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TIMES 


No £2331 


SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


Pretoria air links to be cut 




* r +-? 



• Mr Robert Mngabe, the Prime 
Minister of Zimbabwe, warned his 
countrymen to' prepare for “economic 
war” with Sooth Africa. 

• The. Sooth African Broadcasting 
Corporation said Zambia and Zim- 
babwe ' risked “decline” by storting 
. sanctions. " 


• Thirteen people charged with vi- 
olence were freed in Cape Town in the 
trial which followed policemen hidden 
in crates shooting at rioters (page 5) 

• Searches by South African Customs 
.will hit hardest' at the' Zimbabwe 
tobacco industry, . which last year 
earned £140 million (page 5>. 


From Jan Raafh in Harare airi Michael Hornsby in Jobamtesbing 


Mr. Robert Mugabe, the 
Prime Minister of Zimbabwe, 
yesterday warned his country- 
men, to prepare for “economic 
war” with South Africa* 

He intends by the end of the 
. year not onJy to sever air links 
. with South Africa, but a^o to 
’ ban overflying and stopover 
rights to airiines flying to and 
from there. - 

Alternative trade routes to 
bypass South Africa's railway 
and port system would have to 
be established “within the 
next three months*' and be 
- defended “to the last man” he 
said. 

“Let them proceed. We 
shall proceed in our own way. 
Zimbabwe will not die.” 

But the state-controlled 
South African Broadcasting 
Corporation said, in a . radio 
commentary yesienjay. that 
Zambia and Zimbabwe had 
risked “a further decline in 
their already low quality of 
human life” by “confronting 
South Africa with sanctions”. 

The commentary, echoing 
the defiant “do yourworst and 
be damned” tone - of official' 
pronouncements, over the past 
few weeks, accepted that, the 
South African economy would 
undoubtedly I !$ufrer dents in 
the years ahead”. 

Mr Mugabesaid Zimbabwe 
intended to gjriemenl“to the. 
filin' the 'package - of - flight, 
sanctions adopted at the 
Commonwealth mini -summit 
in London this week. 

But some countries would 
need “a little more time” to 


process the legal instruments 
for implementing sanctions. 

“The timing ts-noi yet fixed 
but could very well be towards 
the end of the year.” he said. 

It- would -be “foolish” for 
Zimbabwealoqe to stop flying 
to South Africa.' “If we sever 
air links witfr South Africa 

TrojanHorsetrial 5 

Border searches 5 

Canada’s action ' • 5 

then we would hot aHbw any ' 
other country to fly from- our 
territory to Sooth Africa, nor 
to overfly Zimbabwe tcSouih 
Africa, or there from.” 

He said that South Africa 
would retaliate against its 
neighbours “mililarily and 
economically” for their im- 
position of sanctions. : 

“When an economic war 
has-been declared against you 
. . . You accept it assiich. You 
don’t go crawling to those who 
are waging the war against 
you. You must fight back. 

“AH thought about luxury 
and comfort will have toga It 
is like a war. “Prepare for it 
And we shall be prepared for 
it. ifwe shall have to eat sadza 
(maize meal porridge) without 
nyama (meat).” 

Mr Mugabe's, .references to 
countering Smith Africa's, ex- 
pected retaliation appeared to 
fie tess ; iri3*ed io aggressive 
measures, t§an to' putting 
alternative trade routes bade 
into operation. ' 

These routes had - to be 
established as a matter of 


urgency, he said. “We will 
have to work night and day, 
and make our day 4# hours to 
ensure that we achieve some 
measure of self-sufficiency, 
not within a year, not within 
six months but within three 
months.” 

“We win have to defend 
these routes to the last man,” 
he said, even if it meant lining 
the railway lines yard-by-yard 
with troops. 

He referred to trade restric- 
tions on Zimbabwean and 
Zambian export cargoes im- 
posed earlier this week as. a 
“blockade” but did not go into 
detail. . - 

The Southern African front 
line states (Angola. Botswana, 
Mozambique, Tanzania, 
Zambia and Zimbabwe) 
would need support, he said. 
He expected it to come from 
the “progressive (socialist) 
world”. 

. But be added: “Military 
support I don't think will be 
forthcoming.” 

He admitted his country's 
military., vulnerability to 
South Africa, saying; “We 
must accept we have not built 
up the mUttary capability yet 
to enable us to offer an 
effective defence.” 

' He also ruled out the grant- 
ing of military bares to antk 
South African -giaafCfit, and 
tord: ..*^'.. haven't got .the 
military capability to defend 
them.” R would adsd give 
South Africa “an excuse to 
invade us\ 

Continued on page 18, col 6 



“I feel fine,” Mrs Thatcher said leaving hospital yesterday (Photograph: Snresh Karadia). 

Thatcher’s surgery ‘total success’ 

By Sheila Gunn, Political Staff 


Mrs Margaret Thatcher retained to 
Downing Street yesterday , two days 
after die operation on her i%ht hand. 

She told a small crowd on leaving 
King Edward VII Hospital for Officers 
in London: “I feel fme. The operation 
was very successful bat it is . going to 
take a little time to recover”. 

She said she was' m no pain bat her 


right arm is expected to be in a sling for 
the next month. She is unable to stoke 
hands bnt has two fingers free so that 
she can sign State documents. 

The operation for Dupnytren's 
contracture, which had been pulling 
the small finger of her hand towards 
the palm, was described as “a total 
success”. 


Violence feared as ‘loyalist’ 
parade is rerouted by RUC 



£28,000 to 
be won 

• There is £28,000 to 
be won today in The 
Times Portfolio Gold 
competition. 

• The daily | 
risen to £12,000 
because there has 
been no winner for two 
days and the weekly 
prize is doubled to 
£16,000 because 
there was no winner last 
WGCkm 

• Portfolio fist, page 
23; rules and how to 
play, page 29; weekly 
list, information service, 
page 18. 


Bomb inferno 

A car bomb turned the west 
Beirut ' street which once 
housed the PLO headquarters 
into an inferno and killed at 
least 25 people Page 5 

US accused 

On the eve of US-Soviet talks 
on- arms control in Moscow 
this weekend, Pravda has ac- 
cused Washington of still 
, wanting; lo achieve military 
superiority Page 7 

Disease fight 

Research is being carried out 
national!}' in an urgent bid to 
contain the outbreak of men- 
ingitis which has claimed 72 
victims so far this year 

Page 2 

Cash crashes 

Who is to blame when a 
franchise operation crashes? 
family Money investigates 
. Pages24 to 27 

Degree results 

Degrees awarded by the 
University of . Sheffield are 
published today Page 29 




•- HoukNois 2-4 

LawReport 29 



■ Overseas- 5,7- 

Leaders 9 

“■ ‘ ' 

• - v 

. . Apptf 17,38 

Letters 9 


. . . c. •"“* 

- Arts 18 

Wrthsjtate, 

Obituary 17 

ReEgiOB 17 



• naniftfes 17 

Serncea - 17 


.’ft' 

Bridge 15 

Science 17 

r j i • : : 

\ * . - ; 

Business .19-27 

Sport 3*3134 


- * > » 

- Chess £15 

Theatres^tr 14 



• Court - 17 

TV & Radio 33 


. >i! 

, Oross*ordslS.l8 

Uoirs . 17.29 

A-i 


^ Diary - 8 

Weather >8 


*»■ • 

Ennis 18 

Wills 17 


i'- - ’ . *. 

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it tr fr ft 


Soccer clubs face 



By David Sapsted 

British soccer dubs could be 
banned from playing even 
friendly matches abroad 
following yesterday's. Moody 
battle between rival gangs of 
fans on a Sealink ferry to 
Holland 

Mr Dick Tracey, the Sports 
Minister, and Mr Bert 
Miilichip, chairman of the 
Football Association,' agreed 
that such a ban would have to 
be considered in the wake of 
the violence which involved 
more than 100 West Ham . and 
Manchester . - United 
supporters. 

Five people were injured 
three needing urgent medical 
treatment for stab wounds, 
and 15 were -arrested as a- 
result of the ! running 


batlle.The ferry, tht Konihgm 
Beatrix, was forced to return 
to Harwich, Essex, midway 
through its journey to the 
Hook of Holland .because of 
the fighting. 

Seahnk announced last 
night that it would slop soccer 
fens travelling on the -route in 
future. - 


With British dubs hoping 
that FIFA might soon lift the 
ban on^urdpean competition, 
-imposed alter the 1985 riot by 
Liverpool fens at the. Heysel 
Stadium, Brussels, Mr Tracey 
described yesterday's incident 
as a tragedy for the game. It 
could put back Britain's 
chances of resuming ^ ^ full-scale 
international competition “by 
years” he said. 

“These were idiots, absolute 
idi.bi& They must .realise that 
-tjiis kind of behaviour is-going 
to break football, certainly in 
ap' international sphere.” 

- He believed the FA should 
now -review the whofe ques- 
tion of pre-season friendlies 
with the possibility of banning 
them altogether, especially 
where' they involve travel to 
Ehrope. 

Such a; possibility was. in 
feet, discussed at- a meeting of 
the Government's working 
party on soccer hooliganism, 
chaned by Mr Tracey, earlier 
this week. It was decided to 
take no action because of the 

Continued on page 2, col 6 


A major security operation 
involving hundreds of police 
and soldiers began last night 
as fears of violence grew 
following the re-routing of a 
“loyalist” parade in a mainly 
Roman - Catholic village in 
Northern Ireland. . . 

Mr Peter Robinson, MP for 
East Belfast, thedeputy leader 
of the Democratic Unionist 
Party, who was to have been 
tto chief speaker at the parade 
was stiU-bemg held by the Irish : 
police. : 

As loyalist leaders threat- 
ened to attempt to defy the 
Royal Ulster Constabulary's 
decision, security forces virtu- 
ally sealed- off the centre of 
Keady in South Armagh. Po- 
lice in riot gear were sent to 
the town, with the Army 
acting as back-up. 

Throughout the north the 
effects of IRA threats to 
contractors supplying security 
forces continued, with two 
companies supplying milk to 
the Army in Co Down 
announcing that they were 
ending their contracts, and an 
electrical firm in Downpatrick 
confirming that they stopped 


By Richard Ford 

working for the security forces 
several months ago. 

Police were investigating 
reports that 30 Roman Catho- 
lic building workers left a site 
at Ballymena, Co Antrim, 
after being threatened by loy- 
alist groups and there was 
widespread condemnation of 
the Ulster Freedom Fighters 
who warned that they too had 
drawn ap a list of republican 
targets. 

' Leaders of the four main 
Churches in the north issued a 
joint statement condemning 
the threats from both sides of 
the sectarian divide and the 
“invasion” on Thursday of 
Contibret in Co Monaghan 
by a mob of masked loyalists. 

■The Church leaders, wor- 
ried about the political vac- 
uum and rising tension, called 
for political leadership that 
could command support in 
the province. 

Mr Robinson learned of the 
RUCs decision to confine the 
parade to a half-mile route 
away from the centre of Keady 
during a visit to the Garda 
station in Monaghan town by 


his wife Iris and party 
colleagues. 

Mrs Robinson brought a 
meal from the north because 
her husband had refused all 
food and drink since his arrest 
at 2am on Thursday morning 
during the incident at 
GontribreL 

During the night the Irish 
army were drafted in to guard 
the police station and an 
extension order was signed 
allowing him to be held for 
another 24 hours under the 
republic’s Offences Against 
the State Acl 

Mrs Robinson and DUP 
colleagues attacked his 
continuing detention, claim- 
ing that there was collusion 
between the two governments 
and police forces to prevent 
him attending the Keady pa- 
rade. 

Mr Ian Paisley, DUP leader, 
said the arrest showed the type 
of justice Protestants could get 
in a united Ireland and in- 
dicated that he might be 
cutting short his visit to the 
United Stales because of the 

Continued on page 18, cot 4 


Lifeline 
of £25m 
for tin 
industry 

By Tim Jones 
The Government yesterday 
offered a £25 million lifeline 
to the Cornish tin industry, 
whicb has been facing the 
threat of complete closure 
since last October when trad- 
ing in the metal was sus- 
pended on the London Metal 
Exchange. 

A total of 640 jobs and two 
mines, the Wheal Jane and 
South Crafty, owned by 
Canton Consolidated Ltd. a 
subsidiary of the Rio Tinto- 
Zinc Corporation, will be 
secure for at least five years 
under the deal. 

Hundreds of jobs in sup- 
plier industries will also be 
saved with the money, which 
is to be provided in the form 
of an interest-free loan of up to 
£15 million, with Govern- 
ment guarantees of commer- 
cial loans of £10 million. 

The aid will enable RTZ to 
undertake a planned £31 mil- 
lion capital development pro- 
gramme over the next five 
years, designed to reduce costs 
at the mines and make them 
more competitive. 

But in spite of the lifeline 
announcement, 300 workers 
will lose their jobs at the 
mines, which the company 
said would have been dosed 
on August 1 8 unless Govern- 
ment aid was forthcoming. 

Yesterday's decision came 
after months of lobbying by 
the community, spearheaded 
by Mr David Penhaligon. 
Liberal MP for Truro, and 
local Conservative MPs. Clo- 
sure of the mines would have 
pushed west Cornwall's un- 
employment rate up to nearly 
50 per cenL 

Mr Paul Channon. Sec- 
retary of State for Trade and 
Industry, who made the 
announcement, did not offer 
any similar hope or aid to the 
independently owned Geevor 
mine near Land's End, which 
has laid off most of its 300 
workforce while it seeks Gov- 
ernment help. 

Mr Channon said yesterday: 
“What this scheme is propos- 
ing to do is to provide 
permanent jobs in the tin 
mining industry anti. Corn- 
wall, and we think the scheme 
is viable and in the end nearly 
900 people will be employed 
in it "He denied he was 
providing subsidies for a 
“lame duck” 

Of Geevor, he said: "We 
could not find any way of 
finding a viable scheme which 
could keep it working profit- 
ably for a long time. I don't 
think it is fair to give an 
operating subsidy to prop up 
jobs for a few more years 
which will not last" 

Mr Penhaligon said: "This 
is a remarkable moment It is 
the first lime this Government 
has given a farthing to any- 
thing but a bank since 1979.” 

He added: “This is a breath- 
ing space on the assumption 
Continued on page 18, col 3 



THE TIMES 


The paper 
for 

business 

Morc British 
businessmen are 
reading The Times 
than ever before. 

The Businessman's 
Readership Survey, 
published 

yesterday, shows that 
the proportion of 
businessmen who read 
The Times has risen 
by 42.4 percent over 
the last four years - 
a larger increase than 
for any other 
quality daily 
newspaper. 

The shares of 
business readership 
held bv The 
Guardian and Daily 
Telegraph have 
fallen over the same 
period and the 
Financial Times share 
is unchanged. Only 
The Times has gone 
on growing in the 
business world. 


MONDAY 


Swinging 
into their 
forties 



The children of the 
post-war ‘baby boom’ 
thought they had a 
chance to change the 
world. Starting on 
Monday, a three-pan 
series looks at how 
their ideals are 
standing up to the 
realities of middle age 


TUESDAY 


Leader of 
the pack 

Steve Cram, the 
first among equals of 
Britain’s middle 
distance athletes, 
looks to the future 


Gold price rises as 
shares fall again 


Reagan to have tests 


Washington - President 
Reagan tsigoing into hospital 
today for medical tests for a 
problem which the White 
House refused’to-disdosei.A 
spokesman, however, insisted 
Mr Reagan was feeling “fine" 
(Michael Binyon write?). . 

Mr Reagan has cancelled his 
normal weekend, visit to 
Camp David, and will have a 
urinary examination at the US' 


Naval Hospital in Bethesda. 

The' examination is not part 
of his periodic -check-ups, 
taken since bis cancer opera- 
tion last year. - Nor is it 
connected with his decision, 
announced on Thursday, to 
submit to drug tests ■ 

Today the 75-year-old Pre- 
sident will have been in office 
longer . than any President 
since Eisenhower, ■ 


By Michael Clark 
Stock Market 
- Correspondent 

Shares fell further yes-, 
teiday, ending ope of the 
worst weeks in the stock 
market's history. 

Early attempts at a rally to 
try to recover some of the huge 
losses which wiped more than 
£7 billion off the value of 
many of Britain's leading 
companies, ended in failure. 
At tne end of the day, the FT 
index of top 30 shares finished 
4.1 down at 1,217.4. This 
week the index has tumbled a 
record-breaking 56 points. 

A gloomy outlook for Brit- 
ish industry was -revealed in 
the past few days after dismal 
trading- news from two key 
barometers of the- manufac- 
turing world - GKN anti TI 
Group. 

The - market remains scep- 
tical about economic pros- 
pects despite the Opec 
agreement on oil -production 
levels. ■ 

' Yesterday, investors wor- 


1 . SaraO****** 1 1 

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-1320 


P ’ 

FT 30 

-12*0 

INDEX 


- \ 

-1240 


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1 ■ JUN * JUL * AUG 1 1 


ried about the future of share 
prices turned to the traditional 
haven in times of crisis— gold. 
.The gold price soared- $8 to 
53703 an ounce — its highest 
for more than two years. Gold 
shares responded to the jump 
and some of the leading mines 
sported gains of up to S7. 

But stockbrokers . win be 
idtngan anxious weekend. 
ie dealer sakt "Conditions 
are still very nervous. I can't 
see any prospect of the market 
pulling round at the 
moment.” 

Stock market report page 21 


Costliest Greek figure may be a fake 


- By Geraldine Norman 

The most expensive Greek 
sculpture hr the world, has 
been challenged as a feke. The 
life-size Thasian marble statue 
of a male -nude dated drea 
540-530 BC was purchased by 
the Getty Museum of Malibu, 
California, for a reputed 
$7milHonin 1984. ; 

The original asking price is 
thought io have been ainsid- 
erably higher; undffitfal ra- 
ports vary between $12 
million and $30 million. Even 
at $7 million it. is by fer the. 
most expensive antique sculp- 
ture on record. 

It has not yet, been seen by: 
the public but the Getty plans 
to -put it on exhibition this 


vt- 


-autumn. It will also be pub- 
lished .“in the scholarly 
literature”; it says; 

The' sculpture was found by 
Jiri Frel.the museum's former 
curator of antiquities, and is 
said to come from a Swiss 
private collection. 

The sculpture's authenticity 
is challenged openly for the 
first tin* in the September 
issue of New York's Con- 
noisseur magazine. . 

: The' editor,' Thomas 
Hoving.- who was. formerly 
director of the Metropolitan 
Museum of Art in New York.- 
-went. to Malibu to kjok at the 
scufpture. He found it 
“strangely -sufficautious and 
. mechanical in execution” and 


the condition “loo pristine for 
an ancient piece”. 

His interest was aroused by 
the Roman art restorer Pico 
CelKni, who is profiled in the' 
magazine and who roundly 
dismisses the statue. “"That 
figure is amply revolting: una 
schifenji! Half man, half 
woman -and clumsily broken 
to boot” 

Evelyn Harrison of New 
York's. Institute of Fine Arts 
“disagrees with it for a num- 
ber of aspects" and:: Dr .Iris 
Love, also of New York is 
bothered’ by "the number of 
styles - dating to different 
periods”. 


mended the kouros (male, 
nude sculpture) for 
acquisition.” she said 

The sculpture had arrived at 
the -Getty Museum on ap- 
proval by " December 1983 
■when it was shown to the 
trustees, including Federico 
Zerl the Mian art historian. 

In the wonds of Arthur 
Houghton Jnr, another Getty 
curator of Greek art. Zeri 
“threw a tantrum and called 
the sculpture a blatant 
forgery". After a year spent, 
canvassing scholarly opinion 
in Europe and America- the 
museum decided to go-ahead 
with the purchase. _ 


“I would never have recom- Masterpiece or- feke? page 8' 


Threat by 
Maxwell 
on Games 

By Mark Ellis 

Mr Robert Maxwell yes- 
terday threatened to resign his 
fund-raising role as co-chair- 
man of the Commonwealth 
Games Organizing Commit- 
tee if the games* suppliers or 
creditors pressed for payment 

The ultimatum was deliv- 
ered as Labour-controlled 
Edinburgh District Council 
considered legal action to 
recover £750.000 which they 
claim is owed to them by the 
organisers of the games, which 
stand to lose up to £3.8 
million. 

In an open letter to suppli- 
ers and creditors. Mr Maxwell 
says that if any creditor 
presses for payment before 
September 30. when all fund- 
raising will be completed, “I 
will cease my own and my 
colleagues' fund-raising activ- 
ities. and invite the board to 
appoint a receiver or put the 
company into liquidation. 

Mr Maxwell urges creditors 
to make a donation from their 
bills to offset the cost of 
staging the games and points 
out that £1.3 million is avail- 
able as cash in band for 
payments. 

A further £1.5 -million of 
bridging finance can be raised 
in anticipation of fund-raising 
revenue to be received by the 
end of September. 

A spokesman for Mr- Max- 
well said last night that predic- 
tions of up to £4 million losses 
were “the worst possible 
scenario.” 

The cash shortfall will be 
assessed by the end- of this 
month and the games com- 
pany will apply for Govern- 
ment aid and lodge an 
application with a foundation 
s« . up., by Mr Ryoichi 
Sarakawa, a Japanese en- 
trepreneur. who is expected to 
underwrite losses, on the 
games. 



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activities include sailing, fishing, climbimg, pony 
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HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


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Urgent research into 
meningitis aims to 
contain deadly disease 


Research projects are under 
way throughout Britain in an 
attempt to contain the latest 
outbreak of meningitis which 
has killed 7 2 people this year. 

But yesterday scientists 
were no nearer to providing an 
e.\planaiion for the recent rise 
in the incidence of the disease, 
particularly in Stroud, 
Gloucestershire, where the 
rate is now 14 times the 
national average. 

Medical experts in the town 
are analysing the results of a a 
four-year case control study 
which has matched 100 chil- 
dren a Reeled by the disease 


By Jill Sherman 
with 200 others of the same 


age. 

The 


study, based on a 
questionnaire, looked into 
ventilation, heating, 
overcrowding, humidity, 
smoking and social con- 
ditions. Bui preliminary find- 
ings suggest that the survey is 
unlikely to come up with any 
definite answers. 

The district has also con- 
ducted several surveys of 
throat swabbing to find carri- 
ers of the disease, but doctors 
point out that it is quite 
common for people to cany 
the meningitis germs at the 


Stroud puts on brave 
face despite threat 

By Robin Yonng 


For a town that lives in fear 
of a mysterious epidemic. 
Stroud in Gloucestershire is a 
remarkably cheerful and pros- 
perous place. 

The local shops were bus- 
tling yesterday, people waving, 
smiling and chatting in the 
street. Chatting mostly, it is 
true, about the television 
coverage of the meningitis 
scare that has brought the 
town national publicity after a 
spate of cases stretching back 
five years. 

The local hotel, the Bear at 
Rod bo rough, admits that busi- 
ness is down on last year. But 
the management blames loss 
^ of the American coach parties 
and the weather rather than 
the illness, the only percep- 
tible effect of which was to 
have brought a booking from 
an Independent Television 
. News crew- 

The town's estate agents 
affirm that no end of people 
want to live there. Mr Richard 
Styles, of Andrews', has 1.000 
applicants on his mailing list, 

. and has sold 16 houses ui the 
. past couple of weeks. 

“I will not deny meningitis 
is on people's minds, but this 
is a popular area and as far as 
; I am concerned it always w-Ql 
be,** he said. “We are 'busier 
than ever and today has been 
the busiest day of the week so 
far." 

Mr Styles said: “It is pos- 
sible that in these offices we do 
not see people who have 
decided they simply do not 
want to move into the area. It 
may affect retired people who 
can pick and choose. Bat even 
if the latest hullabaloo does 
affect prices, it will take at 
least a couple of months to 
work through. Things prob- 
ably look worse from the 
outside than they do if you live 


Mr Alan Bidmead could boast 
of an offer of £50,000 just 
received for a cottage valued at 
£29,000 two years ago, sales 
running ahead of targets since 
Easter, and 150 to 200 ap- 
plicants a week being in touch 
with the office. 

Mr Simon Hole, senior 
negotiator at Sandoe Luce 
Panes, said that there was half 
again as much property on the 
books as three months ago, but 
that was not panic selling: 
“W : e have absolutely no prob- 
lem selling at prices 12 per 
cent above last year's." 

Earlier this week. Baroness 
Trompineton, Under-Sec- 
retary of State at the Depart- 
ment of Health, told a public 
meeting at Stone bo use that 
everything that could be done 
to find a cause and cure for 
meninigitis was being done. 

While the chance of getting 
meningococcal meningitis is 
one in 100,000, there have 
been 14 cases among the 
106.000 people in the Stroud 
district already this year, and 
around 54 since 1981. includ- 
ing three deaths. The Glouces- 
ter area as a whole has had 81 
cases in the last five years, 
with 21 cases this year. 


back of their throats without 
being infected themselves, or 
passing them on to anyone 
else. 

One survey conducted on 
130 children in Gloucester 
recently during three consec- 
utive weeks found that 10 per 
cent were carriers of foe 
disease, but foe findings 
changed each week. 

■ Researchers at foe Public 
Health Laboratory in Man- 
chester are doubtful that local 
studies will show the cause of 
foe disease. The laboratory, 
which analyses organisms 
from different strains of the 
disease sent from all over the 
country, says foe number of 
strains has trebled already this 
year. 

Dr Terry Riordan, consul- 
tant microbiologist at foe 
laboratory, said that it was 
extremely unlikely there was 
any environmental cause for 
foe outbreak in Stroud. 

“People seem to think there 
is some murky pool in Stroud 
where all these organisms are 
lurking. We are failing to get 
across to people about how foe 
disease arises. The infection is 
entirely confined to humans 
and can only be spread by 
close contract." 

Fears about swimming 
pools were quite irrelevant, he 
said. “There is no mystery 
source in Stroud. The source is 
the people." 

Dr Riorden cited similar 
outbreaks in the past which 
had affected other areas in foe 
country and suggested it was 
“pure chance" that Stroud had 
been affected now. But he 
agreed that other outbreaks 
had not lasted for so long. 


The Public Health Lab- 
oratory is now looking at foe 
success of antibiotics in treat- 
ing foe d isease and will shortly 
help to analyse a new vaccine 
being developed at foe Centre 
of Applied Microbiology Re- 
search at Porton Down. 



The vaccine is being devel- 
oped in collaboration with 
scientists at foe Bureau of 
Biologists at Befoesda in the 
United States. 


“Consultants are very con- 
cerned about foe outbreak in 
Stroud, and they are working 
as fast as possible. We hope a 
vaccine will be ready for use in 
Stroud next year," Dr Riorden 
said. 


here.* 

At Hartnell 


Taylor Cook, 




Baroness Trumpington, who 
addressed a public meeting 


Separate research on a vac- 
cine is being carried out by the 


ibytl 

Wellcome Research Lab- 


oratory in Kent 
• The condition of Kate Ste- 
vens. aged four months, who 
contracted meningitis earlier 
this week, has improved 
slightly. 


Soccer violence 


Soccer thugs brawl on Sealink ferry 



Manchester United fan Tony Cannon on his return. 

, - ,Yr#w. 


Continued from page I 

significant improvement in 
crowd behaviour during both 
foe last domestic season and 
the World Cup in Mexico. 

Mr Millichip said that the 
imposition of a 
would now have 
ously looked at” by foe FA. 

Trouble started on the ves- 
sel shortly after she left Har- 
wich on Thursday evening. 

“Fighting broke out in a bar. 
Bottles were thrown, knives 
pulled and a general battle 
took place," said a British 
Transport Police spokesman. 

As the violence spread, glass 
showcases- were smashed and 
wrenched off walls, and fire 
hoses were turned on. Even- 
tually, members of the crew 
were able to quell foe trouble 
while the rest of the 2,000 
passengers - some of whom 
reported seeing pools of blood 
on staircases - took refuge on 
lower decks. 

The violence, according to 
one fan, started when Man- 
chester supporters decided to 
take revenge on West Ham for 
foe stabbing last season of 
United fan, Eddie Collins, 
aged 16. near the Upton Park 
ground in east London. 

About 100 Manchester 
supporters were drinking in a 
bar on the seventh deck while 
an estimated 20 West Ham 
supporters were in a bar 
above. A United fan, Mr 


Westler McGuire, aged 19. 
said foe Londoners had 
started making jokes about foe 
Munich air crash ai the quay- 
side in HarwichJ 
“At first we were going 




The ferry Konatgin Beatrix on which soccer fans rioted on their way to “friendly" games. 


Businessmen are doing well 


Businessmen have done 
well during the Conservative 
government and foe financial 
gap between them and the rest 
of foe population is now wider 
than it has been for years. 

Comparisons of foe data 
gathered by researchers in- 
vestigating the purchasing 
power and preferences of the 
business world, show that 
most of foe wealth in the 
share-owning society has 
lodged with businessmen. 

The Businessmans' Reader- 
ship Survey and foe National 
Readership Survey show that 
in 1979, 26.9 per cent of 
businessmen owned stocks 
and shares against only 7.7 per 


By a Staff Reporter 
cent of the adult population. 
This year, 59 per cent of 
businessmen owned them 

The 1986 figures show that 
62 per cent of businessmen 
have two, or more, cars 
against only 20 per cent in the 
whole population. The me- 
dian businessman’s income is 
now £18,000 while average 
income for Britain is £9.984. 

The 1986 research was con- 
ducted on behalf of the Busi- 
ness Media Research 
Committee and underwritten 
by Times New spapers. The 
Daily Telegraph. The Econo- 
mist and The Financial 
Times. 


• Meanwhile another sur- 
vey by the committee dis- 
closes that about half of 
British executives — still 
predominantly men — have a 
computer at home while 
nearly three quarters of them 
use or have access to one at 
work. According to foe study, 
to discover the changing pro- 
file of the average executive, 
women executives are youn 
ger than their male counter- 
parts but they account for only 
6 per cent of the executive 
population. 


Kasparoy 
rests after 
bruising 


Keene 

indent 


BMRC (c /o Research Ser- 
vices, Station House, Harrow 
Road, Wembley). 


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Lt — 


Wapping dispute 


Inquiry into use 
of jobless centre 


By Michael McCarthy 

The Manpower Services hotbed of .left-wing political 

should 


Commission is investigating 
claims that a centre for the 
unemployed which receives 
an annual grant of public 
money is being used for 
political activities, including 
foe organization of picketing 
in the Wapping dispute. 

The centre, at Harlow in 
Essex, is one of about 80 set up 
all over Britain in foe last four 
years under the Manpower 
Services Commission's 
community programme. They 
provide advice, recreational 
facilities and opportunities for 
retraining for the long-term 
unemployed, but strict guide- 
lines are laid down about their 
use. 

In particular, they are 

S irohibited from “providing 
or or encouraging" marches 
and demonstrations, political 
activities and the intervention 
in industrial disputes. 

Mr Jerry Hayes. Conser- 
vative MP for Harlow, has 
passed on to Mr Ian Lang. 
Parliamentary Under-Sec- 
retary of State for Employ- 
ment. allegations that foe 
Harlow centre has been used 
to organize picketing during 
foe miners' strike and the 
Wapping dispute, and also to 
foment protest against foe 
Government's social security 
policy’. 

Mr Lang has asked foe MSC 
to investigate. The centre’s 
£30.000 annual grant which 
pays foe wages of its four full- 
time, and eight-part time, staff 
and is due for renewal in 
September, has been frozen 
pending foe outcome of the 
inquiry. 

Mr Hayes said yesterday; “! 
have well-documented ev- 
idence. from a constituent 
that foe centre has been a 


activity when it should be 
strictly non-political: Of 
course I do not want to see it 
closed down, but I want to see 
it put its house in order and go 
back to foe use it was intended 
for." 

Mr Danny Purton. - chair- 
man of the centre’s manage- 
ment committee, said 
yesterday that foe charges 
were “just a lot of froth and 
gossip", while a spokesman 
for the Labour-dominated 
Harlow District Counci L 
which finances foe centre 
jointly with the MSC. said that 
foe council knew “nothing to 
suggest that anything im- 
proper has taken place". 

Man jailed for 
threat to ‘Sun’ 

A man who telephoned The 
Sun and demanded £50,000 
claiming he could stop an 
aitack on foe News Inter- 
national plant at Wapping. 
was jailed for eight months at 
the Central Criminal Court 
yesterday. 

William SbieL aged 31, a 
bricklayer, of Tiller Road. 
Poplar, east London, admitted 
making a threat that four men 
dressed as security guards 
would raid foe newspaper 
headquarters and wreck 
computers. 

Judge Machin. QC, told 
him: "You deliberately at- 
tempted to exploit an indus- 
trial dispute and make 
money." 

The Judge gave his 
“highest" commendation to, 
Miss Joanne Fletcher, a re- 
porter with The Sun , for 
stalling Shiel and tape record- 
ing her conversation with 
him. which led to his arrest. 


Chess 

Gary Kasparov took time 
out yesterday after his bruis- 
ing in foe fifth game of foe 
World Chess Championship 
in London^and foe sixth, due 
yesterday, lias been postponed 
until Monday at 5pm. 

The score is level at one win 
each with three draws after foe 
first two weeks of play in foe 
centenary championship. The 
first game had been a quiet 
draw while Kasparov, foe 
Work! Champion, missed a 
win in game two, and game 
three also ended in a draw. 

The match burst into fierce 
action in games four and five 
as Kasparov crushed Karpov, 
only to be destroyed in foe 
following game. 

Spectators have been 
crowding in to the Park Lane 
Hotel where the champion- 
ship is being held, and where 
The Times has a sponsored 
commentary room. The 
match, sponsored by Save & 
Prosper, transfers to Lenin- 
grad at foe end of August. 

Victory goes to the player 
who first scores six wins or 
12 Vi points. 

Quick play as 
end approaches 

Grandmasters Jonathan 
Speelman and Jonathan 
Mestel are leading with 7 *6 
points each with one round to 
go in the KJeinwortGrieveson 
British Chess Championship 
in Southampton (Harry 
Golombek, Chess Correspon- 
dent. writes). 

Murray Chandler, Glen 
Flear. Daniel King and Mi- 
chael Basra an are half a point 
behind. 

Mestel and King drew 
quickly. Speelman obtained 
an advantage against Mark 
Condie who, however, drew 
foe game. Chandler soon 
gained the advantage against 
Ian Findlay who equalized but 
then blundered in the ending 
and lost. Michael Adams, agon 
14. attained his fust Inter- 
national Master norm by 
drawing with Neil McDonald. 

The women's tournament is 
led by Susan Arketi who has 9 
points. 


Maiden 
flight 
for Mr 
Eagles 


By Rodney Cowton 
Defence Correspondent 


to pile up the stairs fait they 
were throwing everything 
down at us," be said. 

The West Ham hooligans 
were believed to be members 
of foe “Inter-City Firm", the 
hardcore of East End soccer 
thugs, while the United fens 
claimed membership of the 
equivalent Manchester gang 
known as the M58. 

United fen Tony Cannon, 
aged 22, from Altrincham, 
received cuts to foe face and 
head when hit by a beer glass. 

“It was foe most horrific 
fight I've ever been in," he 
said, "The stairway between 
foe seventh and eight decks 
was literally running with 
blood. Stanley knives were 
flashing everywhere.” 

The captain derided to re- 
turn to Harwich where 110 
Manchester and West Ham 
fans were taken off, 14 of them 
being arrested. All were later 
released on police bail pend- 
ing further inquiries. Only one 
of foe stab victims, a youth 
from Stockport, was still in 
Colchester Hospital last night 
with face and bead wounds 
believed to have been caused 
by a Stanley knife. His con- 
dition was reported as stable. 

A fifteenth fen was arrested 
when foe ferry finally arrived 
at foe Hook yesterday after- 
noon and another 16 support- 
ers were refused entry by foe 
Dutch authorities. 

Spokesmen for both Man- 
chester United, involved in a 
tournament- in Amsterdam 
last night with matches against 
Dynamo Kiev and Ajax, and 
West Ham, playing a 
“friendly" against Dynamo 
Dresden last night with other 
matches against Dutch and 
Belgium teams arranged for 
foe next four days, declined to 
comment on the violence. 


many. 


Council rebels 
to fight 
in the Lords 


Liverpool's 47 Labour 
councillors voted yesterday to 
appeal to the House of Lords 
against a decision to expel 
them from office. The. action 
is likely to cost them £60,000 
and they are to launch a 
nationwide appeal to trade 
unions and other councils to 
help to underwrite legal costs. 

The councillors have al- 
ready lost two court appeals 
against the district auditor's 
ruling that they were guilty of 
“wilful misconduct" in delay- 
ing setting a rate for the cash- 
starved city last year. They 
were also surcharged 
£106,000. 

The appeal to the Lords will 
he on the grounds foal foe 
district auditor did not allow 
them a personal bearing to 
defend themselves against his 
action. The Court of Appeal 
agreed foe district auditor-was 
wrong in this, but held that the 
original High Court appeal 
had remedied this by going 
them a fair bearing. t 


Inquiry info 
one million 
vacant jobs 

An all-party group of MPs 


launched an inquiry yesterday 
into why so many people* are 
out of work in areas where 
there are jobs vacant. 


The Commons emptoyiftest 
committee, which has been 
campaigning for move befo for 
the long-term mnapfoyed, is 
concerned that there art at 
least one million job vacancies 
because of a lack of skflled 
workers. 


Rider killed 


The committee said: “Muy 

of the jobs available require 
skills of a different order from 

* possessed by the long- 
term unemployed. Fifty, per 
cut of all British firms- sf# 00 
management t raining and 20 

per cent of the hugest British 
companies do none." 


!)l* 










III 






iy 

achieved its second maiden 
flight of the week wheo its 
EAP experimental tighter-flew 
for an how from its plaid' at 
Warton near Preston. 

This came after foe first 
flight on Wednesday of the 
company's advanced 
prop (ATP) short-haul 
senger airliner. 

However, while the arfi 
aircraft flew exactly on sched- 
ule, the fighter had beta 
delayed by about two months, 
first by an industrial dispute, 
that by a technical pro&em, 
and for the last three days by 
poor weather. . 

Just over a month ago 
another British Aerospace 
fighter, the Hawk 20^ 
crashed after malting only a 
few flights. 

The EAP, which stands far 
experimental aircraft pro- 
gramme, is foe only aircraft of 
its type which win ever be 
baHL It has been co nst r uc ted 
solely to demonstrate tbe’hse 
of advanced technologies 
which can be used in fhtne 
production aircraft. 

The pilot, Mr David Fades, 
aged 51, a former navy phot, 
said the aircraft handled su- 
perbly. “It is just what a 
fighter pilot wants. It is a 
shame we are only 
erne aral not 800." 

Mr Eagles took foe aircraft 
ap to 10,000 feet to test its 
general handling and under- 
— ‘ ;e retraction, then up to 
feet to test foe engine, 
before going supersonic and 
reaching mach 1.1 at 30,000 ft. 

The aircraft will now 
undergo an intensive flying 
programme before appearing 
publicly for the first time at 
the Famborough Air Show 
next month. 

The delays suffered by 'the 
EAP meant its rival, the 
French Rap bale, also boflt to 
try out new technoLwies, made 
its maiden flight first -iast 
month. 

British Aerospace hopes 
that the lessons learnt from 
the EAP will be used for foe 
planned Eurofighter, to be 
built by Britain, West Ger- 
y, Italy and Spain. 


.Police 


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Woman doctor freed 


Police yesterday released a 
woman doctor, who was ar- 
rested on Tburday after the 
diwrfh of a patient who was 
admitted to a Hertfordshire 
hospital for exploratory sur- 
gery complaining of severe 
stomach pains. 

Inspector Paul Dompteton. 
a Hertfordshire police spokes- 
man, said a male doctor 
however was still being ques- 


tioned by police last night. 

The two junior hospital 
doctors, both anaesthetists, 
were dismissed from the lister 
Hospital in Stevenage, 
Hertfordshire, on Monday af- 
ter the death of.a patient, Mr 
Michael North, aged 33. 

Mr North, of Vardon Road, 
Stevenage, died in the 
hospital's intensive care unit 
onJaly23. 


Mrs Sally Dawson, aged 33 
of Kilronan, Co Dublin, was 
killed ai foe Dublin Horse 
Show yesterday when her 
horse reared while she was 
exercising it in foe parade ring. 
British victory, page 34 






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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


HOME NEWS 


i 

sch 

afTc 

bo' Gi 


Doctors concerned at 
growing number of 
deaths from astbma 

By Thomsen Prentice, Science Correspondent 


iati 

191 

20 , 

sch tii 


i,] - . Doctors and researchers are 
-"•growing more concerned 
—.about an inexplicable rise in 
number of deaths from 
asthma. 

A study in today's issue of 
iZflte Lancet shows that deaths 
^from the condition have been 
.Readily increasing since 1974 
zn England and Wales, in spite 
wider availability of treai- 
merit, and improvements in 
.■Uiealth care. 

’■■■ ' The increase probably 
•namoujits to more than 400 
)i-.ac xtra" deaths over 10 years, 
—the study suggests. About 
'*'£000 people die of asthma 
.-e very year in Britain. 
——.Mast asthmatics ade- 
^.jjjuate protection by using 
? whalers or other drugs, but the 
trend in deaths coincides with 
ijTising sales of ail forms of 
.^treatment, according to Dr 
' 0 ȣ? Ler Burney, author of the 
—study. 

this context it is surpris- 
jng that asthma mortality is 
«Aot declining”, he reports. 
^J^Vhy deaths have increased 
over the last decade is not 
.i^fcpown and is unlikely to be 
"■■■known until accurate records 
S.*.4se kepi of the prevalence of 
* asthma." 

~ -One possible reason could 
Z.Jx that although drug therapy 
‘ is effective, many of those who 
from an asthmatic attack 
]Z' m a/c found to have taken “sub- 


Doctors who make a mis- 
take when treating patients 
are being advised to say sorry, 
hot this does not mean they are 
admitting legal liability. 

The Medical Defence 
Union, which defends doctors 
and dentists against claims of 
medical negligence, said that 
the legal phrase “do not admit 
liability" had been understood, 
to mean “do not apologize”. 
Yet to apologize was “only 
common courtesy". 

An article in the union's 
journal said: 

“It is tiie onion's view that the 
patient is entitled to a prompt 
and above all tr uthf ul account 
of what has occurred.” 

This should be given by the 
practitioner concerned or a 
senior colleague. 

optimum” doses of treatment. 
Dr Burney, of St Thomas's 
Hospital, London, says. 

Rales of hospital ad- 
missions for asthma rose 
steadily from 1974 to 1984, 
and by far the greatest in- 
crease, an average of 21 per 
cent, was in children under 
five years, old. 

Changes in the classification 
of deaths in 1979 meant that 
from then on asthmatic bron- 
chitis fatalities were included 
among asthma deaths, but 
those changes have been taken 


into account in the study. 

Asthma deaths in En gland 
and Wales in 1974 totalled 
1.086, according to figures 
from the Office of Population 
Censuses and Surveys. In 
1978 they rose to 1,146. The 
total was 1,480 in 1980, 1.603 
in 1981. 1,577 in 1982, 1,645 
in 1983. and 1,784 in 1984. 

In each of the years since 
1974, substantially more 
women than men died from 
asthma. The death rate per 
million of population for men 
and women two years ago was 
32 and 38 respectively, com- 
pared with 18 and 26 in 1974. 

Mr Hugh Faulkner, director 
of the Asthma Research Coun- 
cil, the leading charity for 
asthmatics, said: “We are 
aware of evidence that deaths 
from asthma have been 
increasing 

“Two possible reasons are 
that many asthmatics are not 
diagnosed as suffering the 
condition, and therefore are 
not receiving treatment, and 
that some patients who are 
prescribed treatment do not 
lake it as they should. 

“The challenge facing us is 
to educate both doctors and 
patients in properly diagnos- 
ing and treating asthma.” 

• A two part examination of 
asthma begins in The Times 
on Monday. 


Private medicine inquiry 


Police ‘distressed’ patients 


^7'^The British Medical 
' Association has called for an 
“ihdependent inquiry Into a 
three-year police investigation 
T^of the private practice work of 
g. consultant surgeon. 

It has also demanded 
iT.siricter rales to protect the 
"confidentiality of patients' 
. . records, idler claims that po- 
examined the case notes of 
• 10,000 people. 

lLast week Mr Hugh 
Thomas, aged 50, a consultant 
! 'surgeon at Prince Charles 
... Hospital, Merthyr Tydfil, was 
cleared by a jury on 18 charges 
T ot deception and dishonesty 
after a two-month trial at 
Swansea Crown Coot. 

Yesterday, .Mr John 
Ghawner, chairman of the 
BMA's Private Practice and. 
—'Professional Feck Committee, 
v Criticized the police Stestiga- 
“ tkm, claiming that --‘patients 
- : ~were caused “great distress” 
”|_ wheH officers questioned them 
-'-'OH their illnesses and 
diagnoses. 

*“"■ Mr Haydn Davies, Assis- 

m • a • 

Typist in 
sex case 
‘like tart’ 

_ : : A former nurse behaved like 
“an unprincipled tart” when 
... .she lured her boss into a sex 
trap that involved her sister 
- photographing the couple ua- 
r » fcffd together in bed, a court 
[ was told yesterday. 
r-'-.-Mrs Marion Levene, a 
..mother of two, later took her 
;.rboy friend, Peter Whitehead, 
•: >along to a rendezvous with her 
employer and demanded 
£5,000 for the photographs, a 
— jury at Isleworth Crown Court 
in west London was told. 

" ■ Mrs Levene, aged 29, her 
sister. Simone Russell aged 
t9. and Mr Whitehead all 
deny conspiring to blackmail 
the man, identified only as Mr 

"—"Mr Patrick Upward, for the 
'■‘-defence of Mr Whitehead, 
c.'ivaved the sex romp 
photographs, at the jury yes- 
> . terday and said: “Do these 
^..portray a woman who gave up 
ZJ her career to devote herself to 
Z Her children? I suggest they 
l<s §how an unprincipled tart who 
was prepared to use anyone to 
ZZ&er own advantage.” 

The two women claim the 
^sex trap was sprung on Mr X 
"■■.lo teach him a lesson for 
X^Jfiaking advances to Mrs 
■* Levene at work. 

Mrs Levene's counsel, Mr 
^firuce McIntyre, said the only 
'Z time she mentioned money to 
~^-Mr X was at the rendezvous. 

where police were waiting to 
- pounce. 

The case continues. 


By Jd Sherman 

tout Chief Constable for South 
Wales, said yesterday: “The 
figure of cases investijptcd is 
greatiy exaggerated. The um- 
ber ®f records examined was 
below 1,000." The police had 
been given permission before 
examining the records. 

Mr Chawner accused health 
officials at Mid Glamorgan 
Health Authority of failing to 
protect patients by releasing 
medical notes. 

He condemned a docu- 
mentary made by TV Eye in 
1985 while the investigation 
was still mder way. Com- 
ments made by the chairman 
of Mid Glamorgan Health 
Authority's independent in- 
quiry on the programme prac- 
tically . . - assumed - the 
consultant's gilt although 
the investigation had not been 
amdnded, ha said. 

Mr Chawner also criticized 
a document from NHS Un- 
limited, a group set np by Mr 
Frank Dobson, Opposition 

Doctor 
on drugs 
charge 

A family doctor is to appear 
in court charged with failing to 
record that fee had supplied 
drags to a patient who died 
from an overdose, police con- 
firmed yesterday. 

Dr lain Anderson, aged 52, 
of Rodders Lane, Kings Lang- 
ley, Hertfordshire, is alleged 
to have not recorded that 1 ms 
supplied methadone, a heroin 
subsitute, to a mother-of-two 
last December. 

Mrs Ruth Dock, aged 44, of 
Chantry Close, Kings Lung- 
ley, collapsed and died outside 
the doctor's surgery and a post 
mortem examination later 
found traces of methadone. 

Dr Anderson is a former 
chairman of the Hertfordshire 
police authority. He has been 
a Conservative county coun- 
cillor since 1973. 

The doctor will appear be- 
fore magis trates at Hemd 
Hempstead, after the inquest 
on Mrs Dock at St Pancras in 
London on September 2, police 
said. 


spokesman on health, to op- 
pose private practice, which 
incorporated allegations being 
levelled at Mr Thomas before 
the case came to triaL 

Mr Thomas was cleared of 
falsifying his expenses over 
four yean and deceiving pa- 
tients into having private 
treatment by telling them, 
wrongly, that there were long 
waiting lists for free health 
service facilities. 

Two other consultants in 
South Wales are facing 
prosecution over allegations of 
malpractice in their private 
practice work. 

Vikram Shah, consultant at 
the Prince Charles Hospital 
Merthyr TydfiL is awaiting 
-trial on 14 criminal charges, 
and John Anthony Leighton 
Dowse, consultant general sur- 
geon at die Princess of Wales 
Hospital Bridgend, has been 
served summons for five of- 
fences of obtaining money by 
deception from Mid Glamor- 
gan Health Authority. 

J 

"• ] 

Pop star’s 
brother 
may move 

Boy George's musician 
brother was yesterday allowed 
by a court to move away from 
the star's house in Hampstead, 
where he found the body of 
American songwriter Michael 
Rudetsky earlier this week. 

Kevin O'Dowd, aged 25, 
had been compelled to live at 
the house in Well Road as a 
condition of his £5,000 bail on 
a charge of conspiracy to 
supply heroin to his brother. 

But yesterday, Marylebone 
Court agreed that Mr O’Dowd 
could stay at a different ad- 
dress to be notified to police. 

Mr O'Dowd is due to 
appear in court with three 
others later this month. 

• Liam Kelly, a road man- 
ager from Kilbura accused of 
supplying drugs to Phil 
Lynott, the Thin Lizzy singer 
who died of an overdose, was " 
yesterday refused bail while be 
awaits trial at Acton Crown 
Court. He was remanded in 
custody to a date to be fixed. 



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Failure Air search fails Chamml 


Sex pests at the Palace 


The Changing of the Guard 
at Buckingham Palace has 
become a magnet for sex pests, 
a court beard yesterday. 

London's chief magistrate 
said he has beard of more and 
more men going to the scene 
just to mingle in the crowds 
and indecently assault young 
tourists. 

Mr David Hopkin spoke 
out at Bow Street Court after 


hearing the case of«i tailor who 
touched a girl's bottom. “This 
is not only a grave offence but 
an extremely prevalent one.” 
he said. “It is the third case of 
its type at the same scene that 
1 have heard of in the last few 
days.” 

Selhanin Bartiyar. aged 61. 
was fined £250 for indecent 
assault and ordered to pay £40 
costs. 


may close 
airport 

By Michael Horsnell 

The future of Lydd airport 
on the Kent coast was in doubt 
last night after the crash of a 
travel company which 
wrecked the holiday plans of 
thousands of families. 

Operations at the airport 
were suspended, threatening 
the jobs of more than 40 
people, alter the collapse of 
the West Midlands company. 
Hards Travel Service, and its 
subsidiary, Drakecoai Ltd, 
which leased the airport from 
the local Shepway District 
Council as transit point for the 
parent company. 

Later, as criticism of the 
collapse mounted, the council 
confirmed that the agency had 
announced its wish to dispose 
of the lease as recently as June. 
Mr Nigel Luckett, the liq- 
uidator, moved in after Hards 
had struggled with losses of 
£1.3 million in the past two 
years, and spent the day 
talking to Mr Cliff Hards, the 
company’s managing director, 
and sian in Solihull where 
another 40 jobs will be lost 

Mr Luckett said: “I don’t 
believe there is any chance of 
the company surviving or any 
rescue plan being mounted." 

Mr Luckett, who will visit 
Lydd airport today, put cur- 
rent liabilities at about 
£3 million. 

About 1,700 holidaymakers 
in Austria, Italy and Spain 
were temporarily stranded un- 
til the Association of British 
Travel Agents (Abta) stepped 
in, and another 9.000 who had 
I booked with Hards this sum- 
mer were told their holidays 
had been cancelled, although 
reimbursement is guaranteed 
by the association. The crash 
is the eleventh this year by a 
holiday company. 

Drakecoat planned to put 
the 125-year lease of the 
airport on which it had 121 
years to run, on the market for 
about £400,000, and Shepway 
council decided to commis- 
sion a planning study to 
consider alternative uses for 
it 

Mr George Wood, Mayor of 
Lydd Town Council, sai± 
“This airport has been shut 
down in very suspicious 
circumstances. 1 want to find 
out why Hards Travel has 
gone broke so close to the time 
when the airport lease was 
coming up for sale.” 

Local authorities in Kent 
are hoping a rescue package 
can be arranged to save the 
airport which opened in 1957. 

Abta is asking the 9,000 
holidavmakers to write to 
them for application forms for 
reimbursement. Proof of pay- 
ment is being requested. 

Hards, which registered 
with Abta in 1966, lodged a 
£175,000 bond with the 
association and was licensed 
to cany 165,000 holidays a 
year. 

A small to medium size 
company based in Solihull it 
was incorporated in 1962. 

Most of the 200 holiday- 
makers due to fly from Lydd 
yesterday were warned in time 
not to turn up. 


BR gets there with an Olympic spurt 



;Mr Denis Howell setting off on 
z y esterday’s Olympic Tail sprint 


By Michael Bally, 

British Rail set a new record time 
yesterday of 67 minutes 27 seconds mi 
the 1 04. 6-mile nm from Loudon to 
Birmingham. 

The British Olympic Express, using 
the 5.00Qhp dectnc locomotive Velocity 
from the Royal Train, made the sprint in 
support t>f Birmincfeaia's campaign to be 
host to the 1992 Olympic Games. 

It achieved a start-to-stop speed of 93 
mBes per hour, compared with 7X5 for 
the fattest timetabled Inter-city pull- 
man, and touched llOmph instead or the 
usual lOOmph maximum on a curving 
track. 

It left behind a television 
photographers* helicopter at Bletchley 
and made the journey in half the time it 
took a police car to follow the same 
route, using die ML from Easton 
Station to the Birmingham Exhibition 
Centre, whore many Olympic events 
would be staged. 


Transport Editor 

Passengers included Mr Denis 
Howell the former sports minister who 
is Labour MP for Birmingham, Small 
Heath, and president of the Birmin gham 
Olympic Committee. He believes that 
the Olympics could make a profit of £60 
million if the International Olympic 
Committee's choice, due to be made In 
October, falls on Birmingham. The city 
is emphasizing the strength of its 
transport links, which it hopes will put it 
ahead of Paris. Amsterdam, Lisbon, and 
Barcelona in the race for the 1992 


Dr John Prides ox. British Rail's 
Inter-City director used the occasion to 
promise faster and more frequent regu- 
lar trains from Loudon. 

He said that from next year there will 
be an extra high-speed service at peak 
boors as weD as the present half-hourly 
runs. The fastest trains would be doing 
the trip in only 70 minutes by the 1990s, 


in ‘Perrin’ riddle 


By Peter Davenport 


A helicopter search in the 
“Reginald Perrin" mystery 
was called off yesterday after 
heat-seeking equipment failed 
to find any trace of bodies or 
recently disturbed earth. 

The helicopter was' called in 
after a bloodstained quilt was 
found in a ditch along the 
A51I7 near Chester. 

Police believe it may have 
come from the home of Mr 
Robert Healey, the driving 
instructor who has dis- 
appeared after, it is thought, 
he faked a suicide attempt 

Police also disclosed they 
were searching for a red and 
white striped, angle duvet 
cover and matching pillow 
case now known to be missing 

Blood stains found in the 
main bedroom and other parts 
of the family home in Hazel 
Grove, Stockport, were of the 


same group as Mrs Healey and 
‘ her daughter. 

Mr Healey’s wife, Greeba, 
aged 40, and his step-daughter 
Marie, aged 1 3, have not been 
seen -since Monday of last 
week and it is now thought 
they are dead. 

Men's dothing and a sui- 
cide note from Mr Healey 
were found on the beach at 
Prestatyn in North Wales 
although his car was found 
later abandoned in a Bir- 
mingham car park. ■ • 

A police search of his home 
uncovered three video tape 
recordings of the Fall and Rise 
of Reginald Perrin television 
series in which the central 
character is seen at the begin- 
ning of each episode undress- 
ing on a beach, before faking a 
suicide attempt prior to ston- 
ing a new life. 


hop by 
kangaroo 

The inflatable kangaroo 
above carried Mr David Kzrke 
into the record books yes- 
terday with a four-hour 'hap. 
across the English Channel 
from Beachy Head to a field ia 
Ferqnes, near Calais. 

The 25-fsot model marsu- 
pial was lifted to more than 
10,000 feet by six helium 
balloons, setting records for 
the longest leap and first flight 
by a kangaroo. 

Mr Kirite is chairman of the 
Dangerous Sports Clnb, 
whose pranks include leaping 
from Bristol’s Cfifton Suspen- 
sion Bridge, with elasticated 
ropes attached to their legs to 
break the 200-foot falL 
The balloon stmit was spon- 
sored by Fosters lager, and 
Mr Kirfce gained height fry 
discarding cans nsed as 
ballast 

(Photographs: JohnWfitiams). 


Guinea pig costs woman £150 fine 


A Japanese family fell fool 
of the rabies laws when they 
brought a pet guinea pig called 
Lucky on MMay with them. . 

Mrs Mitsuko Ira, aged 39, 
was fined £150 with £30 costs 
at Horsefenry Road court, 
London, for breaching the 
laws. 

She admitted landing die 
guinea pig and two hamsters at 
Ramsgate without a licence on 


. Wednesday, when she arrived 
on the ferry with her family. 

Mr Patrick Fields, for the 
prosecution, said that .police 
. were called when the woman 
took the hune guinea pig for 
treatment. 

She had admitted brigiag 
the pets from her home jp 
Germany not knowing it was 

against the law. 


Blackburn Gittmgs, for 
the defence, said that the 
couple spoke practically no 
English, and hid not seen the 
and rabies ' laws signs when 
they arrived in the dark at 
Ramsgate. 

He said they brought the 
pets on holiday when the 
guinea pig broke its kg in 
Germany and was too shocked 
to he left with friends. 


‘Jayne 
struck me’ 
lesbian 
told police 

A detective toM the lesbian 
tove triangle trial at the Cen- 
tral Criminal Court yesterday 
how deputy headmistress Sue 
Craker named the person she 
believed bad crippled her for 
life with a savage hammer 
attack. 

Detective Constable Joseph 
McGahren interviewed Miss 
Craker as she lay in a hospital 
bed, paralysed and brain- 
damaged. 

“It was a supreme effort for 
her to speak. She forced the 
words out,” he. said. 

He said she replied “Yes" 
when asked if she knew her 
attacker. Asked her name she 
replied: “Jayne”. 

• “Did she strike you once?” 
asked the officer. “Many 
tiroes,” was the reply. 

The prosecution has alleged 
that Jayne Scott, a physical 
education teacher, attacked 
Miss Craker in a fit of “old- 
fashioned jealousy” because 
she bad slept with Miss Scott's 
girl friend, Mrs Debbie Fox. 

Miss Scott, aged 30, ofCroft 
Hill. Farnham Royal, 
Buckinghamshire, denies 
inflicting grievous bodily 
harm on Miss Craker last year 
when she and Mrs Fox were 
staying at Miss Craker's home 
in Barnet, north London. 

Dei Constable McGahren 
told the court that Miss Craker 
said no one else was involved 
in the attack, which happened 
while Mis Fox was out shop- 
ping. She said she had not had 
an. argument with Miss Scott. 

She told the officer die had 
“worked out" that Miss Scott 
had been charged with assault- 
ing her. Asked if she actually 
saw Miss Scott strike her, she 
said: “Hit first, saw Jayne, 
then more blows." 

Miss Scott says she did not 
arrive on the scene until after 
the attack. 

The jury .heard that Mood 
pouring from the bead of Miss 
i Craker wonkl have splattered 
on to her attacker. 

There would have been 
detectable bloodstains “unless 
steps were taken to remove 
.them". Dr David Paul, of 
Guy's Hospital forensic medi- 
cine department, said. 

The prosecution has 
daimed that after the attack 
Miss Scott did not call an 
ambulance but washed (he 
Mood from her nightie “with a 
degree of care”. 

She later told police she 
heard a groaning noise and 
found Miss Craker lying in a 
■ pool of Mood. As she touched 
her ^nd. moved the hammer 
she got blood on ter hand. 

1 -She said that, when she felt 
it “warm and wet” on ter 
fingers, she panicked and fled 
upstairs to wash it off instead 
of calling an ambulance. 

The trial was adjourned 
until Monday. 



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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


Channel 4 may 
save scheme 
to use cinema 
in education 


MP urges 
check on 
children 
of jobless 


By Gavin BelL Arts Correspondent 

Channel 4 television may teachers, are to be used in 
scue a project by Mr David conjunction with visits to 


rescue a project by Mr David 
Puttnam. the film director, to 
introduce the cinema to 
schools. 

The scheme, under which 
pupils would attend special 
screenings of important films 
as part of their studies, faced 
collapse last week when the 
Department or Trade and 
industry said it would be 
unable to provide funds. 


conjunction with visits to 
local cinemas at reduced 
prices. They include films 
such as Lady Jane and Revolu- 
tion for history studies. Pas- 
sage to India for English 
literature, and Defence of the 
Realm for political and social 
studies. 

A further £35,000 has been 
promised by film distributors 
towards the project's budget of 


Mr Jeremy Isaacs, chief £105.000. 
executive of Channel 4. said Before leaving Britain yes- 


Ihe project, said he was de- 
lighted by the possibility of a 
new sponsor. “If the outcome 
is positive, we should be up 
and running within a week of 
the schools going back next 
month." 


yesterday that he approved of terday to continue his career 
the idea and was considering a in the United States. Mr 
request from Mr Puttnam for Puttnam expressed bitter dis- 
financia! support. appointment at the 

“I am strongly in favour of department's decision, 
children enjoying their stud- “It was a povertv-j 
ies, and I consider this to be a reaction, an act of i 
very positive step towards terrorism." 
helping them become in- Mr Ian Wail, a film 
formed critics of the best and tionisL who is co-orc 
worst of cinema, television the project said he « 
and prim media." lighted by the possibil 

_ However, he would have to new sponsor. “If the o 
discuss with the Channel 4 positive, we should 
board whether it would be and running within a ' 
proper and reasonable to di- the schools going bat 
vert funds from programme- month." 
making. He hoped to 
announce a decision in about 
a week. 

The company has been 
asked to provide £35.000. the 
amount which the Depart- 
ment of Trade said it was 
unable to grant because its 
funds for this year were fully 
committed. 

An initial grant of £35.000 
from the British Film and 
Television Producers Associ- 
ation has enabled the or- 
ganizers to distribute 12 film 
study guides to 2.500 schools 
throughout Britain. 

The guides, written by Mr David Puttnai 


nunin^ar "cultural concern for the children of 

rracuon an acl of cultural , R & ^ ^ - she 

terrorism. 

Mr Ian Wall, a film educa- ... V , . ... . 

lionisL who is co-ordinating _ EE JS 

the project said he was de- comment with equal clarity on 


By Sheila Gunn 
Political Staff 

A Labour MP has called for 
an investigation into the 
suffering of the children of the 
unemployed. 

Mrs Margaret Beckett a 
party spokesman on social 
security and MP for Derby 
South, said that the research 
which existed showed that an 
estimated one million chil- ] 
dren of parents without jobs 
were also the victims of 
unemployment and started 
life disadvantaged. 

They tended to have a lower 
birth weight, were more likely 
to be taken into hospital or 1 
into care, and to do badly at 
school. 

Mrs Beckett has written to 
Mrs Thatcher, accusing her of 
ignoring their plight. "In re- 
cent weeks you have expressed 
on a number of occasions 
concern for the children of 
black South Africans," she 
wrote. 

“I would like to hear you 



• A;-\ . 

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I® 


u — ■ ■ . v 

One of the d eer that will go to China being rounded up yesterday in Whipsnade Zoo (Photograph: Kos umitwaterj. 

Zoo deer will roam wild in China 


the policy of your Govern- 
ment towards a group of 
children rather nearer 10 
home, those in the families of 
the long-term unemployed. 

“You must be aware of the 
growing weight of evidence 
which points to the damage 
unemployment inflicts on the 
unemployed individual." 

Writing in Labour Weekly , 
Mrs Beckett said that what 
research had been done was 
patchy and incomplete. “Just 
as their parents' plight is 
ignored by this Government 


A herd of 40 Pere David's 
deer at Whipsnade Park and 
Chester Zoo were rounded up 
yesterday and crated for 
repatriation to China where 
they will be allowed to roam 
wfld in an important breeding 
programme Angel la Johnson' 
writes). 

It is believed to be the first 


tune in 3,000 years that the 
deer wCB be able to live in their 
natural habitat 


This large water-loving deer 
is named after a French 
natoralist/missionary who in- 
troduced 16 of the species to 
the West in 1865. They have 
since formed the core for a 


world population of about 
1,500 in 100 collections. 

The last known herd of Pere 
David's deer to live in China 
was kept in captivity in the 
Peking Imperial Park. Many 
died in 1900 when the Yellow 
Sea flooded, the remainder 
were slaughtered daring" the 
ensuing Boxer Rebellion. 


Protest over ‘inhumane’ shooting 


Gamekeepers and stalkers 
in Slraiticairon, on the Ross- 
Sutherland boundary, are an- 
gry about what they claim is 
the inexpert and unjustified 


welfare of the children of I shooting of wild red deer. 


'•M? / 


Mr David Puttnam 


the unemployed is ignored 
too. 

“There is no up-to-date tally 
of their numbers, and sys- 
tematic examination of their 
health and social problems 
does not exist" 


They say that the Red Deer 
Commission was responsible 
for sending in riflemen to cull 
the deer earlier this summer, 
after complaints about deer 
spoiling sheep grazings. 


commission, the Scottish 
Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Animals and to Mr 
Robert Maclennan, MP for 
Caithness and Sutherland. 

Mr Hugh Matheson, a pan- 
time keeper at Gruinard, said 
tiiis week: “I examined a 
number of red deer carcasses 
and not one was killed in a 
humane way. Several had one 
or more bullet wounds in the 


Protests have gone to the* haunches, broken legs just 


above the knee, smashed sad- 
dles and so on.” 

Mr Norman McCulloch, 
secretary of the deer commis- 
sion based at Inverness, said 
yesterday: “At no time have 
we received complaints about 
the standard of shooting of our 
men. 

“We have replied to in- 
quiries from the SSPCA and 
the local MP, I hope to their 
satisfaction." 


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Just £500 nets you a tag 8%. 


If you leave your money in an Abbey National Higher Interest Account for 
a year, that 8% grows to 8.16%. This is the net compounded annual rate when 
jour half-yearly interest remains invested 

Or you can take jour interest as a monthly income 
Well happily pay it into any one of several Abbey National accounts or 
your bank account. 

INSTANT ACCESS 

Should jou need your money insranily, it's jours, subject to 90 days’ loss 
of interest Alternatively, give us 90 davs notice or leave a balance of £-10,000 
or more after withdrawal and you'll enjoy instant access without losing a penny. 

There's no limit to how much you invest. And getting Abbey National’s 
Higher Interest couldn't be easier. 

VCe've even provided a larger than average coupon for you to fill in. 


. To: Dept HD', Abbey National Building Society, FREEPOST, 201 Grafton Gate East, 
MILTON KEYNES MK9 IDA 

I I/We enclose a cheque for £ _to be invested in a Higher Interest 

I Account at my/our local branch in 

| Please send me full details and an application card lAXfe understand the rare may vary, 
i I/We would like: A the interest added to the account half-yearly Q 
s B. to take advantage of the'momhiy income facility □ ✓v 

1 (ildcippnifirEaebire) / j 

I Fv»U name/*! MrAIrs/Miss / / 

Address 

I . 1 

| Postcode .Telephone T 11 

| Signatures) HaES?/ 


j Signature^ 


The annuls' return to the 
wfld on a marshland site In tire 
coastal Jiangsu province, is 
the result of several years of 
collaboration between the 
World Wildlife Fond, the 
International Union for the 
Conservation of Nature, the 
Zoological Society of London 
and the Chinese government. 

The deer have come from 
zoos all over Britain, includi n g 
Glasgow, Lon gl eat and 
Marvell where they have been 
bred successfully for many 
years. 

Whipsnade Park Zoo sent 
four of their deer back to 
Peking Zoo in 1956 and 
another six in 1973, bat this is 
the first attempt to rein trod ace 
them to living in the wild. 

The stock of 27 females and 
13 males will leave Gatwick 
airport on Tuesday in a cargo 
aircraft to Shanghai 


Tougher 

airports 

security 



Man of 77 
may have 
been dead 
six months 


A pensioner a^cd 77 found 
dead in bed in his Bir- 
mingham flat may have died 
six months ago, A gas fire was 
burning in the room. 

Reports that the hallway of 
the flat, in Mill Lane. Bartley 
Green, was piled with dinners 
left by the meals on wheels 
service, were denied by Bir- 
mingham City Councirs so- 
cial welfare department A 
dinner is believed to have 
been left on February 24 and 
subsequently removed. 

The body -» r Mr Jacob 
Allport was found on Wednes- 
day when gas board officials, 
inquiring about an unpaid bin, 
broke down the door to the 

flat. 

A full inquiry has been 
launched by the social welfare 
department A post-mortem 
examination showed that Mr 
All port died from a heart 
attack with contributory 
causes, including bronchitis. 

A spokesman for the depart- 
ment said that there was a set 
procedure for direct meals 
service’ drivers if there was no 
reply when they called at a 
pensioner's home. 

ft was acceptable for a 
driver to leave one meal 
without seeing the pensioner, 
but drivers were expected to 
alert their superiors if they 
called a second time and could 
not speak to the person. 

A neighbour. Mrs Ada Bur- 
ton. aged 90. said that Mr 
Allport, who had two daugh- 
ters, had been in and out c ff 
hospital and when he was not 
seen she assumed he had been 
moved back into hospital 
permanently. 

• The body of a pensioner 
who had been dead for several 
weeks was also discovered 
yesterday in a flat in Wren's 
Nest Road. Dudley, West 
Midlands. 


Two get bail . 
in auction case 


By Stewart Tendler 
Crime Reporter 

New anti-terrorist security 
measures have been in- 
trodoced at British airports to 
prevent . time bombs being 
buried m the cargo holds 
aircraft. 

- If- - is- believed that the 
sceeenhtg .process for some 
luggage was been tightened. 

The Department of Trans- 
port confirmed yesterday that 
the measures had beat in- 
troduced bat denied they were 
part of any sudden security 
alarm. The measures are de- 
scribed as part of the devdop- 
I meat of better security at 
airports and no details are 
| being released. 

It is ooderstood the mea- 
sures have been introduced in 
what is called a “Security 
Advice Circular and 1 
Direction** which has been 1 
issaed to airlines and airports. 

The measures coaid include 
the dose scrutiny of luggage 
on any Middle Eastern flight 
or a fhU search of baggage 
carried by a passenger from a 
number of Middle Eastern 
countries with known links to 
terr ori sm, such as the Leba- 
non, Libya, Iran and Iraq. 

Western security experts i 
are aware that X-ray eqmp- 
ment is not always capable of 
detecting devices or explosives. 

One solution is a closer 
scrutiny of passengers and 
their luggage or the insistence 
that they place luggage on 
board themselves before 
embarking in the presence of 
airline officials. 


* Brian Robert Moore, an 
artist, and Richard Tuchband, 
an art dealer, appeared before 
magistrates at Bath yesterday 
accused of dishonestly obtain- 
ing £15,750 from an auction 
bouse. Mr Moore, of Whatley 
Road. Clifton, Bristol, is fur- 
ther charged with using an 
inscription on a painting as;a 
false instrument. 

He and Mr Tuchband, of 
Parry's Lane, Stoke Bishop, 
Avon, were remanded on bail 
for two weeks. 


BR can clear 
gypsy camp 


British Rail was given per- 
mission in the High Court 
yesterday to evict more than 
26 families of gypsies living 
alongside railway lines in 
South Wales. 

Mr Justice Aliiott granted 
BR immediate possession of 
land beside a high-speed, un- 
fenced line at Whitchurch, 
Cardiff, where gypsies have 
been camped since early this 
month. 


Bag snatch 


Patrick Gallagher, aged 46, 
of no settled address, was 
jailed for three months by 
Gerkenwcl! magistrates yes- 
terday for snatching the hand- 
bag of Elena Molakova, the 
Russian ballerina who is 
appearing with the Bolshoi 
Ballet company in Covent 
Garden. 


Gas leak alert 


British Rail was criticized 
for failing to notify Stafford- 
shire County Council about a 
train carrying liquid oxygen 
and explosives, after a leaking 
valve led to the London to 
Glasgow line being sealed off 
at Rickerscote. 


Hedge appeal Bus jobs cut 


Villagers at Spanby, near 
Sleaford, Lincolnshire, have 
appealed to Nottingham 
University, the landowners, to 
save a seventeenth century 
hedgerow which has been 
partly destroyed. 


The Trent Bus Company is 
to shed 264 jobs, affecting all 
grades of staff from admin- 
istrators to drivers in Derby- 
shire and Nottinghamshire, in 
the run-up to the privatization 
of bus services. 


Old engine oil named 
as cancer hazard 


Clifford Webb, Motoring Correspondent 
Government experts are doing so until the proper 

authorities have had time to 
commissioned by the Ford study the findings of the 
SUB- independent laboratory we 
commissioned to undertake 
cancer and contact wuh used the investigation.’' 

engine oil. . He said this study came 


The danger appears to in- after reports in the United 
crease with the higher mileage Slates recently suggesting that 


between oil changes which 
most car makers now 
recommend. 


used engine oil could be a 
danger to health. Oil compa- 
nies there had reacted by 


But newsofthe possible risk a wanting on oil cans 

to health was greeted with thorough washing of 


some scepticism by Ford's 
competitors last night. They 
sugg es ted that the company 


advising thorough washing of 
bands and careful disposal of 
used oil. 

He added: “We are con- 


was hiding behind the report ? erne< | Ibat news of this 
to justify its failure to fall into J nve «>8ation should not lead 


line with the longer service 
intervals now being 
introduced. 


Ford recommends oil 
changes every 6.000 miles 


to a panic. Although it is a 
major piece of work and 
thoroughly documented it is 
rased on tumours occurring in 
n \ ,c *5 xp0Se< * to used engine 


L l J Z-I. P ur «igin«s are technically 


ABBEY NATIONAL HIGHER INTEREST ACCOUNT 


viMuigra s*Giy o.uuu miles *a , “7 

compared with the average -L’ A rl 1 n °J been a single 
9.000-1 2,000 miles. case of a human being affected 

at _ _ in any way."' 

laneer intervale **0011 from Ford OH 3. 


just as capable of running ft* 

longer intervals between oil Ford on a. 

changes as tooserf our oiUnd 
competitors. £.! . s ^ in 8 investigated 


AHHEY NATIONAL HI TLDING SOQ ETV. ABBEY HOt 'NE. BAKER .STREET. LON DON NNX*1 6XL 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


OVERSEAS NEWS 



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'•••;: ••-'■•Jiinftt 
, '■ Dudley, 


Two get bail 
in auction caj 

; •• •* Meat; 

' jrdladc; 

•" *- •ft'Cadfe 

.-i Br.h jac 

••»■■• • •• •‘t.T.csiiyaE 

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t- Braids: 

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BR can cleir 
gypsy cam[ 

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The South African sanctions crisis 

Police in the dock’ and accused 
go free in Trojan Horse trial 


4 . From Michael Hornsby 
Johannesburg 

: Thirteen people were ac- 
quitted in a Cape Town 
magistrate's court yesterday of 
f barges of public violence 
after a bizarre trial in which 
the police, rather than the 
accused, ^often seemed 10 be 
the ones in the dock. 

The case arose out of the so- 
called “Trojan Horse” in- 
cident in Athlone. a Coloured 
(mixed -race) suburb of Cape 
Jown, last October, when 
policemen hidden in crates on 
the back of an unraarked lorry 
Opened' fire on rioters, killing 
three youths, one of them only > 
IQ ye&rs old. 

Accepting defence counsel's 
argument that the case should 
£e dropped because' of a 
“pathetic” lack of evidence, 
ihe magistrate said the state 
prosecutor had been unable to 
show that the accused were 
involved in stone-throwing, as 
churned, or even at the scene 
'at all. 

' . • One of the defence counsel 
told the court: “The only 
teason my diems are on trial 
is because of a red-faced 
Sttemprby the police to cover, 
up the horrific event 
Athlone. last yearr 1 - 


Commenting on yesterday's 
verdict Mr Essa Moosa. an. 
attorney representing the par- 
ents of those kilted and. 
wounded, said he believed 
"enough evidence came tip in 
cross-examination ... to jus- 
tify charges against some of 
the police involved. . If the 
Attorney-General refuses to 


men. 


Bonn firm against embargo 

Chancellor Kohl of West Ger- political reform in the republic 


many yesterday restated hb 
opposition to punitive ecq- 1 . 
manic sanctums against Sooth ‘ 
Africa, saying they were not an - 
appropriate . way to induce 


(Renter reports from Boon). 

Speaking from Austria, 
however, he did not explicitly 
rule out the possibility ofBo™ 
applying sanctions. 


m 


ite, I -will advise the 
families to institute private 
prosecutions”. 

Much of the trial consisted 
of cross-questioning by de- 
fence counsel of white police- 
men involved in the shooting. 

On October 15 last year, the 
truck with the police con- 
cealed on board drove twice 
through Athlone. On its first 
ran. nothing happened. The 
second time round, however, 
stones and rocks were hurled 
at the truck, at which point the 
police jumped out of the crates 
and opened fire with heavy 



cahbre shotguns at almost “I think the presence of] 
poim-Wank range. armed soldiers on school 

f ,*hc officer in charge, grounds is not 'conducive 10 
Lieu terrain D. VermeiUen.-. restoring an ormal situation in 
told the court he considered schools, and I intend tosay.so [ 
the shooting “a normal police when Parliament reopens, 1 
task”, and the use of guns had Mrs Suzman said afterwards, 
been justified by the threat 10 . (Parliament resumes on Au- 
the lives of himself and his gust 18)/ 

Meanwhile, a senior mem- 
ber of the Black Sash, avil - 1 
rigJus.oiganizatioD.Mrs Anni- 1 
ca van Gylswyk. left South 
Africa for Sweden Iasi night 
She had spent 47 days in 
detention under the state of] 
emergency, being released 
only on condition that, she 
leave the country: . 

Mis Van Gylswyk, who is in 
her mid 50s, said she was told . I 
by her police interrogators; 
that if she did not agree 10 
leave the country she would be 
kept in jail for 180 days and 
then charged with - unspecified 
offences. While in prison she 
was held in solitary confine- 
ment 

A Swede by nationality. Mrs 
Van Gylswyk is married to a 
South African, and had been 
living in South Africa for 30 
years. They have three chil- 
dren who were born here. 

To use the “threat of a trial 
to blackmail Mrs Van Gyl- 
swyk into leaving the country 
is an outrageous abuse of 
power and a defeat for 
justice.” the newspaper Busi- 
ness Day. said in an editorial 
comment yesterday. 


■ His instructions had been to 
arrest people throwing stones 
and erecting barricades. - 

In Soweto. Johannesburg's 
black satellite city. Mis Helen 
Suzman. South Africa's most 
famous opposition MP. and 
Mrs Winnie Mandela, the wife 
of Mr Nelson Mandela, its 
most famous political pris- 
oner. were detained for about ' 
half an hour yesterday ' by 
armed soldiers when they 
visited a school. 

About half a dozen photog- 
raphers and journalists, inc- 
luding myself, were also held. 
We were lold that we were not 
authorized to be on. school 
premises. Eventually, a plain- 
clothes policeman arrived and 
we were allowed to leave. 


From Jan Raath, Harare 


JVIni Mandela and fylra.Srizniaii chattfmg with hands Hasped 
* after having bee* detained at a Soweto school. 

; Zambians US decides 
J free jailed to send 
travellers back envoy £Z£!£ 


South African searc h es of 
Zimbabwe exports will lit 
hardest the tobacco industry, 
the main foreign c urr e n cy 
earner, which fast year, re- 
alized £140 ntillioa from 
exports. 

The cared leaf is stored In 
cardboard boxes packed tight- 
ly into 20 sq ft containers and 
loaded two at a time into 
railway wagons. Up to 34 
wagons, forming a “unit 
tram” solely of tobacco, then 
travel direct across Northern 
Transvaal to Durban. 

According to memoranda 
telexed to shipping companies 
here, these unit trains, to- 
gether with any other traffic 
for shipment through South 
African ports, are now being 
diverted to sidings in Pretoria. 

There they ' are “disas- 
sembled” and searched, and 
further delays will arise from 
die method of placing con- 
tainers on the wagons. One of 
the two 20-ton containers on 
each track will have to be 
hoisted off before access can 
be ggined to the other. 

It will take weeks to gauge 
the impact of the measures. 


MV Vienna (Renter) — Zambia 
:4ias released a group of five 
Swiss and one Austrian tour- 
ists who bad been maltreated 
since being arrested last week, 
Herr Peter Jankowitsch, the 
> - Austrian Foreign Minister, 
v said yesterday. - 

Hot Jankowitsch said he 
...had received news that the six 
: -were released from a jail in the 
.-northern town of Kasai* on 
..Thursday. They then drove 
—their own car, under police 
escort, to the Austrian Em- 
bassy in Lusaka, 

- The two women and four 
; men were arrested last Friday 
iwbile trying to cross theZam- 
- bian border into Tanzania. 

Herr Jankowitsch, unaware 
'that the six had been freed, 

• -appealed to his Zambian 
'.counterpart for their release. 
He said “all (had) been very 
badly treated” and one or more 
of the Swiss had been put 
-under physical and psychs- 
..Jogical pressure amounting to 
. torture. 

■“ Earlier this week. Vienna 
“ -warned citizens not to travel to 
-Zambia after a separate in- 
cident in which a woman 
tourist was tortured and 
repeatedly raped while being 
held in a Kasala jail for three 
weeks. 

• Explanation sought Lieut- 
enant-General Peter Zuze, the 
Zambian High Commissioner 
in London, was yesterday 
^.called to the Foreign Office to 

■ answer allegations about the 
" maltreatment of three British 
^ students arrested while travel- 
ling in his country (Angelin 

Johnson writes). 

.... British diplomats were nn- 
_aware that the three men had 

■ been jailed for one week in 
.JKasnma and no reason has yet 
-■been given for their detention. 

A Foreign Office spokes- 
--man sakh “We should have 
"been told as soon as the 
students were arrested and 
-allowed to visit them. We have 
'-■called the High Commissioner 
-4n because no response has 
* been made to onr written 
“•protests.’' 


From Michael Binyon 
Washington 

Mr Herman Nickel, the 
American Ambassador to 
South Africa, will return to his 
post in about two weeks, the 
State Deportment said, as the 
search for a black successor 
appears so for to have drawn a 
blank. 

Mr Nickel has been here on 
holiday and for consultations, 
as the Administration tries to 
co-ordinate promised tougher 
measures against South Africa 
- falling short of punitive 
sanctions — with Britain and 
other allied governments. 

The Administration has 
been visibly irritated by the 
critical remarks of Mr Ter- 
rance Todman, the black US 
Ambassador to Denmark, 
who was thought to be a front 
runner. 

His statements at a press 
conference on Thursday that 
. US policy towards South Af- 
rica still lacked credibility and 
that no new ambassador 
should be named under cur- 
rent circumstances have been 
given wide publicity here. 

It is unusual for any ambas- 
sador to comment on his 
country's policies towards a 
third country, and certainly 
not critically. 

A While House spokesman 
said Mr Todman was speaking 
for himself. 

“That is not a view shared 
by the Administration. We 
have a credible policy.” he 
said. 

There is one other ' black 
ambassador. Mr Edward Per- 
kins. currently in Liberia, who 
may be approached. But in 
‘ view of ihe embarrassing re- ; 
buffs suffered in looking for a 
black, a move that itself has 
been criticized here as empty 
tokenism. President Reagan 
may now dedde after -all to 
appoint a white. 

Meanwhile, the Senate is 
planning to debate a sanctions 
Bill that goes far beyond the 
limited measures acceptable 
to the Administration. 


to speculate, bat notes that the 
prices for leaf at Harare's new 
£4 million auction floors have 
remained stable this week. 

“If any country has had 
experience ofthis sort of thing, 
it's this country,” he said. 

But he added: “I am aware 
of what happened when 
Lea boa Jonathan was asked 
by the regime . . He did not 
finish the sentence. 

Chief Jonathan, Prime 


Ottawa action already 
biting into imports 

From A Correspondent, Ottawa 


Mr Brian Mulroney, the 
Canadian Prime Minister, has 
suggested October 1 as the 
probable target date for sanc- 
tions to be applied . against 
South Africa. 

Etui he added on his return 
from the Commonwealth 
mini-summit that, through 
government edict or vol- 
untary action, most steps 
agreed by six of the seven 
Commonwealth countries are 
either already in place or in 
process of being made so. ' 

For the Canadian 'con- 
sumer. the most noticeable 
effect uni! be the disappear- 
ance from the shelves of the 
popular Granny Smith apple. 

' Their imports accounted for 
SCanl8 million (about £8.8 
million) of the $Can73.I mil- 
lion in agricultural imports 
from South Africa last year. 

Even in the face of hail- 
storm damage to southern 
Ontario fruit crops a week ago, 
no shortages are expected. 

The main importer' of 
$Can26 million worth of raw 
cane sugar from South Africa, 
Redpaih Sugar, has already 
replaced that country as its 
supplier. 

The Canadian Government 
decreed a ban on air links with 
South Africa last September. 
There were no regular links at 
the time, and the only effect 
will be on the occasional 
charier. 

Only seven of 17 Canadian 


companies are majority own- 
ers of South African subsid- 
iaries. which would not be 
allowed to reinvest profits in 
that country. 

The most important is the 
Data Shoe Company of Mon- 
treal, whose , workforce of 
3,200 is 95 per cent non-white. 
An official of the company, 
Mr Basil Baker, said he ex- 
pected the main result would 
be the impossibility of replac- 
ing machinery at the five 
South- African plants, prob- 
ably resulting in cutbacks in 
production and employment 

A minimal effect isrexpected 
from a ban on uranium, iron, 
coal and steel imports. Iron 
and steel imports amounted to 
SCan26 million last year, and 
are easily replaced, while no 
coal was imported. 

El Dorado Nuclear, a 
Crown corporation, is 'refining 
$Can46 million worth of ura- 
nium from Namibia on behalf 
of owners which company off- 
icials decline to name. But it- 
Will not renew contracts, in 
line -with a policy statement 
issued by the External Affairs 
Minister. Mr Joe Clark, in 
July 1985. 

Similarly, the ban on new 
bank lending to both public 
and private sectors has been in 
effect for months. Bank 
spokesmen will not give dollar 
amounts of any present deal- 
ings in South Africa. 



Five women arrested as Thatcher effigy burns 


A Muslim woman holding her daughter's hand as they flee from the havoc and carnage of 
yesterday’s car bombing which claimed at least 25 lives in Aflf Atibi Street, west Beirut 


Harare tobacco hit 
by border searches 


Minister iff Lesotho, 
ousted in a rebellion in Janu- 
ary when South Africa dosed 
its borders encircling the tiny 
country. 

Mr Joe Slaviu, chief exec- 
utive iff the Manka state 
company, said: “If they wont 
to hold things op deliberately, 
they can hoM them op 
indefinitely.'* 

A tobacco agent expected 
that his profit margins would 
be halved by the restrictions. 
He believes he may have to go 
out of business. 

In another area, a spokes- 
man for the Zimbabwe Cham- 
ber of Mines reports that he 
has been told by Preform 
officials this week that asbes- 
tos, usually carried through 
South Africa in loose sacks, 
must now be. packed in 
dustproof, . shrink-wrapped 
bags- 

He was toM that this was 
reqmred because of the 
“health hazard” of asbestos. 
In fact, however, Zimbabwe 
produces long-fibre asbestos, 
which is regarded as now- 
hazardous. 

Economists have also con- 
firmed here that Zimbabwean 
and South African officials 
last week concluded a detailed 
agreement -on trade tariffs 
between the countries. 

Sources said that the agree- 
ment, which updated present 
tariff agreements, granted 
Zimbabwean exporters “sub- 
stantial concessions”. 

The South African Govern- 
ment has described the sit 
as “hypocritical” in the Eaice < 
Zimbabwe's calls for sanctions 
against South Africa. 


7 Sydney — Five women were arrested 
“'outside the Smith African Embassy in 
.. Canberra yesterday after clashes in 
1, -which police were pelted with paint and 
;..Mrs Thatcher was burned in effigy 
(Stephen Taylor writes). 

About 50 women were involved in the 
demonstration, organized by a group 
“ called Women Against Racism. They 
” carried banners reading “Women muted 


and never - defeated”, and “Go Home 
Boer Boys”. The trouble reportedly 
started when the bunting effigy was 
thrown at the group of about 30 police 
who had cordoned off tire embassy. 

It was the latest in a series ofinridents 
outside the holding. On Jane 16 a 
woman involved in yesterday’s protest 
smashed two embassy windows then was 
attacked by a South African diplomat 


with a broom handle. The diplomat was 
expelled by Australia while and die 
woman was later fined $Aos325 (£130) 
on charges of trespass and causing 


Last mouth there was media criticism 
of the director of pablic prosecutions for 
declining to take action against people- 
charged with obstructing a. vehicle 
outside the embassy. 


From Robert Fisk 
Beirut 

There can be no doubt 
about it now. The war of the 
car bombs in Beirut continues. 

Yesterday’s assault on the 
civilians of the city was among 
the more terrible of recent 
days, a brown Fiat packed 
with 50 kilograms (22.7ibs) of 
explosives and' neatly parked 
by a young blonde in the 
narrow, crowded street that 
once contained the PLO’s 
headquarters. When ft went 
off it turned several hundred 
yards of the west Beirut street 
into an inferno of burning 
shops, apartments and cars. 

Among the first victims to 
be dragged from the wreckage 
was a baby, roasted alive in its 
parents’ car. Scarcely one of 
the dead was identifiable. 
Gunmen had to drag a shriek- 
ing woman from the street 
when she realized her entire 
family had been destroyed in 
the bombing. The owner of a 
menswear shop had slipped 
out for a packet of cigarettes 
just before the bomb went off 
— when he got back, he found 
his partner and salesman 
smouldering in a comer of the 
shop. 

It was, in that sense, a 
typical, almost mundane 


Car bomb turns Beirut 
street into an inferno 


bomb that took ordinary lives 
in what has become an or- 
dinary way. It was the third 
such explosion in Beirut in 12 
days, claiming at least 17 lives 
and bringing the total death 
toll in the latest car bomb war 
to 81 As usual, no-one 
claimed responsibility. 

Afif Atibi Street is a long. 

. narrow Sunni Muslim 
thoroughfare adjoining the 
Arab University, a street of 
grubby apartment blocks and 
small basement shops and 
offices in one of which — 
before he was driven from 
Beirut in 1982 - Mr Yassir 
Arafat used to hold court. The 
houses are so cramped to- 
gether and the street so 
crowded in the day that the 
timing of the bomb, at pre- 
cisely 11.55 in the morning, 
had something horribly aca- 
demic about iL The car bomb- 
ers of Beirut are experts. 

For an hour after the explo- 
sion. a doud of blue smoke 
swirled through Afif Atibi 
Street as crowds of militia- 
men. Lebanese and Syrian 
troops and Red Cross workers 
pulled the dead from cars that 


had in some cases piled them- 
selves one atop the other on 
each side of the road. On- 
lookers were kept at bay in 
traditional fashion. 

Gunmen had to fire hun- 
dreds of bullets into the air to 
clear the way for ambulances. 

But amidst the chaos, there 
lay a few salient and disturb- 
ing facts. Not the least of these 
was the further body-blow 
struck at Syria's security plans 
in West Beirut Was not the 
arrival of the Syrian Army 
here supposed to bring peace 
to the dty? Was ft not the 
Syrians themselves who. just 
two weeks ago. ostentatiously 
cleared away all the anti-car 
bomb railings with which the 
vulnerable citizens of West 
Beirut had girded their homes 
and shops? 

The Christian militias claim 
the Syrians are behind the 
bombings. The Syrians blame 
Israeli agents. In any event, 
each explosion brings back to 
the streets the very militias 
whom the Syrians were sup- 
posed to replacewhich is, per- 
haps, just what the bombers 
want 


Washington View 


Warm-up to the Great Race 


Wifi the preacher ran? Is the colours. And for the can- 
maverick right-winger merely . didates visibility, even at this 
a crank or a serious political stage, is vital. 


force? Are the jokes about the 
Vice-President being a wimp 
beginning to. foil fiat? Already 
the political pundits are fitting 
their columns and talk shows 
over the showings of the Rev 
Pat Robertson, Vice-President 
George Bush and others in 
Michigan. 

It seems, even to Ameri- 
cans,' depressingly early to 
start the Great Race. Now- 
adays the presidential cam- 
paign begins almost before the 
newly-elected victor of thelast 
race has paraded down Penn- 
sylvania Avenue. And though 
attention inevitably flags dur- 
ing the gruelling steeplechase 
around foe country, at least at 
the start and foe finish Amer- 
ica and foe world watch to see 
who the runners are and which 
survivors made it through to 
foe conventions. 

The snowy primary in New 
Hampshire marks foie official 
start to foe season. But this 
time the assertive little New 
England state has had its 
influence somewhat curtailed 
by foe attention being given to 
a pre-race trot around foe 
paddock. 

The selection of Republican 
precinct delegates in Michigan 
on Tuesday was. not even a 
primary. Delegates were cho- 
sen to elect party officials who 
in turn will select Michigan’s 
77 convention representatives 
who will finally vote for the 
nomination. 

It is. at most, somewhat 
remote from deciding who 
will be foe next US President. 

But with dark horses taking 
the. field, all are eager to get 
even a small glimpse of their 


Mr Marion G. Robertson, 
the charismatic evangelical 
preacher who calls himself Pat 
and heads a booming Chris- 
tian television network, made 
frequent visits to Michigan. 
His supporters spent at least 
$750,000 (£500,000) in trying 
to persuade voters that the 
Virginia preacher was no mere 
southern Bible-thumper but a 
serious politician, the son of a 
senator, who had a serious 
political message. 

From Michael Binyon 


They seem to have foiled 
resoundingly. Mr Robertson 
appears to have come a poor 
third, after Mr Bush and Mr 
Jack Kemp, a would-be 
sound-alike Reagan conser- 
vative congressman. 

Maybe cool Michigan nor- 
therners are still frosty to 
■ southern moralists. Certainly 
there was surprisingly strong 
support for keeping religion 
out of politics at a time when 
foe religious right have almost 
captured foe soul of foe 
Republican Party. 

Mr Robertson, of course, is 
not yet a declared candidate, 
nor are any of bis rivals, but 
his revealed political weak- 
ness will not give his move- 
ment foe boost he was hoping 
would indicate that it was 
God’s will that he should run. 

Mr Kemp has also been 
somewhat disheartened. His 
candidacy is still tentative, 
despite his football back- 
ground and shock of fine hair. 
Supporters claimed he won 
enough votes to slop a run- 


away Bush victory, and could 
now forge a coalition with Mr 
Robenson, whose spiritual 
philosophy is compatible with 
his own blue-collar conser- 
vative views. 

Mr Bush is of course de- 
lighted. He has proved that he 
can remain ahead in the field, 
that his vast resources can 
attract more resources and 
that he is foe real inheritor of 
the Reagan mantle. 

The Vice-President will 
now concentrate on more 
national exposure, emphasiz- 
ing his efforts in the Middle 
East, making the most of his 
role in directing foe anti-drugs 
campaign. His caravan can 
now rest until after the 
November classic — the mid- 
term congressional elections— 
before moving south for a 
possible “super-primary”. 

And what about Mr Lyndon 
LaRouche, the maverick who 
has caused so much trouble to 
the Democrats? He was not 
directly involved in foe Michi- 
gan Republican primary. But 
it seems, to the relief of 
conventional politicians, that 
any marginal support is fast 
disappearing as voters wake 
up to foe full craziness of his 
tenets — foe Queen of England 
is a drug smuggler. Dr Kissin- 
ger. the former Secretary of 
State, is a communist agenu 
and so on. 

On top of this Mr LaRouche 
faces investigation in Wash- 
ington State, where his 
supporters are accused of us- 
ing campaign money for per- 
sonal expenses. 

The real race is not yet on. 
But from the paddock show- 
ings so for it can only be said 
there are no surprises and no 
new runners to watch. 


Chinese 
flood 
toll rises 
to 74 

Peking (Reuter) — More 
than five million people have 
been affected by floods in 
northern China, with 74 killed 
and thousands of homes de- 
stroyed, the China News Ser- 
vice reported yesterday. 

It said foe floods had killed 
44 people in Jilin province, 
affected 4.7 million others and 
damaged three million acres 
of farmland. Other reports 
said floods in neighbouring 
Liaoning and Heilongjiang 
provinces killed 30 people. - 

Brezhnev’s son 
loses post 

Moscow (Reuter) — Mr 
Yuri Brezhnev, the son of the 
late President Leonid Brezh- 
nev, has been removed from 
his job as a First Deputy 
Minister of Foreign Trade, 
according to an official 
announcement published in 
the latest collection of Soviet 
government decrees. It said be 
had been moved "in connec- 
tion with his retirement on a 
pension on health grounds.” 
Mr Brezhnev is 53. 

A-plant fire 
in France 

Bonn — A small fire at the 
giant French nuclear power 
plant at Catanom led to. a 
bitter complaint from the 
Social Democratic Land gov- 
ernment of the neighbouring 
Saarland (Our Correspondent 
writes). 

The French said the fire, m 
burning rubbish last Tuesday, 
was a minor incident. Bui toe 
Saarland government spokes- 
man said: "The Catanom staff 
did not use a ‘hot-line* tele- 
phone that was installed _ip 
June for just such an event.’ 

Suffocation 
for chicks 

Kuala Lumpur (Reuter) — 
Three million chicks will be 
suffocated in plastic bags and 
burned in an effort to beat a 
chicken glut threatening the 
livelihood of Malaysian farm- 
ers. The chicks will be put to 
death over the next two 
months. 

Earlier this week, nearly 
40.000 chicks were burnt alive 
in Johore state, an action that 
drew protests from welfare 
and consumer bodies. 

Youthful poet 

Peking (AFP) — A Chinese 
girl of 1 1 has been made an 
official member of the 
Writers’ Association of 
Hangzhou, eastern China. A 
Shanghai newspaper said 
Jiang Nan started writing 
poetry at foe age of six. 

Police purge 

Kampala (AFP) — The 
Ugandan authorities have dis- 
missed 1.800 policemen after 
a new screening process was 
introduced to help improve 
discipline, foe Inspector of 
Police. Genera] Luke Ofungi, 
said here. 

Unsafe books 

San Diego (AP) — Mr 
Anthony Cima. aged 87. 
whose love for books almost 
killed him in last month’s 
earthquake, says he still cher- 
ishes literature but he would 
like to sell his collection. He 
has been in hospital since 
thousands of his books top- 
pled on him. 

Photo finish 

Athens - Six West Europe- 
ans were being detained in 
Greece last night for taking 
photographs in restricted mili- 
tary areas in three different 
cases, as the Greek authorities 
seemed to become increas- 
ingly security conscious be- 
cause of the tension with 
Turkey (Mario Modiano 
writes). 

Boat mishap 

Dhaka — The floods death 
loti in northern Bangladesh 
rose to 55 when a boat sank in 
foe Ganges River drowning 30 
people. 


Tea men count cost of Gorkha protest 


From Michael Hamlyn 
Darjeeling 

The tea planters of Daxjee- 
ling, who proudly and with 
justification boast that theirs 
is the champagne of teas, are 
looking forward glumly to .a 
year blighted by the ethnic 
dispute swirling like the hili 
mists around them. 

The Gorkha National Lib- 
eration Front (Gurkhas are 
known here as Gorkhas) has 
mounted a campaign for an 
autonomous Gorkbaland for 
the people of Nepalese stock 
who are the predominant eth- 
nic group in the district around 
the 150-year-old hill station. 

The campaign has already 
cost about 30 innocent lives m 
recent months. 

The continuing series of 
strikes, in the tea 
has prevented the tea 
being picked while foe 
leaves were still new shoots. 

“We. shall -have to throw 
away the whole, of this 
Mr Ranen Datta, 



secretary of the planters’ 
association, said. 

He estimates that 10 per 
cent of the annual production 
of Darjeeling’s 74 gardens will 
be lost. “We reckon the agita- 
tion has cost ns one million 
kilogrammes of tea.” 

The cost may well continue 
to grow as foe Nepalese- 
speaking hfllmen. who came to 
the district after the British 
built Darjeeling as a health 
resort away from foe heat of 
the Bengal plains, continue 
their fig ht for separate status 
from the Indian state of West 
BengaL 


More protests are planned 
by the front leaders, who have 
gone underground since foe 
latest and most violent phase 
of protest. 

Mr Lakpa Doug, a local 
businessman and a founder 
member of the movement in 
1980, says that its programme 
will include a series of protests 
next Friday, India's Indepen- 
dence Day, and a road block- 
ade eight days later aimed at 
preventing raw materials from 
(earing the hills for the plains. 

Mr Subash Ghising, leader 
of the front, has left Darjeeling 
incognito to avoid arrest on 
charges of inritement to 
violence. 

But tea planters fear that 
the violence may continue as 
enthusiasts for foe cause of 
GorkhaHand attempt to bring 
physical pressure on the tea 
garden workers to support 
their cause. 

Already there have been 
several dashes between front 
activists and members of the 
tea garden trade onions, domi- 


nated by the Communist Parly 
of India (Marxist), which also 
leads the ruling coalition hx 
West Bengal. A handful of 
deaths resulted from one such 
dash in a garden near the town 
last week. 

Local Marxist leaders be- 
lieve that the campaign is 
essentially an anti-communist 
movement. “It is aimed -at 
checking die spread of .(be 
leftist forces in the state.” Mr 
RJB. Ray, a teacher and state 
committeeman, said. 

“The churches and church 
people are very much active 
and very much involved. The 
upper middle dass are suppor- 
ting it. They are reactionary 
opportunists” 

While activity in the gar- 
dens has been badly faff 
Darjeeling’s other main in- 
come earner, tourism. Is also 
suffering. 

Tourists had to be taken by 
bus out of foe steeply rising 
narrow streets of the town, 
which boasts 300 hotels, dur- 
iim a 4'A-day general strike 
which has just ended. ■? 


6 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


>. v 

.4^. W 
' • -* " v / 

.V 1 • 


THE PUBLIC ENEMY 

Cagney the gangster: Time and time 
again Cagney played the man you love 
to hate. ‘The Public Enemy’ was the 
film that really started it all, and one in 
which a grapefruit nearly steals the 
picture. Even if you've seen it half a 
dozen times, here's a bit of cinema 
historv no one should miss. 








m 










% 



mm 


LADY KILLER 
Cagney the comedian: 

^IPlt may sound like a murder mystery 
it’s more likely you'll die laughing * 
iPPwatching this one. ‘Lady Killer is 
a fast-r™rfg&£omedy that charts the cvec 
speedier rise of a cinema ™ 
usher to th^&zy heights of Holl^god 
Watch Cagney 
deliver welf 

as he deliver$^^rig]j®^oks- 


kv,; 


iM 


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Iff 11^ 




CAGNEY SEASON 

Throughout August 
Channel 4 are proud 
to present a season of 
Jimmy Cagney films. 
And they're not all 
gangster movies either. 

In films like ‘West 
Point Story’ and the 
unforgettable ‘\ankee 
Doodle Dandy’ he 
proves again and 
again, if you want 
someone to 
make a song and 
dance about 
something, 



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5i-5- 


tyyAfy 






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HI,*, 

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you r man. 


mi 


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V. >*: 


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mm 




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STRAWBERRY 

BLONDE 

' MtmtW Cagney the romantic: 

• jHH HK K r Many a leading lady played 

JSBiBBr opposite Cagneys 

leading man. 

In this picture he comes up 
against two of the greats. 

Olivia de Ha vi Hand and Rita Hayworth. 

If you thought all he ever did 
on St Valentines Day 
was shoot people, watch this. 


iV 


S: 




RIG OUT THE 
' CEMENT 

BOOTS AND 
WOODEN 
OVERCOAT, 
CAGNEY’S BACK 


IN 





ANGELS 

j j WITH DIRTY FACES^ 

' ^ Cagney the 

hoodlum with \ 

the heart of gold: - 
In ‘Angels with Dirty Faces’ \§ 
v an ex-con takes a gang of street-wise 
kids under his wing and tries to keep them 
on the straight and narrow. 

Meanwhile the long arm of the law 
just won’t let him alone. Cagney on harp with 

a thoroughly despicable Humphrey 

Bogan playing second fiddle, f 


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Cagney, The Season: Here are the dates and films. 32 July Footlight Parade 
2 August The Strawberry Blonde, Come Fill the Cup 7 August What Price- 
Glory? 9 August Yinkee Doodle Dandy, White Heat 10 August Each 
Dawn I Die 22 August West Point Story 13 August Blood on the Sun 
14 August One Two Three, The Bride Came C.O.D. 16 August 4 

G Men, Lady Killer, The Roaring Twenties 17 August Angels 
with Dirty Faces 19 August 13 Rue Madeleine 22 August Boy ■ ■ I 

Meets Girl 23 August The Public Enemy 24 August Man of 
a Thousand Faces s 


mi 


CAGNEY SEASON ON 
























THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


HOME NEWS 




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‘Pravda* casts doubts on sommit 

Moscow makes sharp 

on Reagan’s 



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president Reagan's latest 
proposals on nuclear and 
space weapons are uncon** 
stnjctive - and ' do not meet 
Soviet conditions, Pravda said 
yesterday. . . . 

In Moscow's response to a 
letter on arms control which 
Mr Reagan sent last month to 
Mr Mikhail Gorbachov, the 
Soviet leader, the Communist 
party newspaper .said the 
United States was still deter- 
mined to achieve military 
superiority. 

jbe sharp attack came as 
Mr Paul Nitre, the veterab US 
arms negotiator, prepared for 
arms-control talks with Soviet 
experts in Moscow this 
weekend. 

Pravda said the Reagan 
Administration was delib- 
erately leaking the . letter’s 
contents to make it seem that 
a successful US-Soviet sum- 
mit required new Soviet con- 
cessions on arms. 

“The unprecedented; hulla- 
baloo over Reagan's letter 
does not touch .on the. key 
problems surrounding the 
holding of a new summit**, it 
said. 

“As far as one can judge 
from the leaks, one cannot 
consider 'its contents as a 
constructive reciprocal step. 


From a Correspondent, Moscow 


So the fountains of optimism 
generated by the leaks in 
Washington axe gushing from 
a meagre source." 

The United States was not 
offering cuts in heavy bomb- 
ers with Cruise missiles or in 
long-range, sea-based Guise 
missiles. 

Instead,< it was snsesting 
.reductions in land-based stra- 
tegic missiles, of which the 
Soviet Union has more than 
the United States, and thereby 
seeking unilateral advantage. 

Pravda also criticized the 
Reagan Administration for 
trying to avoid restrictions on 
its Strategic Defence Initiative 
— the Star Wars programme 
for an anti-missile shield in - 
space. • 

Mr Nitze is expected during 
his mission to attempt to help 
speed up the Geneva arms 
talks, which reopen - on 
September 18. 

Western diplomats said it 
seemed certain that if the 
Geneva negotiations remain- 
ed in their present state of 
deadlock, there was no pros-' 
peel of a US-Soviet sammit » 
this year. 

Soviet officials and the 
state-controlled media have 
long insisted that there is no 
point in a second summit if 


the two countries cannot 
■ strike a major deal on arms 
control 

Pravda s attack on Mr 
Reagan's letter was the latest 
indication that Moscow ex- 
pects a shift in American 
negotiating positions. 

Mr Reagan's letter is be- 
lieved to contain an offer to 
share a Star Wars defence with 
the Soviet Union by 1991, if 
US research shows the sy$l 
can work. 

But while Mr Gorbachov 
has acknowledged that some 
research into a space-based 
defence is acceptable, he still 
adamantly rules out deploy- 
ment 

He has proposed that the 
superpowers abide by the 
1972 anti-ballistic missile 
treaty for another IS years in 
return for limiting work on a 
space defence system to the 
research level But Mr Reagan 
has turned the offer down. 

Mr Nitze's mission is to 
help prepare for a meeting in 
Washington on September 19- 
20 between the Secretary of 
Stale, Mr George Shultz, and 
the Soviet Foreign Minister, 
Mr Eduard Shevardnadze. 

That meeting is in turn due 
to prepare for a second sum- 
mit in the United States. 


Iran hits back in 
air raids on Iraq 


Tehran (Reuter) — Iran 
yesterday reported air and 
artillery attacks on industrial 
targets in Iraq, and President 
Khamenei said it would con- 
tinue to retaliate for Iraqi 
raids on industrial centres. 

Aircraft struck military and 
industrial facilities north-east 
of Baghdad and near the 
Iranian border and a military 
base east 'of Mosul . in Iraqi 
Kurdesian. Tehran Radio 
said, quoting a military com- 
munique. 

Heavy damage and losses 
were inflicted. AH the aircraft 
relumed safely to base, the 
communique said. 

President Khamenei told 
worshippers at Friday prayers 
in Tehran: **We have started 
to retaliate and will continue 
as long as Iraq keeps up its 
anacks." 

The President rejected a 
peace offer sent by President 
Hussein of Iraq in an "open 
letter" to Iranian leaders last 
week. 

The radio also said long- 
range artillery shelled eco- 
nomic and military targets in 
and around Basra, Iraq's sec- 
ond city, damaging two power 
plants, a helicopter base, an oil 
pumping station and the rail- 
way station. 

• BAHRAIN: Sources in 
the shipping industiy say Iraq 
has mauled Iran's shuttle 
tanker fleet in the past month, 
knocking out about half of the 
vessels ferrying export oil to 
the southern Gulf (Reuter re- 
ports). 


The sources said Iraq crip- 
pled two more shuttle tankers 
on Wednesday near Iran's 
main Kharg Island oil termi- 
nal in the northern Gulf, 
putting added pressure on 
Iran which relies heavily on 
oil revenue to finance the war. 

Successive Iraqi attacks on 
Kharg Island — Baghdad 
claimed three yesterday — 
have' caused the Iranians to 
restrict loading there to one 
tanker at a time, the sources 
said. 

If Iran wants to produce at 
its Opcc oil quota, it has to 
export about 1.5 million bar- 
rels a day through Kharg 
Island and the shuttle tankers. 
“They must be getting a bit 
desperate, trying to keep 
things moving," one shipping 
executive said. 

.Three. other tankers from 
Iran’s estimated ! 1 -strong 
shuttle fleet have been hit in 
the past month. However, 
Iran should be able to bring 
five more vessels into the fleet 
within a month, the sources 
said. . 

The 141.640-ton Pana- 
manian-registered .Magnum 
and the 117,340-ton Liberian 
tanker Mistra were hit during 
an Iraqi blitz on Wednesday 
on Iranian oil and- power 
facilities. 

Iraq said the raids were in 
retaliation for the deaths of 74 
civilians in Iranian artillery 
shelling. Iran denied that civil- 
ians had been attacked. 


Bank raid 
‘hostage’ 
arrested 

From Susan MacDonald 
Paris 

Mile Marline Pielri.-lhe 37- 
ycar-old bank secretary who 
was held hostage for eight days 
while her kidnapper de- 
manded 10 million francs (£1 
million) for her release, has 
been arrested after confessing 
that she had been in collusion 
with her kidnapper. 

The drama began two weeks 
ago when the kidnapper es- 
corted Mile Pietri to the bank 
where she worked, telling one 
of the bank's managers that he 
had tied explosives to her and 
wanted money. 

The couple fled the bank 
minutes before the police 
arrived to surround the cen- 
tral Paris building. For the 
inext eight days telephone 
messages, and tapes were sent 
demanding the ransom for the 
release of the secretary. 

Upon her release, with no 
ransom paid. Mile Pietri was 
extremely vague about the 
details of her capture and the 
man who had held' her. She 
claimed she bad been drugged, 
but hospital tests found no 
trace of drugs. 

. While under continuous po- 
lice pressure, the secretary 
confessed that she had met her 
kidnapper a few months ago 
and had agreed to be party to 
the exploit. 

The police are now search- 
ing for the kidnapper and a 
couple believed to have been 
involved. 


Western film director explores the 
untouched set of modem China 


x-/ 

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/ 


From Robert Grieves. 

. Peking 

Filming began here this 
week on the first Western 
movie about modern China to 
be made in the People's 
Republic. 

The £13.5 million produc- 
tion of The Last Emperor is 
being directed by Bernardo 
Bertolucci who is best known 
for his Last Tango in Paris 
and 1900. It is being shot by 
Vittorio Storaro, the master 
cinematographer whose works 
include Reds znd Apocalypse 
A'duT 

■Qje film stars the Chlnese- 
American actor John Lone, 
whfie credits include Yearqf 
the ^Dragon. the well-known 
British actor Peter O'Toole, 
an<£yiT$ Ruochen, a Chinese 
actovwith experience in the 
US33ra wdrkL 

More than 60 actors have 
principal .parts, in addition to 
the 19,000 Chinese extras and 
1.000 People's Liberation 
Andy soldiers who will com- 
priseHhe crowd scenes. - 

The production crew in- 
cludes 100 'Italian and 20 
British technicians, and 150 
Chinese workers. 

Unlike the recent Western 
film Taipan, based on James 
Clavell’s best-selling novel 
and which suffered cost over- 
runs and problems with local 
Chinese officials,' The Last 
Emperor is being filmed in 
conjunction with China's 
Film Coproduction Corpora- 
tion and Beijing Film Studios. 

Mr Bertolucci said yes- 
terday that the authorities 
were being very co-operative 
because they would like other 
Western companies to make 
films here. 

A 14-week shooting sched- 
ule will take the crew from. 
Peking to Dalian on the 
Liaodong Peninsula, and then 
to Shenyang and Changchun 
in Manchuria. • Afterwards, 
they will spend five weeks 
shooting in Italy. 

The film is expected to be- 
released in Obfohfer 1987. 

The Last Emporertmxs the 
remarkable life of Pu ,Yl who. 



Director Bernardo BertolBcri and actor John Lone holding a 
1934 magazine cover of China's last emperor, Pu YL 

Citizen. His first idea — to film 


In 1908, became the last Qing 
Dynasty emperor at the age of 
three sifter the death of the 
Empress dowager Ci XL 

With the collapse of the 
dynasty in 1911, the young 
emperor was allowed to con- 
tinue to live in the forbidden 
city of Peking, surrounded by 
dozens of retainers and 1,500 
eunuchs. 

In 1924 the warlord Feng 
Yuxiang captured Peking and 
expelled Pu Yi from the city. 
Seven years later, when the 
Japanese invaded Manchuria, 
Pu Yi accepted their invita- 
tion to become the emperor of 
the puppet state of Mahch- 
ukuo. ’ , „ 

At the time oF the Com- 
munist takeover in 1949, Pn 
Yi was jailed for 10 years. On 
his release he became a gar- 
dener and worked m the 
Peking botanical gardens. He 
died in 1967. 

Mr Bertolucci said he had 
been inspired to make the film 
after reading Pu Yi’s auto- 
biography, From Emperor to 


Andre Malraux’s Man’s Fate 
— was rejected by the authori- 
ties who said China "was not 
yet ready for such a film”. 

Mr Mark Peploe, a British 
writer who wrote the screen 
play of The Last Emporer with 
Mr Bertolucci and Mr Enzo 
Ungari, called Pu Yi a man 
who had been “kidnapped by 
history” The director de- 
scribed his life as “a journey 
from darkness to light ... 
When Pu Yi walks out of 
prison and gets on his bicycle, 
he’s free — a different man." 

Mr Bertolucci said he 
submitted the script to Chi- 
nese authorities for review 
and they had asked for very 
few changes. 

The director, who first vis- 
ited China five years ago to 
sign the contract to make the 
film in 1984, yesterday said: 
“The China I am seeing now, 
the reality of this moment 
with people smiling, is very far 
from what I saw five years 
ago. 


Plotters 
agree to 
recognize 
Aquino 

From Keith Dalton 
. Manila 

Leaders of the recent un- 
successful revolt in f he Phil- 
ippines have agreed to recog- 
nize the existence of President 
Aquino's Government, and 
some of them to swear alle- 
giance, in exchange for the 
rebellion charges against them 
ami 25 others being dropped. 

Mr Arturo Toientino, leader 
of the 36-boor bid for power, 
sakl he and the Justice Min- 
ister, M r Neptali Gonzales, 
had agreed on a compromise 
formula still to be accepted by 
Mrs Aquino. 

He said the deal, which was 
“in consideration of die drop- 
ping of the rebellion charges 
against all the civilian re- 
spondents". carefully avoided 
any requirement that he or his 
supporters should swear alle- 
giance to the provisional 
constitution of the five-month- 
old Government. 

This was Mrs Aquino's 
original demand. Last month 
10 military officers who joined 
the revolt were exempted from- 
prosecution when they, and all 
members of the armed forces, 
complied with this require- 
ment. 

But Mr Tolentmo, rnnning- 
male of the overthrown Presi- 
dent Marcos in February's 
election, remains convinced of 
the illegality of the Aqnina. 
Government, which seized 
power after a four-day revolt of 
civilians backed by the 

military. 

“This is a reaffirmation to 
the Republic of the Phil- 
ippines, not the new Govern- 
ment," he said. “When f say 
‘acknowledge the existence' it 
is only the existence that is 
recognized, nothing else." 

Mr Toientino, a - former 
Foreign Minister, said he 
could not swear allegiance to 
the constitution of the Aquino 
Government because “this 
would make me commit mental 
dishonesty and pmgery and 
violate my conscience". 

But other leaders of the 
revolt, including the former 
Speaker of toe National 
Assembly, Mr Nicanor Yni- 
gnez, Mr Marcos's lawyer, Mr 
Rafael Recto, and another 
lawyer, Mr Oliver Lozano, 
had agreed to take toe oath. 

Mr Toientino said toe text 
included “a reaffirmation of 
my allegiance to toe Republic 
of the Philippines", an 



Mr Toientino speaking in Manila yesterday of toe compromise to be offered to Mrs Aquino. 


“acknowledgement of the exis- 
tence of the present Gov- 
ernment" and a “stand against 
force or violence to overthrow 
said Government". 

The Government's modified 
demand avoids what might 
have been a long trial and 
robs toe pro-Marcos “loyal- 
ists" of a highly visible 
“martyr" for their cause. 

• State's witnesses: Twoof 25 
soldiers acquitted last year of 
involvement in the murder in 
1983 of the opposition leader 
Mr Benigno Aquino have of- 
fered to turn state's witness if a 
new trial is ordered. 

The state prosecutor, Mr 
Rani Gonzales, said three 
other people who may have 


seen him murdered at Manila 
airport on his return from self- 
exile in the United States have 
“indicated willingness to 
testify on what they saw". 

The Supreme Court is ex- 
pected to decide next week 
whether to order a new- trial. A 
three-man commission con- 
cluded on July 31 that Mr 
Marcos, now in exile in Ha- 
waii had put pressure on a 
special trial court to acquit all 
toe accused, including the 
Chief of Staff of his armed 
forces. General Fabian Ver. 

It found that Mr Marcos 
had “scripted" and “stage- 
managed" the 16-month trial 
monitored the proceedings 
through closed-circuit tele- 


vision, coached the chief pros- 
ecutor and blocked the pres- 
entation of key eridence. 

• CEBU: Gunmen yesterday 
shot to death two soldiers 
guarding Vice-President Sal- 
vador Laurel's motorcade 
ronte five minutes before he 
drove by (AP reports). 

The victims were shot in the 
head by unidentified men as 
people waiting to see toe 
motorcade looked on, police 
said. 

The bodies were sprawled 
on the roadside as Mr Laurel 
drove by to a speaking engage- 
ment in Minglanilla, near 
Cebu. For security reasons, 
the motorcade did not stop. 

The assailants escaped. 


709 miners 
resign in 
Hungarian 
coal crisis 

Budapest (Reuter) - More 
than 700 Hungarian coal- 
miners have resigned in the 
three weeks since the 
announcement of pit closures 
and longer working hours that 
reflect a crisis in the industry, 
official reports say. 

Hungarian radio disclosed 
the resignations at the trou- 
bled Borsod and Taiabanya 
pits on Tuesday, and official 
sources have given further 
details of the crisis. 

The radio said 400 miners 
had handed in their notice at 
Borsod and 309 at Taiabanya 
since the Government de- 
cided on July 1 7 to rationalize 
the industry, including closing 
some economic pits. 

The trade union newspaper 
A 'epszaxa reported that extra 
hours were being worked at 
some pits because output had 
fallen behind the plan in the 
first half of the year. Borsod 
and Taiabanya, and pits at 
Oroszlan and Vezprem, were 
returning to a six-day week 
from a five-day week. 

There has been a steep 
decline in coal-mining in re- 
cent years, with poor working 
conditions, a lack of con- 
fidence among miners in the- 
industry's future and inad- 
equate investment. 

At a miners' union congress 
in November their leaders 
warned them of a collapse in 
the industry and of unaccept- 
ably long hours. 

Miners were given a 10 per 
cent pay rise from January, 
and the Government has 
given assurances that the in- 
dustry will be looked after. 

However, the July 17 de- 
cision has dismayed miners. 
The general secretary of the 
Union of Mining Industry 
Workers. Mr Laszlo Kovacs, 
sought on radio on Tuesday to 
calm their fears: *'Wc have 36 
deep mines and nine open- 
cast mines. Seven of the 36 
will be dosed w vu a long 
period, three of these because 
the seams are completely 
worked out 

"Another two are being 
amalgamated under new man- 
agement but with all the 
workers remaining in employ- 
men L" 

Official figures show 
168,000 people employed in 
the industry. The average- 
monthly wage is almost 6.000 
forints (£90), but most miners 
earn at least twice that after 
working extra shifts. 


Washington tallies cost 
of Howard defection 

From Mohsfn All Washington 


Edward Lee Howard, who 
sold secrets to Moscow and 
has now defected to the Soviet 
Union, is assumed to have 
done great harm to US se- 
curity operations. 

Senator Patrick Leahy, vice- 
chairman of the Senate intelli- 
gence committee, told 
reporters: "You just have to 
assume its serious, damage. 
But I don't think the extent of 
the damage will ever be made 
public. Nor should it be." 

He said that both the Cen- 
tral Intelligence Agency (CIA) 
and the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation (FBI) realized 
there were difficulties in han- 
dling this case and steps have 
been taken to overcome them. 
Senator Leahy called for a 
better job of screening and 
checks on people with access 
to classified information. 

Howard is believed to be the 
first CIA employee to defect to 
Moscow. American news- 
papers in June reported that a 
highly classified offical report 
harshly criticized the CIA and 
the FBI for "mishandling” the 
case of Howard, who gave the 
Soviet Union details of US 
espionage in Moscow after 
being dismissed by toe CIA. 


His revelations led Soviet 
authorities to execute one of 
the CIA's prime Moscow con- 
tacts and devastated the 
agency’s remaining operations 
in the Soviet capital. But CIA 
and FBI spokesmen refused to 
confirm or deny the existence 
of the report or to comment 
on the Howard matter. 

Meanwhile, in another es- 
pionage story. The Wash- 
ington Post yesterday reported 
that the London station of the 
KGB was placed on extraor- 
dinary alert in early 1981 by a 
Moscow directive stating that 
the US was preparing to attack 
the Soviet Union. 

It said that Oleg 
Gondievsky, whose defection 
after a dozen years as a British 
double agent inside the KGB 
was disclosed last September, 
had told debriefers in London 
and Washington that KGB 
agents in Britain were in- 
structed to gather every scrap 
of information that might bear 
on toe supposedly impending 
US onslaught But the story 
quoted informed sources as 
saying that no evidence of any 
military moves related to this 
intelligence alert was delected 
in the West.- 





Mao back 
into print 

Peking (UPI) — The Chi- 
nese Communist Party will 
publish a new selection of 
works from the late Chairman 
Mao Tse-tung (above) next 
month on the I Oth anniversary 
of his death. 

The official Xinhna News 
Agency said yesterday toe new 
edition of the Selected Read- 
ings from Mao Tse-tung’s 
Works, the first since 1964, 
includes 68 articles written 
between 1921 and 196ft, some 
previously unpublished. 

Mao, the leader of China’s 
Communist revolution, was 
once worshipped virtually as a 
god. but his stature has been 
reduced since Mr Deng Xiao- 
ping assumed power in the late 
1970s. 


Kohl’s election hopes 
get a double boost 

From Our Correspondent, Bonn 


Chancellor Kohl of West 
Germany, who is faring a 
federal election in less than six 
months, has been encouraged 
by two opinions that the man 
who will stand against him is 
not strong enough to take over 
his job. 

A public opinion poll pub- 
lished yesterday found that 
Herr Kohl has overhauled his 
challenger. Herr Johannes 
Rau. candidate of the Social 
Democratic Party (SPD). in 
personal popularity, and a 
former senior SPD politician 
has criticized Herr Rau as a 
poor choice who will un- 
doubtedly foil against Herr 
KohL • 

The opinion poll by the 
respected Emnid Institute and 
published in the popular 
newspaper. Bi/d, found that at 
the end of July, 50 per cent of 
West Germans wanted Herr 
Kohl back as Chancellor- after 
the election next January, 
while only 45 per cent were for 
Herr Rau. 

This was a comforting siep 
forward for Herr Kohl, who 
last April scored only 44 per 
cent against 51 per cent for 
Herr Rau. The “Chernobyl 
factor" at that time was seen 
as a bonus for Herr Rau and 


this view appeared to have 
been right when, in June, toe 
two men were level at 48 per 
cent each. 

Herr Waller Tacke, toe 
institute chief, said toe poll 
finding had confirmed his 
forecast of last January, when 
Herr Rau was the newly- 
. announced SPD candidate, 
that Herr Rau would not stay 
the pace. 

Herr Rau's "softie” image 
results from an attack on him 
by Herr Klaus Bolling, who 
was chief Government 
spokesman under Chancellor 
Schmidt, and later was Bonn's 
"permanent representative” 
in East Berlin. 

Herr Bolling makes his 
attack in a book called Bonn 
Viewed from the Outside, 
which is io be published at the 
end of this month. He says he 
cannot imagine Herr Rau. 
who is Prime Minister of 
North Rhinc-Westphalia, as a 
political leader in Bonn. 

“He strives for harmony in 
his own family in the state 
Cabinet and his party. But he 
who shies away from conflict 
and spends too much time in 
reaching consensus cannot be 
successful in any political 
decision centre.” 


South Pacific offers ‘opt out’ clause for nuclear-free zone 

Lange confident Britain and US will sign treaty 


Zealand, 


From Richard Long 
Suva 

Britain and toe United 
States may now sign toe 
protocols of the Sooth Pacific 
Nuclear Free Zone Treaty 
after the South Pacific 
Forum's derision yesterday to 
include an "opt out" provision. 
Mr David Lange, the Prime 
Minister of New 
said. 

Mr Lange, speaking after 
toe first iay of talks here 
between the leaders of die 13 
independent South Pacific na- 
tions, surprised all with his 
prediction. Previously only 
China and the Soviet Union 
had indicated their willingness 
Washington and Lon- 
don had said they were stndy- 
toe proposaL 

however, were 
more cautious than Mr ! 
about the prospects of he 
ate agreement from London 
and Washington, even with 
the “opt out" danse. 

Britain and America had 
made it dear they would not 
sign the protocols without the 
withdrawal provision. They 
faadmade no commitment to 
sign, thee officials said. 

A copy of the danse, made 
available to The Times, shows 
that a signatory to the proto- 
cols could withdraw, after 
giving notice, if it derided 
“extraordinary events" jeop- 


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ardized its supreme interests. 

Officials said toe wording of 
toe withdrawal provision was 
similar to the provision in 
arms control agreements. 

The South Pacific Forum 
last year decided to establish 
the unclear free zone — ban- 
ning the manufacture, storage, 
testing and use of nod ear 
devices in the vast area of toe 
South Pacific between the west 
coast of South America and 
the east coast of Australia. 

Since then, 10 forum mem- 
bers have signed toe treaty 
and it has been ratified by 
three. Forum officials have 
taken the treaty protocols to 
toe capitals of toe five nuclear 
powers in an attempt to obtain 




an agreement. Mr Lange said 
if London and Washington 
now agreed to sign, it would 
isolate France — which contin- 
ues to test nuclear weapons in 
the region. 

He rejected suggestions that 
the provision was a watering 
down of the treaty and said it 
had drawn no objections from 
forum members. 

Rot other leaders made 
dear there was still a consid- 
erable level of disagreement in 
the forum over the provirions 
of the treaty. 

Sir Peter Kenilorea, the 
Prime Minister of the Sol- 
omon Islands ami toe forum's 
spokesman, said his nation 
and Vanuatu believed the 


treaty did not go far enough- 
sum) had not changed their 
stance. 

Father Waller Lint toe 
Prime Minister of Vanuatu, 
said he was not prepared to 
sign the treaty because it was 
not comprehensive. It did not 
ban the dumping of nuclear 
waste or the halting of nuclear 
weapons and uranium mining. 

Father Uni also hit back at 
critics of his plan to enter a 
fishing deal with the Soviet 
Union, which would include 
the provision of onshore facil- 
ities. He said Australia and 
New Zealand had brought the 
Soviet Union into the South 
Pacific by entering diplomatic 
and trade relations and sign- 
ing fishing agreements and he 
could not see how the Russians 
could pose a threat to his 
country while not to thepthers. 

The forum also criticized 
France for slowing New 
Caledonia's move towards in- 
dependence. It urged the 
United Nations Committee on 
Decolonization to restore the 
French-held island to its list of 
non-self-governing countries. 
This action, which would 
embarrass France and in- 
crease international pressure 
if carried oat, was passed 
unanimously. 

Sir Peter, however, ack- 
nowledged that the UN 
committee, which was ex- 


pected to complete its dis- 
cussions next Friday, would 
probably not consider the 
forum recommendation until 
next year. He said it was being 
drafted in Fiji last night and 
would be sent to New York. 

WhDe Australia, New Zea- 
land and Polynesian nations 
have opposed this move In the 
past, believing it might harden 
French attitudes even further. 
Sir Peter yesterday said that 
while there were many differ- 
ing viewpoints the final de- 
rision was a consensus. 

Mr Lange emphasized there 
was no “allergic reaction” to 
France inside the forum even 
after continued unclear test- 
ing, the Rainbow Warner 
affair and toe New Caledonia 
independence slowdown. 


INDIAN MUSLIM 
FEDERATION 

PROTEST 

MARCH 

ii 


Me a Mb Hmm. 


Hast pat ui to ngiur «n no 
tnaag —mutii rats In Ma i. 
Bj&OO sack an in 30 van) ad at 
Ha amuwn a pwaa ttn ha. ~ 
d as at tta I0B ni 


Mantim, 

T tasty Qua, Laudas Ell 4tt. 
Tat Om ar 551 4553. 






