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TIMES 


No 62,53^ 


FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 




as loyalists 
invade’ south 


The deputy leader of the 
Dcmocraiic Unionist party 
was under arrest in the Irish 
Republic last night alter bang 
detained when “loyal ists” 
“invaded" a village in the 
republic, drilled and then 
attacked an unmanned police 
station and two officers in a 
mobile patroL 

Mr Peter Robinson, MP for 
East Belfast, refused food and 
water as he remained hi 
detention in a cell at Mona- 
ghan police station, while 
senior officers discussed 
whether . to bring charges 
against him under the 
republic's Offensive Against 
the State Act. He can be 
detained for up to 48 hours. 

He was arrested early yes- 
terday after about ISO -loyal- 
ists. some dressed in 
paramilitary uniforms and 
masks and armed with sticks 
and cudgels, crossed the bor- 
der on an .unapproved road 
from Co Armagh and look 
over the hamlet of Gonlibret 
in Co Monaghan. 

Two unarmed members of 
the G ardai were assaulted 
and their patrol car damaged, 
slogans were daubed on walls 
and shrubs uprooted before 
the group dispersed when 
armed detectives fired- shots 
above their heads. 

Shortly before they crossed 
the border rn a convoy of 
vehicles. loyalists in the north 
entered the mainly nationalist 
village of Swatragh. Co 
Londonderry, and armed 
with, sticks, marched id mili- 
tary style before smashing a 
number of windows and caus- 
ing damage to buildings. As 
they left nationalist youths 
attacked the security forces. 

Last night the outlawed 
paramilitary oiganiiation, the 
Ulster Freedom Fighters, is- 
sued a replyto the Provisional 
IRA threats to -contractors 
servicing the security forces. 


Tomorrow 


Weekend 
of sport 



Motor racing: 
preview of the 
Hungarian Grand 
Prix m Budapest, 
the first 

championshipTace 
to be held behind 
the Iron Curtain 
Cricket: the 
second Test against 
New Zealand at 
Trent Bridge 
Yachting: report 
on Cowes Week 





• The prize in today's 
Portfolio Gold 
competition is doubled 
to £8,000 because there 
was no winner 
yesterday. 

• Portfolio list page 21; 
rules and how to play, 
information service, 
page 16. 


Doctors held 

Hertfordshire detectives have 
arrested two anaesthetists who 
were dismissed from the 
Lisler HospitaL Stevenage* on 
Monday after the death of a 
patient at the hospital two 
weeks ago. 

Karpov level 

Anatoly Karpov equalized in 
the fifth game of the World 
Chess Championship in Lon- 
don. Gary- Kasparov was 
forced to resign Page 2 

On this day 

On August 8 . 1865. Edward 
Whymper described the trwic 
descent of his party after 
conquering the 

MatterttonL Page 14 

Degree results 

Degrees awarded by Bir- 
mingham University are pub- 
lished today. Page 26 


Home Ne*s 2-4 
Overseas 5-8 
Appts 18 

Arts 15 

Births, deaths, 
marriages 14 
BusiiKss 17-21 
Chess 2 

Court . M 

Ctwswwds 10,16 
Maty 12 


. By Richard Ford 

In a home-made video a' 
masked man in paramilitary 
uniform, flanked by masked 
men with arms, warned Ro- 
man Catholics working in 
Protestant areas not to turn up 
for work in the present cli- 
mate. and said they had drawn 
up a list of ^ “legitimate targets" 
among the nationalist 
community, particularly 
among those who printed or 
sold Provisional IRA Iit- 



1. Crowd marches mile over 
border into QontibreL 2. 
School danhetL 3. Marchers 
parade in village main road. 
4. Police car wrecked, two 
policemen injured, 5. Detec- 
tives dear marchers with 
warning shots. 

erature and others , attending 
premises frequented by mili- 
tant republicans. 

Their threat came as tension 
in the province rose, with the 
15th anniversary of intern- 
ment due tomorrow and the 
traditional Loyalist Appren- 
tice Boys' parade in London- 
derry cm Tuesday. 

Elsewhere in the province a 
huge force, of- police and 
soldiers were on duly to foil 
similar displaysbf strength by 
loyalists., wjtich the RUC sus- 


pected would involve the 
taking over of other isolated 
nationalist areas. 

After receiving intelligence 
reports squads of RUC offi- 
cers were depfoyed to vulner- 
able nationalist areas and 
unusual movements involv- 
ing hundreds of vehicles and 
thousands of people were 
monitored in the counties of 
Armagh. Londonderry. An- 
trim and Tyrone 
Check points were set up to 
stop and search-cars. 

In spite of the RUCs suc- 
cess in thwarting other at- 
tempted loyalist takeovers, 
•the Guardai were apparently 
caught unaware of the take- 
over of Clonlibret. which 
Unionist politicians say was 
designed to disprove asser- 
tions by Government min- 
isters of better and fighter 
border security. 

Under orders the loyalists 
drilled up the main road for 
about 20 minutes, attacking 
the unmanned police station, 
destroying shrubs and daub- 
ing the slogan “Ulster has 
awakened" on the wall of the 
station and a village schooL 
Mr Robinson was the only 
person arrested yesterday and 
was questioned about events 
in the village., Speaking from 
the police station he said that 
he had been invited to attend 
as an observer and had had no 
reason to run away. 

“As far as security along the 
border is concerned we have 
an area of South Armargh 
with a gaping whole in it. 
without any sign of security 
forces on either side," he said 
The incident was condemned 
by government ministers, who 
apologized to Dublin for the 
injuries to Guarda Leo 
O'Hara, aged 26, and Patrick 
Carty. aged 28. 

Paisley power, - page 2 
Easiest coup, page 12 
Leading article, page 13 


Law Report 

25 


1.4 

Inters 

13 

Motoring 

22 

Obi Inary 

14 

Science 

14 

Sport 26-2830 
Theatres, etc 29 

TV & Radio 

29 

Universities 

14 

Weather . 

16 


* ft it tfir Ht 



into 
hands of IRA' 


lip Webster 
'Chief Political 
Correspondent 

The “loyalist" raid into the 
Irish Republic _ was . con- 
demned by politicians in Brit- 
ain yesterday with Mr Tom 
King. Secretary of State for 
Northern Ireland, calling it 
“disgraceful”. . 

■British ministers, who as- 
sumed that Mt Peter Robin- 
son, MP for East Belfast and 
deputy leader of the Demo- 
cratic Unionist Party, in-, 
traded to get himself arrested 
were angry about the 
demonstration because they 
saw it as playing into the 
hands of the IRA. 

Mr Nicholas Scott, Under 
Secretary for Northern Ire- 
land. who expressed regret to 
-Ihe Republic about the inju- 
ries to two members of the 
Garda, said the .loyalist 
manoeuvres were a "stupid 
stum". 

Mr King said the incident 
had done great damage to the 
image of Northern Ireland 

“This was obviously a dis- 
grace. At this time, when the 
IRA are trying to launch a 
particularly vicious and nasty 
campaign of intimidation and 
when the security forces are at 
maximum stretch to combat 
that threat, for the so-called 
loyalists to launch this 
demonstration is quite 
disgraceful. 

“We knew that the IRA are 
irving to stir up tension, to 
excite sectarian fear and ha- 
ired and to try to provoke 
loyalist reaction. The loyalists 
have walked right into their 
trap" Mr King said 




h 



Mr Stuart BelL Labour 
spokesman on Northern Ire- 
land. said that “over-violent" 
reaction to the IRA would not 
cure the ills of the province. 

.He added: "Our informa- 
tion is that border security is 
improving and will continue 
to improve as the months go 
by. Thai is ihe reason the IRA 
are stepping up their 
campaign." 

Meanwhile a Conservative 
MP yesterday demanded a 
ban on visits to Northern 
Ireland by representatives of 
Noraid the IRA fund-raising 
organization which is based in 
the United States. 

Mr Anthony Beaumont- 
Dark. MP for Birmingham 
SeJly Oak, was angered by an 
incident on Wednesday when 
a party of 30 Noraid members 
cheered the spectacle of two 
masked gunmen putting on a 
show of strength for their 
benefit in Londonderry. 


Ex-CIA 
agent 
flees to 
Russia 

Moscow (AFP) — A former 
US Central Intelligence Ag- 
ency (CIA) agent, Edward Lee 
Howard, has been granted 
political asylum in the Soviet 
Union. Tass reported yes- 
terday. 

-The news agency said Mr 
Howard had asked the Presid- 
ium of the Supreme Soviet for 
asylum, saying his request was 
motivated by hts wish to 
escape from the American 
secret services, which were 
baselessly persecuting him. 

Mr Howard is reported to 
be sought by the US Federal 
Bureau of Investigation (FBH- 
Wesiem sources in Moscow 
allege he had been collaborat- 
ing since 1984 with the KGB. 
the Soviet security police, 
enabling them to arrest several 
US agents in Moscow. 

Mr Howard and his wife, 
Mary, according to the 
sources, underwent CIA train- 
ing from 1981 to 1983. with a 
view to a Moscow posting. He 
thus learnt the names and 
addresses of a number of US 
intelligence agents 

The sources said that be- 
cause of Mr Howard's defec- 
tion. at least five US 
diplomats were caught making 
clandestine contacts here. 
Two were expelled- 
• WASHINGTON: The 
Reagan Administration re- 
fused to comment on Mr 
Howard's escape to Moscow, 
the State Department saying 
simply that he was a fugitive 
from justice (Michael Binyon 
writes). 

After the CIA was told last 
year by a Soviet defector that 
he was a spy. FBI agents went 
to his house in New Mexico, 
but Mr Howard and his wife 
were able to escape to Mexico. 



Record breaker Richard 
Hadlee celebrates one of bis 
six wickets for New Zealand 
in the second Test against 
England at Trent Bridge 
yesterday. He has now taken 


five wickets in a Test innings 
27 times, a world record, and 
only two players have 
claimed more Test victims. 

Photograph: Chris Harris 
John Woodcock, page 30 


Teacher training 
gains £30m boost 


The Government is to in- 
crease the annual budget for 
in-service training of teachers 
by £30 million in 1987-88. 

The total expenditure on 
Inset, the teacher training 
scheme, will rise from. £170 
million to £200 million, an 
increase of just over 17 per 
cent, from April 1987. 

Mr Kenneth Baker, Sec- 
retary of State for Education 
and Science, said yesterday 
that the scheme would mean a 
significant expansion in 
teacher training, allowing up 
to 100,000 teachers a year, or 
20 per cent of the workforce; 
to attend courses. 

Speaking on BBC Radio, he 
said: “Inspectors earlier this 
year said that up to 30 per cent 
of the lessons being taught 
were not being taught very 
well I can't accept lhaL I have 
got to improve the quality and 
one ofthe ways of doing it is to 
increase teacher training". 

A total of £130 million is to 
be spent on "local needs" and 
the balance of £70 million on 
19 "national priority areas”. 

The list is headed by 
£16.5 million for training in 
shortage subjects such as 
mathematics and science and 
craft, design and technology. 
For the first time, a special 
allocation will be made for 
teachers to cope with drug 
abuse in schools. 

A notable aspect of the 
Government’s plans is the 


. By Mark Dowd 

sharp rise, from £40 million 
this year jo a proposed 
£114 million, in the amount 
pledged through specific 
grants. 

These central government 
grants are a controversial sub- 
ject amongst local authorities 
because they restrict councils' 
room for manoeuvre. Unlike 
rate support grants, whereby 
councils can allocate their 
resources relatively freely,, 
specific grants oblige local 
authorities to spend according 
to central government wishes. 

Mr Alan Evans, education 
officer of the National Union 
ofTeacbeis, said that the offer 
was “niggardly and parsimo- 
nious". Unions and local 
education authorities should 
press Mr Baker to increase 
radically the amount for 
1988/89. 

Mr Fred Smithies, general 
secretary of the National 
Association of Schoolmasters/ 
Union of Women Teachers, 
described it as. “a step in the 
right direction". But he said 
that he noted Mr Baker's 
continuing silence on the 
more important question of 
teachers' pay. 

Mr Peter Dawson, general 
secretary of the Professional 
Association of Tecahers. said: 
“This is a veiy acceptable 
figure. Clearly, if the name of 
the game in the second half of 
the eighties is going to be in- 
service training, the money is 
going to be needed". 


IN-SERVICE TRAINING BUDGET 1987-88 

£1 30 million for local needs 
£70 million for national priority areas 


The national prtortty areas include: Em 

Training in the shortage subjects meths^cienca and COT 16.5 

Training for GCSE 15.0 

TraWng for world of work 8.0 

Polytechnics and HE oofleges 7S 

Management training for heads and senior staff 5.5 

Computing and information technology 5.0 

Training &out drugs rmsuse 1-5 

Youth and commun i ty workers 1.0 

ReRgious education 1-0 


Reagan to 
take drug 
test lead 

From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

President Reagan, Vice- 
President George Bosh and- 
about 75 other senior White 
House staff will submit to 
drug tests to set an example to 
the nation as parr of the 
administration's war on drugs. 

.“The president has made it 
clear that he is seeking a drug- 
free workplace for all Amer- 
icans." a White House spokes- 
man said yesterday. “He 
believes all federal employees 
deserve a drug free environ- 
ment, and that federal em- 
ployees should set the exam- 
ple for state and local 
government and the private 
sector to follow." 

The tests will be held on 
Monday at the White House 
medical unit Analysts will be 
looking for traces of mari- 
juana. heroin, cocaine and 
other illegal drugs - though 
there are no suspicions that 
anyone in the While House is 
using any of these. 

Samples will be sent for 
analysis to the US Navy 
laboratory. 


Iraqi blitz on 
Iran after 
shells kill 74 

Baghdad (Reuter) — Iraqi 
aircraft launched intensive 
raidson Iranian oil and power 
installations just a few hours' 
after Iranian shells killed 74 
civilians and wounded 140 
others in a northern Iraqi 
border town, the Iraqi high 
command said yesterday. 

A communique said squad- 
rons of jets bombed an oil 
refinery and two thermal 
power stations in the central 
Iranian city of Isfahan, the 
main oil export terminal on 
Kharg Island and a power 
station at Muntazeri. 

It said Kharg Island was 
raided a total of three times. 


A Majorcan sunshine package fit for royalty 


From Richard Wigg 
Madrid 

In strong sunshineand tem- 
peratures m the 80s. the 
Prince and Princess of Wales- 
arrived yesterday with their 
two children in Palma. Major- 
ca. to begin -several days* 
holiday as guests of King Juan 
Carlos and Queen Sofia of 
Spaim 

At the military base on 
Palma's Son Sant Joan air- 
port. where an RAF jet 
touched down just before half 
past one. the Royal couple and 
Prince. William and Prince 
Henry were met by Queen 
Sofia and Prince Felipe, the 
Spanish heir-apparent- 

The King was not at the 
fra?? because he was sailing at 
the time in the Bay of Palma, 
taking part on the fifth day of 
races in Lhe annual King'sCup 
regatta. He was to meet them 
later at the Royal Palace. 

As if to underline the infor- 

-:V 



Dreams of sandcasties and the sea: Prince William sits on 
Qneen Sofia's lap on the drive from the airport to the palace. 

mality. all the party then piled 
into a Volkswagen minibus 
which had been driven to the 
base by' the 18-year-old Prince 
Felipe from Mari vent Palace. 


the regular summer residence 
of the Spanish monarchs for 
ihe past 13 years, originally 
built by a rich Greek painter. 

A gleaming Mercedes. 


which everyone had expected 
to take the Prince and Princess 
to the palace, went with only 
the chauffeur inside. 

Although the staffs of both 
royal households were busy 
emphasizing the “strictly pri- 
vate nature" of the visit, the 
sight- of members of two 
European monarchs 
holidaying together was being 
hailed by diplomats as an 
indication of how relations 
between the two countries had 
never been better. 

Security > on the island 
which Spain's Defence Minis- 
ter — now holidaying in the 
north of Majorca pro- 
nounced a few days ago as “of 
the best" was stncL and 
reporters were not allowed 
near the arrival area.* 

Immediately after lunch at 
Mari vent, the Prince and 
Princess and their. royal- hosts 
went on board the Spanish 


royal vachL Fortune to watch 
the regatta in which King Juan 
Carlos was competing as a 
member of the crew of the 
Bribon V. 

The British couple are ex- 
pected to spend much of the 
stay on the Foriuna. sailing 
and visiting the island's fam- 
ous calas - small rocky bays. 

For all the interest being 
shown by the Spanish press 
over the visit and in the 
Princess of Wales and her 
clothes and hats. Gibraltar has 
not been entirely overlooked 

In an editorial. La 
I \ ingttardia of Barcelona sug- 
gested that a friendship be- 
tween the future King and 
Queen of England and the 
Spanish royal family “could 
in the long run. be more 
productive than many acts of 
government" for finding a 
solution to the sovereignity 
dispute about the Rock. ' 


Shares 
slide 
on poor 
results 

. By Michael Clark 
Stock Market 
Correspondent 

Share prices fell again yes- 
terday after more disappoint- 
ing trading news. The FT 
index of top 30 shares lost a 
further 12.2 points to 1.221.5. 
but managed to close above 
the day's worst levels. 

This comes after 
Wednesday’s record-breaking 
fell of 32.1. The index has 
dropped more than 50 points 
so far. wiping almost £6.5 
billion off the value of British 
industry this week. 

The market had barely ab- 
sorbed GKN's warning about 
future profits, when TI Group, 
the other engineering industry 
barometer, sent out another 
worrying message. 

TI. which manufactures 
Creda cookers and Raleigh 
bicycles, reported interim pre- 
tax profits up from £ 12.6 
million to £18.1 million, but 
confirmed fears that compa- 
nies had not benefited from 
lower oil prices. The news 
wiped £19 million from TI's 
value as the shares tumbled 
32p to 463p. 

But falling oil prices 
knocked Shell's interim prof- 
its from £1.73 billion to £1.26 
billion. 

Interim figures from 
Barclays Bank failed to live up 
to City expectations. Pretax 
profits rose 8 per cent to £434 
million, well short of the 
performance of its three main 
rivals. The shares were 
marked 17p lower at 457p. 

The appearance of a few 
cheap buyers in late trading 
gave dealers some hope that a 
technical rally may soon be on 
the way. 

One leading stockbroker 
commented: “It looks as 
though the market has over- 
reacted this week and share 
prices are now definitely look- 
ing oversold." 

• The Government is holding 
to its forecast of continued 
steady growth in the economy 
despite the recent record fall 
on the London stock market 
(Phifip Webster writes). 

Prospects for 1987 are now 
better than 1986, and min- 
isters expect the trend sug- 
gested at Budget time of3 per 
cent growth this year slowing 
to around 2.5 per cent next 
year to be effectively reversed. 

Analysis, page 2 
Detitils, page 17 
Market Report, page 19 


Pretoria 
warns it 
may not 
pay up 


From Michael Hornsby 
Johannesburg 

An embattled South Africa 
has served notice that its 
ability to service and repay its 
foreign debts would be re- 
duced and that it would be 
forced to introduce controls 
on imports if substantial eco- 
nomic sanctions were im- 
posed against it. 

The warning, issued on 
Wednesday night by Mr 
Barend du Plcssis, the Finance 
Minister, is the latest develop- 
ment in an escalating eco- 
nomic war between South 
Africa and the outside world. 

In retaliation for this week's 
decision by the Common- 
wealth to ban the import of 
South African coal, steel and 


The cost in jobs 5 

Shultz determined S 

David Watts 12 

Letters 13 


iron. Pretoria has already 
taken measures against goods 
passing through South Africa 
to and from land-locked Zam- 
bia and Zimbabwe. 

The Zambian and Zim- 
babwean leaders. Dr Kenneth 
Kaunda and Mr Robert 
M ugabe. were among the most 
vociferous proponents of san- 
ctions at the Commonwealth 
mini-summit in London and 
have been singled out for 
criticism here. 

Significantly, four of 
Pretoria's other black-ruled 
neighbours - Botswana. Leso- 
tho. Swaziland and Malawi, 
all of which arc even more 
dependent than' Zambia and 
Zimbabwe on the South Af- 
rican economy and are op- 
posed to sanctions — have so 
far been spared any counter- 
measures. 

According to Mr du Plessis. 
South Africa has always 
“played by the rules", but 
could "not allow sanctions or 
the threat of sanctions to 
undermine its total economy” 
or “accept unemployment and 
poverty for its total popula- 
tion. without taking any 
counter-measures". 

A country not permitted to 
export could obviously not 
continue to import he said. 

Mrdu Plessis estimated that 
scheduled debt repayments 
would absorb the entire sur- 

us of about £1.800 million 
brecast for 1 986. and that any 
contraction of exports could 

Continued on page 16, col 2 


to 


Thatcher for Chequers 


The Prime Minister is ex- 
pected to leave hospital today 
after the successful operation 
on her right hand. 

After leaving the King Ed- 
ward VII Hospital for Officers 
in London she will go to 
Chequers to rest before setting 
off with her husband, Mr 
Denis Thatcher, on Sunday 


for a holiday in the West 
Country. 

Downing Street said yes- 
terday that the Prime Minister 
was continuing to make very 
good progress after her surgery 
for Dupuytren's contracture, 
which has been pulling the 
small finger of her right band 
towards the palm. 


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HOMcNhVv 


i iixL i uVxi^o rSkiDAk AuvjUiSi o i>ow 


Modern media 

commiinication 
could affect 


‘Stardust’ 
leads to 
scientific 
conflict 


war censorship 


ice Editor 


Rodney Cowtoa, Defence Correspondent 


A warning that advances in 
communications technology 
will make it difficult to en- 
force censorship during a war 
is contained in an un- 
published study which was 
compiled for the Ministry of 
Defence. 

A book based on the study, 
and prepared by one of the 
principal authors, Mr Derrick 
Mercer, is to be published next 
spring by Seeker and Warburg. 

The study, entitled, "Rela- 
tions between, government, 
armed services and the media 
during times of armed 
conflict ", points out that at the 
stari of the Falklands conflict 
the ministry had no policy or 
plan for dealing with the flow 
of information in war. 

While the report recognizes 
that the Government may feel 
the need to impose censorship 
in war. it says the Govern- 
ment should accept that the 
rapid growth of new commu- 
nications technology will 
make it difficult for one nation 
to exercise control ov^r the 
flow of information. 

It says that the acquisition 
of emergency powers to con- 
trol the media should be 


would offer information and 
facilities to journalists in re- 
turn for compliance with 
guidelines. 

it notes that in the Falkland 
conflict there were difficulties 
about the provision, of 
communications facilities for 
the media, and suggests that 
for any future operation 
largely based at sea. the Royal 
Navy should investigate the 
feasibility of concentrating 
media communications facil- 
ities on a single ship of the 
Royal Fleet Auxiliary, and 
also the possibility of having 
designated transport to enable 
journalists to move around 
the Fleet. 


sought only as a corollary of a 
declaration of war in a crisis 


The report was commis- 
sioned by the ministry after 
problems with the media in 
the Falklands. It was pre- 
pared by the Centre for 
Journalism Studies at'Univer 
sity College, Cardiff. 

Although submitted to the 
ministry more than a year ago, 
the report has not been pub- 
lished, although a copy is in 
the library of the House of 
Commons. 

The report ends with more 
than 100 recommendations. 


which directly affects the na- 
tional survival. 

It advocates continuing 
study of a voluntary bargain, 
which would operate in war- 
time. under which the services 


The ministry is thought not to 
accept some of the more 


accept some of the more 
detailed ones on the internal 
organization of the ministry 
and the Armed Forces, but 
sources say that many changes 
have already been made. 


Maxwell 

attacks 

council 


Test boost 
for ailing 
Nimrod 


By John Goodbody 
Sports News Correspondent 

Mr Robert Maxwell, co- 
chairman of the Common- 
wealth Games Organizing 
Committee, yesterday at- 
tacked Edinburgh District. 
Council as “greedy and' 
grasping** in taking legal ac- 
tion to recover £750,000 
which they claim is owed 
them. 

Mr Maxwell, who quar- 
relled throughout the games 
with the Labour council be- 
cause of the invitation to Mrs 
Margaret Thatcher to visit 
Edinburgh, said that the coun- 
cil should behave like any 
other big creditor. 

“They will receive some 
money on account immedi- 
ately and the balance in 
September when we expea all 
our major fund-raising activ- 
ities to have borne fruit,'" Mr 
Maxwell said. 

The games are likely to lose 
at least £2 million but the 
Government has been ap- 
proached for money. It is also 
expeaed that Mr Ryoicbi 
Sasakawa. a Japanese philan- 
thropist. will underwrite any 
loss, although that has not 
been confirmed officially. 

Mr Maxwell said that the 
council's action “leaves a 
nasty taste in the mouth at a 
time of rejoicing at the 
successful conclusion of the 
great event.” 


By Our Defence 
Correspondent 


Vital improvements have 
been achieved in the perfor- 
mance of the Nimrod early 
warning aircraft, its maker, 
GEC. claimed yesterday. 

The company, which has 
until September 3 to prove 
that it can meet Royal Air 
Force performance require- 
ments, said that the improve- 
ments were in two critical 
areas, the tracking of targets 
and the removal of unwanted 
radar clutter. 

The Ministry of Defence is 
assessing bids by three United 
States manufacturers, and 
others, to replace the Nimrod 
project, on which £900 mil- 
lion has been spent in about 
nine years. 

Mr George Younger, Sec- 
retary of State for Defence, is 
expeaed to announce the 
result in October. 


Two eminent astr on omers. 
Sir Fred Hoyle and Professor 
Chandra Wickraraasingbe, 
have accused other senior 
scientists of hostility towards 
their latest research into life 
from outer space. 

They say their arguments in 
support of the existence of life 
from outer space or a “cosmic 
phenomenon" are not readily 
accepted by a culture with 
another theory of biology for 
the evolution of life on earth. 

They also daim that the 
opposition has spread to the 
blocking at grants needed for 
their investigations. 

The allegations are made in 
the latest issue of the scientific 
journal Nature. 

The two scientists express 
concern about be rejection of 
thelrresearch involving 
astronomical observations and 
laboratory experiments which, 
they say, show that dost 
particles carrying mkro-or- 
gajusms in a dehydrated state 
ni space can reach earth. 

When they enter the at- 
mosphere, eventually settling 
on the ground, these 
dessicated bacteria and parti- 
cles containing viruses are 
revived. 

The two astronomers have 
found difficulty getting their 
scientific papers published in 
the serious scientific journals. 

Mr John Maddox, the edi- 
tor of Nature, invited the two 
men to explain their evidence, 
which other academic expats 
have tinned down. 

The two scientists, based at 
University College, Cardiff, 
say that they are accused of 
eccentricity. Bat they argue 
that they have progressed by a 
series of small steps ova- many 
years, with each step cau- 
tiously tested by observation, 
experiment or calculation us- 
ing widely accepted methods 
of scientific research. 

They describe the measure- 
ments of grains of dust among 
the debris of space, of which 
about 1,000 tonnes a year 
enters the atmosphere. In 
addition, they give details of 
e xp er im ent s to reproduce the 
same sort of molecules m the 
laboratory which correspond 
to those measured in space. 
Other research has looked at 
the ability of bacteria to 
survive intense temperatures 
and pressures, and still revive. 

They say that it was when 
their findings suggested that 
particles of dust in- space 
carried organic molecules, as 
well as inorganic ones, that 
they began to experience 
hostility from referees of jour- 
nals and from assessors of 
grant applications. 


BR moves to 


clear gypsies 


GEC said that further tests 
were being carried out on 


ground-based equipment, but 
a full-scale in-flight pro- 
gramme would be needed to 
show the effectiveness of the 
improvements. 

On Tuesday, Plessey an- 
nounced that it was joining 
the US company. Westing- 
house. in providing radar and 
other equipment for the 
Boeing Awacs, one of 
Nimrod's strongest rivals. 


British Rail has begun a 
series of court actions to dear 
gypsies from trackside sites 
where, the company says, 
their activities have reached 
“riot level." 

. At the High Court yes- 
terday BR was granted pos- 
session orders against more 
than 300 gypsies on a site in 
north London where, it was 
alleged, a security guard was 
stoned. Other actions are 
pending over sites at Man- 
chester and Cardiff. 



THE BIG BANG SHOW 


Make sure your firm 
exhibits at 
the most important 
corporate financial services 
event before Big Bang 


CITY 



The Barbican Centre 
17-19 September 1986 


Ring Elizabeth Cornelius now 
for details and Stand availability 
on 01-493 0000 or 821 5555 


Organised by FiBEX, 55 Catherine Place, London SW1 E 6DY 
A subsidiary of Catalyst Communications Group pic 



Police dean up yesterday at the police station in Clontibret, Co Monaghan, after the attack 
by 150 “loyalists" in which Mr Peter Robinson was arrested (Photograph: Bill Warhnrst) 


The power behind Paisley 


-By Richard Ford 


In the crisis that has en- 
gulfed Northern Ireland's 
“loyalists" since the signing of 
the Anglo-Irish agreement, Mr 
Peter Robinson, deputy leader 
of the Democratic Unionist 
Party, has been in the fore- 
front of plotting their oppo- 
sition to it. 

Yesterday, as Mr Rob- 
inson's supporters passed 
messages from him, his party 
leader, Mr Ian Paisley, was out 
of the country. 

In public and private Mr 
Robinson, aged 37, MP for 
East Belfest, has been more 
calculated and cunning than 
the self-proclaimed “big man' 
of Ulster politics. Increasingly 
Mr Paisley looks tired. He is 


not as sharp or sore-footed as 
he was and his party col- 
leagues privately concede it 

He delegates much more to 
his astute and articulate dep- 
uty. who over the years has 
emerged as an indispensable 
and powerful force. Rival 
Unionists predicted that even- 
tually Mr Paisley would cut 
him down to size. But Mr 
Robinson has gone from 
strength to strength, waxing 
loudly and eloquently his 
loyalty to the DUP leader. 

It was Mr Robinson who 
snarled at a public meeting 
that Mrs Thatcher had been 
found guilty and he would like 
to suggest the electric chair as 
a suitable penalty. 


Cover-up alleged Faslane 


on health of poor 


By Thomson Prentice, Science Correspondent 


bribery 
man jailed 


The Government is accused 
by a leading medical journal 
today of suppressing informa- 
tion about the “widening" 
health gap between the social 
classes. 

An editorial in the British _ 
Medical Journal asks why 
differences in mortality be- 
tween the classes have re- 
ceived little attention in the 
recently-published . statistics, 
from the Registrar GeneraL 

“Could it be because some- 
body in the Government or in 
the Registrar General's office 
is anxious to play down the 
widening gap in mortality 
between rich and poor?" the 
article asks. If so, it says, 
history has repeated itself. 

Similar information pro- 
duced six years ago as the 
Black Report was published in 
limited circulation and made 
available by the Government 
on an August Bank holiday 
Monday, it says. 


“Not surprisingly, this at- 
tempt at suppression made the 
document instantly more 
newsworthy and it has since 
become, in the minds of 
many, the most important 
medical report since the war." 
the BMJ says. 

The latest 'information is 
part of a supplement of the 
national census produced ev- 
ery 10 years! The last version 
had about 60 pages devoted to 
discussing social class dif- 
ferences in mortality, but the 
new edition has only five 
pages on the topic, the edi- 
torial says. 

“Anyone interested in in- 
equalities in health will be 
disappointed. The report 
claims that, the figures for 
social class V are unreliable 
and that we should look 
elsewhere for a more authori- 
tative account of recent dif- 
ferences in mortality among 
the social classes. “ 


Pollution task force 


Four groups of government 
inspeaors are to form a single 
1 00-strong pollution task force 
after years of complaints 
about divided responsibilities 
i from industry and environ- 
, mental campaigners (Hugh 
Clayton writes). 


The amalgamation of three 
inspectorates was recom- 
mended last year by the Royal 
Commission on Environ- 
mental Pollution. 


Mr Nicholas Ridley, Sec- 
retary of State for the Environ- 


ment, added a fourth to 
monitor pollution of water-' 
ways. 

The radiochemical and 
hazardous waste inspeaors 
who work for the Department 
of the Environment will be- 
come part of the new single 
pollution inspectorate along 
with the industrial air pollu- 
tion inspectors from the 
Health and Safety Executive. 

Mr Ridley, said: “ll has 
been a contentious issue. We 
felt that the time had come to 
settle it." 


Industry in doldrums 


World chess championship 

Kasparov forced 
into resignation 


Anatoly Karpov _ has 
dramatically equalized in ine 
fifth game of the World Chess 
Championship at the Park 
Lane Hotel. London. The 
champion. Gary Kasparov, 
was forced to resign in 
moves but his situation had 
been hopeless for some time. 

The score is now one win 
eaA with three draws. For the 
third time Kasparov parried 
with the Gmnfeld defence but 
the challenger deviated subtly 
from the similar variation 
employed in the- first game. 
Kasparov sacrificed a pawn, 
which White was unable to 
hold, but in exchange Karpov 
obtained a mighty protected 
passed pawn on the fer ad- 
vanced d6 square. 


Many experts felt Kasp- 
arov's opening was dubious, 
but he had used up only 20 
minutes over his first 16- 
moves. This gave the im- 
pression that the variation had 
been prepared beforehand by 
the champion’s team of 
analysts. 


ording to him the kind of 
inflexible fixed position which 
arose suited Karpov down to 
the ground. 

The London leg of the 
match, sponsored by Save and 
Prosper, continues until the 
end of August. Victory goes to 
the first player to score six 
wins or 12V: points. Play 
resumes this afternoon. 
Moves: White Bart 

Wife Back 17 efi b7xc6 

nw Nffiie* g 

2 C 4 gfi 19 M M 

3Nc 3 d5 20 NH3 a5 ■ 

4 m Bg7 21 a ■ 

5 a3 c5 22 Rhel a3 
6dxc5 Qa5 23 Nf2 & 

7 Rcl Ne4 24 NtO M 

BcxdS Nxc3 25Ra1 $P 

9 Qd2 Qxa2 25 Hal £ 

10 bxs3 OcCch 26 twg5 

11 Kxd2 M7 27 Bxg5 W7 

•12 035 M 28 BM Rb8 

13 8hI 7 Bxd7 29 Rad Bcfi 

14 a4 5 30 Rc3 -R35 

«£ ‘efi 31 BcS RbaU 
IB c4 Rfe8 32 Ncl Resign 


On move 18 Kasparov 
continued to move rapidly but 
grandmasters watching the 
move believed that at pre- 
cisely that moment Kasparov 
missed a good chance. This 
would" have been 18 g5, 19 
Bxg5 Bxe5, forcing the po- 
sition open for Black's 
bishops. 

Once this opportunity had 
been overlooked, Karpov 
clamped ' down on Blade's 


Earlier this year Mr Robin- 
son admitted that it would not 
be possible to have any solu- 
tion to the Northern Ireland 
problem by ignoring one sec- 
tion of the community and he 
said be was prepared to rec- 
ognize that the North needed a _ 
relationship and co-operation 
with the Irish Republic. Born 
into a strong Unionist family 
from Carryduff, south of Bel- 
fast, he joined Mr Paisley's 
embryonic political organiza- 
tion m the early 1970s. He is 
credited with being the 
motivating force which trans- 
formed it into a fully fledged 
party. ■ . 

Easiest coop, page 12 
Leading article, page 13 


Leaders draw 
after long fight 


With two rounds to go 
Jonathan Speelman and Jona- 
than Mestel are leading the 
British Chess Championship 
in Southampton- with seven 


points each (Harry Golombek, 
Chess Correspondent, writes). 

Half a point behind ts 
Daniel -King while Murray 
Chandler on six is sharing 
fourth position with eight 
players. 

Mestel and Speelman drew 
after a long bard fight and 
Chandler was in serious trou- 
ble against King but the game 
ended in a draw after double 
adjournment. 

In the women's tour- 
nament: Susan Arkell is 2 te 
points ahead of Christine 
Elcar and Rani Hamid on six. 


possible counterplay with the 
locking move 19 h4. After that 


Black could only flash hope- 
lessly around. There was a 
brief period of drama as 
Kasparov made a dash with 
his own passed “e” pawn, but 
when Karpov’s Rook moved 
to al on move 25 the Black 
offensive fizzled out. 


A man who bribed govern- 
ment officials to obtain more 
than a milli on litres of waste 
oil from tiie Strathclyde sub- 
marine base at Faslane Bay 
was jailed for nine, months 
yesterday by tbe High Court in 
Edinburgh. 

. William MacLeod, aged 36, . 
a manager for Lister Oils, of 
Parkrflle Road, BeUshffl, 
Lanarkshire, ' adopted giving 
bribes totalling £22,008 to. 
members of the Royal Mari- 
time Auxiliary Service to 
obtaintfae waste o3 for his 
employers. 

The bribes allowed the un- 
authorized removal of waste 
oil from the base and per- 
suaded officials to have tbe 
water removed so the waste 
became more valuable. 

Lord Ross, tbe Lord Justice 
Clerk, said: “Corruption can 
never be regarded lightly and 
tbe interests of the public 
require the courts to treat 
corruption as a very serious 
offence. 

“I cannot dose my eyes to 
tbe skill of the operation." ' 

The judge accepted that the 
accused was acting for his 
employers but MacLeod knew 
that what he was doing was 
unlawfuL His company could 
not have obtained the benefits 
but for his actions. 

The loss to the Ministry of 
Defence was £99,000. 

The ministry in London said 
last night: “Steps have been 
ta k e n since this incident came 
to light, to tighten up on 
procedures for the disposal of 
sallage (dirty eB) and to 
prevent any repetition." 


Viktor Korchnoi, world title 
challenger in 1978 and 1981, 
said after move 22: “Five 
moves ago I said Black was 
totally lost, and nothing has 
changed." Tony Miles, com- 
menting in The Times lecture 
room, said he found all .of 
Kasparov's moves incomp- 
rehensible. 

Jasba Murei, a former world 
championship assistant, said 
Kasparov should have varied 
his opening repertoire. Acc- 



ABCDEFGH 


Charge to 
replace 
Scots rate 


Director 


phones 
car thief 


The Scottish rates system is 
to be reformed and a commu- 
nity chaige introduced, Mr 
Malcolm Rifland, Secretary of 
State for Scotland, announced 
yesterday. 

Nothing showed more 
dearly that the system should 


be scrapped than the 15,000 
letters of protest received at 
the height of last year's rates 
dispute, he said. 

The Scottish Office had 
received 57 1 comments on the 
Government's Green Paper 
outlining proposals for re- 
form. Mr Rj G rind added: “The 
opposition we have had pales 
into insignificance besides the 
groundswdl of popular opin- 
ion that we felt last year.” 

Legislation would be in- 
troduced in the next session of 
Parliament- 

Many of the criticisms re- 
ceived had been ofa construc- 
tive nature, Mr Kifldnd said 
and he promised that many of 
the views would be taken into 
account. ^ 

■ He emphasized that he did 
not believe tbe answer to be a 
local income tax. Thai, he 
said, would leave almost half 
the eteciorate free of any 
responsibility for funding the 
costs of local services. 


A cohipany managing direc- 
tor tried to persuade a thief to 
return his stolen Jaguar XJS, 
worth £15,000, by talking to 
the driver on the telephone in 
the car. 

Mr Darren Bailees, whose 
company is in Solihull, West 
Midlands, said yesterday: “I 
was amazed -when he an- 
swered and said ‘Hello, can I 
help you?.’’ The car was 
found seven miles away. Po- 
lice have interviewed two 


youths. 


Top clearance 
for coroner 


Lord Hailsham of St 
Marylebqne, Lord Chancellor, 
has rejected allegations of 
incompetence made by 
Derbyshire County Council 
against Britain's oldest 
coroner. 

Mr Michael Swanwick. aged 
80, who has held inquests at 
Chesterfield for 40 years, said 
that the council, not having 
the power to dismiss him, bad 
asked the Lord Chancellor to 
do. so after accepting com- 
plaints from next-of-kin. 


Profit results fuel stock market fears 


By Derek Harris, Industrial Editor 


The London stock market 
jitters continued yesterday af- 
ter the record one-day drop on 
Wednesday that wiped almost 
£4.000 million off share 
values. 


pre-tax profits over nine 
months. It was rather in tine 
with market hopes and the 
shares were marked up. 


A poorer-than-expected 
performance by a leading en- 
gineering company, this time 
TI, the former Tube Invest- 
ments, again played a part as 
did the previous day's setback 
reported by GKN, a big sup- 
plier of vehicle components. 

TL whose products range 
from steel tabes and kitchen 
appliances to Raleigh bicycles, 
is, like GKN, in the front line 
of _ British manufacturing. 
While pre-tax interim profits 
had improved they were not up 
to the market's expectations. 


Clearly the GKN and TI 
resalts appear to show that. 
British maDufocturing has ran 
into difficult times, underlin- 
ing surrey warnings from the 
Confederation of British In- 
dastry last month and given 
added weight tins week by a 
su rvey from the Association of 
British Chambers of Com- 
merce. 


consumer goods industries. 

Exports presented as dull a 
picture as that for sales in 
Britain. The net result ires 
that rather more than a fifth of 
companies in the survey were 
less optimistic about t rading 
than they were in ApriL 


were reported to be falling. 
Flat export orders and a 
weakening trend in home or- 
ders were reported by regions > 
such as theSontlHeast, includ- 
ing London, Bristol and the 
West, and Yorkshire and 
Humberside. 


Rape charges 

Two boys-aged 14 from Hack- 
ney and a printer aged 16 from 
Clapton, east London, were 
remanded in care until August 
14 by Hackney Juvenile Court 
yesterday accused of raping a 
woman aged 18 on July 29. 
Twin brothers aged 12 are 
being questioned by police 
about the incident. 


Bad fortune 


Tbe company argued, as ICI 
bad argued last mouth, that 
Iowa- oil prices had not fed 
through yet to produce lower 
manufacturing costs. GKN 
claimed it had been undone by 
a sudden drop of a fifth in 
world demand for commercial 
and agricultural vehicle 
components. 


The news from industry is 
only one factor in the stock 
market frtlL The market in- 
dices have . been falling 
steadily through the summer 
and the preoccupations con- 
tinue with the effects of a weak 
pound, o3 prices, high interest 
rates and tbe uncertain politi- 
cal outlook. 


CBI economists are prepar- 
ing to rerise their gross na- 
tional product (GNP) 
forecasts, which are likely to 
show a dip from the previously 
predicted IS par cent for the 
year. 


All this points to a continu- 
ation of jitters in the stock 
market quite apart from its 
traditional tendency to over- 
react to events. 


A barman who faked an 
inheritance was arrested when 
he tried to open a b uilding 
society account with a £63,000 
cheque, written to impress his 
(pri friend, the Central Crim- 


inal Court was told yesterday. 
David Milligan, aged 32, -of 
Fleet Road, north-west Lon- 
don, was jailed for 1 5 months. 


In contrast BOC the for- 
mer British Oxygen, whose 
operations now Include health 
rare products as well as indus- 
trial gases, and a company as 
much in the front line, was 
reporting yesterday increased * 


The CBI said yesterday that 
no fresh evidence from the 
industrial heartlands put any 
new gloss yet on its last 
quarterly survey of manufoc- 
tnring industry. This painted a 
picture of industry in the 
doldrums, with output over the 
previous four months worse 
than expected. 


The CBI view Oat British 
Industry is seeing only a loll in 
activity was some comfort to 
the Government. Mr Nigel 
Lawson, the Chancellor, has 
been describing the period of 
economic sluggishness as a 
pause in growth that he ex- 
pected to be o yet soon in 
Britain and overseas. 


■ This makes more welcome a 
relatively calming view put 
forward this week in a study of 
British manufacturing 
productivity by the Oxford 
Review of Economic Policy 
gronp, suggesting tint it was 
excessively optimistic to ex- 
pect a golden era of growth to 
emerge quickly after the ofl 
price faD. 


Farm injury 


Andrew Moderski, aged 33, 
a farmworker, was severely 
injured when he was trapped 
for _ 40 minutes in a grain 
drying machine with a cutting 
Wade embedded in his back at 
Hayton's Farm, Mayfield, 
East Sussex, yesterday. 


Equally , it suggests, there is 
no justification for excessive 
p e ssimism. The Oxford econo- 
mists expect the benefits of 
lower ofl prices to start to 
emerge later this year, in spite 
of. the nnderiying slowing 

down in the world economy. It 
could, they believe, . lead to 

reasonable growth in the world 

economy daring next year. 


Murder walk 


The Association of British 
Chambers of Commerce sur- 
vey of tbe second quarter of 
this year indicates that growth 

in export orders has fallen 
away entirely, with home or- 
ders growth also looking 
sickly. . . 


Some improvement seemed 
due later this year bat it was 
expected to be slow and then 
lady to be concentrated in the 


In the West and Easr Mid- 
lands and Greater Manches- 
ter, all key manufacturing 
areas, home and export orders 


Pmfline Trubshaw, a poficc- 
will retrace tonight 
S* S 031 steps of Diane 
Sindan, aged 21, who was 
in Birkenhead, 
Merseyside, last Friday, in an 
attempt to trace the kilter 


“ Ml Udi 

Director out 


But it still means 1986 amid 

from now prove a trying period 
for British industry. 


_. MrYun Grigoro vich,artis- 
nc director of the Bolshoi 
pieatre, has left a London 
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THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


HOME NEWS 


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turning a blind 

‘black 



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Nearly one . person in four 
knows someone working in 
the “black economy" while 
claiming nnemployment 
benefit, a Harris poll disclosed 
yesterday.; 

The. polk for a group of 
businessmen- called the 
Comraioee for Research into 
Public Attitudes, found wide- 
spread acceptance that many 
of those on the unemployment- 
register are working. 

At the same rime govern- 
ment unemployment figures 
are doubted, with 38 per cent 
of the population believing 
they are higher than stated. - 

The survey.' based on a 
sample of 1,030 adults, found 
evidence that the “black 
economy" is big, but much 
less well organized than com- 
monly thought. 

More than a third of the 
population has at some time 
employed someone and paid 
cash — a sign that income may 


By David Walker • 

not be declared to the Inland 
Revenue. 

Among younger men (aged 
18 to 24) 34 per cent said they 
had done some work for cash. 
Younger age .soups were 
more sympathetic towards the 
cash-in-band economy. Of the 
unemployed. 57 per cent said 
there. was nothing wrong with 
working for money in hand 
and not declaring the income. 

Acquaintances of the sam- 
ple who were- drawing" un- 
employment or other benefits 
while working for cadi were 
said io.be getting jote in the 
building trade, decorating, 
driving or cleaning. 

The Committee for Re- 
search into Public Attitudes is 
chaired by Lord Plowden. an 
industrialist and former Civil 
Servant It raises money from 
big companies for opinion 
polls. 

In a statement accompany- 
ing the results, the committee 


BENEFIT SURVEY 


Do you/agree thnt dote and social benefit 
should be cut to encourage people to work? 

. " : Toia» Ago (%) Cl&*a(%) 

' T(%) IB-24 25-44 46^4 6S+ AB - Cl. 02-06 


Agree - 
Disagree 
Don't know 


18 -111 17 

67. 74 .75 

: 15 IS 0 


24 21 22 22 18 18 

St 62 - 59 70 6S 71 

24 18 20 9 19 13 


said they showed that targe 
numbers of people should not 
be included m the unemploy- 
ment figures. The un- 
employed — defined as those 
desperate for work, looking for 
a job and unable to find one — 
totalled only one million, less 
than a third of the official 
figure. 

It calculated that -some 
J3 50,000 people were drawing 
unemployment benefit while 
: working for cash.Iu addition 
some 600,000 people — one in 
five of the officially un- 
employed - could only get 
such poorly paid work that 
they were better off un- 
employed. 

The public’s attitude, 
according to the results, was 
that the government should 
make it easier for such people 
to take jobs, not by cutting 
their benefit but by subsidiz- 
ing firms to employ them. 
Nearly three out of four 
people said they would be 
willing to pa$more tax to fund 
such a scheme. 

The public believes there 
should be a gap between what 
-people could earn if they had -a 
job and what is available 
through social security. 


Hazards on the roads 


‘Thrombosis’ on motorways 


Inaccurate forecasts of lorry 
traffic on Britain's motorways 
are mistakes for which motor- 
ists and the Government are 
counting- the cost, .it was 
claimed yesterday. 

Mr Arthur targe, chief exec- 
utive of the Royal Automobile 
Gub's motoring services, said 
that the 1,700-mile .'network 
was threatened by a severe 
attack of “traffic thrombosis” . 
as more miles of motorway 
were repaired. 

Trouble spots he- high- 
lighted were: sections of the 
M6 near Preston, opened as 
Britain's first motorway in 


By Mark Ellis 

1958; the M62 in Greater 
Manchester; the M6 north of 
Birmingham and - the M25 
London orbital road, which is 
already showing signs, of 
overcrowding before its 
completion later in the year. 

Mr Laige, speaking in Man- 
chester, said official figures 
predicted that traffic could 
increase by more than 40. per 
cent within the next 15 years. . 
He said it was vital that 
planners,.' when calculating 
motorway capacity, took into 
account the large sections of 
motorway being repaired and 
maintained. “It does not ap- 


Grass verges take 
high, allergy toll 

ByTUbbfidd Police, Science GtftrasvmiQif; ^ 

Asthma - and- hw. Jwer be the equivalent, of 
sufferers should from Airing through . * fcayffeJd j 
on motorways in the summer, hundred miles .long. The best 
an aUeiTO^^ . adficeTf o eifter to 

avoid driving bn motor wa ys 


Tests by Dr flany Morrow . 
Brown, who used an air- sam- 
pling device fixed .fo^.-tbe.. 
bonnet of his car, ^ioodeea 
motorway pollen conntSLap to 
25 times higher than average. 

Such levels were more than 
enough to provoke severe at- 
tacks of hay fever or asthma, a 
condition which claims about 
2,000 lives a year, he said. 

Dr Morrow Brown, director 
of the Midlands Asthma and 
Allergy Research Association, 
based in Derby, Mamed uncut 
motorway, verges for the high 
pollen cowit£ 

“Driving along them must 


completely during die summer 
months, or to keep the car 
Vmdoiys iffint white doing •sd . 1 * J 

Dr' Morrow "Brown said 
researchers at the Derwent 
Hospital, Derby, were aston- 
ished to find such high levels 
on motorways. “It may be that 
the published pollen counts, 
which predict a daily average, 
do not always truly represent 
the hazards to sufferers.” 

He said that family doctors 
were unlikely to .consider 
motorway grass verges as a 
problem because most had ' 
little or no framing in dealing 
with allergies. ". 


pear this is being done and the 
result is chaos for drivers on 
those numerous parts of the 
motorway network under- 
going repairs,”Mr Large said. 

The Department of Trans- 
port admitted that forecasts 
for heavy goods traffic were 
. seriously underestimated 
when they were drawn up and 
the switching of freight 'away 
from rail to road during the 
1970s, as well as a dramatic 
growth in lorry traffic, could 
not have been foreseen. 

Government figures show 
that even though motorways 
constitute only one per cent of 
the roads they carry 28 per 
cent of all heavy freight. 

The continual pounding 
from lorries is blamed for 
causing the rapid deteriora- 
tion jof_ motorways, which 
have 'on' average a 15 year 
lifespan: -' , * V - 

The. Department of Trade 
said 1 the proble m s on the 
motorways might not be as 
bad. as Mr Large :predicted. in 
spite of #is year's £83 mfltion 
maintenance programme. - 

Both the mam motoring 
oig^nsations, the RAC and 
the Automobile Association, 
Name poor forecasting, low 
investment and a lack of 
planning of repairs for the 
problems on motorways. 

Tailbacks and congestion 
on the M25 reflect the heavier 
than forecast volume of traf- 
fic, about 115,000 vehicles a 
day compared with 75,000, 
and it is believed the forecast- 
ing was based largely on long- 
distance traffic use and 
seriously underestimated the 
volume of motorists using the 
route for short journeys. 


‘ '• ;■ ' , •> . ' ' 



Canon Derek Green, the village rector, in front of the Saxon tower of AH Saints Church 

Squire to 
sell home 
and village 

By Michael Horsnell 

Tied cottagers in the pre- 
Norman settlement of South 
Ptckenham, Norfolk, are anx- 
iously debating their future 
because the village squire has 
derided to sell their homes. 

Mr Guy Moreton, aged 82, 
the estate owner, whose family 
has lived at Picked ham Hall 
since 1925, expects the sale of 
his home and the village to 
fetch up to £10 milltoii. 

With the 16-bedroom coun- 
try boose will go 3£47 acres of 
prime shooting and farmland, 
as well as 16 cottages, and 
the village post office. 

The villagers are too anx- 
ions about what the sale wiD 
mean to them to talk openly to 
strangers, although the law 
would' prevent their eviction. 

Tenants on the estate have not 



Pickenham Hall, on the Moreton family estate which is be- 
ing sold (Photographs: Harry Kerr). 


been offered the opportunity to 
boy their homes. 

On die estate, where the 
West Norfolk Hunt meets 
once a season, a butler, groom 
and other household staff 
support the image of a bygone 
England. The 80 villagers, 
half the population of a few 
decades ago, are reminders of 
the less graceful side of the 
rural past 

- Only Canon Derek Green, 
rector of the Picked hams. 


would talk about the sale of 
the Pickenham Hall estate, 
near SwafVham. “I would hope 
that the estate will be pur- 
chased by someone who will 
develop village life, revive foe 
community, and help agri- 
culture grow,” he said. 

“There are people, farm 
labourers, whose livelihood is 
Involved and they are anxious 
about what will happen.” . 

Mr Moreton was not avail- 
able for comment yesterday. 


Sex trap To teach man a lesson’ 


A typist aged 29 who lured 
her employer into bed while 
her sister took pictures of 
them naked together, did it to 
teach him a lesson for sexually 
harassing her at work, a court 
was told yesterday. 

The two women later took 
the: photographs to the home 
of-Mr X. threatening to show 


them to members of the 
synagogue where be wor- 
shipped, Isleworth Crown 
Court in west London was 
told. 

But he went to the police, 
who provided him with a 
hidden microphone when a 1 
meeting was arranged in a car 
park. Officers hiding in a 


horse box heard the typist 
demand £5.000 for the return 
of the photographs, it was 
alleged. 

The typist, aged 29. her boy 
friend and her sister, aged 
19.aH deny conspiring to 
blackmail Mr X. The judge 
ruled- that-he was not u> be 
identified. Thexase continues. 


Crippled 

teacher’s 

memory 

‘reliable’ 

A consultant neurologist 
yesterday described as 
“grotesque” suggestions that 
Sue Craker could not be relied 
on to remember who crippled 
her in a hammer attack. 

Miss Craker, aged 35, a 
former deputy head teacher 
who is paralysed and brain 
damaged, says Jayne Scon, a 
physical education teacher, 
clubbed her repeatedly about 
the head. 

The prosecution in the les- 
bian love triangle trial at the 
Central Criminal Court has 
alleged that the attack was 
born out of “old-fashioned 
jealousy” as Miss Craker had 
slept with Miss Scott's girl 
friend, Mrs Debbie Fox. 

But Mr Richard Cherrill, for 
the defence, has suggested that 
Miss Craker's memory' about 
her attacker's identity had 
played tricks on her. 

Mr Stephen Wilson, consul- 
tant neurologist at the Atkin- 
son Motley Hospital, south 
London, giving medical ev- 
idence for the prosecution, 
rejected the idea. 

He said: “She clearly 
remembers, and it is unshake- 
able, that she was struck on 
the left side of her head before 
losing consciousness. It is 
grotesque to suggest that such 
a memory is fabrication.” 

Miss Scott, of Croft Hill 
Road. Farnham Royal. 
Buckinghamshire, denies 
inflicting grievous bodily 
harm on Miss Craker last year 
when she and Mrs Fox were 
slaying at Miss Craker's home 
in Barnet, north London. 

According to detectives, she 
said she had moved a daw 
hammer lying near Miss 
Craker who might have seen 
her holding it and mistakenly 
believed she had attacked her. 

Mr John Hilton, for the 
prosecution, asked the doctor 
i£ as Miss Scon had said to 
police, she picked up the 
hammer when she discovered 
Miss Craker lying covered in 
blood. Miss Craker would 
have remembered that 
Mr Wilson replied: “It is 
just not possible. She clearly 
remembers being struck by the 
assailant.” 

Dr Richard Hatfield, a 
neurosurgical registrar at the 
Royal Free Hospital, north 
London, who examined Miss 
Craker, said she bad skull 
fractures and neck injuries 
and her left ear was almost 

severed. 

The trial continues today. 


Anger as 
Tories bar 
Chinese 
nominees 

Oxford Central Conser- 
vative Club has been accused 
of racism after it refused foe 
applications of five prospec- 
tive members who are 
Chinese. 

Mr Edward Higgins, foe 
chairman, has resigned and 
five other committee members 
threatened to walk out. 

Seven other proposals for 
membership, all for white 
people, were accepted at the 
meeting on Monday night at 
which the nomination by Mr 
Robby Sterling, a committee 
member, of five people from 
the Liaison Restaurant In 
Castle Street was rejected. 

Oxfordshire Council for 
Community Relations has de- 
manded that the five, who 
indude the restaurant’s owner, 
manager and cbefr be allowed 
to join. Mr Ray Anchors, 
community relations officer, 
said: “We think it's absolutely 
outrageous. We will be report- 
ing it to our anti-discrimina- 
tion sub-committee.” He 
added: “We shall also be 
investigating what we can do 
under the Race Relations 
Act.” 

Mr Sterling said that the 
dab had only one non-white 
member, who had been admit- 
ted about five months ago. 

Six of the 16 members 
present voted in favour of 
giving them membership, 
among them Mr Higgins, but 
the majority rejected them.' 

Mr Higgins, who was ap- 
pointed chairman last March, 
said afterwards.-**! can't di- 
vulge the reasons for my 
resignation but it wasn't be- 
cause of any matter outside 
committee.” 

Mr Jimmy Tsang, the Li- 
aison Restaurant manager, 
said “We will still support 
Mrs Thatcher." 

Inquest opens 
on musician 

An inquest on Michael 
Rudetsky. the American mu- 
sician who was found dead at 
the home of Boy George in 
Hampstead, north London, 
on Wednesday, was opened 
and adjourned until October 6 
at St Pan eras coroners' court 
yesterday. 

Mr Rudetsky, aged 27, was 
unmarried and lived in New 
York. Police have said that he 
died of “respiratory failure 
due to the intake of drugs” but 
analysis was being carried out 
to find out which drugs he had 
taken- .. .... . 


Secretary told 
she ‘lined her 
own pockets’ 

A secretary who disclosed 
details of alleged company 
cash ■ frauds to shareholders 
was. accused of “lining her 
own pockets” by an industrial 
tribunal chairman yesterday. 

Mrs Hizabeth Byford, who 
claims she was dismissed .from 
her £40.000^-yeaf -job for 
'^whistleblowing” on a plot by 
directors to use £90.000 of the 
firm's own money- to take 
control, admitted that she had 
received annual expenses of 

£1,000 to £2.000. 

Mr Lyn Mostyu, the tri- 
bunal chairman, said: “It 
really rather looks as if you 
wanted to jump on the same 
bandwagon as the other direc- 
tors were on. You were asking 
fora decent meal a- car and a 
holiday, and you spent £2,000 
a year in expenses which is 
precisely what you were 
complaining about the 
directors’ doing.” 



«St4* 

Mrs Byford ‘ 

"Mr Mostyzr also xnticized- 
Mrs Byford for passing 
-information to the minority 
shareholders, afier claiming 
that she had been “instructed” 
to do so by the company 
founder on his deathbed. 

“You could have gone to 
the Department of Trade and 
asked for an inquiry. You 
could have gone to the- 
police ” he said. 

Mrs Byford, aged . 40, of 
Putney Hill, south-west Lon- 
don, is seeking compensation 
for unfair-dismissal. The tri- 
bunal reserved judgement un- 
til September. 


Police swoops 
recoup £9m 
in car taxes 

More than £9 million in car 
tax was recouped after police 
swoops in the South-east dur- 
ing May (Michael Baily 
wrnes). 

They reported more than 
9,000 motorists many of 
whom now face • court 
appearances. ' 

'The swoops were in Lon- 
don. Surrey, and Sussex and 
were part of a campaign to 
catch car tax dodgers that has 
been going on for five years. 

The police conduct spot 
checks on traffic and intensive 
surveys of vehicles. 

More than £21 million was 
recovered in the last financial 
year, and between £50 million 
and £100 million since the 
campaign began. 

The May operation yielded 
£6.5 million from 88,000 tax 
evaders in the London area. 

Checks are now going on in 
Essex. 


TV drama 



By Gavin Bell, Arts Correspondent 


J 

j.-if v*\ Michael Pennington 

\ 1 IlfU 1 it ^thony Quayle play , 

• » ■ 1 . . j K of Oedipus, voting am 


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The first televised produc- 
tion or the Theban plays of 
Sophocles, the tragic trilogy 
based On the Oedipus legend, 
will be broadcast by BBC-2 
next month as the classical 
highlight of a new drama 
season. 

Michael Pennington and Sir 
Anthony Quayle play the role 
of Oedipus, young and older, . 
the mao. -arced by the gods 
when the)* foretold he .would 
murder his. father and marry 
his mother. 

Sir John Gjej)gnd r celebrated 
his eightieth , birthday while 
acting foe pait of Teiresias in 
Antigone, the firet part of foe 
trilogy tu be filmed, two years 
agn. - . 

Mr Loois Marks, the pro- 
ducer, said that the pro- 


imme makers had resisted 
temptation to modernize 
the work, written 2500 years 
ago, because it was felt that 
would cheapen the production 
and reduce its dramatic effect 
“The classical approach us- 
ing masks was also considered 
unrealistic for television, so we 
went for a robust, modern 
reading of the original text. 
The idea, was to try to get foe 
authentic Sophocles to speak 
to foe aodieoces of today.” 

Each of foe plays was filmed 
essentially as one perfor- 
mance. with mistakes patched 
np later with art-away shots. 
"It was very tough on the 
actors,” Mr Marks said. 

The trilogy, translated and 
directed by Don Taylor, wifi be 
presented on three separate 


nights during foe week begin- 
ning September 14. It turn 
already been sold to an Ameri- 
can network. 

Theatre Night , to be 
launched on foe same channel 
next spring, will feature plays 
by Ibsen, Pinter, Shaw and 
Joe Orton. 

A new series of BBC-2 films 
includes Blast, in which Ian 
Richardson portrays the 
Keeper of foe Queen’s Pictures 
wbq masterminded foe depar- 
ture of his fellow spies Guy 
Burgess and Donald MacLean 

for foe Soviet Union in 1951- 

BBC-1 has an offering from 
the Scottish writer, John 
Byrne, author of Writers' 
Cramp and The Slab Boys, 
about an ageing rock band on a 
jubilee memorial tour of 
Scotland. 



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Although these terms may 
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SDN ALLIANCE 

INSURANCE GROUP 

•woswawawo •MQttmi MH1MICZ 


Now. 

Sard II w Sun Alliance MM Dcpb. FRSPOST, Bonham. W. Sowar BHE 1ZA. 
Ths h baud opoo Ac Gaoipnyli nnderfaadiag oi current lw» sod Inknd Sewsrec practice. 


(Bepwred Other 5m AUncc & Landau Awnacc Cd. 


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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 i9«6 


Twelve women patriots play truant in mystery of missing college st atues 

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The wrapping of A levels. 

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free education for part-time 

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students, and a 30 percent rise 

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in student numbers by 1495. 

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were proposed by the Social 
Democratic Parly yesterday. 

ri 

These were some of the 

tr 

party's recommendations for 

O 

an overhaul of higher educa- 

at 

tion outlined in iis paper. A 

P* 

New I ision for Higher 

it 

Education. 


By Sheila Gum. Political Staff 


By Jill Sherman 


The paper says that unless 
urgent steps are* taken Britain 
will be at a grave disadvantage 
compared with international 
competitors because too feu- 
people will be educated be- 
yond the age of 16. 

The document is to be 
debated at the SDP's annual 
conference ne\t month. 

It shows that only 32-40 per 
cent of 16 to 24-year-olds in 
Britain are still in college. 


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The missing patriots (from left) Miriam. Deborah, Cornelia, Boadicea, Bathfldis, Hilda, Saint Elizabeth, Queen Blanche, Catherine of Siena, Joan of Arc, Chand Beebee and Lo nise of Prussia. 

SDP proposes to end A levels Youth scheme ‘is Heathrow 

and raise student levels by 30% faUin £jiia bled ’ ‘my riot’ 

By Sheila Gann, Political Staff Youth Training Schemes side of the work. Proposed industrial action 

The wrapping of A levels, compared with 73 per cent in ure rates which leave several against all the other options. yJSEPiiill^jSh The report says that the 5 

free education for part-time ihe United Stales. 54 per cent thousand relatively able The proposals could not - be inability to provide suitable £ JJP?” ”.5? lead : 

students, and a 30 percent rise in Japan, and 45 per cent in young people eveiy year with achieved for less than JESTS' off-the-job training often pro- f us \ ' 

in student numbers by 199x West Germany. no qualifications to show for £1.000 million, on top of the SSwifcuJiiS , ? M “ d voked trainees to leave courses I0 f!, ol ^? n ye V C ?f y ’ 

were proposed by the Social Pan of the blame lies with two years’ education and a current higher education bud- ^“jmbiiitabon 1*“™) prematurely. Mr Max Madden. Labour 

Democratic Party yesterday. the present A-level examina- climate of some discourage- get of £3,400 million a year. s V rve . y c ^ rned jomUy MP for Bradford West, said 

These were some of the tion system, it says. ment and disparagement for Because of this, part-time ™ the 1 P stltl lte . of Sr*?” l?-L sl !!7 ey i» sh ^». that fc 0ol> officer? were ashamed of the 

party's recommendations for “This is highly academic, all but the high flyers.” higher education should be the L t ^ jn lS g * . ,rd .*?* youth scheme conditions m which visitors 

an overhaul of higher educa- specialized lo an extent that is The document suggests priority, the paper says. staff know Uttie about the trainees with special needs were held for questioning, and 

tion outlined in its paper. A unique in the world, and replacing A levels with a M __. v m.tiri »lcn h* ^bratwns of disablnm am- find jobs, while a jJurdgo on to angry about their own work- 

AV»- I Ision for Higher controlled by examination brSader qualification covering ditions,*nd are arable to other coors^erteiidedYTS ing conditions. 

Education. boards that are themselves both ansand science subjects XT 1 ^ “ ™ q rfh2!J “PPropnate training, or mto sheltered employment ^ Home office’s pro- 

The paper says that unless controlled by the universities, which would be under the Jt y ^? °* “ , ^ ier ^ ^ trainees overcome The rest were unemployed 0 f h^nd rooms for 

urgent steps are laken Britain “Some 22 per cent of the age control of a new body. eaucauon, it says. difficulties. M , specified provision v j s j lors awaiting clearance 

will be at a grave disadvantage group take Ihese examinations It also calls for a merger The party is already Radar has called for man- arranged.- when airport centres were full 

compared with international and some 15 per cent pass in between the Department of committed to increasing the stotory trmnmg un itm; e^ds of Manpower Services didnotreducetbethreat.be 

competitors because too few the two or more subjects that Education and Science and the 59£ no ?„ .* >U£ '8 et 41 * east ihose with disabilities for all Commission emphasized that said, 

people will be educated be- is the minimum qualification training functions of the Man- £50 million. stall on youth training jmproreinents in the youth He added that the action 

yond the age of 16. for entry to a degree course. Of power Services Commission. “However daunting the cost scbt c m es ; . . . training scheme for the dis- could bring parts of the airport 

The document is to be those who pass, the lower Such a move is being consid- of expanding bigber educa- t ne survey also snowstnat fl {,led were introduced in April, to a standstill within hours, 
debated ai the S DP's annual grades of pass are commonly ered by the Government. tion, it is important to see the oH-fn e-job training in initner indudii^ permanent addi- and said: “We may have a 

conlercnce next month. regarded, by the universities at It raises doubts about the cost in the context of our education colleges is often tinnai fanduig, a personal situation where frustrated vis- 
it shows that only 32-40 per least, as “poor calibre". present system of student continuing high levels of unsiutable for young people reader service for blind train- itors will simply stonn the 

cent of 16 to 24-year-olds in “Thus we see a picture of grams, but concludes that youth unemployment,” the J* 1 ™ se 9 so *J impairmen Ls ana ^ am } a commonication ser- immigration counters and 

Britain are still in college, intense competition, high fail- there are strong arguments paper says. s mireiaied to the practical vk* for the deaf. gainaccessintoBritainwith- 

1 ■ ■ ■ i ■ ■ out any checks at all.” 

That would create the 

....... . . gravest possible situation, he 

, \ ’ ’ '••• said, as immigration controls 

-. \... . ‘V . - .. • provided the first line of 

v x: drefence against terrorism, 

• 11 • ;| . •. • . -u. • - ,JM " . 1 . . .• • : .- drag trafficking and entry of 

^ - * >■■■'. ■■ undesirable people into 


compared with 73 per cent in 
ihe United Siaics. 54 percent 
in Japan, and 45 per cent in 
West Germany. 

Pan of the blame lies with 
the present A-level examina- 
tion system, it says. 

“This is highly academic, 
specialized lo an extent that is 
unique in the world, and 
controlled by examination 
boards that are themselves 
controlled by the universities. 

“Some 22 per cent of the age 
group take these examinations 
and some 1 5 per cent pass in 
the two or more subjects that 
is the minimum qualification 
tor entry to a degree course. Of 
those who pass, the lower 
grades of pass are commonly 
regarded, by the universities at 
least, as "poor calibre". 

“Thus we see a picture of 
intense competition, high fail- 


ure rates which leave several 
thousand relatively able 
young people every year with 
no qualifications to show for 
two years’ education and a 
climate of some discourage- 
ment and disparagement for 
all but the high flyers.” 

The document suggests 
replacing A levels with a 
broader qualification covering 
both arts and science subjects 
which would be under the 
control of a new body. 

h also calls for a merger 
between the Department of 
Education and Science and the 
training functions of the Man- 
power Services Commission. 
Such a move is being consid- 
ered by the Government. 

It raises doubts about the 
present system of student 
grants, but concludes that 
there are strong arguments 


against all the other options. 

The proposals could not' be 
achieved for less than 
£1.000 million, on top of the 
current higher education bud- 
get of £3,400 million a year. 

Because of this, part-time 
higher education should be the 
priority, the paper says. 

Money could also be saved 
by bringing in a qualification 
after two years of higher 
education, it says. 

The party is already 
committed to increasing the 
science budget by at least 
£50 million. 

“However daunting the cost 
of expanding higher educa- 
tion. it is important to see the 
cost in the context of our 
continuing high levels of 
youth unemployment,” the 
paper says. 


Youth Training Schemes 
(YTS) are failing to meet rbe 
needs of school leavers with 
disabilities, the Royal Associ- 
ation for Di&fMIity and 
Rehabilitation (Radar) says. 

A survey carried out jointly 
with the Institute of Careers 
Officers shows that training 
staff know little about the 
implications of disabling con- 
ditions, and are unable to 
provide appropriate training, 
or help trainees overcome 
difficulties. 

Radar has called for man- 
datory training in the needs of 
those with disabilities lor all 
staff on yontb training 
schemes. 

The survey also shows that 
off-the-job training in further 
education colleges is often 
unsuitable for young people 
with sensory impairments and 
b wnrpiai wrf to the practical 


side of the work. 

The report says that the 
inability to provide suitable 
off-the-job training often pro- 
voked trainees to leave courses 
prematurely. 

The survey shows that only 
a third of all youth scheme 
trainees with special needs 
find jobs, while a-tbird go on to 
other courses, extended YTS 
or into sheltered employment 
The rest were unemployed 
with no specified provision 
arranged. - 

The Manpower Services 
Commission emphasized that 
improvements in the youth 
training scheme for the dis- 
abled were introduced in April, 
including permanent addi- 
tional funding, a personal 
reader service for blind train- 
ees and a communication ser- 
vice for the deaf. 


By David Sapsted 

Cheltenham Ladies' Col- 
lege, Gloucestershire, 
launched a nationwide appeal 
yesterday, in an attempt to 
trace 12 statnes that once 
graced the school btuldiiigs 
but have not been seen fa- 
more than SO years. 

The 4ft statues of patriotic 
women, crafted in 1883 by a 
local sculptor, H H Martyn, 
were placed in a gardener's 
store at the college during 
alterations In 1934. Their fate 
has since remained a mystery. 

“Frankly, nobody really 
bothered about them mffl 
recently. Now we are e ng a ge d 
in efforts to restore our build- 
ings but, despite searching 
fesgfti and low, we can find ne 
trace,” Mr Anthony Siddall, 
the bursar, said. 

The college wants to bear 
from anyone, particularly old 
girls, who might be able to 
solve the mystery. Reports 
that some of the figures were 
stored in extensive vaults be- 
neath the college bnfldlngs 
proved fruitless after a search 
by staff. Others were said to be 
buried somewhere in the 30- 
arre school grounds at the 
start of the Second World 
War. 

“Ail we know for sure is 
that, when the gardener's store 
was demolished in 1969, they 
were not there. With about W0 
statnes of varions sizes dotted 
about the college, it must have 
been difficult to keep track of 
them,” Mr Siddall said. 

The missing statues are of 
the laudable Miriam and Deb- 
orah, chanting songs of vic- 
tory; Cornelia, die mother of 
Gracchi, standing beside 
Boadicea; BathiMw, slave 
manacles in hand, next to 
Hilda bolding a model of 
Whitby Abbey; St Elizabeth of 
Hungary, with roses, and 
Queen Blanche, the mother of 
St Louis; Catherine of Siena 
standing beside Joan of Arc; 
and Chand Beebee, noble 
queen of Bejapoer, next to 
Lonise of Prussia. 






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Solicitors fined 
for ‘joke’ advert 


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Tltat tlic picture abuvv might become 
reality doesn’t bear thinking db» -ul. 

1'iul it wun’l happen, thanks largely to 
the efficienev i ii b.idax ’s farming. 

Uc have around S million more people 
lo feed now than in 1945. Met rather than gpbble 
up more land to feed them, we in facl use 
thousands of acres less for food production. 
So thanks lo fertilizers, and associated 
advances, uv now no i <ml\ produce virtually 
nil I he loud we need, but can also conserve 
more land for leisure and other uses. 

Produc ing food and enriching 
th e environment. 

Concern for our environment is vital: 
farmers themselves play as important a part 
as anyone in protecting it. 

They live and work on the land: their 
livelihood depends on it. 

The unpublicised majority of them are 


Six partners in an old- 
established solicitors’ firm, 
whose eye-catching press 
advertising campaign dis- 
pleased the Law Society, were 
fined £100 each yesterday fora 
breach of professional practice 
rules. 

The advertisements in- 
serted by Jefferies, of South- 
end, Essex, included a “joke” 
entry form for “the 
competition” and went on to 
say: “There isn’t any” The 
firm admitted at a Solicitors' 
Disciplinary Tribunal in Lon- 
don that the advertisement 
read as if it was claiming to 
offer a service superior to that 
of other firms, which is against 
society guidelines. 

Another advertisement, 
based on one used by the Law 
Society, was beaded: “Don't 
you wish you had used 
Jefferies to do your 
conveyancing?” It included a 
drawing of a house sur- 
rounded by mechanical ex- 
cavators and bulldozers, 
apparently removing the 
garden. 

This was in breach of the 
same rale, although the tri- 
bunal accepted that the inten- 
tion was to indicate that 
solicitors would do the Job 
better than unqualified 
conveyancers. 

The firm's advertising cam- 
paign, from December 1984 to 


June 1985, was discontinued 
after objections, and an in- 
dication from its accountants 
that there bad been no in- 
crease in the work attracted* 

The partners who were 
fined were Mr Frank Lock- 
hart. Mr Alan Gershlick, Mr 
Trevor Helm. Miss Jill Dukes, 
Mr Robin Morrison and Mr 
Paul Singer. 

• The tribunal ordered three 
solicitors to be struck off- 

Mr Roland Aka, of Hornsey 
Rise Gardens, Upper 
Holloway, north London, was 
found to have broken 
solicitors' accounts rules and 
been convicted of making 
false statements in value- 
added tax returns and pass- 
port applications. 

Mr Alan Roberts, of Elm 
Grove Road, Dinas POwis, 
South Glamorgan, was found 
guilty of breaches of accounts’ 
rules and of practising without 
a certificate and while 
uninsured. 

Mr George Street, of 
Hoylake Road, Morcton, 
Wirral, was found to have 
practised while disqualified, 
failed to deal promptly with 
certain business and had been 
convicted of offences under 
the Finance Act He was said 
to be in ill-health. 

The tribunal also ordered 
Mr Vivian Jenkins to be 
restored to the solicitors' roll. 


more and more actively seeking positive ways 
to enrich it, planting more trees and enlarging 
existing wildlife habitats. Around 7 million 
new trees were planted on English and Wfelsh 
farms last year. 

In fact, FWAG (The Fanning and Wild- 
life Advisory Group) was invited by a further 
3,000 farmers in 1985 to visit their farms and 
provide conservation advice. 

And while they're caring for the land, 
they're growing enough food for all the rest of 
us. and others too. In 19S4. our exports of 
livestock and other food produce amounted 
to something like £4 billion, putting fanning 
high in the top league of exporters. 

The important role play ed 
bv fertilizers. 

The proper use of fertilizers benefits 
the soil, returning natural elements vital for 
healthy crop growth. 


They help maintain an ample food 
supply to sustain our population, and play 
their part in allowing the landscape to be 
conserved. 

That's why ICI Agricultural Division 
takes pride in being Britain’s leading manu- 
facturer of fertilizers. 

It's also why the picture above won’t 
become a reality. 

You are invited to write to us for more 
information on the issues raised in this 
advertisement 

Please contact Mrs. Diane York at ICI 
Agricultural Division, PO Box 1, Billingham, 
Cleveland TS23 1LB. 


Labour costs may lure 
Japanese car makers 

By Clifford Webb, Motoring Correspondent 

TVrT- - .... - _ 


More Japanese motor 
manufacturers are expected to 
folfow Nissan's lead and bnOd 
car factories in Britain to 
advantage of low labour costs, 
according to a new report on 
the European motor industry. 

It q notes hourly labour costs 
of £4.40 in Britain. Only 
Spain, of the nine European 
and Scandinavian countries 
producing cars, is cheaper at 

The report, prepared for 


ICI 


^FERTILIZERS 

f Helping nature - 
and Britain - to grow 


• L'SiZ major supplier to agriculture. ICI Agricultural Oivi&ion is running this series of advertisements, designed to increase public aimrpncss both of the 
rule after tiliztn* in ntudenijhnnimi and of Other keif issues involved in the production ofBritishJbod. Many of the facts presented here will be familiar to tke 
farming community, hut uv belie re uv have a responsibility to help keep the general public fully informed on these major and complex issues. 


ment consultants by the motor 
industry research team at East 
Anglia University, palmlgt ^ 
that the Japanese can save 
more than £400 a car by 
bulldiiig in Britain. It suggests 
that- the increasingly strong 
yen and fierce price-cutting in 
Europe are depressing profits 
on many Japanese car exports 
to the point where they are 
only breaking even. 

Action by European govern- 
ments to redress their trade 
balance with Japan is aM to 
be another powerful influence 
for establishing focal assem- 
bly plants, or entering into 
more collaborative ventures 


similar to the successful 
partnership between Austin 
Rover and Honda. 

The authors consider that in 
spite of its very low labour 
costs Spain has a serious 
drawback - the Spanish 
Government's opposition to 
more car production. 

Mr Ronald Sewell, chair- 
man of Sewell International, 
said last nqghti “Tills report 
confirms the underlying prob- 
lems in die motor industry in 
Europe today. With so many 
mergers and co-operation 
agreements it will become even 
more difficult for an individnal 
mannfactnrer to survive. 

“Motor traders hi Britain 
beco me increasingly, con- 
cerned by the competition 
smmg manufacturers. The 
pext few years m the motor 
•udnstry will be of great 
coutseqaence in Britain and 
throughout Europe." 

The European Motor MartufitO- 
turvrs: Profiles, Strategies and 
Options (Sewell International. I 
gueea Street Bath,. Avon; 


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THF- TTMF.S FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


South African sanctions crisis 




and coal ban could cost 
i, say employers 



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Joint action by the EEC, the 
United States and Japan to 
ban imports of South African 
coal^ steel and iron ore could 
deprive Pretoria of nearly 3 
billion rand (£79Q million) in 
export eanrings ahd put some 
50,000- people, most of diem 
yacks,outofworik. 

;• Thii is .the first, tentative 
calculation by industry sour- 
ces here of the possible impact 
of die economic sanciionsthat 
now seera m prospect after- die 
deriaoffir taken at this week's 
meeting in London between 
Britain and six other Com- 
mon wealth countries. - 
• It is a worst-case scenario, 
in that jt assumes the 
Commonwealth measures will 
be reinforced by similar action 
by ‘the United States and 
Japan, and that there will be 
ho “leaks'* or “holes" in their 
enforcement. Watertight sanc- 
tions' are, in fact, unlikely 
given past experience. 

Coal , is by far. the most 
vulnerable, sector. In 198S, 
South Africa exported 44 mil- 
lion tons, worth JJ.I4 billion 
rand in foreign exchange, of its 
total .production -, of 173 mil- 
lion tons, according to the 
Chamber of Mines. 

' The" bulk : of ifiese exports 
were sold to the EEC whiefcit 
is estimated, took 22 million 
ions. : and Japan, which ac- 
counted for 8.5 million tons. 
The rest went mainly to the . 

Zambians 
‘beat up 
tourists’ 

. . Lusaka (Rentes:) — Six 
-Swiss and Austrian tourists, 
^axested on suspicion of spying 
for Sotrth Africa, were severely 
^beaten by Zambian police 
demanding confessions, an 
-Austrian Embassy spokes- 

* woman said yesterday. 

. She said at least one of the 
-group, who- were travelling 
.'across Africa when they were 
.-arrested on July 24 in the 
northern Zambian town of 
Nakonde, had been forced to 
confess to being a spy for 
; Pretoria. 

The live Swiss and one 
Austrian, including a couple 
'and two women, came to 
^Zambia, from Sooth Africa 
thiongfi' Zimbabwe and : Ma-'. 
lawL The spokeswoman- said 
. she .visited them w g^sonand . 
found one of the,Spiss men 
very nervous and frightened. 

AlLsix,in thcir.2Qsjin3 30s, 
were beaten and threatened, 
and-a-Swiss woman confessed 
she was afSonth African spy 
after' being blindfolded and 
k driwn. around in a car. for 
several .hours, she said. She 
: declined to name the 

- detainees. 

Their treatment improved 
considerably after the em- 

- hassy protested, and they were 
moved from the police station 

. where they were being hefd. 

* Austria was telling its citi- 
zens to avoid visiting Zambia 

^ except- for. urgent business 
because of police harassment 
of foreigners and paranoia 
-- about South African spies* 

: . - The spokeswoman said an 
'Austrian •< woman arrested 
^separately last mood* had 
-confessed under torture that 
Tshe was a South African spy 
but was freed last week. 

Three British students who 
: were crossing Africa overland 
were also freed last week after 
._ being held for about a week io 

* northern Kasama prison. 

British diplomats said they 
: were consifani! advising 
Britons not to visit Zambia 
1 except on essential business. 

. Zambia has been. on high 

1 alert against .spies and sabo- 
teurs, since a South African air 

jLiaid on an alleged guerrilla 
^ base near Lnsaka on May 19. 
t ■ Zambian .officials 1 say - the 

2 target was in fact a refugee 
transit camp and was com- 

ipletdy unconnected with the 
-t African National Congress, 

. which has its headquarters in 
-Lusaka. 

Northern Zambia seems es- 
pecially tense because the 
Chinese-built Tazara railway 
linking Zambia with the East 
African coast goes through 
this regioa, and President 
Kaunda has warned of a 
- possible South African inva- 
t sion from the north. . 


From Michael Hornsby, Johannesburg 

United States, Korea, Taiwan difficulty in serine a major risen sharply in recent 

poruon of these tonnages be- because of reduced 1 
ing sold at any price, however ^ now account for 


and black-ruled African coun- 
tries. 

In a statement last month, 
pie Chamber of Mines cla- 
imed that 35 per cent of the 

110.000 people employed in 
the coal industry, of whom 

95.000 are black, could lose 
their jobs if all these foreign 
markets were lost to South 
Africa.. . . 

It also said that collieries 
had "started with contingency 
plans to retrench employees in 
the near future", owing to a 17 


r this year, and the impact of 
unilateral bans already im- 
posed on South African coal 
by France and Denmark. 

The chairman of the coal 
division of Rand Mines, Mr 
Allen Sealey, said that South 
Africa might have to find new 
markets for nearly 26 million 
tons of its coal exports as a 
result of sanctions. 

This estimate assumed that 
South Africa wo old be shut 
out of the EEC market, would 
lose sales of 800,000 tons' a 
year in the United States and 
about three million tons of the 
8.5 minion tons it sold to 
Japan last year. 

The opportunities for find- 
ing other outlets for these 
exports — the Far East being 
the most likely target area — 
were limited, he said. “I have 


South African coal is al- 
ready being sold on inter- 
national markets at a discount 
of about 10 per cent, and some 
industry sources here calculate 
that an export volume of 30 
minion tbos a year could be 
preserved by increasing the 
discount to as much as 30 per 
cent 

The low value of the rand, 
and lower labour costs than 
most of ns competitors, -put 
South Africa in a relatively 
strong position from which to 
wage a price-cutting war. 
There is, however, a limit on 
how far coal producers here 
can cut prices and still meet 
freight and other costs. 

The scope for sanctions- 
bustrqg is more limited than 
in the case of some other 
commodities, industry sour- 
ces here say. South African 
coal has specific properties 
which make it difficult to 
disguise its origin. 

In addition, much of South 
Africa's exported coal is sold 
to public utilities abroad. This 
means that it would be impos- 
sible to circumvent sanctions 
unless foreign governments 
themselves connived in the 
evasion. 

Steel exports, which have 


about 40 per cent of steel 
production, had been bud- 
geted to earn Iscor, the state- 
run iron and steel corporation, 
and its private competitors 
some 13 billion rand this 
year. 

lscor's public' relations 
manager, Mr Piet Du Plessis, 
described the EEC and North 
America as “important ■mar- 
kets". It would be “difficult, 
but not impossible" to replace 
them elsewhere. “It is not a 
seller's market at the moment. 
We win have to look wherever 
we can." 

Private-sector spokesmen 
are more pcssimistic.“There 
aren't many other outlets", 
said one. Analysts here reckon 
that South Africa stands to 
Iose at least 300 million rand a 
year in steel exports, and that 
exports of iron ore and pig 
iron, valued at 354 milli on 
rand in 1984, could be wiped 
out by sanctions. 

If sanctions were extended 
to South Africa's fruit exports, 
the consequences could be 
serious. About 75 per cent of 
fresh fruit exports go to the 
EEC, with Britain the biggest 
customer. Last year. South 
Africa exported 305,000 tons 
of fresh deciduous fruit, wrath 
473 million rand. 


Shultz insists on seeking 
peaceful end to apartheid 


From Michael Binyon, Washington 

Washington will not allow 
frustrations and setbacks to 
hamper its attempts to find a 
negotiated end to apartheid in 
South Africa, Mr George 
Shultz, the US Secretary of 
State. 


Resolutely opposing strong 
punitive sanctions a^ii^st 
Pretoria, he told reporters; 
“You're not going to get me to 
say we are going to throw up 
our hands and leave. We have 
to stick with it, even though 
the outlook may not look 
good." 

In his first public comment 
.on the South Africa crisis 
since the Commonwealth 
meeting, at. the wakend, Mr 
Shultz said he was not sur- 
prised at , South Africa's 
counter-sanctions - against 
.Zimbabwe and Zambia. 

Hi shouldn't have been any 
-surprise*- It's- -always- been a 
puzzle to me that when I meet 
members of Congress or for- 
eign ministers from countries 
supporting strong sanctions, 
when T ask them what they are 
prepared to do about the 
problems that will be created 
in southern Africa, there is a 
profound silence. 


“It's a tragic situation, but 
it's the kind of situation that 
dictates that you have to work 
-on the possibilities; even if 
they're not probabilities. You 
have to tty to raise the 
possibilities into probabi- 


lities' 

Mr Shultz criticized the 
white minority Government 
in Pretoria for imposing a 



Mr Shultz: refuses to throw 
up bis hands and leave, 
slate of emergency after saying 
it wanted to negotiate with 
black leaders. He called the 
process “very frustrating", 
taking one step forwards and 
one backwards. 

Nevertheless, he voiced 


Israelis Black US 
send team envoy ‘not 
to Pretoria named yet’ 


From Ian Murray 
Jerusalem 


An Israeli delegation, led by 
Finance Ministry officials, left 
for South Africa last night on a 
mission “to maintain links 
with the Jewish community" 
there, which is estimated to be 
around 110,000-strong 

During its stay, the delega- 
tion is to negotiate the renewal 
of arrangements for the trans- 
fer of funds to Israel. Money 
from the relatively wealthy 
South African Jews makes a 
significant annual contribu- 
tion to Israel's economy. 

The mission also is to seek 
.the renewal of arrangements 
which allow Israeli boats to 
jish off the South African 
coast and for the importation 
of South African coal. 

Mr Shimon Peres, the 
Prime Minister, said this week 
that Israel was not considering 
imposing sanctions on South 
Africa, as it was too insignifi- 
cant a trading partner for this 
to have any effect. 

Since tension has been 
increasing there, however, 
Jews living in South Africa 
have been under increasing 
pressure from Jerusalem to 
emigrate to Israel. 


From Christopher Follett 
Copenhagen 

Mr Terence Todznan. the 
US Ambassador to Denmark 
who has been named as a 
possible candidate for a post- 
ing to Pretoria, said here 
yesterday that Washington 
had not yet reached the stage 
of making an appointment. 

“The united States is cur- 
rently reconsidering its entire 
South African policy," he said. 
“Until then it is not the time 
to decide bn sending a new 
ambassador to Pretoria. Only 
when the clear lines of a new, 
credible US policy on South 
Africa have been evolved will 
the discussion of who to send 
as ambassador to Pretoria be 
relevant." . 

Mr Tod man. aged 60, said 
he had called the meeting to 
dispel what he called “fab- 
ricated stories” in the Ameri- 
can media that had Mown to 
“unbelievable proportions" 
rumours of his supposed can- 
didacy for the Pretoria post. 

He would not, however, be 
drawn on the question of 
whether or not he had actually 
been offered the post “I 
would accept the post if 1 feh I 
could do it." be said. 


reservations about the exiled 
wing of the African National 
Congress, which the Reagan 
Administration regards as 
Communist-influenced. But 
he said he was ready to meet 
Mr Oliver Tam bo, the ANC 
leader, whom he regards as a 
moderate. 

Meanwhile, American Ro- 
man Catholic bishops have 
written to senators expressing 
their support for limited sanc- 
tions. .Failure to take such 
measures, they said, would be 
“morally indefensible”. 

Their letter was sent just 
before the Senate foreign rela- 
tions committee voted for 
sanctions last Friday, but it 
has just been made public. 

US Catholics have taken a 
more cautious view of the 
South African .crisis than their 
Protestant counterparts, who 
have strongly endorsed the 
sweeping measures already 
voted for by the House of 
Representatives. Bishop Des- 
mond Turn, the South African 
Anglican leader, has forged 
close links with many church 
leaders here. 

A spokesman for American 
Catholics said South African 
Catholics had opposed pres- 
sures that would destroy the 
country's economy. But Mon- 
signor Daniel Hoye, general 
secretary of the US Catholic 
Conference, told Senators; “A 
policy of moral and political 
appeasement of those who 
promote and acquiesce in 
systematic discrimination wo- 
uld relegate us to the sidelines 
in the worldwide struggle for 
human rights." 

The Reagan Administration 
has been further embarrassed 
by its failure to find a black 
willing to take the job of US 
Ambassador to Pretoria. The 
latest front-runner, Mr Ter- 
ence Todman, the US Ambas- 
sador to Denmark, has 
reportedly declined. 

The Administration's some- 
what transparent attempt at 
symbolic support for the black 
majority has backfired and led 
to accusations here of token- 
ism without a real change in 
policy. 



Chancellor Helmut Kohl of West Germany and his wife, Hannelore, enjoying an outing on 
the lake at the holiday resort of St Gilgen on the Wotfgangsee. 


Mitterrand 
pays visit 
to airborne 
firefighters 

From Susan Macdonald 
Paris 

President Mitterrand paid a 
surprise visit yesterday to the 
airborne firefighting division, 
stationed at Marignane in the 
south of France. 

Composed of 52 pilots and 
30 mechanics equipped with 
11 Canadair planes, three 
DC6s and eight small tracker 
aircraft, they work in conjunc- 
tion with ground firefighfug 
teams to control fires which 
rage through thousands of 
acres of forests every summer. 

This is the first time a 
president has visited the force 
since its creation in 1963. 
President Mitterrand said he 
had come to see their working 
conditions, equipment and way 
of doing filings. 

Twelve members of the force 
have died while fighting fires 
m the past two years, Indndlng 
four men whose plane hit a 
mountain in the Pyrenees 
three weeks ago in high winds. 

As a consequence of this 
a ccident the pen threatened fo 
strike' if a review of thdr 
working conditions and equip- 
ment was not carried out. ■ 
President Mitterrand was 
taken up in a Canadair for a 
sea landing and water res- 
ervoir refilling operation. He 
said afterwards that he sup- 
ported their claims for greater 
recognition. 

This year so far, forest fires 
have destroyed thousands of 
acres along the Cote d'Azur. 
Many of the fires are started 
deliberately. 

The Justice Minister, M 
A! bin Chaiandon, has- an- 
nounced that volunteer pris- 
oners wQl be used in 
September to dear the under- 
growth before next year's dry 
season. 

The Agriadtnre Minister, 
M Francois Guillaume, an- 
nounced yesterday that he was 
naming an inspector-geoerai 
to co-ordinate all relief opera- 
tions to combat the increas- 
ingly serious drought affecting 
central and south-west France. 

i HUESCA: More fires 
broke out yesterday in the 
Spanish Pyrenees region of 
Hnesca, where about 7,500 
acres of pine forest and scrub- 
land have been destroyed in 
the past week (Renter reports). 

Firefighters struggled ag- 
ainst strong winds which have 
spread the flames over an 11- 
mile froat 


Colombia to carry 
on drug campaign 


From Geoffrey Matthews, Bogota 

Colombia's new President, pursue the campaign to crush 

the drug racket. 

In his meeting with foreign 
journalists, Scnor Banco also 
hinted that the time might be 


Senor Vjrgjlio Barco Vargas 
yesterday re-affirmed the nat- 
ion's commitment to the 
mounting war on the inter- 
national cocaine racket. 

He made the declaration 
when he met the US Secretary 
of State, Mr George Shultz, a 
few hours before his inaugura- 
tion yesterday. 

But earlier, in an informal 
meeting with foreign journal- 
ists, making a clear reference 
to the recent anti-drug “Op- 
eration Blast Furnace" in 
Bolivia, Senor Barco firmly 
ruled out the use of foreign 
troops in Colombia. 

In the Bolivian operation, 
the Government allowed US 
troops and agents from the US 
Drug Enforcement Admin- 
istration to help the local drug- 
enforcement unit to seek out 
and destroy cocaine-process- 
ing factories. 

Colombia has earned high 
praise from Washington for its 
efforts to eradicate drug 
trafficking. 

Under the administration of 
Sendr Barco's predecessor, Se- 
nor Belisario Betancur, coca 
and ’marijuana crops were 
sprayed with pesticides and 
strict import controls were 
imposed on key chemicals 
required for the processing of 
cocaine. 

Also several leading drug 
bosses were extradited to the 
United Slates under a treaty 
designed to bring inter- 
national traffickers to justice. 

Senor Barco told Mr Shultz 
that Colombia would con- 
tinue to implement the extra- 
dition treaty and to accept aid 
from Washington so that its 
own security forces could 


ripe for rc-opening diplomatic 
relations with Cuba, severed 
in 1981 after a big operation 
by the April 19 guerrilla 
movement (M-19). 

Bogota claimed that the 
guerrillas had been trained 
and armed in Cuba. It is 
thought that Havana has since 
withdrawn all support from 
M-19. 

Senor Barco also favours 
Cuba's admission to the 
Organization of American 
Stares. 

The new President again 
emphasized that his 
Government's main priority 
would be to eradicate “ab- 
solute poverty" through the 
creation of jobs and public 
works to improve the living 
conditions of the urban and 
rural poor. 

Colombia will continue to 
play an active role in the 
Contadora group to achieve 
peace in Central America, he 
said. 

Security was tight in Bogota 
because offears that guerrilla 
groups ' might stage some 
disruptive action to mar the 
inauguration. 

Two former members of M- 
19 who accepted official par- 
dons under the previous 
Government’s amnesty pro- 
gramme have, been Ranted 
political asylum in the Swiss 
Embassy here, claiming that 
they have been threatened by 
right-wing death squads. 

They are expected to be 
allowed to leave the country 
within a few days. 


Eta protest against 
Paris turns violent 

From Richard Wigg, Madrid 
than 30 people. 


More 

including 10 policemen, were 
injured early yesterday in 
Vitoria during violent demon- 
strations against France’s de- 
cision to hand over suspected 
members of the separatist 
organization Eta to the Span- 
ish police. 

The usually staid Basque 
capital was celebrating its 
annual fiesta and as a result 
thousands of locals and vis- 
itors were caught up in the 
demonstrations and police 
charges. 


The violence, which lasted 
for several hours, began at 
midnight when petrol bombs 
were thrown at the offices of 
the Civil Governor, the Ma- 
drid Government’s repre- 
sentative in the region, from a 
crowd of about 2.000 stone- 
throwing Eta sympathizers. 

The Governor accused the 
organizers, who belonged to 
groups campaigning for the 
release of Eta men held in 
Spanish jails, of bringing in 
troublemakers from Bilbao 
and San Sebastian. 


Five lost 
in French 
lifeboat 
disaster 

Brest (Reuter) — French 
rescuers found one body and 
were searching for four miss- 
ing crew members of a lifeboat 
lost off the Brittany coast, 
rescue service sources said. 

Debris from the lifeboat was 
found in the Aber-Wrach es- 
tuary on the north-west 
Breton coast where it had gone 
to help a small sailing boat. 

Weather conditions were 
moderate overnight and res- 
cuers said they did not know 
the cause of the accident. 

Indian rail 
rescue 

Delhi (Reuter) - Rescuers 
working in a flood-swept 
north Indian ravine freed the 
last survivors yesterday of a 
train wreck that killed 45 
people. 

Teams of doctors rushed to 
the site near Dhanbad. about 
125 miles south of the Bihar 
state capital Patna. 

Sydney storm 
damage tour 

Sydney (Reuter) — Mr Bob 
Hawke, the Australian Prime 
Minister, toured the dev- 
astated suburbs of Sydney 
where six people were killed 
and thousands forced to flee 
their homes after record 
rainfall. 

Four suburbs have been 
declared disaster areas and Mr 
Hawke and Mr Barrie Uns- 
worth. the New South Wales 
Premier, promised compensa- 
tion for flood victims. 

Rapists held 

Peking (Reuter) — Police 
have arrested four train stew- 
ards on charges of raping 
passengers on long-distance 
journeys, the China Legal 
News reported. 

Briton killed 

Barcelona (AP) - Andrew 
Jones, a British tourist from 
Wale$.aged 19. died after foil- 
ing from the window of on 
apartment building in Calella, 
a resort north of here, a British 
consular official said. 

Swiss festival 

Locarno (AP) — The Inter- 
national Locarno Him Festi- 
val opened yesterday with 12 
world premieres among 17 
entries in the main com- 
petition. About 170 non-com- 
petition movies are to run 
during the festival, including 
ipen-air showings of “Filins 
if the Year". 

Aids deaths 

Nairobi (AP) - Aids has 
killed 92 people in Tanzania’s 
capital, Dar es Salaam, during 
the past year, the Kenyan 
newspaper Daily News 
reported. 

Flights hit 

a Colombo (Reuter) — Swiss- 
air has joined five other 
airlines that are either reduc- 
ing flights to Sri Lanka or 
slopping operations here al- 
together because of a drop in 
tourism. 

Jumped ship 

Gevdand, Ohio (Reuter) — 

A crewman from a Polish 
cargo ship has applied for 
political asylum at an im- 
migration office in Geveland, 
a US Senate official said. 

Refugee plea 

Madrid (Reuter) — Seven 
Romanian seamen have asked 
for refugee status in Spain's 
Canary Islands, police said. 

Video claim 

Tokyo (Reuter) — Three- 
dimensional (3-D) movie 
technology will be the next 
home video fad, Japanese 
electronics makers said. 


‘Flying’ challenger of the seas 


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* ' America II, the New York Yacht Gob's challenger for the America's Cup, beii 
- V Fremantle In Western Australia, in preparation for the title races lata: 


unloaded at 
is year. 


Italy touched by plight of ‘sleeping-bag people’ 


From Peter Nichols 
Rune 

The purpose of (he sleeping 
-bag is obvious enough, but the 
question of where young tour- 
ists in Italy can actually sleep 
in their bags has become the 
problem of this summer since 
the Venice authorities issued 
an edict last month banning 
them in public places. 

The ban has been heavily 
criticized for being repressive; 
infringement brings fines and 
remora! by the ponce in a city 
which offers little alternative 
to the streets and squares for 
travellers unwilling or unable 
to pay for hotels. 

The authorities* object was 
to protect toe decorum of toe 

r t monuments, especially 
Mark's Square, which 
lends itself very well to use by 
what are now called “sleeping- 
bag people". 

The arcades keep off the 
nocturnal damp rising from 
toe canals. And for die more 
sensitive, sunrise over the 
Doge's Palace is a great 
spectacle, even from over the 
rim of a sleeping bag. But it is 
less so if (toe is rudely awak- 
ened at dawn by angry police- 
men. As one East European 
student was heard to comment: 
“I thought I had come away on 
holiday to get away from all 
that." 

The side effects are often 
ill uminating - The outcry has 
convinced editors to equip the 


more casual of their journal- 
ists with rucksacks and sleep- 
ing bags, shorts and canvas 
shoes and send them hitch- 
hiking to Venice to mix with 
this vast but largely unknown 
race of travellers, which is now 
becoming a national political 
issue. 

The analyses vary from total 
identification with the mis- 
treated yoong student, whose 
sleeping bag is seen to be 
stuffed with diplomas and 
university degrees,' to disgust 


with a generation which is 
really prosperous but insists 
on being anti-social and anti- 
hygienic. 

The Communist youth 
moveement rushed to the sup- 
port of the sleeping-b^g peo- 
ple, organizing boat trips for 
them in the Venetian lagoon 
and a party in one of the main 
squares of the dty. 

The affair has reached the 
point at which the tourist 
authorities of Rome and Flor- 


ence, which is the European' 
cultural capital this year, are 
p lanning to meet their Vene- 
tian colleagues to decide 
jointly what to do with young 
tourists not disposed to spend. 

Rome has long experience of 
the problem, in part because it 
has been accustomed for 
centuries to dealing with the 
pilgrim trade. But it has fresh 
difficulties now: its historic 
centre is seen to be in danger 
from the advance of the “fast 
food" crusade. The city, how- 


Appeal to end prison oyercrowding 


Rome — An appeal for 
resolute action to free the 
crisis of overcrowding in pris- 
ons has come from, of all 
people, the director-general of 
Italy’s prison system (Peter 
Nichols writes). 

Signor Nicola Amato, a 
former public prosecutor who 
is head of the Justice 
Ministry's prisons . depart- 
ment, says that more than 
44.000 people are being held 
in accommodation designed 
for an absolute maximum of 
29.000. 

He launched his appeal in 
the wake of two dramatic 
events. The first was a report 
by a group of doctors on the 
appalling conditions in which 
prisoners live in the Poggio- 
reale prison in Naples. 

The report was prepared for 
Parliament's anti-Mafia com- 


mission. It states that cells 
contain up to 20 people, and 
three times more prisoners are 
held in the old building than 
the structure permits. 

The second was a decision 
by party leaders this week to 
postpone until the autumn 
discussion of a long-promised 
amnesty. 

Among other leading mem- 
bers of the Government. Si- 
gnor Giulio Andreorti, the 
Foreign Minister, pressed 
hard for immediate approval 
of the measure, both on 
humane grounds and as a 
partial solution to the 
overcrowding. He fears new 
disorders as the temperature 
rises. 

This measure indirectly fell 
victim to the resignation of 
the Government, though the 
Communist opposition, as 


well as leading politicians on 
the Government side, ex- 
pressed their readiness to go 
on working for agreement on 
an amnesty text. 

Christian Democrat mem- 
bers of the Senate’s justice 
commission yesterday pro- 
posed that prisoners them- 
selves should be asked for 
their suggestions. 

The main point made by 
Signor Amaio in his article, 
published by the Rome news- 
paper La Repubblica, is that 
the criticisms of prison con- 
ditions must be transformed 
into practical imitiatives. 

Virtually admitting his in- 
ability' to impose quick and 
effective change through the 
bureaucratic machinery, he 
calls for concerted help from 
society. “Help us, do not leave 
us alone," he says. 


ever, has plenty of space 
around it for camping sites 
which Venice, being a tight 
little island, does not possess. 

Florence is attempting to 
impose a minimum of elegance 
on visitors to its museums, on 
the grounds that a painter 
such as Botticelli calls for 
more respect than to have his 
work looked at by barefoot 
people in shorts and vests with 
their sleeping bags on their 
backs. 

But it is not only toe great 
cultural centres which are 
proring tough for toe indigent 
tourist. Ricdone, one of the 
. most popular Adriatic seaside 
resorts, is gathering the 
reputation of being the tough- 
est Of all in feeing the problem 
of semi-nomadic tourism. 

The dty administration is 
totally Communist, bat toe 
party's youth movement is 
planning a demonstration next 
week in Ricdone to protest 
against tire strict regulations, 
which include a ban on sleep- 
ing in cars. The idea Is to Mode 
the streets with cats full of 
people wearing mirror-type 
sunglasses, so that police will 
have an impossible job hi 
lecidiig whether toe eyes 
behind them are open or shut. 

But even in Rtedone the real 
symbol of contention is tie 
sleeping bag, and everything 
that it means in social and 
economic terms. 


***** 









6 


THE TAMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 



We Ve held our prices as long as possible -but they've got to go up. 

Very, very soon. So your smartest move is visit an Austin Rover dealer- now! 
Take your pick of the best deals. Pull a fast one - before the price rise. 



There’s a saying in advanced engineering circles - if it 
looks right, it is right. And the pleasing, practical, wheel- 
at-each-comer design of Maestro is precisely right. 

You can specify 5-speed, automatic, fuel-injection, 
alloy wheels — even 4-speaker stereo. 1 But whichever 
model you select — you’ve made an intelligent choice. 


Inexpensive to buy, cheap to keep — Metro is a beautiful litde 
mover — in 3 or 5 door form. With impressive options to 
choose from — like central locking, push-button radio/ 
cassette, sunroof I . . 

Overall, the Metro City offers the most economical 
motoring on the marketJ 




The first saloon car ever to carry the Design Centre 
symbol, Montego delivers the space and ride comfort 
to rival many a limousine. 

From 1.3 to MG 2.0 EFi — they’re the drivers’ 
cars that also care about passengers. 

There are estates that pick up almost as 
much as Pickfords! Plus the MG Montego 
Turbo to out-sprint a Porsche 944.* 




Move up to your new Metro, Maestro or Montego in a hurry - before the price rise! 









THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


7 



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i rice rise'- 



Mutual distrust 
hampers talks 
on Afghanistan 
troop pull-out 

From Alan McGregor, Geneva 


A compromise is nearer on 
a timetable for the withdrawal 
of about 1 15,000 Soviet troops 
from Afghanistan, but mutual 
distrust regarding what could' 
happen during the departure 
period is blocking J indirect 
talks between delegations 
from Kabul and Islamabad, 
headed by the ■ Foreign- 
Ministers. 

The eighth round, which 
began on August 31, is being 
formally concluded today. 
The next is likely to be 
preceded by further visits to 
the two capitals by the UN 
mediator. Serior Diego Cor- 
dovez, an Under Secretary- 
General. 

The Afghans suspect that 
Pakistan's insistence on a 
shorter withdrawal period is 
because increased outside 
assistance to the guerrillas 
would resume immediately 
after the process was 
completed. 

The Pakistanis, on the other 
hand. Lhink that, in pressing 
for an early end to this aid, the 
Kabul Government’s inten- 
tion is the Anal liquidation of 
all guerrilla groups. 

Closely linked to these 
considerations is the question 
of whether the Soviet Union 
will agree to UN observers 
monitoring Afghanistan's 
frontier with Pakistan.. This 
assumes that Mr Gorbachov 
really does intend that the rest- 
of his troops wilt eventually 
follow the six regiments (5,000 
to 7,000 men) already due to 
leave by the end of this year. 

Although the Russians have 
never before accepted any UN 
presence where they. were, 
directly involved, they have 
on previous occasions had 


their own officers there as part 
of Such a presence - in Sinai, 
for example. 

The observer contingent 
would use helicopters, planes 
and four-wheel -drivp vehicles 
for patrolling ^and random 
inspection along Afghan- 
istan's 1.250-mile frontier 
with Pakistan, 1 especially the 
200-mile sector used for pass* 
ing supplies to the - resistance. 

A Soviet decision on UN 
observers, of nationalities 
acceptable to both sides. Is 
uniikeiy before the principal 
decisions on a pull-out. These, 
in turn, are not. expected 
before to the second Reagan- 
Gorbachov summit 

If Moscow does opt for UN 
monitoring, the Security 
Council may not be formally 
requested to authorize est- 
ablishment of an observer 
contingent, which could be set 
up through bilateral arranj 
men is. This would avoid A 
ther Council debate on the 
Afghanistan issue. 

After the withdrawal period, 
the observers would remain 
along the frontier for at least 
six months, and perhaps much 
longer. 

