


Title of visiting professor. 

Professor Donald B. WUson. New 
Mexico stale University, on sabbatical 
feave In the department of chemical 
and process engineering: Professor 
Ivor Smith, "professor emeritus of 
architecture. Bristol University. 


Cambridge 

Elections 

CLARE HALL: Dr SMftn Count to a 
fellowship under UOe A from October 
1 (Intellectual lUstory): feflowshios 
under tiUe C (from October It Dr 
Peter Rowley-Conwy (stipendiary - 
archaeology). Mr R Julian J. Martin 


Cnoiv stipendiary - Wstory 


Dr 

■ history). 


Grove ‘(non-stipend ia ry 

Wales 

Mr J. Beverley Smith, acting 
head of the Welsh history 
department, has been appointed 
to the Sir John Williams chair of 
Welsh history at Aberystwyth 
from October 1. He succeeds 
Professor Ieuan Gwynedd 
/ernes. 

Personal chairs 

Or K Board, electrical and electronic 
U Swansea: Dr N H 
, lUosonhy. Cardiff: Dr D B 
Snath, history of Wales. CardUT: Dr C 


Bristol 

Dr E. Braun, reader in drama, 
has been appointed to the chair 
of drama. 

The following to be emeritus 
professors on retirement: 

Professor D C Berry, prosthetic 
dentistry. Professor H Chitfreund. 
uochemtstry. Professor G w Brandi, 
drama. Professor K B Ingham, his- 
tory. Professor D E Nlneham. theol- 
ogy and religious studies, and 
Professor M c Whiting, organic 
chemistry. 

Dr D. T. Putmani, special 
lecturer (honorary) in drama, to 
be visiting industrial professor 
from August I. 

Dr P. N. Pusey, of the Royal 
Signals and Radar Establish- 
ment, Great Malvern, to be a 
visiting professor from August 

Grants 

Science and Engineering Research 
council: £252.95210 Dr J Malos and 
Or R S Gilmore as a sup p le me nt a ry 
grant towards a n - In vestigation oo 
exper i ments on SPS. TASSO and 
HERA developments of new defectors 
and readout design work for new 
expertinetiL 

Medical Research Council: £386.618 
to Dr F Oervero lo study the 
mechanism of visceral sensation. 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


HRTHS, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS art M MEMOHUM 
M a Im + 15* VAT 

(ramunum 3 lines) 


Announcements, auihcmi&icd by the 
of llw 


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sender. ma> be sail la: 


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Virginia Street 
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or telephoned (ty telephone subs- 


cibcre only) ur IMflt 3824 


AnnouiKxmcnu on be received by 
Kkphooe between 9.003m and 
SJupm Monday to Friday, on Satur- 
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(tMSI 4M Mb). For publication ihc 

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F0RTHC0MNG MMHMBES. WEHRHKS 
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Please allow ai kasi 4S hours before 
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For Uiy mrrof Bgriul abotr Um> tmivera: 


BIRTHS 


SELBY OLNNCII - On 3lst July, lo 
James and Priscilla, a son. Nicholas 
Harry Vincent- 

SHAYLER - On August 2nd. to LaOa 
(Hacktorth-Jooes) and Brace, a, 
daughter. Kale Margaret. » sister for 

Jenny. 

SPEAKS • On Sth August 1986. to 
Rosalind and Johnny, a son. 
Theodore John, a brother for Portta. 
Michael. Sebastian and Susanna. 
STUBBS - On July 1 1th. lo Anne (n4e 
Love) ant Jeremy, a son. Robert a 
brother for Christina. 

WILLIAMS • To Paid and Selina tnte 
McFam. on 31st July. 1986. a 
daughter. Rosina Mary Luster. 


MARRIAGES 


booth : McGovern . on jmy 19 th. 
1986 at Sis. Peter and Paulin EaUng. 
Anthony Thomas Booth of Harrow 
to Catherine Benudeae«KOoveni 
of Ealing. 

CHAMPCRNOWNE : MUS - On Au- 
gust 6 U 1 . in Exeter: Richard, son of 
Oavid and MkeVe Champernowne of 
Cambridge, lo JacWe. daughter of 
Bill and Feretyth WUb of PetersfleW. 

MOORE : YOUNG - The rnamage took 
place on aui August at wantage 
between Damon Matthew Arkell 
Moore, younger son of Giles and 
Sheila Moore of RMUand. Bristol and 
Kale Frances Young, daughter of 
Professor JZ and Raymonds May 
Young of Brill. 


DIAMOND 

ANNIVERSARIES 


ADAMS - On 26th July. 1986. to Jane 
inee Thomasl and Nick, a daughter, 
Isabelle Clare. 

BAM - On 1 st August. K> Sarah (nee 
Jones) and Duncan, a daughter. 
Katherine Charlotte Lindsay, a sister 
for Suzanna. 

BOWDEN - On 1st August, to Claire 
Louise (nee Darteyj and Ian. a son. 
Harry Alexander 

CASEY - On 1 st August lo Arabella 
(we Pelham) and Christopher, a 
daughter. Laura Alexandra. 
EDWARDS - On 3rd August, to Kay 
and Christopher, the gift of a son. 
Jaco b. 

EGCWTON - To Annette (Die Johnson) 
and Ronald. God's gift of a daughter, 
Camilla Ann May. on 2nd August at 
St Richard's. Chichester. 
CBAHAM-MXOM - On SUi August. 
1986 . 10 Sabme CTIlIy) and Andrew, 
a daughter 

6 W AHAM . On 31st July, to Suzl (n4e 
O'Rtordan) and Andrew, a daughter. 
Katharine Rose. 

GREENWOOD - On 5th August- at the 
West London Hospital. to Fiona uiee 
Naime) and George, a daughter. 
Melissa Helen. 

GREGORY - On 5th AugusL to Gamy 
and Henry, a daughter. Luanda 
Harriet, a sister for James. 
HERVEY-BATHUNST ■ On 30th July, 
lo Sarah and James, a daughter. 
Imogen. 

HUOfON-CVANS - On 2nd August, at 
Guy's Hospital. London. (0 Angela 
(nee Fuller) and Tim. a son. Roden 
Frederick Morel {Freddy). 

KENNEDY -On August 4th. to Andrea 
and Ian. a son. Tom McColl Gage. 
Thanks lo staff al Middlesex 
Hospital. 

KIRBY - Oo 2 nd AugusL to Jill (nfe 
Fertile) and Richard, a son. Thomas 
Charles. 

MACWrtBH - On July 28m. in Hong 
Kong- to Valerie <n 6 c Burton) and 
Alistair, a daughter. Joanna Yvonne. 
MQRE-MOLVNEUX On August 4th. 
at Mount Alvemia. Guildford, to 
Sarah and Mike, a son. Tristram 
Neville William, a brother to 
Alexander. Katrina and Christopher. 
MORRIS On 2nd AugusL to Janet 
(nee Carroll) and Stephen, a son. 
David Peter, at SI- Thomas'. London. 
PENNANT-REA On August 4th. at 
Queen Charlotte's Hospital. London 
lo Helen ntfe Jay) and Rupert, a son. 
Edward Peter, a half-brother for 
Amanda and Juliet Kennard and for 
Emily and Rory Pennant-flea. 


RACHER : TWAfTE 7th August 1926. 
Congratulations 1 For Nana & 
Grandad Two People Who Are very 
Dearly Loved. Always. CUff & Julie 

xxxx 


DEATHS 


On August 3rd. 1986. at 
Arundel. Betty Doreen violet, widow 
of Ma>or General Edward Bailey 
Ashmore. C.B.. CM£. M.v.o. 
Service at St. Nicholas Parish 
Church. Arundel on Monday. August 
I 8 lh at 2.15 pm. followed toy com- 
mittal at Worthing Crematorium. 
Ftndon. Cut flowers and all enquiries 
please to F.A. Holland A Son. Termi- 
nus Road. Lirtlehampton. 

Tel. Utuehampton 713939. 


BALANKSHNAN - On August 4th. 
1986. Mavis Y- peacefully at home 
after a long Illness taught wtth great 
courage and dignity. Dearly loved 
mother of Shankar and Nina and 
dear motfier-in-taw or John, crema- 
tion on Friday. August 8 th. flowers 
to Jno Steele. Winchester. 


BATHURST - On August 3rd. suddenly 
at home. Btenftefen Cottage. Avcning, 
Qlos. aged 7*. Joan Irene. Beloved 
wife of Peter Lancelot, mother of Jill 
and grandmother of Luanda and 
Kate. Cremation private. Memorial 
Service on Tuesday. August 19th at 
230 pm at the Church of the Holy 
Cross. Aventng. Donations, if (to 
sired. 10 the League or Friends of 
Tetbury Hospital. Tetbury. Ctas. 


Anthony - SvMetfy al SL 
Thomas' HosmtaL on 3ist July. 
1986. Funeral at West Croydon 
Crematorium on Friday. 8 th August 
at 3.00 pm. 


- On August 2nd 1986. 
peacefully in a nursing home al Bur- 
ges H11L Sussex. Mary Ruby Irene 
Camphefl. of Jura. Private Funeral 
Service ai the Surrey and Sussex 
Crematorium. Worth on Wednesday. 
August I3th al 11.30 am. Enoutries 
k>: PA Brooks and Son. Haywards 
Heath. Tel: 0444 464391 


ELLIS. Thomas manner (Tim) • On 
Saturday. 4 th August 1986. at home 
after an illness bom with courage, 
dignity and strength from tils faith. 
Dearly loved husband of Joan and 
father of John. Peter and Christine, 
who will miss him so much. Funeral 
Service to be held at Union church. 
Min HW on Friday. 8 U 1 August at 
3.00 p m. 


FARR -On July 28th. 1986. SVtofl H_ 
daughter or James Fterr. M.R.CS. 
LRC-P.. late of Kensington. 


Will lam John . On 3rd 
AugusL 1986. aged 20 years, 
loved son of Sheila and Stephen and 
brother to Jane. Funeral Sendee at 
AH Saints Church. Preston Bagot on 
Monday. 11 th August at 12.00 noon, 
followed by cremation at the Mid 
Warwickshire Crematorium. Oakley 
Wood. Family flowers only bul dona- 
tions. IT desired, may be sent to the 
Richmond Fellowship. 8 Addison 
Road. London W14 8 DL. 


ONEENAWAY -.On August 3rd. 1986. 
In hospital alter a short Illness. 
Anthony Philip aged 58 yean. Dear 
husband of Jean and father or 
Christopher and Paid. Requiem Mass 
■ at the Church of the English Martyrs. 
Horiey on Tuesday. August 12 th a 
11.30 am. followed toy cremation at 
the Surrey and Sussex Crematorium 
.at 12.30 pm. Flowers, or 
for Cancer Research or tar SL 
Catherine's Hospice, c/o Stanemans 
Funeral Services. Doran Court 
RedhllL 


BOTMHE Oo August 2 nd 1986. 
fully at home. Alexander Parian? 
Guthrie B.C 001 . CA-. of Langton 
Green. Tunbridge Welts, a much 
loved Father and Grandfather. Cre- 
mation win be at Tunbridge Wells on 
Tuesday August 12 th 11.30 ajn. 


HALUS. Dr Frederick of 5 Porttaod 
Court. Beistzti Park. London NWS. 
peacefully at Ms home on 3rd 
August 1986. Mourned by tils loving 
wife. Helga: son. Julian: brother. 
Adotpti; niece. Diane: and nephew. 
Joseph. Funeral at Colder? Green 
Crematorium. Hoop Lane on Friday. 
8 th August at 3.00 pm. 


HAWKINS - On August Bth. 1986 
Dons Mary aged 82 yean, of Green 
Acres. Highway Lane. Keefe Staffs. 
Much beloved wife or me late Rev. 
Raeburn Simpson Hawkins and 
dearea mother of Allan and Barbara. 
Service at Keete Parish Church on 
Friday. August 8 th al 11.15 am. fol- 
lowed by private crematon. Family 
flowers only please. Donations. If de- 
sired. for Eastngwold Parish Church. 
York, c/o Mrs BAL Field. Green 
Acres. Highway Lane. Kecte. Staffs. 
Enquiries lo Marsh A Son. F_D_ 36 
Friarswood Road. Newcastle. Staffs, 
let 0782 616518. 

HOLT -On August 6 th. 1906, In a traf- 
fic acrkieni- Mark, aged 19. Dearly 
loved son of Colonel and Mm GJL 
HoR. and brother of Amanda. Fuucri 
al on Friday. August 8 th at Royal 
Memorial ChapeL Sandhurst at 
3.00pm. 


HOPE - On August 3rd. Veda. Beloved 
wife of U Cot Xw. Hope. OjbjC_ late 
South Wales Borderers. Bowral. 
N-S.W/2576. Australia. 


LAMBERT - On August 3rd. jack 
Walter aged 69 years. Darling hus- 
band of Catherine, beloved father of 
Christopher. Caroline and Deborah. 
Loving father-in-law and grandpa lo 
Gillian, cure. Emma and Tamsln. 
The Funeral Service, wtn ije. at 
Croydon Crematorium. Thornton 
Road on Tuesday. August 12 th at 
1.00pm. Flowers, or donations In 
beu for Royal Literary Fund, may be 
sent to J B. Shakespeare Limited, St 
george Street Croydon. A Thanks- 
Bhuig Service wifi be held at SL 
Mays Church, primrose His. NW3 
on Wednesday. September 1 7th al 
12 noon. 


HeOLOOWNY. Muriel Sinclair 
(Peggy), formerly VILLIEftS. Widow 
of Ihe late Hugh Cameron 
McGIdowny- and mother of Louisa. 
Peacefully in hospital on Wednes- 
day. 6 U 1 AugusL i486. Funeral at SL 
Andrew's Church. Ashford Bawdier, 
near Ludlow. Shropshire at 10.00 
am on Saturday. 9th August, no let- 
ters please. Flowers W J-H. Kenyon 
Ltd. 49 Marioes Road. London W8. 
Telephone 937 0757 by 5.00 pm. 
Friday, or donations. If desired- to 
The Friends of SL Stephen's Hosol- 
taL Fulham Road. London SWiO. 


MYLES - Rosie (Weno/Mhmow) irie 
Robinson, suddenly an August 3n! at 
home- Much loved and never to be 
forgotten by James. Tim and RoMn. 
her family and her friends. Funeral 
private followed tor cremation. Me- 
morial Service lo held at Midday on 
Thursday 4Ui September at Holy 
Trinity Church. Brampton Road. 
London SW7. 

PEECH - On 4lh AugusL I486, peace- 
fully at the Marie Curie Nursing 
Home after a short Utoess bravely 
borne. Rosamond Betty dtee 
DugdateL Wife of Alan James Peech. 
sister of John and the late Joyce and 
Peter. Sadly missed. Funeral at 
Putney Vale Crematorium on Man- 
day. llth August at 3XX) pen. No 
flowers please but donahom. If 
wished. 10 Guide Dogs for the Blind. 
POPIUM - On August 8th. 1986. sud- 
denly but peacefully in Ms steep at 
home. Gordon Horae Popham. Be- 
loved husband of Patsy and dear 
father of Mark. Matthew. Stephen. 
Mary. Elizabeth and Francis and 
grandfather of Richard. Funeral Ser- 
vice at Sr. Teresa's. ChldnUngrold. 
Surrey on Monday. August llth at 
11.00 am. Flowers to GJ4. Luff & 
Partners. 84 Lion Lane. Hastemere. 
London Memorial Sendee to be 
arranged. 

RU5BRIDGEK - On August 4th. peace- 
fully at home. Norton Grange Farm. 
Peggy, dearly loved wife of George, 
mother of James and Amelia. 
Thanhsgtvtng Service at SL 
Andrew's Church. Tangroere on 
Monday. August llth at 2.15 pm. 
followed by private tarntty crema- 
Hon. Family flowers only pMase. 
Donations. If so wtshed. to SL 
Wilfrid's Hospice. Appeals Office. 
Broyfe Road. Chfcbester. 
STOflHAUC. Leif - On August 4th. la 
Hereford, aged 76. Father of Glenn. 
pandlMher of Finn and Anna. Also 
deeply missed by ad- Ms fondly, in 
Norway. 

THOMSON - At Metkleour. on 1st 
August. 1986. J-E.T.. after a long Ill- 
ness borne with dignity. 

WILTON - on August out. 1986. peace- 
fully at me Royal Free Hospital, after 
a short IBness. Frances Mary, stsur 
of Joan and Peggy. Service SL Mary- 
me-Virgin. King Henry's Road. 
Primrose Hill on Monday. August 
llth al 1.45 pm. followed fay private 
committal. Family Dowers only to 
Levenon & Sons. 181 Haventock 
HU. Hampstead. NWS by 10.30 am. 
Donations, if desired. t6 the Church 
of England Children's Society. 


IN MEMORIAM - WAR 


HAYES - Ivor Wesley Harcourt. 
Private 132S8 4(h Battalion South 
Wales Borderers, kflted to action 7th 
AugusL 1915. GallipoU. aged 20 yrs. 
CWEXJL ANGLIA NA GWARTH. 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


Frank - 1983. 

Remembered always with love and 
gratitude. Sadly missed by ad the 
faculty. 

COE. Norman • 'Remembering with 
love and gratitude. Doreen. 

CROWDER. Irene and Gordon . Re- 
membering with loving gratitude our 
darling and beloved parents on the 
anniversary of this their special day. 
August 7th. 1926. - 

SCOTT David Russell who departed 
from us on August 7th 1980. Dearly 
beloved elder son of Marion and the 
late Alan and brother off bn. Remem- 
bered With love and pride. 

WRAY. Eryt - Treasured memories of 
an adorable wife and mother. Love 
never faHett- Bob. Stuart and Philip. 


MEMORIAL SERVICE 


MOTOR - A Memorial Sendee for 
W attain £. Morion, died 16th July. 
1986. of Wnmor * Co.. Caledonian 
Industries. Northern Ireland and 
.CLF.T.: and of Cunra. Co. Down. 
Northern Inland, will be held on 
Wednesday. 20Ui August at 3.00 pm 
In Malone Presbyterian Church. 
Balmoral. BtafatL 


Forthcoming 

marriages 

Mr J.W. Addis 
and Miss CS- Dewar 
The engagement is announced 
between Jonathan, son of Mrs 
Edith Addis and the late Dr J.P. 
Addis, of Wallingford, and 
Caroline, daughter ofMrs Sheila 
Dewar and the late Mr W.Q. 
Dewar, of Norton. Davemry. 

Dr J.M. Butcher 
and Miss LSJL Evans 
The engagement is announced 
between Jeremy, elder son of Mr 


and Mrs Geoffrey Butcher, of 
louse. Gu 


Melrose House. Guildford, Sur- 
rey, and Katharine, daughter of 
Mr and Mrs Michael Evans, of 
Thuriey House, West Claodon, 
Surrey. 

Mr J. Connolly 
and Miss J. Isberwood 
The engagement is announced 
between John, eldest son of Mr 
and Mrs Sean Connolly, of 
Deary, Northern- Ireland, and 
Judith, younger, daughter of 
Professor ana Mis Ian Isber- 
wood. of Disley, Cheshire. 

Mr M.S. fear 
and Miss CJL Hfllyer 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark, son of the late 
Mr S. E gir and ofMrs M. Egar, 
of Peterborough, and Caroline, 
younger daughter of Mr and Mrs 
J.S. Hillyer. ofBiddenden. Kent 

Mr M. Freer 
and Miss CL. Atkins 
The engagement is announced 
between Martin, only son of Mr 
and Mrs Trevor Freer, of 
Balmaghie. Staplehurst, Kent, 
and Claire Louise, only daugh- 
ter ofMrs Atkins. of Cobbs Hall 
Cottage. Broadwater Road, 
West Mailing, Kent, and Mr 
Eric* Atkins, of Barrington Hall 
Hatfield Broadoak. Bishop's 
Stortford. Hertfordshire. 


Major PJLD. George 
and Miss KJVL Howie 
The engagement is annoonneed 
between Peter George, The 
Royal Irish Rangers, eldest son 
of the fete Mr Eric George hnd of 
Mrs MiQicent George, and Kate, 
youngest daughter of Mr An- 
drew Howie and Mrs Jo Howie. 


Mr M.G. Hudson 
and Miss EJ. Baswens 
The engagement is announced 
between Matthew George, only 
son of Mr and' Mrs John 
Hudson, of Leominster, 
Herefordshire, and Elizabeth 
Jane, younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs John Bauwens, of 
Brighton, Sussex. 

Mr R.W. Lawrance 
and Miss SJ. Foster 
The engagement is anmtounced 
between Robert, rider son of Mr 
and Mrs Brian Lawrance, of 
Edgbaston, Birmingham, and 


Sarah, elder daughter of Mr and 
Mrs David Foster, of Jesmond, 
Newcastle upon Tyne. ■ 


MrS-JJtL Mitchell 
-and Miss AJL Dale-Thomas 
The eng ag ement is announced 
between Simon, eldest son of 
Mrs Phfllipa Hazledine, 
Ramsgate, Kent, and Amingita. 
eldest daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Brian Dale-Thomas, of The 
Go re. 'Queen’s Gate, London. 
Mr CMJ. Newton 
and Miss CL. Darby 
The engagement is announced 
between Christopher, son of Mr 
and Mrs Michael Newton, of 
Broadhurst Wood, Balcombe, 
West Sussex, and Louise, daugh- 
ter of Mr and Mrs John Darby, 
of Highfirid Farm, South 
KHworth, Lutterworth 
Leicestershire. 

DrM.CM. Porter 
and Miss RJ>. Lovell 
The engagement is announced 
between Mark, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs A.M. Porter, of Ross- 
on-Wye, Herefordshire, and 
Rosalind, only daughter of Mr 
and Mrs B.WJ. Lovell of 
Axbridge, Somerset 
Mr DJP. Pratt 
and Miss CJ. Spencer 
The engagement is announced 
between Dominic Paul younger 
son of Dr and Mrs OJE. Pratt, of 
Dulwich, SE21, and Carolyn 
Judith, elder daughter of Mrand 
Mrs D.C Spencer, of West 
Wickham, KenL 
IVfr R.V. Reid 
and Miss LA.C Mason 
The engagement is announced 
between Robin, youngest son of 
Mr and Mrs David Reid, of 
Eastleach, Gloucestershire, and 
Rosemary Ann. only daughter 
of the late Mr Geoffrey Mason 
and ofMrs Christine Mason, of 
Salcombe. Devon. 

Mr AJL Slater 
and Miss LA. Bens 
The engagement is announced 
between Adam, rider son of Mr 
and Mrs P.H. Slater, of 
Cockermouth, Cumbria, and 
Lucy, rider daughter of Mr and 
Mrs B.M. Beves. of Suction 
Grandison, Herefordshire. . 

Mr JJVL Webster 
and Miss A.ME. Martin 
.The engagement is announced 
between Jeremy Webster, 1st 
Battalion Glostm. younger son 
of Mrand Mrs Patrick Webster, 
of Chetwynd, Shropshire, and 
Avril only daughter, of Mr and 
Mrs E.G Martin, of Wellington, 
Shropshire. 

Commander D.CJL White 
and Mrs JJ*. Silver 
The engagement is announced 
between Dennis White. OBE, 
FMA, RN, (retd), and J ennif er 
Silver (nfie Pixley). 

Mr D J. Wilks . 
and Miss S.GJ. Walker 
The engagement is announced 
between Douglas Wilks, of 
BletchJey, and Susan, daughter 
of Mr Peter C Walker and the 
late Mrs Joyce Walker, of Stoke 
Goldingum, Buckinghamshire. 


Science report 


Controversy over life 
on Mars revived 

By a Special Correspcrateiit; 


The argument about the pos- 
sible existence of simple 
nucrorganisms in the soil of 
the plane! Mars has been 
[revived by experiments done 
on Earth. The results have led 
to a review of an earlier 
investigation in which a robot 
laboratory was landed on the 
red planet to analyse sam ples 
of soft. 

The controversy goes back 
10 years, when two United 
States spacecraft, Viking 1 
and 2, reached Mars with 
experimental packages that 
were designed to search for 
microbial (fie. 

A mechanical arm scooped 
some Martian soil into several 
experimental containers. One 
contained a nutrient in which 
any living cells contained in - 
the soil woold grow. The 
nutrient ind tided a radio-ac- 
tive isotope tracer which, if 
taken np by micrn-or gflnKms, 
woold also show in the gases 
released through respiration, 
thereby giving one of the 
possible tell-tale does of ma- ' 
rerial of biological origin. 

The experiment showed a 
seemingly positive result that 

was open to interpretation as a 
sign of primitive life. 

However, another voting 
experiment to search for or* 
molecules, which were 
waste products of 
life, was negative. This second 
result ied Nasa scientists to 
condttde in 1976 that life was 
absent and that some hitherto 
unknown inorganic mecha- 
nism had to be sought in order 
to explain the nutrient- uptake 
and apparent respiration In 
the Martian soil samples. . 

What Nasa scientists foiled 
to consider in 1976 was that 
life on Mars could be ticking, 
over at such a slow rate that 
little in the way of organic 
debris would be present m tire 
Martian soil. Three years • 
later a test of the Viking 
experiment carried out by Dr 
K. Bieman, using a soQ sample 


from the Antarctic (in which 
micro-organisms are known to 
exist), prodneed results almost 
identical to those actually 
obtained on Man. 

Two years later. Dr G.V, 
Levin and Dr PA. Straat 
announced that all attempts to 
recreate the positive residts in 
the Martian gas release 
experiment, using inorganic 
models, had failed. 

At a meeting held in Wash- 
ington recently, to mark the 
tenth anniversary of the Vi- 
king mission, Lena and Straat 

announced that it is ■ much 

more likely than not that life 
was detected on Mars in 1976. 
After a decade of extensive 
experimentation carried ont in 
the laboratory,, it was con- 
firmed * that no inorganic 
explanation of the Voting 
results was posable. 

The most intriguing daim 
concerns the nature ®f living 
-systems that might have been 
detected on Mars. Dr Levin 
and. Dr Straat show that there 
is evidence of lichens, which 
are a symbitMte assoctation of 
fungi and algae such as are 
often found in terrestrial 
rocks 

Photographs of a Martian 
rock token some years apart 
by a camera on one of the 

Viking lander s Show chang in g 

patterns of greeflfeh; patches 
similar to the. behaviour of 
terrestrial lichen-bearing 
rocks. 

Mars is the only earthfike 
planet in the inner regions of 
the solar system endowed with 
mnditimw appropriate for the 
survival of micro-organisms at 
the surface. The discovery.on 
Mare of primitive life forms 
very similar to terrestrial 
forms would tend -stong sup- 
port to the idea that life came 
to both those planets from 
outside. 

K, Biemaim, J. Mol £Vo/ 14, 65, 
1979. 

G.V Levin and PA Straat 
'leans, 45, 494, 1981. 


OBITUARY 

PROFESSOR BANESH 
HOFFMANN 
Aide and biographer of Einstein 


Professor Banes h Hoff- 
mann, the mathematician, 
physicist and former colleague 
of Einstein, died in New York 
on August 5. He was 79. 

Hoffinann, who was also a 
biographer of Einstein, has a 
claim to tome in his own right 
as. for a long time, America's 
lone crusader against the tyr- 
anny of multiple-choice ex- 
aminations in schools. 

He was born in Richmond. 
Surrey, on September 6, 1906, 
the only son of a Polish 
immigrant tailor. He was edu- 
cated at St Paul's School and 
Merton College. Oxford, 
where he graduated with a first 
in 1929. 

At Oxford he was impressed 
by the lectures of the visiting 
Princeton mathematician, Os- 
wald Veblen, and when in- 
vited by him to go to America 
as his research associate, he 
readily accepted. He took his 
PhD at Princeton in 1932. 

In 1 933 Veblen suggested he 
go to see Einstein to seek his 
help in the solution of a 
mathematical problem which 
was vexing him, and Hoff- 
mann entered that formidable 
presence for the first time. He 
later recalled that Einstein, 
while remaining . the soul of 
courtesy, did not appear much 
impressed with the work he 
was doing in mathematics. 

But he was to get another 
chance in 1937. While work- 
ing at the Institute of Ad- 
vanced Study at Princeton he 
was invited by the Polish 
physicist, Leopold Infeld, to 
work with him and Einstein 
on the relation between mo- 
tion and field equations of 
general relativity. This bore 
fruit in a paper entitled 
“Gravitational Equations and 
the Problem of Motion." 

Of this period with Einstein 
he later said: “if you worked 
with him he made you aware 
of a common enemy - the 
problem. But you became his 
partner in battle." He and 
Einstein also shared leisure 
pursuits. Einstein, an amateur 
violinist and Hoffinann, a 
more than tolerable pianist, 
played duets on occasion, but 


only for their own enjoymenL 

Hoffmann’s book The 
Strange Story of the Quantum 
( 1947 ) sums up the vears of 
relativity theory elaboration 
and its translation to elemen- 
tary particle mechanics. 

But though his association 
with Einstein was an impor- 
tant one. Hoffmann is best 
known for the long, if fruitless, 
battle he waged against multi- 
pie-choice testing in .American 
schools. And in his book The 
Tyranny of Testing (1962) be 
derided the system of stan- 
dardized tests as a superficial 
measure of individual 
knowledge. 

In 1937 Hoffinann had 
joined the mathematics acui- 
ty at Queens Col lege. New 
York City University, and 
from ! 953 until his retirement 
in the 1970s be was professor 
there. During this period he 
was also a visiting professor at 
King's College London, and at 
Harvard- 

In 2972 he published his 
biography of Einstein, Albert 
Einstein: Creator and Rebel. 
Wrinen with the cooperation 
of Einstein's trustee and secre- 
tary for thirty years, Helen 
Dukas, the book, while re- 
maining commendably self- 
effacing on Hoffmann's part, 
provided fresh insights. It also 
benefited from a remarkable 
collection of family-album 
photographs, which enlivened 
the text with many human 
touches. 

Hoffmann never suc- 
cumbed to the temptation, 
either as biographer or in 
conversational reminiscences, 
to exaggerate his intimacy 
with his great contemporary. 
He recognized throughout 
that Einstein was a man apart. 
“Journalists” he said “were 
always trying to make out that 
he was a regular guy, whereas 
in torn he was nothing of the 
kind. He was a figure compa- 
rable to Newton, and in his 
heart of hearts 1 suspect he 
knew it”. 

Hoffinann married in 1938. 
Doris Maijorie Goodday. She 
survives turn with their son 
and daughter. 


AIR VICE-MARSHAL 
KENNETH GARSIDE 


Air Vice-Marshal Kenneth 
Garside, CB, DFQ who died 
on August 2 at the age of 7Z 
spent a good deal of his service 
career with Coastal Com- 
mand, rising to become AOC 
18 Group and Air Officer 
Scotland and Northern 
Ireland.. . . . 

He was bora at Hendon on 


it was raked by machine-gun 
fire from submarines. 

By now a flying-boat spe- 
cialist, Garside next com- 
manded 262 Squadron 
(CatafinasX operating against 
Japanese submarines in the 
Indian Ocean. In 1944 he was 
in command of the base at 
Sumburgh in the Sbetlands. 


August 13, 1913, and went to from where air strikes were 


Bradfield College and St 
John's College, Oxford, where 
he flew with the University 
Air Squadron and joined the 
Reserve of Air Forte Officers 
in 1933. A rowing Blue, be was 
in the crew for the 1936 
University Boat Race. 

He joined the RAF in 1 937, 
and on the outbreak of war 
was serving in flying boats. It 
was with 230 Squadron of 
Sunder! ands that be won his 
DFC in 1942 for his part in 
low-level night attacks on 
German submarines which 
were harrying British shipping 
in the Mediterranean. An 
intrepid leader, on several 
occasions he cook his aircraft 
so low on these missions that 


launched against German na- 
val forces m the North and 
Norwegian seas. 

After the war he was, among 
other things. Deputy Chief of 
Staff (Logistics and Adminis- 
tration), Allied Forces Central 
Europe, and Senior Air Staff 
Officer HQ Coastal Com- 
mand from 1961 to 1963. 
From 1963 to 1965 he was 
AOC 18 Group Coastal Com- 
mand and Air Officer Scot- 
land and Northern Ireland. 

After his retirement and was 
a managing director of petro- 
chemical companies. 

He married, in 1940. Mar- 
gery June Miller; they had one 
son and one daughter. 


PATRIARCH JUSTIN MOISESCU 


Justin Moisescu, Patriarch 
of the Romanian Orthodox 
Church since 1977, who 


played the part of a Thomas 
Gromw 


mwell in his country, has 
died at the age of 76. 

Moisescu wps bora on 
March 5, 1910, in Albesti 
community, Arges County. 
He graduated, at the faculty of 
theology. University of Ath- 
ens, where be took a PhD. 

After teaching as a theology 
professor abroad, he returned 
to Romania in L939 and, 
following a period of military 
service, took up the chair of 
New Testament Theology in 
Suceava. He transferred to the 
Bucharest faculty — later the 
Theological Institute — in 
1946. 


In 1956 he was appointed 
Metropolitan of Transylv ania 
and. less than a year later. 
Metropolitan of Moldavia,' 
where there are' many monas- 
teries. In 19S8 he supervised 
measures which reduced the 
country's monasteries from 
more titan 200 to just over 
1 00, and the number of monks 


and nuns from over 7,000 to 

2 , 000 . 

After succeeding as Patri- 
arch in 1977 Moisescu was 
again in the position of seeing 
government policies carried 
through which were against 
the Church's interests. These 
included recent demolitions in 
Bucharest, entailing the de- 
struction of such monuments 
as the Vacaresti Monastery 
and the Church of the 
Cotroceni Palace, now taken 
over by President Ceausescu. 

As leader of the most sub- 
servient and at the same time 

churches, he received protests 
from clergy over the hier- 
archy's compliance with state 
demands. He was criticized by 
western church observers 
when it was leant! earlier this 
year that a number of dissent- 
ing clergy had been 
suspended. 

Moisescu was a member of 
the Romanian parliament, 
and of the National Council of 
the communist-dominated 
Socialist Democracy and Uni- 
ty Front. 


MR JOHN MARION HARTOG 


John Marion Hartog, who 
led many climbing expedi- 
tions and conducted valuable 
polar research, died on July 
10. Hartog was bom in 1922, 
the younger son of Sir Philip 
Hartog. He. was educated at 
Westminster SchooL and 
Christ Church, Oxford. 

His studies wens interrupted- 
by the war in which he served 
in the Royal Corps of Signals, 
reaching foe rank of major and 
being mentioned in 
despatches. 

After the war, in his last year 
as an undergraduate, he orga- 
nized and led the five-man 
Oxford University Nord- 
austlandet (Svalbard). Expedi- 
tion; 1949. This was followed 
foe . 17-man Oxford and 
abridge Spitsbergen (Sval- 
bard) Expedition, 1951, joint- 


From 1951 Hartog worked 
as a senior chemist with foe 
National Research and Devd- 
opment Corpora!^,, and. 
mom 1957 until his recent 
retirement, with foe Atomic 
Energy Authority. 


Between these appoint- 
ments he led an assault on the 
undtmbed and forbidding 
Mustagh Tower in foe Kara- 
koram Range with a team that 
Brown, lan 

McNaugt-Davies and Tom 
ftgey. They reached foe sum- 
mit in two parties on 
suecessive days, July 6-7 1956. 


I • 

•1- ' 

i. 




i ; 

w * - 




3 ' 

i. •• 

* * 

3 


.Hartog was severely frost- 

Irari V d< ™ 1 * 

he summa- 
0281 on a post-card: “Lost 


wuu/ upcuiuun, WI, joint- toes. Warn i; ' - 
!y led by Hartog and Brian ^ 

Hdrland, of Cambridge. 1 m- ^ Thiswas 


nananu, ui v-a manage, im- typical Of his 

ponant geological gladologi- which mSiS***^ manner 

were made On both expeg 

iiioni friend. ^ nerous 


\' ..... 





JARY 

Lessor 

hoffm 



THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


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THE ARTS 


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fifwrw Reports (Channel 4) 
bowed out with a quirky 
examination of the way that 
the media have managed to 
create an am* of mystique 
around crack — the smoke- 
able, potentially lethal refine-, 
meat of cocaine hydrochloride 
which has earned handsome 
col umn- indies and ‘ air-time 
before it Ins substantially 
arrived., on the British drug 
scene. 

", The -programme signed that 
such coverage has inadver- 
tently (and, perhaps, cal- 
lously) had an effect parallel to 
the Government’s disastrous 
overstatement of the case 
against heroin. This was 
hardly borne OHt by the vox- 
pop interviews: some had 
heard of the drag, others had 
not (in other words, some read 
newspapers and watch tele- 
vision, others do not). 

The main thrust consisted of 
inviting an advertising agency 
to imagine that a client had 
requested, a enmpaign for the 
substance, and to this end a 
couple of . rag-headed copy- 
writers -prepared a market 
strategy. It would of coarse be 
monstross to 1 . suggest that 
anyone involved in this report 
had ever put anything more 
interesting than snuff up his 
nose, bat it was a lusdoas 
frony to see members off ooe of 
the - professions supposedly 
associated with' cocaine abase 
stnught-fecedly discussing the 
target group for their putative 
product. 

As' to the moral question of 
Press responsibility (or lack of 
H) in promoting an unhealthy 
response through sensational- 
ism, ^scarcely behoves admen 
to wax pious about the media 
when they habitually expend 
so much energy in the pursuit 
of indirect advertising. other- 
wise known as “hype". Per- 
haps the most valuable 
information presented here 
was the oblique insight into 
this grey area. 

- Black and white were the 
dominant colours of Drams 
Along Balmoral Drive (BBCZ). 
Douglas Livingstone's play 
about the after-effects - of. 
majority rule in Zimbabwe 
conjured up a beleaguered 
outpost of Empire where the 
supplies of fish-paste had ran 
ont and the", native white 
engineer had toiqake do with 
. monochrome television whine 
hfruew blade boss enjoyed a 
colour set. 

-The play's framing device 
was awkward (and possibly 
redundant) and the implied 
personal tragedy never ach- 
ieved. . lift-off, • bat Colin 
Blakely and Rowena Cooper 
graced their wincing accep- 
tance of their new position 
with some excellent lemon- 
chewing smiles. 

Martin Cropper 


Theatre: the Avignon Festival 

Massive clouds 



Forty festivals on, Avignon has 
grown from a modest arts week 
with two theatrical venues into a 
four-week event with 30 produc- 
tions in 20 different places, a 
budget of£2 million and a thriving 
" fringe of some 300 shows. Bat this 
creative cornucopia throws into 
high relief France's current dra- 
matic dilemma. No one seems to 
he writing plays for* the French 
theatre- any more. This year’s 
festival is dominated by adapta- 
tions of foreign works and perfor- 
mances whose actionless verbosity 
is better heard than seen. 

Shakespeare's The Tempest 
opened the festival. A complacent 
new. production directed by 
Alfredo Arias with Pierre Dux as 
Prosper© and indifferently adapted 
into French by Jean-Louis Curtis, 
it is saved by the open-air magic of 
the Cour tTHonneur of the Palais 
des Pfipes. Roberto Plate's set 
cleverly re-creates a fragment of the 
Gout's splendid architecture and 
places it on a sandy island sur- 
rounded by wind-rippled water. 
Clotilde Mollet is a delightfully 
ethereal Ariel who, by a well-timed 
■use of doubles, contrives to be in 
three {daces at once. Remarkable as 
much for her physical meta- 
morphosis as for her primeval ape^ 
like interpretation is Marilu Marini 
as Caliban. 

The main aim of Avignon is. 
however, to stimulate new French 
dramatic works and provide a 
lively trying ground for public- 
funded, productions, destined for 
Paris and other state-aided theatres 
around France, be Malheur indif- 
ferent and L'Eafantaredue to go to 
one of the capitaPs quasi-fnnge 
theatres. Both pieces are gleaned 
from the writings of Peter Han dice 
and directed by Jeanne Cham- 
pagne. Le Malheur is a shared 
monologue between mother and . 


son, laying bare the reasons for the 
former’s suicide; Enfant is a 
straight monologue dissecting the 
transition from being just a man to 
becoming a father. The admirable 
performers do their utmost to put 
flesh on what are basically two 
excellent radio plays, but not 
theatre. 

There is no shortage of text in the 
three-hour Le Drome de la vie: 
premieres scenes, written, directed 
and designed by Vafere Novarina. 
Here, the surfeit of words is 
matched by incessant movement. 
It is to be regretted there is no 
apparent correlation between the 
two; perhaps the promised Deux- 
iemes Seines will bring cohesion. 

A new production of Hugo von 
Hofmannsthal's Veuise satirise 
again has more than ample verbal 
content. This drifts sporadically 
out through an unlifiing. realistic 
mist which obscures the audience, 
the actors, Andr£ Engel's direction 
and, one is told. Nicky Rieti's 
unforgettable set. 

The new production of Schiller’s 
Don Carlos is visible enough, but 
the nauseous green d£cor would 
greatly benefit from several 
shrouds of mist The cast headed 
by Marthe Keller and Gerard 
Desarthe. deserves praise. Michelle 
Marquais's direction, however, re- 
quires considerable honing before 
the piece opens in Paris this 
autumn. 

Around a dozen writers were 
invited by the festival to create a 
short work around the theme Oser 
Abner (Dare to Love). Some failed 
to meet the deadline, other were 
rejected, either by the performing 
company, the Theatre Ouvert or 
the chosen director. Jeanne Lab- 
rune. Played in the Hospice Saint- 
Louis, one of the festival's new 
open-air venues, with its intimate, 
crumbling architectural backdrop. 



The open-air magic of the Cour 411000610: of file Palais des Papes redeeming an otherwise indifferent Tempest 


sheltered by rustling plane trees, 
the five remaining pieces — given 
over two evenings — would make 
an interesting collection of short 
stories, or even a radio series. They 
are not visual theatre, however. 

Despite this dearth of the real 
thing and an unusually aggressive 
French Press, there is hardly a seat 
to be had for any of the productions 
for what has come to be known as 
the “in". Hordes of hopefuls 
nightly turn up at all the venues 
waiting for returns. The "off* does 
not yet have this powerful cha- 
risma. Tolerated by the “in” when 
the first young companies began 
infiltrating the festival in the 
middle Sixties — playing in every- 
thing from boulan genes to back 


gardens — the “off” has steadily 
gained ground. Since 1982 it has 
become legitimate, and today it has 
successfully shed its cafe theatre 
image to emerge as true fringe 
theatre, a term which is still to find 
its way into the French language. 

Unlike the “in”, where short 
runs are the norm — sometimes for 
only a handful of performances — 
“off” productions as often as not 
play through the festival. Daily, the 
town wades through waves of 
publicity hand-outs tor this year's 
record number of shows, which like 
the “in” includes music, dance and 
cinema. Success m the “off”, 
however, has very little to do with 
hand-outs; it depends on word of 
mouth. 


Taking pan in the “off” is an 
expensive affair companies must 
pay their own way, even if the 
money mostly comes out of a grant. 
Consequently they play safe with a 
50-seat venue, only to find them- 
setves squeezing in 70 and turning 
away 100. Fortunately, Avignon 
has a higher-than-average number 
of 100- to 200-seal permanent 
theatres, who share their stages 
with visiting companies. Most 
shows last around an hour and, 
with good timing, a detailed street 
map, plenty of stamina and at least 
£25 a day to spend on tickets, it is 
possible to take in up to five events 
daily. 

One of the most outstanding 
“off” productions is La Barque, 


written and directed by Gerard 
Gelas and performed by his Avi- 
gnon-based company Chcne Noir. 
Technically superior to many a 
major Paris prod union — water 
flows and fire leaps across the stage 
— the piece recounts the activities 
of an qgency who, in exchange for 
all your wordly goods, arranges 
your suicide in circumstances of 
your choosing. The suicidal client 
in La Barque chooses a weekend on 
a mythical boat. Stunning sur- 
realistic sets, Pinteresque dialogue 
and two finely worked perfor- 
mances from Nicole Aublat and 
Jean-Marc Avocat combine to 
intrigue, disturb and entertain. 

Diane Hill 


Promenade Concert 


Slow to gather momentum 


ttni.M > E {N MOJSE 


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Bra th waite/ 
Johnson 
Purcell Room 


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The haunting cry, high up in 
the head, of '^Strawberry” and 
:the languid lullaby of ^Sum- 
mertime" from Porgy and 
Bess, were encores which 
.understandably brought the 
-house down in Maureen 
Braihwaite's recital on Tues- 
..day night For those who had 
seen, her at Glyndeboume, the 
■songs record the electricity of 
her stage presence in the 
production there. For every- 
one in the audience, they set 
■the seal on the bright-eyed 
: generosity and spontaneous 
.warmth which had charac- 
terized her recital. 

• . So direct and distinctive is 
her mode of communication, 
so vigorous, and tireless her 
wide-ranging soprano, that her 
programme, called “I Have a 
Dream",- could have spoken 
most potently for itself. Gra- 
ham Johnson, however, was 
- her accompanist. Taking as a 
starting-point the quirk of 
colonial history that caused 
him. -as a. white, to be bora in 
Southern Africa and she, as a 
black, to be bom in south 
London, he provided a 
Songmakers-style com- 
mentary to the entire evening, 
with characteristic cunning of 
matter and contrivance of 
manner. 

■ We learnt much: about the 
indignities suffered by Lena 
Home and Marian Anderson; 
about Wilhelm Grosz, Wei- 
mar depravity and his “Zwdlf 
kleinc- Negeriein”; and of the 
reforming zeal of Coleridge- 
Taylor. But the music itself 
taught us still more: the 
simplicity of Charles Ives’s 
arrangement of “In the 
Momm' Give Me Jesusf”; the 
money-spinning gaiety of Ir- 
ving Berlin's “He's a Rag 
Picker” and the verbal and 
rhythmic energy of Mont- 
salvatge's Condones Negros. 

This was the repertoire in 
which Miss Braihwaite ex- 
celled. Milhaud's Chansons de 
negresse needed just more 
control of nuance and inflex- 
■ ion than her voice, at times ill- 
focused when- constraint is 
imposed on her heavy vibrato, 
is as yet able to give; 

Hilary Finch 


English Concert/ 
Pinnock 

Albert Half/Radib 3 

Handers Solomon, master- 
piece though it is. isa work for 
which contemporary sensibil- 
ities ~imist make adjustment, 
as they must for any -baroque 
oratorio. Its drama is. to say 
the least, both slowly paced 
and simple, as. well as being 
chopped into three unrelated 
episodes. But that is not the 
point For Handel paints his 
characters and situations with 
painstaking exactitude, so that 
our pleasure — and there is an 
infinite amount to be had — 
derives not from dramatic 
continuity but from a scries of 
static views. The only excep- 
tion is the scene depicting the 
dispute of the Harlots and 
Solomon's judgement 

Even so, Trevor Pinnock[s 
performance, with the choir 
and orchestra of the English 
Concert and an array of 
singers whose voices were 
conspicuously on the large 
side for a period-style inter- 
pretation. began a mite slug- 


gishly. The dominant emotion 
of Act 1 may be amorous, and 
the sequence of arias towards 
• the end of the- act is ' un- 
doubtedly something to linger 
over to a degree, but Pinnock 
here went to extremes, thus 
rather over-exaggerating the 
.pastoral element. * - ' " 

T He - made ' ample amends 
. thereafter, however, generat- 
ing the rhythmic crispness we 
are - accustomed ;to::iii. his 
music-making. Perhaps that 
initial problem may have been 
down to Pinnock bowing to 
the work's Utopian vision and 
allowing his singers their fell 
say in matters of pace. Cer- 
tainly individually they were 
able to produce the most 
convincing results, with the 
unhappy exception of Ian 
Caley who as Zadok sang 
rather messiiy, often under the 
note, and with distinct 
awkwardness in .matters of 
line and tone. 

That distraction should not 
be allowed to cloud the im- 
mense achievement of Felicity 
Palmer in the title role. Majes- 
tic as a king, humble as a 
devout and grateful servant of 
God, chi valrous and delicately 
sensual as a lover, she had the 


measure of every subtle emo- 
tion contained in her plentiful 
contributions. 

The other star — present, 
alas, only-m the third act — 
was Arieen Auger as the 
Queen of Sheba, whose aria 
“Will the sun. fQ(get to 
streak?”, deliciously accompa- 
nied by -gently throbbing 
5trings.wiih oboe and flute 
providing a. simple but effec- 
tive unison obbligato, was at 
■ once wonderousiy serene and 
noble; 

Of the supporting roles, 
Jennifer Smith, though some- 
times idiosyncratic in tech- 
nique. was touching as the 
First Harlot, while Della Jones 
was aptly impetuous as the 
Second. Marie McLaughlin, 
Solomon's Queen, sang with 
perhaps too assertive a man- 
ner, though her Act I duet with 
her king was ravishing. Ste- 
phen Roberts richly turned the 
role of the Levite into one of 
real significance. There was 
much excellent work from the 
choir, too, who themselves 
had some miraculous material 
to relish, not least the magnifi- 
cent dosing chorus. 

Stephen Pettitt 


Galleries 

Musical 
Instruments 
Crafts Council 


If there is any field of art or 
craft which would indineone 
unquestioningly to accept the 
old equation ofbeauty-equals- 
fitness to Junction, the malting 
of musical instruments must 
surely be it. The show of 
Musical Instruments at the 
Crafts Council Galleries until 
August 31 consists of two 
interlinked parts, a display of 
classic musical instruments, 
from a wide variety of cul- 
tures, collected by the late 
David Munrow, and the sec- 
ond Crafts Council Open Ex- 
hibition of contemporary 
instrumentrmaking. And 
there is hardly a discordant 
note to be found anywhere in 
either. 

Evidently there has been a 
widespread revival during the 
last few years, not only in the 
malting of current modern 
instruments but in the 
construction of. new equiva- 
lents to until-recenfiy obsolete 
instruments . for the perfor- 
mance of early music in as 
nearly as possible its original 
forms. Some of the most 
exquisite new pieces here 
present are things like baroque 
viols and Renaissance lutes, 
frequently modelled very 
closely on specific surviving 
instruments but none the less 
impressive for that. 

It is pleasing, however, to 
see that on the whole modem 
instrument-makers, when left 
more on their own to create 
without guidance beyond the 
practical requirements of the 
eventual players, can come up 
with something just as elegant 
and usually much less ornate: 
some of the harps, for in- 
stance, achieve a very effec- 
tive stripped modem look 
within the traditional and 
necessary form of the 
instrument. 



Kerin Renton with his peculiar “Instant Harp r 


There are also new oddities, 
like Kevin Renton's Instant 
Harp, made we are told out of 
plastic, bamboo, tree-branch 
and fishing-line; or David 
Sawyer’s aptly labeled 
“Slither'’, of wood and steeL 
These would look thoroughly 
at home among the more, 
exotic pieces from the' 
Munrow Collection, which in- 
clude such mysteries (to the 
layman at least) as a Renais- 
sance great bass racket! (a sort 
of wind instrument), an alto 
Schrcycrpfcife and a bass 
kortholt, as well as in- 
struments from Tibet, Mo- 


rocco, Norway, India and 
many fer-flung {daces where 
they make music. 

Irrespective of the function, 
and the instruments' fitness to 
it, there is much here to 
admire as one might admire 
sculpture. But no doubt the 
discipline of fitting form to 
function, and the feeling of a 
strong tradition which one 
breaks with at one's peril, 
must all contribute to. the 
strength and lucidity of the 
final effect. 

John' 
Russell Taylor 


Dance 
The Golden Age 
Covent Garden 


Two more of the Bolshoi 
Ballet's leading men have 
followed Irek Mukhamedov 
into the leading role of The 
Golden Age. and it has to be 
said that neither of them has 
even attempted most of the 
trick steps with which he 
decorates solos. Without 
them, it becomes more 1 con- 
ventional, although', still con- 
ceived and danced on a boldly 
heroic scale.- " ‘ :: ‘- 

Yuri Vasyuchenko is the 
more experienced and the 
more successful. Andris Liepa, 
making his first attempt at the 
role on Tuesday, lacks nothing 
in daring, but Vasyuchenko 
conveys more of the sense of 
purpose in the young patriot 
fighting gangsterism. They 
both had the benefit of Alla 
MikhaJchenko as the slightly 
ambiguous heroine Rita, foil 
of fine thoughts but appar- 
ently whole-hearted in her 
employment as a showgirl in a 
seedy dub. With her extraor- 
dinarily long legs, radiant face 
and flexible, slender physique, 
she convinces in both sides of 
the character. 

The other leading part for a 
woman, the gangster’s moll, 
looks a sure-fire hit, with 
Maria Bylova perhaps the 
most pertly beguiling of its 
three interpreters but not a lot 
to choose between them. As 
the gangster. Vitaly Arty- 
ushkin has the more impres- 
sive appearance, Alexei Laz- 
arev the sharper, more 
arrogant manner, but neither 
gives the part quite the domi- 
nant edge I imagine was 
intended. 

In addition to the consid- 
erable demands it makes on 
its leading dancers, The 
Golden Age is remarkable for 
the enormous cast it deploys, 
at least 80 or 90 performers. 
There is no ballet company in 
Britain that could put out such 
a cast in quality as well as 
quantity. True, some of them 
are not asked to do much 
more than swarm over or 
round the stage waving ban- 
ners, or to strike voluptuously 
decadent attitudes during a 
tango. But among them are 
quite a few who exult in great 
forceful leaps, building a cre- 
scendo of movement up to the 
climactic moment when the 
principals burst triumphantly 
upon the scene. 

Andrei Buravtsev and Mik- 
hail Sharkov, as the leaders of 
Boris's followers, maintain a 
buoyant energy through in- 
numerable entries that have 
them leaping, revolving and 
cartwheeling with a bravura 
that could sustain nrajor roles 
but is here almost a throw- 
away among the crowd effects. 

I must mention particularly 
Mikhail Tsivin, the master of 
ceremonies at the night-club. 
The role carries more than a 
whiff of Joel Grey’s perfor- 
mance in Cabaret, but it 
avoids the effete quality that 
Clings to most imitations. 

My apologies for two errors 
caused by the hazards of 
telephonic communication in 
my notice yesterday. Ray- 
monda has many solos, not 
mini-solos, and Gelsey Kirk- 
land, although an older dancer 
than Trinidad Sevillano, is by 
no means an old dancer. 

John Perrival 



Persuasive anti-hero, dashing buriesqne: Brian Deacon (left), Philip Bowen 

Theatre in London 

The wisdom for enjoyment 


Arms and the 
Man 

Regent’s Park 


Shaw's fust comedy is a 
surprisingly short piece that 
whirls past, despite its two 
intervals, in little more than a 
couple of hours. Never again 
did he manage to convey 
wisdom so enjoyabiy. And in 
Bulgaria, of all places. 

Ruritania had only just 
been discovered when Shaw 
pulled the carpet out from 
under the idiocies of romantic 
heroism with the practical 
good sense and clear thinking 
of his Captain BluntschIL A 
Swiss professional soldier — 
only fighting for Serbia be- 
cause it came first on the road 
from Switzerland — he knows 
that food means more than 
cartridges when a soldier is 
fleeing from the enemy. 

This altogether admirable 
anti-hero, played with persua- 


Stitch/ 

The Bitter Tears 
of Petra von Kant 
Almeida 


sive charm by Brian Deacon, 
bursts into a household where 
the ideas of the servants may 
be practical enough but those 
of their employers are a 
muddle of misty idealism and 
self-doubt It is perceptive to ‘ 
give, quite early on, both to 
Raina, the girl who shelters 
Bluntschli, and to her magnifi- 
cently absurd fiance Sergius, 
their moments of uncertainty. 
Are they as heroic as they 
think they are? Can noble 
illusions be enough? No diffi- 
culty guessing the answers 
these questions get 
For an open-air production 
it is unhelpful that the night- 
time scene is placed at the 
stan of the evening, when 
(weather permitting) the 
mackerel sky above is still 
white against pale blue. But at 
least we see Bulgarian soldiers 
chase their fugitive round the 
audience before he clambers 
into Raina's bedroom. Simon 
Higlett’s sets are backed with 
simply worked wooden posts 


and patterned rugs; while it is 
a pity not to have the last act 
set in Bulgaria’s joke attempt 
at a library, the loss is not a 
great one. 

David Conville's direction 
encourages Philip Bowen to 
cany the dashing Sergius al- 
most over into burlesque. I 
suppose this is all right when 
the squawky heroics the part 
satirizes have long since van- 
ished from the theatre. Lean- 
ing over backwards in ele- 
gance, his constant search for 
objects to place one foot upon 
reaches its comic climax when 
he thrusts his loot on to the 
fragile seat of a cane chair. 
Sarah Woodward manages 
most of the veering moods of 
Raina neatly, better at suggest- 
ing genuine love than bogus 
adoration. But Sue Hodge's 
sparky little maid substitutes 
pertness for the required defi- 
ance of an underdog on the 
way up. 

Jeremy Kingston 


“Not The RSC Again.*” the 
posters trumpet or, possibly, 
groan. For the second year 
running, the Barbican com- 
pany has taken over the 
Almeida fora fortnights sum- 
mer camp on a shoestring. 

Tuesday night’s bill of fare 
offered the basic mix of home- 
grown drama and theatrical 
rarities. Stitch — receiving 
here (we are rather grandly 
informed) its London pre- 
miere — is a cumbersome and 
mostly obtuse account of a 
day in the rag trade, written by 
Arnold Yarrow. It is odd that 
a professional actor should 


take half an hour to introduce 
his characters, and odder yet 
that this should be done (by 
Graham Turner) in the man- 
ner of a dramatized CSE 
lesson on the black economy. 

In a basement sweatshop, 
Muslim. Hindu and West 
Indian women are sewing for 
30p a garment. Their, penny- 
pinching Cypriot boss (Mr 
Yarrow himself) tries to cut 
their piece-rate in response to 
cheap imports from Bangkok; 
the workers take over, raise a 
banner and sing the “Inter- 
nationale”; finally, most of 
them perish in a fire caused by 
faulty electrics. 

There are agreeable perfor- 
mances from Penny Rider as a 
chirpy cockney and from Tom 
Mannion as an obstreperous 
presser (a marvellous im- 
personation of slack-mouthed 
stupidity), but the play’s 
polemical intent is overt lead- 


enty predictable and risible. 
This is anyway the wrong 
audience to urge not to buy 
cheap clothes on market stalls; 
they would probably feel more 
at home in the creations of 
Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s 
designer heroine Petra von 
Kant 

The play from which the* 
celebrated film was adapted 
has been given once before in 
London, in 1976; here, a 
sterling company of six per- 
formed it from the translation 
of Anthony Vivis. Watching 
actors on the book is a novel 
experience and did not detract 
from this curiously arid ex- 
pos* of sexual politics. Kristin 
Milward makes an impres- 
sively feline Petra and gets 
able support from Tina Mar- 
ian as the spoilt prot*g£e who 
breaks her heart 

Martin Cropper 


PAINTING IN SCOTLAND 

Duncan- MacMillan 


The Golden Age 


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pjfcxfcq; ad crow* C9 rvjrj tbc Ct U r . Aft 
lo tba tmaiAag book ftMig fc SatltmL 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


Moscow set to 
announce test 
ban decision 


Yachtsman hurt during royal race at Cowes 


' Moscow (Reuters) — The 
Soviet Union will announce 
within the next few days 
whether it will continue its 
moratorium on tests of 
nuclear weapons, in force 
since August 1985, a deputy 
foreign minister said today. 

“Many statesmen and polit- 
ical figures abroad have ad- 
dressed and are addressing the 
Soviet government” about an 
extension, Mikhail Kapitsa 
told a news conference. 

“This question will be 
considered with due regard for 
these appeals and according to 
how far. in our opinion, the 
United States is seriously 
prepared to negotiate an end 
to nuclear tests.” 

The Soviet leader, Mikhail 
Gorbachov, declared the 
moratorium on August 6 last 
year to mark the 40th anniver- 
sary of the atomic bombing of 
the Japanese city of Hiro- 
shima. It was extended in 
January, then in March and 
again after the April 26 
nuclear power station accident 
at Chernobyl. 

Mr Gorbachov has repeat- 
edly asked the United States 
to follow suit, but President 
Reagan's Administration has 
turned down Soviet appeals 
on the grounds that tests are 
needed to maintain the US 
nuclear deterrent and that 
problems of verification are 
unresolved. 


In the past few days, the 
official Soviet press has pub- 
lished many articles quoting 
public figures in Western and 
non-aligned countries as sup- 
porting or expressing sym- 
pathy with the Soviet line on 
nuclear weapons. 

Gorbachev said last month 
that he would give careful 
consideration to international 
appeals for Moscow to extend 
its test moratorium, but added 
the Soviet decision would 
depend on the US approach to 
arms control. 

He has also suggested that a 
nuclear weapons test ban 
could form the basis of ah 
agreement at bis next summit 
with President Reagan. The 
two leaders agreed in Geneva 
last November to meet again 
this year. 

• STOCKHOLM: Swedish 
defence experts have reported 
that the number of nuclear 
tests throughout the world has 
fallen sharply this year as a 
direct result of the Soviet test 
moratorium (Reuters reports). 

A spokesman for the Swed- 
ish Defence Research Institute 
said 12 underground tests had 
been carried out, by the US, 
France and Britain, during the 
first seven months of 1986, 
compared with a total of 20 
worldwide during the same 
period last year. The Soviet 
Union conducted seven tests 
last year. 



The ano onsdoM yachtsman shortly after the accident (left), and being strapped to a stretcher in the press launch for transfer to the helicopter (Photographs: JalanHttbert) 


A yachtsman competing at Cowes, 
Isle of Wight, in the same race as the 
Duke of Edinburgh yesterday was taken 
to hospital by a Royal Navy helicopter 
alter being knocked unconscious. 

He was crewing on the ocean racer 
Blazer, which was among 20 vessels 
competing in the 27-mile race for the 


GEC’s bid for 
Plessey 
is blocked 


Camrose Trophy, when be was struck by 
the boom. He was transferred still 
nnconsdoos to a press launch and then 
winched into the helicopter and taken to 
hospital. 

The Dnke and ex-King Constantine of 
Greece took t urns at the helm of the 
yacht Yeoman XXVI. They finished in 


10th place. It was the Duke's final 
appearance at Cowes Week. 

Shortly after the start of yesterday's 
race the mast of the red and white yacht 
Marionette, which Prince and Princess 
Michael of. Kent helped to crew on 
Tuesday, had buckled and crashed to 
the deck. 


Petrol price campaign 


Close Senate vote for 
Star Wars funding 

From Michael Blnyon, Washington 


President Reagan’s Strate- 
gic Defence Initiative has 
narrowly survived two at- 
tempts in the Senate at further 
budget cuts, though the close- 
ness of the vote, and tbe sharp 
criticism of the programme, 
pointed to growing Congres- 
sional disenchantment and 
opposition to any increase in 
Pentagon spending 
President Reagan wants 
$5.3 billion for the SDI in. 
1987. This has already been 
cut back to $3.9 billion by the 
Senate armed services 
committee, and two proposals 


Today’s events 

Royal engagement 


Royal engagements 

Queen Elizabeth The Queen 
Mother visits the Black Isle 
Show, The Showground, Muir- 
of-Ord. Ross-shire. 12.30 
Exhibitions in progress 

Mixed Arts and Crafts; Frame 
Museum, 1 North Parade; Mon 
to Sat 10 to 4, closed Thurs 
(ends Aug 29) 

Tiena y Libertad; photo- 
graphs of Mexico 1900-1935; 
Collins Gallery. University of 
Strathclyde. 22 Richmond St. 
Glasgow; Mon to Fri 10 to 5, Sat 
12 to 4 (ends Aug 23) 

Ceramics by David Frith and 
Naomi Ogilvic-Browne. paint- 
ings by Christa Gaa and Pat 
Hurley: St James's Gallery, 9 
Margaret's Buildings, Bath; 
Mon 10 Sat 10 to 5.30 (ends Aug 
10 ) 

23rd Summer Exhibition: 
works by 75 gallery artists; Colin 
Jellicoe Gallery. 82 Portland St 


would have further cut it to 
either $3.5 or $3.-2 billion. By a 
one-vote majority of 50-49, 
however, the Senate agreed to 
authorize the $3.9 billion, 
itself a 28 per cent increase in 
the research programme's 
spending for this year. 

The vote came during a 
debate of the full defence ; 
budget for 1987, which the 
Republican-controlled Senate 
has set at $295 billion, a little 
above the House’s figure of 
$292 billion, but sharply be- 
low the President’s request for 
$320 billion. 


Continued from page 1 

markets for telecommunica- 
tions and electronics. 

He also criticized the min- 
ister for accepting a report 
which was at odds with the 
evidence from his own depart- 
ment. Department of Trade 
and Industry officials consid- 
ered that a takeover would be 
desirable towards meeting 
overseas competition. 

Sir John Clark, chairman 
and chief executive of Plessey, 
welcomed the veto. 

The commission's report 
suggests that, even without a 
takeover, competitive pres- 
sures in the market for ex- 
changes would lead either to a 
sale by GEC or Plessey of its 
System X interests to the 
other, the setting up of a 
jointly owned company, or the 
rationalization of both 
companies' interests. 


Continued from page 1 
over the past six months been 
able to convert cheap oil at 
massive profits for sale to the 
motorist 

While the oil companies say 
that they are now “making on 
the roundabouts” what they 
have “lost on the swings,” the 
Government has quietly told 
them that the motorist should 
not be used to keep overall oil 
company profits up. 

Britain's motorists should 
still be able to benefit from the 
petrol price war on the 
forecourts over the August 
Bank Holiday, despite firmer 
crude oil prices in the wake of 
the latest agreement by mem- 
bers of the Organisation of 
Petroleum Exporting Coun- 
tries (Opec) to trim output. 

Prices at the pumps will 
inevitably rise because of 
higher crude prices, but it will 
be only those stations offering 
bargain prices which will post 
price rises. 


The average price will still 
remain below £1 .65 gallon and 
promotional campaigns, offer- 
ing cash prizes and free glasses 
and picnic boxes will remain. 

Motorist who have been 
reaping tbe benefits of lo- 
calized price wars, which have 
sent prices below £1.50 a 
gallon, will find that they will 
have to pay more. 

The stations they use have 
been supplied with petrol 
from the Rotterdam market, 
where there has been a glut of 
four-star petrol. Now that 
world crude oil prices are 
rising, stocks of cheap petrol 
have been quickly absorbed by 
tbe European retail market. 

Crude oil now being bought 
at the new higher prices will 
lake six weeks from the 
September 15 delivery date to 
travel from the North Sea 
through the refineries to the 
forecourts. 

However, most of the big oil 
companies have been arguing 


for several weeks that present 
pump prices are unprofitable. 
They have been supporting 
dealers to meet localized 
price-cutting campaigns and 
say that a price level of£1.64 is 
needed to cover costs, even 
using crude oil bought in at 
nearer $ 1 0 a barrel. 

At present, a company sell- 
ing petrol at £1 .58 a gallon has 
4Ip from which to meet its 
crude oil costs, its transport 
costs and its refining costs. 
The Government takes 88. Ip 
in excise duty, 20.6p in VAT 
and the average forecourt 
operator takes 7.5p profit. 

Higher crude prices will eat 
into the oil-company profit 
margin, but the Government 
takes the view that while that 
profit margin is eroded the 
profit margin from the oil 
production side of their busi- 
ness, the “upstream' side as 
the oil companies describe it, 
will rise to cancel out the 
losses. 



• irt\ ■ ■>• •• ■ - -A •• • 





The injured sailor on his way to hospital at Gosport 


THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Manchester. Mon loFri 10 to 6. 
Sal 1 to 5 (ends Sept 13) 

Midsummer Exhibition of 
Watercolours and Oils; The 
Wykeham Galleries, 

Stockbridge; Tues to Sat 10 to 5 
fends Aug 30) 

Landspace: place nature, ma- 
terial; Kettle's • Yard Gallery, 
Castle SC Cambridge; Tues to 
Sat 12 JO to 5.3a Sun 2 to 5.30 
(ends Aug 31) 

Hand Signals; works by vari- 
ous artists around the theme of 
hands; Peterborough Museum 
and Art Gallery, Pries tgate; 
Tues to Sat 12 to 5 (ends Aug 16) 

Landscape Photographic 
work by Thomas Cooper, 
Hamish Fulton, Andrew Ginn, 
i Goto and Each us, Jim Harold. 
Roger Palmer and Chris Wain- 
wright; Cambridge Darkroom, 
Dales Brewery, Gwydir St Tues 
to Sat 12 to 6, Sun 2 to 5 (ends 
Aug 21) 

Works by Henry Tietzsdt- 
Tylen St Paul's Gallery, Stowe 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,118 



ACROSS 

1 Word for word a son of 
brave chap (8). 

6 Phone, to raise spirits (4J). 

9 It makes a change, putting 
one in a cage (6). 

10 Stop pretty girt endlessly go- 
ing with low character at the 
races (3.2.3). 

11 Dance beloved by junior 
officer? (8). 

12 Leader of small state is 
pressed hard, initially (6). 

13 Ecstatic about money paid 
out (5). 

14 .Agricultural properly after 
dam's rebuilt (9). 

17 Side given financial 
acknowledgments? Must be 
joking! (9). 

19 One father in work as a 
detective. . . (5). 

22 . . . and another kept going 
to sea (6). 

23 The work-force is on holi- 
day - don't interfere. . . 

24 . . . with it. until today (2- 
2-4). 

25 Without a cover, too (6). 

26 A king, in brief lime of yore 

( 6 ). 

27 Recklessly hit and run (8). 


DOWN 

2 Cover up European plant — 
one got lost (7X 

3 Bemoaned changes involv- 
ing film certificate for “High 

Concise Crossword, page 10 


Society" (4,5). 

4 Distressing job for a judge 
( 6 ). 

5 It's very like such famous 
men to be disposed to ac- 
cept an honour (4,2, 1, 8). 

6 Vault where 21. perhaps, 
has a sweet store (8). 

7 One coming to grief in the , 
profession of a pope (7). 

8 At the wicket, the chap bat- 1 
ling began energetically 
(7—J. 

13 Pat is easily conned (4.5). 

15 One knot or 127(5.4). 

16 Emergency treatment of 
hair discontinued, we hear 
(5,3). 

18 Careless talk could upset tbe 
cart (7). 

20 Food for rabbits ... (7). 

21 . , . one's in some gang or 
another (6). 


Solution to Puzzle No 17,117 


31 SK 13 H& 

s □ n 13 h ra n n 
lyEmnraEHan issiEaE 
snsnnpiGff 
annsBEH itfHCTnnsp 
a s n a - s - b e 
itiHHUH '.^rsranynras' 

H • (E O ffl 0 ' . I 
'■ lyssnciHHrs ■ 
a . E- bus n m m 

- tidnnfTSE 

s- e b n m rji a □ 
iilSU3EEI 

n m a n 3r aran 

iiBinraBBras yEraiEECs 


House. 5 Bishopgate St, Leeds; 
Mon to Fri 10 to 5. Sat 10 to 12 
(ends Aug 9) 

Focus on Tiles: history, use 
and decoration; Derby Museum 
and Art Gallery, The Strand; 
Tues to Sat 10 to 5 (ends Aug 23) 
Last chance to see • 

The Home of One Hundred 
Trades; Civic Centre Foyer, 
Darwell St, Walsall; 9 to 6. 

Music 

Concert by the Medici String 
Quartet; Lounge Hall, Harro- 
gate, 8. 

Recital by the Lindsay String 
Quartet and lan Brown (piano); 
Theatre in the Forest, Grizedale, 
8 . 

Organ recital by Roy Massey; 
Si Edmundsbury Cathedral, 
Bury St Edmunds. 7 JO. 

Talks and lectures 

How to trace your Ancestors, 
by Annesley Medley; Portandoo 
Centre. Portrnsh, 8. 

Poems and Poets of Lakeland, 

, by Ron Sands; Lake District 
National Park Visitor Centre, 
Brockhole, Windermere, 3-30. 

Sword. Lance and Bayonet 
(talk); Imperial War Museum, 
Lambeth Rd,SEl. II JO. 

Dress and Textiles 1 750-1 8CK), 
by Imogen Stewart, 1 1; Persian 
and Turkish dress, by Jenniier 
Wearden; Victoria & Albert 
Museum, SW7, 12.30. 

Humming Birds, by Joyce 
Pope; Natural History Museum, 
Cromwell Rd, SW7, 3. 

Rocks that Form on the 
Earth's Surface: Rocks that 
Originate Underground (film); 
Geological Museum, Exhibition 
Rd, SW7, 2.30. 

German Expressionism: 
Kandinsky and Beckmann, by 
Pat Turner, I; Oskar Ko- 
koschka. by Laurence Bradbury; 
Tate Gallery, Mfiibank, SWl, 
6.30. 

George Orwell: The Road to 
Wigan Pier (film), II; The 
Printer's TaJe(h\mY, Tbe British 
Library. Great Russell St, 2. 

Women, writing and war, 
1915-1985: From tbe Hague 
Conference to Greenham Com- 
mon, by Dr Joan Byles; Univer- 
sity Women's Room, 2 Audley 
Sq, Wl, 6.30. 

General 

. Poetry reading by Gavin 
Ewart. Alison Fell and Dinah 
Livingstone; October Gallery, 
24 Old Gloucester St, WCI,' 
6.30. 

Royal Air Force Town Show; 
parachute displays, memorial 
Battle of Britain flights, RAF 
police dog demonstration and 
static exhibits: Western Lawns, 
Eastbourne, today until Aug 1 1, 
10 to 6. 


Books — paperback 


The Deputy Literary ECStoPs selection of interesting books published tNs 

- 

iiuum 

FICTION 


Suicide Excepted, by Cyril HareJConstabte, £3.95) 

HappyFamfliM, by Nigel Gray (Ritura, £3-95) 

Weatmtater Blues, by Jufian Critchtey (Future, £1.95) 

History of «a Own Times, by Bishop Gilbert Burnet (Everyman, £4.95) 
0‘s Legacy, by Helene Harm (Future. £1.95) 

The Cruel Way, by EHa K. Mauart (Virago. £4.50) 

How to Have a Life-Style, by Quentin Crisp (Cecil Woolf. £Z95) t 


Tbe Cruel Way, by Ela K. Maffiart (V 
How lo Have a Urn-Style, by Quenfi 

Anniversaries 

Births: Sir Granville Bantock, 
composer, London, 1868; Louis 
Leakey, archaeoloist and 
anthropologist, Kabete, Kenya. 
1903; Ralph Buncbe. a founder 
of the United Nations. Nobel 
Peace Laureate 1950, Detroit, 
1904. 

Deaths: Caroline, consort of 
George IV, London. 1821; Jo- 
seph-Marie Jacquard, weaver, 
Ouling, France, 1834; Alek- 
sandr Blok, poet, Leningrad, 
1921; Konstantin Stanislavsky, 
founder of the Moscow Arts 
Theatre, Moscow, 1938; Sir 
Rabindranath Tagore, writer, 
Nobd laureate 1913. Calcutta, 
1941. 