8 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


The Getty Museum in California paid a record price for it: but nobody knows who sculpted it, or when, or where... 

million masterpiece — or a fake? 



Geraldine Norman 
digs into the 
controversy over 
Kouros, the Greek 
who came bearing 
a riddle 


A vast marble sculpture of a naked 
young man has reclined, with 
broken arms and legs, in the 
restoration studio of the Getty 
Museum in Malibu. California, 
for the past three years. The 
people there tone been trying to 
put him together and stand him up 
again. He was bought almost two 
years ago fora reputed $7 million, 
ihc highest price ever paid for a 
work of classical an. and is 
scheduled to go on exhibition for 
the lirst lime this autumn. 

But scholarly controversy has 
already broken out over his head, 
with its elaborate plaited hairdo. Is 
he one of the largest and most 
complete Greek statues to have 
survived from the sixth century 
BC. an immensely important 
landmark in the development of 
Western art. or a 20ih century 
forgery? He has been named 
kouros. but in fact nobody knows 
where he comes from. 

The museum canvassed opin- 
ion widely before making the 
purchase, but refuses to reveal any 
information on the advice it 
received. Among those flown to 
California to inspect the statue 
were Martin Robertson, the for- 
mer Lincoln Professor or Classical 
Archaeology and An at Oxford, 
and Dr Ernst Berger, director of 
the Aniikcnmuscum in Basel. 
Both thought it genuine. 

But Pico Cellini. Iialys most 
famous art restorer, describes it as 
“a repulsive fake", while Federico 
Zcri. the late Paul Getty's an 
adx iscr and a trustee emeritus of 
the museum, has pronounced it a 
“blatant forgery". They arc cau- 
tiously supported by Dr Evelyn 
Harrison and Dr Ins Love, two 
New York scholars, while 
America's leading authorities on 
Classical an — Drs Dietrich von 
Bothmcr. at the Metropolitan 
Museum, and Cornelius Vcrmcule 
at Boston — refuse to make any 
comment to the press on the 
subject. 

It is extremely difficult to 
determine whether ancient sculp- 
ture is genuine unless its discovery 
is fully documented. The laws of 
most countries circling the Medi- 
terranean prohibit unlicensed 
excavations but pottery, bronzes 
and marbles arc constantly being 
recovered by peasants and sold to 
intermediaries who smuggle them 
out of the country, generally via 



j . 

£• ii.3%# :ir,vy; 





Form under fire: two views (left and right) of the Getty Museum's Greek statue, which some experts claim is a modern forgery. In the centre is a work 
discovered in the 1930s whose authenticity has also been disputed. It is homed in New York's Metropolitan Museum 


Switzerland and London, to 
America. Along with the genuine 
discoveries come an equal volume 
of fakes, sometimes of consid- 
erable sophistication. 

A large proportion of the Geuy 
Museum's distinguished collec- 
tion of antiquities probably comes 
from illegal digs, though there is 
no way the museum can discover 
the truth of this. As most material 


now reaches the market in this 
way. the same goes for other 
American museums, and many in 
Europe. A proportion of purchases 
turns oul sooner or later, to be 
fake, and the scholarly controver- 
sies can rumble on for decades. 

Arguments arc generally con- 
ducted on stylistic grounds, but 
our knowledge of Greek art is still 
patchy and there is a danger of 


rejecting genuine pieces because 
they are unique. Scientific tests are 
becoming ever more sophis- 
ticated, but the fakers read the 
learned journals and are generally 
only one step behind. The Getty 
statue has been recently cleaned, 
which adds to the problem of 
interpreting scientific results. 

The case for or against 
authenticity is rarely considered 


conclusive until gossip has filtered 
back from the country of origin 
about cither the discovery or 
manufacture of the piece. The 
terracotta Etruscan warriors at the 
Metropolitan Museum of Art in 
New York are a case in point. The 
two monumental figures and a 
colossal head were purchased 
between 191 S and 1921 and first 
exhibited in 1933: the Met pub- 


lished a book about them in 1937. 

They were challenged by a 
sprinkling of scholars out it was 
not until I960 that the Mel's 
Joseph Noble proved the black 
painted decoration to be modem. 
In 1961 an old man named 
Alfredo Fioravanti made a sworn 
deposition in Rome describing 
how he and three members of the 
Riccardi family had made the 



Fake: “Etruscan" head bought by 
(be Metropolitan Museum in 1916 


D ecember 1984 was a momentous 
month for Getty Museum officials. 
After a year spent investigating the 
authenticity of the Greek node, they 
bought it for a reputed $7 rail boo. A few days 
before Christinas an early Flemish painting, 
the Annunciation, attributed to Dieric Bouts, 
arrived at die museum on approvaL They 
derided to boy that too, also for a reputed 
$7 million. 

Both works had been challenged as fakes 
before the museum purchased them. In both 
cases the price was the highest ever paid for an 
art work of its type. The origin of both is a 
closely guarded secret; they are said by die 
museum to have come from private Swiss 
collections. But, in the past items offered on 
the Swiss market as coming from private 
collections have, in fact, been smuggled out of 
Italy; the museum would have no way of 
knowing if this was the case. 


The mysterious story of the Boots has beat 
extensively chronicled in The Tima, bnt the 
coincidence of the two purchases inevitably 
raises the question of whether the museum was 
justified in taking such risks with money which 
the US government had exempted from tax 
because it was being put to charitable use. 

The Getty Museum faces a genuine di- 
lemma. Its resources are greater than any 
similar institution — at last count its endow- 
ment was worth $2JJ billion, generating an 
income of some Si 10 million a year. But most 
great works of art are already owned by other 
museums and thus never on the market. • 

Getty officials can buy great works by minor 
artists or minor works by great artists, but they 
dearly want some major masterpieces. When 
offered works which, if genuine, would fall mto 
this category, it is easy to understand why they 
would want to convince themselves that they 


are looking at the real thing. Caution could 
mean an opportunity irrevocably lost. 

Several of the museum's major purchases, 
including the Bouts and the Greek marble, 
have been described as rediscoveries, im- 
portant works whose whereabouts had been 
lost sight of until an enterprising dealer turned 
them up. Giovanni da Bologna's marble Venus, 
recently identified in an old Scandinavian 
collection, is a case in point, as is Goya's 
portrait of the Marquesa de Santiago. 

Then there are the cases where more than 
one version of a work exists and scholars argue 
over which is by the master and which by 
followers. The Dtzrer watercolour of a -stag 
beetle that the museum ' bought from the 
French actor Alain Delon was demoted , to 
“Durer?” when it was exhibited in Vienna 
recently. Scraping the barrel of Western art is 
a difficult business. 


statues in Orvicto in the yea* just 
before and after the First Work! 

In the case of a porphyry hcadof 
a Roman ictrarch bought by the 
British Museum in IV74. the 
gossip network functioned more 
rapidly. The keeper. Brian Cook, 
was aircadv suspicious, on stylistic 
grounds, when he was raid by a 
Roman professor that it was one 
of a set or four made recently in 
Rome. The professor had seen an 
envelope containing pieces 
chipped from the sculptures to 
imitate the damage of centuries. 
Cook published his findings in the 
Burlington Magazine in 1984. ■ 

Archaeologists working on digs 
spread round the Mediterranean 
provide an efficient gossip net 
work, but so far nothing seems to 
have filtered through concerning 
the Geuy sculpture. If a recent 
discover)', it is most likely, on 
sivlistic grounds, to have come 
from a hitherto unknown sanc- 
tuary in Sicily or southern Italy. 
The shift from horse and oxen- 
drawn ploughs to tractors has 
meant that they dig deeper and has 
led to significant new discoveries 
in recent years. 

ft is highly unlikely that the 
statue comes from a collection, 
since a piece of its size afrd 
importance would not be easily 
forgotten. Besides, it has been 
broken but not stuck together 
again. Pico Cellini points to the 
breaks as evidence of fakcry. He 
says they arc not consistent with 
the statue falling naturally, and 
must have been artificially in- 
duced. He also claims to have 
been shown photographs of the 
statue taken some 40 years ago. He 
suggests that it was put in store 
when no buyer could be found for 
it 

But he goes further, suggesting 
that it is one of a group of 
sculptures marketed in the 1930s. 
which he considers to be fakes. 
Among these he includes a similar 
large marble statue of a male nude 
in the Metropolitan. Here the 
gossip network has been more 
cfficicnL In 1937 the fragments of 
a third statue were recovered in 
Paris by the Greek police. This 
statue, now in the National Mu- 
seum in Athens, and the Metro- 
politan one were found near the 
village of Anavysos in Greece. 
They were broken to facilitate 
transport out of the country. 

The- director of the Athens 
museum wrote at the time: 
“Villagers usually lay the statue 
across a large stone and proceed_to 
pound it with wooden or stone 
hammers until it breaks into two' 
or more principal pieces, to say 
nothing of inevitable minor 
fracture." The breaks sustained fry 
the Metropolitan statue' confirm 
his account. The Geuy statue, 
though obviously similar, was not 
treated in this way. 


Bernard Levin 

Taken with 
a large 
dose of salt 



PautaYouens 


On a recent visit to America. 1 
came across a story in the AViv 
York Tones which awakened 
memories for me. as it must have 
done Tor many readers. But among 
those who read it. I think I was one 
of the few. if not the only one. to 
have two sets of memories re- 
called. The writer of the story was 
clear!) unaware of the circum- 
stances giving rise to the second 
scl hui since the tail seemed to me 
to be more interesting than the 
dog. 1 shall today tell both halves 
of the story: the moral of the 
second half will. I think, be ol 
particular interest to those who 
relish ironv. and especially in the 
realm of politics. 

In 1951. there was a strike, in 
the American stale of New Mex- 
ico. at a mine where the workers 
were mainly Mexican- Americans. 
The strike lasted tor more than a 
year. the strikers' wives played a 
leading part in it. and the strikers 
wen: successful in getting most ol 
what they had struck for. A link* 
later, a film was made — fictional 
hut based on the real events — 
called The Salt ol the Earth'. the 
double meaning in the title was 
plainly deliberate. The film was 
sponsored by a union (the Union 
of Mine. Mill and Smeller Work- 
ers! which at that time was under 
communist domination, a fact 
which had led to its expulsion 
from the American equivalent of 
the TUC. 

No doubt the film portrayed the 
workers as upright and angelic 
souls and the mine owners as 
blackhearted villains, and no 
doubt the political views of the 
sponsors were not rigorously ex- 
cluded from it. And indeed there is 
no doubt, for this was the high tide 
of McCarthy ism. and the director, 
producer and scriptwriter (who 
took no money for iheir work on 
the film) had ail been called before 
the Committee on Un-American 
Aettv hick the director was impris- 
oned. as one of “the Hollywood 
Ten" for refusing io testify about 
his political connections: the oth- 
ers involved were blacklisted and 
found they could get regular film 
work only if they used pseud- 
onyms. So The Sail of the Earth 
was also blacklisted, and very few 
cinemas dared to show it. (The 
actors, incidentally, were ama- 
teurs.) 

Well, that was an ugh and 
shaming era in the United Slates, 
not to be extenuated or min- 
imized. and gave America's real 
enemies a great and lasting advan- 
tage. But things have changed, for 
the point of the AVu- York limes 
story was that a v ideo-casseite of 
the film had just been released, 
and was apparently selling well. So 
it seems to be true ihai the 
whirligig of lime brings in its 
revenges, though in this case 
rather !«»o late for those involved 
in the film. 

So much for the first half of my 
uic. i he hall' that the AVn Fiirfc 
knew about. Now lor Part 
Two. the rest »l* the story, which 
neither the newspaper nor most of 
its readers were aware of. 


At the lime the film was made, a 
diplomat friend of mine was cn 
/uiste in Prague. This was only a 
lew years, remember, after the 
Sox iei seizure of Czechoslovakia, 
and things were happening there 
far more terrible than the v tlencss 
of McCarthy ism and the fate ofhis 
victims: Stalin's show trial, which 
wiped out almost the whole of the 
Czechoslovak Communist leader- 
ship. was fresh in many memories. 
The Soli of the Earth came, 
therefore, as a timely boon for the 
rulers of Czechoslovakia, who 
were in a pressing need of some- 
thing to support their rule: a film 
which portrayed the iniquities of 
the United Stales was just the kind 
of weapon they needed. 

The film was launched in a 
Prague cinema: it started slug- 
gishly. but soon word of mouth 
did iis work, and queues began to 
form at the box office. The 
authorities were doubtless well 
pleased with such a reinforcement, 
from America itself, for their own 
propaganda. 

Then, abruptly, without warn- 
ing or subsequent explanation, the 
film was withdrawn. For some 
lime it was impossible for anyone 
tu guess the reason, but my 
diplomat friend eventually heard 


iL It seemed that the Prague 
cinema-goers were indeed keen to 
see the film, and to learn from it a 
suitable political lesson. Bui the 
lesson they learned was not at all 
ihc one the authorities wanted to 
teach. The audiences were virtu- 
ally unanimous in admiring the 
film because it showed the United 
States in so attractive a light 
Never mind the political mes- 
sage in the film: Czechoslovaks 
had enough of that at home every 
day . and believed not a word of iL 
Never mind the meanness and 
cruelty of the capitalist mine 
owners: much worse meanness 
and cruelty constituted Czecho- 
slovakia's lot. Never mind even 
the heroic stand of the workers. 
The Prague audiences noticed 
only three things in the film, all of 
them far beyond anything they 
could ever hope for themselves. 
First, the workers arrived at the 
mine for picket duty driving their 
own cars: second, they were 
allowed to go on strike: third, and 
most inconceivable, the workers 
it mi the strike. I have always 
maintained that whether a black 
cal crossing your path is lucky or 
unlucky depends on whether you 
are a man or a mouse. To the 
quislings of Czechoslovakia it 


seemed easy to portray America as 
a brutal enemy: to the people of 
Czechoslovakia, however, the 
only brutal enemy they could see 
on even the clearest of days was 
the one which had occupied and 
subjugated their country, which 
had extinguished every flickering 
lamp of freedom, and which was 
silencing, exiling, imprisoning or 
killing those who dared to resist. 
Any film shown by such people, 
with the clear intention of 
persuading its audiences to accept 
its political moral, would be 
instinctively and unanimously re- 
jected. But in this case those who 
went to see it found something 
positively to rejoice in: the twin 
facts that in the United States the 
workers were so prosperous that 
they could even afford their own 
cars, which showed how materi- 
ally wealthy were even poor 
Americans by the standards the 
Czechoslovaks knew so well in 
their own lives, and that in the 
United States not only were 
strikes permitted but the govern- 
ment did not crush them by force 
and did not even support the 
bosses sufficiently to ensure that 
the workers lost the struggle. 

The irony, as I suggested at the 
outset is very enjoyable. But it is 
heartening, too, for it dem- 
onstrates something which should 
not need demonstrating, but 
manifestly does. It is that oppres- 
sive rulere may tell their subjects 
lies on almost anything and have 
at any rate some chance of being 
believed, except when the lies 
concern their people's own lives. 
Unless you take the precaution of 
hypnotising him first, it -is no use 
telling a hungry man that his belly 
is fall, or a man in jail that he is 
free: he will always know better, i 
What is more, it is not only a waste i 
of breath, it leads to even worse 
consequences, because if the peo- 
ple knqw that their rulers are 
telling them lies on a subject they 
know about, they will assume that 
their rulers are also telling them 
lies on subjects which they cannot 
check for themselves. 

And that is not just a theoretical 
construction. George Theiner. the 
editor of Index, once came back 
from a visit to Poland with shock- 
ing but understandable news; 
wherever he went, he found 
support and admiration for the 
South African government — not 
because the Poles had become 
devotees of apartheid, but on the 
perfectly logical ground that since 
they knew that everything their 
rulers said about Poland was a 
pack of lies, they assumed that 
everything their fillers said about 
other countries was equally mend- 
acious. If their government said 
that South Africa was a country of 
cruelty, division and tyranny, it 
must be a land of happiness, 
harmony and democracy. 

That. I agree, is going a trifle far. 
Bui who is to blame? The liars, or 
the lied to? As for The Salt of the 
Earth, who was it who said that 
the worst that can happen to us is 
for us to get what we asked for? 

©Tim** New*p*p*f*. 1B88. 


Blackballs 
in to bat 

A new vessel — perhaps the most 
snobbish ever seen — has been 
launched on the effervescent wa- 
ters of Cowes Week. The Royal 
Yacht Squadron, that organiza- 
tion that makes the MCC seem 
democratic and the Jockey Gub 
look downright plebeian, has at 
last found a rival. The new club 
will, its founder claims, be even 
more exclusive than the Royal 
Yacht Squadron, for the only 
people eligible for membership are 
those blackballed by the RYS. 

The founding father of the club 
is a gentleman who has the 
enviable distinction of having 
been blackballed twice. His name 
has so far been kept dark, but his 
double distinction entities him to 
instant commodoreship of the 
blackball club. As such, he will be 
able to fly a pennant bearing the 
insignia of two blade balls: those 
who have been blackballed only 
once fly a single-balled pennant 
and become rear-commodores of 
the club. 

The RYS does not accept 
applications for membership: you 
must be invited to apply, and even 
then, you might be quietly advised 
to withdraw later on. Proposals 
come up before the entire 
membership, and a single thumbs- 
down is enough to earn a black- 
ball: three people were blackballed 
last year. Nor is it just your actual 
rubbish that gets turned down: 
Lord Mountbalien was 
blackballed in his time. The entry 
fee for the new club is £ 100. which 
will go towards an annual dinner 
at Annabel's. God- bless all who 
sail in her. 

Quaynote 

This Cowes Week is being spon- 
sored by a stationery firm called 
Sandhurst, considered by some 
somewhat vulgar in that they are 
daring to seek a commercial return 
for their sponsorship, and not all 
has gone smoothly for their chair- 
man. Brian Hulmc. as he spent his 
week seeking to do some business. 
The worst happened when his 
driver had the misfortune to 
misjudge time and space when 
stepping from ship to shore and 
plummeted into the water. He was 
rapidly pulled oul but unfortu- 
nately left the keys to the master's 
limo on the bottom of Groves and 
Guucridgp Marina. Hulme and 
his party were earless, but not 
rcsoureclcss. They got themselves 
driven to the Squadron Ball, the 
top social event of the week, in the 
back of their delivery* van. and 
were promptly shown the 
tradesman's entrance: 

Avoid the rush 

Cancrick race course is gening 
ready lo hold its Christmas meet- 
ing. Because the weather in 
December tends to be somewhat 
unreliable, it has derided to make 
a change this year and hold it next 



SPORTS 

DIARY 


Simon Barnes 


Thursday. The racecard reads: the 
Stuffed Turkey Handicap, the 
Christmas Morning Nursery 
Handicap, the Queen's Speech 
Stakes, the Port and Stilton 
Maiden Stakes, the Ghastly 
Guests Selling Handicap and the 
Comatose Handicap. The special 
guest for the occasion will be — 
that's right Father Christmas. 

Chukkaway line 

Channel 4 went whizzing up- 
market when it covered the polo 
last weekend, so one might have 
expected the post-match inter- 
views to be equally exalted in 
lone. But all that Julian Hipwood. 
certainly a grand player of the 
game, came up with was: “Goals 
win matches". He surely could do 
better than thaL How aboufAt 
the end of the day it was a game of 
six chuklcas. Sir Brian. For me the 
prince done magnificent" 

• A team of five women jockeys 
take on the top professionals at 
Newmarket today. The first event 
two years ago was won by Lester 
Piggott. with a consolation prize 
for Jennie Goal ding: she became 
bis secretary. 


Severn seize 

Shrewsbury Town of the Second 
Division are making a dramatic 
change this season.. Fred Davies, 
now well into his seventies, has 
decided it's time he retired and his 
job of retriever of balls booted 
over the main stand and into the 
River Severn will pass to his son. 
Tom. .As befitsa Severn man. Fred 
takes to the river in his .home- 
made coracle which he humps 


BARRY FANTONI 



‘Not Geldof — Maxwell, son 
about the Commonwealth < 


round the sidelines. The crowd, 
with its full-blooded “Come on 
Fred", is almost as delighted by a 
ball in the river as a home goal. 
For every retrieval (the record is 
seven in one match) Fred has been 
paid 50p. "With a ball these days 
costing anything up to £70”. 
manager Chic Bates says, “we 
reckon it's a bargain". Whether 
Tom will make the grade remains 
to be seen. Substituting for his 
father last year he fell in and had 
to be rushed to the dressing room 
to dry off. 

Cradle rocked 

This could well be a record: a new 
mark for the highest score made 
by a Japanese cnckctcr at historic 
Broadhalfpcnny Down, the “cra- 
dle of cricket”, where organized 
cricket has been played for 230 
years. Professor Yamada Makoto. 
playing for the Cricket Society 
against the Broadhalfpcnny Brig- 
ands. smote a most honourable 
20. with “some samurai blows 
over mid-off", as the Cricket 
Society chairman. R.N. Haygarth, . 
put iL The professor lectures on- 
British sporting traditions at Kobe 
University, and is in England 
studying as well as contribuiing.io 
his subjccL 

Gin-slingers 

Player power, boozy revelry the 
night before an internationaL all- 
rounders in the super-tax 
bracket ... it wasn't like that 
during the Golden Age of cricket 
In 1 890. according to The Story of 
Warwickshire Cricket, by Leslie 
Duckworth — which I took out of 
the library the other day — pro- 
tracted pay negotiations almost 
led the Warwick professionals to 
take legal action. Finally, the 
county's finance committee 
agreed to most of the demands: £5 
a match. £1 for a 50 or hat-trick, £1 
extra in matches 'requiring a 
journey of 100 miles or more. It 
even threw them the bone of 
inviting them to the annual din- 
ner. "But,” continued the commit- 
tee firmly, “the understanding is 
that the professionals shall pay for 
their own drinks." - - 


Bid to verse 


uuii-incKCung) Iim< 

tor consideration ft 
hoped, will be a boc 
limericks, with ca 
famine relief. In ti 
here is one from Mik 
gets a Times fiver fo 
f ' escon some (ye 
... in»}ytuy 
And I must dtsagr, 

.... W m:ff. 
» ho prefers (icon 
To Pete and the re. 
And to my nomine 
Johann C 
Further offerings c 
caved for consider 
book, and a further 
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MISSION NOT YET IMPOSSIBLE 


Two conclusions can be 
drawn from the_ American 
aqns . control mission to Mos- 
cow, before they have even 
Stepped on to their Boeing. 
One is the high profile which 
the White-; House is now 
prepared to give arms control 
at the forthcoming summit 
ttfththe Russians. The other is 
that President Reagan, how- 
ever hard the pressures both at 
home arid overseas, is never 
going to be a soft touch. In the 
fight of this week’s vote by the 
Senate in favour of resuming 
talks about a Comprehensive 
Test Ban, this is not without 


- The delegation of arms con- 
trol experts leave next week in 
response to a Soviet invitation 
in' an . attempt to accelerate 
progress at the Geneva talks. 
.With the foreign ministers 
Messrs Shultz : and 
Shevardnadze due to meet on 
September 19-20 to prepare'for 
a Reagan-Gorhachov summit 
later m the year, the super- 
powers have not left them- 
selves very mugh time to do 
anything. .. 

The latest .public set of 
proposals which have been 
showered over each other by 
tihe superpowers since before 
last Autumn's summit came 
from the Rnssians. Mr 
Gorbachov made an offer of 
missile reductions which, 
while not as ma gnanimo us 
numerically as the last lot, 
seemed more flexible on cer- 
tain key issues like the station- 
ing of Soviet medium-range 
missiles in the Far East and the 
~do’s” and “don’ts” of Star 
Wars. 

It received a welcome from 
Washington which was 


wanner than the usual blunt 
rejection. Although , detailed 
United States counter-pro- 
posals are still befog put 
together. President Reagan 
sent a letter last month to 
Moscow, which while, of- 
ficially secret has given rise to 
the usual crop of media reports 
and speculation. The White 
House, ft is said, is prepare! to 
delay deployment of any Star 
Wars system for between five 
and seven years. At least, it 
would do so if the Russians 
agree to re-examine the terms 
of the 1 972 Anti-Ballistic Mis- 
sile (ABM) Treaty — with a 
view to allowing a programme 
of in situ testing of the 
Strategic Defence Initiative to 
proceed. 

That President Reagan was 
not losing any of his enthu- 
siasm for space-based de- 
fences, seemed apparent from 
his own spirited assertion ear- 
lier this week. If any doubt 
remained, then Pravda yes- 
terday helped to dispel it by 
crossly rejecting any sugges- 
tion, that the Reagan 1 letter 
constituted a basis for 
constructive negotiation. 

There is scepticism in the 
United States itself over the 
offer of a five to seven years 
delay in a programme which is 
likely to go on for 20. With 
Congress expected to make 
savage cuts in SDI funding in 
the next few weeks, there are 
also grounds for doubting 
whether the administration 
will be able to press ahead with 
more than a limited mini-Star 
Wars programme — leading 
perhaps to a system not all that 
much more comprehensive 
that that already permitted 
under the ABM treaty. 

There are members of Con- 


gress who, while not exactly 
doves, are worried by the 
impact that SDI spending 
would have on -conventional 
defences. So are a number of 
allies. At home and abroad 
there are critics who concede 
that the SDI has helped bring 
the Russians back to the 
- negotiating table — and to 
elicit from them an offer of 
“deep cuts” in nuclear mis- 
siles. But now is the hour, they 
say, when the While House 
should be ready to respond by 
malting similar concessions in 
return. 

With such pressure mount- 
ing the US administration will 
shortly need to produce more 
convincing evidence of 
progress and a clearer picture 
of what the SDI will mean for 
Western defence. Mr 
Gorbachov may already be 
less anxious to accommodate 
US aspirations than he once 
was. He might at least want to 
drive a harder bargain. 

While the Senate has just 
urged the administration to 
enter into test ban negotia- 
tions, the House of Repre- 
sentatives next week is due to 
debate a motion for an actual 
moratorium. This does' not 
provide a very strong platform 
for the expert delegation. 

This is perhaps why Presi- 
dent Reagan has taken care to 
send npt just a team of top 
negotiators, Hke its leader Paul 
Nitze, veteran of the Geneva 
arms negotiations, bat also a 
scattering of hawks Hke Mr 
Richard Perie and General 
Edward Rowny — just in case 
Moscow might otherwise read 
the wrong signals in the West- 
ern press. The,president is not 
ready for turning. 


MR WAITE’S FINE LINE 


ft is of the nature of the sort of 
diplomatic negotiating enter- 
prise at which Mr Terry Waite 
excels that he cannot say much 
about it, though even less than 
usual has ..emerged .so far 
concerning hjg role in the 
- release - of Father Lawrence 
Jenco. There are fintber hos- 
tages at risk; and Mr Waite is 
well aware that a word or two 
-out of place could increase 
their already considerable 
jeopardy. 

; Conflicting accounts have 
emerged concerning the terms 
of Father JencoV return to 
freedom, but it. would be 
mistaken to look tp Mr Waite 
to resolve the uncertainties. 
Having undertaken the diffi- 
cult and dangerous mission to’ 
try to secure their rescue, this 
has to be his priority rather 
than tidying up the public 
record of recent events. 

Nevertheless the involve- 
ment of an official repre- 
sentative of the Archbishop of 
Canterbury in these matters 
ensures that public attention is 
bound to be drawn to them. 
That is, after all, partly the 
-point But it raises in another 
form the moral predicament 
posed by kidnapping, hostage- 
taking, and similar forms of 
political crime. When hostages 
are taken in order to gain 
leverage on governments, it is 
in the long term a very 
dangerous course for govern- 
ments to give in, even if that 
may be the only way to save 
the lives of the victims. For it 
vindicates hostage-taking as a 
.'method of pursuing political 
causes. 


- In return for safety for those 
in immediate peril, everyone 
else becomes that little bit 
more likely to find themselves 
a target next time. And this is 
true whether the ransom de- 
manded is in terms ofgoyera- 
raent .notion, .^uch as -the _ 
release of prisoners; or- money, 
as in non-political cases of 
kidnapping; or publicity. It 
may have been noted, if not by 
the hostagotakers in this case 
then by others, that Mr Waite 
was able to gain for Father 
Jenco an audience with the 
Pope and an international 
press conference, followed by 
an audience with the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury and 
another press conference. 
Enormous publicity was 
gamed, therefore, throughout 
the world and particularly on 
the American domestic tele- 
virion services. 

Has this increased the 
attractiveness of hostage tak- 
ing as a means of putting 
pressure on governments? If it 
has, the Archbishop of Canter- 
bury and Mr Waite clearly 
have a nasty dilemma to face. 
It may well be that Mr Waite's 
role in negotiating the release 
of hostages is snbject to a Jaw 
of diminishing returns. 

. It has developed ad hoc, and 
not as a preconceived con- 
tribution of the Anglican 
church to international affairs. 
The first and original cases, the 
Anglican missionaries held in 
Iran, were a direct responsibil- 
ity of the church, and indeed of 
Mr Waite himself as the 
archbishop's specialist on 


international Anglican mat- 
ters. His subsequent interven- 
tion in the Libyan cases was 
more artificial, there being a 
rather less obvious connection 
between the prisoners and the 
Archbishop of . Canterbury’s 
primatial concern for the wel- 
fare of the Anglican Commu- 
nion. It was as an ecumenical 
extension of this tenuous basis 
that Mr Waite then became 
involved in negotiating the 
release of the Rev. Benjamin 
Weir, held in the Lebanon, as a 
result of a request from the 
American Presbyterian 
authorities for his assistance. 

Father Jenco was another 
extension. And Mr Waite is 
now quite naturally and 
understandably concerned to 
do what he can to gain the 
release of those who were held 
with Mr Weir and Father 
Jenco, albeit that there is no 
longer any real claim that this 
is somehow a special Anglican 
responsibility. It is simply a 
humanitarian exercise, such as 
could (and once would) have 
been handled by such institu- 
tions as the Red Cross. Lam- 
beth Palace can now expect to 
be approached by anxious 
families and friends whenever 
hostages are captured for 
political purposes. 

It is to the credit of the 
Church of England that it has 
t>een able to sponsor this most 
unusual ministry. But it would 
be wise of it, too, to consider 
how best to wind it up. The 
line between being useful, and 
being used, is a fine one. 


FOURTH LEADER 


It is reported from Delhi that 
at the end of last year there 
were 543,963 lawsuits waiting 
to be heard in the Indian 
-courts. The first thing to be 
' said about India, therefore, is 
that even if she is a little stiff in 
the joints when it comes to the 
speedy administration of jus- 
tice, there seems to be nothing 
; wrong with her ability to 
count. Indeed, the remarkable 
exactitude of the figure could 
well give rise to the suspicion 
that the official charged with 
establishing the total, reckon- 
ing (reasonably enough) that 
-no one is going to check his 
results, may simply have 
cubed the number of his 
lottery ticket and multiplied 
the sum by his grandmother's 
age. • 

Assuming, however.thatthe 
-queue has been accurately 
r measured, the length of it 
strongly suggests that whoever 
else goes short.in India it will 
not be the lawyers.. (We could 
: name a good few more coun- 
tries -about 543,963, as a 
• matter of fact — where that is 
true.) But it also suggests that 
in terms of litigiousness, in- 
c transigence, complexity and 
. judicial dawdling, Jamdyce v 


Jamdyce had nothing on 
Mukeijee v Baneijee. - 

The report does not make 
clear whether the backlog is 
growing or diminishing, nor 
whichever it is, at what rate. 
But we may safely take it that 
those who have only recently 
joined the queue can have no 
hope that they wifi live to see a 
decision, and precious little 
.that their grandchildren wilL 

■ On the other hand, there 
must, near the front of the 
queue, be litigants who by now 
have been dead for many 
years, though no doubt a 
significant proportion of these 
havoleft wills likely to give rise 
.to further litigation among 
their heirs, which should even 
the score again. 

It was Hamlet who referred 
to the law's delays (along with 
the insolence of office, which 
may also not be entirely 
irrelevant in this business) as 
one of the . things that would 
drive any reasonable man 
towards thoughts of self-end- 
ing, and 1,087,926 Indians 
(allowing two litigants to a 
lawsuit, which is almost cer- 
tainly a gross under-estimate) 
must.be seeing his point 

Where can they, look for 


succour? Arbitration? But the 
appeals against the arbitrator’s 
■findings would double the 
length of the queue in a twelve- 
month. Appoint more judges 
and train more lawyers? But 
that would come under the 
heading of- trying u> cast out 
Satan with Beelzebub. Declare 
a moratorium and invalidate 
the entire caboodle of 543,963 
cases? But the litigants would 
all demand redress from the 
Supreme Court, and we forgot 
to mention that the same 
report revealed that there are 
already 10,000 constitutional 
cases awaiting their turn there. 

It may be, of course, that 
what snooker, football pools 
and television soap-operas are 
to us, going to law is to India — 
a form of fairly harmless 
entertainment. But if so, it 
seems a very expensive way of 
keeping oneself amused. Short 
of proposing that litigation 
should be included in the next 
Olympics, in which case India 
would be quite certain of at 
least one gold medal, we are at 
a loss to put forward any 
practical proposals for a solu- 
tion to the problem. It was Mr 
. Bumble who observed that the 
law is a ass; in India, evidently, 
it is also a sacred cow. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Paths through the housing jungle 

From MrKW. Forbes 


Sir, It is odd that the Standing 
Committee on Conveyancing is to 
produce a consultation paper di- 
rected towards the control of 
gazumping (report August 5), 
when the Law Commission, hav- 
ing considered the same problem 
in 1974 (Law Report no 65, 
Transfer of Land: Report on 
Subject to Contract Agreements, 
published January 22, 1975), felt 
unable to recommend any leg- 
islative change. ■ 

The prevalence of gazumping (s 
dictated by supply and demand, 
but the nature of the problem 
remains unaltered and it is doubt- 
ful if there is any solution which 
will not create as many difficulties 
as it resolves. 

The practice in Scotland, where 
an offer, if it is to be entertained, 
must be made unconditionally 

and then accepted (or rejected), j$ 
in many wajrs akin to accepting 
the highest bid at auction when, 
upon the fall of the hammer, a 
binding contract results. 

Neither event avoids possibly 
abortive expenditure because, 
purchase or not. it will still have 
been necessary to pay the cost of a 
mortgage valuation or survey 
inspection if required (or both) 
and to incur solicitors’ fees in 
making enquiries before contract. 

Where the sale is by private 
treaty, the only difference is that in 
Scotland these expenses must be 
incurred before the offer is made, 
whereas south of the border they 
will be incurred after, although in 
the latter instance the offer will 
invariably be subject to contract. 

In areas where a sellers’ market 
operates a vendor would, no 
doubt, prefer to refuse a voluntary 
preliminary forfeitable deposit (on 
the assumption, tint he similarly 
would be under penalty) and so 
keep his options open. A prospec- 
tive purchaser also would be 
reluctant to put a deposit at risk 
before he had been satisfied on the 
financial, structural and prelimi- 
nary legal aspects of his intended 
purchase. 

There may be a need to 
publicise more widely the pitfalls 
of house purchase. It is unlikely 
that there is any legislative route 
out of the jungle. ' 

Yours foithfully. 

K. W. FORBES. 

The Incorporated Society of Valu- 
ers and Auctioneers, 

3 Cadogan Gate, SW1. 

August 5. 

From Mr Robert Egerton 
Sir, The trials of a house buyer are 
not difficult to overcome if people 
would stop abusing the word 
“agree”. 

•You say in your editorial (Au- 
gust Sy. “One man agrees to buy 
another man's home, after which 
. . In actual feet, if there is any 
agreement at all, it is something 
like this: 

“I should like to buy your house 
for £x and will do so provided (a) 
there are no snags to the house 
which 1 may discover when I make 
the usual searches;-' (b) my 


surveyor’s report does not show 
the 1 house to be in a worse state 
than I think it is: (c) I can sell my 
own house fairly quickly; (d) I can 
get a satisfactory mortgage: (e) 
there is no relevant change in my 
personal stituation such as marital 
breakdown, ceasing to be in a job 
for which the house is convenient, 
or my finding a house which I 
think is a better bargain; (f) I do 
not change my mind for any other 
reason. 

“In consideration of this serious 
interest in your house. I expect 
you (a) to take the house on the 
market; (b) to refuse to consider 
offers from any other source even 
if they are higher than mi nr, (c) to 
wait until I either exchange con- 
tracts or tell you that I am no 
longer interested before you know 
whether you have to Stan again on 
your search for a purchaser . . 

Obviously no seller regards 
himself as bound by such terms, 
even when he is given the firmest 
assurances that in practice the sale 
will go through. He might be 
willing to enter into a binding 
contract which is subject to some 
of the conditions and the only 
problem is that it needs expensive 
legal work to reach agreement on 
specific terms for individual cases. 

What is needed is some stan- 
dard terms for such matters as 
searches and surveyor’s report. 
Yours faithfully. 

ROBERT EGERTON. 

Egerton Sandler (Solicitors), 

17-18 Dover Street, Wl. 

August 5. 

From Mr Ken Weetch. MP for 
Ipswich (Labour) 

Sir, The problem of a home-seller 
having agreed a price for his 
house, yet being free to accept a 
higher offer at any time up to 
exchange of contracts, and the 
chaos which results from such 
freedom are currently exercising 
learned minds — just as they did 
during the previous epidemic of 
gazumping in the early 1970s. 

Parliament containing about 
100 lawyers at any given time, it is 
perhaps not surprising that the 
obvious- solution has never been 
hit on: cut out the solicitors' pre- 
contract rigmarole of “local 
searches’* and “preliminary 
enquiries” by, (a) putting the few 
items of fixed information about a 
house on the Land Register, and 
(b) having the local authority 
display a comprehensive town 
map, thus enabling the purchaser 
to see at a glance that the house is 
not subject to a compulsory 
purchase order or road-widening 
or whatever. 

These simple measures (in 
conjunction with some minimal 
streamlining of building society 
procedure) would enable contracts 
to be exchanged within a few 
hours after, an offer has been 
accepted, instead of the present 
.period of four to six weeks. 

Yours faithfully, 

KEN WEETCH. 

House of Commons. 

August 6. 


Leaving Labour 

From Mr P. C Metcalfe 
Sir, As one who left the Labour 
PSurty in 1981 after 25 years 
because of its leftward lurch I have 
the greatest sympathy with Mr 
Kihoy-Silk (feature, August 4). 

Although Stevenage Labour 
Party was not reduced to the 
unendurable state of the 
Merseyside Labour parties there 
was a determined and successful 
push by the left (“hard”, “soft" 
and “loony”) to take control. At 
least two “bed-sit Trots” were sent 
in to organise for the Militant 
Tendency, to culminate in the 
removal of Mrs Shirley Williams, 
our then Labour MP. 

In the event, however — if she 
will pardon the analogy “ the 
electorate shot their fox. 

By 1981, it was necessary to try 
to “whip" moderates for almost 
every meeting. Like Mr Kilroy- 
Silk. I found that most of them 
were keen to urge you to fight on, 
but were noticeably reluctant to do 


any fighting themselves. Some- 
times, mine was the only vote 
against resolutions “condemning” 
the Labour Government for 
“betraying socialism” and the like. 

Another notable feature of that 
depressing time was the complete 
silence of Messrs Healey, 
Hattersley, Kaufman and 
Kinnock. and other recent cham- 
pions of moderation. What a pity 
that Mr Kinnock didn’t come out 
of his corner in 1981’ 

In die end, my wife and I 
concluded that if it was necessary 
to whip votes and organise fac- 
tions in order to keep the party 
anywhere near reality then it was 
no longer worth supporting. Its 
antics since then have confirmed 
that view. 

So we left, and joined the SDP. 
Mr Kilroy-Silk should do the 
same: he would find it refreshing. 
Yours faithfully. 

P. C. METCALFE, 

44 Sandown Road, 

Stevenage, Hertfordshire. 

August 4. 


Sanctions debate 

From Ms Amhea Bickerton 
Sir, This morning I received an 
order from a Johannesburg book- 
seller. Stamped in one corner are 
the words “We are major book- 
sellers. Please let us have maxi- 
mum discount," 

For three years we have been 
discounting South Africa by typing 
on all orders “Regret we will not 
supply books to South Africa until 
the present regime is changed.” So 
fer. all orders have been returned 
by surface mail. This one will go 
for air. 

Do those who feel strongly on 
these matters have to wail upon 
the Government to decide on 
sanctions? Surely this particular 
bicycle can be mounted by anyone 
at any time. 

Yours faithfully, 

ANTHEA BICKERTON, 

Abson Books. 

Abson. Wick. BristoL Avon. 
August 4. 


Close count 

From Mr Geoffrey H. Hodgson 
Sir, As one of the voluntary guides 
to York Minster I was pleased to 
see from your published list 
(August 4) that it maintains its 
position as one of the most 
popular places where no ad- 
mission fee is charged, with the (I 
presume approximate) figure of 
Z400.000 visitors per year. 

My pleasure, though, was rather 
outstripped by my admiration for 
the organisation at Gloucester 
Cathedra] which can produce the 
meticulous figure of 485 J 74! In 
all fairness to them, the closeness 
of the result to those of St Albans. 
Norwich. Coventry and Chester 
(500.000 a piece) leads me to ask if 
there are any possible grounds for 
a recount. 

Yours faithfully. 

GEOFREY H.'HODGSON. 

5 Maythorpe, Ruffbrth. York. 
August 4. 


Taking care of 
art heritage 

From the Chairman of the 
National Art-Collections Fund 
Sir. Sir Denis Mahon, in his letter 
to you (August 6) on the future of 
the National Gallery, refers to the 
tax measures which the Museums 
and Galleries Commission and 
the National Art-Collections Fund 
have advocated to the Govern- 
ment to encourage greater support 
for the retention of our cultural 
heritage. 

These tax measures numbered 
seven. One was implemented last 
August, namely, the lifting of the 
financial ceiling on the acceptance 
of works of art in lieu of tax. 

Of the other six. I should tike to ' 
tingle out three for early action: 

1. Gifts by individuals to muse- 
ums and galleries and charitable 
organizations in this field should 
be offset against income tax. 
following the arrangements al- 
ready introduced for corporations 
in the recent Finance Act. 

2. In the case of works of art 
offered in lieu of tax, benefit of the 
tax exemption should be split SO- 
SO between the offerer and the 
State. 

3. If a work of an is offered and 
accepted by the State in lieu of tax, 
the interest charged during the 
period of the negotiations should 
be exempted. 

The adoption of these three 
measures would go a long way to 
relieve the pressure upon our art 
heritage ana avoid some of the 
expensive last-minute rescues 
which we have had to mount 
Yours etc, 

NICHOLAS GOODISON. 
National Art-Collections Fund, 

20 John Islip Street, SW 1. 

August 7. 

From Mr George J. Levy 
Sir. Mr Hughes-Davies’s letter 
(August 7) telling us that manage- 
ment has reached the National 
Gallery is unfortunately in some 
danger of being taken literally 
rather than as an ironic spoof, in 
view of the credence ingenuously 
accorded today to “professional” 
managerial types. But the sad fact 
is that such types all too often 
have little or no understanding in 
depth of what they claim to be 
managing. 

Yours faithfully, 

GEORGE J. LEVY, Director, 

H. B (airman & Sons, 

1 19 Mount Street. WL 

Mixed-up plants 

From Mrs Brigid Grafton Green 
Sir. There seems to be even more 
confusion about samphire than 
Professor Gallon indicates in his 
interesting letter of August 2. He 
divides the possibilities between 
rock and marsh samphire. 
Gerard’s Herbal (published in 
1599) puts rock samphire and 
glass saltwort (Professor Gabon's 
marsh samphire) in two separate 
categories: but he also sub-divides 
samphire yet again, adding a third 
possibility. 

Gerard's two samphires are, 
firstly, fat-leaved “rock sampler 
... of spicie taste with a certaine 
sal in esse.” which grows on rocky 
cliffs. His second sort is 
“Pastinaca marina or Sea 
Paranep,” with leaves “sharp or 
prickely pointed, set upon fat 
jointed stalks.” and with a root 
“thicke and long, not unlike to the 
Parsnep. very good and wholsome 
to be eaten.” It “groweth neere foe 
sea upon foe sands.” 

Of the glasswort. which resem- 
bles a branch of coral and is “to be 
found in salt marshes almost 
everie where,” Gerard warns that 
“a great quantitie taken is mis- 
chievous and deadly; foe smel and 
smoke also of this herb being 
burnt drives away serpents.” 

Dorothy Hartley, writing Food 
in England in 1954, still identified 
samphire as “growing on rough 
shingle: there is a lot on foe pebble 
ridge at Bideford”. She must have 
been referring to Gerard’s sea 
parsnip, not to foe rock samphire 
of Shakespeare's “dreadful trade.” 
nor yet to foe glasswort of foe 
saltmarsh. 

Yours faithfully, 

BRIGID GRAFTON GREEN, 

88 Temple Fortune lane, NW1 1. 

Closure of Institute 

From Dr N. J. Braiiey 
Sir. The closure, earlier this year, 
of foe British Academy-sponsored 
British Institute in South-east Asia 
should surely be foe cause for 
some concern. It was located in 
Bangkok, now foe hub of regional 
air travel, and Thailand, a “real” 
South-east Asian country, attracts 
an increasingly substantial British 

business interest. 

The BISEA pioneered scholarly 
research in this area. Like HMS 
Endurance in the South Atlantic, 
its disappearance is likely to prove 
more unfortunate locally than its 
Singapore inception was helpful. 
Yours sincerely. 

N. J. BRAILEY. 

University of BristoL 
Department of History. 

13-15 Wo6dland Road. 

Bristol. Avon. 


Plans and planners 

From the Chairman of York Civic 
Trust 

Sir. Mrs R. A. DougiavPennant 
(August 4) says that a recent 
speech by the Environment Min- 
ister. Mr Ridley, in which he is 
reported to have said that he 
looked forward to the time when 
planners no longer had control 
over the exterior appearance of 
buildings, was music to her ears. 
To my ears it was discordant and 
depressing. 

I have for many years been 
Chairman of foe York Conserva- 
tion Area Advisory Panel, set up 
by York Gty Council to consider, 
with the skilled professional ad- 
vice of the City Planning Officer, 


all applications for planning per- 
mission within the city’s conserva- 
tion areas, comprising virtually 
the whole of the historic core of 
the city. 

If Mrs Douglas-Pennanl could 
only see the insensitivity and 
abysmal quality of much of foe 
new development, alterations to 
existing buildings (listed or not) 
and change of use which unbridled 
and uncaring commercial devel- 
opers seek to inflict upon this 
historic city, she would indeed be 
grateful for “the planners” and the 
constraints which they and their 
committees seek to impose. 

She thanks God that there were 
no planners in the 18fo century; 
but if these constraints had existed 


then and in the 19fo century, how 
many more of our historic towns 
and cities would have been saved, 
as York has been, for this genera- 
tion to enjoy? 

Without the protection which 
the planning system provides 
cities like York, under the pres- 
sures of tourism, would rapidly 
become medieval Disneylands, 
peppered by pastiche and plas- 
tered with the architectural graffiti 
of the non-caring, get-rich-quick 
developers. 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHN SHANNON (Chairman. 
York Civic Trust). 

Flat 9. Si George’s House, 

23 Castiegate. York. 

August 5. 



AUGUST 9 1860 

For nearly 300 years Syria had 
been under the suzerainty of 
Turkey, during which internecine 
strife was common. Following a 
dispute between religious factual* 
the Muslims turned their fury on 
the Christian population. 


THE MASSACRES IN 
SYRIA. 

We publish to-day a number of 
extracts from private letters, which 
will be foand of great interest:- 
“ Beyrout, July 19. 

ANOTHER ACCOUNT. 

“Whatever you might have 
learnt of the fearful occurrences in 
these places is not one part of what 
happened lately in Damascus, 
through the connivance of the 
Ottoman authorities. After the 
burning of about 150 towns, vil 
lages, and hamlets of the Chris 
Liana, the massacre of about 10,000 
persons, rendering about 20,000 
widows and orphans, reducing 
them to the utmost poverty, scat 
lering them in every place, ill 
treated and insulted by ail nations, 
the Moslems of Damascus on the 
9th inst, rose up against the 
Christiana, burnt all their 
churches, patriarchates, and con 
sulates, except those of England 


and Prussia, and murdered about 
6,000 — some say more, some less 
(for up to this date the number » 
not exactly known, as things were 
continuing), and also murdered the 
numerous clerical body of that 
capital, both Franks and natives, 
except about 10 persons, and 
forced many women to become 
Moslems, married some of them, 
and killed same of them, while 
others were sold — the married for 
50 piasters, and the unmarried for 
80. All this was done with the 
knowledge of the Government, 
their connivance and assistance, as 
is reported by Moslems themselves 
and the Prussian Consul. As to the 
remainder of the Christians, it is 
said that 12,000 of them are in the 
Castle with the Pasha, who has 
given them a slight subsistence, 
and many of them are dying daily 
of starvation: some, also sought 
protection with some respectable 
Moslems of the place; others, to the 
number of about 3,000, took refuge 
with Abd-el-Kader, the Algerine 
chief, a few also are at the English 
and Prussian Consulates; the rea- 
son ascribed for not attacking 
these two places is that their 
respective Powers are their coadju- 
tors, servants of His Majesty the 
Sultan Abdul Medjid; but with 
regard to the other Powers they 
spared nothing, but did all they 
could do against them, burning 
their convents and killing their 
clergy. The Christian quarter of 
Damascus became a complete ruin 
strewed with corpses; besides those 
who met their death, precipitated 
into wells, and of the 

burning houses, as many who could 
not find a place of escape hid 
themselves in wells, cedars, and 


other places, and who, being, 
starved and feint, after remaining. 


there two or three days, came out, 
but were met by their enemies who 
either stoned them, or threw them 
back into the flames, of these the 
number is not known. These 
atrocities commenced early on the 
morning of the 9th inst. The last 
news from Damascus of the 17th, 
evening, reports that they were 
continuing, pillage, burning, and 
murder being as nfe as before. Ten 
days ago a colonel with 800 troops 
came from Constantinople, who 
was sent with his regiment to 
Damascus, and we were informed 
that upon his arrival 15 Christians 
were executed on one of the gates of j 
the town in bis presence, he having 
arrived before the soldiers. After- 
wards, it is said, some troops were 
despatched with Kaled Pasha, who 
marched only three hours a day; 
the last mail has not yet arrived, so 
we cannot tell what happened after 
the arrival of these troops. Upon 
the news of these disasters reach- 
ing Beyrout the Moslem popula- 
tion were agitated with fanaticism, 
and the Christians with fear, and 
many of the latter left for Alexan- 
dria and other places; in feet, no 
one remains here at present except 
those who were enchained by their 
business, or who have no means, or 
those who are ilL Mohamed 
Kuisbeed Pasha had given orders 
to prevent any one going, but the 
English commander tnlrf him to 
withdraw his order, or he would 
himself send and embark the 
population. The Pasha’s preven- 
tive order was therefore with- 
drawn .... Beyrout has become 
almost a desert; trade is at a 
standstill, money has disappeared, 
and no payments are made; mer- 
chants are all embarrassed, and 
safety banished the land. . . . 


Future of cricket 

From Mr Derek Bridge 
Sir. Mr Anthony Given (August 2) 
is quite correct. The nineteen 
counties which form the Minor 
Counties Cricket Association do 
indeed represent a very laige 
geographical area of England. Bui 
the players are unpaid, and use 
part of their holidays to partici- 
pate in the nine-match pro- 
gramme. It would be impossible 
for them to play cricket full-time— 
unless a suitable Father Christmas 
can be found. 

Yours faithfully. 

DEREK BRIDGE 

(Hon. Secretary, Dorset County 

Crickei Club), 

Long Acre, Tinnev’s Lane. 
Sherborne. Dorset. 

From Mr R. G. C. four 
Sir. The wireless has just an- 
nounced that, for the next Test 
match, the England selectors have 
named their squad. I feared that, 
cre long, the players would be 
referred to as “the lads". A further 
broadcast has done just that. 

Talk about amazing Grace!. 
Youre faithfully. 

COLIN COWE. 

Brookside Cottage, Brook End, 
Chadlington. Oxford. 

August 3. 




V 




THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


THE ARTS 


Television 


Opera 


Healing Counting the cost of 


the 
ills of 
society 


melodic overdrive 


Van Tan Tethera 

Queen Elizabeth Hall 


~ Anonymity is often said to be 
the great malice of the late 
20th century. The sheer scale 
of society, the dwarfing i 
prospective of industry, the 
science of numbers, the func- 
tional uniformity which is the 
curse of mass production,— all 
these are blamed for turning 
human beings into statistics, 
for creating a world where you 
cannot care about people be- 
cause you don't know them. 

Faced with an unprece- 
dented increase in knowledge 
and information, we work on 
arithmatkai principles and 
split human behaviour into 
countless specialist fields, 
achieving a useful moral sub- 
division in which no-one can 

• be held responsible for the 

• whole of anything. 

\_ This has been the argument 
:: bf artists and politicians for 
"some considerable time but. in 
last night's The Heating Arts 
“(BBC!), Dr Patrick Pietroni 
made it the centrepiece of his 
r. critique of modem medicine. 
"Pietroni is a mild-mannered, 
quiet-spoken, and incisively 
articulate family doctor who is 
-framing the virtues of common 
sense and a wider pastoral 
.rare into a coherent medical 
-creed. To him, doctors are not 
merely biological repair men, 
-people who know how we work 
land people who can twiddle 
^fcnobs or replace fanlty parts 
Jwhen they threaten to go 
-wrong. 

The doctor must be a healer 
/-in (he fullest, most spiritual 
sense, someone who accepts 
that human beings are con- 
'genilally lonely and dissatis- 
fied hut who may be able to 
reconcile them to the diffi- 
culties of their condition 
*■-- Must diseases, Pietroni ar- 
gued. are the result of the kind 
'of life we lead. Pain, sadness, 
rimhappiness. distress, are the 
inevitable consequence of be- 
ing alive. Ail the doctor can 
"hope to do, he said, in an 
excellent, encapsulating 
-phrase, is “to share the joor- 
ney with the patient". In the 
end. Pietroni was arguing for 
.self-knowledge and a degree of 
stoicism, for helping patients 
To understand their own nature 
so that they may accept what 
they are. 

Dividing medicine into 
compartments — seeing it as 
chiropody or phy siotherapy or 
psychiatry — is to risk ignor- 
ing the wholeness of the 
person you Ircat. Dennis Pot- 
ter once suggested that we 
choose our illnesses — that, in 
some oblique way, they define 
us — and Pietroni's sane, 
vocational, humanistic, 
priestly notion or healing em- 
braces many of the moral and 
spiritual needs which contem- 
porary medicine so often 
leaves off the agenda. 


The docks Of Birtwistle’s 
muse have been spinning 
madly forwards and back- 
wards to chime together, 
bringing within recent months 
the premieres of hts massive, 
majestic orchestral piece. 
Earth Dances, then of his 
Mask of Orpheus at the Coli- 
seum. and now of another 
opera, Yan Tan Tethera. 


orchestra to that of Secret 
Theatre, and there are similar- 
ities of musical substance. 

Both works make much of a 
strong melodic line, driving 
hard and sum like a chisel, and 
used in the opera to project 


Tony Harrison's version of astronomical clock, but with 


Wiltshire folktale. Both. too. 
combine and measure the 
melodic impetus with pulsat- 
ing accompaniments: Yan 
Tan Tethera is coloured with 
bell sounds, with xylophone 
cJattcrings, and with the 
stressful case of repeated 


» 0 “ — 3 

More 'of itself, that is. B.rtwislle's own description 
because it is a comparatively °fjhe work as a mechanical 


short piece and one which 
gathers energy as it goes, like a 
great round rock rolling down 
a hill: and more of the creative 
intelligence that _ produced 
these works, an intelligence 
which itself seems to grow 
increasingly powerful and 
purposeful as time passes. , 
As compositional time 
passed in fact. Yan Tan 
Tethera was written after Or- 
pheus and before Secret The- 
atre. the London Sinfonicua 
piece which preceded and 
made possible Earth Dances. 
The new opera uses a similar 


Birtwistle's own description 
of the work as a “mechanical 
pastoral" is more than a 
Polonianism: it points to the 
twin, inseparable aspects of 
the piece as a reiterative 
machine and as a fresh song of 
the fields. 

The Mask of Orpheus was in 
this sense a mechanical pas- 
toral too. and there are shades 
of that old myth in the new 
opera when the hero is im- 
mured underground for 
expecting music to turn back 
the passage of time. The 
single. 90-minuic act of Yan 
Tan Tethera also bears some 


resemblance to the last act of alien in the south and the 


Concerts 

Soloists steal the night 


Song of the 
Century 
Purcell Room 


Oh. that concert programming 
is usually as intelligently exe- 
cuted as it is in Michael 
Vyncr's current Summerscope 
scries. One of six in the series. 


Thus the evening really 
belonged to the major soloists. 
Palmer, in fine voice after her 
exertions at the Proms the 
other night showed her darker 
side in Mahler's “Urn Milter- 
nacht" and presented Sibe- 
lius's melodramatic tragedy. 
“Flickan kom ' ifran sin 
fllsklings mole", with real 
passion. 

By contrast she was refined 


” U ." dC S J.2 fo™ d= Scprembre". » 


hud something lo do with iSncd waPaSS^ouSME 

irwsffifwrs: ws-ufa^-.’ 

concert, which covered the /-y -« 

years 1901-1910 and which l/^CC I 

had us tapping our feet to O&V X i 

cheeky, popular songs one J 

moment and breathing the nnr , rr\ 
heady, romantic aromas of DDL IrtJ/Ln)Wn€S 
Ctebussy. Fnure or Berg ,he Albert Hall 

Inevitably, in a programme 

that also contrasted solo song To have lost the Russian bass 


Jackson, meanwhile, gave 
Ravel's “Lc Grillon" an apt 
touch of childish whimsy and 
invested innocence of a dif- 
ferent kind in Ives’s “Wal- 
king". Both he and Palmer 
utterly relished the thinly 
disguised sexual innuendos in 
popular songs by Edwards. 
Abrahams and Berlin, and 
Johnson's own pointed 
accompaniments added much 
to an evening of. as they might 
have said in those days, much 
entertainment and edification. 


Stephen Pettitt 


Sad loss, sweet gain 


BBC PO/Downes 
Albert Hall 


and part-song, one fell that the Paata Burchuladzc. and with 
quality was weighted in favour him Shostakovich's Michelan- 


of Felicity Palmer and Rich- gelo Suite, was sad indeed: but 


ard Jackson, the team that 
Johnson fielded from his 
Songmakcrs' Almanac. 


to have found Dimitri Sitko- 
vetsky. who stepped in with 
the first Violin Concerto 


Fine though the individuals when his compatriate an- 
of the London Sinfonicua nounccd his indisposition. 


Voices arc. they do not make was great gain. 


J ^ The concerto, written in the 


itark. continuing night of posl- 
war anti-Semitism, starts by 


be pitched accurately and with, 
far less vibrato, although the 


making us eavesdrop on a long 
introspection, out of which 


comnuUTtem shown here was a!so grows the Fourth Quartet 

and equally the Tend. 


Andrew Rissik SedUJfbSc/ 


tram MamtTimChm- Symphony. Onlv a playenvith 
wv Je C/iur/ra d Orleans sitkovnskv’s inner compo- 
uorked rather belter. and' almost palpable 


Tchaikovsky’s "Manfred” 
symphony that was really lo 
give them the chance to show 
their stuff. The work, too. 
could really show its mettle in 
this venue, with the organ’s 
great intake of breath 
whooshing through the air 
before the final death and 
redemption of the hero. 

Edward Downes certainly 
had the measure of the work. 
Bur his long-sighted structural 
control was let down to some 
extent by a lack of imaginative 
detail, especially on the pan of 
the orchestra's soloists. Too 
eager to bowl along, rather 
than pause for thought, to play 
out rather than to listen and to 
shape, they presented a robust, 
primary-colour folk tale rather 
than a drama of the high 
fantastical. 


Gala Concert 


The incomparable Pavarotti delighted 
the audience at his silver jubilee 
concert in Wtembley Arena on 
Wednesday. 


concentration of focus could 
recreate with such finesse this 
sense of thought and response 
being overheard anew. 

He is a player whose 
virtuosity is discovered in 
understatement: the most 
minute control of vibrato, the 
movement of the very tip of 
the bow. and the total denial 
of song for its own sake is the 
language in which he speaks. It' 
drew attention to the extraor- 
dinary credcnza between the 
Passacaglia and the Burlesque: 
one whose own act Shostako- 
vich himself was simply un- 
able to follow. In 
Sitkovetskv's hands all the 
work's isolation seemed fo- 
cused there, just as. for 
Shostakovich, all of man's 
Jcfencclcssness was con- 
centrated in the Jewish people. 

The BBC Philharmonic had 
been playing, as it were, rather 
dose to the page throughout 
.the Shostakovich, and it was 


Hilary Finch 


• Yorkshire Arts arc to hold' 
their eleventh Young Com- 
posers' Competition in con- 
junction with this year's 
Huddersfield Contemporary 
Music Festival which runs 
from November 17 to 26. 
Works submitted must be 
cither for clarinet and piano or 
string quartet. John Casken 
and Nigel Osborne will be the 
judges. 


• The Metropolitan Opera. 
New York, arc to record a 
complete cycle of Wagner's 
Ring, conducted by James 
Lcvjnc. for Deutsche Gram- 
mophon. Die WaikQre. which 
opens the Mel’s 1986-87 sea- 
son on September 22. will be 


recorded in April next yean 
Rhcingold and Siegfried will 
be recorded in the following 
April: and GiUtcrdammerung 
in May 1989. Hildegard 
Behrens will sing Brunnhilde. 


DonaM Cooper 




Orpheus, in length, in style, 
and in its construction as a 
continuous thrust moving 
through and over cycles of 
repetition. 

Bui it is a simpler piece. 
One might think of it as an 


music rotating instead of 
heavenly spheres, and with the 
puppet figures replaced by 
human actor-singers in their 
own cirdings. 

Watching it has some fea- 
tures in common with watch- 
ing a dock. There are stretches 
where very liulc happens and 
time hangs heavy, but then 
suddenly the mechanism 
springs into fife, and one 
recognizes that all the count- 
ing was necessary in order to 
reach the golden numbers, 
such as the devil's dance 
hallway through or the mo- 
ment near the end when the 
hill opens to release the boys 
pent up for.scvcn years. 

The counting, with its ref- 
erences to the natural world of 
annual cydcs and population 
growth, is perhaps what at- 
tracted Birtwistle to the story, 
but the feet that the hero is an 
honest northerner, feeling 



'••• 1*?$? 



1 




victim of underhand machi- 
nations planned by his south- 
ern colleague, must also have 
struck a chord with both 
composer and poeL 

The northern shepherd 
prospers: the southern shep- 
herd is jealous and summons 
the devil to his aid. But good 
wins through, and the north- 
erner is left not only with a 
fecund flock but also with a 
wife and four boys. 

That is all that happens, but 
the story has to be so ele- 
mentary when it is effectively 
the accompaniment to the 
music: the Opera Factory 


good- to see the instrumental- 
ists, always there like the 
dolmens and standing stones 
of David Roger’s set. 

But at least one has a good 
view of Arianne Gastambide’s, 
marvellous masks for the 
sheep, whom David Freeman 
has chewing, pawing and nuz- 
zling in a thoroughly ovine 
way: the individual dif- 
ferences within the similar 
mass arc a perfect com- 


Sarah Hemming talks to a young, adventurous artistic 
director with big ideas for a small Edinburgh theatre 


An epic 
ambition 


beyond 
the fringe 


Edinburgh Festivals come and 
go but the Traverse, per- 
versely. remains. Sixteen years 
ago a critic hailed the idio- 
syncratic little theatre buried 
in Edinburgh's Old Town as 
the Festival Fringe’s “most 
enduring legacy" for its be- 
yond -the- fringe commitment 
lo the off-beat and bizarre. It 
has not always been worth 
inheriting, but in this year’s 
festival programme — a riot- 
ous assembly of international 
premieres — lies the imagi- 
native hallmark of its recent 
bold resurgence. The pro- 
gramme runs 1 1 shows virtu- 
ally round the clock: madness 
worthy of the Fringe, but there 
is method in iL 
The programme is at once a 
showcase of the Traverse’s 
most .recent season and a 
development of it that the 
theatre’s artistic director, 
Jenny Killick, sees as a pool- 
ing of like minds: “The 
! Almeida from London: Paines 
1 Plough, a new writing com- 
pany; Tarragon, our exact 
equivalent in Canada; Market 
Theatre from Johannesburg — 
all the visiting companies are 
completely dedicated lo the 
presentation of new work. It 
should be very exciting, be- 
cause as soon as you bring- 
everyone like that under one 
roofit docs begin to have quite 
a loud message." 

The message is the im- 
portance of new writing, and 
in her determination to con- 
vey it Miss Killick is prepared 
to be vociferous — in her own 
soft-spoken way. In her tiny 
play-packed office, looking 
younger and sounding older 
than her 26 years, the new 
artistic director imparts mea- 
sured determination to her 
stated manifesto: “I think the 
future of the Traverse depends 
on mad people — like me — 
who insist on its importance 
and know that generating new 
work is absolutely essential if 
we’re to have live, relevant 
theatre." 

The theatre may be small, 
but the thinking is big, and 
definite. Jenny Killick’s artis- 
tic policy builds on an in- 
spired and stunning season 



Jenny Killick: ‘Our future depends on mad people* 


last year from Peter 
Lichienfels. the outgoing artis- 
tic director to -whom she-was 
assistant- Aiming to expand 
the arena of theatre in Britain, 
Lichtenfcls brought together 
contemporary writing, both 
international and indigenous, 
that used theatre very defi- 
nitely and opened up ideas 
about form. 

The dual policy of com- 
bining work from home and 
abroad is one that Miss Killick 
(who came to Edinburgh via 
the Riverside in London) has 
pursued since her appoint- 
ment last September, and it 
reaches a climax in the festival 
programme. Here writers of 
the stature of South Africa's 
Percy Mtwa. Peru's Vargas 
1-iosa and Canada’s Michel 
Tremblay join forces with 
Scottish writers like Hannan, 
Clifford and Tom McGrath. 
“There is no level of patroniz- 
ing. It's not ‘let’s encourage 
Scottish writers by bringing in . 
the big boys from abroad’. It is 
just important that the Scot- 
tish writers I'm working with 
can feel with international 
writers that they basically are 
in a world pool. You may 
think that grandiose, but I 
think it is very important if 
things are to develop and 
change that you get the biggest 
space for that to happen in." 

Her approach to new writ- 
ing is. fundamental and am- 
bitious. seeing the Traverse as 
the ideal place to give theatre 
room for growth. This means 
for her completely reassessing 
the premisses of modem 
playwriting. What the plays 
put on in the last 18 months 
have had in common is a 
fascination with theatre itself 
a sense of the epic and a desire 
to be theatrical in the very 


broadest sense. It is a move 
away from the purely natu- 
ralistic. 'which is. for Miss 
Killick, now the province of 
television.^ 

"You have to say to a writer 
— why are you writing for the 
theatre? Why is it particularly 
appropriate for what you'are 
trying to say? Theatre has 
recently been a place where 
new writers could think about 
writing in a very loose way, a 
bit of the social worker of 
writing, if you know' whai I 
mean." 

Her belief in the value of 
making the Traverse an effec- 
tive writers' theatre has her 
constantly forking over the 
grounds of her own policy. 
From “active decision" to 
end-result she sees playwriting 
as a craft and continuity and 
collaboration as fundamental 
to its success. But lift the lid | 
off any theatre and financial 
compromise comes scurrying 
ouu “Next year we will pos- 
sibly only be able to do five 
plays. Do we maintain con- 
tinuity with die writers who 
are here or try to keep -the 
Traverse free for newer writers 
coming in?” 

The money spectre has 
haunted the Traverse for 
many years, ably abetted by a 
lingering local image of some- 
thing vaguely hippie in the 
Grass market. Old perceptions 
die hard. Recently - three 
departing elderly visitors, were 
overheard expressing relief at 
not having had to remove 
their shoes. Miss Killick sees a 
challenge in shaking off that 
legacy. “You have to have a 
sense of humour. I mean, the 
odds are stacked so high. You 
just have to say the odds are 
insurmountable — ' which 
probably means they're not.” 


His genius is one of the many delights 
that come from Italy. Others are best 
enjoyed on the spot - the climate, 
great cities, architecture and ait, food 
and wine, beach resorts, lakes, hills 
and mountains. 


Radio 


Disc jockeys, MPs and a touch of religion 


Let Citalia, Italy's most experienced 
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us, or your travel agent for details of 
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Telephone: 01 -686 0677 


A little bit of autobiographical 
chat followed by a snatch of a 
favourite record: Roy Plomley 
is still acknowledged as the 
programme’s creator at the 
end of each Desert Island 
Discs, but no less than three 
new shows which began last 
weekend follow his formula 
without giving him any credit 
whatsoever. It is. of course, 
the perfect recipe for easy 
radio, and easiness seems to 
have become the overriding 
aim of most producers. 

“The BBC I mean, you 
know — Jesus second. 1 ” «as 
59-ycar-old disc jockey Alan 
Freeman’s characteristically 
brash way of recalling his first 
big break on Radio Radio, a 
series of profiles of disc jock- 
eys on Radio I. Freeman 
began his career, unsurpris- 
ingly perhaps as the assistant 
paymaster in an Australian 
limber company. He then 
presented a show on Tasma- 
man Radio that was so late at 
night and had so few listeners 
that Freeman once fell asleep 
at the turntable, to be woken 


by a telephone call from his 
mother saying: “Darling, I 
think the record’s finished." 

The smallest things mean a 
lot to disc jockeys. In his 


under-read autobiography. 
The Living Legend, Tony 


Blackburn recalls, without any 
of the comfort normally af- 


of the comfort normally af- 
forded by memory, his pain 
and devastation when moved 
from the breakfest-time to the 
mid-moming slot on Radio I. 
While Freeman lacks 
Blackburn’s self-absorption, 
he still welcomes the opportu- 
nity to explain at length how 
he came to have the nickname 
“Fluff", what made him hit 
upon the expression “pop- 
pickers" for his audience and, 
most important of all, the 
exact origins of . his 
catehphrase, “Alright? Right! 
Stay bright!", it would be as 
heartless to criticise these 
reminiscences as it would be 
lo sink a rubber duck. 

It was hard to tell whether 
the records played on the Alan 
Freeman profile (Melanie, 
Kay Starr. Elvis) were his 


personal fevourites or the 
most famous from each era or. 
as seems most likely in one 
■ who has been so modern for so 
long. both. There was a similar 
problem on Where Do Yon 
Go?, a Radio 2 Sunday eye- 
ning series in which Christian 
celebrities are escorted by a 
reporter (“I'm asking people 
where do they go to find 
God”) to a place that holds 
religious memories. They are 
then asked to briefly reminisce 
in between snatches of hymns 
and songs. 

First in line was the Arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, who 
revisited hts old parish church 
outside Oxford. The intan- 
gible mysteries of the church 
were caught nicely by the 
purely aural quality of radio, 
but when the reporter, in 
breezy and banal BBC style, 
tried to buttonhole Dr Runcie 
for quickie “quotes" (“How 
do you picture God?"), one 
[had to grit one’s teeth through 
Khe polite flannding (“fun- 
damentally- for me. God is 
beyond ail pictures") . until 


even “Stand Up. Stand Up. 
For Jesus" came as welcome 
relief. This Sunday's guest is, 
inevitably. Cliff Richard. That 
leaves, by my reckoning, 
Harry Secombe. Thora Hird 
and Terry Waite. How are 
they going to fill the remaining 
slots? 

; In may ways more -stalely 
’than Alan Freeman and less 
vivacious than Dr Runcie. 
Edward Heath is- not an 
obvious choice as a Radio 2 
disc jockey, but the first of his 
three programmes of Personal 
Choice was a notable success. 
How bizarre it is to hear the 
statesmen say: “I always think 
back to Oklahoma as one of 
the most exciting things that 
ever happened tome.: in 
the tones of one whose cat has - 
been recently run over. When ' 
he said: “The Russian com- 
poser Prokofiev was noted for 
his sense of humour'!; I 
thought f was going to cry. Bur 
the rumbustious choice of 
music and the pleasing picture-. 
of Edward Heath — I have him' • 
in headphones — struggling to 


add dignity to Jimmy 
Youngisms (“If one wanted to 
lull one's baby to sleep, what 
belter could one have than 
this cradle song?"), suggests 
the makings of a great career. 

As the Democrats’ Desert 
Island Discs, Down Your Way 
remains as reassuring as ever, 
with Brian Johnson ("Now, 
the Carnival Society — what 
exactly does it do. . . Dressed 
as musketeers?! Splendid!”) 
making even as dismal a town 
as Newhaven seem a riot of 
Pageantry, prosperity ■ and 
merriment. The okie-woride 
tone is only slightly offset by 
the frequency of TV theme 
tunes as the Democratic 
choice of music: 

Far more worrying is the 
gurgling, laddisfa sycophancy 
with which Michael Parkinson 
greeted the slimy, lascivious 
Roger Vadim on the pew 
Desert Island Discs a fortnight 
ago. Created by Roy Plumley, 
yes, but surely - no tourer 
blessed by him. 



Women and 
Sisters 

Theatre Upstairs 


One man and his flock: a show of strength by Omar EbraJtint 

lerhand mac hi- London Sinfonietla produc- piemen t to the score's habit of 
:d by his south- lion rather gets this the wrong throwing out variegations of 
must also have way around by placing the sameness. 

>rd with both orchestra aithe back, behind a The cast is led by Omar 
poeL screen. It would have been; Ebrahim. who sings strongly. 


with northern vowels lo ac- 
cord with the dark modality of 
his music; he also never 
wastes a movement. Helen 
Chamock is equally resolute, 
despite the wife's music being . 
more excited, and Richard 
Suart is a serious villain. 
Philip Doghan ably doubles 
on fife as the devil: Elgar 
Howarth conducts. 


chiefly, more or less, in foe 
United States before and after 


Paul Griffiths 


Saw Hudson 


United States before and after 
the Civil War. \‘.I 

The game and dedicated 
performers are not well-served 
by the three women creditgd 
as authors, who have drawn 
upon historical records bui;gp 
not show an instinct for foe 
hard job of bringing depd 
words to life. 

The campaign to abolish 


slavery drew allies froip 
among women fighting .for 


among women fighting ..for 
their own social and elect 013d 
rights. For a lime the two 
bodies worked together, but 
when black mate citizens were 
given the vote, some wonirai 
lost their tempers. ^ 

The end to unity comes at 
one of the play's many co/i- 
•fercnee scenes. These are al- 
most as improbably earnest As 
the domestic scenes, where 
much of the dialogue is con- 
cerned with praising' each 
other's high principles, fine 
qualities, charitableness and a 
host of other virtues. I longed 
for someone to confess 4b 
picking her nose. . 

Elysc Dodgson’s direction 
docs not make these cosy ge(- 
togclhcrs seem likely. But .iu 
some' of. .the public scenes, 
where foe women wear. white 
bonnet^ an£f. 'arc. dressed jjt 
black and white, the grouping 
often. suggests Dutch ponraiis 
of an earlier century. Around 
the walls of Anabel TcmpleS 
set a frieze of angry figures in 
silhouette is a reminder of the 
real passions aroused by 
events. J, 

Alex King, Sophie Sky 
Okonedo-and Roy Qlision are 
force who catch something qiF 
this fire when foe lines do not 
douse it with unspeakable 


words like “aspire” and 
“wonderous”. Dorian Ford 


speaks intelligently, with 
pauses and glances realis- 
tically related to conlenL H6 
also plays foe keyboard and 
sings in foe choir, whose 
whirling explosion of the 
Emancipation chant brings 5 
rare moment of excitement. 


Jeremy Kingston 


• The picture accompanying 
Jeremy Kingston’s review yes* 
lerday of Women and Sisters 
was in fact of Wonderful 
Town. We apologize for ihd 
error. : 



WEARMMRALTf ARCH) 
THE MAIL LOWON SW1 


TEL 01-430 6844 


Craig Brown 



EM ER THE 
Al CTION GAME 


£1000 


SAM-; YOI .'CHER 

PRIZE EVERY 

month 

l ’U\ >’ " Jr fopy of tile 

Illustrated 

London 

News 

Competition organist-tl 
with- 

BONHAMS * CHRISTIE'S 
PHILLIPS 



Theatre 

Through 

glass 

darkly 


At the start of foe evening, a 
black woman, watched by a 
white woman, ojwns two win- 
dows at the rear of the Slhge 
and brilliant light floods - in 
upon them as they recall their 
lifelong struggle against vari- 
ous sorts of injustice. 

Two hours later foe win- 
dows are closed and foe two 
women stare at each ofoejjn 
silence. In its simple way, this 
framing device is effective, but 
the same cannot be said - for 
foe material it frames. 

The Royal Court Young 
People’s Theatre enables Lon- 
doners aged between 18 and 
25 to write, act and in other 
ways involve themselves in 
theatre. They occasionally of- 
fer foeir work to foe public, 
and this latest offering is a 
sober account of a 19th- 
century struggle for black ajjd 
women's rights, conducted 






W.lts 


7 


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,l t :vin> Kin^ 


THE 



TIMES 


11 


August 9-15, 1986 



A weekly guide 
to leisure, entertainment 
and the arts 


To war with the Crusaders 


i- v. ’K, 


_ _Some of Britain’s 
-keenest sailors 
^missed Cowes this 
-week. They are in 
.Western Australia 
t:i training for the 


Rtotopraplfc Korun Evans. Graphic: Geoffrey Sims 


^America’s Cup. 

"“Pearson Phillips 



'Road' 


goes aboard 

be talk among 
the gentle 
.suburbanites 
whose colonial- 
style duplexes 
flank ' Alexandra 
East Fremantle, 
■-’Western Australia, turns fre- 
quently to the latest eccentric- 
ally displayed by the odd crowd 
of men and women who have 
Tftiovcd into number 31 
‘"-Why do they run along the 
‘'flrcct backwards in the dark 
’■before dawn? Who could pos- 
-SWy cat 60 yoghurts a day? 
'•What do they mean when they 
^ciy: “Go for it. Lightning!"? 

, . Things were a lot more 
‘■ordinary when the rambling 
"establishment at number 32 
;was a. home for elderly female 
-alcoholics. Now it is a home 
"from home for the squad of 
: -maritimc supermen and their 
Auxiliaries who make up. the 
■British challenge for the 
America's Cup yacht race. 
j Among the auxiliaries are a 
-number' of American wives 
■and girlfriends who were 
-courted and won by the yacht 
“racing fraternity during the 
last America’s Cup at New- 
T30rttn !983. . 

'"■Since last April, the squad 
of 50 crew and shore staff have 
'been- wintering down in 
; **Frco" (in a climate equiva- 
lent to a rough English sum- 
mer), gearing up for a contest 
■'Much Britain has never won 
■since it began 1 35 years ago. 
They have been largely alone, 
battling away on the actual 
waters over, whftflt tlje 1987 • 
“Cur will be raced, with the 
-squalls blowing in from the 
■South Indian Ocean, bending 
-uiasis and breaking booms. 

"’. From being what an Ausira- ' 
tian challenger called “a lop- 
sided little upper-class .scen- 
ario". the America’s Cup has 
now developed into a hi-tech, 
Jncga-dollar clash of national 
and commercial egos. With 
arguments about the rules, 
secret weapons, battles of 
Semperamcntand psychologi- 
cal pressures, the event has 
become a long drawn-out 
maritime chess match. _ 

- But the outcome finally 
depends on H fit men in a 12- 
■melrc racing yacht, plus the 
Shore crew backing them up: 
in other words, the eccentrics 
of Alexandra Road, running 
backwards before breakfast. 



Winch mob in action: some of the crew hopefuls — a unique mixture of experience and muscle — test Crusader IL the new British yacht whose secret lies in her unusual keel designed by a Clapham Pond model-maker 


These maritime glory seek- 
ers have set up offices and 
workshops, m portable cabins 
on ihc dockside of the Fre- 
mantle Sailing Club. Austra- 
lia. A sign on. one door says: 
“David Arnold’s' Fully 
Equipped Office". “Badger" 
Arnold is the team's chief 
executive, who sold his family 
business to look after the 
administration. He sent a 
telex before setting off 
requesting “a fully-equipped 
office", a piece of bureaucratic 
pomposity he is not being 
allowed lo forget. 

In berths alongside the dock 
sit two white, 12-metre boats, 
the fairly conventional Cru- 
sader I. and the new, secret, 
unconventional ace in the 
British pack, with its kcelwork 
carefully shrouded. 

In command is a red-haired 
Irishman, Harold Cudmore, 


‘No one in his right min d 
would go through all this 
to make a model car 5 


Shown smatef Ihaii 
actual sceol 
ap p roxim a tely B 'AT 
Scale 1:24. 



* Gordon M. Buebrig, designer 
: of die legendary Cord 610. 

j- DuefeabeigJ, Auburn 
Speedster and, now. Director of 
t -Franklin Mint Precision Models, 

The 1935 Mercedes 500 K 
C Special Roadster It setsastandani 

P Few, if any, die-casi models have ever approached. (Indeed, a custom 
£ model of this quality could cost thousands of pounds.) 

A masterpiece in miniature, it is the first in Franklin Minft 
extraordinary J3 bw series. The Great Classic Sports Roadsters- 

• Authentic - crafted according to precise measurements and drawings 
taken from the original 1934 can 

^ • Marvellously detailed. (Over 100 sets of steel dies specially made.) 

- • Hand-assembled. Each of the more than 100 parts individually 
t inspected, hand-painted, hand-waxed, inspected again. 

• Operating features open the bonnet to inspect the detailed engine 
compartment; turn the steering wheel, the toad wheels; work the 
‘knock-ofT hub on the spares. 

^ • Perfect showpiece for tabletop or desk. . . a sew standard in auto- 
» motive scale models. 

* • Available exclusively by direct application -not through any store. 


t 


ORDER FORM — J 

The Mercedes 560 K Special Roadster assoe 

Please post ftp Slst August.. 1986 


F 


Pt» to: Franklin Mint Precision Models. FREEPOST, London SE& ZBR. 
Please enter my order 0>r*T1w Mercedes Benr 500 K Special RoadnoCpredsfOB 
l called in die -on- rpeul, to biusMituj me Fully assembled and ready for display. 
U The issue price fc£7S payable in five convenient monthly hwulmenu. 
p lneeefendnomoMynowIuiidBsi«KiiliaiishaiJtiejii*Diccdrorihenni 
I* uotahrwm of .05 prior lo despatch Of my special roadster. and for Uie remaining 
| R^instriraenuatinomhbiiuera^UiaeahcL 


Signs tore 

Mr/Mn/Mbo- 
Address 


M!rtma»a*^to>oMeiviMtyFmnwnMHPne^ 

. PLEASE PRINT CLEW 


.Postcode. 




! PtameWpwaipAxaeiatiBmiaoUrailwiftna'IonliewCtaeftfwgsewWtPweMewMmWs. 

I . AtW^c^F^nliMW^ljpiWC^XTTp^^t qw^ri&iflano No 36*383 . 


from County Cork, whose 
speciality is the match-race (a 
competition ■ between two 
boats). Some skippers are 
loud, some are soft He is one 
of the loud ones. 

Some time in September he 
will have the task of picking 
his final crew from the 25 
athletic individualists who are 
competing for places. Amaz- 
ingly enough, some of them 
have never done any serious 
sailing before. They are there 
because of their strength and 
athleticism. Having looked at 
the tough winds and heavy 
seas off Fremantle.' Harold 
decided he wanted strong men 
in the boat 

This is why. when J joined 
the squad for its regular 
6.45am run. I found myself 
'trotting beside a 6fl 9in. 19- 
stonc character called "Tich" 
Higgins, who explained that 
he had once filled the demand- 
ing role of bodyguard to 
Muhammad Ali. He is a 
grinder, one of the power- men 
amidships whose job is to 
winch in the 2,000 sq ft genoa 
foresail when tacking. Each 
lack requires four men on the 
winches to lift the equivalent 
of two tons. 

Others fighting for those 1 1 
places include three Olympic 
oarsmen and five others who 
have represented Britain in 
one of the Olympic sailing 
classes. Then there are the 
sailing freaks who seem to 
spend their lives on the water, 
like. 27-year-old Alan 
“Lightning" Nutter. He was 
racing G P 4 dingh ies at the age 
of five and has sailed the 
Atlantic four times. 

ouis Rich 
from Cape 
Town got the 
bug late. Five 
years ago he built 

a 38ft sailing 

yacht and, never having sailed 
before, set off with a friend in 
a westerly direction bound for 
Brazil He got there and has 
been afloat ever since. 

Tim “Dormouse" Haynes 
was taken by his parents on to 
their quarier-tonner for an off- 
shore race when he was only 
three months old. He says he 
tried to give it up and became 
articled to a firm of solicitors 
in Bournemouth. After three 
weeks he ran away and be- 
came a rigger. 

After exercise and breakfast 
at Lombardi's “Seashells 
Bistro" (as much as you like 
for A'usS5 which, in Tich 
Higgins's case included 12 
poached eggs), the squad 
crowded into the dockside 
crew room for morning brief- 
ing. It was like school assem- 
bly. with the seniors up one 
end and the juniors down the 
other. 

It was a good day to be 
there. The new. secret boat 
(unnamed, but known to all as 
Crusader II), was going to sail 
in company .with Crusader I 
for the first ume. It would be 
possible to get an idea of her 
performance: The crew lias 
were read out- I was put in 


a blur of wind and water. An 
America’s Cup 12 metre bears 
as much resemblance to an 
ordinary cruising yacht as a 
Formula One racing car does 
to a family saloon. It is a finery 
balanced, highly stressed 
arrangement of. steel, 
aluminium and lead. The 1 1 
crew have their “areas" and 
their functions. Sailing with 
them is like going on stage 
with the chorus without know- 
ing the steps. 

Chris Law was in charge. It 
was vaguely reassuring to find 
someone with Olympic badges 
on his T-shirt- showing app- 
rehension. “It could be hairy", 
he said. “We'll have to sail out 
as there's no tender to tow us. 
If the wind drops or shifts that 
could be embarrassing." 

When we were safely 
out. and creaming along to a 
20-knot breeze, we got the 


skipper’s chat “There Is no 
need for big stress, swearing 
and shouting. No need for any 
of that Just get on with the 
job OK?" 

Wc began with practice 
starts. You set an imaginary 
line between two buoys and 
aim to cross it at full speed in 
exactly two minutes. The skill 
is to hang around, gybing and 
tacking, picking exactly the 
right moment to go flat out for 
the line. We were being too 
cautious, arriving five or six 
seconds too late. No good. We 
would have been handing an 
opponent who crossed "on the 
gun" a couple oflengihs* lead. 

On to cornering practice, 
picking the right “lay line" to 
bring us up to the mark, and 
then rounding the buoy with a 
burst of heaving, winding and 
wrestling from "Lightning" 
and the others in the bow. The 


sky went black, the crests of 
the swell frothed with white. 
Rainwater sliding down the 
mainsail fountained off the 
boom. No one seemed to 
notice. From amidships some- 
one yelled for "more runner". 


T 

bending 
though 


hat was my 
job. operating 
a winch that 
tensioned the 
steel cable from 
stem to masthead, 
the mast back as 
it were some huge 
crossbow. “Give it 14". Thai's 
1, 4001b of pressure, more than 
half a ion. registered on a 
small digital read-oui beside 
the winch. Getting it past 12 
needed some help from 
AJi's ex-bodyguard. 

What made it so different 
from a day's pleasure sailing 
in the Solent was the constant 


work without repose. We were 
always adjusting something to 
changes of wind or sea. It was 
a full-time search for the 
“groove" the right mix of 
course and sail which turned 
the boat into a flying machine. 

Crusader II joined us in the 
afternoon. Her secret is under- 
water — a small "canard" keel 
in front of the main keel, 
which is said lo smooth the 
flow over the keel area. 

Her designer, David 
Hollom. first became in- 
terested in sailing on 
London's Clapham Common 
pond after being given a radio- 
controlled yacht as a present, 
and his work has dominated 
the model yacht champion- 
ships. But how would his ideas 
fare on the ocean? 

As wc went to windward, 
side by side, there was little to 
choose between the two boats. 


But when we both turned 
downwind, the other yacht 
began to draw away. “She’s 
eating us up", said the navi- 
gator. In Crusader II's cockpit 
we could see the king - of 
Clapham Common pond 
looking very cheerful. “ 

So how are we doing? Can 
we grab the cup from Austra- 
lian tycoon Alan Bond and the 
Royal Penh Yacht Club? It's 
early to make predictions. The 
other contenders are only just 
beginning to gather in Fre- 
mantle.- But our blend • of 
expens and novices who have 
never sailed before, with a 
craft produced by someone 
who has never designed a real 
boat before, must be the most 
original British challenge in 
135 years. It’s cenainlv got 
them worried in Alexandra 
Road. 

0 Tlrow Ne w spaper, Lid. 1988 


SORTING THE MEN FROM THE BUOYS 


L 



From afar the sails of a 12- 
metre in full flight seem to be 
swapped with the speed 
and grace of a well-trained 
waiter changing table 
cloths. But close to, the deck 
appears to be over- 
crowded with crewmen caught 
up in a disorganized 
scramble, in fact, each of the 
11 in the "team” has his 
position and defined tasks. 
Each of these jobs attracts * 
different kinds of mentality and 
physique. 

Bowman is a job for a 
gymnast. There are no hand 
rails and just staying on the 
foredeck, when it Is shipping 
water, can be tricky. He is 


ng. 

can often be seen 
wearing the mark of their 
trade, a waist harness, with 
which they dip themselves on 
to a cable and can be 
hoisted up the mast or swung 
out over the water like a 
pantomime fairy to inspect 
some problem at the far 


" • The elimination races to 
select the two finalists begin 
on Octobers and continue 
until January 23. 1987. 

The America's Cup proper 
begins on January 31. Thefirst 
yacht to win four races wins 
the cup. 


end of a spinnaker pole. 
Sewerman is in charge of 
the sails kept in the sewer 
(below decks). When a sail 
Is called for, he hauls it up 
through one of the fore 
hatches. When a sail comes 
down he ensures it is neatly 
bagged below for further use. - 
His major headache Is the 
spinnaker, which has to be fed 
through a tunnel in the 
manner of a conjurer 
producing silk scarves from 
atop hat so that it can be 
broken out at crucial moments. 
The mast man lives in a pit 
behind the mast, which can fill 
up with water and resemble , 

a small bath. His job is to sort 
out the mass of lines and 
halyards. 


Crusader 1. 
The res 


rest of the day passed in 


I SATURDAY 

Words in your 
.can why poet 
Crai| Raine is 
tuning in to 
opera — page 14 


Am Diary 

16 

Garden! ng 

12 

Bridee 

15 

OulandAliit 12 

Chew 

15 

Open 

16 

Concerts 

16 

PlKrtmpaphy 

16 

Crossword 

15 

Reriew 

15 

Dance • 

16 

Rock & Jazz 

16 

Drink 

13 

Shopping 

13 

Eating Oo* 

13 

Times Cook 

13 

Films 

16 

Travel 

)2 

Galleries 

16 

TV & Radio 

15 


There are two grinders, 
heavyweights capable of 
putting sheer strength to 
- work mi the gearing used to 
tighten up the big genoas. 

The job of the port and 
starboard trimmers is to 
make the genoa work 
efficiently by checking the 
efficiency of the sails with the 
help of the "wool Ies" (wool 
tags revealing the airflow), and 
keeping an eye on the 
“slot" Between foresail and 
mainsail. 

The ma insheet trimmer 
supervises the set ot the 
mainsail, with the help of 
the “coffee grinder", a geared 
winch amidships. Then 
there are those who make up 
the “afterguard", the brains 
of the boat 

The helmsman is mainly 
intent on finding the course 
which will give him the 
optimum speed to the next 
mark, or VMGJVelocity 
Made Good). This is partly a 
matter of feel, but also a 
matter of answering to 
information fed to him by 
the navigator, who has the 
support of the on-board 
computer system, 
programmed to provide the 
best tactical course for any 
given situation. 

Finally there is the skipper 
who. fn the British boat, takes 
the helm for the pre-race 
jockeying and then 
concentrates on watching 
the opposition and pre- 
empting their every move. 


SOTHEBY’S 


FOUNDED 1744 



Sir Alfred M minings, ERA H.R.H. Promt of Walts on HanebcciC \ 
(To be included in our salt on 12th November; 1986. ■ 

Estimate £lGO000-£ 150,000.) C.Z '■ 

Modern British §: 
Paintings =? 

Entries are still being accepted for our important autumn , 

British Impressionist, Post Impressionist ! 
and Modern Paintings, Drawings and Sculptured; 
12th November; 1986 
Entries by: 1st September V2: 

Enquiries: Janet Green nr Susannah Mien ZZi, 
Sotheby’s. 34-55 New Bond Street London W 1A 2AA. 
Telephone: (01) 493 80S). 


town 









Edited by Shona Crawford Poole 


TRAVEL 


Home truths about Kiwi country 


Hot seat ' 
bargains 


New Zealand comes 
as a surprise to 
visitors who have 
believed the cliches, 
says Alan Ponsford 


C ambridge and Newmarket 
lay behind us. We had 
bypassed Epsom and set a 
leisurely course for the 
downs of Horsham, marvelling at 
the tranquillity and richness of the 
verdant rural scene. 

The high summer sun intensified 
the exuberant colours springing 
from roses, marigolds and dahlias 
packing neat cottage gardens and 
bounced off newly-painted red 
post-boxes and signs proclaiming 
cream teas therein. 

First a tubby, bronzed man in 
short shorts and long socks, then 
two constables wearing white hel- 
mets. and finally splashes of yellow 
and purple — soon transformed 
into knots oflemon trees and banks 
of bougainvillaea- dissolved our 
illusions ofSusscx — or was it more 
like Wiltshire? 

Thus one more New Zealand 
cliche had been confirmed only to 
be swiftly denied. Yes. it is indeed 
as English as England — in many 
places, in many ways. But no, you 
hardly imagine yourself at home as 
you soar above the South Island, 
rippling almost from end to end 
with snow-topped ranges, aptly 
named the Southern Alps, crowned 
by glaciers and the apex of Mount 
Cook rising towards the height of 
the Matterhorn. 

Nor do you. languishing on a 
sub-tropical northern shore or idly 
contemplating the awesome 
heights and depths of a western 
fiord. Perhaps least of all when you 
arc on the links, watching your slice 
being swallowed by a burping, 
bubbling, boiling bunker constitut- 
ing one of the smelliest, but most 
effective, geothermal manifesta- 
tions of Rotorua. 

No wonder this supposedly re- 
mote backwater of the world is 
being increasingly discovered by a 
discerning band of travellers 

following In the tracks of the mums 
and dads who have for years 







Beautiful backwater: South Island ripples almost from end to end with snow-topped ranges, crowned by glaciers- But spectacular scenery is only part of New Zealand's appeal 


trekked across the globe to spend 
time with children making new 
lives as Kiwis. 

These people visiting friends and 
relatives used to be content to 
spend most of their time sitting on 
the front porch admiring their new- 
found grandchildren. But today's 
visitors arc a more confident, 
imaginative and therefore mobile 
breed. 


T o record that New Zealand 
is an unspoilt land of 
outstanding natural 
beauty, comprehensively 
equipped for outdoor living, lei- 
sure, sport and touring, is again to 
risk perpetuating one of those 
righl-yct-wrong myths. For time 
has qualified the notion that it is no 
more than a sleepy, unsophis- 
ticated rustic retreat, attuned to 70 
million sheep, fishing and rugby. 

Certainly the rural and small 
town facilities encourage the trav- 
eller to get out on the road, the lake, 
the mountain and the beach. 
And. yes, ihc country's rivers and 
lakes arc indeed a fisherman's 
dream, encouraging enthusiasts to 
dawdle in areas like Lake Taupo. 
But even the tourist's average stay 
of four weeks is uncomfortably 



inadequate for those who try to see 
most of both islands entirely on 
four wheels. It is better to use a few 
of the plentiful air services to cut 
corners and see how the major 
cities explode the behind-ihe- 
limes. oldc-woride myths. 

Auckland, for instance, is 
deserving of much more attention 
than it gets. Tourists tend to use it 
merely as a stop-over. Yet it is in 
fact a delightful, spacious and 
stimulating city, embracing a huge 
harbour strewn with islands and al 


TRAVEL NOTES 


Once the air fare (from about £935 
return according to season) has 
been paid, prices in New Zealand 
are low. Even at the Auckland 
Regent the country’s first de luxe 
hotel, the best double rooms are 
about £70 a night Motels, which are 
exceptionally spacious and well- 
equipped, are particularly good 
value at £1 5-20 a night for two. The 
visitor from the northern 
hemisphere naturally seeks the 
southern summer. However, Dec, 
Jan and Feb are the local holiday 
months and transport and 
accommodation need booking in 
advance. 


weekends peppered with while 
sails. 

Quiet suburban beaches are 
within easy car and bus rides while 
rather further afield are the balmy 
northern holiday areas like the Bay 
of Islands, which are still jealously 
guarded secrets not much leaked to 
foreigners. 

If ever there was truth in the 
premise that New Zealand was 
living 20 years in the past (and 
there was), much of it has been 
dispelled by the new liveliness and 


sophistication that is permeating 
the big cities such as Auckland and 
the capital, Wellington (also set 
round a fine harbour). 

The native drinking habits are 
yet another of those legends into 
which the passing years have 
introduced contradictions. Long 
gone is the Six O’Clock Swill, when 
harsh, barren bars were jammed 
with strong bare-kneed men 
swallowing as hard and fast as they 
could to beat the ludicrous earty 
deadline. And as I sat outside a pub 
in the gracious city of Christchurch 
for a couple of hours in the warm 
evening sun. it was like a June 
evening in fCnightsbridge, without 
punks. 

I nside, the bars were welcom- 
ing and comfortable and a 
back-room restaurant served 
succulent seafood and a range 
of the excellent domestic wines. 

Christchurch is a staging point 
for the deservedly popular South 
Island tourist circuit, taking in the 
spectacular mountain scenery. Its 
focal point is the pretty resort of 
Queenstown, tucked into the end 
of a long, deep lake set among high 
peaks. 

This is base camp for some of 


New Zealand's most memorable 
expeditions down to the jagged, 
fiorded western coast There Mil- 
ford Sound is the target for 
dramatic journeys through or. over 
the Alpine passes. There is a 
driveable route, but the three-day 
Milford walk, meticulously or- 
ganized. is even more adventurous. 

Best of all, to my mind, is to be 
flown by tiny aircraft- On half the 
days of the year it is rendered 
impossible by the weather over the 
mountains or enveloping the air- 
strip at the top of the Sound. So it is 
rare luck that on the two occasions 
in five years that I have attempted 
it. I have been granted dazzlingly 
bright February days to be 
skimmed over the snowy summits, 
zoomed into deep gorges- amazed 
by. tumbling, daggeiniJce waterfalls. 

The New Zealanders themselves 
present perhaps the greatest two- 
way image of alL By reputation 
robust, tough, independent, even 
possibly a little less polished and 
worldly-wise than some, they are 
also friendly, open-hearted, gentle 
and helpful. The authorities rightly 
regard the country's greatest tourist 
attraction as the ability of the 
people to go on being themselves. 


FARE DEALS 


A minf-indnstry has evolved 

over the past couple of years to 

cater for Britons who want to 
break away from the stereo- 
typed travel brochure holiday. 
Almost 1.5 millioa people now 
use toe “seat-only" system fjw .. 
“do-it-yourself" holidays. 

Britain invented toe seat-., 
only concept for European 
flights a few yeare ago as a 
way of using surplus charter 
flight capacity. This is now it 
works. Passengers boy a seflt" 
on a package charter ffipfetbirt 
with no intention of BHUg.'tite' - 
hotel because , they have al- 
ready ' arranged their own. 
accommodation. “NorinjU . 
accommodation" is purchased, 
for just £1, purely to n?eet'. 
foreign government regula^ 
tions. 

There is nothing shady 
about this.. Companies selling 
these charter flight seats, fo- 
ci ode airline offshoots (Mon- 
arch Air Travel and Thomson ■ 
Airfares); specialized agents.. 
(Flair, Lfnijet and VTvairk 
members of the British . 
.Association of Travel Agents- 
(ABTA) and bucket shops.. 
Recently, the big high street 
agents have used compoteriza-" 
don to simplify booking. Hogg. 
Robinson, for example, has- 
collated thousands of flights, 
from about 30 companies.- ; - 

Most charter flights operate 
to the Mediterranean son - 
spots, but there are none ‘to-* 
Scandinavia and only a few to - 
France, Switzerland and West 
Germany. Prices vary depend- 
ing on the departure airport- 
and flight times and dates. A* - 
scheduled flight to Athens this - 
month would cost £159 for an' 
excursion return, or £135 for a, 
regular charter flight. Bot'th 
you book at the last minute* > 
this could drop to £90 or less. 

. It is advisable to book- 
charter seats through a travel- 
agent who is an ABTA mem-' 
her or who holds an Air TraveT 
Organiser’s Licence (ATOt) ’ 
from the Gvfl Aviation' 
Authority. 

Alex McWhirter ' 

The author is Travel Editor, of 
Business Traveller. 


OUT AND ABOUT 


When Adam delved ... 


Kedieston Half was built to 
impress and dominate. The 
drive crosses almost a mile of 
parkland, with the house and 
its great sweep of lawn to the 
lake gradually coming into 
view. The double staircase 
climbs to the imposing en- 
trance. classically colonnaded 
and pedimented- 

Thc Curzon family has 
lived at Kcdlcston in the 
rolling Derbyshire “ country- 
side for 850 years. In the mid- 
1 8th century Robert Adam, at 
Sir Nathaniel Curzon's re- 
quest. began by designing 
ceilings and carpets for a new 
house, but eventually look full 
architectural control. 

Sir Nathaniel, later the first 
Baron Scaredale. felt his 
impressive collection of paint- 
ings needed something 
grander than the family's neat, 
redbrick Queen Anne house. 

No sooner have you 
climbed the shallow stone 
steps to the entrance than 
vou'rc in the marble hall — the 


crushing splendour of Rome 
fined down far the English 
countryside. 

The delicate plasterwork — 
formal coats of arms, winged 
beasts, flowing floral tracery 
or classical designs — is a joy. 
At its mouth-watering best 
when plain white, it is some- 
times picked out in startling 
shades of pink and green or 
red and yellow. 

The 1 1 state rooms arc very 
grand, from the dining room 
with Adam's original furniture 
to the saloon with his slender 

Kedieston Hall is five miles 
north west of Derby. Open 
Sun, 1 -5.30pm, August 
Bank Holiday Mon and Tues. 
Private groups can go 
round Mon-Thurs: details from 
the curator (0332 842191). 

It closes for the year on Aug 
31. Adults £2^20, children 
£1 .10. The National Trust 
recently launched a £2 
million appeal for Kedieston. 
Donations to the Trust, PO 
Box 211, Melksham, Wiltshire. 


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and elegant English version of 
Continental stoves; they are 
rooms mainly for public not 
private use, rich and ornate 
with massive paintings set 
into blue damask walls. 

There arc enviable pieces of 
small furniture, slender-legged 
occasional tables and elegant 
bow-fronted chests of drawers. 
.And. a rare informal touch, a 
worn red leather-framed 
photograph of Queen Victoria 
and five small oval portraits, 
brass framed, on the 
harpsicord in the music room. 

"Waste not want not" 
carved over the wide chimney 
in the sionc- flagged kitchen — 
now a tearoom serving very 
good home-made walnut cake 
- gives the other side of life at 
the Hall. Well-used tin-lined 
copper cooking pots, fish ket- 
tles and strainers line one wall, 
together with a Harrods knife 
sharpener, its instructions still 
stuck to the side, and house- 
hold memos. 

Dymphna Byrne 


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OUTINGS 


STEAM INTO RUTLAND: 

Steam rail and traction engines 
In operation, RAF displays, 
exhibition and side shows. 
Rutland Rad way Museum. 
Cottesmore, Leicestershire. 

For details telephone 0533 
676376. Today, tomorrow, 

1 1 am-5pm. Adult £1 , child 
50p. 

HASTINGS CARNIVAL: 

Events include tug of war and .. 
opening of the fair (today), 
treasure hunt throughout the 
town (Mon, from 6pm), 
procession (Wed. from 6pm). 

■ Hastings, East Sussex. 

Details from Tourist 
Information Centre, 4 
Robertson Terrace (0424 
424242). Today-Aug 17. 

JOUSTING KNIGHTS: Second 
in the season of special events 
at Bosworth is a spectacular 
combat with men-at-arms and 
knights. 

Bosworth Battlefield Visitor 
Centre, Sutton Cheney, Market 
Bosworth. Leicestershire (0455 
290429). Tomorrow, from 2pm. 
Adult £2. child £1. Centra 
opens at 11 am. ■ 

BUSKING SUNDAY: A 
1 920s theme for this event at 
the 1 986 Museum of the 
Year, with the Tyne Valley 
Stompers, Northumbrian 
Pipers, an escapologist 
magician, mummers, and 
street theatre performers. 
Beamish North of England 
Open Air Museum, Beamish 
Hall, Stanley, County 
Durham (0207 231811). 
Tomorrow, 10am-6pm. 

Adult £2.95, child £1.95. 

Judy Froshaug 


IN THE GARDEN 

Easy pickings - 


Is - there such a thing as 
liberated gardening? I have 
women friends who habitually 
spend August enslaved by the 
preparation for the freezer of 
the monoculture fruits their 
husbands produce in pro- 
digious quantities. At the 
other extreme, I grow.as many 
different things as possible 
and indulge gluttonously in 
seasonal variety. 

One needs plants whicb can 
more, or less take care of 
themselves and which provide 
pleasure and relaxation,' not 
repetitive choresJ:ven a small 
garden can supply an astonish- 
ing amount of fruit. Main crop 
strawberries last only a few 
glorious ■ weeks but in mild 
years the wild strawberries 
and alpines will provide their 
small spicy fruits until 
December. Grow them under 
. currant bushes: in return for 
only a little compost or ma- 
nure in the winter, they pro- 
vide not only fruit but pretty 
foliage which keeps the cur- 
rant bed free of weeds. 

The choice of fruit has 
improved over the last few 
years; there are 25 or more 
kinds of currant, red, black 
and white, available, and at 
least a dozen gooseberries and 
raspberries. 1 like the early 
season sharpness of the Raby 
Castle redcurrant followed by 
the sweeter Red Lake: 

; Dessert gooseberries are an 
overlooked fruiL This year my 



Sweetener: the blackcurrant.., 

Early Sulphur, a thin-skinned 
golden yellow variety gave u- 
spectacular .. crop and the- 
Whinham’s Industry is just" 
ripening. They are easy- to- 
grow, so long as they are not!' 
allowed to dry out They* 
appreciate a good start iri; a' 
well worked bed with plenty of 
humus. 

Francesca Greenoak ^ 

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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


GUEST COOK 


are deals 


Howto 


MMrnr^ 

15 »j «* **t- 

ifo?. *' W *P™n 

fetarlt 
pWcWn buy A w - t 

fc«£c charter flight but 

btlmlkm of min. ^ 

"W* 

2*JN Ibcir m 
*?*«•• "**-*tel 
•ft 1 Ptethastf 
* l » wwrly to tneri 
WWtitncat rrtola- 

*» nothing 
h* < Anpjittei •filial 
nkfshi *** E 
ttff'hooh (Moq^ 
Iratel and ifaiawm. 
{* neut 

L *ljrt and Vii«irk 

«*» Iwd Acnca 
wjd hwki-c shops. 
*** tog high street 
!££*£ ewniwfiTttt- 
W*> booking. Hogg 
.for example, )u* 
of flights 
« Ml conponlrs. 

wrtw- fli«hvs operate 
HflUtmunn sun 
: thetr are noae to- 
te and only « law to 
•hxfrUod and W«m 
WJ w* *«> depud- 
e departure airport , 
ttaaet and dates. A 
ffisht ro Athens this 
dd con £ 1 59 far an 

return, or £135 bra 
after fl«lic. Bar « 
at the bat adnata, 
drop to £90 or tots. 
idsbaUr to hook 
ft thronah a tnid 
H an aBTA mmh 
hoUxan Air Inrrol 
* Uww ( 41 OU 
Cl»U Atiacfca 

x McWhirter 

<1 />JlW I dtUt* t'l 

rditUrt- 


DEN 


& sore 

i rfiead 


Ip the second of our summer series, lead 


It His.. a fashiotrable San. 

Francisco event Money, as 
osoUfnns the subject that was- 
beipc- discussed and, to an 
‘ .tmtsider, it looked as good a 
^ galteihjg of young, upwardly )JJ U - be *h»a 
Smop^-pn^fessipiials ; »s ** chosen fhends. 
f t WeSrPoas^conH muster. - .^Er 1 “FJ 
*•? trihn tkip-' to this 0 Of tittlebat 

*iifaiiiirbaslt was a' dozen ■■? “W? 
>botttes ? of the finest and most a ^ B Vj? y r 5 llJ ; 


-Any chef win look forward to be earthy and strong, redolent 




can apply his art to a meal that 
will, be shared with a few 
chosen friends. 

When I am working J spend 
a lot Of lime battling to pass on 
my conception,. my .feeling 
about my cuisine, to- every 


*te*i^freCaiifohun fizz. Bf memberof the Wichen u»m u? 
4 tthe^end ofthe-e*eni^, l was ■ !Pf 1 ke }^ e, 5 unde^tand, then 
astmnsbed' to discover that W- thc 5 ne , di fiWe be- 
'Masf'm of them had been tw *?> good and KteelfcnL 

il ’I. lv ■ .» _■ i.‘ ” Mnn> viral cHlt ic o fim. 


j ^drtm^alcolKol fa dearly flow 
dirty word in the 
\ increasingly bealth-conscimis 
\ Uniffia 1 States. •- 


More vital still is a fun- 
damental respect for good 
ingredients — a fresh sea bass, 
still tense, not having lost any 


% Bnt while Americans rejoice its beauty. What a dif- 
in tfitfr -apparently healthier- £ e 2.'? eo 1bataa& a 

V>ttoS«ftOo existence, wm any kept for three to 

’•‘sbrfnSeir new-angled : eating five daysmen ice before being 
1 ^And'tMnking Writs reach the 


spices which will be freely 
added - the . kind of cuisine 
which is directly finked with 
my rural childhood. 

The aperitif may be cham- 
pagne, dry .white wine or dry. 
sherry. Or if the sun pours 
.down 1 will have a Ricard, 
which' is hot' accepted in 
gastronomic circles. Maybe 
rightly so, but never mind. I 
will serve tittle bits with the 
aperitif: sun-soaked olives and 
some other crunchy little 
things. 

Here are a few dishes I enjoy 
eating and which would be 
chosen according to season. 
For foe sweet, I am sorel 


Tt =**f '■ "ffr, ! 

k <?- S ‘ 


ft 

& 



** 


1 ^ And 'thinking habits reach the 
'”s United- ■ Kingdem? Coolers, 
^tbo^k)w4koliol combina- 


Ir <r« . iHikU 


I i'M 'mm 


induslrial boaL 

’f'btboSr^jw-aJcoboJ combina- - Or foe real chicken which 
^vtioBSof white wine,' fruit juice;- ^ enl its Ine happily on a 
f Sand^oda water, were test &”» Mmejiere being cared 
^(Stuwoer’s new - drink mpwt ^ fed on me best grams and 

. 'i . .. mi ■ * ■* : trpp ia umnnAr onnitf molnno 


i tt&twMheUS.'This year h Is foe 
de-aicoholiied or al- 
Mi^colMrt-&ee wines. 

* i Bfihoving foe alcohoi from 


free to wander about picking 
up extra food; Its shape will be 
harmonious, its texture firm 
and its taste exciting. 

The trouble -today is that 


and.* normal 10 per tent Or-12 per today « Hat 

ceriCSfcohol level, wine is a when guests are offered the 
tebicb process: most alcohol- ««* ofiem enoi«h_they • 
dS^iiiws available here have a® 1 * 0 * ^ firmness of 


citthnskibe jtlcobbl removed by . me pesn. tverybooy is pecora- 
« f idistiaiinff. As a result many ‘«8 lazy Chewing is becoming 
'^behave ^akea on a horrid, too much effort. 1 • ■ • 
.a ^kn»m cooked flavour. ' So"? to wander. I often do 

w • ’ - . ■ hill thp mwlurp v« (a tn# thp 


c><n aSw as I know, only one is bu l?- ^ 

^nite^y /a more refined most important umtaa of 
„ Jne&ol - Masson Light, a Jt may look weird, or 


li^nt^than 'distilling. Any ^ e ^ n ut .J b ! l n ^ c 

ii ^Vnrfcfhl reut lost in this pro- J™™. 

been promptly, re- moment of . resp^t from the 
addition of a cook for the ingrefoenL 
-.ittMoncgntrated frnit jnk»L ^B4y soctal life k pretty non- 


ags 



■sa,, Eersaading the average non- 
conscious British 
; .' ^Iriukts- that . de-alcoholized 
- jtrine is worth boyuig . is “a 
.. . qfficalt message to get 
;crdS", as one . leading 
Marketing man pat it this 
,'1' ^reekJ One of Masson's slo- 
'.'nlans — “the wine you can 
„ 'SjojuKa^en alcohol is taboo” - 
‘■■“lafestjhe point CTcdnctiy if 

_afoer inelegantly. 

Obvious targets for alcohol- 
, ^ -nee wines are party-goera who 
on If want fo drink and driven 
"■ h ^regnant women, and we^ht- 
* " ' Eric’^Mumont 


My social life is pretty non- 
existent, I wilfbost only five to 
eight friends at the most and 
simplicity will be de rigueur. l 
really enjoy, codking and eat- - 
rag food which is not taxing on 
the intellect. The flavours will 


flottante, in which my mother 
used to slide a few sponge 
biscuits moistened with kirsch 
when foe vanilla cream was 
still hot; but 1 go for a dish of 
marinated summer fruits. 

The parly is on. Dinner is 
ready and foe conversation is 
already flowing. There will be 
none of this business of 
dissecting and analysing foe 
food. Just enjoy the .stuff; and 
foe magic of friendship. No 
pretence, just feeling nice. 

Salade de tomates et 
mozzarella 

Serves six 

12 sun-soaked tomatoes — the 
marmandert or dive variety 

if possible 

300g(11oz) mozzarella 

200ml (1/3 pint) good dive oil 
4 tablespoons white wine 

vinegar 

12 leaves fresh basil 

1 small bunch chives 

12 button onions . 

Salt and pepper • . . . 

Both mozzarella, cheese 'and 
cold jnessed extra virgin olive 
oil (oil labelled amply “pure 
olive oiT will .be heat-ex- 



t Vil 

Savouring nature's gifts: Raymond Blanc - *the flavours will be earthy and strong, redolent of garlic and garden herbs’ 




traded and deodorized) can 
be bought in delicatessens. 

If this dish can be prepared 
two hours in advance, the 
flavours will have time to 
mingle and it will taste even 
better. 

Wash foe tomatoes, remove 
the stems, and slice them 
across. -Cut the -cheese in 
halves, and cut each half in 
five slices. Lightly season with 
salt and freshly ground 
pepper. 

Wash foe basil and chives. 
Shred foe basil finely^ Snijj foe 
chives.Peel the' button onions, 
and slice them finely.Place foe 
tomato slices in one layer in a 
large flat dish, followed by foe 
cheese. Sprinkle with foe basil 
chives and sliced onions. Mix 
foe olive oil and vinegar and 
pour over foe dish. Cover foe 


SHOPPING 


dish -with cling film and let foe 
flavours infuse for a few 
hours. Serve. 

Gigot d’agneau de lait roti 
parfume aux herbes 

Serves six 

2 kg (4*4 lb) teg milk fed lamb 
6 tablespoons good olive oil 

Salt and pepper 

450g (1 lb) broken lamb bones 

1 carrot 

'A onion 

6 ctoves garlic, whole 

2 sprigs thyme _/ 

*/« bayleaf 

1 sage leaf 

8 crushed coriander seeds 

3 leaves basil 

6 tomatoes 

Wash, peel and chop foe 


By Beryl Downing 


carrot and onions. Chop the 
Thyme, bayleaf. sage and basil 
finely. Crush the coriander 
seeds in a small bowl and mix 
with two tablespoons olive oil. 
Rub over foe leg of lamb. 

Put four tablespoons of 
olive oil in a roasting tray and 
add the diced carrot, onion, 
garlic and broken bones. Sea- 
son to taste. Place the leg of 
lamb on foe bed of vegetables 
and bones and roast in a 
preheated moderate oven 
( 1 70^/340°^. gas mark 4) for 
40 minutes, basting from lime 
to time. 

During the cooking of foe 
leg of lamb, halve the toma- 
toes. deseed them and sear 
them in two or three table- 
spoons of olive oil. Put them 
in the oven with the lamb. 


removing both at foe same 
lime. 

Take the lamb from foe 
oven, wrap it in foil and keep 
it in a warm place. Skim most 
of the oil from thc roasting tin 
and add foe tomatoes and 400 
ml (I4fl ozl water. Scrape foe 
bottom of the tin to dissolve 
foe caramelized juices. Pass 
foe juices through a sieve, 
pressing on the vegetables to 
extract as much of the liquid 
as possible. Bring to the boil 
skim and reduce to about 
250ml (811 oz). Taste and 
correct the seasoning. 

To obtain well scented 
golden brown juices, it is 
important that the vegetables 
and bones have reached an 
attractive lightly browned col- 
our. If the 45 minutes in thc 
oven have not been enough to 


6 small pears 


Juice of 1 lemon 


1 bottle red house wine 


I00g (3'/;OZ) caster sugar 


2 slices lemon 


2 slices orange 


1/8 cinnamon stick 


4 fresh Ins 


450g flit) raspberries 


225g (mb) strawberries 

Choose very ripe pears which 
are still Arm and not grainy. 
Peel thc pears, leaving the 
stems on and cutting the bases 
so that they will later stand on 
their own. Leave them to 
stand for 10 minutes in cold 
water acidulated with thc 
lemon juice so that they 
remain white. 

Put the wine in a saucepan 
with lhe lemon and orange 
slices, the cinnamon and 
three-quarters of the sugar. 
Bring to boiling point and 
skim. Add the pears and cook 
them at just under simmering 
point for 10 minutes. Turn oil 
and leave lhe pears to cool 
down in their syrup. 

Wash the figs and coat them 
with the remaining sugar. 
Wash the raspberries. Wash 
the strawberries briefly before 
removing thc stems. 

Add all thc fruit to foe 
cooking liquid when it has 
cooled to tepid and leave it to 
marinate for at least one day 
&o that all lhe flavours infuse. 

To serve, place all the fruit 
in a crvstal bowl. Serve iced 
after removing the cinnamon, 
orange and lemon slices. 


on 


-XV 

\:Afl i * iWp fl : 



EATING OUT 


A taste of the Sixties 


! :/ 


tettterfcrwrMif 

. 4 Ihllt t» ll***d 

gait a 

.top *nrf i hr 
f-Jtjvtn n :a»4 
■y ztv rjrtv ti* 
a* foe* jrr m-t;' 
t n am T bn 

frXTd vtjul in a 

d with pi.-mv .-; 

t Greenftftl 


tea. t' M fc a 


tWWf 


SU *1 





• -ateliers (most alcohol-free 
rines contain roughly half the 
- . alories of full strength wine), 
i M it is hard to see who else is 
oing to show mnch interest in 
- -je long term. My guess is that 
pooler .sales are simply 
. eking, over in Britain rather 
kinCSaq-Fjoaring ahead, as is the 
. . - isiv. then de-alcoholized 
' inis ire ’unlikely to take off 
■. thfr. ... “ - 

TMJSrst of.foe hew wave of 
IcohttL-free' wines, JEisberg, 
a&Jaimched in September 
st'ydMv Distilled from Ger- 
.white wine and shipped 
... * id^flttkd in this country by 
.v!i ^I«hp»-& -Bnder, it sells at 
1 1 k Barnett and 

HfOB’aiteon wine shops. Its price, 
{h *0^ must -he said. Is amsiderably 
..Lirtfore appealing . than _ its 
>A^*^icaa^ig' and taste: 1 found 
s Sm*t grapey character, 

• v , ju fenaid with. a. 'dirty, chalky 
-930J>qMjcr . thoroughly unpalat- 

Masion Light, on the other 
mdT wh ich arrived nil May, is .] 
Jjght, .refreshing, slightly 
gfling -drink. Jt Es a de- 
*’ ' white made from 
;and Cheoin Blanc 
m in Monterey and 
to .California and its 
..herbaceous, almost 
nhiwb-like palate makes it a 
acceptable - party 
ple-cPric 1 at; £1JB9 from 
and Gonigh Brothers. 
isv;#?e only de-akobolized 
ife that I can wholeheartedly 


.. white which is 

„ te : 5 Tong’s Schloss 

Wksenbefg; a sparkling wine 
fj, a, light, appkjj'farify- 
ay style; July's other ■at 
iljpMree.. wines are best 
■aided, as are those in the 
sftnstinf^ Wonder bar range 
i£B their osate flavours. 

Z ■JaneMacQuitty 


F 


Teas.al home tend to be rather 
more modest these days now 
that so many waist lines are 
being watched. But you can 
still be originaf in foe -way you 
serve it. You could, for exam- 
ple., boil foe water in a witty 
keltic with a blue plastic 
handle and a whistling red 
bird in thcspouL Designed by 
Michael Graves for AJessi it 
costs £41.-95 from- Way In- at 
Harrods. 

You could then make' foe 
tea in a pot from' the Tea 
House. 1 5a Neal SireeL Lon- 
don WC2 (01 240 7539). They 
have them in 100 shapes, 
including cats, owls, cauli- 
flowers, -Mad; -Hauers, vam- 
pires. figures — ; the camp 
harlequin shown is £17.50. 

Or, for de luxe tea parties, 
choose a copy of the solid 
silver tea pot designed by. 
Marianne Brandi in 1924. It 
costs £2,790. to order, and is 
part of the Tecnoline collec- 
tion of Bauhaus designs re- 
produced from original draw- 
ings and photographs by 
Waller and Maria Schnepel 
and on show at Oggetti, 100 
-Jermyn Street, London W1 
until September 20. The ex- 
hibition' catalogue at £10. 


(£2.50 p&p) provides beauti- 
fully illustrated reference for 
students of foe period. - 

If a Devon cream lea is your 
' idea of heaven you wifi want 
to serve your own preserves 
with foe dotted cream. A new 
Jam Sugar by Silver Spoon 
ensures a good set even with 
fruits low in -pectin.' It needs; 
very little-boiling and tends to 
overset if "you cook for a 
second longer than instructed 
- better, in my view, for jellies 
than jams. 79p per kilo from 
branches of Asda. 

For a parfait ending to your 
tea try one of foe new ice 
creams introduced by Thorn- 
ton’s, foe chocolate people. 
My favourite is Buttered Bra- 
ziL rich and creamy and with a 
definite brazfl nut flavour 
-which is different from any- 
thing else -on foe market 
Orange and Passion Fruit 
Sorbet has a good, fruity 
flavour, too, and Old English 
Vanilla would make a creamy 
and not too sweet basis for 
summer - fruits. AH come in- 
half litre packs at £1.15 from 
selected Thornxon shops 
throughout foe country. 

Or, if you need a tea-time 
oasis after a hoi day’s shop- 


Twfl for ten: the harlequin 
teapot (above) is one of 100 
imaginative shapes 
available from the Tea 
Honse. £17.50. The solid 
silver teapot (right), a copy 
of one designed by 
Marianne Brandi in 1924, 
is part of the Tecnoline 
collection on show at 
Oggetti, £2.790 to order 

■ ping in Chelsea, Chantal Cody 
has turned her tiny chocolate 
shop. Rococo, into a tea room 
and ice cream parlour for foe 
summer. On foe menu: 
Maradona Flip, a banana 
sorbet with vanilla ice cream 
and dark chocolate sauce and 
Celia Cruz Swing, passion 
fruit and raspberry sorbet with 
dark rum. Coupes are £2, 
shakes £1.50. All at 321 King's 
Road, London SW3. 





Fora touch of tea-time one- 
upmanship try offering coffee 
— the exclusive blend served 
by the Savoy Hotel who 
provided generous supplies to 
General Eisenhower in coffee- 
starved Europe during the 
war. It comes in usual blend or 
filler blend and costs £4.93 per 
lb. including postage, from the 
Savoy Hotel Coffee depart- 
ment. PO Box 189, l Savov 
Hill London WC2. 




Bumper baskets 


One. for the road: a bicycle basket hamper from Read's 


There is not likely to be ranch 
slaving over hot stoves around 
Gloucester Road. London 
SW5 from now on. Without 
lifting a finger hostesses will 
be serving all manner of exotic 
delicacies. Read's restaurant 
has just opened a take-away 
shop and catering service. 

It is offering fresh food from 
the restaurant kitchen daily 
phis newly .baked baguettes 
and croissants, borne pre- 
serves, cheeses and wines. 

For energetic goormets head 
chef Timothy Franklin sug- 
gests a Bicycle Basket Ham- 
per at £8 a head with wine. We 
packed ours with a selection of 
specialities, some of which will 
be available by mail order. 
Choose from vinegar with 


whole garlic doves. £2.10, 
pickled limes £1.98, mango tea 
£1.60. For other items contact 
Read's. ISO Old Brampton 
Road. London SW5 (01-244 
8434). 

Further afield. Food For 
Friends in Henley sspply 
home-made collations which 
can be picked up at 
Brakspears Off Licence in 
Hart Street between 1030am 
and 3pm. They do a cham- 
pagne picnic box with smoked 
salmon sandwiches, mange 
toot salad, fresh asparagus 
tarts, chicken, terrine, beef, 
brie, chocolate mousse ami 
cherry cake for £35 for two and 
a white wine picnic for £25. 
Order by telephoning 0491 
574976. 


•A summer wedding in the offing? * 
Austin Reed have opened a new formal 
hire department for men. A “light-black" 
tail coat with waistcoat and striped 
trousers costs £37.95. a two-piece 
-evening suit £21 35. white tuxedo and 
black trousers £2435. gray three-pfece 
with top hat arid gloves £3335. Prices 
are tor a weekend and you can hire 
shoes, too. However, they are available 
only at the branch situated at 103 Regent 
Street, London W1 (01-437 2140). 

• Or perhaps you stilt need a stunning 
hat to finish off an outfit for a special 
occasion? The Hat Shop, which has 
been so successful in Covent Garden, is 
opening a new branch in the West End 
on August 13. ft is at 9 Gees Court, St 


NEWSLINES 


Christopher' s Place, London Wi and 
there- will be panamas and boaters which 
can be trimmed to order, cricket caps 
and leather beanies, -evening cocktail 
hals and satin bands to tie in your hair. 
Prices range from £9.95 to £50. 

You will also get a preview of the autumn 
ranges produced by established 
designers and newly discovered ones 
encouraged by Hat Shop owner Carole 
Dentord, who as a designer herself is an 
adept talent spotter. She is always-open 


to suggestions - if you have ideas to be 
interpreted the Hat Shop will give you a 
headstart 


• The work of well known and up-and- 
coming designers is also on show at The 
Scottish GaHery, 94 George Street 
Edinburgh, where an-exhioition of . 
jewellery in Formica's laminate 
Cotorcore has just opened. 

The collection includes pieces by six - 
leading American jewellers and by 
Britain s Wendy Ramshsw and Louise 
Slater. Malcolm Temple, already well 
known for his vibrant use of colour in 
rugs and furniture, has now fumed his 
hand to Cotorcore jewellery, too, and 
there is also work by Geoffrey Turk, . 
classical master-jeweller for Garrard and 
Asprey. AD the exhibits are for sale and 
prices are from £5 to £3.000. The 
exhibition continues until September 2. 


Twenty years on, 
Jonathan Meades - 
finds comfort in 
the individuality 
of two survivors 

The Hungry Horse is 22 years 
old. It's self-consciously En- 
glish in a way that could only' 
be achieved by a foreign 
management and staff. Iis 
Englishness is peculiarly dated 
too, frozen in lime, foe subject 
of benign taxidermy: foe place 
is as temporally alien as Mini 
Mokes or white plastic boots. 
If a Swinging London film was 
not made here it can only have 
been because of the problems 
of gening a crew down the 
awkward staircase. 

Once you are at the bottom 
of foe stairs you seem to be in 
another age. when waiters 
wore striped mini-aprons that 
may not have done much in 
foe way of gravy-proofing bui 
looked very cute indeed. 
There is a certain acreage of 
black and white tiling and lots 
of pub mirrors, reminders of 
the depredations wrought on 
pubs in the 1960s. The tables 
are chunky kitchen tables. The 
cooking is a Spanish or Italian 
or Malaysian idea of English 
home-cooking — which is at 
least preferable to foe English 
idea of English home-cooking. 

That such a place should 
have survived and should 
continue to survive in an era 
of caterers' homogeneity is 
heartening and should be a 
lesson to whoever it is that 
decrees everywhere shall be 
pastel and chrome. On foe 
other hand, foe practice of 
allowing in hawkers with 
basketfuls of deep frozen 
carnations is one that no one 
should learn from, other than 
. to prohibit The same goes for 
foe ventilation - Swinging 
London was evidently a 
sweaty place. 

The kedgeree will do little to 
lower temperatures - it is 
dose to foe Indian original in 
its fierce spicing of cayenne, 
and the smoked fish has the 
rankness of Bombay Duck. 
Also it is very buttery indeed, 
with the sauce correctly made 
from the fish stock. Stock was 
what was absent from a grim 
vegetable soup: the best soups 
do not necessarily require 
stock, but this, ineptly com- 
posed, cried out for pepping 
up. 

The main courses were 
acceptable, no more. Boiled 
isalt) beef was improbably 
tough: thc dumplings with it. 
however, were light and well 
herbed. A chicken and mush- 
room pie arrived in an 
“indi'iduar dish, a sort of 
vessel which is no doubt a 
convenience to caterers but 
which ■ invariably promises 
disappointment 
There was nothing wrong 


ftancis Moslev 


r'.’ ffiji 




There is a certain 
acreage of 
black and white tiles 

with foe veg here that less 
eager cooking would not cure 
— because cabbage is nice after 
five minutes' boiling, it does 
not follow that it will be twice 
as nice after 10 minutes. I ate a 
very sticky and artery-clogging 
treacle tan while foe plate 
opposite had on it something 
lumpy and blood-coloured. 
This was a “summer 
pudding". 

The bread is ghastly — no 
excuse for this, as there is a 
splendid Italian bakery just 
across the road; the wine list is 
dreary and short; the service is 
cun, efficient and prone to 
shrugs. With a bottle of 1984 
Fleurie lhe bill for two was 
£49. 

The Golden Duck, a couple 
of hundred yards to the west 
in the restaurant ghetto of 
Hollywood Road, is another 
survivor of the 1960s. 