There is no indication that 
much attention has been given 
in this latest round to arrange- 
ments for consulting the three 
million Afghan 1 ' refugees in 
Pakistan and another one- 
and-a-half million in-Iran on 
conditions for returning to 
their homes. - 

In contrast with previous 
rounds, no local repre- 
sentatives of guerrilla groups 
have appeared for the purpose 
of contacting correspondents. 
They had said in advance that 
the talks would get nowhere. 


Threat to September meeting 



Abn lyad (right), Mr Arafat's representative, in Athens 
yesterday with Mr Fnad al-Bittar, the PLO's resident envoy. 


PLO vows 
to keep 
terror out 
of Greece 

From Mario Modiano 
Athens 

The Palestine liberation 
Organization dispatched a se- 
nior security official to Athens 
this week to renew assurances 
that it is willing to co-operate 
with Greek authorities in 
combating terrorism. 

Abn lyad, rtom de guerre of 
Mr Sal ah Khalaf, the security 
chief of Mr Yassir Arafat's 
Fatah group, said yesterday, 
after four days of talks with 
ministers here: “We shall not 
bring our struggle to Greek 
soil, no matter bow hard the 
Israelis try to get ns to." 

The visit came just as 
Athens was dearly upgrading 
its relations with Israel and 
becoming increasingly exas- 
perated by the serious damage 
that Arab-related terrorism 
and violence have been caus- 
ing to tonrism. 

The PLO is anxious to 
dissociate itself from violence 
by dissident Palestinians. 
However, Abn lyad denied 
that the organization was 
informing on them. “We are 
just co-operating on security, 1 " 
he said. 

Abn lyad, here at the invita- 
tion of Mr Antonis Droso- 
yiannis, the Public Order 
Minister, said the talks had 
been a "success, both from the 
political and security point of 
view". 


Syria rejects Gemayel plan 
for solving Lebanese crisis 


Syria yesterday delivered an 
outright rejection of President 
Gemayel's proposal for a 
"special session" of Par- 
liament to decide on the future 
constitutional status of Leba- 
non. claiming that it was an 
attempt to "throw sand in the 
people’s eyes" and obstruct 
"genuine efforts" to end the 
Lebanese crisis. 

Damascus radio contemp- 
tuously referred to the Gem- 
ayel statement, which was 
made last Friday in a speech at 
the military academy to mark 
Army Day, as "just a lot of 
talk" which was intended to 
confuse the population. 

Left-wing and pro-Syrian 
newspapers here eagerly took 
up the theme in their morning 
editions. 

All night, the people of 
Beirut could hear the practical 
effects of the Syrian oppo- 
sition as heavy artillery shells 
exploded across both Muslim 
and Christian sectors of the 
Lebanese capital 

Two bombs exploded in the 
Muslim west of the city, one 
near the headquarters of the 
Syrian plain -clothes security 
police and the other not far 
from the cemetery that ad- 
joins the Sabra Palestinian 
camp. 

Brigadier-General Ghazi 
Kenaan has already described 
the explosions in the Muslim 
sector of Beirut as the work of 
“Israeli agents". 

In Beirut, two pro-Syrian 
newspapers. Ash Sharq and Al 
Hakika. gave their front page 


From Robert Fisk. Beirut 
lead stories over to the Syrian 
condemnation, which treated 
President Gemayel's pro- 
posals as a bluff. 

"If words were enough to 
resolve the Lebanese crisis, it 
would have disappeared long 
ago." Damascus radio said. 

Alexandria session 

King Husain of Jordan and 
President Mubarak of Egy pt 
have ended 24 hours of talks in 
Alexandria on Middle East 
peace prospects (Reuter re- 
ports). No details of the 
meeting — their first in three 
months — were released. 

"But experience has shown 
that words alone arc not 
sufficient to remove obstacles 
in the way of a national 
solution and dialogue." 

Syria's anger may have been 
provoked by President Gcm- 
ayel's decision to circulate his 
apparently mild series of 
suggestions to a number of 
friendly governments, includ- 
ing Saudi Arabia, in the hope 


that Arab stales would per- 
suade Damascus to accept 
them. In west Beirut. Mr 
Nubih Bern's Amal move- 
ment and the Sunni leadership 
rejected the proposals. 

The new controversy comes 
at an inauspicious moment. 
There is growing Dnize dis- 
enchantment with Syria's se- 
curity plan in Beirut, made 
manifest by a statement from 
Mr Walid Jumhlau, the Druzc 
leader, to the effect that Syrian 
troops would not be allowed 
to deploy in the Chouf moun- 
tains south-east of Beirut. 

Syrian troops and security 
men would be allowed to 
travel only on the main roads 
through the Chouf. he said. 

The Syrians have been ir- 
ritated by the Soviet I’nion's 
decision to hold negotiations 
with Israel for the resumption 
of consular relations. Mr Felix 
Fedotov, the Soviet Ambas- 
sador in Damascus, has told 
the Syrians that the talks will 
deal "only with consular mat- 
ters and will not lead to a 
change in basic relations" 


Soviet Jew wins release 


Jerusalem CAFP) — Mr 
Alexander Kushnir, a Jew who 
for more than 10 years pressed 
to be allowed to leave the 
Soviet Union, arrived at Ben 
Gurion airport near Tel Aviv 
to be met by his mother, who 
emigrated to Israel 13 years 
ago. 

Mr Kushnir. aged 38. 
marked his arrival on Wed- 


nesday by tearing up his own 
photograph and biography in 
a brochure about several' So- 
viet Jews who had been 
refused visas to emigrate to 
Israel. 

He described those he had 
left behind as prisoners of 
Zion and asked that they 
should not be forgotten. 


Look whofc getting into 
banking nowadays. 



Athens moves to block 
Turkish EEC benefits 

From Mario Modiano, Athens 

Greece is taking action to' September foreign ministers' 
block the oormatization' of ,-;jneefing to be^jMMrtjwned as a 
relations between tbe JSECfmd ^.protest agajit&t- the. Turkish 
Turkey, an associate jjiiemlier, r ‘Prime7"MW&f^X > visit to 
and wants its gtfevancesj .fsUirthem Cjpros.. 
against Istanbul tirhe dis- 17 1 '-"GreelL ^otiK-ialS^ asserted, 
cussed at the, EEG-Tt6rkey . jKmever, 
association council meeting .be doa^witno^Gree^^ 
scheduled for Septambfe» J6; v 

The Greek Government has • among the I2 to agree our ft® | 


already acted to; back its 
objections in tbree way$:lt has 
announced it is asking the 
European Court to cancel 
special aid of 10 mfltion Ecus, 
granted by -the Community to 
Turkey to mark the end of the 
freeze in relations imposed in 
1980 after the Turkish mili- 
tary suspended democratic 
role. 

Secondly, Mf Thodoros 
Pangalos, the Greek Minister 
of State for. Community Af- 
fairs, said Greece was block- 
ing the release of Community 
financing to Turkey worth 600 
million Ecus withheld after the 
freeze. He said it was prepos- 
terous that Greece, which feels 
militarily threatened by Tur- 
key, should contribute aid to 
that country 1 . 

Finally, Greece is refusing 
to sign documents making it a 
party to the EEC-Tttrkey 
association treaty, Hntess Tur- 
key revokes a 1964 decree 
denying Greeks inheritance 
and property rights in Is- 
tanbul, and exempts Greece 
from the Community 1 com- 
mitment to authorize the free 
movement of Turkish workers 
after December 1. 

The Community's foreign 
ministers last month overruled 
a Greek request for the 


agenda and define , their com- 
mon position cults items. 

■The Greeks' want the 
agenda to include all the 
Greek grievances againstTnr- 
key: the occupatioa of Cyprus; 
Turkey's internal situation^ 
with emphasis on' human 
rights violations, and Turkey's 
alleged involvement in inter-, 
national drug trafficking- - 
Mr MUtiadis Fapaioanoou, 
the Greek Goversmeid spin 
kesman, said thalupless these 
issues were put oftCbe table 
“there can be tier Commiptity 
position paper — we shall veto 
it.” There is nothing to prevent 
the Greek minister from tak- 
ing the floor at the meeting to. 
outline the Greek positions. 

The British presidency of 
' the council, however, grants 
the political issues to be aired 
informally over dinner, with 
the actual session focusing on 
technical issues such as to- 
mato paste and textile quotas. 

“Even without the Greeks it 
will be difficult for the other 
countries to agree, on major 
issues outsta ndi ng with- Tor- 
key," a British presidency 
. source said, “The. September 
meeting, therefore mil be 
largely symbolic. The real- 
negotiations 1 will start in 
October." 


‘Plane-spotters’ upset Greeks 


Athens — Three West Ger- 
man tourists arrested on spy- 
ing charges after photograph- 
ing Greek military airfields, 
told a magistrate in Larisa 
yesterday that they were air- 
craft-spotters. a hobby un- 
known in this country (Our 
Correspondent writes). 

Herr Herbert Diderichs, 
aged 25. a company official. 
Herr Martin Schott, aged 24. a 
salesman, and Herr Wolf.Udo 
WispJinghoffi aged 23, a stu- 


dent. all from Neuss, were 
arrested while taking pictures 
of military aircraft landing 
and taking off at Larisa Air 
Force base on Monday. 

Police said five rolls of their 
film included photographs of 
military planes taken at 10 

Greek airfields. Some had 
pictures of Turkish military 
aircraft taken when the. three 
visited Turkey .during their, 
stay in Greece. 


Acrobats 
defect 
to West 

Two married trapeze artists 
with the Moscow Circus, 
performing in Buenos Aires, 
defected and left for the 
United States on Wednesday 
night (Our Foreign Staff 
writes). 

Diplomatic sources said the 
two acrobats, Nikolai Nik- 
olski and his wife, Bertaina 
Mijailova, boarded an Eastern 
Airways flight to Miami Cir- 
cus officials refused to 
comment 

Meanwhile, police in Ma- 
drid say seven Romanian sea- 
men have asked for refugee 
status in the Canary Islands. 
They stid five members of the 
crew of a cargo ship and two 
fishermen jumped ship yes- 
terday. Their request was 
being considered. 


US airman 
convicted 
of spying 

Beale Air Base, California 
(Reuter) — An airman with the 
US Air Force's elite Strategic 
Air Command was convicted 
yesterday of passing secrets to 
undercover FBI agents posing 
as Soviet spies. Bruce OtL 
aged 26. described by his 
lawyer al a court martial as a 
mixed-up young man headed 
towards self-destruction, was 
said to have contacted the 
Soviet consulate in San Fran- 
cisco and then taken SAC 
documents “with reason to 
believe they would be used to 
injure the United States." \ 

He was arrested in a motel 
in Davis. California, on Janu- 
ary 22 when he was alleged to 
have passed a copy of an SAC 
regulation concerning an FR- 
7 1 spy plane to the FBI agents. 


When TSB Group shares are offered for sale in 
September, we want as many people as possible to 
think about buying them: people in all walks of life from 
all over the country. 

We hope you’ll consider the matter carefully. 

This isn’t a privatisation: the Government will make 
nothing from the sale. The proceeds will be used to 
develop the TSB and its services. 

There’s a lot more information to be announced, 
including the price of the shares. Make sure you receive 
it all by registering now with the TSB Group Share 
Information Office, ’feu’ll receive a prospectus and share 
application farm when they’re published. 

Meanwhile, you’ll be sent a booklet about buying 
and selling shares; and information about the TSB. 


None of this will put you under any obligation. 
Send in the coupon, call at any TSB branch or phone 
0272 300 300. 

Now itfs your turn to say yes. 


lb; TSB Group Share Information Office, PO Box 330, Bristol, 
BS99 ITT Please send me, without obligation, information 
about the TSB Group Share Offer 

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8 


OVERSEAS NEWS 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


Japan to raise defence 
spending as Russians 
continue forces build-up 


Japan intends to strengthen 
its military power in a bid to 
match an unprecedented 
build-up of Soviet forces in 
the Far East over the past 
decade. 

Japan's 1986 White Paper 
on defence, made public to- 
day. says the nation has fallen 
behind in achieving its de- 
fence aim of being in a 
position to repel a limited 
Soviet invasion without the 
help of US forces based in 
Asia. 

Its conclusion has set the 
stage to allow the Government 
of Mr Yasuhiro Nakasone to 
override a long-standing, self- 
imposed rule which has kept 
Japan's defence spending be- 
low I per cent of gross 
national product. 

Such a move would please 
Washington, which has re- 
peatedly demanded that To- 
kyo take greater responsibility 
for its own defence a her 
sheltering for 40 years under 
the US nuclear defence 
umbrella. 

Mr Y'uko FCurihara. the 
newly appointed director-gen- 
eral of the Defence Agency, 
said last month that the 
cherished limit on defence 
spending should not stand in 
the way of Japan's achieving 
its strategic aims. 

The White Paper said the 


From A Correspondent, Tokyo 

matter was one of great ur- 
gency. It said Moscow now 
deployed up to a third of its 
strategic forces in the region, 
including 162 of the medium- 
range SS20 missiles so feared 
by Japan and China. 

It said Moscow had also 
moved in an extra 10 di- 
visions. bringing strength to 
4! divisions, and now op- 
erated 2.390 planes in the 
region, many of them recent 
generation fighters and bom- 
bers. 

Most important, the Soviet 
Pacific Fleet now totalled 840 
vessels, including two modem 
Minsk-class aircraft earners 
and Delta3 ballistic missile 
submarines. 



Mr Knrihara: reassured 
‘doves' on defence spending. 


The hawkish Mr Nakasone 
has vowed to bottle up the 
Soviet fleet in the Sea of Japan 
in the event of war. Military 
experts are not so sure Japan 
can stop the Russians break- 
ing out through the straits 
around Japan to threaten US 
control of the Pacific. 

Meanwhile, Mr FCurihara 
has assured the many remain- 
ing “doves” in Japan that the 
country will not become a 
military power even if it does 
break its defence spending 
limit 

But a 1 per cent spending 
limit still gives Japan a mili- 
tary budget of about £8.7 
billion ibis year, which is 
higher than that of China and 
more than half that of Britain. 

in all other respects. Japan's 
armed forces are already a 
military power in Asia. They 
are not necessarily the biggest 
but they are well equipped and 
the country's superb industrial 
base could quickly turn to 
weapons production. 

Japan fields more than 
130.000 fighting troops, 330 
planes and its 164-ship fleet is 
the most powerful in the 
region alter that of the US and 
the Soviet Union. 

The Army says its main i 
weaknesses are airpower and j 
anti-submarine weaponry. ] 







Monsignor Giglio, the Papal Nuncio, reviewing a guard of honour in Managua after his meeting with President Ortega. 

Six nations urge ban on nuclear weapons tests 


■ Ixtapa, Mexico (Reuter) — 
The Group of Six nations 
ended a two-day meeting on 
peace and disarmament hare 
yesterday with a call for a ban 
on nuclear testing and a plan 
for verification. 

Delegates said the final 
declaration would also call for 
an arms cut to follow a test 
ban, and for President Reagan 
to scrap the Star Wars space 
defence project 

The Group of Six, which 


was formed in May 1984, 
opened a publicity campaign 
aimed at bringing about 
nuclear disarmament at its 
only other meeting, last year 
in Delhi. Attending the con- 
ference in this Pacific resort 
were President de la Madrid of 
Mexico and President 
Alibnsin of Argentina, the 
Swedish, Indian and Greek 
Prime Ministers, Mr Ingvar 
Carlsson, Mr Rajiv Gandhi 
and Mr Andreas Papandreou, 


respectively, and the former 
President of Tanzania, Mr 
Julius Nyerere. 

Delegates said the verifica- 
tion proposal would include 
intricate seismic tests. They 
said they hoped the Soviet 
Union and the United States 
could be persuaded to allow 
their use to verily compliance 
with any mutual test ban pact. 

The meeting received mes- 
sages of goodwill from around 
the world, including one from 


Hiroshima. Its mayor called 
for the superpowers to bold a 
summit meeting there to take 
the first practical steps .to- 
wards nuclear disarmament. 

The Colombian Nobel Prize 
winning novelist, Gabriel 
Garcia Marquez; delivered a 
speech which painted a vivid 
picture of a post-nuclear war 
world of permanent night, 
lashed by orange rain and 
hurricanes and populated only 


Managua 
meeting 
for papal 
envoy 

Managua (Reuter) - The 
new Papal Nuncio to Nica- 
ragua has held talks with 
President Ortega in the first 
high-level contact between the 
Roman Catholic Church and 
the Government since the 
recent expulsion of Bishop 
Pablo Vega. 

-President Ortega and I 
have agreed to do everything 
possible to settle differences 
between the Government and 
the Catholic Church,” Monsi- 
gnor Paolo Giglio said after 
the meeting. 

The left-wing Government 
and the Vatican have long 
been at odds over Sandinista 
support for liberation theol- 
ogy, which uses Marxist analy- 
sis to explain the need for 
social and political change in 
the Third World. 

Mgr Giglio, who arrived 
here last week, presented his 
credentials as the new Vatican 
ambassador in the hour-long 
meeting with President Ortega 
on Wednesday. 

Bishop Vega, vice-president 
of the Nicaraguan Bishops' 
Conference, was accused of 
being in sympathy with the 
Contra rebels. 

The Pope described his 
expulsion as an “almost in- 
credible act” which contra- 
dicted Sandinista assurances 
that the Government wanted 
peaceful co-existence with the 
Church. 


by cockroaches. 

Sandinistas’ other battle front 


With today’s 

criminals, it’s more 


Much of London’s crime gives every appearance of having 
been committed by mindless morons. 

By contrast, some financial frauds are so complex, it takes 
some of our top brains months to unravel them. 

Whichever end of the scale we’re dealing with, a quick 
chase and an armlock isn’t always the solution. 

In our opinion, it’s infinitely better to be one step ahead 
of the criminal rather than a couple of paces behind. 

Brainpower or Manpower? 

These days, we place a lot more emphasis on intelligence 
and keen observation work. This applies just as much to 


lady who wants to throw both of you into the street below Even 

feeing a mugger with a knife requires a bit of quick thinking 

before you put your self-defence training to the test 

Most people would say you’d have to be barmy to do it 
The reverse is nearer the truth. 

A police officer’s job calls for someone with a lot of 
common sense and a very level head indeed. 

You can’t be over-qualified. 

The sort of qualifications we look for are at least five 
good ‘O’ levels. But u you happen to have a couple of ‘A levels 
or a degree, so much the better. 

They’ll help you go further, fester. 

Everyone starts on the beat, and anyone with ambition 
can go just as fer as their ability or inclination will take them. 

Raw recruit to Inspector in just over five years is not 
unknown. As you can imagine, competition is fierce. 

Rest assured though, if you’ve got enough up top, that’s 
where you’re going to end up. 

What’s the reward? 

In the Met, you’ll have to do things others wouldn’t do for 
any amount of money. 

On the other hand, what could match the satisfaction of 
putting away a really nasty villain, helping to reduce the tensions 

in a multi-racial community, or cheering-up a lost toddler with 

an ice-cream? 


Communication and information * systems are now computer-based. 

the bobby on the beat as it does to the special units we have 
specifically formed for the task. 

Like the criminal fraternity, we’re always on the lookout 
for new ideas we can turn to our advantage. 

The Neighbourhood Watch Schemes that are proving to 
be so successful are just one example. 

Micro-chip technology is another. 

A lot of routine investigation is now done by computer; 
tracing fingerprints, checking on stolen cars, cross-referencing 
information to find a common link - that sort of thing. 

The traffic in central London would be even more of a 
nightmare if it weren't largely computer controlled 

Our central Command and Control complex and the 
communication links with local police stations have all been 
computerised too. 

In short, the Met is a very sophisticated machine And it 
runs on brain power as much as manpower. 

Who needs brains on the beat? 

Now more than ever, you need a bit more under your t 
helmet than a neat haircut. 

You might have to come between a wife-basher and his 
nearest and dearest 

You might be the first on the scene of a serious 
accident 

You might have to crawl onto a roof with a suicidal 






In hard cash, the very least you’ll start on at I 8 V 2 (our mini- 
mum age) is £9,108, including London allowances. 

If you’re a bit more mature, youll be better equipped for 
the task. So over 22’s start on more. 

And for anyone with aspirations in that direction, a newly 
promoted Chief Inspector earns a basic salary of £17,604 
On a par with any manager in other professions. 

You’ll have to be at least 172 ems tall if you’re a man, or 
162 ans for a woman. The Selection Board will see whether you 
measure up or not If you want any further infonnation, phone 
(01) 725 4492 (Ansaphone 725 4575). 

Write to The Appointments Officer, Careers Informa- 
tion Centre. Dept MD617 New Scotland Yard, London 
SW1H 0BG. Or visit us at our Careers Information Office 
in Victoria Street 


Church and state 
at daggers drawn 

From Onr Special Correspondent, Jinotepe, Nicaragua 


The last rites and burial of a 
young Sandinista soldier here 
in hk borne town, 30 miles 
south of Managua, pointedly 
dramatized the deep hostility 
between Church and state in 
Nicaragua. 

To the Roman Catholic 
priest who officiated at the 
funeral Mass, Fidel Gonzalez, 
aged 21, was just another 
sinner in need of divine indul- 
gence. To the Army officer 
who spoke later at the ceme- 
tery, Fidel, killed when a 
Contra mine blew np his Jeep,, 
-was a marly, and Aahit. of the. 

(FSaudinlstarevotetidn. 

: “His death was aotln vaip^ 
Hdelgarefe life, hfrdraTOgfe 
. for the revolutionary .cause,” 

[ the officer decla re d. ' •>-. 

The bnrial' wrtnipnyr Pt 
which no priest was present, 
was more defiant than solemn, 
the dimax coming with an 
emotional rendition of the 
Sandinista anthem, a line of 
which describes the United 
States as “the enemy of 
humanity”. 

At the Mass in Jinotepe's 
large Catholic church, one had 
the sense that both priest and 
congregation were merely go- 
ing through the motions. Out 
of a congregation of some 300, 
only a dozen took comm onion. 
The priest, Father Jose Fran- 
cisco Gonzalez, did not deliver 
a sermon. 

“We don't do sermons at 
these types of Masses; we're 
too poshed for time.” be said 
after the service. This year so 
far be had performed the last 
rites for “about 20” Sandinista 
soldiers killed in the fighting 
against the American-backed 
Contras. 

Under orders from his 
superiors. Father Gonzalez 
was prepared to give a funeral 
service to “anyone who asked 
for it”. But he maintained a 
neutral political position, he 
insisted. “We can't be judges 
in the war.” 

It is this, the Church's 
refusal to judge and condemn 
the US and the Contras for the 
suffering inflicted during six 
years of fighting, (hat has 
provoked the Government's 
rage and led to cries from the 
Church hierarchy that It is 
being persecuted. 

The decision last month to 
drive into exile- the second 
most senior member of that 


hierarchy. Bishop Pablo Vega, 
and its senior spokesman. 
Father Bismarck Carballo - 
In both cases for “a criminal 
and anti-patriotic attitude” — 
marked the end of a vicious 
campaign against them lasting 
months, spearheaded by the 
Sandinista newspaper, Barr 
icada. 

The head of the Church in 
Nicaragua, Cardinal Miguel 
Obando y Bravo, is regularly 
referred to in Barricada as 
“the Cardinal of the Contras” 
and the - “Chaplain of the 
White House”. 

■ • Its editor, Senor Xavier 
! Reyes, said: “The Church is 
die ideological ally of the 
United States. As repre- 
sentatives of the only real 
' political opposition in Nica- 
ragua, priests act as American 
agents inside the country.” 

Treason is the chief accusa- 
tion hurled against the 
Church. President Ortega said 
in a speech on July 19, the 
seventh anniversary of the 
Sandinista revolution, that the 
two expelled churchmen were 
fortunate not to have been 
jailed for 30 years for such a 
crime. 

Bishop Vega had indeed 
declared at a news conference 
shortly before bis expulsion 
that the recent US congres- 
sional vote approving $100 
million in aid to the Contras 
had been “legitimate and 
valid”. He even found jus- 
tification for an American 
invasion. 

Cardinal Obando, reported 
by the Nicaraguan press to 
have given a Mass earlier this 
year for Contra leaders in 
Miami, is known to be not 
unsympathetic to President 
Reagan's goal of removing (be 
Sandinistas from power. But, 
according to church sources 
interviewed recently, even be 
is said to have been dismayed 
by Bishop Vega's public 
remarks. 

There are those who feel the 
Cardinal will now ran ap the 
white flag and seek ways to 
ease tensions with the Govern- 
ment. More likely, though, a 
prolonged period of coli war 
will set in, with the Church 
perhaps less openly anti-San- 
dinista bat still refusing to 
denounce the killings occa- 
sioned by the growing Ameri- 
can role in the Contra war. 


Peru Congress split on 
jail mutiny inquiry 

From Our Correspondent, Lima 


The Peruvian Conj 
opened an extensive debate 
this week to appoint a 
committee to investigate the 
prison mutiny on June 18 in 
which more than 200 inmates 
belonging to the Shining Path 
guerrilla group died. 

The Marxist opposition co- 
alition. United Left, is 
demanding that it should 
chair the committee to guar- 
antee impartiality in an in- 
vestigation that could censure 
the Cabinet 

But the ruling Apra party 
does not wish to allow the 
opposition to antag nnisft the 
armed forces, and will prob- 
ably appoint Senor Carlos 
Ennque Mdgar, a veteran 
Senator, to head the invest- 
igation. 

Since the .uprising an im- 
portant dispute concerning 
court jurisdiction over the 
rase has arisen. A Lima judge. 
Dr Herndn Satumo. has 
brought charges of pre-medi- 
tated murder against General 
Jorge Ra banal, the Army offi- 
who was in direct com- 
mand or the security forces 


who suppressed the u; 
by 124 inmates at Lurif 
prison on June 1 8. The j 
accusations are to be exi 
to “others found respon 
Civilian courts have 
tilled that they can try m 
personnel on criminal cl 
nor h ave the armed 
accepted their jurisdictii 
General Jorge Flore 
Minister of War, sai 
armed forces would apj 
the Supreme Court to 
the case heard before a 
tary court. 

Human rights leaden 
expressed concern tiu 
qumes into the killini 
well as events at two 
mutiny sites, H From 
d Prison and the 
Barbara women’s prison 
portof Callao, would bf 
Bogged down in pro! 
congressional hearings 
courts martial 
More than a month aft 
mutiny the Gove rn me t 
yet to produce a final coi 
the prisoners kilted a 
three sites. It has ack 
edged only 156 deaths. 








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The classic C^xri of ’86. 

The tempting price of ^ 





RIGHT NOW ALL CAFEHS ARE AT AUGUST ’84 PRICES* 

YOU SAVE £714 ON A 1600 LASER** 

YOU SAVE £759 ON A 2000 LASER** 

YOU SAVE £1,099 ON AN INJECTION SPECIAL.** 

Now the price of personality and performance is appreciably less 
thanks to these special summer prices on the whole Capri range. 

The Capri is still very much a winning machine on the race track and 
it was described in an April ’86 Motor as a “Driver's car par excellence? 
No wonder Ford have invested so much in it 

The 2.8 Injection Special is a charismatic coupe with its Recaro front 
seats, leather seat surrounds, leather trimmed steering wheel and gear knob, 
sunroof and radio/stereo cassette player Not to mention those alloy wheels 
and the limited slip differential. 

As for performance, let’s just say that the 2.8 injection engine gives it 
a top speed of 130 mpht with acceleration to match. 

Mind you, the Capri Laser is- no mean performer on the road, and 
comes equipped to do you proud. 

So, if you fancy driving one of the real cult cars of the ’80’s, see your 
Ford dealer now An ’86 Capri at an ’84 price can be yours, but only until 
August 31st 1986. 



U-r** •“ 


*Max. price excL delivery and number plates. **Based on max, prices os at June ’86 and mid August ’84. tBbnj computed figures. 


N ' 







Few causes are so dear to the heart 
of the British as their own homes. 
Be they castle or cottage, lodge or 
terrace house, there is no limit to 
the ingenuity directed every year 
towards their restoration and 
improvement. Many old properties 
have have been brought back from 
the edge of dilapidation to function 
once more as homes, providing the 
theme for this year's Royal Institu- 
tion of Chartered Surveyors/ Times 
Conservation Awards. 

The theme of conserving 
residential property drew 60 en- 
tries covering homes ranging from 
flat convertions — the number of 
fiats not to exceed 10 — to single 
houses. They fell into two cate- 
gories: privately and publicly 
funded. The winners in both 
categories will be announced on 
September 23. 

The schemes on the short list 
cover terraced houses, almshouses, 
lodges, cottages, former manors 
and town houses. Some required 
considerable structural work while 
others needed painstaking interior 
restoration. 

The conservation awards were 
launched in 1971 to mark European 
Conservation Year. The enterprise 
was so successful, attracting nearly 
100 entries under the theme of 
urban conservation and land 
reclamation, that it was decided to 
make it an annual event. 

Since the scheme started, the 
themes have included coast and 
countryside, land reclamation, ur- 
ban renaissance and conserving 
the industrial heritage. The total 
number of entrants over the years 
has now passed well beyond the 
1,000 mark. 


Pilrig House, Bonrtington Road, 
Edinburgh 

Michael Laird & Partners 
A late example of a traditional Scottish 
laird s house built in 1638 in an L- shaped 
plan around a turnpike stair for an 



Harpenden Lodge, Luton Road, 
Harpenden 

Plan well Properties (Herts) Ltd 
Built in 1803 by Major General Murray 
Haddon. It has been converted into three 
flats. 

This year's entrants had not 
only to demonstrate creativity and 
historical sensitivity but also to 
show that they were providing 
valne for money, enhancement of 
the local environment, and in- 
ventiveness and efficiency in the 
use of resources. 

Mr Henry Gilbert, chairman of 
the awards working party, said: 
“The mere fact that a good project 
is carried out gives enormous 
encouragement to others. A whole 
area can take off and the smaller 
builder has a very' important role 

*■ An example is the work that 


JR 


Tanyard, Famham, Surrey 

The Famham Bonding Preservation 
Trust 






Advocate’s Close, High Street, 
Edinburgh 

McMenan & Brown 
An original tenement bidding with a 
lintel bearing the date 1590. Converted 
into ten flats. 


Dial House, 790 High Road, London 
N.17 

Levitt Bernstein Associates for 
MetropoGtain Housing Trust and London 
Borough of Haringey 
Built in 1690. Converted into nine flats. 


was carried out on one boose that 
was in an urban riot area. Many 
people have followed this splendid 
example and now we have beautiful 
Georgian houses and squares 
which, if they were in London, 
would be highly prized. 

“We must regret the age of the 
bulldozer. When a well known 
street is destroyed there is a 
tremendous sense of insecurity 
among both the old and the young 
— the old have lost a reference 
point and the young have lost an 
essentia] communication between 
generations." 



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The Old GuPdhan, Church Row, 
Clavering, Essex 

Essex County Council 
A row of timber framed cottages, built 
in about 1475. Con verted into a single 
house. 

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1 and 3 Hofiybanfc Road, Birkenhead, 
Wirral, Merseyside 

Venture Housing Association Ltd 
A detached pair of houses derefict and 
vandalized before conservation. 
Converted into ten flats. 


3 Huskisson Street, Liverpool 8 

Ken Worrali for Liverpool City Council 
Once the home of the MP who was 
killed during the opening of the Liverpool- 
Manchester railway. Converted into 
six flats. 


Manor House, Park Lane, Bristol 

Bristol City Council 
Dates from between 1 650 and 1720. It 
was seriously damaged by fire in 
November, 1978. Converted into nine 
flats of sheltered accommodation. 


5 TIM ESI 


/-T7S */) rs) i * Dark side of the bright lights 



£20,000 to be won 




• A 


As yet another play 
disappears from 
the West End, safe 
old-fashioned 
musicals high-kick 
on remorselessly. 
What future then 


for gen uine drama? 








W hen The Gambler 
doses tomorrow 
night after a West 
End run of only 
four and a half weeks, the 
eponymous Md Smith can 
expect to lose one of the most 
expensive bets of his career. It 
that is. he himsdf was rash 
enough to flutter on the odds 
of any show having the staying 
power for a long run when the 
going is soft 

The surprise, of course, is 
not that it came off. but that it 
ever went on. No disrespect to 
Messrs Smith. Goody et aJ, 
but there is a new bullishness' 
in the mood of producers for 
grabbing a show by the arms 
and rushing it into Shaftes- 
bury Avenue before its feet 
. have become accustomed to 
- what is beneath them. 

Two fads may yet console 
Mr Smith. The first is that his 
is unlikely to be the only West 
End show dosing this month. 
The second is that he was well 
served by his producer. Andre 
Piaszynski. who had the sense 
to pull the show, which lost its 
backers £120.000. before it 
pulled its backers under. 

This is a lesson he may have 
learned from the abrupt and 
unsignalled disappearance of 
Lennon at the Astoria. There, 
on June 8. the cast turned up 
for their Sunday performance 
to find the theatre had been 
stripped without warning. 

Since the 1930s a select self- 
governing group of West End 
producers has enjoyed a privi- 
lege. unknown outside Lon- 
don. by which full members of 
the Society of West End 
Theatres) (SWET) arc ex- 
empted from the standard 
practice l3id down by Equity: 
that they should deposit two 
weeks* wages before opening a 

show. 

After its collapse. Lennon's 
creditors were told that the 
producing management. 
Lupton Theatre Company, 
had not kept proper books 
since March 31.1 983. This led 
to accusations of mismanage- 
ment against the show's pro- 
ducer. Colin Brough, who 
pleaded the heavy workload of 
running both the production 
and the theatre. Brough says 
he lost half a million person- 
ally while the Equity repre- 
sentative estimated the total 
owed to union members at 
more than £27,000- 
B rough blamed the fall in 
theatre attendances on Ameri- 
cans not coming to Britain 
after the Libyan bombing raid. 


Cup ctulonge. oH at sea tn Fremamie 


High seas, hi-tech 

Once the playthings of the wealthy leisured 
classes, the yachts in the America's Cup now- 
have the following wind of commercial 
sponsorship and national egos. And with the 
defeat of the Ltoited States, the offshore circus 
has moved to Fremantle, Western Australia. 

The Times took to the high seas with the 
Britons vying to become the boys in the boat 


Take me back 
to Rotorua 
New Zealand, 
north and south 


The lord of 
Le Manoir 
Oxford's top 
French chef 


Can you always get your copy of The Times ? 

Dear Newsagent, please ddiver/savc me a copy of The Times 

NAME 

ADDRESS 


CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1023 

ACROSS 

I N Me rcgmntM 
$ Ingredients Iran ft I 

8 Bother (,*l 

9 Trouser kg Told (4.2) 
in African talisman (ft) 

-II TcaiJ) 

12 Obsession (J.J) 

14 In burning brands 
10) 

17 BnnOid 
,14 OigrialisiM 
22 Soil lump |4) 

24 Dulhft) 

25 Altitude 

26 Mimic l.l) 

2? Sea tiered (hi 
28 Cannabis acpn*uc 

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3 Childish rage (?) 

4 Whim (") 

5 Rascal 1 5) 


6 Steep met lace cal 

7 R\erf7) 

1.1 Aural organ l.') 

15 Concern (?) 

16 Godofcarth(.l) 


17 Firei-ycarsiudi.nl (7) 

18 Attribute (7) 

20 Accumulated dim?! 

21 ( hurrh instrument 
(Si 

23 Ye I lo» -orange (5 1 


■ SOLUTION TO NO 1022 

ACROSS: 8 Umbilical cord 9 Ore 10 Patagonia 1 1 Filch 13 Hap- 
less 16 Maiador 19 Edict 22 Daredevil 24 Mum 25 St Vims'* 
Dance. 

DOW N: I Cut off 2 Abseil 3 Slipshod 4 Scotch 5 Slag 6 
Bounce 7 Admass I2IB.A 14 Preclude 15 Sac 16 Modish 17 
Thn*c 18 Revise 20 Immune 21 Tamper 23 Dote. 






T 

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Short runners: from left. Bob Goody, Pool Brown and Mel Smith in The Gambler-, right, Peter Bowles in The Entertainer 


Similar arguments were 
traded against dark theatres 
during and after the Falklands 
war, the World Cup. the rail 
strike, the bad weather and the 
teachers' strike. AIL no doubt, 
had some justification. 

Perhaps the only surprise is 
that anybody should still be 
willing to invest in theatre at 
all. One is gambling on a beast 
with no form. Theatres, unlike 
cinemas, do not feel the 
necessity to publish box office 
returns, except in summary 
form to backers. Moreover, it 
is not the producer who stands 
to lose his shirt in the specula- 
tion. That privilege is shared 
by the "angels" who back a 
show (usually sight unseen) 
with hard cash — up front in 
advance, no interest earned, 
no profits or dividends until 
the play breaks even. 

Backing a musical, how- 
ever. may yet hold a cachet 
that the “straight" West End 
play has Iosl Out of 42 
commercial theatres in Lon- 
don. 17 house musicals, four 
are dark, and the rest coddle 
mostly thrillers or long-run- 
ning farces. 

Richard Armiiage is the 
producer of The Entertainer, 
which opened on June 6 and 
closed on July 26. He closed it 
because business remained 
poor even after the World Cup 
and Wimbledon, and be is 
now one of an increasing 
number of impresarios 
questioning the wisdom of 
staging "conventional" drama 
in the West End. 

“I just wonder how eager 
producers will be to put on 
straight plays with good casts, 
wiih or without a star, as we 
get into the next season", he 
says. 

At the Haymarket base of 
Triumph Apollo. Duncan 
Weldon continues to defy the 
auguries as he mounts straight 
play after straight play, though 
invariably illuminated by a 
film star — currently Eayq 


Dunaway and Jack Lemmon, 
previously Lauren Bacall. Liv 
Ullmann. Claudette Colbert, 
Chariton Heston, Rex Harri- 
son. Vanessa Redgrave. The 
play is no longer the thing. 

Triumph Apollo, already 
Britain's largest theatrical 
producers, are set to expand 
even further by persuading 
big-spending international 
companies to back their 
shows. To which end, an 
American sponsorship expert, 
Tom Miller, is wooing inves- 
tors with a lavish brochure 
cataloguing the company's 
long (five or six-year) relation- 
ship with that galaxy of 
Names. 


T he only difficulty will 
be finding a way to 
plug the sponsor’s 
name without the bla- 
tant and intrusive self-pub- 
licity granted in recent 
Hollywood films.' 

One small-scale . en- 
trepreneur who went out of 


business last month made a 
worthy attempt to tame the 
commercial, unsubsidized 
theatre in London, before 
emerging from the shark pool 
badly bloodied, if not quite 
dead. Sean Mathias is a 30- 
year-old playwright whose In- 
fidelities had already been 
approved in Edinburgh, with 
Jill Bennett. He warned to re- 
stage it in London, and 
thought of The Boulevard, 
part of Paul Raymond's 
Revuebar in Soho. 

Raymond refurbished the 
place and provided a separate 
entrance. Mathias and Ben- 
nett formed Off Hie Avenue 
to produce the play. If all went 
well in the 200 -seat venue; 
they would recoup production 
costs of £32.000 in about three 
months, and pay bade their 
investors in six. The play ran 
for less than one. 

None of which dismays 
Kenneth Branagh, producing 
bis own Romeo at the Lyric. 
Hammersmith, or Michael 

DHIUtr 




fts wmeui amMi 

to* a* 





a a 

... > *.■ 


•T^Wifngt' 

-- ur-w!t jrt KT iifc. ' 


Broadway-bound: big, f tot-tapping musicals are a safe bet 


Bogdanov and Michael Pen- 
nington. setting up their En- 
glish Shakespeare Company, 
or Louis Benjamin, head of; 
the Stoll Moss theatre empire, 
about to add the £1 million 
Cambridge Theatre to their £4 
million-worth of recent ac- 
quisitions.'the Royalty, Duch- 
ess. and Garrick, making a 
grand total of 12 London 
stages. The intention? Accord- 
ing to Mr Benjamin, the 
company hopes to take musi- 
cals back into the theatre 
wbich previously housed HaiJ 
.4 Sixpence and Little Me. 

M ore and more, the 
West End is aping 
Broadway — and 
not only in the 
number of musicals it can 
stage at any one time. The 
debate about the £20 seat price 
for Chess has already been 
aired. Bob Swash, former 
president of SWET. thinks 
that if the trend continues, “it 
would make going to the 
theatre a one-off occasion. 
People wouldn't be able to go 
on-a regular basis." " 

In London, the only safe 
answer to that is to go for the 
biggest, most heavily en- 
dorsed (or publicized) musi- 
cal. Why risk an Entertainer 
Or a Gambler n . That same 
critic suggests that “bad" the- 
atre (for which, read expensive 
theatre) offers commercial 
financial success to actors, 
comparable to that available 
to professionals in other fields. 

The West End has, dearly, 
priced itself out of seriousness 
and the play of limited appeal. 
As costs have risen, the 
amount of irrelevant trivia 
has propagated the pseudo- 
serious plav — The Reed 
Thing. Children of a Lesser 
God. Made In Bangkok- The 
aim is now to reach the biggest 
audience, not the best. 

David Roper 

®n«M Nowopapen Ud, 19K 


Gurkhas 

under 

a cloud 


Nepal has never known any- 
thing like it. In the 270 years 
that generation after genera- 
tion of Gorkhas have served 
the British crown, the re- 
nowned Nepalese fighting 
men are suddenly in trouble. 

Four members of the 2nd 
King Edward VII's Own 
Goorkhas are currently on 
trial for allegedly attempting 
to smuggle heroin and can- 
nabis into Britain. 

In addition. Ill soldiers 
have been summarily dis- 
missed from the 1st Battalion, 
7th Duke of Edinburgh's 
Own Gorkha Rifles, based in 
Hongkong, after a brawl in 
Hawaii which left a British 
company commander and a 
Gurkha officer with cracked 
ribs and head injuries. 

The Gurkhas come from 
the foothills of the Himala- 
yan mountains and are excep- 
tionally hardy folk. As the 
Gurkha commander in NepaL 
Brigadier Miles Hunt-Davis, 
puts id "They are natural 
soldiers. If you are from a hiU 
farm in Nepal and you survive 
to adulthood you are a very, 
very tough man". 

And ' British Gurkhas are 
hand-picked. Every year np to 
80,000 of the strongest Gur- 
kha youths apply for the few 
hundred places available in 
the dwindling regiments ol 
the Brigade of Gurkhas. 
Rejection is so dreaded that 
some young men flee into 
India rather than return home 
and admit that thev have 
failed. 

The Gurkhas fear nothing. 
They have won 26 Victoria 
Crosses - 12 in the Second 
World War - and thousands 
of Military Crosses, Military 
Medals and other decorations 
for bravery. The citations 
often defy belief. One VC, for 
•nstance, killed 31 of the 
enemy single-handed - after 
a grenade had exploded in his 
other hand. In the Falklands 
the Argentinians ran away 
rather than face the prospect 
of capture by the hilimen . 

TJe 111 being flown home 
to Nepal steadfastly main- 
tained their chupa - Gurkhali 
for silence - about the identity 
of those who set about Major 
Conn Pearce when he shot 
the bar at a party to celebrate 
the end of a six-week exercise 
ui Hawaii. The brawl itself is 
blamed on Hawaiian mm and 
discontent about food and 
overseas allowances. 

Gurkhas like drinking amt 
are natural fighters - and 
because of an Anglo-Indian 
agreement they are paid only 
SHJ-* *?“ amount their 

British equivalents receive. 
For perhaps the first time m 
™ eir glorious history, it 
seems, they have pat lovnhv 

to array discipline. 1 1 

Robin Young 


* rw. 

U ■■ 









11 





THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


FRIDAY PAGE 


Vn ^ *A. J _ . »*♦..../ s v a v • t> j «- ■:' « t. v ».' ■ • 


Tim Bishop 

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Nicola Hicks: “I was prepared to push myself forward, to say Hey, this space isn't big enough, I need more room*. I lost a lot of friends doing ft” 

Breaking the mould 


Gurkha 
under 
a cloud 


“Oh. you are lucky", fellow students at 
the Royal College of Art said to Nicola 
Hicks when her work was shown in 
galleries and sculpture parks, when art 
dealers vied with each other to sign her 
up. and when Dame Elisabeth Frink 
picked her as the most promising, 
newcomer in the 1984 Artist of the 
Day exhibition. 

“It was always the people who came 
in at eleven and left arrive who said 
that**, says Nicola. At 26. unlike so 
many of the 4,000 or so postgraduate 
students who leave art school each 
year, she's' already making a good 
living from her sculpting and painting. 

For the past few weeks she's beat 
digging five large, pits in a field in 
Rosscarbery. County (Cork (where her ' 
London art dealer Angela Flowers has 
a home and gallery), re-creating The 
Fruits of Akeldama. a grim Old 
Testament tale about a blighted field 
where no living thing' was able to., 
survive. . . , 

This unconventional exhibition, ‘ 
which looks more like an archaeologi - 
cal dig than a -display. of sculpture, 
opens tomorrow. Visitors walking . 
over the brow of the hill wflj look"- 
down on a scene of devastation, with 
the doomed creatures of Akeldama, 
moulded out or the mud and clay and. 
grass dug up by Nicola,, diq&yed ; 
inside and around the shallow jritri 
five pieces of art blending into the 
landscape. 

Nicola says it would have to rain for 
40 days and 40 nighty to wash away 
her exhibition — in feet it almost did, 
and she's been working in the field day 
and night to reconstruct the work m 
lime for the opening. But the mud 
sculptures will inevitably disintegrate 
in time. “Not very commercial, is it?" 
she remarks cheerfully. “But I have 
got a collection of drawings inside, and 
if anyone wants one of the sculptures 
III be happy to go and dig in their gar- 
den and then coat it with concrete."- 


Nicola Hicks, one of our most successful young 
sculptors, unveils a grim new work tomorrow in 
an Irish field. Shirley Lowe reports on her talent 


-Since Nicola left the RCA a year ago 
her work has been seen in more than a 
dozen different exhibitions. One ofher 
powerful charcoal, and pastel animal 
drawings on brown paper, costs be- 
tween £400 and £600; her sculptures — 
vulnerable, vaguely mythological crea- 
tures made out of plaster and straw — 
sell for as much as £3.000; and it's 
more private people than museums 
have her wild goats behind ihesofe. or 
her ragged hogs in the halL Elisabeth 
Frink has a 6ft by 4ft Hicks bull 
rampaging along one of her walls. 
“Nicola's work has great energy and 
vitality", she says, “and however way- 
out it may be, she is always, tech- 
nically. -a very competent sculptor." 

Bom in London to artist parents — 


her mother is a sculptor, her father a 
painter — Nicola has been drawing and 
painting ever since she can rem e mber. 
“1 wasn't particularly gifted”, she says. 
“It was never 'Look at Nicola, isn't she 
wonderful?* It was just something I 
always did and took seriously." 

She wasa difficult child and an even 
worse teenager. Expelled from half a 
dozen different schools, she ended up 
at a college in Sheen (“an awful 
place...") playing poker all day, 
having convinced each of the teachers 
that she was on another teacher's 
course. She left there with one O level 
— for art 

By that time, however, she realized 
she wanted to go to art college and had - 
to have some qualifications to get in. 




■ ... ... f 

■ • > A .? 


BEghted earth: oneofthescnlptares from the Fruits of Akridama exhibition 

‘If anyone wants one of these HI be 
happy to go and dig in their garden* 


By enrolling in three different adult 
education colleges she managed to 
scrape together enough O and A levels 
to get into the Chelsea School of Art, 
and then went on to the RCA. At the 
degree show there, Ntcola.was placed 
next to the gentlemen’s lavatory. 
“Everyone always thinks they're in the 
wrong place", she says. “I was always 
prepared to push myself forward, to 
say: 'Hey, this space isn't big enough. I 
need more room ; . .' and 1 know I lost 
. a lot of friends-doing iL 

“There's an idea in art colleges, 
mostly put about by the tutors who 
are, after all. at the end of their careers 
and often envious of young people 
with everything before them, that it's 
not very nice for creative people to 
publicize themselves and that art 
should somehow be above such 
mundane matters as paying the rent. 

“This is the most competitive 
profession in the world and once you 
deride you want to make a living at it 
— which is, in troth, the only way you 
can give it your ail — you have to 
become two people, the private person 
in a studio and the person who's 
t prepared to grit her teeth and go out 
;*> and sell herself and her work." 

White she was stilTat college Nicola 
married Gerry Kreeger r a jazz pianist 
,and songwriter, and together with 
another Sculptor they have recently 
bought Charlie Chaplin's old rehearsal 
rooms in Camberwell. “It's beautiful, 
marvellous”, says Nicola. “We’ve got 
two studios, a roof garden and a 
bronze foundry downstairs, and it's 
working out cheaper than the £2S a 
week we paid in Southwark." 

Nicola Hicks — . The Fruits of Akeldama 
—Sculpture in the Field, and drawings by 
Nicola Hicks and Felim Egan in the 
gallery will be open from 2pm to 7pm at 
Angda Flowers, Rosscarbery. County. 
Cork. Irciahd. every day except Sunday 
until the end of August. 

•" CT lmM M m um u ptm U 4 1 — 


Winners in 


Many career women have everything 
except a successful relationship. 

A new book attempts to discover why 



, losers in love 


DttnaGoM 


Now here's a good question: 
why do so many intelligent, 
successful ' and amusing 
women end up alone or tied to 
the wrong man? It has just 
been asked in America by two 
clinical psychologists and it's 
made Dr Connell Cowan and 
Dr Melvyn Kinder's first 
book. Smart Women Foolish 
Choices, into a paperback 
best-seller. Today their little 
pink manual crosses the At- 
lantic to challenge the un- 
mated career-giris of Britain, 
those “smart women who 
have everything going for 
them but satisfying personal 
relationships". 

The beauty of the question 
is that there is a set of pat 
saloon-bar answers, none of 
which quite holds water. Some 
wHI claim that nice men avoid 
tough women; others that 
“feminists" with jobs, secretly 
“hate men" anyway; still oth- 
ers thatany girl with a career is 
automatically so “selfish" that 
she couldn't possibly attract a 
decent old-fashioned chap 
with honourable intentions. 
Ergo, only a rat or a wimp will 
marry her. 

Bui because five minutes’ 
thought can produce scores of 
exceptions to all these rules, 
we are left with the question, 
and the problem: there are. say 
Cowan and Kinder, a “grow- 
ing number" of exceptionally 
bright ■ women whose love 
relationships with men are . 
“disappointing, frustrating 
and very confusing". What is 
to be done? 

Despite the initial gush and 
jargon of the book. I warmed 
to it rapidly. It is a dis- 
passionate. and occasionally 
humorous turning-over of the 
emotional flotsam and jetsam 


left on the beach by the ebbing 
of the feminist Seventies: And 
make no mistake, these 
women are definitely on the 
beach. The Carlas • and 
Melindas and Lonnies and 
Lynnies of the case-histories 
present a sorry picture of 
womanhood baffled and frus- 
trated as never before, cruising 
the singles bars and dating like 
teenagers as their biological 
docks tick away the fertile 
-months.- 

They are executives and 
court reporters and lawyers 
’and doctors; they look good, 
they have their own flats, and 
yet nobody seems to want 
them. WeH, J not for long, 
anyway. They are aware of the 
indignity oftheir position, but ■ 
can't understand it: a 35-year- 
old engineer called Debbie 
says: "It’s not as if I'm looking 
for the moon - just a nice, 
decent guy- I'd like to have at 
least one child, andl know my 
time. is running out I'm a 
good listener. I'm as nice as I - 
can be on dates and try to act 
confident, casual and fun: but 
l keep scaring them away. 
Sure I'm feeling desperate — 
■wouldn't you be?" . 

THOUGH THE setting of 
these rates may ■ be trans- 
atlantic, the problem is in- 
stantly recognizable among 
our own far smaller commu- 
nity of successful and well- 
paid women. Ewa Gottesman 
of the Institute of Group 
Analysis, a therapist working 
in London, recognized the 
symptoms and observed that 
with changing times “a Jot of 
things are having to be renego- 
tiated between the sexes". And 
although we may not yet have 
elevated it to the status of a 


7)0 You' CortE 

op-rev ? 



GdlA 


Worrying Trend, everyone in 
a mixed office can probably 
think of at least one woman 
.whose boardroom acumen 
fails her. frequently and disas- 
trously, somewhere on the 
way to the bedroom door. 1 
can think of several who have 
married men whom they 
wouldn't have employed to 
lick stamps in saner moments. 

Cowan and Kinder offer 
many explanations of die 
phenomenon. The most • in- 
teresting is that social changes 
have created a son of internal 
generation-gap: a gulf between 
women's conditioned, un- 
conscious motivation- (the 
search for an omnipotent 
prince, a- strong daddy, a 
patriarch) and their conscious, 
modem aspirations. 

So you get a woman-of-the- 
. world looking at her man with 
a secret desire to find him 
perfect- naturally, wjth her 
sophisticated fault-finding 
perceptions, she finds him 
wanting and moves on. Or else 
she manages deliberately ro 
disguise her strength, and 
plays helpless ' fluffy games, 
only to explode with resent- 
ment later when the poor chap 
lakes this at face value and 
tries to run her life. < 

“We. women are split 
creatures”.. Gottesman . says. 


“We have to ask ourselves 
what independence actually 
means. It is time we learned 
more about interdependence 
instead." . 

“In healthy relationships, 
mates tend to take turns 
parenting each other when 
needed”, say Cowan and 
Kinder. “A _ woman must 
guard against falling into the 
trap of being endlessly ma- 
ternal to a man." ■ 

Another entertaining in- 
sight from the American duo 
is that all the smartness and 
success in the world seems 
unable to prevent women 
from their traditional pastime 
of falling head over heels in 
love with rats, cads and 
bounders. 

In feet, they say. it is often 
the most selective and cau- 
tious woman who fells for the 
smooth, deceiving, manipu- 
lative rat. simply because she 
is so hril-bem on finding 
perfection that she turns 
approvingly towards the man 
who has spent most lime 
polishing his image and ap- 
proach to please women. 
Rhett Butler lives oil 

“Sometimes it is true that 
women who achieve a great 
deal become a bit cut off from 
themselves. There is a gap 
between thinking and feeling. 
In that gap is where disasters 
happen," says Gonesman. 

TAKE POOR old Julie, a 
successful • Californian 
'businesswoman with her Own 
luxury beach mansion, who 
despite prolonged therapy is 
unable to work out that her 
43-year-old and four-times- 
married lover Grant is never, 
ever going to settle down; or 
Melinda, an art gallery curator 
aged 30, who convinced her- 
self that she was the one 
woman who could tame a Don 
Juan artist. The analysts say: 
“These - men are interesting 
and they do stimulate intense 
feelings, of aliveness and vi- 
b nance in women ... . but are 

& 


they really worth a woman's 
time and love?" 

The theory that women get 
easily hooked on worthless 
excitement is possibly the one 
which most betrays the -feet 
that both Connell Cowan and 
Melvyn Kinder are men. But 
this in itself is a breakthrough. 
Books for achieving women 
on bow to manage their lives 
are generally. written by other 
achieving women. 

THESE ARE two men — 
psychologists, yes. but pretty 
ordinary men- next-door in 
their attitudes. As such, they 
are invaluable guides to the 
woman who wants just such a 
normal chap to father a couple 
of babies and bringin the coal 
and keep her company as 
passion fedes. 

And they can make a mov- 
ing plea for women to nse their 
brains to spot “diamonds in 
the rough'V'There are a lot of 
men who may not. .fit the 
mould that many women have 
when it comes to ‘Mr Right' — 
men who may have visible 
flaws in behaviour or appear- 
ance. or who may be insecure 
when it comes to initially 
forming relationships ... but 
these are often men who 
possess great possibilities. 
These men are frequently 
ignored or rejected - some 
women make their decisions 
with frightening, speed, on 
superficial and incomplete 
data." 

Well, some men do too, as 
any stout and spotty lass will 
ruefully confirm; but all in all, 
with- their homely saws and 
old-fashioned common sense 
tricked out in psychojargon, I 
suspect that Cowan and 
Kinder may end up by spread- 
ing more sober happiness than 
Kinsey ever did. 

Smart Women Foolish Choices 
by Dr Connell Cowan and Dr 
Melvyn Kinder (Bantam. 
£2.95). 

Libby Pottos 


Wanted: pen clips designed 
to stop children choking 


Pen tops may seem harmless 
bat they are potentially le- 
thal. Between 1969 and 1984 
right British children suffo- 
cated when the pen top they 
had been socking on lodged in 
their windpipes. 

Now a study commtssiooed 
by die Child Accident 
Prevention Trnst on behalf of 
the Department of Trade and 
Industry has suggested some 
simple changes to design 
which will make sack trag- 
edies modi less likely. 

Mr David Mathias, an ear, 
nose and throat consaftant at 
the Royal Victoria Infirmary 
in Newcastle npoa Tyne, has 
tested a whole range of com- 
monly available pen tops 
nstog robber models of. the 
throat and windpipe. 

There is a critical age, 
between three and 13, when 
children are at risk, be says. 
In yosnger children the wind- 
pipe is ns unity too small for a 
top to be inhaled; rider 
children's windpipes are large 
enough to cope with ft. His 
work has also shown that 
most of the pen tops British 
children of this age are likely 
to come across are potentially 
dangerous. 

“There are currently only 
one or two pen tops on the 
market that are relatively 
safe", be says. “The standard 
cheap ballpoint pen top is 
potentially a disaster. Once 
they get stuck that's it, you've 
got three minutes to get it oat 
before the child asphyxiates. 
It's a rare problem, but one 
which is entirely avoidable." 

The answer, ho np, is a 
simple dip which extendi Che 
foil length of the pen top. 
This will stop the windpipe 
from dosing aroand the fop 
completely and create aa air 
space through which the child 
can breathe, thus buying vital 
time to get the child to a 
doctor. 

“Basically, pen tops with- 
out dips are lethal. A pen top 
with a dip is fine, bat the clip 
must be es long as the pen top 
itself otherwise ft might jnst 
as well not be there." 

Mr Mathias's report Is now 
with the Department of Trade 
which is planning a meeting 
with pen makers. Manufac- 
turers are said to be keen to 
put the findings into aerinn. 

Rovers returned 

One of the 
biggest prob- 
lems facing 
the staff of 
psychiatric 
add geriatric 
hospitals is 
malting sure that confused 
and disturbed patients don't 
wander off Often the only 
remedy is to sedate or phys- 
ically constrain them. 

Doctors at the University 
Hospital in Basle. Switzer- 
land have devised a more 
humane alternative. Patients 
wear a T-shirt with depart- 
ment store-type security sen- 
sors stitched into iL They are 
left free to move around and 
do as they please. But when 
they try to wander outride or 
into ' a restricted area, a 
detector on the door sounds 
the alarm. 


c 


MEDICAL 

BRIEFING 


) 


Blood stock 




President 
Reagan ‘s 
suggestion 
that Ameri- 
cans worried 
about AIDS 
should give 
blood to be kept for themselves 
in case they ever need a 
•transfusion has met with a 
mixed reaction in the States. 

A National Institutes of 
Health meeting on AIDS 
conceded last month that 
those facing planned surgery 
should be able to donate their 
own blood for use during the 
operation. Storing a person's 
blood just in case they needed 
it in future was iogisticaliy 
impractical, however. 

In the UK experts contend 
that so-called autologous 
blood transfusion is un- 
necessary even for those fac- 
ing elective surgery. Blood 
transfusion centre directors 
and the Department of Health 
insist that blood available 
through the National Blood 
Transfusion Sen-ice (which 
has been screened for AIDS 
antibody since October of last 
year) is safe. 

The director of the South 
London Blood Transfusion 
Centre. Dr Keith Rogers, said 
it would take 12 years oj 
biannual donations for a 
person to build up enough 
stocks to cover an emergency, 
and the logistics of storing 
and correctly retrieving it 
would be horrendous. 

Biting back 

Late 20th 
Century 
explorers 
heading for 
the forests of 
South Amer- 
ica would be 
advised to arm themselves 
with stun guns — adapted to 
treat snake and insect biles by 
electric shock. 

This odd method has been 
developed by three doctors 
from Ecuador, Britain and 
the States. They followed up 
the tale of an Illinois farmer 
who reacted severely to bee 
stings and discovered that he 
could prevent this_by jipply- _ 
ing a high voltage/low am- 
perage direct current to the 
rite of stings. 

Writing in a recent issue of 
The Lancet the group say that 
for snake bites “the area is 
electrically grounded as close 
to the bite as possible and 
current is applied via an 
insulated probe to the bite for 
one to two seconds. Usually 
four or five shocks are given 
with five to ten seconds 
between them.” They point 
out that an outboard motor is 
one commonly available 
source of such a currenL A 
lead carrying an insulated 
probe can be attached to the 
spark plug, and the current is 
best applied with the engine 
at half throttle. 

Other motors with spark 
plugs such as lawn mowers 


IS.CLUillUg 

0 


Diung oa 

PS 


have also been used with 
excellent results, and now 
they have developed a modi- 
fied stun gun like the ones 
used by police to immobilize 
suspects. 

The team has tried the 
technique on more than 30 
people, none of the expected 
symptoms of an untreated 
snake bite developed and 
some were able to go home 
within an hour of 
ireaimenLThis group were all 
treated within 30 minutes of 
the snake attack, but even a 
couple of people who w ere 
untreated for two hours su£ 
feted fewer problems than is 
usual. 

Why this shock treatment 
works is a mystery. It may 
either inactivate the venom, 
or temporarily dose blood 
vessels in the area of the Into 
— long enough for the venom 
to lose its power. 

Retching reflex 

Sufferers 
from baltoda 
nervosa (a 
dose cousin 
of anorexia 
nervosa) are 
known to 
keep their weight in control 
by alternate boats of gorging 
and self-induced vomiting. 

Now two doctors at the 
Institute of Psychiatry in 
London have discovered that 
while most people find mak- 
ing themselves sick a grim 
experience, bulimics do not. 
Drs Paul Robinson and 
Letizia Grossi have described 
in The Lancet how they and a 
couple of other people fond 
the whole brainess miserable. 
It took them between 10 and 
15 minutes of retching with 
tears pouring down theft 
faces, showing that what are 
called their gag reflexes were 
in good order. 

Six out of seven bulmrics. 
on the other hand, swallowed 
the tube in a few seconds with 
no apparent problems. 
Bulimics will often admit that 
although they find self-in- 
duced vomiting distressing at 
first, it soon becomes part of 
their rontine and as a r es ul t 
they lose their gag reflex. 

Surgery snacks 

Before surgery patients are 
aiwavs advised not to eat or 
drink — often overnight, but in 
some coses even longer. This 
is to reduce the risks from 
involuntary vomiting white 
on the' operating table and to 
prevent- regurgitated Jood ac- 
cidentally getting into the 
lungs.. 

With increasing numbers ctf 

for^ clay for simple opera- 
tions. new advice is needed 
about what to do before — 
starving unnecessarily will 
only increase their arixietyA 
study in Canada recently 
reported in the British Jour- 
nal of Anaesthesia has re- 
vealed that some patients are 
expected to starve for as long 
as 18 hours, but many doctors 
now belieiv that three to four 
hours will suffice. 

Olivia Timbs and 
Lorraine Fraser 


WHY 300 
TOP SPECIALISTS 
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#fumana Hospital Wellington 

FOR CARE EVA CLASS OF ITS OWN 






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12 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 



THE TIMES 
DIARY 

Liquidating 

Sukarno 

Amazing revelations from the 
other side of the Atlantic. In a 
book to be published this autumn. 
The CIA: .t Forgotten History 
(Zed Books), the American author 
William Blum reproduces part ofa 
sensational 1962 CIA report 
which suggests Supcrmac and JFK. 
talked about •■liquidating'' the 
troublesome President Sukarno of 
Indonesia. The author of the CIA 
report, which has been declassified 
under the American Freedom of 
Information Act. states: “I have 
concluded from the impressions I 
have received in conversations 
with Western diplomats that 
President Kennedy and PM Mac- 

I KgnrcJy tai Hartltllwi (H 

agree* U Liquidate President Sukjma, 1 
t^d available opportunities- (ttlanl 
or overthrow in Inteeded tq> Ole word j 


Milbn agreed on the following 
matters in their recent meeting 
and will attempt to carry these 
things out." He goes on: "They 
agreed to liquidate President Su- 
karno. depending upon the situa- 
tion and available opportunities. 
(It is not clear to me whether 
murder or overthrow is intended 
by the word liquidate)-** Sadly for 
history, (he name of the CIA 
officer who penned this extraor- 
dinary report has been deleted. 

tl apparently refers to a meeting 
between the leaders in Wash- 
ington from April 27 to 29. 1962. 
At the time. Sukarno was ve- 
hemently opposed to a British- 
backed plan to create a Malaysian 
Federation, consisting of Malaya. 
Singapore. Sarawak. North Bor- 
neo and British-protected Brunei. 
CIA mischief in the abortive I9S8 
coup to oven h row Sukarno is well 
documented. It is not known if 
any Anglo-US action was taken 
following the supposed dis- 
cussion . Sukarno eventually lost 
power to General Suharto in 1967. 
He died of natural causes three 
years later. 

Lord Stockton was not available 
for comment this week, but his 
grandson. Alexander, tells me that 
a check on the private papers at his 
home. Birch Grove, has revealed 
"no such items" on the Kennedy- 
Macmillan agenda. One of the 
most highly-placed MI6 officers at 
the time assures me he had no 
knowledge of the alleged dis- 
cussion. Nor does he believe that 
liquidate could have meant 
bumping Sukarno off. “However, 
they might well have discussed the 
best, way of gening -rid of this 
awkward fellow." • ■ 


BARRY FANTONI 



“Sorry, he won't be back until 530. 
Ile\ lunching op the 1 M 6 ' 


Faulty tours 

Sunmed Holidays must be regret- 
ting bouncing a party of four from 
an o\ erbooked "really lovely little 
family -run hotel" in Crete into 
what their own brochure dc- 
Mrnbed as an “older-style pension, 
run more like a lavema. with the 
owners still learning as they go 
along". The difference in price in 
the brochure was only £10 a head, 
but the disappointed panv leader 
threatened legal action and only 
'settled when the company paid 
out £440. No wonder. He was 
David Tench, the legal officer of 
Consumers' Association and 
consultant to That \ Life. 

m One of rhe detectives investigat- 
ing the theft of £145,000 worth of 
cordless telephones from the IMC 
phone company In Reading. Berk- 
shire. is Del Sgt Rob de Bank. 

Illegal tender 

As if the Commonwealth Games 
Had not suffered enough, the Post 
Olficc has now brought its good 
name into disrepute. The Advert- 
ising Standards Authority has 
upheld four complaints over press 
advertisements for the PO's 
commemorative £2 coin which 
; began: "Old £2 coin now worth 
- £450 - new £2 coin still only 
£2 ... so don't miss out." The 
complainants reasonably pointed 
. cut that the 1 823 two-pounder was 
made of gold. 

Owed by so few 

The Royal Air Forces .Association 
appears to be so strapped for cash 
that it regards its life members as a 
"drain". An editorial in its journal 
notes that 40 per cent of members 
; joined years ago as life-members 
and accuses them of "admirable 
foresight" in paying a one-off 
subscription of as’ little as £5. "It 
needs to he said that unless life 
members contribute in other 
ways. . . they arc a severe drain on 
the association's financial res- 
ources." The editor. Jem Monk, 
asks them to become “life-giving 
members" — i.c. pay the full subv 
h seems a bit much to me: those 
life members who gave a fiver in 
[945 had already done a fair bit 
towards preventing the club being 
called the British Luftwaffe 

Association. 



Low wages don’t make work 

by Alec Nove 


“Unemployment in Britain i$due. 
or mainly due. to the fact that 
wages arc too high and rise too. 
fast" - so government ministers 
and The Times arc telling us. and 
the economic models they use tell 
them just how many hundreds of 
thousands of jobs depend on a rise 
or fall in wages. And the constant 
repetition of this, at best; part- 
truth. might eventually persuade a 
credulous public that the basic 
problem of the British economy is 
that the trade unions insist on 
their members being overpaid, 
and ignore the interests of the 
uncmploycd- 

Mueh has been said on the 
short-sightedness and obstruc- 
tionism of many British trade 
unions. 1 would not deny that 
excessive wage rises can. put firms . 
out of business. Yet the official 
doctrine is seriously misleading in 
three fundamental ways. 

First, the model used by the 
government's advisers gives the 
answer that ii does because it is 
programmed to do so. There is an 
assumed substitutability of labour 
for capital, an assumed marginal 
propensity to employ more at a 
lower wage. Thai is to say. if wages 
were lower then labour would be 
substituted for capital, and 
employers would hire more work- 
ers. Maybe, but how many? Sup- 
pose a company has 20 machines 
and 20 word processors. It will not 


employ more labour than is 
needed to operate them, even if il 
would cost them a little less. With 
a given capital stock it is by no 
means dear how many extra 
persons would be employed if real 
wages were to fall by (say) 10 per 
cent and all else remained equal 
While there would probably be 
some positive effect, there would 
be a 10 percent fall in real income 
of the working population, which 
would reduce aggregate demand. 

1 have repeatedly seen models 
in which real wages fall and output 
rises, in a closed economy, with 
never a word as to who would buy 
the extra output or why in these 
circumstances it should be 'profit' 
able to invest in expanding capac- ■ 
ily. Underlying all these models is 
a quasi-religious belief in laissez- 
faire extended, to the labour 
market It is believed that “mar- 
kets clear" — in other words, that 
supply and demand will balance, 
and that all factore of production 
will find buyers — if there is no 
govern ment or union interference. 

I once heard it argued that 
markets for bananas clear, so why 
not for labour? Bui if the price of 
bananas falls, due to lower de- 
mand. production can be cut 
Even the most extreme laissez- 
faire fanatic could not advocate 
the human equivalent of chopping 
down an unprofitable banana 
plantation. 


Second, when compared with 
our principal European compet- 
itors. British wages are low. as are 
social-security contributions and 
welfare benefits. Further, in recent 
years British wages have not in 
fact risen against those of West 
Germany. France or .Scandinavia 
(or Japan), when allowance is 
made for sterling depreciation. 

Let me illustrate: suppose in two 
years average, money wages in 
Britain have risen by IS per cent, 
while those in West Germany 
have gone up by only 7 per cent 
Does this indicate a fell in British 
competitiveness? Not at all since 
in the past two years the 
Deutschmark has appreciated by 
more than this difference* (it. is 
appreciating fast now). 

Third, if with relatively low. 
wages vis-a-vis - our European 
competilors-we still find ourselves 
uncompetitive, -this suggests -a 
whole complex of possible rea- 
sons. Lower labour productivity? 
Yes. but why? What of invest- 
ments wrongly chosen or not 
made? The low status and pay of 
engineers and designers? Neglea 
of research and development? The 
quality of management? 

What of other causes: Design? 
Credit terms? Marketing? What of 
the cost of factors other than 
labour, such as energy, or interest 
on. borrowed capital? Better and 
cheaper infrastructure? Un- 
employment rises when • firms 


dose. High labour costs could be 
one reason, but others may well be 
decisive. Have the laissez-faire 
ideologists ever made an industry- 
by-industry survey of compet- 
itiveness? British Ionics and buses 
are being increasingly driven off 
the road. by European competitors 
who pay much higher wages. 

More jobs arc unlikely to 
materializc without more invest- 
ment. private and public, and 
most public-sector investment 
generates jobs and profits In the 
private sector. 

The ideologists object to public- ' 
sector capital spending because it 
would “crowd out" private invest- 
ment and force up Interest rates. 
Yet their own "privatization” 
policies lead them to divert pri- 
vate, in vestment funds iwo |he 
purchase of state . assets — which 
creates not a single extra job, 
"crowds out" genuine new invest- 
ment and contributes' to the 
maintenance of high interest rates. 

There is a wage problem. But let 
us keep a sense of proportion. A 
visiting German recently, asked 
me: "Why is unemployment so 
much higher in Britain when 
wages are so much lower?” A good 
starting point, this, for serious 
thinking. 

The author is professor emeritus in 
the department of international 
economic studies at the University 
of Glasgow 

©Tina* Newspapers, 1986 - 


Richard Ford on the wider effects of IRA intimidation of business 


The Provos’ easiest coup 


The Provisional IRA has probably 
been taken aback by the success of 
its campaign of intimidation 
against contractors working for 
the security forces in Northern 
Ireland. Recent defections, nota- 
bly by the leading British builder 
Laing from a maintenance con- 
tract at RAF Aldegrove. have 
provided a remarkable propa- 
ganda coup at a time of diminish- 
ing terrorist returns. This week's 
CMcnsion of the intimidation to 
local suppliers had an instanta- 
neous effect. 

By attacking isolated RUC sta- 
tions and then threatening con- 
tractors prepared to carry out 
repairs, the Provisionals are using 
a tactic from the 1920s. when the 
objective Nvas to force the Royal 
Irish Constabulary to retreat to 
heavily fortified regional barracks. 
Michael McAtamney. Deputy 
Chief Constable of the RUC. has 
recently declared that the force 
wiH not be driven from its 
stations. But what the 
Provisionals want this time is to 
undermine police morale, reduce 
their operational capacity, and test 
the resolve of the government in 
the belief that over a long period 
they can sap Britain's will to 
remain in the north. 

Business people — five killed in 
the present campaign so far. one 
mistakenly — provide the gunmen 
with the softest of targets, and 
ripple effects are felt throughout 
the community, particularly in 
rural areas where such deaths have 
enormous unsettling potential. 

The Provisionals will have cal- 
culated (hat the killings will 
probably leave their base support 
unaffected." though working class 
supporters may be rather more 
critical at job losses caused by 
contractors withdrawing from 
sites. Such tactics will also un- 
nerve those Roman Catholics who 
have been prepared to soften their 
attitudes towards the police, and 
wilt make it much more difficult 
Ibr the government to encourage 
leading nationalists to publicly 
declare their backing for the force. 
Already one Roman Catholic 
member of the Northern Ireland 
police authority has resigned after 
a death threat from the 
Provisionals. 

In concentrating their efforts in 
the counties west of the River 
Bann. the Provisionals shrewdly 
recognize the difficulties posed to 
the RUC in policing a vast area 
with a growing Roman Catholic 
population. Many fuel merchants, 
greengrocers and bread companies 


The centenary World Chess 
Championship, now being played 
in London, could determine much 
more than whether the young 
genius Gary’ Kasparov, with his 
fiery, hungry style, will defeat his 
intractable opponent the meticu- 
lous Anatoly Karpov. It could 
decide who will administer ihe 
international game, the image of 
which has been transformed from 
plodding private encounter into 
glamorous televized 'combat. 

There can be no. doubt that 
there is little love lost between 23- 
ycar-old Kasparov, whose playboy 
image is enhanced by his trendy 
clothes bought from El Corte 
Ingles in Barcelona and Karpov. 
35. who lends his rare stamp 
collection when he is not prepar- 
ing for games. One eminent 
grandmaster says that quite sim- 
ply, the two men hate each other. 

It is an animosity they conceal 
Both are Soviet citizens and 
careful to avoid public pronounce- 
ments that could damage the 
prestige of the game in their 
homeland and dent the luxurious 
lifestyles they enjoy. Because of 
that the match being played at the 
Park Lane Hotel for prize money 
of £610.000 appears to the un- 
initiated to be no more than a 
game of chess being played be- 
tween the world's two 'leading 
exponents of the game. 

But it is behind the scenes, and 
beyond the board, that the real 
game is going on. played by the 
men who inhabit the strange 
world of super-chess. The reward 
for all the ploys and gambits is 



Newry, scene iff the worst of the recent spate of attacks on RUC stations. Nine officers died 


in this area were quick to an- 
nounce after the most recent 
threat that they would not be 
providing provisions for the po- 
lice. This could be little more than 
a foretaste of what is to follow, 
with the RUC planning for polic- 
ing into the next century in a part 
of the province where they pri- 
vately recognize they may be 
operating among a sullen, if not 
actively hostile, population. 

If large numbers of firms' 
supplying everything from sophis- 
ticated telecommunications to 
bread and milk do eventually heed 
ihe Provisionals’ warning, the 
government will be faced with a 
major logistical problem. The 
Army, with 10.600 troops in the 
province, has developed a degree 
of self-sufficiency, but there are a 
fun her 22.000 locally based mem- 
bers of the Ulster Defence Regi- 
ment. RUC and prison service. 
Supplying them through outside 
contractors would be a huge and 
costly undertaking involving air 
drops, as already occur to isolated 
bases in hostile territory' in Ar- 
magh and parts of Belfast. 

For the Provisionals the latest 
extension of their campaign has 
given a remarkable fillip. Over the 
years the security forces have 
slowly but surely pushed the 


terrorists further into rural North- 
ern Ireland, so that there is 
increasing talk of the campaign 
now resembling a border war! 
Until this week the Provisionals 
had not killed a member of the 
security forces in Belfast for 16 
months. Criticisms of the 
Provisionals' inactivity and opera- 
tional failures have led to an 
upheaval in the Belfast brigade 
and a new commanding officer 
there. Elsewhere, violence is most 
frequent in rural areas with off- 
duty members of the security 
forces providing the terrorists with 
easy targets. 

The warning to people the 
terrorists describe as "civilian 
hirelings'* came because, accord- 
ing to the Provisional IRA. it 
could no longer tolerate the activ- 
ities of business interests assisting 
British rule in the north. Bui they 
have also taken advantage of an 
RUC building programme that 
has involved £53m being spent in 
the past five years with another 
£l50m allocated for the next 10 
years, including £60m which will 
be spent on projects designed to 
improve outdated and inadequate 
facilities and provide accom- 
modation for a force ' that has 
expanded- fourfold since 1969. The 
official nationalist view, as ex- 


pressed by Gerry Adams. Pro- 
visional Sinn Fein MP for West 
Belfast is: "The business class are 
growing rich on the backs of this 
struggle.” 

In a small place like Northern 
Ireland the terrorists and their 
allies have . found it easy to 
discover the companies involved 
in the building work and in some 
cases the directors and their home 
addresses- As one. security source 
said: "It's a rural community. Mo 
one has any secrets.” 

By killing businessmen" and 
bombing RUC bases the Prov- 
isionals have achieved maximum 
propaganda value for minimum 
effort. There is little surprise in the 
timing of their latest warning to 
suppliers and contractors to the 
security forces that they will be 
considered "our enemies". It ap- 
peared as the province approaches 
another of its rituals— tomorrow's 
commemoration of the 15th 
anniversary of internment — and 
as the US fundraisers. Noraid, are 
on a tour with the smallest 
delegation for some years. 

And August is the "silly 
season", when lack of news . else- 
where guarantees more extensive 
coverage for stories from Ireland. 
The Provos. masters of propa- 
ganda. haunt the silly season. 


Tim Jones looks at the manoeuvring behind 
the scenes at the London championship 

Beyond the board, 
a retd chess game 


nothing Jess than control of the 
World Chess Federation (Fide) 
itself. The heavy artillery has been 
uncovered - ana the defences 
erected to depose or defend the 
controversial Florencio Camp- 
omanes who in November, during 
the Chess Olympiad in Dubai, will 
be striving to retain his position as 
president of Fide. 

The very mention of the name 
of the dapper, well-groomed Fili- 
pino is enough, at the Park Lane, 
to release a torrent of abuse. He is. 
according to his detractors, a 
master of intrigue whose dictator- 
like domination of the world body 
has been enough to threaten its 
very fabric 

More seriously, it is alleged that 
he blatantly favours Karpov over 
Kasparov. At face value, the 
evidence for this is hard to refute, 
and stems from his extraordinary 
intervention in the first match 
between the two men in Moscow 
in 1984. .After five months, with 
Karpov, then champion, leading 
by five games to three 
Cam po manes arrived in Moscow 
and abruptly ended the match 


when it was clear to every observer 
■that Kasparov's strategy of phys- 
ically wearing down his opponent 
was succeeding. - 

A Fide resolution after his 
intervention “thanking him for 
his initiative” was greeted with 
great derision, although be ex- 
plained be took his action because 
the match had “exhausted the 
physical if not the psychological 
resources not only of the partici- 
pants. but of all those connected 
with the march". 

During last year's rematch, 
which Kasparov woo, Cam po- 
rn an es - a friend and admirer of 
Ferdinand Marcos, the former 
presidem of the Philippines —’was 
further accused of directly aiding 
Karpov in trying to .retrieve 
£340.000 owed to the grandmaster 
in Germany as a result of' a 
commercial transaction. 

Campomanes is also the central 
figure in the decision to hold the 
forthcoming Chess Olympics Con- 
gress in Dubai, a move that has 
outraged the international Jewish 
community as Israel will not be 
able to take pan. The Third World 


vote was crucial in Campomanes’s 
election to the presidency in 1982 
and the 10-vote Arab bloc could 
help him retain that position and a 
lifestyle which Includes apart- 
ments in Lucerne and Madrid. 

Dissatisfaction with his leader- 
ship is so-great that some countries 
have formed or are forming 
independent chess federations, 
vowing to remain outside the fold 
until Campomanes is .deposed. 
For his part. Campomanes alleges 

that there is a conspiracy against 

him engineered by a small band of 
■ activists in the higher echelons of 
the chess world. 

One reason for the intense 
politicking at the Park Lane.Hotel 
and elsewhere is that if Kasparov 
retains his title the Soviet 
establishment will be forced to 
recognize an elephant when it is 
parked on their doorstep and 
switch their allegiance firmly be- 
hind Kasparov.This would almost 
certainly mean that all the Com- 
munist countries would, at Dubai, 
vote for Lincoln Lucena of Brazil, 
the candidate who has the backing 
of the world champion. 

. Some months ago.. Kasparov 
charged that “world chess'is run 
. by an international chess ' mafia” 
He added: “We must try to. do 
something now, because this is the 
moment to get rid of the Fide 
leadership. Our fight is on behalf 
of the honest people in cbess”- 

With four months to go before 
the elections, the manoeuvring, 
the accusations and the counter 
daims will become more bitter. 
The FI degate affair will rumble-bn. 


David Watt 

Mrs Thatcher’s 
costly triumph 


The barely suppressed sound of 
crowing from the 'direction of 
Downing Street proclaims the 
Prime Minister's belief that she 
has won a famous victory at the 
Commonwealth mini-summit. In 
a limited sense she is right she has 
got away with a minimum sanc- 
tions package, and the Common- 
wealth has not broken up. In her 
own mind, moreover.'saiisfection 
at this practical achievement will 
have paled beside the dazzling 
pleasure of having, as she believes, 
asserted Britain's right to -protect 
its interests against meddling and 
blackmail from, .the likes of 
Kaunda. Mugabe and Ramphai, 
and having 'stood out angle* 
handed for “principle" against the 
massed' ranks of wets and hypo- , 
critcs in the Cabinet and the 
Foreign Office. The triumph, such 
as it is. is undeniable. Bui at a cost. 

In the first place, British policy 
towards South -Africa now has no 
coherent basis whatever The 
strategy proposed by Sir Geoffrey 
Howe and the' Foreign Office 
throughout this affair has not been 
particularly heroic, but at least it' 
has been consistent and prag- 
matic. Conceding that sanctions 
will probably do no practical good. 
tiky have nevertheless argued that 
onoe opinion in the United Stales 
turned decisively towards.' sanc- 
tions . last year there was no 
realistic possibility of Britain 
avoiding them entirely. 

The corollary was that since we 
could not avoid action, the best 
way of limiting the amount we 
would have to do — and at the 
same time maintaining the initia- 
tive in the EEC and the Common- 
wealth -would be to make sure 
that we got full propaganda value 
for what we actually did. This 
entailed acting with reasonably 
good grace, orchestrating a lowest 
common denominator'consensus 
with all our partners, incl uding the 
US and Japan, and oiling the 
wheels with liberal applications of 
the right kind of culminatory 
rhetoric against apartheid. 

This strategy - which was al- 
ready. barely credible after the 
Prime Minister's perfonnance at 
Nassau — is now in smithereens. 
We have, as forecast, been obliged 
to open the Pandora's Box of 
sanctions, but because of the 
manner of our concessions we 
have got nothing for them: except 
much of the ill-will we should 
have earned by doing nothing 

Furthermore. Mrs Thatcher’s 
final choice between the sanctions 
available cannot be logically ex- 
plained. The ban on trade in coal 
and steel which she has agreed to 
wflhcause the Joss of more btariT- 
jobs in- South Africa and consid- 
erably, more damage to ' British 
companies (BP, for examplertes 
considerable investments in South 
African coal) than . that on . fruit 
and vegetables which;. she has 
violently rejected. - - ■ • • 

. Again, why the fanatical oppo- 
sition to a ban on air links? Inis 
would, in fact, allow British 
Airways to go on operating quite 
profitably in Botswana and Zim- 
babwe. leaving the onward 


connections to local airlines. The 
possibility that. say. Swissair 
would pick up some of BA's direct 
flight business to Johannesburg is 
for less significant than the pros- 
pect that BA, and hard-pressed 
British Caledonian, may now 
suffer the loss of valuable existing 
• rights in West and Central Africa. 

The more one looks at this 
hotchpotch: the more one is forced f 
to the conclusion that the Prime 
Minister has brushed aside logic 
and said:' "These horrible: 
sanctimonious.- hypocritical peo- 
ple are making me go along with a 
stupid policy. -Very well. I shall', 
show them what I think of them . 
by refusing to do morethan half of 
what they demand. So there”. 

One can sympathize with this 
irritation. Rationally speaking,’ 
economic sanctions are indeed 
stupid; there is also a good deal of 
hypocrisy about some of their - 
proponents. Mrs Thatcher need 
have no concern about the British, 
public's reactions, either. She wfll 
lose very few votes by being f 
truculent with black Africans. 

And yet it is still self-indulgent 
of her to let these emotions dictate 
policy. It is dangerous, too. for R . 
encourages a totally unrealistic 
view of the international scene', 
and Britain's place in it. The facts 
of fife do not permit us the luxury 
of Mrs Thatcher's brand of Little-. 
England nationalism. Our econ- 
omy is week and vulnerable to 
external forces, among which our 
Southern African interests are a 
small consideration. We - arc 
obliged to live by our wits and 
ingratiate ourselves with all sorts, 
of tiresome Continentals and 
Third World parvenus whom we 
would formerly have been able to 
browbeat or ignore. Our inter- 4 
national interest in the next 20 
years will depend increasingly on 
intangible elements of goodwill 
and on our ability to turn collabo- 
rative and multi-national enter- 
prises to our advantage. 

The Commonwealth, as such, is 
not absolutely essential to this 
effort; but we cannot afford to 
ignore the fact that countries like 
India and Nigeria are serious 
actors otf the world’s stage as well 
as being major trading partners of 
our own. and that the Common- 
wealth itself is not just a useful 
vehicle for British influence but an 
organization which, if we behave . 

with some sympathetic imagina- * 

tion, can help to soften the 
potentially calamitous dash be- 
tween the West and the forces of 
anti-Western nationalism still ris- 
ing in the Third World. 

The South African affair has 
-demonstrated once again that Sir 
Geoffrey .Howe, who has grasped 
these realities, is probably not the 
best pereotfso impart them to. the : 
prime minister. His ' laborious 1 
lawyers exegesis now ; seems to 
inflame her as much as African 
mdralism. But the truth' is that her t. 

background and her temperament 
are hostile to the message; and so 
long as her Cabinet is so supine as 
to let her conduct -British foreign 
policy according to their dictates, 
our true interests will suffer. 


moreover . . . Miles Kington 





Alan Maryon-Davis and I once 
found ourselves traipsing ihe end- 
less corridors of one of those well- 
padded hotels just off Hyde Park 
Corner looking for a room to 
change in. Apart from bedroom 
doors, there was nothing in those 
featureless passages except the 
occasional tray full of sand. They 
looked too big to be ashtrays, but I 
could think of no other function 
for ihem. t asked. Alan. if he had 
any theory. 

"Yes", he saidL“They are for 
Arab guests so that, when they get 
homesick, they can climb in-tbem 
and walk around for* bru” - 
- Ttris evocative .sentence rever- 
berated in my mind long after- 
wards. I had .never before 
wondered where restless Arabs 
might go when stuck in London. 
Wc all have a vague image of 
Britons in Arabia becoming home- 
sick and looking for pubs, but 
what do Arabs do? 

sS hare the Riyadh Experience! 
said the airship floating over 
-London this week. Come to Ri- 
yadh! said the posters. Of counsel 
Had not the Saudis recreated the 
city of Riyadh- inside Olympia, in 
what was billed as the largest 
temporary ■ structure anywhere. 
Would that .not be the place for 
rootless Arabs? Would they not 
flock to the capital of Saudi Arabia 
if ii were conveniently situated in 
West Ken? 

I have- been to Milton Keynes, 
that brave attempt to hide every 
new building behind a row of 
trees, but it did not prepare me for 
the concept of Riyadh-, a city ofa 
million and a half people which 
has. over a few yeans, grown out of 
something no bigger than a large 
county town. In Olympia they 
have rebuilt pan of the old town 
walls: ironic as they have been 
knocked down in Riyadh. They 
have also put in two camels, a lot 
of sand, four folcons. a fine 
bedouin tern and a well with real 
water.. But this is only a prelude to 
the huge attempt to persuade us 
that Riyadh is really -a great city of 
glass buildings.' schools, marble 
offices and the prettiest airport in 
the world. 

So bombarded was I with 
information by the Ministry of 
Information' that I can now 
remember only three facts: that 
Riyadh means "gardens”, that a 


new school opens in Saudi Arabia 
every two weeks, and that more 
than 2.000 Koreans work at .the 
airport. But as you wander round 
the show, one thing comes 
through loud and clear — they 
have built a huge, modem city so 
fast that the old. restless, nomadic 
spirit of the bedouin has changed 
overnight into a build-itbig 
American mentality. 

. . Or has it? This show, after, all 
. has already been to Germany.' and 
Is due to go on to Paris, New York. 
Japan and elsewhere. Maybe this 
Experience is just a bedouin tent 
on a huge scale, restlessly looking 
for somewhere new to camp? 

The crowds were enormous, 
and varied, too; there were so 
many flowing Indian robes. "Leba- 
nese costumes. Caribbean getiiips 
and Sikh turbans among the 
public that the Arabs on display 
bad a hard job looking exotic. But 
whai I didn't see was much sign of 
those homesick Arabs of whom ! 
had gone in search. 

Eventually the whole thing 
seemed so crowded that I went in 
search of peace in Leighton 
Hpuse. This, scarcely half a mile 
from Olympia, is the house that 
the wealthy -Victorian painter. 
■Lord Leighton, built as whai be 
thought an Arab house should.be 
The cool tiled interior still stands 
the fountain still splashes exoti- 
cally in the Arab hall; the elaborate 
screen work-still gives mysterious 
glimpses of the rooms beyond. 

When I arrived, the place was 
quite empty except for the-Irid 
superintendent looking at . his 
watch and hoping to lock up soon. 

1 asked him if the goings-on a* 
Olympia had boosted his atteffl- 
dances. "Definitely," he said. 
“Why. today was much "fuller than 
ever. Normally we average about 
70 people a day. But today we 
were way up to 1 12 visitors. 1 " 

The excess. I’ll be bound, 
consisted of those "homesick 

■ a j _ come for a momrat's peace 

and Lord Leighton's spring water- 
works. Next week the • Riyadh 
caravan moves on, splendid and 
circus-like, but Leighton House 
• remains. Perhaps they should can 
»t the Leighton Experience. 

_ All that worries me now is those 
•■•000 Koreans working at Riyadh 
airport. Where do they go wfce® 
they are footing homesick? 


*/:■ 


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l Pennington Street, London El 9XN Tdephone: 01-481 4100 


THE MISSING LEADERS 


The determination of North- 
ern Ireland’s more violently- 
inclined unionists to reduce 
the popularity of their cause 
yet further seems to know no 
bounds As the events of 
Thursday night were pieced 
together yesterday,, there.: 
emerged a picture of convoys 
of cars zig-zagging across - 
South Armagh bent on 
provoking violence in a Ro- : 
man Catholic enclave. Frus- : 
trated by the police, parts of 
the convoy crossed the border . 
and “in vaded” a tiny village in 
the Republic. An event at one 
and the same time menacing, 
farcical and sad. - 

When the reverberations die 
down, it . may be that the 
elements of farce will stay 
uppermost in our minds. But 
this bizarre episode raises two 
less entertaining questions be- 
yond the immediate . issues 
(who did what and why?) so 
noisily rehearsed in Monaghan 
yesterday. 

The first of these is the 
suggestion that there is a_- 
determined effort afoot ten 
make this weekend one of 
widespread violence. The 
Government has — so far — 
brought the Hillsborough 
Agreement through the loyalist 
marching season with rel- 
atively litle violence compared 
to the dreadful predictions of 
earlier in the year. 

Some 1 800 marches have 
been completed and there are 
only a few hundred more to- 
come: before this week, only 
six had been the -scene of 
serious violence. There- have 
been a few appallingly uglyj 
attacks on senior police offi-' 
cers during negotiations on the 
routes for marches but the. 
hard-liners who wanted lb see 
unionist resistance set alight 
have been disappointed. At 
least some of the credit for this 
encouraging balance sheet goes 
to those moderate unionist 
community leaders and poli- 
ticians who set out to 
neutralise the influence of 


those who arrived looking for 
trouble: . 

The events of Thursday 
nighisnggest that disappointed 
men are trying . to raise the 
stakes. This weekend sees a 
number of marches which may 
cause - trouble in Roman 
Catholic areas, or if rerouted, 
provoke confrontations- with 
the police. And that-is only on 
the loyalist side; nationalists 
traditionally spend this week-, 
end marking the anniversary 
of the 1971: internment 
swoops. In Lhe background, 
the IRA is reaping the quick 
propaganda benefits of its 
extended threat to security 
force suppliers. Once again the 
province relies heavily on the 
nerve and skill of the police 
commanders out oh the 
ground. 

The second question pro- 
voked by Thursday's hide and - 
seek concerns the leadership of 
unionism. The existence of the 
Hillsborough Agreement in- 
creased. the importance ofan 
issue which has laced union-! 
ists since the creation of 
Northern Ireland. Do they 
wish IQ link their future to the 
United Kingdom or do they 
wish to fashion it alone? 

If it is to be any real kind of 
union, and not the chimera of 
independence, then it follows 
that the type of union cannot 
be defined by Northern Ire- 
land alone. The Government, 
and by extension the elec- 
torate. of the whole country is 
bound to have some say in the 
matter. This basic truth, which 
underlies, the Hillsborough 
Agreement- is ' accepted by 
spme unionists." 

'■ Bui they are not the union- 
ists whore voice is being heard. 
Unionism is at the : moment 
being led by those carloads of 
men in South Armagh. There 
is a vast majority of unionists 
who disjike and fear the con- 
sequences of Hillsborough but 
who prefer peaceful protest 
within the law. There seem to 
be few leaders for them, how- 


ever. Mr James Molyneaux, 
the leader of the Offical 
Unionists, should be formost 
among those who are prepared 
to try and lead unionism in 
this direction and away from 
force. 

At the moment, unionist 
opinion seems to be divided 
into three segments. There are 
those who are ready to take the 
risk of breaking the link with 
London in order to mobilise 
self-defence against the South 
and . who make little secret of 
their readiness to take violent 
action. Mr Peter Robinson's 
escapade in Monaghan is part 
of his drive to secure the 
allegiance of this group. 

There are the traditional 
supporters of the OUP who are 
law-abiding but wish to ensure 
that their worst fears about the 
Hillsborough Agreement lead- 
ing ip form! unification with 
the South do not come about 
Many of them are succumbing 
to the felse lure of arguments 
for integration. A third, and 
very small, group would like to 
make an early and- profitable 
accommodation with the South 
and secure the best terms 
possible within a federal Ire- 
land. 

Fifteen years ago, with some 
encouragement from London, 
lhe unionist political monolith 
broke into the two parts which 
are now represented by Dr 
Paisley and Mr Molyneaux. 
Far from isolating extremism 
in a minority, the split has now 
yoked moderation to ex- 
tremism; Mr Molyneaux ap- 
pears unable to find any 
distinctive voice that is his 
own and meekly follows. Dr 
Paisley's leadership. There are 
indications that behind him is 
a potential constituency of 
people who wish to protest 
against Hillsborough but wish 
to make sure that it is only 
done in a way which obeys the 
rules of the country to which 
they wish to remain united 
They are entitled to better 
leadership. 


SEASON OF STRIFE 


Mr Norman Tebbit blames die 
silly season for the fashof 
stories concerning, his chifnr 
bling hold- on .the Prime 
Minister's confidence: He has 
a certain degree of justification 
for his complaint. 

A pebble . tossed into 
August's calm parliamentary 
pond will inevitably produce 
more ripples than one hurled 
into October's choppier wa- 
ters. At this time or the year 
some of those ripples -may be 
forced into patterns that. owe. 
more to the laws of physics 
than of politics. The relation- 
ship of rift to resignation, for 
example, is not as that of night 
to day. 

Familiar assumptions are 
too often made. The fact that 
newspaper stories hostile to 
Mr Tebbit come regularly 
from the friends of Mr Peter 
Walker does not mean that 
they do so always. The fact 
that Conservatives sometimes 
criticise Mr Tebbit as a conve- 
nient surrogate for the Prime 
Minister does not mean that 
they are doing so in this 
particular case. 

And yet, however seasonal 


its impact in' the. press, the 
hard pebble . of fed remains. 
The Prime Minister has woken 
up ta-the reality that in .the 
battle for :an unprecedented 
third term of office,her head — 
and her head alone — is on the 
electeralblock. Others, includ- 
ing Mr Tebbit, may live to 
fight another day. 

More than at either of the 
two previous elections, the 
issue will be her governance of 
Britain and her capacity to 
. .create .an administration in 
which the nation can have 
confidence. That does not 
mean~tbat she should present 
herself as a one-woman band. 
Indeed the evidence of the 
polls is that on key policy areas 
such as the health and educa- 
tion services Mrs Thatcher has 
acute electoral difficulties. She 
needs to be the leader of a 
team. She needs ‘ to be a 
credible leader of a credible 
and united team. 

Mrs Thatcher is loyal to her 
personal allies. That loyalty 
has extended well beyond the 
call of duty in respect of the 
staff who let her down- in the 
Westland affair.-She mustnow 


decide whether it has also been 
excessive in the case of, $jr, 
Tebbit 

• Forallfiiswen-known cour- 
age under., the . heaviest per- 
sonal and political fire,, will he 
be effective in the. electoral 
task ahead? Does he need to 
change his ways? If so, how? 

The time for questioning is 
short. The diplomatic side- 
ways shunting of Mr Harvey 
Thomas into a new job of 
organising the Prime 
Minister’s personal appear- 
ances is a small matter. It 
clears the way for a new 
Director of Communications 
whose -role will also be rig- 
orously confined unless some 
amity breaks out over the 
choice of agency to carry out 
the Party's political research 
and advertising. 

Mr Tebbit himself is entitled 
to have his position made 
clear. Mrs Thatcher's instinc- 
tive solution to office prob- 
lems is to bypass them, to take 
a greater load upon informal 
groups of advisers and upon 
herselt It has never been her 
surest instinct 


SECOND - BEST BUSH 


Mr Guy Vander Jagt, a 
Republican from the state of 
Michigan, is canvassing votes 
in the House of Repre- 
sentatives to repeal the 22nd 
Amendment to the constitu- 
tion of the United States. This 
is the amendment inspired by 
the Republican Party in 1947 
as a way of denigrating the 
memory of Franklin Roose- 
velt He had won four consec- 
utive terms in the White 
House: the amendment for- 
bade any future incumbent to 
stand for presidential office 
more than once more. But now 
Mr Vander Jagt and -he 
hopes — the millions who will 
sign his petition, want the law 
changed to allow President 
Reagan to stand again. 

The President is popular, 
still highly popular, mid-way 
through his second term. 
Republicans not only want to 
win; the party’s elders want to 
avoid internal ideological bat- 
tles. and the great electoral 
umbrella spread above them 
* by Ronald Reagan would en- 
sure peace. 

What does a draft-the- Presi- 
dent movement say about Mr 
Bush, . vice-president heir- 
apparent and. to judge from 
this week's - polls, .the .front- 
runner? It surely says nothing 
complimentary. Mr - Vander 
•Jagt’s crusade to change the 
law is likely to fail. It has, 
however, already suggested 
. that Mr Bush is a second-best 
candidate. He will remain 


vulnerable, periiaps right up to 
the convention, to 'some 
movement to draft a glam- 
orous figure from outside the 
ranks of serving Republican 
politicians. 

Mr Bush cannot be faulted 
for his assiduous efforts to 
prevent himself becoming a 
mere appendage.to the White 
House machine. Like Walter 
Mondale before him he has 
used the perks of office to 
travel and speak and. pre- 
condition of political mobility 
in the United States, to be 
photographed. There . was Mr 

Bush last week in Jerusalem 
with yamuika . {and camera 
crew}: this week ii is Kala- 
mazoo. still with camera crew. 
. The effort has paid off The 
indications yesterday were 
that Republican-registered 
voters in Michigan were 
favouring delegates commit- 
ted to Mr Bush in the' earliest 
test of his standing in the 
party. But enthusiasm for the 
Vice-President is another mat- 
ter. Though, by common as- 
sent. Mr Bush's political 
manners are less stilted than 
before, he continues to lack 
wide, appeal. Among his early 
competitors. -Jack JCemp has 
more u sm.art .ideas and Pat 
Robertson a. broadcast pulpit: 
in the wings Senators Dole and 
Laxali offer .Republican 
loyatism without commitment 
to President Reagan’s fiscal 
policies. 

All seem better placed to stir 


hearts and minds than Mr 
Bush whose recent efforts to 
turn himself into a political 
brawler by attacking Governor 
Cuomo lost him respect. Mr 
Bush seems at odds with the 
times. His Texan connection 
could be a liability now the oil 
business is slumping. 

Abroad. Mr Bush offers a 
safe pair of hands into which 
to put the management of SDI. 
indeed the defence of the West 

But where is the geopolitical 
vision? Some Europeans have 
found the revival of American 
nationalism under President 
Reagan hard to take: they have 
feared the hard edges of his 
anti-Communism. But they 
could never doubt that the 
President spoke from deep 
within America, articulating 
popular beliefs and shaping an 
American identity for the 
1980s. Vice-President Bush 
seems cerebral and insubstan- 
tial by comparison. 

The moral is not to repeal 
the 22nd Amendment but to 
hope that in the by-ways of the 
procedure for selecting pre- 
sidential candidates (which 
has a long way to go) two 
things might happen. One is 
that there might emerge, some 
more vjfel spokesman for the 
American temper. The other is 
that in. the. heal of debate and 
political dialectic Mr Bush 
finds a voice and. a presence 
more suited to the high office 
he so evidently desires. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Commonwealth and South Africa 


From bard Home of The Hirsei 
Sir, Now that we have all had time 
to digest^ the contents of the 
communique of the mini- 
Com monwealth meeting there are 
one or two conclusions that must 
be valid. 

First, the future constitutional 
and political pattern of South 
Africa must be settled in Africa, by 
Africans, for Africans of all races. 
The necessary programme of 
conciliation and co-operation can- 
not be brought about by any shot- 
gun wedding organised by. 
outsiders. 

Secondly, voluntary sanctions 
as a means to achieve a political 
aim are at best peripheral and as 
fell of boles as a sieve. Effective 
sanctions would need 10 be 
universal, mandatory and. in the 
case of South African nforced by a 
naval blockade. 

With the Prime Minister of 
Zimbabwe talking lightly of arm- 
ing all southern Africa, few are 
likely to entangle themselves in 
such military action. 

Lastly, all Commonwealth lead- 
ers should ponder deeply as to 
whether they really wish to turn 
the Commonwealth Secretariat 
into an executive imminent deal- 
ing in the political issues concern- 
ing its members. ■ 

A number of Commonwealth 
countries run one - party states; 
others, including Britain in North- 
ern Ireland, India in relation to the 
Sikhs. Sri Lanka and the Tamils, 
have racial and religious problems 
which are stubborn and certainly 
cannot be solved by intervention 
from outside nor by sanctions. 

Surely the role of the Common- 
wealth is to meet, to learn and 
then to act individually as each 
government thinks best, and not 
to try ro lobby and pressurise one 
member or another to take action 
against its judgement That was 
the concept of the Statute of. 
Westminster and we would be 
wise to stick to it 
Yours etc. 

HOME 
•The HirseL 

Coldstream. Berwickshire. 

August 6. 

From Mr A. F. Wigram 
Sir, Let us assume that all 
Commonwealth leaders wish to 
bring about a peaceful, lasting, fair 
and democratic constitutional 
settlement in South Africa. If this 
is the case then they must draw a 
distinction between punitive mea- 
sures designed to illustrate jus- 
tified detestation of South African 
racial policies and the construc- 
tive measures which might win the 


confidence of the powers that be in 
South Africa that a fair, lasting, 
democratic solution could be a 
possible alternative. 

If we agree to impose sanctions 
now. then we must ask ourselves 
what further steps we are prepared 
to take when sanctions foil. Are we 
prepared to supply sophisticated 
weapons of war and military 
training to the front-line states? If 
not are we prepared to stand by 
and watch whilst such supply and 
training are obtained from else- 
where? Are we prepared to com- 
mit our own forces against the 
present South African regime? If 
not. are we prepared to stand tv 
and watch whilst such forces are 
obtained from elsewhere? 

If the answers to these questions 
is no. then the Commonwealth 
leaders must look for answers 
elsewhere. They could bean by 
publicly recognising the difficulty 
of the problem: by committing 
themselves absolutely to a policy 
of non-violence: by recognising 
that any constitutional settlement 
is going to take a long time to 
introduce and may well involve 
novel territorial ideas, including 
federalisation. which could give 
local majorities and internal self- 
government to white. Coloured 
and tribal areas. 

They could go on by seeking to 
increase trade, sport, business and 
all other contacts with South 
Africa, thus exploiting to the 
utmost the relaxation of racial 
discrimination in that country and 
building confidence on the 
possibility of future relationships. 

Finally, they could end by 
encouraging and promoting multi- 
party democracy in their own 
countries and an end to inter- 
tribal discrimination. 

Such measures must at least 
have some chance of winning 
increasing support from white 
liberals and in all probability 
would prove a much quicker route 
to fairness and justice in South 
Africa than anything to be 
achieved by sanctions and the 
escalating violence which .would 
inevitably follow, probably over a 
IS to 20 year period. 

Yours faithfully. 

ANTHONY WIGRAM. 

6 Queen Street. 

Mayfair. Wl. 

August 4. 

From Mr Clive Dennis 

Sir, I have not been so ashamed of 

my country since Munich. 

Yours faithfully. 

CLIVE DENNIS. 

22 St Mary's Green. 

Ashford. Kent 


Faith and reason 

From.Mf Sydney Shenton _ 

Sir, Worthwhile theology has al- 
ways had to question and enquire, 
and with the increasing availabil- 
ity of the fintits of many kinds of 
scholarship investigation has in- 
evitably been more searching. We 
now know far more about the 
authorship and content of biblical 
texts and the life and times of 
Jesus than ever before. The great 
wonder and encouragement is that 
with understanding and discern- 
ment the whole of this knowledge 
serves to strengthen and enlighten 
the Gospel and render its meaning 
deeper and of increased relevance. 

Unfortunately the situation ap- 
pears to have, increased the ten- 
sions and division between some 
pastors and scholars, but this 
stress needs to be borne and 
conquered. To seek spiritual and 
all aspects of truth is surely an 
essential Christian duty. It is both 
wrong and very dangerous to 
ignore the unfolding revelations of 
knowledge, and science and rea- 
son must prevail in all our work 
and endeavour. 

Our Catholic brethren have 
recently set a heartening example, 
liberal theologians and conser- 


vative Vatican circles listening 
and learning from each other and 
joining forces with the great 
spiritual resources at their dis- 
- posal to attempt to alleviate the 
dreadful problems of deprivation' 
in South America and elsewhere. 

Let us hope and trust that 
Anglicans liberal and traditional- 
ist will similarly hearken and 
reflect so that we may an join 
together to combat together to 
greater purpose the mounting 
forces of evil and materialism. 

Myth of ancient and mysterious 
dimension may be retained, even 
cherished, but we cannot shirk its 
identification. It is quite un- 
reasonable to state that there are 
certain traditional received truths 
which must not be challenged. 
Truth in its very essence and 
literal meaning must welcome the 
constant impact of new knowledge 
and information and survive. If it 
requires alteration or modifica- 
tion from this constant searching 
examination, and fails to do so, it 
simply ceases to be truth. 
Sincerely, 

SYDNEY SHENTON, 

95 The Crescent, 

Davenport, 

Stockport, Cheshire. 

July 29. 


Lost chords 

From Deaconess Vivienne Lake 
Sir. If Mr Meredith (August' 5) will 
come to St Paul's in early morn- 
ing. as the pale light streams 
through the dome, he will find the 
great cathedral a place of medita- 
tion. and the tido-chapel used for 
Martins and Holy Communion a 
place of living prayer. Worship 
continues daring the day, despite 
the noise of people — the jewel of 
God's creation — and a chapel is 
set aside for private prayer. 

I cannot but rejoice that the 
world does not pass by, but enters 
to pay its sometimes unwitting 
tribute and worship to God. And 
unfortunately, cathedrals such as 
St Paul's and Ely need vast sums 
of money to survive. 


I learned my Anglican faith in 
this beloved cathedral in recent 
years, and am proud to be 
regarded as a St Paul's ordinand. 
To refer to the Dean and Chapter 
as appearing to “see themselves as 
servants of the tourist board" 
rather than sacred ministers is 
both untrue and unjust. I can 
personally testify to the quiet 
pastoral care which goes on 
continually behind the crowds and 
ceremonial. People from all walks 
of life have precious memories of 
St Paul's Cathedral. 

Yours sincerely. 

VIVIENNE LAKE 
Good Shepherd House. 

19 Walker Court, 

Arbury Road. 

Cambridge. 

August 5. 


Cutoff 

From Mr Michael Berger 
Sir. I can assure Lady Macdonald 
of Macdonald (July .30) that her 
experiences with British Telecom 
are not confined to the Western 
Isles or to small businesses. 

Our company are involved with 
international exhibitions world- 
wide and our operation is what I 
believe our American friends call 
“verbal-communications-in- 
tensive" 

We have experienced precisely 
the same problems as Lady Mac- 
donald has described and the local 
British Telecom engineers are 
welcomed very much as old 
friends, not least because of their 
cheerfulness and willingness to 
help. 