Motor cycle safety 

Suggestions on how to make 
motor cycle riding safer are 
being invited by tbe Depart- 
ment of Transport. It has issued 
a booklet which it hopes will 
help to cut the present death 
rate. At presenL an average of 
, two riders die in accidents each 
day. Safer Motorcycling: DoT, 2 
Marsham St, London SW1P . 
3EB (01 212 3434). 1 

Tower Bridge 

Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 2pm and 6.15pm. 


i Crisp (Cecil Woolf, £Z95) NS 

Roads 

-Sc o tl a nd: A9& Single fine traffic 
between Aberdeen and Inverurie. 
M& Westbound carriageway at 
Junction 8 (Baifileston Interchange) 
dosed. Aft Single lane traffic in both 
(fractions at Rfflieoankto. 


JliecranMe. 


The North: Mfc Lane closures on 
both carriageways at junction 23 (St 
Helens). Mn& Contraflow between 
junctions 6 and 7; southbound exit 
sfiproad and northbound access 
dosed at junction 6. M63: Works at 
Barton Bodqa between junctions 1 
and 3; avoid. 

Wales and the West M4: Lane 
restrictions in both (fractions be- 
tween junctions 44 and 45. M5: 
Outside lane of northbound 
carriageway closed between Junc- 
tions 8 and 9. A38: N and south- 
bound carriageway lane dosures at 
HakJonHW. 

The Mi dl a nds: Ml: Roadworks N 
and S of unction 20 (Lutterworth); 
delays likely. M5: Two lane 
contraflow in both (fractions be- 
tween junctions 4 (Bromsgrove) and 
5 (Drotwfch). MG: Delays between 
Junctions 4 (M42) and 5 (A4S2); 
aUow extra tone. 


, London and the South East: A23: 
Single tine traffic between Lombard 

i Roundabout and Thornton Heath 
Pond. A25: Temporary lights at 
| junction of Dorking Hrah 5t and 
Dene St expect delays. A602: 
| Temporary lights at Little 
l Wymondey: avoid. 


Weather 

forecast 

A deep depression to 
the SW of Ireland wiU 
move steadily NE- Fron- 
tal troughs will cross most 
of Britain. 

Scotland and Northern 
Ireland will be cloudy 
with outbreaks of rain 
heavy and prolonged at 
times. Wales and western 
districts of England will 
also be mainly cloudy 
with outbreaks of rain, 
tuning showery later. 

London, SE England, E AngSa: 
Sunny start, becoming cloudy with 
showers later. Wind S fresh becom- 
fnt^SW strong. Warm, max 25c ( 

Central S, E England, E Mdbmds, 
Channel Ik Bright start becoming 
cfoudy with showers. Wind S veer- 
ing W strong. Warm, max 24c (75Q. 

W Mkflands, Central N, NE 
En g la n d Rather doudy, outbreaks 
of rain turning showery. Wind south 
veering westerly straw. Near nor- 
mal, max 20c ( 681). 

SW England, Wales: Mainly 
cloudy with outbreaks of rain. Wind 
Steering W strong to gale. Max 18c 

NW England, Lake DIM, la of 
Man. SVT Scotland, Glasgow, N 
Ireland: mainty doudy, outbreaks of 
rain, prolonged at times. Wind 
southerly becoming northwest 
strong to gale. Max 1 7c (B3f). 

Borders, EtSnburah, Dundee, 
Aberdeen, Central HBgMande, Mo- 
ray Firth, NE Scotland : Cloudy, 
outbreaks of rain, some heavy and 
prolonged. Wind "E or SE strong. 
Max 16c(61fl. 

Argyll, NW Scotland: Cloudy, 
outbreaks of rain, some heavy and 
prolonged- Wind east bacWng north 
strong locally gale. Max 15c (591). 

O r kney, Shetland : Mainly cloudy, 
rain spreading from the S. Wind SE 
fight becoming E strong. Max 14c 




High Tides 


Mlw sky: bc-biue sky and cloud: c- 
doudy. o-overcaaL f-fogs d-drfcafc: 11 - 

hall: mislrntst: r-rahi: 9-snow: th- 
Lh understorm: p-shawer-s 
Arrows show wind direction, wind 
speed imphj circled. Temperature 
centigrade. 


TODAY 

AM 

HT 

PM 

HT 

London Bridge 

a49 

68 

4.04 

29 

Afaerdoon 

2^7 

4.1 

234 

48 

AvonmoiBh 

9.13 

12 2 

225 

125 

Belfast 

12.37 

3 A 

1.00 

20 

carom 

8^8 

11 3. 

9.10 

11.6 

Devonport 

7.47 

58 

789 

58 

Dover 

12.38 

62 

1.00 

68 

Faknotdh 

7.17 

48 

729 

21 

Glasgow 

nrawtOi 

Z1G 

133 

48 

38 

3.10 

1.51 

38 

3-8 

ftojrtmad 

8.10 

7.1 

1222 

240 

22 
7 JO 

Uftacoote 

7.57 

8.6 

212 

88 

Leith 

4-26 

58 

483 

58 

Uvetpool 

1287 

9.1 

1.17 

88 

Lowestoft 

11.13 

24 



Margate 

1-57 

4.5 

208 

48 

MMoro Haven 

8.13 

S6 

228 

68 

Newquay 

7.03 

6.6 

7.16 

68 

Oban 

788 

27 

781 

29 . 

Penzance 

6.45 

21 

688 

54 

Portland 

9.12 

18 

9.16 . 

21 

Portsmouth 

1.04 

48 

181 

44 

rfmitelran, 

anomm 

1281 

5.8 

121 

58 

Soettiampton 

12L33 

43 

1.04 

44 

Swansea 

820 

86 

8.33 

98 

Teas 

523 

52 

582 

-5.1 

WBoo^n-Nze 

1-36 

48 

1.48 

4.0 


Around Britain 


The pound 



AostrafaS 
Arabia Scb 
BrighxnFr 
Canada S 
Denmark Kr 
Finland Mfcfc 


Greece 
Hong Kong S 
behind Pt 
Kafr Lira 
Japan Yen 
Netbgrianda Gfd 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Esc 
Sooth Africa Rd 
Spain Pts 
Sweden Kr 
SwdxariaadR . 

USAS 

Yugoslavia Dnr 
Rates for small dvomiru&on bank notes 


089 10.14 

288 244 

1.54 1-47 

84540 59580 


bumss. 

Pew Price Index: 3858 

Londos The FTMex dosed down 32.1 

at 1233.7 


limes Portfolio Gold rate are as 

1 Times Portfolio Is free Purchase 
or The Times is not a condition or 
taking nan. 

2 Times Portfolio Ust co mp rises a 
gro up of public companies whose 
shares are listed on the Stock 
Exchange and dueled In The Timas 
Stack Enchants prices page. The 
companies comprising that fist will 
change from day to day. The Ust 
(which Is numbered 1 -44) Is divided 
mio four randomly distributed groups 

of II shares. Every Portfolio card 
contains two numbers from each 
group and each cart contains a 
unique Ml of numbers. 

3 Times portfolio “dividend' win be 
Uie figure m pence which represents 
Ihe optimum movement in prices (Le. 
the Largest tnersase or lowen ksuof a 
computation of etgtil (two from each 
randomly thstfibuiecigroup wimm the 
44 atiaras) of Ihe 44 shsrmwhich on 
any one day co mp r is e The Times 
portfolio I hi. 

4 The daily tUvMend vein be 
announced each day and the weekly 
oivWeKl win be announced each 
Saturday In The Timas. 

5 Times Portfolio Ust and detefb or 
! the daily or weekty dividend win also 

be a callable for inspection at the 
offices of The Times. 

6 If ihe overall price movement of 
more than one centenarian of shares 
eauals the dividend. Die prize will be 
equally divided among the claimants 
holding thane combinations at shares. 

7 All claims are sUbtect W scruUny 
before payment. Any Times Portfolio 
card that is defaced, lam Bored with or 
incorrectly primed hi any way will be 
declared void. 

8 Employees of News mternaaonai 
pie and ns subsidiaries and of 
Eumpnnl Croup Limited, (producers 
and distributors of the card) or 
members of their immediate famlHea 
are not allowed lo May Times 
Portfolio. 

9 All participants win Dr subiecl to 
these Buie*. Ail ImWiMom on i^ow 
to May" and “how to claim whether 

Wahed in The TilB CT.ar In TTmea 
portfolio cards will be deemed in be 
part of thee Ru les. T he Edi to r 
reserves the right lo amend the Rules. 

10 In any dispute. The Editor's 
. decision Is final and no eonoSpOn- 

denre wiu be enisred mio. 


II If for any reason The Tiroes 
Prices Page Is not puhUahed in the 
normal way Times Portfolio will be 
suspended ror mat day. 

Hw u play - Dafly OMdawt 

On each day your unique set of efahi 
numbers will repr esen t commercial 
and industrial shares published In The 
Times Portfolio list which will appear 
on the Stock Exchange Prices page. 

In the columns provided next to 
your shares note the price change i+ 
or -x in pence. « published in that 
day's Times. 

After listing the price changes of 
your right sharos for that day. add up 
all elghl share changes to give you 
your overall total plus or minus <+ or ■ 

J- 

Check your overall total against The 
Times Portfolio dividend published an 
ihe Stock Exchange Prices page. 

If your overall total matches The 
Times Portfolio dividend you have 
won outright or a share of the total 
prize money staled for that day and 
must claim your prize as instructed 
below. 


Outlook for tomorrow : drier with 
showers dying out Rather cool and 
windy. 


Sun r ises : Sunset* 

533 *m 839 pm 


735 Ml 9.43 pm 

first Quarter August 13 


Sun Rain 
hrs in 

EAST COAST 
Scarboro 10.1 .03 
BrirOngton 104 .02 
Cromer 73 .08 
L ow aateW 9.6 33 
Cte cl ow 13.7 . 

Margate x 
SOOTH COAST 
Foicestooe 123 - 

f| go »tflt x 


12.1 - 

4.1 

13.1 - 

12.1 - 
x 

11.7 - 

10.6 - 
93 - 

113 - 

93 32 
7.7 - 

73 - 

73 - 

3.1 - 
45 32 

135 - 

9.0 .07 


Worthing 

UBWnM 

Bognorfl 

Southern* 

Samfcmn 

Sfunhfln 

Bote teW i 

Poole 

Swanage 

Weymouth 

Exmeath 

Targnmouth 


19 66 sunny 

20 68 tuny 

20 68 sunny 

21 70 sunny 
21 70 sumy 
20 68 bright 

18 64 suiny 

18 64 sumy 

18 84 sunny 
16 64 sunny 

18 64 sunny 

19 68 sunny 


SunRam Max 

hrs Si C F 

Mr acote be x - 19 66 

53 33 17 63 
OjAwynBay x 

Mwcom tw 104 36 16 61 

Dou0a» 53 32 IS 59 

ENGLAND AND WALES 


London 11.1 
BTmAfepI 93 


11.1 - 21 70 

l 9-0 * 20 68 

6.8 .11 19 66 

. &2 38 19 86 

73 - 18 61 


CardM _ _ 

asra* li i ii & 

103 :« le 68 
f fctf-n-T yna 6.6 .02 19 66 

Gn«0 10.1 37 16 61 

SCOTLAND 

FHSrin te m u ir 43 .15 15 59 

fiWte** 53 .02 18 B1 


Lighting-op time 

Newquay 


I n n rton 9.09 pm n 534am 
Bristol 9.1 B pm to 5.14 am 
Ecfiofatrgh 938 pm » 530 am 
Manchester 9.24 pm to 836 sm 
P atuaw e 938 pm to 531 am 


18 84 bright 
18 84 dSidy 


TjlW 63 - 

^omoiray 53 .04 

iS** 93 - 

Ktetora 04 34 

ggEra S 

EdtewBk 23 .11 

NORTHERN IRELAND 
as .19 


Monday- 

Portfooo 


ta pin - Weekly Dtrideod 

■Saturday record your daily 


Yesterday 


Add these together’ to determine 
your weekly Portfolio total. 

If your total matches the published 
weekly dividend figure you have won 
outright Or a share of the prize money 
stated for that week, and must daira 
your prize as instructed below. 

T otophone Tba°7lMS 

fen OZH-snn between la jSten and 
.t.TStxM, eo the day yam overao total 
auteur The Then PuHTuBu Phrirtonti 
Me states can be ampted amshJa thau 
hours. 

You mint have your card with you 
when you telephone. 

If you 'are unable to re l athone 
someone else can claim on your behalf 
but they must have your card and call 
The Times Portfolio claims line 
between the stipulated times. 

No responsibility can be accepted 
for failure to contact me culms office 
for any reason within the stated 
hours. 

The above instructions are ap- 
pttcsble lo both daily and weekly 
dividend claims. 


Temperatures at midday yesterday: c, 
rfout f. fair: r. rain; s. sut. 

C F CF 

Belfast c 1661 Quaraeey rl763 
B’ltnahan r 1886 ktnnws* f 1661 
Badraool H661 Jersey c2170 
Bristol r 1559 London a 32 72 
Cardiff c 1783 HracMW e 1661 
Etfftbwgh e 1457 New cas tle r 1559 
Glasgow e 1355 Rtddsmy C 1457 


Our address 


_ Information for inclusion In The 
Times Information servi ce should be 
sent lo.The Editor, i 1 IS. The Times. 
PO Box 7. 1 Virginia Street. London. 
El 


NEWSPAPERS .LIMITED. 
Printed ' 


London Et 9XN. Thursday August 7. 
^Re^modasanewspapm-at 


MmQAn e. doud: d, drizzto: 

see. ;is?g%s 

1 30 asSrto^ 
AM s 30 88 DiNr 


Abroad 

f - fak; *9. fe* t. rain: 

lisas? 


» 22 72 Dubrovnik 
Faro 

H *hratn s 37 99 (T orence 
****- .1 3i 88 FflmkS 
Barreto, s 2S 82 Punch* 

I 30 B6 Geneva 
Belgrade tti 24 75 Gtalnr 
gw*" , s 21 70 HeteMd 

jar 1 § R SSL, 

a 28 82 Istanbul 
Bodtoa Jaddtei 

SSf 


Bmtepst c 22 72 Karachi 
BMu' c 13 55 LPatoia* 
Cato s 33 si Lisbon 
craw Locarno 

CJtetwa a a 77 LAngator 
CMeage* c 27 81 Luxate 
Ch 1 church s 9 48 fEdrid* 


r 14 S7 
s 33 91 
S 25 77 
S 33 91 
» 25 77 
» 23 73 
■ 23 73 
8 25 77 
C 16 61 

c 30 66 

8 24 73 
s 29 84 
a 37 99 
3 18 68 
i 32 90 
8 24 75 
a 27 81 
8 29 B4 
* 23 73 
8 24 75 
8 31 88 


■Mfrnw 
Mateo C* 
Miami- 


Mimb bw 

Muntoh 

Nairobi 


*• *w: sn. mow; t thunder. 

c f c F 

J S If 2 0 " s 30 86 
8 27 81 fTteilimu s a 77 

c . J? *5 Santtago* a 18 61 

IJsisr 

.UR 

Tangter g 28 82 
I"*-**' 8 30 86 

I S 3 26 79 

* 35 ® i«*yo ■ 32 90 

* ® S Toronto- f 26 79 

* 19 66 7iiata t 32 90 

5 ® XMaoda s 30 H 

* S H X"*'*"' 8 20 88 

I H £ V **» s 29 84 
! ?? g y*te * 25 77 

6 11 58 * 23 2 

. _ yrifto 1 a 31 89 

! SW"" i ii s 


c 28 82 
IBM 
f 31 88 
8 22 72 


• 28 82 
S 90 86 
3 26 79 
a 32 90 
f 26 79 
8 32 90 
a 30 86 



U‘3’ 1 

ijilltf 


"S' -V 






• v 4 =-I L 


' i-'-i 







17 



it Coy 






BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


SPORT 28 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 31 


THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 



Executive Editor 
'Kenneth Fleet 


STOCK MARKET 

FT 30 Share 

1233.7 (—32.1 ) . 

FT- SE.100 
1540.4? (-21 2) ’ 



(-0.02). 

THE POUND 

US Dollar 

t.4775 (-0.0055) 

W German mark 

3.0725 (-0.0292) 

Trade-weighted 

71 .3 (-0.5) 



r' 


tilt* tlii !;:• i, 








& 


\rn* 


»inl Hi 


»*»■ 


Ten leave 

I Quilter 

™ Quilter Goodison. the 
stockbroking firm headed by 
the Stock Exchange’s chair- 
man, Sir Nicholas Goodison. 
yesterday lost 10 members of 
its international division to 
ARK Securities, a new firm set 
up to act as agent for BNP. 

. BNP, a subsidiary of 
Banque NationaJe de Paris, is 
an exempt dealer, meaning it 
only has corporate clients. 

At least four other stock- 
brokers from different firms 
will be joining ARK. The 
defection follows the recent 
departure of Quilter’s 
pharmaceuticals team to Mor- 
gan Grenfell and is one of the 
largest mass walk-outs so far 
in the reshuffle in the City 

Trust battle 

Barclays de Zoete Wedd has 
launched a campaign for con- 
trol of the Philip Hill Invest- 
ment Trust. BZW, which 
speaks for 56 per cent of the 
shareholders, is unhai 
about the performance 01 
trust 

GKN rises 

GKN, the automotive 
components manufacturer, 
v,5 «;t lifted pretax profits from 
* a ^ £®.5 million to £745 million 
in the -year -to June 30. 
Turnover feH from £1:155 
billion to £.1.089 billion and 
the interim dividend is up 
' - - from 45p to 5p. . 

Z—, Jr - Tempos, page 18 

elosesrout 

. Coca-Cola, the «)ft drink 
! pant, has cancelled an agree- 
ment to buy Dr Pepper Com- 
9&ny from Forstmann little 
V] for $470 million (£317 mfl- 
' / lion) after a Federal judge last 
/ja week blocked the proposed 

II • acquisition. 

; Healthy profit 

• Smith* Nephew, the medi- 
cal and health care group, 
lifted interim pretax profits by 
22 per cent to £37 million. 
Turnover rose by 4 percent to 

— * £212 million and the dividend 
‘‘ * was increased by 1-Ip to 6.8p 
bet. Tempos, page 18 

Flying chance 

* European Helicopter ln- 
- . dustries, a consortium 

comprising Britain's Westland 
; dnd the Italian company. Au- 
. gusta, is one of four compa- 
• dies being considered to 
■_ supply a new helicopter for the 
;• 2 Canadian armed forces. 

Charter view 

Charter Consolidated, the 
mining equipment and indus- 
. trial group, reassured 
•; shareholders that the com- 
pany would not be seriously 
affected by sanctions on the 
' South African government. 

Shares halted 

FII Group's shares were 
' ' suspended yesterday, pending 
H a possible takeover bid by an 
f imlist^Nrom^n^j 



, 18 Fortipn Exch 19 

Co News 18 Traded Opts 1 ? 
Won Street 18 Unit Trnsts 20 
Ctauttat 19 Commodities 20 
Stock Motto 19 USM Prices 20 
Mooey Mrkts 19 Share Pits 21 




funds US 
record 
placing 


Boots, the retail chemist 
and pharmaceuticals group, 
yesterday unveiled a S555 
million (£375 million) aOr 

J uisrtian in the United States, 
t has bought the Flint di- 
vision of Baxter Travenol 
Laboratories and will -pay for 

the acquisition with a record 
£377.6 million vendor placing 
of 1842 million shares. 

The deal also breaks new 
ground in that it offers or- 
dinary shareholders the right 
to . subscribe for all the shares 
on a m inim um one-for-fbur 
basis. 

The previous record vendor 
placing was Dee Corporation’s 
£350 million issue last June, 
which had a 75* per cent 
clawback facility for ordinary 
shareholders. 

The news of the acquisition 
and placing started to leak into 
the stock- market on Monday, 
depressing the Boots share 
price from 253p to a dosing 
price yesterday of 2 13p, down 
9p on the day. The new shares 
are priced at 20Sp and will 
represent 20 -per cent of the 
enlarged share capital. 

The Stock Exchange is look- 
ing into the leak, although h is 
not initiating a full investiga- 
tion. Mr Peter Cadbury, of 
Morgan Grenfell which is 
acting for Boots,, said: “Any 
leak is regrettable, but bearing 
in mind the large number of 
people involved, it is not 
totally surprising.’' Negotia- 
tions for the purchase have 
been under way since the end 
of June. 


By Alison Eadie 

Flint is a manufacturer and 
distributor of prescription 
pharmaceuticals and is heavi- 
ly dependent on Synthrold, a 
drug treating thyroid de- 
ficiency, which accounted for 
83 per cent of sales last year. 

Although the drug has not 
been protected by patent for 
many years, il bad 74 per cent 
of the American synthetic 
thyroid replacement market 
last year. 

Boots is confident that 
Synlhroid will preserve its 
pre-eminence because it is 
cheap, costing patients about 
$50 a year. There is still plenty 
of scope for price increases in 
America, Boots said, but very 
limited scope for selling the 
drug outside the US. 

Flint's sales, profits and 
margins have been rising 
strongly over the past five 
years to reach pretax profits of 
$33. 1 million last year on sales 
of $53.6 million. In the first 
four months of this year, 
pretax profits were $15 mil- 
lion and net margins widened 
to 70 per cent. 

Flint's profits before tax this 
year should rise to around $50 
million with the benefit of 
savings from the integration 
with Boots. Although there 
will be some earnings dilution 
for Bools this year, it should 
be eliminated by next year. 

Mr Robert Gunn, the Boots 
chairman, said yesterday that 
the acquisition fitted Boots' 
strategy of expanding in the 
United States in pharmaceuti- 
cals. Boots' own products 


have been sold in America 
under licence through Up- 
john, which has lost Boots a 
large slice of the profits. 

ft wflj now combine its own 
sales force with that of Flint to 
sell both companies' products. 
The combined sales force of 
300 will have to be expanded 
to 350, the level at which 
Boots believes new products 
can be launched in the US. 

.Boots has spent heavily on 
research in the Uni tied States 
in recent years and expects 
most of the new products to 
come from its stable. 

A vendor placing was cho- 
sen as the best method of 
raising the money for . the 
acquisition, because the ven- 
dors wanted a quick sale. 
Rights issues and vendor 
rights issues take up to three 
weeks longer to complete. 

A conventional rights issue 
for cash was not possible 
because of the high level of 
goodwill Flint's net assets are 
$12.8 million. Under the ven- 
dor placing, the goodwill can 
be written off against the share 
premium account. 

Despite appalling stock 
market conditions, the new 
shares were conditionally 
placed with institutions, who 
will take them up if the mass 
of shareholders do not sub- 
scribe. 

The investor protection 
committees of investing in- 
stitutions insisted on the high 
dawback level of the issue. 
They also forced Dee in June 
to increase its clawback 


Stockley 
profits 
up 290% 

By Jnditft Hnnttey 
Commercial Property 

. ■; Correspondent ■ . 

Stockley, the property com- 
pany set up in 1983 by Mr 
Elliot Bernerd, Mr Jacob 
Rothschild and Mr Stuart 
Upton, has increased its pre- 
tax profits for flie half-year to 
May 31 by 290 per cent to 
£4.45 million. 

The figure includes rents 
from the £61-5 million ac- 
quisition of the European 
Femes portfolio in May 1985 
as well as £4.8 million profits 
from its 265 per cent stake in 
Stock Conversion, the prop- 
erty company. 

The shares were sold to the 
Peninsular and Oriental 
Steam Navigation Company 
for £T00 million following 
P&O’s bid for Stock 
Conversion. 

The money is being used to. 
partly repay £66 million debt 
and the rest wjll be placed in 
short-term investments. 
Stockley still has a commer- 
cial paper facility worth £100 
million left untapped. 

The second half figures will 
show an extraordinary gain of 
£13.4 million from the Stock 
Conversion sale. 

The company has a 4.5 
million sq ft development 
programme. Stockley is part of 
the consortium redeveloping 
Paternoster Square in the 
Square Mile, which was pur- 
chased for £66.25 million net. 
And it is also developing the 
2_5 million sq ft SlockJey Park 
business park near Heathrow 
airport, where the first lettings 
have been agreed. 

Stockley is still not paying a 
dividend but says this may 
change at the year end. Earn- 
ings per share have risen from 
Q.98p to f.Q2p. 


Ex-Thorn chief to 
head Oceonics 


By Alison Eadie 


• if’ 




MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 




New York 

Dow Jones 
Tokyo 
Nikkei Dow 
Hong Kong: 
Hi 


1769.97 (-7.03)* 


— 17353.48 (-61 50) 



- &*■ 

I «• 

» ^ 
t -« 

i >* 


■' Commerzbank 
Br uss e ls: 

-' General — 


... 18940 (+28.7) 


769.70 (+63.65) 
37&8 (+1.0) 


: . tv 


Parts: CAC 
ZUlidl: 

SKA General 487.70 (+3.0) 

London dosing prices Page 21 


INTEREST RATES 


to* 

(to 


m 

* 

2 


Mr 

t 




■r*-" 

4 


Air 

^ 


_. r 

M... 


I. << 

-IV 

I 

I 

s? 


London: 

Sank Base: 10% 

. 3-month Interbank 9 ,6 i&-9 l3 i«% 
3-month eligible bffls:9tt-9 ll, a3% 

‘ irate 


ugingi 


Prime Rate 6%* 

Federal Funds (Pu* . 

3-month Treasury Bflts 5.73-6.71* 
30-year bonds 98' 14-66 V 


CURRENCIES 

London: NewYoric 

£61.4775 &S1-48Q5* 

£ DM3 0725 S: DM2.0800* 

£. SwFr2.4719 & index: 111.0 

E: FFr9.9438 

£: Yert227,76 ECU CO 6841 56 

£ bvtor.71.3 SDR £0807382 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 

Sidney Banks 
WSL 


325p(+20p> 



Kteinwort' 
Property Secs. ... 
OJ. Alarms 


FALLS: 

GKN 290p(- 

Lucas 513p (-1 

Hawker Sidd. 491p(-2 

Vickers 40lp(-12p) 

n Group 495p -IDpj 

A6._ 209p(-13pj 

Boots : 21 3p f-9p) 

Ptassey ]98p f-8p) 

GK 


insurance 


R 
B. 

Rcxflme 
Saatchi 


r 


S93p| 
3850 j 
§40p 


General Accident 789p [-23pj 


GOLD 


London Fixing: 

AM $36035 pn> 
close $360,75-361 JS (£244.00- . 
244.50) 

NewYortr. 

Comex $36030-361 -80- 


NORTH SEA OIL 


Brent (Sept) pm$i3^0W*{$14,05) 
• Denotes latest trading price 


Mr Peter Laister, chairman 
and chief executive of Thorn 
EMI until July last year, has 
been appointed chairman of 
Oceonics, the troubled marine 
electronics and information 
technology group. 

Oceonics yesterday an- 
nounced a pretax loss of £8.7 
million hi the year to March 
31, compared with a £3 mil- 
lion profit the previous year. It 
was hit hard by the downturn 
onsh 


offshore survey company 
which has now been sold. 

The company has reduced 
its exposure to the offsbdre 
industry. Of the £7225 million 
operating loss, £158 million 
resulted from now -sold or 
discontinued businesses. 

The loss of the continuing 
businesses contained a £15 
million provision for surplus 
equipment and a high propor- 
tion of central costs. 


m oil-related offshore business 
and incurred losses of more slashed by the 
than £3 million at Comapi, the 



Peter Laister: He 
turn to profits in l! 


Group borrowings were 
‘ ! sale of defence 
businesses, which produced 
an extraordinary profit of £5.2 
million. A return to profit in 
the current year is considered 
most nnfikely, but the com- 
pany hopes to be bade in the 
black in 1 987-88. No dividend 
is being paid. 

Mr Laister said yesterday 
that Oceonics’ problems were 
not over, but had been 
contained. 

He said his appointment 
would relieve the board and 
particularly Mr Bob Aird, who 
now becomes deputy chair- 
man and chief executive, of 
externa! pressures and allow 
them to concentrate on growth 
opportunities. 

Orconics shares fell 3p to 1 8p. 


Memcom alters terms 


By Onr City Staff 


Memcom International 
Holdings, the troubled dec- 
ironic filing system manufac- 
turer quoted on the Unlisted 
Securities Market, has been 
forced to change the terms of a 
cash call to shareholders after 
a collapse in its share price 
and a worsening trading 
performance. 

Memcom, which needed 
£2.3 million to help cut its 
borrowings, planned a rights 
issue of oidinary and loan 
stock at 40p a share. But the 
market price of the existing 
shares has fallen sharply and 
the terms are being revised to 
30p. 


Badly hit by the collapse of 
its Middle East markets, 
Memcom has revealed that 
last year's loss topped £2.8 
million compared with a pre- 
vious profit of £1 million. The 
board says the level of orders 
outstanding continues to be 
insufficient to enable it to 
forecast a return to profit this 
year. 

The rights issue is being 
underwritten by two compa- 
nies which have close trading 
ties with Memcom. With the 
share price now at 23p — 
compared with a one-time 
high of3l 0p — the new shares 
are likely to be left in the 
hands of the underwriter's. 





Report calls 
for merger 
of System X 


By Teresa Poole 


Derek Roberts: Bid decision harmful to UK economy 
because it would limit competitiveness abroad. 


RHM stake buyer 
may join board 


By Cliff Feltham 


Ranks Hovis McDougall, 
the British bakery group, may 
offer a seat on the board to its 
newest shareholder, Good- 
man Fielder, Australia's larg- 
est food business. 

Last week Goodman 
Fielder picked up a strategic 
14.6 per cent shareholding in 
Ranks at a cost of £107 
million, sparking off specular 
tion that it was preparing to 
launch a full-scale bid. 

Bui yesterday Mr Fat Good- 
man, the chairman of Good- 
man Fielder, emerged from a 
116-hour, meeting with Sir 
Peter Reynolds, the Ranks, 
chairman^ and - Mr Stanley 
Metcalfe, the chief executive, 
and said: “1 think they under- 
stand the commercial realities 
of the situation. I haven’t 
directly asked for a -board- 
room seat but we need to take 


the best advantage of our 
investment in their business 
and to do that you need to 
exercise some influence at the 
top. I am sure they understand 
the position. They are going 
away to think about the whole 
relationship." 

A Ranks spokesman said: 
“There was an exchange of 
views. We cannot go further 
than that" 

Mr Goodman, who said he 
. had no plans to make a bid for 
Ranks, said: “I had a courte- 
ous reception which I had 
expected. We agreed on a 
number of points and had a lot 
-in common." 

Mr Goodman is understood 
to have argued that close 
trading ties between the two 
companies could, stimulate 
trade in the European Eco- 
nomic Community. 


The General Electric 
Company’s proposed £1.2 bil- 
lion takeover of Plessey was 
blocked yesterday by Mr Paul 
Channon. the Trade and In- 
dustry Secretary, who ac- 
cepted in full the majority 
recommendation of the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission that the ac- 
quisition would be against the 
public interest 

However, the MMC report 
also recognized that there 
would be considerable cost 
advantages from the 
rationalization of the two 
companies' System X digital 
telephone exchange busi- 
nesses and that these benefits 
could be obtained without a 
full merger of the two 
companies. 

It said rationalization 
would give better opportu- 
nities for exports and would 
improve the prospect of 
financing the development of 
ftnure exchange systems. 

The majority view con- 
cluded that the benefits of a 
merger to the System X 
business would not outweigh 
the adverse effects in other 
market areas and the loss of 
competition for defence elec- 
tronic equipment. 

Mr Derek Roberts, joint 
deputy managing director at 
GEG said the derision was 
harmful to the British econ- 
omy because it would inhibit 
the formation of a company 
better able to compete in 
world markets for tele- 
communications and 
electronics. 

The Commission's report 
suggests that, even without a 
takeover, competitive pres- 
sures in the market for ex- 
changes would lead either to a 
sale by GEC or Plessey of its 
System X interests to the 
other, the setting up .of a 
jointly owned company, or the 
rationalization of both 
companies' interests accord- 
ing to a joint plan. 

But the prospect of im- 
minent agreement seemed re- 
mote yesterday with neither 
.company interested in selling 
its stake in System X. Mr 
James Prior, GECs chairman 
said: The combination of 
GECs and Picssey's, public 
switching, and ' associated 
transmission businesses 


would have been achieved had 
GECs bid been successful but 
in the present circumstances, 
GEC can do no more than 
express its willingness to ac- 
quire Plessey's activities in 
this area if terms can be 
agreed." He said he regretted 
Mr Channon's decision. 

Plessey was equally forth- 
right about its future involve- 
ment in System X. A 
spokesman said: "We would 
be happy to lake over GECs 
System X interests, if the price 
is right. But that depends on 
GEC. 

“We have been trying to get 
an agreement on System X 
since 1982. We shall continue 
to pursue a sensible agreement 
which must reflect Plessey's 
leadership of System X 
development" 

GEC had argued that its 
merger with Plessey would 
bring significant benefits to 
Britain through improved 
competitiveness abroad. 

But the majority report 
found that, except in the case 
of System X. it could not see 
that there would be benefits as 
a result of the increased size of 
the merged company which 
might not be available to the 
two companies separately. 

h also agreed with the 
Ministry of Defence that a 
takeover would appreciably 
diminish existing and poten- 
tial competition in many areas 
of defence electronics where 
payments to GEC and Plessey 
bst year amounted to £1.7 
billion. 

This would lead to in- 
creased costs - estimated at 
up to £840 million over ten 
years by the MoD — and 
reduce the possibility of tech- 
nical innovative choice as a 
joint company would be un- 
likely to pursue two compet- 
ing lines of research. The 
MMC also believed that a 
takeover would possibly re- 
duce the total amount of 
business coming into the UK 
because the number of compa- 
nies available ' for inter- 
national collaboration would 
be one less. 

In a weak stock market, 
GECs shares yesterday fell 6p 
to 190pand PJessey Jost8pto. 
I98p. 

Kenneth Fleet, page 19 


Bestobell 
‘on course 
for f 9.8m’ 

By Clare Dobie 

Bestobell, which is fighting 
off an unwanted bid from 
Meggitt Holdings, launched a 
strong defence yesterday, 
forecasting nearly doubled 
profits of not less than £9.8 
million for the year to Decem- 
ber 31. 

Mr David Ingman, the 
chairman of Bestobell. said 
Meggitt's bid failed to rec- 
ognize the recovery taking 
place and the effect of recent 
management changes. He ar- 
gued that Meggitt’s manage- 
ment structure was unsuited 
to Bestobell's international 
spread of businesses and that 
there was little overlap. 

The defence document, re- 
leased yesterday, also revealed 
doubled interim profits of £4.6 
million before tax and extraor- 
dinary charges of £809,000, 
The full-year forecast of 
£9.8 million is about £25 
million higher than analysts 
had been expecting for the 
current year and compares 
with a profit of £5. 1 million 
reported for 1985. 

Meggitt is offering four 
shares for every one in 
Bestobell. valuing each share 
at 520p with Meggitt at I30p, 
down 2p yesterday. There is a 
cash, alternative valuing each 
share at 500p. 

BestobelTs shares fell 2p to 
507p yesterday. 


Trusts poised for change 


A comprehensive review of 
the regulation and content of 
unit mists was published by 
the Government yesterday in 
a move which wfl] bring 
considerable changes to the 
way in which trusts are mar- 
keted and the nature of their 
underlying investments. 

The review, in the form of a 
consultative document pub- 
lished by the Department of 
Trade and Industry was de- 
scribed by the Unit Trust 
Association as a milestone In 
the industry's history, 
representing the first time that 
all the regulations concerning 
unit trusts bad been published 
in one documenL 


By Lawrence Lever 

The document proposes the 
introduction of four new types 
of unit trust, broadening the 
limits on existing investments 
and giving trusts greater 
flexibility to hedge against 
currency fluctuations. The 
principal proposed changes 
include: 

• Doubling the limit for 
investment in unquoted 
companies from 5 to 10 per 
cent, allowing unit trusts 
broader use of traded options 
and, for the first time, to use 
financial futures. 

• Allowing unit trusts, also 
for the first time, to engage in 
a limited ammount of gearing. 
Funds will be allowed to 


borrow up to lOpercentotthe 
value of the fund. 

• The liquidation of all unit 
trusts below £1 million in size. 
According to UTA estimates 
there are at present about 50 
unit trusts in this category. 

• Introducing four new types 
of unit trusts, namely money 
market, property, commodity 
and mixed trusts, the latter 
having the facility to invest in 
a number of different sectors. 

• Replacing the present sys- 
tem of quoting bid and oner 
prices for unit trusts with a 
mid market price quote, with 
disclosure of the charges 

• Allowing unit trusts to go 
liquid where necessary. 


Demand for executives falls 22% 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


Demand for executives in 
Britain is decreasing overall, 
with a decline of 22 per cent in 
the second quarter of this year, 
compared with the same pe- 
riod last yea r. The decline is in 
energy-related industries, but 
demand is still substantially 
down in the high technology 
sector. 

There is only one dear 
exception to the tren± the 
surge in recruitment asso- 
ciated with the big bang. - 

This emerged yesterday 
from the latest quarterly sur- 
vey by HAY-MSL, the 
management consultants 
whose index has measured 


executive demand since 1959. 

There has been a steady 
slide in demand over the past 
12 months, but some sectors 
are considerably down. 
Appointments in research, de- 
sign and development in the 
second quarter slumped 43 
per cent on annual compari- 
son, while production 
appointments slid 37 per cent 

Sales and marketing recruit- 
ment eased by 15 per cent and 
general management by 11 per 
cenL In computers there was 
an 8 per cent dedine. 

But in accounting and fi- 
nance there was a marginal 
drop of 2 per cent on an 


Big hopes for new BAe 
turbo-prop airliner 

By Edward Townsend, Industrial Correspondent 


Britain’s new £170 million 
propellor driven airliner yes- 
terday made its maiden flight 
amid renewed speculation 
that the Russians may build 
up. to 800 of the aircraft under 
licence. 

The 72-seater plane, called 
the advanoed turbo prop 
(ATP) is claimed by British 
Aerospace to be one of the 
most economical short-haul 
airliners in the world. It has 
taken two years to develop 
and marks another milestone 
in the UK production of turbo 
prop airliners that began in the 
early 1 950s with the Viscount 

As the aircraft took off from 
BAEs Woodford factory near 
Manchester in driving rain, 
and landed two Hours later in 
a 30 mph crosswind. Sir 
Austin Pearce, chairman of 


BAE, confirmed that negotia- 
tions were proceeding with the 
Soviet Union but he declined 
to put a time scale on the 
discussions. 

The prospect of a deal with 
the Russians, who could build 
up to £7 billion worth of 
ATPs, For use on internal 
flights, was first revealed last 
September but now appears to 
be improving. BAE could earn 
£35 million in licence fees 
from the deaL which would 
cover 20 per cent of develop- 
ment costs. 

The Department of Trade 
and Industry' has raised no 
objections to the licence deal, 
and BAE says that the Soviet 
Union would gain no tech- 
nological advantage. 

Following the American 
embargo on sales of technol- 

f 


ogy to the Russians, one 
stumbling block may be the 
20-25 per cent US content of 
the ATP. The aircraft is 
powered by Pratt &. Wbitney 
engines, fitted with new high 
technology six blade propel- 
lers designed and manufac- 
tured by BAE in association 
with the Hamilton Standard 
division of Pratt's parent com- 
pany. United Technologies. 
But privately BAE executives 
are hoping that improving 
US/USSR rclauons could 
make the deal possible. 

Sir Austin said of the Rus- 
sian talks:* 4 !! is a slow process: 
it always is and it could lake 
years to achieve." 

If it is successful, the Soviet 
deal would mark the first 
major civil aircraft contract 
with the West for 40 years. 


annual comparison. This was 
because demand had been 
sustained by competition for 
skilled financial management, 
especially in the City, said Mr 
Scott Anderson, MSL Group 
chairman. 

Executive recruitment in 
the energy-related industries, 
especially oil. is now running 
at less than a third of the level 
in the second quarter of last 
year. In the first quarter of this 
year recruitment had dropped 
by nearly a half on annual 
comparison. 

Executive demand in the 
high technology sector saw a 
decline of more than 60 per 
cent last year. 


Permission has been granted by the Council of The Slock Exchange to deal in the Unlisted Securities 
Market of The Suck Exchange in the undermentioned securities. It is emphasised that no application 
has been made for these securities to be admitted to listing. 

AmBrit International PLC 

• (name changed from Steaua Romana PLC on 1 1th July 1980) 

Registered in England No 1 70788 

Issue of 

£2,867,367 of 9 per cent. Convertible 
Unsecured Loan Stock 1996 at par 

by way of rights to holders of Ordinary (Restricted Voting) Shares of 25p each on the register of 
members on 22nd July, 1986. 

Details of the above securities are contained in the new issue cards circulated in the Betel Unlisted 
Securities Market Service. 

Copies of the Circular relating to the issue may be obtained from the addresses below up to 28th 
August 1986 and also, for collection only, from the Company Announcements Office. The Stock 
Exchange. London EC2 during the two business days following the date of publication of this notice. 


AmBrit International PLC 
34 Park Street. 

London W1Y3PF 


Henderson Crosthwaite & Co. 
194/200 Bishopsgaie, 

London EC2M 4LL 


7th August, 1986 





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18 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


WALL STREET 


New York (Agencies) - erased much of the rally 
Shares retreated ia early (rad- triggered by stronger oil 
mg yesterday, main taming stocks. 

Tuesday's late decline which Oils fell on profit-taking. 


Aug Augj 

5 4 


AMR 4911 

ASA 3IS 

aim Signal 40% 
AttfldStre 40* 

AttsCttimrs 
Alcoa 
Anas Inc 
Atn’rOa Hs . . 

Am Brands StS 

Am Can 82% 


354 

33% 

10 % 

18% 


AfliCynm'd 
lEfPwr 


78'/. 

28% 


3% 

37% 

23% 

62% 

7% 

11 % 


Am 

Am Express 58% 
Am Home 89% 
Am Moms 
AmSt'nrd 
AmTeieph 
Amoco 
Annco Steel 
Asarco 
Ashland OH 54% 
AtRicnfiaKl 51% 
Avon Prods 32% 

Bkns TstNY 47 U 
Bankamer 13% 
BKofBsmn 38% 
Bank of NY 63 
Beth Steel 7 

feeclscde 5Z% 
BrtJen 46 

Bg Warner 33 
Bnst Myers 8055 
BP 36% 

Bratton M 35% 
Bratton Ntn 51% 
66 % 

. . Sp 63% 
Can Pacific 10% 
Caterpfler 45% 
Celanese 211% 
Central SW 33 
ChampKin 23% 
Chase Man 40% 
ChmSkNY 45% 
Chevron 
Chrysler 


Oartcl 
Coca Cola 


40 

37 
54 
16% 

38 
39% 

129% 
ClmttaGas 38'% 
Cmb'tnEng 29 
Comwtth Ed 31 
Consuls 49 
Cn Nat Gas 29% 
Cons Power 11% 
CnMOate 20% 
ConwngGI 
CPC inn 
Crane 
Cm Zener 


58% 
68 % 
29% 
36’/. 
Dart & Kraft 60 


21 % 

42 

16% 


46 

51% 

15% 


Deere 
Delta Air 
Detroit Ed 
Digital Eq 
Disney 
Dow Cham 
Dresser Ind 
Duke Power 48% 
DuPont 77% 

Eastern Av 8% 

Estm Kodak 55% 
Eaton Corp 66% 
Emerson B 79% 
Exxon Corp 64% 
Fed Dpt Sts 79% 


51 

31% 

38% 

39% 

3% 

33% 

11 

18% 
91% 
81 % 
78% 
29% 
58% 
' 89 
3 
37 
24 
59% 
7 % 
11% 
54 % 
48% 
33% 

46 % 

12% 

37 

62% 

7 

59% 
52% 
45% 
33 
80% 
34% 
34% 
47% 
66 % 
62% 
10 
45% 
211 K 
33 
23% 
38% 
44% 
38% 
36% 
52% 
16% 
38% 
40 

128 % 

38% 

29 

31 

48% 

29% 

11 % 

20 % 

58% 

69 

29% 

37% 

59% 

21 % 

41% 

16% 

90% 

47 

52% 

15% 

48% 

74% 

8 % 

56% 

65% 

80 

61% 

79% 


Aug Aug 
5 ^ 


STTSf nsrSCSaSHEBn 


Firestone 
Fst Chicago 
Fsf fntBncp 
FstPermC 
Ford 

FTWadwa 
GAFQorp 
GTE Carp 
Gen Corp 
GenD/mcs 
Gen Electric 
Gen f rat 
Gen Mb 
Gen Motors 
GnPblltny 

Geneses 
Georgia P« 

Goodrich 
Goodyear 
Gould be 
Grace 
QAttfiTac 

Gfftnd 
GrumanCor 
QutTS West 
Heinz HJ. 
Hercules 
HTett-Ptod 
HoneyweB 
PC bos 

IBM 
INCO 
Int Paper 
ira Terra 

t rying Sank 

Jhnsn&Jhn 
Ksfsar Alum 

Kerr McGee 

KmbtyChK 
KMart 
Kroger 
LTvTCorp 
Utton 
Lockheed 
Sirs 
Man timer 
ManvffleCp 
Maoco 
WnmMM 
Mrt Marietta 
Masco 
McDonalds 
McDonnal 
Mead 
Merck 
MbsteMra 
MoMOl 
Monsanto 
Morgan .IP. 
Motorola 
NCR Corp 
NLbdstrs 
Nat Distirs 
Nat Med Em 

NatSmcndt 

Norfolk Sth 

NWBancrp 

OcddntPW 

Ooden 

oScorp 

Owens-B 

Pac Gas El 

Pan Am 

Penney J.C. 

PennzoB 

Pepisco 

TkiBBc 


24 % 

29 
61% 

7% 

55% 

41% 

30 

55 
66 % 
71% 
73% 
18% 
88 % 
69% 
22 

3% 

30% 

43% 

37% 

31% 

16% 

49% 

25 

30% 

23% 

63% 

45% 

50* 

39% 

64% 

24% 

56 ■ 
16% 

131% 

10% 

61% 

51 

50 % 

67% 

14 % 

27% 

84% 

51% 

63% 

2 % 

75% 

48 % 

23% 

44% 

2 % 

45% 

47% 

44 

29% 

62 % 

80% 

48% 

107- 

109 % 

33 

65% 

86 % 

37% 

49% 

3% 

31% 

21 % 

9 

75% 


24 % 

28% 

60% 

7 

54% 

42 

31% 

55 

66 % 

71% 

73 

18% 

90% 

89% 

22 % 

3% 

30% 

44% 

36% 

30% 

16% 

48% 

25% 

30% 

23% 

63% 

45% 

51% 

38% 

64 

24 % 

55% 

16 

131% 

10 % 

63% 

51% 

49% 

68% 

14% 

25% 

82% 

52% 

63% 

2 % 

74 % 

48% 

24% 

43% 

2 % 

46 

47 % 

43% 

29 

62% 

80 

48% 

107 

110 % 

31% 

65 % 

84% 

37% 

49% 

3% 

30% 

22 

9% 

74% 


26 % 24 % 

37% 38% 
44 % 44 % 

36% 38% 
24% 24% 

5% 5% 

77% 77% 
53% 52% 
30% 31% 
gM dUbissk 


Aug 


4 AUfl 


Pfizer 

PMpsDge 

PMipMfS 

PhApflPet 

Polaroid 

PPG tod 

PretrGmW 

P6SE&G 


Corp 
RyrridsMet 
RodmaU Int 
Dutch 


67% 

17% 

70% 

9X 

63% 

61% 

78% 

42% 

61% 


San Lee 
SFESopac 
SchJ'berger 
Scott Paper 
Seagram 
Sears Rbcfc 
Shea Trans 

SmSdnBfc 

Sorry 

SthfcaJEd 


StdOiCMo 
Storing Dm 
Stevens JP 

Sun Comp 
Tatedyne 
Tenneco 
Texaco 

Texas E Cor 
Texas tost 
Texas Uttts 

Textron 

TravfrsCor 
TRW be 
OALfnc 
{Mew NV 
Un Carbide 
Un Pac Cor- 
Utd Brands 
US Steel 
UtdTechnd 
Unocal 
Jim Water 
WmerLmbt 
Wefts Fargo 
W'stghsa a 
Weyerti'aar 
Whirlpool 
Wootworth 
Xerox Corp 
Zenith 


41% 

82 

65 

69 

29% 

30% 

56% 

57% 

42 

50% 

51 

90% 

18% 

34% 

75% 

44% 

48% 

32% 

49 

310 

38% 

30% 

26 % 

106% 

33% 

52% 

44 

97% 

49% 

212 % 

21 % 

53% 

27% 

n/a 

40% 

1B% 

42% 

57% 

99 % 

54% 

32 

69 

42% 

52% 

22 % 


67% 

16% 

71% 

9 

63% 

62% 

77% 

42% 

61% 

%> 

41% 

80% 

65% 

89% 

29% 

29% 

50% 

56% 

42% 

48% 

50% 

89% 

18% 

34% 

75% 

43% 

49 

32% 

48% 

308% 

36% 

29% 

24 

109 

33% 

52% 

43% 

96% 

50% 

213% 

21 % 

52% 

27 

t 

17% 

42% 

58% 

99% 

54% 

32% 

67% 

42% 

52% 

22 % 


CANADIAN PRICES 


AhMhl 
Men Mum 
MgomaSU 
Can Pacific 
Comlnco 
Con Bathrst 
Hkr/SUCan 
HdsnBMM 
Imasoo 
eriaroi 
to Pipe 
Mess-Ferg 
Ryl Trustee 


Co 
ThmsnN'A' 
Wlkrtfiram 
_ WCT 

pSIK*S* 


ns 


21 % 21 % 
39% 39% 
13% 13% 
14% 14% 

^% 

27% 27% 
27% 27% 
36 38 

33 30% 

39% 38% 

"ft. t 

79% 79Y, 

21 % 21 % 
29% 28% 
37% 37% 
13 12% 

(Unvoted 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN. 


. 10 . 00 % 


Mam & wmpany 

am 

10.00% 


-10.75% 

rnmaJriatat (into . .. 

_10.00% 


1000% 

Cooperative Bank 

0 Hnare 8 Co 

-10.00% 

10110% 

Hong Kong & Shanghai- 

_10.00% 

-10.00% 

Nat W’sh 111 ^" m, 

-10.00% 

Royal Bank of Scotland _ 

TSR ' . 

-10.00% 

10.00% 

! Gfihank NA . 

1000% 

t Martcaxe Base Rate. .. * 


APPOINTMENTS 


International Factors: Mr 
BJ Abbott and Mr WD Goode 
have been made executive 
directors. 

Scapa Group: Mr SW 
Goodall becomes executive 
chairman and Mr J 
Haytborntb waite is named as 
worldwide chief executive. 

Dobson Park Industries: 
Mr David Bucks becomes a 
non-executive director. 

Prestwick Holdings: Profes- 
sor NeO Hood is made a non- 
executive director. 

E ast E uropean Trade Coun- 
cil (EETC): Lord Jellkoe has 
been named as chairman, 
succeeding Lord Shackletoa 
who is to become honorary 
president 


( COMMERCIAL PROPERTY ) 

Young Turks lead the 
hunt for ready assets 


The property sector is 
suffering from bid fever 
inst the background of a 
ng stock market and the 
City's new aversion to the 
takeover mania that has swept 
through other sectors recently. 

The latest entrants to the 
takeover stakes are 
Mounileigh Estates and 
.t Group. Both stocks 
at a premium to asset 
value, giving the companies 
highly rated paper which they 
can use to buy a ready-made 
asset base. 

And Mr John Whittaker’s 
attempt, through his private 
company, Highams, to win 
control of the Manchester 
Ship Canal Company can 
largely be seen as an argument 
over how to capitalize on 
property assets. 

Moves are also afoot at 
Wingate Property Invest- 
ments, the company which 
called off a £19.7 million 
merger with Trafford Park 
Estates last year, due to 
disagreements over manage- 
ment style. Wingate’s shares 
were suspended at its request 
and the outcome has yet to be 
revealed. The proposed 
merger was made against a 
possible bid for Trafford Park 
by Fed Holdings, the retail 
warehouse developer of which 
Mr John Whittaker is 

chairman 

Such moves are indicative 
of the changes which have 
swept through the property 
world. The new, young and 
not so young Turks of the 


• C ONTINENTAL AS- 
SETS TRUST: Interim figures 
to June 30th, 1986: gross rev- 
enue £132,000. expenses 
£90,000, tax £16,000, earnings 
£26.000, eps <U2p, nav 111 .OSpi 

• BRITISH ALCAN' 
ALUMINIUM: For the six 
months to June 30, with figures 
in £ millions, turnover was 327 
(321.9), operating profit 26.3 
(33.7), interest 8.9 (10.8), pretax 
profit 17.4 (22.9) and tax 13 
( 2 . 1 ). 

• MARKING NAMES: Divi- 
dends payable in fan ada and in 
the United States on or before 
July 23 and up to and inHndinp 
July 29 are valued at 46.09p per 
Canadian dollar and 64.86o per 
US dollar. 

• INDEPENDENT NEWS- 
PAPERS: The dividend for the 
six months to June 30 is 4p 
(3Jp). With figures in 1R£000. 
trading profit was 3.558 (3.010X ' 
depreciation 807 (772), pretax 
profit 2,751 CL238). tax 616 
(558). and earnings per share 
9.3p (7. Ip). 


business, the trading compa- 
nies, are on the takeover trail 
with old established invest- 
ment companies as their prey. 

Market performance and 
sentiment have much to do 
with this. The old established 
property companies have been 
turning in dull p erfo rm ances 
of late. The revaluation of 
their portfolios has been less 
than exciting, contributing lit- 
tle to raising net asset value 
and in some cases actually 
reducing iL 

By contrast, the trading 
companies are developing in 
sectors of the property market 
showing the most growth — 
retailing and offices in 
London’s West End and the 
City. 

How long the present boom 
will continue is anybody’s 
guess, but those who went in 
early have done well from 
their entrepreneurial instincts. 
And they do not have the 
problems of dealing with an 
ageing portfolio in un- 
fashionable areas of the mar- 
ket like some of the older 
investment companies. 

But to maintain their pre- 
mium rating they also have to 
maintain dividend growth and 
earnings without seeing their 
ratings change to a discount to 
net assets. This can only be 
done by chasing more and 
larger developments and by 
acquiring portfolios or 
companies. 

But there is an irony in the 
fad that these so-caned “mer- 
chant developers” are keen to 


COMPANY NEWS 


• T COWIE: For the six 
months to June 30 the dividend 
is 1.75p (1.25p), payable on 
August 22. With figures in £000, 
group turnover was 104,412 
(1 12,358). interest 6,132 (4,551), 
profit before tax 2£52 (1.631), 
lax 713 (366). earnings per share 
13.65p (8.1 5p). 

• ERNEST JONES (JEWEL- 
LER) Hie foliowing figures are 
for the 18 months to March 29 
(12 months to September 29 
1984). The final dividend is 
1.4p, payable on October 6. 
With figures in £000. turnover 
was 23.543 (12.851). profit be- 
fore tax 1.692 (702), tax 756 
(238). extraordinary charge nil 
(271) and earnings per share 
9.4p (4.6p). 

• NORTH KALGURLI 
MINES: The company, in hs 
quarterly report says that the 
total gold output for the last 

uarter to the end of June was 
1.064 ounces, bringing the full 
year production to 93,309 oz 
(78,1 9 laz). Kaignrli now has the 
capacity to produce more than 
130,000oz of gold a year. 


1 


buy themselves an investment 
portfolio, thereby transform- 
ing themselves into the very 
type of company they are so 
avidly stalking. 

The answer must lie in the 
fact that trading companies 
continually have to run faster 
to maintain growth, with the 
attendant problems of raising 
finance and finding develop- 
ments in an increasingly 
competitive worfd. 

And they often keep only a 
small share of their develop- 
ment profits. Buying ready- 
made assets gives them a base 
on which to borrow money, 
allowing them to keep a 
greater share of their develop- 
ments. The attraction is that 
schemes do not have to be pre- 
funded or sold, which necessi- 
tates giving an institution the 
lion's share of the proceeds in 
return. 

This is certainly the reason- 
ing behind Greycoat’s wish to 
buy Property Holding and 
Investment Trust, a battle 
which is becoming increas- 
ingly acrimonious as time goes 
on. 

Mounileigh, on the other 
hand, will only make an offer 
for United Real if terms can be 
agreed. And Mounileigh says 
it wants United Real for the 
development potential within 
its portfolio. Either way the 
investment companies are un- 
likely to be able to resist their 
predators once the price is 
right. 

Judith Huntley 


• DELTA GOLD: Sharehold- 
ers have approved the ac- 
quisition of the mineral interests 
of Canyon Resources. The pur- 
chase is being made by the issue 
of 16.075,5 a) Delta shares to 
Canyon, raising Delta's 
capitalization to SI3 million, of 
which Canyon will own 46 per 
cent. 

• TEMPLETON GALBRA- 
ITH AND HANSBERGER: 
Net assets at July 31 on the 
Templeton mutual funds were 
(figs S million): Templeton 
Growth Fund 1,704 (1.166), 
World Fund 3.054 (2J»79), For- 
eign Fund 175 (93), Global i 
Fond 303 (268), Global ii Fund 
498 (290). 

• ELSWICK HOPPER: The 
results for the first half of the 
year are likely to be below 
management’s hopes due to 

market conditions in the 
quarter, especially in the 
ri cultural machinery . sector. 
iup sales improved consid- 
erably in the second quarter. 


( TEMPUS ) 

GKN plunges 56p as 
setback stuns market 


GKbTs news from the front 
line of British manufacturing 
wreaked almost as much 
havoc on the stock market 
yesterday as did IQ’s simi- 
larly gloomy statement last 
month. GKN said there had 
been a sharp economic de- 
cline in the second quarter as 
a result of which it now 
expects profits for the foil 
year to be similar to last 
year’s. 

This warning stunned in- 
vestors, as profits had been 
expected to rise by about £20 
million to about £153 mil- 
lion, and GKN’s share price 
fell by 56p to 290p in a matter 
of hours, reducing the 
company's stock market 
value by £133 million to £689 
million. 

Since the annual meeting 
in May when Sir Trevor 
Holdsworth, the chairman, 
said results were running 
ahead of last year, there has 
been a sudden drop in de- 
mand for components for 
commercial and agricultural 
vehicles. GKN says that 

worldwide registrations in 

the second quarter were 20 
per cent lower than in the 
same period of the previous 
year. 

Despite that downturn, in- 
terim profits rose £nom £70.5 
million to £74.5 million be- 
fore tax, reflecting excep- 
tional demand for constant 
velocity joints in America 
and a good performance from 
associates, notably Allied 
Steel and Wire, a joint ven- 
tures with British Steel. In the 
second half, demand for CV 
joints is likely to return to a 
mote normal level. 

The company is attempting 
to limit the damage to sec- 
ond-half profits by cutting 
costs. In the first half there 
were 1,000 redundancies, 
leaving the workforce at 
44,800. The £4 million cost of 
these redundancies was 
charged against profits. 

In addition, there is a big 
restructuring in France at a 
cost of £26 million, charged 
below the line in an extraor- 
dinary charge of £25 million. 
Though this left the com- 
y with no retained profits, 
increased its interim 
dividend from 4.5p to 5.0p. 
Presumably, it intended this 
to underline the better pros- 
pects it sees for 1987. 

By then the armoured 
personnel carriers will be 
making money, boosting 
profits by £2 million. In 
addition, the development of 


new products, in particular 
viscous couplings and springs 
will be costing less. In the 
longer term, investors can 
look forward to lower 
luciion costs resulting 
jm the current capital 
spending programme and 
growth in Japan. 

In the short term, investors 
are likely to concentrate on 
the poor outlook for this year 
but thereafter better pros- 
pect s should contribute to a 
recovery in the share price. 
Buy. 

Kleinwort Benson 

Klein wort Benson, the City's 
largest merchant bank, could 
have waited until after the 
grouse shooting season to 
present half-year results 
which were well beyond 
anyone's expectations. But 
with profits more than dou- 
ble last year's interim result it 
is hardly surprising that the 
bank decided to give its 
competitors something to 
ponder as they depart for 
their Scottish moors. 

After a transfer to inner 
reserves, the group's pretax 
profit to June 30 jumped 
from £28.4 million to £57.7 
million, with earnings per 
share following not far be- 
hind with a 102 per cent 
increase from 31.09 to 
62.85p. Results like that 
should go a long way to 
achieving the aim of Mr 
Michael Hawkes. the mer- 
chant bank’s chairman, of 
eliminating the large discoimi 
on the stock market at which 
merchant bank shares trade 
atpresenL 

One explanation of the 
discount is worry over the 
effects of the big tang and the 
increasing emphasis of many 
merchant banks on risky 
securities markets. 

Kfeinwort's profit break- 
down, however, shows a 
widely diversified business 
with a heavy reliance on no 
single area. Of merchant 
banking profits, a quarter 
came from overseas business 
and its new securities opera- 
tions, with only 5 per cent of 
Grieveson Grant's £10 mil- 
lion profits included. 

The bank considers that 
second-half profits will not 
keep up the breakneck pace; 

But there is so for little sign 
of a slowdown in mergers and 
acquisitions business which 
has powered the corporate 
finance performance this 
year. One rather doubtful 


area remains the US securi- 
ties market operation which, 
after tost year's troubles, has 
onlv produced profits of £1.5 
million in (he fast six months. 

Vet the strength of feding 
against the sector was illus- 
trated by the stock market's 
grudging reaction to the 
bank's sparkling results. 
Klein wort’s shares rose 20p 
to 735p. despite an increased 
dividend of Sp. against 6p last 
time, suggesting a prospective 
p/e of about six. In a year the 
present price may look like a 
bargain even if big bang does 
not all go smooihiy. 

Smith & Nephew 


A growth rate of 20 per cent a 
vear can seem boring when a 
company has been doing it 
for as long and consistently as 
Smith & Nephew. Bur rig- 
orous cost control, strong 
marketing and growth by 
acquisition have enabled 
themanufaeturer of medical 
and healthcare products, tex- 
tiles and toiletries to do just 
that. 

The group does not have 
the glamour of 
pharmaceuticals company 
where discovery of a new 
wonder drug can transform 
prospects overnight. Never-; 
theless. demand tor its prod- 
ucts such as Elastoplasl and 
Nivca is not going to gp away. 
Indeed, some areas are enjoy- 
ing a boom. One example is 
surgical gloves as a result of 
the Aids scare. 

Continuing the tradition, 
pretax profits for the six 
months to June rose 22 per 
cent to £37 million, in line 
with market expectations. 
Had it not been for adverse, 
currency movements, es- 
pecially the South African 
rand and the Australian dol- 
lar, turnover would have 
risen by 13 per cent, rather 
that just 4 per cent to £212 
million. 

Most analysis are looking 
for 1986 full-year pretax prof- 
its to reach £85 million, to 
give earnings per share of 
6.8p. At the present price of 
I20p, the shares are on a 
prospective multiple of 1 7.6. 

Smith & Nephew shares 
have outperformed the mas-, 
ket by 10 per cent in the last 
12 months and they now 
stand al a premium of 36 per 
cent While the premium has 
in the past been greater than 
this, the present share price 
appears to reflea the group's 
above average growth pros- 
pects fairly. 


Is 


i 




Communication is not simply 
sending a message. . .it is 
creating true understanding— swiftly, 
clearly and precisely. 




I know he s trying to tell me something: 
but what does he really mean?" In our worlc 
of proliferating technologies and new termi- 
nology, this kind of question is asked a lot 
Here is what we are doing about it 

Hitachi’s scientists and technicians’ long- 
term goal is to break the language barrier. 
They are diligently at work today on an array 
of projects that will vastly improve the com- 
munications of tomorrow. 

For example, we've made tremendous 
progress on a system to translate Japanese 
into English. 

This system can be used to translate 
various scientific/technical papers and 
machinery/equipment manuals. Special 
"glossaries" can be developed to adapt it for 
fields as diverse as medicine, electronics 
and aeronautics. Further development could 
lead to automatic telephone translation or 
even portable verbal translators for travelers. 

In addition to the machine transla- 
tion system, Hitachi's research specialists 
are also developing advanced transmission 
systems that send your phone calls or 
business data across great distances using 
hair-thin optical fibers and laser beams. 

They are also working on other new methods 
of communications, such as advanced 
telephone exchange systems, satellite com- 
munication systems, TV conferences, 
and so forth. 

At the root of much of this is our highly 
advanced computer technology: because 
Hitachi is producing some of the fastest, 
largest-capacity systems available today! 

We fink technology to human needs. We 
believe that Hitachi’s advanced technologies 
will result in systems and products that are 
functionally sophisticated but easy to use. 
Our goal in communications— and trans- 
. portation, energy and consumer electronics 
as well -is to build products and systems 
that will improve the quality of life the 
world around. 


Hitachi's wide-ranging technologies in communication ( from left to right): 
optical libers, optical IC, advanced telephone exchange system, 
and satellite communication. 


-ii-. ... 






0 HITACHI 

7 . ; 




THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1 986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


19 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 



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'..•a : 


! Share prices went into a 
nosedive yesterday, suffering 
their biggesvever one- day fell 
following a profits warning 
from Geest,. Keen & 
NettlefoWs, one of Britain's 
Biggest manufacturing 

companies. 

, Almost £4 billion- was wiped 
from the value of quoted 

m Rio Tfnto-Zmc. the mining 
finance group, is hoping to re- 
store some of its good win 
ra the City over the next few 
jteonihs. As a first step, it 
will peet Laurence Prust, the 
broker, today aad has 
ether meetings planned. But it 
fs-too early to expect good 
newsiest yet. The shares, 
which have 

■mderperforraed this year, fell . 
fry 8p to 549p yesterday. 

Shares as the FT index of 30 
shares tumbled by a record 
32.1 points to 1.233.7. This 
edmpares with the previous 
biggest one-day fell — in terms • 
efpoims — of 30.7 on July 8. 
On that day £5,478 million 
was wined from shares. The 
index has now fallen nearly 
200 points from its highest- 
fcver level of 1.425.9, achieved 
in April this year. 

" The broader-based FT-SE 
100 also closed sharply lower 
on the day, with a fall of 21.2 
points to 1,540.4. The market 
has been in a highly nervous 
State and the interim figures 
frbm GKN proved all too 
touch for investors. Pretax 
profits were up from £70.5 
million to £74J million, but 
Mr Trevor Hojdsworth, the 
Chairman, warned that the 
fell-year profits were likely to 
fell short of last year’s £133 
million. 

; The share price responded 
accordingly, tumbling 58p to 


288p and wiping mote that 
£133 million from its stock 
market capitalization. The ef- 
fect on the other .big 
industrials was predictable. 
Hawker Siddeley fell by 26pto 
49 1 p and Lucas Industries by 
14p to 516p. TI Group, with 
interim figures expected later 
today,- was down by lOp to 
495p. Analysts are expecting 
pretax profits to rise by £1.5 
million to £20 million: Evered 
Holdings, which has just Tost- 
its battle for control of 
.McKechnie Bros, continues to 
speak for about 20 per cent of 
the dares. 

Sentiment in the market 
was also hit by confirmation 
of a large placing of shares by 
. Boots, the high street chemist, 
the share price of which 
dipped by another 9p to 2 i3p, 
ex-dividend. The group is 
paying £375 million for FHnt 
Laboratories, a subsidiary of 
Baxter TravenoL To help 
finance the deal, Rowe & 
Pitman, the broker, was asked 
to place 184 million shares at 
205p. It did — but it turned out 
to be quite a struggle. 

The Government's decision 
to block. GECs £] .900 million 
bid for Plessey also did little 
to help confidence. Plessey fell 
8p to 1 98p, while GEC dipped 
6p to 190p. Dealers had 
already convinced themselves 


p) 


EQUITIES 

Angte Sees j 

Beaverco 
Borland (I25p) 

Chelsea Man (125p) 
Coated Etoctrodas (84p) 
Coline (11Qp> 

Evans HaSshaw 
Batcher. Dennys 
GT Management 
Guthrie Corp (IS 
Harrison tfisqp) ” 

HiBe Ergonom (92p) 


m 


141 

198-1 

ra-i 

ISO 

139-2 

128 

90 

113 

117 

74+1 

203 

162' 

156 

S3 


By Michael Clark 

that the bid would be Hocked, 
but, nevertheless, had relished 
the prospect of all that extra 
cash flooding back into the 
market from GECs huge ca<h 
mountain. 

With so much bad news 
around the marketmakere 
were ha ving a poor time of it 
as they continued to mark 
• share prices sharply lower. But 
there were a few signs of Hue 

creeping in towards the close 
and some dealers took the 
view that the fen had been 
overdone. Nevertheless, the 
outlook remains bleak. 

Gilts were' also in retreat, 
following Tuesday's dis-. 
appointing money supply fig- 
ures which. have again delayed 
the prospect of another cut in 
interest rates. Prices at the 
longer end of the market were 
£% down at the dose. ... 

The insurance ' composites 
were m a spin and continued 
to lose ground throughout the 
day. Marketmen fear that the 
heavy flooding in' Australia 
could result in big payouts for 
the insurers once the real 
extent of the damage is as- 
sessed. There is also talk that a 
bearish broker’s circular is on 
the way. 

Commercial Union fell 8p to 
293p, General Accident 23p to . 
789p, Guardian Royal Ex- 
change 35p to 804p, Royal ‘ 


RECENT ISSUES 


Hughes Food t20p) . 24’: -1 

ton Utd inv <330p) 71 -2 

MB Cash & CpAOp) 88 

Marina Dev (110p) 90 

Morgan Grenfefl (500p) 438 

Omnfcech (33p) 34 • 

Shield (72p) 140 

Soialtoone (165p) 160 - 

Soundtracks (40p> 37 

Stanley Leisure (11 Op) 122. 

TV-AM (I30p) 151 

Tenby Inds (112p) 134 

Thames TV (1 90p) 226+2 

TTbtoet & Britten (I20p) 128 

Treas 2H%|n 2016 *97 £4 (Pa 

Un3ock (63p) 68 


Insurance 25p to 799p, Lon- 
don United Id vestments 3p to 
205p and Sun Alliance 25p 1o 

662p. 

The insurance, brokers also 
suffered a mark-down with 
CE Heath 5p lighter at 502p, 
Minet Holdings 4p at 247p, 
Hogg Robinson 5p at 307p, 
Sedgwick Group 2p at 358p, 
- Stewart Wrightsoo 3p at 434p 
and Willis Faber 2p at 407p. 

But the clearing banks spent 
a quiet session ahead of the 
interim figures . later today 
from Barclays, the last of the 
big four to report Analysts are 
still expecting Barclays to 
weigh in with pretax profits of 
£460 million for the-first six 
mouths, compared with £410 
million last time. Barclays 
slipped lOp to 474p. as Na- 
tional- Westminster eased 5p 
to 502 p. Midland firmed 2p to 
549p, while Lloyds was un- 
changed at 387p. 

The merchant banks pre- 
sented a steadier picture, al- 
though some prices were off 
their best at the dose. There 
were gains of 2p in Henry 
Ansbacher at 72p, Guinness 
Peat at 79p and Hill Samuel at 
355p, while Kleinwort Benson 
rose 15p to 730pand Mercury 
International a similar 
amount to 658p. But recent 
newcomer Morgan -Grenfell 


Windsmodr 

Yaivenon 


RIGHTS ISSUES 

Barker & Dobson N/P 
Gotorofl F/P 
Datasarv F/P 
Erskine Hse F/P 
Eroamet F IP 
Leigh Interests F/P 
Television Sth N/P 
Top value F/P 
— CoUns F/P 
N/P 

(issue price in brackets). 


104-3 

U 


h 

195 

160 

141 


Wight CoUf 
yonanount 


168 

98 

22 

88 

440-3 

22 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


?Dme North Siedng 

_SepB6 

Dec 86 

JMarB7 

Jun 87 

.Sep 87 

Dec 87. 


J" i- 

i ". 


Previous day's total open rterasi 14518 

'Three Month Eurodollar 

.Sep 86. 


sss 


Low 
9031 • 

CtoM 

9023 

ErtVoi 
1394 . 

9051 

9053 

9049 

9051 

675 • 

9050 

9052 

90.49 

9051 

79 

90.40 

9041 

9038 

9058 

.50 

9039 

9029 

9034 

9026 

20 

90.10 

90,10 

9010 

9039 

3 


.Dec 86 

.Mar 87 

Jun 87 

-USTremury Bond 

- Sap 88 

-Dec 86 

-Mar 87 


Short on 

Sep 86 

Dec 86 ..... 
Mar 87 — 


Long Oil 
Seo 86 


Sep 
Dec 86 

Mar 87 

Jun 87 

FT-SE 100 
Sap 88.— . 
Dec 8 8 — 


9150 

93.49 

9341 

9323 

96-15 

95-16 

- N/T 


100-58 
N FT 
N/T 


120-07 

12001 

3ff 

158.10 

N/T 


Previous day's krttf open interest 19504 
9334 9350 9354 918 

9153 93.49 9351 1246 

9343, .9340 93.41 23T 

9124 9120 . 9323 ■ 229 

Previous day's total open Interest 7940 
96-16 96-C2 96^10 3961 

95-16 95-16 95r16 15 . 

• . 0 


Previous Pay's total open I 
101-02 100-88 100-68 


10068 

10068 


103S 


. . Previous day's total open interest 13054 
120-14 119-28 120-06 .. 6520 

120-01 • 126-01 12001 “• 18 

119-27 0 ’ 

. . 119-27- 0 

Previous day's total open interest 2577 
15820 15650 15855 433 

15940 0 


/. 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


First 

July 21 
Aug 4 






Aug 1 Oct 23 Nov 3 

Aug 15 NOV 6 'Nov 17 

Aug 18 Sept 5 Nov 20 VDecI 

Cat aptkns were taken oat ore 6/B/86 Ifenas Veneer, Press Tocte. Wiggins. Un, 
- parkdaio. Thurgar. Bardex. Dowty. Rowntrea. Bntoa. Amstrad, Bods. Po#y Peck. 
.* Ramar. Newman. SIC, Ml- Charlotte. ABad Irish Bk. Portland. Mercury tat Hawbn. 
“Put* Celt Mercury Ira. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Augusts 

N York. 14770-14838 
Montreal 254&25S2S 
Amsdam3480634821 
Brussels 635564.01 
Cphgan 11.4983-115822 
Dublin 1.1031-1.1099 
Franldut3£72610906 
Lisbon . 21556-21850 ' 
Madrid 19952-20622 
Milan 1 21 09.1 1-212682 
Date 1 a 8884-1 05534 . 

Paris 95691-105251 
SOrWm 102682-1 05306 
Tokyo 2275322942 
Vteme 2159-21.77 
Zurich 24751-24900 


046-0.43prem 

05tHL20pram 

iK-IHpreoi 

T7-t2prwn 


Marti 

14770-1 47B0 

20426-2.0465 

34634-34679 

6356-6174 

114983-115206 IK-Kiaem 
1.1031-1. 1041 par-5prem 
2073635778 IK-IXprai 

21586-21749 66-t59dfa 

19852-199.81 63-112UB 

2109.11-211349 par-3As ' 
108884-105032 3V-*i4f«s 

95681-95662 2Sr2Xprere 

102682-102825 %- 

227^3-22121 1 

2159-21.65 

2475624795 . . IVIXpram 

1 tUB was daw n rt 715 (day s rsngs 


128-123pr»rn 

O66053preni 


Bprem-lrfis 

4 V 354 prem 

183457<fc 

142-203dto 


12K-13Ui£s 

6%-6Sprora 

-U 


2654-2314 [ 
354-3 X pram 
715-71^. 