Though it still describes 
itself, raiher preposterously, as 
a “Chinese bistro" it has 
undergone transformations of 
both decor and menu. It no 
longer seems quite as odd as it 


did: this. I think, is less due to 
its decorative metamorphosis 
than to the number of imi- 
tators it has spawned: every 
more or less affluent quarter 
of London now has a clutch of 
up-market places specializing 
in Peking and Szechuan 
dishes, and foe Cantonese 
cafes of Soho are busily tailing 
themselves up, throwing 
money at interior designers 
and getting proper wine lists. 

Still none of these places 
can match the Duck's selec- 
tion of Chinese and occidental 
paintings and prints, and few 
can match its cooking, which 
is classy. Poor marks for some 
floury- pancakes to wrap round 
a delicious Szechuan duck, 
and a question mark over the 
unsalted but otherwise fine 
crispy lamb: but generally thc 
fond is first rate and good 
value. 

For £30 we ate. in addition 
to the duck and lamb, a 
bizarrely attractive hot egg roll 
(a son of deep fried omelette 
stuffed with bean shoots and 
fungus): a very hot and sa- 
voury chicken dish called 
chcung-du which was notable 
for tasting of something rather 
than merely mugging one's 
mouth; a light and grease-free 
“paper" wrapped chicken. 

Since I do not drink wine 
with Chinese food, foe well 
composed list was waved at us 
in vain; it is a shame that there 
is not a similar range of beers. 
The service has robotic ten- 
dencies. foe customers include 
Iols of beautiful people gliding 
jnto middle age and foe place 
is altogether urbane. 

Hungry Horse. 196 Fulham 
Road, London SWiQ (01-352 
7757/8081). Open Mon-Fri 
and Sun 12.30-2.30pm; daily 7- 
12pm. ' 

Golden Duck, 6 Hollywood 
Road, London SW10 (01-352 
3500/4498). Open Sat and 
Sun 1 2.30-2.30pm; daily 7.30- 
1130pm. 


September 6th, 

1986 - 10.00 hrs.: 
Historica Auction Hamburg 


r Tam burg's leading auction 
XXhouse for historica 
offer a fine selection ofitems of 
historical interest for auction 
sale: 

li/Filiiaria of many countries 
XViand periods, rare head- 
dress. uniform, fudges, accou- 
trements and accessories 
as well as antique firearms and 
edged weapons. j 


Admits 

A 


O rders, medals and decora- 
tions. citations, related doc- 
uments and personal autographs 
of personalities of historical 
importance. 

/"Objects of art, paintings, stat- 
v/uettes, bibliophile editions 
and scarce reference works. 

E usbatcd catalogues are avail 
ble at DM 30,00 by bank 
. draft airmaiL 


Hanseatisches Auktonshaus 
for Historica 
Husken/Schafer ohg 

Nel-eb W*ll 75, 2000 Hamburg 36. West GERMANl.Ttl. 040/363137-38 















THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 , 


ENTERTAINMENTS 


THE SOUTH BANK CENTRE 


iSU e I * tot Dfc v 5' , f : . IT.V.’I Jl v’ taco 


5JG in- fl ^**1 


Open all day with free adtMom and kmchiinw mmic. Coffee Sion Buffet, Ban end RnwiidaCcrfa. 

Jazz grows every Fn£atfiun rwi^. Enjoy the mognhcant views of Big Ben end fbrion w i from our nroradewula. 


r : ROYAL KESTIYAI . HALL 


Saturday LONDON FESTIVAL BMUET Bnawt u aWnmnces 01 Haora m 
9 Aug- J^oiiauTO.n9*u>wsii Coppcra itton II Augu*-Sri fflAuguHj 
SwnHy Enema* *i 7 Sam Satu-itov Mum** *3 <*(>■« 

16 Aug foMct .1 mm* nna OIJB M AljW London Fearaal BOTtUd 


Sundry 
10 Aug 
7.30 pro 


POPULAR CLASSICS - Niw Sfntnonf O WALftL He Ham 
icond) Amen Hatfi (pnoi CnrOiNr Espaw : &*■» THe3o««iWi 
Apg«m<y. Qwriwn WupMoy in Buie 1 8— Hf Spt i Uka sm. 
Bow Pomp ft Creumsancn No ■ HMi Sacra 
saw ts*u c tajjioag fiojoga wor w— m 


Sanaa* Moscow wiruosi wamc 8 Wrirac uHtememottu 

17 Aug MaantinoFh^krNACiVniuvk BKeuacnCenaHTOUIAmnor BWV 

7 JO pro KU1.*NwWTIwF]uSM»a 

» ts U i [; 085 0 jSjfttjOSO Raymond Gufabey Ltd 


30 Aug 
T JO pro 


THE MANTOVAM BUCHOTIIA Qnd Cetenan (amtuckr) 

Thu un^uc uinuioni arrangements wavoa Oi 
itv-XHta-eeoiiJWMiiBaari Pary ManuguriMaon) 
oa »aQ C50 tt30 ca The South Bara Boot 


WAug 
Tin pa 


onwaoyc FESTIVAL OPERA Atari KvrOT. Sbr-stagud 
concert M W ee o> MA cnem. conouaea by Jot Omni. 
G fr ndabo u me can Mti HU ri IN London fMenaN 

Oirirora. a tt-tiacis The Boult, Bark BOM 

SmflHMrfHMOWIT: COS NN TUTTE - Open Ndon LondWi BloMl 
l/iTO/ZZ W Dnm I i conductor) M Freeman loicoor) Pend Rogro 
*M fdsiynerj Eegksn vmon dy In Rifle 
7-00 pot Lawsynersndpoiw aomned unto (he N»m» 

EQ5D ma y ot art onty) C6. C9. Ci? The Soon By* Board 

LONflOrt SlNFOHmTTA LPWW B fi nk KO-fl Mona 
now OH. Stephen Robert*. Terry 

... intro & Aflaro B*riohCo*nr»« wea DaiSatner 

Beouem. Wi dpiiSfteoeeW 1 H WMHrapi-End 

CM.O M OM nw tub SoaaiBir* BOOT 

Thawky Pmup LPMCMOOC ikpoh Jdtai CdSBT ( porat png met Rnd 
3T Auq Cinq racemes pooi/Wiee grooves Pouttno Le retoa do reroeet. C 
7.46 pn Png pour PW. Dn—l WMner awns am songs By he*. Oer ari ri n. 

The Soon 1 


a elm CB 


Thuredey MOZAtTf ASLiMMCnWCHTSPBCAM Qty a London Wn l iv re Jan 
31 tag LeOranvnoMB ,condl *Howd Butte* lOfonrH Menett e Din m 
7 J0 pai lomeiMnartiM TneUemageotF>g*i:> "Piano Gone ciO nan K *66. 

Dn>.*lmmu m Cl K U6. Obue Cons n c K 314. Symphony No 41 
|J—W»1 1)350 C5 ttSO a The Souttl Sana BOOT 


PURCELL ROOM 


SSjf Hirspnom the shows . _ . 

3 Aug Edema iconfli Horayn « Snam. Jem Loomaoo. Exam fcom 
7 J0 pm CJti rwalieleSlorv 1nen.naSi.MtF«>Uwy.Ouar»ma.Cwo>a« 

H.yvOO'iv.'^anHbLAnnwaelvoutOun.etc D 30. t* SD C550 C7. 

UsO QS0 11050 Vhcmr HoCMumtr'5oi»i Bar* 9oam 


•QUELS EUZAB E1TI HALL 


5VUMERSCOPE 

Sat Tue-rueBarrwiSUt VAN TAN TETHERA 

91219 - Ooera Factory London S c r* un * eili» .Bg» lie — dH |«aiduCW»lPHe 

Aug r - i t nni| P e nn nnjni im jm i| 

745pa u A (Jj, Q< prti omyi C£ Q EU T he South Bum Soem 

Sunday STRING QUAflTETS OTTHE 3B> CZHTURV 13). 

10 Aug lira Smog OmiM OurM Quirtm ha i CMuoy Ouerta in G 
745pm m>iartpm>>e^w«aOpiBirfnOurMruS 

L7 Ll C4 to T in Soutn 8*n* Board 

MOZAHt COS* FAN TUTTE 

_ Opera Factory London ScdanMda. PH DaidM (conductor) 

7JM pm Onrd rmia iVidon Dm flooer loraonuo Engnvi «mon by 
Im Ream. Likunn «ni nor on Jarrrted i«i rnelraeraal 

L* >0 i&r, .y »»t iWyi CB M tontyl The Scwm Bent Bom 

Wedneidey MAN JUMPING ah imegmaiw ano comemoorary group o*nu>cians 

11 Aug jrio L.]rritvsers pirvninq a W> Ol mix v>i*ch rvMOs a ahdH> 
7.45 pm WKl'ian or «muuncc ham lunk U Chemis hes 

L3 C4 ti, The Soon Bane Ba»o 

Tlunaay STBIMG OUAhtfts of TM* 20m CEntuht lit. 

14 Aug Lnduy SMg OuanM. Janecoh Ouan<x No 1. Kurtag Ouadct 
7.45 pa Tipped O'oJKH No I. Havel Oiurui in F 

U U H. lb The South Bant Boon] 

Fmtay ENGLISH DANCE THEATRE. Sea Change Muse Gary Carpenter, 

15 Aug Cr.o-uwqi.ipn, A Cyvgn Ed Wtdtw Paa—IH. Cnon«<* apny vac 
7 45 per l-.rnz. Atiinc Dv sruveney iJfr ror iwooumaf 7heJMa.hun. 

Cmaeoiriimv v. r , Vai-ii T joea nuve ov Mjmwraan Tr jnstar 
QiO L*50 IS>1<£ the Sumn Bane Board 


«*ug 

MOpn 


Sunday 
10 Aug 


iBank Boanl 


SONG OF THE ti£NTuAV (3) WMW 
Londai Bn to aada Wweaa A The ffo i iBi Hlai f Ahiwc SH 
— d— MPPl AI— a a raHn ianiGiBliw nJgtaapnipnoi Songs 
ov SOT. Brtdgc. Imng Bedla OaaNa haa ana RKAOT Stmtm, 

nso. £5 Tire Saudi Sm Board 

UNOA MUST imscoioaanoi John ConRatdr i tnol Daryl RurwaMi 
IheWMOT}) jphn rtMngiaound) Mae BanytbaibgiaU'l Songaay 


The Scum Bane Boot 


It Aug 
7J0pn 


T uea on 
12 Aog 
7 JO pm 


131 _ 
7 JO pm 


Thunday 
14 Aug 
7 JO pm 


OaMwRaweaoi and SdddlNto 

£3. £350 E5 

SONG OF THE CENTUWT PI The 

SMameda Vgmm S The S a£ynaarf«' Alm a nac Card SM (son 
saphan VMM lean Gtaliam JoMBn idoqi Songi o» Fauw. Bmon. 
CintrU. Wimant Voumane aoo Jemma Hem 
050 LS The Scum Banfc Bowd 

JOHN HAfOTS BOOMER BAND Ptvaeo Ov POUm c Mgtdpanny 
and Jeter WDM muse by Kim w«« and Mane But The 
protpanme also mevajee ne» songs tw John Hade ano Alan Bek; 
uona or Pawn HaMhano Kurt waaioie 

tJ.OSO O Thejoum Bane Boat 

SONG OF THE CENTURY (4) 1924- 193S London 
The Unnnruiiau - Mm true Loma Andam a n isooi 


nonoi Songs oy 


i (Ban 


The South Bane Bonn 


Sangmemn 1 Aanancc But 

tarn InNiaui ipnai Songs Of Mttn. Tippett. Siiuaiauiiv It ana 
suer 050 CS The South Bane Board 

FAYPBESTO rnoMagoerma -aoosetiatvmeoijaiiene Oetnen and 

a haoeurui roo nan tam ccnpirar An everwg or ma^c ana many 
sunrmei unto Fey ana Frans 

AhMonCA The Scum Bank Board 


^SUMMER^COPEr 2 , 8 ; 

' A Celebration of our ( 


ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 


RAYMOND GUB8AV present* at the ROYAL FESTIVAL BALL 

SUNDAY 17 AUGUSTat 7.30 p.m. 

MOSCOW VIRTUOSI 

VLADIMIR SPIVAKOV director/violin 

Mozart ..EINE KLEINE NACHTMUSDC 

Bach VIOLIN CONCERTO IN 

A MINOR. BWV. 1041 
Vivaldi .THE FOUR SEASONS 

H.tt.ft.fziSsp.eTisq.tlOSO Hall 01-028 3(91 CC 01-0288800 



RAYMOND GU8HAT pmnm FRIDAY S SEPTEMBER at ZSO pA 

FRIDAY NIGHT IS MUSIC NIGHT 

.4 r^ v. r n * ^ .jLi performance <•( BBC R*iMr2'ipcjmbrmuik 

pri •jruinmt (wiw brojJtaU lit * /or Jit/irfi limejtvm 
dv ftoxal Fcarcji Halt 
BBC CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
CondiAior. BARRY WORDSWORTH 
jXLL GOMEZ wpraoo RAMON REMEDiOSienor 
THOMAS TROTTER arpm JOHN McCARTHY SINGERS 
BAND OF THE ROYAL MARINES (DEAL) 
lm reduced by ROBIN BOYLE 
Rr'S.fh.'ifl. l3.J9W.fID60.cn 4Ti Hall 01-928 M91 C.C. 01-9288800 



VICTOR HOCHHAUn prtMIUi ike ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

TOMORROW at 7.30 

POPULAR CLASSICS 

Introduced & conducied by: ANTONY HOPKINS 

NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA] Snlfeu; ANDREW HA1GH 

CHABtUER Eapasg 

DUKAS - — — The Sor ccnr 'a App r ent i ce 

GERSHWIN .Rbapunrly la Bloc 



TCHAIKOVSKY Swan Lake Suite 

ELGAR Poop & Circtudawcc March No. 1 

RAVEL r ' 

1 1 « t* *■•*■* HrtJB >orroe. IUU il«l-«a 


rl|D|J| | VICTOR HOCHHAUSER & the South Bank Boanl 
CJ Wm pmeniai the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

Xjmffl FRIDAY 22nd AUGUST at 7 JO 

FROM THE SHOWS 

NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
Cond: John Owen Edwards 
Soloisis: Marilyn Hill Smith, John Lawrenson 
Excerpts from CATS, WEST SIDE STORY 
KING AND I, MY FAIR LADY, OKLAHOMA, 
CAROUSEL, HELLO DOLLY, CAMELOT, 
ANNIE GET YOUR GUN and many more. 

£5 60. £4 6tf. fS.60, L7. £».«. £9 60. £10.60 from Hall 928 31911928 MOO 



VICTOR HOCHHAUSER A the South Bank Boanl 
present u the ROYAL FESTIVAL HALL 

SATURDAY 23rd AUGUST at 7 JO 


GLORY OF VIENNA 


factcdby AP 
NATIONAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
JOHANN STRAUSS Oi D.r Flrdemmn. Huang; Rjto. Vbica of Spnqc, 
Cihlum rulb. Radrroky Marah. Egypunn Match. Champag ne Mi a, ftynmm 
Mohik. ru-ncua fnika. The Blue Danube. TTALDTEUFEL Eapanx; 
SCHUBERT Symphane Na 8 (L'niiaatacd) 
ilW'IM £4 10 , {;. L8 51). l9.60. £10 Wlrwn HaU«28 1191 W28 8800 



VICTOR HOCHHAUSER presents at the RFH 
TUESDAY 16 SEPTEMBER at 7.30 

LEONARD BERNSTEIN 

conducting the 

ISRAEL PHILHARMONIC 
ORCHESTRA 

HER N STEIN .JUBILEE GAMES (European pre m iere) 

LUKAS FOSS SONG OF SONGS 

Mt^zo Soprano: Sheri Grcenawald 

DVORAK .SYMPHONY NO 9 (New World) 

Turku I’mr Royal FeMival Hull Box Office 9’8 3191/9288800 


CONCERTS 


■ARUICAN HALL *..'H HTQC, f-Jfl 
W‘1 r«,-| 7 45 Acade m y 

W M-rto>4a Um fhrtrU, 

kmnrlh *4.111141 dir. MtrhjW 
I Vila in nfiln 


EXHIBITIONS 


innHDAT Atm 

TODAY - A Aud i hparkM.'. 

I hull 1 iT.un ilimi .lull SO lo 
vihiiivI IO llr.uin Ft. it I 
t Mi mpi.r Admtielan 7HU. 
(.iiiutv muminm .,ii aomii 
5.111111 \i.ilu iiirludlnu iprc 
. 1 nil. Int rtnlilri n 


TaaifttKa. a turn hmwf 

nkedlm •* Rare Memaittr 1 
T ri el i TeeWee 4 oin 400 m- 
m lipt.e mi Wnr and Pnwery 
JeweRary. V u-IIhui LvlHOilmn 
• ■■■in I7ih -Vihi Oim to .so r- 

■*4iii .’'ji iTinra rhiiri onli 
r>. rt..i llnyr Uallnri ruifeln 
S4lM. K rMI rsIM-mu-lll. 

Mort-1 Trt 9)71 I)«ti7l9 

■V V Sign Ithk-il 


OPERA & BALLET 


- toe- si6i 
PL P4Q M5B 

DKLKM NATIOHAL OPERA 
Nia lltMikiiHt H Travel ere /The 
mi FltarrThe 


Mum, ni rise. Taon tor tn-dlm 


CLYMOCBOURHE F enthral Opera 

wiln inn innrinn PhilhjrmonK 
Oairw^ir.i unttl I5IH Auqinl 
ALL PUrOHMAMCC* V»LD 
OUT Po. 5i bln rntumi only 

max miaa.’T)HiMii 


■OVAL FESTIVAL HALL 9» 

.'• ! a I CC OW 8000 

TKkiHnuilrr 643J 

LONDON FESTIVAL 
BALLET 

L’lilll Auq IP. C»« 7 SO. SJI 
M4K Jpm T«VJJV H an n a A An 
4M imii. Mirliiq.u,/*irti4uiuri 
Ler Albryli/ht lViuliuil Tram 
Man le Anq 


ROYAL OPERA HOUSE Cm. ml 

Cuidnn 1»C2 01040- 

pS qmpht eeefa 
-»..>il i, inn ia.im an inn das 
THE BOLSHOI BALLET 
T ratal 70) A 730 Sjeartacm 
te.iet taertei 


SADLER'S WELLS TUI BdlO 
BfTEHHATWHAL AUTTOTH 
DANCE - BALLET SEASON 

Cad Ol 77H OB SO Ml colour 
bnvrmrr 


THEATRES 


ouke of vonrs 

Of-KX SI2S 

SUNDAY TOO AUGUST si 730 
FRANK VICK ER VS COMEDY 

TWHXIfiH AW THROUGH 

REMARK ABLE-'' 

CuVOan 

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Now Smssnan 
"HtLAHlOUS " 

Weswm uai 
• EXHILARATING. '" 

Man Or. 


ALDWVCH TMCATRC 01836 
6UM/CMI tr Ol 370 MJ3 
1RVMO HWUH*S 

"40 - v<Mi-ol(l nunpl" Tlm#i 

ANNIE GET YOUR GUN 

rr ran Ihn Cnemkr FrlUial 
Thnjlm 
NUrrma 

SUZI OUATRO 

'■MahiS un I nr nrgnl me most 

d.i7/tmi, wnl Cud drtmt . Catch 
leer leday" D.Tcl 
C\q« T 30 Mate Wnd A Sol 2 30 
P4ht 7 ikit i r boonmq on FIIW 
r-.lt Ot 740 7200 Ibkq im 
ABONtt KJ6 761 1 nr MO 7*1 3 
/« CC 741 0449/836 7358/379 
44,3 1 ) 1 , Same <130 6173 Firm 
L Jit >?4nr 7 day CC ?-»0 7200 (tH>e 
tern now BOOLING TO FEB 
1987 

ME AND MY GIRL 

THE LAMBETH WALK 
MLnaCAL 

Nmtiilv at 7 30 »L»tv wnd 44 3 3C 
A Sal 4 30 A BOO 

"H« HAPPIEST SHOW 
M lOltir S Ctamn 

Theatre Atr C amB M oai d 


ALBERT Air C eod H Ie na d Tkg- 
a*rv oi 830 3878 CC 379 0805 
/o433 Group Mm 830 3902. 

JOHN SHEA i. 

THE NORMAL HEART 

(JV LARRY KRAMER 
“AlAOIflFICDnr Tlroc. 
’■HOTHiat SHORT OF 

SENSATIONAL** S Exp 

Ce«v ft Mjtt Tn«ir A Sat a 30 


IRC DEMAND UKTH. SETT t 


APOLLO THEATRE 437 2603 

*»4 JM8 riral Can 01240 7200 
ViriiHnwKter n 370 6483 
MOn-rn R 00 Gal 4 30 A B.lfi 
Tnur* nuts LOO 
PAUL uorau 
"M ASTERIV" r T. 
HOWARD ROLUNS 
■■MACNinee»ur‘ dmfi 
W inner I9B6 Tony Award Bni 
Play 

CM NOT RAPPAPORT 

“WONDCHFLILLV FUMMV“ 

DECS 


APOLLO VICTORIA SS 828 S6U 
CC 0300202 rKMlMtttr« 379 
0433 1st ran rr (24hr1 940 7200 
inha rent Cm Sales 930 0133 
Erne 7 45 Mals Tut A Sat 30 

STARLIGHT EXPRESS 

“A MUSICAL THAT SURPASSES 
AMTTTCMO AROUND M EVERT 
OMKHSHM** O Exp 

STARUGHT EXPRESS 

Miner by 

ANDREW LLOVD WEBBER 
Lynn Dv RICHARD STUCOC 
DirrvinJ Dv TREVOR NUNN 

APPLY DAILY TO BOE OFFICE 


HOW BOOttme TO MARCH 1S0T 


Ol 028 8798/638 
8891 CC I Mon-Sun 10BHV- 
flgnni ROYAL SHAKESPEARE 

EARBlCAH THEATRE Tod4» 
2.00 A 7.30. Mon A Tun 1 30 
THE MERRY WIVES OF WDS- 
SOR. 13. 14 Aug TMHUW A 
5 16 Aug 


THE Ilf Today 2 00 A 7.30. 
Mon A Tun 7 30 PMUSTHWS 
by Mmm Gorky. 13-14 Aug 


CHAUCER THEATRE Ol 481 
5204 5213 SragwKk Centre 
AMgat? E 

A BEATLE REMEMBERS 

Martin Dmwry'i "oulHanding'* 
bmnon. Moot by The Walrus 
Band II lb Aug 8 p.m. LA.QQ. 
C2 60 


TV BB> prewnci ihe '»)nd x»-n .4 Henry L'l.eJ Pumehlrmnn 

PROMS 



18 July — I* September 

Royal Albert Hall 


TONIGHT 1.» BBC WELSH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

JAMES LOUUHIUX In the South lAkaowi ELGAR 

1 1 ARAN HARDEN HERtjER Array, tar trumpet uel snlf arohoxt* 

■ BBC cotmimaMn.- world premiere' 

CORDON CROSSE 

£4, C2M ONLY* SympfaiB./ No. 2 in D moor SIBELIUS 

Pne-Prum talk by Rotter Wright 6.16 pm 


.MONDAY II AUG. 7. JO ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
Kfc'IURN SEA 13 O.VLV Boris h? Babm ant hUtuhen 


TUESDAY 12 AUGUST 7.W NASH ENSEMBLE 

LIONEL FRIEND Link- Sviupbaor far wmJ GOUNOD 

IAN BROU N Piojjli muMCt nattuma DALLAPICCOLA 

SARAH WALKER 'Ihnx lWn»ot Swpfuor MaUermc RAVEL 

thoux oacques OLIVIER MESSIAEN 
Intnxluaioa jixl Allegro RAVEL 

ALL SEATS £4 00 Fotk S^ip LUCIANO BERIO 


WEDNESDAY II AUGUST 7.00 BBC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
SIR JOHN PKI'ICIIAKD l*un.> Lunccno ui A minor SCHUMANN 
BERNARD d'AM.OLl Ad Alpax Symphony STRAUSS 

£ I. £2 r*l ONLY 


WEDNESDAY 1! AUGUST 9.45 in ST. PAUL'S CHURCH, 
KNIGHTSBRIDGE LONDON BAROQUE 

ALL SEA1S SOLD Wortahj Purctfl. Scitlmi Ik Camunh 

Ihumcnak ndieo tvkiUilr un thcarin 


THURSDAY (4 AUGUST 7.30 PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA 
RlilVRN SEA'1’3 ONLY Wurkv h> Bcerbaven znJ Bruckner 


FRIDAY 16 AUGUST 7 JO 
OLIVER KNUSSEN 
PHYLLIS BHYS-IVLbOS 
PETER HALL 
IAN lALEY 


LONDON S1NFON1ETTA 
Amnia MADERNA 

Four Soogs. Op. 1 1 UTEBENN 

Cham mxU prom) OLIVER KNUSSEN 
2 Scared Soap VOLT *r STRAVINSKY 


DAVID WILSON-JOHNSON Eptrophaun SIRA VINSKY 

ItRKY EDWARDS Cancxmev a Gioonar Ll'IGl NONO 

BBC SINGERS Double Oman STRAVINSKY 

Rjcacor flV Muucat t-Hhamgi 

BAiM utdL WEBERN 
a tmnical oUeroig J.S.B. WSl 

ALEXANDER GOEHR 
ALL SEA IS £1 Roiail STRAVINSKY 

Pre-Pram talk by AlmnJrr Goehr A Qlreer pm 


PROMENADE TICKETS AVAILABLE ON THE NIGHT ONLY 

£I.Si)<AKimi.Ll-3] iGallmr, 

Hot l Hike UI-SWItUIL L.C. UI-VN W66. Taieunaucr 01-779 MM 


CtOCHCSTDt 0343 781312 

jmc mm /a funny tkmg 

HAPPENED OH THE WAY TO 
THE FORUM C\n 7 30. Mats 
Thu A Sal 2.30 


E 01-930 
2678. CC 741 9999. Find Call 
24 nr 7 day CC 240 7200. Cm 
Sam 930 0123 MorvFn 8 OO 
Sal 600 A 8.45 

THE GAMBLER 

by 8RCWIS. GOOD V A, SMITH 
A romrdy inuMal Willi 


PAUL SOWN 

■•A mram me nnUny' wn On 

■Huqrtv pnooyablrr* FT 

“fc ll t d. wry dawy ht d aad** 

OH mcr 

“A. WINNER ALL THE WAV** 

D Mail 

ENDS TONIGHT 


COTTESLOE *»* 938 2263 CC 
•Notional Theaim'5 ymall audt- 
■aouml Today 230 A 7.3a 
Man 7 30. I fn Auq 12 to 14 A 

Auq 18 NEAPT®E By Sarah 
Oumrlt 


UniUHON Air Coral S 930 3310 
CC. 379 6505/379 0433/741 
9999 Orel 830 3902. E*9» B OO. 
Thu mat 2 30 Sal 5 30 A 8.30 

“BRITISH FARCE AT ITS BEST" 
D Matt 

The Theatre ol Comedy Company 



RUN FOR YOUR WIFE! 

Wiwre and directed by 
RAY COONEY 
Our 1.400 


“SHOULD RUN FOR UFE** S. Ex 


DOM INION THEATRE Box Ontce 
Ol SBO 8845/01 030 8638/9 or 
Ol 580 9502/3 Cm Sam 930 
0123 FMST CALL 34hr 7 Day CC 
BOOMNCS OH Ot 

(MO ROOaUNC FEE) 

DAVE CLANK'S 

TIME 

THE ULTMATE 

CUFF RICHARD 

AS -THE ROCK ST AIT 
THE PORTRA6 AL OF 'AKASH* 

LAURENCE OLIVIER 

Mon-Fn 7 30 Thu Mat 2.30 Sat 6 
A 8 30 

SOME SEATS STILL AVAILABLE 
FOR TUOAV* P E WPU I IM AH CE . 
SPECIAL CO MCCSSKWS AT E7 
ON THURS MATINEES FOR 
&LP4. tOMOe. STUUCKTS * 
UNDER IVa. 

Haw S ee k i ng hr April *87. 


VAX8MXH1 340 
823 0 rr 3 79 0506/0433 
“TREAT VOURSEUF** 

Mall on Sunday 

BY SJDE BT 


LATE NIGHTS: Fri A Sal 
Itpm. Sen 18pm ELISABETH 
m her award winning 
NY dtOw 


DRURY LAME THEATRE KOVAL 

01 830 8108. Ol 340 9060/7. ec 
3790433 Fun rail 24-nour 7-day 

cr HP 240 7200 1 no booking tecl 


42ND STREET 

A SHOW FOR ALL TK FAMILY 


\OM 

BEST MUSICAL 

STAMOARD D R AMA AWARDS 

toted 

BEST MUSICAL 

LAURENCE CUVIER AWARD 

idled 

BEST MUSICAL 

PLATS A PLATERS 


AWARD 

Ec« BO Mala Wed 3 a 
SM SO & 8 JO 
Gram Sam 930 6123 


DUKE OF YORKS 830 6122 CC 
UO 9837/741 9999/240 7300. 
Ceec 8 Thu 3 Sat 5 & 8 30 

COMEDY OF THE YEAR 

Elidnrd Drama M a ri ISM 

STEPPING OUT 

“TRIUMPH ON TAP” Std 
Mil Comedy by RMhard Ham* 
Directed by Juli a McKetror 

•UHOiTWHarsurTol 

■■P ERF ECT DELKMT* U Tet 

THIRD HILARIOUS YEAR] 


FORTUHE (Mr Cowdl S ce 836 
2238 KP 741 9999 Crv Sales 930 
0125 Mon to Fn S Sm L30 Mai 
Thun A Sal 5 oo 


DOUBLE DOUBLE* *" 


-A f t a mtr at whodunnrv « 

cmerlarpment PnuUe Dauo4* b 

unbeaUMe” Times C Supg. 
“Stuns Uir aumencr” S. Tod 


GAHMCH * 836 4001 CC 379 
0433 A CC 24 nr/7 day 240 
7200 Eta 8 Wed mal 3. Sal 5 A 
8. MO SDL UME- 


CLODE 437 1592. CC 379 6433 . 
8kg tee IV Catt 24 hr 240 7200. 
Ob Sam 930 0123. EtCI 8 atari 
Wed 3 Sat 4. 

Andrew Upyd Webbrr Pirated* 


JAM FRANCIS 
RONALD HOLOATE 
JOHN BARRON 

LEND ME A TE NOR 

“A MASTERPKCE** Times 
-FILLS THE THEATRE WITH 
THE SOUND OT LAUGHTER” 
a e*p 

An American Comedy by 

Ken Ludwej 

DtrecVd by Da\id cal more 


E Ol- 

7756. Evenbig* 7.45 M»l Sat 

2.30 


FMECRACKER CONTEST by 
Beth Hmley “A Cracker” D. 
Tel “Vb ra ri ana 

Dally Mail 


II AA M ITE A B 722 9301. Evea 8, 

Sal Mari 4 301 



HA YM ARRET THEATRE ROYAL 
Box tUlH-e and CC OI 930 9832. 
Tint Catl 24 hr 7 day CCbottUnw 
01 240 7200. 

Otrerl libra Broadway 
”A ttarrb London dage debut” 
Financial Time* 

JACK LEMMON 

“The master ot tragedy on Ute 
heroic scale” Dully MaM 

LONG DAY% JOURNEY 
INTO NIGHT 

By Eugrar O Nettl 
-Johnathan Miller's brilliant 
production" Standard 
E\ei only Mon-Sal 7 30 


MER MAJESTY*. Haymarfcri 
930 4025/aoOO 2046/2850 
Ttchetmadcr 379 0131 
Tim CeU CC 240 7200 

THE PHANTOM OF THE 
OPERA 

Siarrmg 

MCNAEL CRAWFORD 

Sarah 8tnr 

BrnPiman Barton 

Mime by ANDREW LLOVD 
WEBBER 

Libretto by RICHARD 
STfLCOC A CHARLES HART 
Directed by HAROLD PRINCE 
Onens 9 Oct. 


1916. Until 
Aug lo. Dm 7. Show Spin. 
BERTICE READINC returns by 
mand In har show 


LYRIC ... 

Act W» 01-437 3086/7 01-434 
1550 01-434 1060. 01-734 

5106/7 

COLIN BLAKELY 

-A bnnianl A MyouRy 
coemr gerfomtance” F. Tunes 
in 

Thr Natkaial TheairFT atxteimcd 

production oi 

ALAN AYCK BOU RN'S 

A CHORUS OF 
DISAPPROVAL 

-Hrartbreatungty runny” Odn 
~HUanoi». ” S Times 
“A rare evening of 
«nttr nchHarawn” Tune* 
Em 7 JO. Mats wed jm Sal 3.0 
Group Sam 01-930 6123. 

Reduced ante tnari Student A 
O AP S tandby 

FMST CALL MHR 7 BAY 
CC BOOKINGS ON 01 240 7200 
(NO BOOKBHS TEE) 

WINNER OF ALL 
THE BEST COMEDY 
AWARDS FOR 1985 
NOW BOOKING UNTIL! 
JAN ‘S7 


LYTTELTON T 928 2262 CC 
(NBbotui TheairaT pro sc e ni um 
uagr> Today 2 is ilow price 
matt & BOO. Mon 8 00 (not 
7 AS as pruned m leaflet.', men 
Aug 18 io 21 PAUIAHCE by 
SrhniQfer. ttrwn by Tom 
Stoppard 


LYRIC MAIBIIERSMnN 01-741 
2311 TTVUKfc Aug IS - Sept 6 
at 8pm nroraeu lAug 14 al 7 prat 

will. 


LONDON PALLADIUM 437 7373 
437 2055. CC 734 8961. 579 
6433. 741 99991 on bkgfeeL FITO 
Can 24 Hr 7 Day CC 240 7200. 
Grp Sam 930 6123- 

THE HIT MUSICAL 
COMEDY 

GEORGE HEARN 
A DENIS QUILLEY 

LA Cage aux polles 

“A CLQRKKIS CKLEBRATIUN— 
A TULL-T HHOT tLE 
nWQHARWBItr D Mall 
Mon-Fn 7 30. Mott Wed 2.00 
Sal 2.30 ft 8.00 

suoi e we na w a avail, ai doer; 
Mon-Fn ft Sal mats 


JUS BARBICAN HALL 

MO Barbican Centre. Silk St. EC2Y 3DS 
01-638 8891 /628 8795 

Telephone Bookings: l 0 am- 8 pm 7 days a week 

On--* 3 lueses ins Tien.iqcC by - .~e Cc ! 3U'.' !l '-" IcrScn . 




Todtty LOHOOW SYMPHONY OHCHESTHA. Lorfci lMaal (c on d uapf ) 

9 Aug n aOTou OTS yrppiio^NeamP.Opa3H H iHf .gy iPpricioyKol«lD. 

“ *. koiowga of 

, HK3HT GOHCSTTWITH FW6WDRKS. Lttlwridtt 

Terraco. Lonoon Symphony WhdiBwhN Wind 
CdMdiM g U W VM; MURC tar tfw Hoyal ftwtts awti 


UObb Raroms only. 
1043ptB FHEEUtTEN 


Tipmor ACAOENY OF ST HAHTIHNT-THBflELOS. 9rNtt*Ntt Nwitnar 
TO Aug (conn) ArtMi Augar (snoi AFrgda Hedgton (tnezzodop) 

KbWi LeMm(iwot) John fort tmoo (bsari AcadMy Ctnui 

mNRNMMBMMI 


-7J0pn 


WhaMt GuR Bcdhonn: SyrnAany No 
cit C9.sn. ease. E7. ce, csot 


Omnaf ‘ChoraT 


POPULAR CLASSICS. Syragtany Oeefttt**Q*vti »*•«» 

Bgbttrt BrtgMnwrt igirian NomIM Owmiro Tho 
ol SKotg Ones Paw Gym Sum No T Rodrigo: 

■turtRt SaOre DsnC8 mm 

ssierteratate. 

citfso. aSfi. ££a g E6t WetarNfleWBUM/Ufr 

lUd/Sun IttCO POM AW HSHAMBKO DANCE COWANY 

12/17 Aug Sm Mparaa anoouncemenL MyjMMHgtK 

Wed BUNHB) love CLASSICS. London CnoartOrehettr*. 

20 Aug ChrMopherAdtt* (eonCI Anthony GoMasonttlpenoi Prog 
Bbat Caman SdB RrTmBntooY: PagNim nit 

J SbauM Biutt Dan ubo Rml: BdiRO A Swanwr 
ewnlady member ot the KdMCe. 

EW jo. CsAQ, ease. C7. C6. CS. Raymond SuMayOtf : 


Z45fm 


PHBJ1AHN0MA ORCHESTRA. RobgriTbw(CW*0)Bgn)amin 

21 Aug Luson Iber) Prog. OC BOBHOm* Ov. ‘Cano&f HOTHt Waw 
745pm Music Laoncnrilo: Prorogue TBgnacri' Mozart; rsoageno's 

Ana Irgm *lhtt Mamc Bui? Seronaoe and Champngna Ana from 
Don GtoMwa Synrtrony No 40 Wagner TarnYiSiiaer. 
C125 0. CU50. Cl030.ES,C7a).C6. Raymond GdObav Led 


Fri CITY OF LONDON SMFOHfA. fad IMriaOa (cor'd) Mgei 

22 Aua Kcniwdy Mn) Handeh Amval of Hitt Queen ol Stiaba Mozart: 
745pm 6r» Hama NacmmuPk Bade Vlokn Concma in A mnor Vtaakfe 
The Four Settfions. 

civ50. ciaso. eg. so. caso, C7.C6 .es. 


ATARAH’S 

BAWD 


Tomorrow at 3pm 

A special summer p rog ra mm e 
of muse and musical fun. 
Thebetf mtraductian 
io concert-going 
for any child and 
lets nffammg ml 
All feats £150. 

BOOK ROW! 

01-638 8891/628 8795 



SMHi d iy 23 AuguS al 7.45pm BARBICAN HALL 

ACADEMY OF 
ANCIENT MUSIC 

SCHUBERT Symphony No 5 

HA3DN Trumpa Cmccno 

BEETHOVEN Symphony No 5 

CHRISTOPHER HOG WOOD conductor 

FRIEDEMANN IMMER trumpet 
Scat Pro £9. IS. £7. £6. £S. £4 HaB 01 -bj* mt/r£#H7V3 



VICTOR HOCHHAUSER 


Mlbc BARBICAN 


MONDAY Uih AUGUSTat74S 

POPULAR CLASSICS 


ROSSINI. 

GX1IGJ 


RODRIGO 

KHACHATURIAN - 

RIMSKY -KORSAKOV. 


^O wj t ura The Bate pfSeviDc' 

-_PwGyncSabc No 1 

-Conciertod* Arenjuei 

e Ducc 6om ‘Gayaneh’ 


NEW SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Cantfiioor DAVID COLEMAN 
So tain: ROBERT BRIGHTMORE 
£6.00. £7.00. £&.». £960. £10.60 final Hill 628 8795ft 58 6861 



VICTOR HOCHHAUSER wan. BARBICAN CENTRE 

Direct from Spam 

-j- PACO pena!s 
Flamenco Dance Company 

eA\ m a spectacular m- 

Spanish 

1 Fiesta 



ANELSCTRIFTiriG PERFORMANCE OF 
FLAMENCO GdfTAR PLAYING. 

SINGING AND DANCING 
Aagnst 12 to August 17 

Eraariga at 7M. Sm at 7 JO 
rmtiib-TiT — *. 
UCIOJODJOIl 
BWHCAK 
828 8795 C38B881 


VICTOR HOCHHAUSER j 


l ai the BARBICAN 


SUNDAY 24 fh AUGUST at7J0 

TCHAIKOVSKY 

‘Swan Lake* Sake , HarndH Svbc*, Pino Coaccrto No I 

OVERTURE 1812 WITH CANNON AND 
MORTAR EFFECTS 
LONDON PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
CooductDr. GRAHAM NASH Sokast: ALLAN SCHILLER 
Cb.OO. £700. £8.50. £9.50. £10.50 fiota HaU 628 87951658 8891 


TIE 



18-23 AUGUST 
1986 

7.30pm 3 matinee 2.00 pm 

THE GOLDEN AGE 

A spectacular and exciting ballet in 
t ftp classical syle of the Bolshoi, set 
in the roaring 1920’s. Exhilarating, 
soar in g dancing performed to 
Shostakovich’s brilliant score. 

“A rip roaring triumph * n 

"Vigorous, high-soaring power on display” 

THE TIMES 


"Irresistible drive and vitality* 
THE FINANCIAL TIMES 

"Astonishing virtuosity and brilliance* 

THE LONDON STANDARD 

TICKETS NOW 
AVAILABLE 
FROM £15 




LONDON 

FESTIVAL 

ballet 

Artistic Director 

Peter Schaufuss 


Royal Festival Hall 

Tonight at t .30 
Tomorrow at 3.00 « 7.30 

Frederick Ashton's 

ROMEO AND 

Juliet 

Sponsored b y C/Ti8/lA/CO 


■ 

/ 


Tonight: Truglia/AnTand 
Tomor (Mat): MdBgan/Schauftss 
Tomor (Eve): Alberti/Schaufiiss 


Next Week 


COPPELIA exesIs 


Mon. |l;'ty^uTifejre)«rt5rarc 
Hiet li Ti^NureyeY^AiToria 
Wed 13. Boiygeod/SmitWGraftt. 
Thurs. 14: BoujeoWBefcnaWrrwa 
Fri. 15- CakJeririfidnufeBS/IohnKin 
Sac (Ml 16: B»t«iii^mesWd»nond 
Sac iQ 16: C^tterintfSchauftos^ohnson 



Eros, at 7.30. Sac Mate ac 3.00 

CJC. Bookings: OI-f» 8000 


Box Office: 01-928 3191 
TWeennaater: W-379 6433 

Tickets: £4 to D 3.50 ^ 



Details from 
, Ae box office 
i 021-6227486 


ONLY OPPORTUNITY TO SEE 
THESE 2 BALLETS PERFORMED IN FULL? 


RAYMOND GUBBAY presents 

at the BARBICAN 

WEDNESDAY Z8 AUGUST at 16 pun. 

SUMMER LOVE CLASSICS 

TchaSconky SLEEPING BEAUTY WALTZ 

Bat CARMEN SUITE 

Rachstaidaov -RHAPSODY ON A THEME 

OF PAGANINI 

Grieg — PEER GYNT SUITE NO. 1 

I. Sown... BLUE DANUBE WALTZ 

RorrJ BOLERO 

LONDON CONCERT ORCHESTRA 
Conductor: CHRISTOPHER ADEY ANTHONY GOLDBTONEptaao 
And a SttBuacr Rase for evrty lady member at die audience 
£5, £6, £Z £8.50, £9.50, £10.50 




THURSDAY U AUGUST sc MS pa 

BENJAMIN LUXON baritone 
ROBERT TEAR conductor 
PHILHARMONIA ORCHESTRA 

Bcctbovcfl ConoUn Ormurt: Uandel Water Mosic; 
Vbdghab-WIBnttl Soopi oTTrjyd; 
LctwanraUo: Prolopoe frotn 'Pasliaca'; 

Manvt hpuenoSana Iroro The Mapc Flute'; 
WagtirrOdti mn Holder AbenduoD from Tannhatuer*; 
Mossn Senauds tndOintungne Ana from 'Don Gweuuti*; 
Symphony No. 40 
£7.50, £9. £10.50, £1 1 . SO, £12.50 



FRIDAY 22 AUGUSTat Z4I p.m. 

Handel .-ARRIVAL OF THE QUEEN OF SHEBA 

Mozart EINE KLEINE NACHTMUSIK 

Bach VIOLIN CONCERTO IN A MINOR 

Vivaldi THE FOUR SEASONS 

CITY OF LONDON SJNFON1A 
C onducto r IAN WATSON 

NIGEL KENNEDY violin 

£6, £7. £8, £9.50. £10.50, £11.50 

MONDAY 25 AUGUST at 145 p.m. 

RomM THE BARBER OF SEVILLE OVERTURE 

-MUSK FOR THE ROYAL FIREWORKS 

.PIANO CONCERTO 




SYMPHONY NO. S (PASTORAL) 

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 

Cooduem BRAMWELLTOVEY 

JOANNA GRUENBERG piano 
£6, a £8, £9.50, £1 0-90, £1 1 JO 


SUNDAY 31 AUGUSTm X30 pun. 

BEETHOVEN 

Egmont Overture 
Plano Concerto No. 5 (Emperor) 
Symphony No. 3 (Eroica) 
ROYAL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA 
Conductor JAMES JUDO ALAN GRAVTLL pn 
£h £L £8, £9.50. £10-50, £1 1.SD 
Box Office 01-6^ 8195 CXL01-6389W1 


8UVFABV SCO 699 3036 Mod- 
Thu 8 Frl/SM 6.40 ft B.10 

RICHARD TODD m 

“The Bid ThriBar tor ywm" S M 

THE BUSINESS OF 
MURDER 

“An unaBauud wumcri* S Exp 
‘Srawtana" Tkuc* 

6TH THRILLING YEAR 


MUIMMB Air Cond 236 6868 cr 
741 9999 First Can CC 340 7200 
124 Hr* 7 Day} Mon-Frt 6, SM 6 ft 
K» 


METAMORPHOSIS 

ataged fay 

Steven BERKOFF 

**THe most cxenwo 


hot oar curotu. 

LknttM Season 
( ft ribaw food * drintt) 


Mft-nOMJU. TKKATMC SOI Bank 

NATIONAL THEATRE 
COMPANY 

Sra SEPARATE PffH O under 
OUVtER/ L YTTELTOM/ 
TISLOC Excrllni cheap 
seals lays ttlarrfs an Ihranee 
IrtaVl 10 am RESTAURANT fOM 
MW. CHEAP. EASY CAR PAR. 
Info 663 0880. AM CORD 


(TOW LONDON Drury Lace WC2 
406 0072 CC 579 64*SE*ea 7.40 
Tuc A Sal 3.00 ft 7.48. 

THE MRKN LLOYD VITER Hi 
rtJL SUOT iRWfCAi. 

CATS 

AMPLY DMLY TO BOX OFFICE 


COOD SCATS nUAVAXARU: 
RR TODAY’S WER R H Ug. 
Now booking M April 1987 


Grouo Book in g* 01-406 1867 or 
01930 6123. Postri bookings 
only now bring accented (or peri* 
front Dec l lousy X 19B7 or by 
iriepbonc on 01-379 6433 


OUVUM V 928 2253 CC mo- 
tional Thoaub's oooo Kaoel 
Today. Mon 2.00 now price 
maril A 7.15. then Auo2t to 28 


486 2431 CC 379 6433 
cc HoWne 486 1933 
ARMS AMI T OT MAM Tori-Ty 

HURT'S B RE AM, MOT A Toes 
7.45. Fnv Ticket* for tne 

unemployed all mattneco. 

iponsorad by Mart* ft Spencer. 
Bwwtefc Kaier m LOOK HERE 
OLD SON. Opens mn Man ra 
1.00 


PALACE THEATRE 437 6834 
CC 437 8327 or 379 6433 
Fri Can 24Hr TTtay CC 340 7980 
Cm Sale* 930 6123 


LES MISERABLE 
“IF YOU CANT GET A 
TICKET- STEAL ONET sm 

Era 7 JO Maa Thu A SM 2.30 
Latecomer* not MMtted 
until the Msrval 
BEAT TOT TOUTS BY EMC 
BM FOR RCTUimS AT THE 


PHOESRX 836 2294 oc 240 9661 
7-1 rim eau 24 hr* 7 tun 
240 7200. Qrp Saw 930 6123. 
Era 7 -30. Thur mra 3. Sari « A & 



THE COCKTAIL PARTY 

WTAOnr 

**A CR A CK Ria CAST** F.Tbnas 




PALACE 
THEATRE 


MANCHESTER 


12-16 AUGUST 
1986 

7 -30pm, -matinee 2.00pm 

RAYMONDA 

This glittering classical fairytale 
ballet with magriifii cent music set in 
a medieval castle. 

A sparkling spectacle, Yuri 
Grigorovich has brilliantly 
preserved the beauty of this 
classical ballet. 

"Grandeur of gesture, of dancing, and of performance" 

THE GUARDIAN 

"Superior to any other I have seen. An amazing 
statement * 

"Profoundly moving. "Serious and gradous, noble and^ 

THE FINANCIAL TIMES 

Details from 
the box office 
061-2369922 


I 




PtCCAMULY TOTATRE Atr Con 
drtKjnrd. 437 4306. Crrdtt Card 
HolHnes 579 A86S. 74| 9999. Orp 
Sale, 836 39*0/930 6123. 


DAVID FRANK 

ESSEX FINLAY 

MUTINY! 

-SPECTACULAR MU S ICAL" 
Revtew Mbabane 
Era 8.0 Mara w*d 3 a sm 5 


jt ontce 
734 8961 rw Cau 24 Hr 7 Day* 
cr Booking 836 3464 Cm 
930 6123 
Mon- Sat & MM Thun ft SM 3.00 

CHESS 

-A GRAND MASTER OF A 
SHOW" 


PRMCC OT WALES 01-930 8681 
/2 CC HotHne 9300844/6/6 Grv 
Sain 930 6123. KetUi Prowae 
741 9999/379 6433. Pmd CM 24 
hr 7 day 240 7200, 
«iuc-T APMH c aootr d. mm 

“SEVEN BRIDES FOR 

SEVEN BROTHERS" 

TOT BLOCK BUSTER MOMCAL 
9 DCTY ANYONE NOT TO 
DUOY IT" F.Tnw. 
“5EVEWIH REAVEM-E Shorter. 
E*« 7.3a MM Tnur ft SM 3- 


qnun 01-734 1166/7/ 
0261/0120. 

MAURTE H LIPMAR t n 
LEONARD RERMB IE WS 

WONDERFUL TOWN! 

MOB- G M 8 Man Wed gJO SM 0 


ROYAL COURT S CC 730 1743 
Era B.a A COUCH CURATE 
by Kartm Airawl. Cbr. by Si- 
mon Guru* A Max Sudani- 
Orv 


ROYAL COURT UPSTAIRS 730 
WDRBI AIM HtTUft, 


SAVOY 01926 8888 CC 01-370 
6219. 836 0479 Evening* 7.46. 
Mat* Wed 3 l Sot 5 A a 30 
STH YEAR OF 
MICHAEL FRAVPTS 
awaro-winnmC FARCE 
CHRISTOPHER OOOW1N 
STEPHANIE HUGH 

COLE PAQOtCK 

MICHAEL COCHRANE 

coLrrre timothy 

OXESOri CARLTON 

NOISES OFF 

Dir by MICHAEL BLAKCMORE 


STRATPORD-UPOK-AVOR 
•0789, 296603 or TtChetmarirr 
01 379 6«33 ROYAL SHAKE- 
SPEARE’ COMPANY at Royal 
Viakettpaare TfcaOTn . URrt 
Tot. Today l.3a Tue 7-30. 
Raraa, A MM TbMgnL Mon 
7.30 D un, wed TJ# ■— 
Tbaalra Mbnara Today 1.30. 
Tue 7 JO Every Man ToMgDL. 
Mon 7 JO Revar Wed 7 JO. For 
sgerul meat/Uwatre deals and 
noiri atop over ring tOT89) 
67262. 


THEATRE OF COMEDY 
COMPANY 

"The *cry best of Britain's nmr 
latent" Daily Mall 
See separate e n trie s under: 

CHTWM THEATRE/ 


ST MAN7VPS 01-836 1443. Spe- 
nal CC No. JJV 6433. Evgs ftO 
Turn 245. Sal 5 0 and 8 0 

3416 TT el AttATMA CIWU1TR 

THE MOUSETRAP 


836 2660 CC 836 
4143/6190 741 9999 Flrd CaU 
24 Hr T Day rr 240 7200 
Ora Sales 930 6123 

CABARET 


Starring 

WAYNE SLEEP 

Directed 4 Choreonrnphcd by 

TTOH a n Ly n n i 

Mon m 7.45 MM Wra 3.00 
_ Sal 430 A 8.18 

NO S EAT mcc HCMAX 
BEST VALUE IM WEST END 


VAUDCVEU. wca. Bon OWtce 
and CC 01836 9987/8646. Fled 
Call (CC 24 hr* Ol 240 7200 Bing 
lre» Eve* 730 Evea 730. Wed 
Mari 230. SM* 5.0 ft 8.15. 


■IOANNA VAN OYK0UM 
and MAR CI A WARREN 


mo. COWARD'S 


LMCNT AND THOROUGHLY 
EIUOTARU7*F.T. Over 200 Bert, 
LAST 3 WEEKS 


VICTORIA VALACE 01-834 1317 
Eves 7 -JO Mara Wed ft Sol 8 AS 

CHARUE GIRL 

“Wraanrira, Fi 

Pri.a lh y" __ 

PAUL NKtCOLAS 
CYD CtUUOME 
DOHA BRYAN 


MARK WTHTER 

CHARUE GIRL 


Family STO? Times 
Ario book on FIRST CALL 24 HT* 

7 Daw. iDhg Feet Ol 240 7209 ft 
ALL USUAL AGENTS 


WES I MUU1UI 01-834 0283/4 
*r 834 0048 nra ran cr 24 hr 7 
day* 240 7200 ft « 741 

9W/379 6433 Oro Sale* 930 
6123 Cveo 7.46. Wed Matt S. Sal 

■ „r. r . 8 A 8. IS 

HTKK bMIH PORTE R 


WALSH 


Murder Mystery 

DEADLY NIGHTCAP 


"HURRY 8b dm WESTHRTOTEir* 


"MU CH BETTER THAN ARATHA 
Mwnr whra on 


Air Cnndlliened. 
8363020/5790365/379 0433 

Grp* 836 3962 

Eves 8. sal* 5 ft 830 

Far A Ui. dta il Seam 

FAYE DUNAWAY 

-a rrinTym g- ID Mall) tn 
CHICE ft BRAVO 
By Donald Freed 
Daraed by HAROLD PtNTO 
”A aunulaung pray, lueraie 
and winy- Ttanrs . -Foil or 
MWn. ranerrn and ouunge- 

Qiy uwb 


YOUN6 «1C STUDH1 928 6363 
La« nrrf Tom Bran. ROriaOT 
Tfa e rir . Cm. pre ran l THE 
DOROTHY PARKER SHOW. 



CURZOM WEST EM BhaOnbuiy 
Avenue HI 439 4806. Tim 
CMI 24 Hr 7 Day tt«B 7200 
■Bfca Feel Magrac -Smtui. 
Denhohn emolL Judt Dench In 
A ROOM WITH A VIEW (POL 
min M 1 30 (Ml Hunt. 3 46. 
6.10 ft aag 


NaWng Hlll> 

Cnte. 727 4043. SH> AMH RAR f 
cr 118) 2 30 INM Sub) 4.40 
6.60 9.00 l_NtgM,.U 19 

SU NDAY 2 IGHE— WHbOETS 
SLAPPED (PC) and lyUJCPACE 
(PC) Uw mmical Avinipa* 
rornL LMgni Sun 11.15 
TOUM80 IPQJ antr-HBOEM 
Fwnttu (PCD ALU TOWS 
BOOKABLE. 

11IT 


NA 379 3014/ 
ft NANCY 118). 


896 0691 SW 
FOm at 1.30 550 6.15 8.48. 
LATE SHOW FNI ft SXV ONLY 
AT 1 II 6PM AIR 

CONOmOHEO 


236 4225 Meryl _ 

Robert Bedford "OUT OP 
A«HCA"iPG) DaUy-J OS 0 9 Q 

837 8402 ..... 

HU. IIBV 
rdra ai 2.28 4.35 6 45 9.00 
2. POLICE 1 13). Film at L4S 4.00 
6.20 8.48. ' ■ AIR 

coMPmoNEO 


1 SLECOUC 226 
r HEARTS < 


3o44. DESEmr HEARTS <181 
33a a.15. T.ia 90S. Seal* 
bookable. Plenty of free bartUng 
nearby. 


935 2772. U OUT OF AFRICA 
(PO) 1.15. 4^5. 7.46 Z> 

AFTER HOURS IIS 3.00. 4 56. 
r.OO. 9 06. Ur Bar. Seats 
Bookable. 


226 3820 Sieved SMeUmg^ 
TOT COLOR PURPLE <131 2.06. 

5.00. 006. Seals bookable In 
advance 


ONE WEEK ONLY 

AUGUST 25*31 

Ewrinp 730) Man SR ft Son 3M 
OSB,tiMO,DSO,BMi,BUSB 
aflLDRBU HALF PRICE 

ROVAL FESTIVAL HAIL 
9283191 

CCCNo booking fee) 928 8860 


SWl Ol 930 
77t*/8J*» 4456 oc Ol 379 
6505/6433. 741 999Q CtTO Ol 
K3o39b2. MOn-Frl 8 00. Wed Mal 
SCO Sari S OO ft 8 30. 
THEATRE OF COMEDY prwm 

WHEN WE ARE MARRIED 

By J B Prrariley 
Dn-eried ny Ronald Eyre 

“YOU WILL NOT FMO A MO 

PLEASURABLE EVENMO ANY 


MNMLO" S. Cxprran 


ART GALLERIES 


ANTHONY dTOFFAV 23 Oertaig 
SL W1 ANDY WARHOL 499 
4100 


HAROWAH ART OALLEHY. Bar- 
Mean Centre, EC2. 01-638 
4141. CZCH. KATUN, over 
TOO DhotograDra. drawings, 
rouume*. 


Time Ouf:_**pat tm (ririMcu 
M rmm ua" S. Time*. EXTEND- 
ED RUN ENDS TOMOR. Today 
iOam-6.46pnt. Tomor 12- 1 
6 46om. Adnuauon to ft Cl. 


Men al ST AUCUSTME OP 
IRPPO (354-430). lean . a,, 
105. Sun 2-306 Aqm free. 


HAYWARD OALLEHY. Soon, 
Ba nk- SE X. SCANMMAV1AH 
1900 i 


MM- UnlH 5 On. Adra i 
a GO/Ct.sa Recarara 1 

Ol 261 0127. 


HATKMAL PORTRAIT 

umr SI Marlin’ V Plate London 

2LS3P i? 63 JOH " 

PLAVn PORTRAIT AWARD 

Upui 31 Aug Adm. free ’ 

TV PON TODAY * 


mJU THE NHJL 436 
3306/9787 DESERT HEARTS 

(181 3.00. 4 45. 7.00 4 06. 
Pn/Sat 11.15. Uc Bar. Seat* 
Bookable. Aw Condmonea. 


PERSONAL 

ContiaBal fr0M pHigr ' ' 28 


ROLLS R 0 YCE 4 
BENTLEY^;., 


SHADOW L P rrq. 99.000' muev. 
dark nrown/rream - learner 
£9.500. Tel Mr Gardner Ollier 
hora 01 981 3921 


performance cars 


LOTUS EXCEL 1983. ire blue, air 
ran. P-VS. leallter Inirnor. new 
lyre*, evonausl. F5H. 42 'W 
milev. anvniuieiy nranaculair. 
CU000 0527 44939. 


PUBLIC NOTICES 


CHARITIES ACT 1985 
SOCIETY TOR PROMOTING 
THE TRAINING OF WOMEN 
Nodeo ts nerrtav glvwieol ihe 
proposed anulvamaiion OL Iu«B ' 
atminmnod by tho'araive Soo 
ely Ciwuinr* k, Radrlilln ft Cb 
•Ref: Pi 10 Lillie COUeqe SI reel. 
London SWl - - 


legal notices 


FRYENT INVESTMENT 
COMB4NV LIMITED 
NOTICE IS HEREBY' GIVEN 
Miat fhe Onhots of (imMie 
named Orapany, which tt being 
votunlanly wound uo. are iv- 
qulrra. on or before uw 31 Dl day 
ol Ortobcr 198b. to vend In Ihrar 
Ml Cnn ami and surname*, uwir 
addrewv and dranauoro- lull 
pariK-uiar* of their debt* or 
riaum. and me namev'dnd ad- 
dre«e* of Uni SoJmiorf ra any), 
to Ihe undeewmed. David Barry 

Zarkheim. FCA of 48-Welberk 
srreei. London W1M THE. Ihe 
Lwuidaiar of me laid Company, 
and. if w required by.ngbrr in 
wntinq by itu? uid UqiiKliHif 
are. by ihn r Sonmor* or perron 
aUv. to i rotne tn and prove thrir 
•aid debt* cw rlaim* of vurti time . 
and Ware on. vhaJI be somfied In / 
s? "“We. or in default thereof 
they _ w!H be exrluded Drsoi the 
oenefli ol any dnlnnulroq made 
before vurt) oetx* are proved. 



■ I 


Aug. Adm 60» Mon- 

FTI 10-5 SM 106 Sun 2-6 


Pners from E&O : Soeelal offer* 
wi - 


WCTWRA ft ALBERT MUSEUM I 
Jj riM M d Row rari Art ft | 

PAUL AND THOMAS MNMY 

wrotraburv. MAITIHiSII i i 

or fhotocraphtTaiSK 
cah w nai TODAY. 

Recorded Info. OI 881 0894. 

wkoays 10 - sjo Suns 2J0 - 

6-80- OObd Friday, , 


zamaha uunr 1 crenrerofl 
«J —.at — -Tj.. 


CINEMAS 


It 01-628 8795. Slu- 

dMTMnta: C 2 all perK^kSb 
riwkacne. Today VAOaronh 
• 18) 6.16 ft 0 10. T doay Khm 

KA » R (Ul 11.00 ft 


DA-mr thQ 44h August 1986 
David Barry Zarthelm FCA 
UQLllDATOR 

TRUSTEE ACTS 

Is- 

NOTICE 1 * hem>v gtven pursuant 
k>-«T of the TRUSTEE AeL 1925 
•"at any pervm hav inq a -CLAIM 
SSSJI’i-? ■" INTEREST- tn Ihe 
ESTATE of any of tne deceased 
person i whnr name*. aHnwi 
and deMTiHiwK are —tout brio— 
n hrerby required lo —rat wtOC 
.HJP wriunq of fits 'cfitim or 
uiiereu io in# peragn gr perlOM 
meiMjoned In relation lo-che (e 
ceased oervon cancrmeo-before 
Hie dale weetfted: after wMrti 
jUlrJ Ue e viaie of Ihe decearad 
will be dhtniuiieu tjy iqe > ofnonM 
repmenuiivca among me Pri- 
sons emu im inereio " havBM 
rcbnro only lo Ity claim and In ■ 
lereri* of Which Uicy have nod - 
noatr#« t 

WWARD. ROGER V1L>EN. 01 
CardM na. B^Word. 4 Berk 
J«d Road. Bain, dted on 20TO 

HAiS55r r . , ?5 5 “ 

* RASKIN. Scafoor 
Oiron Horoie. 29 Jam* street 
jjrs-j wUl B.ll 2 BT. Sabrilon 
^^^WarvbelonSlbOc 

STEPHANIE MAL'IL 
Grealhi -<1 Manor. Ltnafk^l Sor- 
rry RH7 opa. died l&h May 
i9B6 particulars io atraneft Ot-, 
Crettvam SireA. Lwi 
SgJLEOV 7BU. DriorV MUi 
Unolw. ] 49 ^ 






r 3r N S !tjv*¥ a*43 


sgaa*?S?S 


Pyour" 
2 EXAMS 

•— WffTlniHilMrthFwrbft rah. 


£ pfessiSr r 

v Exams. 

& R8flfto8j»ctus: 

Deot Al * INMKnu 






m rift m 




THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 



BRIDGE 



Ruffled 

hearts 


CTXoss of concentration is the 
-■^uuse of countless errors at the 
ridge table. On some occa- 
arshi ns declarers are defeated by 
>«M» OL . ta sk that is too exacting, on 
< ^E thers because there appears 
>—* tobe no problem. 

*£38ibber Bridge. North-South 
ie. Dealer South. 


♦ 04 
o A 7 
0 AKBS4 
4 O B 76 


S _ ~ 


486532 
? Q 10 6 S 

e io 

4 A 102 


N 

W E 

s 


49 

<7 KJ942 
0 OJ732 
4 94 


4 AKJ107 
083 
•: 8 6 
4 KJS3 


W 


NO 

NO 

No 


20 


NO 

NO 


14 

24 

No 


«\1 


Opening toad U5 

■ North, no great striker of 
the ball, put down his hand 
apologizing for an uncultured 
•rebid. it had been a long and 
painful rubber for South, 
whose delight at the sight of 
dummy was exceeded only by 

• the pleasurable expectation of 
journey's end. 

South was a practised 
performer, so it would be 
untrue to say he paid no 
attention to potential dan- 
i. gers. He took the Ace of 
hearts in dummy and cashed 
■^Tihe *Q. noting East's ^9 
.^ = ’with a twinge of apprehen- 
sion. 

; .Calculating that if he 
-- -played on clubs the defence 
“T.couId conceivably take the 
; _ +A and a club ruff a heart 
* and another club ruff he 
played a heart to sever the 
communications. East 

• .1 shrewdly played low, permit- 

- -ting West to win and play a 
-.^.second round of spades. 

^-Declarer lost trump control 

- and with it his contract 

It was muddled thinking to 
•. ~play a heart at trick three, but 
* the real error occurred at 
. trick one. Provided declarer 
clucks the initial lead, only a 

- 6-0 trump break can hurt 
him. 

The next hand is admitted- 


Paperbacks 


REVIEW 


Chocolate box of tricks 


The Poisoned Chocolates 
Case by Anthony Berkeley: 
The Hollow Man by John 
Dickson Can; The Face on the 
Cutting-Room Floor by 
Cameron McCabe (Penguin, 
£3.95 each) 


V ly difficult. 

Rubber Bridge. 

.-•-Dealer North. 


Game all 


498S 
<? AS6S5 
0 - 

4 K7B54 


4 32 
V OJ42 
0 KJ1098 
493 


N 

W E 
S 


$ AQ 10 
107 3 
0 7 4 3 2 
4 010 2 


4 KJ764 

• • ’ V K 

C- A065 
4 A J 8 - 

South, declarer, in an 
^ungainly contract of three no 
„ Jruraps, feces two problems: 
- -severing the defence's com- 
ipunications while unravel- 
ling his own. After careful 
-"""thought he took the third 
'diamond and then ducked a 
club to East, who persisted 
— with another diamond. De- 
.. -darer released the <\?K and 
the dubs, leading to this 
three, card ending: 

4 98 
4- 


43 

?Q 
0 9 

4- 


N 

W E 
5 


4 A0 10 
v — 

■5 — 

4 - 


J 7 


O - 

4- 


y.Z . •’Unhappily be played a 
. .-spade, which allowed East to 
make two of the last three 
• - tricks. Why? Because he had 
concentrated so hard on mak- 
-~mg his plan, he had forgotten 
-Sow many hearts had been 
■“discarded. 

^ - Jeremy Flint 


For once, a publisher's use of 
the description "classic'' is not 
exaggerated. Penguin have 
started a new series of "Classic 
Crime" paperbacks, and three 
of the first batch are in the top 
division of crime fiction. All 
were first published more than 
SO years ago, and all have been 
either out of print or at any 
rate difficult to obtain. 

Hie Poisoned Chocolates 
Case by Anthony Berkeley 
(who. as Francis lies, wrote 
the seminal psychological 
crime novel Malice Afore- 
thought) is both a satire on the 
whodunit genre and a bril- 
liantly executed example of it. 
Six members of the exclusive 
Crimes Circle meet to discuss 
the unsolved murder of a 
young woman poisoned by the 
injection of nilro-benzine into 
her favourite chocolates. On 
successive evenings, the arm- 
chair detectives expound their 
theories, resulting, of course, 
io six different explanations 
and 0 culprits. 

Every dramatic and forensic 
cliche makes an appearance, 
deliberately so, allowing 
Berkeley simultaneously to 
advance the action and poke 
gentle fun at his characters. 

Purists of the traditional 
Whodunit tend to regard John 
Dickson Carr, alias Carter 
Dickson, as the best in the 
business. He wrote well de- 
vised fiendish puzzles, played 
scrupulously fair with the 
reader, and evoked chilling 
atmosphere. He is not read as 
widely today as he deserves to 
be, perhaps because his books 
are more cerebral than most in 
the field, and not as easy a 
read. 

He was the master of the 


FICTION 


Crusoe's Daughter by Jane 
Gardam (Abacus, £3.95) 

Polly Flint is & small child in 
1906 when she goes to stay 
with her strange aunts in a 
yellow house by the marshes. 
She is still living there 80 
years later, marooned and 
isolated. World wars come and 
go, social conventions are 
turned upside down, and peo- 
ple she loves fell away. 

It is a particular vision not 
only of the choices that are 
open to women, bat of the ways 
in which their valuations of 
those choices are conditioned. 
Both funny and sad. it is a 
wonderfully clear story. 

A Gfimpse of Sion's Glory 
Isabel Colegate (Penguin, 

Three stories, each abost life 
being in some way wasted. The 
third story is the most am- 
bitions it is aboot a race of 
superior beings living in isola- 
tion in Siberia. It is a rather 
clumsy comment on 20th- 
century civilization, but it 
displays a peculiar grasp of 
snobbish attitudes and the 
ways in which people meet and 
rise above them. 

Foreign Land by Jonathan 
Raban (Picador, £3.95) 
Jonathan Raban's first novel 
is extraordinarily accom- 
plished. In it he does two quite 
separate things. Firstly, he. is 
telling the story of George 
Grey, who has returned to 
England to retire. Suddenly it 
is a foreign land, unfamiliar 
and hostile. Secondly, it is a 
guide book to English man- 
ners and aspirations. The 
author weaves them together 
skilfully. 

Anne Barnes 


; - .CONCISE CROSSWORD NO 1024 

I Prizes of the New Collins Thesaurus will be given for the first two 

{ \ 1 correct solutions opened on Thursday. August 14. 1986. Entries 

i •- should be addressed to The Times Concise Crossword Com- 
! petition. I Pennington Street. London. El 9XN. The winners and 

j -solution will be announced on Saturday. August 16, 1986. 

i ■ ACROSS 

_ . 1 Victoria Falls discov. 
j » • - • crertll) 

; • Affccicd charm (7) 

! f.'.iO Consent f5) 

j II Hiatus O) 

I 13 Stiff paper (4) 

• W Ddicatc strand (4} 

I ‘ -T.tr Compel (6) 

■18- Avoid (4) 

-_2B Human-eating giant 
14) 

■ 21 Rabbit colony (6) 

•..-*22 ycin 14) 

-23 Imprint vividly (4) 

“ US Society girl f3) 

. 28 Spooky (5) 

— • 29 Slighi illness 17) 

. '.,^30.'35ih US president 
. » i 14.7) 



DOWN 

- 2 Bring upon oneself" 
t . IS) 

3 Coloured eye part (4) 
1 j '.4 Tam-iam (4) 

. -* 5 Race stall (4) 

V‘V6 Suckling 17) 

■ 7 Mercury II I) 

g Shield chairbacfc 

styled 1) 

" •; -12 Soft yam (6) 

‘. 14 Oxbridge teacher |3) 

. "JR Give satisfaction <t>) 
•- 19- Experience (7) 

■ - . -20 Single 13) 

24 Fashion 15) 
-J-'TSFCaibedrai admin- 
istrator 14) 

36-Cook in o»cn |4) 

27 Tnbe |4) 


SOLUTION TO NO 1023 
ACROSS: I Arctic 5 Rrcrpc 8 Ado 9 Turn- 
up lOGrigri II Char 12 Idee fisc 14 
Flambc 17 Fracas 19 Foxglove 22 Clod 24 
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out 16 Bel 17 Fresher 18 .Ascribe 29 
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Name 

- Address .... 



“Jocked-room" mystery, a 
popular sub-group of the 
detective story in which, typi- 
cally. the victim was killed in 
apparently impossible circum- 
stances — in a room, for 
instance, which no one could 
have entered or left The 
Hollow Man is regarded by 
many Carr aficionados as the 
pinnacle of locked-roomery. It 
also contains a famous chap- 
ter giving all the possible 
varieties of locked-room mur- 
ders. with all their possible 
solutions. 

The Hollow Man has many 
of the Carr hallmarks — the 
emergence of a guilty Gothic 
secret overtones of magic and 
illusion, one victim killed in a 
closely watched room from 
which no one emerges, and 


another shot at dose range in 
the middle of a street without 
his assassin leaving any foot- 
prints in the snow. Carr’s 
solutions require a little 
concentration on the reader's 
part. The effort is well worth 
iL 

The Face on the Cutting- 
Room Floor is a unique oddity 
in crime fiction, a virtuoso 
one-off with an intriguing 
background. The author’s real 
identity remained obscure for 
many years, but Cameron 
McChbe is now known to be 
Ernest Borneman, a well- 
known German professor with 
a substantial academic reputa- 
tion in the field of sexology. 

Astonishingly, Borneman 
wrote the book at the age of 
19, when he arrived in En- 


gland as a penniless refugee. 
The book was meant to be “no 
more than a finger exercise on 
the keyboard of a new 
lan g ua g e”. 

As a result, the work has a 
powerful naive urgency that 
more sophisticated writing 
lacks. For the most part, the 
story of a young girl’s murder 
in a film studio, and the 
subsequent investigation, is 
told in a staccato first person, 
by a film editor who is both a 
cynical observer and an emo- 
tionally involved party. More 
twists are added in an extraor- 
dinary postscript written by 
another character. The whole 
is forceful disturbing, and like 
no other detective story. 

Marcel Berlins 


O goatherd, are you Greek? 



of the 


The kfytls of Theocritus 

translated by Thelma Sargent 
(Norton, £3.95) 

It goes against the 
in to credit a 
Greek with the in- 
troduction into the 
Western literary 
tradition of a genre 
to which, with the 
orious exception 
the usual 
response has been one of such 
uncontrolled mockery. Any- 
one beginningat the end of the 
English pastoral tradition, for 
example, may well be forgiven 
• for refusing outright to believe 
that Theocritus was father of, 
and Virgil gave the defining 
poetic and philosophical 
shape to. a genre that threw up 
surfi a risible rabble of Colins 
and Cuddies, Lionells and 
Lobbs, Ned Swashes and Brisk 
Nells. “What are my Sheepe 
without their wonted food", 
eh? Peckish, dear boy, that's 
whaL 

Since, then, not only is 
pastoral dead but its memory 
(unlike lyric, epic, or tragedy) 
generally mocked, translators 
of Theocritus face more acute 
problems than usual in 
persuading their readers that it 
is worth the effort. Whether or 
not Theocritus’ First Idyll (a 
pointless term, probably first 
applied by the Romans) did in 
fact announce pastoral to the 
Western world, let us start 
with it in Thelma Sargent's 
“modern" translation which 
aims to keep close to the 
"spirit" and "words" of 
Theocritus, in a “flexible" 
line, “roughly" hexameiric in 
rhythm: 

Sweet is the whisper of wind 
as it plays in that pine 


Hear the spring, O goatherd, 
and sweet too is your piping 
That obscures the argument 
(in Greek the wind makes 
music in the pines, as the 
goatherd does with his pipe). 
It is not modern (anyone said 
"O milkman” recently?). The 
first line is pentametric. The 
second can be made 
hexametric only by bump- 
starting it on “Near”, with 
excruciatingly horrible results. 
Still, it is intelligible. We must 



Faced with a modern 
translation: Theocritus 
be grateful for small mercies. 
Twelve lines on, the goatherd 
expresses concern that his 
piping may disburb Pan's 
afternoon snooze: 

Custom forbids. O shepherd, 
that at noontime we play on 
thesvrinx. 
For we go in fear of great 
Pan. At this lime of day. 
Weary, he rests for the chase. 

He has an irascible temper. 
And bitter gall perches for- 
ever over his nostrils. 
Poor chap! Doubtless BUPA 
can sort the problem out for 
him. That last laughable line 
is. of course, a literal transla- 


tion of the Greek, but would 
Saigent expect to be ap- 
plauded for translating, say, 
J'ai mal delete zs, “I have pain 
of head"? It passes com- 
prehension that anyone can 
even call them En g lish , let 
alone “modem" English, 
which reflects the “spirit" of 
Theocritus. 

I havea suggestion to make. 
Let all translators regard then- 
work as nothing more than a 
humble prose paraphrase. If 
they can simply get the argu- 
ment right by saying what -the 
Greek means in intelligible 
English that stands the test of 
declamation, they will be 
making a considerable ad- 
vance on 95 per cent of 
existing translations. 

Let them go farther only if 
they can look the mirror 
firmly in the eye and say “I am 
Tony Harrison” (though Pope 
or Dryden will do). The 
prejudiced may regard this as 
an unduly restrictive con- 
dition, but we are dealing with 
one of the world's most intelli- 
gent and influential bodies of 
literature to which 
“comprehensive" education 
blocks access these days for 
virtually the entire population 
— except through translation. 
Accuracy, intelligibility and 
the grace that attends the 
spoken word are the least we 
owe the classic shades. An- 
thony Holden's Penguin 
translation ( 1 974) does as well 
as any by this test Here is his 
opening to the Idyll: 

There's subtle music in the 
whisper of that pine 
down by the spring: yet your 

piping, goatherd. 

rivals it. 

Peter Jones 


ON THE AIR 


By Peter Waymark 


A torrid 
passage 
to India 


FILMS ON TV 


More than most of the 
remarkable 1940s output of 
the Michael Powell-Emeric 
Press burger team. Black 
Narcissus (BBC1, tomorrow, 
3-4.35pm) has survived initial 
scepticism, even ridicule, to 
become hailed as little short of 
a masterpiece. 

Though not as eccentric as A 
Canterbury Foie or as tech- 
nically innovative as A Matter 
of Life and Death, Black 
Narcissus was still an unlikely 
film to emerge from the 
British cinema in 1947. 

Flying in the face of the 
dominant realist mode, Pow- 
ell recreated the Himalayan 
setting of Rumer Godden's 
novel entirely at Pinewood 
studios. Much of the impact of 
the film derives Grom that 
artifice, allowing the designer, 
Alfred Junge, and camera- 
man, Jack Cardiff complete 
control of their material 

Cardiff's magnificent 
Technicolor photography not 
only conveys a striking visual 
beauty but constantly under- 
lines the emotional shifts of 
the story. It deservedly won an 
Oscar, as did J unge's sets. 

The baring of emotions was 
the film's second departure 
from the norm of coniem- 


The force 
of rank 
outsiders 



Tension: Darid Farrar, Kathleen Byron hi Black Narcissus 


RADIO 


A programme which starts on 
a narrow theme but spills out 
interestingly Into wider cul- 
tural issues is Joan Lock's 
documentary on women in the 
police, A Man's Job Alone? 
(Radio 4, Wed, 8J5-9pm). 

Ten per cent of police 
officers are female tart only 
two women hare senior po- 
sitions in Che force. Since 
eqoal opportunity has existed 
only since 1975 it may be too 
soon for this to be reflected in 
the top ranks. . 

But there is evidence, too, 
that women are often reluctant 
to chase the top jobs, because a 
promotion is likely to mean 
moving home and family. The 
programme is narrated by 
Anna Carteret, who played a 
version of the woman 
copper in Juliet Braro. 

Dr Antbopy Clare's In the 
Psychiatrist's Chair returns 
today (Radio 4, 6^5-7pm) 
when the subject is Sr Mi- 
chael Tippett. Clare has a way 
of drawing out intimate 
thoughts withoat appearing 
prurient and Tippett is a ready 
collaborator. Future guests in- 
clude Mrs Wendy Savage, 
Vladimir Ashkenazy and the 
former spy, GreviUe Wynne. 

Idealism confronts cynicism 
in Chris Barias's play, A 
Schoolboy Dreaming of Africa 
(Radio 4, Mon, 8.15-9.45pm). 
His hero is a young man doing 
Voluntary Service Overseas m 
an African state about to 
become independent He goes 
to work in famine relief bat is 
soon caught np in the shabby 
manoeuvrings that acco mp any 
the transfer of power. 

Elizabeth Jenkins's acute 
dissection of a failed marriage. 
The Tortoise and the Hare, is 
the new Radio 4 Classic Serial 
(tomorrow, 7-Spm). Maureen 
O'Brien plays the abandoned 
wife, with Charles Kay as her 
husband: and Gwen Watford 
in support 


CHESS 


Challenger on board 


Victor Korchnoi variously 
known as “The Leningrad 
Lip" or “Victor the Terrible”, 
has been in town this week, 
kiebiizing the great match. If 
Bobby Fischer was the true 
modem innovator of psycho- 
logical warfare over the 
chessboard, then Victor 
adopted those techniques and 
honed them to a pitch never 
previously imagined. 

In spite of his 55 years and 
the fact that his two title 
challenges in 1978 and 1981 
both foundered. Victor still 
occupies an incredible num- 
ber Four slot in the world 
rankings. 

This week to accompany 
the London match. 1 begin an 
occasional series on challeng- 
ers for the world title — great 
players who did not quite 
complete their mission to the 
summit of world chess. Over 
the past century only J3 men 
have held the chess crown 
and. remarkably, only anoth- 
er 12 have risen to the 
position of challenger. 

White: Korchnoi: Black: 
Karpov. 

13th Game. Merano 198!. 
Queen's Gambit Declined. 

I C4 
3 a* 

S BW 

l 8a 
ii nn 

Artificial castling is more 
efficacious than 11 0-0 since 


MUS4 

17 

Rxcfl 

CM 

oar 

>9 

Nc7 

Reft 

r>«6 

21 

R*1 

•ft 

Mat 

ma 

23 

2S 

r 

Bb4 

Qf7 


27 

•3 

NxQ 


«6 

2 NS3 

tS 

Bar 

4 cuS 

•xo5 

c6 

6 *3 

BE 

Baft 

8 U 

NK 

0-0 

iff as 

c5 


White may need his King's 
Rook on hi for attacking 
purposes. It also helps to keep 
the h3 pawn continuously 
protected. 

11 . . . Nefi 12 Kg2 Rea 

13 Bel Re8 1« d*c5 Bic5 

15 NU Bt8 IE Nfd« 

A subtle move. Karpov had 
been expecting only 16 Nbd4 
and now. uncharacteristically, 
he sank into thought for 35 
minutes. 

16 ... 

13 ridl 
20 Nut 

£& 

ZB BsS 
26 gfi 

The only move of Korchnoi's 
in this game which can be 
criticized. Stronger is Tal's 
recommendation: 28 Bg3 
Nh4+ 29 Kh2 Nf3+ 30 Khl 
Nh4 51 Bxh7+ Kxh7 32 
Q\h4+ and RC. 

26 ... h«tS 29 box 

Now Karpov misses his 
fooling in the tangled forest 
of variations. The only cor- 
rect path is the resource 
29 . . . Nh4 +!! eg 30 Qxh-i 
QO+ or 30 Bxh4 Qfl+ 31 
Kh2 Bd6+ 32 Bg3 Rf2+. 

29 . . . Ber* 30 RT2 N«l* 

31 Kk1 Otf2 32 Bxf2 N xfl 
33 Onfi- HIT 34 Bo3 NztS2 
35 DkSS »S 35 Bofi OS 
3/ Q&3 Bum 38 QoS 
39 Ort* Kar 40 BeS* 

41 QibS* KK7 42 

And black resigned. 
Korchnoi's mosi impressive 
achievement in that match. 

Raymond Keene 




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porary British cinema, where 
shattering, events like a death 
or a broken affair tended to be 
off with “never 
let's have a nice cup of 

tea” 

Far from resorting to cups 
of tea, the characters in Blade 
Narcissus let their -feelings 
show. They are a group of 
Anglo-Catholic nuns, lea by 
Sister Clodagh (Deborah 
Kerr), who have been sent to 
establish a school and hospital 
in a former Himalayan harem. 

The remoteness of the 
mountains, the repressed 
sexuality of the women, and 
the intrusive presence of of the 
English agent (David Farrar), 
set off tensions that eventually 
spill over into tragedy. 

The catalyst is Sister Ruth, a 
character played with extraor- 
dinary intensity by Kathleen 
Byron, who in one of the 
film's most dramatic mo- 
ments flaunts a startling red 
lipstick to symbolize her re- 
volt against spiritual bondage. 


RECOMMENDED 


Yankee Doocfle Dandy 

(1942): James Cagney's 



anc 

Coban i 
2.45-5.1 
The Gold Rwh (1925): 
ChapSris classic satire on 
greed, with some of his 
most inspired pantomime 
today, £30- 


Red River (1948): John 
Wayne and Montgomery COft 
in a stirring cattle drive 
Western (BBC2; today, 9- 
11 . 10 pm). 

White Heat (IMS): Cagney 
again, as the psychotic, 
mother-fixated gangster 
(Channel 4, today, 10.55pm- - 

"Man Is Note Bird (1965): 
Trart-comto look at urban B#e 
by the controversial 
Yugoslav Dusan Makavejev 
(Channel 4, Fri, 1i.30prn- 1 
1am). 

* Hrat Brittah W vffl on ahowtog 


Brief encounter 
under pressure 


Distressing as the last 18 years 
in Northern Ireland have 
been, they have inspired a rich 
vein of drama, which, with 
writers as good as Bernard 
MacLaverty, is in little danger 
of being exhausted. 

A former schoolmaster who 
penned the stories from which 
were made the films Cal and 
Lamb, MacLaverty is the 
author of The Daily Woman, 
the latest in a so for variable 
series of BBC1 Sunday plays 
(9.05-10. 15pm). 

Brid Brennan, an actress of 
rare sensitivity familiar from 
Graham Reid’s BiBy trilogy, 
plays a timid mother-of-two 
with a drunken, loutish hus- 
band who beats her, and a 
* part-time job as-a daily. 

Reluctantly selling her fa- 
vours to a lecherous employer, 
she Mows the money on a 
hairdo and dotbes and a night 
at the Belfast Europa, where 
she has a brief encounter with 
an American joumalio. 

Thanks to the quality of 
MacLaverty’s writing. The 
Daily Woman is nothing like 
as pal and predictable as such 
a bald summary might sug- 
gest It is about Northern 
Ireland tart at the same time 
tells a human story that 
transcends time and place. 

Mbongeni Ngema's 
Asmamali (BBC2, Wed, 9.25- 
10.30pm) is, on the other 
hand, straight political drama. 
Forged in another of the 
world's trouble spots. South 
Africa, it is an account by five 
blacks of how they fell foul of 


TELEVISION 


the regime and ended in jail 
There is much anger, as well 
as humour, in tire piece, a 
filmed record of a stage perfor- 
mance in Johannesburg dur- 
ing the state of emerg e ncy. It 
will sadly move. President 
Botha not one inch while for 
the rest of us it will probably 
kick at an open door. 

Having exhausted the stock 
of Second World War escape 
stories, the cinema might well 
turn its attention to the no less 
brave and ingenious attempts 
to crack the Berlin Wall, 
erected 25 years ago this week. 

Some are recounted in Peter 
Stevens's documentary, 
Hanoi Sends Jier Lore (Chan- 
nel 4, today, 7.30-8.30pm). 
The most improbable (cap- 
tured on an amateur video) 
was effected by an East Berlin 
railway worker who fooled the 
authorities by blacking up as a 
Ghanaian student 
pinuging Tines ( Channe l 
4, Wed, 8-8. 30pm) carries the 
credit of a giant m television 
documentary, Denis MitcheH 
It is a series about five British 
museums and the social con- 
text which they reflect, start- 
ing with the Welsh Miners’ 
Museum in the Afan Valley 
near Port Talbot 
The area once boasted 47 
mines. All have gone and the 
vafley is green again. But jobs 
went with them and selling 
souvenirs to tourists does not 
have the same dignity as hard 
toil at the coal face. 



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THEATRE 

INGMAR’S DOUBLE: Ingmar 
Bergman may have retired from films 
but he remains active in the 
theatre. He brings two productions to 
Edinburgh, Ibsen's John Gabriel 
' Borkman, which opens on Thursday, 
~ and Miss Julie from August 28. 
king's Theatre (031 225 5756). 



BOOKS 

SHUFFLED PACK: Penelope 
Lively has collected her short stories 
of the last eight years m Pack of 
Cards (published on Monday by 
Heinemann, £9.95). They 
demonstrate the elegance of her 
style and a range of mood from 
high comedy to sombre insights. 


TIMES CHOICE 


CONCERTS 

USHER RUSSIA: Vladimir 
Spivakov, the Russian violinist and 
conductor, brings his own 
orchestra, the Moscow Virtuosi, to 
Edinburgh for a programme of 
Schubert, Haydn and the Viennese 
Strausses. Usher Hall (031 225 
5756). Wednesday. 


DANCE 


BOLSHOI BALLET: The 
Co vent Garden season ends 
, today with Spartacus. The 
company moves to 
^Manchester with 
Raymonds and a mixed bid 


. .1 Garden (01-240 
"1066). Palace. Manchester 
: -(061 2369922). 

'.'London festival 
"BALLET: The big company is 
7 at the Festival Hall until Aug 
—16 with Romeo and JuBet 
" today. Coppelia next week; 

Nureyev appears as guest 
: - Mon, Tues. The smaller 
>. LFB2 group is at Edinburgh 
Festival Mon-Wed with a 
...programme including the . 

premiere of John 

“Neumeier's Petrushka 
Variations. 


Symphony gets a 
comparatively rare outing from 
the BBC Symphony 
Orchestra under Sir John 
Pritchard, and Bernard 
d'Ascoli solos in Schumann's 
Piano Concerto. 

I Albert Hall, London 
'(01-589 8212). Wed, 7pm. 

GALLERIES 

OPENINGS 

FAKES: Subtitled "Don’t Trust 
the Label", works by some of 
the world's greatest fakers. 
Ferens Art Gallery, Queen 
jare, Hi 


THEATRE 


Victoria Squan 

). From today. 



■JAMAICA NATIONAL 
: DANCE THEATRE: In London 
■ for performances today, 

T Sun at Commonwealth 

- institute (01-603 4535) and 
y Tues- Aug 16 at Riverside 
--Studios (01-748 3354). 

- concerts" 

• •MAAZEL/LSO: Lorin 
Maazel conducts the London 
-.. Symphony Orchestra in 
.. Beethoven's Symphony No 8, 
, '^Mahler's Symphony No 1. 

- Barbican Centre, Silk St, 
riondon, EC2 (01-628 8795; 

- credit cards 01-638 8891). 
Today, 8pm. 

. 7 CHORAL SYMPHONY: 

Vivaldi's Gloria and 
’“Beethoven's Symphony No 
. 9 "Choral" are performed by 
-Sir Neville Marriner with the 
Academy of St Martin-tn-the- 
n.-Fields, the Academy 
' :* Chorus and soloists. 
-.•Barbican Centre. 

.^Tomorrow, 7 .30pm. 

; COLEMAN/NSO: Rossini's 
-Barber of Seville Overture, 

• ' Grieg’s Peer Gynt Suite No 
and Rimsky-Korsakov’s 
- - Sheherazada are 
, performed by the New 
- . Symphony Orchestra under 
David Coleman. 

. Barbican Centre. Mon, . 
"7.45pm. 

STRAUSS, SCHUMANN: 

. .. Richard Strauss's Alpine 


full (0482 

222750). " 

ROBERT AYERS: With 12 
assistants and special effects, 
the artist transforms the city's 
botanical gardens. 

Information and bookings: 
Mappin Art Gallery, Weston 
Park Sheffield (0742 26281). 
From Mon. 

SELECTED 

ENLIGHTENMENT: Major 

Scottish paintings from the 

Enlightenment 

Talbot Rice Art Centre, South 

Bridge, Edinburgh (031 667 

FROM TWO WORLDS: 

Contemporary work by non- 
Europeans working in Britain. 
Whitechapel Art Gallery, 
Whitechapel High Street 
London El (01-377 0107). 

OPERA 

GLYNDEBOURNE 
FESTIVAL: Bernard Haitink 
takes over as conductor of 
Peter Hall's revived Don 
Giovanni, tonight Mon, 

Wed and Fri at 5.30pm. Porgy 
and Bess has its last 
performance tomorrow 
(350pm) then Tues and 
Thurs at 4.50pm. 
Gtyndeboume, Lewes, East 
Sussex (0273 812411). 

SOUTH BANK OPERA: 

Harrison Birtwistle's new 
opera. Yen Tan Tethers, 
ways tonight and Tues at 
7.45pm, conducted by Elgar 
Howarth. A new production of 
Cost tan tutte plays on Mon 
at 7pm conducted by Paul 
Daniel. 

Queen Elizabeth Hall, South 
Bank, London SE1 (01- 
928 3191) 


OPENINGS 

ROMEO AND JULIET: Kenneth 
Branagh produces, directs and 
takes the role of Romeo, with 
Samantha Bond as Juliet 
Lyric Studio, Hammersmith 
(01-741 2311). Preview Wed. 
Opens Thurs. 

SELECTED 

TM NOT RAPPAPORT: A rare 
chance to see Paul Scofield as 
a geriatric prankster In Herb 
Gardner's soft-edged park- 
bench whimsy. 

Apollo (01 -437 2663). 

LONG DAY’S JOURNEY WTO 
NIGHT: Jonathan Miller’s 
quirky production of O'NejU’s 
doomy masterpiece; Jack 
Lemmon is miscast 
Haymarket (01 -930 9832). 

OUT OF TOWN 

EDINBURGH: 40th 
International Festival: Among 
the theatre events in this first 
week of the offical Festival are: 
Crime and Punishment, 
directed by Andrzej Wajda (St 
Bride's Centre). 

Born m the RSA from the 
Market Theatre of 
Johannes burgh (Royal 
Lyceum). 

A Wee Touch of Class, an 
-adaptation of MoKere's Lb 
B ourgeois Gentifhomme (Leith 
Theatre)^ 

Festival box office: 031 225 
5756. 

Festival Fringe: Hundreds of 
shows; among them are: 
Lorca's final play. Comedy 
Without Trtte, Dario Fo’s 
Obscene Fabiesr, Argentinian 
Eduardo Pavlovsky's The 
Boxer and German Humor 
Muller's Phitoctetes. 

St Cuthbert’s Hall (031 226 
5138). 

Kora, a new play by Tom 
McGrath; Ka trite and the 
Hippopotamus by Mario 
Vargas Uosa Ml in repertory at 
the Traverse (031 2262633). 

ROCK AND JAZZ 


QUEEN: Freddie Mercury's 
pomp-rock circus alights in the 
grounds of Knebwortn 
House, with Status Quo and 
Big Country as guests. 

Today (noon-10.30pm), 


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(information: 01-748 1414). 

ROUND MIDNIGHT: The 
Edinburgh Festival's late-night 
jazz senes starts with a 
rare vMtby the trombontat 
Bob Brookmeyer. 

Tomorrow, Queen's Hall, 
Edinburgh (031 668 2019). 

CHET BAKER: His trum 
is still the most 
sound in jazz. 

Mon to Sat, Ronnie Scott's 
Club, London W1 (01-439 
0747). 

PRINCE: The heir to Jintf 
Hendrix and Little Richard. 
Tues, Wed, Thurs, 

Wembley Arena (01-902 1234). 

MAN JUMPING: Salsa and 
systems music mark the poles 
between whitih this 



FILMS 


OPENINGS 

PRETTY IN PfNK (15): A 
predictable but polished 
exercise m adolescent drama 
from the scriptwriter John 
Hughes, with Molly Rfngwald 
as the growing girl from the 
wrong side of town; directed 
by Howard Deutch. 

Plaza (01 -437 1234). From Fri. 

EDINBURGH INTERNATIONAL 
FILM FESTIVAL: Begins today 
in a blaze of French chic witti 
the British premiere of Jean- 
Jacques Beineix's Betty Blue 
(Playhouse). Other highlights: 
striking British films by Neil 
Jordan [Mona Lisa, Sun, 
8.30pm) and Mike Newell {Trie 
Good Father, Fri, 8.30pm); Jim 
Jarmusch's off-beat 
Down by Law ( Mon. 8. 
all at Film house (031 228 
2688). 

SELECTED 

DESERT HEARTS (18): 
Powerful, beautifully controlled 
drama set in Reno during the 
late 1950s; a fine feature 
directorial debut by 
documentary-maker Donna 
Deitch. 

Screen on the HI (01-435 
3366), Electric Screen (01-229 
3694). 

SfD AND NANCY (18): Alex 
Cox's subdued elegy to punk 
rock, deverty pitched between 
the sordid and romantic, with . 
Gary Oldman as Sid Vicious. 
Lumiere (01-836 0691), 

Camden Plaza (01-485 2443), 
Gate Netting Hill (01-221 0220). 


PHOTOGRAPHY 


PRINTED LIGHT: A happy 
alliance between the Scottish 
National Portrait Gallery and 
the Science Museum in 
London present this 


and Robert Adamson. 
Scottish National Portrait 
Gallery, Queen Street 
Edinburgh ((XII 556 8921). 


BOOKINGS 


FIRST CHANCE 


ROYAL OPERA: Postal 
booking opens Mon fix 1986/7 
season, with new 
production of Jenufa in Czech; 
plus revival of La Trawata. 

Also Royal Baflet. with 
performances of Mayeriing, 

The Steeping Beauty and fast 
London performance of 
David Bintley's Gafanteries. 
From Oct Personal/phone 
bookings from Sept 1 . 

Covent Garden, London 
WC2 (01-240 1911). 


LAST CHANCE 


CECIL BEATON: Exhibition 
of his theatre and film design, 
fashion photography and 
war-time reportage. Ends 
tomorrow. 

Barbican Centre. Silk 
Street London EC2 (01-638 
4141). 


For ticket availability,, 
performance and opening 
times, telephone the 
numbers listed. Concerts: 

Max Harrison; Dance: 
John Perdvak Films: 
Geoff Brown; Galleries: 
Sarah Jane Checkland; 
Opera: Hilary Finch; 
Photography: Michael 
Young; Rock & Jazz: 
Richard Williams; 
Theatre: Tray Patrick 
and Martin Cropper; 
Bookings: Anne 
Wbitehonse 


DANCE 

REST A TIME: Paco Pena formed 
his Flamenco Dance Company in 
1970, since when it has dazzled 
toe world with its rhythm and 
spectacle, orchestrated by toe 
dynamic guitar playing of Pena 
himself. Barbican Centre (01-638 
8891) from Tuesday. 


OPERA 

EASTERN MAGIC: Frank Dunlop, 
director of toe Edinburgh Festival, is 
also the producer of the major 
opera production, Oberon. Elizabeth 
Connell and Philip Ung ridge head 
toe cast in Weber's tale of Oriental 
magic and chivalry. Usher Hall 
(031 225 5756), from tomorrow. 


MUSIC HALL 



artist in the world, in a one-man srigw 
being given hi the Ecfiriburahi ■ ^ 
suburb where Lauder was bom 
1879. Portobelto Town Half (031 
225 5756), from Thursday. 


Giving opera new 
rhyme and reason 


Hugh Routtedgo 



ARTS DIARY 


.»> 


J ust down the street 
from the National 
Union of Insurance 
Workers are the offices 
of Faber & Faber. Here, on the 
fourth floor, in the chair once 
occupied by T. S. Eliot, and 
wearing rather tight blue 
jeans, sits a man whose own 
outpouring has been com- 
pared variously with Donne, 
Swinburne and the poet 
McGonagaU. 

Lauded by his peers — many 
of whom were Oxford 
contemporaries — as the man 
who has brought the pleasure 
back into poetry, Craig Raine 
can expect to sell up to 15,000 
of his slim volumes. Cocking 
his poetry editor’s hat he also 
presides over a list which 
currently nets Faber £2 mil- 
lion a year. 

At the age of 4Z Craig Raine , 
exudes the air of a squat 
gamekeeper to a once dilapi- 
dated estate - an estate now 
opened to the public in very 
successful way. "Readings and 
performances have helped a 
lor, be says with nervous, 
confidence, sucking at a 
Gitane. Though two years ago, 
the helicopter booked to take 
his various poets on a tour of 
hungry audiences was can- 
celled, there is no avoiding the 
sense that with Craig Raine’s 
hand on the joystick, poetry is 
taking off a gain- 
In doing so, fresh bounds 
aries are Deing made. Cur- 
rently in the offing is a three- 
minute video of a Raine poem 
(to the music of his office mate 
and ex-Wbo guitarist, Pete 
Townshend). And, more 
extravagantly, there is an op- 
era commissioned by Glynde- 
bourne, to be staged there next 
year, entitled The Eledrrjfica-' 
tion of the Soviet Union, the 
libretto' of which Faber pub- 
lishes on Monday. j . 

When Raine** distinguished 
predecessor was approached 
by Tippett for Child of Our 
Time, he declined. Imbued 
with perhaps a more robust 
ego than. Eliot’s, Raine did no 
such thing when Glynde- 
boume floated the idea ofhim 
adapting Boris Pasternak's no- 
vella The Last Summer, 

Sitting .with his back, to the 
window, he recalls bow, out of 
one blue day, the -composer 


How the poetic 
talents of 
Craig Raine are 
soon to become 
music to our ears 

NigeLOsbornerangtoaskifhe 
could set some of his poems to 
music. Raine was delighted. 
*Tm not musical but it was 
like finding one of your chil- 
dren in Westminster Abbey.” 
What Osborne really wanted, 
though, was to adapt 
Pasternak's Last Summer for 
'the . operatic stage.” ‘How 
extraordinary’, I said. I've just 
taken it down to re-read.’” 
Osborne had chosen wefl. 
Pasternak happened to be 
unde to Raine’s wife. (On cold 
days, Raine dons the Russian 
writer’s leather coat. “It's like 
a Heseltine flak jacket”, he 

says. “Woolly on the inside.”) 

Admitting that the librettist 
is-essential only as a flunkey, 
he nevertheless set out to wnie 
an opera which would avoid 
“the silliness which some- 
times seems endemic”. His 
words would be a sturdy 
accompaniment to Osborne's 
score. “We need to g£l away 
from the contorted, improb- 
able; ridiculously low level 
which causes you to buy a 
programme, glance at the plot 
summary, read four tines and 
look for an ice-cream.” 

As a working title; Raine 
chose There will Be No 
Interval Mischievously, he 
volunteers the information 
that “intervals are important 
ai Glyndeboume**. The joke is 
a minor example of how much 
lie likes- to turn preconcep- 
tions on their head - a talent, 
which revealed itself most’ 
femously in the tide poem of 
his 1979 collection. A Martian 
Sends a Postcard Nome. 
Squinting at /similar obfects 
with an alien eye, - Raine’s 
Martian inspired the 
helicopterfuir of poets. , 
Reading his poems can be 
like entering a hall of distort- 
ing mirrors — eye-opening but 
not hearirstopping. (“Bread 
develops slowly under the 
grill, J a Polaroid picture of 



desert”) At his worst, they 
have a purposeless honesty. At 
best — and he can be very good 
— his famous similes are 
capable of genuine disloca- 
tion. Rooted in the ordinary, 
they strive- for preternatural 
effects. 

It was his Guholic mother, 
he - explains, ' who could 
“remember the trivial in away 
I found exciting”. And it was 
his father, a boxer and. spir- 
itualist invalided out of the 
RAF with epilepsy — “the 
result we think, of an explo- 
sion in a munitions factory” — 
who allowed the young Raine 
at borne in Shfldon, County 
Durham, to feel the bumps in 
his steel-plated skull. 

Like his similes, Raine's 
first version of Pasternak's 
work bore no. resemblance to 
the original. The director, 
Peter Sellars, rejected ft. The 
second- was made with- more 
collaboration. ■ 

he tide alludes to 
Lenin's claim that 
communism was 
Socialism plus the 
electrification of Russia. “So- 
cial revolutions are about 
social improvements, but they 
also carry the charge of dec- 
pi fying a country with vi- 
■ iolence. Pasternak was very 
enthusiastic early on. He be- 
came horrified later. The op- 
era tries to do justice to both 
points.” . 

In writing his libretto, 
Raine has come to the conclu- 
sion -that “opera is - the only 
place where poetic. drama can 
now seem obviously natural” 
It is a-brave claim, for one who 
has- not yet beard toe music, 
but typical of a poet out to 
displace the “vulgar myth” 
that poetry .does not make 
sense. “Of course, the rules 
change, anti if you're a good 
writeF you’re interested in 
changing the rules. It's like 
changing toe rujes of rugby 
union.” He stares impres- 
sively at the ceiling. Then, 
sheepishly, he- turns round. 
“Actually, I never watch rugby 
union now.” 

Nicholas Shakespeare 

The Electrification of the 
So ^ ^JoJon bjrCraig flame is 

{fS^esjeS). onday 


Comic 
capers 

John Cleese has chosen'Uhe 
veteran film director. Charles 
Crichton, as a collaboratoc4br 
his latest feature flint GiVen 
the two men's rather different 
comedy backgrounds.^ 1 it 
should make for a fascinating 
combination. >1 

Crichton, who is 76 andjfcst 
worked in toe cinema mere 
than 20 years ago. is best 
known as the director of cosy 
Ealing comedies like The fjrv- 
ender Hill Mob and T he 
Titfield Thunderbolt. Cleese's 
humour has always been Of a 
more frantic, not to say patho- 
logical. nature. Though he: is 
reluctant to give details at this 
stage. Cleese will reveal that 
toe new film is to oe caHed 
Wanda The Parrot and s (foot- 
ing will start in the new year. 

Train pain ~ 

Poets Roger McGough arid 
Pete McCarthy will be travel- 
ling to the* Edinburgh festival 
by air, following a nasty 
incident on a British Rail train 
recently. McCarthy feu invol- 
untarily, he says, into a brawl 
with a superior BR steward 
who refused to . serve him 
breakfast because he had a 
iecohti cfaiss ticket The guard 
was. railed and the bewildered 
poet": found ‘ * himself ■ • b^ng 
interrogated by police oil Car- 
lisle station. Still, it's all-grist 
toa poet's mill. McGough-bas 
written up the inridem aS A 
Bad Thing and will be reciting 
it at the Assembly Rooms 
from tonight onwards. 

• Sadly the painful attack* 
of shingles which Maria ^ 
Ewing has suffered “ 
throughout the summer .1 
stopped her from '* 1 
completing her role as Poppea 
atGh cbourne last weeks 
But she is fighting back ana 
will playing Salome in Los r 
Angeles in the autumn I 
followed by the Merry • 
Widow in Chicago, and wi0 
also play at the New York J 
Met early next year. ' 
Meanwhile her husband . “ 

Sir Peter Hall points out 
itwas the BBC not he, asC 
suggested last week, who ■ 
finally withdrew from the I 
recording of Simoa • 
Boccanegm. I 


I and I 


Roger Rees leaves his arm 
play Double Double thisu£d 
to become Associate Direeto 
of the Bristol Old Vic. iTu 
high point occurs when Rok 
seems to appear on stage wit) 
himself. Few who have'yeet 
the play, which continues ai 
toe Fortune Theatre jyiti 
K.ehh Dnnkel taking his part 
have. managed to understand 



Rees and \ 
how the trick 



toanaggd io gw 
invited to a far 
Monday night 
he wii? both be 



Meanwhile 
usual, prej 
barmy as 1 
One perfo 
Marija Nal 
audience t 
heads eme 
*n the sta 
actors ptt 
them - de 
faint heart 
play Yenn 
rate lifting 
poline-sivl! 
« count 
sontetoing 
Nuria Esp 

about 


eral obi 
N ewcasi 


<L 







THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1 986 


COURT AND SOCIAL 


Frederick Dillistone 


Beyond culture and theology 


| SOCIAL 
p NEWS 

princess Anne win visit the 
-Royal College of Defence Stud- 
ies on August 20 and be enter* 
3dined at luncheon. 

Sftrincess Anne, Patron of tbe 


Princess Anne will open Uk 


No theologian of the twentieth century 
has been so concerned about tbe 


XIV international Congress of relation between culture and theology as 


Microbiology at the Free Trade 
HalL Manchester, on September 
7. and afterwards, attend a 
reception at Manchester 
University for those participat- 
ing in the congress- 
Princess Anne will open the new 
junior school at Stouehouse. 
Gloucestershire, on September 
8 and the new premises of 
_s£ip&, will attend the champion- Mecanaids at St Catherine 
-whips at die National Water Street. Later she will visit 
^Sports Centre. ' Holme Indalex Limited. King's Ditch 
jHerrepont, Nottinghamshire, Lane. Cheltenham, to celebrate 
August 22. their twenty-fifth anniversary. 

^Forthcoming 

• The engagementi is announced 

marriages between Peter, younger son of 

Mr and Mrs John Davis, of 
Mr TVf T PhilKnm Henteaze. Bristol and Carolyn, 

and Miss CC.B. Barnett elder daughter of Mrand Mrs 

The engagement is announced H^£^on^-TT^Tne^ UC 

between Michael, son of Mr and House * Henley-on-Thames. 

'Mrs OA Phillipps. of Petworth, Mr A.D. Mackenzie 
Sussex, and Cathy, eldest da ugh- and Miss J.M. Parnell 
leroftbefaueMrAAC Barnett The engagement is announced 
and Viscountess Leathers, of between Alexander Donald, son 


ChiddingfokL Surrey. The wed- 
ding will take place on Decem- 
«ber 13. in London. 

•■■'Dr D.E. Bland 
. and Miss G Holliday 
The engagement is announced 
between David Edward, elder 
son of the Rev A.E'and Mrs 
Bland, of Waddington, Lan- 
cashire. and Christine, younger 
daughter of Mr and Mrs K- 
HoHiday. of King's Lynn, 
Norfolk. 

Mr CA.K. Cooksen 
'-and Miss CM. Hardy 
''The engagement is announced 
• between Christopher, only son 
: of Mr John Cookson, of 
Rushford House. Barnstaple, 
Devon, and Mrs Stephen Ag- 
1 new. of Oulton Hall Aylsham. 

- Norfolk, and Camilla, second 
daughter of Colonel and Mrs 
Michael Hardy, of Crouds 

■- Farm, Long Sutton. Langport, 
'Somerset. 

.Latest wills 

■ Mr Anthony Arthur Barrett, ol 
„ Chelsea. London. Cleric of 
Standing (Legislative) Commit- 
"■tees in the House of Commons. 

left estate valued at £381,420 
-• neL 

; .Dr Charles Ion Carr Bosanqaet, 
...of Alnwick. Northumberland. 

first Vice-Chancellor of New- 
’ ".castle University, left estate 
valued at £205,644 neL 
Mr Henry Charles Shaw-White, 
of Whyte I cafe. Surrey, left estate 
valued at £724,471 neL 

- Mr Edward Albert Bosbjr, of 
"'Upper Wool Hampton, Berk- 
I. shire, left estate valued at 
■•£1,219,168 neL 

..‘Dr Robert Yeats Forbes, of 
-Chepstow, Gwent, medical 
administratorand bridge player, 
.''.representing Scotland 17 times 
“ and England once, left estate 
"* valued at £54,535 neL 

~.Other estates include (net, be- 
■ fore tax paid): 

i.;HaH Mr Cecil John, of 

- Birkdaie, Merseyside, 

• stockbroker £462.600 

- Johns, Mr Henry Hadyn. of 

- Hereford £296,159 

' Mathews. Miss Norah Spencer. 

. of Burton, Cheshire — £357.398 


of Mr John Donald Mackenzie i s 
and the late Mrs Rita Marianne — RmBlEion 
Mackenzie, of Perth, Scotland, gjj™ 
and Jennifer Mary, daughter of For turn, the d 
Mr and Mrs Frederick John sally today is ti 
Parnell, of Swindon, Wiltshire the concentrate 
and Lagos, Nigeria. the analysis an 

Commander S JL Slater, RN, finite, the mam 

and Miss RJVf. Barclay dence, the su 

The engagement is announced become superf 
between Steven, elder son of tbe bition to maste 
late Mr Raymond Geoige Slater his view the p 
and Mrs I.E. Slater, of Oldbury, modern culture 
West Midlands, and Rosamond, , . 

daughter of Mr and Mrs A. A second ch 
Barclay, of Old Ravenfield, follows. There 
South Yorkshire. limitation in re 

Mr P-JS. White this human ami 

ami Miss T. Krikorian sinfulness, bea 

The engagement is announced The paramour 
between Peter-John, son of Mr education rathe 
and Mrs DA White, of Hamp- 
stead Garden Suburb. London. 

Appointments 

Leatherhcad. Surrey. 

Birthdays 

TODAY: Sir Ewen BroadbenL 
62; the Right Rev Colin Bu- 
chanan, 52; Mr J. Butterfield, 

57; Sir Frank Cooper. 81: Mr 
Tam DalyelL MP. 54: Baroness 
Deningion, 79; Mr Ahmed E. H. 

Jaffer, 77; Sir Christopher 
Laid law. 64; Dame Elizabeth 
Lane. 8 1 : Mr Rod Laver. 48; Sir 
Frank Layfidd. QC 65; Rear- 
Admiral G. C Ross, 86; Sol- 
omon. 84; Major-General Sir 
Christopher Welby-Everard. 77; 

Mr J. V. Wellesley, 53; Lord 
Young of Dartington, 71. 

TOMORROW: Mr John AUdis, - 
57; Sir Frank Bowden. 77: Dame Mr Mark Bakei 
Gillian Brown. 63; Mrs Justice to the United 1C 
Butler SIoss, 53; Sir Lawrence Energy Authorit 
Byford, 61: General Sir George >n successor 
Cooper. 61; Prolessor Alexander Nicholson, who 

Goehr. 54; Cardinal Gordon 

Gray. 76; Lord Kahn. 81; Mr Tkif 4rr ia 00 
Leonard Lickorish, 65; Lord JYiamage 
Lisle, 83: Miss Kate O'Mara. 47; Dr G.C. Reid 
Lord Porritt, 86: Sir Stanley and Dr M. John 
Raymond. 73; Mrs Elizabeth The marriage u» 
Thomas, 67; Major-General Sir on Tuesday, 

Humphry ToUemache. 89; Mr Haddington, bet 
W. T- Wells. QC 78; Sir John Clydesdale Rek 
Spencer Wills. 82; Mr P. H. Edinburgh, and 
WrighL VC 70; Mr George Johnson, of Lc 
Wynn-Williams. 74. Lothian. 


Paul Tillich. This is his centenary year 
(he was bom on August 20. 1886) and 
his first published speech, printed in 
1919 was entitled On the Idea of a 
Theology qf Culture. 

A collection of his articles under the 
title Theology qf Culture appeared in 
1 959: in the same year he was honoured 
by friends who contributed essays to the 
composite volume Religion and Cul- 
ture, a book which included Karl 
Barth's famous letter to Mozart. 

Tillich's urgent contention was that 
“every religious act, not only in 
organised religion, but also in tbe more 
intimate movement of the soul is 
culturdy formed**. language, whether 
verbal or visual was for him the basic 
cultural creation: “He who can read the 
style of a culture can discover its 
ultimate concern, its religious 
substance". Thus in his view there can 
be no dichotomy between religion and 
culture. Each is intimately related tbe 
one to the other. 

Is it possible then, to speak of English, 
culture? Not precisely, in Tillich's sense. 
For him, the dominant culture univer- 
sally today is that of industrial society, 
the concentration of human activity on 
the analysis and transformation of the 
finite, the manageable world. Transcen- 
dence, the supernatural God, have 
become superfluous. The human am- 
bition to master the environment is in 
his view the primary characteristic of 
modem culture. 

A second charactersftic immediately 
follows. There can be no sense of 
limitation in regard to the fulfilment of 
this human ambition. Falieu-ness, guilt, 
sinfulness, become meaningless terms. 
The paramount need is felt to be 
education rather than redemption, tech- 


nical know-how rather than reconcili- 
ation to ultimate reality. 

Thus concern about the divine and 
the demonic, tbe sublime and tbe tragic, 
the conflict of power in every realization 
of life, disappears. Scientific and tech- 
nical conquest of time and space have 
come to constitute both tbe religion and 
the culture of modern civilization. 

Throughout his career Tillich was 
deeply involved in what may roughly be 
called cultural activities, philosophy, 
psychology, politics, the history of 
painting, and literature. 

None of these, however, did be reg ar d 
as independent and self-fulfilling. These 
could all be manifestations of some 
ultimate concern, a concern in which 
culture and religion are interwoven and 
interconnected. Both can be debased: 
both can be creatively renewed. 

What consti biles the death of each is a 
concentration on finite aims, on poten- 
tialities belonging exclusively to the 
world of time and space. In his rejection 
of this worldly industrial technocracy 
Tillich might be regarded as unrealistic. 
But his watchword was always “ul- 
timate concern**. 

Theology for him was the exploration 
of what this terra implied both for 
religion and for culture. He built up a 
massive system of theology but it never 
became an end in itself. It was never 
designed to direct the attention and tbe 
vision of humans beyond finite interests 
and ambitions and potentialities to- 
wards depth, towards transcendence, 
towards ultimate Being, towards God. 

And his central conviction was that at . 
the heart of ultimate Being he bad 
discerned New Being, the picture of the 
New Being in Jesus the Christ 

The difficulty in all this surely lies in 
the meanings attached to the word 
“culture". Primitive culture? National 
culture? Class culture? Whatever might 
be said about sub-cultures, Tillich 
believed that the spectre confronting the 


whole world in the twentieth century 
was Thai of technological culture. 

This seemed to him to ■ threaten 
expressions of philosophy, art politics 
and economics. Only a radically God- 
centred culture could be regarded as a 
possible alternative. Theology and 
theonomy were for him the necessary 
antitheses to ideology and autonomy. It 
seemed that an atheistic humanism was 
threatening to become the essence of 
religion and culture everywhere. 

Have his forebodings been justified? 
Technology has certainly made 
spectacular advances since the time of 
his most creative writing. A1 1 peoples 
crave for its benefits in production and 
communication. But at the sapse time 
‘ there have been spectacular intensifica- 
tions of nationalism and racial sectari- 
anism within nations. 

Moreover, these corporate manifesta- 
tions have been intimately linked with., 
traditional religions expressed in tra- 
ditional symbolic forms, especially 
language. Tillich was profoundly aware 
of tbe dominant role of technological 
culture: be was not equally aware of the 
immensely powerful resurgence and 
attraction of national and racial 
“religious" cultures in vast areas of the 
world today. 

In a recent review, the Bishop of 
Kensington, the Right Rev Mark 
San ter, wrote: “English and American 
ideas about how to do business are not 
the same as those of Italians and 
Germans and Poles. The more deeply 
the church becomes embedded in the 
cultures of the world, the more surely 
these conflicts will arise — Sorting out 
what is of theology and what is of 
culture is a most delicate task" 

It is indeed. Tillich made a sustained 
and heroic contribution to tbe task. He 
did not provide a final solution. 

Canon Frederick Dillistone is Chap- 
lain of Oriel College, Oxford. 


OBITUARY “ 

PROFESSOR RALPH 
COCKER 

Influential figure in dentistry 

Professor Ralph Cocker, . NHS. he felt it was important 
CBE, FRCS, FDSRCS, who to train dentists to think, or 
died on July 30, at the age of careers within that service. ' 

ft..’ C U« , L.nnn 1 a orAlV Ofl 


78. was an influential figure in 
the world of postwar dentistry 
in this country. 

As Sub-Dean of King's Col- 
lege Hospital Medical School 
and in his work on the Dental 
Education Advisory Council 
from 1947 to 1973, he played 
an important part in advising 
the government on the shape 
and scope of training for 
dentists after the inception of 
die National Health Sendee. 

He was born in Manchester 
on April 18, 1908, and educat- 
ed at William Hulme's Gram- 
mar School and Victoria 
University, ' Manchester* 
where he qualified LDS in 
1930. After practising and 
teaching dentistry for a while, 
be returned to study medicine, 
qualifying in 1939. 

During tbe Second World 
War, he was seconded to work 
in the industrial health service 
of Imperial Chemical Indus- 
tries. where, his aptitude for 
administration received free 
play. Afterwards be returned 
to lecture in periodontology ax 
Manchester University and to 
be consultant dental surgeon 
to tbe Manchester Royal 


Infirmary. 

In 1947, he 


was appointed 


He also began to work on 
what became his greatest con- 
tribution to King's: a complete 
new hospital and 

school which was openeddn 
1966. 

Cocker, had an impact on 
the affairs of the dental profes- 
sion at many levels. He was a 
member of the General Dental 
Council and of the Board - of 
the Dental Faculty of the 

Royal College of Surgeons,, of 
which Ik was for a time Vice- 
Dean. He was also a member 
of the Standing Dental Advi- 
sory Committee and the Den- 
tal Manpower CommitteeTof 
the Department of Health and 
Social Security. From 196&fo 
1973 he was adviser in dental 
surgery to the DHSS- 

At the academic level Joe 
was busy as an examiner not 
only in this country, but also 
overseas, and from 1970 to 
1972 he was a temporary 
adviser to the World Health 
Organization. ••••.• 

Cocker was a hard woTftr 
who dedicated much of his 
time to bringing sanity into 
the dental training pro- 
gramme:- He might not seem a 
passionate advocate of a cause 
in front of a huge audience. 


to the then King’s College . but m committee or in perstin- 
Hospital Medical School as ai dealings his patience and 



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1 Peanbon firaaL Lands El 9XH 


Please allow at least 48 hoars before 
publication. 


The king, and all Itw people Dial were 
wiUi run,, came weary, and MMM 
nwnwhn (Her, 

2 Samnrl l& 14 


_ BIRTHS 

— BLATHWaYT - On 2nd August, to 

Alexandra (nie Adams) and Mark, a 
■" — daughter. Flora Elizabeth Genevieve. 
**-"*’' 'a sister tor Tom. Harry and Clare. 
"■^■ULTEEL ■ On July 29th. to Ruth i nee 
Sampson) and Davtd. a son. Timothy 
» David BeOendan. a brother (or 

a Charlotte. 

•- CHARLTON - On August *un. to Sally 
(nee Reeve) and Andrew, the gift of a 
son. wnttam James Hedfey. 
COMPTON . On August 8th. at The 
Matnoa's Hospital. Hong Kong, to 
Caroline (nee Ckae-Smith) and 

Jonathan, a daughter. Rosalind 

Eleanor Cnxrttne. 

CONNfTJm - On 17Th July, to Ian and 
Attract*, a son. Alexander Ingram 
-- Aylmer. 

‘ CRAWFORD. On August 6th 1986. to 
- Georgia inte Moyloni and Mkhatl. a 
„ ■ • daughter. Iona Caroline, and a son. 
. William Stewart 

DA VET - On 15th July. 1986. at Leam- 
ington Sea. Warwickshire, to Motile 
. . and Mature, a son. Jonathan Martyr, 
H e nr y- a brother for Jo Jo, 
HOOCKOFT - On 28th July. In Sta- 
vanger. Norway lo Ellen (nee Bayer) 
and Ken , a daughter. Emnn Britt. 
HORTON ■ On August 2nd. at Queen 
Charlotte's Hospital. lo Debbie and 
, ■ Nic k, a daughter. Charlotte Fetidly. 
JEKVB - On 280, July, at the John 

— • ' Radcllffe Hospital. Oxford, to Louise 
— (nee Rogers) and Richard, a 

daughter. Jessica Louise. 

' ’ " KOU O CH ■ On 6d> August. 1986. at 
rf.' ' the Leicester GeneraL to Kate ente 
... , Price) and Jerry, a daughter. Urn. a 
sister for Henry. Emily and Sally. 
----- MOfTER - On August 7th. at Colches- 
ter Maternity HosnltaL w Diana me* 
Brawn) and Jonathan, a son. 
Bentemus Simon. 

PANTWOTON - On SOOiJuty. 1986. to 
Katharine (Nt Johns) and Colin, a 
' daughter. NlWd. 

7“ 'MHESTLET -On August 4Q, 1986. lo 
...... . Susie (hie Dickson! and Jeremy, a 

son. Jamie, brother Tor Alexander 

— -- and Roderick. M The Matilda Heart- 

ial Hong Kong. 

. — ROBERTSON - On 5(h August. 1986. 

lo Lynn (nte Tucker) and Bruce, a 

daugtuer 


MAJUOAGES 


■OWC 1 BALE ■ On August Blit. 1986. 

at the Norwegian Embassy. Rome. 
. Michael Bowe. R.IAA. of London lo 
Mariana* Dale. Architect of Oslo. 


DEATHS 


ALLEN - On August 6th. J986. ADeen 
Marforte (nee Davidson) aged 84. 
widow of Arthur Allen. Funeral an 
Thursday August 14th at West Herts 
Crematorium. Carston at 2-15 pm. 
ample bunches at flowen only 
please. 

APLET - On August 7th. 1986. Janie, 
beloved wife of Alan and mother of 
Mary and Rfchanf. after a long (li- 
ne# ». Cremation at 230 pm on 
Tuesday. August I2ih at woktng SL 
Jo hn's Cre matorium. 

■I fHIWnri H - On August Sttu In Tor- 
bay Hospital- South Devon. Patricia 
Mary (Pat Larthe Model Agency). Be- 
loved wife of Bin and loved mother 
of Sonya. Yotande and Chamtian 
and granny W to Fiona. Robert. 
Julian. Justin. Samantha. Victoria 
and EmOy and veai -granny to 
Thomas. Requiem Mate at Shaidoa 
Catholic Church at 12.00pm op 
A ugust 12th. Flowers to Harris and 
Sons. Willow Street. Tetohmouth. 
South Devon. 

CfHSHOLM - On Augnrt dth. 1966. 
very suddenly at home. Audrey 
Viva. Beloved mother of Jane. Pat- 
rick and Robin Funeral at Golden 
Green. East Chapel at 1120 am on 
Thursday. August 14th. Flowers to 
Kenyons. 49 Marioes Road. W8. 

COLE - On 5(h August. 1986, at Queen 
Mary's University Hospital. 
Roehampfon. Mary Grace, sister of 
the Reverend Norman Cole and last 
surviving daughter of the late 
Wiiuam and Lydia Cote, aged 73. A 
dearly loved sister and aunt and a 
Ufo-Jong worker for Morel Rearma- 
ment. Funeral Service at SL Mary's 
Church. Wimbledon at 2-15 pm on 
Wednesday. 2<Xh August, followed 
by private Interment Farafly Dowers 
only but donations lo The Oxford 
Group. 12 Palace Street London 
SWl. 

CORBETT - On August 5th. 1986. 
Anthony Alfred wuuam. In Brigh- 
ton. The cremation will be at Downs 
Crematorium. Bear Road. Bright o n 
on Thursday. August 14th at 2 OO 
pm. All Downs to Gnevour Funer- 
al Consultants. I69B/C Lewis Road. 
Brighton. Sussex. 

CULLEN ■ On 7th August 1986. peace- 
fiffly at SL Maura ConvenL 
Weybridge. Surrey. Sr. Benigma. 
Catherine. Funeral Mass on Wednes- 
day. 13th August at SL Maun 
Convent at 11.30 am. fallowed by 
Interment at Wey bridge Cemetery 

FECEN F.W. (Peter) - On August 7th. 
peacefully tn Mayard. Co. Galway 
Husband of Joanna, father of Patrick 
and Carol ine. 

EHEESTON. Irene (Pip) - On Hm July. 
Qtdetty ai Park Prewctt Hospital. 
Basingstoke. Pioneer m women's 
education, much loved aunt and 
Iriend. Funeral al Hcartm Chapel at 
3.00 pm on 20th August. Donations. 
If desired, to CAFOD. 2 Carden 
Clo se. Stock wen Road. SW9 9TY. 

FRY On Thursday. Angus 7th. 

Peacefully al her home in Recpham. 
Norfolk. D e a ne May. m her 97th 
year. Daughter of the late John 
Henry and EUzaoeth Fry of Finchley. 
London. Funeral Service ta be held 
ai St. Mary’s Chureh. Reepham on 
Tuesday. Auqutt 12th at 10 OO am. 
fallowed by private crmaUon. 

OLSON. O uwr op ne r James of OM 
Windsor • On July Sisl 1986. aged 
54. 

HARVEY -On 7U, Allputt 1986. alter a 
brave right agMnst cancer, in Prin- 
cess Mary's Royal Airforce Hospual. 
Hof (on. Joyce. Beloved wife of Briga- 
dier M»e Harvey, and mother of 
Michael John. Cremation. Wednes- 
day 500, August. Amera h am. Family 
Service only. No flowers please. 

LEWIS ■ On August am. 1986. Albert 
Harold, aged 78 years. Moved hus- 
band of Doris for 52 years, adored 
father of John. Charles. DnM and 
Diana. Much loved and respected tar 
jus eight grandchildren, daughtera- 
In-law. son-in-law. ^stcr. brothers 

and aU h* many friends. Funeral on 
Sunday. 10th August al 3 JO pm at 
Edgwareeury Cemetery. 

Edgwaretwry Lane. Edgwan. Mid- 
dlesex. Memor i al Prayers al 69 
Portmao Towers. George SlrreL 
Umdon wi on Sunday KXh. and 
Monday llm AugusL at 8.00 om. 


DM MEMORIAL - PRIVATE 

p r une . Llly-Lynne ■ Loving Birthday 
memories today of a beloved wife, 
mother and grandmother who died 
70, April 1985. Ju* a wntsper away. 
John and children. 

HARVEY . On August TUi. 1986 al 
Holton. Joyce beloved by husband, 
son. daughter- in 4a w. and grandchil- 
dren. God bless you. 

OLUUUWH Lawrence • In lov ing 

memory of Lawrence, who died on 
9th August 1985. May lui soul rest in 
peace Remembered by all Ms chil- 
dren and their mother, and oil the 
family. 

■BLEY. Tom. Mi August 1984 . In 
ever loving memory of a beloved 
husband, father and grandfather. 

I IT TON Christopher Sc«t - 9ift 
August. 1977. Remembered evgry 
day with love. 


Science report 


Bright light may stop jet lag 


sub-dean of the dental school persistence helped greatly .to 
and - director of foe dental achieve the ends he had^in 
department He also became a view, 
member of the Denial Educa~ He had a surface reserve 
lion Advisory Council which which was not easy to pene- 
he chaired in 1956-57. irate. This was due in parf. to 

The establishment of foe innate modesty, but it con- 
National Health Sendee had cealed a kindly and symfca- 
led to an immense expansion - thetic spirit. It was 
in the demand for dentists, characteristic of him foal 
and it was Cocker’s task to while he was not at ease; in 
stress to the government, large student gatherings -he 
through much patient advoca- had endless- sympathy for foe 
cy, the necessity for expanding problems of students ~ as 
foe provision for dental train- individuals, 
ing by establishing new dental He leaves a widow, Marga- 
schools. A firm believer in foe ret, a son and two daughters. 

w 

DR RICHARD McCONNELL 

• 4 

Dr Richard Bradford veys m Bc chnanalan d (now 
McConnell whose views on Botswana) and subsequaaly 
foe geology of Africa were in British Guiana. His pnb- 
once regarded as controyer- lished researches into structur- 
aal died on August 6, aged 82. al geology included 
He was bora in Canada on controversial papas on the 
December 27, 1903. His father origin of the African Rift 
was a Canadian ge ologist after Valleys, 
whom the McConnell front of In 1952 McConnell re- 
tire Rockies, and a Canadian ceived a giant from the Lydl 
mountain and river are fund of the Geological Society. 
named, and who conducted On his retirement he lived in 
the first research on the Sussex and founded the Rich- 


Mr Mark Baker to be Secretary 
to the United Kingdom Atomic 
Energy Authority from October 
I, in succession to Mr Robin 
Nicholson, who is retiring. 