However, we arc consulting our 
solicitors as to what redress we 
may expea from British Telecom 
for the disruption to our substan- 
tial business. I strongly advise 
Lady Macdonald to do the same. 
Yours faithfully. 

MICHAEL BERGER. 

Andry Montgomery Ltd. 

1 1 Manchester Square, Wl. 

July 31. 


On first-name terms 

From the Chairman of the Royal 
College of Nursing Society of 
Geriatric Medicine 
Sir. I read with some disquiet the 
letter : from Dr T. Van der 
Cammcn (July 29) regarding the 
manner in which elderly patients 
are addressed in departments of 
geriatric medicine. 

In 1975 a report. Improving 
Geriatric Care in Hospital, pro- 
duced bv the combined efforts of 
the British Geriatrics Society and 
the Royal College of Nursing was 
published with the following 
recommendation: 

Identity and dignity: A patient 
should be addressed by his proper 
name. Some patienu may prefer to 
be known by a first name, or a 
familiar pci name — but this should 
only be used .in response to their 
expressed preference and with their 
permission. 

The report is recommended 
reading for all qualified nurses 
who care for elderly people. 

Yours faithfully. 

P. D. BLIGHT. Chairman. 

RCN Society of Geriatric Nursing. 
20 Cavendish Square. Wl. 

August 4. 


Travel without 
let or hindrance 

From Mr J. B. McCooke 
Sir. With reference to “A 
kingdom's feeble calling card" 
(feature, August 5), my father's 
1923 passport begins: 

We. George Nathaniel. Marquess 
Curzon of Kedksion. Earl of 
Kedleston. Viscount Scarsdale, 
Baron Ravensdale. Knight of the 
Most Noble Order of the Garter, a 
member of His Britannic Majesty's 
Most Honourable Privy Council, 
Knight Grand Commander of the 
Most Exalted Order of the Star of 
India. Knight Grand Commander of 
the Most Eminent Order of the 
Indian Empire, Ac, &c, & c. His 
Majesty's Principal Secretary of 
State for Foreign Affairs Request 
and require in the name of his 
Majesty . . . 

What splendid confidence that 
must have given the traveller! 
Yours faithfully, 

J. E McCOOKE 
9 Lodge Crescent, 

West Hagley. 

Stourbridge, 

West Midlands. 

August 5. 

From Mr Peter Pugh 
Sir. If we want to know why we 
find it difficult to compete in lhe 
modem industrial world we need 
look no further than the applica- 
tion form for a passport. 

When applying for a passport 
one has to send a photograph, 
signed on the back by a 
Commonwealth Citizen who knows 
you personally, and who is: a 
Member of Parliament. Justice of 
the Peace. Minister of Religion. 
Doctor. Lawyer. Bank Officer. 
Established Civil Servant. School 
Teacher. Police Officer, or a person 
of similar standing. 

In other words, those are the 
people that the authorities respect 
as worthy citizens. There is not a 
single person there who actually 
creoles any wealth. Is it surprising 
that the manufacturing profession 
which does create the wealth that 
these “respectable** professions 
depend on fails to attraa the best 
brains in the land? 

Yours faithfully. 

PETER PUGH. 

Old Webbs. 

West Green. 

Barrington. 

Cambridgeshire. 

August 3. 

Parking tickets 

From Mrs B. .-I. Dinsdale 
Sir. I have recently had cause to 
write and return to the Chief Oerk 
of the Metropolitan Police some 
parking tickets left lying outside 
my front gate and in my 
neighbour's garden. We frequently 
find these tickets blowing along 
the road where ignorant “liner 
louts" throw them away. I am sure 
we can't be- the only road in 
London to experience this! 

In this day and age when great 
emphasis is being made to dean 
up our dries could not a system be 
devised whereby these tickets 
could be issued without causing 
fitter? 

My suggestion would be to 
actually stick them to a car 
window. 

Yours faithfully. 

BEVERLEY A. DINSDALE 
5 Carmalt Gardens. 

Putney. SW 15. 

August I. 

Cat fleas 

From Professor RS Anderson 
Sir. Cats are kept in about 20 per 
cent of British households and cat 
fleas are certainly not uncommon. 
Your headline. “Cat fleas can kill, 
says sricniisT (August 4) will, 
therefore, have been a matter for 
serious concern to one in five 
households throughout the land 
(indeed to more than one in five of 
Times readers since cats are 
relatively more popular among the 
AB social group). 

The inclusion of Aids under this 
headline, even though it is quali- 
fied as “the cat version", will have 
guaranteed an even greater level of 
concern and some will have been 
left with the lingering impression 
that cat fleas are in some way 
assodated with Aids. 

Since the role of cat fleas even in 
transmitting feline leukaemia 
from cat to cat is. at best, 
speculative, it is quite unwarrantr 
able and unnecessarily worrying 
for millions of cat owners to 
include any mention of Aids in an 
ostensibly’ authoritative article 
about cat fleas. It could lead to the 
needless euthanasia of many cats. 
Yours faithfully. 

R. S. ANDERSON. 

The University of Liverpool. 
Department of Animal 

Husbandry. 

Lcahurst, 

Ncston. South Wirral. 

August 5. 

Uncertain glory 

Front Mr Alan V. Chubb 
Sir. So England won 52 two gold 
medals at the Commonwealth 
Games. Fifty-two times Edward 
Elgar must have turned in his 
wave as a truncated version of his 
tine tune from the first “Pomp and 
Circumstance" march was played 
in honour of the victor’s country. 

It was also rhythmically incorrect. 

True, the sentiments expressed 
in "Land of Hope and Glory" may 
be considered inapt in the context 
of current politics, and the empha- 
sis should be placed more on the 
former rather than the latter 
attribute: but this should not. of 
itself, be an excuse to tamper with 
one of the most stirring melodies 
ever written. 

Yours faithfully, 

A V. CHUBB. 

Signal-Elm 
Wood Lane. 

Kidmore End. 

Reading. Berkshire. 

August 3. 



AUGUSTS 1865 

On July 14. 1865 the Matterhorn 
was climbed for the first time by 
Edward Whymper and his party — 
Charles Hudson, D. R. Hadow, 
Lord Francis Douglas and three 
guides — Michael Croz and the 
Taugwalders , father and son. The 
tragic descent is described in 
Whymper’s own words. The 
Times on July 27 thundered, 
“What is the use of scaling 
precipitous rocks . . .? What is he 
J the mountaineer] doing there, 
and what right has he to throw 
away the gift of life and 10,000 
golden opportunities in an 
emulation which he only shares 
with skylarks, apes, cats and 
squirms l" 


THE MATTERHORN 

ACCIDENT. 


TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES. 

Sir,- After the direct appeals 
which I have received from the 
President of the Alpine Chib and 
from yourself to write an account 
of the accident on the Matterhorn. 
I feel it is impossible to remain 
silent any longer . . . 

We remained on the summit for 
one hour, and during the time 
Hudson and I consulted, as we had 
dune all the day, as bo the best and 
safest arrangement of the party. 
We agreed that it would be best for 
Croz to go first, as he was the most 
powerful, and Hadow second: Hud 
son, who was equal to a guide in 
pureness of foot, wished to be third; 
Lord F.Douglas was placed next, 
and old Taugwalder, the strongest 
of the remainder, behind him. 
suggested to Hudson that we 
should attach a rope to the rocks on 
our arrival at the difficult bit. and 
hold it as we decended, as an 
additional protection. He approved 
the idea, out it was not definitely 
settled that it should be done . . . A 
few minutes afterwards I tied 
myself to young Taugwalder and 
followed, catching them just as 
they were commencing the descent 
of the difficult part described 
above. The greatest care was being 
taken. Only one man was moving 
at a time; when he was firmly 
planted the next advanced, and so 
on. The average distance between 
each was probably 20 feet. They 
had not, however, attached the 
additional rope to rocks, and 
nothing was said about it . . . 

I was, as I have explained, 
detached from the others, and 
following them; but after about a 
quarter of an hour Lord F. Douglas 
asked me to tie on to old 
Taugwalder, as he feared, be said, 
that if there was a slip Taugwalder 
would not be able to hold him. This 
was done hardly ten minutes before 
the accident, mid undoubtedly 
saved Taugwalder’s life. 

As far as I know, at the moment 
of the accident, no one was actually 
moving. I cannot speak . with 
certainty, neither can the 
Taugwalders, because the two lead- 
ing men were partially hidden from 
our right by an intervening mass of 
rocks. Poor Croz had laid aside his 
axe, and in order to give Mr. 
Hadow greater security was abso- 
lutely taking bold of his legs and 
putting his feet, one by one, into 
their proper positions. From the 
movements of their shoulders it is 
my belief that Croz, having done as 
have said, was in the act of 
turning round to go down a step or 
two himself; at this moment Mr. 
Hadow slipped, fell on him, and 
knocked him over. I heard one 
startled exclamation from Croz, 
then saw him and Mr. Hadow 
flying downwards; in another mo- 
ment Hudson was dragged from his 
steps and Lord F-Douglas immedi- 
ately after him. All this was the 
work of a moment; but immediate- 
ly we heard Cruz's exclamation 
Taugwalder and myself planted 
ourselves as firmly as the rocks 
would permit; the rope was tight 
between us, and the shock came on 
us both as on one man. We held; 
but the rope broke mid way 
between Taugwalder and Lord F. 
Douglas. For two or three seconds 
we saw our unfortunate compan- 
ions sliding downwards on their 
backs, and spreading out their 
hands endeavouring to save them- 
selves; they then disappeared one 
by one, and fell from precipice to 
precipice on to the Matterhorn 
glacier below, a distance of nearly 
4,000 feet in height. 

For the space of half an hour we 
remained on the spot without 
moving a single step. The two men. 
paralyzed by terror, cried like 
infants, and trembled in such a 
manner as to threaten us with the 
fate of the others. Immediately we 
had descended to a safe place I 
asked for the rope that had broken, 
and to my surprise — indeed, to my 
horror — found that it was the 
weakest of the three ropes. As the 
first five men had been tied while I 
was sketching I had not noticed the 
rope they employed, and now I 
could only conclude that they had 
seen fit to use this in preference to 
the others. It has been stated that 
the rope broke in consequence of 
its fraying over a rock; this is not 
the case, it broke in mid-air, and 
the end does not show any trace of 
previous injury - - ■ 

I am, Sir, your obedient servant, 
EDWARD WHYMPER. 
Haslemere, Aug 7. 


Seat of power 

From Mr Christopher Amander 
Sir. It was a happy suggestion by 
the Duke of Edinburgh that fee 
Lord Chancellor's Woolsack be 
replaced by a box of machine 
tools, symbolizing modem in- 
dustry (report, July 31). 

Would it npt be equally 
comfortable for him and, pemaps, 
be more reflective of the dynamic 
elements in our industrial scene, if 
the Lord Chancellor were to sit on 
a bag of silicon chips or a cushion 
of synthetic subordinated deben- 
tures? 

Yours faithfully, 

CHRISTOPHER ARNANDER, 
Rosteague, 

Portscatho, Comwafl. 



COURT 

AND 

SOCIAL 


COURT 

CIRCULAR 


CLARENCE HOUSE 
August 7: Queen Elizabeth The 
Queen Mother today visited the 
Black Isle Show at Muir-of-Ord. 
Ross-shirc. 

Her Majesty travelled in an 
Aircraft of The Queen's Right 

Ruth, Lady Fcrmoy. Major 
Sir Ralph Anstruthcr. Bl and 
Captain Niali Hall were in 
attendance. 


university's 350th anniversary ¥ TnivPrSltV I1PWS 
celebrations. He will visit Chi- UUlTCrailJ UCWa 
cago on September 4 and 5 to Cambridge 
attend a charity ball in aid of the Elections 
Salisbury Cathedral Spire Ad- 


Salishurv fath«1ral Cmm An- I D M Ovwr. un D. Mkx* at wolhson 
oaiisoury tainearai opire Ap- I coiiw and k«wct of irte Unuersuy 


peal and the Field Museum of 
Chicago, open the British 
promotion at Marshall-Field's 
department store mid play m a 
polo match. 


The Prince and Princess of 
Wales win pay a three-day 
official visit to Portugal in 
February, 1987. 


The Prince of Wales will visit 
Harvard University on Septem- 
ber 2 to 4 to attend the 


The Prince and Princess o/ 
Wales will visit the Federal 
Republic of Germany in Oeto- . 
ber 1987. ! 


Marriages 

Count Michael Badeni 
and Miss S. Briggs 

The marriage took place on 

August 2 ai St Aloysius Church. 
Oxford, of Count Michael 
Badeni. son of Count and 
Countess Badeni. and Miss 
Sarah Briggs, daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Peter Briggs. Dom 
Aelred Burrows officiated. 

The bride, who was given in 
marriage by her father, was 
attended by Hilary Briggs. Katie 
Burca and' Francis Burca. Mr 
Philip Nod was best man. 


Mr R.H. Mitchell 
and Mrs M. Ball 
The marriage look place on July 
2S of Mr Rodney Mitchell and 
Mrs Mimi Ball. 


Birthdays today 

Professor Jack Baldwin, 48; 

Lord Campbell ofEskan, 74: Sir 
Joseph Cantiey. 76; Lord 
Chappie. 65: Sir John Fletcher- 
Cookt 75: Mr Barney Hayhoe, 
MP. 61: Mr Dustin Hoffman, 
49: Lieutenant-General Sir Da- 
vid House. 64: Professor P. T. 
Landsberg. 64: Mr Nigel 
Mansell. 33: Sir Alan Muir 
Wood. 65; Sir Patrick Neill, QC. 
60: Sir Denning Pearson. 78; 
Professor Roger Penrose, 55; Sir 
Hugh Rankin. 87: Professor J. 
A. Steers. 87; Lord Tranmire. 
83; Mr Andy WarhoL 55: Mr 
Justice Wood. 64; Professor J. 
Yudkin. 76. 



Oct F M v Sofroniew. BS 
MD (Ludwie-MaxLnUUan). 
i Oxford i. 


Latest wills 



Mr J.R. Parker 
and Mrs P.M. King-Smith 
The marriage took place on July 
12 at St Martin's. Dorking, of 
Mr John Richard Parker and 
Mrs Patricia King-Smith (nee 
Johnson). 


The Hon Lady Betjeman, of pcterhouse Honorary FenowsMp: 
Cusop. Hereford and Worcester, D MacX snuiu. 


County Planning 
Officers 9 Society 


The following have been elected 
officers of the society: 

President: Mr C. R. B. Brown 
(Hampshire CC): vice-presi- 
dent: Mr G. C. Stecley 
(Hertfordshire CC); honorary 
secretary: Mr D. Tattcrsall (Lan- 
cashire CC): honorary ireasuer 
Mr M. Law (Shropshire CC). 


widow of Sir John Betjeman and 
author of several travel books 
written under her maiden name, 
Penelope Cherwode. left estate 
valued at £1 12.107 net. She left 
all her letters written to her by 
her husband to Duncan An- 
drews. of New York, and the 
remainder of her estate mostly 
to her children. 

Mr Alfred Richard Woodley, of 
Amcrsham. Buckinghamshire, 
left estate valued at £1.403,402 
net. 



ST CATHARINE'S COLLEGE 
Alex Jacobson research fellowship for 
thrw years from Oct 1: P J Sands. 
BA. LLM. 



Appointments 


ST JOHN'S COLLEGE 


Luncheon 


HM Government 
Mrs Lynda Chalker. Minister of 
State for Foreign and Common- 
wealth Affairs, was host yes- 
terday at a luncheon held' at 
Lancaster House in honour of 
the High Commissioner for 
Botswana. 


Latest appointments include: 
Mr Kevin Bums to be British 
High Commissioner at Bar- 
bados. in succession to Sir Giles 
Bullard, who will be retiring 
from the Diplomatic Service: 
Mr Peter Boorman to be Prin- 
cipal of Davies. Laing and Dick 
College and Abbey Tutors. 

Mr David Knight, of the West 
Midlands police, and Mr Alan 
Elliott of the Avon and Somer- 
set Constabulary, to be assistant 
chief constables of the West 
Midlands. 


Fellowship under UUe E from Oct 1: S 
J Heal. MA. PhD iNewnham College) 



Professor ER. Pike, FRS, has 
been appointed to tbe Clerk 
Maxwell chair of theoretical 
physics at King's College. 

Lord Dainton, FRS, Chancellor 
of Sheffield University, has be en 
elected an honorary fellow of 
Birkbeck College. 


Births, Marriages, Deaths and In Memoriam 


BIRTHS, MARRIAGES, 
DEATHS ad « MEM0HIH1 
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(minimum 3 lines) 


AmuMinccmcniL authenticated by the 
name and permanent address of die 
sender, may he sent nr 


THE TIMES 
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or telephoned I by telephone subs- 
citwn only* to: 11-481 3824 


Announecmenu can be received by 
telephone between 4.00am and 
$..Hipm Monday to Friday, on Satur- 
day between o.miam and 12 noon. 


C 1-481 4000 Mtrt. Fur puhhcaiion the 
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FORTHCOMING MARRIAGES. WE0DM6S 
etc on ( nun and Social Page £8 a llaa 
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Emiuum to. 01-822 9953 
taller 10 .Miami. nr send lo: 

1 P—n laa v street. Leaden El 9XR. 


Please alUm at least 48 hours before 
puNKaiwn. 


MARRIAGES 


STOWE : COLUNBMDGE - The mar- 
nage tool, place an Saturday. August 
2 at St AJdaie's Church. Oxford, of 
Mr Aidan E3dryd Stowe, younger 
son of Dr Roy Stowe of Ramsgate. 
Kent, and the late Mrs Pauline 
Stowe, and Mbs Alison Louise 
Collingndge. eldest daughter of Mr 
and Mrs Gordon Golltnvidge of 
Knaptuu. wofcutg. Surrey. 


RUBY ANNIVERSARIES 


SUTTUE : CUMMER - On August 7th, 
1946. at Southwark Cathedral. 
Ernest iBitn lo Judy. Now at 
Malvern. Worn. 


GOLDEN 

ANNIVERSARIES 


BUTTERWORTH : LINCOLN 

- On Slh AugusL 1936 at Utttepon 
OongraiuJations lo Charles and 
Margaret. Per ardua ad astra.' 


I rjtnr not hi rail ttw rtglucouv but 
ninibn-. lo irpenUTHP 

SI Mark 17 


WATTS: LOTT -On August Rlh. 1936. 
at St. Mark's Church. Cheltenham. 
Wilfred Richard James to Phylte 
Manorte. 


BIRTHS 


DEATHS 


BEMTINCK On JuLi ZSrd. to Miranda 
imx* UhnrhiMdi and Mark, a 
daiiqhUT Alice. a iNit for George. 

CLARK On luguM cm al 

MnlUli-sliornuqh M.iU-rrntv Hospital. 
b> Marion and Simon a daughter. 
Abig.nl franco*. 


BAUER On August 3rd. peacefully, at 
Leonard Pulliam House. Haiion u> 
her 90th year. Joyce EUiabeih. 
rormcTly of Cheltenham. Cremation 
private. 


CONOLLY On ix August to Amanda 
innp Bird i and John, a son. Thomas 
RntuTI James 


BLA GROVE AUterf Edward i’Ben'1. 
homer of me British Emotre Medal, 
iormertv a Porter ai Bainoi College 
•Oxford*, on 6ih AugusL aged 84. 


EAVES On t si August, to Simon and 
Wav no mix- Mclnlvro, a daughter. 
Emily Sarah, a friend for Thomas. 


OLAKJE. Anthony • Suddenly a( SL 
Thomas' Hospital, on Slsi Jub. 
1986. Funeral at West Norwood 
Crematorium on Friday. 8th August 
at 3.00 pm. 


' ERSKINE-MLL - On August 6lh. at 
The Royal Deion and Exeter 
■HeavllrcxM. lo Sarah incc Clarkei 
and Roger, a son. a brother for 
Kirslv. 


SKUBB ■ On AuquM sih. lo Jennifer 
i nor Wi|son> and Tony, a son. 

Ru.ir.iwn 


HAM-COLE On 1st August, in Crispin 
and Alison, a son. Alasdalr Hugh, 
brniher (or Alexandra and James. 


ELLIS. Thomas Charmer mmi - On 
Saturday. 2nd Auqust 1986. at home 
after an illness bom with courage . 
dignity and strength from Itts faith. 
Dearly loved husband of Joan and 
father of John. Peter and Christine 
who w-tii miss him so much. Funeral 
ScrWce lo be held af Union Church. 
Mill Hill on Friday. Bth August at 
3.00 p m. 


HELPS On 7lh August. to Katherine 
Hire Rnrthousei and Kll. twin boys. 
Joseph Chnsiophrr and Thomas to- 
ward at The Rosie. Cambridge 


GARDNER - On August 51b. peacefully 
in hospital. Hugh, losing husband of 
Margaret, much kned father of 
Alison. Donald and Jinny and a dear 
grandfather Funeral on August 13(h 
ai SL Peter's. Serkhamsted at 2.00 
pm. No flowers. 


JENKINS On 24th July, af Queen 
Ovirioiu 's. to Sally um Turner' and 
Cdu ant. a son. Fergus, a brother for 
Flora. 


JONES - On August Sth 1986. al 
. Guildford, to Sbeiagh incc FdJTori 
and Nicholas, a son Beniamin. 


^LEAF On Auqust 1st. al SI. Mary's 
< Hospital. Paddington, to Cdroline 
T mee Nav top ana tan. a son. Harmon 
Michael Rhodes, 


CREfG - On Wednesday. August 6lh. 
peacefully. Jonathan Oreig. eldest 
son of John Grag and Lena 
Denunnou Funeral Service at 9.00 
am on Saturday. August 9Ui at Holy 
innocents Church. Tottenham Lane. 
N8. Family flowers only please but 
donations may be sent lo Holy 
Innocents Church. 


LESLIE On 2Sh July jj The Westmin- 
ster Hospital, lo Philippa, wife of 
Dai Id Leslie, a son 


OWEN - On August Slh. at the John 
Rddrliffe. Oxford, to Helen inee Mo 
, Donald i and Nicholas, a son 


HOLLANDER. Hans • On 6Ui August 
peacefully at Holcombe. Dawltsh. 
Pm ate Requiem Mass. Thanksgiving 
Service to be arranged. 

IRWIN i nee Carver) on Wednesday. 
August bth 1986. peacefully. Irene 
aged 90 years. Beloved wife of the 
late Freddie Irwin and mother of 
Ethnc. No (lowers by request 


1 SCHNEIDER on 51 h Auqust 1986 at 
. OMsiadi krankenrutK. Hannover. 
. To I'rvuta i nee Dauson-Baiesi and 
Mirhoct. a daughter. Fredencc. Au- 
- gusto. Louisa 


■5ELFE- On Tih AugusL to Joanne into 
’ Vickery i and Jeremy, a son. Edward 
Rupert Ay l win 


LLOYD • On 6th AugusL Belly 
Rosemary Alice UoytL wife of the 
Reverend Julian Lloyd and daughter 
of the laie Admiral and Mrs Bernard 
Fairbaim Funeral at St. Thomas'. 
Aboyne an Saturday. 9Ui August at 
1 1.00 am. No flowers please. Dona- 
tions towards a Memorial win be 
gratefully received at HazeUnmt 
Cottage. Aboyne. Aberdeenshire. 
AB3 5HY 


-SHARRATT - On 6(h AugusL to 2at 
• incc Hamsoni and Jonathan, a 
daughter. Elizabeth Anne. 


* SIDNEY- WILMOT - On 3ls* July, to 
w Claire iCranttwmi and Colin, a son. 
.. Mungo Rupen Llewellyn Alexander. 


SUPESTEUN - On Slh August at Har- 

- rngaie. to Diana inve Markham) and 

- Jan. a daughter. Alexandra 
. Cervaiv. 


LUCKETT - On 5th AugusL Gerald 
Archer. Priest Husband of Peggy, 
father of Richard and Helen. 
Rrauiem on Monday. 1 Uh August at 
SI. Andrew's. Meonstobeai 3.30 pm. 
Memorial Service al Q’anbreok. 
Kent on Salurday. 20th September at 
ll 00 am. No (lowers, donanom to 
Historic Churches Preservation 
Trust Fulham Palace. SW6 6CA. 


.-THOMPSON on Salurday 26 ih July. 
- to Judv incc Bland' and Tony. 
•- rrrqus. a brother for Shallo. 


/ WHITE - On August 6th. at the Matilda 
? Hospital. Hong Kong, to Linda incc 
West head i and Mark, a daughter. 
Cecily Frances 


MARSH - On August eth. 1966. pe«& 
fully in a nursing home, aged 85 
years, Winifred May. Beloved 
mother of Joan and Michael, grand- 
mother of Joanna. Mark and 
Alexander. Service at Chichester 
Crematorium. Sussex on Thursday. 
August lam al 3 30 pm Cm flowers 
and all eixndrles please lo F.A. 
Holland & Son. Terminus Road. 
Ulile hampt on. Sussex, tel. 713959. 


McLELLAN - On 5th AugusL suddenly 
at his daughter's re sidence, aged 77 
years. Thomas. Dear husband, of 
Jean, loving father of Heather and 
Metvyn and grandfather of JennUa- 
and Alistair. Sometime Mayor a I 
High Wycombe and Chapman of 
Wycombe District Council. Funeral 
Service ai2A5 pm on Tuesday. L2th 
August al High Wycombe Partsb 
Church. 

tWOMTSOMERY-SMITH - On Wednes- 
day. 6Ui AugusL peacefully. Kenneth 
George Hope Montgomery -Smith. 
BJaC- C-Eng.. F.LC-E- FJ-StrucLE^. 
F.ClJVrh.. of Harpenden. Herts. 
Dearly loved husband of Marian, 
rather of Joanna. Bruce. Gavtn and 
Rogan. Private cremation fotlowe d 
by Memorial Service an Tuesday. 
12th August at 3 pm at St Nicholas 
Parish Church. Harpenden. No Dow- 
ers mease but donations may be sent 
for the National Deaf Children's Soci- 
ety. c/o L.C. Weston. Funeral 
Directors. 96A Luton Rd. 
Harpenden. Herts. 06877 2865 
MYER - On 6th August. 1986. peace- 
fully al Kestrel Grove. Louie Ruth, 
adored wife for 67 yean of Henry 
Denxus Myer. much loved mother of 
Duicie. Dick, verily and Yvonne and 
treasured grandmother and great 
grandmother. Cremation at Golden 
Green Crematorium. Hoop Lane at 
11.00 am an Friday. Bth AugusL 
Prayers af west London amagogue 
at 6-00 pm. No flowers. Donations, tf 
desired, to British Red Cross or 
R N.L.I.. 

NEWMAN • On 6th AugusL peacefully 
al hts home. Hotly Cottage. Green 
Lane. Prestwood. Great Mhsenden. 
Bucks. John, husband of Hazel and 
father of Philip and Penny. Rivals 
cremation, followed by Memorial 
Service at the Church of SL John the 
BapdsL Lillie Mtssenden. Bucks an 
Monday. 11th August al 1.30 pm. No 
flowers by request but donations, tf 
desired, to Imperial Cancer Research 
Fund. PO Box 123. Lincolns hn 
Fields. London WC2A 3PX. 
POWNALL-CRAY ■ Suddenly on Sth 
August, al home. In her 72nd year. 
Margaret Felicity (Felicity Cray) of 
Appleby. Lav erst ock Park. Salis- 
bury. Wilts. Beloved wife of 
Willoughby, mother of Dickon. 
Andrew and Lucy. Funeral at Salis- 
bury Crematorium cm Tuesday. 12th 
August at 11.15 am. Memorial 
Service to be advised. 
SCOIT-HEMDCRSON - On August 6th. 
Cynllua. al The Brampton Hospital 
Al rest aftrr a long Uiness so bravely 
borne. Betoved mother of Deirdre. 
Cremation Service at Putney vale 
Orematorium. Kingston Road. 
Putney. London SW15. Enquires 
and flowers to E.B. Ashton & CD.. 
Telephone: 01-584-0079 
SMITH • On August 6th. peacefully. 
Mary Louse, aged 78. Beloved wife 
of Canon Enc Smith, loved also as a 
mother by Margaret Eric Peter, and 
Christopher, as graiKtanother to 
Catherine. Brian and Graham. 
Funeral al SI. Mary's. Burpham. 
Sussex on Wednesday. August 13th 
al 2 00 pm. No Rawer* but donauoas 
may be sent lo Francis Quppell it 
Son. d8 High Street Stdcup to be di- 
vided between the Church 
Missionary Society and SL 
Augustin's. Bromley. Extension 
Fund. Memorial Service at Hayes to 
be announced. 

rENBT - On August Sth. 1986. 
Humphrey (Rey) In his S4ih year at 
his home in Luslleigti. Devon, after a 
long illness borne with wonderful pa- 
tience and fortitude Dearty loved 
rather of Julian. Funeral Service al 
Exeter and Devon Crematorium. 
Monday. August llihat3JOpm.No 
flowers by request but donations. If 
desired, to the Marie Curie Founda- 
tion. 28 Beigrave square. London 
SW1X 8QG. 

TURNER - On August 5th. Robert 
Heap, aged 86 years, peacefully at 
home al Parsonage House. Henffett. 
Sussex. Beloved husband of Molly 
and father, grandfather and treat 
grandfather. Funeral Service at &30 
pm on August ixtb at Com peon 
Church near Guildford, followed by 
private crenatioo. Family flowers 
only please. 

WILLIAMS - On August 6tti. unexpect- 
edly and peacefully. Ingrid Louise, 
beloved widow of Winston Alison 
Williams, and greatly loved mother 
of Deirdre and Winston, and a dar- 
ling Granny to Charles and Davina. 
Cremation at Putney Vale, at 2^0pm 
on Monday. August l lib. Flowers to 
Kenyons Ltd. 49 Mafloes Road. W8. 
WILSON Basil Cthe Somerville • Be- 
loved husband of Anna, qidetty at 
home in Belfast on Wednesday 6th 
August 1996. Service at Rosetawn 
crematorium. Belfast al 1 1 00 am on 
Salurday 9th August 1986- No flow- 
ers. Donations to chanty of choice. 



THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


Archaeology 

American visitors 
32,000 years ago 


Forthcoming 

marriages 


By Norman Hammond, Archaeology Correspondent 
The detailed evidence of the 6,000 years ago. There fcngap 


Mr M. Benson 
and Miss T. Colpi 
The engagement is announced 
between Micbad, elder son of 
Mr and Mis L Benson, of 
Caiheart, Glasgow, and Terri, 
eider daughter of Mr and Mr$R. 
Colpi. of Milngavie. 
Dunbartonshire. 


OBITUARY 

EMILIO FERNANDEZ 

Colourful Mexican film director 


Archives, has Men riectod into the 
Sandare readership in UWnrapny 
for the acadcnwaf year 1987-88, 


oldest human presence in 
South America, reported re- 
cently in The Times * has now 
been published. It suggests 
that people entered the New 


between the two phases, and. 
there are ho carbon dates for 
the second until 8^00 years 
ago. 

Some 560 flaked stones 


World from Siberia well over were found in the first layer of 
32,000 years ago, and that the Pedra Furado phase, with 


ORTON CPU .EOT 
Honorary feUowsMpt: Geoffrey Chan- 
dfrr. MA. Rosamond NJra Lehmann. 
MA. Janet Marta Vaugh. FRS. 


CONVCULE AND CAIUS COLLEGE 
□more studentship from Oct 1: J A 
Davies. BA (Christ's College). 


JESUS COLLEGE 

Fellowship in class 2 and into a 


college lectureship in anatomy from 
Oct F M V Sofroniew. BSe (Loyolai. 


before 30,000 years ago cave 
art was being painted in 
Brazil. 

The discoveries at the Pedra 
Furada cave, on the Rio Piaui 
in north eastern Brazil, in- 
clude more than a thousand 
stone flakes, some of them 
tools, the remains of plants 
and animals, and numerous 
deposits of charcoal from 
hearths. Radiocarbon dating 
of the latter has yielded 17 
dates ranging from about 
32.000 for one of the earliest 
layers, to about 6,000 years 
ago for a late layer. 

Pedra Furada is one of some 
200 painted rock shelters, or 
shallow caves found on the 
Piaui River by a Franco- 
Brazillan expedition which 
worked there in the early 
1970s; Pedra Gurada proved 
to have deep deposits, some 
three metres deep, and 
excavations finished only last 
year. 

Processing of the radio- 
carbon samples by the French 
laboratory at Gif-sur-Yvetie 
produced the surprisingly long 
and complete chronology re- 
ported in Nature by G. 
Delibrias, of the Gif lab- 
oratory. and N. Guidon, ofthe 
Ecoie des Hautcs Etudes en 
Sciences Sociales in Paris. 


two dates suggesting that this 
occupation dated to before 

30.000 years ago. Painted rock 
fragments in both this and 
later deposits indicate that a 
rock an tradition existed here 
from the beginning, as early as 
the famed cave an of France 
and Spain. 

The early dates from Brazil 
are strong evidence in favour 
of an early entry of humans 
into the New World; while 
other sites with early dates 
exist, such as Hapacoya in 
Mexico and Meadowcrofi in 
Pennsylvania, they are some 

10.000 years later. Also, some 

of tbe evidence advanced in 
recent years from California 
and Canada to support an 
early date for human entry to 
America has been discredited 
by the latest dating tech- 
niques, atlhough new sites 
such as Monte Verde in Chile , 
are churned to be as early as 
Pedra Furada. I 


Dr DAB. Dance 
and Miss RJVf. SoBtinrorth 
The engagement is announced 
between David, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs RD. Dance, of St 
Dunstan's Coflege. London, and 
Rachel younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs W.R. South worth, of 
Waddington. Lancashire. 


Emilio Fernandez, the Mex- 
ican film director and actor 
who was better known by his 
.nickname, El Indio, died at his 
home in Mexico City on 
August 6 . He' was 82. • 

His films of the 1940s 
established him as a director 
with a style that was to 
become influential among 
film-makers in the 


well-known titles were Rio 
Escondido (1947), A fadovia 
( ] 948) and Enamorada . which 
he remade in Hollywood as 
The Torch in 1950. 

His films were noted for 
their strongly nationalistic 
character, one of his preoccu- 
pations being the plight of die 
Mexican Indian. His directing 
style was marked by carefully 


Hispanophone world, and did composed long shots, dramai- 
much to establish the reputa- jcally lit close-ups and interi- 


MrDXS. Dearie 
and Mrs A-C- Wall 
The engagement is announced 
between David Dearie, of Rich- 
mond, Surrey, and Anne Wall 
(nee Fuller), of Twickenham, 
Middlesex. 


lion of Mexican cinema 
abroad. 

His personal life was scarce- 
ly less colourful than the 
matter of his films. He had 


ors employing 
chiaroscuro effects. 


The financial crisis through 
which the Mexican film indus- 


matter of his turns, ne naa uywem ; n the 1 950s odminis* 
been guerrilla fighter, pilot a to his directing 

and circus perfoimer Before career, as producers found hk 


Mr M. Dwaa 
and Miss W. Swann 
The engagement is announced 
between Michael, etdest son of 
Mr and Mrs G. Dwan, of 
Didsbury. Manchester, and 
Wendy, younger daughter of Mr 
and Mrs S.G. Swann, of ! 
Hainautt Essex. 


and circus perfoimer Before ^ producers found his 

going into the pnema, ana ^j ms ^ expensive. However ; 
even, quite late in ufe main - ^ l0 the fore as an ' 

4 a ndtel «k ivirC lArt fMYinPffl- a * ■ 


Mr D.W. Grey 
and Miss CjS. Meflenfidd 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Duncan William, only 
son of Mr and Mrs William 
Gray, of New Mills, Brampton, 
Cumbria, and Christina Sarah, 
only daughter of Mr and Mis 
David' Melleafieid, of Barnet, 
Hertfordshire. 


tained a passionate tempera- 
ment which earned him a jail 
sentence for homicide in 1978. 

Born in 1904 he fought as a 
child alongside his father in 
the Mexican Revolution of 
1910. In his youth he wan- 
dered about the Americas, and 
the wider world, qualifying as 
a pilot working as a cowboy in 
a circus in the United States, 
salmon fishing in Alaska, and 


joining the crew of a whaler 
for a voyage to the Far East. 

He began his cinema career 
as a Latin lover in Hollywood 
movies in the 1920s, and one 
of his characteristic roles at 
this period was in The Gaucho 
(1928). - But in 1934. he re- 


The debate about bow early 
te first Americans arrived 


Mr JM. Harris-St John 

and Miss 1LE. BeaseO 

The engagement is announced 


The earliest deposits at the 
:e are undated: they con- 


site are undated: they con- 
tained only a scatter of char- 
coal and two flaked stones. 
The following layers are di- 
vided by tbe authors into two 
mqjor periods, one named 
Pedra Furada after the site, 
lasting from 32,000 to 17,000 
years ago, and a later Sena 
Talhada phase from 12,000 to 


the first Americans arrived 
has been going for more than a 
century. Those favouring a 
recent arrival around 12,000 
years ago point to the numer- 
ous sites after that period, and 
the very few, and even fewer 
undiscredited, of earlier date. 

The proponents of a human 
presence before 20,000 years 
ago, and perhaps as early as 


between Jeremy Michael, son- of mmed to Mexico to act in 
Major and Mis B-LHarris-St home-produced films. Hisdi- 

IrvKn nr FWif Hnmmhirft. and r . . ■ ma * 


John, of Fleet, Hampshire, and 
Karen Elizabeth, daughter of Mr 
AI. Bessel) and the late Mis 
MJ*. BesscH. of Naflsea. Bristol. 


reeling debut was in 1941 with 
the film La Isla de la Pasion, 


MrRJVLG. Lawrie 
and Miss GE. Queen 
The engagement is announced 
between Roderick Malcolm 
Gordon, only son of Mr and 
Mrs Arthur Gordon Lawrie. of 
L.vereowrie, Perthshire, and 


457000 years a^arpte .hat SSBSJSSSSJSt 

while there are indeed few of Mr and Mrs Michael James 


the film La Isla de la Pasion, 
which launched him on a 
course which made him one of 
the best-known figures of what 
has been called Mexican 
cinema's Golden Age. 

Maria Candelaria won him 
the first Grand Prix for tbe 
best film at the 1946 Cannes 
Film Festival. Among other 


actor in American producs 
lions filmed in Mexico. 

Typical of these were 7V 
Return of the Seven, in which 
he played one of the avenging 
gunslingers, and such Mood- 
spurting Sam Peckinpah ex- 
travaganzas as The Wild 
Bunch and Bring Me the Head 
of Alfredo Garcia. 

More recently he played a 
brothel bartender in John 
Huston's film version of Mal- 
colm Lowry's novel. Under 
the Volcano. 

A powerful,, stocky man 
with an Emiliano Zapata 
moustache, Fernandez lived 
in a manner which :itnght' 
effortlessly have translated : 
into a Peckinpah film; and in 
1978 he shot and killed a- 
young man during a brawl. 
For this he was jailed for fonr 
years, but was freed m a 
government amnesty two 
years later m recognition of 
his services to Mexican ' 
cinema. 

He is survived by his wife, 
the actress Coliimba 
Dominguez. 


very early sites, there are Queen, of Bridge of Allan, 
enough to prove their case. Stirlingshire. 


The Pedra Furada discoveries 
strengthen it substantially. 

Source: Nature ; Vol 321, 
pp769-77l. 1986 




MISS CATHERINE GRACE 

Nto Q^ne pymotg amount of time to helping 

between John, son of Lieutenant them over problems. 

Commander AJJR. Lee (nd) Christophers School, Bristol, Her family background was 
and Mis Lee, of Boscastle, for the multiply handicapped, Quaker, and her own in spira- 
ComwaD, and .Melanie, da ugh- died On August 2, aged 79. - tion was throughout her life 


ter of Mr and Mis B.T. Geotge, 
of ^ Westcliffon-Sea, Essex. 


MrSJVLD. Lord 

and Miss SA. Pyne 

The engagement is announced 


Toe engagement 
between Simon. 


In September 1945, with a 
small group of friends; she 
opened the school in the 
Quaker Meeting House in 
Redland. Bristol. At the lime 


raodore J.T. Lord, CBE, Royal 
Navy, of Lady Hamilton Ou- 
tage, St Thomas* Street, Old 
Portsmouth, and Mrs Portia 
Lord. 2 Admiralty • Cottages. 
Western Kings, Stonehouse, 
Plymouth, and Sarah Anne, 
daughter of Major and Mis F.K. 
(Sam) Pyne, of The Old House, 
Leckbampstead, .- Newbury, 
Berkshire... .“ 

Mr J-A-L. McNeflage 
and Mbs AJVf. Sandemaa 
Tbe engagement is announced 
between Angus, elder son of Mr 
and Mrs-J.O.- McNetiage, of 
Ufford. Suffolk, and Angela, 


son of Com- I -there were only six severely- 


handicapped pupils. The 
teaching was based on tbe 
methods of Rudolf Steiner, 
such as eurythmy (movement 
to music), which are noted for 
their success in educating the 
handicapped. 

Tall, slim and white-haired. 


who never needed to asserther 
authority, because it came to 
her naturally. She had great 


Christian, though she adopted 
Rudolf Steiner’s Anthropix 
sophist faith. In . the cumcfr 
lum she laid down there was to 
be religious leaching once a 
week, and a Don-denomina- 
tional service at the school on 
Sundays. 

She retired in 1974, but the 
school continues and now has 
140 pupils aged between 5-19, 
as well as 24 adults. 

Wishing to maintain her 
links with ft she gave Ji$r name 
to the Catherine Grace Trust 
for tbe.provision of training, 
work ed .residential accom- 


younger daughter ofMr and Mrs 
A.G.F. Sandeman, of 


her naturally. She had great modatitin for young adults, 
gentleness r -and, infinite , pt Just before she died she agreed 
} “ r ;to become president of the 

individuals and devoting any schooL 



A.G.F. Sandeman, of 
Wtncbelsea, East Sussex. 

Mr CW. Nash 

and Miss GA. Brisbane Mr Ferenc Donalh, a life- 

The engagement is announced long Hungarian communist, 
bclw ““ Chnstopber. middle who died on July 15 at the age 
son of Mr and Mrs R. Nash, of Q f 73 was & close associate of 
Commonfields Farm, Newent, pi-.”’ 

Gloucestershire, and Gabrielle. J 0 ™ 6 u* N ? 8y 

middle daughter of Mr and Mrs during the abortive Himganan 
JA. Brisbane, of The Lee, revolution of 1956, but did 
Kn^bton. Powys. not share Nagy’s fete. After 

Mr R.V. O’Farrell serving a term of imprison- 

aud Miss SjC. Polfltter mcnt he became the figure- ' 

The engagement is announced headof Hungary’s present-day 
'between Robert, youngest son of unofficial opposition, 
the late Dr Richard OTarreJl Donath was born on Sep- 
and Mis Mary O’Faneti, of tember 5, 1913, into a provin- 
CaxshaIt 2 n * S? y ’ ciu* Petty bourgeois Wily, 

Gloucestershire. Communist Party while at 

university in 1934. 

became prominent as 

mew is announced -S* liaiso P «*“ betweoi the 
vid. elder son of Mfr Communist Party and the 
Harry Owen, and Populist, ami-fescist March 
gh ter of Mr and Mrs Front in 1937. He was elected 
■ to the Central Committee in 

frnpsoa 1945 31x1 under Nagy, then 

HA Thomas Agriculture Minister, took 

mem is announced part in the distribution of large 
emy, elder son of Mr estates to the landless peas- 
M-P. Simpson,, of ants, the most ambitious re- 
f orra carried oiit by the 

SS5iS“ ^ p o a - 

M w.. . the ranks of the 

cn!IL home-grown Communists 

Semis announced WCTC d ^ dtnated ^ Mos- ' 
Jrew. son of Mr and °°w-uamed Rdkoai taction. 


MR FERENC DONATH 


MrDJVLOwea 
and Miss M. Balks 
Tbe engagement is 


Support for the Royal National Lifeboat Institution came in 
an unusual form when a mock Viking loogship took part in a 
practice run to invade Lundy island L The raiding party is 
hoping to raise £2,000 to keep the RNL1 lifeboat at Cloveily 
in north Devon. Invasion day is set for August 16. 


British Academy 
fellowships 

The British Academy has 
awarded the following post- 
doctoral fellowships 


psyrnotogy: Dr D S Eastwood (Ox* 
ford) modem Bridsfi history; Dr K J 


“eraiorr Dr 
P M Oouk (CMbrd) Msxaiy or science: 


Dr M Craen (tJartvarn) 


Irish history DiMO LunOfy lOxfonO 
PhUpsoDtjy: Dr A J Mdvor cs&aUi- 
clvdel roodemScooish hi story; Dr N J 



Marston (London} history of irnisK: Or 
D J M^ungly (Oxford) MedUerraean 


Dondth was given a 15- 
yearprison sentence for al- 
leged anti-state conspiracy in 
1951. but was released in 
1954. He then joined the 
reformists, and although not 
initially in complete agree- 
ment with Nagy’s policies, be 
remained loyal to the end. 


and Mrs Harry Owen, and 
Mokey, daughter of Mr and Mrs 
Peter Bailes. 


Mr JJS. Simpson 
and Miss JJ1JL Thomas 
The engagement is announced 
between Jeremy, elder son of Mr 
•and Mrs M.P. Simpson, of 
Didcot, Oxford, and Jacqueline, 
daughter of Mr and Mrs D.M. 
Thomas, of Sahderstead, 
Surrey. 


areftarotogyr DrDQu 
racial anthropology: 


■Birmingnaini modern. Greek 

fOTSST % 8 b 


LAjJAsAa snxiK»: Dr ME RuSUi 

i&fTdjndge) m«UeiaJ EngttsU UWJorv: 
Dr C Wauccr csoutoamptoni TuOot 
H ierauire and polHics: and Dr A J 
Wei burn lOxfordj RocnantkWni. 


Mr. A.RjG. W3sen 
and Miss A^L Dale 
The engagement is announced 
between Andrew, son of Mr and 
Mrs MA Wilson, of High 
AuchensaiJ Farm, Cardross, 
Dumbartonshire, and Alison, 
daughter of Dr and Mrs P.G. 
Dale, of Abbey Mead, Romsey, 
Hampshire. 


remained loyal to the end. 

After the Russian suppres- 
sion of the revolt in 1958, 
Donath was accused of being 
Nagy's “accomplice”. He 
pleaded guilty and. while 
Nagy and three others were 
executed, he received a sen- 
tence of 12 years* imprison- 
ment. 

He was released in tbe 
general amnesty of March 
1963, and given a job- in an 
agricultural research institute. 
His two books. Democratic 
Land Reform in 1945-47 
(1970) and Reform and Revo- 
lution (1976)*, show hinr to 
have been an unrepeotani 
critic of official polities] 

His last public appearance 
was at the Monor Meeting in 
June I985v when dissenting 
intellectuals held a conference 
to discuss the worsening so- 
cial. economic and' political 
conditions in Hungary. - - 


SIR LEONARD MILOS 


Science report 

New clues over cystic fibrosis 


Sir Leonard Minis, CBEJP, 
who died on July 30 aged 77. 
win be best remembered for 
ms work as Director and 
Secretary ofthe British Water- 
works Association from 1939 
to 1974. 


By Pearce Wright, Science Editor 


The search for the cause of 
cystic fibrosis has taken a 
significant step forward. Sci- 
entists have discovered a bask 
difference in the way affected 


the transmlssgoa of chloride 
ions across the membranes of 
their cells is orach redaced. 

Bat the research has also 
shown that tbe membranes of 


the signals that affect the 
efficiency of the flow of ions 
via chloride channels. 

The scientists compared 1 
normal and seemingly faulty 


■ Millis was born on Aijgust 
L 1908, and educated at the 
Grocers' .Company . School 
Hackney and the London 
School of Economics. 


He was caMed to toe Bar in 

1936. Inner Temple. He be- 


tissues of cystic fibrosis pro- individuals prone to fibrosis cells by means of tiny elec- ^ me Sccreia ry of the British 
cess one ofthe body's essential are not deficient in the so- trades implanted withinceHs, ^ Waterworks Association .in 


IN MEMORIAM - PRIVATE 


WHITE. Maud - In at er loving memory 
of a dear mother who fell asleep, 8th 
AugusL 1971 -until the d ay break*. 
B«(y and Mary. StonefonL 
Dagenham. 


chemical elements compared 
with normal tissues. 

The life-threatening dis- 
order, which is inherited and 
■the most common of the lethal 
genetic diseases, is disabling 
because it stimulates an 
accumulation of fluids in the 
body, producing difficulty in 
breathing and complications 
such as lung infections. 

The great recent advances in 
genetics has led to a way of 
identifying the faulty gene 
responsible for the condition, 
but that has not explained the 
biochemical cause of tbe dis- 
order on which a treatment 
might be based. 

Now the results of research, 
published in Natan, show that 
the tissues of people inheriting 
cystic fibrosis differ from 
those of normal people hi that 


railed “molecular channels” 
that allow the chloride ions Co 
ps$$ through the cell walL 

An gYamlnarina of the oalU: 
shews tint both normal and 
faulty ones have the same 
pathway through which that 
essential dement can flow. 
Hence the research has tnrned 
to tbe mechanism by which 
these channels are controlled 
inside the celt containing 
rtwn. 

An explanation of the inter- 
ference with the transmission 
of the chloride ions is provided 
by Dr Michael Welsh, of Iowa 
Medical College, and Dr Car- 
ole Liedtke, of the Case West- 
ern University School of 
Medicine. They suggest tim 
the fit alt lies a hormonal 
imbalance, or a deficiency of 
the molecules which provide 


Association -in 


and by measuring the dec- J ^ subsequently becoming • 
trical and chemical trans- PiiBC tor, and in 1973 its 
mission across' isolated ™ es, v en t. just before, it was 


patches of cell membranes. 

They have shown that chlo- 
ride transmission is normal 
amss patches of cefl mem- 
brane taken from cystic fibro- 
sis cells, but the traasmissian 
across tiie membranes of in- 
tact cells- is abnormally low: 
tiros, the inference tint the 
defect is in the regulation, of 
the rhan wp jg. 

Writhm in die same issue of 
Natan, Dr Michael Case, of 
Manchester University, sug- 
gests that the fault m the 
hormone signals would ex- 
plain other compUcafioas 
associated with cystic fibrosis. 


taken over by the National 


Water Council, of which be 
became a member. 

In 1966 he helped set up the 
Water Supply Industry Train- 
ing Board. The water industry 
training centre, Millis House, 
at Derby was named after 
him. 

In 1948 -he was appointed 
OBE. and in 1970 CBE He 
was knighted in 1977. ; ’■ 

. -Millis's influence on the 
water industry, both Jo this 
country and abroad, was im- 
mense and he was admited 
and respected wherever he 
wenL ‘ 

He is survived by his wife. 
Ethel May Wflmott and two 
daughters, Elizabeth -end 
Jocelyn. 


1 vli' 

Vi* * 


y 

oil' 


T 


MRS BERYL MARKHAM 

. rally aroused much anenrion. 


May I correct one feet in 




not only because ofher gender 
and her good looks, but also 


■ ■■ 




' " 


■ u. >*••• 


* il 1 '' 

I;.::--*! 

' "J f'*’ 




CSi 

fiJ'Vri ! • 

■u: % i- ’ 


i’jiOti - 1 




Hs* 


C'.t' *•*' > . : 

V ‘ l • < • • . . - . ■ 


touch in 


fcEarih 


Jnw%- j *», 

‘k|PG» 






Source; Natan vol 322 , 
p 467 - 70 ,I 986 .‘ 



w 50,0 Ireland to 
New Brunswick in l932)natS 



v~u. 



:S. : 


-RY 

to FERN. 


THETMES FRIDAY -AUGUST 6 i?o6 


ij 


(-Mexican 

and acinr 
m by ht% 
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rii> on 




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THE ARTS 


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sought a 
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tiutam .»{ 
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ta\ka. am! 

f a wtulct 
Far Ejm 
in* caift 1 ? 
lolly* r*xt 
Is ami fine 
f roles al 
he Utiiuiz*' 
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(o act in 
\\ His do 
1941 with 
tj i'jM-'V. 
mi tin .i 
tint tmr of 
nol wii.il 
Mexican 

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t kum him 
ti iur the 
to Cannes 
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lends, shr 
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“Real adolescent yon know 
&aUombk pesssKiism’’. too- 
ted Wane Keaton in Max- 
hattaa when Woody Alien 
prommeed Ingmar Bergman 
the bob' true genius in the 
daema today. *T mean the 
sifence. God's sileoce Yon 

ahsohiteb outgrow it" Judg- 
ing from the bleak etiolated 
agony of bat night's Tie 
Biased' Our (Channel- 4), 
Bergman birasdf has not oot- 
grown silence — still- '-less 
pessimism. 

Indeed, thb tefevision fan 

of UU* Isaksson's sdaptatkm 
of her own novel was ope of his 
more depressing works, an 
exacting dirge Of a drama 
about a middle-aged couple 
cruelly bound 
spiritual torment embttt 
lore and crazed imagini ng.. 
God may have remained rilmit 
but the DevQ did not as the 
wife dragged her husband into 
sharing no* obsession with the 
evil eye and dark, forces. At 
least it ended at its most 
optimistic . when the couple 
sought tbeir' fiual solBtion' 
courtesy PT Swedish gas, the 
stove' appeared to provide 
more terminal comfort than its 
British counterpart ‘ 

’• Bergman's receiil Fanny and 
Alexander* 'at times, almost 
indulgent in its pleasures, had 
promised a late flowering of a 
grants that tfaieatened to be- 
come crabbed by its persistent 
obsessions. The Blessed Ones, 
however. Is n throwback to 
themes of earlier master- 
pieces.' The return is not 
altogether successful. 

Part of the problem is that 
Bagman has for the first time 
chosen to work in video. As the 
dull immediacy of dally soaps 
shows,' vkteo, when not op to 
its visual _trick& «ncunrages 
intimacy with characters, at 
the expense of sharpness- of 
image. Last night the gloom 
came ' straight without * the 
hush visual beauty of the 
films. Some scenes, were 
reminiscent of Beckett, par- 
ticularly when the couple sat 
Ukkered in dark glasses be- 
neath an upturned umbrella to 
ward off “poison 4 *, bat with 
fitde of his rich brevity and 
none of his wit. A humourless 
vision of humanity is necessar- 
ily inadequate. 

. In Boifymatten n jolly, old 
nuqir who had bad his latynx 
removed; -comically . com- 
plained that spraking in tafjp 
ruined the timing of hhfjdkes: 
It.iwas. .better. thotqJv; he 
m^nteihedthansUence.oi; 
death. Break that to Bogpmb. 

- Andrew Hislop 


Theatre 


Donald Coooar 



scars 



The American 
Qock ’ 
Cottesloe 


which fiction strains to emu- 
late, and the creative writer in 
any picdium naturally re- 
sponds to the freshness of 
_ expression as well as to the 

. . _ \ . . authentic detail which such 

ssjysrsaa. 


trauma, not excepting The 

Civil War — the “two great 
wounds" invoked si. the dose 
of this play which make even 
Vietnam and the War of 
Independence pale by com- 
parison. 4Jo event in Ameri- 
can history has brought home 
so crash togiy the brittiehess of 
blind confidence and the il- miaidina * 
lusonness of pro gre s s: the day - 
the money went funny was the 
day the eagle got its first 
hair.' 


grey 


; Arthur Miner's: episodic 
mini-epic of theperiod — first 
produced' in 1980 ofF-Broad- 
way and here - incorporating 
the- author's substantial later 


shafts of illumination which 
decorate the edges of the - 
canvas; the story of a butcher • -’Vi x ^ v 
being forced at rifle-point to 
hand over the fresh (masot- : . . v 
free) meat Supplied by the '*". *3 
Government's relief, pro- 
gramme^ the brief word-pic- 
deputies 
a cornfield while 
starving fomilies sat in the 
road and stared at “all that 
food": the tales of suicidal 
despair the image of babies 
being heard in certain houses 
for the first time in 20 years as 
destitute young' couples 
moved in with their in-laws. . 

If. this were a documentary. 



Strap-ha nging on the subway .-. . with Marsha Hunt, Michael Bryant and Neil Dogfish in the forefront 


revisions — was inspired by thef researcher would - get aJ~ 
Studs Terfcd's ' pioneering, pha-plus; but theatre is not a 
work ofpopular record; Hard history class, and this piece 
Times. The Terkd procedure loses affect when so many of 
of giving real people their its riches sparkle offstage. Mr 
head in reminiscence has pro- Miller's aim of building “a 
duced some invaluable 


some invaluable ac- 
counts of personal experience 


mosaic, a mural” works only 
when the disparate voices 


come 1 together to make dra- 
matic sense, as for Instance the 
scene in the relief office where 
an ethnic salad-bowl of citi-; 
zens vent their frustrations in 
a setting 1 worthy of their 
expression ... 

, .The main story we follow is 
that of a wealthy Jewish 
family progressively pauper- 
ized until not only has the 
chauffeur been paid off, and 
the jewellery pawned, but the 
windows of their Brooklyn 
house, have to be kept shut to 
fool the man from the mort- 


gage company that no one is at 
home. There is not much to 
recommend the Baums as 
exemplars of the national 
agony: they may be typical but 
they are also, by the same 
token, inertly familiar, and 
when they and their immedi- 
ate circle keep playing Schu- 
mann or Gershwin on their 
prized piano one suspects that 
Jewish charm has got the 
upper hand of hard-headed 
play-making. 

Peter Wood's company 
double and triple with mostly 


first-rate changes of accent, 
and the patterns they make on 
the spacious stage are often 
very pretty, particularly when 
strap-hanging in a swaying 
duster for a scene on the 
subway. Paul Curran has a 
fine edge of solemnity as a 
decrepit finanderai the speak- 
easy on Black Thursday and 
later as a no-nonsense judge 
attempting to regulate an en- 
forced form auction in Iowa. 

Marsha Hunt appears as a 
hooker invited to raise her 
consciousness with Engels 


and. most effectively, as an 
aged Communist. David 
Schofield steals the show as 
the soft-shoe-dancing presi- 
dent of General Electric, a 
Mississippi sheriff and a 
manic Slavic anarchist. 

• The caption for the photo- 
graph with my notice on 
Wednesday of Long- Day's 
Journey into A 'ight mistakenly 
identified Peter Gallagher as 
Kevin Spacey. 

Martin Cropper 


Lurianq Pavarotti 
Wembley Arena 


The handful, of rice , which 
Pavarouidaimedhtwouldbe 
tuckingipio auhe Sayoy three 
hours- before bis. gala . concert 
obviously, went down welL In 


Gala concert 

■ .There may' well come a’ 
tune, though, when the open- 
ing bars oC say, “La donna 4 
mobile" and a swish of the 
white handkerchief win be 
enough. At- a generous es- 
mnate, Pavarotti was on stage 


Neapolitan favourites after 
the interval, the smile was 
widening, the feet were tap- 
ping; and both the cantabile 
and the perspiration were 
flowing more freely. .Hie 
grazed higher reaches of The 


for 35 ’ mhnrte? out of two -register seemed, to have. had 
hours.- In between, Emerson balm applied to them: De 


the vast barn orWembiey's * Buddey, lobldng'aaxf helfod Crescenzo's “Rondine al 

crawled out of a Norman Nido" (with flute) and Buzzi’s 

“Lolita" (flute, tambourine, 
harp) showed the beginning of 
a spriteliness of articulation 
and firmness of legato which 
reached its apotheosis in 
Giordano's “Amor ti vieta" 
ami De Girtis's “Non ti 
scordar di me". There were 
doubtless encores which were 
even more fun, but ray dead- 
line did not, alas, permit me to 
hear them. 

One last thought. Mr Har- 
vey-. Goldsmith, who pre- 
sented the gala, might like! to 
include a* charity- ln^it.hext 
time. That way, not all ..the 
ticket-stubs trill end up in 
Pavarotti’s rite-bowl. 


arena Pavarotti looked pos- 
itively Lilliputian^ dwarfed by 
his latest .publicity campaign 
and a massed - audience of 
9.-000.. - 

Not thattherewas anything 
diminutive about the- sound 
A huge central sound system 
amplified every note through- 
out the evening; and just as 
well.- for the overture to / 
yespri Sicilian i was barely 
aiidibte lhrougte the •steady 


Norman 
Rockwell Saturday Evening 
Post cover, conducted the 
Royal Philharmonic in a pot- 
pourri of Verdi and Rossini 
overtures and Mr GrrmraelH 
. entertained with his flute. 

So what was the nature of 
those-precious minutes? The 
Yeirii arias in the first half 
rang out in a well-controlled 
fortissimo, the- words and 
rhythms of “Quests -o qiiella" 


sti^m 'of lafecomenr arid the fiJven some ^welcome jeirfra 
“Dance of the 'Blessed Spf- leverage where necessary.' By 
nts” played- by*- Andrea . the time Cilea*$ L'arlesiana 
Grrmmelli. PkvarottiY iame . had been'reached, the darker 


oT'- vetidoitf- stiR; it seemed regwer. 
doing a brisk trade outside. r When* it was. time for the 


Hilary Finch 




Ohebial ati eticotiragmg discovery from China 





Yellow Earth 
ICA v 


' 

... 


Survivors — Hie Blues 
Today (PG) 

Cannon Chuing Cross 
Road 


Chen Kaige's Yellow Earth represents a 
new stage in the Chinese cinema's 
painful recovery, from the depredations 
of the “Cultural Revolution”. It was 
made in one of the small newly 
established provincial studios which 
have given opportunity for young direc- 
tors who might otherwise wait years for 
the chance to direct in the more 
hierarchical metropolitan studios, it has 
a freshness . and suppleness new to 
Chinese cinema, uses rfemole locations 
neve* seen on the screen before, and ' 
breaks away- from the neatly packaged 
dogma and obligatory optimism of most 
precedent Communist ^ film-making. 

TRe ‘story is set in '1939. in a* -poor- 
province of western China and .a ; vfllage 
on the Yellow River — a river which has 
a mystical place in Chinese history and 
culture yet forever impoverishes the land 
it runs through by relentlessly washing 
away the top soiL It is. says Ch< 


of 


enKaige. 
civilization and its 


“the mother 
destroyer". . . . 

The Sino-Japanese war is raging, but 
no rumour of it reaches this remote and 
wretched place. A young Communist 
soldier arrives in the village with the dual 
task of collecting local folk-songs .and 
spreading the party message- He is 
shocked by the poverty and by oppres- 
sive local customs like the selling of 
. brides: Billeted with a- widower and his 
two orc-wen children, he gradually 
overcomes their reserve, and excites the 
children ‘with the idea of Communist 
revolution. After he has left the 12-year- 
old girt tries to escape a sold marriage by 

• running away to join the Red Army, but 
vanishes on the river. 

* The -story is told with simplicity and 
touching regard for the characters — the 
open, eager girl, the taciturn old man and 
the tongue-tied little boy who suddenly 
blossoms imb life - as he plucks up 
courage to bellow a bawdy folk-song. 
Their rudimentary lives are played out 
against the dramatic, menacing moun- 
tain landscapes, and ordered by age-old 
custom and superstition. Kaige shows 
the villagers engaged in a marriage 



The young soldier with his idealistic mission tries to draw out 
Ae tongue-tied little village boy in Yellow Earth 


is a perpectual and delicate, issue in 
Communist' . philosophy.: .Kaige refuses 
dogmatic judgement. He will neither 
allow a sweeping condemnation of the 
old traditional order nor concede that 
Communism can bring instant and easy 
answers: at the end of the film the young 
soldier is. forced to recognize his im- 
potence in being unable to save the lost 

girl- -. 

The story is historical in setting but 
dearly raises' still relevant issues: the 


ceremony (so poor is the community . conservative Chinese film organization, 

\ !. Sir oviVIli for *9 


that carved, wooden, fish .have to - 
stitute for a ritual dish) and an incantar- 
lory ram-dancc to the Dragon King of 
the Sea. In The Red . Army camp too.- 
though, there are cekbraiory dances. The 
film seems to argue for cultural continu- 
ity: the purpose of collecting folk-songs is . 
to adapt them to the uses of Com- 
munism. . . 

This dilemma between destroying or 
adopting cultural l^ades from’ the past 


is Mid ito.have opposed its export for a 
while despite..— or/ becaiise' of — its. 
success abroad. Now it is permitted, and 
its openness gives new distinction to the 
Chinese cinema.; 

A second viewing exposes weaknesses 
. moments of somewhat selfconscious 
artistry- shaky post-synchronization of 
the very lairing folk-music; and some 
inappropriate passages of background 


' music quite inconsistent with the skilful 
manipulation of sound elsewhere in the 
film. They are slight 'faults in such an 
encouraging first work. ■ 

Shot by Cork Mareschi and Robert 
Schwartz during a three-day blues con- 
cert in Minnesota. Survivors - The 
Bines Today is really more about 
Revivers. The only performer who 
qualifies as survivor is the black blues 
• '.veteran John Lee Hooker, most of the 
-others are middle-aged, middle-class and 
evidently over-fed whiie.enthusiasts who 
faithfully produce the sounds but rarely 
. much of the feeling of black music. There 
•arc some rather perfunctory backstage 
■discussions about the sources and the 
authenticity of the music they play, but 
these are fahoo scrappy to get anywhere. 
In compensation there are a few good 
numbers by both black and white 
performers. 

David Robinson 


Dance: the Bolshoi Ballet 

Bold sweeps of drama 


Spartacus 
Covent Garden 

Spartacus was Yuri Gri- 
gorovich's first blockbuster hit 
with the Bolshoi Ballet and h 
remains almost certainly his 
most successful work. The 
roars of approval at Covent 
Garden on Wednesday night 
showed that it holds the same 
attraction for British audi- 
ences .now as in previous 
seasons here. 

The plot is familiar enough, 
if only from the film based on 
the same novel Just as well, 
really; since Grigorovich does 
not so much narrate it as 
illustrate it The actual 
confrontations • between the 
Roman General Crassus and 
• his ; prisoher Spartacus, who 
leads an uprising' of slaves 
against him, are minimal 
Much-pf the time they are 
either indulging in long solos 
meant as soliloquies, leading 
their followers in warlike 
manoeuvres or indulging in 
domestic relaxation: virtuous 
wedded bliss for the hero, and 
what looked like tango teas for 
his adversary. 

Until the very end. when 
Spanacus.is impaled and held 
aloft on the Roman spears, 
and his • faithful Phrygia 


that make you alarmed his 
chest or thighs might burst 
with the effort. Watching at- 
tempts at Olympic records 
could scarcely be more thrill- 
ing than these solos. 

I must add that those who 
have not seen the ballet before 
are likely to be more im- 
pressed than those who have. 
For one thing, the extremely 
simple, repetitive nature of 
the choreography can soon 
exhaust its interest. For an- 
other, today's casts, impres- 
sive as they may be. will not 
efface memories of the two 
men for whom the principal 
roles were created. 

Irek Mukhamedov, who 
took the title pan at this 
performance, is an extraor- 
dinary dancer. For sheer phys- 


gia is even more familiar. At 
45, she maintains her tech- 
nique clean and sharp, and has 
kept much of the fluency and 
pliant plastique that are her 
hallmarks. Her control and 
flamboyance in the virtuoso 
duets are striking 
The fourth of the quanet of 
principals. Maria Bylova as 
Crass us’s lover Aegina, see- 
med to me the one who could 
most successfully have moved 
into the ballet's original cast 
and held her own. Her big 
scene is really quite prepos- 
terous: a long seduction num- 
ber in which she, aided by 
some fellow courtesans, 
spends the night undermining 
the stamina of Spartacus's 
allies and thus ensures his 
defeat- By applying an arn- 


ica] prowess he is astonishing, used, ironic attitude to it, yet 
- no inhibitions at all 

about the extremely erotic 
movement, Bylova strength- 
ened the pan and made it 
seem the equal of the others in 
a way that was not true before. 

Notable among the support- 
ing cast' were Messrs Lazarev. 
Buravtsev and Sharkov. all of 
whom have stood out in other 
ballets, as a trio of shepherds 
whose dance has an unusually 
light-stepping quality. 

1 had forgotten quite how 
dreadful the score is: Khacha- 


Besides, his wild looks suit the 
role and he acts with serious 
application. As a military 
commander , he is entirely 
convincing Whether he em- 
bodies so successfully the 
revolutionary leader, the man 
in whom the spirit of liberty 
seems to have become flesh, is 
another matter. Vladimir 
Vassiliev, one of the two 
greatest male dancers of our 
generation, first stamped his 
image upon the part. That is a 
help to his successors in giving 
them a mould for their own 
a 


. _ , turian in particularly foggy 

grieves over him. the drama .performances; but it set a moocL Alexander KodyIov. 
comes mostly from the fre- Mndrtof jornparison un- Sets it^iaSly^ffhe 

refuses to believe it so bad. 


quenl incursions of one army 
or another in bold sweeps of 
male dancing which are given 
their climax by the entry of 
their leaders. Rome has the 
bigger batallions, but the in- 
surrectionists have the bigger 
jumps, and Spartacus has the 
biggest of all: great torrents of 
movement through the air, 


likely to be reached. 

Boris Akimov similarly 
shapes his Crassus after the 


Simon Virsaladze’s designs, 
on the other hand, play a part 


model of Mara Uepa: not so j ^ ballet’s success, imply- 
in the mixture of : 


complex 
seeming courage and political 
shiftiness, but a clear, well- 
crafted portrait He has played 
the role here before, and 
Natalya Bessmertnova's Phry- 


ing great weight yet actually 
moving so easily and quietly 
as to allow each scene to flow 
immediately into the next 

John Percival 


Promenade Concerts 

Not a chink in their armour 


NYOGB/Elder 
Albert Hall/Radio 3 


The vast forces of the Na- 
tional Youth Orchestra ass- 
embled once again for their 
annual outing to the Proms on 
Wednesday, and once again., 
under the firm guiding hand of 
their conductor (and former 
colleague) Mark Elder, pro- 
ceeded to amaze us. Here'ihey 
chose a gargantuan ‘pro- 
gramme. consisting of De- 
bussy's La Mer and Mess- 
iaen's Turanga/ila-Sym- 
phonie. In neither work was 
there anything to suggest 
tenderness of years or for that 
manerany other chink in their 
musical armoury; bur we have 
come to expect little else. 

Even so. the confidence 
with which La Mer was deliv- 
ered was something of a 
surprise, though no more so 
than if the orchestra had been 
a professional one. Richness 
of tone-quality was evident in 
all departments, but what was 
really outstanding about this 
reading was the maturity of 
the emotions that lay behind 
it. not simply the abundant 
technical expertise. Robust 
where it needed to be. it was 
also ‘coloured to the finest 
degree: and considerably help- 
ing that finesse were, some 
marvellously poised . solos 
from the Wader and from the 
first cello and trumpet players. 

Yet even this achievement 
looked relatively modest be- 
side the Messiaen, now 
approaching the status of 
popular classic. Perhaps, in- 
deed. a few years hence some 
of these players will find 
themselves grateful for the 


NYO’s lavish preparations as 
they sit at a front desk in the 
only rehearsal for yet another 
performance. In this one the 
orchestra relished the dizzying 
erotic frenzy of a movement 
like “Joie du sang des etoiles", 
while the complex rhythms of 
the three “Turangaina" move- 
ments proved no problem, 
and the slower sections were 
tightly - controlled. Excellent 
work came, too. from the 
principal soloists. Peter Dono- 
hoe (piano) and Cynthia 
Miller (ondes marten oi). 

Ridiculously, it seems that 
this orchestra, a great national 
asset if there ever was one. is 
still not publicly funded: last 
year two concerts had to be 
cancelled because a sponsor 
went bankrupt. Really, where 
are our priorities? 


Ronald Eyre's production 
for this Promenade Concert 
performance by Nexus Opera 
chose to dispense with the 
specified masks and thus, 
probably sensibly in so vast a 
hall, drew the audience closer 
to the personalities on stage. It 
was a similarly effective, if 
obvious, solution to have the 
monks process through the 
arena singing the “Te Deum" 
at the beginning and end of the 
work, and to enact it on a 
small stage erected for the 
purpose below the main 
platform. 

One’s view af the work is 
inevitably coloured by Peter 
Pears's celebrated portrayal of 
the Madwoman, and here 
Mark Curtis, though both 
younger and purer in voice, 
seemed to have that model 
_ L n . firmly in his mind as he 
Stephen Petti tt pursued the character's tor- 
tured rambling* .so simply but 
deftly reflected in the upward 
slides of Britten's vocal line. 
Robert Poulton, the Ferry- 
man. sang with a directness 
appropriate for such a simple 
soul, while John Rath's Trav- 
eller and David Gwynne’s 
Abbot offered splendid con- 
textual support 
Lionel Friend directed the 
spare but richly effective score 
purposefully though not over- 
urgentiy from the chamber 
organ, and the ensemble 
Divenimenu played excel- 
lently for him. But the most 
telling performance- came 
from young Meirion Jones. 


Nexus Opera . 
Albert Hall/Radio 3 


Benjamin Britten's Curlew 
River, the first of his “church 
parables" which were written 
after his encounter with the 
Japanese Noh-play. must 
-surely rank among his finest 
and most deeply affecting 
dramatic works, not excepting 
the likes of Peter Grimes. The 
subject-matter— the death of a 
child and the grieving of his 
mother — is presented with a 

simplicity that overwhelms, singing the part of the Boy’s 
And the snanenng climax. Spirit with a confident and 


when the child appears in a 
vision, thus bringing peace 
and sanity to his mother, the 
Madwoman, is executed quite 
brilliantly. 


stunningly beautiful sound. 1 
do hot mind confessing that I 
was moved to .tears. 

SJ». 


Opera 

So what 
is real? 


Cost fan tutte 

Elizabeth Hall 

At the end one is left wonder- 
ing how very shocking it might 
have been if this Opera Fac- 
tory-London Sinfonietta pro- 
duction of Cosi fan tune had 
been done in powdered wigs 
and buckled shoes. As it is, the 
vision is of course of a beach 
party in the present day. with 
Ferrando and Gugliclmo 
feigning a tour of duty in 
Northern Ireland, returning as 
sheikhs and being revived by 
electric shock treatment. 
Equally inevitably, David 
Freeman being the producer, 
there is a good bit of groping in 
the builder's sand (unfoir on 
the wardrobe department), 
including an extraordinary 
slow motion squirm in the Act 
I finale — though this makes 
more sense after it has been 
paralleled by similarly coiling 
contortions, but now mental 
rather than physical, going on 
at the very end of the opera. 

This ending is poignant. 
The four lovers gyrate around 
each other in perplexity, and 
iheir final couplings are left in 
doubt: perhaps the lesson they 
have learnt is that they do not 
really matter, and it is a lesson 
the music is curiously capable 
of sustaining What the score 
cannot sustain, of course, is 
any contact with 1QS6 leisure 
wear. Mr Freeman's printed 
apology for his production 
refers to something called 
“real people", but he ignores 
the obvious problem that real 
people do not go about singing 
Mozart. In 1790 they could 
have done: that blessed audi- 
ence could have seen charac- 
ters in contemporary dress in 
subtle fluctuations from the 
genuine to the affected. But to 
put the opera into contem- 
porary dress now is to smear 
one gross irony over a host of 
more interesting ones. 

I can understand why Mr 
Freeman should have wished 
to avoid the plain solution of 
period costume, which can 
easily distance us from the 
true business of the work as 
much as updating does. How- 
ever, there needs to be some 
contact with the lSth century, 
some reason for this music to 
be going on. There must also 
be some reason for the social 
conventions: one needs some 
sure emotion at the heart to 
avoid everything seeming 
affectation. 

Fortunately for this produc- 
tion, there is Marie Angd in 
Act It to express that des- 
perate certainty of feeling She 
may not have the resources to 
fling her voice easily around 
the role of Fiordiligi. but she 
sings and acts the part of a 
solemn but potentially vol- 
atile. intensely sexy, young 
woman to perfection. She 
alone has some resemblance 
to "real people". 

The others ably project their 
roles as actors in a Freeman 
production. Janis Kelly is a 
vibrant and juicy Despina. 
Christine Boles a young miss 
enjoying the part of Dorabella. 
Nigel Robson a distinctly 
worried and vocally frayed 
Ferrando. and Geoffrey Dol- 
ton a straightforward and 
charming Guglielmo. Tom 
McDonnell is suave and as- 
sured (though not always so 
assured in pilch) as Alfonso, 
and his counterpart as con- 
ductor of the musical proceed- 
ings is Paul Daniel, for whom 
the woodwind of the London 
Sinfonietta make a more ad- 
mirable noise than the strings. 

Paul Griffiths 


• The Metropolitan Opera, 
New York, are to record a 
complete cycle of Wagner’s 
Ring, conducted by James 
Levine, for Deutsche Gram- 
mophon. Die H a/kUre. which 
opens the Mel's 1986-87 sea- 
son on September 22. will be 
recorded in April next yean 
Rheingold and Siegfried will 
be recorded in the following 
April: and Gotterdammerung 
in May 1989. Hildegard 
Behrens will sing Brimnhilde. 


1 


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NATIONAL 

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Olivier Ibnighl at 
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< 



16 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUSTS 1986 


‘No magic wand’ to tackle meningitis epidemic 


A junior health minister 
attended a public meeting 
yesterday in Gloucestershire 
in an effort to calm feats a boot 
a meningitis epidemic in the 
Stroud area, where the in- 
cidence of infection is 14 times 
the national average. 

Baroness Trampington, Un- 
der-Secretary of State at the 
Department of Health* told 

400 parents and residents at a 
public meeting in Stone ho use 
that everything that could be 
done to find a cause and core 
for the illness was being done. 

She said; “I recognise the 
stress and anxiety dial the 
outbreak continues h> cause. 
But I have got no magic wand 
to wave and no wander cure to 
offer. I only wish ! had." 

The baroness, accompanied 
by Sir Donald Acheson. the 
Government's chief medical 
officer, said that although 
research was pressing ahead 
lo find a vaccine, in the short 


C£ 

term the problem was int- 

vt 

ractible. Bat the Government 

m 

would support the strengthen- 

bi 

ing of the Public Health 

th 

Laboratory Service if the need 

to 

was shown. 

nt 

Meningitis cases are rising 

P* 

nationally — there have been 
72 deaths so far this year — 

ri 

but the Stroud area has had 

IT 

more than 100 cases in the 

O 

past five years. 53 of them the 

at 

more severe bacterial type. 

P* 

meningococcal meningitis, and 

n 

three children have died. Men- 
ingitis is a membrane in- 

T 

flammation of the brain and 

V 

spinal chord. 

o 

Mr Gordon Hopwood, pres- 

ll 

ident of the Stroud Chamber of 


I inu^ MIU IIMI pxwpil "WIV 

refusing to come to the area to 
work or shop and were staying 
away from the public swim- 
ming pool. “The area is 
becoming like a leper colony," 
be said.Concern about the 
disease has resulted in 
plummeting house prices and 
cancelled holidays in the area. 
• A four-month old girl was 
diagnosed as having men- 
ingitis in Stroud yesterday. 
Kite Stephens was admitted to 
Gloucestershire Royal Hos- 
pital earlier this week. 

Doctors were doubtful last 
night that the infection was 
picked np in Stroud, as the 
family moved into the area 
from Germany only three days 
before she became ill. 

A Department of Health 
spokesman said that the in- 
cubation period for meningo- 
coccal meningitis is between 
two and 10 days, hot is 
commonly three to four days. 




Mr Michael Squibb, who helped to collect 2£00 simalures on a petition asking flow many 
more most die?* which he took to Downing StreeLfPhotographs: Ros Drmkwater) 


‘The area 
is 

becoming 
like a 
leper 
colony’ 


Mr Gordon Hopwood, 
President of Stroud 


Chamber of Trade 



jgaas 


Two of the children among the 400 residents at yesterday's meeting 


Baroness Trampington and Sir Donald Acheson yesterday 


Pretoria warns it may not be able to pay debt 


Continued from page 1 
thus make ii impossible for 
these repayments to be made. 

Last year. South Africa 
froze repayment of most of its 
£16 million foreign debt after 
American banks, worried 
about the country's stability, 
called in short-term loans. 
Under a re-scheduling agree- 
ment reached with its cred- 
itors early this year. Pretoria 
undertook to repay a first 
instalment of 5 percent 


Meanwhile. Mr Dawie de 
Villiers. the Minister of Trade 
and Industry, has warned that 
Pretoria might have to put a 
general ban on the release of 
information about national 
trade (it has long been a 
criminal offence to publish 
details about trade in strategic 
goods, such as oil). 

“Information regarding our 
products, clients, volumes of 
exports and production and 
other details could very rosily 


be used by our adversaries in 
the sanctions campaign 
against us," he said. 


“If an economic war is to be 
waged against us. then we are 
bound, just as would be the 
case in other warfare, to 
become less talkative about 
these issues, lest we jeopardize 
our own position." 


Since Monday, three dif- 
ferent sets of measures have 
been imposed by Pretoria on 


Zambian and Zimbabwean 
transit trade: 

• All goods sent by road, rail 
or air from Zambia and 
Zimbabwe through South Af- 
rica for export from South 
African ports have been liable 
to a physical customs exam- 
ination. 

At the moment the checks— 
ostensibly for the purposes of 
a statistical survey — are only 
being made on south-bound 
traffic. 


• A cash deposit has had to be 
paid on all goods imported by 
Zambia through South Af- 
rican ports. 

The deposit is equal to 125 
per cent of the customs duty 
that would be paid if the goods 
were being imported for sale 
in South Africa and is refund- 
able in its entirety once a bill 
of exit from South Africa and 
a bill of entry into Zambia has 
been furnished to the South 
African Commissioner of 


Customs and Excise. - 

The measure, supposedly 
intended to combat customs 
fraud, has not yet been applied 
to imports • of any other 
country. 

• A licensing system an- 
nounced last week goes into 
effect today on imports into 
South Africa from Zimbabwe. 

Again, this is officially a 
statistics-gathering exercise, 
but is seen as a punishment for 
Zimbabwe's support. 


France 

relives 

climbing 

triumph 


From Susan MacDonald 
Paris 


v- ;, ;*T'- : ;• . 






THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Today’s events 


New exhibitions 

The Enterprising Scot audio- 
/visual view of Scottish enter- 
prise. Royal Scottish Academy. 
Princes St. Edinburgh: Mon to 
Sal !0to6.Sun II lo6(endsOc! 
5) 

Paintings by Elizabeth 
Shacklclon. The Ginncl Gallery. 
Lloyds House. 1 6 Lloyd Su 
Manchester: Mon to Fri 9 to 
5 JO (ends Aug 29) 

Painting in Scotland: The 
Golden Age 1 707-1 S4 3. the 
Talbot Rice An Centre, Old 
College. South Bridge. Edin- 
burgh: Mon to Sat 10 to 5 (ends 
Aug 31) 


Exhibitions in progress 

Shipping Sketches by John 
Wilson Carmichael. Laing An 
Gallery. Newcastle: Mon to Fri 
10 to 5.30. Sat 10 to 4.30. Sun 
2.30 to 5.30 (ends Sept 4) 
Plagiarism Personified?: 
European Pottery and Porcelain 
Figures. Adeane Gallery. The 
Filzwilliam Museum. 


Trumpington St Cambridge; 


Tues to Sat 10 to 1 and 2 to 5, 
Sun 2.15 to 5 (ends Aug 31) 

Photographic Display by 
Mark Warner. Oldham An Gal- 
lery. Union St: Mon to Thurs 10 
to 6. Fri and Sat 10 to 4 (ends 
Aug 18) 

A Breath of Fresh Air Views 
of British Landscape Painting. 
Athenaeum Gallery. Princess Si, 


Manchester; Mon to Sat 10 to 6. 
Sun 2 to 6 (ends Aug 10) 

Edges: visual ait m different 
media by women, Leeds City 
An Gallery. The Head row. Mon 
to Fri 10 to 6, Wed 10 to 9, Sat 
10 to 4. Sun 2 to 5 (ends Aug 31) 
With Walls and Towers Gir- 
dled: photographs of York from 
the 1850s to the present day. 
Impressions Gallery of Photog- 
raphy. 17 Collieigate. York: 
Tues to Sat 10.30 to 5.30 (ends 
Augt 30) 


Music 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,119 



ACROSS 

1 Infernal food, as served, has 
no good ingredient (8). 

5 Symbol appears to resemble 
meaning, but not alt of it (6). 

10 One “reluming" lo capital 
fortune and fame (4. 1 1 ). 


II Ring us up about nothing? 
How insensitive! (7). 


12 Take advantage of a great 
it (7). 


achievement (7). 

13 Show Boat flower-girl in this 
state of Mississippi (8). 

IS No red ruin where Samuel’s 
spirit was raised (5). 

18 About to complete perm? 
(5). 

20 Like Johann Strauss having 
to contend with three dif- 
ferent directions (8). 

23 Linde wandering by a river 
shows such energy ('7). 

25 Something alarming, taking 
on a war goddess (/). 

26 Peterson's opponent, one of 
a tenacious breed (7,8). 

27 Boy‘s terribly ill. swallowing 
one (6). 

28 Worker of Open University 
in barrel construction (8). 


type Roman soldiers (7). 

7 The game of many a Holy 
Roman Emperor (5). 

8 Threatening main disrup- 
tion to railway (8). 

9 The cheapest way to travel 
is always in coach (8). 

14 Entry of inferior press into 
royal reception obtained bv 
purchase (8). 

16 Left after record party on 
our soil (9k 

17 Docs a fellow provide a 
meal for him? (8). 

19 Timeless 14 underfoot 
causes revolution ( 7j. 

21 One’s out of line perhaps 
with the boss of this plant 

22 Wav up? Left to a snake to 
bring you down (6). 

24 Instrument for a bit of bat- 
tery. nothing more (5). 

25 Morning massage up in the 
country (5). 


Solution to Puzzle No 17.118 


DOWN 

1 Satan captured 500 we have 
to infer (6). 

2 Show inderision — leave 
premises, sick at heart (9). 

3 Despicable dope (3-4). 

4 Mistakes made by mouth- 
piece on board (Sk 

6 Pin-up held by masculine 



Concise Crossword, page 10 


Concert by the National 
Youth Wind Orchestra, Royal 
Hall. Harrogate, 8. 

Serenade conceit by soloists 
and ensembles. Parish Church. 
Ambleside. 8. 

Piano recital by Peter 
Donohoe. St Andrew's Church. 
Nauitton. nr Cheltenham. 7.30. 

Concert by the International 
Festival Orchestra of Oxford, 
University Church, High Si. 
Oxford. 8. 

Organ recital by Ian Higgin- 
son. Tewkesbury Abbey. 1. 

Concert by the Bournemouth 
Symphony Orchestra. Winter 
Gardens. Boornemonth. 8. 


Talks 


Memories in Focus, by Rob- 
ert Anderson and Tom Mc- 
Donald. Portandoo Centre, 
Portrusb. 8. 

Poems and Poets of Lakeland, 
by Ron Sands. Lake District 
National Park Visitor Centre, 
Bnockhole. Windermere. 3.30. 

Joseph Blade, by Dr Robert 


Anderson. Royal _ Society of 
iorgeSl. 5. 


Edinburgh. 22-24 George 
General 


Book Fair. St George's Hall, 
Truro: today 2 to 8. tomorrow 
10 to 5. 

Craft Fair The Octagon. 
Buxton. 10 to 5. 


Food prices 


Slimmer* can have a feast at 
this lime of year without too 
much expense. Melons, the ideal 
summer starter, are 35p-80p for 
a Spanish yellow honeydew, 
70p-£l-50 for a GaJia. depend- 
ing on size, and 20p-30p a 
pound for a slice of water melon. 
Cyprus sultana grapes are good 
at 55p-80p a pound, KiwUnih 
I9p-30p each, apricots 40p-80p 
a pound, pfcais 35p-50p a 
pound, large juicy American 
black plums 95p-£l.30 a pound, 
peaches and nectarines I0p-30p 
each and pineapples from 75p- 
£1.20 for medium to large sizes. 

Home - grown soft fruits are 
coming to an end and prices 
rising. But cultivated black- 
berries are appearing at 50p - 
55p for a half pound punnet, 
some areas have blueberries at 
75p - 8 Op a half pound and first 
B ram ley cooking apples are 45p 
- 48p a pound. 

Mushrooms, with only 13 
calories per 100 grammes, have 
becomes so popular that we are 
eating 60 per cent more than 
five years ago. slicing them raw 
into salads as well as cooking 
them. They range between 60p 
and £1.20 a pound. Stick beans 
are worth having at 5 Op - 60p a 
pound, green peppers are 
cheaper at 60p - 70p a pound, 
cauliflowers are 40p - 45p each. 
Savoy cabbage 20p - 35p a 
pound and carrots I6p - 22p a 
pound. 

Fresh fish supplies are good 
throughout the country with 
some lower prices. Best buys 
and average price per pound are 
fillets of haddock £1.78. plaice 


£1.86 or whiting £1.37, boned 
Uldl 


herrings 85p and fresh mackarel 
63p. 


Tower Bridge 


Anniversaries 


Tower Bridge will be raised 
today at 2pm and 6.45pm. 


Top Films 


The top box-office (Dm in Lon- 
don: 

1 (-) Cobra 

2(1 ) Hana and Her Sisters 
3 (6 ) A Room With A View 
4(2) Tha Karate Kid Part U 

5 (3 ) The Color Purple 

6 f ) Desert Hearts 
7(A ) Ski and Nancy 

8(5 ) Police Academy III: Back in 
Training 

9(7) 9J* Weeks 
10(8) ET 
The top fame in the 

1 The Karate Kid Part II 

2 Police Academy Ilk Back in 
Trailing 

3 Ptnoccfio 

4 ET 

5 The Color Purple 

Suptecd by Scjbcti <m mulra f 


Top video rentals 


1 (1 ) The Goantes 

2(2) WetrdSdence 

3(4) Troll 

4(5) Ladyhawks 

5(6) Legend of Bate Jean 

6(7 ) Mad Max: Beyond Thunder- 

7(3) Cocoon 
8(8 ) The Emerald Forest 
9 (9 j Witness 
10(10) Retch 
Supplied by nan 


Roads 


W4m and «M: A3& Mays to trattc 
between Bath and Wyfye. at Umpley 
Stoke. *48: Temporary road at 
Uanddaroa witti 40 mph bntt delays 
between Cross Hand and C ar m art he n. 

Mdtemts: Ml: Delays around (unction 
20 ( Luttwwtjrtfi). Leicestershire. M5: 


Cont raB ow betwee n Junctions 4 and^fj 


Bromsgrwe / DreJMch), Hereford 


North: *19: Lane ctostns southbound 
S o» Murton fljRwer. eo Dutawn. At: 
Repairs N of Testos roundabout. Tyne 
and Wear. MS& Avoid Barton Bridge, 
Greater M a nchester serious delays. 

Scotian* M8/A& Westtxxnd lane do- 
stees between Gtasgow and EtSn b urrti at 
Newhouae Mercnanga. Sttathdytte. Ex- 
pect extra traffic In Eonburgh dry centre 
for Tattoo. *720: Contraflow at CoUnton. 
nrWMMMes Rd, Lothian. 

WennetfoQ l up pS ed by AA 


Weather 

forecast 


Low over North Sea, 
moving away NE. Ridge 
of high pressure extend- 
ing from SW. Sunny 
intervals in most places 
with just a few showers.. 


6 am to midnight' 


London, SE, central S 
East Anglia, E, W Midlands ! 
intervals, mainly dry; wind W I 
or moderate; max temp 20 to 



: (68 to 72F). 

E, NW, central N England, 
Scotland, I 



District, SW, NW 
gow, central I 
Sunny intervals 

showers at first wind NIAT Baht or 
moderate: max temp 16 to 18C<61 
to64F). 

; Channel islands, SW England, S, 
N Wales, Northern tratamMafe of 


Man: Sunny intervals, mainly dry; 
wndWtoNWi ‘ 


’moderate, becoming 
max temp 18 to 20C (64 to 


NE England, Borders, Edinburgh, 
Dtmdee, Aberdeen, Moray Firth, 
NE Scotland: Mainly cloudy at first. 


rain stow iy dying out wind NW 
moderste or fresh; i 


max temp 13 to 

15C (55 to 59F). 

Orkney, Shetland: Mainly cloudy 
at first rain slowly dying out wind 
NW moderate or fresh; max temp 13 
to15C(55»59F). 

Outlook for weekend. Some rain 
In N, a few showers in S. Tem- 
peratures near normaL 



High Tides 



star: bc-btuv sky and cloud: c- 
ctoudy: o-overcaol: f-tog: d^lrtzzte: h- 
bad: mlsi-mta: rratn. s-snow: Ui- 
Unmderstorm: p-showr*. 

Arrows show wind direction, wind 
speed (rnphi circled- Tempera hire 
cenograoe. 


TODAY AM 

Loudon Bridge -425 
Aberdeen 330 

Avonmoutfi 9 49 
Bettes! 1.12 

CanSff 9.34 

De v onport 822 

Dover t.10 

Falmo u th 732 

Glasgow 231 

Haranch 2.10 

Kotybud 1233 

Hud 6.44 

t W m c n mb e 834 

Lett) 439 

Liverpool 1.32 

Low estoft 12.05 

Margate 2.33 

MBtord Haven 847 

Newquay 737 

Oban . 837 

Penzance 732 

Portland 9.48 

P ort smo u th 138 

Shoroham 135 

Sout ha mpton 1.05 

Swansea a 54 

Tees 557 

WTtojvon-Nze 2.12 

Tide measured in 


HT PH 

7.0 438 
43 4.10 

1Z4 103 

3.4 135 
113 9.45 

5.1 632 
63 134 

4.9 8.02 
43 3.44 
43 237 
55 1256 
73 8.15 
B.7 a 47 

5.4 536 
93 152 
23 1151 
45 240 

6.6 9.01 

6.7 752 
17 822 
53 733 
19 847 
4.3 288 

5.9 -155 
43 137 
83- 836 
53 6.29 

4.1 223 
Ii 


HT 

73 

45 

if 

113 

aa 

65 

5.1 

44 
33 
S3 

- 7.1 
83 
S3 
94 
25 
4.7 

63 
83 

4.0 
5.4 
21 

45 

64 
44 

9.1 
51 

4.1 


833 sm 
First quarter August 13 


955 pm 


Lighting-op time 


Around Britain 


London 9.07 pm to 5.06 am 
"*■ »"» 9.17 pm to 5.16 am 


ww— 0.1 7 pm bo-ivoni 

Edtebwgb 936pm to 5.01 am 
Manch ester 933 pm to 547 am 


Births: WOKaxu Bateson, 
biologist, Whitby, Yorkshire. 
1861: PAM Dirac, physicist 
Nobel laureate 1933, BristoL 
1902. 

Deaths: Thomas 6 Kerapk. 
Agnietcnberg, Netherlands, 
1-171: George Canning, states- 
man. Prime Minister. 1827; 
Jacob BurckhardL historian of 
art. Basel. 1897. 

Resignation of Richard 
Nixon. 37ih president of the 
USA succeeded by Gerald Ford, 
1974. 


The pound 


Bonk 


AamfiaS 
Austria Sch 
BetgwnFr 
CanadaS 
Denmark Hr 
Finland Midi 
France Fr 

Dm 


Germany Di 
Greece Or 


Hong Kong 3 
Ireland Pi 
Italy Lire 
Japan Yen 
Netherlands Ghf 
Norway Kr 
Portugal Eoc 
South Africa Rd 
Spain Pta 
Sweden Kr 
Switzerland Fr 
USAS 

Yugostawa Dnr 


2235 

8630 

2.1C 

1157 

7J9 

1035 

3.185 

21550 

1150 

1.14 

219050 

24050 

-358 

1135 

22350 

5-50 

-20575 

1055 

256S 

154 

63050 


Bank 
Setts 
237 
21.15 
62.70 
251 
1137 
739 
STS 
- 3515 
20250 
1130 
156 
207050 
22S50 
339 
10.75 
21150 
450 
194.75 
10.10 
2425 
147 

CTO on 


Hates for small Oma n— bop bank notes 
only as suppled by Barclays Sank PLC. 
Different rales apply to travellers 
cneoues and other 
business. 


appl y to t 

foreign currency 


Retail Price Index: 385.9 
London: The FT Index dosed down 
123 at 12215. 



Time, Portfolio Cota rum an as 
foUowT* 

1 Times Portfolio Is free. Purchase 
of The Times is not a condition of 
caking part. 

2 Times Portfolio (fort comprise a 
group of putmc companies wtme 
shares are listed on the Stock 


II If for any reason The Times 
Price Page ts not puoitaned lo the 
normal way Time Portfolio win be 
■ended for that day. 

How to play - Daffy B M W lt d 
On each day your unique set of right 
numbers will represent -commemal 


Exchange and Qua led In The Times 
Stock ExC 


—tehanoe price* page. The 

companies comprising that llsl will 
change from day lo day. The DM 
twnich a numbered i - to divided 
into rour randomly distributed groups 
oi u shares. Every Portfolio card 
contains two numbers from . each 
group and each card contains a 
unique set of numDere. 


and industrial shares published m The 
_ “ wim which win an 


tn die commits . provided, next to 
your slum note the pride change <+- 
or -L tn pence, as pObUsbed In that 
day's Times. 

After listing the price changes of 


your eight shares .for lhat day. ana up 
light i 


3 Times portfolio ttnldend' win be 
lhe figure m pence which r epresen ts 
me optimum movement in prices i|.e. 
the largest increase or lowest torn) of a 
combination of eight itwo from each 
randomly dtstrlhutedgroup wflhln the 
44 shares) of Ihe 44 shares which on 
any one d-\y comprise The Ttmea 
Portfolio list. 

4 The daily (ttvMend. win .be 


all share changes to give you 
ytiur oi eratl total Pico or minus h- or - 


Check your ov erall local against The 
_ .... published on 


Times PortfoHo dividend . 
me Slock Exchange Prices'page. 

If your overall total matches The 


Times Portfolio UJvtderel^ywj^ haw 


announced each, day and Ihe wggjg 


won outright or a share. 

prize money stated for that day and 
must dalra your prize as instructed 
below. 


dividend win be announced 
Saturday In The Times. 

5 Times Portfolio tel and details of 


Hew to play — Wssftfcr PMdre d 

Monday Saturday “ 


Uie daily or weekly dividend will also 
Be available for li 


at me 


inspection 

offices of The Times. 

a if ihe ov erall price movement ctf 
more than one combination af shares 
eauais the dividend, the^rtre^wui be 


.... _ record your dally 

Portfolio I coal. 

Add these together to determine 
your weekly Portfolio tolaL 


If your total matches the published 
weekly dividend flgitte you have won 


equally divided arnoM Ihe claimants 
holding ihose combtnaaans of snares. 


ouinoni or a share of the. prize money 
stated for thai week, and must ctattn 


your prize as Instructed Betow. 


7 All claims are suWertip smttttty 
iny Times 


before payment. Any Times Portfolio 
cart lhai M defaced, tampered with or 
Incorrectly printed in any way wtH be 
drriared void. 

8 Employees of News In lemattonat 
Pk and its sutw diaries and of 
Europe! nl Group Limited (producers 
and disiributors of the eaa d) or 
members of Ihelr lmmediaie families 
are nol allowed to Nay Times 
Portfolio. 

O All parociuams will be subfect lo 
these Rulm. Ail mstruenom on -how 

lo play- and "how io claim", wheiher 
puHMieu in The .Timm or In Times 
Porifoflo cards win be deemed »be 
pan of these Rules. The Edllor 
rewnes the right to amend me Rules. 


I f gpf to otarin 

Ttwphane TTta Tbwsr Pontelte rldmi 
Hns a&*S32it bswsasn isnasui 


Me stattos esn bo aooeasd amrida mass 

hours. 

You must have your cans with you 
when you tefcohon*. 

ir you .are unable to teicohone 
someone eke can claim on your behalf 


lotto claims 
between tne stipulated ttmea. 


Une 


No respoMUBy can 


lO bi any dispute. The Editor's 
decision b find and. I 


for raihav to contact ttw 

for any reason within the staled 

hours 


.The above Instructions are ap- 
pUcauie m bom natty and weekly 
dhfdcnd claims. 


in mm pxopmioajw m 

Panaanca 934 pm to i32 am 


Yesterday 


Sun Rain 
tea in 

EAST COAST 
Scarboro ’ 2.8 .10 

BridDngton 3.4 .01 

Cromer 23 

Lowestoft 3.7 56 

Ctecfon 36 - 

Msraate 
SOUTHC 


Max 
C F 


I COAST 

Folkestone 23 .04 


19 66 rain 
19 66 Cloudy 
19 86 dowdy 

19 66 showers 
21 70 bright 

20 66 ctaudy 


TempefBforos a! midday yesterday: c. 
cloud; f. fair; r. rats. sun. 

C F c F 

C 1457 Guernsey c1B61 

C 17 63 fownasi r 1254 

c 1457 Jereay c 1661 

c 1864 London c 1864 

Cartfifl c 1661 I T ncfi s tef r1457 

EdblMgb C1S59 Nawc ast te c 15 59 

Gtetgow c 1661 RYUdsway C 1559 


Bond Winners 


Winners of£ 10.000 Premium 
Bond prizes for August are: 

13 AP 497172 (winner lives in 
Bedfordshire): 6MF 492062 
(Hampshire); TK 158997 
(Leeds): 3WL 764285 (Cam- 
bridge); 22 WZ 159794 (Essex). 


Eastbourne 

f _:.ihuT. 
on gnum 

Worthing 

Littfchmptn 

BognorR 

Soutbsoa 

Sandown 

ShanMn 

Boumemfli 

Ponte 

teaage 

Waymoutfi 

Emsoutfi 

TeJymuouth 

Tot^uay 

Fataowh 


1.7 

43 jn 

2.1 57 
43 .01 

5.7 .02 

5.1 - 
33 .04 


19 68 bright 

19 66 bright 

18 64 bright 
17 83 cloudy 
te 66 bright 

20 88 sunny 

19 68 bright 
19 86 doudy 


Sun Rain 
hre in 

Rmcombc x 
Tmrby 6.1 .05 

CofwynBajr - 41 
M te C Mte 33 31 
Douglas 35 33 
ENGLAND AND WALES 
London 3 8 .02 
B*hmn Airpt 23 .05 

Bnstol — — 

Cardiff 


Max 
C F 


18 68 
16 61 
18 61 
15 59 


sum* 

doudy 

brtftt 

bflrfa 




73 .19 
&5 .13 
1.1 .11 
13 .49 


Mamrtwier 03 .15 
Ncttfcfitam z.7 .02 
frctl-u-Tyne 13 38 
Carfiaie * ' • 


13 .41 


20 68 
18 64 

16 64 
IB 64 

17 63 
15 59 
15 59 
17 63 

17 63 

18 64 


shower* 


DrtgM 

SSSf 

bngra 

cfcxidy 

stenMS 

BtUMOfS 

sreresre 

ftrtW 


3.7 - 

3.0 - 

4.1 
.43 

43 .02 
8-1 -02 
49 


73 59 
63 .15 


5.5 J» 


tiskusr™ “ 

Sctfy lain 6.9 - 

Newquay 6.1 33 


20 68 
20 68 
19 68 

18 64 

19 66 
19 66 
19. 66 
ie 64 

17 83 

18 64 

19 66 


cloudy 

doudy 

bnght 

cloudy 

Gunny 

Sumy 

sunny 

sunny 

sunny 

doudy 

bnght 


1.0 .48 
2-2 .72 


63 30 
0.4 .09 


16 61 sureiy 
19 B6 sunny 


SCOTLAND 
Edufetoffluir 23 .43 
S— bsrc h 

SS? 0 " 

Tb-ee 
Storno way 

Lerwick 
Wick 
Kntoss 
Aberdeen 

St Andrews 
Efflnfejgb 

NOBTMBfN IRELAND 
Bdfete 0.1 ,(B 


1.6 .06 
- 36 


- .72 
1.0 .71 


&5 .43 
03 36 


16 61 

17 83 
19 66 

15 59 
14 57 

12 54 

13 55 
13 55 

16 61 

18 64 
17 63 


Bwndar 

aflowers 


Showers 

ran - 


rate 

rap 

showers 

ttundW 


15 » showen 


Safe cycling 


Abroad 


The Departme n t of Transport has 
issued a booWet, Safer Motorqr&ng, 
wtBch coukf act as a consritaMm docu- 
ment tar future feostason cm motor cycle 
safety. The txxMaL which invites re- 
sponses from various mcMduals ana 
bodies mtsrested in motor o/dea. before 
the end of October, aims at cutting what 
the Ministry cads " the p re se n t appaiung 
accident ram" among motor eyefets. 


MDDAY: 




Our address 


Informatien far tndusMn in The 
Times Information serv ice should he 
sent KJ.TTie Editor. TTK. The Times, 
PO Box 7. 1 Vlramu Street. London. 


^nMK^NEWS'.APERS LIMITED. 


j., Jled by London Post I Print - 

ersi . Lfrmteo or l vufpnu street. 


London I EI9XN, Friday. August s. 

» a newspaper at 


Atotdrta f 
Algfere s 
Amtfdm e 
Athens s 
Bahrain s 
Bartsads* f 
Bwdn c 
Bent t 

iSS* J 

Bermuda’ I 
Biarritz f 
2 «W* c 
BouTag c 
aresaete f 
Budapet s 

CrtST*" s 

Us t 

%5Zk T e 


c, tfaA d. drizzle; UakT fg. to* f , ram.- a. sure sn, snow; t. amlar. 

2 ffi Cologne t 20 68 Mafaen C F C F 


C F - - 

s 29 84 -Roma * 3 « 
t 22 72 ow— a 27 81 

a 30 88 i3sf cҤ 

f 30 B 


® 91 Faro 
^ 95 Ffomnce 
27 W Frankfurt 
^ 82 Ftmehal 
29 64 GflnMa 

26 79 GfomKar 

2 7 81 HataMd 




22 

19 §8 Istanbul 
16 8l Jeddah 




% xivpZiZ* 
33 91 usbon 

21 JOuSL 


>ss 

! 20 68 **-ninn 

I 31 88 NnU 
* 2 |1 NYortT 
4 3 84 Nfca 
4 39102 Oato 
s 19 86 Parts 

s 29 84 




r rt g 

ias 


t-z - — ■ wa u w 5 Xn 

ifiSsss- 


« Madrid ~ f 31 £ * 23 73 wa._ 

wadn^f 


S 28 79 
a a 77 
8 34 93 
S 34 93 

* 29 84 Tokyo 
8 29 84 Toronto* 
c 15 59 Tunis 
c 19 66 Vafenoia 

* 30 88 vanefear* 
c 16 61 - 

* 25 77 

1 13 56 w s maw s g 
■ 27 to waMrnr c ffl-g 

, SB 77 



Two hundred years ago 
today. Jacques Balmai and 
Michel-Gabriei Paccard be- 
came ihe first climbers 10 
reach the summit Of Mont 
Blanc. Equipped with walking 
sticks, hob-nailed boots, a 
haversack and a barometer, 
they took up the challenge of a 
Swiss physician, Horace Bene- 
diet de Saussure. who had 
promised a reward for the 
peak’s first conquerors. 

Bicentenary celebrations, 
which have been building up 
all summer, culminate today 
in an explosion of festivities. 
Two mountain guides will 
climb the peak dressed as ihe 
original climbers were, and a 
Min Eiffel Tower will be 
placed on ihe summit. 

At Chamonix. 500 waiters 
and shopkeepers in period 
costume will serve thousands 
of climbers and tourists. Tele, 
vision will cover ihe event 
throughout the day. 

Climbers had been trying to 
reach the summit for 25 years 
before Balmat and Paccard 
succeeded. Since then people 
have come in ever-increasing 
numbers each year to climb in 
the massif. 

In 1741 two British gentle- 
men, Messrs Windham and 
Pocock. made a trip to the 
valley, sincerely believing they 
had discovered one of the last 
unexplored bits of Europe. 
Today the French are inclined 
to look on them as Cham* 
onix’s first tourists. 

In 1876 a British lady, 
Isabella Straion. climbed to 
the top of Mont Blanc and 
married her mountain guide 
when she came down. 

Today the gendarmerie 
mountain rescue service at 
Chamonix is a 40-strong team 
dedicated to saving lives on 
the massif, where 50 per cent 
of all mountain rescue opera- 
tions in France are carried ouL 
Last year there were about 350 
rescues, and 50 lives were lost. 

The Chamonix tourist of- 
fice complains lhat there are 
still people who think Mom 
Blanc is in Switzerland, and 
that the Swiss, usually an 
honest people, never deny H. 




ailjn ^ 
‘m 




i r 


inu v. 


Up 


ri! 


*0C 


asu- ;: 



5 


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■-V - J - 


5 ZB IX 

c 29 M 
I » » 
» 33 BI 
C 29 84 
s 19 66 
C » 2* 

* ss 

s 25 77 











BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE 



TIMES 


n 

SPORT 26 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 29 


FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


■ •> 

I 


ll<m mam 

nr* 


, . 



’X-w. 

*** iqj- 

'll T 


i ■* ■. i-%' 




.. 

l,l| « lb. 

;-"C 

% 

i : 


STOCK MARKET 

ft 30 Share 
1221.5 (-12J2) 

FT-SE too 
1529.9 (-10.5) 

Bargains 


1 

USM (Datastream) 

120.07 (-1.32) -• 

THE POUND 


US Dollar - 
1.4756 (-0.0010) 
W German mark 
3.0519 (-0.0206) 

Trade-weighted 
70.9 (-0.4). 





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$500mfor 

Goldman 

Goldman Saqhs, the US 
securities house, is to receive a 
capital injection of SSOO mil- 
lion <£340 -million) from 
Sumitomo . Bank, the thin! 
largest in Japan. Sumitomo 
win become a limited partner 
and . will be entitled to 1Z5 per 
cent of Goldman's proms 
from the end of 1988. 

Goldman is the last of the 
big New York investment 
houses to seek extra capital to 
finance- rapid expansion into 
securities markets around the 
world, particularly Tokyo. At 
the same time. Sumitomo, 
hopes to use its link with 
Goldman to develop its busi- 
ness rn New York markets. 