OTHER STERUNG RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 



Africa rand 
UAEdkham 
*Lioyds Bank 


1.6755-157S5 
25425-23435 
8748057530 
15440-15450 
14305-14315 
m 4256-4350 
73000-73005 
14550-14620 
13450-136.00 
■1430-14.62 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 



- i 



;; 

S«fM 

Oct 

Jan 

*pr 

Oct 

Art 

Jan 

Apr 


Sartes 

Calls 
Sant Dec 


s-P 

Purtr 

Dec 


■ " ASed fcyons 

:f3ib) 

300 

330 

300 

28 

13 

5 

38 

20 

11 

48 

30 

17 

6 

23 

45 

9 

27 

47 

12 

32 

50 

Jaguar 

f»5) 

500 

550 

600 

28 

12 

2K 

47 

23 

13 

60 

38 

23 

15 

50 

97 

27 

52 

100 

32 

58 

105 

-BP 

;-T583) 

500 

550 

600 

97 

53 

19 

110 

8S 

40 

i 

1 

9 

33 

3 

15 

23 

25 

47 

Thorn EMI 
(■472) 

420 

460 

500 

550 

60 

27 

7 

re 

42 

20 

82 

54 

37 

3 

20 

37 

13 

25 

40 

17 

27 

47 



30 

10 

4 

42 
'27 
. 14 

50 

32 

21 

55 

90 

40 

67 

95 

40 

72 



8 

““ 



— 

;.r<27) 

m 

Tesco . 

(*368) 

300 

330 

75 

45 

53 

— 

2 

3 

6 

— 


260 

18 

10 

5 

3 

24 

15 

10 

6 

33 

22 

1 

12 

26 

42 

71 

18 


390 

5 

14 

2S 

27 

30 

35 

330 







■ 





9 

18 

28 

18 

19 

26 



ADD NOV Fab Aao 

NOV 

Feb 


■ 360 

2 

1 

.10 

4 

18 

43 

73 

44 

73 

45 

Brit Aero 

1*470) 

480 

300 

32 

12 

50 

30 

68 

45 

10 

78 

20 

38 

25 

40 


600 

90 

105 

125 

7 

15 

25 

550 

2 

13 

25 

72 

75 

78 

:r«s) 

650 

700 

750 

50 

18 

7 

65 

40 

20 

85 

58 

H 

30 

55 

90 

46 

65 

BAT Inds 
(*386) 

380 

390 

420 

27 

10 

2 

42 

23 

11 

55 

35 

17 

3 

ID 

40 

6 

22 

43 

9 

25 

45 

"ObMms 

600 



110 

— 

— 

4 

— 


480 

* 

3 

— 

80 

82 

— 

;-reaoj 

650 

700 


10 

37 





12 

30 


Barclays 

(•474) 

460 

500 

25 

9- 

45 

22. 

60 

37 

7 

35 

17 

40 

22 

45. 

-‘GEC 

180 

20 

26 

32 

7 

9 

11 

550 

2 

10 

22 

82 

82 

85 

pa* 

200 

220 

/ 

.3 

15 

8 

20 

18 

34 

20 

34 

22 

Brit Telecom 

086) 

180 

200 

12 

3 

21 

11 

2Sfc 

17 

3ft 

17 

8 

19 

11 

22 

'Grand Mat 

327 

62 



— 

2 

— 

— 

220 

1 

5 

8 

36 

38 

38 


. 355 
360 
382 

38 

24 

45 

55 

6 

18 

12 

17 

Cadbury Schwpps 160 
(■162) 180 
200 

8 

. 2 

1 

16 

7 

2* 

22 

13 

5 

4 

20 

40 

9 

21 

40 

13 

24 

42 

^Jseo) 

900 

950 

1000 

1050 

90 

57 

32 

122 

90 

60 

102 

70 

11 

Z7 

54 

16 

37 

60 

87 

« 

74 

100 


300 

330 

360 

55 

25 

8 

63 

35 

17 

— 

1 

2 

18 

2 

7 

27 


' • • . 













V Land Sac 
_f320) 

300 

330 

380 

El 

39 

21 

m 

5 

16 

8 

20 

42 

9 

21 

43 

(*340) 

330 
- 360 

16 

6 

27 

14 

-38 

19 

4 

22 

10 

28 

13 

29 




■ * 




ran 






.rjMvfcst'Span . 
■'T192) ' 


19 

7 

25 

13 

33 

19 

3 

12 

5 

14 

7 

17 

32 

nii) 

HU 

it 

20 

15 

27 

20 

5 

10 

10 

IS 

12 

18 
















7M 

750 

800 

145 

95 

48. 

156 

110 

122 

2 

4 

S 

14 

23 

(•549) 

550 

'600 

13 

2 

27 

6 

42 

22 

27 

65 

33 

67 

III 















-■'■-Jcafalgar House 

El 

36 

19 

9 

44 

27 

IB 

52 

36 

25 

4 

6 

20 


9 

16 

25 

f490). 

. 500 

550 
600 

8 

2 

1 

25 

10 

4 

42 

20 

22 

65 

115 

35 

67 

115 

40 

72 

* % 

O 

SMfeS 

Sap Dec 

liar 

£e_ 

Dec 

Mrt 

Racrt 

H86) 

160 

180 

30 

15 

38 

20 

44 

30 

2 

5 

4 

9 

8 

10 

■J-BBecham ■ 

>5*386) 

* -4 

360 

37 

47 

57 

5 


15 

200 

4 

13 

17 

14 

18 


390 

420 

400 

18 

8 

3 

27 

16 

8 

40 

27 

14 

18 

40 

77 



RTZ 

T549) 

550 

600 

650 

15 

4 

1» 

40 

22 

9 

55 

33 

15 

| 

un 



4 

10 

17 

79 

29 

L'J 



1» 

3 

7 

|E3 


ILJMl 


260 

.280 

2* 

1 

4 

2 

m 

48 

69 

49 

69 

50 

Vnal Reets 

45 

60 

7 10* 
3* 7% 

11» 

9V 

i 

3ft 

3 

6ft 

4ft 

7 

>.*BTR 

260 

20 

ZT 

a 

8 

15 

m 

60 

1 

414 

5K 11» 12» 

13 



2 

6 

15 

48 

48 

- 









Bass 

P 38) 

750 

20 

10 


65 

35 

25 

65 

ri 

40 ■ 
66 


•jima 

AUB 

Now 

Mar Aug 

Now 

W 

6 



UJ 

Em 





12 



24 

25 


Biwcircte - 
f561] 

El 

30 

9 

m 

50 

28 

13 

75 

50 

28 

8 

42 

92 

17 

45 

92 


(*Z05) 

220 

236 

240 

■1 

~7 

16 

*9 

42 

41 " 

30 

48 

DBBMis 

1*595) 


40 

75 

85 

35 

60 

75 


255 

1 

3 





R~| 

20 

9 

30 


120 

125 



Srttet 

Cl 

C21 

Era 

a 

fiab 


8 

4 

12 

— 

170 

ire 

— 


n 

g 


n 




Dttons 

r32B) 

S 

30 

10 

42 

22 

52 

32 

3 

14 

7 

16 

10 

20 

ErJ 

Ca 



2ft 

3ft 



4 

ELI 

22 

36 

36 



114 

116 

118 

120 

122 


5 

4 

3 

1’» 


3* 

IX 

I 

GKN 

(•290) 

30 0 
330 
380 
330 

11 

3 

2 

1 

22 

11 

4 

3 

18 

10 

4 

23 

46 

78 

106 

26 

46 

78 

106 

46 

78 

106 

(Til 8) 

2'ia 

1°TS 

6ft 

4ft 

3 r u 

2»m 

ft 

IS 

2ft 

4ft 

1ft 

"a 

5*.. 

3ft 

Glrao 

El 

85 

120 


25 

40 



124 

*» 

IK 


61V 



f948) 

B3V 

iooo 

1050- 

55 

35 


90 

75 

65 

95 

125 



Oct 

Not 

AuuSapt 

Oct 

Nov 


2U 

45 

70 

110 

120 

FT-SE 1550 
index 1575 
nS40) 1600 
1625 
16S0 
1675 

48 50 

22 37 
12 27 

5 20 

3 13 

2 6 

65 

52 

<2 

32 

25 

18 


in 

79 

40 

55 

Hanson 

ri«) 

TE0 

3 

34 

19- 

10 

4 

• 2 

19 

10 

23 

13 

7T4 

1 

1 

4 

16 

35 

7 

19 

35 

9 

21 

36 

65 

37 

60 

85 

110 

135 

45 

S3 

87 

112 

137 

52 

67 

88 

113 

138 

65 


August 6, 1965 • Total c*otre«»l9affl. Cals 10672. Putt 9156. ' "Undedyina ascudty price. 


MONEY MARKET 


The slightfy brighter spark 
noted in the market on. Tues- 
day had completely faded 
yesterday as sterling aad ofl 
prices lost their impetus. 
Rates firmed sfigbdy along a 
pretty flat yield-line. Bdshmss 
was slack throughout No me 
showed much mterest in any- 
thing beyond day-to-day 
money and the short dates. 

Overnight fandmg proved 
relatively inexpensive h spite 
of a hefty shortage. 

BSSSRSMS% 

Clearing Banks 10 
Finance House 10 


_ 10)4 Low 7 

Week feed; 

Treaswy Brts (Discount 
Buying Saang 

2 rmitn 9°w 2 mnm S'Hi 

3mrah9t4 3 ninth 9)4 


art Brts (Discouit 1U 
1 ninth 9'^fl-9»as 2 ninth 9X-9 "m 
3mnth 9K-9«n Bmnth O’wO** 


IsIDJscart^ 

1 mmh 10’i* Zmrth 10H 

3rrrth 1DX Bmnth 10« 

Omgtt:toBi9Xcta4 
1 week 10)4-10 • 6nwh 

1 moth 10 'vlO 9m«h 9»»5o,»- 

3 ninth 12mth 

Local Autterit]rDapostoi(%) . 

2 days 9% 7 days 9 % 

1 mrrth a% amntfi 9K 

6mnth9K 12nrti 9K 


. (vy 
1 mnth 10 U -10 2 mmh 1 QU- 1 Q ' 

3 moth 10)4-10 .Bmnth 10)4-9)4 
9 mrrthlOX-IO 12mth5%-9* 


1 mnth' 1D-9K 3mntti95WX 

6mntfi 9»w4'>is I 2 mth 
fiiiim rrin (Tci 

1 mnth 645-640 3 mmh 640435 
6 mnth 6 l 4033S 12mth 645330 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days F 1 + 6 X 
3mrffi (Pia-Pte 
Deutochmifc 
7 days 4 l '«-4 8 is 
3 mnth 4)4-4 Vi 
French Franc 
7 days 7)4-7. 

3 mnth 7 # ia-7 3 ia 
Sarin F%rec 
7 days 2 S«4 
3 mnth 4V4-4V4 
Yea 

7 days 454-4X 
3nwrth 454-4X 


cm 

.imoih 
.6nmth 
cal 
1 mmh 
6 mnm 
eaO 
1 mnth 
6uuWl 
cal 
imim 
Bmnth 
call 
1 mwh 
6 mnth 


7-8 

6><+69m 

54 

4)4-4% 

4 1l i«-4*tg 

714-6)4 

7 3 i+7 l ia 

7Vr7% 

2)4-154 

4»»4 , i# 

4H-4V4 

514-1)4 

414-4* 

4)44)4 


GOLD 


GoktS 360 JS -38125 

Krugertand'^m 
Sm76^1J 


ECGD 


Fixed Rats Sterftig Eyport Finance 
Scheme IV Average reterance rale tor 
■merest period July 2. 1986 to 
August 5, 1986 tnokiiW 10309 per 


was again left ooi in the cold, 
dosing all-square al438p. 

This compares with *e 
original striking price of 500p 
and means that those inves- 
tors who were in there at the 
start are now sitting on a fry* 
of 62p a share. 

Brewery shares were again a 
flat market after Tuesday’s 


• BP was the biggest casa- 
alty in the oil sector yes- 
terday, felling by I3p to 
593p. Wood Mackenzie, the 
powerful Scottish broker, 
must take some of the Mame 
for this after placing about 
3 motion shares, worth nearly 
£18 million, at 590p a 
share. They were taken up by 
a number of institu ti ons 
without too modi fuss, despite 
the dull conditions. 


attempt at a rally. The pro- 
posed Monopolies Commis- 
sion. inquiry into the tied 
house system for pubs still 
weighs heavily on the market. 
Among the leaders. ADied- 
Lyons fell 4p to 316p, Bass 7p 
to 738p, Grand Metropotitan, 
the Watney and Truman 
group, 8p to 380p, Greenall 
Whitley 4p to 176p, Greene, 
Xing 3p*to 215p, Scottish & 
Newamtle 2p to I86p and 
Whitbread “A” 6p to 2S4p. 

Oil shares ran into profit- 
taking after Thursday’s excep- 
tional performance which saw 
double-figure gains among 
most of the big producers. 
However, prices were able to 
close above their worst levels 
of the day. The agreement 
reached by Opec oil ministers 
in Geneva to restrict produc- 
tion during September and 
October to 16 million barrels a 
day was, at first, well received 
in the City. 

The autumn is traditionally 
the time of year when most 
distributors start to stock up 
few the winter and it was 
hoped that this, combined 
with less oil slopping about on 
world markets, would breathe 
new life into the oil price. But 
many analysts are now of the 
opinion that the measures 
could just prove to be a 
stopgap. 

As a result, BritoD 3p at 
1 18p, . Bunnah 3p at 377p, 
Enterprise. Oil 4p at 117p. 
London & Scottish Marine 03 
2p to 1 Up. Tricentrol 3p to 
58p and Ultramar 5p to 156p. 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Double-edged blow 
for Weinstock 


Whatever the merits of the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission's majority finding 
against GEC — and some of them are 
dubious (bully for Mr Baillieu) — it is 
a major practical and psychological 
blow for GEC matched only by the 
elation of Plessey, which has been 
saved from Lord Weinstock's clutches 
by the persuasive powers of the 
Ministry of Defence and a revitalized, 
determined and unusually subtle 
Plessey board. 

Though Paul Channon, the Sec- 
retary of State, has accepted the 
majority judgment, the Department 
of Trade and Industry must be 
dismayed by the block put on the 
restructuring of a vital industry. 

There is one avenue left open for 
GEC and Plessey to explore — the 
“but” in the Commission's “No, but 
Minister” judgment — namely “some 
suitable rationalization of System X.” 
This the Commission is content to 
leave to the mutual interest of the two 
companies to being about. It will 
surely need more than that and the 
Government, if it is serious about the 
future of the telecommunications 
supply industry, will have to address 
itself to the problems. 

The point is made by what tfre 
companies had to say yesterday. The 
word from Plessey was: “We shall 
continue to run our profitable and 
successful System X business. In the 
longer term we have made it dear we 
would like to combine out’s and 
GECs System X interests. That 
remains our ambition.” 

By buying GECs interests? “We 
would be happy to take over GECs 
System X interests, if the price is right. 
But that depends on GEC In the 
meantime, we have a separate and 
profitable business.” 

A joint venture? “We have been 
trying to get an agreement on System 
X since 1982. We shall continue to 
pursue a sensible agreement which 
must reflect Plessey’s leadership of 
System X devdopment” 

But a sale to GEC? “We are the 
leader and need to. have this reflected 
in any arrangement on System X in 
the future.” 

At GEC Jim Prior, the chairman, 
said GEC could do no more than show 
its willingness to buy the Plessey 
public switching interests if terms 
could beagreed. GEC accepts negotia- 
tions between the two companies will 
have to be re-started, a joint venture 
still being an option. 


The “no” leaves GEC in a difficult 
situation where dismay at the latest 
turn of events might degenerate into 
defeatism. With one or two exceptions 
— telecommunications clearly and 
perhaps office systems — GEC is 
essentially a large, mature business in 
which rapid growth is not easy to 
achieve. 

GECs enviable financial perfor- 
mance. is the result of Lord 
Weinstock's determination to follow 
one guiding star: performance mea- 
sured by earnings per share. But his 
critics, many and variously moti- 
vated, have been quick to point out 
the two main pillars of GECs 
earnings record: highly profitable, 
cost-plus defence contracts and high 
yields from the company’s enormous 
financial reserves. As Sir John Clark 
would often say: “1 am a manager, 
Arnold is a banker.” 

With interest and inflation rates 
declining and the age of cost-plus 
work coming rapidly to an end, GEC 
needs to travel in a new direction. The 
company, and Lord Weinstock in 
particular, also badly need a major 
success. 

Ideas and schemes have not been 
lacking: the AEG initiative, merging 
with British Aerospace and the bid for 
Plessey are cases in point. But for 
various reasons, of which lack of 
sufficient determination or follow- 
through has undoubtedly been one, 
GEC has not made the quantum leap. 

At the same time, problems of 
succession and a conspicuous lack of 
political nous have brought clouds of 
grey around Stanhope Gate. Though 
Mrs Thatcher and Lord Weinstock 
like and admire each other, their 
dialogues have become no more than 
competing monologues. GECs fail- 
ures with Nimrod have not been 
counter-balanced in the eyes of senior 
politicians and civil servants by its 
successes with torpedoes, and GECs 
alignment with the Europeans in the 
Westland affair did not go unnoticed. 

The pressure is now on GEC to take 
new initiatives. It will be unfortunate 
for British manufacturing if Lord 
Weinstock is persuaded that the best 
course is to become an industrial 
conglomerate. 

As for Plessey. this week’s Westing- 
house deal might well prove only the 
first of such cooperative ventures, 
particularly involving American 
interests. 


GKN INTERIM RESULTS 1986 

INTERIM 

REPORT 

Pre-tax profits up to £74.5m (1985-£70.5m). 

Earnings per share up 9.5% to 15.0p. 

Interim dividend up to 5.0p from 45p. 

* 

Acquisition completed of majority holding in two Spanish 
transmissions component companies. 

Phase I of S22m investment in automated production facilities 
commissioned at Hardy Spicer. 

New engineering computer centre opened. 

Acquisitions strengthen the Industrial Services sector. 

Special steels and forgings businesses merged into United 
Engineering Steels. 



First Half 
1986 
£m 

First Half 
1985 
Jtm 

Full Year 
1985 
£m 

Sales 

1089.0 

1155.4 

2199.6 

Pre-tax profit 

745 

70.5 

132.7 

Earnings 

35.6 

32.6 

63.2 

Earnings per share 

15.0p 

13.7p 

26.6p 

Dividends per share 

5.0p 

4.5p 

12.0p 


Thefirsthalfsawafurtheradvaiiceiiipre- 
tax profits, reflected in the earnings per 
share whichrose to 15.0p (against 13.7pin 
the 1985 first half). Although we have 
achieved an improvement at the half-year 
stage, the adverse economic and market 
trends which emerged duringthe second 
quarterwillnowmakeitdifficulttorealise 
an improvement for the year as a whola 


Howevei; the fundamental strengths of 
the Group together with the action we 
are taking to develop new products and 
further increase our competitiveness 
should enable profits to resume their 
upward trend in 1987. 

Sir Trevor Holdsworth 
Chairman 



The international automotive and industrial group 


Ifyoo would like to receive a copy of the GKN Inierim Report, 1986. please write to: 
GKN pic. GPR Dept, 7 Cleveland Row: London SW1A 1DB. 

TH: 01-930 2424 Telex: 24911. 


































BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


Bd Otter CSms YW 




nm Hwn Inc 1908 2022 +' 

Pr* Stem 1B3 19-5 

ConmotMy 1 1 0-8 1105 *t 

F+renoel sees <50 <80 -I 

Gate 5 Ow l*a 180 -4 

fcn Lmn ]§3 174 -j 

PWp SlB«« MO 725 -t 

Unw Energy *02 *£*• *4 

UWllTacSf 381 417* 4 

AmraOw*i BM Mj 4 

Ham Income 56-9 80.7 4 

Hum SmBm Cos 21 2 22XW -t 

Aua Croain SOB 64.6 4 

Euro Shafer 153 WJ -C 

nr EW <6.5 51 8c -t 

dona um W 3*1 art -t 

Stinwin 355 579 -c 

japm port 755 005 ~C 

jaSrSmriter it* 175 -i 

Ewmpi 801 n« 

Exempt Market 647 47.7 

BROWN BWLEV 

9-17. Penwoim Rd. ilay w tis Heeth 
mu 458144 


+1.1 4X2 
. 10=0 
+M =j» 
- 0.1 220 
-07 250 
-07 052 
-03 131 
+03 1.73 
-04 090 
-OS 353 
-03 S37 
-05 033 
+05 151 
-03 071 
-04 037 
-08 288 
-04 150 
-03 


tsqn income mra 

Q£ & FmM M 

to or fcw Trusts 
Seeoal Star Hu* 
Nm tow Two 
Fir Eastern Tuna 
In* Growth 


M Otter Qrg YU 


745 785 *0.4 6.16 

529 56341 *05 a<2 
59 1 839c -07 256 
7J 4 7M -03 341 
57.B 615 -09 1.76 

825 8?,8* +01 056 
495 632 -05 158 


Smsler Co s Acc 
Do Income 
H«li hconn 
Mcome 

uan Prxrttero me 
Do ACC 

Norm American 
On** 


1235 13i.8 +02 272 

230.1 247.4 -05 . 

1485 138.1 -03 OSS 

644 4«.l 592 

74.4 60S +03 492 

SOT te 7* 405 324 

995 1WS* +09 .. 
57.7 82M -1.0 135 

8*5 903 -14 022 


BUCKMASTCH MANAGEMENT 

The Sadi Snetixnge London EC2P 2JT 

01-968 2868 


Genera* me (4) 
Do Acann (41 
toBtete Frted (3) 
Da xceun C3> 
fete Inc (Z) 

Do Acaan ffl 
SrroWer Inc (5) 
Do Accum (5) 


2091 2199 
334.4 3515 
1000 105 A 
1756 1855 
1279 133 7 
160.1 1769 
Cl 127 1196# 
*1201 1274* 


CSFWOWUUOBRS 
125. High HOteom. Lai 
01-2421148 
CS Japan Fund I 


Ot^W 




war. Wemotey. HAS 0MB 

9 

Z705 2678# -10 296 

3165 336.7# -15 4.10 
2057 21 Id +23 031 
lean 1463 1570 +07 056 

*7.7 SO 7* +02 150 
499 S3.1 +0.1 1X0 

-579 615 407 060 


CAPEL (JAMES) MANAGEMENT - 
PO Box 551 Bens Marta London EC3 7 JO 
01-621 0011 


EQUTY1LAW „ _ 

SL Georaa HU Corporation St Cownoy CV1 
15D 

0203 553231 

UK Growth Nam 1442 1113 ■ +06 396 

Do Income 1292 133.1 +09 355 

Kiteier me Accum 3*0.7 2565 +1.1 *9* 

Do mam 1837 2065 +09 *9* 

GWS/FraeO Aceum 1015 10BB *09 296 

□o m co me 802 969 +3.1 296 

Nm Amor Tel ACftjm 1294 1325 -65 056 

FarEaa Tar Accum me I6i2 -25 099 

Ewo Th Accum 146* 1579 -39 1.19 

General Trust =308 3*69 -O! 298 

FOCUNTMMIAGCMGKr 

1. uwed Pautney HO London BC4R DBA 

01-623 *880 

US Smtetar Col 89* 7*5 -1.7 029 

C»» FkjDd 1019 1065 -09 043 

income Fund 775 625 +07 *.76 

Far Eastern Fund 755 800 -14 033 

Omraeas morana «L2 730 -06 390 

Fnaatamon 57 4 ei* -03955 

Nauxte flex Fteid 35.7 362 *0.1 4.4 

European Income 703 81.7 -OS 390 

FSMVESTMBIT MANAGERS 

1 90. WM George SL OtesgOw G2 2PA 
041-333 3132 

Bamncod Gar tne 43* <82 190 

Do Accum 44.1 405 . ■ 

Income Go* me 367 *22 590 

Do Acorn ili 443 

Semra Ctft me 479 SOX i« 

Do Accum 479 61.0 

RDBJTTr HTEWATKMAJL 
Ri»er wah. Tonbnoge. tv» inv 
0733 362233 

Amman 101J 1004 +1.1 071 

Amer Eqttey mcome 323 316* +04 458 

Amer Spec* 9(6 489 520 ..172 

Fte East me 349 97.1 +03 374 

GW & Fared H 31.0 323 -01956 

Growth 6 Income 944 101.0 -09 4.70 

japan Soeote 9m 44.7 479 *04 .. 


H Otter enng wo 


□UNWSSMAH0HUNI7 TRUST 

MANAGERS 

PO Bor 4*2. 33 SiMaiy-tMteL London EC3P 
3AA 

01-623 9333 

ttoh mcome SOO S37a +OI 6.76 

N Amer Tn« 997 1001 - 1 J QJft 

Recoroy 202 Jr Si +05 235 

G* Trust 387 *0.1 te +0* 906 

51 vmesm Inc 634 88 ic +06 550 

Si Wnwnt US Gdi 739 762c -19 077 

Tempo Bar 5m Go's 1713 181.0* 327 

Temple Bte usu 367.1 3867 292 

KAM8ROSBAMC URTTRUST MANMBtS 

Prermer UT Mam. 5, Fteyte^gh Rd. Brentwood 
Esan 

0277 217916 


Bd otter Chnj W 


43* <82 
*4.1 469 
367 422 
<15 442 
479 SOX 
479 61.0 


Norm American 
CATCH ALLEN 


2769 2989 
2825 3017 


i Wteam SL EC4N 7AU 
*6314 



F» East Inc 349 37.1 

GW & Rxad H 31.0 323 

Grown 6 Income 944 101.0 
Japan Soeote 5m 4*7 *79 
Jvan Truer MOO 1SCLS 

uwageo me Tra 1206 M7.7 

ItelkcuM Eaten 787 847 
Protesolmiel GUI 33 0 355 
Soum Ebsi Asta Tat 29.1 31 0 

Sped* SB» 1608 1719 


8. Crosby Sq. London EC3A SAN 
01-838 5B5B 

Amanean Exempt E3S 0 8605 
Jor Emm* , **227 *382 
Am Property la S107B9JJ * 

PropexiyTruat *20325 


+1.1 071 
+04 458 
.. 172 
+03 374 
-01 9X6 
-05 4.70 
*0.4 .. 
♦07 . 
+1.1 OOI 
*02 530 
-02 248 
+05 046 
-04 09* 


MANAGERS 
Rende r Pten. BnU 
0600 373333 
Amer Growth 
Equay Ht^i Imne 
Ecnmean Growth 
General Equity 
at « Fbad mt Gin 
0« 6 Fixed me 


BARCLAYS UfOCOliN 
Uncam House. 292. Randa 
0153*56*4 

Ainerca 838 

Aim Accum 1175 

Do inco me 833 

Capoi G6.1 

ExenxU IhM *16.7 

Extra Income 736 

Fmanaal 224.1 

500 2617 : 

General 134 0 

GW 6 Fixed me 5*9 

Japan 6 Gan me 16*5 

Do ACC 1861 

Growth Atom 1732 

mcome Trust 321-6 . 

Lmsura That 790 

Specs* Sauamre 1375 

Racovery 1885 

TnSM Fund 1035 

Unra Tech Accum *9.4 

Do Income 409 

WtotteuwU Trust 1435 

B‘ Ta few Fiaid Acc 3K5 : 
Do Inc 20*0 : 


PO Box 196. Beckenham. Kent BR3 • 
01-658 9002 


229 206 

413 44.0 

269 267 
37.7 402* 
309 31.6* 

al » 

329 347W 


COUNTY in MANAGERS LTD 
181. CheapMB, London EC2V 6EU 
ffT-TBS IMS 


-03 190 

+0.1 4.70 
-OG 2X0 
+0.1 270 
+93 370 
+02 950 
+9.1 230 
ei 090 


“BirTrtamt 
extra mcome 


435 482 c 
1675 1675* 
Rnanote 164.1 17*5te 

GW Sraegy 562 575 

.GroMh Invasrmem 286.1 2835W 

mcome 6 Grounn 306 41 OW 

Japanese 6 Paofic 1755 it»X 
Nth Amer Gnwti 1014 107.6 

me Hecnwery 1072 114 Ote 

SnuAar CP's mi 2215 

Global toe Tft 565 GOO 

Special Sts Acc 275.4 2929 

CROWN UMT TRUST SERVICES 
Crown House. MeWmg GU2i 1XW 
04882 5033 

High Income Trust 2319 2C9 

Grorwh Trust 2139 3287* 

American Trust 1259 1349* 


Australia 
Eamm • 

BqiEiy bicbma 
Europe 
Growth S me 
Japan Soeote 
Japan Sunrise 
Frst Europe 
First Japan 
Brat n Amer 
Fni Smtewr Go's 


57.4 619 
96 7 606 
55.1 589 
1209 1788 
609 66.4c 
1012 1103 
61 1 97* 
1069 1129 
887 924 
49X S23W 
62* 67.0 


+24 030 
+01 030 
+03 590 
+19 090 
+02 230 
+16 030 
-Ot 830 
+13 0X0 
+19 030 

•a* 160 

. 270 


Rebate . Steray RH2-BBL 
07372 *2*2* 

UK Incame *84 5l5 

UK Growth Accum 463 Sl4 

Do Dot 483 $14 

EraooMii Growth 51:7 550 

Pac*c Growth . 532 $06 

EF«I UNIT TWBT MANAGERS 
4. MeMe Oaacant Etenbixoh 
' 051-226 3*92 

Amarcan FM 709 768 

CraxM Fund 93.1 695 

‘Growth 8 me Fimd 12*9 1333* 


Mgh DM Fund 
Inte maa cn a l Fund 
Etesources Fund 


1055 1129 
1905 2Q39W 
207 221 . 


SmUr Jap GO'S Fhd 381 40 9 


10 r e n cnrach Sc London EC3 
01-823 8000 

Planned m» 1275 1367 . 393 

European few 903 949 . +19 195 

Do Accum 1113 1189 +23 125 

Gmwte me 151.3 iao9* -is 296 

Do Accum 2064 2194 -21 266 

Gte YNrta me U35 1169 +19 2*2 

Do Accum 1831 1886 +1.7 942 

T Vtarn me 839 883* -03 567 

Accum 167.0 1777 -19 567 

Japan rnccma 2**8 2S7X -33 010 

Do Atom 2484 zm -33 010 

N Amanean Inc 485 SIX -05 058 

Do Accum 563 597 -OX 0X6 

Pattern mcome 1313 1379 -i 0 021 

Do ACCWB 1479 155.1 -i.i 091 

smur co s me 783 83.4 188 

Du Accum 929 986 196 

BRITANNIA UNIT TRUST 
74-78 Bnsbory Pavement Londcxr EC2A 1JD 
01-588 2777 DoarrgXI-638 0478/9 UonoyGurde 
0800010333 

Growth GW 5SX CO <• +01 041 

fete Recovery 1020 M»9 -19 272 

Smater CO'* 1419 I5i Oc .. 199 

IK Growth 267 36.1 *0.1 223 

Extra *K 539 57 2W +02 7 8* 

GW 261 J75# +09 7.75 

Inc 6 Growth 1905 2039 +09 438 


Tokyo Fimo 167.7 17S.*# 

lExi Amer (21 i*3X iaa* 

(ExT Japan (3* 1125 1169 

(Ex) RK«C (f) 2839 2910- 

’lEx) Smteter Jap (4) 220.1 2273 

Eumtund 269 276a 


-03 450 
-0.1 680 
-19 1.10 
+0.1 045 
-0.7 .. 
-1.1 090 
.. 3.68 
.. 019 
.. 034 
.. 0-10 
-03 392 


CAGLE STAR latmUUST MANAGERS 

Ban Ftoao. Chtetennam. Oteucrotar GLS3 7LO 
02*2 521311 

UK Bteanead tac 889 714 -09 293 

Do Accum 680 725 -02 299 

UK Growth Accum 61.1 665 -04 1.77 

UK ragh me Inc 639 879 +09621 

N Amanean Acorn 6<3 086a -05 1.11 

Far Eastern Accun 969 1010a -04 0X0 

Eiamsn Accum 755 805# -13 0L9* 
UK oil 6 FI me 543 579 +04 630 

Do Accum 580 $87 +04 8X5 

ENDURANCE FINO MAMAOEMBIT LTD 
Attesn Cam™. Hexagon House. 28 W ste a m 
Road. R un Wad FtMi 3LB 
070888966 

Enthnnca 1069 114.1 314 

G0UTA8UE UMIB ADteBOSTRAHOH 
33 Fountam SL fetenCtMSter 
061-236 56B5 

Eounabte PaSon 724 77.1 +02 399 



Extra Hx*me 
Fauncrai 

uW (rwrme 
OMd mcome 

Da Actsm 
mcome 

Mill 

W4U, A Smgjpora 

PKrf« nv 

DP Rmrwest 

Prat Sham fd 
UK Capi ta 

Speoar $43 
Mditw'CSV 
WcteO M’S 
Warvjw-Tn CsouF 

EouW E« lM 

Do Accum [31 


11*5 mic 

rto? rso 

1034 1107c 
US MO 
963 to; 7 
.■91 849 

1M* 106 48 
22 1 »6 
09 5 93 . c 
HO* 117 7C 
17 5 id aw 
699 7ta« 
837 668a 
06 4b 5 
553 H't 
137 4 147 6* 
;« 4 64 < 
lifid 1569 


IHMHTOH IWT MANAGERS LTD 
Part rtcuse 16 FmsSury caoa Lonagn CCJM 
7DJ ' 

01-636 *761 

Fe> East * 6*n 5*5 577 -09 QV 

MintOte 53 7 571 -10 088 . 

NMiMrlOW *77 SO? -06 099 

Pj&uTaOl S'* 5*3 -03 fits 

r Sr SS9 M< -01 on 

UNA Gen 432 499 +03 216 

a UMtr TRUST MANAGERS 
z sT Min. AM. Laam EC3* 6flP 
01 9280356 

Smaae* Cos &3 682 -H 810 

TQuCtn REMNANT 

M+mcud Hsuso. ?. Pu8*a 0(X>. lontW EE*V 

3AT 

01-2*8 1=50 

aneucan Grorteh *14 *41 -0*091 

GenwraGTOwPI 300 539a -0=214 

roSST rSn 4=1 45.1 -OS OKI . 

Grown H3 « '• +02 *57 . 

Mcane Motunry *80 lira *9*658 

SSraSSr 463 5.4 -01 012 

Urn Eqwt* me S| ■•52 

□o Mass =39 MS - . 286 

oSesGJSwTO *7J J07 -07 190 : 

Cwufeer C03 61 1 65 1 . . 2X9 .. 

SokoI Oops 723 77 0a +0.1 150 ^ 

tynoall managers 
18 Caronge Rd. Bmrai 

0273 7328*1 . . 


Do ACOtei 
CxWtMt 
Do ACOtei 
Fer eastern 
DO Accum 

Fn A Pnp 

Oa Accum 
GWCteMM 
Da Asatei 
GW mcome 
Do Accum 


Do ACOtei 7161 762 Sa +11 iH 

milEtenmgi 1555 1059 +02 275 

UK PROVTOCNT UT MANAGCm 

UK House. Cerate SL Sftnewy SPi 38H 
072= 3382*5 

UK Eduty 109.7 1iB6a -03 

Paa+cBasm '560 ifiABte -II .. 

N Anar 11=4 1194* -07 

VANGUARD TRUST ‘ 

6$ Hotoom VtertKL EC1A 2EU 
01036 3053 

Grown toe 1659 197.6 -13 849 

v DO Accum 2704 2877a -19 249 

WiTMd 203 a 2160# -05 503 

bo *CCum 2075 =209 -OX 303 

Spec* Sm 40.7 <33a -02 2=7 

Do ACOtei <09 438 -02 227 

Trustee 133= 1*1 6* -06 401 

‘ Do Accum 2833 2183# -09 *01 

AitrorAOsn 99$ 633 -02 123 

Do Accum $95 833 -02 123 

Uetssr PantafeO CS9.73 81 26# -024 238 

Da Accum C$997 6151 -02*. 236 

Aberg Ftdfel Astt [51 1 133 130 ®* .. IK 

Eta Accent 1133 1200 1J$ 

Far East A Gan fere *94 $26 -06 036 

Do ACCum 494 526 -06 038 


WAROLEV U*€T TRUST MANAOCRD 
Wanfley House, 1. D a rcr nl ifu So. Li 
31-939 1632 


Amanean Trust 
Far East 8 Gan 

fete OrtteD 

income Trust 
Japan Growth 
SmfeB CoraDteWM 
rsennatogy 
Ausnaa 
UK Trust 
European Grown 
Hong Kong 


62 8 67641 
1011 TM7# 
689 739# 
8Z9 889 
124= 1336 
1091 117* 
329 3SJ 
39$ 381 
1=7 5 135 7 
S3 1 MS# 
233 247 


WAVCRLZY ASSET MANAGEMENT 
13. Chartotte So- EdmounM 
031-2=5 1551 

Aumfean Gcdd 182 19* +H0I5 

Paohc Beam i3i iso +02 0=0 

CteKKMnBteGai 563 $0= -06 097 

Game Mat fnd 4101 * 105 6a +0.1 730 

WNtTTHOOAU! IMT TRUST MAMAOERS 
2 Honey Lx EC3 88T 
01-606 9085(6 

SM Dm GW Fuad 675 66B .. 000 

US Govt Bond Fd 430 7 5L0 +0.1 .. 

WMDSOR TRUST MANAGERS L7D 

wanaor hum. 83. Kaigsway. London WC2B 

6SO 

01-405 6331 


Cam AEqttey 

IncnRM 

Growm 


*7 S 506 .. 764 

S*5 559W . 524, 

*8 9 511 -0 1 220 1 


The prices in this 
section refer to 
Tuesday’s trading 


Last Thuraday of month. 


■‘.W J++ +; . 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


28 

14 

592 

77 

68 


93 

18 

14.7 

23 

IX 

19 5 

26 

19 

149 





153 




43 

+5 


. 72 

10? 

• -3 

16 

i.B 198 

bO 


7 1 

142 336 


-5 

57 

22 1*9 

|T>j 


37 

37 IJ9 



25 

22 172 



74 

11 25.1 

55 

-5 

21 

36.146 

106 


7.6 

72 92 

75 


29 

17 159 

U 

•3 

60 

95 125 

60 


10 

12 130 

*b 



. 28.1 

161 

• -? 

17 

1 1 140 

110 

+ 19 

= 1 

19 90 

65 


1 4 

22 93 

198 


49 

25 212 

83 


« 

*2 202 

24 



YU 




44 

+1 

29 

6 6 67 

136 

•2 

29 

21 191 

75 

*-S 

5 4 

72 17 

90 

-3 

107 

119 61 

195 


70 

36 164 

*55 


56 

12 264 

21 


03 

14 163 

46 

-1 

25 

12 US 

139 


31 

22 ?4 1 

72' 

-1 

04 

1 6 166 

24ft 


66 

35 146 

22 

-2 

■ 4 

550 

:i!9 


96 

25 17 5 

116 


4.6 

40 184 

60 


23 

29 117 

B 

-1 

14 

175 36 


*2 

71 

45 11.6 

745 

+5 



233 


3X 

15 25 0 

55 


19 

7.1 19 7 

91 


1 7 

60 24 


+1 

3fi 

4 0 172 




89 

I» 


358 


*3 



176 


88 

87 

Fora 6 Nnm 

87 


48 

*9 112 

220 

1*5 

French Com 

180 


7X 

42 113 

ioa 

» 


94 

#-1 

23 

29 157 

855 

42U 


BSO 


112 

1.6 15X 

1*8 

9* 

GHbca 

146 

*3 

4.1 

28 205 

150 

3b 

GeejCeoq 

96 

. 

3.7 

39 .. 



Gm/houm 


. 



S3 

72 


63 


60 

6X 13* 

165 

too 


190 


6.1 

34 164 

17 

11 

GWJErt Home • 

16 



v 750 

60 

32 


45 


32 

71 1V0 

1B6 

8b 


123 


31 

25 175 

124 

88 


122 

+2 

*J 

35 163 

128 

1(13 

Gated iLMenoa) 

118 


$1 

*3 93 

91 

« 

G>4nyl* Suiaee 

65 

+2 

30 

43 113 


118 


120 

+1 

42 

4 1 12B 

38 

19 

Greenwich Cable 

30 

+1 



115 

aa 


88 

-S 

86b 86 7-0 ' 

180 

lbO 

Guennev Wffin* 

180 


35 

19529 

92 



+1 

21 

28 121 : 

49 

38 


45 

-1 

. IX 

40 133 ! 

210 

133 

Harmy 8 ttonp 

175 

-2 

61b 3X21.7 , 

255 



23S 


5.7 

24 21.6 

46 

26 


42 


T.l 

26 16.7 

«0 

383' 

.- Heavmee 

430 


123 

23 169 

390 

293' 


390 


123 

33 153 

145 



144V 




415 

19b 

Hnte-Ptxro 

I9S 


81 

31 124 

96 

90 

boytand Pan 

HdM Eiqcncrrt 

75 

93 


29 

21 142 

30' 

7 

MOOSCfr 

28 

r-a 


26 180 



Hoogion 

108 

-2 

30 

158 

115 

Hooen Hyteumjn 

123 

• +3 
-1 

4.6 

37 160 

3*0 

200 


330 

-8 

60 

TX 202 



tfejteies Food 

24V 

-1 

0.7 

29 17 6 



■ Hioiarjd Bae 


-1 

ft* 

S3 75 







27 173 

230 

165 

HunOwqn Tech 
INSTBB 

210 

180 

+10 

21 

32 

.10 253 
(X 154 








115 

44 


90 



. 103 

103 

66 

mrraBwi 











42 92 

9 

3'. 





. 20 


lb 





32 

as 





25 213 

340 

333 


3*0 


33 

.1031.1 


116 


173 


72 

46 163 

62 

36 

22 

2 

jnptem 

Jteivini 

SO 

7 

+4 

04 

03 25 X 
.. 02 

148 

IDS 














Just Rubber 

56 


25 

42 SX 

330 

2bJ 

KLP 



47 

13 172 

90 

67 






300 

220 

Henynn Sees 

280 


1*5 

93 122 

113 

55 

67' 

KewW Suytome 

Klart-TokmK 

74 

• 

1.7 

23 1L0 
i L9 137 


67 

LPA me 

93 


39 

42 62 

63 

37 

Lteteaw 

63 



63 7 8 







54 121 



Leaura few 


• 1 


.. 203 




105 

•+a 

38 

36 119 



Lodge Car* 

78 

29 

37 163 




118 


6X 

69 106 

196 

133 


190 


32 

12 it? 

62 

90 

r7 

86 

Lyander Pm 

25 

+3 



745 

IfiO 

MMT Comp 

?*0 


66 

28202 







86 ex 



Magneee Mswrot* 



AX 

6.7 84 

73 

54 

IrUnnel 

7(1 


14 

2219.9 

90 

90 


90 



30 213 

178 

92 

Mamn (RoraKD 

156 


4.7 

116 

135 

101 

93 

Maxwm 

Meytar at* 

12 

105 

126 

-1 

-2 

43 

1.1 

4.1 213 

09 171 

283 

195 



r+5 

54 

25 132 

220 

140 

Meow Tech 

140 


63 

38 >16 

98 

75 

fe?aatew»e 

98 


*3 

44 230 

18 

9 

ntirnory COtnp 

13 


232 

.. 21 

75 

23- 


23 


5X 21 7 1 5 

148 

140 

M8<w«rSw»(i 

1*5 


36 

25 1*5 

390 

350 

UefTvoown wne 

355 


86 

24 89.1 

V» 

9b 

W BiMte 

TOH 


6.1 

55 152 

102 




-4 

35 

38 13$ 
23177 

95 

69 


73 


1.7 


360 


EM 


29 

06 623 

220 

118 




57 

4.6 102 

47 

22 


3* 


16 

53 M9 

1S3 

8? 


173 


57 

33 794 

385 

=31 


3R5 


att 

092&6 

193 

16b 

M4wera Brown 

ins 


at 

19*03 

220 

130 

UK worta 

190 


74 

39 100 


13 

MiMmos 



.. 1 


158 

m 


140 


20 

14 23 

124 

fa 


120 


88 

33 ISO 

156 

149 


ISO 

-1 


44 233 

50 

25 


48 


21 ' 

23' 

16' 

Moms [WMem) 

16 



. • 64 




70 


35 


16* 

12$ 


184 

+4 

<3 

-261*2 

367 

ST7 


290 


BX 

$0 158 

31 

■3 

New a Nat Rsa 

16 

+ 1 

2* 

150 42 

5 

l 

DO Wmfe 

3 



73 

11.6 ' 

95 

14 

n 

New Errand Props 

: 16 
£83 


0 




13 



33 1S> 

136 

91 


129 


43 

190 

60 


60 

• 

12 

17 6J5 

135 

83 


115 


3* 

30 123 

*6 

14 



+4 

26 

83 52. 

75 

35 


35 


34 

•3* 


3* 







» 



13 204 ! 

293 

180 





35-'. 

23 


32 


21 

6 ? .SI 1 

143 

8b 

PCT 

108 


'J 




. - 


— 


— — "■ • • 


22L 

255 

LOW 

166 

79 

56 

158 

130 

560 

206 

52 

10 

53 

30 

175 

143 

152 

80 

1*8 

63 

39 

23 



abo 

135 

27 

14 

3* 

28 

116 

2* 

73 

31 

125 

66 

SO 

25 

176 

115 

283 

115 

245 

SO 

156 

63 

1*3 

115 

5'. 

. 2 

S’ 

■ 2 

388 

158 

43 

16 

46 

33 

123 

85 

AO 

1* 

105 

aa 

86 

40 

42 

19 

100 

70 

87 

Si 

85 

63 

200 

1*5 

139 

114 

126 

73 

48 

14 

130 

10* 

176 

138 

195 

1=0 

106 

71 

26 

7 

350 

171 

3S5 

253 

80 

68' 

•S* 

22‘ 

yan 

168 

185 

110 

101 

50 

113 

1=8 

zm 

136 

70S 

131 

1B0 

1fl 9 

131 

86 

37 

37 

183 

113 

31 

12 

99 

M 

150 

SO 

03 

48 

38 

20 

99 

87 

71 

65 

220 

8ft 

» 

» 

100 

71 

38 1 . 

17' 

93 

58 

129 

no 

330 

175 

235 

ISO 

200 

110 

13* 

117 

m 

137 

106 

ISO 

52 

140 

100 

365 

194 

205 

130 

188 

>20 

1W 

70 

272' 180 

81 

63 

SG 

47 

144'. 

113 

50 

32 

180 

135 

*70 

270 

. 98. 

65 

280 1*0 

75 

4 

545 

<20 

135 

93 

M 

85 

100 

53 

lOG 

66 

Its 

75 

19 

i* 

95 

66 

98 

*3 

186 

■50 

10 

A'. 

27 

18'. 

130 

98 

. 90 

48 

157 

151 

220 

185 

96 

76 

4 

4 

158 

118 

38 

3= 

97 

JO 

68 

25 

10* 

80' 

27 

16 


it* 


96 
114 
253 

. Sac §• 
*20 
91 

Japan 218 



24 

D7 


. 

69 

22 

344 

-1 

64 

36 

36.5 

+2 

15* 

52 

270 


82 

1.1 


-a 

6.6 

25 

739 


KX 

52 

18.1 


0.1 

02 

-i 

34 

ax 

405 


51 35 

102 81 
122 95 
199 155 
236 201 
101 89 

173 116 

166 140 
118 90’« 

174 139 

169 135 
305 237 
370 300 
207 157 1 .- 
143 112 
94 79 

274 217 
62 33 

74 56 

115 65 
105 BO 1 
358 288 


Stewmt Entetp *5 
TH AuMTMO 6* 

TR Ojy 01 Lxn DM107 
TR tod A Gon 188 
TH Natural Res =20 
TR Naroi America 9i 
TR Pact be Boon 172 
TR Property 179 

TH Teen • 103 

TR TruaUM 158 

Temple Bar 1*9 

Thoromonon 278 
Tlnog Sncurod Cap 355 
Trans Oeeamc 19B 
Tribune 140 

Trmlexwst Inc 91 
US Deoontm 273 
Wong Fteuurcws 37 
werapooi 56 

wmwtbo u om Egy io= 
Witter 97 

Yeoman 350 


dnr YW 

Chga pence •» FYE 


r 06 13 

+1 03 39 29.8 

-1 580 S2 30X 

-2 5.7 10406 

11 0 54 SOX 

26 2.9*62 

1* 08 .. 

-3 57 32392 

78 . 25 486 

60 36 3*8 

-2 810 5 *200 

• -3 11.9b *J 33.0 

55 28 «1 

• -3 4X 29 40.1 

15S 17.4 8= 
-1 93 3.4 5*J 

• 2X0 78 182 

= 39 *03 

33 32*3* 

l -3 4.8 4 .7 SS.1 

• -S 15 1 b *3 36.1 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


1 Amencan Express C3* f i 

Argute A3 

Bousraod X 

Bnunrxa Arrow 137 

■ Own MM 619’. 

■ Do -A- «9 

Been i40 

Enfl Trust 118 

Ereo • 22* 

EUtforation *00 


Frost tST B3 

Goode (0 A Ml 115. 

Hwrooraon Aqntei 820 
KM 163 

MAI 3*0 

MAG. 235 

Marow iae House 287 

Ptetex: few Tst 11* 

. Do warns S3 

Snwh New Court 173 


■VO 4.4 160 
a 7ao 3X MX 
te-"+ 70 a 3.7 13* 

-3 59 42 303 

-1 4.0 34 163 

80 27 144 

32 3313.1 
-10 93 1 3 335 

. . 6.4 7.7 60 

+4 =5 22 3Z2 

5-3 179 23 163 

1230 79 67 
-5 229 67 69 

61 2626# 
200 75 50 

ox a* .t 

*-2 iQ.0 55 65 




G W Joynsan and Co report 
SUGAR (Rram C. CxamBtaw) 
FOB 

oa — iswMaa 

Dec _ isawao 

March 165.B-65.6 

May 1 ©,6-692 

Aug 174D-7ZX) 

Oa 178JJ-77.0 

Vot — — - 1795 


LONDON METAt EXCHANGE 
Unofficial pricti 
Official TnRKnrarflgnro* 
PrtcaiaC par metric toana 
SBvorin papep pertiuy oanew 

RHCMI Won & Ca in NP«t 

COPPSIGRADEA 

Cash 080X0-881.50 

Three Months . 90050-90140 

Vo) 2900 

.Tone : Stopdy 

STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash - 856.00-857 JK) 

TTireo Months. 877O097WJ0 
vy m 

Tone Wte 

•LEAD 

Caeh 255.00-250.00 

Threw Months . 257^0-25400 

V6I : 1300. 

Tons : — Steady 

ZBtC STANDARD 

Cash — 46000400.00 

Vol ' NB 

Tone Ida 

ZMCffiQHOMOE 

Cash 526.00-527 JO 

Threa Months. 53Q.fS531.00 

Vol ™-750 

Tone — — Steady 

SILVER LARGE 

Cash 35O.00-35i.00 

ThnseMofShs. 35&50-35EL00 

Vol 4 

Tone Quiet 


COMMODITIES 


Three Months. 9505085990 

vol — — — NB 

Toro fdte- 


^6h 75MX775C-00 

ITrse Months . 768J30-7B9.00 
W 45500 

Tone - Btnartirw 


Cash 2630-2660 

Three Months^ — 2647-2655 

Vol 48 

Tone Quiet 


MEAT AND LIVESTOCK 

COMMISSION 
Average fatetock prices at 

repreaentrtuB rnsritm on 
OthAurgiHt 

' Gft Cbum. 9557p per kg hir 
^:^eep 1 5EL46p per kg est 


'At per Kg bv 


LOICON HEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
Pig Contact 
p.parMk> 

Mot® open Close 

Unq. 102J 

Sep Unq. 109.8 

Oa Unq. 114J 

Wo* Unq. 1155 

^ki Unq. 101.5 

Fjb Unq. IQ), g 

“w Unq. lou 

^ Unq- 102 j0 

fay Una 102 D 

lun Una 1025 

Vot4 

Pig Meat vafeB 

LONDON MEATFUTURES 
exchange 
U ve Cam* Contract 

P-pwkflo 

WOn Open CJoso 

Una 98.0 

ff S 3M 

" Unq- S6D 

Unq. . 99 jj 

S’ Una 90S 

£f Una 905 

m Unq. SLO 


En^eod and Woles; 

Cats* nos. down 7.1 %,awa. ' 
price. 9551pl-0itB 
SHeep nos. up &3 %,aw. 
wSri5560pf+33l) 

Pta nn. down 3.0 14, me. 
price. 77.84p (-C94) 

Scotland: - 

Catflenm. upiD.7%.a»e. 
priced 95.74p{+1.04) 

Shaap noe. dawn SfSi %. am. 
price. 75T-00 1+1283} 
im nos. - — — %.avo. 

•P»“ — ' ' ; 


LONDON GRAIN FUTURES 
Cpertome 

Mam# • 

jwntn Ctosa Close 

1Q3.65 101.70 

No* 106.10 1Q4.M 

Jf" 109.10 107.M 

Mar 111.40 10950 

May 113.90 i“3g 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 


Epertonm 


Month 

Open 

Ciooa 

Nov 

128.0 

129.3 

Fed 

137JJ 

M03 

& 

21 Od 

211.0 

2205 

222.0 

Nov 

60.0 

3ZX 


GALL ftelgtt FMorte LW 
report SftO per index point 
freight Ends* 

High/Low Goao 
O«06 672.0-6670 6890 

Jan 67 695.0-688.0 695.0 

Apr 87 7400*738,0 7400 


Vol: 1fl7 lots 
Open Interest 1922 


TANKER REPORT 
HrghAJW CK»8 

Aug 86 1000-1000 10060 


VffWRB 

Wheat 

BartBy I! 


344 

122 












































THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 



' From yoar portfolio cud check your 
cighl shait pn<£- mdvemenlx. Add mem 
up tq give you your overall lotaL Check - 
(His aganm the 7 daily 'dividend figure 

e Missed on this page. IT it matches yoir 
ve won outright or a share of the total 
daily' prize money - stated..; If you are a 
winner follow the daim procedure on the 
backiof your canL- You must always have 
your card available wheii .ciaimn*, 


» » • ■ ** »: " p A \ 9 ™ [ 

■litesSsfSPte 




ho m Rea Btos .. si- 
wa TIB. RoKCMd&fl HU T31 

MB 60 uS 0 ** « 


PtaTCnraXJCi t*v 

car* (mum 

BaffuB 

qimuhumt 
aww »Qng 


MW) 50 

% 

?* . st 

KHjnum 5u 

0 223 




• 

12 

XB 150 

251 217. 


2*7- 


9.1 

17 117 

2*8 131 


t*1- 

+• 



234- 163 


156 

• -2 

100 

54 11.1- 

5*8 153 


30 


154 

41140 

3>6. 223 


25* 


11.1 

4.4 112 

318 228 

Oo-B' 

258 

-5 


411,0 

251 188 


213 


100 

S0Z72 







325 .195 

Young A. 1 • 

325 

+10 

ia* 

12 2X4 


' 

- 





BUILDINGS AND ROADS 





0 TlnKNwififffiLliaM 

DAILY DIVIDEND 
£4,000 

Claims required for 
+28 points 

Claimants should ring 025+53272 


UK 

H«n lm Comunr 



as 

10 130 

•+, 

7.1 

54 07 

-Z 

Ml 

45 80 

+’i 

192 

xriij 

s 

500b 70 50 

9 

529 

70 671 

• V 

7> 

X7Q0 


-4 1U 
-7 21-7 

I 12 
' « 
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» 7.6 

• 1U 
. '07 

-IS 

-« 70 

i-3 &n 
»-4 103 

2S0 
29 

as 

fl.0- 


2 

a 

64 

568 
213 
IBS 
37 
«9 
203 
250 Cny 

,40 - 

58 
M7 
£9V 
■262- 
X . 

2 16? 

360 
4 
42 


520 -10 

100 

10 170 

166 b-S 


59 109 

102 

41 

42 90 

\3 -1 

01 

OJ 203 

82 

06 

a7 &9* 

S6S b-7 

130 

20 W 2 

220 b-3 

100 

45 T12 

133 

XI 

1.1 244- 

43 -1 • 


ia. 

196 -2 


„ , 

310 

21 

a7154 

313 -2 

50 

1.8 220 

210 -2 

ti 

XI 1X7 

59 

04 

105 195 

160 -1 

1.0 

05 . 


10 


315 B-5- 

20 

09 212 

38 

XI 

551X1 

174 ^ 

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24 1X5 

370 . B-3 

89 

2,4 mo 

66 

to 

10 504 

5, 

40 

90 142 

za .+3 

' 80b 31 152 

300 • 

60- 

21 401 

16, 

XI 

10 «9 

114 -f- 

X4 

XI 17.4 

36 

10b 

> X6 ,50 

190 H-5 

01 

12 1,0 

,20 

82a 60 100 

80 

16 

45 102 


17 

31 70 

1238 s 

10 

a* .'■ 


T2J 

48 90 

250 b-3 

17.1b 68981 

253 -Z. 

170 

7.1 90 



350 »-S 

150 

*4 120 

171 

1.4 

08 261 

Z35 

U 

IB 182 

55 

07 

12 8.1 




36 

0.1 

01290 

46 

am 02 970 

266 


60110 

8B -3V 

70 

54 125 

17 -4 

1.1 

60 X4 

S3 -7 

25 


28 

10 

62120 

£117 

5W 


rov +v 



2* 

5 

75 

XI 1X4 

;« 

1 

79 

40 .92 


a -5 

72 

30 140 

£21 V +1 V 


_ • 

14 

i 

11 

22 205 

8 

i 


.. 124 



FINANCE AND LAND 


248 220 Affaprorti . 
184 128 MMUrn 
715 288 ArttXagasw 
210 110 BarMay Toco 
26 18 M 
263 194 Caedorer 
43 16 C w W — » 

29V 17 €qu*y * On 
IBS 132 hoy a Onw 
194 153 MUM - 
78 82 Bhobw Lna 
96 60 0o*% - 

148 114 HaimiWrtrM 
220 220 Tempted 


220 U U .. 

128 -3 U 25 U 

625 .. 27.5 X4 6.1 

208-2 

£1BV 17.1 09 742 

250 5.7 23 3BL5 

32 +2 

27*7 -*» 13 4.7 253 

132 63 5218.1 

181 -1 22b 43 253 

67 
£68 
144 
220 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


J3lai3=i 


** • Ml 


CINEMAS ANDTV 


270-178 JM0.TV-A' 
. 52 27 Graap ton 

3*0 178 HTV N/V - 
368 283 UWT.rtdgs 
380.188 Scot TV’S' 
278 149 TVS. N/V . 

46 31 TSW . 

226 223 ThsopsTV 


-1 

119 56110 
29 .60-01 


114 13 95 

♦2 

2L3 62115 


«0 40 107 

♦2 

Mlb'. 00 100 


.20 50124 






OVER FIFTEEN YEARS 

WIN aiN-Andu ION 2001. 103**4 

KS'.-aavcnw a tn 2001 wb i 
9T 95V Con* BN 2000 9T.4 

137 1 . (ITVftMS T*M99841 12SV 
Tl IN 84', Copy 10N 2002 -10a'- 

12*'. ICOV&cb 12% 199M2- 1»>« 
US'-.-BO TOMB- B'iN 2002 102V4 

112'- 83 V Tress 10% 2003 10* ‘•I 

1 39 v, 18 V Tram 13-A 2000-03 129'- 
123*. ItM T/m IV. ■% 2001-04 114 >. 
tl£V W- Trees 10V 2004 104N 

60'. AVFend X/% 1960-04 56'- 

108 1 - 90V OOnv B'jN' 2004 TOO 1 - 
io9'« 98’. Com f .Na-aoos inr. 
MB'- 90 -Con* 9VH2C03 MXft. 
11 ?N 94 '-Ek3- T0‘.% 2009 .109'*. 

MMVII^TOms 12’ +k 20034* l2f- 
9Sv 79V Tn«** . 8% 2002-06 - BSV 
W. 10? CWW 9ft 2006 103'- 

.127-- 104'- Treat 11 2003-07 116 
24- -23 Tte0.8'.*»2OO7-26 2*>. 
»4V 92'- TOwf I'AtW . BT. 
1*3 , -315'-Tr8*t 13’-% 2004-06 133V 
. 65V *7V 17 ms 3S 2009 38V 

72V 57-. Inn. 5'.% 2006-12 E> -.« 
93V -78VT0M- -INN 2012-15 BBV 
,-<436 ataVEu* -ON. 201347 128V 

UNDATED 

46>. 3a v const*' «. ‘ *Jv 

42 34'< w» Ln 3 v% - 38 

S2V 44-.CMV iW- S0’< 

34v 29UTMS . 3% . . 3T-. 

29*.’ 24’. Conaota 2'^v 27V 

. C9v Sa'-Treas 2’.% 27V 


-lUVTrwsit 2N 1888 122V 

- St '- Trees It 2N 1990 MB'. 

1I»’>TmU IL 2S 1996 119'- 

- 96V Treu (L2 N2D01 103V 

■ S3'- TrBU tL2’ N 2003 tO?V 

; MV Trias L 2X2906 105’- 

. 97'-TT4W IL2 IJ V 2009 IDOv 

. 97 TiWS lU'.-N 2011 106V 

- 79 V Tress 12’. N 7013 B8V 

- 87'- TiM»U2’.N 2016. 98'. 

• ■97V Tnu-U'.N 2016 A S7V 

86 V Tims 12 \NaS0 94 v 


109 

u . 

103 
95 - 
. M 
108 
■ mo 

u 
02 
95 

04 
04 
06 

. 10 . 1 " 

90 
95 

100 
36.1 

91 .9182 
lOI 9571 

9.1 9226 
83 0962 

BO 0120 

95 9295 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


n*-*. rt-‘‘‘ ,pr 
MW''**''' 


MO 183 «Mk« 

86 66 AMbatNt (Hm) 
2S6 185 An NH Z 
12v bv Bankanertco - 
2B 179 Bar* CK MU 

MiUlinMMl- 
^ 290 MiUmW 

§o S 

« 3? nSmA 
740 410 BRWR SUM - 

4MM6 O^hST* . 

Si LS £■« W0 ft0"O4 

378 3*2 GhtbaI Mi 


00 a? 7.1 
■ . 37J 

150 17 


160 57.113 
200 SO 08 
356 55 55 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


178 AAH 

.160 . AG8 R4MOI 
85 AM ' 

-575 -APV 

'80 Aanraon 
-173 AOtutn 
'207 Ataoodra WV00 
.144 Mu l t 
130 «8>M 
170 Appiadon 
32 AfWMOn 
23 Amour 
355 Aiti 8 Lacay 
41 AlMMh 
255 Ass Br Eng 8% 
37 V Avers • 

263 Awoflutaw 
*3 MWiMM 
138 BBA -. 

363 err wa . 

82 0ETBC .' .. 
277'. BOC 
-237 BTR 
148 BjPcoO 

‘•2fl 

■ZM BMtPWUls 
128 Bano tna 
112 fljrMra 
'160 Bartow RaiU 
*0 Sarrtjw Haobim 
180 Banon Transpcw 
: 21 asyaaB tenarttst 
08 Beanori GWfca 
a? Bwufart 
.151 - Baazar pxj 
318 Daecnain 


233 -4 

174 

117 

.-575 -IB 

82 -1 

217 -7 

310 
157 
150 

T7D • . 

■ 37 -a 

'27 


408 -2 

SB 

307 • 

288 -6 

.MB 4 

17V- ' -V 

355 -6 

270 0-5 

.WO 

.-ffi 

2*7 -5 

-58 

250 -10 

■22 
•tai 
■61 
214 

386 ■ -12 


11 1 45 13.1 

55b 55 23.0 
62 7BT22 

155 25 185 
60 7X B.1 

112 52 155 
85 -25 185 


19 BSflKK . 43 

229 ' BansWJ (SUM] 2*3 


102 « GuamaPItt 
251 208 HM*m 
430 333 HMSmol 
74 55 HK£h«ngk 
520 318 JOMpn Uso 
198 136 K^«jSa 
955 mnMn.Betl 
451 293 LU*a. 

853 638 MenuyU' 
<53 190 ' Do n A 
599 417 U6MB0 .- 
XJ 101 W Am, Be 
593 <26 Nm MBS - 
,2 80 ObWM» 

4*8 260 FMnda*.- 


Mncut* U' 
Do#* A 


% 6 55 62 
0 54 815 
155 AS 114 


114 35281 

2.1 15 1*7 

03 02 500 

05b 15 14 
337 
35 14 53 

17.9 

23-15 125 
1Bl7 S0 145 
24 25 £5 


•05 .amstono 96 

MM Btcpsk • 126 

1 214 BauM 507 

i 310 Staweod . 578 

:S 

78 SBMnU) 106 

84V BnrW QuaScM 137 

105 Snmuoni Mn 160 

147 Back Arrow 153 

ITS BMck (Pew) 243 

35 HMM - *2 

133 BUX 133 

1B6 sue Arrow 560 

167 BodyeOH 290 

285 aoJaJ - 343 

- Sir Sens 213 

V S' soutun IWR) 19 

2S8. Bowaor 296 

18V Bom lac tlftv 

.73 Br*cr>wM» Grp 129 

313 BBiaoHr .313 

62 fraswe* fifl 

33 V Pr*ngr*en 46V 

35 Brngem^i «0 

. 110 BUM 149 

.139. 8mfei*G<M4y 2T0 

•115 B, BM6 Dig Ago 126 

IBB 8SS Group 260 

97 .BSVPMH 114 

198 Br Vta 320 

299 . .BWOT HM .336 

' 34 Bromwow Mtt 118 

15 ftomlng 26 

' 25- BncteTctf 33 

154 Brown & Tbwf* 158 

' 19 Bream (John) 27 

4 Bnrtona (***} 64 

200 B Jpuon ' 272 

ix • 204 

. 50 BimWAnaaRM 72 

56 Canure Eng 100 

S' CapuoM SI 

56 Capa mb .73 

253 CsrCU Eog 425 

59 easavjs 105 

25' Cms& 33 

4- Ccnm 3 5av 4- 

13 -C miuhibi ma 21 

.45 OHnd 90 

85' Oianbanam Ph 87 

9 Oanor* AH*. 96 

193 Chsiur Com 243 

SI6 Oang * 540 , 

. 263 Cliiaw H - 273 

' 36 Cbnalyttmt - 46 


35 *6 125 
25 7b 103 7.7 
15b 35 . 
107 5.6131 
11 62 U 
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17.1 44 16JJ 

15 3.7 37.1 

75 75. 75 
7*1 75 78 

6.1 48280 

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•85 If 43.1 
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34 IS 355 
5H 49 124 

6.1 45 0.1 
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7.1 45-103 
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146 35 65 

20 06 241 
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tai 47135 


175 S7 138 
32 35 94 
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05 .15 267 
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10 1419.7 
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315 168 
19’r 17 
371 180 
102*. 63 
1 10 96 

123. » 
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97 81 
88 72 


erne (daman) 

damn Son 

WwiAJ 
Cotoroa Gp 

Comonoo Taai 
Concatimc 

COr* Stationery 

Coca (wmj 

Cooksor 

CopMtilF) 

Costa 

Comnty Pope 
Cdmi Da Gron 
Craw wnouan 
Crewn houm 
C tanmna 3'ft 
DSC 
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DUM 8 UM A 
Dawaa * W—gi gn 

dTIj Rue 
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Drtoa Hew 

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Dotson Park 
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Dyson U&J) 

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£66'. 

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215- 

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295 212 

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118 «-a 
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174 -5 

275 

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100 
115 
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313 345 Eftsttm Prod 265 +2 

221 156 EdOro IBS 0-2 

277 214 Efi 228 

45* 29V Bomf 3G 

153 102'.- Btco 134 . 4 

29 V 17V BectrokA (AEJ "B 1 C20 -V 
10* 63 EKtt IS) 65 0-2 

26*- JBV tnrwn C22 -IV 

38i 262 Engton enma CUy 332 *a 

26*- 19*.- Eocsson (lAq B £21 -V 

ISA 134 Ejsirv, House 143 r ' 
177V 130V ELropean Fames 134V -IV 
142 112 Do 5N Prf 131 
342 158 FMrad 218 * 

2 U 13* ExpvnM In, i8B t -S 

411 312 ,E*>W 360 0*6 

55 22 Falcon *0 -1 

42- Ij.-Paaow Agnc-ma 36 
VU 106 F*T* pH) 126 0.1 

75 60 RV mornar GO 

626 406 Foots 533 -6 

67 35 Fjtmnon 62 

12* B* Ftcxaao CAW 102 

68 31V FoOM 46 

123 ■ 99 Fogarty 99 -1 

41V XV FoSes Grom N/V 3«V -V 
IBS IX Focharpa & Harvey 173 

X « France (Tnomaai 50 0 

Ui 84 COM 97 -2 

585 258 OKN 256 • -65 

3T0 250 OT KG *10 

118 60 Qarton Eng 108 

157 100 Qawwnar ITS 0 

150 HI QW 115 -« 

11 V7S6V Gtteo 948 -0 

344 184 OynMd 300 -6 

505 ■■ 2SP * Gomg Karr 270 0-10 

iB2 107 - aaroan HUga 138 -3 

312 206 Granada 280 -2 

lOv 6V Grow*** 7V 0 

83 59V Hatn FTadston S3 


164 

136 -4 

203 

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SI 0 . 
23 *3 

166 0-1 V 

£167 -3 

107 -IV 

El 17 V -V 



232 13« Hal Era 
162 128 Hat (MT 
265 180 Haase 
290 230 Kama 
41 2SV Humean kid 
49 20 Hernti 

191 Ml Hanson 
190 145 DoSNCn* 
116 98 DO 5><N Pf 
124 V 116V Do ION 
263 IX lUrgroas es 
275 175 Huns (Pt>*>} 


150 32 HanlM 96 -1 

100 • 61 Hay (Norm*!) 173 

221 140 Htpworm Gararetc 190 -3 

201 96 Hesar 161. *J 

96 85 Haunt (J] 831 -2 

142 122 Hr^pata 6 Job 135 

81 62 HoAd Bres 0 

106 68 Hot Uayd S3 

265 145 HooUKont 2*0 

120 9T Hawdan 95 -1 

3io 234 Himeng Aeaoe zto 

115 88 HaiOnfl Qroop 101 0 . 

285 207V l Ucft an VWwnvoa Z74 *1 

181 115 M - 161 4 

115 211 .team 230 r,-*~ 

295 256- Jaorspnt Bqmw 2a 
133 96 V Jarone Math 130V • 4t 

SIS 433 Jomsan Caamm 565 
216 133 Jonnson UWay 101 -2 

44V 22V Jormaon 4 FB 32 -V 

346 236 Jcrrao* - - 316 

140 66 jonee 4 SMpnwi 126 -2 

132 67 JoiedW (Thona^ 126 +3 

29 21. * Itauimn 1 28 

a ■-2S-.-K0ori.;.. •- 31 

325 161 -■ Mauay kid 3iQ 

130 105 Kennedy SmWe IM • 

294 - 130 ' «anrw* Ml ' 713 v-i? 

211-123 mean B Si . ■ zoo •« , 


315 33 
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170 63 93 

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60 55 S3 
471 40 115 

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104 44 90 

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74 84 120 
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70 681X7 

64 74 133 
64 05 110 


143 54 67 
107 57 123 

90. 42 1X5 
27 70 111 
60n 45 1X4 


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65 51 08 
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90b 57 Ml 
145 40 164 

07 l.B KLB 
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50 63 17.4 
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61 62 05 

20 56 60 

05 721X9 
41 82 MO 

54 U 124 
17.1 66 67 

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60 48 61 
XI 10 103 
47 40 130 

157 1.7 25* 

1XS 43 ISO 
155 57 10.4 
57 61 119 
103 33 1X7 

05 67 133 

25 XI 174 
1X0 73 7.7 
64 40 164 
143 7.0 16.1 
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10 43 69 

670 14 140 
800 45 
82 7.7 
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Wagon kid 
MMarpSW) 
wwrfnrt Gun 
waarnaa 
wangwooe 


Wtkas (James) 
Wean Mags 
was Go 
W oi a aim 

WOOd (Arose) 
Wood (5*1 
WoodMue 6 A* 
Wjnonam Eng 
Young (H) 


56V **! 
115 -1 

,80 

323 m*2 

107 -2 

177 -1 

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71 

108 
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90 -2 

2S0 6-2 
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623 -10 

135 

513 -7 

66 

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71 

56 • 

143 


121 51 127 

1.1 IS 210 
19 17171 
51 28 2X6 
Ml 4 4 105 
41 35 B« 
10 17 216 

107 

43 61 34 7 
70 72 ISO 

35 13 197 
7J 86 79 
120 50116 
96 64 97 

17.1 17 364 

86 64 

1S0 29 164 

16 U 165 
140 44 113 

36 51 112 

35b 45 115 
47 33 140 


312 SOD 
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120 33 
430 271 
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54 31 
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243 9> 
300 IX 
48 15 

143 SI 
3i 2, 
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sis m 
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97 18 

29-. 11*. 
153 41 
280 80 
215 153 


Gttoat N Res 

Goa: pm 

ffl western Res 
& Gas 
ICC 04 
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KCA Drwig 
LASWO 
Do Uim 
New London CM 
Pen aeon 
Prenwi 
Am DuttSi 

Snte 

Swotena 

SOverngn 

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Ultramar 


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14 42 1X5 

29 50 
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174 157 U 
142. 693 

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17 6 

236 41 
SOD 60 62 
86 5* 247 

116 

71 110 2b 

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150 96 4 6 


OVERSEAS TRADERS 


INSURANCE 



79 

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391 

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393 

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101 

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72 

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19 42 62 
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185 

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Cam linen 
Eg-ylU. 

Can Acooent 
GR6 

HatkiC E 
Hogg Racwtson 
Lag* 6 Cm 
L ondon 6 Man 
LmlWln. 

Mann* MtLan 


Saogwck Oo 
Siawart Wrsoo 

Swi (0a 
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masFaow 


Barr 6 WA A' 
Boosev 6 Hawns 


nm tenure 
GRA 

HantkegwJfcoo 
Hornao Travel 
m Loom 
Junta's nogs 
Lae M 


Saga Hons 
San«mon Go 


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100 

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90 

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50 50 70 
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55 4,4 l£i- 
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210 70 220 
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BV 31. A»GMd . 