Dr G.C. Reid 
and Dr M. Johnson 
The marriage took place quietly 
on Tuesday. August 5. in 
Haddington, between Dr Gavin 
Clydesdale Reid, of Liberton, 
Edinburgh, and Dr Maureen 
Johnson, of Longniddry. East 
Lothian. 


McCONNELL - On August 6th. 1986. 
peacefully at home. Richard 
Bradford McCoonclL aged 82 years. 
Geotogttt and Founder of Richard 
Bradford Trust. Beloved h us ba n d of 
Ro. and son of the late R.C. 
McConnell, of OUowa. Service at 
Streal Church. Sussex on Tuesday. 
August 12Ui at 3.00 pm. Family 
flowers only. Enquiries lo Frank 
Dave? A Co- 0273-832179. 

MURR AY • On August 6th 1986. sud- 
denly as the result of an acddenL 
Edith Agnes Milter Caimey. 
LHJVM . Hon F.R.G£~ aged 88 
yean. Teacher of Music, formerly of 
Egypt and or -Rirahaa'. J84 North 
Deeshte Road. MmUmber. Beloved 
wife of the late George William Mur- 
ray. M.C- Cremated at Aberdeen. 

RAMEY • On August 7th at Mi home. 
UW House. Hedenfum. Bungay. Suf- 
folk. Anttxxiy. much loved hiafaand 
of Dorothy and father of Louisa and 
Luke. Private cremation, no flowers 
please Memor ia l Service to be an* 
nounced later. 

ROSENKRANZ Dr Alfred • On August 
8th. peacefully after a short Olness. 
Cremotioo al 1. 15 pm on August 
nth at Gotdera Green Crematorium. 
Family flowers only please. 

RUTHERFORD. Norman Alan - peace- 
fully and painlessly In the early 
morning of August 7th al ha home. 
10 Woodlands Road. London SW13. 
An informal craraation will lake 
place al Moruake Oematorium at 
3 00 pm on August 1 2th. No 
wreathes please. Flowers If wished. 
Donations can be given to Cancer Re- 
search. 

SRAWTER ■ On August 7th. suddenly, 
babel (Betty). Greatly loved wife of 
Robert, dear mother of Anne and 
Claire and devoted grandmother. Fu- 
neral ser v ice at Taunton Deane 
Crematorium on Wednesday 1 3d, 
AugusL at 10.30 am. Arrangements 
by Hatchers of Taunton Tel 72277. 

UKDEJtWOOD - On August 7th. 
Rosalind, at home after an Utnesa 
borne with great courage and digni- 
ty. Belov ed wife of Michael and 
mifct, loved mother of Jeremy. 
Adrian and Justin. 

WKAN ■ On August 7th. peacefully at 

'home. Colonel Charles Richard 
Wigan. M.C.. T.D.. O.L.. tn IMS 96U, 
year. Funeral Service at SL Martha's 
on Thursday. August loth at 3.00 
pm Eranaries to Messrs. Ptaun's. 
Guildford 67394. 

WOOD - On Augrot 3. 1986. at 
Hlghgate. after a severe illness brave- 
tv suffered. Mane E. Wood, widow 
of Frank William Wood. Funeral Ser- 
vice at SL Joseph's Church. Highgaie 
on August ts at lO.lS am. followed 
by interment. Flowers to Levertona. 
lei 01-387 6075 or donations, if 
deMred. to Cancer Res ear c h . She wta 
br deeply m i ssed by all her family 
and friends. 

ZlHOVIDr - On Wednesday. August 
6th. 1986. <n Ms home. Andrew 
ztnov-ien. oar . mb c&jjwp. 
Deeply mourned by his wife. Joan 
son. Nicholas and daughter. Mary. 
Funeral private, followed by crema- 
Hot. No flowers by reouesL 


Air travellers could soon be 
spending an boor or two Hnder 
bright fighting before board- 
ing their aircraft in in attempt 
to offset foe effects of jet fog. 

That, at least, is an implica- 
tion' of recent research by a 
fwun of scientists at the Har- 
vard Medical School Dt 
Charles Czeisler and his col- 
leagues hare found that the 
hnman bkriogical dock, or 
mraiifan rhythm, can be 
changed by exposure to bright 
fight at certain times in its 
cycle. ' « 

When foe timing of the 
circadian pacemaker is not 
synchronized with night and 
day, the mnanatrh is foooght 
to be the root of several flb, 
most notably jet lag, insomnia 
in shift w o rkers and some 
psychiatric disorders. No one 
has yet found the dock in the 
human brain, but there is 
| indirect evidence of its 
; existence. 

Many physiological 
characteristics, such as body 
temperature, rise during the 
day and fell at the night 
Another is foe secretion of the 
hormone cortisoL 


Oxford 

President Cossiga of Italy has 
been made an honorary fellow 
of Oriel CoUege. 

Cambridge 

Appointments 

J T D Hall BA, PhD (Manches- 
ter). has been appointed Deputy 
Librarian of the University 
Library from October l for three 
years. 

A Iseries. MA (King's College). 
MSc (Hebrew University, Jeru- 
salem), PhD (Ben Gurion 
University), has been appointed 
university lecturer in applied 
mathematics and theoretical 
physics from June 1. 1987 for 
three years. 

Dr A. K. Dixon has been elected 
into an official fellowship at 
Peterhouse from October I. 


By a Special Correspondent 

e Animal biola£caI docks 
r have long been mown to drift 

- backwards or forwards with 
it changes in the tinting of 

periods of tight and dark. Bat 
. a s imilar response in humans 
i has been hard to assess. 
w It is difficult to separate foe 
t effects of fight from alterations 

- in the Hitting of certain 
e beharioms. To judge from 
r animals, foe circadian rhythm 
e is nmst likely to shift if foe 
t subject is exposed to light at 
s certain times daring foe night. 

But such exposure w31 wake 
e foe subject. So what is respoo- 
t siMe, the light or foe enforced 
i change in steep pattern? 
t There is a way of answering 
t the question. The Acadian 
i rhythms of elderly people are 
i often advanced so that foe 
J night-time phase begins before 
J bedtime. Dr Canister's team 
i were fortmiate to find one 
i healthy 66-year-old woman 
who «hii maintained her mid- 
I night bedtime despite a 
f marked advance in ho- dr- 
s cadian rhythm. She coDabo- 
. rated in their experiments. 
i For seven evenings she was 
exposed to four boors erf bright 

University News 

diary). Dr R Grove, fttsocy (non- 
stipendiary! 

1 FTTZWILLIAM C O L t- EGF . 

' tr^oX 


fight, equivalent in intensity to 

she went tobed.’ftfoe team's DR RICHARD McCONNELL ” 

Dr Richard Bradford veys in BnAimia land (no w 
hours within one to two <tays of McConnell, whose vrero on POOjrann) and I subseguotfy 
the start of the exposure. foe geology of Africa were in British Guiana. His K)b- 

JfoiSSiSlSeSmntiis- once regarded as oontrover- lished researches mtpstructn^ 
ing ordinary ekcfric fight, aal died on August 6, aged 82. al geology included 
which kfoRr nr five times less He was bom in Canada on controversial papers on the 
SSe Bf Sn W S^ IS December 27, 1903. His father origin of the African Rift 
virtually no effect. was a Canadian geologist after Valleys. 

The soentfcts soecnlate that whom the McConnell Front of In 1952 McConnell re- 
exposure to brightfightat the Rockies, and a Canadian raved a grant from tte Lyell 
appropriate time could tone mountain and nver are fimd of th e Geo logical Society. 
the traveller's internal dock to named, and who conducted On his retirement he lived to 

foe first research on the Sussex and founded foe Rich- 
destination before be sets out Klondyke river. His English ard Bradford Trust “ to lex- 
tia his iournev It could also Jean Bottordl -Richard plain foe relationship between 
beto the shift worker adjust to McConnefl’s mother — was a methods of sdentmc investi- 
anoctnnial existence! and graduate of McGill Universi- ration and artistic creation, 
perhaps bring relief to others MontreaL She ran a hospi- His last woik was editing a 
suffering from certain types of ial in Eqgland dnring the First book ofTrust lectures given at 
btgn mnfr World War. foe Royal Institution by a 

But before that is possible, Richard McConnell also number of distinguished id- 
other questions most be an- took his first degree at McGill enlists and artists. . 

swered. For example, when in but moved to Lausanne where He was a man of node 
the arcadian cyde does expo- became under foe influence of interests and definite opin- 
snre to bright Baht have to Professor Lugeon. Three years ions, though not opinionated, 
greatest effect’ And for how later he was awarded a DSc for since be always respected.'lbe 
tone must foe snbiect be writ on the geological struts- views of others. At times he 
expend to light? ture of the Alps, before follow- tended to be somewhat with- 

!T *!t 7 ing his father into the drawn into bis awn thoughts, 

TKJP 3 * Canadian geological survey, and in later life became rather 
pp667-67I (8 August 1986). Soon afterwards be moved to philosophical in his way of 


graduate of McGill Universi- 
ty, MontreaL She ran a hospi- 
tal in Eqgland daring the First 
World War. 

Richard McConnell also 
took his first degree at McGill 
but moved to Lausanne where 


ration and artistic creation.” 
His last work was editing a 
book ofTrust lectures given at 
the Royal Institution by a 
number of distinguished Sci- 
entists and artists. 

He was a man of node 




became under the influence of interests and definite opin- 
Professor Lugeon. Three years ions, though not opinionated, 
later he was awarded a DSc for since be always respected.'lbe 
work on the geological struts- views of others. At times he 
ture of the Alps, before follow- tended to be somewhat wi th- 
ing his father into the drawn into bis awn thoughts, 
Canadian geological survey, and in later tife became rather 
Soon afterwards be moved to philosophical in his way of 
Britain, where he took a PhD thinking, which is perhaps 
at University College, Oxford, why he founded the Richard 

In his youth, apart from Bradford Trust. Whether 
being well known for his climbing a mountain on skis 
research in tropical countries, or walking tbe Sussex Downs, 
be was also a noted skier. He he was always an intelligent 
raced in the first Anglo-Swiss and- often a humorous 
•ski race as a member of the companion. ' 

British Universities' team at a - He is survived by his wife, 
time when technique and rules Rosemary Lowe, whom he 
were very different '• married in Uganda in 1953. 

After Oxford he joined the Sbe is well known as a leading 
British Overseas Geological authority on tropical fish and 
Surveys and spent many years fisheries. Though they had no 
in Tanganyika, Nigeria and children of. their own they 
Uganda before being appoint- took great pleasure in looking 
ed director of geological snr- after other people's. • 


Beit fellowships 

The following Beit memorial 
fellowships for medical re- 
search. 1 986. are announced: 


< rai tnurtx m. at Rie depurtroen l of 


SELWYN COLLEGE. . 

Elected d ir ector of music Dr A V 
Janes. 

TRINITY COLLEGE. 

Elected into honorary rcAreMps 
Prof T Gold. FRS. Prof J H 
Humphre y. ^E RS. and Sir James 



RJVLGreen 

Wales 

Dr R. M. Green has been 
appointed professor of conser- 
vative dentistry. University 
College of Medicine. 



i College elections 

CLARE HALL 

> Dr S Comm has been efeciod Into a 
fellowship under title A from October 
t itnieiieetual hlsioryr. fellowships 
under UUe C from October: Dr P 
Rowley. Ccmwy. archaeology LStipen- 
diarvi- R J J Martin history and 
philosophy of sciences inon-mpen 


Manadon awards 

Royal Naval Engineering Col- 
lege Degree Awards 1 986 

Admiral of the Fleet Sir John 
Fieldhouse. Chief of Defence 
.Staff, was the guest of honour to 
whom the graduates were pre- 
sented at the Royal Naval 
Engineering College's gradua- 
tion ceremony. 

Results 

Master of Science In Advanced 
Marine Engineering 
Distinction: Lieutenant Commander C 
C Hodge. Umicnani C J Longbotront 
Degree Lieutenant Commanders a w 
H Arnold, j a BucVk-y. C p coma. 
Bra? S'. C S HalletL CF.S A Martins, 
BruzN. A O Momodu. NgN. Lmi ten- 
ants S R Cosden. C J Hoctdev. D C 
Powell. S s Young and Mr K F dun 
r Vickers Sfupouuduig and Engineer- 


Bachelor of Enoineeting with Honours 
Firsl OasKflralion. Sub Ueulmant* C 
J Alien. P E Gallop. R J Hall, p A 
Hammond. M_S Harrison. J M Heiey. 
c w Jenklhs. P J MdrrtV D C Mttfill, 
M N Parker S Shepherd. M P 
Westwood and M R T Warefram. 
Coper Second Clamfirailon. Lteuieiv 
«ID F Holle. RBOF.Su* Ueutenanti 
8 H Cutojjn. T J Daltian. S A 
Des oto. M R GiH. B L H«. C A 


Stirling 

Dr Kenneth Turner, with Inter- 
national Computers Ltd. has 
been appointed as third profes- 
sor in the area of computing 
science. 

York 

Gram 

Agricultural and Food P umm el ; Coun- 
cil El 15312 to Dr D Sanders to 
study mcxecuur meenamsms or inter- 
oeiluur Mgnamng by cytoplasmic 
calcium in ptant ceils (cell signalling 
and rt-cognilioa InlUilftri. 

S OOTer. P E Jcnop. J K Lewis. M A 
Bnen D P Rawlings. C J Saxby and 
S G E Waters 

Lower Second .CtaMflauu; Son 
Ueutenants P Berestord. P Si J 
Brown. I P Bryan. C C Bull. P D H 
Campbell. A L CWniw, K C Ciaflt. I E 
Cume. s A Frencti. C M Giilan. C A 
Hiding. R L Johnson. A M Leigh. R 
A Lobley. M J CMagan. A MUIs. C H 
Moruiead. C J Preeeo. I B Shaw and 
A R winflald. 

Third Oassmcation Sub Ueutenants 

C w Be resfoco -Hartw^u. a M Cor- 
nniL r Davies. P M Eaemnah. NgN. p 
K Fray. M J Hards. O W Hunon. k 
M tui.ro. P W Murptiy and D S 
William. 

Bachelor of Engineering: 

S.uo Lteuienanls P J FVankham. a 
H ewin. r w Holmes, M C G 
Hooklnson. M J Lemon. A D Noala. 


The Queen’s Gold Medal for the 
best overall marks on the en- 
gineering degree course was 
presented (O Sub Lieutenant 
Mark Parker. BEng. Lieutenant 
Nick Oakley. BSc (Eng) was 

S resented with (he Queen’s 
word for the best overall 
results on the post-graduate 
engineering training courses 
over the past twelve months. 


Eleventh Sunday 
after Trinity 

CANTERBURY CATHEDRAL; 8 HO 
9 30 M: 11 Sung Euctv. Mfesa Marla 
T f waa (Haydn). How Wauttfol iffloo 
Dir mountains SuImtI. the Rev A M 
Alkhtn: _3tS_E- Responses. (Rose). 
EMlUt 
Stacev. 

YORK MINSTER: & 8.05 HCS 10.XS 
Sung Eucli (Martin Howl. The Lord Is 
my shepherd (Howl the Treasurer: 
1 1 .30 MfSUnfordl: o E Stanford). Ye 
Choir, of New jeninHm (Stanford), 
the Dean: 6.30' E. 

ST PAUL'S CATHEDRAL: 8. 11.30 
HC. iSurnsloQ). Blessed are the pure in 
heart ■ Watford ravin): 1 &3Q M. 
Responses (Hotmesl. Jubilate CBrttten). 
TeDeuro (chantaj. the Rfv Graham 
RouUedoe; 3.15 t. IPurcetl). 1 Was 
olad i Purcell), the Rev Mtcnaei Beck. 
WESTMINSTER ABBEY: 8 HC 10.30 
M. iBiain. Rootco in the Lord (Anon), 
(he Dean: lido sung Euch. Mag 
8mo (Mozart): 3 E. (Wood). Sing we 


Services tomorrow 

‘ the Re v John Stott: 6JO. ST 
Swimlnbank. SV 

OLD CHURCH. OM F9 
sws 8. 12 HC: 11 M: si 


gjoHCt it. me Rev 


_ gws 

li. MP and HC. Dss S W«son. 
CROSVENOR CHAPEL. South 

coOtns: 630 ES. the Rev P J S 
Peridn. 

HOLY TRINITY. Prince Consort 
Road. SW7: 8-30. 12 JX HCt 11 MP. 
the BWuxj or Furnam. 

HOLY TR&8TV. SMane Shrert. SWl: 
830. 12.10 HC: 1030 Euch. Canon 
Roberts. 

ST ALBAN'S, Brooke SL Ed: 930 
SM: 11 HM. OMiKe). Canatrt do m ino 
i Hester). DSS SDerwin: 530 LM. 


mTOKT. ■ 

ST VEOAS T. ros ier Lane. EC2:. ti 
Sung Euch fTailt?). O Lord, increase 
my irtth (L o ose n wee i. ■ 

ANNUNdATtON. . Bryanhon 
Street Wi: it HM. Mima atnUie est 
regnQm cocforum O/ictorta). Ave 
Marta (Victoria): 6 LM and Benedic- 


_ _ SCOT- 
Co vwtt Cardan. WC2: 11.1S. 
the Rev Ketm M Mcnobb.. 




merrily iCampheflj. 
KjWPgFlsher: 6.30 


dmom^i rmilwii 4.ii <k!5 LMx ix HM. Mbn 


ST CUTHBERT’ 
SW6 lO HC 11 


SOLTHWARK CATHEDRAL: 9 HC: 
1 1 Euch. Mtssa BrwfS In D IMoCim. 
a sacred feast. Worthy art Thro 
iwiiiani. Canon Gerald Parrott: 3 E. 
iFrtedell). Hear my prayer (Men- 
delssohn l. 

WESTMINSTER CATHEDRAL: 7. R. 
9. 12. B.sa 7 LM. 10.30 SM. Mlgsa 
-Cum UihW' (DuruOe). Exaltabo le 
■Campra). O saiuiarfs hastia iGounodk 
3.30 V. Magnificat (Surianai. o 
sacrum convlvuon (Pflonl). 

ST GEORGETS CATHEDRAL. South- 
wark: 8. ID. 19.16 6 LM: 1 1 HM. FT 
victor McOean. 

Dnun and JuoUaie (BntMni. Jesu. 
warn me mb. I pray isanuwi. me Rt 
Ret L Ashton. 

ALL HALLOWS BY THE TOWER: 1 1 
Sung Euch. the Rev Petsr Delaney 
ALL SAINTS. Mwgarrt Street. WlTB. 




nUSMr 3 SS?- 

i® V. Beau mundo cord* 


tn# net- D R watasMO 
i my fatth 

Westminster. 

12.18 HC: 11 M and 
Trevor Beeson. 

■THE- FIELDS. WC2:- 
Vlcor: 11.30 MP. (he 
■Service: 6JO EP. 


load. SWS: li. 




IS. Mweirrt Street. 

5.13 LM. 1 1 HmT Phr ygian Mode 
• Wood). O thou, the central orb 
mood), me vicar: 6 ES and 
bon tSttmerL 
deunngJBarh). 


9. 

cuncta ( 

(Locke). 

FT 

Solemn 

Rev C K Hamel 

ffT h p^^S. Wilton Place. SW|: a. 9 
- 11 SOUB EUCH. DM Rev R G 
ucsrtl. 


Rev j w McMuir. 


3: 11> the 
Mr Tony 


LO EveiHong and 
6.30. the Rev 


arsa? 0 -' 


CHAPEI-pty 


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(MethodWL SWl: it. « 
Oolfr.Rpwe. 


J- HALL 
the Rev g 








i 





The downs and ops of watersknng at Tbonw Park, Soney, where die European Barefoot WaterskiingChai^^ being iu4H tfric wrirwui 


Lifeline of 
£25m for 


feared the.wqrst : when foe 
manN^fotbats^rikfefoour 
British;^ Airways Boeing 757 
into bay N643L : : • ;■■ 

Ttie brflHant sunshine that 
hadscorchedHungaiyfor 90 
manydayshad disappeared 
behind a dfcep. layfer of grey 
overcast and there, was not a 
breafouf windi; • 

: The Srst -rumbtes of thun- 
der weretO'be head dining 
the' next-half hour as * we: 
packed tbegrin^afriyaihaU, 
passports -and visas -at' the 
ready, feeing’ a Kpe of booths 
y^tmh wfcw* there seemed 10 

bfr.7- ah - V unpromising at- 
mosphere of-eonfusiati -and 
inactivity. :Motor racing’s 
Grand,- Prix. diictis had .ar- 
rived in town,- and we sensed , 
tipi perhaps we were there a 
day-too-eariy.’-- '• . ■ ' 
-Nextfoere was- the game of 
find your luggageL Eventually 
discovered oursnot on the 


was toid, and considerable. ^ 
ingenuity, fe.also.bemgshowff:^' 

by other Europeansm finding- - 

'a way. of' visiting tifr .■ 
Hungering. The problem is-/': 
money, or the lade Of i|. - 
' Compared with his eastern, 
neighbours the averaged 
Hungarian is comparatively 
wefl oif with -his monthly -,r 
safecry of abbuf£80, ofwhkfc ’ • 
he will have to spend anvf 
-• thing from- £S to £25 at tte 
gate, depending on hu r yn%y' 
tfl gp point But be is used lo. . 
paying dear for hi& moiorittf" - 
pleasure. A basic Lada I2 uk 
will cost him £2,500, and ' 
will have to wait-four years,' ' 

■ 'Alleviation of the car shoo- ' 
.age is-.one of the longer. tenfi.r> 
benefits which Hungary najjr 
derive from hosting me-^" 
Grand Prix this weekend aflg- 


for the next four years. - - - ■ [ti 
The heme is that when titti U* 




The hope is that when tht| 
world sees the depths of car 




‘Silent’ Gurkhas 
win some appeals 


By Tim Jones 


tin mines 


biftween: two others, one 
marked Prague and the other 
Mosdow: . Things qould o.qly 
get .better— couldn’t they? 

> They (fid; immediately; we 
passed through custams ahd 
into the bristly lit reception . 
hall ; where, for the . first time 


here, car manufacturers ovt» 
sideihe Eastern bloc maybe' 
encouraged to set up shoe 
Ideally. •?- 

..-The Japanese have been 
quick ..off 1 the mark, and 
Daihatsu is already- involved 
in negotiations with load 


Some of the 111 Gurkhas 
dismissed for foiling to co- 
operate with an army inquiry 
into a brawl between officers 
and men during a party in 
Hawaii have been reinstated. 

Others have been un- 
successful in their appeals and 
have been flown back to then- 
homes in Nepal. The Ministry 
of Defence said a “sizeable 
number” of the men had 
asked for their cases to be 
reconsidered after the 
announcement of their dis- 
missal earlier this week. The 
majority of the soldiers were 
not involved in the incident in 
which MajorCorin Ponce and 
a Gurkha captain suffered 
cracked ribs and cuts to the 
head during a party to marie 
the end of a training exercise. 

Major Pearce, who was 
seconded to the 7th Duke of 
Edinburgh’s Own Gurkha Ri- 
fles in February 1984, was 
posted back to Britain after 
the incident 

. Most of the Gurkhas were 
dismissed because they re- 


fused to name the culprits and 
decided, for the first time in 
their glorious 170-year his- 
tory. to disobey orders and 
place loyalty to their comrades 
above loyalty to the Array. 

Before the party which 
ended in uproar and disgrace, 
the Gurkhas had complained 
of inadequate rations of rice 
during the training exercise 


Continued from page T 


and of poor pay allowances 
during their stay in Hawaii 


Because of a tripartite agree- 
ment signed almost 40 years 
ago by India, Britain and 
Nepal, an unmarried Gurkha 
serving overseas receives only 
about one third of the salary 
paid to his British 
counterpart. 

A Ministry of Defence 
spokesman said that because 
of the Gurichas’silence, an 
Army inquiry team had been 
unable to discover exactly 
what happened at the Scho- 
field barracks in Hawaii on the 
night of May 27. 

Tea men count cost, page 5 


the price of tin will' recover.' I 
personally think it wflL” 

Mr David Mudd, Conser- 
vative MP for Falmouth and 
Camborne, said: “There was a 
very strong case in support of 
maintaining the mining of 
strategic minerals in 
Cornwall.” The Government 
has been embarrassed by the 
amount of flak on the . issue 
from Cornish MPs. 


For tbe company, Mr Brian 
Calver, Camon’s managing 
director said: “This is super 
news. We have got three or 
four years breathing space 
which gives us the chance to 
finish what we started. 


He believed that the price of 
tin would rise to around 
£6.000 a tonne in five years 
and that production costs 
would foil sufficiently to make 
the mines viable. The 
workforce at the mines might 
incresase to more than 800 by 
1991. 


Continued from pagel 
seriousness of the situation. 

The decision to re-route the 
Apprentice Bgys of Deny 
parade was taken after a series 
of meetings of senior police 
officers who believed it was 
being staged as a “set piece” 
demonstration to involve loy- 
alists from across the 
province: 

In a • statement which was 
greeted* with anger 'by the 
Apprentice Boys, the RUC 
said ’ Ready was an almost 
totally Roman -Catholic vil- 
lage and that the parade went 
well beyond being local .in 
character. “In these circum- 
stances and fearing a breach of 
the peace or serious ’ public 
disorder, the RUC could not 
permit the parade to take 
place along the route sited by 
the organizers.” ' 

The Apprentice Boys No 
Surrender Club in Ready, 
which has about 100 members 
but -only 20 or 30 living in the . 
village, planned- the parade to 
unfiiri a new banner; but 
nationalists in the town-said 


that by inviting large numbers 
-froth across the province they 
intended it-fo be an exercisein 
triumphalism. 

.The organizers had invited 
120 bands;- Apprentice . Boys 
and- members of the Ulster 
Clubs. Mr Jerome . Mallon, a 
local Social Democratic * and : 
labour Party cotrariflor, pre- 
dicted: “There is bound lo be 
trouble. It should have been 
banned. I’m very Very : 
dfoappointed ” 

Unionists claimed the de- 
cision. was yet further* ev- 
idence of the influence of Mr 
Peter. Barry,- .* the Irish 
Republic’s Minister for For- 
eign Affairs, over events in the 
north. Mr John Noble, general 
secretary of the Apprentice 
Bbys; said: Tm- angry and 
disgustedthmonceagainthe 
RUC has bowed to the dic- 
tates of FeterBariy.** ' 

-He said the occasion wasrto 
be an occasion for dignity and 
pride. 

But Protestants in the town 
privately wanted little to do 
with last night’s parade. ... 


C&ptitmed from page 1 . 


.* ffe. said Britain’s refusal; to 
foHow.. the * mmi-summit’s 
sanctions . - jfecom m endatfons : 
was “a Wessm^ in disguise” 
for foe: Commonwealth.. . 


• - The meeting.’, in-. Mari- 
borbogh House showed > .“the 
Commonwealth can act and 
ad opposed to the wishes of 
■titetourse<£osenrby .Britain. I . 
am glad this has* happened;” 
Be 'said.. 1 •• •'■...* . V ; ’ . 


zr~ . 4 r t x, [_TT7“j m h -W: ■ 1 - -ifW* j. 






hi !Hi Sj : T * Via TiV-^rf- 


_ But- *• foe -South - African. 
Broadcasting Corporation 
said the setbacks to foe Pie-, 
toria economy co^d be over- 
come. : 

’ ¥ The skill and^ ingenuity 
that saw' an embargo on 60 
supplies overcome and that 
saw: sanctions’ expand, not 
weaken. our military caphbil- 
ity.areavailabte m abundant 
measure to gjve y .farther 
strength to the- economy, and 
even to stimulate expansion in 
stictors- where this is humanly 
possible.” 




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THE TIMES INFORMATION SERVICE 


Solution to Puzzle No 17J19 Solution to Puzzle No 17,114 I Today’s events 



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Royal engagements 
The Queen visits Oydfoank 
lo_mark Jts_ ceiiiehary; arrive 
Briiannia Docks, I (£30- 



Itrwp 


re 

• 

*■ - - 


Weather 


A prize ofThe Ti mes Atlas of Worid History will be given for the 
first three correct solutions opened next Thursday. Entries 
should be addressed to: The Times. Saturday Crossword 
Competition PO Box 486. 1 Virginia Street. London. El 9XN. 
The winners and solution will be published next Saturday. 

The winners of last Saturday's competition are: Mrs G Cooke. 
Morcstcad. Winchester. Hants ; G A Lucas, Romsey Road, 
Winchester. J P L Tory. Bryanston. Blandford, Dorset. 


Name 


Address 


The Times Crossword Puzzle No 17,120 


■ ■ u ■ 


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"■Si 


Britannia Docks, 1030. 

New exhibitions 

Scottish Landscapes by Alan 
Turner. Commonwealth In- 
stitute Gallery. Rutland : So, 
Edinburgh; Mon to Fri 10 to S, 
Sat 10 to 1 2 {ends Aug 30) 

Paintings by Gurminder 
Sikand: Ceramics by Kyra Cane; 
the Castle Museum. Notting- 
ham; Mon to Sun 10 to 5.45 
(ends Sept 21) 

At Home: Scottish Interiors 
1820-1929. the Fine An Society, 
12 Great King St. Edinburgh; 
Mon to Fri 930 to 530. Sal 10 
to I (ends Sept 20) 

A Retrospective of John 
BeQany. Scottish National Gal- 
lery of Modem Art. Bdford Rd,' 
Edinburgh; Mon to Sat 10 to 5, 
Sun 2 to 5 (ends Sept 21) . 

Portrait 80’s: British. Por- 
traiture 1980-1985. Victoria Art 
Gallery. Bridge St. Bath; Mon to 
Fri 10to6.Sat 10 to 5 (ends Sept 
6) 

.Architecture at a price... 
Royal Fine An Commission for 
Scotland. 9 Athol! Crescent.' 
Edinburgh: Mon to Sun 10 to 4 
(ends Aug 31) 

General 

Children’s Day: mask mak- 
ing. fun castle, model tramway, 
miniature railway and com- 
petitions. Han bury Hall, nr 
Droitwich. 12 to 6. 

(0th Hastings Town and 
Country Fain craft and trade- 
exhibits. demonstrations and 
horticultural display. Alexandra 
Park. Hastings, today and to- 
morrow 10 to 6. 

Rugmaking demonstration by 
Mrs Wagstaff. Co is wo Id 
Countryside Collection. 


poisonous seed-pods fipmfabor- 
_num _tre^_partkailaiiy_wheQ. 
children are around. After roses 
have finished their first flower- 
ing, and the stems cut back to an 
outward pointing leaf with five 
leaflets, give the plants a feed 
with a good generalfcmlizer, or 
if you prefer, with a special rose 
fertilizer. This, treatment, jised 
with plenty of water in dry 
.-spells, .will enocurage a ; good 
second crop of flowers in the 
autumn. 

Roses, and 'indeed other 
shrubs purchased as “diy root” 
plants, plastic-wrapped; in High 
Street stores or garden centres, 


A.dfy dajr witii stmay ^ 
periods; ia rnost plates as 
a iicfee of itigh .piTesstire 
covers Tnuch of U-IC . .* 


... » a : - 


6 am to midnight 



; 

. s * 




2 - um i MJ - . -ll, 

■A.., ‘raS-.w-n.lJ 


must have acfequaie .water. 
Many have not made much 
growth , so far ' this year. Even 
container-grown roses apd other 
shrubs purchased from garden 
centres need to be assiduously 
watered. Borders at foe foot of 
walls receive ranch less rain 
than beds, or. bonders in the 
open. RJEL 


Tugowita par ; 

Him lor ms danumihalion barttiiotBa 
ortv-ss supplied bytedqm 8w* PLC. 
. Orag B -nrta s japR i jf to . t rav elHin’ 
cheques and otfiar foreign cwrency 


wrwf^sra 


mpmc 

1 

• • J 


HighTides 


ami w — wa rn aasa • 

London: Tim FT Indn doaad down.4.1 • 
at '12174. 


max. wrap tfitol 


North leach, today (0.30 to 5, 
lomorow 230 to 5. - 
Summer .Steam Weekend: 
femiiy- events, Rutland Railway 
Museum. Ash well . . Rd. 

Cottesmore, nr Oakham, today 
and tomorrow 1 1 to-5. 


Tomorrow's events 




ACROSS 

1 Blow from tiger, say. could 

stop work (4-5.61. 

9 Recounts contents of free 
book (9). 

10 Land divided - parts of it 
arc OK. perhaps (5). 

11 Parents sheltering ringleader 
in Italian city (S). 

12 This person's said to be 
alone (4). 

•43 Attempt to form a party (4). 

* 15 Dark blue can be neat on a 
boy (7). 

17 Pictures family in water- 
proof material (7L 

18 Neither odd in number, nor 
in level (4.3); • 

20 Brigade deployed to cut a 
communication link (7). 

.21 One of the first names re- 
corded in Somerset House 
(4L 

22 Six-foot high-jumper (4). 

23 Top scorer's off-drive (5). 

26 P.M. giving direction (51. 

27 Like a maid during her wed- 

. ding? (2.7). 

28 Musical direction — right, 

.- left, right? (4.4.5). 


DOWN 

1 It might produce nonsensi- 
cal prose with wrong disc 
(4.10). 

2 Isolate individual between 
sides (5). 

3 It’s relatively informative, 
and reputedly odious (10). 

4 After start of triaL motive 
for crime revealed (7). 

5 Roman shields game Japa- 
nese shoots (7). 

■ 6 Dark. like FL Knox (4). 

7 Set aside for attention, bovs 

(9)-. - ' 


New exhibitions 
Wort by . Andrew Shiitt, 
Towndey Han Art Gallery and 
Museum. Towndey Park. Burn- 
ley: Mon to Fri 10 to 530, Sun 
12 to 5 (ends 'Sept 7) 

.. Paintings of the- American 
South - wesl by Dale Bratcher. 
Doncaster. Museum and Art 
Gallery. Chequer Rd: Mon .to 
Thursand Sat 10 to 5. Sun 2 to 5 


. Births: base -Walton; author. 
The Compiau Angler, Stafford, 
1593; *11011198 Telford, . civil 


engineer. -Westkirk. “Dumfries, 

1 757: Jean Piaget, psychologist. 
NeuctateL. 1 896; Giles Cooper, 
playwright. Diibli n. - 1 9 1 8. 

Deaths: Frederick- Marryat, 
novelist. Mr. Midshipman Easy, 
Langbam. Norfolk. 1848: Ernest . 
HaeckeL zoOlogisL- Jena...Ger- 
many. 1919:. -‘ ■ 


8 immediate payment for res- 
cuers? (43.8)7 

14 True rivals may be bevond 
reach of authority (5,5)7 

16 Ruin for cast going too for 
(9). 

19 Composer includes extra 
note for scores (7). 

20 Collected a vessel in a sea 
(7).. 

24 No dilemma for this pachy- 
derm in India (5). 

25 Measure of resistance for 
monarch’s benefit (4). 


Music 

Recital by the Longslade Con- 
sort Warrington Parish Church. 
6.30. . . 

General 

A "Jacobean** Open After- 
noon: music, dancing and dis- 
plays of foe Jacobean period: 
Crossways Farm. AUnger, 2 -to 

Antiques' and Collectors Fair. 
Bii^ham HaJL Cirencester. 10 


Lunch Aid 




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NOON TODAY 



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Around Britain 




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BUSINESS AND FINANCE 



TIMES 


iy 

SPORT 30 
TELEVISION AND RADIO 33 


Executive Editor 
Kenneth Fleet 


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STOCK MARKET 


PFT 30 Stow 
1217.4(-4.1) 

FT-SE100 

1526.7 (-3.2) 



120.08 (+ ft01 ) 7 ._\ 

THE POUND A 


Dollar 

T.4745 (-0:0020) 

W German mark 

ap522 (0.02033 

Trade-weighted 

70-9. (same)! . 


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John Bln 


IG Index 
!buys rival 

. IG Index, lie commodities 
-le share indices beiiisg, con- 
csttu has bought its smaller 
rival, Ladbroke Index. • 

IG offers bets on 70 to 80- 
cpmmodities, futures, iudices 
and options.' Ladbroke offers 
si* bets on the FT30 index, 
FT-SE J00 index, Dow Jones 
industrial average, 

pound/doilar . - rale, 
doBar/mark rate and the gold 
price; •„ 

Mr^Stuart Wheder, the IG 
Clan aging director,- who 
founded the company in 1 97S, 
bad the previous - year sug- 
gested to Ladbroke that It set 
up: in competition with- the 
Criihil Index Ladbroke later 
bougbuhe' -.Coral Index and 
now .IG has swallowed 
Ladbroke. No price rs being 
disclosed, but if IC 
Ladbroke’s clients 
double its turnover. 


IG keepsl-all 
it sitoidd 


On bid trail 

^ ' Intervision Video has- com- 
pleted its reorganization and 
changed • its 1 name,;. <o 
Cllyvision. The new - board 
will immediately look for 
acquisitions in ihelrisurc and 
allied fields. . 


Bid response 


--■***■ »»■■■« 



-Meggilt Holdings re- 
sponded - yesterday to 
Bestobell’s defence document; 
issued - last Wednesd ay; wit h 
tenewed - empbasfe m tfie 
annmen^Idgi^m foehidf 

No referral 

. . In accordance 1 with. Lthe 
recommendation of the.Direc-t 
tor. General, of Fhir Trading, 
the: Trade, and. Indushy .Sec- 
retary is not referring Turner 
& Newall’s proposed ao 
quisition of 'Ac io ! the 
Monopolies and Mergers 
Commission, ' 

Maltings sale 

Grand -Meiropolitan. the 
brewing group, is selling its 
maltings business, which em- 
ploys 70 people at four loca- 
tions, to the privately owned 
JP'; Simpson for an un- 
disclosed amount. 

Websters writ 

Websters Drives is to issue a 
writ ‘ for- defamation, against 
Sound Diffusion, after recur- 
ring problems with lifts made 
byJSound Diffusion's subsid- 
iary, Alpha Lifts. Several of 
the lifts have gear boxes made 
by.Websters. . 

Bell’s agency 

Lowe H oward-Spri ng 
Marschalk has been appointed - 
the British and international 
agency for the Bell's whisky 
account. Bell's 1986 advertis- 
ing budget is £2 million and 
will increase next year. - 


Tempos 20 
Cmpqy News 20 
Stock'Mwke* 30 
Will Stmt -20 
Cocament -21 
F«s%nExck 21 
Tn^ed Opts 21 


Money Mrfcts 21 
Commodities 21 
USM Prices! 21 
Unit Trusts 22 
Share Pres 23 
F«m0y Mooey24 



The. Stock Exchange yes« : 
terday -issued its “definitive 
arrangements’^ for -the third 
■markcL These showed - same, 
relaxation froth -the draft Tntes- 
iSsuedin May!' J 5 

■The past two ,months;have 
been' spent “ in consultation , 
-with more than 200 interested 
parties, including members of < 
the Stock Exchange; licensed 
dealers and government 
agencies. : 

The mam changes arc a 
Tetreat -from the outright -ban 
on . certain types of company 
eomihg to the .third market, so 

- long as foe disqualifying, activ- 
ities do not amount to mom 
than 10 per cent of the 
companies' profits, turnover 
or capital employed; . . 

Special permission by the. 
Stock Exchange committee mi 
quotations could . still admit 
companies breaching the. 10 
per cent limit. - 
- The disqualifying activities 
are-theTroloing of cash or near 
cash assets, minority interests 
in other companies or holdiiig 
or .dealing m investments, 

■ property or commodities. 

- The draft rule insisting that 

-third market .companies be 
ihcorporaied- in ‘ Britain is 
retained, but again special 
permission from the quota- 
tions committee 1 can over- 
come the rule. • 

-The Stock Exchange, whose 

Greycoat 


atPhit 


■ml ill I Ji ■ tfi|« 

WlllVJ pal 


By Richard Thomson ' 

' Mr Geoffrey Wilson;; the 
chairman of Greycbat Group. 
{ yesterday sent' a letter’ to 
Property Holdings and Invest- 
ment Trust shareholders hit- 
tingout at statements madeby 
Ph it .which he caUed 
“innacurafe." 

^r^A?t!^rt“^olnc“Phtt , s 

^ chMrifia ^rge^vft|^gie- 

about Greycoat ' - v * 

• Greyqoafs£109 millionbid 
for j»hiu. the. ^property. inyest- 
nient company,, --closes on 
Tuesday. Mr Wilson-sad that 
if the onerdid notgo uncondi- 
tional at ibat stage ft was likely 
to be extended. , 

It does not seem likely, 
however; that the size of the 
offer would be increased if an 
extension was. jiccessaiy. Mr 
Wilson said: “At the present- 
time I cannot see any. reason 
to mcrease-ouroffer.*'' ' : 

In- his letter Mr Wilson 
corrects “inacuararies” 'con- 
tained in a letter sent by Phit : 
to ils shareholders. 

PKH claimed that Greycoat 
used doubtful - valuations on 
many properties,- but Mr Wil- 
son said that all the company's 
properties -were valued by 
repiaable. companies’ in ac- 
cordance with (he Guidance 
Notes ‘ on the Valuation- of 
Assets issued by the Royal 
IifStliliile -of Chartered 
Surveyors. - 

But according to Mr John a 
third of Greycoat's properties 
were. inadequately valued . 

He said ■ that Greycoat’s 
accounting policy, criticized 
by Phil, was normal far a 
property, development com- 
pany! Although Phit'-said that 
its shareholders will own only- 
37. per cent of the combined 
company's equity, Mr Wilson 
sajd~ the .figure win be more' 
than 40 per cent 
Mr- Wilson . accused Phit of 
ignoring Greycoat’s perfor- 
mance and' exaggerating the 1 
dynamism of its-own manage- 

menL ' 


- By Alison Eadie * 

chairman -is! Sir Nicholas 
. Goodisoiu has maintained its 
-insistence, .-that sponsors! of 
ooTTipaaies . coming to market ■ 
/must be exchange members. . 

A great deal of reliance in 
.the .'..exchange's scheme of 
things is placed mi the vigi- 
lance, of foe sponsor making 
anie.thc company r is a sound 
; 'dne.- There- wll, however, be 
-no draconian, consequences' 

- for -a. sponsor which brings - 
unsuccessful companies to the 

markeL 

Mr- Graham Ross RusseTL, 
‘deputy - chairman of the ex- 
change, said yesterday that the 
greater weight will tie with 
public perception rather than 
the Stock Exchange. Investors 
and companies seeking list- 
ings will tight shy of sponsors 
with poor records. 

Sponsorswbo wish torelin- 
quifo their sponsorship, be- 
cause ■ the company is .no 
longer complying with third 
market rules, must notify the 
committee on quotations with 
adequate reasons. The 
-committee will then ensure 
that- dealings . m the stock are 
conducted on an off-market 
‘basis only until an alternative 
sponsor is found. ■ ' 

'! - Investors will still he pro- 
tected by the Stock Exchange 
compensation fund, if. no 
alternative sponsor is found.. 

No minimum and maxi- - 


Anew 


mum limits have been set for 
the size of companies coming 
'to the third market 
The exchange has main- 
tained its preference for two. to : 
four market makers in each 
.stock when it bapns dealings, 
but h has left it to the 
discretion of -the Stock; - Ex- 
cteoge Council to reduce foe 
requirement to .one 
The exchange hopes to have', 
its third market in operation 
by November or December. . 

The new rules- do not re- 
move the potential conflict 
with foe Securities and Invest- 
ment Board's rules; which 
stipulate that a Recognized 
Investment Exchange .(the 
third -market) cannot limit its 
membership -to. those au- 
thorized by a particular self- 
regiiiaiory organization (the 
Stock Exchange). However, 
the SE market will begin 
operations before the SIB is 
authorized by Parliament 
Several-, over-ihe-counter 
dealers have approached the 
Stock- Exchange about become 
ing members' and participat- 
ing on. the third, market 
-However, they do not know 
. whether they win be accepted 
by the exchange, and. six 
licensed dealers.' including 
Harvard Securities, are meet- 
ing next week to consider 
setting iipa rival RIE to coyer 
the third market 



Sir Nicholas Goodison, chairman of the Stock Exchange: third-tier market to start in 

November 



. By Cliff Feltham 


. The Unlisted Securities 
Market which critics claimed 
was running out .of. steam 
earlier in the year, is firmly 
back in business. 

The. latest survey 


U- estimates that- the average 
cost of a company raising £5 
million was £384.000. 

Mr A)an Comber, who 
• ’ specializes in USM companies 

_ of .the ' for Peal Marwick, said that the 

market by accountants Teat- decision by the Slock Exr 
Marwick, shows that 27* change -Council" io raise- foe 
companies joined in foe sec-_upper. limit, foe placujgs.ftqm 
ond-quancr of foeycar com- 13 millioq -to £5 piifoon 
'pared with -seven in the first should improve the position.'. 
qt®ter.‘- , / V-- r " •"-= “More"^ompanies will be 

—The. tigtires'-indicate mo :-^ble to^qjii the USM without 
shortage -of .mterest.m ihe incurring: the additional 
USM in' Ae run tip to big Marketing costs required by 
bang, and reduce fears, voiced the conditions of an offer for 
earlier. in. ihe . year, jhat the sale:*’.; . .. - 

junior market is running out The- changes. Mr Comber 
of. steam,” the -accountants believes, are also likely to 


say. . 

. But they point out that the 
high cost ■ of. coming to the 
USM through an offer for sale 
might have kept some compa- 
nies away. 

■ The survey shows.that only 
two . companies Joined the 
market through an -offer-for 


increase the number of foil 
listings. “The reduction in the 
advertising requirements for 
companies raising up to £15 
million oh the foil' Stock 
Exchange makes the main 
market more attractive: 

.By the end of June 470 
companies' had obtained a 


,sab6fup.to £5. million in the,; quotation on the USM: Of 
year, to Juno' 30. " compared these 6\ had -switched to a full 
wiih* tep in . the previous year, tistmg. -■ 


Fraser decision dates 


The' Court of Session in 
Edinburgh has fixed October 9 
and 10 to settle .whether 
Houseof Fraser should.repay 
its preference share - caphaL 
• The~ repayment was pro- 
posed on May 1-9 and aph 
proved; -at an extraordinary 
■generaT : nteeiing-on June 11. 
-Hie proposal requires the 
court's approval. - 
. Lonrho, as foe benefirial 
owner of 97,953 -5.25 per cent 
cumulative preference shares, 
intervened on- the basis that 
the repayment involved not a; 
fulfilment of the class rights of 
the holders of the shares but a 
variation. 

Lonirha argued that a vari- 


ation required tite consent of 
the holders of each' class of 
preference shares. House of 
Fraser's legal advisers dispute 
Lonrho's views. 

Meanwhile, Houseof Fraser 
yesterday doubled its divi- 
dend to l2Jp in the 66 weeks 
to March 3 compared with fop 
6.25p paid in the previous. 12 
■montits: The- reporting period 
was changed to conform with 
foe holding company. 

Operating .profit' rose to 
£71.7 mi!IR>n-fh>m £58 mil- 
lion on turnover of £U465;9 
million, up .from £1,058.1 
million-. 

Comment, page 21 


Sellafield tests way to 
clean nuclear waste 


British Nuclear Fuels, at 
Setlafield ■ in Cumbria, . is 
eraloatmg a system, devel- 
oped in Canada, for cleaning 
radio-active waste. Northern 
Empowering. Industries is to 
act as project manager for the 
system, which has been devel- 
oped by DeVoe-Holbein 
International. 

• if is one of the first moves in 
a . European sales drive 
launched for., the system, 
which extracts from water 
metals .ranging from gold and 
silver fo toxic wastes, includ- 
ing, radioactive elements like 
those released iit the Soviet 
atomic power station disaster. 

The industrial market is 
vast, with metal processing 
alone. worth an estimated £2 
billion this year in Europe 
including Britain, according to 
TteVoe-Htilbein; Y-; '. * 


By Our Industrial Editor 

Low-level nuclear waste was 
still mostly diluted and dis- 
persed, whereas the DeVoe- 
Holbein system by removing 
trace elements could make a 
big contribution to dealing 
with such waste, according to 
Dr Leo Yaffe, a nuclear cbem- 


wonld not pretend that our 
technology offers a total solu- 
tion to nuclear waste problems 
but hope it will produce a part 
solution." It could not deal 
with large-scale removal of 
uranium, for instance, because 
of the volume of metal in- 


i st ‘who is an administrator of ' volved, he added. 


McGill University’ in Mon- 
treal. 

The unclear metals which 
coaid be dealt with, especially 
those involved in nudear fuel 
reprocessing in which BNF is 
involved, include caesium 
137, strontium 90, plutonium 
and cobalt 60, according to Dr 
Irving DeVoe, managing 
director of DeVoe-Holbein. 

Dr DeVoe,' who developed 
the sy stem .with fellow micro- 
biologist, Dr .Brace . Holbein, 
from research work on men- 
: -itigitis" in 1980; said: “We 


-When researching men- 
ingitis, the two Canadians 
explored' the human body's 
microbiological systems for 
transporting trace metals 
needed nutritionally. They 
adapted this natural system by 
synthesizing materials that 
selectively attract metals. 

So far about 40 different 
metals can be captured from 
the water in which they are 
carried, effective to a claimed 
99.9 per cent so allowing water 
either to be re-cyded or harm- 
lessly dispersed. 


Jack L Israel 
pays £317,000 
for two firms 

: Jack L' Israel has acquired 
Osborne Brothers and 
Neatstar. Transport for a total 
of £317.000 — to be paid in 
qish and shares. . 

• Israel is : a canned fruit and 
vegetable importer and 
distributor, which joined the 
Unlisted - Securities Market 
Iasi year. 

• . The purchase price for Os- 
borne, a warehousing com- 
pany, -is -£138.000,. to be 
satisfied by the issue of 
2 73.7 7^ Israel shares with the 
cash balance payable over two 
years." 

The price' for Neatstar is 
£] 79,000, to be satisfied by the 
issue of 273,776 shares with, 
the cash* balance payable- over 
two years.- 

In the nine months to April 
30. Neatstar incurred a net 
loss of £9,400. 

- The chairman. Mr . John 
Alexander, says that he ex- 
pects both -companies to make - 
a contribution to profit in the 
present financial year.' 

- At yesterday's annual meet- 
ing he said the group was more 
stable, with problems in the 
insurance division overcome 
to a large extent. 


Glaxo sells subsidiary 

By Teresa Poole - • - 

Glaxo, the pharmaceuticals tines, to retail chemists in 


group, is Id continue with the 
disposal of non-mainstream 
activities with foe sale, agreed 
yesterday, of a subsidiary, 
Evans Medical to a team of 
directors and managers for 
£27 minion. 

Evans Medical manufac- 
tures and supplies a wide 
range of generic (off-patent) 
and over-the-counter medi- 


Britain. 

Its management ap- 
proached Glaxo in May with 
buyout proposals. 

Glaxo emphasized yes- 
terday that the sale did not 
signal any. more widespread 
move out of generic dregs. 

Evans Medical.made profits 
of around £3 minion on sales 
of £30 million in the year to 
June. 


Whisky 
makers 
seek eud 
to ban 

By Derek Harris 
Industrial Editor 

The Scotch Whisky Associ- 
ation has called on foe Euro- 
pean Commission to act to 
force Greece to lift a ban on 
imports of akholic drinks, 

The association says the 
one-month ban, coupled with 
selectively heavy taxation, is 
causing its members severe 
problems. 

Whisky makers are suffer- 
ing along with all exporters of 
alcoholic drinks to Greece but 
Scotch had been doing es- 
pecially well in building up 
sales. Exports to Greece rose 
24 per cent last year to 
represent 2 per cent of all 
Scotch exports but various 
restrictions cut them by 9 per 
cent in the first five months of 
this year 

The ban, which came into 
force at foe end of last month, 
means that importers of 
Scotch cannot obtain licences 
and the association fears that 
things could gel worse. 

It has told the European 
Commission: “On the basis of 
past experience trade sources 
fear that the Greek Govern- 
ment will cither extend foe 
ban or employ bureaucratic 
delaying tactics associated 
with' new price approval mea- 
sures to prolong foe blockage 
of alcoholic beverage 
imports." 

The price approval mea- 
sures were also brought in (ate 
last month. They require im- 
porters to acquire approval 
from a committee of foe Bank 
of Greece before an import 
licence is issued. It means 
much documentation. 

A backlog in dealing with 
applications for Scotch im- 
ports as well as other products 
has built up, according to foe 
association. 

Before the latest curbs 
Scotch had been subjected to . 
what ihe'association describes • 
as severe restrictions and bla- . 
tant tax discrimination. Sinoe - 
October last year import 
deposits to 80 per cent of 
landed value have been nec- 
essary, held for six months 
without interest by foe Bank . 
of Greece. 

Scotch was already bearing 
a regulatory tax of 143 percent 
of duty paid value compared 
with only 47 per cent on 
imported brandy while spirits 
distilled in Greece escaped foe 
tax altogether. This discrimi- 
natory lax is to go but not until 
the beginning of 1 989. 

Mr Bill Bewsher, the Scotch 
Whisky Association's director 
general, in calling on foe 
Commission to take immedi- 
ate action over the ban, said: 
“The latest measures, which 
are a clear contravention of 
foe EC Treaty, make a mock- - 
cry of the Common MarkeL” 


MARKET SUMMARY 


STOCK MARKETS 


■ r 

j 


>*- 


V 

at " 


.. i 
,-r* 




- New Yoik 
1 Dow Jones 

.' Tokyo 

Nikkei Dow 

. HoOgKong: 

• Hang Seng 

:.i AmJrterdam: Gen 
Sydney: AO 

- Frankfurt: - 

. • Commerzbank _ 
;• Brussels: 

General 


- r;- 


_ 1784J31 <-1.87J* 
1743&53 (+13.17) 


1931.29 (+11.11 
290.4 (+2 * 

— iisai 1 + 2 . 


. 1952J3 (+64.0) 

„ 77922 (+5-' 
_ 378.1 


;* A ' 

rf *- .. • 

.*• h C . 

to r ' .1’ - '> . 

HIM**’ 


^ I* 


Parte CAC ..... 

Zurich: 

SKA General n/a 

London closing prices Page 23 


INTEREST RATES 




******* 
in 


to** - 

«r 

SC? 






... r»-' 


U 






isr. 


gpiir 

*-•- : : 




4 

r* 

, i-'V 

I 

?S 

A 

i-3 

: i' 1 - 


b yrt w ; - 
Bank Base: 10% 

3^nonth Irrtwbank i0-97«% 
3+nqnth eligible bUteS%-9Wart6 

bigrf fiflrata 

Prime. Rate 8% ' 

Federal Funds! 6 V- ' 

3-month Treasury 89b 5.70-5.68* 
30-year bonds 


CURRENCIES 


London: 

R81A745 

£iDM3.0522 
£SwFi2.4602 
E FFr92308 
E.Yen22722 
£: I0dfflc70j9- 


NewYoric 

2:81.4745*- 
S: DM2.0700" 
$j Index: t«4J 

ECU £0-689508 
.SQR9k818809 


mainPrice changes 



515p(+10p) 
428p +10p] 
760pi +10p> 
883p +30p) 
44 2p +18p> 


FALLS: 

3HkJ7-5nl 





British Aerospace, — 







1480 (- 7rt 


« 945p(-15p) 


_ loop (-1 Op) 

L GouM 

- 108p.(-10pj 


GOLD 


London 
AM $36T.8S | 

Oosmi 
251.00) 

NewYoric. : • - 

Comex $369.60-370.10 


NORTH SEA OIL 


BmnMSepa-, 

’Denotes latest trading- 1 


350) 


Patent agents may face 



. Britain's 1,200 patent 
agents are facing a possible 
referral to the Monopolies and 
Mergers Commission by the 
Office ofFalr Trading. . 

The profession's statutory 
monopoly, administered by tbe 
Chartered Institute Patent 
Agents (CIPAX is the latest in 
the line of. practices, mduding 
those of solititors and op- 
ticians, to come endec scrutiny 
In the Government's campaign 
to open up -professional 
services.! . 

Changes, tf they come, rare 
likely to affect tinree areas in 
particutarr advcrfefflg,. wfifafo 
at present isr restricted under 
CIPA’s rules; fees; on which 
foe institete gives guidance to 
its membei's;and rules. These 
govern the tide of ^patent 
agent" which fa determined by 
passing -an examination and 

paying a registration fee. 

. It is thoH^ht that there are 
many groups who could give 
competent advice on -the 
protection-of innovations but 
are prevented from doing so. 
In addition, it is signed, a 

broader spread of help far 
Britain's hard-pressed, in- 
ventors, renowned for letting 


By Anne Warden 
to be exploited abroad, might 
coax more of foem.tb'regjster. 

Tbe OFT fa due to report 
.soon to Mr Michael Howard, 
Parliamentary Uhder-Sec- 
retaiy for Corporate and Con- 
s timer Affairs. It has made a 
survey; as yet anpabifaheiL 
users of the patent system ami 
patent applications. The Gov- 
. emment referred ihe question 
of themonoptfiy aud its effect 
on competition to-theOfiice in 
July last year. ■ 

According to' Mr 'Richard 
Gallafent, a member of 
CIPA's coandL, talks' have 
been- nnderway since a jQreen 
Paper in 1983, which con- 
tained suggestions for reform. 

An mtestigation was "ab- 
solutely fair , he said and 
: added, M ! hope that we shall 
come up dean. 

The most significant efiaif .v 
suggested was, he felt, the 
review of those entitled to call 
.themselves. patent agents. It 
was the essentially political 
question ofwhether there were 
a lot of people who could be 
giving advice but were imjprop- 
erly prevented from doing so. 

Whatever foe outcome, he 
said; u what!w£want to do is.to 


maintain an - ' identifiable | 
profession." .' 

The impending decision is i 
the. latest in . a .series of 
' nphpavrals for those handling 
patents. The profession will 
have to work with an. atjd 
unknown quantity when the 
Patents Office is hived off as a 
non-departmental public body, 
eligible to rdteive private 
frmds.in April 1988. A cor-' 
porate plan, commissioned by 
the Department of Trade and 
Industry, fa being drawn np by I 
PE Consulting Services, a I 
management -.consultancy | 
based in Egham, Surrey. 

Many finns.of palentagenin | 
have only recently recovered 
from the' loss of btfainess eight 
years ago when the establish- 
ment -of tiie European Patent 
Office in Munich, under the 
aegfa of foe Cooncfl of Europe, 
forced them to shed partners 
and move -to smaller offices. 

Indeed, fw more' than half of 
Britain's .patent . agents who 
also bold the title of European 
patent attorney, a change in 
foe trales of business at home 
may not have as modi effect as 
foe. Government might wish, 
since restrictions imposed by 
bodtes abroad will still apply. ; 


Europe-go 
for the encore. 

Following spectacular growth in 1985 
European markets have consolidated in the 
first half of this year. Many financial advisers 
are now looking again towards Europe for 
dynamic growth. 

The Oppenheimer European 
Growth Trust 

aims to capitalise on the obvious benefits of 
low interest rates, low inflation, dramatically 
reduced eneigy costs and the general climate of 
political stability. European markets are still 
relatively cheap. 

Currency Gains 

In addition, to the healthy outlook for 
stockmarkets, clients, will benefit further if the 
pound continues tp weaken against major 
European currencies, for example the Swiss 
Franc has appreciated 15% against Sterling 
so far this year. 

Oppenheimer was one of the first to forecast 
the major European potential in late 1984. 
Our European fund was the top performing 
of all authorised unit trusts in 1985 and is 
currently up 59.9% over the 12 months to 
1st July. 

For a copy of our latest Euro- 
pean brochure call 01-489 1078 
or write to Oppenheimer at 
66 Cannon St, London EC4N 6AE. 






20 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


* * *■ fr ft SL 


WALL STREET 


Bonds provide support 


New York (Agencies) - 
Share pikes edged higher in 
moderate early trading yes- 
terday, continuing Thursday's 
advance. Once again, a stron- 
ger bond market provided 
support. 

The Dow Joses industrial 
average rose by 5 points to 
1,791.28. 

Analysts reported that in- 
stitutional investors had been 
cautious buyers. Others said 
that a tendency to take profits 
was continuing. 

The number of stocks rising 
outnumbered the declining 
ones by three to two on a 
volume of 14 million shares. 

Consolidated Edison topped 
the list of active shares, clip- 
ping by 'A to 48%. IBM 
advanced by Vi to 131%, 
Digital Equipment by l'A to 


93% and Texas Instruments 
by 3% to 108%- The trans- 
portation average was 1.25 
points up at 718.00- 
On Thursday, the Dow 
Jones industrial average 
ended 6.75 points higher at 
1,78628 -its highest dose far 
nearly two weeks. Shares 
ended the session with 
modest gain after a midday 
rally had run out of steam. 

Mr Jack Conlaa of E 
Hatton explained: mar- 

ket was essentially a victim of 
profit-taking late in the 
session" 

Advancing issues were 
greater t h«n tolling ones on 
Thursday by four to three; The 
bond market was stronger 
after reports that the US 
Treasury auction did better 
than expected. 


AMR 

ASA 

AttedSkn 
AfledStrs 
AdfsCMnrs 
Alcoa 
Amaxlnc 
Am'rda Hs 
Am Brands 
Am Can 
Am Cynmd 
AmEtPwr 
Am Express 
Am Home 
Am Motors 
AmSTnrd 
AmTeteftfi 
Amoco 
ArmcoSoe! 
Asarco 


Bankamor 


Beth Steel 


Brdsfl 


BP 


Compiler 
Cetanese 
central SW 
Champion 
Chase Man 

CnmSklov 

Chevron 

Chrysler 


CtakU_ r 
Coca Cola 


CmbtnEna 
Comwftft Efl 
Cons Eds 


Com Data 
Comma Gl 
CPC hit 

Crane 

OnZeSsr 
Dart ft Kraft 
Deere 
Doha Air 
Detroit Ed 
DfcrtalEq 

Dow Chem 


DuPont 
Eastern Mr 
Estm Kodak 
Eaton Coro 
Emerson B 


Red 


tni wp 

WSfe 


V 

T 


V 

T 


r 

ff* 

51 

50 


23% 

23% 

Pfizer 

67% 

67% 

31 Vi 

31% 

Fst Chicago 

29% 

29% 

PtwtpsDge 

19 

18% 

40% 

40% 

FW ins Boon 

62% 

62% 

Rt*J| 

69% 

68% 

49 

49% 


7% 

7% 

IITr-rfin 

9% 

9% 

3K 

3% 

Ford 

54% 

54% 

FWaroM 

62% 

63% 

34 

33% 

FTWfechva 

40% 

40% 

PPG kid 

60 

60% 

m 

11% 

GAFCOrp 

31% 

30% 

PrctrGmbl 

78 

79% 

18A4 

18% 


53% 

54% 

PbSE&G 

43 

42% 

92% 

65% 

80% 

92% 

82% 

79 

Gan Carp 
GenDy'mcs 
Gen dearie 

65% 

71% 

73% 

88% 

72 

73% 

Raytheon 
RCA Corp 
RynhtoMot 

61% 

4 

61% 

'fill 

28% 

28% 

Granina 

19% 

19% 

Rockweam 

42 

42% 

59% 

50% 

Gen MBs 

87 

87% 

i- \. iTTlIB 

81% 

81% 

89% 

89% 

Gen Motors 

71% 

70% 

65% 

65% 

2% 

3% 

GnPbUtny 

21% 

21% 

Sara Lee 

68% 

68% 

37% 

37% 

Gone sen 

3% 

3% 

SFESopac 

30 

29% 

23% 

24 

Georgia Puc 

30% 

30% 

SchTtwrgsr 

30 

30% 

62 

62% 

Gusts 

43% 

43% 

Scott Paper 

58% 

58% 

7% 

7% 

Goofrich 

36% 

36% 

Seagrnrn 

58% 

57% 

12% 

12 


31% 

31% 

Sears Rbck 

42% 

41% 

54% 

54% 

18% 

19% 

Shea Trans 

49% 

49% 

51% 

51% 

Grace 

48% 

49 

Singer 

SmthUnBk 

52% 

51% 

33 

33 

GtAttATK 

25 

24% 

91% 

89% 

47% 

47% 

GrTmd 

31% 

31 

Sony 

SthColEd 

19% 

19 

13% 

13% 

GmmanCor 

?4 

23% 

35% 

34% 

39% 

m 

Gull & West 

63% 

63 


75% 

75% 

64% 

63% 

HalnzHJ. 

45% 

45% 


43% 

8% 

7% 

Hercules 

49% 

49% 



47% 

58% 

58% 

Htetf-PKrd 

39% 

39% 


32% 

51% 

45% 

52% 

46 

HonowwO 

(Clnca 

63% 

23% 

63% 

23% 

Sun Comp 
Teledyne 

49% 

309 

49% 

307 

32 

32% 

mgarsoO 
hfirKJ Steal 

57% 

58 


38% 

38% 

79% 

80% 

18% 

1/% 


30% 

30% 

35% 

35% 

IBM 

131 

131 

Texas ECor 

26 

27% 

35% 

35 

■ ' ^ V 

11% 

11% 

Texas Inst 

105% 

103% 

52% 

51 

bit Paper 
rntTeTRrf 

63% 

62 

Texas Utta 

34% 

33% 

67% 

66% 

51 

E£1 

Textron 

53% 

52% 

83 

63% 


50% 

50% 

TravYs Cor 

44% 

44% 

10% 

I 71 

jrmsniJhn 

67% 

U/% 

TRW me 

100% 

38% 

48% 

44% 

Kalmar Aim 

13% 

14 

UAL me 

50% 

49% 

207% 

210 

Ken McGee 

75% 

26% 

Unlever NV 

212% 

213 

33% 

32% 

Ktnbly Ctrk 
KMan 

84% 

85 

Un Carbide 

70% 

20% 

23% 

23 

51% 

51% 

UnPacCor 

54 

53% 

39% 

40 

Kroger 

L.T.V. Corp 

61% 

62% 

UM Brands 

28% 

27 

46% 

47 

7% 

2% 

US Steel 

■fin 

•£% 

40% 

39% 

Litton 

75 

74% 

U!d Techno! 

37% 

38% 

Lockheed 

47% 

47 

Unocal 

19% 

19 

53% 

53% 

Lucky Sin 
Man H'nver 

24% 

24 

Jfan WaRer 

45% 

45% 

16% 

18% 

44% 

44% 

ft ' 1 

57% 

57% 

38 

38% 

MonvIloCp 

2% 

2% 


100% 

100 

39% 

40 

Mspco 

44% 

45% 

54 

54% 

132 

133% 

Maine Mid 

47% 

47% 


32% 

31% 

38% 

38% 

Mrt Marietta 

42% 

43% 

ft ijr 

70 

69% 

28% 

28% 

Masco 

28% 

29 

Wootaortti 

4? 

42% 

32 

31% 

McOonakfe 

62 

60% 

Xerox Corp 

52% 

52% 

48% 

49 

McConnell 

79% 

80% 

Zenith 

23% 

23% 

28% 

28% 

Mead 

49% 

48% 




11% 

11% 

Merck 

108% 

108% 




21% 

20% 

MbistaMng 

109 

109% 




62 

68% 

59% 

88% 

MoUOfl 

Monsanto 

32% 

65% 

33 

64% 

CANADIAN PRICES 

29% 

29% 

Morgan J.P. 

87% 

88 

AUttbi 

22% 

21% 

38% 

37 

Motorola 

37% 

37 

AlcnAkm 

41 

40 

59% 

r 'Tii 

NCR Corp 

50% 

50 

AlqamaStl 

13% 

13% 

21% 

21 % 

NLmdotra 

3% 

3% 

Can Pacific 

15% 

14% 

42% 

41% 

Nat Oaks 

33% 

32% 

Comhico 

12% 

11% 

17% 

16% 

Nat Med Bit 

71% 

21% 


77% 

22% 

92% 

rrj 

rrTTi 

9% 

B% 


28 

22% 

45% 

fcprl 


76% 

75% 

HdsnBMM 

28% 

27% 

49 

50% 

NWBancrp 

38% 

38% 


36% 

36% 

15% 

15% 

Occur* net 

75% 

26 

imperial 00 
m Pme 
RytTrusIco 

40 

39% 

49 

77% 

48% 

77% 

Ogden 

OariCocp 

O+fara-ui 

37% 

43% 

37% 

43% 

40 

31% 

38% 

31% 

IW 

8% 

36% 

36% 

Seagram 

SwwCo 


79% 

55% 


PacGasB 

25 

24% 

20% 

20% 

66% 

I'-Tl 

Pan Am 

5% 

5% 

ThmsnN'A- 

30% 

29% 

79% 

62% 

79% 

m 

Penney JG. 7B 78 
Pennzol 53% 53% 

ISOS* 53%, 30% 


255 

37% 

12% 

2.70 

37% 

13% 



Wickes in 
$2bn bid 
for Owens 


New York (Reuter) — 
Wickes Companies, the build- 
ing suppies retailer which 
operates in the United States. 
Britain and the Netherlands, 
has made a hostile $ 2.1 billion 
bid for Owens-Corning 
Fiberglas. the US building 
supplies manufacturer. 

Mr William Boeschenstein, 
chairman of Owens-Coming, 
received a telephone call from 
Mr Sanford Sigoloff., chair- 
man of Wickes. in which Mr 
Sigoloff requested a meeting 
to discuss the proposal 

Mr Sigoloff said: “It is my 
hope £at Owens-Coming 
Fiberglas management will 
respond favourably to my 
request for a meeting, since I 
believe the Wickes offer is is 

the best interests of all Owens- 

Coming Fiberglas 

shareholders." 

Mr Boeschenstein said that 
the request would be consid- 
ered. The Owens-Corning 
board would also examine 
other courses of action, pos- 
sibly including a management 
buyout or a snare buy-back. 

A Wall Street speculator, 
requesting anonymity, said 
the fact that Wickes had 
already acquired up to 10 per 
cent of Owens* stock was a 
sign of serious intent and an 
indication that Owens would 
have to fight hard to avoid the 
takeover. “It is very rare in a 
hostile deal that the first bid is 
successful." 

The speculator added that 
the likely outcome was either 
Owens finding another com- 
pany to make a friendly 
acquisition or Wickes raising 
its bid to conclude a friendly 
deaL 


Multiione Communica- 
tions Systems Mr John Row- 
lands joins as sales and 
marketing director. 

Oceaneering International: 
Mr John Rossman Huff be- 
comes president, chief exec- 
utive officer and director. 

Lever Industrial* Mr Gra- 
ham Wildgoose becomes 
director, food industry clean- 
ing business unit, Mr Trevor 
Gonl-Wheeker director, cater- 
ing and institutional business 
unit and Mr Roy Tfikard 
operations director. 

Bonar & Flotex: Mr Brian 
Hill has been made technical 
director. 

Ogilvy & Mather Mr Chris 
Ambler joins as director, cli- 
ent services and Mr Bfil 
Patterson becomes deputy 
media director. 

Pentos Home and Office 
Products Group: Mr Ray 


COMPANY NEWS 


Sedgwick in £22m 
US acquisition 

Sedgwick Group, Britain’s 3p (3. Ip). The board expects to 
biggest independent insurance recommend an increased final 
broker, is buying the dividend 
Armistead Group, of Nash- • AMALGAMATED FINAN- 
ville, Tennessee, for a maxi- CIAL INVESTMENTS: The 
mum of £32.5 million (£22 company is to place 6 nuflion 
million V ' new ordinary Jp shares at lfi.5p 

^ each with HDFI, raising about 
Armistead is a private eqonnon HDFI will then hold 
Insurance broker, ranked 37th 23JS3 per Si of API’s cringed 
in America. capital. HDFI is a publidy- 

Mr Carol Mosselmans, quoted Australian investment 
chairman of Sedgwick, said banking and financial group, 
the acquisition would give the The plMog^wiU be subject to 
group a significant increase in shareholders approval 
coverage in the southern •SAVAGE GRdUP: The 
United Stales. It was part of group has bought the goodwill 
Sedgwick’s continuing US and shxk of a west German 
expansion, supplier of wooden shelving 

iSKSSta (£678 - 000) ” 


revenue last year was SI 1.7 
million. 

• SMITH & NEPHEW 
ASSOCIATED COMPANIES: 
The company is reporting for' 
the 24 weeks to June 14. Interim 
dividend 0.83p — an 18.6 per 
cent increase. Sales (excluding 
inter-company and those of 
related companies) £ 212-1 mD- 
lion (£204.4 million). Pretax 
profit £37 mDlion (£30.4 mil- 
lion). Earnings per share 3p 
(2.53ft adjusted). 

• RODIME: Nine months to 


• JOSEPH WEBB; Total divi- 

dend held at O.Sip for the year 
to March 31. Turnover £5.83 
million (£4.83 millioii). Pretax 
profit £304,000 (£230,000). 

Earnings per share Q.8p (0.3pL. 

• LAW DEBENTURE CORPt 
Interim dividend 2.5p (same) 
for the first half of 1986. Pretax 
revenue £1.43 million (£1.23 
million). Earnings per share 

• S&OrSsH, ENGLISH 
AND EUROPEAN TEX- 
TILES: Total payment 5J 


• ruuime: Nine months to .TILES: Total payment X3p 
June 30. Turnover £51.46 mO- >(4.9p) far the year to April 30. 
lion (£55.88 minion). Pretax; Turnover £14.68 million 
profit £853,000 (£1Z2 million).' (£18-51 million). Pretax profit 
>). £1.24 million (£1.92 minion). 


Earnings per share 6.9p (88.9p; 

• COSALT: The company has 
agreed to acquire the outstand- 
ing 26 per cent of Cosalt Halson 
Leisure which owns the Beacon 
Fell View Caravan Park in 
North Lancashire. The price will 
be 170,000 ordinary shares, 
worth £1 75.95a 

• INVESTMENT TRUST OF 
GUERNSEY: Interim dividend 
2-5p (2.5p) for the six months to 
June 30. payable on Nov. 3. Net 
pretax revenue £532,000 
(£547.000). Earnings per share 


APPOINTMENTS 


Parkinson becomes financial 
director. 

BSS Group: Mr P Cooper 
has been made deputy group 

manag in g director. 

Pearson: Mr Frank Barlow 
and Mr Mark Burred become 
executive directors. 

Caribiner: Mr Eric 
Steenson becomes director, 
sales and marketing. 

Fieldtech Heathrow; Mr 
Trevor Cams joins the board 
as chief executive, Mr Mi ke 
Newman becomes manag in g 
director, special projects and 
Mr Peter Woolhonse manag- 
ing director, sales and busi- 
ness development 

John Mowlem A. Company: 
Mr Clive Beck becomes dep- 
uty chairman and joint 
managing director and Mr 
Edwin Jones a director. 

Felix RosenstieTs Widow & 
Son; Mr Michael D i i nmnr e 


Earnings per share, before 
extraordinary item, I7.6Sp 
(26-29p). 

• BPP HOLDINGS: Six 
months to June 30 (compared 
with the year to Dec. 31, 1985). 
Interim dividend 2J2Ap, as in- 
dicated in the prospectus. Turn- 
over £1.16 million (£2.16 
million). Pretax profit £208,000 
(£155,000). The board expects 
profits in the second half to be 
significantly greaser than, in the 
first 


becomes marketing director. 

Moore Stephens Inter- 
national: Mr Norman Farrant 
has been made a director. 

Nippon Yusen Kaisha: Mr 
T Kotani becomes marketing 
director, Asia region. 

Pratt & Whitney: Mr Dong- 
las Hamilton becomes vice 
president-controller, manu- 
facturing division and Mr 
William Ken vice president, 
development operations. 

Sand & Gravel Association: 
Mr Robert Freer has been 
made technical executive. 

UDO Holdings: Mr Robert 
Flashman becomes a director. 

Institute of Employment 
Consultants: Mr David 
Mullins has been appointed 
president. 

Prestwick Airport Dr WG 
Watson becomes chairman 
and Mr GF GOes managing 
director. 


r TEMPUS ) 


Not all is lost for the 
engineering sector 


A more sanguine mood re- 
turned to the stock market 
yesterday after, last week’s 
debacle as analysts argued that 
GUN'S problems were not 
typical of either the engineer- 
ing sector or the market as a 
whole. 

investors may. however, 
find this argument hard to 
swallow, having traditionally 
regarded GK.N as a 
bell weather for engineering, 
just -as IQ is for manufac- 
turing generally. They are in a 
nervous mood anyway, as was 
demonstrated by the speed at 
which TTs share price was 
marked down on Thursday, 
barely before the figures were 
out 

GKJSTs experience of a 20 
per cent drop in demand from 
commercial and agricultural 
vehicle manufacturers is un- 
doubtedly of economic signifi- 
cance. And its problems in 
steel stockholding in Britain 
affect a number of other 
quoted companies. 

Behind the general gloom, 
however, there are some spe- 
cific problems, notably com- 
petition in the autoparts 
distribution business in the 
United States where margins 
are squeezed 

But the sector should not be 
written off. The Farnborough 
Air Show, beginning at the end 
of this month, will help to lift 
some of the gloom as several 
new orders should be an- 
nounced then. 

Mr Peter Deighton, an an- 
alyst with Hoare Govett, fa- 
vours Johnson Matthey, 
whose price has already bene- 
fited from the rise in plat- 
inum, itself a consequence of 
fears that supplies will be cut 
by sanctions against South 
Africa. 

His other choices include 
IMI, titanium supplier to the 
aerospace industry, Suter, 
which has been notably absent 
from the takeover front re- 
cently but this week increased 
its stake in Thermax to 12 per 
cent; and Williams Holdings, 
now the proud owner of 
Duport He reckons Bridon 
and Babcock International are 
fully valued 

Tip Top 
Drugstores 

Tip Top Drugstores, which 
was oversubscribed 66 times 
when it came to the stock 
market in April, sells dis- 


counted toiletries and house- retail trade can be fickle and 
hold products in attractive fashions can change. The 

■ A * u - shares. 1 86p yesterday against 

the flotation price of I60p 
look reasonably priced 


Conran-designed stores in the 
North of England and Scot- 
land and has been pulling 
more and more customers 
away from the independent 
chemists and established high 
street stores such as Boots. 

The success of the policy is 
demonstrated by a 65 per cent 
rise in pretax profits for the 
year just ended to £ 1.2 mil- 
lion. There is no reason why 
tin's success story should end 

— but there are signs that 
Boots is hitting back with 
selective price wars waged 
against key Tip Top outlets. 

Good stuff for the consumer 

- but what will be the impact 
on the company’s future 
profitability? 

Tip Top is likely to sustain 
its growth record through 
continuing to become more 
specialized concentrating on 
fashion-related lines, particu- 
larly in its haircare and 
skincare ranges. 

At the same time, the drive 
is underway to increase the 
proportion of own label tines 
which offer margins 10 per 
cent higher than branded 
■goods. The proportion of own 
label lines is likely to rise from 
about 18 per cent at present to 
more than 30 per cent 


Bestobell/ 
Meggitt 

If Bestobell is to wriggle free 
from Meggitt Holdings, its 
new management has to con- 
vince shareholders that it can 
turn round the company and 
set it on a growth tack. This 
week's profit forecast felled 
to do that, to judge from the 
share price performance. 

Bestobell forecast nearly 
doubled profits of £9.8 mil- 
lion for this year. Given that 
most analysts had been 
expecting it to make about 
£7 2. million before lax, this 
forecast might have been 
enough to impress sharehold-l 
ere. It would produce eam-f 
ings per share of not less than 
43p, suggesting that Meggitt 
is offering 12 times earnings. 

On the stock market how- 
ever, BestobeU's shares were 
unc hanged at 508p, I2p be- 
low the value of the share 
exchange offer but 8p above 
the cash alternative. 

Yesterday Meggitt resp- 
onded to the forecast by 


Top was trading from 82 ,- nn OTr( , ntiona | credit. 


was 

stores with a selling area of 
192,000 sq ft, a rise of 9.7 per 
cent. The company aims to be 
trading from 100 outlets by 
the end of the year, but still 
appears in no hurry to venture 
south. 

According to Tip Top, Brit- 
ain can accommodate twice 
the 2,500 drugstores dotted 
around at the moment, but 
problems begin when compet- 
itors set up shop next door to 
each other as has been 
happening with disastrous 
consequences at the check-out 
for either one. 

There are indications that 
the operators are 
endeavouring to avoid this 
clash so prospects for growth 
in a market at 
presen increasing about 3 per 
cent a year look comfortable. 

Drugstores have carved out 
a fashionable niche for them- 
selves and fond managers 
seem quite happy with perfor- 
mance at the moment 
In the present year Tip Top 
seems likely to turn in about 
£1.9 million. Beyond that the 


lion exceptional 
including a £900,000 pension 
holiday. Earnings which were 
forecast to rise by 117 per 
cent are being helped by a low 
tax charge and there will be, 
an £800,000 extraordinary 
charge to cover closure costs. 

Meggitt claims the take- 
over has commercial logic to 
commend it but Bestobell 
denies this. 

It would be rash to assume 
that by holing the profit 
forecast, Meggitt bad won the 
day. Mb' David logman, the 
chairman and chief executive 
of Bestobell, has much at 
stake, having only taken con- 
trol earlier this year. After 37 
years with IQ he opted to test 
his wings; he does not want 
his flight cut short 

Shareholders however may 
find the temptation to realize 
a 100 per cent share price gain 
in six months, since Mr 
Ingznan joined the boar d, 
difficult to resist With BTR’s 
29 per cent stake committed 
to Meggitt, the odds are that 
Mr Ingman will have to look 
for a new perch. 


L i \ K E D ! N 5 U R A N C E I N V E S : ■'■A t N T'S 


Wart* 

Oder Ch'ga Y«* 


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401. St jom Street, London EC1V 4QE 

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Tnd Fjr East Aecura 1820 1976 
Jno CapBM Acccm 955 *01 1 
Tnd Ewo Aceum 992 105 0 
2nd Japan aceum 1109 1174 
M G*0lM Pons, AC 958 101 4 

2no Euro Pnns M '00* KB2 
2nd Jwn Pens AC 1<52 1219 
LftC S» 1080 114 0 

Do 2 70ft 750 


WamMy. uom has ONB 


- 1 ; 
*04 
-03 
-46 
*65 
-07 
-34 
-03 
-1 7 
*05 
-03 
• 71 
•45 
•10 
-05 


CITY OF WESTVONSTBI ASSURANCE 
iMumv Houu 500 a.ocuy 8«. 

Cun M4xn MVim Mk9 TLA 

0908 606101 

ProoWFuM 1112 117 1 -28 

Mon*, Funo 2M5 2372 M3 7 

Managua Fund 3982 4192 -60 

Eflurj Fund 74* 8 257 7 .55 

Fi-M) tnpvtv Fima 1494 15' J -04 

far £dM Find 708 6 2136 -34 

tan «™» Fund 167 2 1760 -156 

N41 Qmsuton Fund 1216 1230 -3ft 

9UN Fuq Fimd 113 3 H9 3 -3 3 

PBR Fund 1175 1237 -67 


CLERICAL MEDICAL (FKIELITY 
INTERNATIONAL 
AMTWjtom £knu as: OJH 
07 7 290568 
4'.. iff d nee funds 
“«« 1298 1387 

Eouiiv 144 3 152 0 

P-oocm. 1083 114* 

Cm A Fn«d m 1160 1222 

indexed 5fCS 1006 >059 

C*sp 1069 H26 

Nin Amonun 1062 1118 

Fat East tSSO (353 

Imomjn.iwjt 127 4 1769 

54s 1425 1500 

M income 135 1 1*33 

■»m«ncan he 1(34 1194 

Europe*! 142 8 ISC 4 


Flrmt** nt n u rriqn 

UWC 

Eawbr 

Piopwiv 

Gui & Fued w 
Indei Linked 
CdSS 

Mm American 
For EM 
ImS r WAIPml 
Scco# Sas 
Emcasan 


P»n Fund, 

1A15 I486 
139 1 14<5 
H25 1185 
12(9 1284 
1041 1086 
1140 120 7 
mo 11I>9 

144 6 I52J 

1237 13 &S 
1601 1686 
(61 4 1699 


•05 
-OJ 
•0 2 
•02 
*03 
-03 
-18 
*05 
-1 1 
-04 
-14 
-16 
-80 


+C 9 
-15 
-02 
-04 
+10 
+04 
-02 
-0 9 
• 18 
-05 
• lift 


COLOMAL MUTUAL 

24 LuOUn HA London EG4P 4BD 

01-248 9863 

C.10 Lite. Km 155 1 

Gap inf PacemRw 1806? 

Cap LHeCasn (300 1264 +001 

Cat LXcEcjiIv 224 5 2083 .390 

Gao (jie Fued mi (70 7 1797 ^155 
Cm UfeLbnadftd 1803 <903 -091 

CdO (.itePreoenv 2137 2350 -490 
CWLiPeni Cam cap ti :2 1 ?l 4 -0 19 

CUUftiiilCMh h. 120,2 1349 -038 

CA1UF*1(E0IV Cap 106.0 3221 - 1 34 

CAIUPsni Eon ln» 334 5 352.2 -101 

CWUPen(FnUJ Gift 1703 197? -06 

CM Li Pent Fad m 194 9 3002 -092 

OuuPenrmoi Gao n09 iiOB -038 
CUUFNIMKb rn» 121 J (27 7 -025 

CUUPsniUan Cap 218 5 2301 -05* 

CMuPuitum m» 2390 2Sift -353 

COWAlKUL UNION 
Si HNen , 1 unoennaft EC3 
01-283 7500 

V» Are Aceum (51 2S?SS -626 

V# Arm rSl 52 1 -111 

Pnmn- Uanawd 2204 KffO -1 3 
Pww- UK Edwlv 238 9 2515 -40 

Pnnv- Im Eoun 1760 l&SJ *33 

Prmuf- P*operty 12J7 131J *02 

Pnme. Fiokj nun' 1*78 1302 -07 

Pnmt- moto-LMed 10* ' 106 5 -05 

Puma- Own 1199 1263 *03 


CONFEDERATION UFE 
woiancsry uns. Unjw WC 2 A IME 
o<-£42 agai 


Wauged Fund 
Fund 
PIP Fund 


Mg 3 * 3 -' 

TMi 7769 -5ft 
C19746 -002 


crown Financial 

frown Hpuat Wdkma GU21 1XW 

04869 5033 

Lrfe WWXM ACC 300.7 3Z4ft -I 0 
Utt Fiiea mi Aceum 2283 74fl3 -02 
L4« EuUt, Acsum 357.4 3762 -47 


Bd 


wsswy 

Oner Ch'ge YMd 


Urn Moner *cq»" 
Liu in* Tim Aceum 
Lrta me Aceun 
Lite Hqn Inc Aceun 
urn (YcDCfiy Aceun 

Cra-n fim m» A 
frown Bunt 
DBS Managed 
Growth aceun 


1742 103ft 
3724 382ft 
330ft mi 
319.7 336ft 
177ft 100ft 
430ft 

4629 4872 
176ft 1801 
1701 108ft 


+0.7 

-24 

♦1ft 

-9ft 

-Oft 

ii 


CABLE STAR HSURANCO 

Bath Roaa Omentum. QkwcnMf OLS3 7LQ 
02*2 5B13T1 

Seeue Fum 1012108ft *02 .. 

BW OR) Fund 116ft 1252 -1ft .. 

Ad - r w nu o uf Fund 1336 140.7 *13 .. 

nertoniWBca Fund 138ft 1492 *0ft . . 

EAGLE SrARJMOUWO 
1 Tireatmemaa 5L London BC2 
01-588 1212 

EaffeflAflUr 0 IM» laftft 1542 -1ft 444 
EQUITY A LAW 

Amuvum Road. Mi wyeunba 
0454 33377 

UK Equmes Fund 4068 

mcoma Fund 389ft 

Piocenr Fima 2667 

F11M mtuesi Fund 2375 

•rgn-uwea 5ra Fd 1O6A 

&o Oaoaxn Fum 1730 

Mn Amerce Fuad 278ft 

Far Ea» Fund 2E34 

Fucop Fuia 7H0 

i"-w*runonei Fund 2868 

Murad Fund 3312 


4202 

410ft 

2738 

2500 

1119 

1822 

3408 

2772 

7221 

2839 

3*9.1 


Pmum E"d Ooncmg RH4 K9A 
0336 865055 


-44 

-«# 

♦3ft 

*0.4 

+iai 

*03 

-ift 


LdeCMi Aceun 
UK Ea Aceum 
Swwjroshfl Aceum 
Li to fit ea *« Aceun 
Ldp-i/Wt-Lnw Ace 
Li*rUu>>d Aecura 
Lrta 0 hub Ed Ace 
L'lePropeiry Aceun 


1187 122ft 
1682 1750 
1554 1636 
1289 1357 
1008 1082 
1488 1567 
1809 180.4 
1356 1428 


-33 
-10 
-Of 
*1 1 
-1 1 
+1 4 
*08 


OT MANAGEMENT 

16 FnieuY Cma London EC2M 7DJ 
0i -KB 8131 

GT Ban Bens Fund ITS 5 (079 *4 5 

CT Ptjn nan YBU 18*3 18*1 -15 

or Pun Fd, East 2031 213ft -16 

GT Plan North Anw 1408 1481 -80 

GT Pun UK & OE 732 8 245.1 -5.9 

GT Plan Wcrldtoae 277ft 2930 **5 


GENERAL ACCIDENT LINKED UFE 
20 7* AcdrKomee Roid. Croydon 
01*888 0411 

Manapea 112 f 1100 

U« EcrffTy 1250 131 6 

F.teo un 114 9 120ft 

967 1038 

C4V DnW 104ft HOD 

Piacert, 1056 1112 

ir-ummcnM 101 3 iosb 

Ameneen 93ft 97 7 

Japan 1333 1392 

Japan Sr4* Cos 1353 1434 

European 1062 (Mft 


CR9 5BS 

-0,7 . 

-as . 

-0*3 ., 
-04 .. 
*02 
*03 . 
*09 .. 
-Oft . 
- 1.1 . 
-08 . 


-44 

-37 

-OB 

-78 
-1 1 
+04 
*02 
-1.7 
-14 


GENERAL PORTFOLIO LIFE 
CnjwprooA 5L CrusBum HaRa 
09M31971 

(ArKlW Fo Ace 397ft 

Bo m> 2324 

l»l»l 397.4 418.4 

UK Eouirv 1905 2002 

O seat Enuty 139 1 1405 

SnijA*r Cos 1096 115ft 

G41 pfc»s 118ft 1252 

DO 98 1130 1191 

FortK ku Dep 1102 1161 

Managed 1583 1080 

to U an 1422 1407 

ORESHAMUWr 

3*6. pnfltt ft WHS now. BoumemouBi 
QJGf .'67172 

Manaeed Bouf *063 <281 -60 

Money Fund 1833 1939 +0* 

Eduuv Fund 329 2 3488 -8ft 

Fiiefi tottoM Fund 147ft 165 7 +14 

Prcofrl, Fund 211 0 2223 +1 1 

Gwvw Fiamtngwi 
fcnentan 8 Grow 2885 2967 -107 

income 337.S 3S6.1 -71 

Inteman on al GnMR 2950 3108 -8ft 

Caowi Find 3766 396ft -AS 

Fleam*, Fund 2336 2*62 -4ft 

Japan 5 General 152.4 1608 -0.1 


GUARDUUI ROYAL OS&UAOE 
Rev# Eiounga London EC3 
01-703 7iJH 

*» Pros Bas 3602 3960 

Uan»jed meal 301 6 317ft 

Co Aceum 3567 375ft 

Eouay toul ®l 0 411.6 

DO Aceum *824 4867 

Fned un meal 2397 2523 

Do Acaan 315 2964 

mn msiji 361 8 380 ft 

fc Acorn 427ft 4503 

Ntn Amer NW 128* 1361 

Oo aceun 1303 1454 

Papftc «nai 209-7 208 

DC Aceun 2236 054 

F'WV wmai 1369 1*30 

Pd Aceum 1666 I BSD 

Mwei-Lin.ee noii rooo usu 

DoAuur 107*1133 

Depcn.1 »■*» 1373 1445 

Do *<euit (624 (TfiS 


HENOBtSCH ASamasTRATION 
Fruun Soups London EC2A 
01-636 575? 

►+o*i Income Fu*e 3*7 3 36' I 
Gin Ecok Fum 93.A 986 
Djonat Crowm me 2322 2*5.1 
Teonw-ff Fgnc 1806 1907 
neiuAi teJUTB 1032 lOftft 
Saurtons. 2705 2855 
Menu Fund 2359 750.1 

Fr En> Futo 337 } 35*6 

tJanmtC Fima 286* 3033 


*67 
-63 
-70 
-110 
-136 
*1 4 
*10 
*65 
*6i 
*68 
+1.1 
-13 

*02 

*04 


IDA 

-69 
-02 
-A 2 
+37 
-0.7 
+01 
-45 
-44 

-Oft 


BW 


WeeMy 

fflte Ch’ge YWJ 


Dwosal Fund 137ft 144ft 

Pnme RmdMri 175ft 105-1 +C7 

HdPirtyFuid 133B 1*0.1 

Managed Cumncy 1070 1100 +17 

OU» Hmn Cm 125.4 1324 -67 


HU. SAMUEL UFE 
NLA Tow*. 

01-886 +355 
Seeuny Fund 
Braaf Fund 
witomanonai Fund 

Dot* Fona 

Cajwai Fund 
pteomt Fum 
PiOPUIV Senas "A" 
Propara Umo 
Fmanoal FuNJ 
Manama Senu A 
Vo'c 

Managed IMs 
Hgh Yittj FUXJ 
Monoy Senas -A- 
Monay Una 
Equey Ftme 
Fuad hares Fund 
Mued Secs Fund 
Euopean Fund 
Naort Ru Fund 
Far E an Fund 
Smaier Co-5 Fund 
Speoil 5a Fond 
Mbi Cuancy Fund 
Jopaiwn Teen 


Add N comoa Road. Croydon 


2*28 256ft 
2358 g«fl 
2573 270ft 
1B7ft 2078 
23*ft 347ft 
3843 2993 
2138 223.1 
345 7 383JJ 
2261 2860 
3651 279.1 
1938 2038 
*62.4 4861 
2822 2760 
1088 178ft 
217.4 2268 
2997 3165 
207ft 2178 
107ft 113ft 
*02 4 423ft 
130ft 1373 
339ft 3573 
2927 3062 
2350 2*7.4 
1573 1666 
1361 1464 


-1ft 

-ftft 

♦2.4 

-as 

-1ft 

-7ft 

♦24 

+4.1 

-2ft 

-0.4 

-a? 

-ift 

-7.1 

+4U 

+06 

-L4 

♦Oft 

+108 

+48 

*83 

-24 

+51 

+4.4 

*63 


HPKMAL LIFE OF CANABA 

Jraoera La Name. London Road. GoMUrt 

0*83 571355 

Gnxeu Fund (4| 3*94 271.1 -04 . 

Una LOOM Mgn 234ft 2*7.1 -Oft . 

LM UnheaFMdH 219ft 2305 +20 

Un* UMa See Cep 1G6E i7sj -a* .. 

Un* UWM Ea Fd 5*89 577 9 -15ft .. 

UM Unup Prop FO 174 J ItOft +lft .. 


IRtSHUFEASSWAMCE 
Lorgoow House. 20. 

«TV 
01-030 1731 

Proo MocukJS 1 2784 

Prop Modules am 387 s 
Proo MOd Grn S«r 2 1790 
prop Moo GPt Sat 3 171.5 
Bua CMP Senes 1 196« 
01* tt*l senee 2 306B 
B»» am Sums 3 306ft 
AAsucad Senes 1 0032 

Managed Sene* 2 2820 
Manaqeo Sanaa 3 2390 

Gwwf Managed 3 284 3 

OtoW Properly 3 13* J 

O0WI Fmeo bit 3 271.1 

frocul Equry 3 3132 

GtaW Cmp 3 1161 

regp K senes 3 811ft 


done* Bl Union EC1 


2930 +130 

*078 +160 

1094 *H2 . 

180.fi -48 

2067 +07 

8801 -lift . 
2764 -48 . 

772ft -4 3 .. 

7097 -32 .. 

14L7 +18 . 

SS ^ •: 


8M 

lUugM Fund 
UK Eourtv 


StreeL E Gnmwt i n EH2 2YH 


Money Marba 
f-ied bneresi 
Japan 

Norm America 
fcu e matonal 
Naum Baa Fnd 

European 
F» 6W 
H*Jh 


2108 
3414 
rats 
092 
171ft 
2871 
1*3.9 
104 3 
614 
1561 
1067 
0B8 
tut 


2660 

156* 

146ft 

Si 

1677 

2061 

65ft 

1669 

111.6 

948 

>208 


-Oft 

-90 

-04 

+06 

+ 1.1 

+2* 

-M 

-ift 

+ift 

*07 

+48 

-18 

—ift 


LEOAL8 GBtouttUWTJUMjMNCe 
2 MantnAon, Bd. Mml Eases BUS iSE 
0273 78*588 

frag See u*d M iQ20 HXTA *02 
do 4ceun 1074 T13.1 *03 

Cash Maui . 1363 135.1 -O i 
_ Da Aceum J* 170.4 1794 +03 

Bury (raw 3742 W -44 

DO AOUn M 4S68 5231 -64 

FWd UM * 2*90 ZBCft -73 

Bn Aecura 3307 3*62 -2.1 

Indas-UnLad QJ1 991 1064 +02 

DOAcoan H2ft 1163 +0.7 

Indrnmt 2469 2831 +23 

Do Aocum 3257 3438 *38 

Managed meal 302* 3io* -1.4 

Do Atom 401ft 4S& 7 -ft 8 

jM 1516 1612 +ftft 

Aceum 2048 2166 +48 

LEGAL 4 GENERAL PROPERTY 
it ouean wc a Lonocn ecan *tp 
01-2*8 9670 

L 6 a (291 1509 1078 


LONDON UFE 

toa Term# smeL BneUL BSl 0E6 
0277 279179 

Ecuty . 417.1 ' -2JS 

FtMimta* 7199 ■ +1.7 

Prooara 228 2 * +4L9 

Dense 160ft +04 

Uuao 3968 

MdmttfSu* 1213 +ftl 

104ft +49 


LOH 1 MANCHESTER GROUP 
WAnwM Para. Entfr E» IDS 

0332 52155 

M» Tiwl cap 3821 -07 

Do Aocum 4523 -4.1 

Property Cap 1 23 ft \ *01 

Do Aecura 144.1 *03 

F««d Httrasi Car 153.8 -0.7 

Do Aceun 1783 -05 

Eau*y Cap 100.4 -20 

DO ACCwn 7224 -27 

Banvnonai Cm 181-1 +06 

Dd Aecura 211 1 +1.1 

OnOmosaCap waft +01 

Do Acuna IBS +0* 

HUM Cm 2398 -2ft 

.00 Aceun 260ft -17 

Monevonter Fuw 2233 -22 

Casa* Crontn Fund 6042 -ft* 


Bd 


■ VKaeMy 
Oder Cnge yield 


MAQ 

Throe Oiuns. Toner HR EC3R 680 

-02B-4SW 


01 

Amar Bond Acc i860 706ft 
Amar Rac Bond 2388 2318 
Amar fr* Co Bond 1122 1178 
AuanataM Bond 865 103ft 
CoramuMy Bond 114.1 1168 
- Doom Bond Ace 2135 22*3 
Eusry Band Aceum 613A 3392 
Euopean Bond Ace 162.1 1793 
Extra YU Bd Aecum 2762 2922 
Far EM Bd Acnun 109.1 114.7 
G41 Bond Acorn 2*33 255ft 
Gold Bond Aceun 740 7&7 
HV1 VWd Bonn 2094 2190 
feKM-UlMO Qt Bd 117ft 123.6 
Wam a Pon a i Burt 3318 3466 
Japan Burt acc 317.3 Z204 
Japan Soar Oo Aoc HO.B 189.0 
Managed Bonn 3874 4178 
Prop Bond Aceun 275.1 2888 
Ree Bond Aocum 2573 2688 
Family Bond Aceun 6503 


-05 .. 
-4.4 .. 
-Z2 .. 
+104 .. 
*02 .. 
+04 .. 

45 :: 

♦so :: 
-00 .. 
+88 .. 
-18 041 
+96 .. 
+48 .. 
+47 .. 
-07 .. 
-1ft .. 
+1ft .. 
-10ft .. 


0903 aSSa?** 1 * B ‘ L Wort,, ^ Bmi 301 


UK Eouty Fund 
Do Acoxn 
Spaeal 54s Fund 
Do Aceum 
NonJi Amancan Fd 
Do Aceum 
PW»e Beam Fund 
CTO Aceum 
Fata Manma Fund 
Do Accum 
Fund 
Aocum 




1680 1748 
177.6 1878 
1203 1351 
1373 1452 
16*5 1732 
1760 1059 
286 * 280ft 
291ft 3063 
IBS 2164 

214ft 2202 
1140 121.1 
123ft >301 
1123 1163 
1208 rrro 
into mo 

1897 1934 


Do . 
Ma na ged Fund 
Da Accum 


MANUFACTURERS LFE 

Managed Fwrt 
Propara Fund 
E«My Fund 
Gar Edged Fund 
Dupon Fund 
■nwnment Fund 
JWr na aonM Fund 


3*9.7 3681 
2528 266 2 
361.4 3004 
3*31 3612 
157.9 197.8 
1528 160ft 
3591 3791 


:I5 :. 

♦14 .. 
♦Ift . , 
-94 . 
-2ft .. 
+73 . 
♦7» .. 
-03 .. 
-03 .. 
-33 .. 
-13 .. 
-04 .. 
*03 .. 
-02 . 
-03 .. 


-192 

-09 

+05 

-67 

+*3 




MERCHANT mVCSTQRS 
LamHouaa. 233 ra^i St Onydon 

2907 -06 . 

«14 -61.. 

Munrn Market Bond 294 0 - 1.0 .. 

□epae* Fixrt 2232 *QS . 

MtMgnd Fund 2384 -63 . 

jw Bwr ass* -07 .. 

rap Uaramed waft -n_t .. 

Norm Amancan 1252 -1.7 . . 

Far EM 2392 *49 . . 

mcl Curnncy 1060 *68 .. 

NATIONAL PROirma n 
48. Gracacnucn St EC3P 3101 
01-623 *200 


Maragad 2*0? 359 2 

wSaaty 2022 bti 

Oserseac Equty 2492 7729 

Amoncas 2193 O 7.7 

Par Earn zros 20*0 

Prooara ittfi I29.J 

Fnad imeroat 1962 2044 

indasud GH 1137 1197 

Dapesi 1268 133ft 

HomnCNUHXw. _ 

TO Box *. Noran cn NR1 3MG 
0603 622200 

Managao Fund Mil BM3 

Eouty Rmd £i2fti 1285 

Properly Fund ffl 29M 3 W2 

FraM H Fund 03 3 * 2.1 3502 

DeooM Fum (3) 195 4 205.7 

um Furt (301 122.1 1296 

UMjjntad Pius 7213 

PEARL ASSURANCE 

252 HNI Horocnv wciv 7EB 

01-405 8*41 

In* Prop Ml 13*? M13 

DO Acaue 20* 5 2142 

*w EOura, 52&ft K*3 

Ira Managed 377 1 3970 

R0 Umgta 337.0 354ft 

PHOENIX ASSURANCE 
+4 King W Mm 5L EC4N 701 
01826 9570 

waati Assusd 3463 3614 

Eaor Pneonu EnAiy 2465 26M 

phopbttygrDwth 

Lmh House. Croydon CR9 1UI 

01-530 0606 

Property Fund 303ft 

Praxmy Fund (A) 2822 

AgnoRuft Fund 0361 

Ague Firao |A] 7963 

Afioty Nat Furt 255-1 

AtMy Nat Fu>0 (A| 3538 

tauesunani Fund 1008 

bnmmqu l Fund (A) Ifti S 

Edira Fund 
Eany IA1 
Money Fund 
Money Fund (A) 

Atman* Furt 
G*€09«l Frmo 
GdNEdgsd Furt (A) 

Rena 


-OB 

-4.1 

*47 

-08 

+54 

*67 

-OS 

*04 

+63 


■63 

-618 

+05 

-20 

*05 

+ 2-1 


-67 

-3ft 

-7ft 


6107 
26*8 
358 0 
2965 
2359 
2358 
*316 
2040 
352ft 
1330 


imamaumal 1 

BOg Soc Ota fW 

PROV1DBCE CAPITAL 
30 U'Mdga Rft W 12 SPG 

01-749 9111 

Eown fu« Accwn 1603 >690 
Food Imarest Ace 111 7 U7g 

namaaonai Accun 1219 12&6 
Manrgea Aceun i35* i*2ft 
PTOPera ACCuD 1578 1565 
Money Aceun 064 SU 

Smcd MM Aceum 1076 tnl 
jaaanGnmmAce 11 22 no* 
M Am— MS one 


-2ft 

-23 

+08 

+01 

-OB 

+06 

-Oft 

-as 

-74 

*68 

+67 

-12 

-IS 

-Ift 

+17 

-1*8? 

+40 

*63 


& 
*18 
+tft 
*68 
-02 
+4A 
-I I 
-SB 


BM oner Ch’ge YWd 


PaaOc Accwn 


77ft Oift 


*05 
+32 

_ .. Aocum 44ft 47.0 -28 

JapNi Granb Aocun 169ft 1909 -27 
Euopean Accum 718 062 +62 


Taemotooy Aocum 106ft 1118 
Natural ra» 1 - ““ 


PnOVBCKT MUTUAL 

25(31. Mw miM London EC2R B8A 

01-628 343ST 

Managed On) 211.0 2221 

Managed tamai 1858 >908 

Earn Old 271 4 205.7 


Equivtal 2315 2SZ.1 

WtaRfSoJ G4T Ord mft 1102 


fertn LMmd OR M 1048 1098 
.Oseas Enuiy oro 3414 
Oseas Intro 
ry oro 


Property 
■ F«ed mt Old 
Fmed Sit meal 
Depow Oro 
Dapoaa M 


214.7 2S0 
1278 144ft 
1127 1168 
1*61 1536 
1268 1W7 
1 70S 1266 
100ft 1118 


-1ft 

- 1.6 

-4ft 

-48 

♦Oft 

+02 

+08 

*02 

+07 

*Oft 

-0.4 

-05 

*02 

+ai 


-12 

+ 1.4 

+61 

-14 

-08 

+14.6 

S7 

+*ft 

-4ft 

-1J 

-27 

•65 

-09 


FNOVMOALUFE 
EtramongroB. KandCL CunOra 
0538 23*15 

Managed Fund *272 *602 

Ca»l Raid 195ft 2059 

Praoora Fund 198 3 2090 

Equity Fund 471.6 497 a 

Fml Sdarast Fund 2*1 ft 254ft 

inanuaonal 2*29 2559 

Hyp mc a raa 305ft 333ft 

Fm, East 3248 3421 

North Arnvrcan 732.1 2470 

Spacal S*s 3879 *T0ft 

Technology 204 4 2175 

Ertra Km. Raid 167S 1T73 

Oil Furt 20 260 7 Z77.4 

PRUDENTIAL 
Herown Bars. EC IN 2MH 
01-405 9322 

Managed 1762 1836 *04 

TOTAL HEMTAQE UFE ASSUBAWCE LID 
20 CWona Smrot London EC3A 4HX 
01-370 Oae 0733 252574 
U* Grown (4St 39052* 

MUn Drown A 1451 3320 
oo B Prop 
Op 0 Eraicy 
Op a nynWi 
OpOMamgad 
Op 8 Oapowr 
Dp 0 us Daev 
Amar Smaler 
Coramoom 
Ena Inc 
fb East 
FW Secs 
Oort Gan 
Inc Gtn 
M Rjnd 
Japan Pert 
Jaoan Star 
Nan raeyi 
Prop SM 
M Racowry 
Smaller Cos 
lira Energy 
Wond Teen 
M^gadDTO 

•£"0 


asp. 


QW 


Amer CfiftQ 

Ausrfran 

B rasn 

Commodily 
Ertra me 
Far Easton 
Gar 

□tOM (35341 
000 9 MTO 
H 91 Himw 



UKSme - cob 
M 3" Growh 


ROYAL UFE 948WUNC6 

Now H 30 PUHO. Lmarpoe* LEB 3HS 

051-227 4*23 

noiM ShWd Furt 5066 526ft -AO 
Royal Life LSrt UMd 
Managed Furt 2076 218ft -IB 

EoiW Fund 2*33 2 S 8 I -25 

Prooara Fund MS O 1 &I 6 -ift 

uaraasonar Furt zaso 2909 *oo 

PKrtc Basra Fund 1622 ITQ7 *58 

Unaed States Furt I2t 9 1263 -23 

Grt Fund 1637 1723 -04 

Maim Fund 1234 1296 *63 

SAVE A PROSPER ... 

1. Fu Qury Ave LcndOftBCZM 2QY 
0?06 66960 

Bat few Fund 3080 3965 -ift 

Oewrai Fund 01 2163 23i.i +06 

G4I Furt 2804 3074 -1ft 

Qebai Emm Fuad 1Z3.7 131 ft -02 

frapany Fund ran 5 *2 574a *0.1 

AO Bono Fund 69ft 6*4 +0ft 


-44 

-28 

-07 

♦Oft 

-03 

*64 

-45 

*48 

+138 

-04 

.-101 

■2JB 

-63 

-1ft 

*66 

-5J 

-26 

*24 

•06 

-SI 

-04 


am 


VTOMy 

Offer Chga 


Baar pue Us e. P a onta u th 

0705 BJ7733 


ftodfeWB 

Managed 

DapoM 

Owsan 


mi 752 
3061 3224 
3736 3953 
20*4 216.1 
2274 299.1 
3864 3805 
2224 Zja.l 
1036 109ft 
3054 3214 
183* 1720 
3390 SS6ft 

§4.4 2^7 

Stngam A'MM IMS 

Smav Corapaneo 30*3 3203 
Ttafcye Fuv 3*63 303.4 

«- 

» a-iu 


Amenean 

AusnSan. 

European 

Mn w ilnl 


SCOTTISH AMHSABLE 
ISO 8 1 Vtnen BL Gtaagra* 

041-2*8 2323 

Eqrtty 2867 3006 -64 

Ffead Mueat 1BSL3 issft -32 

W n u lrtpat TOA 7M2 *0.7 

Properly 1298 1386 -+6* 

OSl . 1352 1*24 +03 

Managad 2298 3*18 -Or 

SCOTTISH EOUIT ABLE 
ZB. Si Aratow So Edkrtugh Be 
031 558 9101 

CnS 1016 1003 


Indw-lMtod B67 1 1013 

Raad meraa 107.* 1131 

Used 1283 135.1 

UK Eqdty 1108 1222 

Mil 1514 
119ft 1259 
1742 waft 
151ft 158ft 
156ft 1589 
1239 1302 
raSft 1369 


j »pen 

txstr 


1YF 

+633 

*04 

+13 

+13 

-1.7 

44.7 

+lft 

-64 

+58 

+23 

♦25 

+4ft 


SCOTTISH WIDOWS 

PO BOX rn Edttugh EH16 5BU 

031-665-6000 

Aw W T 4453 +00 

hw Pot 2 411ft *333 +05 

Sw Pul 3 40C8 *2*8 +03 

sw Casn 1700 1088 +0.4 

Furt 2309 2*32 -03 

ejuly Fund BSl 8 275.7 -35 

PiramnyFurt 1*03 1*00 +82 

snammunal Fond 231 2 2*35 +5.1 

rmd kaaraai Fimd 1902 2003 +0.1 

jndexad Suck Furt 11*9 1218 +1 1 

Cwh Fund 1319 1308 +83 

SKANDIAUFE 

we. Netaon* GaM. Sounaneun 1 

7BX 

GOT 33*411 

Managad Accum 2175 2288 -03 

aunv Accum Z234 235 1 -4.1 

tnmrnaeonat Aecua 2*1.7 JSA4 * 4 1 

Property .. 1532 1613 +02 

A -vrano t M"99 1*78 15*7 +1.6 

1167 1758 +02 

1271 1317 -10 

1*33 150 7 +09 

- 1367 1430 -00 

TS 8 Managua liao 12*7 -03 

Nortn European 197 * 207 7 +8* 

Pturae 1709 1707 *09 

fed (tommy 1538 1619 +15 

ON PK* Aceun 1756 1040 -U1 

Norm Amancan 1160 izS8 -03 

Depose 1564 164ft +63 

STANDARD UFE 

3299 3*7 3 -1 7 


Emm* 


1064 1963 *60 I. 


433 0 4567 -58 

330C 3488 -an 

Fated Heron 221 7 2334 -of ! 

fede* iMttrn 117.7 1239 +87 . 


Cash 


157:1 1054 


wamt art ure MvtanuewTa 
m%s2ii* ** M ,VB 

PfOpeny 
UK bUfe 


Pae*e 

European 


fj+rt Interra 
Mas Lattad 
Depcw 


1129 116ft +68 

1063 1752 -Yj* 

M 68 M7J 
1719 180.1 *J? 

3146 2208 + 13.1 

1633 17^0 


1168 1252 +62 

1063 114.1 H % 
1113 1173 +03 

1*69 154 7 - +69 
SCOTTISH HUTUAI. ASSURANCE 

oJ?^0^r SLOte9 °- Q26HN 

Ffe» Fund FK| 795.7 8119 

XyTT HPI MUT UAL grVEyilpfTS 

iKisr 510 ™” 

Satoy Fung 114 4 ims -0 9 

Fuad 136ft 1265 *65 

s nss™ ssiss ts 

Fm .ini 1173 "+S5 

Safes- Lu*md Fund 1060 1059 +63 

‘wrawiai Furt (433 1S03 +37 

North Amvcw FO im* 1128 Jn% 
***e-K *A 176.1 185.4 *67 

Prorany Fund 102.1 107ft *61 

IW 115ft 121.1 -62 

m Sntor 138ft 1354 3o 

scprnmpmm»4r 

1429 1506 -13 

153ft 1GCL4 -zj 

_ — . 1710 180.1 +1.7 

gWfrt¥_ 1108 1189 -ftB 
Foma feWTOK 1175 1239 -Oft 
tgKUolWl 1042 IDM +64 

Cfl * n 1124 1104 +63 

SUN ALLIANCE 

tas* 

FnfH Harm Fund 3 bI 7^2 
JJ»*l^to0Furt 1518 1398 
nptto ly FLnd 275 7 2963 
5j*P , "M | ora1 Fund 3132 3330 

n Amman Fiai i 13 % nA.l 
Fund IK 7 1713 
gW< Fen d 1710 (BOB 

toWdSM E3916 

wtotoraie agno uq 

SUN UK or CANADA 

mhT* 9nr "" 

OTONB1 Accourt . 7271 
Uenageo Accoux 4018 

Eourv Jceouir j(s - 

atogd Rrao Acoun tB32 a»a 
Ew y-Furt Accum 2036 2*59 
Prop Fund *CO0I 1450 1520 
™* M M *<* IEU 1728 




-10 

i 1 

+17 

*60 

+05 

*62+ 

+10 69a 


-26 1 
-30 
-1ZB 
-1ft 
-00 
-Oft 

-64 


iwaMy 

EM Ofler Cnge YWU. 


Ml Rmd Aceun 
Mgney .Rmd Accum 
hrtx-Lnkd So aoc 
P us Ppn* Account 
Pans Mngd Aconmr 
Pan GuienM 
Pena Eouty 
tone Property 
Pans fisad M 
Pirns mo 
(fens Money 
Pam hda-UM 


2698 2835 +49 . 

1278 1340 *63 . . 

115 8 121.7 -06 .. .. 

7BS0 *46 .. 

365 7 3850 +22 .. 

1098 1156 *<3 7 .. 

1301 1369 -02 .. 

1004 114 1 +09 

12*1 1306 +19 

122.7 1292 +09 - 1- 

1110 1172 *00 .. 

1019 1072 *64 .. 


SUN UFE UNIT 

St Mm Barton Bristol B3U 78L 
£073 *786 J( 


*018 *230 
212.7 2238 


Managed Aceun 

Proparty Aeon _ , 

Emily Accwn 527 1 55*9 
Fuad m Aecura 2160 221.7 
Indw-Lnkad Aocun 11*9 121.0 
Casn Accum 1791 1856 

Amar EQimy Aceun 179 6 189.1 
IIS Bonos Accum 1288 >35.7 
.Japan Aceum 222.7 23*3 
Pac*c Accum TO17 1148 
Far Eastom Aocun *00 1 4313 
Seanuponal Aocun 3388 3565 
US Dotor Accum 964 101 5 
Yen Accum 1293 1362 

Euro Cur Accum 1135 1i95 
DearfcuBon Furt 1709 1798 


T58 LIFE LTD 

Keans Hnat Amber. Hants. &P10 IPO 
026* 50789 

UanagadFund 1433 151ft -69 .. 

Property Fund 1180 1253 +63 .. 

Fnaa Snares Fund i3ob 1370 -05 .; 

Money Fund IlftD 1223 -02 .. 

Euaty-Furt 1803 189ft -2ft .. 

TARGET UFE 


+08 .. . 
+04 .. 

-7 7 

-23 . • 
*1.1 .. - 
+65 .. • 
-33 .. 
+14 

*80 ... 
♦114 . . 
+95 .. 
+09 .. 
+60 
+32 

-07 822 


Amenta, Eagle 
Ausnassn 
C o nwno a ry 
Dewwm 

SSSu 

Fuad fetonumw a 
Com 


toamafe ma i Equty 
Jaoan 

PaaSe 


Proptoiy 
SoecMi Samoans 
Storting 




1080 1117 
667 619 
84 3 888 
1589 162.0 
533 S60 
1780 167.4 
1680 1769 
932 983 

202.7 SI84 
3037 0197 

279.7 29*5 
BS2 GO 7 

371 6 391 4 
013 S60 
t <LO t49ft 
1«2 1550 
1331 1*22 
2573 2708 
1865 1064 
67 

9*9 093 
*390 4025 
1529 I6lft 
■723 ten 


-6ft 

+1U 

*06 

-01 

-13 

-54 

+63 

+ift 

-25 

-98 

-3ft 

*38 

+06 

-0.7 

+2B 

-2ft 

-31 

-7ft 

+05 

+46 




TOWVLAWaCO. 

Ss3?BK«4 W ' W * 0 • a, S * Vi SL4 1XL 

114 9 1200 
1370 1443 
137 5 1*40 
<223 1200 


pUWrnnSMATKMAL 

,NU 

I Man Fund 3585 272 I 

s.-iSS'SE 3SI 

SjMtssjIj 

t^C? S i 3 0 *£“’ Fa *6*® *?«7 

Tujp hnqai Furt 7690 2835 
S*5,“*W ftrtJ 3530 rTs 
jvww war as* 4 
* Aceun 291 4 006 7 

TmOENTUFE 
London Rped. Gtuww 
0*52 36MT WW0fl0 * CT 

fropertv Fund 
Amancan 
ok Equty Fund 
‘■'“■ttW&Fbna 


an 


!**»» -— 
Intematamj 
frowm c« 

Do Adam 

PtoDMUN Aa 

Henderson Aa 
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Casn DfeoN 

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12 

StSMmgJ 
SfeMnSi 
Sto Mngo s 

VAHmuQHUFGAGS 

*i-43U4daa6SM^M8 

5W 

Fd 

Casn Fund 
P"?* Baw Fd 
5* Aroetcan Fd 
lUTOFuid 



205. 

i«l 

256 

17ft; 

123 

1071 

S12J 

IWj 

114. 

mi 

2121 

162.1 

1971 


- 1.1 


+a.i 


•a.7 


+20 


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-41 

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-&5 


-05 


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+4ft 


♦4 ft 

. . 

-07 


-0.7 


-00 


+20 


+3JJ 


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r»**’ 

+00 


-21 


-0.1 


+30 

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+60 

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+66 


*22 


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+68 


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♦03 

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* *»* ’ 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 l9ob 


Zl 


STOCK MARKET REPORT 


Investors rush into gold 

continues 



By Michael Clark 


Gold has always been hedge 
for* investors in times of 
adversity and yesterday 
turned out to be no exception 
as investors clamoured for the 
precious metal when share 
prices continued to fafL - 

Any reservations investors 
had earlier in the week about 
putting money into South 
Africa., the world's biggest, 
producer- of . gold, were 
brushed aside as the price of 
bullion rose by another $8 to 
$370.5 a A ounce — its highest 
level since June, 1984. Then 
the FT Gord ’Mines Index 
stood at 650. Last night, it 
stood at about the 193 leyeL 

Markelmen claim that in 
these depressed conditions the 
price of gold is destined for 
even better things. Mr Rich- 
ard Lake, a chartist with 
Savory MiUn. the broker, says 
that lbe gold price is heading- 
for the $400 level over the 
next couple of months. 

“Looking further- ahead. I 
now believe that the steady 
progress made since February 
1985 could eventually gen- 
erate enough : momentum to 
lake the price back up to the' 
$500 area,” he confidently 
forecasts. 

The latest flurry in the gold 
price was inevitably good 
news for the -©aid producers, 
who scored sizeable gains after 
their recent spell in the 
doldrums. 

Consolidated Gold fields 
led! the way higher with a leap 
of 30p to 454p. That compares . 
with the low for the year of 
409p. James Capei, die broker, 
was a heavy buyer of Cons 
Gold and was just as surprised 
as everyone else at the sudden 
change of fortunes for the gold 
market, 

Mr Julian Baring, a director 
of James Capei, said that there 
had certainly been a change of 


heart by investors about Sooth 
Africa. “There have been 
some -fantastically large rises 
among many of the 
producers.* 7 he said. 

Dealers also noted support 
in Anglo American Gold $7 
higher at $5214. Baffetsfimteni 
$2 to $1 7%, Driefootein $% to 
$1.1 tt. Freehold $Vf» to $7%. 
Raadfbntein .$2 . to $81 te. 
South vaal $2 to $26 and Vaal 
Reefs $4»A to $53%. Among 
the cheaper stocks. Blyvoore 
rose 20 cents to 410 cents, 
Elshurg 10 cents to 150 cents 
and Mueral - Resources 25 
cents to 708 cents. •- 

The rest of the equity- 
market remained m the dol- 

• Tomer & Newafl. cur- 
rently bidding £175 miHiba 
for AE, slugged off die 


SHARE PRICE INDICES 

LONDON . * Jan 1*100 

FTA 

ai K IT •*in . .%r= 
n! i * - 

si • • 

WVA W 

/ V \ 

J NEW YORK 
DOW JONES 


HONGKONG 
HANG SENG 

s 

OATASTnEAU 

JAN i FES i MAR , APR , MAY , JUN , JUL , 


market yesterday and 
advanced by 4p to 182p. 
Fielding Newson-Smith, 
the broker, is a fan of (he 

shares and yesterday 
poshed oet a “bay” recom- - 
mendalion. The shares — 
on a p/e ratio of 7 and yield- - 
ing almost 4 percent — are 
regarded as cheap. ‘ 

drums, after an early rally 
soon ran out of s teamin g 
ended the account on a dull 


note following .one of the 
worst week's in stock market 
history. 

The FT Index of 30 shares 
continued to fall, but dosed 
above its worst levels of the 
day. It ended 4.1 down at 
1.217.4. having been 5.5 up 
first thing. It has now fallen 56 
points this week and wiped 
more than £7.000 million off 
quoted share values. The 
broader based FT-SE 100 
finished 33 lower at L.526.7. 

Analysts spent a very ner- 
vous day and were busy 
scanning their lists of stocks 
and making sure that there 
were no more shocks in store. 
This follows the disappointing 


RECENT ISSUES 


trading news from GKN. 
down lp at 277p. and TI 
Group. 2p firmer at 463p, 
which shook the market to its 
core earlier in the week. 

Dealers now fear that a 
wholesale downgrading of 
companies profits is now 
underway. Sectors like 
electricals may be badly af- 
fected. Racal Electronic lost 
ground after hours losing 2p at 
I80p. GEC eased 2p to J84p 
and Plessey a similar amount 
at I92p. 

Government securities dis- 
played losses ranging to £%. 

While share prices in Lon- 
don continue to tumble, over 
in Hong Kong they are enjoy- 


EourriES 

AnoSa Secs (1 l§p) 
AsftaflJ (135p) 

BBB Design (67 p) . - 

Beaverco (i45p)- 
Borland (l2Sp) . 
Chelsea Man (I25p) 
Coated Electrodes (84p) 
Colme (li Op) 

Evans HaUshaw (120p) 
Fletcher' Demys (70p) 
GT Management (21 Op) 
Guthrie Coro (I50p) 
garrison 1(1 50p) 


138- 1 
IBS -6 

60 

ISO 

139- 1 
128 

90 

113 

117 

74 

203 

160-2 

156 


Hite Ergonom (92p) 
Hughes Food “ ' 

Lon Utd Jnv 
M6 Cash & C (1 
Manna Dev (ilOp) 
Morgan Grenfell (500p) 
Omhitech (33p) . 
Shield (72p) 

Stanley Leisure (ilOp) 
TV-AM (130p) 

Tendy tnds (1 l2p) 
Thanes TV (T9Qp) 
Tftjhet & Britten (1 
Treas 2H%l/t 2016 
UrriKx* (S3p) 


93 

23V +'7 
58 
84-1 
92+2 
433 +2 
32-2 
140 

120-2 
150 
140 
224 
127-1 
£41* +»« 


Windsnwor 

YeJvefton 




RIGHTS ISSUES 
Bartter & Dobson N IP 
Coioroa F/P 
Dataserv F/P 
Erstane Hse F/P 
Expamet F/P 
Lemh interests F/P 
Television Sth N/P 
Top Value F/P 
Wight Collins F/P 
(Issue price in brackets). 


100+1 

U 


>4 

196+2 

158-2 

139-2 

160-2 

96 

21 

88 

435-3 


LONDON FINANCIAL FUTURES 


TIM* Month SMtag . 


£$ . 

Low 

90.15 

floss 
on an 

'll 


90.45 

90X9 

90X5 

on as 



90X6 ' ' 

90X9 

90X5 

90X7 

93 


9006 

9037 

9034 

9037 


9026 

9028 

9028 

anon 

16 


N/T 

90.11 

A . 

Previous day's total open 
Three Month Eumdter 

ntorast 14306 

Previous day's total 

open interest 20537 


Sap 86. 
Dee 88,- 
Mar B7_ 
Jun87 


US Treasury Bond 

Sep 86 

DecB6 L_ 

Mar 87 


9357 
9357 
S3 -48 
9327 

96-28 

96-05 

m 


9351 9357 9350 1282 

93.62 ' 9356 9359 2399 

9353 9347. 9350 252 

9352 83-27 5350 116 

Previous day's total open Merest 7700 

9621 ' 96-24 98-08 7280 

?7-22 ■ 9605 9921 .' 219 - 

... a*- --- - • O'- 


Sep 86 . 
Dec 86 . 
Mar 87 . 


' ProMousday^Dttf openinrerestTS 

T8653 — KXT 56 - 1 0051 - 10052 -— 357 - 

an 


100-52 O — .. 
10052 O 


Sepl 
Dec 86 — 
Mar 87 " 3 — 
Jun"87 — . 
FT-SE 100 
Sep 86 .c— 
Dec 86 — 


s day's totet open I nterest 1SK7 
12000 12003 11021 11028 4136 

119-27 11029 11026 11924 157 

MfT ... 11047 O 

- • N/F ...... . 119 - 17 . 0 

. - -Pravtausdnrs total open Hmtt 2666 

15570 15555 15475 15625 289 -. 

H/T ■ . 158.10 0 . 7. 


TRADITIONAL OPTIONS 


Aug 15 
Sept 5 
'Sap19 


LaatOedMefioo 

Nov 6 

Nov 20 

Dec 4 


For 
Nor 17 
Duel 
:15 


Ffcetuaafioga 

Aug 4 
Aug 18 
Sep a 

Caiopionaen 
Inds, PariMlale 

strong EgUpment, Brttoa. EnecuOncSTC. Hestar, fWG jJWer. Roawnro erojm. 
Sound wBSlon. Lontn. PartdWdGrom J. WbcKOieed. LB» Group. NortoftCapdaL 
NiKSwift. Cafec Haven.' Norton Opax. ' 

Pbc ParkfieU Group. 


FOREIGN EXCHANGES 


STERLING SPOT AND FORWARD RATES 


day's mge 
August 9 

N York 1/4740-1X750 
Montreal 2540320441 
Arns'dam353522.4538 
Brussels 63.106356 
trphgen 11X190-11X007 
Dub* 1.0935-1.1024, 
•Frankfurt 3.0497- 35648 
Lisbon 2152021756 
Madnd 19882-19970 . 
M4an 2096532109 l 94 
Oslo .186819-109217. 
Pans - 99060-99559 
St'kidm 102399-102837 
Tokyo - 226 63-22753 — 
.Vienna .21502159 
Zurich 2X557-2X708 


MjHtl 

1X700-1X775 

20362-22452 

3X352-3X538 

83.12-6351 

11X198-11.4423 

10971-1.0981 

30497-30540 

21520-21653 

19882-19890 
209603-2100X0 
• 1 aaSt 9-708767 
S0O97-S0ffi8 
102399-102542 
-22882-227.30 
2L502156 ... 
2X5642X603 


0.45-0.44preni 
O23024prem 
IH-IXprwn 
17-14prem 
SprWTvl«fia 
par-Sprem 
IM-lXpram 
65-160cfe. 
56-1 05do 
par-3drs 
.3%-4Xcte 
2V2Kprain '. 
%-Jkprwn- 
IX-fiprem 
9S^r-8XpjBfH 
IK-1 pram 


3 months 
129-127 pram 
0.76-051 prem 
3'+-3%prern 
46D9prem 
IK-Xpram 


4K2%pH0m 
175-45&S 
145-21 Odes 
3-7 da 
12V12*<*S 
7-6%praro 
-U+-Kprem - 
32Kprenr-- 
2BK-23Xprem 
355-354 pram 


8 W » 6 nflhid a» uj mperad eB ei lgTSi ve a i me i elTPJ (i My* * r eegeTOa-Tt-l). 


OTHER STERLING RATES 


Argentina austral*- 12712-15735 

Australia 3o«ar_ 24215-2X280 

Bahrain dinar _____ 0552505565 

Bncfl cnaado • — , — . ... 2030-20X2 
Cyprus pound 0715007250 

FMnd madca-J — 75246-70645- 

Greece drochrria — ; 19860-19860 


DOLLAR SPOT RATES 

Ireland - 


Austrafia. 

Canada . 


Hong Kong dollai . 

Indarupee 

iraqdmar . 


11X880-11X900 
1830-1850 


Sweden 

Norway. 

Denmark. 


13460-13470 
3.1912-3.1949 
33569-33645 
, 0.6080-03087/ 
13856-13860 
63350-63450 


OX25O0X® 


.3358933645 


Kuwait cflnarKD 
Malaysa dote . 

Mexico peso 9300998030 

New Zealand dote 
Saudi Aradffl riyei 


West Germany 

Swtoertand 

Netherlands. 
France _ 



Africa rand 
UAEdMam 
•UoydsBar* 


Hong Kong 
Portugal. 
Spain 


Austria. 