The new capital will take 
Goldman's total capita] to 
$1.8 billion, which is Kill less 
than most of its rivals.- . 

Hamlyn leaves 
Newslnt 

Mr Paul Hamlyn has re- 
signed as a non-executive 
director of News International 
pic. The chairman of the 
company, Mr Rupert Mur- 
doch. said: “Mr Hamlyn has 
given Heat service as a direc- 
tor of News International for 
the last 16 years. We look 
forward to continuing our 
friendship and mutual counsel 
in the future. : . — . 

. .JTbeJjoardf <rf Ngws.Interr. 
national is now composed 
entirely of -tither.-tiirectois. of 
its parent compare ^ The News- 
Corporation limited, or full- 
time executives;”.; 

BT contract 

British Telecom has won a 
contract initially worth £26m, 
to supply Satellite ■ Racing 
Development with Europe's 
largest private satellite net- 
work to enable betting shops 
in Britain to screen live cover- 
age of sporting events. 


iMthrifc Holding cat 


m * 


>>/- 


. i*..- -ill 

\nnutf 


. ■. * s 


Eagle Star Insurance has 
reduced its holding in Philip 
Hill Investment Trust by 4.15 
million shares to 13.43 foil- 
lion. or 13.9 per cent Eagle 
Star Investments has disposed 
of its 851,460 Hill shares. 

U profits up 

TI Group, the engineering 
company. lifted its pretax 
proms from £12.6 million to 
£18.1 million in the first half 
of this year. Turnover feU 
from £502.6 million to £490. 1 
million. _ 

Tempos, page 18 

BQC ahead 

BOC Group, the industrial 
gases and healthcare. group, 
lifted profits from £124.1 mil- 
lion to £135.2 million- in the 
nine months to June 30. 
Turnover fell from £1.76 tril- 
lion to £1.66 billion. 

Tempos, page 18 


Tamms 

WdTSms 


18 Foreign Exd» 19 

18 Traded Optt 19 

Ctopoy News 18 UnitTraffl* 20 
Cmxnenl 19 C o n i m o te tt 20 
Stock Maricet 19 tSJWPAM .» 
Money Mrkts 19 Share Prcs28, 2J 


By Richard Thomson 
Banking Correspondent 

Barclays Bank ended the 
half-yearreponing -season for 
the big four clearing banks 
yesterday by announcing a 
disappointing set of results 
which revealed an unexpect- 
edly weak performance in 
domestic banking operations. 1 
Pretax profits for the group 
over the half year to June 30 
were £434 million, up 8 per 
cent from the -£403 million 
profit at the same time last 
year.. 

The result was -near the 
bosom of ' the range of 
analysts’ expectations and fol- 
lows. profit increases an- 
nounced by the other three 
clearer* ranging from; 26 per 
cent to 34 per cent It also 
follows a strong profits growth 
at the end of last year. 

Despite a 13 per- cent in- 
terim dividend increase from. 
8.4p to 9-5p, Barclays’ shares 
fell sharply- by 17p from 474p 
to' 457p after the news. The' 
rest of the banking sector 
weakened in : response to the 
figures and to a generally 
lower stock market. 

Sir Timothy Bevan, the 
chairman, said: 'This is a 
healthy performance and we 
could have shown larger fig- 
ures had we expanded assets 
more rapidly,” In the present 
competitive conditions 
Barclays had limited the 
growth m assets in the in- 
terests of long-term banking 
prudence, seeking controlled 
expansion and quality profits. - 
Sir Timpthy said that he 





Sir Timothy Bevan: "a 
- healthy performance” - 

regretted the failure of the 
South African Government to 
respond positively to Sir 
Geoffrey Howe's recent mis- 
sion. or to the Eminent Per- 
sons Group. 

He said there were plans to 
withdraw the Barclays' nam e 
from Barclays National, the 
South African Bank in which 
it has a 40 per cent bolding, 
by 1 990 although it could hap- 
pen sooner. BarNat produced 
a strong performance over the 
last six months which was 
mostly cancelled out be tbe 
fall in the value of tbe Rand. 

Sir Timothy also hit out at 
irresponsible lending on mort- 
gages to individual borrowers. 
.He called for restraint by both 
lenders and borrowers .and 
said the more generous terms 
offered by some lenders were 
irresponsible in tempting peo- 
ple to borrow more than they 
could afford. Barclays' own 
mortgage lending has readied 


rise 


£2.7 billion, offering advances 
of 2^ to 3 times income, he 
said. The bank made a profit 
of £17 milliou on mortgage 
leading over tbe last six 
months. 

While the other clearing 
banks have made their biggest 
profit increases in domestic 
banking, Barclays produced a 
domestic increase of £4 mil- 
lion to £200 mDhon, a rise of 2 
per cent Sir Timothy said that 
the introduction of free-if-in- 
credit banking early this year 
had made a negative impact 
on commissions earned by the 
bank, while tbe foil in the 
general level of interest rates 
had depressed the bank’s in- 
terest margins. 

Bad debt provisions on 
British business bad remained 
virtually unchanged from last 
year at £62 million 

Barclays was, however, able 
to cut the overall bad debt 
provision to £196 million 
from last year's total of £217 
million. 

Barclays de Zoete Wedd, 
tbe securities and investment 
banking arm, was included for 
the first, time in the figures, 
showing a profit of £20 million 
compared with the £10 mil- 
lion profit from Barclays Mer- 
chant Bank alone last year. 

BZW is also acquiring a 60 
per cent stake in Wall Street 
Gearing Company, a New 
York stock exchange member. 
- - Other areas showed little 
. profit growth apart from a 10 
per cent improvement in US 
operations 

Tempos, page 18 


NHBCto 
tighten 
rules on 
complaints 

: -The'tfttional'Hou s e B nild- 
iitg Council. <NHB€) is 
tightening- its. inspection, and 
disciplinary procedures! This 
will save time in identifying 
defects, . remedying them or 
disciplnunga builder. . 

• The -irritml period allowed 
to a builder to correct faults 
will be cut from 30 to 14 days 
and defaulters will appear 
before a disciplinary hearing 
within six weeks. 

The council is the con- 
sumer-protection body for pri- 
vate house-building. It 
h&sme a Government-ap- 
proved inspector for building 
control iff November, 1985. 

It is ' also developing . a 
computer programme to col- 
hue and analyse claims by 

home-owners. 

The NHBC strikes off about' 
40 builders a yfear. It paid out 
£10 million in 1985 on 3,000 
claims by houseowners who 
are protected from building 
faults by the NHBC insurance. 

About 98 per cent of all new 
homes are covered by the 
warranty since mortgages are 
only granted if they carry one. 
This tightening of regulations 
comes as the NHBC. feces 
competition with local auth- 
orities which are planning to 
set up a similar insuran ce 
scheme of their own. 

JBufiderS—pay.- an. annual 
subscription of £60 for small 
firms to £300 for big compa- 
nies such as Wimpey, plus an 
inspection fee and an 'insur- 
ance premium on each house 
built These costs are passed 
on to the boase purchaser at 
an average cost of 0.4-percent 
of the house price. 

The council has also pub- 
lished a list of the top 100 
builders in its Pride in ihe Job 
awards — phts a list of the 
struck off members for the 
first six months of this year. ' 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


New York _ 

Dow Jones 17S1.78{+1233r 

Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow 1742236 (+60.08) 

Hong Kong: _ _ 

Hang Seng ~ — 1920.18 {+32^ 

Amsterdam: Gen — 2487-5 (+1.2J 
ft AO 11504 (+108) 

_ 1688.0 H>-0) 


Sydney At 

Frankfurt: 

Commerzbank 
Brussels: 

General 

Paris: CAC __ 

Zuide 

SKA General — itfa 

Londonckurfng prices Page 21 


77052 




INTEREST RATES 


.-*«r 

M-|). 

jLl-r**** 

w 

„ r „i 
•J1- T* 

***** 


fS — 
*■ * 
if-- 


$ 

£ 

i 

-A 


London 

Bank Base: 10% . 

3-month Irrterbank lO'is-S 16 ^ 
3-momh eflgibie bflte9 3l as-W% ' 
irate 


bgingi 


PrimoRateOTt 
Federal Funds 656%* 

3-month Treasury BBS 5.70-5.09% 
30-year bonds. 95*^32-95^32* 


CURRENCIES 


London: . NewYorfc 

£51.4766 £ 51.4765"-. 

£ DM3.0519 $:.DM2J067Q* 

£SwFrl4606 S: Index: 110.7 
£FFr9^B77 

£ Y»227.0ff 'ECU 20.6 91111 
£lmkuc7ffS . SDRHL807382 


MAIN PRICE CHANGES 


RISES: 


S-C .Banks — 340p{+15rt 

BriL Aerospace 488p (+10p) 

Utd, Sdenfflic 168p (+ 10 p) 


Benson — 

United Real 

Uncroft KBgour 


23lp{+6p] 


PALLS: 

Blue Circle. 
GKN 
Lucas. 


TI Group 

Evened » 

Barclays ... 
National West - 
Turner &Newafl 

Vaux Group 

Untever 

Yorks. Chemicals 
Good Relations 


550p(-8p) 
- 279p|-9p} 
506p(-1(W 
463p(-32p) 
204p-12p 

, 457p i-17p) 

JTOU 

373p(-ir 


GOLD 


London Rdng: 

saniitiis^ 

246.M)- 

Cornw§B2«K38330* 

NOR TH SEA OIL 

Brant (SepQ . . 

* Denotes tatBSLfftdlng 


Mountleigh offers 
£117m for trust 

By Judith Hnutky, Commercial Property Correspondent 


Mountleigh Group is mak- 
ing an agreed £117 million 
offer for United Real Property 
Trust, a move the City has 
lohg -beeh' 

• . Mountleigli is offering 83.of 
its ■ convertible preference 
shares for every 12 United 
Real shares and £34 in cash, . 
which values United Real 
sharesat 975a There isa cash 
alternative of 975p per share. 
Mountleigh has acceptances 
for T2J5 per cent of United 
Real on the basis of the cash 
offer. 

Mr Maurice Wohl, former 
chairman of United Real and 
51 per cent shareholder, has 
agreed to Mountieigh’s offer. - 
United Real has 14 properties 
in its portfolio, which was last, 
valued in 1983 at £844- mil- 
lion, giving anet asset value of 
703p per share in 1985. 

Mountleigh, which still does 
not hold any United Real 
shares, estimates that United’s 
potential net asset value, 
including the redevelopment 
opportunities, enhancement 
value and reversionary poten- 
tial within the portfolio is 
l,250p per share. Therefore, 
Mountieigh’s offer stands at a 
28 per cent discount 

The Co-operative Insurance 
Society, which holds 10 per 
cent of United Real’s shares, 
has not yet been approached 


about the offer, which is due to 
dose on September 4. United 
Real shareholders living out- 
side' the" tJK, including Mr 
WohL are-btipg offered: an 
indemnity against currency 
fluctuations in the event of 
Mountieigh’s offer lapsing or 
failing . to. . become 
unconditional'.. 

Mountleigh 1ms £13 million 
in cash from die sale of part of 
the Lonrho portfolio it re- 
cently bought from Samuel 
Properties before the latter’s 
merger with Qayform Prop- 
erties and the sale of the Efira 
ate in London, pan of- the 
.saraedeaL It say^therewiUbe 
minimal dfliiitioh to earnings 
per share from the acquisition 
of“Unite<f ReaL' The -Royal 
Bank of Scotland and 
Charterhouse are underwrit- 
ing the issue of 83 mQHon 
Mountleigh convertible pref- 
erence shares, representing 36 
percent of the company’s fully 
diluted ordinary share capital 
and providing the loan for the 
cash alternative: 

The deal will give 
Mountleigh- the chance to 
redevelop two large Gty office 
buildings in the United Real 
portfolio. The company says 
State House in High Holbom 
could have a site value alone 
of £35 million. 


WAnJrWW - 



Curry chain plans USM debut 


Mr Sant ChatwaJ (above), 
whose world d»ahi of Indian 
restaurants has led to a quote 
on the New York Stock Ex- 
change, opened bis third Lon- 
don outlet yesterday and 
announced plans for an 
expanding British drain ami a 
launch on London's Unlisted 
Securities Market, (writes 
Derek Harris). 

He is aiming at a February 
quote on the USM for his 
British company, which also 
takes in several restamants in 
Canada. 


He bunched his first Bom- 
bay Palace in New York, 
expanded in North America 
and then branched out into 
Europe and the Far East. He 
hopes to open restauants soon 
in Pelting and Moscow. 

To cope with the demand for 
trained specialists in Indian 
cooking be has opened a 
training centre, a “carry 
university,” in ' New' York to 
which staff from Britain will 
go, some for as long as a year. 

Mr ChatwaL 39, from the 
Pniljab In northern India, is 


adding variations to the Bom- 
bay Palace formula. The latest 
London opening, the Bokhara, 
Is more specialized, 
concentrating on the cuisine of 
the North-west frontier. 

He is aiming to set up 
almosta dozen British res- 
taurants, mdnding Bombay 
Palaces at Bristol -and Bir- 
mingham. Oxford is expected 
to be another location. 

. . The has been bmlt np 
since 1979 with turnover this 
year expected to reach S16 
million (about £1(L8 million). 


Lotus sold 
by Burton 
for£19m 

By Cliff Felt-ham 

. Burton Group yesterday 
dawed back some of the £580 
million it paid for Debenhams 
when it hived off the -Lotus 
shoemaking business to PEL 
tbe South Wales footwear 
manufacturer, for£I 9 million. 

Mr Monty Sumray, chair- 
man of FT1, was jubilant. He 
said: “It is a golden opportu- 
nity for us. 1 have been 
looking around for a deal like 
this since 1972.'* 

The acquisition makes him 
the largest supplier of 
women's shoes to Marks and 
Spencer*. .. 

Sir Ralph Halpem, chair- 
man of Burton, was also 
happy- He is now free to 
concentrate on finding buyers 
for other unwanted parts of 
Debenhams, Hamley's toy 
shop in Regent Street, London 
and an American shoe shop 
chain. 

Lotus, which was founded 
in 1760, has three factories in 
Stafford, Northampton, and 
Ban bridge, Northern Ireland, 
which will all be kept going. 

Last year it made a profit of 
£4 million on turnover of £36 
rmUioiL 

FII is paying for the ac- 
quisition through a rights 
issue on the basis of seven new 
shares at 276p for every six 
hekL ' 

Mr Sumray is forecasting 
profits for tire year just fin- 
ished of about- £ 2.2 million 


October talks 

Opec will meet again on 
October 6 to discuss produc- 
tion quotas, a new price 
system and how to abandon 
the netback system of oil 
marketing, S£nor Javier 
Espinosa, Energy and Mines 
Minister of Ecuador, said. The 
venue is undecided. - 


Prudential buys two 
estate agencies 


By Alison Eadie 


The Prudential Corpora- 
tion, through its subsidiary 
Prudential Property Services.* 
has bought two more estate 
agencies — Chestertons 
Res id ential, an upmarket 
London agency, and Earl & 
Lawrence, based in tbe East 
Midlands. 

Chestertons is the 
Prudential's first estate agency 
acquisition in London and 
will provide the base for 
further expansion in the 
capital. 

Aside from its substantial 
letting department which let 
1,000 properties last year, 
Chestertons' 10 offices han- 
dled £200 million worth of 
sales in 1985, at prices averag- 
ing £150,000. 


Chestertons is also strong in 
sales in most European 
resorts.The overseas connec- 
tion provides the Prudential 
with opportunities for its new 
international financial ser- 
vices arm, which will start 
selling to the expatriate mar- 
ket in the autumn. 

Earl & Lawrence has II 
offices in Lincolnshire, Not- 
tinghamshire and Humber- 
side 

The two acquisitions, at 
undisclosed prices, take the 
Prudential's total number of 
outlets to 188, leaving it in 
third position behind Hambro 
Countrywide with 385 and 
Black Horse with 243. 

There are more acquisitions 
in the pipeline. 


Goodman cuts stake 


ByCliff Fdtharn 


Mr Harry Goodman, head 
of the International Leisure 
Group, has sold a £4.4 million 
block of shares in tbe 
company. 

Mr Goodman, whose 
Imasun group is the country's 
second largest tour operator, 
said he needed the money to 
meet personal commitments. 

The sale of 3.7 million 
International Leisure shares 
cuts his stake in the business 
to 8 million shares, or 15.5 per 
cent 

A small block of 125.000 
shares was also sold by his two 
deputy chairmen. Mr Stephen 


Matthews and Mr Peter 
Woodward. 

The shares were placed with 
City institutions at a price of 
112p. It was the second at- 
tempt to reduce their holding 
— last Friday they unsuccess- 
fully tried to find a home for 
the shares at USp.. 

Mr Woodward said the 
reason for selling was not that 
they were no longer commit- 
ted to the business but because 
a large chunk of their personal 
wealth was tied up in the 
company. 

International Leisure shares 
were unchanged at 118p 


Profits 
drop 
16% at 
Shell 


Energy Corresj 

Profits of Shell the world's 
second largest oil company 
have dropped by 16 per cent 
because of Opec’s decision last 
December to send oil prices 
down. 

Shell's figures for the second 
quarter of the present year 
issued vesierday underline the 
importance to Western econo- 
mies of the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting 
Countries' hold on prices. 

Profits dropped from £646 
million in the April to June 
period last year to £545 mil- 
lion this year. 

The fell was in line with 
stock market expectations, but 
nevertheless demonstrates 
how welcome the present rise 
in crude oil prices is to 
Western oil companies. 

Shell also lost £126 million 
because of currency fluctua- 
tions as sterling rose against 
the dollar when dollnr-de- 
nominated oil prices fell 
Losses were £95 million 
higher on currency trans- 
actions compared with the 
same period last year. 

However, profits from 
refining and marketing — 
turning cheaper crude oil into 
the products bought by in- 
dustry and motorists -rose by 
1 1 per cent while sales from 
oil-derived chemicals have 
also risen to record levels. 

The latest Opec initiative 
has led to announcements 
from Shell and the other 
leading oil companies that 
rising crude prices mean that 
higher petrol prices are 
needed. 

Texaco, in fourth place in 
the British market behind 
Esso, Shell and BP~said that 
the public should not be 
surprised to see prices fix 
within the next week or two. 

Texaco has consistently said 
that prices of about £1.64 a 
gallon are needed to bring 
profits from petrol sales, even 
with crude oil at $10 a barrcL 

However, market forces win 
mean that petrol prices -win 
rise from the present barcain 
levels in some areas. How- 
ever, market forces and Gov- 
ernment pressure to keep 
prices down will mean that 
prices far above present levels 
will not be seen this year 
unless Opec suprises world 
markets by cutting back fur- 
ther on oi! output ' 

That is regarded as unlikely, 
even if Opec wins concessions 
from non-member oil produo 
ing nations to trim their 
output. 

The Opec president, Mr 
Rilwani Lukman, the Ni- 
gerian oil minister is now 
planning to meet the Secretary 
of Slate for Energy. Mr Peter 
Walker, to again ask for co- 
operation from Britain in 
helping to bring the present oil 
supply-demand imbalance un- 
der controL 

Kenneth Fleet, page 19 


System X dilemma 
still to be solved 


Yesterday morning, jnst 24 
hours after GEO'S £1-2 billion 
bid for Pfessey was blocked by 
tbe Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission, Sir John Clark , 
rhairman an d chief executive 
of Plessey, was enjoying a 
well-earned holiday. 

■ Mr James Prior, ch a irman 
of GEC, and Sir John's ad- 
versary otthe past six months, 
was equally efficient in depart- 
ing the country. He left: for a 
business meeting in Canada by 
lunchtime oo . the day the 
.report was published. At GEC, 
bids may be blocked - bit 
industrial life must go OH. 

As the two men whiled away 
the hours on their respective 
aeroplanes, copies of the 
MMC report were no doubt 
near to hand and both wflTby 
now. have digested tbe recom- 
mendations on the future of 
System X which prescribe 
some form of- ratiouafization. 
In this respect tbe two compa- 
nies will, for now, have to fife 
the MMC report as ‘^mtfin- 
isbed business." 

The Commission argued 
that a merger of the System X 
digital exchange businesses 
would save costs, leading to a 
better export performance, 
greater investment in future 
systems, and lower prices 
which would benefit British 
Telecom. 

Here the MMC is preach- 
ing to the converted. Since 
1983 the two companies have 
tried, unsuccessfully, to come 
to some agreement about 


By Teresa Poole 

merging a part or all of their 

telecommunications 

businesses. 

BT has supported this move 
but refuses to take the initia- 
tive in enforcing some 
rationalization: it has no inten- 
tion of driving either one out of 
the market by simply placing 
all orders for digital : ex- 
changes with die other. 

In its' .evidence 1 , to the 
Commission, BT said that 
rationalization aline would 
not be adequate to ensure « 
viable British supplier of pub^ 
lie switching. It sees the need 
for extensive relationships 
with partners with wide inter- 
national interests even for a 
monopoly British switching 
manufacturer. The UK alone 
could not provide a 
enough base for the 
and development expenditure 
necessary in the production of 
the next generation of 
switches, it sanL 

Since- the early 1960s, 
Britain's share of World ex- 
ports of telecommankatimis 
equipment has declined from 
25 percent to under 5 per cent 
and, so for. System X has had 
mi n i mal export -success in -a' 
market suffering from- world- 
wide over-capacity; 

Plessey is already 
collaborating on research and 
development with Alcatel of 
France, Itahei iff Italy and 
Siemens of West Germany, 
under an agreement signed m 
April 1985. But there are 
p> iMemg with GEC over the 
"f 


European partnership having 
access to System X technology 
without some benefit to GEC 
Tbe - MMC considered that 
fusion of the two companies' 
System X interests would 
avoid jnst these sort oi 
difficulties. 

The fora of such a fusion 
remains to be seen, given the 
present stalemate. Professor 
Biyan Carsberg, -the tele- 
communications watchdog, 
said be would 'prefer to see 
only the public switching 
actirites merged rather dan 
foil amalgamation of all the 
respective telecommunications 
businesses. 

BT said there was some 
logfc to induding transmission 
equipment and cables in any 
merger but the MMC decided 
this would dominate the field 
to such an extent -that the 
position of other domestic 
gupliere would become very 

Nevertheless, with the ad- 
vent of optoelectronics, the 
boundary between public 
switching ami transmission 
will become harder to define. 
With tills to mind .and the 
possible future .need to create 
transmission systems teams if 
cable and components are to 
be successfully sold at home 
and abroad, BT also suggested 
that an affiance between 
Plessey and B1CC might be 
more desirable. That is some- 
; that may concentrate the 
fat GEC. 



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A22f> 



I-*-* _ 





Ainu riNANc£ 


iHr, TiiVir^ FRIDA y AU'uLfai 6 1*66 


BARCLAYS PLQ 

The Directors of Barclays PLC report the following Group results 
for the half-year ended 30thjune 1986. 

The Chairman, Sir Timothy Bevan, in the UK and overseas, 
said today: todays Group pre-tax profit It is our policy to give a first dass service. In the 

increased by 8% to -£434ra in the first half of 1986, UK, we are iziakii^our branches more attractiveand 
reflecting the Bank’s policy, in increasingly have increased the number of staff dealing with 
competitive conditions, of seeking controlled customers. Nevertheless, theincrease in our operating 
expansion and quality profits. costs was held below 9%. 

Post-tax profit was 31% higher at £283m. It remains our objective to provide stockholders 

Overall our provisions have maintained their with consistent real growth in earnings and we are 
downward trend. increasing the dividend by 13% to 9-5p. 

The Group's strong capital position has again In spite of economic uncertainty and the rapid 


im proved with retentions up by 38% to -6214m. With 
the successful Euroyen issue, the free capital ratio rises 
to 7.1%. This is ahead of most of our major inter- 
national competitors and, bearing in mind that 
banking is a long term business, will give us the 
strength we need to cany out our plans for expansion 


Barclays remains strong and 
future with confidence. 


1 lA* 


7th August, 3986. 


CONSOLIDATED PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT (UNAUDITED) 

(Historic cost basis) 


Operating profit 

Share of profit of associated companies 

Profit before taxation and extraordinary items 

Taxation 


Profit after taxation 

Profit attributable to minority interests in subsidiary companies 


Extraordinary items „ 

Profit attributable to members of Barclays PLC. 

Dividends 

Profit retained. 


per £1 Ordinary stock 


Average exchange rate for period: US$/£ 

(Used for profit and loss account) 

NOTES 

1. The accounting polities set out on pages 39 & -JO of the l<*3 annul accounts ate 
uniHingrd Comparative figures for the 1st half of I98> have been amended from those 
published un Ik August ISOTlotike account of (bechance in watusofRanJsys National 


Half-year coded 

Year ended 

30.6JH* 

30.685 

3L1285 

£m 



394 

372 

780 

40 

31 

74 

434 

403 

854 

151 

187 

405 

28? 

218 

449 

1 

1 

2 

282 

215 

447 



3 

280 

213 

450 

66 

58 

128 

214 

155 

322 

41.0p 

35.9p 

69.5p 

9«5p 

8.4p 

18L6p 

JL47 

1.19 

130 


published cm 1 m.' A ugust I9tn to tike account of chedunge in stanisofBiaJi^s National 
hank hunted and the changes in accounting practices relating mdivtdend accounting 
and hyper inflation implemented in the I-W annual accounts 

On ImJuik lWoBuithyiBank PLCieqaiied the businesses of irodtbro leers dcZocteA 
Brian and stockjobbers \Xedd DurUcner Mcudaunt & Co th tough a new subsidiary. 
Barclays de Wedd Hoi di run Limited, in which former partners of de Zoetes and 
Wedib now have an interest The businesses of Bird ays Merchant Bank and certain 
other subsidiary companies have also been transferred to the new group. 

The profits of die BurcLns de Zoete TOsdd Group reported in this announcement 
com pme those of the former Barclays Merchant Bank for the six months to 30th June 
198b jnd the Group's sham, related to its previous 29 9 1 * holdings, of the profits of the 
termor dr Zoete and Void pxrtncnhi ps to Jlst May 1*186. They include fm of realised 
investment gams by Barclays Development Capital Limited. 


liabilities can fluctuate significantly dependent on the level of trading activity In the 
Securities markets 

3. Analyses ol profit before taxation and extraordinary items 



Rilt-yor 

MbSJC 

ended 

Stt&W 

Year ended 
51 im 

By nature oTincome/cxpeiuei 

J Cm 

Cm 

fm 

Interest Income 

3^665 

%808 


Inrcrctt expense (note 4) 

2473 


1.0 M 

Nci inretev income 

UM 

I.M- 


Foreign exrtungr trading income 

34 

. W 

!U 

Other operating income 

540 

4W< 

222 


U784 * 

»*■ 

3.448 

Operating expenses 




Stiff 

719 

MjO 

1,346 

Property, ind equipment 

219 

XA 

419 

Oihcr 

*59 

2M 

48'’ 


1,196 

I.M9 

2.272 


590 

WO 

U96 

Purge hir tod and doubtful debt 




pwvrvons 

ISO 

217 

416 


394 

rj 

780 

Shoe al protu ol issoaaiod companies 

40 

M 

^4 


434 

■Wi 

8V< 

By area of operati ul 




l K Domestic {Uniting Operations 

200 

19T. 

41T 

C enrraj Retail Semres Dmwon 

35 

W 

73 

Merc annle Credit Group 
bin. law de Zoete Vticdd Group* 

39 


"*9 

20 

111 

:i 

FiiuiuijI Scrvica Division 

20 

X 

40 

Other L'K Compinies 

Interns nnrul Km Icing Operations 

16 

10 

21 

ml’K 

36 

*4 

109 

I'nned Sutes 

34 

*0 

34 

Resr nf (hr WimM 

41 

U 

W 


434 

40\ 

sw 


provisions m the 1st hall ot 1986 retlects the realKXaoon as spec he ol provasionsw 
<’139m in respect of certain cross-border risks previously arvoed within mentality of 
general pumnoos. 

(L Hie charge for taxation ts based an n estimated overall poup rate for the year and 
assumes an avenge UK corporation ox rare of 36 l23%( 1983 :■ * LZHb). Deferred oration 
ts provided at toe estimated future tax cares on all timing dif feren ce s between the 
accounting and taxation treatment of income and expenses, except where, in the 
opt moo of die Damon, no liability to taxation is expected to crystallise. 

7. Esrtmigs per flOidimry stock are based upon profit before extraonfinary items and 
after deducoqgtaxaooo. profit attributable to tmnonty interests and divideods on Stxff 
stock, and are related m me Ordinary stock in issue during ebr half-year 

8 . Summansed consolidated balince sheet of Barclays PLC (uncudud): 

Half-year ended Ybar ended 
16*36 30A» 51-1X83 

Anets: JCta JTm 

Cash and short-term fbnds 12^)18 9JM 11.198 

Investments 1JMM 1,394 1,701 

Advance and txfaer accounts Wjg 3UU8 30.680 

7U3U 6iJ26 «J79 

Associated companies and trade 

investments ... 344- 417, 570 

Property and aptupintent . UK 1,189 1JM4 


"1'W comparanve lieu res are tor the Barclays Merchant Bank Group (note 2) 
Interest expense includes interest on loan capital and undated Opal notes ot' 
4U>'ni (in hall Clirtm. Year M» 4'20'tn) 

The charge against profit tor bad and doubtful debt provisions composes 

Halt' year ended Year ended 


Charge tor specific provisions 
new pros mens 

mnsrcrrcd from general provisions 

Outgo (credit ) for general provisions 
new provisions 

tramrerred ns specific provisions 

Rcrovcrm of amounts previously 
written off 


Deposes and cheque accounts 
Other accounts 

Longterm borro w in g s of overseas 
subsidiaries 


Loan cam cal 
Undated capital notes 
Minority interests in snhwdiancn. 
Scockbuden* finds: 

Called up shire capital 
Rescues 


Penod end exchange rate: USSlf 
(Used for balance meet) 

& Movements in stockbofdera' funds. 


At begmmag of period 
Stock issued- 

Rights issue (net of ex p ens es) 
Under profit sharing and 
stock option xhemes 
Goodwill ansae on aco rns tions. 
Effea of non-amsoWanon of 
certua companies 
Translation difference moms on in 


58,718 5JJM 55,127 

7485 5 ,793 3,789 

*M« 39.957 3R9I6 

842 780 830 

67,223 39J37 59.766 j 


Um \Mi U59 

1471 463 836 

16* 23 24 

55| rsn eg? 

*j47l| |2.«8| 1 2^21 
3464 3.175 3408 

5.781 4.995 5,427 

7*454 64432 65,193 

L5t 1.30 1.44 


Half- year ended Year ended 
MAN 30445 3LI245 

i5n fm £m 

kin 2401 2401 


certain compames - (51) (31) 

Translation difference arising on movements 

m exchange rates (481 (43) (73) 

Other items (*) 

Profit ret ai ne d *M 133 322 

At end of period 8448 3.173 3J08 

18. The infonnaoon in dns atmo u mc m q i t does out ctunptac full mounts wnbm the 
meanmg of Secoou 254 of the Companies Aa 1983 Full accounts for the year ended 
4 1st December 1963 containing an unqualified audit report woe dd n r u t d to the 
Registrar of Com panes in aoamfancc with Seaton 241 of the Companies An 1983 
11. This announcement will be published in the Times, Financial Times. Daily Telegraph 
and the Guankan on 8th tagust 1986 


DIVIDENDS 

The Hoard has decided topiy, on Hch October 1‘Wfi. a first interim dmdend for the year ending 31st December 1986 of9.50p pear jfl Ordinary stock in respect of 
stuck roT-tntdin thctxmksnl thcsom|\inyjcdK!dojeof bust nelson 12th September iWfcThiMxequi valent to I j jmiigrtwsonrhar stock and representsa 1 3% increase 
mer fix- hr-t interim Uir J>W5 of H ■!» >p An interim dividend of 7 OOp perj; 1 on tbc Staff stock will be paid at die same ome to holders w gm ew d on 30th June I9H& 


COMMENTARY 


post -tax pmtu was ^ 283m. JPUiigJurthan thc{216m recorded in tin: fin t 
halt ul l , W5 Pre-ux proht increased by ffS from 4'H>3m in the faw half of IW3 
nl-LUm 

timinck per 4 1 Ordinary stock 1 nuttsed from 35 9p in die first half of IVH5 

to 4 1 op. a nsc ot I4X and ax have declared an interim dividend ol 9 5p per 4 1 
Onlin ja stink, an inc rease of l Vb on List year's first intenm tii vidcnU. 

ThereaasarwiiM.nonin the et'lectueraceoftasanon from ■lfri.mthefirsrh.tif 
of l'W5 p> Wi reflecting the fall in l ’K. corpora non tax rates and the cl fee r of the 
leiUixanoa as specific, of ft jym of our tool general provisions. 

Profit by nature of income/expenae. 

Net interest income grew bjr only -I'liut U9-m, tdlecnn^ a lo* 1 lew! of 
advances jtmwth jnd lower 1 merest pans in the UK, and alsoourcon onued policy 
ol serkint; to improve the quality ol" our lending 

Other opera ting and forcigti exchange trading income inoeased by KTc 
to^'Min Vi'tthtn din figure, commission income grew by U'u 10 ^469tn 

Operating expenses mse by nearly ‘Tn to ^U%m The increase in sail 
expenses ol O'hn retlects the saLuy nses awarded to our soft’ and also die 
recruitment ot additional staff in the L'K to -support our Customer Service 
Programme 

Tbc chaigc for bad and doubtful debt provisions reduced f tom { 2 1 ~m to 
i 196m with improvements achieved pnncpaHy in Rest of the %'orid opaanons. 
where spccilu provisions were reduced by ^19m Experience in the UK has, 
however continued to be cfawp pointing The charge for general provisions was 
^35m poor to the transfer of if iWm in speafit provisions in respect of cam n 
crovs-Sndcr nsks. 

Pro&t by area of operations. 

UK Domestic Banking Operations -pre-tax profit increased by f-lm to 
1 200 m This grow th was disappointing, reflecting j low kvd of commission 
ineomegiowdi. due to rbeetluct cil‘‘ free fenking" and increased competition, and 
3 fall m inreresc mirprts Irom 6 2*n in 1985 to 5 as the impact of lower interest 
rates was felt At the same nmc. our costs increased as we invested for the longer 
term in our Customer Service Pipgrimmc 


Central Retail Services Division - includes our credit card, Masteddan 
and travellers cheque operations. Pre-ox profit increased by 41m to 435m. 
Our credit cud operanotucontiniied to perform well, although there was* higher 
level of provisions. Underlying profit from travellers cheques unproved bur was 
reduced by theoostsofiatqgiaaiigdw business purchased from Chase Manhattan 
earlier this yean 

Barclays de Zoete Wedd - increased pre-fax profit to £20m^ This indudes 
47m of real ised 1 nvestmen cgai ns by Bandiys Development Capita] but represents 
principally tire profit of Barclays Merchant Bonk which experienced a very 
Mtuktctotyperfornrantx. 

United States -achieved a prc^ ■ tax profitof £34(11, an uicreaseoff4m on the 
equivalent penod in 1986, and 430m above die result achieved m tbc second half 
of 1983 Results from our United States operations have been affected by the 
cononued strengthen ngof stcrfing^nst the USckillar-fftheavet^eexdiaqge 
rare prevailingdunngthe first half of 1985 bad been tnaintamed,ptoftt would have 
been f8m more. 

Rest oftbeTSbrld- pre-tax profit maeased by 48m eo^lm.Oursharerf 
the profits of Barclays National Bank amounted to 410 m. Our operations m 
Fiance and Spam continued to make good progress. 

Balance Sheet. 

Tool assets increased by -T-ifon in die first sue months of 19S6. Within this 
figure, advances and other accounts mcretsed by 43.9ba in parr doe to the 
uxl iron of die sceuntres trading assets of deZotws and ’Medds totalling some 
415ba - 

Capua! resources were«ief®diened tfaroogb retained profit of 4214m and 
the raising of U$S75Qm in undated pnmaiy capital notes offset by goodwill of 
4!25m wntren offuiconnecnoii wtdi theset&pg up ot'Barctayscfe Zoete ''Kfedd. 
Since the end of thchalf-yeacopital resources harepqmfurt h ers tt eqgrhencdby 
die issue of^ \en 40bn of 6”# Guarsmteed Bonds 1996 

Future P rospe c ts. 

The outcome for die full year is mewed with caunoas optimum 


COMPANY NEWS 


Brunning 
makes 
£lm loss 

• The Brunning Group, lhe 
first advertising agency in 
Europe to receive a stock 
market quote, made a pretax 
loss in the year to Mardi 31 of 
£1.18 million, £180,000 higher 
-than the loss forecast at the 
time of the reconstruction last 
May. 

The loss was due mainly to 
a £983.000 pretax loss at 
B running’s promotional han- 
dling ana contract packaging 
business, which has now been 
discontinued.. Continuing 
activities lost £196,000, 
against an estimate of 
£200,000 in May. 

Since the year end addi- 
tional business has been won 
from MFI, R own tree Mack- 
intosh. Ever Ready and 
Dimptex. The business is now 
on a firm fooling, the com- 
pany said. 

In brief 

• GROSVENOR SQUARE 
PROPERTIES: Total dividend 
6p (5.5p) for lhe war to March 
31. Turnover £63 9 million 
(£9.43 million). Pretax loss 
£78,000 (£1.06 million profit). 
Loss per share 1.08p (earnings 
IS.lp). The company has a 
development . programme 
representing a value on comple- 
tion of £100 million, covering 
25 projects. 

• TR CITY OF LONDON 
TRUST: Year to June 30. Total 
dividend on deferred units 4. Ip 
(3.45p). Total income £7 XL 
million (£6L28 million). Earn- 
ings per deferred stock unit 
4_28p (3.570). 

• HICKSON INTERNAT- 
IONAL: Six months to June 30. 
Interim dividend 5Jp (5p). 
Turnover £77.19 million 
(£74.88 million). Pretax profit 
£6.99 million (£7.79 million). 
Earnings per share 21p (22pk 

• STANDARD BANK 
INVESTMENT CORPORA- 
TION: (38.98 percent owned by 
Standard Chartered): Six 
months to June 30. Pretax profit 
R99.4 million (£25.66 million), 
against R I OOL2 .million. Interim 
dividend 22 cents (20 cents). 

• BELL RESOURCES: Half- 
year to June 30. Interim divi- 
dend 13 cents (same). Net profit 
AusS98.08 million (£41.12 mil- 
lion), against AusS34.74 mil- 
lion. Turnover AusS643.18 
million (Aus$I2l.07 million). 

• PROPERTY SECURITY 
INVESTMENT TRUST: Year 
to March 31. Total dividend 
2Jp (2.08p, adjusted). Pretax 
profit £5.4 million (£4.72 mil- 
lion}. Earnings per share before 
extraordinary items 6.92p 


TEMPUS 


BOC’s early warning 
system rescues price 


• SECURICOR GROUP: 
Half-year to March 31. Interim 


million) and overseas ’ £19.91 
million (£18181 million); Pretax 
profit £7:3 T million (£6.51 mil- 
lion). Earnings per -share 3p 
(2.6p, adjusted). 

I •SECURITY SERVICES: 
(controlled by Securicor 

' Group): Half-year to March 31. 
Interim dividend 0.69p (0.62a 
adjusted), payable on Sept. 30. 
Turnover UK £128.98 million 
(£113.04 million) and overseas 
£19.91 million (£18.81 minion). 
Pret a x profit £5.83 million 
(£5.16 million). Earnings per 
share 3.3p (2.8p. adjusted). 

• AKZO NV: Net profit for the 
first half of 1986, 436.7 million 
fi (£126 million), against 4593 
million fi. Turnover 8.09 billion 

II (9.16 billion fl). 

• CRAY ELECTRONICS 
HOLDINGS: The deferred 
consideration for the ac- 
quisition of Stead Publications 
— £136375 — is now payable 
and will be satisfied by 43,406 
ordinary shares. 

• RELYON GROUP: Interim 
dividend 1.8p (1.65p), payable 


on Oct. 6. Half-year to June 30. 
Turnover £12.49 million 
(£10.73 million). Pretax profit 
£13 million (£805,000). Earo- 
ings per share 636p (3.99p). 

• ROTORK: Six months to' 
June 30. Interim dividend 2.7p 
(2.4p), payable on Oct. 24. 
Turnover £15.84 million 
(£13.83 million), pretax profit 
£235 million. (£2.1 - million). 
Earnings per share 5.7p,(6.1p). 

• STORMGARD: The board 
expects profits to improve in 
1986/87. 

• CHARLIE BROWNS CAR 
PART CENTRES: The com- 
pany has opened two new large 
branches in Newcastle and 
Gateshead and these will be 
followed before the end of 
August by a branch at HulL Hull 
will bring the number of 
branches to 42 — having grown 
from 33 in May, 1 985, when the 
company joined the USM. 

• SYDNEY C BANKS: Year to 
Ami! 30. Total dividend 113p 
( I C'p). Turnover £ 1 0836 million 
(£1233 million). Pretax profit 
£2.4 million (£1.94 million). 
Earnings per share ‘443p 
(33.8p). 

• AMERSHAM INTER- 
NATIONAL: The company is 
to buy the diagnostics business 
of the Upjohn Company of 
Kalamazoo. Michigan. This 
purchase is due to be completed 
by the end of August- Its value is 
not material in relation to the 
assets of Amersham. 


The BOC Group succeeded 
in defying gravity yesteiday 
by pushing up its share price, 
by 4p, to 31 lp in. a weak 
market 

That it was aide to with- 
stand the forces which took 
down the rest of the market is 
a credit to its early warning 
system rather than the results 
themselves. The company 
had to prepare investors for 
bad news! 

For most of this year it has 
been dear that the book value 
of the carbon business was 
unrealistic. 

Yesterday, BOC confirmed 
that after unsuccessful at- 
tempts, so fen, to sell the 
business, it. has decided to 
write down its value by £128 
million to £f25 million. 

The writedown will be 
charged in the full-year ac- 
counts, possibly against pre- 
tax profits. 

Next year, however, there 
will be a £1 1 million boost to' 
profits from lower 
depreciation. 

While It is tempting to 
regard the whole saga of the 
carbon business, which BOC 
doubled in size just as 
profitability was about to 
collapse, as an exceptional 
item, shareholders should not 
be lulled into- believing that 
the rest of the group is 
without problems. 

Reported pretax profits in- 
creased from £124.1 million 
to £135.2 million in the nine 
months to June 30. 

The company has restated 
the previous period's results 
to allow for currency effects, 
suggesting an undenying in- 
crease from £1 18.1 nulUon to 
£135.2 million. 

The increase does not how- 
ever reflect trading improve- 
ments but a peculiar quirk of 
BOCs accounting. . . 

The company chooses to 
charge additional depred- 
ation against historic cost 
profits, and . because the 
replacement cost of its fixed 
assets is lending to rise more 
slowly as inflation fells, the 
charge it makes for additional 
depreciation has reduced 
sharply. 

In the nine months to June 
30 it fell by £13.2 million to 
£16.3 million. 

If BOC had not adopted 
this accounting principle it 
would have reported a £2 
million fell in pretax profits. 

For the, year as a whole 
Writings per share are likely 
to be. little changed, after 
adding back . additional 
depreciation^ at BOjp." ; 

■ That leaves the sharra at 


308p trading on 10 times 
earnings, hardly a rating to be 
proud of in centenary year. 

Until the early warning 
system promises better to 
come there is no reason to 
buy the shares. 

Barclays 

Barclays' chairman Sir 
Timothy Bevan believes that 
the bank's results were 
healthy, but stock market 
investors think otherwise. Its 
surprisingly weak perfor- 
mance looked lhe more dis- 
appointing after the 
impressive results of its main - 
rivals. Barclays has also at 
this stage conceded to Na- 
tional Westminster the po- 
sition of most profitable 
bank. 

Officially at least, it regards 
this as a virtue. The chief 
reason advanced by Barclays 
for its meagre 8 per cent 
pretax profits rise was its 
conservatism in new lending 
which kept assets virtually 
unchanged over the six 1 
months. 

It has been putting quality 
above market share and any 
immediate boost in profits. 

- Yet it is hard to avoid the 
impression that the limp 
result owed as much to lack 
of competitiveness in domes- 
tic markets. The other 
clearers showed no spectacu- 
lar increase in assets yet their 
United Kingdom profits 
powered ahead Barclays' did 
not — domestic banking prof- 
its advanced by only £4 
million to £200 million. 

Without a large fixed in- 
terest loan book, interest 
earnings suffered as general 
interest rate levels fell. While 
Barclays' interest margins re- 
mained unchanged on other 
business, they fell in the 
United Kingdom from 6.2 
per cent to 5.7 percent. . 

The bank was hard hit by a 
substantial loss of commis- 
sion after the introduction of 
free- if- in-credit banking and 
there was increasing concern 
over bad debts experience in 
the personal banking sector. 

Barclays has copied Nat- 
West in switching a chunk of 
existing general reserves to 
specific — £139 million, in 
this case— and taking the tax 
benefit This helped it to 
show a healthier rise in 
earnings per share, up from 
35.9p to 41p, than the profits 
alone seem to warrant • : -- 

On the plus side, at 7. 1 per 
cent .the free -assets ratio' is . 
one of the highest in the :: 
world. There was a relatively 


modesi 9 per cent rise in 
operating costs and a reduc- 
tion in bad debt provisions. 

But with little promise of 
anything better from Barclays 
in the second half of the year 
investors gave vent to their 
disappointment The. bank's 
shares dropped by more than 
20p and pulled the rest of the 
sector down with it 

Unless Barclays can dem- 
onstrate a sharp improve- 
ment in its domestic 
operations the ‘ prospective 
p/e of between five and six is 
unlikely to show much 
chan ge. 

n Group 

Tl Group was caught by. the 
fell force of the tidal wave 
that hit the engineering sector 
yesterday, after GKN^s warn- 
ing of unchanged profits on 
Wednesday. Even though it 
promised higher profits, TTs 
shares fell 32p to 463p. 

The reaction reflects the 
market's general nervous- 
ness, which' was reinforced 
yesterday by TTs statement 
that it bad yet to fed the 
economic benefits of lower 
prices. 

Reported interim profits 
were up from £12.6 million to. 
£18.1 million but little if any' 
of that increase was from 
trading. Lower interest 
charges accounted for £3.1 
million, a pension holiday for 
£2.6 million and lower redun- 
dancy charges for £^00,000. 

Below the line there was an 
extraordinary charge of £163 
million, reflecting closure 
and redundancy costs net of a 
£4.7 million property profit 
This absorbed all the after-tax 
profits and more, leaving the 
increased dividend to be paid 
out of reserves. 

The company denies feel- 
ing vulnerable to a bid , but it 
is difficult to see why it- 
increased its dividend in 
these circumstances unless if 
was anxious to hold up the 
share price. 

To be fair the company 
says the second half will see 
an increase in trading profits, 
over and above the benefit of 
tbe pension fund holiday. 
This reflects growth in the 
specialized engineering busi- 
ness. loss elimination at Ra- 
leigh cycles and at the 
American gas cylinders busi- 
ness. In 1987 there should be 
benefits of new automotive 
contracts with General Mo- 
tors, and Ford. 

While bid speculation is 
likely to support the shares, 
trading is not strong enough 
to push them back over 500p. 


WALL STREET 



r 


LENDING 

RATES 

ABN 10.00* 

Man & Company 1000% 

wa more 

Cffitank Savings* 10.75% 

ConsaWatad Cnis 1000% 

Continental Trust ,10.00% 

Co-operative Bank 1000% 

C- Hoate & Co 10.00% 

Hong Kong fr Shan^m 10 jQG% 

tafc Bank- 1000% 

m Westminster 10.00% 

Bowl Bank of Scotland __l0i)0% 

TS8— — 10.00% 

Citibank NA ; iooo% 

Roe Rate. 


APPOINTMENTS 



54 Lombard Street London EC3P 3AH. 


Leslie & Godwin: Sir Fran- 
cis Kennedy becomes a non- 
executive director, Mr Niee3 
Christian, Mr Duncan Mekie, 
Mr Jim Monk,. Mr Chris- 
topher Robinson and Mr Peter 
Ronndell directors. Mr Chris- 
topher Ottfras been made a 
director and Miss'. Laura 
Cballtley, Mr Howard 
Cheetham and Mr Melvin 
Co Hard divisional directors of 
Leslie & . Godwin 
Reinsurance. 

National Association of 
Health Authorities: Mass 
Yvonne Monncer has been 
made deputy director. 

Marathon Oil (UK): . Mr 
WF Madison has been made 
president 

Alexanders Laing & 
Cruicfcshank Holdings Mr 
Bernard Lardner, Mr Robot 


Dowdall and Mr Nigel 
Webber join the board. 

Spafex: Mr Cofin Binder 
becomes- managing director. 

Cater Allen Bank (Jersey) 
and Cater Allen Investment 
Management: Mr John 
Edrich joins the board. 

Phoenician Holdings: Mr 
TR Usher becomes a director. 
- ED. & F Man. (Sugar): Mr 
John Aarvoldfras been made a 
director: Mr Rafael Muguiro, 
Mr Darid Rosenzweig and Mr 
Nfels Vesterdal. associate 
directors. 

Alexander Stenhouse (UK): 
Mr Eddie Hazel has been 
made director. 

Tarmac: Mr Don Carr be- 
comes a group managing 
director and Mr Terry Mason 
group finance director from 
October 1. 


Ms are pleased to announce that ■ 
with effea from 11th August 1986 
our new address is 15 AthoU Crescent, 
Edinburgh EH38HA, 


LO DIES 

SOLICITORS 


15 ATHOLL CRESCENT, 
EH38HA 
TELEPHONE 031-228 3777 
ANSWERING SERVICE 031-228 2406 
TELEX 727129 
FAX 031-228 3878 


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THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 1 9 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Slide continues after further 




is 


By Michael Clark 


Share prices were again on 
the run yesterday, extending 
Wednesday's record-breaking 
fall after another spate of 
gloomy corporate news. 

The FT 30 Share index 
dosed above its worst levels of 
the day. but was stiQ showing a 
deficit of 122 points, at 
1,221.5,-by the end of the 
session as a farther £2,372 
million was wiped from the 
value of quoted shares. The 
index has now fallen by 51.9 
points so far this week and 
DataSiream calculates -that a 
massive £6,493 million has 
been wiped off the stock 
market The broader-based 
FT-SE 100, which had been 


• Reports of short selling 
of Boots' s bares by Pember & 
Boyle, now part of Morgan 
Grenfell Securities, have been 
denied by MG Securities. 

Any seffing which took place 
ahead of .Wednesday's ven- 
dor-placing was done for cli- 
ents, following press 
reports of the it ; endmg deaL 
The fact that MG cor- 
porate finance was acting for 
Boots and that MG Asset 
Management helped to under- 
write the issue just goes to - 
show that Chinese walls work. 


20.1 points down earner in the 
(fey, eventually finished 10.5 
points down at 1,529.9. 

The slide started with in- 
terim figures from Barclays, 
showing pretax profits a mere 
8 per cent higher at. £434 
million. This was at the 
bottom end of expectations 
and the market snowed its 
displeasure by lopping 17p off 
the share price to 457p. 

The other cleaners were also 
marked lower, with Midland 
Bank down 5p at 544p, Na- 
tional Westminster down 1(h) 
at 492p. while Lloyds rallied, 
to close unchanged at 387p. . 


71 Group then added to- the 
market's misery by confirm- 
ing analysts' fears that lower 
oil prices were not filtering 
through to profits. Interim 
figures showed pretax profits 
up from £12.6 minion to £18.1 
million, but it looks as though 
full-year forecasts of £44 mS- 
lion may have to be revised. 

The shares tumbled 32p to 
463p. 

GKN, which was mainly 
responsible for Wednesday's 
shakeout following a warning 
about prospects, continued to 
lose ground. The shares fell by 
another lOp to 278p — making 
a two-day loss of 66p. As a 
result engineering stocks were 
again bit Hawker Siddefey 
fell lOp to 481p and Vickers 
1 Ip to 390p. 

Nine-month figures from 
BOC Group proved .dis- 
appointing, but surprisingly 
the share price ended 3p 
dearer at 3 1 5p as jobbers tried 
to squeeze out the bears. 

. News of lower profits from 
Shell finally capped another 
dismal day for the equity 
market and renewed fears that 
the oil . mice may soon come 
under pressure a gain. 

Another nervous perfor- 
mance by the pound on the 
foreign exchange market left 
gUs with losses ranging up to 

International Leisure, the 



Intasun package tour op- 
erator, held steady at 118p 
despite a large placing of 
shares by several directors late 
on Wednesday night. 
Sciimgeour Vickers, the bro- 
ker, placed a total of 3.87 
million shares at ll2p, cum- 
dividend. after attempts last 
week to place the shares ended 
in failure. 

The bulk of the shares 
belonged to Mr Harry Good- 
man, the chairman, who sold 
3.75 millipn, reducing his total 
holding in the company from 
22.8 per cent of the equity to 
15.5 percent. The rest of them 
were split between four other 
directors. 

The. company emphasizes 
that these are the first sales by 
directors for at least a year. Mr 


Goodman says the sale' was 
necessary to meet “pre-exist* 
ingpersonaJ commitments." 

Good Relations, the public 
relations and advertising 
agency, ran into more nervous 
selling as the price dipped 8p 
to a new low of 90p. Dealers 
claim the shares are still 
overshadowed by last year’s 
sale by former director Ms 
Maureen Smith of her entire 
stake in the company to Mr 
Christopher Moran, the 
con&oversial insurance bro- 
ker, at a substantial discount 
to the market price. The sale 
led to her resignation and an 
eventual dressing down by the 
Stock Exchange. 

The shares have since been 
the target of takeover talk and 
at these levels must appear 


RECENT ISSUES 



Coline mop) 
Hatlsliaw 


Bans 
Fletcher Dennys 
GT 

Guthrie 
Harrison 
Htfle Ergonocn 



Hughes Food (20p) 

Lon .Utd tnv (330p) 

MB Cash & C (1 
Marina Dev (11 
Morgan Grenlefl |500p) 
Omnttech (3$)) 

Shield (72p) 

SmaUbona (I65p) 
Soundtracks ( 

Stanley Leisure 
TV-AM (130p). 

Tenby Inds (1) 


Thames TV (19C 
& Britten 


TTbbst 
Trms 201 



Untacfc (63p) 
Wlndsrnoor (It 
Yeiverton (3Bp) 

RIGHTS ISSUES 


68 

99-6 


Barker & Dobson N/P 
CotoroS F/P . 
Patasarv F/P 
Erskine Hse F/P 
£xpamet-F/P 


Leigh interests F/P 
Television Sth N/P 


Top VUoe F/P 
Wight CdHps F/P 
(Issue price in brackets). 


'4-U 

194-1 

160 

141 

162-6 

96 

21 -1 


438-2 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


: 

Thra* Mottfli Staffing 

. sss 


LAW 

90.15 

cm— 

90.17 

Eat Vot 
1560 

• 1 •>- '•*; 


9048 

9050 

9042 

9044 

870 




9048 

9042 

9042 ‘ 

149 




90X8 

«V?a 

9022 

38 

• u .. 

Sup B7 

9025 

9028 

9021 

9020 

19 

- ; , ■ • ■ 


90.13 

90.18 

90.11 

anno 

12 

v.-* 

Previous day s total open 
Three MontO Eurodonr 
Sep 86 

Merest 14256 

9351 ‘ 
9348 ‘ 

Previous day's total 
9353 9349 

9350 9346 ' 

open Merest 19687 
9353 1285 

9349 2368 

’ .. 


9337 

9340 

93X5 

93X8 

■saa 

- 



9320 

93.16 

9318 

'82 

• . u. 

US Treasury Bond 


Previous day's total open Merest 7968 
95-31 ■ 95-13 . 9560 . 8379' 



9560 

9563 

9460 

8567 - 

9. 


Mar 87 

i NTT 





, :■■■ i^r?! aap?»r vS?y 


10061.. O' 
; ^ 10061 0 



TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


FksrOaafeigs 

Aug 4 
Aug 18 
Sap 8 


IMOhRmi 

Aug 16 
Sop 5 
Sap 19 


Nov 6 
Nov 20 
Dec4 


For 
Nov-17 
Decl 
Dec IS 


m takan out ora 7/8/86 Raine. Hyman Kwfic ffl, Brttoi, Barclays, PoBy 

. - - " ■ ' “ ‘ • Bract BT. STc, 


Feck. Neepsand, Partajate, Tranwood. Metal EkdL. Thurgar Bdx, Amstrad. 
Parkdale. nxfcware. Bnraw Hepburn, BOMS.- 
Put ParkfieW. Smith Newcourt. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


Market rates 
day’s rang* 
AiaaM7 

NYaifc 1-4725-1.4780 
Montreal 20353^2' 161 
Amsdam3. 4325-3.4504 
Brussels B3J07-83J8 ' ' 
Cphgen 114034-114736 
DuWFn 1JB47-1.1068 
Frahkfurt3u0457-3n62S 
Lisbon 21439-216.79 
Madrid 19648-19944 
MBm 2097.08-21 09J1 
OMo--'- 102523=109024- 
Parw 98929*9412:-- 
SANm 102172-102759 
Tokyo 22658-227^2 - 
Vkonns 214121.60 
Zurich . 2465024897 


■tetfcraratea 


August 7 

147661, 


-14770 


114 

63206329 

114376-114800 

1X977-12987 

3-0502-3.0544 

21 4.76-21 S38 

19677-199X6 

2098.13-210251 

: 10X840-10.0988 
: 9X0696X240 .. 
■102370-102513 
228X822724 


046XL43pram 
030021 pram 
IVlKpram 
17-12prera 
IK-Kprere 


par-5pram 

"&-1*pnMi» 


3 months 
129-124pr«m 
O70O55pram 
3K-3Kprem 
46-37prero 
3J4-2Xprem 


1^-H . . 
66-1 racks 
56-T06CSB 


pari3db 


UMMdto- - ■■ 
2K-2Upmm ~ 


’ ' SHOKprsnr : 


4*-3%prom 
18l-454cfls 
152-21 3dM 
JSrBtBa - - 

-12%-13X(8»' 

•Kprsm^par — 

:i£&r ‘ 

'XKrOKprMT : 


OTHER STERUNG RATES 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 


lAsgsminawsmr 


Qrszl cruzado 
I Cyprus pound .■ 

FMandmarkaJ 


. 12740-1X765 
,'2^41 8024200 
-0XS5tWJ559O 
*403420471 


Greece dra ch m a . 


HongKongdodar . 

Jodi* rupee 

Iraq (knar , 


0725067350 
7X150-7X550 I 
197.05-198X5 


& 
I— BjOW* * -! 

Aashsh u 
Canada | 


; 1X410-13450 


1X2000X22001 
i 3X700-3X900 


.U8112XL6119 


Sweden . 


1 1X805-1X810 
6X475-6.9525 


. 11X080-11X190 
1840-18X0 


Kuwait dinar KD 0427064^0 

Malaysia doBar 3X700X8900 


Mexico peso. 


93000980X0 

New Zealand dolor 2X4002X600 

Saudi Arabia riyal 552206X620 

Singapore dolar 32000-32200 

South Africa rand 3X500-3X900 

UAEdktnm 5406064480 

"Lloyds Bank 



Austria 


brBwclaysBankHOFEX ondErdM. 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


MONEY 





Ml 



nra 




1 

tele 



Puts 



Satin 

Oct 

Jn 

Apr 

Oct 

Jan 

Apr 


Series 

m 

Dee_ 

Mer 

Sap 

Dec 

Mir 

ANed Lyons 
f*313) 

300 

330 

25 

11 

35 

IB 

45 

28 

8 

25 

10 

30 

13 

33 

Jwor 

r&teT 

500 

550 

77 

12 

48 

22 

58 

37 

17 

52 

28 

53 

33 

58 

380 

4 

10 

15 

48 

50 

55 

600 

2K 

12 

22 

100 

105 

107 

BP 

500 

93 

105 


1 

5 



Thom EMI 

420 

60 

75 

82 

3 

13 

17 

(*586) 

550 

47 

60 

77 

9 

20 

28 

C4S7) 

460 

27 

42 

54 

20 

25 

27 

600 

17 

35 

50 

40 

45 

52 

500 

/ 

20 

37 

37 

40 

47 


420 

30 

37 

50 

25 

40 

43 









(*422) 

460 

10 

20 

32 

6/ 

«/ 

74 

Tosco 

300 

/6 

— 

— 

2 



500 

4 

13 


92 

97 


C386) 

330 

45 

53 


3 

6 

— 

Co^irfayltig 

260 

15 

2b 

29 

12 

14 

an 

360 

390 

20 

s 

30 

14 

45 

25 

10 

27 

15 

30 

20 

35 

(*255) 

280 

8 

13 

20 

28 

30 

32 




300 

4 

9 

— 

46 

46 

— 










330 

2 

6 

— 

n 

76 

— 


Series 

_*!5L 

Nov 

Feb 

Aiq 

Nov 

FWt 

Com Union 

300 

9 

18 

28 

18 

20 

26 

Brit AMO 

460 

40 

57 

73 

13 

15 

22 

(*282) 

330 

3 

10 

16 

43 

44 

■ 45 

(*488) 

300 

12 

33 

60 

22 

33 

36 

360 

1 

4 

— 

73 

73 

— 

550 

2 

12 

27 

65 

67 

73 

Cable & Wire 

600 

80 

95 

115 

6 

20 

30 

BAT IndS 

360 

27 

42 

55 

3 

6 

9 

r«») 

660 

40 

55 

80 

38 

40 

45. 

vm 

390 

8 

23 

35 

12 

22 

2b 

700 

-16 

33 

46 

m 

6b 

75 

420 

1 

11 

17 

40 

43 

46 


• 750 

5 

1b 

— 

100 

100 

— 


460 

- 14 

3 

- 

80 

82 

— 

Dotfltofs 

600 


105 

__ 



4 

— 


460 

12 

37 

52 

18 

30 

31 

(*675) 

650 

— 

8b 

— 

— 

15 

— 

(*457) 

500 

2 

18 

30 

SO 

to 

66 

700 

— 

27 

— 

— 

36 

• — 

550 

2 

6 

13 

100 

10S 

107 

GEC 

. 180 

16 

24 

30 

B 

9 

11 

Bril Telecom 

180 

12 

20 

25* 

3 

8 

.11 

("186) 

200 

l 

13 

18 

18 

20 

24 

rise) 

200 

3 

11 

1/ 

17 

19 

22 

220 

3 

7 

— 

36 

36 

— 

220 

1 

4 

8 

37 

38 

3/ 

Grand Mat 

327 

57 

— 

— 

2 

— 

— ‘ 

Cadbury Sdiwpos 1B0 

7 

15 

21 

4 

9 

14 

(*375) 

355 

32 

— 

— 

. 8 

— 

— 

(-181) 

180 

2 

7 

12 

20 

21 

24 

360 

— 

42 

52 

— 

12 

18 

200 

1 

3 

6 

40 

41 

41 

IO 

382 

900 

22 

87 

120 


20 

10 

20 


Imperial Or 
(*353) 

300 

330 

55 

25 

63 
• 35 

- 

1 

2 

2 

7 

- 

(*960) 

950 

64 

8/ 

100 

30 

40 

45 


360 

8 

17 

— 

20 

27 

— - 

1000 

1050 

30 

13 

6/ 

37 

6/ 

47 

54 

90 

60 

90 

. 77 

too 

Ladbrofce 

(*337) 

300 

330 

40 

14 

45 

98 

54 

35 

1 

6 

4 

11 

6 

13 

Land Sec 

300 

2/ 

3b 

46 

6 

9 

10 

360 

4 

1? 

16 

26 

29 

30 

.(■316) 

330 

380 

9 

2 

1/ 

8 

28 

18 

18 

45 

21 

45 

23 

45 

LASMO 

(106) 

90 

100 

22 

15 

30 

23 

35 

30 

2 

4 

6 

10 

7 

12 

Marks A 5pen 

180 

18 

24 

32 

3 

5 

7 

110 

9 

17 

23 

9 

16 

20 

1*191) 

200 

220 

. fi 
• 2 

13 

6 

18 

12 

12 

30 

14 

32 

17 

33 

- Midland Bank . 
("544) 1 

500 

550 

45 

13 

60 

27 

77 

42 

2 

25 

10 

32 

15 

37 


700 

138 

162 

— 

2 

b 

— 

600 

2 

B 

22 

65 

Of 

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(*830) 

750 

800 

87 

43 

10/ 

60 

120 

85 

.4 

17 

15 

30 

25 

40 

PSO 

(*466> 

480 

500 

32 

7 

42 

23 

63 

40 

5 

25. 

. 15 
37 

20 

42 

Trafalgar House 

240 

32 

38 

48 

- 4 

8 

10 

559 

2 

. 9 

10 

67 

70 

73 

(-265) 

260 

15 

23 

33 

10 

15 

18 


600 

1 

3 

— 

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— 

280 

I 

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23 

24 

26 

29 . 

Baca! 

160 

24 

34 

40 

2 

5 

8 









(182) - - 

180 

10 

18 

26 

8 

12 

14 


Satie* 

Sep 

on 

Mar 

Sep 

Dae 

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200 

■3 

12 

18 

20 

22 

24 


360 

35 

45 

57 

5 

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18 

FftZ 

550 

10 

34 

50 

15 

27 

33 

(•381) 

390 

17 

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36 

20 

25 

32 

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600 

■ 3 

18 

30 

62 

to 

6/ 

. 420 

8 

16 

25 

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47 

48 

650 

tV4 

8 

14 

10/ 

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114 


460 

2 

6 

14 

62 

82 

82 


700 

IK 

3 

/ 

16/ 

180 

1U3 

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240 

4 

S 

18 

31 

31 

33 

vaal Reels 

'45 

7K 

11 

12 

1 

3 

4K 

(*211) 

260 

2 

4 

9 

51 

51 

53 

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8K 

4 

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7 

280 

1 

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— 

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60 

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121 

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260 

16 

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(■283) 

307 

5 

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— 

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32 

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333 

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5 

— 

63 

63 

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Nov 

Mar 


Nov 

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750 

15 

35 

55 

30 

45 

50 


218 


11 

— 


20 

— 

f732) 

800 

6 

17 

30 

80 

80 

80 

raoi) 

220 

— * 

- — 

15 


*— 

31 

850 

. 3 

8 

20 

130 

130 

130 

238 

1 

6 


43. 

44 

48 

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rsso) 

550 

600 

650 

20 

6 

2 

40 

20 

9 

S3 

40 

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14 

52 

102 

25 

55 

102 

32 

82 

102 


. 240 

ass 

~1 

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62 

62 


600 

37 

65 

80 

35 

60 

75 


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Nov 

Feb 

*SL 

NOV 

Feb 

(■590) 

650 

P0 

38 

55 

70 

85 

100 

Tr 11*% 1991 

106 

2 

m 

— 

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* 

— 

700 

9 

22 

— 

120 

126 

— 

(*£106) 

108 

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4 

11 

— - - 

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1/6 

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40 

50 

3 

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330 

10 

20 

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14 

18 

22 

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116 

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360" 

4 

9 

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38 

40 

42 

118 

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300 

330 

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35 

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122 

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Aug Sept 

Oct 

Nov 

AUf 

Sepi 

Oct 

Nov 

(*S45) 

950 

so 

80 

110 

45 

W 

70- 

FT-SE 1550 

20 42 

58 

Hi 

28 

35 

43 

80 

1000 

30 

55 

85 

75 

■86 

95 


13 32 

47 

6/ 

40 

62 

60 

70 


1050 

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110 

120 

125 

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75 

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100 

125 

100 

125 

100 

177 


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15 

79 

4 

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13 

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150 

153 

- 


180 

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9 

12 

17 

20 

22 










200 


4 

7 

37 

37 

37 






' 

' 



Anvat7, 1986. Total contracts JW548. CNM10974.- Puts «BM. ■UadstlyinB ssoatty pritw. 


Once again a heavy short- 
dominated the markets, 
helped to concentrate 
attention on overnight funding 
and the short dates, to the 
detriment of the periods. Rates 
generally drifted back to 10 
per cent The authorities left 
the shortage well under re- 
lieved and local authorities 
still showed no real borrowing 
interest. 


B«m Rates % 

Ctearing Banks 10 
FmancsHousa 10 
Ukonmi Markst Loans * 
Ovenkght Hmh: 9* Low 9* 
WBl*TStt*T*-W 

Treasury BMs (Discount*) 

2mnS m 

3mnth 9**s 


2mmfi S*it 
3mnth 


Primal 
1 mreh 9 ™vs6»b 
3mndr y'aj-BS 


2mrth _ 

6 moth 9 7 ib-8°sj 


- Trade BUs (Discount V ) " 

1 mrnh 10' w 2mrth I0"w 

Smith 10®n Bimth 10’n 


PD 


Overnight open 10 ctosa 20 

1 week 10'i»-9»m> 6 ninth 10-954 
1 mnth 10‘ia-IO Smnth ID-9% 
3mnmi0'^-9»n IZirth 10-W1 


Local AuftniltyDfposmptt 

2 days 9H 7 days 

1 mnth 9K 3 mrver. 3% 

6romh 9% 12irth 9S 


Local Authority Bonds (%) 

1 mnth 10'4 -ip 2 mnth 10X-10 


6 mnth 105W54 
12mth 9Kr« 



vulnerable. Bui now that the 
spate of "mega-bids" has 
dried up, the maricet feels it 
has seen the best for the time 
being, from the advertising 
and PR sector. 

Oil shares made a cautions 
start with analysts still un- 
certain about this week's 
agreement by the Opec oil 
ministers to reduce oil 
production to 16 million bar- 
rels a day during^ September 
and October. Prices opened 
lower in nervous trading, but 
managed to close above their 
worst levels.of the day. 

Interim figures from -Shell 
produced further evidence of 
the impact on companies of 
lower oil prices. Net income 
during the first six months fell 
from £1,730 million to £1,264 


• Evidence that the mar- 
ket may mm be oversold was 
offered by the futures mar- 
ket yesterday. Dealers have 
noted that the FT-SE 100 
August 1S25 series is 
commanding a 30-point 
premium over last night's 
closing level of 1529.97 
This, they claim, suggests 
that a technical bounce is 
on the way. 


million. The shares responded 
with a fall of 6p to 830p- But 
brokers such as Wood 
Mackenzie were pleased with 


Shell's performance; Wood 
Mac is force 


forecasting a 12 per 
cent increase in the interim 
dividend when it is an- 
nounced next month. Wood 
Mac is also continuing to 
recommend the shares as a 
“buy.” 

Brito 0, which shocked the 
maricet last month with profits 
more than halved and a 
dividend cut, , slipped, another 
2p to Il6p. Other - losers 
■included BP, 7pIowerat 58 6p, 
following a a large placing of 
shares on Wednesday, 
Bnrinah 5p to 372p,~ Enter- 
prise 03 3p to 1-ISp, after 
113p, London & Scottish Ma- 
rine 03 3p to I08p. Premier 
Consolidated Oilfields 2p to 
25.5p, Tricentrol 2p to 58p 
and Ultramar Ip to 15Sp. 


The insurance composites 
recovered from another ner- 
vous start and managed to 
recoup most of their earlier 
losses. JThere are growing 
hopes ihatthe heavy flooding 
in Australia will not lead to 
the clajjns that^had been 
fqr«inal|jrfrared-^r- 7 r 
— eommarial Utnorr finished 
lp lighter at 294p, after 291p, 
General Accident was un- 
ebanged af794p, after 789p, as 
was Son Affiance on 664p, 
after 654p, while Royal Insur- 
ance finished fighter at 
802 p, after 794p. Only Guard- 
ian Royal Exchange made any 
headway, advancing by 7p to 
8l9p. after 807p. - 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


Puss-in-Boots in 
the City of gold 


A riddle: when is a vendor placing a 
rights issue? Answer when there is 
100 per cent clawback of the shares 
and institutions underwriting the 
placing are paid commission on the 
deal. 

Wrong. It is nothing like a rights 
issue because the shareholders have 
no automatic rights to shares at a 


discount, rights they can sell in nil- 
iflhe 


they do not wish to take 


paid form 
them up. 

There are three classes of partici- 
pant who stand to gain or lose from 
the type cif deal by which Boots is 
raising £377 million to pay for the 
acquisition of Flint, an American 
manufacturer and distributor of 
prescription pharmaceutical products. 

First, there are institutions who are 
also shareholders who should do very 
well almost regardless of the outcome. 

To begin with most, if not all, will 
be offered pan of the sub-underwrit- 
ing for which they will be paid a 
commitment fee of ‘A per cent, 
followed by another -Vi per cent if the 
Flint acquisition goes through. 

As shareholders, they can apply for 
as much of the issue as they want. If 
the market price remains above the 
issue price of 205p, they will want all 
1 they can get. If the market price falls 
below the issue price, they will apply 
for none, and take up only what they 
have underwritten. That is the normal 
underwriting risk for which they are 
being paid commission. 

The second group, underwriting 
institutions who are not also 
shareholders, will do less well They 
will be paid an underwriting commis- 
sion, but will be allotted shares only to 
the extent that they are not taken up 
by shareholders. 


If the market price falls beiow the is- 
sue price, shareholders will apply for 
fewer shares. leaving more with the 
underwriters than they perhaps want. 
But that is what they are being paid 
the underwriting commission for. 

it is the the third class, the private 
shareholders, who stand to do least 
well. Indeed, they can lose out 
substantially. 

Many of them will be unable to 
afford to apply for shares. In a 
conventional rights issue, if they do 
not want to take up their rights, they 
can sell them in the market, thereby 
realizing a share of the discount at 
which the issue has been priced. 

Many others, the so-called ”lazy 
shareholders”, do not understand 
what to do. do not realize they need to 
take action, or arc on holiday. In a 
rights issue, rights not taken up are 
sold on their behalf and for their 
benefit. 

In a vendor placing with clawback, 
shareholders must put up the money 
and apply for any shares they want. 
Otherwise they gel nothing. That is 
why this deal differs fundamentally 
from a rights issue. Shareholders have 
been deprived of their basic right to 
sell nil-paid rights if they cannot or 
will not put up the money. 

The City’s understanding of what 
vendor placings actually mean for 
different groups of shareholders is less 
deep than it ought to be. In some 
instances it goes only as far as “how 
much is in it for me?” If greed is para- 
mount then investing institutions will 
undoubtedly prefer them either to 
bought deals or vendor rights issues. 
Is this self-regulation or just another 
example of City self-interest? 


Opec needs larger market 


There is no shortage of oil m the 
world, there is a glut. The Organiza- 
tion of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries’ pledge to cut production 
next month can only make the glut 
worse in the short term. 

It will cause the industry to stock up 
in the intervening weeks, increasing 
the amount of oil slopping around in 
the system, making it harder than ever 
for production controls to bite. 

To raise the price meaningfully, and 
keep it up, Opec needs to create either 
a genuine shortage, or better, a crisis. 
Then having got the price to where it 
wa^ts. it,, defend.it by means offing, 
tuning production." Assuming : Opec 
does nof want to recreate a crisis, what 
it needs to do.is to increase fhesize of 
market : 

It will not be easy. Opec has done so 
much damage to confidence that 
consumers are resisting any switch to 
oil Below $14 a barrel, .fuel oil 
becomes competitive. But oil has a 
reputation as an unreliable and expen- 
sive fuel, and if consumers are to 


make it their preferred fuel, as once it 
was. a big marketing effort is required. 

In the short-term, all Opec can do is 
to try to create a modest shortage. 
To do this, it must first implement its 
production controls next month. 
Then it must adhere to them. There 
must be no cheating, and no net-back 
deals. 

Then, in the depths of winter, when 
demand is highest, supply and de- 
mand may come back into some sort 
of balance. If the market believes the 
chances of that are good, prices could 
stabilize at about $ 1 2 to $ 1 5 a barrel in 
.the next few months. Then demand 
could start to grow, while expensive 
new .developments would still -be 
inhibited. 

Opec’s record of adhering to 
production controls is not good, 
which makes the market’s initial 
reaction to Monday’s announcement 
all the more surprising. The more 
cautious will stock up while oil is still 
cheap, thereby helping to keep it 
cheap. 


OoUrCOsm,) 

1 mnth 640-6X5 


6 nwab 6406X5 


3mmh G406X5 
12mth 640-6X5 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7dm BVM 

Sntntti B’irPia. 


7dm 4X-4J4 
3 mnth 4H-4ft 
Fraud) riant 
7 days 71fr-7 • 
3 mnth 7K-7X 
Swim Franc 


7dm 
Smntti 


Van 

7dm *Vr41t 

3 mnth 4«w-4”w 


call 7*6 
1 mnth fi 7 1*6* i8 
6 mnth fi’w&ia 
call 54 
1 mnth 

Smntti 4"i«-4*» 
cafl 7*6% 

1 ninth 7X-7H 
Smnth 7H-7S4 
call 2%-IK 
1 mnth 4H-4K 
6 mnth 4"io-4*» 
cal 5K-4K 
1 mnth 4X-4U . 

Smnth 4* a i»- , *iB. 


GOLD 


OofctS36a.2S662.7S 


‘Excludes VA' 


76-245.75) 
) 


ECGD 


Fixed Raw Staffing Export Finance 
Schama iv Avenge reference rate tar 


Interest period July 2. 1980 to 
August 5. 1986 mm* 10X09 pttr 

I 


Rqyal Dutch/Shell Group 


Results for First Half 1986 



Net proceeds 


SECOND QUARTER 
1985 1986 

15,670 10,343 

FIRST HALF 

1985 1986 

£ million 

33,175 23,234 

Income before taxation 


2.359 

1,373 

5.485 

3,324 

Taxation 


1,697 

824 

3.711 

2,054 

Income after taxation 


662 

549 

1,774 

1,270 

Income applicable to minority interests 


16 

4 

44 

7 

Net income for the period 


646 

545 

1,730 

1,263 

Parent Companies' provisional share- ■ 
■in Group net iriborne: 

Royal Dutch / 

Nfl 

6-68' 

Peri 

4-90 

wefinary share 

17-16 

11-37 

Shell Transport 

pence 

21-5 

18-2 

57-6 

421 


Results for both the second quarter and the first half 1988 were significantly influenced by the world-wide collapse in 
crude oil prices. (Met income reflected estimated after-tax inventory holding losses of £362 million in the second quarter 
and £955 million in the half year on those inventories accounted for on a first-in first-out basis, compared with 1985 losses 
of £69 million in the quarter and gains of £93 million in the half year. 

Key features for the second quarter included:- 

- Exploration and production earnings were considerably lower, principally due to reduced crude oil realizations and 
the strengthening of sterling against the US dollar. 

- Manufacturing, marineand marketing eamingson a reported and on an estimated current cost of supplies basis were 
significantly better. On a . repotted basis, inventory losses partially offset the higher current margins. 

- - Chemicals earnings' were greatly Improved reflecting higher margins and safes tonnages. 

Shell OiTs dollar net -income- for tfae^ qtiarter was 35% lower. Stronger performances in the oil and chemical products 
bLiSinesses were rTfore than offset by sharply reduced; earnings in oil and gas exploration and production, reflecting 
considerably lower Selling prices forcrude oil and natural gas. The contribution to Group sterling net income decreased 
by 50% from £227 million to £1 14 million, in part a reflection of the depreciation of the US dollar against sterling. 

For the first half year '1986 the decline of 27% In Group net income reflects the impact of oil prices declining sharply over 
the period. Reduced earnings from exploration and production activities and the effect of inventory losses more than 
offset the higher currant margins from manufacturing, marine and marketing operations. Chemicals results benefited 
from reduced feedstock costs and higher margins which more than compensated for inventory losses. 

Group funds generated amounted to £3,550 million for the half year compared with £5,686 million in 1985. Capital 
expenditure and exploration expense at £2,227 million for the half year were 16% lower than in 1985, partly reflecting 
the weaker dollar. The Group’s financial position remains strong with cash and short-term securities at £5 ,034 million and 
the long term debt ratio an 6%. ■ 

Given very difficult trading conditions and much tower oil prices, the levels both of reported net Income and of earnings 
on an estimated current cost of supplies baste for ihe first half year were satisfactory. However, if there are continuing 
wbak crude oil rprices^-financTal results-pn both base§.are likely to be lower in the second half year than in the first 


gas contractsfrie effect of delayed indexation tooiiprices. Such lower earnings are unlikely to be fully compensated 
by the performance of the downstream oil and chemicals sectors. ... 

Nevertheless tiie Group's strong financial position, as evidenced by its net assets and cash generation, enables it to 
continue to take a long-term view of its objectives and to invest accordingly. 

August 7, 1986 


An Interim repert by Roytf Dutch Petro/Qurri Company and The “ Shell * Transport and Trading Company, pic. on the unaudited resists of the 
Royal Duteh/Sfidf Group of Companies, in which their Interests am S0% arid 40% raveeffre/y. 

A copy otthatuS report may be obtained /rim Shell Centre (Ref L6SI), London Set 7NA or by telephoning 01-934 6252. Results forth* First 
Quarter 198B ware issued on May 15, 1986 arid can be obtained from the same address. - 


w 




- 'v 






A*\J 


Ljj 


UnLSS AND FiNANCc 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 19a6 


THE TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


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AROUTHfOT SECURITIES 

131 Finsbury Pjw ant. London EC2A 1AY 

01+ea ®r6 oi-rao smoji/m 


Cauoi Growm inc 

ST 7 

617 

-Ql 

1 71 

Do Accun 

640 

680 

-01 

1.71 

Ejsieni ft Mil 

1X7 

1*6.1 

-17 

002 

Db6%W««niwBi 

733 

783 

-OS 

0® 

Fxiance ft Proomv 

612 

67 5 

•02 

222 

Oh ft F»m Mceme 

47 9 

sa*# 

*03 

B29 

Do Accwn 

81 S 

Si 7* 

•00 

823 

Eouty Income 

724 

774# 

+03 

405 

Do Accum 

1716 

181 7# 

•00 

495 

row Yxtt income 
Do Accun 

737 

786 

•0* 

7® 

1932 

2067 

+12 

760 

M Mcoma 

7S6 

so a 

-1.4 

235 

Do Accum 

776 

tea 

-1.4 

125 

Do If. mhdnxl 

701 

749 

-13 

£25 

Marugea Fuifl 

BOO 

61 2 

+16 


rie4#cno» income 

290 

310# 


9.88 

Do Accum 

65 J 

MCI# 


BN 

SmaBarCos Acwn 

1Z76 

1360 

-10 

1.73 

Worid Fenny Stero 

97 

103# 


072 

Ponwro tb uk 

74 7 

77 4# 

•01 

1.65 

Pwitrto Tu Jeorai 

1033 

1070# 

-14 

000 

Porltobo TK US 

877 

701# 

-04 

1 K 

FtmokoTsi Europe 

107 S 

1114# 

-40 

on 

Pontau Tm Htt 

416 

411# 

• 10 

a io 


BARIC GtFFORO 

3 Owrtrtm Si. Edrtvoh EH3 GYY 
03 1 -2ft 2181 [Dollar* Cm WW 

w e» cm 

Japan e* |i^ 

UK Er (311 
P sal Pam tni 
FmI Pens UK 
EK> in«U 
BG Energy 
9G Mean* Gnurtti 
BG Jaoan 
BG Teerwotogy 

BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 

MOT AOMmirte Swat. London WIX 4AO 

Qi-401 <K» 


4291 

447 8# 


1.13 

4X2 

*55 1 


020 

2395 

2542 


132 

4J&0 

4716 



1990 

2096 



16*0 

1754# 

-31 

028 

1375 

1463 

*2 2 

140 

<880 

2001 

-Oi 

537 

1967 

2093 

-32 

on 

■436 

1520 

-23 

087 


Amend" 

*75 

506 

•01 

077 

Auerroton 

166 

180 

+Q3 

313 

Japan ft General 

1117 

1195 

-02 

017 

Kgn Mcome 

442 

473 

-04 

701 

IntmuDonal Trust 

7*3 

790# 


106 

mcome GOi Tm 

443 

47 4# 

-08 

409 

G4N ft FnM m 

m 

£1 5 

-03 

913 

Global Marhm 

332 

355 

-0* 

2-11 

Special Snuabens 

377 

404 


1® 


ASSET UMrmUST MANAGSRS 

BO. HOkUrtuiTM fld. Uounemoutfi BW6 SAL 

03*1 717373 iLnunai 


G# ft FnoQ 

1172 

12*0 

966 

H«i me Eixry 
WOrtbwvn Bond 

92 1 97 B# 

1910 2052# 

506 

4.73 

Amencan Growm 

1471 

1X4 

143 

Amti PaoLc 

4 12 

50.7 

325 

Aunts ft Earns 

1020 

1090 

1 X 

Cawui Rasena 

65ft 

682 

153 

Comm ft Enragy 

698 

74 6 

1 10 

European Caprai 

927 

980 

129 

General 

1321 

1412# 

301 

Japan 

801 

853 


UK Growm Me 

9A.7 

1018 

1 TB 

Do Acoan 

1358 

1460 

125 

US Fmenyng Cos 

530 

567 

085 

Earns Prowess 

1882 200* 

3X 

MMerM Ace 

630 

670 

£18 


ALUBD0UN8M (MT TRUSTS 
AIM Dirtur Centra Swmoon SHI 1EL 
0793 610366 A tPB3 36291 
Fiffl Trust 
Growth A income 

Cura Trust 
Bawrad 
Actum Trust 
American toeeme 
Hgti fncgme Tst 
tainJy Income 
Hqn Tmu 
Gout Sacs Trust 
m t # nation a l 
Japan Fung 
Paofic Trusi 
Amer Sod Sas 
Sees Ol Amor Tst 
Aid Asset vnur 
GW Growth 
5me*w Co's 
2na Smrter Cos 
KfCO-s-y Trail 
Met m* & emoty 
Osais Earwigs 
Tacnnctooy Tm 
mm Essm* 

EiemnSmauarCoi 
USA Etontpl Trust 
BARCLAYS UNICORN 
Urncom mxca 21 
01 53* 55J+ 

America 

AirJ Acorn 

Do Income 
Cabral 
EtemM Trust 
Ejuti income 
Francs 
500 

General 

GJt 6 Fi»«d Inc 
Jaoan A Gen nc 

Do Ace 
Growth ACCun 
Iran* Trust 
LnSUTO Trust 
Soacul Srtuahona 
RoCbwy 
Trusiee Fu 


2200 2351 

3® 

I3<5 

1400 

324 

2268 2*10 

261 

3*6* 

3660 

1U 

5369 571.8 

3® 

3i 6 

33 7# 

4 X 

2453 »f 7 

476 

134 7 

143*# 

4.96 

l.»7 

1*8 0 

550 

no 

31 3 

920 

619 

87 2# 

090 

1148 

1223 

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1701 

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099 

635 

676 

145 

2082 221 7 

004 

221 2 2X6 

3J0 

377 

39 3 

230 

1182 

1238# 

277 

152 4 

1523 

£48 



218 

786 

BIG 

2*3 

177J 

1880# 

114 

85.1 

900 

on 

1236 

1310# 

820 

2286 2*23 

£08 

332 6 3528 

1 16 

Hannon Rd E7 


83B 

XI 

150 

1173 

1247 


833 

886 

172 

661 

703# 

3 13 


Trustee Fund 
Urn Teen Accum 
Qo incom 

SMI Trust 


*117 *42 2 
73.6 766 
224 1 2384 
261.7 271 Jc 
1340 1421 
MS 57 7c 
1642 174 6 
1661 1766 
1732 1642 
3216 342 1* 
79 0 640 
1371 1462 
I860 1999 
1035 <10 ts 
494 szse 
469 520* 
1431 1 52 641 


IVoMMa 

B Ta n» Fira Acc 31* 8 33* 8 

Dome 204 0 217.0 

BARMG FUND MANAGERS 
PO Boa <56. Beckenham. Kara BR3 
01-656 9002 


405 

5*0 

324 

312 

.114 

949- 

016 
0 16 
23B 
181 
133 
229 

241 

296 

021 

021 

108 

338 

338 


4XQ 


AU56B&I 

Eastern 
Eouty Income 
Euooe 
Gnwrth 6 »C 
Japan Soacoi 
Japan Sumso 
fiat Euudo 
F eel Japan 
Firyt N Amer 
First Smaller Cos 


562 622 
57 0 609 
547 MB 
1308 12SS 
60S HOC 
1029 1100 
907 9&S 
1054 112 I 
67 0 927 
486 11 9# 
62 3 669 


*09 020 
*03 0J0 
-04 160 
-01 090 
-04 230 
-03 030 
-05 030 
-06 080 
-07 030 

-04 180 
-01 270 


BARRINGTON MANAGEMENT 

10 Fencnurrtt Si. London EC3 
01-623 8000 


fiarwee Am 
European me 
Do *ccum 
General me 
Do Accum 
GR Trtj Inc 
Do Accwn 
hen y«w me 
Do Accwn 

Japan wc om e 
DO Accwn 
N Anwican Inc 
Do Accum 
Paotc incamo 
DO Accum 
Snrn Cos me 
Du Accwn 


1271 <317 
89 2 *16 
1100 1112 
152 7 1623# 
2082 221-3 
1112 1166 
<626 186I 
845 ®9# 
1881 1789 
245 0 2579 
2469 2598 
49 3 114 
56 1 599 
1313 1379 
147 9 1152 
784 635 
930 990 


BWTAMM UNIT TRUST 


393 
-12 127 
-1.4 127 
• 14 263 
*19 2B3 
-03 945 
-05 941 
*05 5 64 
•12 564 
*04 010 
*05 OlO 
-02 058 
-02 058 
021 
*0l 021 
*01 156 
-02 >56 


4-78 Frttury Pavement London EC2A lJD 

' ‘ MgneyGiMa 


01-190 2777 DoaungOt-638 017619 
0600-01 0-333 


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UK Growm 
E*tra me 
GR 

m 3 Grmiti 


19 4 60 JR 
101 7 1085 
141 3 150 7e 
364 368 
53 5 1? «• 
260 274R 
1885 2W 1 


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-03 273 
-03 129 
-03 22* 
-01 7 65 
-01 777 
-21 4«3 


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GW 8 Gen 
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Prop Snares 

<£"*£5' 

W13 T8C*i 
Amer Grmtn 
Amer mcoma 

Amer Smart* Cos 
Ami Grovtn 
Euo SmaMi 
Far East 
Hong Kong fbf 
Mil Growm 
Japan Pari 
Japan SmaWr 
Enmpt 

Exempt MarVet 

MMMMSMPLEY 
3-17. Perrymowc R{ 
0444 456144 
Frami 

Smarter Cos ACC 
Oo! 


1878 2003 
183 13 1C 
HOB 1163 
44 7 477 
<4 8 160 
<83 17 J 
660 725 
403 43 OR 
392 41 6R 
Ml 96 1 
57 0 60S 
214 229B 
61 1 G52 
155 185 
484 515c 
341 75.7 B 
356 3B0 
750 800 


-19 487 
1020 
292 
-03 222 
290 
053 
101 
*41 1.72 
*01 090 
*07 350 
+OJ *36 
*02 03S 
*06 1 68 
*02 021 
-04.047 
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no 

830 *01 

198 

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1230 

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207 4 


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644 

68 J 

502 

744 

800 

4 33 

S8J 

627# 

324 

990 

1050# 


577 

620# 

105 

840 

803 

022 


HUCKHASTgt MANAGEMENT 
The Sam* Eicnanga London BCSP 2JT 
01-168 2868 
General me (4) 

Do Accum (4J 
Mcoma Fund t3) 

Da Accum (St 
MU Me ia 
Op Accun a 
Smarter Me (M 
DO ACCWn |5t 
CS FUND MANAGERS 
125. H<gn Htfoom. LOW WCiV SPY 
121148 


209.1 

219.9 

3 05 

3344 

XI 5 

305 

<n* 

1057 

•04 4 71 

1X2 

1850 

*00 423 

1279 

1317 

108 

l® 1 

1760 

105 

£1127 

1196# 

2.74 

£i»1 

1274# 

274 


01-242 

CS Japan flam 


852 906 -Ol 034 


CAMION FUND MANAGERS 
I. Mmora Way. Wembley. HAS MB 
01-902 8876 


Growth 


Far East 

Norm 

GttMl 

Euooewr 

Japan 


2711 2884R 
317 5 3375B 
2030 2159 
1488 1563 

472 5fl2» 

49 8 530 
57 1 607 


*06 297 
*1.1 4JK 
-29 031 
-1.6 0-59 
-05 150 
-oi 100 
-09 050 


na n i imwiuiMtinui tT 

PO Boa SfitBews Uarvs London EC3 7JO 
01-621 OO11 

Capital 3559 3806 -27 1.91 

Mamie 2743 2914 -27 43s 

Norm American 2824 302 1 *04 097 


CATS) ALLEN 

1 KMg WAam SL EG4N 7AU 
01-623 6314 

G4I Trust 1024 105LCS 

CENTRAL BOARD OF FMANCe OF 
OIURCMGFENGLAlim 

2 Fora Street- London EC2V SAO 
01-586 1815 

M* Fund 3979 

Fiiaa ktl 144 4 

Dapasn 1000 - 


AM 

990 

970 


CHARmesomctAL investment fwo 

2. Fore SOM. Lcodon ECZT SAO 

01-588 1815 

Mcoma 364 <4 # 505 

Accwn El 0578 1 

Depend 1000 9S0 

CLERICAL MEDICAL UMT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Narrow navi. Bran esz OJH 
0800 373393 

Amer Giowdi 223 230 190 

Eauty Hfflfi Incoma *0 7 434 -0 6 490 

Ewdpean Grtwai 272 290 *03 200 
Genarai Eouty 37 2 396* -06 2 70 

GR 8 Fired Mt On 300 31 6s 320 

GR 8 Find Me 34 i 25 M 950 

indev Secunuas 263 26 7 230 

Japan Oremn 326 34 7s 090 

COUNTY UT MANAGERS LTD 
161 CniupPd a. London EC2V 6BJ 
01-738 1999 

Ouo to tacnraealairraa, tOueara nopreat «cr 
Ctaimy UT Mraogare Ltd 

CROWN IMIT TRUST SERVICES 
Crown House. Wuhan GU21 IXW 
O4862 S033 

H^I Income Trust 230 7 3*6.7 -1 3 530 

Growth Trust 2120 22E7S -1 9 3 IB 

Trust 1253 1340S -06 0.75 


CRUSADER UNIT TRUST MANAGERS LIB 


Rarawa Surrey RM2 1 
07372 42424 
UK Income 463 51 4 

UK Growth Accun 4B1 513 

Do Dot 461 512 

European GrtMtl 123 55.7 

Pacrtc GrawOI 533 66J 

EFM UNIT TRUST MANAGERS 

UaNBe Crescent Esnum 

031-236 3492 
American Fund 
CrauI Fund 
Growm 8 tnc Raid 


r*gn Chm Raid 

mtammonai Fun 

Rasciaces Ftan 
Snvv Jap Co s Fnd 

Tahiro Fund 
IEm) Amer a 
1E11 Japan (3) 

IE*) Paohc (4| 

<E.J Smaaar Jap (41 

EiVtAaid 


S? »1 

1246 1333a 
1055 1129 
1905 2035S 
20 7 221 
36.1 408 
167 7 1794S 
<43 B 146.4 
1125 1162 
2838 2339 
220 1 2273 
256 276S 


-01 447 
-02 243 
-02 243 
*07 163 
*Ot 


224 
1.71 
450 
5.88 
1 10 
045 


OOO 

380 

019 

034 

OlO 

362 


EAGLE STAR (BW TRUST MANAGERS 
Bam Road. OuRSfPwsn. Gtoucasar GL53 7LO 
02*2 521311 


UK Balanced Inc 
Do Accum 
UK Oowei Accum 
(JK Hqjn Inc Inc 
N Amancan Accun 

Far Eastern Accun 

Ewopaan Accun 

UK GR 8 H Inc 
Op Accun 


56 * 709 
67 4 710 
80 5 859 
635 677 
6*5 685S 
955 1O20S 
769 B1.9S *M 093 
5A2 579 -01 831 

550 58.6 


-08 2-96 
-06 291 
-09 170 
-03 522 
401 1.11 
-19 000 


-01 996 


EMJURAMCEPWD MANAGEMENT LTD 

AOHWI Cemra. Hwa gnn Housa. 28. Western 

Roan. Romford Ran 319 

0708-66966 

Endurance 1064 |138 -03 214 


EOUHABLE UNITS AOMMSTNATION 
. fmw St Man amsm 

1-236 5681 

EaivUtne Pe*can 71.6 782 -09 333 

raan mcoma Trust 7*0 789 -OB 520 

G* 8 Filed Mt 528 S62B -0 1 0*3 

Tst Ql Bn* Trusts 592 BIOS *4) I 206 

5 Deo* Sft Trust 738 783 -09 244 

NSi Amer That 573 613 *0 1 1.75 

Far eastern Trial 822 S75S -03 058 

Md Growth 483 521 _ -Ol 1 09. 


ad onu Ovq vw 


GOUTY* LAW 
SH Gouge Hso Corpora&an 9L Comtnr CV1 

0203 553231 
(lit Grawsi Accun 1442 1133 355 

00 Mams 1352 133 1 356 

Hanot me Accun 2407 200 aba 

Do Mccme 1937 2069 494 

GRE/Faad Accun 1015 1069 . 266 

Do mcome 863 963 296 

MhAmyr Tyt Accun 129.4 1329 036 

Far East Tst Accun 151 6 181 2 059 

Euro Tst Accun 146.4 157 B 1.19 

Cert »UH 230.8 2455 286 

FAC UNIT MANAGEMENT 

1. Lauanca Poumay HP. London EC*R OBA 

01-623*680 

US SmaSsr COS 096 745 *02 029 

CMMSl Fund 1015 1037 -02 0.43 

mm fuxj ?aa 822 -07 49a 

Far Eastern Fund 709 81 2 *94 033 

OWWtS MCtm 69.0 738 *08 376 

Fnrad merest 578 620 *08 900 

Natural Am Find 369 3Bi -CM *50 

European ircpm* 768 822 *05 318 

FS INVESTMENT MANAOBH 
190. Wow Gauge St Gmsggw G2 2PA 
0*1-332 3132 • 

Baunead GM Inc 434 *62 

DO Accun 44.1 .469 

mcoma an me 33.7 *22 590 

Do Acoan «15 442 

Serwca Cos me *u> 505 190 

Da Accun 479 SI 9 

nOEUTTINTSWATIONAL 
River W3A.TQrpraMd.-1W9 IQV 
0732 


-0.7 a7l 
-09 462 
-03 173 
-06 360 
■*Ot 905 
*0 7 422 
-09 
-1 1 
-05 001 
*0-1 526 
-01 246 
-Ql Q46 
. 08* 


American 1006 1072 

Amac Equvy Wasmo 320 343s 
Amor Soecul Sts 483 61.7 
FMEswme 3*9 365 
GR 6 Food Mt 31.1 324 
Growtn 8 tecdme fco tQi.7 

Japan SposS 54S «*3 474 

Japan Trust 090- ugj 

Managed Ml Tst 1383 1473 

Ml< Mccmt Equ«y 7S9 849 
FAotauonal on 329 OS.ie 
50uffi Eos ASM TK 299 306 
SpeosISds 1699 1718 

FL0SNG (ROBERT) 
a^ ra sn.u«MnB C 8A8AN 

American Exompt 0542 3618 *128 158 

Japan ExemxH £1232 *368 *149 095 

Am Prooemr Tat SI 3798.0 S 5 00 
FYdpany Trua £20329 . 590 


FRAKMOTON (ROT MANAGEMENT 
3 Lenoon wm BUga. London Wat 
ECW Sno 
01-529 1181 

Amer 8 Gen Me 2226 2369a 
Da Accun 227.6 2429c 

Ame> Twiavnd Be 199* 2122* 


Do *ccun 
Carnal Tst mc 
D o Accum 
CO". 8 GR tnc : 
0c Accun 

Enra me Tst tnc 
Do A ccun 
MCPme Dust 

Dd Acoan 

mt Growth Fo Inc 
00 Aeon 
Japan a Gen Me 
00 Accum 
Monody Mcoma Fd 
Radovary 
Do Accun 

European Me 

Do Accun 


2068 2202S 
2042 2772 
2*89 2812 
569 52M 
US* 1229S 
1658 1656# 
1669 1794s 
11*6 1319 
120 8 126* 
ISO 1699 
1759 1879 
57 2 326 
Sa9 936 
BOO 588* 
131.6 1409S 
1432 1522S 
532 628 
593 629 


Pranam End. Oonuna. Surrey 

Q30688SQS5 


FP (way Dot 
DO Accun 
FP Fared Mt Dot 
00 Accun 
Stewards* Dm 
oo r 


1689 2009 
313 1 3344 
1139 121.1 
128.7 1375 
1659 1769 
171.0 1619 


-03 051 
-02 051 
+0 < 1.19 
*0.1 119 
-09 186 
-19 196 
.. 550 
*02 530 
-05 444 
.-00 444 
*12 437 
-1 6 437 
*04 . 
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006 
. 008 
-OB *95 
-05 167 
-05 197 
*09 080 
*99 099 


-2.1 292 
-33 292 
-02 503 
-02 503 
-10 1 78 
-19 1.76 


FUNDS IN COURT 

Pur*c Trustee Kmgaway WC2 


01-405 *300 
CapM 
Gross me 
H<P Yarn 

GT (ROT MANAGERS 
8m Floor LOmrat 
01-283 2575 Deahng 
UK Cap Fnd MC' 

DO Accum 
Incffaa Fund 
Rumen Exompt 


3510 3602 
148* 1499 
2169 2SQ9C 


US A General 
Tech A Grawli 
japan A General 
Par East A Gan 
European Fund 
Gormirry Fund 


me So. London 
01-626 9431 
9 29 994S 
1339 1432 
770 613 
1655 1733S 
156.0 177.6 
5S9 609 
GO* 646 
2453 2624 
1102 1179 
2*6 2 2634 
65.1 83.7 


26D 

7.74 

587 


EC2M4TJ 

-15 310 
-29 3.10 
-19 030 
-0.1 190 
•02 000 
.. 0« 
♦01 120 
-23 020 
-00 0.40 
*24 0.40 
*17 180 


QARTMORE FUND MANAGERS 

Z St Mary Axe. LoraJon E£3A 88P 

Olga 1212 DaahpQ OV-523 5TBC Daatng 01-633 

Amencan Treat 857 322 -03 090 

Ausirakait Tnot 17 7 169 *03 Q36 

Bmnti Tyt Accum 537 S7.6S -07 200 

DO Dot 467 50.1a -09 ZOO 

Canvncoty Share 503. 539 *03 197 

Euooeen Treat 500 539 +08 03* 

Extra Income Treat *55 483 -0 1 5« 

Far Eastern Treat 1328 1*10 -09 000 

FnOC anorew Find 2S2 76. IS *01972 
G4 Trial 26.8 270 . . 845 

GtaOtl FuM Accun 1738 1B40 *03 020 

DO 004 105.8 1782 *03 020 

Gud Situa Treat 112 120 . 237 

Haogad Anwcan 294.315 OlO 

Hon Mc o ma That 1369 T470S -07 590 
Hcng Kong Tnot 203 304 *01 1.10 

income Fund - - 721 77.5S -03 334 

lasuance Agsnoaa £4571 49.06s -000 200 
japan Tool 1*55 IS49S -2 1 Q00 

LLvugad E*an« 2654 2765 -15 2*7 

Ox 8 Energy Trust 312 335 *02 1.75 

Spaool Saa 1 >im 323 980 *05 0 79 

UK SnarC* Racist 713 764 -02 153 

OOVETT(JOWt) (BBT MAMA— IT 
WncMnor Has. 77. London WML London EC2N 

IDA ... 

01-588 5620 

Inn Grow* 712 839 *01 195 

American Grown 61.7 663S *04 004 
Amencan me 065 715 +03 558 

Ewooann Grown 2l*.l 22 U *09 026 
Gold 8 Mnarea 3*5 370S -03 1 82 
Japw> Oown 165.1 17U# +0.1 . 


ORE UNIT MAMAO EIIB 

a EBJRngo. BC3P30N 
01468 9503 
G* 6 Fwno mt 
Grown Eqiuy 
GuatdM 


P»e*c 


Ewoaesn Treat 


1216 1264 
195 3 2079 
Z7U 28800 
1352 1449 
231. t 24A9 
299.7 Z763S 
206 6 2220 
2*17 2572 


-0.1 676 
-25 205 
.. 296 
♦09 132 
-07 013 
-15 1.4* 
-05 1.82 
-25 1 11 


Bid Otter Chng YH 


GUINNESS MAHON UWT HUT 


Pp Boa 4*2. 32 a *Mnr W44R. London BG3P 
3AJ 

01-623 9335 


Hem Inc 
N raner 


mccme 

Treat 


SCO 53.7S 6.76 

997 I06i . O0i 

2032 2192 . 235 

GR Treat 387 40 IS . 998 

a Umcdnl tnc '• * 835" 66.1c T. 550 

? ^ ^ Of 739 76 9e 977 

TempteBuSmCos 171 5 1610S .. 327 

Tampa Bv (194 357 1 3897 . 292 

HA8BR0G8AMC UST TRUST MANAGERS 
Premer ur ASM. 9 n ay hx cyi Rd. Bremrood 
Esse* 

0277 217916 


HsntH Snaacoa 1288 137.0s 

HTOroa N Amor 698 709 
Hantvos Jap A F E 1202 1Z7.9 
Hanaam Scandvn 802 853S 
hnbotos Europaan 92i 990 
Hsinros Caradvi 47 7 50J 
Hanasos Eouty VC 822 87.4 
Homoroa Mgh Inc 589 629 
Hanam Ras Asns 590 566s 
H» mt» o a MSS 485 519 


199 

053 

047 

000 

05* 

198 

498 

550 

297 

0S7 


FENOERSONAONnSSTRATIDN 
Pranser ut AtreRiaman 9 RMRan Rd. Humn 
Brentwood Essex 
0277-217236 . 
toad So Me 
Da Accum 
Tnot 


Rscomv 
Gkmbi Grown sic 
DO ACCOM 




121.7 1*09 
1895 1985 
649 1014a 
S39 577- 
829 693 

1019 1140 

PnanaS Treat 1*1.1 561 7 
Mcome 8 GrdwSt Inc 1396 1453 
DO Accun 271.1 2915 . 

Mcoma Trua 1699 181 .7S 
<590 17D.1 . 
1069 1M4S 
470 S0.1-- 
439 495S 

34 0 572 

897 . 74.6 - 
1059 113J7S 

369 tZA 
1609 1721 
6Q5 64 IS 
3587 3770 
944 S2 
2327 2302 
804 972 
1622 1729S 
1754 IBM 
729 77.7 

38.7 305* 
1370 M79S 

60.6 6*.1 


Sma aar C06 Dm 
■Pref 8 0S 

GR Treat 

Food Wrest Treat 
Gw&ai ' 

(tow Tech 
Gold 


Octal 


(9 


Eua SnuBor Gas 
Japan Treat 
Japan SoaoM Sas 
Pachic Smoiar Doc 

Smgapors 8 Malay 

Nonh Ararcan 
•mar Bmaaar Dos ___ . 
Amor Racomry Tst 101.1 1062 

HAi Mcoma Exompt 1195 1282 

Smaaar COS Exorrpt 1162 1229 
Euo Exempt 1172 123.4 

Japan Exompt S) 15*0 i62Jc 
N Amar 84 3 892 

OotMl Tech & (3) B4.S 998 
Part* Exenod (fi) VS9.I tSA9 


048 

048 

310 

147 

1.47 

3E6 

252 

307 

107 

498 

4J4 

5.11 

936 

833 

8M 

001 

091 

290 

091 

Q01 

2.79 

158 

0 7* 
03B 
091 
091 
00 * 
300 
02 * 
091 
095 
493 
21 * 
112 
05B 
1.10 

001 
277 


Tower. Aodsanb* Hind, Ciuyoui 


5449 
10Q3S 
191.4 ' 


WJ. SAMUEL (JNTT TRUST 

NLA Tl 

01-686 4366 01-628 8011 

Bnnsh Treat TM 511.8 
CjpObI Tnot UrtB- 942 
OoOar Tnot IM ' 1799 
Ejroomn That 1283 
Pre East Treat 1170- 

Fmanaal Trust 355 r 

On Farad Mt Inc 29.1 
Do Grown 489 
Man you Tnot G1.6 
Mcoma That 765 

Hsmanonai 1160 

Japan Teen TM 345 
Naapaf Raaouces 299 

5ecurVy Trust 1752 

Smaare Cos B80 

gfiwm Jra BJ 

■I nBO MANAGBB 

32 Queen Aram Oar. London 6W1H 9AB 
01-222 1000 

cr law 1287 1370 +07 1J0 

Bl MC Plus 56.0 586 

IM Capxal GrawM 540 585 
Miuean e ra Tat Fno 869 70.1 


1 

3770 
300# 
402 
GAB 
6t A 
124.1 S 
365S 
300 
1964 
B3.7 
96.7 


-92 832 
-05 251 
*04 80S 
-13 0,73 
+05 122 
-Q6 222 
-0.1 992 
-0.1 747 
-05 837 
-07 592 
+1.5 232 
+05 Q3S 
+03 270 
-44 397 
-Ol 151 
-07 258 


S-70 

.. 200 
403 3.40 


‘X) 


20 . 