S* 33 AA1T-7 
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41 22 KX 

196 120 Auer Warn 
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141 

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79 

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91 

366 

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366 

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209 

145 

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05 

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159' 

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30 

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73 

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66 

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35 

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230 

179 

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194 

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135 

98 

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193 

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245 


52 

2331.4 

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419 


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31,30 

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106 

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29 

27 99 

49 

383 

31 

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58 

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650 

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50 

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112X0 

79 

86 

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63 

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20 

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129 

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176 

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133 

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19* 

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143 


90 

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91 

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Moonai cobs 

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121 

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165 

165 

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ns 


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605 

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196 

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338 


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518 

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90 


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390 210 
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158 §1 

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350 175 
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160 65 

l3V 6V 
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157 64 
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123 60 

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297 225 
781 Sll 
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556 873 
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136 73 


BO* 

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E Rand GoU 
E Rand Prep 
FS Con* 

R* Da* 
Gemor Tki 
Ganoai 
Gen Urang 
GFSA 

GM Kalgoorl 


MalayanMkitag 

Mano ml i 

MaHsBre 

Wargtl 


H TZ 

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Bung* Bat! 
Troooh 


69V- 3iv VWReeta 
544 233 vanamon 
,05 50 WaUdraear 

90 35 uogw 

17 10V war** Cebary 

5*5 2*8 HWrent 
310 12a western Ataes 
29V 15 yaesum Deep 
196 IM w as mn Mawig 
2® 113 Was, Rana Cans 
wo 80 wnen Creak 
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66 . 20 W* Mgel 
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ADM U*l 79 

Acer 55 .3 

Artngren Sacs 1’0 -3 

BMjnwo 138 • 

Barer (P) 284 

Biwflord 535 #-5 

Br Land 172 • 

Brwon 159 

Card (A! 6Eon* *2 

Cop 6 Counties 233 

Caraai Prop 273 -,0 

CMbomai ire -2 

CJWnartWd . 470 

CALA 860 

CUM NckoBs 1*8 

cenneas 250 -3 

Control Sacs 18’. 

Country 6 New 119 +1 

County B'- 171 


r-3 

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120 71 49 
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51.4 5? 73 
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325 233 
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320 273 

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266 147 
288 2,8 
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380 Z75 
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IQ-.510 
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297 253 
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MB 85 
900 525 
885 675 
615 475 
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175 142 


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EvamWUed* 108 • 

:SjSr 

GrPORM • 178 

Oreycost 0*4 

Hat-cod Op £13 +V 

Marebre CourerywtdaSQS -S 

H a ulier w n 445 -5 

Ob -A' *35 -5 

Hanowr Dnaa 2*6 

Hamanger 290 -S 

kray 355 +5 

Jennyn ias 

Lwng PUB 300 *2 

uoa kwasrere 76 

Land Swuaas 320 

Lon * EdB Tai *35 

Do 6’ *. 243 -2 

Lon 8 (Von snap 240 -3 

Lon Shop ftnp ■ ,7, 

Lynton 338 • 

MEPC 325 -1 

Mpkivney 95 

Mc*by Sacs iiB 

Markneaoi 50 

Menvaki Moore 190 


17.1 60 144 
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41 25 144 

6.1 5, 197 

66 17 216 
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17.1 36 195 

37b 30 127 
90 E, 224 
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Mranwgi CO 

Uwtw 725 

Miewow (AM 102 

Muramt EfIV 

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Pnaw Marmot 250 

Prop & Rev 228 

Prop Hwgs ,45 

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RegUan 775 s 

mwoniupn 595 -5 

Rush 6 TonreMnj 260 -3 

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Spa MH 96 • 

Swoon Esmes 170 

Speyfwwk 370 -5 

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Swcklav 88 -1 

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226 

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THE 


TIMES 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


August 7, 1986 



A s a frequent visitor to 
the UK during the past 
15 years, and an in- 
terested observer of 
management trends, I 
have been suiprised by an appar- 
ent contradiction. British attitudes 
to human resource management 
have improved dramatically, yet 
at the same time the practice of 
staff recruitment and retention 
does not seem to have kept pace. 

There seems to exist what I can 
only describe as an air of resigna- 
tion. Many managers responsible 
for selection and recruitment are 
too prepared to settle for “the best 
of the batch" rather than “the 
best" and in consequence add less 
value to their business than if they 
set their sights higher. 

What this appears to mean in 
practice in Britain is that the 
agency recruitment process throws 
up, say, a dozen lightly screened 
candidates, several are inter- 
viewed and, to save going through 
the whole time-consuming, expen- 
sive procedure again, the best of 
the batch is chosen. 

This is an expedient rather than, 
as it should be, a calculated, long- 
term investment decision, and it 
has negative knock-on effects. One 
of these is that people who apply 
for a position tend to do so 
speculatively rather than in the 
expectation that they will match a 
precise requirement. From my 
own and colleagues' observations, 
they are not fully confident that 
the eventual selection decision 
will be made for totally the right 



reason. This does not encourage 
them to be Number One; they set 
their sights on being hopefully 
good enough rather than best 

The net effect of achieving a 
selection rather than - necessarily 
the right selection is to perpetuate 
what British managers are fre- 
quently accused of — management 
by not making mistakes. They are 
judged on action rather than the 
consequences of action. 

Although it may be a notion of 
declining favour in a political 
sense in this country, it is my 
experience that management by 
conviction is what differentiates 
the successful from the average 
and that human resource manage- 
ment is as critical as financial 
management in ensuring that 
good business results are 
achieved. 

Having been through a similar 
process ourselves, we in Australia 
are watching with interest how the 
UK will respond to the challenge 
of the Big Bang. A clear side effect 
will be the impact on staff 
movement. This point is illus- 
trated by just one tiling that 
happened to us. As a result of the 
liberalization, the number of 
banks in Australia increased from 
five to 20 and this has created an 
acute shortage not only ofbanking 
staff but also of computer staff 
The same thing will inevitably 
happen here and, of course, on a 
much larger scale. 

Skills and management short- 
ages lead firms to become much 
more inventive in procuring the 


British business 
often fails in the 
selection process 
and the effect is 
a negative one, 
says Geoff Slade 

people they want. We have begun 
to experience the “golden hello" 
phenomenon in Australia much as 
you are experiencing it here. _ 

What is even more destabilizing 
is the growing trend to recruit 
whole teams. Whereas taking in- 
dividuals from your competitors 
has always been an irritant, taking 
teams of key players can, at a 
stroke, push them out of business. 
This is particularly true in service 
companies where staff and their 
skills represent the principal, tan- 
gible assets. 

In the case of a systems and 
software company, for example, 
the asset value of their product is 
relatively low. Their revenue 
comes from time charges and does 
not contribute to building a solid, 
re-sellable asset base. Even with a 
software products (as compared to 
software design) company, the 
recoverable asset in tiie case of 
business failure is low. Companies 



such as these are particularly 
vulnerable to losing teams and 
must attend very closely to staff 
motivation, career development 
and rewards. 

What all this boils down to is 
that in the management and skills 
area supply is simply not capable 
of matching demand and in this 
respect neither we in Australia nor 
you in Britain are yet doing 
enough to pul this right. 

It is not just the shortage of 

S laces at universities and colleges 
ut the educational infrastructure 
which fails to provide adequate 
career counselling and informa- 
tion, particularly in the sphere of 
information technology. We need 
more people m IT and yet there 
are insufficient knowledgeable re- 
sources within the educational 
system to match the needs being 
generated by commerce and in- 
dustry. And it will remain so while 
there is inadequate commitment 


to educate the educators. 

The revolution in information 
technology and particularly in 
communications has changed the 
way business operates, creating 
new and different pressures and an 
infinitely more complex commer- 
cial environment in which people 
must interact One positive step to 
improve the understanding In 
schools and colleges would be to 
second teachers into the business 
world for at least one-year periods 
to experience the management, 
motivational and role play issues 
first hand. 

This has been said before but as 
I understand, not yet practised to 
any extent in this country. Obvi- 
ously there are organizational 
problems to be overcome but this 
could be further assisted by 
secondment from industry to 
education, provided appropriate 
financial reconciliation were 
made. 

However, to return to what I 
consider to be a primary concern 
in the human resources business. I 
observe in the UK. as in Australia, 
personnel selection consultancies 
being discredited by the large 
number of small unqualified prac- 
tices who are sometimes little 
more than curriculum vitae bro- 
kers. It is my contention that 
client companies should demand 
much more. The business is 
primarily about accurate analysis 
of need, speed and response, and 
confidence in obtaining the best 
result 

When I started nearly 20 years 


ago the going rate for selection was 
2 per cent of the first year’s salary, 
or, to put it more dramatically, 
about one week's earnings. Most 
consultancies at the top now 
charge 18 to 21 per cent for 
advertised selection and consid- 
erably more for executive search. 
This increase has nothing to do 
with opportunities or marker 
forces but the level of service 
provided. 

B efore seeking appro- 
priate candidates a con- 
sultancy must first 
thoroughly understand 
the client company and 
position requirement It should 
then present to the client only 
those people who will fit the 
specification, having interviewed 
and filtered out the inappropriate 
candidates whom the client com- 
pany would otherwise have had to 
handle itself. 

In my book, the client should be 
contacted at least twice a week 
with progress updates and I would 
expert a three to four weeks’ 
tumround to be a legitimate 
expectation for advertised selec- 
tion. A very good test of a 
consultancy's worth would be the 
extent to which it was prepared to 
guarantee results. If you are 
confident in your vetting ability 
and have properly matched the 
candidate to the position, then he 
or she will not walk out after a few 
weeks and it is therefore worth 
underwriting that expectation. 
Many people ask about career 


opportunities in Australia and 
indeed, despite some lightening- 
up of immigration policy, these 
still exist, particularly in the 
accountancy and data processing 
professions. 

The test for success is relatively 
simple. If you have a good record 
as an achiever in the UK you will 
probably succeed in Australia, and 
.indeed your British qualifications 
could ultimately prove an ex- 
cellent passport to high positions. 
If your achievements are mod- 
erate. however, you are far less 
likely to succeed in what is 
probably a more aggressive 
environment. 

An increasingly popular way of 
testing the ground, which the 
teaching profession has beta 
practising for years, is cross- 
migration where, say. two yean 
are spent overseas on an exchange 
basis. Recent research has shown 
that a high proportion of top 
achievers have spent some years 
overseas. It is far more than just a 
change of scenery and can contrib- 
ute significantly to the common- 
wealth of knowledge and 
experience which makes us alt 
better businessmen and 
businesswomen. 

Geoff Slade is managing director 
of the Slade Consulting Group, one 
of Australia's largest executive 
selection and management 
consultancies. The company 
opened a London office last 
October 


Appointments Phone: 01-481 4481 


Appointments Phone: 01-481 4481 



CJA 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 

35 New Broad Street, London ECSM 1 F\!H 
Tel: 01-588 3588 or D1-5SS 3576 
Telex No. 887374 Fax No. 01-638 3818 




LONDON 


A challenging, ruggodaifotouffia ssk p im ert calling for sta te sma nship and tenacity. 

DIRECTOR GENERAL - 
SOUTH AFRICAN TRADE 


£40,000— £50,000 


BRITISH INDUSTRY COMMITTEE ON SOUTH AFRICA LTD. and UMTED KMGDOM SOUTH AFRICA TRADE association 
A pplications are invited from candklates, preferably aged 55-62, who are Hcely to have headed a successful substantia) international 
trading Group or have held a senior position in HLM. Diplomatic Service, who believe in the demanding of apartheid, leafing to a just 
society in South Africa and in the maintenance of trade with South Africa Responsttfties wfll cover the dear communication of British 
Industry 's views on South Africa to the meda in the U.K. and corresponding bodies within the EEC. and U.S A, H.M. Government 
and opposition parties and British buseiess interests as well as to the South African Government and the South African business 
sector. The successful cancfidate, as Director General, will also have ultimate responstoifty for the control, tfinectlon and 
ad mi nisfralion of the trade association. Some overseas travel wfll be necessary. Initial salary negotiable. £40.d00-£50,QQ0 + car + 
fete assurance and other appropriate benefits. Applications in strict confidence under reference DGSA 4438/TT, to the Managing 
Director 


CAMPBHl-JOHXSTOII ASSOCIATES (NAKABENBfT HStHHHElfT COKUUJUIIS) UMTED, 35 KW BROAD STREET, LOIDGN EC2M W. 
1HBWNE: 01-588 3588 [or W-588 3578. THEbUTCTA FAXRfcBf-2» 8501. 


WATERAID is a new registered charity of the 1980s, 
sponsored by the British water industry . In the Third 
World it supports low-cost water and sanitation im- 
provements in which those will benefit cere actively 
engaged on a self-help basis . Recurrent income now 
exceeds £1 million per annum, and rapid further 
growth is planned. 

FINANCIAL CONTROLLER 

The Financial Controller will have a wider role than the title may 
imply- As well as the supervision of accounts, he/she will be bead erf 
office administration, and will design and implement procedures 
appropriate to the organisation's further growth. Candidates will 
preferably be accountants with a proven capacity to achieve effi- 
ciency in an informal and de-centralised organisation. 

HEAD OF UK OPERATIONS 

The Head of UK Operations will seek both to increase awareness in 
UK of water needs elsewhere and to generate the resources for 
Water Aid's sustained growth- Candidates will need strong entrepre- 
neurial qualities, a proven record in effective management and a 
capacity to ; motivate others at all levels. 

Sa la r i es for these posts £11,000 - £14,000 pja. according to experi- 
ence. Anticipated age range 30-55. Further details from Director, 
WaterAid, 1 Queen Anne's Gate, London SW1H 9BT. 

Tel: 01-221 8111. 

Closing date for applications 1 September 1986. 

WaterAid 


VENTURE CAPITAL 

Abingworth pic, a leading international venture capital group 
with an extensive technology based portfolio, seeks an additional 
individual aged 30-40 years to join a small professional ream 
located in London. 

Candidates will ideally haw experience in the venture capital 
field but an investment or investment research background 
could also be suitable. Alternatively candidates with relevant 
industrial experience who have run a company or a division of 
a major company will be considered. 

The chosen individual will be expected to originate 
investment opportunities and will have direct responsibility 
for monitoring and assisting portfolio companies. 

A competitive salary and benefits will be offered as well os an 
attractive equity incentive scheme. Enquiries will be treated in 
the strictest confidence. 

Interested applicants should write enclosing full 
Curriculum Vitae to: 




Box No. 397 

Streets Financial Advertising Limited 
IS Red Lion Court 
London EC4A 3HT 


AREA MANAGERS 

Competitive salary plus bonus, expenses and a car. 


CONSULTANTS 

LONDON AREA, THAMES VALLEY 
BASINGSTOKE, CRAWLEY, 
CROYDON, GUILDFORD AND 
MILTON KEYNES 

£ NEGOTIABLE 

Accountancy Personnel, Britain's leading consul- 
tancy in the specialist r e cru i tment of accountants 
and their staff, has a proven policy of continued 
expansion through the trailing and development of 
its consuHaits, providing unrivalled career oppor- 
tunities with widely varied and challenging 
respons&jttties. To join one of our successful 
teams, you should be 21-28, setf-confident. edu- 
cated to degree level and preferably have an 
accountancy or commercial background. 

Contact our Personnel Manager ok 
01-828 6004 

Accountancy Personnel 
1 Glen House, 

Stag Place, 

London SW1E SAG. 


ROYWEST TRUST 
ISLE OF MAN 

PORTFOLIO 

MANAGER 

Roywest Trust, a leading international bank and 
trust company, has a vacancy in the Isle of Man 
for a Portfolio Manager. The successful appli- 
cant should have experience in international 
bonds/equities and a degree or an equivalent 
would be an added advantage. Assets managed 
are multi-currency and applicants must be able 
to manage international portfolios on their own 
initiative. The job to be filled offers a very at- 
tractive salary and benefits package, which 
rnchwfe fi a pension plan, medical and file 
insurance. 

The Roywest Group is associated with National 
Westminster Bank PLC and the Royal Bank of 
Canada Group. 

Write to: 

C R. Middleton 

■ ROYWEST TRUST CORPORATION 
(ISLE OF MAN) LIMITED 
33 Athol Street, Deeagbs, Isle of Man 
or telephone (©624) 27124 


The continued success of our rapidly 
growing chain of restaurants means 
that we now need to appoint Area 
Managers in the north and south of 
Englan d. 

The chain is expanding fast and 
we are therefore looking for 
ambitious, talented people who have 
the flan and enthusiasm to grow with 
us as part of* committed management 
team. Aged 27-32 you should have a 
recognised catering qualification to 
HND or equivalent leveL together with 
field management experience. 
Naturally, we would expect you to be 
fully mobile and hold a clean driving 
licence. 


As part of the Bern! Host Group , 
we offer excellent benefits Including 
medical insurance, a pension scheme 
and four weeks holiday. 

Please send a detailed c.v. to 

Tom Mayers, Director. Pastifiao 

K es r a nra nts. 36a New Broadway. 
Ealing. London W5, 

TeL- 01 574 5518. 


Are you earning £20,000— £100,000 p.a 
and seeking a new job? 

Connaught's discreet and successful Execu- 
tive Martsting Programme provides profes- 
sional excellence in helping you to identify 
those unadvertised vacancies. 

Contact us for a free and confidential 
meeting to assess if we can help you. If you 
are currently abroad ask for our Executive 
Expat Service. 

01-7343879 


International Trading 

on the phone and face to face 

£l6K-£18Kplusb(Xius 


Our client IBP inc. part of a giant 
US. corporation wants an individual 
who can clinch major international 
deals in an agricultural product 
that’s a base commodity erf fife in 
the Wfest. 

Similar to a commodity braking 
operation but more diverse, you will 
also target and contact new sales 
prospects. 

As a member ol an enthusiastic, 
compact team based in Piccadilly 
you'll spend about 25% of your time 
in mainland Europe so fluency in at 
least Rendi is a key qualification. 

Possessing an entre- 
preneurial instinct 
coupled with presence, 
integrity and proven 


m 


international sales expertise, you'll 
he under 35 and as efficient in 
adminstiation follow-up as you are in 
initial contact 

On top of the salary we’ve 
quoted, there's a bonus that could 
range from the acceptable to the 
lavish, with equally attractive 
additional benefits. Career-wise, 
there’s every opportunity to move 
into a management role in the U.S. 

If you're interested, please write 
quoting ref. 7Q2/PB/86 with a copy of 
your CV to Paul Balbrd, Austin 
Knight Selection, 17 St Helen's Place, 
London EC3A 6AS or telephone him 
on 01-628 5021 (01- 
256 6925 evenings/ 
weekends). 


OPPORTUNITY IN 

MANAGEMENT SERVICES 
& MANPOWER INTELLIGENCE 


£13,765 to £17,782 pa 

The Electricity Council is the cen- 
tral co-ordinating body of the 
etetrioty supply industry in En- 
gland and Wales. 

As a result of promotion, we are 
seeking a self-motivated person to 
join an established team of weW 
qualified staff in the Industrial Rela- 
tions Department which is 
responsible for a range of work 
including productivity, manpower 
information (most of which is 
computerised), manpower plan- 
ning and forecasting and Job 
evaluation. 

You w3l initially provide support 
for project work in these areas and 
have some responsibility for over- 
seeing the running of 
computerised data bases. As your 
experience develops you will have 
the opportunity to take greater 
responsibility for a growing range 
of project work. 


Applications are invited for the position of 

CHIEF EXECUTIVE TO 
CHARLTON ATHLETIC 
FOOTBALL CLUB 

Selhurst Park, London SE25 

The appointed person will be responsible to the Board of 
Directors for the Club’s commercial and administrative activ- 
ities. 

Applications which will be treated in the strictest confidence 
are to be addressed to the Chairman, marked strictly private 
and confidential. 


FRIENDS 

OF THE ELDERLY 

(Charity EsL 1905) 

Arc seeking a mature, sympathetic and perceptive 
person to join a BUSY VICTORIA based wa»n run- 
ning 16 residential and Nursing Homes for 
professional people mainly in the SOUTH of EN- 
GLAND. Duties include interviewing applicants 
together with responsibility for the welfare of 
residence. 

Nursing background useful sound administrative 
ex pe ri ence essential 

Applicants must be owner-drivers. FULL Four Day 
Week. Salary according to experience. 

Pteose sent C.v, tor 

General Secretary 
42 Ebury Street, London SW1W OLZ 


SALES 

MANAGER 

Leading London Piano Retail 
Company is looking lor a 
person with proven sain and 
i&uageflicnt skills to spear, 
head its mail operation. 
Mvst be abte io play. Poien- 
ual earnings JEI4K+. Apply 
with full details in writing to; 
The Directors. The Ptar>0 
Workshop. 30b Hifthjcuc 
Road. London NWS INST 



1 


1 




1 


SEARCH? 


Wefl over 9096 of oor clients 
in Senior and Middle 
M a nageme nt achieve job 
search success tfcroagh ds 
anadvertiaed job mm*— 

To find ott bow oor career 
development and CV. 
Services can maximise your 
rereer progression, awnw 
os now for an exploratory 

meeting - at no cost or obli- 
gation - or send ns your C.V. 

Yew future could de pen d 
oniL 

Cnren A iMsury Services Ltd 
6 Queen Street Mayftfr 
London W1X7PH 
Tab 01-49)2648 



c.v. and 


SOMERSET COUNCIL ON 
ALCOHOLISM 

DIRECTOR 

Salaiy £10,950 - £11,604 + traveffing 
expenses. 

The Somerset Council on Alcoholism wishes 
to appoint a Director, initially for a period of 
three years. 

Prospective cancfidates should be able to 
provide the leadership necessary to sustain 
and develop the Courier's work. The person 
appointed should be able to work with volun- 
teers and professionals at all levels. Training 
and management skins and an energetic ana 
enthusiastic personality are essential. A 
knowledge of Alcohol and Drugs Abuse will 
be an advantage. 

Whilst guidance and support to individuals 
and their families is an important part of the 
Council's programme, tiie essential task is 
the development of commiting awareness 
and action to combat Alcohol and Drugs 
Abuse. 

Please apply with C.V. to the Chairman, 
Somerset Council on Alcohofism, 3 Upper 
High Street, Taunton TA1 3PX 

Closing Date 31st August, 1986 
Interviews wttl be held on 
30th September, 1986 


me. 

You should have a sound knowl- 
edge of s t atis tic a l techniques 
preferably at graduate or equiva- 
lent level and be able to 
communicate effectively both 
orafiy and in writing. 

Good analytical abilities are essen- 
tial and a keen interest in industrial 
relations and manpower issues to- 
gether with computing knowledge 
are highly desirable. 

Please write, giving details of age. 
quafifieations. experience and 
present salary, quoting reference 
65/TG to: 

Dwid Webb, Recnsitnunt Officer, 

The Bectriaty Carnal, 

30 Hflbrek, London SW1P 4RD 

ELECTRICITY COUNCIL 


91, Wembley Part Orta, 
Middlesex HA flHf 
01-963 4449 


Career Crisis? 


If you are contemplating 
changing your job in the next 
few months or have recently 
been made redundant, now 
is the time to start serious 
work in preparation for a job 
search starting in September 
when recruitment begins 
again. Do not leave things 
until after the holidays or 
you may miss out on 
Autumn opportunities. 
Contact us today for further 
information on our 
GUARANTEED programme. 
Telephone 01-631 1110 

Eaecutiue Action 

37 Queen Anne Street., London W1M9FB 


ACQUISITIONS 

MANAGER 

N. LONDON ASICS 

Vittle Inns Ltd is one of the most dynamic and 
innovative catering companies in the ILK. The success 
of Calendars Cafe Bar Restaurant and MunreUs Cafe 

Bars shows that its future acquisition programme, 
backed by a major public company, has to be achieved. 
Ate you that achiever? 

Aged 25-35, you must have the talent, drive and eoerc 
that ensures you axe a winner. A «JnTie d negotiator, tfau 
is y our c h a n ce to prove that you are of rapid 

promotion, two levels above this position. 

This post offers a good salary plus substantial bonus, so 
write now. enclosing a brief C.V. and details of ywr 
present salaiy to> 

Toby Fi ller n 

Ward Management Appointments 
65 Blandford Street 
London W1H 3AJ 

All ap p li cati ons will be treated in 
the itrictaa confidence. 


GRADUATES £10-£12K 

or geei ‘A’ levels 

who seek young 
You must be under* 




unri'swt HcaOTiATON s» 

flfWiii **■ f mm far Quail BUT MW 

"*• Con. 938 Him.™"”" I RJ" *** V ftWmoM ■ 

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THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


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APPOINTMENTS 



bda^rialEconQmist 

hdnstrialBankoflbaen 

fenfinMRepaHic 


to develop and initiate systems to provide 


: flam tomarite*; oontzol, jmSew and 

ewtaatB pscfects contahkBd wi&izi 
fteBank^portfotia ' * 
Otherdntiea indodo advising on 


•to project pwpamtinn. 

AppGcaniB rfKMdd be Btitiah CSttans 
wife a d ogma in ferfir^rfal PmvnUfjrt arv^ 

idea%lammen gm»»Bq n g > wf* j rf»in<i 

F1vetDtOTyeaispn^actBfcJlow-np 

aqjerienc^ pnteabty gsmedin a 

dtydopmg country, is <te<rraMet . 
asisaknewrladgeaf Arabic. 
The^jxxntmentiscfflcwaiadtoO^ 

mkian toftgGew bTmnPTrf rf*i«4 , yhwiA»i 

Arab RspaUic^ fcr a psdod at tmo ya&xa. 


to £!AOSO pa, mdniSng an dement to 
flee of 8op wranniv»tirTn . A tax faae Baomgn 
Seruice Jmai ww nnft, tw »yn ja 

£3^90 to £6J40 pa, is also payabia 
Tbe post is wholly financed by 
the British Gommmaat under BdtaicA 
pcogrammaoCAkl to toe developing ' 
countries. OftMW h pnofifg tin Tmany 


e d ac atkn aItowancB^.fi^ac carTTTi» d »rt kB i 

and medical attention. 

FbrtoflMgdetafla andappikadfaaafarny 

piease apply qaotmg re£ AH362/IM/TT, 
rating post ocmcczned, and giving 
delailBcf age; qualifications and 
e sp eri e n oe to: Appointments Officer, 

OWMBMD nil qMPtit AAw in ii J i j Iiwy 

Boom Sfl, Abenmnifaia Haase, 

Rajtwih am BroH T*ftRT HTt.Wnn g ■ 
Gbsgow G3S 8 EA. 

Closing date ft* appficatians is one 
month from the dale afpobticatkai. 

Ijr^OVbfci^AS 

EEVELOTMENT 

Britain helping nations to help themselves 



Immigration Appeals 
Adjudicators 

London, Leeds and Birmingham 

Full and part time adjudicators are to be appointed, under the Immigration 
Act 1971, to hear appeals against decisions taken m the exercise of 
immigration control. Applications are invited for expected full Qree posts. 
one in London and one in Leeds, and for onexjrtwoiarl time posts in both 
London and Birmingham. 

The primary qualification for appointment is the ability to conduct hearings 
and decide appeals impartially in a judicial spirit Legal qualifications are 
essential and relevant lepal experience is highly desirable. Candidates 
should be resident in the vicinity of the hearing centre to which appointment 
is made, although they may occasionally be asked to hear appeals 
elsewhere. 

Fufl-time appointments are for specific periods, normally 10 years for 
people aged under 55. Salary is £27,996 plus £1,365 Inner London 
Weighting (as appropriate). The posts are pensionable. 

Part-time appointments are for 12 months, renewable by agreement. The 
work is fee-paid [£100 a day) and the appointments are not pensionable. 
Part-timers are called upon as the need arises and are expected to be 
available for at least one day a week. 

Further information and an application form (to be returned by 29 August 
1986) may be obtained from Miss S. Ellis, Home Office, Room 627, Abell 
House. John (slip Street London SW1 P 4LH. 

The Home Office is an Equal Opportunities Employer. 



AREA SALES 

EXECUTIVES 

CENTRAL S NORTH LONDON 

Would you like to join one of the U.KJs leading 
employment agencies? Do you have the deter- 
mination and drive necessary to succeed in a 
fast-moving environment? . 

If you have a proven track record in recruitment 
or previous sales experience in a service industry, 
we would like to hear from you. 

Working as a member of the newly established 


sales' divtsiontoid'alongside -branch stafC 5 [on 
will he responsible for generating and developing 
new business in Central and North London. This 
is a marvellous opportunity for seifmotivaled 
Salespeople who are looking for a rewarding 
career within ait exciting indi 

An excellent' ^ B&saMa&+4 

company ear' 



Far farther information, 

Janet Marshall on (01 

Sales Office, 

56 CopthaJI Avenue, 
London EC2R 7DL 


RECRUITING CO-ORDINATOR 
London W2 

Bain and Company fs an American consulting company which works with major 
mufti-naliona] clients to develop their corporate strategy and improve their financial 
performance. 

The Recruiting Department works with members of the professional staff to recruit 
Consultants and Associate Consultants from universities, Business Schools and 
industry throughout Europe and in the United States. 

The Recruiting Co-ordinator must be an outstanding administrator, accustomed to 
waking to deadlines on a wide variety of projects. The ideal candidate will 
probably be around 25, qualified at degree level, with two years' demanding 
administrative experience and preferably a working knowledge of French and/or 
German. They will have the stamina and drive to work well aider pressure and wifi 
enjoy working in a company where dedication and achievement are expected and 
recognised ' 

Applications should compose a one-page CV and a brief covering letter. The 
closing date is 13 August 1986.. Please reply to Elisabeth Jordan, Bain and 
Company, 1 6 Connaught Place, London W2 2£S. 


BAIN & COMPANY 


BOSTON ■ LONDON - SAN FRANCISCO -.MUNICH • PARIS • TOKYO. 


YORK CITY ART GALLERY 

Ceaservator of Works oa Paper 

Scale 5: £7,820 to £8,897 (under review) 

Apflcaiim an Mid tor thfe temporary poet tor which a 
mr oo - y ear connet is ottorad. 


York c#y Art Salary has a tent oote u Mon ot wawcoiows. 
drawings, and arm, tha majority ol • 
arttes or are wow of York, or both. The successful i 


I wrack ara attar by York 


w»ba Maponatote tor attebteWng a coownratton sludo and 
tor csrrykig out a systematic progr a mme o# axafransben. 
documenuSon and conservation. Mfle steo being raaponatote 
tor ccMmlntflng work on mowlfng and advteing on 
consanmton aspects ol efisttay. atoraga and packing. 

AppBcsnte should haa a recog ni sed quaMeadcn in tea 
conservation ot works ot art on paper and at lesat wra years' 
practical experience to paper conse r vation, p ro to r ao iy to a 
museum env i ronment. 

> by 12B> 

■toad tarn tea Curator, York 

Steam, York YOI 2 EW. 



• A leading European technical testing and inspection organisation is planning 
■ v further expansion of its project team m Saudi Arabia and is itiviting applications 
for die following posi ti ons: 

_ _ . DipL-loga of Hectrical Engmeering/ 

- v : Electric Energy Engmeering 

"tf^e^eandidates ^should have well-founded technical qualifications and 
relevant experience in inspecting or projecting electrical installations for 
engineering services on airports in Saudi Arabia. 

The successful candidates will be responsible, among other things, for 

- testing power current systems on their own, 

- investigating failures occurred in electrical installations and 
di vising concepts for improvements, 

- developing guidelines for the testing of electrical installa- 
tions and familiarising the owner’s personnel with testing 
services. 

Attractive salaries will be offered. 

Applications and full CV*s should be sent to: BOX G76 t The Times, 


PART TIME FINANCIAL 
JOURNALISM & RESEARCH 



regular work on a flexible basis. Suc- 

applicants will have knowledge of 

investments together with writin g abil ity and 
experience. Remuneration win be attractive to 
wed qualified persons. . 

Please write giving details of qualifications 
and experience to: 

James Wootten, 

World Investor, 

7-11 Lexington Street, 
London W1R 3HQ . 


ACCOUNTANCY 

RECRUITMENT 

CONSULTANT/MANAGER 
c £15-20,000 package 

EkCdfenl opportunity for a young 'consulta nt with a jcncc of 
humour and l or 2 yean Accountancy Reoninnenl experteoa 
to join an expanding team of professional consultants in the 
city. If you bewvc iftat you on manage and develop an afreacy 
sucoesstW division without constant supoviteon and *ww like 
teal job prospects then call us now or send your CV.^ id com- 
plete cooiideiK* UK ■ 

Miss Dayne Atkinson 
Abacus Accountancy Recruitment 
30-31 Queen Street 
London EC4 

01-236 0642 


SALESMEN/WOMEN 

Chemaide is an all B ritM, Mn n ii fi M' ^ i ri ti g Company 
whose growth haa crented farther opportunities within itg 
nates. 

Salary, cwnmteaion, ear and aipimaaa make an ra c alfait 
package where wfmpte achievement of quota earn* in 
excess of £1Q£00 in year one and sohstantinlly nxae in 
taany cases. 

Supexb products add an a re peat a ble usage basis, first- 
cJefls back op with goaranteed areas and guaranteed 
c ormni a a i nn rates make C he ma i d e the place to be. 

W« require quality people aged 23-40 who axe articulate 
and who can shown aac waafa l commercial record in their 
c a ree ia to date. 

We bane opportunities m the following orsuc- 
SOTJTH WALES, BEDFORDSHIRE. WATFORD 
AND WEST HERTFOBD8H1JLE. NORTH 
LONDON AND EAST LONDON. 

If you led.apabb ot adding to the strength of a . truly 
professional sales force with help and t r a i n i ng bat no 
crutch, that telephone the Sake Director, on Honharn. 

( 0403 ) 64683 

Today. Thursday, or tomorrow before noon, 
for a first local interview. 

And remember nothing ventured nothing gained. 


ART DIRECTOR 


Int mn atioiDalrecon^oomp^.gx wiftKBin g 
production and m ar keting of c MWPcal music, seek 
an Art Director to work as part of their cre a t iv e 
team producing packaging for tha dawks. 

You will be required to research and produce in 
graphic form, quality visual solutions to iDustxate 
our fine recordings. You should therefore possess a 
broad knowledge of the classical mnmc repertoire, 
combined with the skills of a graphic designer and 
have a sympathy with, and understanding of con- 
temporary fine art, illustration, design and 
photography. A formal training in the areas of ac- 
tivity described together with a portfolio of work it ■ 
required. 

We offer the salary and benefits to be expected from 
international compan y and would ask inter- 

to write with current cv to: . 

Sally It 3 
Feraaanel Officer 
Decca laternatioaal 
1 Redder Road 

LONDON 
W14 0DL 


DECCfi 


PIMLICO ESTATE AGENCY 

Requires Manager for newly established office. High 

eommBsioo and excellent prospects for enthusiastic 
person with proven negotiating ability and track record. 

Please ring Stereo Pring 
01-222 0793 (day) or 
0892 77793 (evenings) 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


SALES EXECUTIVE 

PACKAGING MACHINERY 
UP TO £20K + CAS 

Rip s i wnred sabs executive 28 to 39 Man tttetind la farther 
develop sales of well — abtishtit advanced nose of pfkspng 

mjiehmar y 

Applicants, who wO be based in GnOdfbnL Sumy, must be co c v n- 

aol with parkspaa nmMu e ty . cqwbte of negoostkm at director 
Irvd end able to nmwsiwiM e a proven sales record. 


The right eppticaflt will _ 
siw company ha ltin g to ■ 


oncer prmpeds. in a profw- 

■ *P- - - — “ 


Tefrpfutr or ariu in; Mr. L A GoeaL, . 
F. P. Packaging MeeUawy LtdL, 

|A Mubntiiary of Freest Pee* Machinery Lid.), 

134. Walnut Tree Ckoe, GaDdfanL Sarny. 
Telephone; (0483) 32811 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER 

for professional body will many comtrttnes: varied duties b- 
ctude secreaysft® of some and ssnhdng-or written liaison wrtn 
ottos. Stall it Ketto d iaasman sMp essential. 

L7.SCKH9^Q0 depending on qualfca&ms and mperienco. 
Apply, in envelope marked "C o nfident ia l - A0". to 

INSTITUTE (ff iSSuSt^ ^UOmHoRY SCIENCES 
12 Quoor Ane SbooL Londos WIN 0AU 


EDITOR 

SUDANESE AFFAIRS 

We are s' Iodine Arab bn g w g r msjszinc published from 
London and are tooking to recruit a pawn suimbty qualified 
tO lilt the position of Ediuir for Sudanese Amira. 

The m rllrani should have had cmisidenbk ex peripce in a 
govern me m type brotgiound in either the Civil or Diplomatic 
Services in a appropriate field. 

Frcreqnshs ire an exceUmi coomsnd of both written and 
spoken Arabic as wen as a working Knowledge of English, en 
understanding of French A German would be a considerable 
advantage, proffered age range 45 - 55 . 

The position offered is a Senior Editorial one. and this will be 
reflected io the toms and condtuots of craptoymenL 
Please reply in the fini nuance lor 

The General Manager 
Box No. G71 . 


SALES & MARKETING 


THINK YOIT 
CAN SELL 
HOUSES?? 

We're looting for embus*, 
tic and indnstrious 
negotiators, not afraid of 
bard wort, to join our suc- 
cessful young ream. Exceflent 
career prospects end a real 
Qiurre for the right perron. 
Abb 21 - 24 . Compel Derek 
Ffetdier on 871 3 * 33 . Ray- 
mond Barbell. lot 
Wandswonb High SiretL 
SW 18 4 JB. 


EXKHUNCa UTTHU nma 

IbilCM nuMr>4 Bv IMH Onlrdl 

Lrmacn i^ieit aorta- Mist Or 
VU mttnSfS. *MniH. 

25 35. sum clean amino h 

frnrr C 9.000 + romm 4 pmy 
in writing wnn r\ W Ms rcw r- 
ra Ahoou. Kmwooo estates. ZS 
Sen up Street. W 2 tJA. 


AfiE TOO PAD WHAT 
YOU ARE UOOTH? 

Exdtiog opportunity 
for two people (25+) 
to join a major 
group in the finan- 
cial services industry 
(West End location). 
Full training, rapid 
progression imo 
management, equity 
participation, remu- 
neration second to 
none. 

Please call Mark 
Froggail or Peier 
Ritchie on 01-439 
8431. 


A’ level 

school leavers 

International firm 

training and work experience 

London 


Coopers & Lyfarand is the largest firm of Chartered Accountants and 
Management Consultants in the UK. We are looking for bright ambitious 
school leavers who want to set their sights high for a consulting career 
in pensions, employee benefits and financial planning. 

The work is interesting and rewarding. It involves contact with financial 
institutions and a wide range of clients who look to us ter professional 
advice. 

\bu should have, or expect to have, at feast 5 *0' levels (including 
Maths and English) and 2 ‘A’ levels, preferably in numerate or business 
related subjects. 

Ybu will be encouraged to study for the Pensions Management Institute 
qualifications. Your study and work experience programme will enable 
you to enjoy progressive career advancement 

The is an opportunity for you to embark on a satisfying career in a 
professional environment 

We are offering highly competitive salaries and benefits (including 
study leave) which you would expect from a large international 
organisation. 

In the first instance please write for an application form to Pat Horrocfcs. 



Coopers 

&Lybrand 


Plunrrtree Court 

London 

EC4A4HT 




^ot 

.-£555: 

B AB-“. 






a & 









ioP- 




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— ot 



ARE YOU INVOLVED WITH INSURANCE 
OR THE COMPUTER INDUSTRY? 
ARE YOU TIRED, DISILLUSIONED AND 
LOOKING FOR A NEW CHALLENGE? 

As a leader in tbe European Leisure Industry, we have a 
number of vacancies for experienced, proven sales people to 
sell villas and timesbare in We United Kingdom and Spain. 
We're not looking for people who wanton easy life. We're 
looking for people who can sell an easy way of life. 
People who can convert leads, people who can establish 
relationships and make presentations. 

For people who sell tbe good Hfe, we guarantee a good 

living. 

Earning potential is £50,000 and over per year. 

More than enough to buy your own place in tbe sun. 

Also EXHIBITIONS ORGANISER required. Nationwide 
coverage, but based in the West Midlands. 

Required to co-ordinate busy Exbibitions/Promotions 
programme. Pull written, applications ordy to 
Please apply to: Personnel Director 

DMDM 

121 High Street , 

Henley-m-Arden 
West Midlands, B955AU 


An Exceptional Young Talent? 


FINANCE 

SECTOR 

London 

Top level 
salary/benefits 
package 


Outstanding opportunities are rare. This is one. Our client is 
one d the woritfs largest and most prestigious banks. They 



services to major corporations, financed institutions! 
governments. 

They are looking for unusually able individuals to work in 
personnel. The rotes are generalist in nature. The toy 
elements are to ensure the continued success of the 
business through resourcing and making people more 
effective in their careers. 

You must be a top class honours graduate, aged mid- 
twenties, with at least two years’ experience in a major, fast- 
moving organisation, either In personnel or a commercial/ 
management function. In either case, you wB have taken 
responsibility early and have a proven track record of setting 
ideas and achieving results through others. 

Essential personal attributes are business acumen coqplad 
with creativity, high energy, maturity and an enquiring, 
analytical mind. 

Development w91 be limited only by your awn potenttf. 



COURTENAY PERSONNEL LTD. 

Management Selection and Personnel Consultants 
3 Hanover Square, London WiR 9RD. Tel: 01-491 4014. 


CV* leu ptofi-ovona*. B\ rewii-* 
uoiuk. r\ Pim. on cwnwdi 

RtMU SoDUry. Will* OTZZ 
SI4U6 

snuHMiE job 0 pp 0 ren.Ni- 

TICS FCD LP WITH TYPING. 
OUb 232S8? 


EXP WWOClfTUL NCCOT 1 A- 

'raCNCH SPEJUUWO OadiMK 

TOR rmunvU lut hnNMKm 

wbi 9 nun nanm* r*. 

EM^li- Igwwr Mu* w Minn 

ammo la wen, us wgMMsr tn 

. eUH. vn m©n»*i«JareJOO*'™ 

lour Duunm Dm mo Dthk*. 

miiiiu' Yd Ol oOS 

Runm rmKH ano Outgoing per 

7\21 

uxwdiy tmrmm r j 


R«ruUmrnl OI 49 i M 46 . 


TOMB CLL 

■Miugnrn lo heto win Mi *». 
wra Oi running tilts ttuMor 
rlubi Mua De nUHe. Mws- 
aMf. efferent awl a good ms* 

nrtjwe. Stem uc. U 3 M- 

I 9 BS. 


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THE TIMES THURSDAY AuOUSi 7 iboo 


GENERAL APPOINTMENTS 


SYSTEMS MANAGERS- 


MOXON 
JOOLPHIN 


INTERNATIONAL RANKING 


London 


£ negotiable + car + benefits 


Recruitment Advertising 
Executive Search 
Management Selection 
International Recruitment 


178-202 Great Portland Street 
London WIN 5TB. Tel: 01-b31 4411. 
8 Mathew Street. Liverpool U oKt, 
Tel: 051-236 1724. 


Lloyds Bank is in the process of developing a comprehensive With dm project now expanding, die Bank has need of additional 
International Banking System BO replace exist in g facilities forward chinking and highly experienced managers to apply their 
worldwide. The system will encompa ss all facets of i mrn a nnnal skills to this ambitions development, which capitalises on modem 
banking operations, provi ding high quality global banking services. technologies and architectures. 


Valmet 

Corporation 


Itora Corporation is one ofthe largest 


Systems Development Manager 


The ideal candidate wifl lead a major portion of die developme n t systems development experience in the hanking of financial sector 
effort and take responsibility for a large staff engaged on a variety of and possess strong man management, project management: and 
mwyatwl projects. He or she will have gained extensive large interpersonal skills. 


Marketing 

Development 

Manager 


50pants and marketing companies 
worldwide. 

Valmet Helsinki shipyard plans to service 
the international oflshoie industry with high 

quality products and services 

A cooperation agreement nasbeen 

coftdSteo^lhFoaaWhecleiPen^Kn 
Developme nt Limited, world renowned lor 
their design and project [flan^ment 

tapabfflcyfarthe ofishore: oil are! gas induSry. 

The companies plan romATKCl in or 

combined design and manufacturing capa bjuty 
fir accommodation modules and systems. The 

partnership is well equipped to explort the 

potential in the Arctic in particular in the USSR. 
For this new posit io n candidates wiUneed : 


livl Fluent wnHenond spoken Finnish and 

V ' English; a knoivlo^c of other 

Sc5^vwlangwaS» wo ^ bcdn 


The Involve merits! exploitation, 

diem liaison, tdonnflcaoon and review of 
potential UK based supptocomiTHaticatton 
£rth Valmet and Foster Whedcr demand 
production staff, and piqjeci co-otdmaaon. 

This isademondfrig rote aratiK • 

environ mentis a difficult one. The M arket ing 
Development Manager mustdemonsvaic 
qualities otetinanveand sclmntanoe. 


Please reply in writing wi th foil personal 
i career details. quoting CTOrfmg 


Senior Project Managers/Project Managers 


S An engineering degree 
Previous heavy cnCjne* 


Successful candidates will manage one or more a p pltcdrimn experience is particularly important. Applicants should also be fully 
development projects and will be responsible for project planning conversant with structural analysis techniques for on-foe systems 

and control, including resource allocation and estimation, user development, 

liasion and quality assurance. Strong banking or financial systems 


Scotland based 


experience m me ui\ 

(IQ 


and career details. quoting exnling 
remuneration to 
CPAmey. Manager FcnsorowA 
rosier Whcekrr Petroleum Development 
UmaetL V 25 Shaftesbury Avenue. 
London WC2H BAD. 


Database Administration Manager 


In otder to take charge of the data admansaadoo/idaiahase environment, pr e fe r a b ly with knowledge of ADR and rekukmal 
admini st ration function, suitable applicants will be experienced in databases. Managerial skills in die area of application development 
both logical and physical database design in an integrated systems project co-ordination are a prerequisite to success in this pos ition . 


Ready for your 
first step into 
Training 
Management 


Digital is undoubtedly one ofihe largest and . 
certainly the most exciting company m today s 


fy>TTipntorfT irI> retr y Within OUT KSptuIy 
expanding oxganisatkm. employee 
development is an integral pan of our braness 


Consequently, if you're an experienced 
xsonnei or management training 


accept the challenge of man aging an e mployee 

training group, we are very interested in 


Each positron ryUs for dose user contacr and provides the opportunity for international traveL 
Very competitive salaries will be agreed for die right candidates, together with provision of a company 
cat, preferential mortgage and loan facilities, an annual bonus, profit sharing and a pension scheme. 


To apply, please write to Alunand enclosing your CV, or telephone 
Peter German or Bill Taylor on 01-251 8861 (01-461 4626 during the evening). 


Lloyds 

Bank 


Alimand 


AKmaifoCoiriptito Resources Limited. 

Witec House. 82-88 City Road. London EC1Y2BJ 
Telephone: 01-251 8861 {24 hr) 


m 


ASSISTANT MANACER 

PRODUCTION PLANNING 


Ambitious 

Graduates 


c.£1 8,000 


Independent Television News has a vacancy for an Assistant 
Manager to strengthen its Managerial Team in the Production 
Department at its West End Studios. The successful applicant 
will assist the Manager, Production Planning, with the 
organisation and programmes, together with the day-to-day 
management of production staff in several areas. 


Outstanding career opportunities 


Although experience in broadcast television is not essential, the 
post offers a unique opportunity for an ambitious young man or 
woman, aged at least 25, from a related industry and with a 
proven track record in staff management and organisational 
skills. Applicants must also show that they can cope calmly with 
problems under the pressures imposed within a national news 
organisation. 


In addition to tire salary indicated, the post carries an excellent 
benefits package. 


Please apply with c.v. and an relevant information to: 

The Personnel Office 

INDEPENDENT TELEVISION NEWS LIMITED 
48 Wells Street, London W1P 4DE 


UN is an equal opportunities employer 


Phillips & Drew is one of the City’s leading stock 
brokers and is part of the Union Bank of Switzerland, 
which is the largest Swiss bank. 

Due to our continued expansion, we need more 
graduates to help us service our clients' growing needs. We 
offer good training in today's sophisticated markets, and 
excellent prospects for those with the ability and initiative 
to develop themselves in a continually changing and 
increasingly challenging environment. We offer entry 
opportunities in most areas of our business, including 
fund management and international private client 
management. 

If you have the desire to be successful in finance, and 
you are numerate and can communicate effectively, come 
and convince us of your ability at an interview. 

We win reward your success with an excellent compen- 
sation package, including a bonus and mortgage subsidy. 


Please send a full curriculum vitae to: 


Tk&Haifiett Portals Professor 

fctytecfo lio Manufacturing Technology 

Portals Engineering Limited is a rapidly developing subsidiary of Portals 
Holdings PLC. a leading EM200 + UK Company. 


SaDy Wafldey 
Personnel Department 
Phillips & Drew 

120 Moorgate, London EC2M6XP 


The Polytechnic and Portals are assoc ia ting in the establishment of; 
Chair of Advanced Manufacturing Technology based in the School of 
Engineering. 


The objective is to recruit a person able to apply relevant 
lethodologies to current and future operations within Portals 


Engineering and within other companies with whom the Polytechnic is 
associated. 


The successful candidate will be expected to show evidence of an 


ability to bridge successfully the educational and Industrial aspects. High 
academic Qualifications are reauired with a stronq commitment to the 


academic qualifications are required with a strong commitment to the 
task of Identifying and solving some of the problems of modem 
manufacturing industry. 



The opportunity is an example of a new partnership which is 
emerging between successful academic institutions and industry 
Accordingly it is envisaged that the new Professor may choose to return 
to industry after a three year period to cake up a senior management 
position. 


TRAINEE BROKERS 


The salary is negotiable and win be consistent with the expectations 


of a high calibre engineer employed in a high technology company Age 
will not be a barrier if there is adequate evidence of maturity, experience 
and commitment 


We are a well established and highly successful West End 
brokerage providing a wide range of ideas/concepts in the 
financial services market to both the private and corporate 


To discuss the appointment informally, please phone Dr R Barrett on 
Hatfieid (07072) 79100. 


sectors. 


Formal applications should be sent fn the form of a 
comprehend!*; C.V. to the Staffing Officer, The Hatfield 
Polytechnic, P.O. Box 109. HatfleM ALIO 9AJ3. Please quote 
referenc e 150 


Due to continued expansion we now require lour trainee 
brokers. No relevant experience is necessary but you will need 
to be ambitious, able to thrive In a c om p e titive environment and 
aged between 23-35. 


Closing Date: August 19th 1986 


SALES PROFESSIONAL 

We’re Challenging You 


If you are the right person we offer a hill training programme, 
leading to a full professional qualification. High earning 
potential. Plus the usual benefits associated with a company 
excelling in its field. 


If you want the opportunity to tfetate your own future and you 
think you can satisfy our requirements contact 


As the leading all-British storage equipment manufacturers, producing a 
top quality range of racking and shelving products, we have invested 
heavily m the future - in new products, new plant and above aH the 
training and development of an efficient and weH rewarded sales force. 
We are enjoying considerable success and now have a vacancy for an 
ambitious Safas Professional, mafa/female. to share our success by 
covering areas of South West end West London, and 
Buckinghamshire. 

25* paraon wffl be aged 25-35, experienced in industrial selling, 
industrial engineering or mechanical engineering and have a high level 
of enthusiasm and self-motivation. 

In return tar your commHment and abilities we wfll offer. 

• A realistic salary 

• Good professional training 

• Genuine career prospects 

• Company car and expenses 

• Other targe company benefits 

H you feel you can rise to the challenge with us then caU In and see 
Brian Harpham on 0952 588811 


The Recruitment Officer on 01-491 0934 
for a confidential interview. 


ftffWEaaiwaaatoee a in Ku ig CtKaAoqnnreBianaialdiebn 

gxmtiiLlRriMOrt^ (fefeMtoareortrfMriL 

UNEMPLOYED. IfearespecafcisonteFfrdepk^^ 

Offi7MdfetDppoatoBaeKueade6sedl 


FWcterHrtdiAssa^ateespecafisttMi H WfttdW|StWMf)Oll09Z3 55602 ■ 
esUbfiffiedtohehi iedundant,exiaL orthose waffcebotxsat (*_ 

sg togadBHff tofad the rig M posicn. qu rifr FLETCHER HUNT* ASSOCIATES 

Pienier Ho^770xfonlStreri, W1R KB. 
let 01-439 ISB 


Take the Chance - Accept the Challenge! 




Link 51 limited. Link House, 

HataeMd 6, TWort, Shropehlra 

\N8M»MaaDooautti8smpifm. 




INSURANCE EXECUTIVE 
drive rewired la nonage London martenng 
investment aid insurance cnmssny vrtvdi has 
mgsnan and manages 'a hfettj successhi 


CHANGE OF DIRECTION 


THE LEADING ALUM ITEM STORABE 
B tmjwmSST NMMIMCTUMEII 


mater? vntti mnernnu m martetng msorancs 
waged tads to Euooean hmsuis. 
ottered hi suable apptant 
Tatophon* or write tea 
Rawal & Arfcell, Accountants 
Box 4, 84 War-dour Street 
London W1. Teh 01-437 2052 , . 


Tins could be tour oppgnu- 
niiv, IF jou five ra Loudon or 
the Home Counties, ire 25-55 
«<iih business acumen, we will 
ir»ui v<iu Tara new career with 
Britain's leading com pm} ui 
the financial services industry. 


For farther information rim 
C«Jn Lockwood. 
01-343 4200. 


Over the past 2 years, the employee and 


^winidcpartmemanduvtmoppoxturuuesfor 
advancement into other areas erf foe : exanpany. 

The 5 alaiy for the succcssml applicant wiil 
be up to £18K phis cat depending on your stalls 

anC giheTtoiSts arc substantial as wtxdd be 
expected from a m^or international company. 

If you would like to find out more please 
send foil details including salary hsttwy to 
Judith Meddfnds, Employee Development 
Manager. DECTShne Hall, ShtnBdd ftnk 
Reading RG2 SOCU. Tel. Reading [0734)8687 11 
ext 3337. , 


rapidly and we now need id recruit a manager 
responsible for the defiveiy of our extensive 
training curriailum. Thejob requires the skills 
to manage a team of training professionals and 
a programme already accepted for its high «. 
quality and effectiveness. 

Career prospects are excellent within a fast 




Equality of opportunity at DEC 


FumasKCD RENTALS, tenor 
nfffaiuior/rTMiugtr ivawfM 
lor a urn nuaushM Fulham 

firm Expotm-nre essential. Sau- 
ry ciaooo/cis.ooo DCT 
annum Win nr or allowance 
John Hoiiimnworui. Harwood 

House. Fulham Broadway. 

SW6 Oi 736*406. R*f JW 


MILLS AND ALLEN MONEY BROKING (SERVICES) LIMITED 


This major financial services company in the City has openings for the following key personnel 

COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER 

- Range £25k - £35k 

To manag e and control a major telecommunications centre with a team of support personnel. Voice transmisnem 
experience is essential and a thorough technical knowledge of both speed) ana data communications a required. 
M^jor prqject management experience would be preferred. 

TECHNICAL SUPPORT MANAGER 

- Range £20k - £25k 

To provide technical support hi a multi-supplier machine environment to development staff and management. 
Relevant experience will include p ro g ramming, data communications, database knowledge, software development 
and hardware evaluation. 

COMPUTER SERVICES MANAGER 

- Range £20k - £25k 

To provide a professional service in a0 aspects of back office o pera t i o ns including computer centre. Previous 
computer operations management experience is essential and a development background is preferred. Candid at es 
win need strong inter-personal skills to succeed in this role. 


The Company Is a subsidiary of a U.K- PLC. with offices m all international financial centres. The working 
environment c demanding, and exacting. Potential candidates should therefore be resilient, dedicated and be 
prepared to demonstrate exceptional leadership qualities. 


The above posts, in addition to normal company benefits, also cany the provision of a company car. 
Please reply m writing with current CV. to: 

Mrs. E. Mozley, Personnel Officer, 

Mills and Allen Money Broking (Services) Limited, 

8th Floor, Adelaide House, 

London Bridge, London EC4R 9HN. 


DELMAR NMC LTD 

require a 

SALES MANAGER 


IRNKEEPERS 

USA 


Attractive Salary. Executive Car, Benefits 
Ddmour NMC Ltd market leaders in the Polyethylene pope insulation field under the 
'Climatube’ name require a Sales Manager to head the Insulation Division. The 
individual concerned wilt have a technical background ideally gained in the insula- 
tion or construction industries along with good trommunicaoon skills and the ability 
to fiaise at aH levels. Experience of managing a distributor network as wbB as a 
sales force would be a distinct advantage. 

Applications in Miring to: MR G. BOWLES 

SALES & MARKETING DIRECTOR 
DELMAR NMC LTD 
MANOR ROYAL, CRAWLEY 
WEST SUSSEX RH10 2XQ 


ffisfarfc Ocean Grove, 
New Jersey 


EiWD«fc ante, no dtttm to 
mange a 20 ran hotel (no 


mange a 20 ran hotel (no 
mads aovodj. ant block Iren 
ocean. RuporeWtas nctada 
m antt na n a d bating and gar- 
den tax npeneflu requRd. 
WMK 


425 tab Ammo M> 

att 

Mm Ml lev YM NON 
MM 


NEWS EDITOR 


MlcroScope. the toatfng weekly newspaper servicing the mi- 
crocomputer trade seeks a News Editor. Mowing the 

epporonemof tna present post hoUer to ttw of 

Personal Computer World. 


The sucoassM candidate la Body to offer McroScope: 

- Knowledge of Vie Dusmess rrecrocomputar market, with first 
ran contacts and cretfbmy earned os a staff or freelance 




INTERNATIONAL 


journalist in this or an awed Industry. 

- A news nose second to none. 

- The aoHty to comftriesfcxi. Improve and Inspire our team of 
inhouse and freelance |oumatsB. 

- Keen writing, edttlng and org an i sa tional skids. 


Appfcatlone horn cantfdates at Senior Reporter level who 
have news editor potential w* also be considered- In return 


We seek a proven Sales Manager to develop new 
business, principally with the worltfs Airlines . - 


MteroScope otters an exciting package inckidlng a top salary 
plus expenses, foreign travel and seme for personal profes- 
sional development with Sportscene Epedadst Press. 


Interested? Can MlcroScope Editor, Jerry Sanders on 01-580 


0544, or send by-fine samples of currant work to him at 
14 Rathbone Place, 

London W1P IDE 

Applications win be treated in the strictest confidence. 


ABC International is a efivisron oi Read 
Tsfepubtiahing, end has extensive worldwide 
activities which include travel publishing and data 
supply. You witi be concerned with the sales of 
schedules data, routings data, airline timetables, 
analytical services and tariffs. This will necessitate 
the control and motivation of the sales team, as 
well as liaison with excellent customer support 
and data processing departments. Worldwide 
travel can be expected. 


CAN I HAVE THE BEST 
OF BOTH WORLDS 


You could be offering some of the most 
sophisticated personal and corporate products 
with a range of top companies investment 
expertise without having to become an 


Ideally you should be aged botween 28 and 3 SL 

have a background within the Airline/Travel 
industries and be excellently qualified in selling 
new business. Presentation strengths and foreign 
languages would be additional assets. You wRI 
report to the Travel Information Services Director. 

Remuneration will be by basic salary and bonus 
to give earnings in the range £15.000 10 £20,000 
PA Benefits, commensurate with a major 
international company include a contributory 
pension scheme. 


Merchant investors contracts coupled with a 
choice of fends managed by: Framlington, 


Gartmore, Guiness Mahon , Klemworth Benson! 
Henderson, Perpetual and TSB put you in the 


Please send ■ tuBc.v. to: Gins WBtlamson. 
Penonnel Officer, ABC Ifoematkmel, World 
Timetable Centre, Church Street, Dunstsble, 
Beds. LUS4HB. 




* tfwfton offlMNf rvfcptfttefwip 




London Ralph Daniels 01-387 8070 Leeds 
Brian Lucas 0532 433557 Bristol 
Bernard Shreyer 027 2299917 Manchester 
Ray Pfefrepoflt 061 872 4015' Leicester 
Peter Harrison 0533 555014 


Are yon Decisive? 
Unconquerable? 


Bonusbreaks 


| ^ ■■ re 4 

Would you describe 
yourself as persuasive, 

adventurous, self, 
reliant? Have you 
willpower? 


TRAINEE 

BROKERS 

SAL NEG 

Eaabtahcdbrotostnllta 

nccUcmtiwmogMo 


Pbnwptus bonuses Iw 
dynamic livdj people who 
«*w participating M I 
wnemulieun. Insurance 
or tanVmg aperients Wpt 
Prefer graduates or at kau 
educated 10 "A' kh*l - 
standard 

Call Lyra Lab now 


AREA SALES EXECVTIVES VARIOUS LOCATIONS 

Ibonm &E2BJM0 + car 


Could you successfully 
come through a 
demanding training 

schedule to break into 
something exciting, 
new and rewarding. 


We are a Public Cbmpuy and No. I in the Lome Incentives 
Martel. 


Wc arc looking (or Bntaltic candidates who cm display an ability 
» sdl our product at Director level. 


Due to expansion wr require applicants who should be ared 28- 
30. ambriioas and seif tnotiviued. Sales experience cssemiaL 
Duutanding finuro management possibilities witbtrt rapidfv 
Erouuna company. 

Send CM', nr irkph wtT 


[ If 3»u are aged between 
28 and 47 and come 
from the obvious 

background call 

Peter Rockford on 

01-831 0621 


Staff htndoEito* 
■reuoMOBOOSt 


The Sales Dhccwr, Be na ttn m ta. 13 Cariisfe' Road. 
LomIm NW9. Tat; 01-200 9555. 


cv’Sji wninnew mcu> TS 

mb Wttrrh ouiifanr# 
Rodix^ sb HavonSrF 
BnrtnumsM >04457) raw" 


OMDUATK UK QOUftipy 

4«*a2 4V Our iwvitrareM 
■rmtvn mu M, tun ana Siam 
and if you w—4_ * 
make COdO* mt waait «or 
mrtelin/vrar* u feonoiw ma?: 
tox as twt aa *»u < 
orwrevnan ana can wort jf 
our OTTicn nw Kmas CraH 
o No axarniw or weaaana 
work MM yon no BMnacdymf 
own car or home pWma. Tag 
NjMjf Wk Duller on Ol-SST 
oar or 837 mm. 



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•VMS. 




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BANK: \ 


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MANAGER 


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Wmu 


; (SKR VICKS) l.lMrfg 

* **•*■ Ml««n«r. Vr% r^.nnri 

AN ACER 

* 

» of tufv^n pn^.ur .,1 \ 

■xfl an>1 Jau 

tlAN.VGER 

ik 

itotthut •u.!:*„r.- 0r4 3g: 

it AN ACER 

4 


fowl ;n«Wkti:::.‘ . .-r.ir c is.. 

|MIMM lMtif'»-V - ;• • | ~t« 1 t^c. 

IMIU'.Linj ! iyi . •- f •:■••■ ;-rf * n . 

U |hr:r».ar hr ,:i. j!i j a;". 

Rl Ifri n. •»■■>•.• r., HI. j; 

irv 

I Officer, 
i#fttt*r%» l irniVd. 

NW. 

4« »»IIN 


INNKEEPER 

USA 

Histone Octni* 
New Joq 


FUND MANAGEMENT 

-We^a**8ta*i«Ihr TO h^^ 

.emwwm of nadfl Under mmsranm* ■» nn» muui i.wi IWttw ». pmmMi 

FUND MANAGER - FAR EAST EQUITIES 

*1^,00^41^,000 

Aiaiiaia^^?ygOTeq>ftrigict^feafinanekii iirt i hrt i nB <if rtoe>faiiAer.mAiaHgrW«na^ ir TMr A ff w ft f 
the Japanese ohH » wwmH t l . Knowledge of other Far Eastern merimt g wwdd he an adveat^R. 

INVESTMENT ANALTST-UJS. EQUITIES 

Up to 3 yams experience m thi s martlet with a financU twrifntsm, at stockbroker is — « r* ?TW * 

INVESTMENT ANALYST-U.K. EQUITIES 

’ . tl5,000-E»8,000 

to 3 yean ex p e rien c e m this emit of the maikrt with a flnanrint iratibitinn ■t/y- fc WLw i* 
^ n .***^*? v * benefits p ur fc ejs is afro ofl w rd winch in c ta d— a ncm-coatribototy p—fcH i n ■«*—««» and 


shtrnU apply in writing, including a compre hemr re curriculum vitae, ttx 
A-P. Pfenie Effi, Investment A ihjafitirilni. 
hmn^fi M kl United, 1 Thn a dmrdlf Street. Lortn EC2R 8BE. 


Senior Accountants 

North London c. £18,000 + benefits 

Amajorretail^otip withanmioref inexcesof £380m,is a result, two opportunities have arisen in the Finance Department 

rapuuy expanding ns actmnes. The company's success and for recently qualified accountants 

profitabilily is set to continue through organic growth anH^ as 


Financial Accountant 

Pr inci pa lly; yon will be responsible for the preparation and deadlines, a small tean 

production of statutory accounts and of financial reports for to manage and rootivai 

pres enta tion to the Board and Departmental Heads. Other duties addition, experience ol 

will include the necessary year*ecd procedures, variance analysis, modelling would be us 

the development of accounting procedures and the exte n sion of the mwfrf j piTne and mi croc 
current computerised systems, lo assist you in meeting tight Ref: SSAS/0602/T. 


deadlines, a small team will report to you and, therefore, the ability 
to manage and motivate this young department is essential. In 
addition, experience of computerised systems and financial 
modelling would be useful, as extensive use is made of both 
mainframe and microcomputers. 

Ref: SSA8/06Q3/T. 


Eagle Star 


STATISTICS IN 
BANKING & FINANCE 

Marketing & credit appraisal systems 

United Dominions TVust limited a major finance 
house and a member oftheTSB Group is seeking to 
recruit additional staff ranging from Analyst toSauor 
ConsuhanrtD work on the development of credit 
marketing and behavioural scoring systems, 
PreferaWyeducated to degree level you will have 
experience in developing scoring systems and 
monitoring the performance of loan portfolios,^ Tfou 
should be able to demonstrate initiative commercial 
awareness and possess sound interpersonal skills. 


a broad-based computer science background 
who are interested in helping us to research new 
statistical techniques. 


career development within the TSBGroup In 
to competitive salaries, a full range of Company 
benefits is provided including mortgage subsidy 
non-contributory pension and reiocation assistance 
where appropriate 

Please reply giving fuD personal and career details, 
including current salary and benefits to-. 

Me K. WyH TSS Tiaining & Recruitment Manages 
United Dominions' TVust Limited. Holbrook House 
- 1 16 Cockfosters Itoad Cockfosters. Herts. EN4 ODY 


United Dominions Trust Ltd 


BUSINESS ANALYST 

COMPUTER MANUFACTURER 


£ negotiable + car + free petrol 

McDonnell Douglas Information Systems are established as one 
of the UK's primary suppliers of high value computer and 
networking systems with currenttumover in excess offlQOm 
and an annual growth rate exceeding 30%. 

This constantly changing environment makes the role of Business 
Planning critically important with an involvement In all aspects of 
pricing, capital appraisal, top level budgeting and review of mgyor 
business plans. 

The department Is expanding in line with the growth of the UK 
bus! ness but this role has arisen specifically as a result of a 
promotion Into our International operation. 

The post will ideally suit a commercially minded qualified 
Accountant probably in his/her late 20’s, with the ability to work 
closely with Business Managers atthe most senior level. 

If a role with pace, flexibility and a wide range of career 
. opportunities meets your requirements write giving full career 
details to John Paterson at’McDonnell Douglas Information 
Systems Limited.Boundary Way HemelHempstead.Herts.HP27HU 
or telephone him on (0442) 61266. 




GRADUATE TRAINEES 

VARIOUS LOCATIONS to £1 3,000 au 
Leading UK muKktational seeks mobile 

graduates wishing to qualify as accoun- 
tants (ACMA/ACCA). Excellent study and 
benefits package. 

For larfarMaffs costa* 

Management Personnel 
2 Swafiow Place, 
London W1R7AA 

01-408 1694 

quotingrofr DM 2328 


STOCKBROKINCT 
WEST COUNTRY 


Our efeni. at established but expaidiiig ftm o* stockbrokers, 
is seeking a PRIVATE CUBVr EXECUTIVE, kteafly the 
successfu c&xWafe sffl have passed the stock exchange 
aamin a tkK B aid nay ham existing business. As a major 
stoddxoklng firm may offer excolent Kmg term earner 
prospects. 

For further details contact Moira Williams. County 
Apportments. Adsborough, Taunton. Somerset TA2 8RP or 
161 0823 413122. ■ ■ 


ACCOUNTING 

W. London 

£ 10 -£ 12 £ 0 Q + study 

Household name Ratal 
group nave crated new po- 
rtions wttttn HO. Affisant 
Accountants w* be nsspon- 



Senior Administrative Accountant 

.TT us potion requires a highly-motivated character with maintained and the group complies with legal requirements, you 

mmmmm supervision. Your wfll maintain records of borrowing levels, be responsible for 

r esp on n b u iO e s will rod tide han d lin g ifae nre af fa i re an d company updating cash-flow forecasts and monitoring inter-company 

secrccanal matters, as well as monitoring the daily cash balances, borrowings and dividends. An interesting and challenging role 

wffl involve constant liaison with the group’s external for which a good technical background and the requisite tax 

advisors. In addition to ensuring that the statutory books are knowledge is required. Ref: SSA8/0603/T. 


Both these positions offer invaluable experience and 
ex ce ll e nt career development opport u nities to bright, 

energetic and ambitious individuals as pair of a small, 
box dynamic team committed to the success of the 
company. Candidates should be recently qualified ACA7 




ACCA/ACMAs, aged mid-20s to early 30s, who are 
prepared to make a positive contribution to the group, 
lb apply, please write is confidence, indicating 
current salary and quoting the appropriate 
reference to Fiona McMillan. 


R\ Personnel Services 


Ex ecutiv e Search - Selection * Ps ychome trics • Remuneration & Personnel Consultancy 


Hyde Park House, 60a Kxdgtasbndge, London SW1X7LE. 
Tel: (H-2356060 Telex: 27874 


Deputy County Treasurer 

Salary up to £27,000 plus leased car or 
essential car user allowance. 

Hertfordshire has a gross revenue budget of £510 million and employs 46,000 
people. 

Applications are invited from persons with an appropriate accountancy 
qualification and experience for the post of Deputy County Treasurer. The 
present holder, Mr. David Prince, leaves in October to become Director of 
Finance and Administration of Cambridgeshire. 

The Deputy County Treasurer takes a leading role in the management of a 
department of 270 staff and in developing its contribution to effective financial 
management He/she will be expected to make a positive contribution to the 
full range of the County Council's policy making processes and wilt have a key 
accountability for the further development and implementation of the corporate 
information technology strategy. 

For further particulars contact Caroline Holloway on Hertford 555563. 
Interviews to take place middle of September. 


Hertfordshire 

CountyGouncil 

An EquaLGpportunity Employer 


. Applications* giving relevant career 
partteutamand three referees, to be 
sent by Friday 22 August 1986, to 
M J le Fleming, Chief Executive, County 
Hall* Hertford, SG13 8DE (reference CH). 


US$ FIXED INCOME SECURITIES DEALERS 

BECOME CHIEF DEALER 

SETUPTHE 'MARKET-MAKING' DESKIN 
THE INVESTMENT BANKING SUBSIDIARY OF ONE 
OFTHEWORLD'STEN LARGEST BANKS. 


This is an opportunity to move up to become 
Chief Dealer and lead the Company's strategic 
expansion into market-making of USS Fixed 
Income Securities. You will provide its primary 
expertise in this market and will be responsible 
forbuildingupand managing your team. 

This is a growth opportunity that you simply 
can't afford to overtook. Hie bank has immense 
financial strength and no one doubts that they 
wffl become one of the leaders in this market 


Candidates should have a minimum of three 
years market making experience in USS Bonds 
and have the ability to recogniseand interpret the 
key influences on the market 

The rewards for this post will certainly be 
greater than in your present job. 

To appfy, please telephone or write to 
John Sears, 11/15 Wlgmore Street, 

London W1H 9LB, 01-629 353Z 


John Sears 


.: w .■ 3 * 4 **' .v . U**** -*-. 


PROFESSIONALS 

Considering emigrating 
to Australia/ 

Nelson Wheeler Chartered Accountants, with 
branches in all states of Australia, have grown rapidly in 
the past two years and are now amongst the top twelve 
firms in Australia. 

Much of this growth has been achieved by providing 
an environment which enables innovative and energetic 
achievers to operate with relative autonomy The practice 
is large enough to provide work on prestigious accounts, 
yet still allows assignments to be followed from inception 
to conclusion. 

currently have three opportunities, at various levels 
of seniority requiring self-directed people who.will quickly 
contribute in their new environment and the firm has a full 
time Training Director to assist you. Aged 24-35 you will 
have a minimum of three years professional experience. 

Mike Hannaford from our Melbourne office will be 
visiting Britain during the next three weeks and is inter- 
ested in talking to people who are actively considering 
emigrating and will be able to tell you about career oppor- 
tunities. excellent salaries and benefits and also advise on 
comparative lifestyles. 

Please telephone Mrs. Ricky Lawrence our UK repre- 
sentative at Grant Thornton on 01-405 8422 for more details. 


■ a 


WITH 

THE TIMES 


If you have a holiday let to advertise, 
you will reach potential holiday makers 
more economically in The Times than in 
any other quality daily newspaper. 

The message is clear. If you want 
your holiday advertising budget to go 
further, yotfre a great deal better off in 
The Times. 

To reserve space now, write to Shirley 
MargoUs, Group Classified Advertise- 
ment Manager, Times Newspapers Ltd., 
Advertisement Department, P. O. Box 484, 
Virginia Street, London El 9DD. 

Access, Visa, Diners and Amex Cards 
welcome 

Source: TGlAprU-Sept ’8S(Se^Catem^HoSdafmakersin UK.) 


Finance Department 

Investment Accountant 


£13,082-£f4,126 

Grade P01-4 (Pay Award Pending) 

A> a natural cento form* North 5«a Ol and Gat 
InduBiiy, no Shetland Wands ham unOMgono can* 
•tamable economic growth, the Wand* Council has 
mponded wtih pngwuhe pofldes to deal wtfti the 
Impact on the local economy. 

As Investment Accountant your mmU w(fl beta 
aaW In Implementing mow poBdM and adminWering 
theMaeedoclWtlwoliheChaiaQWe Bust ana o n octatod 
companies. The poo oflers me opportunity of involvement 
In a wider variety ot woriclhan any other local authortty. 
and ol dkeci involvement wtm the mombea ol the 
community benefiting horn Hurt RunOt. 

You should be an aqserienced. professional 
accountant wflh chartered status (or stmBaiX probaby 
aged 25/35. MBed to your highly developed com- 
munication sMk. you professional background wfl 
toeaHy Include experience of banking or commer ci al 
investment and investment npfnwnf a working 
knowledge ot company taw and taxation and an 
tmdantandlng of the problems of small businesses/ 

communities. 