.73675-73775 
. 7.7420-7.7470 
.2071020720 
. 13665-1.6870 
2334543356 
.87275-87325 
15330-15330 
1421.0-14220 
_ 42.72X2.77 
7.7960-7.7980 
14800-14830 
13430-13430 
— 1457-1459 


by BarcMye Bank HOjFEX and EatsL 


LONDON TRADED OPTIONS 


Series Oct Jan Apr 


Puts 

Oct den Apr 


ABM Lyons 
t*308) 


300 

330 

360 


20 30 40 
9 15 23 

3 8 13 


9 13 15 

30 33 37 

57 60 63 


BP ■ 

1-585) 


500 

550 

600 


S3 103 — 

47 60 77 

17 35 50 


1 .5 — 
10 20 28: 
40 45 53 


Cons Gold 
T454) 


-420 

480 

500 


54 62 70 

27 40 47 

13 20 — 


15 13 35 
37 50 57 

74 82 — 


CounauWS 

260 

13 

20 

29 

14 

15 

21 

C254) 

- 280 

8 

13 

20 

30 

31 

34 

300 

4 

9 

— 

48 

40 

— 


330 

2 

5 


79 

79 

— 

Com Union 


to 

20 

30 

17 

18 

23 

(•295) 


3 

11 

19 

42 

43 

44 

360 

1 

5 

— 

70 

70 

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Cable & Wire 

600 

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95 

115 

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20 

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650 

40 

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600 


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650 

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700 

— 

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16 

24 

30 

6 

9 

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200 

7 

13 

18 

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20 

24 

220 

3 

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36 

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327 

53 

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2 

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355 

27 

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382 

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900 

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300 

22 

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330 

8 

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21 

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360 

2 

6 

11 

48 

49 

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180 

16 

24 

32 

3 

5 

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200 

6 

13 

18 

12 

14 

17 

220 

2 

6 

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32 

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133 

148 


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750 

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105 

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40 

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20 

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. 240 

34 

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50 

3 

6 

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(*2661 

■ - 260 

U 

23 

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14 

17 

W1 

6 

ts 

24 

24 

25 

28 


Series 

Sep 

DSC 

Mar 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Beecham 


n 

40 

M 

10 

16 

20 

(•385* 


15 

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33 

25 

30 

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22 

50 

52 

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7 

12 

88 

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. 240 

12 

17 

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14 

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260 

4 


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26 

280 

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48 

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7 

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Th 

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10 

18 

21 

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1 

3 

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38 

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Dec 

Sep 




500 

38 

65 

63 

15 

25 

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550 

13 

27 

42 

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53 

57 

600 

3 

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500 

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37 

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560 

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300 

78 




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330 

48 

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360 

22. 

32 

47 

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20 

- 

390 

6 

15 

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22 

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R 

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Feb 

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35 

55 

73 

10 

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300 

12 

33 

50 

20 

33 

32 

550 

2 

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27 

62 

62 

68 

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360 

27 

42 

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3 

6 

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8 

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10 

22 

25 

420 

1 

11 

17 

40 

43 

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3 

— 

80 

82 

— 

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460 

12 

35 

50 

12 

35 

31 

. (*452) 


2 

18 

■30 

50 

80 

65 

550 

2 

5 

13 

100 

10b 

1 

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180 

10 

18 25*4 

3 

8 

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200 

2 

10 

15 

18 

19 

21 


1 

4 

. 7 

36 

38 

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180 

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9 

13 

18 

19 

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200 

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38 

39 

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300 

•48 

55 


1 

2 




330 

20 

30 

— 

2 

8 

— 

360 

6 

1b 

— 

23 

28 

— 

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300 

43 

49 

56 

1 

4 

6 

("339) 

330 

15 

26 

36 

5 

11 

12 

360 

4 

.12 

17 

21 

27 

30 

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90 

n 

n 

35 

2 

6 

7 

(111) 

100 

15 

22 

30 

4 

10 

'12 

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9 

17 

23 

9 

15 

20: 


500 

45 

n 

77 

2 

10 

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<■542) 

550 

13 

27 

42 

2b 

33 

40 

600 

2 

8 

22 

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67 

70 

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460' 

30 

47 

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13 

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500 

a 

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25 

37 

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550 

2 

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70 

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1 

3 

— 

117 

117 

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160' 


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38 

2 

5 

8 

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9 

16 

24 

9 

13 

16 


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10 

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22 

26 

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550 

10 

34 

50 

15 

27 

33 

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3 

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67 

550 

1ft 

8 

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107 

110 

114 


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163 

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Series 

tog 

Nov 


Nov 

Msr 

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218 

2ft- 

11 

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22 

24. 



T206J 

220 


— 

15 

— 

— 

28 

236 

1 

6 

— 

39 

41 

— 


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8 

— 

— 

45 



59 

NOV 

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Tril’Xtiggi : 

(*£108) TJtu* (oiPrhnlral dtllirunHw ai ihrUers rananga 
liw oplMn »nr unouainauc 


Tr 11*.°tf03®7. : 
(*£118) 



' 

tog Sept 

Get 1 

Nov 

m 


Oct 

Nov 

■ FT-SE 

1550. 

?n 

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57 

70 

29 

35 

4fi 

5? 


1575 

13 

30 

45 

57 

. 52 

54 

55 

65 

C1524) 

1600 

6 

18 

33 

. — 

77 

80 

IS) 

— 

1625 

3 

13 

2b 

— 

nw 

103 

10b 

— 


1550 

2 

7 

20 

— 

127 

128 

130 

_ 


1675 

1 

4 

13 

— 

152 

153 

155 

— 


August 8 1966 . Total contracts 14016 . CaR*8443. Put* 5571. Underlying sec uri ty price. 


MONEY MARKETS 
AND GOLD 


BaseRatea% 

□earmg Banks 10 ; 

Finance House 10 

DtsemaA Mariret Loam % 
OvemWn High: 9K Low 7 
Week mad: 10-9K 

Treasury BBs (Discount %) 

Buying Seii*x) 

2mrtn 9"w 2mntn S^m 

Smntfr 3mnth9K 

Prime Bank BBs (Discount iw 
1 neitti 9 -''ij- 9'3 w 2mnth 
3mnttt Wr8'«33 6 mtti 9%-0 >m 

Dade BBS (Discount %) 

1mnthio& 2mnth Wa 

3mnth 10K 6mnth 10K 


(%) 

_ :openiOKdoea1l 

1 week 10-9fi fimrrth 10-9% 

Imran io%-io flmrah io-s’x 

3mnth 10-954 12rrth 109K 

Local Authority Deposas (%) 

2 days 9K 7 days 9 \ 

imnthgft 3mnth 9% 

Brandi 9K I2mth 9S 


<%) 

1 mnth 10!4-10 2mnth 10K-10 

3mmh 10K-10. 6 mnth 10K-914 

9 mnth 1054-10 12m* 9K-9K 


1 mnth 10-9'/, 3 ninth g*i*8 a ie 

6 mnth 9>S»9r3 M Klrth 

flute nielli 

1 mnth 840830 3 mnth 840830 
6mrth 6X0650 1 2 mth 6X0630 


EURO MONEY DEPOSITS % 


7 days 6K-6»i» 
3mnth6 ? »8^. 


7 days 4K-4K 
3 mnth 4K-4K 
French Franc 
7 days 754-7 
3 mnth 7K-7K 
Swiss Franc 
7 days 2K-2S 
3 mrah 4S-4Vj 
Yen 

7 days 4X-4K 
3 mnth 4V4K 


CM) 7-8 

1 rnran 6’m-6*n 

Orrinth 
caH 64 

1 mnth 4%XK 
6 mnth 4">e-4*M 
cafl 7K-6H 

f mnth 7K-7H 
6 mnth 7K-7K 
cafl 2%-1V4 

Imnth 4%-4H 
6 mnth 4 i 'ib- 4 *i* 
can 5HXS 

1 mnth 4K-4K 
6 mnth 4 ,, ra- ,, w 


GOLD 


'Excludes V A' 


506025) 


TREASURY BILLS 


6*50.1 M' 
£97.615% 

Last week: £97.630% 
Avge rate: £95445^ 
Next week: £100M 


a0eMd;£100M 
received: 4tn* 
recawed: £80% 
last wk £95021% 
reptacefnooM 


ECGD 


Priced Bate Btertlng Export Finance 
StTamo IV Average reference rale tor 
interest period July 2. 1986 to 
August 5. 1986 Inctosve: 10009 per 
cenL 


ing a record-breaking run with 
the Hang Seng Index again 
scaling fresh heights. News 
that attempts to push through 
trade-protection measures in 
■ the US House of Repre- 
sentatives had been defeated 
provided another boost to 
sentiment There has also 
been talk of another cut in 
local interest rates which has 
brought the buyers rushing in. 

Turnover on Thursday 
night reached almost HK$680 
million (£59 million) as the 
index hit a peak of 1.920.18. 
But this latest rush of enthu- 
siasm failed to make much 
impact on those of the 
colony's stocks quoted in Lon- 
don. Hutchison Whampoa ad- 
vanced to 295p, but soon ran 
of steam, closing ODly 4p up at 
292p- Jardine Holdings recov- 

• Wodworth has ap- 
pointed Mr Archie Norman as 
its new finance director. 

He beaded tiro team from 
McKiasey, the manage- 
ment consultant, which has 
been helping Wool worth to 
develop its Focus strategy 
since last year. He was 
also a key, behind-the-scenes 
player, in defending Wool- 
worth from Dbtmts. 

ered an early fall to close all- 
square at 134p as did Hong 
Kong Land on S5.5p and Hong 
Kong Robber on !30p. Bui 
Hong Kong & S hanghai Bank 
eased by OJpto 6Ip. 

Meanwhile in London, 
brewery shares remained flat, 
sun affected by the proposed 
Monopolies Commission in- 
quiry into the tied-house sys- 
tem for pubs. AUied-Lyoas 
dipped another 5p to 308p. 
Bass 9p to 723p, Matthew 
Brown 3p to 51 5p, Greenall 
Whitley 4p to 170p. Scottish 
& Newcastle 2p to 185p and 
Whitbread 3p to 248p. 

Grand Metropolitan, the ‘ 
Truman and Watney brewer, 
was also a dull market, losing 
8p to 368p. The group has sold 
its mailings business to JP 
Simpson & Co for an unspeci- 
fied price. 

Mount Charlotte Invest- 
ments eased by 0.5p to 87p on 
profit-taking following last 
week's interim figures show- 
ing pretax profits up from 
£73% million to £8.38 million 
despite difficult trading con- 
ditions because of the absence 
ofUS tourists. Brokers such as - 
KJeinwortGrieveson are look- 
ins fdrjjrofits for the full yter 
of£19 million compared wiUi 
£16.1 million in 1985. 

There has also been talk that 
the company could soon be 
the target of a bid. Pleasurama 
has been mentioned to me as a 
likely ' suitor. Grieveson 
recommends the shares as a 
strong “hold/* 


COMMENT Kenneth Fleet 


House of Fraser under 
new management 


As House of Fraser and its best- 
known store Harrods have been 
privately owned since the suecesfiil 
takeover by the Al Fayed family in the 
spring oflast year, the group's 1985-86 
results, released yesterday, may seem 
to be largely of academic interest. 
Nothing could be further than the 
truth. 

They are not easy to interpret since 
the latest accounting perido has been 
extended to 66 weeks to make the 
accounting date conform with the year 
end of the parent company. House of 
Fraser Holdings. Nontheless they are 
encouraging for a transitional phase of 
uncertainty and change. 

The immediate effect is to include 
the quietest trading period , February 
to April, twice in the published figures 
for 1 985-86. These show a turnover of 
£1.47 million, including VAT of £1 76 
million) compared with £1.06 million 
(VAT £128 million) for the year to 
January 26, 1985; an operating profit 
of £7 1.7 million (£58 million); pre-tax 
profit of £50.5 million (£48.2 million); 
and an after lax profit of £53 million 
(£28 million) - this largely due to a tax 
credit of £2.5 million replacing a tax 
charge of £20.2 million). 

The new owners of Fraser inherited 
two major problems — perhaps chal- 
lenges is a better word. The Fraser 
group is composed to two distinct 
parts: Harrods. by far the more 
significant contributor to profits, and 
the national network of around a 
hundred House of Fraser department 
stores. The imbalance needed, if 


possible, to be corrected: easier said 
than done since Harrods, despite 
being taken over by the first Lord 
Fraser, stubbornly remained a sepa- 
rate cutlure, which with even a 
modest injection of fresh drive was 
always likely to leap forward. 

The second problem was that of 
management The seven year war of 
attrition fought by Lonrho against 
House of Fraser, with two directors 
actually in the Fraser boardroom, 
meant that the majority of Freaser 
directors and senior management 
were in a constant state of siege. 
Progress was certainly made as the 
results showed, but new management 
was needed. A new chief executive of 
House of Fraser, Brian Walsh, who 
previously headed the Australian 
Davy Jones stores group, took over on 
July 1. Other key appointments have 
been made and despite the slack 
trading during the absence of Ameri- 
can tourists the current year's results 
are certain to improve, ifonly because 
of the way previous weaknesses in 
cost control and methods of operating 
are being tackled. 

On favourable assumptions about 
earnings, the investing public can 
reasonably look forward to having a 
stake in House of Frascr-Harrods, 
either as one group or as two separate 
enterprises. With High Street retailing 
still in the throes of major change, 
there must be a chance of Fraser 
stores, though not Harrods. linking 
with another group on its way back to 
the stock market. 


Bus buyouts in traffic jam 


Privatization of the National Bus 
Company is not breaking any speed 
limits. In May, the chairman. Rodney 
Lund, was confident that the first 
batch of management buyouts was 
imminent Two and a half months 
later only one company has actually 
been sold. National Holidays, the 
coach holiday offshoot was bought by 
Pleasurama whose £2.5 million bid 
trumped the management's offer. At 
the moment just one other bid, from 
the management of a West Country 
bus company, is being perused by the 
Secretary of State. 

The process is not beset by any 
major problems. But it has become 
clear that the business of privatizing 
71 subsidiaries individually is more 
time-consuming then originally 
boped. It is unlikely that many sales 
will be completed before deregulation 
bits the industry on October- 26- : - 

Mr Lund sees privatization as 
offering managers a “once-in-a- 
Ufetime” chance to own their own 
businesses although the would-be bus 
barons will be taking their chances in a 
newly-deregulated industry. Life after 
October will certainly be tougher as 


competition leads to tighter margins 
and an end to the cross-subsidization 
of loss-making routes. The Trent Bus 
Company, which runs services in 
Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire, 
yesterday sounded a warning note as it 
issued redundancy notices to 264 of 
its 1,400 employees, blaming the 
Government's privatization plans. 
Cutbacks will have to be made at all 
grades. 

Many managements are still wait- 
ing to hear whether tenders for the 
profitable routes have been successful. 
Only then will a business plan be 
drawn up and a valuation possible 
and the shrewd could try to bold back 
until after October when future 
prospects are clearer and local coun- 
cils have decided on the financing of 
uneconomic routes. 

Almost all managements have ex- 
pressed interest and, at one stage, 
there were potential outside bidders 
for more than 50 -subsidiaries. 
Whether this initial enthusiasm sur- 
vives the harsh economics of an 
unsubsidized future remains to be 
seen. Just in case, the National Bus 
Company will once again advertise for 
buyers next month. 


_ “There, there. Binder. Perhaps we 
shouldn’t identify so closely with our clients. 


n 



In the whole history of accountancy, none Bear in mind that tax matters are only the 

‘ have sought to be nearer to their clients than Sir most visible aspect of the Binder Hamlyn 


Bernhard Binder and RjVshton Hamlyn Esq. 

We, their successors, play it just as close; 
and always with the long term in view. 

This is especially true ofPersonal Financial 
Planning, where a long and close relationship 
can bring most comforting results. 

For example, a widow of our acquaintance 
is now provided with income without having, to 
worry about income tax, thanks to a benign 
conspiracy between her husband and ourselves. 

We can, of course, bring comfort in the 
short term as well. One of our partners was 
recently introduced to the victim of an awesome 
assessment upon some shares he’d cashed in. 
Income and capital gains taxes were cunningly 
entwined. 

We saved him well over £500,000. No 
wonder we’re invited to so many christenings 
and weddings and family reunions- 


Personal Financial Planning Service. 

It’s designed to make the most of all your 
resources, income and capital. 

And we find that it’s made us, in addition 
to our livelihood, a good many lifelong friends. 

Tears well in the eyes. Just fill in the 
coupon, will you? 

!"” Tq: Frank Akere-Douglas, Binder ftomlya, 8 St Bride Street, "1 
1 London, EC4A.4DA. Telephone 01-355 3020. 1 

| Wfaeiherornoilwamyoviobealiielw^&kiidwUdqicndon ^ 

I whai further infonnatioa you scad me, j 

I Name j 


Address 




Post Code 



! 


BinderHamlun 

CHAIUERtD ACCQ U N r ANT 


i - ; 

London/ Ayr/Bacup/Baih/BeHasi/Birmingham/Bury St Edmunds/C^rnydnn/Dublin/Enniskillrn/Glasgaw/Leeds/Manehesier/Newcastlr 
Newnarket/N oi i ingham/ Rochd ale/Safi coais/Sheffield/Siranraer/'lelfordAV olverhampion. 

BOD Internationally Binder Dijker One & Co 






























-22 


BUSINESS AND FINANCE 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


THE. TIMES UNIT TRUST INFORMATION SERVICE 


BM Otter Chng VM 


Mbuthhot secuwres 
Wi Fmsoury Pawmani. London EC2A IAV 
w-6w M’6 oifflfl asM/i/f/a 
Cdoui Growm on: 

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town 8 H 
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fin A Fund nam 
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-Do Accum 
Ham Y®« Income 
.Do Accum 
tatf Income 
Da Accum 
'Do V. WmervH 
Ma naged F y"J 
FreMnoi name 

Do Accum __ 

Sms* Cot Aovn 1270 1350 
WcvW penny Snjip 97 103® 

Pc-ffato TB UK 


57 0 

809 

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173 

636 

sao 

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f rj 

1378 

1470 

+IJ 

081 

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789 

•06 

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£30 

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031 

718 

76 7# 

-07 

500 

1707 

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-17 

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730 

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204 8 

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£24 

bl * 

6«7 

+ 10 


295 

310# 


986 

955 

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986 


Rvnom Ta jgpan 
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TB Europe 
PjnfoOO TSI HK 


1*2 789® 
1030 107.5® 
680 70 AS 
H2I 116 Id 
AI7 *32# 


-04 174 
072 
-05 166 
-05 000 
+0J 1.12 

+4 7 DOO 

+0 1 0.10 


BA8LUE CBTODD 

3. GtonUnUS SL EMMI EH3 6YY 
Ui-226 2SBT iDNMntii 426 80661 


*8 Ei p3> 

JAM" Ei (431 
Un E> |3l) 
pu Pens m 
Phi Pens UK 
BG America 
Energy 

BG Income Gnwn 
BG Japan 
BQ Ttcnnology 


«43l *62 8# +14 4 109 


*36.’ 465 1 
239.5 264 7 
448 0 4716 
1940 2046 
165.1 175.7# 
1373 1461 
1869 197 3 
197 9 2105 
1425 1518 


020 

1J2 


+05 026 
-02 1.40 
-22 543 
• 10 0.00 
-11 0B7 


BALTIC TRUST MANAGERS 
3606 Atwrmade SlieeL London Mix 4AD 
01-491 0295 
Amman 
AusrrBuai 

Japan A General 
H*qn tocom* 

Wranainnai Trusi 
Income C* Tb 
CA n A Fixes Me 
Wotul Hwhets 
SOoora Srtunoc. 

ASSET UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
90 Hddanfluni Rd. Ba/nemoum BH8 SAL 
0345 717373 (LnUMJ 


470 

503 

-00 

ore 

16 7 

179 

-01 

315 

1118 

1196 

•01 

0 17 

*3.6 

48.7 

-00 

7.61 

71 1 

701# 

-33 

1.11 

434 

46 5® 

-09 

4 17 

200 

£14 

-0 1 

9.17 

32.6 

3*9 

-06 

2 15 

371 

397 

-07 

165 


G4I 8 Fned 
Hnpl Itic Editor 

Wrorid m O a Hand 
Amencan bowl 
Asian Paata 

Assets A Earn* 
Ciraul Hewn* 
Comm A Energy 
Europran Capiul 
General 
Japan 

UN GnMi me 
Da Accum 
US Erwegrig Co 4 
EquDs Process 
UftEMfBLACC 


1186 173 3 
908 9bJ® 
195 5 709.1# 
147 8 1572 
48 3 519 
999 1068 
65 8 662 
70 1 75 0 
956 1016 
1289 137 8# 
81 I 863 
93 5 1005 
134 2 1*4 2 
53 9 576 
104 6 1005 
63 5 670 


-0.7 973 
-1 6 S 14 
-38 4 6* 
-08 143 
*12 310 
-22 109 
. 1 S3 
+04 109 
+30 129 
-30 308 
+ IO 

-13 101 
-17 12# 
*09 093 

-as 345 

+09 216 


2166 

£307 

-43 

386 

128 7 

1371 

-H 

330 

2220 

2304 

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2£6 

3389 

360 9 

-7 8 

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526 0 

9603 

-110 

316 

31 7 

330® 

+01 

405 

2*01 

£557 

-5* 

406 

1321 

140 7® 

-17 

505 

1370 

1487 

-2.0 

558 

298 

31 1 

-02 

£26 

831 

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•10 

0S2 

1186 

1240 

• 1.9 

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173 6 

18*9® 

•36 

097 

637 

$78 

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216 9 

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-40 

337 

375 

391 

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-10 

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830 

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223 

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+0.4 

£41 

173.2 

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-40 

321 

856 

91 2 

*06 

099 

1214 

1287® 

-20 

&01 

227* 

2410 

-13 

300 

3317 

3516 

-1.0 

1.17 


MJUEDDWBARUMT TRUSTS 
Afcea Dunbar Cemra Smlon SMI 1EL 
0799 610366 S 0793 28291 
F tb Tr ust 
Cronin 6 income 
Cape# Truu 
Balanced 
•mrTw 
American Ipcon 
■V pi Mcame TM 
E««(y Income 
t+qn Y*w 

Gob Secs Trust 
blHmhiul 
Japan Fund 
PacAc Trust 
Amer Sod Sm 
Secs Ol Amer Tst 
Aid Asset Value 
Grit Growtn 
Stiuler Cos 
2nd Smaaer Cos 
flecorery Trust 
WlUnt CnxBy 
Oseaa Eamnge 
Teemoiqm Tm 
income EMtigM 

EiemoiSmanarCos 
USA Esempt Trust 
BARCLAYS UNtCOIM 
Uracom House. 252. Romtord Rd E7 
01-534 6S«4 

Amenta 840 893 +02 190 

AuM Action 1209 128 6 +38 1 67 

Be income 05 0 912 +29 167' 

Capital 64 7 68 8# -1 5 3 19 

E.ompl Trail 4066 014 -109 41$ 

Extra Income 72 2 768 -17 552 

Financial Mi 3 2354 -29 320 

500 257 9 2743c -19 317 

General 1313 139 B -28 333 

GK&Fbnwmc 54 6 57 <e -03 994. 
Japan 6 Can me 1662 1768 +21 015 

Do Act 1661 1788 +21 015 

Growm Action 1708 1817 -29 242 

Mcame Trust 3155 335 6* -63 J0S 

Leisutr Trust 78 1 830 -10 1 35 

Soecut Seuafcans 134 7 1432 -29 234 

Rwo+ery 184 1 1958 -4.0 £46 

Trustee Fund 1013 1077# -23 302 

Uewr Teen Accum 502 533# +OB 021 

Do Income *97 S2B# *08 021 

Wortdmde Trial 145 7 1550# +23 1.05 
■B In inv Fund Act 3069 3264 -82 347 

Do me 1988 2U4 -54 347 

BARMS FUND NAfiAOERS 
PO Bos 156. Beeeenmm. Kara BR3 4X0 
01-656 9002 
Australia 
Ea s te rn 
E<jury Income 
Europe 
Gtowtn 8 Me 
Jason Special 
Japan Sumoe 
Font Ei/opa 
First Japan 
F*s N Amer 
F*b Smaaer Co's 


IMANAOENCNT 

tO. F«rcrhecii SL London ECS 
01-623 8000 


579 

BIS 

-03 

030 

575 

614 

+05 

030 

537 

57 7 

-1 1 

580 

ISO 7 

1283 

-02 

090 

598 

840E 

-08 

230 

1038 

1110 

+1.0 

030 

917 

980 

+ 1 1 

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1D61 

mo 

*09 

080 

887 

948 

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030 

*85 

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-01 

100 ‘ 

61.7 

880 

-08 

£70 


1279 1359 
901 949 

1110 1163 
1512 160 7# 
2061 2191 
112.9 1 163 
1821 1876 
840 004# 
187 2 177 9 
247 8 2609 
249 5 282 7 
484 515 
562 999 
133 2 139 6 
150 0 157 3 
784 835 
S3 9 90 9 


Planned m» 

European Me 
Do Aceien 
General he 
Do Accum 
Cm Y«d me 
Do Acorn 
Hue Y«*a me 
Do Accum 
Japan Income 
Do Accum 
N Amercan me 
Do Acojm 
P*otc Income 
Do Accum 
Sir* Cos Inc 
Oj Accum 
BRIT ANNA UWT TRUST 
74-70 FmDury Pane mem London EC3A UD 
01-586 2777 Du#* 01 -638 047079 MonwyGm* 
OBOO-0 10-333 


+03 390 
+00 126 
+1 l 126 
-16 289 
-22 236 
-03 9.47 
-09 9.47 
-09 567 
-10 597 
*29 110 
*28 0 ID 
*0.1 059 
♦01 038 
•19 021 
*21 02i 
1 98 
-01 169 


Grain m G4I 
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Smaum Cos 
UK CnMU 
C«uj me 
G * 

Inc A Growth 


59 5 60 4# 
1016 1084 
1401 1494c 
359 383 
53 2 58 7® 
26 B 27 4# 

1852 1979 


*01 041 
-01 2.73 
-13 130 
-09 227 
-04 7 80 
. 777 

-3.5 4 51 


Bel Oder Qmg YU 


tut Hall ms 
Brut Shaw 
C a mnooft 
Fiuneui Sees 
Gou aoer 
mi Ltwr 
Pnu Srum 
Unnr Energy 
wood TeS. 

Am* Gmnn 
Amer Income 
amer Smader Cos 
AuSt Growth 

Ei/d Smflar 

Far Earn 
Itong Kong PH 
Ml Gremim 
Japan Pen 
Japan SmadUr 
Euvnpt 

Eumot Madiet 


1052 W5 
184 19 Be 

111 7 119.1 
442 47 1 
14 8 160 
163 174 

67 0 71 5 
40 2 <2# 
396 *22# 
902 982 
57 3 61 l 
21« 228# 
61 J 654 
158 169 
*89 522c 
249 2&2* 
39 9 383 
781 012 
16.6 17 7 

79.1 828 
04 7 07.7 


BROWN SMPLEY 

9-17 Perrymount Rd Heywards I 

0*44 4&0144 


Fmanoai 

Saw C04 Acc 

Do I 


Man Pamwo me 
Do Ace 

Norn Aimnaui 

Othtu 


1212 129.0c 
224.4 2413 
1443 1552 
934 682 
731 786 

57 2 611# 
965 103-2# 
578 63 1# 
853 917 


-27 404 
*011014 

*09 290 
-09 224 
.. £90 
. 09? 
-10 103 
-0.1 173 
*04 009 
*01 3.49 
*03 634 
. 039 
+02 130 
+04 021 
+07 080 
+03 293 
+03 193 
+12 . 
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-10 tor 
. 4.14 


-19 £70 
-59 . 

-SB 057 
-06 592 
-1.4 500 
-16 £33 
-26 . 
+01 135 

+14 022 


BUCnUSTEfl MANAGEMENT 

Tne Sun Eschenge London EC2P 2JT 

Oi 588 2860 


General me (4] 
Do Aca/n (41 
Income Fund (3) 
Do Accum 131 
me me ia 
Do Accum [2) 
Smw he (Si 
Do Accum (5i 


2070 2184 
3322 349.1 
1004 1067 
1762 1855 
12T9 1337 
160.1 1780 
0127 1196# 
£1201 1274* 


-14 3.08 

-zj sm 
. 473 
4.73 
. 159 
.. 155 
.. £7* 
.. 2.74 


CS FUND MANAGERS 

125. Hk/i Howom. London WC1V 6PY 

Ql-242 1140 


B# Oder 


YU 


734 781 
525 559# 
580 626# 
727 774 
579 615 
824 07.7# 
43.1 525 


Chng 
-0 7 iS 


-as 0 48 
-04 £07 
•09 £47 
-01 1.75 
+42 05S 
+02 190 


Hrjn Income Trial 
G4l 8 Fned mi 
T9 Of mv Trusts 
SpsMI Srifl Trust 
Nm Amer Trust 
Far Eastern Trust 
me orowfli 
EOUrTYL LAW 

St Gaorge use corporamn Sl Owej CY1 
ISO 

<083 553231 

UK Growth Accum 1412 1502 

DO HSM 1227 1305 

Nrtwr me Acorn 2309 HI 9 

DO wante 1095 2029 

Gas^nea Accum 10> 0 1063 

Do income 86.4 909 

Nm Antor Tst Aca/n 1290 1372 

Far East Tst Aeon 1557 1050 

Euro Tv Aocum 153.1 16S9 

General Trust 2274 2415 

Ft C UNIT MANAGEMENT 

i. Laurence Poumey h*. UMon EC4H OBA 
01-623*600 

US 5maiar Co s 895 7*4 -0.1 039 

CNMP Fund 1027 1095 +12 £43 

lr«£*a Fund 789 81 3 -05 490 

Far Eastern Fund 775 828 +1.7 032 

Overseas income 685 744 +05 3.73 

Fned Moral 575 91.7 -03 000 

Nam Res nm 362 3B5 +47 452 

European name 775 8£9 t0 7 117 

FS INVESTMENT MANAGERS 

ISO. WAV George SL ONsgoer G2 2PA 

041-332 3132 


-3.1 3S8 
-26 358 
-45 495 
-35 495 
-05 207 
-29 £67 
+£1 037 
+45 056 
*49 l.lO 
-35 259 


Ba Oder Qmg TM 


GUMN8SS MAHON UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 
PO Sot 441 32 0i MarywHA. Londgn EC3P 

01-923 9333 


N Aim Tnisl 
Recovery 
GDI Trust 
Sl Wnam me 
Ei wee* us ran 


60 1 530# 
996 1060 
202 I 215.1 
385 399# 
829 052c 
733 78 tc 


Tmptp Bar fim Co's 1715 1810# 
Tanpia Bar USU 354 5 5823 


*0.1 6 74 
-01 051 
-1.1 £37 
-02 912 
-03 656 
-05 078 
.. 327 

■173 £08 


ruuuaftos BANK UNTT TRUST MANAGERS 
PrAnMr UT Admn. 5. HeyMgh Hft, a an wuutl 
EliP 

0277 217910 


Karmoa Sm* Cos 1772 1353# 
Habra N Amer 67.1 71.4 
HanmsJaetFE 1228 1306 


Batanoto Gin Inc 
Do A ccum 
income Gtn Inc 
Do Accum 
SarswM Cos Inc 
DO Accum 


434 492 
44 1 469 
397 *22 
415 442 
475 506 
47 » 51-0 


CS Japan Fund 


089 824 +19 023 


CANNON FUND MANAGERS 
Jl Otgngg^Way. WambNy. HAS 0NB 


Growtn 

Income 

Fv East 

Nc+tri American 

Global 

Er/apwi 

Japan 


267.1 204 I# 

314.1 334 1# 
204 1 +171 
1464 1557 
47 4 50 4# 
■489 531 
579 613 


-42 30? 
-36 4.13 
+12 031 
-05 059 
*02 150 
*01 100 
+09 050 


CAPEL (JAMES) MANAGEMENT 

PO Bo* 551 Bens Mam* London EC3 7 JO 

01-621 0011 

Capeal 3543 3795 -I I 1 92 

me 2703 2897 -36 591 

Norm American J iff O J02J *02 097 

CATER ALLEN 

1. Kn vwam SL EC4N 7AU 
01-623 6314 

Get Trust 101 8 108.0# -0.711.00 

CENTRAL BOARD Of FIANCE OF 
CHURCH OF ENGLAND 
2 Fora Street. London EC2Y SAO 
01-588 1815 

inv Fima 3979 .. 447 

Fared M 144 4 - .990 

DMPM 100 0 .. 9 70 

CHAMTCS OFFICIAL IWESTMGKT FUND 
£ Fore Street London EC2Y 5AQ 
01-588 1815 

tneume 364 14 • . . 595 

Accum £106781 

Depot* 1000 .. 950 


CLERICAL MEDICAL UMT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Narrow Ptam. tom BS2 OJH 
0800 373393 
Amer Growth 
Edutr mgn Met me 
Etropaan Growth 
General Emery ___ 

GDI 8 Freed W Gtn 29 8 31 4# 
G4l 5 Freed he 
indae Socums 

Japan Growth 


225 240 
4#4 43 O 

279 297 
368 392* 


24.4 25 7# 

25 2 265 
310 352# 


*92 ISO 
-04 4 90 
+97 200 
-94 2.70 
-02 320 
-01 9 SB 
-41 £30 
+05 050 


COUNTY UT MANAOStS LTD 
161. erwepsoa. London E£2V 8EU 
01-726 1999 


Energy Trust 

Earn income 
Fmanoal 
Gre Strategy 
Orow - 


mcome 5 Growth 
Japanese & PacAc 
Nm Amer Growtn 
mn nrexmry 
Smaller Cos 
Global Inc Tst 
Spec* Sns acc 


445 47 3c 
1551 184.9# 
1623 1729# 
562 57.9 
260 4 277 0* 
378 4(L2# 
1774 188.7 
993 1055 
10B B 113.4® 
206 7 2198c 
559 80S 
2095 2886 


CROWN UNITRUST SERVICES 
Crown House. WnUng GU2I 1XW 
04862 5033 

HMi mcame Trust 227.0 2414 
Growth Trust 200.9 7ZLim 

Trust 124.6 1313# 


*1 I 332 
-2.5 569 
-19 2.+3 
194 
-59 2 74 
-08 488 

*£0 073 
-22 1 17 
-06 193 
-18 191 
+45 530 
-6.1 1.06 


-12 537 
-32 122 
-07 0.7S 


CRUSADER UNIT TRUST MANAGERS LTD 
i ijwuri. Surrey RH2 BBL 
07372 42424 


-03 447 
-08 £43 
-96 £43 
+14 163 
+06 .. 


+0.1 £24 
-1.7 1.74 
-42 4.66 
-1.4 60S 
+£7 1.09 
*04 044 
+05 

+1.7 000 
.. 160 
-17 019 
+30 034 
+£1 <M0 
+07 153 


EAGLE STAR IMT7RU5T MANAGERS 
Bah Roaa ChatannaaL Gtan w t GL53 7U3 
0242 521311 

652 695 -13 101 

062 700 -13 £97 

79.1 84 4 -15 161 

6£4 666 -1.1 530 

6*1 604# -03 1.12 

97 1 10*2# +1 9 060 
European Aca/n 770 636# +1.1 001 

UK G41 & FI he 54 1 57.7 -01 833 

556 595 -01 607 


UK hcarne 466 51.1 

UK Grower Aca/n 475 506 
DO DM 475 50.6 

European Growth SX3 575 

Pacoc Growth 5* 0 575 

EFM UNTTTRUST MANAGERS 
4. MeMe CreicaaL EAntwgn 
031-226 3402 
Amer o n Find 
Cap at Fund 
Growm 6 Inc Fund 
Hrgn DM Find 
MhiWMnal Fund 
RauuroM Find 
Sm# Jap Cos Fnd 
To*yo Find 
(Exi Amur (21 
i£a) Japan 13) 

iE»l Paohc (4) 

[Ex) SmaSer Jap (4) 22 £2 2294 
Eurolund 28.4 203# 


71.0 7S9 
915 979 
1206 1296® 
1042 1115 
1311 2066® 
210 2£5 
38 6 41.3 
1693 181.1# 
1410 1404 
1109 114.5 
268.7 296 0 


UK Bakxaccd he 
Do Accum 
UK Grow+i Accum 
UK Hgn Inc he 
N American Aca/n 
Fm Eastern Accum 
Acorn 
UK Cm & FI me 

Da Accum 


ENDURANCE RJND MANAGOefT LTD 
Admai Centre. Hexagon House. 26 
Road. Romford RM1 3LB 
070066066 
Endurance 


1064 1118 


114 


EOUrntRU! UMTS AUMHL1 1 RATION 
35. Fdunum SL Manchester 
061-236 5605 

EON*# Paul 70S 756 -1 2 338 


Amer EgtWy tneome 
Amer Specsd Ss 
Far East he 
Oil 6 Food mt 
Growth 8 hcoora 

Japan Special S*s 
Trust 


Japan ' 


FIDELITY MTSWATIONAL 
River We*. T onondge. TWO 1DY 
0732 J62222 

100 0 1079 
322 345# 
4B4 510 
3*5 369 

31.1 32.4 

835 100.1 
44 1 472 
1365 149.0 

1364 1473 
787 047 
32.7 346c 
292 31 I 
1560 1709 

Fleming (Robert) 

8 Crosby Sa London EC3A SAN 
01-638 5858 

Amercan Exempt £3542 381 9 
Juan Exempt C4212 4368 
Am Property Tst SIO7B90 • 

Prrxwny Trust 020320 


Managed hi Tat 
Mas henme Eaurtf 
FYoTessonN Gth 
Soun E/51 As® Tst 
Soecai sn 


160 

560 


*02 07D 
+92 459 
+01 172 
+03 375 
.. 9.05 
-1 6 474 
-02 .. 
-05 .. 
+0.1 061 
-02 529 
-03 2 +8 
+02 0 45 
-16 064 


166 

095 

560 

660 


FRAMUHGTDN UNIT HANAGEBCNT 
3 London Wc# GMgs. London WNL London 
K3M 5NQ 
01-628 5181 

Amer 6 Gen he 2226 2360c -0.7 051 

Do Accum 2206 241 Oc -16 051 

Amer TUmamd Inc 1996 212 4® +03 1.19 

Da Accum 207 2 2204® *03 1.19 

Crortsl Tel me 202 0 2154 -1.7 1.90 

Do ACGvn 2*3 B 2962 -19 1.88 

Carre 1 Ge me 852 910® -04 532 

Oa Accum 1146 1218® -06 532 

Extra he 1st he 154 0 1838® -18 439 

DO Accum 1670 1776# -16 <39 

Income Trust 1132 120.4 -1 4 4.42 

Do Aeaxn 1182 1206 -1.7 4.42 

hr Grower Fd Inc 1592 iG92 *02 .. 

Do Acorn 1786 1886 *02 . 

Japan S Gtn he 892 046 +£1 006 

Do Aocum 906 95.fi *26 GAS 

Monthly Inocme Fd 790 040# -1.0 501 

Recovery 1306 1386# -1.1 168 

Do Accum 1422 1512# -16 150 

Eimman he 59 6 814 +05 088 

Do Accum 595 G14 *06 080 


fp Eavty Den 
Do Aeaxn 
Fp Food m Den 
Do Aca«n 
Siewarastio CM 
Do Accum 


106* >97.8 
3105 3296 
1117 1209 
1294 1370 
163 8 1716 
1690 1796 


-2.7 297 
-47 £97 
-02 694 
-03 594 
-19 181 
-19 161 


HMDS IN COURT 
PutK Trustee Khanoy WC2 
01305 <300 

Catxui 361.0 0002 

Gross me i«8.* 1«90 

H«pi Y«<d 2106 2206a 

GTUWr MANAGERS 

Bh Floor. B. Devonstree So. London EC2M <yj 
01283 2575 D«*ng 01-626 9*31 


260 

7.74 

597 


UK Cap Fnd he 
Do Aoaxn 
mcame Fima 
Hhvon Exervgn 
inter na tional 
US* Gmm 
Teen S Growm 
Japan a General 
Far East 5 Gen 
Eumoaan Fima 
Germany Fund 


B14 070# 
1317 1409 
77 0 814 
1642 172.0® 
1561 1777 
55 4 593 
60 1 643 

2484 2ES.7 
1112 1196 
247.6 2649 
665 712 


-16 3 10 
-22 116 
-06 620 
-13 260 
+01 090 
-05 000 
-03 120 
+12 020 
+1.1 040 
+■5 040 
+15 160 


GAimeom FUND MANAGERS 
£ SI M*V Axe. London EC3A OOP 
01623 1212 Dnakng 01-623 5766 DeUng 01-823 
5806 

85.7 9£2 
170 180 
52 5 566® 

456 49.1® 

49.9 S34 
505 54 1 
45 3 408 
134.4 1416 
262 28.1# 

267 276 


.. 000 
-01 035 
-16 £0« 
-l.l £04 
-04 158 
♦05 034 
-02 551 
+19 0.00 
.. 0.72 
-0.1 840 
+09 020 
+06 020 
+02 233 
+ 0.1 0.10 
-12 695 
+05 1.10 
1.1 1*0 


American Trust 
Aumrakon Trust 
Bnwm Tst Acaro 
Do Del 

Cbnwnotjuy Sma 

Eiropean Trust 
Extra tneome Trust 

F# Eastern Trust 
Freed bans Fund 
G® Trust - _ 

GoM Fund Accum 17*6 1050 

Da Drsl 1863 1770 

GMd Snare Trust 114 i££ 

NMbed Amerroan 29.5 379 

Hum income Trust 1359 1455® 

Hong Kong Trust 206 309 

tneome Fuel 7i2 763® ... _ 

insurance Agencies US 19 495># -054 £09 
Japan Trust 1454 154JM -01 090 

Managed Exempt 263 1 274 1 -14 £48 

O* « Energy Trust 31 1 313 -02 1 75 

SoeoN &« Trust 91 0 975 -10 060 

UKSrwrCsRecTst 706 750 -00 155 

OOVETT (JOHN) UWT MANA GEMEN T 
Wnchest# Hie. 77. London was. umoon EC2N 
10 a 

01-585 5020 

NM Growm 782 816 . . 105 

American Growth 617 009# .. 094 

Amencmt he 865 715 . . B5B 

Ewnpean Growm 214.1 2289 .. 026 

Goto * Mnerms 34 5 37JW .. 198 

Japan Growm ifiSi 1765® .. .. 


GRE UWT MANAGERS 
Royal Eronange EC3P SON 
01680 9903 
On a Fned in 
Ouwtn Eaxty 
GuanM 


n 
P wtc 

Propeny Snare 
S ma ivr ComoamM 
European Trust 


1213 126 T 
1922 204.5 
2709 250.7c 
1356 1*45 
233 9 240 9 
2569 2713# 
2079 220 3 
2435 2581 


-03 660 
-12 268 
-01 265 
*05 131 
+29 0.13 
-29 145 
-1.7 193 
♦19 1 10 


HamOros Seanmm 
Hembroe European 
Hamtzas Canadian 
HarrCxtH EOurlV UK 
Hambros Hrgb he 
i b npot Res Asms 
Ha imro s he Sn 


01 1 063# 
B55 1019 
48 4 515 
007 BIB 
609 01.7 
554 569# 
467 510 


-1.7 101 
+06 062 
+2-7 046 
+10 000 
+15 091 
+09 155 
-1.6 498 
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-0 7 200 
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HENDERSON ADMTWSTRATIOH 
Premwr LfT AQinlngt rato n 5 Ra yteigh HO. Kmcn 
ra e n twpod Eases 
0277-217238 

Special Sns he 1293 1384 

Do Accum 192 1 I94.B 

Racwery Trial 925 B90c 

Capon Growtn he 526 563 

Do fetura 58.5 04.7 

hegny Assets 1020 1106 

Fxunoal That 1357 1470 


Income 1 Orowfli Inc 1311 1411 
Do ACCufll 
Hgn Income Trust 
Extra Income 
SmaOer Cos Dre 

Prof * G« 

CM Trust - 
fixer 1 hceresf Trust 




Amer Hennery T* 

Hrgn Income Exempt H7.7 1Z3.B 
SnaOer Cos Exempt 1150 1210 
Eixo Exempt 1205 1266 

Japan Exempt (5) 1577 166 0c 

N Amar 652 69.7 

Global Tech Ex JS) 950 1000 
PecOc Exenen (» 163.0 ist.t 


-25 IDS 
-16 165 

-2.4 100, 

-14 151 
-1.8 151 
-49 3B1 
-46 £60 
-6.7 120 
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-4 1 5.12 
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+24 069 
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+1.1 034 
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-23 5.10 
-10 1.79 
+14 122 
+30 0.54 
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MIX SAMUB. UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
NLA Tower. Addacmb* Road. Croydon 
01-865 4355 01-628 6011 


w man yuiinxw 

32. OuMn Ames Gets. Lontton 8W1H 9AB 
01-222 1000 
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hNMw nt TM Fnd 

KLEMWORTBeMBON 
21 Fencturcn SL London ECS 
01-823 8000 


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1.70 

650 

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530 

570 

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850 

69.7 

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617 

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-03 

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630 

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200 

£14 


£34 

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250 

£70 



Mrtt Ywta Inc 

121 3 

(290 

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5.79 

Dd Accun 

2020 2163 

-10 


mt Recovery me 

101 0 107.6 

-04 

£00 

Oa Acaan 

1064 

1133 

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Japan Grown bx 

102.4 

109.1 

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Do Accum 

1028 

1090 

-02 


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160 0 

1690 

+0.1 

201 

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208.9 221.4 



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£76 

29.4® 

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39.6 

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HOUM 

2800 

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IntoniahonN 6 Gan £426 £476 

LEGAL* GEHBIAL UMT TRUST 
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5. RavMiqn Rom. Brentwood Essex 

0277 234034 


513 

167 


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Da Accun 
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2589 2769 
4040 4317 
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-103 £41 
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+02 l« 
+10 001 
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+12 191 
+05 203 
+0.7 194 
-13 135 


LLOYDS BANK UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
Repurars Dpt Gamg-BpSea, Worthing, w 
SUBMX 
0444 450144 
Balanced 
Dd Aca/n 
Energy htl 
Da Acorn 
Extra hoome 
Do Acaan 
German Gtn he 
Do Accun 
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Do Acoon 

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Do Accum 
Japan Growth 
Do Accum 
N Amur * Gen 
Do Acoon 
Pacific Bash 
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174 1 1001 
3050 3313 
49 8 630e 
547 514c 
140 0 1562 
267 0 285 5 
B34 670 
814 670 
2570 2740 
5050 5409 
1759 107.7 
1033 1956 
833 896 
835 693 
1019 1069® 
HOI T17 7# 
1276 1364 
_ 1312 1424 

Smaller Ooe 6 Rec 1858 1904 
Do Accum 207 6 2226 

WortMUe Growm 188.9 2020 
Do Accum 265.4 2838 

UK Growm Fund 456 407 

LONDON * MANCfESTER 
VMnsuiaa PM. Exeter EA5 IDS 
0392 52156 

General True! 41.1 44 0 
Income Trial 355 386 

hKmantXUl TlUM 35 5 380 

Amercan 310 3*1 

Japan 444 415® 

Trust of hv 28 0 300 


330 
130 
£44 
£44 
549 
549 
0.12 
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468 
456 
046 
046 
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163 
0.17 
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199 
199 
091 
091 
197 


-06 300 
-06 640 
+04 070 
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+09 1.00 
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UNLISTED SECURITIES 


BU Oiler cmg no 


M * G SECURITIES . 

Three Ouart. Tawm HP EC3& 690 
01036 45ft 


Amer * Gen Inc 
Do Accum 
An>«r Reco-wy 
Do Aca/n 
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Do A«eum 
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DO Accum 
Comm * Gen me 
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Ct/npft/td Growm 
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Drwoeod Fund UK 
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308 4 2230® 

243.0 2600 
229 4 3*55 
250 1 2676 

56.7 60 f# 
578 613# 
69.6 74 7c 
761 014 

141 4 1513® 

107.0 2001 
3040 <150 
3159 3412 
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£1150 1219 


European A General 2039 216.1# 




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Extra Tan he 
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Stand Gan me 

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1190 1269c 
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2340 2409 

309 1 39i£ 

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617 640c 
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340 364# 

3017 325.0 
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£1156 1£3G 


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I r Daronshra Sa London EC2M 4YR 
01-256 8280)8262 
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Do Accum 4902 5120 

Uh Martu Features 7*6 795 
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Japan Perfor ma nc e 1417 151. 1 

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6000 

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84.6 

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930 

990® 

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847 

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179.4 

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1291 

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29 1 

310 

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Security Trust 
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59 

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05 

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108 


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Ztgai Dynanton 

21 


a S3 115 
345 DO 
156 03 

143 113 
5-< 2 
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308 150 
43 IB 
4B 33 
123 85 
40 13 

103 S3 
68 *0 
42 IB 
190 70 

87 30 

85 63 

£90 145 

139 114 

128 73 

48 14 

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178 136 
195 120 
ifflfi 71 
26 7 

350 171 
355 253' 
80 W 
54 22' 

220 i6a 
165 110 
101 50 
173 120 
220 136 
205 131 
160 >58 
101 M 

37 33 
1ST 113 
31 II 
99 90 

150 80 
63 48 

38 SO 

99 87 

71 55 

220 05 
70 £2 

100 71 
38' I7\ 

93 SB 
125 110 
KM IS 
235 ISO 
200 110 
IN 117 

151 137 
110 IDS 

140 52 
146 00 
385 1W 

m iso 
188 120 
136 7D 

IT. 100 
01 63 

56 45 

!44> iig 
SO 32 
100 IS 
470 270 
98 85 

280 140 
75 43 
545 4» 
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94 8* 

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106 68 
10B 75 

19 14 

95 SB 
98 « 
188 169 

10 


Poreoroo 
Porewch Mama 


Procerty T« I0p 
Do 8o 
Ouastsr 
Rada Oty 'A* 
Rmo Owe 
Raaus 
Ramen Oi 
Premia 

no# Tone Carom 


Rrv#r 0365 

RocMKKd 
RoOe * Natan 
Rudd# (G) 

SAC 

Sanger* Pnoio 
Sapomr* PW 
Saiuge 
Scanro 

Scat Heroatta 
StKunguaM 
srencTV 
SharxtwxA 
Share Drug Str» 
Sheldon Jone* 
Sheraton See 
Sherwood Gamp 
Shwtd 

Sera Cawrow 

sector (WWaml 
Sorters Food 
Smovoane 
Snowdon Brahe 
Souidmela 

Sfm BUS 

Sw Rraoums 
SO*C0 PUrxm 
Spalax Tata 
Soecaa Auto 

Soedrum 

Soce 

swmn 

9urtesi MfltM 
Sunreca 
Sttrenc PUD 
5ui*ugh Boa 

Sumer and iE71 
SwhdOn Pr HOW 
SynaiM Camp 
T 4 5 Stores 
TDS Crons 
TMD Aavan 
T-V AM 
Tart Force 
Tay Haem 
Tech For Bus 
Tech Comp 
Telecomputing 
Ter Sere m 
Thermal 
Therm Scormfic 
ThOfJMC 
Treswy (Eta) 

TM iWdJ) 
Towngrade Sac 
Treae PromoKri 
Trencher wood 
Troon 

Tyne Tees A 
UU Catamc 
Lnd Fneraty 
UM Padum 
toner rFiai*) 
Vrewtaan 
Wayne Ken 

Wanore Etearo 
WeSw; 

wed urevn 

WTOwenhi Foods 

w to** 

WReee 


136 

90 


40 

103 

15 
90 

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22 

151 

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05 

200 

114 

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145 
163 
101 
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320 

335 

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156 

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156 

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11 

99 

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173 

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110 

185 

200 

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117 

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315 

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129 

233 

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143 

40 

106 

420 

73 

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545 

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-2 


44 

£4 16 340 

54 80 ULB 
£6 31 11.1 
4.4 33 133) 


6lS £7 156 
..a .. 64 

43 113 130 

14 1 4 153 

10 67 £6 
73 63 161 
23 64 163 

.. 163 
01 61 . . 
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ZB £4 306 
63 £4 21 9 

£l 13 19 7 
31 £7 24 3 

. . . . £1 

4 3 £4 17.1 

5.7 £9 118 

44 £6 14 2 
£9 30 16.7 


-5 

+2 


53 1.7 393 
£3 09 384 
£6 83 93 
l.l 24 104 
44 2-0 283 

.. ..234 

00 15 5.1 
57 £7 191 
73 30 Ii3 

40 £2 123 
51 £2 M3 

39 37 l£J 
17 U U 

44 29 BE 

. . . 44 

2.6 2(6164 
£9 20 221 
£6 05 £7 

a £6 

4 0 40 14 1 

47 83 90 

04 34 24.7 


SLSB £0 214 
.. .. SM 

4 0 7 3 20 8 
.. 367 

2.1 ii a* 

40 22 21.4 
20 1.7 74 

£4 £1 214 


+5 


25 34 154 
66 4 7 21.1 

7.7 1 3 94 
44b 14 425 
a.i 10 1i3 
2 9 21 366 
14 II .. 
lfi 1.5 31.0 
£6 46116 
4.1 9.1 62 

4.7 £3 20-7 

16 40 314 
53 £0 101 
7.4 1 8 20 1 
13 £2 155 

160 7.7 83 
64 74 126 

24# 43 . . 
4.9 U 40 
£4 73 101 

10 28 212 
SI 31 76 
33 35 11.S 
0.4 25 113 
79b 64 113 
29a £7 10.1 
£0 17 200 
. 386 
13 62 169 
20! • - 
1 l 21 *6.4 
79 SO 16* 
36 £0 134 
£7 48 120 


®-3 24 16=69 


19 £9»l 


Git * Freed m 
Hrgh henme Uns 
H/m Yield OH Uni 
ha Growth Una 
N American Urea 
Far East IAMB 
5maBer Cos Fund 


112 2 I1B2 
1124 1164 
570 590 
IZ7.9 1350 
00 3 72.6® 
027 90 5® 
664 704 


740 
. S61 
. B01 
. 0*1 
. 0*8 
. 0 13 
. 1.79 


MERCURY FUND MANAGERS LTD 
XL King WHam SL EC4H 9*3 
1802860 


WMCAP UMT TRUST 

Uncom Hie. 252. Romtord Rd. E7 

01-234 56*4 

1303 1388 -20 *06 


-07 067 
-0.7 087 
-02 449 
-04 440 
+03 115 
+06 1.16 
-30 £27 
-50 227 
.. 738 
.. 73# 
-0l 6 449 
-00 440 
*20 l.OB 
+23 108 
+23 0.00 
*26 0.00 
-3.1 £08 
-34 £00 
.. £74 
.. £74 


01-280 
Amur Growth 
Do Accun 
Am# Income 
Dd Accum 
European Growth 
Dd Accun 
General 

Do Accun 
G* A Freed 
Dd Accun 


Da Accun 
h trenau ona 
Do Accun 


fa 


Accun 

Recovery 
Do Accun 
Eaampi Dai 
ex empt Accun 


927 08.6 
96 5 1026 
514 543 
534 567 
128 0 136.1c 
1314 130 7e 
2314 3400 
376.0 3999 
87 7 8S3 
980 99J 
793 043 

87 8 93.4 

NM 256.4 
2900 3160 
1873 199* 
191 9 204 1 
1861 2000 
200.7 2133 
225 8 2327® 
3483 3004® 


MSLAND BANK GROUP UNIT TRUST 
MANAGERS 

Coiztwooa Hsa. S#er Sl Head. Sheffield SI 3RD 
074? 759842 


Capri® Income 

DoJon/i 
Coovnod/v A Gan 
Do Acun 
Extra High inc 
Do Accun 
G* 6 Food he 
Do ACCum 
Won YOU 
Da Aceua 

hcoma 

Do Accun 
Japan 6 Paefie 
Do Accun 
N Amenovi he 
Dd Accun 
Eun Gm he 
Da Accun 
SmaMr CM he 
Do Accum 


732 780® 
99.7 1063® 
1034 1103 
145.7 1554 

57 1 au® 

86 7 71.1® 
5*4 566 
869 920 
1*81 157 9 
2SIJ 2802 
1563 1690# 
.2823 2793® 
2070 4064 
4012 3214 
1105 1174 
1323 1411 
1163 120.4 
1422 1510 
1104 1177® 
1179 1257® 


-10 234 
-24 £3* 
+03 322 
+13 £22 
-00 701 
-06 701 
-04 901 
-04 901 
-20 569 

-<0 sa 

-40 405 
-76 305 
+40 OD9 
+30 009 
+03 127 
*1.1 127 
+34 1.11 
♦39 1.11 
-10 £17 
-2.1 £17 


MURRAY JOHNSTONE UNIT TRUST 
MANAGEMENT 

'63. Hope SncL QMgow G2 2UH 
041 221 9262 

Amancui 1157 12£5® +02 408 

Eoropooi 246 0 2626 +20 UK 

Cos 2073 2213 -20 100 


NATIONAL PROMOBfT PtveSTMEKT 

managers 

a#. Gradual Sl EC3P3HH 
01029 4200 Ext 280 


NPl UK 
Da Accnm 
NPl Overseas 
Do Accun 
Far East Acc 
American Aec 
Euooean Acc 
ww«w«b acc 


1900 2028 
3070 3273 
576 7 6!£6 
7036 7460 
075 931® 

573 8l2 *03 1J0 

52.7 561 *22 0.E0 

<94 523 +00 1.40 


-33 £90 
-5.7 £90 
+00 070 
+110 0.70 
+20 010 



NORWICH tfT MANAGERS 
PQ EkN 4 Normal NR I 4 nG 
0803 622700 

Group Trust ni 48 '2.08 -0 M 3.06 

lire Trust 1271 133 8 *1? 145 


QPPENHBMER TRUST MANAGEMENT 
88 Coraion Sueat Lonwn EC4N 0AE 
dealings 01 236 MBSA/TOM 
hirmahonal Growtn I49T 1495® 
heume 6 OP"* &4 63.fi 

WortwroM Rac 033 


Amercan Growh 
Japan Growth 
Europe#! Growm 
UK GiCMitn 
PoCrhC Grown 
Hoi hcoma 
Pracucai mootra 
Do Aca/n 


32 * 347 

61 1 05 4 

649 095® 
623 560 
5£9 56.6 

33 1 355 
523 559 
951 1012 


PEARL TRUST 


252. Hxjh I 
01-405 6441 
Grown Fund Inc 
Op Accum 
Income Fund 
hd Eguty he 
Do Accum 
urn Trusi Ire 
Do Aca/n 


Hoeam. WC1V 7EB 


072 930 
130 9 1394 
1153 1235 
i»5 1367 
1203 136.7 
1210 1292 
2102 2236 


*21 189 
-1.2 300 
♦07 130 
+03 000 
+04 000 
+35 007 
-OB 1 16 
-0.1 126 
-02 7 37 
-04 214 
-07 214 


-0 7 S.10 
-19 210 
-25 35# 
+19 U1 
+1.9 141 
-2 7 258 
-40 £0#- 


PERPETUAL UMT TRUST 
46 Han Smw Kertoy On Tramp, 
(V9I 576860 


wa Gro wn 
hoome 

Worldwide Rec 
Amar Growm 
no Erntro Cos 
Far East &wh 
Europoui Gtn 


264 9 2043 
181.3 T942 
1443 1549 
B75 725 
771 820 
750 014 
564 006 


PROLIFIC UMII IHUSrS 
222. Hronm London EC2 
01-217 75*4/7 

1l£l 1204 
567 632a 
958 iCOIc 
1775 1903 
1250 1353 
57.2 723a 
1078 1160 
64 7 91 I® 


Con* 8 Oil 
F# Easnm 
Norm Amenean 
Special Sns 
Tecrmotogy 
Extra Income 


+19 07B 
-£0 433 
1 35 
0.73 
. 069 

+00 039 
+0.6 1.45 


+03 001 
-1.1 Ml 
-07 506 
+£4 000 

+00 099 
-1.1 IJB 
+18 013 
-2.1 400 


PRUDeniAL UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
51-69. Bora H®. BUrd Ewam IGI 20L 
01-475 3377 


Whom Eou4y 
Eurooean 
Kofixxn Conns 

tT 1 * 


joparawi 
N Amencan 
Horbom Spec Els 
Hobom UK Growth 
Hohcro G# Trail 


3776 *01 7 
97 3 1030 
620 553# 
643 683# 
973 1030® 
97.7 1035 
73 1 77.7 
61 1 060® 
760 81 *C 
107.6 1967 


-4.7 341 
+10 007 
+0* 064 
-00 £46 
+13 0 83 
+2.1 050 
-02 008 
-00 219 
-10 229 
-04 £48 


QI0LT81 MANAGEMENT GOMPAKT 
31-45 raestum SL London EC2V 7LH 
01-000 4177 

Quadrant General 4289 *562 .. £07 

Quadrant hcoma 23' 8 3467® . . 8*1 

□uadrirt Inf Fd 3762 398 0 . 112 

Quadrant Recovery 2558 2720 . £57 


NHR0TRSCH6D ASSET MANAGEMENT 
Si SwMvns Lana. London EC*P *DU 
01-200 5450 


NC Amanca he 
Da Aacun 

NC Energy Res 
NC hcoma 
NC Japan 
NC Smder Cos 


2779 2956® 
302.1 3213® 
1333 141 B 
850 013 
189 5 2015 
1360 1*7 7 


-10 135 
-1.1 124 
+00 £T* 
—0.4 309 
+06 001 
-01 100 
+2 A 03* 
. 8*6 


NCStrarEunpCdl 181.1 1020 

NC Exempt Q* n 300 1350 

NC Amar Prop SM67 1£1B 

NC Property 1503 1562 

ROWAN UWT TRUST 

33 Mng w#m Strom. London EC*R 9AS 
01-638 5078 


Socunies oi 
Htfi Yield (51 
Marin (3) 


ttgh hterasj 
Far East 12} 


2160 2220 
B80S 8950c 
i860 1605 
3045 4020® 
170 0 1710 
1215 1220 
2370 2*00 


-15 1.90 
.. £60 
803 

.. 1.86 
-05 £43 
1203 
. 0.19 


ROYAL LIFE FWD MANAGEMENT 
New Hal Phm. Lnarpool L09 3HS 
051-227 4422 
EtMY Tru« 
hd Trust 
G# Then 
US Tnx» 

Mn Tm 


588 

6£5 

-10 

285 

7Z3 

780® 

+1 1 

132 

250 

278 

■02 

627 

316 

338 

+03 

181 

*30 

*69 

+1.1 

IMB 

1 EC2 

1119 

US 1 

-06 

107 

1573 

1674 

-09 

197 

B6i 

91 7# 

-IB 

4(0 

1010 

1060® 

-20 

463 

560 

HB 

-0.1 

097 

670 

610 

-Ol 

0.97 


01-920 (Dll 
Eouxy Drat 
DO Accun 
High hcoma Triad 
m Accun 
US Growm 
Da Accun 

ROYALURBON UMT TRUST UANAGBIS 
Royal London House. Crtcrwtuor C01 IRA 
OH* 576115 

Amancwi Growm 061 010® .. 062 

Cuxtd ACCun 1700 1B14 -£0 £28 

G*1 hcoma 550 565® -02 602 

Hrgn Income 760 836 -00 500 

mean 6 Growm 95.7 101.9® -1 3 4*8 

Japan Growm 931 991 +16 005 

Special Sb 1035 110.1 -10 109 


SAVE * PROSPER 

23. Wastam Rd. Ftomtaid RUT 3LB 
06-73. Quean Si. EO nbugn EH2 4 NX 
(Romtad) 0706-66966 Or IBM} 031-229 7351 


Anxr he 6 Grown 
Copal raw 
Commothy 
Energy has 
Europaan GrowWr 
Exarnpt me Bnd 
Do M (A3) 
ExpMmon 
Fmanonl Secs 
G# fi FI he 
HfiFi Return Uhfis 
Hfsfi Yield Una 
hcoma Una 

Trow 


Jaoan Growth 
Japan SmaMr CU 
Masw nund . 

New Technology 
SE Asa Grown 
Scotwts 


Sconces 
Saha ht amaaorW 
Smaaer Cos he 
Spnonl Stuabons 
UK Equay 
US Growm 
U reversal Growm 


676 722 

97.7 1040 
44£ 47 2 
420 45 A 

1007 1130 
775 81 6c 
580 610 
37 0 404 
953 1019 
54 0 560 
173B 1550® 
157 7 1600 

90.7 07OC 
03 5 690 

1184 1250 
SS7 1023 
1267 1370 
28* 303 
88* 9*5 
TOO* 107.3 
125? 1339® 
1405 1580 
147.0 1572 
762 804 
1557 1680 
070 835 
1050 1796® 
859 74 T 
846 90S 


•. 660 
-00 £14 
+01 ISO 
-03 405 
+0.4 051 
-12 505 
+01 236 
+02 0.00 
-00 £>0 
-0.11005 
-£2 *0* 
-£7 4.40 
-1.0 600. 
-0.7 £74 
+00 £20 
♦12 .. 
+1.0 .. 

.. £03 
+0.7 .. 
♦20 £80 
-0.7 £91 
-Ifl 906 
-22 4 S3 
- 0.1 101 
-10 4.13 
-l.l £10 
-25 208 
-O.l IBS 


jgssas.'ss- 

0705 827733 


Amancan Inc 
(JO Aeaxn 
AuMrawn he 
po Aca/n 
Euopean he 
Do Accum 
CM 8 Frrao he 
Do Accum 
OoAl Fund he 
Do Accum 

mram 
Do Accun 
biff mcoma 
Do Accum 
Jbp Smitr Cos Ac 
Snupae 5 M Nay 
Do Accum 
Sm+a+r Cos me 
Do Aca/n 
Soeaaf Sds he 
Do Accun 
To*ya Fund Inc 
DO Accum 
US Smaser COS AC 

UK Enure me 
Do Accum 
Raeoroiy 


1263 135 0 
1293 1382 
527 MS# 
57 2 61 5# 
115 7 123 7 
1 IB B 127 0 
54? ST I® 
B3 2 07 7® 
28 6 305 
299 319 
1659 177 A® 
3701 3958# 
110# 1104 
1529 183 5 
148 2 1585 
52.0 556 
53 9 57 6 
1266 1354 
1330 1422 
1003 107 2 
1039 ml 
229.7 2456 
3322 2483 
53 1 567 
974 104.1# 
151 1 161 S® 
7975 B520C 


S Ctunry 5U.7 602.0* 
Extra hcoma 56 3 815® 


+0.2 086 
+02 066 
•03 214 
•05 21* 
+ 1 7 103 
• I 7 103 
-0.1 9.60 
-02 080 
+0* 3.16 
+05 2 lfi 
-30 5IS 
-01 £15 
-03 047 
-0 5 0*7 
+10 000 
•02 000 
•02 099 
-06 1 1S 
-0 5 1 18 
-10 1 01 
-1.0 tot 
+90 0 32 
•30 022 
+02 000 
-1 I 340 
-1.7 £46 
£57 
3 19 
-03 710 


SemVTAR ASSET MANAOWENr 
33-38 Gracachuron Si London EC3V (MX 
01 623 S776/8711 


UK Forty he 23* 

Do Aec 236 251 

&4RT5IM *3 MO# 

Do MC *63 

Global Gm he ff.9 87 

Da Acc 26 0 298 

Managed Exempt 118.4 1233 

SCOTTISH EQUnABLE 
20 St Anorews Sa Edrauign 
031-559 9101 

■no heome Unas t*6S iSSB 

DO Accun 217 7 231 0 


-01 522 
-01 522 
.. 1.00 
.. 100 
-02 100 
-02 100 
+03 400 


335 

£35 


-42 100 

+13 133 
+40 005 
+0.1 056 


.. 271 
.. 022 
.. 216 
. 090 


W3J 1 1 1SHUFE DIVESTMENTS 
18. 51 Arxhews So. Erenougn 
KM 225 2211 

UK EdUly 174.5 188.7 

Ani^ii 144 6 154.7 

Paohc 1819 194 0 

European 2338 2501 

SCOTTISH MUTUAL INVESTMENT 
MANAGERS 

109. vmcem Sl GMudw G2 5HN 
041-246 6100 

UK Equay 161 0 1720 

OU 6 Fund 1176 125.0 

UK Sm# Cob Ea '«■§ 
Ei/opesn T94B 2073 

K Amercan 109* 116.4 

P3C4C 172J 1814 

SCOTTISH IIWT TRUST 
29. Charlene Sa EOMx/gn 
031-228 4372 
P»c*e 

Worm Growm 
N Amencan 
Income Fund 

European 

re Amer Inc 
UK Growth 
Extra ho 


SCOTTISH WIDOWS 

PO Box ME EAnnugh EH16 5BU 

031-655 8000 

Ed he 211 B Z380 -66 3 13 

Accun 255 3 271.7 -4.0 £13 


064 


66 T 

997 

+09 

002 

350 

38.1 


1.07 

329 

350 

-01 

016 

428 

450# 

-OB 

501 

410 

444 

+08 

089 

264 

280 

-01 

206 

29.7 

31.8 

-04 

1.64 

304 

3£6 

-0.4 

048 


V. 


SSI11NEL FWD6 MANAGEMENT 

? ] Ore Rd. Lcnoon ECTY 2AY 
1-638 8011 
Amer Tech a Gan 
hacAc 

Sac hcoma Fnd 
Spocwl Sffuabona 
M Grown 
Amercan Motors 
Smaa Cob 
japan Tea t Gao 


Exempt 
UK Gam _ 

Eixo Grown 
Eun hcoma 

SdAON A COATES 
1. London HH BU 
0)688 3644 Exi 3! 
Speoai Sa iS) 
STANDARD LIFE 


991 1060 

194 9 208 5 

1010 1731# 
2010 2151 
321 34 3# 
68 4 73 4 

37 7 400 
H3J2 121 1 
54 7 505# 
5212 557.7# 
31 5 317 
33J 356 
41 9 44.Be 


+01 024 
+30 000 
-10 4.15 
-06 149 
+06 0 15 

+0* 031 
-00 167 
+35 000 
+01 504 
-68 £23 
-00 IBI 
♦09 002 
+10 400 


a. London £C2M SPT 

' 

49 3 527 *0.7 0.76 


3 Guwga SL Eonbugh EH2 2X2 
031 22f2S“ 


2552 
hcoma Unts 
Do Accun rams 


239 2SJS 
265 204 


STEWART. IVORY UWT TWIST 
MANAGERS 

45. Chanon Sa EMxxgh 
031-226 3271 


American Fund 
Do Accum 
Do wwiranm 
Australian Fund 
Do Accun 
Braun Fund 
Do Aocum 
European Fund 
Do Accum 
Japan Fund 
Do Accun 
Sms PPP 


2219 2364 
249 1 2654 
1557 1669 
066 1056 
1002 1060 
5818 632.4 
7998 851 8 
2960 3161 
31 £5 3320 
337 5 35SB 
3362 361 J 
189.4 17a* 


-03 345 
-03 £45 


+04 226 
+0* 236 
+0J 235 
+17 1» 
+1.7 1.26 
-40 4 41 
-60 441 

+9£ 003 
+98 083 
♦5.9 021 
+60 021 


SUN ALLIANCE 

Sui A#ance Haa. Horanam. Siam 
0403 56203 


Equity Trust Acc 
N Am Tne? Acc 
F» East Trust Acc 
Wbratwaa Bond 


370 1 303 7 -40 £72 

571 80 7 +01 100 

0*7 901 +15 009 

493 630 +4 1 603 


TS8 UWT TRUSTS LTD 

Keens Houm. Andover . Hants. 5P10 IPG 

0264 56709 Otaing# 0284 63*32/3(4 


Amorcan he 
Do Accun 
Extra hcoma he 
Do Accun 
General UW he 
Da acumi 
G fll 6 Flxadhe 
Do Accun 
heome 
Accum 
Pac/c he 
Da Accum 
bill he 
Do Accun 
Selected Opps he 
Da Accun 
Natural Res 
Do Aocum 


1l£0 1201# 

1180 1264# 

11£0 Il9£c 
1308 1392c 
1*90 1589# 
2*67 2620# 
490 516# 
656 084# 
20*0 2174 
3107 3391 
1809 1712# 
1661 1780# 
315.5 3357 
389 0 414.5 
61 1 650 
669 712 
410 442 
4£6 *54 


+00 t.14 
+07 1.1* 
-1.6 £41 
-19 £41 
-29 £95 
-39 £95 
-03 641 
-04 641 
-5.1 4.80 
-79 4.60 
+22 002 
*22 002 
+£9 126 
+48 120 
-05 101 
-00 1.01 
+03 £15 
+00 £15 


TARGET TRUST MANAGERS 
Tinsel House- Gaunowa Rd. Aytabuy Bucks 


5041 
Am® Eagle 
Ausnafian 
CommotMy 


708 75.4 -00 003 
161 172 .. 010 

. 668 71.7 +01 140 

|#TO 266 31 7# -03 1 66 

!#“re _ 1190 12B.7 -1 0 £33 

Ewopcan Spec S4a 1030 1007 +17 198 


Exit] hcoma 
Fmanoat 
Dm btamn 
Gold hcoma 
at Accum 
meow 
Japan 

LUUy * Smgaoorr 
ftolc hv 

Dp n^me-31 

Prof Snaro Fd 
UK Gooreii 
SPC<*N 54* 
Tacra>oios» 
wend income 
WuUvnO# CapoN 
'Eouty Ex (31 
Do Accun Ol 


1l?S l?t -ia 
7960 27 1 i 
1(150 1 1O0C 
526 »! 

9b 5 1029 
rj 829 

1014 107 8® 

22? 232 

B2.fi 903c 
114 r i?' Je 
175 180® 

08.8 736® 
826 86?® 
43 3 462 
55 7 59 5® 
138 5 IM9# 
709 844 
140b 1589 


-14 575 
-3 7 IJJ- 

-uj ras 
•01 D$.* 
•U.‘ 057 
-00 5-U 

• 1b 0 10 

♦ 02 2 78 ' 

♦ 18 064 

• 22 Do* - 

17 45. 
-09 141 
-07 108. 
-01 010 
+03 395 
-Ob 181 
IN' 
ISO 


THORNTON UNIT MANAGERS LTD _ - 

Para House <6 Furebury Gkus London CC2M- 
2DJ 

01-638 4761 
Far E» 8 Gan 
japan 0 Gan 
Nth Amar 6 Gan 

Pareto Tocn 

l£*6 Gan 

0 UWT TRUST MANAGS1S 

2 Sl More Am London EC3A BSP 

01 920-0356 

SmraerCos 633 «0 010 


556 

55! 

+ 14 

004. 

546 

500 

♦09 

096 + 

444 

514 

+07 

097 

531 

564 

•2 1 

099 

56* 

600 

•06 

062 

4! 7 

454 

-08 

£20'' 


TOUCHE REMNANT 
Mermarn houm. £ Puddhr 
3AT 

012*8 1250 
Amenc a n Growth 
General Growm 
GM* Teen 
hcoma Growth 
hcoma Mum«y 
japan Grown 

Man Eoutv he 
Du Actum 
Oseas Growm 
SmaOer Cos 
Specs/ Oppo 

TYMUUX MANAGERS 
18 Canvnga Rd Bnurt 
0272 7323*1 


DOCA London EC*V . 


41 1 

438 

-03 

068. 

*89 

52 5® 

-09 

£17, 

415 

444 

-0* 

010, 

588 

80 5® 

-1 2 

4 98 

47 5 

509® 

-04 

6.48 

486 

51 5 

+05 

0.1Z- 

23* 

24 9 

-04 

236 ■ 

a j 

249 

-04 

206 

47 7 

51 J 

*03 

099 

60? 

6* 1 

-oa 

£00 

71 1 

759® 

-09 

157 


Ausnbon 
DO Ace 
CatMai 
Do Accum 
Exj-nw 
Da Accun 
Far Eastern 
Da Accum 

Fin A Prop 
Do ACOim 
CM Capital 
Do Accun 
Gi« hcoma 
Do Accun 
Y«U 
tocu» 
het/na 
Do Accun 
inti Earrwigs 


T' 


523 
5*5 
29*9 
528 6 
7828 
6505 
1630 
1768 
507 
800 
124 8 
1446 

1095 
178 0 
520 
1140 
2267 
7000 
1523 


55.9 
580 
31* t® 
582 8® 
3012® 
69? 8® 
1752 
1891 
54 0® 
850® 

1287 
1492 
1125 
1831 
558 
121 8 
241 4® 
745 8® 
1622 


+16 160 
+ 17 169 
-80 £47 
-15 2 0 47 
-13 588 
-97 5 88 
-4 3 009' 
•4 7 009 
-l.l 348 
-16 3.4S 
-0 4 6 40- 
-04 8*0 
-00 952 
-08 952 
-08 B07 
-1 9 607 
-57 526 
-163 526 
-3 3 281' 


107 3 114 0® 
156 7 1665® 
110 3 120.4® 


-IB 
♦ 1 3 
+06 


1030 1951 
256 6 780-7# 

200 2 2130® 

20*7 2178 
400 42 8® 

*0 5 401 
1301 138 5® 

198 7 21' J® 

59 5 53 0 

£5974 6?£7® -01* £40 
£« Mfi’53 -0M2.4O 

-10 193 
-0.9 056 
•04 05B 


-2 7 3 M 
-60 25* 
-20 5.18 
-20 5 16 
-04 239 
-04 £39 
-22 4 17 
-31 4 17 
-01 104 
-01 124 


UK PROVRJENTUT MANAGERS 
UK Mouse. Cast# Sl Saksouy SPi 35H 
3722 336242 
UK Eouty 
Pareto Basm 
n Amar 

VANGUARD TRUST 
65 Hohom Viaduct EC1A 2EU 
General Enqunes 01-236 3053 Doswg Lhe 01 
238 2460 
Growth Inc 
Do Accum 

HKh Y«U 
Da Accum 
Special Sos 
Do Accum 
Trusue 
Do Accun 
Amer 8 Gen 
Do Acoum 
Master PottioM 

Da Accum «. _ - 

Atwg fWfn ASM (51 M2* *'9«# 

Da Accum H£4 1190 

Fol E ast 6 Gen me SOS S3B 
Do Accun 495 50 B 

WARDUEY UMT TRUST MANAGERS 
waroaey House. 7. Davon W e Sa. London ECZ 
01-929 1532 
American Trust 
For East fi Gen 
InS GraWb 
hoome Trust 
Japan Growfli 
Snua Compamei 
To cn notogy . 

AuUaM 

UK Trust 
European Grown 
Hong Kang 
WAVHtLET ASSET MANAGEMENT 

13 cnadoae Sa- Etxioutfi 
031-225 1551 

Austrian GM) 1&5 197 . 015 

M(Bm 136 140 *01 020 

Canataan Ba> Gh 50* 600 097 

G-nive Mae Fnd <1014 1056# 700 

WffnMDDALE UWT TRUST MANAGERS 
2 Honey La EC? SET 
01-606 9065/6 


835 

6# 3® 

+03 

1 70 


111 6® 

• 1 5 

Of® 



*04 

DM 


880 

-OS 

560 

irfti 

1356 

+?.« 

070 

1082 

116* 

-0.6 

200 

328 

352 

-03 

070 


391 

+01 

700 

ITS .1 

1333 

-Ifl 

270 

538 

57.1® 

*05 

a bo 

238 

25* 

+00 

140 


Stff Did G« Fuid 
U5 Govt Braid Fd 


576 

*507 


807 

509 


-0.1 


WINDSOR TRUST MANAGERS LTD 

Windsor Houm. 83. Kngswiy. London WC2B 

650 

01-405 8331 

Com 0 Equty 47$ 500 76* 

hoome 52.0 55*® -05 509 

Grown *96 52 B -00 200 


The prices in this 
section refer to 
Thnrsday's trading 



month. 

month. 


• Ex ifiviOand. e Cum tfividend. k Cum 
stock spfiL s Ex stock split, m Cun aU 
(any Wro or more of above), a Ex a* (any 
two or more ol above). Dealing or 


ith-ffilia 

1st ana 3rd Wednesday ol 
20th of month. (24) 3rd 
Tuesday ol month. (25) 1st and 3rd 
— J ol month. (26) 4fli Tuesday of 
ol month. (28) 


momix (27) 1st . . 

tost Thursday ol month. (29) 3nj working 
dayof month. (30) 16th of month. (31) 1st 
workbig day of month. (32) 20th ol month. 
(33) In day of Fobruoy. May. August 
Navambw. 04) Last woridnq day ol 
month. ( 35) 15th of month. (36) 14th of 
month. (37) 21 sl of month. (38) 3rd 
Wednesday of month. (39) 2nd 
Wednesdanr ol month. (40) Valued 
monthly. (41) Last Thursday of Stock 
Exchange account (42) Last day o I 
month. {43 2nd and 4ih Wednesday of 
n Quarterly. (45) 6th ot month. 
Tuesday ol month. 


INVESTMENT TRUSTS 


1988 

tagn low 

Company 

PHca 

Ouea 

dnr 

QTga pence 

YM 

* PfE 

1980 

Hqn Law 

Company 

ffcoas 

dm 

Pncft Qi'ge pence 

YM 

■5 P/E 

pH 

9* 

Aim 



£6 

30209 

330 

244 

□reemnar 

3*0 


24 


■(i 1 

683 




as 

39 383 

ra r T 

215 

Gmnam House 

310 




Fh 1 

126 

fimer Tnisl 



4 A 

38 39.4 

Id 

158 

Hjrmrau 

176 




E '- T ~l 

288 

Aug Amer Sac 


• .. 

89 

£7 524 

f.1 


H*1 OP) 

295 





9* 

flttrrae Assets 


-1 

09 

10 710 



bwem m Success 

800 




t» 

ye 

Banker* 


• .. 

39t 

3* 420 



/nr Cop 

298 




JS* 

159 

Awry 



T0t 

as .. 

m 

13? 

Jxory t 5mi 

ra? 


SB 


eo- 

53 

Or Assets 

5a'.. 


30 

50 004 



Japan A&£ers 

59 

.1 . 



53 

31 

Br Empne Sac 

37 


07 

19 507 



KLwnroti Chanar 

93 




«H 

38* 


418 


ai 7 

50 268 

132 

110 

Wwiwon 0 seat 

119 




1«2 

80 


90 

-1 

30 


299 

237 

Ktanwori Snulnt 

2U5 




7*8 

136 

Crescent Jsprai 

£18 

+1 

00 

00 .. 

233 

188 

Low Daoentun 

229 




157 

ire 

Doroy me 

163 

• .. 

129 

B4 180 



Lon Mertfiam Sac 

56 




153 

no 

Da Cap 

133 






Lun Trust 

81 




LJ 

314 

Drsyn/i Cora 

370 


wi 

4 8 318 



Mitrautns 

111 



MU 

Drayton Far East 

177 


16 

09 . 



Horace 

201 

+1 

37 

10 758 


a* i76 

117 99 
150 119 
374 284 
158 T36 
93’ 75 
ISO 119 
112 85 

207 142 
10 8 '. 
348 287 
ISO 05 
558 480 
193 1*5 
345 254 
125 8*' 
140 109 
70* 480 
Ml 123 
147 123 
1K2 1*3 
133 107 
90 68 
109 88 

195 118 
182 138 
330 275 
143 115 
123 97 
147 127 
218 138 
231 184 


Drayton Japan 

Dumm Lon 
Etfcn Amar Asm! 
Ettncutyi 
Electric Gen 
Engfcn Ml 
Engksn Scot 


717 

197 


tAm 00 
ROB 41 35.1 


F * i_ ... 

FBCPaobc 
Fra! cnanotM 
Foret Scar Amar 
Few Un Gen 


FTanwg 

Ftenwig cmrpw 
Rwimg F/ EM 
FNrung Redg4ng 
FMmng Japan 


ri em m g Tech 
Ftenwig UmverHl 
Fra Cra 
GSG Carat*! 

OT Japan 
Genraw Funda 
Gan®ra Cone 
Qwgow Stock 

oSSl Aflanw 
Oovad Onanral 
Govan sraegy 


99 


00 

00 770 

138 

-1 

47 

£5 *00 

343 

e-5 

8 A 

10 570 

157 


S3 

30 430 

87 


£0 

20 527 

144 

+1 

£0 

14 800 

112 

+1 

as 

20 580 

206 

+1 

£1 

10 790 

8'. 


01 

10 

310 

-2 

1*0 

4 8 297 





^vl 


80 

10830 

if 

• .. 

74 



• -2 

120 

40 33.7 

124 

+t 


1 1 . 

131 

•+1 

38 

£7 50 6 

704 

+1 

57 

OB . 

155 

-1 

51 

30 401 

139 

*1 

30 

£8 607 

1*4 

■ -1 

30 

£0 81 3 

127 

s . . 

£0 

23 sao 

89 


£1 

2.4 60.1 


no 

195 

>82 

296 

132 

108 

138 

718 

£17 


£00 ID .. 
£S 18 0*8 
170b 60 26® 
34 £8 539 

Sl7 48 278 

4.0 a 2.9 42.4 

£0 10 95 8 

9.1 £4 610 


159 128 
167 137 
306 215 
380 318 
440 390 
ea *9 
189 158 
64 50' 

256 185 
329 278 
87 20 

370 219 
201 1*5 
78 « 

38 31 

4£ 37 

405 OT 
171 147 

258 218 

259 207 
23* 181 
326 267 

14 If 
138 116 
374 297 
323 £73 
113 89 
420 390 
528 402 
318 245 
870 570 
85 68 

81 87 


Murray InoDma 
Murray Ml 

Murray Smol 

Murray Varnura 
**<w Coun 
New Danon 04 
920 

Nwnrofl Me 63 
New Torao 
NM Aflanw See 
N*i Sm Auers 

Npm Amar 

Outwtcn 
Paohc Assets 
Do Wmts 
Personal Assets 
RaaBum 
Rrew & More 
R™*r Plan 
Rooaca 
Rcanco 
Romnev 
Rraamo 
Sl Anrawws 

Scgrwh 

Scar American 
Scar Eastern 
Seal Mere A 
Sea Mtg* 

Sea u 
Second A#ance 
Sec Of Scodana 
Smofltr Cos 


149 

154 

306 

375 

418 

56 

184 

64 

256 

320 

£0 


33 
37 
383 
159 
241 
259 
234 
9E 
C14V 
12 


09 

5J 

40 

1.1 

40 

0.7 


+2 

+2 


• -Z 


356 
£96 
108 
390 

22 * 3 

are -i 

“Si * z 

s . 

81 +t 


T.7n 50 276 
71b *0 320 

39 10 

mOb £7 610 
210 5.1 290 

18 610 
£1 3b .3 
7.5 l&l 

04 .. 

I0B9.T 
£5 3Z0 
77b £1 660 

40 £0 505 
ID 14 880 

05 1.4 67.4 

171 40 38 6 

S6B 04 2 92 
124 5.1 £70 


7.1 £2 490 

4 60 3* 480 
*80 20 61.4 
100b 30 410 
2.9 £7 580 

25.0 8.4 108 

12.1 24 540 

72 £6 524 

24-8n £8 335 
3.9b *4 30.1 
£0 £5 588 


1900 

Hgn Low Company 


Grass 
»v YM 
Chge pane* P/E 


51 

35 

KB 

Bl 

122 

95 

199 

■55 

226 

201 

101 

89 

173 

118 

186 

MO 

118 

90' 

174 

•139 

169 

135 

305 

237 

370 

300 

207 

157' 

143 

112 

94 

79 

274 

217 

62 

33 

74 

5* 

105 

80' 

35S 

288 


Smart Enttrp 42 

TR AuuraH 0S 

TR COY 01 Lon DM 106 
TR mf 1 Gan IBB 

tr ream r« 

TR Norm Amerca 
TR Paollc Bum 
TB Propsny 
TR Teen 
TR TrosMas 
Tcmraa Bar 


219 
91 
173 
178 
100 
158 
148 
27? 

TTtrog Secured Cap 350 
Trans Ocwrac 195 

Tnauie 138 

TnpMwm Me 90 

US Daoaimxe 270 

Vftkxig Resources 36 

wasipoai 5* 

WMsn 95 

Yeoman 3*0 


r 

06 

1 4 


30 

3 9 299 

-1 

B0D 

60 2*0 

-1 

57 

30 400 

+1 




28 

£9 460 


1 4 


-1 

57 

30 35 5 

-1 

26 

£6 472 

*1 

80 

3 8 04 6 


8 it 

58 25 9 

• -£ 

11 9b 

44 320 

•2 

55 

28*89 

• +2 

40 

29 390 


158 



90 

34 54 1 

• . 

2.9b 8.1 17 7 

-4 

22 

4 1 388 

a -1 

*6 

48 540 

• -B 

15 ib 

4.4 35.1 


FINANCIAL TRUSTS 


47-x 04'. 
71 31 

*9 21 

154 116 
22'.- 13'- 
20'. 12', 
158 131 
140 90 

2*7 187 
106 88 
750 373 
0* 77 

133 75 
900 490 
210 153 
4*0 320 
290 >90 
36? 26Z 
115 78 

27 IS 

aos 102 


Amanam Exprasa 
Argyll 


M) 


Bra-irav* Arrow 
Daffy Man 

Do A 
Etaetra 
Eng Trusi 

Exraoraum 

Franwngujn 
Frost Op 
Goode (D R .... 
Henooraon Admn 
ICH 
MAI 
MSG 

Maro anra e House 
Paa#C Mv Til 
Do Wlvrancs 
Snub Now Court 


E40'. 
42' • 
30 
136 

nB'- 

no 1 .- 

130 

118 

£29 

100 

720 

83 

115 

830 

153 

330 

240 

207 

115 


1 4 

80 

700 

700 

59 

40 

60 
. 33 

93 
8.4 
25 
179 
120b 
220 
a i 
»o 
as 


£3 22.7 
. 811 
4 4 150 
30 130 
38 131 
40 319 
3 4 180 
£6 14 7 

3 3 T£1 
1 3 330 
7.7 60 
£0 322 

22 16.4 
64 80 
89 67 
26232 
75 SD 
OA .. 


100 £1 £1 


COMMODITIES 


LONDON COMWOfTY 
EXCHANGE 

G W Joynsoa and Co report 
SUGAR (Prom & Csamlun4 

pQ0 

Oct 1508-506 

Dec 159.0-56-0 

March 165.MS2 

May 169.2-69.0 

Aug 174.0-78.0 

Oct 177.8-7IL0 

Vafc 1754 

COCOA 


Doc 


Mar. 

May. 

*1 




VOL- 

COFFEE 


1398-07 
1445-64 
1481-80 
1502-01 
1520-19 
153837 
1563-80 
— 2534 


Nov . 


Jan. 
Mar . 


»: 


1835-831 
1846-640 
1855-845 
1865-650 
1893-875 
1920-880 
1940-875 
3077 


SOYABEAN 
All 




Ooe. 

Feb 

Apr- 


Jun 

Au 


C3. 


129.0- 27.0 
1ZT&27J0 

127^27.0 
130^-29.0 
131 0-30.0 

129.0- 28.0 

128D-28.0 

78 


GA8CW. 
Aug -- 


§00. 

Oct- 


Nov 


Ok. 


— LT-122.00 

128.75- 2350 

129.75- 29.50 
131 <50-31.00 

134.00-33.00 


Jan. 

Fsb 


s- 


134^0-33.00 
.. 137.00-SLR 
- 135.00-SLR 
_135J)frSLR 
3736 


LONDON HETAL EXCHANGE 
Itaafflctol prices 
Official Turnover figure* 

Price in E par reatric toaa# 
SOver tn pane# par trey ounce 

RodoBT Wall A Co. Ltd. report 
COPPER GRADE A 

Cash 882.00-88300 

Thm Months. 901^090200 
Vol 1075 


Tone 


Steady 


STANDARD CATHODES 

Cash B57D0-859JX) 

Direa Months . 879.00881 .00 
Vol 500 


Tone - 

LEAD 

Cash. 


.Qua 


259.50-260.00 


Three Months . 259^0-259.75 
Voi 1025 


Steady 


Tone 

ZINC STANDARD 

Cash 50000-51000 

Vol m 

Tone - tdto 

ZINC HIGH GRADE 

C83h 54450-54500 

Three Months . 545.00-545^0 

vol -—400 

Tone — Steady But Quiet 
SILVER LARGE 

cash 353-00-354.00 

Three Months . 361 00-3S£00 

Vol 10 


Tone 


Quiet 


SILVER SMALL 

Cash 35300-354.00 


Thraa Months 
Mot - - 

- 381.0W62.00 

Tone — 


ALUMINIUM 


Cash 

Three Months 
Vol . 

- 75800-75900 

■ 77i.so-rra.oo 



MCKEL 

Cash 2S20-SB25 

Thraa Months, 
uni 

— Z6 15-2625 

Tons . 

— Stsady 


MEAT AND UVESTOCX 

COMMISSION 
Aveng# famock price# «t 

l# | V#»a flt« l i *#ll»M h # U BB 

Augusts 

G&CatU#.9535pperkg)w 
>157.0^7 per kgestd 
ipvkglw 

England and Walm; 

Cattle nos v up 7J%. ave. 
.95.1. : 

jnos. down Oil %, ave. 




S cntla nd: 

Catfle nos. up 1ZXI %. ave. 



LONDON RATFUTURES 

EXCHANGE 


Month 

Sep 

Oct 

Nov 

Jon 

Feb 

Mar 

Apr 

May 

Jun 


Pig Contract 
p.perkao 
Open 
Unq. 
Unq. 
Unq. 
Unq. 
Unq. 
Unq. 
U"Q- 

iMq. 

Unq. 


Ckne 

1098 

1145 

116.0 

102.0 

1025 

102.0 

1025 

1025 

1025 

VU:0 


Pig Meat ved:- 

LONDON HEAT FUTURES 
EXCHANGE 
LhreCaifia Contract 
p. per tax? 

Open Close 
Unq. Sao 
Una 985 
Una 98J) 
Una 99.0 


Month 

Aug 

Sep 

OCX 

Nov 

Feb 

AP 

Jun 


Unq. 985 
Una 985 
Unq. 995 

vato 


UMOON GRAIN FUTURES 
Eper tonne 

Wh#M fiartey 
pose Close 
!«■» 102.70 

I2S-S 10S1 5 

10950 10750 

”3-» lUMS 
11A40 in.75 


Month 

Sep 

Nov 

Jan 

Mar 

May 

Volume; 
Wheat.. 
Bam»y _ 


300 

143 


LONDON 
POTATO FUTURES 

Eper tonne 


Month 

Open 

Close 

Nov 

1320 

130.0 

FBb 

1415 

1513 

X 

215.0 

224.0 

227.8 

234.5 

NOV 

675 

650 


Voi 2024 


BffFEX 

G-N-J- Freight Futures Ltd 

report *10 per index point 

freight Index 


High /Low Close 
678-665 S7S5 


Oct 88 

Jan 88 

Apr 87 

-MS? 

Oaf? 790-790 

Jan88 

Apr 88 ■ 

Juf 88 

VoL 40 lots 

Open merest 1955 


7025 

7475 

890.0 

790.0 

775.0 
8500 
775.0 


TANKER REPORT 

Hlflh/Low Close 
Aug 66 1010-1010 1010 

Sep 06 1010-1010 1010 

Oct 86 1055 

D« 86 — _ 1050 

M0T87 ,050 

Jun87 1110 

Vote IMS 

OpanifflBre8t4a 

Spot market commentary 
Tanker mag* ; 

1107.0 down 8.0 on 6(8/88 
fry cargo nutate 
«5.0 up 05 an 6/8/88. 



_ r 3 fe. 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


BUSINESS AND HNAN 



— ^cld — 


. From your .portfolio canf check your 
eighl shore price nK>vcroent&. Add them 
up. to give you your overall tool. Check 


have won outright or a stare of the total 
daily prize money stated. If you arc a 
winner follow the claim procedure on the 
bade of your card. Yon must always have 
your card available when rf "’ rT T n g l 


STOCK EXCHANGE PRICES 


Nervous end to account 

ACCOUNT DAYS: Dealings began July 28. Dealings ended yesterday {{Contango day next Monday. Settlement day August 18. 

§Forward bargains are permitted on two previous business days. 



r- . 


Gaia or 

[Nil C— part 

Gm» 

km 



Courtney -Rope 


RJ FTT^TI ;< | 

m EES3B M 1 

m 

BB 

m 


80 

58 


63 

+2 




MB 

ROKCMd 0 )HH 

129 

9*1 

7.1 


380 m 

Reyi Bnk Of Sea 

307 


M 3 



5 - 

SdvDdffs 

a 


192 



4 >B 

SMdBI 

719 


M.Ob 70 

HB 

«13 

(Avon 

683 

•-5 

5 Z 9 



48 ' 

Web Fayo 

CHI' 




320 

220 

imvm 

285 


7 J 

£7 135 



BREWERIES 


re irr I 



AWiwu 306 

gy ZS 5 

Bo o d mu t on * US 

ftMMMI 510 

ESL&Ta™ i£ 

OWL (M*Uwk) 510 
Dauenren (J A) 216 
Qreanal Windey 171 
.Groan* King zro 
Gmms 301 

Nam 8 Knos sii 
H gmntf Oca 75 
kwawlon M 155 
mtifini 2zi 

Marnon Tfeonpam im 
IWM d 2S2 

SA Dnj ne ntl ws 
Scot a NM - TBS 
van* an 

WWMd "A" 248 

DO -S' 250 

WbttTOed in* 211 
watniHpma o 533 
YMV 'A 1 325 


-5 T35 <4Ht 

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43 37 IS B 

-a sum as iaa 
9-9 7.6 U 113 

• ■ 15 * 27 l&l 

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-3 75 if 122 

• •1 BO 13 12.0 

-2 103 1 * 11.4 

• +4*« ESJS 43 137 

23 19 152 

-1 83 *4 99 

■a flD 87 . 

• .. 3.2 3JS 15.4 

91 03 133 

9-9 100 5 A 112 

.. 164 43 143 

-3 11.1 43 11.4 

-5 11.1 4 A 113 

*1 iaa so 27.1 

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104 32 224 


BUILDINGS AND ROADS 


Oariie NktoOs I Propeny 


Please be sure to take account 
of any minus signs 


Weekly Dividend 


Please make a. note of your daily totals 
for the weekly dividend of £16000 in 
today's newspaper. 



BRITISH FUNDS 


268 2M Aberdeen Car* 
297 213 Amec 
74 52 AmcMto 

177 125 AOwooOt 
950 331 BPS HIKOnC 

•2 M 4 

&£ gEr ,coow 

83 S3 Ben Bens - 
875 ere BtocMtyS 
728 531 SuOfcM 


91 61 Br Dmdgreg 74 

20 ifi BnMOA iaCkSOn 24 
73 37 Bam |*M 58 

132 U Brum 107 

Z7 II Boom 6 Halwa 11 

158 158 Cekatned Roeey 158 
12C 85 CamM-Homm 111 

118 60 CoWGip 116 

574 440 cowan 510 

4G6 296 Comryreda 486 

181 XT* Cmacn (Drunk) 163 

£ 3 l£ 

10* m Sin 102 

83 re Feb BB 

jn 54 DO -A • 62 

17 ? 51 FMftBMd Hcg M 2 

SB SS FtoMn Go 60 

9 * 00 GaWort 89 

131 106 Greta 4 Dandy OM 1 ZT 

*385 254 GMKMiUJ) 3 B 3 

133 BB HAT 133 

246 SB Harore Bar 227 

79 42 HewdavSkien 88 

292 149 Heywooa Man 224 

S AW H*ga 6 MB 610 

‘.126 KssxSl Jnwt TB2 

433 265 Jrevo(J)»Sans <3® 

408 298 Leregp) 4 14 

S 20B Do -A' 412 

7B Lawranoa (WaM 112 

91 71 L4ey (FJC) 72 

429 290 UxaKVJ) *ffiB 

196 128 Maanai 6 Soon 172 

306 178 Manoan 283 

135 101 Uarlay- %w 

198 181 iiaranMs (ttattez) 193 

136 96 Mai 8 Hesxefl OB 

444 304 McMpna (Mbad) 418 

272 171 Mew W 238 

38 23 M4lar tStredtyl 33 

130 IBS Monk K 118 

444 306 Mowtom (Johrtl 378 

mo 796 NMOrmd 860 


238 


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0.1 

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182 


6.1 

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301 

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125 

£6 M5 

346 

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30 125 

134 

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105 

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172 

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55 H.4 

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65 185 

920 


371 

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553 

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300 

54 75 

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I4J 

5 4 251 

74 


43 

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163 Noon^wn Brick 17 B 


395 285 Rxnm 
672 440 RMC 
482 340 Radand 
323 IBS RubBrasa 
191 133 ’. Rugby Omani 
136 BT Stan Kfieher 
84 70 Snnrt (J) 

516 342 Tarmac 
348 238 '/ Taylor Mudrm 
130 140 Hawy Group 
439 328 Tram 8 Arnold 
101 73 Tram 

185 138 TunOT 
• 3*3 195 MbrapSM 
2 B 0 2*6 Wart 
84 - SB War nuiQm ( 1 ) 
204 172 . Wana-rahn 
82 . 87 waoam Brea 


*9 as .. 

i 25 22 158 

2*30 «J 15 
B-S 18 125 

85 SB (1.1 

86 BA 13.7 

2-50 2.0 227 
47 <K 190 
25 28 12.0 
25 4-0 8 4 

47 13 145 

54 BjO 23.4 

83 7.1 144 

25 2.1335 
73 £1 IS£ 

&4 4.1 l£S 

.. .. 650 

£4 35 12.1 
95 45147 

194 3.2 167 

7.1 39 13.7 

2508 S3 143 
109 2 A 11.7 

TO9 2 A 115 

52 45 89 

55 7.6 03 
10-2 25 14 A 

7.4 43 19.1 

•115 4.1 17.1 
SA SO 20.7 
75 3916.1 
0.1 0.1 . . 
179 43 135 
82 14 127 

14 43 .. 

. 03 79 159 
229 8.1 114 
157 15 173 
93 53133 
75 83125 
43 49 33 

184 S3 79 

209 81 143 

185 4.013.1 

133 44 1Q9 

9.1 63 169 
33 £4 209 
68b 85 189 

134 3D 189 
123 40135 

79 45 12.1 
123 £8183 

15 £1 93 

109 65 304 

134 39 159 
104 85155 

14 13 £3 
- £8 35 185 
19 £1 229 

07 05 172 
£9 1.1 202 

54 £7 193 



19K 

Up Um CCrtWny 


MO 132 
1<3 M 
520 no 
2ifi 141 

a- a- 
IQ 71 
OB » 
220 74 

570 359 
BO 32 
v 11l 63' 
*425 311 
81 40 

174 121 
224 156 
216' 112' 
48 32 
315 wr 
305 308 

a- i7v 

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238 178 
132 82 
KNtaa 
359 167 
Z73 TM 
315 IM 
IB' 17 
371 18O 
102'. 83 
110 90 
123 as 

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88 72 


tew icwnonq 
Qeyton Son 
Coaen 1A1 
Gotorai Go 
Gammed T«cn 
Conuntnc 
Cant StMonary 
Cot* (wraj 
Coekson 
Conan (FI 
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teS N49KAH0 
Crow Hood 
££?""* 3'.’. 
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ST. are 

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Deretna Sawing 
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VST 9 


9 . bb 27 US 

109 73 93 

• . 154 31 . 

• -2 71 39 1S2 

58 55149 

U £9 165 

• ■*10 64 29 159 

-10 11 1 £4 125 

21 31383 

• . . 48 45 153 

-2 129 33 139 

• .. 35 61 104 

68 4.7 11.7 

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373 32 
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-2 23 09 383 

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■*2 143 63 73 

• +S <9 58 83 

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-*8 83 S3 66 

.. 114 43 133 

*5 104 44 99 

06 35 191 
75 37 13.8 

• 7.4 84 127 

-2 71 72 108 

79 73 123 

-3 

84 7.7 1£B 
64 88 114 


348 215 Mwo-ann 215 -3 15 05 .. 

IB* 128 Aaun Hum 128 33 £5 54 

715 286 Ar mri a gaw a S75 -23 275 49 55 

SiO- 110 &mWo 1 Tach 203 -3 

23 .18 CainaM CIB'r >1 17.1 09 742 

263 194 candow 250 ..57 £3 385 

43 18 Camaway 32 

29‘r 17 EW 6 ban 27^ -•» 13 47 2S9 

105 132 hoy 6 5m 132 68 52 161 

184 153 IMada 161 - 89b 49 259 

70 62 NaT Homo Loam BB 

95 SO Don* EM 

148 114 N—mark e t Mi 

2» 213 TumMion 213 


FOODS 


CHEMICALS. PLASTICS 


H 






|k 















48 36'. 
288 180 
418 291 
247 180 
158 US 
111 78' 

132 102 

IBB 112 
100 57'. 

136 82 

306 3(5 
168 135 
1B0 112 
21 ' IS 
163 127 
131 100 
2*5 172 

133 111 
3W 215 
IBS- 113 
«3 330 

i Of" 72'. 
ID' 734 
4U 333 
118 100 
155 119 

91 SZ 

176 129 

73 38 
233 178 
153 67 


£46’. 

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400 

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141 

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170 

189 

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112 


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88 

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108 

150 

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AKZON/V Bearer C*6' 
ABodCotods . 190 
Amana am *05 

Ancnot ChomtcW 337 

BTP 141 

Gayar DM50 189 

-raagoan 117 

Bienr Cnemfi 135 

Br Benzol - 68 

Cwimg (WJ 112 

Crane SB5 

Comb* Bros 188 

Do A' 150 

Cory (Horace) W. 
croda 146 

DoOW 124 

BBS 8 Evened 206 

Eroda 118 

Foaeoo M ni ap 232 

Habmad (Jareaa) 150 

WW» . 388 

HoadM DM50 t82' 

MW CBM M 879. 

LapOrtB 351 

Lam 100 

Mi IS* 

Heebreok Mdgi as 

Raw 136 

SHIA BPD 261 

SwdHa SpaaMan 47 
W ntmnft c lm e Art 228 
Yortabna Cum 139 


CINEMAS AND TV 



HOTELS AND CATERERS 


270 178 AngM TV -A 
52 27 Gramoon 

240 176 HIV HIV 
368 283 LWTWdb* 
350 188 Scot TV A 
273 149 TVS N/V 
46 31 T5W 

225 223 ThwiasTV 


2*8 •' 139 55 139 

44 * £9 66 63 

2T0 -3 114 5* 88 

sm . . 213 63 135 

320 -3 160 *.7 10.5 

218 r -2 i4Jb 86 107 

45 26 58 124 
224 


433 328 Grand Mat 370 

286 208 Karewdy Breokai 233 
391 312 LadbrrAe 339 

5*5 447 Lon Part HDMx 520 
100 76'. Mouni QMrtom 87 
105 67 Pmoa 0« W HoMb 86 

79 58V Queen* Moat 65 

405 366 Savoy HUM* 'A* 318 

81 56 S35 64 

209 Ml TruMMusa Fcna 143 


-5 135 315 124 

.. 24 15 120 

.. 16.1 4,7 189 

. . M3 25 1U 
-'i £1 24 143 

» £1 £4 155 

21 15143 
69 I4H1 
a .. 15 23155 

-8 75 55 149 


INDUSTRIALS 

A-D 



. . 3 "* ’ 


.OVER FIFTEEN YEARS - . 
.in- 9i'. Kern 10V 2001 lU'/V+v 

U9*. 8B-C0n« B'.vrOCI 10T>*.. 

97 85 &m MOO 

137' 117*. Tret* 14V 1998411 128'. +S. 

Ill' 94' con* nr. 2082 103-* 

13*'.50a-.t9un 12V 19894)2 115- *■'« 

1® SB Tim 9- V 2002 102 •*■'« 

112' S3'.1MM 10V 2003 IM'-**'* 

138' llB .Tmas I3'.V 2000413 129. +%■ 
123' 10* Traaa IT V 20014)4 114’. +’- 
112 9*'- Tims l0 a .2OO* 104 *■- 

80* 48. RM 3’.V 199804 56'- +'- 

108- 80' CSm 9* V 2004 U»'- +'- 

108' 96'. Con* 9' Va 2805 UOv *■. 
108 90 -COW 9' V 2005 100-- +V 

117 9* -Eren 10 v 2005 »09 *V 

134 1ir-Tre» 12' V 20034H 7W. *V 
Sff 79 - Traaa 8*. 20024* 68-- 

107' 102 Ore* 9lV 2006 l02v . . 
127- id*'. T rees 11 .V 2003417 ii7^ .. 
»' 23 Treat 8' N 2007 =25 23'i 

94- 9B- Trees 8' V 2007 93'- . . 

M3' 115 Trees 13' V 2MJM3S 132'- -+V 

95- 87' Traaa 8V 2009 ms. +'- 

7?- 57' Treat S'. V 2008-12 »-.•-»•. 
93 78'. Trees 7 V 2012-15 88‘- 

•-Q6 113' E«3i 2013-17 12Bv ♦•>■ 

UNDATED 

«■ M'.CtWSOI* «v o 

42 34'. war Ln 3' V 37 

52 44 - Con* 3- V S - 

3* 29 Trow 3V 32 

29 24' Cons* 2' V 27 

29- 2*'- Trees 2-V 27 


Trias £ 2V 1988 12? ■ 

■ Tree* £ 2V 1690 107% 

Trees n. ZV 1996 119 1 - 

■ Trees 1L2 1 *. 2001 . 103 - 

■ Trees £2' V 2003 HJ?'- 

Tresa £ 2*. 2006 IDS'- 

-Tree* £2 V2008 101 

Trees 12' V 201 1 106M 

■ Trees £2' VShS- M « 
- Treat 82' V201B 

1 ■ Trees £2' V 2016 A 97'. 

' Trees £2' V 2020 95' . 


87. 95*8 

95 8575 
8*83 

109 8.927 

85 9546 
104 9824 

96 8521 

95 9509 

108 9620 
10 0 9 827 

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69 -82*0 
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101 9.611 

9.1 9913 

95 9449 

MU) 9585 
353 

97 9250 

102 9.W» 

9.1 9261 

94 8370 

90 8134 

95 9215 


DRAPERY AND STORES 


21 2202 
£2 2.746 
£4 3532 
20 2^66 
36 3524 
£7 £*74 

30 

30 £337 
35 3296 

31 32*5 
£6 1210 
£0 3211 


BANKS DISCOUNT HP 


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INSURANCE 


Asoev utt 
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PrucMntad 

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Sa-rga Hrogi 
Sun Akanca 
Sun uw 
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177 -1 

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295 *1 

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380 

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176 
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245 

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99 58 . 

100 4 0 

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85 22 267 
42 6 51 
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LEISURE 


Barr 8 WA A 134 

Borne* A Kawhae 150 
Warn fearer 164 

C*no»r 45 

Cnrysalls 186 

F*w Lereure 37» 

can so 

Hentutmar Brooke 65 
HOnzan Tram 114 

an Inn 113 

Juirenaa HHOa 38 

Irea me 153 

Mtomnstar 135 

Vbbmm 313 

Baafy UiaU 368 

May LaretfB 43 

Saga Kokanrs 138 • 

Sarm ewon Gp 330 •- 

Tonanmm nonpar 69 
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MINING 


100 7J 105 
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79 4 8 12.7 

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80 4£ 13 I 

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63 55 65 

7 1 S3 104 
43 113 IM 

7Bn 59 91 
107 14 129 
161 44 15 I 
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67a 83 1£S 
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OVERSEAS TRADERS 


Bprmwck 50 -1 

CIMPOIon 1U 

F«e*v bkmasl 76 ft 

Harmon CtPSUeM 35fl 

mencape an 

jstks |Wrm XI 

uy*bo 206 *4 

Ocean WAon 66 

Pawnsn 20ai 210 

Pa a 21O 

K-rey Peck Ml *8 

S*pe Curb* 43 

swei ftm SCO -5 

lore irereeiay im 

Vida Cano 196 


PAPER. PRINTING. ADVERT'G 


Abbot! MDU 21O 

ruorsori Pag* 133 

A*Clvti Im 54 

Assoc Purer 231 

AuB 8 weorq 3* 

Barker lOrenni iad 

Bemrosr HiO 

Bum Mnun 
BPCC 

Umnntng 

Pn H'V 175 

Bum 21Q 

Canton Comte eso 

cnxinun ma 

Crewrer (Jamas) 355 

DBG ns 

Omnm Paetca i30 

Eucarpu PUp *Vt 

Ferguson W3 273 

Frttb Damon 408 

Gams Gross 76 

God Grearem 200 

Goon Brtabons 91 

Hitnrerprn 2*5 

Lope* 115 

Low H-S C-F 375 

MrConwodaia 208 

Mora OFerrafl 115 

Mortal Omi 133 

Crywy 5 M au rer H9 

OMI Paoer 42 

SZ was Go 706 

Saatrra 8 Saiza 685 

DO 63*. Cnv Prl 112 
SmittI* Matt) 233 

Uslun Water 208 

vaim Run 130 

waca 58 

Waodngtnn (j] 170 

Waueough 230 

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120 

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478 

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HtyvQOfS 

263 

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262 

225 .. 

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Cora Gouteuc 

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123 


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218 

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227 

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£8 89 

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64 

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36b 55 6.7 

77 

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Lea (Anna) 

71V 

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263 

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250 

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410 

306 

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395 

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114b £9 1*9 

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106 

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31 

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39 

330 

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50 


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820 


86 

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Maring 62 

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Msnnai (Lmtod 

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163 

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128 

Meal Ctesuwi* 

143 

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£7 21.4 

91 

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79 


£2 

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55 

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11 T 58 

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70 

Mronao Some 

110 

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198 

183 

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112 

67 88 

318 

212 

Morgan Querela 

283 

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121 

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25 


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216 

158 

Nre4(J) 

163 

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81 58 

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Newnren tods 


+1 


£2 515 

153 

82 

Newman Torres 

148 

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102 

7.1 122 

133 

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Nobto 8 Lund 

122 



05 394 

(ft 

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48 



£0 51.7 

289 

188 

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133 

55 115 

268 

203 

016m Elsa Mrem 

213 

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121 

5.7 87 

«*8 

247 

POker Knoe A 

3/8 


154 

45 137 

Mb 

S2S 

Penreii JT 

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163 

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163 

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383 

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9 On 75 162 

674 

332 

PH|U»»HnaiiJny 

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286 

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620 

140 

PWflffnJ Irxf 

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413 

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396 

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323 

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288 



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85 195 

09 234 
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Radrem Matre 

145 



25 89 

589 

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472 



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Roreoma Smi 

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138 

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RboIbuti fjypk^r 

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340 


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173 

132 

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183 


69 

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91 

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102 

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S3i 314 De Barer* 

200 105 Daa*r»al 

4'. Doamionmn 
13^ 7 DreMui 
Vx 3* Dunren 
255 150 e Deggas 
59* Z» Banoanwd 
205 T29 BOro 
l® 85 Qsttxg 
380 211 E Rand QoM 
4*. Vx E Ratio Prop 
9 4 , FS Com 

213 93 FS D«v 
75 17 GeavorDn 

8v 4-. Gonael 
TO 8 Gan Mmg 
1(H- 5'- GF5A 
478 313 GM Kalgoori 
(§ 35 Gooena 

37? 165 Groovin 
158 91 Hamoion Areas 
9- 4*. Harmony 

350 175 Harm 

81 47' Jama* 

12'. S’. Krmoss 
6'. 2- noof 

160 65 Less* 

13 6'- Urenan 
410 170 Lorema 
157 64 DOM 
28 15 Mateysren Mmg 

123 50 Uarre. a H 

26'.- M\ Meeds Exp 
26 5V Uiengure 
9 5'. kkaoa Wt» 

655 450 Unorco 
5'- 2'. Maw 
142 73 um Brtkan SW 

44 2S>. Mn Kdgrt 

22 ■- UK ttangeftea 
128 90 Peokng Tm 

289 20* PBkoWaaseflO 
25 S'- Rand Hw LU 

**s 170 Rand bane* Prep 
69 16 Ranofonum 

351 225 Renaon 
791 511 RT£ 

7'- 4'- Ruaerburg 
10‘ 5>- SI Helena 

168 to u Lana 
31 14 ’« Soamvaai 

556 273 Sutorean 
138 80 Suigm Ben 
138 73 Trencn 
569 300 umel 
59’. 31' Vare Heebi 
S*a 233 vanrerapMi 
105 50 VUMontMi 
90 35 VogaK 
17 ID'. WaHaa COkOV 
5*5 288 MBBram 
310 128 Wanarn Area* 

28 ■- 15 Western Deep 
t® it* Wostam Mam 
285 108 Meet Rand cons 
140 80 Wltrn Creek 
17' 7'- WnkOs 

ware Noel 
18'. 10-- Zamrea Cooper 
58 26 Zandpan 


+2 iao u 
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♦V 92J) 2ft<i .. 
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129 £8 .. 
86 £3139 
14 9 149 .. 
289 126 .. 


+'* .. 

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f5 540 
5.4 

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+3 ISO 24.7 .. 
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flO *69 133 .. 
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+5 5*0 205 .. 

. 150 XO 

43 109 59 

flO WO 209 
230 MS . 
*■/ 171 109 . 

fl 3.0 £1 .. 

•2 129 109 . 


37 109 - 



MOTORS AND AIRCRAFT 


AE 204 

Apoteyart 130 

Armstrong 115 

BSG 45 

Bk*ne( Bros 
Bramai (CO) ?B9 

Br Aerosoaca *88 

Br Car AuCDOM 119 

Cmtiymi Z5 

Con* |T) 210 

Daws tGdotieyl IDS 

Dowry 214 

ERF 63 

FH Group 30* 

Fort U0K* 183 

Gaits (Frank Cl 74 

General Meta 7*2 

Gankato Lawrence 96 
HamieBs 85 

Honda Motor *65 

jaguar 523 


Assoc Br Pais ?5I 

Br CanmarereaHi 243 
Cjredoma 2ii 

Fonar (James) 67 

Grreg 500 

Jacoos (A) 59 


Ocean Trarapol 217 
P « 0 CW 488 

Rimcanen (Warren 141 
T*iwak 318 

Tuntoul Scon 370 


71 28 139 

7 1 £9 17 1 

71 33 37 7 

4 7 70 129 
214 43 64 

51b 7 4 52 7 
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33 

98 4 5 109 
229 4 7 149 
7 1 5 0 223 

53 17 196 
129 3 5 518 


V 


SHOES AND LEATHER 


Krek-Fg 

Lex. 

Itwn 
Lucas 
Parry go 
teams HS) 
QreCk (HJ) 
Borer 
S«xa 


50 

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»3 5 7 

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49 

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43 

♦3 250 

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*13 £8 

fiB 129 
6.1 
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151 
76 
15.7 
64 
84 
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360 290 F1I 325 

206 145 Oamar Booh 145 

45 32 Heattm Sans 42 

218 168 Lambed Howarm 1B3 

82 82 Uewbow 8 Burton 62 

II* 82 Putaid 108 

157 118 Sbong 6 Foner 1*8 

273 158 Styto 223 


98b 30 12? 
143 99 90 

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62 57 7* 

114 77 59 
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31 4 8 122 

T 4 S3 11.7 


NEWSPAPERS AND 
PUBLISHERS 




Accord 164 

ASSOC BOOk 205 

Assoc MewSUCMr 315 

Sack (ABO 315 

BMW 6® 

Courts fWmj 460 

Do A 293 

EkIAP A 118 

Haynes PotMIMiQ 355 

ChriHt 210 

ktoepenoeni 305 

W Thomson 562 

Na»s totamaMMl Ci2 

Ooodm *50 

Ponsmoum Sund 118 

Tnniy MB 415 

Ute Meosoaoers 373 


-T 44 
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M 3 

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n.t 

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100 
120 
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57 

214 

225 


TEXTILES 


AHM Tsil 360 

Alkms BRM 253 

Been gem i*a 

Btckman (A) 102 

Br MOirer 133 

Bukaer 6 LiAb 9? 

Cash 69 

CourauKB —5* 

Cnremr Ml 15* 

P»wson 242 

Deaon *4 

Dura U4 43 

Foster ktohnl 70 

GasUi Eboaaeeni ® 
Kuamg Penwcau 37 

Ingram (Haiokf) 145 

Jerome |S) 75 

Lamm 158 

Leads 178 

99 

Lyies 1S1 73 

MacMy (Hugh) to 

Maun 16 

Parkiano A 130 

Readcw 40 

SEET 122 

&rtar 146 

Smatshei* |H| 60 

5*000 HrHy 117 

Teaued Jersey 1*8 

lornmnwns ISO 

Toooi 92 

YorWyde 270 


Jd 17* 
100 4 0 15.6 
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82 80 12.0 
86 65 88 
7 1 7 7 ?1 I 

57 a? 

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21 14126 

89 37 139 
3*9 

57 133 58 
50 71 61 

79 81 71 

39 27 ia'r 

43 57 fj 

6* 41 IQ 1 

80 45 11.5 

14 14 66 
82 112 152 
66 69 138 

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69 53160 

2 3 57 9,4 

99 Bl 49 

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39 65 55 

43 £7 59 
86 5B M 
86 4 B 14 J 
57 62 9S 

100 3? 84 



IK 

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86 

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0 

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12 

33 

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AHOK &SWWS 

M 

618 

S16 

B> Perotoun 

585 

17 

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14 

356 

323 

S' Borneo 

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116 

419 

559 

Botnar 

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103 

48 

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158 

84 

Camay 

125 

33 

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54 

152 

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Emtoane 

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32 














































































THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


FAMILY MONEY/1 



The video victory 


y{P 


FINANCIERS AGACHE 

Consolidated net profits 1985: FF 635 millions 

The General Assembly of Financier® Agache (formerly SFFAW) was heW on 25 June 
1986 at 11.00am in Paris. The Assembly decided to modify the company's managing 
body from Supervisory Board and Directorate to Board of Directors. In addition to the 
appropriation of 1965 results and the internal reorganization issue, shareholders were 
invited to approve the transfer of company headquarters from Perenchies, in northern 
France, to 11 rue Francois ier in Paris. 

Mr. Bernard Arnault presented the Directorate's management report for 1985, which 
featured the following points: 

- Composition scheme approved on 30 September 1935 by the general assembly of 
nan-secured creditors. 

- Capital increase accomplished on 5 November 1985. augmenting equity by FF400 
million. 

• Implementing a recovery plan designed to promote CQSFs industrial activities and 
improve its results. 

- Continued growth in distribution activities (CONFORAMA, AU BON MARCHE) and 
luxury products (CHRISTIAN DIOR). 

ConsoGdatad current not results for 1985 showed a profit amounting to FF90 million, 
against a FFS3 million loss in 1984. 

These figures do not indude nonrecurrent extraordinary charges and proceeds, this 
improvement may be attributed to sound operating results in the dtstrtoution branch and 
diminishing fosses in the industrial branch. 

Consolidated net profits for 19 85 amo unted to FF635 million, after extraordinary 
charges and proceeds . including FF776 million under the terms of the composition 
scheme at Group level, and FF323 mHKon in restructuring charges involving the C8SF 
subsidiary, in 1984, the consolidated net loss amounted to FF150 million. 

The Group's long and medium-term debt stands at FF2.7 billion, rndudirjg FF1.7 bfflkm in 
liabilities lor which a moratorium has been granted, to be reimbursed otter a period of 14 
years. / 

Capital expenditures amounted to FF437 million, most of which (FF311 mfflion) went to 
CBSF. 

The Group's workforce was down from 22,800 as of 31 December 1984, to 19,000 as of 
31 December 1985 (-17%). Cuts involved primarily the industrial branch (down 3,600 jobs 
at C8SF, including 1,700 in sold production units). 

The trading price of SFFAWs share, which had climbed finom FF43 in October 1982 to 
FF271 on 14 December 1984. at which time quotations were suspended, reached FF650 
at the end of 1985 and nears FF825 today. 

In 1986, the Group has set the following priorities: 

• Concentrating efforts, particularly capital expendrhses-wise. on activitifes in which the 
Group enjoys a significant competitive edge, and a strong outlook for medium-term 
growth. 

- Pursuing the rebuftfmg effort launched to promote industrial activities, with emphasis 
on productivity. This wfll entail further cuts in CBSF's workforce in 1986. The target is 
to streamline afl the production units remaning in the Group and to turn them into 
profit-making operations within 4 years. 

- Intensifying on-going efforts toward tighter management procedures, in order to 
maximise capital generation. 

implementing these guidelines should bring about a significant improvement in the 
consolidated current result figures for 1986 and 1987; the target set for 1966 is FF120 
million- The transfer of real assets deemed norvessential to the Group's operations will 
partly finance payments due this FY under the terms of foe composition scheme. 

Cliristian Dior AU BON MARCHE 

CONFORAMA Oompagnie Boussac Saint Freres 


(GUARANTEES) 

Are the extended warranties 
you buy with consumer goods 
worth the paper they are 
written on? Anna Villiers, of 
Slough, Berkshire, would re- 
ply categorically; “Nol" . 

In 1983 she bought a video 
machine from Laskys, one of 
Britain's largest electrical 
goods retailers. The 
company's products now 
come with a free initial one- 
year guarantee. but in 1 983 the t 
guarantee was for two years. 

A Laskys spokesman said: 
"During this initial period we, 
as a retailer, go a bit further 
than the manufacturer’s guar- 
antee, which provides cover 
for manufacturing defects. We - 
i want to give the customer as 
comfortable a time as pos- 
sible. and apart from acciden- 
tal or malicious damage we 
make no charge for any 
repairs.” 

Mrs Vilfiers bad no com- 
plaint about this initial guar- 
antee period. During the two 
years there had been a small 
fault, which was repaired with 
no charge. What she was not 
happy abouL was the cover 
under an extended warranty 
she had bought at the shop. 

An extended warranty ba- 
sically is a scheme under 
which the customer is offered 
protection against product 


failure after the expiry of the 
initial manufacturer’s guar- 
antee. Extended warranty 
schemes are often insurance 
policies and' you usually pay 
extra for them. ■ ■ 

“When ! bought the video, 
the sales assistant asked me if I 
wanted to extend the two-year 
guarantee for a five-year 
period," said Mrs Villiers. "It 
sounded like a good idea and 
two weeks later I went back to 
the shop and paid £79190. I 
was not shown a copy of the 
guarantee or the insurance 
policy until after I had paid for 
iL But the guarantee does in 
fact say, ‘Now you can extend 
your normal two-year guar- 
antee to a full five years 
including parts and labour 1 .” 

In January 1986 Mrs Vil- 
liers made a claim under the 
extended warranty. The video 
was receiving a picture but no 
soundL Mrs Villiers said: "In 
layman's terms the unit 
needed repair. I took it into 
Laskys and when it came back 
I paid £30.76. The manager 
lold me to send the receipt 
together with the service re- 
port to the insurers, and I 
would be paid in full." 

The insurers refused to pay. . 
The fault bad been rectified by 
cleaning the tape heads, and 
the insurers argued that, as the 
certificate of insurance cov- 
ered only the cost of repair 
attributable to faulty : 


workmanship or faulty ma- 
terial used in manufacture, 
they did not have to pay. 

Mrs Villiers went back to 
the shop several times and 
contacted Laskys’ bead office. 
But the company agreed with 
the insurers and confirmed 
that the extended warranty 
did not cover “routine 
maintenance”. 

In desperation, Mrs Villiers 
rang The Times. She said: “I 
had already cleaned the ma- 
chine with a bead cleaner 
before I took it to he repaired. 
I was told that the work the 
company carried out' involved 
intense cleaning that a house- 
hold head cleaner would not 
be able to do. I felt I had been 
totally misled and' paid £79.90 

‘We lean towards 
the customer’ . 


for a guarantee that was 
useless." 

Laskys agreed to investi- 
gate. A short time later Mrs 
Villiers received a cheque 
from I-askys for £30.76 “as 
goodwill and entirely without 
prejudice". Mrs Villiers was 
delighted. Laskys said: “If 
there is. any area of doubt, we 
must lean towards the cus- 
tomer. In this case we do think 
the company was a bit hard on 
her. We do not expect our 






■ -V 

* V'JftS.' 






■ ■*. A ■■ •*> a^ssaStuSSmSmsmiWM WW m IIW \\m 

Happier now: Anna Villiers 
customers to be technicians.” 

What does Laskys think 
about the value of extended 
warranties? The company 
said: “The number of unpaid 
claims is so small in relation 
to the total. On a sophisticated 
and expensive piece of equip- 
ment such as a compact disc 
player, it is good value but I 
would not take up an extended 
warranty on every product. 
We believe our scheme offers 
very genuine cover. You do 
have to read the small print to 
see what you are entitled to." 

Laskys now has a new 
format for extended war- 
ranties that is very much 
easier to understand than the 
one Mrs Villiers took out in 
1983. The Office of Fan- 
Trading recently published a 
report on consumer guar- 


with the troublesome video '/ T 

antees, urging consumers to- ■ ■ 

treat all forms of guarantee 
with caution, and never to pay - -■■■•* 
extra for a guarantee .without 
studying all the terms and-:-:' 
conditions. 

Furthermore, a guarantee is - — 
not the same as a maintenance 
or service contract Although - -~- 
these contracts are more " ' 
expensive, they may be more 
suited to your purposes. The 
Office of Fair Trading con- 
dudes: “Of course, it may not 1 - 
be in your interests to buy "■ ^ 
either a guarantee or a mainte- — - 
nance contract particularly if. 
you think (preferably on the 
basis of independent ev- "t 
idence, such as from Which? 
reports) that the item is likely: --- 
to be fairly reliable." " “** 

Susan Fieldman 


The solicitors’ clients who got justice 


A recent High Court case, 
which could result in an 
estimated payout of more 
than £400.000 by negligence 
insurers for a solicitors* firm, 
may go some way to reassur- 
ing the public that solid tors 
can be successfully sued by 
clients. 

The facts of the case can 
only be described as a 
conveyancing solicitors* 
nightmare. In 1978 an 
advertising agency dedded to 
take on a lease of some new 
offices in Covem Garden, 
central London. They in- 
structed their solidtors. the 
London firm of Bulcraig and 
Davis, who 1 started the legal 
I formalities and sent off the 
standard form of inquiries and 
search to the local authority. 

The results were received 
shortly afterwards. There was 
an entry on the search reveal- 
ing a conditional planning 
permission affecting the 

premises. ■ - ■ • 

The judge in the case said: 
“Here, therefore, was express 
notice of a planning condition 
affecting the premises. A copy 
of the planning permission 
was never bespoken or exam- 
ined: the existence of the 
condition was never men- 
tioned to the diem." 


The lease was completed 
and the agency proceeded to 
spend more than £300.000 on 
the property. But what the 
agency did not know, and 
what it was daimed-its solic- 
itors and surveyors failed to 
say. was that the planning 
consent restricted the use of 
pan of the ground floor to 
office use in connection with 
the printing trade only. The 
terms of the conditional plan- 
ning consent meant the . 
advertising agency's use of a 
prindpal area of the premises 
was in breach of planning law. 

The agency occupied the 
premises as it had originally 
intended. But two years Taler it 
went into liquidation. The 
liquidators. Booth White, 
tried to sell the lease. 