01-623 8000 
Amar Grown Me 
Do Accun 
Fird tor Tat Me 
Do Accum 
TOfil Me 
. Acoan 
H ac o »ary Me 
Do Acoan 
Japan Grown inc 
Do Accun 
Smaure Go a Me 
Do Accun 
UK Ed Grown too 
Do Accun 
WOrMwMa Toth Inc 
Do 


London EC3 


621 » IS 
03 4 072 
200 214 
252 279 
1222 130.1 

2030 2180 

1014 1089 
1060 1137 
1028 1099- 
1032 1054 
1689 1BU- 
2989 2214 
27.7 299c 
45.6 489 
395 421 C 
399 424C 


L8 C UMT TRUST MANAOCMB4T 
F^iHMaChtaiAw, EC2H 

Mcoma Fun 4319 4*02# 
M tw t wfio aal 6 Gan 2(20 2470 

LEQALACBBULUMT TRUST 


*03 1.17 
*02 .. 
.. 234 

+12 575 


Ecuty DWfetSon 
DD Accun 
Do Mc o ma 
Eiaopeen 
For Eosaam 
oa Thai 
Ml It gr a gad 
Natural Has 
N Amman That 
UK Spoon Sts 


LLOTTM 8AMC UMTTRtMTIMNAGStS 
Rogatm Dpt Gonng-By-Seo, WortflMa. w 
Suoass ■ 

0*44 480144 ‘ ’ 


2653 283-7 

. £35 

4140 4410 

. 235 

5A8 

820# 

. 5.17 

880 

714# 

. 132 

10H.fi 

1161 

. 001 

760 

880 

. 801 

770 

823 

. 102 

48.7 

521 

. 205 

746 

790# 

. MS 

620 

880# 

. 139 


Do Accun 
Energy Md ■ 

Do A ccum 
Em Mcome 
00 AOCun 
German On Me 
00 Actum 
Marne 
Da Accun 
Md Teen 

Do Accum 

Jtoah Grown ' 
Do Accun 
N Amar 8 Grer 
Do Accum 
PaaAc Basai 
Od Accum 


174 1 1651 
•2099- 3313 
499 53.0c 
54.7 554c 
1*50 1582 
267 0 2965 

634 673 

834 670 

257.0 2749 
S0S5 5*09 
1755 1872 
1833 I960 

aa|ae9 

835 893 

101.9 1089s 

110.1 117.7# 

1270 1364 
1332 1424 


Co« 8 Roe 1686 1984 

DO A ccun 2070 2220 

WodOwTOB Growth 1880 2023 

DO Accun 2BS4 2839 

UK Grown FtvxJ *56 *62 

LOmON 6 MANCHESTER 
y *?F *Oe P*V. Exeter EX5 IDS 
0362 52155 

Ganaral Treat 41 7 449 

MromaTnoi 36 0 389 

Mtarnaaon* Treat 36.1 370 

319 342 

J- 413 ' 

Trust at Mv 282 302 


49 330 
-62.290 
+02 244 
*02-244 
-24 549 
-40 5.49 
♦10 DI2 
+10 0.12 
-4.1 496 
-81 496 

.. 0.48 

... 0.48 
.. 0.02 
.. 092 
.. 193 
.. 1.03 
.. 0.17 
.. 0.17 
-49 109 
-44 103 

-10 asi 
-44 091 
-09 197 


-05 800 
-03 690 
-0.1 070 
. 290 

-09 100 

‘[Aft 


UNLISTED SECURITIES 


84 (War ©Xig TV) 


M A G SECURITIES 

Throe Town HR K3R 630 


01-626 
Anar » Gen me 
Do Accum 
Am Recovery 
Do Accun 
Am Seskt Gas 
Dd Accun 
Aust A Gen MC 
Do Accun 
Com 8 Gen me 
Do Accun 
Canoand Groroh 
C re iiw p o n Grom 
Do Inc 

Orafana Fired Mg 
Do Accun 


2084 2230# 
2130 2600 

229 7 2*58 
250.* 2679 
56.7 60.1 S 
57 7 613S 
692 7*0c 
7 55 609 
1*22 152 2s 
168 0 2012 
392.4 *239 
3126 3*52 ■ 
1767 1908c 
3ȣ 4235 

Ell 72 1242 


European 8 General 201 6 2H7# 
Dd Aeon 240 6 2553# 


2161 2291 

*6*0 *927 
117? 1266e 
1*24 153 Be 
2373 2515 

37X0 395* 
5964 6322a 
£1264 1340 
GIB 640C 
0X7 964 
30 B 33 OS 
329 352a 
309 7 3314 
839 0 687 7 
7220 7660# 
tl 193 12.33 
$76 604 
7961 6470 
85*2 909.7 
Bl 7 97 7 
■5625 5964 

£1*90 1*0* 

Rocownr Fired me 3486 3779# 


Em YSfiJ Me 
Dd Acoan 
Fre Eastern me 
Do Accum 
fired 01 fin Inc 
Ds Ace 

Ganarai mcome 
Oe Accun 
Or 8 Food M 
Do Accun 
OtW roepm* 

Dd Accun 

Mcoma Mo 
Accun 
mg Grown me 
Oc Accum 
kid Me Me 
Japan ( Gen Me 
Do Accum 
Japan QsiN s r Ace 
IMM S Gal Me 
DO 




DO 

Sacano Gen Me 
Do Accun . 
SrnptarCoa Me 
Do Acoan 
Trustee Raid Me 
Do Accum 
Chorreond Me O) 
Do Acoan (3l 
Cmntund Mc^) 


Do Accun 
Pensron Eaompt (ft 650 4 *707 
NAAC3F Me *3J 37.5 

DO Accun FS 


HM UMT TRUST MANAGERS 

11. Dewtrahva Sa London EC2M 4YR 

M-i 


*00 193 
+10 103 
*09 059 
*09 059 
*05 036 
*05 036 
*00 099 
+10 009 
*03 3*1 
*03 341 
+1.0 335 
--OF 297 
*10 &2S 
*31 520 
*009 590 
-33 0.77 
-40 077 
*30 574 
+6* 574 
*08 166 
+10 IBB 
*09 298 
*15 266 
*30 420 
*006 *20 
*04 918 
*06 9.16 
-0.1 306 
-Ol 306 
*2.1 5 46 
*59 546 
*0.1 184 
+090 194 
+02 593 
♦15 007 
♦10 097 
*01 007 
+39 4.11 
*096 4.11 
+15 348 
+20 349 

+91 3.74 

+096 374 
+05 29S 
*091 295 

*21 4 22 

+096 422 
-301092 
*67103? 
.. 597 
.. 597 
.. 4 49 


4599 S +1.7 899 


4541 490.*# 

6970 7337* 

03.77 M 6Q 
6440 B55e 
£1095 1065 
4461 4779- 
£1278 1X68 
1115 

359.1 s 

378 0 3919# 
999910089# 


■w 


211 

2.11 

155 

195 

001 

ao» 

020 

020 

133 

193 

462 

492 

L02 

102 


99-100. Sending Rd. UuMn. Kent MET* 1XX 
0622 67*751 


383 8 4110 
498 1 5262 
UK Marks! FMturM 752 802 
Oa Accun 77.4 829 

jaoon Perfor ma nce 1381 1479 
□o Accun 1387 147.9 

US 5peoai r e t iree 653 70.4 

Do Accum 65.9 71.1 

GcadA PreciauaMat *1 1 *46 
Do Accun 424 48.1 

US 5oecal Inc 56J 61.1a 
Do Accum 61.4 682# 

Earopaan Perl Inc 823 S75 

Do Accun 824 87.6- 


MLA. General 

MLA hnmow 

MLA 06 Uiat 


WA Eunpoan 


a^ eg^Wgy. Stevenage Hens 

Growtn urea 720 775c 

GR 1 Fbeo Ml 1122 1162 
H#h Inc o me Umts 1124 119.4 
hfign Ywro GR IMS S70 590 
HI Growth Unas 127.9 1319 
N A re araan Unre -Bax 726# 
For East Ones 827 905# 
9naBar CDs Fund 665 704 


MncAPuar trust 

Untcnm Use. 252 RomTOrd Rd. E7 

01-234 5544 

Mencap 1325 1409 

MERCURY FUND MANAGERS LTD 
32 Kng WMam 3L EC4R 9AS 


317 385 -04 223 

524 555 -0.1 CSS 

233 235 a *041044 
401 424# -02 330 
294 31.1 *0.1 090 


*09 201 
-01 7 JO 
+14 901 
-Ql 091 
*05 041 
-04 0.46 

-03 0.13 
.. 159 


+20 .. 
-04 1.98 

UI-XOU <OCU 

Amer Growm 

S3* 

M3 

. 067 

-as 


Do Accun - 

972 

1013 

.. 007 

-oa aoo 

Amar Mcome - 

- 51.4 

940- ■ 

+03 4.41 

-as 


Do Accun 

530 

57.0 

+03 441 

-02 221 

Baopeee Growm 

1270 

1350c 

-\2 1.18 

-02 


Do Accum 

•1308 

1361C 

-13 1.16 


001 

General 

2342 

2*9.1 

-IO 230 

-4LI 


Do Acoan 

3808 

*030 

-1.6 230 

-04 1.15 

am ft rand 

‘87.7 

■65 

-02 708 

-04 


Do Accum 

«B 

387 

-0 2 708 



Mcoma 

802 

853 

-04 443 



Do ASH 

667 

043 

-05 443 

7BE 


Monuftml 

2392 

2544 

-0.1 107 



Do Unn 

2960 

3105 

-0.1 107 


■ •ere 

Jaoan 

1®0 

1968 

♦1.7 000 


7.1a 

a M 

Do Accun 

1®4 

2010 

+10 000 


1 w 

Racoxerj 

191.1 

2012 

-1.1 £11 



Do ACO01 

2019 

2163 

-10 £11 



Exraran Drat 

2258 

2327# 

.. £74 



Exempt Accun 

3480 


.. £74 


MANAGERS 

CouiwoodHMbf 
0742 799842 


UNIT TRUST 

St.HHd.SMMd SI SO 


c«ai Mcoma 

749 790# 

.. 249 

Do Accun 

1020 1067# 

.. £49 

CarssxxSty ft Gen 

1020 1094 

.. 305 

Do teeun 

1440 1540 

.. 625 

Bara Htpi toe 

57.7 610# 

.. 784 

DO Accum 

673 71.7# 

.. 784 

GM ft Fuad toe 

54 7 57.1 ■. 

. .- 806. 

Do Accun • 

M3 912 






"2S81 273.1 


Mcoma 

-1619 173.7# 

.. 304 

OO ACCwn : 

2® 8 287.7# 

. .184: 

Japan ft Pacrtc 

283 7 3020 

:. 008' 

Dd Accum 

2970 317? . 

0® 

N Amencan fi* 

1068 1160- ' 

..126 

Do Accum 

1313 1400 

.. 1 S3 

Euro Gth Me 

1154 1260 

.. 1 15 

Do Accun 

1364 1476 

. 1.15 

Smelter Costae 

112 2 1198# 

.. £13 

Do Accwn 

1190 1278# 

.. £13 


MIRRA Y JOHNSTONE UWT TRUST . 


18X hope Street. Glasgow G2 2UH 
0*1 221 9253 


Eu ropeoi 
Bmaaar CM 


1159 1233# +1.1 309 
2*32 2598 *44 1 .06 

2100 34.1 -OS 106 


NATIONAL FROVBENT MHEtTMBir 


48. GracscMch $L 6C3P WH 
01923 4200 Ext 269 
NPI UK 1940 2094 

OP Renan '5133 3333 

R P arian 5861 60*4 - - 

Do Accun 683 0 737.0 

FW East Acc 656 9i is 

American Acc . 575 869 
Euooasn Ace 509 119 

t *68 520 - 


290 

290 

0.70 

070 

0.10 

.190 

060 

140 


ad OHor Chng VH 


MOirMCH UT MANAC6M 
PO Box 4. NCMOI 3NG 
0603 

Grots Tnot Ell 59 1220 -006 301 

SS^ret 1260 , 326 *M 

OPPBRBHBITRUST MANAOaiBFr 

69 Garmon SPOIt terdpn 6C4N 6AE 
demgs 01-236 98W6/7/8i9fll 

i n a mnU dM go* 'ili* 

Mcoma A Growth 605 8*8 


WUUeXM Rec 
ArnaiOP Growfi 
Japan Ore® 

European Gw* 

UK GTOwM 
Pacrtc Grow* 

M Mcoma 
Pracnea! means 
Do Accun 

reARL TRUST 

252. FfitFI HtSBdrh WCtV 7EB 

366441 


829 86* 
321 3*4. 
604 6*6 
625 669# 
53 1 585 
5X0 597 
333 357 
525 563 
897 1019 


01-«t6l 

Growth Fund me 

Dd Accun 
Income Fund 

Md Eouty Me 
Do A»rei 
Dry) Tnot Me 
Do Accun 


66 4 940 

1327 1413 
1161 1246 
1267 1349 
1267 134 8 
12X6 1317 
2T4X 2290 


•15 163 
*01 XOB 
-0.4 155 
-07 000 
-19 000 
-1 1 0.07 

-02 1 16 

-03 155 
*02 7.37 
+05 2.1* 
*05 2.14 


2 U 
214 
377 
153 
153 
292 
£92 


HJtFE T U ALIPMT TRUST 
49 Han Snoot barney On Themes 
0«91 576088 


Md Growth 

mccme „ 
Moridwroa Roe 

■Amar Growtn 
hid Smaro Cos 
Far Ees Ow* 
Cuapaon GW 


2631 2824 
1912 I960 
1443 1549 
675 725 
77.1 B28 
.760 605 
S9S 690 


-05 079 
-2-1 4 49 
-OB I3S 
-93 073 
+01-058 
+0.4 000 
*93 144 


FROUnCUNtr TRUSTS 


222.1 
01-2*7 
umim n o r ni 
Ffirei Mcome 
Cm 8 GR 
Far Eastern 


Spaool 6*a 
TacrmoiogY 
Extra Mcom a 


Londo»EC2 .. 

1119 1200 
800 B* la 
. 968 1030c 
1752 1879 

125 0 1345 
685 735a 
161 114.1 


-1 1 091 
*0.1 4 36 
.. 598 
-19 000 
-14 098 
-0.1 196 
-10 050 


695 834# +04 400 


. PRUDENTIAL UMTTR1I8T MANAGERS 
51-69. Hard H4L Sard Esso*. SOI 2DL 
01-478 3377 

Mofeom Equiy 3625 4095 -8.7 337 

95 6 1017 +1.4 056 

51.7 549s .. 004 

647 686# -01 642 
965 1023# +05 093 
997 1019 -04 005 

733 773 -02 098 

620 999# -04 216 

... . Grow* 784 833c -08 22* 

Hosotn a# Treat 1879 197 1 -09 248 


boTOom Comma 
Me 


ar 


N Amerce rr 


3i-*5 Sreuiare SL London EC2V 7LH - 
01-600 4J77 

OuNtrant General *2BB 4665 . . 207 

Ouearant Mco ma 2310 2497# .. 541 

QuaOent Md Fd 3765 3990 . . 1.12 

Quadrant Recovery 2598 2720 .. 257 


155 

15* 

256 

307 

001 

1.00 

03* 

546 


St Smthms Lana. Loadret EC*P . 

01-380 5456 

NC America Me 2789 2980# 

Do Acoan 303.1 322.4# 

NC y Ra 1320 1410 

NC Mccme 892 915 

NC JWStl TB89 2009 

NC SmaAer Coe 1390 M7.B 

NCSmSEurapCD'a 1780 1905 

Vt GB £ 


NC Exempt Cat £1300 1350 

NC Amer Rep 611 57 1216 

NC Property (589 1665 


ROWAN wrr TRUST 

33 icng twkam StroaL London EC4R BAS 
01-638 5678 

American Mt ' 2190 2235 .. 195 

Sacunfes (2) 6805 6950 c .. 200 

H^n Yietl & 1660 1695 ..683 

Mi* [35 SO *025# *85 198 

FdwTO Mrerest 1705 1715 . . 242 

Ugh altered 1210 1225 -101252 

Fu East (3 237.0 2405 - . 0.19 


ROYAL UFEFUM) MANAGEMENT 

Now Had Place. Lrerepod 109 3HS 

-051-227 4422 


Eqarv Truer 

600 

638 

.. 280 

•Hriura 

713 

740# 

.. I3« 

GNTiut 

.268 

280 

621 

US Trial 

314 

•ten 

.. 102 

PaOfcBartiTrt 

420 

440 

.. 049 

20 Cfitton SL London BCZ 



01-9X011 




^aSU 

1T2S 1167 

-08 1® 

1662 

1863 

-1.1 106 

Men Mcome Truer 
Do ACCUO 

870 

960# 

-1.0 404 

103.4 

110.1# 

-10 404. 

US towto 

503 

550 

+01 007 

Do Accun 

574 

61.1 

+01 037 


ROYAL LONDON UWT TRUST MANAGERS 

Royal London Hme. Ooktaalr 001 IRA 

0208 576115 

Amencan tow* 891 91.B# -02 092 

Cental Accun 1730 1B*.1 -19 225 

WMcoma 597 587# -0.1 BJ9 

Mgh mcoma 793 8*4 -04 495 

Mama • Grow*- 970 1035# -07 4 40 

Japan Growth . ; it,7 070 —07 OK. 

l • 1017 1114 - -25 rS 


SAVE A PROSPER 
29 : Western Rd. Rrenttrd RH1 3LB 


66-73. Queen St Eh MBUgn EH2 4NX 
krertodl 070666986 Ot l&M) 011-226 


PomtodJ 

Amer Me A Grow* 

Cap*# Un fit 

CuixraxPty 

Energy Mds 
Eueperei tow* 

Exempt Inc Bnd 

Do Md <*3j 


FMancsl Sec* 

09 * Fl tnc 
Mgn Rnm (ins 
«CFi YWdUMM 
Mooma Unit* 
fi nsa a nan t Treat 


Japan Orowtn 
Japwn SuaSar Cos 


rStooSsr 


SootytaMs: 


3mM ar Co t tnc 


UK Eouty 
US Grow* 
Unwresal Grow* 


670 722 

W62 1050 

44.1 47.1 
429 457 

1053 1120 
780 820c 
57.9 610 
370 402 

955102.1 
5*-1 570 

1799 1M.I# 
1603 171 A 
91.7 980e 
0*2 900 
1170 125 2 
9*6 101 1 
1270 1360 
284 303 
87 8 939 
985 1053 
1259 13*8# 
1503 1607 
1480 15B9 
759 B05 
1574 1089 
985 940 
1704 1532# 
700 740 
8*9 906 


73SI” 
409 609 
-05 2.13 
-Cl 190 
*10 *52 
-05 051 
-05 527 
-OJ 23* 
+02 000 
-03 210 
-011093 
>10 409 
-15 442 
-09 652 

.. £72 
-01 322 
-01 .. 
-09 .. 

.. 903 

+09 295 
-00 299 
-15 400 
-14 4*5 
-02 101 
-04 *09 
-00 208 
-10 292 
*02 1.89. 
-04 138. 


SCHROOEH UMT TRUST 

B na r p n a a H aws fireumredh 
0705 827733 


Amonewi Inc 
Do Accun 
AuatraMn MC 

Qo A ccum 
Euccean hip 
Do 4 *oji» 

Gs 8 fixed me 
Do Acoan 
Gwj fired me 
Do Accun 

Incoma 
Do Aasjm 

mg um 

Do Aroun 
Jap Sum Cos Ac 
ft Matey 


Smwer Go % me 
Do Acoan 
SpeoN Sds Me 
Do Aeon 
Tohya Fund Inc 
Do Aaim 
US StNMr Co s Ac 
(At Eurey Me 

Do Accum 
fteewery 

RauMMf ft tony 5637 
Em Moonre 589 623# 


1281 1349 
129.1 1980 
524 569# 
568 BID# 
11*.1 122.0 

1172 1252 
643 572# 
BS« 879# 
282 30.1 
29.4 314 
1603 1510# 
9779 40*1# 
1110 1157 
1534 10*0 
1*60 157 0 
St .6 554 
53 7 574 
1772 >350 
13M 1427 
1(00 1090 

1058 1129 

2256 205 
2293 2452 
529 565 
sa* io50# 

1527 1603# 

707.5 


068 
.. 0.66 
*1.1 3 15 
+09 215 
+10 1‘ 
+19 1— 
41 850 
-OT 658 
*02-219 
+0.1 £.19 
.. BIS 
.. 515 
-16 0*7 
-21 0*7 
*05 000 
*0.1 099 
*01 099 
1 16 
. 1 18 
*04 099 
+04 039 
*10 032 
+10 027 
*02 000 
-02 944 
-0* 34* 
.. ZS7 
3.19 
•02 7.15 


SCIMITAR ASSET MANAGEMENT 
33*35 toeadutft St Umooa EC3V OAK 
01-533 5776/6711 


l W e 

267 

237 

252# 

252 

923 
. 523 

Euro Tel tnc 

263 

260* 

. 1 00 

~D6'Ace 

XI 

2ao# 

. 1® 

Stood G8i me 

280 

299 

. 100 

Do Acc 

XI 

300 

. in 

-Managed Exempt 

ir«.*-i210 

.. -4 00 


SCOTTISH MUTABLE • 

28 81 AOdMwf So. bJrJjuKti 
031-556 8l0t - ' 

me Mcoma utm 1*85 1550 

Oo Accun 317.7 2316 


UKGMy 


SCOmSN LIFE MVESTMENTS 
19. St AnhawoSa. Edmourgn 
031 225 2211 

1785 181.0 
1434 1534 
1781 1905 
Enrooean 2279 2439 

SCOnttH MUTUAL BWESIMENr 
MANAGERS 

199. VMcant SL Glasgow 02 Shn 
041-248 6100 


UK srorecos Eg 

Eirtmean 


1618 17 23 
1175 1250 
1*46 1S3B 
1940 2073 
1094 U64 
1723 1834 


SCOTTISH UNir TRUST 
39. Charted* Sq. Enraxrgt 
031-226*372 


Pacrtc 

world Growm 
N Amencan 
Mcoma Fired 
Eunpaen 
N Amer Me 
UK Orowtn 
Extra, tnc 


M3 686 
35 8 381 
330 353 
413 484# 

*1 0 *39 

2BS 284 
-301 322 
308 330 


US 

33S 


181 

13* 

005 

056 


-13 271 
-0.1 822 
-17 216 
+25 098 
*01 1*4 
-17 004 


-03 032 

-Ol 107 

-05.0.16 
-02 4.96 
+05 090 
*01 275 
-05 162 
.. 541 


SCOTTISH WIDOWS 

PO Bra SIB. ECMdugh Bilfl S8U 

031-855 6000. ' 

hs 2251 2395 

Accun 2592 2758 

SB4TIMEL HMDS MANAGBHBfT 
30. C*y Rd. London GC1Y 2AV 
01-638 6011 

Amer T(di ft Gan 990 1059 

_ ' 1920 2054 

1832 1748# 
2015 215.7 
316 339# 
68.6 71* 
384 41.1 
1098 1175 
546 564# 
5278 5647# 
322 345 
32 3 340 
409 430c 


Sec ficont# Fha 
SpecMt SRuaaane 
Inn Growm 
Amencan Mam 
Small Co 4 
Japan Tech ft Gen 
‘ li 


Exampi 

UK Genreu 
Euro Growm 


-09 3.16 
-12 ais 


-19 024 
n rai 

-20 *1S 
-20 1.49 
.. Olfl 
-0.* 031 
-03 1.67 
.. 000 
-0.1 50* 
.. 225 
-06 1.81 
. 032 


SMON 6 COATES 
1. London «Ul Bogs. 
01-568 3844-Ext 357 
Spaool S«s ISt . -'486 


London EC2M 5PT 

520 ..I 


STANDARD LK 

1 George Si ErtnOuy EH2 2XZ 
031 2252552 ■ 


Mcome IM 
Do Accun Urats 


STEWART,.! 
MANAGERS 
45. tortsm Sq. 
031-226 3271 
Aftrericrei fiexJ 
Do Accun 
Oo Withdrawal 
Auxtrafian Fund 
Do Aoccm 
Bntttt fired 
Do Accun 
Euopaa n Fend' 
Do Acoan 
Japan fired 
Oo Acoan 
Safins PPP 

SUN ALLIANCE 


2*2 259 
. 269 283 


EtMxa^i 

2215 3360 
2487 2850 
1554 1650 
97.0 1033 
986 1050 
5981 6370 
805.6 8580 
287 8 3069 
3030 3228 
3319 3534 
333 * 355.1 
IBB* 178.4 


-02 3*1 
-02 241 


237 

237 

237 

127 

127 

438 

438 

057 

097 

021 

021 


Sun ASanca HM. Hcnhwu. Sussex 



0403 56233 




Equty Truer Acc 

374 4 3B8J 

-40 2® 

n Am Tiura Aee 


+0 8 1.16 

Far Cart T row Acc 

oa mb :• 

+03 0.10 

Wnrtf*»*cfe BoocJ 

- 494 520 : 

+03 683 

TSB UNIT TRUSTS LTD 

* 




IPG 


0264 567® .Oaefinig. 0284 6343201 

8 = 

I “ 

Amencrai Me 

1123 1190#- 


□ 91 

Do Accum- 

1161 125.7# 


001 


1135 12000 


623 

DO ACCUn 

<320 141 1e 


533 

General Urn fix: 

1521 1610# 


2® 

Do Accun 

2505 2660# 


£® 

0* ft tod Me 

490 510#- 


63b 

Do Accun 

660 680# 


638 

Mccme - 

2090 2220 


4.40 

ACoxn 

3263 3*70 


449 

Pacific me 

1580 1890# 


U0S 

Do Accun 

1640 1740# 


02S 

tod toe 

3117 331.7 


102 

DC Accun 

3850 *008 


102 


618 656 


1.81 

Do Accwn 

67* 710 


181 

Natural Has 

410. *17 


218 

DO Accun 

422 448 


£18 


TARGET TRUST MANAGERS 
Target House. Gstenouae Rd. Ayteotaey Bucks 


+Q3 003 

+02 0.10 

140 
-02 107 
-05 333 
+05 201 


5941- 

Amer Ee^e - ' 71.1 ' 757 " 

Auat ru — i i .Mai' 173. 

Gonxwcxxry •. 857 71# - 

j—W • .294 320# . 

Eouiy 120B 129.7 ■ 

Eumpegn aaec Swe. 101 a. 1080 


Bd Otter Png YM 


Extra 
Fnancai 
G# Income 
Goa mcrene 

Da Acoan 


japan 

M#n ft Smgfiporo 
■Poertcmc 
Do Ramw 
Pro* Smto Fd 
UK Caom 
Soecai S4s 
Taennaosr 
worio mcome , 
wortdxnn CaptM 
t Ex *31 
Accun (3 


‘ff-J 


114 2 1228c 
2585 £78.8 
105.3 1109c 
525 560 
983 U»7 
787 837 

99.9 

220 235 
BOB - 063c 
1119 11920 
17 5 IBS# 
895 7*5# 
833 880# 
434 *63 
559 »3# 
1370 1*7 4# 
789 8«4 
148.6 158.9 


-03 568 
-12 l.*i- 
-01 7*3 
. 057 

057 
•05 536 < 
-05 0 18. 
-01 062 
*13 085 
+10 005 
12*0 
-03 139 
♦0.1 107 
-02 OlO 
-02 3.96 
-04 1 *1 
.. 190 
- 100 


THORNTON UWTHANALHya LTD 

Park House 16 firtshuv Caws London Q3M 

7DJ 

01-638 *761 

For Efit> ft Con 5*3 57 7 .. 087 

japan & Geo 58 7 57 1 008 

ShAmarftOtre f7 507 .. 099 

eg* 1 *" Us U 3 * : SS 

uCftOen 432 45.9 218 

3 IPOT TRUST MAN AOETO 
3 St Mary Aaa. London EC3A 68P 
01 3263356 

Smmre Go s SH 662 . 0.10 


T0UC«l«*#4A»n' l ^_ M 
Mermred House. I Wtft 
SAT 

01-2*8 1250 
Amobcen GrthTOt 
Grater* Growm- 
GubU Teen 
income Growth 
Income MsroNy 
Jure Growth 
ManEquqrtoc . 

Do Accun 
Otan Orowtn - 
SmaAer OS 
Sooctf Oto 


DOCA. l0ndon BC4V ■ 


414 

*97 

416 

979 

479 

*82 

It 

474 

609 

723 


*41 .068 

535# -03 2U 1 
449 -83 0.10 1 

61 7# -04 407 ■ 
513# -01 843 
St 3 '-01 '013. 
-02 238 
•02 296 
•02 in 
-02 208 ■ 
-02 106 


■255 

255 

509 

649 

789# 


TYNDALL MANAOCRS 
18. Crewnge Rd. tow 
027? rjjSt 


Aunrakan 
Do Acc 


Do Accun 
Exempt 
□o Accun 
Far Eastern 
Do Accun 
Fin ft Prop 
00 Acoan 
C arm* 
Do Accum 
Gat ream 
Do Accun 
YwkJ 
Accum 


V. 


Do Actum 
hid Earnings 


506 

529 
3031 
5433 
2870 
8595 
159 7 
1723 
51 7 
815 

125.1 
145 0 
1100 
1788 

530 
H60 
7322 

716.1 
1550 


543' 
566 
3228# 
5766# 
303 6# 
7028# 
1708 
1843 
55 1# 
858# 
1291 
1498 
1131 
1838 
564 
1210 
2473# 
762.6# 
1656 


.. 175 
. ITS 
. 338 

- 336 
. 678 
. 5.78 
. 0*0 
. 040 

. 341 ' 
. a*t 

X. 628 

. 638 
. 947 
. 9.47 
. 028 

- 828 
. 514 

614 

275 


UK PROVIDENT UT MANAGERS ■ ___ 

UK House. Castle SL Sekebuv SP1 3SH 
0722 336242 . _ 

UK Eouty 1090 USB# -08 .. 

Pease tom i960 1652# ^06' .. 

N Amar 112.7 .11*9# . *04. . 

VANGUARD TRUST. _ 

65 HdBom vacua ECIA 2EU - ... 

01-236 3053 

Grown Me 1869 197 8 2*9 

Do Accum Z7&4 257.7# *30 249 

HQtl YXHO 2021 2150# .-ID 5.12 

Do Accutt 2066 2198 -10 512 

SpeetfSa *06 *32# -01 23S 

Oa Accun *08 *35 -0 7 225 

Trustee 1322 1*07# -11 *03 

Do Accun 201 T 2149# -1 7 403 

Amer 8 Gen SS6 63* *01123 

Do Accun 58 6 634 *01 123 

Muter Rorrtoko £5988 6142# +016 257 

Da Accum £80 13 61 67 +015 257 

Ateng Ran Asa (5] 1133 <206# 196 

Og Accun 1133 1206 .. 105 

For EfiM ft Gen me 49 7 529 *03 036 

Do Acoan 49 7 529 +03 058 

WARDLEY UNHT TRUST MANAGERS 
weroiey House. 7. Dromnro Sq. London EC2 
01-929 1532 

Amencan Trust 612 680# *04 1.70 

Par East ft Gan 103.5 HOI • *04 000 
Md Growth 633 ' 73 7# +04 070 

Mcome Trust S2 3 865 -0 * 550 

Japan Growm I2aa 1333 -0*020 

SnuB CoBOraxM 1067 1169 - -06 208 
Technology 33 1 355 +02 020 

AMBMO 363 390 +00 200 

UK Trust "--1270 1351- -00-270 

Euopean town. 534 -568# *03 100 
Hong Kong- 233 248 . *0-1 150 

WAVERLET ASSET MANAQCMCNT 
13. Chzncoa Sa. EraneuU' 

031-225 1551 

Auwrenen Gow 160 19.7 *03 015 

Paafic Bntn 135 144 +0 * 020 

Canadian Bat Qth 56* 803 +01007 

Grerta Mm Fna did * 1068# . . 730 

WHtrnNODALEUNn" TRUST MANAGERS 
2 Honey La BCZ 8BT 

01-808 9085/5 

Snt Dtf G» Fund 878 887 +0.1 000 

US Govt Bond Fd 8507 51 0 

WWD90R TRUST MANAGERS LTO 
windier Haim. 83. Ka^iHay. London WC2B 

SSO ■ 

01-405 8381 

Com ft EraXty 47 5 50ft 784 

Income 520 509# .. 524, 

town *8» 531 ' .. 228 


The prices in this 
seetjotroefer to - 
Wednesday's trading 


• Ex dhAdend: c Coin divhfand.'k Cien 
stock «KiL a Ex stock spHL. m Cum a 
(any two or muni of above), a Ex al (any 
two or more of above). Deakng oc 
valuation days: (1) Monday. (2) Tuesday. 


(3) Wednesday. (4) Thursday. (5) Friday. 
(20) 25th of month. (21) 2nd Thursday of 
month. (22) let axTard Wednesday ot 
month. . (23) 20th of'mortth. (24) 3rd 

Tuesday ot month.. (25) 1st and 3rd 

Thursday of month. (26) 4th Tuesday or 
month. (27) isLWBckiesdayat month. (28) 
Last Thursday of month. (29) 3rd working 

oayof month. (30) 16th of mexith. pi) In 

wening day of month. (32) 20th ot month. 
(33) let day of February, May. August. 
November. (34) Last workeig day of 
month. (35) 15th of month. (36) 14th of 
month. (37) 21st of month. (38) 3rd 


Wedne 


of .month. (39) am 
of month. (40) Valued 
tl) Last Thuradey ot Stock 
account. (42) Last day. -of 
* 2nd and *th Wednesday of 
v. (45) 8th of month. 
I month. 














Grass 


1 





Gross 









988 




am 

YW 

i 





*» 

VW 

Hxyi LOW 

Coavany 

Pnea 

1 

ft 

S 

% P/E 

Mgr 

t» 

Company 

fiice Oige pence 

*» PIE 

[ ragh Low 

Congreiy 

Pno» 

Chgi pmea 

% P/E 








80 

JB 

nova O- 

Jj 



. 17 8 

143 

03 

PCT 

108 


46 

*3 t£3 








B8 

61 

Foro ft wesron 

87 


43 

49 110 

25b 

168 

Pacar Systems 
Paofac Sales 

210 


43 










<rwd> Cam 

180 




79 

Sb 










ar idg 


to 

Frosncjfce 

93 

• -1 


29 155 

158 

IX 

Pwntwrgtw 










46 

655 

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90 

270 

X 

58 

96 

348; 


-1 

-2 

-2 


• -2 
-5 
-3 


+2 

s-t 


06 1A .. 
33 30 29.9 

500 53 29.7 
57 30 410 

11.8 5 4 23.4 
28 28 483 
14 00 . . 

' 5.7 32 39.7 

. 26 26 47.5 
60 18 34.4 

91b 50 259 
71 9b 40 328 

S S ZB 48 4 
40 29 390 

TSB 17 8 BJ 
93 14 54.1 
200 81 17T 
Z2 1B4J3 
*8 46 545 


R-2. 15.1b *3 350 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


*7 3* 

71 31 

4# 21 

154 118 
22' IT 
2 (T 12' 
1® I3T 
UC 90 
2*7 187 
T06 88 
750 375 
9t 77 
133 75 

900 *90 
TIB 1S3 
440 320 
290 190 
362 262 
115 78 

27 16 

206 152 


■ Amencan Exerau 

■ 

Boaroa 
B ntann w Arrow 
D**V MN 

• DO A 
Eleara 
Eng TruM 
Exct 

Exoioratxre 

sssy 

■Gooaa ID S M) 
J^nOenon AOmn 
ICH 
MAI 
U ft G 

M wcanua House 
Pacac Mv Tit 
Do Warrants 
Sram New Court 


42’ 

20 

137 
£19 1 
£13 

138 
118 
234 
100 
720 

B3 

115 

880 


14 


60 

• TOO 

• • 700 

-2 09 

40 
80 
33 
93 

84 

-85 -22 322 
■6*10 179 22 16A 


33 227 
.. 81-1 
44 180 
301X8 
17 114 
43 310 
1* 180 
27 1*4 
13 111 
13330 
77 U 


153 

-10" 


83 

330 

-10 

220 


87 



61 

£8 280 

282 

-9 

200 


40 


♦1 

00 



a 

+2 




in; 

-ft 

100 

60 

6ft 


LONDON COMMODITY 
’ 1 EXCHANGE 

G W Joynsen and Od m^art 
SUGAR (From C. Czramttm) 



Dec 

-1594-58.* 

March 

1g7.M7.ft 

May 

171.6-70.8 


1750-7*9 

Oct 

180.0-780 

Vot: 

COCOA 

Son 

2039 

1413-19 

Dec 

Mar . 

1459-57 

. T496-S5 

May — 

1514-10 

Sep 

mo-49 


1574-73 


?sos 

COFFEE 

Cop 

17*2-741 




177037* 


17M-7H1 


_ - 1805-800 

JyL. 

_ .. 1 825-SI 5 

Soo — i — 

1650-830 

SOYABEAN 

1305-280 


1225-27.5 

Fab - — 

1360-22 i) 

fp> — 

1314K29.Q 

- 13d 0-28. Q 

Aufi 130.0365 

VOL - 


OAS OB- 

12600-2550 


1 30.00-31 R 


139)00- SLR 

NOV ...... 

13400-33.75 


Doc 


13700-BYH 


Jan. 
FBb. 
Mar. 
Apr. 
Vol: . 


_ 138.00-BY • 
140 DO-34.00 
14a«M2J30 
J44.omoo; 
6101 


LONDON MCTAL EXCHANGE. 
Unofficisl prteM 
OfflcW Tirwnr Oguras 

PriCE in £p«r imtrtc tORM 
SBuar in dmk# p#r troy odiie# 

RttWf Wolf l CO. Ltd. report 

COPPER GRADE A 

Cash 67&00-879.00 

Three Months . 896.00499.00 

Vot 3450 

Tone — «. — StMdy 

STANDARD CATHODES 

CSSfl 854,00-656.00 

Three Months . 8754XW77JX) 

VO) Nil 

Torw kS8 

LEAD 

cash 25500-256.00 

Three Months. 25800-^650 
VOf ; 550 


Tbne r_.. 

ZMC STANDARD 

Cash : 50000-510-00 

Vo) - l NN 

Tone .-idh 

ZMCWBH GRADE 

Cam 539.00-541.00 

TflreB Months. S43D0-544.QQ 

Vol 2050 

Tone —3 Stttdra 

SILVER LARGE 

Cash 3*900*35100 

Three Months. 3Sa.00-3SS.50 

VW 12 

Tone — Quiet 


SILVER SMALL 

Cash 34&5D35T.QQ 


COMMODITIES 


Three Months ’. 35BJXW58J0 

VW • — N3 

Tone l — CcUb. 

ALUftMNRM. 

Cash 1 75550-75650 

Three Morths. T70.00-77050 

VW 2000 

Tons 


NICKEL 

Cash 2585*2590 

Three Months .... 2600*2605 

VW — 278 

Tone Steady 


MEAT ANQ LIVESTOCK - 

COMMISSION 
Average Matocfc prices #t 

repiMiHiUltra markets on 
T8i August 

(» Cattle, 9&56p per kg hr 

Sheep 158t38p par kg 

d 

cw(+1J33) .■-• 

GB: Pigs. 8IL21p ps-kglw 


Btgfand and Waiae 

cam nos.<nm os ^ %. ava. 

:: i-i.o« 

.inos. up 15-7%, eve. 
pnea. t57-37p(+l.l6) 

Pig nos. up 1.7 V ave. 
prKS. 0 Oj2o (-0.41) 
Sc o tl a nd : 

Carte nos. down 3.0 %. ave. 
□nae.94.l4p (-1.41) 

Sheep nos up 592 lb, ave. 
gnc8.15042p(+2.14) 
^gnos. down liSVave. 
prw.73S3p(+1J7) 


. - UWDON MEAT RJTIMES 
. EXCHANGE 
PigConhsW 
p. par Mo 

Open -Close 


Oa 

Nov 

Jan 

Fab 

Mar 

Sm 


Unq. 
uno. ioaa 
Unq.. 11<5 
■ Unq.-: nas 
Unq. 10TJ 
Unq. 101.8 

Una 1015 
Unq. 1024 
Unq. 1020 
Unq. 10ZS 
Vot 10 

Pfg Mut trot 20 


uondon katritures 

EXCHANGE 

uvecattecomreet 

p.pwkfk3 

Open Ctosa 

Unq- ?aq 
Unq. 

Unq. 


Month 

Aug 

oa 

Nov 

Feb 

Apr 

Jun 


S&O 
9&0 
Unq-' 99.0 
Unq. flas 
Unq. . 98.5 
Unq : 99+0 

Vot 5 


LOfOON GRAIN FUTURES 
£ par tame 

Wuet Barley 
Close Ciote' 
10355 102J25 

10530 104 35 

108J75 107 50 

11130 109. BO 

113j65 111.80 


Month 

Sep 

Nov 

Jan 

Mar 

Msy 

Volume: 

Whan 

Barley 


-£01 

-228 


LONDON 

POTATO FUTURES 
EpBr tamo 


■Month 

Nov 

Fftb 

X 

Nov 


GJLL Freigbt Future* LM 
••port S1Q par index point 
f»e«Btrt Index 


open Ctosr 

1323 130.7 

■1433 1465 
2I5jO 21W 

225.8 2230 

833 885 

Vot 1183 


High/Lour 
OctM 665.0660 j; 
J« 87 69T.D688X 
Apr87 73SQ.73&C 

Jut 67 

OaS? 

Janes : 

Apr 88 . 

Jut 83 

JWi 78IM6 
Open interest 1996 


Close 
G62L5 
691 J) 
736 J> 
6900 
78EJ0 
7875 
850.0 
■775J) 


TANKER REPORT 

High /low dose 
At^W- 1010*1010 101£ 

sop« 1010-1010 ion 

Ltcf 8b lost 

Dec 36 ‘ iqsc 

Mar 87 10H 

JtirB7 HM 

Vol: 8 tote : 

Open Interest 40 

tt?4|SiSte onBW *' 

luptLSonB/B/BB 



























1 



From your portfolio card check your 
eight share price movements. Add them 
up to give you your overall total. Cheek 
this against the daily dividend figure 
published on this page. If it matches you 
have won outright or a sham of the total 
daily prize .money stated. If you ace a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
bock of your canL You mas always have 
vour card available when claiming. 



THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1 986 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


still in retreat 


ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began- July 28 . Dealing s end today; §Contango day next Monday. Settlement day August I&. 
. §Forward bazgains are permitted on two previous ousiness days. - 


—tSo/cJ— 

© Tmh Mcm i N inw IMM 

DAILY DIVIDEND 

£ 8,000 

Claims required for 
-12 points 

Claimants should ring 0254-53272 


No. CeW»MT 



HdJfl Low . tommy 


158b 

Hqn Lew Company 


8® 38 tant 61 ■ u Uttt 

1SS RomcMd (JIMo 128 m-3 7.1 U as 

380 2R) Royl We Of Scot 30} * M3 aj as 

8 5 . toodw t»- -V ift* 33 110 

894 419 Sam Dart 717 50*0 70 n> 

818 613 'Son SSS S£9 73 670 

JV «3'- WteS-togd - CS7. TT 

320 220 WnmU .385 . . 71 27133 


8*0 620 

& g 

530 3» 
M2 147 
S7D 405 
515 410 
23/ 128 
am IBs 
243 M3 
365 275 

&;§i 

1M 77 
252 217 

248 131 
234 163 
5*0 353 
316 223 
3M 22B 
251 180 
550 410 
330 WS 


. BREWERIES 


Ataa-tyont 3i3 
But .. TZf *-i 

MMl 61 •■! 

Momm 125 -1 

BrmuMMwh) 518 -1 

B U Wf (H Pi : 148 w-J 

BU IUW OCTl BMW se • . 

Cfa* IMMBMW) 510 -i 

5 1 4 

ear s u 

HMlM i Km 512 -0 

Mg&fand Oita 75 

kr K^e fla n thus 1GB 


I 


138 43 143 
21 J 30 156 

12 IS 137 
40 37 352 

200b 3S 18S 
7S. 5.1 11.4 
154 2.7 16.1 
107 2.1 2tL6 

13 45 124 
8.0 33 IIS 

103 3.4 11J 
25* AMU2 

29 as 152 
6S 44 KM) 
BS 27 .. 
32 ao 154 

na s ns 

lbs S3 its 

16l4 4.4 144 
11.1 44 US 

ti i 44 ii a 

IDS 5*27.0 
127 24 193 

104 32 224 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


Industrials E-K 


Audio Fkklitv 


Bespat 8 


Davies & Newman 



Please be sure to take accomt 
of any mtnas signs 



33 6 6 284 

4 S 45 137 


219 124 
423 270 
17B 126 
433 205 
BZ 51 '/ 
250 ao 
sa 33 
65 46 

313 241'. 
108'. 61 
48 a 
580 383 
32 18 

iM'.tie 
T7-. 13 
260 1B0 
ISO 120 
MS 162 
24 ■- 15S 
158 116 
45 22 

234 150 
488 158 
615 445 
132 74 
54 31'. 

168 96 

216 MS 
134 75 

IBS 13>. 
253 170 
125 44 
529 374 
250 170 
380 225 
318 206 
273 183 
286 155 
190 IT# 
505 320 
323 225 
108 54 

103 75 

285 230 


B< Tattcom ' 188 
Bmmi Sown Kay 101 

?S WA £ 

Cxmb A iimw 658 
Caramga Bee 215 

%£ H 

Do V S CPF 196 
Comcap m 

Cray Eiea .311 

CNOM SOB 

DM Efaa SB 

Dattaen 160 

Dawnm -A . 34 

Domra 315 

Dowfflag 1 MB# JB 
Dubiv . 174 

Bectrocotennents 373 
Onro nc Maen 83 
Efc£feonc Rentes 49 
Ernes bgneog 268 
Euroowm 300 

Faina* Baa -158 
Farm# T12 

Foaaia Tecti 39 
GGC 186 

Grosranor 120 

immo Sad ao 
bl sa 

lm Signal 5 CarnroJZK 
Janas Stroud 248 
(Code 245 

lac R nfagmnon 250 
Loon 194 

UKEIM 363 

MACTO 4 171 


li 


Mumone San 38 

Mxray Sad 46 

NBMBark (Loras) 268 

NS . 89 

Ocaonc* 16 

Odom tathumns SO 

mean » 

maps Fti 5-.^ MT7 

mans Lamps «/v em'« 
Web 2«5 

OB 'A LB Uotmg 165 

Rwnav - 194 

Do ADR 25 £19'. 

Prasaae 138 

Duett Automaton 27 
RwW EM 182 

Romka 483 

Sends (OH) 585 
Sterna* 184 

Sound IMustOD 31*# 

STC MB 

8WM M 160 

^omtMgnKS ^ 

Telephone Rentas 195 
Tetomema 49 

Tborfl BS 467 

TMnmfFW) 250 
Tumi 260 

UB 295 

Unseen 185 

U(d Leasing 155 

Iftd Scientific lag 
TO fan ua tea «M 
Vokw 245 

Western setocuon 75 
whaMonb Beet as 
Mamas Fnang 255 


FINANCE AND LAND 


100 IS 170 
WL7 50109 

u uu 
m arms 

05 07 63 
13* 2.1 150 
70S 4S12S 

2.1 1.1 24 I 

.. .. 10 * 

21 07 153 
5* 1*219 

55 32 125 
84 110 192 
1.0 06 . 

1* 47. 7J 

2* OS 21J2 
21 5* 12.1 

4.1 24 129' 

BS 24-16.1 
is 1*683 
4* 8.4 13*. 
8SB 23 14S 
G* 23 102- 
11 £0156 

24 £1 17.1 
1*» 26 1SJ9 
51 33 II 6 
8*4 OB 10.0 
8* 45 102 

17 32 7.4 
10 04 .. 

121 4S 9* 
171b 70 511 
172 72 9.7 

14* 07 210 
154 44 12S 
14 08803 

4* 1*182 

07 12 9.1 

03 03 28* 

0.111 02 972 
10* 57 121 

7* 84 12* 

1.1 89 32 

26 05 226 

16 67 IIS 
575 4S .. 

75 3.1 134 

7* 4* BO 

72 3.714* 


Aowgwonh 2i8 

Allien Hone 129 

Antafagesa 600 

BerUay Tecti 206 

Camaas £19'- 

CnkMr 250 

Ga n trewe y 32 

EqUty 4 Gen zb 

trory 6 Sana 132 

M«ad» 191 

Nm Hons Loan* 66 
Da 8V £86 

We* maria Ml 

Tampteoa 213 


iThota appiaroa I 


-2 1 * 0 *... 

42 12. 22 54 

-25 272 4* 50 

47 17.1 OS 7*3 

.. 5.7 2* 88* 

♦'/ i j 4* 284 
6* 52 151 
.. 59b 4S25S 


FOODS 


24* 

56 Wdntaaonl 
172 Waoa BSke 
67 
41 
-157 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


48 86V 

206 ISO 
415 291 
SAT 150 
156 106 
111 76' 
732 .102, 
18S 112 
TOO 57' 
136 82 
306 - 245 
168 135 
160 112 
2T 15 
163 127 
131 100 
245 172 
133 111 
298 215 
168 1(3 
453 330 
101'. 72*. 

10' >734 

410 333 
118 100 
155 119 
91 82 

178 129 
330 216 
73 36 
233 17B 
153 67 


MCZO n/v Bearer w. 
AJted Cotoka 191 
Araemnwi «ro 

Anchor Omotut 237 
BTP Ml 

Bayar DMSO Efl6‘. 


Bran Owns 136 

■r Banzai " ' 89 

Cossaa Bras 16# 

DO K 152 

Cory (Horace) 20 

era* M7 

DoDW 124 

as* Everwd 2ns 

Erada • 1W 

FosacoMnsop 233 

Hrtnad Uamao) ta 

rwcion 308 

HMCtwtOUSO ma 

tap Om> tai 080 . 

Lspone MO 

3gn . 100 

_ »; 

RaalKpt* HBga 88 

Remou 139 

SMA B**D 257 

SutcUM Buakran 48 

WobnnhaMie Rmk 231 

Vorksnce Cnam T4t 


400 U .. 
3* IS 20* 
100 25 203 

51 2* 133 

64 4* 17.0 

700 51 .. 

10* 59 (7* 
6* 4.4 15L7 
.. ...153 

57 46 IBS 
107 3*10* 
6* 33 10* 

56 43 9* 
OS 4J $7- 
10L0 6* 152 
. . . . 12 * 
9* 4*145 
47 4.0 127 

12S 55 9* 
54 42 11* 

214 54 103 

456 5* li* 
119 34 14* 
54 54 14 6 

2* 7.7 158 
*6 42 BS 
3* 2* 174 

“ " 55* 

11 1 4* 26* 

.4* 3* 127 



-2 


3*142 

100400 

-5 

11.1 

37 13* 


07 

£0 110 

-1 

90 

52 200 

-6 

17.1 

32 137 

+15 

11* 

34 iai 

-V 


.. 104 



39 e* 


67 

5.4 17-6 1 

•-3 


3*107 i 

-4 

5J 

30 1*1 

: m 

7.4 

8*2K4 

, m * 7 

ao- 

.16220 

*i 


*219* 


00 

5* 07 


10* 

40120 


10* 

61 119 

-10 



-2 

id* 

42152 

-1 

32 

1*23* 

• -1 


0.1 111 

• ... 

50 

3* 140 

-2 

2* 

1.7190 

S 

4J 

27 15* 

-4 

6* 

21 176 ' 

+2 

45 

5* 9* 

-a 

9.4 

19 213 



3* 184 

• .. 

20 

5* 

28 130 . 
5* 88 ! 

-6 

1/0 

3* 17.0 

-5 

30 

10219 

-3 

7* 

70 152 ! 

-2 

19 

1*200 | 



30 140 


2 J 

61 15* 



42 130 



34 14* 

• -3 
-3 

8* 

0* 

39123 

34169 


170 

4J10.1 

-4 

79 

3? 21.1 

• -1 

4* 

3210* 

•- 

301 

50 112 


03 

23 21.0 

-7 

09 

5-1 «* 

-2 

iaw> 

67 119 

• .. 

82 

57 19* 


HOTELS AND CATERERS 


II 


CINEMAS AND TV 



270 178 

Angke TV A 

2*8 

• 

139 

50130 

52 77 

Oamptsn 

44 


10 

6* 6* 

240 176 

HIV N IV 

2t* 

-2 

114 

54 17 

368 263 

lwt nog* 

340 

-3 

21* 

6* 130 

350 188 

5(« TV A 

323 

-a 

15* 

40 100 

273 140 

TVS N N 

220 

T 

M*b 05 100 

48- 31 

TSW .- 

- 45 

„ 

20 

58 124 

225. 223 

nwmes-IV 

224 

-3 


*: 


433 328 Grand Mai 378 -4 115 3* 12* 

288 208 Kennedy Btaafcta 233 -3 24 13 12.0 

301 312 LsODraM 339 -1 151 47 182 

545 447 Lon Parte Hotels 520 .. 14* 2* 15* 

100 78'- Mount CMrtOIM 87'. 21 24 144 

105 67 Prynot 01 W HoM 88 »-1 £1 15* 

79 S8> Queens Moat 85 -V 2* 3*14* 

405 368 Savoy Haws A- 388 .. 53 14 M* 

81 56 S®W 84 • .. 1* 2*153 

208 141 TiunMuBeFane MS 7S 54 144 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 


F.NANCfr-TRuj 


DRAPERY AND STORES 



l* 3*30 

30 3*69 

3* 3*18 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


260 

193 

85 

85 

296 

IBS 

a 

8* 

260 

170 

9 

6 

2a 

230 

480 

364 

590 

*29 

48 

32 

740 

«10 

438 

268 

58 

36 

37 

24 

42 

33' 

00 

46 

117 


270 

215 

212 

148 

are 

2*2 

102 

66 

ai 

200 

430 

333 

74 

55 

520 

318 

198 

136 

855 

» 

451 

293 

853 

638 

153 

120 

509 

417 

321 

191 

563 

420 

122 

80 

448 

260 


Afled Irish 

m 

72 

196 

-7 

ft* 

30 

Aim fttew Z 


150 

7.7 

fcijSfcraSlS 

E9- 

210 

a 

Ml 

+ 1 - 
-& 

170 

07 



100 

0.7 



-5' 

20* 

50 

Bataan 

*57 

*0 

480 

-17- 

260 

56 



1*6 

20 

Cuter uST 

308 


aw 

04 

cm* 

54 

-1 

lb 

40 


127 

• 

138 

01 


06 


206 

57 

.ton to* Wafas 

70 


34 

40 







r?6i 

+3-. 

200 

46 


175 

• -2 

66 





221 

74 

Gtetews Peat 

77 

-a 

19 

30 

HamouK 

200 

• -10 

I03r 

SJ 

WSM ■ 

348 

-7 

Iflfl 

5.4 

mk gienger 

81- 

+1 

*3 

64 



-5 

177 

37 




12* 

87 



+15 

257 

34 

U>y» 



25* 

60 

Merauryiro 

M* 

-10 



DO &• k 

121 

-2 



M«Sa*| 

5*4 

-5 

371 

08 

Nat .Stas Bi 

fM 

• -1 



Nat west 

■92 

-10 

278 

56 

Ottoman 

Ci 12 


600 

04 

FrowMm 

321 

• -2 

155 

4* 


101 

• -4 

40 

20 10* 

-61 


36 

59 2D0 

90 

-1 

35 

4*115 

131 


15 27* 

7 


a*" 



sa 

-5 

05 50* 

52 


07 

1*38* 

720 

-2 

18.1 

22 202 

276 

-2 

60 

25 1».T 

131 


3* 

2A 337 

*0 

-2 

01 

70 

7.7 

3C8 


111 

03 M0 

474 

-6 

171 

08 M2 

205 

-3 

90 

47 101 

125 

-4 

07 

54 

7* 

250 


80 

34 

97 

01 

-a 

1* 

1* 17.1 

3 

-2 

43 

1*201 

-8 

70 

17 l&B 

m 

-1 

05 

39 11* 

600 


116 

2*232 

180 

-2 

54 

3* 170 

238 


61 

16 17* 

115 

-6 

10 

2* 

04 

135 

-5 

5J 

07 101 

85 

-1 




200 


9* 

47 

10* 

42G 

-6 

100 

2* 

102 

IBS 

-* 

7.7 

49 

14.1 

76 


14' 

1.0 

450 

WO 

+1 

.57 

01 

17.4 

186 

•-6 

107 

SB 

406 

cn 


300 

£5 

107 

CIO 


300 

30 

13* 

.£22 ' 

-4 

-03 

3* 

17.7 

25 

>■ 

-2* 

88 

05 

42 

fl 

31 

74 

117 

147 


HO 

02 

KL7 

78 


5.0 

66 

112 

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m 

TI 

02 

a* 

.122 

• -2 

64 

52 

182 

191 

-d 

ED 

31 

a* 

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1T.1 

18. 

205 

zn 

■ +6 

107 

40 

159 

i» 


5* 

£0 

22* 



50 

19 

344 

210 


29 

14 

M3 

SW 


02 

15 

26* 

208 


•51 

25 

217 

236 

-1 

5 Bn 

IS 

197 

330 


1£9 

39 

192 

.75 

-1 

10 

1* 

105 

■108 


55 

01 

810 

184 

-4 

4* 

2* 

102 

.350 


79 

18 

305 

141 

+1 

7ft 

50 

12* 





107 

112 - 49 4 4 

264 -2 88 aa 

.a -1 1.7n 3* 

76 -38 4J 

86 • 31 5* 

33 0 *-6 11* *4 

■rW 

145 

153 

151 

315 

102 

170 

101 


71 

10 219 


- 84 

'29 

42 125 

2* 

14 325 

. S3 

20175 

3 Be 23 

2Z0 

37 142 


398 100 A0 EM 335 

i8i 120 Mxuinanc tes. 

138 36 ■ Amsvad 132 

99 -43 AonoM OQMPUUrS SO 

98 63 -Aden 84 

300 205 AUstac Comp 250 

58 48 Ando fieteWy . -S3 

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410 

306 

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123 

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237 

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256 

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220 


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247 

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370 

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950 

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165 




603 

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135 

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314 

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156 9l 
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360 175 
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791 5H 
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53 

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BSG 

4b 


10 

30 14.1 



BUnel Bros 



f 

314 

IK 

Braman (CD) 

287 

-S 

11 1 

30 150 

608 

421 

B. Aerospace 

491 

+13 

228 

40103 1 

151 

ao 

Br Cor AUCkOBS 

ng 


50 

42 111 

273 

166 

CaHyne 

228 


79 

*0 . 

£15 

re 

cow* rn 

207 

-1 

5.7 

20 97 

133 

106 

Dam (Godfrey! 

107 

• 

64 

60 92 

Mi 

172 

Dowry 

210 

-S 

7* 

3* <4.4 

115 

X 

ERF ’ 

85 



50 

332 

253 

FR Group 

304 


48 

10 204 

194 

125 

tod Motor 

183 

• -5 

70 

3 B .. 

90 

« 

Gams (Fienk G) 

74 


4* 

00 62 

£96 

SSB 

General Motor 

230 

+4 

25* 

100 

103 

51 

OW*M Lawrence 

n ■ 

-3 



114 

66 

Hanweds 

88 

>3 

ao 

4*100 

.«M 

37* 

Mono* ugsr 

453 

♦7 

■ *0 

00 

MET 33S 

Jaguar- 

505 


12* 

24 104 

142 

72 

Jessups 

123 

-1 

61 

50 9* 

115 

55 

KwW^d 

IBS 

-1 

3* 

£8 1b* 

402 

269 

Lta 

302 

■! 

15.1 

50 171 

.183 

■» 

Lookers 

161 


7b 

4-7 10* 

653 

479 

Lucas 

513 

-3 

157 

31 103 

.141 

tie 

Perry gg 

IK 


64 

si 112 

91 

66 

Pts (tons iGB) 

E9 


64 

63 94 

96 

51 

toe* (HJI 

81. 

-3 

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51 114 

71 

M 

Rtmo* 

38 




72 

43 

Sucre 

81 


3.1 

40 12* 

a 

32 

Uteomad (Jonas) 

66 

-3 

14 

21 120 


AKM Br Ports 255 -6 

B» Corampnwann 345 -3 

CetedDna 216 -5 

Fanf» kJemesl 67 

Crag 500 • 

Jacm 14] 69 

L«to 7- 

Mersey Docks 32 -i 

Ocean Transwtt jib -i 

p B O Did *86 -4 

Rucanan (Wasted 138 -6 

T-DDOO* 320 -10 

Turner* Scab 370 


71 28 141 

71 20172 

71 3*379 

4 7 70 122 

214 4* 6* 

5 lb 7* 527 

as 

34 

98 45100 
2J9 4 7 139 
71 5 1 21 7 

S3 1 7 19 B 
129 35 510 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


800 29Q Fit 325 

206 1*5 Gemar Boom 145 
45 32 Heaaum 5raj 42 

218 168 Lamoen Mowann 183 
0? 68 Newooid s Burton 7* 
11* 65 Pmard IDS 

157' 118 Smsng & FoMyr tea 
273 158 5W3 226 


K 


I 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 


I 


167 

165 

Ueerd 

165 

-1 

44 

97 SOI 

2S0 

WS 

Assoc Book 

213 

-2 

80 

35 135 

358 

220 

Assoc Newsoaper 

316 

• -2 

8* 

2* 17* 

315 

280 

BUCk lAAO 

315 


M* 

40 174 

730 

515 

BnSW 

G» 

• 

888 

50 175 

y* 

450 

Codral (Ufa* 

460 


111 

24 »7 

383 

295 

- DO A 

295 

-3 

11 1 

38 13* 

119 

76 

EMAP A 

119 

1+Z 

31 

20 212 

378 

330 

Haynes PuekSta* 

3S0 

-5 

a* 

57 1B0 

MO 

85 

Home Coutaes ■ 

210 

-10 

100 

40 104 

380 

163 

moeoenoent 

305 


•12* 

39 

56ft 

404 

tai TTfamWyi 

547 

,s 

14 0 

28 144 

M 

820 

News kuarnnaui 

£12 

■ 

14 0 

1 1 

MO 

465 

OcfdpUG 

465 

-5 

.96 

2.1 1U 

*138 

113 

PonsmouDi Sund 

118 


57 

40 212 

455 

220 

TrmrlY loll 

415 


214 

52 119 

.403 

an 

Uu NtwspaoBo 

373 


320 

61 140 


TEXTILES 


ASM Text 280 

Atkuu Bros 253 

Bute (Jam - 140 
Beckman iAi 98 

Br Mow 133 

Burner i Limb 92 

Coran 70 

Courauida 255 

Onvumef Ul 153 

Dawson 238 

Dabrun 44 

Dura Mb 43 

Foster (Jowl 70 

Gitkel Broadoom SB 

MOuna Pameeen 37 

mown maroKO 145 

Jerome (S) 75 

Lamom 158 

Leeds 176 

Lwlor »>. 

Lj4K(S] 72 

Macuy |Hugni . 98 

Manun 16 

Pvuand -A 131 

Raaacui 41 

BEET 122 

Smar 146 

Bmaosnaw (R] 80 

Broud Rkey 118 

Tenured Jersey 1*8 

Tomkoiaons iao 

T00M 

vanayoa 270 


93 £9 12.7 
1*3 99 80 

07 1 7 

82 45 98 

4.4 59 224 

52 57 74 

114 77 59 
&4 2*27.9 


10.7 38 192 
100 40 15* 

60 40 64 

ar &* 11* 
86 65.08 
71 7 7 21.1 
57 01 

aa as 06 

21 14124 

80 37 IS* 

. ..34* 

6.7 133 68 
50 71 61 
7ft 02 7* 

39 27 107 
43 &7 72 
64 4.1 10* 
8 0 4* 114 

1* 1.4 07. 

82 11.4 150 
5* 67 M2 
54 

00 53161 
23 56 9* 
7*0 5* 49 
04 4*110 

30 55 5* 

43 aa 6 * 
as 5 * a* 

06 4* 14* 

57 62 ft* 
1Q0 37 04 


























































































ii)C X XivJuCO flUuUil 6 1^00 



Motoring by Clifford Webb 


All geared up for the great oil change 


. The oil companies are gear- 
JWg themselves up for another 
°,‘ loeir periodic assaults on 
tne car engine oil market with 
new, and if their claims are to 
be believed, even better oils. 
The "in” word this time round 
*? “synthetic” Once upon a 
hme synthetic meant inferior. 
Now it seems that the 
chemist's arts are so advanced 
that mixtures from the lab- 
oratory do the job far better 
than natural mineral oil. 

The pressure from the car 
makers for advanced oils has 
been mounting for 10 years. 
Turbo chargers, sophisticated 
“black box” controlled fuel 




andignmon systems, new lean The Renault 21: rewarding to drive 

burn fuel efficient engines .... 

have all pushed operating non tests which can be met cosung £6,845 which I tested 
temperatures up so rapidly only by oils containing syn- recently is the likely big seller, 
that existing oils are close to ihelic compounds” To dem- Jt is the second cheapest in a 
Iheir limits. Some engine de- onsuate the extra protection range costing from £6,485 to 
signers claim that advanced afforded by EX2 it went to £10.170 and all carefully 
new types of internal com bus- Silverstone Racing School targeited to give them a price 
lion engines are actually being where cars suffer a lifetime's edge over the major 
held up by the lack of suitable wear in a couple of months, competition, 
lubricant*. Engines there are completely The new 21 is a good looker 

But new engines aside the rebuilt every 1.500 miles. judged by any standards. It 
problem is further com- It reports “When the en- stays safely in the current 
plicated by the trend towards gines on Supeiiube EX2 were moul — low pose, high bool — 
longer and longer intervals stripped there was no sign of but manages to do it while 

between recommended oil engj ne stress therefore indicat- still retaining an instantly 

changes. The average now ing that greatly extended re- 

seems to be every 12.000 build periods could be 

miles, six tones what it was in achieved”. Vital StatlSuCS 

I960. If are thinking ol trying Model: Renault 21 TS 

In practice all oil companies the odd tin next time you need Price: £6,845 
have been “spiking” their oil a top-up it mixes perfectly well Engine: 1721 cc 

from the ground with chemi- with existing mineral oils. Performance: 0-62mph 10.7 


new types of internal combus- 
tion engines are actually being 
held up by the lack of suitable 
lubricants. 

But new engines aside the 
problem is further com- 
plicated by the trend towards 
longer and longer intervals 
between recommended oil 
changes. The average now 
seems to be every 12.000 
miles, six times what it was in 
1960. 

In practice ail oil companies 
have been “spiking” their oil 
from the ground with chemi- 


cals since the 1940s to combat n , _ 
oxidation, improve wear ivOSfl 1 CSl 
resistance and reduce sludge. 

The chemicals are collectively I? pnoiilf O 1 
labelled “additives” and at A'-vliaUH 1 


some time all the main 
companies have proclaimed 
that theirs contain at least one 
secret ingredient which the 
others cannot match. 

Esso is just launching 
Superfube EX2 containing a 
new and bigger mix of ad- 
ditives (40 per cent of the total 
compared with about 5 per 
cent) which it prefers to call “a 
synthetic based oil”. It would 
like to go the whole hog and 
drop the word “based" be- 
cause like all its rivals it knows 
that synthetic will soon be the 
biggest selling word in the oil 
industry but trading standards 
officers would be down on it 
like a ton of bricks if it did 
that 

I almost forgot the 
punchline. Esso Superlube 
EX2 will cost nearly £3 a litre 
compared with £2 for the 
company's present top grade 
Superlube Pius. As the average 
sump takes 4 litres that's an 
extra £4 for every oil change. 

Esso insist it is money welt 
spent and in any event “Some 
European car manufacturers 
are developing new sperifica- 


The Renault 21. the French 
company's much needed new 
contender in the upper me- 
dium family saloon and fleet 
car market is now reaching 
British showrooms in num- 


targeited to give them a price 
edge over the major 
competition. 

The new 21 is a good looker 
judged by any standards. It 
stays safely in the current 
moul — low pose, high boot — 
but manages to do it while 
still retaining an instantly 

Vital statistics 

Model: Renault 21 TS 
Price: £6,845 
Engine: 1721 cc 
Performance: 0-€2mph 10.7 
seconds, maximum perfor- 
mance 1 l 6 mph 
Official consumption: urban 
31.4mpg, 56mph 55.4mpg, 
75mph 45.5mpg 
Length: 14.6ft 

Insurance: Group under 
negotiation. 

identifiable frontal appear- 
ance devoid of a grille to aid 


mainstream of European de- 
sign and tastes. The ride 
quality is quite outstanding. It 
soaks up the worst road 
surfaces in the traditional 
French way but it does it 
without resorting to excep- 
tional suspension trouble and 
roll. Like most front wheel 
drive cars it will understeer in 
the last resort but to reach that 
stage requires a degree of 
foolhardy driving that do- 
serves trouble. 

The 1.7 engine and the five 
speed gearbox are a perfect 
match. The result is a very 1 
rewarding car to drive, its 
brisk performance was only 
marred on the test car by a 
rather heavy accelerator. As 
the R21 provides small throt- 
tle openings for at least half 
the accelerator movement this 
makes for too much heavy 
footed, unfeeling driving: 

In one respect however it is 
the dear class leader. Indeed I 
will go even further and say 
the front seats are the best in 
any car I have driven this year 
and that indudes models cost- 
ing three times as much. Saits 
are very much a question of 
individual taste. Some tike 
them firm and some soft 
Some prefer strait-jacket like 
support during cornering. 
Others prefer more room in 
which to shuffle around easing 
aching bones. This 5ft 9in, 

1 1 ‘£-sione driver likes his seat 
moderately firm with plenty 
of lateral support and the 
ability to adjust height and 
angle to give some but not 
excessive support to the lower 
back and thighs. The R21 did 
all this so magnificently I 
would like to swop its seat 
from car to car in the 100 or 
more different models I drive 
each year. 


IV. E. WIGG & SONS 


85 B ROVER 23 

AUTO • ... 

With sunroof. In Silver. 

22.000 tidies. £*800 

86 C MONTEGO 
2L VAN DEN PLAS 

en Estate, oporto Red. 

7.000 miles. EU00 

79 V RANGE 



BARN BY BcCCLES 
SUFFOLK MR 54 7Q0 
Tel: (051*2, 75204 


• Mi 

I 


MANN EGERTON V 


LuxuryUsedCars 


3SB- JAGUAR XJS HE- 85B-JAGUARSOVfcRHCN 
KfK MUM Sll VHCWVIII* ‘ KE-TUIXWWHm-. KIACK 

OtFV. MOW Mill* £ 20 SW lllljHN'n-KHM.Ks.K. ISUW 
S4A- PORSCHE <H I 

CARRERA SPORT COUPE- 8 *A — RANGE ROVER 
WHIT*. I <M- ' IWNHL IMXJU VOGUE AUTOMATIC - 
MU 1*124995 TAN. IOUU MILES 113995 

SSB- JAGUAR SOVEREIGN 86 C - PORSCHE 924S - 
4J-SAUt(JR£EN, GUARDS RED, SUNROOF. 

I WOft MILE. £16995 5000 MILES £16250 


WIMBLEDON. Ask for Roger Hamilton- 
01 946 0123 (Wrr kidays). Of 642 6604(Sundays 


rmr.:T >^SET3 


trackside 

HOSPITALITY AT 

BIRMINGHAMS 

BIG MOTOR RACE 




Mvcai 


Take the 
profit... 

on your new car 
investment 



H. F. EDWARDS 


“Offers you 
can’t refuse” 


32-38 Upper 
High Street 
Epsom, Surrey 

Tel: EPSOM 

25611 


JULIAN VINCENT 



‘SUMMER SPECIALS’ 


bers. That this is happening aero-dynamic efficiency plus Pnetoof Fctoto 
only four months after its attractive, well balanced lines -T 4alval £iSUtlv 


only four months after its 
launch in France indicates the 
urgency of the need and the 
damage done in recent years 
by the absence of a modern 
rival for Sierra, Cavalier and 
Montego. 

Renault's UK sales team 
has big plans for the new 2 1 
and none more important 
than establishing a firm base 
in the huge British fleet and 
company car sector. Backed 
by a £4 million advertising 
campaign it hopes to sell 
25.000 next year. If it succeeds 
the 21 will account for more 
than one in three of all 
Renauits sold here and half its 
total fleet sales. 

Initially six versions are 
being imported when a choice 
of 1 .7 and 2 litre engines but a 
further seven are in the im- 
mediate pipeline including es- 
tates. The Renault 21 TS 


when viewed from the side. 
From the start however I 


The Lancia Thema Estate 
claimed to be the fastest estate 


was worried about the car's car in Europe with a top speed 
flimsy feel. This is most of 135mph went on sale in 


noticeable when slamming the 
doors. The boot lid in particu- 
lar feels light and tinny, a 
point which was remarked on 
by friends inspecting the first 


Italy this week. It should reach 
Britain around Christmas. 
The big two-litre turbo- 
charged load carrier is ex- 
pected to cost between 




Hr-***** Service. |T _ 


Crffeeand Bar S«vk*«Ud = - 


PEUGEOT 

205 CTI CABRIOLET 

115 bhp, silver met, 
very rare, delivery 
mileage only, onreg- 
istereo & available for 
immediate delivery. 
List price. 

CflUBty Motors 

061 480 0831 


Vain 780 GLE Moat Mo, 
OT. « eood. goto hwbSc 
with black learner 
Interior — £11850. 

Vain 248 OE Satan teo- 
nJ. bbB green metaftc. wft 
the usual refinements O U58. 



Bristol Streei 

Motors®^ 



NISSAN 300 ZX 
TARGA TURBO 

Star hMi air con. 
MPa or. C rag- £13.750 



21 they had seen. They were £16,000 and £17,000 and will 
similarly critical of the un- provide keen competition for 
protected metal sides of the existing high performance es- 


suggesting 


tales such as the Audi Avant 


would be prone to damage Quatro at £17,987, the 
from sharp-sided luggage. Mercedes 300 TE £20,500 and 
That aside I have nothin the Volvo 760 Turbo Estate 
but praise for the new car. It is £17,064. 
everything its predecessor, the The estate version of 
old Renault 18, was not The Lancia's top-of-the-range 
2 1 signals even more strongly Thema Saloon is being assem- 
ihe message already conveyed bled in Turin by Pininfarina. 
by the new Renault 25 Exec- Present plans call for only 25 a 
utive: Renault no longer day. Lancia tell me this low 
builds French cars for French rate is to guarantee both 
tastes. Today it is right in the quality and exclusivity. 


MEW KIWOr 90B CTI CNho- 
m. now tn Mock ■ ctww* ol 
colours - phs fun Prugral 
rang* York (0904) 49ml. T 


Rovnznos A«o Ant/u. 
] 6.000 mOn. Cx in rector's car. 
MelalUr Mur Prtsune condi- 
tion. C5JOO ono Tct 993 6967 


mum as - A [<v sunroof. 
While tmnur 34.000 mrtes 
only Low- - proni tyres. 
Panasomr cndlr £5.300 Trt 
Ol 236 0662 ldpy> or Ol 828 
0039 (after Son) 

BHAHAPA 2.1 etna 4X4. — - 

Orey O reg. On n cry 

only £14.730. net 

898818 Off. 0892 33485 Hm T 



STAB "76 P reg- 64-000 gen tint*. 
W. BR green. 19 mectiaracaHy. 
manual, h/s top. «ac. body wrk. 
CiOOOono. TM. 0636 264589. 


653 High Road, 
Finchley, N12 ODZ 


TOYOTA CEUCA (ST Lawn mod- 
el in whit*. 1986 C. man. PAS. 
air con. nr. only 2000 ndles. 
Cl 1.496 Ti-1 Day 0704 SO909. 
Eves 0704 32298. T 


VOLVO 740 OLT7 aim. o/d. ra- 
dio. Mu* metallic, registered 
April 86 . 14-800 mHo only. 
C9.996 Trt 01-64? 4876 Inw 
or Ol 683 2136 idapil 


RENAULT FUBOO CTI Black. 
1963 A 17.0O0mlB. | owcit 
F 8 H. nr. stereo. £3.600 Ol 644 
1332 or 0836 240990 
TOYOTA CELICA U ST Uback 
1982. Miter, pas. esr. alloys. 
C3.600 016441532 or 0836 
240990 


AIRPORT' CAR SALES 

53 Y JAGUM XfS HE 
Auto, TWR conversion re wheels, 
FSH. voy r*e £1M8S. 

HI V RAMS ROVBt 
44.000m, PAS. tws. stereo. 
besje/hetBe vettur. super C&5SS. 

S3 Y VAUXHAU CAVALIER 
1 8 CDi 5dr uo. 34.000m. met 
goU/cboc velour, mo spec £4585. 

TEL 0763 685 S 77 


JAGUAR E-TYPE ROADSTER 
wiitt 1973 vi2. manual gear box 
44,000 ins. 2 owners, good con- 

anon nuughom-, £i 1.695. 

BMW 3231 CABRIOLET 85 C rag 
mpnfcc Meek. 1 owner. FSH. 
12J100 net. alarm. pfumdOM. 
central tomna. a*or wheats 5 


aDsobtety as now throughout 
muei Op wen £12995. 

Tel: 0276 73469 (T) 


DATSON 288 . « TArga 82. MM 
mam pic Law mi l eage IA. 2 SO 
TM Ol 207-4429 


rar prestige, sports or sports 
ratoon, top pna pad. any 
model v mdeage canadefeo, 
HP accounts setted. 

RING NOW 



A BMW 

Telephone: John Leah 
061 833 0161 



BMW 

AUTHORISED DEALERS 


635 CS1A 

1986 Platan en Green with 
beige leather. Ex demo. 
5.800 mdes only. 


Vnceats of Reaing. 

Sunday 0836 205 862 

Ulnaliriwc fUlA RKfi lfil 



WWW 3231 83 Red. new shape 
43 000 mlk VOC. HU- rod UK. 
4/rooC r/tovs LL800 c » iia 
0304 «i3340iWe<« day» 
■MW 316 l«»85 1 own re. red. 
Irnmarulilr rronfly wn teed 
Pro am Mir C6.9G0. TMcnhoric 
Ol 409 3600. No dcalcre pbe. 
BMW 32M S3 A PMarto tUtcr. 
ev.-dcreo. 36.000 mb. JFSH. l 
owner. CS996 Trt Ol 644 
1332 or 0836 240990. 

62W S spa. Baltic Mue. A rep. l 
owner. 21.000 mis. usual m 
lr«. F5H C8.750. 01-977 
79oO iwkmdl 643 8077 Idani 
52DL aula. B rep. pnsllnc condi- 
tion. luH BMW VTMee history. 
extras 06.496 lor quick sole 
Tel 01 368 3613 
S28M V. opet/pine. ESR. CW. 
C/L TRX. S?R. sp. 60.000 m. 
FSH. nrnru). £6730. ono. P/X. 
Trt >079881 1 620 
*4*36 BM W Stark wtut Mac* 
trainer air rondiuonuip. 8.000 
mh. £30.000 Oo662 2888 
NEW BMW'S - au modefv lo or- 
der JJO'i in slork Large 
discount, Trt 0227- 793010 m 


944 LUX 

F*b 1985. menBc Ztrmjtr Shw 
wth back pmsnpe menor. Ml 
hstory. elec am rad. tow orafie 
tyres, asm. stereo, tuns, 
other extras. 3 LOGO mfe. 
immacuuu condnon. 

. £16J88 ONO. 

TB. (0737) 66991 (DAY) 
OR 01-771 4276 (EVES) 


BMW 520i. 

Regis fnroO August 1984. 
36,000 rmles. Full Service 
History. White with 
contrasting blue intenor. 

’Alloy wneets. Soodere 
Sunroof. BUupunkt stereo 
radio/casselto. Superb 
condition. 

Price: £7,250 
Tab Day 0582 410114 
Evas: 0234 325783 


IMW 7281 IMS (81 tUanc 5 
Speed N/ROTM j*mvv AB5< 
kilbrr v,ili Blanpunki yetea 
I lerlrir .mirt windowv imr 
inn rte I nu-rter VI OOH MK 
Super iniHlilmii rull -mur 
Urt week tIO.ssn ono O4o2 
750141 iltomet or 0462 
733291 >Bos> Iw Uiw »»Hn 
PM W 


1264, Not HA wnrhaNr Juki 4 
ilnoi . mnialir hlur pyn mural 
In Inn. rle. Ilk front uindmrv 

liimled rtip dill nporK tleenne 
unert irji Minds At lecn tut 
prminn. Trio nu.ul Mr»m Ttm 
•PTC not, (12,600 N-l nflrr 
oier SI 3.000 IrlOl WTO) 


7461 YUMPO. Juts 86 H Ren 

I mqiie piwrtlif 2nO RHP 
lyimnh • L/4Bo« L earner, 
.in i (Xkl sell lit susp rtr 
60 000 nuHmM.-n mik-s LHO 
inwrHwr 4.16000 Curpnonr 
rxlia Tel 4J32J SSHMna or 
OH60 5I-1-71 


US CSi 54 OOO mum vt arrant ed 
Ml X Pea CImikmI/ Mart 
leallm Rnarx seals L'leclnr 
lort BUtimititl sieren Aulo 

tmet<or HMta isairjiiit parts 
A labour £7.999 Phone wkeb-s 
onl\ 060 875 258 


B* ret \ pisj 1 98.- automatic 
red Imv iiunoiMrt stereo Mr 
ten, BMW m.mnle,i|er sersKed 
A resenlls J5CSM mh s res 
smart r.rJ car rsretvnl rimd 
CUH k Srih- t9 or 5 Tri uM444i 
■Oi 5238 L»es 3519 


7321 Aulo fl£ 1 Drrrslori Gar 
saher nu-l Mim- >i4our. r lerlrir 
^iiniooi A iltoi 

ss-nreh. rear spMief . atrenn. 
j itmr rsmiof. camnuler. 
BUupmrklrad lawtk- to 750 
mo Trt >P444i tsSTSl 


RM.W. WANTED 


628 C8t Am n tow imieaqp win- 
der 5-CXWl 86 C rea. rauM be 
air rend Tel (051 1424421 1 tOl 


BMMPSI imiaiH salurtions isa- 
irautsKM- C-ril joftn Das ie -1 now 
ret 0*62 23456 »Ti 
WANTED BMW *6 1978 |9eo for 
lliebescprur Trt 01 S02 4248 
or WHIP lor lese 


911 CARRERA 
Sport Cabriolet 

Mo 85 MGxCs CWoa 
Proncrtv 4 ivaa; sons 

SNB lel«« uorxvsov 150 fecml 8 
Bee Scorer. F*a* Socfi Ekrrrc 
Merer. Coku Com wnceK FSH 
1‘BOTSte. 

£26SB 
Mr Prhce 

01-500-1980 (Off His) 


PORSCHE 



E19JQ0 

TEL: (H) 027587 2772 
(W): 027587 2589 


PORSCHE *ltr Carrera crepe a 
i re. June ba 19 500 mis stale 
Mm- mrtalirr Stark porerne 
■ loui nilrrior Tull sports parts- 
iir minus rear sooiler Soorts 
v.Ms buiolai alarm. FSH. ex 
redeisl eondlrmn 2nd Wads’ 
im essu.ilrs this sad sale 
Lk*l « SO rcl Ol 8769090 / 
m 57a7T7> 


PORSCHE 924 A RP4 >984 Sun 
root rtrfluc windows and 
mu i ore s"7ieauerrd inlertor 
Ounts Bed Rrtwriaru sale, 
rnsnei qouvianroad niaununM 
radio / rasselle C9 500 nr 
nMinl oiler Tel C*5I 48s 
40J7U / ns I 498 4626 rie- 
re l ms and errlPHils 


•ORSCHK Sll SC SPORT 
COUPE |1»I 63.000 miles, see 
swphislnrs- auards red. paslu. 
m/nnnois. pT's. stereo MOT 
A Us esrrllrnl rendllion. 
<’.15 260 ono Trt 0118*0202 
47451-1 Home 04254 9804 


KM LUX. |985r8l 16 OOO miles 
Pi is ale sale Blue Radio, elc. 
Mauulasiiuer's searanirr 
PlHC til 250 Tel 061 JS7 
n*no Idas i 051 487 9346 
■Lse* 


911 SC SPORTS 





1962 30.000 Mies 
Dgm metafile bbe 

Passenger Cgo r rwrrgr. 
Cotour anted wneeis. fSH 

ttsjsoo 

Call Steve or 
021 359 5363 or 5383 


634 Dark Blue S reg 5 roof 
Sleare rasa Full ss-rsire n mo- 
rs r.sri-ik-nl and bcaulifuP! 
C3oS0 ono Tel Ol 0284981 
■re l ire i and 605 CrtTT tnrenei 


Lint- 1984 STOCK? mb. 
SlsnMirl. aulo Chairman's 
second car Immaeuialr Fun 
Fusion’ C1J.4S0 Tel 01 354 
4761 


M4 LUX Alpine wMe Fen u, 

■ *• esr prim 25 COO mis only 

AhsolpUTv immdcurale 
C14j700cuio Ctoy 0902 21731 

Csr-i a *s ends 021557 8529 


Saab dealers know that a 
used Saab with ‘Safeguard’ is 
a better investment than many 

OTHER NEW CARS. 

Safeguard* is our Mech- 
anical INSURANCE ONLY AWARDED 
TO USED CARS THAT HAVE BEEN 
THOROUGHLY CHECKED AND TESTED. 

IT^S JUST THE STANDARD OF 
QUALITY YOU’D EXPECT FROM THE 
ONLY CAR COMPANY IN THE JET 
AIRCRAFT INDUSTRY 



911 SC TAMM. May 83 Altai- , 
isriees Ml Green hsel I 

42.000 mi* f inaitre Chrertore I . 

I.H henre odd smurtv I ***, 24 008 


r 17.500 Trt M Waters Ol 
48o 7200 olllre 


miles FSH Sunroof. PDM. 
213/nOs Cl 4 OOO \ iew 
Rmsion oi 493 1302 uxncei 


900 16V TURBO (O re* Out- 
standing White. 9 COO roues 
ords. eserv rdra. New Saab 

roimii* Cl 0496 tor pm ale 
sale Trtrenon* 078 dsi 7766. 


900 TURBO A PC- C reg May 86. 
5 door. aulMMUc. «kc Mi 
root windows, arid & mirrors. 
Radra/4 speakers Dark Grey 
metallic. 4 OOO nU*. lUM pne* 
new ClSSOU Ouick sale 
C 12 SOO ONO. Trt Ol sra 
5371 ret 131 lO). or oi 229 
8185 p\ej wends. 


911 SPORT CARRDIA Sept 84 
R Guards red. Mark lealher 

spoils seals POM sun rool p 911 C*ROIRA SPORTS Blark 


Lsprmise radio 12.000 
miles FSH Lady owner Pm 
line C24 OOO Trt 0204 27479 


nuirnfleC C<nr>. mrl Burular 
dtairn 3.000 Mk LM 800 
0990 273eS M 01 439 07 IB 


V.W. AND AUDI 


US CTA »i8» 6.000 Miles, i.n 
marked Many l anas 485. On 

PmiiI CrenpulrT L windows 
A Rort 4Ud» Wheels. Sieren 
C10J00 nno Tel 01 691 0770 


EESL KM6 iCi Mel *reen 

r/ooct P45 Altai’s M/rool 

(kirdar alarm RadM/rartlr 
3000 mh As new C12.99S 
Tel 10234821 2369 


911 SC TARGA. 1979. greet, are IIW. _ 

FSH. HiMiMt uldlr. only 46 OOO Ten 2 J {yio Jl, ‘LjT° r 
mh and sweeter INn nrwi Pris t>, iC 1^T 
sale Cl 1 250 hor French 734 mteW ^«180 / 733531 
4 1 77 oc 3T0 6477 et r-v/w’riub 

CARRSKA SPOUT OOLPC 84 B 
light Hi on re Beige Learner 
15 000 inh FSH L22 950 Trt: 

Umlurtls 8486 637098 
924 LUX IQR2 Guards red. Bar 

her ». POM. Pfaneer. FSH. I ... nt ,n.r,- , 

42 000 miles. I dtiscr from ”i Tinwi U. rep 

new Cogso Ol 996 7400 I * ,T2~ “HrWUpk leather 



BMW 3231 85 B Rre. 1 1.500 .'T T'"' 

■ I — • ■ ■ ,n-i re _j_ I *Hnii mriAiiK . iini SOL mflinr 

K/raI^^w.^^ S L d ,; I 1070 ™ ® W Trt W23 
FNH Cl 0.260 Orel 33043 


BMW C28 CSi Auto 1983 >A>. 
Irani Mur melallir . ailin' w hertv 
dnlllt siinrotM A windows, 
nnistaiiiliiei randilran 

lll.eSO Ha vied Motor Co 
Llil CCA2 806202 


74648 men mgs & weekends 

911 TARCA « model. Guards 
ten ii'.u simler. slunnino. ua 
i.ueil. lusl sersiied LlO <00 
Tel 181 1S7T/438 |479 

944 LUX Apr 86 7 008 Utiles 
Millie Esiss Mid CIO SOO H 

Oral 7no 7307 Vs OT7T 531 S3 


911 PORSCHE Turno 3 . 3 . rra 
“•’Ue/hiaek leather. 

WOOD sprnl Iasi 1 ? immlhs. 
mlh as ,n large, nsemnn radio 
« aweile s\ arm ♦ usual Porsche 
vie. Co nreciors rar e^reuent 
mini ilmn. CI5 BOO ono Phone 
rseuinos oal 9u9 0936 

911 SC Cabriolet vwinr/ 
leamer ml 33.0W nk 1983. 
ev euem rondilron Juy had 
24 OOO miles srrsKr Cm 750 
Wvws- He* Ol 73d 1920 ofliee 
01 006 0002 



635 CSI AuUl 83 Y Reg Sapphire I PORSCHC 911 TARSA 1986. lr«s I 024 LUX Ciurds red. 26«CO 


hfiie hliie ksslhn CSR -\BS Mam mrt shrel eslras. 9 OOO 

TQ\ Itmipulm 53 800 miles miles LT7 »5D >3052 882787 

I*sH SUP'S car Cl? 950 Trt 

1 07721 620 526 or 858 721 T 938 S AUTO 83. stale Mur /full 
k-.ilhn s/ront 38 QOO nil,. 

fas ETA, Aug 83 1 Owner topis >*H Cl 9 250 Ol 882 1060 
Hue new MOT litas sun , 

rore irel/rmw 50.000 mh. 


(.5 500 OdSn 27158 >0*Hrei 
C2H5 00206 -Hume, 


lord 48.080 mh. all eslras. su 
pefti LIS <W Ol 948 8980 T 


mh rt|n»». 205/60. rK ,.,n 
dfl’tsA mirrors, sieren RMunle. 
24fk'4 mis insei rom reeled 
C9 5O0 O20g 835107 >H> 

PORSCW 8 ll SC 1987-35 000 
mis mrtaHn /mr all esirw 
mini loniiiimn LIS COO in, 
I otulnn Tel >0?79i 500163 
1 stun re Ol SSI 2830 >w Oassi 


KEMS WORTH OA H AB T lOflirtM 
S w ue,iiers> hare user 30 new 
GniiCTi s 3 3 S doer models* 
rjoli funs mitdes man/putosm 
stock Jot mimed drtnen' Buy 
urns A tmal in* PTKe mrreair 
0587 M 77 1 87 

VOLK5WACCM CALF CTV». Or 

si is I urun Diesels. CL'S A CL'S 
.■ml mil Luoi range ai prr-in 
llisw peter lumas] idle 
in h\n\ tails rt inr Lk3 lead 
mu \udi/\ W dealer Pnoue 
1 tow - Q21 n43 7341 IT> 


AUM OUATTRO CPC 1984, >81 
U rale un 26 OOO ires FSH 
lone, 114 750 Tel I OS- Ul 
Onoo »H Ol 367 2972 Hn T 


AUDI 80 QUATTRQ 

136 to B reg. Back well gray Ka- 
ra. Mil term navy. AU ewras 
n nUdBe: e«cnc hwfi wntfm, 
Doaer neemo. neafflamc »/*. & 
fog lamps. Bacmc canoai Wang 

r sm. ptos Pwsonc staraa n- 
B$sene wm 4 spestas, . 
S8jm BOO. 

Ob kk ok » oolt) a thread. 
Tel: (6865) 58203 


SOROCCO BLB 1980 W Rra SB- 
set. 00 M- SWfS. Lsi 
COnd C2.IB0 ono T#L 01-871. 
2439 Cses « Wkends 


«TI CQHV. 85 B. alorm rte. VCC- 
iCaiaanii 1 lady wstwt 
C7.7«] ono. TrkOl 733 9401 


Morocco iTOHi H v rra »u* 
mriallii /learner. S/R 
mm. imnsar CToas one P/X 
Trt '079881 1 620 ■ 

CONVERTIBLE GOLP* all mod 
rts im All Vs rule asailaue. 
i turned ilrt 0682 S7S1B2 T 

GOLF c: Formei E. Jan 83 V. 
33 000 miles. IM. C3AOO Trt 
Ol 074 7127 

COLP CTTS Allas gees-, rltare M 
5 itow imieira. I rained an 
OSH? 8721X2 T 

«W OOLFGTPS. Convert HMei - 
lull V vs -vudi range ai cbvgnl 
prues (ram IOC Ol 202 8696 

MEW rncniw on« fuu 
-to * C/L * Piertuv Asad 
now (0 496 let 042873 8203 


420 SL 

D Hag. Rad wth bage HMi. 
Oebrery mieage £3050 

230 E . 

0 Rag. Saver MTOIttc vnth 
Back doth manor. Electee 
Smoot & Window. Cnee 
control. W/W. alloys. CMnwy 
mteagL r»jM 

Tel: 01-203 4421 
Suiay or 452 7154 
VeeUays (T) 


WHCO BS aOCl 1981 W reg. 
Red. Sneswroom rerutlUon. W 
rectors Car win luu Meergdra 
service hislory. A Hoy whee ls 
Oarti grey 1 elour mtcelor. Freni 
and Dark head restraints and 
armrests octrtr wmflows 
Stereo caseetie radto. Oecirtc 
aerial Air rerun uorvruj 
C8.300 Trt 051 929265TW / 
070*8 76663H 


230EIW124I October 86. AuK). 
MrtaiMr Wue ASS. Oec srev 
roof A windows Crude control. 
Rear head restraints. Altov 
wheels. Front arm rests, 
euiminki radio earaecw. Pirn 
other esiras. 8800 miles 
Showroom condiuon. £17.700 
Trt 01 209 1257 lofftort or 01 
964 3654 ire re 6 w/endsi 


230 TEi B reg As new 7.000 
mtv I owner 5 speed honr 
wtm crown inm. cteqnc win- 
dows. seat rovers, rear seal 
■seats, rear taring children's 
snL front arm reel head re 
strainis. sun rool. burglar 
alarm, anav whee l s, irmnaru- 
Wr rtmdiiton ihrouwoui. 
C13.77S Telr *05271 45793 


W4« S«8 SM Mnarae blue. Hue 
velour mi noor. amg suspen- 
sion. body, wheea. tow profiles 
fat H/R rteeirie wmdows. 
roof. I A r sedis. 4 sp swiirtiable 
aulo. mw. air rood. aw. pri- 
vate reg mmt rondmon oners 
Ot rr C20.000 0752 

672146/770678 


BO E 1963 'VI. auto, meuibe 
Thsue Creen with contr asting 
bngr leather uptwMery. ESR. 
FSH. Berner verm a- other es 
Irm 79.000 mUes Chairman's 
rar Ejcertlem eondlbon 
C7.950 ono Trt. 0268 64236 
loffrm - - 


460 SLi 1978 rnodrl H/S taps 
Brown metalbr. rtrerm irauiar. 
aUoi wheel*. lint*, 
sieceo/rawtlr. FSH Around 
£9.600 Trt 031 44*4828 


Metallic Laps btue/craam 
b8Q8 taaBw interior. 
Beartc sunroof, cruse 
control, head-lamps, wnh 
and twpe, Clarion stereo 
radJofcassreto. Buxton 


■ PRKfc £14^50. 

TEL J G WALL 

DAY40742) 349311 


Ron Brooks Ltd 
0602 302885 


1971 MERCEDES 
300 SEL 

Special EthtJon Auto. pas. 
excellent condition, with 
prized registration (SS45), 
tax and MOT tor 1 year. 

E6£00 or offers. 
Tetophona 0952 607780 
Evenings 0952 610980 


290C AUTO *e D RES. OrtUwy 
mileage MeuiUt smoke reiser 
with medium red doiti inlertor. 
Oecinr sunroof Anoys. Rteta 
stereo. Centre armrest etc. 
Cl 7. 990 0303 404316 

380 SE. 86 B. relsar grey, blue ■ — 

srtour m*. & j 600 miles, electj*- 

ranv adpiswo front mu. S80 SEL AutomaUc 83 <A) Reg. 



April 86, 4£00 mites. 
Smoke grey. Rear seats. 
Automatic. Becker ste- 
reo radio. As new. 

£24,000. 

Tel (0784) 33988 


»OE 1986 lO While. 2^300 
miht only Pertert. E/roc f. 
C/C. rM/rare e 19.700, Pn- 
vale vale Trt 078 4A| 2766. 


healed rear view rntnurv heal- 
ed from 3 rear Mb. cellular 
phone. Berker radto carertle. 
etmrtc sun row £23.000 Trt 
01 318 9203 


7.000 miles, silver with blue ve- 
•our. rtertrtr sunroof, aitays. 
enrtrir teats, radio tWetlr 
C22LOOO mo Ring 01-637 
0956 


500 SEL 

SSO Brame. Clasac WWp, Grey 
rtdt every Extra bietonm Bnter 

Mtno RiC kva pm imwtd a toy 

£43,000 ono 
Calk John Moore 
01-242-2223 (Off) 
or Dr H Wadhwani 
01-289-9137 (Eves) 


UOE Aulo 84. ekt roof A win 

dowv. 1 ladv owner, garaged, 
low mtteaoe stereo A ABS 
C9.500 Trt 047485 3673 


C ** a Pk ‘983. S Hire a level. 
SWB. 4 Wheel drrse. Imnufu 
iS!T_i? n 2. n * on - * MOT 
C8.S00 Trt 0560 211543. 


WANTED 




(ROMFORD) LTD 

Mercedes Benz main 
dealers. Underwriters 
(or late and low 
mileage Mercedes. 

CONTACT 


500 SEC l«8S. Paietl red. cream I 2S0 TE. Aulo MSR Augutt 


learner, rear brad restraint*, 
healed from ortMoaedir seats 
wain memon . air irmp gauge. 
OMaenaMe towtiar, then alarm, 
radio/rasveue. 16,000 miles. 
L30.75O Trt- 0043 44369 or 
510480 Nias i 


mnaBcsamzesosE Ares 

1983. pale Hue nteuHK willi 
tamng vetour upMuoy. 
20000 miles. Air conditioning 
a Blmuskl stereo Company 
rar _ Emnunnaie ceodiaoo 
Cl 6.000 Trt 0666 Z456I 


Wile- Approx 
31 OOO mK Ira mar ula u> Otirts 
araund tl i son Trt. woher 
hampton HWQ3) 758846 ries 
u- ends. 47531 office 


MERCEDES 330 E. 1985. 12000 
muev metallic reiter/blue com. 
Sun root Cleclnr wimow, 
RadmAwene Eiertrir penal 
C 1 2.350 0695 431600. 


pu ac. o reg Thrttle 
Mrtamr/cream Hide a. BA 
E/Rort eir «r Exrrltpoi ran*- 
lion -C21.950 TeL 01 552 
BIBO idflrfe hoursi 



REGISTRATION 

numbers 


500 SL 1981. cherirend norabn-. 
reiver with grey hide trim A j 

jsur A^aa*T2 ** 1 "sis® 


romrol. ABS braking, jgfl 
rervirnl, FISH, mure be scon. 
£15996 PK ronsMcrea Trt: 
oaa6 309609/ 309080 anytime 


on 1 1 ore decprnlinL lull spec. 
ABS. C34.960 Tel 103721 
J799S Z ties w/eno*. EPHRl 

22857 idavre 


WEKDQrihrn'n'H'rtt Me- I 500 SCL 1986 Tiureie Creen. 
LUlir rnampagne. wun Ham I cream Lealher. Elect Beals. T«- 
brown rtooi interior Altar roota Stereo. Aliens. 5XXXJ Mis 

wtweh Bara brad rests. Radto Onlv Core CS5.000 Exreor. 

rtfrt p etc . LK supplied. | UO.OOO Tel 0523 62008 
ca a . 2 50 Trt-0203 404216 


MERCEDES SOO SEC Smoke sH 
ter. 39 OOO miles. 1 tear aid. 1 
Qw-tirr. to" wspenreon. 
TJ77 ooa COn 14(1 Mr R Buiw. 
Grew Mition Minor. Oiurrn 
Bti. Grrai Ml non. Oun Tri 
Great Milton 08446 8881 
2B0C Aulo 1981 W OOU. 27.000 

■yfiuuv- aides. Hnlorv. m, 

Mm rr BiaununK! rad/cata. 
l/r headrests C6990 Trt 
Riinrord <0744881 5404 T 


280 SC Y reg 1 owner FSH Prt 
■M Blue Leather Alton. 
L/ROOI UOW5 Trt oo23 
B4S305Hm. 0622 A&GO ott T 
280 SL Aida uruie. Blark 1st 
IW8 HAS tops PAS MOT. 
Tas A ’rtSOD’hli 

sale Tel 0734 430068 
MERCED ES ISOE AUTO 1988 C I 280 SL COUPE 1384 22X00 


3BO SL C Dm UlO Miles. 
Bnue/Grr\, Immaculate. Lads 
Dnv« pnv ale Sale. All Extras. 
Onto PtAled Leilenng rtr 
C77ROO Trt 0908-641 174 


Rra Rgvdi Mur and inm 8,000 
miles, sierra Etrrtlenl rand 
Otters Cl 2-300 Trt 0e5a 21348 


mites FijH, -cgti/hard lop, 
him. allot uneek. C19 99S. 
Trt 0734 669021/065425 T 


£* Nov M. Sther blue. 
39.500 null-* FSH. ElKlru- 
“»!«“ air toodluoncd 
Cl 6. 500 ono. Trt. Ol 878 2272 


280 8L i wb Mark, all *r«ssg. 
nes. 14.000 mllea. 1984- Wi 
C133MO Trt 01 346 5616 


«W 200 E Automatic Diamond 
' oJ?-4- air rond. es.r . bm 

Otter Tel. Thom him pgg 


W Aulo H/S tap 
While. \CC Offers 9 etre 
C7.GOO 107331 863 978. ■ 


THE HEW MERCEDES HOTUW 


4*0 E A Reg. While. 21 OOO MH 
1 Owner Mini Condition. Full 
HlSIOrV C9.9SO 038673-818 
IM I COSWOfmi 1986 LHO 
alt rauat £14.930 
Oi 302 0368 or 01602 n ba* 

SSms^S 65SSv rSH - 

280 SE ES -C Smoke 9000 m 
Lw \rt. CC SMta C19 760- 

J5S2?** T « : 01 «0 418^ 

I ^'“»i?5 d ’80.000 



85 AJU 64S0 
429 «VN 5® 

6J3BAH 

«7RIW 1 

66 oa 
197 CPF { 

306 our ! 

FGH B3 I 
9%ESU £ 

577 jTB f 
JM* too s 
JL72 (3 

_ tL 
CREW 



On/Crrs IM 50000 ml* 
™ F nt l sper C 1 8500 Ol 
222 0876a(l Ol 6930072 HIP 


Cunmeiai I 210 TE Auto •83>'i 1 1 Own. FSH. 


*APOf superb C8 900 AMo 
Z34 TL man. 'X- FSH. rar as, 
OB «O0 0438 5193 iBurrey, T 




U « 'C5C18.79S Ol-BSl4i7B 


registration 
numbers wanted 


WANTED CNEIHHIED WMB 

^SF.y.oc 11 -a Apunra. -w 




































































































isafe 


Of JndWiduul UibSHi 

*»y»"'» unitio , 7 * 

VWMte. r, 2lo 

^SiSft^rr ^.ni'.v-— .__ 

5 * M fr t lodoor pits'o^?^ 
Jirtw.otn.rt,f mbh '^lV 
I Formula 3000 


MR intranc© y lc 


wwpu gno R »cep« ton 

mr Rrti Lunch nnd aS 


CAR BUYERS’ GUIDE 


ROLLS ROYCE& 


ristol 

Mi 




Ibrthefmestusedcars 

choose Mann ^T tnn 

1985 Rolls-Royce SOvcr t98S Bentfcv' V. Ocnjan 

Spirit, Ocean BfaoBrtge: 16,000 SdwrVDaABbr 12^00‘m4s: 

mdesf £48^00 ■ I4M50 

1984 RoOs-Roto-SDver 1984 RoOs-Royte Star 

Spirit. Coial/Beigr 8.000 rr wW SpinC Ught QramTOaxk Bta 
£47,950 2£2SQ iris 143,950 


1985 RoIb-RoyceSihw 
Spirit. Deep Ocwrv'Bdgc: . 
2LS0Q a&x £46,950 

1984 RoHs-Roycc Silver . - 
Spirit. QrmftBi^e: 22,000 

nrilot: 145^00 

<984 Bentley Turbo. B^nonl 
GrecnMaerioua: 30,000 mflcE 


1985 (B) Bandev *81 Rood 
Huc/Brpr 18,7*5 inks: £42,950 

1982 RoOf-Rovce Silver 

Spirit. L*faOwter/R«t J2JW0 
milfs; £34,950 

1980 HoBp-Royoe SDver 
Shadow 1L Stack with Red root/ 
Red ft d oa nne 2UOO ndo: 
£24,950 ' 


m 


ce. 


All Warranted motor cars are offered exclusively by the authorised Rolls-Royce and Bentley dealers of Great Britain. 



£44,950 £24,950 

1984 (A) Rofls-Royce SSvrr 1979 RoDi-Royce SJver 
Spirit. Cotswold Beiga/Darfc ' Shadow IL iSoer LarohfBeter: 
Brown: I8J68 mdex £44,950 1 8000 mfe* £24,500 


V&r MANN X -MMl 


EGERTON 


' gar sales 

tutu tri HI 

l TV.. 

JWCI K-.'KH 

i • •• 

t - 17.-.V 

onm ;ev« u ’)i. 

R- "I 1 — 
'WMSTV^ 


H& tSf HZ 
AUGUST 


I « a •is 


O P 

f m ift« ea 


l.:# ! •"• 

■ nw in 


fCRcrou 


anri'Mi 

;£*** 




for farther drt*fe> plmsr coroaa u* on 01-499 8342. 






WtLh rail service history, 
meticulously mainminaJ m 

Widow gold, c v crflex root 
gold mascot!, spue wheel 
never used. An imeitiseu as 
£17500. Td 0639 65178. 


SILVER CLOUD 

1965 midnight blue A 
steel blue, blue hide 
interior. . 


UinfO'JfrcfilO J.ua” 


BE AHEAD OF 
THE PACK 

85 B XJ6 14 Auto. Gros- 
venor Brawn, parchment 
trim. 1 onr. FSH. Under 

10000 mis CM 2,395 

88 CXJSHE Cirrus Gray, 
SawUe Gray hkto. 1 onr. 
Under 4.000 mis. Man fact 

warranty £22405 

82 Y XJS HE Sapphire 
Blue, Black hkto. Low 


De Riche . 
Contracts Ltd 

CONTRACT HIRE A VEHICLE LEASING 


NATIONAL CONTRACT HIRE— 
per month 

AUSTIN— ROVER RENAULT SIX £ 127.10 

Metro Chy £11851 STSE £169.46 

Maestro 1300L £15847 2SGTS C7SJ7 

Moolcjo I600L £16416 „ _ 2SOTX £31244 

' Rover 216SE £195.94 SAAB 900 Mr 124889 

MG MOMCRO Efi £227-51 900 4-dr £27537 

BMW 900 Turbo Mr £38657 

SIS] £23830 GM VAUXHALL 

31S £27007 Asm 13L £15847 

520i £301 Jj Civaber 1600L £174.76 

pirnA™ Cuboa L8L 02241 

LliKUIfiW Cavalier SRi £23130 

BX 16 RS £18535 Ctflwm 2.0GL £24354 

■uAlSSBB voL^^lli 

MRDtonili! TOL U? 0 i^SiS 

FORD 740 GLT £375.98 

Escon 1300 Laser £169.46 740 GLT Estate £397.17 

|}S-» VW/AUDI 

Orion hueoioD Gbia £222.41 rStfrr fi Z'ia 

°-vaaa ossssaii 

Sens XR4 x 4 £34930 


Sen. xnivS rSom Audi 90 CO 0*9.00 

Sera XR4 x 4 £34930 Audi Quanro Coop i £397.17 

One monthly poywsent for yotu- motoring overheads 

Uwrttum co ntr act biro available 
3-6 mon th duratioa- 

tdephone for details 

Tek (0922) 614014 
or Telex 335069 

for fill! details and a written quote on any Company Car 
MAINTENANCE PROGRAMME INCLUSIVE 


01-579(377 
Not imports, fcansad cretft 
brokers. Warranty & servicing 
camad out by your local dMlar 


Ford 

Contract 

Motoring 


01-441-7089 





CAR CRAFT 


JENSEN INTERCEPTOR 
RESTORATIONS AND 
CONVERSIONS TO 
DflOPHEAD 


Tel: Heoptum (Kent) 
(0474) 812498 


WAKEY’S 



CAR SPARES AND REPAIRS 
JAGUARS OUR SPECIALITY OTHER SPARES AVAILABLE 

PORTSMOUTH (0705) 830412 

We Hmm atovMb 3-( TH* Arefeee, Portsmouth 


HOW CAN YOB BE Ul 
WHEN rOOHE OUT? 

k s easy men you'n got a Mo- 
Me Colmar Rxko 
We ofta Vadalm - 1 dual rok 
Mephom that can b* used as a 
moMe telephone sowed « the 
car « as a handomed portable 
umL making it an snsM enev 
Sim to the oh ice 
THE HOME 1HJEHKK casts 
less than von the*. Wt offer the 
most comoentw raw n London 
ana the South* 


MM CT UL -w rce CHMMr I 
grefnMul rrtmso. mctualne 
S Btre mol nr Walnut Iran. 
Lratirr uanotawn> Run cas- 
sette. 2-600 moss £8.780. TeL 
Oi 778 8938 W/tfays. 


COLLECTORS CARS 


■M O UAie X4S. I%& Manual 
will, eirromr Wire wheel. 
Taxed and Intel. In very good 
rendition. £1.780 ono. Td: 
10427721 821 . 