Benefits tadude a normal 34 hou working weefc 
Wtafton-prool pension scheme, generous holdays, 
repayment of removed expenses, and the posstoMy of 

Cound housing. 

Wyou w e lcome the oppotlu n fiy to de ve l op your 
career In a stimulating environment, Shetland otters 
excoient educational and leisure lodHtes and a unique 

quaRyof Ha 

the ctockig dole far meelpt elrrepfeoMm Is 2Mi Augurt 
For an Informal dhrji—lw i c o nc mte g toe post, contact 


3S332 





Shetland 


SUPER SECRETARIES 



SECRET AKICS tor AnMtNtt A 
Dmgnm. P « ni»n »M A MW 
rary poohkwb. amsa Smohhi 
nrc. Coas. 01 734 0632 


PART TMC HCRTTMT waal- 
M for duwtan' ofTirv nr Bakrr 
Siren Hours nmnrr Too rales 
for ngni person. Driver pre- 
ferred. Or a\ alia Me. Tel Mr 
Crtara 01-73* 1494, 


TT-I'.'yf 

■art H: 


3 MINS 

VICTORIA STATION 

Ikgety raqores **>■> / »£ tot 
busy tador and waoow. Ocn- 
scMiiscqMnGttMkssI*) Fssl 
accurate rymoo essentul Good 
iA*m raw, reght sut «d 
qulMted college leaver. Mon 
Stnotaronly Rng SiSa on 01-630 
5454 (No agenaesj. 


EXMBfTKMt CO. Sales PA. 
90/50. Drr or MPdor Dtopi 
Dtt create own Cftents. Lan- 
ouapn inHul career praoperts. 
C9,ooo*++. Call Natalia TED 
AW 01-756 90S 1 


FULHAM SWL COHegr Inter. 
■ rusty shorthand, accura te tyn- 
ins Audio iraunng. for smaD 
busy drum to. £6.500*-. Ape 
la-t-. Bernadette Bee Cons. Ol 
629 1204 


SECRETARY Tor Director In 
Mayfhir Estate Aeency Good 
shorthand, typing. Own oft ire. 
Saury C9.G00 + Bonus. Tel Ol- 
491 3959 ReC VtP 


TRAVEL CO. PA/Ser to Genera 
Manager bo/m. Arman a ett- 
ent lonon. tS.aco » T ravel 
Pena Can Nauru TED Agy 
01-756 9867 



IBTsh with good ersucaoon and 
preaealapon to work wipmb 

young team » fneodty 
Kmonnortooe Property Dept of 
PLC- Mbud duttrs moudino 
come audio. Utle shorthand + 
goad typing. Uann wtm 
agnus/buHdors. Training an 
owetah telex, r £7.000 lup- 
opus free lunch, bupa etc. 
Joyce Gukuu OS 589 

8807/0010 IDtc Co ns) 


TEMPTING TIMES 


■EOM MONDAY! HnMv OHereM 
Ing twohingi ataUaMe m 
PubtHhnw and Media. Current 
Altatrs and ArrtHiects. Proper- 
ty and Banking. Chanties and 
Non rammer nat. Top rales. 
Ring ioda>'. Cmem Garden Bu- 
reau. iso nett EGA su 
7696. 


NON -SECRETARIAL 


PS CO WEST D0. Monarch 
swnrhboard ooerator Hus gen- 
erBl o Time adntm HB.800 Joan 
Trcr RecruMm en l. 01-379 3510 


— 

mk' 1 







SITUATIONS WANTED 


■nr AntcAit oouim murtwr 
i Bn Inn Subwci/emaie) wanes 
peunoo as legal exec /legal ad- 
« iw with proieSHOital t 
rommernal tiim. Ol 48S 0869 
rCtcsi 


Eapennxed in aonun. smaD 
btsmeo. warhUM. writing. 
Seeks muresnng post. London 
area. Td 01 834 i 6 a 9. 


KGEH1LV rrthrM Naval Com- 
mander Meta (uH/pan time 
emptoyrnenl withui 30 mttn 
Shaftesbury. DoneL Tel. 0747 
wwa 


MT» MALE BRAD 34 good 
raonsman trda tntemono po 
utwi. home or abroad. Wed 
travrurd weU educated. Fluent 
Spanish. busmenAenchtog ex- 
perience ExeeUeM references 
Canada. Spam ana Mexico. Td 
01 8B4 0047, 


MIBUC CCWMM. mao, V. led* 
admut/oreaneational ponuon. 
In rura/irml rural tocaitoo. 
Wide experience to dace. A cast- 
able immrcMicly Td 6373 72) 
46646 


: * i t? 


moorm in— i — n — erai lM W f 
ResHMU 7 ere Tokyo. 
ctialMngng career. 0903 «)^4S 

OXFOm GRADUATE 36 year- 
Fmancr bcus framed, vnor h 
teiegts. 6*e«a dwwngt fe*d 
variety oi-37M3oO ten. 































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\ 



THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


LA CREME DE LA CREME 



High-Technology Executive Search 
Knightsbridge 


CRC Technology Limited is a 
successful broadly based consultancy 
group. Its activities cover executive 
search, selection (through Cambridge 
Recruitment Consultants) and a systems 
and marketing consultancy company. 
The search operation. CRC 
International, acts for a wide range of 
blue-chip companies in the UK. Europe 
and the USA- It is shortly relocating to 
Knightsbridge and bas the following 
two key vacancies. 


applicant will be judged. This position 
is not a backroom role. 


Research Manager 

(Circa £20,000 plus profit share) 

We are looking for an experienced 
researcher to set up a new department. 
Warkingwith two consultants, 
recognised as leaders in their field, the 
Research Manager will be expected to 
interface with clients and candidates at 
the highest levels. Creativity, excellent 
inter-personal skills, intellect and 
integrity are factors upon which an 


Secretary /PA 

(Circa £11,000 plus profit share) 
Fbr this role we require an intelligent, 
self motivated person with high 
professional skills. As a professional 
close knit practice we expect the 
secretary to be able to cope with 
pressure and be a good ambassador for 
the Company. 


The prospects fbr career development 
in both jobs are excellent. As a group 
we are able to offer in ter -company 
transfers as well as training in new 
skills. To apply, please send a 
comprehensive curriculum vitae to 
Geoffrey King. Managing Director of 
CRC International at the address 
below. Interviews will be held in 
London. These positions are open to 
both men and women. 


Cambridge Recruitment Consultants 

la Rose Crescent, Cambridge CB2 3LL. Telephone: 0223 311316. 


TWICKENHAM 

£ 10,000 

This fast-moving consultant 
oeads a professional 
PA who warts tots of 
ficatai in many different 
fields involving the construc- 
tion and naming of tauy 
homes. A krowfedga ot PR 
and media is essential for this 
top position. Liaising at time- 
tor level your ongansatioiiai 
flak wit come id the (ore. A 

teen sense of humoti is wel- 

comed as is a car driver. 

01-589 4422 


Senior. 

Secretaries 



MUSIC VIDEOS 
FUN! 

NW10 £9,500 

We need a hefy tadbfc aB- 
ronnder wth mceBent state 

( 100/601 far this dynamo ann- 
um. Someone wbo can work 
infer pressure, is this you? A 

muse merest is essential tor dns 

young production and dWnbuUon 
company "here promotion pros- 
pects look promising. You wU 
need to haw a flak (Or 
orgeteataa and adapbhAty 
wining in supeti modem of- 
fices. A ear diner would be 
p rofa ned. 25+ 

01-589 4422 


Senior 

Secretaries 




SUMMER 
TEMPORARIES 
WE NEED YOU 


We don't offer holiday pay 
with strings attached but i» 
do offer the foUowing: 


"Top 1 


Come and meet oir young 
will ca 


energetic team who 
ter to your needs with a 
variety of bookings. 


01-589 4422 

Senior 

Secretaries 




SPINNING TOP 

c^iijne 

Do you enjoy the excitement 
of a dealing room, and 
would you like to provide 
secretarial/ administrative 
assistance to two senior ex- 
ecutives in one of the most 
prestigious investment 
banks. 

Your excellent organ- 
isational skis will enable 
you to develop your own 
systems relating to diems, 
financial products and de- 
partmental results and 
activities while your quick 
reactions and abifity tp work 
on your own mibalivB will 
enable you to thrive in this 
metorei atmosphere. 

Age: mid 20's.Stote 80/60 
City Office 
726 8491 

AS2££AJ*9®S£R 

A 


a* SECRETARY/PA TO TWO DIRECTORS 


An experienced secretary is required to 
work with two Company Directors in a 
busy and friendly educational 
environment 

The successful applicant will probably 
be over 25, have several years relevant 
experience, and have good shorthand 
speeds. Salary £10,0004-. 

To 
on 

agencies. 

Pitman Education and Training Ltd, 154 
Southampton Row, London WC1B SAX. 


i apply please telephone Ros Skinner 
01-83/4481 as soon as possible. No 




PROPERTY 

MANAGER 


We require an energetic responsible person who b look- 
ing fbr job satisfaction with some relevant experience 
been both numerate and a good typist, aWe to work 
under pressure, to handle the management af high dass 
furnished properties. Ability to deal with people essen- 
tial. Attractive salary. 


Please apply to Pamela Berend 
01-722 7101 
Anscombe & Ring! and 
Residential Lettings 
8 Wellington Road London NW8 


SOTHEBY’S 


A leading auction house requires 
enthusiastic and organised Secretaries 
with impeccable skills to work in expert 
and administrative departments. A 
knowledge of French or German would 
be useful together with the ability to use 
a word processor. We offer a 
competitive salary and benefits. Please 
send your CV to: 


The Personnel Department 
Sotheby's 

34-35 New Bond Street 
London W1A 2AA 


SECRETARY/PA to MD 


Enthusiastic, client orientated Secretary/PA required 
for MD of young and growing mana g em ent 
consultancy. Aged 25-35, good phone manner. 
WP experience and accuracy essential 
Background in marketing usefoL 

Unique opportunity for growth 
Salary c £9,000 + profit share. 


Ring 01-994 9404 

and tell ns why yen fit the bill! 


LEGAL SHORTHAND/ 
ADMIN SECRETARY 


To work for a solicitor in a commercial environment. If 
you have good secretarial skills and would like to be 
more involved in the running of the company, dealing 


with personnel pensions, etc foisis tbejob for you. 


Excellent working conditions. 930 

Salary £10300 pins annual bonus. 

Phone Maureen (Law Staff Agency) 
623 9806. 


TELEPHONIST RECEPTIONIST 
£10,500 NEC 

Those professional Chartered Surveyors in W1 
are seeking a telephonist receptionist wftfi a mini- 
mum one year Ptessey 1DXS or Monarch 
experience. If you have good grooming, are weB 
spoken, aged between 25-36 and can Raise confi- 
dently at all levels, please phone Carolyn Weston 
734015 


for an immediate appointment on 734 0157 or call 
in at Alfred Marks Recruitment Consultants 151 
Regent Street London W1. 




ALFRED MARKS 


AUDIO SECRETARY 
LONDON SW1 


Professional firm of Quantity Surveyors needs first rate 
Secretary for 3 Partners. Excellent WP skills and sound 
commercial background. Under 30 preferred. Salary up 

to £ 10 . 000 . 


Ring Soe Ireland 
#1-730 9901 


■experienced ■ 

ACCOUNTS CLERlT 


To take over responsibil- 
ity for al day-to-day and 
quarterly accounting for 
large and active Property 
Management dept Must 
be experienced to mini- 
mum of trial balance and 
in working with a fully 
computerised accounts 
operation. Typing an ad- 
vantage but not essential. 

Salary to £9,500 
depending on age 
and axperienca 
Contact L. Watts, 
Kinleigh LtcL, 
01-785 2122 


SECRETARY 


Required for Publicity and 
Promotions Department, Na- 
tional Newspaper Group, 
c. £9 JOS 

Immediate opening for ex- 
perienced Secretary whit 
CMxtkm shor thand and typ- 
ing skilh and good telephone 
manner, in busy and lively 
office. 

Please ttfaphoM 01-353 4835 

for appohitBKBi. 


PA/SECS 

£13,000 


EXEC 

£ 10-£1 

Ow darts vi one of . 

Madam Ehrta la Da coy. Dm u 

(mamn and a rea- dg w tanmem 

iMiss.sBUt.a 

a WP Marina Bf Mm aortal u 


CITY- 01-431 2345 
WEST END: 01-938 2188 


aHratt 


ADMIN IN RETAIL 

£9000 Package 

A garter of cMaupng SH Stepci- 
twa. ham mm win Ms tip* 





CITY- 01-481 2345' 
WEST END: 01-938 2188' 


alhatt 


SECRETARY TO 
SALES OFFICE 

Secretary required 
for busy sales of- 
fice in Putney to get 
involved in all as- 
pects of Estate 
Agency. Fast accu- 
rate typing 
essential. 

Sadary c£8£00 aae 
CmtactL Watts, 
KiHfetgO LttL, 
01-705 2122. 


INTERVIEWERS 


£8-10,000 + 
Commission 


Due to currant expansion, 
small triaruSy group requires 
experienced consultants 
(Sac. Accounting or trial for 
City and W/E branches. No 
rigid targets but with our 
training, seti-motfrated staff 
can qiKfcty earn in excess ot 
£18X00 pa. . . 

Cal 499 8378 


SECRETARY/ 

ADMIN/PA 

To an expanding 
young partnership of 
three Chartered 
Surveyors. Westmin- 
ster based. Varied and 
responsible work. No 
shorthand but good 
WP and audio. 3/5 
years' experience. 

£10,000 p-a. 

Jones Hubbard 
Hawkins 
01-222 4434 


PA/SECRETARY 


Lading manufacturer of 
** ‘ir Graphics, W8, 


highly motivated 


PA 25+/- with 
organisational ability 

and initiative. Word pro- 
cessing, French and an 
Interest in high tech, 
equipment an asset. 
Must be able to work un- 
der pressure & shoulder 
responstjtilty. 

Top salary to successful 
applicant 

Phone Susan Forbe s 
on: 01 743 7679 


BARNARD MARCUS 

Commercial Bepartawat 

Require «vrJJ presented 

Secretary/ Asduuu able lo 

work on initiative & os pun 
of i small rapidly expanding 
department within highly 
progressive firm. fXDOO pjl 

Ring 602 5581 
No Agencies 


HARLEY STREET 
MEDICAL 
SECRETARY 


Busy Harley Street 
Specialist requires an 
experienced medical 
secretary. Must be 
enthusiastic, responsible 
and capeable of running 
tin expanding practice. A 
genuine interest in 
patients is essential. 4-5 
days per week negotiable. 
Salary £8300 plus. 

Please telephone 
01 935 6698 


SECRETARY/PA 


To work in very busy 

— iment 


„,^_jrry management 
depC Respond to 1 
Management Director 
mvoheC In all aspects of 
property management. 
Accurate and last axso 
esseramJ - shorthand an 

advantage. Must be able 
to wok on awn Mttative in 
DWeWS absence- 

Salary c£&500 

84UO. 

Contact L Watts, 

IGnleigh LttL, 

01-785 2122 


French Speaking 
SECRETARY/PA 


c.£9,000 Enfield, Middlesex 
“The Schlumberger Saga” 


The locale and set-up for tins job may sound Bka a 
Hollywood scenario. But there's no fusion. It's for reaL 
Imagine: a position near the tub of a vast empire, an 
international enterprise that employs 80.000 people of 75 
nationafities in over 100 countries. See yourself, in ultra- 
modern, spacious, luxurious offices with an the latest 
amenitie s , involved in six or seven businesses who are afl 
autonomo u sly operating units of the Soiartron 
Transducers division and part of the Schtumberger 
Electronics giant. You wW be the ‘right hancT of perhaps 
two or three management level people, with French. 
American and UK connections. 


Besides your various linguistic abffities. you'd esse n tial ly 

since 


need word 
work involves ii 
goes without 


much of the 
fiaison and correspondence, h 
that you'd be self-motivated with top 
Is and the capacity to work on your 
own Mtiativa We are looking for someone with a truly 
professional attitude and mature approach to the 
situation, who can make an effective contribution. 


If you feel you are ready to expand your career at the 
heart of this dynamic network - send your cv now. to; 


Geoff Head, Peteonoef Mana ger, Weston (UK) Division, 
Solartren T ran sduc er s. 580 Great Cambridge Road, 
Enfold, Wddtosex. EN1 3BX. Tefc 01-368 1100. 


20 dud interviews, no. 
A few real crackers, yes. 


WORLD WIDE PUBLISHERS 

£7,500 


TWs position involves working as a WP/secretary for an out- 
sat in Covent Garden. You wiB need 


and friendy cSant 
to Baisa " 
pension scheme. LVs 


with Editors. Benefits include 
dsoount on books. 


DISCOUNT CLOTHES 

£1 0, 000-E1 0,500 

How wcnkl you Bke to work far a famous fashion company. 
You would be woriang for the MD. perforrrang afl major 

b taiidesStt (fi 


secretarial duties 
postal. Benefits Include 


aasoaate d with this senior 
discount on dothes and STL 


Please contact Satyr Sherman or Denize Gray, 
Alfred Marin Recr uitm e nt Consultants. 
14-18 VHara Street, Charing Grose. 

Tefc 01-930 8855. 


m 


ALFRED MARKS 


PERSONAL SECRETARY TO 
ADVERTISING MANAGER 


It is essmtial that the job holder should have at least 2 
years experience working as a secretary in the 
advertising/communications industry. 


As well as needing impeccable shorthand and typing 

id work 


(100/60) the applicant must be well organised and 
efficiently under pressure. 


will be in the region of £9,000 plus other fringe 
ritn 1 


its associated with working for a bank. 

Please send your C.V. marked private and confidential 
la 

The Advertising Manager 
Advertising Department, Barclays Bank Pic 
Jaxon House, 94 St Pauls Chnrch Yard 
London EC4M 8EH 


O p po r t un ity to mm Supervisory Admin & PR Skills 

Office Administratin' South of the River 
circa £9,000 

Successful Mail Order Fashion Company 
Due to expansion we seek an experienced office adminis- 
trator, aged 25-45 to take on the overall adminisnarive 
management of this rapidly developing company- Report- 
ing to the Managing Director, responsibilities will include 
supervision of staff, streamlining procedures, development 
of new products/ designs, public relations activities. A me- 
thodical but flexible approach combined with a cheerful 
personality are important attributes. Car driver and typing 
essential. 


Applications in stria confidence with CV to: The Manag- 
ing Director, James Meade Shim Ltd, 302-304 Barrington 
Road, London SW9 7HW. Or telephone 01 274 3100. 


STOCKBROKERS - W1 

Speciality firm dealing on New York Stock Exchange 
seeks young motivated secretary to work dosdy with 
Managing Director and sales team. Excellent s e cre t aria l 
skills, good organisational ability and desire u grow, with 
company. 

£8.500 .+ BUPA, Bonus 


Send CV. to Powdl GRC Ltd, 16 Hanover Square, 
Loudon Wl 


PA TO DYNAMIC DUO 

PA/Ssc required for two young go-ahead partners in Mayffflr firm 
of /yditects and Surveyors. You vrifl be involved in the many and 


varad aspects of propaty development Basing with clients and 
staff. Superb audio skfls and organisational abilities essential. PC 
irtft WP capaMity is there to help m this ttenanifinfl 
environment Cheerful and positive attitude is an absolute must 
An exceflent opportunity and salary for the right person. 


Telephone Safiy Clara cm 01-493 8200 


SECRETARY/PA 


The General Secretary of e p rofess ional association requires an 
experienced person, in c urren t typing practice, who is flexible and 
Dreamed, and is prepared for limited n ati on al travel. A knavri- 
«£e of computers wodd be an advantags. The position calls for 
an applicant who is prep ar ed for variation and inrobemet within 
the otramaatioa. London resident preferred. Crrca £10/100. Apply 
with CV and contact telephone ta BOX G77 n» Times, Ad- 
vertisement Dept. PO Bax 484 Virginia St, London El 9DD. 


LEAVER, 17,500. 
Tha nnwoiul wcning la In 
tlx* Clue) executive's suBe of a 
wall known pubUc mwony. B 
ramtnnm secretarial work III) 
ihe organization of social and 
waning fimcnam whUi you 
wiu attend. A good educational 
background, auenuon to detail 
and flexiMtuy are nerasaary to 


equip you (or Hus exciting start 
lo yuor career. Age I 
Skills 90/50. Tetcotwne The 
Recruitment Company on Ol 
831 122U 


PART TIME VACANCIES 


PART TIME VACANCIES 


LANDSCAPE 

ARCHITECT 


Requires part time Secretary 
(aftamoops preferably) for 
amal practice South of the 
rwer. Salary c. £4,000 pjk 


Tefc Robert Adame on 
01-627 2599 


THC DRAKE FELLOWSHIP, a 

charily, wb inMUNmii ran 
tu» pan lime lypm. Pleas* Tel 
Ol 481 7049. 


BOOKKEEPER TO T/B 

WITH SPOKEN FRENCH 


Pro Rata £10,000 

3 days per week 


A unique opportunity has arisen Tor bookkeeper 
to T/B to work within the film industry. Experi- 
enced applicant must be fine to spend ail of June 
each year working in Cannes with a generous 

living allowance. 


Ous the successful 
in their late 20's or 


Bright capable and 
candidate will proba 
early 30'5 l 

If you feel that yon fill the requirements for this 
specification please phone for an appointment 
01-437 3103 


Julia Mclndoe 
Part Time Careers 
IQ Golden Square 
London W] 


This is an example of vacancies available for 


part time qualified, part qualified accountants 
jrking 


and bookkeepers working on both manual and 
computerised systems available now in Central 
>n and the City. 


SWITZERLAND 

The BANK FOR 
INTERNATIONAL 
SETTLEMENTS, 
an international institution in 
Basle, 

seeks a fully-trained 
SECRETARY/ 
SHORTHAND-TYPIST 
for its General Secretariat 


Candidates, who should be aged between 20 and 
25 and have English as their mother tongue, 
should have a good knowledge of French and 
German. 

The Bank offers an attractive salary and excellent 
working conditions in an international 
atmosphere. 

Interested applicants are invited to write to the 
Personnel Section. Bank fen- International Settle- 
ments, P.O. Box, 4002 Basle, Switzerland, 
enclosing a curriculum vitae, references and a 
photograph. 


THE 

incorporated 

SOCIETY 


OF 


ISvA 


VALUERS 

AND 

auctioneers 


DEPARTMENTAL 

SECRETARY 


We are seeking an intelligent and experienced S«ae*«y, 

witling to use initiative, with a ae»e of to *h» 

interesting potation assisting the 
Services Officer. Common sense and good wh o fthra d 
and toping aKDs required; also an interest in peopto.ee 
there to a good deal of telephone contact with members 
of the public and Members of the Soart*. 


Starting salary £7.750 pa rising to £&000 on ontiafiKtaqr 
CT T ftp tetton of three tropUii probationary aetvico. L.VV 


Applications in writi ng please to ISVA. 3 
Cate. London SWlX OAS. For further 
information telephone 235-2282 and aek far 
Kenneth Forbes. 


CHAMPAGNE RECEPTION 
Tuesday 12th August 
I0am-7pm 

ALFRED MARKS 

100 OXFORD STREET, LONDON WIN 9FB 

WP OPERATORS-SECRETARIES- 
CLERJK TYPISTS 

You are invited to attend our open day. if you are seeking 
temporary employment, short or long tarm. If you don t 
use a WP. we would be happy to un you afl about our 
ie. We are ottering 
an your first day wHn 
calf for further details 


extensive WP training progr am m e 
and si ‘ ‘ 


immediate hoflday and sick pay from 
us. We took forward to your phone 
and invitation. 

Please can Helen MBs on 631 5262. 
Alfred Maries Recruitment Consultants. 


m 




ALFRED MARKS 


the fumishtng fabric sale shop 


The partners of Spofls are looking for a 
motivated, hardworking person to help run 
and expand the Spoils furnishing fabric sale 
shops. 


Ideally aged between 23-45 with flair and 
experience in the interior design business.. 


Telephone Stephen Lewis 01-960 0468/5444 
or write to See West 


SPOILS 

157 Munster Roads 
Fulham SW6 ©DA 


EXPERIENCED PA/SEC 

c.£l 2,000 


For a partner of large architects’ practise in 
Covent Garden. Challenging and demand- 
ing position. 

Tel: 01-585 0391 

No Agencies 


BMJI6UAL PA ADMIN ASSIST 

Two fast niowng hMech company Directors require expert* 


encad PA wrth one wnopean language Must have W P (prat 
My and typing, export wpari- 


Wordstori. exceflent admsi abtoy _. 

ence to ktese with UK and overseas customers. Mutt be sttf 
motivated with a strong personalty to lake charge of office 
during Directors absence abroad. Age 25-30 yean. SaJaty 
negotiable accenting to aga and experience 


Write with CV to: 

SpttdttHx Systems 

ClarevOle House 47,Whttcomb S tr eet 
Or phone 930-1407 tonJfiht 5-30-7pm 
London WC2H 7DH 


PERSONAL 


rn w fi e w i l trere page 27 


GENERAL 


almtam. Brunsrtt 


Hague. DuHtn. 


780. Ol 236 8070. 


avail. 


Ploi Holidays. Aid 2136 


SELF-CATERING 


6723. ABTA ATOL 1276. 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARICS 


MZ3KMTCA Villas. SUM 


l*TM Aid 1772. 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


VUlas. Ol 246-9181. 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


Famines. Lu 
0122 24 tin 


maglr 

hotMain. Freedom mis 
Ol 741 4686. ATOL 432. 


119900. 6 13. 26 

Slrama. 0706 862B14. 


Greek Island 
Villas 

h b not too late to find a 


apartment In quiet Hilling 
village: bi Crete superb wrt* 
Front audios. Good Family 
houses too most dates. 

Day Rights available every 
Tuesday from Qatarick and 
Manchester. Brochure: 



AUGUST/SBTEMBEB 

FLY DIRECT TO CORFU 


CRETE 8 SWATHOS. 
Baatdfte villas ft apts 
Oosa to gforious beaches. 
FREE 


ILIOS ISLAND 
HOLIDAYS 


«m aitd nn. 1432 


SWPLY CRETE 
tffiRSOffiftSOS ft CHAIM 

Anglo Creak tanto offer oea 

onvate ritos/sbaox Many 


Mfisg&DtoctflgifeHHMMoi] 

AVAAAB8JTY 19TH MJ6UST 

Rnc for snail, fondly -brodm 

D1-994 4405225 AW 1822 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 

ha- VILLAS WITH A aaMUC TOUCH, 
n A vtaa. a poof ang a neaunfui 

me view. What more could you 

ou- wani7 Choose from Tuscany. 

2a. Sarxbnia or RaveUg - the lovrtl 

IX er pans of Italy where the mass 

market operators oon7 go. Or 
mi combine a villa bobday with a 

m siav in vemce. Florence or 

ml Rome. Free bromurr from 

75 . Magic of lialy. Dem T. a7 Sheik 

herds Bush Creen, W12 BPS 
Tefc Ol 749 7449 124 hra 
— service) 

FLOREteCE Just converted farm- 
__ house. Garden flat In Tuscan 

hills Sieeos 6.2 irate* from cen- 
a tre. August onwards £160 per 

itfi week- Phone owner Ftorence 

2 689 496. 

sm 

Md 

_ SELF-CATERING 

- PORTUGAL 

ALQARVE ALTERNATIVE. VWa 
mm Holidays of dMmcuon tar me 

very (Few. Teh 01-491 0802. 73 
m St. James'* Smret. swi. 

« 11 ALGARVE. Lu* villas with pools 
96 6 apts. Avail Sepl/Oct. Ol 409 

2838. VdlaWorkL 

22 

24 

= SELF-CATERING SPAIN 

MARBCLLA. Lux villas with 
pooh 6 Mb. Sent 10 Oa. Ol 
— 409 2838. Villa World. 

“ SELF-CATERING 

- TURKEY 


= TURKISH DELIGHT 
HOLIDAYS 

_ Indushre holidays for 12 

Aug 1 week only £289 
also 19. 26 Aug/Sept 
a* aval 

“ 01-891 6469 

3; AI70 ATOL 2047 

& 




«• SKI BLADQN UHES 

86/87 BROCHURES NOW OUT! 

47 Resorts in Smaeriand. 

Austria, fnou fl Italy. 

The Bggast Own On Stas! 

Ex Satwick. Luton. Maochestv, 
Glasgow ft Ednbutfi 

01 785 2200 

J ItaoetL Dup*. B422 71121 

ABTA W723 ATOL 1232 

Ml Wltl bumper brochure out 
now parked with all the lop re- 
sorts, suntay mgnis <neai the 
iraffk-ll. and amazingly taw 
pnrrsstarlino M C69. Rm, ioi) 
786 9900 lor your ropy. 

. ABTA692&6 ATDLI383. 

|bgggg| 

UJC. HOLIDAYS 

S. DEVON, sea. Spacious famihr 
llal Sepf on tar 2/6. £8 a-£ih 

PM Ol 794 0257/01 47* t bbSO. 

DOMESTIC & CATERING 
SITUATIONS 

(XKHBKO CWF / COCK 

(under 30i required 8-30 ■ 4 30 
. to txBvralenng kitchen. Salary ! 

neoonanie. Tel Ol 627 6333. 

a 

| AH-PAIRS/HAlflaES~ 

Required. Mature, 

( responsAie. to five wftfi 
faniHes in Toronto, 

Canada. Good salaty. with 
groat owonurofy. 

Reply ID ABC Pflfsemd 1 ■ 
| da Jsuce Cottan a 

Tat KfliickMt 34342 


STOCKHOLM SWEDEN EngHSli 
M**kine sSwwnsti laimhi mov- 
ing UtV from London after 10 
yronwlth 3 CMklren 9.6 and 4 
years a» tooking Mr a reUaMe 
girl ol 20 + wnn a grral wfflf of 
humour Musi be able to drive. 
Nonsimuwr Plenty at travel 
Lovely house on the sea. 20 
mmuirs itom Cuv ernire by car 
or train Beolv W irieohone lo 
Mrs C Hammon Drron August 
aih and after August 8lh on OlO 
4668230048. Between August 
6 lh amt August eat in London 
on Ol Wto 6768. alter August 
inn on oio 4 «e 71? oaoa or 
in wnttng lo Mrs C. Hammon 
C/a crnkuua Secunues. 26 
Finsbury Suuare. London 
EC3A IDS together wtth 
phMograllh. 


STM AFRICAN qualified soHclwr 
IBninh SuhjrrtJetrvilej withes 
miun as legal exec /legal ad 
visor wftn professional 

commercial firm. 01-466 0669 

(Eves) 


TOP CLASS Cook/Chef for nrestl 

gmut family m Hmwtod. Fun 

Starr kept £200 pw. neg. Tel. 

10962-1 64123. iCmp. Agy 1 


three person household Central 
London. No pm. Cooking A 
cleaning. I 1 .- days oft. Own 
room a bain m large <ul sala 
ry negoiwble. 01-489 0146 
office hours. 


UKZNT1 Married couples. ESP. 
or dual, nannies, housekeepers, 
hollers, chauffeurs Ring 609 
. 3990 now for iitmsrdiaie post- 
uons. Bdmeroi! of Bel grav i a 
iA«yi. 


1 In Dulwich 
seeks fun Dim dady nanny/ 
mother's help for 2 boys, 
years A 16 months. 01-761 
0383. 


OVOISCAS AU PAM ASKHCY 


87 Regenf Street. London Wl 
Tel 439 6634 uk /O verseas 
Also m-hclps/doma tnap/perm 


cook required tar busy Direc 
tars Onunp Room, cay based 
company. BJOas - *30 pm. 
Salary neg. Tel Susie rarouhar 
Ol 634 IOOO rxl 2221. 


DOMESTIC Sc 
CATERING 

SITUATIONS WANTED 


business couple and teenage son 
seek house mndrng posfliaa 
London or home counties. Ref. 
aianabie Pti ot-asa 6938. 


NORTH OF THE 

THAMES 


HAHMCRSMini WL Lux 2 bed 

ftal in p/b Mock Lee lounge, f/f 

Idlrhen. Fully tHed bauinn. Qui- 

et location. Off street parking. 
980 yr lease. Qutcfc 
E72.000 Inc carpets 
Tel. 01-740-7173 


CCNTTIAL LONOOM Off New Ox 
lord ». large bnghl. lux fum 
studio, stunmnp fuHy mesg 
conn, sep k/b. huge roof lerr 

£67.600 ono. T« Ol 749 0232 


spacious studio, ideal pied 
lerre. secure, porter, cellar 
More, long Mae. £86.000. Tel: 
01381 6097 


CHELSEA St 
KENSINGTON 


2S rwp, 2 double beds. bath. 
Fitted Mlrhen. sunny terrace. 
6. Abbott weekdays 493-8040. 
Eve«iiH»/wrefctfnd8 221 7904. 


ret. karo. CH. pti. ta yr+ Jia 
pw Co /DDL prfrd. 0707 46966 


SOUTH OF THE 
THAMES 


iw-w a iwm Mon 

Hat near Common. £ 66 . 600 . 
Tel. 727 6668 Sat or Sun 


WIMBLEDON 


house CH Qw > Wt.. l nmr , 6 
sun. C7SJOOO. Tel: UJ73& 


SURREY 


Beams/ b. 
“« 46 Mn L Bridge. Law — . — 
Oodsione lomsi 8*36*8, 


BERKSHIRE 


MODERNISED HTH 

CBITURY FARM HOUSE 

tt SHtt nfL «< ■ MBMfa opn 
cas nbv pdt. Ascot / Wo rn 5 
mu. 6 MdL 2 Mb fl amteL 4 
reept. luofmnf taWdn emtera- 
Ruy. saw caHtinnf. Dub* Bn 
oaaQOL otter tons, sap* far 
mention/ cdmoshl Dcidotraonl 
POWMl 

0FRR3 EXCESS C3O0MI 

m (6344) mm 


PUBUC NOTICES 


CHARITY COMMISSION 

The Lady Nn cawrtty 


The 


Charity Oonunmonfr* 

. to mate an Order ap- 

pointing trustees or this Chartty- 
CohK of Oe draft Order may be 

obtained from them tref. 314180 

A/i L5)at sl Alban's House. 57- 

60 Hevmvte. London BW1Y 

4QX. Ouectlons and suggeMtou 

may be sent to mem wnMn one 

montn from today. 


CHARITY COMMISSION 
Charity - Si Ceonm r mnui a iton 

The Charity 

have made a Scheme tar Bus 

Chanty. Cotem can be abtttocd 

From i hem al St. Alban's Home. 

57 60 Hay market . London SW1Y 

4QX fret- 326I20-A1 LB 


LEGAL NOTICES 


IN THE HIGH COURT OF _ 
JUSTICE NO. 004IB1 of 1986 
CHANCERY BVKKW 

IN THE MATTER Of. 
BERKELEY EXPLORATION 
AND PRODUCTION PLC __ 
AND tel THE MATTER OT THE 

COMPANIES ACT 1986 

NOTICE IS HEREBY CJVEN 

that Hie Order of Uie High Ojurt 

of Justice (Chancery Dtvtstom 

dated 28th July 1906 cooJkrutep 

me reduction of caudal of the 

above-named Company mn 
£32.500.000 to £3-250.000 and 

•he Minute approved by the Court 

thawing wun naaiecl to the capi- 

ta! of the Company as atleml me 
several partiruiars required bar 

the above-mentioned art warn 

regtslercd By the Register of Com- 

panies on 1st August 1986. 
DATED uns 4th day of AuMrt 

1986 

HOBSON AUOLEY 6 CO 
7 PUgrtm SU*rt 
London EC4V MW 
Tefc 01-248-2299 

RefcCLW 

Soliciton far the aoov-e-njmad 


RC COMMERCIAL DECORAT. 
INQ SERVICE LTD 
On voiunuty t kniktalHini 
AND THE COMPANIES ACT 
1988 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
that the CREDITORS of die 
above-named Company are re- 
quired. on or Before Friday toe 
1 2u» day or Septe m ber 1986. to 
send their uran and addmsm- 
anti particulars of theft- dew « 

claims to the understonrd Richard 


Andrew segai of 18 Droenurd 
Woodford vuens. CM* 


Caroem. 

•G8 OPA die Lnimbtor of the 
said Company ami if to nmdred 
By nonce in wntungfrom Dieted 
Liquidator are lo come Hi add 
pros 1 1 heir *aia dews er owns ■! 
sure time or place as shall M 
specified hi sum nonce or m 
Fault thereof they wtd Be 
excluded from the benefit of a mr 
dwrtbuitan made be f ore such 
dretvare proved. 
dated ous 30fh -day of July 
1986 

P A- 8ECAL 
LIQUIDATOR 


THE COMPANIES ACT IMS 
t-WlA LIMITED 


NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN 
jvrsuflnl to Sretion 688 of to* 
OtoMteHa Act. 1086. toal •" 
MWlino of uie CredHm <* ** 
“Srnww Company *vte Ba 
“3* HoHmri Viadurt. Lon* 
don EC1A 2DV on Monday «• 
'“"•foFof Aifoua 1986 al 11.00 
“teetarenoon. tar tno purpoacs 

dtoi Hra for Hi BMltote 0*9 »S 

« We C B o ipa W as Art 19*6- 

1 -Ttw nomination of a UquUalor 

*; T ° f appoaamem of a comma- 
" t-W te toerttan 

toteuateauiiaatoi^ 

toS 

55* A a :°° "«Mdte on M 

« Angus 1VH, 

Poteti Pte itt day of au»M 1M6 

■n, S W BRUMMER 

®V ORDER OF THE B OARD 
DIRECTOR 


“O OP- ARTHU H WOOO teCeaf 
aa Mhmborne Ortve. ARirtow 


Wake Qem. Wrat Yc 

Febtiutv 1986 

(EMata atom £2*300* 

" of the Huum gamed 

to applv la Om TMte. 

W Titew B tHdlir nor Bte 


S' 


.nC 



/< 




Mr Vj 


5S.SU 
d HC* 0* 


- .u« • •: ‘ 

■£. .*• It 

.vr> :•>- ; 


h 







‘i. ' 

tei 





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E 




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4lr: , 

I IHifiMiiT. o::{, - M . h ,,rMr '' '»<) 
resit (on b*j.j,„ c ct.r ■v 1 .". ,, ' l,r, ''‘5ij^' 
k« t'-dntu.,,, • IwJ 

au. a ., 0| 

OH «NHi rif (r !«•«.[„.,„ _ | , '' 1 

>• **n4 MrWr.. ’ v 'UiO« 

“ ■•iri, 

■v* * *N)|ut»., al .| 

i Itm* m-AiV ;-r..i 

* ^ wrilia - 

M*. Lo«duB *»*. . 

» telrrtOB- F-rfi* 

vW ^ “nd ^ 


^k^~ s AfJ£^ 

•dthospo^.M,. 

flri Nsfwoon r;» i“ ^.fh ,, 

I in the mtenor ^ Mjj 

i Skpktm Lews ft', %q Bjmk,,, 

ar write to Sue w«i ^ 

SPOILS 

57 Munster Road 
Fulham SW6 sda 


K60AL PA ADM1K ASSIST 


*■•' •*-. - .-. > 

» • •.: . ..••• -77»s*l 

■*”re» Jiv •>.•• . . 

• a v»j> •• i pi-. ' i. ■ . r, r 

'* a.".?’ f -• ••. ■ . . „., 2 

i. ? |e> h . . 1,^ , 

wni«* witu cv :.-» 
80OCi^-« ti*r.tr-rr. 

'* d ’ Wi-tcomb Street 

■ UDO 140' to'ic^l 5 30-7 w 

London WO 'DH 


>-■- HKMim 


j VcPfRMSED TfTs 

f ! csv-ei f&rmKaS 


.•Mm: tints sh* : 

i. r^M-tw* 


- i 


ft MJf NnnfE 


I/-- -■• i 

i..; w. • i 


,1 N.'lH'i' 


»«■ *«r*° 9 I 


« %N!» i 


* Sli* 

1>- s 


.»***• w *i 


ir tt ! * 


AD dandled - advertisements 
cm be Kcnted b* rckptwM 
(except Announcements). The 
deadline b 5.00pm J days prior 
io poUication (ie 5.00pm Mon- 
day fix We dn e sday )- SboeJd 
yon wish to sendee advemje- 
ment in writing please include 
your daytime phone number. 
CUSTOMER SERVICE* Kr 
PARTWan. if you have any 
queries or probfcias nriuing to 
your advenboiKM once h has 
appeared. please contact our 
Customer Services Deportment 
by fdcphuK on Ct-4*1 <100. 

announcements 


■httism mwwwinp exsreAMe 
nrr® Sponsor for Inn C1SJOOO. 
T«wn serving and mamrlcf 
mm. PtrasoMntjr to BOX ESI 
muu pkw enow home to Nina. 
Mike. Gainer hw & James, ah 
knr you denoUU. 


SERVICES 


CMJ«K cr» LM prsfranma) 
rurnculom \ttae Oocuramta. 
DMUfc: 01.031 3388. 
COMPANY aoir Dans crvOntSM 
for suit or rustomm. Any bv 
eauon. Tfe* orao 872722. 
BSUtAKAWAY. LondOfTS Ctnb for 
oro^nslofial unaiutmed people 

23-13. Ovrr 200 events month- 
ly. £4 nr info tape. 997 7994. 
CAPITAL CVs prepare nnh auau- 
ty rumruluni iIim. 01-607 
7905 

LONDON TV SKTWOMt Has sto- 
dtoK avauaMf. FuM make-up A 
dmdna tacHttwsjoi 462 4377 

far deuns ll-9om Mon-FrL . 
ftmnnine. low or Mmiwe. 

Ail BO**, arms. OaMHW. DeM 

<0161 23 Atanndon Roan. Lon- 
don Wfl. Ten 01-938 lOll. 

ASCOT BOX toleutcsur Box C80 


LEGAL SERVICES . 


“CONVEY AIKtHtS tty liaty oiuU- 
fted SoucMm. £160 + VAT and 
MaiKUrd dbMntnimB . ring 
0244 319598 

UK VISA MATTERS E S Cudeon 
US lawyer IT SuMrode Sl 
L ondon W1 Ol 486 0813. ' 


SHORT. LETS 


HOU0AY FLATS A houses 
aole. C200X5.000PW PHS4UI 
Smw. 01-466 3680 or 0836- 
692824 anytime (T) 


SW7. Cwnspir Oomerdmi 
mews house. 2 OWe Beds, targe 
rerfp. w. (umtohen. 3 Mms 
umr caaonw. 58i It 67 Home 

KERSftieTON WS. L«r M>«r mv 
UMKAriar IWL Usr.of kurticn. 
tnnr. h- w. CH. Unen A fi/mau 
' C70 pw + drpoUL 229 4609 
kens, waL Sonny a/e nat sips 
S/4. Root t«r. Liar actm. Hou 
day WL Nr thoin A tube. £l 60 ■ 
CITS a** 370 3047 morns/eve 
NWS Studio FBI. Prof Lady. CH. 
Entry Phone. Smites. SHOO 
pw Trts Ol -4866873 (o)orOl- 
794.7356 lEvn) 

PUTMCY HBLi Manor Fields. 2 

bed f/lum riBL F/f kHchen, CH. 
Porterage, gdm. tree panting. 
U75 pw. Teb 01-789- 6902 
SOIVKXD APARTMENTS fn 
hrmmwon. Col T.v, 2« tv Sw 
Bd. Trine CMmphara apb. Ol- 
373 6306. 

ST JAMES PLACE, cm Luxury 
smmd 2 Bed apartmcnl. 
Prime location neu loPark. 01- 
373 6306 IT). 

. c ny «B h OMWft untaue. 2 
- hcorm n. Prtv nww> «ardm. 

£166 D,W. -rw 01-997 6497 
NOCUIND PARK 2/5 Momfi let 
.SuH 1/2. 2 mm* walk tupe/bus. 

. £14Q pm. 01727 5465 

KENSUMTOH Sunny garden flat 
in voeur mafidiwLiiuBee 3 
bed*. £220 pw. 602 9941. 
LUXURY SERVICED FLATS, 

I muni London Irom £526 pw. 
Rum Town HM Apts 373 5433 
S KEN- EXfluStVT period 3 DM 
nu. Newly rum. )0|-Ctv rrm, 
CH. rol Tv.' maid. 01-373 0763. 

[ PCL August. Lovely 2 bed ftaL 
btg garden. Ml nuOUms Rea- 
sonable. 689 6988. 


FLATSHARE 


25+' (emaAr lo share idor lamlty 
house wtih 2 others. Own sun- 
ny double bedroom with 
bumpy. Tube 3 rains. £3co 
non ntlurii e. Phone 736 1014 
ev es; 480 9327 days. 


DULWICH 12 rrrtira VKTOrtu/Ctty. 
2a+. M/r share mixed to e. o/r. 
£42 esc pw. TCI Ol 670 7049 
rewso. 



WANTED 

A German female 
(20 y.) 

ibnleent of gomrar sdml.s 
snnimtv a job as an Au-PNr 
ki a MM Bnton tamiy f or Sap- 


stiii’Jm-ai inui-weg 18 

4200 Oberhauaan 11 
WEST GERMANY 


Buy* War Medals 

MudbiB CMats A OacentfoM 

SptnkE Son limited 
5-7 KxSwa. SlJluk/i, 
London 5WIY6CS. 

^ TW: 0L98073M (24 hoots) ^ 


FOR SALE 

RESISTA 
CARPETS 
SALE NOW ON 

Wool mix Bertwi from £335 per 
sq yd + VAT. 80* mol Heavy 
Domestic WBffin £13.65 per sqyH 
+ VKf: Cotoptet tte HJ5 par 
sq yd * VAT & many othv 0M. 
leducbons 

. 255 Na» Khp Rt . . 

Pmow Boa SWT 

Ted: 01*878 2069 

nil. NSMBrOpHI ~ 


mutton nocks for ImmaPUMi 6e- 
Uvery. t7dl A 10Oi Century 
repitca fumHnrf Including Ah 
ttiur BretL Tttcflmunh A' 
Goodwin. WlWara TUman. 
Netuebed- near Henley on 
Thames (0491) 641118b 

Bournemouth i090S9 293B80. 
Totohara. Devon 1039287) 
7445. BcflUfey. ON (0453) 
810962. 

FINEST fluaHly wool carnets. At 
trade prices and under, aho 
available lOffJ extra.- Large 
room size mtwanN under two 
normal Price. Chancery Canwts 
Ol 405 0463. 

THE TRUES 17 W 18 — »- Other 
Win avofl. Hand bound ready 
for preseoiauon -• ate 
-SuptUyC- E12J50. Bentwhber 
When. 01-688 6323. 

TICKETS FOR ANY EVERT, CMS. 
Starlight Exp. Chess. Les Mis. 
ah theatre and span*. 

Trt- 82) 6616. B2B4M96. 

A. Ex Visa , Diners. 

■RtTHDAY MIC r Clv e someone, 
an original Times Newspaper 
dated ute very say they were' 
born. ei-ZJUX. 0492^31305- 

OLD YORK FLAGSTONES, cob- 
Me- iHB etc, * Nationwide 
drilveriev Tel: 10380) 880039 
(wgui. 

SEATFR0CRS Any mini mcLo 
MU. Cm errOdn. Staniglit Exp. 
Ciynoeoourne. 0 1-828 1678. 
Maior credit cants. 

CATS, CWM, LCS Mts. A ll m e- 
aire and sport. Tet 631 3719. 
657 1715. AU tnator cmtll cds. 

OLD YORK FLAGSTONES for 
sue. Beuuufui - roudtuoa. Ta 
061 225,0881.061 231 6785. 


«S& . 
ABLES 


ROTAL DOULTON Toby Jugs. 
Figurine*, art men. etc- want- 
ed. Ol BBS 0024. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


Genuine reductions on over 
IOO new a restored 1 instru- 
ment*. Unrivalled after sales 
service Free catalogue. 30» 
Hlghgale WL- NWS. 01-267 
7671. Free catalogue. 


SW4 Prof. male, n/s-.lo stun 
(laL gdn. nr. lube. Own dM rm. 
£OOpw rac Ol 730 0600. eves. 

NWSb Charming cottage. ^h»r 
Hampstead Heath. 3 Bedrooms 
dbte reception, kitchen and 
bathroom, secluded rose gun. 
Stall 5 on Co let. £20Ck>w. Tel: 
014)26 8611 Greene * Go. 
SWI . Large, fully furnished, 
double room In Pleasant 2 bed. 
ground floor (Ml In mud street 
next IP New Kings Rd. Own 
phone. Sum prof- M/f or cou- 
ple. C85PW. Tel : Ol 736 5609 
WEST HAMPSTEAD Prof grad F 
N/& 2330 to Share lux UaL 
Own room. Arras lo gardens 
and lennta rouns. a ndra from 
lune/rall. modern. exeL 
TQffll 436 3656 after 5.00pm. 
■HUM VALE 1 person to Share 
comfortable nu with 1 other. 
-Own bedroom and rub use of 
nat- Close to tubes. £200 Plus 
bids pcm. Teh 01 423 4160 

BELGRAVIA Luxury ayportmenL 

Utooue opportunity for profes- 
sional nd y. notvsnokar. Cl 10 
. per week. 238 4608. 
CH H UCK Prof lit red to stnra 
nice toe nr tube. CM TV. CM. 
' wash Mach. O/R- £40 PW. Mr 
Dowdell eves 990 0604 
CUVNAMi Non gmoker to stnrg 
Dal wilh pMgrMuUH. own 
larae room. £147 pan itor heat- 
ing * RalCSl TeC 01-671-3626 
CLAPNAM CO— ON StoMe 
Room Shared C/H House, a/s 
£160 pm IncL Tek 01-238- 
2553 After 7pm 
FLATMATES Sriechve Sharing, 
wed estab introductory sovlca. 
Pte Iri for appt 01-589 6491. 
313 Brampton Road: SW3 
HI 2 Prof fT to ahr lovely toe. 

. Each own due rm. £60/5 pw. 
Today eve; 0234 751135 Frl 
eve; 01-364 1789 
ML Prof person fbr ran in her. Nr 
lube.. CH. small. gdn. £130 
px.m. excL.Tei 01-364 0924 
CM* 01-751 6535 «C 5126IOL 
WEST H AMP ITE A O nr. tube 
shops. aiUft. friendly, mixed 
.flat. prof. M/P. a/m. Ige o/r. 
£66 pw tod. 01 794-8759- 
■ATRMKA. M/p: Oi/R. ASrac- 
f use flac £162. pan end. Tot 
730-34*2 ufw 6 gniL- 
CL AP N AM M/F. O/R. £180 pan 
todushe. Tel 01 674 3136 aftor 
6- tan. 

• MAHNOM8RTN Nr Tube O/R * 
toungn In lovely naL Good 
faemues. £66 nw. 01-381 6021- 
■MMSIEAD. F to »hr hnc flaL, 
£260 P-C-nt TU Ol 222 4858 
(Days). -01 372 0000 tEtai . 
MLMBTOM Share with 1 other, 
tax eta gOn ftaL p/%.- £68 PW. 
Avail 90> Aug. 01 359 6707 
LITTLE VCMKE. Young prof F 
N/S 100ft gdn. Nr lubcn. 

. £60pw met: 01 723 1308 
MARTlEROREHMBSTLuxFtat 
O/R. All Amenities. £260 pan 
Inc. Tet 01-936-2993 levee) 

2 Win FROM CRT Female 
o/r. Lux House, n/s. An Arne- 
DHlea £45 Pw 01-241-3052 
PUTNEY, mod • Frl. She tux ftaL 
Prof person only. £46 p.w. tod. 
789 4399 (H) or 725 1111 K». 
MU 3rd pm to stir Ige CH use. 
cts Wandsworth Cnut/lube. 
£160 pan. 6T3 2577 Em - 
UK. Prof M/F snare tox flat 
O/R. £175 pan Mas Mils. Good 
area, tmj 01-73 1 5497 ewes. 
AW 17 - Own rooms in attr mixed 
house wtta gdn. 10 ratals lube. 
£35/38 pw exd. Tlel : 767 6640 
Wfl: Own room bt magnificent 
Oeorglan house. Shared fadW- 
des. £60 p/w Inc. 01-387-1699 
pets Pror female. O/R. Bright 
spar lux flat. £70 yw Inc. Tel: 
01884 9649 (wl/402-9534 OO. 
N12. Large comfortable room In 
■ CH honor. . Sun N/B prof. CM 
pw Inc. 743 4105, 

W2 Sedan. buIi prof m/r. a/% CH. 
hot water. £*2.60 per week 
tort. Tel Ol 262 02S7. 

WU Professional female re- 
grtred lo share tovdy naL 
£260prr ntonui. Tett 486 9976. 
STEEATHAM Nr Station. Own 
Rm. All mod ranv. £iE6pcmafl 
tod. Can 674 1670 after 7pm. 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


an w» 

W/l £117 

7/1 

IB/t 03* 
9/1 036 
Ml* 059 
.1 M 089 
23/i net 
*tlfi -079 


AUQUST 
FLIGHT SAVERS 


ALICANTE -flOS 
ATTBtS £149 
OWE £139 

Sffl™™ 

GENEVA £99 
HAMBURG £15 
ROME 1 EJ3J 
MMMD £99 


MALAGA' £108 
MOHTmJBUEg 
MUNCH £79 
NAPLES £129 
MCE E1IB 

MIMA 599 
MEAN £118 
VIENNA £129 
2U9CH £99 

>1 1 Mddte Etswa 




CLUBS 


* EVWFY w 

* HATH * 

* HOSMT * 

* jffawc * 

* AUWLAMJ + 

* M * 

* BANGKOK * 
-e-MMUPOSC -a 

* DUB» . * 

* A* EAST * 

* IUSMA * 

* TORONTO * 

* t WASTES * 

* CAHBBDM ♦ 

** SOUTH 
* lfSA + IIS* 


SUNWORI 



Y0UN0 CHELSEA BMDOE dub 

and school 1 1 e-so age gr oup j 
T rii 01-373 1665. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Give Direct 
l To Cancer 
Research 


.VSdi B90 ioSbicisis, 
docnuadtodtaiccK 
McwowdUmatonoi 
asernn of jour donation nr 
bptyjpBifoa^toitsaRlL 

SmdKEOLBmttLIInnTL 

Itoto6lmr.VW.Iflu»WaunL 


(EMU 1969) 

» South Si. Ewom Suncv- 


■ Montfcjw-costftighls . 

I via more routes 
to more destinations 
tfan any other agency 
PLUS 

Tan, expert, Mgttetadi 
strvfea - RMuforliMkie 
ItotBl tear hire pass . 
• Npto60%dscoant* 
Open 9-9 Mon^SM 
- On^H»-Spol 
Immunfsallon, (nunnce, 
Fofptan Exchange, 

Map A Book Shop 


42-40 ErfIs Coort Mood : 
LaNdM W*MW ! 

ionggflJIAOWTMOfl 
ISt/BlMlMU 01-93*3444 


1-93*3444 | 
iuwm! I 


BritislTHeart Foundation 

The heart research charity. 


102 Gloucester Place, 
London WIH'AOH. 


WINGSPAN 
IMOtaLtaMiNeam 
SMC 7182/1042 urn 


BARGAIN FLIGHTS 

Sydney E455 £755 

Auddand £415 £745 

JO' Burg £306 £498 

Bangkok £309 £355 

Cato £136 £210 

-New York £149 £320 

Los Angeles £216 E389 

TOP DECK 
FLIGHT CENTRE 
01-370 6237 


DISCOUNTED FARES 
Mt ijtnra 
Jotxn/Hv ^ 

Narat* SS 

cum naj £230 

Laoos £240 £368 

^ i 

Da j8n> Arntarn Tranrol LW 

t - A igsp^S #ka ” 


Fly Savely 

July August flights to 

FARO SAfttaONA WORD 
IBCA MALAGA ALICANTE . 
ATHENS WOOES HStAKUON 
I2MR OALAMAH ANTALYA 

pun makt im« OEsnMiran 
01-995 3883/4/5 
Simply Fly 

A TOt 1922 


LOWEST FARES 

Paris m N YORK £35 

rmum bbo lnsf E395 

Lagos 020 tom £320 
wod KBS Sngnare ££20 
jottorg Ewo BjStfS oss 
Cano £205 Kmenai £V0 
OBjBom OSS Rangoon ESStt 
Hong KongESIO CoStt £426 
Ptane cal 
SUN * SAND 
71 Mtar SL Laatai Ml 
BMB 2UM37 JHT 
. MJOA CJCABBS ICCEFTB) 


NEW LOW FARES WHLDKIDE 
Abtton Eton Dubo 070 

irmoMt £400 tstantMd EiBO 

Lagos £330 Jefldrt MW 

£4W Karachi £275 
Aonun £390 Kkri/Sai £445 

Batguk- £360 Kuna £345 

E3« N-Ybrl . £275 

cam £220 seat mo 

OgMU £415 SWIM fJB5 

Pa ro c t is £270 Tdga £500 

SXYURO TfiAm LTD 
2 DBWHN STBET. LONDON W1 
Tat ohm mtms 
AHUNE1M» 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. io'Bofg. Cairo. Dubai, 
Istanbul. Singapore. K.L Ddhi. 
Bar^fcok, Hn Kong Swteey. 
Europe, t The Amends. 

Flamaso Travel, 

76 Shaftrshmy Aveme 

Laadn W1V 7DG. 

01-439 0102 

Open Staaaday IOiOO>UU» 


TH£ IiM£S THURSDAY AUGUST V 1986 


UNlVbKSi 1 Y NHWS 


HOT -TUNKCV. August nol. 
Bnrnd a wera rriaxtog al our 
pmaie-btwh Hotel, then a 
week rrutstng on onr yacht tor 
£460. tor fll. H/B tree 
H'/tports. other ronUMnethwa 
BOVy Ol 526 1006. Ol 757 
6861c24nru. ATOL 2091. 


MSTCUTm* ON mgh»/hot5 

to Eoitwe. USA & most nesuna 
tens. Ou*kwh Travel: 01-730 
asm. ABTA tATA ATOL. 


RENTALS 


BAYSWATER, W2 j HTY, EC2 

»**r «teorwd_MO ttod- 


art 3 bedroom fiats o good pu- 
mfrjn « Nock ctoe to 
Xmiq*on eaRhaa. Lags dbte 
leap rm. modem to and 
ttatfwm*. From EIBO 10 £330 pw. 
Long to. 


UFIHCA SPECIALISTS- Key 

Travel. 50. Red Lton ST. wci. 1 
01 405 14915: ABTA/lATA. i 


CHEAP rUOMTS fiurape Vlorid. ! 
wide. GUI Ldgp Travel: ABTA ■ 
01-839 SOSSJOPg AiNPe I 


CHEAP FUHIT3 WorldwMa. 
Haymurhel 019S0 1366. 


MBCaWOCD ft oaoup PARES. ! 

U.T.C. OP«fl SaL 0763887055. , 


LOW COST PMM* to U£JL. Ma- 
for Travel. 01 4869237. 1ATA. 


MAUUIA, C ANAI NCT . 01 441 

llli. TTandwise. Abta. AioL 


SPAM. PortugM. Cheapen tores. 
BOOdes- Ol 736 8191. ATOL. 


SWITZEBLAND Scheduled fllgtiB 
Ol -7M 238B ABTA ATOL 


room musonfltto In heart of 
Off- Undergrotmd parting, 
south facing ptfo, specious 
reoopdon room, £275 pw. 


DOGKUNDS OFFICE 01-538 4921 


BELGRAVU SWI 

Last DvfM fiete; ataiatoA at Das luxury btodt in quiro nwrm. 

Receimy furnished and My fitfed. 

. . LtfL vidao entrance-phone and QA H AOES. 

1 BEDftOOM FLAT- £200 pw. 

2 BEDROOM FLAT - m& pw 

2 BQWOOM PENTHOUSE - MW pw 

Co toft only. Pratmab/y long tarn toft 
Contacts Sarah 239 90WT/9999 
D. HOUHHOS 


FULHAM, HAMPSTEAD/ 
QOLDERS GREEN 
& ST JOHNS WOOD 

Superb new studio. 1. 2 a S bad fists for rental, some in 
extensive Parkland setting with use of private leisure 
faciMes. 

£130 to £350 pM. 

Ring ‘ON THE HOUSE' 01-771 9637 


SAVOY HOTEL ADJOINING 

Magnificent 2 bed, 2 bath apartment To 
Let. Beautifully furnished with 
airconditioning, total security and direct 
access to ail hotel services. 

Phone Mr Finn at 01-992 5647 


MtJtSA Fly dtrert 9.16. Aug 
Oa. Free w/s. tennis, supere 
I faedA (rwvdnr.Chaoreactab 
«-* luxtry or Sf* hotels by 
ramty beach. Lunancane Cn- 
441 0122 2« hr*. 

—MOMCA. Tenerife. Creek Is- 
luxK. Algarve Visas AMs 
Pensions Tmernss. Holidays/ 
FlWib. Bntrtiura/boeungs. 
Ventura HoUoayv Tel 0742 
331100. 

SWITZERLAND) 

FROM ONLY 1 
£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissair^ 
Super Apex. 

London to Zurich or 
Geneva daily on con- . 
venient afternoon 
flights. And daily 
flights to Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days : 
before departure. 

Stay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday after amvaL j 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travel agents or 

01-4379573 


i» rouncos MGS RD SW3. 

taMWKi. 
■JSs MtotoMO Siraff 

■ft toc o. My tow ttetan me 
wjw sdk M Mcbms mosomqi 
m* Mtoftmwv ta. IM M Ml 
BMP Par Mad* 


CHELSEA. Prostigo Area. 
Rrm FtaL 2 Beds. Lounge. 
(Cl & Bate. SwL Embassy. 
£2S0pw. 

CHELSEA. Self contained 
fiat dub Bed. K a 8- would 
sub executive. To include 
CH A CHW. £T50pw. 

JANE COLE ESTATE 
01-352 9940 


PUTNEY; nee balcony flai wtih 
garage. 3 wJu khu m to Ares 6. 
lacttzzt bathroom and Mwrate 
Ntowgr room, agnt kflehen. 
furnMwd to hMi sumtonL en- 
ure contents of flat are new, 
Stottam 8 mins. Waterloo/ West 
End IO rains £225 pw. Tel Ol- 
628 6691 no ajn. - 4 p.m.) or 
1 025 126) 4249 after 6JO pjn. 


FUU44B4 4th floor 2 bed fM In 
brand new Mock o'looUng^ 
Par*. Rerep. bath * w.c.. Id . 
Ml machines. Sports complex - 
swtauMog pool gym A sauna + 
parking. Co long let. £200 pw 
Goddard A Smart 01-930 7321 


wvmmi wan, wu«eir 3 
storey Mews house momerts 
tan natal Mopping of tin 
West End. Rtraptau Nttm. 4 , 
Beds, Baft. Shont An & Rod 
Tcrraca tm<m NaMaUe. 
FMACE GnEDNAMtedioo 
of ann «g nevtte ijpcaatcd Has 
wtoalriatat/uy himabed. No ! 
expense has boon sowed In ae- 
«ng homes ol anstdetablD i 


HOIAAND PARK recently refur- 
bished deUghtniliy spaaom 1 
bed Period flat wtu htoh oett- 
iag*. fun length windows at 
balcony. Ktt.- Ml machines. Go 
long M. £226 pw 
Goddard A Smilh Ol 930 7321 


Vtanwa-ljONDON/PAItK ton I 

Bates A Company have a large 
seiecHott of flats A hou ses avai l-, 
atrtc tor 1 werk+ from Jl 200 uw. 
490 M6A. 

Wl Luxury furnished rtafc ayod 

bruited .2 beds. 2 rreps, 2 pains. 

KtL OCH. Loog'Cb Ijrt- SSTB 
PW. InCf.’Ol 2J7 4608(01/907 
7444 <Mr Andrew) 

NMCmCAM BANK ' urgently re- 
quires luxury flat) and homes 
fiuu* £200 - HMD pw. Rbw 

Burgess E«awrA9Hils88i 6136 
iaVWMLENOW Luxury Dais A 
houses. Clretsea. Kntghtaftridge. 
Belgravia- £20o-£2.oooow-.- 
TeL Borgew 581 5136. 

Z acMtoomeD Garden flat with 
phone, oarage. Near trains. 
£80nw. Call Rental Guide Ol. 
686 7576. Open 6 days. 
Clt O YIIOL 1 brdroomed flat.' 
Mils I net. Oertric bealUts. Very 
near trams. C70pw. Rental 
Guide: Ol 6B6 7576. 
CXCCUDfT FLT SMflL DMe 
recep- bale. River views, dbfe 
bed. bte e/s. Kfl an madk £300 
pw. Andre Lanauvre 491 7822. 
HOLIDAYS A LONB LETS. Lon 
don. FonstsKW Pixws LM. Ol. 
242 9462 ex 27 or Ol 831 
0366: 

WEAL FOR VBHTOtofk South 
Kensington. Fully serv iced Dal 
for 2. Lift- Phone Col TV. CH 
etc. OI £84 2414/786 4281. 
mJWrroN inr Angen lux hse. 4 
beds. *hi win let CIBOPw. To- 
day eve; 0234 751133 Fn eve: 
01-364 1789 

KENSNNtTON WB, Mod tux S/C 
male. 2/3 beds. 2 bate, faring 
Can So. close Ken MHFi SL 
£375 pw, 01-370 526 £>- 
H1Z. WeU furnBhed ItaL 2 hem. 

1 reception, kitchen, bate In 
. serviced Mock. CH. RWaranl 

OtlllOOk. £86 PW. 445 2B19 
NWS. New dec Iowa hw. » beds. 

2 receptions, kitchen and 2 
bates. Cge and gdn £460 pw. 
TeL 01 -626 86H Greene* Co. 

P— B OH WU- Large 3 bed 
unfttm flat all lux ratings 6. 
madt*£3i0pw. Also i bed rum 
bale (lal £!20pw. 436 8380. 
ReOCNTS PK - BAKERS ST Flat. 

2 beds, i reep. Ma>. parking. 
furnUttre ad brand new. Co tet 
£190 PW. Tel: 01 724 9312 
SOUTH LONDON A bedroamed 
family house. Pets welcome. 
Washer. Garden, mspw. 01 
666 7876. Rental Guide. 
9378681 The number to remem- 
ber when seeking best rental 
propertie s hn central and prime 
London areas £150/£2JXX)pw. 
WIDE RANGE of houses, flats, 
bedsits, snares fa stn London. 
Ah prices, sizes. Open 6 day s. 
Can Rental Guide: 686 7S76. 

3 BCD ME, recent T.V. gw. 
£120 pw. Can Express Returns. 
Of 883 6457. 

CHELSEA Immar lux flaL balco- 
ny. dMe bed. recepi. Ufl. porter. 
£196 PW. Long tel. 622 562a. 
HAMPSTEAD VOLUME NWS. 2 
bed. lux Dai to wi. 6-12 rants. 
£166 pw. Tel: Ol 436 0764 
NKBMBATE VBXAGE 2 Bed flat 
avattablc now. ElSCjjw nego- 

uabfc. Nigel Holder 883 32S5. 
HOUDAT APARTMDftS f ram I 
Week to 3 Months from £300 to 
£3.000 DW 01-937 9681. 
KENSINGTON. £138 pw Excel- 
tent spacious writ furnished 2 
bed garden naL 603 M66. 

RMumuuDoe L^isSL S LKSU 

flat. £226 p w TekOBbS 35332 
or Ot 589 8946 
LOOKDfG for tee ben flat, du- 
plex. house te London? 
£10Q/I000pw. Call 589 6481. 

WBNBLCDON AREA. CkLietectlon | 

tari/flaB No rev lo irnanu. 1 
Wlitans * Son M7 3130. 
waWWTW requi red ■ 8ee S ales , 
a. Ma rkMiao Aportnlme pK 

BA RG AIN HWnWL Ring now 
lor AuOratU. nz Middle mb. 
India. Far East. ABTA. aub Air 
Travel. 01 629 26B4. 
frens 9H0E n«hto spcdalatos 

in Flrsl. Club CUffi. Economy lo 
Aisiraua. Far EaSL S. Africa. 
ISA. Lisbon. Figo « Geneva- 
Pnosie Travel entire 01-656 
TC2S ABTA 73196 
LATH AMERICA., low com 
• flights C9 Wo £485. Uma 
G49S rm. Also Small Croup 
Hobday Journwsjeg Rent 
front £3S0i JLA 01-747 31OB 

EUROPE /WORLD WOK IOWB 

fares on cbarter/schedMed <1B. 
Pilot Fttglii 01 631 0167. AN 
AM 1893. 

GREECE. Entoy waiersports al 
our unspoffl ktolan vwtage. 2 
whs CSW. T«! 01 969 8423. 
AM 2156. 

GREECE. TURKEY, CANARIES. 
Aitg/SeM. avallaMdiy (0923) 
T71266 Ttrasway Hobdays. 
ABTA ATOL HOT- 
LOW COST FLIGHTS. Most EUTO- 
i pean dotmauens. Vatantandcr 
01-400 4262/0060 ABTA 

61004 ATOL 1960 
| MBAML JAMAICA. H.TDRK. 
worldwide chrapot Urea. 
RicnmoM Travel, i Dube St 
mrhmond ABTA 01-9404073. 
MOROCCAN BOUND TRAVEL. 
Hotel reservations aU over Mo- 
rorro Tet: Ol 734 8307 

ABTA/ATOL 

TUNISIA. Perfect Oraches for 
s-our summer holiday. Call for 
our brorhure now Tunisian 
Travel Bureau. 01-373 4411. 

AMERICAN VACATIONS. No 1 to 
Li A ■" Tel: 01 637 78S3 
6. AFRICA From £469. 01-684 
7371 ABTA. 


£180 wjdy Luxurious Abode 
- with every comfort. 3 bed- 
rooms Spacious Reception. 
Separate Diner. Available now. 
Ol 286 8040 ill 
■B 0M9T0N PARK BWfc luxury 
4th floor. 2 bed. 2 balcooied 
nat oreriooMnd Private 2 acre 
park- Gyro, sauna- solarium, 
pool. Prtv parking. £195 pw 
Inc Tel 01-874 1060 



CRUISE A SAIL ABROAD 

MWMF LDTtAS DJEOA. 

9.12. Aug to Oct. Direct FKL 
active- & relaxing IW L Oh 
unspoui tste*. boat trios. B8Q* 
* Boo. For Soto v. Coupm A 
faoUiteS. I imbiw Oi 441 
0122 24 hrv 

ClIB^MMd OH JMge 36 ; 


Degrees awarded by the 
University of Leicester 


| Leicester University has 
i awarded the Mowing degrees: 
Faculty of Science 
BSc (single subjects) 


in DtKE L E Bride, - A R Brooks; J C 
Deny it. K L Hadtedham. 

I 2nd (uppor 8ft L 9> Alton'. L 

[ ApMriUf: TjWBlhofl! D CouJson: S 
Flrek: h L Ctauxt; S J Clover; E C 
I Hayward: p M Higgins; D L Johnson: 
J N Moraan: J ST Parker: M R J 
P&ytutg: J Kl John pnctpstewi: F M 


PownaU: J D Ridley: 8 L Rtes: M C F 
Sharpe; J A Shaw: C L T^or; s E 
TebM: G WUdtanHh. 


2/3 Dbte Bads. Battnn. RwWs 

Itau E30D-400pw ugattttB. 


F.WMMPP iManagement Ser- 
vkrel Lid reaatre properties in 
central south and west London 
arras lor wailing appiimiiLOi- 
221 8838. 


UGGHTSBRRMC CSSBpw 

Tremendous value. Superb 1 
Bed fully serviced flai - lop hotel 
calibre. 3 Wks nun. TV. 
Aytetfara A Co 361 2383. 


SUPERIOR FLATS ft HOUSES 

avail. Br read, tor dlpionutr 
executives. Long a, short lets in 
all areas. Unfriend & Co. *8- 
AlbemarleSI Wl. 01-499 8334. 


LMMI/SHORT LET prtXterttes 
from £i00-£3000pw. P e n o uM 
Service. 01-468 3680 or 0836- 
592824 anytime (TX 


WANTED Superior properties for 
tong/shOrt Co lets. 01-458 3680 
• or 0836 692824 anytime (T). 


BELSRAVU. SWI* Highly htof-; 
viduai collage style flat with) 
private courtyard garden.' 
Recep leading WOonserraiory.i 
KIL Bed. Bath. COOOpM. Oootaa^ 
828 8261. 


BAYBWATER superb studio. 
Newly decorated to MRi sun- 
'Hard. Large, -studio room, 
bathroom and Htchen. Direct 
access to communal gardens-' 
Close public transport and aH 

iwwil hMi fMerncn rroiMtwL 

£100 P-W. TetfH 723 9361 ' 

AMORCAN EXECUTIVES Seek 1 
lux nati' houses £200 • £1000 
g.-w. Usual Ires rest- PhHttpo 
Kay » Lewis. South of the Para. 
Chelsea 1 Office. 01-352 8111 or 
North of thr Park. Regent's 
Park alltoe. 01-586 9882. 


E ciarkson: Al p Como*: L h Cook; s 
E Cook: AD Curttt: E S Dalton: F J E 
Dlx: E J Eades: H M Ellis: D Eta: J M 
Fryer: A Hatah: j c Hoad: B A 
Hodgson: J K Larntoat: J h Mitten: s 
E Munson: L R Ness: C A Parkin: J T 
Parsons: J R Quick: R J Robinson: F B 
P Santmut £ A Set/: S ShUUner. J 
Weoster: C S Wight. 

3rd (Me S C Burley : $ D Garrett: R W 
Hurdman: l Johnson: A M Ketn c L 
Staniper. 

Paste J L Bryen SOD Friendship. 

Cha m t su y 
tn ctoSK M P Clarke: M P Cowling: R 
Mtsra: I Savage: P A Shan min. 
lad class IBMNT Ot/y. G Dodsworth: A 
L Guest: D J Law: M R Moore; J 
Nettd; D A Pape: J Spencer R Upton. 
2nd class (io«ur dlv): L j Bailey: S C 
Bratey: P S Dobbin: C G Fox: G A 
Goodard: O T Howeu: K v Jones: L J 
F MCEfryde: R S Partridge: T E 
PnUSKl D Podrnore: D M Rtrtord: J 
E Rogers: T A Shepherd: P Thu. 
3rd due D Choodhurt- A Evans; D 
HeRunlno. a M Holland: P M Jones: H 
J lyon: M L Macher: P m Newell: M p 
, Nunn. J P Taylor: L C Turner. 
Pam S Morris. 

t Hwndit iy with OlnrhraAmy 
| Itt Mam L a Forrester. 

2nd tint (upper dM}: J M GUdhOl. 
2nd Oikts (lower dlv): j EJ Baxter; C J 
WUfmot. 

3rd Nam D J Barnham. 

chenusny whh Caitolw i lni y 
2nd cum (upper otv): c I Cooper: A j 
Norman; C A Rochelle. 