Booth White's spokesman 
said; ”We could not get any- 
one to take the lease because 
of the restriction. Bang an 
advertising agency, they had 


made a very plush entrance to 
the offices when all they could 
be used for was for the 
printing trade. The best offer - 
we had was to sell it back to 
■the landlord, but the price we 
received did not cover the 
money that the agency had 
spent." 

The liquidators sued the 
solicitors and the surveyors 

‘Dearer and more, 
frequent claims’ 

for breach of professional 
duty. They felled in their 
action against the surveyors. 
But judgment was given 
against the solicitors. Dam- 
ages of £195, 621 were awarded 
against them, together with 
interest of about £140,000. 
They also have to pay the 
costs of the liquidators' solic- 
itors. and the legal costs of the 
other defendants, the survey- 


ors. which together are es- 
timated at about £100,000. 

“We think it would be 
inappropriate for us to com- 
ment in view of the possibility 
of an appeal," said solicitors 
acting for Bulcraig and Davis 
and their insurers. 

But Jack Leonard, of Wil- 
liam Prior & Co, the 
liquidators*' solicitor, said: 
“Solicitors need to have the 
utmost care. The lesson that 
comes out of the case for 
solicitors is the enormous 
expense of a very simple 
mistake." 

All solicitors must be. in- 
sured against negligence under 
the Law Society's Master Pol- 
icy. In 1985 about 5,500 
allegations of negligence were 
notified to the solicitors' 
insurers, of which, when 
examined, about one third 
looked to be liable to result in 
payouts under the policy, 
according to a Law Society 


spokesman. But in a letter, 
circulated to solicitors last 
month, the insurers said: 
“You will no doubt appreciate - 
that not only arc claims 
becoming more frequent, they 
are also becoming more 
expensive." 

So is it difficult to find a 
solicitor who will sue another 
solicitor? “It was the first time 
we had taken a negligence 
action, but we had no- 
problem,” said Booth White. ' 

The Law Society in fact has 
a Negligence Panel Scheme. lL. 
offers .a free one-hour inter- 
view with an independent 
solicitor who will advise you 
on the. merits of your claims 
for negligence.. The solidtors 
on the panel will, if required, 
take on the case for you. 

: SF 

The Law Society's Negligence 
Panel. Portland House. Stag 
Place. London SWJ 







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THE SUNDAY TIMES 











x j.xxi x jlL> 1 wA< w ■*'• - - i M w * x 1 


FAMILY MONEY/2 



: Who takes the blame? 


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When the Yoang’s Fraacluse 
Group laancw Us ftH 
firandiisiag ventere - ’ Li 
Mama maternity wear slums 
— the Rjutatioe of ns 
Proonptia sod Yoang’s For- 
mal Wear franchises was 
virtually second to none. The 
British Franchise Association 
granted La Mama foil 
membership in January J984, 
only one -month after the first 
franchise opened. The Na- 
tional Westminster. ' Bank 
granted loans to 20 of the 23 
La Mama franchisees. Among 
these were loans to people 
taking np La Mama franchises 
in August, October and 
November last year. On 
November IS Yotmg’s went 
into receivership via debts 
estimated at £3.75 mfllion. 

A confidential . . report on 
Young’s, prepared by Peat 
Marwick Mitchell, the 
accountants, was passed to 
The Times this week. It is 
dated November 5, ten days 
before Young’s went into, 
receivership, and it indicates 
that YoimgV lost almost 
£500,000 on La Mama during 
the previous year. 

The company’s assets have 
been purchased from. the re- 
ceiver by Cyril Spencer, the 
former Barton Gronp 

f jpinmin 

The summer 1984 issue of 
British Franchise. Association 
News, the association’s- quar- 
terly newsletter, carried an 
article -on the Young’s Fran- 
chise Group. 

It reads: “The Group’s lat- 
est venture. La Mama, comes 
dose to an absolute ideal in 
franchising.” The article; un- 
signed, had in fact been writ- 
ten by MBP Marketing, the 
then public relations, consul- 
tants to the Young's Franchise 
Group. 

Far from being a franchising 
ideal, the La Mama venture 
for many of the franchisees 
has been a nightmare.- , 

We have spoken to seven 
franchisees iri this position. 
All except one want anonym- ‘ 
ity. They are concerned that 
the new owners of La Mama 
may call in debts they owe 
them for stock. 

Complaints common . to 
most, and in some cases alL of 
the seven disgruntled franchi- 
sees are that their initial start- 
up costs proved more than 
they were led to believe, that 
the franchisor's projections of 
their likely turnover were 
wildly inaccurate and their 
stock supply was erratic, the 
goods also being un- 
fashionable and overpriced. _ 

Young's was purchased 
from the receiver by Cyril 
Spencer for £1 .75 million. The 
disgruntled franchisees claim 


that communication with the 
new company has been less 
than satisfactory. 

Most important of all, some 
claim to have injected further 
money into their franchises on 
the ■ strength of assurances 
from the new owners that 
steps would be taken quickly 
to rectify deficiencies in the 
way the La Mama franchise 
was run. They say the com- 
pany has now changed its 
tune. “If it was a non-starter, 



Mrs RaiHiea: £35,000 lost 


why did they take nine 
months to tell usT asks one 
franchisee. 

They all had loans from the 
National Westminster Bank 
secured on their homes. Below 
are extracts from their stories. 

• “It is the most horrifying 
experience,” says one. “We 


never thought in our wildest 
dreams that things could go so' 
horribly wrong. We - will have 
to sdl our house; We owe 
£30,000 4o .lhe bank, and we 
have put in our savings of 
£20,000. The business is not 
viable. We were told in our 
first year our turnover would 
be £80,000. It was £36,000“ 

• Another says: “Tve dosed 
the shop down and the bouse 
is now on the market My total 
debts are about £72, 000-plus. I 
have rent and rates which are 
about £11,000 a year. I just 
cannot get rid of the lease. 

“My legal . adviser con- 
stamlywamed me * £*?**♦ the 
dangers. I simply saw him as a 
person who had to say these 
things. I got a loan from 
NatWest The bank were pre- 
pared to back it up to the hilt.” 
She currently owes NalWesl 
£25,000. 

• Another franchisee traded 
for only 16 months, closed her 

. shop down and put her house 
on the market. She borrowed 
approximately £22,000 from 
Nat Wesi and fost life savings 
of £1 7,000 in the venture. 

“We were told we would do 
£1,800 a week. Our best was 
£1,400 and we often did 
between £200 and £400. We 
are almost £60,000 down. My 
solicitor has advised me to file 
for bankruptcy.” 

• Dannielle BaiQieu took a La 
Mama' franchise with her 
mother-in-law, Sheila, a re- 
tired schoolteacher, who put 


in £17,000 lift savings. She 
reckons trading losses to date 
are around £35,000. On top of 
that the start-up costs came to 
£60,000, which include a pre- 
mium on her lease which she 
thinks has increased m value. 

Mr Spencer, the new owner, 
offered to buy out the Bailiieus 
for the cost of their initial 
investment. As the offer 
would still leave them with 
their trading losses they 
turned h down. . 

Among Mrs BaiHieu’s griev- 
ances against both manage- 
ments is that the maternity 
clothes supplied “were un- 
fashionable and too highly 
priced for what they were”. A 
report on ber shop, by one of 
the new company’s directors, 
confirms the inadequacy of 
the stock supplied. 

She says: “I made sure it 
was a member of the BFA 
before I was prepared to 
consider the franchise.” 

Independent, verification 
for some of the franchisees’ 
complaints against Young's 
Franchise Group before it 
went into receivership is pro- 
vided by the Peat Marwick 
report which The Times has 
seen. This shows that in the 46 
weeks ended August 1985 
sales of La Mama clothes were 
34 per cent below the 
company’s budget. 

The report also refers to 
shortage of stock in the shops 
which the old management 
considered was a major factor 
in the sales shortfall “Stocks 
are lower because of the 


group’s cash flow difficulties,” 
.it says. 

We have not been able to 
talk to Edward Young, the 
former owner, who is believed 
to have retired and to be living 
in Spain. 

The La Mama franchise 
agreement specifically states 
that the franchisee has been 
advised to discuss the venture 
with other franchisees and to 
form his own view of what the 
management has told him 



m 

Edward Young: Retired 

Mr Spencer considers that 
the franchisees' complaints 
against him are “unbelievably 
unfair”. 

He says: “I have spent 
£250,000 of my own money 
falling over backwards to help 
these people. I reduced the 
prices on all the existing stock 
we were holding and gave 


We were satisfied, says NatWest 


How could NatWest arrange a 
formal scheme offering La 
Mama franchisees special 
terms? 

Moreover, as NatWest pro- 
vided 20 out iff the 23 franchi- 
sees with loans, it would surely 
have been in a unique position 
to assess the viability of the 
franchise when many of the 
franchisees were experiencing 
problems? 

The bank says: “Only seven 
franchisees used the finance 
scheme set np for the La 
Mama operation. Holding the 
accounts of individual franchi- 
sees did not provide ns with 
advance knowledge of the 
serious problems which sub- 
sequently emerged. 

“The viability iff die La 
Mama operation was the sub- 
ject of investigation and in- 
quiries were made with the 
franchisor. We were satisfied 
with - our findings and the 
information we received at that 
time and only then was a 
formal scheme approved.” 

Will NatWest foreclose on 


any franchisees? “We cannot 
make a forecast of action the 
bank may or may not take.” it 
says. 

What of the role of the 
British Franchise Associ- 
ation? Its literature states: 
“All BFA members have been ■ 
subjected to a rigoroas 
accreditation procedure at the 
time of the entry into the 
association and you should be 
able to invest with confidence 
In a franchise which has been 
admitted to the BFA.” 

It granted La Mama full 
membership in January 1984, 
when the first pilot operation, 
in Watford, Hertfordshire, 
had been going for less than a 
year, and the venture had not, 
therefore, been folly commer- 
cially tested. The Peat report 
makes it dear that the Wat- 
ford outlet was not a proper 
basis to judge viability. This 
shop “started at a level which 
has not been achieved by any 
shop' since”, it says. 

The La Mama franchise did 
not satisfy the BFA's normal 


criteria for membership. This 
is that the franchisor must 
have run a successful pilot 
operation for a minimum of 
one year and been franchising 
the concept for a subsequent 
period of two years. 

Tony Outfield, BFA director 
since 1984, says: “It is no 
secret that the BFA stretched 
its criteria in this case. 
Remember, Young's 
Pronuptia franchise was the 
most successful in the 
country.” . 

Mr Outfield is not certain 
which criteria the BFA was 
using for membership in 1983. 
He does, however, point out 
that no accounts for La Mama 
were sent to the BFA: “With 
hindsight it wasn't throrongh 
enough to the extent that it 
obviously should have re- 
quired accounts for the actual 
franchise in question. It 
wouldn't be permitted now.” 

At the time of the applica- 
tion for La Mama the BFA 
bad introduced its registration 
system. This was for new 
franchises which haven't a 


sufficient track record to jus- 
tify membership. Why did La 
Mama leapfrog over registra- 
tion into full membership? Mr 
Dutfield replies: “Edward 
Young had a very high expo- 
sure. He was an ex-chairman 
of the BFA. It may well be that 
his views held undue sway at 
that rime. I don't know.” 

The BFA says: “It would be 
wrong to make franchising a 
scapegoat — Young’s might 
just as surely have foundered 
had it been a managed chain.” 
Its demise brings into focus 
certain key issues. The BFA 
says: “Franchising is certainly 
not a substitute for sound 
management by tbe franchi- 
sor. Nor is it entirely free of 
risk. 

“Franchising has statis- 
tically a much higher percent- 
age chance of success than 
that of other comparable ways 
of starting a business. 

“The BFA continually 
emphasizes tbe need for poten- 
tial franchisees folly to investi- 
gate their proposed 
investment.” 


them a credit note for their 
stock. They took sites, paid 
rents and money on a basis 
that wasn't viable. The initial 
market research done by the 
company wasn't nearly strong 
enough. 

“I told them from the 
beginning that their sales fig- 
ures were a third of the level 
they should be. We asked 
them to produce their ac- 
counts for us to look aL We 
improved the buying of mer- 
chandise and the level of 
sales” 

Lister Fielding, who re- 
cently joined Young’s as 
managing director, says: 
“There was an interval where 
communcication was not 
good. A view had to be taken 
on the senior management. 
This was between December 
and mid-June. We moved 
with reasonable speed. 

“The project was not prop- 
erly thought out. 1 have diffi- 
culty in finding any objective 
research work. We are doing 
this for the first time ever. If 
that research comes out with 
an absolute No-No then we 
will have to close down. I 
expect it to say that with more 
frugal management, better 
conceived ana smaller loca- 
tions, La Mama can be turned 
into something more 
successful.” 

What is interesting is the 
view of Mr Spencer, a former 
Burton Group chairman, and 
Mr Fielding that essential 
aspects of the La Mama 
franchise were misconceived. 

Mr Fielding says: “This is 
not a definitive view but the 
initial investment could pos- 
sibly have been more mod- 
erate. We are talking about 
niche markets and small bou- 
tiques here. There was a 
tendency to rite too many 
branches loo close to one 
another. 

“And the concept as applied 
did not generate the necessary 
turnover. Certainly the idea 
that a catchment area of 
1 50.000 people was sufficient 
was not correct. This would 
not be large enough.” 

The feet that only three out 
of the 23 franchises are in 
profit and the new manage- 
ment expects to see the num- 
bers reduced to around 12 
tends to back the idea that 
there was something wrong 
from the start. 

• We have been asked to 
point out that not all the La 
Mama franchisees are ag- 
grieved. Those in Manchester." 
Kingston upon Thames and 
Norwich, and possibly others, 
are very positive about the 
franchise, and are. according 
to the company, “progressing 
well”. 

Lawrence Lever 


l/S’j 





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SECOND GENERAL PERFORMANCE TABLE. 

V&Jue ol £1000 nvesied on5th June 1956. 


Date 

M&G 

F.T. Ordinary 

Buttling 


SECOND 

Index 

Society 


5 June ‘56 

£LOOO 

£1,000 

£1,000 


31 Dec ’66 

£2£96 

£2,472 

£1.699 


31 Dec 76 

£7,812 

£3,859 

£3,437 


5 June ’86 

£67,208 

£21,042 

£8,104 


NOTES: AS fipjres include reinvested ncome net of basic- rate tax. 

The BuWmgSooetyfigtees are based onan extra interest account offering 
1 * 3 % above tne average yearly rate (source: Build mg Societies 

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INTERNATTONALPERFORMANCETABLE. value on 1st Ai«ua 1986 of 
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Launch 

Date 

M&G 

Unit Trust 

Building 

Society 

International 
Income 
International 
Growth . 

May -85 

Dec ; 67 

£1456- 

£11,632 

■ £1,098 

£4,558' 

NOTES: AH figures include reinvested income net of bastc-ratec®. 

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Income Accumulation Yield 
Internati ona l Income 60-4p 62-Op 5-33% 

International Growth 766-0p.xd 1233-2p 1-84% 
SECOND GENERAL 739-7pwJ 1460 Ip 3-74% 
Prices and yields appear daily in the Financial Times. The 
difference between the ‘offered 1 price (at wtnet) you buy units] 
andthe'bKf price (at which you sen] is nomiafly 6%. An mrtial 
charge of 5% E included tn the offered price and an annual 
charge of up to 1% of each Funtfs val ue - currently VA (except 
Intematiorel Income, which is 14^ - plus VAT is deducted from 
gross income. Income for Accumulation units is ramisted to 
increase their value and for Income units it is dstnbutefl net of 
basic-rate tax on the following dates: 

fcit a n a tiot ia i International 

Income Growth SECOND 


SPECIAL OFFER CLOSES 31 st OCTOBER 


All eppfications for £1,000 or more received by 31stOdober. 1986 will be given an extra 
1% allocation of units, nereasineto 2% for applications of £10,000 or more per Fund 
To: M&G SECURITIES LIMITED, THREE QUAYS, TOWER HHJL, LONDON EC3R 6BQ 
Pleas* invest the sum(s) indicated below m the Fundfc) of my choice (mmimum investment In 
each Fund: £1,000) in ACCUMULATION /IN COME units (delete as applicable or Accumulation 
units vwfl be issued for International Growth and SECOND and Income units will be issued for 
International Income) at the pree ruling on receipt of this applcabon 
DO notsend any money. A contract note will be sent to you statmg exactly how much you owe 
and the settlement date, 'four certificate will 
fodow shortly 


Distributions 


1 Jim 
1 Doc 


20 Mar 
20 Sap 


15 Feb 
15 Aug 


Next distribution 1 Dec 
lor new investors 1986 


20 Mar 
1987 


15 Feb 
1987 


Ybu can buy or sell units on any business da* Contracts for 
purchase or sale wtt be due for settlement two tothree weeks 
fate: Remuneration is payable to accredited agents: rates are 
available on request The Tnstee tor International Growth is 
Ban%s Bank Trust Co. Limited and for international income 
and SECOND GENERAL is Uoyds Bank Fic. The Funds are afl 
mder-range investments andareauthorfeedbytheSecrelary of 
State for Trade and Industiy. 

M&G Securities Lonfitad, Three Quays, Tower HR, 
London EC3R 6BQ. Tel: 01-62% 4588. 

Member of the Unit Trust Assooatiwi 


International 

Income 

wwaopoi 


SECOND 

pm £1000) 


bitematiofial 

Growth 

tmaaciooi 


■00 


■00 


•00 


SGNMUfiE, 
MTE 


m| nniroREHMcpi 


pon 

COM 


SG 483216 









THE M&G GROUP 


!* .'ft ■* - 1 itiillll jl||( !I1H«> ti 










Ill 




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\ 

V . . 



FAMILY MONEY/3 


How the elderly 
can tap that cash 


■ For many elderly home-owners, 
unlocking some of the money tied up 
in the house would provide a useful 
cash sum which could he used to 
supplement income or pay for a 
new central heating system or kitchen. 
The problem is that repayments 
often cannot be managed out of 
current income and most societies 
insist on a short repayment period for 
the over-60s. 



can be set against invalid care 
$. This means most 


payments, 
married women will not have to pay 


any tax on these payments. The 
life's 


wife's earned income allowance for 
1986-87 is £2,335 and any invalid 
care allowance received up to this 
level should be tax-free. The new 
rules win be incorporated in next 
year's Finance Act 


Know your rights 


The Cheltenham & Gloucester 
Building Society is prepared to lend on 
an interest-only basis to older 
home-owners who are retired. Just 
how helpful this is can be seen 
from repayment comparisons. A 
£10.000 loan on an interest-only 
basis costs £71 a month. But if you 
had to repay the original £10.000 


can be used Tor house purchase. 
Details are available from Cheltenham 
& Gloucester branches. 


Car package 


a hefty 19.5 per cent which is fixed 
for the term of the loan — so if you can 
get an overdraft instead, go for 
that At 12 to 15 per cent It is a much 
cheaper option. 


over a 10-year term, the monthly 


repayments would rise to £123. 

Both quotes assume that (he loan is 
eligible for mortgage interest relief. 

With the Cheltenham & Gloucester 
scheme, the original loan is repaid out 
of the sale proceeds of the house, 
or out of the estate on the borrower s 
death. The maximum loan is 50 per 
cent of the value of the property and 
interest is charged at 1 percent 
above the society's normal rate, which 


If you are buying a car in time for 
the new registration number which 
comes into force this month you 
might like to look at the Co-op Bank's 
new car loan package. It's not that 
much different from the loans 
available at the other high street 
banks except that it offers a £25 
discount on car insurance bought 
through Co-operative Insurance 
Services. If you already have a 
policy in force, the discount remains 
available until the end of the year. 

The loan can also cover the insurance 
premium as well as the first year's 
road tax as part of the package. 


Women’s bonus 


■ Good news for married women 
who receive the invalid care 
allowance. The Government has 
announced a change in the rules 
which will mean that many of these 
married women will pay less tax on the 
benefit Payments of invalid cane 
allowance in the past have been 
taxable. But a married woman 
receiving these payments could not 
use the wife's earned income tax 
allowance to offset against invalid 


■ Nearly one million pensioners 
live below the poverty level because 
they don't claim benefits to which 
they are entitled, according to Age 
Concern which this week publishes 
the latest issue of its rights guide. The 
booklet. Your Rights wr 
Pensioners, helps the retired to find 
their way around the social security 
system and claim every penny that is 
theirs. It covers supplementary 
pensions, housing benefit, rates relief, 


how to meet heating bills, paying 
' ast other 


works out at T2 per cent. Money is . 

ante, or 


available for home improvements, or 
to buy an annuity (regular income 
during the annuitant's lifetime), or it 


The minimum loan is £1,000 if you 
want to benefit from the discount on 
insurance, with repayments spread 
over one or two years. Otherwise, the 
minimum is £250 with a maximum 
of £6,000. The interest rate charged is 


care allowance. As a result many 
isubje 


for residential care and most 
topics. 

ft is available for 90p from W. H. 
Smith and other booksellers, or by 
post from Age Concern, England. 
60 Pitcairn Road, Mitcham,? 

CR4 3LL The price Includes 
postage. 


wives found the benefit was subject to 
tax at their husband's highest rate 
paid. 


The change in the rules means that 
with effect from tax year 1984-85 the 
wife's earned income allowance 


■ Our apologies to Fidelity. Last 
week’s Family Money gave the wrong 
number for Fidelity's Personal 
Equity Plan telephone advice service. 
The correct number Is 0800 
414161. 


A lot of holiday bottle 


duty-free allowances on goods BOUGHT IN EEC 


Duty and 
taxi 


Duty-free and 
tax-free 


ALCOHOL 

Still light wine 

5 litres 

2 litres 

Over 22% vol (spirits 
and higher strength 
liqueurs) 

1.5 litres 

1 litre 

or 

Not over 22% 

3 litres 

2 litres 

or 



Additional still 
light wine 

3 litres 

2 litres 

TOBACCO 

Cigarettes 

300 

200 

or 

Cigarillos 

150 

100 

or 

Cigars 

75 

50 

or 

Tobacco 

400g 

250g 

PERFUME 

75g (90cc/3fl oz) 50g (60CC/2fl oz) 

TOILET WATER 

375cc (1311 oz) 

250cc (911 OZ) 


The Merrill Lynch -UTI connection 


What it means 


for investors like you 


Merrill Lynch and Unit Trust of India present you 
with a unique opportunity to invest in one of the 
fastest growing capital markets of the world. 
The India Fund. 


You, as an investor, will find this 
information of great value It’s all about 
investing in India made easy. 

First, a word about the Indian potential. 
India. A dynamic economy 

The third largest economy in Asia and 
one of the world’s leading developing 
countries. 

This is the India of the Eighties. 

Trace the patterns of her growth over the 
last five years. Observe how her economy 
has been surging ahead at 5.-* per cent a year 
on average 

Now with the recently introduced 
economic liberal isadon policies, Indian 
Government projections indicate that the 
same momentum will be maintained during 
the next five years as well. 

Contribuung substantially to this growth 
has been the expansion and diversificadon 
of Indian industries. 

Industrial growth is projected to 
accelerate to S per cent a year on average 
in the next five years. 

And that’s not all. Reflecung this overall 
upward trend is another aspect of die 
economy. 

The stock market. 

An expanding stock market 

The Indian stock market has grown 
considerably over the last five years. 

The number of new Issues has rapidly 
increased and stock market prices have 
more than doubled. 


combine their financial expertise to bring 
you a great investment opportunity. 

The India Fund 


Tax Benefits 

The income and capital gains realised by 
UTI on the investment portfolio will neither 
be taxed in India nor in Guernsey. 

Income distribution by UTI will be subject 
to Indian withholding tax at the rate of 
25 per cent ; . . . 

Full Investment Opportunities 

You will receive access to a broad range 
of investment opportunities in India, without 
any Non-Resident Indian investment 
restrictions. 



Merrill Lynch 

One of the largest financial services 
companies in the world 
Is sponsoring The India Fund 



Unit Trust of India 


One of the largest and most 
experienced investment institutions 
in India will manage the investment 
portfolio with the principal objective 
of long-term capital growth 


Advisory Board 

Expert advice will be offered by an 
advisory board including representatives Of 
Merrill Lynch, UTI, Indian financial 
institutions and industries, and major 
international institutional investors. 


Recent equity issues have been heavily 
oversubscribed. 


It is against this favourable background 
that Merrill Lvnch and Unit Trust of India 


What it means to you 

The India Fund, a dosed -ended unit trust 
established in Guernsey, is your opportunity 
to invest in the fast growing Indian capital 
market 

You gain the following advantages: 

Ease of Investment 

Your investment in The India Fund will 
not involve any Indian foreign exchange or 
tax procedures. 

Liquidity 

The shares of The India Fluid will be 
fisted on the London Stock Exchange. 

This together with Merrill Lynch’s 
intention to make a market in the shares will 
greatly facilitate the buying and selling of the 
Fund’s shares. 


The Confidence of 

International Investors 

Major international institutions have 
indicated that they will subscribe to a ' 
substantial portion of the Issue. 

Ask for the Prospectus 

This is not an invitation to subscribe for 
shares in The India Fund. Full details of the 
offer are contained in a Prospectus dated 
10di July, 1986 on the terms of which alone 
investment in The India Fund may be made. 
The information set out in this advertisement 
has been extracted from and should be read 
in conjunction with the Prospectus. 


For a copy of the Prospectus and the application 
forms, contact: 

Merrill Lynch limited 
Sherborne House, 119 Cannon Street 
London EG* 


or 


cheir advisors in India 

DSP Financial Consultants Ltd. 

91*4, Raheja Chambers 
213, Backbay Reclamation 
Bombay 400 02 1. (Telex : 01 1 -6774) 

or offices of 

Scare Bank of India, Bank of India, 
Grindlays Bank Group and 
Bank of America Group in die UK, 
Middle East and Hongkong. . 



= The India Fund 


Offer for subscription of 60,000,000 shares 
(subject to increase) of £ 1 each. 

To be listed on the London Stock Exchange. 


The closing date for the subscription: 15th August 


A unique investment opportunity for Non-Resident Indians 


OflM/7311 


Manv holidaymakers are not 
taking full advantage of duty- 
free discounts because of mis- 
understandings about the 
limits. Practically none of the 
airport or airline notices cor- 
rect indicates the full value 
of duty-free goods you can 
bring back. On wine, it can 
amount to more than II 
bottles per person. 

If you buy wine in shops 
within the EEC Customs and 
Excise will permit almost 1 1 
bottles (actually 11.428 bot- 
tles. which may be helpful for 


calculating excess quantities). 
eachof70cl. 


, W11 to be brought in. 

This is for light still wine. 
Customs disregards whether it 
is a bottle of first growth claret 
or airline r in de table. An 
increasing number of inves- 
tors arc using their allowance 
to import fine vintages that 
they have either purchased 
ahead on a pre-payment 
scheme ih rough a UK wine 
merchant or bought in the 
vineyards. 

Burgundy and Champagne 
are two of the most favoured 
regions for buying single 
producer's stock. However, 
the allowances are meant for 
personal use and not for trade. 

If the capacity per bottle is 
75ci. a popular size in Europe, 
the allowance is 10.66 bottles 
for light wine, though where 
the wine is purchased in a 
dutv-free shop or on a ship or 
aircraft, the allowance is re- 
duced to either 5.71 bottles of 
70cl or 5.33 bottles of 75cl. 
This amounts to four litres. 

For those who prefer spar- 
kling wine — whether it is 
champagne or other bubbly, 
such as Asti Spumante — you 
can import four 7 5c I bottles in 
addition to seven 70cl bottles, 
or 6.67 boules of 75cl of still 
wine. This is for purchases in a 
shop or supermarket in the 
EEC. If the purchase is in a 
duty-free shop, the limit is just 
over two and a half bottles of 
bubbly. 

Fortified wines — sherry, 
port and Madeira - are usu- 
ally in the 18-22 per cent by 
volume alcohol range and can 
represent your allowance in- 
stead of sparkling wine. Low- 
strength liqueurs, such as 
advocaat, qualify for the same 
number of bottles as sparkling 
wine: but the higher strengths 
(more than 22 per cent, such 
as Southern Comfort, Coin- 
treau and Benedictine) take up 
the spirit quota. 


Many viators to Europe 
iv the 


decide to stock up and pay 
tax (both excise duty and 
VAT) on the surplus to their 
allowance. By going into the 
red channel at Customs; you 
will have to pay only an 
additional 73Vip plus VAT on 
every 75c! bottle, or 68Vip per 
70cl bottle plus VAT. For- 
sparkling. die extra will 
amount to£l 21 plus VaT, for 
fortified of more than 18 but 
less than 22 per cent volume 
alcohoL Customs will require 
an additional £1.44 per 70cl or 
£1.54 per 75cl bottle, plus 
VAT. 

It may pay, therefore, to 
stock up your boot for autumn 
drinking and openly declare 
the balance. 

However, duty-free goods at 
European airports are not 
always a bargain. The buying 
advantage can be greater in 
one country than another. 
That was the conclusion this 
week of a survey made by 
BEUC. the Brussels-based 
consumer watchdog body, 
which found some so-called 
savings were illusoiy. the cost 
at the airport being higher 
than in die local shops in 
town. 

• At London's Heathrow 
cigarettes and alcohol are a 
relatively good buy but film 
there is 2 per cent more 
expensive than the average in 
European airport outlets. 

• Smokers get the best deal in 
Milan, while drinkers have the 
advantage in Madrid. 

Athens is the best airport in 
Europe for perfume. Prices are 
79 per cent less than at 
Amsterdam, the next 
cheapest. 

• For cigarettes. Amsterdam, 
Athens and Madrid are also 
cheap. The most expensive is 
Frankfurt, where cigarettes 
cost nearly a third more than 
in Milan. 

• While many Spanish air- 
ports. as well as Madrid, offer 
bargains in alcoholic drinks 
Paris is the most expensive, 
being 47 per cent dearer than 
in the Spanish capital. 

BEUC said the survey jus- 
tified earlier findings that 
some airport shops appear to 
be making excessive profits 


Conal Gregory and 
Derek Harris 


BASE 

LENDING 

RATES 


ABN. 


Adam &' Company. 
BCCL 


JQ.00% 


Citibank 


Continental Trust-. 
Co-operative Bank. 
C. Hears 8 CO. 


[taojfonfl 8 Shanghai. 
LLoytfe Bank. 


,10JD0% 

iodo% 

.10-75% 

,10230% 

.10230% 

. 10 . 00 % 

.num 


. 11100 % 

10230% 

Nat Westminster 1000% 

Bowl Bank of Swaand— 1000% 

JS8 10.00% 

Citibank NA t0JB% 



r* 

\ 








Jui i’r. : - 
'“Tin, I ; ; 




Pq 




£ 




Sun 


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* i 1 




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A>s.. 


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THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


H— 


m 


FAMILY MONEY/4 


e 




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‘ ‘ * R . 

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■' "'U- j* 
l,r '■:>3h. 

• ' \:.<v 

■■ P'j'.rjvpi 

:• •"■..-1.1 r. 


New faces in the 
unit trust crowd 


The Government this week 
published proposals ‘which 
will have a considerable im- 
pact on the unit trust industry 
and those interested in invest- 
ing in unit trusts. They are dne 
to apply next year when the 
Financial Services Act comes 
into effect 

For investors the Govern- 
ment has given the go-ahead 
to- four completely new types 
of unit trusts — money market 
funds, property funds , 
commodity funds and mixed 
funds. 

At the moment authorized 
unit trusts cannot invest di- 
rectly in property but are 
confined.. to the shares of 
property companies. ^rohaiiy 
they are not allowed to invest 
in commodities. Gold funds, 
for example, do not hold the 
physical gold but invest in 
mining companies which 
mine gold and other precious 
metals. 

So property unit trusts will 
be able to invest directly in 
property. .The Government 
wants it to be in prime 
income-producing property, 
which, it - appears, can be 
either residential property or 
commercial property such as 
office blocks. 

What has concerned some 
unit trust industry figures is 
the qnestion of liquidity. 
What would happen, for in- 
stance, if there was a sudden 
rush of redemptions on a 
property unit trust? 

Properties cannot be sold 
ihat quickly, certainly not as 
quickly as ordinary shares, so 
there is a serious danger drat 
investors would not be able to 
sell their units and receive 
payment within a reasonable 
period. 

In an attempt to get round 
this the Government is 


proposing that proper t y unit 
trusts must keep 15 percenter 
the trust in - cash or other 1 
readily realizable assets. 

Tim Miller, man 
director of Framlington Unix 
Management, and Mark St 
Giksjomi managing director 
of Gi Management, are very 
positive about the 
Government's proposals hot 
are, nevertheless, concerned 
about certain aspects such as 
property unit trusts. 

Mr Miller says: “I am very 
sceptical about extending the 
unit trusts to commodities 



INTEREST 

RATES 

Banks 

Current account — no interest paid. 
Deposit accounts - seven days, 
notice required for withdrawals: 

Barclays 4.375 per cent Uoyds 4.30 

per cent Midland 4.35 per cam. 
tafflfest 4.375 per cent National 
Girobank 4.35 percent Fixed term 
deposits £10.000 to £24,999 : 1 
month 675 per cert, 3 months 
6.625 per cent, 6 months 650 per 
cent (National Westm i nster): i 
month 676 per cent 3 months 
6.167 per cent, 6 months 6.167 per 
cent (MkttancQ. Other banks may 
differ. 

MONEY funds 

Ran* Net CNAfl Taiaptem 

Artkan Hixna 

rnmdyfce. 6X1 7.13 016386070 

B 01 Scotland 695 718 Or 6288060 

Barclays Heitor Rate 

693 679 01 626 1567 

7-00 7.19 0l 6261567 
710 7.3* 01 5882777 


and property. This seems to 
me to undermine the principle 
of a unit trust as something 
whose value can be as- 
certained quickly and which 
can be quickly liquidated." 

Another proposal of im- 
portance for investors is the 
suggestion that the.iradrtional 
method of quoting bid and 
offer prices for unit trusts 
should be replaced by a single 
quote which would be the 
mid-market price. 

Dylan Evans, of Target 
Trust Managers, says: “I don't 
like the proposed pricing sys- 
tem. A great virtue of unit 
trusts is that you can buy or 
sell at the price you see in the 
papers. You can't do this with 
a mid-price.” 

Lawrence Lever 


tt.OOK9.939 
£1(Un>*Mr 
Caw Mental 
Qatar* 

Money MM plus 7.25 7 JO 
MFC Trust 7 day 775 60S 
Handemn Money 
Manat 

Cheque Accent 695 7.18 


MeflxndHICA 

£2X00^3.999 675 698 

£10000 ml ow 7X0 719 
NmWestHgn 
IntSpaeResena 
£2.000- £9999 6X8 7X5 

£10X008 over 7X0 7.10 
Oppertwnw Money 
Management Aecoint 
mw* £10.000 6X1 7X1 

over £10X00 7X1 7X0 

Royal B of Scotland 
Premium Account 710 729 
S&PCal 6X0 7X4 
Schratol 
£2900 to ESi 
over £ 10.000 
TiSetSRtoyeal 
TAR 7^ 

,^17 Hay 

WeatemVrua 
1 month 


6X2 704 
7X1 724 
727 742 
716 7X3 
7.13 723 
7X0 7.18 
6X2 7.00 


012401222 

012368301 


Of S385757 
013883211 
01 6261500 
016284568 

0742 20999 
0742 20999 


017261000 

017261000 


012363382 

012368362 

018332121 
0708 66966 

0706 827733 
07D5 827733 
01 2360952 
01 236 0952 
0272 732241 
0272 732241 
016264661 


cent variable at sfx weeks 1 notice 
paid monthly without deduction of 
tax. Repayment of 3 months’ notice. 
Penalties m first year. 

National Savings Indexed Income 
Bond 

Start rate monthly income for first 
. year. B per cent , Increased at end of 
each year to ma tch Increase in 
prices as measured by Retafl Prices 
Index. Cash value remains the 
same. Income taxable, caved gross. 
Three months’ notice 
Minimum investment of £5,000 m 
multiples of £1.000. Maximum 
£100.000, 

National Savings 4th Mn-UnM 
Certificates 

Maximum investment — £5,000 
excluding hokflngs of other issues. 
Return tax-free and linked to 
changes in the retail price index. 
Supplement of 3.00 per cent In the 
first year. 3u25 per cent In the 
second, 3.50 per cent in the third, 
4.50 per cent in the fourth, and 6.00 
per cent in the fifth. Value of 
Retirement Issue Certificates pur- 
chased in August 1981, £148.42 . 
including bonus and supplement. 
June RPi 385.8 . (The new RR 
figure Is not announced until the 
third week ol the fotiowing month). 
National Savings Certificate 
31st issue. Return totally free of 
income and capital gains tax, equiv- 
alent to an annual Interest rate over 
the five-year term of 7.85 per cent 
maximum investment £5.000 
Genera) extension rate tor holders 
of earlier issues which have 
reached maturity is 8.01 
National Savings Yearly Plan 
A one year regular savings plan 


7X5 728 07S2 281161 
CNAR — C om po u nded Met Annual Rare, 
figures am the Must rad** at tee tme of 
gons to press. Research D. Berm 

National Savings Bank 

Ordinary accounts — if a minimum 
balance of £100 maintained lor 
whole of 1986. 6 per cent interest 
px. for each complete month where 
balance is over £500, otherwise 3 
per cent, investment Account — 
10.75 per cent interest paid without 
deduction of tax one months' 
notice of withdrawal, maximum 
Investment £100.000 . 

National Savings income Bond 
Minimum investment £2.000, maid- 
mum £100,000. interest 11.25 per 



converting Into 4-year savings cer- 
tificates. Minimum £20 a month, 
maximum £200 . Return over five 
years 8.19 per cent, tax free. 
National Saving* Deposit Bood 
Minimum investment £100 . maxi- 
mum £100.000 . Interest 11-25 per 
cent variable at six weeks' nonce 
credited annua By without deduction 
ol tax Repayment at three months’ 
- notice. Half Interest only paid on 
bonds repaid during first year. 

Bu tiding 

Ordinary share accounts — 525 per 
cent. Extra interest accounts usual- 
ly pay 1-2 per cam over ordinary 
share rata. Rates quoted above are 
those most commonly offered. Indi- 
vidual building societies may quote 
different rates. Interest on all ac- 
counts paid net of basic rata tax. 
Not redalmable by non-taxpayers. 
Fore ign currency deposits 
Rates quoted by Rothschild’s Old 
Court International Reserves 0481 
28741. Seven days' notice is re- 
quired for withdrawal and no charge 
is made lor switching currencies. 
Sterling 9.03 per cent 

US dollar 5.7B per cent 

Yen 3.77 per cent 

D Mark 3X4 per cant 

French Franc 6X9 per cent 

Swiss Franc 3.11 per cent 


Lloyd’s 

A MUST FDR ALL LLOYDS MEMBERS 

Jus out; 32-page Advance Summon; covering over 90% of she . 
Syndicate Results. Including underwriting performance, investment 
return and cheque per £10,000 sham for each syndicate 
Published by the Association of Lloyd's Members — offered to Lloyd's 
members In UK and Europe at £35 (US$55) and m other countries ai 
US57Q (£45) to include a further comprehensive results analysis in 
September and ALM Membership for the rest of 19S6 


£ 


Send cheque for ycur copy by return of post, to 

Association of Lloyd's Member* 

Lloyd's. Suite E2 
Line Street 

Loudon EC3M 7DQ (TeL- 01-6237100 Ext. 4038) 


If you are about 
to invest for 
capital growth 
listen to the 
ex perts. 




01-831 6373 


TARGET 

TARGET GROUP PLC 


UN IT TRUSTS -LIFE ASSURANCT -PENSIONS- FIN ANCIMTMaK aGEMENT 


TargetGroup PLC, 7/9 Breams Buildings, London EG4A1EU 


I1‘ you’re 

« 

about to retire 
make Mire vour 

4. 

monev works 

t 

even harder. 


When you stop earning, the most important thing is lo 
keep your money safe and well protected against inflation. You 
may be thinking of turning part of your pension into a tax-free 
lumpsum. 

One answer certainly worth thinking about is the 
Commercial Union Prime Investment Bond. An investment of 
£2,000 made in February 1985 has increased by June 1 9Sb to 
£4,529. No less than 125.48 net of all charges. Tax-free in basic 
rate tax-payers. And you could have cashed in your holding at 
any tune. 

The value of units ran of course go down in the same 
way as they can go up and past performance is not necessarily a 
guide to the future. At each anniversary since its start in 
February 1983, it has been Britain’s most successful Insurance 
Company Managed Fund and continues to be one of the bes[ 
performers. 

If you have £2,000 or more to invest and would like to 
know about this opportunity just fill in the coupon, or phone 
Allan Ball on 0 1 -285 7500 /pvt 8852). « 

A leaflet with details will be sent to 
you completely free. It involves no 
obligation. It doesn't even cost you a 
stamp. 

Cl’ Prune Investment Bond 



;i \ m ' j- 


W: 


• i • . 
n 



Nationwide 


THE WARDLEY JAPAN GROWTH TRUST 


EVERYS50OO INVESTED 
HAS NOWGROWN TO £25,080 
SINCE OCTOBER 1982 


Building Society 

(Incorporated in England under die Building Societies Act IBM) 

Placing of £20,000,000 10% per cent Bonds 
dne 17th Augnst 1987 

Listing for the bonds has been granted by the Council of The Stock Exchange- Listing 
Particulars in relation to The Nationwide Building Society are available in the Extd 
Statistical Services. Copies may be collected from Companies Announcements Office, 
P.O. Box No. 1 19, The Stock Exchange. London EC2P 2BT until 12th August 1986 and 
until 25th August 1986 fincMiu- 

Fulton Preboa 
Sterling Ltd., 

34-40 Ludgate Hill, 

London EC4M 7JT 


Chase Manhattan 
Securities, 

Portland House, 

72/73 BasinghaJl Street, 
London EC2V 5DP 


Rowe & Pitman Ltd. 
1 Finsbury Avenue, 
London EC2M 2PA 


9th August 1986 



Port of London 
Authority 




i (Ifi’-jr 



Summary of Accounts 


for the year ended 31 st December 1 985 

GROUPBALANCESHEET 


GROUP PROFIT AND LOSS ACCOUNT 

1985 1984 
fin 

TURNOVER 78.1 


OPERATING EXPENDITURE (63.0) 

GROSS PROFIT 

Administrative Expens 
Investment Income — 


fin 

725 

(58.8) 


FIXED ASSETS 

Tangible Assets. 


1985 

fin 


1984 

fin 


65.1 62.9 


Interest — ...... 

PROFIT 

BEF0RETAXAT10N .. 
Taxation Charge 

PROFIT 

AFTERTAXATION _ 
Profit Attributable 
to Minority Interest _ 

PR0FITF0R 
THEYEAR 


14th July, 1986 


- 1 5.1 

13.7 




.. (9,9) 
- 1.3 

(9.7) 

1.2 

NET CURRENT ASSETS _ 

73.9 
- 2CL2 

71.0 

11.5 

. 6_5 

52 


94.1 

825 

- (4.4) (4.6) 

Creditors: 



« 2.1 
- (0-2) 

0.6 

amounts failing due alter 
more ihsri on** y** 1 * 

_ 51.1 

S4.7 

Provisions for * 

Liabilities and Charges 




_ 15.8 

16.1 

- 1.9 

as 


- 32 

3.4 




23.8 


- 0.1 

— 

Minority Interest 

- 0.2 

1.8 

0.6 


94.1 

825 



GR0UPS0URCE AND APPLICATION 




0FRJNDSSTA7EMENT 

NET DECREASE 
NLJQ1J1DRJRBS 

- (1-3) 

(22) 


Sir BRIAN KELLET 
Chairman 


TJLMACMASTER 
Director ofTinance 


J.N. BLACK 
Deputy Chairman & 

CbiefExecutive 

Published by the Port ofLondon Authority under Section 8(3) ofthe Pan ofLondoh Act 1968 


The above is an extract from the published Accounts ofthe Port ofLondon Authority for 
the year ended 3 1 st December. 1 985 which have been delivered to The Secretary ofStatr for 
Transport. The audit report contained in the published Accounts includes a qualification 
relating to the continued availability of financial assistance under the provisions of the 
Ports (Financial Assistance) Act 1981 as amended bythe Ports (Finance) Act 1985. 

G. £. E finals. Secretary 

Copies qf the Report and Accounts 1985 can be obtained from the Secretary's Department, 
Port ofLondon Authority. Leslie Ford House. TUburyDodcs. Essex RM 18 /EH. Price£2.00 


Ener gy 
costs down 


The W&rdley Japan 
Growth Trust is one of the 
very best performing of all unit trusts. 

Had you been fortunate enough to 
have invested when we launched in 
October 1982 you would have seen a 
402% increase in the value of your units to 
date. And this year alone an investment would 
have grown by a remarkable 74 % . (Figures 
calculated offer to bid, income not reinvested 
to 1st August 1986.) 

Compare that with the growth you have 
been getting from your portfolio. And, if your 
money is languishing in a building society 
account, the comparison hardly bears 
thinking about! 

As for future prospects, all the signs are 
that this level of growth is set to continue for 
the rest of this year and beyond. 

The Japanese economy Is going 
from strength to strength 

.The Japanese domestic economy is awash 
with money. Manufacturing costs are down. 
Inflation is fast approaching zero. Interest 
rates are at about 1 % . The Yen is strong. And 
the citizens of Japan are demonstrating their 
own confidence by investing millions of Yen in 
domestic companies every single month. 

This is the economic climate that other 
countries only get to dream about And it 
means that investing in the right companies 
now can earn fabulous rewards. 


Wardley are uniquely 
placed to make the most 
of the Japanese boom 

What is it that has made the lfardley 
Japan Growth Trust one of the very top 
performers in its sector? In short, the answer is 
local expertise’. 

Wardley is a wholly owned subsidiary of 
The Hongkong and Sh anghai Ban king Corp- 
oration, one of the largest financial institutions 
in the world. That means we have enviable 
resources in the Far East and a specialist local 
knowledge of the Japanese economy. 

The Japan Growth Trust is managed from 
our Tokyo office, and the same fund managers 
who have produced 74% growth so far this 
year will be striving to improve that perform- 
ance over the months to come. 

However, it is important to remember that 
the value of units, and the income from them, 
can go down as well as up. 

The best time to make your 
Investment is NOW 

It isn’t often that one can look ahead with 
such confidence. But all the indicators suggest 
that the Japanese economy will continue to 


prosper. And that’s why it makes 
sense to make an investment now. 

You even have a choice of how to 
invest. You can make an immediate lump sum 
investment of £1,000 or more. Or you may, if 
you wish, invest through the Wardley Capital 
Builder savings scheme — from just £50 a 
month. Full details are available on request 
Simply tick the appropriate box on the 
application form. 

But whatever investment route you choose 
to take, the time to act is NOW. 


Application for Investment 
in the Wardley Japan 
Growth Trust 


I 
I 

| ‘ Surname 


r units to the value of (&_ 


, 00 ) 


I/Ufeai . 

in the Ridley Japan Growth Tlrust, at theoffer price 
ruling on receipt of this application. (Minimum 
investment &1 ,000. Subsequent additions can be 
made in any amount subject to a Uwer limit of &100). 


GENERAL INFORMATION 


Dsafing in (Mac links wIBb* bought atttiaOMrprn on any txBtoss day 

onwhfetiontoB araiaeatvw.£A*a guide the Odorpnca on is August 1988 

a»l34Spj.AConp#«No»wH6bBaBmBnme«*atBlyiiouran»licationlB 

wwlwd-andyfturUnitCartificafewitloottiniiyWiowwteantne nw>42 


(5000- 

wsoo- 

c*ooo 

S3G00 

two 

Se* how waethswudlty Japan 
Granrthlhist has performed in iriatton 

ID the Japan MkhMMr overage. 

f 

C3S00 i 



£2000 

race 

nooo 




1062 *83 ' «4 1986 

IB6B 


.hnnHEhl llmi IMngH fd 



daja Whan wussUyawunihP3yiwrtwMbtR**rttha Bid pneft 

normafly wttNn 7 days rftha receipt ofyour renomad IhutCetifflcaia. 

Prt ca an d j da k fcTliBtagtwpitaaBandyWdarequoMln tea 
Dally "telegraph, RnancWUmes and The Tanas. 
kteom« The asttmatad gron cunant yield on 1st August me 024b par 
annum. Nea Income is distributed wtuaily on 29th Novambei: 

Chtegret An ■kWctaaraaelMia ted tided aiteprica of units. 

Comralsetaiii paid to qualified Intermed ones, the rates being avaRobto on 

request. An annual management chargaolilbtptoWOtrftttevabeal the 

Hvdl* deducted from thelncomefer capital. IHhawtsinsjftcianttoMrna). 

Srieguwde:Th8"BuR Is authorised by the Secretary of Stats torsade and 
induaryandiaewidef range investment under die "BusieeliirestnwxAa, 
t961.ThelhMnitLlDydB8aidtPiB.7i Lombard Stmt, London EC3P3BS. 
Management Company: WartfeyUnaitusi Managers Limited. 

Reo. Nd 1306845 Erriarri. Hag. Offiea: Wardtay hfousxTDwonshbe 
Stteare. Imdon EC2M4HN. 

Aiwnber of theUnk’fruBt Association. 

' ? ^? r 

WW' : 


First Names 


Address 


Postcode 


Signatures 


Date 



Fund Managers Worldwide 
— MewtfeirHtwgliiongBankffln^^X^ 


(hi ihacaseoi joint applications, each mug sign and attach lull names.] 

Please tick the box if you would like income 

and distributions reinvested □ 

Pleae tick theappropriate box(es) if you would like: 

(i) Del ai ts of the V^rdJey Capital Builder □ 

(ii) Details of our Share Exchange Scheme □ 

Oil) Details of our Portfolio Management Services Q 
Please send this completed application form and a 
cheque for the amount you wish to invest to: 

Wardley Unit 'Crust Managers Limited, 
Wardley House, 7 Devonshire Square, 
London EC2M4HN. 

Telephone: 01-929 1532 or 929 1534. 


Not applicable in Eire TIMS is j 









THE T IMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 i9$o 




HOLIDAYS & VILLAS 



TURKISH DELIGHT 
HOLIDAYS 

INCLUSIVE HOLIDAYS 
12 AUGUST 1 WEEK ONLY. 
FROM £289 

Also 19, 26 Aug/Sept Avail 

01-891 6469 

iITO ATOL 2047 


CORNWALL* DEVON 


DORSET, HANTS, * 


Summer 1986 



Switzerland 

from only £99 
return 

GENEVA £99 RETURN 
ZURICH £99 RETURN 
BASLE £99 RETURN 


Early Saver fare available now from 
Heathrow Book 14 days in advance. 

For further details of these and other 
Saver fares contact your travel agent or 
British Airways travel shop. 

British Airways 


The workfc favourite airline, a 


UP UP & AWAY 

Nairobi. Jo'Bmg. Cairo. Dubai. 
Istanbul Singapore. ILL Delhi. 
Bangkok. Hoag Kong. Sydney. 
Europe. A The Americas. 


The rich o * g port y o m d 

Come to The Bahamas 
to enjoy your «pon aa is best. 
Play as superb 
duiBipiQBsfaip golf-coona, 
Dire m the crystal dear 
Bahamian warns. 

Or sad and fish in die moat 
spectacular waters in ibe 
world. 

You may not want to do h 
all, but it’s nice to know n’t 
there. 

Str tow bed n*d jpon or aresa 
TbrtehureTovna Office. 

UOtd UondSL Ipadoa VLX4PQ. 
Tel: 01431 U3A 

""£466 

MBenerln 

The Bahamas. 


IT’S ALL AT 
TRAILFINDERS 


More low-cosi flights 
via more routes 
to more d a m nati o n! 
than arty other agency 
PLUS 



-STAyae AT THE UnURMfi/ 

■ 4-swr stab; a pwmsq 
hoth. on shuts gouei 

COSTADELSOL 
NEAR HM8ELLA. 




£99 RETURN 

Save with Swissairt 
Super Apex. 
London to Zurich or 
Geneva daily on con- 
venient afternoon 
flights. And daOy 
flights to Basle 
(except Sundays). 
Book and pay 14 days 
before departure. 
Stay in Switzerland 
at least until the 
Sunday afleramvaL 
Bookings and full 
conditions from 
travel agents or 

01-4379573 


AUTUMN IN AUSTRIA 

to days h W bo wd. choc, of 
man A! rooms with pM fc- 
efttm Vdaga cwn haute. 
Luxury Ngh k na r castas. 
Oeparrums from: 

WEST MOLANOS. CAMBS 
ESSEX KENT & HERTS. 

£135!! 


Aua 30 
pt 13 ft 27 




SOmd a wtffe nrbodni M our 
gnwiF trart, hsM Idea ■ 
•nr* uuiw i ni 0*1 oar yMtil for 
£460. inr Ot. K/te. (.«« 
w/sparts. other combinations 
now Ol S» 1006. 01 T37 
386l(24hrsL ATOL 2091 


4BIUI1IU B ON amb/MI 
to Europe. USA A mast Mina- 
lions. Otptonui TravrE Ol 730 
2201 ABTA IATA ATOL. 


SPEEdffiNG 

01-491 1734 
01 -629 3368 

ATOL 1624 

OZ-NZ 

PERTH >Cii29 

SVD/MEL/BRtSr,., v ibis 
AUCKLAND £?55 

01-242 5555 
RE HO TRAVEL 1 cere. ; \t\ 


1ST A CLUB CLASS FUSMT*; 
Hugr DtMOunt*. Sunwortd 
Tranrt (03727) 26097 

/271O9/27S30. 


Sept 13 ft 27 
Oct 4 

BOOK DRECT ft SAVES 
Upper Ataman 
Tourist Authority 
Munytands. St. Ives. Cambs 
let 0480301584, Jeta 32496 
Rione or send lor 
colour brochure NOW 




AUSTRAj^ 

N £ W ZEALAND 
POUND fhcV»ORLD 



COTSWOLOS 

Country Mure tetri, ril none 
wen cof TV and pmrett toes. 
Cotswrid tar and aupeib food. 
Ideal tourist canM tatweoo 
MabnesDury ana Ctrenceriwr. 
Start aatence MtiJEtat 17). 

3 ngtas DflU CM nduw*. 
Speori oter. any Fri. Sri & Sun 
m Ai«ust antf £81 rid. 

FOr Brochure 

Mayfield House Hotel 
CrodweO, Malmesbury. 
N Yorkshire 

TeL (0667) 409/7198 


COTSWOLD 
COUNTRY HOTEL 

fas 3 aar ousted hatpin break* 
Fn/Sc/Smu 3 dm a £29 Dp per 
day DR A & or Sen/Mon. Zibys 
□6 pp per iky D.BA Exdudn^ 
bank bobby weekends All rooms 
with private bath, colour TV. etc. 
Three Ways Hotel 
Middetoe Gles. 

Tel: (038677) 429 


rhinefield house 
HOTEL 

tb nAhmrf, New Fmft HsapsWre 9042 7QB 

I ntr od u ces phase X 

LUXURY TIMESHARING 

Aad abo«e aO - wpenorlocuioa. Set in ibe bean of ibe New forest - 

Sfcriag 35 acres ^ tad retasutori 

interval InteroUMMl over 500 resorts ro 30 

•todoor/uindoor rwimroinfi (completion IW) *Toinis coots IMro- 

ptoion 1987)- 

INTRODUCTORY OFFER 
Asr 2 *** * dtao, M aed bccaktat Em «L» » 

rai personalized toon are aow bang comforted - Gran miwk bo 
obligation to purchase. 


-Truly in He heart of the New Fbrew 




ESSCBALC. Bummoor Im. Sum- 
mer - msuttc MB £13-00 
roUiraU or ter meals. 
1090031 22*. 

LAKELAND 6cV Catalog. CM- 
By*. OalDB etc. G rey Abbey. 
Broetc 10946) SJ73. 

■EMOTE OOTTASK. tofcca/dales. 
hwndB dn«.£tnT. CH.TV 
23 Aua on. 061 881 2407. 


■' 1 ' 2 T u” ‘ * 


LONDON 


(BMMBTONWIIUbc Serviced 
apt*. Col TV. unicorn Ltd. 16 
Elgin era. Wit Ol 401 3094 


EAST ANGLIA 




Aagrett 30th £65 
Sept 13th A 20th £56 
BBEM 

TeL 0323 24243 


Fantastlr views over frik. Got- 
our Tv. £200 P.w. MttAapal 
on. 07048 77182 


DISCOUNTED FARES 
mete man 
Jotuq/HK rife E49Q 

Iteria £275 £39Q 

Cud £150 5730 

Look £340 £38 0 

dS/Bcw £250 EJ5C 

Bangkok £220 £350 

Duda £420 

Afro Asian Trawl Lid 
182/188 Mllrt SC, W1 

TIL 01-437 E55/flJty» 
Lab 8 Group Borings MteOBM 
MtfXjtttft/DMRS 


CHEAP ruom Worldwide. 
Haymarhet 01-930 1366. 



namnr bolocm mm Travel 
1*2 wkt, 2 rentres.fty-drtvc. 
mine. I no mm-nr*. Charter * 
sctM-duled or lUgM* only July * 
Altodrpo 4»MI Bradiure Ol 
404 1962 or Ol 788 8030 194 
MM ABTA ACCESS VBA 
MHTABE SPECIALISTS Sydney 
o/w C420 rin £760. Auckland 
o/w £430 rtn £770 Jo'burg 
«/w £306 rtn £499 Lot Ange- 
leto/w £216 rtn £409. London 
FHalH Crnlre Ot 370 6332 


ME HRA Fly direct 16. Aug-Ocf. 
Free wfe tennis, merti food * 
free vine Chowo a club 4* 
luxury or 2 * hotels by sandy 
bearh Lunanrapr 01-441 
0122 24 m 

ME CAH lor same of the tnl 
dra»« in mgnts- anartments. ho- 
leto and car lure Tel London 01 
636 6000. Manniestn- 061 832 
2000 Air Travel Advisory 
Bureau 




LOW PARED woa u awi E 

USA. & Aiarrtra. Mid and Far 
Cat. S Africa. Trayvale. 4a 
Margaret Street, wi Ol 600 
2928 IVloa Accepted) 


LOW FARES TO Amerrin. Aus- 
tralia * New Zealand. Tel: Ol 
900 2S66. Hermit Travel 35 
Whitman London. swi 
ABTA 34S3X 


U T C Open SaL 0763 857036. 


B ARBADOS 14 ntghu. */c. from 
onty £426. 21 mghtt from only 
C499 Airfares IntcmaUonJl. 
0602 504 684 1 24 Hrak AMa. 
GREECE. TURKEY, CAW A MES . 
Auo/Srpt avadabUliy (09231 
771266. T1 runway Holidays. 
ABTA ATOL 1107 
LOW COST FUGMTS. MoH Bn> 
pean desUnaltons. V a l ena n d er 
01-402 4262AXB2 ABTA 

61004 ATOL 1960 


PREMIER HOLIDAYS 
0223 355977 

ABTA 50118 ATOL I23SB 


LOW COST FARES to U.&A. Mo- 
tor Travel Ol 486 9237 IATA. 




SWITZERLAND Scheduled (lights 
Ol 734 2388 ABTA ATOL 


■■AML JAMAICA. JLYORK, 

Worldwide cheapen fares. 
Richmond Travrt. I Duke Si 
Richmond ABTA 01940 4073. 


Hotel r rwcv.tUoni aO over Mo- 
rorro. Tel: Ol 734 8307 

ABTA /ATOL 

TIINDA. Perfect beactiea lor 
your tummer neaday Can lor 
our broch u re now. Tunisian 
Travel Bureau. 01-373 4411. 


Pans EH N YORK £275 

Fmddul £60 LA/SF £3% 
Lagos £320 MkW £320 
Njaobi £325 Sogapm E420 
JO burg £480 Bangkok £335 
Cam £205 Katmandu £440 
DtUBom £335 Rangoon £350 
Hong Kong ESiQ Cafaria £425 


■ Innlniimi 

^rapiogne 

B THENEWSKl 
m BROCHURE IS 

"nowmoulable 


gl~ri^a 



SCOTLAND 




cod Fr 16 Au«. SI E £173 pw. 
TEIOW 188 412. 


*OF 9aLV 1 DniiUn!il^iakK 
lale^enton Crand Tow. tpe- 
(UH> designed to sadtfy wide 
Lastes. with tent! Me dally mile- 
age. Oepartiwn Tuesday 30 
SrpL 7.14 * 21 Oct £298 lad 
day flights Gatwick. 7 ntmut 
H/B m 3/4 Mar hoKh. airport 
taxes, entrance fees. Special of- 
fers also in TAORMINA, met 
1st cal. hotel £268 H/B. beach 
hotel £218 H/B. penRoneClTl 
B * B. aU lor 7 Phriis. tamo dtp 
dato. BLAND SUN 01-222 
7462 ABTA/ATOL 1907 

ALL US Hires . Lowest fare* on 
malar scheduled c a rrier s . Ol- 
604 7371. ABTA 

HONS KOfia £488. Bangkok 
£369. Slop £487. Other FE Cit- 
ies 01-604 6614. 

SYD/MEL £618 Adh £648. An 
rn lor earners to Air* WZ-Ol- 
884 7371 ABTA. 

L AFRICA From £468. 01-884 
7371 ABTA. 


CRUISE & SAIL ABROAD 


Saw Traditional sailing schooner 
world voyage to s am nle what- 
ever Is encountered whgamer 
U may appear embarking as 
soon as possible on open endee 
Expenses shared berth available 
07666 8817 


SELF-CATERING 

BALEARICS 


9.12. Aug lo on arret nta. 
arttve * relaxing hols, on 
■msoffl Wes. bore inia. BOOT 
* Bap Far Solo's Couple* ft 
raiuMlm Uuuncw Ol 441 

0122 24 tin 

MEED CREW renulrrd lor Aege 
an sailing TMMUV. mM Sept 
Share nw iwi Ot 996 BeOa. 


GENERAL 


las Apis ft Tavrma lo m an 
pner ranges ft all age groups. 
12-J ft 4 bedrms avail. Tet 
Monarch VIBas ft Apartments. 
106821 466773/419898 ABTA 
ATOL 1821 

KMORCA vaias. some with 
pools, apartment*, tavrmas. an 
dale* avail AuguM specials. 

high season from £166. Ccfttc 
Holidays Ol 309 7070 ft 0622 
677071 or 0622 677076 124 
first AIM 1772. 

Private Hobday 


Rre Srofartwaitw nol taka a ere 
ft sample Ur deigMs d France & 
Span. MU 23 too sties, ore 
mobile homes oiler choice. 
Ireettom ft luxury. Really Low 
Prices *th oflos mduring 3 *ta 
bofeday tar Aa price of 2. guano- 
teed value tor money, (me; 


HOUBAYS 

821 711 S0B1 (2tiln) 




We'll put a 
spell on you. 

tt you answer this 
advertisement, well send 
yon the. Magic of Italy 
brochure, and you will fail 
under ils spell: 

Here you win find 
Icaly, of f the tourist 
track. Horcls,villas 
and swimming pools in 
Tuscany, Sardinia and 
lovely, unspoiled RaveDo 
on the coast of Amalfi. 
People who expea magic 
on holiday use us. Call 
01-7497449 now (24 bis). 
Magic of Italy Lid., 

47 Shepherds Bush Green 
London W128PS 


SELF-CATERING 
CANARY A MADEIRA 


LAKZAKOTE 6 Star Luxury villa 
to Lei Sleeps 4/6 2 Week* 
Conumuctnq 261h ScpL £800 
Tet 0299-102380 


TEMUUFE dose In America* 2 
bed lux apL pool/bcach. tips 
4/6 0993 842813 revest 


<L CAJCAIUA. Puerto Rico. 2 nkr 
I bedim opts mad- 2 win. Jan. 
Pool, sea sxrw 0209 413070. 
I EMI RIFE. Bearh opL POOL tar 
fslerpsZftt. Trencor htn>. From 
£86 pw 109031 892101 
YENKRfPE Puerto de u.Cruz. 7 
new miraii opts. Vacant Bret- 
on COO week. Ot 979 9901 


u nh i d Swimm in g pom. Bft 
O. waMM and washing-up 
rrutMim. 4 bathrooms, s dou- 
ble i nd i um » s and cMlagr for 
two AvalUbto AuguM 16 31 
due to toil mmuU- canCTOalton. 
Cl. 500 pw Tel 01886 9761 


SELF-CATERING ITALY 


TUBCAMV 18/8. Lovely VIBas. 
SIPS 4/6. Manna di Ptetrasaida. 
Denial from £460pw. FUa avail 
or ferry Other dues ft villa* 
avail. Resort villas 061 833 
9095 ABTA/ATOL 


Totally restored. (Matched ni 
cal cottage, sleeps 6. btyme 
scenery Avan from 6 Sept. 
£100 £200 p.w. Tel 01 670 
2196 tEvs/Wh Cndsl. 

FLORENCE. 4- lmll ill vUla to vtl- 
logr 20 mins CUy Centre. 
Swtmmlog near by. Avail 16 
30 Ai^. Manna Holidays 0722 
332121/0963 70636 

FLAT in Tiann farmhoiBe. MBl 
available lor Aug ft Sept. Very 
reasonable Ol 622 7292 (week 
day evesl 

TUSCANTi 30/8 13/9. 4 people 
lor mixed vWa pony. £190 per 
ncTSOo TcL 0894 630267 


CUBZO H HOTEL 

4 Crown dnStrihi 

One mile from city cen- 
tre. All en-suite. Large 
private car park. U- 
censed bar. Any 2 day 
breaks. 

£52 per person inclusive. 

Telephone Chester 

(0244) 678581. 


ACTIVITY HOLIDAYS 



SELF-CATERING SPAIN 


SELF-CATERING 

FRANCE 


Corfu 
102131 Ate 


and every Sunday m SeDtonber. 
Beaubfa Wta by the Sbl Hotata 
*so watt* txouohoul tupgt ft 



MAR BELLA & CRETE 

Wc wH have availability m 
Auguu/ScpKmbcr. Villas am] 
apartments some with private 
poaL Von can't aRbnl to watt - 
call now: 

01 724 7775 

IrataM credit cud kookireB 

PLAYA HOUDAYS 
ATOL :«» 


TAKE TIME OFF to Pom. Am- 
sterdam. Brussels. Bruges. 
Crmsi. Bern-. Lausanne. The 

Hague. DuoHit. Rouen. Bets 
tognr A Dieppe Time 0(1. 2a. 
Chester Qav. lomkm. swix 
7BQ 01 236 8070. 


day not m catto. vma a/o. 
£280 «w . Cheap (UgM> (ran 
C240 return Contort Amanda 
0734 863964 


SELF-CATERING 


fUBETAMYIAL Private villas. 
Mtv With NUfl. all wtth own 
pools asaS ol chnoper price s in 
ten Oct In Algarve. Marbefla 
ft South of France. Palmer ft 
Pother Ol 493 6725 
I W O WD Ofrift PKtumour Cot- 
tage Nestling In HIUs. Vacancies 
tel ttasw Steeds 4/6. Uas- 
brrft lOSMl B7I232 


SOWT1MRN BRITTANY CMC 
Meeptng 6 adults. 7 kms from 
beam. Avail Irani 16 Aug. 2 
weeks C5T6. 2 weeks to Sept 
£325. Phone 0368 23546 


tag Pan World 
Holidays 
Open Sat 81-734 25*2 
(Son 01.736 2464) 


CORFU VI L LA S *oa have aval), 
ability Sunday 2* 4,31 August 
tor 2 wto beouuiul sUlos nr the 
beam from CMwIck. Open Sal. 
Pan World H oM d ay w Ol 734 
2962 

CYCLASES Mykonos. Paras. 
Naxos. bn etc. Villas. 

Ttimusft P n oKxts simply 
cheaper. Straply Supert Sknpty 
btmon Holidays. Ol 373 1933. 

LEFNAS 12.19 Aug-Srpt 

IJ moot It Greek Me. Wlmfeurf. 
B80 s ft bop. SOto* Couples ft 
Families. Lunarscaoe 01-441 
0122 24 nr» 


MUAS CTJEL SOL 

Superb sss and m o u ntain 
views. Prtvsrta vita. 5 bed- 
rooms. 5 bath/shower 
rooms, large own pool, 
tame own garden. Sleeps 
8/8/10. Available August, 
September 86. £100 per 
parson per week, mriwlm 
6. HaverMR 0440 62259 or 
0440 704115. 



Ol 




RKflng tor novices, mid Sep- 
tember. Rrre ol a varied 
weekend activity programme - 

art/oatt/ goM/cfasric care. 
Enstris acco mm odation 





Ra pregridon. Snarecr breaks £75 
pp ad OEM any 3 days. AD ocdii 
teds anTp i r d Neares Wti oii 
Auwancr 

Bmchee (CTO) 27*8 


For bradure 
Tikplwn: (BS98) 75831 


55 


ItaMm 31 Aug. Intemtvr 
coaching by top nro i emtnnM) 
tor OH ages ft M an da ro*. Inci 2 



LA FAYflDK. Nr Lavandou ( St 
TWp«r ' . hrl Apt Spa 4. Nr 
safe beach, shops. Macros, wind 
surfing. From Sept 20th. From 
£108 pw Teh .027783) 366. . 

DORDOCm Mr Le Bugue. Coe-' 
tone w let SuU 2. All mod rorn. 
Atari lMri/23Ul Aug ft ScpL 
CI35tfw T afc 0628-23982. 

DONDOCIE - B er g erac.- house 
with own pool and take, sips 10 
3 balhroMn*. 30/8 Onwarda 
£3S0 P -w Tel 0228 337477 


nights. VUU nnUb etc. Zeus 
Hob. Ol 434 1647. AtoL AKo. 
RIIOOES Lux apart hob from 
£18999. 6. 13. 20. 27/B. 
Slroma. 0706 862814. 


MBDDELm 2 tad lux opl 
bcoi/bmcIv tin 4/6. 0993 
842813 tevcw 


COSTA DEL SOL (20 rams Puerto 
Bonus Marbrlla). Super har on 
beach. 2 IMS ImIii i w ft 2 bua 
rmuMr. patto, gdn. s/poots. res- 
Uuranb. nipmurM. Award 
wtnotng desHopmeM. Mold 
service, from coo pw. Owner 

01 58b 4689/883 2321. 
r UE RTO RAMIS lux 2 bed. 2 

bath apL ami 6 Sept onwards. 
SwtmtninQ pool Tenns court. 
£178 pw Tel: 073782 3213. 
JAVEA Prtv VWa. 4 beds taps 81. 

2 b a th *. Sea view. Pool. Sep* 
onwards. TeL- 01 SSO 4948. 

■BARSF1 1 A Lux vritto wUh 
pools ft apt*. Sept to OcL Ol 
409 2838. VISiWorUL 



CkHV any 2 ntpet In the com- 
fort of the Cotowold House 
Hotel. CMopmg Camoden 
Imagmouve menus. Interesting 
wines, charming Regency build- 
ing. £96 pp lor P BftP between 
14 to and 29th August- Reacrva- 
uons (0386) 840330. 


Houses. Oct 16th • 19th. vtstUog 

houses churches and villages. 
Apply Dilettanti 01 749 7096. 


CORNWALL ft DEVON 


ILK. HOLIDAYS 



BEACH VILLAS 



SELFCATERING 

PORTUGAL 


ALOBRVEi Prato Da Rocha. Apt 
l. srps 4. Aval 1-14 Sept ft 
Ocl-Aoprax £176 pw. Apt 2; 
etp* & AuH Sept ft OcL Ted: 
Clare Dba: 010-151 -82 22348 


CAreCELUHlOWS ITU AuduO - 
2 wfcs. targe luxury vtBa wWi 
pool, near beoeft. fuRt toe* teU- 
oay for £449 pa. 6 shoring. 
CHy Trosri. Ol 380 8191. 
ALOMtVKZL/B. 2 sms. Lovely 3 
bed villa, srilh pool. VtUtiMum. 
£349uo. otner dates oho ovaa. 
Resort Was 061 B33 9096 
AL8AKYC. 2 luxury vflto*. Sip* 
IO. POM. MW Avail 28/8 Id 
11/9. 11-ZB/9..09O3 713078 
A L C ARVE. Lux vinos wlm pools 
ft nh Avail Sepl/OcL Ol 409 
2838. VHIaWond. 
rOOLSOC Algarve garden col- 
lage. writ 2. Avail end A as a 
tel £160 P.w. 04893 6467 


BROADWAY HOTEL 

Broadway, Worts. 
AA— WR12 7AA RAC” 

Egon R omy^AAIcy ^Ctancw y 

“The utvuxsi rilte rit lbe 
Ctas-oU^ 

(MINI BREAKS) 

2 day mriMnnoL 2 peq* 
staring £33 per penon jjre day. 

Dinger, room and btoikba. 

3 days £100 per penoo. Afl 
rooms ouoriteoJow 

idevisiaD.miakcn.GPO 
tdepbone and radioL 


(838b)g524l1 

Brodateemtcucfi 


k DEVON. Soa. Soodoui Canrity 
riot. Sew on for 2/6. £84X184 
pw 01-794 0237/01-674 6650. 


W A PANIC? 

ALGARVE. VILLA CANCELLATIONS 

Soper reductkxza 

ZWAmifa2cr3teefa.slaew6.S6aahuBJlwsiwWDeol6id8Bff.il 
Pom. Il JSO HR 28D A^pst 12 ar W diw. Sams 10. RRRb RteRiy «M 
tenalied ran mo pod m son. i ode (rom Mteim. F1750 po. Otter 
saw boon amm Sen/Oa/ltor. 

Tho Maprere Absmatlvo 
73 St Janas St, 

London SWI 
Tdfc Oi-«81 0802 


THE ROYAL 

YORK HOTEL 

Samira, s. oevon 

BUS-** Jtafetay CaretaBiy 
Fifty toned. Centre Espiaade 



RIGHT BY SEA 
AND SAND 

Etwortc roorei. nina. 
wtarium and a dicke of 
cacdtare fbod. 

FROM £28 PER DAY 
OR £125 PER WEEK 

TEL 9271 $70398 

AA**LITTLE BEACH**RAC 
HOTEL 

THE ESPLANADE 
WOOLACOMBE ■ 
DEVON 


BEL ALP HOUSE 

CtHtry Hotel 



TORQUAY 

LAST IMNUTE 




Aug ft SapL Indear ft outdoor mttv 
nriog poe ts , dmcrig ft 
enterateMMi^Tflyutri 
rendsnt tarn) tirtd Mbtital 
bdOdng'BMteCWeB. 
•Spmteltiittotatay 
BfB £80. Otator cpBored 
Wrtta/pboua 


THE RAINBOW HOUSE 
AA***HffTH.***MC 
P al gra wB Rosd 
Torquay, Dovon TQ2 5HP 
T«fc (0803) 213232 


AA*+ BMC** 




FOR JULY ft AUGUST 
AT GOOUE CROSS HOTEL 
BOVEY TRACEY, DEVON 
Ta); Berey Ttopy (KZQ 83ZC75 
Any 2 days or more £214)0 
op. par day. 0« ES. in thta 
beatiihil country house an 
the edge of the moors. 23 en- 
satB bedrms. wtth coL TV. 
tsa-making fadL For a relax- 
ing holiday amidst oul- 
amndbtg scenery. 


DEVON MAGIC 
IUWOR HOUSE HOTa 


:1V 


FamRy hotel, 2 * * AA 
RAC. All rooms ensurte. 
Colour TV, baby Bstentng, 
heated sw&wntng pooL 
own grounds, dose sea. 
A la cans and veg etar ian 
menu. Licensed. 

CLOVELLY 

( 02373 ) 380 



6 nights bed breakfast and 
evening meal 5 DAYS SOU 
(Monday Friday). From £114 
tufty tachshBL 
Licensed bar. 

Friendly atmosphere; 
Person! service. 


Terra Perk, Mra c ren b e, 
Dares. Tet; (8271) 62864 



(ftLnl&ki 

UlUft M. Dm EZKBQ 



B&S frara E52 per tnek. 
Enafte rooms trim ootaw TO 

TB: 0S7 255 21B1 


A peaceful hotel of 
unusual chaim on seafront 
near cento. Renowned for 
aisfa. TV. PA OR Lift. 

TeL (0202) 28581. 




late (Men toa«c4to Tmtaiy). 24 
ScMraun. sA kwy Mdw Mkl 
CbI TVs. dps 4/E. re tec. dUB gtnm) 



MHMMN niTtVAU Rant 
drlux. studio flaL lOndnsfram 
etty emtre. All mod codl £160 
P/W Visa / Access. TO: 031- 
88741029 l day) or 031-226- 
6528 (CVCS). 


front July. SIPS »S.- Sandy 031 
226 6379 Quota TER 261. 


bargains. Perfect tor golf or Ed- 
inburgh louring. 4 d*V* D-RftB 
In ihb rlrg an t hotel from only 
CI& 1W BELLEVUE HOTEL 
(0368) 62322. 


MID WALES 

DOVEY VALLEY 
Ptsccfitield l8thCc« uy F«n»- 
in bfonliU comliysidt; lo*te 
raw aril ttsltai csRMlahta and 
bnMtfy StaMpItoR total. toRBB 
aad autumn oamdi. 
BPK3AL MINI BREAKS 
Bed, hnsfcfai nd nenriy ncaL UB 
per PHtoP per sto- fite atfasoR. 


Trieptoxie (0664) 2796 





Tiara r^n ci sub 1 8w I 1 * - J 

ine iTonnKa, mmouopo 
. AA RAC** 

55 bedfioms oesoie srih colaur TVs. 
Isnutag. droa pbasre pent roams, 
rata inr. ML cm pat- pod. barer. 
Res p* (ZJ. DOBtmined. OJBU rim 
E25 pp pd tadnsne. Mtei far 7 
itapi or im red ta ddUrei (1 ett) 

Trite m ttie p l i M ! 
•492 74343 



ffq folPnngi 


Klbcook, Nr. Mhrehcad, 
Somerset TA24 6HQ 
“ A gem woag small tourney 

house kouis" 

Egm Raooy omd MhUjCaartataj 


Stated between the coast the 
Exmoor National Park. Hie 
Quantocfc and Brandon HHis. Ibe 
Oregon Home ■ atatey located 
.tor eto w ng trie couoysafe and 
crestti scenes of tafinrtt rarioy 


BEECHFIELD 

HOUSE 

BEANACflE 

BaauWul County House h B 
aoes near Lacock red Bath. Out- 
standing lood/wure. heated 
smtitaq pool, croquet and Ian- 
nis. Chet P rop rietor- Sunnier 
Breaks. 

Tet 0225 703700 


roummouTii . oukl m-wty 

fi rn t m a S/C DM fUU Mmm 
town centrr. S teens 2/4. Very 
hlgn slaadsrd. C/H. Open all 
ssnr. From £160 pw. Tel s 
•02021 298776 


etropo a. Sea 1/2 mfto. Free 
now Tet 046 030 380. 


COURTXAND8 

HOTEL 

Comfortable AA/RAC 3 
star bold. Heated covered 
pooL Garden Terrace. 400 

yuds Hove SesEronL Smn- 
mor. Winter, Weekend 
faaeaka. 

0273 731055 


DALES lATUnAL PAM 

Qireniog, taniy tun Geotnan 
Manor ^ House, set hi own sechaW 
grounds, ottering fredi tood and 
goad Hina. Central haaUw and 
open fires red bedrooms «h m 
suite faedhes. 

Qreiplm tranquBty ta unspoR 
Oatas milage in this am of out- 
standing ntem) beauty. 

Mnl tar 3 Peaks. Lakes, fame red 
Hanot ctwtiry. 

Broc hure f rom: 

PAM ft PETER TAYLOR 
THE TRADOOCK 

AturnmcK la 2 nr 
or TELEPHONE: (04686) 22*. 


mm 


YORK Prestigious house IrihWM- 
to centrt uvcrtooUpp IM 
MDMo-.Tct: 0904 27230 



PERSONAL 

CeatinaedfruB page-29 

FLATSHASE 



MAHM-VALE i permit lo share- 
coMorUri Oat with 1 other. 
Own bedroom and lull use of 
Obi. dose to tubes. £200 pins 
n ets pa n. TO: ai 423 4160 
BATTERSEA, m/f to share flaL 
-Own bedroom and -full- usr of 
OaL £160 pan exd. 622 2975 
nfler torn 

EAST END SLUM. RMprim 2nd 
rahtonl • Igr pleasam Rai v. 
dose to CHy. TO; TorquU 0923 
720477 or 981 6669 
2 OKU H U— a. M Shr-cna- 
ciotB room br Fge Battersea 
house. £11 5 pent each Inc. 360 
156B Eva or 671 3238 Day 
—CHOATE AOraatve sunny rtn. 
Spacious arrant- for 1 prof pen 
• nr tube £46 Exfl. 883 6290 
SC5 Dane urn hi Lux Shared Flat. 
All Sers. IS mtm Town. £65 
pw Exd. 01 701-8677 Escs 
SW7 Prof, t.o/rm Mured OaL 8 
nrins Ctouceaer Rd tutw. £S2 

'pw ua 373 1897 


three person household: Central 
toHMton. NO pets. Cooking ft 
droning..!* days 6H. Own 
room ft bom In large lloL Sala- 
ry negotiable 01-489 0146 
office hours. 

OVERSEAS All PAIR ACENCV 
87 Regent StreeLLoodan Wl. 
TO 439 b534£lK/Ds«TMt 
Ahn m.hrlps/<lono lema/perm 


NORTH OF THE 
THAMES ' 


****■*■***■711 9tfc Lux 2 bed 
Rat utp/bUocJc. Loe lounge, f/r 
kitchen, fully Hied uihrm oui- 
Mtonlton OH street parking. 
^ JP; J*** Outoh sale. 
£7a000 Die carpets + cimama. 
Tel: 01-740-7173 


CENTRAL LOMXMi Off New Ox- 
rord 6t. large bright, lux farn 
■Pw. SUuuilng fully mod 
wnftsep k/b. huge roof terr. 
£67.500 ana. Tel 01-749 mm 


FWjiAM Rtserstde am M optnei iL 
reanous studto. tonal Med a 
tome, secure, porter, cellar 


BERKSHIRE 



hantsjxjsset, ft 

LO.W. 


taOmiT ftCAUTY SPOT. IMtatrd 
weeny emuge- UnmodMitised- 
Sound Atruclure. Sea 5 m*»- «- 
lerj (ram £30.000. TO estnOl 
659 6065/0339 10903. 


timeshare ux 


w» "WEST UteSSHAlK 
KtHnNlMd Home Hotel me UK 
HM|*,y». . 


S. DCVON COURT RARTON nr 
Satoombe. Available Satoraay 
25 Aug. tor z WKS. Ste-calarlng 
ru». accsm. Sip* 8. 
indoor/outdoor HU sumradna 
ROM* wants conn, none rMmg. 
Ctose h sea. £350 pw. pmh 
L ee-warner Ol 588 6460 (of. 
fleej or gt 362 2896 (tame*. 


Avan AUB/S9L 
c on ver t ed bora. 


4/s. Fuuy KuSert 
Making ft ftaiuag- 


kitchen- walking ft itaHn 
£130 pw. Td : 046050 351 


ESSjBHSSjSs 

MBSiiI r<i i > ! r ;BI 


FAMILY UVM9 In tne souriwen 
part of the Btacfe Forest, resort 
area, wool* Brfllsb lady, experi- 
enced housekeeper, also lo took 
oner Utelr 1 1 tar trid 
daughter Own apartment, food 
simply and usual social expendi- 
ture. The not income is 
considerably higher than mat 
p*M in England. Application 
set Eh pnolo. certmcaiesand cur- 
tl tui um suae taPrefawr 
Michael FoMt MJ>. Hnsiaeristr. 
1.7821 Fetoberg-AB^MiUlien. 
Federal RepubHe of Ceonany 


*s.!as5SLwas ss 

* Trt l0MS ' wow / WS651- 

Evenings/ weekends 221790*.' 


MJL CTSLOOO TO-'.'&S 
























































































































THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 



mNK ®V'oi* 

mi. V* ‘ ‘ 

*■’-«•* : “ <"■<», v lr 

llMf s ,. 11 

- ■ 'RINq 


: t 


^ . I #• lr-i . 

‘ '• V 


s 

L<*-, 'Ft. 


i ' 


l\i K4 IfSc t j • , 

oi 

|M. die..,- . U|J 


i >r*m rt<P\ . 





i 



"•« . . J,1 . I 



imnin 


2?5f! 


’•re hi 


LTiill p T’/^: 

|( s ‘'l: 0325 3^: 



1 1 *n> w® 

| | •"■'Miuyj 

m *■* « t or- -.• r I J . 


| I oHIttl ».(,& 

■ | * r- rh. -m uiftj j 

i . ‘ — — ^ 

! ■ [wc PROBia 


. I 




• '■» ‘ - 1 I'WI* 
■r.r'.':v-i sV.' 

Tel t0544Sl2 


*M i * ^ ••'• 


• t>?LACMl«§ 

TV* -K 

u ta- 


tfri.c ci teit£ 

i o«?: 71«! 

MCI Ml WBH*' ‘ 


in.!'"' ” 



; i 


rtllN|£ 

BEECHTf 

KCl^ 

kw* 9 


\ t 


<**»■• T *’ " i 

•©?«* 


1 I 


PERSONAL 


AH daw fi eri advenisnBctns 
<aa be acc ep te d by telephone 
fneefll AauouneemenuJ. The 
dadbne. srS-OOpm 2 days prior 
(id poblicatSm (ie £00pm Mon- 
(fay for Wednesday). Should 
joa wsh' vo scwTin ajvcnisc- 
Imnu in writing please indode 
your (byline phone number. 
C U STO MER S ER VICE S DE- 
PARTMENT. If you have any 
queries or proble m* retains » 
your advcnocmcni ooceri has 
eared, pha se coo tan our 
Homer Services Dc ptrtmm i 
by tekphone on Sl-dSI 4100. 


I ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SACRED HURT or Jrm* and St 
- jude man* you EJLB. 


SERVICES 


WHEN M LONDON (Wl a TV or 

• video Dy dal . wv or month. 

- TOPS TV Ot 720 4469 

PHEHD6KIP, Love or Kmm. 

* AH ages, Breus. Datrttnr. Dept . 
i. upiCM 23 Aomqdon Road. Lon 

: don V*d Tri. OJ-S36 sou 

pWtMUir OOU p*y» oru Biu sca 
, for sun or nmomm any lo- 

* ration. Trt 0754 872722. '' 
ttftCAKAWAr. London's rtub tot 
' prrteMWMLuiaUalrtird ueortr 

Si4J Over 200 nfflS monlh- 

■ IV 34 hr Inlo bkxv 997 7994 

WP «P TOUR Leader/ 

■ tv«i SarhU Card. Central. 

• South Alrtra. AvrllaMt now 

■ Trt 0468 71689. 


ANCESTRY 


' Contact 

the team with the best 
experience Worid-wtie 

ACHIEVEMENTS 

DEPT IT, NORTKGATE 
CAKTERBUKY CTUBA 

TEL: 0227 402618 


HERALDRY 


FOR SALE 


HESISTA CARPETS 

- SALE NOW ON 
mo Betas 

fum £335 persq yd + VAT. 
flO» wirt Heavy Donate Won 
£1185 pe at yd + VAT 
Coduptast ides 
£875 p» sq yd + VAT 
A any rtko ant redsefiMK. 

148 Wmbworib Bridge Rd 
Pwsws Green, SWG 

Teh 01-731 3368/9 

Fn* nftMtot-fepert Wag. 


WANTED ■ 


fiooo paid lor China cabmm 
_ aim Xante*. Unto, wordrooe* 
, etr. t rumdv wanted oat oil 
painWHrt. enframed- tom. u, 
■“ buy i twin Phone Minm Drgtoy 
*- Oi wwxfc or wnfc* *o 36V, 
*■ Harrow Road.- London W9. All 
- Enal ami covered. 

•XZO perm no IO pad lor «lvrr 
»■' articles. L p lo C2SO pn tnJor 
. OOMt Mr Hart Ol 960 8030 or 
_ wnk> 361. Harrow Road. Lon- 
w don. 99 All EngtaM rovrrrd. 
jpnOJlt HR 16 ram or 9-5 mm 
. Also any Mndd IiMe, Wrur 35 
_ Alvonot SL Ukmon SOMIS. 


FOR SALE - 


SPLENDID solid mahogany, hand 
bull rtniino tabtr. ln««L SUl 
-- pataUal home or rtrgant board 
> room - ' Umb lo nearly 12 *. 
n dom it 8* Can aral !6..Tradl- 
v liorwt Rlwnn' reproduction. 

_ ruungv. solid nrata. Arrrpt 
_ Cl .500 Mvmtnrr ol mairhuio 
Prlwv m Wain rham. hand 
rartrti and MKInd All un- 
• inert 1125 rwf! AKKX2 similar 
' hand ' built solid mahouny U- 
birv. unused, oranng un lo 16 or 
r 12 Trt Ol 203 6027 
'BRIGHTS OF NtmXHO £2 
» minion siorta lor Immrdiaic do- . 
.• In on- 1 7lh & 18lh Crniury 
: rrolnn lurmluro inrtudlna Ar- 
, Ihur BrrU. TlKhnunll ft 
Goodwin. WIIBam Tillman 
KrtUrgad. - nmr rtonlcy on 
Thanm «049i» 64iti5. 

* BOumoimMIth 102021 293380. 

* . Tooshani. Onto 1039287) 

« - 7445. BerLrtry. 'CMs <0453) 
•* 810963 

-FINEST quail tv wool c a rpe t s. At 
« * irartr nrren and under, aba 
n-avatlaMr 100 ‘s rxira. Xaroo 
■ room w rrmnanLs under half 
. normal oiwr Chancery Carpets 
v 01 405 0453 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 



Together we can beat it 

We fund over one ih inf of 
ail research uuo the preven- 
tion and dire of cancer in 
the UK. 

Hdpus by sending* dona- 
lion or male a legacy to: 

Cancer 
Research 
Campaign 

3 Carbon Houvr Terror” 

(fh-pi TT9/B iL.mdunSWiy SP 



HURRY HWMtV TO TOPE. SO «4 
TV's, fulh- grid iron C50 W 
CIOO Half or 1m Of uapl 
pniHjI lOMT SM3t» Sl_ , 
5W1 730 0953. 

LEATHER . CHE STOnQ J by 
Thomas uovd .2 ml ulus 2 
. wing arnwhan in gold hvoe. ' 
Cod Cl .288 Aprfl. Accept 
G8S0 0395 32034 
THE TWES 17RS-19S*. CMtwr 
uuc, avail. Hand bound Toady 
tor wrvMMioa also 

■Sbk»W CIS 50 Bom smbrr 
Whom. Ol *68 6323. 

TICKETS FOR ANY EVENT. Cuts. 
SUi-hoM Exp. Chm. Lrs Ms. 
AU thnam* and eports. 

Trt.. 82 1*61 6 8260496 

A £*' Vm ' Down 

■nrnoMY DUE ? cnowimw 
- at) original Timra Niwfpuyer 
Cburd'lhn wrv day ihry wore- 
born. Cl 2 50. 0492-31503. 

OU) YORK FUUUTONCS. cob- 
Mr srtte rtf. NBUonwidp 
drtlvwtcs. Tel: <05801 850039 

(Win*t_ 

tATF IPU m Anymrnl Inrtri 
Ans-OmriM Gdn. surbohl Cn. 
Gh-ndraournr. 01-628 1678. 
Major rrrrtd rards 
F1HDGES /FREEZERS. Cookers. 
Mr. Can sou buy cheaper? B ft 
Si LM. 01 229 1947/8468. 

OLD YORK FLAGSTONES for 
sale enwMoi rondiuon. Trt 
061 .225 0881 061 231 *785. 


CO 


ANTIQUES & 
LLECTABUES 


ROYAL DOULTON ToOV JU9V 
- Ftgurmrt. animats, fir., warn- 
ed 01 883 0024. 


MUSICAL 

INSTRUMENTS 


THE PIANO WORKSHOP SALE. 

Genuine redurtMAS on over' 
ICO new ft rtsHwwl InUru- 
nmils. Lnnvrtled after sales 
servirr Free nuhwu? 30a' 
H>qh9ate Rrt. NWS. 01267 
7671 Free raUMQur. 


ANIMALS & BIRDS 


Wes. Beau Id id 
Ear rile pi pedigree and lemoera- 
nunl Horae reared. Meal show 
/ Land h‘ pel. Ready Aug 14lh. 
Trt. 10284 1 810910 ' 

WELSH SPRtNCER SpouA KC 
RcrtUered. Mud sell now al 
low PfWC A9(W <0990) 23132 


FOR HER 


DARLING Thai lovely soap from’ 
. Spain is railed Maia. Samples 
from RDM Ltd. FreevovL 
Bakewrtl. Derbyshire * DC4 
1XA 


HOME A GARDEN 


FREQ Strain new bum Cua- 
louue 64 rotoorful page*. 
Hundreds ol colour HCIuTes of 
bidhs. and Rowers plus useful 
growl no hails. With 38 consec- 
utive gold medals 31 Cbefcca. 
voifTe asumr-of uw best.' 
Wnie Ron BWm. Drm TIZ 
- Leavmdeii. Waiford. wia 
7BH Or phone 0923 672071 
<24 hr si 


SHORT LETS 


HOLIDAY FLAYS LtooHi aVaU- 

dblc- C20DC3.000PW. Pe rsona l 

. Bervim 01-458 3680 or 0836- 


.' S9ZB24 anyuthe m. 


KARHEVFoHy eqolppcd spaOtaS 
dM bed flat.- Mr recep. krt- 
Oatt>-C140sw.T»L. OX-876 3964 

KOOmCTON Sunny garden fla( 
. m rogue magasme.LCTmfle. 2 
beds. C22D pw 600 5941 
LUXURY S CR WCm PLATS, 
rernral London from 025 pw. 
Ring Town Hse Apts 373 3433 
S KOL CarfuMve period 3 bed 
Dal. Newly lum. knply r«cp. 
CH- cot TV - makl Ol -373 0763- 
WC3. AiiqllM. Lovely 2 bed flat. 

bt« garden, alt mactuncs- Rea- 
. sOlUMe 589 6988. 


!W*28 


Before you write your Will 
think ^about committing suicide. 


An attempt at suicide is 
a ay for help. So is a call 
to The Samaritans. 

The difference is that itfc 
aery that will always be 
answered, MUST always 
be answered. 

Thafe whywe're making 


ourown'call for help. 

Please remember ia m 
your Will 

Pieese call Slough (0753) 
32713 or write to: Oawd 
Ewans, The Samaritans. 

17 Uxbridge Road, Slough 
SLl ISN tor further details. 


The Samaritans. 


REDWINGS HORSE SANCTUARY 

~ ThwFwwww howw 
. Tr.'i *rf*rw««ad^ri 0 «' , *7 

■•'.'Lai 1 ' dwriurtodNXirodmd 

L-. 'Vi - iEDor*jice of man. We east 

W' I 

HiD .Too Farm. Hall Last 
Flttlreua. nr Norwich 
Norfolk 

Td Norwich 737432 

* Aftn nw of<«if <ww hop** ft 

iwm* p|rtr<raplba rrpMta 

Inn ttwwiyL 

* ATTinil ft-WK IR-a Auort u 
nor nram lie nrw i drhhm fur 


ib» n«w onauertlrad Ur 
Vmm>- *Hnur Ninhw ■.'* pm 


lo help thaw in dnlnm 
and provide them mill a 
loving permanent borne -' 
od who* bereoyer HD 
horaes. paoiea and donliqiB 
fa>uurcue.W«Dud 
YOUR hel p to tu minue- 

ouremric I FEEDING 

BILLS ALONG COST 
C70U EVERY WEEKI. 
Phase Mod yr«r donatiom 
or requM farmir 
newrfeuer (whidfa indudes 
details of Tnecnebcrahiv 
and irifta) to the above 
adebms. 


RENTALS 


,|»vl 





PVTNSYi Iun balnmy del woh 
iwrjor. 3 heurowm to dv» 5 . 
wtrum ruinntom and separate 
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■ htr rmlmlv at -flal jw new 

MdUon 8 imnv.wataTWo/ wmi 
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028 e69i ito a.m. 4 o.m i or 
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LONG /SHORT LET prapmies 
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59TH24 ran limp iTi. 


WANTEO Superior prtfnrtniestor 
louu/sbwLCo Irts. Ol ->5S 3oS0 

or OT36 692824 anytime ,T> 

AMERICAN EXECUTIVE Seeks 
ln\ iMI/hMne up to CBOOpw 
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sea oflHP.’- Ol 350 Sill Or 
Amlh of I he Park Rruenfs 
Park olliee. Ol SB* 9S82 
WH LiiMin furnished llal avail 

ininesl 2 brtis. Z'rrcpv. 2 horhs. 
Kil. CCH Long Go Lrt CS75 
PU IihI 01 247 4c>08iOl/907 
' T444 i Ml' Ahdrewi 
HOLLAND PARK: ' aw w. 1 
reii-p.-Kftb. lorn, w'r .bqhi ear 
rten llal Avail 1st Srtrt -Cl 15 
pv. 01 356 6089 rant dd\>) 
HOTTING HHJ. 1 bedroom lUi. 
ni 1 ub^ « iih phoue. CTOpw 
Lvpfiws ReiiUU. 01 883 5467 
..-UlLtflini 

MOCNTS PK - BAKERS ST rial 
2 be,K t mg U.b parking, 
luniilille Ml IK mid iw» Co M 

Cion pw Trt Ol 724 9312 
937 SCSI The number lo remem 
in nfm wrtuiiu nml rental 
properties in cenlrrt and prime 
LonrtftP areas CI50' VS OOOpw 
W. LONDON 2 bed llal tecepl 
we. IblsOk LIOCpu rjfln 
Pifm. R-ni-K 01 883 6JS7 
Open o Unt 

TOWN MAM Stun mo in 
bendrt's linkl esaminoljDti 
Srrliv peusil in London him be 
. giurt . Phone 0494 BSlMl 


CWCLSCA K n lqhHbrldgp. Brtgro- ' 
v m. Pimlwo. Weslmimler 
1 usum mins and flan aval): 
ante mi ■ kmmi or mon letv 
Pteave ring tor current IftL 
Cmiis e9 Buckingham Palace 
Rri SWT 01 820 8291 


S KEN. Thurtoe So SW7. Elegant' 
ruviirv lullv mm-S/CUal. own 

niliriiKe Near lube. Kuil rouDle 
■ - cingte Co trt only Mm 6 
mmillts C1200W 584 3373 


SUPERIOR FLATS ft HOUSES 

avail ft rend for dtpkimah. 
• ever wives Long ft short Ires ui 
all .itmv Lipinend 1 Ce 48. 
VUrtiuiU-SlUl 01499 5334 


CHELSEA Lanr' sludio. tupemi) 
lui nnhnf Ihrourtwul C120pw 
Trt oi 363 0489 
DBLE BEDSIT, nr Tube, own 
ktfcnra Hi pw call Em’re 
RenbiH 01 8H3 5467 
FREE SERVICE to kindlor*. ul|h. 
rfiium m N tiwaon. Cull e» 
nirss Rmlnls CH 883 5457 
GARDEN FLAT 1 'brdnn. rrrp. 

. phi'Hie. nr lule*. C70 pw Call 
own 7576 RmiM Gurae a nav*. 
KENSINGTON. Lux slwlm flat. 
LM TV rl< o -months C95 pw 
( .. irt ptrt Ol CTO 6681 
- LOOKING inr llte Mil llal. dir'. ’ 
ulex how in Loiidon? 
Lioo/ioaOnw Call Sfri 54S1 
MODERN .itHr laslvil. t38 PW Nr 
imv own Hirnen 686 757b 
Hriu.il dudr. 

NW 3 uni ItoiiM*- ni Tube. Him 
i.#yi Li an pw Cxpresv 
Riml.ds 01 8K3 5*57 
SW 7 Dninii luu. phone -jOn. 

, u'klitg. ur Ir.iin-CSOpu Renin) 
UUHle 6Ho 7576 unlll 7 pm 
THORNTON HEATH KHIS pels ok 
Hrtin IHKilie. udn. CI30 pw 
Reulal duife eHB 76766 Oats 
WE LET PLATS AND HOUSES 
C nui.n I f?H Isml Or Mirk Oaus 
W nolle ft Co 402 7381 


Law Report August 9 1 986 

Crystallizing a 
floating charge 


lawajniversity news 


29 


University of Sheffield degrees 


The following degrees are an- 
e Unive 


Jruversiiy of 


In re Brightlife Ltd 
[ Before Mr Justice Hoffinano 
(Jodgmcnt »ven July 24] 

. A floating charge created by a 
debenture could be crystallized 
into a fixed charge by notice 
under the agreement of the 
parties and not only by opera- 


difficult to think of any reason 
for ritaliing distinctions accord- 
ing to the moment at which the 
charge crystallized or The event 
which brought that about. 

Bui the Griffin Hold case 
revealed a defect in the drafting. 


nounced by the 
Sheffield 

Faculty of Arts 
BA 

Ancient History and 
Classical Archaeology 
PHarrft aiL A C Hyrrnr «a.i). s J 
SnHto d f w iUs ‘2.n. d r 
BulKTS 12 . 21 . M A Hum tSSi. K 
iaj». L J Murphy i»Tj a 

55^? &3X J L '=-«• E S 

Archaeology anti Prehistory 

J Ffw^pr ya). j> m Crav n < 157 ), c 


Madiematics/Pbilosophy 

Brwn i2.il O S WpifTtow i 2 j?j. 


KJ 

HAaanK6iw2.lL P 


K Binjon a.lji p C^WfaJiLt R 


E»t«DrtnA I2.IL M P EUison t2.IL K 
E FiNdra- I2.IL D N HOf&Sh t O H 
Howard i2.il M M pnc» 12.1 1 j l 
S rhwwniniNr 0.11. PL Smith «. u. 
ktnn . 211 . 1 j wan i 2 .il c m * 


3661 

Since the Griffin Hold case. 
Parliament had made many 
amendments to the Companies 
Acts, and passed two consol idat- 


bokler was entitled by notice to 
crystallize the charge at anytime 
before a resolution for voluntary 
winding-up and to be entitled to 
payment m priority to the 
. preferential creditors. 

Mr John Vallat for the liq- 
uidator Mr Richard M. Sheklon 
for the debenture holder, 
Norandex Inc; Mr John Mum- 
mery for the preferential cred- 
itors. 

MR JUSTICE HOFFMANN 
said the company had assets of 
about £40.000. but owed 
Norandex Inc. an American 
company, over £200,000. se- 
cured by a debenture of April 
1 1. 1983. and about £70.000 in 
respect of value-added tax. 

The debenture created a “first 
specific charge" over, inter alia, 
“all book debts and other 
debts", and also a floating 
charge over, truer alia, “the 
undertaking and all other prop- 
erty. assets and rights whatso- 
ever, present and future". 

Clause 3(B) provided that 
Norandex might at any time by 
notice * convert the floating 
charge into a specific charge, il, 
for example, il considered the 
assets to be m danger of seizure. 

Of the realized assets, nearly 
£18.000 came from the collec- 
tion of bode debts, and 
£19.000 was the amount that 
had been standing 10 the credit 
of the company's bank account 
The rest, some £2JOO was 
from sale of stock. 

Mr Sheldon said Norandex 
had a fixed charge over all but 
the £3200, and therefore prior- 


The Insolvency Act I98S (not 
passed at the date of the present 
transactions) had amended sec- 
tion 196, in a way that would 
prevent a debenture bolder serv- 
ing a crystallization notice and 
next day appointing a receiver, 
but, rather oddly, section 
6I4(2Xb) remained unamended, 
leaving the anomaly still 
remaining. 

Mr Mummery contended that 
the only events when crystalliza- 
tion occurred were fixed by law. 
and not by the agreement of the 
parties: they were (I) win din g- 
up.(2) appointment of a receiver 
and (3) ceasing to cany ore I 
business. 

He relied on In re Cromptc 
& Co Ud ([19141 1 Ch 954k 
Government Stock and Other 
Securities Investment Co v Ma- 
nila Railway Co ([1897] AC 81k 
Edward Nelson & ■ Co Ltd v 
Faber & Co ([1903] 2 KB 3671 
and Illingworth v Houldsworth 
([1904] AC 355). 

He also contended that public 
policy required restrictions 
upon what the parties could 
stipulate as crystallizing events. 
A winding-up or the appoint- 
ment ofa receiver would have to 
be noted on the register, but a 
notice under da use 3(B) did not 
need to be registered and a 
provision for automatic crystal- 
lization might take effect with- 
out the knowledge of either the 
company or the debenture 
bolder: and the result might be 
prejudicial to third parlies giv- 
ing credit to the company: see 
The Queen in Right of British 
Columbia v Consolidated Chur- 


Cooper (3rd) 
Biblical Studies 
M T Oinstiin-EdiwriB (2.1) P 
COKOn (2.1 >. L A NKiSsSn (iliD T 
mmn I2.1L 8 M Rawitns 12.1). r> 
SW«t I2.1L L J Slone 0.11 W H 
Thomas i2.lL P A Woitams 12.11. p 
CUbllt GL2J. M K Jordan s K 

j-fVtond 1 23V. Z l5S?te I2 !zl H S 

5ES. , ^ AV * ,son,2J, - CH 

Classical Civilisation 

J Port 21. 

En g li s h T atrpimro 
M Goodwin <2.1 L C ^NrtU2.1X S M 
w Reed <2.11. JM Rodway i 2.1L J L 
Bunoay l2-2i. V Drafcetey t22), K A 

C&. N Wftmnsion 

Englis h L i t e ratur e 

S R B Yarwoort (2.1), C P Barter 
S-J*- S-LfEi! r,e F, J 31 *. S V Britten 
C.1L M P Brown 12.11. j M Calthrsp 
a. UR G Clare 12.11. C H Cleaver 
12-11. S M ai l <2.1 L M Done I2.1L T 
Firm (2.1t. J O Conner I2.IL P R 
Gilson <2.1L C A Gonnet '2.1 L A X’ 
HlOQtm 12.11. T G Kelly i2.»». S M 
Law i2.ii. C J Lynn a'lt. S Marsh 
J2.IL J F Mils (2.1L JSR NeUleshtp 
J2.il. A J Odonnrtl 12.lL N J R s>ayne 
J2.i>. M H Raven hall <2.1L S M E 
RkWrtl t2.lL E M Rowe (2.1L E J 
Sneesby <2.1 1. J L Somerhetd ra.lx J 
L Swan (2.1). R M Tanershari (21 L F 
M Vocal <2JL S F Woods <2.11. M R 
Ansrombe <2.2L M L Baines tSJZL H A 
BaprtMer t2-2). J M Barlow 12SX L J 
Caiiaghan <22 l C a cnaswick <22 <. 
E. Connor i2-2>. C Demetnou f2i). W 
L Flatrtl (22). P M CIU '2-21. J M 
Cnnrtroo <22 1. K L Hudson <2-21. S C 
Jones <2-21. A C Klenczofi <2-21. D F 
MUb <2.21. c P Noon <2.21. J K 
Rowley <2.3L H SchollleM <2.2). C M 
Todd <2.21. S ToUiursi r2-2L J M 
walker tSSx A B ward 12-2). p A 
Watkins (2_2V. C M WdBon l ?.2i . D 
Wild (2-2J. T L Wllford (2.2). K J 
Wllkneka <22L R A Wllntolt 22. 

French Laagnage and Literature 

A H COX i2.1l S COnm (2.1 L J E 
Fisher 12.1 >. S J Green <2.1L D I 
Gubas 12.1L L E Hess (2.1). L M 
ink pen (2.1). P A Jarvis 12.1 L j Moore 
(2.1 ). S A Momsv (2.1). D J 
LYStilDvan (2.1 L H M RaicIlUe (2.1). s 
E Ranmbury (2.1). L j Duncan (2.2 1. 
H M Gtasoy (2-2L D S Mann <P 2> s 
Mrdouoall (2.2L C A Ry croft (2.2L A 
M Scotltri). H M F Scott 12.2LJ A 
Smart 12,21 R E Smilh <2-2L J W 
Williams (2.2L R A wollertOB 22. 

German Studies 

PM Birch rtslL J S Dunn d«L A E 
Ruse mi). P A Dwklnoon t2.X). E A 
Hayden <2.1 L A A Uovd (2.1L S L 
Skelton <2.1L S L Terry (2.1). E M 
Ward (2.1). p L F Crawford 22. 
History 

J D J WomfoM a si), c E Baker <2.1 ). 

P A Stowers <2.1). I P BraUslord (2.1L 
M Cal nan (2.1 1. T Clark (2.1). P A C 
Smith (2.1). $ K Dann i2.il S J Elliott 
<2.1 l G J Hogarth <2.1L R D Horton 
(2.1). C H (infer i2.1l A D Mcphee 
(2.11. D M Phoenrx (2.1). J L Rayner 
(2.1k A Richardson i2.r i. a M Roberts 


Pure 

L F O’Brien i 

R uss ian/Spanish 

T J Shirr, i <2li 

S pan csh/Bnsi ness Studies 
C J TurataamilsiL MDCfHkfln22i I 
R Stunner <2.2< 

Faculty of Pure Science . 
BSc 

Anatomy and Cell Bk»Ior> 

J COOPer <lslc L Farrar ilsii- J L 
Abbev 12.1 1: C R KKHM ‘2-1 c R 
Brooded (2-2): E M Coot- <2^i: T 
Freestone I2J3K M P McLeod HiU 
( 2 . 2 ) 

Animal & Plant Biology 
J M Haves (2.1 ). J C Bocrdn (2.2) R E 
Hill <2.2i: ft j Huooard <2.Zr J 5 Marr 
<2.2ii C J Simpkins (Z2L E J Small 
<2-2 ). M Thome <2-2L 

Biocbemistrj' 

' D Sharrorks llslr. 
Casidy t2.lt C 
.. Hodokinson iZ.li: 1C Hopkim i2.li: 
K Hughes <2.1): L M Hid me <2.1). R I 
Krtotell (2.1). J A K&sack i2-ir K 
Klirhm <2.1>: P J Lewis i2.il C H 
Br anion i2.lt R J SUMI 12.1 1: R J 


vy j; ««*»»• for example, that if the 

I m°Mr) 0f hdd‘ ta'lbToSmSy 1 ■ NDPertonsSSfyS 

I Division. ^ 'gggES&l 

voluntary liquidator either section: as. for example. 

Jf CTedl1 in in re Woodroffes (Musical 

debts and. other debts": that on 
the' true construction of the 
debenture in which those words 
occurred the charge created. 

■' n 8 Ans, but no anempt bad 

fSPfJL: ? 2^ ting been 1118(16 1(1 reverse the de- 

cnaigr. and that ihe debenture cision. 


Siut)t6 rs.it: D B Turner i2.n. M C 
Brady <2 Sr L C Gffibon I2.2L C B 
Grundy <2 2) 5 C Locked I2.2B 4 J 
Morris (2_2i. a P PoweU t2.2). A D 
Thornum <2.2): J A Lewis 1 3rd) 

Biochemistry & ChemistrT 

C B Baguley (2.1 k J B Raderts’ <2-l> 

Biochemistry & Microbiology 

H BenUey <2.1 1. S J Chapman <S.Hl 

0 Vi pond i2.li: D J Oetunan <2.2). 

Biochemsitrj & Phvsiology 

J A Bnitaui i2.li: S J Brown i2.li. L 
MCcctrston <2.1 1 . k A Goldberg *2.1 K 
J E MrLoughlin 12.1 CPC North <2.11. 
D L Pownail <2. 1 1: M SoudxdelU <2 1 1. 
» M Brannam *2.2 1. A J CarroB <Z£i. 
D C Croud >23). R A Mitrnrtl <2.2 c A 
F Mummy <2-2 r. C -J Prgman <2.2C P 
Burgess ijrdl 


ity over the Custom and Excise - chill Copper Corporation Ltd 
652). 


Commissioners. 

■His Lordship did not accept 
that submission. The bank bal- 
ance did cot fell within “book 
debts and other debts", as used 
hi the debenture, and he consid- 
ered that the rights over debts 
created by the debenture should 
be categorized as a floating 
charge. 

It was significant, his Lord- 
ship said, that Brighilife was left 
free to collect its debts and pay 
them into its bank account, and 
once there they were finely 
disposable .by the company. 
Neither Siebe Gorman & Co Ltd 


([1978] 5 WWR * 

But his Lordship did not 
think it was open to the coons to 
restrict the contractual freedom 
of parties to a floating charge on 
such grounds. The floating 
charge was invented by Vic- 
torian lawyers to enable manu- 
facturing and trading com pani 
to raise loan capital on debe 
tures. offering security of a 
charge over the company's 
whole undertaking, without 
inhibiting its ability to trade. 

. But the mirior image oC those 
advantages was the potential 
prejudice td the generafbody of I 


v- Barclays Bank Ltd ([1979], 2 creditors. ; who . might know. 
Lloyd's Rep J42k ror In re nothing of' the floating charge 


12.1). T S TOOTDe (2. 1 1. A J Wllkuwon 
•2.1). S ArxpnotU I2.2L J L Bennett 
(2-71. J E Cowev (2.2). S J Downey 
I2J3L D R Fowler 12 - 2 L C D Hfttton 
t22k N M Kerrigan (2J2L R C 
Mtm m oii £2.2). J A ruichol <2^L S J 
Pua*ey I2.2L R E Rainbow >2.2). S A 
Reeve (2-2). R M Riddick <2-2L J S 
Robmson (3.2). J L Senior (2-23. A 
Suidlfle (2-21. E M Woollen (2-2L S 
Cameron iSrdL D Clark (3rd). B M 
Moron (3rd). A Thram iSTOL 

Modern East European Studies 

V E Townsend 22. 

Latin 

A D I Taylor (2.1L A P Murray iz.il 
D G HI (Hard (2-2). A M Sutherland 22. 

Philosophy 

M Loogmtn (1*0. M I Daniels <2.1). L 
Slater I2.li. J P Ward (2.1). F I 
Bamowsid (2J23. A J Potter r2-2L S M 
Randies (2.2). J reUow* vSrtlL A J J 
Van der Rest (Pass). 

Russian Stndies 
C C Cork (2.1 L J Ward 21. 
Spanish Studies 

. - McConvUlr • 1ML A C Simpson 
12.1). E C Hayward (2-2). J W Maas 
(2-23. N MuroTO- I2J2L R S KMUI (2-2). 

-Bachelor of Music - 

K M Baker £2.13. H C Burns v2.lL Z C 
Davis (2. 1 ). H M Gulian Flrtetier (2.1L 
C A Hanes I2.UOA HawrybuK (2.1L 
J C Luck mi <2.1), J E Maugtian I2.1L 
J Nicholson (2.XL ' 


Keenan Bros Ltd ([1986] BCLC 
242). assisted Norandex s case. 

Alternatively, Mr Sheldon 
submitted that the floating 
charge was converted into a 
fixed one before the winding-up 


bur find that all the company's 
assets, including the very goods 
which they had just, delivered on 
credit, had been swept np by the 
debenture-holder. 

The public interest required a 


resolution. The notices -under balance- of- the- -advantage of 
section 293 of the Companies facilitating the borrowing of 


Act . 1948. convening the 
creditors' meeting for December 
20. were sent out on December 
4, 1984, but on December lO, 
Norandex sent notices • to 
Brighilife. (i) demanding pay- 
ment of£22L658. (ii) convening 
ihe floating charge into a spe- 
cific charge over all the 
company’s assets, and (iii) 
requiring the execution, pursu- 
ant to clause 13. of ah assign- 
ment by legal charge of those 
assets. 

Mr Sheldon relied on In re 
Griffin Hold Co Ud ([1941] Ch 
129) which decided rhai Uie 
priority given by statute to 


money against the possibility of 
injustice to unsecured creditors. 

The arguments for and 
against the floating charge were 
matters for Parliament rather 
than the conns, and had been 
the subject of public debate in 
and out of Parliament for more 
than a century. 

Parliament had responded by 
restricting the rights of the 
holder ofa floating charge, and 
requiring public notice of its 
existence and enforcement, and 
in various statutory provisions. 
Parliament's limited and prag- 
matic interventions made it 
wholly inappropriate for the 


preferential debts applied only if courts to impose additional 
there was a charge still floating restrictions on the ground of 
at the moment of winding-up. public policy. 

It followed that if the deben- It was certainly not for ajudg* 

turn holder could manage to of first instance to proclaim a 
crystallize his charge before new head of public policy which 
wmding-up. the preferential no appellate court bad even 
creditors had no priority, under hinted at before, 
section 614(2)(b) of the Com pa- His Lordship would therefore 

nies Act 1985. On the other respectfully prefer the New Zea- 
land, in the usual mo- of ^nd Supreme Court decision in 
crystallization before winding- in re Manurewa Transport [ Ltd 
up, namely by the appointment ([1971] NZLR 909). recognizing 
ofa receiver, they might still be the validity of a provision for 
entitled to priority under section automatic crystallization, to the 
J9& ’ contrary dicia in the Canadian 

His Lordship said that both case above, 
sections originated in the His Lordship would therefore 
Preferential Payments in Bank- declare that the debt secured by 
rupicy Amendment Act 1897. the debenture ranked in priority 
One imagined that they were to the preferential debts in 
'intended to ensure that in all respect of all assets in the hands 
cases preferential debts had of the liquidator, 
priority over the holder of a Solicitors: David Sprecher 
charge originally created as a Grier & Co: Unklateis& Paines: 
floating charge. It w ould be Treasury So licitor. 


S J Meteor 12.1). a 

R N W Stolth (2-13. R~M Taytor (2.1). 
R TOWN- i 2 U K F De Conrrtcao 
12.2). S M Dlntfp 12^3. X M Ford 
(2-2). A M Gtanbr 12-23. L D Jones 
•221. P J Kirk (2-2). C H Mowie C2-23. 
E F J Saundm (2-23. L j stannapr 
V2JU. 1 M -Stepltoitsan .<2.2). J E 
Switzer (22), t_ f wright <i2L A M 
McDonald iftnlL N J Woodman (Pass). 

... BA ..." - 

Ancient History/ 
Archaeology and Prehistory 
R N Ben (Pass) 

Ancient History/ 

Biblical Studies 

G A WlUson (2-2) 

Ancient History/ 
Classical Civilisation 

N D Bieazan) <2-1/. A M Brewer (2.1L 
L J Cook (2.1). S J Pair i3.»L C D 
RMetulgh cz.ii. A J Walton (Z4L L M 
Watt on (2-1). R A Carnegie (2.2L N B 
Keller 122). 1 J Lowe <2.23. J W 
Mather (2.2L S B Pyne (220. M j 
Wilson (3rd). 

Ancient History/ 
Medieval History 

H W Elton (2.1). C-A Decks (223. S 
Hardy (2.2L A L Hutchinson (22). 
Archaeology and 
Prehistory/Geogntpby 

S A Cox list). A Snowdon <2.1L T L 
SudeU <2.ik I K George (22). 
Biblical Studies/ 
Classical CIviHsatiod 

H C Lawrence 12.1) 

Biblical Stndies/Ei^Esh 

C J Askew (2.23. 

Enclish/French 

S M HalsaH i2 2t. 

English/Hisrory 

.. _ . iwcomhe <2. IL C J Barham <2.1J. 
M P Powell (2.1). S Ctaylott (22). S L 
Tanner i2^j. 

English/Italiaa 

V L Parker 12-2L 

Engltsb /Philosophy 
N C Brookes i2.1l 

English /Spanish 

E A DUS <2.11. ■ 

English Langnage/EnaGsh Lit . 
D L YulU <1 six E J Hall ra.lL W J 
Kenny <2.1L K M P Grlndley (22k M 
P Mrtoone <2^>. 


JR JBDarkwell Hue 6 R Daoum 
<2.1L D O Saw <2.1 c R E Booth (2 .21: 
K Edwwds \22r. H J Tasker 1 22t G 
W uicock t22i. 

Chemical Ph>-shs 

R H Johnson <isii: S A Hocking <2.1 L 

Chemistry 

G E Bail list): J D Crane Hsti: C E 
Dairy <IMk C I Lindsav Hsli: K J 

a dvwnb (1st). K A Masoh HUr. A 
rauley (lsir C A Nirklin <itu. D 
pyalt (IMl S J Renals *««i. J P 
Rourke <wi. J Vtrdcn clsti M C 
WlUums <2.11- J P Adam 12 II: J T 
Carter i2.1i. A FuMord <2 S». R P 
HPWill i2.tr R M HikJer *2.1 <: S E 
Hunl <2 |r. H R Juftb (21* S I 
Kilrhen (2.1 1: J C Mawk-Oeck <2.1 <: S 
D Miodleioo 12.1 1. M J Poole <2.1 <• C 
RJdguftv <2.1 1. P Tailor .2 !■: M J 
William* >2 i < DR Adams >2 2i. J a 
BN umonl 12.2k- P G Bums <2 2*. 5 C 
Bond <2.21. W ft Crovstand <2^<. M 
Gamer 12.2k A J Gasratgne <22i. N J 
Ciuan (22t: a Giaroieks *2.2 1 S A 
Hooe (2.21: D ft Ramiwon <2-2( J 
Lead better i22t. J Marsh <2 JI.TSP 
Mills (2.2 1: S C F North i22i. G A 
Parker (2-2i S Parkinson <2J)i. I E D 
smith i2.2i. M l BurtTidoe > 3rd». s P 
coales (3rd): D R Lund <5rdi. P J 
Renos (3rd) I c WMittaker <3rdc N 
Bud worth iPassi 

Chemistrv & Phyuoloey 

J K Gledstone <2.1 n ft M Parsons 
<2.11: P C Russell <2.11. 

Com paler Science 
M A Shackleion Osti. G W under- 
wood list): A S Dickinson <2.1 1. P A 
Grubb i2.tr. K Hamson <2 1*. ft 
hcinwai <2.11: R k-nagq l2.1l:D A P 
Mitrnetl <2.n. M Paart <2 1>. G s 
Per tons <2.1 K ! J Baker Barratt <2.2<: 

C M Dun fold <2 2k 5 M K Hussain 
<2J?i:T r Leonard -Jones (2.2j: T E 
Owen <2J?>. M A Sykes <2.21. C L 
L* other (22) C C Allen <5rdi. N D 
Uovd *3rd): M p Mounienei iSrdi. R 
D Poller (3rd); P H Wnghl <3rdl: O K 
A Van (3rd). 

Computer Science & 
Mathematics 

S A Connor <isii: E P Darnell (2.1k C 
Dyball (2.1): D M Schwartz (2.1 L R P 
D Mllrhrtl <2. 2) S A Beatty (3rd): M 
Pushpangadan <3rdi. 

Computer Science & Statistics 

l J Staler <2 2>. 

Genetics 

A I F BULemore tlsli: M L Creenarre 
(1st): J M Snlnk (1st): P F Watson 
list): i Oementsi2.il: F Dypri2.lL D 
P Cruer t2.ll: S A RKtoe 12. U: K A 
Rldgeon i2.li; C J Russell <2.1 K C A 
Shippey (2.1i: J K Bowker (2.2R J 
Golden i2^i. A HUIman *2.2r. D L 
Mura Ford (22K S A Naik (2.21: P W F 
Strutt (22k M M Town <3rdl. 

Geography 

S J Perkins cm): J A Pomeroy (1st): A 
Burrows (2.H: D Carver <2.1*: M A 
Cuotoon <2.1): P N Fowies i2.lt: M R 
Fuller <2.1): D R Holmes I2.H: C 
Jolley i2.ir. E J A Landy (2.11: S J 
Miller I2.lt: C Phillips <2.1 ): C 
Wharton l2.t>: J M Alnscough i2J2k C 
E Batilwtck (22): CAL Brown V22Y. 

S A Carly <2.21: S P Chadwick <2^*: S 
R Dav les \2.2Y. J D J Evans <2.2L D J 
Fagfi 122 r. c k Georoe (22). F J 
Grosso <2J?): S A Hawley (22k C E 
Just <2^1: S Lusrolt Evans |2J2): S P 
Morns (2.2 k S Robertson <2.2V S R 
Smith (22K I G Stephens (2.2k M A 
Taylor i2-2i: j V Dartey -A3rdL O-- 
' MMkte (Zaa). 

Geology 

M F B Chambers (lsn C M BJ entail 
(2.H: T M Brooks -i2.lt F M OoBlns 
(2.11: -T H F Cuntbertand (2.1k C 
Holliday 12.1k B J F htorth f2.l j; K D 
Rawnsiey l2.lt: R B Scott ra.uT A: 
Soto) an i2.l): C J Stewart (2.U: O S 
Wray i2.1k S A H Vtoung 12.1k M E 
Andrews (22Y. P J Brovh wood (22T. S 
K Blundell (2.2 c I A Cramo (22X P 
Crowscto <22K S J Fallon (22t. H R 
Fox l22k C Jewllt (22K J A Keen 
(22K R K Reed (22): v M Saundm 
12 2k H Stnnott 1 22K A Straker (22). 
Geology & Physical _ 

. Geography — 

. L C Georae list), a C Beettiam <2.«1: 

M S Berrtvord i 2.1L T P Firth 12.1k 
M C Gallon (22 r. c Creett v2.li: H R 
While CP.1L K J Burtson (22k D N 
Cray- (22). 

Landscape Design & Plant 
Science 

C J Citrine <2.1 1: R H Lonodin i2.1k T 
J MfCann v2.n: K A Nelson 12.IK C 
Robinson <2.1 v. P C Teller i2.lv a N 
Cleaver (22): C J Farrier (2.2V N A 
Newbury (2.2k R S Payne (22r. P L 
Yam (22). 

Mathematics 

S N Pearson clsti: I Sandman tlsik H 
j Swiaiek ilsii: I P Thomas list): R D 
Avery (2.11: C Bailey <2.1i: M J 
Blackball <2.1 1: A M Blake (2.1V P 
Grassland tz.ir. R M Disiev-JonK 
i2.lt D Evertnglon <2.1L K J Gamer 
I2.il: P J Homes <2.Ik L trwing (2.1 1: 

A E Maunews <2.1 1: ft L 
Mounts evens i2.lv J a Nakiefeki 
(2.IK C M O'Donnell <2.1 K A J Owen 
12.1 1; T M Riley <2.1 ). I Simpson i2.i>: 


<2.21 DMA Rnqers <2J>< .» M 
Runerklrs .? 21. ft |. Smilh i2.2t L % 
.Sanofll <2.?i B M Snur«eon i2.2i T R 
sireiion -2.2k J t Tavinr I2J?<: S 
WaikfT <2 2* CD Boles Cedi 

Zoology & Genetics 

ft K PHIII: P J R.-rt<vrfk |2.1): SMR 
ftrrtlluld «2.2r L P Pindai <2.2< 

Combined Hons in Science 
Subjects 

C Calkwiun <2 ii. D w CiuniDrtv 
<2.2r B J Mould no <?.2r. L M Prtir 
<2?i: □ j God i ie\ iSiru M P Simms 
•3rdt: N M rarttou iPassi. 

Applied' 1 Mat hematieft- 
Astronomv Comb Sici 

R Mondal (22) 

Applied Ma i hematics- Phys- 
ics Comb Sci 

N W Cowgrrthwaue <2 It. S Fertvrttk 
>2.1 1 A-N Houldsworth 12 jl 

Astronotny-Cbemistry Comb 
Sci 

S N walker i2.li 

Aslroootn> -Electronics Comb 
Sci 

I S Bone * 3rd i 

Astronomy -Phvsics Comb Sri 

C Willork <2.2 k I M WynaiHts <2^1. 

Astronomy-Pure Mathemat- 
ics Comb Sci 

D J Cove '2.2' 

Chemistry -Pure Mathematics 
Comb Sci 

C J Clqey tlsli: G R Renwirk <2.1 1 

Computational Maths-Phys- 
ics Comb Sci 

P G k'mghu ilsii 

Electronics-Physics Comb Sri 

A P Dairy I2.2L V V K Pandva iPavsi 

- Geography-Pore Mathemat- 
ics Comb Sd 

C L Lorkin i2.it 

Geoiocy'Phjws Comb Sci 

a p J unite <2.21. 

Geology-Pure Mathematics 
Comb Sri 

J C EwtunL <2.1 > K P Holllum (22> 

Physics-Pure Mathematics 
Comb Sci 

D SjtmM <3idi S R OUrv iPav.i, 

Mathematical Stndies 

D Clupnun <2.1 < J L Pill i2.li. L ,t 
ftllrn <2 2*. C J Egcili-MOn >22) G L 
E i am i2 2i. M J Golding i2 2> l J 
Hrnrv l2.2i- M R knilnna '2.2i s A 
L.iw-jjn i2J*i- N B I >-w n (2 2i SI s 
MrCowen >2.2 V ft H MrGtodderv 
•2 2( T M Powell <2 2*. L J RoOtiwot 
<2 2* O ft Slough I2.2L E R M Stocker 
<2.2i.P J Trill well (2.21. \ R West 
(2-2i: f M Wilkinson i2.2i J Wnaht 

<2 2< S F AvpinaJI lirdl- S C Rale*. 
'3rd> ft ft M Diptoek >3rdi G L (inn 
■3rdl. H F rnrVuw <3rdi J C Lew-tv 
< 3rd*. D 4 Ne.uh iSrrti N B Kordin 
•3rdi S D Rove i3rd<. G Vvjkon Urdi. 
W Wotvon (3rd). Z H ft Hnujn iPjsm 
S K Had iPaui. j t Hoti >Pjwi. a j 
NUG ulre iPj»i. a N Overton <Pasto. 
M J South (Passi- K J Somerville 
■Paul. T J Wadsworth vPav>< 

Faculty of Medicine 
and Dentistry (Med) 
MBCB 

Bachelor of Medicine 
and Bachelor of Snrgcry 
Clinical Medicine 

Honour*: E C Sevan. K J Cvrantl 
Paw F M Abemelhy. J M Adams. C E 
A I her lev . A J Avery. T I Aw. D J M 
Baker. L J Barlielo. M Barnes. S A 
Ban all. A K Ballunon. R L Brttnell. R 
P Bennett. G L Benson. M C Blalas. G 
L Black. S H Bosi oc k. C M Bow ns. L 
M Brenna. M B Biowr. A D Bull. S J 
nurkimhaw. S c Burton, p j 
Campbell. K B Challen. R D Chappie. 

J Chittenden. M T Clarke. C Clinton. 

D J Counts. M A Cooper. P J Corke. J 
■ Co (lorn, P j Cowan F ft Cowte. G J 
Davenport. T D Dickson. A M 
Doneqasi. J J Edwards. K N Elks. B K 
English. F E Femur. M A CalLmher. 
ft E Gilliland. R c CrrntrU. s r 
Hancock. J Harhan. J E Hardv. W n 
H arrison. C l Hawley. A Hejiort R I 
F Hrnrv'. D R HUI. T C Hodqkmson J 
P Hopcrott D I Hulchtnson. Ah 
kmowi. M R Jabczyitski. J Ft Jagger. 
O-S James. Ris Jebb. C M Jpdtoaie. 