VOLVO CS I BOO. 1978. Res GO! 
l Odd yn MOT. beaiMinu 
mroushout. £3-850. Aller 6 
Sm.srweekembOl 771 8098 




(093589) 348 


ROUS ROYCE k 
. BENTLEY : 


SHADOW » - Hit 046 28.000 
mlln. nutmeg <bdge roof. 
£28.000. Teb 0969 . 35478 
■eves) 0689 50614 (dayi 


SIUIMW L P re«. 99.000 mO«s. 
darx bawn/tmn Teamer. 
S9JXO. Td Mr Gardner offlee 
Hours 01-981 3921 


NUDOW H 1978 CoM. BaHm 
Hide. BtacK Cvrrflcx Roof. 
Good Condtiiofi. Rarefy Used. 
£12.990 ono TeL- 0332618006 



r / u.vm\ ^ 

I Spi-ci^li'l Carl I 

I Oil!. iJ' 1 ' ju :>-.n-!i 'J 1'i-iriC"!' '-.I 




1986 (C) JAGUAR 

SowraHpt 43L Fbwhed n 
steel biua with barley trim, 

1.700 miles. 09,750 

1984 9) JAGUAR XJS HE. 
Ctoet with doeskin, ISjOOO 

mfles. — Ctojwo 

1988 JAGUAR XJS HE 
Stow yrith. blue . trim. 
1 owner, 21.000 mfles. - ■ 

C14,7SO 

83 Deo (A) JAGUAR 42 
Auto. FMshed in sage 
ipaan/baige doth, ESR, 
18,000 mites. £12250 


Auto. Oarat with doaakin 
trim. 15JJ00 mles- £18^80 
AtehoriBadlkidaphara 
SttepflarAbwtBlar 
105 Ouwns Rd. Weybndoa 

Starey 0932 49225 





DAIMLER 
DOUBLE SIX 

1984 As Daimler 
Specification. Black. 
£13,500 Tel : 0258 
52022 (home) or 
0202 291889 (office) 



ASTON MARTHI V8 
' "Ex Cfcafcwtott car'..' 

- 1961 updated to 1983- 
spedflcMion by Aston 
Martn. Pato Hue mat. 
Magnate batter. Body work 
and a* mechanics to top 

condWor. Lovingly 
maMatood by apaaubL 
Any jnspacdon watooma. 
•BBSwteeto'etc. 
£23^00 

0273 722131 (O) 
0323 883 691 (H) 


388 GTS UC 

Dd ism. Hojso cora* (red). «4h 
nognota tamor. tea aid mr 
ipHtC FSH. ir awdoonnQ 2.700 
mb triy. bnnaatoe anatn. 
Raw* tab. 


JOH B4. wm gray cat tester 
■manor. 171)00 Hu. Bee wnton. 
door maims etc. FSH from new. 
Way extras; aim wh«efc.RAS. 4 
spur snso. Abnuely mki ooodi- 
.1km. Must be sDHL. 

"■ •^AtOJIBono 

•782 824428 Bas 
•r 1782 840481 Hmm 


I l.ill 


Oetnber 1983. Storar body. 
Stack bather Herior. 8D00 
mte. 0» 0*«r. Luopga 
rack.. Sana radn and attar 
extras. Used only through 
summer. 

£11,750 djul 
Tet 09657 472 




teth My restored by MS 
CC Mantar. Would ex- 
change both lor Ue Rote 
Boyce Shadow. 

TH; PAUL WBGKTMAN 
f07Wt} 733121 OR 
(0892)38331 (O) 




XJS VIZ. . 1966. CM wttfl doe 
sMn Mde. complete roec. tust 
neevired. odder nanuhcrvnrs 
warranty. 8.000 roilev. m new. 

. Mr condtUonlng. erttn cootroL 
SJi-rro eaxetu-. £21J2BO. Tel 
<0682) 606013 


CWMUT % M . Sew 8S C; 
1.800 nm. 1 owner. wtMe 
win, MseuH hide, trtpnxnpuler. 
headlamp ww. alarm nued. as 
new. £18.730. Tel (0203) 
404216 


1 TW1 VIZ, conwrW b le. 1974. 
rootwy rm. beige- leather inte- 
rior. low mileage, tni mandate. 
C18JSOO. TH 01-776 0909 
mat . . 



aHttelk 53/300 miles. 
Cobalt blue FSH. £10000. Tei- 
oy 236 0600 iwwmdaysi and 

ot 607 ceai rewsL 


tsna mahtm dm Mara a 
Vantage manual. 1970. PacHlc 
blur with Mur Mde upho ls tery. 
CarMuny restored. JUdjOOD. 
Prhafe sab. Telephone 
0234 768226. 


TVS* 3SM CONVnrrAHX May 
1986. Metal he slab any. red 
inferior, sumo. EBc windows. 
12.000 miles. Superb example! 
£13400. TH: 021-308 4(78 


LOTUS EXCEL. Sept 84 Jersey, 
white. Mue Interior. 6.000 nas. 
Aircond. PASl ExceOeni cond 1 
owner. £ll-60a 0S34 63840 


HOMAN 4/4. 3 str'1986. Ahoy. 
«l\er/dove any- w/w. prey 
Mlhcr. lonneau etc. ClLZSO 
onO. 0484 607 059. 


nxnn kalusta sls i964. 

• MeUUhr blue. Chrome nmsh. 
13.000 nUo. Inunacutau. 
£7.800 one. TH : 0932 S8G91 


LOTUS 62 ECLAT: 22. JPS. I 
off. Low mil e age, air rmdttion- 
Ing. Ex road. Tel 10223)861 148 


lotus esntrr twwo, ipbss. 
only 29.600 documented mdes. 
full leather, air rondtuoning^u- 
perD ihroug h ouL only £ia795_ 
prowlng family sole aeump raa- 
xm. would px 944 or MondtaL 
TH 036901 612310 lew 

w/endM or >0703) 224061 
(day) Hampshire.. 


ELECTRICAL 

TRANSFORMER 

POOLING 

RADIATORS 

(11K.V.-275K.V.) 

Specialists in the 
refurbishing, repairing 
• and flood painting- 
of the above. 





Tek (0691) 773391 


COMPANY 

PROBLEMS 

Are creators hounding ytxf? 
Arp suppliers insisting on 
prafanra a CWO? 

Are batata about to levy the 
stock? 

Are tta bate insatna you sHpi 
more poraoral guarantees? 

It tte ansmr is yn to any id 
then questions you wed our 
help. It we caonot beta you sm 
your company we can advtn you 
on Squutanon. Contad us today. 

Ross Wriker & Associates. 

» 

rmpBsi. 

Lnley. 

Warwick. CY35 SDR. 

(8789) 841292 
m {9905) 776617 


Chiswick High Rd. 
Prime position, 
class 1 retail + 

■_ burglar, aiaren. .. 
£85,000 

01-874 7783 


■LX ' OF SKYE. BuriMP 
premises wit many trades, 
cram etc. Living accaoinrada- 
bon. Pncne 047022 442. 


AGENTS 

REQUIRED 

tbr mild sted nipples. Ka- 
rachi based - maou&cturer 
of exceUemqurihy pipe fil- 
lings. holts -and nuts is to 
appoint selling agents for 
the UK. Annul uraover 
projected £3m. Items very 
competitively priced. 
Agents having five connec- 
tions and experience in 
saks of these hems may 
please comacc- 

Tdfc (0109221) 293454/7 
Telex 24178MB1-PK 
MBI lndnstries Unfitcd 
A-5I SXT.E. 
Karachi 16 
Pakistan 



AUTHORISED DEALER 


SPECIAL 

DEALS 


• available 

TOGETHER WITH 
FIRST CLASS 
SERVICE AND 
SUPPORT. 


& MANAGED U.S 


[Hull ii 1 ] ;f:i f ft] . 


with direct access to 
public sector, contrac- 
tors associ a tions etc; 
in SE United States; in- 
vites enquiries from 
parties interested in 
entering new markets 
or expanding existing 
ones. Fee or commis- 
sion by negotiation. 

Reply to BOX G68 






BUSINESSMAN, 

domicted hi England, is 
seeking potential ctents 
with products for the 
Scandinavian export/ Im- 
port market interested 
perries may write to: 
Product Promoters Urn- 
ited.il Kenyon Mansions, 
Queens Cfob Gardens. 
London W74 9RN. 


THE 


TIMES 



Propert y 


SOVEaCMH 42 83Ang Dor- 
rhesirr brown. Dor akin 
mimor Air ronm. Rror cut 
OH tv FSH. 38.000 mUn. 1 
owner. Prlrolr relr C9.600. 
OI 267 9822 day lime 
OI 351 6929 nn/wkdi. 


If you’re a private advertiser looking 
to sell your car, you will reach potential 
buyers more economically in The Times 
than in any other quality daily newspaper. 

The message is dear. If you want to 
get your car moving, yorfre a lot better 
off parking it in The Times. 

To reserve space now, write to Shirley 
Margolis, Group Classified Advertise- 
ment Manager, Times Newspapers Ltd-y 
Advertisement Department, EO. Box484, 
Virginia Street, London El 9DD. 

Access, Visa , Diners and Antex Cards 
welcome. . 

•Soiiwef TCI April-Stpt ‘85 (BuvtTsqfmand hand can las 
12 months} 



NORTH OF THE 
THAMES 


8A4 — CMXi reni Mb Lux 2 tM 
Itaiinp/bNOCK. Lovlouno*. f/T 
Itllriirn. fully IIM bothrm. Qi4- 
m isnikw. CUT arw4 parking. 
980 yr hay. Quick nlr. 
C72J300 1 nr (VPHS + cunatm. 
TH: 01-740-7173 


CEN1WU. LOMDOte OCT NHor Ox- 
ford SL buw onare. rux (urn 
studio, stunning folly nod 
rand, wp k/b. huge roof trrr. 
C6T-500 ono. TH 01-749 4232 


fulham RHmMr UnHoomcnL 
spaclou* studio. Ural plrd a 
krrr. srem. porter. eHtar 
store. Mna Mte. £50000. TH 

oi sei sow . 



POUT PLANT LIMITED 
NOTICE IS HEREBV GIVEN 
mirwani to srrnon 688 of mr 
C ompare r, An 1985 dui a 
MEETINO qf thr Creditor, of 
PORT PLANT Limited. wM Dr 
hold 01 RtrNncnaf LmnardCur- 
i» L Partner* 46. riodney StreH. 
Liverpool LI 9AA on Mommy the 
I lih Hoy « August 1986 at 1200 
o'clock Noon. lor the purpose, 
prmidrd for tn sccnon 689 and 
59 0. 

DATED THE LSI day of AIMuri 
1986 

A. DAMES 
DIRECTOR 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


TOWN AND COUNTRY - 
PLANNING ACT 1971 • 

PASTORAL MEASURE 1983 
PROPOSED DEMOLITION OF L 
ST ALBAN'S CHURCH. . - ~ 
TEDDINCTON 

Thecmrcn of St Anon. Ferry. 
Rood. TnMUiWxi wat declared - 
rmund.im on 1 January 1977 
:Hncr wtim ihe Dtowm Bedun- _ 
idant cnurrnn Uwi Coomn l Un 
has endrai ourrd without ruertre 
•to find a suiuMo alternailir use . 
for tnr bunding. Accordingly mo 
Church CoramnuonerL on Ihe ' 
reconumndnimn of Hie Dwneef - 
London, hair made a draft re- - 
dundanry vrltemr nrovKUng lor j 
ns demalinon. it b a grade n- ustv . . 
ed minding and Ihe imraM, 
detnaUiKxiisagainsi ihradvxeor “ 
ihe Aditsory Board lor Redon- ■ 
danl Churches and a numtwr or ■ 
reptMrnianons agaiiM the mo- • 
poms hair been rrcroed. . , 

Therefore al Die request of the _ 
Church Conummonm and la ac- 
roroanre with a procedure " 
agreed between the CmnWon- ■ 
ct* and Ihe Secretary m Stoic for • 
Uie EmironmrnL NOTICE IS. 
HEREBY CHEN mat an Insptc- . 
ter instruned nv ihe Secretary of 
suse lor me EmiraniMN win at- * . 
tend at York Home. TwMrnlda ■ 
on TueMlay 30 September i486 ' 
at 10 OO am to hold a tent team— 
ry to hear irpmcnatwn 
ranrrrmng ihh «ww lor m» - 
liuon. and all rniemiM pet*ona_ 
are mined 10 allend or be repre- 
vemed m mat the Secretary of . 
Slate may be aware of UMtf- 

i lew* 

The prenoosly arranged hund- , ' 
ry wn poRponrd at the repuesl of 
the Church Com ma s! oners 
As IKted ouUctang consew is not ' •• 
required lor me demolition or a •> 
redundam church of tne Church . 
of England in pursuance of a bps- . 
local redundancy scheme under 
the Pastoral Measure 1983 the In- 
quiry will be nan-fUtutory- 
Consequenllv there wtu be no * ' 
power lo summon witnesses on ■ 
subpoena, lake evidence on oam 
or obtain costs from any persons 
or body. 

R WILLIAMS - 
Depaitmenl of the Enioonment ' 
Ref TSE9S/01/0482 
RH. HB/9028/270/43 , 


FINANCIAL NOTICES 



PARLIAMENTARY 

NOTICES 


WIMBLEDON 


WIMBLEDON : 2 bed. terraced 
house. CM. dose ML. tube Si 
UaL £7tLOOO. Tet 10730 
64085 



(188,800 Fj'HLD COTTAGE WS 

26' rrcep'2 double beds. hath, 
filled idlctien. study terrace. 
aAbbou weekdays 49S«»a 
Ei etungi/ weekends 221-7904. 






Complex of shops & out 
buddings with ptenntig con- 
sent for arcade development 
of 7 shop ints & 2 service 
flats. Offers on £150,000. 

Bratso, Knowles & Co, 
Bourtoo-ota-Bw- Water, 
Bios. BLS4 2AD. 
Jet (0451) 20536. 




CLAMiAMXaroeSrosra garden 
ILU near common. £66(00. 
TH. 737 5688 Su or S««-. 


mmoomn a Aug. nmntwre 
whs. lor mte Pus Taloarai tux. 
bungMow SIM 6. No VAT or 
Buyers premium. 0444-460055 
after enre. 


HERNE HILL SE24 

Substantial freehold 
poperty for sale with 
vacant possession. 535 
sq ft stwp + ceiar & 
rear access. Large 2/3 
bad flat in good 
cpndttron with separata 
access- 2 separate 
garages. 
£110400. 

Td: 01-737 0334 
(after 7.00pm). 


PROFESSIONAL 
SALES AGENTS 

Hard working profesooml 
saks agents required to sell 
a range of high quality 
medium priced dodo. Our 
onget market includes 
retail, promotional, 
executive gifts and 
coairaa. We offer a full 
support package and the 
potential lo'securc a long 


Flan cend CV and detoSs 
of all csiem *genri« to 
BOXG93. 


A taUT OPPUmiMTT mu*. 
nouonai ptAtesbing re crauire* 
gO-Hwad ulrt ortenuled ireH 
ikiiuK lo become exrfuMir 
dbnibuon of fast arilteg publl 
raiHHK dirert to ute pubUe NO 
franchise hm& or fees ore In. 
roned. H«h profit earning* 
win be eraoyed For funner m 
formadon write lo Emybodo 

. Pubimuom Limited. 29 Kingly 
Street London. W1R fiLB. 

COHWUMN AOCMTS wanted 
to *Hl new boi already popular 
duality product to Uie 
ort/oraotec trade reiallrn. Hr. 
Telephone 0202 S53597 Mr. 
Homon. 

OOU KQVWMEKT SHI dlreri W 
roman* & fnendc. Good mar 
giro. Rfru I0ST7I 226G98. 


JUST DESKS 

IVntMl ami icprodiciinK IVdcv 
lal tlciLv. Fartacn dais. 
Wrurag uNcl Davmparu and 
|>riL chans 

Urfe hfiUhe 

FWruUd f 'alkn UHraar 
■Jw iwr Dpi ux 
31 IM SOM. laatao NUB 
IiMmc 01.711 7VM 


PROMOTION, 
PUBLICITY & 
MARKETING 


COLOUR 

newspapers 


mmmvooramoonY . p9»duaa 
or oroomsmn with an Bpage 
COLOUR ntmofiapor. tor around 
S pane* par copy ffJCUJSVE of 
Donyn Artww* arnt Amt 
GIVE YOUR SALES A BOOST 
THIS AUTUMN - IN COLOUR. 

OUAYDESHtN. 
ftt Phase. Ham HA 
A M/eaona. 

Weytodfs , 

Stony 

TatmSOSaOBB . 




















































































































24 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


YOUR OWN BUSINESS 


Help small 
firms and 


pay the hills 


on time 


Pressure on big companies lo be more 
accommodating towards smaller busi- 
nesses. especially in paying their bills on 
time, is growing, writes Derek Harris. 
David Trippier, minister for small 
businesses at the Department of Employ- 
ment, initially wroie to the leaders of 
Britain's top 100 companies urging them 
to take action on a guidance paper drawn 
up m Whitehall after discussions with 
the Confederation of British Industry, 
the Institute of Directors, the Associ- 
ation of British Chambers of Commerce 
and the Institute of Purchasing and 
Supply. 

The response has been positive in 
almost every' case, according to Mr 
Trippier. The guidance paper. Payment 
on Time, is now circulating within many 
of the companies so those further down 
the chain of command are aware of the 
objectives. Mr Trippier said: "It is 




Good cheer: Eric St. John Fori with Sandra Anderson, general 
manageress, and staff during a weekly quality control test 


Monks 9 innocent punch 


encouraging that many major companies 
value the importance of maintaining 
good relations with suppliers, particu- 
larly on repayment terms." 

Some of the big companies are 


producing simple guides about how to do 
business with them. Some operate 


business with them. Some operate 
simplified payment procedures for small 
businesses while others are adopting a 
more flexible approach towards those 
which have cash flow problems and need 
payment quickly. 

The first printing of the guidance 
paper of 1 30.000 copies has already run 
out and a reprint has been ordered. Local 
enterprise agencies, as well as other small 
business organizations, will soon be 
getting their full quota which will mean 
small businesses will be able to see what 
they ought to expea from big companies 
to which they are suppliers. 

The moves will not bring great changes 
overnight, says Mr Trippier. He sees 
them as part of a gradual process of 
achieving an improvement in commer- 
cial payment practice. 


By Brian Collett 

A punch-manufacturing business that 
began as a bit of fun in a kitchen has just 
moved into a £230,000 factory in 
Norfolk. 

Eric St John-Foti discovered the recipe 
for the non-alcoholic Original Olde 
Norfolk Punch in 1980 while going 
through papers he found 31 his home, 
Welle Manor Hall, in the village of 
Up well. The punch used to be made by 
Benedictine monks who lived at the hall 
for nearly 600 years. 

Mr St John-Foti stood at his kitchen 
sink with a funnel and a jug to make the 
punch from the 30 or more herbs and 
spices listed in the recipe. His first efforts 
went to a charity but ihe punch was so 
popular that he started making it 

commercially. 

His first factory was the coach house in 
the hall grounds. He then switched 
production lo an abandoned Methodist 
chapel, also in the grounds. The business 


diseases", and does “mightily expel the 
wind from those that suffer with it.” 


has now moved again - to a newly built 
factory nearby, officially opened recently 
by the writer and natural-health ad- 
vocate, Barbara Cortland. 

The business, called Original Norfolk 
Punch, has provided jobs for 23 people 
in an area of high unemployment and is 
expected to produce a million bottles a 
year. 


wind from those that suffer with it.” 

it is considered best drunk hot to 
release its properties. Mr St John-Foti 
says: “1 believe this was a medieval form 
of holistic medicine.” 

His next enterprise is even more 
novel. He has bought The Five Bells in 
Upwell, renamed it The Norfolk Punch, 
and intends opening it as Britain's first 
health pub. It will serve the punch, 
organic food and medieval ale made by 
the Norwich Brewery. “I think it will set 
a trend,” he says. 


BRIEFING 


■ Small businesses are reasonably 
served by business advisors (mostly 
accountants), get fair value for money 
and usually stick to one advisor for long 
periods of time. This emerged from a 
survey by the National Federation of Self- 
Employed and Small Businesses 
whose policy unit chairman Dr Bernard 
Juby said the high level of reported 
satisfaction was surprising considering 
the grumbles emanating from some 
small businesses about poor 
accountancy services. 

But there were some causes for 
concern disclosed, including die quality of 
advice in areas such as tax planning, 
the level of fees and how far accountants 
check with clients about returns to the 


tax returns before they went off to the 
tax inspector. Only 30 per cent felt they 
had a good understanding of tax 
affairs, 55 per cent thought they were 
“reasonable" and 15 per cent 
classified themselves as “poor 1 '. But 78 
per cent felt satisfied with the work 
done by their accountant 
■ Project North East the local 


MR FRIDAY 


enterprise agency based in Newcastle 
upon Tyne, [Mans to launch an on-line 


uponTyne, plans to launch an on-line 
business information service to help 


particularly those involved in starting 
up young businesses. The arm will be 


up young businesses. The arm will be to 
help budding entrepreneurs to choose 


the right business Idea and to give them 
back-up information. The main 
sponsor for die scheme, to be known as 
BISON, is Esso, which is giving 


Inland Revenue. Only 53 per cent of those 
surveyed were offered aavice on tax 


£40,000 over two years to buy computer 
equipment and to help with costs. 


surveyed were offered advice on tax 
planning and only 49 per cent checked 


equipment and to help with costs. 
Initially BISON will be available 
through a pilot group of organizations 
covenng areas Tike the careers service 





‘Why did the gods decree that id small, 
businesses everything most break 
down on the same day?" 


HOW LITTLE DO YOU WANT TO PAY 
FOR A NEW FACTORY & HOME? 


UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY TO ACQUIRE 
CHILDRENS AMUSEMENT PARK 


1500 sq.ft. 
FACTORY & 
3-BEDROOM 
HOME FROM 
AROUND 




Includes Arcades. Rides, Shops, Catering - 
cafe, snack bar etc. Ice cream/Rock, Candy 
Floss, Large Car Park. 


IVill 


Designated amusement area - planning permis- 
sions not necessary. Prime seaside location - 
ideal six or twelve acre development site for 
existing Leisure Company or Entrepreneur. 


A new home tor you and your business can easily be 
yours in Mid Wales from around £90 per week, including rent 
and rates 

And the weekly cost of high quality larger units is around 
£40 per 1.000 sq.ft rent and rates included! 

You won't nnd deals on new factories and modem homes 
like these anywhere else - maybe that's why you should move 
to N lid Wales ... a new Wales! 

Contact us u you'd like to attend one of our special 
presentations held regularly in manylocauons. or want our 
inlornuuon pack. 


Genuine reason tor sale. 


Principals only please write in first instance to 
BOX A07 


TELEX & FACSIMILE 


In today’s modem age or advanced comnuuikaticuu can 
your company afford to lose business by not having 
facsimile and lelex? Silhouette Industries supply, install, 
service and train operators in telex & facsimile machines, 
on outright purchase, lease, or rental nationwide. 


MIDVvM.ES 


.anewWales! 


For farther information: Silhouette Industries lid, 

01-582 4155 


Mid Wales Development 


Mid Wale-. Pc*. cIopmcnL Pcpi DoJb.TRFLPOST NcAioua P.v.w* SYlii IJB. 
M <'Vw,i Or FREEFONE NEW tt’.XLES now 1 


COSTA 

BLANCA 


BUSINESSES WANTED 


GENERAL 



BUSINESS FOR SALE 



BUSINESS 
AND LEASE 
FOR SALE - 


A unique opportunity In 
acquire a well uMablished 
pirture and antique gal- 
lery Occupying an 
excellent position in a 
dunning row of period 
properties overlooking 
the market square in the 
nld and biMuric market 
town of Fanngdon. 
which ts luca led mid-way 
between Oxford and 
Swindon. There is good 
car parking close to the 
premises Telephone 
Pilgrim. Bond Fanngdon 
MSfi 22422. 


PIPE 

INSTALLATION 

TOOLS 


Fiii ,'uinnr and lhri-ading 
on siic Due in rrurcrncnl 

ol(X‘>W>‘.-iiir ttimpjm 

unh rcivnl lurnoicr m 
cvcv. C>iil.t*iu humv and 
export m-nls new owiht 
»nh cimpU'mmuiry 
huviw-sk Hifhlx respected 
pro. fuel Horiduide SMrii 
CS'.iVii. goodwill and 

pw,nu-ni icrmi negotiable 
Plrwxr repl, to 

Ba\ No. CM, 
ejo Time, Newspapers. 


ROYAL DEESIDE 


Small 7 bedroomed 
family hotel lor sale 
situated on main road 
m dose proximity to 
Balmoral Castle and 
Glenshee ski slopes 
and 50 miles from 
Aberdeen. For full 
particulars please 
write or phone: 

Mr. JJL Crawford, 
Inver Hotel, 
CratMe, Ballater, 
Aberdeenshire 

0338 4345 


MANUFACTURER OF 


mini excavators, controlling 
5 njre- homing m company 
Fully sub -contracted 
manufacture. Would suit 


parry <*uh selling 
rajmsation or atultn 


organisation or ability 

Full details from 
Box No. G72. 


for sale popular family 
run beach restaurant 
Javea. Capacity 120 
plus bar. Turnover 
£100.000. Asking price 
£200.000. Restaurant I 
La Perla. Javea. Aii- , 
came. Spain. 


MAJOR 

COMPANY 


PfUNTINC COPY SHOP Xxrll c- 

l.lilil Jirtl rrlMl winlllW 
i.i.iir.% m "V'rlli'ni Iiy-diioo in 

Bnui iwnwvjin T/O rrirrrolb 
,.7S rax* p.i «iiKH»ii>i cnx 'O - 
CP I/Hor LftWIwM irKXWn 
lamiiw on ,ilr pjrkinfl 

Ttir. nuxini^i n,w rnourmwi:. 

poirniui A K niilx on lh» m.,r 
Krl Oiu- lo \ *-T\ I'WI'IMtofUl 

riffunriLuvii tillminiil ,, d in 
( \rm nt tttS OuO lor lit*- ItuM 
iW'i a 9 om ronrorn will) 
tvu. Iivnr F/H Iw-OMum*- II if 
qUlinl 1 lH 

itt/croh Cl nr' ollrt ?DI1»1 
FULLY FITTED BAR. \m Mm 
rfll irdl Ir.uli- Pnvnw Thorrun 
Corfu !4t72Mhm lOOOam 
A 4 l>Jtmi 


REST HOME - DEVON rag » 

TAJ L3.SOO p w N P 
CIO? OOO iManoprdl 7 acres. 4 
hnUronm luxury home Pncr 
CUOOOOO F/H Apply Cnn&tM- 
A Co C\e tor lOiWi SWTI 


looking for selec- 
tive acquisitions 
in the Vehicle 
Contract Hire 
Leasing Sectors. 
Replies treated 
in the strictest 
confidence. 


f rwhouw Exrrtteni rummer , 
2 1 hint Cl .55 000 Reply 10 ; 
BOX ECS 


Reply to 
BOX G48 


WHOLESALERS 


SKATEBOARDS Next romiqn 
ttlMII dip mid 4IMU9 DHIWnl 
M/m aiailaUr LitoM ck-mot 
ran- 7 10992) 7l54od 10 lo 6 


c/o Times News- 
papers, PO Box 
484, Virginia St, 
off TTie Highway, 
London £1 8DD, 


Mr St John-Foti is optimistic “It 
could even be two million bottles a 
year,” be said. “We expon container- 
loads to America and also sell it to 
Belgium and the Middle EasL We are 
now negotiating to sell it to Japan. 
They’re very keen on iu The word is 
spreading. This is our third factory in 
four years.” 

In Britain the punch is sold in health- 
food shops, department stores and even 
restaurants, pubs and off-licences. 

Claims for its health-giving properties 
over the centuries make interesting 
reading. Writers have said it “kills 
worms in the belly”, “marvellously do 
help all cold and rheumatic distillations 
of the lungs and other parts”, “defends 
against the plague and all epidemical 


nwGOi-wnea 


BUSINESS 



ELECTRONIC 
OPPORTUNITY 
IN THE USA 


A well known British Engineering Group has acquired a small 
defence electronics subsidiary in north-east USA. The company, 
which is engineering orientated, designs and manufactures test 
equipment, simulation interface equipment and other products 
for maj’or US defence contractors. Employing some 50 people in 
modern premises occupying some 30,000 sq. ft, the company 
has annual sales of $4m which could be easily expanded. 


The Parent Group would be interested in adding to the 
. product/market range, of its US subsidiary via representation or 
licensing or both. This is a rare opportunity to benefit from an 
existing British-owned base that is well managed. In the right 
circumstances an investment in the subsidiary might be possible 
if this was seen as likely to lead to a more meaningful relation- 
ship and consequential success. However, it is not in any sense a 
prerequisite. 

Enquiries will only be considered from principals who should in 
the first instance contact Beck Services in total confidence and 
describe the nature of their business, their interest and objec- 
tives in relation to the North American market. 


Contact: J. E Drinkwater 


BECK SERVICES LTD. 


Beck House, 75 Moorend Park Road 
Cheltenham, Glos. GL53 0LG 



MOORE STEPHENS* 

WANTED TO PURCHASE 


COMPUTER BUREAU 


Substantial international clients are looking to acquire a 
100 % interest in a computer services bureau as a going 
concern. 


Must be IBM 4300 based, preferably 4361/4381 or 
equivalent (AMDAHL, HITACHI, etc.) Preferred 
location South East but others considered. 


Enquiries in strictest confidence should be sent to:- 


Alan Cox, Moore Stephens, 

St Paul’s House, Warwick Lane, 
London EC4P 4BN 
or phone 01-248 4499 


(Ask for Alan Cox or Orvase Hulbert) 


M S 


Main Concourse 


On completion of the present phase of 
re-development due to finish in iune 1987 
opportunities will arise for the operation of 
a small number of trading units on a 
concession basis. 

Tenders are therefore invited for the following 
areas of activity- 

1 . Fashion clothing and/or accessories 

2. Quality gifts 3. Speciality foods 

4. Business centre and/o'r waiting lounge 

Tender documents and supporting information 
may be obtained from the Commercial Manager, 
Manchester Airport pic Manchester M22 5PA 

The closing date for the receipt of tenders is 
Friday, 5 September 1986. 


MANCHESTER AIRPORT 

BRITAIN'S CENTRAL GATEWAY 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


IN STORE CONCESSIONS I 


Mnrad Retail takings PIC are a 
real sun group a wMfr e ngaged 
on an expansm programme 
Dw awes n tocatao n strong sub- 
uitxw snopMig sdwnu sarong the 
ndqenous pmiaaon gl mai partia»- 
lar sebsme cafenmant am 
Wo woum he to muss akti any 
iradng company wMastar or aw 
iiaoere who eonudur tftena a ees to 
ne of a more m operate a otcbs- 
swo tupinmem » our Harts. 
wtonaDv. raDonaity or on a angle 
Eton bass. 

Wtv owJua group coroderad Write 
or tetomone stamp jour product to 

Lifias A Htdcfamnw, 
Rstafl Salas Director. 

Adraocad Ratal 
Habgau PIC, 

P0 Box IB, 1 
Kortsfond WA16 8IIX 


PARTNER/ 

INVESTORS 

REQUIRED 


London based, wefl estab- 
lished. leading odfular 
mobile comminucauons 
company. 

Excellent repatawM m the 
industry wnh first year 
turnover of £700.000 
(showing profits) needs 
investor/panner panicv 
peting or sleeping to assist 
company with farther ex- 

panuonanddivenifkaUM : 
into other areas of oornmu- 

ruca irons, lc. Gul 

kypbones etc. Cnntmiy 
over 600 cusuroaa. 

Rcpb to Bax G78. 
c/o TSbrs Newspepers. 


UNIQUE GOLDEN 
OPPORTUNITY 

Experienced, successful 
entrepreneur recently 
obtained sole, exclusive 
hcencsstor QK and Bre of 
proven winner £30,000 
mmmum investment 
required to realise full 
paternal. Franca! detaifs 
etc. available to oenume 
enquires only. 

Reply to BOX G73. 


Darlington Tea & Coffee 
Company Limited 


mart* the fine* tree wd crtlfttolte Counuy 
cutenna and *®*d trBOea 

Tm a*octaw ompouin haw been and owmriuninB bow 

BMhmridf an rermt^ 

.. . . L , rmuua Brill fes nccthd to nuidma 


hwj in rxpaod rtw sate* unth**™- .1 ■ “T- 

Nn Mi nr wpahiei are involwA b®* fa**** nred*d to pudoia 
innulxiMk. _ „ . muH nin nirmv 


nliriwiL drulh. Dt.nr- HOUCC JOHN DARUNGTON, 


COMPLETE TELEX SYSTEM - 

£899 + VAT 


PORTEX is a portable/desk topjdex system com- 
plete with full sized keyboard and printer ready for 
use. Call us for details: 


B.C.S. Limited 
01-582 6060 


ixsi 



Gobutk^i: 


A RARE 
OPPORTUNITY 


As people discover the pro- 
found cflcci of colour in 
our lives, wc are seeing and 
explosion of interest in col- 
our analysis up and down 
the country. 


Angela Wright is now pre- 
pared to teach her unique 
technique to selected peo- 
ple and ofTer an 
opportunity to join the 
company. 


You will be scIFempfoycd. 
There are no goals, so you 
work at your own pace, but 
income in excess of. 
£30000 per a year is not an 
unreasonable expectation. 


The fast training course 
suns in September. 


For further information 
calk 

01-622 7SI2 



CAPITAL 


Investment required for 
revolutionary new 
office/ciub concent in 
London s West W1. 
Remarkable returns 
plus equity offered. 

Telephone 
01 589 1939 or 
581 3635 for 
appointment. 


A BUSINESS you can run. 
iron home with unlimited 
potential. Agents reouired 
for all areas of the UK to 
sell in the growing field of 
communication equipment 
Small capital outlay. Full 
product training and sup- 
port will be given. 

Ring 

091 271 6980 

for full particulars. 


CKARTBIEB ACCOMTAVTS 

Seek potential partners with 
the view to promotuw further 
prownoul associatadotficas. 
The successful appRcant w« 
have drive and good aH round 
professional expertise. He witl 
Ofl supported with capital and 
a wealth of experience from a 
long established central 
London firm. 

REPLY TO BOX 015 


INVESTORS 

£50,000 trading oppor- 
tunity. Min 70% pa. 4 


Details 

01-930 8732 


PRIVATE 

INVESTORS 


with £100,000 plus 
looking for suitable 
opportunity, willing to 
take active part not 
afraid of hard work. 


Reply to BOX F88. 


CELLULAR TELEPHONE 
DEALERSHIP 


Wdl esubfishel Agendas wfth 3 : 
oraor manufararera. Access to | 
Vodafone 4 Ceilita Parmer/ ; 
investor reeured lot npinsnin. 
Veiy heavy him onto booh & 
an exciting advertising pip- 


gramm ttudy booked, 
ro purchase a the notit 


purchase a the ngm price 
Reply to BOX OQS 


TODAY’S BUSINESS DREAMS... 


OPPORTUNITY 


- recording studio. A new 
24 track recording studio 
seeks participator/s in- 
terested in its business 
venture. Set in a rural lo- 
cation within 1 hour of 
London, this expertly de- 
signed studio offers high 
quality facilities. 

If you are prepared to 
consider investing in tins 
enterprise, further details 
can be obtained from 
H orison & Associates on 

0240 65752 



Experience in 

motivating others . . 
We'D ghw you the backing; 
training and confidence to 
become a Regional Sales 
Manager and earn over 
£25,000 p A 

You don't need any capital 
or security, but you do 
need to be flnandsny sta- 
ble and have your own 
car. 



auuUHe UST ror me 71.500 
athntxv ntrlM MMmm. an 
Man Onfvr cast purchanrv 
from Of to C40 £5.000. T<M; 
<oa2Z> frttfet or lOesei mu 
UMK mC. VKWCLE Op trUH d . 

oauumcni 

un/bMb/iriKiu MmM at 
home Paapnis mock know 
how lor ulr BOX CM 
CORNWALL 20 one Mwrr MM 
prtxori tothow lOO^o net prom 
cao.ooo Reply to BOX CSS 


INVESTMENT OmNmiWTtES 

inquired for biMnmaiwn with 
niimtui marxrtwe cvpcr 
Usr PkNiK- forward 

pmirntnary Matts to BOX 
G2S 


FRANCHISES 


FRANCHISE 
FOR SALE 


X VMM aemaw to «wn am d Ac 
n» nagw nw m Lcttton. 
109 JERMYN STREET 
MMDKkmoM«dBlMllM.SlD- 
«n*M pntui mqums ta «tt mkm 


Teds Karl OMnkm 
( office hours) 
01-930 2430 


LOANS & INVESTMENT 


FINANCE 


Available for commer- 
cial properties, hotels, 
Hcanced premises, 
businesses etc, also 
building, development 
and project finance. 


. Can 

0803 25479/25470 
{24br aaswer pftoae) 


SMALL AVIATION jam cornu 
ny wiih 1-KTtmil faniiUrs in 
LK & US. imuun riitonrtal /In 
ccnUTOTji uotance lo 
RHMOUdaM- /npand ncMlnq 
oraaninbon la handle Largr 
port oram now in hand Also 
J 1 ** mioron i arcom i wdaiion 
lo ocyvtoo nvoiiHwuie or aornr 
a\uuon On cm laird manutac 
lore AhortMiil. on airport 
ttrauon Reply to BOX O&i 

***** ir a*®- aa pw manual 
vou how lo start sroitr 
own Buurms financing wtsks 
NO ra»m or wctaJ adurailon 
rraiorpo C5 SB Inc ptp For 
»«w ur Fite o. 25. Caa 
Smvl. London. WIH 

WAmOO AID DETAIL DTacUcn 
to "T/toic lo luiUMy ouauned 
tmarin o aw dnntww on 
tornw xqrcnawc For nirthvr In 

truer Bau, Sir ml. ciasgow 


BUILDING SUPPLIES & 
SERVICES 


PLANNING 
TO BUILD? 

Let us guide you 


the professional and 
contractual maze. 


John McManus 
Tel: 01-441 4747 


C ul ture u S aa pete 23 


LEIStMC VENDINC VANS for 

Mir fr.iliiunq inr LMml Ivor w 
c-uinpcnrni C.i-J> ■ ullii liocr, 
null No dm fc ton! Ijrh /vnl 

nmiillipoi I 1 5 2S0 at.irL.imol 
WWO .uni r. J Ptvsion 
Fr. ’jO M.,n> hrMrr Co. 500 

■iiirt CS200 hnl inrimirr 
tMXJO and S4O0O Rnpli lo 
W»» UO' 

ON THE CHANNEL TUNNEL 

ilnoivon Idralli Mlualnl in 
I .«! Krnl X ulil-iun ftp 
poiliimll Ini Ham I rrrtioia 

■iprtOMnidlrtt IT jrn-i * Hltli 

lr-urlKT .1 i . 11 . 11.111 lull In slJI 
ii irMUriilL and iciuiil! 

, ,n .,1 iiii-i Flftw mdIi Ich jur 

inn drlailL to Bov rso 

HEMDENTUL CADE NOME on 

I Mf MiC <0- qunK la 

irnli noim I *11 approi al or .ml 
o! I‘4r ol lviutu Xrrhilrrh 
numv aiail.ihio vun drvrtopri 
Ofrnv in> ilrd in iOwi> 


BUSINESS FOR SALE 


It you want to buy a busi- 
ness venture Caortal Report 
provides 500 specific oppor- 
tunities each year For free 
sample and fuM detafe 


VCR, 

20 Baldwin Street, 
Bristol 1 


TeL- 0272 272250 


TOMORROW’S BUSINESS SUCCESSES 


LICENSED 
90 SEATER 
RESTAURANT 


Large bar/recapnon plus 
3.000 sq ft semt^iasemant. 


3000 sq « semi-basement. 
Newcastle quay s*0e ta year 
lease CSS, 500 

Telephone 

0661 22621. 


If you’re keen to start a business, you need a total plan to 
maximise your chance of success. 

"mars where the New Enterprise Programme makes sound 
business sense: 90% of our entrepreneurs from previous years 
have succeeded. 

we will test your business plan under the unwavering ga?e of 
proven business professionals. And, once they've ironed out any 
wrinkles, they’ll add strengths you may not yet have. 

The counselling will be individual and practical and the 
business contacts you'll make will be valuable for the rest of 
your life. 

Best business sense of all. these Programmes are sponsored 
by the MSC at five of the mqst prestigious Business Schools in 


the country Afl we ask of you Is that you have: 

• a clearly defined business idea, ambitious enough to employ 
others 

• or a recently started business of the same potential 
■ a plan for raising the finance 

• the drive and commitment to make a go of it 

• the enthusiasm to get started NOW 

The first 4 weeks of the Programme are residential and Include 
an intensive grounding in marketing, tax, legal requirements, 
preparing a cash flow forecast and business plan-all with 
specific reference to your business project. Fbrtbe foJJowJng 
12 weeks you'll be setting up your business with the full support 
of our entrepreneurial consultants, y 


forSk^n^ t ° y0U - indSed to eligible £ 


^ Bra. There are only 5 of these .4 

[jresSgous business training Programmes 
available and places are limited. Postthe 
coupon today for the Information pack 
NEP Sound Business Sense. 

rrsn • 




m 







Sir 


< Li- . . 

ili'.'S:'; - 

^ W. ... 

’i.'H Tjtt 'lr-i . 

-i 

••• • i. 

<i»li!i3d I'ti-jl. ■ - • •• 
'XIECS l Ls,.. ; 


JlDNSi \\ 


■-C- :.r ,• 

J iiard. . 


^Tl i sn ^ 

Jskf H 

V . . 

^ 'Pp'inaj?-.— i 


x,.,,,. .... 






^ 'Pamirs.-. 


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S!“ R ^n, 


^81 1,,.^. 

I?!' 1 ”’'- 


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TV”- f i 
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SINESS 

‘'Sssy?.** 


5: >+* * »-m« «... 
»• 1 



THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


LAW 


25 


PERSONAL 



mum 

£899 

‘‘I» till! i 

•y u‘. iV ip 


B.C’S !,- 

6l-5«2 



tSlM.VS 
i*n miiis 



RARF 

JRTtMTV 


■.u- 


Ifrl v 

it i »nui.- 

irj" j; 


>/i|t.i >1 * 

•<■*•11 ft . 1,1-/ 

■ 111 “-"flit.-.* J, 
!.! » 


he 

“C* ;nir [Vj, r K • 

I* »• . 1% . • 

I* ■ Mil II n..| 
»&*>' i . 

VI v 

V^piiK, 


/j; 


"*s&| 


AH t UsiM *htrt«meai* 

on be accepted by telephone 
(except Announcements). The 
deadline is iflOnm 2 days prior 
to publicBiioa fie 100pm Moa- 
rfiy for WednadtayV Sbndd 
yoe wish to fend as advenue- 
non in writing ptewe Sadade 
your daytime phone- number. 
CUSTOMER SERVICES DE- 
PARTMENT. If you htwe my 
Queries or ptvWems idujjpgio 
your eduennaneni once it has 
eared, phase co co a oar 
Miner Services D epa r tm ent 

by telephone on owsmon. 


announcements 



. KANOS. SRU 

anforopotogW nd author who 
ha* surcwiunv meuMp *no- 
manfeUr hrattna on people, 
onimab and plants (tor Him 
yeanMthi funding. IradtuUnw 
al or pm-Pt*. (or in-depth 
ini nuganon or a phenomenon 
thr BmA hM recently declared 
cannot MU. Reply to BOX C84 


owatjoa optical 
Mesons etahatnoc can. Ain. 
ca- Used spemrtes. broken 
wa unes. help of any kind. Box 
65. Cnurrh Crooknan,. Hants 
CL IS OOC 

ANTIQUARIAN BOOK FAflL 11 
Aim. Open lOara - 7pm at The 
MartMroutfi Crest Hotel. Great 
Rnssed 6 l Adnumton Free. 

TODDURt DM Nursery School. 
Owning Sept 86.<NW3uNwm_ 
<sw6mN8i. TO En quirie s 286. 
73P6 leicti or 4350726 UUyl. 

8 POST UHCSMCSk MUt bey 
hum the sun sntocs. Salmi 
JJ/DHT 


SERVICES 


5,000 

ITURE 

PITAL 

s*! 

1 

.>» ,* 

\ * 

•av* • 

v.-’v • 

»9hon« 

• 1*39 or 
M3) lor 
tol iwitU. 


»OUB 0W?28l 


y*. 

t S * ,! ttetaiw. 

mi, 

*‘LV: IV!b * 

„ i'.-'W 

. * -- 1 G. 


M 

i *•.■ 
' 

* • 


r. 


MF-y 

« *'-* 


71 6980 

piiticiiJjv 


.{mat 


I si wwtt 


i k t v ■!>* 


•OWW^MTl 


0 BlS* 


ifei 

franchise 
FOR SALE 

108 JtBM«KSTSf 


Toi netCitW 
irff-r* M"" 1 
pi BJfl » . 



SES 


CAIJ— g CVT# L 

rurnruUim tin 

Details: 01-631 3388. 
COMPANY SOUP Days organised 

Mr «a« or tMW Mas An y lo- 

cation- Tel 0730 872722. 
PNEAKAWAY. London's club (or 

prMesMenal nnanatehed people 

rl-ojOin 200 events nwollv 

IV W hr Into lane. 907 7994. 

LONDON TV MCTWOKK has sto- 

dtos aialla Me TUT make-up a 

drawn? faaimesOi 452 3788 

for details 11-Opm Moo-Frt. 
FR IPIP S IO P. Love or Marriage. 

Ail wn. areas- Dauura. Dept 

1016) SO Abwpdora Roao. Lon- 

don WS. Tel: 01-938 1011. 


WANTED 


***** tew 

tn,,n *nS 

on «IT8 


7ES YOU CU 


Cl OOP paid for CMfia Cabinets. 
Also tames, desks, w ord r obes 
etc L'rgtnQy wanted . Old . Oil 
oanuings. unfran: torn, we 

buy imp. Phone Martin Dtgtav 
oi-9t>oaoo6 or write to 361. 
Harrow Road. London W9. AO 
tnpind colored. 

<20 ger act up lo paid for stiver 
articles. Up to £360 per ce Mr 
«okL Mr Karl 01-9*50 8030 or 
Write 361. Harrow Road. Lon- 
don. W9. All Englaiid covered. 


WANTED TH 

10295) 410652- 


Warrington 


legal services 


"CONVEYANCMC byftffyouah- 
Dcd Solicitors. £160 vat and 
riandort dhtmrsrencnts nng 
0244 319388. 


FOR SALE 


■w eir ra of Ncnmofap ow- 

pen*rfe and Sheraton style 

dining fpraffure made fo order. 

O'er GO fflnlna suites always 

available for tmfaedtate oeu\- 

«Y. NettMiM. wr Henley on 

Thames i049i> eaius. 
Bournemouth <02021 293680. 
TofKham. Devon (039287) 
7443. B er ke ley. G)os <0465) 

810982. 

FWCCT quality wool carpets. At 

trade pans and under, ateo 

available lOOrp extra. Large 

mom star remnants under hair 

"“^^■Chhwrery Cupets 

Ol 405 0465. 

THE TlpT S 179S4SK. Omer 
IIUcs matL Hand bound ready 

for prescmaiion also 

-Sundays-. £12 60. Remember 
When. 01-688 6323. 

TICKETS PDR ANY EVENT, Cate. 

SUftmu Exp, Chew. Us M» 

All nieatBf and sports. . 

Tel- B21-4616 8280498. 

A.Ejt Visa . Dtnere. 
■RTHMY DUE t One someone 

an original Thncs NmraMr 

dated me coy say they were 

bom. £1230. 0492-31305. 
SUTRNHRI Any event Inc Les 

Mts. CoveM Gfln. gurugni Exp. 

aymUtounie. 01 828 1678. 
Mator ctmil. cants. 

CATS. CHUB. Les MIS. A8 the- 

tore and soon, to 651 3719. 

637 1715. AH major neon cds. 

wam/r se twin . Cookere. 

etc- can you buy meaner? B & 

.S Ud. Ol 229 1047/8468. 


CO] 


ANTIQUES & 
)LLuTi4 


rABLES 


BR0WWN6 
ANTIQUES 
01-699 7198 


Jtss . 

.iNed. Also ait 

OthBT 

Other good quality cMna 
required. 


TONY and ch a mrter fugs, a CCS- 
mtiOD of 220 ekL new. large, 
small. Some rare, some UmtUd 
editions- Woods. Btswirk. Roy- 
al Danen nr; To be omd 
cumokte at XBJioa Tat 0633 
692787 

ROYAL BOULTON Tot>V Jugs. 

Figurines, pnunahL, etc. waul- 

ed. 01 883 0024. 



WHY WAIT FOR SUMMER T 

ENJOY SWIMMING ANYTIME INSIDE A COVAD* DOME 
INSTALLS) OVER YOUR POO. 

{mran: MBny. ptmg vto mail 

ml MW poo vnttHT NltaL 

pncetL 

Snd for ddaib ton the Mnubasnc- 

COVAW STRUCTURES LTD 

IbIm h M “ 

Tit B455 Stmi p48re) 



MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


■ate. SnauUfal condition. Tel 
061 225 0881.061 251 67S& 


RESISTA CARPETS i 

. SALE NOW ON 

Mni mix Barters 
from E3S5 per so yd + VAT. 
80% pool Heavy Domestic Wttm 
£1X85 per at yd +-VAT. 

Cortaootu dies 
£8-75 per sq yd + VAT 
5 maajr ofoer great mtuHtaiif . , 
148 Wawfnmtt Bridge Rd 
Pauses Greta, SWS 

Tel: 01-731 3368/9 

Rea i 




IARY 
OF 

THE TIMES 

CLASSIFIED 



Tbe Himes; Cb^bed colmmis are read toy 
13m3Bdn offliemoGt affluentpe^de in the 
co unity. The foDowin^ cathodes appear 
■egnbriy each week and ave geneoBy 
accompanied by relearnt edStorial articles. 
Use the coopoii (bdow), and find out bow 
|~easyrlKtoad«con<Hnicalltistoadm1iseiii~| 
The Tunes Qassi&ed. 

— MONDAY=== 


Education: University Appointments, Prep& 
Public School Appointocnts. Educational 
Courses, Scholaisbips and EeQowsbqs. 

La Cieme de la Creme and other secretarial 
appointments. 


TUESDAY 


Computer Horizons: Computer Appoint- 
ments with editorial 
Legal Appointments: Solicitors, Com- 
mercial Lawyers, Legal Officers, Private & 
Public Practise. 

La Creme for top legal secretaries. 
Sector Appointments. 

WEDNESDAY= 


La Creme de la Creme and other se c ret aria l 
appointments. 

Property: Residential, Town & Country, 
Overseas, Rentals, with editorial 
Antiques and Collectables. 

THURSDAY 

General Appointments: Management and 
Executive appointments with editorial. 


La Creme de la Cieme and other secretarial 
appointments. 


FRIDAY 


Motors: A complete car buyer’s guide with 
editorial. 


franchises etc. with editorial 
Restaurant Guide. 


SATURDAY 


Overseas and UK Holidays: Milas/ Cottages, 
Hotels, FEghts etc. 


THE WORLD FAMOUS 
PERSONAL COLUMN, INCLUDING 
RENTALS, APPEARS EVERY DAY* 


THE 


TIMES 



Fill m the coupon and attach ii to your advertisement, 
written on a separate piece of paper, allowing 28 letters 
and spaces per line. 

Rates 
Bated 

Court — 

AD rues subject to 15% VAT. 

Send to: Shti)ey Mi*£o8s, Gttmp Qassffied Advertise- 
Blent Manager, Times Newspapers LbL, PO Boat 484, 
Vkpaia Street, London El HDD. 


spaces per line. 

; are L i nag e £4,00 per line (min. 3 lines); 
i Display 123 per snide column ce nti metr e: 
[ & Sock! £6 per line. 


Name. 


Address. 


Tdepbooe (Daytime). 


Dareofinsejtioo'- 


(Pteasedknf three ^ waiting days prior to insertion ds®.) 


PIANO S 


a SS^!^S 1 ^ 

9-7% H. 


nuBnKuwM«n 

■01-4912777 


CENTRE. Seasonal stocX dean 
oner, continental upriynp a 
Grands. Ugh ainuty. offor : 
able nnres 38. Wigxnom SL 
Wl- Tet Q1 486 31 1 1. or Ol 
956 7378 

THE MAKO WORKSHOP SALE. 

Genuine redactions an over 
1QO new a restored instru- 
ments. Lnmaued oiler sales 
senlre. Free raialouue- 30a 
HMmale Rd. NWS. 01-3S7 
7671. Flee catalogue. 


ANIMALS £ BIRDS 


Mrs. Bmtmful 

Eseefienf pedigree and tempera- 

ment. Home reared ideal show 
ItaaMs yet. Ready Aug 14th. 

TOM284) 810910 


SHORT LETS 


ICVUMNUta. tLavYfy snuMMn). . 
Spacious gr fo- flaL superbly 
turn 3 men. 2 due beds. 2 
baths. CCH. noe. gdns c£Oasx> 
son- TOj 10892) 47000 tT). 



EHCLOSDPOOLS 

PORYEAft-ROtMOSWBnWQ 



root DOME 28n * lea never 

wAretih. to*. cosb^E 

106827) 69732. 


Encfasureseianbeinslaled 
over new or ensfing pools 
Several styles avsdabte. Abo 
, ou&toorand exercise pools . 
{Send fx Brocti ure ta: apt ST1 1 
AntepLtdlGreenfWaeWay: 
CWMBRAN, Gwert NP44 3UZ | 
Tet 06333 72737/8 


OVERSEAS TRAVEL 


HOUDAY PLATS * houses omO- 
able. CKX>X5O0apw. Personal 
Service. 01-4E6 5680 or 0836- 
092834 anytime m. 


Id 

Kenstegtai. Col T.V. 24 nr Sw 

Bd. Telex. OoUnsham Apis. Ol- 

379 6306. 

ST JAMES PLACE; IK Lnxury 

servlced 2. Bed aparuaenl. 

Prime location next Id Park. 01- 
379 6506 OX 

KDtSMSTON Sunny garden Rot 

ta Vogue magaoUM.Lounge. ' 2 

beds. £220 pw. 602 8941. 

UfXinrr ser vi ce d flats, 

central London from £326 pw. 

Ring Town Hse Apts 373 3433 

RESENTS PARK. Holiday Let. 

Snail RaL Suit autef persea. 

£126 pw. 08956 38049 
■OL August. Lovely 2 bed fbd. 

Mg gmden. aa mactunM. Rea- 

sonable. 889 6988. 


FLATSHAKE 


25t female lo share nKe family 
house wtlh 2 others. Own son- 
ny double bedroom with 
balcony. Tube 3 nans. £380 
pem exclusive. Phone 736 *014 
eves: 480 9327 ttays. 


SWITZERLAND 

FROM ONLY 
£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissair’S 

Super Apex. 

London toZurich or 

Geneva daily on con- 

venient afternoon 
flights. And daily 

fGghts to Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days | 
before departure. 

Stay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday afterarrivaL | 
Bookings and full 

conditions from 

travel agents or 

01-4379573 

swissair^^ 


IT S ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 


svaev 

PERTH 


E«J 


_ _ are 

HOBG KQNB E248 
OBJO/BOMUY EZS1 
COLOMBO 1237 
STMBUL EU2 

hh» ae 
jowjHG an 
UU EBQ 

LOS nans E2M 

ww raw rim 

GENEVA E 75 

NUIWCTTM/ £174 
BM.THWE 


E541 

EM? 

E748 

m 

ms 

sire 

CB« 

E41S 

£187 

are 

«H 

KB 

ra 

SM 


42-48 CUU CtNRT UU 

n uj 

, 01-937 MOQ 

01-603 1515 

: 01-038 3*44 

GsnmmH Ucmsed/Banfcd 
«TA HTA ATOL MOB 



BARGAIN FLIGHTS 

Sydrrey G4S5 27S5 
Auddsnd £415 £745 

JO’Bu^j £306 £499 

Bangkok £209 £355 

Cairo £135 1210 

New York £149 £320 

L68 Angrtes £216 £399 

TOP DECK 
FLIGHT CENTRE 
01-370 6237 


BULtncHl a . mfos VWwWCto. 
' 24+. M/Fobfere rntxetf hse: o/r. 
£42 eXC pw. TO 01 670 7049 
feves). ‘ 


WANDSWONTH/TOaHLEY 

MU- area Prpf. Peraon. Excel- 
lent fadlHIes in Ige hsc. Gdn. Nr 
min/hus. Own for dbte rw, 
£85 p.w. lire. TO eves; 870 
6639 

CMEUEA l prof F to stum- amaa 
beawnrutty dnonM noose 
with 1 other 9trL Own Room, 
cteantng tally. CSOpw-i-blllAOl 
889 0072 or 684 9033 
■MBA VALE 1 person to stun 
comfortable not with t other. 
Own bedroom and mu use of 
flat. Close to tidies. £200 Pius 
MBs pa w. Tel: Ol 433 4160 
BATTERSEA. mTF to shore Hat- 
Own bedroom and lull use of 
flat. Cl 60 pem excL 622 Z97S 
toner 6cm, l 

EAST END SLUM. ReoukYS 2nd 
rewdeni - for pteosam iw v. 
ctow to City. Tel: TorguO 0923 
720477 or 981 8669 
FLATMATES SdtdKr Sharing. 
Weil estab introdwiory service. 
Pke Iri for ooot: 01-869 6491. 
313 Brampton Rood. SW3 . 

Z 8IRLS RCQUNtED U, Stir *90- 
rlous room m Ige Battersea 
bouse- £118 gem each me. 380 
1868 Eves or 671 3238 Day 
5W11. p for me mi In lux Use. 
All amen, to mins central Con- 
don. £170 pern excL Phone 
Eves 228 7881 Beverley Stott 
WEST HAMPSTEAD nr. tube 
shops, mart, friendly, mtxc-d 
ftaL prof. M/F. n/s. Ige n/r. 
£86 pw tael. Ol 794 8759- 
CLAPHAM SOUTH. Praf M. O/R 
toe hsev £105 pan met. TO: Ol 
673 8848. 

CLAPHAM JUNO O/R. N/S. CH. 
M/F prof. £1«B pm exd. 407 
8522 X73I2 day. 870 3492 IW. 
FULHAM Prof. r. share fire. ofr. 
all mod cons. £SS PWindOl 
7316773 momlngs/etes 
HAMPSTEAD. F lo SW lux Hat. 
£250 D-r.m. Tel Ol 222.4888 
lOayU. 01 372 6050 (Evu. 
MCHGSTt Prof M/F. N/S. O/R. 
U+v. £200 C r.m. (excluding 
phonei 486 8877 Ext 212 work 
UTTUE VENICE. Young prof F 
N/S loon gdn. Nr lubes. 
£60pw inrL- Dl 723 1308 
ROOM AVA I LA B LE for retired 
person Ctevedon area. DccMls 
on reouesL Reply fo BOX C74 . 
SES Dfchp Rm in Lux Shared FlaL 
Afl Serv. 16 rains Town. £86 
pw Excl. Ol 701-8677 Exes 
WI2. Large comfortable non la 
CH. house. Sun N/S prat. £68 
pw foe. 743 4103. 

M2 BrtgM lux IU. o/r with view. 
V.rentnaS. N/S. C296pcm + * 
bfos. Refs. 01-402 1704 
W2r Prof female. O/R. Brkdn 
spac lux fUL £70 pw Inc. Tel: 
01 -684 9649 IW1/4Q29S34 (hi 
WEST HAMPSTEAD. M/F U dhr 
mod CH flaL O/R. 3 rains lube. 
£45 p.w. excl. 01-628 8170. 


jgDnu/Hv 


MSCOUNTED FARES 
angle nun 
Otici £490 
£775 ESSO 
Cam £150 I23G 

Lagta EM a 

DiJ/Bom £250 £350 

fongtdi £220 £350 

DatM* £420 

Afro, 

182/11 


SUPER HOLIDAY 

SALE 

tatL Corfu, Rhodss. bn. Snator 

SmM htaxfc. Tbp Mgaivc. Itawa 


85.1C.1I An 
13.15,16.1 M4 ■ 
202Z23M25^J 


2SJ83I tag 
UJJ. 




Ink tab 

ure cats 

rug £3*9 

ran £229 
Eire £229 


Ml » «*»» »e 

■dqw aoO. Btodons 
■ CmM Cud Baataw 

ONLY DIRECT FVIOH 



Id: Loatfre tl-81 5451 
TettfegflHU 1742 3311M 
Tet Mrechettar HI >34 5C3I 
MDL HS4 


Lite 5 


Sum Boamgs H 
MCVWVWBIS 


FronUeft 


10WEKT FME9 

£69 N YORK 
£80 LA/SF 


£275 
*395 

. _ £320 Mam £330 

Mmeu £325 Sagwore E«20 
JOtXpg E480 Bokpu* £335 
Cara £205 Katmandu £4xo 
Del/flom £335 RangooQ £350 
Hong KongESiO Cwadta £*2S 


SON I S4K0 

21 tadb 8. Uataa m 

■uob cjcmokxmfB 


mn TURKEY. August avail. 
Spend a week retaxmg at our 
private beach hotel, men a 
week croWng on our yaeM for 
£450. Inc m. h/b. free 
w/aporn. other combinations 
DOW. Ol 326 1006. 01 737 
386l(24hre>. ATOL 2091. 


■ WHUIIHW ON mghlii/lioR 
to Europe. USA A meet deetina- 
■tons. Diplomat TravU 01-730 
2201. ABTA LATA ATOf- 


WT • CLUE CLAM FUBHIB; 

Huge Dbcotmcs. SunworM 
TTavel. . *0 3727) 26097 

/27 109/27638. 


KW LOW USES mniNMDE 


% 

Lagos 

Monravn 

Niwao 

Bugkok 

aom/Dd 

Cam 

COtMOO 

0R1BKU1 


EMO OubU £370 

£400 KanM £180 

£330 Jtdddi E440 

£400 Kmchi £275 

E2R1 Kul/Sn £443 

£360 Kune E345 

£34 5 N.Y0ffc £275 

£220 Seoul £730 

£415 Sjd/Mdf £785 

£Z70 Tokyo £500 

mum TMH. UD 

2 DEMUN SlHSLJi^lXM lfl 
Tot EH39 afel/IM7 

muBi 


- -- Key 
Travel 60. Rad Lion ST. WC1. 
Ol 406 1498. A8TA/IATA. 


WOfldwMe. 

HaymarkM 01-930 1366. 


OnCOONTED a SBOUP FARES. 

U.T.C. Open StaL 0783887035. 


1DW COST FARES to U^A. Mo- 
tor Travel. 01 488 9257. IATA. 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi, lo’Bnrt. Cairo, Dubai, 
lslanboJ, Singapore, K_L Ddhi, 
Bangkok. Honi Kong, Sydney, 
Europe & The Americas. 


76 Shaftesbnr Ai 
London W1V 7DG. 

01-439 0102 

Open Satwday HJ8-13 jN 


Ol 441 
mi. Travrtwtse. aoul aw. 


SPADL PonugaL C haopgp t rare*. 
Btggles. 01 736 8191. ATOL. 


SWriZULAND Scheduled ntghf* 
01-724 2588 ABTA ATOL 


... Fly direct 9.16. Aug- 

Oct. Free w/i. tennis, superb 
rood 6 free wtne. Choose a dub 
4* luxury or 2* hotels by 
sandy beach. Umarecape Oi- 
441 0122 24 hn. 


TOUR 

OF SICILY- Exceptional value 

la le season Crand Tour. *pe- 

ctatty designed to icmsty wide 

tastes, wun sensible dally, mile- 

age. Departures Tuesday 30 
Sep*. 7.14 *71 Od £296 foci 

day flights Catwick. 7 nights 

H/B tn 5/4 star hotels, airport 
taxes, entrance fees. Socoal of- 

fers also u, TAORMINA, bid 
1st col. hotel £208 H/B. bench 

hotel £218 H/H. pemtoM cm 

B4rB.aU for 7 nights. 8BRMda» 

dates. ISLAND SUN 01-222 

7482 ABJA/ATOL 1907. 
ARIF ARE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
o/w £420 rtn £760. Auckland 

ol « £420 rtn £770. Jo'burg 

O/w £306 rtn £499. Los Ange- 

les o/w £216 rtn £400 London 
FUghl On IT* 01-570 6552. 


Low cost 
flights #.9- Rio £488. Lima 
£495 rm. Also Small Croup 
Holiday jou’neys.ieg Peru 
from £380) JLA 01-747-5108 


LOW TAREK 

USA. S. America. MM and Far 

EasL S Africa. Trayvale. «8 

Moroaref Street. Wl. 01 580 

2928 (Visa Accepted] 

BARCABI HUNTERS. Rtog now 

tor AuatraiUL NX. Middle mol 

India. Far Ean. ABTA. Club Aar 

Train. Ol 629 2684. 

EUROPE /WORLD WOE lowest 

fares an charter /*ch«Julcd fils. 

Pilot FHghl Ol 631 0167. Apt 

A lot 1893. 


New York £249. LA £349. To- 
ronto £279. Nairobi £319. 
Sydney £749. Auckland £749. 

DortoJr 130 Jerrayn Street. 01 

839 7144 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


The RAF 
Benevolent Fund 
repays the debt 
we owe 



The Royal Air Force reached a peak strength of 
1 ,200.000 in 1944 and more than 1% million men and 
women served during the war years. 
Thousands did not come hack. Many tie in the forgotten 
comen of the earth and sea. Many thousands more were 
left disabled > mentally and physically. 

Last year the RAF Benevolent Fund made grants in 
excess of £7.000,000. widows, dependants and the dis- 
abled receiving the rmyor share. And ibis cost continues 
10 rise as age and infirmity overtake the Survivors. 

Inflation too imposes an ever increasing burden. 
We need yonr help. Every donation we receive means 
we have mote to give. Please remember the Fund in 

your WiO; advice on legacies, bequests and covenants is 
gladly given. If you know of anyone who might qualify 
tor help from the Fund please let us know. 

Royal Air Force 
Benevolent Fond 
67 Portland Place, London WIN 4AR 
Tel: 01-580 8343 

Registered under the War Clarities Act I MP a nd the Clarities 
Act I960 RegHtrefam No. 207327 


Aug/SepL availability (0923) 
771266. Tl noway Hobdays. 
ABTA ATOL 1107. 

LOW COST niCHITS. Most Cura- 
pran Oattuuttoa Vatmandn- 
01-402 4262/0002 ABTA 

61004 ATOL 1960 

M.VORK, 
Worldwide cheapest fores. 
Richmond Travel. 1 Duke a 
Richmond ABTA 01-940 4073. 

MOROCCAN BOUND TRAVEL. 

HoM reservations all over Mo- 
roreo. , TO: Ol 734 6307 
ABTA/ ATOL 

riRRMA. Perfect beaches lor 
your summer nouday. Can for 
our brochure now. TUntotan 
Travel Bureau. 01-373 4411. 
USA. CANADA. AMO EUROPE. 
LOWEST AIR FARES AMO 
Club and First, BESTFARE Ol 
394 1642. AM 1400 
ALICANTE. Faro. Malaga etc. 
Dtmond Travel ATOL 1783. 
01-881 4641. Honnam 68841 
ALL US am, Lowest fares an 
motor scheduled carriers. 01 - 
884 7371. ABTA 
HOMO KQMC £468. Ban** 
£369. Slog £467. Other FE cu- 
lm 01-584 6514. 


Flights /attar 01-471 0047 
ATOL 1640. AMeai/Viu. 
SYD/MEL £618 Penh £545. AO 
major earner* lo ah 6 NZ. oi- 
664 7371 ABTA. 

AMERKAH VACATIONS. Hottest 
Price Busier*. 01 657 7863 
S. AFRICA From £468. 01-884 
7371 ABTA. 


CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 


128* Traditional sailing Knottier 
world voyage lo sample what- 
ever H encountered whgaievre 


H nay mnt. embarking _ 
soon as possible on <men endee . 
Expenses shared Berth available 
07586 8817. 
WINDSURF LETKAS DJERBA. 
9.12. Aug to OfL 01 reel Fit*, 
anise A retaxmg hols, on 
msioftt turn, boat tripe. 8 B©s 
Boo. For Solo's. O ouotto a 
Femmes. Lunarecape Ol 441 
0122 24 hfs 


GENERAL 


M off to Pane. Am- 
sterdam. bunch. Bruges, 
Geneva. Berne. Lausanne. The 
Hague. Dublin. Rouen. Bou- 
logne & Dieppe Time Off. 2a. 
Chester Ctose. London. SU'IX 
780 Ol 235 8070. 

MAMCLLA A CRETE we sun 
have avail. Aug/Sepl 
vtilaa/oHL Some wlfo-tpru 
pool- Cab nowon 01 724 9775. 
Piava Hototays. AUM 2136 


RENTALS 


SAVOY HOTEL ADJOINING 

Magnificent 2 bed, 2 bath apartment To 
Let Beautifully furnished with 
airconditioning, total security and direct 
access to all hotel services. 

Phone Mr Finn at 01-992 5647 





PUTNEY: lux balcony ftat with 
Wage. 5 bedrooms to (trap 5. 
lanuTt bathroom and separate 
siwwer room, superb kuchen. 
lundehrd to hfon standard, en- 
tire ccnlena of fin are new. 
Star ion 8 mmi. Waterloo/ w«u 
End 10 mua. £226 pw, TH 01- 
608 6591 HO ajn. • 4 p.ra 1 or 
1029 1261 4249 after 630 p.m. 


FURNISHED MEWS House 

rrnt Montague Souarr. 

Bed. Lflc Rerep. Duung 

kab. Long M pm neopw 
TH. Ol -029 6103 (Ti. 


LARGE LUXURY fbnvhliM flU. 
Wl. 5 mm walk US Emnaasy. 
Availahle umnedtately- 3 Beds. 
2 Reams. KUriwn & 2 BUha. 
Gas CH All appliances. Long let 
pref ESBOpw. Tel: 01 «29 
6102 fT). 


NOTOWBUU. CATE SoacUMB 2 
double bed flat, dounle rerep, 
mod kurhra. bath. Koerate 
WC. garagtug and porterage 3 
rains tone. £200 per waek nag 
Tel Ol 727 0996 or 722 6883. 


SWx. Sunny OOi floor ftat with 

views of the Royal Mews. 

Herrp/Dtner. New ku. 3 Beds. 

Bout. Porter. £360 neg pw. 

Cooks 828 8281. 


HARLEY HSC. Regents Park. To- 
tally return foci new Ml. 8 
Bear. 3 Recrr*. 2 Baths. Rem. 
EI3300M F*F. 499 9981. 
Eves 870 4703 fTV. 


, FWham $u- 

per modern executive 2 bed flat 
wttfcgarage fo prestige devl. 
£160 pw long let- Buchanans. 
391 7767. 

Wl Luxury /umtshrd flaL avail 
limned. 2 beds. 2 rears. 2 baths. 
KU. GCH. Long Co Let. £376 
PW. ton. 01 247 460810)/ 907 
7444 I Mr Andrew) 

AMERICAN rank utvenUy re- 
guim luxury flan and houses 
from £200 - £1.000 pw. Ring 
Burgess Estate Agents 681 5136 

AVAILABLE NOW Luxury flats A 
houses. Cbetoeo. Kmoh t sbnagc. 
Belgravia. £200-£2.000pw. 
TO: Bmgesa 881 8136. 

HOLIDAYS A LOOM LETS, Lon- 
don. ForesMOe Props Lid. Ol 
242 9462 « 27 or 01 831 
0566. 

HOLLAND PARK: ntri bed. 1 
rerep. tM. firm, s/e HgM par- 
den ftat. Avail isl Sept. £1 18 
pw. 01-3866009 fwecK days) 

MEAL FOR VISITORS. Soum 
Kenungton. Ftiliy serviced dal 
for 2 LUL Phone. Col TV. CH 
etc. Ol 884 2414/786 4281. 

LONSDALE SQUARE, HL Su- 
per* bilou Mews fiat (sleeps 2) 
wtlh terrace. Phone 01-607 
8931 oner 1pm. 

MAYFAIR. HYDE PARK. The 
mosi luxurious fong/short let 
apt*, lwfc/iyr. 1/8 beds. Best 
prices. w.T. P. Ol 938 9612. 

M7 NR TUBE, l bed flat with gdn. 
CH. Avail 1 yr. Prof 
person/ento. £95 pw foci. 607 
1765 Before nan. 

N18 Luxury 2 Bed IW. folly fur- 
rushed. Available lo rent from 
2Sth August w nr ■ year. 
dOOpcm. TeL- 249 0272. 

M U I’ WMA MLL 1 bedroom ftaL 
nr Tube with Phone. CTOow. 
Express Rentals- OL 883 S4S7 
an 8pm. 

P R— ROSE MLL. Larue 3 bed 
unfum flat. aO lux lUUngs 6 
machȣ3lOpw. Also 1 bed fum 
- bale -ftat Xl20pw. 436 836a 

RCOCNTSPK- BAKERS ST Flat. 
2 beds. 1 reep. kM. parking, 
furniture all brand new. Co ml 
£ 190 PW. Tfc£ 01 724 9312 

9*79*81 The number to remem- 
ber when seeking beet rental 
properties In central and prune 
L ondon ar eas £i8O/£2£O0pw. 

W.LOH D OH 2 DM (Ol reoapL 
goe. kids OX. ClOOpw. ran ex- 
press Rentals. Ol BBS 6487. 
Onen 6 days. . 

WAN I ID 2 bed flat handy for 
fonlOi Suture SW1. Co M V 
needed. £80 pw. 01-439 6744 
(daysw Evas 0334 44601 ftaiei. 

C HEL SEA Large studio, superbly 
ftonitoied throughout £120 pw. 
TO 01 363 0489. 

DOLE BERMT, nr Tube, own 
k lichen. £43 pw. CoS Express 
Rentals. Ol 883 8487. 


have duality property ro lef i 
us about 11 We offer a pro 
Nona) and rename venire 
Phone Omnm ConNantme 
today: Ol 244 73S3 


Realty lovely 

110119 #- 2 Mm aapham : 

tube. 2 baths, washing madun 
etc. Sim 6 sharers at £45 
earn t£22S pw). " 

361 7767. 


Superbly 
raunoed luxury- flat witmi 
yards of the amenlnes of Stoan 
St and Kmghtsbndge. Long lei 
£250 pw. aadsanans: 3Si| 
7767, 

BAKER ETi Sapurb 3 yrs otd I . .. 
toe. 4 beds. 2 bath n nouiier 
touoge/diner. ku/bkfsl Oge) 
Pauo/gdn. CCH. £375 p.w. Ol { 
847-2641 / 221-8276 

FREE SERVICE 10 ._ 

accom. tn N. London Can Cx-( 
press Rentals. Ol 883 8487. 

BARDEN FLAT l bedrm. reep. 
phone, nr tube. £70 pw. CaS 
686 7576 Rental Cutte 6 days. 

SOLDERS CHEER 3 Bedroom 
House. £200pw negotiable. 
NfoH Hotter 883 3286. 

KENSINGTON. £138 pw. Excel- 
lent tpactou* welt niratstwd 2 
bed garden ItaL 603 9466. 

LOOKING for the best ftaL du- 
plex. house ta London* 
£100/1 OOOpw. Can 889 6481. 

MAMBLE ARCH Mews cottage. 2 
double beds. £275 pw. Refs es- 
sential 286 8260. 

MAYFADL Small but very 
oeautful studio flat. £175 pw 
Inc cleaner. 936 2781 07. 

M ODE RN dbleoedslL £38 pw. Nr 
tube. Own kitchen- 686 7576 
Rental Guide. 

MW 3 bed house, nr Tube. WM* 
washer. £130 pw. Express 
Rentals. Ol 883 8457. 

• HEN. Exclusive period 3 bed 
flat. Newty fum. tovrty recep. 
CM. col TV. matt. Ol 3730753k 

SW 2 bedim flat, phone, gdn. 
piling, nr train. £80 pw. Rental 
guide 686 7576 unul 7 run. 

THORNTON HEATH Kids, pets ok. 
washer, phone, gdn. £130 pw. 
Rental Guide 686 7576.6 days. 

WL 3rd floor l bed. recep. a * n. 
CH. CHW. Ear value. Cl 16 pw. 
935 9512 m. 

W14 CH Gdn flaL Bedsit k/ta. 
£228 pem. 6-12 mtbs. suit 1 
quiet loving person. 603 6091. 

WE LET FLATS AND HOUSES. 
Contact Richard or Mick- Davb 
WooUe A Go 402 7381. 


SELF-CATERING 


USniRY VKJLAS with pools and 
•off suit avail, south of France. 
Marneua. Algarve. West todies. 
Oo ii mental VUtaaOI 2459181. 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARICS 


.Was. some with 
pools, apartment*, laverras. au 
dues avail. August specials, 
high season from £186. Cetttc 
Hobdays. Ol 309 7070 & 0622 
677071 or 0622 677076 (24 
hrsl Aid 1772. 


SELF-CATERING 

GREECE 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


MCE. Lowest tares fr £99. 

Btggles. 736 8193. Atm 1893. 

BRITTANY/ SOUTH OF FRANCE. 

Augus For the ngm villa rail 

Euroittas 0376 61156. 


UX HOLIDAYS 


S. DEVON. Sea Spacious family] 

flat. Sent on for 2/6. £84.£i5aj 

pw 01 -794 0237/01 -674 6650 


WINTER SPORTS 


Greek Island 
Villas 

H is iwk too late lo And a 
quality vlHo holiday fo August 
on the Creek Islands. In Corfu 
we con offer tome super small 
vflia*. many with use of pri vale 
pool: or Paxos, « comfortable 
Opanment In quiet fishing 
village: In Crate superb wa 
front studios. Good la mliy 


Day flights available every 

Tuesday from Qstwkfc and 

Manchester. Brochure: 

CV Travel (T) 

ssstsfsr i 

oi-ssi ouir < 
014MM0S < 

_ csesom-Mkr m 
IS Matecmtal 3 



CORFU VILLAS. We sun have 
availability Sunday »3i Aug 
for 2 wfts. Beautiful vfUas or toe 
beach ex Gaiwtcic. Pan World 
HoHdays. 01 734 2862 
LEFKAS 12.19 - AupSfpL 
unspoilt Greek Isle. Windsurf. 
BBCv & bop. Sotos Couples 8 
Families. Lunarecape 01-441 

0122 24 nrs 


nMr prices. Fllglus A 
holidays. Freedom Hoddaya. 
01-741 4686. ATOL 432. 
CMECE. Usfpont Islands, cheap 
rnwib. vlfta rentals etc. Zeus 
Hols. Ol 434 1647. AWL Alto. 
WNMMn Lux apan non from 
E 189pp. 6, 13. 20. 27/3. 
Strama. 0708 862814. 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


VILLAS WITH A MACH: TOUCH. 
A viua. a pool and a beautiful 
view. What more rautd you 
wont? Cnoew from Tuscany. 
Sardinia or Ravetlo - tor loveli- 
er pwrf* of Italy where the mass 
market operators donT oo Or 
combine a vua hoflday wtu> a 
stay in Venice. Florence or 
Rome. Free brochure from 
Magic of Italy. Dnu T. 47 Shop, 
herds Bush Green. Wiz aps 
Teh Ol 709 7449 (24 hn 
sen irri 

FLORENCE- 4-bedna HBa fo \u- 
tage. 20 mm Ob Centre. 
Sudifuiunp near by. Avail 16- 
30 Aug. Manna Holidays 0722 
352121/0963 70636 


SELF-CATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALGARVE. Law summer A au. 

tuntrt aiMabibty pi Portupart 

rvHumr Carvoewo Club wun 
luxury Milas, apartments, pools 
A maid service can Puneu 
WUOMOOO LUL 0849 817023 or 
01 668 6722. ABTA ATOL 
1276. 

ALCARVC ALTERNATIVE. Vina 
Holidays of dfsttonton tor toe 
very frw TO; 01-491 0802- 73 
St, JamrtfS Street. SWl. 
ALCARVC. Lux vinos won poets 
A a Ms Avail Sept/OeL 01 409 
2838- villa World. 


SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


jn illla* wtlh 

pools A opts. 6spt to Oct. Ol 
409 2838 vtllaWstML 


SKI BLAOON UNES 

86/87 BROCHURES HOW 0UT1 
47 fksons u SmtortmcL 
Austro. Franca A /tity 
The Biggest Choke Oo Stas' 
Ex 6aNKk. Luton. Manchester. 
GDsgow A Ednhorgh 

01785 2280 

Jtaock.Deps.M22 78121 
ABTA 16723 ATOL 1232 


SKI WEST bumper brochure out 
now parked witn all the Up re- 
sorts. Sunday flights meal Ihej 
traffic’!, and amaunaty fowl 
prtevs starting at £69. Ring lOlU 
788 9999 for your copy. 
ABTA69266 ATOLI383. 


SUPER SECRETARIES 


SBCHETARBCS for ArchUectS A 
Designers. P er ma nent A tempo- 
rary positions. AMSA SPfCtaiM 
Rec. Cons. Ol 734 0532 


DOMESTIC A CATERING 
SITUATIONS 


STOCKHOLM SWEDEN EngUsn 
speaking Swedish family mov- 
ing back from London after toj 
years with 3 children 9 A find 4 
years are looking for a reliable 
gtn of 20* with a areal sense ol 
humour. Musi be sole fo ante 
Non-smoker. Pinny of travel 
Lovely house on ihe m. 20] 
minium from City centre by enri 
or train. Reply by Mephone to 
Hn C-Msminoa before AuguN 
5iti and oner August Bin an OiOi 
46 682 300 48. between August' 
8Ui and August BUi in London 
on Ol 998 6768. after Auguu 
. tun on 010 468 717 050a Or 
Hi writing to Mrs C Hamilton 
C/o EnUUKta Securities. 26 
Finsbury Souare. London 
EC2A IDS together with) 
photograph. 


Law Report August 8 1986 

Justices should be 
more ready to 
appoint guardians 


F.W8WF l Management Str- 
um) Ud require properties m 
mural south and west London 
area* for waiting appbc*fus.0l - 
221 8838. 


se adss. 

r. nue 

g Atm. 

asopwl 


TreraenMut value. Superb t 

Bed fully servKea Dot - top hotel 

calibre- 3 vvks nun. TV. 
AyiefhM & Cd 351 2383 


5 SUNS CITY Exceptio na l lux 
AM. 2 able bedims. 25" Inge. 
Filled Ut all marfB Otooung 
quwt Green Co let pref Cl SO 
pw. Tet Mr Fottard 637 5388 


SUPERIOR FIATS A HOUSES 

avail. A read lor dtptoaiota. 
nKinia Long * sissti lets m 
au area*. LiMnend a Co 48. 
AfoemaneSOWi. oi-499 5334. 


from £ 1 oo-cs.ooopw. Personal 

Service. 01-458 tosa or 0836- 

692824 anytime m 


2 bed lux: 

Italy lurmshed Ral ESOOpw 1 
London A Pins. Ol 930 0833; 


WANTED Superior properties for 

long/uwn Co Met. Ol -438 36M 

or 0636 592824 anytime itTI 

AMERICAN EXECUTIVE 

lux rtal/houw: up to xaoopvvj 
Uuui fees reg Pmuar, Kay sj 
Lewis. Soocn of the Pork. CheH 
era mi foe. ox-352 Bill . 
Norm Of the Pork RrgrfUl 
Park office. 01 586 9682. 

GREAT VALUE KmghHmdoe 
Kensington, for sefocuan of uiJ 
prrb 1. 2 A 3 bed serviced I 
for Short nobday lets. 

£275 pw. Avinipra a Co. ' 

Ol 727 6663. 


Hinder 301 regmred B-SO ■ 4-30 
in ousy catering kitchen. Salary 
nepottahie. Tel Ol 627 6232. 


THE RKR0H CHALLENGE for 
(hr Amer**"» Cup requires a 
high class rook/chrf and am s- 
Din rook for toetr ndnsie 
dining dub m Perth, western 
anciraiu for 6 months starting 
September. Flair, itnowwuon 
and a sunny dmposdmn emen- 
uai. Free flNMs and salary by 
nraouaiwn according to expert 
race. Teleonane Ol 968 8170 

HOUSEKEEPER MEEDEO far 
inrre person nousenatt. Central 
London. No pet*. Cooking & 
cleaning. 1 l : dam Off. Own 
room a Nth in targe flat. Sau- 
cy negotiable 01-489 0148 
Ol fir* hours. 

SUPER MB/super SW6 home mo 
rtutoreni tor smart, personam* 
au Pair pfus/girt frwoy Soar 
rooking, cleamns. driving etc, 
01 381 1837 

OVERSEAS AU FAIR AGENCY 
87 Repent Sum London Wl. 
Td 4» 6S34.LK/@ve«ra*. 
aim tnjietpi/itom temp/perm 


CoNtias^i on psgg 23 


Regina v Plymouth Juvenile 
Court, Ex parte F 
Before Mr Justice Waterhouse 
(Judgment given July 31] 

In child care proceedings, 
justices, having decided that it 
was in the best interests of the 
child to grant legal aid to the 
minor so that he could have 
separate representation m those 

proceedings, should bear in 

mind the probability that the 

appointment of a guardian ad 

liim would also be in the child's 
best interests. Such an appoint- 
ment would assist the child's 
solicitor. 

Mr Justice Waterhouse so 
said in the Family Division 
when dismissing the parents* 
application for judicial review 
of orders made in the Plymouth 
Juvenile Court. 

The first order was made by 
the clerk to the justices under 
section 32A01 of the Children 
and Young Persons Act 1 969, as 
amended by section 64 of the 
Children Act 1975, and pro- 
vided tha the parents should not 
be treated as representing the 
child in proceedings brought 
under section 15(1) of the 1969 
Act as it appeared that there 
would be conflict between the 
interests of the child and those 
of the parents. 

The second order in dispute 
was the juvenile court order that 
the child be committed to the 
care of the local authority. 

Mr George G. Brown for the 
parents: Mr Llewellyn Sellick 
for Devon County Council; Mr 
A. Graham H. Jones for the 
child; Mr Gregory Stone for the 
justices. 

MR JUSTICE 

WATERHOUSE said that the 
child L had been born in 
December 1983 following the 
marriage of her parents in 
February 1983. 

Following the birth ofL there 
were allegations of violence by 
the 18-year-old husband to- 
wards his 1 6-year-old wife. 

A supervision order was made 
in August 1984. In February 
1 985 L was admitted to hospital 
with multiple bruising and ev- 
idence of bite marks. A place of 
safety order was taken out and 
the the child had been in care 
ever since. 

The first order in dispute was 
made by the clerk to the justices 
on February 15, 1985 which 
provided for the separate 
representation of the child un- 
der section 32A of the 1969 Act. 

It was submitted on behalf of 
the parents that the order should 
be quashed because the order 
was made without affording the 
parents the opportunity to be 
heard on the matter. It was said 
that the making of the order was 
a judicial act and that there had 
been a breach of the rules of 
natural justice because the par- 
ents had been deprived of their 
‘'right" to represent the child. 

His Lordship was not per- 
suaded that the parents had 
established any ground on 
which the court would be jus- 
tified in quashing the order 
made under section 32A. 

. There was no breach of the 
audi alteram rule. The clerk had 
acted in the best interests of the 
child. The parents had not been 
deprived of their right to be 
heard in the care proceedings. 

A subsidiary criticism was 
that no notice of the order made 
by the clerk to the justices was 
given to the applicants. 

The Magistrates’ Courts 
(Children and Young Persons) 
Rules (SI 1970 No 1792) (as 
amended by the Magistrates' 
Courts (Children and Young 
Persons) (Amendment) Rules 
(SI 1976 No 1 769)} required that 
a parent or guardian should be 
given notice of the care proceed- 
ings and also notice of the 
appointment of a guardian ad 
litem. There was no similar 
provision relating to an order 
under section 32A. 

His Lordship had been per- 
suaded that it would help to 
avoid uncertainty and possible 
mistakes if there were to be a 
requirement that notice of any 
order made under section 32A 
should be given to persons 
specified in rule 14(3) of the 
1970 Rules. 

The main ground of the 
application for judicial review 
of the care order was the failure 


of ihejuvenile court to appoint a 
guardian ad lacm for the child. 

It had been submitted that no 
reasonable court proerly in- 
formed could have failed to 
appoint a guardian ad liiem in 
those circumstances. 

It was also submitted that the 
parents and the child had been 
prejudiced by the omission as in 
consequence there was no effec- 
tive appeal to the crown court. 

It was argued that there was a 
gap in the legislation as there 
was no one with the duty to 
lodge an appeal on behalf of the 
child. 

It was suggested that once the 
hearing had ended in the ju- 
venile court, thr solicitor 
representing the child was 
functus officio-, that there was no 
guardian ad litem to prosecute 
an appeal on her behalf and that 
the parents were debarred from 
doing so by the provisions of 
section 32A. 

The fallacy of the argument 
was that the child's solicitor was 
not Junaus officio when the 
juvenile court made the de- 
cision. The solicitor had the 
duty to consider the question of 
apperi and to serve notice of 
appeal if appropriate. 

The solicitor had taken the 
view that the care order was in 
the best interests of the child. 

There was no legal impedi- 
ment to an appeal despite the 
fact that no guardian ad litem 
had been appointed by the 
juvenile court. 

Although the availability of 
an appeal was dear the practical 
reality was that parents were 
now in a less favourable po- 
sition because of the provisions 
of section 32A. 

A solicitor acting on behalf of 
a child too young to be able to 
give instructions was likely to 
have limited opportunities to 
make a close independent in- 
vestigation of the facts and 
circumstances and might led 
obliged to support the making of 
a care order without the benefit 
of the view of an experienced 
guardian ad litem. 

In order to succeed, the 
parents had to establish on the 
principle stated in /tssonato/ 
Provincial Picture Houses Ltd v 
Wednesbury Corporation 
([1948] I KB 223) that no 
reasonable court would have 
failed to appoint a guardian ad 
litem in the present case. 

There was no mandatory 
requirement for a guardian ad 
litem to be appointed. No 
application for such an appoint- 
ment was made at any stage of 
the proceedings before the ju- 
venile court 

The child's solicitor staled 
that in view of her knowledge of 
the practice of the Plymouth 
Juvenile Court any application 
for a guardian ad litem to be 
appointed would have been 
refused and that such an 
apptication would have been a 
fruitless exercise. 

His Lordship had been told 
that in Plymouth Juvenile Court 
a guardian ad litem was ap- 
pointed in only 10 per cent of 
care proceedings while in Tor- 
bay such an appointment was 
made in a high proportion of the 
cases. 

Recent research carried out 
under the auspices of Bristol 
University which had covered 
14 courts in the South-west 
revealed that a guardian ad 
litem had been appointed in 
only 78 out of 908 cases which 
was broadly in line with the 
practice in Plymouth. 

For the justices it was said 
that there was a great shortage of 
guardians ad litem and that 
many teething problems were 
being experienced in im- 
plementing the statutory pro- 
visions. 

The present case was not an 
obvious case for the appoint- 
ment. of a guardian ad litem and 
the making of a care order was 
inevitable in the light of the 
evidence before the juvenile 
court. 

There was no ground on 
which the court would be jus- 
tified to quash the care order or 
the order made by the clerk to 
the justices. 

Solicitors: D.CI. POwelL 
Plymouth; Mr J. E. Coyne, 
Exeter: Bond Pearce, Plymouth; 
Mr Clifford Moiser, Plymouth. 


Identification problem 
in joint enterprise 


Regina v Elliott 
Where a defendant was 
charged with an offence which 
was a joint enterprise with a co- 
defendant who challenged the 
evidence as to his identification, 
the failure by the judge to give 
the jury a proper direction on 
the issue of the co-defendant's 
identification was a misdirec- 
tion which could affect the 
defendant, even though there 
was no issue on the identifica- 
tion of the latter. 

The Court of Appeal (Crim- 
inal Division) (Lord Justice 
Ralph Gibson. Mr Justice Hirst 
and Mr Justice Onon) so held 
on July 21, giving reasons for 
the quashing of the defendant's 
conviction on March 12. 1986 at 
Preston Crown Court (Judge 
Sellers and a jury) for burglary. 

MR JUSTICE OTTON said 
that the prosecution case de- 
pended on the evidence of a 
witness who said she knew both 


the defendant and bis co-defen- 
dam and that she saw them in 
the vicinitv of the burglary. 

71k defendant admitted his 
presence but said he was there 
for an innocent purpose. His co- 
defendant denied being there 
and ran an alibi defence 

There were several discrepan- 
cies in the identification ev- 
idence but the judge failed to 
remind the jury that an honest 
but mistaken witness could be 

convincing. 

The judge directed the jury 
that they could not convict the 
defendant unless they also con- 
victed his co-defendant. But the 
jury were not told that they had 
to be satisfied that lfaedefendanl 
was doing something as a party 
to and in furtherance of the joint 
enterprise. 

Thai coupled with the failure 
to give a modified Turnbull 
direction ([1977] QB 224) mad«» 
the defendant's conviction un- 
safe and unsatisfactory. 


Thwarting access order 


In re E (a minor) 

The fed that the attitude of a 
child's mother and stepfather to 
the father’s having any access to 
the child had caused distress on 
the child's pan could not of 
itself render an order for such 
access, which had been made in 
and for her best interests, inimi- 
cal to those interests. The 
mother could not rely on what 
amounted lo her failure to 
comply with the court's order 
for ac ces s as a ground for 
contending that the order 
should not have been made in 
the first place. 

The Court of Appeal (Used 
Justice May and Lord Justice 


Lloyd) so held On Jul; 
dismissing an appeal bj 
mother of a minor froi 
older of Mr Justice Wood 
on June 24 had varied an 
of Wariey Justices, tha 
father have monthly aca 
the minor, by redorin 
frequency, but allowing 
father's cross-appeal by r 
ing the frequency of s 
ordered by the justices. 

LORD JUSTICE MAY 
that the court hut pow 
enforce its orders fbraccea 
if the mother made any fi 
attempt to thwart the oedi 
might well find that the 
would exercise those possj 



























































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26 UNIVERSITY NEWS/SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


University of Birmingham degrees 


The following degrees are pub- 
! university 


of 


listed by the 
Birmingham 

ItyofO 
and Soda! Science 

Commerce 

cun it; j HoUowaj," z c Jones 
Ctan 9 (Dta 0 ; C L Adams: a IAmi» 
IdKt bussiudr N M BinXv S J darts: E 
J Coduhotr. M 6 Davie* J L Dowwll: 
T enrnwood: S L Howard; J R Jones: 
J W Ketqtilev. J K Leo: A K London: 
J F Lynch: S E MacOoiuW: P Matt: 
w D Noon: T R Panenon: A D 
PrtUnguxv S D PrHtt: A M Scanlon: G 
P Spencer, j M Spray: A G M Stevens: 
C O Storey: I M wa 


M Quance: A D Raynstort: G L R«K 
B E Retd: J C Rewshaw: _E R R eynokfa. 
j M ftimnwr J M RMtanon: a 
S ankarawa: P A SaraenL J M 
Savers: K Savyah-Sina: EC 
T Shanks: C W Snowdon: T JSotet 


Pvnlam: PER Baritrap (Hatory. 
Political Sell: J K Bm (Englkn 
French* J P Sown t Latin. Master: C 
M Brooder (American studies. En- 
fltehf l M D Calvert (French. 

(French. 


T Shanks: C M Snowdon: T J Soiart; PtiiiorwuhyJ: C J CtaW (French. 
S R Sptwefcy: H C TMma$: R W G Pol meal Science): F A Condon iCeoq- 
ThompsoniOG Tilley: BTYiciJchaidt: raphy. History* A J Cook (Cede 

why 


vard; T O Woodcock 

idW pu« study 

dm 9 (Dta H): I M Anderson: 
Black: F J Brownlie: V C Chan: J A 
Connor. M R Devmisti; P R A 
Douglas; S L Drew; A J Elburn: D J 
CUbey. G J W Godfrey: H L GrMflDw: 
M K Kans D T MacGregor: v S 
MHIer. M A Ooden: M F Paturson: J 
M V PiUtno. M ASavape: A J Scholcs: 
W Tahwswn: T VTJ Tan: L £ 
Thomas: N D Thomas J F Trewhrila: 
S M WcctBtaury: M J WootIHT: C A C 
Wright. 

Ctasi rjA Booth; OCR Conroy: O S 
Macrmv T J Sylvester 

Russian Studies 
Om 9 (Mr Q: R J Cookjcm 
Accotratrag 
Ctau it N R Owen. 

CtW 9 (Dtv Q: M A Adat W D 
Ardroo; A M Bannister: A R amnner-. 
M D Cary: R C C Oodndge: D I 
Fletcher: L G Ftowerdew: HJ French: 
M c/btooov S M Goukttng: KT A 
Hamson: M P Henehery. G T 
Hopwood: l R Johnson: J Macey: M £ 


Scon: B K M Sim: E D Thomas, K A 
waller idut management reporting): J 
£ S Wheel house: C A Williams, 
dm 9 (Dhr SI: H W Ashton: A S L 
An: I J Bowed: C Calow: CKL Chan: 
D C I Chow: F S M Christina: C N 
Dodman. F J EaoWnd; L E Harpy: I 
Hethertngton: V Holder. W Kiyanl: J 
A Krause: P R Neat: J D Potter; I O 
Richards: R W Stewart: S Warn*: C S 
Went. N S Williams; K-K WOnp: R 
Yatiya. 

Ctan *lt H John: PHD Mias. 

Bachelor of Social Science 
Economics 

IS R A KCTStay: B J Martin: P J 


S A Turner: J (j I lock: K S Upton: P W 
\1ney- A J waghom P jySSS^f; J 
G Wakenvan: A T Warfield; S J 
whliehow: £ J W«tay: L E 
Wilkinson: D WltUams: MAC 
Win lams: S P Williams: P Wilson 
ihortsk R A Winur N w wood- 

Bachelor of Dental Surgery 

A L Baror G Canon; A T Fox: A R 
Humphreys: N p Marray; M E Party 

Facafty of Arts 

BA 

African Studies 
Ctan 2 COW 0: R Hamilton 
CUa 3 <Dhr II): G M O Davies. 

American Studies 

Ctan It C s Tegg. 

Ctan 2 
Oliver: C 
Wicks. 

Ctan 3 (Dtv IQ: J P Broderick: P M 
GrtmShaw: K T Mackie: D RosweiL 

Ancient History and 
Archaeology 

Ctan 1 (Dtv I): K A Brown: S A 
F cm roll: L 1 Mealh; P Kltttaen: J 
Pamnwni: O A McEwan Retd; P D 
Sheehan: H V A Simons T J 
ThuraflcM- 

Ctan 2 (Dtv li): d l Cobs eir. C L 
Crave: H tlUdou: P P -Went: T L 
morion. O Power: S P Vtrdee; A 
Wilkinson: S Wuishire. 

Ctan tJS Bemsfotd: C E Strangs. 
Paw A P Lewis. 

Drama and Theatre Arts 

Ctass t l Hughes. 

CUu 3 (Dtv H): J M C Bird: N L 
Breoley: O H^Cvde £ L Darwin: M J 


■. History 1 : A J Cook (Ceog 
. _ Pliywv Edi: J C Cox (English. 
Philosophy v M B Crortey i) ) (French. 
' lie*); R JDanti 


(Dtv 1); C M Hodges: L. S 
j Reilly: A M Stevenson: K E 


German SUidie*): R J Daniel lAnc HM 
& Arch. English): J Dawson (French. 
Greek iMooemlk S Donoghoe (En- 
glish. French* S Emmanuel (SI 
iByzantinr Studies. Greek I Modern Ih 
DT Evans (Anc Hrt a Arch. Enghsht 
A C Farr fFw nch. History): C S 
Farrell (QngMh. COST- A C Ferrari 
(African studies. Geography): D C 
Foulkn (Drama. MumcL A J Fuge 
(Hisiory. Political Sdencnn v GasWfl 
■Tl i Drama. En^tehK T Harrison «Aac 
HM A Arch. Otwacai studies): L R 
Jones i German Studies. Malta* A j 
Kharrnava <5? /German Studies. Rus- 
sian): S E Kostyn (HMory. Mattah D 
Kumar (Physical Ed. Soria) Adn 

A McCfll (CCS. PMIOsoghyK _ 

O'Donnell (Political Science. Htspanic 
Stud): N C Osborne (French. German 
Studies): M P Pu rehouse (Engttsh. 
Hisiory'. T j Randies (CCS, Physical 
£d): L Rxlout (Drama. ErwUShk K L 
Saunders ( 1 ) (Drama. French 1 : P 
Seartes iCompuier Studies. GenhAii 
Studies): J L S*m (French. German 
Studies-. L M Sorrell (History. Physical 
Edi: C J Sullivan (History. PoHpCai 
Science!: S L Torldimion (American 
Studies. EngUshl: A L Whalen (His- 
iory. Political Sdencek J M N Wild 
iHMory. Political _ Srtencer: A . T 


Admin): D 
hyt C B 


. (Enguvn. 

R K WUb i French. German Studio): J 
M Win) I French. German Studies): K 
J Young (Drama. English). 

Ctaa 3 (Dtv IQ: M Ainsworth (French, 
n studies* j Arrow (African 


Doable Degree of BSc and 
BCon 

Mechanical Engneetteg and 
Ecowmucs 

Hw tJOK BardrkJc D M Hobo 
P an 2 (Dhr l): O C Sweeney 
Ctw 2 (Dtv IQ: R J E Newton 

Engineering P rod action and 
Economics 

Ctan 2 (Dtv Q: J Mcvea: F G Powell: 
N J Stanley 

Ctan 2 (Dtv ID: R 8 ' Atkinson; T J 
Smart; A J Statnton 

Joint Degree of BSc 
Mechanical En gine er iag and 
Ecoathaks 

Ctan feHS Wong 

Cttu 2 (Dtv 0)5 J V Cooper 

Joint Degree 

Engineering Production and 
E c ono m ics 
Class 3: R L Loader 

MEngand Management 
Mechanical Engineering Mann- 
bttnrt and Management 
Ctw liRPP ROMn 



Ow 2 (Dtv I): L CspMito: C A Finch: 
P A Gray: I M Jacques: C M MlUs: J S 
Slow: p n tnius: S E Toulson (dlst 
vcanoroetncsi A J walker. 

Ctan 3 (Dtv IQ: S K Durmefl: J A 
Freevton. s m Gray. K A Hamer. R m 
J ones: S J U«*H: D R Uoyd: A $ 
Mullen: P R J Phtfllw: A J Sewell; C 
A Stone; P J wesson: P H Whiteman, 
a H W M Davie* 

N J Sbnkins. 


Mathematics, Economics 
and Statistics 
Ctan f: c M Muddimer 
Pan: N r Lancaster. 

Economics mth Modern Eco- 
nomic History 
Ctau 9 (Dtv f)i w w Daniel. 

Ctan t (Dtv II): J M Bradley. 

Money. Bonking and Finamx 

t: J M Radcuife. 


Edwards; A C Jones: H S Janes; J (V 
Mertfwid: C E Round: A J Sumner: I D 
williams. 

Ctan 9 (Dtv Qi$M Atkins: C Bass: S 
J Beniley: N J McArdle: L A Morris: K 
F Priestley. 

School of English 

1: S H Jan: R Walters. 

3 (Dtv Q: S R Barker; J R 

Barron: J C Bateman: J A Beavan: M 
G Benson: R K Beniley: R E Beynoo: B 
S U Blunt: J F Brook: J H (tanermoul: 
K Chandlcy: S A Con key: p M Gallon: 
T Dickinson: A J Forskitt: D J Crane 
S Hardy: A Johnson: M A Jones. T 
Jones. C M Lord: E J MacWntrter: C 
Marshall: J c Matthews: E N 

Ml In tyre: R J McKetTOw: D J 
May hew: J P Moore: S D Moore: A 
Peever: S J Pltfield: X M Pin: c A 
Richards: D Rooms: S J SanOley: P R 
Savage: A G Semper: B A 

Sdiwardena; J M SroraynOd: N M £ 
watsh: V J vv imams. S J Womack. 
Ctan 2 (Dtv 0): P J Allan. A J AUbutL 
- A P Clark: R J Coliyen S J 


S J Burrh: A L _ 

Constable: M M Donovan: M K 
Fenlon: G M Foster: SLR Foster: O R 
FAson: S A Cues; S A Janes: E M 
Umond: A P Lumley: A M Lux: C R 
MaxweU-Rcld. E Moore; W J Musior: 
C A Naylor: P B Pamsh: R H Party: R 
A Powell: M L Roberts: L Rush worth. 
R K Thorpe: M M Wilson. 

CUu ta R L White. 

French 

CUu RSA Hickman: J H Westwood. 
Ctau 2 


sr :c 


(Dtv Q: S C Andrews: G L 
J Edwards: N S Foiley: ALA 


J 2 (Dhr Q: C J Allen; S A Benyon: 

N-Demon: P A Glover: J E Harrl no- 
ton. K L Hawkins: M D Hodgson: M C 
Jex: M D McBrlen: H J swnner. 
Ctau 2 (Dtv II): P Born: A D Cox; J N 
Dirk: S J Huebner: G H Mtaen: D J 
Orme: K J Price: C A Shutc 

Economfc and Social History 

2 ON* Q: B HassalL M Mother. 

3 (DM B)t M H Bennett: J 
Hargreaves. 

History aod Sodal Science 

Ctau 9 (Dtv Qs T A Haium; K J 
Smith. 

Political Science 

liNJ Melvin. 

Ctau 9 (MrJfcA H Bam A J Carey 


- auskell: J Gardner: C J Gin ins. K J 
Hendry: M R Hlndniarsh; K J 
HoiroytL M Jackson: C A Johnson: G 
F Katzaroa: H Monk: B A Neighbour: 
D Paterson: H A Peel: C J PenfoUL C 
J Richardson: A H Robertson; D M 
Sherman: J L Smith: J M Smith: K J 
Smith: J C Slone: H v Williams. 
Ctau 2 (DM H): S A Barber; S E 
Seven: S P Coyne C F Fox; G C W 
Grant H J Hall: SDL Hawkins: S E 
HOdgscn: O L Manifold: O Metcalf: L J 
oitfmgT S p Ois-pwska; p m 
R ain bone: L J Regan: H D 
Thonngtco; V M Winiamson; M J T 
Wheel * 


j p Ashton 
Y T-J Barnes 

. Edh A L Batson- 

James (Mathematics. Russian): A J 
Beaton (Geograolty. Ptaslcat Ed* C V 
Bern man iMedleva! Entftai & His- 
lorvi: M A Blackburn (Emdtsh. 
Hisiory': E J Bloom iHtstory. CCS* K 
H Bowler (French. Hisiory): J G 
Carter (German Studies. Russian): S L 
Clarke iGeogranhy. History): M-P 
Davies (French. Creek (Modern* J J 
Davies i English. History): M-L De 
VaUancey i African Studies. Oeog- 
raDhy): V A Ducketi (French. German 
studies). C D Dudeney (French. 
Hispanic Studies* H R Emblcfon 

■ French. Htaory). K L Enucon i En- 
glish. Mustek t M Fail « German 
Studies. PobbraJ Science* A J Fennah 
(French. Hispanic Studies): Z M 
Fletcher (French. German Studies); I 
M Funke ■ History. Physical Ed* A J 
Garbun lAnoent History & Arch. 
History* J A Garforth (French. 
German Studies): S C George (Phys- 
ical Ed. Social Admin): C A Gordon 
/PhyaraJ Ed. Theology;; C C HCSfceth 
• Anoertf Hist & Arch. Russian* G 
Hnoim (Hisiory. POUhcai science): j 
E HtnchilfTe (German studies. Pont) 
cal Science* B C Hotlamby (French. 
Creek (Modern* J E Horae (Hisiory. 
Physical Education): H M Johnson 
■French. German Studies* J H Lang- 
dair /French. German Studies: S E 
Lavers (Medieval Engttsh and His- 
tory): K M Lees (EngUsnTFtiench* Q H 
S Lever (French. Italian): E J Lorenzo 
/Drama. Music* V L Matthews 
(English. French* R C Meczes ( 2 > 
French. German Studies* C J Oxiee 
i French. Hispanic Studies* C Pinkney 

■ Drama. History* S j Portman 

■ French. German Studies* C S 
Redman /French. German Studies* p 
j Rose (Political Science. Russian* R 
P Slater (History. Musk* V j Stocks 
(History. Physical Education* S J 
SJownovtc (German Studies. Medieval 
Eng* C Sussman (French. German 
Studies* B e Sutton (Physical Ed. 
Theotogy* M I Tenlorl (French. 
German studies* E M Watt (American 
Studies. English* DS Wax (American 
Studies. English* 

Ctan 3ACK Brown (English. CCS* 
R M Culver (French. Hispanic Siud- 
(esr B I a its (French. German 
Studies* s-a Hall (French. Hispanic 
Studies* L * " “ 


1 : A Baird 
9 (Dhr Be. K K 


ABM* 


A M King (French. La' 




list comparative .POIUKS): S Guess: E 


Mun>ri^ -; kf P rtorrteh. H C Rhodes: 


K D (toller: C E Sums 
eomparauve politics* M j skmey; 
p williams. 

Ctaca 2 (Dta ■): S Acott A J Mere dlth - 


Geography 

ctau a 

CE Be. 

Bracey: _ . 

Callow: m C p Dadge. C E Davis: G J 
□rysdaie: K Etntxen: D M Freeman: A 
J E Hall: J S HenPeli: C Htason: I J 
Httl: F Holmes: F J Mead: C R Money: 
J P Phillips. T R PMMev: T J Pogsoo: 
M S Robaltom: A J Roy an: A R I 


M P Nevlan (EnoUtfi. History* J 
Wood lOasstcal Studies. Enrtbh): F R 
Bold (German Studies. Russian). 

Bachelor of Mask 

1: J M HatwelL 

2 CDtv Q: N D Brown: J R 

Braondge; K A Chatfcrton: A T 
Clarke: J E HUh E j Juett: T j 
Roberts: C P Rogers: D Williamson, 
am 2 CDtv , 

chnsmias: CSl ^ . .. 

S Maxim: C L Poulten V M Tucker. 