2nd tWt (lower dM}: P R Mnrhefl. 
3rd gum R S Leggotl. 

EnctawM; 

2nd tin own BA: S m Gower 
win l anw: M J Mcbi tosh: R S P 
Meredith: P M Taylor. 

3rd due j j Fisher. 

EnsUMrtnc (CM)) 

2nd dta (upper dM): R J ApMeyard: 
M W Jeflord: A J Kendefl: J P 
Suthertam: S W right. 

Upper 2nd nun flow dM): N R 
BaUey; P S Davies: N D Haramond: R 
Urn: K J Luntley. 

3rd atom J E Barnes: K S Layne: S J 
Lockwood. 

Cnphusttag ( D e ct rt uai and Gteatranto} 
in ctrn: B Raynes: C H Yet-. 

2nd Mass (tapper dW): sc Abbott: D E 
D e nn e o d: C P Evans: R S Fenn: R A 
Lovraxtve: V N Masstnghant: B Patel: 
O A Richardson; a J Rowbottom: D J 
Wilson. 

2nd aim (tons* SMpcR HetUngs: M 
R Lambert; T R T Ln»: 8 J P 
M clniay: B P Ryan: p w Thompson. 
3rd Slam G D Btanjks: G HUdilch: M J 
Mulroy: A M Ward. 

Pam 1 R C Bryant n A Rtchsntton. 

E n tfns grtnt (Mectianisif) 
in hub: N D Banco: I N Cot grave: A 
D Morrison: R J M venness. 

2nd SUM (tower dh): A J Bryant: H E 
Buxion: B G Cwihwoe; w K Ho; P R 
Lindley: J m Mtchalcyzk: J F Rooney: 
T F C Tsang. R H ward. 

3rd Mam A L Weaver. 

[ Pass S C Houchen. 


1st slam D I Bonn. 

2nd slaw rumor dM>= J Hanwortfu S J 
Johnson: J M Lewis; R B Mould:* M 
Pnsworth: M a RMgway; S J Webb: 
w Webb: S m wtuoaker. 

RowiinscKU P A Stammers: □ J E 
Summers: A L W indie. 

M tarn R D Basten: A D P 
Constance. 

BaotoCY 

1« atom A 1 Hewnn. 

2nd atosa foppar dM}: G C Bingham: J 
F Creed: DX Staler; M S Turner: P D 
Yaiet. 

2nd aiaaa (tower dM): H A Bauch: MG 
Boyne: RE. Davidson: RDF Hartley: 
N s Hodd: G P Nibterc A w Peachey: 
J A Praetor: SJ Prodiero: J Thomas. 
3rd clam J Samson. 

Pass: C L AmoK M E Blackburn. 

GaotacY wtih C aaph ya to i 
2nd dan (upper dM): A M Dougl w- 
Bevenaoe: 1DGR Hughes: M jquWc 
S W Vickers- - 

2nd etaam (tower dM): A M Bohane: P 
w Brown: I P MtekiewrigbL 

lat ctom 51**? Whitworth: M D 

Wilkinson. 

2nd ctoas Canaar AOtNM.Bhbr. P J. 
Hewitt: S jHodgeas: D P Newetu M J 
Parker. 

2nd utoad ttowgr dM}: Jt P Bcenchley: C 
Chengeta. 


1st Mass: R B Biayney. K Mtetry. S V 
Pennington. 

to id dm (Bppar MjC D 4 
BtumenUwL- C.E Oostoen: P_C 
Henderson; N ■ Hobson: D Lewis; C F 
Robertson: 4 RoHlrac N J Thomas. 
2nd alas (tojrar dM)r R H iBennlsten C 
E Bieazard: EC Brown: J L Dyer: E C 
Fryer: 4 M Gower: G Howarth: L C 
Ladwitro P D Mdler J SeweU. 

3rd atosa: D J Doynes: C D Drake: P 
FHzsimmom: „D m Gabon: v M 
Kehoe: A R Pollard: N Yuaof. 

M Mh S ta t tos wtth Asteonoaqr 
1st aiaaa: D E.P Walsh. 


2nd ettou (tom dH): j G Fowled R N 
Jenkins. 

Msth matei wtm Contpo anc 
lit stsm ft B Coe: D M Haw ken. 
2nd «bu Qum dhfc $ T Pearson. 
Physics 

in atom j M orrasiey: S P 
Muliarkey: K F O'Sufflvan. 

2nd Ettas Capper dM}: C J Axtard: H M 
Gnhuns- M l Homnsaead. m p Smun. 
2nd sbss (tower dM): K Harbour. 

3rd ctom M DcvalL M K Ella; K J 
Ctbhs: M Shan- 

FlDsm with AAMtoflu 
in bIsse G Holland: D Phctiotsbn; M D 
O'Rnuv- 

Smith. 

2nd ctoss (tower dfv): R w Saunders. 
3rd Must J A Brvmj.ee: G P Davis: A 
Lambris. 

Pam P Wear. 

Phrstes wfth M kiu s Mrnwn tos and 
gmy yHj| 

in (Mb R J Brow mow. 

2nd oluc (upper dM)s B VV Oark: A 4 
Pockney: D RiSKn S T wans. 

2nd etas (towerdM}:K A Fbmegsn; W 
R Jones: P A Murray. 

M Mans K j Gunning: G R HowNtt: B 
S M undin: p A Stores-. 

Pass: C A Jones. 

rSjCDOioEj 

1SI atom S E Dye. 

2nd MM (upper dM): K M Bennett: V M 
Bowler S water: s E.CtBenun; C 
CoombN t cannon: S H Hack: J M 
HoUand: C C NrtL E A Reid: AC 
RobUKOn: K B Smilh: J l Swaby: R E 
Winter. 

2nd etas (tom dM): E N1 A rmaw w ig 
M L Bennen: A J Cunurungs: l- 
Douqhiy: s J Gascoigne; C A Cray: P 
M H otson: W Hurtcstep: P K Mooney: 
P S Murray: N P Roberts, I c Thomas: 
H D Wilson. 

3rd Mam F J tTArty. 


PMlttts and Erommto Htotaiy 
2nd Mass (upper divh A C Royle; M A 
bmmr G M A Williams. J 
WiiilcTtxXhmt. 

2nd ctoU (tower dM}i D J Ride; R M 
Woodward. 

3rd Mass: C A Taylor. 

■So fCcngnlH) 
in ftos M Andrew. P Syk«. 

2nd tint (npptn dM): ) c Davws: P A . 
Klnrade R M Pepper: O C Turner- 
Slid Mass (tom <fiw): R J L CraU: D J 
M Mann ton: M E Preston: N M Smith: 
J L SoDoway 

3rd cum M Dolphin: T J Meehan 
B8o (Sgctotogy} 

2nd C<SM (tower riMi r Alam: L-J 
Carr. J S Cote: s L D I'Ansom P 
Large; j G Screen. S J summers: M A 
Thomas. 

tod atom C K Larrter. 

BSc (AfttUad Sedolotar) 

ted Etas* (upper dte)i D Abbott: R 


2nd atosa (tow tew): T S BetUey: P M 
Finn. 

BSc (Combined Studies) 

lac Maas: M R Lee: D M RtM: B W 
Taylor. S j Ttramtns. 

Ssaiotoxa (upper DM): J j G Brown: P4 
Butler; C A Chung: L f Cower; A L 
Dckany: A-M Doyle: a M J Dudlrv: k 
I. Fanvaby: j E Forster: G Frior N 
carneti; R Haddock: R L HaUam; S C 
A Ham-YUig: S G Hamson: j Iru-tn; R 
A James: Ml Karnik; A E Lawiey . r l 
MO rtey: A MuBa: L J reams; C A 
Rickard: J Slum. N E Stewart: ORB 
union: R A Worry; J E wmiantt; D J 
Winter: C A wood. 

2ad Maas (tower dtv): M M-R Bader: T 
J Burnell: m J comwr; S J R DavoU: s 
P Devine: C E Folrbroihcr. J A 
French; V C Cray; CAS Hayward: S 
M Homer; M Langton: C M Martin: M 
E McBride: P Milam: T A Proctor: D 
A Smith: C J Walken C A Williams. 
3rd atosa: J T A Coen; D E Dixon: R J 
Foster. J A FuraiCS mated: A L Ince; 
A C McK Inlay. AML Tborncroft: K 
Wrtghl. 

Pam N Foreman: R Jones: P G 
Looker-CUddie; C JSnvfdlev. M K 
wiuiehouse- a Worth. 


1st Mam M E Ryan. 

2nd ctou (upper tea); M c, Aristides P 
Brown: S E Ctuutnvan. G L Cleaver: J 
S Dawson: P E cringes. D Eomonda: A 
A Flinl: DC HalLA J HltttlSE Lord: 
S A McGregor. D L MM«to: D J 
Moore: C E Parkinson: S E Rrdfem: 
M J scuUther; a ft wdr. A WMieman. 
2nd Hut (toinr dM): H B Adams R J 
Adams L A Baylis P B Breeders M E 
Brooks: J S Coates l M Connor: A c 
Crtso: P A Dasltley: R M Eyre: M 5 
Fawbett N C Foundly : D J Hume: T 
Maud: C J Matthews DMA Mon te 
A J Ravboutd: T J Rees: fi H 
R J Schofield: I S Wauchope. 

3rd slam p R Cuodlng; T A Khan. 

Esefltonta and Social Htsmy 
2nd eiasa Omar dM: C BmMock K J 
Canham: G Coomber: A Dunn; J E 
Maddock: ta H Morgan: L R Osborne: 
P J Smith: P Whawen. 
told aiaaa (bwar dhf): M N Douch: D J 
J Ftttiwtck: JS Flynn: MJHendytCJ 
Lawrence: J S Morgan: F M Muhrey: 
A D Oldman: K Pickering: S M 
Saunders S Webb: S G Wood. 

3rd Muss C Baraeft. 

ted ctou (npmr dto)i D P Coates S K 
Coleman: C § Lynn; N McConnell: A 
D MilcheU: E M Ray: S J Regan: A D 
Simktats C J Staunton: K vaclier. 
2nd ctou (towar dM): D I CmudgeC 
Evans: H R Ctafley: A J Pettener. C J 
Pollard: A J S Timms. 

3rd atom J K Harmsum. 

PoBttos 

ted ctou (uppar d to): J A F Brine: T 

W. Trafford: l R Whitaker. 

2nd atom (towar dM): J A Beer*: s E 
Btrldn: I Brumpimi: RJ Burbage: L M 
Bus hen: w M Butwn C ACowbertuC 
r Fowler. P A Fry: R M Coy: C Hirst 
M D Jenoo: A J MClvor G M Petown: 
p A TPurtc: P K Webbom: R A 
Whttemao. 

Vd ctom J Sahotv N A Tboorn: L M 
Tin ion: R M Walker; E A White head. 

•etiology 

2nd Mass Qypnr. dM): L Akhtan J R 
Ben (ley: A J Hotcombe: R MeaMn: A 
F .Newcombe. 

and Maas Qownr t**0?A L CuMfC J M 
Foster: J Gamble: K E Johnston; A 
Lucas: A JP Mann: H M Redmond, 
tod atom P A Robots, 
me E L Vann. 


j stotey. 

and Man (towar M«): D S Cox: A J 
Toaze: D M wass- 

Econ a ndaa and Eao n an d a Watary 
2nd ston (uppar dM): C M Howarth. 
2nd alau Mrwaa dMX S C Green: J B 
Limn; P C WUdenpln. 


ted dan (towar dM): p a Baker; J M 
Bryan. 

j Sid ctou; S J Matiioii: v J Wragg. 

LLB 

w m daftt K L Denny: s M McGowan; 
A A Owen 

B 2nd alau (upper dM): c M Adams: J 
AikwrnM; N B Avery; R Batnunui; 
C Bosetry: s J Branch. R I 
Chotewlnski; P M Oaydon: A p 
Corcoran: R Davenport. I Daviex C - 
tales. B H Fuser. G F Hardraslle: M J 
■s HnkeUt; ASA Hub: A P Jackson; s 
£ F Johnstone: PJ Kershaw K Kotechai 
"5 la Manning; B D Maxwell: P H 
5 Mitchell. L MoUrrshrad. o J Rees: J T 
s Robbins; A J SaweU: A J T 
l^uiuluii. J Singh. B K Ttundi. L J 
v Tnewlb: S J Wamwnght: D J wntov. 
| K D White: S J WiggteeworUi; N R 
P Wldlams: C J Writfit- 
£ 2nd Man (tower dM): J M Appleion: J 
* C Baden- Dainirer: S J Best: J J Biter: 
L M Booie. m S Brouuhton. C J 
Burkland- C L Bute: C T canertey; R 
T Gowdell: T C Crick: J R Day. L M 
Draper: K M Dudley: C P pugqan; L J 
Dyttaii; S O Edwards. D N LTawcefl: 
A Corner: A Hall: J □ Hail: A R 
Hall i day. A J Harris; A L 
Houldsworih; C N Jones: E A Lomba. 
W S J Matching! on. T MMW. A J C 
McBride: P M L McBride; J E 
ij Mckcnrie: K McMahon. C Mulch: E J 
L Nolan. C L Nuliey: J L Owen. EDH 
k page. S F Pickeii. J M S Ramsden: A J 
N Riley: J W Roberts: J C Rushton: K 

-. spenrer: E J Soady: S L Steete: M R 
T hack ray' S Thompson: A C Turner: 
L R M J Turner: H D walker: F J 
A WMMtav. L A Wilkinson: M wiiktirion-. 
B G Williams: R J Williams: M T Wilson: 
j C L W woo. V Woodhousc: T J 
WooKi enroll. 

T 3rd atom J A East ham: T Middle ion: A 

5 P Resell 
A pass: S B Crossley. 

m LLB with French: 

P 2*d alau: (mar «*): D J R Austin: D 
®l j Bateson: PjBentham; S H Btylhc: S 
J M Cooper: D Eaiough: V A Harvey: c 
t; R Hemingway: p J Ingham. J M 
K McPeake. A Minted: D R Power: P S 
_ Taylor D A Trefford. 

9 2nd Class (tower dN): C M Gunning: P 

K A Sam worth. 

Facalty of Medicine 

MB, CUB 
(AN Pass List) 

K E Alexander. S w Bamnbter; A B 
p Barker. K A Barnes: S c Bedford: I 
j Bilas: H M HirchaU: M D Bmnfld: E M 
a Brown: C A Caranrt: R H Chaplin: R 
pt. Chew; J E aark: T J CM: TTa A 
j ooaies: ME Crams; CJ Darn. JD Dak 
ri ion: D Dexier-F F Dickson: M J 
Duxburv: J A Forge: C F_Fox: O 
Freeman: BMC Gaunt: I M Gemmeii: 
P AM Ctbtwns: M J Gould: J F D 
£ Gregson: M C Halkerwte: R H 
Hampton: J D Hughes: S J Hughes: S 
t p Hughes: N S Hume; A D bines: R 
J Jamshldipour: D R Kent: A-M KUteett: 
5= C R King: S Kirby: S J Kirk: J H W 
Lal no: L K Lee. DAD Udgcy: F J F 
Li ovtl. m R McCut cheer: H M 
M (Grady: A R MacIntyre: F A 
Mackenzie: R MBCDherson: D J 
J MansfieM: J MHbum: A Mitchefl: T J 
r Myhlll: hi B Newell: J Oliver. S P K 

6 

M s wild-. D A wrnteSE. V Winunon: J C 
Williams: S J wnghL 
Rtet Blau: K C Andrews: E A Bishop: 
S D Monram; J P Thompson. 

K tote (ten (tetearjteOrN I R Calvert; F 
A Dore-Green: J Gale: S B Nlnono: $ 
n Parthasaradiy; J M Sa-ivcn: D P J 
u Turner: H J whliaker: G Williams. 
e ted atom (towar dM): H L Bialctdbrd: 
, t R M Henderson: S D Short C I 
wtednuu. 

Ftcnhy of Arts 

t BA 

I Arehaaototem Stnteas 

j sacand Ctoas (Uppar DM)d> S Hides: I 
R Marsden: JR MuUb: A T Nayler: S 
P D Ottaway: P A Reynolds: J Shaw; o 
m Wicks. 

C SawndCtaM aawar DMJ: A M Carey: 

S J GardnertK L ScaUe. 
n: Art Htoury SBtetoc 

A Second Clan (Upper DM): R L Barnett: 

R J Barneveld: A W Clayton; A R 
M Faiione: d J McArthur: S A H 
d. Webster. 

Saoaad Ctoss (Lower DM): KLS Beil: 
a L J Candy; D A Churchert L J 
X Watoon: S C Wtngrowe. 

M Saaflite Ctou (Upper DM): G Ca rr: C E 
A Foreman. E M Harris: J n iMander; I 
d- MR Newnain; M C S O Riley. 

teeood Ctou (Lower DM): r E Davies: 
A v Hargrove: D G wBnuiim: K A 
Wilson. 

E EagBsh 

r Rnt Class; P R Hnev: D A PurcelL 
Seouod Ctou (Upper DM: E .Arnold: A 
j j Bramham; M Bums: E A Coldwen: J 
p DoMnson: S J Ellis: M 6 Fea; j r 
G iii: E M Green: Y Griggs: J A 
Heantec A J Hornsby: B D Hunr, v A 

II Knaggs: H 4 Meokin: M Michael: J E 
B Millard: F £ Milieu; C A Mo eh I O 

Rtmlngion: A 4 Simpson: J C Tayht; 


Mte Ctou (Upper Dfv): R L Barnett; 
J Barneveld: a W Clayton; A R 
illone: d 4 McArthur: S A H 


N T Thompson. C P Thome; M K 
Toben J A s uiUUms 
Second (ten aowar DM): cAmbtw 
H J Black. C. VV Brain: J A Brunt. K D 
Burt: J J Clark. D v Cv-urc D Gee- 
ctough: t Gioowyn. A c Hanunond. 4 
A Lmdvev. W J Lord. HE MelheralL 
c o Mil mouse h si k Qurttun: J C 
Pfuibps. G South: A R Thomas. 
Asfreua: T H Gunnell 

Eitotah and FldtosaphY 
Second Hits (Lower tori; F J 
Blackwell, s L Dnn'. I D wood. 
French 

Mewed Ctou (Upper DW); S J ANtew- 
J A Blundm. .1 E Greenaway: S A-M 
Crocoll. M J Howard. R B Jones: J G 
Mohbs e Nome' R J North: D L 
Parker. P R Headman: H J Seeley: R 
□ R Stapiev A J Tapper: C I Taylor: G 
Taylor M J Tool. 

Sassnd Ctoss (tower DM): D K Churrtv 
S B McNifol. A K Roberts: J A Rogers, 
i Romrki Rome 
me R L Oatway. 

French aad C i n ue n 
First Ctou: P Norman 
Second Ctoas (Upper DM): J D Aten: H 
Baltomtov: J E Meiior. R j Prince. 
Second Ctou (Lower DM): M C Com ns: 
M T Flynn. H T Gregory; S AHyner: 4 
G Maddnon 
Aafrotet: C McGowan. 

French and MMu 
Saoaad (teu (Uppar DM)l S K Davies. 
Saeoad (teas (Lower DM): F Burden. S 
j Canning: M R Fonmam. D M 
Lrpkowsiia. ACC Marinos. G J 
walker: C F wtonerr. 

Ce oa r ap hy 
Fir*: Ctastt S K Innnv. 

Second Ctou (Upper Die): P D Alum S 
G Banks: G CUMon. M r Harmon, h 
j Law. j n Morgan: H K Payne; S 
PrfKoU. G J Weeks 
Second Ctou (Lower DM): CL Brown: 
d l Coiliu-M-: s j D»ws A W porreiL 
R M HJddetsey: S E Hobtowortb. C 
Hvmkm a Jordan: P Lewis. A J M 
Perkins. A M RvdC: A M Sfllrv. J A 
Spencer; R P F Sduim p j Ssroonai; 
C A Wilson 

Tfted Ctoas 5 A Wheeler 
Centeto 

SaeMte »>«« (Upper DM): K E 
LUidsay. D N Mane. C D Musson. N J 
PiefKlrwlcr: J N Sfwmilh 
Seeend Ctou (Lewer DM): E F Hinri L 
Janovskri: M F V Lee. 

Third Claes J Collie: D F MUUngton: S 
J Robinson. 

Hixuiy 

First Ctoss T J M Wtararun 
Second Ctou (Upper DM): L C Cevrtt- 
Nor i ham. J Derwent. s J Hawley. T J 
McTernan. C Modev: P c musCR 
Potnier. D SChOdrtd: B M Webb: H M 
Wilks. 

Seeond Glass (Lower DM): M C Bather. 
A S Beasley. M p Brim. LAC Brown. 
J D Carter. T Cooper: J A Crompton. 
K s Evans: M P trxiey: P E FUrneaux: 
T M Harm. G J Khan. J M 
LLUtewood: M M Metralir. P R Owen; 
M M Pope, M C Roberts: J A Simmon. 
Tlted Ctoss S C Ryle: S Wfllkum. 
Pass M A Jenkins: S C Krihero 
HMiery ta* Ci ene n ke History 
Seaeod Ctou (Lawar DM)< J A Blount. 
M M Cregon: J R Wales. 

Third Ctou: P F Krmpa. 

i unnrr and rwitwi 

gee ew d Clips (Upper PMtaN L Frott: 
D J Cienaway B M O'Connor. P & 
Phillips: R M Round. 

Sacand Clan (Lower DM): P C 
Renames. R J B KeniwtcM A Lee. M 
Nrhon. S Ntcholh. 

Lean 

Seee nd Ctou (Upper DM): A J Hunt. 
Paw O N Hemming*. 

MittimWIn 

Seeend Ctou (Upper DM): P A Goodge. 
Second Ctou (Lower DM): j P O'Hara 
l*ustelsn » I U p 

Second Ctou (Upper DM): W A 
Constantine; A 4 Nugent; to J Reed; S 
M Russell: T A Smilh 
Seeend Ctoas (Lower DM): S D 
Herdson. 

rhikuoptir 

Ftm Eton-, g SiJ n Murphy- 
Seoand (ten (Upper DM): S G M 
Ashcroft: J Holder: A M RuMo. 
Seoand Ctos* (Lower DM)t L J 

Crainorn: K A Drake* J Peak. P R L 

Smilh: T J Varney. 

Third Ctoss A R Hurley. 

PMtoa o pliy aw Psy eh otog y 
Saoood Ctou Glppar DM): L R 

Peratlefon: j K Setters. 

BA (Combined Studies) 

Seeand Ctoss (Uppar DM): A F 

Alexander-wiiuams: A J Bray: M F 
Breen: M L BunuHtead'. R L A 
Bunney: S J Cocked: C C Daly: R A 
Dfcks: D M Doctor: P 4 M Fenbv: M 
Fenetoy: L TCrewcocX: S M Grl filths: 
A Halstead: E A Harvey: 2 B Harvey: 
S A Hinchime: w j HockenhulL C A 
Hughes: A R Jenkins: E L Jones: S F 
Jones: S Catherine; S Jones; H A 
Kent: J J R Naish; S E Parry: J C 
Phytnlan: S C Pollard: L A Roberts; R 
H Smilh: K A Scorahy: C R Stone: M 
H Vaughan; R E Wade; M a way. p 
W illiams: H N wooden: C S Wright, 
tea a«te Ctou (Lower DM): C G 
Atkinson: M Bauey: V A Baker: P A 
Baldwin; S J Bennett: I P Black: D 
Brewer. M H Buckley: V H 
-EttJtterwofth: CEDi Raokt: R J S Duff: 
G , C Durrant D V Comdl: a 
Harureaves: S M Hafhway; R A 
incted on- Webber: C Ingram: J R 
Inman: J A JerreU: K "Jojwac M A 
Keyes: G E Lees: W Lewfat S DXJnm: 

■ j k Lunn: k jl Nobit .C Noun: s l 
P tuuiMton: N A Outaut; W H SMPMy: 
G S Taylor: A WUflamson. 

TMrd Ctoss C F BeUefty. 


First Ctoss J A V aluer. 
teB aw d Ctou (Uppar DM)i J C Boone: 
N L Corbett; H M Cmiw: J M Lord: A 
E Oakes A J soiutex: A F TrnnklreK N 
waibridge: J E West; D j williams. 
Sae oa d Ctou „ (Lower Bfl: PC 
Dawkins: K M Fraser: M J Gttling: S J 
Jones: S T Kelllher.- F J. Linfoot: A C 
Masters: S E Rowtes J K WooUey. 
TIM CtoSS A De Pascal!- 


University of Salford degrees 


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today; 01 244 7353 
mute**. Really lovely targe 
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HARLEY HSE Regents POriJ. Tte 
tally refurti mri new KtL 5 
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£13-5©Ooa. FAF. 4P9 9981. 
Eves 870 4703 fD. 

MIISOHS nun, Firiiam. Su- 
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£160 pw long ML Buchanans 
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Express Rentals. Ol 883 6*6T 
MARBLE ARCH Mews cottose. 2 
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rac cleaner . 935 2781 (TX 
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NlO 2 Bed fiat available now. 
£120pw. Nigel Holder 01-883 
3256- 

NW 1 bed flat, recept- phone, gdn. 
nr Tube £85 pw Expre s s Rtal- 
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over wins £215 p.w. Oa lei. 
TrilOl 564 5737/22Q 2986. 
SW 19 Flint flat, recep. diner. 3 
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GCH. E220BW. Nrg. 947 6135 
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pan. Tel 289 9353 riler 7pm. 
WA P U N C- Lux 1 bed (urn flat in 
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Non £165 gw. 01-481 9199. 
WE LET FLATS AMD MOUSES. 
Contort RKftard or Mick. Davis 
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BARGAIN AIRFARES. Cantatae-' 
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REST FARES. BMT FLUBTfS. 
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ATOL 1640. Arcmi/Vtta. 
SYD/MCL £618 Penn £645. AH 
. major t-arriera 10 AU*4 NZ- Ol- 
B84 7571 ABTA. 


The following degrees have been 
awarded by the University of 
Salford: 

Faculty of Engfaie eriog 

AmnuiM HMf Htodwloil 
g^RERlAcWJorocD. 
AeromsMcsl E ntfuMrin g 

B?W l&g&ik 

Hariand; D. A HID: M Horrocks: A CP 
Pratl y: GJ Todhimler: M J H While. 
Ctou 7 (DM 7)z A J Co nan t: A Juwab: 
p C Martin: A P O MasslngbeTO- 
Munday: RJSeeMy: P J Sltenten: K A 
Wallace: D J Ware. 

(test 3z S Kitriey: J M McLoughUn. 
Pass: A P Duune, 

Onanaty (DM 1>: n Crow*; C 
wamock. 

Ordinary (DM J): E Evans: M W 
Holding - . 1 L Hubert: N A Sharpe: M P 
SMJJh: R N Tayktr. 

A ip s ue S J Tate 

Ei tHm u ri BS HguBaros 
Ctou 2 (DM 1): A B Billing: N A 
WaBwr. ^ 

(ten 2 (DM 2): I A Perry: E Watson. 

SnUrtujr 'J)Nif 2)?'p^)ewhurst: RAC 
Idle: J Lucas. 

■Mciianiari rnihia—lili 
Ctou 1: c Bradsnaw-McKeown: a M 
Dww O A Henh; J O Hughe: J S 
Rushton: B J Swlnnenon. „ 

Ctou 3 (DM 1): D Bainbridge: D 
Blackley: P J BuUdey: J Dudley: A P J 
Hammond: C C Kendrick: L P J 
Kenny: M, A P KlSv: M Latham; J 
LPanday; N ,4 PtoterTw J Rend man: P 
Soden: K L Stonetaanks: J WhUely. 
Ctou 2 (DM 2): M J Cnrtefloc P.L. 
Doncaster: S N Dunneti: D A Foster: J 
P Goodwin: N HaMead: I SHrtlwdl: 
T J. Mabrietoele: A OUcrensbaw. M W 
Richards: CAP ROoertsom: C M 
Sera I ion: R B N Simpson: G S Smith; 1 
Talk J C Walden. 

Ctoss SRJ Best; SJ Blair: AH Latd: 
D A Lee; SJL MitcheU: A P RMby: T 1 
Vevers: W Y Wong. 

Pus: s M A Wartaak 

OtlUittiy (DM 1): T C Hartley; J R 


Bakan H E Baimayan: N 1 Goddard: S 
Hamzatv. A J Hayward: l D Jenkins. A 
Kaka: KVA Kwan: N McNiaotaK F 
Md Basiiatn A N Md NprA J rifSrt: 
R Osman: POtjanut; M J PearaK T B 
Phillips: PRC , Sellars: 8 B 
ShamsudorcP J Smith; E P Water* 
Bui 32 C Charttou: H Hassan: N K 
Hassan: K 2 HIMd Yunitt: C WSHuK 
D M Siddle: I Taylor: G w s Wftesena 

Pass! K A H “ 

Salman. 

Bn to H n Uw auemal BRi W i 

Sau 1 * 2 A (5» S WY n L Arnold: D M 
Bradley: PA Burro; « MlnsnuU: S M 
Mole: A L PhUUps; C StenOiorpe: L M 

» ‘itnSSZSZ *2S23& " d 

Ctots UN S Green: D E Marsden: M A 

ZSS'Am? JCNfePM 

Eisr? : &?4it c s 

Eid ridge: P R Harris; M O OnuekwusL 

ictouafpH ChanTk MHgr NF Lain: 
S K Lau: LWSLtWK Wong 

Electronic and Electrical 
Engineering 

bsb in Electrical Enjfln es rinf tetance 
Class 1: M F Cheung: C Nicolaides: S K 

ISw' 2 (DM 1)S KM AtUDlttT W N 
□one: B G Haile: R S Rolande: O R 

Cb«¥ (DM 2): C W Cassidy: S D 

R j 

Sawy (DM Q: B E QtUnn: M 
Thctmton 

BSc tn Elut rogfe aW Etoctrioal En- 

Ctafs 1: R J Atherton: DC Brown; 8 J 
dew; M W James: A J Kn ott: J 1 
PoslIethwaJte: O 4 Simmons: 1 

ObT COM 1): P E Dtamant: G 
Lawrence: C A Margettt: B Mlichtaoii: 
I Povey: R Simpson: K Smith: P aonr 
dm 2 (Dfe 2): T A Arles: A D 
Bennett: S B Hill: J M^MUteri P S 


Ingram; w HM Kunert: M A MOTen l 
Mukhenee: C J Parry: M G Scott: A 

huE M McKenny; M F Vickers 

Biologtcal Sciences 

BSc In Rtatoctari md Btae ta R nta at 


Ctoss 1: J CtatmetL p carjtie S U 
Ougnicrson: R G Paul: E A Smith: □ R 
Tyrmum: A S Walker:, C E Weltt. 
Chat 2 (DM 1): S Y Altortmuller-. K 
Buck burr: a # Booth: S J Chadwick: 
S Fair burn: P J French: P A Greaves: 
K C Crossed; 1 w Hay: J Henry: A J 
Midwood; A C Mitchell: P M Nugent: 
J V Ogden: K A Overend: E M RUejr. E 

1 . TlwIot n l Veal: J Ward- 

Ctoss 2 (DM 2): L A Armstrong: S D 
Brown: J Connell: P A Coroford: A S 
Doupheny: P P Kelly: M C Loras: J I 

Y H R Chiu. 


Ctoss 2 (DM t):HS Alsou: K a Davte 
f k Sigmund; C J Skrtton-Foord: R 

Ctoss 2 (DM 2): A L Bur P B Carter: 
s E Newstiam: D B Paget: K 
Patterson: E Wrtghl. 

BA ta Modem L fURR 
Class Is F W Cameron: JECrat fee S C 
Green: S A Johnson; Y T Quinn: R P 
stock. 

Ctoss t (DM 1)1 S J Aldersen: Jl A 
AUlnson: C N Ashworth; A M Bartow: 
H A Barram C B Beardsmore: J E 
Berwick: R E Birch: c J Blrkheed: J F 


Chemistry and Applied 
Chemistry 

BSc In ApgBed CfwmtotJY 
Ctou CDP Blanchard: S P Edwards: 
« Hlbberi: M Rorlc P B Wright, 
terond data 2 (DM 1): R A Carter; M 
R Dean: K Hatchman: D Hoop: T G 
Hughes: S A Javaduour; T B Krily:A 
Parkinson; A M PhOngs; S G Robots; 


R Dean: K Hatchman: D Hoga: T G 
Hughes; S A Javaduour; T B Krily:A 
Parkinson; A M Phony*; S G Robots; 
P A SegynowycK NW SMlIen: T A 


TSVXUil 

J Mathews: A M Pickett: J K Puri. 
Ctoss 3: C Chakmer. 

aso at Chutap y 

Ctoss 2 (DM 1): M A Benotu C A 
Brown: A J CUBtiaw: A Garsfate: A K 

Sttu?'(DM 2): S Am In: E A Corrtpan: 


GUUV C. Johnson: S E Jones: K A 
Laxon: H Udgetc D m .Lovatt R P 
MUieneR A urponerr s J Potter; S p 
Prue: C A QvUnn: P A Roberta: ,5 L 
Samuel: P A Shephert: N J 
Sianortdge: N Travis: S G Wetn L M 
woods, 

Class 2 (DM »:JL Allen; RDM Barter: 
C B Bayitss: C Bland: P R Brtdgnnan: 
M E criiaghan: I P Cartwright: J A 
Caulfield: S HuKUMc: A Mawoy; C E 
Paidoussb; M C Parker: 4 Peart: V 
Pohoomuil: G Rogereon: A M Rosa; N 
TortUca: K weUtngion: S C Whiting: A 
V Wrighi. 

Ctoss ta K M Carmona: L A James: A 
C McCaside: P Yue. 

Pmk a J LWeslake. 

OrStaQ (DI* »: J C manez. 

BSo In Serial sriencss 
Paste c c Wetotenhoime. 

BSo ta Sorial Soiams and HumanWet 
Ctou 2 (DM I): 0 J Edgar: W Flynn: D 
M peny: G Perry: T Regan: C M 
Smith: A T Slewan. 

Clan 2 (DM 2): R J Barken J A 
BarracKMion: N C Bennett: R J G 
Bunman: Mr 


Class 2 (DM»:S Amin: E A Corrigan: Bunman: M p Fomhawj JL Harding: 
D K Caskeli; A H Khan: Y Lee: MM C Hogg: 1 M Hunt: SE Jones: ft 
Lomas: J McCormack; K McCrane: C LeylaSS: I P McGarry: O M McGuire: 


Haugberg: M J Kings M Lalng; F 
Laurtben: S J Tovell: m a Western; A 
Z Penal. — — 

Applied Acoustics 
BSC in Bacfraacnitttas 
ecus 1: R G Maxwell: M A Rowell. 
Ctoii 2 (Die 1): PMMbi: K D make: 
R M Cole: K R Harris: D HaVergUl: N4 
Haywood: S A Williams 
SSs 2 (DM »: N J T Adams: C 
Howorth: J R McLeughun: H C 
Sullivan. . 
pest: d AjMdBon. 

Qidbury rpMaj; j a Baker: A T 
Johnson: P Swam 

Cbemkal and Gas Engineering 
BSc kt o u t ne ss r umliii 
Class 1: E A S Atadutaatlah: R Carter: 
T Mirt 

CUM 2 fpiv 1): S A Hallh: I G M Hol- 
land C H Slenmark: M C Ward 
Class 2 (DM D:JN Baker: H Glaever: 
C A Jones: IKaiMkUkls: N M McCoy: 
j M Oakley: TOmtoelu K Ostgronb A 

3: as Ai-Harthy: N KulPtHI: L N 
Raiapaku 
Pass: e Farsiad 

Bsc m Nttunt CM En tff taari ac 
(ten U M Hovd: P Tillotson 
Ctou 2 (DM 1): B Baitestcard: S J 
Grossman; S J Hotham: S Panmeker: 

H Selsene: I R Urwm: A N ward: A J 


NnaentV M (6 Pollock: P N Read: P F 
wwker. C C Wall: P J While; T j 

. D Boardman: P D Crosby: J D 

®8S£re%W 1): J Okell 

(DM 2)r M A Ashraf 

BSc to EMCUBuk Cuauuuiluntan 

Onkimy (DM 2): I M All 

BSc Id Etocmnic Co oip u tar Synnu 
Ctoss t T J HawsC EHavn . 
Cfcux t (tte 1): C C Cooke; I J 
Deravshtre: S J Drake: L Cuntvrtt: c 
THjSrtaon: G D uiwarfl-SWUu: N 


cu«i 2 tDw'jp C Baxter: O Sfepews: 
C J Clark: D A Houston: S H Khan; H 

w ^ MWSftwTV 

McBroom: M 
Warivam: A M Vakboul 

BSo to Etaeonulcs 


Ctou 2 (DM 9): o M Carter: H A 
Faitshe: B Granas: N JackOTfU S B 
Mills: Bento Skari: 0 Skorilc: A K 
Stonehewer R M WlBier 
Ctou ta G R Dluyr. M A EOBR O 
HeUand: H M Jacobson: O S Middtun; 
M P Pascoe: K RorneMrg: A 
StronmiB: T M Vonctttiol 
Kite K A Skaset: H M vmgen 

Crrtl Essoneeriag 


U magu nmT 

2 (W Alwriu C 4 

Ambrose: j 1 p Gaskeli: C M Hot R A 
.JaMues; S T Kwok: C A Madden: M L 
Ruey: K R Tnomas: N JR WUklnaon 
CtaM 2 (DM 2): c H Buxton: K w 
Chung; L A Freeman- G R Fuller: R L 
Joghnslon: ft M Mead:,S M MeUa: A P 
ROoens: M A SHipperJee: P A Taylor; 

Q» talc's Baker: B H Bursom c H 
Man 

BSc to CMS EntfmertoS 
CWs I: S K AJtkcn; C BradWnjr. A J 
S Green. CJ Hardy: M R Mohd AU; A 


! screen C J Hardy: M R Mohd AU: A 

^^Vr^STp w 
Brindley, J A Cassidy: G R Denman: s 
s Faran S HanSTs M Heaton: H N 
Kaye. D- unoanr. S nowc P Roddk: 
R H S Ting 

raw 2 (Dm 2): z Abd Hamid: I Abu 


Jones: D A Sanderson: RP SeweU: A 
p SMehy: J SWlkas; N P SnUth: D J 

XB5VE&it G W /fitoutto: Pakhtort 
1 J Brownell: A Sruu^D J Qxdtw. M 
D East on: A J E 

Matthews: J Paid: A J Paterson. E 

SSS'ir^T^lCSTHraedra: 

w R J Hoy land. A M Lw/den; G 
LJoyd; N HNrira M A Shannon 
pan: B Engushby: B R Seidel 
BSc to Ehretroates 
Ordtaary (Dfv t): R J. Kenuo 
flllftoT (DM til M J Bull 


W Slorey. 

Ctou ta F Jivrai: D Media: 1 M Pugh: S 
E Surrldge; M Teuhatn- 
Pau: I J Lovell. 

BSc to Chemistry (wtm radios la USA) 

Class h O J wiihher 

Ctou 2 (DM 1)! S P Cush: P NOriTK 1 A 

Ralph 

Mathematics and Computer 
Science 

BSc in Beslnau Opetattaa and Coatrel 
Ctou is A Kitto; M J UtUe: P G 
Murpny. G E Stainer. 

Cbn 2 (Di* II: C-A Armstrong: G A 

Lester; S C Marlin; K L Meakln: D 
Rigby; J Scudder. 

Ctou 2 (DM 2): S W Booth; C L Dow: 
H T Halford: A Hughson: A 
McGurran: P C Monwc A PniClMURl: 
M s Smuiu M J Wheeler. 

Ctou ta M D Ordtsn: N D Tale. 

BSC to MttMMStics 
Ctoss 1r R A Forbes: J P Irvins: 4 
Lewis: P A Webster. 

Class 2 (DM Hz G Lambert: M 
Longworth: M Ril»i: C J Waltons. 
Ctou t (DM n: z EJnanouUldou: K 4 
GaunUeii; J CGoOUcr: Judith K Riley: 
R j Wilson. 

Ctau ta C D Barker: Renekah 
Kingston; S A BaUUe: K Morgan. 

Pare and Applied Physics 

BSo to AppKad Ptetas srtth Be«n»- 
Iftt 

Clan 2 CM* n;DM euro, p a wm c 

J S Perkins: M A SHhbr: E R 
Twenurman: D J Woodall 
Ctoss 2 (DM 2): C D Andrews. T L 
Axon; K J Bell: P D Uketv; I B Ptripnr. 
C A Sanders. 

Ctau ta P N Mason. 

BSc to Pfaysfes 

Ctau 2 (DM t): J A _ CTfoun: 1 C 
France: R S Hayre: K B Joo«: S 

cSu a 5 t, (DM »t A Bwley; N M 

S*StaA t AmatronfcJ > (S^xter: K D 
Cump; s O Eyres: A M Standring: A 
M williams 

Faculty of Social Sciences and 
Arts 

BA with John Homan to Am and 


K A O’Neil: J Zcmmcl. 

Ctau ta P Geach. 

Business and Management 
Studies 

BSo to B o rin c c s and Adutatatradoti 
Ctau 1MN Ardky: A Baines. 

Ctau 7 (DM l)s J C Dunconitoe: P 
Fenows: S C Herod: L E Jay; E A 
Mowlnskl: C H I Tsui; J A Van Der 
Velde: L C Waunieid: M A Whitt./ 
Ctau 7 (DM 2): A Abu: J F BeH: C A 
Qounatu l RtW S H Heart; S M 
Minciwi: L Y Pcwk: B Quinn: T D 
Richards: N N umeouanl: C s 
wakell n: S Vl Wl warns: J D 
wriunihouse: S C Yeung _ 
CtaUtaCJ Flnucmorr: S FGUIiafl: N 
A Johnston: C T Lo; S R Shrtmpten. 
Pass: M Azfzl: J M Jones: G Oduntan; 
P ValenUnr: D A Weir. 

AasntaB w M C Soo. 

BSc to Ftattwa and A M — Mas 

(teu i; B Bril: K K Cheng. 


Ctass 2 (Drt Z): E A Austin: p A 
NithObon; P * S*wr. ,t> G 
waichom: A J Williams Y-C Wong. 
Ctau ta S A Hamid: H Augusta: vs 


Faculty of Science 

BSo frith JoM Il M W N tt In seta— 

Ctet liCJ A Irom: C L Bentley: J L 
Evans: H J High Lon: O M May don: A 


Ctau 2, (DM 2): E Atkinson. 

Pass: N Grauer. 

BA in Soeta) Sriancac and H u m aniti es 


«£? 7 P J M 

rs£E,.w<SEsf i A P < aas; i g 

Mairsfield: 'S M 

OTirwoii: 0 PSapey: L w ishRnSBS P 
A Swain; L V Taylor. S J 1 Tomlhpcxu 
S E wiicock; M S Wooldridge: M D 

SsS* U ? (DM ry. s P Bruno, N w 
ChuntMey; s J Gordintfey; C Loahc A 
Deoianms: □ C Qcocjl A P Grady; C 
K Hu): AM Jones; YSTKwan;F j p 
M urray’: L Nezhal: S Potts: S M rice: 
A c Spencer 


Ctou SPO Claine: MG Caider: w p 
Chan; J Cennm: L A Gulirvund: C w 


Lamb. P B Morris: A J An-teous: 4 E 
Roberta: M L Tomdnsoh 
CttU ta R G R DiUetta-AUura. 

Geography 

BA hi Geograpliy 

Ctau 2 (DM 1)s L Cooper: A J Francis: 
M T Ke&y. L M Hod well: P Rwsslier. n 

Stall P 2 (DM 2)i C J Btomlno: P K 
cross: A J Howard: s A Pritchard: M 
J Sandbach: A M Smith. 

Ctau ta P J woods. 

Pasta I C Evans. 

Modem Languages 

BA to Bah) Language and Utasaura 


Ctau ta S A Hamid: H Augusta: VS 
Dniuan: J J B Jeffery. M A Thomas: 
w h w tnranim. 

Pan; A K K CMuiw K R Hadsow. 

Ecoaomks 

BSo In C gflBO Mtai 

ts&fo UUMU S 

K M woo. 

Ctou 2 (DM 2): S J Ashford: T p J 
Bennett: w V Clayion: J C Cull: N P 
Cutis: P Donum: A Dtlntop: R J 
Fleming: KM Forier: A J Hyde; S J 
Ives; M L Long; H W G Mak: P M 
Minanam: l w nmtM; p J Tapper: R 
D Tilley: M H Whimy. 

Ctass ta 0 P I George; J C Packman: ft 

i&T* 1 * **“- 

Geography 

BSa ta Caegnphy 
Ctau 1: D J Writer. 

Ctau 2 (DM t): J E Coventale: J N 
Deamiey: D G Grider: J A LesUe; N- 

cfiTYW 2hN K Grice: ft A 
Harwood: A McCarthy. 

Sociology and Anthropology 

BSo ta SactotasY 

Ctau to PM Ramcrtaran. 

Ctass 2 (DM i): T a Adam: C W 
Burke: A Conway: P 4 Corns: j M 
Evans: C M Jones; M Loom*; 4 Plater: 
CD Prowl. _ _ _ ^ 


Gfasc 2 (DM 2): S BuBriworth: A 
Durham; A J Pane: FCl Pang: N 
Heading. 

Mm ta K N TaL 

Putt A S Little. 

Correction 

The list of Exeter University 
degrees (August 6) should have 
shown A K Macdonald a* 
receiving a n.1 in BSc Biological 
Sciences. 


tr- ■■ 


1 


28 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


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Law Report August 7 1986 

Whether a single 
transaction 
is taxable trade 


Matson (Inspector of Taxes) v 
Morton 

Before Sir Nicolas Brownc- 
Wilkinson, Vice-Chancellor 
[Judgment given July 31] 
General commissioners were 
entitled as a matter of law to 
decide that a one-off purchase 
and sale three months later of 
land that gave rise to a profit 
was not an adventure in the 
~ nature of trade assessable to 
Case I of Schedule D income 
tax. 

Sir Nicolas Browne-Wil- 
kinson. Vice Chancellor, so held 
in the Chancery Division, 
dismissing an appeal by the 
Crown from the decision of 
Wiiham general commissioners 
in favour of Mr Brian Robert 
Monon and his three brothers 
and discharging assessments to 
the tax made on them for the 
year 1977-1978. 

In June 1977 the four tax- 
payers purchased a piece of land 
for £65.000 following a recom- 
mendation from Mr L. an estate 
agent and property developer. 
The taxpayers provided £35.000 
of the purchase money, the 
balance being borrowed by them 
at .1 7 per cent annua] interest. 

The evidence of Mr Brian 
Morton, a potato merchant, was 
that he was putting his money 
into an investment, had no 
intention of using the land, of 
developing it or of receiving any 
income from it. His intention 
was slated to be to make a 
medium to long-term invest- 
ment. Neither he nor -his broth- 
ers had ever previously invested 
in land. 

On September 15, acting on 
the advice of Mr L, the tax- 
payers sold the land for 
£100.000. They were assessed to 
income tax under Case I of 
Schedule D each in an amount 
of £7.345 in respect of their 
dealing in land. The commis- 
sioners discharged the assess- 
ments finding that the 
transaction was far-removed 
from the normal trading activity 
of the taxpayers and was not a 
venture in the nature of trade. 

Mr Alan Moses for the 
Crown; Mr Christopher Sokol 
for the taxpayers. 

THE VICE-CHANCELLOR 
said that the Crown's case was 
that this case came within the 
principles set out in Edwards r 
£&/rff0M.'t[!9S6] AC 14): on the 
facts found the only propter 
conclusion open to the commis- 
sioners was that the transaction 
was trading within the defi- 
nition contained in section 526 
of the Income and Corporation 
Taxes Act 1970. 

Alternatively, the Crown said 
that the commissioners mis- 
directed themselves as to .the 
law in two respects and the case 
should be remitted to them for 
reconsideration in accordance 
withthelaw. 

it was well established that 
there was a band of cases in 
which different minds might 
come to different conclusions as 
to whether trading had taken 
place. In such cases the court 
had no right to interfere with a 
finding by commissioners. 


It was clear that a single 
transaction could be an adven- 
ture in the nature of trade. 

However beyond that, the many 
authorities did not establish any 
single statement of the law that 
was applicable to all cases and 
all circumstances. But the cases 
did show certain “badges” that 
pointed to one conclusion or 
another. 

The foliowing list of those 
“badges” was not comprehen- 
sive and no one pointer was 
decisive: 

1 Was the transaction a one-off | 
transaction? Lack of repetition 
indicated that it might not be 
trade. 

2 Was the transaction related to 
the trade that the taxpayer 

ordinarily carried on? 

3 The nature of the subject I gnji^d strokes and everything 
TfXSSFSEZSfti ' I*' 1 out of sync. The only thing 
mailer of a kind generally traded 


Easing 
back 
into the 
fray 

Stratton Moutain, Vermont 
— John McEnroe won his first 
Grand Prix match after a 
seven-month absence, beating 
Marco Ostoja. of Yugoslavia, 
7-5. 6-3 in a first-round match 
here. 

Ostoja was a last-minute 
replacement for the un seeded 
American. Brian' Teacher, 
who withdrew because of a 
back injury. The Yugoslav 
was a lucky loser from the 
qualifying toumamenL 
“It'll take some time to get 
back.*’ the world's former top 
player said after the match- “I 
thought I was tentative on my 


TENNIS 


with and could it readily be 
turned to account? 

4 It might be helpful to look at 
the way in which the transaction 
was carried through. 

5 What was the source of I 
finance? If finance was bor- 
rowed that might be an indica- 
tion to short-term resale and 
trading. 

6 Was the item sold as it stood 
or was work done on it? If work 
was done that again was a 
pointer io a transaction being a 
trading one- 

7 Was the item purchased and 
resold in one lot or broken down 
into saleable parcels: if broken 
down that was a pointer to a 
trading transaction. 

8 What was the purchaser's 
intention as to resale at the time 
of purchase? if he intended to 
hold an item indefinitely, albeit 
to make a profit at the end of the 
day. that pointed to investment 
ana not to trade. If before the 
purchase a resale contract al- 
ready existed that would be a 
strong pointer to the transaction 
being trade. 

9 Did the purchase of the item 
provide the purchaser with any 
enjoyment or pride of pos- 
session or produce an income 
for him pending resale. If so that 
might show an intention to buy 
for personal satisfaction or 
investment rather than an inten- 
tion to trade. 

To reach a factual assessment 
of a case it was necessary to 
stand back and look at it as a 
whole and to ask “was this an 
adventure in the nature of 
trade?" Pul, in more homely 
language “was the taxpayer 
investing his money or was he 
doing a deal?" 

The facts of the present case 
were unusual. Perhaps the tax- 
payers were acting as dealers 
with a view to making a quick 
, But It was for the fact- 
g body to make a decision. 
The Revenue's attack did not 
succed. 

Moreover it had not been 
shown that the commissioners 
had misdirected themselves as 
to tbe law. It followed that the 
appeal failed and was dismissed. 

Solicitors: Solicitor of Inland 
Revenue; Aughterson, Keeble& 
Passmore, Colchester. 


: of sync. The only thing 
that was all right was' my 
serve." 

McEnroe attributed the 
problems in his game to a lack 
of feel. “I was flat out there," 
he said. “I had no feel 
whatsoever." During the lay- 
off. McEnroe said he had been 
willing to forgo being No. 1 in 
order to be happy." The 
happiness revolved, in 
particular, around his wife, 
the actress Tatum O'Neal, and 
bis 10-week old baby, Kevin. 

“Fatherhood chants your 
perspective. It can't help but 
make you more positive. And 
it came at a time when I most 
needed something positive in 
my life," he said. 

At a news conference that 
lasted longer than an hour, 
McEnroe expounded on a 



McEnroe serves op winning quotes at a Press conference 


variety of topics, including the 
Press, the public his personal 
life and his preparation for his 
resumption of play. On the 
subject of his treatment by the 
Press. McEnroe said: “Some 
of it has to do with selling 
newspapers at any cost, and 
some Of it is a lack of 
understanding of me as a 
person." 

McEnroe, who , was the 
fourth seed, turned bis back 
on several questionable calls 
and even saluted the crowd, 
encouraging their applause, 
after a stylish forehand volley. 


After taking a 6-5 lead, 
McEnroe broke Ostoja for the 
first set on a backhand error 
from the Yugoslav. A single 
break of service in the sixth 
game of the second set gave 
McEnroe a 4-2 lead, and he 
held on to take the set 6-3. The 
match lasted one hour and 20 
minutes. 

Other first-round winners 
were the top seed, Ivan Lendl, 
of Czechoslovakia. Paul 
Annacone, Johan Kriek and 
Robert Seguso, all of the 
United States. But Jimmy 


a , a _2 : , Arias, the tenth seed, and Man 

At 4-4 in the first set, McEnroe A mw seeded No 1 1 both of 

expectedly beaten, 
winner. Results, page 30 


FOOTBALL 


Havelange favours 
seated stadiums 


Joao Havelange. the president 
of FIFA, favours all-sea ter stadi- 
ums to fight hooligans. After 
inspecting Villa Park, the Haw- 
thorns and Si Andrews, prospec- 
tive grounds in Bir- m Ingham’s 
attempt to stage the 1992 Olym- 
pic dames, Have-lange said: 
“I'm against standing room in 
stadiums. I think sealed spec- 
tators are less liable to cause 
problems than spectators stand- 
ing up" 

Havelange, also a member of 
the International Olympic Com- 
mittee. was accompanied to 
Aston Villa. West Bromwich 
.Albion and Birmingham by Bert - 
Millichip. the FA chairman, and 
Ted Croker, the secretary. De- 
spite the clubs each possessing 
two terraces for standing-only 
spectators, the Brazilian was 
impressed by the standard of 
iacilities and thought the clubs 
had done “an extremely good 
job" to try to combat hooligan- 
ism. paying dose attention to 
closed-circuit TV systems. 


• Helmuth Ducadam, the 
Romanian goalkeeper who 
saved four penalties to give 
Steaua Bucharest the European 
Cup over Barcelona on May 7. is 
recovering from a five-hour 
operation in Bucharest that 
saved his arm from being am- 
putated. Ducadam fell during a 
hunt and aggravated blood dots 
that had developed during his 
career. He will be out of the 
game for six months. 


ing 
I Ru 


signed Rubin Paz to join Enzo 
Francescolli as the second mem- 
ber of Uruguay's World Cup 
squad at the newly promoted 
French first division ciub. Rene 
Hauss. the general manager, 
said yesterday that Paz. from 
Porto Alegre in ' Brazil, . had 
signed a four-year contract Paz 
will compete with Francescolli 
and Pierre Litlbarski, the West 
German, for a place in the side 
as French sides allow only two 
foreigners to play in each match. 


Discretionary power of 
tax apportionment 


Celtic steal victory 


Regina v HM Inspector of 
Taxes and Others, Ex parte 
l eas ing Bagnali Ltd 
Before Lord Justice Kerr. Lord 
Justice Parked and Lord Justice 
Balcombe 

[Judgment given July 31] 

Tax inspectors had a dis- 
cretion under paragraph 3(1) of 
Schedule 16 to the Finance Act 
1972 as to whether or not to 
apportion among the partici- 
pators sums paid by a close 
company in respect of annual 
payments and deducted by it in 
arriving at its distributable in- 
come. Thus notices of 
apportionment issued on the 
basis that an inspector's power 
io apportion was mandatory 
were invalid. 

The Court of Appeal so held 
in a reserved judgment dismiss- 
ing an appeal by the Crown from 
a decision of Mr Justice Peter 
Gibson, silting as an additional 
judge of the Queen's Bench 
Division. {[1986] STC 117) 
granting the application of Lan- 
sing 1 Bagnali Ltd for judicial 
review and ordering certain 
notices of apportionment to be 
quashed. 

Lansing Bagnali Ltd. a close 
company, made covenanted 
donations to charity for various 
of its accounting periods be- 
tween 1978 and 1982. On instruc- 
tions from the Board of Inland 
Revenue a tax inspector served 
on the company notices that 
those annual payments were to 
be apportioned among the 
participators under the 


only to a residual discretion 
{con veniently referred to as “tbe 
care and management 
discretion") not to exercise the 
power where such tax collection 
would be an uneconomic ex- 
ercise. the Revenue was under a 
duty to exercise the power. 

After consideration of the 
earlier legislation and having 
been referred to the cases of 
Julius v Lord Bishop qf Oxford 
{(1880) 5 App Cas 214) and IRC 
v National Federation of Self- 
Employed and Small Businesses 
Ud{[ 1982J‘AC 61 7), it was clear 
that the use of “may" in the 
provisions gave nothing less 
than a general discretion. 

When Parliament intended to 
impose a mandatory duty it 
knew how to do so and used the 
appropriate word “shall 

To whom was the exercise of 
the power granted? Primarily io 
the individual tax inspectors. 
Blit section 1(2) of the Taxes 
Management Act 1970 provided 
that inspectors should act under 
the direction of the Board and 
although that did not entitle 
commissioners to direct an 
inspector how io exercise his 
discretion, there was no reason 
why the Board should not give 
directions as to the factors to be 
taken into account Further tbe 
Board might itself exercise the 
Schedule 16 powers — see 
paragraph 20. 

What were the factors that an 
inspector was to take into 
account in the exercise of the 
discretion? The Crown said that 
the obligation to collect the 


Two goals in tbe last 10 
minutes enabled Celtic to beat 
Arsenal 2-0 at Highbury in the 
testimonial match for Arsenal's 
long-serving centre half David 
O'Leary, on Tuesday nighL It 
was an encouraging result for 
Celtic, who were under pressure 
for most of the match. The 
crowd was almost 30.000, at 
least a third of which were Celtic 
supporters. 

In the eightieth minuteihe 
stadium erupted into a display 


of green to rival a St Patrick's 
parade in New -York. McStay 
pumped the ball to Aitken and 
from his centre Johnston left 
Lukic helpless. 

Four minutes later Mclnally 
sped down the right and blasted - 
the ball into the far corner. 

Although there were no major 
incidents off the field, the police 
did. however, prune a handful of 
more boisterous Celtic support- 
ers from the crowd for sundry 
transgressions. 


Safeguard 
sought 
for Shield 

By George Ace 


Confusion reigns as dubs 
prepare for the start of the 
Northern Ireland season on 
Saturday. With just over 48 
hours to kick-off. the majority of 
dubs taking part in first-round 
lies of the County Antrim Shield 
have no idea what their line-ups 
will be. 

More than 50 per cent of the 
players in the Irish League are 
still unsigned parity because of 
disputes over new contract 
terms but mainly because of the 
uncertainty with regard to then- 
standing under the new League 
arrangements whereby all play- 
ers will be classified as pro- 
fessionals. Tbe situation is 
sufficiently serious for the or- 
ganizers, the: County -Antrim 
Football Association, to call for 
a meeting today in an attempt to 
restore sanity. 

All Irish League senior dubs 
are scheduled to participate* 
with B division sides boosting 
the total to 16 teams. In order to 
compete in County Antrim 
games, players most be reg- 
istered 12 days before the first- 
round ties - and that is the 
thorny rule which will come 
under the microscope today. 

It is a regulation which must 
be waived. The letter of the law 
has to be seen to be observed: if 
not, the County Antrim Shield 
will be in danger of becoming 
the competition that never was. 


Why paying close attention 
can reap some ripe rewards 




ule 16 to the 1972 Act 

The company applied for 
judicial review seeking an order 
quashing the notices on the 
ground that they were void 
because the inspector had issued 
them on the fooling that she had 
no discretion as to whether or 
not an apportionment should be 
made. 

Paragraph 3(1) provides: 
there may be apportioned under 
paragraph 1 above as if it were 
income of a close company for 
an accounting period any 
amount which was deducted in 
respect of annual payments 
made by the close company in 
arriving al its distributable in- 
come for that period and which 
in the case of an individual 
would not have been deductible 
or would have been treated as 
his income in computing his 
tola! income." 

Mr Donald Ranee,. QC and 
Mr Alan Moses for the Crown; 
Mr Lcolin Price. QC and .Mr 
James Denniston for tbe com- 
pany. 

LORD JUSTICE 

BALCOMBE said that the 
Crown accepted that the use of 
“may" in paragraph 3(1) con- 
ferred a power on the Revenue: 
it did not as such impose a duty 
to apportion. 

Bul Mr Ranee said, subject 


the only factor. Thau it was said, 
was supported by the duty to act 
fairly between taxpayers. 

For die company it was 
submitted that it was relevant to 
consider the size of Lansing 
Bagnali. its turnover and profits 
and the number of employees 
and to compare its covenanted 
payments to charity with those 
made by other similar sized 
companies that were not dose 
companies. 

It could not be said that those 
were irrelevant considerations. 
Further, it might also be that the 
inspector should take into 
consideration the pramice 
adopted for many years bv 
previous inspectors in relation 
to the company's covenanted 
payments to charity. 

Payments under covenant 
had to last for a minimum 
period and it was possible that 
the company might have been 
influenced in fixing the amount 
it donated by the past practice 
not to make any apportionment. 

The judge was right to quash 
the notices of apportionment 
and his reasoning could not be 
faulted in any respect. The 
appeal should be dismissed. 

Lord Justice Kerr and Lord 
Justice Parker delivered concur- 
ring judgments. . 

Solicitors: Solicitor of Inland 
Revenue; Gouldens. 


In die second extract from Phil 
Edmonds A Singular Man, by 
Simon Barnes. Edmonds weighs 
ihe effects of close fielding 
against the dangers. 

“Nobody fields as dose as I 
do." Edmonds said. "For one 
thing, they have a lot more 
sense. For another, they see 
their cricket in a different way. I 
am not there simply to take 
catches. My presence there also 
makes the batsman play in a 
different way. It is perfectly 
possible for a close-in fielder to 
catch a good, solid defensive 
stroke off die face of the bau So 
a batsman has to change tbe way 
he plays - I defy anybody to 
play the same way when 1 am on 
top of him. I am there to put 
pressure on him, I am doing an 
important job even if I never 
touch the ball. I might make the 
batsman extra cautious, or 1 
might make him over-aggres- 
sive. trying to hit the ball harder. 
But when ne is doing that, be is 
likely to be over-eager to wipe 
the ball, probably at me — and 
get himself caught behind. My 
name doesn't go On the score- 
card. but it's a wicket 'that might 
not have (fallen -had I not been 
there." 

Inevitably Edmonds turns 
fielding into a matter of 
confrontation rather than one of 
retrieving balls. He has swift 
reactions, hands like buckets, 
and is surprizingly agile; consid- 
ering he was the heaviest crick- 
eter in the squad that went to the 
West Indies in 1986: heavier 
even than Mike Gatling - who 
was initially 30 pounds over- 
weight. His ferocious and un- 
compromising attitude to 
fielding was a central .part of 


England's scintillating perfor- 
mances in the field in the 1985 
Ashes series, in which Edmonds 
took seven catches, some of 
them dazzJers. It should have 
been eight, but he suffered a 
mental aberration and dropped 
a simple chance at short leg — he 
admits that he was trying to 
throw it up in the air in triumph 
before he had got full control of 
it. “He just looked at me," 
David Gower said. “Later- be 
apologized, and we had a wry 
giggle over iL" 

Edmonds doesn't even wear a 
helmet at short leg: he finds 
them uncomfortable He has 
never been bit seriously — until 
his latest tour — nothing worse 
than rainbow bruises, at 'any 
rate. He got hit on the thigh by 
Allan Border in 1985, and his* 
reaction to Lhat was nothing less 

Taste for drama 

than Closeian. “i should have 
dived across tbe pitch and 
caught the rebound," he said, 

g mnncly annoyed with himself 
r his slow reaction. He had 
been rocked back on to his heels 
by the blow, but to have flung 
himself forward and clung on to 
the ball at Bonder’s feet would 
have satisfied both his taste for 
drama and his taste for 
confrontation in one splendid 
momenL 

“I have had some pretty 
frightening moments when 
fielding in dose," he said. “I 
remember one time when I was 
fielding 45 degrees behind 
square to Embers, who was 
bowling to Mike Den ness. He 
bowled an appalling ball a slow 


long-hop outside leg stump. 
Normally Denness would have 
swept it square, but this ball was 
so appalling, and so wide, that 
he picked up bis bat, looked me 
in the eye and drilled the ball 
behind square. It went straight 
for me like a bullet, -and all I 
could do was close my eyes. The 
ball fait me on the shoulder. 
Now I happened to be wearing 
three sweaters, -because it was a 
cold day, and somehow, the ball 
seemed to stick. to the wool fora 
moment before bouncing gently 
upwards. So I just stretched out 
a hand and took it easy as you 
like. Denness went off prac- 
tically crying in frustration, and 
we were laughing fit to buret." . 

Edmonds feels -that a further 
advantage of fielding close in is 
that it inspires the rest of. the 
fielding ride- “At once, all the 
other fielders get the impression 
the entire team is being really 
aggressive: we are really pushing 
for someth ingtojtappen. We are 
not waiting for something to 
turn up, we arc really trying to 
force the pace." 

Edmonds argues that fielding 
really dose in is safer than 
fielding semi-dose. You are, he 
said, generally above tbe ball. 
He does not field close to slow 
bowlers, and he wifi not field 
dose to any bowler he has. for 
the moment, lost faith in. “I 
remember saying to Both once, 
as I went to field in very dose: *If 
you're going to bowl anything 
short, make sure it's up round 
the throat.' But be bowled a 
couple of dreadful long-hops, 
and Border wiped them both in 
my direction, so I said: “OK, 
Both, that's enough.' and moved 
back." - 


CRICKET 
Second Comhifl Test match 
{11.0 to 6.0. 90 overs minimum) 
TRENT BRIDGE: England V New 
Zealand 

Britannic Assurance 
County Championship 
U 1.0 to 6.30, 110 overs minimum) 

CHELMSFORD: Essex v Middlesex 
CHELTENHAM; Gloucester V Notts 
CANTERBURY: Kent v Hampshire 
LEICESTER: Lefcs v Yorkshire 
NORTHAMPTON: Northants v 

Glamorgan 


TODAY’S FIXTURES 

WESTON-SUPER-MARE: Somerset 
v Warwicks 

TIE OVAL: Surrey v Lancashire 
EASTBOURNE: Sussex v 
Derbyshire 

SECOND XI CHAMPIONSHIP: Oetby- 
Dwoyshre V L wcwterehra; Bristol: 
Gloucestershire v Hampshire: Enhokfc 
Miodtese* v Surrey: Nownrfa Nowmctwn- 
9teiev Nomnnip(onsMre,-8itKtDfc Somer- 
set v Glamorgan; Worcester: 
Worcestershire » Warwickshire: Heno- 
Yorkshire v Kent. 

MINOR COUNTIES CHAMPIONSHIP: 
Fenner's: Cambridgeshire v HartronJ-- 
artre; Bounteraoutb (Dean park): Dorset v 
Shropshire: Lekeobenu Norfolk » 
Durham. 


OTHER SPORT - 

CROQUET: Huriingham tournament 
CYCUNG: NtttcrfuU track champioraNps 
(a Leicester]. 

EQUESTRIAMStt: DufaBn show. 

GOLF: English women's amateur strote- 
piaylat Broadswne). 

SWWWNQ: London charetoraMps (at 
Crystal Palace NSCt 

TENNIS; Ow te hi r e open touwnent (at 
Beading University; Qtanransmr Insur- 
ance Bournemouth tournament (at West 
Hants LTCI: Stradey Park Hotel 
Camanhenstwe open tournament (at 
Ltarwlft); Suttofc dosed senior champton- 
stvpe (at FramHngnam Ortega). , 
YACHTMG: Cowes week.. 


MODERN 

PENTATHLON 

Proposal 
to end 
problem 
of drugs 

From Michael Coleman 
Montecatini Tenne 

Trials and tribatatioas still 
afflict die world championships 
here. Last night Wflle Grot 
general secretary of UIPMB, 
tbe governing body, for 25 
years, went home to Sweden In 
disgust at what he regards as the 
refusal to tackle the drugs 
question property. 

Grot was Olympic champion 
in 1948 and is probably tbe most 
respected figure in the sport- He 
retired from office last year but 
had crane to Italy to present to 
the UIPMB- Council his report 
on bow tbe sport's top-heavy 
administrations conld be 
re s tr u ct u red. 

That dome, be left. “I no 
longer want to watch tbe sport 
which is spread over five days," 
Grut said. “We introduced the 
four-day contest in 1983 to try to 
stop competitors taking drugs 
before the shooting. Now it has 
reverted to five days. This is no 
way to stamp eat doping." 

The foer-day formula had the 
shooting and cross-country race 
on the same day, persuading 
competitors not to take a nerve- 
settling depressant before the 
pistol event became of die 
adverse affect this woahl have on 
r unning performance, and It 
worked. 

Grot wants the shooting and 
ran to be combined. The targets, 
black balls set at a distance of 10 
metres, are fired at with air 
pistols. Competitors, having be- 
gan the- 4,000 metres cross- 
country race (2JKM metres for 
women) return to the stadium at 
the midway point shoot until 
they knock over all the targets, 
viewed by all the spectators, 
then pick np tbe race again. 

Grot said: “My air pistol 
system is much cheaper ami can 
be ased by juveniles. It will give 
the sport ranch more of an 
impact especially for television, 
which is what this sport badly 
needs." 

About £120,000 is being spent 
annually on drag testing at 
competitions. “What an otter 
waste of money," he said. “In- 
troduce the air-pistol system, 
forget about the drags problem 
and spend tbe money on spread- 
ing the sport baying horses and 
sending out coaches.” 

The American drama contin- 
ues. Mike Barley, ranked No. 3 
in tbe States ami their most 
experienced competitor, re- 
ned from the team yesterday 
er learning that he had been 
downgraded to reserve. In bis 
■n Mr he had been dropped 
because be had supported two 
team coileagaes, Lazslo Beres 
and Harvey Cain, in their 
attempts to have Blair Driggs 
and Bob Stull thrown off the 
squad after they had- taken a 
drug in the United States na- 
tional championships last May. 
Driggs and Stall were named as 
competitors along with John 
Scott 

Beres and Cain, here in case 
Driggs and Stull were finally 
banned by the UIPMB, were 
told to return bone at once. Both 
are threatening to sne the 
American Association. 

The contest opened yesterday 
with the riding, and Drugs, the 
second man on, had eight re- 
fusals and several gates down 
before being eliminated without 
scoring a point, American 
interest in the team contest had 
immediately evaporated. 


Club seeks 
money for 
test case 

By Conrad Voss Bark 



A test case to deckle whether 
value added tax can be claimed 
on the sale of fishing is to come 
before tbe coarts Hint a«m«wi. 
The game fishing organizatw 
the Salmon and Trout Associ- 
ation, is bnmctiine an appeal for 
funds to fight the case, for if 
Customs and Excise win; ft 
would affect fishermen 
everywhere. 

The claim that is bring con- 
tested was made after the sale, in 
1983, by theGwydr Hotel, of the 
Ptas Madoc fishery on the 
Conwy, in North Wales, to a 
local fishing dub. which was 
suddenly faced with a demand 
for a £12,000 payment of VAT. 
The dab appealed to the VAT 
Tribunal in London and -the 
tribunal's chairman. Lord 
Grandiester QC foend that 
VAT was not payable: Customs 
and Excise are appealing 


The issoes are complex. The 
VAT Tribunal judgement was to 
the effect that if the sale of the 
hotel and tbe fishing rights were 
made in the coarse « further- 
ance of the business then ft 
would be taxable. On the other 
hand. Lord Grancbester said 
that as lie was concerned with 
land that had not been built on, 
that was to sav a part of the bed 
of the River Conwy, then under 
the provisions of an EEC direc- 
tive, no tax was chargeable 
despite ' the United Kingdom 
legfoiation. 

Since then, a carious sequel 
o ccurred during foe sale of 
fishing rights al'Thnshary on 
the Test, when a letter from the 
local office of Cus toms and 
Exrise was rend which said they 
did not consider VAT was 
payable because foe sale was of 
the- land and not -foe fishing 
rights as Such. Whether this is 
relevant to the issue of the Has 
Madoc ‘-case will .not be known 
until tbe case is beard. ' 

Contributions to : foe fighting 
fend should be soft to Ptas 
Madoc AppeaL Salmon and 
Trout Association, 

Hall, London 

EC49EC 


ATHLETICS 


Wells return to top 
class sets a 
teaser for selectors 

By Pat Butcher, Athletics Correspondent 




Ingrid Kristiansen's retrieval 
of the world 5.000 metres record 
in Stockholm two nights ago 
means lhat the Norwegian is 
again holder of three world 
records. Strictly speaking, it is 
two world records — 5.000 and 
10.000 metres - and one “world 
best" - a 2hr 2 1 min 6sec 
marathon in London in I9S5 — 
since the marathon is run on 
variable routes. 

Nonetheless, it re-emphasizes 
Mrs Kristiansen's position as 
the queen of distance running, 
and it makes her an obvious 
favourite for the European 
women's 10.000 metres title, 
when it is run for the first time at 
the championships in Stuttgart 
in three weeks' rime. 

When Mrs Kristiansen took 
just over 45sec off her own 
world 10.000 metres record, 
with 30:13.74 in Oslo's Bislett 
Stadium on Julv 5. she said that 
she thought there was still 
another half-minute to come off 
the record for it to be considered 
on a par with the men's record 
of 27:13.81, set by Frinando 
Mamede. of Portugal, in Stock- 
holm two years ago. 

Mrs Kristiansen also said that 
the women's 5.000 metres 
record, then held by Zola Budd 
with 14:48.07. should be around 
14:30. With that in mind. Mrs 
Kristiansen set off For three 
weeks' altitude training in 
Switzerland, returned to 
Scandinavia for Tuesday's race, 
and took almost II sec off Miss 
Budd's mark, with 14:37.33. 

It was the start of another bad 
night for Miss Budd who. after 
leading the 2.000 metres in the 
UK v Commonwealth match at 
Gateshead for almost four and a 
half of the five laps, she then 
faded badlv to finish a poor 
fourth in 5:44.48, ISsec outside 
her best time: 


It was her third defeat in a 
row. and she was at a loss to 
explain just why her form has 
cone awTv She said her training 
wus going as well as at any point . 
during her career, “but things 
just aren't working out in races’*. 
And that is as much a headache 
for the British selectors, who 
met yesterday morning to make 
iheir provisional choice for 
Stuttgart. For Miss Budd was 
preselected for the 3.000 metres, 
and on this form is not going to 
gel through the heals in 
Stuttgart. 

The team announcement is 
not due to be made until 
Mondav. but Miss Budd is not 
the only problem for the selec- 
tors. Alan Wells* amazing return ; 
to top class after a two-year . 
hiatus when he beat the 
Commonwealth sprint cham- 
pions. Ben Johnson and Alice 
Mahora. in Gateshead, will also 
make picking the three Euro- 
pean sprinters at 100/200 me- 
tres a teaser. Similarly, the ■ 
return of the British 400 metres 
record holder. Derek Redmond, 
from injury spoils the selectors 
for choice as much as with the 
800/ 1 .500 metres pretensions of 
Steve Cram. Sebastian Coe and 
Steve Ovett, while there are ’ 
other top-class youngsters wait- 
ing in the wings. 