A K Joto. S Johl, J Johnston. G E" 
Johnstone. H S Jones. J Jones. M E 
Ketsall. A S Krtshlker. N L Kidner. K 
P C Kinddsn. A j Kuroirt. P J 
Lawson -Mauttew . c A Lear. C H L«*. 

S M Levick. P J Ljomtoot. R N 
Lonsdale O M Lyons. S E Macdonald. 

S P Mrguiness. L C Mear. N A Milner. 

A c Monmef. C J F Moore. P H N 
Morion. R J Mugqlrlon. A NKol. A M 
Korns. B E Non &. c O'Malley, a J 
O'Rourke, d M Pen. r Petnnger. N w 
Palmer. M S Parry. R Paid. R H 
Pal on. A J Penrose. AMS Prterson. 

S J-Pill. F A Pounder. G Proyag. C L 
PnesL P J Pnnsi. a Puv an- Is war an. a 
R amlord. S Ramqoolani. P K Randev. 

W J Reeves. J L Richmond. S M I 
rpherts. J R Rooinson. J N Roddick. N 
Roqan. N E Rotherham. J B 
W Sadler. J L Schindler. C R 


Electrical EncnWiTinB 

CtiSt I: M P 1 urih-i 

Class 7 (Dm I) X H.iul.i-1. L3 M H 

vt.iim.-u-. p i Mopklioirx- 

Clais z (Dnr III: U \ \ Deiiu-lsoonulkw 
Clau St j R l'anttvirsv 

Chemical Process Engineering 

OU< 3 <ptvl>:R D r Desnv.t JkH 
Us M P Gi.ihI s M Hi.dtVi. U R 
Milieu ft I 'iinn-v 
Class 9 (Div II); M Hushrtl J V M 

(.Iviii. \l I* Dav k-s J H Hards. *» p 
kamrii37din.il i [) K Purins 
PUK T k ft Rogers 

Mechanical Engineering 

Um 1: 4 R Hitii-i | k k L.im 

cats 2 rim i); p l Bid. i y r Hail, d d 

Ii.iII N ft kiln; M C M.imol! s H 
Millward D H Mnme V iKhU n £1 VI 
Chveii P Ki dll l is, il i |1 H Rouli-v- RG 
OshiMiH- Shill i- J R hlisino «kie It B 
'sltmo.wt- ft k Wartut-tiM, SM Watts. 
S C: Vlliqhl 

Clasi 3 (Dw II); ft fkiker. R G 
Hisiumnnl. G R Cook. P J Danes: DC 
IL-e. ft DWfiMlrtis. J ft rortl S L Hull 
I C M.irlin S i Mallison. p Mrtluxk. P 
tt Morns S O Knllv ft M Russell, i; 
R sand's i(h. D C Swinnenun. c m 
1 lirnei K j riiTIHT tt MMt MM. C 
ft Ward S G Wvdfthurv 
Class x -\ -uimnd k c itemnun. ftl J 
ILnev D H Mcuikin. n P.ULkliniimou 
R I Smilh. W ft Wirosmiin s» m 

Wiiii.ims 

Pass: p j Ronnen s Coodrnild. P $ 
Kenned). P J Hilrhie 

Bachelor of Techniral Science 
Control S'tfemi and 
Computing Science 
Gian z roi« If): ft w Dunning M G W 

s. .1 M ‘ — 


Juiti-s. 


Lomas 


Master of Engineering 
Materials Process Engineering 

N M G-iuci. J G lamu-MHi P R m I 
Muibhv. J tt Nrw Ion S J Paul. L) C 
D Wish 


Facnlry of Malrriah 
Bachelor of Metallurgy 
MeLallurgv 

Ckus t: M J Coov D I kunihl N O 

hnnlh' J E J Vs adsw ur Hi 

Cure a (Do I): M H-rrv . d h 

H.iltoarth r L KnJIm.av R N 

Iduniiri- P G Plaiili-iira- L) 
X.uSrton T Walinsh-v ttJHtt alli-r. T 
ft umlidL.'l 

Wan 7 (Dm ID: ■ r r,.r*m I n 
HiHlntw- ( \ Jums K n Mtlk-iis P M 
P.idlu-ld .1 I ISudt- S \ \v.ilh-l 
Clare X M r ILirb.i UButtink PA 
\ Mom h 

Past: ft II flantillnn. ft J Javksou 

Bachelor of Technical Science 
Science and Technology of 
Glasses 

Clan z (Dw 1): iv p o<- Dmion 

Science and Technology of 

Materials 

Clare l: S P Auok-t un) L ft Ctunn r L 
Kniuni 

Clare a (Dm I): I R Crosinu P .1 Os on 
LI Hi-iim-. E L Huiih'l k H LruiMJ R 
M. <1 tow . V R Moiifcill. I Nu (it 
Oats 7 (Dtv II): J p B,Ml(nrk L D 
ILUlurd P D Ldm- k liippill. J ft 
I uni. L M H.ili lilti* G M Slixkwrll 
Clare AMD HlhiIhs U M U T 

I IVnldll P R IT my 
Past: ft Ihrhumsun J C Tailor 

Science and Technology of 
Polymers 

Clare a (Dw II): M J Gaskin 

Arrnuptinc & Fin Maaacement 

tUMMU B I Lit H— « < I si I (7 llunon 
i2.Ii. I nirkinwiii i2 i > M rihrvn 
<2.1 L M Purnrvt <2 1i. k I H.-jion 
<2 l>. H Lo* i2 1 ■ D M< Is ills <2 It G 
Miijwuid <2 I < M rilsloni- *2 1 ■ H 
Ckurr <2.2>. (V Good <2.2< N Lev ell 
(?2r ft l.ur.rt <2.2< T N\ Is rsli-r (2.,'t 
K Willi jins i22k N Sntonmn <3rd>. D 
A krllv iPitoSI. 

MattHHuaucs. I Hiiirninviii <2.U R 
ft War mm on <2.1 1 S Di-ar <2.2. j 
Uuuir 12.21. C vail <lrr VinH <2.2i. 

Business Studies. Japanese 
_ _ Studies 

C Gltolr- .2 11 J know It-, <2.11 J 
HuMTAiall <2 11 C D Slone (2 2). D 
Sihuroh <3rd* 

Economic & Social-History 

EcanoiMci:: A .svt'uihM n urdi. 

Caotraphy: M M Bortwl <2.1 > 

<2.2. s Butts .2 2* 


J B.iiM'rHf <2.1 < C Brown 

<2.1 1. K WhilPtMsad <2. ir ft OmwnHs 
<2^1 

Econ & Soc Hivr 
Pomoai Th & inn i Gibson ■ 2.11. N 
Plillord i2.lt.- M ttmvr i2.li. C 
Llllwistk* <2.2*: S Hudson <2 2l. P 
Janies <2.21: R Johnson <2.2t: R 
Murray (22 1. 

Sociology 

JWMMm.lstL C Snebon <2.2r C 

WfHIS l2a^l. 


Economics 


Roqan. 1*1 E Roiherham. J B Ryan. D 

W Sadler. J L Schindler. C R Scott; N rnnnim— "i ' ifiiiEiH 

R p&sAr^Kifsass: . rSBP!® “ 


N^lewart. R P Slut 
ylor. 


90EI W** 


*V , Vrtanla?' ft A X*>yrt> pictott (2.2 f K While 
• HMhS'fH PhUreo ph y ft Pnlrhdrd <2 1 1 
jHfftWard.CH PrtUeatTWy A Inst m Coda (2.4I7S 


, P K .TImi 

. J Turner. 

Wan Of n. E C Walker. 

WiutarriswL D C WilscS: S W *i£iA! 
A D Wo! km. A L Wi - - 


r% 


rtd i2.I>: 


w 


K C Simpson <2. Ik- H C Topping (2 .1 ■: 
C Wooum v2.li; D G Wren <2.1 v h M 
wnghl t2.lL A J Brown <2-2*. N A 
Bryan (22K M Carter (2.2Y. M S M 
CockF (22K C J -Corn mi ns (22): A D 
Connolly <2.21; D E Connor 12^1: L J 
Coo oer (22): R Curler i2.2>: M P East 
(22): DM Fox <2.21: H R Coyfrr (2.2L 
E A G CUmore (22K J Hanley <2 2>. P 
D Hills <22): C J KoiUner <2.2): C G P 
Krauyhar (22): p j McGhee i22>: J P 
Mrtmvre 122); R A Navarro i2.2»; M 
L Paierson (2 2); S M Prtlchard <22): 
C M Read <2J!l: J M Read <2.2t: P 
Smart (2.21: M I Somerville <2.2L P C 
P Tertora <2.2i: D L Thompson <2.2*. 
K M Walkixtson I2.2L T WDinfleld 
<2Jfi: D J Wiles (2.21: A Cask in .3rd*: 
B Kumar (3rd): R Lorkbeod i3rdr S M 
Powiry I3rdt I H R Rae (3rd): s P 
WhlleUw (3rdL M R Cresswell iPassL 
H 1 Morgan (Parer. R Simpkin (Pass*. 


A D Wouon. A L woodmanscy. P A 
Woodmansry. D A Woods. J P Wyatt 

BMed Science 
Bachelor of Medical Science 
Bw > -<°h •>: M E dements: G S 
.JoJI^A Le Boullllier: A D Moctted: M 
F Palmer: C T Topping 

8 K Otarts: J A 
DfSHt; H 5. Harnter: S A Holden. B A 
Modena: J D Saunders; J C Stew 
Clare 31 R J Ikaml 
Paw L J Wood 

Facnlty of Medicine 
and Dentistry (Dent) 

BDS 

Bachelor of Dental Snrgery 
Clinical Dentistry 

Hanons: N F Hertesy. j G Pearson 
Pare: K O Davies. B a Bailey. D R Be- 
am. P J Bottom. R D Brocklesbv. A P 
Covne. M R Dixon. L w R Dugmore. 
M J Fagan. E A F arrant. N J A Grey. 
TJCHiH-CS Homs. I d Harm. JC 
Holmes. B Huggins. T C Imbush. H A 
Jones. R Kirk. CM j Klrkpainrk. R E 
Loslen. Uovd. M J Martin. G 
McEsoy. B Mtlllic. C J Murphy. R D 
Kakielny. E H Nichols. A E North. D 
C H Parker. S Paid. M n Pemberton. 
T B PKkenng. M J Prllchord. I 
Simpson. A Sood. H J Slawickl. J A 
Slorev. P J SlraUord. D A Wane. C G 
WdUouiion. S J wood. S M Yales 

Faculty of Law- 
Bachelor of Law 
Law 

U J P Donnelly: I P Loader: J M 


GMv I): D P Barter: R C 
J ft' Barnes; 


Microbiology 

*1» E M VaUir 



Times Portfolio Gold rules are as 
follows; 

1 Times Portfolio is free. Purchase- 
of The Times vs not a condition of 
taking pan. 

2 Times Portfolio list comprises a 
group Of puDMc companies whose 
shares ore Usied on Uw Slock 
Exchange and auoied in The Times 
Slock Exchange prices page. The 
companies comprising that its: s*»Ul 
Change from day lo day. The hsl 
iwturt ts numbered l - oat is divided 
Into (our randomly d&ttibuied groups 
of li Shares. Every' Portfolio card 
contains two . numoers )rom each 
group and each card conjoins a 
unique of number? 

3 Times portfolio -dividend" wlil be 
me figure in pence wtuen reoresents 
Ihe opUmam mov pmeitl In prices (l.e. 
Ihe largesi increase orWwpy low)M a 
comunauon ol eighi iiwo (ram each 
randomly dtswltjufedgrtup wlUvln Use 
«« sharrei of the 04 snares wuch on 
any one day comprise The Times 
Portfolio INI. 

4 The dally dividend wui be 
announced, earn day and Ihe weekly 
dividend will be announced each 
Saturday In The "nines 

5 Times Portfolio list and details of 
me doll) or weekly div Mend won also ; 
be available for Inspection at the 
offices .of The Times. 

6 ir Ihe overall price' movement of 
more lhan one romMnatton of shares 
equals ihe dividend, the Dnre will be 
equally divided among IDF claimants 
holding mono comoi nations of shares. 

T An nat ms are suuect lo scrutiny 
before payment Any Times Portfolio 
card Hut is defaced tampered wiui or 


11 If for any reason The Times 
Prices Page b not published in the 
normal way Times Portfolio will be 
suspended Tor that day. 

Has id play - Dttty Dhrtosad 
On each day your unique set Of eight 
numbers will, represent commercial 
and induunal shares putxtsned in The 
Times Portfolio Hsl which will appear 
on ute Stock Exchange Prices page. 

In Ihe columns provided next lo 
your shares note the pnee Change <+ 
or -i. in pence, as published hi mai 
day s Times. 

After I tiling the price changes of 
your etghl shares lor that day. add up 
all ettjTH share changes to give you 
your overall loval plus or minus i+ or - 
I. 

_ChecL vour overall total aaairtn The 
Times Portfolio dividend publbhed on 
me Slock Exchange Prices nape 

H your overall iota) matches The 
Times Portfolio dividend you have 
won outnghf or a share of the total 
price money staled for lhai day and 
must claim your prize as inururied 
below. 

How (0 pin - Weekly p M B e n tf 
Morsdav Saturday record your dally 
Poriiouo total. 

Add these together io determine 
your weekly Portfolio local. 

If your (oral nuiches Ute published 
weekly div Mend figure vou have won 
oulTighi or a share of the prize money 
staled for Dial week, and must claim 
your prize a» Instructed below. 

How to uwm . 

TlU phi ii The Timas Porttodo Malms 
kna 02S4-S3273 .bHtWNI |MHB Hid 


KSSSW" “ ■ ^ ^ ** ■ * ssa vur 8&SX&2S. 

8 Emplovees of NewsIniernaiMHiai ££« —to- ommda Hire, 

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dividend claims 


C A-M Loefke (22k 
English Langnage/La ri n 
T D Coburn (22). 

English LangttBge/XJngnxstks 

A E Healey (22). 

Fnitch/Busiaess Studies 

SS emits • iso. C A ArUand v2.l>. K A 
Arnold i2.lv. O N Casey <2.1*. A 
Collins <2.1 L J DybaU (2.1). D 
Colliding (2.1L C A Green <2.13. A J 
HUrhborn (2.1L A L Lee (2.1). A C 
Serrombe i2.li. A J Wood (2.1L C A 
Cragg (2.21. M C Dixon (2.2k A J 
Tawney <2.21. 

French/Economics 

$ M Cayion (2.1). A C Hill (2.1). 

Freoch/German 

J D Cooper (1st i. R J Brown (2.IL S A 

P astes i2.l). B Goulds (2.1). J K 
Mmi(46n (2.1). J Vella (2.1). G 
(Vrlghi <2.11. J M BarweU <223. J 
Brontgan (2.2). J M Eaton <2 jiTh s 
C lavier 122). C A Johnson (22). M, A 
Maiach <2.21. w.S.Montmer >2.2). K J 
M Phipps (22k G C Rowley <22k A 
Shape (22 1. D W Wilde (22). H A 
Armstrong (3rd). 

Frendi/I talon 

LAS Turner i islk AFC Aqlus <2.tL 
B 5 Hau i2.il J R Cacace (22), S L 
While (22). 

French/Lingpistics 

A Mrk'efUi <2.1 L 

French /Music 
J D Coe (2.1). A J Coe 02). 
Fmch/Polirical Theory & Inst 

CJ Robson (2.1LPFJ Heal its (22LS 
J ward 1221 

French/Rossian 

H Chow <2.li. T M Wood (2.11. 

French/Sphnisb 

M A dblln (2.1 1. A J Hlncftiey <2.1). 
Y R Mllrhrtl ca.l i. C ft' Newnham 
(2..H. S M O'Connell <2.1 l P A a 
A lknSson (22). J M Barker (22). J A 
Dawson 12.2). D ft Anderson Smith 
<2 2k 

German /Econom ic$ 

C L Smith <2.1 l JD H Fenner (2^) 
German/Linguistics 
|-J Furber (22t. Y Salat (22) 
German/Music 
S M Norman <2.l). 

Gerntan/Eussian . 

D R Lee <2.1i. J .ft Livesley <2.1). A J 
Campbell <S2). C D Seal <221. 

U ngnistics/ Japanese 

J M Thuriow- i2.lt. A F Bril iSrdi 
Modern History/Japanese 
M S Davies i2.ik 

Modem Hist on/ 
Political Thcorj and Inst 

S Connor (2.1 1. W M Corcoran <2.11. 
M W Holden <2.11, K C H James (2.1 l 

S T Keo-ttHi i2.lt. - A A Srczertnak 
I k C E U’horlow <2.t). W F Arbury 
12.2k T P O'Sullivan 1 2.2). A R Wood 
( 22 ) 

Philosophy/Spanish 

S Kills 1 1*11 


I StantfleM <lslk E M Walling <m»: S 
C Cavanagh (2.1 r. P _N Edging* on 
<2.11: C A Gore <2.1 1: D L Laughton 
i2.1 <: I Singleton (2. P: T'Amm <2-21: F 
C Asttli (22). S C Courtney <2^1: M G 
GUUgan <2.2r C A Creator* <2.2l: D R 
J Rahman (2JZK D A Rooms 17.21: p 
A Wilde i22i: N Reeves <3rdi. 

Natural Envrroniiieotal 
Science 

G P Bishop <2.1). J FCredtond <2.1 r. R 
A Cults <2.1*. A M Fordei2.lL B Hunl 
€2.1); R A Potter I2.IJ: J M Robinson 
<2.1*: T A Acuna (2.2>: PGDc Jono 
<2.2k S K Ferns <2.2 • R A Fraud 
(2 2 ). R J Guild 12.21. D I Hamwon 
■2.21. S J Mart land i2.2> I F Michael 
■2.2): J R Pearson i2^>: D w wiuiams 
<2.23. 

- Pharmacology St Chemistry 
C J Emerson <2 1 >. QA Pan iron <2.2*: 
B A Shaw (22k C C Whitaker <22* 

Phvsic? 

M R Dmsdale il«):\l K Griffiths ilsr. 
E M MOran i Isle J M Saxlon ilsii. D 
SwbeM (lsl>: Sv t E Togg «ini. m s 
W nghl Hsl*: M L A1UII t2.l i: M Brown 

- ir j Cunuie ( 2 . 1 j: 

_ i 2 .ii. r k 

Germgn <2.11. M P Haboil i2.l). S E 
Hjvward <2.1 »: C F Hoitord <2 1LJ D 
Jury >3.1 1: O Loir <2.IL PAL Morey 
*2.11: X) E ~ ' “ ' 


i2.lt: T Copnetl <2.1 r i Cx 
8 Dolan i2.li. L night 


D E Paiireyman , *2.1f. 
Porter <2.1 <: M J Revnotas > 


.... D A 

. <2.1 k S D 

Rodman '2.D: C M Staler (2.1): A c 
Strange <2 . IL G M Thomas (it f D E 
V atgn! <2.1*: A BOVS (22). P T 
Cawtnorne i2.2): M C Daniels '22\ P 
I Davies <2.2i: D A Franklin «2.2>. S J 
Harragnv (2.2*. J W Ltney <2 2c I R ■ 
Ma»r* (2.2*. L E CL Penn <22) J M 
Turner <2 2k O ftorrier *22* S C 
Wllrock <2.2»: S C Archer <3rdL T D 
Baker Ortt D J W Barren (3rdi: K 
Counts * 3rd i M D Lang <3rdi. M S 
May <3rdr. M Norman i3rd>: S D 
PursQlove *3rdr C B Romnson iJrai. R 
f wood * 3rd*. R J woodland <3rdt: A 
C Chariton (Pas*L C J Davidson 
iPffiU £ G Daves lPassi M I Mongou 
(Patoi: R M Phillips ipassi. 

PhvsrolORft 

D J CUrt: I2.1L S E Hill i2.ll: R L 
Horner <211 ). C P Mayers i2.li: L 
Plckenitg <2.Ir. R A PKkup i2.l): C P 
Seppie <2.1 c S Smnn <2- 1 <: J !» Tovtor 
•2.1 *; A 3 Woodv,ard >2.1 ): C E B 
Barnnn <22*: PM Goldman <22i:F L 
Hickson <Z2K P Z & Message <22r. S 
Fisher (3rd <. 

Physiology & Pharma at (og> 

D Brow ning 12.11: j Htxig i2.li. G R 
Lew in <2.11. A Smilh (22k 

Physiology & Zoolon’ 

SB A-Bowlirtqi2.lr a Donald i2.it: J 
C Mead (22). 

Probability & Statistics 

P R wilUaaKcii <l*Jt: P Hodges <2.1 1: 

L C LOlrfHtoue i2.1<. R J McNamara 
(2.1 1: C Slum 1 <2.2*: D H WiUlamson 
■2.21. 

Psychology 

H j Barker <2 1* J Darongkamas 
•2.1 1. J W Daws <2.13. M R Heptrte 
<2.1r K S Mel tor .2.1 ) F J Powell 
<2.1 1. D CO ft del <2.2*. C R Brils (22i: 

K Coleman (2.2*: P A Croucner (2 2<- 
A M Georae <2 2*. P L Hancock i2-2*. 

C H Morion <2.2): K J Whipp >22). 

Zoology 

.. .1. N TGHf— 

E Lee <lv»f C 19 Bavier <2.1*: G P 
Garn eu <2.1 c M Grtifuh.t2Jti A d 
H ill >2 I j: K A Penfold <2.lt C PowkiI 
<2.11. S E Price <2.1 >: ft H G Wicks 
•2.11. J M Howell (22l. M C M Jones 
<2.2*. J M Nooie (2.2) H M O'Dea 


Walsh 

Clare 2 _ _ 

Bartow J ft 1 Barnes: R ft Bales: S J 
Bril. P Bolton: J W Cadlnan. S C 
Clarke: C M Cryer J ft Devine: J M 
Devov: TCM Downing: J P Tanning: 
K J Firth W Green, w Green: W A 
Johnson: H M Jer* B. J A Lamb; J A 
Lawrence: A J Letgh: D ft Lelch: ft' J 
Lewis. H J Lloyd. A A Mahon. M T 
Mr Mahon: M T Monaghan. M R 
Moragtsan- S E Mutlsns; A H Nrhan: C 
F O'Gorman. PC Oirrih J L Owens: K 
E Riddle. QSJ Robbins: S M Roberts: 
P G Rudd: J A Soolev: I C Stone. J C 
Srerdy. J B Tyson. S F Waller: C J 
Wood 

CttW 2 (DtiD):S.JCK Aqnew: RN A 
Ahmad: T As Din: H Bto&ell: ft J 1st 
Brown. D t Brown: J G Campbell. S J 
Choi nock S W Crltrtilow.- F P DtUon. 
1 M tt Dugmore: R A Early. S E ft 
Fox: NAM Garoen. J A Glen non. B P 
Harrington: T A Ironmonger: S C 
Johnson: A M Jolty : G R E Janes: G A 
Kenny PJS Lanibn*. k"M CL Jones: 
K E Lowe, k T Mornuev. J K 
Newian. B L O'Sullivan: ft D Oates: R 
Oliver. L A Patmore- J E peiers. R K 
Pike. M E Bohson T J N Rycroft. D A 
H Sellars. R Shafte F Steunsuddin: c 
C Shaw . S P Soo- J a Sw.ibnrk. C -ft 
Tas-tor. S 4 Tild-sley. C S Tube: P H 
WeaUiersione: S M Worrall: J L 
W right 

Cure S G R Llovd 
Pare: S ft’ MeCoiern 

Law (BA) 

cress 2 <Dh l)i S L BH-kler: S N 
Bashiovd. ft Brawn. M Crummack P 
E Gee Pemuenon: K E Harris: D C C 
Johnson: S Rouers: J F Ruliun 
Clare 7 (Dhr U);S Orocott. J Paoget: N 
Sounders. S J Smnn: M M Thomas. S 
Turner: K -L Wormaid. 

Facnlis of Eagioeering 
BErrg 

Civil and Structural Engineering 

crass I : R B Erridge: l H Ha: D M 
Rudruns. J R Sharpies. RAN Shaw 
ClMI 2 (DW I): C M Brnnrtl: J R 
Binov ft j Crow lev- p R uarkrttar: T 
J Maivim R J Mrtltng. J Mofian: A D 
Riarh. M B »pb«b, P J Tem\ T R 
Turner. N V H Wong: R J Williams 
Claw 2 (Oar II): C T Adams, r c 


Geography. Politiaii- Theory 
- & Itatirutions 

K Bawrina «2.t *. P RubirHon <2.2). 

o'uS'S VS&&S8- 

Political Theory & Inst/Sotial 

C Wehb 

Political Theory & 

M HannK^/^^'s feKon <2^1: A 
Bradbury <2 -21: P Mans ijrdl. 

Facnlty of Architectural 
Studies 

Architectural Studies 

G Slovsell IISIR M Whileli-V <lstr. M 
Wood < lvii; M Baker <2 11. I Clarke 
I2.li. N Currv <2.1* S Loke (2.1L'J 
Mavvson <2. 11: P RobirLs <2.1). .J 
Smith 12.1 1. H Spemt-r (2.1 u S 
Touwon <2 1i: P Walson i9.1r P 
Woodward 12. H: O Young <2.1 s C 
Berevimd (2.21 S Briscoe <2 21: J 
Bfoughlnn <32*. S Collinqh.ini >2.2*: 
N Oave-s <2 ,2V J rorsnaw <2.21. S 
Haigh <2.21 R Harris <2.2i M Kaner 
<2.21. M Li*e (22\. u Lorkvii <2-2*. D 
Marsh \2.2) P Mr Nulls i2.2<: P 
Rail null * 22 <■ P Reason <2Ji: S Soh 
I2J2I. A Tore <2.21. E Wan i2-2i: P 
ts .il kin <2.21: Y.iroub <2.21. G 

EnaitoiKlis (3rd*. C -Ewhank i3rnir c 
Hoar i.Vdi. S Hookhani <3rd). P 
Oldham >3rdi. M Rothivrtl <3rdL S 
TiWdin i3t<i>. M Alls iPiw.1. H Taylor 
lPassi 

. , Urban Studies , 

J Freere Ball <2.11. ft M Hughes 
(2 1 1 I. A Jackson <2. 1 1. J Jones <2. 1 1. 
r Wilkins <2. 1 3- P Moreau <S 2*. D 
Owen <22<: J Pearson (22 > S Walkrr 

i2 

pohocsi Theory A lostmiuora 

i B>-i*tHftlo *2.1* T Collins iS.IK M 
' Cooper <2.1 1. A Lowe *2.1 1. 1 Neesom 
<2.1 ■ G Possril <2.11 L SmKh (2. II. T 
Thorpe <2. u. J ftrnhrid <2.2*. N 
Barton i? ?<- D Bains <2.2i. A Dull 
<2 2i M Ham <2. 2t. K MrElditX <2.2 L 
R Pqrtman i?.2i T Mrllravey >3rdl 
Psyehotocy 

F Poller ilsii, E BruncUsh i2.lt: C 
ChaJnu-rs i?.i <: S Coir <2.11 S Drake 
•2.1 <: A raw-red i2.1 >. R Cl boons ip.l i. 

J Graham <2.1 1. H Cradale i2 It: D 
Meerhan >2 1 < N Owens .2 1 1: I Peit-n 
<2 ti S Ronmson *2.l> N BllhCf <2.21: 
J Busn <2.2i: J Dwprrvhnuse (22): k 
H rtnmre <2.2i- C Hurburj- <2 2*. H 
Jones <2.2<- J Kennv (2.2). S Savory 
<2.2* P Slanwav *?2<. S Steriuig 
*2.2i E. Thorne <2.?< L Walker *22l 
L H.iu-kins (3rd* r Mil ion <3rdi. G 
Pan oil iPitss*: k Snnlh iPussi. 

„ See pi Powy B Soeiolore _ 

S ft Beebv <2 1 1. C Groblor ,2.ll: D 
l"e *2 1* K Tonnani <2.1 <: S Clark 
ii?.2l K Halrison >2.2) !i J.ims <2.2<: 

P King <2 21 S Lon-v <2.2<: D Wall 
<2.2< C Vshallet <2.21 


Soetotocy 

M rianklln iP.H SK.ikod <2.11. H 
nnncis.ip 2<: S rnrsiro <2.2». 

AMR A Flo Manag smut, Cornuaur 


ftoperley: JPL Axrord. P J Ayres: C 
E Bnrrievr D w Brown: S A Calvert-. 
P K Chun: J A EIIKM- C C 
Crrmonaros: ! A Gill. D A Peake: R D 
Perron: A A Soufani: J M Stokes: P T 
Toms 

ChM 3: H H M Alloub: J Brrrv: M A 
cownii: A oawner: c U KenneoUv. O 
J Lnniey. C R New ton. L. P Okan. M I 
Rathten. C J Rcvcc; A R Tlmnu^ G 
TcMdotf R ft Wemaway: A D H 
Williams: J M Zvborskl 
Pare: P D MrCraUi: A T Samba 

Control Engineering 

Core K N ft Hail- j s Ross 
Clare Z (Dtv 1): s r Basuii. M C 
Crrs-nsalae: •» HunC S G HUtrhetoOn 
Ghu 7 (DVrJt): S .1 Guy: W M Hunier: 
S ) Rartbfic, E G Tew 
Cbn HP Bonnet l : K W Bdwen: J D 
Harkrtt: M M Ramil. B Thomas 
Aczratae P J Kirhois ■ 

Pare: M F HObson 

Electronic Engineering 
Ctare 1: A R Chaoman. I E Mr- 
COrtnock: P F Miller: P ft Nat lor: b Vs' 
toalkrn M H Wim.ni 
Clare 7 fOhr D: P I. ftspden R J 
Bill lev: 4 J Cooper- R H Devavva: N 
Hard*. L Moult I Vs Marriott: M W 
Newman: V* R Pur« is. D P Rs-an. K C 
.Sinuh. p j Swrt-lland. P M Thome: ft 
s Turtilxill G F Williams, ft P Wood 
Clare 7 tDtt B>: C C Ashmore G E> 
Bell- ft Vv Brander G R Cook, ft J 
Campbell. R J Candlin: A I Co\: R C 
Craule. J D .w dll S L Enqram. S J 
Kiiur J D Marsh S R ShultfewvrU*. C 
J Tarior S M Touliss j C Van der 
Veide: a j Williamson 
Creu tHO ftpMeinii: I Carduv: I K 
L\ ans: G K Mallinson: M J Morrb, O 
R Vonforlto. P J Newton: E T 
Sawdon- K Thor lev: D C Woodward 
Pass l Burke. J G Butter R P Ginn: M 
C Holland. D C Jones; O Ross la nos.. A 
M Zvhorski 


G Lillie <2.1 v B Austin <2.2L K Shah 
<2.7* A Johnsione (3id< 

Faculty of Soaal Sciences 
BA 

Acoowninc a Ftna nctal Manaremani 

A dark <5.1 1. G Hollander <2.1 r S 
Hume. <2.1 1: A Rallrav i2.»i. S 
Robinson ip. 1 1 P Ss.-ob i2. 1 *: R 

Wmlrrhollom (2. It. I Wnaht >2.1 *: P 
ftdrork ip.?*: P A^pmall i2.2l P 
arorkvsrtl <2.2 r I Bur Met (22< K 
dark <2.21. 1 Clarke i2.2i: J Cook 
<2 r:< 1 Crompton <2.7( D Eaves i2,2<. 
H r.in i2 2< M HUqhes <2.?< J JftKOn 
12.21: J krtlv i2.2i. T Kisow les <22 1 A 
Mar krone <2 2k I Mallison <2.21: A 
Piullipsnn <2 ^j. -S .Slortunu (2i?i: P 
V.indnll <2 2< C timid i2.Pl: D 
Williams <2.2i. R Hum <3rd) 

Busmtsi Studies 

N BLiknni.m cisi<: G Hern I man ilsii: 

J ftlevanaer i2.i<- C ftrmur i2.1i: s 
Clark -2.1 <. M Cos U.lj: 1 Crump 
<2 it: ft m Dam-. «2.i » M Davy <2.1*. 
C Do sv iii-s i2.D. p Eirrw (2.1 1. ft Hart 

<2 i*i ft Hawns i2.1l P Hhiosi2.il P 
Hill <2 1i. L Minion <2.1 1: S 
HiKkennull i2.ir M Jaibson i2.n. s 
kenni-iii- <2|i. A Matom- <2.1 k N 
Mtitt.ihv i? ii. K Parker <2.1 r. j 
RiftiMud <2,1 1. J Salmon ip.n. T 
Sonin <2.i i k TamiiT ca it. K 
Thompsun <2.11. N BmHum *2 2i. S 
BeestoV' OS*. VI Bburisey iPX*. M 
Brough <7.2< P Grovv <2 2< m H.mrov 
(??•' L How gale i2.?<- £ Lau (2.2) S 
LoievLiie i 2 .ji: p Mason <2.2i. G 
Nkholls (2 21 S Ovn (2 21. M J 
PpgWfc IS^L « Riley <?.2l, D RoorTs 
<J;.r< E) Shaw 12 21. C New ion iSM). C 
Seou ipassi 

„ EcanoBHa & Social Hltniy 

S Mtk) <2.1 1 T Zunds'i 12 |V v 
Cm iMuulier <r-.2i P Cdssanfr. <2.2*. S 
Hu'k' '2 £'* E KJKLiS2( S Mrttor 
i Miller <2. 2i. E Newman i0.2i: 
f.^rert *2^ |: r swianovs <2.2 r. J 
V* alter ( 2 . 2 ) 

Cednomkc 

C Uiloll list i N kirkbv ilsIL I 
Pam- i|s4*. M ftihcnon <2.1 o F 
Dmihurv <2.1 >. j Milrtsdi s2.lL S 
Pauttd 'E.l' ft Sloan <2 11. J Walson • 
<2 1 1 D B.irtei 12^*. N V* ikon <2.2* D 
Gam ipassi 


M 

ftUsteHx-rrv 

<2.1 |_D r^'Wey (2_l i. M Daotov <2.1 < 
M !)<* Vus i2.ii ft Flt-niiuu J 

Ciigrisl ■?.! i S Graham <2.1 1 . C Hare 
{?»' ' H.iiI <2.1 <: R Hill .2.1i. S 
Hr.irot il < 2.11 r Maihessson <2 l< R 
Mooney <2.1 . I Mi-.H ,2.J,. .1 Onvell 
<E.l*: J Raw tins <2 1i; S Reynolds 
's. 1 ’ A SealHirne <2.1 •. G Shannon 
S. s iP? r,on 'S.I* J T.llbol <2.1 ■. 
T W-ctib .2.11. s ft.unns <2 ?i. L Clam 
<2 2*. J Davie <2.2): V Detai <2 2 >: C 
Dtiiin .2.2". r ns-son <2 2i: a ration 
<?.■?* 5 Fosiri i2.2ilS Co tone) <?2); J 
Hrsdh i2.2r. ft Wusgsworth i2.a* K 
-iWVi-' 1 - H -XlOkins ,2.2*: P Page 
<2.7l S Plan (2 2*. P Rir h.irdsun <2.21 
ISM1I «i2i. M Wabh <2.E). P Brook 
< Pass i 


•y 





30 


SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


RACING: RICH PICKINGS AWAIT ENGLISH CHALLENGERS IN EUROPE’S MOST VALUABLE TWO-YEAR-OLD EVENT 


Then Again to initiate 
long-range double 
for talented Cumani 


Luca Cumani, the talented 
Newmarket trainer, can land a 
long-range double this after- 
noon by winning the 
Buttonwood Brewery Sum- 
mer Trophy (2.45) at Haydock 
with Then Again and the 
Auckland Handicap Slakes 
(4.35) at Newmarket with 
Celestial Storm. 

Then Again, a fancied out- 
sider for the Derby, failed lo 
stay one and a half miles at 
Epsom and finished 1 3th be- 
hind Shahrasiani. He then 
developed a skin rash and was 
not considered to have re- 
turned to his peak when 
showing his inherent class 
with a narrow, but decisive 
defeat of Pinstripe on the July 
course recently, conceding 
2 lib to the in-form runner-up. 

That form certainly entitles 
Then Again to preference over 
today's rivals, the only pro- 
viso concerning the three- 
year- old's ability to last out 
the distance of this afternoon's 
extended 10 furlongs. 

If there is any chink in the 
favourite's armour. Queen's 
Soldier and Wassle Touch, 
second and fifth, respectively, 
to Nisnas at Goodwood, could 
be the pair to probe any 
stamina weakness. If forcing 
tactics are adopted with 
Wassle Touch. Dick Hem's 
Northern Dancer coh could 
well reverse the placings with 
his conqueror, but Then 
Again's finishing speed should 
still gain the day. 

Celestial Storm is being sent 
on a quick recovery mission to 
make amends for an expen- 
sive defeat when third lo 
Chinoiscric in last week's 
Extol Handicap al Goodwood. 

After starting a heavily 
backed favourite. Celestial 


By Mandarin 

Storm looked like winning a 
furlong from home but was 
just outpaced by hts stable 
companion and Sweet Mover. 
Of the favourite’s four rivals 
today. Power Bender showed 
much improved ability when 
sprinting home from 
L astcomer over the track and 
distance last Saturday. If he 
can find that form again 
today. Power Bender will 
prove a serious threat to the 
selection. 

The Newmarket pro- 
gramme is packed with in- 
terest In the opening Saccone 
and Speed Karamea Maiden 
Stakes (1.30) the all-conquer- 
ing Michael Stoute runs Rus- 
sian Rover. 

This half brother by Nijin- 
sky to several winners is the 
subject of rave notices from all 
Newmarket work-watchers 
and is sure to start at a very 
short price. But Russian 
Rover, even at the first time of 
asking, can prove too good for 
the more experienced Tauber 
and another well thought of 
newcomer. Fahad. 

The Sweet Solera Stakes 
(2.0) for two-year-old fillies 
features a meeting between 
four interesting future pros- 
pects. Of this quartet Laluche. 
Littlefield and Montfort all 
impressed when winning last 
time out for Henry Cecil. Ian 
Balding and William Jarvis. 
Betting in an apprently open 
race is not advised, but 
Laluche is taken to confirm 
the promise of her Doncaster 
win. 

As the ground looks like 
riding fast al Newmarket Cox 

Blinkered first time 

HAYDOCK 2.15 Raawnye. 3.15 True Nora. 
HEDCAR 20 Creole Bay. Ptuieam. 130 
Warm Welcome. 4.0 Only Flower. 
UNGFIELD: 6.0 Pariogrts. 730 Odervy. 


Green and Twice Bold are 
preferred to five Farthings in 
the Air New Zealand Handi- 
cap (130). Cox Green, nar- 
rowly defeated by Just David 
at Goodwood, is napped to 
beat Neville Callaghan's 
progressive three-year-old. 
Twice Bold who did well to 
beat High Tension at 
Windsor. 

Reverting to Haydock, 
Clantime must be ibe choice 
. to win the Coral Bookmaker’s 
Handicap Slakes (3.15). Al- 
though only successful once 
this season when accounting 
for Imperial Jade at Epsom, 
the selection possesses blind- 
ing speed as he showed when 
fifth to Double Schwarz at 
Goodwood. 

Al Redcar, where the 
consistent Sanditton Palace 
appears to be the best of the 
afternoon in the Fox Hunters 
Stakes (4.30), Wabarah and 
Lyphlaw look the ones to be 
on in the feature Paul Daniels 
Magic Nursery (3.0) and in the 
supporting Aske Handicap 
(3.30). 

Al Lingfield's night meet- 
ing. where Cox Green's trainer 
Guy Harwood can strike an- 
other blow with Ightham in 
the Gaiwick Handicap (S.20). 
Michael Dickinson can finally 
gel off ihe mark for the season 
by winning ihe Meiropole 
Handicap (6.50) with 
Coincidental 

Originally bought as a lead 
horse for the two-year-olds, 
the four-year-old did well 
when running Bowl Over to a 
neck on the course at the end 
of last month and can now 
give relief to the supporters of 
ihe former champion Na- 
tional Hunt trainer by defying 
top weight in this seven- 
furlong dash. 



Piggott 
produces 
a juvenile 
of note 

Lester Plgeott saddled Ids 
18th winner ©f the season when 
Deputy Governor, ridden by 
Tony Ires, defeated the heavily- 
backed favourite, Angara Abyss, 
in the Hammenrood Stakes at 


Forest Flower can 
bloom again in 
Irish spectacular 

From Onr Irish Corrtspoodent, DtOilm 

breakdown of the. rennets re- 


Lnca CnmanTs Celestial Storm, a dose third behind his sta- 
ble companion Chinoiserie in Goodwood's compefi’ve Extel 
Handicap last week, returns to the fray in the Auckland 
Handicap at Newmarket this afternoon 

Rakaposhi King raids Deauville 

Rakaposhi King (Sieve Cauthen) has a bright chance of winning 
his third consecutive race in the £23.183 Prix Keigorlay (J5f) at 
Deauville tomorrow. A rare runner in France for Henry Cecil he 
made all to win valuable prizes at Haydock and Ungfield last 
month. 

Singkma (Waller Swinbum) lakes on Germany's best filly. 
Comprida (Andrzej Tylicki) in the £1 12199 Herbststuten-Preis urn 
den Gaizwcilers Ali-Pokal (10 1/20 at Neuss tomorrow. 


trains dris colt, a 
j third first time out at 
Ascot, for Ahmed Sal man , 
whose racing mananger, Charles 
Dingwall, slid: “This will be a 
nice colt next year. He's still a 
big baby and will probably bare 
one more race as a two-year* 
oM." 

The trainer was asked if he 
had set a target for winners in 
bis first season. He shrugged his 
shoulders and said: “i hadn't 

Racing results page 31 

thought about it - the fust one 
was enough." 1 

Grevilfe Starkey, riding the 2- 
1 on Angara Abyss, made the 
running oa the stand-side rail, 
but was caaght inside the final 
furlong by Deputy Governor, 
who went oa to win by one-and- 
a-half lengths. 

Brian Rouse, the leading 
jockey at Ungfield, delighted his 
supporters once again by win- 
ning on Parklands Belle, 7-2 
favourite for the Godstoae Sell- 
ing Stakes. 

Rouse had the Epsom filly ina 
challenging position and took 
command inside the final far- 
long to bet Flying Silently by two 
lengths. This was the fifth 
success of the season for her 
trainer Mick Haynes. 

• Kim Tinkler collected a 
three-day ban from the Redcar 
stewards yesterday for careless 
riding, after her mount Kanlu 
was relegated from second place 
for interfering with Blond ini 
during the Jack Colling Me- 
morial Apprentice Handicap. 
The ban operates from August 
17. 

Neds Express* completed a 
double with a fine ooe-and-a- 
half lengths victory from 
Carribean Sound in the Pat 
Phoenix Handicap lo provide 
some consolation for the Tinkler 
family. 


The status of the Heinz "57" 
Phoenix Stakes as an accepted 
group one pattern race has been 
under fire for some time. largely 
because of changing habits 
among racehorse trainers. 

Before the War. it was the 
custom that the best two-year- 
olds would be seen out in the 
first half of the season with iheir 
target a Royal Ascot victory. 
Nowadays, the late-season 
races, such as the Middle Park 
and Dewhurst Stakes, have 
taken on a far higher degree of 
significance, and the Phoenix 
Stakes, for long the most cov- 
eted of all Trish juvenile events, 
has suffered in consequence. 

However, the promoters of 
the Phoenix Park race track are 
not going to let go of (hat 
coveted croup one status with- 
out making .a light of it This 
year, they have increased the 
prize fond to IR£200.000, which 
makes it not merely a record for 
Ireland, but actually eclipses any 
two-year-old race ever staged in 
Europe. 

To put it into its proper 
context at the latest rate of 
exchange, it is approximately 
equal (o the prize money offered 
for all the two-year-old races at 
Royal Ascot. As the racecourse 
manager, Jonathan Irwin, said 
yesterday: “If a prize-, of this 
magnitude did not succeed in 
attracting Ihe best juvenile tal- 
ent. then it is hard to imagine 
whal would." 

A field of 10 will go lo the post 
at the Phoenix Park, when for 
the first time in its history, the 
eveni is staged on a Sunday. A 


veals that the English chalL 
outnumbers the local .leant 
six to four. But it is significant 
that the fillies appear to domi- 
nate the race. 

Pat Eddery has gone on record 
as believing that Forest Flower 
“is possibly the ftstestiwo-yeor- 
old 1 have ever ridden, ‘J0id * 
with an unbeaten record m three 
starts, she is entitled to start 
favourite. She was a three 
lengths winner of the Queen 
Mary Stakes at Royal Ascoupd 
then gave 21b and a ,tnree- 

quarters-o Pa-length beating .to 

Minstrel la in ihe Cherry Hinton 

Slakes al Newmarket. ” ’ 

Minsirella takes her on again, 
but there is no good reason-why 
she should reverse Ihe NfW- 
market placings at level weights. 

The most fancied Irish runner 
is Polonia. who is unbeaten. in 
Ireland, winning all her starts by 
wide margins, but who railed to 
act on the fast ground at Royal 
Ascot when relegated to sixth 
place behind Cutting Blade.. in & 
the Coventry Stakes. -• 

The only course-and-distance 
winner in action is Flawless 
Image, trained by Df?id 
O’Brien. 

Wigamhorpe. having woft'Jjis 
last four races, is obviously- the 
best two-year-old in. the North 
of England, and a sparkling final 
gallop makes him the best each- 
way prospect. However. Ijsfty 
with Forest Flower, and nomi- 
nate Polonia and Flawless "I tri- 
age for the rich rewards awaiting 
those finishing second 
third. 


(U'lll 

tilt 


BIG RACE FIELD 


Tstevised: (BBC) 3.40 


aLSoB^SzOT 1 PHOENIX STAKES (Group h 2-Y-O: colts & ffflfes: 
£127,500: 61} (10 runners) 


41312 OOMMON ROY ALE (D Robteson) R WHaiRS 9-0- 
221123 8 NGIMG STEVBI (Or S Bennett) R Hannon 00 _ 
11213 SIZZLING MELODY (Mi " 


> (Mro M Watt) John FitzSaraU 00- 

201111 wwwmwwEr ' ‘ " 

212 ADVENTURMEf 
1 FLAWLESS I 

111 FOREST F10WER(P Mellon) I Baking I 

son 8-11. 


WPEfttes 5 Eastortw) M W Extfsrtjy 9-0- 
UNE (h Mn ©"Farra® K PrantSomasi 0-11 . 
■ MAGE (Sheikh Mohammed) D O’Brien 8-1 


<212 IHN5TREUA(EEv«m)C Nelson 8-11 
1101 POLONIA (H De KmatkowskO J Boigor 8-11 . 
311 SNOWffliCHr" 


l (R SangstaO J Bolger 8 - 1 1 . 
2-1 Forest Flower. 3-1 Potonia. 4-1 Minstrela, 
Wiganthorpe. 10-1 others. 


HaiMess image, .4-1 


lent art 
i deli: 


NEWMARKET 


Televised: 1.30, 2.0, 2.30 
Going: good to firm 
Draw: no advantage 

1.30 SACCONE & SPEED KARAMEA MAIDEN STAKES (2-Y-O C & G: 
£3,606: 61) {10 runners) 


ABLE SAINT fflr C Li) R Armstrong 00., 
CRUSADE DANCER (USA) (R Trusse* J< 


CEfl (USA) (R Tru&seM Jr) B HantMy 
HHAgaKhanl ~ 


101 
1U 
106 

107 

108 
110 
111 

113 

114 

115 

15-8 Russian Rover. 5-2 Tauber. 0-2 Fahad. 7-1 French Sonnet, 8-1 Green Ve 8 . 
12-1 Able Samt. 14-1 others. 


, _ i| R Johnson Houghton 00 . 

FRENCH SONNET (Sfiakh Mohammed) C Bnflam 9-0_. 
GREEN VEIL (USA) (Sr R McAtptne) G Wragg 00 
UNDVARO (J Btay) R Anr 


l Armstrong 9-0- 


MACROBIAN (Mas EMacgrogorlJ Shaw 9-0 

RUSSIAN ROVER (USA) (Sr GWtfite) M Stoute 90 
SPANISH GALLEON (Ms L Davies) B Hanbury 9-0. 
032 TAUBER (MrsC Reed) Pat MtfcMtt 94 


. B Thomson 8 
.. AGemo(7}9 
. S Cauthen 10 
G SiariierS 
Paul Eddery 4 
Part Eddery 6 
. B Rouse 7 


WflSwMwm 2 

— . Thtesa 

affWsi 


Newmarket selections 

By Mandarin 

1.30 Russian Rover. 2.0 Laluche 2.30 COX GREEN (nap). 3.0 Mr 
Jay-Zcc. 3.35 Philosophical. 4.5 Amjaad. 4.35 Celestial Storm. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
1.30 Rusian Rover. 2.0 MontforL 2.30 Five Farthings. 3.0 Mr Jay- 
Zcc. 3.35 Tropico. 4.5 Amjaad. 4.35 Celestial Storm. 

Michael Seely’s selection: 2.30 Cox Green. 


2.0 SWEET SOLERA STAKES (2-Y-O fillies: £9.563: 7f) { 8) 


202 

203 

204 

205 

207 

208 

209 

210 


10 PENANG BEAUTY 
123 UPPER (Lady H de 


(BFljK Lon) E EkSn 8 - 11 . 
! Wanen) E Wayrnes B- 11 . 


_ A Mackey 5 
..... G Starkey 3 


01 COLOR ARTIST (0 McIntyre] J Winter 8 - 8 - .!! 1 WR SwMxrn 7 

00 HURRICANE VALLEY (Mrs R " -- 


I Sim) M Usher 8 - 8 . 


1 LALUCHE (USA) (Srw*n Monamnedl ' h~ C ec4 SO. 
21 UTTLEFIELO (Mrs R Chapkn) I “ " ' ““ 


) I Baking 09 


01 MONTFORD (D) |G Sangswi' W Jams’ 08~ ~ 
11000 MY HBAGMAT10N (RaftSe L 


M Vftghmn 8 
S Cauthen 2 
Time 

B Tbonoon 6 


j Ltd) P Keftjway 8-8 „B Rouse i 

11-4 LafcKhe. 3-1 LrWehetd. 5-1 Momfort 7-i Color Artist 8-1 Upper. 10-1 My 
fmagi nation. 14 - 1 Penang Beauty. 16-1 Humcane Valley. 

roo™LS2 L ?? ABTIST 18 - 11 ) heal Verta ( 8 - 11 ). whiner since, sh hd at UngftaM (Bf, 
26.J 4 ran > Rwwpushf (8-1 1) ran on final 21 when 715th® Canadian Mil 
S-. ran)- MONTFOBT|S-lt)vra» never nearer Bth. ten 
aMut anolhw l j' LAUJCHE ( 8 - ii) iv,i Doncaster winner from ShimngWater ( 8 - it) |H, 
|«? » |.hrm. MUl ranMJpLEFIEUD ( 8 - 11 ) inchiaSengecI for 7fBath victory over 
Tcz Smfcjn (51 1|7yd^ £1767. firm, June 16, 10 rani. MONTFORT (8-11)41 Yarmouth 
TiTO S It? July*Z3. 8 ran). MY UIAGMATION (8-9) 

H 7tn ® Forew jjawor (9-0) here (61 Group 3. £25776. good. July 8. 10 rani. ' 

ZnIKOQlL LI I I LfcMtLU 

2.30 AIR NEW ZEALAND HANDICAP (£1 1 .550: 1m 41) (7) 

304 10-0403 BUST AAA IE Mo4ert G Wragg 3-9-7 Raul Eddery 1 

305 100-012 nVEFARTMNTC (17) (SnaftwO Stud Co UlSM Starts 4-86 WRShMm»5 

306 1 C COX GREEN (USAXuHBF) IK Alxtula] Q HarwOOfl 3-8-12 G Starkey 7 

307 1-03421 TWICE BOO |K AfSadlNCaagnon 88-9 HHWs3 

308 020-244 WITCHCRAFT <E kloledGWram 4^-7 BCrossleyA 

309 31-004 HAPPY BREED (R Boucher) C Brettfl 3*3 S Cauthen 8 

310 43-0301 VERY SPECIAL |Q) (Mrs E LantMon) W Hoidan 4*7-13 RMwm(5)2 

3-1 Twice Bold. 4-1 Cox Green, 5-1 Five Farthings. 11-2 Happy Breed, 6-1 

Witchcraft, 8-1 Very Special. KM Bustara 

FORM BUSTARA fB-S) ran an wel when 11 3rd of 4(o Queen's SaMer (8-12) at Warwick 
nm21 170yds. r3413. good to 1*m. JuifZf. HVE FARTHINGS {9-6) 4J 2 nd of 6 » Auehwi 
Fever (B-3) at York (im 41. ES952. good to firm. July 11). HAPPY BREED f 8 - 8 ) was 7TS I 
tuck m 4 th Previously FIVE PARTHR4GS (84) hao WITCHCRAFT (8-7) 12v>l back m 4th 
when Newtxjry winner (im 41. £5994. good. June 1 2 . 8 ran). OOX GREEN (9-7) nk 2nd to 
l David (9-31 at Goodwood ( 1 m 61. £4G9a good to firm. July 30. 7 rani. TWICE BOLD 

>tf horse SOL bade) (1m3M50yds. £2566. 

Beverley winner tram Four Star Thrust (9- 


Setactoon: VERY SPECl 


St 


4-100. 


B Thomson 9 

. Brooke Sanders 10 


3.0 DICK1NS INVITATION UMfTED HANDICAP (£2,642: 1m) (10) 

401 138210 MR JAY-ZEE <N Canadian) NCaAaghan 

402 04*100 IKTIYAH (O) (S Tretafl S Mflior 4-9-9 

403 100-003 WARPLANE (A WHsonf C Thormon 89-8 

404 014102 DUELLING 

405 MO(BO 

406 001021 

20003-1 XYLOPHONE (L Shepherd) D Marks 4-9-2 


5-98 - JeanM GouUnn 6 

T frets 

ViitadM J 

407 20003-1 XYLOPHONE (LSfieplwcfl 0 Marks — I WflSttftuftiB 

408 B®»21 HELLO GYPSY (D) (Mrs C TmWer) C Tinkler 544 Hxrins Jotter 3 

409 OQtM PARTS IS PARTS (USU(G Hoskms) R J Wdams 3-9-1 Diana Jones 4 

410 004203 TIE YOMPCR(FR)(WSeBers)J Parlies 44-13 S Cauthen 7 

4-1 Fool Patrol. 5-1 Xytophono. 6-1 Ikttyar. 7-1 Mr Jay-zee. 8*1 Helo Gypsy, 

DueNng. 10-1 VakacJi. 12-1 Warplane. 14-1 The Yomper, 20-1 Parts Is Pvts. 

OF NEW ZEALAND SELLING HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £1358: 

im) (16) 

S canteen 18 
. E Guest (3)4 
R none (Sja 
Pad Eddery 2 
MWWuaie 
Twdameio 


514 

515 

516 
5>7 
519 
522 
524 


) R Haanshead 89 . 
— tson) A Hum g-9 — .. 
n)D Morley 8-9 (568). 


502 2-40000 DEPUTY TM (P Trent) J Betnefl 9-7 

503 30 4B0Q STANGRAVE fflungrava Chanacats i triy ft ftntc gli 
5te 000000 F1N0ON MMuR( Mrs ST)ne)M Tonkins S- 1 

506 8 00000 MITNEH (A DeJ-Gnjflce) C N VWfiams 80. 

507 1-00030 PtflLOSOPWCAL (G Cumnang) W Musson 813 

508 004231 TROPICO JD) (Mrs T Bks) P Haatera 813 

511 1000002 KEEP COOL (FR) (Mrs J 

512 0-00000 IfOSTANGOffllfAbsSl 

513 003010 D0RADE (B) (O Poiard , 

“SS B! 

000040 BAUDAREEN (W SeBera) J Partes 7-7 fiBclSg 

„ MTropca 1 KWO Dcrada. 5-1 Mitner. 1 3-2 Staepfine Duchess. 7-1 Keep Cool 
11-1 Fandango Kiss. 14-1 Rnoon Manor. 18-1 others. ’ 


..... S P«fce o 
W B Sw irtb u r i i 9 
B Route 5 


. Tlrej 4 


*5 KIWI MAIDEN STAKES (3-Y-O: £3.197: im 2fl (6) 

603 AMBASSADOR (Mra P Yarn} W O'Gorman 9-0 

000232 WGIffST PEAK (BF) (W Du Pont til) G Pmchetd-Gortlon 80 W Hood 7 

6 H 0232 WLLEffS DUST (gl (Dr C 1fa»ana H fhnt (U sCubwl 

613 DOMMM SAWAS (Z Papastytew^S^onr^ N WWren 2 

617 0 TOUNSHIPlMraJ McOougwl) I Battng M GfSSI 

622 000- NORPELLA (E Mo 8 er)GWSg Ml - - ^ 

M BMW 9 OUM. 4-1 Ampad. 8-1 Highest Peak, 8-1 NorpeBa. 12-1 Township, 14-1 
Ambassador, 25-1 MrSawas. ^ 

4.35 AUCKLAND HANDICAP (£3,843: Im 2f) (5) 

I 13 CELESTIAL STORM (USAJIDKBF) (R Duehossos) L Cumen 3-9-10 

WRSvMmui 3 

5 OO-004fl GWfflflEJJA (W (M« M camnges^Smillfil C BrtHaki 4-9-T — G Carter (3) 4 
G 02-124 GLOWING PTOMKE (C^ (Pwnaar BkWKttx* Fanu LB) B HSs 888 

BThomsooS 

I BBNOSB (C-Ol (Adtfaon TooQ G ftnchanM3otdon 4 *4^»> |[||||| | 
3000-00 WILD HOPE (C-0)(HF) (J Wrtgfttf Q Kuffor 5-4-3 WUtwte(7)2 


7 22-4301 ROWS) I 


6 

5-> Celestial Storm. 9-4 Power Bender, 5-1 Glowing Premise. 7-1 Gundreda. 10-1 
WHO Hope 


HAYDOCK PARK 


Televised: 2.15, 2.45, 3.15 
Going: good 

Draw-^Mm, low numbers best 

2.15 *MA1L ON SUNDAY* HANDICAP (3-Y-O: 
£3,228: 7f 40yd) (6 runners) 

3 -400 AL DWAN (B) D Artnithnot 9-7, JRddG 

25 Q010 BELOW ZERO A Bailey 9-2 R Cochrane 1 


3.15 CORAL BOOKMAKERS HANDICAP {£7#43: 
.500) 

1 1440 OUBUNLAO 


] M Bnttan 8-9-12 — 
4 1220 CLANTIME (B) (D) R WMaker 5-82 
I PLACE 


(D) K Braraey 4-9-0. 
ra C Nelson 3+9. 


_A Bacon (7) 2 
. D UcKeown 6 

G Baxters 

J Reel 4 


26 010 TRAVEL MAGIC (BF) 6 Hanbury 9-2 GBener2 

27 200 RAAWIYEH (B) (USA) H Thomson Jones 00 _ R Mis 3 

211 4030 GOOSE HLLMWEastathy 8-11 T Lucas 4 

217 0233 OR11CA J Eteermgton 7-12 : W Canon 5 

9-4 Bekw Zere. 3-1 Travel Magic. 4-1 Raawiyeh. 6-1 Al 
□Ivan. 8-1 Goose H 8 L Orttea. 

FORM: BELOW ZERO <841 6th to Night Out Perhaps (0-7) at 
Newmarket (Bf. good. Aug zLpreviausiy (89) pushed out beat 
Surfing ( 8 - 1 ) 11 at SaUstwry (7i. £2727. 1km. June 26. 20 ran). 
TRAVEL MAGIC (8-2) 4^1 ate to Pastraao (8-11) at Newcastle 


Yarmouth (61. good to firm. Sept 10) last season and blinkered 
test tree loday. alter (B- 8 ) a 6 th to Am»a (Belters year. GO OSE 
HILL (8-1) Bth to Postorage (1001 last hma (7f.ftrTn.jwie 28L 
pwwously(9-4) 1X1 3rd to Ltam p-7) at Tlwsk (». £2969. firm, 
Sum 17. 12 rani ORT1CA (8-10) 2Vil 3rd lo Fnvole (9-2) al 
Doncaster (71. £2044. good to fwm. July 31. 17 ran). 

Selection; GOOSE HBX 


Haydock selections 

By Mandarin 

2.15 Below Zero. 2.45 Then Again. 3.15 
Claniimc. 3.45 Enbarr. 4,15 Great AspccL 4.45 
Secret Wedding. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 

2.15 Below Zero. 2.45 Then Again. 3.45 Osric. 

4.15 Rough Dance. 4.45 Cynomis. 


SUMMER 


2.45 BURTONWOOD BREWERY 
TROPHY (£8.129: Im 2f 131yd) (6) 

2 4302 LEADING STAR I BaUng 4-9-2 WNwm) 

3 1023 NEBRSRAhahurst 5-9-2 P Cock 5 

4 -110 CONQUBDNG HERO (USAXBF) M SlOUie 36-11 

R Cochrane 2 

6 -OM WASSL TOUCH (USA) W Ham 34K9 W Carson S 

10 -112 OUffiWS SOLDIER (USA) H Coed 3-8-8 WRyenl 

12 -101 THEN AOAML Cumam 886 R Gant 4 

11-4 Queer s SokOer. 5-1 Conquering 
assi Touch. 10-1 Leering Star. 


15-8 Then Again, 
Hero. Nebns. 8-1 Was 


5 4300 DURHAM 

6 0300 TRUE NORA 

8 0000 LAURIE LORtilAri (D) M McCoun 4-8-8 W Carson 3 

9 0400 DUCK AJGHT (D) J Douglas-Home 4-84 RGodram 1 

11 0330 MANDRAKE MADAM (D) Denys Smith 3-84) 

LChunockS 

12 0021 RAMBLMG RIVBI (C-D) W A Stephenson 9-8Q|4ajtj ^ 

14 0032 SULL1TS CHOICE (USA) DChepmm 5-7-12. A Proud 7 
2-1 Ctantnw. 3-1 Dubim Lad. 0-2 Ranteing Rem. 182 

Dude FfighL 8-1 Sidy's Choica. 12-1 Durham Place. 

FORM: CLANTTME (941) 3«] 6 Bi to Double Schwartz (9-5) at 
Goodwood (5C Group 3, £17928. good to firm. July 31. 14 ran). 
DUBLIN LAD ( 8 - 8 ) was 12th. Prwotisty CLANTIME (9-2) DM 
2 nd to RotherfiaM Greys ( 8 - 1 1 ) at York (51. £ 61 70. good to firm, 
July if, Tflranj DUBLIN LAO (KKH was nisi ovarii back m4tfi 
and TRUE NORA (8-9) another 21 away 5tn.Esrker DUBLIN LAD 
(0-1) beat CLAmiME (8-13) 1 W at Newntsoe (51. £8545, firm. 
June 27. 13 ran) DURHAM PLACE ( 8 - 11 ) was another »l back in 
3>d and RAMBLING RIVER (7-10) further 3 back m 7th. 
RAMBLING RIVER (9-6) has snoe scored (here by IM from 
sumrs CHOICE ( 8 ^ 10 ) (51. £4550. good to firm. July 26. 7 ran). 
MANDRAKE MADAM 1 8 - 11 ) hampered inside final lurtang, 
finished further 35w back In 6 th. 

Sdedian: CLANTME 

3.45 HARVEY JONES HANDICAP (£4,142: Im 21 
131yd) (8) 

3 1310 B 6 MRR (USA) H CK4 39-7 W Ryan 8 

4 OHIO HAWAIIAN PALM (USA) JTnsa 804 W Carson 1 

G 0011 HANOLEBARJW Watts 4-8-11 NCgramtenfi 

9 0000 SHELLMAN (C) K Stone 4-6-7 QBtomi7 

10 414 OSRIC M Ryan 3-86 PnatamonA 

12 -320 ION BALADfS Norton 40-1 J Lowe 5 

15 2221 REGAL STEEL (CjRNoftnshaact 8-7-73 A Cutesne (7) 3 

17 2004 TRY SCORER Danys SnMh 4-7-10 LCtmm«*2 

5-2 Hawavan Palm. 4-1 Enbarr, 5-1 HandteOar, 6-1 Min 
SaladL Osnc. 10-1 Regal Steel. 14-1 Try Scorer. 20-1 SheBman. 

4.15 EBF LADY HILL STAKES. (2-Y-O: £3,624: 7f 
40yd) (6) 

2 CMCO VALDEZ (USA) MJatvtt 8-11 T Lucas 5 

3 0 CRANCHETER J Etherngton 8-11 S Webster 6 

6 GREAT ASPECT W Hem 8-11 W Canon « 

8 4 IRISH BRIGADIER MdS SHeR 8-11 — 1 

12 0 ROUGH DANCE W Jams HI R Cochrane 3 

IB HIGHLAND BELLE J W Watts 80 NCorawrtofl2 

2-1 Irish Brigadier. 02 Rough Dance, 4-1 Chico Valdez. 6-1 
Great Aspect 8-1 Highland Betfe, 10-1 Oancheter. 

4.45 WARRINGTON MAIDEN FILLIES STAKES <3- 
Y-O: £2,065: 1m4f)(11) 


800 CAVALEUSEJ Bethel 011 . 


FORM: CONQUERING HERO 6 KI 6 th (012) to Un Desperado ( 8 - 


0 CORfQjAN G Hanrood 011 . 


00 CROWLEY (USA) L Cumani 011 

3 CYNOMIS WHaswusGass 011 

-420 EXCEPTIONAL BEAUTY M Jarvis 011 . 


21. £6597. good to firm. July 19. 6 ran). THEN AGAIN (0-7)' won 
Newmarket n cep by u trom Pmstnpa ( 6 - 0 ) (im. £lif~~ 


lo firm 
Selection: 


. good 


1 

3 

4 

5 
G 
8 
13 

16 _ 
21 -232 SECRET WEDOMGW Hem 011. 
23 004 STANDARD ROSE HCandy 011. 
26 00 TORY BLUES A SMwan 011. 


— J Reid 7 
ACM 11 
R Quest 9 


R Unea(3)8 
. T Loom 4 


800 GOLDEN AZEUA R BrazraKHi 011 JWffiamtlO 

CBefrfl-L 


00 MARY MILFORD P Cote 01 
0 NAUTTCA S MeVor 01 1 , 


TCk*ni3 

- I Johnson 6 

- W Carson 2 

W Newness 
. M Roberts 1 


5-4 secret Wadding, 7-2 Exceptio na l Beauty, 5-1 Cynoms, 
7-1 Cornskon A Crowley. 101 S ta nd ar d Rosa. 20*1 others. 


UNGFIELD PARK 


Going: good 

Draw: high numbers best 

&30 PIER MAIDEN-FILLIES STAKES (Div 1: 2-Y-O: 
£959: 61) (12 runners) 


17 0001 LEADING ROLE (tQRHOOOBB 7-7 NON -RUNNER 4 

19 0240 SARASOTA R Akeiurst 7-7_Z 
5-2 State Baflet. 7-2 Spotter. I 
Castle Hwgnts. BioMa. Lord Cotfcns 


T WHbams2 

02 Stele Seflet. 7-2 Spotter. 01 Lady Sunday Sport 01 
!. 12-1 Hard Act 14-loteere. 


GREENSWARD H 
00 LADY'S MANTLE 
LAURISTON ' 


011 . 


JDtrtfop011 R Fox 9 

Pal Mecnei 011 — MMIerS 

00 INCA'S TREAT R Armstrong 011 PTuftlQ 

0 NAPARBIA R Hannon 011 — 2 


13 

19 

20 
22 
26 
28 
31 
35 
38 

40 
42 
-43 

7-2 Our Natfiafce. 4-1 Linda's Treat 01 Lady's Manila. 11-2 
Simply Silk. 01 Greensward. 101 Suniay Seteunst 12-1 
Napanna. Percy, 101 oteent 


4 OUR NATHALE R Sheaiher 011 

0 PEROYCBens»ad011_ — - 

0 SIMPLY StKCHragan 011 

0 SUNLEY SBMXftSTP IflWwyn 01 1 . 


TACTTURN LADY J SuKkfie 
-nSSERAHDS R Smyth 011 _ 

0 top cover OEtewrm 011. 


11. 


— MRtmer4 

— BROOM 11 

— R Weaver 1 
. Pat* Eddery* 

MHMaT 

. C Rutter (3)3 
.AMcGta»12 


6.50 METROPOLE HANDICAP (£2,868: 7f) (13) 

1 T-02 CONCUDENTALMWOk*tosm4-9-n~SCautbeaS 

2 0000 SAJLOtrs SONG N Vigors 4-9-8„ C Rotter (3) 3 

3 41M DOGMATIC m(D) R Johnson H ‘ 

4 1000 READY WTT OJ)R Haraxm 502R 

5 0030 STEADY EDDIE “ “ ", 

11 140 MOMCA (BP) J Dunlop 3-010 B ReuM 13 

12 -200 INDIAN SUMkER HCandy 308 TWBmumIO 

15 000 MGHLAND NAffi (Q R Hutchinson 4-01 


. J T Ives 4 
I P MtaJwl 4013 .„*A < ScXik« 11 


20 0010 FAR TOO BUSY ( 

21 nm BILLY 1 

23 mt APRIL MABESQUEH 

24 020/ TIN BOV W Kemp 7-7-7. 
2G 400 NORHAM CASTLE N( 


P Hutchinson (3) 9 

fy 07-7 S Dawson K 

»rali 4-7-7. NCMMB12 

B 4-7-7 RSM«5 

- — N Adams 7 

107-7 — 2 


02 CofeiddenteL 7-2 Morica, 01 
Eddie. 01 Far Too Busy. Ready WK. 101 
others. 


102 

Summer. 12-1 


Ungfield selections 

By Mandarin 

5.30 Linda's Treat. 6.0 Percy's Lass. 6,25 Spotter. 
6.50 Coincidental. 7J20 Spinnaker Lady. 7.50 
Kadial. 820 Ightham. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
5.30 Our Nathalie. 6.0 Percy’s Lass, 6.25 Lord 
Collins. 6.52 Tin Boy. S.20 HanJdcy Down, 
Michael Seely's selection: 820 IGHTHAM 

(nap). 


720 POLEGATE SELUNG HANDICAP (3-Y-O: 
£897: Im 2f) (7) 


2 -000 NO STOPPING R Hannon 07 Three 5 

4 100 SOLENT EXPRESS B Stevens 06 RWentfiam2 

10 DM SPWNAKER LADY M UdWT01O MWWteml 

15 0(« SHE® CLASS J LOW 86 , T Wnm 4 

17 0040 L’ETOtE DU PAUIffB Stevens 04 —3 


16 0000 GEORGIAN ROSE (B)Kh«y 03 W Wood* ( 3 ) 7 

47-12, 


21 0000 ODERVY (B)JHo4< 


N Adame 6 


6.0 PIER MAIDEN F1LUE$ STAKES (Div ll: 2-Y-O: 
£959: 60 ( 


2 

3 

6 

7 

9 

18 

23 

a 

29 

30 
32 


BELAX4 R Sheaner 011 . 


, MRtamerS 
. RMcGbln? 
A Macfcay 11 

CLARES BUCK JFfildvHeyes 011 Donlnc Gibsan 1 
DBMMAJ Dunlop 011 GSradtey 10 


00 BLANDELL BEAUTY M Bolton 011 . 
CHAOONU GML E Sdm 011 . 


0 HX» CUMBER D Smyth 01) 

00 MAMADORA G Balding 01 1 

0 MASCALLS DREAM P Makn 011 

PERCY'S LASSG Wragg 011 

000 PEMGRS(B)R Hannon 011 

PINK FONDANT J SufciHe 0] 1 
RKONDAUHG P Welwyn 011 


SWMtwteteS 
.filnsi 
— 4 


. PWaWn»12 

—2 

MIB>3 


■ Pad Eddery 5 

2-1 DotpNnta, 100-30 Percy's Lass, 01 RhomWkw. 01 
Bdaka. Pmk Fondant 10-1 Chacxrta Got 14-1 others. 

625 CRUISE NURSERY HANDICAP (2-Y-O: 
£3,308: 7f) (11) 

2 1000 HARO ACT R Herman 07... 

4 01 STATE BALLET (D) I Baring 9-1 

9 404 bOmCOLUNSM Stoute 07_ 


0-4 L'Etode du Palais, 01 Solent Express, 7-2 No 
(Stopping. 01 SpmakarlaAf. 12-1 Georgian Rosa, 101 Sheer 
Class, 201 Odervy. 


7.50 SOUTH COAST STAKES (£2/56: Im 2f) (3) 

2 01- irSNDWQRNEVBt(UGHannad4«3GStaikMi3 

4 ran THATCMNGLY(D)Mflotan50O RCtetergl 

8 2142 KAIHALR Johnson Houghton 3011 SCeutfwi2 

4-6 kadteL. &rora if's Notv Or Namr, 20-1 Tftatcftingfy. 

820 GAIWICK HANDICAP (£1,772: 2m) (7) 

1 OM K04IHAM IB) (WUG Harwood 3-9-10. GSterfcay2 

5 0032 COLUSTO (B) (BF) K Brassey 5-012__ S WUtwonbS 

8 0004 HAMOEY DOWN EBdin 008 AMechay3 

10 0200 SMACK H OAnrotoe 400. UHnnail 

13 3000 NARCISSUS (ra)n%duret 40.1 TWMtenl 

15 200 TARAS CHARIOT PMtehel 500 AMcGtme* 

16 002 RUN FOR YOUR WIFE G Lewis 07*10- MLIhonsfi 
04 Ightham, 01 CoDsto, 11-2 Run For Your Wife, 01 

Hanktoy Down, Mack, 12-1 Tare's Chariot 201 Nsrnssue. 


G Starkey 9 
ThMSTI 


11 01 SPOTTER (D)W Hem 02 

12 4000 VAIQLY BLAZED C Horgan 01. 

13 030 CASTLE HEIGHTS R Armstrong 80, 

14 4023 LADY SUNDAY SPORT NCWhfrwn 7-7 


15 0300 CABAL1UCM 

16 3002 BLQPFAP" 


7-7. 


— B Rouse 3 

MHMS7 

Pad Eddery 1 
_ AMcQkmel 

GBradwoams 
CRntterlSLIO 
. LHgglo(qfi 


• Mark Birch, one of the leading northern 
jockeys, gave up his rides at Redear and Haydock 
Park yesterday in order to be with his wife, Joyce, 
who is in hospital after being Involved in a serious 
car accident near their home at Heringham. near 
MaUon-Birch said: "Joyce's car skidded on some 
loose drippings* crashed into a tree and was 
virtually tom in half. She was rnshed to hospital 
while still unconsrioas. but, seems to be slightly 
. better now. She b very laclcy to be alive." 


REDCAR 


Going: good 
Draw: no advantage 

2.0 BED ALE SELUNG STAKES (2-Y-O: £3,043: 71) 
{15 runners) 


&0 PAUL DANIELS MAGIC NURSERY HANDICAP 
(2-Y-O: £4,116: 61) (8> - 

3 3112 WABARAH(DHBF)H Thomson Jones 07— A Murray 4 

4 0010 STAGE K Stone 9-4 C Dwyer 2 

7 01 BWSTBN p:} M Camacho 01 1 G Scrim E 

8 324 GREY TAN <BF)T Barron 010 N Day 3 

11 0041 MUSEVENI (BIPCaMr 08 MFry 1 

13 4033 GAYS FLUTTER C Nelson 8-6 OMdwtaS 

15 034 SCAWSBY LBS M W EastBfby 80 GDuffi(U7 

16 2400 PANBOY T Farhurst 83 KDarteyl 


C Dwyer 13' 
DufMd7 


1 004 ABOVE THE SALT NTkMer 011 

3 400 CRA(aBOARROCHJSVMson011. 

4 0 BfCHANTED COURT GOkkoyd 011 

5 0000 EUROCOND Chapman 011 DMdMMII 

6 00 FMEMlSFORtANTi)Wv011 J H Brown'S) 14 

9 23 RUSTIC EVES T Barron 011 NDay9 

10 00 SBtGEAMTMERYU.JWVWBW0n —10 

14 0012 CHANTILLY DAWN RWhttahor 08— KBkadMraw 

15 000 CREOLE BAVf9TFakhur«8tL^> J I 

17 003 OBJTEflllPF 

18 0021 BILLOT t)AR( 

20 0004-LYNHAEM H 

21 021 MAOAl«lAmT7E(D)JEtharrgton08. OWood12 

22 0000 MTMABB.MWEunad^r08 U Ifiniley (3) 1 


01 Gaya 
Museveni, 01 


a Butter. 01 Wabwah, 01 
Grey Tan, 101 Panboy. U-t 


01 Gnsttin. 


£ BAVfB) T Fakhura00_ JPa—teaw^O 

iteUFTW JrimyFazgaraM08-__- AMonrayA 
r BAR (D) M WJEasteitiy 8 - 8 . K HodgwnlS 


3.30 ASKE HANDICAP (S-Y-O: £4,084: Im 2Q(8) 

1 1302 SAMAMPOUR OR R Johnson Houghton 07. RDariey3 

2 021 DCSGRTOF Tran (USA) L Cumani 06_ PHNiteiatt 8 

3 000 LYPHLAW (USA) JDwiiap 02 GSaun7 

.A Many 4 
. MWW02 


08. 


[5 020 ABADJBIO Jinroy RttgmUd 
I 0 0400 SECLUBWEC TWflerW.; I 

8 0030 WARM WELCOME (te G ■■ 

9 2332 HELLO BENZ {61 M hIEbS 
13 HMD HONEST TOS-RWtoker 7-9 


09. 


03. 


_ GDufflakf 1 
A Shoults295 
SPGriffifnfi 


23 0002 PML£ARN(B) M Bnttan I 


KDoriey 2 


04 Samanpour. 10030 Desert of Wind. 01 Lyphlaw. 102 
3 . 7-1 Haio Benz; B-i Warm Waloome, 12-1 He 


01 Rustic Eyes. 100-30 Glloi Bar, Madame LefWta, 11-2 
Chanfifly Down, 7-1 Phiteam. 101 Creigendanech, 14-1 others. 


Toil 201 Sechnwe. 


Honest 


Redcar selections . 

By_Mandarin 

2.0 Madam LafRue. 2L30 Worthy Prince. 3.0 
Wabarah. 3 JO Lyphlaw. 4.0 Benarosa. 4.30 
Sanditton Palace. 

By Our Newmarket Correspondent 
2J0 Worthy Prince. 3.0 Wabarah. 3 JO Desert of 
Wind. 4.0 Benarosa. 

Michael Seely's selection: 4.30 Sanditton Palace. 


4.0 MIDDLETON MAIDEN STAKES (£684: Im Q 9 
160yd) (8) 


1 00U RACMG DEMON F Carr 4-9-7. 


2 0480 BBWUM LADY B McMahon 504 
3. 0 BEKADLOD Chapman 404 
5 « BANNEROL 

11 OH 




2J0 NEW MARSKE SPORTS CLUB STAKES (2-Y- 
0: £2^60: 7f) (9) 

.PteAlEVl 
(Bonds 


2 

3 

6 

7 

9 

12 

13 

15 

IS 


1 WORTHY PRMCEJWPayna 03. 
0 ATXKASHACKG Calvert 4-11- 


33 NORTON MBjODY (BF) M H E a^rtw 011- MBhtib 7 
BEGAHT BLEJ W Watts 06 ________ _ — 9 

MILL TRIP M PTOSCOn 06 GDuffiatdS 

SPATS CXMJJM80 J Btierington 06 N Wood B 

WOODPECKER HT7wnsor*ow 06 A Murray 2 

MAJESTIC MBS GOMroyd 03 DMchob4 

HtCOPHANA (TTY) D E Inctea 03 HBeecronB 

- . M "f od y- rt-4 vvoodpecker, 02 Worthy Prfnca. 

01 Mill Trtp. Mcophana. 101 Atakashack, 101 others. 


G Harwood 008 A Murrey! 

rc Thornton 308— JBM«tA7 

12 0422 BENAROSA PKeSaway 005 — „ Gey Kafewsy t)1 5 

15 004 NOBLE FUEJDtiriw 005 GDteWdfi 

16 003 ONLY FLOWER(B) C Thontton 005 — M TahOutt (7) 2 
110 NaUe Hie. 01 Berwrosa. 02 Only Rower. 102 

Bannerol 01 BernWi Lady, 101 others. ^ 

430 FOX HUNTERS HANDICAP (3-Y-O: £1,69fr .5f) 
(3) .** 

1 2003 GOtrSI 

3 1312 SANDfT 

4 2000 CAPEABHJTY POUND ( 

6 -000 HIGHLAND GLBtF Watson 013__ 

8 0231 BAHGAM PACK Mrs G Reieiey 03 

10 0000 THE BKZHnB) BBT Fakhunrt 00 . 

11 0000 MBS SERLBf A Balding 7-13 

14 9040 EASTERN OASB(BXD): 

18 4000 MBS TAUFAN M Brtttaki 7-7 

2-1 Sanditton Palace. 3-1 Berate Peek. 02 God's Ms. 01 
CapeateCty Pound. Hig ‘ 


JeKeB 0 wkar( 7 )l 
KDBdey* 


Mtss Tauten. 101 
other*. 


Htghtend Gten. -201 




WORCESTER 


Going: good to firm 

6 JO SANDWELL SELUNG HANDICAP HURDLE 

(£814: 2m) (13 rurmers) 

2 IPO- TOP GOLD (O-DT H QUbN 7-11-9 GMcCourf 

3 UK -0 SHARH) EXreRCNCE R Hattop 011-8 RGuHt(7) 


11 04-1 PRINCE MOOWG Baking 0114) 


12 0/00 GENOA MAGMFKO Mis M Babbage 011-0 


neahstm 


14 FPF- TURKANAT cesey 011-0. 
17 PO0 ABOUT TN* TOO » 


a 


4 IB-4 SOLITAIRE P Buttor 011-3. 

6 332- AGAIN KATHLEEN P Makin 01013— QCtsartea Jgoes 

7 334- HIGH DR Tucker 01012 SMcNeV 

8 002- THE KRACXP Daws 01012 PDevcr 

11 0M «X^affiDINAIB)BFor5ey0lM PCnmcher 

11 SS- 4-1 M_ R Straaga 

15 000 JUSTSPUOJP Sn*J] 5-106 PCtedteM 

16 000 UTTLEtMIPlERHoktef 4-105. 


.PlkHh 

IS OF0 JOHWTS SHAf^ES (USA) B Praeca 4-105 

SHottend 

* 193 O0PURP IEP Jonten 0105C Smttf. 

22 /O0 GniETS WAFFLE JCOSgnne 01 05 TPmtWd (7) 

02 Again Kathleen. 7-2 The Krack. 02 Top Gold. 11-2 
<3oMan Madina, IS - 2 ThateMt. 101 Sofftarc. *2-1 High Reel. 
14—1 others. 


PI 

H OKea 7-1013 _ RDunwoorty 
Jones 01012 RjBa^m 


^-7 


Worcester selections 

By Mandarin 
6.0 Golden Medina. 6.30 Dance The BIues.7.0 
Windbound Lass. 7.30 Kamatak. 8-0 Well 
Covered. 8 JO Arges. 


-- f Mrs V Teal 01011 Jl 

1904M REUAMDBI GML J Colston 01(W Jt_. 

. 02 Wnce Moon, 7-2 Oryx Ma)or, 01 Lor 

fitos®. 101 Remainder GW, 14-1 others. 

IL0 HALESOWEN HANDICAP HURDLE (£1^16: 

2m 2Q (IQ) 

J «*■ BRONSW (C-ffl J Jantdns 01Z-O J Akt 

3 IV BEAUHAVE7 W GM Turner 5-11* J 0 .OU 

5 04*i TARQOGAWS BEST RE Peacock 01013_ -1 

6 OU- MATCH MASTER 

7 000 SAILOR BUSS O I 

9 m- BALTIC SEARJudtes 01010 

« SS: £^SS&”!?o!»wnead0l08 

la HE SP’flT Monon 0UM)_ Ml 

« <W- ABAUCWr Mrs M Thornes 01 00 Rr 

19 /O 0 JADPS DOUBLE Mn> B Waring 0100— 

Tarqqgan'a Boat 7-2 Bronstd. 4-i WaB Oo-wfeSJ 

S^*oS?Bra hlTh<,BreeaB,10 ‘ 1 B *"“ N"* 1, 12-1 

STOURBRIDGE NOVICE HURDLE (£685r2ni) C 


ord 




“Vr, 


PDerar 


000 ARGES R HoBnsfiSBd 011 - 0 . 


mrr rrx -* 1 r *^ iB,,oaB — PDewf 

a hm P RIRC C OF AMPHEY M MnchHfa 01 1-0 SMdWfi 

6 000 PRINCE OF DAWN (USA) K Bric^wster 011-0 

WWtefliKdOrt 

in OW CKFBIC EHJ HW)bcr 011-0 Binnffc 

10 ___ SCAJ IfcwUCK FWMewn 011 -n , ■», anu itirn dt 

2 HUsSSpraad 

13 000 TOWEMNG GThorrwr 7 - 1 iJ 1 -_ , 

14 30 WXUAM PERHAPS C Reed 7-11-0 

It iE£ fJ*y°yKEDRTuOMr 01 (M 1 

17 OPP- JANAASjJonUns 4-1011 

« WCgWf Harris 01011 

^ **" M McConnack 4-1011 _ 

99 ren i¥5SS^LP. N & 0,son 4-1011 
S “2 M TtlWten 0109, 

15 m fftrara* MNIL 0 C Tudmr010fl 

Z7 P 20 TMWER GIFT T Morton 01 09 . 

1 £ aasaaBKa fa 


6 J0 WOLVERHAMPTON HANDICAP CHASE 

(£1,987: 2m 4f) (9) 

1 tt-1 ALLB lEWCASTLE (C-D) D Bswvih 0101 Bex) 

2 010 PLLETTS FARM (C-D) T Foriter 10T1-4 SoSSu 

3 3M BO^UAL BLAOqB) D McCffl 1011-1 

4 4t2- CS-T 1 C STORY (C-Ol J Jettons 0105 SSRaUECdes 

5 POP- MAT1VEB8EAK(USX)P9 1*8 W Sykes 0104^” 

6 M». KARS JP J OM 1010a — f. 1 

7 0WJ . TEaIjtV LAD ffj) & Motor II-101 fiCWoXal 

8 Fit* DANCE 1HEBL0ES(B) (USA) JWMwW 



9 on- KAY HMXaMBM Thomas 0100 R 

Evens A*ed Newcastle. 9-2 Imperial Btock. 11-2 Cottle 
Story. 01 Dance The Btoes, 101 Teteby Lad, 14-1 FOette 
Farm. 101 others. .. . .. 

7J) WALSALL NOVICE HURDLE (3-Y-O. £665: 2m) 

AffnsncCtUtMHQNM Pipe 107 PScadaim 

BALMAC HAIQ J Doughs-Home 107 G McComt 

BBMOCKK»toW BPmrel 

BRBfTKYB^XG 8a**« 10-7 ftGtmtm 

KL05n9IBIUUJSMsvn%7^ SMoSmS 

MOtnBEMS (TORJiiCfts 107, 

1 WINDBOUND USB RHOdar 107. 

3 AWT tSMAY Mte M RtaflU 102, 

CaTJOCHWY WG Morris IK. 

CULUaPSPET WGMorra 102 

PL ADOA P HMCBf PMaMnlGa^. OCteriesJanaa 

4 BU Perr8D AUGHTHtMCBSM102— MBwfcvm 

WH6PBIB) CHANT JJerfdn; 1D2 _j%ht 

2-1 Mndbound Late, tf-4 Artistic Cfwmpfen. 
Whispered Chant 01 Batnaotfg. 10-1 Aunt temay. .12-1 
Ktostarbreti, M-1 Ritetrte Daughter. 201 others. 

7 JO M. J. LOW JL SONS NOVICE CHASE (£1,602: 

2m) (10) 


1 

2 

3 

4 
6 
8 

ID 

12 

73 

14 

18 

a 

22 



8 103- LOR MOSS A L. 
10 3U2- ORYX MAJOR D I 


Todays course specialists :>-/■> 

NEWMARKET ! 

TRAB^^ H Cam. 90 wtanero from 342 nteoere. * Ja-. - 

H»nvo«LK teSSJwL X 'V ■•. . 
jockeys; s Caunen, 77 wbmers from 5S5 rides, i4Wk " s- • > . 
Oawst».ioirom7ai4^WReiMrS^M^WiS70 

haydock ^ * 

iBfroms? 55 3fL2%,-WW«- ' 

jgcn&ArM i fl. H y*°°d M tram 82 . 29X1%. ■ ^ .. > ,‘""S 

.4 t-. 

UNGFIELD 











Flow er 

mb agaj n 

1 s P«ta^ 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


SPORT 


31 


* 


n. 


CRICKET: ESSEX AND SURREY MAKE UP GROUND IN COUNTY CHAMPIONSHIP AS GLOUCESTERSHIRE ABE hfi n TO A DRAW 


Weather and 


Irnh Bin-, 

■ thill.- 

< 1*1 p: 

J».!' )•. . 

Iw!u !.IK 

t'"£ 

■4»«* r» 

. li Hjt .1 
Irt.s . 
H '*lil Hi J 

uit'i ■!. . 

la;. «... 
Mult.!!. !• 1; 
•nfle- » _ 

till 

ih* ri,,, 

V Hi...! ... 
-•’fill, • » . . • 
w-TU.-'i-. . 

teiini.-.;. i . 

a..- »t.<. ). _ 

f* ..I 
• „ i: 
It i’i l! : 1 

IU {.-.IV ,1 

» ik m.-:.! t 
If. tiJ-V 
Si.'ii ii 

■» !l‘. J1,. 

i.:: 

•(!;, l 

Mi •!»! •. 

? - * i : .«! i 

h> - r.i> ..... • 

(1 tlu.ii .... 

|ir. .- 


***** 





•l.l, . 


n , * 

msnr 

S. - ■ 




■•in. 


r, 




halt progress 
of leaders 




■fun 





By Iro Tennant 

; "CHELTENHAM: Gloucester- There were, of coarse, those 


•ii, 


?l . 1! 


MU . w.K 




if*. W»1. - 


a t. 

• ; , 

• it 

\ 


\jftirc (5pts) drew with Not- 
s-iinghamshire (7). 
_ ; .j31oucestershire, the 
"■championship leaders, were 
1 .content to let this match 
--’dwindle to a draw yesterday. 
'."They were in a strong enough, 
'-position to make a declaration 
. only when the day was almost 
" done. They must hope for 
better weather today when 
^Middlesex are the final vis- 
itors to the festival. A quicker 
^ • -^titch would also be of help. 

S,<,u " l - - it was the rain on the first 
.„day which spoilt the chances 
-“of a positive result Thai and 
-■ the slow pitch. No doubt the 
, feeling was - that not even 
—Walsh and Lawrence -would 
rbowl out Nottinghamshire in 
"‘30-odd overs. They looked a 
little worn out on Thursday, 
then, to let them 




Hbuu’ 

. ' •' 

"■“Bed J ! - 

,T V 

: i a 


; r ^H ;; 0 euer, 

Vr ' him 


Jn ‘ 1 11 -recharge their batteries. 




in (he crowd who disagreed 
awl they were not merely the 
drinkers. Most of them stayed 
to see Curran and Stovold, 
who dropped down the order 
owing to a finger injury; boost 
their averages. The crowd 
seemed unaware that the eu- 
phoria of Gloucestershire’s 
victory over Hampshire ear- 
lier in the week is not to be 
matched every time. Neither 
is a ran of five wins. 

For the records, Curran 
ended a lean time with the bat 
by scoring bis third 100 of the 
season, batting 117 minutes 
and hitting two sixes and 18 
fours. He and Stovold put on 
an unbeaten 191 m 141 min- 
utes. Curran reached 1,000 
Tuns for the season and took 
20 off the last over. It was by 
then cosmetic cricket 

GLOOCESTBtSHRE: first forties 346 (P 


BAinbodgo 105. A W SKWdkl 

, v| Hoe* * . dared as soon as they gained PWRomaineBbwee_JIl 
■ ffcr' -War fourth balling point - PBriN^VtadSnS? 


BIG RACE FIELD 


TtatCviSrd iSKCl 


'““■cl 3 CO 



HOfNIX STAKES 

iTVWl- < 

STrvrn • s . 

3eMii)SV • 

KWR ».*-• • 

um •• * • 

HW.,1 • 
tutor d ■ v 
UiA-; . 

If. 

mu* '• 

* t • i- - 

1% 


Ofcl 


.'■"at, -This they achieved thanks to a 
" nin * i.few bold strokes by Rice, who 
•fad recovered from the stom- 
ach upset that kept him in foe 
int pavilion on Thursday, 
was also on song in foe 
iekL He swung foe ball 
around, hitting Romanes's leg 
stump and having Bainbridge 
'•caught at first slip. Gloucester- 
shire were then seven for two. 
* They promoted foe promising 
;2CQeyne to have a swing but 
- -he; too, was picked up in foe 
;^Hps. When Tomlins was out 
, rat ;-57, and Lloyds at 38, well 
^caught at square leg, foe 
Headers reckoned ttusy should 
preserve their energies. 


_ o 
.37 
1 


-Y-ff 


•:-C _ 
> - " 
*ii 


M WAtteynec Johnson b Cooper „ 15 

KM Curran not out 117 

J W LJoyds c Bfcctl b Frarar-Olrtnfl __ 1 

AW Stovold not out , 7* 

Extras 0b 3, nb 1) < 

Total (5 wfctsdec} 249 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-1. 2-7. 3-45. 4^7, 

5- 58. 

BOWLMQ: Snatty ll^SOO: Rk» 14-3- 
40-2: CooperJZ-^37^: Frasw^Dwfino 
14-1-55-1: Broad 9-1464); Bkch 34M4fe 
Johnson 3-0-25-n. 

N0TTWGMAM8H»Es Fhst Mam 

BC Bread bwbBssMtoe 105 

R T RoUnson c and b BuntaidM 108 

C 0 FtBser-Daffcg c RusmI b Lawrence 
20 

M Hula nn4 nut 23 

*C E BHce not out 33 

' Extras [b 4. to 4, nt> 3) 11 

Total {3 «4ds dK. 75.1 oven) 300 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-221. 2-Z26. 3-255. 
BOWUNQ: Walsh 22-3-102-0; Uwranoe 
18-2-74-1; Balnbrfdgs IB-4-47-2; Umda 

6- 0-31-0: Tvnwa 11J-3384). 

Umpires: C Cook and R Palmar. 



Richards the toast 
as the best wine 
is saved till the last 


By Ahn Gibson 


H £S TON- $ UPER-MA R Er 
Somerset (2pts ) drew with 
Warwickshire (4). 

The Weston Festival has 
saved its best wine, or at least its 
best weather, till the lasL There 
were many arguments between 
lathers who thought there never 
was such a day for watching 
cricket and families who never 
thought there was such a day for 
the beach. As the day wore on 
more and more fathers seemed 
to be reluctantly losing the 
battle. Tbis was not too much to 
do with foe cricket which 
retained its interest and possible 
result until the last hour. 

Warwickshire, who began the 
day 236 runs ahead of Somerset 
with all their second-innings 
wickets in band, declared at 
lunch at 239. This was a fairly 
tough declaration, setting 
Somerset to score 356. With 
Botham out of the side and 
Roebuck injured, h seemed 
almost an exaggerated tribute to 
Richards. 

The first two men were out for 
32 and then Richards came in. 
Probably be felt he owed Somer- 
set, or anyway Weston, a few 
runs. At any rate he soon scored 
20 man over and their 100 came 
up at five an over. Warwickshire 
bowled steadily but began to 
make some slips in foe field. 
Somerset hopes were high. 

At tea the score was 136 for 
two with a minimum of 33 overs 
toga Richards was 75 and Rose 
52 but there was still the dickens 
of a long way for Somerset to 
travel. - 

Richards duly readied his 100 


and was loudly applauded, as he 
deserved to be. and then was 
bowled, uncertain whether to hit 
another six. when the total was 
196. He was lauded from the 
field but it had been a crucial 
blow. 

Somerset could hardly now 
expea to win. Nor did they 
Rose and Harden baited 
soundly through the closing 
stages, distinguished by the 
grumblings of foe Weston 
crowd, and made sure of what in 
the circumstances was 
honourable draw. 

WARWICKSHIRE: Rrs! Irrti™ 302 tor 4 
doc (P A Smith 87, A J Motes 68, O L 
AIMS 53). 

Socond Innings 
A J Motes cFMtonu Marks , 

P A Snxttic Daws B Marks . 

B M McMBjn not out 

0 L ARMS not out 


an 


Extras (0 & IB1. w 1. no 2 } . 
Tom (2 wMs ctec) . 


.102 
- 78 
.48 
_. 1 
. 10 
.239 


TG W Humpaga. Asif Dm. K J Karr, 0 A 

Thome, GJ Parsons, T A Minton ana *N 

Grftord cfcd not btt. 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-155. 2-235. 
BOWUNG: Gamer 34-7-0; Daws 90*3- 
Coombo 30-6-82-0: Marks 31-9-74-2; 
Ihchcrds 3-1-94L 

SOMERSET: First Innings 188 tor 1 dec (B 
C Ross not out 78. 1 V A Rtchw Os not out 
74). 

S e c ond Irani 
B C Rose not out . 


J G Wyatt bMcMBan 

N A Fatal e Humpaga b McMOan 

I V A Richard* b McMUan 

R J Harden not out 


Extras (b 1.1b l.wl.nb 4), 
Total (3 wfcts) . 


— 96 

— 5 

1 

.115 
.. 8 

— 7 
,232 


*P M Roabuok. V J Marks. tT GanL M R 
Davis, J Gamer and R V J Coombs did not 
UBL 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-30, 2-32. 3-198. 
BOWUNG: McMtea 10-1-47-3: Sntfh 7- 
1-31 -0: Parsons 9-034-0; Karr 7-032-0. 
Munton 9-0-40-0; Gifford 13-0-48-0, 
Uinpmn: M j Kitchen and J H Hampshire. 


YESTERDAY’S OTHER SCOREBOARDS 


5 0 PAL't r AN S, L « VAGlC NURSEST# 

<7 Y • ; 

: z.i “ r •'• 


!*r<' 
«. ■* 




Kent are denied by 
! a defiant Smith 


Bound for foe boundary: Bairstow, Yorkshire's captain, hits a four a gainst JLeicesterahire 

Gap closes Yorkshire beaten 
for tide by Yorkshiremen 


yw.f. «.a«.-il-ap 


■ By Richard Streetoa 

-CANTERBURY: Kent fSpts) 

" drew with Hampshire (4). 

.- „ This match briefly came to 
*' “ fife as foe last hour started and 
~ „Kem captured two wickets to 
' -^leave Hampshire 156 for five. 

needing 41 to avoid an 
runnings defeat -Robin Smith, 

‘who stood firm for_two4iours, 


his first run for half an hour, was 
caught at mid-on just as five 
o’clock was reached. In the next 
over, Tavar 6 , having a rare 
bond, with medium pace, caused 
James to glance a catch to leg 
slip against foe first ball he 
faced. -.Kent brought back 
Baptiste and Underwood but 


i, TouitZT Ja stalwart ' ipfriifer 'Si r woe hot able to break through 
Tremkti- and foe match was further. 


4C M ; 

> .’i.' t 


V:-- 

,4-V 


Pi 




• ANw^Siven up with 11 oven left. 

For most of foe day foe game 
seemed to be in a stalemate. 
«,*;*«» « a TEN STAKES 3. Cowdrey allowed Kent to accu- 
mulate a lead of 197 and there 
„ ■ • m a ■ - - a - ■ - i •■'*£** four hours 25 minutes left. 

— ^".-•wneii Hampshire started their 

. i > ■ •; second innings. It soon became 

»•••-• 1 . * , \\. . "clear that foe depklcd Kent 

* ' ’T 4 '. . ar -bowdingwas going to make little 
‘ !. impression on a placid pitch; 

.... r *. ,-lggjesden, the young Kent fast 

- bowler, could take no pan 
because of a badly strained side. 

... But Underwood, wearing a soft, 
k h k" ”*'• j-anDICAP ^'■’’surgical collar, to counteract foe 
eff&ts of a neck spasm, bravely 
' 'bowled 23 overs. He was obvi- 
I, e , . -oiisly in some discomfort but 

! •* . . . . . c jstHl managed to keep foe bats- 

: .men quiet without looking dan- 
.• gerous. 

• 4 - • * ■ ' *J«V^Greenidge bad gone cheaply 

• •at the stan of the innings but 
''-’Middleton and Turner stayed 
. *• •• • * ’.‘together for 23 oven. Tomer 

1 chopped a ball from Taylor on 
> * ' his stumps and Middleton, 

•’ >- after 140 minutes, was beaten by 

a ball from Underwood which 

turned sharply. Then Smith and 

/ Nicholas dropped anchor. 
-Nicholas, who did not score 


HAMPSHRE: Ffrtt Innings- 234 (N G 
CDMay 78 not oia; C S Cowdrey 5 tar 60). 


Second taningB 

C G GraenUge c Marati bBaptMe . 

T C MlddMon b Undenmood 

PBUjmerD Taylor- — 

RABmttinataut 


, 17 
49 

.33 

.55 

•M C J MchoMs e Cowdrey b AMtt _ 15 
jTavart 


K D James c and b 
T M Tremlett not out 


Extras (b 4, wl nb0. 
Total (5 wkts) , 


0 

... 5 

— 7 

iF 


FALL OF WICKETS: 1-27, 298, 3-118. 4- 
155.5-156. 

BOWUNG: Baptists 182-11-1; Cowdrey 
12-3-48-0; Blm 4-0-12-0: Underwood 
23- 1332-1: Taylor 30-14-1; Attett 9-1- 
27-1; Tavarti 5-33-1. 

KBIT: Rrat knfeigs 
MR Benson b Cowley _____ 

S G Hrnks b Marshal . 


By Peter Marsos 

The gap between Gloacester- 
sMre, the leaders in foe Britan- 
nic Assurance County 
Championship, and Essex, who 
bead the chasing group nar- 
rowed appreciably at Chelms- 
ford yesterday, where Essex 
scored a decisive victory by an 
innings and 92 runs against foe 
champions. Middlesex. 

Begin ing again at 142 for five, 
Middlesex bad lost foeir 
remaining wickets in 53 minutes 
for 32 runs. Slack, who made 92 
in a stay of 221 minutes, fell toa 
brilliant catch at slip by Prich- 
ard off Foster, whose four for 56 
brought him nine for 107 in foe 
match. Childs's slow left-arm 
bowling had played . an im~ 
po riant pan too, and his four for 
64 brought him a match analysis 
of six for 88 . 

Glamorgan foDowed-on 159 
runs behind Northamptonshire 
at Northampton. An innings of 
54 by Hopkins and anofoo 1 


By Peter Ball 


C J Tavarti c Partes b COwtey 

N R Taylor e Marshal b TiwrtWt . 

DGAsfettftwb Marshal 

*C S Cowdrey c and b Tramten _ 
E A E Baptiss b Connor _____ 
RM Bison notour . 


- 94 
131 
_ 14 

- 42 
_ 0 


tS A Marsh c Smith b Jam . 

Extras (t> 14, nb Q 

Total (8 wkls dec} . 


431 


Scorn at 100 ovws: 340 for 8 
0 L Underwood and A Iggtesden tfid not 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-191. 2-224, 3248, 
4-248. 5-324, 6-339, 7-3S8, 8-431 . 
BOWUNG: Marshal 26-8-34-2; Connor 
28^-t^8-1: James 19^-2-7B-1; Tramtesf 
22-1-832: Cqwtey 25.1-3-702: Nicholas 
2-1-9-0. 

UmpJres: J A Jameson and D R Shaphsrd. 


: Trio ordered to travel 


«£ HO. 


\ 


k r ; iAP 








Chris Maynard, who has 
missed foe last two champion- 
ship matches with an injured 
... foot, returns to keep wicket for a 
-Lancashire side hit by illness 
..and ipjury for their match with 
•.Derbyshire at Buxton 
“tomorrow. 

’*■_ * Michael WatJdnson. Paul 
- Allotx and Steven 
O'Shaughnessy are all doubtful 
' -and three players have been told 
-to travel. They are left arm 
‘ "reamer David Makmsoo, a 
regular until a month ago, foe 
“Danish-born Soren Henriksen 


and David Varey who played in 
four matches at the beginning of 
foe season. 

Northamptonshire have 
n amed an unchanged side for 
their Britannic Assurance 
championship match against 
Somerset starting at 
Wellingborough School tomor- 
row. They have no injury wor- 
ries and all-rounder Duncan 
wild is likely to replace Robin 
Boyd-Moss for the John Player 
League game between foe two 
counties, also at 
Wellingborough. 


Morris who made 52. out of I 
for three steered Glamorgan 
away from more trouble. In the 
morning, Glamorgan bad made 
a gallant effort to score the 77 
runs they needed to avoid 
following on. in this, Maynard 
made 70 before MaUcnder 
bowled him. and Derrick -76. 
Their stand of 136 for foe sixth 
wicket nearly succeeded in balk- 
U ing Northamptonshire's drive to 
30- enforce the follow-on. As foe 
20 scene shifted, Glamorgan's' ur- 
. gent need was to avoid defeat by 
an innings. 

At the Oval. Surrey had done 
well to beat Lancashire by tern 
wickets. Set to make 295 to wm. 
Stewart made 69 and Jesty 71. 
before Richards (46 hot out) and 
Oarke (29} provided foe swish 
in Surrey's laiL In the morning 
Abrahams had made 81 notout, 
and Fairbroiber 55, as Lan- 
cashire declared at 292 for four. 

Sussex, too. answered 
Derbyshire's challenge at East- 
bourne where they won by three 
wickets. Alikhan. Lenfaam and 
Colin Wells had all batted 
splendidly before Gould saw bis 
side home in an innings of 78 
not out. 


LEICESTER: Leicestershire (22 
points) beat Yorkshire (6) by 
seven wickets. 

Yorkshiremen dominated foe 
day at Leicester yesterday, but 
the three most successful were 
wearing Leicestershire's colours. 
Bairstow's positive declaration 
was made to look too generous 
as, for the second day running, 
Whitaker treated their increas- 
ingly threadbare attack almost 
with contempt, hitting an un- 
beaten 82 off 84 deliveries. Boon 
and Baldexstone made im- 
portant contributions as 
. Leicestershire won with more 
than two overs to spare. 

When the day began, there 
was still the possibility that a 
contrived result might not be 
necessary. It was increased as 
Hanley and Metcalfe fell in 
successive overs with the lead 
only 54. 

Baklefstone, however, had 
somewhat surprisingly dis- 
counted the likelihood of bowl- 
ing Yorkshire out on a wicket 
which got slower and slower, 
leaving Higgs standing pen- 
sively at slip and turning instead 
to Potter’s erratic left-arm spin 
even before Love had lost his 
middle stump to a Ferris deliv- 
ery which suggested the pitch 
still had its perus. Robinson and 
Bairstow thereafter justified 
Baideistone's diagnosis with a 
stand of 99 in 21 overs. 

The subsequent declaration 
left Leicestershire to score 238 
in 125 minutes plus 20 overs. 
They set off as if the tarot 
required hectic measures. 29 


mine in five overs for the 
both Butcher, skying a 


runscomn 
loss of 

return catch, and Cobb] who 
became foe ninth Ibw victim of 
foe match. 

Balderstone and Boon, how- 
ever, put Leicestershire back on 
foe rails with a stand of 73 in 24 
overs before Balderstone drove 
at a wide delivery to be well 
taken at slip. Briefly, as' 
Whitaker took his time to settle. 
Leicestershire's rate slipped, un- 
til a straight six announced that 
he was ready for action. 

YORKSHIRE: Rrat Innings 218 (A A 
MrtcaHe 60: K Hfcgs 5 lor 22. P A J Da 
Freltw 4 far 94). 

Socond fankags 

RJBtakoytowbTayior ________ 8 


Essex v Middlesex. 

AT CHELMSFORD 

Esau (24fitf±tw UkUum & br an 
mngsmtdSZnm. 

ESSEX: Firtt listings 382 tor 8 doc (KWR 
FWchorSI. A WUEy 87. JP Stephenson 
54: 3* J F SyMK 4 far 102). 
MIDDLESEX; Rrat Innings 11B(N AFosfar 
5 tor 51). 

Socond fnntnoB 

AJTMBercHsrdebLBW 5 

WN Slock cPrtdiardbFootw 92 

KR Brown c Prichard b CMOS IB 

R O Butcher Ibw b Foster 3 

*C T Radley Kw b CMds _ 

J DCarr bAcfoto 

I »R Downton tow b Foster 
F Sykes c Border b Foster 
Hughes 


GC Holmes not out 


Extras (b 4 , r> 5, nb3) . 

Total (3 wkis) . 


SPI 


ibCMds 


W W Daniel st Bums b Childs 
NG Cowans 


Extras (bl. to 4,wl) 
Total 


_ 9 
_ 12 
— 2 
_ 26 
_ 2 
_ 1 
_ 0 
_ 6 
174 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-9, 348,362. 4-96, 
3137,3143.7-182,3173.31 A 13174. 
BOWLING: Lever 132-431: Foster 20-4- 
534; CMOS 27.1-364-4, AcBeU 32-31. 
Umpires: D Uoyd and R A WMto- 

Snrrey v Lancashire 

AT THE OVAL 

Surrey (Zipts) beat Lancashire (5) by 2 
imcMs. 

LANCASHIRE: First Innings 192 JS T 
Ctortre 4 tor 51. M A F*hm 4 tor 47). 

Second Innings 
G Fowler tow b Pocock 


20 

_12 

— 138 

FALL OF WICKETS; 1-96. 2-97, 3138. 
BOWUNG: MaBander 7-1-130: Capet 3 
330; Harper 14-7-230. N GBCOOk 133 
270; G Cook 33130; Water 13334-1; 
Boyd-Moss 143231; Bailey 432-2-1. 
Umpires: B Laadbeatar and A J T 
WMenaad. 

Sussex v Derbyshire 

AT EASTBOURNE 

DERBYSHIR E Rrat timings 351 tor7deb 
(A Hril 130 not out, R Stwnta 84 not out) 


*K J Bametl c to Roux 
B J M Maher not out 


Second Inntogs 

KbW&s, 


A HBc Parker b Gould 


JE Morris c Standing b Gould . 
B Roberts not out. 


Extras (to l.nbl) . 
Total (3 wMs dec} . 


169 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-20. 377. 3129. 
BOWLING: Reeve 33130: Wtoia 32-23 
1: Green 103330: Gould 13367-2; 
NMm 34230; Part* 1-3441. 

SUSSEX: First trams 205 lor 2 dec (PW 

G Parttor 100 not out R l Ataman 64) 
Second Innings 

R I ABctan c HU b Finney 

_ nbWsmer 

PWGParirer 


GD Monetise Lynch b T att ham . 
J Abrahams not out ______ 

I Foley b dartre . 


68 

25 

81 

5 


A A Metcalfe c Cobb b Taytar 
S N Hartley tow b De Frwfas . 
P E Robinson 


J D Love b Ferris . 
fO L Bairstow . 


35 
22 
12 
10 
- 1 
.27 
.15 
.16 


P Cant* c and b Boon _____ 

P J Hartley c Higgs D Boon — 

Extras (b1.fc7.wt, nb7). 

Total (7 wkts dec, 673 overs) __ 256 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-19. 369, 373. 4- 
88. 5- IK. 3232. 7-256. 

BOWUNG: De Fretoa 17-4431: Taylor 
14-7-132; Poner 17-1-81-0: Fafria31-23 
1; BaktofSto ne 33234k Boon 830-433. 
LBCESTERSHRE: First Innings 235 UJ 
Whitaker 100 not out). 

Second kmfciga 

I PButotwrcmlbPJ Hanley 7 

■J C Balderstone c Carrs* b Hatcher 48 

R A CobbJbw b Derate — 5 

TJ Boon not out 78 

-82 
-19 


NHF e kfarofcarc R ic tia id s b Pocock 55 

*J Simmons notout . 36 

Extras (b 14. to 3. ob 5) 22 

Total (4 wfcta dec) 292 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-82. 2-115. 3127. 4- 
212 

BOWUNG: Ctortte 17-6331; -mamas 13 
43Mk FaNhsm 14-2-531; Pocock 2313 
332; Medlycott 27-7-117-0- 
8URREY: first tonmgt 190{M A lynch 72; 
J Simmons 4 tor 21 )T 

Second Innings 

A R Butcher cFairbromerb Simmons 26 

DJmomasc and b Patterson 10 

A J Stewart c Waflansonb Patta reo n 55 


Extras (b 6. to 3 nb 2). 
Total (7 wkts) . 


72 
13 
.. 1 

77 
50 

78 
_ 7 
_ 4 
_ 6 
- 11 

319 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-30. 2-31, 3143, 4- 
182. 5-263. 3275. 7-298. 

BOWUNG: Malcolm 14.1-1-91-2; Warner 
11-3532; Rnney 16-4-52-1; Mtoar 131- 
92-0; Snarma 4-323-2. 

Umfties: B IteSeston and P B Wight 


AM Greene Mamies t 
. KcMBerbMateokn. 

N J Lenham c Maipias b Warner . 
CM Watts c Maher bSharma __ 
-NjGouMnotOiit — 

G S le Roux b Sharma _ 

D K Standing b Malcolm 
DA Reeve notout . 


CHAMPIONSHIP TABLE 



TE Jesty bFoltoy 

MALynchbFofey™ 
fC J Ricrtards not out . 


J JWhkakar notout 


Extras 0>7,to9.w1,nb2)- 

ToW (tar3 wkls, 544 overs) 238 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-7. 2-29, 3102 
BOWUNG: Danib 14A4631; P J 
Hanley 6-3431; Can** 17-3630: Shaw 
4-1-130; Hetcher 131-431; Love 1-33 
0. 

Umpires: A A Jonas and R JuBaa 


tCJ 

MAFekhamcsubbWatkinson . 
STCtortrec Abrahams bSnvnons _ 29 

K T Medtycon c Want b Simmons 5 

■P I Pocock not out 0 

Extras (b 5, to 9. w2nb1) 17 

Totai(8wkts) 295 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-33. 247, 3185, 4- 
185. 3194. 3217. 7-283. 3294. 
BOWLING: Patterson 16-1-99-2; 
We tton ao n 11-0-64-1; Simmons 103-1- 
533: FMey 132-632 
Umpires: J H Harris and B J Meyer. 


Hampshire (2) 18 
Yorkshire (11) 18 
Notts (8) 18 

Worcs(5) 17 
Kent (9) 16 

Northants (10)16 
Darbys (12) 16 

Lancs (14) 17 

Somaraet(17) 16 
Sussex (7) 17 

Warwicks (15) 17 
ic\l) 17 


D MBvrl Pis 
8 40 51 235 
5 37 51 200 
5 35 54 1B5 
8 41 51 172 
7 38 50 168 


4 10 50 46 168 
2 10 44 53 161 

5 8 42 50 156 
4 8 32 53 149 

2 10 40 38 142 

4 8 27 50 141 

3 11 35 40 123 

2 11 41 32 121 
7 7 30 40 118 

3 12 36 43 113 
9 7 29 52 97 

5 11 31 34 81 


i in brackets 

b's total Inckides atom points tor 
as Maned level 


drawn match where scores I 


Northants ▼ Glam 

Malvemians six of best 


Jarvis setback 

Paul Jarvis, the Yorkshire fast 
bowler, aged 21 , has injured his 
back and has pulled out of the 
TCCB team to play New Zea- 
land at Edgbaston next week. 
His replacement will be an- 
nounced over foe weekend. 


Old Malvernians have 
reached the final of The Crick- 
eter Cup for the sixth time and 
will meet Downside Wanderers 
at Westminster Sell oofs ground. 
Vincent Square tomorrow. 

It is foe first time Downside 
have reached foe final which is 
administered by The Cricketer 
and sponsored by Moet & 
Chan don. They should prove 
well-matched sides, although 
perhaps Downside's passage has 
not been quite as testing as foeir 
opponents. They have beaten 
Sherborne Pilgrims, Lancing 
Rovers, Felsted Robins and 
Marlborough Blues. Their bai- 
ting strength has been impres- 
sive. Bernard made 100 against 
Felsted, Halliday, better known 
as a Bath rogby player bats at No 
4. Henderson, late of Glamor- 


gan, follows him. while Cottcrril 
and Barrington rescued them 
with a stand of 130 against 
Marlborough. 

The Malvernians have de- 
feated Old Merchant Taylor’s. 
Old Tonbridgians, the five-time 
winners. Charterhouse Friars 
and Oundle Rovers, foe holders. 
A partnership of 157 between 
Roger Tolchard. foe captain, 
and Jeff his brother, saw them 
through against Tonbridge and a 
fine match- winning century by 
Mason against Oundle were two 
of foe highlights. They can call 
upon three genuine all-rounders 
to give depth to foeir attack. If 
MacLaurin, of Middlesex, and 
Ellcock. of Worcestershire, are 
available, they will be hard to 
beat. 


NORTHAMPTONSHIRE: Rrat Innings 441 

! 148 not out, G Cook 120. 
i 86. A J Unto 56). 

GLAMORGAN: First Iraaius 
J A Hopkins c and b N G B Cook — 34 
*H Morris c Watorton h Maftrator — 16 

DB Parable bCapel 3 

G C Holmes b Harper _____ — 21 

MP Maynard bMalender 77 

R COntongcG Cook b Harper 14 

J Derrick b N G B Cook 

P D North c Ba4«y b Harper . 


D J Hickey not out , 

Extras to 4. to 11, w 1. nb 15) 31 

Total 282 

Score aMOO over* 223 tor 5. 

FALL OF MCWET£1-3p. 336. 4- 

95. 5-120. 3256. 74858. 3279. 9282. 13 
282. 


BOWUNG: Mattartow 21-383* Cwel 
1: Harper 43315-83-4: N G B 
Cook 39-12-77-3: G Cook 1-1-04; Water 


132-331: 


32-11-0. 

Second 

J A Hopkins c Waterier b 
‘H Moms b Bailey . 
DBParamehttwfct 


b Pauine. 


• Grevflle Starkey, who rode 
Dancing Brave to victory in foe 
2.000 Guineas and Eclipse for 
Khalid Abdulla, but had u> be 
replaced by Pat Eddery because 
or injury in the King George VI 
Queen Elizabeth Diamond 
Slakes, has not lost the ride. Guy 
Harwood, foe colt's trainer, and 
Gram Priichard-Gordon, 
Abdulla's racing manger, were 
adamant yesterday at Lin^fidd, 
that Starkey retains the ride on 
Dancing Brave for the rest of foe 
season. Pritchard-Gordon 
stressed: “ Starkey is Dancing 
Brave's jockey and that is the 
way it is. He only stepped down 
at Ascot because of iqjury.” 

• Heart Of Stone, foe winner 
of the Dormansland Handicap 
at Lingfield Park yesterday, for 
R eg Ake hurst win be trained for 
foe Free Handicap Hurdle at 
Chepstow in October. Akehurst 
won the Chepstow race last year 
with Nebris. 


BOWLS 

Pair set 
sights 
on gaining 
treble 

By Gordon Allan 

David Bryant and David 
Rhys Jones, of Oevcdon. have 
been together now for 21 years. 
They first played as a pair in 
1965 when they won the Somer- 
set. English and British Isles 
titles. 

Last Saturday thev won foe 
Somerset title again. In the 
Gateway English Bowling 
Association championships 
which begin at Worthing tomor- 
row and end on August 22, they 
will try io complete the second 

leg ofa celebratory treble. Their 
first round opponents, at Wor- 
thing Pavilion, are Paul Clarke 
and John Stephenson of 
Bcteravc. Leicester. 

Two former champions Andy 
Thomson (1981) and Wynne 
Richards (1984) are among the 
qualifiers in the singles. So is 
Kevin Bone, the runner-up to 
John Bell in 1983. Richards also 
appears in the fours and Bone in 
the pairs. 

Tony Allcock has come 
through in the singles and 
triples, fn the singles he finds 
himself with a potentially awk- 
ward first round match against 
Steve HalmaL Allcock won the 
English indoor singles last year 
and would like io emulate 
Bryam, the only man so far io 
have won the national indoor 
and outdoor titles. 


Mariner sails on 

Paul Mariner, the former 
England and Arsenal forward, 
completed his free transfer to 
Portsmouth last night and will 
make his Fration Park debut 
today against Watford. “I had a 
terrible time at Arsenal last 
season because of injury but this 
move to Portsmouth has given 
me a great challenge." Mariner, 
who is 33. said. “They are the 
biggest club outside foe first 
division and I hope I can help 
them win promotion this 
season." 

Red Rovers 

Third division Brisiot 
Rovers, who play at Bath City's 
ground this season, have debts 
of £342.000. including a bank 
overdraft of £160.000. it was 
announced yesterday. The club 
are to sell their training ground 
in Bristol for £250,000 and lease 
the ground back at £ 20.000 a 
year. 

Newcastle worries 

Paul Stephenson and Ken 
Wharton, of Newcastle United, 
are likely to miss the first month 
of foe football season. Stephen- 
son is still worried by an ankle 
injury, while Wharton's knee 
injury, which kept him out for 
mosi of last season, has under- 
gone further complications. 


YACHTING 

COWES RESULTS: Island Safe* Cfefc 

ftaoMtoSomta: t. ftuaattiirR j Sanfc2. 

Aftormought (W and S Jacobs); 3. Tiger 

Rag TC Sanderson). Six Mator 1. Razrte 

Dazzle (T Russel and T Sumij: 2. 

ScraundalJB Owen), only two bustled. 

Eteheft: 1.Stamol(M Sd***):2. Vixen (F 

ONeifc 8, Aquawt (P Chisholm and R 

it Danny 1. Dxrtus (G Caws and 

2. Damsel (T Stakton and J 
3. Lam Garou VUI (J Ctortik 

' wk 2. 


(J BuckweB and J Prunty); 3. 
(P Andreas). RaiMnga 

I.BtuaJayJJ Cleave): 

_ . le* 3, Taia (Lord and 

Lady Brabazon of Tara). Suib anm (Sun- 
beam Trophyt 1. Lucy (P Fowta* 2. 
Ouery (J_ Oldham); 3. Beury (R Dale). 

toird(N 
and M 
M and Band I 


Victory {%*wte Trophyt 1. Kadi 
HB and D Uoydfc 2. Eatfe p] 
Bunyard): 3. Shearwater {Dr M and 

Me*). 024: 1. Uttte Eagle (Ajgtanl 

ISAK 2. Jrtapap Dwtoy andMU i*Pi 
Smokey Joe (J Ctark). SCOD: 1 . Macaroon 
(J C Schmas); 2. Tuonela (R Harding): 3. 
Msler Jngto (T Robwtson). Manaaim t. 


Slwon (R 


. 2. Zara (A Boyd); 3, 
(H Eddowes). FMng 15 (Tudor 
1, Fommor (P Coryn); 2, 
r(DLees|; 3. Heshdance (R 
Ontamattonel Pm Pol): 1, 



phr 1, Sidewinder u Oswald): 2. Fair 
Lady (E Juer): a Backfish (T 6 C Herring). 
Clan 2: 1 agual . Bamsneba Sir Maurtc* 
Lamg) and thee Spears (E G Byrne); 3 
Whw Gold IN (A F IMIer). Qm 3: Sk boo 

(J McDonald): 2. Courtesan (C Brown); 3. 

Hy Flyer (D Hwidtoy). On 4: J Samuel 
Wm cup: 1. Slareom H (P Dickson); 2, 
Diamond JO Sanders): 3. Pu Presto (M 
Dubocd F Bedel). Class 5, tatond Cm 1, 

Tattsman (M StapHans); 2. ngfrtor (W 

CoUnsz 3. First Quencher (B PoueyL 
Ctoeso, Cowes Town Cupc 1. me FMng 
Fteh (D HopWnst 2. Gusto I (A S S. 

H*Mpn-Laver);3. Quit (L Thomas). Class 

7: CsrtnenaJC WobeW); 2. Buntote P 
Chtowett X A Tomi*insl; 3. Blue Rtotion (K 
M Ramp). SkHUK 1. Warp Factor U. R 
FtoMen 2. suadon. P Nicholson: 3. 
Stsrshme. W Smith. OOO 34: 1. 
VWidspra®. p Meson; 2. Redcoat. M 

Pheby: 3. Ms*ay Mouse of Beaufieu. K 

Robinson. Contessa 32. Jeremy Rogers 

Cupc 1. Sxrara. P Vatte: 2. RoutotSTj 
Metmaws l H Dares; 3. Muery. N 
Patdnson. Impels: 1. Tantrum, R Posrce: 

2. Kudu. A C Coot; a Swara. J & T 

GoodfeOow. 


»«’ 


YESTERDAY’S RACING RESULTS 


Lingfield Park 

‘^Ctoingx good 

--Qjg (71)1. DEPUTY GOg aW OHfT toflS. 

'lilfHUN U^Bubon | 

tasaasssvt 

^ionite. Mam Lass. Tom's LitBe B 

.am l»l. a. W. hd. a L F 
: New ma r k et Tote £400: S1.1t 
n£9i3Q.DF:£20O. CSF: S4.78. 

230 (61) 1. PARKLANDB BELLE (8 
Bouse. 7-2 1WT, 2. Flying SBenfly (D 
■-WflBtams, 12-1); 3. KMm Dana (W 
Newnas, 131). ALSO RAN: 5 Gone For K, 


Putooroctoh. Tote: £2.1 a E1.1D. El JO, 
n 20 . DfTeSJXJ- CSF: 29.77. 

400 lint 2f| 1, HEART OF STONE (S 
' Whitworiti. 9-4)2. AM: Mama (B Routs. 4- 
1); 3. Taft of Gtoty (N Cartes. 2-1 lav). 
ALSO RAN: 4 Straight Through (5th), 8 
Redden (4 th). 14 Sevan Swattows (Kh),33 
C hati ats pa rfc. 7 ran: nr Tabatdar. 2L XL 
2KI, art ltd, 6L R Akeiiusutt EMom. Tots 
£3.70. 21-80. 21J0XJF: S5a CSF: 
£1239. 

Jackpot: 243006. PfacepoL £500. 

Redcar 

Gotiigrgood 

1.40 (1m 2Q 1. RUSTIC TRACK (ft 
VcKere. 12-1); 2. Dominion Prtncsss 
VBndy Carnr, 31L 3, San dDoBat (0 
Arcy, 2-1 tart. ALSO RAN: 132 Kavaka. 



« l.v‘sfc' lU ‘ r- ~ M » J. LOW* TOM 
. .. V tavfc 4. oenwevtow (M \inj*raffl. i 




.trvJ-M 


• Hi* 1 ' 


-**■**' 




V-- 


»‘.i • 


' £ . 2'iL M J Haynes at Epsom. Total £330; 
.mV ^-30. ES40. SS - B0 - ™=fS30a CSF: 
S&-77. Bought in 1,150 gn». 

9L0 (60 1. LONELY STREET (L 

Hope (N Car- 

Wemhanv5-l 

igheffl. 

RAN: 1M War Wagon, 8 Pine 
r ti?w« (fitt). io Betts Tower, 14 Crasta 
Leap. MaWha (5th), Mta Jubea. Santefla 
: PaLl6Shadnofmie.20Hfldaiartous.25 
- siutoee, 33 Datoaan Bay, Lauries Trojan, 
, Naughty Ntotay. Lmton $ttrcfty. IB ran. 3L 
MLlnl nk. P Arthur at Aston 
Tirrold. Tott: £5.10: 21 JG 2130, £130, 
E3M. DFi £920. CSF: 24834. Tricast 
22187Z 

-■330 (5fl 1 MUKHABBH (T Wftems. 11- 
10 tar): 2. Ctorentia (U Wlgham. 5-1h 3. 
i Samtoon (L Jones. 16-1). ALSO RAN: 8 
, Juvanflede6(H|o«H Mlh). 7 AtedL 10 
Enchantod itan, RWra Or Mar (5to}, 14 
'WtM Meld (6W. 25 Ciwywood Sam. 9 
ran. 2M. 1 H W. 4L hd- C J Benstted « 
“ aom. Tola: £230. £1,10. 2130. S84G 
i £4.60. CSF: £735- 
4J»(1m4i) 1. NEWQUAY (GSortcey. 15- 
9 tar); 2. oammendw Bette (P HamUett. 
w) 3. LouHadtoMwe (R Cochrane, M). 

""v-sn 


Bishop Auckland. Tote: 2)330: £230. 
£1.70, £130. Dft £4230. CSft £7732. 
TMcact E188JJ7. Kavaka finished second. 
Otter a stewards inquiry,, was dtoquaROad. 

2.10 (71) 1. NEDS EXPRESSA (M Wood, 
4-n 2. Cantata Sound IS Cautfwi. 1-4 

tortain Award (NConnorton,l 

RAN; 9-2 


■ B-ti 


(5th). 

man Bay. Lauries Trotan, 030. DP. £43a CSR E14.1G a Z Fleet 


-i i 


■•Ml: 3. Louw 

ALSO RAN: 8 

Stay (4ihL 14 

■ e (Sih), 50 Mias Bhrohett. 8 ran. 


~Sagarame 

• hl ii. ia 4i. 


2%L G Harwood to 


-tar 

TheMezak. 13-2 Wefl Rigged (4m).7Air 
Command (6OT, 153 Heavenly Hoofer. 14 
Ruining Bud. Frtrne Ot Heavea 25-1 Top 
mn'Lane (5m). 33 Always Natlra. iiran. 
21H, 6L nk 4L 4L H Wharton at Mkkttehem. 
Tow: £830: £220. £130. 2330. DF: 
£830. CSF: C2&68. Tricast £261.15. 

3.10 ( 

4 fa«k ■ . , 

2B^^(5th). 93 

tlptand Goom (Sto). 0 ran. 1L 1 » IK 2L 
2 sT M Frascon at Newmarket- Tote: 
£2.10: £1.10, £2.10- DP £3.10. CSR 
£8.15. 

i mUCESSANDROMBM 
; 2. Alwratan p Robxt- 


eon, 5®: a (HR0LE NESS p TWder, 4- 
7 tar). JU30 RAN: 8 Dh Etoflee (480. 4 
ran. nk. itoL 71. G Prifchanl-GonXxi at 
Newmarket Tote: EB.70. DF: £8.70. CSP 
£2531. Sold D W Chapman 3JS00 gns. 

4.10 (Iffl 4f) 1, BUCKLEY IB&* 
Evens - mv); 1. ROYAL DYNASTY (S 
Catam. 6% 3. HU Knowl(B irtomoa 
5-1). ALSO RAN:* Noble Rise mjl 
Sometting State (6m). ISTumina (5th). 
100 Gunner Mac BOD NtohottsL 7 ran. 
dead heat iW. 71. 3l. hd. Buddmr L 
Cumani at Newm a rk o t Bcrrai Dyracty G 
Wnm « Newmarket Tota:£1 30 Buddey 
and £230 tor Royal Dynashr. £130 
Buckley £230 RoyaL Dynasty. OF: 030. 
CSP Bucktoy and Royal Omasty £3.74. 
Royal Dynaaytad Buckley £8.18. 