Faculty of Engineering 
BSc 

Chemical Engineering 

tYD Baker: G^P^M^FWu A A 


(D: J C A Brennen: _ 
S Hatoern: L J Halsey: R 


S Smith: M A Sudbury: S M Warren: 

M M Weekea: D M Wren. 

J*?ooper AnMrtCK 8 J 


Sodoiogy 


j 2 (Dtv l): p J Ayling: J M BuH: M 

Davey ISM social anthropology* R De 
Fonseka: A D Dev any wm race and 
etantajk S J Mlnier: L M G O 

Ctass^ (OH M): J E Holder: K 

International Studies 

am t m v voass. 

Ctass 3 (Dhr l)i K J Bishop; V M Shan* 
K P Spraas (drtf hospanle stud* C L 
Vesty 

am 7 rotv m: A R A Campben: G R 
Hamer. M A Hornby: T A MaultSW 

dm 9s D R Haddock. 
International Studies with 
Economics 

9 CDtv IQs B J O Cornor. 

Social Administntion 

2 (O/r ()t Cj AJcwandtmi; S M 
Battles: C House: A P Naliy. 

9 (DM IQ: H J Shearn. 


Public 


Policy Making 
Administratioa 


and 


2 (DM I): L M Denned: D Robson 
policy analysis lech* 
am Z (Dhr II): H B W Broom: C 
Carroll: R J Lee. 

African Studies 

dm 9 (Dhr M): O O Atxodwi AMmaie. 

Joint Honours 

am 2 (Dtv Q: G L Baker iqeoq. Man* 
M J BeM loeog plan* T E Rnghl 
rgeoq plan) idtsi Man* JM s dime 
/pot ki vorioi: A J Ewrsden 
(SKIP wrUI rfdmln* G M zero pal 
sell D J Pear) own (grog pUnr. G J 
Smi in i pro hiM pul veil: M S Wallace 
zero km pol sell. 

Ctass 1 (Dtv mi G M Blbby 
tpnil vocio* C S Capelin 
(grog cranemm; I L Dave ieco pal 
scl* R J Jarvis igrog plan* J C 
segnm <eco pol set* J H Sheppard 
i pol Ml socKrt. 

Bachelor of Edncatkm 
Newniaa College 

Ctass i (Dtv n: A J BrHor. J M C 
BarmwKk. J t l Bourdon Pierre-. C a 
M adden A M Mason. K Megonon. P 
M preetft-. G W Rooms. J C bcarrait: 
M C Stevens. T Taylor. 55 R-M 
Ucreltmi. S N wetton 
am 9 (Dhr H>! J F Barnes: C M 
Baxmdalr. K A Ehrnie: M M Camp- 
bell. C L Dean: A C Deeqan: ME 
Duaoan- A R Hlbbert: P T Joseph: P J 
KilqaUon: J unu-more. R F Me 
Govern: J O Miiham. S B Murteofi. C 
O O'Shea. D Perrv: P Ray. W C 
Sweeney. T M WTmii. C S While. S L 
vvosmak 

Cl a ss 3i A G Hawker; J M ffeeney. 
Ordinary: J Armstrong: M AiMm: M C 
Barron. S P Rennet: C V Boiion: N K 
Cnaooer. M Corkerv. A Ogrreger. □ 
Cowny L P Cuile. C N Cunnlngnam: 
D J Cl Thus. H A Czoudcrna: A E 
Day. G L Downing: M L D’Souaa: M A 
Drupn. .1 A Fraser M (Gabriel: L C 
Gtt. C D Gands~ M Graham; N J 
Harvey: s M Henry P Kaur. M J 
KUnlKITUk. T B K lemon. D A 
Knapp. K L McGinnis: E B Mahony. S 
A Mauiwadno. H Markham: D p mw. 
M A Mol toy. A MOW A F MlDTahy: M 
T O'Hara. P A O'Hara: KH Pearson: 
V s Penney p j Powell: C F Pro(l. C 
E Preston. D M C Price: L S Purnell. P 
& LRoom C L Ryder: C M Sharkey: C 
J Singleton. D M Soralling: C F 
Toon* r c Varty; JL vicatv B B 
Walsh. S J Walters: G R White: £ N 
Woibotd. 

WeslhiU College 

Ctass 1 : p j Evans. K A Giles, s L 
Humphns. w Roberts. E M Clare. 
Ctass 9 (Drv l);J L A Cavil). M Charles: 
J C Freeman: C V H 10 : J A Jennings: 
D L Jones. J E A McNulty. P H 
Marlin: J J Pritchard. AJSUWS M 
Ttan/ff: C C Trnmper: A Watkins. 
Ctasi a COW H): P S Davison: P R Fry: 
(ughes. A E Keniurd: M L 
J M Taggart. J H Wood. 


_SJ Cooper R A Dodge: A 

N Hakim: S C Herbert: J L 

McGregor S D Own A C B Payne N 
T Penn: A B Rogers: M C Say. R N 
wendoven o K Yates^Snxth. 

Gcrwan Studies 

Ctass liDJM Coleman. 

Ctass 3 (Dtv I): O Brown: C J DooBOn: 
R K COcs: I P Nottoway; K Johnson; V 
J Lowe: S P Morgan: N H W Moms 
D W Noma: Q Parr R S Rowlands. 
Ctass 2 (Dtv B): F J Ban ton: K P 
Crockett: H S Gannon; D Lmuswc 
C Marshall; V Myan; Y B Prabhuttas 
A T Reed. 

Hellenic, Roman and Byzantine 
Studies 
Classics 

dm 2 CDIV Q: A D R Colyer H V 
Johnson. 

Ctass XMJ Kelly: E G Newman. 

Greek 

am 15 T S Osier. 

Ctass t 0 » Q: C A Wadeson. 

Latin 

dm 2 (Dtv I): c E O'Sullivan. 
Ctass 2 (DM IQs S J BOdtUngtoiK A L 
Keeton: R M Rogers. 

Ctass 3: J D Houtngwonh. 

Pass S A E Tipper. 

Hispanic Stndies 

Ctass 2 (Dtv D: A D First W R 
Haronam: W J Lodge: K J Robbins: S 
E watton. 

Ctass 2 (Dtv 10: S H Bcraamont: M A 
Green. M R Ncwntiam: H J Stringer: 
E A Stulc. 

History 

Aacienf and Medieval History 

Ctan 2 (Dtv Q: p D Humphry: M C 
lbeti: A J R Langford: G McKinnon: P 
E Skinner. 

Ctass 3 (ON ll)i J E Dunham: T L 
VtscovKh: F R Will toms. 

History with additional Eco- 
nomic and Social History 
Ctass 2 (Dtv |)i j m Canter I 
Crawford: S Maxwefl: M N Oxley: J C 
Plan. 

Ctass 3 (Dta II* E A Atkins: R A 
Barker. S J Fletcher. L M Spencer. 

Medieval and Modem History 

Class 3 (Dta I): M J Andrews; L L 
Etoddetey: S A Brtsham: S J Berry: N 
A Byrne: T N Cooper S E Dixon: N W 
Dorrington: J O Evans: C E Frenon: D 
P Glynn. L J Court S E Hotorrod: A 
M Holland: D Honingwprlh; A E 
Jenkins. S J Mara* A L Malty: M E 
Mavall. P T MUCheU-Fox: J M 
Nornwnlon: D Parkin; S K Pavcy: J 
w Pavne: D J Perrett WBj Pugti: l F 
Rawsiome: N J Rees: B Scnofwld: M 
K Stonott: R L Swlers: A M Tav tor: N 
A M Toll. J Wild: D T H Williams. 
Ctass 9 (Dtv II): G .Ban vara. M G 
Bishop: H J Bright: M G Brooks: S A 
Conquest: R E J Dunk. C A Grainger: 
w j Lewis: j a Midqtoy. K J 
Mortimer: A Motrersnaw. K a 
N tctioila: C_J NtoW. D R Price: N C 
Robinson: T c B waller. 

Class IBM Khano. R M J Mangham. 


FMc T M Medal* D J Mills: G L 
Pickering: M W TUston 
Ctass 2 CDtv n:SJ Bingham: 
Bollen: ASFu Harare down: 
Chappell: R C Dunktay; S J Earns 

D J Harris; J S HigMey; C P Hob/ 

I Humphrey: S H Latham: N J 
Longman: S D Luxford; j Maddy: E C 
marsh: I E C Mott G B Mi 1 C 
e C M B 
A Saknon: 

: M vahdi 


Pennington: 
Robson; A A 
P L Staid 
J Wilson 


M B Radway: j r 
mon: A P F Smart; j- 
vahdatL C M Wells: S 


Ctm 2 (Dta n: S Baxter C L Budd; A 
L Corn tat* R R Orpin; J A Reid: J 
Sian brook 

Law and Politics 

Ctass 3 (Dta l)s E L Gone: J v Krana* 
P J Lagerbere o C MacManus: D H 
Redman: M L Richmond; S M Rodney: 
P A Edward Smith 
Ctass 2 (Ota in: W j Lai* s n Okoro: 
N Ratna: A satin* T C C Wong 

Faculty of Science 
BSc 

Chemistry 

am * a Bailey: M J Bamford: C G 
crane: T R Dessot* M J Frost r n 
H anctnc A M L Irvine: P W SealdnK E 
L Tlte: A R Young. 

Ctm 9 (Dfv Of C AtUarti: P P Clayton: 
M R Dyson: R E Green: F E Keen: R A 
KresttrskL M J Macdonald-Smiai; C L 
MaltoUei* D M Marabrldra: F H 
McCraw: J C P earson: NT Ray: S 
Raymond: m v ReddUMioo: F S s 
Ro^pgai; A D Tomkins; A A Tyrer J 


am 2 (Dta IQs M A Cairns: A T J 
Chaplin: K M Cheng: A C Dahl: D 
Forbes-Ncxon: I G F or re ste r ; A Hanud: 
T J Hanford: R G Hodgson: P R v 
Hookway: M A John; G RMaddox: P 
S Nettle/ on: G C Onyeka: H Plnder C 
F Rlntoul: J C SMI II»ei-v p TTOUtl: R K 
Vigbnfr A h waimsicy. J P 
Wheatland: G J WBd: G J Wild: 
Class * J R Gardner: T D Goodies K S 
Handley; S C Mooree: D C F 
Waghorn: A G White: J M WooDtas 
Pass: M C D Evans: M Hughes: G 
Uwrts 

CivO Eagmeering 

Is A K Samra; P D J White 
. ^ 9 (Dta ns D W Goodwill; S R 
Harbrtdgr K H Kong: E W M Lam.- S 
L Measnam: S J C«er BCHSrKM 
Yeung 

2 (pttf HV M R Ftarnhan* R A 

:RJ HlDbert R , 


I A B Higgins: R 

A Rumerford Lamb: M W Lee: C Y 
Ng: V M POTWl; M Sampsme M 
Shepherd: O K J P Warszewsld 
dm ta D C Davies; A D Rich: P M 
Roberto: T J Tempowsk/. 1 

Wmlerldg*. HA Aoohtort: S G 
Baltoidloe: D J Carter MY S Cheung 

BEng 

Civil Engiiieeriiig 

dm tSP carttedge: X C P Wong 
Ctass 2 (Dta Q: H AOb rook: P Gibb: C 
Y R HO. A C Murphy- N A RobUBbn: 
G A Toiling: M T C wnion 
Ctass 2 (Dta cr): h K K Chong: C J 
aemmow; D Hung: P K Wong: A E 
wow 

Ctass tNPC Lee: J I Sinclair 


3 (Dta *X M A Aagta* D A 
Boacott: R J Cooley: R J Cross. D P 
Onley; S J Karri* M L Howard: E A 
Hughes: S M Humohreys: KPN 
Martin: J A McDonm: CE Mead: C A 
Narramore: P A Platt: N J Richard- 
son: D A Storey: R F Whale: a R 
Whyruan: R D wmiatnK M R Wood. 
Ctass *FJ Boyle: D K Oaaue: S J 
Dennett: K A Edwards: J EWson; K 
Jumel: J M Madeas; SJR Oakes: J 
P Spencer C M Sutton: S D Williams 
B ag r a f n (b ana): G A Jones. 

Geography 

dm t C E Madge: M Schareach. 
Ctm 2 (Dta n: j j Blackford: M 
Brough: S E CaOls: E A Curry: A R 
Ganss: C A Grtimm: J W R 
Hammond: M P Rower: K Moses: C L 
Oliver: K T PMnjRK R M Spear; C N 
SUndrlng: S A Sleet L F MSwInyard: 
m p Warner G P Watts: 8 A West P 
L Wttcnertey. 

dm 2 (Ota B)s j G Carton.- R M 
Cousins: JCUrnan; TFM Hint: A G 
Kenyon: S L LUle y: K AMtai J 
Marofc V A North; R A Penned; D J 
Perks: J D Seddon: V A Walker. 
Ctm % V A O Johnston: D M Sw«L. 

Gcorgraphy and Physical 
Edncatios 

Ctm 2 Dta It N J Dawson: H A EUs. 

Geological Sciences 

,2 (Dta Di C P C hvrstt: S 
ley: P N Dancer G Darke: j C 



H Mil 

RrauKUir; 

Ordinary: H Bolton D A Chandler R L 
ClenmHvon: J M Cock mil: J L Cook: 
H h Dnokia. R Eccicr. F Eckmley. T 
M Eym. D F Goodwin: E A Greaves: 
M J Greenwood. R J Cnilllhs: J S 
Halporn: D J Hand!* S r Hatch. R a 
Heriey. V E Hicks. J L laaro. A R 
JenkilK. R C Lev. D C Ltavd: P J 
MacDonald. HR Nicholson: A V Pate): 
& A RiVy: S M Rourtdhlll: R A 
Sfhfpper'K L Booth Skinner: R P 
Skinner S A Slock. □ Swttiqler: J 
Walton. A C Whttiull: a V wud: S J 
WHMs. b w Will toms: G L witbams; C 
S Williams. 

Faculty of Medicine and 

Dentistry 

Bachelor of Medicine and Bach- 
elor of Surgery 

E J Attn* R Atkinson. G N Bancroft J 
M Barnett. P J Bartlett: B R 
Baxcnoale. J G B Baxter: A S Beavon: 
K Brecham: T w Beer J P Benson: R 
M Beniley. D S Bhomra: M J Boro: A 
J Bourne. S P Brown: D M Bush: S N 
Clay. D A Clay Ion: J O Clear: S 
Coo lull: A D Coward. N J A Corera: G 
A De Cothi ihoos* A R Dtor: G E 
Douce: d J Downs: h D Duncan: P G 
Dunmnq: G J Edwards; D J EMxrry: J 
Ethennoton: S P Fowler J N Friend: 
P P Garrall: P Gee. G K Goode: J S 
Codnvan. I Greaves: M R Green 
inomt R Grew a), m A Grom: R G 
Crumb . R J Hanrox: J M Harcourt- 
Bath:P turns: ft F Hamson: RCA 
Marhtouonion Hawes. K J Hendefsotl: 
C C Hepwortn: R J HilUer. G B 
Hillman. M V Hirsch: J P Holland: R 
A Hook. F J Hopkmv T B Horsburgh: 
R C Ha rum chons).- A J Hum Owns): P 
H Hyde: K J Isaac: A S Jherta: D A 
Jones; N M Kane: A Khan: K L 
Lanyon: P C Lanyon: J M Lyon: G R 
Mjruv: s J Mann. ST MaswnocuSR 
Jenkinson Maxwell (hona* H M May: 
R C Millard. D E MortlDOV: C A 
Muck law S M Murpny: S J Murray: 
P P V Myers: J E Naso chore* J S 
Newlon: 6 Ntcholts. J £ Ntchous: A J 
Noon: ) T Owen; H S Pandha: N J 
Porker. A J Parke* Hum* H C Pitt* 
w J c Pottsonby : J S Poole: M price: I 


Italian 

Ctass 2 COW Os S Gort. D A Power S 
D winch. 

Ctass 9 (Dta IQ: M Cicero: ECO Lee: 
A C Thomas. 

Pare Mathematics 

Ctass 2 (Dta n: c A Costello: t p 
H arris. D R Tomliraon 
Ctns 2 (Dta 0): L M Bogle: S Manning: 
C C wnclan. 

Musk, Drama and Dance 

Oats 2 (Dtv D:JHH Johnson: J C 
Tomlinson. 

Ctau 2 (Dta IQiHE Campbell. 

Philosophy 

Ctau 2 GMv I): M AchMeos A J 
Armstn- ) S Oiudge: 4 B k Hoyle. 
Glass 7 (Dta K): TO Barton. P C 
Feeney: E L G Couhtaume: N " 
Morbn. 

Ctau X J 0 Wallers. 

Pass M G Butler. 

Physical Edncatkm 

Ctan 1: □ L Wheoer 
Cbss 2 (Dtv I)- z A Elsby: £ H Foster 
G Hams: A J Johnstone: S P Leggett. 
S J Nvucner. 

CbU 2 (Dta IQ: S A Chambers: w 
Ourhlowski: c Mogford: L M Roll: R 
C Stmiusft. 

Russian 

Class HR J Lagerberg. 

Ctau 2 (Dta l)i E A Burns: H M Jones. 
Clau 2 (Dta B)r C D Mocrury: M A 
SNIU* 

Theology 


Lawson 
.... 2 . 

Burton. I 
P MatSey: C P 
Parr 

Ctau * A M San. M c O Todd 
Paso A C Ashworth 

Electronic and Coammaicatioa 
Engineering 

Ctm U M D Alum N A C Bruce 

Ctau 3 (Dta I); PS Owe M C Graham; 

S Simmones 

Ctau 2 (Dta VH I Hoar 

dm Jt J a Slone: C F Williams 

Pw S K Gupta 

Electronic and Control 
Engineering 

Ctan fc S J Baker 
dm 2 (Ota I): O J Burke 
Ctau 2 (Dta tt): C A Gregson 

Electronic and Electrical 
Enginee ring 

Ctan C D Barker: P M Fox: F8F Lai: 
C H Lam: D G Scon Maxwell; p a 
S harpies: W Y Yip 
Ctm 2 (Dta Q: C J Bartow: T Barrow: 
A C J Berry: G D H Coppttvg: S O 
Green-. J A KeteaD; R Meades: R J 
Moulds. N r m Taylor N worsen 
Cim 2 (Dta my: a BeverWge; v 
Chsuhsn. J A Corbeli; A 
Ghassemradeh: V A Ghoucar. J R 
KUaalnrk: T M Lain: A M Lane. R J 
Uncoln-Smlih. J M Matthews: J d 
pardoe. A S Teasdale; YC Tsui: S J 
Turner I G Wants: C H N Wang: K A 
ward: j p wetsoy 
Ctau % £ Jt Chew: PKW Lanu M J 
Newton: C A Romford. 1 v p smith: 
O K Staples. C wtuiams. W S Wong 
Pass c Emery: A K £-D AD Maims: P 
A McCormack: P J ROmaiUKk: BGM 
Scrcombc: T W P Wong 

Engineering Production 
Ctau 2 (Dta 0 : K L Buzzard: J L 
Moms. J m Craiaoohnessy: M Scott: 
D WiKcn 

Ctan 2 (Dta m- D B F BeonetL D C Oe 
Thier P a Gautt. S B Lee: 

Ctau t R J Beasley: A Colo: s n 
C unningqn: P c Kershaw: P K C 
hung: T p Sutton: R s Syxes 
Pass T Sprague 

Metallmgy and Materials 

1: H L Smith 


McAuley: K E Shersxone: M R Tidlar 
G F WUUarns: J R Wbc. 

C tare 3 (Dta IQ) A R D eesle y : C J 
Bramley: C Chadwick: M R 
Oiarlesworth; H M CMC J L 
Dowdeswel): S Q Fool D N James G 
H McArthur; J A E Peiroe: A J Ray: J 
Reade; A D Stoti. 

Om 3: W J Dunphy: A C Penrhyn- 
Lowe: H C Rose: L wrtghL 
A sp utH (hem): 1 Strong. 

Mathematical Sciences 

Ctau 2 (Dta tt): C A Brown. 

Ordbary: M A Heraghty. 

Matfaematics 

Ctau b J H Cook: H M Moore: K 
Slater j sprtngthorpe: S M wuuams. 
Om I2j (Dta I): FT Casey: J E aarke: 
S K Cnws/uw: S Parker C F Smith: 
R J Smith. 

dm 2 (Dta ID? D J Atkins: D J 
Benson: R S BhaWa; P K F Buretow: 
CM Burt: J K ChUds: SM Davies: R M 
Deane: S P_Durock: S M Elba: S J 
ClUInqtuan: S M Greens) U. A B Hobbs; 
D K LUburn: A R Mlllman: N A 
Scarron. 

Cim 3: M E a mo ns on: P HefTerorv M 
w MtddJetaiu H C Newulk H W 
Tsang. 

Pass s J Baker F J Reed. 

Ludnstria] Mathematics 
CUU 3 (Dta Q: P j Hold, 
am 3 (Dta II): DS Bailey-. B Hopkins 
G w Scorer. 

CUu 3 : G E Dootfiw oiie. 

Pare Mathematics 


Doherty: C A Edwanb: M A Hoow F 
P Johnson: S A KrWits: M 
LOvegrove: P C Murray: tar . j Sims. 
Ctass 2 (DtalQipj Bowden: 0 £ Bull: 


I H Cross: L J Fantozz* R Fax: C A 
Hardy; S E Huiuer E s Mmll: p T 
Mtibun* R L RavenhaO: OCSheehan: 


u E 

2 (Dta D: J A Edwards. 

3 (Dta IQ? A CMgcm. 
* l J Walker. 


C A Steele, 
dm 3: F E Henrtck : J Massey. 
Pass J Cartier P j Graven S 
GowUand. 

AKpuM (pm): c A BuiwiL 


Biochemistr 


Phipps: 


GlrHIUls: C R Hammond: A P 
Harrison: J K Haney Samuei: j C 
Klirnener: P C Labourtiere: A p Lee: 
0 C Un/ofd; N A Macwey: M S Paine: 
M J Peace: J W Skene: P Wilson; C Y 
WOng: P T R Woodward 
Ctass 1 (Dta Q: R Mason: A D 
Williams 

Bachelor of Laves 


with 


^ M L 

2 (DM 11): e s Davis: J M Eklan: 

C M Mason; N a Taylor, 

Pass: R M Wilson. 

Medical Biochemistry 

Ctass tt N C Moore tt Y Woog. 

M L 

Saadnam: H P strawfortL 
Medical Biochemical Studies 

Ctan tNP MlcheU: M R Torokiraon: 

d b k williams 

Ctm 2 (Dta D? E M C AsMey. 

Biological Sciences 

Ctau h F J 

□earlore (Mkrobfoio*/). A J 
(Plant Biology”/! 

2 . (Dta Qt N J Abbott ^ 0 * 0 ^ 


SS£S^§aA£Stmgm:-Ae 

Fox; W p Gonesh: J A H GUtmarc Y C 
M CoMingham: S J Counting: P M 
Grundy: A J Hunt S H JaaSor: H 
James: H J Lacy: S J Lamam: S P 
Levine: B M McKenna. C Mori: A 
Oyebanh: L S Parker S J PriveU: M 
Rat: A D Ridley: D A Roberts: S C 
Rodn: A D J Rovce: R Sawhney: M A 
Shaw: R H Smith: M Q Sroe N A 
Spence: M G F Stacey: H R Warner: D 
C R Waierttokl: H A Woodward: G M 
Wren -Hilt on 

SL 

Bovan: S a Bird: J M Bona: ^ A 
Brock: J W Bushed: S C_ 


Barnett: > a 

a: j S W Braheur S <) Cartwright 

M C O Chile P M L Chon«_g A 
Crawford: A W G Creed: G A Obflon: 
M J Davie: J K F Delaney: £ C 
Devenbort: J manure: R Drinkwater. 
C L Edbury; D J Fimc A J Foster SJ 
Franklin: M R CUlden; C H Cleave: N 
A Haggis: R J Karwood: S M Hunter 
A 0 wav: R J Kind: C Kbita M S 
Kingston: D 1 Kularathnam: S P Levy: 
R J LKherUnd: E T H M* P A 
Manning-. S C MannbM: E Manueli P 
D Mormor E A Matchett K 
Mcorauu D MU* V G Mttchell: 1 
Murray: A J Naytarr G E New: _ _ 
Owen: R J Peachey: J A Powna tt; J C 
Rice: D J Richardson: G A Rook: T J 
Savage: K M Sctwym e C suvuon: M 
R Smith: D J Stringer M P Smart: C L 
Tcagle; C S Thomas: N S Todd; K A 
Vimpany; S M Wallace: M A Webster: 
K west fc M A Wheeler C L Whtthy 
dm JC C W Brunei: A R Burton: D A 
Corns P M B Doyle: P W From; N 
Gotio: J E Hazel* L H E MO: G W 
Hottner. R C S Loader K Maguire: G 
F Peters: M SI J Swallow: M H 
Taiboi.- D F Wood hall; s J 
woolf enden 

Law with French 

CtaU h M A Costelloe 


and Cfltflparattv* Pftysialogy): s 
Ashoole (Genetics* N j Anomon 
(Ptanl Bitogo®/* A K Baldwin (Mlcro- 
btoiogy* C (Ben (Ptanl BlOtogy* P A 
BramweD (Plant Biology* C J Bray 
(Zoology and Comparative Physiw- 

Edwards (Zoology and Comparative 
PhvWoiogy LD J Eniott (Oenenra* M 
E Hamson (Zoology and Comparative 
PhyviologyX-HHyae (Genetics* R E 
Jones iMiCT-obiotogy* K j Keen 
(GenetttsS: S A Knott iGenetics* A C B 
Lake (Microbiology): M D Lane 
iGenetics* P E Ugh) /Zoology and I 



(Genetics): 

MMOvgor _ 

McGee (Geneucs* V R Morris 
(Physiology* E A Owen: J Parkmn 
(GenrtKS* W C Passamst (Zookwy 
and Comparative Physiology* S H 
Pelt j M Ralph (MlcrotalotogyX C E 
RlCkwood (Plant Btotofly* A J Rbt 
(Ptanl Btotogy* A E Roberts (zoology 
and Comparative Physiology* J J 
Shea (Biotechnology): R Steed (Genet- 
ics): M G Thomas (Genetics* K M 
Thompson (MicrtMotcnyk S J Tuck 
(MKTobtotogs'* M J usiwrwood iPlanl 
Bkdogy* J S Vlner S D Wallace 
(MlSbbiblogy* L A Wheeler (Zoology 
and Comparative Physiology* G C 
Whiling (Microbiology): G P 
Woodward. 

Oma (Dta IQ: a J Aber (Zoology and 
comparative pnysKMosy): J e 
A damson (Genetics* HM Austin 


S H Clark (Mkro- 

y-Hunt (Genetics* D J 

H Davies fBidecnnoloBy* C M 
D'Souza CPtara Biology* A J Evans 
(Zoology and Comparative Physiol- 
ogy* P J mu (Zoology and Compar- 
aGve PhysiolOQy* R SHobbs (Zootoro 
and comparative Physiology* H L 
Mayers (Microbiology). S J McGowan 
(Genetics* A P McQueen (Ptanl 
BtoJogy* M A Miller: SfM Monk 
(Phv'Hotogy* E A Picked (Plant 
Bkxogyj: J A Roper (Zoology and 
eomparauve Physlolorao: N D 
Saictiwefl (Zoology and CXxnparative 

SjrSSflreSAysiolom^^SiSs 
(Microbiology* M W Tfwnias (Mlcro- 
bKXogy* R C Vaughan (Zoology and 
Comparative Physioiogy* G Award 
(Zoology and Comparative Physkrt- 
ffit* C. Waugh. oBtorobtotoOTW J 

(Zoology 

and Comparative Physiology): J A 
wood (Zoology and Comparative 
Physiology* S a Wright CPhyskdogyL 
Pare: R R Bantukur. 


Biological Sciences and 
Geography 
2 (Dta I): D G Pearce. 

2 (Dta IQ: J A Griffiths. 

Anatomical Stndies 

ft RE Joplin: EJ A Robinson; W 

S ScriYerer M j walker. 

Ctau 2 (Dta I): T D BradWiaw: 8 L 
Mister: IM Whyte. 

Ctau 3 (Dta my: S E Norris. 

Bachelor of Science 
School of ft rt botogical Stndies 




Green; M. W Hewn 
RooboBom. 

Pharmacology 

Ctau fc R F Loudon. 

Ctau 2 (Dta ■): A W S Elves. 

Ctau J: J MUIon. 

Physioiogy 

Ctau t AP Booth: CM Cate: CB Pep- 
per. 

Ctau t (Dta Q: C E Richardson: A N 
Rogers: M J WOdman. 

Physics 

Ctau l: M Bailey: R W Bartow: J C 
Cook: N M Harrison: D R Henry: K B 




M A Hoytand; S C Jones: S 
Smith: J M Thorpe: 


I C 


Turner 

Ctau 3 (Dta l*AD Archer: SJ BaOey: 
P F BahAefar: A S Bhomra: S H 
Booth: G D Broadhead: R A Burston; 
K M ChaHinor: N P Cxaric J A 
aemenls; C Evans: P C Evans A E 
Gkbb; D J G-ntle: G S Harris A J 
Hicks S P Hollins: S R Hummek I 
Kirk; R J Krawtec: E V J Lamb: N T 
Lever: A Main J M C Marques J W H 
Pwrv: M Petty: G D Richards: E A 
Saunders: A J Seed; A J Stye* T W 
Slaton K Thomas: A C Todd; J 
Traverse; R C Travis: k R 
WMiehorae: M R Wttaan. 

Ctau 2 (Dta Q: M J Attany: J N 
Aatley: I J Baron: O S Baade P G 
Burton; G A Cameron: M J Gorki 
R H Cornish: 1 Cutts A DKHensoru _ _ 

Price: S R Smith; M D Sondheim: A J 
Sykes: J S Ttnson: M W Tivnen A J 
G Watson: A C Waiters: P A 
Wood 


Lawton: r J 
-Marsh; D J 
P Morrte A J 


WRhey: P J 
Ctau *K J Attonbn 

Cm BrewerrD ABd„ 

S L HJU; M P Hume: G L M Jambon . 
KyrtacowP A MIBen AN A P e rei ra: 
R C Sambrooic L M Shields. 

Pam P E Btctoey: D W C Broughton: 
F j Macartney; R M Waimra. 

A T DUkm. 


L A Andertom 


Physics with Astrop hysi cs 

.«* to M J Edwards K ones S 
Howard; S Taylor. 

Ctau 2 (Dta 0: j M Deveremc D B 
McLeod: □ A Rage; T G Paaeraotu G 
T Rbcon. 

Ctau 2 (Ota ti): 8 B Crane: A R Hunt I 
G Knight; P O'Toole: R “ 

Ctau 3: W l 

Psychology 

Ctau tCJ Jenkins G H Williams. 


McLaughlin: G M TUdge. 


Ctau 2. (Dta B* R J Andrews H 
Bolton: J\i Bracer J A Brown: j G T 
Catalan: O P Cunntffe: M J Davies J 
A Grundy: B R Halpenn: 4 Holmes J 
Marlowe: N^ttsry: 9 R Rogers: N 


lib. 

Phychology and Physical 
Ed oca boa 

Ctau 2 (Dta Qt l J Carden S G Dean. 
Ctau 3 (Dta fl): S Games: J H 
Marshall 


Co mpu t e r 


mo w e r : d c 


Mathematics and 

Ctan 2 (Dta Qt N J 
Robinson: P Smith. 

Ctau 2 (Dta in: j S Breeze: V M 
Cheung: A 5 Green: A N HObbS. - 
Ctau 3: M A Mlnsftaw. 

Mathematics aod Physical 
Edocatioii 

CUU 2 (Dl» (*: D A BlDhnelL 
Ctau 2 (Dta m: A J ASDUTSt M 
Senior. 

Ctau 3t K Roberts. 

Mathematics asd Psychology 

2 (Dta K)i A E PameU- 


Ctau 3 (Dta I): A M Creen: P a 
K niqflL Pm Mamn: R j Minor: C M 
Stewart: D H Ton entire: K wabh 
»a 2 (Dta H): p M Bradshaw: S w 
Chinn: J Cannon M A Khan: G T 
Porrm. K Robinson. S J V Rus$«(: N 
T Sclulton M A Selwnad: M G Smith 
CMU 3S E A Clark 

M Parkinson 


1 : L A Alloon: fi Merritt: 
Rose: R W B Thomson: 


due 2 , 

5 J Plan 
P P W; 

J Alexb: C J: Ambierr 
Day. J M Donohue; L 

Hughes L Klrliey: P 

M Lucy: R 8 Stephens. 

Ccnetal Studies 

Qua 2 (Dta l): K T Burke. 

Dku 2 (Dta IQ: C J Cray: E A Jones: J 

Yens. 

Ctau a J S Rogers. 

Combined Subjects 

Owl: J J Cohen (English. CCS* K L 
Hamby 1 French. German SUdctt H 
M T . Kennedy (American Studies. 
Enqluh): S L Longtoy iFWnen. 
Malhcmadrs): F A Muller DO (English. 
German Studies): T w Murphy 
(Malhrmjua. Rusnam: p raMn 
(French. German Studies* c J Smith 
iFrenrn. Mdlhematlcsl. B Vincent (1) 
«•! (French. Hispanic Studies/. 

Ctau 2 (Dta I): N G Aubrey (French. 


Hopklnmn. 

Mathematics and Statistics 
Ctau l: c K Y Lin. 

Ctau 2 (Dta Oi AMP Davies: I J Met- 
calf: D A OiivanL 

Statistics 

Ow 2 (Dta Qi JBerryman.. 

Ctau 2 (Dta IQs N K APA«: C A 
Mattueson; S J A McClure: S Squire 

Statistics and Computer Science 

Ctau 2 (Dta 0= M L Fung: C W 
UgrufooL 

i-SUSSSSSic A A ? 

Ctau I (Dta IQ: K F ChW: M E 
□onaghy: J GaHinwr*: P E 
QMtouh: M A Janes: D JSoratt. D 
M Stales; D P H Tees C P Thorpe: J T 
wagner. 

Ctau £ J S Duk S M M Lee. 

Computer Science and Elec- 
tronic Eiqpneeriag 

Ctau h P J Sheppard. 

Ctan 2 (Dta Qs N S Brgwn: H 
HengwaunakutTK W Law: S G Lee E 
S C Leung- 

KHSfflmSfS aum fcs.im) 

M Rcttnvm lf J TurnOCk: P L 


Minerals Engipeering 
Ctau to R K Hanna; M P Smith 
Ctau 2 (Dta Q: J W Anderson: S L 
Atkinson: s L EDML R A Heins: J K 
Sett* 

Ctau 2 (Dta IDr I A Dale: J D 
Makeoeacec w R Proudfove: a y 
S uungwe 

Mechanical Engineering 

Clan 1: K C Cheung: S Coleman: L V 

Grasiy. E /v Knorn: 1 J Penny: H 8 
Seng: R J Sheppard 

Amos: A M Band: j 
" ~l M ChIU: G 
: joranonis 


University news 

Southampton 

Professor John Large, dean of 
engineering. 10 be director of 
industrial affairs. 

Or Chris Anthony, reader in 
biochemistry, has been pro- 
moted 10 a personal chair in 
biochemistry. 

Dr H. T. Delves, honorary 
senior lecturer in - chemical 
.pathology and human metabo- 
lism. has been promoted to 
honorary reader .in analytical 
science. 

Kent 

The title and status of reader has 
been conferred on Dr Derek 
Rutter, senior lecturer in social 

psychology at the university. 

Stirling 

Professor Allen Many will join 
the university’s institute of 
aquaculture this month as 
professor offish nutrition. 
Buckingham 

Professor Antony AllotL of the 
School of Oriental and African 
Studies. London University, has 
been appointed professor of 
African law. 


Williams: A J Wwon: S W S Ylu: N 
ZMenovK 

CUU 2 (Dta IQ: P R England: A 

see 5 j M K. F ^r^jirm&d 

M J Bobaof) Q H TOng 

row 3 M CLiritt. D J Libya: F J 

KkDOBwi: MB Sown 


Pmd/rton. 

Ctau 31 A G HW 1 H Ting. 
Pan: I P Davis. 


Ctass 


Biochemistry 

ERA Stapvwxth. . 


Mr M lichen Davis. LLB 

■lam: Mr Eawara PnilllK LLB. BCL 
■taw * Mr DtaKdas Stotidort. MA. PMD 
iniarkcimgi. and Dr John Gal telly. 
Btjr. PHD icomeuier sciencei 


Corrections 

In the list of Exeter University 
degrees (August 6) the following 
stiidenis should have been 
shown as having received II. Is : 
J M R Picsse(BA Philosophy^. 
C Haynes-Curtis (BA Philos- 
ophy): C P BlaxiU (BStr CTiem- 
isirv). V 


MODERN PENTATHLON 


Hosts take the initiative 
as uneasy riders tumble 


From Michael Coleman 
MoQtecatmi Terme 

The riding catastrophe; where 
an unprecedented a umber of 
riders failed to complete the 
coarse to the required time, 
witnessed at the world 
championships hereon Wednes- 
day in which Italy seized the 
initiative, mast be put into 
perspective. 

It is tWmnhMimp to examine 
the record of eKmmatios at 
previoas world championships: 
Melbourne, 1985, two; Coto de 
Caza Olympics. 1984. three; 
WahrcBdorf. 1983, three Rome, 
1 982, six. Here the f^sre was 1 2 

and, in addition 10 oiben (com- 
pared to 1, L, I, 3) had scores of 
only 700 poinls or less. 

The position yesterday mora- 
ine was that Italy were going for 
gold in both indiridnal and team 

coaiests. It is hole to accase the 
Italians of having palled a fast 
one as in Rome roar years ago. 
Nearly 100 bones had bran 
shipped up here from Rome and 
the best picked oat for this 
contest. No doubt many of them 
had become used to the feel on 
their hacks of Signori Carlo 
Massnlio, Daniefe Masala and 
Cesare ToraJdo who stole the 
show on Wednesday with scores, 
respectively, of 1,100 (the maxi- 
mum), 14130 and 14110. 

We ought to dismiss any 
suspicions of doping. It was 
noticeable that visiting teams 
deployed spies to accompany to 
the stables the horses their 
colleagues had picked to keep 


Results 


RISING: 1. M Hoyo (Mex). I.IOOpte 2. C 
Massuto (H). 1 . 100 : 3 . Ftoftng (CftxttJ. 
fflTAItedsonfAusJ. UP£3.1P WgB 

li. 1.060: 6. M Scharf (WGi. 1XJ38. 
2a. P Hart 950; 47. 0 MaDony. 
722: SO, fi Phelps. 676. Turn 1. ftaty. 
3%VZ FrWiOOS. 3. Austria. 2SB6 : 
a, Mawco. 2.906: 6. Hungare. Z87th 6. 
Sweden. ZQS& 10. Briton. 24*8 
FENCING: Women: 1. 1 KeetaavaiUSS^. 
36 mns. 1.069PB: S. T PiftOn ^^35, 


Other BfMsbiB. W Kloman. 30. M1M2. L 
Baa. 27. 862. Teant i. Britain. 2J&& Z 
Soviet Umon. Z816: 3. Sweden. 2.724; 4, 
W Germany. 2^86: 5. Poland. Z540; 6. 
France. 2.471. 

ITNCJNG: Junior. Men 1. V fiev (ftA 
32 wms. \JSSp»: Z A Madaras (HunVai. 
1.000. 3. ^30.^5: 

Wttahi’ri. G WRiylB. 23. 800: 33. J 
Lawrence, 18, 675. Tmhb 1. Hun^y. 
Z775pts: 2. IWy. ZS50; Z Swadea 255ft 
6. Bntam. Z42S- 

them onder observation on til the 
time to ride. 

What was it then that saw no 
less a performer than Vakhtang 
YagoreshvOi, winner of the re- 
cent Moscow Goodwill Gaines 
contest and junior world cham- 
pion, scrambling together a mere 
794. or his coHeagne, Anatoliy 
Avdeyev, second at Moscow, 
scoring 0? 

The catastrophe had occurred 
in the hue afternoon: only four 
had performed zero rides in the 
morning session. Bat after the 
drags drama in the American 
camp, this had not raised eye- 
brows. AttBa Moser, the 
Brian title bidder, had kepi 
„it despite losing 162 points 
[ 938) which he can recover. 


Anatoliy Starostin knocked off 
three but his 1,004 did not 
disturb the Soviet camp unduly. 

U was from 4J0pn that the 
fiasco began. Richard Phelps, 
who had definite tropes of a 
medal had refusals at gates 2, 3, 
7 and 9. It seemed to be a 
wrestling match from start to 
finish. 

We then had the painfW 
spectacle of a succession of 
riders being made to look fools: 
Horn of Brazil, whose mount 
galloped the peri meter of the 
coarse for five foil c ir cuits before 
the time bell went Tateao 
(Japan), who wrecked every- 
thing. “Pavem Bestia ” an ap- 
palled local stable band 
exclaimed* It certainly was a 
time for horse lovers to look 
away. Avdeyev had 13 refusals; 
Mike Csisen (Canada) prob- 
ably the same number, and, most 
ludicrous of all, the horse of 
Tinunemans (Holland) stopped 
to the corner after gale one and 
stayed pawing the air to protest 
for a foil four minutes. 

The charade went on. U 
simply became a matter of 
getting around regardless, even 
a it meant fawding on jumps in 
the process. 

Were the horses jest too 
refined for modern pentathlon, 
furious at being away from die 
glamour of the Billa Borgbese, 
and unhappy with the clumsy 
handling? Or are Fralfem cavatti 
exceptionally patriotic? What- 
ever the answer, the povtra 
bestia here in Lncca an Wednes- 
day was clearly not the horse. 


TENNIS 



Hands full: Jimmy Connors, the third seed, pulls himself to- 
gether at Stratton Mountain, Vermont, to win his first round 
match against fellow American Erik Korita 6-7, 6-3, 7-5. Bo- 
ris Becker, of West Germany, was another Mg name who 
struggled to find his touch us her prepares for die United 
States Open; the second seed eventually overcame American 
Ken Flach 6-4, 6-7, 6-4 to reach the third round. The match 
everyone wants to see is Becker against John McEnroe^ the 
fourth seed, who is making a return to grand prix action. 


BASKETBALL 


League ‘not in trouble’ 


By Nicholas Hailing 


The English Basketball 
Association will not be replacing 
Worthing Bears in Uie Carlsberg 
National League next season. . 
Only 14 dubs will compete in . 
the first division instead of IS 
now that (he Sussex club has 
folded. 

Worthing's withdrawal and 
the announcement that none of 
their players will get paid next 
season, does not indicate that 
the League is in trouble, accord- 
ing to Peter Draper, the EBBA's 
administrative officer. “I don't 
think that it generally augurs 
badly for the sport," he said. 

Worthing have not gone into 
liquidation but have withdrawn 
with debts of £5.000. The dub 
hope to recoup the money from 
transfer fees. 


“In lots of ways Worthing’s 
realism is nice to see. When 
Colin Smith (Worthing’s chair- 
man) took over the dub they 
were in a financial pickle, but 
although he has improved that, 
they have not generated enough 
to run on." Mr Draper said. 

Worthing hope to collect 
funds from the sale of American 
Jerry Jenkins, who is close to 
negotiating a move to Leicester, 
while Billy Hungrecker. 
Worthing's other American, is 
expected to join Swindon as 
player/coach. Mark Hubbard, 
an England junior international, 
is wanted by Bolton and Nick 
Bums, the club's senior England 
international, will doubtless be 
in demand 


America’s Cup diary 

Stars and stripes 
on the waterfront 


Eight weeks before the 
America's Cop challenge trials 
begin, Fremantle's waterfront is 
moving to to top gear. The 
British and New Zealand syn- 
dicates who have had the waters 
almost to themselves for the past 
two months were joined last 
week by the New York Yacht 
Club with their three 12 metres. 

Dennis Conner and his team 
march into town next week with 
two farther challengers. Stars 
and Stripes 85 and 87, which 
have been shipped along with 
the ValenQjn-designed Eagle, 
representing the Newport Beach 
Yacht Ctob and Canada XL 

Tom Bladutiler’s San Fran- 
cisco challenger, USA IL and 

Heart oT America from Chicago, 
skippered by the Wizard of 
Zenda. Buddy Metges, missed 
the ship and are not arriving 
until September 7, a. month 
before the first races. 

9 The Bond and Parry defence 
groups hare wasted no time 
since retailing from a month's 
rest to continue their daily round 
of sail evaluation trials and put 
the finishing touches to their 
latest designs. Kevin Parry’s 
third Kookibrnra, designed by 
Iain Murray, has been com- 
pleted several weds ahead of 
schedaleand idH be imvdled on 
Sunday and Ben Lexcen's fourth 
Australia design for Alan Bond 
is doe to be lunched a week 
Inter. 

The two Australian rivals, 
designed and tank-tested with 
the help of the Ship Model 
Basin in The Netherlands, are 
similar In concept except for the 
shape of their wine keels, where 
the two designers have opposing 
views on what works best in the 
Pacific swells off Perth. 

• The depth that New Zealand- 
ers will dig into their pockets to 
sopport their national America's 
Cup campaigns has no limits. A 
pop.rccord supporting the chal- 
lenge has gone platinum, having 


h ea d ed the Kiwi charts for more 
than a month. And $1.1 mUlfoa 
was raised at a SSOO-a-piate 
auction-dinner attended by Den- 
nis Conner and John Bertrand to 
celebrate the launching of the 
third Kiwi GRP 22 metre. 

Conner gave his thoughts on 
who would reach the semi-finals 
in the Challenge trials: the New 
York YachtOoh, his own effort, 
the Kiwis — and “Crazy Harry 
(Harry Cud more] if he gets his 
act together'*. 

• That is exactly what 
Codmore. the British skipper, is 
doing — running dally trials to 
evaluate David HoDom’s radical 
canard-keeled Crusader 11 
against Ian Howlett's evolu- 
tionary Crusader L 

The Hewlett boat, which had 
the advantage of arriving hi 
Fremantle three months before 
Crusader II, proved to be a 
winner straight out of the box. 
bearing the Lexcenndesigned 
Australian contender. South 
Australia, in early trials. 

When the 70-foot Hollom 
design joined the divas in June 
she was found to be slower 
upwind but Easter than Cr usader 
I off the wind. After moving her 
mast back fonr inches last 

month the newer boat, which has 

a narrow groove requiring a 
different sailing technique/has 
been transformed. 

Reports indicate - that 
Hofiom's Hippo is faster upwind 
and downwind to wind strengths 
above 20 knots and below 10. 
"There are times,” one source 
tells me, “when she is dramati- 
cally faster than the Hewlett 
design bat then folk out or tone 
for so apparent reason” — a 
problem that has Cndmore and 
his Crew scratching their heads. 

The deristat on which of the 
two boats will represent the 
Royal Thames Yacht Club to the 
Challenge trials will be made to 
the middle of next month. 

Barry PickthaJl 


SWIMMING 

Dunsbee is 
ready for 
the rough 

By John Good body 

Long-distance swimming, the 
sport of obsessional sparians, 
gets international recognition 
tomorrow with the first World 
Cup on Windermere. England’s 
largest, lake. FTNA. the Inter- 
national Swimming Federation, 
have been tardy in their support 
for the activity. This is curious 
because the feat of swimming 
the Channel has always cap- 
tured the imagination of the 
European public more than the 
Olympic sprint events. 

Tomorrow's race for both 
men and women is over 25km 
(15% miles), shorter than the 
England to France crossing but 
long enough to make certain 
dial former pool swimmers do 
not make the transition without 
difficulty. Windermere can also 
be quite rough. 

•Dover’s Lyndon Dunsbee 
prays it will be. Last year he set 
the France to England record of 
8 hours 34 minutes (sub- 
sequently broken; in his first- 
ever long distance swim and he 
excels in awkward conditions. 

He admits that he is only 
county standard at 1,500 metres 
in the pool, with a best time of 
17min 3Qsec. nearly two-and-a- 
balf minutes slower than current 
British internationals. But this is 
still fast enough for most events 
that now demand sustained 
pace as well as profound 
stamina. 

Much of his five-and-a-quar- 
ter hours daily training is in the 
pool, where he concentrates on 
speed work, with just one daily 
two-hour outing in the sea. He is 
only 18 and weighs 1 stone, 
quite light compared to some 
Channel swimmers of the past. 
He describes himself as tubby 
and clearly is more suited 
physically and temperamentally 
to die lake and sea rather than 
the pool. 

“It can be disorientating when 
the mist comes down and it gets 
rough. You are very much alone 
in the water and unlike running 
or cyding. you do not always 
know where your rivals are." 

He knows little of his oppo- 
nents from 14 countries. Robot 
Schmidt, an American, is cred- 
ited with last times, while an 
interesting entrant is a West 
German professor. Ulrich 
Haevecker, who recently swam 
the Messina Straits. 

In the women's race, Bridget 
Young, also from Dover, will 
probably find her sternest oppo- 
sition from the American pair, 
Florence Barker and Alexa 
Reetz. 


TODArS FIXTURES 


CRICKET 

Second Comhffl Test match 
(llj to 6-0. 90 overs minimum) 
TRENT - BRIDGE: England v New 
Zealand 

Britannic Assurance 
County Championship 
(11.0 to 530 or 6TD 
CHELMSFORD: Essex v Middlesex 
CH ELTEN HAM: Gloucester v Note 
CANTERBURY: Kent v Hampshire 
LEICESTER: Leica v Yoriatwe 
NORTHAMPTON: North ants v 
Glamorg an 

)*^TO»^W , SHaAREi Somerset 
v Warwicks 

THE OVAL: Surrey v Lancashire 
EASraouRNE: Sussex v 

g ” CHAMPIONS** Derby: 

gjWvBv LacnleraMiB Brtaofc 

v Hampshire; Eaflekl: 

setvGlamo rqa n . Worcester: 
"22SEK2? * wanwekahlrB: Hbrq- 
pMc Yorkstara v Kent 

OTHER SPORT 

!£>*ETIC& (AC grand prix (at Crystal 


aO^awnemouthopan. 

track dwnpiBMNps 

“U^W^Oubtojrxw. 

WOTOAUj Hendon v Chelsea 3Q (7.30). 

ga£& a 5srus LX’S 

YACHTING: 

Tonic required 

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TH£ iTMES fRJLDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


£11 

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RACING:MISS SIDDALL’S SPRINTER CAN CONTINUE HIS WINNING WAYS IN REDCAR HANDICAP 

* Eddery on 


The Mazall in 


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to complete 
swift treble 


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By Mandarin 


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till I . I J .. T II 

il-tn .4***S$ 

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Redcar racecourse, still 
basking >n the reflected glory 
of Princess Anne’s first victory 
in the saddle on Tuesday, 'will 
be the centre of action again 
today. 

Tyne tees television are not 
only screening the first four 
races but are -also showing 
video recordings of the BMX 
bike championship for chil- 
dren, the event which started 
off proceedings on Family 
Day at the enierprizingly-run 
Cleveland track at 9.0 am. 


■■»i;i|il. rJ Jrj| * c "(* 


1““:: 


Both racegoers and televj- 
f si on viewers will be confront- 

l* a ed by testing problems as no 
less than three of these races 
i^S t are handicaps. 


the John Smith's Brewery 
Handicap (3.10). . Jimmy 
Fitzgerald's old stayer finished 
third to Crazy in the 1984 
Ebor Handicap. Although not 
entirely reliable, the nine- 
year-old showed signs of re-, 
turning to his best when third 
to Manion on this course last 
week and can prove too good 
for Joist and BustofE 
Colin Tinkler's brother 
Nigel can make it a family 
double by winning the 3.40 
with Girdle Ness. The 
trainees wife, Kim, is the 
season's leading apprentice 
and having twice beaten Pat 
Eddery at Ayr on Wednesday 
can now persuade Girdle Ness 


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iti' 1 1 . li \ fa 

ti-UI ".| 

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b.ilhls-iiy | 


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enanuicaps- to repeat his Tuesday course 

My idea of the winners of win in the Stockton 
esc events 'are Ned's Stallholders Stakes. 


. Jrf *£? 
*' Pairii^J 

r:r >T - i! 


Jr, > 


these events are Ned's 
Express The Mazall and 
BocklowHOL Ned's Expressa 
hails from the in-form stable 
of - Colin Tinkler, whose 
speedy two-year-old. Chim e 
Times, looks sure to take a 
deal of beating in the Gun- 
crack Stakes at -York later in 
the month. 


At lingfield the best bet 
could be Mukhabbr in the 
Eden bridge Nursery Handi- 
cap Stakes (330). The two- 
yea r-o Id’s trainer, John 
Benstead, is something of a 
Lingfield specialist and must 



song 

again with 
double 


| SWlMMjjjjf 

| Dunsbeti 
I ready fa 
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Ned’s Expressa showed 
himself to be on song at 
present when making all the 
running at Beverley and looks 
to be the one that they all have 
to brat in the Pat phoenix 
Handicap (2. 10). 

The Mazall runs in the 
Bonusprint Stakes (2.40) De- 
spite being penalised for two 
recent victories, Lynn 
SiddaH’s six-year-old is still on 
the upgrade. Startling confir- 
mation of this was given on 
Wednesday when Fancy Pan, 
previously fourth to today’s 
nap at Doncaster, -romped 
home by seven lengths at 
Yarmouth. One to couple with 
The Mazall for forecast pur- 
poses could be Jimmy 
Etherington’s four-year-old, 
Mara villa, who also appears to 
be on a handy mark in the 
weights. • 

Bucklow Hill wOl be at- 
tempting to defy top weight in 


have high hopes of watching 
Mukhaobr defy a 71b penalty 
for his six-length victory in a _ . 

similar event at Windsor last performance carrying 9st 71b, 
weekend. quickening in magnificent 

Guv Harwood i« smother fash »on to beat his stable 

su^fS^ddnutoSKi S m C! OI !^t»S on ?Sl 2 r 

Dancing Brave's trainer must 
havemoutmndmgdanceof 


Reg Holllnsbead’s Jackdaw, twice a course and distance winner at Newmarket reappears in 
the Headland Overseas Properties Handicap at tonight’s Suffolk meeting 


winning the Haxnmerwood 
Stakes (2.0) with Angara 
Abyss. 


Despite being penalised for 
is two wins'at Brighton and 


his two wins'at Brighton and 
Keinpton the selection is 
dearly a useful .two-year-old 
and should be equal to his 

tas k. 


all seasoned handicappers, 

Aunni who form at 

present but Sarfraz remains 
the choice to show further 
sed for improvement 
on and Other likely winners at 
ion is Newmarket are Sharp Times . 


(6.55) and Homing In (735). 

At Haydock Park’s night 
meeting I like the chances of 
Frmde (7.0) and Broken Wave 
(7.30). Ftivole can make it 
-three wins in succession for 
Paul Cole in the Haydock 
Park Leisure Company 
Handicap and Broken Wave's 
form reads superior to that of 
Husnah, who is likely to prove 
to be his prindpal rival in the 
DH Wei ton Stakes. 


Brave return 
by Morris 


Today’s coarse specialists 


Bin Mortis, the National 
Hut jockey who has been oat of 
action since Christmas, returns 
to the saddle to m orr o w after 
almost losing his teg. Moms, 
aged 24, is dne to ride at 
Worcester where be will partner 
Cullen's Pet for his father in the 
Walsall Three-Year-Old Novice 
Hurdle. 


The Sussex stable will also 

be in action at Newmarket’s ruman. kjw-m stnuE!B?inmii£ 

Sarfraz and Zarbyev can com- w n swMwm, so <nm m 137 %: 
plete a first and last race staricay, 40 from 359 , n.t%. 
double in the Headland Over- HAYDOCK 

seas Properties Handicap and trainers: h cod, 21 wtonem fron 
Islebam Maiden Stakes. runners. 3&2%fw hem. 18 from ; 


JOCKEYS: S Dawson. lOtrom 70. 14.3%; 
W n SwMwm, 50 from 386. 137%: Q 


REDCAR 

TUAWntS: L Cumanl, 1 2 wMwrn from 32 
runners, 37 Q Harwood. 11 from 33. 
3aa%; 8 Huffar, 12 from 47. 25 l 5%. 
JOCKEYS; FI Quest, 10 winnens from 39 
rides. 25.6%; G DufWd. 30 from 220. 
13a%: J Lowe. 33 from 306. 1018%. 


HAYDOCK 


TRAINERS: H Ced, 21 winners from 55 
runners. 382%Tw Ham. 18 from 54. 
33J%: J Hindey, 8 from 2S. 32JJ% 
JOCKEYS: T Qumn. 11 winners from 43 
rides, 25.6%; W Canon. 35 from 150, 
233%; S Cauthen, 23 from 1 01 . 22.8%. 


In last week's Goodwood 
Slakes, Sarfraz put up a fine 


LINGFIELD 

TRAlNERft G Harwood. 38 wbmre from 
157 rumen, 242%; H Candy. 15 from 78. 
19.0%: J Dunlop. 33 from 73S, 147%. 
JOCKEYS: G SterHuy. 34 winners from 
184 rides, ias% T Ives, 12 from 84. 
14J3%; B Roim.49 from 39A 12J%. 


Moms makes his comeback 
after an operation on Ms right 
leg to remove a 12 inch plate and 
screws, pot in after a crashing 
Cell three years previously which 
had turned septicJfe said: **1 
was very Incky.The surgeon said 
that if I had coo tinned riAeg for 
another few weeks I would have 
lest my leg. Riding is so phys- 
ically SemandiBg that a ample 
of the screws hadcome loose and 
bacteria got in between the 
bones." 


**rif Si»- . 
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NEWMARKET 


Going: good to firm 
Drawrno advantage 


HEADLAND r CVERSEAS PROJ 
HANDICAP runnW 


PROPERTIES 


• 1 1101 SARFRAZ (U8A)GHwv«odW1 (4ex)~ QSMayA ■ 
2 11 ' RHYTHMC BLUES H ObcISOIOj: — — WRy«n2 

8 3241 -MARLIQN Mss S Had &8-8(4ex) EMP|I 

9 -142 MYCENAE CHBWY (B) G 3-8-7 — Thfw5 
11 23t2 -JACKDAW (USAK&0)RHoilii8MdSS8 

ACriSH(f)1 

13 3002 BALLET CHAHP m (USAXC-Of R HoWar 0-63 ^ 

A Proud 7 

14 0084 ORAN8EMU.mjTVM4S-a._- WNwrwB 

15 1330 tXJ) MALTON JToler 4-7-12_ -RWbS 


5 4314 ROSiEDtCKMS0)RHoanstiaad4S-ORLaa>jn(7)l3 

7 1400 LUCKY STAMCBrfmRHoldar 48-18 s5w»qnl 

8 0233 SKENTGAWmiUSA] WJants4S-9_RCWtaam8 
8 2132 EASHMOOK{pkm Miss S Hal SSS- K Hodgson 9 

ID 0144 BEECHWOOO COTTAGE (B) A Bafay 3-6-7 

GAlhanBakw(7)11 

• 14 2108 SHARP TRIES WMussonSSa^-l- MW lg A — a 
. 15 0444 SaiB’HBKMfB) G LasMS-42^: — GCartwOTS- 
■ IT 0024 HKHARKlBnBB AHUi 47r10_L_^_ ANadfia* 14' 
18- 0040. B6MCH RZVOBE M TompWns 47-7- R Hoot (5)4: 

' 19 0003 . SHAHRffiiGBkini 5-7-7— : M LTbomtlO 

' 20 HMD DEOLOGUMB) A Mdfl 47-7— GFWKM2 

41 FtovaRo, 9-2 Simp Tanes, 8-1 BaedMOOdCoMBa, 8-1 
Mistflr March, anneydaie. 10-1 Ro3ie Dicklns. BeUeptaron, 12- 
1 Eucharis, Slant Gfin. 141 oOwn. 


REDCAR 


lie' 


7-4 Sarfraz. 3-1 Rhythmic Hubs, 5-1 Mycanaa Chatty. M 
BaOet Champ. 10-1 Jackdaw. 141 Marion, 18-1 Oranga ML 
20-1 OM Manor. 


7^5 MILDENHALL CLAWINQ STAKES (£2,847: 
1m 4f) (12) 


3 0000 KUMANJARO BOB (B) R J WMam4S-7 Tlvaat 

5 3MJ SANTBIAMAN P Cundafl 7-9-7 G8Mny7 

6 0000 ROIANNA OF TEDFOLD A Davison 5-34- I JobnaonB 

81290 MJBARAK OF KUWAIT J Suidfta 7-8-11 RHHt3 

10 2013 CHUMMY'S OWN (D^BF) N Cafeighai 3-8-1 0 

PRoMnsoal2 

13 0 SAMJY BILL M Tompkins 3-8-10 RCodamS 

19 0400 QREAT TOPIC G PritchsrtJ-Gordon3S-fl_ W Ryan 10 

22 3230 QOOOTMEHALJ HkJtfcy 3-8-4 Hliisl 

23 0432 HMHEST MOTE G Hum 3S3_ MMaaaar4 

25 O' KATK BRIDCTC Draw 3SS^_ AMackafS 

27 -800 faSOWSUPHlYANKH P HaSara 3-7-12 G Ranch 11 
29 NOT SO SHARP P Hasten 37S -TWMNnsS 


, .... 
- o : 

* ’ * • 

;..r » . 

. »- 


. Newmarket selections 

By Mandarin 

6.0 Sarfraz. 6.25 Honey Plum. 6.55 Sharp Times. 
725 Mubarak .of KuwaiL 7.50 Homing in. 8-20 
Zarbyev. 

. By Our Newmarket Correspondent 


I Going: good 
Draw: no advantage- - 

1.40 JAaCCOLLHiKS .MEMORIAL APPRENTICE 
’ (£1,417: 1m 2f) (lOYunnerel ■ 

5 1000 PATCH8BR0WBaiBh4»7 - ^.1-. BMeatfS 

- 8 4000 aARW (Mm TFaSmM 7-94 JCMaaRI 

8 0-13 SAI&OOtLARM Prescott 3-8-1 3 — ^ — DIY AmyW 

9 3031 DQHMONPRHCenP Rohan 88-13 {56S) 

WaadrCMart 

12 8001 KAVAKAHWMdng 48-11 — S 

16 0U0 RUSTIC TRACK f&IM Denys SomOi 6-8-4 RVkkMsffl4 
.19 3000 TREYAIW0lltU8AlSf*trt»i48-1_ LAMwortli®7 

20 2000 TARtETORP Rohm 989 GWadmS 

21 -881 BLAOCRfVra MHEawvhr 5-7-13. GHbdwareh (7)1 

240900 BXMOOWGCsIvart 87-19 PBaria(3)0 

5-2 Swid-OoKar. 41 Black Rlvar. 142 Dominion Princess. 
Rustic Track. 91 Kavaka. TwWon, 12-1 Patehhurg, 


13 1031 HEAVENLY ROOFER (CN D) Denys Srath 97-11 (Bex) 

JQnfcai(5)4 

14 -000 RUfNNQ BULL OR (USA)(D)GCaMn 5-7-10. MFW 3 

15 0024 MARAVlUAJEtnanngim 47-10 GCsriwa)9 

IB 0400 TOP (rWUNEfCOnT^croft 97-7- LChamoeklO 

' 19 0400 ALWAYS NATIVE (IIWKPfDW Chapman 97-7 

: 9 P Griffith! T1 . 

94 The MazML 3-1 Huavwiy. Hoafsr. 9-2 Wb« Rigged. 11-2 
MaravNa. 8-1 talshpour ID-1 Air Command.-t6-1 others. . 

3.10 JOHN SMITHS BREWERY HANDICAP 

(£1^772: 2m 115yd) (6f • 

2 0003 BUCKLOW MLLJtns%RtzgBnrid 997 : AMway 1 

6 -400 SUN STREET CBrilfam 488- SCamheot 


7 2432 JOBT(B1 (C-D)M Pr«scn«4-9& GDqfBakf5 

12 3001 BU5TW+ Mbs S Hat 5-7-11 JCate}han(7)4 

14 044 UUOSTEJW Watts 97-10 .LCbmocfc2 

16 4/20 UPLAND GOOSE P Rohan 97-7 JQnin>(5)3 

7-4 Joist 58 Bucklow Hil. 91 Bustoff. 7-1 Sun SvaeL 12- 
1 Uridsta. 191 Upland Qooaa. 

340 STOCKTON STALLHOLLDERS SELLING 
STAKES (3-Y-O: £918: 1m If) (4) 

1 0000 
6 0003 
9 0011 

15 080 


c 60RhyflmncBliie962STiynov*L655'Eudwris. 
7 25 Chummy’s Own. 7 50 Homing in. 8 20 
Genghiz. ' ‘ 

Michael Seely's sdection: 7.50 Homing In. 


92 Mubarak Of Kuwat 91 Chummy's Own, 91 Great 
Tone; 91 Goodtkne Hal, 8-4 i lghest Note. 10-1 Sandy BN, 12- 
1 W N naiWro Bob. 141 others. 


6^5 BARROW SELLING STAKES (2-Y -O: £1.786: 
7f)(12) 


1 0001 LEADING ROLE (BltDJR Hodges 92- 
3 00 AFRICAN SAFARI P CUndoK 5-11 


3 00 AFRICAN SAFARI PQireW I _ 

8 2204 PBITAW IB) W Wharton 911 IJpOBWl 

a QUE PASA P Haslam 911. .j » Ranch 12 

10 SHADE OF PAIEPHaslan 911 T WNhma 10 

12 GALT'S COMET P CwdSfl 88 MMtalT 

13 440 HONEY PLUM MlMw 98 M Wbk aa i f 

IB 000 6T JOHNS MY M McCormack 88 -RSSaatll 

17 00 SWEET RIBOTC Draw 88 -—-—2 

18 SWYNFORD LADY ffR) K Stone 96 G Own 5 

19 00 TINA'S BEAUTY G Hum 98-; P M atuBaMS 

20 020 TRYIKJVA (BF) G Pritchard-Gordon 88 WR|Ba4 

11-4 Loading Role. 7-2 African Safari, 4-1 TVynova. 91 

Shade Ot Pale, 91 Honey Plum, 191 Tina's Beauty. 12-1 
others. . 


Thw»3 

_Q3«wfcayl 
- 1 Johnson 1 
.G Franck 12 
T WHtama 10 
AMcGlana7 


7 JO TUDOR GATE HOTEL NURSERY HANDICAP 

(2-Y-a £4.890: 7f) (7) 

3 410 SANAM (USA1 J Dunlop 97 .WSkrtml 

B 4214 HOaUHO IN G Huflor 9-3 (7»d Q Carter (3)1 

8 2840 PAOFK BASSI ffll (USA) W O'Gorman B8 — T hrea 5 

9 0203 BORN FREE AGAWlPtartt 88 RCgchrtete* 

11 0400 HURAJAH C Benstead 8T... TW 

12 2014 ELBEOOUBLEYOU(p8NBRNCNNghmM 


Redcar selections 

By Mandarin 

1.40 Sand-Dollat 2.10 Neds Expressa. 2.40 THE 
MAZALL (nap). 3. 10 Bucklow HilL 3.40 Girdle 
Ness. 4.10 Buddey. 4.40 Sed: the Truth. . 

By Ouir Newmarket Correspondent 
1 40 Sand-DoDar. 2 10 Mwfisha. 3 10 Joist. 3 40 
Atromitos. 4 10 Buckley. 4 40 Seek The Truth. 
Michael Seely’s selection: 3-40 Girdle Ness. 






MWUhmB 

.RSBaatll 


14 0044 OYXINNELL STREET UTOoipttns 7-7— R Mor«ap) 6' 
11-4 Bom Free Again. 7-2 B Ba Doubtayou. 91 HominB In. 
Saram. 91 Mur^ah, 9T Pacific Basin. 12-1 (TCcmaB StraaL 


820 EBF ISUEHAM MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O: 
£3.775:7^(10) 

1 DUNBOH Candy 90— ! WNnmeaB 

2 Ga«HC(USAj_LPtggo090 Thwafi 

7 0 UOHTRXJT PRINCE MUcComw* 9-0 . J Law* (7)1 

9 8UPPBIY HAX G Prifcftaid-Gonlon 98 .... 


Z10 PAT PHOENIX HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £2,784: 71) 
(7) 

2 0413 

4 0010 

5 1004 

6 0100 

9 014 

11 S3T1 
13 4000 

91 Nads Expressa. 3-1 Uudsfta. 91 Cvrbean SoukL 91 
Cartaln Award, 91 Royti Fan. 10-1 Nap Maja Mica . 

2.40 BONUSPRINT HANDICAP (£3£93; 7f)(t1) 


4-5 Gkdte Naso. 5-2 Dbc EuBas. 91 Atromitos. 91 
Princess Andromeda. 

4.10 DUNCAN NORVELLE STAKES (3-Y-a £822: 
1m4fi(7) 

4 .3 

5 S» 

7 842 
9 94 

11 880 
n 4-m 
21 803 






91 Buckley. 58 Royal Dynasty. 92 Nabto Rise. 91 High 
Knowt 191 Turkw. 191 athare. 

4.40 KBF SINMNOTON MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES 
(2-Y-O: £2,469:61) (13) 




PD’Arcyl 
. R Guastl 
Ateart 


2 1200 WELL RUG8I M H Easttrby 998 MBMil 

3 0002 AR COMMAND (Q) Mre G Havstey 588 


A Shooks @7 

4 (043 MSMPOUR fC-Ot H Wharton 48-2 — MBrannan^ja 

5 0000 FRtMQE OF HEAVEN fl»J Hanson 48-1 


6.55 HEADLAND. ESTATES AGENCY HANDICAP 

(£2^29:60(14) . 

• J 0100 REVEILLE {D1 U Jan* 4-108 ■ yJMaa l 

2 0000 5TONEYDALE N CeS&ghan 48-12-_-__~G Stertay 1 
4 1411 IBSTER MARCH (P) nrkitotnon 3-98 pMt) 


10 30 TAFFY TaiFLARJKndtey 90 

12 TORRES VEDRAS (USA) M SlM 


TORRES VBMAS (USA) M Stouw 90 W R SteMxan 3 

0 UP THE LADDER A Saitey 90 PBtoaadMd4 

3 ZARBYEV (USAJflBF) G Hmrood 98 GSteriwyjB 

ABSOiTHEX) Money 911 RGaaat 10 

CASmBC N CAVIAR RJWHIS 91 1 RCoctaana2 


5 0000 FRINGE OF HEAVEN (DM Hanson 48-1 

JHBnmn(S)2 

6 2211 TIE MAZALL (C8) Mbs LSiddafiG-913(Sox} 

DNkMsI 

11 pan DLETMES 89 WEbay48S JLmm5 


issss 

■ii 

JLms4 

USETA M W Easterpy 911 — 13 

0 MKS ZOLA Jmnmy Ffcgerala 9t1 R Brown (7} 11 

03 ROMAN BELLE G PrrtSanLGordon 911 GOuffiaUIO 

2 SEEK THE TRUTH (USA) H Cad 911 8Cnthea3 

SO KHOJW Watts 9T1 NConoortont2 


IS 043 SUPETO UBE (USA! E Carter 911— Wendy Cartw (T| 6 
20 00 TR&ZE QUATOWi C Tfxxraan 911 — .. DMcMta7 

158 Ghantylm. 11-4 Seek The TVutti, 4-1 Roman Bela. 19 
2 Supercube. 91 KaSe Says. 12-1 others. 


118 Zartwav. 4-1 Ganghiz. 98 Tons* Vedras, 91 Taffy 
Templar, 191 burbo. 191 SBppery Max, 14-1 others. 


Brighton results 

tea- firm Gaitaw Prinoen UQiinn. 2tM). ALS3 


HAYDOCK PARK 


i !«t 

I ‘ 

•1 • 

| I * I " 

iii 

U.- 

tfl |VI * T -" 

llM *•:* 

mas » • 


todays^ 

_ ' 


Draw: Bf-lm, low numbert best 

6.0 MANCHESTER EVENING NEWS NURSERY 
HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £1.226: 61) (8 runners) 

2 1343 FLAXLEYR HaKnshead97 - s P!SS5 

3 104 TREVtsiORStwattier9l3 ; — ~ J BMd 1 

8 04 CAPITAL FTDW R Hannon 93 PrtMdery 3 

9 200 FLEET PACT BHBs 91 WOamoa2 


15 480 8NARRY MLL W Bbey 911 CDayarlS 

16 2040 STiLL DREAMWG N vigors 910 P Cook 8 

17 -300 FLYMQ KDOYfi/SA) ^finfiay 99— A ShouRs (5) 12 

18 800 ROYAL ROUSTO R HoNnshaaa 96 S Parka* 

20 2433 TABLE-TURMNG JB) (BF) J W Watts 88— K DariM 10 
2! -Kffl SY CHANCE CWHnwi 96 BCiesMayt 

24 3002 MPSHAL 8UNRISE (BF) M W Eastortv 88 

JMte Boakar (7) 1 

25 800 IMPERIAL PALACE C Tinkler 8-4 M Fry 3 

27 0000 PELLS (X05E (B) M W Eastetby 90 MftyS 


Ooing: firm 

28 (T0 1, MY NOBLE LORD (TC 
lirtevki-njlty Lath fW Carson. 

SUM Section (P Wakfron, 91 
‘ RAN: 8 PoiEth lad | 

, 12 Seperwe Roafttles 

. Newrgreen (5tti). R — 

20 Ccmnemara Dawn, 25 Tropical 


Boy, 33 Magnofla Dancer, Frnotoui 
Fanw. 12 rarOSL a. KL 1*. a P Cote at 
Whatoomtie. Tote: E2.60; £1.30, £380, 


fan HurNo. Boktera, 6 The Rusk. 

192 Musical WH (5th). 9 Earis Court. 
Vsrtndsn (4th), 16 DeerfleU Beach (6th). 
20 Rad Ocudsr. 25 Jotmy Frenchmen. 
Usaihr. Our Anita. 14 ran.nk.2VH. VU.1KL 
71 P Butter at Lewes. Tote; E&0Q; £180. 
£180. SAM. DR £82-90. CSF; £67.50. 
Sdd R Thompson 2JXX) gns. 


3.15 (1m m 1. SEVS4 HILLS 
Roberts. 91); Z KnfghTs Mr (L RWu. 
191k 3. Din Encore (S Cauthm. 11-41. 
ALSO RAN; 9-4 fav Retorm Princess (Sh). 
92 Wakasin (4th). 7 Gone Overboard (6th). 
25 JuUtee Jamboree. 7 ran-NH: Hankley 


Dorm. HL %L hd. 1KL 2L Jimmy 
Fitzgerald at Mattoa T<« K.10: S2S0, 
£350. DF: £26.60. CSF; £70.86. 


1. RIOT BMOADE (S OuahM. 


£1.10. DR £2020. CSF: £3069 


3^5 (1m) 1.TURFAH (Paul Eddery. 6-11 
lav); 2. Factotum (A Murray. 7^1t 3. 
Podaroao (Pat Eddery, 91 L ALSO RAN: 5 


13 200 OUR NOROOHT Barron 7-11 7 

17 4000 JAYS SPECIAL UWE&Karby 78 LCtamckt 

22 0001 HARRY HUNT JBteV 7-7 — 

23 4303 SHUTTLECOCK GIRL W Jan* 7-7 _ Dale Gbsoe (7) S 
118 Harre Hunt 78 Count Trwtata. 92 Jays SgeciaL 11-2 

ftaxley. 192 Rest Faa 191 Capital Flow, ii-1 Shutttooock 
Sri, 191 Our Horizon. 


78 Frivote, 91 Sovereign Love. 91 Surfing. 7-1 
Sutiso. 91 Imperial Palace. 191 Bold Sea Rove 
Biddy. 191 Tabte-Tumtog. 14-1 FasMty. 191 others. 


fav); 

Thomson. 11-8); 3. 


1, OUT ON A FLYai 


HamtJWL 291). ALSO RAN: 8 


Port Ptease (p/uL 12'Moal Famroau (4th). 
5 ran. 2KL 3LKL PWahmm at Lamboum. 
TotR £1-40; £1 E0, E230T3F: £4.00. CSF: 
£584. 


X45 __ 

Evens ink Z SteiWWte (T 1yM. 3-lh 3. L 
fly (R Guest 13-2L ALSO RAN: 118 

— .8 Stan Hope (5th). 33 Bamby 

ran. sh hiZSM. sh MJXL 
15L C Brittam at NevanarkM. Totm E2J00: 
£180. El .70. DP: E2L90. CSF: £484. 


im). 16 Baby Alex (5th). 5 ran. 4L 1L 3L 
<*sl D Elsworth U WhHttuy. Tote; £2. ID; 
£ia SI 59. Oft £180. CSF! £287. 
Bought in 3^00 gns. 

*J0 (61) 1. GLEN KELLA MANX (A 
Mt^tona. 192k 2. Hkktm Briaf (E Gueet, 


•, TH-t‘ 

•- ll-'f 




7J3D D. H. WELTON STAKES (£2,562: 1m 6f) (6) 

3 4040 WESTRAY (USM R HoAnahesd 488 S Perks 4 

* 0 JBMUisntSRBrazi^Bn 68-10 * Weaver 1 

7 3(9 SmtJAR OK. 0 Thom 48-7 — O Sextos 2 

8 3121 HUSNAH (1©AXD) L Cumani 38-4 Pat Eddery 3 

11 103 BHQKHiWAVEH Candy 97-12 JLee»6 

13 080 TOP ROW AW Jones 3-7-11 HFiyS 


1. TINA’S MELODY (R HOa. 94 
8Buation(Pat Eddery. 11- 
■ (G BardwelL 91). 


4.15 dm 2f) 1, FOLLOW THE BAND 
Cauttwa 14-I): 2 Heed <* School 
Mackey. 911: a Como To The Bol . 
DuffirtS. 91 6v). ALSO RAN: 4 Grimesg 


(6th). jQRMtays B^IOrjjOfGema. 11 


tki-. V 

A- fct-— 


' f 1 


Haydock selections 

By Mandarin 

6.0 Fleet Fact. 630 Tahard. 7.0 Frivpte; 7 JO 
Broken Wave. 8.0 Native Pawn- 8 JO All Haste. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent - 
6 0 Shuttlecock GirL 6 30 Bold Hideaway. 7 0 
Sovereign Love. 7 30 Husnah. 8 0 Bold Duchess. 
8 30 All Hasie. 


4-lfc 3, rates Brown (P Cook. 1 .. 

ALSO RAN; 118 fav Green- Ruby, (4th). 


Winter at Newmarket Tote: £280; Q. 60, 
£1.60. DF: 23.00. CSF: £5J0. 


ran. 1J4L 114L 41. 1BL 4L W Jarvta M 
Newmarkat Tola: E9.30: £2.70. £950. 
£1801 DF: £15^0. CSF: 296-5S. 


Dream Chaser (5th), Sudden mpad, 10 
S<t TTbs One Out 14 Roman Rutar (smj, 20 
Barrack Street 33 Bean. ID raa iJSL hd, 
II, 41. 3L J Fax at Ames&ury. Tote: £930; 
£2J0. £490. £180. DF: £900. CSF: 
£79J)0. Tritaw: £320.41. 


48 Broken 'wave, 7-4 Husnah. 191. Top Row, 14-1 
WMnty, 591 Jbnrwstocs, Sirdar Girl. 


REdtfWf 

MBlRbS 

TLoma 


6.30 WOOD PIT CUMING STAKES (2-Y-O: 
Cl .515: 61) (11) • 

4 0 BOLD HIDEAWAY RShaMharS-ir 

5 00 BREWM TIME MHEatasrtw 8-11 
B 0 FOSSARD M W Eetsterby 8-11 . — 

7 tSLAHP LOCKSMITH MW Eastgrfay 911^ _ . ^ w 

8 003 STARS W MOTION DAfbUthnOt 91V 

9 0000 TAHM10 R Hoflnshaa0911 S Pwta l 

10 1120 0000 THE (ML WR H»nonS-l0 WCataanlO 

19 D WELSH FUTEC-waras 97 -—j— 3 

23 ROCKETS OAK BMoptai M g potete yg 

24 4204 MAZURKANOVAC ThQfflton 95 J Pfr - J I "J 1 

28 2«0 BMGO QUEEN JBe>ry9> — "FiyT 

11-4 Stars in Motion. 91 Bold Mdeaway. 4-1 Good Tima 
-Gkt 92 Mazuricanova. 191 Brewki Ttam, iO-1 Bingo Queen. 
Fossardrl4-l others. - 


SO EBP HERMITAGE GREEN MAIDEN STAKES 

(2-Y-O: E2^41:6f)(13) 

5 0020 CREAM AMD ORBMKWHte 98 P Cook 6 

7 002 HANSEATIC PMaWn 90 T Quinn 4 

8 HXAN SOVEREIGN R HoHnahead 90 S Parka 13 

9 KENTON'S LAD Jtaitny Ragarald 98 — R Brown (7) 5 

11 00 NATIVE PAWN C Bra&n 98. SCautfaenll 

13 ROLFESON B Morgan 98 BCmaMay? 

14 0 SAVAMM KING Taeiron 90 NDayl 

15 40 SKOLBIN M W East&by 90 M Hndtoy (3)3 

16 32 SONG N’JEST Jimmy Rznwafcl 98 UBirdi lO 

22 02 BLAZE OF GOLD E«8tm911 GDutflaUZ 

23 BOLD DUCICSSM Janta 911 TLucaa12 

24 03 CASHEL VIEW NTMder 911 „KkaTtaktarRa 

26 ‘ 09 WBJLOWBANKS Norton 911 J Lowe 9 


3J30 (1m 2f)1, DERBY DAY (TIMBares, 
91J: 2. Lord It Over JA dark. 92); 3, 
Socks Up IN Adams, 13-2), ALSO R “ w ' 1 
fav Vague Melody WW, 5 Leonktas 
14 Farming, w TarraHan. 33-1 __ 

** SL-.-Ku. Srsn,nk,20LTLhd,2LD 

jm. To» £780: £180, 
£15-30- CSF: £25.10. 


ROLFESON B Moran 98 

SAVANNA KING TBaron 90 

SKOLERNM WEa«8rtjy98 

SONG N’JEST Jimmy Faznrafd 98- 

BLAZE OF GOLD E Alston 911 

BOLD DUCICSSM Janta 911 

CASHEL VIEW NTMder 911 

WKJLOWBANKS Norton 911 


SCaTObanll 

BCroaalay 7 

NDayl 

— GDuffiaUZ 

T Lucas 12 

KhaTfaUar(5)8 
J Loan 9 


4.45 (6f) 1 , GUUMMAN FOR GRAMS 

(Pat Eddery. 94 it-favt Z HHta (M 
Wigham. 9-4jt-fav);3.Tkta»(@ Randr. 7- 
ALSO RAN: 5 Madness Not Ta 11 
Young Benz (4th). 12 Champion Joker. 20 
Take Effect ffth). 25 Breokslda. 33 Miss 
Bn Star. 10tan.2L2L 
at Newmarkat. Tots: 

£1,40. £1.40, £180. DF: £380. 

CSF £773. 


4.45 (61) 1, MURPHY'S WHEELS fS 
Cauthen. 1-3 tev): Z Boo Accual (L 
nggto. 4-1); 3. Mayor (N UMfiL , 98L 3 
ran. NR: The Mecharac. U ZV& A Jante 
Bt RoyMon. Tota: £140. DF: £2.60. CSF: 
£2.13. 

Ftenapot-P6S.70. 


Devon 


£1J0, £180. 


48 (1m 4fl 1. CHUCKLESTONE 
Adams, 25-1k Z Mtea SWrteyfW Carson. 
9^3. AaNurton Qrm (P Cook, 7-1). 
ALSO RAU -10-11 fav ProdoM Dancer 
(4th), 7-2 NO Doublet dm. SO Baton 
Matth(6th0.6ran.a,3l 
at umboum. To» ESI 
DF: P4.10. CSF: £114,40. 




S.1S (6fl I.TAMFOi (N Cwfista. 12-1); 2. 
StriHy Spoken (W Rmi, 7-2 tevk 3. 
Duffers Denote (M HhicBoy. 7-1). ALSO 
RAN: 4 Pokartayaa. lt-2 Workatay (5mk 
9 Gods Sokffion. ID WHta Gan, 14 
Pommes Chateau (4thL 1 6 Oft Your Mark. 
20 angle Hand (6th). 2» Via Vitae, 33 Sm 
Gate# Stag. 68 Nadron. 13 raa nk. II. 1 Ki, 
2W. 21. reran at Dunbar. Tote: 

E3-50, £1.60240. DR £10.20. CSR 
£51.18. Tricast: £29784. 
PtocapotEMJKL 


Gates: flood ts firm 
2J0(2m5fhdte)l.S8ptte(RGuwL»* 
IL 2. Redgrave Alta (193 tevk a Val 
Cimber (S-1). 30L 15L f «n. F Gray. 
Tots: £2420: E2J0. £l8t £140. Dr: 
£37.00. CSF: £53-91 . 


3J» Em If hdtaj 1. Bank Panda „ 
Murphy. 118(av);3.BoMYWtogs(7-2); 3, 
Svrih Aecara (4 -il a.ja. 8 ran. j p 
Davies. TotK £170: £110. £240. DF: 
£4J» CSF; £6.19. 


li-iD Native Pawn, 7-4 Song teJssL 91 Hanseatic, 12-1 
Blaze Of GokL 14-1 Sfcotam, I9f wnowtmk, 20-1 ottwra. 


4J0 (5f B6yd)T. ARDENT PARTNER (5 
Dawson. 2-1 tav): 2. Water Maroh (P 


Hutchmsoa 7-2): 3. Rastless Rhapaody 
IS Whitworth. 11-2L ALSO RANT'S 


&30 HAYDOCK PARK PONY CLUB MAIDEN 
STAKES (£2,460: 1 m 2f 131yd) (11) 

1 DEADLY OOfMO K Bridgwater 888— : .pWAiey 

2 20 DONOR Mrs CReewylM J Ratal 

3 008 GLEMORE CAPTAM C Spares 488 — <• 

5 20 ALL HASTE (USA) H Ce3 38-8 SCaothmS 

6 00 DIME AND A DOLLAR A W Jonas 388 


B Whitworth. 11-»- ALSO 
DuUmahe. 6 La Dtatoa 


12 Persian 


Yarmouth 

Gotesp good to firm 


Bazaar (5th). 20 My Mucte (4th). 
BaAnaw. 8 ran. 4L 1KL VA. 1»L 1L 


i(7T) 1, YUMZUW CM HBfl, 91fc 2. 
Of Awlen (S Cauffien. M tevgg. 


£2.60: £1JKL £1.50. El 80. DF; £2.m 
CSF: SAJST ' 


Holder at BristoL Trn32.m £1 . 1 0. £1 .70. 
£1.90. OF: 2530. CSF; £9.43. 
PteoapefetEMfi. • 


, . - «J) (2m If hdte) 1. Pteri Wonder (G 

VSS25JJSLW*??' ^21- Hwer 78): 2. Gold Humar CI1-1>: 3. 


LINGFIELD PARK 


Going: good 

Draw: high numbers best 


2.0 HAMMERWOOD STAKES (2-Y-O: £2.264: 7f) (T2 runners) 


Pat Eddery, who on Wednes- 
day announced that he is leav- 
ing Baltydoyle next year after 
signing a ihnse-year contract to 
ride all of Kfialed Abdulla's 
horses, carried on his tremen- 
dous form at Pontefract yes- 
terday when he landed a double 
on Hot Betty and Glamgram for 
Games. 

This season's leading jockey 
was also expected to take the 
opening event, the Carieion 
Maiden Stakes,on the favourite. 
New Mexico, but had to be 
content with second {dace be- 
hind Aid and Abet, ridden by 
Walter Swinburn, who was 
celebrating his 25th birthday. 

Swinburn started the day on a 
dismal note, when sustaining a 
black eye while riding at ex- 
ercise. His mount threw up its i 
head and caught Swinburn in | 
the lace. 

On his only ride at the 

meeting, however. Swinburn’s 
fortunes quickly rhanged. Aid 
and Abet was smartly out of the 
stalls and after a furlong had 
taken command. Although New 
Mexico tried bard to get on 
terms he never appeared likely 
to catch the winner. 

At Yarmouth Jeremy 
Hindley, the Newmarket 
trainer, reacted a career land- 
mark when he saddled YTdizlar 
to teat the favourite Mists of 
Avalon in the Scroby Sands 
Stakes. 

"That was my 600th winner, 
and I am pleased that it was 
from my principal patron, Kais 
al Said, said Hindley, whose 
first winner was IS years ago. 

Steve Cauthen tried to make 
all the running on Mists of 
Avalon, and Henry Cecil's filly 
appeared to be in complete 
command of the situation as she 
quickened into what looked a 
winning lead intide the last 
quarter mile. But. inside the 
final furlong, Yldizlar began to 
dose and. when Cauthen picked 
up his whipi, the favourite had 
no more to give. Michael Hills 
pushed Yldizlar ahead 100 
yards from home to score nicely 
by a neck. 

Hindley added, “She is a nice 
filly and I am very pleased with 
her. She is sure to improve a lot 
for the race and will go for a 
decent mile race before the end 
of the. season." 

Mark Prescott's stable is now 
firing on all cylinders after a 
desperately slow start to the 
season. His Native Image 
landed a gamble from 7-1 to 4-1 
in the Golden Mile Selling 
Handicap to give the trainer his 
22nd success, four of which 
have come from as many run- 
ners in the last four days. 



G Sorter 9 
Paul Eddery 4 
B Rouse 11 
S Whitworth 2 
HI ThrosID 
RCurwtS 
I Salmons 
R Mcfflwi 12 
HcOom( 3)> 
W Huron 3 
R Cochran* 1 
NHow«7 


5-4 Angara Abyss. 9-4 Battalion. 4-1 Deputy Governor. 91 Low une. 16-1 Angel 
City. 20-1 others 



Lingfield selections 

By Mandarin 

2.0 Angara Abyss. 2.30 Jet more. 3.0 Gallant Hope. 3.30 Mukhabbr. 

4.0 Commancbe Belle. 4.30 Talk of Oloiy. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2 0 Deputy Governor. 3 0 War Wagon. 3 30 JuveniledelinquenL 4 0 
Commanche Belle. 4 30 Straight Through. 

Michael Seely's selection: 3.30 MUKHABBR (nap). 


230 GODSTONE SELLING STAKES (2-Y-O: £958; 6f) (13) 

201 001020 ABSALOUTB HEAVEN (D)(W BtUey) R Slutf* 91 _ David 

202 000323 8I0TW(B) (Horae Haakt) Prods) P D Haynes 911 

203 0040 BOMZO (Mrs V O'Etesn) Pat MochM 6-11 

205 0200 jEYMOR£«)rSSimm RHarvwn 911 

206 L UCKY S TARCH (C COrKM O Lawa 911 

207 00 RIPSTEnrr Howarth) R Stubbs 811 

211 0330 PLYING SILENTLY (H Witans) H OTM41 88- 0 

213 00000 QONE FOR IT (F Jones) A tngnam 8-& 

214 0 WNSHAM DEJttjW Dou^K-Honw) J Dow*»-H«ne 88 -~ 

217 NBRSO LASS IMn V olW) Pat Mtchfl?58 

216 024039 PARKLANDS BELLE (BF) (D HatOi) M J Haynat 68 

221 0030 SNAPSHOT BABY (to (P Bibwhaml R VoorSpuy S8 

223 0O WHAT3 A CBJWEA (U Sutoonand) G Thome* fHJ . W 


158 Parklaods Bella. 10080 Bottfi. 81 Ftyrtg Sdently, 13-2 Jetmore. 81 Lucky 
Sarch, 181 AbsaiCHfle rteaven, 14-1 Ripstor. 181 othars. 



3 J COWDEN HANDICAP (£1^09: 6f) (18) 

302 010000 

303 210010 

304 080001 
!Mfi toman 

307 830240 
306 0/08004 
309 004000 




310 901010 PINE HAWK(D)(MrsJ WNdnson)D Haydn JOras 588. DWMtaroa(7)1l 

311 0200 MALEWA (Mrs N Itoors) N Vigors 388 TlwalO 

313 040000 DALSAAN BAY [P Cost!) Pat MmJiall 38-5..—— Pttad W I 

314 0080 LAURflE% TROJAN (L James) C A Bol 388 WNmmmIT 

319 000080 MIA JU8ES (DJJJ Rowland) P Arthur 87-13 S WIMworth 12 

320 000202 GALLANT H0K(MraN OutMQL Cottrell 4-7-12 NCarttata2 

321 OO-mat SHALBEE (A SpeaW) J Bm)Mr87-12 N How* 7 

322 008000 NAUGHTY WGHTY (Lad* t * Bfeon of Sttflord) M TOmplwis 87-9 A Machay 3 

323 020430 SANTELLA PAL (B) (USA) (Mrs H M&Ctartane) L Conreh 5-78 MLThOTOMS 


... MVflgbamf 
CltaBar(5| 15 
— P 11*11 
Jokway (7) 14 
... L Joo**(5)1 
R WmiK>mb16 
588 

N Adam 5 


321 008000 SHALBEE (A &eai 

322 008000 NAUGHTY WOTTY 

323 020430 SANTELLA PAL (B) 

324 003000 UNION STARCHY 
327 008004 WLDALAWOUS (M 


N Havre 7 

ITQmpk*is87-9 AMachay3 
LCoarell878 MLIhomaS 
5-7-0 — P HMchmon (3)4 
T WWam 13 


91 War Wagon, «-1 Lonaiy Street 91 Dcwmsvtaw. 118 BeM Tow. 7-1 OaBant 
Hope. 91 Crstta Leap. 12-1 Pina Hawk. 181 Santa* PaL 181 ottura. 


FORIfc AIKMM (W) 41 2nd ol a to Mfcwgs Benk (84) at Canarick (Bt). earfer (81T)a 
course and dtatanca wroner from Dream Launch (82) (£3319. tirm. June 27. 6 ran) 
MAKE OR MAR (911) nk Newbwy mdn winnar from SuraiyGreat (8-1 1) (St. £3425. good 
to finrwJuly 18, 1 1 ran). CLAREKnA (7-7) baaten hd and nk km3rd behind Garnet (7*13) 
at Gcxidwood (5t QB18. good to firm, Aug i, 9 ran). ARTFUL MAID (7-7) was 9h. 
JUVEMLEDELINOUENT a Hamilton (50 winner on debut subsaquantta fi-4) 4L 2nd lo 


Cantaun (811)ar Windsor (M. £977. good, Aug Z 19 ran). MUKHABBR (78) snowed ma- 
jor improvamant Ki beat Infanta Mana (813 )h at Windsor (5f. 22131. good. Aug 2. 11 


ran). 

Selection: I 


3.30 EDEN BRIDGE NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: £2.166: 5f) (9) 

man 97 T hwa 3 

ttf)CHwgan98.... PaiEdctary 7 

ft 812-...-. S Whitworth 1 

in 8-5 L Jones (5)2 

•2 M Wigham S 

1 ud) A Batay 92. R Cm&ane 8 
Co Ltd) R Stuftbs 7-11 A Mercer 9 



Bad 7-7 (7ex) TWibamsA 

MOi) H OTteiB 7-7 C Rutter 5 

94 Mukhabbr. 92 JuveraiedalinquanL 91 Ctarentia. 7-1 Make Or Mar, 91 
Enchanted Timas, 12-1 Ataack, 181 Samtoon. 281 others. 


FORM DOWNSVtEW tMow form since (108) beat LONELY STREET 198) V,\ over 
course and ctettnCeltrJwie. LOKELY.STi«EET(B4) neck 2na to The Mechanic (7-1 0) at 
5aodownonpnuMnitastart(5fc£32ia.teTn.J<dy2S.12rBn). WAR WAGON re-0) beet 
SkvenFortn (H)H over coufseanrldtatance (£2492. crood. JUhr 11. 11 raniCRESTA 


SituarRxtn fB-3) H over course anddisiance (£2492. ooocl. Jidy 11. 11 raniCRESTA 
LEAP best eftort when (8-10) ned< 2nd to Hayhaan (8- Wfl at Kempion(6f, £3823, good ro 
firm. May 5. 25 ran). PME HAWK (7-1 1) 2X1 5th toLOChtiJIufn (9-5) at Bath (K5I. E?725. 

g od. June 2. 16 rm ). SALLAWT ROPE (7-7) hmtd runneMjp to The Medte«c(fi4) at 
Hit with THREE BELLS (84) 3kl 4th ot 9 &5f. £2892, firm. July 28. 9 rani 
MLDALAKOUS, (7-10) SI 4th to Pendor Dancer (81 0) at Winetaor. BELLE ^ TOWER (WR 


Uh with THREE BELLS 


E (7-7) hired namer-up to The MadnMc'flM) at 
4th of 9 (&5f. £2832, firm. July 28. 9 rani 


HUJMLAItiOUS, (7-10) 51 4th to Pendor Dancer (810) at Windsor. BELLE TOWER (9-* 
a short head beck 5th and LINTON STARCHY (81) behind (St £1557, good. Aug 2, 1 


Selection: 


GALLANT HOPE 




4j0 FELCOURT MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES (3-Y-O. £1,400: 1m 4f) (8) 

503 
506 

511 33 

512 00 

513 0 

515 3822 

519 00-4000 

520 03 


118 Newquay,. 84 Louvedermos, 81 ShsprAd Durr, 181 .Commanche Bek 14-1 
Mary Smiley. 281 others. 


*30 DORMANS LAND HANDICAP (£2,742: 1m 2f) (8) 

602 008010 TABARDAR (USAKD) (H H Aga Khan) R Johnson Houghton 4-108 

R Cochrane 7 

607 002801 ASK MAMA (p) (Sir R Cohen) j Dunlap 388 BRoum4 

609 008140 REDDEN (C-OJJJ Honeysett] M BoOon 888 C Rutter (3) 5 

610 020022 TALK OF GLORY (Oftfl (E Gadsden) L Cottret 5-86 NCaifste2 

611 212214 STRAIGHT THROUGHJDKBF) (J Prenn) J Winter 388 ... D DunoacMa (7) 1 

613 6-10008 SSJEN SWALLOWS ffl) (Mrs G Davidson) H Cofcngrnl#; 588 M Rkaner 3 

614 080103 HEART OF STONE (U&M(C8) IM Morrison) R Manure! 488 — 8 

619 00308 CHATTERSPARK p Hawn) S Dow 97-7 — 6 


> Dawdaon) H CoUnrnige 588 NRfanner3 

(M Morrfeon) R Akrturat 488 — 8 

Dow 87-7 — 6 


619 00308 CHATTERSPAHK (D HooUn) S Dow 3-7-7 — 6 

58 Straight Through. 10080 Ask Mama. 98 Tabsntar, 118 Heart ot Stone. 8l 
Talk Of Glory, 181 Redden, 181 Seven SwaBows, 581 Cnattare pari c. 



My Noble Lord lands 
a successful gamble 


A big Brighton gamble was 


landed yesterday when My No- 
ble Lord, backed from 7-2 to 2-1. 
won the Black Rock Maiden 
Stakes, despite showing 
greeness. 

Richard Quinn, riding his 
48th winner of the season, 
brought the Paul Cole-trained 
runner to the front two furlongs 
from home, and they went on to 
score by balfa length from Tufty 
Lady. 

: Quinn said: “The coll ran 
very green, pricked his ears 
when hitting the front, and 
didn't quite know what to do." 

Cole's assistant trainer, Mi- 
chael BelL said: “Quinn rode a 
fine race and nursed My Noble 
Lord home beautifully. This one 
is improving and has shown 
marked progress since running 
second on his debut at Sal isbury 
in June. He's entered in all the 
decent races." 

The stewards lost no time in 


sending for the Amesbury 
trainer Jimmy Fox after Glen 
Kella Manx had landed the 
Brighton Sprint Handicap. Fox, 
better known as a trainer of 
jumpers, was asked to explain 
the improvement in form 
shown by his mare, who had 
finished only 15th in las* week's 
William Hill Stewards Cup at 
Goodwood. 

Fox's explanation that the 
ground was firmer than .at 
Goodwood and with a smaller 
field they were able to hold the 
mare up this time was accepted. 

Glen Kella Manx was 
completing a quick Brighton 
double for her jockey Tony 
McGlone. earlier successful in 
the seller on Out On A Flyer, 
who took Glen Kella Manx to 
the front approaching the final 
furlong and the mare held off 
Hidden Brief by one and a half 
lengths. Green Ruby, winner of 
the Stewards Cup, finished 
fourth under a 71b penalty. 


Charlton’s costly mishap 

There was a sensational start down to 20-1 with one book- 


to racing at Devon and Exeter 


yesterday when Tony Chariton 
was unshipped from the well- 
backed Amantiss as the 
combination crossed the line 15 
lengths clear in the Well To Do 
Challenge Trophy for coo- 
.diuonal jockeys. 

With Amantiss left in front 
after the fall of second favourite 
Riverside Drive two flights out, 
his supporters were already 
counting their cash. But the 


Hhw 7-2t 2, Gold Hum* (11-1); 3. 
Forewarn (84 (avl II. ittl- 9 ran. J O 


Pontefract 


Newmarket. TotK £680: £280. £1.60. 
£920. CSF: £17.74. 


Danas. Tote; E4.SB; £1.10. £280. £1.40. 
DF: £15.10. CSF- £3834. 


»*:•*"* 


*“• 

.ti 

k* =■’ ic ~ 

, #*■«’ •* 
•U) 


7.0 HAYDOCK PARK LEISURE COMPANY 
HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £4,727: 71 40yd) (16) 

4 1310 BOLD SEA ROVER M H BMMtW 910 (6ax)MBkCft 11 
8 3-24 SURHNG (BF) J Tree 9-7_ PatEddwy7 

7 4011 FfHVAE P Cota 87 (8n) TQukwIS 

8 2302 SOVER BGN LOVE TOWHatajnga8am 98 TLucm5 

11 0020 FESTIVITY OAituthnotSO JRrtl2 

13 830 SROADNURST J EMrtngton 811 M Wood 14 

M 048 COURT T0VINRHMIK»911 WCmU 


14 00 NORTH LAKE G Harwood 388 

17 PWNCEBOL0OTt)JOudu388 TOutenlO 

21 -233 TAP*BI TWICE MJanris88a..,~ I .. TLuagT 

33 9043 INDIAN LOVE SOIG RHota™hte0995— SPwfcel 

24 0300 Lfi(ENESS(toWH4ffl995 — WCVSM3 

28 820 NAJRXYA (tKAj R Houghton 385 KDtetayll 


48 Al Haste. 94 North Lake. 91 NapcRw. 181 Tkp 'Gn 
a. 181 Indian Love Song. Ukeness. Prince Bold. 281 


twice. 181 Indian Love Song. Ukeneu. 
others. 


Going: good to rum 

245 (51) 1. A 10 AND ABET (W R 
Swinburn, 92); 2. New Mexico (Ttet 
Eddery. 2-1 tovk 3. Oroea Qiray (FtH3ta. 8 
1L ALSO RAN: 11 Heff Ffc* (401. 16 
Fit-ton, 20 Carfs Pride nth). Not So 
SGy, 33 Surme Otti), 50 Cansmto 9 
ran. 11 3t 41 £ 1*L M Stoute at 
Newmarint TotK £2ft £1.10. ei JO, 
£180 DH=*£3J0 CSF:£784, 


248 (im) 1. NATIVE OKAOE (G Duffield, 


480 (2m If note) 1. Tratewac 
Powefl. 58 fav): 2, London Contact 


3, Home Or Away (91). 3. 51 6 ran. R 
Hodges. Tote: £1.90; £1-48 £140. DP: 


(4tfi). 8 Potanstb. 14 Responder. Take 
The Biscuit (6th). 338ig Land (5th), 
TrantuBo Blue. Diek'a By?. 11 ran. NFL 
Poco Loco. 31. 3L 41, KL 3L M Prescott at 
Nswmarittt TOtS: £SJ0: £230, £1.80. 
£3.70. OF: £1020. CSF: £14JH. Tri«*t 
£121^4. Bought in &200gns. 


58 (2m II ddl. ailannrowe (0 Mem, 
11-2b Z The HoorttVte (HjNMi 3. 

taeveinir 

Tote: £530: £220. £180. DF: £9 JO. CSF: 
£2229. 

Bacepecraas. 


coununa their cash. But the < 
Toby Balding-trained gelding 3 
ducked lowaras the parade ring, - 


dislodging the hapless young 
Chariton. 

This left the race at the mercy 


maker, who took a single bet of 
£5,000 to £100 
The stewards held an inquiry 
into the incident and inter- 
viewed Chariton, (who on foe 
finishing photograph was shown 
lying across the line), in the 
presence of Tony Balding's 
representative. They accepted 
the explanation that Amantiss 
"ducked sharply left, possibly 
towards the parade ring exit, 
causing the jockey to be 
unseated**. 

: Blinkered first time 


of Slip Up, and Richard Guest, 
who had been backed from 50-1 


tJNGPKUfc 30 Strata pro, 48 
Sagvame. 

NEWMARKET. 6J55 Ootaphitm 7 JO 
Pacific Btaln. 


who had been backed from 50-1 haydock: 7.0 Sovara^i umb. 






• 




28 


SPORT 


THE TIMES FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


YACHTING 


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It 

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fi 


Juer set fair 
with a 
double amid 
the debris 


By Barry Pickthali 


Ernest Juer and his crew 
sailing the chartered Beneteau 
one tonne Fair Lady, winners 
of the Britannia Cup on 
Tuesday, scored a memorable 
double at Cowes by winning 
the equally prestigious New 
York Challenge Cup yesterday 
on a day when one yacht sank 
and broaches and dismastings 
were common place. 

The start to the day’s 
proceedings was delayed for 
an hour and a quarter by force 
eight winds and the harbour 
master's warning to the or- 
ganizers that an oil tanker 
would be passing through the 
start area. 

This allowed the organizers 
to set the fleet on an eastward 
reaching start once the tanker 
had passed. 

Kit Hobday's one tonne 
Unbearable was first with a 
spinnaker seL She led the fleet 
to the first gybe mark, closely 
followed by Local Hero. Fair 
Lady and Basil Rizzis's Tril- 
ogy II. 

Problems set in on the 
second running leg towards 
Leon Solent with Blazer 
performing the first crash gybe 
of the day which left the 
bowman clinging perilously 
on to the pulpit as the rest of 
the crew fought to regain 
control. 

Moments later. Alan 
Dewhirsfs Pacer followed 
suit, but with her boon 
strapped down on the wind- 
ward side, it took considerably 
longer for this crew to regain 
their composure. 

Running down the leeward 
mark, they were still feverishly 
trying to recover the spinnaker 
with sheets strewn like spa- 
ghetti across the deck, her 
crew decided to call it a day. 

On the beat back across the 
Solent. Owen Aisher’s Yeo- 
man XXVI broke into the 
lead, but when spinnakers 
were set once more for a run 
past Cowes Green, Unbear- 
able still held the advantage 
on handicap — until the slip- 


up with one of the runners, 
which sent the mast crashing 
over the side, led to their 
instance dismissal. 

Tim Herring and his crew 
on Backlash, then lying third, 
almost came a cropper too 
when they ran aground doing 
10 knots under spinnaker. 
*‘We bumped hard four or five 
times," designer Chis Everitt 
said later after the crew had 
gone on to clinch third place 
on handicap. 

It was during this second 
spinnaker run back towards 
Leon Solent that Trilogy's 
crew found they had their 
hands full controlling the boat 
and fell out of the frame and 
were unable to gel their 
spinnaker down until long 
after around the Leeward 
mark. 

Yeoman finally crossed the 
finish line six seconds ahead 
of Backlash, but with the 
smaller Fair Lady fourth, her 
crew, which included former 
world champion contender 
David Pitman, were in no 
doubts that they had won as 
they danced across the line. 

Class two results, domi- 
nated for the fourth day by the 
South African %tonner Three 
Spears, was marred by the 
sinking of Robert Bottomley's 
SJ35 Feama ught off Cowes 
Green following a collision 
with the Class five entry, 
Spoofer. 

Bottomley's boat, under 
charter to Peter Tvrell for the 
week, was holed under the 
water line on the portside but 
her seven man crew were 
rescued by the League of 
Adventurers before she went 
down and an attempt will be 
made to salvage the yacht. 

Kim Taylor, winner of three 
races so far this week in the 
victory class, finished out of 
the points yesterday but had 
the consolation of winning the 
Beaver Trophy which was 
presented try Sandhurst — 
sponsors of the week — for his 
consistent performance 


YESTERDAY’S RESULTS 


Behais: 1. Vixen (F O'Neil); 2, Temerity 
(C Kknpton): 3. Sharoa* (M SdvcM). 
Darinas: Regatta Cup: 1. Oanus (C Caws 
and T Porn: 2. Damsel (T Station); 3, 
Duenna (J Green). Dragon: 1. Ganymede 


Carisma (R Pascall); 2. Skram IP Vaiie); 3. 

Richard so n) Impale: I, 


1) 2. Kudu (A C Cox) a 


V<P Wteon) 2. Dragonfly UWftams); 3. 
Sura IF SA'Morton) SeaKoflc Caicott- 
Relly Bowh 1. Boomerang {J Buckwefl); 2. 
Auction (D Palmer A J Vernon) 3. Hamer 
U Mareti & A Trairtiton) Redwing: Fane 
Salver 1, Capeia IITW Ctegg A E Itort); 2, 
Btai Jay y Clem)' 3. Prawn (P Andreas) 
Sunbeam: 1. Penny IS OlszowaU A P 
Mazzob]: 2. Fay IK Webster) 3, Rainy |R 
Dale) Impa ir 1 ■ Burtxxi (C King) 2. Kudu 
(A and C Cox); 3, Unravelled (R Austin) 
J24: CUDC Cup: 1. Little Eagle (Alglon 
Cottage SAfc 2. Joveidraft (J Hatgn) 3. 
Just Enutt (Mrs V Roberts): Mer mai d: 1. 
Sneen IR Dobbs) 2. Cynthia (J Symes) 3. 
Btuebee (Mai Gen and Mrs A MU) Flying 
IS: 1. Feeing Frisky (D Lees) 2. Yahoo (A 
and S Gardener); 3. Forrader (P Coryn) 
Squfc: The Celtic Ouaich: 1, Super Kipper 
41 Motts) 2. Sahi (R Hewn); a.Seren Wto 
(Mr and Mrs H Evans) Sigma: 1, Insignia 
(A Bngcten and M Kemp) 2. Smmatm ft (□ 
Bonner); 3. Warp Factor II (R Flakier). 
00034: i. Mazes N (J FHzeQ: 2, Riot 6 
Turner) 3. Redcoat (Cpt M Pheby). 
Co ntes ts 32 Oe Quincy Trophy: 1. 