Wells might underline his 
claim bv racing again on Friday 
in the IAC meeting, which has 
found a new sponsor and seem- 
ing financial security with 
Miller Lite, who have put in . 
£50.000 this year. Oven and 
Said Aouita will decide today if ' 
and in which event they will 
compete. But the biggest interest 
will be in the return of Ronaldo 
Nehemiah. 1 10 metres hurdles J 
world record holder, to com- 
petition after his reinstatement. 



Queen of distance ran: 

record-breaking 5, 


Kristiansen after her 
metres in Stockholm 


EQUESTRIANISM 


Settling the account 


Major Malcolm Wallace, 
director general of the British 
Equestrian Federation, is 
optimistic that Britain's three- 
day event team will collect more 
than S4.000 (around £2.600) in 
prize money owed to them by 
the organizers of die world 
championships, held in South 
Australia in May. 

Viqpnia Leng. who took the 
individual gold medal, is owed 
$3,000. while Lorna Garke won 
S 1.000 for her bronze place. The 
financial problem arose when 
the championships’ organizing 
committee suffered a major loss. 


It now appears, however, that 
the Equestrian Federation of 
Australia will step in if the South 
Australian government does not 
pay off tbe debts — estimated at 
one million Australian dollars. 

“There are other riders who 
have won money and 1 have told 
them we are optimistic of 
getting this sorted out,” Major ! 
Wallace said. “I have been 
involved with the sport for 10 ‘ 
years and have never known 
such an unhappy saga. I would ■ 
have thought they could have 
somehow found the money and 
then kept their dirty washing at 
home." 


m CERTIFIED DIVIDENDS 


AH matches for August 2nd 


LITTLEWOODS 


POOLS. LIVERPOOL 




TREBLE CHANCE - Max 24 Pcs -No Client with 24 fts 
TOPDIV FOR ONLY 23 Pts. 

23 PTS £588,707-50 

22VZPTS £11,468.30 

22 PTS ...... £1,328-50 

21V2 PTS £223-30 

21 PTS £52-50 

20Vz PTS... ....... £19-35 


[freefone 

124 HR. SERVICE)! 


4 DRAWS £25-25'- 

12 HOMES £24-65 

6AWAYS ...£224-70 

Atam rtufemf* W writ* «f top 
Expens®* and Commission 
TBth July 1986-28 0% 


0800400400 


VERNONS 


THIS WEEKS SUPER 

5 GOES APENNYTREBLE CHANCE 


POOLS LIVERPOOL 



5 DIVIDENDS 
Possible points 24. 

No client with 24 points. 

£21,244-55 

22% pts--., £1,074-05 

£2 ,1** £238-35 

21% pts £424)5 

21 pts —£ 8-95 

Trebte Chance Dtvktemfe to Units of 

... 


12 HOMES £1995 

(Nothing Barred] 

8 A WAYS -..-£79.50 

(Nothing Barred) 

4 DRAWS. £16-35 

(Nothing Barred) 

Above Dividends to Units of tOtx 

and Commwaton for 19th July 


for coupons Phone 01-200 0200 



23 Pts— £8,273.40 

22 vi Pts £209.45 

22 Pts £51.75 I Jam 

21% Pis -.£7.75J/*5p 

4 DRAWS £33.40 (or 1 


CWCKETPOOL 

22 Pts..-.. £1,042.10 
** Pts.-, — £104.20 
21 Pts ....£19.55 . r - 

3^ Mjr.3a.3a.4sSj. ’ 

2 ^ 541 8 ^ 0 ^ ^ 1 ^ 30 . 3 ,^^ 






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THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


SPORT 


29 


RACING: CUNPELL-TftAINEP HILTON BROWN PREFERRED TO STEWARDS’ CUP SCORER IN BRIGHTON SPRINT 


Improving Turfah can 



.. .j- ylS Zf \.i jS. If 


*s fortunes 


Tmiafa is napped ■tO'.conh 
tinne the revival of . Peter 
Walwyn's formnes by. winning 
this -afternoon’s Pontefract 
Maiden 'Mile Championship 
final (3.45);. ' 

On Saturday night , the in- 
trepid Berkshire ha ndler went 
to -Market Rasen, where the 
victory of Perang saw him 
briefly installed as 
Lambourn's- - leading jump 
trainer for just 36 hours. 

Now Turfah looks handi- 
capped to give' Wahvyn his 
24th success of the current 
Ftoi Taring campaign in the 
£5,000 feature on tbe-South 
Yorkshire track. 

After finishing an unlucky 
second to Adamstown at 
Edinburgh Turfah . returned 
North to Pontefract at the 
beginning of July where the 
three-year-old stayed on 
strongly to beat Hamlou in a 
tjualifying event for today’s 

Turfob then went to Scot- 
land again at the end of the 
month, when, after being de- 
nied a clear run early in' the 
straight, he lengthened his 
stride in fine style inside the 
last furlong to foil the odds 
laid on EagicDestiny by half a 
length. . 

Not surprisingly, -the run- 
ner-up declined a return 
match, as he would have to 
meet his . conqueror on 131b 
worse terms- Another line of 
form involving Eagle Destiny 
also shows Turfah to have a . 
few pounds in hand of this ' 
afternoon's top weight, 
Poderoso. 

Of the other runners, both 
Factotum and Port Please, ran 
well last time out.and could be 
the pair to cha$e the nap 
home. 

The . finish of the Dianne 
Nursery Stakes (4.15) looks 
likely to be fought out between 
Ongoing Situation and Light- 
ning Laser. Ongoing Situation 
has earned his welter burden 
of lOst with three sterling 


By Mandarin 


-performances, notably when 
accounting for Full ofPrideon 
this course a shade comfort- 
' ably last time out - But ‘ in 
receipt of 231b -Paul 
Kelleway’s Edinburgh scorer. 
Lightning Laser, is. preferred, 
not Only to Ongoing Situation 
but also to Tina's Melody./ 

- The Brighton Spring Handi- 
cap (3.0). sees the quick to-, 
appearance, of Green Ruby, 
the" winner of laid week's 

Course specialists 

BRIGHTON 

TRAMERBc O Harwood. 32 urinmrstan 
116 cumin. 27-fWc B HMs. 15 from 61. 
24.6%; P Cote 29. from 141, 205%. 
JOCKEYS: W Carson, 42 winners from 
199 rides. 2t.1%; T Qutm, 19 from 92. 
209%; GSteriroy. 37 from 178, 20.7%. 

YARMOUTH 

TMMERS: H CeO, 63 winnecs (com 159 
nuiere. 3891%; A Stewart 9 from 36, 
259%; L Cunmi. 35 from 169, 207%. 
JOCKEYS: S Cautfwn. 25 winrwrs from 98 
ribas. 2 Sl5%c A Nmbertoy, 11 from 52. 
219%;R Guttt, 13 from 74. 175V 

PONTEFRACT 

TRAOffitSc B HUs, 13 winters tram 43 
runners. 302%: M Srouie, 13 from 51. 
255%: P Wahwyn, 8 from 36. 225%, 
JOCKEYS: PM Eddery. 21 winners from 
53 rides. 395%; J Lowe, 18 from 202. 
85V 

DEVON 

TMAERSb D Bswonh. 20 wimra from 
66 runners, 303%; M Pipe. 37 from Iffi, 
200%: J Juntos, 20 from 101. 195%. 
JOCKEYS: P Leach, 27 winners from 156 
rides. 175VBPownS.l4frosi96.14J%; 
P Richards. 10 from 71. 14.1*. 

Stewards' Cup at Goodwood. 
Even with a 71b penalty Green 
Ruby should again prove diffi- 
cult to beat with John Wil- 
liams in the saddle, especially 
as Young ' Jason, the 
Goodwood' runner-up, has 
met with a minor setback and 
has been withdrawn. But ina 
tricky event my dunce is 
Hilton Brown. 

• Peter CundelTs fine sprinter 
has been running well all 
season and last Friday he may 
have found seven 
shade too for when 
behind Reignbeau. Hilton 
Brown has been dropped a 
pound or two in the handicap 
for having foiled to win this 
season and be should be 
capable of conceding only 21b 
to Green Ruby. 


in the Brighton Summer 
Handicap (3.30) Gay 
Harwood's candidate, Lord n 
Over appears to be on a 
lenient mark in the weights. 
However the three-year-old 
has been running bdow his 
best recently and my selection 
. is Leonidas, who romped 
home with a zest that belied 
his eight years when making 

all the r unning in a simitar 

- event for David Arbuthnot at 
Leicester. 

■ When it comes to assessing 
handicaps it often pays to side 
with horses who are running 
again quickly before they have 
had time to be reassessed. And 

at Great Yarmouth two that 
foil into this category are 
Reform Princess' (3.15) and 
The Mechanic (4.45). 

Reform Princess beat Diva 
Encore by three lengths at 
Nottingham ten days ago and 
with Ray Cochrane on board 
will be difficult to beat in the 
Michael . Barrymore Stakes 
(3.15). 'The Mechanic was 
successful at Bath the same 
afternoon and can now make 
it three victories in qrndc 
succession for John Sutcliffe 
in the Red Fox Handicap. 

Fox returns 

Richard Fox has been given 
the all dear to resume ruling 
after a layoff of more than 
two months. The Irishman 
has been out of action with a 
broken right ankle since May 
27 and was passed fit before 
racing at Brighton yesterday 
by the Jockey Club senior 
medical adviser. Dr Mkhpel 
Allen. 

After jubilantly giving the 
thumbs-up sign as he came 
out of the weighing room. Fox 
said: “Ifs great to be back and 
I shall bending at Haydock on 
Friday and Saturday. I 
smashed my ankle in two 
places and it's pinned and 
plated. 1 wanted to resume at 
Goodwood but wasn't one 
hundred per cent and refused 
to ride ft. 



Laing compensated 
by Black Sophie’s 
ipressive success 


Ian Balding's Forest Flower (right) and Mmstrella, seen here fighting out a thrilling finish 
to Newmarket's Cherry Hinton Stakes, are dne to dash again in tire Heinz 57 Stakes at 
Phoenix Park on Swtiay, Europe’s richest two-year-old event Pat Eddery takes over from 
Tony Ives on the Kjngsclere-trained filly, who is anbeaten in three races. Ladbrokes, fire 
bookmakers, offer 9-4 Forest. Flower, 5-2 Pofamia, 4 Minstrella, 6 Flawless Image, 8 
Wigantkorpc,14 Sizzling Melody, 16 and upwards others. 

Monterana rewards Wragg’s patience 


- Patience paid off again fee 
Geoffrey Wragg when 
Monterana upset the odds laid 
on Saraahell in the CEff Park 
Stakes at Ynnnsnth yesterday to 
rife the Newmarket trainer a 

third winner from six jarade 


Michael Stoote's 400,000 
newcomer Ml ** 

on, looked like landing the 
odds as be moved easily up to the 
pacemakers Supreme Rose and 
Nabras, bat both were cut down 
inside the final furlong by 
Monterana, who had been 


switched right round the back of 
the field to get a ran. 

Wragg, who was winning this 
race for the second year nmmng, 
said: “I haven't rushed my two- 

year-olds, bat I never do. I think 
the second and third were both 
well fancied so Monterana may 
have a bit of class.” Monterana 
ns the 20th winner of the 
season for jockey Philip 
Robinson. 

However, Philip Robinson's 
hick did not last long. After he 
rode the first winner, his next 
mount. Little Law, refased to go 


into the stalls for the seller and 
had to be withdrawn. 

Philip Waldron and the Ep- 
som trainer Geoff Lewis are not 
often seen at Yarmouth and 
backers took the hint with 
Who's Zoomin' Who, who races 
in dm name of trainer's wile 
Noeiene. 

The connections, however, 
had to go to 6J>00 guineas to 
retain the filly. Yesterday's auc- 
tion was the third time tmder the 
hammer for Who's Zoomin' 
Who. She changed hands as a 
foal for 5^60 gnmeas and again 
as a yeariu ^. for 4J)00 guineas. 


Ray Laing, disappointed 
when his Meet The Greek was 
touched off in the handicap at 
Brighton on Tuesday, was in 
belter mood yesterday after 
his filly Black Sophie won the 
British Thoroughbred Racing 
and Breeding Handicap at the 
rewarding odds of 6-1. 

Paul Cook brought the filly 
to lead inside the final furlong 
and she swept clear to beat 
Ballad Rose by two and a half 
lengths. 

Laing said: ‘First time out as 
a two-year-old Black Sophie 
beat Ballad Rose at level 
weights at Newbury. My filly 
had a weight advantage of 
101b this time. However, the 
field took her off her legs and \ 
thought we had no chance 
coming down the hill but she 
improved as soon as she hit 
the rising ground. 1 don’t 
know where she will go nexL 
The main objective was to get 
a win out of her as a three- 
year-old.” 

Laing has revised plans for 
his Goodwood winner Candle 
In The Wind. He said: “We 
are giving the Sweet Solera 
Slakes a miss and Candle In 
The Wind could now go for 
the Lowther Stakes at York." 

Voracity, who once carried 
the famous colours of Lord 
Derby before he was sold 
privately to Mrs John Winter, 
wife of the Newmarket wife, 
£Oi back on the winning trail 
in the Brighton Challenge 
Cup. 

Cadmium tried to make all 
the running for Richard 
Quinn, but was collared inside 
the final furlong where four 
horses had their chance. But 
John Reid brought Voracity 


with a superbly timed ran on 
the stands side to beat Fleeting 
Affair by half a length 

Dallas Smith took the 
Stanmer Selling Handicap for 
the second season running. 
The five-year-old, a !4-l shot 
ridden tv Ian Johnson, made 
most of the running to hold off 
Tom's Nap Hand by 
threequarters of length ana 
win the race for trainer Mi- 
chael Chapman, who bought 
the colt from Reg Akehurst 
after Iasi season's success. 

At the subsequent auction 
Chapman bought the horse for 
himself from owner Peter 
Smith for 2.000 guineas. 

The dual forecast for Dallas 
Smith and the 33-1 runner-up, 
Tom's Nap Hand, paid 
£1.094.70 to a pound stake. 

Sharron James received the 
£25 award for her horse. 
Composer, being the best 
turned out in the field of 17, 
but then ten minutes later was 
before the stewards where she 
was fined £100 for excessi ve 
and incorrect use of the whip. 

• At Pontefract the Ameri- 
can-bred Misk. who cost 
SI 20.000. provided anoiher 
two-year- winner for the New- 
market trainer Henry Cecil 
when battling home to a neck 
victory over Colway Rally in 
the EBF Featherstone Maiden 
Stakes. 

The colt well ridden by 
Willie Ryan, started 5-4 
favourite and the post just 
came in time for him. From 
the start Misk tracked 
Beckinham Ben and shot 
through to take the lead one 
and a half furlongs out. 
Colway Rally followed and 
only just failed to get up. 


Top Arab horse put down 

By Christopher Goulding 


EJ Trapera, arguably the best- 
ever Arab racehorse, has been 
pm down after injuring himself. 
This season the 14-year-old 
showed he had lost none of bis 
enthusiasm. At Towcesicr in 
June he won in is his usual 
front-running style, galloping 
his rivals into the ground. 

It was during a racecourse 
gallop at Newton Abbot at the 
end of Iasi month, on the 


morning before he was due to 
race that the injury happened, 
and he never recovered. 

The winner of 15 races and 
placed in 12, he only foiled to 
make the frame on two occa- 
sions. He was a credit to 
Margaret Lloyd, his owner, 
trainer and rider, as he invari- 
ably won the best turned out 
award. 


BRIGHTON 


Going: firm 

Draw: 5f-&f, low numbers best 

ZtT EB)^ BLACK^RdCk MAIDEN stakes (£Y^. £^90^7^(12 
runners) 


&30 BRIGHTON SUMMER HANDICAP (£2373:. 1m 2f) (8) 

A SkmML Pirate 4-0-10. 
i(G WanjlJD ArtxSnra 8-8-13 


1 201134 YAQUE M ELOPY 
fi 35041 LEONDMS^H 

11 raiOMO DUST BMW 

12 4131-08 TAARAXANl 

13 0800 LORD IT H 

14 1MM0I0 roMMMi 

15 034440 SOCKS UP J 

16 420300 DBBYDA1 


.9 Coe* 3 
. JRaUS 


1 

2 

5 

6 
a 

10 

it. 

12 

16 
10 . 
20 


4 CtWBUfU MNN ^Hbralidl ft Holdtt'&O. 


P Cook 4 


OtllkssS Sandra 5-84 . PWrtkml 

4*4 . A«oQloM2 

8WK AfatUq GHarwdiM3?=12 . ~ ACMk.4 

LtaAra B Sown* 4-7-1 0„___ — I 

Houghton) it John so n Houghton 9-7-10 H Mm7. 

^D)(NSpmKtuy)OAWteon577_^ TWMlf 



- a mvmobleuxk>JM| 

004 RWERBOAT PARTY 
■ SEPARATE REAUTES 
03 STRMQ SECTION (B| 
00.. TROPICAL BOY fftfl 
00 HBVOiOU S fancy] 
023 PHLQWYNHrad 
00 TUFTYRta 


XW8 FAHCY-pas P BnwnHtl BU 
VVNU Moran) D Lang »-1l__ 
LADY(MnSHtede) R Amwnwg 


, ..HgtchipaooM PHoacWnaMpIS 

(USA) (SfSardnf) Q Haranod 9-0., BSMwyS 

8 Until 9-0 : 0J*W*w11 

9-0 . #„• . ... . ... . ■ Tho ra aa 7 
0-11—^— WH—i ra tt 


3-1 Laonida*. 4-1 Lort ft Over. 5-1 Vagua Motady, M D*hy OW. Socfca Up. 10-1 
F(xgWng.Tt«TBfawi, 25-1 DustCorejuaror. . . ....... 

FORHEVAOUE MBjOOrpO^ 1114th to Bart ERwCHninMcot Ladte> awnt. ratter 
(M3] bear Tate of Tima pW) ZM at Warwick (1m 22029, good to fln% Jona2l.8 

LEOMDAS(8-6) puNwdnti » bate Coccotulo (9:7) 2Mrov«rcowv» anddtaw 
(m«5.goodtDftin.Ji4Yl4.6ia ' 

toflmv . 
noroar much room 

Juno U. 15 ran). - 

: LORD IT OVER 


94 Shtnq Sactkxu 4-1 My Nabla LorL 5-1 PhAgwyn, 1H Fourth Lad, 10-1 
CoonemaroI»wn.Blvaffaoa1Pany. 12-fKnkart3Navw g taaa.14-f Sapgate n ra h te a . 
20-1 others.- 

“ ' — 1 — — L ' LORD €9-00 2L 2nd to 


(551. £1100. 

ButascoiM 

ThneSgtitor 

fi »' ' 


■ goofltt hmn. Jui)r24.9isn). 


tlite Sandom TUFTY LADY (0-11) 7ft (71, J 
- :STRO*Q SECTION 


Z30 RfNGMER SELLING STAKES (2-Y-O: £790: 5f 6^fd) (5) 


Brighton selections 

By Mandarin - 

2J0 My Noble Lord. 230 Out on a Flyer. 3.0 Hfltoo Brown. 330 
Leonidas. 4.0 Prodigal Dancer. 430 Ardent Partner. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.0 Knights Nevergreen. 3.0 Barrack Street 330 Vague Mriody. 
Mfidnd Seely's selection: 3.0 Hihon Brown. 


0 BABY ALEX 
01204 CLEARWAY 
02 HB3ERA 
S GRBMLLE 
002 OUTONAFLYER 



4J) CUFTOHVILLE MAIDEN STAKES (E959: 1m 41) (6) 

RATON NATCH (CDRMWnkNIa I 
ASHWaiPN PROVE jBF)(SWc 


i ooma 
4 0-22332 


rUtOK bLHKWAT Vfll / W WWJW WW-I I 

ran). Earlier (B-11) a runner-up to O u nneteona Lad i 
UX (8-1 1)te » pink PUfflpMn (80) at UngfiekJ { 
ON A FLYER (00) DBtan a IwadDyThe Chiwnhair 
good to (inn, Aug 4, 6 ran). Earaar (B-11) r 
E3309), firm, July 17. 15 ran). 


10-11 Out On A Hyar. 5-2 Ctearoay. 02 Kadora Hot*. 10-1 Baby Alex, 20-1 
GramribLass. 

FORNb CLEARWAY tW)7W 41h to JatM Mac( 

. _ _ ■ - ‘ *n LranMa re , 

L good. J«ly 11. 6 ran). OUT 
i Man (8-1 llteFolkeskxw (BL E9“ 

1 58i to Dunnbnd (B-11) at Kamptan | 

.July 17 

SatocttoR OUT ON A FLYER 

3 JO BRIGHTON SPRINT HANDICAP (£5,471: 6000) 

2 3 B3000 SIT TKS ONE OUT 

3 400404 BARRACK STREET 

4 022430 HILTON BROWN 

5 4F4100 DREAM CHASER 

6 304331 OROTRWY; 

7 00-1200 HBOBiBHB^rKBC 
9 000400 GLEN KELLA MANX 

11 004330 SUD0EH IMPACT 

13 000404 ROMAN RULER 

14 440300 EXERT 

540wifMv t 

THs One Out 12-1 Gten Kafia Mara. Roman Ruhr. 16-1 others. 

FORM: SIT THIS ORE OUT eaagy bestoftxt whan (94). W adio .ftuNgfij.. ^ , 


6 040004 CHUCKLES TONE(A^M 
^^^MHIHMDAN»t(USA) 


0 PRODIGAL I 



G Harwood 300 - 

GShifcayA 

JDuteOP30V- W Canons 
B Ms 300 Tlunsoa 2 


10 0402 MUSHMLEY 

11 320222 NO DOUBLET 
B-4 NoOoubM, 3-1 Ms* Stariey. 00 Asningtoo Owe, 6-1 Prodgal Dancar. 

FORM: BATON MATCH (94) 35« 3rd to Sander JS-3) at Beverley (1m «. Mdn, £684. 
good. May 16. 0 ran). ASMNGTON GROVE (8-13) finished strong N whan 1%l 2nd » 
Era! DaitOFaat Warwick Clm 41.21343. Goodwood, Jute 9. 11 ranLCHUCKLESTCNE 
)9l4ihtDRoutayd(0^atBathn'n35I.Mdn.£m<finnijfr2B,17ran).PnODI- 
rvd taste die final fratong when 10L Sh 



pvertey (1m 
fstraimwi 

Liiran^CH 

a — , . ^Km Jiter 20, 

at (94) weakened Inside tea final fratongwhen 10L Mh to Varordf (94Q « 
m < Mdn. E2B44. firm. July 16. 15 ran). MSS SHHILEY 1%1 tar 2nd » 
1-7) n m 51. Mdn. E9S9. tbm. July 22. 1 1 ran). NO DOUNLET #-1 1) 21U 2nd to 


Mll^atBipon (1m 4t MM, £2756, firra, Jrty 19, 11 ran). 
430 EDBUBTON HANDICAP (3-Y-O: El 366: Sf 6Gyd) (8) 


1 001411 ItSIER MARCH 

2 @83-833 IMIfll Mllllir MU 

3 4-24040 RESTLESS N 
S 004000 MYMUTZIfi 
fi 00444 LADMNAJ 

7 000400 PERSIAN Mill 

8 000302. ARDENT PARTNER 

9 000000 RALMEW (J CMOl 



IFooarforateOPMachrtM. 
J ft 8-8 -j 

1 Butter 7-12 



(61. firm. 
swctat2nd 
owrlt. - 

Selection: MJTDN BROWN 


2-1 Outtenaira. 3-1 LA DMna, 92 Ardent Partner, 6-1 Raatiaas Rhraa o dy, 7-1 
Mtatw March, 2D-1 My MUtzle, Persian Bazaar. 33-1 BNMew. 

FORM: MISTBI MARCH a 51 and a 551 winner this: ^ 

a comfortable X>1 a Hamflam (W. £1306. firm. July 24, 7 rant D 
fate on whan I NI 3rd to Angels Am Stoa (8-11) at Bath (5L&, 

12 rant RESTLESS 

Fafipe Toro (94) te 

Undo (8-8) K Chaps — , — rp — 

of first sfa sfnoa (B-4) AKieth to Hafaw9(9-7) over couraa and (tistsnoe (rai9«, good to 
ftm. June 23, 1 5 rani ARDENT PAffTMEROMh headed dose homo when beaten JSJ by 
Sandftton Paface(9-8)Bt Wotwrhampton (§, El 706, good, Jiiy 21, 13 rw^- 



Brighton results 

Gotarfkm 

25 (70 t DALLAS- SMTH (I Johnson 
n*-l)T2, Tom’a Hap HandM Hom.33-1); 
' 3. Craw (J Wfifams. 1SU 4. Nafaan’a 
UKty (ISr*T«on. 6-1 favL ALSO RAN: 13-2 
StaEHjnsroes. T Count AJmavtva 

Gwwwin; 15-2 Sandron, 8 

10 Russati ttm. 11 Guynwaon. 12 Stock 
Spout, Rockwto Squaw. 14 Composer. 25 
Groat Owing, 33 Turcy Boy (5th), Unit 
Tent 17 ran. NR: Fort Duchesne. XI. 2L 
%t, «h ML 1L M Chapman at Marta* 
Hartwrouah. Tota: £18^0; £3.10, £17.40. 
E&3D. S2J00. DFr C1.094JD. C8Fi 
£37657. THcasfc £859557, Soid -M 
Chapman 2J)00 gns. • >■.- - • 

250J7nt .BLACK B OWB C tP Cook. B- 

tis&'Sassuf 

ran. 2JW. It a. sh hd. nfi. D tainn at 
Lamboum. Totr £750; £250. E1.20LDF: 
ESJthCSF: £1859. 


YARMOUTH 


Going; apod 

Draw; tugh numborabest 

Z15 EBF SCROBY SANDS MAIDEN FILLIES 
STAKES (2-Y-Cfc £2,010: 7f) (8 runners) . 

2 843 CABWET1E(B) A Batov 0-11 PBSoorafieidS 

4 CAYE M0i*3ffi R Sheatner B-11 RCocferowS 

6 FYOUPlEASEiHQPKafrmay B-11 GDaKaUI 

7 4 UJXMARffiCB«tanM1 M Roberta 2 

9 4 WSTS OF AVALON (USMHCedt B-11 _ SCwtewn 5 

12 MQ SLOPE LPtegOtt B-11 i Thra«- 

13 1 IffATWA (DSAfLCraani 8-11 • R.GaateT 

14- ... . YLDtZLARJJ4ndtoy0.il — MWfaB 

•.7-4-Mteta « ArtWv 4-1 SO. Slope, 5-1 t^pattea, 8-1 

Litiowte, Ytotdar, 12-1 Caenmtta. 15-1 Caya Mornre, V You 


. 35 (1m 4A1, VORACITY 
30): 2. Fleeting Allair 

RtiksHoMeHintor 


Raid, 100- 
11-4 


11-2L ALSO 
9-2PeMncoun 


(5th). 5 nr. KLshhd.nk.7LJ Wbtiar at 

fewmarkaLToiB: 8450; £150. EL20L DF: 

£5.90. CSP £1155. 


Richard (W Carson, 5-1L Ali 

Castle Comet Mh). 93 tory-Em (501). 6 

ram. 8h hd. 2L 2. dfat C Nelson « Upper 
Lamhoum. TotK £6.00; £150, PI 40. DP. 
P2«l CSF: £654. Alter a s tew ar d s 
Inquiry, the resufi stands. 

UDdH SEAFORTH (Paul 
: 2. mtishmoi* Wand 
LandsU (S WhitiMflll, 

25 Marsh HanterJAtM, 

: Baa (5th> 5 ran. 1L 1L hd. 20L H 
Cedi at Newnwrfeu. Tote: £220; 21.10. 
n.10. DP £1.70. CSF: £257. 


45 (1m 
Eddery, - 


1m 21) 1. UK 
11-lOMc I 
son. 6-51:3. L 


| T — 4 2D BtEBtQUJKTBHmray: 

^ 6 « HER»FU«lltadhew94 

tape B St JWfn .. . 8 400 REWWEXICO D Morley UL 

-- A 9 NOT SO Sfii-YT Barron 94- 
0 SnfiNBLE WMaokte94. 



PONTEFRACT 


to firm 

if, tow numbers best 

245 EBF CARLETON MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£2.014: Sf) (9 runners) 

CAlffE0ROGCah«n94 

00 CARLS IWEDanw Sir* y- . 

8 FAMBURNJknnyEtagiwtedM D *“S£5 

» misMPvu — ^sJl?S2 

" patEddavl 


3 0002 FACTOTUM BHBI 8-11 

4 0300 MOa.FAMMAUJ Toter 8-1, .... 
6 4002 PORT RJEASE M H Easterhy 74- 


. AMkerayS 
RMBsl 


Maud 8 

, LCwhmA7 



. 42 A» AND ABET {BFJM-StouB 8-11 — WRMnhnnl 

10-11 Aid And ADM. 7-2 Iterr Fficfc. 5-1 INte JtariBtoH 
Groen Glory, 1M Ca rts Prida. 16-1 Not So S8y. 20-1 othara. 

Pontefract selections 

By Mandarin 

Z45 Aid and Abet 3.1S Earis CburL 3.45 
TURFAH (nap). 4.15 Lightning Laser. 4.45 
Millfon. 5.15 Softly Spoken. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.45 Aid and Abet. ‘3.45 Poderoso. 4.15 Tina’s 
Melody. 4.45 Millfon. . 

Michael Seely’s selection: 5.15 SOFTLY SPO* 
KEN (nap). . ; , 

ais UPTON SELLING STAKES (2904: 1m 40 (14) 

1 -048 CARL'S COUtTra n Fiancte 1IVW S Webster 6 

2 4001 NUtiU5mFSr1044. 

3 040 MUSICAL WLLmTFNrhuol +40- 


J Lowe 3 

6-4 Turfah, 5-2 Factotum. 9-2 Port Ptaase, 6-1 Poderoso. 8- 
1 Mote Fammau. 


4.15. DIANNE NURSERY HANDICAP {2-Y-O: 
£2^69:60(7) 

1 0131 ONQOM SfTUATlON (G) D Mortay 1MF£0_ _ 

Pet Ed dery 2 

3.3301 UQHTWNB LASBt P Keteway 60 (7ex) 

4 Stt-TWa MELODY (BF)J Winter M 7 

5 3140 LfMODEE M WElsterby7-l3 -K0ejtey3 

. 9 0*00 SILVERS QiA N Cateohan 7-7 OBeidwNi(7)S 

10 0300 MEATH PWNCESSS Norton 7-7 — . JLOwsB 

11 1030 SWYMFOIP Pf H MC m K Stone 7-7 — L ftwranrlr 1 
5-2 Tina's IWody. 10640 Ongoing Shotion. 4-1 (Jgteting 

Laser. 6>1 Unn CT Dee. 8-1 Swvntorn Princess. 12-1 Meant 
Princess. 14-1 Stem Bra. 

4A5 STEWARDS’ MAIDEN AUCTION STAKES (2- 
Y-0: £1,565:60 (10)' 

2 Ctl A H P IQW JOKSI J EBwrWgtnn 8-10, — -_H Woods 

5 00 MAUNOBNOTTOM Fteherston-GoNsy B0_Rlilje4 

8 000 YOUNG BOOM HEasWtNM-— — - Ntert7 

9 04 gJLMCRAM FOR GAMES R Boss 8-2 — Pt t Biden 1 

12 23 WLLfW m WMUMOn >_1 ■■lgj 

15 0 BROO iaDEtB K S10W 8-0 LOjameNiB 

J0 0000 TAKEffTOTMBittam^ILn--— - Kpwtey 2 

23 0 W$5 $ARAJAME R ROhneheed 7-11 ACuBoeeS 

X 0 STDLH4STAHW VttBflon 7-11 

27 0084 TWIASFDuir 7-11 — : OFteHNi3 

" 6-1 Gtamgram For Grams, 9-4 hfflfan. 5-1 Young Benz, fl-1 

Tldas, 104 Ttea ElteX 20-1 attars. 


5 OBH BOLQGRA ID) DiCfeemn 5-8-11— DNWioiS 13 

h OOOO DE^TODBManfrsB Waring 4-9-11- A tensy 4 

I S8 

9 00/0 U8AB.Y /USA) N Brcrofi 6-8-10 M WdteHteae P)5| 

10 4D4- HH3 cnt5ir& . . 8W«*S3| 


5.15 *GO RACING 
(£1,850: 6f){13) 

2 0031 WORKADAY 
5 1040 TANKN 
fi 0040 BOOS SC- 
'S Mil DWYER'S 


IN YORKSHIRE’ HANDICAP 


40-12. 


TBsrron 502 BMcfiKf (7) 13 


BCrossteyT 
I Jotaeson 1 


Jaws 50-10 

11 W0 THE RUMCF Jordan 50-10-™— 

12 0090 DtfflAVAWAC Gray 5-57— 

13 3000 vemMIMRMB) OHM SNorten 4-0-7 J Low 14 

14 SALAXYFWNOSS iwny Rogerald 3-70 ■ 

JCWtoi(5)9 

15 0000 OUR ANNE E Carter *70 — ■ 

.MurtBO.01 
i erhera. 


10 -000 


CHATEAU W (C-P) H Coingridga^ VB-l 


A-lltitfNalWte. 5-1 Dteraoma. 01 ' 

The Rusk, EarTo Gout 101 Hr Baity. UsaKy. lS 

3-45 POtfTEFRACT MAIDEN MftJE HANDICAP {3- 
Y-O:£3^05:Tm)(5)-- , 

1 0040 POOBttSOft Boss 9-7 PteE*teiy4 

2 0211 TURFAH (USA) (00) P Welwyn 8- 13 „ 

Edm 2 


14 3001 Bffii^GAN(C0)DenyaSniah6061S6^^ || ^ n 
. IS 1202 'SOFTLY S>OKEN P Wgate 00^_ |0 

!? s 

IB 0002 POeagHPAYM m (»«*) (D) B McMahon 7- 7 : 12 

AMackajriD 

19 0000 NADRON M Camacho 4-7-9— 1 — —J Lowe 8 

22 0000 YIA VITAE RHoensnead 407 _ — kCOamJT)* 

23 0000 SING GALV0 SWG P Bevan 5-7-7_ G BaRteW (7) 11 


.15-1 otiira. 


Pontefract 


04 to# 2. 

ad Hex 


Gates: good to firm 

rr wntems. 01). also RAft 16 Johmy 

Sharp. 20 Barnaby Benz. Radde Ashton. 
Thank Haven (4th). 25 Junta Monty (StiiL 
33 Becktegham Ben. Burcroft JStia 
Dunum Lari, Mr CndkflL 13 ran. » 
Raymonds Star. nk. 5L 1JM. 2L 2»L H 
Cecil at Newmarket TOw E150: £1.10. 
£190. £U0. DF: E4J0, CSF: £7.7a 


Prime Number (f«n, 16 'mm, « uumt 
UKnes*. Gtendvry, 50 Rowl vateur fflh). 
9 ran. NR: Stontibrolter. Si 3. 1L 1KL BL 
M Prescott at Newmarket Tote: £4.40; 
£150. £1.40. E1A0. DF: £7.ia CSF; 
£1793. Alter a stewards' taqitey me 
rasutts stands. 

145 CSfl 1 , Al Agroed (G DutfiekL 3-1): 
Z Music MacMneU Scafly, 150 (»); 3. 
PhOatar (A Mactay.7-1). ALSO RANr11>2 
King Chariemegne (4th). 6 Menton Mark 
(500. 11 Mabura Bate 25 Ught 
Ancle. 7 nm. 1 Jil, 2L 3L 5M, 5L J Winter at 
Newmarket. Tata: £290; £1.20, £1.50. DR 
£290. CSF: £8.73. 


4.15 flm) 1, SWG1NG BOY 
10-1K 2. Wore (W Hyan. 7- 


g (W Ryan, 7-2 Jt-tavt 3. 
(S Parks. 7-i> ALSO RAN: 
n Mb &&), Knights Secret 


C30 (M) 1 . EASTERN SONG (J fMd 40 
lav); 2. ZnhiKnktiit (Paul Eddery, KMkA 
Bnthoyna (R hS, 4-1). ALSO RAN: 9 
Angels Are Ouemfi. USlanb«o(4tf|) l 66 
Boone Jack ($tti). Some Guest 7 ran. 1L 
4L 2L 31. 3L C Nelson at Upper Lamboum. 
Tote: £190: £12& *290. W-T £490. CSR 
£7.09 

Ptecepot EBJtiL 

Yannonth 

(6j) IJjigmBWMA (P RObheon, 
3. 

Bora __ . ... _ ... 

„ r (4tii). 33 No Lie. Speadbird BOtL 
50 S«K8me Rose. 9 ran. KL 1KL IHi.XL 
2KLG Wragg M NewmarkeL Tote: £&AO; 
£1.50, £190! £190. OF: £890. CSF: 
£1034. 

2^8 (6ft 1. WHO* ZOOMIN' WHO (P 
Waldron 7-4 Fcnk Z Mae Aceda UH 
Brown 11 -a 3. Mtai (S CauthM S2). 
Also ran: 5 Sweet PiocoioffitiD. 12 Nations 
Rosa. 20 Refempego 33 Lynda 
Bnaad (5thl. 7 ranTHfi: Lula Law. i 4L 
29U. wTSi. G Lmris at toom. Tote: 
£3 .10: £190. £190; DF: 43.TO. CSF: 
£10.B7 

3.15. pm 2f) 1. TBBBt TYPE (R 
OochronL 4-1 kM Z Gw>nM Mg|<t 
(T lues. 4-1 jt-nv); 3, Ktegfs Croaatit (P 
Waldron, 5-1L ALSO RAN: 9-2 Marshal 
Macdonald, 5 Noillo (4»i). 9 Needle- 
woman. 10 Al Shamfth (Bib). 14 Adnwata 
Afl (5th). 25 Tower Fame. 33 Rnbis. 10 ran. 
Hit’ %L 3L 1L 3L M Tomkins at 
New me tkeL Tote: £390: £1.1 a £1.70, 
£290. DF: £790. CSF: £2091 Tricast 
£76.70. 

3^5 rmi.FANCYPANfTives. 15^:1 
Punmm mm (G Wng, 9^: 3, Rare Seuid 
j^Kelewa^7-4 tev). ALSO. RA 1^92 

Ilnex-PWned, 25 Oe 
Gatade. Bears Revenge @ht Garda's 
Gold (4th). 10 raa 71 nk. 3. hd. 5L W. 
HasUiigvBass at N ew na rta t . Tote 
£690; el 90, £190. £1.10. DR £1690. 
CSF; E3B95. Tlrfcwt E7B33. . 

4.15 (1m 61) 1. D fcSanu) (T Ives. 11- 
4k 1 Throe Tme A Lady (S Cautisn. 7- 
4k 1 Tonquin (P Robinson. 33-1). ALSO 
RAN: 6-4 fav Parson's Child Miti). 20 
Abydos (5th). 5 ran. 8L hd. 10L 4L G 
PriKhard-Gordon at Newmarket Tote 
win: £490: £190. El.llDft £290. CSR 
£799. 

495 (71) 1. FEARLESS ACTION 
Caidhen. 4-5 favk £• CaM (R Morse, ra- 
1k 3. Dantte Darius (R Cochrane. 6-1L 
' RAN: 5 Sunset Bcutevard (5ch). 6 
.8ReaffflGold. 


Yarmouth selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 YkSiriar. 2.45 Polemistis. 3.15 Reform 
Princess. 3.45 Riot Brigade. 4.15 Head of School. 
4.45 The Mechanic. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2.15 Yldizlar. 2.45 Heathgriff. 3.15 Reform 
Princess. 3.45 Slim.Hope. 4.15 GrimesgOL 
Michael Seely's selection: 3.1 5 Reform Princess. 


3.15 IIBCHAEL BARRYMORE HANDICAP (£2,127: 
1m6f)(8) 

2 ' 1122 WVA ENCORE (C-OXBF) R Armsfrong 3-9-7 

SCartwal 

3 MO GONE OVERBOARD RISA) A Stewart 3-8-1 

R Carter (5) 3 

5 0341 REFORM PRMCESS (B)(D)M Ryan 30-12 

fi MM JUBILEE JAMBORStBHAMde 30-14- P Brat! (5) 8 

7 0004 HANIUEY DOWN EBdn 30-10 AMackayB 

ID 2010 WALC1SM (DIR Hannon 3-80 — GDuHMdS 

11 0003 SEVEN HILlS (q(F1QJtaimy Rbgerald 303 

M Roberta 2 

- 13 0000 KNCHTSHEBtH Whiting 500 Llfi0gio(7)7 

11-4 DNai Encore. 4e1 Gone OrortioartLRafiariii Princess. 
139 Watcfaln. 8-T. Hankley Down. 12-1 Knot's Heir, Seven 
HHs. 16-1 JiteOM Jamboree. 

3.45 DARXIE COSTELLO MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O 
C & G: £1 ,238: 6f) (6) 


1 B BARMBY DON M Lurch 9J>— 

2 I TRY L Cumani 9-0 — 

6 PIPSTB0 G Wii«90 — 

7 0833 RIOT BRIGADE C Britten 30— 

8 SUM HOPE M Stoute 90 

9 0 STAHT-RITCWCrGOfinanM. 


— N Leach (7) 4 
R Quest 3 

— PBohineMB 

SQHIMH2 

, WRSwMaml 
Th**5 


tf a tra n i lmwa 5 

Iw Wharton 4 


Z45 GOLDEN RRLE SELLING HANDICAP (£713: 
1m) (12) 

2 0000 RESPONDER (B) R Stnbbs 40-10 JH Brown ^7 

3 0000 HEATHQfflFFN CaUeghan 4-9-5 IMhrD 

4 0230 POCO LOCO A Davison 4-95 GBetearll 

5 0801 POLEMtSTB (B)(D)M James 7-94 (5e*) 

6 000- BIG LAND Ms NMacaulay 7-M ... 

7 mm TISITCLLO BLUE BRjdvnond 993 
9 0240 COUNTESS CAflLOTTl 

10 3t»0 BALKAN J>D)J Harris 
13 0300 TAKE THE BtSCtn 1 
15 0000 HANPION WALK JHok 50-10 
IB 0000 NATIVE HUGE MPnscon 3010 ._ . 

18 000 DICK'S BOY (fi) J Scaflan 3-8-6 ML Thotna E 

53 Potemfatte. 7-2 Countess Cartotti, 5-1 Haatntlf, 01 
Native Image, 01 Poco Loco, 191 Responder. 12-1 Baman, 20 
1 others. 



130 Sfim Hope. 01 1 Try. PipstMd. 7-2 RU Brigade. 201 
Start-Rite. 33- 1 BambyDon. 

4.15 CITY OF NORWICH MAIDEN CLAIMING 
STAKES (E2.028: 1m 20 (11) 

1 004 FOLLOW THE BAND W Jarvis 408 SQwthanl 

3 000 RIBOKEYES BOY A Dawson 400 G Baxter 4 

4 0402 BN5H HERO (USA) R Sheetlw 40-&«~ R Cochrane 7 

6 004 HEAD OF SCHOOL JWInter 300 AMackayB 

7 900 KING OF GEMS A Jarvis 308 M Roberts 6 

9 00 MCE PRESENT (USA) RAmstrong 305_. RCwant 3 

11 000 REGAL SAM MTomptans 304 PRoMumlD 

12 000 COME TO THE BALL R Hannon 303 QDuNWtfS 

13 00 FIRST SUMMER M Jervis 3-6-2 T Ives 2 

16 004 GRB4ESGBX J Hkidey 300 MMKs5 

17 4004 TABT01 M Fetherston-Godlay 300_ CRuttrrt (5} 11 
9-4 Head Of School. 7-2 Irish Hero. 110 GrimesgBL 01 

Folow The Band. 01 Tate Tot, 101 Coma To The Ban. Regal 
Sam, 101 otiiers- 

4.45 RED FOX HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2,050: 61) (4) 

1-1232 MURPHYS WHEELS A Janes 90 SCautimnA 

2 0000 BON ACCUEH. m M Mating 90 LRigglO03 

5 0004 MAYORtp) M Leach 92 M Leech (7) 2 

IMEOUMCI 


7 2311 THE I 


! (8) J Sotctfte 013 (7ax) C Rotter ( 


11-10 The Mechanic, 04 Murphy's Wheels. 01 Mayor. 10 
1 Bon Accurst . . 


DEVON & EXETER 


Going; firm 

Z30 ‘WELL TO DO’ CONDmONAL JOCKEYS 
HURDLE (£834: 2m 5f) (8 rurmar) ' 

3 111- REDGRAVE ARTIST (C)MC Pfpa 0110 J Lower 

40P32- AMANTISS G B Efaksng 011-4 ACkarttonf 


5 403- CARO WOOD JD Davies 01 1-4> 


M Brown 


0 40-1 RNERSIDE DRIVE JDDwws 7-1 10 Dllontefi) 

7 000 VAL CUMBER (USA) M Castafl 01 1-4 — MBoerfby (S) 

9 23-3 LOQCABMW Clay 5-110 DfaneCfayCS) 

10 BOP- QUITE MOT (Cl N G Aytffe 7-110 R5parfcs(5) 

|- 11 OP0 SUP UP F Gray 0110 R Quest 

110 Rfvendda Drive. 04 Redgrave Artist 01 Amanhss. 0 
1 Log Cabin. 101 Caro wood, 101 omera. 


7 POO/ NORTHBMJ GALA T B H*S8U 7-1010 D Wonnacott (7) 

10 PWU SOLDIER ON J R Payne 7-1010 C Cos (4) 

12 R0-2 YANGTSE-WAHGJM Bradley 010-10 G Davies 

14OPP0 JETS ffllPON (B) (tm A Barrow 010-7 — J Herat (7) 

15 104- LECTOR (USA) D R Efcwarfh 010-7 C Brown 

5-4 Yangtse-Kfang, 01 Seetver Prince. 7-2 Buriats Prince. 
01 Lector. 12-1 Bans way. 101 orhens- 

4J» SUMMER SELLING HURDLE (E507: 2m If) (9) 

11000 BE1XAMUSE (B) (USA)(C-D) M Castefi 011-1 

2 P3V FOREWARN (B) (IRC Hotmes 011-1 

3 OP0 TABHONYAjm J R Jenkins 4-1 01 2 J WMte 

6 002- FUM WONDER J D Dawes 01 010 G Heaver m 

70F01- GOLD HUNTER RJ Hodges 0101D „Whvtae(7) 

9 001- SEASONED EMBER (B)(C-D)JM Bradley 01010 


15 EILO MAGIC TKeanor 0106 

16 0 NIGEL'S ANGEL RG Frost 01 06 

17 0 SPEND IT LASS (B) R Champnn 4-10-2 


G Davies 
C Gray 
J Frost 


Devon selections 

By Mandarin 

230 Redgrave Anist3.0 Majuba HilL 330 

Lector. 4.0 Forewarn. 4 JO London ContacL5.0 
The Flooriayer. 


l Doughty 

110 Tashonya. 7-2 Forewarn. 02 Gold Hunter, 7-1 Flort 
Wonder. 101 Seasoned Ember. 101 Spend K Lass, 14-1 
others. 

440 GRANVtU-E HOTEL ILFRACOMBE NOVICE 
HURDLE (3-Y-O: £707: 2m If) (6) 


3.0 GRANVILLE HOTEL ILFRACOMBE NOVICE 
HURDLE (£776: 2m IQ (6) 

1 03 BANK PARADE (BP) JOa»teS010lO E N w phy 

2 09« BE HnrWBiGS(OTJnjBAkins 01010 J White 

5 20-2 MAJUBAWLLMCPtee 01010 Pleach 

9 0 CORSTON SPRINGS DR Tucker 4-107 SMcNeN 

13 SWFT ASCENT (USA! GSBaklaig 4-107 RGUMt(7) 

15 pp0 CBMR ROOM Mm EHwt 4-109 

2-1 Bank Parade. 11-4 
Swttt Ascent 101 Coraton 


CROWN COLONY Mrs A Knight 197 G Knight 

HOME OR AWAY J H Baker 107. LHawey(7) 

LONDON CONTACT M C Pipe 107 P Scudamore 
TRELAW9JEY R j Hodges 107 BPowefi 


DEBORAH COY TROfeetMod 102. Mr L Lay (7) 

GLAZEPTA FINAL K S Bndgswuer 102 W Wortfatefiton 
04 Trteawney, 130 London Contact. 7-1 Crowt Cotofry, 
101 CBazapta final. 14-1- Home Or Away. 201 Deborah Coy. 


HN. 7-2 Be My Wings, 7-1 
101 Cedar Room. 


3.30 ALWYN TRUNDLE NOVICE CHASE (£1,156: 
2m If) (IQ) 

2 00-3 BELLWER PBNCEJHBaJwr 6-1010— — -8' teigfrt 

3 FBF- BEN'S WAY K S Bndgwtear 7-101tL~_W Wwtitingten 

4 800 BOATOSMANS 


221- «m£RSPETj 
FW 


DRTudoar 7-1010 

R Sparks (7) 
T BHatott 7-1010— . P RfahanH 
Hates 01010 Pater Hobbs 


5.0 JOHN LUBftfY HANDICAP CHASE (£1^45: 
2m 11) (9) 

1 202 THE FLOORLAYKJHBNwr 01 1-10.™ L Harvey (7) 

2 P01 FAST FLIGHT J Ffitch-Heyas 11-11-13 Bex) 

WnP nta i I teras d) 

3 402 MAGGC DEE (QRGFtaBI 011-6 J Frost 

4 Brt-F SWIfSGLETRK M9F)RChaniqion 1011-2 NDoeekty 

5 002 SUEVEanACKfiljm Way 1011-1 sJbtiaM 

6 O0F DANCE MASTER (C-ifl C Homs 101012 C Ham 

7400P- THeWURZELFGHoCs 11-196 CGray 

B 833- BLACK EARL I P Wanfle 0196 — PDewar 


9 340 BRrrANMCUSNBTItennon 10104... 

15-3 Tha Ftoortayor. 02 1 

Swingietree, 101 Sack Earl, 14-Totttera. 


D Morris (7} 
11-2 


WhfsKampgiowiah). 14 RussM Creek. 
beO0rd.8fBn.NR: Sdoutsmlstekfc 1L KL 
1KL 3. 2KL A Hide at Nawmarkflt Tom 
£ 9.80 £220. £170. £190. DP. £2990. 
CSP £4097. After a stewards tateriry tiw 
rasutts stands. 


£2209. 

PtaMpefeSM$. 


Ayr 


.. ... w. ai 

RAN: 20 Commander Robert (4tn). 4 ran. 
3L 1WL 151. H Cecri at NewmartaL Tote: 
£2.00. OR £220. CSF: £3-90 


! MO EVIL 


EVB. (T WHams. 
Morris. 201 L 3. 


5.15iim) 1, 

201 1 i Hot Ltatog ffi 

Meow (A ShoteteVn ALSO RANi.3 lay 
Nawadder. 4 Roi de Sofafl. 11-2 
Target B Fassa, 12 Dun Low, 

tasvMfifw 

41 aTCMrSw at VftyM. Tote B 
£3.10. £7.70; £190. m C179M. > 
£318.44. Trieast £2485.77. 


GOrng: good to soft 

2.15 (Bn 1. Owner Groan (Pat Eddery. 
15-21: z Sky Cat (15-2): i Ban Ledi (3-1 
lev). 1 VH. V-L 9 ran. J Berry. Tote: £1330; 
£240. £1.10, £290. DF: £25.10. CSF: 
£52/44. After stewards Hiqufcy result 
stands- 

245 (61) 1. mtft PM Eddery. 5-4 tayfc 

LVfiUSQSUft 

£290. CSF: £892- 

3.15 (1 m Sf) 1 , Weaeex (Kim Tinkler. 1 0 



£190. £190. OF: £1990. CSP. £57.66. 
After a stewards «qiriry the resuB stands. 


348 flirt 1 . Attch irtroe (ftet Eddery. 4- 
1k 2 Idck The Habit |fO>1|ELVfM 

£390. DF: £1170. CSF: £3592. 

4,15 (7f) 1. Authentic {Kvn Tinkler, 5-2t 
z Kfarara ^4 tevk 3. Bteck Mans BaytB- 
1L nk, 41 Bran. N Tmwer. Tote £3.70; 
£1.10, £1.40. £190. DF: £290. CSF: 
£891. 

4.45 (70 1. Rossatt (J Quinn. 101k 2 
Quiafiiairess (I1-2k 3. Thirteenth Friday 
(BrVjStav). Sir WNnore 101 jl-larrt. 
ran. T Craw. Tote; E13A0. £23 
£190 l Dfi£3490. CSF: £5793. 
Pfacepoc£7-7a 

Devon 

Going: firm 

290 (2m If hdte) 1. Prince Mean (ft 
Guest 4-1); 2 Baytte (7-1k 3. Rusty 
Rupert P01J. Our fib (11-10 M- 4LJ0L 
12 ran. NR: Golden Medina. G Baidbm. 
TOte: £040. £280. £590. DF: BZSO. CSF: 
£2994. 

39 (2m 5f hdto) 1. AtnerickfC Brqwn.7- 
4 favjcz. Lucky Chedie (1 i-w 0 awtoy 


Crepeto (201). 121 . 71 12 ran. J Roberts. 
Tote: £390 £190. £190 £5.60 DF: 
£11.40 CSF; £11.40. 


»1)lS 

Spamh Goa (5-1). Dance Master (3-1 
fav). 31. 12L 11 ran. N Mtcnefl. Tote: 
£2020 E390 £390 £240. DF: £14890- 
CSF; 25397. Tncatt £1.48499. 


40 (2m If 
Scudamore. 2-1 


1. Eric* Wish (P 
2 Vlvre Pour Vhre 


£190 


(4-1): 2 QMe'5 waffle (501). 10L 3L 14 
ran. S Preece. To»: £3.00: Jn.lO, £190 
£890. DF: £5.70. CSF: £11.08. 

490 (2m II hde) 1. American GM (R 
Dunwoody, 7-1); Z Hawaiian Heir {u-k 
0 Memera Dream (9-2). Mona (5-2 

S BL 2VH. 10 ran. H O'Neia. Tote: £890 
0. £3.40. £290 DF: £31.10. 

£91.77. Trawt £463.12 

59 (3m Ifch) 1, Celtic Hamtet(RPowe. 
11-4 fav): 2 wrior Tom (5-1): 0 Learftw 
Artist (14-1). 3LflTl2 ran. NR: GttflaWay, 
Breac Baa P Cundefl. Tote: £3.60 £1.90. 
£200 £490. OF; £1010 CSF: £1690 
Tricash £15321. 

Ptacapct; £84.40. 


m The draw for Saturday's 
Dickins Invitation race at New- 
xnarkeL in which a team of 
leading lady amateur riders will 
take on top professional male 
jockeys, was made yesterday. 

The ten runners with riders are: 
Mr Jay-Zee (B. Thomson). 
Iktiyar (Brooke Sanders). War- 
plane (W. Carson), Duelling 
(Jennie Goulding). Valrach (T. 
Ives). Foot Patrol (Franca 
Vinadinik Xylophone (W R 
Swinbum), Hello Gypsy (Max- 
ine Juster). Pam Is ferts (Diana 
Jones), The Yomper (S. 
Glut ben). 

Blinkered first time 

YARMOUTH: 2.15 CMriratte 295 R»- 
wondar. OcfriiBoy. 4.45 Bon Accntti. 
BnOKTOM: 2JD 6«pnte RatiMtite. 290 







30 SPORT THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 

CRICKET: LANCASTRIAN RETURNS TO LEICESTERSHIRE’S RANKS AT AGE OF 49 AND TAKES FIVE YORKSHIRE WICKETS 


Higgs returns 
to teach 


the youngsters 
a lesson 


By Peter Ball 


LEICESTER: Leicestershire, 
with nine first innings wickets 
in hand, are 184 runs behind 
Yorkshire. 

Old craftsmen never lose 
their skills. Four years after his 
last appearance and six after 
he officially retired to become 
the county coach. Ken Higgs 
was pressed into service by a 
parlousty depleted Leicester- 
shire and made a romantic 
return. 

Bowling with all the experi- 
ence of his 49 years and the 
control and craft of his pomp 
on a wicket which offered 
some help, he took five wick- 
ets for 22. the fiftieth time he 
has done so in a career which 
began back in 1958, before any 
of yesterday's victims had 
been bom. For them surely it 
was an educative experience, 
if a painful one. 

Higgs's impact was in- 
stantaneous. In the 70 min- 
utes before he appeared, 
Yorkshire's young openers 
had looked in complete con- 
trol. Metcalfe, with all the 
confidence of centuries in 
each of the last three matches, 
was apparently set fair for a 
fourth in succession. After a 
couple of early edges, which 
did not help De Freitas as he 
conceded 41 in his first five 
overs, the more restrained 
Blakcy was almost equally 
assured. 

Higgs changed all that. The 
broad figure is a bit thicker 
now. the countryman's gait is 
even more heavy-footed over 
the six-paced run-up. but from 
the moment his third ball hit 
the scam and reared to find 
Blakev's edge flying between 
Whiuicase and first slip, 
might have been back bowling 
to Bill Lawry in his last Test in 
1968. a year before his first 
retirement 

The implications could be 
imagined as that chance went 
begging but Higgs did not 
have long to wait as he 
constantly hit the seam test- 
iugly. In his fifth over Met- 
calfe was trapped leg before. 
Two overs later Blakey inno- 


cently drove at a ball too short 
for the shot Potter took the 
catch at first slip and Butcher 
the credit at second for parry- 
ing the resultant thick edge. 

If Blakey had looked puz- 
zled. Robinson was com- 
pletely baffled by the 
examination, his downfall in 
the slips eminently predictable 
well before he became the 
third victim in a spell of three 
for one in 28 balls. 

Well satisfied, Higgs took 
his sweater but his lesson on 
the virtues of line and length 
had made its impression on 
his protege. De Freitas, who 
took over to accentuate 
Yorkshire's decline. 

Rain, which cost 30 overs 
between lunch and tea, and 
then Peter Hartley interrupted 
Leicester's progress and Higgs 
was recalled to finish things 
off. To the delight of all 
romantics he did so instantly. 
Hartley and Shaw succumbing 
leg before in his second over. 

Fittingly, the final wicket 
fell to De Freitas, who had 
been awarded his county cap 
in the lunch interval by 
Balderstone. a mere stripling 
of 45. the fifth in line for the 
captaincy behind the absent 
Gower. Willey, Briers and 
Clift. 


YORKSHIRE: First timings 

R J Blakey c Potter b Higgs 32 

A A Mwcalle Rm b Higgs 60 

S N Hartley c and b Ferris 23 

P E Room son c Potter b Higgs 2 

J □ Love c wmmease b De Freitas 8 

•fO L Baretow c Whrtucase 

bOe Freitas 15 

P Camck Ibw b De Freitas 25 

PJ Hartley Ibw b Higgs 30 

S J Dennis not out S 

C Shaw Ibw b Higgs . — 0 

S D Fletcher c Bauerstone b De Frertas 2 

Extras (1b 6. nb 8) 14 

Total (64.4 overs) 218 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-96.2-103.3-113.4- 
132. 5-136. 6-1 75, 7-187. 6413. 9-213, ID- 
216. 

BOWLING: De Freitas 224-3-94-4; Ferris 

21- 6-62-1; Taylor 10-2-32-0; Higgs 11-4- 

22- 5. 

LEICESTERSHIRE: First tarings 

IP Butcher not out 11 

‘J C Balderstone b Dennis 14 

R A Cobb not out — 3 

Extras (B) 4] — 4 

Total (1 wta. 11 overs) 32 

J J Whitaker. TJ Boon. L Potter, P A J De 


Freitas.tPWhitticase.KHiggs.LBTayior 
and G J F Ferns to bat 


and G J F Ferns to bat 

Bonus points: Leicester 4. Yorkshire 2. 

Urn pres: R Jtdan and A A Jones. 


Warwickshire and 
the wind pick up 


WESTON-SCPER- MA R E: 
Warwickshire, with eight first 
innings wickets in hand, nave 
scored 202 runs. 

It was a wet and windy 
morning at Weston-super-Mare. 
In the afternoon, probably as the 
tide came in — at least that is 
what we are always told — the 
clouds lifted, and wc had some 
intermittent sunshine, with 
enough blue skies to make 
trousers for. say. the crew of a 
con cue. 

Play began at a quarter past 
two. with 65 overs available. 
Warwickshire won the toss and 
hailed on a placid pitch. Old 
Wcsionians said the pitch would 
play up later on. but that is the 
sort of thing Old W'cstonians do 
say. and the square has served 
us well so far this festival. 
Botham was unwell and unable 
to play, a disappointment to a 
crowd which grew quite large in 
the afternoon. 

At tea. with 34 overs bowled, 
the 100 was up. Smith and 
Moles eaeh on the brink of 50, 
which both achieved soon after- 
wards. The bowling was steady, 
the fielding tidy, and the hatting 
sound, but somehow it had not 
added up to a very exhilarating 
afternoon. 

After lea. Warwickshire began 
to brisken the rate. The 150 
came up in the 44th over. 
Ciaraer was brought on again, 
and a load of helmets brought 


By Alan Gibson 

f.-I R E: out from the ancient shed which 
p hi first is the nearest Western can get to 
d. have a pavilion. The immediate effect 
was that the batsmen became, 
windy once again, indistinguishable, 
x-Mare. though Smith was pulling ahead 
ly as the on the scoreboard. 

'that is The clouds stayed high, but 
eS — the the wind was getting up and 
id some swishing ominously through the 
with trees which surround Clarence 
i make Park. Somerset kept their spirits 
ew of a up by some optimistic appeal- 
ing. At 161. Moles pulled a ball 
ter past from Coombs onto his wicket, 
■ailablc. which pleased the young man. 
oss and who was bom in Barnet but 
:h. Old learned most of his cricket at 
h would King's College, Taunton, and St 
it is the Luke's College. Exeter. This 
liansdo either encouraged Gamer or 
i served discouraged Smith, who was 


caught at the wicket in j the 
following over. Amiss and*Mc- 


following over. Amiss and Mc- 
Millan were now together, and 
saw to it that Warwickshire had 
had the better of the day. 
WARWICKSHIRE: First timings 

A Moles 0 Coombs 68 

P A Smtti c Gant b Gamer 87 

B M McftAOan not out - 22 

O L Amiss not out ii 

E»tias lb 2. to 6. w 1. no 7) .J6 

Total (2 Hikts. 69 overs) 202 

|G W Humpage. Asrf Dm, K Kerr. D A 
Thorne. G J Parsons. T A Munton and *N 
Git fore to oat. 

FALL OF WICKETS 1-161.2-166 
SOMERSET; B C Rose. "P M Roebuck. I V 
A Richards. R J Harden. N A Felton. J G 
Wyatt. V j Matte. tT Gard. M R Davis. J 
Gamer and R V J Coombs. 

Bonus points- Warwickshire 2. 

Umoires M J Kitcneri and J H Hampstwe. 


Lilley and Fletcher 
give Essex backbone 


CHELMSFORD Essex have 
w»iv/.W’ runs far tight wickets. 


the scoring rate slowed and the 
50 did not arrive until the 19th 


A fifth wicket partnership of over. But Pnchard stepped up 


Ib7 between Alan Lilley and 
Keith Fletcher steered Essex to 
382 for eight from exactly 100 
overs against Middlesex at 

Chelmsford yesterday. Their 
siand lasted 39 overs before 
Lilley was bowled by Wayne 
Daniel just 13 shori of his 
second firsi class century. 

Lilley struck two sixes and 
nine fours, while Fletcher went 
on to make ui. containing It 
boundaries, before he was 
stumped oft" Jamie Sykes, the 

Middlesex off-spinner. 

Earlier. John Stephenson, the 
opening batsman, aged 21. hit 
54 in an innings spanning three 
hours and Border 45 as Essex 
made good use of africndly 
pitch. Prichard, however, was 
one batsman who failed to 
quash Middlesex's delight at 
scoring their long-awaited first 
victory of the season the pre- 
vious day. He made only 1$. but 
nevertheless completed 1.000 
runs for the season for the first 
time in his career. 

Middlesex had begun well 
when Cowans broke up a 
promising opening partnership 
after Essex had won the toss. 
The fast bowler struck in the 
10th over when Hardic. forced 
on to the back foot, pul up a 
simple catch to Radley, the 
acting skipper in place of 
Gatling, in the gully with the 
total 34. Hardic's 21 included 
three boundaries, twice finding 
the cover fence against Daniel 
and pulling Cowans to square 
leg. 

Stephenson needed five overs 
before opening his account and 


the tempo by taking seven in 
and over from Sykes, but was 
trapped Ibw with the total on 62. 
Border quickly announced his 
arrival with four boundaries, all 
against Hughes, while Stephen- 
son took two fours in an over 
from Sykes. 

Border was the first to go 
caught by Butcher at mid-wicket 
after striking nine fours in 45. 
Lilley and Fletcher then took 

Essex into a commanding 

position. 

• Sluan Turner, the Essex all- 
rounder. announced that he will 
retire from first class cricket at 
the end of the season. Turner, 
aged 45. made his debut for 
Essex in 1965 and played in 361 
championship games, scoring 
4.411 runs and taking 821 
wickets. “My years with Essex 
have been the happiest of my 
life and I look back with pride at 
my own contribution to the 
success of this great dub." he 
said yesterday, "but time 
marches on for all of us." 

ESSEX: First tamngs 

Bfl Hanfee c Radley b Cowans 21 

J P Stephenson c Brown b Sykes 54 

P J Pnchard Ibw b Hughes IB 

A R Border c Butcher d Sykes „45 

A W Ldey b Darnel 87 

*K w R Fletcher st Downton b Sykes . 91 
N D Bums b Sykes — 29 


N A Foster 0 Hughes 3 

J K Lever not out .3 

JH Childs not out .3 

Extras (ba.Bfl.nbil) .26 

Total (6 wkts. 100 overe) 382 
DLAcfieMBbat 

FALL OF WICKETS- 1-34. 2-62. 3-141, 4- 
1 56. 5- 6-367. 7-376. 6-378. 

MIDDLESEX: WN Slack. A JTMJer.KR 
Brown. R 0 Butcher. *C J Radley. fP R 
Downton. J D Carr. J F Sykes. S P 
Hughes. W W Daniel and N G Cowans. 
Bonus points; Essex 4. Mxxsesex 3. 
Umpires: D Uoyd and R A vvtwe. 



Cowley’s 
best is 
too good 
for Kent 


Signing on: Higgs gives a young fan his autograph after a superb spell of bowling 


Northants 


running 
the show 


Limited progress 
by the leaders 


■ 14 By Peter Marson 


Despite having to shoulder 
arms because of rain in mid- 
afternoon. Northamptonshire's 
batsmen still managed to main- 
tain the momentum as 
Glamorgan's bowlers suffered 
another battering at Northamp- 
ton. There was a century apiece 
for Geoff Cook (120) and Boyd- 
Moss (114 not out), and 
Larkins, who had prepared the 
ground, made 86 as Northants 
came in at the end of a highly 
satisfactory day at 372 for two. 

Choosing to bat first. Larkins 
and Cook had prospered in a 


confident beginning against the 
bowline of Hickey and Barwick. 


bowling of Hickey and Barwick. 
Larkins, though, who by now 
had slipped easily into a higher 


gear, escaped after offering a 
chance to Morris at mid-off off 


Hickey's bowling when he had 
made 32. The England batsman 
went on to make a half century 
in 80 minutes off 84 balls, a first 
for him in the championship 
this season. 

With Cook content to allow 
Larkins a free rein, these two 
pushed on to put on a hundred 
for the first wicket, another first 
for Northamptonshire this sea- 
son. The luncheon interval 
helped take the wicket Glamor- 
gan badly needed. Larkins fall- 
ing to the first ball after the 
break. Roberts's catch down the 
leg side off Hickey, was his first 
in the championship. 

At the Oval, in what might be 
described as a half-hearted re- 
hearsal for their meeting here 
next week — in the semi-final of 
the NatWest Trophy — Lan- 
cashire won the toss and chose 
to bat against Smrey. Sylvester 


CHELTENHAM: Gloucester- 
shire have scored 150 for two 
against Nottinghamshire. 

The excitement, engendered 
by Gloucestershire's victory 
over Hampshire on Tuesday 
could not be matched yesterday. 
The weather saw to that. Rain 
lopped 45 overs off the day's 
play, the winds buffeted the 
tents throughout and it was 
thoroughly cold. The champion- 
ship leaders made some prog- 
ress. but it was limited. 

It was. in short, not the sort of 
day you want when others have 
games in hand — even if your 
lead is 54 points. The downpour 
began before lunch, turning into 
what, in the West, they call : 
mizzling rain. 

Graveney left himself ont to * 
enable Gloucestershire to field a 
medium-pacer. TwizelL as sup- 
port for Walsh and Lawrence. It. 
is his Championship debut. The 
days of spinners such as 
Mortimore and Allen plying 
their trade on the first day of the 
festival are gone. 

Gloucestershire were put in 
and got away to an unconvinc- 
ing start on a slow, greenish 
pitch, the occasional delivery 
jumping off a length. Roraaines 
was dropped in the slips off 
Fraser-Darling before the stop- 
page. which lasted 155 minutes. 


By Ivo Tennant 

ucester- It was all tame stuff after the 
for two excitement of the previous day. 

When they resumed. Ro- 
mdered maines and Tomlins took their 
victory partnership to 54 before the 
fuesday former swished at Cooper out- 
sierday. side off-stump and was taken 
it, Rain behind. Scon moving some way 
e day's .-to his right. Tomlins went 
led the sedately on his way until he 
it was flicked Saxelby into square leg's 
mpion- hands. He had batted 171 
e prog- minutes for 27. 

The best cricket of the day 
i sort of came when Stovold joined 
ts have Bainbridge in the gloaming, 
if your Both punished the loose ball 
wnpour severely. Bainbridge taking 
ing into three foursoffone Rice over and 
ey call : scoring eight in all in his half- 


century, and Stovold hooking 
powerfully. It was something for 
sizeable crowd to cheer. 


le crowd to cheer. 


GUOUCESTBUHRe Ffcrt timings 
PW Romanes c Scott b Cooper — 32 

K P Tomfins c Newell b Saxelby 27 

•P BaciDridge notout : — 58 

A W Stovofa not out 22 

Extraa(tt>7,w1,nb3) ...- 11 

Total (2 wkts. 65 overa) 150 


A w Stovold not out 22 

Extras(lb7,w1,nb3) ...- 11 

Total (2 wkts. 65 overa) 150 

KMdmn.JWUoyds, MWAfleyne.tR 
C RusseU.C A WaMvDV Lawrence and P 
H TwizaH did not baL 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-54, 299. 
NOTTINGHAMSHIRE: R T Robinson. B C 
Broad. *C E B Rice. M Newell. P Johnson. 
J □ Birch. tC W Scott R A Pick. C Fraser- 
Darting. K E Cooper end K Saxatoy. 
Bonus pants: Gloucestershire 1, Notts 0 l 
U mpires: C Cook and R Palmer. 


Ban fought 
by Hughes 


Appeal at 
The Oval 


Clarke may have thought that to 
be a challenge, for Fowler and 


be a challenge, for Fowler and 
Mcndis came in for some of the 
short-pitched stuff in a hostile 
opening spell. 

Clarke was firmly rebuffed. 


but this softening-up process 
might have helped Thomas to a 


might have helped Thomas to a 
wicket at the other end where, 
with 10 runs on the board 
Mcndis fell to a catch at second 
slip by Lynch. Rain and bad 
light had helped slow 
Lancashire's progress, so that 
ihe> had made too few runs by 
the close. 

Having received Sussex's in- 
vitation to bau Barnett re- 
sponded by making 39 of 
Derbyshire's first 50 runs for the 
first wicket before he fell to a 
catch off Jones, and at the same 
score. Maher played on to 
Rec\c. Hill then batted purpose- 
fully in partnership with Morris. 
Roberts and Miller, and he had 
made SI out of 182 for four 
when rain, followed by bad 
light, ushered the players in for 
tea and an early close to the 
day's play. 


Perth (AFP) — The former 
Australian captain. Kim 
Hughes, said here yesterday 
that he had been told he .would 
end op at the bottom of Sydney 
harbour in cement boots if he 
leaked information mi a tour of 
Sooth Africa by rebel Australian 
cricketers. 

Hughes was gmng evidence in 
coart where he is challenging the 
legality' of a ban imposed on the 
players who defied the Austra- 
lian Cricket Board to go to Sooth 
Africa. The Western Australian 
cricket association hare pre- 
vented him from playing first- 
grade cricket here. However, he 
is not contesting a three-year 
ban on Test cricket. 

He claimed the remark was 
made by a fellow cricketer, 
Graeme Wood, a former Austra- 
lian player and now captain of 
Western Australia, when they 
were in Sharjah, in the Middle 
East, with an Australian side 
early last year when the pro- 
posed tour had not been 
announced. 

The court was told chat 
Hughes was later contacted by 
the South African cricket union 
bnt he declined at first to join the 
tour. 


Ann Barrington was at The 
Oval yesterday to help the 
appeal for a cricket school to be 
erected at the Vauxhaull End in 
memory of her husband. Ken, 
the England and Surrey 
batsman. 

The fund is now approach ig 
the £1 .25 million target and test 
drilling has begun for the build- 
ing. 

Ian Scou-Browne. the' Surrey 
secretary, said: “We hope to 
have the school completed in 
1^88 


Second XI championship 


BRISTOL | Imperial Ground): Somerset II v 
Gtamoman IL No play - ram. 

BMSTtSJ Hampshire H 164 for 8 0 R 
Savage 77 na exit l R Payne tour lor 53) v 
Gloucestershire H. 


DERBY: Derbyshire n 200 tar 8 
Leicestershire H. 

ENFIELD: Surrey II 86 (P KasfnvaJ g tor 
23k Middlesex 11221 tar 5 (A R Harwood 
51) 

HARROGATE Yorkshire D v Kant II. No 
play -ram. 

WORCESTER: Worcestershire H 129 tar 1 
(J P WngtH 65 not our. R K Smith 51) v 
Warwickshire IL 

Minor Counties 

FENNERS: Hertfordshxe 185 for g dec 
(Dean 62. Ottley 54) and 14 lor 0: 
Cambndgshoe 171 tar 9 dec (Gamham 
54. Snath 4 for 33), 

BOURNEMOUTH: Shropshire 81 lor 2 dec 
and 33 tor no wfc£ Dorset 81 tor 1 dec. 