440 ten 1.1. SEEK THE TRUTH (S 
Caturien.4-0 lav): Z Qhanaytai (A Murray. 
3-1); 3. So KM (N Connortan. 9-1). ALSO 
RAN: 7 Roman Bette. 18 Lascivious Wert. 
Supercube (4th). 25 KMte Says . Uaatt 
33 Ahle Abbe. Emsteys HoMs 
iLoch. Mies Zola. 100 Trefae 

13 ran. nk. 1»L hd. 71 hd. H 

Cectt at MwnahcgL Totate.10: £im 
E1.7G £2.70: DF: £230. CSP £416. 
Ptocepot £21130. 

Haydock Park 

* ' Good. 

1 . Jm Spwdal (LChamock7. 
a Z Fleet Fact (9-4 tar): 3. Shutttacock 
Gk1 (8-1). 8 ran. 21. a. M.W. Easttrtw. 
Tote: £600: 2130, £130. £130; DP 
n230-.CS- £11.74. 

630(60: 1. MazaikanoMjJ Btoasdale 
93k Z Good Time Gal (10030 Fawk 3. 
Brawto Tima (7-1). 10 ran. NR: Weteti FW 
3toL HL C Thonnon. Tote: £5.70; £1.40. 
£130. £2.70: DP ES30. CSF: El 670. 




ipum.20 
to ito. 


Newmarket 

Going: Good to Firm 
60 {Si24yd):1.Sarfraz(G Starkey 85- 
40 Fw): l &a Httl 111-2): 6 Marton 
(12-1). B ran. Nk, 41- aitewood. Tote 
£2.70: El 30. £136 £2.60: DP £830; 
CSF: £12.83. 

«35J7f);1.Shad*OfPatorrvvffiamB- 
1k 2 Trynova (3-1 Favk 3. Tula's Beauty 
p-1). 12 ran. toL 1V4L P Haatan. Tote 
030: £210. £130, £930; DF: £730: 
CSP £2836 


330 (1m If) PH 

(G DumeU. 8-1): : 


Duffield lands 
21V2-1 double 

George Duffield was in good 
form at Redcar yesterday, land- 
ings 21^-1 double with Joist ( 6 - 
4 ) and Princess Andromeda (fi- 
1). Joist, another winner for foe 
Newmarket trainer Sir Mark 
Prescon, led three furlongs out 
and had to be hard driven to 
score by a hauling length. 
Princess Andromeda, trained 
Gavin- PriirhanJrGordon, 
10 provided Princess Anne 
with her first winning ride at the 
course on Monday, led a furlong 
out and was ridden out strongly 
to take foe Stockton Stallholders 
Selling Stakes by a neck. 

Steve Cauthen took his num- 
ber of winners to 99 when Royal 
Dynasty dead-heated with 
Buckley in the Duncan 
Norevelie Stakes and Seek The 
Truth took the. EBP Si Arlington 
Maiden Fillies Stakes. 

Inishpour repeated jits victory 
of last year in the Bonusprint 
Handicap when scoring an easy 
two-and-a-balf lengths victory 
from Maravilla in foe hands of 
Martin Brennan. The 23-year- 
old rider was gaining only his 
second success on the Flat, but 
can claim the full 71b-allowance 
despite having 126 winners over 
the jumps. 

Hairy Wharton saddled the 
winner this year, but Ron 
Thompson was responsible m. 
1985. 


FOR THE RECORD 


BASEBALL 


NORTH AMERICA: American LMflOK Toron- 

to Blue Jiys 5. Kansas Cky Royafc 4; 
Miwaukee Brewers 10. New YtacYntees 2; 

Texas Hangers 9, BsBimora Ottafas 8; 

Cawoma Angola 4, Sestta Uarewra 3 (11 

nwig); D«fMT^ers B, Cteteand Indtans 2. 

Et Louis Cardinals S. 

& Montreal Expo* 5. 

PMstxxgh Prates 4: Now York Mats 12. 
Chicago Cuba 3. 


HMfttti (KtimRonl OTJ S MeKBrx* (Ctoton 

Braes) lost to L water (Grange) and DEmy 

(Heritage). 3 and Z S Bmnatman (CnxNn 
Say) mo A Eton 1 


(Ennis) and M 

and a T MdntMh (Tarrfouse) and N Duncan 

■ (Don Acoorai ton to K Sheehan (Cork] and D 

ISgai?sa!!g ga , CT 

Rimott (Co Armagh) wSRHutwi (Ardgten). 


RusBOll (CO Armagh) 

3 and 2. 

iomK first): I 


BOWLS 


BOURNEMOUTH OPEN: Wft monte R RldoW 
(LMS Headstone Lane) 21. J Floater (Bourne- 
mouth) 17: W Hatto (WUchens) 21. P 
Woocfiiratd (Avenue Corenhy) 18; A Jeckeon 

Newman (ReedinM 21, cStertki (PoofePk) 19: 
J Morgen (Barry Athletic) 21. W Hayward 
(Preston Pk) 3; G Ctark (Taltorri) 21. D 
Candtoh (HanWtod) 19; M Pita (Sir Parab 
Crake) 21. C Pshar (Wessex) 18: D Sndl 
(woonon Basseo) 21. R Hetara (Bristol) 13: 
GCanxnn Cdyot EMZl.CEfartonfTaBy Ho) 
1ft □ Tflytor (BR) 21 , U VKxxfley (S^wxn) 
11: 1 Boyb(Weriir1dgg)21. J3HawBB<Norto* 
and Noiwien) 13: NSrrMi (Brockanhurat) 21, 
P Sterenoarg (Rrema Saawed) ft R Kemp 
(Rwnrmng ft) 21. A Barry (Taunton) 17; J 
Wright (Cadoxon) 21. G Watson (BOA) ia. 
Stem mad: Hatto 21 . Rk*M 17; Jackson 21. 
TuArtwnor 13, Nawman 21. Coomber ft Ctarti 

21. uergra 1ft snal 21. PhiTiM 11;1tiytor21. 

Camaon 14; Bayta2i. Sn*n 9. 


(England names’ first): Rrasomee: S 
(PartjaonelandWHenrytPo rteriP fcibcJUar 

tote J Peyn* (S«v»wv») and v c ox (w 
Essex) ion w A Sabnan (AntoeeM and D 
Dewet (AJuraeM. 3 and It 6 Evans 
(Wotaew) and? Hwring (CoaesmorellBtMd 
with W Lockett and C _Pte (Padeswpod and 

B!£!SSRS.si 

lost to lee. 2 how Edglejr WPIBL 8 irto ft 
Bemen hated wta Wftams: rtekman tahred 
wtth O'CbtoU; Rnne bt Sahnan. 3 and 2: D 
Praesar (Moaatey) « Loctotl4ar*d3. Era* 
bt D Davies. 6and4 : Ctate pewdBon, 3i ind 
4 ; but n Wasson. 1 hole: Bamgate hand 
wta S Dawes JWernow ‘ 

UNK* Soudan 


I3VEN UNICft Scotland v Sweder 1 (Septa 
fraft C Brooka and 0 Camek hated war ij 
U mbra and C Harare J MacGregor and J 
MWganMJ Pimep*« id J Hy aro m.4 and ft 
Cterenomene and K Water t*C3mxnbarg 
andPJonanra o n.1 


.one hole.. 


CYCLING 




LEKXSTEft BiWan mk 
Praflantonsl ftnrtuur 1. G MBcfted (Percy 
Mon. Condor CyriesL 10t*R 2 I Fegen 
(PropjctAif. Hianax), 11; ft D MUw IwSer 
Tech). 15. 4. c LtghTttxk (Snooker Ctob. 
TixietnomB). 18 wnatew tan dem sprtnt 
flnft M Borman (NotSnghsirrt,C Pyait(Stc*a) 
W S ftukina S Biydonjmtbuiah), 2-0. 
Third Piece: h MKMB (Zorte), /SmoU 
(Long Eaton). 


GOLF 


SEATON CAREHA. Boys 1 tolerae l io nete : H- 

nat toast posmow smtaa 1, Ireland 4 
(Scottish names Draft rmra aiea *. a Tm 
(I rvine) and G King (Snotu) tost 10 P Gnotxn 
and Q McHeu (Werreraxant). 3 and 2 A 


A Benz: K Poettawte R WMo n. _tite 

T ft BKJera: LRWw 8 
Kig^O^ Massey, R Jta“i c Mackey; L 

MOTOR RALLYING 

BRITISH MIDLAND UL8IEB BALLY. Leatfng 
pogatowsartar lira specais»pe :l.J Mc Rae 
IMG Metit^ 4nta 8&ac 2. DJJewefti OJQ 
Motart. 4^ ft M &n«vw5 [ pB«i« 20a 
4:39: 4. M Lovei (Ford 1^200), 442: ft H 
Tohonen (MG Meet*). 4:45; 6. R Brookes 


1, M Btaaion ft. Lanoa Data S~4\. Ihr 33nwi 
12 hk Z J KarAlainan (ftn. Peucaos 20SL 
1:34.00: 3. J RacaktejArt). Lance De«a S-<>, 
134:40. 4, M Alan (fin, Uncta Delta 
134-54; 5. S Bkxnqnsi Owe. Peugeot 20ft 
135.00: ft K Ertewn (Swa. VW God GTTL 
1-44^5: 7. B Sdw (Ft. Peugeot 205). 1:4630: 

ft F Wtanarm (Ausl VW» 1:464ft .9. R 
StoNIAust Audi Coupe Okwttro), 148.18: 10, 
8 CnhCOS (Gr. OpeliSina 4«g, 13643. 

ROWING 

OXFORD FOURS: Ftaefc OxtoTO C and C (G 
Wlnsione. M Bks. B TraHort. I Motmeamc) 
28. Tiwonon Damn u Cwgenban. P Cakk. M 
Vann. M Robertson)/. Peira: Second rauntfcJ 
Belb aTO C Wester « K Cteto rad J PoBey. 
17-ift A Co* and L Thehwfl M J Jones and B 
jeer* 22-15: B Johnson and N Shaw U W 
Mdoows tad M Woods. 21-19: K Heatfi and 
M Bryso ht A Baybs and £ Dunfard. 26-lft E 
Bowe and C Laytawna M M Duffy and E 
Bradshaw. 24-1 ft $ Turner m B Stntw m an 
n B tee and J Carder. 23-12; P Davis and J 
Adamson M D Lewis and P Groan. 27-ft M 
Brfl and S Jones M J Burgess and J Ftaneft 
24-21: Y flrtom and S nfehota bt J Ptasoy and 
V Grooby. 23-11: M Barnett and M Hurre* bt 
H Cot w and M Holt, 19-ia N Steen and 1 
Undamfl bt J Bancs and S Omar. 16-15: R 
Raymcnd and M Caron M V Ooane and 0 
W Auto. 2621; J PUntoy end I Dean bt H 

Water ml K Bain. 21-14; M Richardson and 

E wood bt J Mbaon end M Adken. Ifclft F 
Brown and G Lye M T Tufl end D Cave, 23-8. 


SPEEDWAY 

NATIONAL LEAGUE: IMttarough 44. Bar- 
wick 34 

INTER-LEAGUE CHALLENGE; (pewish 44, 
MMannaH 34. 

SVENtHQ ECHO ESSEX CHAMPION: 1. M 
Gooavn (Arena Essex), ift 2. N MkkBHfncn 
(Arena Essex). 1ft ft J Luckhurtt (Wlnttte- 
donT 11; 4, A Gehm (Hwirwy). 11; ft Q 
Mann paniartjuiy). 11 (alter ran oft). 


SWIMMING 

SANTA CLARA: US eerier tang eowew 
ctonptoaMm: CUS unless sated): Mere 
- 1. Q Bnrianen “* “ 


4Ma f raeaty te : .. — ... _ 

54B4sec ft J Piter 355,12; ft A 
335.4ft 300m ted jnetaey: 1. W S 
2nw Q29Bsec ft R Karnaugh 204J 


Poor 23531 304twtre. SOn tranqte: 1. S 

McCadam 2S.3& 2. T Wtawns 2237; ft J 

SMtiwid 23.14. Women 400m fmeetyte: 1. 

T Cohen 4m«i 14 JMmc ft J Martai*: 1434. ft 

K Heme 4.1539. 200m tad medtow 1. W 

Hectaepath 2m»i18.47sec: ft J Goman 
2:183ft ft C CnxHee 21&BS. 50m MmMc 
2. S Prison 2633; 3, 


1.G 

KCOttm2&4& 


TENNIS 


STRATTON MOUMTAWc Mml Grand Me 

Second mad: J McEnroe (US) tn P Benwxj 

(US). 6-1. 5-4. Herd raonte B Badwr (WS) bl 

K Ctaren (USL 64. 36. R Seguso (US) bt 

M Pemfore (SweL. 6-3. 4-6, 6-3: B Gdbert (US) 
M G Holms (US). 62.4-6.64; I told) (CqM 

USreAer(CzL6ft6ft 
NEVfPOffr BEACH: totataUcmmeere tneraa- 
meeb Cta ener t te e l e; V Gendeaa (US) bt L 
uvW f (Mq- i. 64. 43, 6-4; J FugeraU (Aus) 
KVAm ntrei (tad). 7-6.63. 

KITZBUWL: HerTa ^and pMe H de la Psna 
(AttfM C Mezzata (8). 67. 74. 7-5 Third 

KPS ** J Ppl ? -s. 

S'® Dw«l(Aus). 6< 64; 

TSrjd (Ct) bl 1 Ttraczy (Hung). fcS. 63: H 
Srofl (4u«w) usPe&eM 64. fr?M 

Meek 1 C 2 ) bt u tamnrno (Arm, 60 . 


Mac* (fit) HM temramo u 

Pena (Am) bt u Armedni 
Gomez (&i) bt B wvteneoi 
SanCfta*_fSrt bt P Cane 1 
QuteieHinala:M«*bt9u; 

« Smd 63, 6ft 
ttjqgft . atem Braewre Open c h i ml ee 


...6ft Ofa 
. «L 6ft A 
(US). 64. 7ft E 
L 2ft 63. 64. 
7-6. 6ft Gomez 


n runrooo Dt C re«. 63 6aseeil- 
(tab Omdale 64. 6ft 
s . Ston e bt Fiawogd 61 . 64. W crae n' e 
MrateftataTPnoejSAtblJTmxxv 
6?- 3 5-£iT£ i 5 ,in b»LRIite!.6ft 64Anb 
Fnoebt Can 7ft 6rt. 


YACHTING 

NORTH BERWICK: Brbteft end 

nteiw ctMrnpfcmaNee Reee Fm 1. 6MC8. 1 
WWher JOtpsuMSC]: 2. 57003 G WUUns 

(gSoSgfsf^ *■ W4ia L 

HEUETOErSUltS. H ottanct Tbppar world 
Coatsworth. Re«e Sexere 1. Peters: ft Hak ft 

Carwr. 4. J caw: 5. J VMmu. Final pasUntm 

t. PeKraiftCtetar.ftKafl. 


•te*’ 








SPORT 


THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


MOTOR RACING 


Williams tighten then- 
grip on Mansell as 
he loses it on the track 


There was a triple celebra- 
tion for Nigel Mansell at the 
Hungaroring yesterday. The 
first "was his 32nd birthday: 
the second was that he pul his 
Canon Williams-Honda on to 
the provisional pole position 
during the first hour of 
qualifying for tomorrow's 
Hungarian Grand Prix. al- 
most a second clear of his 
team colleague. Nelson Pi- 
quet; and the third — and the 
most important — was that he 
had agreed terms with the 
Williams team, which had 
enabled him to sign a new 
two-year contract despite the 
strenuous overtures he had 
received from several other 
teams. 

"1 am delighted we’ve 
reached a satisfactory 
agreement." Mansell said after 
climbing out of his car yes- 
terday afternoon. It has meant 
a substantial pay increase, 
even though Williams were 
not prepared to match the best 
offers from elsewhere. 

“There are certain things 
which Williams can oiTer 
which arc more important 
than money." a team spokes- 
man said in an obvious ref- 
erence to the driver-designer 
relationship between Mansell 
and Patrick Head, which has 
produced formidable results 
this season. 

The contract will not alter 
Piquet's status as the nominal 


From John Blnnsden, Budapest 

No. I driver for this year and 
1987, in line with the terms of 
the Brazilian driver's contract 
which he signed last year. For 
1088. however, new arrange- 
ments will have to be 
negotiated. 

Mansell has declined invita- 
tions from Ferrari. McLaren 
and Fonl who were prepared 
to consider three other teams 
for their engines with Mansell 
forming part of the package. 

Yesterday's qualifying was 
all about grip and how to fmd 
it. The lack of it had all the 
teams in a quandary and the 
tyre companies kepi franti- 
cally busy as they mounted 
one tyre compound after an- 
other" on to their contracted 
cars' wheels. 

Derek Warwick, the fastest 
of the Pirelli runners in tenth 
place, said: “So far I've tried 
six different compounds here. 
Now I am hoping they arc 
looking for a seventh!" 
Goodyear’s chief racing en- 
gineer’ Lee Gaug. explained: 
“The corners are not long 
enough to heat up the front 
lyres adequately, so we can 
virtually forget about qualify- 
ing tyres and run soft race 
rubber instead." 

Even the Williams team had 
problems despite their impres- 
sive lap times. "When there is 
no grip around you just have 
to go looking for it.” Mansell 
said, "and 1 guess so far we’ve 



found a bit more than the 
others. Tomorrow, though, 
will be quicker for everyone. 
I'm sure, so we'll just have to 
find a bit more.” 

The slipperiness of the 
track, from which the top 
coaling has still not been worn 
away, has sent car after car off 
course in mild spins. Martin 
Brundle. eleventh quickest in 
his Data General Tyrrell, reck- 
ons you have to meat the track 
like a street : circuit. 

It seems likely that before 
the Hungarian Grand Prix 
comes back here next year at 
least a couple of the corners 
will have been eased a little. 

"It wilt probably be a tough 
race for engines." Warwick 
predicts, "because we're using 
them so much on the overrun 
to slow the cars down. It's like 
Jerez all over again." The race 
organizers hope that he is right 
because the Spanish Grand 
Prix last season produced the 
closest finish for years, with 
Senna and Mansell side by 
side across the finishing line. 
PRACTICE TIMES: 1. N Mansell 
(GB). Canon Wi I hams -Honda, 1mm 
30.516sec: 2, N Piquet (Br). Canon 
Williams-Honda. 1:31.417: 3, A 
Senna (Br). JPS-Lotus Renault 
1:32.281; 4. G Berger (Austria), 
Benetton -BMW, 1:32.886: 5, A 
Prost (Fr), Marlboro McLaren-TAG, 
1:33.113; 6. A Jones (Aus), LoJa- 
Ford. 1:33.737; 7, K Rosberg (Fm). 
Marlboro McLaren-TAG. 1:34.146: 
B. P Tam bay (Fr), Lota-Ford, 
1:34.187; 9. M Alboreto (It). Fbrrari. 
1:34-255: 10, □ Warwick (GB). 
Olivetti Brabham- BMW, 1:34.561; 
11. M Brundle (GB). Data General 
Tyrrell-Renault. 1:34.725; 12, S 
Johansson (Swe). Ferrari. 1:35.092; 
13. P Allrot (Fr). Ugwr-fienault, 
1:35.129; 14, T Fabi (It). Benetton- 
BMW. 1:35.265: 15. R Patrese (It). 
Olivetti Brabham-BMW. 1:35.337; 
16. P Streift (Fr). Data General 
Tyrrell-Renault, 1:35.831; 17, J 
Dumfries (GB), JPS Lotus-Renauit, 
1:36.108; 18, A Nannini(lt). Minardi- 
Modemi, 1:36.266; 19. C Danner 
(WG). Barclay Arrows-BMW, 
1:36-540; 20. R Amoux (Fr). Ljgier- 
Renautt. 1:36.552; 21. T Boutsen 
(Bel). Barclay Arrows-BMW, 
1:37260: 22. A de Cesaris (It), 
MinardhModemi. 1:37.796; 23, J 
Palmer (GB). West Zakspeed. 
1:37.937; 24. PGhinzara(lt). Osefla- 
Atta Romeo, 1:39.564; 25, A 
(Can). O sella- Alta Romeo. 1:40.1 
26. H Rothengatter (Neth), West 
Zakspeed. 1:42.736. 


RUGBY UNION 


Experience gives Australia edge 


Experience is expected to give 
the Wallabies the edge over a 
young All Blacks side in the first 
internal tonal today. 

Australia have had an un- 
impressive build-up to the three- 
malch series with dose victories 
over second-rate provincial sides 
but they are full of players with 
established international 
reputations, from the former 
Arcentinian international. 


Enriqne Rodriguez, in the front 
row, through to flanker Simon 
Poidevin and backs Andrew- 
Slack and David Campese. 

Against them, the New Zea- 
landers, dubbed the “baby 
blacks" by the media, have two 
novices and nine players on only 
their second international out- 
ing. Only winger John Kirwan 
and their captain and scrum 


half, David Kirk, have top-flight 
experience. . 

AUSTRALIA: D Campese; P Grim, A 
Stock (captain). M Burke, B PupwdRn ; M 
Lynagh, N Farr -June* R Reynolds. S 
S Cutler, W Campfaeo, S 
M Haiti, T Lawton, E 

RodnQUfiL 

NEW ZEALAND: G Cooper: J Kfnmm, J 
Stanley. T Wright, A Stone; F Botica, D 
Kirk (captain); M Brewer. M Brook e- 
Cowden, B Anderson, M Speight. A Earl, 
KBoroevich, S Fitzpatrick, B McGrsttan. 


Tuytiman, 

Poidevin, 


WEEKEND FIXTURES 


TODAY 

CRICKET 

Second Comhill Test match 
<11 0 to 6 0) 

TRENT BRIDGE: England v New 
Zealand 

Britannic Assurance County 

Championship 

(ii 0 to 6 30) 

BUXTON: Derbyshire v Lancashire 

CHELTENHAM: Gloucestershire v 
Middlesex 

SOUTHAMPTON: Hampshire v 
Sussex 

LEICESTER: Leicestershire v Essex 
WELLINGBOROUGH: North- 
amptonshire v Somerset 

THE OVAL: Surrey v 

Worcestershire 

EDGBASTON: Warwickshire v Kent 
HEADINGLEY: Yorkshire v 
Glamorgan 

Young cricketers one-day 
international 

CHELMSFORD: England v Sri 
Lanka 

FOOTBALL 

Scottish premier division 

Celtic v Dundee 

Dundee U«d v Aberdeen 

Fdlkirk v Moihenveil 

Hamilton v Clvdebonk 

Hibernian v Rangers 

Si Mirren v Hearts 

Scottish first division 

Brechin v Montrose 

Dunfermline v Forfar 

E Fee v Kilmarnock .... 

Monon v Clyde 

Partick v Dumbarton 

Queen ol Sth v Airdrie 

Scottish second division 

Arbroath v Alloa 

Avr v Queen & Park 

Cowdenbeath v Aibon 

St Johnstone v MeadOwbank 

Sienhsmuir v 8erwick 

Stirling v E Stirling - 

Stranraer v Ranh 


OTHER SPORT 

AMERICAN FOOTBALL (230 unless 
suteCK British League play-off* Man- 
cluster AS Stare v Lyton Flyers; FyWe 
Falcons v Leeds Cougars (? 0). 
Budweiser League, second round play- 
offs: Sreatnam Olympians v Wreiun 
Gums 12.01: Thames Valley Charges v 
Nonhams Storm on goere; London Ravens 
v Chelmsford Cnerokee. Cardiff Tigers v 
Swindon Steeiere 

CROQUET: Cotcnester weekend iftft 
namem. Southpon weekend tcumamem. 
Compton weekend: Croquet Association v 
Irish CA tat Comckimnesi 
CYCLING: National track cnampionsmps 
lat Leicester I. 

HOCKEY: England v London Indians (at 
Btsnam Abtwv). 

SPEEDWAY: England » tinned Sums (31 
SnelfufHtn 

YACHTING: Ouarrer ton Cup (at Torquay I 

TOMORROW 

CRICKET 

John Player Special League 
(2.0 to 7.0 unless stated) 

BUXTON: Derbyshire v Lancashire 
(1 30 to 6J0) 

CHELTENHAM: Gloucestershire v 
Middlesex 

BOURNEMOUTH: Hampshire v 
Sussex 

LEICESTER: Leicestershire v Essex 
WELLINGBOROUGH: North- 

amptonshire v Somerset 
THE OVAL: Surrey v 

Worcestershire 

EDGBASTON: Warwickshire v KetU 
SCARBOROUGH: Yorkshire v 
Glamorgan 

MINOR COUNTIES CHAMPIONSHIP: 
Bedford: Bediotdsnm* v Norm urn Derianc. 
Chester: Cheshire v Oiioias-rme. 
Wadebndge: Cornwall v Dorset: Barrow: 
Cumberland v Uncdnshire 

OTHER SPORT 

BOWLS: Bournemouth Open: English 
Women's Cnampionsnips (at Leaimngtcn 
Spai 

CYCLING: National track champtonsbips 
I3i Lacesren 

CROQUET: Hurtingham tournament: Col- 
chester weekend tournament: Southoort 
weekend toumamenr Compton weekend 
tournament. 

GOLF: Sronenam Trophy: Brush Boys s 
Chamoionsnip (at Seaton Carawl: Scot- 
tish PGA Championship (at Gienoervtei. 
GYMNASTICS: Commonwealth 

championships (at FaBurtci. 

MOTOR SPORT: Ulster Raoy (at Bertas). 
SHOW JUMPING: Dublin Horse Show 
SWIMMING: Long distance enampwn- 
ships (at Wetdermerei- 
TENNIS: Borkslwe open tournament (ai 

Reading University) 

ROWING: Maidenhead regatta. 
YACHTING Cowes Week. 


MOTOR CYCLING 


Lawson in 
sight 
of victory 

From Michael Scott 
Anderstorp 

Wa>ne Gardner (Honda) 
pushed i he world championship 
leader. Eddie Lawson, into sec- 
ond place in practice for the 
Swedish TT tomorrow, a race 
thai will probably decide the 
lvS6 championship. 

But if Lawson does pull off a 
win in this penultimate round, 
the 27-year-old American will 
be unassailable for his second 
500cv title, leaving fellow 
Californian. Randy Mamola 
l Lucky Strike- Yamaha), and 
Ltncoinshirc-bosed Australian 
Gardner to fight for second 
place. 

Gardner holds the position by 
one point alter a victory at 
Silvcrstonc last weekend. 
Mamola. racing with a broken 
shoulder, wus fifth in England. 
He had to be lifted from his bike 
and has spent the week under- 
mime intensive treatment in 
Vienna from the doctor who 
treated Formula One motor 
racing champion. Nikki Lauda. 

Rob McElnea. from Humber- 
side. was an excellent third 
fastest \esierday afternoon, as 

expected from a Works Y amaha 

rider. In sixth place was the 
young Scott. Niall Mackenzie. 
Mackenzie usually races the 
British Sil'crsione-Armsirong 
machines in the 250 class. 
Indeed, he was fastest here in 
the firsi sessions of 250 practice. 

SWEDISH 500 TT PRACTICE [after 
three sessions). i. w Gardr» ’ (Aiatraio. 
Honda), tmn 36.35SMS. 150 6kjn/h: 2. E 
Lawson (US. Yamaha). 1:3664; 3. R 
McElnea (GB. Yamanal. 1:36.86: 4 M 
Baldwin (US. Yamaha!. 1 '36.90; 5 R 
Rocfie (Fr. Honda). 1 .37.70. 6. N Macken- 
zie (GB. Suzuki). 1 37.73. 


TENNIS 



Fighting back: John McEnroe, the fourth seed making his 
return to grand prix action at Stratton Mountain, Vermont, 
shows no mercy on his doubles colleague, Peter Fleming, as 
he powers to a 6-1, 6-4, second round victory. Thunder- 
storms interrupted play but in a third round tie, second-seed- 
ed Boris Becker, of West Germany, saved two match points 
before beating the American, Kevin Current 6-2, 3-6, 7-6. 


FOOTBALL 


Rangers may have 
to be patient 


By Hugh Taylor 


The Scottish football season 
opens today in an atmosphere of 
excitement and anticipation un- 
known since the league was 
reconstructed 1 1 years ago. 

The surge of enthusiasm has 
mainly centred around Rangers, 
a slumbering giant for too long, 
who have enticed Graeme 
Souncss to the club in the hope 
that the glamorous Scot can 
perform a managerial/playing 
miracle. 

Souncss has already made his 
mark by spending more than £2 
million on new quality 
players.$o the famous dub from 
Ibrox has again made the head- 
lines. injecting a little colour 
into the pale complexion of the 
• Scottish premier 

division.Scottish: football has 
not yet recovered from the 
insipid performance of the inter- 
national side in the World Cup 
and the disappointing standard 
of play in the leading divisions 
Iasi season. 

. . Whether Rangere will achieve 
their burning ambition and win 
the championship is still open to 
question. Although they have in 
Chris Woods and Terry Butcher 
two of England's outstanding 

S ' ers and in Souness a mid- 
gencral still acknowledged 
to be of world class, sweeping 
changes do not usually mean 
immediate success and general 
opinion is that the supporters 
will have to be patienL 
They will, however, take mas- 
sive support to Edinburgh today 
for what should be the most 
intriguing match of the after- 
noon. While Hibernian find 
themselves outsiders in the 
betting for the title aL 66/1, 
compared with odds of 3/1 on 
their opponents, they have 
shown splendid form in pre- 
season friendlies, one of which 
was a 4-1 win over Chelsea. 

That form and the infusion of 
fresh talent in the Hibernian 
side will give Rangers a stiff test 
at the stan of what their fans are 
predicting will be an Ibrox 


crusade.The favourites for the 
championship are last year's 
winners. Celtic, and Aberdeen, 
both of whom are bracketed at 
9/4. 

Although Celtic have not 
significantly strengthened their 
squad, they have shown in 
warm-up games that the potent 
mixture of verve, pace and 
flowing attack, which marked 
their astonishing run-in to suc- 
cess at the end of the season, is 
still present. They should start 
the new campaign by beating 
Dundee at Parkhead. 

Aberdeen's hopes of taking 
the title were throttled last year 
by an appalling away record so 
they will be even more deter- 
mined to start witha win against 
formidable -rivals, Dundee 
United, at Tannadice. This 
should not be beyond them even 
though United, placed ar 5/1 on 
the betting list remain one of 
the most experienced and, on 
form, the -classiest team in the 
league. 

Dundee United teye worries, 
about RichartT Gough, their 
outstanding player, who wants a 
transfer. And there are no 
indications they have discov- 
ered a sharp-shooter to lake 
advantage of good chances; 
missed opportunities put them 
out of the title chase last season. 

St Mirren have looked 
impressive in pre-season games 
and will give Heart of Midlo- 
thian a fright at Paisley. After 
their heartbreak of seeing the 
two main prizes swept from 
their grip at the end of last 
season, there is nothing to 
suggest that Hearts have the 
resources to challenge for the 
championship, so no trans- 
formation is likely unless they 
lift themselves dramatically. 

The champions will surely 
come from the elite group of 
Celtic. Aberdeen, Rangers. Dun- 
dee United and perhaps Hearts, 
with the pack of outsiders 
yapping im potently at their 
heels. 


Fenwick sees specialist 
before kicking a ball 


Terry Fenwick, the captain of 
Queen's Park Rangers, has a 
dine with a specialist today 
which will determine whether 
he will be fit for ihe start of the 
season. He is troubled by the 
groin injury which flared up 
during the World Cup finals in 
Mexico and which has pre- 
vented him kicking a bail in 
training. 

• Oxford will stan the season 
without Billy Hamilton, the 
Northern Ireland forward, 
whose persistent knee trouble is 
threatening his future. Maurice 
Evans, the Oxford manager, 
said: “We've been back in 
training for three weeks and 
Billy has only done two days." 
The club arc to arrange for 
Hamilton to see a specialist. 

• George Reilly, of West 
Bromwich Albion, is likely to 
miss the first three months of 
the season with a ligament 
injury. He had an operation 


during the summer but has been 
struggling since returning to 
training. Imre Varadi. a likely 
replacement, is suspended for 
the first two matches of the 
season. Ron Saunders, the man- 
ager. may be forced into the 
transfer market. 

• Mel Eves, the Sheffield 
United forward released at the 
end of last season, has joined 
Gillingham, who have also com- 
pleted the signing for £25.000 of 
Paul Haylock. a Norwich City 
full-back, subject to a medical. 

• Mai Donaghy. Luton Town’s 
Northern- Ireland international 
defender, returns from their 
tour of Sweden today and will 
have talks with John Hollins, 
the Chelsea manager. Donaghy 
is a free agent but is also 
considering a new three-year 
contract with Luton under 
which he would qualify fora 10- 
ycar service testimonial in 1988 


Silver lining to some 
Yeomanly service 


— * 


Thursday was a mixed sort of 
day. 

The car wouldn't start because 
the battery was flat, which 
complicated on early breakfast 
interview with a chap from 
Royal Lymingtou before the 
day’s fleet set off from Cowes. 
Round about lunchtime, a turbu- 
lent Solent, whipped by a Force 
6, was lapping disconcertingly 
round my armpits somewhere 
near the Bramble Bank, halfway 
between Southampton aad the 
island. At the time I was 
supposed to be in a boat. Such an 
occasion is termed “broaching". 
In the evening, my mind too 
genuinely a shade blown, I 
managed to pot fire gallons of 
derv in the car. It is not a diesel. 

Not every dood at Cowes this 
week, however, has been without 
a silver lining. The boat's skip- 
per, who as commodore of the 
Royal Ocean Racing Club has 
an answer to such situations 
other than firing a flare, got os 
ship-shape in no time. A couple 
of his crew, who had been 
swimming about like castaways 
amid a chaos of ropes, spars, a 
horizontal mast and language fit 
to make Mrs Wbitehense emi- 
grate, returned on board in 
immaculate order; little time was 
lost, a vertical profile was re- 
sumed, and on a spinnaker ran 
at the end of 30 miles. Yeoman 
XXVI beat run Herring's Back- 
lash for the Squadron's gun by a 
distance no farther than I could 
have thrown my fall wellies. 

I’ve seldom had as much fun 
without laughing. Admittedly, 
my sailing is more a matter of 
who gets up early to go aod boy 
the bread in St Peter Port or 
Camaret, or unblocking the 
ship's loo with a wire 
era thanger. Not the least 
remarkable part of this Class I 
race was that the 86-year-old Sir 
Owen Aisber. a veritable old 
man of the sea, sat in the stern 
throughout, as npright as the 
Needles lighthouse, alongside 
his son Robin at the helm with 
do concession to age other than 
woolly gloves. When it was all 
over be had a beer and sailed 
back to Ports mo nth. 

Boltin Aisber is one of the last 
or the top flight “amateurs" of 
yachting, with enough knowl- 
edge and experience to have 
helmed his own boat in an 


DAVID 

MILLER 


Admirers Cap. One of _ he 
contributions with the RORC 
has been the introduction of the 
Channel Handicap, « rating 
measurement which can be ob- 
tained by standard production 
family boats of, say. JO feet for 
only £25 instead of the £500 or 
more necessary to have an 
international ocean raring. He 
believes that this will help on- 
set the gap that is developing 
between the amateurs and the 
new breed of professional 
yachtsmen, which will increase 
even more with the advent of 
individual boat sponsorship. 

Yeoman XXVI has almost as 
much technology below deck as 
a television broadcasting unit. 
All around above deck, elec- 
tronic digital screens blink at 
you through the spray like an 
airport departure lounge. A 

Public image 
of exclusiveness 

matter of some alarm is that the 

light displacement, a configura- 
tion of contemporary design, has 
so tittle bouyance for'ara that 
the breach was precipitated by 
the weight or two deck-hands on 
the bow preparing for a gyb*- 
Tbe nose went wider as far back 
as the mast-step, the 45ft boat 
halted from 10 knots and slewed: 
the mast cottid have snapped. 
One of the crew observed later 
that he wasn't sore if he'd fancy 
the middle of the Atlantic in 
such a sensitive craft. 

Few people can afford such 
complex gadgetry, and indeed 
the whole problem of yachting in 
Britain is bow to overcome the 
public concept of its seeming 
financial and social exclusive- 
ness. As was remarked this week 
by a dab official with a con- 
science: “The major dobs oo the 
Sooth coast are like social 
fortresses, with their guns point- 
ing inland". For a democratic 
expansion of yachting, the Brit- 
ish hare to move towards the 
pattern in France in the relation- 


ship with the local council. 
Mostly in Britain, in the edgy 
ba lance between “town" amt 
*>achties~, the council under- 
standably tend to identify with 
“town" and are grudgingly 
helpful. “Sailing boats disfigure 
the jetty" one council contradic- 
torily ruled oo a mooring 
request. 

Royal Lymington has a wait- 
ing list: bint whereas potential 
social members wanting (o dine 
have to wait, those wanting to 
sail arc quickly admitted. Ten 9 
per cent of the 3,400 members 
are under 21, paying only 1 £9 per 
annum. On Wednesday, the club 
is open to any child from seven 
to 16 in the town: and has been 
swamped by (hose anxious to 
avail themselves of the 15 Scow 
dinghies. 

-Ever* dob should be asking 
whether it is doing a good job for 
its community." a chap from 
Lymington says, gratified that 
the club is now qualified as a 
Royal Yachting Association 
reaching establishment. , TSo 
many youngsters would like to 
sail. 'but don't know how to start 
or haven't the means. They’re 
like tennis players without 
rackets." 

Yachting, like golf, is strong * 
on traditions of etiquette. It is 
imperative that this is not 
sacrificed io the breaching of 
social barriers. The natural 
tendency when a youngster who 
has just won a dinghy race 
appears in the bar in soaking 
clothes is to say “get out" rather 
than -well done". It would be 
retrogressive if rlw yacht dobs 
were over-run: they need; to 
become more cosmopolitan in 
outlook, but not unduly common 
iln standards. 

Silver winner 

Leicestershire’s Phil De 
Freitas, who has been selected 
for the Test and County Cricket 
Board's team to meet New 
Zealand, has woo the Webster's ^ 
Yorkshire Bitter Silver Can 1 
Trophy and a £500 prize for his 
performances in July. He im- 
pressed the judges in a match 
against Essex by taking a total 
of 13 wickets for 86 runs; then he 
scored 104 and took sit for 71 io 
the same day against Kent 


OVERSEAS FOOTBALL 


Bribes goalkeeper on probation 


Attila Kovacs. the Hungarian 
goalkeeper who was suspended 
for four years in 1984 for 
accepting bribes, has had his ban 
reduced, allowing him to play 
club football again. But the 
Hungarian Football Association 
have put the former national 
goalkeeper on probation for two 
years. Kovacs. formerly with 
CsepeL is expected to continue 


his career with the first division 
side, Vasas. 

• Goalkeeper Harald 
Schumacher was voted West 
German footballer of the year 
for the second time yesterday by 
German football writers. 
Schumacher, aged 32, won eas- 
ily despite his poor performance 
in the World Cup final in 
Mexico in June. Midfielder 


Felix Magath. who retired after 
Mexico to become business 
manager of Hamburg SV. was 
second and defender Karlheinz 
Focrsicr. now playing with Mar- J 
seille. was third. 

• Former West German inter- 
national forward. Juergen 
Milewski. aged 28. has an- 
nounced he will have to retire 
because of injury. ■' 


DRESSAGE 

Paying the 
price for 
boldness 

■' From a Correspondent 
' Toronto 

A close contest, eagerly. antici- 
pated by many, developed in the 
Imermediaire II. the warm-up 
test for the grand prix world 
team championship: between 
the two rising stars of dressage, 
Margit Otio-Crepin on 
Coriandus. from France, and 
Christine Stuckelberger on 
Gaugin. from Switzerland. 

Coriandus was the first to 
perform, his rider keeping com- 
pletely controlled and relaxed, 
finishing the test with the ease of 
a champion. The horse was 
never greatly extended and 
seemed to treat it as a practice 
run for the more important 
dressage championships ahead. 

In contrast. . Miss 
Stuckelberger .went for the best 
making Gaugjn's extensions 
much more dramatic. But she 
paid the penally for this bold- 
ness. making a number of 
mistakes towards the end of the 
lest. Despite 'this she still fin- 
ished three marks behind the 
French pair. . 

These two pairs finished well 
.ahead of the German riders — 
their best performer was Her- 
bert Krug in third position, a 
wine grower, on his new horse. 
Dukat. His team members, the 
former professional. Jo 
Hinnemann. and young Gina 
Catellman came fourth and 
sixth respectively. They were 
without their most experienced 
member. Dr Klimkc. who was 
saving himself for the grand prix 
evenL but it gave an indication 
that the team is stronger than 
anticipated. 

The event also showed that 
the Russians are unlikely to 
make an impression, as only one 
horse, the -stallion. Rukh. at- 
tracted the judges and scored 
highly, taking fifth prize. 

British riders suffered from 
the tensions of the occasion, 
except for Jennie Lorision- 
Clarke (12th prize). 

RESULTS: 1. Coriandus. Otto Crepm, 
1.456PS. 2 Gawn. C Stuckdberqer 
1.453: 1 DutiSL n Kfug, 1.436. Brifoh 
ptocsagS: 12. DutcD God. J Lorston- 
Glarhe. 13, WHY Tnwt.C Bams: 20. 
Pmocchio. J BartlB-Wilsorn 27. 
Powd e nnonfcBy. E Jowey. 



R 


I V E R S I D 

The Ultimate Sports dub 

FREE TENNIS COACHING 

Sunday morning 9am - noon 
Wednesday evening 5pm - 0pm 
August 3 - September 10 

Membership available at a discount 
until 30 September 1986 

Official opening of Riverside 
scheduled lor July 1987 


DUKE'S MEADOWS CHISWICK LONDON W4 2SX 
Telephone: 01-994 9496 


MODERN PENTATHLON: VICTORY STILL IN SIGHT DESPITE THE EARLY SETBACKS 


Cross-country gives Britain a chance 


From Michael Coleman 
. Montecatini Terme 

One of the delights of modern 
pentathlon, especially for the 
reporter, is that there is always 
hope, something to grasp and 
shout ’’victory" or “victory is 
possible". This is even more the 
case when the world champion- 
ships arc being contested in all 
categories as here in Tuscany. 

It is an opportunity to enjoy 
that well-known ability of the 
Hungarian to go last through a 
swing door and emerge first 
Kc\ in Griffiths, for instance, 
is holding third place for Brit- 
ain. ahead of 43 others, in the 
junior (up to 2D years of age) 
men s contest with high scores 


of 975 points and 1.086 from 
fencing and riding. Griffiths, 
Jason Lawrence and Greg 
Whyte won the riding 
competition.. 

Britain's women won the 


ing to show what British legs are 
made of. Like the Hungarian 
and the swing door. Britain can 
lose and yet win. 

Meanwhile: in the real battle 

up front Anatoli Siarosiin. of 

fencing and. although suffering . die Soviet Union, has. after only 
some setbacks in Thursday's ; iwo events, already disposed of 
riding, have Wendy Norman irf ? "the usurpers 
10th place on 1-967 points.. 


(Swe). 30. 331:8. S Gafins (SweL 30. 931 
Other Brfthfc 8. W Norman. XJBI-. 12.L 
Bafl. 37, M2. Tew t. Britain. 2JB8a 2. 
Sonet Union. £816; 3. Sweden. 2.724; 4. 
W Germany; &5B& 5. POtottfl. Z540: 6. 
Franco. 2.471. Store 1. A Starostw 
1.068 ports: 2. L Dot, (Hun). 


.034: 3. D Bfluftfl Fta). 1.000: 

“k 5.T.F«wn fHun^ 


KxJtec (Crech). 983: 
986. 6.2 Sart# 


SzuWi (Pol). 940- BrtrtB . 

898: 44. R ttwJps. 701: 52. P 


winch is only 37 points behind 
the bronze position 
With Teresa Punon faster 
than the fleet-footed Norman 
and Louise Bail even quicker 
than Punon. tomorrow's dosing 
cross-country race should be a 
total triumph. Our men. too. 
will dominate over the country, 
with Richard Phelps. Peter Hart 
and Dominic Mahony pro mi s- 


Tbursdsy's results 

RIDING: 1. M Hovo (Me*). UOOpts: 2. C 
Massullo (It). 1.100; 3. Fan Bra (Chna), 
1.070.4. A Watson (Aus). 1.07ft 5. 1 PertS 
(Austral. 1.08ft S. M Schart (WG). 1.036. 
Bntrtt 24. P Hart. 950: 47, D Mahony, 
722: 50. 8 Phetps. 676 Team: t, Italy. 
3.14ft 2. Frame 3.008; 3. Austria. 2J2S: 
4. Mexico. 2.906: 5. Hungary. ZBfO: 6. 
Sweden. 2.696: 10. Bfflan 2348. 
FENCING: Woman: 1. 1 Kisaiyeva (USSR). 
36 wins. V069pts: 2. T Punon (GBI. 35. 
1.046. a S Moresam /Fr). 34. 1.023; A, H 
Zlmng (Clw»). 31. 9S«: 5. A Lereson 


Overall (after two events): i. 
SWWtwi. 2.072: 2. Dots. 2.024; 3. Kadlec, 
2X117; 4. Soube. 1-998: 5. C MassuUo (in. 
V847; 6, D Masala m. 1.928. Brtttth: 33. 
Mahony. 1520; 36. Hare 1.607: 49. 
Pturtps. 1.377 Team: Hungary. 5.66ft 2. 
Italy. 563ft 3. Franca: 5:481 
JUNIOR (positions after tvn eranto): 1. A 
Madaras (Hun) nrtng 1,070. fern 
1.000. total 2JJ70. 2. F (kjtoy (Fni.l 
975: 2J»1. 3. K GffffftW (OBJ I.Ofe 95ft 
2.042. outer British: 18. G wnyte 1^120; 
BOO: 1.820. 28. J Laurence, L070. 67& 
1.745. Team t. Hungary 5JW7: 2. W 
Gennanjr 5.875: 3. Britan 5. 60/ Britain 
won ndtng contast wnfc 3, iBZpts. 


REGIONAL TELEVISION VARIATIONS 


Continued from facing page 

SATURDAY 

RRHI WALES. 5. IS- 520 Sports 
HHSii News waj«. SCOTLANft 
5.1 5-5 J20 Scottish News and Sport 
NORTHERN IRELAND. 5.15-5J0 North- 
ern Ireland News and Snort EN- 
GLAND. 5.15-5.20 London— Sport. • 
South-West -Soortghi Spon and 
News. All oitier English regions - Re- 
qonal News and Sport 

CHANNEL a® Lowra except 

LnanncL irooam- izna 


Terrahawks 2J30 pm -340 When Ihe 

Flag Diops 11-30 20 Years On 12-15 am 

Mog 12*5 Steve Hactott 1-30 
Closedown. 

GRA MPIAN . 


12.00 Tetebugs 1.00 pmChnsiOpner 
Columbus 245-5.00 Scottish God 12JH 
Scottish Gott LUO am Refecmra. 
Closedown 

GRANADA As ujnaorrex- 
OHM1WUA pap, n JO am -1200 


Terrahawks 1.00 pm Film: Mysteri- 
ous Island 3.05 Film Funeral in bertn 
5.05 Return io Treasure Istond 6.00- 
6J0 Gramoieweeds Show 12-00 Wish- 
bone Ash in Concert 12LS5 am Tales 
From me Oarkeide 1.20 Closedown. 
TGtVAsLon{larwc«|n:11.33 

am- 12-00 Gemkxig Gang 1.00 


pm-XOOFdm Hea Drivers 12.00 
flock pi me Seventies 12J35 am post- 
script. Closedown 

YORKSHIRE MUflgg;- 
1240 Captain Scanei 1.00 pm - an 
Film- Cold 5.05 Rerum id Treasure Island 
6.00-6 40 GnimMeweeds Show 
12JX3 midnight -6am Muse Box 

TYNE TEE S 


12.00 Terrahawks 1X0 pm Film. The 
Games 2X0-3.00 Cartoon 11.30 20 Years 
On 12.15 am Mog 12.45 am Poetry ol 
me People. Closedown. 

BORDER As London except 
nvnuen ^ . 12 xo Captflm 


Scanet 12X0 mftfnigM Fre&zeFrame 
l2XOamCtoaaaown 
S4C Sts' 15 1.15 pm Racing 2X5 

■ Film. A Night to Re me mber* Com- 
edy rtirBer 4 JO And me Beal Goes . 

On 5X0 B«ls ot Bntam 6X0 Hwyl yr Wyl 
6X0 Newyddmn 7.00 Eisteddfod 
10X0 Mm Come Fill me Cup’ 12.40 am 
Closedown 

HTV WEST 


Terranawks 1.00 pm - SXOFWrr. First 
Men m the Moon 12.00 New 
Sciuad mares 12.30 am Closedown 

HTV WALES ^ vananon. 

n I v ¥»#%»- CO A „ programs 


me same as lor HTV West 
ANGLIA As. London except 
^ ^ 1 ixo am - 12.00 Teiebugs 


1.00 pm - 3X0 Filnr Hefl Drivers’ 
12.45 am At the End ot the Day 
Closedown 

central aarar 


Teiebugs 1-00 pra Film- HeB Onvara' 

5X5 Return to Treasure Island 6X06X0 
GrumUeweea Show 12.00 Rm. The 
Human Factor 1.40 am Jootmder 2X0 
Closedown 

■jn#c As London except- 11X0 am 

— - 12X0 TenahawKs M0 pm 

Whan the Flag D> ops i50-3.00 Car- 
«»n 11X0 ZtfYears On 12.15 am Mog 
12M Steve Hacfcen 1X0 company. 

Clos edown 

ULSTER As London etcepl 
11X0 am - 12X0 

Terranawks 1200 nudmght Sports 
Results 1200 At Home. Leslie Thomas 
1230 am News. Closedown 

SCOTTISH 


tat- 11X0 am -1200 
Cnnstopnar Co- 


Tenahawiis 1X0 pm • 
lumous 245-5X0 Scomsn Gott 1200 Go« 
1230 am Law Can. Closedown 


SUNDAY 


BBC1 WALES. 10.15-10X5 Na- 

nonaigisieddloo- The weak 
in Fishguard 10^56-1 1X5 Owes 
wnat $Ywr Powi n 1 1X5-1200 
Favounte Wafts i200-i23S»n 
Grand Pr« 12X5-12.40 News ot Wales 
SCOTLAND 6XS-6X0pm Hannan 
Gordon appeals on henan erf Sense m 
Sauiano 11.56-1200 News 
NORTHERN IRELAND 11.55-1200 News 

CHANNEL 4s London eveeph 

928am Starting Point 


9X0-10X0 Lea Francais Cner Vous 
iXOpm Great Western 200-3.00 Scare- 
crow and Mrs Rina 1 1.05 A Fu> Lite 
.11X5 Marm s Best Friends 12X5«n 
Ctoseoown 

GRAMPIAN S'SfSSXi*. 

the Mouse 9X5 Sasame Street 
10X0-1 1.00 Smurfs 1.00pm Farming Out- 
look *i Japan 1X0 Bowling. Aoer- 


deert Tournament 230 Pruitts ot * 
Southampton 3.00-5X0 Scoispon 
special 7.45-aaOCrarv LAeaFc* 11.05 
james Mitcnener 1200 Reflections. 
Closedown 

TQW As London exreor 9X5«m- 
JLSZL 10X0 Getting On 11.00 Reasons 
«X5 Look and See 11.30-1200 - 
South West Week 1X0 Scarecrow and 
Mis King 200 Whose Baoyi 230 -■ 
Fknr Your Money or Your Wife 4X0 -■ 
CarraOels 4X0 Gardens tor AH 5X0 - 
Survival Special 6.00-6X0 Albion Market 
11X5 Duck Factory 11X0 That s Hol- 
lywood 1 1.55 Postscript. Closedown^ 

YORKSHIRE 


*. 


Getting On 11X0 Rea 
12X0 Farming Diary ' 
200 Piece ol Qom I 


On 11X0 Reasons 11.30- 

1.00pm Tne Earpn 
Turn Shroud ■*- 
230 Film. Bnowam Junction 4X0 Camp- 
oe<ts 5X0 Survival Special 6XO-6X0 
Albion Market 7X6-8.40 Crazy Uka a Fox 
11X5 Rm: Quatennass II 1240am 
Five Minutes 1245-6X0 Muse Box' 

TYNE TEES ** L 00 ** 1 «• 

, I I nCiCCO __ 9X5am Mom- 


Hol born 255- 
10' 00 Lookaicund 1.00pm Farming 
Outlook 1X0 Northern Life 200 
Prizewinners 2X0 FNrr. The Moutam 4X0 
CampbeHs 5.00 Survival Special 
6.00-8X0 Aib>on Market 7.45-6.40 Crazy 
Likea Fox 11X5 Rlty fifty 1200 Epi- 
logue. Closedown. 

border^SX^sL 

9X5-10X0 Border Diary 1.00pm 
Farming Outlook 1X0 Whiskers and Wet 
Noses 200 Love Boat 3X0 Gum ness 

Book Of Records 4.00 Look Who s Talk- 

ing 4X0 Campbells 5X0 Survival 
Speoai 6.00-6X0 AJtnon Market.7.46- 

8.40 Crazy Uke a Fdx 11.05 Doors ' 

are Open 1 1 4S Closedown. 

S4C SiartSk iXSpm The Great 

Piam Collections 2X0 Up and 

Com mg 2X0 Senm Wan 230 Film- 

What Prca Gfcxy?' 5X0 Mmd ol Dawd 
Bergtas 8.15 Rover Skating 7X0 
Newvdaion 7X0 Ymryson Y Beirdd 8X0 
Etstaddfod 10X0 Ait me Prime 
Mmstar s Men 11.00 Fdm: The Strawber- 
ry Bfonde* 1250am Closedown. 

HTVWEST^i^»- a ^ 


Mouse 9X5-10X0 Rooosiory IXOpm 

Gardening Time 1X0 West Country Farm- 
ing 200 Fknr Rasing Daisy Roth- - 
schiH 4X0 Thai & My Bov 4X0 

Campbells 5.00 Survival Special 
6.00-6X0 AUMfi Market 7,45-8.40 Crazy 

L4iea Fox 11.05 Bamie for Dien Bed : 

Phu l2X5am Oosedown 

HTV WA LES f* YanatwaAB 

- SaBg programmes are 
the same as tor HTV west 

ANGLIA 5 s Lonaon ncsDt 

Starts 9XOam-To.OO At 


Home 1.00pm Beverly HiUpiikes - 1X5 
Weather 1.30 Farming Diary 200 By- 
Sft*s2X0 film: Snows of Mimania- 

ro 4X0 Campbells 5.00-5X0 Aibon 

Market 1 1.05 New Avengers 
1205am Norwich Cfitw, Closedown. 

CENTRAL 


9X5-10X0 Faraface 1.00pm Gar- 
owimg Time 1X0 film. The Undefeated 
245 


nog Time 1X0 filn 
S Magic RoBtng Be 
ir Languaoe 4XO ( 


Board 4X0 Mmd 

Your Languaoe 4X0 Campbells 5X0 Sur- 
vival Special 6X0 -6X0 Albion. Mai he! 
7-45-&40 Crazy Uka a Fm iiX5 Crane 
Inc 1205am JoOftnder 1.05 
Closedown 

TVS ** tiraon except 9X5wn 
Action Lux 9.30-10.00 Smufs 
1. 00pm Great Western 2 00-3.00 
Scarecrow and Mrs King 11.05 FuH bfe 
11X5 Mann s Best Friends l2X5am 
Company. Ctosudown 

ULSTER ** l **ni*»*&.. . 

” ■ brans 10X0-11X0 Morn- 

raWorsmp 1.00pm Garaerang Time 
1X0 film. The Unaefadiea 4.00 Hartem 
Globe rr oners 4.30 Gamptelis 5.00 
Survival Special 6.004X0 Albion Market 
7.45-6.40 Crazy Like a Fox 11.05 
Sports Results ii.iq Mystenes ert Edgar 
WaHace I2i0am News. Closedown 

SCOT TISH *8 London «r- 

r ff; ■ 1 1 Ji * cepr 9X5amFooFno 
aao Farming Outlook 10.00-11X0 
Sesame Street 1.00pm Sunday Lwe 200 
Survival Special 3X0-SX0 Scoisport _ 
Special 5X0 Lwt me cnnoran Sra6XO- 
6X0 Aibon uarkat r.45-6.40 Crury . 
ukeaFp, 11.05 Lara Call 11.10 £0 Years 

On 11,55 Thai s My B£» J2X5KH ■ 
aoseflown 4 

GRANADA txncwn «»■ 

Mouse 9X0-10X0 T* Dimrca dou* 

Pan’ 11.00 Reasons HXS Ann Kaa Han 
11X0-1200 Marilyn Baker 1-W" » 
CnatMun de la Loire 205 Bevwty 
ins 2X0 Film Puree and the Pa«J«, 

4X0 Campoeus 5.00 Survival Specmf 
6.00-6X0 AibKin Market 7 .45-8.40 
Crary Like a Fan 11.05 CetebraKW <n . 
Concert nxo OlMne Rack- iZXOrt* 
Ooaedonn 









THE TIMES SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


33 


y ser 



Saturday 


Weekend television and radio programmes 
Edited by Peter Dear and Peter Davalle 


Sunday 


. ,,, i 
'“in L. 

:• U.N?: 


« hir 

raffiNlitsu „• sfli 
*F» .1 run, . 
*1* <a\% h, 
ml 

Nl , , , 
;t« fsiiM 
*" h.ii, 

'HR ijtiu- jr, 

• “III fci *;■ 

" A 'fiq'.u 

Jll.l 

fc “III it.. . ’ 

8 S'* Ilinim; 

h In* tli-t k , 

UllJtilUi; If I* I J 

tr Uni. . 

*"•»' Mini 

tii,. ..., 
InuiHj V 


ige 

niU'ss 


'* "»■! *i.i\ ' "ii "jk " aao Tba danger*. (r)8.40 The 
Fanffly Nest, (r) L45T1 m 


6AS 


BBC 1 


Unhreraay. Unffl 


‘HU '**■** 

!;•'■■* i Iv 

■ !«,(,• /"H? ft- — 


Saturday PietiBe Show' 


r " iIitI 


a •fl.kv 

‘M 


arid Cheryl Baker. See 
pop stanmanAU Star 
Chanty fair: watch Mark 
take part in the Isle of Man 
Bath Race: Fred Harris 
has details of a new 
electronic game: Su 

Pollard is in the stutfio; 

and Jank» Long 
rewewsMerseyiide's 
musical scene.. 


U| 

..’I ■* 

■ '■ -iffM Grandstand introduced by 


' ... 

nA.-u 

: fl Hi, "l 1 «« -Desmond Lynam.The 

Tv V* fine-up is: TTJXLIAQ and 
1,1 1 *.. , ftO -i L XSOCriefcet Second 


h w a;- ; 


1 ‘"vu 

"X. _ 



•• n IS *’• - 

K 1k* H 

*h*r*z- 
'"m ’■ 

"k'lrn 


■ lull 
11 \ 


Test The third (fey's play 
in the match at Trent 
Bridge between I 
and New Zealand: 

Mows summary and 

weather 1.10, Z2& 150 


England 
ctCos 
immary and 
;l.10,12tLt 
1 Cycling: tne 




— • * i.. 


'Ik 


“Ml 




.^■ai ik Us-; 5j„ 

*1 H t , 

a»i d, »,J 

>i fill iifil i;:,,. 

i., 

Uii k ... 

me jew j 
MtLT 4S, »j, fc 
. Ihv 

Mll\ dlitf v 1 .. i, , J 

hait 

nWruV i • 
fr it tu it : j i . 
hv liljiiii. ,, 

iMi 

Itl afLllcf 
*. a:tU in:'..,: 
*1 ft ' Bi till:}- .■> 
1 o»« iivi:ii 

.it ns 
*ij| r\ t 
If kill Chi', it. . » 
■I mill j , , 
*♦** i !u:*s 

llkl 1.1. 
In? i'ain* i. 

■ a dnn.>. i 
tlUflg. 
r liiMiirii, 
lU (lit l . .. 


• •in, 

••In 


III* . 


British National Track 
Championships: no. 140 
and 3.10 Racing from 
Havelock. 

- -{LOS News with Frances 
’.1 Coverdaie. Weather 5.15 
Spori/regionaJ news. 

-• $20 The Dukes of Kazzani. 

W; The Duke- boys arainwitBd 

' "f t to Hollywood to Join a 

team of stuntmen, 
doubling as bex^guards, 
after they rescue a star 
whose Die is in darner. 
With the rest of the 
Hazzard characters in tow, 
they protect their man 
from a series of accidents; 
and Boss Hogg, hoping to 
moguL'is 


i m ^ i. 

- | Un *: - ^ 
‘ “«n : 

" ,,h ^7 

•i' 4.^-— 

“ n * 'iikw'.": 
,r r “n- -- - 

; -re-as?' 1 




become a movie 
upstaged by Ws dog. 


N , iiu ‘ r «'inir— 

■ h « U 


" 105 Sonyl Snooker star Ray 
B '4; > Reardon makes a guest 

appearance this week 
when Timothy tests his 
skin on the green baize 
and lands up behind the 
washing machine. Starring 
Ronnie Corbett. (Ceefax) 


' “ -tnr. 


£1, 




ft- 


Hin ff t ■ 

4i-d ; * 

ID • ■ • 

11 *' 1 1* 14k - — '* 

" furWL^.. 

• 1! jndi«4 a -*' «* ■ 


Jj 


•* ■‘tinqV 


FOOTBALL 


•er on probatic 




w\\ 


brid Rock W RoU 
Trophy. Six couples, 
representing Austria, Italy, 
the Netherlands, 
Switzerland, West 
Germany and the United 
Kingdom, compete In the 
Fbotwork and Acrobatic 
sections. Introduced by 
Josephine Buchanan from 
the Bournemouth 
International Centre. 

7.05 FibnrTheBridMat 
Remag en (1968) starring 
George Segal, Robert 
Vaughn. Ben Gazzara and 
Bradford DiUman. Second 
World War drama about 
the efforts to stop the 
- Germans destroying the 

LT. - one remaining bridge 

across the Rhine, tweeted 
7 by John GuBlermin. 

!.' L (Ceefax) 

9 M Bob Monkhouse Meets- 
The 1 entertainer’s guest Is 
Max Bygraves, (r) 

' j 140 News and sport. With 
Frances Coverdaie. 
Weather. 

155 Barry Norman's Guide to 
American Soaps. Mr 
— — . Norman with everything 
~ you would wish to know 

7* about American soap 

opera, (ii (Ceefax): 

1045 IntarnatioflaiGoli Steve 
... Rider introduces third 
round ooverage of the 
United States PGA 
Championship from 

Toledo. Oh to. 

.1150 Weather. 


TV-AM 


645 -Good Homing Britain 
introduced tw Mika Morris. 
Weather at ttSB; news at 
7JJ0; regional report at 
740; and sport at 7.10. 

7 JO The Wide Awake 'dub 
with Tommy Boyd. 
Michaela Strachan and 
James Baker. 


ITV/LONDON 


125 Get Fresh! in Perth. 11 JO 

Wake Un London with the 
- VtotousBoys. 

1240 News with John Suchet. 

1245 WrestBng from the Spa, 
Bridlington. 

140 FtiRcBondtoona 
Budget - (1940) starring 
Penny Singleton, Arthur 
Lake and Rita Hayworth. 
More comedy from the . 
Bumpstead family. 
Directed by Frank R . 
Strayer. 2J0 That’s My 
Boy. Comedy series 
starring Molhe Sugden. (r) 

3.00 Christopher Cotontous. 
The third and final part of 
the serial based on the life 
of the celebrated 
navigator. 445 Walt 
Disney Presents. 
Hawaiian Holiday. 

540 News. 

545 The GntmWeweeds 
Show. Comedy sketches 
and music. 

5J5 John 5flvef*s Return to 
. Treasure Island. J&n 
Hawkins and his friends 
find Mexico in the grasp of 
Spanish bounty hunter, 
Garcia, who is arresting 
every man he can find to 
work in the gold mines. 

6L30 And There's More 
Cricket Comedy from 
Jimmy Cricket 

740 We Love TV. Windsor 
Davies and Jessica Martin 
are tested on their 
knowledge of television. 

7 JO Summertime Special. 
Variety show presented by 
Roy Walker. Among those 
appearing are Cannon and 


ill. 

8J0 AD Star Secrets. What do 
Sandra Dickinson, Roy 
Hudd, Duncan NorveUe, 
Leslie PhflHps and Zarxfra 
Rhodes, have to hide? 
(Oracle) 

9.00 News and sport 
9.15 FHm: Honkytonk Men 
Ing Clint 
Kyle Eastwood 
and John Mclntire. Set 
during the Depression, the 
story of a country singer 
working his way from 
Cafifomia to Tennessee 
where he has a chance to 
appear at the Grand Ole 
Oprv. He calls on his sister 
in Oklahoma where he 
picks up an adoring 
nephew and the boy's 
grandfather who wants to 
(Se In his home state. 
Directed by Clint 
Eastwood. (Oracle) 

11 JO LWT News headlines 
foflowed by Mog. Comedy 
series starring Erm ReiteL 

1240 20 Years On. David Frost 
and guests examine race 
relations in Britain over 
the past two decades. . . 
1245 New From London. Flesh 
for Lulu. 

145 The Longest Row. Peter 
Bird’s open boat voyage 
from San Francisco to 
Australia, (r) . 

240 Night Thoughts. 



BBC 1 


645 


ST 


University. Until 


James Cagney and Joan Leslie in the George M Cohan Bfestory 
> ankee Doodle Dandy, on Channel 4, 245pm 


630 


BBC 2 


O pe n University. Until 


1-55 Rg. An animated 
Introduction to 
220 FBni: The ©reus* (1 

Starring Charlie Chaplin as 
a dreus hand who causes 
chaos under the Big Top. 
Directed by the stan ' 
3J0 FHm: The Gold Rush* 

(1 925) A specially- 
prepared sound version of 
the classic comedy with 
Chaplin providing the 
narration. 

440 Cricket Second Test The 
dosing session of the third 
day's play in the game at 
Trent Bridge between 
England and New 
Zealand. 

6.15 World Chess Report, 
presented by Jeremy 
James. BDI Hartston ' 
reviews the week's games 
between Kasparov and 
Karpov. 

6J0 News View. Frances 
Coverdaie wftri today's 
news; Sue Carpenter 
reviews the week's events 
in pictures with subtitles. 

7 JO Znbln Mehta Mast er c la ss. 

Four promising 

conductors receive a 

masterclass on the 
Schetzo and Finale of 
Beethoven's 'Eroica* 
Symphony, (r) 

820 The Man Who Wafts on 
Fire. A Q.E.D. programme 
which explores the 
possibility that everybody 
possesses the abffity to 
put mind over matter. With 
Hugh BromHey, a 
ftrewalker who claims that 
anyone can walk on fire, (r) 
940 FHm; Red River* (1946) 
starring John Wayne and 
Montgomery Clift. A 
classic western about a 
strong-willed and short- 
tempered pioneer who is 
determined to drive cattia 
an unprecedented 
distance from Texas to 
Abilene in Kansas, and his 
clashes with his adopted 
son Directed by Howard 
Hawks. 

(11.10 Cricket Second Teet 
Highlights of the third 
day's play. 

1140 FHm: To the Devil a ' 
Daughter (1976) starring 
Flicnard Wfidmark. 
Christopher Lee and , 
Nastassja Kinski. After his 
excommunicafion-Fr 
Michael flounces off to 
Bavaria where he founds a 
convent dedicated to the 
devfl. Based on the novel 

S t Dennis Wheatley and 

it 

Ends; 


I reeled by Peter 
tat 1.15. 


CHANNEL 4 


1-15 Channel 4 Racing from 

NawmariwtTha 1-30, 

2.00. and 2J0 races. 
245 Film: Yankee Doodle 


James Cagney man 

Oscar-winning 


life. Directed by Michael 

Curtiz. 

545 Broofc*kte.{ri{Orad0) 

540 RighttoRepte-Ust 
week's People to People 
implied that 

unemployment is good for 
your heafth, say cntics. 
and this could lead to 
Government complacency 
.6J0 The Stamp of Greatness, 
lain Cuthbertson stars as 
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 
this first of three 


of celebrated 
Scotsmen who have been 
honoured on the 1 
stamps of other i 

740 News summary and 
weather followed bV The 
Sons of Abraham. Part ten 
of the series features the 
Eastern Orthodox 
Christians. 

7 JO Berlin Walk Hannf Sands 
' Her Love. On the 25th 
anniversary of the Berlin 
Wall, Kleran PrendlviBe 
reports on some of the 
daring and ingenious 
escapes from East Baffin. 

8J0 Mewti a rt American 
domestic comedy series. 

940 The Organization. Part 
three dr the drama serial, 
first seen in the Seventies, 
set in the public relations 
office of a large 
organization. Starring 
Donald Binder, Anton 
Rodgers and Peter Egan. 

1040 H91 Street Blues. The 
transfer of a notorious 
narcotics officer to the 
precinct leads to ifl-feeHng 
among the resident police 
officers. (Oracle) 

10J5 FtiiK White Hear (1949) 
starring James Cagney 
and Edmond O'Brien. A 
gang leader confesses to 
a lesser crime after he - 
killed a railwayman during 
a train robbery. He is 
befriended in prison by a 
fellow inmate who is in 
fact an undercover 
detective. Directed by 
Raoul Walsh 

140 L'Ecote des Facteurs* 
(1947) starring Jacquwie 
Tati as the village postman 
who delivers his mail at 
breakneck speedJSrodted 
by Jacques Tati. 

1.15 Begone Dull Cart With 
toe Oscar Peterson Trio. 
Ends at 125. 


845 Ptay School 9.15 Knock 
Knock- Stories and songs 
for children. 

9J0 This i« the Day. A simple 
religious service from a 
viewer's home near Poole 
10.00 Asian Magazine. 
Ghastia Amin presents a 
programme of music. 
10JD The Great Palace: 
The Story of Parflament 
Part seven, (f) 

1 1120 Cameo. The meadows of 
Cranbome Chase in the 
summer, (r) 11 JO 
Saabrook’a Year, (r) 1240 
Cartoon. Innertube Antics. 

1245 Sign Extra. Visions of 
Crenge- the effect 
tale vision has had on the 
way people viewed the 
world, with sign language 
interpretation. 

1225 Farming. Eric Stanhope is 
due to be evicted from his 
councU smallholding In 
Cheshire where he has 
been bving for toe past 30 
years. With the return of 
single generation 
tenancies to the private 
sector. Farming reports, 
evictions like that could be 
repeated across the 
country. 1228 Weather. 

140 New* headlines 1.05 

Bonanza, (r) 120 Cartoon. 
Daffy Duck Slept Here. 
240 EastEndere. (Ceefax) 

340 l^m: Black Narcissus 
(1947) starring Deborah 
Kerr. Sabu, and David 
Farrar. A drama about five 
Anglo-Catholic nuns who 
establish a school and 
hospital in a disused 
harem in the Himalayas, 
who find that their serene 
exists nee upset by outside 
factors- Directed by 
Richard PoweH and Enteric 

Press burger. 

425 The Pink Panther Show. 
Three cartoons, (r) 

425 Great RaBway Journeys 
of the World. Eric Robson 
travels from London to 
Bucharest (Ceefax) (r) 

525 Wild Britain includes an 
item cal wolf populations. 

625 Appeal by Marian Foster 
on behalf of the Royal 
Orthopaedic Hospital 
Research and Teaching 
Centre. 

620 News with Frances 
Coverdaie. Weather. 

640 Songs of Praise from 
Aberystwyth. (Ceefax) 

7.15 Fhn: Drop-out Father 
(1962) starring Dick Van 
Dyke. A made-for- 
televtsion comedy about a 
top advertising executive 
with an the trappings of a 


FREQUENCIES: Ratio 1:1. _ 
- 92.5; Radio 4: 200kHz/1500m: 
1458kHz/206nc VHF 944; — 



i to give everything 
up and go and live in 
Greenwich Village with his 
younger daughter. 
Directed by Don Taylor. 

820 News with Frances 
Covedale. Weather. 

945 Ptay; The Dafly Woman, 
by Bernard MacLaverty. 
Brid Brennan stars as Liz 
O'Prey, 'a Protestant 
nothing married to a 
Catholic nothing' who 
earns her living by 
charring, and dreams of - 
' leaving seventies Belfast 
for no matter how short a 
time. One day a chance is 
presented to her. (Ceefax; 

10.15 Choices. Do we realty 
have freedom of choree 
where entertainment Is 
concerned? asks Rabbi 
Julia Neul 


SiT'ihSHlSE' 


( Radio 4 ) 


’■'’NiE TEES 


■ Jin, .. 


On long wave. VHF variations at 

- . - and. 

- . 525 Stepping. 6.00 News briefing. 

■ ~ ' 6.10 Prelude (s). 

620 News; Farming Today. 

620 Prayer for the Day. 

•; , 6u55 Weather Travel 

. !; 740 News: 7.10 Today's 

Papers. 7.15 On Your 
Farm. 745 In Perspective 
(with Ri 

720 Down to 

" Weekend r 

725 Weath®-; Travel. 

&00 News 8.10 Today's 
■ . Papers. 8.15 Sport on 4. 

827 Weather TraveL 

* 940 News 

945 I'mSony IH . . -TA 

a. Edited highlights 

of I'm Sorry, I Haven’t a Clue. 

"925 A Sideways Look 

at ... by Anthony Smith. 

920 News Stand. David 
Walker reviews the 
weekly magazines. 

1045 Talking Poetics. Geoffrey 
Goodman's tour-part 
Investigation into aspects of 
democracy In Britain (1) 

! 1020 Loose Enas with Ned 
Shemn and studio 
guests. 

~ 1120 From our own 

Correspondent LHe and 
pomes abroad. 

1240 News; A Small Country 
Uvlng. With Jeanrae 
McMullen. 

; 1227 The News Quiz (S). 1225 
Weather 

140 News 

1.10 Devon Journeys. Tom 
Salmon travels from 
Tiverton to Stsrcross (r). 125 


»\1 


240 News; The Afternoon 
Play. Nettie Beer, by 
wauam Grant WWi Derek 
Newark and Tessa 
Worstey in the cast Drama 
about tne impact of - 
redundancy (s) 

320 News: Travel: 

Into manorial 

— Assignment BBC 

correspondents report 
— 440 The Saturday Feature: 
Nerves of Swoon. Alun 
Lewis explores the 
Besot robots 

jg more human. 

445 in Keeping with Tradition. 
Keith Mian meets 
Douglas Clayton. Keeper of 
SaJtwefl Park. 

Gateshead. 

540 TheUvm^Worid. 

Presented by Peter 
France. 

225 Week Ending. Satirical 
- review of the week's 

news. 520 Sltippmo. 525 
Weather Travel 
. 540 News; Sports Round-up 
625 to the Psychiatrist's chair 
(new senes). Dr Anthony 
Clare interviews composer 
Se. Michael Tippett 
740 Saturday-nightTheatre. 

The Dark River by 
Rodney AcMarid, with Jane 
Asher. Dermot Crowley 
and Isabel Dean (s) 

940 Baker's Dozen. Richard 
Baker wnh records is) 

10.00 News 

10.15 Evening Service (s) 

1020 The Good Book. Brian 
Redhead continues his 


Moment the 
.. Prophets. Were they any 
different from sooth- 
sayers? 

11.00 Soenee Now - In- 
Passing. Colin Tudge 
visits more leading 


laboratories. 

11 JO Don'tStop Now -ft's 
Fundation. Comedy 
cabaret (s) 

1240 News; weather. 1223 
Shipping 

VHF (available in England and 
S Wales only) as above 
except: 5J£640am Weather; 
TraveL 1.55-2. 00pm 
Programme News. 449-6.00 


Programme. 540. Modem 
European Authors (5) 
Christa WOll 520 Back on 
Course. 


( Radio 3 ) 


On Vt^only: 

625 Open University. UntB 
6-Kam. ChM Gberatkxi 
On medum ware ortjp - 
625 Weather. 740 News 
745 Aubade; Britten 
(American Overture), 
Mozart (Hom Quintet to E 
' flat K 386c, with Norberi 
Hauptmann, hom). Bridge 
(Summer). Schubert 
(Fantasia in F minor. D940, 
with Lupu and Perahia, 
pianos! Janacek (Idyll for 
strings), Handel (Love in 
her eyes sits playing: with 
Pears, tenor), Prokofiev 
(Love of Three Oranges 
sutta). 940 News 
945 Stereo Release: 
Mendelssohn (String 
No 9), Eka 



r . pian o). Malcolm 

Pearce [flS^aml^own, 
piano), Franck (psyche 

jteepoem), Debussy 
1 in G minor 
vioOn and Bronfman, 
3), Brahms 

ion St Anthony 

1025 Test Nte&cfr IWrddayof 
the Second Test 
between England and New 
Zealand. Ccwerage 
continues on meteum wave 
until 6J3 
On VHF only: - 
1025 Faure and MBiaud 

songs: Bisabeth Parcels 
mo),wfth John York 
1). indudes Faure’s 
unrevttteid 
baud’s Chansons de ■ 
Ronsard 

11.15 Philadelphia Orchestra 
(under oe Bingos), with 
V^es, guitar. Arriaga. 
(SyrrahoiwinD), 

Rodrigo (Fantasia para un 

b). 

jfLebaiserdeta 
fee ballett 140 News 
145 Piano reataL James - 
Walker plays Smetana 
works todudtog Bridegroom 


and bride ( 

Scenes, No 23. Haydn's 
Fantasia in C.HXvl 14. 
Beethoven's Sonata in E 
mtoor,.Op 90, and . 

Schuberf s Alegretto to C 
minor, D 915 

240 Britten: Brodsky String 
Quartet play the Quartet 
No 3 

2.35 Lee contes cf Hoffmann: 
Offenbach’s three act 
opera, sung In French. Mono 
recording. Antes 
Cluytens conducts Chorus 
and Orchestra of Opara- 
Comique, Paris. Cast 
includes Raoul Jobin 

Rene Lapefietrie, 
iPemetRenae 
Doria, Vina Bovy, Charles 
Cantoon, Charles Soix 
and Roger Bourdto 
540 Jazz Record Requests, 
presented by Peter 


545 A Study in Evolution: (2) 
Hard Science, with Cofin 
Tudge 

On medium wave only: 

6.30 Organ musteTanothy 
Bond pteys Bach’s 
Toccata in C. BWV 564. toe 
Fantasia to G.BWV 5772. 
and Passa c agiia in C minor, 
BWV 582 

740 A Questkm of Faith. 

AnteBw Branch reads 
the story by John Gohorry 


720 Proms 86: BBC Welsh 
SO (under James 
Loughran). with Hakan 
Hardenberger (trumpet). 
Part one. Elgar {In the South 
concert overture) and 
Gordon Crosse's Array, for 
trumpet and string 
orchestra 


8.10 as othere Saw us; an 
18th century view of the 
English from the other side 
of ma Channel 


8-30Proms 86: Sibefius 
(Symphony No 2) 


925 Quasimodo in Trainers: 

Peter Hennessy on the 
Snowdonia marathon 
1040 City of London Stoforaa 
(under Richard Hickox). 

With Michael Thompson 

(hom). Schoeck 
(Soramemacht. Op 58). Hom 
Concerto Op 65 . and 
Suk s Serenade for strings. 
Op 6 

1145 A Choice Cofiection: 
music by John Blow, 
performed by Robert 
Woolley (harpsichord) 
and 'Emma Kiricy (soprano) 
1125 The Jazz Pianist: 

Charles Fox with 
recordings by Rfley and 
Dean 

1127 News 1240 Closedown. 


.■vr: •-! r i.:" 







lain Cntbbertsoii: Stamp Greatness, C4, 6^0pm 


C ‘ ; adio2 ) 

On meteum wave. Stereo on 
VHF. 

News on the hour until 140pm, 
then 340, 640, 740 and hourly 
from 1040 l Headlines 620am, 

720. Sports Desks 1142am, 
10.02pm. Cricket Scoreboard 
720pm. 

440am Dave Bussey 640 
Steve Truekwe 645 David Jacobs 
1040 Sounds of the 60s with 
Brace Welch. 11.00 Album Time 
with Pater Clayton 140pm 
Huddwmks with Roy Hudd 120 
“ rt on Z Includes cricket 

jland v New Zealand) and news 
1 the Britannic Assurance 
County Championship. Also, racing 
from Newmarket and football 
(Fine Fare Scottish League kicks 
off the domestic season). 640 
David Hamfiton presents Two's 
Best 740 Three in a Row 


1025 Grand Prfx. Highlights of 
the Hungarian Grand Prix 
11 JO Favourite Walks. Anna 
Raeburn strides through 
London's contrasts, (ij 
1125 Weather. 


TV-AM 


6.55 Good Morning Britain 
begins with Sunday 
Comment 7,00 Are You 
Awake Yet?: 725 WAC 
Extra. 

830 Kelly 00 Sunday. The 
guests toefude David 
Lodge. Tessa Sanderson, 
and uavid Kirk. 


ITV/LONDON 


925 Waft Disney Pro* 
fy. in African { 


Presents. 

Goofv. in African Safari 
925 Woody and Friends. 
Cartoons (r) 925 Roger 
Ramjet (r) 

1040 Morning Worship from 
Harrow Baptist Church. 
London 11.00 Getting On 
includes a report on a 
group of Hackney 
pensioners who are 
campaigning for greater 
road safety. 

1U0 Reasons, Could people 
govern themselves 
without government or 
would it lead to social 
chaos? Paul Sieghart 
leads a discussion on the 

S^wuKennath Mi tongue 
and Alan fly an. 1240 Our 
Bomb: The Secret Story. 
The second of two 
programmes in which 
John Barry examines the 
history of Britain's nuclear 
deterrent and the issues 
surrounding Trident 

140 Catweaxto- It's the day of 
the flower show at King's 
Farthing, (rt 1-30 

^ Telebug* Cartoon 

to adventures, (rt 240 

Survival of the Fittest, The 
Snowdon Run. the final 
event of the Britvic 55 
Challenge. 

230 LWT News headlines 
followed by FHm: Taft of 
the Devi) (1969) starring 
Hugh Latimer, Tim Barrett 
ana Suzan Fanner. A 
comedy short about a 
bachelor's pact with the 
devil Directed by Francis 
Searie. 

340 Albion Market An 

omnibus edition. (Oracle) 

540 The Campbells. The 
Campbells am) the Sims 
take legal action over the 
ownership of a stray pig. 

530 Survival Special: 

Galapagos - Cold on the 
Equator- The secrets of 
the strange creatures in 
the seas around the 
Galapagos. 

630 News. 

620 Highway. Sir Harry 
Secombe introduces 
highlights from his series. 

7.15 Winner Takes AIL General 
knowledge quiz game. 

7.45 Murder, She Wrote: One 
Good Bid Deserves 
Another. Jessica 
investigates the murder of 
a film star. 

540 Return to Eden. Tom's 
condition deteriorates and 
he (apses into a coma. 
(Oracle) 

Q 4C Mamiuk 

920 The Real World: Ghost of 
a Chance. New machines 
are beginning to transform 
the experimental 
investigation of the 
paranormal. Tonight's 
programme tests a 
number of the new 
techniques. (Oracle) 

1020 The Jimmy Young 
Television Show. The 
future of television is 
discussed. Among the 
guests are Michael Winner 
and Paul Fox 

11.05 LWT News head Enos 

followed by The Irish RNL 
Major Yeates Is given the 
ran around once more, (r) 

1240 Show Express. James 
Last and his Orchestra. 

1225 Night Thoughts. 




. ... ^ • . r - -v • 


B v V ; '; , v' : .r j 

■V. •* •; * - 1 

• sir _ “ 



North American peak district: a landscape from part oneofThe 
Making of a Continent, oq BBCZ, at 7.15pm 


BBC 2 


620 C^en University. Until 

1J55 Sunday Grandstand 
Introduced by Steve Rider. 
The line-up is: Motor 
Racina the H 
GrandPnx from 
Cricket a John Player 
Special League match 
between Derbyshire and 
Lancashire: and. at 
approximately 3.40. Horae 
Racing: the Champion 
Stakes from Phoenix Park. 
Dublin. 

620 Foley Square. It is 

Valentine's Day and Alex's 
man ol the moment is 
plying her with champagne 
ana flowers. 

7.15 The Makingof a 

Continent The first of 
three new programmes 
examining the geological 
jigsaw that maae the North 
American continent. This 
programme - Collision 
Courses - begins in Alaska 
where volcanoes 
continually shake and 
rumble from the gigantic 
forces producing new land 
within toe surrounding 
oceans. 

8.10 Jean-Michel Jarre's 
Rendezvous Houston. 
Modestly described as 
'the biggest show ever 
presented on this planet', 
a concert pert of 
Houston's Sesqulcentenial 
celebrations, using the 
modem downtown skyline 
as a background and a 
projection screen, for a 
performance involving 
lights, projections, lasers 
and music. Jarre 
discusses the concert with 
David Hepworth who 
introduces highlights of 
the spectacular event, 
(simultaneous broadcast 
with stereo Radio 1 from 
823) 

945 The Paid Daniels Magic 
Show. With the help of 
Dame Vera Lynn and 
Wynford Vaughan 
Thomas, Paul Daniels, in 
the Cabinet War Rooms in 
Whitehall, recreates a card 
trick that fascinated Sir 
Winston Churchill. His 
studio guests are Danuta, 
the Spider Goddess; 
magician Meir Yetfid: and 
ballet dancer Graham 
Fletcher, (rt 

920 Film: Reflections in a 
Golden Eye (1967) 
starring Marlon Brando 
and Elizabeth Taylor. 

Drama, set in a peacetime 
army camp in Georgia, 
about toe underlying 
passions that are hidden 
by the outwardly mundane 
everyday routine. Directed 
by John Huston. 

1135 International Golf. The 
final round of toe United 
States PGA Championship 
from Toledo, Ohio. Ends 
at 1.00. 


CHANNEL 4 


1.05 Irish Angle Court Cases. 
An examination of two 
court rulings that have 
raised eyebrows m the 
Republic -toe first 
concerning a pnest found 
dead in one of his 
parlshoners' bedroom: toe 
second dealing with 
treasure trove found by a 
father and son with toe aid 
of a metal detector. 

120 Model Magic. Model 

engineering, (r) 

2.00 Everybody Here. 

Magazine programme for 
children, (r) 

2J0 Spartacua. The Bolshoi 
Ballet perform Yuri 
Gngorovich s version of 
Aram Khachaturian's epic 
ballet. With Erek 
Moukhamedov in the titte 
role. Mikhail Gabovtch. 
Natalia Bessmertnova, 
and Maria Bylova. Alygts 
Zhyuraitis conducts toe 
Bolshoi Orchestra. 

4.50 i860. Parisian lire in 1880. 

5. IQ News summary and 
weather followed by The 
Mind of David Berglas. 

The magioan s guest is 
tan Carmichael. 

640 No Comment South 

Africa is today s topic and 
the programme features 
the work of George 
De'Ath. the cameraman 
killed in a communal not 
earlier this year. 

6.15 The Skate Electric British 
Artistic Roller Skating 
Championships, from 
Bury St Edmunds. 

7.15 The Arabs. Sudanese 
wnter Ati El Mek examines 
howthe Islamic faith 
affects toe lives of one 
particular village on the 
Blue Nike, (r) 

8.15 Country Matters: The 
Higgler. Harvey Willow's 
mother cannot understand 
why he should give up the 
prospects of marrying mto 
a wealthy family for toe 
sake of his village 
sweetheart. Starring Keith 
Dnnkel. 

9.15 People to People. The 
second of two 
programmes examining 
unemployment from the 
point of view of toe 
unemployed. 

10.00 Film Each Dawn f Die* 
(1939) starring James 
Cagney and George Raft. 

A reporter is framed for 
manslaughter and teams 
up with a fellow prisoner 
to help him escape and to 

g rove his Innocence. 

irected by William 
Keighley. 

11.45 The Twifiglft 2tone: Four 
O’clock'. The story of a 
crank who harasses 
anyone he thinks is evil. 
Starring Theodore BikeL 
12.15 Kama Sutra Rides Again. 

A Bob Godfrey cartoon 
about a dull couple with an 
adventurous sex fife, (r) 
Ends at 1225. 


( Radio4 ) 


On long wave. Stereo an VHF 
525 Shipping 640 News Briefing: 

weather 6.10 Prelude (s) 

630 News; Morning Has 
Broken (hymns) 625 

Weather travel 

740 News 7.10 Sunday 
Papers 7.15 Apnal-fl 


(Eng l 

from 


from Manchester) 730 ' 

World of Opretta. Robert Mandefl 
conducts the Melachrino 
Strings and Orchestra. Inct, 820- 
845 Harold Rich at the piano. 
930 String Sound (BBC Radto 
Orchestra) 1045 Martin Ketoer 


Weather; Travel 

840 News 8.10 
Papers 8.15 

Religious news and views 
presented by Clive 
Jacobs. 620 Brian Reteiead 
appeals on behalf of The 
Mental Health Foundation 
825 weather Travel 
940 News 9.10 Sunday 
Papers 9,15 Letter From 
America by Alistair Cooke 
930 Morning Service 
from Moume Presbyterian 
Church, Ktlkeel, Co 
Down. 

10.15 The Archers. Omnibus 
edition. 

11.15 Pick of tire Week. 


1245am Night Owls (Dave Gefly) I n.15 of the week. 

140 Steve Madden presents I Programme htahHghte 

Nightride 340-440 A Little Night I presented by Anne 

Music. I Ntahtinoale. 


Ngrtride 340-440 A Little Night 

C Radio 1 ) 

News on the half-hour until 
1230pm. then 240, 330, 530, 

730. 930, 1240 midnight. 

6.00 Mark Page 840 rater 
Powell 1040 rave Lee Travis 
140pm Adrian Juste 240 Radio 
Radio. (2) Jimmy Savile OBE 340 
The American mart Show, 
direct from New York, with Gary 
Byrd 540 Saturday Live with 
Andy Kershaw 630 In Concert 
(Ricky Scraggs) 730 Simon 
Mayo 930-1^00 The Midnight 

Runners Show with Dixie 
Peach, featuring Cutting Crew and 
Phil Godins. VHF Stereo Radios 
1 & 2> 440am As Radio 2. 140pm 
As Radio 1.730-440am As 
Radio 2. 


12.15 Desert Island Discs. 
Olympic horsarider 

Virginia Holgate to 
conversation with 
Michael Parkinson (s) 1225 
Weather 
140 The World This 

Weekend: News. 135 


WORLD SERVICE 


640 Nawsdesk 630 Mention 7.00 News 
749 Twemy-Four Hours 730 From he 
Weekbes 745 Network UK 840 News 
849 Reflectors 8.15 A JflUy Good Show 
9LOO News B4B Review ol Srittsil Reas 
ais world Today 930 Rnanoai News 
640 loom Anead i«8 About 8m»n iooo 
N ews mm Hots a Humpw 1015 Letter 
From America 11.00 News 1149 News 
About Brian 11.15 Spwttworfd 1130 
Mendon 1240 Radio Newsreel 12.15 
Anything Goes 1245 Sports Roundup 
U» News 149 ■nuemy-RJUf Hours 130 
Network UK 14$ SatutiW Spec*! 240 
News 201 Saiuntey Spwras MO Rxeo 
Newsreel 3.16 Saturday Special 440 
' 4.15 Satu 


Saturday 


1 45) 545 Sports Roundup 
a Twenty-Four Hows 830 
Asunq &00 News 941 A 


News 449 
SpeoaHumiM 
too News 849 
Jaz* F<x The Aswnq 
RUer s Suds to Repression 4.18 Wltas 
New 930 The Junior Minster 1000 News 
1049 Rem Our Own Correspondent 
1030 New ktaas I0401tofiecinns itUS 
Sports Roundup 1140 News 1149 Com- 
memary 11.15 A Parted Spy 1130 I 
Befteve m Yesterday 1240 News 1249 
News About Bntrvn 12.15 Radio Newsreel 
1230 Baker's Halt Dozen 140 News 141 
Play ol the Wook 240 News 249 Review 
ot British Press 2.15 Lake Wobegon Days 
230 Atom Tme £to News 349 News 
About Britain 3-15 From Oar Own Corre- 
Ksowtanr *4S Re*«t«e« 440 financial 
Rewew 340 Urn* 548 T wen ty -Four 
Hours 545 Latter From Amonca. AS UmM 
hOWT 


240 News: Picnics. Susan 
Marl tog finds out about 
Ufa to Walls Cathedral 
School. 

2J0 The Afternoon Ptay. A 
Man Alone, by Andrew 
Rissfic. With Ronald Pickup 
(2) Jennifer (rtfs) 

330 A Splendid Discipline. 

The development of 
music wrtten the einama (9 
Raata Dazzle Days. 

440 Origins (new series). 

Bany CunHfte takes a 
cruise round the 
Mediterranean and visits 
some of the remains of the 
Hellenic world (1) The 
Isles ot Greece. 

430 The Natural! 

gramme, with I 
K&MngandUonail 
540 News; 

545 Down Your Way. Brian 
Johnston visits Ripon, 

North Yorkshire 520 
Shipping 535 Weather 
640 News 

6.15 Weekend Woman's 
Hour. Highlights of the 
past week s programmes. 
The Tortoise and tire 
Hare (new i 
Elizabeth Jenkins, i 
Mauredn O'Brien and 
Charles Kay. Episode 1 (s) 
840 A Good Read. A choice 
of paperbacks. With 
Bran Gear. Paula Gosfing 
and'Derak Robinson. 

830 The Maestro (new 
series). Jeremy Siepman 
on the history of conducting. 
940 News: A Word in 


740 


Edgeways. Brian 
Redhead an 


Regional Tl : on facing page 


dhaad and guests discuss 
whether literacy b out of 
date. 

930 Communities to Crisis. 
Margaret Percy on how 
communities nave r 
with different l 
ens«8(iy$ 


1040 News 

10.15 The Sunday Feature: A 

nakLftamati^^n^ 
Charles Allen's recent 
book. Starring Claire Bloom 
as Charlotte Canning 
and Pranefla Scales as 
Queen Victoria (2) (s) 

1140 Hush . . . Money. Laurie 
Taylor meets the money- 
makers and purse-stnng 
holders Jr) 

1125 Tan Thousand Mtes on 
an Overdraft. (2) Guys 
and Trolls. With Fred Basnett 
1240 News: Weather 1233 


VHF (available in England and 
S Wales ortiy) as above 
except 525440am Weather; 
Travel. 740-840 Open 
University: 740 Science 7 30 
Portrait eff Adam Smith 
730 Cancer Research 440- 
6.00 Options: 440 Inside 
Castro's Cuba 430 The Scots 
Tongue 5.00 Back on 
Course 530 Get By in Kalian. 

C Radio 3 ) 

On VHF only: - 

635 Open University. Until 
625am. Education: value 
for money 

On medium wave entiy: - 

625 weather. 740 News 

745 Vivaldi's Venice: includes 
recordings of Vivaldi's 
Bassoon Concerto in A 
minor. RV 498. and the 
motet Carrta m prato. RV 
623. Also works by 
Bonporti and Benedetto 
Marcello 

840 Pierre Fournier 

recordings featuring the 
celebrated cellisL Poulenc 
(Sonata, with Fevriar. 
piano). Faure (Berceuse, 
with Gerald 

Moore.ptano). Lata (Celia 

Concertoto D minor, with 
Lamoureux Orchestra). 348 
Nfiws 

945 Your Concert 
GhoicsrGiazunov 
(Flnteah Fantasy). Poulenc 
(Nocturnes NOS 13.4. 
played by Poulenc). Britten 
(Les itUrntnabons. with 
Peter Pears). Ireland (Ceflo 
Sonata: Juban Uoyd 
Webber, cello and John 
McCabe, piano). Du pare 
Oran son tnste. with the 
Partridges). Sfbekus 
(Symphony No 6) 

1025 Prom Talk :indudes Fritz 
on Schuberts 
C major Symphony, 
and Nigel Rogers on the 
Italian Baroque tradition in 
the 17ft century 

11.15 Shura Cherkassky: piano 
reotal. Schumann (Drei 
Fantasiestucke. Op 111). 

Liszt (Sonata in B mmor). 

■ Grieg (Sonata to E minor. Op 
7). Bernstein (Touches), 
Tchaikovsky (Theme and 
Variations in F. Op 1 9 No 
Gh Pabst (Concert 
paraphrase on Eugene 
Onegin) 

140 National SO of 

Washington DC (under 
Rostropovich ). wi th Arm- 
Sophie Mirtter(voJin). 
Beethoven (Symphony No 4) 
Mendelssohn (Violin 

Concerto m E minor). 
Shostakovich (Symphony 
No 1) 

220 Horowitz and Josephs: 

BSC Stngera.wift 


Jennifer Adams (soprano). 
HorovrtZ (Endyrroon), 
Josephs (Spring Songs, Op 
120 ) 

3.15 Capricorn: Stravinsky 
(The Soldier's Tale suite). 
Schnittke (Piano Quintet, 
with Julian Jacobson, 
piano), Denisov (Sextet). 
Schoenberg (Chamber 
Symphony. Op 9, arranged 
by Webern) 

435 JC Bach: English 

Concert (under Pinnock) 
with solo instrumentalists In 
the overture Artaserse. 
Symphome concertante to E. 
and Harpsichord 
Concerto in G 

530 The Harlequin Years: 
Parisian musical life after 
the First WoridWar.Wift 
Roger Nichols (r) 

6.15 Liszt and the Piano: 

Malcolm Btrms plays 
works including Mephisto 
waltzes Nos 1 . 3 and 4 . 
Csardas macabre, and 
Bagatellle sans tonalite 

740 Postponing Death: 

Graham Fawcett talks to 
the Mexican novelist Carlos 
Fuentes 

730 Ulster Orchestra (under 
Col man Pearce), with 
Bany Douglas (piano). Part 
one. Brahms (Tragic 
Overture). Beethoven 
(Andante cantabile from 
Archduke Tno. orch Liszt), 
and Liszt (Piano 
Concerto No 1) 

6.15 Letter trom NashvlBe: by 
Laurence Lemer 

835 Concert part two. 

Stanford (Symphony No 
3. the Irish) 

920 Takacs Quartet Part 
one. BartOk (String 
Quartet No 1). Beethoven 
(String Quartet in F. Op 
59 Nol) 

1030 My Childhood: Michael 
Deacon reads from the 
memoirs of Carl Nielsen (3) 

10.45 Takacs Quartet part 
two. BartOk (String 
Quartet No 4) 

11.15 Ian Parrott: BBC Welsh 

SO (under Kasprzyk) 

play Luxor 

1135 A Choice Collection: 

Robert Woolley 
(harpsichord). Emma Khrkby 
(soprano) in works by 
John Blow 

1127 News 12.00 Closedown. 

( Radio 2 ) 


On medujm wave. See Radio 1 
for stereo VHF. News on the hour. 
Headlines 730am. Sports 



Brid Brennan: BBC 1.9.05pm 


Desks 1242pm. 10.02. Cricket 
Scoreboard 730pm. 

4.00am Dave Bussey . 6.00 
Stave Truetove 730 Roger Royha 
says Good Morning Sunday 
with Ruth Madoc and Paul Shane 
945 Melodies for You (BBC 
Concert Orchestra) introduced by 
Richard Baker 11.00 Desmond 
Carrington 2.00pm Stuart Hall's 
Sunday Sport 630 Chartte 
Chester with Sunday Soapbox (teU 
081-228 1884) 735 Old 
Stagers. Memories of Ctiff Edwards 
(Ukelete ike) 8.00 Vernon and 
Maryetta Midgley 8.30 Where Do 
You Go? Chtf Richard talks to 
Cmdy Kent 9.00 Personal Choice. 
Edward Heath MP presents a 
further selection ot his favoume 
music 10.05 Songs from the 
Shows 1030 The Gospel Truth. 

Bob Smfieid'5 history of Gospel 
music 1140 Sounds ot Jazz | Peter 
Clayton) 140am Nightnde 3.00- 
440 A Little Night Music 

C Radio 1 ) 

On medium wava Stereo on 
VHF(seebetow). 

News on the half-hour until 
‘11.30am, then 234pm, 330, 430, 
730. 330. 1240 midnight 
640am Mark Page 8.00 Peter 
PoweH 1040 Simon Sates 12.30pm 
Jimmy SavIJe's "OkJ Record" 
dub. (1984, 7B, 721 230 Classic 
Concert featuring Focus 330 
Radio 1 Mora Time (Adrian Juste 
with Radio 1 highlights) 4.00 
Chartbusters (Tommy Vance) 540 
Top 40 (Tommy Vance) 740 
Anne Nightingale Request Show 
8.17 Rendezvous Houston. 

Anne Nightingale welcomes Jean- 
Michel Jarre to the Studio 
(simultaneous broadcast with 
BBC2) 940 Robbia Vincent <md 
the UK debut of Anita Baker, at the 
Hammersmith Odaon on July 
27. 11.00-1240 The Rankin' Miss P 
with Culture Rock VHF Stereo 
Radios 1 *2: 440am As Radto Z- 

240pm Benny Green. 3.00 Alan 

□ell. 4.00 Sing Something Simple. 

540 As Radio 1. 124tM40am 

As Radio 2. 


WORLD SERVICE 


6.00 Nswsdesk &30 Jazz For The Asking 
740 News 7.09 Twenty-Four Hours 740 
From Our Own Correspondent 740 
wawguvte 840 News 949 Reflections 
a.15 The Pleasure 5 Vovre 940 News 949 
Review to Sntsn Press 9.15 Science tn 
Acton 9.45 Piano Rofl 1040 News 1041 
Story 10.15 Classics Record Review 

11.00 News 1149 News About Bream 
11.15 From Our Own Correspondent 
1140 Bakers Had Dozen 1240 News 
1241 Play of me wreak 140 News 149 
Twenra-Four Hours 1 JO Sports Roundup 

I- 45 Torn Myati Request Show 240 

News 240 Mystery olthe Blue Tram 340 
Rado Newsreel ±15 From tne Prome- 
naoe Concerts 440 News 449 Commen- 
tary 4.15 A Wortd Tnmker: H G Weflt 5A5 
Sports Roundup 8.00 Maws 849 Twemy- 
Four Hows BJ0 Where Do You Go? 040 
News 941 srory 9.15 The Pleasure's 
Yours 10.00 News 1049 Lake Wooegon 
Days 1045 Book Choce 1030 Financial 
Review 1040 Range two?; 10.45 Sports 
Rouneup 1140 News 1149 Commentary 

II- 15 Lenar From America 11.30 A Word 
m Edgeways 1240 News 1249 News 
About Bmaml 


„ .12.15 Radio Newsreel 1230 

RW&ows Service 140 News 141 Eccen- 
tne Tiave«nrs i.*5 Pluto Jones Brass 
Ensemble 240 News 249 Review of the 
Bnwth Press 2.15 Peebles' Chon 230 
Science m Anon 3.00 News 349 News 
ABOUT Bream 215 Good Books MS 
Ranecuns 430 wmveguda 540 News 
549 Twenty-Few Hours 535 Racommq 

oi me week, am ttmes to smt. 


Regional 7T; on facing page 


V 


1 



\ 



34 


SATURDAY AUGUST 9 1986 


r ytT' rr .- 





First pabSshedlfl 1785 


****** 


Man that swung 
the ball is now > 
swinging the bat 

By John Woodcock, Cricket Correspondent 


TRENT BRIDGE: Ne up Zea- 
land. with five first-innings 
wickets in hand, are 45 runs 
behind England. 

Just when England had 
looked like taking a hold of the 
second Test match against 
New Zealand sponsored- by 
Comhill. Hadlee came in yes- 
terday evening and showed 
again that he is much more 
than a great bowler, adding an 
unbroken 67 for New 
Zealand's sixth wicket with 
Gray. Until then there had 
been some longish periods 
when nothing very much 
seemed to be happening. 

At 80 for one. with England 
beginning to wonder where 
the next wicket was coming 
from. New Zealand too. had 
looked like achieving rather 
more than they did England's 
faster bowlers were doing less 
with the ball than New 
Zealand's had only partly 
because as time went on the 
skies began to dear. Thomas 
bowled rather too short and 
Small look time to find his 
feeL 

But of New Zealand's first 
five batsmen four got out 
when they were in. When 
Coney and Martin Crowe did 
so just before and after tea 
England found themselves 
with a sudden, somewhat 
unexpected advantage. 

Not only is Hadlee second 
in the current first-class bowl- 
ing average, he is also in the 
first 10 in the batting, with an 
average of 54. He came in now 
and in that high and mighty 
way of his took it upon 
himself to revive New 
Zealand's spirits. He has hit 
six fours so far, most of them 
through the covers and of 
some ferocity. 

The gates were dosed by 
1 130. with only members and 
ticket-holders admitted after 
that. The ground is full these 
days with only 15,000 inside, 
rather than the 30,000 or so it 
■ held in the days when spec- 
ulators thought nothing of 
‘ standing. Today they are all 
provided with seats. The out- 
held is like a billiard table, and 
as green. As for the pitch, it is 
slow enough to have a good 
many runs in it yet, particu- 
larly if the forecast of sunnier 
days materializes. 

England's last two wickets 
were worth over 50 by the 
time New Zealand finished off 
their innings yesterday morn- 
ing. Hadlee was denied a 
seventh wicket when Small 
was put down at first slip, a 


bad miss. There was another 
life for Small at the other end. 
Coney dropping him at second 
slip, this lime off BracewelL 
Coney then 1 made amends. 
The tall had moved about so- 
much for Hadlee and 
Bracewdl in the few overs 
which they sent down that 
England must have been look- 
ing forward to bowling. In the 
event Small's opening spell 
was rather plain and Thomas, 
though faster, gave the bats- 
men far too much that they 
had no need to play. 

Scoreboard 

ENGLAND: Hr** liming* 

Q A Goocti tow b KacSte 

MDltatnblMH 

C W j After 9m b Watson . 

D I G wwffcwl 
"MW Getting I 


urbGray — 
ibttedm , 


D R Pringle c Wataea to StHng 
J E Embamy c Smtti b Hadlee 
P H EOwnda c Smtth bHadtoa 
J G Thomas b Hadkm H 


MN munch e Corny b Wataon . 


i C Smalt not out . 

Extras (bl, ft 3,0b 2) . 
Total. 


- 18 

- 9 

- 55 

- 71 
_ 17 

- 21 
~ 8 
— 0 
. 28 
- 21 
_ 2 
— 8 

256 


FALL OF WK3CETS: 1-18, 2-43, 3-126. 4- 
170, 5-176, 6-191, 7-191, 0205, 9-240, 
10-256. 

BOWUNGC Hadlee 32-7-80-6? SMng 17- 
362-1; Gray 13-4-39-1: Watson 165-6- 
51-2; Corny 7-1-18-0; Bracamfl 4-1-11- 
0. 

NEW ZEALAND: first ftntags 

BA Edgar ttm b Thomas — 8 

J G Wright c Atfwy b Small 58 

JJ CrotMtc Franc* b Small 23 

M D Crowe c Etenomfs b Emburey _ 28 
"J V Corny run oat — — 24 

E J Gray not out ■ ■ 14 

R J Hmm not oat - — 53 

Extras (a 1, • 1, nb 1) — — 3 


Total (5 wkta) 


211 

UPS Saitth, A G Brac—6, D A StfcBog 
and w Watson to baL 
FALL OF WICKETS: 1-39. 2-85, 3-92, 4- 
142, 5-144. 

BOWLMO (to date* Small 19045-2: 
Thomas 19-1-73-1; Pltagfa 13-1-29-0; 
Edmonds 17-9-27-0; Emtarey 21-1006- 
1. 

Umpiras: D J Constant and K E PaMor. 

Pace was, in feet of much 
less account than accuracy. 
There must be countless En- 
glish bowlers, exponents of 
seam and swing, who in the 
conditions would have al- 
lowed New Zealand's opening 
batsmen no let-up. As it was. 
Pringle tad come on for 
Thomas and then Thomas for 
Small before Edgar was leg- 
before to a yorker from 
Thomas. A couple, of firm 
pushes, one from each of the 
opening batsmen, bad gone in 
and out of short-leg's hands. 
They were not so much 
chances as balls that were 
technically catchable. 

At lunch New Zealand were 
5 1 for one, Wright being 39. In 
the Test match here last year 
Wood made 172 for Australia 
after having started the series 
badly. Wright, another left- 
hander and the recipient of a 
pair at Lord's a fortnight ago. 


was promising something 
similar when be flicked Small 
fast and low io Athey, stand- 
ing just to the left of the 
square-leg umpire. Wright had 
already taken 12 off the. over 
and was not best pleased In 
Small's next over he picked up 
Jeff Crowe with the help of a 
good diving off-side catch by 
French. 

*By tea Coney, driving al 
Thomas, had been missed al 
second slip by Gooch, a two- 
handed chance not far to 
Gooch's right, and then run- 
out by Small. Coming in the 
last over of the afternoon, this 
was a sickening blow to New 
Zealand. Coney turned 
Emburey past short leg, Small, 
the next line of defeats, 
running forward and to his 
right for iL There was a long 
single for the taking, but by the 
time Coney realised how for 
committed Martin Crowe 
was. Small was bending to the 
ball. Small's return to the 
bowler beat Coney by the 
narrowest of margins. He and 
Martin Crowe had added 50. 

Worse followed for New 
Zealand when, two runs later, 
Martin Crowe glanced a turn- 
ing off-break from Emburey to 
backward short-leg. It was his 
first sign of a mistake. With 
the sun out by now. New 1 
Zealand must have felt they 
should have been moving 
steadily towards an appre- 
ciable lead. Instead, for the 
first time in the match, En- 
gland found themselves with 
the initiative. albeit briefly. 

Coming together at 144 for 
five with nearly two hours left, 
Hadlee and Gray had put New 
Zealand back on level terms 
by the close. This was an 
admirable partnership at a 
vital time, Gray's stubborn 
support being just what 
Hadlee needed. Small .came 
back for another spelL The 
crowd had rather taken him to 
their heart after he tad come 
up with his two wickets. His 
appearance, with no neck to 
speak of, gives him a some- 
what asthmatic appearance, 
but that, of course, is entirely 
misleading. As his figures 
show, he did. overall, -quite a 
good and tidy job. 


Botham back 

Ian Botham, who has recov- 
ered from a stomach disorder, is 
in the Somerset squad to play 
Northamptonshire at 
Wellingborough in the 
championship and John Player 
Special League this weekend. 


BOWLS 


Morgan fails to reach last eight 


Jim Morgan, the 1977 win- 
ner. fresh from picking up a 
gold medal in the fours at the 
Commonwealth Games, went 
oul of the Bournemouth open 
tournament at Mcyrick Park 
yesterday (Gordon Allan 
writes). 

Graham Dark, who played 


for Devizes before moving to 
Telford in Shopshire. won 21- 
1 9 to advance to the last eight. 

In build. Morgan looks like 
a slighter version of David 
Bryant. In his previous match, 
according to all accounts, he 
played like the master too. 
beating Wallv Havward 21-3 



with bowling of mechanical 
brilliance. But Clark proved to 
be no respecter of reputations. 

He got stuck in from the 
start and was ahead all the 
time, finding the gaps to score 
shots when tfte Welshman’s 
position seemed secure. Mor- 
gan drew level at 16-16 and 
19-19. but in the end Clark 
was not to be denied. 

David SneU, of Wootton 
BassetL who beat Roy Hedges 
of Bristol, last year's runner- 
up. carried on the good work 
with a 21-11 victory over 
Michael Phillips of Plymouth. 
Iain Boyle, a member of the 
Surrey Rink who won the top 
fours championship last year, 
beat Nicky Smith of 
Brockenhurst 21-9 after lead- 
ing 13-1. In the morning, 
Boyle had overcome Brian 
Howes, who may be remem- 
bered as the man who lost the 
final of the English indoor 
singles two years running. 

John Ortaway. Peter Line 
(boih previous Bournemouth 
winners). David Cutler and 
Ron Keating were among the 
famous names to disappear in 
the early rounds. The Bourne- 
mouth tournament is a great 
leveller, despite which - per- 
haps because of which - many 
of the best players in Britain 
come back to it year after year. 

Not only is it a great 
leveller. It is great entertain- 
ment if the game means more 
io you than an elaborate 
combination of snooker and 
marbles played on grass. Dur- 
ing one of the preliminary 
matches at Souihbourne, a 
dog ran through the gate, on to 
the green and removed the 
jack when some unsuspecting 
player was holding three shots. 

Results, page 31 

Worthing preview, page 31 


SPORT 



One giant leap: Small stepping in with two wickets for England daring his Test debat at 
Trent Bridge yesterday (Photograph: Chris Harris) 


Oswald carries 
big gun from 



By Barry Pfc kt ta ll 

Sidewinder. John Oswald's ahead of its one-ton ri vals. 


one-ton ner. returned to Cowes 
vesterday from 1 winning' line 
honours in last week's Ar- 
mada Cup race to San Sebas- 
tian in Spain and promptly 
pulled off a notable victory 
over the big names in class one 
to win the ■ Rocking . Chair 
Challenge Trophy ahead of 
Geoffrey Howison's Local 
Hero IV and Backlash, skip- 
pered by. Tim Herring. 

Ernest Juer's Fair Lady, 
disqualified ; from . Wednes- 
day’s Cam rose Memorial Tro- 
phy race along with Pacer 
(Sandy Dewhirsi) after an 
hour-long protest on Thurs- 
day night? finished fourth. 

Both skippers were hauled 
before the committee after the 
Southampton harbour master 
claimed that the two yachts 
had ignored instructions to 
keep dear of Esso Demetia, 
the 258.000-ton supertanker, 
as ;it was making its way 
towards a berth at the Fawley 
oil terminal in Southampton 
water — the first time yachts 
have been disqualified for 
forcing a passage ahead of 
commercial shipping during 
Cowes Week. 

The race was won with a 
well-judged lack across the 
Solent on the beat up from the 
start, to the Hamstead Ledge 
buoy. Fever's crew was first to 
test the strength of the flood- 
ing tide on the long tack across 
from the north shore and was 
knocked back badly. 

Oswald then tried his kick 
and after 20 minutes itbecame 
apparent that he tad judged 
conditions to perfection for 
the Welboum-designed Side- 
winder rounded the mark well 


After the first round of this- 
3116 -mile course. Oswald and' 
his crew built up with a 90= 
second lead over Local Hero 
IV with Backlash third, and" 
making most of the increasing 
sea breeze, they extended their 
advantage by a further minute 
on corrected time at the finish: 

In class two. Excaliber, the 
French entry, was the early 
leader on corrected time, but 
was later disqualified leaving 
Bathsheba (Sir Maurice Laing) 
tying equal first with Three 
Spears, the South African 
entry. That provided the Cape . 
Town yacht, preparing for the' 
Three-quarter Ton Cup in- 
Torbay next week, with in; 
fifth win in this Sandhurst- 
sponsored week. _ 

The most successful boat so- 
far. however, is Sonata Fruesli 
IL skippered by Roger Egliq: . 
which won her sixth race 
yesterday, followed by the ' 
crew from Aiglon College who 
gained another gun aboard' 
Little Eagle yesterday in the. 
highly competitive J24 class to 
share five wins with Three' 
Spears and Dragonfly (Erie 
Williams), winner of yester- 
day's Dragon race. 

David Miller, page 32 
Results, page 3L. 

Prize increase - 

Prize money in the Bell's 
Scottish Open golf champion-^ 
ship at Haggs Castle from * 
August 21 iq 24 has been 
raised from £100.000 to* 
£130,000. Sandy Lyle. Sam 
Torrance and Howard Clark 
will be among those chasing a . 
first prize of £21,660. 



SKIING 

Bell sounds 
lone note 
for Britain 

By Richard Williams 

Martin Bell, whose season 
of near-mirades in the BASF 
World Cop last winter turned 
him into a racer capable of 
compering on frilly equal terms 
with his contemporaries from 
the Alpine nations, begins a 
new ca m paig n in the first race 
of the 1986-37 season at Las 
Lenas. Argentina, today. 

Bril's five finishes in the top 
15 and his overall seventeenth 
in the table conJd not help the 
tiny British team to tang on to 
their sponsor, Gordon’s Gin, 
whose support — £150,000 last 
year — became a casualty of 
the takeover by Guinness of 
Distillers, Gordon’s parent 
company. No replacement 
funding has yet been found. 

Bell is the only Briton 
entered at Las Lenas, where 
he finis bed 36th and 37th in 
last year's two races, both of 
which were won fej Karl. 
Alpiger, of Switzerland. 

Bell has been training in 
Argentina for a fortnight, 
spending the second week in 
the company of the Austrian 
team, whose members include 
Peter Wirnsbeiger,the down- 
hill champion. 

The second Las Lenas race 
takes place next Friday over a 
slightly different and . more 
technical course, which may 
prove more congenial to Bell, 
who was 33rd in Thursday's 
first practice. 

He will be joined for the 
start of the European season at 
Val dlsere in December by 
Nigel Smith and Ronald Dan- 
can. It is hoped that Graham 
Bell, his younger brother, will 
have recovered from a knee 
operation in time to join the 
team at some stage. 

This year’s WorM Cop 
downhill consists of 11 races, 
one of them over a coarse new 
to the calendar — Mount 
Allan, near Calgary, where the 
Winter Olympic Games will 
be held in 1988. The series is 
interrupted by ' the Alpine 
world championship at Crans- 

M on tana in Switzerland from 
January 25 to February 8. 
WortdCup downhill calendar 

MEN: August 9 and 15, Las Lenas, 
Argentina; December 5/6, Val 
crista, France; December 13, VaJ 
Gardena, Italy; January 4, Laax, 
Switzerland; Jammy 10-11, Gar- 
rmsch-PartenkHChan, West Ger- 
many; January 17-18, Wengen, 
Switzerland; January 24-25, Stz- 
buhei, Austria; February 28-March 
1. Furano, Japan; March 7-8, As- 
pen, United States; March 14-15, 
fit Allan, Canada. 

WOMEN: December 12-14, Atom; 
January lb-11, Mefiau, Austria; 
January 16-17, Pfron t en; March 7- 
8. Mt Alan, Canada; Man* 13-15, 
Vail, United States. 


GOLF 


Norman will not stop at one 


Greg Norman, not content 
with his British Open crown, 
made a 'strong challenge for 
his second consecutive major 
title by shooting a course 
record 65 on Thursday to take 
the first-round lead in the 
American PGA 

Championship. 

“Now that I’ve won one, 
Tm going to be working 
harder and harder.” the big, 
blond Australian said , after 
going six under par to take a 
two-stroke lead over Craig 
Stadler and Phil Blackmar. 

Norman, whose victory at 
Turn berry last month was his 
first major championship, 
one-putled nine greens, 
including a 45-footer to save 
par at the 528-yaid eighth 
hole. 

Stadler, who won the 1973 
United Slates amateur 
championship at Inverness, 
might have been within a 
stroke of the leader had he not 
three-putted at the 17th. 
Blackmar. who has been strug- 
gling -this summer, matched 
Startler's 67. 


Gary Koch. Wayne Grady, 
Peter Jacobsen. Wayne Levi 
and Ronnie Black were airtied 
at 68. three shots off the pace. 

Jack Nicklaus was happy 
with his opening round of 70. 
even, though he bogeyed the 
16th and 1 7th holes.lt was his 


70: J-Stunun; DFrost (SA); J NteMauK D 
on: J 


Hammond; S 
Stockton: DUwa; 


C Snood; D 
Stewart. 


71: LTiwrinorTNakajlKia (Japan): D Barr 
(Can); O A Watering: L W&acinK K Green: 
0 Fofat M Row: L Clements; C Back; 8 
Upper: T S*E j Mahattoy; J Coofc C 
Pawn: J Thorpe; D Pootey: D Watson (SA); 
MMcCUntber. 


72: H Clerk (G8J: T KhKl Woosnam (88); 
Wo*, *k;«. »- *».,-* A North; J Mudcfc D Edwartte: D Edwards; 

best Start in this years four B Gardner M SuKvan; P Awiaar: M 
major championships. OGnmy; J .QvwtoreP gaMey: T mtaorn 

‘-XlLr^'e ctin ihrZ § Tway; M Lw; J-M.CanfcaresJSp); H 


“There's still three rounds to 
go," he said with a gleam m his, 
eyes.' '• 

Nicklaus. playing in his 
hundredth major champion- 
ship as a professional, opened 
with a birdie, but quickly gave 
up his stroke advantage when 
he bogeyed the second hole by 
missing A putt of less than two 
feet. “I just got careless, he 
said. It was an uncharacteris- 
tic- lapse he should not be 
expected to make again as he 
pursues his 2 1st major 
championship. 

First round scores : 

(USutixtsso mo- 
65; G Norman (Aug. 

67: P Btackmar: C Stedtar. 

68: W Grady (Aus): G Koch; R Stack: P 
Jacobson; W Levi 

69: B Liatzka: B Giktar; B Wadkms: L 
Mbs: E Couples: M Hufcert J Haas: G 
Sauart. 


Twtftrfi Cranshaw; J Milan G Petes; S 
Hocft; J.Btor. . .... 

73: M Moyas; F Zoata; O Tdiwft T 
Simpson: K Brown (GB); T Pbrtzoc M 
Kunmon- (Japan): B Unger .(WG); C 
Rook L Nttarc P Rzsknons: B Juotel' 
LGiltwi:.M O'Mearai.G Bums; I'Sotem: 
B Murphy; I Aokt (Japan); R UaUbfe. 

74c C Strangs: L- Nekton; J Slodelv; K 
Knox; A Moqm: M ScMuatar K Morris; L 
Jansorc E . Dougherty; B Loir.- B 
Schurnafcoc S Baflesteros (Sp): J CDfcart 
A Bean: S Besa: M Donald. 

7& D Grtewn(Aus); D HalktoroonfCar^: K 
AflanJ; M.McNuftv (SA): M Wtetoa N Price 
ISA* A Palmer H Groan: T-M Chen 
(Tahwarr); D Duschans; R Vetshure: J 
WMe: ft Froemaa • - - • . - 

- 76: OMooralAusfcM Pinero (So): RRoyd: 
K hwri: P McGowan; W WoodlS Rate; B 
Ackerman: . W Stewart L Webb: “ 
VudnidK N Faldo (GB). 

77: G Morgan; fi Hoyt G Ostrega _ 
Faxon; C Epps' R McBbk B Faxon: . C 

Leaven L. Rkiken J Foxx. 

.7ft L Thompson; D NevU: L Bahrca: G 
Jones: B Gteaaatr. O Forema n. 

80: R Acton. 

82: P Way (GB)- 
63: G Robinson. ■ 

84: H Watte: P Wise . - 


EQUESTRIANISM : 

AgaKahn 


Turner sets the pace once more 


FOOTBALL 


How green was my pitch 


Reading’s opening League 
match ■ of the new football 
season at home to Miliwall is 
in danger due to an error by 
Gordon Neale, the second 
division dub's groundsman. 
With only two weeks to go the 
Elm Park pitch must be re- 
seeded after Neate. their 45- 
year-old former defender, 
sprayed it with a concentrated 
weed-killer instead of a selec- 
tive weed-killer solution. 

Seventy per cent of the 
surface lias been ruined and 


Reading have had- to cancel 
potential money-spinning 
friendly matches at home 
against first division sides. 
Wimbledon and Arsenal next 
Tuesday and ^Friday 
respectivdy. 

They are now hoping to 
switch the venues but the 
Miliwall clash — Reading's 
first in the second division for 
55 years — is in doubt as well 
as the Littlewood's-Cup sec- 
ond leg tie with Bristol Rovers 
oit September 3. 


Falsterbo, Sweden (Reuter) 
— Greg Turner, of New Zea- 
land. winner of last week's 
Scandinavian Open, went to 
the turn in 30 to take the lead 
in the second round of the 
PLM Open championship 
yesterday. 

The slim 23-year-old strung 
together four birdies in a row 
from the long third to move to 
seven under -par, a. stroke 
ahead of Barry Lane, aged 26. 
from England, the overnight 
leader.' 

Lane, who had to go 
through the European Tour's 
qualifying school before this 


England 
stays on 

Mike England is happy 1 to 
continue as Wales's part-time 
football manager despite fail- 
ing to meet a Welsh Football 
.Association deadline for the 
signing of a new contract. 

England said he was. sur- 
prised when a Welsh FA 
Council meeting threatened 
him with the sack if he foiled, 
to return the completed form 
by mid-day last Monday. En- 
gland explained he had re- 
cently returned from holiday 
and had ■ forgotten about the 
original July 31 deadline. 

Golden pay-off 

The British gold medal- 
winning three-day event team 
will finally receive more than 
54.000 (about £2.700)* in prize 
money owed to them-by the 
organizers of the world 
championship in South 
Australia last May. A tdex 
from tbe. financiafly-trouble 
organizing committee said, the 
prize money-was on the way. 

Hero returns 

An estimated 10,000 people 
in downtown Reno, Nevada, 
turned, out to welcome home 
Greg LeMond. the first 
American winner of last 
month’s Tour de- France cy- 
cling classic. , , t 


season, had birdies at Six of 
the holes on the 6,885-yard 
seaside course during his 'first 
round on Thursday fora hew 
course record of 65... The 
previous record of 66 tad 
been set on Wednesday -by 
Jos£ Rivero, of Spain, and 
Ove Seliberg, of Sweden, dur- 
ing'a Pro-Am tournament. 

Lane's previous best Euro- 
pean tour results this year bad 
been eleventh in the French 
Open and fourteenth in the 
Italian Open. 

' Bob Smith, ihe veteran 
American, was two shots be- . 
hind Turner after 10 holes 


yesterday, at- five- under; par. 
Keith Waters, of Britain, .was 
out in 31; and he and Peter 
Senior. oCAustralia, were both 
four under par after 12 holes. 
Robert Lee. also of Britain, 
was out in 34 for three under 
par.' 


LEADING FIRST ROUND SCORES 



Brand. 70; M James; P.Teravainen 
(US): A Murrayr G Marsh (Aus); T 
Armour (US£M Poxon. 71£M Few; 
M terssmpmy, RLir L Stephen 
(Aus): P Baton D Russell; M 
McLean; B Marchbanfc J Morgan. 


SPORT IN BRIEF 



m 

Salazar: marathon date 


Cramout 

Steve Cram has withdrawn 
from the Mobil grand prix 
meeting in Budapest on Mon- 
day due to a ilight tendon 
strain incurred in training two 
nights- ago (Pat Butcher- 
writes). However. Allan Wells, 
the resurgent Olympic . 100 
metres gold medal winner 
from’ 1980. has decidedio run 
a 200 metres in Budapest after 
his sprint double over the 
Coriimopwealtii ctampibus. 
Ben.. Johnson and Atlee 
M shorn, in Gateshead last 
Tuesday. 


fighting back No reprieve 

Albeno. -Salazar, winner of - 


three New York City mara- 
thons. has entered tilts: year's 
race - his first marathon in. 
two years- Salazar, whb^wqn 
the race in 1980.- 198f and 
1982'and Was also the winner 
of the 1982 -Boston marathon 
. in2hr. 8miiu 52sed thefostest 
lime ever by an American, has 
been hampered, .-by . injuries 
since 19S4. 

Called up 

David Emeram. the City of 
Leeds ; swimmer, -has -been 
called up by Britain for the B 
international againjt.Cscatfa. 
at Crystal .Palace, from August 
20 to 21- He replaces Martyn 
Wjlb)-(Gty of BradfordL who 
is working, in' Aiiierica.;Einer- 
sbn will edrrfoetefrt tire 200m 
butterfly;" '? 


Javed Miandad. out of the 
world's leading, batsmen, 
could become the target of any 
interested county following 
Glamorgan's announcement 
mat they will not rewind their 
decision to sack the - Pakistani 
Tot player. ' Miandad, aged 
29. returned, to South Wales 
this week and asked to be 
reinstated — three months 
ufier foiling to turn iip to 
honour the final vear of his 
contract • 

Oldham win 

Oldham Rugby League club 
have won a six-month battle 
to have Hussein M'BaritL 
then" Moroccan winger, who 
has played in England since 
I9SI. classified as "a non- 
overseas.player. 


for Britain 

From Jenny MacArthtir ■ 

; Dublin 

Thanks to two superb 
rounds from John Whitaker 
and the 18-year-old Next 
Ryan's Sen, Britain won the 
Bank of Ireland Nations Cup;, 
for the Aga Kahn TVophy.for 
die second year in successitw 
at the Dubliii Horse show 
yesterday. . . 

The United States, who tad 
'been in the lead few much of 
the competition, fell back to 
second place jnat two and a 
half points behind Britain, 
with Ireland ending third. 

At die end of the first round 
the United-States were leading 
by one point from Great 
-Britain. I 

Britain tad. tad a dis- 
appointing opening round 
from Nick Skelton and Rafiks 
A polk), who tad 12 faults, 
hitting the second and last 
fences, and the' middle .part of 
the difficult combination. Bat 
Michael Whitaker on Warren 
Point qtdckly put Britain hade 
in tiie picture with a dear 
round. 

Because of Skelton's score, 
Peter Charles, the least 
experienced of the four team 
members, tad to produce a' 
good round on April San^ the 
nine-year-old gjelding . who 
had' made -an astonishing 
recovery from tbe operation fie 
tad in April to remove an 
internal- blockage. ' They 
jumped, carefully, if slowtjv 
collecting jest four faults and 
Ope time fault. 

John Whitaker, in the key 
last position, made iw mistake 
producing a much needed dear 
round. The United States* two; 
dear rounds came from Joe 
Fargte on May Be and Conrad 
Homfeld on' Abdallah, -the 
Olympic individual g®M and 
silver winners. 

Skeltoo and Apollo returned, 
after tta interval in fop Conn pi 
the second round with jast a 
quarter time fault.. Mictad- 
Whitaker, produced a nerve*, 
wracking round on Wanmt 

Print too seemed, to get moft 
obstreperous with each fence 
be jumped, . collecting foot 
fanlts at the water. " 

The picture altered witii foe 
third riders. America’s . Hop 
Hansen had four faults white 
Charles for Britain prodUcedA- 
0 ik dear, round. America bad 
to add four faults to their first- 
round score whatever tltefr 
foarth rider, HomfeW, dfo, bn* 
n John Whitaker went cWOf/ 
Britain would have only *■ 
quarter time fault to addling 
them victory. ' ; : ' 
Hmnfrid kept the pressure 
on wrth a second ctear-rou^l 
then Whitaker and Ryan's 
Son followed them info the- 
■Kaa. A hash descended ® 
the legendary pair set ofo 
Approaching fence nine tlte 
©M horse gave three enormous 
bucks. Whhaker ktelted him 
trying to unpart tixe - te^ ' 
portance of the occasion, -and 
the wily old Irish gelding 
completed the course rime 
ritb just a quarter of a-tifflc 
foul to claim the Aga Kata 
Trophy, the I7th time Britan 
tare collected the prize: 
g^a.’^tank of Intend tMW* 

Stenrfnga torteJ: 

Franco 



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