Impromptu 
Burhou (C 

Unraveled (R Austin) Senate: 1 . Buesft 
J Egkn) 2, Tiger Rag (C Samfeson) 3. 
one Del (R Smpson) Victory Cuton 
Cup: 1, Blackbird (N H« and □ Uoyd) 2. 
zest (K end S Taylor) 3. Eagle (B M 
Bunywd) Scotb 1, TuoneiS (R Hardkig) 2. 

KiUScnmas 


; 3. Macaroon (J a 

1 (New York 


Martina (S . 
and 0 Kjngertaa) Class 
Yacht CUB Cup) I. Fair Lady (E Juan; 2, 
Blazer (H Couteon) 3. Backlash (TAG 
Hemng) Class 11 (Vanity Cup) 1. Three 
Spears (E apne); 2. Matjas (Pda Kort) 3. 
Amaryllis of Dart (Britannia RN CoBega) 


CJsss ill (Da Maas Cup) 1. 

* “k'boo (H McDonald) 3. 


Hero H IR Beales) Class IV: 1. 
(P Dickson^ 2._Monster 


ID Evans) 2. Sk'bpo 
Local Hero 
Startxjm 2 . 

Gobbler H (C Bonar) 3. Pm Presto (M 
Aiboc A F Bedel) ow Vi i, Barracuda 
of Tarrant £)JP Fisher): 2, Taksmen (M 


Stephens) 3. Chamotte MHayman) 

VI; 1. Tara (R Perrin) 2, The Flying Fish (D 
Hopkins) 3. Gusto IIJA S Hi reon- Lever) 
Ctna Vfc 1, Ctiron (R Watters) 2. Bui s 
(A Shew); 3, BaggywrWde (S Parker) 
XOD Class (Oliver Cup) 1. Heyday <L 
Vmcant A D Bedford): Z Law Star (G 
Shute A B Dunning) 3. Madcap (R Strath) 


FOR THE RECORD 


ATHLETICS 


VIARGGGIO. hair 

Mwc SflOtK 1 M hanks (US) 48 19 mc 2. 

IM (Nfienal *635 3. R R4Hud (Id. *6. BO. 

tel E koech (Kenya). Imn *6 £ 


. J) liiwr 465830C. 2. 

A Btkmun (AM) I *6 89. 3. 5 Cecctwv (IT). 

14793 IIOmhunflMrt R Nehenuon (USl. 

13*8sec. 2 K Taney (US) 1366. 3. D 
Fonteccteo (Ri 13 90 Wcl S Me. (H) 3mm 

58 fiSsac. 9. K Cnenuyot |Ken) 33897. 3. M 

Fal (Sent. 359 44. Hgbjump: 1.G Da Vito (rq 

3 aim. 2. U Benvemti <H). 221. 3, M Di 

Gorge ill) 2 10 Pole raum 1. D Kmwonhy 

(OS) 530m. a G SKcxni (hi. 5 30. 3. G Grass 
mi 320 shoe I. A Andre: (III. 2206m 2. G 

TafraK (US) 20 54. 3. □ Swra (It) 14 $3 

Womans none ». E Asntora (USi. 2217 see. 

2 D Wftams (US) 2292. 3. R Givens (US). 

S3 26 400m: 1 . C Canwana (in. S3 5*sec; 2. 0 
Floyd Walton (US) 53 S2. 3. EHossiim. 54.18 
USOObc i G Dana (II) *rmn tawsacr. 2. F 

Aouom (Morocco) 4 11 0*. 3 R Brunei (It) 

41374 


BASEBALL 

NORTH AMERICA: NeUanol Laegue: New 
York Men J Chicjgo Cubs 8. San Rancnco 
Gann 2 Gnomon Reas I. Loo Angeles 
Dodgers 7. Houston Astros *. Montreal Expos 
3 Pmsotvtifi Prates 2. Si Lows Canfevds 2 
Phtxtepma PfWhes i. Atlanta Braves 4. Son 
Diego Padres 2 A martc a n Laeg u e ; Meineso- 
a Twms 5 CaUonw Angels 2. T aroma Bue 
Jays 8 rvansas City Rauls ft New York 
W Brewers 3. Boston 


and J Kfler (Herts LadWs. Watford) 27-17; J 

PkmMy and I Dean (Havering. Essex) bt J 

Frost and P Spraggs iHasangs) 29-19; M 

RKhardS and E Wood (Bantxryl Dt B Sown 

and B Edwards (March) 19-15. J Mason ana 

M Anken (MaxhtniMMd) bt G Darw and R 

Kneebone (ftmiynj. 19-14; F Brown end G 

Lye (Townsend. Si Asians) bt D Adamson and 
C KnovAes (Bobon)20-tB;T Tun and D Cave 
IBucknaam andGreemochi bt M Player and E 

Boston (Rymstock. Devon) 2t-i5. R vane 

andASmthlKsaisney. KermaBBtytneand 
J Stevenson (RottnwH. Nonhams) 36-18. 


CYCLING 


LEICESTER: Butted tack ebarokmedipe: 

Amateur sprint final: ejNXbn puraub float R 

Muno(Ha*erM) 4mm 52 46seewD Webster 

(Manchester wnetfers). 50i 812 Bronto 

medal ndc G Sword (Kotov). *56 Bl. or P 

Wan (Notengnam) *5637 Professional 

1000m eprtat 1. D Leays (Scorch 86) 2. D 

Mder (Water Tecli-AaLm Soon) 3. M 
Wabitam (Percy Baton Condor Cydesi. 


FOOTBALL 


AUSTRIAN LEAGUE: GAK Graz 2 Austna 
Vienna 0. Verna Spathlub 2. LASk Lnz 0. 
V«nna 1. Sturm Graz ft FC Tea 5. SC 
Eisensuiat3:Haoiavienni8 Ausma Kiagen- 
lun I Aurora WacJier 2 VOEST Lnz 2 
PISA. Italy: EidUbitton match: Pda 0. Aston 
VAlD 


Yakres 5 


uuxee 


Red Sox 9 Chcogo White Sox ft Texes 
Rangers 13 Banmote OnoMS 11: Oakland 
Athletics 7 Seattle Manners 5 


BOWLS 

LEAMWOTON SPA: Umpool Waorm Insur- 
ance women's national chamoloRaNp: Sift- 
glee: Oueeter-BnolBiB Money (Bartangt 21. D 
Pnw iReddocm. 17. i Moiyneux (Oxford City 
M County) bt V C»alf«kl iWootenoi ana 
Ptumsteedl 21-17 StigleK samkllnsl: J 
Rmianee (Norm wjtsnam) bt i Moiyneux 
(Ork>m C and C) 21 ■ 16. 

FOURS; SemFHneto: Tiverton (OfKonl 20. 
HougMon iDurham) 17. Oxford C and C 21. 
Bournemouth 18 

PAIRS: PrUmmety round: J Vafis and C 
Wess«r (Raynes Park Surrey) tx J P 


HOCKEY 


WELLmGTDN. New Zeeland: MemettonM 
Man^der taomamenb Austraka 5 Argentina 


SPEEDWAY 


NATIONAL LEAGUE: Long Eaton 39',. 
Peieroorough 3 7\-. Wvnbiedcn 43. East- 
boumc35. 


TENNIS 


end H Easy lUttieport. Cantindge). 23-21. 
Laycocx ma J UcOuskoy (Eston. Mtides- 
bnuam » a Roberts and B Evans irtgh 
Wycomwi 29-11. J Pryde and □ McAipme 
(Kemon Mtimi R p Dawes siti E Bnjrtnefl 
(Leomm^er Heretira) 22-18. K Coles ana J 
Roaipy (Cnomianll H B Calims and J Bratton 
(Partnwaoa kkMstone) 31-10 NOrreeanaM 
Edwards (Rugttyi H B Styles and P Cherry 
iBroatBXne Dorsetl 32-14. A Cox and L 
Thetwefl (MariOwl bt R Oncti and M 
WoftnqlOn Iktepibndgo OMtef 22-16. A 
Porter and 8 Atnerton (Carton Conway. 
Notts) di E Kmqni and B Warbumn (Here- 
ford) 2M3 J Jones and B Jacob tSouthamo- 
tom M E Salmon and M Wuson (Bembndge- 
BWi. 20-15. H Hiskett and I Pyne ILutoni to M 
woodcock and J Parker (Woratmg PavMn) 
23-11 V wmcnn and M Woods (Cotmqr Arts. 
Nonwicn) w P Whale and M Baker 
fCixoDenrumj 20-15. a Beaie and J Tagg 
iBrentree. Essex) M P Bradley and W Gabo 
iSOOwd. GtiuC&l 19-17 FlMI round: J Vais 
andC Wessier at G Ltyeoefc ano P MeDuskey 
20-I9 K Cows and JPouevotJ PrytM and 0 
McAipne 41-6 A Cox end L Timbrel bt N 
Omf and M Edwam 17-14. j Jones and B 
Jacob W A Pftrier at*) B Adwrton . 23-22; V 
Wroaows and M woods « h H&ken and 1 


Y Groom and S NKiwiK (Start. Somers«1« 
G H«ks and B G>een (Betagham) 22-1B: H 
Conail ana M Hum iwmermg. Hums) bt J 
Abel ana B Bence (Weangboraugh) 25-22. M 
Benreti end V Hum* (Lostwrthrei. Cornwall) 
M k nuim ana J Measures (Hemow Park. 
Boast Z2-:o N Suae end I Underhfl 
(Bnrtorti m S E»e«aR ana 0 Burgess 
(Uncolnl 2J-1J. a Barks and S CMItor 
(ShenMdd Notts) to E Supnens and F 
Humohnes i Brecon Wortsi 22-19. V Doane 
and D Wiliams (Tcptana Bay) m E Dodds and 
O Gascorone tBurradoo NorthunAuriand) 
20-19. R Raymart and M Cw< (Ouenoon. 
Essex) bt J CUeey ana J Bayfcss 
(Wokranaml 23-iJ. h WaUrer ana K Bane 
{RodDoume Cheney YAfisl bt J Coiquohoun 


KtTZBUHEL: Mari'e grand prim Second 
raund: J Nystrom (9wei to T Muster (Ausme) 
6-2 6-7 6-1. B Tarocrv (Himgt bt L Duncan 
l US). 3-8 6-3.6A:TSrmdiCzltoJAveneam 
ISpl 6-3. 3-6. 6-3: M fnqar ai no (Aig) bt D 
Peraz Ufnjl 6-13-6.6-4 

STRATTON MOUNTAIN, Vermont Men’s 
grand prac Smgles: Second multi (US 
unless stand) l Lendl ICO R 8 Mor (SA) 6-1. 
6-2: B Beckto (WORK Fiach. $-4. 6-7. 6-4; W 
Masur (Ausim M Fiur. 6-2. 6-1 . R Segusa to M 
Dam z-6. 7-5. 6-2. G Hokties bt J (uiek. 6-1. 
6-3. J Career to t Wdsken. 6-1. 7-5. S Dams » 
M Kracmann (Aus). M. 6-4- P Arrays (Peru) 
bl T WAoson. 6-4 4-6- 6-2. M Pern tore ISwel 
to G OOnneBy. 3-6. 6-3. fra. K Cumm trt C 
sWi(SA) 6-3. 7-6. J Connors be B Pearce. 6- 

4 6*3: B Green to M Freeman. 3-6 6-2 ML A 
Agassi bt T Mayone. *-6. &*. 6-2. u 
LdurandaaulCaniWPAnnacone.M 4^.7- 
6 MSrajber (Co Dt R Knshnan (Ma). 6-2. 4- 

MONTREAL: Ptayers Cheflange women'll 
taeneaent Skigtis: Secenf rand: M 

Menus (US) W S Ftehe (US) 5-7. 6-3. G-4. C 
Lntqwst (Swe) to E Bwgm (US). 7-E. 6-1. A 
Temesvan (Hung) bt J Thomoson iAus) 7^." 
6-3. H Ketesi (Coni bt J Byrne (Aus) 6-2. 34. 
&3. TPfieiKIUSJMK Kmey(US) B-2.6-4. S 
Comer (GB) « T Hosaday (USLM. B-1. R 
Fwoank ISA) bt C Kutoman (US) 6-3 6-i ; a 
L knier (Aus) to M Pa; (Arn) 64.6-3. G Rush 
(US) to B Nagrtsen (US) o-4.4-6.6-3 

NEWPORT BEACH. CeMonie: Men’s kivfin- 
Vonel tou memenfc First round; H Sundstram 
(Sw) MR Tanner (US) 6-1.fr-* PCWh(AuS) 
to B wans (US) 6-3. 64 

BJCLEYr ChmUe Brown'* Open Aampien- 
Mter Men'* Mnotec ttat te r- W n at s: P McNa- 
mara (Ausi to M Sbnoow (Nonftantsl. 6-3- 6-4. 

5 SnawiMOtoesexim H L*w«(Mejdiesffl) 6- 
3 5-2 


YACHTING 

HELLEVOETSLUt*. Hotantt Topper worm 
ehamelenahip: ifltn race (Ad GQ: I. A Peten 
2 H Raowne. 3 A Tayiw; 4. B Worra*. 5. T 


Cooper 


A Taylor: 

SUQ)KX to pnxosi 


GOLF 

Shapcott 
takes 
big step 
forward 

By John Hennessy 

Susan ShapcotL the 16-y ear- 
old Bristol golfer who finished 
runner-up in the English 
women's matchplay champion- 
ship in May, went one better in 
the stroke-play equivalent, 
sponsored by National West- 
minster Bank, at Broadstone 
yesterday. With final rounds of 
78 and 75. and a total of 301. 
nine over par, she beat lisa 
Hackney. ofTremham, by three 
strokes. Miss Hackney, aged 18, 
who began the day nine strokes 
belting Miss ShapcotL had a 
superb morning round of 73 and 
took only one more in the 
afternoon. 

The morning's round had set 
up the possibility of a taut 
struggle between Miss Shapcott 
and Sandra CaifordL From four 
behind overnight, Mrs Catford 
had reduced the deficit to only 
one. and that after dropping two 
shots at the 18th. She was in a 
bunker there and needed four 
more to get down, including 
three putts. 

She was not to know that that 
was the start of a passage on 
either side of lunch that will 
surely come back to haunt her. 
She started the afternoon 6. S, 6, 
6 against the card of 5. 5. 4, 4 
and in a twinkling she had 
dropped four behind. A bunker 
tee shot at the sixth and a 
proliferation of putts on the 
eighth and ninth took her to the 
lum. seven strokes behind. 

Without quite being at her 
best Miss Shapcott gave little 
away. Having secured an un- 
expected birdie at the first, 
where she flirted with the dish 
on the right of the fairway, she 
paid her dues with a six at the 
second in spite of a free drop 
from beside a tree trunk because 
of a rabbit scrape. 

Thereafter it was par all the 
way to the turn with the help of 
some expert recoveries, until 
she took three putts at the ninth. 
Meanwhile Miss Hackney, three 
matches ahead, was cruising 
impressively along in par figures 
as she had done during the 
morning. To the 13th she had 
played 31 holes in par. a 
performance unmatched by any 
other player all week. Miss 
Shapcott also came to that hole 
at level par, having had a birdie 
at the llth. and stood four 
ahead of Miss Hackney. 

Miss Hackney produced a 
grandstand finish by holing' 
from off the green for a birdie at 
the home hole, but she had still 
not done quite enough. Miss 
Shapcoit came sturdily home, 
dropping a shot here and there, 
but she stood on the !8th tee 
with the luxury of knowing a six 
would do: she, loo. went 
through the green with her 
second, but got down comfort- 
ably with two putts. 


StapcotL 75, 80, 77. 75. 309: M-J 
Corneous. 77. 78. 77. 77. 31ft S Cattail. 
77. 75.75.83; J Walter. 74,81, 78.77.311: 
A Sawders. 75. 78. 80. 78. 312: J 
Ccftndiain.77.84, 77.74.314: N Way.80. 
77. 78. 81: A Booth, 79. 81. 82. 72: C 
Bailey. 79. 82, 77. 7S L Pertiva) 76. 85. 
77. 75. 315: J H51. 79, 82. 78. 78. 31ft S 
Lowe. 80. 79. 76, 81. 

England in 
sound 
position 

England took an immediate 
upper hand over Scotland when 
the boys' internationals began at 
Seaton Carew. Durham, yes- 
terday. But the team captain. 
Wayne Henry, who last week 
reached the quarter-finals of the 
English amateur, was having to 
fight hard to uy to make it a 
clean sweep of the morning 
foursomes. 

The 1 6-year-old from 
Hertfordshire, favourite for next 
week's British Boys champion- 
ship. and Steve Edgiey, of 
Parksione, were one down after 
seven holes to Alan Tail and 
Graham King, but battled back 
to square by the 1 1th. 

There was a thrilling end to 
the top match between Ireland 
and Wales. The Welsh pair, 
James Lee and Chris Davies, 
won the ISlh and 17th to pull 
level with Patrick Gribbin and 
Gary McNeill but then Gribbin 
struck his approach to the final 
green within a foot of the flag for 
a winning birdie three. 

Ireland, who recorded a 
crushing victory last 

year, won the second much 

RESULTS: Woles 6H, Ireland 8% (Wetsh 
names first): Foursomes: J Lao and C 
Davies lost to P Gribbin and G McNetf. 1 
bote: A WMams and C O'Caral lost to L 
Walker and D Errity, 2 and 1; A Salmon 
and 0 Oovna W B Gttgen and M 
MacGuaan. 2 and 1; W Lockett and C 
Platt bt K Sheehan end D Butler, 2 and t: 
A Wesson and J Davidson lost to P 
Rus5«fl and R Hutton. 3 and 1. Stngtec 
Lae bt GftiboL 4 and 2; C Dairies ion to 
walker. 2 and 1: WMains bt HuOoa 1 
note; O'Carrofl lost to McNoO. 4 and 3; 

Salmon lost eo Ernto. 3 and 2; Lockett bt S 

Hogan. 5 and 4; D Danes bet to 
MacGuosn, 3 and 2: Davtison lost to 
Butter, Ztoid 1: WBsson bt Gihgan, 4 and 
3: S Danes halved «Mi Sheehan. 
England v Scottand (Entfsb names first) 
FomomtsS Edgloy and W Henry tost to 
A Tail and G Kmg. Zand 1: J Bennett and 
D Hickman bt S Banmman and G 
Mathew. 3 and 2; J Payne and S 
McKittncfc. 2 holes: G Evans and P 
Hurring lost to M Hasfle and F Coflaghan. 

4 and 3; D Bamgata and G BMr at E 
McIntosh and N Duncan. 4 and 3. 

Briton sweeps 
into the lead 

Falsterbo. Sweden (Reuter) — 
Britain’s Barry Lane was the 
early pacesetter in the wind- 
blown first round of the KLM 
Open championship yesterday. 
Lane, a former world assistants’ 
champion, bhtiied three of the 
first four holes to reach the turn 
from the tenth in three below 
par figures. 

He then picked up two more 
birdies to move five under in the 
chase for the £20.000 first prize 
in this new European Tour 
event on a links course on 
Sweden's most southern tip. He 
led by a stroke from American 
Rick Hartmann, who had three 
birdies in a row from the fourth 
to turn in 31. 

Gordon Brand, who finished 
runner-up 10 Greg Norman in 
the Optra Championship at 
Turn berry three weeks ago. 

turned two under par. 


CRICKET: CHAM PIONSHIP LEADERS BROUGHT BACK TO EARTH BY NOTTINGHAMSHIRE 

Broad bat defies 
Gloucestershire 

By Iyo Tennant 






Pride hammered 


By Peter Marson 


Wayne Daniel is honied by Foster. (Photograph: Hugh JRontiedge) 

Hicks and 
Benson 
in control 

By Richard Streeton 

CANTERBURY: Kent, with four 
first innings wickets in hand, 
lead Hampshire by 106 runs. 

An opening partnership of 
191 in three hours between the 
left-handers, Benson and Hinks. 
saw Hampshire's bowling mas- 
tered yesterday on a easy-paced 
pilch. Kent lost wickets later 
before Cowdrey and Taylor 
made useful runs. Witb 
Igglesden and Underwood in- 
jured. Kent lace problems in the 
field today. 

This was the Festival's tra- 
ditional Ladies' Day. Masculine 
opinion in the Press-box 
awarded the palm to Mrs Chris 
Tavare in the Dista/THat Stakes 
for a spectacular garden party 
type creation. Nothing really 
could detract attention for long, 
from Kent's remorseless first 
wicket stand. It was the county's 
best in the championship since 
Luckhurst and Johnson made 
two 256 together' at Derby in 
1973. - 

Benson had scored only one 
when he was dropped by Mar- 
shall at second slip off Connor, 
but otherwise neither man made 
a serious error. Benson pushed 
and drove his runs a shade more 
circumspectly than usual and 
finished with only four fours. 

Hinks often hit the ball hard 
through the covers on the back 
foot as he made his career-best 
score to end a recent barren 
period. 

Hinks reached SO first, with a 
legsidc six against James. At 
lunch Kent were 123 and there . 
was a 35-minuie hold-up after- 
wards for rain. The stand ended 
after 54 overs when Benson 
pushed forward at Cowley and 
was bowled through the gate. 

Tavard was caught behind from 
a similar stroke; again against 
Cowley, who later retired with a 
recurrence of back trouble. 

Marshall, who did not bowl 
between lunch and lea, brought 
Hampshire two further wickets 
when successive balls beat 
Hinks and Aslett by sheer speed. 

Hinks. bowled on his pads, 
bailed four hours and a quarter 
hours and had 18 fours. 

HAMPSHIRE: First Innings 234 (N G 
CDwtey 78 not out; C S Cmtiroy 5 (or 69) 

KENT: first Innings 

MR Benson OCowtay 84 

SG Itinlcs b Marshall 131 

CJTawfrc Partes b Cowley 14 

N R Taytor c Marshal 0 Tronte n — 42 
Aston E 


Northamptonshire's massive 
total of 441 for three declared 
meant that Glamorgan needed a 
miracle to avoid another day's 
humiliation at Northampton, 
yesterday. That proved to be 
beyond them, and making the 
neocssary runs is going to be 
frighteningly difficult. But. 
Maynard made 56 not out, and 
Derrick. 45 not out. as Glamor- 
gan trooped in at the end of a 
long day at 215 for five. 

When Northamptonshire 
started out Cook's intention had 
been to go beyond Glamorgan's 
reach. At 372 for two. Boyd- 
Moss and Lamb had been 
charged with leading one more 
assult phalanx ofbowlers. Lamb 
reached a half century before 
falling to a catch off Barwick's 
bowling. 

It was here that play was held 
up for half an hour, but Boyd- 
Moss returned to fire the last 
shots before Cook's declaration. 

A good day would seem to be 
in prospect at the Oval, today. 
With only two runs in it in the 
first innings; Lancashire, who 
lead by 124 runs -with eight 
wickets in hand could Jie in- 
volved in a tight finish with 


Surrey. In the morning Lan- 
cashire had fallen short of a 
second bonus point as the last 
two wickets fell in three overs 
for six runs. 

Butcher, who was making his 
first championship appearance 
for a month began promisingly, 
but when he had made 1 1, he 
was bowled round his legs by 
Patterson. 

With the score 31. Surrey lost 
Stewart, leg before to Allotu and 
Monkhouse. who was obliged to 
retire having suffered a broken 
knuckle on his right hand. At 
lunch, Surrey had made 77 for 
two from 23 overs. Lynch, 22. 
and Jesty, 21. Later on, Lynch 
celebrated his half century by 
straight driving Folley for six. 
When Jesty then fell to a catch 
off Folley. Surrey's ninth wicket 
pair had pul on 93 in 25 overs. 
At 140. Lynch fell leg before to 
Simmons. He had hit 12 bound- 
aries in making 72 off 91 
deliveries. 

Paul Parker made 100 not out 
and Alikhan 64. as Sussex made 
205 for two before dfidaring ; 146 
runs behind Derbyshire,- at The 
Saffrons. Eastbourne. 


YESTERDAY’S OTHER SCOREBOARDS 


Essex v Middlesex 

AT CHELMSFORD 

ESSEX: Hret tarings 382 for8d0c(KWR 
Fletcher 91. A W LBey 87, J P Stephenson . 
54; Bowftng: Daniel 21-1-73-1; Cravens 
21-6-54-1 ; Hughes 24-2-93-2: Sytos 26-4- 
102-4: Stock #■1-4305 

MIDDLESEX Hrat brings 
A J T MIBar & Lever 0 


WN Slack cHantob Lever 

— 15 


3 

■CTRadlayc Bums b Foster 

_ 14 

fP R Downton st Buis b ChMs _ 

__. 15 
_ 12 

S P Hughes b CMds 

WW Daniel b Foster 

0 

0 

NG Cowans & Foster 

_™ 7 

Total (432 oven) 

_ 118 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-2. 233, 348. *51. 
5-60. 6-90. 7-100, 8-106, 9-107. 10-116. 
BOWLING: Lew 12-4-35-3; Foster 17.2- 
251-5; Chlds 14-5-24-2. 

Second brings 

A J T Miter c hteitfre b Lever 5 

WN Slack notout 89 

KH Brawn c Prichard ft ChBds -- 16 

R O Butcher tow a Foster 3 

9 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-14, 2-31, 3-124, 4- 
140, 5-142. 6-146. 7-171. 8-190, 9-190. 
BOWUNG: Patterson 15.1-1-80-3; AOott 
8-4-20-1; 0 : Sltaughns3sy B -1-22-0: 
Mtottinson 3-1-7-Uf Folley 9&31-1; 
Survnons 11-4-21-4. 

Boevs points: Lancashire Bt Surrey 5. 
Umpires: J H Hants and B J Meyer 

Northants r Glam 

AT NORTHAMPTON 

NaKTHAMTONSMRE: Frit Innings 

*G Cook c Hgrtfns b Barrick .120 

W Laridns c Roberts b Hickey 88 

B J Boyd M o w not cut — 148 

A J Lamb c Maynard b Banxrick — . — 58 

R J Bailey not out - ; 9 

Extras (t>2. to 7,w 1, nb 12) 22 

Total pwtts dac) ; 441 

Score at 100 overs 347 tar 2 
DJ Cape) R A Harper, tSNVW*taton.N 
G B wok, N A MadonOerend A Walter Old 
not Oat. . 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-151. 2-281 , 3420. 
BOWLING: Wcfcey 30-2-122-1; Berwick 
24-5-120-2: Derrick 15-0-72-0; Outing 35- 
1&320: North 17-3338. 


CHELTENHAM: Nottingham- 
shire. with eight first innings 
wickets in hand, are 119 runs 
behind Gloucestersh ire, 

Centuries by Chris Broad and 
Tim Robinson, the formers 
first against his old county, 
brought Gloucestershire, the 
championship leaders, back to 
earth. The Nottinghamshire 
openers matched each other 
stroke for stroke in a partnership 
of 221 in 199 minutes. Broad 
hitting 18 fours to Robinsons 
17. Earlier Bainbridge, GIouc^ 
estershire’s acting captain, had 
scored his first century of the 
season. 

Broad left Gloucesteshire be- 
cause he thought they were not 
ambitious enough, as well as 
feeling a move would enhance 
his Test prospects. To return to 
see his old county having a huge 
lead at the head of the 
championship table, watched by 
large crowds, must be galling. It 
was as well he made a big score. 
His straight driving was the 
feature of the partnership. 

By batting on after lunch. 
Gloucestershire were not merely 
intent on gaining maximum 
bonus points. They clearly felt 
they could bowl out Not- 
tinghamshire twice in a day and 
a half. Lawrence tore m, stretch- 
ing every sinew, but the spec- 
tacle was greater than his 
effectiveness. The pitch was too 
slow for both him and Walsh, 
who looked a little jaded. It was 
not festival weather but it was 
sometimes festive cricket, es- 
pecially when Gloucestershire 
were seeking their fourth bonus 
batting point. Before that, 
Stovold played one of his in- 
nings which make you wonder 
why he never caught the 

Whitaker 

takes 

charge 

By Peter Ball 

LEICESTER' Yorkshire, with 
nine second innings wickets m 
hand, lead Leicestershire by 36 
runs. 

After the veteran's trium- 
phant return, the young 
prodigy's. In his first match 
since breaking bones in both 
hands in a confrontation with 
Malcolm Marshal! over a month 
ago. James Whitaker held 
Leicester's innings together, bis 
fluent, undefeated century 
preventing Yorkshire gaining a 
useful first innings advantage on 
aday in which otherwise the ball 
once again held sway over the 
bid. 

Yorkshire were not able to 
call upon Higgs to exploit' the 
conditions, their young, bowlers 
lacking his canny accuracy, but 
with the frail seaming consis- 
tently on a gloomy day, batting 
was always a difficult propo- 
sition. made more so by the 
constant interruptions for bad 
tight and squalls of ram. 

They made little, impact on 
Whitaker. He immediately 
picked up the threads which had 
brought him 911 runs in -his 
previous 20 innings, batting 
with certainty to justify his 
selection the TCCB team 
against the New Zealanders. 

None of his colleagues 
matched his security as wickets 
fell at regular intervals. Dennis 
soon trapped Butcher leg before. 
Boon fen the same; way shortly 
after the first interruption and 
Cobb, whose resistance was, as 
always, of the passive variety, 
followed, splendidly held by 
Garrick at slip to give Shaw 
some reward for a persistent 
spell. 

Whitaker was not ion 


selector's eye. Perhaps Broad 
pondered on it. too. 

Anyway. Stovold made 81 in 
126 minutes with 15 fours and 
had overtaken Bainbridge when 
he was out. Anything short be 
mercilessly thumped. 
Bainbridge carried on in bis 
vein of the previous evening, 
and reached hts century in 132 
minutes with 16 Touts. Then 
wickets tumbled in the quest for 
that final bonus point, flattering 
Cooper’s bowling. So far 
Bambridge. Lloyds, Russell and 
Walsh all got themselves oat 
having a go. but thanks to 
Lawrence the fourth point was 
gained- He played same further 
stirring shots, one swiriing skier 
giving Hemmings. Notting- 
hamshire's substitute, a trying 
time as it swung around in the 
strong wind. 

GLOUCeSTERSHHlE: Bret tarings 
P w Romames cSooa u Coooor — 32 
K pTomtowcNeweflO Sexajtiy — 27 
•PBaWtidgaeRotawonbSaxs** 10S 

A W Stovoti b Pick — 81 

K M Curran e Bitai b Rmra'-Oaritag . i? . 

JWLfqydSC Scott b Cooper 3 

MWAfeynoc Johnson bSaxetoy _ 23 
R C RWSOB c Rotonson b Cocpor __ 2 

C A wash c Pick b Cooper 2 

DV Lawrence not out 34 

_ — ■ ■ — Q 

- 19 
.345 


i . 

1 


P H tWomB c Birch b Cooper 
d.nbfr- 


Extrasflb 14, w i 
Total 


Score alter 100 oma 300 (or 8 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-5*. 2-80. MS7. 4- 
274. 5-283. 6-283. 7-291 . 8-295,3336,10- 
343 - 

BOWUNG: Pick 18-545-1; Rice 9-2-330; 
Cooper 394-8-102-5: Saxeby 25-581 -3; 
Fraser-Dwlsig 14-1-70-1. 

MOTTIlfGHAMSHHE: First Inntigs 

BC Bread not out 104 

RT Robinson not out 108 

Extr3slb4.b2.nb3) : 9 




Total (no wkt 53 ewers) 


221 


■CEB Rne, M Nawefl. P Johnson. J 0 
Btah. 1C W Scott; R A Pick. C Fraser* 
DaritoQ, K E Cooper end K Saxaby » baL 
Bonus points: Gtiucestarahira 4, Not- 
Bngharnshta 5. 

Unjares: C Cook and R Palmer. 

Weston 
super 
sun fare 

By Alan Gibson 

WESTON-SUPER-MA RE: 
Warwickshire, with all second 
innings wickets in hand are 236 
runs ahead of Somerset. 

Again it was a gloomy morn- 
ing but a sunny, though windy, 
afternoon. I once had a friend 
who was public relations officer 
here, who maintained that the 
sun always shone at Weston, it 
was only that sometimes it got 
behind the douds. This was not 
without truth. 

Warwickshire, who began, at 
202 for two. after neariyhalf the 
play had been lost on Wednes- 
day. went on baiting effectively 
until they declared aL 302 for 
four. Marks had McMillan 
caught at mid- wicket for 36 and 
Coombs had Amiss leg-before. 

-Somerset batted in the after- 
noon quite; confidently,- Rose 
and Richards seeing them 
through. Richards played well, I 
thought, though, taking a little 
time to settle down. The 
declaration came bravely at 186 
for one. This was a real chal- 
lenge bv Roebuck. 

• Moles and Smith started well 
in Warwickshire's second in- 
nings. 1 suppose what will 
happen to the rest of the match 
depends upon Weston’s 
weather. The sun is still about 
but its presence cannot be 
guaranteed for today. 


- r : -‘ 


l 

l 




WARWICKSHIRE: First Irntogs 
A J Motes b Coombs 


PA Smith c Good bGomer 


*CT Radley k>wb Childs. 
JDCanrbAcMd 


tP R Downton not out . 
Extras (bl.b 4, wl) 
Total (3 wkts) . 


GLAMORGAN: first tarings 
J A Moptorus cand b N G B CooiT_ 
■H Morris c Wawton b Maflendw _ 
D B Paiftie b Capef 


DGi 

-CS 

EAE 


R M EHson not Out 


l bw b Marshall . 
c and b Trenton 
not out 


Extras (b 12. nb 5) 


38 
- 3 
_ 1 
17 

Tom (8 wkts. 100 nos) 340 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-191. 2-224. 3-248. 
4-248. 5-324. 6-339. 

tS A Marsh. 0 L Underwood and A 
Igglesden to baL 

Bonus pants: Kent 8 Hampshire 4 
Umpires: j A Jameson and D R Shepherd 

Second operation 

Adrian Jones, the Sussex fast 
bowler, is to enter hospital at the 
end of the season for an opera- 
tion on his left knee. Jones, aged 
25. bad a cartilage removed in 
February but the knee has 
continued to trouble him, 
restricting him to just six 
championship matches 


142 

FALL OF WKXET5: 1-9. 2-48,3-62, 4-96, 
5-137. 

Bonus points: Essox 8. MUdosax 3. 
Umpires: D Lloyd end R A White. 

Surrey v Lancashire 

AT THE OVAL 

LANCASHIRE: first Innings 

G Fowler c Richards b Faflham 20 

G D Mondts c Lynch b Tlxxnas 2 

J Abrahams c Lynch b Clarita 28 

orUFet 


12 
, 2 

G C Holmes b Harper . 


M P Maynard not but ... 

R C Omong c G Cook b Harper . 
J Derrick not ouT 


Extras fa 4, to 8, nb 72) , 
Tool (5 wkts.91 oven) . 


.34 
. 18 
- 3 
. 21 
56 
. 14 
45 
. 24 
.215 


N H Fertrothar b Fatthsm 


S J CTShaughnessy run out 


*J Simmons c Stewnt b Fotttam 23 

M Watfclnson c Mecflycott b Cterice _ 29 

PJWABottbCtarka 5 

t Folley tow b Feftham 13 

J J Stenwonh not out 11 

IP Patterson e Butcher b Clarke 0 


P D Nonh. TM L Roberts, M R Banwfck 

and D J Mckey to bat 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-30, 2-48, 3*8. 4- 

95.5-120. 

Bonus points; Northerns 6. Glamorgan Z 
ttagtaK^B U adbea ter and A J T 

Sussex -V Derbyshire 

AT EASTBOURNE 
DERBYSHIRE: first Innings 
B J M Maher b Reeve 


•K J Barnett c Pigott b Jaws . 
AHd not Out 


Extras fa 4. to 4. nb id). 
Total (82^ wars] 


- 18 
.192 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-10. 2-37. 3-38. 4- 
82, 5-1 12. 6-140, 7-158. 8-165. 9-191. ID- 
192- 

BOWUNG: Ctorfct 245-7-51-4; Faltham 
17-4-47-4; Thomas 8-1-23-1; Monkhouw 
23-9-62-0; Pocock 3-2-1 -0: Medycott 7-4- 

Second tarings 
G Fourier ttwr b Pocock 


J E Morris b to Roux . 


B Roberts e and b Reewe . 
G MHter Ibw b to Roux . 


tC Marptes c Gould b la Roux , 
A E Warner cGouktb Reeve _ 
R Shsrma not out 


.39 
130 
. 31 
_ 9 

- 40 

- 11 
_ 7 

- 64 

- 12 
361 


Masey’s crown 

Betty Masey. of Barking, de- 
feated Jayne Roylance. an inter- 
national. by 21-17 to win the 
singles title at the Liverpool 
Victoria Insurance women's na- 
tional bowls championships at 
Leamington Spa yesterday. Mrs 
Masey bowled to a better line to 
lead 20-12 but faltered as Mrs 
Roylance. .from North 
Walsham. Norfolk, won three 
ends in a row to close the gap to 
20-17 before Mrs Masey bowled 


G D Mends c Lynch b Fettham 25 

J Abrahams not out 11 

IFoitey not OK 2 


Extras fa 10, to 2. nt> 4). 
Total (2 wkts). 


_ IB 
122 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-82. 2-1 15. 

SURREY: Ffot tarings 

A R Butcher b Patterson 

G Monkhouse retired hurt 

A J Stewart tow bAKott 


11 
. 7 
13 
72 
24 


Extras fa 1.1b 4, w s. nb i) 

Total (7 wkts dec) 

Score at 100 owerar 2SG tor 7 
R J Ftawy and D E Makxto) (fid not baL 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-50. 2-50, 888. 4- 
128. 5-191. 6-203. 7-216. 

BOWUNG; to Roux 27-3-104-3: Pigott 18- 
1-480: Ram 33-12-71-3; Jones 50-9-1; 
We»S 9-3-13-0; Green 20-3-43-0; StanOng 
3-1-13-0; Lentam 4-0-16-0: Gould 5&0- 
29-0. 

SUSSEX* First tarings 
H lABdanc Roberts b MBer _ 
-AM-Green c Barnett b-Mateota 

PW-GPerkarnotoit 

NJ Lenhamnotout '. 


Shaw was pulled for six from the 
last ball before lunch and the 
same treatment was meted out 
after the interval to the inconsis- 
tent Dennis, who quickly re- 
moved Potter. As Hartley came 
on for an impressive spell 
amongst the showers in the 
afternoon session, removing De 
Freitas. Whiuicase and Taylor 
in quick succession, h seemed 
Whitaker might run out of 
.partners. 

Ferris, however, rose to the 
occasion, swinging lustily to see 
Leicester past Yorkshire's total 
and Whitaker to his thousand 
runs. Higgs had bis moment, 
surviving long enough for 
Whitaker to reach his century 
with his second six off Dennis. It 
had taken only 129 deliveries. 

YORKSHIRE: First Innings 216 (A A 
Metcalfe 6ft K Higgs 5 tot 22. P A J De 
Frettas 4 for 94) 

Second tarings 

R J fflatay tow b Taylor 8 

A A Metcalfe not out 28 

S N HarBsy not out 12 

Bttras(lb5.wl.nb1) _________ 7 


B M McMHton c Richards b Marts __ 36 

DL Amiss Ibw b Coombs — . — 53 

|G W Htxnpage not out 32 

D A Ibarra notout ___________ 11 

Extras ._ — — 17 

Total (4 wkts dec, 955 overs) — 302 
Astf Dm, K J Kerr. G J Parsons. T A 
Munton and 'N Gifford did not baL 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-161 . 2-185. 3-040, 
4-268. 

BOWUNG: Gamer 16-1-40-1; Dates 150- 
62-0: Richards 4-0-1 0-0; Marks 29-6-79-1; 
Coombs 24.5-6-62-2; Harden 4-0-2HL 
Second tarings ' 

A J Motes not out Z.. 55 

P ASnitti notout 56 

Extras fa 6. w 1, n b 2) 9 


Total (p wkQ . 


.120 


SOMERSET: First tarings 
B C Rose not out . 


•P M Roebuck retired hurt . 


,78 

- 4 
. 20 
74 
12 


Total fi wM) 


FALL OF WICKET: MB. 

LEICESTERSHIRE: Ftat tarings 

I P Butcher tow b Dermta - 

"J C Baktormxw b Dennis __ 

RACobbeCamekbSnaw 

TJ Boon Ibw bfiotetar 

J J WWiskarnotout 


55 


J G Wyatt b Parsons . 

IVARichardsnotout 

Extras (b Z I b7. w 1, n b 2) , 

Total {I wktdae.50 overs)-; 188 . 

FALL OF WICKET; 1-G4. 

BOWUNG: McMBan 6-2-14-0; Smith 9-3- 
24-0: taK Din 1-OEft Parsons 1T-T-2M; 
Kern 15-2-42-0: Munton 8-0-61-0. 

Bonus points: Somerset Z. W&rwfckaHra 

Umpires: M J Ktahen and J H Hampshire- ■ 

Cracked it - 

Sussex batsman Paul Parker 
earned himself £3.000 with a 
single blow against Derbyshire 1 
at Eastbourne yesterday when 
he hit a six frill pitch on to one of 
the giant eggs around the bound- 
ary. It was the first time a Sussex 
player had bit one of the eggs 
since the idea began 10 years 





Test 


Extras (to 7. no 6) , 


M A LyncMbw b Srimora 

T EJeshrc sub b Folley 

tCJ fficnards c 3tanworth b Patterson 33 

□ J Thomas c sub b Stantons 0 

M A FelthamcStanwortfib Salmons . 0 
KTMedlyaxtc Stamens b Patterson 5 

ST Clarke c sub b Simmons 13 

*P I Pocock not out 0 

Extras fa 4. b 5.nb 3) 12 


_ 64 

- 3 
100 

- 25 

- 13 
205 


Total (54.1 overs) 


190 


Total (2 wkfs dec. 63J> orars) . 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-19. 2-129. 

C M Wei#, 0 K SWriJtan. tl J GooW. G S 
le Roux. DA Reeve. AN Jones and ACS 
Pigott did not ML 

BOWUNG: Malcolm 13-3-57-1; Warner 
12-4-41.0; Fmev 6-2-14-0. MBer 245-3- 
75-1; Shama 

Bonus poins: Sussex S. Derbyshire 1 
Umpna: B Oudteston and PB Wight 


100 

L Potter c Barstow b Dorris ______ 7 

PAJOeFrtritescBalrstowbPJKwtley S 

n wtutdcBsecRobtaaibPJ Hartley 0 
}TmtarcBalr«owbP J Ha«tey_ 1 

U J F Farris c and b Shew ig 

KHkssnotaut - 3 

fa 1,-to 9, nb 4) U 

235 


Total |9 wits dec. 824 overs) 

FAIX OF WICKETS: 1-22. 263. 3*4 A. 
106. 5-138:6-159.7-183. 8-l^^g - . 
BOWUJKk P J Hartley 21-&51-3: Dennis 

Bonus Pants: Laics 6. Yrakslrire 8. 
Itapbes; A A Jones raw R Jubm 


re-run 

Adelaide (Reuter) - The 
Australian and England -sides - 
wbo played in the dramatic 
Cenienary Test match in Mel- 
bourne nine years ago will 
meet again in four one-day .. 
matches next year, oigantccrs 
said. Australia, who wop by 45 . 
runs, will be again be cap- 
tiiined by Gn^; Chappell and 

England win be led by Tony 
Greig. Only England’s 
wicketkeeper, Alan Knott; is * 
unavailable. 





COMMONWEALTH GAMES 

Financial consolation 


Lesotho failed to win any 
medals at the Commonwealth 
Carnes and Bermuda had the 
opportunity taken from them, 
but both countries emerged with 
financial rewards — £1,000 

apiece from die Guinness 
Commonwealth Games athletics 
awards. Similar amounts went to 

the English decatfalete, Eugene 
Gilkes. and the Australian ran- 
uer, Debbie FGntofL . . 

The six-strong Lesotho squad, 
five athletes and one official, 
arrived in Edinburgh with only 
£20 between them, but tbeir 

H ^rnlti <iim( <-<vwimitnu»n t (O 


Games Meals have earned them 
then* award. The money will go 
towards training grants in their 
own country. 

The judges, media personnel 
working in E&lnngh, chose 
Benuuda to compensate for their - 
yo-yo existence at the Games. 
Alter arriving in Edinbargh (bey 
were toM to withdraw g,oly to be 
reinstated to take part hi tbe 
opening ceremony at die last 
minute. Then, after only one of 
their competitors had competed, 
the team were ordered to return 
borne. Tbe Judges felt they bad* 
acted with dignity throughout 
(heir ordeal. 


football 

Hopes high for sponsorship deal 

The Football League -look cany on Into the start of th* k.„„ 
uenain to kick off the new season, but we are confident w “ 10 m 

season on August 23' without a will u ,,! lwe a ^ ven,BM 

new sponsor to^ replace Canon sponsor. 

^ withdrew m Jannary. Bui 9 ^ ilMated Edinbureh 
officials are hoping to announce Commonwealth GamS 5H 
aO million tw-year package claimed, another Slualtv 
emfy mfiep4«nber* wuba major Meadowbank FC. whoS 3 
oil or eteoncal muhwiatioiuil st^ed .ihe GameTliSS 
company the top ups to take must play ibeir second 
ov J sr ’ ^ fixture against Stenhouseimtir 

Lraguc spokranmn -Andy on August 16 at theiroppSS 
Williamson said: “We have . ground beta use of 
been in talks witita company for their own pi irf, ^ 51316 of 
a month now. but h ave yet to •Scottish Premier League dub 
secure a deaL A second- com- MOthenvdJ are to benefo ® 

pany hascOmeon the scene antf sboosorshin deal 



certain to kick off the new season, but w* are cSnSfen. we “ to carf y 

a will ultimately ^seewe'^a campaign. 'centred. 

Jn ^jonsor." e wfficb will be 

' - - worth £45.000 to Motbenmfl, 

over tbe next three years. 

• Portsmouth have pfa»cg d their 
jJWsed captain, Mick Ken-- 

SSS'mvF transfer list at- 
J-50.000. Kennedy, aged 25, 
jost £1 °0j)00 when he 
roovsd from Middldhroiigh. 
two years ago, sfillhMafoSmr 
^“ contract to ron. : 
•JS** Republic, of frefamd 

th^5f^ ODal - was furiota when 

“e oub stripped him of the 
captaincy m a clean-up 
-campaign. r 




iHh UMfc6 FklLJAr AlKjUai 6 iyso 




Today’s television and radio programmes 


Edited by Peter Dear 
and Peter Davalle 


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BBC 1 


VoO Ceefax AM. 

L50 Breakfast Time with Rank 
Bough and Goy 
Miehelmore. Weather at ' 
B£5,7JS,755,«J5afld 
3J5S; regional news, 
weather and traffic at &57, 
7J7, TST and 637; . 

national and international 
news at 74)0, 7 JO, 8-00, 
BJO and 900; sport at 
7 JOand 8J0; pop music 
news at 7.32- Plus, 
gardening advfce from 
Alan Trtwimarsh; the - 1 
weekend’s best food buys 
recommended hy Ggtn 


Christian; and. at ft 
Steve EHackneH's .Summer 
Magic. The guests indude 
lanOgitvy 

Dudley Do-ftight Cartoon. 
825 'Slas. Adventure 
serial about a young boy . 
who rurisaway from a • 
■a-siri- V drous.(r}(Ceefax) 

^L50 NewsimMSpedal _ 

whoaraattamptifigtQ 
drive around Europe in a 
solar-powered car 9.55 
The Adventures of 
Bulhrinkle and Rocky. 

- n Part nine, (f) 

".*100 Why Don’t Yoo~? ' 

' Entertaining ideas for 
bored yourwsters. (r) 

10.25 The Advenhnes of 
BuOwinkte and Rocky. 

Part ten. « 1020 Play v 
•■•* ' • SchooL • • • 

■ - • 150 Cricket Second Test. The 

• • i morning session of the 

. -5- secondoay'epfayinthe' " 

.'.I i. - game at Trent Bridge 

£»twssn England and New 
...... ' ' Zealand. - * 

f -— ijk News After Noon with 
• ^ Richard Whitmore. 

includes news heacfiines 
*.“* ^ with subtitles 120 
^ ’ -• Regfonal news' and 

.. ' Tf weather. 125 Hokey 

' Cokey. 0) - 

■ Cricket Second Test 

• ^>v. 1p Further coverage erf the 

game at Trent Bridge, 
(continued on BBC 2) 427 
Regional news. 

The Roman Ho l i d ay s . 

ies. 4^0 Hekfi. 


‘ ,,r *s . 


■-.ri-S? 




■ > 
T ^ 




Cartoon series. 
Drama serial about a 


^ estop 

uidiiia dcuof owut a 

super „ sfflsaMi 

sun fait 

Hl Man (jihee 


of New York's School of 
Performing Arts puU out all 
thestops when a school 
inspectorate arrives to 
investigate the possibility 
of cost-cutting, (r) - 
. . 1.00 News with Nehotas - 

WitcheU and Philip Hayton. 
.,!!• Weaiher. 

135 LondonPkis. ' 

' r 5 y -00 Vfogan. Among tonight's 
1 ‘"‘-p guests are Chnstopner 
Plummer, Anthony . 

- jv;. Buckeridge and. via 

i. : : satellite from Maw York, 

" • :: Robert Lindsay. Plus. 

' ~'r? music from Bananarama. 
It:-. '.40 No Place Like Home. 
Arthur Is upset by his 
family's lack of moral 
• r. ;ri T scruples, (r) 

->10 Dynasty. Ben challenges 
.. ~ Blake over the Carrington 
!"■ inheritance; and the tears 
flow when Jackie 
confronts Dominique with 
' her birth certificate. ' 

' '• *- v '*LOO New* with Julia Some rvrite. 

- ' :2 -- arid Andrew Harvey. cr-.s--; 

• ■' Regional news and-.. p : 
vr?; 'weather.'-- *: .. 

j-r-ct30 In at the Deep End. The 

first of four programmes fti 
which Chris Serfeand Paul 
Honey try something 
. completely different Chris 
Serle sings with the 
English NationalOpera ' *' 
after a crash course from 
Sjr Geraint Evans, 
Jonathan Miller and Sir 
Georg SoltL (r) (Ceefax) 
H20 Omnibus at the Proms, ' 
introduced by Jane 
■ Glover. Iona Brown plays 
Walton's Violin Concerto 
r with the BBC Philharmonic 

Orchestra, conducted by ; 
, Edward Downes. Followed 

Respighi's Pin® of •* 


l- -is:i 
J.-v 




125 Film: Sunshkie (1973) 

• starring Cristina Raines 
anddm de Young. A 
'maderfor-televis ion 
drama, based on a true 
story, about a young 
mother, living with her 
daughter and lover in the 
mountain countryside, 
battling with cancer. The 
film contains six songs by 
John Denver and Is 
directed by Joseph 
. Sargent 
'125 Weather. 


TV-AM 


6.15 Good Momma Britten 

presented by Mike Morris 
and Ann eka Rice. News 
• with Gordon Honeycombe 
.■ at 620, 720, 720,8.00, 
820 and 920; sport at 
6.40 and 7.4ft exercises at 
62& cartoon at 725; pop 
music at 725; Jimmy 
Greaves' television 
hiahliflttsat825. 

8.45 


Tarurty Matiett inefudos an 
appearance of a pet 
tarantula: 


ITV LONDON 


925 Thames news headSnes 
» followed by WBd, Wild 
World of Afthnab-The- ■ 
badger 920 MBca. . 
Adventures Of a young 
man bringing a reindeer 
from Lapland to the Paris 
Zoo 1020 Eskimos: A 
- Changing CuKurs-Tha. 

Eskimos of Nunivak - 
Istand.fr) 

10.35 Little House on the 

Prairie. After a stagecoach 
crash a woman has to rely 
on a bfind person to help 
save her inborn chad, (r) 
1125 Courageous Cat 
1120 About Britain. Robbie 
Shepherd visits St 
Andrews where he goes 
lobster fishing; learns how 
golf dubs are made; and 
tackles a round of golf at 
the Royal and Anoent 
1220 Teettane end Claucfia. (r) 
12.10 Rainbow. Learning 
to be sensible writh the 
hefpof puppets and guest 
SuaHoiderness. 

1220 Is Democracy Working? 
The first of a new series 
examining why interest in 
' politics has waned. 

120 News at One with Carol 
Barnes 120 Thames 
news with John Andrew. ■ 
120 FQneKiB Me Tomorrow* 

(1 957) starring Pat O'Brien 
and Lois Maxwell. A crime 
reporter needs money tor 
an operation to save nrs 
son's sight When he goes 
to see Ws old editor to ask 
for his job back he finds 
him murdered. Directed by 
Terence Fisher. 

320 Take the High Road. 325 
Thames news headlines ■ 
320 Sons and Daughters. 
4.00 Rainbow. A repeat of the 
programme shown at 
,12.10 4.15 The Moomins. 
Cartoon series, (r) 425 
Scooby-Doo. Cartoon 4.45 
- From the Top. Comedy . 
serial^ •- 

5.15 The Parlour Game. Old 
fashioned indoor games ■ 
by Liza Goddard 
Alfred Marks. They 
are joined this week b 


Ftoella Benjamin, I 
. Llewellyn, Molly Parkin 
and George Meliy. 

5.45 News with John suchet 

620 Thames Weekend 
News. 

6.15 Police 5. 

620 City Satan. The habitats of 
fiie great crested grebe. 

720 Danny Baker On Money- 

In this first of a new serf® 
Danny Baker tri® to find 
: outwnatpeopfewoukl-do 
-4f they Sudden lyriecame v . 

i ” mfllfinaii^s; i ' — — i ' : 

720 l olewabon alAttaeMcs. • * 
The Mider LiW/IAC > •. 
fntemational from Crystal 
.Palace. 

920 The Practice. Drama serial 
set in a modem Midlands 
^ health centre. (Oracle) 

1020 TtewsatTan with Martyn 
Lewis and Pamela 
Armstrong. 

1020 Spitting Image. Highlights 
from the last series ofthe 
satirical comedy 
programmes.LwT News 
. headlines. 

1120 Fam: Body Heat (1981) 
starring Willian Hurt and 
■ Kathleen Turner. Ned, -a 
Florida lawyer, lias a torrid . 
affair with a kical _ 
gangster's wife. They 
dectdetoJdll the husband 
and after the deed is done 
fee lawyer discovers that 
fee wife only wanted her 
husband dead for his 
money. Directed by 
Lawrence Kasdan. 

1.00 World Chess 

Championship. A report 
on the day's play in- the 
series between Kasparov 
and Karpov. 

120 The Doors Are Open. The . 
Doors in concert (r) 

2.15 Night Thoughts. 



Iona Browrc The Proms, BBCT. 
1020pm and Radio 3. 720 


. • No common-or-garden 
GP. Patrick PietronL "l want 
you”, ho tells a panel of 
stressful patients in THE 
HEALING ARTS (BBC2. 

9 -30pm), - to draw an imaginary 
drde around yourself ftot 
that Dr Pietroni will not prescribe 
piu$ or stuff in bottles, too. 

But ® founder of the British 
Holistic Medical Association, 
he counters the slings and 
arrows of outrageous health 
with other weapons rarely found 
in the your local doctor's 
surgery; acupuncture, 
homoeopathy, the ' 
aforementioned classes m , 

meditation and relaxation. 

And - the technique that many a 
disillusioned pattern must 
have given up all hope of 
experiencing - the ear that is 
never dosed, the mind that looks 
beyond fee effect to find the 
cause, and the hand feat reach® 
out to make a comforting 


CHOICE 


bridge between physician and 
sufferer. Obviously, Dr 
Pietroni's medical philosophy is 
not unique to him, but when 
did you last hear a doctor saying 
that a GP needs to clean® 

himself psychically as much as 

he needs to wash his hands 
at the sink? Or hear him propose 
that when problems are not 
curable, the family doctor should 
be prepared to journey 
through them with his patient 
.You would be hard put to find 
a better travelling companion 
than Patrick Pietroni. 

• Looking ahead to the 
weekend. I recommend two 
documentaries of exceptional 
quality, Ned Kelly's THE MAKING 
OF A CONTINENT (Sunday, 
BBC2. 7.15pm), a geology lesson 
about North America which, if 
adopted In the classroom, would 


have them queueing up for 
the next geography lesson, and 
Gordon Stevens's BERLIN 
WALL: KANNI SENDS HER 
LOVE (tomorrow. Channel A. 
7.30pm). all about the 
practitioners of one of the 
most dangerous and ingenious 
skills of the twentieth century 
- getting East Germans through, 
over, and under the Berlin 
Wan. 

The Making of a Continontis 
a trilogy. It is stunningly 
photographed, and excitingly 
speeds up what the commentary 
perceptively calls '* the slow 
metre of geological time ''. 

Hanoi Sends Her Love, from 
that enterprising regional ITV 
company TVS. proves that 
fee spirit of Baroness Orczy's 
Scarlet Pimpernel is doing 
just as well in Germany as it did 
in France. 

Peter Davalle 


priva 

inves 


BBC 2 


825 Open University: 

Manpower Services and 
the School 720 Weekend 
Outlook. Ends at 725. 

920 Ceefax. 

425 Cricket: Second Test The 
closing session of the 
second day's play In the 
at Trent Bridge 
n England and New 
- Zealand. 

6.10 Fibre Crime Cfld) (1972) 
starring Uoyd Bridges, 
Paul Burke and Qoris 
Leacfiman. A made-for- 
teievision thriller about a 
its detective 
igthe 

mysterious death in a car 
crash of the son of one of 
his oldest friends. The 
detective's probings are 
hampered by a none-too- 
hefpful local sheriff and 
take a turn for the worse 
when another body Is 
discovered. With 
Rush and Martin Sheen. 

. Directed by David LoweD 
Rich. 

720 Cartoon Two. 

720 H»ny. On the eve of 
- Women's Day in South 
Africa. Winnie Mandela 
talks about fee role of 
women in fee battle 
against apartheid. Back 
home, Krishna Govender ‘ 
. go® behind the seen® to 
meet television's most 
famous black fictional - 
family, fee Carpenters of 
EastEnders. Music is • 
provided by Aswad. 

820 The Groat Era Race. 
Three teamsTfrom Hytbe. 
Belfast and the West 
Midlands, are on an Irish 
beach with three 
refrigerators but no 
electricity. The teams’ task 
is to turn the 'fridges Into 
stills capable of turning fee 
seawater Into drinking 
water. 

8.30 Gardeners’ World. Roy 
Lancaster is in the 
Harts op. Cumbria, garden 
of Dilys Davies, which 
against the odds she has 
turned into a home for 


10 p 

- bog plants and alpines- .' . 
9.00: My MusiciA-fighthearted 

; - tesrof musicalJcoowiedga 
f between Denis Norden : : . 
partneredbylan Wallace^ : 
“arid Frank Mu'ir-with John 
Amis. 

920 The Heafing Arts. This 
sixth of -nine 

documented® on unusual 
. aspects of medicine 
focus® on Dr Patrick • ' 

- Petroni. a family doctor in 
v a Paddington health 

service clinic whofounded 
fee Holistic Medical . 
Association because he 
believ® that curing 
symptons is not enough 
and that the whole patient 
' ■ should be treated, a belief 
shared by many other, 
doctors in this country. 
(Ceefax) (s® Choice) 

1020 Cricket Second Test 
Highlights ofthe second 
day’s play in the game at 
Trent Bridge between 
England and New 
Zealand. 

10.50 NewsnigM 1125 
Weather. 

11.40 The Rockford Files. A 
best-selling authors® 
hires a sceptical Jim to 
protect her from 
revolutionary feminists I 
who, she says, are trying I 
to kill her. (r) Ends at 1225. 1 


CHANNEL 4 


220 The Impersonation. The 
story ofthe mystery 
Identity of 'Reginald 
Pepper' a contemporary 
English primitive painter 
who lived a quiet Ufa in 
Swindoa Did he really 
exist? 

320 Carnatic Music. A profile 
of Gown Kuppufwamy, a 
singer of classical 
southern Indian music. 

.420 Bill SmaHes of Crosier. 
The story of the last in a 
fine of family fishermen 
who have lived in the 
Northumberland village for 


420 


genera tions. 

Danctn' Days. AJ banco 


has a get-rich-quick 
scheme. 

520 Car 54, Where Are YouT 
Confidence tricksters 
mistakenly telephone 
Schnauser's wife and 
invite her to a fake seance. 
When she is there they 
convince her that her 
husband is an ex-count. 
Starring Fred Gwyme and 
Joe E Ross. 

520 Revid. Gary Crowley and 
Jon Stephen Fink review 
the week's video releases. 

SAS Sotid Sold, presented by 
Juliet Roberts and Chris 
Fort®. The guests this 
week are Chaka Khan, 
Gwen Guthrie and Mondo 
Kane. - 

5.15 The Chart Show. The 
latest pop music charts 

- from this country and 
. overseas. ■ 

7.00 Channel Four news wife 
. Trevor McDonald and 
Alastair Stewart indudes a 
report from the Berlin 
Wall. Weather 

720 Book Choicer Michael 
Neve, lecturer at the 
Wellcome Institute of the 
History of Medicine, . 
discuss® Phyllis 
Gross kufe's biography of 
the controversial 
psychoanalyst Melanie 
Klein. 

820 What fee Papers Say with 
Peter McKay of Sunday 
Today. 

8.15 Looks FamlBar. Denis ' 
Norden invites Judith 

; - Chakners, Bob Hotness 

- and Ken Dodd to 

' 'reminisce about the r : 
entertainers and 
' entertainments Of fee 
Thirties and Forties. 

920 Inte rna tional Athletics. 
The Miller Ute/IAC . 
International from Crystal 
Palace. • ' 

1020 The Golden Girls. 

American comedy series 
about four middle-aged 
women who share a 
house in Florida. (Oracle) 
1020 Budgie. The rascally 
Budgie is bribed to take 
Hazel's bank derk cousin 
from the North on a tour of 
London. But the mild- 
mannered man is not as 
simple as Budgie thinks. • 
Starring AdamTaife and, 
® the cousin, Derek 
Jacobi- (Oracle) 

1120 Film: Hamlet (1976) 
Ceiestino Coronado's 
version of Shakespeare's 
play focusing on the 
duality of Hamlet's nature, 
showing turn as a split 
personality. Starring 
Anthony Meyer, Helen 
Mirren and Quentin Crisp. 
12-45 Joe Albany: A Jazz life. 
The celebrated pianist 
talks about his career and 
also Hhjstrates his playing 
style. Ends at 125. 


( Radio 4 

On long wave. Stereo on VHF. - 
525 Shipping. 620 Maws Briefing; 
Weather. 6.10 Farming. 

625 Prayer (s) 

620 Today, mcl 620, 720, 

820 News. 6.45 Businss 
News. 625, 7.55 Weather. 
720, 620 News. 725, 

825 Sport. 725 Thought for 
the Day. 625 Letters 
8.43 Lake Wobegon Days. 

Part 5(ri627 Weather 
Tfevei 
9.® News 

925 Desert Island Discs. The 
castaway is the travel 
writer Norman Lewis. With 
Michael Parkinson (r}(s) 

9.45 in Keeping with Tradition. 
Keith A] tan meets 
Douglas Clayton, keeper of 
Saltwef! Park at 
Gateshead. 

10.00 News; international 
. Assignment BBC 

correspondents report 
1020 Morning Story: Evening 
with the Marchesa. by 
Mark Bourne. Read by 
Robert Rietty. 

10-45 Daily Service (New Every 
Mom Ira. page 46) (s) 

11.00 News; Travel: A Glimpse 
ofthe Burning Plain. 

Chart® Alien s recent book 
dramatized. Starring 
Claire Bloom [as Charlotte 
Canning) and PruneBa 
Scar® (as Queen Victoria) (r) 

11.48 Youthful. Rural and 
Broke. Dan Cherrington 
recalls his farming 
childhood. 

1220 News; Can We Help? 

Experts answer 
questions on your rights in 
the NHS and private 
medical care. From Bristol 
1227 Don't Stop Now— it's 
Fundation. Comedy 
cabaret (s). 1225 Weather 

1.00 The World at One: News 
1.40 The Archers. 125 

Shipping 

220 News: woman's Hour. 
Includes a feature about 
a new kind of holiday host 
320 News: The Light That 
Failed, by Rudyard 
Kipling. Final part (syr) 

4-00 Nows 

4.05 Film of the Book [new 
senes}. The film versions 
of famous novels (1) Oliver 
Twist With Christopher 
Cook. 

420 Welsh Arts Week - The 
■ Theatre on fee HilL Chris 
’- Segar recounts the history of 


Theanr Clwyd. Mold. 

5.00 PM. News magazine- 
520 Shipping. 525 
Wdsthtf 

620 News: Financial Report 
620 Watertin®. Spotting 
activities in. on or under 

water. 

7.® News 
7.05 The Archers 
720 Pick of the Week- Anne 
Dngaiewith 

tkghts ol programmes on 
BBC radio and television 

820 hitler's Ojym pics. Hitler's 
Olympic Gam®, in 1936. 
e® ured that politics would 
never agam be left out of 
sport. Helen Palmer reports. 

8.45 Devon Journeys. Tom 
Salmon travels from 
Tiverton to Honiton. 

920 Letter from America by 
Alistair Cooke. 

9.45 Welsh Arts Week: A 
Plague on Anglo-Saxons! 
Martyn Williams finds out 
why the National 
Eisteddfod of Wales holds so 
much Importance to 

some Welshmen while 
others hate it and afl it 
stands (or. 

10.15 A Book at Bedtime: 

Under a Monsoon Cloud, 
by H R F Keating (10). Read 

Sam Dastor. 1 029 
ithar 

1020 The World Tonight 

11.15 The Financial World 
Tonight 

1120 Week Ending. Satincai 
review (s) 

1220 News; Weather. 1223 
Shipping 

VHF (available in England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except 522%20am Wea then 
Travel. 125-2.D0pm 
Listening Comer (s). 520-525 
PM (continued). 

( Radio 3 ) 

On VHF only: - 
625 Open University. Unta 
625am, Tolstoy on art 
and morality 
On medium wave only: - 
625 Weather. 7.00 News 
7.05 Concert: Mozart 

(Symphony No 32). C P E 
Bach (Trio-Sonata in E. Wq 
162). Stravinsky (Dans® 
concerts rites), Gershwin (I 
got rhythm: variations, 
played by Weissenberg 
(piano) and Berlin PO. 

8.00 News 

825 Concert (contd): Sibelius 
(Swan of Tuonela). 


by Sa 
Weatl 


Bartok (Three Rond® on 
folk run®: Scruff, piano). 
Gimenez < Romanza de 
Tempranica. Berganza, 
mezzo). PonchieUli (Dance of 
fee Hours. La Gioconda). 
Tchaiskovsky (Variations on 
rococo theme: 
WaUfisch/ECO). 920 News 
9.05 This Week s Composer 
Brahms. Concerto m A 
minor. Op 102 ( Francescati. 
violin. Fournier, cello: 
Columbia SO). Four serious 
songs. Op 121 (Ferner. 
contralto) 

1020 Bournemouth Srnfonletta 
(under Adey). with 
Duncan McTier( double- 
bass). Boyce (Symphony 
No U Bourgeois (Concerto 
for double-bass, 
chamber orchestra), Holst ( 
& Paul s Suite) 

1025 Cricket Second day of 
’the Second Tea.. 

England v New Zealand. 
Coverage continues on 
medium wave until 620 

On VHFon!y> 

1025 Schubert and Schumann: 
Paul Cross! ey (piano). 
Schu&en (Sonata in A major 
D 664). Schumann 
(Bunte Blatter) 

1125 Pted Piper; the fate David 
Munrowon Schumann 
songs and symphonies (r) 

12.15 BBCWelsh SO (undBf 
Otaka). With Cho- Liang 
Lm(vtoiinL Pan one. 
Mendelssohn (Calm S® 
and Prosperous Voyage 
overture). Mozart (Violin 
Concerto No3)~ 1.00 News 

125 Concert (contd): Brahms 
(Symphony No 3) 

1 .45 Voice and piano: Teresa 
Cahill (soprano), Roger 
Vtgn Dies (piano). Deoussy 
(Five Baudelaire Songs). 
Richard Rodney Bennett 
(This is fee garden) 

2.15 Berlin Radio SO (under 
Albrecht and Zender): 

Reger (Symphonic Prologue 
to Tragedy). Rudi 
Stephan (Uebeszauber, with 
Fischer-Dieskau, 
baritone) 

325 Beethoven: Frank! 

(ptano). Pauk (violm). 
Kirshbaum (cello). Violin 
Sonata in D major. Op 12 
No 1; Tno movement m B Hat 
major. woO 39: and 
Viokn Sonata m E flat major. 
Op 12 No3 

420 Choral Evensong: from 
Gloucester Cathedral; 

425 News 

520 Mamfy for Pleasure: with 
Graham Fawcett 

On medium wave: - 

620 Music for two guitars: 

Sergio and Odair Assad 
play works by Giuliani. 
Scarlatti and Kish km 
(first UK 

K mance: Concertino) 

: Gabrieli String 
Quartet play fee Quartet 
m F 


720 Proms 86: BBC 

Philharmonic Orchestra 
(under Edward Down®), 
with Elizabeth Laurence 
(mezzo) and lona Brown 
(violin). Part one. 8erio 
(Eptfame) 


820 Fiesole: Portrait in verse 
of the Tuscan village. 
Presented by Kevin 
Crossley-Holland 


820 Proms 66: Walton ( Violin 
Concerto) and R®p<ghi 
(The Pin® of Rome 
symphonic poem) 


920 Passings: Ian Weir's play 
about King Arthur and a ■ 


dream called Cametot With 
Paul Daneman. Mick 
Ford and Douglas Storm m 
the east (r) 

10.40 Mefvyn Poore: tuba 
recital. Borkowski's Vox, 
and McLean s Beneath the 
t Horizon, for tuba and 
whale ensemble 
1120 Scrtatxn Piano Sonatas; 
Boris Berman plays the 
No 8 and No 9{Btack Mass) 
1125 Bacn BBC Smgers/John 
Toll (organ)//Amanda 
Maenamara (vioione). 

Marilyn Sansom 
(baroque cello). The Motets 
Kotnm. Jesu Komm. 

BWV 229. and Smget dem 
Herm. BWV 225. 1127 
News. 12.00 Closedown 

( Radio 2 ) 

4.00am Cohn Berry 5 30 Ray 
Moore 720 Derek Jameson 920 
Toddy Johnson 1120 Jaunty 
Young mcl legal problems 
answered by BUI Thom® 125 
□avid Jacobs 2.05 Gloria Hunn'ifbrd 
320 David Hamilton 5.05 John 
Dunn 7.00 Hubert Gregg 720 
Friday Night is Mus ic Night 8.45 
Pete Moore at the Piano 920 The 
Organist Entertains (with Nigel 
Ogden) (continued on VHF) 9.15 
International Athletics. Miller 
Ute international at Crystal Palace 
1020 Veroon and Maryetta 
Mrdglev 1020 Hinge and Bracket 


Angela Rlppon 120am 
• ‘ “ LD0 A Little Night 


Nigritude 3.00-4.1 
Music. 


c 


Radio 1 


3 


On medium wave. Stereo on 
VHF. 

520am Adrian John 720 Mike 
Smith's Breakfast Show 920 
Simon Bat® 11.00 Radio 1 
Roadshow from Barry Island 
1220pm Newsbeat (Ian 
Parkinson) 12.45 Gary Davt® 320 
Steve Wright 520 Newsbeat 
(lan Parkinson) 5.45 Singled Out. 
with Janice Long and her 
guests 7.00 Andy Peebles 1020- 
1220 The Friday Rock Show 
With Tommy Vance, featuring 
Mama's Boys VHF Stereo 
Radios 1 & 2 4.00am As Radio 2. 
9.00pm The Organist 
Entertains. lO.dO As Radio 1 . 

12.00 -4. 00am As Radio 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 


LOO Nemdnk 620 Merxban 720 Newt 


Brass Ensemble 620 Music Now 9.0C 
News a oo Review ol Bntsh Press 9.15 
World Today 920 Fmancal News 9.40 
Look Ahead 845 Tune Mechne 1020 
News 10.01 New Waves on Shortwave 
10.15 Merchant Navy Programme 1120 
News 11.09 News About Bntam 11.15 
Sportsworid 1120 Mend tan 1220 Radio 
Newsraei 12.15 Jazz For The Asking 
12.45 Sports Rowidup 1.00 News 129 


Our Hours 120 A Land of SOn^ 


Twerv _ _ 

1.45 Sportsworid 220 Outlook 2.45 .. 
Perfect Spv 320 Radio Nawst a al 3.15 
Eccentric Travellers 420 News 429 
Commentary 4.15 Sconce in Achon &45 
Sports Roundup 7.45 About Britain 620 
News 829 Twenty-Four Hours 620 
Soancem Achon 9.00 News 921 Network 
UK 9.15 MUSK Now 94S For Whom The 
Bell To«s 1020 News 1029 World Today 
1026 A Loner From Northern Ireland 
1020 Fmancdt News 10.40 Reflections 
1045 Sports Roundup 11.00 News 1129 
Commentary 11.15 From the Weakens 
1120 Aspects ot Liszt 1220 News 1229 
News About Britain 12.15 Redo Newsraei 
1220 About Britain 1245 Recording of 
the Week 120 News 121 Outlook 120 
nbw waves on Shortwave 145 A Perfect 
Spy ZOO News ZD9 Review ol British 
Press Z15 Network UK 220 The Junior 
Mmater 320 News 320 News About 
Bntain 3.15 World Today 445 Reflections 
450 financial News 520 Nows 529 
Twenty-Four Hours 545 Worid Today. AB 
time* In GMT. 


BBC1 WALES 4S0pw*J6 

Fame 626420 Watoe Today 


625-720 Game. Set and Match - 
t.lfiaa-120 Newsand weather SCOT- 
LAND 625pm-720 Reporting Scot- 
land 820-1000 Batamy 1Q20-102D 
D ee ch t yo ve Garden NOWTTCRN 
IRELAND 420nm-420 Hekfl 426626 

Fame 525-540Todajff Sport Su4D- 
620 inside UStar 625-720 TheRoman 
Holdays 74M.10 It Only Seams 
Like Yesterday 1.15am 170 News and 
weather ENOLAND 626pm-720 Ra- 
glonel news magazines 

border 

1025 Professor Kkwl 1025-1120 
Nova 120pm Nows 120 SrommyOTO 
220 Fine The Magnet 3.30-420 Play 
It Again S.lS445Sporting All Stars 620 
Lockaround 620 Take the High 
Road 720-720 AQxon Market 1120 
Southern Upland Way 1120 Special 
Squad 12J0mn Closedown. 

S4C Start* 120pm Dancin’ Days ' 
SSi 12 s Cat n fee Hat 220 Sam Sbn 
Z15 interval 220 Eoteddtod 320 
Ffcrc Woman Warned 420 Cadvgjan 525 
Franceeco 520 Chart Show 6.15 
RevW 620 So*d Soul 720 NuwyAflon 
SaWi 720 Hwyl Yr Wyl 645 Bstedd- 
fofl 10.1 S Athletes 11.15 FUnt The 
Blessed Ones 1245 era Closedown. 

TCUI As London except 925am 
1SJSL Sesame Straet1026 Russian 
Cinema 1050 Cartoon 1120-1120 ■ 
Orphans o< the Wild 120^ News 120- 
620 Fanr Treasure of San Teresa 
328-420 Yoieig Doctors S.1544S 
Blockbustars 620 Today South west 
520 Spprtswaek 7.00-720 AKaon Market 
1022 pin: OuaCrophenta 1220am 
Postscript, Closedown. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


YORKSHIRE 

Story 620 Last Frontier 10.15 
Glenroa 10.45 Fok Tales 1120-1120 
Gather Your Dreams 120pm News 
125 Help Yourself 120220 Film: Roods 
ol Fear 5.15-545 Sporting ASstars 
620 Catondar 620 Who's The Boss? 
7.00-720 Albion Market 1120 The 
Sweeney. 1220. Muse Bote First 
N^ht&xhours ol pop muse. Ends 

TYNE TEES As London ex- 


cept 925am News 
1025-1120 


920 Sesame Street 
Gurmess Book of Records 120pm News 
125 Lookaround 120-320 ftec* 
from Reocar 5.1M45 Take the „ 

Road 620 Nortnem Life 620 Me and 
My Girl 720-720 Albion Market 1120 TX 
45 1220 Quincy 120 am Countryside 
Christian. Closedown. 

TVS A* London except 928am 
2-=2£ Sesame Street 1020 Argonauts 
10-50 Cartoon 1120-1120 Orphans 
0 < the VRd 120pm News 120000 Fitae 
Lady in the Fog 320420 Coramy 
GP 5.15-545 Connections 620 Coast to 
Coast 620 Human Factor 7.00-720 
Thet a My Boy 1120 Prisoner: Co* Block 
H 1220 FUm: Paradise Canyon 
120am Company, Closedown. 

CENTRAL *5 London saact 
l - rW -V Blockbusters 

950 Robcstory 10-15 Sea Urcnms 
1040 Ths a Me 1120-1 120 Survival 
120 News 120-3.00 FKm For the 
Love ot Bertl 5.15-545 Mr Smith 620 
News 720-720 Albion Market 11.00 
Film: The Repcle 1240am Joofinder 


channel 

1020 Argonauts 1050 Cartoon 
1120-1120 Orphans of the WW 120 pm 
news 120-3.00 Rim: Lady in the Fog 
320-420 Country GP5.1MU5 Conneo- 
tons 620 Channel Report 6.15 Ca- 
nadian Documentary S25 Jane s Dory 
620 All the Fun 720-720 That's My 
Boy 1120 Prisoner Cel Block H ilOO 
FUm: Paracfise Canyon 120am 
Closedown. 

SCOTTISH sagar 

Beathaichean Naomacti 950 Incredi- 

bie Hulk 1020 Captain Scarlet 1045- 

1120 Guinness Book ot Records 
120pm News 120 The Baron 220-320 

SPGA Golf Chsmponshlp 6.00 News 

and Scotland Today 620 Whose Baby? 

720-720 Aibon Market 1020 Festi- 

val enema 11.00 Golf 1220 La» Can. 
Closedown. 


l(TV U/CCT 925am Sesame 

_ n I Y wca.l Strea i02SSmuris 


10.40 M*a 11.05-1120 Small Won- 
der 120pm News 120 FKm: Wedding 


Night (Garv Cooper) I 
Dreams 620 News 7. 


5.15-545 
20-720 Alban Mar- 


ket 1020 Your Say 1045 Sprtting frn- 
11.15 Mike Hammer 12.15am 


HTV WALES 

1025 Sesame Street B.oopm-7.oo 
Wales at Sw 1020 Fanvat Choice 1120 
Spntmg Image 11 20-1 220am Mike 
Hammer 


GRANADA iL^nd. 


Reports 920 Matt and Jem v 955 
Spacewetch 1025 Mika 1020 Jayoa and 
the Wheeled warrxxs 1120 Granada 
Repons 1125 About Bream 1120-1220 
Connections 12 8pra Granada Re- 
ports 120 week m Vow 220-320 Hotel 
320-420 Invitation to Remember 
5.15-5.45 Home 10 Roost 620 Granada 
Reports 620 Me & My Gvt 720-720 
Alton Market 1120 v 1155 Fjtau Why 
Not Stay for Beaktasr? 1.40am 
Closedown. 

ULSTER As i 2 ndon except- 
■ U V? I crt 925am blockbusters Bl 50 
Sesame Street 1050 Groowe 
Ghouhes 11.15-1120 Cartoon 120pm 
Lunchtime 120-320 Film: Beach- 
comber 5.15-545 Bygpnea Special 620 
Summer Ed«on 6.15 Summer Sport 
620 Password 720-720 Alton Market 
1020 Witness 1025 HoW 1120 
Richard Ctayderman 1155 Sprttmg Image 
t22Sem News. Closedown. 

GRAMPIAN 

Thma 920 Baathaxfeaan Neonach' 
9555esame StreeM050 Struggle Be- 
neath the Sea 11.15-1120 Toytown 
120pm News 120 Guinness Book of 
Records 220-320 H«Kxy of Grand 
Prtx 5.15-545 Star Choice 620 North To- 
mgre 820 Whose Baby’ 7.00-7.30 
achoo Market 1120 SPGA Got) Champi- 
onships 1220 News. Closedown. 


1020 Cartoon 1025-1120 Posexlon 
pes 120pm News 120-3.00 Film: The 
Big Store 5.15-545 Sporting Alt 
Stars 6.00 About Angha 720-720 Albion 
Market 11.00 Fflm: A Touch ol Lows 
120am Janos Harvey Smgs. Closedown. 


EOTER3AINMENTS 


CONCERTS 


■AKB1CAN NALL 62S 8706/638 
88*1 Tou't 7 *6 A ralwy «f 


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*»YADH - VCSTCMMV AND 
TODAY - A Saudi E xpiHinct * 

Itaib- tOam-Spm July 30 to 
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wrvnK YOUNG (HASTENS vn 
ill sooimuyr aoui Daily 10 
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IVst 


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THAf W i m . A (area hwWI 
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all performances solo 

OUT Posutui* returns cnb 
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LONDON FESTIVAL 
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THEATRES 


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JANE EYRE -THE RELAPSE 

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mtrm 014156 3878 CC 379 6E65 

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JOHN SHEA M 
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foM NOW BOOKING TO FEB 

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ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MUSICAL 
MBhm at 7jo Matt wm at 2 JO 
A Sal 4.30 A 600 


m TOWN” S Exprra 

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ALDWYCH THEATRE 01-836 
O404/0641 rr Ol 37 9 6233 

IRVINS SERUM'S 

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ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

From Ihr durnralrr, Fmnal 
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sumne 
SUZI QUAY 
-L Win- up the nbhl ihrjnod 
da/rline Wi^i End iMwl 


■today - D Tel 
Matt Wo 


tun 7 30 Matt Wed & Sat 230 
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APOLLO THEATRE 437 2663 

4J4 3398 FU7I CaD 01 240 7200 
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Mon Fri 8 00 Sal 4 30 E 8.15 
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-MASTERLY- FT 
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Winner 1986 Tony Award 8 M 
Plav 

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APOLLO VICTORIA SS 828 8663^ 
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•08 orS 

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-A mesmeric merino” Wts On 
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-BRITISH FARCE AT ITS 88 5 1" 
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RUN FOR YOUR WIFE! 

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the. potrrpAVAf or -akash- 
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SOME SEATS S TILL AV AILABLE 

FOR TODAY'S P ER F O RMANCE. 

SPECIAL COHCESSKMS AT £7 

OH THURS MA TRIXES FOR _ 

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Haw BaaklaE Date April 1 7. 


FOR RETURNS i 

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THE PIT- Toni. Mon A' Tue* 
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DUKE OF YORKS 836 512? CC 
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THE PHANTOM OFTHE 
OPERA 

Starring 

MICHAEL CRAWFORD 

Sarah Stole 

Brigtilman Barton 

MUfir by ANDREW LLOYD 


Libretto by RICKARD 
STTLCOC & CHARLES HART 
Dtreried by HAROLD PRINCE 
Opens 9 Ocl 


JAN FRANCIS 
RONALD KOLCATE 
JOMI BARRON 

LEND ME A TENOR 

“A MASTERPIECE” Timm 
-FILLS THE THEATRE WITH 
THE SOL NO OF LAUGHTER** 
S EaP 

An An imran Comedy by 
Km Ludwig 

Direr lea bv Dana Cdmore 


GREENWICH THEATRE 01-8S8 
7765. Einunav 7 46 Mai Sal 
2 30 SANDRA DICKINSON, 
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A FU LL-TKROTTLE 
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Vr WX 01-437 3686/7 01-434 
1550 Ol 434 1060 01 734 

5166/7 

COUH BLAKELY 

-A brilliant « Myoufiy • 
rocmr oenonnaiKi'- F Tiroes 
to 

The Naitofiai Theatre's arriainwd 
• woduoton of 

ALAN AYCKBOURN'S 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

-HraribrraLuigb- funny “ Cdn 
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FRIDAY AUGUST 8 1986 


SPORT 


Day belongs to Hadlee 
as England stumble 


B; John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


TRENT BRIDGE: England 
have scored 240 for nine 
against New Zealand. 

Some more superb bowling 
by Richard Hadlee reduced 
England to 240 for nine when 
the second Test match against 
New Zealand.- sponsored by 
ComhilL began yesterday. In 
mostly cheerless weather he 
took six for 74 in 29.4 overs 
after Coney had won the toss 
and been pleased to field. 

It may be taken as read that 
England’ s batting was mostly 
pretty mediocre. Alhey made 
his first Test 50. a good, 
professional innings, and 
Gower confounded those who 
would have rested him by 
looking more secure than for a 
long time. It was as though the 
hint that he was near to being 
left out had been as good as a 
cure. Then Thomas made a 
useful 28, keeping New Zea- 
land in the field until the light 
went and confirming the ab- 
surdity of making him the 
regular No. 11 in the West 
Indies last winter. 

But the day revolved round 
Hadlee, who bowled six short 
spells in all — one at the start, 
two before and after lunch, 
two more before and after tea. 
and another which was inter- 
rupted when the batsmen were 
given the chance to go off with 
20 minutes remaining. In the 
process he became the third 
highest wicket taker in Test 
history. He went past Willis 
(325) yesterday and now has 
only Lillee (355) and Botham 
(354) ahead of him. This is 
Hadlee's 65th Test. Willis 
played 90, Lillee 70 and 
Botham has played in 84. 

In his last seven Test 
matches and a bit Hadlee has 
taken 62 wickets - and he is 
35 years old. It seemed almost 
like a bonus to the New 
Zealanders yesterday when 
first Watson, then Gray and 
finally Stirling helped out with 
wickets of their own. They 
bowled perfectly well, but it 
was Hadlee who had set iheir 
viclims up. 

He wasted nothing, probing 
every batsman at his weakest 


point, sometimes round the 
wicket and sometimes over, 
mostly to a full or fullish 
length, and off a run of no 
more than 1 8 yards. It is worth 
a visit to Trent Bridge just to 
watch him bowl; that is hqw 
good he is. 

Although the chairman of 
selectors last Sunday and 
England's captain on Wednes- 
day. one emphatically and the 
other inferentially said that 
Willey would be playing, he 
was left out when the time 
came, ft could be said that 
Diiley's withdrawal since the 
team was first chosen left 
England more in need of 
Pringle as a seam bowler than 
they otherwise would have 
been. 


Bridge, and after three-quar- 
ters of an hour Moxon .was 
bowled by him between bat 
and pad. A they was in less 
trouble to Hadlee, basically 
because be went right forward 
rather than half way. 

At lunch Athey had made 
42 out of England's 102 for 
two. On a morning when the 
crowd were rather huddled in. 
their seats, the New Zealand- 
ers had decided that cool 
drinks were called for. They 
did the same in the afternoon. 
You would not have thought 
from this that they are a hardy 
race or that they wanted to 
bowl as many overs in the day 
as possible. I doubt whether 
there was another match in 
the country yesterday, played 


Youth has its chance 


The England selectors have 
chosen a side of promising 
players for a Test and County 
Cricket Board XI against the 
New Zealanders at Edgbaston 
next Wednesday,. Thursday 
and Friday. Nine are under 25, 
the only exceptions being 
Nicholas, the captain, who is 
28. and Barnett, the Derby- 
shire captain and opening 
batsman, who is 26. No one 
from the four Nat West semi- 
finalists— Lancashire, Surrey, 
Sussex and Worcestershire — 
was considered. 

TEAM: M C J Nicholas (Hamp- 
shire, captain), K J Barnett (Deity- 
shire), A A Metcalfe (Yorkshire). J J. 

New Zealand made one 
change from the side that had 
the better of the Lord's Test. 
Stirling, a bowler, coming in 
for Rutherford, a batsman. 

After three overs England 
were 18 for no wicket, Gooch 
having scored them all. In the 
fifth over he was leg before, 
playing across the line and on 
the move. Beaten by his first 
tall, from Hadlee, Athey then 
got off the mark with a good 
hook and an on-side force off 
Stirling. Moxon never really 
got the hang of things. There is 
nothing easy about playing 
Hadlee bowling with a new 
ball, especially at Trent 


BOXING 


Whitaker (Leicestershire), J E Mor- 
ris (Derbyshire). R J Bnfey (North- 
amptonshire), P A J De Freius 
(Leicestershire). R C Russel! 
(Gloucestershire), P W Jarvis (York- 
shire). PM Such (Nottinghamshire). 
D V Lawrence (Gloucestershire). 

• Headingley authorities are 
to dig up and re-lay their Test 
pitch and appoint a deputy 
bead groundsman after the 
pitch was reported as being 
unfit for first-dass cricket. 
After Yorkshire lost their 
NatWest trophy quarter-final 
against Sussex by 88 runs last 
week, the Test and County 
Cricket Board contacted the 
county. 

by over 12s, in which they 
took drinks. 

For England's third wicket 
Athey and Gower added 83. 
This was Athey's best innings 
for England. He is a much 
more eager runner between 
wickets than most of 
England’s present batsmen. 
But it was disappointing that 
he got out when he did, leg 
before to one from Watson 
that cut tack at him. 

The pitch had no pace to 
speak of. but there was the 
occasional movement off the 
seam and the ball from Gray 
that had Gower leg before 
turned a lot out of a bowler's 


footmark. Gower padded up 
to it a chance to take with 
Gray bowling over the wicket. 

Hadlee's third wicket had 
come when he bowled Gatling 
just before a shower drove the 
players in for an early tea. 
Gatting looked cross with 
himself, having presented the 
bowler with anything but- a 
straight b&L Hadlee next made 
short work of England's two' 
spinners, getting them both 
caught at the wicket in quick 
succession off identical balls 
that left the bai and lifted 
more than most. 

He could have had Pringle 
by then, too, BraceweU at third 
slrp putting him down off a 
fairly straightforward chance. 
It was Emburey’s wicket that 
took Hadlee past WiJJis’s 
record and with Edmonds's he 
took five wickets in a Test 
innings for the 27th time. One 
more than Botham's previous 
record. 

After Pringle had hooked 
Stirling raLher tamely to long 
leg — I do wish he would start 
really hitting the ball again - 
Thomas and French stayed 
together for 50 minutes, - 
Thomas playing with a wel- 
come confidence. No doubt 
Hadlee was fortunate yes- 
terday in that it was neiLher 
very hot nor at all bright, this 
helping him, together with his 
marvellous technique, to keep 
going and to move the ball 
around. • 

Scoreboard 

ENG LAM): Ffrat tarings 

G A Gooch Ibw to Hadfea 19 

M D Moxon b HMfiM : 9 

C W J Athov Ibw b Watson 55 

D 1 Gower am b Grey 71 

■MW Gatting bKadtoo 17 

D R Prtogto c Watson b Stbang 21 

J E Emfauray c SmHb b Hwflao 9 

P H Edmonds c Smith b Hadtee 0 

JG Thomas bHadtee 28 

t6 N French not out 7 

G C Smafl not out — 0 

Extras (b 1,l> 3, nb 2) - 9 

Total (9 Wilts) 240 

PALL OP WICKETS: 1-18, M3, 3-128, 4- 
170,5-176, 5-191, 7-191, 8-205, 9-240. 
BOWLING (to (Me): Kadtoe 25+6-7*6; 
Sibling 17-3-62-1; Gray 13-4-80-1; Wat- 
son 14-5-41-1; Coney 7-1-18-0; 
BraccwoH 4-1-11-0. 

NEW ZEALAND: BA Edgar, JGWrigbiM 
D Craws, J J Crewe, *4 V Coney, E J 
Gray, Ft J Hadee, tl D S Srotti, J G 
BncnMfl, O A StMng, W Watson. 
Umpires: D J Constant and K E Palmar. 


RUGBY UNION 


Sibson looks beyond Andries Club will 


Middleweight Tony Sibson 
steps up as one of the most 
unlikely challengers eager to 
depose light-heavyweight 
Dennis Andries. Britain's sole 
reigning world champion. 
Sibson, from Leicester, wonld 
much prefer to be scrapping 
for a world middleweight 
champion again, but takes on 
Andries at London's Alexan- 
dra Palace on September 10 at 
the heavier weight for the 
Hackney boxer's World Box- 
ing Council crown. 

Sibson has taken on the 
assignment as he is convinced 
that victory over Andries will 
enable him to carry on where 
he left off in his quest for a 
world middleweight title. He 
dairas that as soon as he deals 
with the Hackney boxer he 
will immediately slim down so 


..By Bryan Stiles . .. 
that he can have another tilt at 
the world middleweight cham- 
pion, Marvin Hagier. He lost 
in the sixth round to the 
American three years ago 

His meeting with Andries 
will be the first all-British title 
bout since lightweights, Jim 
Watt and Charlie Nash, met at 
Kelvin Hall, Glasgow, in 
March. 1980. 

Andries, who took the title 
from American JB. William- 
son in May, will be making his 
first defence. Since he became 
world champion he has seen 
little difference in his lifestyle 
and feels he has not had the 
recognition his status de- 
serves. He is largely unknown 
outside the boxing fraternity 
and has not enjoyed the finan- 
cial perks that usually go with 
being a world champion. 




)OUrc^Rtal^tM 

It’s all too easy to get caught in the 
money trap. 

Either your income suffers or your 
capital dwindles. 

Hill Samuel together with the 
Nottingham Building Society- could have 
the answer you’re looking for. 

Its called the Hill Samuel Monthly 
Income Scheme, which combines 
the security of a Building Society- with 
the growth potential of Unit Trusts. 

If you have £6,000 or more to invest, 
complete and post die coupon, and well 
tell vou more. 


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issa INVESTMENT SERVICES 


He will be recelving tbe 
highest purse of his career and 
can look forward to an even 
higher fee if be is still around 
to unify the world title with a 
contest against whoever holds 
the WBA -version of 
championship at the time. 

He, or Sibson, will benefit 
from the promoter Frank 
Warren's partnership with the 
American impresario, Don 
King, who controls much of the 
boxing in the United States. 
Warren, who is also Sibson's 
manager, promises the winner 
a "very big pay day* 7 on his 
next on ting. 

In the main support boot at 
Alexandra Palace, Sammy 
Reeson from Battersea wifi 
defend his British 
cruiserweigbt title against 
Hitch in's Andy Stranghn. 


FOOTBALL 


Welshman 
earns 
his Wings 

Mickey Thomas, West 
Bromwich Albion's Welsh 
international winger, is mov- 
ing to Wichita Wings, the 
.American Indoor League club, 
for £35.000. Thomas signed 
for Albion last September for 
£100.000 but was one of the 
players placed on the transfer 
list by ihe manager, Ron 
Saunders, for refusing to live 
in the West Midlands. 

“it's disappointing because 
I thought I would suit the , 
manager's style.” Thomas 
said “However. I'm taking on 
the new challenge because I 
obviously had no future with 
West Brom." 

• Chariton Athletic, now in ' 
the first division, have re - 1 
ccived a double injury set- 
back. The midfield player. 
Alan Curbishley, still recover- 
ing from an ach files tendon 
operation, and the defender. 
John Pender, recuperating af- 
ter an ankle operation, will 
miss the start of the season. 

• Mick Harford, the Luton 
Town forward, has pulled out 
of the club's tour of Sweden 
and flown tack to England for 
his third knee operation in 
nine months. A club spokes- 
man said: “The surgeon says 
Mick should be fit to play tn 
the first League match of the 
season.” 

• Bobby Doyle, the Hull City 
midfield player, will miss the 
first two months of the season 
after breaking his right leg in 
Wednesday's match with 
Doncaster at Belle Vue. 

• Martin Dobson, the former 
England midfield player, is 
poised to hang up his boots to 
concentrate on managing 
Bury. Aged 3$ and a pro- 
fessional for more than 20 
years, he feels his best playing 
days are over. 


miss 

full Moon 

By David Hands 
Rugby Correspondent 

Richard Moon, the England 
B scrum half, will be missing 
from Nottingham's ranks 
early in the new season. 
Moon, a blue in 1984, has 
been invited to join Cam- 
bridge University’s tour to the 
Far East Harlequins will also 
be travelling to the other side 
of the world before their 
season begins. They leave 
next Tuesday for a. five match 
tour, beginning in Singapore 
and ending in Bangkok. 

Three of their inter- 
nationals, Rose and Salmon of 
England and Milne (Scot- 
land), are unavailable to tour 
— Milne is returning to Scot- 
land — but David Cooke will 
lead a 23-strong parly contain- 
ing much experience as well as 
the promise of outstanding 
juniors. The Harlequins party 
will be managed by John 
Currie and coached by Dick 
Best. 


Cardiff up 
in arms 

Ron Jones, Cardiff City's 
managing director, has 
'aunched a scathing attack on 
the Welsh FA Council follow- 
ing their decision to stage 
Wales’s first two home. Euro- 
pean championship matches 
in Wrexham. “They are ignor- 
ing the needs of the South 
Wales fans and I find that 
amazing. I wouldn't even 
complain if they gave an 
international to Swansea 
rather than Cardiff" said Mr 
Jones. • ■ - - 
■ He dairas that the Welsh 
FA are “teaching Cardiff City 
a lesson” because they with- 
held gate-money from the 
WalesScotland World Cup tie 
at Ninian Park, after a dispute 
over receipts. 



Kiwis triumphant: Joy in the slips as Gooch falls lbw to Hadlee (Photograph: Claris Hauls) 


EQUESTRIANISM 


Oliver could not 
ask for more 

From Jenny MacArthor, Dublin 


Robert Oliver was 
congratulating himself on a 
shrewd investment at the 
Dublin Horse Show yesterday 
after watching Ned Cash's 
four-year-bid heavyweight 
Overture win the Ridden 
Hunter Championship. Oliver 
had bought the horse the day 
before, attracted by its bold 
outlook and commanding 
presence. Ironically, Oliver, 
riding Huge McCuskefs five- 
*y ear-old lightweight cham- 
pion Chubb Guardian, 
competed against his new 
purchase. 

The reserve championship 
went to Valerie Glass’s Step 
On. another . four-year-old 
heavyweight, making it a great 
day for the quality Heavy- 
weight type of hunter, a rare 
commodity these days. 

Overture, bred by Patrick 
Quirke in co Tipperary and 
bought by the Cashs as a three- 
year-old, is by Carnival Night, 
who also sued the Gashs's 
Standing Ovation, winner of 
the Dublin hunter champion- 
ship in 1983. Yesterday Over- 
ture was expertly shown by 
Frances Cash, who had wisely 
opted to ride him in the 
heavyweight championship 
rather than her other winner. 
My Noble Lord. 


nine-year-old Irish-bred geld- 
ing. who has won more than 
double the amount his owner 
paid for him; (£4,500) as' a 
three-year-old. 

Ireland's' Eddie .Macken 
proved how last Charles had 
gone when he sped round, 
with the crowd urging him on, 
and, although good enough to 
take second place, was almost 
four seconds behind Charles. 

Macken looked as if he 
would have his revenge in the 
next class, the Irish Whiskey 
Classic. Riding Carroll’s 
Flight, he went into the lead 
after a fast round in the eight- 


horse jump-off Charles, on 
April Suq, finished a fraction 
of a second behind Macken: 


•Both riders were beaten by 
Freland’s Captain Gerry 
Mullins, the lan to go. who 
produced a superb round on 
the inexperienced eight-year- 
old Glendalough. 

John Whitaker, on Ryan's 
Son, the horse he rides in 
today's Nations Cup, looked 
set to win the class but came in 
too sharply at the final fence 
and had a refusal. David 
Broom e.jvhOse horses dislike 
the soft going, did not com- 
pete in the class and is not in . 
the Nations .Cup team. 


Jameson International open: 1. 



SPORT IN BRIEF 



Big dates 

The Rugby Leag u e World 
Cup qualifying game between 
Great Britain and France will 
be played at Headingley on 
January 24, and the two 
countries win meet again in 
France on February 8. Great 
Britain will also play the 
Australian touring side at Old 
Txafford on' October 25. 
Elland Road on November 8 
■and Wigan on November 21 


Mhmdfldr reffrink ! 

Lillis goes 

Mark Lillis. Manchester 
City's leading scorer last sea- 
son, has jollied Derby County 
in exchange for Trevor Chris- 
tie and £100.000. Lillis scored 
only two goals in his last 18 
games for City. 

About-turn 

Javed Miandad, the Paki- 
stan Test batsman, is believed 
to be interested in playing, 
again , for Glamorgan, three 
months after being dismissed 
for failing .to report at the start 
of the season, Glamorgan 
signed Denis Hickey, an 
Australian fast bowler, ip his 
absence but are currently bot- ' 
tom in the championship. 


Going down 

Four dubs will be relegated 
from Rugby League's first 
division and only -two dubs 
promoted from the second at 
the end of the 1 986-87 season, 

. thus reducing the first division 
from 16 teams to 14. 

Nicholl moves 

Rangers Have signed Jimmy 

ttichoil, West Bromwich 
Albion's right back, for an 
undisclosed sum. The club 
have now spent more than £2 
million on new players this 
summer. 

Safety first 

Gloucestershire, the county 
championship leaders, have 
banned ■ their players from 
. driving to away matches and 
have hired a luxury coach. 
“We- face some long journeys 
late in the day at a lime when 
our pliers will be vulnerable 
through tiredness,” said Da- 
vid Grave ney, their captain. 

Hornets. saved 

The shareholders of Roch- 
dale Hornets have agreed to 
continue their support on 
hearing that Rochdale 
Corporation and a consortium 
are prepared to assist the dub. 
-Warrington have - signed a 
three-year sponsorship deal 
■with Vladrvar Vodka worth 


Priory out Top entry 


Edgbaston Priory squash 
club. one. of the founder 
members of the American 
Express Premier League, have 
withdrawn due to a shortage 
of sponsorship and top-class 
players. 


Virginia Long, the world 
champion. Ian Star. Loma 
Clarke and Garissa Strachan 
are among the entrants for. the - 
Croft Original British Open 
horse trials at Gaicombe Park 
from August 16 to 17.’ •’ 1 ' 


• with /Vladrvar Vodka worth 
£60.000. 

Bngner bout 

Joe Bugner. aged 36. 
Britain's former _ European 
heavyweight . boxing' cham- 
pion. is to aitero pt'a co meback 
against a leading American in 
Sydney on Septeniter 15, 



ATHLETICS 

Nehemiah 
makes 
up for lost 
time 

By Pat Butcher 
Athletics Correspondent 

The comeback of Renal do 
Nehemiah. who competes -at 
Crystal Palace tonight, has 
promised more than any other 
of the extraordinary happen- 
ings this week. That it is not to 
demean the accomplishments 
of Ingrid Kristiansen in taking 
more than 10 seconds off Zola 
Budd's 5,000 metres record, Of 
a supposedly less than fit Said 
Aouita in running within a 
fraction of his own 5,000m 
record, ■ of Allan Weils in 
defeating- both Common- 
Wtalth sprint chaqipicras; Of of 
Steve" Qvett .itr running his 
fastest .T400UI in. thnee.years 
and this year's best But, after 
four years out of competitive 
athletics. Nehemiah ran just 
over half a second outside bis 
own ilOra hurdles world 
record of 12.93 seconds when 
he won m Viareggio in 
I3.48sec two nightsago. 

And the -prospect is that 
Nehemiah will run even faster 
this evening in the Miller Lite 
IAC meeting. For .he races 
against Gregg: Foster, the 
world champion. Roger King- 
dom, the Olympic- champion, 
and Mark . McKoy, - the 
Commonwealth champion. 
Nehemiah Is to he. congratu- 
lated for either his courage or 
bis confidence, ' but his de- 
cision to race ■ immediately 
against top class opposition is 
an object lesson to those 
athletes, most of them British, 
who run away from their 
opponents before they even 
get on the track. 

Tonight's race is' also an 
opportunity for the young 
British hurdles - star. Colin 
Jackson, who has been tagged 
“a young Nehemiah” to cross 
hurdles with the master. 

Jackson won the inaugural 
world junior title last month 
in Athens, where, at a concur- 
rent- International Amateur 
Athletic Federation council 
meeting, Nehemiah was re- 
instated after being banned 
while playing professional 
fynerican Football for four 
years. It was a ban which 
defied logic, for Nehemiah 
claimed that he could have 
earned more in amateur 
athletics than the $400,000 
(aboirt £27Z000) which he got 
for playing professional foot- 
ball for four years with the Sam 
Francisco 49ers. 

The intermediate hurdles 
should also be one of the most 
interesting races, despite the 
withdrawal of Andie Phillips 
and Danny Harris, leaving Ed 
Moses._ the double Olympic 
champion, another virtual 
solo race in his avowed charge 
towards the sub-47 ‘ seconds 
barrier. 

Oyett still carrying a spike 
injury, from -the ■ Common- 
wealth.Games, which did not, 
however, stop him winning 
the 1.500m in Koblenz two 
nights ago = in 3:34.5. and 
Aouita, who won his-5.000m 
m La Coruna, bad still not 
decided’ last night, whether 
they would compete this eve- 
ning. - But if sa .ft is unlikely 
that.it would be in'tbe same 
race. 

For the rest the Inter- 
national Athletes' Cub have' 
assembled their- best meeting 
since the demise of their 
sponsorship with Cora Cola 
t*o years ago. and - with a 
budget of a million pounds 
™ ls year, with the likelihood 
of a 50 per cent increase next 
wear, the meeting looks like 
living up to the IAC chairman 
David Bedford’s -prediction 
foat “it will be second only to 
2unch on the Mobil Grand 
Prix circuit” 


Hungary 
to keep | 
eastern VI 11 


promise 

From John Blonsden 
Budapest 

This is an historic week for 
sand prix motor racing, one 
m which a long-time ambition 
of the Formula One Constrncv 
tors Association (FOCA) 
chief, Bernard Ecclestone, is 
being brought dose to fulfil- 
ment. On Sunday,, as the 11th 
round of the world- champion- 
skip, a Hungarian grand prix 
will take place on a brand pew 
purpose-built drenit 13 miles 
north-east of Budapest, to 
mark the first time the world 
championship has moved into 
eastern Europe. 

Mr Ecclestone hopes the 
championship will become a> 
truly world-wide contest 
involving races on all conti- 
nents and regions of the 
industrialized and commer- 
cialized world. 

That Sunday's race is to 
take place at ail is a consid- 
erable achievement in inter- 
national diplomacy _ and 
negotiation. That, to judge 
from - first appearances, it 
promises to be une of the best 
planned and organized events 
of the season and that H will 
take place on one- of the most 
appealing of all . circuits for 
spectators and supported fay 
the most sophisticated opera- 
tional infrastructure yet seen 
on the world championship 
.scene, is nothing short of 
remarkable. 

Negotiations for a Hungar- 
ian grand prix began in Brazil 
in July, 1983, when one of the 
race organisers there. Tanas 
Rohonyi, of Hungarian an- 
cestry, learned of Ecclestone's 
interest in taking the worid 
championship into eastern Eu- 
rope and alerted the Hungary 


Memorial to 
Ferenc Szisz 


The Hungarian government 
stepped in and, in Febraary 
last year, tire transport min- 
ister, Lqjos -Urban, was given 
the task of co-ordinating the 
preparations for running a 
1986 grand prix to be staged 
on a purpose-built two and* 
haffmde track near the village 
of M&gyorod. 

" Motor sport wds first staged 
m Hungary in 1901, and it was 
a Hungarian driver, Ferenc 
Szisz, who was the victor of the 
first official international 
grand prix which took placets 
France in 1906. A memorial to 
Szisz is to be unveiled in the 
main administration block of 
the new circuit. Sunday's race, 
however, will he the first grand 
prix to take place in Hungary 
for half a century. 

-Although Hungary has been 
active in the lower echelons of 
motor Sport in recent years, 
their lack of a proper draft 
has meant that most of their 
events have had to take {dace 
in. other eastern European 
countries. The enthusiasm far 
the sport however. Is deep- 
rooted and more than 40,000 
people attended a “w arm-op” 
race in June when the new 
Hnngaroring was tested for 
the first time and the main 
event was. for single sea tecs 
powered by Russian Lada 
engines, an eastern European 
equivalent of our Formula 
Ford. 

The designers of the circuit 
have managed to build no less 
than 26 -corners into the two 
and a half mile lap and the 
undulating- countryside has 
provided some m agn ificent 
vantage points for spectators. 
In character, the circuit bor- 
rows something from both 
Jerez, which was used for the 
first time for the Spanish 
grand prix this year, and 
Brands Hatch, ■ and the , 
opportunity to create the dr* 
cnit from what was prerionsly 
barren land has not been 
wasted. 

Driver response 

favourable 



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Stand capacity for 32flW 
people is angamehteff W 
standing space for a farther 
156,04X1, and the Hungarian 
automobile dub are : already 
talking about a sell-oat . 

Two hours were allocated (9 
the teams for femflfara mtioa | 
runs around the draft this i 
week and the initial driver 
response has been generally 
favourable. If there rs a gen- 
eral criticism it is that the 
dreuit k proving to be slower 
than most antiapatut. "That 
is just the sort of comment I 
like to hear," Derek Ongaro, 
the FISA draft fampat® 

commented. 

Once the dost has been 
cleared and the track becomes 
tes slippery, lap times awsrf 
90 seconds, giving an average 
speed of 100 mph» can be 
expected before the end tf 
qtmtifying mi Saturday: '£ 

“They’ve done a goedjefa. 

Nigel MaaseU said, aftbongb 

he added that it was "tight, 
stow wad sOppery”. Moth* 
Bnmdle aidei; “There, are *■, 
Jwj of ‘tight’ oooiers, so Hjj 
difficult to set np-ta * 
a**®-” Alain Pro* had £ 
dabmns honov of.havfog 
first “off". : 




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