LEADING FIRST-CLASS AVERAGES 


Batting 

Qualification 8 ms. average 44.00 

I NO Runs 


Bowfing 

QueUffcatfon: 15 wkts, average 23.00 

O M 


A l Kancharran 
G A Hick 
J J Whcaker 
PM Roebuck 
AM Ferreira 
MWGattmg 
A j Lamb 
RJBadey 
CGGreoudge 
R J Hadlee 
A R Boraer 
CEBRks 
BMM cMdan 

IV K fi Benjamin 
G Boycott 

m Newell 
J E Moms 
G Cook 
J D Birch 
MWABeyne 
TS Curls 

V J Marks 

N H Fartirotfw 
GSle Roux 
R A Harper 


MD Marshall 
RJ Hadlee 
C AWateh 
ST Clarke. 
TM Alderman 
A H Gray 
Imran Khan 
MAHddng 
DE Malcolm 
KTMedlyooa 
JHChBds 
J EEmburey 


O M Runt W 

458.4 117 1084 70 


- 338.3 92 746 49 15.25 

603.1 157 1514 95 15.93 

mi 52 449 28 16.03 

448 ICS 1360 81 16.79 

297.3 54 850 48 17.70 

2382 55 669 34 1928 

279.1 80 761 39 19.51 

131 29 372 19 1957 

210.1 51 631 '31 2035 

3584 116 839 41 20.46 

264.4 95 472 23 2052 


PA J De Freitas 4883 88 1409 68 20.72 


M Jean- Jacques 
DRPnngla 
N Gifford 

J Gamer 
GCSmal 
PW Jans 
PBCfafi 
N G Cowley 
K 6 Cooper 
WW Darnel 
MPBtcknel 


96 10 338 16 21.15 

357 101 891 42 2131 

389 127 902 42 21.47 


4645 104 1340 81 21.96 


4284 82 1332 00 22 Xt 

413.3 120 1002 45 2Z2B 

230.5 48 609 27 2255 

293.1 79 M 31 2254‘ 

350.1 40 1249 55 2270 

165 36 503 22 2286 


■ denotes not out 

FASTEST HUNDRED: I V A Richards. 102 
Somerset v Glamorgan, at Taunton, May 8 


New Zealand batting 


STATISTICS: Whfcetkeapen; R J Park* £4 (60c*. W.SJ 
Rhodes 48(41 ,7}:D E E&846 (38 lOK H C Ruesea46(43,% P R 
Downton 37 (34. 0Y. G W Htxnpage 36 (30. 8p S A Marsh 34 04. 
m; C J Richards 33 (30, 3) FMdonew M A Lynch 25ct: K M Cur- 
ran 23: C E B Rice 22: R A Harper 21: G A Hck 19: C S Cowdrey 
18. XJ Barnett 17. 


rain. 

HAWSHRE: First Innings 

C G Greenidge b Baptiste 26 

T C Middleton b Baptiste 23 

D R Tumor c Marsh b Baptiste — __ 12 

R A Smsti b Underwood 39 

*M C J Nicholas b Cowdrey 4 

K D James b Cowctiey ........ 0 

M D Marshall c Marsh b Cowdrey 0 

N G Cowley not out 78 

T M Tremlatt b Cowdrey 20 

+0 J Parks tow b Cowdrey 13 

C A Connor c Cowdrey bBBson 0 

Extras (*>5. wS, nbS) 19 

Total (91 overs) 234 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-48 2-78 3-78 4- 
84.5-84.6-84,7-141,6-211.9-23810-234 
BOWLING; (ggtesden. 5-020-0: Ellison. 
23-5-58-1; Cowdrey. 29-8-69-5. Baptiste. 
255-708 Underwood. 85-9-1; Taylor. 1- 
034) 


KENT) M R Benson, S G Hinks. C J 
Tavare. N R "Taylor. 0 G AsletL *C S 

Cowdrey. R M EBson. E A E Baptiste. tS 

A Marsh. D L Underwood and A 
Iggtesden. 

Bonus points: Kent 4. Hampshire 2 
Umpires: J A Jameson and p R Shepherd. 


OTHER 

SCOREBOARDS 
Northants v Glams 


NORTHANTS: Kret lontngs 

G Cook c Hortons b Barwick 12C 

w Lariats c Roberts b Hickey 8C 

R J Boyd-Mrus not oul m 

A J Lamb not out — 32 

Extras (b 8 lb 7. nb 11) 20 

Total (2 wkts] 372 

Score St 100 overa: 347 far 8 
R J Bailey: D J Capet R A Harper. ts N V 
Waterloo: N G B Cook; N A MaBenden A 
Walker did not baL 
FALL OF WICKETS; 1-151. 2-281. 
GLAMORGAN: -H Morris, d b Paufine. G C 
Holmes. M P Maynard. R G Ontario, j 
Derrick. P 0 North. fM L Roberts, M R 
Berwick. D J Hickey. 

Bonus points: Northants 4. Gtemofgan O. 
Umpires: A J T Whitehead and B 
Uadbeater. 


Surrey v Lancashire 

AT THE OVAL 


LANCASHIRE First Innings 

G Fowier c Richards b Fettham 

G D Monde c Lynch b Thomas 


J Abrahams e Lynch b Clarke 

N H Fafetrother b Fetmam 0 

SJCSiaughnessynnout - 43 

MSmmorac Stewart bFetttam 23 

MWatiarsoncMedtyanbOaike _ 29 

PJ WAHott b Clarice 5 

l Fofley not out 13 

tJStanwonhnotout , 9 

Extras (lb 4, rib 10) 14 

Total (8 wkts. 80 overs) 188 

BP Patterson to baL 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-18 2-37. 3-38 *- 
82. 5-1 18 6*140. 7-158 9*165. 

SURREY: A R Butcher, M A Lynch, A J 
Swwm. T £ jesty. 1C J RKharda. D J 
Thomas, G Monkhouse, K T Motycott. M 
A Fettham. S T OBfke and -P ( Pocock. 
Bonus points: Lancashire 1, Sunny 8 
Umpires: J H Hants and BJ Meyer. 


MD Crowe 

JGBracewei 
E J Gray 
BAEdgar 
J V Coney 
iDSSnxih 
K R Rutherford 
J J Crowe 
J G Wright 
TEBfam 
T J Frank bn 
D A Swung 
W Watson 


1 

NO 

Runs 


Avgs 

10 

4 

596 

106 

99.33 

5 

3 

183 

iixr 

91 50 

9 

4 

280 

83 

56-00 

15 

4 

580 

no- 

52-72 

11 

2 

462 

93 

51-33 

S 

2 

147 

48 

36.75 

14 

3 

291 

91* 

3554 

12 

2 

354 

75 

35.40 

11 

0 

386 

96 

35.09 

5 

2 

87 

34 

29.00 

7 

0 

171 

96 

24j42 

4 

1 

57 

20 

1950 

4 

2 

22 

10 

11.00 


BEST BOWLING: C A Walsh. 9 tar 72 tar Gloucestershire V 
Somerset at Bristol, Juiy2i. 


New Zealand bowling 


ALSO BATTED: R J HaOtad 19; B Barrett 8 3*. 

Or. 

* denotes not out 


SVEJChatfieta 



O 

M 

Runs 

W 

Avge 

EJGray 

341 2 

118 

- 806 

34 

23.70 

J V Coney 

46 

13 

125 

5 

2550 

JGBrawsfSI 

2965 

99 

685 

2/ 

ffl.37 

EJChaifleta 

78.4 

19 

156 

6 

26.00 

O A Stirling 

167 

25 

662 

20 

33.10 

W Watson 

2272 

47 

659 

19 

34.68 

8 Barren 

127.5 

17 

452 

13 

3476 

M o Crowe 

46 

8 

167 

2 

8350 


Sussex y Derbyshire 

AT EASTBOURNE 

DERBYSHIRE: First IraUngs 
B J M Maher b Reave ■ - ■ ■ — ■ 8 

"KJ Barnett cPrgottb Jews 39 

A Hi notout si 

J E Moms hie Roux — 31 

B Roberts c and bRew — 9 

GMiiernotout — — 34 

Extras (0) 4, w 8 r>b 1) : tl 

Total (4 wkts. 74 ovare) 183 


tC Maples. R Sharma. A C Warner, R J 
Finney and D E Mafcohn to bet 
FALL OF MDCKET& 1-50. 2-50. 348 4* 
120 . 

Sussex: R l AHdtan. A M Green. P W G 
Parker. C u wefc. 0 X Standing. N J 
Lenham, *fl J Gould. G S la Roux. D A 
Reme. A N Jones. ACS Psggott 
Bonus points: Sussex 1. Derbyshire ~1. 
Umpires; B Owflesm and P B wight. 


ALSO BOWLED: R J Hadlee 845-14-158-7; K R Rutherford 3-0- 
84). 


SHOW JUMPING 

Kilcoltrim and 
Apollo home 
and dry in rain 





By Richard Streeton 

CANTERBURY: Hampshire 
has scored 224 against Kent. 

Nigd Cowley, returning to the 
side for the injured Christopher 
Smith, held an uneven Hamp- 
shire baiting performance to- 
gether with 78 not out yesterday, 
at No. 8, his best score of the 
season. Baptiste took three early 
wickets before Hampshire 
plunged deep into trouble when 
Cowdrey took three wickets 
without cost in 10 balls. 

Cowley, however, defied a 
depleted Kent attack, for just 
over three hours. Hampshire's 
struggles were surprising for a 
side standing third in the 
championship table, still bold- 
ing title aspirations. Cowdrey 
was forced to bowl more than he 
might have done because of 
ii\juries and finished with five 
for 69. A perfect -summer's day 
changed to wet and gloom late 
on and Kent were unable to start 
their innings in the closing hour. 

Apart from the countless cats, 
Canterbury Week is one of those 
reassuring occasions which has 
changed little over the years and 
has retained a special at- 
mosphere of its own. Lord 
Harris himself would have rec- 
ognized most of the marquees, 
including those of the Band of 
Brothers, the High Sheriff and 
the Queen's and Queen’s Own 
Buffs, even if he might have 
blinked at one hosted by the 
Campaign for Real Ale. 

It had passed five o'clock 
before a scorching sun lost its 
strength and slowly dis- 
appeared. The cricket was al- 
ways absorbing, with the 
Hampshire innings resembling a 
roller-coaster in its ups and 
downs. 

Nicholas must have been 
pleased to win the toss, initially, 
and thought the pitch tended to 
yield a low bounce. Hampshire's 
progress for a while was trouble- 
free. Greenidge looked in good 
order and Middleton, replacing , 
the out-of-form Terry, who was 
dropped, seemed well organized 
and calm. 

Baptiste changed the pattern 
with a spell which brought him 
three for 16 in eight overa. This 
was Baptiste’s first champion- 
ship match since May 2. He 
arrived late after Alderman 
withdrew at the eleventh hour 
with a shoulder injury and could 
not bowl until noon. Baptiste, 
though, then soon yorked 
Greenidge and Middleton and 
in between had Turner caught 
by Marsh as be dived to his left. 

Cowdrey's devastating spell 
began with the first over after 
lunch when, truth be told, there 
. were plenty in the crowd still 
packing the luncheon hampers 
away in the boot One gathers 
Nicholas pushed half forward 
and missed a ball that left him: 
and that the left handed James 
was beaten by a breakback. 

These wickets fell, to the 
second and sixth balls of the 
over. Ellison bowled a maiden 
to Robin Smith before Cowdrey 
had Marshal] caught behind as 
the batsman chased a ball 
outside the ofFstump. 

Cowley looked imperturbable 
from the start. He and Smith 
added a careful 57 in 18 overs 
before Smith played on to the 
second ball Underwood bowled 
as the batsman made room. 
Tremlett excelled himself as he 
helped to add 70 in 25 overe for 
the eighth wicket Cowdrey 
eventually bowled Tremlett af- 
ter a 1 0-minute stoppage for 


From Jenny MacArthur, Dublin 

Nick Skelton, riding ^ ™ h* 


Apollo -^who^sUkes the soft ^ La^y'ljlcl.'and Joe fiaigik on 
S tkM.ona a. Ufc ^L^unahin, Uurd a« 




dilions in the mam arena ai un. ™ 

Dublin horse show here yes- fourth. The txrst live norsts were 
terday to tie jsqu^ fta ^Sriiish had a to* sW 


j'S 1 .*™* An Kilcoltrim in ing. Michael Whitaker, on Next 


sin« u!2 TOrid 'SamSonS ffi'himM njSbr fc'S'or 
last month where Skelton won the fences as for the going 
K team silver medal and the because h.s ^. Coumryran, 
individual bronze. Bui the w suft WD mf^PcnfHCed- 


dSEEavB* " n0 In the next clas. theshcu- 

- ' ^ lUArt Pnui.T and SeeecL the wet 


Power, and Speed dm 

the New York one a year ago - conditions proved ideal the 


B ! ETsSSiT Californian riden Hap HansetL 
terday suggested, that could who« v Gertnan-bred 


Krjsra “-sr*. 

However, the relentless rain had gome . They fin'^d ^0-Qlsec 


nOWCver, un: rercuucw j r \L r»_ . — 

produced atrocious conditions ahead of the west Unman 
and the course builder wisely ndcr. Klaus ReinaAer, with tas- 


ana me wune uuuub _ - - - , r — 

Lent the wall four inches lower roan marc, Desiree.. John 
than the record Dublin height, Whitaker kept Great Bnimn m 
... ^ the hunt finishing third qntNexi 


which was sei in 1984. 


wmen wa» xi w 1 -ro-r. — . -** - - r 

With part of the main arena Hopscotch, only a fraction be- 
lying under three inches of water hind the leaders, 
yesterday morning, the show got Anyone looking for a heavy- 


yesunuav uiuiuuik. un. wu- *>»-* ---j- — . w - „ — j 

off to a delayed start because the weigh! hunter who can gallop m 
water had to be suctioned out. deep going had ample opponu- 


waier ifcdu iu « auvuuiiwu — - - — ■ — t- o , ■ * — - — 

The I rish riders then showed the mty to study the field yestenlay... 

- .. . : T ,u. D .k-n nlivpr mnHp nru* nr ih> 


U1C mail mini ut»ijiivnv« "--j — -v--- v * . :■* 

way in the deep going. In the Robert Oliver made one of the 
opening jump-off class. The shrewdest purchases of the day 
Wylie Trophy, Con Power. Ed- when he bought Ned Cash's 


wyiic iiuuiiy, v-uu - 7 . — ~ - 

die Macken and John four-year-old Overture, by Car- 
Ledingbam all had clear rounds, nival NighL 


Power, the eventual winner on RESULTS - sm pusimok Equal 1. 
King Kong, said that the going Raffles t^»to(NSk««on)^KiicoBnniu 
was wet but not sticky: “You •"*£!)■ 4 

can gallop straight through lL ^e^^GamliriniB (H Hansen, US) On 
By doing just that on King Kong -jtTlflsec; Z DesJrte (K Ranadnr. w 


can gallop straight through it. ^wnMnis (H Hansen, US) on 

By doing just that on King Kong 2Tl8sec: Z Desk&e (K Hanactar, w 
— who is by Imperious out of a Germany). 0. 26. 18 3. NeXT Hopscotch (j 

.... . . - . l. ItlhiMkarl ft MUl 


14.2 hands high 
relegated Macken to second 
place on the stallion Carrol l*s 
Flight.. 


mare - he 
to second 


Land, US). 8 3856. 


BOXING 


GOLF 


Murphy to 
turn pro 


Busy time 
for Henry 


By Srikiraiar Sen 
Boxing Correspondent 


Sean Murphy* a bantam- 
weight from St Albans, is the 
first of five English gold medal 
.winners at the Edinburgh 
Commonwealth Games to turn 
professional. He signed yes- 
terday with Frank Warren, the 
London promoter, and will 
make his professional debut in 
the autumn. 


Murphy, aged 21, the ABA 
champion this year and last 
year, looked impressive in his 
contests at Edinburgh, particu- 


larly so stopping Rory Nash, of 
Northern Ireland, in the third 


Northern Ireland, in the third 
round of their bout in the final. 


Warren was not there 10 see 
Murphy lake the gold medal but 
he said yesterday: “Sean is a 
decent little fighter and we have 
high hopes for him." Warren’s 
matchmaker, Ernie Fossey, said: 
“We have had our eyes on him 
for the last two years. He is a 
good fighter, strong and moves 
welL He will be the next British 
bantamweight champion. It will 
not take him too long to climb 
up the ratings.” 


The England boys' team, led 
by Wayne Henry, challenge for 
an eighth successive win over 
Scotland in the home inter- 
national tournament, starting at 
Seaton Carew. Durham, today. 
In the traditional curtain-raiser 
to next week's British boys' 
championship, Scottish hopes 
should be lifted, however, be- 
cause their most recent victory 
was at Seaton, in 1978. 

Henry, aged 16, from 
Hertfordshire, last week reached 
the quarter-finals of the English 
amateur championship, and is a 
strong favounte to take the 
boys’ title after finishing runner- 
up 12 months ago. First, how- 
ever, he has to concentrate on 
the home internationals. 

Ireland meet Wales, with the 


winners playing the winners of 
the England-Scotland game 10 - 


the England-Scotland game to- 
morrow. With the match be- 
tween Britain and the Continent 
being played on Saturday. 
Henry is facing a testing time, 
and may have to play 36 holes 
for each of the next three days. 
Then, after 24 hours of rest, he 
faces seven matches in four days 
in the boys' championship just 
10 reach the 36-hole final. 


FOR THE RECORD 


ATHLETICS 


FRHHJES: Bvfflca Z So u t ham pton J ft .‘V— 
Boctam 0. Evortoii 2. 


STOCKHOLM: tagwnatiaml meeting: wom- 
en: 5jmhMimK I Kristiansen (Nur) 14mh 
37a3sec(wortd record). 


TENNIS 



MONTREAL: Mayer's Challenge women's 
tournament Rrsl raumt H KefeafCan) PTC 
Momero (Braz M. 8-4; B togeben (US) 
W K Hcrvmh (US) 7-ft 6-1; R Fantiank (SA) W 




CYCLING 


K SaiKb (US) S-4.4-& 6-0: M Mental (le) MC 

Sure (Fr) 6-1, 3-6, 7-S G Rush (US) tt A 
Motion (US) 6a. M; A Temasvari (Him 

Han* a . 68 C M J 

FpnnarnUSl 6-3. 6-Z: T Holbitay (US) tx G 
Kg)^U 6-3:MF^ wrSores 

Second I round: K Jordan (US) M J 
Heatiwrtraton |Can) 6-1. 68 E PtoH (WGtfX 
CBassenjCanj3H6.6-l.6-l.PSI 



C BassenjCanjM. 6-1. 6-1. P5hrtwr(US)« 
E Inoue (Japanj 6-0. 6-8 H Sutawtidj « P 
Purada W 7-6. 6-4. G Sabawx (Arm tit P 
RBfrtdci [USj 38 6-8 7-8 Z OamsonltfS) K 
R Marstttova (Czj 6-1. 64. fl Raw (H) W 6 




c s? rtta Mbi'i Open an a m pl nn - 
Mtip: Here singtaK IMta nwncfc P McNamara 


FOOTBALL 


ICAGUE: Mco Z Toulon 2: Nantes 
i. LBe 0; Runnes 1. RC Pans ft Sotaaauxi. 

Ehertnea Im Havre' 
i J2f5 T Nanc 7 t- Au*»re l; Pans SG I, 
Laval ft Laos 1. Toulouse i; Ustsbom a 
Monaco i. •* ars ® , “ a. 


• Graeme Hick, of- Worcester- 
shire. the Zimbabwe-born bats- 
man who wants to play for 
England, is the Britannic Assur- 
ance young player of the month 
for July. He will receive a 
cheque for. £250 after amassing 
914 runs in the month, includ- 
ing two double-centuries and 
two other hundreds. Gloucester- 
shire. who won four out of fiv* 
championship matches in July, 
are the team of the month, ano 
Will collect £750. ' 

• Younts Ahmed, the Glamor 
gan and former Pakistan Test 
batsman, is raking a short break 
from the county circuit after the 
death of his father at a London 
hospital. 


YACHTING RESULTS AT COWES 




(C 0 Khnpfon): 8 Parade 

Sfrigysai 

ffeagorc I. Dragonfly (J 


•S PI 


BBg tBrfaaaE 

E2»BEgff«ss 


Ffsamantle). 

Buctare^Z. 

ButieVBwh 

rt-rarafciQ 


Btodiburid (M HSA: 3 . Ea»a 

Greer Bean'(J % 

S’aawj'SKraSI 



raas&'-ssj 


Gros): 3. ChanteNe 
7: 1. CvfliMHa 

R«»un(KK«nrt; 






31 


coltrim 


£ jr * * 8 L 


THE TIMES THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 



’s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


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6.00 CoafaxAM. 

650 Breakfast Time with Frank 
Bough and Sue Cook.' 
Weatoar at £55,7.26, 

7.55, 625 and 655; 
regional news, weather 
and traffic at 657, 7-27, 

- 757 and 687; national and. 
international news at 7-00, 

, 750, 600, 630 and 600; 

- sport at 750 and 620; and 


r. 


ss 


newspapers at 637. 1 
. Dr Richard Smith’s 
’phone-in medrcal advioe 
* and Save BtackneTs 
Summertime SpedaL 
620 DudteyDo-fltght Cartoon 
- series, set in the 1920s, 

" about a reluctant Mountte 

£25 Record Breakers 



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** — • • 

iHTHE RECORD 


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TtKKJS 


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Kennedy and Julian 

Farina (r) 

650 NewmnHKid SpedW 
Defivery, presented by 
John Craven, and 
Maturing Bernard 
Hesketh, a television news 
; cameraman who is retting 
„ alter 30 years behind the 
cameras. 

655 TheAdventuresof 

BuQwinkte and Rocky. 

Part seven, (ri 10.00 Why 

Don’t You-7 Have fun 
(frawing cartoons aid 
scuba diving in a 
‘ swimming pool 1025 The 
Adventures of BuOwtekle 
and Rooky. Part eight (r) 
1630 Play SchooL 
1050 Cricket Second Test 
Peter West introduces the 

* first morning’s play tn the 
game at Trent Bridge 
between Erupand and New 
Zealand. 

L05 News After Noon with ' . 
Richard WMtmore, 
includes news head fines 
with subtitles 120 
. Regional news weather. 

. 1.25 Utte Misses and the 

Mister Men. Little Miss 
Neat narrated by Pauline 
„ Collins and John AMerton; 
Mister Chatterbox 
. narrated by Arthur Lowe.. 

150 Sfcket Second Teat 
Further coverage of the 
first day'sptaym the game 
between Bigland ana New 
Zealand, (continues on 
BBC 2)627 Regional 

• news. 

430 The Roman HoKdays. 

Cartoon series set in 25AD 
Rome 450 Hekti. Serial 
about a young orphan girt 
(rl 610 Fame. More 
■ dramas concerning the 

students and stafrof a 
New York performing arts 
schooLfr) 

600 News with Mohoias 

WltaheH and Phfflp Hayton. 
Weather. 

635 London Phis. 

7410 Too of the Pops 

introduced by Mike Smith. 
730 EaatEndara.AHandSue 
receive a surprise cafi 
from the police: Arthur . 
receives a nasty shock; 
and Hannah and Tony 
decide to do something 
positive about Cassia's 
schooling. (Ceefax) 

600 Bodymatters.Drs Graeme 
Garden. Alan Maryon 
. Davis, and Gfflian Rice, 
with the help of opera 


box. (Ceetax) 

630 Sharon and EWe. Sharon 
moves in with Else when 
she has to move out of her 

house because of 
subsidence, (ri 

600 Nows with Julia Somervffle 
and Andrew Harvey. 
Regional news and 
weather. 

.930 The Thom Birds. Part two 
of the drama serial based 
on the novel by Colleen 
__ McCullough and Mary 

Carson, during her 75th 
birthday celebrations, 
makes her confession and 
fateful vow to Ralph; 
young Meggie is me belle 
of the party but is upset by 
7 Ralph’s seemingly 

disinterested attitude 
towards her. (r) (Ceefax) 
114)5 In the Waks of HMS 
Sheffield. An Horizon 
documentary examining 
why the latest technology 
fafledto savethe 
destruction of HMS - 
Sheffield after it was hit by 
an Exocet missfle during 
i the FaBdands conflict (r) 

1135 Weather. 


615 Good 


Britain 
_ Monts 
and AnnekaRIca. News 
with Gordon Honewcombe 
at«30, 74W.7368JJ0, 
630 and £06 sport at 
6 AQ and 7 j« 0 ; exerdees at 


: at 736 
645 Waeaday presented by 


(TV. LONDON 


125 Thames news headlines 
foVowed by WPrid Chess 
Championship. A repeat 
of last night’s report on the 
Kasparov/Karpov battle at 
London's Park LaneHoteL 
140 Lost IQngdoats. The 
Sultanate of Brunei - 
Borneo 1610 Jaqpe and 
mwiMM wamors. 
Cartoon series. 

1630 Island WUBta. The flora 
and fauna of the Irish 
hedgerows, (r) 1130 
Cou r ageous Cat. Cartoon. 

1130 AhootBritafn. Robbia 
vfadts 

.avBtegethat 
was once a thriving 
Victorian spa resort, and 
discovers that plans are . 
being made to attract the 
tourists back. 

12410 Tates From Fat Tufipte 
Garden. The Seven 
Washing Machines, (r) 
12.10 Puddto Lane, (r) 
1230 The StriBvans. 

14XL News at One with Carol 
Barnes 120 Thames 


130 Riptide. The three 

detectives find themselves 
In the middle of a bathe 
between gun runners and 
the Mob 235 Home 
Cookery Club. Sakai 
Monte Cristo.(r) 230 
Three Uttte Words. Game 
show p re se nted by Ray 
Alan. 

3410 Take the Hfch Road. 
Drama serial set on a 
Scottish highland estate 
335 Thames news 
headlines 330 Sons and 
Daughters. 

4410 Tates From WTripl 
Garden. A repeat oftha 
pr ogramme shown at 
noon 410 The Moond ns . 
Cartoon series. (r)420 
Nature TraB. Tony 
Vtiarburton reports on 
penguins, ponds, and 


445 Under tbs Same Sky: OM 
Potato. A play from . 
France, set in a small 
Rhone Valley vilage on 
the day of the summer fate 
615 Saver Spoons. 


American comedy sertes. 
645 News with John Suchet 
6410 Thames news. 

625 HalpISpecteLVtv Taylor 
Gee reports on the 
importance of chfld care 
fadfities; women's training 
opportunities: and why 
women should register as 
unemployed. . 

63S C ro s sr o a ds. ' 

74)0 Emmsvdate Farm. What Is 


astir at the Woolpack? 
730 Give ds a Clus. Lionel 
Blair and Una Stubbs are 

^F?s^ Carson, LcrnSne 
Chase, Liza Goddard, 

- - Susan Jameson and 
Kenny Lynch. 

600 MtoderWhatl 

01—1 Hut?. Arthur hr 
fr tess than pteaaed when he 

1 dtteeverai thtftheB5 £20 

notes he has been given 

are ail forgeries, (ri 
9410 Troubles and Strife. 
Comedy series about a 


630 Workout features 
examptesof how 
communities are fighting 
the spectra of 
unen^wmenL 

14)0 News at Tsn with AlastaJr 
Burnet mid Pamela 
Armstrong. Weather 
flowed ^Thtunes news 
headlnes. 

1030 HoteL A young lawyer 

faBsto^te^rippec^ 

1130 Bunting the Phoenix. The 
fourth programme in the 
series on London's Royal 
Cottage of Art. 

124)0 Lifestyles of the Rich and 
Famous. CybSl Shepherd. 

1235 raght Thoughts. 


mr* 



• Why suffer Bee that? After 
all, ft’s only a movie. The 
question dinned into my brain 

as I watched BURDEN OF 
DREAMS (Channel 4, 
11.05pm), Las Blank's 


and steamboat 
1135 pm . 


on earth -. You don't havB to 
take my word for it that the 
jungles of Peru were infernal 
regions. Herzog itimseH says: - 
“tflbeSevedrntheDevB, Jwoufd 
say the DevS Is right here". A 
land that God created in anger, 
he goes on; with a curse on It 
A curse, moreover, that 
proceeded to descend on al 
of t hem. There were fatal 
accidents; actors ted (H or left 
native Indians in the Am urtit fall 
to the arrows of rival tribes; 
and a supervising engineer 
wanwd of a 70 per cent 


CHOICE 


chance of catastrophe as the unit 
tried to haul a 300-ton 
steamboat out of the river and up 
and down a steep- sided hid 
that was a see of mud. 

Why, then, did Herzog persist 
with his spectacular display of 
masochism ? What makes an 
intelligent, creative man say: “I 
five my fife, or I end my life, 
with this protect "? The title of 
Les Blank's ttm provides a 
chie. “I would " says Herzog, 
“be a man without dreams iff 
putted out of it- " Fair enough. A 
man is ratified to hte dreams 
as well as his nightmares. 
Whether, in the course of 
achieving both objectives, he is 
entitled to risk the lives of 
others, is a matter tor debate; At 
the end of 95 of the most 


exhausting minutes l have ever 
spent watching a film being 
made, l was ten with the 
conviction that Herzog, in the 
grip of an o b session fat was 
lunatic, was merely 
determined to outdo the original 
Fltzcarraklo (an Irishman 
called Fitzgerald) who also 
hauled a river boat up and 
down a WR.^ The big difference is 
that the craft was a tenth tiie 
size of Herzog's. And it was 
dismantled on the way 141 and 
reassembled on the way down. 
• Other highli g hts today: 

Harold Lloyd's The Mfiky Way 
(Channel 4, 230pm): Bruson, 
Grttoerova and Shicoff in 
fbgotatto (Radio 3, 230pm), 
and Tchaikovsky's Manfred 
Symphony at the Proms 
(Radio 6 630pm). 

Peter Davalle 


i hgpo —to te. Jim 
and his team do 


BBC 2 


655 Open Untae re ity: Inner City 

. Story -The Developer. 

Ends at 736 600 Cilfw. 

230 JhnrM National Eisteddfod 
of Wales. Uve coverage of 
“ wemonyat 
Pavition, 
Fishguard, when the 
members of the Garsedd 
of Bards pay tribute to the 
winner of the major poetry 
prize. The commentator is 
AtamWBUams. 

* an rnafiT 

425 Cricket Second Test 
Coverage of the final 
session of the first day’s 
ttay in tiw match at Trent 
Bridge between England 
and New Zealand. 

610 

Pheipsi 

battle with a ruthless 
mercenary who rules Ws 
. part of e reia to ri ai Africa 
with a rod of iron, (r) 

7410 Fine Wotoot Saturday 
(1955) starring Victor 
Mature, Richard Egan, 
Stephen McNaHyTLee 
Marvin and Ernest 

1 . Drama, set in a 
mining town In 
Arizona, about three 
strangers who plan to rob 
the barticThs operation to 
metiatiousJy plotted but 
many i nnocent s are 
madvertentiy tovolved in 
its execution. Directed by 
Richard Fleischer. 

830 The 20tti Century 

R em embered- In the first 
of three programmes 
recorded in 1981, the late 
Lord Boothby talks to 
Andrew Boyte about his 
potties 


Edwardian era. (r) 
94)0 The Travel Show 


3rd tain 
Taormina, Sidy, and 
reports from a baking-hot 
beach, from a very cold 
river, and from a rumbfing 
Mount Etna; Matthew 
COBins is due to report on - 
thedefightsofBulgaria; 
there is news of the tricks 
young Italian thieves are 


holiday is with a 
smgte-parent and her son 
touring the Loch Ness • 
areal 

930 MoonBghOng. Maddie . 
infuriates David by buying 
yet another portrait of 
herself. But this pfebaa to 
by an artist who has been 

murdered and the 

* - ' — ■— ** — *-*- 

• purcoiwwacw Maoow 

and David totiwmurider . 
Side of the art world. 
1615 Making Waves. Reports 
from Cowes and from 

Yugoslavia where the 


trophy, the 


Cup. 


- Pfus, advice on flotilla 
hofidays, and action from 
the World OB T ' 
Chammonshtosatl 
Ptarrepont 
1645 Newsmglit includes a 
repeat from Charles 
Wheeler on the 25th 
anniversary of the buikflr 
• of the Berlin Wafl. 1130 


1135 Cricket: Second Test 

HlgMghts of the first day’s 
ptay inthe match at Trent 
Bridge between England 
and New Zealand. 

124)5 Often IMverMty: 

Weekend Outlook 12-10 
TTte Plough andthe Hoe 

at 1640 


230 Fame The NBky Way* 
starring HaroM 
Adolphe Menjou, 
Helen Mack. Comedy 
about a dopey nfflonan 
who becomes embroiled In 
a street brawl after which 
. he is halted as a future 
boxing champion and 
taken under the wing of a 
crooked manager. 

Directed by Leo McCarey. 

405 FObc The Garage* (1919) 

A sflent comedy starring 
Fatty Arbudde and Buster 
Keaton. Directed by 
Roscoe (Fatty) Arbuckle. 

430 Dancin’ Days. Jufia, 

instating that she loves her 
fiance Ubirajara reluctantly 
i to meet Carlos. 

». Yolanda is set 
on manying HeOo 
although she does not 
love him and he has 
intamts eisewhers. 

600 Film: Whet Price Glory? 

‘ 1 James 
f, Dan Dailey and 
1 GttvaL Comedy 
drama set in France during 
the First World War about 
a hard-bitten Urtited Stales 
Army captain and Ms 
sereeant who both fal for 
tiielocaMnnkaeper's 
daughter. A re-make of the 
1926 sientmowto which 
starred Victor McLajtten, 
Dolores Del Rio, and 
Edmund Lowe. Directed 
by John Ford. 

74)0 Channel Foot News wfth 
Trevor McDonald and 
AlastaJr Stewart 

730 Co mm en t Wfth a' view on 
a topical subject ta art 
gallery owner, Renske 
Mann. Weather. 

84)0 Equinox: Turbo - 

QueStying Boost The 
second or two 
programmes about the 
technotogy behind 
Formula One racing cars. 
Last week's programme 
examined the struggle to 
design a replacement for 
. the most successful radng 
engine- the Ford 
Cosworth DFV; tonight 
the engine Is surocxsed to 
be ready for the San 
Marino Grand Prix. 

94)0 The Greet Plant 
‘ Cofle c tfa ns . Roy 
Lancaster visits Ihe 

of tnvereweon 
I'S Wester Ross 
■ which, rithough on the 
' same latitudes as . 
Labrador and Leningrad, 
contain plants that thrive in 
South Africa and the 
Antipodes, (r) (Oracle) 

630 The Blessed Ones. A play 
byUia Isaksson, made on 
hta introduction to 
videotaping by inrpnr 
Bergman, it is the story of 
the marriage between 
Vh/eka, a mkWta-aged 
teacher, and Sune, a man 
who fafied as a theology 
student and has felt a 
fatiixe in everything else 
ever since. They meet 
when the man is on the 
verge of suidde but hta 
saved by his future wife. 
After seven years of 
marriage their love tor 
each other threatens to 
destroy them both. 
Starring Harriet 
Andersson and Per 
Myrbeig. In Swedish with 
English subtitles. 

114S Ffct Burden of Dream 
(1982). Directed by 
• Us Blank, (see Choice) 
Ends 011236 


( Radio 4 ) 

On long wave. VHF variations at 
end. 

535 Shipping. 600 News Briefing; 
WSathar. 610 Farming. 

625 Prayer (s) 

630 Today, ind 630, 730, 

830 News. 645 
Business News. 655, 735 
Weather. 7J», 600 
News. 73S, 835 Sport 7.45 
Thought for the Day 
643 Lake Wobegon Days. 

Part 4 (r). 837 Weather; 
Travel 
600 News 

605 Safe In our Hands? Cfive 
, Gookson exa m ines 

controversies surrounding 
toe financing of the 
National Health Service (r) 
630 The Natural History 
Programme. Mike 
Stoadart reports from toe 
Psychology of Perfumery 
conference. 

104)0 News; The Good Book. 

Brian Redhead’s 
exploration of the BB)ta (r) 
1630 Morning Story; No Time 


Debbie Cook. Head by 
Lesley Saweard. 

1645 An Act of Worship (s) 

114)0 News; Travel; A Mess of 
Secrets. James Naughtte 
marks the 75to Anniversary 
of the Official Secrets 

114S TtaeW verse. Aldan 
Carl Matthews (Sscusses 


124)0 News; You and Yours. 
Consumer Advice. 

1237 Trivia Test Match. 

General knowledge 
game. With Brian Johnston 
and captains Tim Rioe 
and W»e Ruahton (r) 1235 
Wbather 

14)0 The World at One: News 

140 The Archers. 135 

390 SL.' 9 Hour. 
Includes an interview 
with Sir Kenneth Newman. 
Commi s s io ner of toe 
Metropolitan Police. 

34)0 News; The Afternoon 
Ptay. Troubled by the 
Scenery, by Howard 
Wakefing. Cast includes 
Gwen Watford and Gudrun 
Uro. Drama, set on the 
Isle of Skye (s) 

44)0 News 

44)5 A Good Reed. A choice 
of paperbacks. With 
Pauli dosing, Derek 
Robinson and Brian 
Gear. 


435 Welsh Arts Week. Phi 
Rickman on Arthur 
Machen, widely realized 
as toe father of toe 

modem honor novaL 
600 PM. News magazine. 

530 Shipping. 535 
Weather. 

630 News; Financial Report 
630 BraJnof Britain 1866 
First seml-finaL London 
and South (r) 

730 The Archers 
730 1888. How provincial 
papers reflected the fives 
of toe people of Chester 100 
years ago. 

7.40 Iron Curtain Can. Play by 
BobSirrfteJd— The 
Cambridge Footfights Revue. 
Cast includes Richard 
Denning as Phffljy and David 
Goodareon as Mactaan. 

835 The Queen of the Sea. 

How the Queen Mary 
came to be built during the 
Depression. 

600 Does He Take Sugar? 

For disabled tistenecs 
and their famSes. 

630 The Archive Auction. 

Gerald Priestiand in toe 
BBC Sound Archives. 

645 Welsh Arts Week: 

Paradise Regained? 
Professor Gwyn A Wfifiams 
on why so many people 
8 TB teaming Welsh. 

1615 A Book at Bedtime: 

Under a Monsoon Cloud, 
by H R F Keating (9> Read 
by Sam Dastor. 1039 
Weather 

1630 The World Tonight 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1130 Hot Air . . . Balloonist 
Anthony Smith 
takeshBtorian Richard 
Keene over toe South 
Wales coalfield (ri 

1230 News; weather. 1233 

VHF 


} Wales on M as above 
except 536600am Weather; 
Travel. 935-1030 Priate 
Radio 4 (s) 135-230001 
Listening Comer (s) 530- 
535 PM (continued). 1130- 
1610am Open University: 
1130 Arts: Measure for 
Measure. 1130 Hie 
Racfccal 1790s. 

( Radio 3 ) 

On VHF only: - 

635 Open University. We war wito 
rude nature. Until 655am 
OniMdkBnwava:- 
655 Weather. 730 News 
. 74)5 Concert Estampie Real 


(anon), Telemann 

(Conceno _potonois in G). 
Giartoni (vota Concerto 
in A: Lefkowttz with ECO), 
Offenbach (Ktes-lui. 
from Grande Duchesse de 
Gerotetein:( von Stade. 
mezzo), Malcolm Arnold 
(Four Cornish Dances).. 
600 News 

84)5 Concert (contd): Rossini 
(Lagazxatadra 
overture), Mozart (Sonata in 
C, K 336 Horowitz, 


. _ (Grand 

Fantasia tnumfaf). 600 News 
605 This Week’s Composer: 
Brahms. Symphony No 
4. And swigs indudtrtg Four 
Daumer settings, and 
two Graft settings. Fischer- 
Dieskau (baritone) and 
Karl Engel (piano) 

1600 VtaHn and piano; Lydia 
Mordkoviteh and Roger 


NolL Ravel (Piece on 

forma dhabanara). 

Omusson (Poeme, Op 

25) 

10j 45 Test Match: First day of 

toe second Test. 

England v New Zealand. 
Continues on medium 
wave only until 530 
On VHF only: - 

1645 MartifitK Prague RSO 

ptay Frescoes of Piero 
detia Fr an ce sc a 
114)5 Six Continents: foreign 
radiobroadcasts, 
monitored by the BBC 
113S Baroque Rum Music: 
Edward Beckett plays 
works by Telemann and 
Bach (Sonata In A minor, 
BWV1073) 

12.00 Pied Piper: the late David 
Mwirow with more 
Schumann illustrations (r) 
1230 BBC PhAharmonic (under 
Downes), with Michael 
Roll (piano). Mozart (Plano 
Concerto no 22). 130 
News 

135 Concert (contd): 
Rachmaninov 
(Symphony No 2) 

235 Rebecca Clarita: Toby 
Appel (viola) and Peter 
Pertr^er(^no)pIaythe 

230 Rigoletto: Verdi's three- 
act operas, sung In 
Italian. Skiopoii conducts 
Chorus and Orchestra of 
Accademta Nazionate dl 
Santa Cedfia. Soloists 
indude Bruston (title role), 
Gruherova (G4da), Nefi 
Shicoff and Robert Lloyd. 
Acts two and three begin 
at 3^40. News at 435 
600 Mainly for Pleasure: with 
Andrew Keener 
On medium wave: 

630 Bandstand Lewisham 
Conceit Band (under 
Proctor)- Piston (interme z z o 
for symphonic band): 
Tunbridge Fair), Gordon 
Jacob (Five movements 
from Musk: fora Festival) 
74)0 Stefan Heynt An 
Ambiguous Witness. 
PhiipBrady, Reader In 
German, Btfkbeck 
College, London, talks to the 
German writer 


730 Proms 8&BSC 

Philharmonic Orche stra 
fonder Edward Downes). 
Shostakovich viofin 
concerto No 1. with soloist 
Srtkovetsky Dmitry. 


610 My Dear Muscovite: 
Robert Stephens (as 
Flaubert) and Stephen 
Moore (as Turgenev) ft 


selections from toetr 
correspondence 


630 Prams 86 (contd): 
Tchaikovsky (Manfred 
Symphony) 


635 Bernard Roberts: piano 
recital. Bach (Partita No 6 
in E minor. BWV 830), 
Dodgson (Sonata No 3), 
Brahms (Venations and 
Fugue on theme by 
Handel) 

11.10 Couples: Instrumental 
dialogues. 1137 News. 

1230 Closedown. 

C Radio 2 ) 

On medium wave. Stereo on 
VHF (See Radiol) 

44)0am Cofin Berry 630 Ray 
Moore 7.30 Derek Jameson 630 
Teddy Johnson 11 30 jimmy 
Young, ind food informalbon from 
Tony De Angeli 135pm David 
Jacobs 2.QSTGtena Hunniford 630 
David Hamilton 535 John Dunn 
7.00 David Allan. Country Club, 
featuring Johnny Rodriguez. At 
830 John Anderson. 9.u0 Ha It 
Boys! Ricky Skaggs finds out 
how country music has permeated 
other musical styles 1600 
Huddwteks starring Roy Hudd 
1630 Star Sound Cinema ind 
music from the golden years of 

MGM and a sneak premew ol 
toe Edinburgh Film Festival 1130 


Round Midnight 130am 
Nlghtnde 33&-430 
Music 


A Little Night 


( Radio 1 ) 

On medium wave. Stereo on 
VHF (see below) 

News on the half-hour from 

then at 1630 


7.00 Mike 

Smith's Breakfast Show 630 
Simon Bates 114)0 Radio 1 
Roadshow from Portcawl 1230pm 
Newsbeat (Frank Patridge) 

1235 Gary Davies 34)0 Steve 
Wright 520 Newsbeat (Frank 
Patridge) 645 Simon Mayo 730 
Janice Long 600 Radio Radio. 

(1) Alan Freeman 1600-1600 Andy 
Kershaw. VHF Stereo Radios 1 
& 2> 4.00am As Radio 2. 10.00pm 
As Radio 1 . izOQMkOOam As 
Radio 6 


WORLD SERVICE 


8.00 Nawsdaxk B.30 Nature Notebook 

6.40 Farming World 730 News 731 

Tiwnty-Fow Hours 730 New Warn on 

Shortwave 73S Network UK 830 News 

8.09 Reflections 8.15 Country Style 830 

John Peel 930 News 939 Review of 

Brnoh Press 9.15 World Today 930 

Financial News 9.40 Look Ahead MS A 

Ruler's Guide to Repression 1030 News 

131 Ray Moore oiks to.- 1130 News 

11.09 News About Britain 11.18 
Sportsworid 1130 Assignment 1230 
Radio Newsreel 12.15 Top Twenty 1235 
Sports Roundup 130 News 139 Twenty- 

Four Hours 130 Network UK 138 

Sportsworid 230 Oudaok 235 A Decada 

of Hits 3.00 Rato Newsreel 3.15 The 

Pleasure's Yows 430 News 439 Cora- 

msntsry 4.15 Assignment 535 Sports 

Rowdup 7AS Here's Humph! 830 News 

839 Twenty-Four Hours 830 Businesa 

Matters BM News 9.01 Book Choice 935 

In the Meantime 9.15 A Joey Good Show 

1030 News 1038 World Today 1035 A 

Letter From England 1030 Finandai 

News 1040 Reflections 1045 Sports 

Roundui 1130 News 11.09 Commentary 

1 -LlSMercham Navy Programme 1130 

Nature Notebook 1140 Farming World 

1230 News 1239 News About Britain 

12.15 Rato Newsreel 1230 Musk Now 

130 News 1.01 Outlook 130 A land of 

Song 145 Book Choice ISO in the 

Meantime 230 News 239 Review of 

British Press 2.15 Every Day AHoty Day 

230 Aspects of Liszt 330 News 33ft 

News About Britain 315 Worid Today 445 

Reflections 430 Frandal News 530 

News 539 Twenty-Four Hours 545 World 

Today. AHtmaefnGMT. 


BRC1 WALES 430pm-535 

1 Rune 535430 Wales Today 


S35-7 30 Gardening Together 1135- 1 
1230 New s end weat h e r SCOTLAND 
^^^fe30 Reporting Scotland 


NORTHStN BRELAND 430pm-430 Hekti 
430^JB Fflme 535540 Today's __ 
Sport 54»«30 kisida Ulster 836-730 
The Roman Ho«deys 1135-1230 
News and weather BiGLAND 8 3E pw 
730 Regional News Magazines 

GRANADA 

Reports 130 Rhodes of Africa 1130 

Qrenada Reports TI35 About BrtWn 

1 130-1230 Connectiani 1230p» 

130 Country Practice 330430 were 
Way 5.15445 Srevfwri 545 News 
830 Grenada RKortsS3043STNa la 
Your Right 83O-930 Moon Orest 

1030-1130 Mke Hremner 1230 Near 

Squadronairas 1235am Closedown 

As London 

035 Human 

Face of the Ptcifle 1130-1 130 Con- 

nections 130pm News 130-230 The 
Baron 5.15-545 Biockbustars 630 
Today South Was! 835 Falcon Crest 730 
That’s My Boy 830-430 Murder. 
SheWrote1fl32apitfing6maw1130- 
1130Saaln‘ThekBoodi236See- 
son of Blues 1230 Postscript, 

OoedowH 

YORKSHIRE 

and the Wheeled Wv^rsfl30Ca5- 
torr»a Highways 10.15 CJlanroa 1045 Unl- 
com Tales 1135-1130 Friends of my 
Friends 1230pm-l00 Lunchtime Uw 
130 RecoBections 230-230 Parlour 
Game 5.15-545 Survival 630-535 Calen- 
dar 730-830 That’S My Boy 1230 
Teles from tite Dartakh 1230m 
Cloeedown 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


1U0 Jack Htoom 1055 Cartoon 


News 130 Home Cbomytl 

Riptide 230-430 County GP 5.15-545 

Connections 830 Channel Report 

61S«25Canoon 1030 Your Music 
1130 Bunting the Phoenix 1130 
That's Hoeywood 1230 Untouchables 
130m Closedown 

GRAMPIAN 

Thing 930 Once Upon a 

Time . . . Man S^SSonne Street 1030 

Short Story 1i.15-11.te WortcTs Chi- 

ton 13apm News 130-230 Man ine 
Subcase 5.15-545 Star Choice 630- 

6X North TotoW 730-730 TfWs My 

Boy 830-930 Falcon Crest 1030- 
1130 Swvival 1230 News. CkMedown 
TVS As London except 938am 
JJS sesame Street?030 Jack Hol- 
bom 1035 Cartoon TL00-113Q Cap- 

tain Scarlet 130pm News 130 
Emptoymsnt Action Line 135-230 
Riptide 330-430 Country GP 5.1 5-545 
Comectlons 53P435 Coast to 
Coast mao Your Music 1130 Bunting 
the Phoenfac 1130 There Hollywood 

1230 Untouchables 130m Company, 

Closedown 

Sir Stans: LOOpbiDsndn' Days 
130 Alee 230 Guto Goch a 

Mahren 2.15 Interval 230 Bsteddtod 

345 Fim: Mysterious Mr Moto 535 

Stiwron y Byd 530 Wds' Kale 830 

Brookskto 530 Wine Programme 730 
Newyddion Sate 730 Hwylyr Wyl 
845 Bstoddfod 1615 R&n: Swiss Mak- 
ers 12.15m Closadown 


SCOTTISH 

wood SpecW 1025 Adventures of 

S UL25 Caban 1035 Glenroe 1130- 
Captain Scarlet 130pm News 
130-230Sarecrowand Mrs King 330 
Me and Uy Girl 330-430 Prizewin- 

ners 61S-430 Prizewinners S.1S-54S 

Partour Games 530-5 3 5 News and 
Scotland Today 730 Take the Htah Rood 
730 Life Attar Maradcmna 830-930 

Hooray for Hotyrood 1030 Crime Desk 

1035Spittinglmaga1136Wanted — 
Dead or Aflve 1135 Bunting ttx* Phoenix 
1235m Lata Cal, Ctosedown 

Sesame Street 1030 Groovie 
GhouMes 11.15-1 120 Cartoon 120pm Si- 
mon and Sknon 330430 Canto 
Camera &15-S45 Sipercarf 830 Stan- ■ 
mar Edtton &20 Pbtce Sbc 830-835 


830-830 FaEon Crest 1030 About 
Britain -■ The uiner Way 1130-1130 Ar- 
cade 1230 News. Closedown 

mjttssass^ 

Street 1035 Feax tiieCat 1040 Mike 

1135-1130 &rwe Wonder 130pre News 
130-235 Country Practice 61S545 
DifTrart Strokes B30-63S News 830- 
930 Falcon Crest 1030-1130 
Smeney 1230 Mem's Best Friends 
1230am Ctosedown 

HTV WALES SS. 


1035 Sesame Street 83tom^» 

•WNes at SM' 1030-1130 Sweenev 


CENTRAL 

650 RobOitory 10.15 Moon Ainpar 

1035 Survival of the Fittest 1130-1130 
Caltomle Wghways 1230pm-130 
Conmct 130 News 130330 The Baron 

5.15-545 Give Us aCtue 600 Cross- 

roads 535-730 News 730430 Me end 
My Gfci 1035 V 1230m CkMedown 

t 

1030 Cartoon 1030 Cartoon 1035 

Gtoreoe 1130-1130 Once Upon a 

Time . . . Man 130-230 Hotel 5.15- 

545 Diff rent Strokes 630-635 About 

Angtia 730-730 Anything Goes 830- 

9.00 Krvght Rider idao Wheels 11.15 
Bunting the Phoarax 1145 Tales 
Irom the Darkside 12.15m Teflaig the 
Tale. Closedown 

BORDER A* London except 

935am Sesame Street 
1035 Fefl* the Cat 1035 Faebafl XL5 
1130-1130 Once Upon a Tune . . . Mat 
130pm News 130-230 The Baron 
330 Bygones 330-430 Horses for 
Courses 5.15-545 W«r9 Way 530- 
835 Lookaround 830-930 Sanon and Si- 
mon 1030-1130 Mike Hammer 
1230 ctosedown 

930 Sesame Street 1035 New 
Sqimdronajros 1045-1 130 Little House 
on the Prana I3tem News 135 
Lookaround 130 The Baron 233330 
Look Who's TaMna 615545 Par- 
kxrGame6.00-S35 Northern LHa B30- 

930 Murder, She Wrote 1032-1 130 

Mapp and Lucia 1230 The Eyes Have tt; 

■CkMedown 


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THURSDAY AUGUST 7 1986 


SPORT 



The shadow of Hadlee 
hangs over England 


By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


England sum the second 
Test match against New Zea- 
land at Trent Bridge today and 
their Fifth Test of the summer, 
under the sponsorship of 
Comhili, with no more settled 
a side than they had for the 
first. It is little wonder, there- 
fore. that the selectors must be 
as anxious as the players for a 
genuinely good performance 
as a prelude to going to 
Australia this winter. 

When Thomas and Small 

take the new ball together, 
assuming they do. they will be 
the sixteenth different pair to 
do so since Willis retired from 
Test cricket in 1984. More 
than that, only three times 
before in this century has the 
England attack been opened 
by a pair of bowlers playing in 
their first home Test match. 

When last it happaied, in 
1964. Rumsey and Price were 
the two and Australia made 
656 for eight declared. Jim 
Smith and Wellard were more 
successful at Old TrafFord in 
1937. New Zealand being 
beaten, and when Gilligan and 
Tate made their debuts in 
England together. at 
Edgbaston in 1924, they 
bowled South .Africa out for 
30. 

To be fair to the selectors, 
today's instance is the result of 
an injury to Dilley. So often 
these days does someone have 
to pull out of a Test match 
after being chosen that I really 
do wonder whether the mod- 
ern cricketer is as durable as 


his predecessors. I can under- 
stand, when there is so much 
very fast and dangerous short 
bowling, that broken bones 
should be two a penny, in spite 
of all the protective gear that 
batsmen wear. “It frightens 
me just to stand at the other 
end," said a first-class umpire 
recently 

But I begin to wonder 
whether bowlers suffer these 
days from bruised heels and 


drawal for the second time 
this season — it is his ankle 
this time - gives Thomas the 
chance to show how he is 
bowling. He and Small will 
make an interesting compari- 
son, as well as a new partner- 
ship. and if the pitch is half as 
good as for last year’s Test 
match against Australia their 
sLamina will be tested. 
England's faster bowling then, 
while Australia were making 


Today's teams at Trent Bridge 


Stirling. 

Umpires: D J Constant and KE Palmer 


sore shins and strained shoul- 
ders and stress fractures be- 
cause of the time they spend 
doing their gymnastics. If they 
broke themselves in by bowl- 
ing. and so using the muscles 
that matter to them as 
bowlers, might they be har- 
dier? i doubt whether Alec 
Bedser would have stood up to 
sending down all the overs he 
did had he been made to 
prepare himself as though for 
a PT display rather than a 
cricket match. On the other 
hand the current West In- 
dians, who are put through all 
kinds of contortions by their 
physiotherapist are fitter than 
they ever were. It is very 
puzzling. 

Anyway, Dilley's withf 


539, consisted of Botham, 
Sideboitom and Allott, 
Botham becoming sufficiently 
frustrated by the problems of 
getting anyone out to throw 
one of his tantrums. 

The Trent Bridge 
groundsman, Ron Allsopp, 
probably gets nearer than 
most to the type of pilch he 
aims for, and these differ 
according to the sort of match 
it is. Having thought that last 
year's pitch was rather too 
good, and that the drawn Test 
on it (1191 runs for 22 
wickets) was “the worst match 
we have staged in many 
years", he may produce some- 
thing not quite as easy today. 

It is certainly not green 


though, and it should be fun of 
runs as soon as the weather 
improves. 

But the shadow of Richard 
Hadlee again hangs over En- 
gland. He knows every blade 
of grass on the Trent Bridge 
square. Since joining Not- 
tinghamshire in 1978 his 
record there in first-class 
matches is remarkable. He has 
taken just under 300 wickets 
at just over 13 apiece at the 
rate of one every six overs. If a 
majority of them have come 
on pitches fairly unlike this 
one, he will soil feel very 
much at home. He looked in a 
class of his own at Lord's, as 
he is likely to here, whatever 
the pitch. Unfortunately for 
New Zealand Chatfield is 
thought not to be quite fit 
enough to take his place as 
Hadlee's partner. 

England have won three of 
the four Test matches they 
have played against New Zea- 
land at Trent Bridge and 
drawn the other. On the last 
two occasions their spinners 
have had a lot of work to do. 
In 1983 Nick Cook's figures 
(and where is he now?) were 
82-36-150-9; in 1978 
Edmonds's were 48.5-20-65-6. 

I hope England play both 
Edmonds and Emburey today, 
though it would be more like 
them to leave one or the other 
out The selectors’ statement 
last Sunday that Willey will 
definitely play has left them, 
in fact, with a tricky last- 
minute choice. 


ROWING 


GOLF 


ARA against move 
to exclude S Africa 


By Jim Rail ton 


Another course to 
suit Norman style 


The three delegates of the 
Amateur Rowing Association 
(ARA) at the International 
Rowing Federation's (FISA) 
annual congress in Notting- 
ham a week on Snnday will 
oppose a motion by the Soviet 
Union to exclude Sonth Africa 
from FISA. 

The ARA delegates’ vote 
was determined after an infor- 
mal council meeting in London 
on Monday and the decision 
was unanimous. The Soviet 
Union's motion, which is to- 
wards the end of the FISA 
agenda, was, I understand, 
discussed fully, frankly and 
openly. It reflects a feeling 
among rowers that politics in 
the sport has no effect on 
world matters and should be 
kept in cold storage. 

The ARA's delegates are 
Neil Thomas (president), Ivan 
Pratt (treasurer) and John 
Vests (chairman of the ARA 
executive). The ARA. having 
held the world championships 
already in Nottingham in 
1975, are now ordinary' mem- 
bers of FISA and as such have 
three important votes. In mak- 
ing their decision the ARA 
councillors appear most deter- 
mined to keep politics oat of 
rowing and recognize the 
International Rowing Federa- 


tion as being successful in 
keeping an apolitical stand in 
the sport reflected by the 
absence of national flags and 
anthems at the world 
championships. 

The last time the Soviet 
Union moved to exclude Sooth 
Africa from FISA was in 
Monte Carlo in 1977; the 
motion was defeated. 

Sooth Africa, despite having 
crews of international stan- 
dard, does not enter the world 
championships. There ap- 
pears to be a gentlemen's 
agreement on this course of 
action. If Sonth Africa did, in 
the prevailing political df- 
mate. it is clear that FISA 
would free a walk-out by most 
Eastern Bloc countries as well 
as others. 

Yet the Sonth Africans did 
not make many friends in this 
country last year when their 
national eight competed as the 
British affiliated dab, 
Cantabrigian, in Henley Royal 
Regatta and won the Thames 
Challenge Cop. Henley, how- 
ever, has its own rules and is 
not governed by FISA, al- 
though having a healthy re- 
spect for the organization. The 
president of FISA, Thomi 
Keller, is, in fact, a Henley i 
steward. j 


PLATINUM 

-A UNIQUE INVESTMENT 


Toledo, Ohio (Reuter) — 
Greg Norman, winner of the 
Open over the testing con- 
tours ofTumbeny last month, 
believes the course for the 
United Slates PGA champion- 
ship. starting today, presents 
another demanding challenge 
that will suit bis style: 

“This course sets up per- 
fectly for me." die long-hitting 
Australian said of the 6.982- 
yard Inverness Club course, 
which has many difficult par- 
fours and requires both ac- 
curacy and patience. Norman, 
who played here in the 1979 
US Open, said: **I really love 
the course. It takes a cool 
player — someone who keeps 
his head out there." 

Tom Kite, fresh from a 
victory in the Western Open, 
also complimented the course. 
“The only way you can make a 
golf course difficult for today's 
professional is to have small, 
fast, undulating greens — and 
that's just what Inverness has. 
These greens are so small and 

More gol£,page 30 

fast, you don't need narrow 
fairways," Kile said, compar- ' 
ing the relatively friendly fair- 
ways of Inverness to the 
narrow landing areas which 
characterized this year's Open 
and the US Open. 

Ray Floyd, who emerged 
from a nine-man free-for-all to 
win the US Open in June, 
agreed with Kite about the 
Inverness layout, which was 
designed by Donald Ross, one 
of the most respected course' 
architects. 

Floyd, winner of two PGA 
championships, said Inver- 
ness was especially challeng- 
ing because long rough had 


been allowed to grow around 
its tiny greens. 

“With this calibre of golf 
course 1 don't see a new name 
popping up (as winner)" 
Floyd said. He has won 20 
tournaments in his 20-year - 
career. He predicted the win- 
ner would be “a good player 
who is playing well at this 
time". One such player is Bob 
Tway, who has already won 
three tournaments and is the 
second leading money- winner 
on the PGA tour behind 
Norman. He also did well in 
the Masters and US Open. 

Tway said: “If you hit the 
greens, you'll have some 
chances for birdies because 
the greens are small" If that 
assessment is accurate, there is 
one player who stands out as a 
likely winner — Calvin Peete, 
who lops the PGA tour in two 
vital statistics, driving ac- 
curacy and greens hit in 
regulation. 

Peete, the winner of two 
tournaments this year, is fifth 
on the tour's scoring-average 
list and sixth on the money 
list. He also did well in the two 
other majors he played, tying 
for tenth in the Masters and 
24th in the US Open. 

The overseas challengers 
will be led by Bernhard 
Langer, of West Germany, 
who tied for third place in the 
Open. Seve Ballesteros, of 
Spain, who has been playing 
extremely well in Europe, and 
Tommy Natayrma, of Japan, 
who has performed well in the 
three previous major tour- 
naments. Then, of course 
there is Jack Nicldaus. Since 
his stunning victory in the 
Masters, no one is counting 
him out of anything. 


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Mudi of the platinum produced is m 

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Shapcott scrambles on 
and leads the parade 


By John Henaessy 


Sx — 


Please send me fuD informal ion on Johnum Mauhvy pUinum bare 


Johnson Abtihiy (ItaiinumAbrkeuq: l^ivMon) **0 

Hvepoti London !-Cl 11 II .fl Telephone 01 -43IKKI1I (liMotoiwi 35b) 
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For all her modesty and self- 
e {face menu Susan Shapcott, 
aged 16. of Bristol continues 
to dominate the English 
women's stroke-play 
championship, sponsored by 
National Westminster Bank, 
at Broadstone. 

In wretched conditions ofi 
first, fierce wind, then driving 
rain for most of yesterday, 
utterly at variance with the 
sunshine of the day before, she 
bad a second round of 75, two 
over the nominal par, for a 
total of 148. 

This placed her four shots 
ahead of Sandra Catford (nee 
Halieit) a Kent county player 
who also had a laudable 75 
yesterday, and five ahead of 
AHyson Saunders (78 yes- 
terday). on vacation from 
Lamar University in Texas. 
Wearing spectacles and lack- 
ing the services of a caddie. 
Miss Shapcott was severely 
handicapped when the rains 
came at the eighth hole. Since 
she had started uncertainly 
with three fives, one over par, 
when she might have expected 
to be one under, one had fears 
for her. but she showed great 
resource for one so young. 

She reached the turn in 38, 
still one over, having traded a 
four at the short six with a 
birdie three on the previous 
hole, where she drove the 255- 
yard green but thereafter, she 
departed only once from par. 

Another short hole, the 
llih, frustrated her with a 


bunker, but on either side of 
that disappointment she 
scrambled like a trooper to 
save par. She knew no more 
alarms, and might have hoped 
for something better than par 
figures at the 13th, 16th and 
17 th. 

Mrs Catford. so recently 
married that she appeared in 
tire programme under her 
maiden name, did indeed 
secure birdie fours at the 16th 
and 17th to share with Susan 
Shapcott (the younger of two 
sisters in the field) the best 
score of the day. At both boles 
she chipped to 15 feet and 
holed the pulls characteris- 
tically for she is an aggressive 
putter and the saturated 
greens well suited her. Her 
husband. Chris, like herself is 
a member of the Kent county 
team, having been reinstated 
as an amateur after two 
frustrating years as a 
professional 

Miss Saunders had an 
extraordinary round, out in 
43, with two shots dropped at 
both the first and fourth and 
home in 34, with a sparkling 
eagle at the 16th. 

LEADING SCORES: 14S: S 

Shapcott. 73. 75. 152: S Catford, 77, 
75. 153: A Saunders, 75, 78- 155: J 
Walter. 74. 81: S Mooreraft 75. 78; 
A Shapcott 75, 80; M-J Cornefius 
77. 78. 157: L Hackney. 80. 77: L 
Newton. 77. 50: N Way. 80, 77. 15& 
L Fletcher, 78, 80; l Chesterton. 75, 
83; P SmaSa, 77, 81. 159: D. 
Christison, BO. 79; S Lowe, 50. 79. 
Seniors cham pi on ship: (over 36 
hates): 161: C Satey, 79, 82. 

f 










. . 






■e England expects: Gladstone Small looks ahead to his first Test with captain Getting yesterday 

2 YACHTING 

l Turmoil and drama take 
j gilt off Howison win 


The fifth day of Cowes 
Week, sponsored by Sand- 
hurst was filled with drama as 
one yacht was dismasted and 
an injured crewman on an- 
other entry having to be 
airlifted to hospital after being 
knocked out by the boom 
during a crash gybe. 

The day began well enough 
with the class one entries 
competing for the Camrose 
Memorial Trophy providing a 
spectacular sight for onlookers 
lined along Cowes esplanade. 
The vessels set offin sunshine 
with Prince Philip's chartered 
Yeoman XXVI making most 
of the Force 3 southerly breeze 
on the initial reach across the 
harbour entrance. 

The spectacle soon turned 
to turmoil however as the 
fieel still bunched together, 
closed on the first gybe mark. 
First, hydraulics tensioning 
the rigging on Chris Dunning's 
Marionette failed. Boxed in by 
other boats her crew, who had 
been alone in setting a spinna- 
ker on this first leg, were 
forced to gybe round with the 
others, and as they did so the 
unsupported mast crashed 
over (he side. 

Moments later, the second 


No danger 
of boycott 

Pakistan, the world and 
Olympic hockey champions, 
yesterday confirmed their 
participation in the World 
Cup tournament starting in 
London on October 4 (Sydney 
Friskin writes). Akram 
Shaheedi, the Press attach^ of 
the Pakistan High Commis- 
sion. said that the Govern- 
ment of Pakistan at Islamabad 
bad not even discussed the 
question of a boycott. 

The Pakistan hockey squad 
are in training, having recently 
concluded a tour of Europe. 
They will defend their title at 
the Asian Games tournament 
in Seoul, the final of which is 
to be played on September 29; 
then they wfll fly to London 
for their first World Cup 
match against Argentina on - 
October 4 . 

The World Cup organizers 
announced yesterday that 
Seiko had been appointed the 
official timers and had be- 
come the third .big sponsors. 
Seiko will present a watch to 
the best player of the tour- 
nament and of the final itself 


By Barry Pickthall 

drama of the day occurred at 
the .next marie, during a dis- 
pute over right of way between 
Tim Herring's Backlash and 
Blazer. As the two boats closed 
on the mark. Backlash's boom 
swept perilously close to 
Blazer. Peter Nelson, the 
helmsman, swung hard to 
avoid a collision but in doing 

Results, page 30 

so put Blazer into a crash gybe 
and he was caught by the 
boom as it swept across. The 
Press boat steered by David 
Lemonius, coxon of the Yar- 
mouth lifeboat, took the in- 
jured crewman aboard and he 
was later transferred by heli- 
copter to Royal Naval Hos- 
pital Hazlar. where he was 
being treated last night for 
shock. 

Basil Rizzfs Trilogy II 
eventually took line honours 
just ahead of Promotion, the 
Dutch entry, whose crew 
failed to get the gun they 
deserved after mistakenly 
passing the wrong side of the 
finish buoy. 

Ernest Juer's Fair Lady, 
winner of Tuesday's Bri tannia 


Cup, was provisionally placed 
thind last night, but faces 
disqualification along with 
Pacer following complaints 
from the Southampton har- ; 
bour master that the. two j 
yachts allegedly interfered 
with the passage of SS 
Demetia, a large tanker enter- 
ing Southampton water. 

Prince Philip, competing in 
his last race this year, finished 
the day fourth on the water,- 
but dipped to tenth on handi- 
cap. Honours in class two 
went to Jacobite, whose crew 
gained a dear win over Baih- 
sheba (Sir Maurice Laing) 
with Countdown third. Thee 
Spears, the South African 
entry and winner of the first 
three races, which has been 
forced to change its name to 
Hiker to avoid protest under 
Rule 26 regarding sponsored 
names for next week's three- 
quarter ton cup, was fourth. 

Richard Beales's Local 
Hero IT, the star performer in 
class three, foiled to finish 
yesterday ending a string of 
four wins, a record now 
equalled by Roger Eglin’s 
Fruseli II in the Sonata class 
and Eric Williams's Dragonfly 
in. the Dragons. 



Curran: Cotoradobound 

Wheel change 

Paul Curran, England's 
Commonwealth cycling 
champion, will take part in 
next month’s world 
championships in Colorado 
following an about-turn. The 
cyclist from Tboraaby, aged 
25, who rides for Manchester 
Wheelers, won two gold med- 
als at the Edinburgh Games. 
He was persuaded to travel to 
America by : a British Cycling 
Federation . official after he 
had withdrawn from the six- 
man squad. 


- t-i • rare* years aner Uie club was 

Title on line ML “ * *— 


Cupboard bare 

Worthing Bears have been 
forced to pull out of the 
Carisberg National Basketball 
League after foiling to find a 
sponsor. The Sussex dub need 
a cash injection of around 
£25,000 tO maintain their 
position as one of the 
country's top teams, but no 
one has come forward. Chris 
Smith, their . chairman, has 
written to the English Basket 
Ball Association to say Wor- 
ding will cease to be members 

from noon today. Worthing 
reached the semi- finals of the 
national cup competition last 
season and took part in the 
Wembley play-ofls in 1984- 
85. 

Top of League 

Wigan Rugby League Cub 
could be the first to top the £1 
million turnover marie in ei- 
ther England or Aust ralia 
within the next two years. 
This was claimed' by the 
Wigan vice-chairman, Mau- 
rice Lindsay, when he dis- 
dosed that .the Central Park 
dub had record profits of 
£130.878 for the two seasons 
between 1983 and 1985, only : 
three years after the dub was j 
on the brink of financial 


Cowes is; 
tied in 
a sailor’s 
knot 


r DAVID 
K MILLER 


Cowes Week has got its'.- 
burgee in a bit of a twist. The 
most prestigious regatta of the 
year, with more private money, 
royal connections and histone - 
privilege than any spent other 
than borse racing, has run into" 
die traditional dilemma which; 
has confronted the aristocracy ' 
over the past century: Must 
they sell the fur niture in order - 
to pay, and keep, the servants?' 

Sponsorship is the dirty, 
name of the word, in the eyes . 
of the Royal Yacht Squadron, 
and sponsorship has been 
raffling the waters of the. 
Solent this week. The irony is' . 
that any half-dozen members ’ 
of the Squadron could rattle . 
their pockets for loose change 
and come up with the modest 
£50,000 or so without which, 
according to Major Peter 
Snowden, the secretary of. 
Cowes Combined Clubs, 
Cowes coaid not continue. 

“I don't expect to have to 
pay for my racing," a Sqnad- . 
ran member is alleged to have 
said recently, notwithstanding 
his six-fignre yacht lifting 
gently at its mooring. The ‘ 
world, unfortunately. Is not 
what it was, as the Scottish : 
Commonwealth Games 
organizing committee discov- . 
end. The only solution for 
front-line sport is sponsorship, 
which is a kind of unseen 
commercial taxation of the' 
public. 

Every single member of the 
rubber-necking public, with 
the ram dripping from the bem 
ofindeceatiy brief shorts while 
the kids oiler for another ice 
cream cone, who telephone 
home to tell granny they are 
having a wonderful tinu^Js 

£®5riterli®^fr«CT me comes to 
yon courtesy of a free tele- 
phone from British Telecom, 
who are providing the Press 
facilities, afloat and ashore. 

In pursuit of the 
decisionmakers 

The arrangement by the 
Combined Clubs turns out to 
have been what is known, 
when a halyard becomes en- 
meshed in an insoluble tangle 
in die upper rigging during a 
Force 6, as a“baachofb-”: the 
main sponsors being Sand- 
hurst, the office equipment 
company who supply every- 
thing from paper to computes 
... and radio telephones, in 
competition with BT. 

Brian Holme, Sandhurst's 
chairman, is at pains to remain 
on good terms with the Com- 
bined Clubs, because the 
£70,000 or so it costs his 
company, including Wimble- 
don-style executive entertain- 
ment, makes good sense. “It 
doesn't matter if the man in 
the street has never heard of 
as," he says. “What I'm after 
is the derision makers. Ten 
per cent of the boats on the 
Solent never go beyond the 
Needles, bat a large slice of 
those who matter in British 
industry are down here." 

There is probably as maefa 
influence within the . royal 
yacht dnbs of the Squadron, 
Thames, Southampton, Lon- 
don, Corinthian, Southern, 
Ocean Raring and the Island 
Sailing Cab . as there was in 
the Abbey a couple of weeks 
hack. For eight days, they are 
almost the captive audience of 
Sandhurst Cowes Week. 

Financial reality 
must be faced 

Holme was thought by some 
to be too aggressive in his 
attitude last year, the first ofa 
deal which is guaranteed add 
inflation protected for another 
two years. Holme, himself * 
Royal Thames member, denies 
this. “I've tried so hard to play 
it their way," he says. “We 
have no intention of interfering 
with raring and we're not •» 
sponsor who is going to rrin 
away." 

Too many of the sponsors 
whs have dabbled with Cowes 
have beat joined to the 
organization by what is termed 
a snowball hitch; they have 
melted away in the face of 
hidebound traditionalism. 

Hnbhe's advertising ban- 
ners and anoraks, by no meahs 
obtrusive compared with, say. 
the whisky company who 
sponsored the last Ryder Cap, 
may make some Squadron 
members splutter in their pstk 
gins. If Cowes is to survive, 
however, as a g nintessentially 
British occasion, the Com- 
bined Clobs no less than the 
Commonwealth Games are go- 
ingto have to come to terms 
with nnanrial reality: no take 



worn? 

'Me.ir. 

Disport 


m/f u 

^ Gc'“ 

*«*"*-'■ 


%\ 


V ■ ' l *l * 




Duke McKenzie, the Euro- 
pean and British flyweight 
champion, has been ordered 
to defend his European Box- 
ing Union title against 
Giampiero Pinna, of Italy. 
McKenzie, from Croydon, 
stopped Charlie Magri at the 
Wembley Arena in Jiay. 


The Australian rugby play- 
ers, Peter Smith, .a prop 
forward from Dlawarra, and 
Bob Morris, a hooker from 
Taree United, have signed for 
Leeds Rugby League dub- 
They win replace tbe 
Britain Test forwards, Jeff 
Grayshon and David Ward, 
who have retired. • 


Derby date 

Steve Davis heads a 120- 
strong field chasing a £60,000 
first prize in the £300,000 
Dulnx British Open snooker 
tournamenl.whicfa will reach 
its dimax at the Assembley 
Rooms,- Derby, on March 1. 


Pay Hp and shot up" is *** 
* stegaa which is acceptabkTto 
sp^msors, who are entitled to a 
return for their investments* 
There b not a de Savery born 
ever 5 r minute. Besides which, 
m ° st c rewmen are already 
Professional in nimne* every 
Yachting ha« to get its 
act together.